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INTERNATIONAL 




Published With The New York Times and Hie Washington Post 


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ZURICH, MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 1985 


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ESTABLISHED 1887 





Normal 
Route ' 


Increasing 

Headwind 


Strong Down Draft | 


mrnmmm 


'Xrash 
Route a 


Rowout 


Black Miners 
In South Africa 
Threaten Strike 


FJowout 


!ha Aoooufad (Van 


Rescue workers at Dallas-Fort Worth International 
Airport cover victims of the Delta Airlines jet crash in 
which 132 people were killed. The cause of the crash 
has not been determined, but federal investigators sus- 
pect a phenomenon known as wind shear, or micro- 


Jit Crash Near Dallas Kills 132; Wind Shear Is Suspected 


(iaWfOeibit Ov Staff From Dispatches clues. twi Dr. Petty Said SOtne K- 


GftAPEVINE, Texas — A Ddia mains might never be identified. 


clues, bar Dr. Petty said some re- &1 times, he said, crashed into a ■ Aviation's Worst Haza 

mains might never be identified. huge water tonic and exploded in a William R. Greer of TK. 

Airffett jet with 162 people aboard Ed Proto. ^Spokesman for ihe fireball. Y prk Times reported J from Nat winds are morine wito equal force 

ended and exploded in a fireball Federal Aviation Administration, a bo Ut ^ in the opposire direction. it will be 

last 20 rows of passenger seals The conditions surrounding the slowed suddenly, often ip the point 
hroke off and came to rest burning jet crash at the Dallas-Fort Worth where the p, lot cannot throttle fast 
kcrashkffledDl It ms but intact on a swampy airport iirport are typical of those associ- enough to awn a crash, 

people aboard the plane and one on Wlt ^ a st0 P field. The survivors leaped from the ated with the violent wind shifts James W. Wilson, a scientist who 


■ Aviation's Worst Hazard But once the plane reaches the 

William R. Greer of The New 0[he f ° r *= where the 
Ypr* Times reported from New ««“ ®o«n» with equal force 

York- m the °PP° 5S,K direction, u will be 

The conditions surrounding the sl ? wed * udd * nJ i- ^ P<*nt 


.Vn* York Times Serene 

L I V \ JOHANNESBURG — South 

X . \ . .V Africa's principal black mine work- 

ers union announced Sunday that it 

f " would call a strike for higher wages 

/ Aug, 31 Sold, diamond and coal 

/ / mines. It also threatened further 

/ / / \ protests unless the authorities 

/ / § Wm ** called off the country’s state of 

/ | _ c - _ L emergency. 

5 I r iP‘., . n 9 I The union, representing at least 

r Tailwind I 150,000 of South Africa’s 550,000 

black mine workers and regarded 
as the country's stremgest black la- 
. bor group, also said it would call a 

bursts. This occurs when a powerful downdraft at low national mine strike if President 

altitudes creates winds blowing in opposite directions. ^ ei<?r w - Botha carried out threats 
A pilot who adjusts the controls of the aircraft to com- \° rc P a ^ e foreign black workers 
pensale for a .strong headwind can crash when the wind 

shifts on the otiier ade of Ibe doffndrafL re- 

- _ - sponse from employers or from the 

government. 

_ _ Cyril Ramaphosa. general secre- 

I« kfe,-a ^ tary of the union, Lhe National 

}£1J* SUSDeCtea union of Mincworkers. said in Jo- 

^ hannesbutg that if lhe work stop- 

_ , page took place it could affea 

But once the plane reaches the vergences will have to be recon- mines that yield 10 percent of 
other side of the ihiur. where the siructed by other means, such as by South Africa's gold production. 


Increasing 

Tailwind 


burets. This occurs when a powerful downdraft at low 
altitudes creates winds blowing in opposite directions. 
A pilot who adjusts the controls of the aircraft to com- 
pensate for a strong headwind can crash when the wind 
shifts on the other side of the downdraft. 


winds are moving with equal force reports from other planes, invesii- 
in (he opposite direction, it will be gators said. 


The announcement of a strike 
came on the I5th day of a state of 
emergency around Johannesburg 
and in die easiem part of Cape 
province. Police said Sunday that 
1.412 people had been detained 
since the emergency begun and that 
114 of those had been released, 
leaving 1,295 still in detention. 

In isolated incidents of unrest, 
the police said that a 39-year-old 
black woman had been dragged 
from her home in a township near 
Port Elizabeth, in the eastern Cape, 
and accused of being a police in- 
former. A crowd tried to burn her 
io death. 

At least 24 persons, by official 
count, have died since the ’emergen- 
cy was proclaimed after months of 
unrest in black townships iba: 
claimed more than 500 lives. 

On Saturday, about 1.500 black 
mourners challenged without seri- 
ous incident regulations imposed 
under the emergency decree that 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


Police Find 


where the pilot cannot throttle fast 


but intact on a swampy airport airport are typical of those assod- enou &b 10 3Vert a crash. 

T-I I -Jr T..- _ . ... -, lr - . ... , ... 11/ 


at Dallas-Fort Worth. 


>- thegrooDd.. at twuas-ron wmn. fuselage to safety 

-- Pedori Investigators focused on The pbuje bad been cleared for ^ J 
, wind shear, an abnmi change in tending by controllers at the Dal- G- H. Patrick fiursley, a member 
-wind ifireciion or speedTas the tes-Fort Worth airport, but as it of the National Transportation 
■» j rmeftt probable cause of the crash approached the nmway for its Safety Board, said a preliminary 
- THdar aMb t lauding, witnesses repoited “it was examination in Warrington, D.C„ 

. a'. Uocj tb eomtng down at an attitude, nose of the aircraft’s cockpit voice re- 

do^ said a Delta spokesman, corder and flight dam recorder 
Man Gtrilfovte. gave no hint of the cause. 


that are now considered aviation’s s penalizes in the study of wind 
worst hazard, an expert said Satur- shear at the center in Boulder, said 


reports Irom other planes, mvesii- Gold accounts for half of rise w » / ^* / 

gators said. country’s foreign exchange earn- _ _ 

ti could not be learned immedi- “d taxes on gold min i n g MnW/Tf V fill 
ateiy whv only one sensor was companies last year provided one- r tM » 

equipped’to record. Icn “ of official revenues. More _ ___ 

. . . lo<t . .. K7 . . _ than 400,000 of the black mine T 

In July 1984, the National Cen- workers are employed on gold MTL UlStGT 

ter for Atmospheric Research test- mines. D 


day. the wind shear detection systems at 

The phenomena, known as mod most of the nation's airports were 
shears or microbursts, have been inadequate, including the one at 


Matt Gtrilfcjyte. 

Witnesses said the plane sudden- 


L-WU Tristar, survived. Most sor- Witnesses said the plane sudden- 

. wrais had beat seated in the bacL . ly. nose-dived: and, as it neared the 
V . . v-flf the plane, which hrcAfi iway gratmd, struck several automobiles 
from the rest of the_A»sdage:V. ’ - . on State H^way 114. 

^-&UKlay mooring, onty. i9 of - Anthony Rogers, who was driv- 
the 121 bodies rbbbioetf fam the ingon the highway, said; “All of a 
•s' : s&&pad been identified; saM Dn suddai, a tire and a big jolt 
‘ }i: f,C3toles Petty, EteDasCbuaiyrnedi- bounced my car. I got out, saw 
calnczanriner. :• another car had been hit and the 

-‘^^More than 160 reteliwes wcttt to gpy. was 30 feet from hte vehicle 
; brn®mg ph> : and had been decapkated." 

1 togr^hs, dental aiarts and other ’ ' The aircraft then bounced sever- 


gave no hint of the cause. 

“There's nothing in the cockpit 


blamed for 28 accidents since 1964. Dallas-Fon Worth, 
accounting for 491 deaths and 206 The systems consist of six to 12 
injuries, according to scientists at wind sensors placed at ground level 


ly nose-dived and, as it neared the voice recorder in the preliminary 
ground, struck several automobiles reading that indicates the pilot was 
on State Highway 114. conscious of trouble," Mr. Bursley 

Anthony Rogers, who was driv- snid. “There was no indication of 
ingon the highway, said; “All of a anything unusual.’’ 


the National Center for Atmo- around the airfield to measure the 
spheric Research, in Boulder, Colo- speed and direction of the wind. 


the wind shear detection systems at 0! j lccl !f 8 ^ thrcal of a pay strike ap- 

most of the nation’s airports were r 25 *,uJSI designed to pressure em- 

inadequate. including the one at “ a ^ i 6“ m wind speed, ployers into increasing raises of 

DaK-Fon Worth. S,VZ' n US , mg ^PPlf radar, ]9A percent for the lowest-paid 

The svstems consist of six to P r* 3 * aroi “ d Staple- black mine workers and of 14 per- 

uind sensors placed at ground leyel ed BESS™"*"''* SdS ^^fSits^ 

Mr. Wilson and officials at the bers, along with a say in scrapping 
sderal Aviation Administration, tews that reserve the most lucrative 


rado. ' The systems detect only wind shew F f dt f al Aviarion Administration, laws that reserve the most lucrative 

Wind shear, which results from a close to ground level and the which paid Sa08.000 to finance the mine jobs for whites, 
strong downdraft of air, plays hav- gauges are so scattered that a severe ktopplff system was The union’s other demands, 

oc with an aircraft's aerodynamics, wind shear can slip between them, amc ro premci t / mmutes m ad- however, seemed logo beyond eco- 


Compiled by Our Suff From Dispatches 

BELFAST — British Army 
bomb disposal experts blew up four 
home-made mortar shells planted 
in a van near the police station in 
tbe town of Newry on Sunday, foil- 
ing a planned attack similar to one 
that killed nine police officers in 
February. 


io. i nere was no maicauon oi qc with an aircraft's aerodynamics, wind shear can slip between them, 
ytiring unusual. Similar to a cascade of water hit- Mr. Bursley of the safety board 

Some witnesses said li ghtnin g ting the ground, it disperses air in sjid Saturday that at the Dallas- 
>Us appeared to hit the plane as it all directions. A plane moving into Fort Worth airport, only one of six 


bolts a] 
approa 


yance where a wind shear was go- nomic issues and to present an of- 
tng to occur. Mr. Wilson said, “It ten -predicted political challenge to 
was tremendously successful" *' — * - • • ■ 


Mr. Botha from the increasingly 


gny. was 30 : feet from his^ vehicle jetlinera are electrically groumkd, 


tbe field. But because this formation at low level nil en- sensors, at Lhe center of the airport. However, the FAA cut off man- militant miners union. 


: arid had 1 been decapkated. 


The aircraft then bounced sever- was a factor. 


tors doubted liattniag 


counter winds that will tend to lift was equipped to record, and ll 
it at first, and su unsuspeuiag pilot * not ne.tr :he doomed p Sant. 


cy for the system this summer be- Moreover, the challenge coinrid- 


Meanwhile, Tbe Sunday Times 
of London reported that the out- 
lawed Irish Republican Army had 
a new chief of staff and identified 
him as Gerry Adams, die member 
of Parliament for West Belfast. 

The paper said Mr. Adams's ap- 
pointment was secretly ratified last 


(AP.NYT) will slow the throttle. 


Therefore any unusual wind di~ longer afford the expense. 


cr.M. officials sad. it could no ed with the country";, were* i^ism n*omh Hy the IRA’s wen-man ex 


of racial unrest in years. 


Tehran 9 $ Weapons Connection 

Sophisticated Agents Penetrate U.S. Supply Network 


Convenes 


By Gaylocd Shaw ’ V 
and William C Rmpci ' 

i^AagdesThna Strike ■ 

WASHINCnfON — Iran isoaa- 

^m^bffliQn-dallar campaign to 
- penetrate HJS, militar y stockpiles 
. and defense supplias m its search 
fo weapon and spare parts io sas- 
.(Sin.tfB war with Iraq. ;• 

Interviews with investigators and 
. officials in the United Sates and 
ahroad, . and the examination of 
thousandsof pages of government 
documents, has produced evidence 
that Iranian agents have succeeded 
in buying spare parts and other 
military hardware directly from 
military supply depots, from US. 
businessmen and from a range of 
other sources. 

. .Some of the agents o£ Iran’s lead- 
er, the Ayatollah Rnhoflah Kho- 
raeuri. operate under the aegis of 
the Iran Air Force Logistics Sup- 
port Center (Europe), and work out 
of a London office that also houses 
the National Iranian Oil Co. . 

They have sought to buy, Meal 
and smuggle American- made ^nmveiequiauys3 
weapons, spare parts and -supplies 

to repair sophisiicaied US. equip- A* suggested thej 


weapons and that the embargo’s 
success has increased Ayatollah 
Khomeini's desperation. 

In their first quests for U^S. 
equipment, lhe Iranians apparently 
were swindled out of millions of 
dollars. In one such fraud, crates 
labeled “farm equipment" — but 
thought by the Iranians to be bold- 
ing vital war matferid — were 


lathe last year, 54 
individuals and 
eight companies 
have been accused 
of violating the 
arms embargo. 


dripped to secret warehouse in Bdh 
gram. The Iranians pried open the 
crates and found, rusty farm equip- 
ment 

Such naiveti quickly gave way to 
sophisticated bargaining, however. 
' As suggested by the two most 
recent Iranian smuggling cases — 
one last month in San Diego ic- 


ing caution about tbe reliability of Tn nllFtTHl 
delivery. They insist, for example; "Ul MW 

that purchased cargo be inspected 
before payment, preferably outside By Barbara Crossette 
the United States. Nn> York Tones Sen in 

Although many of the Iranian RANGOON, Bunna — The rui- 


schemes have been stopped by U5. ing Burmese Socialist Program Par- 
undercover agents in recent ty opened its fifth major party con- 
months; federal officials says, they vention this weekend, and 
acknowledge that hundreds of diplomats and Burmese say they 
anus shipments have gone through are watching the agpnda for dues 
undetected over a period of almost to who might be in line to succeed 
five years. General Ne Win, who has ruled the 


in line to succeed 


five years. General Ne Win, who has ruled the 

The amount of money Iran has country since 1962. 
available for this procurement po- . The meeting, which is expected 
licy is piggested by the existence of to last a week, is also being watched 
individual purchase orders for indications of how the govem- 
amounting to hundreds of millions mem intends to tackle the serious 
of dollars, voluminous shopping problems facing the Burmese econ- 
lists and the high prices of sophisti- oray. Some ministerial changes arc 
cated military gear. In addition, expwted, diplomat s in Rangoon 
transcripts of tape-recorded meet- gay. 

mgs with Iranian agents indicate Under General Ne Win’s so- 
they have boasted casually about called Burmese Way to 
having access to 5500 million each the country was almost entirely cut 
for duferent groups of arms pur- off from the outside world for near- 



ment porchasedby tbe shah oflnm rrat Inmian smn^g cases - 
Woiitev^mhrowninI979. 

These weapons have been severely 
(feptetod by lhe Gifryctr iwwith 


“They act like they’ve got a bot- tiona remaining from the British 
tomless pit of cash, a customs in- colonial period before World War 
veshgator said. [I were nationalized. The results 

Documents in one case suggest were disastrous, according to gov- 
that two American agents, as abo- eminent figures, 
nus for obtaining aiiplane parts, By the early 1970s, Burma, fol- 
were offered commissions of up to lowing a policy of strict nonaBgn- 
580.000 a day for selling discount— ment, began to reopen cauti ously 

ed Iranian oil. to outside wsislance and tn Hhentl- 


LSSZtS Head-On Train Crash Kills 32 in Southern France 


An express from Paris carrying vacationers collided at high speed Saturday with a local train on a single 
track near the station at Flaujac, 95 miles southeast of Bordeaux. Fifty-eight persons were hospitalized in 
serious condition. Local officials said the crash may have resulted from confusion over timetables. Tbe 
express, which operates weekly in vacation periods, was running late on a track usually free of other trains. 


eeutive and its 13-member Army 
Council 

Mr. Adams is president of Sinn 
Fein, tbe political wing of the Pro- 
visional IRA and the legal front of 
a movement which is proscribed in 
Northern Ireland ana in the Irish 

republic. 

Sinn Fein in Belfast denied the 
appointment, but political observ- 
ers said the denial was inevitable 
since Mr. Adams would risk arrest 
as a member of a banned organiza- 
tion. 

“We have no knowledge that 
Gerry Adams is a member of the 
IRA,” a Sinn Fein spokesman said. 
Mr. Adams dismissed the report as 
“a load of rubbish." 

Is another development, Martin 
Galvin, a prominent American 
sympathizer of the Irish Republi- 
can Army, arrived in the Irish re- 
public over the weekend 

Mr. Galvin, a lawyer and the 
publicity director of the New York- 
based Irish Nonhem Aid Commit- 
tee, known as Noraid, defied a Brit- 
ish ban on entering Northern 
Ireland last year to attend a rally 
Aug. 12. Police trying to arrest him 
charged the crowd, killin g one man 
and injuring 20 others with plastic 
bullets. 

Mr. Galvin refused Sunday to 
say whether he would again defy 
the ban. 

Mr. Galvin, speaking at tbe 
Dublin headquarters of Sinn Fan, 
said: “I am not stating at this time 
whether I will cross the border. It 
would be wrong to reward the ccn- 

(Continued on Page 2, Col 3) 


Iraq. 

. Tne United States imposed a to- 
tal aims embargo during the 1979- 
80 crisis when Americans were hdd 
hostage in Iran. And even, though 
hundreds of shipments have got 
through to Tehran, administration 
officials say the smuggling opera- 
tions have filled only wont ID per- 
cent of Iran's requirement for 


INSIDE 

■ Thousands went to a Moscow 
• cemetery to hcobr an wp& m 
' ground poet who died fiy? 

Sn. PageZ 


votving U-S. Navy personnel and ed Iranian oil. .to outside assistance and to tiberal- 

tibe arrest Thursday of a career U.S. The most startling disclosure in ize slightly at home, where a thriv- 
Anny officer — Tehran's agents the investigations of Iran's ability ing black market now meets many 
are now trying to penetrate the U.S. to penetrate U.S. security came consumer needs, 
military and ns supply system more Thursday, however, with the indict- Diplomats say they are waiting 

directly. of a Pentagon missile expert, to sec if these trends will continue 


SSissSSsH India's Gujarat: A State f Gone Mad 9 With Violence 


Lieutenant Colonel Wayne G. Gil- and, if so, at what 
lespic, who has been in the army 25 nary papers prepare 


^Zgstssa gBBSKES! 

jaMgsaa 


Prelim- 


By Steven R. Weisman 

New York Times Sernee 

AHMAD AB AD, India — The shops in one 


for the party of the busiest parts of this historic city remain shadowy sireeis. 

■ _i • _ _ • « j... r? * s — - - mi ft All nrtftro 


walled city that divides the area's Hindu and In June, Madhnbsinh Solanki, chief minister 
Moslem neighborhoods, residents said they of Gujarat, was di<mi«rd by leaders of the 
were afraid to venture out is tbe narrow and governing Congress Party, inc luding Prime 


meeting are reported to oontinuc a shattered most of the day. Frightened residents 
is accused of conspiring with policy rtf seeking assistance from and merchants cower indoors, wondering when 
ational arms merchants and Western and international Lendint the next round of violence wiU erupt. 


“We all opened our shops this morning bo- police violence. 

.l. _~r i - ,-j » r i r . • « , .. 


Minister Rajiv Gandhi, after failing to curb the 


S tiw^bitinaeas. Iranian govanmeni to seU institutions. Burma is on 
Ition, mey cxmrai mcrea^ ^ the most advanced world's poorest countries. 


merchants and Western and in ternation a l lending 
t officials to sell institutions. Bunna is one of the 


U.S. and French missiles to Aya to l- General Ne Win, the 74-year-old 250 people and wounded hundreds more, Ah- 1° Hindn-Mosiem violence, families 
lah Khomeini’s regime for more chai rman erf the party, has run tbe "tadahnd is struggling to bring an end to some been burned alive by mobs, and others 
than $140 nnllion. country more or less singie-haij- of the worst Hin3u-Moskm and caste fighting retaliated by hurting ho m e ma de bombs, o 

A week earlier, seven other per- dedjy since he overthrew the last in years. - 

sons, among them a navy supply democratically elected govern- Ahmadabad and the surrounding state of _ . , 

specialist on the aircraft carrier menu Gqjarai oa India’s western coast have long been Ironically, it was here that 

Kitty Hawk and a civilian employ- lhe general has now decided to a prosperous region of textile nuDs, factories 

ee of a military arms depot, were create the position of party deputy and farms. Bm the violence has turned the state Mohandas K. Gandhi began 
indicted in San Diego for stealing chairman. An amendment to into a virtual war zone. As former Prime Minis- & 

Phoenix missile components, end- change tbe party constitution has 10 Monuji Desai put it recently, “Gigarat has Ujs nnnviolpnf fitmaalp fni* 
cal parts for the F-14 fighterjet and been made ready to be presented to gone mad." oo ie r 

other equipment and supplies and the 1,186 convention delegates. Ironically, it was here, on the marshy banks of T_J! a „ ; n J anon j. nno 

smuggling them to Tehran. The dmv*s last amventibn w« the Sabarmati River, that Mohandas K. Gandhi inoian independence. 


the next round of violence wiD erupt. 

After five months of continual bombings, 
shootings and stabbings that have killed at least 


cause the curfew was lifted,” said Manumal 
Golaldas, 69, the owner of an appliance store. 


Mr. Solanki was also criticized for his inabd- 
r to end a strike by government employees and 


Then there was a bomb explosion and a stab- a student strike that has shut all 


bing. and everyone closed up again.” 


SPORTS 

■West Germany defeated the 
'United States in a Davis Gip 
quarter-final as Becker bat 
Kjjckstein. ■ I3 - 

BUSEVESS/ITNANCE 

■ The u& economy remained 
■weak nr My, purchasingman- 
Ogprsn?) oiled. 

• act an austerity ptogran D& 
. rainaa of lC5 debts. .?&&£ T 



schools since March. Both strikes were called to 


In Hindn-Mosiem violence, families have protest the government's system erf preferences 
been burned alive by mobs, and others have for people of lower castes for jobs, promotions 
retaliated by hurting homemade bombs, cement and educational emoDmaiL 

Caste conflici has long been pan of Gujarat’s 

history. It reappeared after Mr. Solanki, appar- 
lronically, it was here that "tty hi a bid for votes, raised the job and 

education quotas for lower castes a few weeks 

Mohandas K. Gandhi began Native elections 

b He won the election overwhelmingly, but an- 

hi* nonviolent straggle for 
Indian independence. 


ower equipment ana supplies ana the 1,186 convention delegates. lrommy.it was here, on the marahv banks ot l„4{ an students, continued even after Mr. Solanki with- 

smuggliug them to Tehran. fhe party's last am vention was Sabarmati River, that Mohandas K. Gandhi mman muepenaeiice. drew the new quotas. 

Despite these arrests, there have in 1981. In that year. General Ne began the ^ struggle for Indian mdependmee * ; A premise by Mr. Solanki's successor Amur 

been instances erf poor coondina- Win stepped down as tbe cowrnys flumps with nails sticking out of them, and rag sinh Chaudhiy, to reconsider some of the exist- 

tion between the US. agencies m- president, relmquishiflg ceremonial 1930.“ leu hu march to the sea to protest the balls soaked in kerosene and set on fire. ing quotas led to an agreement with someTfelit 


A promise by Mr. Solanki's successor, Amar- 


TOMORROW 

Aug. 6 marks the 40th anniver- 
swy of the day that time stood 
still in Hiroshima; The atomic 
bomb exploded over tbe city at 
1:16 Aid.' 


vdved in combating the smuggling, duties to U San Yu, who asqi pted 
Tbe Stale Department security Gie title in 1982. 
office, for instance, did not know Bui General Ne Win retained the 


British salt tax. 

Now al the Gtijarat Vidyapith, an academic 
center dedicated to Gandnian traditions, stu- 
dents and teachers pray and spin cotton be- 
tween their studies. “It is yet a mystery to me 


But General Ne Win retained the 525? 


until interviewed by reporters that more: 


ujjuiiuiwfe™. -/ , »r , — — : tr - - ivlli tween their studies, “it is yet a mystery to me 

the Customs Service, federal prose- Noorgaruzed pohucal oppo- bow it began,” a professm said of tbeiMuna. 
cotors and defense attoroeysm San autm u pemnUud a toaa, and Sns highly orgSbm 

Diego had deputy b. m effect, the gowm- ^hSh^on so 

Beoeral is exnected to hr W. «■ "aa gooe w^og? Th«e ,are to 


parunent telephones to contact on 
(Continued on Page 3, CoL 1) 


The general is expected to be rc- 
(Cotrtiitued cm Page 2, Col 7) 


questions we are asking ourselves here." 

On RdieF Road, a principal artery in the old 


oaus soared in kerosene and set on fire. mg quotas led to an agreement with some, but 

For most of this year, Ah m adabad has been not all, of tbe striking groups. 

tm.«n Mo* ra ^ Hindu 

There have been many reports of tmorovoked viewed 8Uggesle ? ^aLPObucal leaders in the 
police attacks. In April aK a constable was P? n f ienl « “flW* * ^ contributed 
a group 

burned down the offices of a newspaper that - 8 0ve yninein UKlf Was mstrumemal in 
had been printing repots critical o^pohoe be- inciUn R people, said Cftim^bhal Patel, a lead- 
havior. (Continued on Page 2, Orf. 2) 




m. 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 1985 


Fans Share Poems, Taped Songs at Grave of Soviet Actor-Poet WORLD BRIEFS 


By Seth Mydans 

New York runes Serrice 

MOSCOW — They gathered at 
the cemetery again last week in the 
rain, thousands of Russians carry- 
ing bouquets, sheaves of poems and 
tape recorders from which a gruff 
voice sang of the ironies and hard- 
ships of their lives. 

People who had never met him 
or heard him sing during his life- 
time exchanged fond stories about 

this hnr ri-1 iyin g , fraiAri rHiiring man 
and scribbleddown the lyrics of his 
songs. 

It was the fifth anniversary of the 
death of Vladimir Vysotsky, an ac- 
tor and poet, a man whose songs 
were hardy tolerated by authorities 
during bis lifetime and who has 
become, since his death at the age 
of 42, probably the most idolized 
figure in the Soviet Union. 

The line at the Vagankovskoye 
Cemetery stretched along the 
graveyard’s yellow plaster wall, 
around the comer on 1905 Street 
and toward a railway overpass. 

At his grave, where someone had 
placed a laige photograph erf Mr. 
Vysotsky bolding his guitar, the 
bouquets grew into multicolored 
heaps, and candles burned bapde 
email offerings of food. From time 
to time people placed tape record- 
ers by the tombstone, and his voice, 
roughened, some say, by alcohol 



recording monopoly, has issued a Jgrod Stiff CMS WeStBailk SeCUTlty 
record of some of ms milder songs. 


But the main distribution pomt 
for his music and the wellspring for 
his continuing legend remains the 
cemetery, where admirers gather to 

honor him. 

Most people seemed to God it 




a series of harsh security measures. 

Strip, but stored short of acceding to 
tarorislSw 

_ __ „ The cabinet voted to deport to Lebanon or Jordan 

difficult l to l Splain whai it was constitnie a security risk," detain indefinitely and without _ 
about Mr. Vysotsky that brought suspected of security offenses, increase prison capacity m the 
ih«n to the cemetery. and dose Arab newspapers thatvidate censorship bypubhr 

'slack judged inf lammator y. AH rite measures exist under current I: 

but have been, for the most pari, unused for three years because of legal 
obstacles and appeals. 

In the last year, Palestinians lave killed -at least II Israelis, either 
Mrinapping rhwn in remote arcastof Israel dose to the West Bank 
boundary or shooting them in crowded streets of West Bank towns. The 
two most recent incidents, in which , three Israelis were killed, have 
occurred since July 21. 


A man i 


that it execute amvicted 


who 
Arabs 
estBank 
material 
i statutes 


Hundreds of bouquets and photographs adorned the grave of Vladimir Vysotsky on the fifth anniversary of hb death. 


and Marlboro cigarettes, 'filled the 
air. 

Though Mr. Vysotsky is not an 
officially approved hero, the au- 
thorities bowad to the force of pop- 
ular sentiment Hundreds of po- 
licemen kept order, blocking off 
traffic and ushering visitors 
through a metal barricade toward 
the grave. 


While he was alive, Mr. Vysotsky 
was a popular if sometimes histri- 
onic actor in 01ms and at the Ta- 
ganka Theater. But although the 
authorities recognized him as an 
actor and granted him the freedom 
to marry a Frenchwoman, Marina 
Vlady. the actress, and to travel 
abroad, his songs were not pub- 
lished in his lifetime. 


Mr. Vysotsky’s underground life 
quickly overtook his official career, 
though he remained an extremely 
popular actor. He Rang for small 
groups, and his songs spread 
through the COUntiy OO h n ntfaiwirfci 
recordings. 

The extent of bis popularity be- 
came dear only cm his death on 
July 24. 1980, of a heart attack. 


Without any official announce- 
ment or organization, 100,000 peo- 
ple gathered outside the Taganka 
Theater in a mass demonstration 
without parallel in the memory of 
people here. 

As his popularity has continued, 
limited and carefully selected edi- 
tions of his lyrics have been pub- 
lished officially, and Mekrdiya, the 


tahty. 

trees at dawn and tears in my eyes,'’ 
be said. “He calls a dog a dog.” 

Another admirer su'd: “He 
speaks for all of us about our daily 
hues. He has a true Russian soul 
and a Russian heart" 

man said: "He is wi th- 
is beyond wars,’' 

Mr. Vysotsky com- 
Ms countrymen 
that is hunted down 
. men who stake nit 
the boundaries of their lives with 
red flags. 

“Why do we run into the guns?" 
the song asks. ‘*Why do we not tty 
to escape?" And the pessimistic an- 
swer. “A wolf cannot change his 
ways." 

“We learn it as Httle cubs," the 
song says. "We drink it in with our 
mothers’ mOk: ‘Don't go beyond 
the flags. 1 " 



Turkey to Ask Revisions 
In U.S. Aid Agreements 


By Henry Kararn 

New York runes Serrice 
ANKARA — Turkey wants 
more U.S. military aid ana will seek 
fundamental revisions in the mili- 
tary and economic cooperation 
agreement expiring in December, 
according to senior officials and 
military officers directly involved. 

Under the five-year agreement, 
the United States operates from 
several militaxy, intelligence-gath- 
ering and communications bases, 
and stations 6,000 to 7,000 troops 
in Turkey. 

The Turkish government be- 
lieves that the Reagan administra- 
tion fails each year to request the 
amount needed for a costly mod- 
ernization of Turkey's armed 
/cares, and the U.SL Congress, un- 
der pressure from Greece, cuts the 
appropriation even further. 

For fiscal 1986, the Reagan ad- 
ministration requested $939 mil- 
hem in security assistance, of which 
$150 million would be economic 
aid and $789 million military aid. 
Congress scaled the military por- 
tion down to $714 million. 

In the Turkish view, shared in 
the Pentagon, the modernization 
objectives for the Turkish military 
require $1.2 billion yearly for a de- 
cade. 

The Turkish military is still pre- 
paring the request for a new agree- 
ment, which is to be presented 
soon, and Prime Minister Turgut 
Ozal declined to discuss specific 
demands. He also would not dis- 
cuss what Turkey might do if die 



Soviet Orders Economic Reforms 

MOSCOW (AP) — The Communist Party initiated some of the 
e co nomic changes igandmed hy the Soviet feeder, Mikhail iGoxbadiev, 
with a decree published Sunday in Pravda orderiag new price incentives, 
industrial bunding polirics ana wider powe rs fa; l ocal decision mtikmg 

The decree, issued by the party's Central CramnUleeand ite Council of 
Ministers, set down changes m the role ofjhc powerful state jrfanmne 
co mmission It said government bodies charged with, maintaining prod- 
uct quality most take more resp on s ibilit y, and antaed a system of 
incentives and fines to be applied initially to factories producing high- 
technology machinery. 

In June, Mr. Gorbachev said in a speech chat the centralized economy 
should be more responsive to demand, manufacturing quality should be 
improved and obsolete factories rebuilt, and local manag ers should have 
more autonomy. 

Uganda Says Leader Met Guerrillas 

KAMPALA, Uganda (UP!) — Ugandan radio said Sunday that Prime 
“ ‘ " j tauves 


Abortion Legal in Spain: of guerrillas who fought the previous regime; in talks aimed at forming 

“ ± 7 broad-based interim g o ve rnm ent. The guerrillas denied the assertion. 

Church, Doctors Protest 


United Slates failed to meet them. 

Asked to comment, a Stale De- 
partment official familiar with 
Turkish affairs said in Washington: 

"None of this is anything new. 

We've had all sorts of indications 
that Lbey would like to revise the 
agreement, but nothing has been 
formalized yet. 

"The Turks are dearly frustrat- 
ed," the official said. “There is a 
degree of dissafirfaction about how 
the relationship is going But they 
not only get a lot of aid, they get it 
on very favorable terms. The idea 
that by renegotiating the base 
agreements, for example, they can 
get a better deal from Congress is a fTM T) i« *-!• -m -mm- 

pipe dream. Hus is DO^rfett il IStCT COUCe 1 IHU MOltOTS 


Tha Naw York Tima, 

Gerry Adams, left, was reported by The Sunday Times of 
London to have replaced Martin McGmness, tight, as dwf 
of staff of the Irish Republican Army. He deified the report 


If Turkey wants to open it iq> 
for changes, we might too.” 

Mr. Ozal emphasized what he 
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called the complex nature of the 
issue and Turkey’s importance to 
the Atlantic atKanne not only be- 
cause it guards frontiers with the 
Soviet Union and Bul gari a and the 
straits from the Blade Sea into the 
Mediterranean, but also because it 
shares borders with Iran, Iraq and 

Ozal said Turkey was not 
treated fairly in comparison with 
the two top beneficiaries of U.S. 
military aid, Israel and Egypt, the 
only countries that receive more 
than Turkey. 

Congress has approved spending 
authority in each of the next two 
years of $3 billion for Israel and 
$2.1 billion for Egypt, in addition 
to onetime infusions of emergency 
economic aid of $1.5 billion for 
Israel and $500 million fra: Egypt. 

“We are spending a lot for our 
armed forces," Mr. Ozal said. “This 
affects our economic develop- 
ment." 

Turkey’s per capita gross nation- 
al product in 1983 was $1,102, the 
lowest in the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization. 

Mr. Ozal said that during his 
visit to Washington this year he 
stressed an easing of protecti o nis m 
rather than more military aid. He 
said protectionism limited the ex- 
port of such Turkish products as 
textiles and steel goods, and he also 
said Turkey received little help in 
reducing a trade deficit of $800 
million with the United States. 

The Turkish request trill not be 
an ultimatum, both civilian offi- 
cials and military offices said, and 
no thought apparently exists of 
abandoning tire accord. But senior 
American officials agree with a 
Turkish contention that Turkey 
readily provides more facilities 
than its commitments under its 
public and secret agreements with 
the United States. 

Political and militar y anal ysts 
say Turkey has considerable room 
fra applying pressure. U.S. military 
planners consider the installations 
in this country vital in view of Tur- 
key’s long border with the Soviet 
Union and its critical position be- 
tween Europe and the Middle East, 
as well as its position between the 
Mediterranean and the Black Sea, 
where one-lhird of Soviet naval 
strength is based. 

Tire United States monitors So- 
viet nuclear and missile tests amt 
other military operations as well as 
space and strategic nuclear devel- 
opment from stations in Turkey. 
Ground-to-air missiles with nucle- 
ar warheads guard the Bosporus 
and Dar danelles- Incirlik Air 
is the most forward U.S. 
bomber station in the eastern Med- 
iterranean. 

Turkish resentment is particular- 
ly strong at Congress’ insistence on 
maintaining a 7-to-IO ratio in aflo- 


Near Site of EarUer Attack 


(Continued from Page 1) 
soiship ban tire British government 
has placed an me." 

Mr. Galvin briefed 13) Noraid 
members who left by bos fra a two- 
week visit to Northern Ireland. 

In Newry, police said they found 
an unoccupied van carrying explo- 
sives parked Saturday near one of 
the town's busiest streets. Mortar 
shells in the back were pointed at 
the Edwards Street police barracks 
400 yards (365 meters) away. 

The van was parked about 50 
yards from the spot where a truck 
laden with mortars shelled the po- 
lice station Feb. 28, killing nine 
members of the Royal Ulster Con- 
stabulary, including two women, 
and injuring 10 others. The IRA 
claimed responsibility fra that at- 
tack. 

It was described at the time as 
the worst single assault an police in 
the province in the past 16 years of 
violence, in which nearly 2^00 peo- 
ple have been killed. 

A police spokesman said a repeat 
attack apparently had been 
planned. He said there was no indi- 
cation of why the van was aban- 
doned. 

The police said the army blew op 


the van after evacuating nearby 
houses early Sunday because it whs 
considered too dangerous lotryfo 
move the explosives. The van con- 
tained four pipes primed with 40 to 
50 pounds (18 to 22 kilograms)# 

explosives, a spokesman said. {; 

tf the report erf Mr. Adams’s ap- 
pointment as IRA chief of staff -is* 
true, then fie has taken over the 
military post from Martin 
McGuinness, who made headlines 
last week when the British Broad- 
casting Coip. canceled a documen- 
tary program featuring him after 
strong protests from Home Secre- 
tary Leon Brittan. 

Mr. Adams, 36, is the architect of 
the IRA’s “buDets-and-ballot-box” 
strategy to try to drive Britain out' 
of Northern Ireland. This calls fra 
a joint policy of guerrilla attacks 
combined with a political challenge 
in local anil national elections m 
the province. 

He was elected member of Par- 
liament for West Belfast in 1983, 
but has declined to take his seat in 
the House of Commons. 

He was arrested in March 1972 
and interned in Belfast's Maze pris- 
on until May 1972, when he was 
released. (AP, UPI) 


By Edward Schumacher 

New York Tuna Serrice 

MADRID — Abortion has be- 
come legal in Spain over the bitter 
objections of many doctors and a 
statement by tbe Spanish Roman 
Catho lic Church that anyone “who 
cooperates physically or morally” 
in the operation will be “automati- 
cally excommunicated.” 

The regulations enacting the new 
law, signed July 5 by the Socialist 
government of Prime Minister Fe- 
lipe GoozMez after nearly two 
years of court battles, went into 
effect Saturday. 

Tire law limits abortions to cases 
of rape, a malformed fetus or dan- 
ger to the mother. AH abortions 
were illegal before. The operation is 
free of charge in public clinic*. 

Authorities sard they expec 
25,000 abortions to be performed 
in tbe Gist year, but I 
church ana leaders of tbe National 
Medical Association suggests that 
many Spanish women wm still have 


on demand," a Health Ministry of- 
ficial said in a radio interview. 
“The law protects tire rights of the 
unborn child and will be strictly 
enforced." 

The ethics commission of the 
Medical Association, however, de- 


Mr. Muwanga, who was sworn in Thursday after a military coup 
overthrew President Milton Obote on July 27, reportedly told tire 
diploma ts that a consensus had been reached m talks with Uganda's main 
political parties and the National Resistance Army on prospective 
candidates fra a cabinet. 

In Nairobi a spofcesmmi for the guerrillas, Matthew Rukikaire, denied 
that members of the resistance had met Mr. Muwanga, and he rejected 
the claim of consensus. The cabinet under Mr. Muwanga is to administer 
Uganda until elections, which the ruling military council has promised 
will be held in a year. 


dared recently that it opposed all n ^ n . . ». 

abortions, except in cases of rape, BollviflD T CNflDS rffiSldeilual Majority 
1 to wide- . . 


for fear the law would lead to wic 
spread abortions. A 1983 poll of 
»«ndarinn members showed that 
nearly half opposed any abortions. 

Seeking to avoid suits by doc- 
tors, the government’s regulations 
were loosened just hours before 
publication to allow doctors to ex- 
empt themsdves from having to 
perform tire operation in public 

r.Hnres 

A doctor, however, must notify 
the authorities of his derision, a 
requirement that the governing 
board of the Medical Association 
said infringed on doctors' rights. 


LA PAZ (AP) — Victor Paz Estenssoro won a pledge of support from 
his chief leftist rival Sunday that appeared to assure his election in 
Congress as Bolivia’s next president 
Hugo Banzer SuArez, who ruled Bolivia as an army general from 1971 
to 1978, won 2SJ percent of (he popular vote in July 16 ejections to 26.4 
percent for Mr. Paz Estenssoro. Another 16 candidates shared the rest of 
the vote, and tire constitution requires tire Senate and Chamber of 
Deputies to jointly choose the president from the top vote-getters if no 
candidate wms at least 50 percent of tire votes. 

.The Revolutionary Nationalist Movement party of Mr. Paz Estens- 
soro, 77, won 59 of the 157 congressional seats m the Jnly elections. 
Before Sunday’s session, he had obtained pledges of another 1 3 votes. On 
Sunday be was promised 16 votes, enough for a majority, by tire Leftist 
Revolutionary Movement, which finished third in the popular vote. 


list,” Dr. Ramiro Rivera, president 
difficulties getting the operation, of the association, was quoted Sat- 
The sweepingaedaration of ex- u^ay as saving in the newspaper 
coromimicatinn was made by tire . *s*d .he personally 

National Council of Bishops five f avora * 111 — • - - 

weeks ago and has been regularly 
'repeated by bishops and priests 
speaking from the_pulpiL 
“Decriminalization is a morally 
unjust and pernicious derision," 
the bishops said. “The life of the 
new human being is stripped of its 
rightful protection and left to the 
mercy of others." 

Archbishop Antonio Rouco Var- 
da of Santiago created a political 
stir when he harshly condemned 
the law in a sermon before King 
Juan Carios I and government offi- 
cials at a mass July 25 celebrating 
tbe patron saint of Spain, SL 
James. He said abortion violated 
“human rights." 

Spain, which is almost totally 
Catholic, has been greatly liberal- 
ized since the death of Franco 10 
years ago. Polls indicate that most 
Spaniards now back abortions in at 
least tire law’s limited cases. 

“The law does not grant abortion 


“We are ready not to give any Managua Official to End Anti-U.S. Fast 

il nnKidenf O 


the associa- 
tion on any member who accepted 
the regulations and submitted Ins 
name. 

Officials of the Ministry of 
Health said an abortion hot line 
was being to give Spanish 

women information they fear doc- 
tors may withhold. 

Those favoring the rigjit to abor- 
tion reacted skeptically to tbe ex- 
emptions for doctors. 

“Tire ministry's regulations lend 
themsdves to a situation in which 
at no moment does a woman haw a 
teed right to abortion," said 
Ruiz Jarabo, a leader of 
tire Association for the Defense of 
Public Health. 

A law {(realizing some abortions 
was pushed through by the Social- 
ists in 1983, but the main conserva- 
tive opposition party, Popular Alli- 
ance, appealed it to the 
Constitutional Tribunal, prevent- 
ing it from taking effect 


MANAGUA (UPI) — Aides to Foreign Minister Miguel D’Escoto 
Brockznann of Nicaragua said Sunday that in two days be would end a 
month of fasting, which he undertook to protest U.S. policies against the 
Sandmist wjveramenL 

Father D’Escoto, a Roman Catholic priest, reportedly made his deri- 
i after his doctor warned that the fast had reacted a pram where it was 


aom 


. jj — a 

The foreign minister weighs 172 pounds (78 kilograms). He weighed 
205 pounds when be started fasting. 

For the Record 

day as mission contronti^hlouston directed the commander. Colonel C. 
Gordon FuHoton,.to land at Edwards Air Force Base. California, on 
Tuesday instead of Monday. 

Atoka's governor, Bfll Sheffield, a Democrat, shoold not be impeached 
for his role m a SSkmOkm state Hearing scandal, the Rules Committee of 
tire state Senate recommended Saturday. (NYT) ■. 

■ Jim Chapman, a Democrat, won the U.S. House of Representatives seat 
for the Fiist District of Texas on Saturday, defeating Edd Hargett, a 
Republican, by 52,670 votes to 50,736. The framer holder of the seal, Sam 
B. Hall Jr, a Democrat, resigned to became a federal judge (UPI) 
Kxm Dae June, a leading South Korean opposition figure, was freed 
Saturday from house arrest. He had been confined to nis home since 
Wednesday. (AP) 

Tbe Soviet Unioo has expeDed all personnel erf the Liberian Embassy in 
retaliation for Liberia's severing of diplomatic relations on July 18, Tass 
announced. (UPI) 



South Africa Miners Threaten Strike 


(Continued from Page l) boring countries soch as Lesotho 
ltmi T tin* bm and nature of ftweral y and Mozambique, 
for victims of dvil unrest The mine workers statement said 

i gnoring rules that forbid politi- unspecified action would be taken 
cal speeches at f unera ls and tha’i , if Mr. Botha did not “immediately 
outlaw funeral marches through withdraw his threat" to repatriate 
black townships, mourners in the foreign workers. Tbe warning ap- 
settlement ofZwide, near Port Eliz- peared to represent a direct cfaal- 
abeth, rfumted sfegans praising the lenge to Mr. Botha’s authority, 
outlawed African National Con- The statement said the state erf 

emergency “should be withdrawn 
within 72 hours, failing which boy- 
cotts of all white businesses near 
the mining iowns will be embarked 
upon.” Economic boycotts have 
become a principal weapon of 
black defiance in some areas, par- 
ticularly in the automotive center 
of Port Elizabeth. 

At a press conference, Mr. Ra- 


Potice patrol the waHed city of Ahmadahad in security hoses. 

uaputua 

^ Gujarat: A State r Gone Mad’ With Violence 


Military assist 

Greece and Turkey. 

“The role of Tuikey m this area 
is much more important than 
Greece," Mr. Ozal said. 


(C o n tinued from Page 1) 
er of the opposition Janata Party. 
“They did n to divert attention 
from their own scandals." 

Government officials, including 
the prime minister, counter by 
charging that tbe caste agitation 
was spread by the opposition. 


They then jogged through the 
streets between the church and the 
cemetoy to escort tbe coffins. 

Eighty to 100 white soldiers and 
policemen, armed with whips and 
automatic rifles, confronted the 
mourners after the bmial Saturday. 

1 The soldiers descended from six 
armored vehicles and formed a line 
on the roadside as a 500-yard (450- 
meter) funeral convoy made up of 

pickup trucks and raises went by, 
led by a black hearse. 

After 15 mmoles of tense but 
uneventful confrontation, troops 
and poEcemsn climb ed back into 
their armored cars and drove past 
the convoy. 

There were no immediate reports 
of inridmis- Saturday. Although 
the mourners could argue dial they 
defied the new regulations with im- 
the police and (be army 


maphosa, a 32-year-old lawyer, 
raid his ration was recognized by 
enqrfoyas at 18 of the country’s 44 
gold mines and II erf 55 pits. 

The mines that recognize the Na- 
tional Union erf Mlneworkers in- 
clude some of the deepest and big- 
gest in the world, owned by Anglo 
American Cot;). 

For the first time, Mr. Rama- 
phosa said, the mine workers union 
included miners at a diamond mine 
owned by De Been Consolidated 
Mines LuL, a sister company to 
Anglo American, in its strike call 

He said a limited period would 
be given to the employers to make 
new offers, but that “a few days 
before the 25 tb we will not be open 
to offers." 


Others blame what a well-placed payoffs from the dozen organized 
police source termed “the criminal - crime groups that run the city’s 

potitirian-police nexus." especially bootlegging, gambling and extor- 

strong in Gujarat which enforces " tarn operations. Politicians and po- “ c0I1 f crcn ^' the” National 
P”** ltion - Utical parties are also said to re- Mineworirers said Mr. 

This source said, for instance, cave money from these groups. ^ “seeking a confronta- 


that hundreds erf low-level and un- 
derpaid police constables received 



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Yugoslav Is Given Reduced Sentence 


Reiners 

BELGRADE — The Yugoslav 

Federal Court has reduced the pris- 
on sentmee of a dissident socado- 
gtst, Vqjislav Seselj, from four 
years to two years and two months, 
according to a Belgrade newspaper, 
Veoenije Novosti. 

Mr. Sesdj was sentenced to eight 
years imprisonment in July 1934 

[or counterrevolutionary activities, 
but a higher court later reduced the 


charge to hostile propaganda and 
tbe sentence to four years. Tbe 
Federal Court then dropped some 
of the charges and reduced the seo- 
renoe. 

. Mr. Sesdps family said that, with 
time served, including time in de- 


say that the number invol 
was insignificant' 

Id a Ktatnmen t Jay niyl at Sunday’s 

But he was suddenly dismissed 
in May 1983, ostensibly on charges 
_ . of misuse of government funds. 

The source said that whenever tion” with mine workers “by Diplomats suggested Ms real crime 
the police planned to rrid one erf threatening to repatriate m i gra nt might have been that he had be- 
these operations, the criminals workers.” come toojirorainent a pubhc per- 

were tipped off. He“ added that “Should be attempt to proceed a " "" 

whenever one of the come leaders his ill-advised threat,” the 
was arrested, someone with politi- statement said, “our union would 
cal influence engineered his release, hnmediately call a national strike 

of all miners and atop all the mines 
until te. reverses all action be may 
haw taken.” • 

By South African law, 97 percent 
trf all Made mine winkers must be 


Burma Party Opens Meeting 

(Confirmed from Page 1). Thc dty of Rangoon has been 

elected as party chairman at the 
convention. There has been specu- 
lation that the tide of deputy chair- 
man might go to the defense minis- 
ter, GeneraTThctra Kyaw Htm. 

Until a few years ago, it was 
assumed by m&ny who follow Bur- 
mese politics that General Ne 
Win's successor would be Brigadier 
General Tin Oo, the security and 

• . «* ‘ _L' r 


for weeks, with ihe gpvcnunaii- 
controlled newspapers featuring 
article after article about voluntary 
labor offered to guarantee its sue- 


TmOoisinpris- 


"Crime is a very 
here, "the source said, 
nrim-empire of their own.’ 


have a 


-o — . T7 k: recent disturbances, many _ 

tendon for questioning. Mr. Sesc§ {of those interviewed said priva tely, migrant workers* These workers 
could befree in seven axmihs. Rrisr ; spread after a breakdown occurred live in single-sex hostels in mine 
on authorities force-fed ME Ses3S | in the order of ihis criminal system, compounds while they work out 
in February when be went \pn a < which exacerbated latent religions one-year contracts. Of the mi- 
hunger strike. • and economic tensions. grants, 40 percent are from neigh' 


sonaHty. 1 
on. 

Diplomats said there was no in- 
dicatian that General Ne Win is 
planning to retire in the near fu- 
tarc. But they pant ed out that he 
has reached an advanced age by 
Burmese standards and has appar- 
ently been giving more thought to 
his renaming yesrs- The general, a 
Buddhist, like most Burmese, is 
having a pagoda built in Rangoon, 
a traditional way of trying to en- 
sure a better next life. 


Work crews have been exprod- 
ing scarce paint supplies on sga- 
posts and guard rails. Teams of 
women and men could be seen last 
week sweraam the broken pave- 
ments of the aty with homemade 
brooms, occasionally ;o the 
paniment of marching-ba a “ 
drams. Potholes were being njfed 
by people carrying asphalt in iheir 
bare hands. . ' 

30,000 Protest in Mexico 


MEXICO CITY — Mice in 
Monterrey, Mexico, used dubs and 
tear gas to disperse 30,000 demon- 
strators, some throwing rocks fflrf 
bottles, who protested Friday.® 1 


Institutional . Revolutionary Party 

in July 7 elections. The demoastf** 
lion was called by the National 
Action Panv. 




EVTERJVATIONAL HERALD TRIBIHVE, MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 1985 


AMERICAN TOPICS 



PAMPERING THE PASSENGERS — John Cloak of Chicago calls his cab the 
“•space shuttle." He has installed a bar, television, telephone, video recorder, stereo, 25 
internal mood lights and “air cologne.” Mr. Cloak says be takes in about $1^200 a week. 


How Reagan Rates 
As an Arm-Twister 

Ronald Reagan ranks right up 
there with Franklin D. Roosevelt 
and Lyndon B. Johnson as a 
president who can twist arms to 
make members of Congress do it 
his way. 

“The magical ingredient" of a 
telephone call from the presi- 
dent, according to Martin Tol- 
chin, who covers Capitol Hill for 
The New York Times, “is a presi- 
dent's ability to help or hinder a 
congressional career." Presidents 
can offer patronage jobs, cam- 
paign help and support or a con- 
gressman's pet legislation. They 
also can refuse all these. 

But presidential arm-twisting 
also requires a skillful pursuit of 
the art of politics, which the late 
Jake Arvey, once Chicago's 
Democratic boss, defined as “the 
art of compromise" or the “an of 
the possible." 

Mr. Reagan is a master of the 
technique, but Johnson was a 
veritable artist. Robert C. Byrd, 
Senate minority leader, recalled. 
“I have never seen anyone who 
could twist an arm as well and as 
painfully as could Lyndon John- 
son.” 

John F. Kennedy liked to take 
congressmen on the presidential 
yacht die Sequoia. Richard M. 
Nixon “didn't enjoy the arm- 
twisting die way President John- 
son did.'’ recalled William Tim- 
mons, a White House liaison 
man with Congress. Not so Ger- 
ald Ford, Mr. Timmons recalled. 
Mr. Ford had no hesitancy in 
buttonholing congressmen and 
“he wwked them good, on a per- 
sonal basis.” And Jimmy Carter, 
who got rid of the yacht? A veter- 
an Republican senator remarked 
that “Jimmy Carter makes Rich- 
ard Nixon look like an extro- 
vert” 


Notes on People 

Edward M. Kennedy Jr. says 
he has decided not to run next 
year for the Massachusetts con- 
gressional seat of Thomas P. 
(Tip) O'Neill Jr., speaker of the 
House of Representatives. Mr. 
Kennedy, 23. who lost his right 
leg to cancer when he was 12, 
said he would continue working 
as an advocate fir disabled peo- 
ple. “Every indication showed 
that 1 could do well if not win 
the thing,” he said. He said that 
his father. Senator Edward M. 
Kennedy. Democrat of Massa- 
chusetts. had neither encouraged 
nor discouraged his candidacy. 


e part 

of the governor of Texas, which 
he is, in a coming episode of the 
“Dallas” television series, even 
though he flubbed his only line. 
Playing himself, he was to say, 
“It's really wonderful being here 
with you all today. Thank you!” 
But it came out, “Thank you, it's 
really great to be out here with all 
you aU today.” The Dallas tech- 
nicians decided that “ail you all” 
was acceptable, if unusual, Tex- 
an. 


Short Takes 

Betsy Nelson. 33, is suing a 
sporting goods store in Falls 
Church, Virginia, for 5600,000. 
charging she was falsely accused 
of shoplifting a basketball and 
forced to partly disrobe. The 
bulge was mere because she was 
nine months pregnant. The day 
after the incident, she gave birth 
to a healthy boy. 


Circulating in government of- 
fices in Washington is the follow- 


ing list, which has no explana- 
tion but speaks for itself: 

Lord's Prayer 56 words. 

Twenty-third Psalm: 118 
words. 

Gettysburg Address: 226 
words. 

Ten Commandments: 297 
words. 

U.S. Department of Agricul- 
ture order on the price of cab- 
bage: 15,629 words. 

Shorter Takes: Four years af- 
ter an extensive federal study 
identified 2,884 unsafe dams in 
the United States, little has been 
done to prevent a tragedy such as 
the one that killed more than 200 

S ’ i in Italy last month, ac- 
g to Joe Ellam, head of the 
Association of State Dam Safety 
Officials. . . . Illegal cultivation 
of marijuana has been reduced 
50 percent along the northern 
California coast by a two-year 
campaign of federally financed 
helicopter raids, according to lo- 
cal officials. But they concede 
many growers who have been 
forced out probably are growing 
the stuff elsewhere" 


A T ongne-Twister, 
Intentional or Not 

Remember the old exercise in 
proper enunciation. “Peter Piper 
picked a peck of pickled pep- 
pers?” 

Mark S. Fowler, chairman of 
the Federal Communications 
Commission, in expressing grati- 
tude for work by Peter K. Pitscb. 
chief of the agency's Office of 
Plans and Policy, and his staff, 
wrote, “Thanks to O.P.P., PeteT 
Pitsch and your people, Peter!” 

— Compiled by 

ARTHUR HIGBEE 


Peru Says Chile Police Chief Resigns'in 

It Will Pay 
Debt Interest 
OwedtoU.S. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF JORDAN 
LIBRARY 

SERIALS Nragj l$LfLi 

Page 3 



§51! 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LIMA — Peru will pay the Unit- 
ed States 5123.000 in overdue inter- 
est. Foreign Minister Alan Wagner 
Tram has announced. He said Peru 
would ask Washington to renew 
the economic and military aid it 
bad suspended because of the de- 
linquent debL 

Mr. Wagner made the announce- 
ment Saturday after a 40-minute 
meeting between President Alan 
Garcia Perez and the U.S. ambas- 
sador, David G. Jordan. 

Radio station Radiopragramas 
quoted Mr. Wagner as saying: “Ev- 
erything has been magnitw. Peru 
is willing to make the payment.” 

Radioprogram as quoted Mr. 
Jordan as saying that the suspen- 
sion had been taken more seriously 
than intended, and indicated that 
Peru would pay the debt 

The radio station quoted uniden- 
tified U.S. officials in Lima as say- 
ing that U.S. aid would be renewed 
immediately after the payment was 
made. 

The. State Department banned 
new aid to Peru on Friday when the 
South American nation fell a year 
and a day behind on payment of a 
5200,000 military loan. 

U.S. law requires a halt In new 
aid to nations that fall more than a 
year behind on repayment of devel- 
opment or military loans. 

A spokesman for the official 
press agency Andina said there 
would be no formal statement from 
the government on the aid cutoff. 

The United Slates is the largest 
provider of economic and military 
aid to Peru. It supplied about S60O 
million during the five-year term ol 
President Fernando Belaunde Ter- 
ry, which ended last month. 

At his inauguration July 28, 
President Garcia said Pern would 
not spend more than 10 percent of 
its export e arnin gs, currently total- 
ing just over S3 billion dollars an- 
nually, on foreign debt payments 
while uying to renegotiate its for- 
eign debt 

Peru is suffering the worst eco- 
nomic crisis in its histoiy. Its for- 
eign debt is S13.6 billion, and it is 
5425 million behind in its interest 
payments. Inflation in the South 
American nation is running at 
more than 160 percent annually. 

■ Castro Rejects Garda Plan 

President Fidel Castro of Cuba, 
in a speech Sunday that dosed a 
Latin American economic confer- 
ence in Havana, rejected Mr. Gar- 
da's plan to restrict debt service 
repayments. Reuters reported. 

Mr. Castro said, “The policy of 
paying back 10 percent of export 
revenue would not resolve the 
problem." 

He described the region's huge 
foreign debt as a "cancer that must 
be rooted out" and restated his 
belief that only cancellation of the 
S360-billion debt could solve Latin 
America's economic crisis. 


Rmters 

. SANTIAGO — President Au- 
gusto Pinochet of Chile has re- 
placed the head of the paramilitary 
police force after a judge implicat- 
ed |4 members in the murders in 
March of three Communist oppo- 
nents of the military government. 

General Rodolfo Stange, 39, the 
former deputy police chief, was ap- 
pointed commander Friday and 
was also sworn in as a member of 
Chile's ruling junta. 

He replaced General Cfcsar Men- 
doza, 66, a close associate of Gen- 
eral Pinochet since the coup in 1973 
that brought the military to power. 
General Mendoza resigned Friday. 

Diplomats said the reshuffle 
posed no immediate threat to Gen- 
eral Pinochet, but that General 
Mendoza's departure represented a 
significant setback for the govern- 
ment 

Only once before in almost 12 
years of military rule has there been 
a change at the top of one of the 
armed forces, when the air force 
commander, Gustavo Leigh, was 
removed in 1978. 

The opposition members killed 
' were Manuel Guerrero, a teachers' 
union leader; Jos£ Manuel Para da, 
a human rights worker, and Santia- 
go Nattino, an artist The case ap- 
peared to have been settled Thurs- 
day, when the government said the 
14 policemen had been dismissed, 
and General Stange and the third- 
ranked police general had offered 
to resign. 

General Mendoza's decision to 
resign apparently earned them a 
reprieve. 

General Stange later said the 
courts were investigating the mur- 
ders but refused to repeat General 
Mendoza’s denials of police in- 
volvement. 

It was not clear why the three 



Tha ABadtftd ftm 

Hie widows of three Chilean Communists murdered in March, bolding posters showing 
their husbands, confronted a police officer dining a demonstration Friday in Santiago. 


murders should have led to the re- 
moval of such a high-ranking offi- 
cial; the security forces have been 
implicated in many other killings. 

Another incident that had reper- 
cussions in the top echelons of the 
government was the murder in 
1976 in Washington of Orlando Le- 
telier, an exiled opponent of the 
government. The head of the intel- 
ligence service at the time was sub- 
sequently dismissed. 

Diplomats said there were strong 
indications of a dispute between 
the police and the National Infor- 
mation Centre, the secret service, 
which is run by an army general 
appointed directly by General Pi- 
nochet. 


There were clashes Friday in the 
center of Santiago between "riot po- 
lice and demonstrators. 

The speed with which General 
Stange was appointed and the tone 
of General Pinochet’s comments 
during his swearing-in, which were 
broadcast on television, indicated 
that the Chilean leader was deter- 
mined to give the impression of 
business as usuaL 

“Those' who may try to take ad- 
vantage of the moment in pursuit 
of their petty interests should un- 
derstand dearly that we will not 
lack the determination or the ener- 
gy to adopt the most drastic mea- 
sures required to mam tain order," 
he said. 



General C6$ar Mendoza 


Dole, Gray Doubt U.S. Deficit Cut Will Be Achieved 


By Helen Dewar 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Principal 
figures in both houses of Congress' 
have expressed doubt that the com- 
promise budget plan they approved 
last week will reduce the federal 
deficit by the intended amount, 
5280 billion over three years. 

The Senate majority leader, 
Robert J. Dole, and the chairman 
of the House Budget Committee, 
William H. Gray 3d, said late last 
week that the savings for fiscal year 
1986 would be closer to $40 billion, 
not S55 billion as had been an- 
nounced. 

- Mr. Gray, Democrat of Pennsyl- 
vania. expressing a widespread 
feeling in Congress, acknowledged 
tbal-economic projections and the 
ttaasuranent of cutbacks in mili- 
tary spending were probably mis- 
leading, contributing to an overly 
optimistic estimate. 

Mr. Dote, Republican of Kansas, 
expressed doubts about whether 
Congress would enforce the 
pledged cutbacks. 

"1 think we have to be vety care- 
ful when we look at numbers." he 
said in a television interview, “be- 


cause I doubt Congress will do all 
the things we've been asked to do, 
and the deficit will really be much 
larger than anticipated." 

He said later that the failure 
could come in a wide variety of 
appropriations accounts, especially 
areas where program cuts are not 
mandated. Other sources said there 
was likely to be resistance to pro- 
posed cuts in farm supports. Medi- 
care and other smaller programs, 
including such popular ones as 
Amtrak rail-passenger subsidies 
and local economic development 
If Mr. Dole and Mr. Gray are 
correct, next year’s deficit could be 
5180 billion or more, compared 
with 5210 billion anticipated for 
the current fiscal year, which ends 
Sept 30. By fiscal 1987, it could be 
more than $220 billion. 

The Senate Budget Committee 
chairman, Pete V. Domeniti, Re- 

E ublkan of New Mexico, observed 
ist week that savings claimed for 
fiscal 1987 and 1988 were likely to 
be $25 billion to $40 billion less 
than anticipated, largely because of 
optimistic economic assumptions. 

This could mean a deficit of $ 1 50 
billion by fiscal 1988, the year the 


White House and congressional 
leaders had hoped to cut it to below 
$100 billion- A separate analysis by 
Senate Democrats, based on earlier 
Congressional Budget Office eco- 
nomic assumptions, put the fiscal 
1988 deficit at $161 bQKon. 

These assessments by three of 
die principals in the seven months 
of congressional budget negotia- 
tions underscore that the figures 
used in the calculations are ques- 
tionable, that the economic as- 
sumptions are fragile and that there 
is doubt that Congress will enforce 
the spending cuts voted Thursday 
night 

Fan of the savings crane from 
money that probably would not be 
spent anyway or from using ques- 
tionable benchmarks for measuring 
the savings. 

Military spending is a primary 
example. The Pentagon does not 
spend all the money available in a 
gjven fiscal year. But these are still 
considered “savings” and added to 
real cutbacks that result from re- 
straining the growth of spending 
authority. 

Even the real savings will depend 
on whether program cuts are mea- 


Iran’s Smuggled Arms: A Sophisticated Penetration of the U.S. Military Supply System 


(Continued from Page 1) 
undercover agen t posing as a smug- 
gler. 

The U.S. government's initial re- 
sponse to Iran’s smuggling opera- 
tion in die early 1980s also appears 
to have been lackadaisical. More 
recently, however, the Customs 
Service and the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation have counterattacked 
rigorously. They have conducted 
investigations in more than a dozen 
locations, from Los Angeles to Bos- 
ton and from San Francisco to Or- 
lando. Florida, deploying under- 
cover agems and using wiretaps, 
mail and telex intercepts and 24- 
hour surveillance. 

Justice Department statistics 
show that in the last 12 months, 14 
indictments have accused 54 indi- 
viduals and eight companies of vio- 
lating the Iranian arms embargo. 
That is more than double the total 
number of indictments for the 
three previous years combined. 

The investigations have resulted 
in more than indictments. Some 
have turned up information sug- 
gesting the possibility of high-level 
corruption. 

In San Diego, for instance, an 
undercover customs agent, who 
taped 75 meetings and telephone 
conversations after infiltrating a 
smu gg lin g ring last year, heard the 
Iranian agent boast that the smug- 

Gorbachev Misses 
Gose of Moscow 
Youth Festival 

The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — A crowd of 
100.000 filled Lenin Stadium here 
for ceremonies closing the I2lh 
World Youth Festival. 

Seven members of the Commu- 
nist Party Politburo presided over 
the two-hour spectacle Saturday 
but the Soviet leader, Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev, who opened the festi- 
val involving 157 countries on July 
27. was not present. 

Members of some Western dele- 
gations said Soviet organizers 
warned a formal closing communi- 
que, but many of the Westerners 
resisted this and also insisted that 
the content of the final message be 
politically neutral. 

The document that was finally 
released noted that the festival was 
held while European nations, the 
United Stares and Canada marked 
the 10th anniversary of the Helsin- 
ki accords on security and human 
rights. 


glers had contacts with “the con- 
gressman," who he indicated was 
involved in arms deals. 

“The congressman" was not 
identified in the transcript of the 
tape recording. 

The Customs Service has not 
“come up with any substantiated 
evidence at this point" that any 
congressman is involved, an official 
with the Customs Service said. 

The Iranian agent, Yasser Ab- 
dulrahim Shooshtary, an I ranian 
immigrant with British citizenship, 
also told an undercover customs 
agent, who was posing as a supplier 
of high-technology equipment, that 
a customs agent had been paid 
525,000 to get illegal shipments out 
of the country. 

Questioned after his arrest, the 
Ir anian agent said he was only re- 
sting what he had been told by 
ier-level members of Lhe ring, 
investigators say. 

The transcripts also disclose that 
Brian Lewy, a west German freight 
forwarder who is a fugitive after 
being indicted for arms smuggling, 
used the State DepaitmentYaiplo- 
matic courier office in Washington 
last October to make and receive 
long-distance telephone calls in- 
volving illegal shipments. The tran- 
script also showed that a mid-level 
State Department official person- 
ally placed one of the coils lor him. 

The official, James R. Yandivier. 
59, was questioned by federal 
agents in November about his con- 
tacts with Mr. Lewy. 

Mr. Lewy, with four other indi- 
viduals and three companies, have 
been charged with attempting to 
export arms to Iran illegally. 

Iran's global effort to keep its 
military machine operating is run 
from a 



emuen" equipment men- 
IOC. House i 


Three U.S. officials describe a plot to smuggle arms to Iran. They said the S75-nuUion 
conspiracy inducted guided missies, such as the one shown. The officials, from left, are 
Perry Doran and Richard Ross of the FBI and Pan! O’Brien of the Customs Service. 


One method of getting arms des- 
tined for Iran out of the United 
Slates involves using authentic ex- 
port documents. Iranian agents 
buy these documents, a U.S. agent 
said, “from military officials in 
Third World countries and in some 
countries that are American mili- 


weU -guarded, seven-story, tary allies." These documents, usu- 
modern building at 4 Victoria Sl. signed by 


London. 

Called NIOC House because the 
National Iranian Oil Co. is head- 
quartered there, the structure also 
is home to the Islamic Republic of 
Iran Air Force, its Logistics Sup- 
port Center, and the Ir anian Navy 
and its Technical Supply Office. 

From there, neatly typed —but 
sometimes badly misspelled — or- 
ders for monitions, pans and giant 
war machines are issued. 

“Further to our verbal negotia- 
tions on 9-19-84. would you please 
deliver two brand new and genuien 
(sic'j of VA145E tubes to our as- 
signed freight forwarder at your 
earliest convenience.” reads one or- 
der. “It is understood that the sum 
of 5294,000 U.S. dallore (sic) will 
be paid to you within — ” 

The order carries an official 
stamp. It was sent in September. 


a mDitary general 
trade on the munitions black mar- 
ket for a minim um of 5100,000. 


“These documents allow the 
arms to flow out of the United 
States unquestioned," a customs 
agent said. 

A federal investigator said he 
had seen three distinct phases in 
Iran's strategy to penetrate Ameri- 
can weapons and supply markets. 

“At first they flooded the coun- 
tryside with so many agents that 
even if SO percent got caught, they 


and gei 

Honed in the NIOC House order, to 
be purchased for $294,000. are ra- 
dar-sensing devices that are critical 
electronic components of mobile 
radar stations. These devices can be 
purchased by authorized buyers for 
as little as 530,000 each. 

A Western company reportedly 
was getting almost a 2,000 percent 
prom, according to a government 
agent, by buying scrap aircraft 
parts for 52,000, “knocking out a 
few denis and repainting them, 
then getting 540.000 each" from 
Iran. 

There is speculation that such 
costly experiences, coupled with an 
increasingly effective Customs Ser- 
vice enforcement effort, forced 
Iran into its third, most sophisticat- 
ed, phase. It includes knowledgable 
buyers, detailed lists of specific re- 
quests, thorough inspections and 
authentic-leaking documents. 

Despite the rising numbers of 
investigative successes, many fed- 
eral prosecutors and customs 
agents are dissatisfied with what 
they consider light sentences fre- 
quently imposed by the courts on 
persons convicted of smuggling 
arms and weapons parts to Iran. 

The sentence that caused some 
of the widest discontent among en- 
forcement officials was the one im- 
posed on Moises Broder of Portu- 
gal a wealthy real estate developer 
who was paid $85,000 in commis- 
could count on the other 20 percent sions to arrange the sale of Anxri- 
— with a lot of goods," can-made radar components to 
Iran. 

While Mr. Broder was awaiting 
trial in Los Angeles federal court, a 
U2S. magistrate permitted him to 
remain confined for almost five 
months to a 520,000-a-monih 
apartment condominium be had 
rented. He was guarded by a pri- 
vate security fum. 

Upon conviction of conspiring 


export 

Broder was fined 550,000 and sen- 
tenced to a year in prison. Howev- 
er, he was given credit lor time 
served. The five months he spent 
confined to his apartment reduces 
the time Mr. Broder must remain at 
Terminal Island Federal Correc- 
tional Center in Los Angeles. 

Also frustrating to law enforce- 
ment officials is the haven from 
prosecution that foreign smugglers 
enjoy if they remain outside U.S. 
jurisdiction. Most nations, includ- 
ing such allies as Britain, do not 
recognize most eeport violations as 
extraditable crimes, at least not 
when one of their own citizens is 
involved. 

11 Die in Wyoming Storm 

Washington Past Service 

CHEYENNE, Wyoming — A 
strain strode Cheyenne with torna- 
does, floods, lightning; and hail, 
killing at least 11 persons. Many of 
the dead were swept from their cars 
by fioodwaters, while two died 
from heart attacks during the 
storm, which dropped 6.06 indies 
(15.6 centimeters) of rain in just 
under four hours Thursday. 


_ec- 

tions or against President Ronald 
Reagan's own spending plans. 
Nearly 513 billion of next year’s 
estimated defidt reduction is the 
result of using Mr. Reagan's bench- 
mark. 

Officially, Mr. Reagan and both 
houses of Congress used Projec- 
tions from the Office of Manage- 
ment and Budget in their an- 
nounced figures. However, by 
dting economic projections of the 
Congressional Budget Office, 
which are less optimistic. Senate 
Democrats unofficially predicted a 
reduction in defidts over three 
years of $76 billion less. 

As for meeting the spending-cut 
targets, plans to overhaul farm pro- 
grams fall short of the budget's 
target numbers, as does Medicare 
reform. 

First-year savings can be en- 
forced, but savings after that are 
more difficult to achieve unless the 
programs themselves are cut Only 
about one-quarter of the projected 
three-year savings stem from per- 
manent changes in law. 

Budget negotiators, for instance, 
did not mandate program cuts for 
Amtrak, mass transit and a number 
of other politically popular pro- 
grams, raising questions as to 
whether about 510 billion in future 
savings mil be realized, according 
to a Senate budget source. 

In a statement Friday upon pas- 
sage of the budget and in nis week- 
ly radio address on Saturday, Mr. 
Reagan threatened to use a veto to 
enforce restraint- But there is doubt 
within the administration as well as 
in Congress as to how well this will 
work, especially without David A. 
Stockman as director of the Office 
of Management and Budget. 

Mr. Reagan seldom used a veto 
to block appropriations bills but, 
Mr. Stockman, was suc- 
3 in using veto threats to trim 
spending authority in bills before 
they were passed. 

Although the administration at 
various times asked Congress to 
kill more than 20 federal programs 
or major agencies, the House-Sen- 

lition ofra^^S^ouse and Sen- 
ate Budget Committee staff aides 
said Friday. 

The four are federal payments to 
the Conrail freight rail line, which 
the government is selling; general 
revenue sharing, to be eliminated 
after 1986; the U.S. Travel and 
Tourism Bureau; and a small loan- 
guarantee program under the Com- 
munity Development and Block 
Grant program. 


Tto Aoocmad Prw* 


coming up 

saidthe investigator. “But they 
were awfully naive and ineffective, 
so Tehran went to Phase 2, using 
brokers to represent them in covert 
deals.” 

That proved to be an expensive 
strategy. As the layers of middle- 
men multiplied, so did the price 
markups. 

The two pieces of “brand new 


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Page 4 


MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 1985 


Ucralb 


INTERNATJONAL 



tribune. 


PublUwd With The New YoA Time) tad TV Washington Port 


The Rap on the Budget 

Why all the moaning and groaning that 
Congress didn't cut the deficit enough? If I 


remember correctly, it set out to cut $50 billion 
and the new budget resolution ends upeuning 
$55 billion. What's so bad about that? 

What is bad is that those numbers don’t tdl 
the whole story. The Congressional Budget 
Office says the $55 billion will actually work 
out to only $39 billion. So we mil still be 
looking at a deficit next year that’s more than 
$180 billioa. Some cut 
And remember, we're still talking about 
estimates. Budget projections are notoriously 
unreliable. Tax collections fall short Spending 
runs over. In any case, the deficit in the final 
year of the Reagan administration would still 
be way over $100 billion — and that was the 
original target of this exercise. 

All right, but Tm still impressed. The presi- 
dent pushed Congress and iL worked. You just 
wish it had worked your way. 

Worked? Hie president wanted to eliminate 
a whole bundle of programs. How many did 
Congress kill? One — revenue sharing — and 
it was due to expire in a couple of years 
anyway. People can disagree on which pro- 
grams are good or bad. But when Congress 
cannot bring itself to kill any at all, that says 
something important about the functioning of 
government. Paralysis. 

And so far, we have only been talking about 
spending cuts. We have not said a word about 
bolding down Social Security increases, or 
about new taxes. 

Why are you so determined to be gloomy? 
They cut $55 billion this year. They can cul 
some more next ye tr. 

You've got it backward. U they can't make 


the tough choices this year, when there is no 
election, do you really think tl 


^ they will do it next 

year, when that is one? This was the critical 
moment. Congress and the ad ministration fi- 
nally acknowledged that deficits had gotten 
out of hand. They sounded serious. 

Then look at what happened. Congress 
started «n.iifing real cuts in defense and non- 
defense programs. There was a moment when 
it looked as if the president might bend on 
taxes and Sodal Security. He actually agreed 
to a temporary freeze in Social Security, but 
backed off in a hurry. And for a while, he said 
he would consider tax increases as a “last 
resort.” But at last resort, be said no. 

You may say he has the courage of his 
convictions. I say his convictions guarantee a 
deficit crisis long after 1 m is gone. 

What crisis? Things are pretty good. Infla- 
tion and interest rates are down. Jobs are up. 
The stock market has never been higher. 

All true, but that’s just the point. If you can’t 
save during good times, how on earth can you 
expect to do so when the economy turns down 
again? Besides, big deficits carry with them the 
expectation of more inflation, sooner or later, 
and that’s why interest rates are still quite 
high- The government's enormous borrowing 
to cover the deficit jost adds to that pressure. 
And jobs may be up but unemployment is 
stuck at more than 7 percent. 

I'm not gloomy. Fm worried about our lead- 
ers’ failure to cope with problems when the 
time is ripe. Deficits are all right, even desir- 
able, in recessions. But when the next recession 
comes, the deficit will already be excessive — 
because it was cut so little on Aug. 1, 1985. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



Colonialist 

Obstinacy in 


■if 


lb 






Hong Kong 


The Bomb: Was Truman Justified? 

Yes, It Was a Necessary Evil No, He Had Other Options 


Nairobi’s Boost to Women 


By the standard of these events, the United 
Nations Decade for Women Conference at 
Nairobi was a notable success. It seems to have 
generated a feeling among many delegates that 
there is something worthy of being called an 
international women’s movement. A final doc- 
ument was produced and, for the first timt- in 
three such occasions, the United States found 
it politically inoffensive enough to sign. Mau- 
reen Reagan, the president’s daughter and 
bead of the U.S. delegation, came home pro- 
nouncing the conference “a first-class win for 
us and for women and for the UN system as a 
whole.” She did much to make it so. 

Delegates from some Arab countries and 
from the Soviet Union and its satellites came 
to Nairobi chiefly, it seems, to vilify Israel 
They did their best, but many other delegates 
obviously resented any political intrusion that 
was going to take away from attention to 
issues of direct concern to women. In this 


pattern, delegates reacted strongly when the 


foiled States — to show “we can play the 
same games they can play," Maureen Reagan 
explained — launched its own political inter- 
vention to condemn a “small group of outlaw 
states" for supporting terrorism. 

ll is true that many political issues bear on 
women's concerns, but it was more true, to the 
delegates in Nairobi, that an excessive empha- 


sis on divisive political issues would under- 
mine the quest for a feminist consensus. The 
United States, with Israel did have to threaten 
a walkout to get the conference to delete an 
ugly, UN-type condemnation of Zionism, but 
it appeared that this was what many women 
wanted Washington to do. 

The final report mi “Forward-Looking 
Strategies” is premised on the idea that women 
are a political class and one dominated by 
men. The report is a long wish-list of feminist 
goals — a longer and more optimistic list than 
any angle delegation might have written had it 
not been in the hothouse atmosphere of a UN 
conference with no responsibility for turning 
its recommendations into reality. 

As they surely had to, the Americans took 
part in the work on this consensus document. 
Maureen Reagan was then attacked, unfairly, 
by some American feminists for countenanc- 
ing certain demands that go beyond both U.S. 
law and the Reagan administration’s policy. 
Her response, which was a bit too flip, was to 
dismiss the document as “a piece of paper." 

But the report offers encouragement and 
stimulus to many women, especially in tradi- 
tional' societies. It is lonely out on the frontier 
where many women are pursuing change Nai- 
robi gave them comfort, and company. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


By John Connor 

S ACRAMENTO, California — 

Forty years ago this Tuesday in 
Hiroshima: the dreadful flash, the 
wrist watches fused forever at 8:16 
A.M. The question stiH persists: 

Should the. United States have 
dropped the atomic bomb? 

History seldom gives derisive an- 
swers, but documents recently de- 
classified point to a dear judgment: 

Yes, it was necessary to drop the 
bomb.- It was needed to end the war. 

It saved countless lives on both sides. 

In the early summer of 1945, Ja- 
ight 


By Gar Alperovitz 


on the grounds the bomb might not 
Work, or that the plane carrying it 
might be shot down. Moreover, it is 
questionable how effective a demon- 
stration bomb might have been. The 
militaristscoald have imposed a news 
blackout as complete as the one im- 
posed after the disastrous battle of 
Midway and continued on their sui- 


ASHINGTON — Though it 


ridal course. That is exactly what 
happened at Hiroshima. Within 


pan, under tight control of the milita- 


rists, was an implacable, relentless 
v. The Ja 


adversary, 
territory with a pi 


janese defended 
Arneri- 


Without thebomb 
there might have been 
an invasion, with 
awesome loss of Hfe. 


Big Sister and the BBC 


We confess we have not seen “At tbe Edge 
of tbe Union,” a 45-minute documentary 
about Northern Ireland produced by the Brit- 
ish Broadcasting Coip. But neither have Prime 
Minister Margaret Thatcher or her home sec- 
retary, Leon Brittan. Relying on press ac- 
counts, they made an astonishing rawest that 
tbe program be suppressed — and the BBC's 
board (5 governors has complied with alarm- 
ing alacrity. It is a bad show all around 
What provoked Mrs. Thatcher was the an- 
nouncement that the program included an 
interview with Martin McGuinness, reputedly 


the Irish Republican Army’s chief of staff. Mr. 
Brittan. who is responsible for law and order. 


feared the interview would lend “spurious le- 
gitimacy” to violence. If it is now supposed to 
pursue that principle regularly, the BBC is 
going to have a tough time pursuing tbe news. 

Obviously, political violence poses dilem- 
mas for a free society and its press. Driven by 
competitive zeal careless broadcasters can in- 


deed supply. terrorists with “the oxygen of 
publicity, in Mrs. Thatcher’s phrase. But 
when anxious governments impulsively reach 
for the tap of that oxygen, they betray the 
very values they aim to defend. 

The casualty in this case is the BBCs admi- 
rable tradition of independence, a vital source 
of its credibility. Its broadcasts arc pubikdy 
financed and the government has the legal 
right to compel it to suppress information. But 
that power was not even invoked. Instead, the 
government simply requested suppression of a 
program that had taken months to prepare 
under an established code for dealing with 
political violence. By yielding, it was the BBC 
that gravely undermined itself. 

Yet in an Orwellian (ouch, Mrs. Thatdzcr 
dares to boast that “I am never going to put 
censorship on — we are not that kind of 
party." Over at BBC. however, they have obvi- 
ously decided that Big Sister has arrived. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


cans had seldom encountered: Sol- 
diers were taught that surrender was 
worse than death. There was savage 
resistance in battle after battle. 

Of tbe 5,000-man Japanese force at 
Tarawa in November 1943, only 17 
remained ahve when the island was 
taken. When Kwajalein was invaded 
in February 1944, Japanese officers 
slashed at American tanks with sam- 
urai swords; their men held grenades 
against the sides of tanks in an effort 
to disable them. 


On Saipan, fewer than 1,000 of the 
32,000 defeat 


Other Opinion 

Britain’s ’Honorable Isolation’ 


It is beginning to look as if Britain could be 
the only major country to refuse to apply 
sanctions against South Africa. In our view 
this will be an honorable isolation, since 
sanctions against South Africa mil do no 
good. Sanctions, insofar as they are effec- 
tive, wQJ increase black unemployment and 


exacerbate tensions in the black townships. 

If the aim is to provoke black revolution, 
then sanctions might conceivably serve that 
end. But since black revolution would cause 
more misery even than apartheid — as well as 
far metre bloodshed — Britain should have no 
part in a policy that might produce such 
a disastrous result. 

— The Sunday Telegraph {London). 


FROM OUR AUG. 5 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

191<h Why Dollars flow to Europe 


LONDON— The London “Globe” says: “We 
do not know where the American writer who 
has recently been discoursing on the flow of 
dollars to Europe obtains his statistics, but his 
account is so detailed that we may assume it is 
cot imaginary. Tbe stream of dollars reaches 
the respectable volume of about a hundred and 
fifty millions sterling. A large part of this goes 
abroad fm two reasons. One is that America, 
though blessed with some of the most magnifi- 
cent scenery in the world, is so uncomfortable 
a country that the American with a holiday in 
front of him and money to spend goes some- 
where else. The other is that American “fi- 
nance" has so shaken the confidence of tbe 
American in his own securities that he leaves 
them to the foreigner for investment. 


1935: Pacifists March in Harlem 
NEW YORK — A cross-section of New 
York’s pacifist citizenry — Socialists, Commu- 
nists and college students, Negro and white — 
banded together in Harlem [on Aug. 4] for a 
“march against war” and in particular a dem- 
onstration against Italy’s threatened invasion 
of Abyssinia. There were 25,000 in the parad- 
ing columns, which for three hours trudged 
through the sweltering streets of tbe black 
neighborhood, waving banners, singing, shout- 
ing and denouncing the forces of militarism. 
There were ex-service mm in the khaki uni- 
forms they wore to the war to end wars. Com- 
munist groups in gray shirts and hats, and 
Young Liberators of Harlem in red and blue 
tunics purporting to represent tbe uniforms 
of Emperor Haile Selassie’s forces. 


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JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chmman 1958-1982 


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Execute Editor RENt BONDY 


Editor 
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ROLF. "" 


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it- 


ef ending Japanese troops 
survived. Casualties among the Japa- 
nese-ruled civilians on the island 
numbered 10.000. Parents bashed 
their babies’ brains out cm rocky cliff 
sides, then leaped to their deaths. 
Others cut each other's throats; chil- 
dren threw grenades at each other. 
America suffered 17,000 casualties. 

Just 660 miles (1,065 kilometers) 
southeast of Tokyo, I wo Tima's garri- 
son was told to defend the island as if 
it were Tokyo itsclL In the first day of 
fighting, there were more American 
casu a lti es than during D-Day in Nor- 
mandy. At Okinawa — only 350 
miles south of Kyushu — more than 

110.000 Japanese soldiers and 

100.000 dvUians were killed. Kami- 
kaze attacks cost the navy alone some 

10.000 casualties. The army and ma- 
rines lost more than 50,000 men. 

In ttye early summer of 1945, the 
invasion of Japan was imminent and 
everyone in the Pacific was apprehen- 
sive. Tbe apprehension was justified, 
because U.S. intelligence was good: 
With a system code-named “Magic,” 
it had penetrated Japanese codes 
even before Pearl 
would play a crucial role in Lhe 
ing days <rf the war. 

Many have maintained that tbe 
bomb was unnecessary because in the 
dosing days of the war intercepted 
Japanese diplomatic messages dis- 
closed a passionate desire for peace. 
While that is true, it is irrelevant. The 

Japanese government remained in 
the hands of the militarists: Their 
messages indicated a willingness to 
fight to the death. 

Ja panes e planes, gasoline and am- 
munition had beat hoarded far the 
cooling invasion. More than 5,000 
aircraft had been hidden everywhere 
to be used as suicide weapons, with 
only wwng h gas in their tanks far a 
one-way tnp to the invasion beaches. 
More than two milli ort men were 
moving into positions to defend the 
home islands. 

The object was to inflict such ap- 
palling losses that tbe Americans 
would agree to a treaty more favor- 
able than unconditional surrender. 
The army chief erf staff. General 
George C Marshall estimated that 
American casualties could run as 
high as one millioo. 

. The willingness of tbe Japanese to 
die was more than empty bravado. 
Several of my collet :es at Kyushu 
University told m i as boys of 14 
or 15, they were bong trained to meet 
the Americans onthe beaches with 
little mare than sharpened bamboo 
had no morions about 
for survival. 

The Potsdam declaration cuffing 
for unconditional surrender was 
beamed to Japan on July 27. On July 
30, the Americans were informed that 
Japan would ignore die ultimatum. A 
week later, the bomb was dropped. 

Could America not have wanted 
the Japanese in advance, critics 
asked, and dropped a demonstration 
bomb? That alternative xu* vetoed 


hoars, the Japanese government sent 
in a team of scientists to investigate 
the damag e- Their report was imme- 
diately suppressed and was not made 
public until many years after the war. 

After midnight on Aug. 10, a pro- 
tracted debate took place in an air- 
raid shelter deep inside the Imperial 
Palace. Tbe mill Lay insisted that Ja- 
pan should hold out far toms far 
better than unconditional surrender. 
Tbe peace faction favored accepting 
the Potsdam declaration, providing 
that the emperor would be retained. 
The two factions remained at an im- 
passe. At 2 AA1, Prime Minister 
Kamaro Suzuki asked the emperor to 
decide. In a soft, deliberate voice, the 
emperor expressed his great longing 
for peace. The war had ended 

It was impossible, in August 1945, 
to predict the awesome shadow the 
bomb would cast on humanity. The 
decision to drop it seemed both am- 
ple andobvious. Without iL the mili- 
tarists might have prevailed an inva- 
sion might have been ordered And 
the loss of both American and Japa- 
nese lives would have been awesome. • 
The atomic bomb accomplished 
what it had been designed to do. 
It ended the war. 


has not received broad 
attention, there exists 
historical evidence that President 
Harry S. Truman knew he could air 
most certainly end World War II 
without using tbe atomic bomb: The 
United States had cracked the Japa- 
nese code, and documents released 
over the last 40 years show that Mr. 
Truman had two other options. 

The first option was to clarify 
America's surrender terms to assure 
the Japanese it would not remove 
their emperor. The second was sim- 
ply to await the expected Soviet dec- 
laration of war — which, U.S. intelli- 
gence advised, appeared likely to end 
the conflict on its own. 

Instead, Hiroshima was bombed 
Aug. 6, 1945, and Nagasaki three 
days later. The planned date for the 
Soviet Union's entry into the war 
against Japan was Aug. 8. 

Tbe big turning point was the em- 
peror’s continuing June- July derision 
to open surrender negotiations 
through Moscow. Top American offi- 
cials — and, most critically, the presi- 
dent — understood tbe move was 
extraordinary: Mr. Truman’s secret 
diaries, lost until 1978, call the key 
intercepted message “the telegram 
from Jap Emperor asking for peace.” 

Other documents — among them 
newly discovered secret memoran- 
dums from Wi lffi ™ J. Donovan, di- 
rector of the Office of Strategic Ser- 
vices — show that Mr. Truman was 


tqp presidential aide pul it. Having 
decided to use the bomb, however, 
Mr. Truman was urged by Secretary 
of State James F. Byrnes not to give 
assurances to the emperor before the 
weapon had been demonstrated. 

Additional official records, includ- 
ing minutes of top-level White House 
planning me eti ngs, show the presi- 


dent was clearly advised of the im- 
of a Soviet 


portance of a Soviet declaration erf 
war It would pull the rug out from 
itnrfur Japanese military leaden who 

Red Aj^*^^driwneut^ W * rfU ^ 
General George C Marshall told 
Mr. Truman in mid-June that “the 
impact of Russian entry on the al- 


Ameriam leaders 
wanted to end the war 
before Moscow got in . 
f onthekUL 9 


By Frank Ghing 

H ONG KONG —The British au- 
thorities here, who will have to 
turn Hong Kong over to China in 
1997, are alienating the public in 
their efforts to show that they are not 
a latne-dudc administration. Dire 
consequences could result. 

Lang accustomed to running Hong 
Koagas their own fiefdom, with little 
interference from Loudon, local offi- 
cials have been at pains to show that 
they are stiH in charge, and will re- 
main so, until July 1997. 

Their handfing of several issues has 
betrayed a colonial mind-set that is 
ill-prepartd to deal with an increas- 
ingly vocal and politically conscious 
population. The administration has 
shown little awareness of the sensitiv- 
ities of the 5.5 m£Hk» people here, 
most of them refugees from China or 
children of refugees. 

Although the Chinese-British 
a gi Bc m cnt provides that Hong Kong 
wUl become a capitalist enclave in 
ffrina many here fear their 
personal rights and freedoms will be 
curtailed after China takes charge. 

As if to confirm their anxieties, 
only weeks after signing the accord, 
in December, the administration in- 
troduced a WJ in its hand-picked 
Legislative Council to do away with 
jury trials in cases erf complex' com- 
mercial crimes. The move seemed 
fraught with sinister implications. 

A public outcry arose, led by the 
Hong Kong Bar Association. Its 
chairman decried the measure as “the 
rhm cad of lire wedge” that might one 
day lred to dismantling of the jury 
system, a pillar of any free society. 
Rumors of a secret understanding 
itnt!«»r which Britain would make 
Hoag Kong more compatible with 
the system in China began to spread. 

These rumors gained strength as 
the adminis tration, while agreeing to 
shelve the commercial cranes bill. 
hum up with other controversial pro- 
posals, including establishment of a 
tribunal to deride if articles or publi- 
cations were pornographic or “objec- 
tionable.” The panel's decisions 
would be binding on courts, and 
judges would have no choice bat to 
find guilty any person dealing in such ■ 
publications. Again, because of pro- 
tests from the legal profession, the 

admink tia tinn hacked down. 

Then, the administration intro- 
duced legislation, ostensibly to define 
the powers of the Legislative CounriL 
that would have deprived the public 
of the right to attend its sessions and 
would have made it a crime for any 
newspaper to report on tire council’s 
dosed proceedings, even if such re- 


« been o 

rfont inno 

tepast tk 

drivers er 
niqueway 


ready hopeless Japanese may wefl be ports were accurate. The bill woulc 
the decisive action levering them into have made it a crime for anvone tc 


The writer, a professor of anthropol- 
ogy at California State University, was 
attached to General Douglas MacAr- 
ihur’s headquarters in Tokyo in 1949 
and 1950. He contributed this com- 
ment to The Hew York Times. 


initiatives through Swiss and 
guese channels as early as three 
months before Hiroshima. Moreover, 
Mr. Truman told several officials he 
had no objection in principle to Ja- 
pan's keeping the emperor, which 
seemed tbe only sticking point 
American leaders were sure that if 
he so chose “tire Mikado could stop 
tire war with a royal word” — as one 


Lurching Incautiously 
To a Crucial Summit 


By Stephen S. Rosenfeld 


■^^ASHINGTON — With the first meeting of 


first meeting of Secretary of State 
; George Shultz and the new Soviet foreign minister, Eduard She- 
.... io wen have formally begun planning 


varddadze, m Helsinki, tire superpowers 
for a summit meeting that ii * " 

events since World War n. 

It will enable Ronald Reagan to take Ms first personal measure erf 
Soviet policy in a period of potentially heightened activism. For tire 
Kremlin it will be an opportunity for tire first up-dose reading of 
American policy since tire conservative wave started flowing through 
Washington in the late 1970s. 

It is a mistake for the great powers to go so kmg without a summit. It 
dqjrivestherileadOTaftnecTOxrrtunifyto^pascinaiassesanentsinto 
their policy equations. It builds unnatural twminn into those m i m m it 
meetings that do take place. Ready or not, however, November is coming. 

Unfortunately, nothing visible at Helsinki alters the impression that 
the two powers are 1 arching stnmnitward in a rather casual way. The 
meeting, with all of its nalural freight, is not going to be allowed just to 
happ^ A tremendous amomit- of extra frriftiu is being pikrf orc 
The Kremlin started it in April by announcing that it would .step its 
deployment of SS-20 missiles aimed at Western Europe — it had been 
1 J-_ * S " A * years — until November. If by then the 

tents of missiles in Europe (which were 
i), Mikhail Gorbachev said, watch oat 
So November was bound io be a tense time. And the scheduling of a 
summit meeting to coincide with tire deadline for tire SS-20 moratorium 
puts tire whole Eurofrean issue squaretyoa tire Reagan-Goibadwv plate. 


deploying them weekly fra: i 
United. Stales did not halt d 
begun in 1983 to counter the. 


That is notaH. In June, Mr. Reagan made his own heavy contribution 
to the November sweepstakes. While deriding to stick with the terms of 
the SALT-2 arms-control agreement, he challenged tire Russians to 
“correct tireb notrebmpliancer and he commissioned the Pentagon to tell 
him. by Nov. 15, what arms programs the United States should add to 
offset any violations uncorrected by Moscow. 

Mr. Reagan was finally going to cany off Ms ambitious effort to cope 
with the lagging c omplianc e with old arms-control agreements, 

even while trying to negotiate new agreements at Geneva. The summit 
falls precisely as Mr. Reagan’s Nov. 15 deadline comes dire. 

And last wed: Mr. Gorbachev upped the ante. He announced that the 
Soviet Union bad begun a unilateral moratorium on nuclear testing. 

it cuts across the Geneva arms-contr^^bf 
where tbe ostensibly mutual effort is to negotiate binding restraints. 

But there it is. Add to this the consideration that a new Soviet five-year 
iwanmif. plan is in the making and that by- Some calculations the 
Russians are today where Americans were five years ago: ready to go to 
the next generation of weapons. You win .then see that the Kremlin is 
talking not only about resuming testing but-also about picking op the 
pace of major new weapons programs. . . 

■ rbachcvare without experience tn high-stakes 
They are acting al a time of poor U5-*Soviet 
[ issues lying between them are at best, in a 

renrenisrecoveringiroinacancer 

and the other has as his foreign minister a provincial ai 
One might have thought that the two leaders would ! # , 
toward their first summit meeting. Instead, each, responding 
domestic imperatives, is turning up the heat under the other. 


Mr, Reagan and Mr. 
international negotiant 

relations ami when the 
state of paralysis. One c 


capitulation at that time or shortly 
thereafter if we land.” 

A mouth later, the American-Brit- 
ish Combined Intelligence Staffs ad- 
vised their chiefs of tbe critical im- 
portance of a Red Army attack. As 
the top British general, Sir Hastings 
Ismay, summarized tire mn rlusinrK 
for Pnme Minister Winston Chur- 
dull: “If and when Russia came into 
tire war against Japan, tire Japanese 
would probably wish to get out on 
almost any terms short of the de- 
thronement of tire emperor.” 

Mr. Truman's private diaries also 
record his understanding erf the ag- 
mficance of this option. Chi July 17, 
1945, when Stalin confirmed that the 
Red Army would march, Mr. Tru- 
man privately noted: “Fini Japs 
when that comes about.” 

There was plenty of time: The 
American invasion of Japan was not 
, scheduled until the spang of 1946. 
Even a ,t ~ ! “ 1 ‘ 

T-dand 

months 

General Dwight D. Eisenhower, 
appalled that the bomb would be 
used in these circumstances, urged 
Mr. Truman and Secretary of War 
Henry L. Stimson not to chop iL In 
his memoirs, be observed tint weeks 
before Huoriuma, Japan had been 
seeking a way to surrender. “It wasn't 
necessary,” he said later, “to hit them 
with that awful thing ” 

The man who presided over the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff. Admir al W3- 
tiam D. Leahy, was equally shocked: 
“The use of this barbarous weapon at 
Hiroshima and Nagasaki was erf no 
material assistance m our war against 
Japan. The Japanese were already 
defeated and ready to surrender."^ 
Why, then, was the bomb used? 
American leaders rgected the most 
obvious option — simply waiting for 
the Red Amy attack — out erf politi- 
cal, not military, concerns. 


commit “any act of intentional disre 
sped to or with reference to the pro 
cmfings” of the council. Such “disre 
spect” would earn a year in prison. 


In response to public protest ih« • r . * ■» - - 

‘to**™** * Jsf'-’wk tiro*, gig 


“K feature 


which consists entirely of 
servants and appointed members • 
the pablic — agreed to drasutiif 
amendments that in effect emasculat- 
ed tire bifl. but still enacted it ■ 
the widespread calls for a deft 

The British, who have patemalisti- > ^ , 

cafly ran Hong Kong for 133 yeais. r j‘ Vj ” . rtf 
were caught by surprise by the strong . *' ^ * ; 

public reactions. Accustomed to a ■ ? 
politically apathetic populace. they^QAJc 
have not yet come to grips with the 
new political consciousness. 

Tbe administration’s actions have 


created an atmosphere of stispid 
and hostility. Unless the British la 


on 

lake 


immediate steps to re ga i n tire coufi- 
dace of the public, there is a real 
pr elimina ry landing ou the danger that toe administration will 
of Kyushu was still three become increasingly isolated and in 
in tire future. credibility eroded. It is li! 


likely that if V 
continues to stonewall in the face d 


public criticism, some Hone Kong 
political groups will Teel so afienatec 
they will appeal directly to Beijing foi 
support. If that happens, tire Bniisl 
may find their position untenable. 

Conspiracy theories axe so ram- 
part L that tire drieT secretary (who L* 
second to the governor in power). Sir 
David Akers- Jones, has bad to state 
repeatedly in public that there is “nc. 
hidden agenda.” 

Whether such bland assurance 
will be effective remains to be seer 
Mil as the author of a letter to r 
newspaper said: “Let tbe govenmreni 
be under no illusion. They now have 
on their hands a thoroughly fright- 
ened populace.” 


As tire diary of one official gut iL 


they wanted to end tire war before 
Moscow got “in so much on the kill” 
Secretary of the Navy James . V. 
ForrestaTs diaries record that Mr. 
Byrnes “was most anxious to get tire 
Japanese affair over with before tire 
Russians got in " 

American leaders had also 
to thnukerf the atomic bomb as 1 
Secretary Stimson termed tire “mas- 
ter card r of diplomacy. Mr. Tr uman 
postponed his Potsdam meeting with 
Stalin until July 17, 1945 — one day 
after tire first successful nuclear test 
— to be sure the atomic bomb would 
strengthen Ms band before confront- 
ing the Soviet leader on the shape of 
a postwar settlement 
To this day, we do not know with 
absolute certainty Mr. Truman’s per- 
sonal attitudes on several key issues. 
Yet we do know that his most impor- 
tant adviser, Secretary of State 


The writer, former Beijing corre- 
spondent of The Walt Street Journal, is 
author of Hong Kong and China: For 
Better or for Worse: ' lie contributed 
this comment to The New York Tunes. 


UTTERS 


the bomb would serve caudal 


confident, without evident reason, of his 
Care, and modesty, are desperately need 

Tbe H'uJuni}itin Pint 


bargaining prowess. 


As one atomic scientist, Leo Szi- 
lard, observed: “Mr. Byrnes did not 
argoe that it was necessary to use the 
bomb against the cities of Japan in 
drier to win tire war. Mr. Byrnes ' . . . 
view [was] that^oor^possessmg and 

Russra.more manageable." 


The European Satellites 

I read with interest Axel Krause': 
report “Europe Slow to Hook Up 
Satellites" (July 11). Whik the devel- 
opnrent.of satellite TV reception in 
Europe is far behind that oftne Unit- 
ed States, it is not quite in the early 
stages described. British manufactur- 
ers have sold about 1300 satellite - 
systems, in the last 12 months. There 
are receiving systems in hotels in Par- 
is, Geneva, Amsterdam. Milan and 
London. Bri tain liberalized its regu- 
lations for satellite TV reception in 
May. As Mr. Krause notes, remain - 
mg regulatory problems in Western 
Europe are restraining growth mot* 
than are cost or availabity. 

PETER C FUNK-. 

London. 


Noncitizen, Nontraitor 


The wriler, ahtionan and political 
economist, is author of a revised edition 
of." Atomic Diplomacy : Hiroshima ami 
Puritfum. “ He itoilnbuhtl tlit\ min- 
- itum i" T>:i W* >■•*#. 


The South African government 
contradicts itself when .it arrests 
™*tcks for treason. Treason is wfeR 
citizens of a country commit when . 
they betray their country. Since d* 
white minority regime does not offer 
its black natives the rights of cilia*- 
sn'p. South Africa’s blacks do 001 
hav< Privilege to commit 


■4 











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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 1985 


T 


yty Election 
ines Hailed 


% ' " ^rcos Opponents 

^y .I984. In that election, Iheop- 

Ligagssau, sssasBRan 

■—ssasatte 

Hoerm^aihng pr^j^i^^ cos ip Ste p down bot tmdl now he 

and ^3*^«3®:edtheideaof 

anSStaS^ P “ 5TOof °*ng'?Jdec ! H> M . 

f r *MtS3ES52£ 

-frLril “»it resolution scheduled robe 

““was 

■SSMSiftssa smubsase 

^SSSSr^^ tSc president said last night 



Peace Plan May Hinge on Arab Summit 


By Christopher Dickey 

Woshnpm Post Service 

AMMAN, Jordan — The Arab 
League summit meeting scheduled 
to begin Wednesday in Casablan- 
ca, Morocco, could make or break 



Salvador H. Laurel 


resolution seeking the impeach- 


uuon seeking Li 
meat of tte president-" 

The resolution, sgned by S3 
members of the opposition, charges 
Mr. Marcos with using government 
funds to enrich his family and his 
friends. 

Bui if the ruling party's state- 
ment was intended to pressure the 
opposition 10 not go ahead with the 
impeachment move, it seems to 
have failed. 

"Marcos has now insured the fil- 
ing of the impeachment resolu- 
tion," said Homobono Adaza, an 
opposition assemblyman. “If we 
didn't file it now, people would 
assume we were bought off or in- 
timidated." 

Opposition politicians said that, 
in a fair elation, Mr. Marcos 
would get no more than one-third 
of the votes. 


~ ouu mtr icaocrs 

. party, the New Society 

; After the caucus, the presidential 
■palace issued a statement saying 
that Mr. Marcos and his followers 
7 ®cootoly discussed” a proposal to 
hold elections for preadenz and 
vice president this year. The nest 

Q-M.U iTLTT* 


win resoundingly” 

No final decision was reached on 
the dectian proposal Bui accord- 
ing to the palace statement, the 
ruling party* leaders expressed a 
“Strang sentiment" in favor of elec- 
tions this year. 

The discussion of dissolving the 


■saasssLaigg -^.g— ■» ***% «■■ 

J£2£Ml MWs cymS 

Marc “ fromfflingitehmeaclmiSTOoh^ 

h«beeo m office 19 jrem. 

. .The pM ifl cn t , according to the rating party’s dwridq n oq dissolv- 
go vem ment sta t e me nt, is also cm- ing the assembly would await 
the National “what action the opposition will 
Assembly, which was elected in take on their reported plan to file a 


liberation Organization, accord- 
ing to Jordanian and Palestinian 
officials. 

The plan, based on the accord 
Jordan signed Feb. 11 with Mr. 
Arafat, calls for a jam Jordanian- 
Palestinjan team to negotiate peace 
talks with Israel that would result 
in the Israeli-occupied West Bank 
and Gaza Strip becoming a Pales- 
tinian stale confederated with Jor- 
dan. 

Although Jordan was the first 
country to accept the renewed call 
by King Hasson n of Morocco for 
a summit meeting, the first such 
meeting in three years, Jordanian 
officials have said privately that 


they are uncertain about what they 
will get out of it. 

PLO officials have openly de- 
scribed the meeting as a challenge 
to Syria, which opposes the Hus- 
sein- Arafat plan. The officials say 
they expect violent moves by Syria 
in the next few days in an attempt 
to thwart the meeting. 

{Fourteen of the 21 members of 
the Arab League had confirmed by 
Sunday that they would attend the 
meeting. The Associated Press in 
Rabat quoted the official Moroc- 
can news agency as announcing. 

[Syria, Lebanon and South Ye- 
men have formally rejected tire in- 
vitation, the agency said. Algeria 
and Libya have criticized the meet- 
ing but have not yet announced 
whether they will tike pan. North 
Yemen and Somalia also have not 
announced their position but they 
were generally expected to panki- 
paie.J 

Despite the obstacles to success, 
the Jordanians hope for a broad 
endorsement of the joint peace ini* 


The original idea for a confer- 
ence was promoted this spring by 
the PLO to protest the Syrian- 
backed war on Palestinian refugee 
camps in Lebanon. So whether Syr- 
ia attends or not, it is likely to find 
itself isolated and criticized by 
many of the Arab nations. 

Khalil al-Wazir, deputy com- 
mander of the PLO. said': “This 
conference will strengthen the ma- 
jority's power to make decisions. 
This is what we are stressing with 
most of the Arabs who are fed up." 

Even among nations friendly to 
the idea of the meeting, however, 
ibe joint Jordaman-PLO peace ini- 
tiative faces strong opposition. 

At a press conference in Moroc- 
co last month, Hassan suggested 
that the Palestinian question as a 
whole would be examined in light 
of the peace plan put forth at the 
Iasi Arab summit meeting in Fez, 
Morocco, in 1982. 

“If these initiatives are compati- 
ble with. the Fez plan, the summit 
can only approve them," Hassan 


U.S. Forces Join Maneuvers in Egypt , Jordan 


Untied Pros International 

CAIRO — Egyptian and U.S. 
military forces began a weddong 
joint exercise Sunday, including 
air, sea and land operations, in 
Egypt's western desert and along 
its Mediterranean coast. 

About 9,000 U.S. military per- 
sonnel are taking pan with Egyp- 
tian forces in the maneuvers, code- 
named Bright Star 85, which 


include a Marine landing oq the 
Mediterranean shore west of .Alex- 
andria, a Pentagon spokesman said 
in Washington. At the same time, 
about 520 LLS. troops will lake pan 
in a joint exercise with Jordanian 
forces in Jordan, the spokesman 
said. 

Somalia and O man also will par- 
ticipate with U.S. forces in sepa- 
rate, smaller-stale maneuvers on 


their own soil, military sources said 
in Washington. 

A U.S. source in Cairo said that 
General Robert Kingston, com- 
mander of the Rapid Deployment 
Force, which is contributing the 
participating forces, would be su- 
pervising the exercise. The division, 
now formally known as the Central 
Command, has a force of about 
300,000 from all branches of the 
armed forces. 


said of the Jordanian-Palestinian 
plan. “In the contrary case, the 
summit will invite the Jordanians 
and Palestinians to modify their 
action or abandon iheir initiative." 

The key to the initiative's surviv- 
al thus far has been the ambiguity 
of central passages in the joint Jor- 
daman -PLO accord signed Feb. 1 1, 
especially regarding the creation of 
an wdcpeade&t Pales tinian state. 

The united States and Israel op- 
pose an independent Palestinian 
state of any kind. 

The Fez plan called unequivocal- 
ly for the establishment of an inde- 
pendent Palestinian state with Je- 
rusalem as its capital 

The February accord referred 
more vaguely to a confederated 
Jordanian and P alestinian state 
and thus was able to sidestep some 
of Washington's objections. 

After Hasson’s announcement 
both Palestinian and Jordanian 
spokesmen were quick to say th3t 

they considered the Feb. 1 1 accord 

a bilateral agreement and would 
not submit it for debate or modifi- 
cation. 

Mr. Wazir said Thursday, how- 
ever, that the PLO was ready to 
defend the accord as it is. 

A planned meeting between a 
joint Jordanian-Palestinian delega- 
tion and Richard W. Murphy, LIS. 
assistant secretary of state for Near 
Eastern and South Asian affairs, is 
portrayed here as a vital step in the 
process. 

The meeting has been stalled for 
weeks as the PLO has made it dear 
that the or ganization wonts to go to 
die negotiating table soon. Wash- 
ington has made it clear that this is 
unacceptable. 



Shakib Hmeidan 

ABC Employee 
Seized in Beirut 

The Aaocuuetl Press 

BEIRUT — Gunmen have kid- 
napped the operations manager of 
ABC News in Beirut. 

A spokeswoman for the U.S. 
television network said four men 
with rifles seized Shakib Hmeidan, 
50, on Saturday, while he was on 
his way to Beirut airport in a chauf- 
feur-driven car. She said he was 
going to board a flight to the Unit- 
ed Suites. 

She said the men ordered Mr. 
Hmeidan. who is Lebanese, into 
their car at gunpoint, took the keys 
and warned the driver not to fol- 
low. The spokeswoman said ABC 
had contacted Moslem militia lead- 
ers in West Beirut, trying to locate 
Mr. Hmeidan. a network employee 
for 17 years. 


ABS has been one of the most 
hnportant innovations in car safety 



I 4 IK 


- '* L«; 2i;T v - , f , : j, : --'-f • 






a standard feetare 


BMW models. 

BMW wasn't just the co-developer of the 
ABS anti-lock braking system. 

BMW has also adopted and Implemented 
JJtis latest development towards maximum 
braking safety more comprehensively 
than anyrttheT manufacturer in the world. 
And that’s why you'll discover that ABS 
is a standard on all 6 and 7-Series cars and 
on the topS-Sertes models. . 


. ABS works more precisely, more 
efficiently and more reliably thanahuman 
being ever could. 

And it completely eliminates any risk of 
wheel-lock, whatever the circumstances. 
As aTesult, ABS will prevent a car skidding 
even iti an emergency braking situation 
or on difficult road surfaces. 

With ABS you can also apply full braking 
power while cornering. . 

At the sametime, steering ability is fully 
retained atali times, allowing you to 
take advantage of any gaps which present 
themselves between the obstacles ahead, 
even though you've got your foot flat down 
on the brake pedaL 

And becauseof the unique way it makes 
maximum use of the braking forces 
and the adhesion characteristics of each 
individual wheel, ABS can also help 
to reduce braking distances dramatically. 
But ABS doesn’t just represent an 
increase in driving safety. It simultan- 
eously improves motoring economy. 

The reduced tyie wear can cuttyre costs by 
anything upto 30%, and tyre damage . 
-.caused by locked-wheel braking at high 
speeds is also avoided. 

Safety is part technology andp artijs 


ur^iv:Ji-LjL 


Under numerous circumstances, vehicles 
equipped with ABS can achieve slgnm- 
cantly shorter braking distances. 

Andthls naturally meansthat one of the 
most important prerequisites for avoiding 
rear-end collisions with following care, 

which could resuttfromthisiinprovedbraK- 

ingperformance. Is thatthe rar’s brake 
: fights are always In full wojjps ord ® r ‘ 

t^t’s why ABS on a BMW fe^^an«“ 

[ tamely valuable back-up system. Active 
’ Check Control. 

ft constantly monitors of tf« car s 

and rear lights, and it Immediately 
•tae drlver’s attention to any malfunction. 



/Ayy / / '\V 




— SllLs* — 

r V 11 1 r>H 1 . * I 


I — ,, Ccn'rol urt.'t 


l Hydraulic CCnlr 

* =t>-- 


; ccnlrol lys’en-. 


ABS with BMW. 

ABS is further proof of how BMW compre- 
hensively exploits the astonishing poten- 
tial of electronics in building better cars, 
and how it consistently makes it available 
as quickly as possible to its drivers. 

Don't trail behind technolo g ical pro g ress 
in international top-class motorin g. 

Drive BMW. 

Model and equipment availability in the BMW interna- 
tional range may vary from country to country. 


ABS consists of a revolution sensor Titled to 
each wheal and coupled to an electronic unit which 
then con vertsthe revolution data provided by the 
sensors. 

At the very first hint of a wheel locking, the fluid 
pressure to that particular wheel is redueedand the 
wheel can continue to him, avoidi ng wheel- lock and 
ensuring safe braking with full steering control. 


BMW AG. Munich 










TWIT 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 1985 


Weekly International Bond Prices 

Provided by Credit Suisse First Boston Securities, London. Tel.: 01-623-1277. 

Prices mar vary accordint to market conditions and other factors. 


RECENT ISSUES 


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By BOB HAGERTV 

rownnw Intanaikmil HeraU Tribune 

.J. Amcncan tourists tending^ Pi lfppe Tjg. 
" S^^??i* n ?f Iia . Bcrs m discovering ihSitodoIlar 
can do httk about it TThe fund 

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10JO % 
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Market Turnover 

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ie & 

: -been mc*easing"£eir foreign 
bond investments, and others 

are fairing note. 

: “Thcr?s really been a ma- 

J® acceleration of interest” 
iiaid James Wate rman^ a vice 
president at InterSec Re- 
search Corp^ an investment 
■ research firm based in Stam- 
ford, CormecticuL “It’s been 
a real boom this year, albeit 
from a low base.” 

InterSec estimated a year 
qgo that US. pension funds, 
endowments and founda- 
tions had invested a total of 
$850 million in diversified in- 
ternational portfolios of 
bonds and other fixed-m- 
come securities. By June 

1985, Jiilr._ Wate rman esti- 

mated, the figure was well over S2 billion. 

- That ’ 

trillion 

nese, British, west German, Dutch and Swiss J1W 

does it begin to rival investment in foreign equities. The same 
institutional investors have put about 10 times as mnnh into 
foreign equities as they have into foreign bands, Mr. Waterman 
said. 

. Portfolio managers expect fhnf eqmtiny will nmninn^ to domi- 
nate, the' overseas holdmg * of US. institutions, but the fastest 
growth currently is in bonds. So European f nrid-mflnagwTvm t 
compaiues are malting regular trq>s to New York to show off the i r 
international bond market expertise. 

have found the level of interest to be immeasurably higher,” 
said Alan Brown, a British bond-fimd numugwr recruited last year 
to head American Eiquess Asset Management (UK) Ltd, a 
London unit of American Express Co. Mr. Brown said he 
personally had come across 17 nutjor U.S. institutions preparing 
to appoint managers for international bond poitf olios. 

Peter J. Widmeaya senior vice president at Bank Julius Baer & 
Co. in Zurich, which already manages band portfolios for three 
bigUJJ. institutions, said that he had found “a terrific increase of 
interest” since the dollar tinned downward. 




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IV / HHJE the dollar was dhnbing, U-S. institutions that 
%m/ wished to invest abroad at all concentrated on foreign 
** stock markets. A strong dollar helped foreign companies 
export mote to tho^ United States, and share prices often rose Cast 
enough to outgaceany losses suffered by the US. institutions in 
t ransla tin g their returns into ikiHar ffn^t 
" Now. that the doIlar'&wKi^ believe^ to' be on a loog-tenn 
dedine, a far stronger case can be made for international bonds. 
"Bonds give you a cleaner currency play ” said Mr. Widmex. 

Shares in such companies as hxpenal Chemical Industries 
PLC a favorite of Amencan investors last year, have suffered 
with the fall of the dollar because export prospects are bleaker. 
Bonds. by coatrast, offer potential for what John Rigg of Kkin- 
wort Benson International Investment Ltd. describes as a “dou- 
ble whammy.” 

: For instance, a U.S. investor who bouht gilts, or British 
government securities, last February would now be showing a 
gam of approximately 30 percent from the rise of the 
against the dollar- The strength of the pound, ia turn, hasr 
the British government to nudge down, interest rales, feeding a 
rally in bond prices. So the investor also has a gain in the market 
value of the gilts. 

The potential for such huge profits comes at a time when more 
European b imy * are trying to sell their services as international 
bond fund managers. Two years ago, said the m a n age r of a 
pension plan sponsored by one of the biggest U.S. industrial 
companies, he tobked for such service and iound “there wasn't 
rami to choose from.” Now the list indudes investment-manage- 
ment uzdts at most of the biggest UJS. commercial banks and 
British merchant banks. 

Even so, si gning up U^L cheats is not easy, European bond 
fund^ managers say. Many UJ5. institutions still feel more com- 
(Coiitmuedon Page 9, CoL I) 


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Stock Indexes 

Unhed States 

■ 7 . . bHtwiu PiwMk. an** 

DJ Indus U53J35 US7J* — B30* 

iDJUMI. - 156*5 15742 — 0M% 

DUTfllM.-. 695J8 M&2B +107% 

S&P1D0 18620 1*741 — 1*5% 

S*P5M__ 19148 79240 —048% 

NYSECli— . 1WA5 HUS —045% 


Money Rates 


Ni 

* Sri 

if. I 


lEi: il» b£ 

aX, 


FTSEMB^. UB230 1.23740 +J«* 

FT3B_— 95250 919.10 +848% 

. HoagEisag - 

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124*809 “097% 


United Steles 

jrtW. 

PmJM. 

Discount rate — . — 

716 

7V6 

FMferal funds rute_- 

7% 

7te 

Prime rate ■ ■ — 

9Vj 

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5 


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West Gamny 

4% 



6 

6 


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480 

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530 

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11U 

12 

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11% 

&ntonth Interbank — _ 

ni/14 

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DoSar lour. 

rave 

Bk Enal index— Y3TSB 

Gold 

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London pjnHxJ 32050 

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WttSXSeS&ZSSSSL w — 

■\0*t>K data from Rmfrrs amtAP. 


Fraser 

Studies 

Options 

Debenkams Afoy 

fie Corned E^p 

By Bob Hagcrty 

7mrma niwwj/ Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The long, fero- 
cious battle for control of Deben- 
hams PLC is over, but a carving up 
of Britain’s second-largest depart- 
ment store operator is still in pros- 
pect. 

As reported, Burton Group PLC 
a highly successful re taller of casual 
clothing for the young and affluent, 
announced late Fnday that its 
£5S0-miUion (S7S3-miliion) take- 
over bid had attracted a majority of 
the ordinary shares in Dcbcnhams. 
On Saturday, Burton pul the num- 
ber of the shares it controls at S3 
percent of the total and disclosed 
that it gained that narrow victory at 
the last minute when two major 
Debenhams shareholders offered 
their shares. 

The takeover means a huge ex- 
pansion for Burton. It had pretax 
profit of £S6.4 million last year on 
soles of £413.9 million. That com- 
pares with sales of £723.8 million 
and pretax profit of £40.7 million 
at Debenhams. 

But the outcome leaves House of 
Fraser PLC, Britain's largest de- 
partment store company, with a 
shareholding of just under 25 per- 
cent in Debenhams. Fraser, which 
owns Harrods and about 100 other 
stores, built up that stake in recent 
weeks in an effort to thwart Bur- 
ton's bid. Had the tad failed, Fraser 
and Debenhams planned to coop- 
erate in credit cards, merchandis- 
ing and distribution — a plan that 
many analysts said was tanta- 
mount to a merger. 

Fraser, which itself was acquired 
last Marti for £615 million by the 
Al-Fayed family of Egypt, has not 
made dear its intentions for its 
stake in Debenhams. “House of 
Fraser is considering its position,” 
a spokesman said Sunday. 

Some analysts have suggested 
that Fraser could use the stake as a 
bar gaining chip in negotiations 
with Burton. For instance, Fraser 
might be interested in acquiring 
certain Debenhams stores, such as 
Harvey Nichols, an upscale de- 
partment store near Fraser’s own 
nugply successful Harrods store in 
London's Knightsbridge district. 

Aside from Fraser, there are sev- 
eral other interested parties. Habi- 
tat Mothercare PLC a British re- 
tailer of futxtitore and clothing, 
backed Burton in the bid. Habitat 
also acquired an option to acauire 
20 percent of the shares in Deben- 
hams from Burton. 

Harris Queensway PLC { a fast- 
growing retailer of caipcStng and 
discount furniture, also is involved. 
Hams last year formed a joint ven- 
ture with Debenhams to handle 
that company’s furniture, carpeting 
and consumer dectronics sales. On 
Friday, Harris helped swing the 
outcome of the takeover bid by 
selling its Debenhams shares to 
Burton at the eleventh hour. 


Manufacturing Growth in Massachusetts 


Index of manufacturing employment in Massachusetts, <1 980= 1 00} 
High-tech employment category includes technological employment 
except computers. 


j Computer manufacturing 
! ' : Actual total: 59,200 


■ ' - : v. Hi-tech manufacturing 

* Actual total: 216,300 




100 





80 £ 

-w»%: ’ .*W- 

1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985* 

*AsofMay 

Source: Massachusetts Department ot Employment Security 


AH other manufacturing 
Actual total: 41 1,600 



^111 


Boston Looks Beyond Computers 


By Thomas J. Lucck 

Nr*' York Tuna Service 

BOSTON — In the two de- 
cades since U.S. computer com- 
panies began seeing a market in 
every office, factory and home, 
this city of world-class research 
has blossomed into a center of 
world-doss manufacturing. 

But the computer revolution 
has stalled. And Boston, which 
has emerged as the strongest ur- 
ban economy in the United 
States, is wondering where its 
future growth will come from. 

“The computer industry was 
growing so fast there had to be a 
shakeout,” said Michael S. Du- 
kakis, governor of Massachu- 
setts. Fred Wang, executive vice 
president of Wang Laboratories 
Inc., said: “This industry is in a 
tough transition.” 

The governor is not pessimis- 
tic. Within a 40-mile (64.5-kijo- 
meter) radius is one of the 
world’s largest concentrations of 


small companies at work on ge- 
netic engineering, photovoltaic 
power cdls, fiber optics and oth- 
er embryonic technologies. 

“We don’t have all our eggs in 
one basket.” be said. “There is a 
whole new generation of entre- 
preneurs moving in.” 

In the Boston area, where the 
unemployment rate has been 
hovering at about 3 percent — 
lower than in any other large 
U.S. metropolitan’ area — the 
word “layoff” had been all but 
forgotten until recent months. 
But since May, more than 3,000 
workers have' lost their jobs at 
Wang, Data General Corp. and 
other computer companies here, 
and the downturn is expected to 
continue. 

“My gut tells me there is more 
had news to come,” said Ken- 
neth Donohue, a spokesman for 
Daia General, which laid off 
1 .300 workers in June and halted 


domestic manufacturing for the 
first two weeks in July. 

David Birch, an ’economist 
and physicist at the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology, put 
it this way: “The computer mak- 
ers won’t wither away. They’ll 
oscillate, go up and down, and 
join the real world." 

Indeed, in a metropolitan area 
whose economy is fueled by 
prestigious universities, top sci- 
entific research and young com- 
panies on the leading edge of 
technology, some believe the 
computer industry has grown 
mature, if not mundane. 

“When you strip away the 
glamour of computers, you have 
a capital goods industry that 
isn't all that exciting.” said Har- 
ry J. Healer Jr., vice president of 
Farrell Healer & Gx a large ven- 
ture capital firm in Boston. 

The computer slump is 
blamed on many factors. The 
(Contmued on Page 9, CoL 1) 


IMF Urges Egypt 
To Cut Spending 
As Deficit Swells 


By Judith Miller 

•Vch- York Times Servin' 

CAIRO — The International 
Monetary Fund has warned Egypt 
that its balance of payments posi- 
tion is facing serious deterioration 
and that there is an “urgent need” 
to enact an austerity program. 

A 43-page IMF report, complet- 
ed in June, estimates that Egypt's 
foreign debt is more than 531 bil- 
lion, almost twice the government's 
official estimate. The figure ex- 
cludes Egypt's debt to the Soviet 
Union, which is not an IMF mem- 
ber. 

The report made available to 
The New York Times, projects a 
deficit in the balance of payments 
for this year of SI J billion, com- 
pared with the modest surplus that 
Egypt previously ran. 

Balance of payments refers to 
total foreign trade in goods and 
services, flows of gifts and foreign 
aid, capital loans and official settle- 
ments and reserves. 

Even if a significant austerity 
program is enacted and sustained 
over several years, “projected fi- 
nancing gaps are likely to remain 
very substantial," the report as- 
serts. 

The document, prepared by the 
fund's staff, notes that President 
Hosni Mubarak has taken steps re- 
cently to deal with the situation by 
raising prices, reducing the large 
subsidies provided to various seg- 
ments of the economy, limiting 
public sector employment, and re- 
ducing imports. But (hose steps, the 
report concludes, “have been inad- 
equate." 

Egypt has informally discussed 
with the IMF the possibility of ar- 
ranging a stand-by credit agree- 


Egyptians Lend 
GMS700 Million 

Reuters 

CAIRO — Mist Iran Devel- 
opment Bank of Egypt said 
Sunday that it would arrange a 
5700-million loan to help Gen- 
eral Motors Corp. build a car 
plant in Egypt. 

A spokesman said the bank 
would lead manage the syndi- 
cated loan. 

GM plans to make two 2-liter 
models Tor ibe Egyptian market 
at a plant to be built between 
Cairo and Alexandria, he said. 


mem. Egyptian officials confirmed. 

The IMF would undoubtedly in- 
sist on stringent economic changes 
before granting such assistance. 
Egyptian officials said. They fear 
that rapid price increases ana fall- 
ing subsidies could be politically 
unsettling, perhaps leading to food 
riots s imilar to those that faced 
Anwar Sadat, the late president, in 
1977. 

The IMF report is the latest ex- 
pression of concern about Egypt's 
growing debt burden. During Mr. 
Mubarak's trip in February to the 
United States, and in a visit last 
month by Prime Minister Kamal 
Hassan Ali, Egyptian officials re- 
peatedly asked the Reagan admin- 
istration about the possibility of 
rescheduling or partly forgiving 
Egypt’s debts. The administration 
has been reluctant to agree, fearing 
that would lead to an avalanche of 

(Continued on Page 9. CoL 4) 


E.F. Hutton: Tightening the Organizational Reins 


By James Stemgold 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — After pleading 
guilty to defrauding banks through 
a cbeck-overdrafung scheme, EF. 
Hutton ft Co. is undertaking a 
sweeping overhaul of its organiza- 
tional structure and management 
practices. 

Long an anomaly on Wall Street 
because of its highly decentralized 
operating structure, the 8 1 -year-old 
brokerage and investment banking 
firm is now laying plans to become 
more centrally controlled, shaking 
up nearly all of its departments. 

The looseness of the old struc- 
ture was evident two weeks ago 
when Hutton, which has 17,000 
employees, told an incredulous 
congressional panel that it had nev- 
er prepared an organizational 
chan. The structure was a legacy of 
Hutton’s genesis, as a West Coast 
firm that grew nationally by ac- 
quiring regional broken that con- 
tmued to operate with relative au- 
tonomy. 

The changes, according to senior 
Hutton executives, involve the re- 


alignment of nearly all of Hutton’s 
financial operations. These include 
the establishment of a new internal 
cash management system and the 
appointment, for the first time, of a 
corporate treasurer. 

In addition, the firm’s marketing 
i strategy will be revamped. And it is 
likely to be searching for acquisi- 
tions to bolster weak departments, 
said Robert Rittereiser, president 
of the HF. Hutton Group. 

Mr. Rnteretser, who is directing 
the strategic shifts, joined Hutton 
last June from Merrill Lynch ft Co. 
He said be also aimed to open bet- 
ter lines of co mmuni cation be- 
tween the branches and headquar- 
ters. 

While all of these measures will 
eventually prove expensive, as well 
as occasionally disruptive, Hutton 
already is suffering some heavier 
costs. Paul J. Beehler, a senior vice 
president, said Hutton was heavily 
overcotnpensating its banks, thus 
forgoing interest income, until its 
new cash-management system is 
fully set up. 


The check-overdraf ting scandal 
“has started a whole series of 
changes there,” said Perrin Long, 
an industry analyst at Upper Ana- 
lytical Services. “This also is forc- 
ing management to get off its ped- 
estal and communicate more with 
the troops in the field. But there 
will be pain in the process." 

Mr. Rittereiser said the company 
must also rebuild several key areas, 
primarily its weak corporate fi- 
nance department. In the short 
term the focus will be on asserting 
more central control, he said. 

A product of this was that in- 
stead of having one office collect- 
ing funds from brandies — as other 
major Wall Street brokers have — 
Hutton’s system routed funds cir- 
cuitously from branches to regions 
to two nationwide concentration 
offices. 

This decentralized approach is 
what allowed the illegal overdraft- 
ing of regional bank accounts by 
branch and regional managers to 
lake place without detection by se- 
nior executives ai headquarters, the 
firm said. 


Although the catalyst for the 
changes is dearly the check-over- 
draft scandal, Mr. Rittereiser said 
the firm was two to three years 
overdue for such a revamping of 
organizational structure. 

“Any organization goes through 
stages of growth,” he said. “EF. 
Hutton over the last 10 to 15 years 
has grown exponentially in size and 
complexity. At some point you 
have to adjust for the next genera- 
tion of growth. I think that we’re at 
that point” 

William Renshaw, a cash man- 
agement expert with Arthur Young 
ft Co. who advised Hutton on its 
system after the fraudulent scheme 
was uncovered, said he was struck 
at both the Ievd of decentralization 
and amount of duplication in Hut- 
ton’s cash concentration system, 
He added that the system was also 
highly sophisticated, aggressive 
and precise, when used properly. 

“They were doing daily what 
many other companies did only on 
a monthly or quarterly basis.” he 
commented. 


Caracas Sees 
Interest Rates 
Aiding Revenue 

Reuters 

CARACUS— Finance Min- 
ister Manuel Azpurua said Sun- 
day that lower interest rates 
would compensate for the loss 
of an estimated S215 million in 
oil revenues expected after Ven- 
ezuela cut its heavy crude ofl 
prices. 

Venezuela announced on 
Thursday an average price cut 
of S1.78 a barrel for its heavy, 
extra-heavy and medium 
crudes, of which it exports 
690,000 barrels a day. 

Mr. Azpurua said that Vene- 
zuela had saved S315 million 
from lower interest rates on its 
534-billion foreign debt in the 
first half of the year. He esti- 
mated another 5300 million 
could be saved in the second 
half if interest rates did not rise. 

The ofl price cuts came amid 
pressure from Venezuela’s com- 
petitors. 


U.S. Economy Seen as Weak in July 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK —The U5. econo- 
my remained weak in July, with 
production falling to its lowest lev- 
el since the start oT the present 
recovery in December 1982, a na- 
tionwide survey of purchasing 
managers said Sunday. 

For the sixth consecutive month, 
new orders and inventory levels 
were unchanged and no items were 


reported in short supply, the Na- 
tional Association of Purchasing 
Management said in its monthly 
report based on a survey of 250 
industrial companies. 

“The problems in the economy 
continue. Every key indicator ex- 
cept unemployment confirms an 
underlying weakness,” said Robert 
J. Bietz, chairman of the survey 
committee and director of purchas- 
ing for Pitney Bowes Inc. 

The group's composite index 
rose fractionally to 46JJ percent 
from 46.7 percent in June — its 
sixth consecutive month under 50 
percent, the report said. 

A reading baow 50 percent indi- 
cates the economy is declining; a 


reading above that indicates expan- 
sion. 

In July, as in June, the rate of 
new orders remained essentially 
unchanged, with members report- 
ing better conditions roughly 
equaling those reporting worse 
conditions, the report said. 

Production declined significant- 
ly in July as it did in June, the 
report said. 

“The 26 percent indicating worse 
production is almost twice the 
number reporting better,” or 14 
percent, it said. Tu June members 
said production was not growing; 
in July it definitely declined. The 
26 percent reporting production as 
worse is the most since December 
1982.” 

The report cited rate possible 
mitigating factor: that 68 percent 
of respondents said their plants 
would be dosed for main tenance or 
vacations in July. 

' The speed at which vendors de- 
livered orders in July also painted 
out weakness in the economy, with 
quick shipments indicating that or- 
ders are 


Twelve percent of purchasers re- 
ported faster deliveries and 4 per- 
cent slower, the latter being the 
lowest since October and Novem- 
ber 1982. 

A drop in inventories was report- 
ed by 32 percent of the managers, 
while 55 percent reported the same 
level and 13 percent said inven- 
tories were higher. 

The report said 19 percent of 
managers reported lower prices 
and 10 percent higher. That was the 
dghih straight month that lower 
prices prevailed. 

The employment situation im- 
proved slightly in July, with 14 per- 
cent saying it was higher at their 
companies, 66 percent the same 
and 20 percent lower. 

That compared with 13 percent 
reporting gains in May and June, 
while drops were 
percent in June and 
May. 

But, the report added, “the reali- 
ty is that this is the 10th consecu- 
tive month that more members said 
their employment level was lower 
than ' 


reported by 22 
id 24 percent in 


Imperial Says It May Owe IRS $54 Million 


By Bill Ritter 

LuAnffta Tunes Sendee 

SAN DIEGO — Imperial Corp. 
of America may have improperly 
collected about $40 million in fed- 
eral iiwnme tax refunds in 1981 and 
1982 and could owe the Internal 
Revenue Service about $54 million, 
or about 27 percent of Us stock- 
holders equity, the company has 
disclosed 

The possible overpayment, dis- 
covered during an IRS audit of 
ImperiaTs tax returns, arises from 
■the company's cany-back of losses 
following its acquisition of US- 
UFE Savings ft Loan Association 
in 1981. 

Imperial, holding company for 
Imperial Savings ft Loan, said Fri- 
day that it would “vigorously” pro- 
test the IRS* preliminary position 
that the refunds should be re- 
lumed. 


“At the time, our tax counsel 
said we had a reasonable basis for 
the refunds,” said Bill Haynor, Im- 
perial’s senior vice president of 
strategic planning ana marketing. 

If Imperial is forced to pay back 
the total now owed — $40 minkm 
in refunds and $14 million in inter- 
est — ■ then it could claim tax-loss 
carry-forwards to offset future 
earnings, Mr. Haynor said. 

As the company fights the claim, 
however, interest payments will 
continue to mount. 

Imperial’s total capitalization is 
more than 4 percent of its $8.5 
billion in assets —above regulatory 
net-worth requirements. Bui if the 
company was forced to return the 
554 million to the IRS. then its net- 
worth ratio would fall below the 3- 
percent minimum required by reg- 
ulators, according to Mr. Haynor. 

However, it » “possible that, if 


this thing were dragged out, we 
could earn enough by then” so that 
the company's net worth would not 
fan below the 3-percent minimum, 
he said. 

Imperial also reported Friday 
that warning s for the second quar- 
ter ended June 30 dropped 71.9 
percent to S5 10.000 from $7.6 mil- 
lion last year. The dedine was pri- 
marily ihe result of a S4.1 -million 
after-tax loss from the default of 
$25.1 million in securities that Im- 
perial had pledged as collateral for 
a loan from Bevill, Bresler ft Schul- 
man Asset Management, a govern- 
ment securities dealer that was 
placed in Chapter i 1 of the Federal 
Bankruptcy Act in April 

The chief executive, Matthew J. 
ShevUn. said Imperial will continue 
to improve its interest-rate spread 
by placing a “greater emphasis on 
die sale of fixed-raie leans.” 


We are pleased to announce that effective 
August 5, 1985 the offices of 

Goldman Sachs International Corp. 
Goldman Sachs Limited 
J. Aron & Company (U.K.) Limited 

will be relocated to our 
new building at 

5 Old Bailey, 

London EC4M 7 AH 


The knowing existing telephone and telex numbers wHI apply: 
Telephone telex 


Switchboam (All Companies) 
Equity Sales (Institutions} 


(Retail) 

Fixed income (Sales) 

{Trading) 

Syndicate 
Capital Markets 
International Equities & 
Euroconvertible Trading 
Financial Futures & Options 
GSIC CDs 
GSL Forex 

J. Aron Forex 
J. Aron Bullion 
J. Aron Coffee 


01-248 6464 
01-236 3701 
01-236 1313 
01-236 1201 
01-248 3335 
01-236 9131 
01-236 9251 
01-236 6146 
01-2364001 

01-2369625 
01-3530961 
01-2486592 
01-2362166 
01-248 0349 
01-236 7356 
01-353 6493 
01-3535501 


Mam Number(AU Companies) 887902 GOSAC G 
Fixed Income (Sales) 8956565 GOSAC G 

GSL Forex 892524 GOSAC G 

international Equities & 

Euroconvertibte Trading 887905 GOSAC G 
New telex numbers ate as follows: 


J. Aron Bunion 
J. Aron Coffee 


934431 ARONUK G 
924027 ARONUKG 


Goldman, Sachs & Co. 

New York Boston Chicago Dallas Detroit 
Houston Los Angeles Memphis Miami 
Philadelphia St Louis San Francisco 
London Feng Kong Tokyo Zurich 






6 SSigfiSe SSESS5S55GS66 £ £S 5 &B ?g| 



















































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIPHNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 5. 1985 


Page 


I New Eurobond Issues 

| Compiled by Umrence Desviletles from information supplied by European bond traders. 

Issuer 

Amount 

(millions) 

Mat. 

Coup 

% 

Price 

Price 

end Terms 

week 

FLOATING RATE NOTES 

Den Norsks 
Creditbank 

$150 

1991 

*4 

100 

105.15 Ore* 6*w>rth libd. Norcalobfe. Fie 030%. Deromino- 
Nons 510.000 

Sundsuollsbanken 

$30 

1992 

Vi 

100 

99.60 Ore* 6*ncr*ti titaid. Callable at per m 1988. Fees 0-25%. 

New Zealand 

£100 

1997 

1/16 

100 

99.70 Over Jmontti l*or. CaBobfa at par in 1990. Fee* 0.36%. 

HXBJ-COUPON 

Hanwa 

$50 

1991 

10% 

101% 

— Noncalabfe. 

Kobe Steel 

$50 

1990 

TO* 

100 

99.38 Noneaflabfe. 

Eurafima 

DM 70 

1989 

6 

99% 

— NonecfoWe private placement. 

Bayerische 
Vereinsbank 
Overseas finance 

ECU 60 

1988 

8% 

100% 

99.38 Mancafable. 

Chrysler finance 

ECU 75 

1992 

9 

100% 

97.88 Nonctfabte. 

Morgan Guaranty 
Trust (London) 

ECU 100 

1990 

m 

99% 

97.88 NonadtaWe. 

Security Pacific 
Australia 

ECU 100 

1990 

BY 

100% 

97.38 Nonadlable. 

Imperial Chemical 
Industries 

£75 

1992 

\m 

100% 

97 75 Ccdlabte at 101 in 1990. 

Australian Industry 
Development Corp. 

Au*S50 

1990 

12% 

100% 

98.B8 Nanooflable. 

Commerzbori; 
Overseas Finance 

AusS5Q 

1990 

12% 

100% 

99.00 Noncalabfe. 

Deutsche Bank 
Finance 

AutSdS 

1992 

12% 

100% 

100.25 NanodJabfa. Increased (ram AusSSO traKon. 

Dresdner Finance 

Aus$90 

1990 

12% 

100 

9975 NorcaBobfe. Increased from AusS75 iraffion. 

New South Wales 

Aut350 

1990 

13 

100% 

9775 Noncafiable. 

Fletcher Challenge 
Overseas 

NZS15 

1988 

16% 

100 

— Nooco fable. 

Nederbndse Gasunie NZS60 

1991 

16% 

100% 

— - Noncafabte. 

Rank Xerox Leasing 
lnt‘1 finance 

NZS15 

1988 

16# 

100% 

99.25 Nooeattobte. 

Thyssen Caribbean 
finance 

DF 50 

1990 

714 

100 

— Noncafabte private ptaoemert. 

EQUITY -UNKH) 

Aico Kogyo 

$ 20 

1990 

open 

100 

99.00 Coupon indicated or 7\'*%. Noncdbble. Each S5J300 bond 
with one warrant uerbsable into shares at oi expected 
2W% premium. Terms ro be set Aug. 9. 

Comcast 

$50 

2000 

open 

100 

99-50 Coupon indicuted at 7-TVfc. Redeemed in 1990 to /ieid 
10%. Convertible at an expected 23-28%. Team to be set 
Aug. 8. 

Nippon Suisan Kaisba $ 30 

1995 

open 

100 

— Semonrnnl coupon indicated at 3fa%. Callable at 104 in 
198ft Convertible at an expected 5% premium. 


Bond Markets Attract New Investors 


(Continued from Page 7) 
tollable buying a familiar-looking 
blue-chip equity overseas than risk- 
ing the more esoteric world of 
bonds. 

“Fora Jong time. people thought 
about international investing as be- 
ing fairly complex, and equities 
were the thing if you were going to 
do it," said Mr. Rigg. a director of 
Kleinwort Benson International 
Investment, which is a unit of 
Kleinwort, Benson, Lonsdale PLC, 


the British merchant bank holding 
company. 

Some U.S. institutions that re- 
cently began to buy international 
bonds may pull out of the market 
after profiling from a quick tobog- 
gan run down with the dollar. Al- 
ready. some fear that they have 
missed the best pan of the run. But 
investment managers say the bigger 
and more sophisticated institutions 
will continue to commit funds to 
international bonds in an aitempt 


to diversify their risks and catch the 
best short-term currency and inter- 
est-rate plays around the world. 

There also are long-term argu- 
ments for buying foreign bonds. 
LnierSec's nondollar bond index 
showed total returns in dollar terms 
of 8.9 percent a year in the 10 years 
ended last Dec. 31. That compares 
with 8.4 percent from a Merrill 
Lynch U.S. government bond in- 
dex during the same period. 


Bond Prices 
Stage Decline 
After Report 
On Jobless 

By Gary Klott 

Vfit York Times Sen-ice 

NEW YORK — Bond prices 
have eased after prospects tor low- 
er interest races were dimmed by 
the U.S. government's report of 
larger- than -expected employment 
growth in July. 

The market was also weighed 
down Friday by concern over the 
heavy supply of new government 

U.S. CREDIT MARKETS 

issues that will be pouring into the 
market this week. The Treasury 
holds die fust of its quarterly re- 
funding auctions on Tuesday. 

Prices on long-term government 
bonds fell by 1% points. Short-term 
interest rates drifted slightly high- 
er. 

“Investors were hoping for more 
decisive news confirming an eco- 
nomic slowdown, and the unem- 
ployment news was not viewed as 
being weak enough," said Edward 
Yardehi, director of economics and 
fixed-income research at Pruden- 
tial-Bache Securities Inc. “Then 
right ahead here, the markets have 
to go through a record refunding. 
Hanging overhead is the concern 
whether foreign investors will come 
in and buy the securities." 

He added that market partici- 
pants were also disappointed with 
the budget compromise adopted by 
Congress on Thursday, feeling that 
it contained “a lot of show but very 
little substance in deficit reduc- 
tion." 

Bond prices moved lower after 
the government’s release of its 
monthly unemployment report. 
Traders, who have been hoping for 
signs of a weakening economy chat 
would pave the way for lower inter- 
est rates, were discouraged by fig- 
ures showing that nonfarm payroll 
employment grew by 243,000 in 
July, and that manufacturing em- 
ployment had stabilized for the 
First lime this year. 

Rates on six-month Treasury 
bills edged up to 7.51 percent, from 
7.45 percent. 


UPI Agrees to Withdraw Request 
To Cancel Its Contract With Union 


Boston Ponders Economic Life After the Computer 


(Continued from Page 7) 

strong dollar is reducing computer 
sales to other countries. Large 
manufacturing companies, some of 
the largest buyers of computer 
products, have reduced capital 
spending. And many potential cus- 
tomers are confused by the large 
variety of computers on the mar- 
ket. 

"Nobody knows whether the 
problem is endemic, or whether 
some macroeconomic force is at 
work." said Jim P. ManzL presi- 
dent of Lotus Development Corp., 
the largest U.S. manufacturer of 
software tor personal computers, 
which is based in Boston. Although 
Lotus has not laid off any workers, 
Mr. Maori said the company's hir- 
ing had been sharply reduced 

In addition to the layoffs at Data 
General. Wang has reduced its pay- 
roll by U300 workers. Taradyne, 
Honeywell Inc.. Computervision 
Corp", GCA Corp. ana National 
Semiconductor Corp. — all makers 
of computer equipment that are 
based here or have plants near Bos- 
ton — have also announced layoffs 
this year. 

Executives say they do not know 
how long the downturn will last. 

“Maybe the economy will pick 
up and everybody will come back 
Leaner than they were before," Mr. 
Wang said. “Maybe the slump will 
be extended." 

Companies making computing 
and electronic office equipment 
* more than doubled their employ- 
ment in the Boston area over the 
last decade, to 58.900 in 1984, from. 
22.900 in 1975. 

The emergence of the Boston 
area as a computer manufacturing 
center has its roots in the 1950s, 
when companies such as Wang and 
Digital Equipment Corp„ now the 
area's largest computer company, 
were formed in the suburbs north 
and west of Boston. During the 
1970s, greater Boston became 
i, home to more than than 900 high- 
tecbnology companies, most of 
them related to the computer in- 
dustry. 

Turkey Considers 
Sale of Airline 

Realm 

ANKARA — Lazard Frtres & 
Co., the New York investment 
banking concern, proposed on the 
weekend the sale of the govern- 
ment-owned Turkish Airlines to a 
private foreign airline and the 
Turkish public. 

■ In a study prepared for the Turk- 

. ish government- the company sug- 
gested a private minority share- 
holding of possibly 40 percent. 

Any foreign airune involved will 
also have a management role, the 
study said. It added that such an 
operation, if started this \ ear. could 
be completed in 1986. 


Economists say a turning point 
was the decision by the major com- 
puter companies to expand their 
manufacturing, as well as their re- 
search, in the Boston area. 

“High-tech companies are 
knowledge intensive, and tor that 
reason it makes great sense to be 
here," said James HowelL chid' 
economist of the Bank of Boston. 
"But when they went from research 
to manufacturing, there was no as- 
surance they would build the plants 
around Boston." 

Mr. Howell ascribed the growth 
of computer manufacturing here to 
an abundance of low-cost industri- 
al real estate, much of it left vacant 
by textile companies and other old- 
line manufacturers. 

But now, with the computer in- 
dustry downturn, executives said 
the companies are under extreme 
pressure to cut their costs and re- 
duce their payrolls. 

In addition, Mr. Wang said, a 
growing number of pre-buiit parts 
manufactured abroad and refined 
automation techniques were mak- 
ing manufacturing jobs obsolete. 

Mr. Howell estimated that man- 
ufacturing employment in the Bos- 
ton-area computer industry would 
be reduced between 10 percent and 
20 percent over the next five years. 

But Boston is not likely to miss 
those particular jobs because other 
segments of its industrial and ser- 
vice base are thriving. Some em- 
ployers. in fact, maintain that the 
layoffs in the computer industry 


are actually relieving a severe 
shortage of qualified workers. 

The troubled General Dynamics 
Corp., which has announced that it 
would close its Quincy Shipyard 
near Boston next year, said it had 
received listings for 6.600 job open- 
ings at area companies, in part be- 
cause nearby military contractors 
are thriving. Raytheon Corp., for 
instance, a maker of radar systems 
and other military goods, has in- 
creased its employment in and 
around Boston by 4,500 since 1981, 
io29,800. 

Boston's financial services in- 
dustry is also growing fast. Em- 
ployment in securities firms and 
financial consulting companies in 
the city and its suburbs has in- 
creased by 4,700 in five years, to 
12,911, according to state figures. 

But the stalling of the computer 
industry does not mean that Bos- 
ton will be totally relying on its 
traditional companies. Hundreds 
of start-up companies are shifting 
the focus of the Boston area's 
growth to new technologies that 
have not yet evolved into large- 
scale manufacturing. 

Among these small companies, 
according to an analysis by Gover- 
nor Dukakis's staff, are more than 
40 biotechnology concerns using 
advanced genetic engineering tech- 
niques to create new pharmaceuti- 
cals. agricultural products and 
chemicals. 

Boston has 25 photovoltaic com- 
panies at work on solar power cells 


that generate electricity. There are 
more than a dozen companies de- 
veloping advanced fiber optics 
products for computers and tele- 
communications. and more than 15 
small concerns at work at the appli 
cation of "artificial intelligence;’ 
the science of giving computers the 
same reasoning skills as the human 
brain. 

“We can’t hope to grow fast 
enough to compensate tor the lay- 
offs in computers." said Roger Lit- 
tle, founder of Spire Inc., a maker 
of manufacturing equipment of 
photovoltaic cells. “Photovoltaics 
will create thousands of jobs in the 
Boston area," he added, “but that 
is years down the road. 

Other industry experts question 
whether the biotechnology compa- 
nies will ever develop 
manufacturing in Boston. 

One reason for the uncertainty, 
according to Mr. Howell at Bank of 
Boston, was the huge cost of bring- 
ing new pharmaceuticals through 
years of clinical testing. Because 
most of the Boston biotechnology 
companies are small, he said, they 
could be acquired by the major 
U.S. drug companies “particular- 
ly those in New Jersey, And be- 
cause regulatory review of new 
drugs often takes less time outside 
the United States, Mr. Howell add- 
ed, the companies now doing re- 
search in Boston may elect to move 
their manufacturing to Europe or 
the Far East. 


Genstar to Bid $390 Million 
For More of Canada Trustco 


United Press International 

TORONTO — Genstar Corp., a 
Canadian-based company with 
substantial holdings in the United 
States, has announced that it would 
offer about $390 million for control 
of Canada Trustco Mortgage Co. 

Genstar. based in Vancouver, 
said Friday that an offer of about 
S32.56 a snare would be made for 
12 million shares through its sub- 
sidiary. Genstar Acquisition Corp. 
There are about 22 million out- 
standing common shares, company 
officials said. 

Genstar. which now owns about 
9.8 percent of the outstanding com- 
mon shares of Canada Trustco, 
would boost its holdings in the 
company to 50.1 percent if the 
share offer is successful. 

The offer will be made to Cana- 
dian shareholders only, said Gen- 
star’s corporate affairs manager. 
John Mclntyre. 

“The expectation is very posi- 
tive." he said. “It’s a reasonable 
offer, an attractive offer to the 
shareholders." 

About half of Genstar's assets 
are held in the L'niled States, where 


the company operates from a San 
Francisco base. 

Genstar owns what used to be 
Flimkoie and recently acquired the 
assets of SCA Services, an Ameri- 
can waste-disposal company. Gen- 
star also has real estate holdings in 
the United Slates. 

There have been rumors of a 
takeover bid for Canada Trustco, 
but analysts bad suggested that 
Genstar did not have enough finan- 
cial backing to do it. Genstar said, 
however, that it had fully commit- 
ted bank loans to finance the offer. 

Genstar said it planned to pro- 
pose amalgamating Canada 
Trustco, of London. Ontario, with 
another subsidiary acquired in 
1981, Canada Permanent Mort- 
gage Co. of Toronto. 

The company said it has, 
through C ana d a Permanent, estab- 
lished a strong presence in the fi- 
nancial services industry. 

“We believe that future interac- 
tion between Canada Permanent 
and Canada Trustco could create 
an outstanding financial institution 
with world-class capabilities." 
Genstar'* prcMdem. R*>>s Turner. 

sold in j -la lenient 


IMF Warns 
Egypt on Debt 

(Continued from Page 7) 

similar requests from other debtor 
nations. 

However, after Mr. Mubarak's 
visit, the administration did agree 
to add S500 million in emergency 
aid to the more than S2J billion in 
military and economic aid the 
United States will provide to Egypt 
this year. 

Bankers in Cairo expressed con- 
cern last week that Egypt's finan- 
cial situation seemed to be entering 
a dangerous phase because of 
mounting deficits od visible trade 
and on current account which in- 
cludes trade in goods and non-mer- 
chandise items: an over-reliance on 
foreign aid. and a failure to cany 
out basic structural reforms. 

This view- is reflected in the IMF 
report, which projects that exports 
will be “virtually stagnant,^ in 
large pan because of the drop in 
die price of oil. one of Egypt’s most 
important sources of foreign cur- 
rency. 

The IMF document implicitly 
blame* Mr Mubarak's original 
economic adu-ers. many v»f whorr 
have peer: repi.xcd 


U.S. Consumer Rates 

For Weak Ended Aug. 2 

Passbook Savings 

-550 % 

Tax Exempt Bonds 

Bond Buver 20-Bond index 

. 9j01 % 

Money Market Funds 
Donoahue's 7-Day Average 

. 7.25 % 

Bank Money Market Accounts 
Bank Rate Monitor Index 

- 6.90 % 

Home Mortoaae 
FHLB average 

-1186 % 


' m 


By Nell Henderson 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — United 
Press International has readied an 
agreement with its employees' 
union that reduces the dunces of a 
strike while the news service reor- 
ganizes under Chapter 11 of the 
U.S. Bankruptcy Code. 

UPI agreed Friday to withdraw 
its petition to federal bankruptcy 
court asking for permission to void 
the union contract, a federal medi- 
ator said at a bearing before Judge 
George F. Bason Jr. 

The Wire Service Guild, repre- 
senting about 750 UPI employees 
in the United States, agreed to bait 
the strike vote it began Thursday, 
said the mediator, Ed McMahon of 
the Federal Mediation and Condli- 
ation Service. 

Judge Bason appointed Mr. Me- 


Intergroup 
Agrees to 
Buy Permian 

Las Angeles Tunes Service 

LOS ANGELES — National In- 
tergroup Inc says it has agreed to 
buy Permian Corp., a crude oil 
transportation company based in 
Houston, for S172 million. 

The announcement was made 
Friday, less than 24 hours after 
Ford Motor Co. said it would pur- 
chase a National Intergroup sub- 
sidiary, First Nationwide Financial 
Corp., for $493 mffiion. National 
Lntergroup is a bolding company 
based in Pittsburgh. 

The majority owner of Permian 
is Wesray Capital Corp.. whose 
chairman and principal sharehold- 
er is William E Simon, former sec- 
retary of the Treasury. A minority 
share in Permian is held by the 
company’s employees. 

National lntergroup is to pay 
Wesray and Penman’s other share- 
holders in roughly equivalent 
amounts of cash and stock. It will 
finance the purchase by issuing 3 
million new shares of stock and pay 
tor the rest in cash. 

Mr. Simon and the co-owner of 
Wesray, Raymond Chambers, will 
join National Intergroup's board 
and own about 9 percent of its 
stock when the transaction is com- 
plete. 

National Intergroup's stock rose 
S1.25 a share on the New York 
Stock Exchange on Thursday to 
$29.87 V; in apparent anticipation 
of the sale of Fust Nationwide, but 
fell 62*4 cents Friday after the 
agreement to buy Permian was an- 
nounced. 


Mahon to conduct further media- 
tions between the two sides, which 
the judge thanked for withdrawing 
"from the precipice of a potentially 
disastrous conflict to work together 
for the benefit of alL” 

Mr. McMahon announced the 
agreement after several hours of 
negotiations between both parties, 
winch disagree over the need for 
further labor concessions to save 
UPI. The company and the union 
plan to begin formal meetings Aug. 
14, Mr. McMahon said, adding 
that no deadline hod been set for 
resolving the dispute. The current 
contract expires m April 1986 and 
will remain in force during negotia- 
tions, he said. 

UPI management argues that it 
must cut labor costs to continue 
Taking an operating profit and to 
attract buyers. The company asked 


the court to reject the contract after 
the union refused to accept pro- 
posed concessions, including de- 
lays in restoring previous wage cuts 
and reductions in pension-fund 
contributions and severance enti- 
tlements. 

The company said the conces- 
sions would save $1.5 million, as- 
suring a 1985 profit of $2 million to 
$3.3 milli on. Without the conces- 
sions, the company may end the 
year with a loss. UPI management 
said. 

The union complained that 
breaking the contract would scare 
away potential buyers and vowed 
to “vigorously” challenge the com- 
pany m court. The union executive 
committee had asked its members 
to authorize a strike in the event 
that Judge Bason terminated the 
union contract. 


Doyle Done 

Buys Agency 

Liu Angeles- Timet Semite 

LOS ANGELES — Doyle 
Dane Bern bach Group, a New 
York-based advertising agency, 
has announced the acquisition 
of York-AJpern Inc. of Los .An- 
geles. The terms of the purchase 
were pot disclosed- 

York-Alpern specializes in 
campaigns for health-care con- 
cerns, aimed particularly at 
women. Doyle Dane Bernbach. 
with 1984 revenue of $213.2 
million and net income of $8-7 
million, spent much of 1984 re- 
viewing its operations after two 
big clients. Atari and Polaroid, 
withdrew their accounts. 

That review, in pan, involved 
a focus on bolstering Dovle 
Dane's health-advertising spe- 
cialty business. 


Pierson, Heldring & Pierson 
(UK.) Limited 

s» 

announce the formation of 

Pierson, Heldring & Pierson 
Securities (U.K.) Limited 

International Capital Markets. 


Level 15, City Tower 

40 Basinghall Street, London, EC 2V 5DE 
telephone 01-6285 091 telex 8 8 5 1 19 


XSribun* 



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Take advantage of our special rates for new subscribers and 
we’ll give you an extra month of Tribs free with a one-year 
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IVASD^Q National Market 

Conxiltdafetf trading for week ended Friday. 


Sotwhi Not 

IMS HMl Low CfOH OlW 


AtMFd 
ADCTI 
AEC 
AELS 
AFC 
ASK 
AST 
AT&E 
ATE 
AamRt 
Afinam 
Aeadin 
AcapRs 
AceJrtn 
ACUROV 
Ace ta s 
ACAAAT 
AcJvsn 
Actmdi 
Adac Lb 
Mgge 
AdfcnW 
Adla 

Ad*C Ir 
Adept 
AdvEr, a 
AduGen 
Adv3am 
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Asquint 
AarSysl 
AflBcp 1 X 
AHBsh AO 
AoevHf t 

AlrCoro 
AirMd ,10 b 
AICW be 
AHJ.BC 

AtsfcMt ASa 
Abk.NI t 


82 IS 


3* 


JO 2.1 
JIN A 


374 7% 6% 6*8 + % 
84318% 17*4 » 

4 9% ?% TV, — ft 
19425% 25 25 + Vi 

1162 20ft 20 20%— V, 

212513ft 12V, 13 — V* 
576818% 15% 18% +1% 
1296 9% 9 9 - % 

202 4% 3ft 4 + ft 

35520% 20 V. 20% + % 
U 6 6U 5ft 6U + TO 
11 T7M 6% 6 «6 — % 

152 4% 4ft m 

7S8 Oft 9ft 9%— Vi 

,9 250327% 26% »%- % 

9017 15% 16U — lfe 

11210 ft 10 10 — ft 

Z749 ft % ft 

66023% 21ft 7144— ft 
35*2 2ft Zft 2ft + ft 

1547 7% 6ft 7 

31 STO 32% X + ft 

35925% 24% 2544 — ft 
106211ft lift 11% + ft 

944 3ft 3ft 3% + ft 

113211ft Hft lift + ft 
218 6ft 5% 5ft — ft 
619 4ft 4ft Aft + ft 
559 2ft 2ft 2%- ft 
56 5749 17ft 18 + ft 

47 1624 17 16% 17 + ft 

19335 33*4 34ft— ft 

60S 6*4 6 6ft + ft 

J 197213ft 11% 13ft +1 ft 
299218% 16% 18ft +1% 
59 5ft J 5 —ft 
16 7961544 14% 15% + ft 

7615 14% - — 


Solos In Not 

toes wo* low ciaw aw 


32 

40 

ill 


AfOXB I A0 4X 121835% 35 35% — ft , 

Altai 1632 19% lift 19% +1% 

AiDOIrx 1630 5% 4% 5 

A/JqdIr JOa J 159 59 59 +7 

AleiiWl -Mb 5 944721% 20% 20ft— ft 

AllegBv A0 2.1 33119% 19 1944— ft 

AlOOOri M 3 2335 33ft 33ft— 1 

AlldBn 44 35 2164622ft 21*4 21ft— % 

AlMCap IjOOo 46 3921% 21ft 21*4 + ft 


AHd Rah 
AJIfMt 
AllYGar 
AlPMiC 
AiPflGe 
Altmcr 
Affo* 

Aftron 

Almost 50 24 
Amrfrd JO* 14 

AWAIrt 
AmAdv l 


ABACI S un 
ABnkr 40 
AmCorr 
A Coon 
Am Bail 

AFdSL 40 
ARItm 140 
AmFrst 1 

AFtotes 

a Purr, -ZB 

AG met so 
AmlnU 40 
AlndF 1.12 
AlntapB 
AlnvLt 30b 44 
ALond I 

AmUst 

Am Lock 470 3 


100 7% 6ft 7% + % 
2385 4ft 3% 4TO +*4j 
11911% 10ft lift + ft 
138 6% 6 6% + ft 

215 4*4 4 4 — ft 

760 7ft 6*4 7 — ft 

2556 72% lift ISO— ft i 
19111ft 10% 10ft— ft 
517 1t% 16 16 — ft 

2 4 4 4 

572611ft 10ft 17*4 + ft 
124312% lift lift— % 
230 Oft 7% 7%— ft 

3023V. 23 23ft— ft 

28613% 13ft 13ft— ft 


Berkley 

Darklnt 

Berk Cl 
Berk Ha 
BesICp 
BettLJQ 
Bibbs 
BIO B 
Big Bear 
Billings 
BMIyt 
BloRts 
BTagon 
Blemet 
Btosrc 
BtotcR 
Blrdinc 
Blntvw 
Bkicnr 
BJsbGr 

Bldclnd 
Blaalus 
BliSsAT 
Bftdoun 
Beat Bn 
BebEvn 
BottTc 
BaotaB 
Boon El 
Booth in 
BaattiFn 
BostBc 
BrinDto 
BstnFC 
Brad RE 
BratfvW 
BrasCP 
BmehC 1-20 
Brenco .12 
BrdaFd .126 
BrttLee 
BrwnRb 

BrwTom 1 

Bruno* .14 

Bufflon 

BuildTr 

Brnhm 40 

BumpS 

BurrBr 

Bwrtl I 

BMAl 144 
Busin Id 
BuftrJ -12s 
ButtrMt 141 


140 

40 

.16 


40B 14 
600 44 
30 4 


I J 494719ft 17ft 19% +7% 
45 47912 10ft 10ft— 1 
94 122 22 22 —3ft 

1325 04S 117 +42 

1564 ft ft ft 
37 325935k. 34% 35% + ft 
25 29334ft 24 24ft— ft 

49016 14ft 16 +1% 

22517% 17ft 17ft— ft 
345 3% 2% 31« + ft 
99612 lift lift— ft 

2128 fft Sft 8ft- % 

730318ft 8% 10 +lft 

1089 19 18% 18% — % 
649 2ft Ita l%— ft 

330 B 7ft 7ft — ft 
359 9% Oft 9ft ' 
5147 5ft 4% 5ft + 1b 
129 3% . 3% 3% + ft 
200 5 4ft 4% 

24 158 10ft Oft 10ft + % 
72 4% 4ft 4ft 

593 ft ft » + 

615 14% 15 + % 

43 35835ft 32% 34ft— ft 
14 236022ft 21ft 22% + ft 

25 161 7ft 7 7 

517 6ft 5ft Sft + TO- 
H4 73 4 5ft 5ft— ft 
257 4% 4ft 4ft— ft 
17 101 18ft 18 18 

14 90825% 74ft 24% — ft 
74 6ft 5% 6 + ft 

51221 20 20% — ft 

1213ft 13V. lift — ft 
24033% 33 33ft— ft 

66712ft 11% 12 — ft 
141 37% 36ft 37ft + ft 
321 4ft 4ft 4ft 
12 4 4 4 

458712ft 11 11*6— ft 

ioSTC ’1ft '%+X, 

2248 15% 14ft 15 — % 
2489 In 1 1ft 
114531ft 30V. 38% — ft 
35520 19% 20 

747 Bft 8% 8% + ft 

22018ft 17ft 17ft— ft 
12618 17 II + % 

56828% 25ft 20 +2% 

4481 0% 6 8 — ft 

1249 19% 18% 19ft + ft 
9327ft 26% 27ft + % 


40 44 


Air 

33 


X 3 


.12 


14 


37 


cmwTi 
ComAnj 
Comind 
CornSvs 
Com Stir 

envois 
GppUs 
C omma 
CmPoT 
QnpCrs 
CinarsL 
CmpSav 
Campus 
CCTC 
CmpAs 
CoiAut 
CmaOt 
CPtEnt 
CmrtH 
Cmeldn 
CmAH 
OitnlM 
CmpNet 
OwW! 

CmpRs 
CmTsfc* 

Cmputn 
Cotcfl 
Cmatrc 

Comshr 
Camstk 
Comte h 
ConcOv 
Conatff 
ConWrs 
ConrtWl 
CnCan 
CnCanl 
CCopR 
CCapS 
CotiFBr 
CnPaps 148 27 
ConaPd 48 2.1 
CnTom 40* 14 
Coral IB 1-52 47 
Consul 

ConsFn 45o 1.1 
CanWIs 140 5.1 
CfltlBCP 2409 54 
CIIFSL 
ClIGtn 

cnHit* 

ciihiic 

contsn 

ConttnB 48 4 

Ci Lear 

ConvFd 37a 12 
Canvgl 
Comma 


Satesta NbI 

1001 High Low doe ChW 

>40 £8 


3578% 37V* 37V. i— TO 
217 1ft 1% 1ft + ft 
14 414028 27ft 27ft— ft 
424 9ft 8% 8% 

45313 12% 13 + ft 

16020ft 19 19% — % 

128 8 7% 7%— % 

3319111ft 10ft lift + ft 
79 9% 8% 9 — ft 
141804922% 19% 2D —2ft 
957 5ft 5 5% 

202518 » Bft— M 

498 3 2% 3 

1139 9ft 9ft 9ft— ft 
220229ft 27% 29 
337 6ft 5ft 5ft— ft. 
24210% 9% 10% + ft 
IKS 8% 7M 8ft + ft 
40510ft 10ft 10% — ft 
1214 9% Bft fft + % 
14 3817 8 7 8 + % 

8574 6ft 5ft 6 - ft 
128 7ft 7ft 7ft 
1422 8ft 8ft Bft 
57 3% 3ft 3ft- ft 
493619% 18 18% + % 

463 6ft 6ft 6ft 
163 3 2ft 2ft— % 
4111ft 9% 10 —% 
630 9% 6ft 8ft— ft 
88212 9% 10% — 1% 

474 1% 1% 1ft- ft 
104112ft lift 12ft + ft 
418 69* 4 4H— ft 

34229% 28% 29ft 

17918% 17ft 17% 

3LOOQU.1 144925 34ft 26% + ft 
140a &3 484 19ft 18ft 19% +1 
146a *7 65417ft 17 17%—% 

340 125 112334 23% 34 +% 

32 7ft 
41654% 

147 3% 

137 
74 33 
2371 4ft 
13 4% 

5538 


Sotasln Nat 

lOBs Him Low Cla** OW 

EnFacf 145214ft >3% Mft + jfr 

ErtfiRJV 133 % ft ft— 

Enochs 30 \3 2715% 13 15 — % 

EntPub 4316 15% IS%— ft 

EfltrCPI 2SD11 10 10 —1 

Envrdn 868 5% 4ft 5 

GnvSyi 34623 21% 22% — ft 

ErtvrTs 4911 10ft 10ft 

ErrvrnP 334 3ft 3% 3%— % 

EDvTStS 41819ft 11% 19ft + % 

EnzoSI 97213% 13 13 —ft 

Ecribi 8511% WTO 10ft— ft 

Earn 250 fft Bft 9ft+ ft 

Equal 1131114ft 12% 12ft— 2 ' 

EavlM - 735 7 5ft 6% + % 

Eqtto Bft 24 74129ft 27% 29% +1 "J 
EalwaB 148 54 13423% 22% 23% +1 
EqtOfl 30 24 24* 7ft 7ft 7% + ft 

ErOLm 2223% 22k, 22% + * 

ErlcTI Ate 20 2121 30ft 29*6 30 + % 

ErieLOC 3103 101 103 +2 

Essex 21 4% 3*6 4ft + ft 

EvnSat 171716* 15 Hft +lft 

Evrpd 795 5 4ft 4ft + ft 

Excnint 63514% 13% 14% + ft 

Exovtr 1W0 9% 7% 9% +1% 

Expdln 68111ft UH6 11% + % 


ICC 

115 
ILC 
IMS 5 
I PL Sv 
ISC 

rvB Fn 
lot 

idbwid 


IX 34 
148 83 


7 7% + ft 

54 54ft + ft 
3ft 3ft— ft 
37 37 

32V 32% 

3 TV— % 
4% 4% — % 
27% 27% — ft- 


FM Not Jt 13 

FOP 

FMI 

FfltrtWlB 

FfllrLn .16 XI 

Fair Fin 

FamHIs 

FomResl 

FaradL 

FrmHm 

FarmF 

FrmHo t 

Form Ur j » IB 


2626% 
1140 9 


CaprBlo 
CoprLsr 
CooraB 
Copytet 
Cor com 
Cerdte 
Core St 
Corvus 


443 ft 
14616% 
629 a 6 
12? 8ft 

31804 9*6 
110574 


15B88 2 
2991 4% 


CCBb 

C COR 

CPRM) 

CBT8S 

CCNB 

CCXNt 

CML 

CPI 

CRT 

CSP 

CVBFn 

COM TV 


IX 

10 

1234 

XM 



306 8% 

8U 



487B 5U 

4*8 

M 

14 

ma 

29% 

IX 

XO 

1533 

31 



32119 

W . 



54811 

10ft 


8% + % 
5ft 

29% —1 
33 +1 . 

18ft + ft 


SEP 

CbrvSc 

Cadmus 

Calibre 

CalAmp 

CaJFBJt 

CaUky 

CalMIc 

COIStvfl 


. « 

AMS 
AMdSv 
AMMI 

ANIHId 1.16 
ANtln* 1J8 
APlrvG 
AmPkxi 
AQuash 


.16 3 


10 


- . . 9 — ft 

29328 26ft 27 — *6 
79 4% 4ft 4% — ft 
21916% 15ft 15ft— % 

61 35 36 34 — % 

115 8% 7ft ■ —ft 
JO 27 233629% 2Sft 29ft +lft 
24 18412ft 11% lift— ft 

17 678134ft 34% 34ft— ft 

XI 1714 12 12*6 13 — ft 

5J 131*116 20% 21 

3511 1R6 16ft 18ft + ft 
25xSft 5 5 

10 4ft 4ft 4ft— ft 
4910% 10% 10% — M 
16 19ft 9*6 10 — % 

716 7 6% 6*6 + % 

650 21 21% 23 +1% 

5681816 17% 17ft— % 

2365 ft ft ft 
156*8 25 27 +2% 

80236% 35ft 36ft + % 

345 3ft 3% 3ft— % 

iAI % \- + t 

30831% St ant -HW 

65614% 13% 14 — % 

1647 2% 2 216 + % 

ASllTB 2738 % ft ft 

AWttCp I 910 Oft B 8*6 + *6 
Amrttri 180 4* 130638ft 37 38 — *6 

Amrwst 10771 25ft 22% 25H +316 

Amoan 915 7ft 7 7ft + 16 

Am fader 750 7 6*6 6ft— 16 

AmSkB 1*0 16 27128% 27% 27ft + ft 
Ammlc 1 JOa 3* 1 40 40 40 +3% 

Am pod a AD 21 38319 1716 19 +1% 

Anodlfa .10 17 136 6 5ft 6 
243314ft 14% 14ft 
81310ft 10% 1016 + ft 
1114 14% 13ft 14 —ft 
0012ft 12% 12% + % 

3057 rJL ft 

6% 6ft + % 

12% 13ft +1% 

ft ft 

1* 417)10% 1016 10% + % 

4467022ft MM 19% —3 
1771016% 15% 15% — ft 
137826ft 24ft 2S —1% , - 

M T **=* H 

212225% 23% 2516 +1 QiOPral 

iSSS 22 

*0b 2.6 93021 30% 31 + % ChrlFdl 

- 1251 49% 50%— % Qiorvax 

7ft 8M + ft 
lift 12% +1% 

31% *1%— 1 

56028% 27ft 27ft 
9127ft 27% 27% 

134 8% 7ft 8% + % 

257614% 13% 14% — ft 


AnJosic 

Anatvl 


AndrGr 

Andavr 

Andrew 

AnlmSlB 


Apooob 

ApoloC 

AppJoC 

AKBIas 

ApktCtn 


.14 


291819 ■ 
213 7% 
735114% 
2333 *6 


325020*6 19% 20% + % 
1853 6% 6 6% 

43111% 10ft 11% + % 
I 713 12% 12% — % 

63 3% mi 3% + ft 
692 2ft 2ft 2*6— ft 
335 4ft 4% 4ft— ft 
*51 U 364320% 19ft 19ft— ft 
*<l> 17 11521% 20% 2116 + % 
62 2ft 2 2 V< 

151 3 2% 2ft + % 

1*8 57 1819 18ft If +16 

75b 28 3336 34 34%— 1 

137910% 9*6 10 — % 

695 4% 4ft 4ft + ft 

Cotwtrs 240 57 13447% 46 46 —1 

Cation P 289 3 2ft 2ft— ft 

Calnv .16 1.1 341365% 14% 14% — % 

Co turn! ,14e M 2282 10ft 9% 10% + ft 

Cardan 4*0c 19 5*6 5ft 5ft 

ConanG 637521ft 19*6 21 +1 

Canon) .10r J 169920 18ft 19ft +tft 

Conrad 277 8 6ft 8 +1% 

COPfiwt .I6B 7 718% 18% 18% 

COPFSL 30 17 175112ft 10% 11%— ft 

CapTm 7SB 44 21 5ft SU 5ft— U 

COPCrb 1734 1*6 1% 1% + K 

CardDls *8r A 19310% 17*6 18 
Cardb >11 7W 7 7ft— ft 

CareerC *U 1* 3176 5 4ft 4ft + ft 

Caramk 273512ft lift 12 — *6 

Cartetoo 31110 9% 9%— % 

Corel In 9M 2ft 2ft 2%— ft 

Carter! I 175813% 11% 13V6 +1*6 
Cascade 140a 27 2 

834720ft 17ft 1916— ft 
134 ID »% 10 + % 

S48d4 33% 34 + ft 

173619% 18% 19 +1 

47953 49 51*6— 1ft 

20436% 34 34% — 1*6 

27730% 28% 28% —1*6 

15327 25% 27 +116 

*0 11 20310ft 16 16% 

28012% lift 12ft + 16 

44b 24 233 33 33 


Confers 
CourOs 
CousPr 
Covnst 
CrkBrl 
CrodT r 
Cramer 
, CrarEs 
Crestk 
Cronus 
CrosTr 
CnAuts 
CwnBk 
Crump 
CuIMFT 

Cuirum 

Culp 

Cycpr« 

CyprSv 

Cyprswt 

Cyprus 


53837ft 37 37% 

1 12ft 13ft 12ft— % 
2813* 13% 13ft + *6 
97413% 11* 13 —ft 
1364 5ft 4ft 5ft + ft 
ft *6 + ft 
M IS 
4ft 6*6 +1*6 
7*6 8ft + % 
8ft 9% + ft 
13ft 13ft— ft 
1ft 3 + % 

4ft 4*6 + ft 

17 946121*8 19ft 21ft + ft 
214233 25ft 31% +4% 
312 7ft 6ft 7 

392710ft 9ft fft— ft 
34 294058 57% 57%—% 

12D9 216 2 3ft 

416 4 3*6 4 + ft 

70 I* 59327% 26*4 27% 

22 6 6 6 

- W Sf 2 * "*6 \ 

.14 1.1 28314 12*6 12*6—1% 

*6 X3 70817% 15ft 17 + ft 

7 8ft Ift 8ft 

510744 12% lift 

2 4ft 4ft 4ft— ft 

746 15 14ft 14ft + ft 

*0 27 S31 28 24ft 27*4 +1*8 
52 4ft 4 4ft— ft 


FrmG 

FarrCo 

FdScrw 

FeOGps 

FdGrfy 

Faroflu 

FIbrona 

Fktlcra 

FldFdJ 

FlfthTs 

Fioa ft 

Film lac 

Flltrlk 

FHiolco 

Ftnlnst 

FndSec 

Flngnut 

FlMoan 

FAMBk 

Ft Amor 


B —1 
Bft — ft 

... 9ft + » 

236 7*6 7% 7Vl — ft 

2ft 5ft 5ft- 5ft— % 
118514% 12*6 14 +1J6 

5597 ft *6 ft + * 
786 2* 2ft 2ft + ft 
10 4 4 4 

422427ft 25% 26ft +1% 
70216% 15*6 16 + ft 

131 3ft 3*6 TM 
539M 3»*k 39M— *6 


278 


FstAms 1-20 
FtAmPf 79 
FABPB A *0 
FIAFed 
FIAFtn J2 
FfATn 1*8 


Vt 13 734745*6 *1% 64*8 +1% 
*4 23 8911*6 10% 10% —1% 

23X7% TO 16% — % 
178018% 17ft 18% + % 
13011ft 1116 11% 

2358 6% Sft 6% + *6 
117915ft 13*6 15% +1M 
214731% 31 31ft + % 
13920% 17*6 19*6 +2% 
348 55 50% 54 +1% 

581 37ft 37 37% + % 

26021ft 21% 21% 

*0 U 1397)16% 15*6 16 
30 4A 77 4ft 4ft 416 + Hr 

,14B 17 223 7ft 7 7% 

345 6% 4% 6% + % 

379 7 Bft 6ft 
282314*8 12ft 1318—118 
1.12 17 9733016 29 30% + % 

*21 4412% 12 12 —1 


t X9 
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t 

140 10 
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... 44 50321% 20% 21% +1% 
56 ZB 57027ft 27ft 27ft 
*8 1* 107 7% 4*6 «4 

17621 28% 20%— % 

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20415*6 15 
48239 36 

222 3ft 2ft 
2810 9ft 
105 3ft 3*8 


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38% — 1% 
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3W— ft 


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Cancers 
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Conteor 

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172 4A 

FdEUs 44. 29 
CJcrBc 1*0 


APMMt 


ArabSb 

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17 121243% 42% 42ft— ft 
277 1ft 1% 1%— ft 

13411% 10 10% — ft 

36515ft 14*8 15% 

17 65 7ft 7% 7*6 

965 4 3*8 4 + % 

234713% 13 13ft + % 
18 ft ft ft— ft 
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6ft 6M— ft 
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4 4ft + " 
7ft 9 


48 28 


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AadHat .12 — 

AstraM ” 31710 fft 10 + ft 

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as. ^“aSftJka*?# 

AttcoPn 16411% 10% 11% . 

AftGsU LSI 74 1414 TO* 31% Eft— 1 
AlWn 40b 17 _1|336% 25 26ft +lft 


24 138 Sft 

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14 49^21** 
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Alt Pm, 
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200110*6 13% 14% +1% 
99711% 10% 18ft— ft 
4iO A 17510ft Oft 9%— % 
43428 27% 27ft— ft 

294220ft 19% 20ft +1 
2294 14% I3M 14 +ft 
75 4ft 3ft 4 
19515ft 15 15*6 + ft 

t 173 7 6% 6*6— % 

.16 14 9111% 10ft 11 

332 5 4ft 4ft + % 
8110% 9% 9%— ft 
2001 7ft 6% Bft— ft 
t 349 fft 9% fft + % 

567 7% Bft 6ft + ft 
210 6 Sft 6 — ft 
504 fft 816 9% 
503134 22% 24 +lft 

30519ft 19% 19ft— ft 

S IBft 17ft 17ft— ft 
S 4ft 5 + ft 

271 2% lib 2 + ft 


44 107448% 45ft 4Sft— 2% 
5510 9% 9% + % 

16 7ft 7ft 7ft 
218 2*4 2ft 2ft— ft 
357 9 8, Bft + ft 

2210 9 9 

164 7ft 7ft 7ft— *8 
9737ft 37% 37% — % 
49 Sft |% 8ft + ft 
99930ft 28ft 30ft +lft 
2258ft 56% 56ft + ft 
4425*6 25% 25% 
24618ft M 18% —j % 
24033% 33% 33 + ft 

35210% 10 10%—% 

XI 10WW% 9*6 Oft— U 
34 6632 31 32 + ft 


BBDO 2*0 
BGS 

BlWCb .100 13 
BPISV 
BRCam 
BTR • 

BelrdC 

BakrFn 140a 2L7 
Banks 

BeltScn .18a J 
BnPane 2*4 X9 

BancPs *> a l.l 
Bancokl 90 49 

BcpHw 146 XI 

Banetae 

BangH 40 

BkDals 1*0 ... ... 

BkGran M 14 10727ft 25M 27 — I 
BKNE8 240 4J 2221 46% 44ft 46% + ft 
BkSaua 44 22 81329*6 26% 39*6 +3% 
Bnkest ■ 48 4 A 29016 15% 15%—% 
BknttlG 40a 24 523% 23% 22% +2% 

Bfclowa 146 3* 5850 48 4«%— 2 



K 1%=1& 


370 15 14% 14*6 + % 

5522ft 27ft 22*6 + *6 


988 10*4 10% 10% 

388 8% Bft 8% + ft 
509 6*4 6 6%— % 

1757816% Hft 16ft +U8 
- 19010% 9% 10% + ft 

142T XI 29817% 15% 16ft + % 
12422 28 36% 26% —I 

54928*6 28% 28% + % 
1565 7 Bft Bft + *8 
40 1* 16217 15% 17 

OarlGp .13 .1 3403% 101 TOi —3 

Dal Arc 1438 8 6% 8 +1% 

Dotard* 44 1* 75621% 20% 20*4— ft 
Ota IO IBM lift 1016 10ft— ft 

DtSwtCh 1848 4% 3ft 4ft 

DaJmar 4 SM 5*6 5%— ft 

Da tow 49 2% 2M 2%— % 

Datecp 37222% 20*6 22% +1% 

□taath 502 4 3% Sft + % 

Datum 1159 5ft 4ft 5*8— U 

Dauohn 1J6 <4 12343% 42% 42*6—% 
DavWl M 5 8318 Hft 17%— % 

143 Sft 5ft 
2236 4% 568 __ , „ 

30 1.1 70218ft 17*8 17% — ft 
415414% 13ft 13*6— % 

134 Ift 3*8 t 

31 10 191923ft 22% 23*6 + % 
48 14 807*8*6 16ft 

279 1ft r 
1JM 94 144 11ft 11 

43 Sft 5 

873 7*8 6ft- _ . __ 
230 44 2051*6 51% 51% + % 


FtBnOh 
FtCalF 
FComB 
FComr 1*0 
FCmcJs 
FtConr 142 
FtCorrt i.ia 
FDatoR 
FEsfCs 145 
FTEmp 1*0 
FEXBC 
FFvrst 
FFdMIc 
FFdNH 40) 
FFdBrfc 48) 
FFdCal 

FFChar 1421 7* 
FtFdCS 54 XI 
FFFIM A0b U 
FtFKol 

FFdtVa *Se 14 
FIFO SC 

FFMon JOB S3 
FIFnCp 40 XI 
FtFnMS 

FtFIBk 40 U 
FHowS 140 44 
FINCPS 
FllndJ 

FimBk t 
F ImtCp 1J» 15 
Ftnlovra 
FJerNt 140 
FKvNt 9 140 


XS 438034V 34% 34% —1% 
54 4 20 38 20 — 1 % 

2.1 441 9ft fft 9ft— ’A 

32517ft 16% 14%— ft 
24 4229% 28% 28% 

14 116438 37ft J7ft — ft 


4262% 40*1 61 
191 18ft 17*6 18% + ft 
18 5% 4ft 4ft— ft 
44 115327 36% 26ft 

19920% 19% 2D% + ft 
24 9557% 47 55% +8% 

142 217 7ft 7ft 7ft + % 
64831 2f% 30 — *8 

33 8038% 36% 36ft— 11b 

24 5561% 5fft 40 — ft 

14196 13ft 12% 13ft + % 
3615 14% 14% — % 

200917ft 17% 17ft 
12 718 18 18 

4 41 13*6 13ft 13% + ft 

196 Z7% 25 25 —2% 

10226 25 25% + % 

49844% 13% 13ft— 1 
20723 22% 23 + % 

40512ft 12 12*6 + ft 

21818 17 18 + ft 

1302 11% 10% 10ft— ft 
773% 73ft 13ft +1 
33127% 25% 24 —1% 
3417*6 17ft 77% 
31828% 27*6 28ft + ft 
1037ft 32 32ft + ft 
13719 18ft 19 + *6 

172 22*6 22*6 22M 
1215ft 15% 15ft— % 
11328% 27 28ft— ft 

690 3ft Ift 3 —ft 
52 176234ft 32% 34% +1% 
U 55730 28*6 


FJMdB 140 24 159561% 54% 57V,— 3. 

44b 34 *31314% 15% 15ft + ft 


1*0 it 
46 W. 


13 


FtMkh 
FtMidB 
FMMISv 
FNtGas 
FNICOI 
FNICklB 140 
FNIOtl 
FNISWP 42e 
FNHB 40b 27 
PNlttSL 40 XI 
FDhBn j 
FtOWB 

FRBGe 148 27 


57 21ft 20% 20% — T% 
149 33 32 33 + ft 

4433% 32% 32% + ft 
34 7% 7 7 —MB 

29336*6 34% 36%—% 
71 1% 1ft 1*8 
39423% 23% 23% 

173 22 19ft 22 43% 

13619 18 19 +1 

2426ft 25 25 + 14 

573 7*8 Bft 7*8— ft 
73440% 39 39% — ft 


S — ft 
+ % 


1*0 34 


25 

X8 699220% 19 
20432114 20% 
TO% 10 
2146 21 




asgj. - 


24 



140 



48 34 


CteorOi 

OwtRt 240 104 

Cntilme 

CooatF 

CoobTR 

Catllnt 200 X3 
CslSov 

Cobonc 24o 52 
CobRaC 


1* 


CobeLb 
CocaBtl 
Coeur 
Osgaidc 
Cohrrtfs 
CotobR 
Cotagan 
CotFdJ 
Collin* 

ColABn 48b 24 
CBcbpA 40 14 
Coin Gas 146 94 
CotGsPt 140-104 
ColLtAc 140 
CotrTto 
Colo N I 74 
CohjFd 49 1 
CalSav 
CotuMII 140 


__17*6 17 17%—% 

22710% fft 70 
337 .27 27 + *6 

1054072*6 lift 11% —116 
61030% 29ft 30 
95528% Z7% 28 — % 

796 7 5% 6ft— ft 

42 7634 23 23% —I 

120510% 7% 10% + ft 

40 XI 491 IV 18% 19 
,18b 14 701 7 6*8 7 + ft 

124 24 69053% 51 52 —I 

115615% 14ft 15% + % 
.130 J 94044% 40% 40% -316 
400319% 18% 19*6 — ft 
I 585 7% 6% 6%— ft 

51 3 7 Bft 6*6 

1*0 24 53342*6 40 42*6 

76 3-5 774221ft 19ft 21% + ft 
144 34 83334*8 30ft 34% -W% 
171730% 29% 29ft 
48e 34 6118*8 18% 18% + % 

I 3318% 17 17 

t 600 40% 39% 39%— ft 
146 54 23637% 35% 36 —1% 
29 448043*6 13 13ft * % 
3-1 1424 28% 27 28% +lft 

24 294*1 36 40% +3% 

52223% 23% 23% — ft 
10 6% 5*6 5*6— % 
4419 18% 18% 

205 If 18 18% 

119427*6 34ft 27 
95616ft 15ft 16ft + ft 
24 7% 6*4 7% 

451 6ft 6 6*8 — ft 

53117ft 15ft 17% +1% 

ft ft-’* 

89038 18*6 20 +1» 

29546% 45 45*6 + ft 

188715% 15% 15% 

73q 2% afi 3ft 
121817 MU 16% — ft 
754 3*8 3 3%— ft 

34413ft 12ft 13ft + *8 
162411*6 12 13% — % 

779 5*6 5% 5*6 + % 

7720*6 19*6 70 — % 
123 16% 15 16% + % 

1D0 17*8 Hft 17% — ft 
917ft 17 17 —ft 

19 198136ft 35 35 — ft 

336518ft 18*8 18ft + ft 
3* 131120% 19ft 2D% + % 
J 222 9% 9% 9ft + ft 

1741 13*6 12% 13% — % 
X» 436 35 35 

211619*8 17ft 19ft + ft 


40 ao 


Wl ... . 

482 Sft Sft 5ft + ft 

f Slft 31ft 31% — % 
8% Bft 8*8 + ft , 
9% 9 fft— ft 
1 3 3 3 —ft 

11113*6 U 13% — % 
2730*6 29*6 30% 

2?% 23*^2 
25*14% 13% >4% + % 

'i!r£; s 

61 416 3ft 4 — 



I7ftr»ft8 | ■ 


-34 10 


637 3 


BkMAm 

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Banfcvt 




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41094820% 

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5652 IK 

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Barrts* 



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34 

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B«TnA 



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19W6 Mft 

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4X79% 

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BayPoc 



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7 

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25 

61241 

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282 

44 

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86 

27 

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Bovtv 

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10634 

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33ft + ft 


32 

65 

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H 

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120215% 

WTO 

1516 + TO 

fliFuae* 



321 Bft 

BU 

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20 28 

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28 

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304 10% 

fft 

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BnchCf 



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916 

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CwfthB 

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66 

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22% 

22% 

Bonbon 



9020% 

19% 

19% — TO 

CmwSw 



11012% 

11% 

12 — TO 


DamC 
Denovn 1J6 

DovIDB 48 
Drontz 381 
Drab* 
DreaBs 
Drewin 
Draxlr 
DravGr 
DuCkAI -32 
Du mag 
□uikDs M 
DiNSn 
Durakn 
Durhm s 1-28 

Durlron M 

DurRIS 

Dyeem 

DynRs 

Dynsai 

DynfctiC 




24 146 15*6 14ft 15% + ft 

34 128226% 34 34ft— 1ft 

17 67312(6 lift 12 

24512ft lift 12ft + % 
308425% 23 23% —1*6 

’re 17% 14% 17%—% 
76319ft 18% 19 + ft 

17 131517 169b 16ft— ft 

57 4ft 4 4ft 
l.l 134534ft 21ft 22% —1*6 
52 27% 24*6 27% 
51714% 13% 13% — ft 
13 3440 39% 39% — % 

XB 44611*8 lift lift— ft 
48814 13 13ft— ft 

3210*6 >0% 19*6 + % 
232 9 7% 8% + % 

248 6ft Sft Sft 
372738*6 27% 28% + ft 


EClTel 12011% 10% 10%— *6 

EH lilt 197 1% 1ft 1ft— ft 

EfL (not TIB 6*6 6 4 — ft 

EIP .12 17 39 7ft ‘9 7—1 

EMC Ins 41 XI 78511ft lift lift + % 

EMF 883 » 3% H6 + ft 

EMPI 49 8 7ft 1+ % 

EZEM 54214% 13 14 + ft 

EaotCDt 4631 % ft % + % 

BaalTI 1965 1ft 1% 1ft 

Earl Col 79011% 18% 10%—% 

EatnF 10515% MM 15 — % 

Earn Lb MM 18 4321 35 33*6 34ft + ft 

EOSoutf 140b 8J 216 .18 >6 

EdCmp ,1ft 12 18410% 9ft 10 + ft 

EJOllC 82212ft 12 12% + ft 

ElPas 1JS2 1X1 358215% 14* 15 — ft 

Elan . 353 9ft 9*6 9ft + ft 

Elbttg 2078 9% 8% fft + ft 

Etco 72 33 19319 18 lift + ft 

EkfarB 22b 1.1 49 21% 20 28 —1ft 

Eldon B .16 13 22214% 12% 13 — 1 

Elder 8 38 5*6 5% Sft + ft 

EldrM 57 ift 4% 4% — ft 

ElecBlo 1151 8% 7ft 8ft + ft 

E ICOtltS 63317 15*4 IBM + ft 

EtoNud 1 25518*6 17ft lift— U 

ElcRnt 1831 14 13H 13*6 

ElcSd 67518 16*6 17 — I 

ElcSara 27 5% 4*6 4ft— ft 

EldMb 89912ft 11% lift— ft 

E tro*) El 657 TO 9 9*6— % 

Emcor 97 ft ft ft 

EroPAlr 909 8ft 7ft Bft + *6 

Emu l«X 1353 8% 7% 7ft— U 

endta 162 T* 3% 3*6 

Enttvea 38 6*6 6ft 6*6 + % 

EradoLa 340012ft lift 12 — *8 

Enooa* 93813% 12*6 1J%— ft 

Engntt, lJ8b Xf 46 22 21% 22 + ft 

EnsCnv 831 18*6 17% 18% +1 


FtSvFta 40 X8 2511 30 25% 38*6 +3% 

FSvWIs 38 9*6 8% 9%— % 

FtSocC 1.10 X5 2174 24ft 22% 34ft +lft 
P5acKv SO 1 0 7827 25 27 + ft 

lUSrco 44r X6 174)17 14 17 + ft 

RtSMn 42214 13ft 13ft + ft 

FTonNt U0 X0- 105B40M 38% 3fft— 1 • 

FsftJnC 1.12 17 447142 41ft 41ft— to 
FtUFJn 72 37 12221ft 19 21ft -Hft 

FtVaJya 1JX) '3-0 25933*6 22 33 — ft 

FTVtFn Uta X4 11 29 38 29 +> . 

FtWFn 70 37 404 4% 5% 5ft— ft 

Flrbr ' 24 22*6 22 23*6 + ft 

Rrstor 270 XV 753% 53% 53*6 + % 

Planter 73o 17 1311ft lift lift— ft 

Flakay ' 1409 6 Sft Sft +’4b 

Flendt At 37 - 7113% 13% 13% 
Fiehtln . 26 3% 3% 3% + U 

Florfxi 490 4*6 4 4%+ft 

FlaCom 41b 17 1439 28*6 29 —% 

FtaFtS 70 7 387921% 38 31% +,ft 

FlPGuif 120417% 17ft 17% 

70 X0 239739ft 38 — 

170 44 9 lift 14*6 

. ’ 19018% 17% 1 

RUTDCb 74 14 387)4*6 16ft 
- • 1754 4% 4ft 
79 7 53118% 17% 1 

a -4 187218%. 17% 

76 If 87133% 32ft 
170 SJ 11318% 17% . 

4 7% 7% 7*6- . 

40121% 20% 71 — % 
1349 3% 1ft 2ft ♦ ft 

.}« S’SE ’3 '%-Z 

T X> ■ H%k W 
74 3 14938 35 

20710% 10% 1018—% 
519914% 13-13*6 ' 

•48 17 209025% 24% 34ft— *6 
78 17 3716% ISA 16 + % 

1473 8% Ift 7*8— % 
72 27 159016% 15% H 
TSr 17 < 9 4*1 4% 4% — *6 


5413% .13*6 12ft— % 
192 2% ‘ 1ft 2% + ft 
• 386 4% 4% 4% + % 

50611% 10ft II + ft 
93 31 38*6 38*6 + 

24811% 10ft 10*6 
395 8% 71b 8% + % 
438 6*6 Bft Bft 
249750% 47 49% —1ft 

55415 14% 14%— ft 

1530 27 28 + % 

27011% 11% lift + ft 
52613% 13 13 

683 20% 17% 19.. +lft 
255 2 1H 1ft— ft 
496 4% 3% 418 + ft 


Imlm wt 
imunex 
lanupo 
Imogen 
loacmp 
IndBcp 
indHMD 
indBnc 
IndnaF 
indlN 
IndINpf Z45 
IdpIWot 17 7 
indnHB LOO 
inAcous 
IndBl 
InertO* 
Intolntl 

l ltfSQJ u 
I alb vi 
Intram 
irurwdC 

(nnove* 

InsihiE 
insttr 
Intrrn wt 
InslNtw 


Sates m N«I 

ISOs Htoh low Ctoaa ChW 

35 4H 4 4*8 

SB 1.1 M14 4ft 4 4% + *8 

15010ft 10 10 — *8 

6 A 573030 27% 28%— Ift 

SB 2% 2ft 2% 

340813*8 12ft 13 + % 

0 A3 37030% 34% 34*4—1% 

2753 7 6% M8 + ft 

0 X3 926 34% 2£1 

“ =5 ^ VA 


172 X6 
750 A 
Mb 4 3 

ISO 31 
7 A 
03 
23 
3Se X3 


749 6% 5ft Sft 

srrir 

4ft 

41ft +1 
12 % — 1 % 


m S 


sas 
IT 4ft 
18141*6 
4013 
185 7 


» 

4% 

40 

13 

6*4 


. . ... 5ft- If 

26444% 42% 42% —2% 
*533% 32% 33 -% 
17431%. 30% 31%—% 
14034% 32*6 34 + ft 

3 Sft 5% 5ft .. 
161 3 . -3ft 2ft— % 

41 «*6 .'4*8 4ft— % 
326 15% 13 15% + % 

171 Z 1*6 2 + % 

134029 Z7ft 27ft— l 
44 2*6 2% 3% 

31473 n 22 + *6 

21 7% Bft 4ft 
11512% 12% 12V6 
19823ft 2146 21ft— 2 
32011%. Wft 11 —ft 
886 ^ 7ft 7% + % 
633 3ft 3% 3% + % 
46125% 23 


sobs In Net 

1006 Mob Law Close enw 


MJOABC -56 XT 
MdAHtl IWr XI 

w ®* eA - .. 
MdStFd A0 13 
M dbWl T-SD XI 
MdldCa 
NUdIBk 1.12 
JMdwAH- 
MdWCm 170 
JMdwFa UD 
NUIIKT JO 
M/Ttlom 
jwumpr At 
Mluope 
Mlnbcr 
Minetnk 
Mlnstar 
Miodiar 

JMGak 7lt .1 
Mitsui 75a 3 
MObfCA 
MoMCB 

MebGas 100 73 
MQCON 75e 3 
Modlnas M 13 
Metedr 


itoClra 
InlgDv 
IntaGan 
ISSCO 
JntBBFn 
Inlet 
Intel wt 
inlet 1 1 
intLSy 
rntrTet 
mRod 


Wft +lft 
4% + *b 
Sft— V* 
4%— % 
13 + % 

3*8 + % 


Intdvnh 

IntrtRr 

Inlrtac 

Intgetis 

Intrmga 


Intrmel 
IBicWsA 
InCacE 
IntCIbi 
l Game 
Intttkt 
ntKIng 
iniLsas 
iniWobtl 
intnosh 
IRIS 
InfSMp 
ITCps 
ITCP wt 
lntTolol 
Inh+ae 
intPtpa 


invere 
IGNMA 
invaiSL 
Jamega 
twaSeu 
lioiTnta 
I tel 
M wt 
Itotpf 


5304 5% 5*» 

47 <% 6% 

175813% 12% 

140 3% 3% — - 

158717% 14*6 17% + % 
87 7*6 7% 7*6— % 
36S06 3D 27 29% + % 

9023 7ft 6% 7ft + H 

115413 11% lift— ft 

29B4 5*8 5 5*8— % 

267 168 1% 1% + % 

99 5*6 5 5ft + ft 
18913 -12 12 — % 

162 7*6* 7% 7*6—16 
.16 1.1 1059 IS 12% 14*8 +2% 

17911.9 838 9ft 8% 8*8— J? 
34467 33% 29*8 30% —2ft 

571 4* Mr fft— ft 

474718% 16% 18*8 +1% 

273 8% 7% 8 + % 

46612% 11% 12% + % 
158 4% 4ft 4%— % 

149816%- 15%. .15*6 + % 
2601 10 9% 9*6 

t 21014% TTft >3*6— *8 

t 19020 191-) 19ft + % 

331514 .12 14 +1 

1638 Mb- 1 Sft— *8 

* " & ** X M 

11723% 22% 22% + % 
145125% 23ft 24*6 + % 
191 14% 13 14% + ft 

SB 8% 71b 8%— ft 
42 3 2ft Zft— ft 

170 54)82 31H 32 + % 

71 11% Wft 10»— % 

71e 3 316 4ft 4% 4ft— % 

3J2B13J 178 29 % 27 28 +1 

Ma J 639 7*8 7% 7ft— ft 
746712 JDft lift + *8 
148 73 23647% 46ft 46*6— % 
36311% 10ft 10*6— ft 
3269 8% 7ft 8% + >8 
201 4*6 4% 4*b— % 

12039% 38% 39ft + *6 


JBRsts 
JLG 
JP lnd 
Jackpot 
-lackLte 
JocEan 
JamWtt- 
JetfrCp 
JetfBsh 
JaHNL* 
JstSmrf 
JotMart 
Jar loo 
jtranE 
loneVs 
Jenlcbi 
Janol A 


.16 17 18V 13% 13 13% + % 

86 Sft 5% Sft— ft 
83719% 13% 18% — ft 
1 139 6ft Sft 4% 
427039ft 36% 36% —3% 
50 17 12929% 28%-Zffft + ft 

35718ft T7% 17ft— 1ft 
2428 22% 19% 28 — % 
140 AS 10648% 43 46% -2% 

M XI 13S21ft-ZI 21% + % 

78a 17 73522ft 20*6 22 

256 Sft 5% 5*6 . 

.12 A 513621 19*6 20% — *4 

485 7% 6% 6ft + % 

.10e 27 13S 5 4% 5 + % 

t 538 7 4% 6M— % 

t 5090 6*8 6 6*6— % 

253 Ift. 818 BM + % 

74618% 17% TIM— % 

AO XI 3M19 IBM 18% + % 


KLAl 550721% 19*6 30 —1 

KJMWSV 33 9% 9% 9% + % 

KTron 310 4ft 4 4% — % 

KVPtir 8) 7 6% 7 

Komar, . J6 17 133131% 3DM 3116 
Kamnat 381 3% 2M 3 — % 

Koppq 149 5% 4*6 5% + % 

Korchr 831 16ft 15*6 15ft— ft 

Hosier JDT 14 120615 14 14% — ft 

Kavdon 429 9ft 9 9*6 + ft 

Kaypra . 991 2H 2% 2ft + ft 

70 LI 411 17M 17*6— V8 

KetlVSA M 1 A 25646ft 43 46*6 42 

KOtlVSB J2 1.1 146% 46ft 46%—% 

Kemp 170 XI 1505 57% Sft 57ft +lft 
Kencop 73 346 3% 3H + H 

Kanorn 194-0% 7ft ■ — ft 

KyCnLf 70. X4 119139% 37*8 37% —3% 

Kavax 70 6*8 6M 6M 

KBVfln 2Tt> 4% 5ft 5*6— % 

KtwnSs A* 3A X13 13 13 

KeyTm 1351 89h 8ft 8*6 + ft 

KeyiFn 178 X0 22726% 24% 25 — % 

KimbOl 74 U 71535 - 36 34% + % 

Hlmbrk 63 3*6 3% Sft 

Kincaid 72 8ft 7*6 8V6 + % 

Kinder s 76- J 409021ft 30% 38ft— ft 

KngWld- 713021*6 20 2B*6— % 

KkteVd • . 417 3% 3% 3*8— ft 

KralBlr 8 8-. 7% 7%— % 

I Krov - 76 7 2215 7*« 6*6 7% + ft 

Kruger 72 XI- 347515% 13ft 15 +lft 

Klltcko .121 3 77MI Hft 14 14% —1% 

KutfEI - 132 7*8 7ft 7%— ft 





157534+ 

Monfa 

JSe 17 

145 71 TO 

Menttr 



5« 7% 

Man) Lb 



X 3*8 




23510ft 

Monoflt 



3807 WTO 



43 

22932% 

MooriF 

UOb tA 

6725ft 

MooreP 

M 

15 

2425*6 

AtorFfo 

X 


15419 

AtarKs 

.W 

13 

27413ft 

MCS8 



432 43TO 



28 

188322% 




1710 4U 

Atoatnre 

X 

25 

124 WTO 

MotCZi 

30 

ZO 

13815 

Musi lor 

170 

77 

122 

touttbks 

At 

22 

10*528% 

Afcrtlmd 

At 

LI 

2729X8*6 

MutSvL 

IAOd 17 

1260 

Mttoii 

.w 

4112X23% 


HI 944% . 

2473% 22% 23% • 
4»3% 3% 3% — % 

V 122*1% 3Mb Mft- ft 
67 8222% 22 22 

7913*8 121b Wft— ft 
XD 136438 36ft 3648—1% 

1446 7 4ft 6*6- % 

X) 848 46% 48 +1% 

84 29515 MV) 14% + ft 

17 226140% 38ft 39ft 

308 4% 4 4ft— U 
l.l 268843ft 41ft 1% 

120 IS 17% 17% 

859 3ft 218 2V» — % 

49T5 9% Bft •% + % 
139822*6 22% 22ft— % 
5414ft M% Wft + ft 
60510ft fft. fft— ft 
5637*6 37% 37% *2 
6T21M8 « 

116011ft Wft. 10ft— ft 
7714% I» l»-JJ 
2)3 7% 7 7ft + ft 
2018% 18 18% + % 
349 6*6 6% 6%— % 


Prates! 

Previn 

PrvLfy 

PrwTBe 

PubwC 

PbSNC 

PB5dBc 

PataoF 

Puitmn 


170 

178 


SaHj fai Net 

100b HWi Law Oasm am 


9 18 1M 1%— % 
31016*8 H 16 — % 
209834% 34 34% — % 

3411 W* «% + % 
130 Hb 1ft 1ft— 
32722ft 38% 31 —1% 
22737 306 36 — >% 


36 XI 


34 


TatPiu* 

ratertt 

TaJecnd 

Taftmt 

TaMBKt 

TetvkJ 

TeiebS 

Town * 


M 2 A 3725% Z*ft 25%— % 

2463 7ft *U 6ft— % JSS 


Rdm at "328 4*8 4 4% + ft 

puSKT JO 23 WWft 3W. 23% — % 

I — _ « — i 


OihSi 

Quodn 

CtaokCa 

OuotS r 

Qntrn* 

Quontni 

Querns 

QuatfM 

Ouesfdt 

Qofntef 

Qubtete 

Ouotrn 


345511*8 10% lift— % 
5222 9*8 •% 9*8+ % 
«. if»n 10% »%— 1% 
ia i% ift 2ft— % 
2«(U lit 9% + % 
30037ft 36% 26*6—1 
. 66 5ft 4ft Sft 

4976 5 Iff 5 + ft 

37 B98 >% *% 

,?3 Jft M + ft 
22913% W » — % 
■701168 Wft Wft- ft 


Tnw<E 

Tamm 

TndrLV 

Tatmanl 

TaraCp 

T#m»Dt 


us 


7 7ft + % 
3% 3ft + % 
TO 10ft 


34*6 25 — 18 
25 25ft— % 

Wft 18ft 


RAX 
RIHT 
RJ Fin 

fig 


71a J 
X48 X0 
.108 7 
Ji XI 
. M 


+ U 

-it 


14ft VC%— ft 
22 -22 + % 


58% + % 
-60 +10 


170 

RomFbi IAS 


Ranootr 74 


NBSC 
MCA CP 
NEC 
NM5 
NOoaVI 
Napcol 
Now coo 
NtahFn 170 
NxhCBk 


-lir 


.181 


TSr 17 
74 XS 
JOB 17 
.158 47 


NatbF 
NBnTex 
NB Ate I 
NfCaptt 
HClvBn __ 
NtlCty 200 
NtCtVPf 330 
NCBC6 
NCmNJ 270 
Nta>trs 3B 
NDeta At 
N Hard a 
NHttCs 
NtHMO 
NtLirmb 
NMkm 

NttPenn ITBb 23 

NttPZO ,, 

NSecIra SOb 14 
NTecti t 
NtWnLf 
NtnwdP 
NorrBty 
Nh-Sims 
Nought 
Noup wt 

iT 70 
Nelson 
NwkSoc 
NtwfcSs 
NtwkEI 
Nautras 
HavHBc 
NBranS 


34 1221 20% 21 +1 

83 5% 4*4 4M— % 

3 123820% Wft 20 +* 

IMS 4%_ 6 6 — *8 

40 14*6 14 Hft 
239 15*6 14*6 15% + ft 
091416 13ft 13*6— *6 
X5 76 29V. 28% 2B%— M 
X2 3 37 15 35 +1 


Ruy m nd 

RpyCn 

RedfCr 

Reodne 

REITs 

Recoin 

RedknL 


160 3ft 3% 3ft + % 
37134 22*6 24 + M 

28 2 41% 42 — % 

190 4ft 3M 3*6— % 
-.214 18 16*6 16*6— *6 

XI 313449ft 48ft 49% + ft 
73 12749% 48% 49%— ft 

123 23 22 22*6—16 

47 104 70 48 69% + % 

LI 7246 19% Iff* Wft— ft 

971 6% 6 6ft + ft 
1104 3% 2ft 2Jb— % 
1747% 43*6 47% +5% 
301218 11% 12*8 + % 
514% 14% 14% 

24 3*6 3% 3% 

194515*6 12*8 15*4 +S% 
5314 6% 5% 6ft + ft 
364 3% 3% 3ft— % 
3 4*8 4ft 4ft— *8 
1162 6 Sft 5%— % 
113 1 % *8 + % 

27 1375 7% 6% 7 + ft 

W55 Ift 7% 7M— ft 

446 Mb 7*8 7*8— % 
1264227*8 25 26% +1% 

632 7 5*4 5*6— *6 

181 33% 31 32 —1% 

90 6M 5ft 6 
502 10% TO 10% + *6 


RetoC 

ROCVEI 

R3dAah 

RetdLb 

Ret mb 

Renal 

Repco 

RntCnfr 

RpAute 

RpHlltl 

RsPsns 

RaPnls 

Reahlnc 

ReaOM 

RuExp 

RsPnSs 

RestMg 

ReatrSv 

Ro u tort 

RautrH 

ReverA 


RoyRey 


174 

74 

MbilMt* 
RkhEts 
RhxnN X0C 
Rlfzys 

Rivet 70 
RJvFor a 20 
Road Sv 170 
RobMyr 
Roftssn I 
RebNuo 76 
Rob Van 
RdcwH 
RMUnd 
RkMtG 


NE BUI 52 17 224 2W, 28% 29*8 + *8 
NwFPt# HU it ft __%— ft 


NwFPtS 
NHnlpB 78 X9 
NJNatl 1.12b XI 
NYAIrt 
NY A wt 

Nwdrv LW 77 
NwtdBk Jtsa 3 

76 7 

NmepEI 
NwpPtI 
Ntcate t 


51128ft 36% 20 — % 
65827*8 26*8 27ft + % 

ns 4 ».^ +Vk 

33015*4 15ft 1516 — *6 
278 15*8 14% 15ft + % 
1177 25 24*6 Zfft 

85 3% Xft 3% + ft 


PasasSt 

RooeSB 

RuJPttH 

Roums 

Rowe FT 
RoyPtm 
RovIRS 
ReylAIr 
Rulelnd 
RustPet 
RvonFs 


955 5V. 4*6 5ft + % 
14 2709*9% 2*M 29ft— % 
4X1 5426 2Sft 26 + % 

M 749 2ft 2% 2ft- % 

1A 202 7*8 7 7% + ft 

3 % 

27520*6 20% 20% — ft 
178 U 73815*6 15ft 15%— % 
175410ft 1*6 10% + * 

M 7A 113826% 25*6 26% + % 
357911% W% 10*6— % 

J.* XI iSl S ’2% + % 
M 7 5M16 15ft 15ft— »% 
3W 6% 5% 5*6— ft 

536 51b 5% Sft— % 

379 Sft -5ft Sft 

94 3% 316 316 

115 6H 5*8 5*6— % 

175623% 22% S + % 
950 9*6 8ft 9*4 + ft 

522913% 12% 13ft 
70013*6 12% 13 

sa ft 

122 9ft 8*6 8*6 

149 1PM 79ft 19*4 + ft 
24316ft 15 15% — *6 

712 fft 9ft 9ft— % 
55423% 23 23% + % 

168 13*6 13 13 

393 6% 616 6M— % 

63741% 40% 41ft + ft 
49314% H 14% + % 
1139 9 8 Bft— M 

9020ft 19*6 30ft 
4955% 53% 55% +1 
3M Zft 2 2ft + ft 
54 7*415*8 U% H%— % 

LI 35 2D 19 19 —1 

It 530629*6 28ft Zfft + M 
19213ft 12*6 13ft + % 
471 6 5% 5*4 

£ 70313 12*6 1ZM— ft 

49613ft 12% 1218— *8 
537 9 Bft 8% 

469 9% 8% fft + ft 
142 7 1 TO IHb 11% + ft 

5011 9% «%— Ift 

•380 U 
TBe 17 
40 U 

M 23 
.120 14 


Tncn 
TbtrPr 
Ttirmdi 
TMW 
ThrdNt 
Tlwrln 
Thcrtec 
TTBffTr 
3Com 
Tkreo 
Tlmbrtd 
TkneEn 

TmoRb 

TIprarv 

Tates 

Toted TV 1.90 47 
TolTrpt X90 W 
ToeavA 
TortSV* 

TovsPK 

TrakAu 

Tran lad ► 

TroLaa 170*64 

Trader 72r 7 

Tmwii 

TrwtBc 

TrevRE 173a 102 

TrlodSr 

TrlMte 

TrtbCm 

Trltoov 

Trlon - 70 17 
TrusJo 40 1 3 
TreitiY 140 37 
Tuck Dr 
TwnClh 
TV loo 


Softs bi Mat 

. Mb Hftti low Cteea Cirea 
564510ft r* 9ft + % 

4791Mb S'* 9*6— % 

73 17 H6418 Uft 17M + M 

I 5% 51b Sft 
2X5325*6 34% 25ft + ft 
4831 2% 2ft 7ft 
2186 Mft »Vi Hft + ft 
158917ft H% <7 
1526 SU 7*8 7% 

3368 2U 1% 2 - ?- 

9 7ft 6% 6*8- ft 

135 4 3% Jft— % 

* * r S 2 ?* 

t ire 5ft 4ft 5ft + lb 

264 1*6 JJt Ift 


TZ5* .» 


89910 

8% 

f —1 

34115*8 

14TO 

15% +T 

135 fft 

IN 

9%— % 

XB 1755 44 TO 

44ft 

46ft +1 

456 nro 

KUb 

Wft-1% 

683 7ft 

7% 

7% + % 

162814 - 

15% 

I Jft— TO 

5601 WU 

94* 

9»- U 

38 Bft 

1% 

r/j— % 

291 7 

6ft 

6ft— % 


UB7 9*w 9 9 — % 

17412% YPb 12% 

8210 % ft ft— ft 

918 17ft 15*6 18% 4 % 
13045 44 4* — 1 

738 36 36 —2 

m 2 7ft 7ft— ft 

244 X) 31 31 +1 

67214ft 12ft Hft + Vi 
198 Bft 11% 17 
29 7ft 7ft 7% + % 
2445ft 15ft 15ft — ft 

»M I Mb- ft 
723 Zft 2% Z% + % 
20 Bft 6ft 6V. 

324 >0% 9*6 10% 4- ft 

640 9% 9% t% 

1346 7*6 6*8 7% + *8 

932 2% 3*8 3*8 + % 
5113 1% l IU — 

194 8ft 8ft 8ft— M 
W1 27% 28% 77ft + ft 
2538 3*% 36% —1M 

156 6% Sft 6% ♦ U 
32* *8 % *8 + % 

3016% 15% 16 — V, 


JBS# 4 


.16 17 

771 XI 
741 34 
73a X> 


781 27 
J0H £ 

.150 14 
73B L0 
144 1L1 


Tyson t 76 7 «R3 72% 34ft ♦ U 

g- : ~i 


OSLtC* 70 if 
U5PRI 2670737 
USPCI* 

UST .94 23 
UTL 

UITrScp 170 34 

umw 


18 

14 


34 


3022% 22M 22U — % 

6141ft W* It + ft 
86932 20ft 21% 

41 31% 31ft XZ —2 
08422ft 21% 22ft + % 
4032% 36*6 32% + ft 
940 8*8 7% 8 — % 
4501748.15ft 16ft +1% 
Unibcp raw 17 17ft— ft 

unibepf 173 
Until 
Unltrc* 

untmad 

Unto IjOO 

UnNaUs IAS XI 19226% 25% 26% + % 
i inPUitr 1A9T to 3203 27ft 27ft 27ft 
uStEE 340 S «J84% « 1«% +2% 

Unworn 

UACaia M 7 3724 25 22ft 25 +2 

uSa 555 40 24 24M23M SOM 23ft 
UBAtafc ,l5r 14 
UBkSF 



761*% 

17ft 

4 7ft— TO 


11X11*8 

9ft 



4V912TO 

11 

UTO +1 


'53714 

IS 

15ft— ft 


2947% 

47 

47% + % 


8012% 

tl 



.141 


48 57 


3021% 30% 21ft + 16 


13022ft 21ft 

5215ft ISM, Wi + b 
70027% 22M 2316— % 
164 9 8*6 8ft— % 

61511% WTO 10*8— % 
245 S 4% 5 
31211 10% 11 + % 

281 5TO S 5*8 + % 
2071648 Mft Hft— ft 
461 18 17% tl + % 


NfCare 
NfcfcOG 
Nteo 
Nike B 




lie 


Air 


8A 




51 
334 7ft 


7ft 

7ft 


■ft 
7ft— ft 


_--- Ala 

LBWtaP 78b 15 
Lexicon 
Laxkrta 
LtrtFOa 
LWVHA 
LMyHB 
LBHJBi 1A4 
Llebr* 


2111 Mft 13M 13*8— M 
45325*8 34ft 25*8 + ft 
7513 lift I6U 18ft +1% 
843 15 14 Mft 

1297916% 14% Hft + ft 
55847% 47 <7 — ft 

16419% lift lift— % 
42319% Wft 19*4— ft 
133618% IBM 17M— M 
48311* lift 11*8— *8 
231010% fft TO + % 
XT 61 16 15*4 15ft— ft 

47 234 H 15ft 15ft 

37 113629% 2 Fft 29% + % 
XD 120 10% 10% 10% 

XI 381019% 17*8 1916 + % 
56120% 17% 18*6—118 
17 278 56% 54% 55 —1ft 
XI 171 I 7ft 8 + ft 

19% 21 +*6 

Wft 29% — % 

Sft 6 + % 

9*6 fft— % 
15% 16 
7% i — % 
3 Sb— % 
2ft 2% 

5621% r 21% + % 
33 11 IBM IDft— ft 
9 TOft 10ft 10*6 
20535% 35 35 

20*117% 16% 17ft 


54318ft 18% 18% 

40 37 3*92 lift 11% 1!%— ft 
TSeXO 41710ft TO TOTO— ft 
218 8% 718 8% + % 
1724ft 34 34ft + ft 
18ft 11% 18% _ 
49ft 47 48 — 1ft 

. 42% 41TO 42 — ft 

417 7% 7% 7ft— % 
58011ft lift 11*8— ft 
450 7ft 7ft 7% + % 
8523*6 229b 22ft— TO 
79*1 20 20ft 

5 3ft 3*6 3M - 
7621% 19 21% +1% 

6763 59% 62ft— ft 

1854 IS 14ft 14ft + ft 
263 41b 4ft 4ft + ft 
113ft 13ft 1316— ft 

146 73 105918% TTft lift— % 

N Trip a .161 34 1 ift 4ft 4ft— % 

NwtFn B 48 X2 48731% 30TO 30% —1 
NwNLl 40 23 6440 28% 36% Z7TO-1TO 
KwxtPS X10 9 3 40523 31ft 21*6—1% 

Nome -M XB 40 5 4ft 5 

Novmtx 386 4ft 4ft 4ft 

asssr. * 

iSSF .92 U 177253% 52ft 53% + ft 
NueMoT 36614 13ft 13% — ft 

KJdS .« 4 "»!» im l»b +1 

Numrmi 1&2?* 6 7ft— % 

aasr* ™ 

NuMed* 636 


Nodwov 
Noxfcd 
M ai de n 
Nordctr 
NnkB ■ 

Norstan 
NaANat 
MAffln 
NCarG* 144 
NoFkBS 

NthHin 

NWitTB 

NeatBc 240 XS 
NeotSv 


Nttivws 

NwNG 


.13 14 94 9ft 8% 8ft— % 

25615ft 13% 13% — 1*8 
419515ft WTO 15% — ft 
342 18*6 10ft 18ft + *6 
JOT LI 532 9 Bft 8*6— % 
217ft 17ft 17ft 
48 34 1308 20ft 19 20ft + ft 
17610 916 9% + ft 

441 4 0 28% 27% 28ft +1% 

90 14 438820ft 19ft 2016— % 
13 46214146 3Mb 41% +1*6 
134221 20% 20ft— ft 

XI 4928% 27% 2816 + ft 
164615 U 14% — ft 
XI 367474% 0 73ft +3% 
688 5ft 5% 5%— % 

0 i 170 H re I - % 
to 8*8 8% Sft + % 
32 13 1 7 7 7 

1400 L7 9843ft 43ft 43% 

40c 24 55722ft 21% 22ft + ft 
At XI 581)14*6 I4t6 74ft— TO 
40 IB 1 ft 4k + K 

658 8% 716 8*8 + ft 

31616% 15 H + % 
42 25 161313% 12% 13 + U 

27738 17ft TV% +1% 
777 24% 22% 23ft + M 


140 


100 


UBVWl 
UnBkra 
UBCO) 
UCOrSc 
UCtvGa 
UnDom 
UnEdS 
UFnGrp 
UFstFd 
UGrdn 
UMofln 
UnNMx 
UnOklo 
UPrad 
US Ant 
US to 
US COP 
USDagn 
US Em- 
its HC a 
USHttl 
USPrcp 

ussntt 

USSur 

USTrk 

USTrs 

ustatn 

UTeta 

UnTetov 

UnTota 

UnVtBn 

UVOBS 

UtwFm 

Unvtflt 

UavHtd 

UnvSBC 

UPSBk 

UnvBTr 

UoRptit 

UPenP 

Dacota 


JOb 24 
1A8 23 
UK) 34 
1A) 7A 
42 X3 


14411X0 
140b 24 
JSe 24 
J24 X9 


1A8 


lift 9 WM, -Hft 

20 3V* 2*8 2*»— % 
307 HU Wft 15ft— ft 
20710ft fft T8U + U 
74927% Z7ft 27%— % 

16526% SSft 26ft — ft 
99*22% 19% 21% +1*6 
22 Mft H 14% 

234 4 3*8 4 + ft 

874 OW 7*8 7ft— % 
141218 17 18 + ft 

413 14 TO 13% U%— % 

12938% 37ft 38% + W 
2210 fft fft— % 
f 4(6 6% 6*8 — TO 

448 12% 13% 12% + % 
340 3*8 Sft 3% + *8 
34 38052918 27% 29ft +1U 
M4 3% 3%— % 
5445 3*8 Zft 3*8 + % 
U92 6% 6 6% + % 

664081 26ft 29 ft— *6 

110 TO 10 - ft 

1302 2*8 2% 2*i* + TO 

.12 XI 415 4ft 4ft 4ft 
JOa 1.7 0919% lift 7818— *6 

1J0 W4 59712% 11% 11%—% 
L2D 23 110237 35% 36 -1 

JO .9 196622 21 21ft — ft 

379 6% 6% 6ft - — % 
21024 23% 23% — ft 

01 6*6 Sft 5% —1ft 
36 U 2421 20 21 

144 07 96744% 41ft 43ft + *8 

945lfft 19 19 - ft 

1334519 17*8 1718— % 

91 5ft 5%. 5% 

315 3% 29b 3 — TO 
315 10% 10ft 10%— % 
JQe 1.1 3 19% 18% 18% +1 

LI 294 5% Sft Sft— % 
A» MU 882V* 30% 20% + ft 
JJe A9 1707 5% Ah ‘ 


Uiacfa 140 XX 12838% 36% 37ft + *8 


SBkPSo 


AO 


f sr 

33 6% 


38 4 5TO 
1» 418 4*8 
W7 9 Hft 


U 


Genets 



2644 7ft 

7TO 

TV.— TO 

Ltabrt 

X 

J 

670 23ft 

21ft 

22ft + ft 


.IB 

■3 

1251 

SOTO 

50% 

Ltimre 

3A 

. J 

11 44ft 

45% 

46ft + % 




1399 J 

2% 

Zft— ft 

LtaOxn 



1109 6% 

6 

Jft 



219 5 

446 

5 

UIItAb 

LJlvTut 

88b Z6 

19B15 

Uft 

Wft— TO 

GeS ltd 

ASr 

S 

153 6 

5% 

Sft + TO 

X 

18 2530X0 ft 

li. 1 

19*8 + TO 

GaFBk 



39SO 21ft 

BTO 

JOft— % 

UnBrd 


1235832% 

FiTI 

32ft + ft 

Gartod i 

08 

3 

615 9 

B* 

9 + TO 

UncTsf 

280 

64 

• 35ft 34TO 

34% — TO 


34a IS 

013ft 

UTO 

13% — % 

Undbrg 

.M 

XI 

378 5% 

4*6 

5% + ft 

GibsGb 

34 

1.11156623% 

21% 

21% —2% 

UnerCp 



102 4% 

4 

4ft 

GtoaTr 



94717V. 

HU 

16% + U 

UqB<M 

72 

U 

3957 

a 

56% + % 


GtlbrtA 

Gadtrys 

GkJCorr 

gome* 

Gataas 

Galt 

GauIdP 

Grace 


Guo lire 

Grapbl 

GrptUM 

CrphSc 

GravCa 

GtAmC 

GAPrt 

GtLfcFd 

GWSav 

GtSoFd 


SELECTS &&1/LTJC. QKTfflMS 


MO 

ASK 

ApoUoComp. 

20K 

TOY, 

Mr Gasket 

9Yt 

10 

Bitter Gxp. 

3 Vi 

3% 

Modulaire 

m 

9 

Rodime 

m 

m 

&& WTTti COMPUMCMTS OP 

CONTINENTAL AMERICAN 




VUng Rmoutcm 
K ntamationul N-V- 

NAV. as of 31-7-85 
%*6A7 


INFORMATION; 

Pierson, HeM ri n g & Pierson N.V., 
Hor*fyjrodit 214, AmsferdanL 


(f Bhckk$/ 

J HwsecfBw*^ * 

I Aduten n, the Wjihinenei Hiinn f 

Van i OUR 59th YEAR.—' 


Lastmel& 

AMEX 


! AMEX Most Actives ~1 


vet. 


H1o8 Lew Lost dm. 


wricfcas 72304 
WkkaBpf 15780 
rated g 15333 
HtwGp 14037 
TBXAtr 11957 
BAT In 11632 
Hcabrs 11356 
HWInaPf 9270 
WOOB 9135 
EdoB a 
tniBknt 

OotoPd 
InstSy 
DomeP 
TIE 

viCentA 
TotlPTg 
KevPti 
GrtLkC 
NYTtaTO 
WWgiH 
Amdahl 
MOiOn 
Aamrg 
NundRs 


4*6 

3*8 

4*6 

+ 

% 

SOU 

28*8 

X 

+ 

% 

MM 

12*6 

M 

+ 

ft 

2% 

2*8 

2% 

+ 

fi 

* 

16*8 

4% 

% 

+ 

+ 

TO 

% 

35TO 

31% 

34*6 

+ 

TO 


9134 

ASM 


6833 

5610 


21 

17% 
MM 
4ft 
1216 
1% 
Z ft 
6% 
14% 
5151 MM 
4290 12*6 
4047 Mft 
3962 46*8 
3717 UV, 
3581 14% 
3442 6% 

3225 9ft 
319 14% 


20 

16% 

13% 

3ft 

12ft 

1*6 

2h 

6 

12 % 

13*8 

11% 

43ft 

44% 

Utt 

13% 

5% 

Bft 

12ft 


20M 

17% 

1358 

4 

1318 

IM 

2ft 

6*8 

13% 

13% 

11*8 

42)6 


— % 
— 16 
+.*8 
— % 

= 8 

— u 

— % 
—i 
—i 
—i% 

45% — *8 
Mft + ft 
T4U + % 
5% + % 

8 ft — *8 
Mft -Hft 


AMEX Diaries 


TMtWk Lad wk 


Advanced 
Dadlned 
Un ch ang e d 
Totat issue* 
New HhM 
now Laws 


AMEX Sales 


Total tor wd 
woafcaoo 
Year age 
Jan l to data 
H84 to date 
AMERICAN BONDS , 
Total for week 
Tear ago 


42.MMOO 

39A3UN0 

4X170000 

1220330400 

B9X3SBA01 

1XWOO0D 

XftOODO 


i 


LastWM& 

NYSE 


71 X5 
J5ell» 
.10e J 
AOr 2A 


Gre*Ad 140 14 

GrHTch - 

GwttlFd 

GrubER 

Given 

GoorFn 

GuorMt 

CuoraF At xa 

Guests 

GuMrd 

ohapW ao xb 

GKBdC 
Gull 


L70 5A 12229% 28 2J % +1% LtadAlr 150 6 l 3 10325*6 ZJft 25ft +lft 

J2 XI 21717 IBM 17 UWlArt JO 23 1836% 25% 25ft + ft 

J4e 7 S 153 12ft 12ft 12% . LUCla« X 7121047ft 0ft 47 +1% 

34 13 IMS 20)6 Jfft 20 +16 LoanA 3619% 17ft 18ft + ft 

416614ft 1318 14ft— ft Local F .15o J 33217 16ft IBM— M 

43417ft 16*6 17)8 Ld/kTOH U 7ft 7% 7ft 

‘ ,17% 17 17ft + ft LoaaStr 10429 8ft 7% B*8 + % 

38115 Mft 14% LoncF 1J8 53 26925ft 24 24ft 

151 fft 9 fft + 16. Lotul 825329 27% 30ft— ft 

815 8 7*6 7*8 + % LaBfldi 4SB 3A 67316% 15ft 15TO— 1ft 

7791ffft T7ft 18*8+18 Lyndin 3136% 36 75_ —ft 

« 3ft 3*6 3% 

4753 6 Sft 5% 


30 X4 

At xa 


Lyphat 


4481 lift 24 37*8 +1 


ASa A 


125 Sft 8% |% + ft 
5Z1V6 20% 2D%— ft 
17 4% 4M 4ft — TO 
147914*6 13% Wft + *6 
60920% 20 20*8— TO 

78912% 11*8 12% + TO 
333 7ft 6% 7 + TO 

3312 201 70S 

29-6 6 6 

192 Aft 5% 5ft + ft 
117X9 8% 8*8— % 

338 13ft 13U 13% + *8 
311 9M 9 9 — _ 

2568 5ft Sft 5% + % , 
2516 16 16 + % 

38415ft lift 15 + ft 

429 Mft 16 16 — *6 

46 7ft 4% 7ft 
42T0 15% 75% 75% 

0 13% 13 13% + % 


OCGTC- 
ORS 
OokHIII 
Oatanar 

Octfln E 

OtfaLoo 

OoilOP 

Oglboy 
QMoBc 
OhleCa 
OtlDrl 
OtaFdi 
OidKlds 1A0 
CXdNBl ZAO 
OtdRRB 34 
Ofcistna 


2T2 Tft 


IA8 

XM 

X52 

xoo 


12% 11*6 n -ft 

1 ISK? 
1 iSSS 

B- 

i ssr 

Setaai 
ISSn 


1U IV +18 
Sft 3% 

415 3ft 316 316— TO 

MSS 2% 2 . 298 + % 

. 67316% 15ft 16 — % 

56 1*8 1*8 1% 

2A 99545% 45 45 — % 

*4 17732% 31ft 22% + % 

48 8S3 50% S3 + % 

XS 129263 60% 62ft + % 

13219% ISM 19 
192 5 4*8 4*6 + TO 

13 54)31% 30ft 31*6 + TO 

14 459% S*% 58%— % 

L9 284839ft 37ft 39% + % 
73 T1229U 2846 25% — ft 


353 5% 

L9 

1713 7% 

5S- 51? 

3J 4938 
7520 

i.» -xs 33325% am 

844 2TO 2*8 
2803 346 2*8 

A0 44 1878 


1 30 


5*6 

14 

42% 

6% 

4^ 

Ik 

36% 

1916 


9 +16 

6*6— TO 
6% 

Sft— TO 
4*6 + % 
8*6 
STO 

lift— M 
43 —I 
7% + % 
7Vb— % 
STO + % 
19 ■ 

M + *8 


V 

VLI 
VLSI 
VMX 
VSE 
vonnui 
vanen 
VMvBc 
VatFSL 
VUFrei .12 1 7 
VINBck 150a X0 
VcdNtl UD XI 

VI Utah* 

Vobnnf JO XI 
Vaflah .14 22 
Vott-n A0 1A 


■16e TA 


1A8 23 


1498 fft Ift 9 + TO 

1991 f 7*8 7*8 + TO 

1404 MM 13*6 13*8 + TO 
525 4% 4 Bft— % 

1 Bft Ift Bft— W 

2225 9K. 8*6 Bft— ft 

615 14% 15 + TO 

13731% 28TO 29 — ITO 
72716*6 MW Hft 
30 6*8 6*6 4TO + TO 
15250 46 49% +3% 

2280 37 37% 38 ' U — ft 

BOB 21ft 20ft 21TO 
IIO 15*6 (Sft ISM 
IX 6% Bft 6% 

1832ft 23 22 — ft 


Vanzatl 
VarlCr a 

_ . „ ESS " 


AS 


*07 8% 


34k— *8 
218 + TO 
18 18ft— 9*8 

8% ■%— ft 
8 BM 


VtconF 

Vlcnrp 

viemn 

WdroS 


4 10445 ■% 8% 8% 

2ZS0 % TO TO + TO 


AO A 7994 MM 13*6 M + TO 
JO X7 470922ft X TITO + M 


I 


OWSpfB 248 TL2 4222% 21% 21TO— TO 
QkSpfC XM 115 8021*8 21% 21*8 ♦ TO 

OtsonF 1313 10 13 — TO 

OtieBcp J*B U 1X121% 19*6 ZITO— *8 , 


On Una 
Dpi IcC 
QpttcR 

OplrtCl 

Orbanc 

Orttt 

OrapMt XSDb 
O rtoCo 
Orton R 
Mm 3D 
Osmncs 
OttrTP 276 
OyrExp 
OwanM 40 
Oxoco 


442 fft 7% Sft +1% 
293115*6 1516 15TO . 
609239ft 37ft 3STO— ITO 
1812*6 12 12 —M 

19215% 15 15ft 4- ft 
1477 7ft 4*8 6*8— % 
1584 9% ITO 916+1 
295 4ft ift 4*6 + ft 
*917% 16% 17% + TO: 
27417ft 15% 1716+1*6 

S I 6% 16 WTO— TO 
31 29ft Xft + TO 
30511ft lift lift 
21923ft 22ft 22% — % 
2511 % *8 % + TO 


Srvmot 
SvcMar 
SMnti 
Sendee 

SvcFrd M , 

SavOak .16 5 T75S18 

ShrMod At L6 624*30% 29% SOTO + TO 
Shwmt* L68 X6 380 37% 36*8 36*8—% 
Shelby S .16 A 781 20TO 2Dft 20% + TO 
Shetdl* 20511*6 OTW 11 — ft 

A 4409 28 ft 26ft 26% —1*8 
129011 10% 10ft— TO 

»L .** 4ft— TO 


X 

5% 5% — TO 
16% 17%+TTO 


.15 


PACE 

PDA 

PLM 

PNC* 

PTCom 


PocFst 

PcGoR 

PocTot 

PncWB 

PackSv 


PaoeA 



H 


NYSE Most Actives 


VaL 


Htek 


119485 

11043 

10M92 

62504 

57TT6 

57170 

56764 


11 

9 

6 % 

21TO 

12 

13% 

15% 


MtdSUI 
East Air 
PanArn 
AT&T 
PM PIS 
NlSeml 
BnkAm 
IBM 59678 132% 129% 
TezOGa 48914 17TO 15% 
LnrISt 43589 49% 47*8 

UnEnra 39768 Bft 30ft 
Reynrn* 39610 29% 27*8 

ITT Cp 35874 33% 32ft 
USStaat 35273 31ft 29% 
CoIgPal 34873 38*8 36% 
AMR 8479/ ■ Xft 46% 
AH DSP 34294 4Sft 44 
Mobil 33948 31% 28*8 
SouthCo 33466 21% 20ft 
MaSCVF 32359 2% 2 

UMC0J J1973 31 Ztar 
AHlEXP 30794 45ft 42% 
CBS 30553 123 106% 

Onrslr 30*17 36% 34% 

C/nwE 30283 30% 


11TO —3 
11TO +2% 

7 + ft 

31% — TO 
12TO — *b 

lift +1% 
16% — % 
131% — % 
16% —1 
49% +1% 
34 +2*8 

» + 1 % 
33% + TO 

n +1TO 
X +l*b 

2,^ +:m 
45% + % 

29ft —1% 
20 % — % 
2% + % 
2PTO -ITO 
44*8 +M 
111 —9% 

Sift + ft 
TTft — TO 


NYSE Diaries 


THIS Wk Last Wk 


306 

326 


882 

739 

443 

437 

Doeltnefi 

1110 

1217 

160 

151 


248 

229 

909 

914 


2340 

2345 

X 

77 


157 

are 

X 

X 

New Lews 

22 

15 


NYSE Sales 


VbL 


Total for weak 


Year ago 
Two yean age 
Jan 1 to dale 
1984 fo date 
1903 to data 


531.740800 

59X01X800 

.0X16X800 

40X7(0000 

1X14X73X850 

1X66X770080 

1X087.71X000 


HoleSy A 
Halifax ■ 
Halmt 
-HcmOil 


.10 


HaavGo 
Henvln SA 
HoipGi 3A 
Hrtmt 160 
HrtfSts 1A8 

Harvln a 
HattTWS 
Hauser AOa 
Havrty S2 
HcwfcB .Mi 
HIIHC5I 
Hlth In 
HJthdyn 
HchOA * .16 
HdtaBs X 
HBiStC 
Helen T 
Helix 


MHOHT 9 4ft 4ft 4ft— TO 

HBO x ■» 657224% 22% 23TO— % 

HCC A6a £ 52DI1TO 11 11*8—18 

HCW .10 22 2S2 Sft 4TO 4TO— % 
HE) Tk 332 18M. 10ft 16% 

HElWn 22 5 5 5 

HMD Am 191515% 15 1STO— % 

Ha eft Co 3A 1A 2324ft » 24)6 

33720ft 19% » — ft 
338 4*8 4 4% 

788 3 2% 3 

22? M % TO 

A 2B7 5ft 4*6 5TO + TO 

30 09 2% 2M TVs 

A 16714% 16% 16% + TO 

18 5 5 5 — ft 

37 71% 10 10 —3ft 

13 134744 42ft <3% + TO 
LI 324 21*6 2MA 21% + TO 
53 177730*6 X Mft — TO 
12 273 51 ft 50ft 5016- TO 
63419% 19 19ft— % 

53710% 9*6 10% + TO 
X7 23615*6 15 15 

X4 2T9 22 21 21% + % 

464 7*6 6M 7ft— TO 
93014 13TO 73ft ' — ft 
254 3% 2*6 Jft 

3500 3% 3TO 3%— TO 
£• 1235 IBM 18 Wft 
A 49521% SOTO Xft- TO 
1 8TO 8% ~ 

406 4ft 4 
49323ft 21% 23ft 
31 3% 3TO 3% — Mi 
31 13 31033*6 X 33ft 

WIZTtt Wft ZITO +1TO 
12» 7 6TO 6TO + TO 
76 3M 2% 3% + TO 
78223% 23 23%- ft 

in 9TO 9*8 9TO— TO 
362217% 17 17% + TO 

37 3% 3TO 3TO + TO 
1892 4% 4ft 4*8 + TO 
2S27 X 36*6 — TO 
163 SOTO X WTO 
1014 W% 15 + TO 

43414*6 14% U% + TO 
17913TO IZIh 13TO + TO 
11X35% 34% 34% 

549 6ft STO 5%— 1% 
20735 38 X .4TfS 

38334% 72 23ft —y 


Moo Oka 
MogGo M 
MolnaN LX 
Mai Rt 

Molr/f s Ale 
MalrttA 


AO X3 

> 

ZAO 




XI 


.180 


4“Br£ 


Maxcr 6 
AftOXWM 
May pi 
M aySuA 
MavnOI 
MovjJ 

McCm X 
Meftad . 
McFort 
VteGIH IA> 
ftcGrflt 
ft Bdi tr 
JO 

it— 

AS 


ModcfSi 


HnrdF 

HarHFd 

Hariay 


HtberCp IA0b+3 

Htekom 

HlgtaSu 

HtohINY 

Hooan 

HotmD LOO 13 
HmEOA M 23 
HmFAH t 
HmFFI .Hte 3 
HmFRk Mr SA 
HmFAz 
J+me cf t 
Hn»5L 

Hoolnd J6 24 
Hoover 130 43 
HrznAlr 
HcrzlnG 
HmtBNJ t 
HwrdB L12a 4 a 
H ungTp 

HurtUB A5a 3 
Hntgln 

HntgBs A4 XS 

Haras 

Hvbrttc 

HvdeAt 

Hypanx 

HyfBkM . 


Medial 

I Medals 
M BO dtB 
MatnPrt 
Mantor- 
MartrG 
MereBel 


MercBfc 1A8 2J 
MerfiCa 

MarBPe 1J0 25 
Horsy uttblA 

torch Co 
MrdiNs 


1247 21 TO 19ft 20 —ift 
(60312*6 lift 12U— TO 
4X233 9% 9% 9TO 

57 7TO 7TO 7V6 + TO 
70 6ft 5*8 5% 

103 Sft 5 5—16 

1J 14021 20ft 20ft— 1 
121527% 27 27% + ft 

23 6223TO 21ft Z3% +2 

569012% 10% 12 + TO 

U 6*425% 23% 25% + TO 
13% WTO 
12ft 13*6 + 18 
13V6 U%— ** 
44 44% 

8% Bft— TO 
U 12TO— % 
10V) 1)%— *8 

15% 15*8— % 

740 34% 33ft Mft 
491 Wft 13ft 14% — TO 
724 *5% 64TO 65V. + ft 
14 UZ2IBTO 18% 18TO— *b 
193 5 5 5 + TO 

44 . 38031 TO WTO 30ft— TO 
a 7ft 6ft 7 — ft 

44 JjOWft X 20 — ft 
200 WTO fft 10W + TO 
. 196617% 16ft 16*8— TO 
10 60 16% 16% 1616— TO 

34 102 66ft 66ft 66ft +1 
XI J7BA32TO 31% 32ft + TO 
922 4% 4TO 4*6 

89967ft 65ft 66% 

7630 3% 3% 3 + % 

J S3 31% X 31 + TO 

15 3*8 Zft 3 — TO 
922722% 21 31*8— TO 

13114 12% 12% — 116 

914 Sft 5 5 

A 79125 24% 24% 

105 «ft 4% ift 
48 9 9 9 + TO 

24 102235 34ft 34ft— ft 
. 1M11N.11 1116 

4I811TO lift lift + ft 
44 1517 3M 30% 

IX 9 Bft 9 + ft 

016*6 15% 15ft + *6 

17112 11% 11% — *8 

i»a 27% a + ft 

AW lift 10*6 IBM 
M6 5% 5 5*6 + ft 

33 7 5% 5ft-=*ft 

*3 9ft 8ft r-i— TO 
165423% 22% 23 —ft 
41 5 4*6 5 

M2SM 3Ki 33% 

201 446 4*4 4% + TO 

JSe ZJ 1230 1018 9ft » „ 

3658 15% 13% -15 + ft 

1618929 ISM 19 —3 
1.97 SJ 1163 38 ~ 37ft' 37*4 — M 


24 


49929 28% 28*6 + TO 

1196 7 5*8 7 +1% 

1267 5*i 4ft STO + TO 
319227*1 25*6 27% +1ft 
6625 23% 24% — TO 

671 4% ift ift 
81525ft 24ft Eft + ft 
3013*6 13 13 — ft 

989*4 21ft 23*6 
494 4% Sft 3*6 + ft 
62426ft 24 24- — T" 

354 5% Sft 518— ft 
405611% 10% lift — ft 
588 8% 7% 8TO 


MTdBCB UD 5A 126335% S 
MTdBPf ISO *9 47 37 X 
MeriBS 36 23 


X xo 


2060% STO 60 +1 

100 5TO‘ Tft 2*6—918 
39861% 55% a —2ft 
TDM 101 W4 +1% 
16820*6 18*6 19% — Wb 
48344 42% 42%—? ft 


PoncMx .13 L6 


4 A 


PorPti* 

PorTch 


Pork Cm 
Purkori 40 


PoaocfTc 


PoaFdA ASb 


Palrvi 

Patriot 1A0 
PafriM 2J0 
PoutHr 1 
P out Pt 

Pewtov JM 


tmS21TO 19% 20% — ft 
231 11% Wft U% +1 
.12 14 47 STO |M. 8*6 — TO 

„ 84029% 26% 29TO + 46. 

Ate A 5732 13ft 13 13TO— ft 

IJSO 24 128246ft 45 45ft— 1 

10413% 12% 13% 

LOO 43 10420ft 20 20ft 
40 56 86514% ISft Wft— TO 
.rat 1 J 34 7*6 2*6 7 — TO 

t 31 9% 8ft 9% + ft 

JZr A 8026TOW 19 — TO 

42816 15ft 15% — TO. 
1864 1*6 1% Mb— ft 

554 3% n 3ft— ft 

733 Bft Bft Ift + TO 

54024*8 24TO 24ft 
211021ft 18ft 20ft— TO 
79019 77% 19 +1 

113 Hft 15% 15TO— % 
63 37% 35ft 37 + TO 

23613*6 WTO 13% 

421TO ZITO 21TO— TO 
212% 12% 12% + ft 
377 Sft 2*8 2*8— ft 
22 W — — 

21 76 

’SSSro 

4547 


Shontv* 
ShonSei 
Shpamt 

IK 

SfotnaR 
AOtean 
SmconS 
Sllkval 
smenx 
strtac 
SIvStMn 
SfoiAIr 
51 mein 
Staoln* 
STOCp 

5 HUB r a 

SMpeer 
Sky Exp 
BtoonTc 
SmlltiL 
SmlthF 
Society 144 
SoctySv 


40 A 


40 SA 


A6 


169ft 6916 69% 


VOoDd* 40 241218117 15ft 16% +ITO 
1688 lift lift 11% 

IX 8 r- 7ft ♦ ft 
39 7ft 6*8 7 

11612% lift 12ft— ft 
656 % TO 
11711% WTO 11 — TO 
310 4% 3 % 3M— ft 
032% 30ft J1TO ♦ ft 

154422ft 21% 21ft 

200 3ft 3 3%— TO 

At* J 144626ft 24ft 25ft -1% 

IA0 47 2127ft 21% 21 TO — TO 

MJ 3 2M 3 ♦ W 

WT 6W 3TO *18— TO 

33» 2.1 1572 WTO Wft 10TO 

420 Wft 12ft 13 — ft 

.. 9ms U 15ft— 3 

J* Zl 374 BW ITO iTO + TO 

1447 1ft 1% ITO 
I 1*4x7 *TO *TO 

01 W 9)6 Ift— ft 

tf 418 4% 4TO + TO 

356719% 18% WTO— 1 
50r 14 101 H*8 30ft 3H8 + % 
AB 3 5B7 9TO W8 »*— % 

J48 LI 17XITO 21% ZITO + TO 
0 Bft Bft 6*8 


VtodeFr 


iVWbch 


VWtCP 

VWtlirf 


27 7TO 

6*6 

7ft + ft 

II 



W 


1 

1395 7ft 

4* 


fnrj 


4 A 

038 SOTO 

19% 

» — % 

270413*6 

12% 

13*6 + % 

ly). 

34 

IA 

1X13*6 

I JTO 

IJTO— ft 

23217% 

16ft 

17ft + TO 




230 9TO 

Bft 

9% +1 

238424 
753 7 

20% 20% — Sft 
% 


IX 

8A 

635 11 TO 
1215 22TO 

WTO 

20ft 

WTO + % 
2Kb + TO 

3952 I 

WF8LB, 

JO 

as 

113224% 

31TO 

23% + % 

1094 Mft 
25516% 

14% 

15% 

Uft + TO 
U + U 

WMSB 

wmscs 

.70 

£ 

55113*6 
62 WTO 

13ft 

17*6 

13% 

lift 

5013 

12% 

)2%— TO 

WMrM 

.11 

IA 


4TO 

4ft 

B2 5 

4TO 

5 

WousPP 

A0 

27 

3X 15ft 

WTO 

15 + ft 

115417% 

W 

16% —1U 

Wave 16 



723 6ft 

«ft 

BTO 

102 9TO. 

9% 

9*6 + H 

Waxra ■ 

X 

A 

22513TO 

lifTO 

13 

303 STO 

2*8 

3% + % 

Webbs 

AO 

38 

81912ft 

lift 

12 




SonocPs 48 


SoMioG 152b 


srtxJFn 

Soutrer 

BwElSy 


15 H +1 
WTO 16 + TO 

7*6 7*6 + U 
3TO <M +1 
9% 9TO— TO 
3416 38 +316 
43% 47 +1TO 


scanwr iA0 


40 

10 

.10 

148 


SPSCCt! A6 


Sovran 

SpcMIc 


SptcCm 

NwCoY 


64412M 12% 12% 
11012*8 12ft 12% — ft 


Payehx 

Payczj* 

PeokHC 

PcarlN 

Pertesv 

PeirAW 

PagGkf 

PmnVo 


SpartlD 
spire 
swrsr* 
StafBtd JO 
Standv* 7 A0 
StCTOb 40 
SMMfC 
StResa 40 
Stondun 
StanfdT 
Startws IX 
Stansby 
StaSTB IX 


Jto L4 VETO XM 38*8 

40 24 917*6 I7TO 17% — % 

■ 171516% ISM WTO + TO 

1*3 27 23% 27 « 

1326 16*8 16M Hft— % 

9*1925*8 24% 2SM +1TO 
427 B% 8*6 8% 

31 53 213% 13% 13% 1 Stated 

A* 4 2695 W 9% 9TO + TO SSSt 
140a It 15048ft 46ft 47ft + ft Storre-i 

2A0 13 TSM6DM 59 60M + M 

2J0 64 3M34TO 34 34 — TO 

41 22 28231ft 30ft 30% 

14710ft 9% 10 + TO 

POOPEX 42786 14% Wfc lift +3TO 

PeoEpI 244 1X6 44721% 19M 2DTO + TO 

PeeEpfBZSO 64 149037ft 31% 37ft -Mft 

100 14 3141ft 40*6-4* +11 

* 25 ^ ^ ** 1 % or 

361 10% fft ]0 — TO l SSriH 
Subaru 
MbAirt 
SubrB 


Poop Be 
WPaaR 


stwtnf 

StmrSn 

sum 

StckYle 

StackSv 

Stratus 

StrwCis 


PbtpaW 

ftareGPt 

P kilnd 

PETCO 

IfoMB 

Petrmn 

Phrmct 

Phrmrio 

Phrmkf . 


LT2 4A 


PSFS 

PhttGt 

PhnxAm 

PhnAG 

PhataCa 

VBSSS 


JOo A 


A5e 4 


111123ft 22ft 23 — ft 
31 7*8 7*8 7*8 
103 Jft 3% 3% 

6*9 Zft Zft 2% 

517 27ft 27 27ft + TO 
439 3 2TO 3 + TO J 

1329 7*8 7% 7TO + TO 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 1985 


Page II 


roval of Manville Plan 


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*" By Smart Diamond 

r _ . • • ’> New YarkTimts Sayice 

NEW. YOR K — Lawyers in- 
volved m Manville Corps’s propos- 
al lo set up a trust ip pay asbestos 
' victims say the prospects for final 
L approval aregood. , 

After grapp&ns 15 years with 
jj. 1 thpitsanos of asbestos-related 
cfabns, ManviDe' Friday efiered to 

pay victims S2L5 biHion in the larg- 
;«f ■.'*«* health-rdaled settlement pro- 
posal ewer made by a U5. compa- 
ny.'. ' ’ r ' 

The offer calls far Manville to set 
up a fund to which shareholders 
would 'surrender half the value of 
. their stock and the coaqrany would 
gfactip moch of fts earnings for 25 

years. 

: The offer, approved Friday by 
the board of directors, most now be 
approved- ^ stockholders, unse- 
cured creditors, co-defendants and 
health claimants, as well as federal 
bankruptcy court. 

Robert J. Rosenberg, a lawyer 
and dK court-appointed represen- 
tative fen- all present asbestos vic- 
tims, said of the Manville proposal. 
*T like the financial terms very 
much and 1 think the committees 
win go for it." 

He said that the biggest objec- 
tion would t*e from stockholders, 
but that bankruptcy law provided 
for approval of a reorganization 
plan even if one class objected. 

Approval would allow Manville 
to emerge from bankruptcy pro- 
ceedings, which it initiated on Aug. 
27, 1982, after about 16,500 law- 
suits' claiming more than $j2 hii - 


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Um had been filed against it over 
^^“Ws-related healthproblems. 

. The fiber, widely used in insula- 
bon, appliances, clothing and other 
products, causes various debilitat- 
ing or fatal lung diseases, including 
““stosts and cancer. The diseases 
often take more than 20 years to 
and Manville. once the 
world’s largest asbestos producer, 
opected more than 60.000 H»im« 
toe company had estimated hs 
w «^l obligation at S2 billion. 

The largest fund previously set 
“P °y ? . U -S- company lo settle 
Health claims was S61S million, by 
A.H. Robins & Co. in connection 
with the Daikon Shield, an intra- 
uterine birth control device associ- 
ated with pelvic infections, sterility 
and spontaneous abortions. 

Manville's filing for protection 
of creditors under Chapter 11 of 
pie federal bankruptcy aide was 
intended to insulate the company 
from billions of dollars in claims 
while settlements were worked oul 
I t was considered a novel tactic 
because Manville was solvent. But 
legal experts say the plan back- 
fired. 

The company bad expected that 
the proceedings would eatable h to 
pay the claims over a period a lime, 
as individual settlements were 
worked out, without severe damage 
to its financial structure. Instead, 
bankruptcy court required the 
company lo provide for all future 
churns, based on statistical and epi- 
demiological analyses. 

Legal and financial experts say it 
was a landmark blunder and was 


bound to discourage other pre- 
emptive bankruptcies by compa- 
nies expecting large health claims. 

"The company could have dealt 
with each claim, year by year, in- 
stead of accelerating all claims and 
wiping out the stockholders " said 
one legal expert, who declined to be 
identified. 

The proposed settlement would 
oblige the forest products and min- 
ing company to pledge 20 percent 
of its annual profits indefinitely 
until all claims are settled. Man- 
ville's total eventual cost to emerge 
from bankruptcy could thus be wdl 
over $3 billion. 

The company conceded that the 
proposal would be a severe finan- 
cial hardship, but that it would at 
least result in a viable operation 
that could emerge from bankruptcy 
protection in 12 to 18 mouths. 

Tt will have an adverse effect, 
but there is only so much money 
and a lot of constituencies must be 
satisfied,” said Curtis B. Linke, a 
company spokesman. “Consider 
the alternative of perhaps the 
stockholders ending up with zero." 

He added that the company was 
likely to continue its no-dividend 
policy, set up just before the bank- 
ruptcy filing, for at least some 
years. 

Tim plan provides for a trust 
fund to pay the asbestos claims. 
The fund would include half of the 
company's 24 million shares of out- 
standing common stock. The trust 
also would be financed initially 
with $315 million from insurance 
claim* already received by the com- 


pany, $300 million in cash or other 
insurance payments the company 
expects to receive, and $200 mulion 
in cash and other receivables. 

From the fourth through the 
13th year after the plan is ap- 
proved, Manville would guarantee 
$75 million annually, and from 
then to the 25th year, up to $75 
million a year would be paid if 
necessary. Manville's 1984 net in- 
come was $77 million. The fund 
payments ore likely to be tax de- 
ductible and so would noi result in 
dollar-for-dollar reductions in 
earnings, the company said. 

Manville also agreed to pay un- 
secured creditors $250 mulion 
when the company emerges from 
bankruptcy proceedings and $175 
million to $250 million in the next 
three years. None of the unsecured 
creditors have been paid since the 
bankruptcy filing. 

After the approval by Manville's 
board, its president. Josh T. HuLce. 
g-ild the plan “provides a desirable 
alternative to tort litigation, on eq- 
uitable and efficient means of com- 
pensating tbc valid claims of all 
creditors and preserves Manville as 
a viable business." 


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Astrfr 
AHmF4 
Ahp-Pf 


9to 

4to + to 
3K 

Tto 

2K— K 
34b— to 


4*711*1 ITS* 114b 
1401 12K 1216 124b— lb 
242 IK IK Rb • 
249174* 171* 174* + Vt 
719 199. 14* IK 
1137K 371A 371* 
*00301* 371* 30 + 16 

238 24* 2* 24b + K 

94 5* 3 54b + 16 

14* 24b 7K 24* — to 
2*9221* 21V* 22V. + K 
1M7I2K B 124b— U 
303 216 Tto 216 + 4b 
271* U UK 1* +116 

45 41b 4% 44* + to 


B 


32. 3.1 


BKUV 
- BMJ 

BT Fncl 1. 
BVCOMh 
Boconfl 182a X* 
BncOpI iSO 13 
BcOklDf 250 10J 
Bncsrv 

BDTNCV 7 M ISA 
BkUM 

BKNHm L2S 3A 

BokFoi 

akrMto 

BkTrSC 1A0 U 
BkMAmpua US 
BorbGr 

Sartfan 1J» AO 
‘ BsTnB 


171 T1 4* UK H»— K 
4 m + lb 


5311 HWl 10W— Ml 
532* 23 2716 

10A*to 2*16 2*U 

37 24b 216 24b + to 

3*S 2* 28 +2 

25?® i/rv, *9to _ 
. 9 241* 2346 2349— 16 
1 1616 1*16 1*16 
13 916 ?V» 9 V*. 

1 1M6 Mto 1*16— to 
693716 37 3716 + V6 

eWJXSto ISM. 15to 
203 5 44* 5 

4424*16 4* 4*46 + 16 

1*16 10(6 1016 , 

257 0 916 74* + 16 

72516 25 25 

g-sr is i»b=s 

BoukNo JD 7J TO, 10 10 

SeSm .15« 32 3535 *J* - 

.BtfIFIr . ^ Tto 2ta 2to 

Puli— 1 t SQ3 -Dno 2 ZVm + Ml 

SS3J D41 IAK I4to MK 

BbttQV 32S1S 1416 15 + 16 

WWKi JW 3 2* 2J-* 

BorlUcr 22 ! m — to 

BloMtO 112 416 4 4 — to 

BIModun 1 fij Sj Sj u. 

njoTcC HI 3lb 2to 21b— J* 

BWI P# 1A5 125 Klfl* Mto 1*4* + W 

USE ,50 2A ™ +1 

Bloisky 84 2« “j* 

BIWOOT J3bl4A 9H0 «i ** 

UnhWrt 302 1% iw 

iSbrnm -10} 145114b 11 Tito- to 

ES5“ ^ 

Brkwtr 2954 *7* 

Orenamr Me 1 A 7 

BrontB 3* 23 521Bto 
OimM 
BdBCm 

BrooaF 5 94b 94* + 1M 

*16 *16 

44* 44*- to 


■fc* 


tto— to 
7 7 

*16 1016 +1 
9i3 74* 7» 7K 

22*1 UK UK 14K— "6 
JH T Ml 1 * 

J3r 3A 1707 * 94b 

1 4ft 
01x416 


A5 95 


BraUKI 
BrafeRs 

.BfUMRt — — 

BchpyF • 3711 

B«fW* 3399120 1M631 
Bvrmh .15* AS 3121 3 

3* 2Vb 
172 1 


BurtH 

BuHrNt 

fMrtrfld 


104* I OK 
77V. 20K— 14* 
3K 3K — 

49 K — 
2K TU 
K 1 


2.12 33 
310 70 


CFISI 
CFS - 
CLAul 
CNS 
CMLFn 
COMB 
CTG 

cuato „ _ 

Counor -140 3 
ComGwl ■ 
CopBcS M AO 
Corobln _ . 

• Carver • 
CMUISv AO* 43 
Cnrinnc 

. GORtfm _ , c 

CnSkSv A»2J 

ChJarSv 

CnPocC 

CPocMH 

■-.SSff .10013 
ttScpf UO 

.QtanD . 

■ Owtint 
. Qumfi 
Omfxun 


93S 9K g* OK- K 
10M14 TOTS 13K- » 
51 34b 34b J* 

W4 S ^ *3 

Atmroj « iw-i 
10 341 34b “46 
443 10K 10 B, £ 
5761916 

f 

SlSlIto^+T 

11420K W »to +1W 

0915 Ti ^ 

2*4 74b Tto 

Bfliaj* ™ l|to + » 

227 9K 5* 

«5a * 

49 4W 4 


74b- Mi 


TA* 1W 
J09 J 


*$ IS-' 03 
• ■ :§* % 
t % V: 
SI •f 


as 


: * -y 


85 


•a# 8 

■1 ‘;K ^ 
-•i *«•; s 

* •£ . 09 

It > 5 

■ v: 6^1- ^ 
: t v .ik 



OltAuT 

ctnnm 
Ckelnc 
CbBnk 
atcobi 
CtzFInl 

MO 

OFd DIB 2-10 
CtmMF 
CterStv 
CoastM 

Coats 
CotCmsf 
CotSvWt 
CmBBAm 
! CmlDd > 
CwNtFii Ifi* M 

' CmwRl JOe 25 
f Cmb+te 
f CmpVW _ , , 
I Cdwtak .12 b LI 
QWPOuL 
OnHzun 
CawRsh 
Cwpsue Jlo 
Comfrcx 
CdocCbI 

* 3 

cnmtM 

sas.* 


iiV'A - - 


o +ito 

® a S 1 s 

& 75 *57££ ^ Jl2 




Si 555 ^ 2% 

\ K + to 

j 1 — w 

35 35 


3 5K 
1303 *K 
Ml J* 
22 7V6 
35 


^3? *T 4^+lrt 

^ *ss 


“llto IT 1 * llto — ^ 

MtK 

M iK 

4to K 

1* 201* — J* 

’Sib 3to + to 


04 3V> 


MM In Nil 

im Hioh low Loi) are* 


ConiS oi 30? 112 
ClnSLfi 34 3 A 
Csuum 
CrftHav 

CrwWC 32 33 
Ctwtia SO 0J> 
CtMlnd 

C nm r* 

CuftCrs 

CusCunl 

Cut CO .74 3A 

cvtwnx . 


*1274* 271b 2716— I* 
TV* 7 7M— to 

M 716— V. 
3to 3to— lb 
3IK 2146—11* 
*K *K 


6*0 749 
19 3U 
mw 
3 *K 


40 2 

. IK 

lii— k 

3487 


to + 

4410 

Bto 

9 —1 

4*10 

9 

9K— to 

a 4 

Sto 

Ito— to 

4* 6 

SK 

SK— to 


92 OK 
97 SK 
383 9to 
7714 
54* 
25 7 
39 OK 
812 54b 
345 «K 
397 3K 


DAB 1 

DM1 

DNAPun 
DST 30 

Dal El 04) 

DotoPc 
DalaTr 

Datcpy 
Darroo 
Doxarwt 
DBMT J4a XJ 20338 
DbrtsSv « 2 

DHoQa 
DbfiiMA 130 
CtonlMa 130 
Dm) 

DefCon SO 
Dev«lcn 
DkfcwiA 
DtdumB 
DtcScov me 
WrcRa 
DMEie 
Dtstrlb 
Dtvl un 
DomMI 
Dnfcocf 
DDIEfli 
Donti* 

DraiBb 
OrbrfCn 
DruoS* 

DualLlX 
Dwtoh) 

Dyotm 


X7 


.10* 23 


.12 33 
230e 29 


1 OK + to 
516 516— 16 
*16 9to + to 
1316 14 +16 

54* 546 

7 7 

74* OK — 16 
5K 5Mi 
54* * — K 

a IK + to 
44b — to 
2 2 
1214 U U 
*C210to 94b 101b— 4b 
4510 Tto 946— 16 
1545 Mb t 64b + to 
821316 1316 1346 
10 «to 4to 416 — 

B33 5K 5to 516 

3* 5% 5(6 516 

114 1246 124* 12K 

25 «h K to + 16 

130 149 IW 149 + to 

32 54b 5 54b + to 

93154* 15to 15to— 46 

1388 flt fit * 

5* 146 14b IK + to 

H 4 346 34*— to 

959546 9216 9546— to 


rA 


U*9 63 5629 209* IHto 19 — 16 
416 + to 


A0 93 


221 *16 
229 m 
12 34b 
112 3 


*7* 

4(6 

3 

24* 


24* 


EB Mar 

EagTwiC 

Cattmt . 283 

EatVon a* IS 

EdgStls 

Elctmgs 

exccos 

EawCa* 130 2 S 

Eacara 

EnrVM 

En*xR» 

EnaMaa 

EailaA 130 S 3 
ErchGd 

§S«C> 232 1 A 

Exar 
exadlon 
Exnosoc 


*4 Oto 746 
2 4b to 
1920 216 2 
4431 2946 

59723 1916 

2001746 1*4* 
31X64 Vi 13 
113 49 AIK 
3578 5K 546 
30 0 0 

535 1 16 

287 * 6 

124.. 24 
204 316 2K 
127K 27to 
0*9913 UK 
1071216 llto 
514154b 13K 


816+16 
2to +to 

SSmiZIw 

17-16 

14K 

484* — K 
54b 

V- to 
* 

*2* 

27K + 16 
13 

1249 +.16 
154b +146 


15 


2A 

S3 


XI 

53 

33 


FCP 
FMlwt 
FolcLtS 
FoWhlH 
FkTNII 
Ftddrpl 335 
PMNFn 30 
FMInd 
FWHBC 30 
FnTms 1 A 0 
FhwAun 
FABCpdI 
FAB 6 PBB 30 
FBncTx A 0 
FICaptS 137 
FCanHd 
FlCann 30 23 
FIColBa 33 a 23 
FDIMal 

FExac Df 1108733 
FFdAust 
FPMBCPH 30 73 
FtFnd L 7 » 4 J 
FFneni 

FlIndBC 1306 13 
FUwpl 330 43 
FJar MB 238 83 
FtPaaMJ 

FPoapt 1.99 133 
Fluids 

Flbnhia 130 U 
Fstoutf 1.12 1 J 


Fttxttl 
Ftoans 
F locb In 
FtaCygr 

For Bair 

Forms) 
FIWWII 
Forum w) 
Form wttS 
FndrFn 
FrthFn 134 
FourSTr 
Frnktds 230 
FrnkBc ‘ 
FraeSG 
FrtFSLh 
Frosts 
FmiPh 
FflUW 


2175 a iff 
510 15to 154b 1549 + 49 
317 Ato *K *Vb 
JO Tto 249 24b 

305116 50+ 51 +to 
4 I9K 1916 19to + H 
316 1U 316 
23*46 3* 3446 + 16 

1120 27 28 +1 

4 SM Sit 546— to 
7*816 *716 *8 —I 

5 9V6 946 9V6 

1* tto M6 *to +K 
453816 30 301*— to 

3701 5 3to 4K + to 
722 22 22 

*29 UK 1319 MJb— to 
1119K 1916 1946 
725231b 23to 23K + K 
17*22 2044 22 +1K 

0 55 54 55 + K 

83716 1716 3716 
29 * 4 * 

*5816 5816 5046 
104016 4tto 4816 +1K 
IS 354* 34K MK + K 
19 9 9 9 

61516 IS 1516 + 16 
7933 32 33 +1 

*1916 1916 1916 
1155746 554* 57Vi +1K 
*94146 4116 4116 
4M19V6 1116 19 ♦ 44 

moSfc k att 

ib 4 !t *5 It 

122716 2716 2716 
1502049 19K 88 ■ — K 
*52 499 41* *16 — 49 

S 3 3 24* 24* — to 

3492916 284* 29 + to 

5* SVi SK 516 

... *5016 5016 5016 

30O 33 1*32224* 194* 22 +2K 

23MBA 14392149 Wj. 19^-IK 

.10 34 143 31b 34* OTk + to 


35a S3 


.Wa 13 
.10 XI 


30 13 


43 


GACLa 1750 MS 73 JK 
GglOCftC 7*75 944 

Gombro 33 a 3 ITllOto 
GTotSM* 30 1 X 9 Sfxfto 
GTalSof ua HA 
GanesB • 130 a 1 * 


8 to 9 %-to 
fto lOto + to 
... Oto 8 W 
_ Oto OK IK— to 
414256 4016 41 —116 


OooWbh 
OtenGpf 2 JSC U 

Glam is 34e 

GMXH 30o 1.1 
GoKICo „ 
GWFW A7I 43 
GoKfR* 

Go [dale 
OwCvcl 

Goody M U 
GIAMb 
GtAmRs 
GrbERun 
Guar Bn 


73 3 
42B 

W8 716 


2«i 219 + 16 

28 +16 




100 2J6 
74 Ito 
39 3 


2to 

116 

2to 


U 1 ?* “tt Itt- tt 

77A816 TO 18 — to 
*3 1216 12 1216 


HPSC 

Ha mil on 
HamOpf 1-7* T ,ifl 
HartcnO 
Hortvns 

Hortpn* 

HBWhC 
HowtllF 
hua wf 
HcrDEn 
HJ-Port 
Hlohvld 
HlnrsL 
HhadPfc 


30r 13 
I A 0 43 


351 9K 
9 tto 

n»„ 

337 IV* 
22* 4 to 
74* 
4 SO* 


9to Oto- to 
ito tto— to 

T 7* rff 

344 ito + tt 
Tto 7to- to 
Sto 5K 


HmFOMO 30* 1A 
Hooper X* 14 

SStf J» ■> 

SUSopf '*■' 

HvdFpp 

HViehun 


493016 20(6 29(6—1 
192 tto bit tto— to 
842 Alt 3«b Ato + 16 

a 5» ^ 

-•* 1Si2KSto- fc 

B»tt 1216 Tito- to 

5*01116 l«b »» + * 

074 Ito IK lKi + tt 
*6 IW IK Oto + to 
S JK 7 K 2 K 
“ *16 6 *«i + to 


Ltf 7J. 


I 


IDB » 

I DC 

IPC 

IRE Pn 

IIIMMa 

l mark 

imimun 

loiprBC 

imrre 

IlKDRSB 

IndSqS 

Indinsr 

lndR#5 

l nil to 

rnttoo 

inslGwl 

InDGun 

ICP^ 

in&lCp* 

I mo Bar 

lflt«b 

inlrSBS 

IdtrcDv 

iniLfo 

i mk# g 


35 At 


13* IIJ 
I A0 O 


740 
*32 tto 
34 Itt 
445 316 
3750. 

. 4 ito 
4 Sto 
591 Tto 
445112 
193 2tt 


39 S9 —2 
Oto tto + to 
Vto 94*— lb 
3 3to 
49 49 —1 

316 38b— (b 
Sto SK 
7» 716 + to 

» llj+l* 


2tt 24b- hi 

S91H6 to* l*to n „ 
3993416 33 32*— 2K 

*79 9to 2V6 
3 2* 214 
331 tto tto 

mu« « 

59 Oto Sto 
& 

MM B 

SMS TfiS 


349 + Hi 

3* 

tto + to 

MK +1* 
Oto ^ 
7 * to 

a + * 
sto- to 


InrmtCo 

intAm 

IniConl 

InCrna 

InDalry 

IniFIm 

InFIm wt 

inFlm un 

IntHRS 

InThrun 

Inlrwsi 

InviDs 

I twins . 

invSLP) 

Irwin o 

Irwin nv 

lionwr 

Isrllnu 

ItoYokd 

l venn 


So Ml In N*t 

U0t HkXi Low LOtt Clfoe 
1774 IK 74. 04* + to 

902 *49 *K *49— to 

1124 SK 5 Sto + K 

190 Ito 99b 94* + to 

31*5 *1 *5 

32 *9 to 99 

5 lb to (b 

31 146 116 

532 349 3K 

340 OK IK 


AO A 1 


2J5 UL7 
Jtr A 


75 tto Ito 
5 216 3 K 
407 ID* 10(6 
33 4 Ml 416 
ID 349 39 * 

5 74 * 244 

412316 22 
53747 V* 4 * 9 * 

B* 4 MHb lOto I Oto — to 




88 

55 

99J5Vi 

IS 

15 - to 

Jto — tt 




209 4 

Sto 

Oto 

■to 




1955 9* # 

SK 

9 + to 

Uto— to 




3749 10 

Vto 

9 lb— to 

&>M — U 




30 Bto 

■ 

t 





ft* Jta 

jk 

IT» + tt 




18 

t 137 17 to 

t*to 

ITto + 5* 





393 3 

2K 

2% + S 


RoyGra 



*33 K 

to 

— 

22 —IK 
4*to 

■ s 1 


1 J ^1 

JMB 

184 

9.1 

23 

11 

18 




38 Itt 

ito 

ito — tt 




A 17K 

17U 

17K 




334 4to 

4to 

4to 




2* 4to 

4K 


Joshm 

1.40 

48 

39931(0 

29 

29 — 2to 

1 — » 1 


KnOvKS .9* 
Kylnvct JO 
Kaycon 
KevsHrt 
Kinolnl 
Kinney 
Kiatnr) 
KloafG 
KnapeV 
KvleTc 


95*7 2*K 2*K — 46 

2 111* llto llto 
121316 1216 12(6 
1*22116 1916 2016 
II 0 I 

a 84* oto Bto 

15 716 7to 716 + 16 

172a 59 21893344 2849 29 — 4M 
1A0O 3J 3*3016 3716 30 —to 
2* 3(6 349 34* — Mi 


3.7 

2S 


.108 1.1 


Loom a .158 
Lodtwpf 2JH XI 
LdlT As .1* 1A 
Lancer 

LndlPV .ISs 1A 
Landing .158 1-7 
LnneTI 
LomtCp 
L radDv 

Lfnlne 

UncFIn ISO 15 
LJncLfo SO 23 
UncSv 

LMlGSPl 1J5 70S 
LouGP) IS* 10J 
Luskin 

LvdnPIt J78 5.1 
LyanM) 


831 9% m 99b 
29536 31 3316-316 

2012M 1116 llto— 16 
538 MVj 13to 14W + 4b 
lint fb M 

Bto 9 + 1* 

2to 214 
■to 016 + to 
IK IK 


12 9 
II 2to 
*4* 016 
25 IK 


1428 « 

5K 

SK 

+ 

to 

2 Sto 

51 

29to 

51 

794* 



T» 2K 

2K 

Tto 

+ 

Vb 

35 llto 

uto 

llto 


to 

231 TVS 

17to 

ITto 

— 

to 

90312 


12 



*19 *(b 




to 

1819(0 

19K 

19(0 

+ 

to 


M 


MCI wt 

MCMCp 

MSI El 

ManIRp 

MogAP ) 

VIMOSCC 

Magna I 

Moans) 

MaMta 

MarPat 

Marlin* 

MdtftAB 

MaulLP 

Max ca 

MachTc 

Msdar 

MalrdB 

MaihdA 

MMhdB 

MafrTI 

MsrroSv 

MavrPk 

MtchJ 

Micrbto 

Mlndtn 

MlnaSaf 

MnrRs 

Modlolr 

MonAvl 

Monar 

Marlan 

MuttnA 

MullnB 

Mutto 

MuHFS 

MutREI 

Mu toil 


J4 X2 


J82T J 
JOr IS 
2JN81A* 


IS** lib 
12 11 
3 216 
1*1 416 
in 3K 
54 to 
1541 llto 
51 946 

}7 IT 

59 to 
729 4 

.3*319 

27 4to 
2744 | 
3*5134* 
.12 3 581134* 

.10 3 101316 

SOD 1.1 20 24b 

73S4I9 
421*99 
J4D 73 13x816 

608 4 
211 

1j04 1A 573 

JOa 14 136*4 8K 
235 84* 


.15 2J 


AOs 13 
AD* X7 


47 416 
23 11% 
219 S 
1* 5K 
* 

1577 41b 
104 |V% 
II 9(6 
1259 S 


Itt Itt- tt 
II IT 
2K 21b 
41b 416 + to 
3W lib 
to to 

15K I* — lb 

9 9 -16 

19 199b + 9b 

U 1* 
to to 
IK 39b + to 
45 52 +7 

3to Ito 
44* 44* 

716 7K + to 
1316 13to + to 
1319 I3to 
UK UV6 
29b 299 

1*K 19 +2K 

1416 1499 + lb 
I Oto + K 

\ ‘tt + * 
73 73 

0 8 — 

I Bto + to 
* *16 + 16 
IK IK 
4K 5 + to 

SK 5K 

Stt 3tt + K 

IK Ito 

ft ft + tt 


Nonomt 

NarrgC U0a 7A 
NtBusSV 
NlGuard 
NParaa 
HIRItV 

NwAFn I 
NV Mar 
NwtdB un 
Nwgk wt 
Nissan OH 
Nor 1*0 
NCarSL 
NoTrutt 232 
NwEna 
NwNOsI 247 
Novoun 
Nawsca 40 
NuVksn 


141 Sto 4to Ato— 16 
*04399 41 to 42 — to 
37B18K I7K IB + to 

2728 1314 llto 1116— 9b 

... .. 4 

2tt 4 
1316 
34 


3to + to 
2*16— to 
2to 



1*0 

1996 

A 

to 

2(0 


11 

is*. 

13 


183 34 

34 


551 

20 


,S ff 

12 

112 

371 

Stt 

Ito 

ft 

88 

4 

TVS 

7to 

38 

797 71 to 

IBto 

■8 

9 

Wl 

£ 

3(0 

2# 


58 

2to 

Zto 

XI 


Uto 

i4to 


74614K 

MK 


OCMLIq 
OKCutl 
OMI CP 
Odd Nan 
Oca*Md 
Oce-NV .22c 
OfLgpfA 
OOUWPt 
OlKntPf 141 
OldNtB 
OldRgpl U* 24 
OnsLbt 141*114 
Opto 
OotlcSp 

OshBG A 41 14 
OttiUBB 47 14 
Ovralno 

Oxocopt 3401504 


44 


14 


5A 


141) 

11 

11 

12(0 

11K 

ttto + to 

820 3(0 

3(0 

3to 

442 9 

no 

8(0— to 

489 ttto 

12 

12K— to 

3421K 

21K 

21to + to 

14 IK 

Ito 

IK— K 

90 Ito 

Ito 

ito + (o 

138 33V. 

32 

32to— K 

ails*) 

ISto 

ISto— K 

48 4910 

46(0 

49K + (0 

S31SK 

15 

ISto — to 

3(5 *to 

4K 

*k— to 

178 Sto 

4to 

5K— lb 

97532 

29K 

29to— 2K 

8*30 

27to 

28 —2 

2to 

2to 

2to 

117 2tb 

lib 

2 



PCAInt 


132 4 

Sto 

4 



PMC Of 1*0 

63 

124 

33(0 

24 

+ to 


PtiCpfD 180 

63 

W27 

35 

27 

+1 

2tt+ S 



9 

9 

9 


Itt + tt 

PacliCr 


15323 

22K 

22* 

— to 

3 + to 



U 5 

5 

5 


ISto +2 



1224 

nvt 

24 

+ to 

15 

PdpCppf 250 

93 

12327V, 

27 

27 

- to 


Pottocn 

Pairkun 


PoarRSn 

PwfcPk 

PserCh 140 

PonlnFd 

PaHall 40 

Panto 

PfctFII 

PoniAp} 

PotOv 

PtHel vto .14 
PTHolnv .1* 


I 


34 


135 9 816 9 + (6 

14 1Mb 9 91b- tt 

1032 7K 796 7(6— 16 

447 IK I OK 
JK 3(6 3(6 
4721(6 2116 2116 
3*413)6 7M 13V) +1 
729 2* 29 +1 

47 116 IK 116 + K 
llto llto llto + lb 
2393 lltt llto llto + to 

lit to to to 
Tto 7to 
7)6 716— to 
IK Ito 

716 1019 +2to 
tto Mb— to 
Sto sto 
2K Tto 


74 719 
ttt Tto 
137 ito 
071016 
84 7 
4 Sto 
20 » 
1*9 
I5W 
295 ttto 
• *» 2W 
1* 9to 
48* * 


Phffliun 
PhnxMd 
Ptwtron 
WiviTc 
PM rae 
PbBO 
PlttBr 
PMftnft 
PtnRspi 
Ptvcatt 
PaaM I 
PraBRW 
PfdHlts 

fft fj-j f ft /M 14 

PraGM 1,94*104 2042211) I8K 1 Bto —IK 

pSS!; 1258 ia» 2021 MJb SOto 2M9-J 


9(6 «16 

— _ tto 7)6- V) 
2542116 2116 21K 
30 Alii 416 4V) 

15* MK 14 14K — (6 

18 13 13 13 


Prlmg 

PraMad 

Prog F0 

ProvBc 

vIPtVBs 

PrudFn 

PuMEq 

PuinTr 

PvffflO 


42* 74 
I 


UO 3A 


1*4 Sto TVb 2K + to 

125 4K 4K 4K 

*3 UK 13K 1316 
95116 51 51 — to 

251 316 3 3 -16 

4211 Uto II + K 
51 IK IK 2K 

1341 41 • 4) 

44 3K 3 3K + K 


OT&T 

Auanlc 


2414 Itt 
100 2*9 
* 3 


IK- tt 
2K- K 
3 +16 


RHNB 
RSI Cp 


RalnrR 

RemHO 

Royrtfl 

RaalAm 


70 M 

JP 

-jBfiJSPk 

349 tto 
*1 Mb 


Uto 1 SK — to 
Itt 2K + K 
2T9 31b— K 
W M 

Ito 

3d M 


Sain In NBI 

1005 Hian Low Last Oi*o* 

Raebak 2247* 249. I9K 24K +4K 

Rotldn I IB024VJ 13 23 -Ito 

RolbLfe 140a 4A 509 39 39 

Rttilnd 742 99b 4K tto 

R8SIMO 49* S I49I9V. I9K 19to + K 
R lemon SX 7 ito *to— to 

RvrsdG AOe 9A 434 41# 4to 4K + to 


SK 

SPiPhS 
SPI Sus 
SaoeAl 
sageDri 
StHIGd 
SolmNt 
Sallck 
Sand Reg 
SIManB 
Santos 
Sosol 
SavrFd 
Saxtnln 
ScanOwt 
ScanO un 
vJSchak 
SdCam 
ScalCh 
SaoBnk 
Sadtwb 
SaamFr 
SaatlaT 
Setsmeun 
Shan lev 
SMseid 
ShapGs 
ShoWM 
ShoraStf 
SlerR S3 
SlerR 84 
SlIvLlS 
SIvKkW 
SlmKar 
SlmnFis 

is ssn s* 


JO IS 


Jt 2A 
1 

JOr 1.1 


.14* S 
JO 13 


JOr 1A 
A0 2.9 


U 


_.. jNIs 32 X2 


71 8K 7K 7K— K 

S* S 389 I3K I OK 1116— IK 
1014 *K 9K 9K— K 
J2a 13 19 19 19 

24 IK IK JK— to 

1.33*10.1 949 UK I Tto l3Vb— P9 

21 9to Oto 9K — to 

1907 2116 3)to 211b +1M 
4* lOto 10 TO — Mi 
A0D 3S M 3416 23to 24 
.ma 1.9 1925 4K 39. 4K + tt 

.148 44 *23 3to 2 2 —to 

+ .to 




142 MS 

SwWtrs 1A4 52 

Snuarvl 

SicnWst 

StarG lo .108 2J 

StarTe 

Startal 

5IWBCP 1J0 54 
SIwBw) 

SMB Pl 220 13 
StwBiir 230 *4 
Store Vs 
MarE wt 
Strata 
StrtkPt 

SfrrtiRo 3S0* 9S 

Sulptrg 

Sun Eat 

SwiWM 

Sunlitc 

SuwBc 124 3A 
Sutran 

Sven Cal 40 b 1.9 
Swsdlw 41 1A 
Svntcpf 275 I0S 
SvrSup* JO 2A 
Syslnst 


^ 'K-ff 

32* 2to Ito 2to + to 
10 Uto 15 ITto +2K 
210 2K 2(6 2V)— K 
470 I Oto 10 1016 + to 

90 MK 1016 lOto + 1* 
*3 Uto 14, 14 — K 

2*8 Itt Itt lib 
354427V* 241* 27to +1K 
2627V) 2*to 27to +1 
88 4K 4K 4K 
1708 tt + 

» 22K 24 +IK 

9* 14K 1*K UK 
2K 2K 3K 
3001599 Uto 1419— to 
74101* TO* lOto 
0* 9to 91* 99* 

Wtt 5? 

2 14 14 14 

1M6 1*16 UV) 

63* 3* 3* 

50739*6 37K 39 — K 
0 ito 4U. *19 
1022216 21K 2216 +1K 
701 to K K 
84 1816 1056 IW , 

10 IK 0 IK + to 
200 UK 121* 13K + K 
327(6 27K 2716 
3 4(6 *K *K— to 
50* 3to 3 3K + to 
7 41* 4K 416— to 
*07 4 3K Ito— to 
1» IK Itt Ito 
7024 2219 22K-1K 

25 4K A 4 — K 

452916 28V) 2816—1 
103319 Bto 3216— to 
098 OK 74k Tto — 16 
319 3K— to 

Ht ve 

^ ^ +j 
3 3 — to 

9 9(6 + 16 

3(6 316 — K 

748(6 48to 4016 
*3 2K 2K 2K 
90 Uto 141* 1* +116 

191916 19(6 19(6 
111 3*K 25K 2tto + to 
Mil Id* 10K— K 
209 2)6 TV) 216 


21 4K 
42 IK 

821 tt 

4439 
W IK 
23 3(6 
9*2 916 
32 3K 


TEL OH ; 

TRVB 

TSInd 

TSCCP 

Tocvita 

Taro VI 

TavIrOv 

Tchdvn 

TchCoal 

TacoPr 

TICinw) 

TlanB 

Tel Me* 

TenVEn 

TeraMa 

Teva 

THmAV 

Thundr 

TldeRh 

Tlmlv 

TakloF 

TpBraa 

Tor Roy 

TWnCtry 

Tovala 

TmNLs 

Tmsid 

TrovRt 

TriS tar 

Trsirwl 

TrSirun 

TrtbSwtj 

TrlcoPd 

TrtnRsa 

TrtoTch 

TrttonG 

TrltpfC 

TrsINJ 

TurlPor 

TrnrBwt 

202 DM 


lAOeliS *4210 
341 216 
AS* 919 
2 IK 

140 2tt 
SI 2to 
>1*8 7 
200 to 
A0*2*7 22 116 

*3*1* 

t 112 Bto 
JSrlBJ 30454 tt 
A0 55 48510K 

I 259 Itt 
JT7e 1A 507 4to 
SB 4K 
.108 11 158 4to 

J3e X3 


2to 




10 + M 

Sto 

. 91* + to 

IK 119 
549 

& 2K— to 

^ -ffJT’tt 

Ito Ito 
15V6 1519 + K 

3 'Z\ 

91* 10K +1 
ito ito 
31* 4K + (6 
319 4K 
4K 41* + K 



SK 

5V, 

5K 





ttto 

12K 




■0 

88 

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3*; 

3K 

— 

to 



Ato 

7 

+ 

to 

143511 

10K 

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+ 

to 

1055 

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910 

fto 

— • 



3(0 

3VS 

3(0 



23* 

410 

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— 

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17K 


+ 


505 

9 

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191 

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ft 

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1390 

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38 

38(0 

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7to 

7to 





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232 

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152 15K 

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39 5)0 

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44 llto 

llto 

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188 

48 

4740(0 

40 

40K — to 

UFdBk 

52 

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80 

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554 llto 
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into 

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451(0 

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18 

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USvAdPf 



241 3K 

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41 4tt 

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US Ploy 



114 13K 

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13 — to 

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1 Sto 

sto 

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49 

47 

47 -J 

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138 3(0 

3 

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UVUBk P4X75 

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43 

44 

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Ui 


VMSft 

VtolRi 

VocOrv 

VallAsc 

vawtgun 

VielAwt 

Valero 

vtFsdi 

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VictMkr 

VlewAAS 

vi poor 

VoF»t 

VWaRa 




Jfl X913SX 

139 7b 


.92 23 


AOO 2J 


.18* 14 
JO# 3 


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15*3319 31to 
16 K 
W tt tt 

3034(9 m 
1 * 111 * 11 
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171716 17K 
20*101* 10K 
314217 151* 

2S110K 81* 
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t 

678 28-% 

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WIMTWt 


284 Stt 

Stt 

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593 4tt 



itretHG 

290 132 

463 4K 

stt 


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3*4 Wtt 

10K 

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wchsp 

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1571Mb 

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1)78131 

218727 

22K 

23 —Ito 

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3712 

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18# 48 

3784 

23 

24 +1 

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208 IK) 

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Z 


1 

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49 Stt 

Stt 

MO 

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1S7 9to 

9(0 

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an Exchange Opti 

Figures as at close of trading Friday. 


Option 1 0L-iai 

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Put* 

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r— Net traou M-Joanc ottrfn* o-Otd 


Mutual 

Rinds 

Figures os of close of IraOino Friday 


HE A YORK (API— 
Tn# loiiowina auoia 
iion, suanxied bv me 
Noiional Auoculion 
o> Securilias DaaL 
*>5 me .arc Uto uric 

fi al wnwsi I tone 
belurifia# could have 

Men Mid (Her Auet 
vaiuci or Douoni 
■ .due plan Mies 
cnorgel Fridov 

BM As* 
AARP invs): 

CopGr 1022 NL 

CRUM 15J3 NL 

CenBd 1520 NL 

Gin Inc 1727 NL 

TiFBd 15A0 NL 

T.FSH 1521 NL 

abt Family; 

Emra 1429 15AI 

Glhlnc 1X141655 

Sec Inc unavail 


100 Fa 

101 Fd 
Boston Co: 

Copad 
M odi 
5pGlh 
Bowser 

Bruce 

Bull & Bear Go: 
CaoitG 14 AJ NL 

Eoullv 10-71 NL 

Galen 10.11 

HtYM 1434 

CatMun 10.19 

Calvert Group: 

Eoullv 1824 

Inco 15+4 

SOCHU I9A8 

TsFL 1059 

T*FL 15J* 

Calvin Bullock: 
AMGt 7A9 &19 

Batan 1239 1154 


Ullllnc 

178* 1884 

ADTEK 

182V 

NL 

Acorn F 

3U1 

NL 

Ahiluro 

1X59 

NL 

aim Funds 



CvYld 

1283 1287 

Gmwv 

9.15 

929 

HIYId 

988 1057 

Summit 

*80 


AMEV Funds: 

Cacrill 1121 1225 

Grwtli 1189 1AM 

Sped 19JI NL 

US Gvt 957 IQAi 

Alliance Coo: 

Cham 9.«3 1025 

HKSrd 10*1 1123 


HJYId 
Inti 
Marta 
Survey 
Tech 
Alpha F 


Amor CooJlol: 


9J4 1031 
1222 1421 
9J5 WU2 
1X89 15.18 
1822 2002 
HUM 2059 


Cara 

Cmstk 

Entra 

E*di 

Fd Am 

OvSee 

Grow 

Haror 

HI YM 

PravW 

Ventr 


0.94 720 
1197 1527 
(225 1415 
4438 

KUO TUI 
1122 1225 
2444 

1114 14J* 
10.13 108* 
1827 1921 
10A4 1143 
2127 2325 
451 48* 
1538 1081 


American Funds; 


A Bal 
Amca 
a Mun 
Bofid 
EuPOC 
Fd inv 
Gnaitii 
lnomn 
ICA 
NEco 
N Para 
TcxE 
«Ml M) 
A GttlFd 
A Hants 
A Invert 
A Inv In 
AmMed 
A NtGtn 
A mine 


Anoivt 

Amatng 


M971 1130 
144 94* 
1008 1755 
1X2* 1449 
1551 10*5 
1X98 1419 
1481 1019 
1134 1U3 
1X15 1328 
T7J2 1X93 
851 9 JO 
1007 1057 
95* 1838 
830 951 
242 NL 
7.19 NL 
923 NL 
3013 NL 
4.18 448 
1054 282* 
027 071 
142.95 NL 
733 NL 


Axe HouoMan: 

Fnd B 1032 1145 

Incom 47* 117 

Slock UB 080 

Babu» Group: 

Bond 15* NL 

Eniera 1X47 NL 


Gwtn 
UMB St 
UMB B 
BLCGt 
BLCInc 
BartBV 
G«l 
Beac Hill 


1153 NL 
1143 NL 
1024 NL 
1013 1743 
lOU 174* 
1150 NL 
1520 NL 
2041 NL 


Bonham Capital: 
CaTFL 1029 NL 

CafTFI 9.93 NL 

Cap NT 1027 NL 

Berper Group: 


Burnt. 

19a1 

3022, 

DNTC 

105* 1L34I 

Go/1 vnaveil 



5.17 

5571 

Dreyfus Gm: 


FedTx 

1X74 11.191 

a Bnd 

17 AT 

NL 1 


X10 

173 

CaiT. 

1384 

NLl 


1325 1*29] 

Drevf 

1389 1421 

NV Tax 

10*4 1089 

GNMA 

1482 

NLl 



4.9C 

interm 

1287 

NLl 

utils 

083 

7Ji 

Leva*- 

1928 2385 


289 

2.25 

GmOo 

I0J1 

N| 

US Gov 


75C 

NY 7« 

l€.l4 

N| 1 

Celt A 


*83 

Sol Inc 


NLl 

FrdGG unavall 


Ta* Et 

1*^2 

NL! Fd alSW 

M25 12 1« 

Tnrd C 

*25 

NLlFdTrGI 1 

UJ2 

NLJ 

Eaol Gth 

725 

8.47: GIT HY 

1078 

NU 

Eaton Vance. 

! 

GIT IT 

9 J3 

“L 



CIGNA Funds: 

Aarav 1148 1251 
Grwtli 
HIYId 
Incom 
MunJB 
vahw 

Colonial Fu 

Capo 

CPCsn 
CPCSII 
Fund 
GvSec 
Grwth 
HI YM 
Incom 
Online 
Opt 1 II 
Tax Ex 
Columbia 
Head 




1322 1425; GTPac 1*44 NL. 

1143 1349' Gale Op 1457 nQ 

7.1D 7 7*1 Gen Elec inv: 

4*2 528' Elfnln 1143 


11.18 IX" 
7J7 7, 

S3 l 

1153 IX 
12541X1 

F ^n«J 


%% at 

2.13 230 P TC 

c ^* 1b ^ ,: nl SX 

114* NL 
953 923 5dOH 
446 NL S«{|n 
144 149 5*1 Fin 
2759 NL SclMtt 
2019 NL Sdy« 

ODD NL SelMH 
852 NL SrITch 
102* 1757 fdUtll 
Criterion Fundi: Sgesn 

Cmrce 10*3 1142 Thrllt 
10.01 1HL41 Trwxl 
1028 11X FlduCdP 

10J3 Financial Proo: 
9.9* 1843 Pvi» W. 
1548 IXU 
1040 103! 

17431 NL 
Wl 47 NL 


lirvOl 

Lowry 
Pilot 
QuaiT 
SunMt 
US Gw 
DFA SOI 
DFA IM 


Dean Witter: 

ColTF 71.15 NL) 


DvGt r 

DIvGI 

HIYId 

lodVl r 

NYTxFr 

Nil Use 

Option 

SaaiTx 

TaxAdv 

TaxEx 

USGvt 

WrWW 


„ NL 
1359 1417 
1145 NL 
(02* NL 
7 JO NL 
9.91 NL 
1098 NL) 

unavaJI 
104410881 
1042 NL{ 
unavall 


Decot 
Detaw 
Deleft 
Tx Fra 
Delta 
DIT CG 
DIT AG 
DIT Cl 
iDG Dhr 
DodOc Bl 
DadCx 5) 

DMeTx 
Drexel Burnham: 


FndTx 
HIYId 
Indus! 

Incom 
Select 

WTtdT 

8-53 NUFst Invastors: 

444 n 0 Bnd Ap 1244 1X43 



Disco 

Govt 

Grwth 

Incom 

IntlSec 

Nat Res 

NYTF 

90-10 

Optn 

Tax Ex 


1153 1X60 
1144 1237 
OS7 139 
291 *46 
1231 1349 
524 533 
1X90 1X91 
1X89 1449 
521 542 
943 10.17 


Delaware Group: Fk m s hto Group: 

DMC 102* 1075 Cracm 4843 NL 
1631 182* MlChDD 941 9 a 
2148 7SM OhlaOb 947 949 
742 tm FlexFO 10*1 NL 

7JB 751 4*WIEq *30 4J# 

1345 142* 44 Wall 146 NL 

1255 NL Fnd Gift 454 4.9* 

7D-M NL Founda^s GfTk»: 

9.93 NL p™«*( J'g Nj- 

K4I NL incom M42 NL 

Sn NL MutuM 1042 NL 

nS NL Sped 2090 NL 

1047 ll.ll FranUin Grow.: 


AGE 


345 340 


EMnTr 
ElfnTx 
US 
545 LB 
Gen Sec 
GMoIEr 
GlnlM 
GrdsEm 
GrdsnEs 
Grth i no 
GcdPkA 
Ham HDA 
Mart Gtti 
Mart Lev 
HOMlTx 
Heart id 
Hmelnv r 
hot Man 
Hutton Group: 
Band r 108* 
colli 
Emra r 
Gwtn r 
Online 
GvtSc 
Basic 
Natl 
NY Mu 
PracM 
IRI Sick 
IDS Mutual: 

IDS Ap r 744 
IDSEa r 
IDS inr 
IDS 8d 
IDSEqP 
IDS Dls 
IDS Ex 
IDS Grt 
IDS HIY 
IDS lilt 
IDS ND 
IDS Proa 


NM 

2535 NL 
105* NL 
3090 ML) 
11.09 NLj 
1X13 NL| 
3582 NL 
■147 NL 
937 NLl 
1X77 NL[ 
1123 NL 
1940 21 JW 
044 744] 
1039 NU 
1X89 NU 
HUB 1847] 
1X12 12491 
1022 NU 
2X69 NU 


NL 

1024 1047 
1X11 NL 
1447 NL 
9.19 NL 
938 NL 
1047 NL 
1840 1125 
1041 1044 
1052 NL 
84S 88M 


NL' 
*27 NL 
551 NL 
438 095 
8479.12 
631 7.12 
4L90 5.1* 
1745 185B 
417 439) 
559 549. 
9J* 946 
7.15753] 


MBS 

*»W 


0*8 720] 
33* 411, 
HL42 U29| 
102* 1121. 
065 NLl 
1070 NU 
944 1075] 


MOl Ret 
Mull 
IDS Tx 
PrecMl 
Stock 
Soled 
1SI Group: 

Grwth 
Incam 
Trat Sh 

Idex 

Industry 
Into Cap r 
Int Invst 
I nvst Portfolio: 
Equity 9.91 NL 
GvtPI B47 NL 
HIYId 9.13 NL 
Optn 849 NL 
ITB Group; 

ImBas 10251141 
HI Inca 1455 1549 
MOTF 1524 16.10 
Inv Rest) 523 532 
Istal 1358 NL 
IvyGIh 1432 NL 
Ivylnst 1203* NL 
JPGrtti 1433 1000 
JP Inca 843 9.17 
Janum Fund: 

Fund n 1137 NL 
value 112« NL 
VWltur 2450 NL 
John Hancock: 

Bond 148* 1*24 
Grwth 1323 1457 
USGvF 834 955 
Tax Ex 987 HL79 
USGvT 1021 1127 
Kauiinn 1.11 NL 

Kemper Funds: 

CaiTx 1X9* 1X57 
Incom 850 984 
Grow 1X89 1449 
HI Yld 1054 1120 
IMIFd 1448 1529 
Mun B 841 944 
Optn 112* 1XC 
Suttim 264* 2848 
teen 11.90 1341 
Tol Rt 1478 1007 
USGvt 942 940 
Keystone Mass: 

Cue Bl r 15.94 
Cub B2r 1848 
Cut B4r 754 
Cue Kir 185 
Cux K3r 13S 
Cu» Sir 2054 
Cus SSr 848 


NL 

NL 

NL 

NL 

NL 

NL 

NL 


Cue Mr 557 NL 
inn r 524 NL 
KPM r 1287 NL 
TxFr r 847 NL 
KldPeor 1420 NL 
LMH 2530 NL 
LeflBMob 2442 NL 
LeftCoP 1887 NL 
Lahlnval 1809 NL 
Lcvnw 841 NL 
Lexington Grp: 

CLdr It 1XU 1410 
Goldfd 358 NL 
GNMA 747 NL 
Grow 9JM NL 
RCbh 1091 NL 
Llotrty Group: 

Am Ldr 1144 NL 
Tx Fra 942 NL 
USGvt 847 NL 
LtdTrm 1X24 1259 
LtadDv 2X40 NL 
Llnonr 1854 NL 
Loomis Scry lei: 

Coptt 2244 NL 
Mill 1832 NL 

Lord Ahheh: 

Atfllld 955 1033 
Bnd db 1023 1129 
Dev Gt 788 853 
incom XU 345 
TaxFr 9.95 1045 
TxNY I0LI7 1848 
VolAp 1045 1142 
Lutheran Bra: 

Fund 1583 1*4* 
Incom 885 922 
Muni 720 748 
MasbFlnond: 

MFI 1QJ4 11.15 


MFG 

M5NC 

M5VA 

MIT 

MIG 

MID 

MCD 

MEG 

MFD 

MFB 

MMB 

MFH 

NIMH 

MSF 

Mothers 

Mebdirt 


1XU 1L-A7 
1X181049 
104*105* 
1XU 1109 
1148 1259 
943 1028 
1134 124* 
1547 10*8 
1X20 1X15 
1X23 142* 
952 1041 
*51 745 
981 1020 
136 027 
2042 NL 

2428 NL 

Merrill Lvndv: 

Basic 1543 1*32 
COPil 21.18 2245 
Ecu Bd 1X15 124* 
FedSC 939 104* 
FdTm 1X53 NL 
Hllnc 8.14 850 
HlQlt 1088 1123 
IntHId 1020 11J* 
InTrai 1082 1184 
LtMot 981 9.91 
MunHI 95* 9.9* 
Munlln 725 744 
PocFd 17.10 1829 
Phrtx 1X02 118* 
ScJTch 989 953 
SM Val 1341 1437 
MM AM 636 741 
MMAHI 5J0 548 
MSB Fd 2037 NL 
Midwest Group; 
InfGv 1817 NL 
LG Gvt 1048 1052 
Mut Ban 1742 1X70 
Mutual of Omaha : 
Amor 1887 NL 
Grwth 054 7.11 
mam 981 939 
Tx Fra 1029 1129 
MttQual 1887 NL 
Mut Shr 5727 NL 
NDlAvto 1088 1189 
Natlnd 1X14 NL 
Nat Securities: 

Baku] 1X93 1582 
Bond X29 XSS 
CnTxE 1184 1250 
FedSC 1150 023 
Grwth 885 954 
PreM 7JS 82* 
Incom 058 739 
RealE 829 989 
Stock 858 948 
Tax Ex 885 924 
Turtle 018 *4* 
Falrtd 951 WJ9 
NOtTeiO 1259 1X7* 
Nationwide Fds: 
NatFd 1134 1249 
NeeGtti 928 1885 
NatBd 957 1025 
NEUfeFund: 

Emit 2022 2X09 
Grwth 2338 2555 
Incom 1053 1145 
Ret Eq 2127 2X12 
TaxEx 7.19 753 
NaubernarBarm: 
Enrav 1939 nl 
G uard 4X48 NL 
Homtaph 721 NL 
LHNV 433 NL 
MOMII 787 NL 
Partn 1559 NL 
NY Mun T.M NL 
Newt Gt 2B48 NL 
Newt Inc BJI NL 


NlehatabGraun: 


N Idiot 
Nidi II 
Nchlnc 
NIcnGth 
NE InTr 
NE I nGt 


3052 

1488 

271 

148* 

1227 

1341 


NL 

NL 

NL 


North 5 tor: 

Aoollo 1038 
Bond 9.71 
Resion 1825 
Slock 1334 
NOvaFd 14*0 NL 
Nuvwm 7.98 NL 
OldDom 2224 3*42 
Omasa 1X71 NL 
OPpenhelmer Fd: 
AIM 1028 1835 
Direct 2054 2X45 
Eainc 754 824 
Oppen 9.79 1070 
Gold 075 728 
HI YM 178* 1829 
NY Tax 1124 1187 
Prom 2044 2X34 
Racy 1X7* 1XM 
Saed 1981 213* 
Taraet 1751 1843 
Tx Fre 843 B83 
Time 1X99 1529 
BluoCh 1888 1189 
RelGov 1049 11.46 
OTC Sec 17.17 184* 
Pacific Horizon: 
Aarasv 1938 NL 
Cant 128* NL 
HhdiYId 1529 NL 
Paine Webber: 

Atlas 1X99 1281 


Amor 
GNMA 
HfYM 
invGd 
Otvmp 
TaxEx 
PaxWld 
Penn 5a 
Penn Mu 


1412 1543 
982 103* 
1030 1845 
981 I0J7 
958 1047 
10.10 1055 
1288 NL 
883 NL 
081 NL 


Vovaa 

Quasar 

Rolnbw 

ReoGr 

RadiTx 


1823 19.92 
5539 NL 
441 NL 
1387 ILIA 
1X12 118* 


RaweTF unaucul 
Ravce 018 NL 
SFTEat 1024 1)21 
Safeco Secur: 



1087 

NL 

Eainc 

1144 

NL 

Grwth 

1822 

NL 

20th Century : 



1X50 

NL 

Gill r 

US 

S27 


1X3* 

NL 

Grwm 

1424 

NL 



Select 

763? 

NL 

CaiTx 

1017 

NL 

UMrar 

7.58 

781 


58.78 

NL 

USGv 

9090 

NL 

CasGt 

1*80 

NL 

Vista r 

*85 

487 

Grwln 

14.17 

NL 

USAA Group: 


incom 

1X35 

NL 

Comstn 

10.7* 

NL 

inn Fd 

2*83 

NL 

Gold 


NL 


823 

NL 

Grwth 

14 W 

NL 

NYTax 

10*0 

NL 

inco 

UJ* 

NL 

TkFrta 

9.95 

NL 

suit 

1*2* 


TxFr93 

1044 

NL 

• TxEN 

1285 

NL 



TxElt 

1188 

NL 

Action 

044 


TxESH 

1082 

NL 


ParmPrt 11.10 NL 
Phi la 887 949 
Phoenix Series: 
Baton 1134 1283 


CvFd 

Grwth 

HFYM 

Stock 

PCCp 


NL 

NL 

NL 

NL 

NL 

NL 


1085 1842 
14*2 1588 
923 982 
1X77 1384 

1185 NL 

PHarimGra: 

PAR 2120 2355 
GNMA 15591024 
PIIMOO 8.11 874 
PilaFd unavall 
PilaHI 0.13 847 
PlonaarFund: 

Bond 922 HUB 
Field 2144 2343 

II Inc 1755 19.18 

III Inc 1473 1010 
Plllrnd 1325 NL 
PrioeFunds: 

Grwth 1584 NL 
Glhlnc 1X41 NL 
HIYId 1048 NL 
incom 8J5 NL 
Inti 1427 NL 
N Em 1728 
N Hortz 1418 
ShTrB SM 
TxFrl 872 
TxFHY 102* 
TxFrSI 53 
Prill PTE 941 985 
Pro Services: 

MedT 1025 NL 
Fund HUB {^L 
Incom 8JB NL 
Prudenttol Boche; 
AdlPfd 2*24 NL 
CoiMu 1084 NL 
Eouttv lOll NL 
GkdNr unavall 
GvPIu 1X12 NL 
GvtSc 1023 NL 
GthOpor 1345 NL 
HIYId 10.1* NL 
HYMu 1485 NL 
MuNY 1083 NL 
OptnG 1045 NL 
Qtvlnc 1539 NL 
Rsch r 924 NL 
Utility 1154 NL 
Putnam Funds: 

Conv 1471 1408 
CaiTx 1419 1480 
Caplt 744 
CCATP 4045 4980 
CCDsp 0294983 
EnoRa 11411X69 
IntoSc 1284 1X1* 
ini Eq 1840 20.11 
Georo 12891331 
Grolnc 11591247 
Health 1884 2059 
HI inco 1181 1XAA 
HI YM 1529 1*50 
Incom 78* 757 
Invest 10.9* 11.98 
NYTx 1549 142* 
Optn 1083 1184 
Optnll 1152 1XW 
Tax Ex 2284 3X98 
USGM 1454 1529 
Vlbta 1744 1928 


Band 737 XU 
Eauty 545 017 
Invest 981 985 
Ultra 882 944 
Selected Funds: 

Am Shs 1181 NL 
SM SM 1985 NL 
Sel toman Group: 
CapFd 1X13 132* 
CmSIX 1X76 1X7* 
Ccmun 9.14 9.99 
Growth $43 407 
Inca 1X32 1339 
MOSSTx 753781 
MkhTx 7.70 408 
MlnflTx 72973* 
NatITx 74* 884 
NY Tax 740 7.98 
OhlaTx 747 784 
CaTax Oil *42 
CaTxQ 428 6.58 
GavGM 741 738 
HIYM 742 739 
MlaSOC 727 7.74 
Sentlnet Group; 
Batan 1032 1132 
Band 428 0(77 
Com S 19.11 2089 
Grwth 1441 1X97 
Sequoia 41.98 NL 
Sentry 1137 1X39 
Etwaraon Funds: 
ATIGf 80.11 NL 
AgrGr 1137 1229 
Apprie 2044 2133 
CalMu 1443 1540 
FdVM 727 745 
Glottal 2X10 2X2* 
HIYM 1845 1943 
MpGvt 13831X73 
MMun 1402 1436 
NYMu 1580 1539 
Sharm D 012 NL 
Sierra Gt 1125 NL 
Stoma Funds 
Caplt 1481 1420 


789 833 
823 9.10 
73* 

1287 lit9 
1029 1139 


Inco 
invest 
SPd n 
Trust 
Vent 

Smith Bornev: 

Eaut 14*5 NL 
incGra 9M 1086 
USGvt 1X29 1410 
SoGen in 1587 1538 
SilmfGt 1084 NL 
Swlnlnc 482 NL 
Sower In 2120 2243 
Stale Bond Grp: 
Com St 5*9 *22 
Diver* 054 7.15 
P roars 831 9-5! 
SIFrm Gt 1049 NL 
StFrmBI 1485 NL 
ststreet Inv: 

Exdi 9X93 NL 
GrwHir588* NL 
Invut 7347 740* 
Steadman Funds: 
Am Ind 2J0 NL 
ASSOC 87 NL 
Invest 154 NL 
Ocean 524 NL 

stem Roe Fds: 

Bond 835 NL 
era Op 2X15 NL 
Dlscv 1052 NL 
HFYM 1048 NL 
Sped 17.13 NL 
Slack 142* NL 
TaxEx B45 NL 
TotRet 2341 NL 
Univ 17.75 NL 
Sirateaic Funds: 
Caoit 049 789 
Invst 445 48* 
SJlvr 521 549 
Strom Dv 2*80 NL 
Strut Gm 1841 NL 
Stronoln 1X0 1825 
StmgT 172* 1754 
TeflnSh 1*53 NL 
Templeton Group: 
Fran 1224 1X49 
Global l 3787 
Glob II 1X82 1X14 


Grwth 1X59 1157 
World 13.47 14.94 
Thms. McKhman: 
Gwtn 17.4) NL 
inco 1087 NL 
Oaor 1121 NL 
Tudr Fa 212* NL 
Trust Portfolio: 
EoGth 1054 NL 


unliiedManini: 
Genrl 821 NL 
Gwtn 2081 NL 
inco 1254 NL 
Indl X12 NL 
Mutl 144* NL 
United Funds: 

Ac cm B21 L97 
Bend 543 015 
Gvt Sec 520 552 
IntGIh 585 *50 
Con Inc 1027 1738 
HI Inc 115* 1482 
incom 1439 1573 
Muni 083 7.11 
NwCCPt 508555 
Rellre 591 *4* 
Sc End 982 98* 
Vang 582 *2* 
Uld Services: 

G Id Shr 421 NL 
GBT 1483 NL 
Growth 757 NL 
inco 10-49 
LoCap 739 
Pried 42 
ValFro 1034 
Value Line Fd: 

Bond 1224 NL 
ConvFd 1028 NL 
Fund 13.02 — 
Incom **2 
Lev Gt 1947 
MunBd 1044 
SM Sit 1342 
Van Kompen 


NL 

NL 

NL 

NL 


NL 

NL 

NL 

NL 

NL 


IraT^F 1557 1035 
TxFrHI 1443 15.15 
USGvt 1528 1015 
Vance Exchange: 
CanEx *927 NL • 
OBst 44g NL 
Diver 7722 NL 
ExFd 11X35 NL 
Ex Bast 99.17 NL 
FMEx *143 NL 
Sec Fid *523 NL 
Vatto uond Group: 
Exptr 3383 NL 
Gemln 7787 NL 
I vest 1824 NL 
Morp 12*1 NL 
NaesT 3981 NL 
QOIv ( 1093 NL 
QDIvll 018 NL 
QDvIll 2387 NL 
STAR 1051 NL 
TC Int 30.15 NL 
TCUBO 3X95 NL 
GNMA 951 NL 
HlYBd 0*0 NL 
IGBatd Bill NL 
ShrtTr 1022 NL 
indTr 2X48 NL 
MuHY 945 NL 
Mu int 1188 NL 
MuLs 933 NL 
MlnLO 3ftsa NL 
MuSM 1529 NL 
VSPGd 095 NL 
VSPHIt 1489 NL 
VSPSv 1589 NL 
VSPTc 1122 NL 
Wells! 1451 NL 
Weiltn 1359 NL 
Wnosr 1428 NL 
wndsr II 1011 NL 
Venture Aovisera: 
NYVen 088 930 
RPFBd 7.70 NL 
IncPI 10.74 1134 
WPG 2251 NL 
WollSI 030 078 
WelnEq 1074 NL 
Wstord 1124 1229 
Weed Smittiera: 
deVeu 1352 NL 
Neuw 2123 NL 
Pine 1X13 NL 
YosFd unavall 
NL — No load 
(sales Charge) 

I— Preview 
aav'sauol*. 

Redenmilon charpe 
mov apply. 

—Ex dividend. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

SERVICE 

USA l WORIDWIDE 

Hood office in New York 
330 W. Mi SL. N.Y.C 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAJOR omtr CARPS AND 
ocacs Atxmw 

UB—Lawlitata AiwJiiJa 
ril*VW> IWMmMnMMfMi FtoW^^94P^« 

Wi award wta nl ng seryfee bra 
been Murad m Km ton A mast 
•xdrthu Eeeert Sbivkb by _ 
USA 1 irdsmdtaind HOWS mSa 
fio and TV. 


* USA & TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 

ESCORT SERVICE. 
EVERYWHERE YOU AK 0* GOL, 

1-813-921-7946 

Cd free from L&: 1-300-237^1 
Cd!(r» from Ronds 
lowd Emtam vulcomri you back! 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT SBIWE 
IN NEW YORK 
TEL: 212-737 3291. 


LONDON 

KENSINGTON 

ESCORT SERVICE 

10 KB4SMG70N OUCH SLJ W 
IHj 937 9134 OR 937 9133 

Ai Utofor cradd cords accepted. 


REGENCY NY 

WQRtOWttC ESCORT SBtVjCE 
21M1M037 or 753-1IM 


MAYFAIR CLLffi 

OUDE SStVKZ from Sim 
ROTTERDAM iM 10W1SS 
THE HAGUE (0)7MO 79 9 b 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


{ Continued From Bade Page) 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


LONDON 

BRGRAVIA 

tw een Service. 

Tefc 736 5877. 


LONDON 

Porlman Escort Agency 

47 ddteni Strap), 
London Wl 

Tab 416 3724 or 416 Till 
AB oMfor cradt card* B O RpMd 




* LONDON ★ 

EXECUTIVE ESCORT SERVICE 
01-229 2300 or 01-229 4794 


ARISTOCATS 

London heart Somob 
IS Wiffiiore SL London W.l. 
AB noior CiwfifUwb Accopied 
Tet or a ai / aa 
12 noon - midngfct 


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AND HEATlffOW 

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ZURICH 

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Trawl Service. Tel 06P/55J2-10 

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Page 12 



PEANUTS 



BOOKS 


BOUND OVER: Indentured Servi- 
tude and American Conadence 

By John van der Zee. 382 pages. SI 8.95. 
Simon & Schuster, 1230 Avenue of the 
Americas, New York, N. Y. 10020. 

Reviewed by Herbert Mitgang 

CRT said Dr. Johnson in Boswell's 1775 
u bkwrariiv. “they arc a race of convicts, 


3San'S?<rf e iuSg?' ThtTaccr^ doctor, 
referring the Amencan colonists, was not sim- 

lor g revolutionaries; his remark, contained 
mare than a shred of truth. 

Some Hfartrians believe that neatly half of 
the eady white settlers in the New Wcnid canut 

invol untari ly, as indentured servants or labor- 
ers who had to work for betweep four and 
seven years before they were set free from thdr 
bonds and contracts. A number of their tales 
can be found in John van der Zee's “Bound 
Over." In effect they became “white slaves" — 
bought and sold apprentices, tenants, homeless 
men and women shanghai ed by shipowners, 
and convicts whose price for partial freedom 
was banishment sometimes still in chains, to 
America. 

This interpretation is not found in the stan- 
dard schoouwoks, where the impression is gen- 
erally left that the colonists were a noble form 
of the human race, who came to America to 
seek political and rdigioiis freedom- Many did, 
but not everyone made the perilous trans- 
Atlantk crossing carrying a copy of Locke and 
Montesquieu in his baggage, like the later 
waves of immigrants in the 19th and 20th 

c entimes, the Rnffmists did not conform to the ' 
distorted image created in modem times by the 
Sons and Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion. 

Tbe indentured whites worked side by side 
with, the slaves from Africa. Often, when the 
whites served out their contracts, they were 
replaced by blades. As late as 1824, an adver- 
tisement ran in lie Raleigh Gazette in North 
Carolina offering a S10 reward for the return at 


Solution to Friday’s Puzzle 


lEDSD 03300 0303 

eejhb □□□hd aaso 

GonnauannG □□□□ 

□EDD 0 □□□□□□BQ 
! □□ana cmaa 
□□□□ a □□□ □□□□ 
EBQEJan asna 30 
EEQnnnQ SEBanai 
GGn aaaa 033301 
GDnaa aaaa □□□£ 
de an 3300 a 
GDBaaaaa aaana 
dche aaaaHaaaa 
□egg snaon nan 

0000 3UU0O BDCDu, 


two white “apprentice buys. legally bound, 
who bad run away from iter master, a tailor. 
Tbe blacks were considered more vakubk 
than whites because. »Wjf ^ ** 

traded without ever being freed. 

- The surprising difference in value ami treat- 
ment between indentured whites and blade 
slaves appears in an account written two years 
be fo re the Declaration of Indep e nd enc e bv 
w niiam Edifis in his “Letters From America. 
He observed; . 

“Negroes being a property for life, the death 
of slave*, inthe prime of youth or strength, is a 
material Joss to the proprietor; they arc, there* 
fore, in almost every instance, under more 
comfortable draunstances than the miserable 
European, over whom the rigid planter exer- 
cises an inflexibte severity. They arc straum 

the utmost to perform their allotted labour; 
'and, from a prepossession in many cases too 
justly founded, they arc supposed to be receiv- 
ing only the just reward which is due to repeat- 
ed offences. There arc doubtless many excep- 
tions to this observation, yet. generally 
qv^»Hng they groan beneath a worse than 

indudes case histories of 
craftsmen, ne’er-do-wells, adventurers and 
convicts who undertook some form of involun- 
tary labor in the New World. The subject has 
been before, and with greater rele- 

vance to other stirrings in the Colonial period, 
by such professional historians s Abbott E. 
Smith, author of “Colonists in Bondage," Ed- 
mund S. Moigan in “American Savoy, Amer- 
ican Freedom," and Richard B. Moms, “Gov- 
ernment and Labor in Early America." 

The stories reveal the resiliency of the white 
bondsmen who survived under tbe contract 
instead of the lash. One concerns a boy named 
Peter Williamson. While playing on a quay in 
Aberdeen in 1743, he was enticed to board a 
chip Press gangs working for Scottish mer- 
chants roamed tbe streets seizing boys who 
might be “fit subjects for the slave trade." 
After nearly three months at sea, Williamson 
and other boys were sold in Philadelphia. He 
was bought for a seven-year term, found a 
kindly master, worked off his bondage, then 
mantel the daughter of a prosperous planter. 
Then came new troubles — capture and tor- 
ture, fust by Indians and »b«i by the French. 
When he made his way back to Aberdeen, he 
was arraigned before the magistrates and 
charged with libel and slander for priming 
material that reflected adversely upon “the 
characters and reputations” of the merchants 
who had kidnapped him. 

It was not lost upon the framers of the 
revolutionary new government that the lan- 



vitude in the most prosperous colonies. The 
words of Thomas Paine in “The Rights of 
Man” and in “The American Crisis fired 
dreams of freedom in the minds of the inden- 
tured classes. It would take a civil war before 
“neither slavery nor involuntary servitude” 
were written into the 13th Amendment to the 
Constitution. 

Herbert Mitgang is on the staff of The New 
York Times. 


BRIDGE 


Unscramble these lour Jumbfu, 
one letter to each square, to torn 
fair ordinary words. 


DYGUP i 


rm 

□ 

u 


PUMBY 


zc 

□ 

□ 


MIOGES 


~rcr 

bn 


By Alan Truscoct 

P i AR on the golf course is a 
simple concept, but par at 
tbe caratabte is a complex one. 
Each deal has four pars: a 
North-South par, an East- 
West par, an absolute par, 
which assumes that both sides 
do their theoretical best, and a 
practical par, based on good 
play that is not however, dou- 
ble-dummy. 

Consider, far example, the 
diagramed dcaL The North- 
South paris dearly four hearts, 
which is unbeatable; The East- 
West par, hardly relevant, is a 
small dub part-score. 

Tfce next question is tins: 
Does it pay East-West to save 
in five dubs? The right play in 
trumps is to lead the queen, so 
there are four dear losers. 
There is a fifth if North is in- 
spired to lead a spade, or the 
heart jack followed by a spade, 
bat those are unlikdy choices. 
So in practical terms tbe 


five-dub save is worthwhile, 
costing 300 rather than 500. 

North-South -tried five 
hearts gngtw»A of defending 
five dubs doubled. Was that 
decision right? 

It was right in practice, be- 
cause West not unnaturally led 
his smgteon diamond in the 
hope of a ruff. South put up 
the ace in dummy, cashed tbe 
ace and king of tramps, and 
led the diamond queen. The 
defense was now helpless, for 
die diamond jack provided a 
discard for the dub loser. The 
trump was the essential entry, 
and a spade was eventually led 
toward tbe king. 

A dub lead would have de- 
feated the doubled contract, 
for East would ruff, cash the 
spade ace and exit with a 
spade. West might have con- 
sidered that his partner’s final 
double showed defensive po- 
tential, perhaps in the form of 
a void in his partner's suit. But 
he also had to consider North's 
removal of Us partner's double 


erf five dubs: He might nave 
been motivated by a void dub. 

So the practical par on the 
deal is five hearts by South, 
made in the absence of a club 
lead. Tbe absolute par appears 
to be four hearts, making just 
10 tricks. But it is actually five 
hearts by North, an unlikely 
circumstance. That is unbeat- 
able on any lead. 

NORTH 
*18 4 3 

* J 73 

o A J 8 7 4 
fl 

WEST EAST (D) 4 

*83 * AQJ MS » 

PS 0884 

OS O K M 183 

*Q 10 9876542 « — 

SOUTH 

* K 8 

? A K Q 18 3 3 

OQ 3 

*AK 3 

Nctt!Mr Mm m vatanbto. TUB 


twMtag: 

Hut Sort 

WON 

North 

1<* 

DbL 

5* 

f" 

Pass DbL 

Pan 

}» 

DDL 

SO 

Pan 

nav 

DHL Pan 

Pass 

Pan 


WWt M One (Hunand Urn 


YIFNEI 

R 


TT 

□ 



WHAT IT WAS? 

WHEN THE 
tPOCTOR SA1C7, 
“THIS WON'T HURT. 


Now anange Die circled letters to 
torn ttn surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


nrr t r r t i 


fridbys 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: AORTA BANDY PESTLE NEEDLE 
Answer: How the students (sit abo ut the 

examination —THEY "DE-TEST-ED" IT 


The Associated Prat 

COWES, England — West Ger- 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Algarve 


ADwn 

BarcelBM 


Coon Del Sol 

DBMln 

Mlnterea 


Lai Pel mo* 
Uttoa 


Madrid 

Milan 


Ode 


RevkfcnrK 

Roan 


Stnabuurv 

Venice 

Vienna 


HIGH 
C F 

31 88 
17 43 
33 VI 
28 82 
28 K 
28 48 
17 41 
25 77 

28 48 

11 44 

21 83 

12 54 

17 43 

32 M 
19 44 
23 73 
14 41 
3$ S3 
2S 83 
32 90 
14 57 
38 1B0 

2 9 84 

22 72 

18 44 

27 81 

18 44 

19 44 
19 44 
12 54 

28 82 
17 43 
28 48 
27 81 

30 48 
17 a 
W 44 


Zurich 
MIDDLE EAST 


LOW 
C F 
3! 70 

12 54 
24 75 

18 44 

13 55 

13 55 
12 54 
17 53 

14 57 
17 54 
30 48 
II 52 

9 a 

21 70 

11 52 
14 57 
14 57 

19 44 
21 70 
19 44 

12 54 
14 41 
28 48 

12 54 
14 57 
19 44 
■ 44 
14 57 

13 a 

8 44 
21 70 
13 55 

13 B 
38 48 

14 41 
M 57 
13 55 


ASIA 


Banaftafc 
■enter 
Hons Kens 
Manila 
•few Date 
Seoul 


TBlpel 
Tokyo 

AFRICA 

AJgtars 

Cairo 

Cope Town 


Harare 


Nairobi 

Toole 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

32 90 24 79 d 

33 98 23 73 a 

32 m 2B 83 a 

32 M 25 77 o 

39 82 24 79 r 

30 86 24 75 o 

33 91 26 79 ft 

28 82 13 55 0 

32 90 27 81 IT 

31 88 26 79 d 


32 90 13 B tr 

35 95 23 73 fr 

14 41 4 43 fr 

29 14 21 70 fr 

23 73 15 59 fr 

28 82 25 77 O 

32 90 19 64 fr 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Alboreto Wins German Grand Prix 

NURBURGRIN G, West Germany (AP) — Italy’s Michele Alboreto, in a 
Ferrari, won the German Grand Prix nmnula One aino race Sunday to increase his 
Lead in the 1985 world championship. J 

* Alboreto crossed the line with his engine smoking, 11.6 seconds ahead of his main many, the defend i ng champion, re- 
rival for the championship, France's Alain Prost Erost, in a McLaren-TAG- tained itsfead Saturday in the Ad- 
Porsche, challenged Alboreto whed-to- wheel in the doting laps, but spun ouL miral's Cup yachting senes after 

the third race, a trip mto the En- 
glish Channel that some competi- 
tors said was the mptigroehngcop 
event since the 1979 Fastnet Race 
claimed 15 Eves and sank 22 boats. 

A dozen rfmmgpl cup contend- 
ers bad to retire. Some, like Chal- 
lenge HI of Australia, lost their 
masts. Counting the boats not com- 
peting for the cop in the 212-mfle 
(341 -kilometer) channel race, more 
than 60 of the 149 starters were 
farced out 

Britain, with all three boats in 


Germans Retain Admiral’s Cup Lead 

Gale Winds in Channel Force 12 Contenders Oat of Race 


Kiefel Takes Coors Cycling Opener in U.S. 

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Rem Kiefd ou traced a field of 96, iiKduding the' 
prerace favorite, Gres LeMond, to win the opening time trial of the Coors 
International Bicycle Clastic on Saturday before a crowd of nearly 40,000. 

Kiefel, of Wheatridge. Colorado, pedaled the 1 .05-mile (1 .7-kflometer) course in 
3:05.3. Andrew Hampsten of Boulder, Colorado was second at 3: 10.7 with LeMond 
third at 3:1 1JL Bernard Hinault, winner of (he Tour de France, finished 26 seconds 
behind Kiefel. 

Amateur Verplank Keeps Lead in U.S. Golf 

an amateur, answered Jim 


of its boats managed to gain the 
first 20 places and, as a result, tbe 
team was in ninth place. 

“It was pretty scary put there," 
said Steve Taft of San Francisco, 
tactician aboard Sidewinder, which 
finished 32d. “Our boat overstood 
a buoy very badly off the French 
coast By the time we got going 
again it was all over.” 

As a southwesterly gale sent the 
boats down The Sedan, the estuary 
between the Isle of Wight and the 
En glish mainland crews Struggled 
to ken out of trouble in poor vis- 
bilily. Many boats were damaged. 

Denmark, third in the overall 
standing; after the two inshore 
events, suffered a severe Wow when 
Maitressehad to Hum back toporL 
She was soon joined by Belgium's 
Mariner. 

Later, during the long tacks to 
the Needles, a lighthouse at the 


LATIN AMERICA 


17 £3 14 57 0 
47 81 19 44 *r 
Lino 17 43 15 59 O 

MndeoCtty 24 75 13 SS at 

MoAaJmtrv 24 75 20 41 d 


For die Record 


NORTH AMERICA 


A tlanta 

Otilifl 

CMcaOO 


w 


Jerasatom 
Tal Avtw 

OCEANIA 

Auckland 


34 93 17 43 
30 84 28 82 
34 93 17 43 
32 90 18 44 
82 90 22 72 


Houatoa 

lmabmju 


12 54 S 41 If 

17 43 4 43 d 

d-ctoudv: to-taoov; fr-talr; tHioll; 
sl»-elK»i*«; st-oJormy. 


27 
29 
38 
29 
31 
34 
31 
31 
a 
25 

Nttnoa 30 

Maw York 39 

Sot Frondtoa 20 
Saaltta 22 

Toronto U 

motllnglM 29 
tewurcast; Kaartty 


MkmaapoiH 


44 12 
82 19 

81 J4 
84 14 
84 14 
84 14 
88 34 
97 33 
88 34 
88 23 

82 23 
77 15 
M 21 
84 n 
48 13 
72 14 
75 18 
84 If 
doudv; 


54 d 
46 ir 
41 fr 
41 St 

57 fr 
ST fr 
75 PC 
73 K 
7S IH 
73 It 
73 pe 
9 ) tr 
JO tr 
44 Ir 

58 pc 
57 no 
SO fr 
44 fr 
r-raiii; 



OAK BROOK, Illinois (AP) — Scott Vl _ __ 

Thorpe's challeng e with two birdies late in the third round and retained a two-shot the first eight in the provisional 
lead Saturday in the Western Open golf tournament platings, inoyed up from fourth to 

Verplank. 21, an Oklahoma State student who is the current UJS. amateur second, provided it survives a pro- 
champion, is seeking to become the first amateur to win a professional tournament test New Zealand, which has not 
since Doug Sanders won the 1956 Canadian Open. His 3-nnder-par 69 Saturday at been in contention in previous 
the Butler National Golf Club course put him at 205 with Thorpe at 207. cups, hdd third place. The Danish 

• Ian Baker-Finch shot sti-under-par 66 Sunday to win the Scandinavian Open, team, despite losing one erf its 
beating fellow Australian Graham Marsh by two tiiots as the third-round leaoers, boots, was fourth- 
Johnny Mfflfir of the United Slates and Sandy Lyle of Britain, faltered The Danish yacht Euro, fourth 

on handicap in die channel race, 
retained its individual lead ir. the 
54-yacht competition. Euro is skip- 

Tbe Siwiet llniou wiD have a team at the 1988 Summer Gaines in Seoul, Leonid pered by Jens Christicnscn. 

Zamyatin, the spokesman of the Soviet Communist Party’s Central Committee, Jade, a British yacht owned by 
told Japan’s Kyodo News Service. (AP) Larry and Debby WooddcD of the 

Track Barron, ridden by * * 

ay to win tl . r w r _ _ 

Race Track in Saratoga Springs, New York. (UPIJ lowing the channel race, although °f harness rating Saturday at tbe 

Hahnes, younger brother of the heavyweight champion, Larry, lost his Uii its position may change after a pro- Meadowlands. 

Boxing Association middlewieighi crown Saturday to John Coffins, m a trrt by Challeng e ITT. Prakas easily won the two one- 

knockout at 2:05 o f the second round in Scranton, Pamsylvania. (UPI) West Germany’s Outsider was mile (1.62-kilometer) heats 

Violence united Saturday night when police tried to move fans awaiting thud on handicap and, after good 
Stofciay’s motorcycling Grand Prat at Siivmtone, England. Ftiioe said there were pafonnmc^m the two inshore 
37 arrests and three minor irg'uries to police officers. (AP) Ses earlier in the week, took over 

Sena* African teams have been banned firm the International Games for tbe second place in the individual 
Disabled at Stoke MandeviDe, England, organizers announced Sunday. Thar standings. The West Germans' Rn- 
foUowcda boycott of this year’s games by the United States, Canada, Zimbabwe' KnVffiwas sixth and a third boat, 
and Trinidad and Tobago because a South African team had competed. (AP) gya, was 27th. 

Maty Decker Sbuey of the United States fell more than four seconds short 1 The race was a disappointment 


western tip of the Isle of Wight, 
“ was dismasi- 

Chatlengp 

_iese entry. 
Snake Oil, and Brazil' s Carrocbefe 
went out 

Including those six Admiral’s 
yachts, 35 of the 149 starters 
retired by the time the leaders 
reached the Needles in winds of 35 
knots. 

The start of the race had been 
held up for 40 minutes because 
crews jockeying for position forced 
two general recalls. When they did 
get off, they were met by enormous 
seas and driving rain as they began 
the first beat against the tide. 

The Hnmngftri yachts have until 
Tuesday to be repaired. Then the 
third 30-mQe inshore race, the 
fourth race of the five-race sales, 
takes place. 


Prakas Takes Hambletonian 

had Utile opposition and covered 
the mile in 1:49 3/5. 

The Hambtetonian, which at- 
tracted a field of 17, is the second 
leg of harness rating’s triple crown. 

. _ _ Master Wiflie won the Yonkers 

stretch Saturday to win the £225,800 Whitney Handicap by a half-length at cap in the provisional results fol- m 8 fastest horse in the history Trot in June. (NYT, AP) 


EAST RUTHERFORD, New 
Jersey —Prakas won die Hamble- 
tonian. the second leg of the triple 

* crown for 3-year-dd trotters, and 

Cordero Jr, ouiduded Carr de Naskra in the United States, was fast on hamfi- NMator narrowly m issed becom- 

: OoA . ti— l.. * l.im .l . ■ >l « i • . n. r.i mo tna foctart kw* m #lu> . 


quired for the 
aod' 

the $1,272,000 total purse. Hans 
Engrcen of Sweden, who bred Pra- 
kas and stiQ is part owner, wanted- 
resell him for $60,000 as a yearling 
but could not find a buyer. 



Tpiro. 32 — 27 <90— 81). MANILA: Showers. Temp. 29—23 CM — 73) SSOuL 
Oowdv. Teina. 30-23 (86—73). SINGAPORE: ThwWertfk£« Terrip.JB— H 
(84 - 77). TOKYO: Fair. TaniA 32 - 25 (W- 77). ^ 'cmo. ju o 


_ ., , . — Nihilator, a pacer, came thnre- 

rnoay or recapturing the world mile (1,609 meters) record she last held in 1982. for the United States, which was .fifths of a second from becoming 
despite winning the event in the International Athlete’s Club Grand Prix meet ai trying to make up for a poor show- the fa«esi horse in harness history 
the Crystal Palace in London. Her time was 4 minutes. 19.59 seconds. tLPli ■ ing in the two inshore races. None > n a $50,000 invitational pace. He 


a long dis tance as he defeated a 
field of six in the ll^mile Chal- 
lenge Cup Invitational at Roosevelt 
Raceway in Westbiny, New York, 
The Aasotiated Press nported. 
Die French horse, driven by 
Jean- Paul Andrfe, became the first 
in 27 years to win the Roosevelt 
International and the Challenge 
Cup, run a week earlier, in consecu- 
tive sears. 


5 Inducted 
Into Football 
Hall of Fame 

United Pren International 
CANTON, Ohio — It was a day 
of broken promises at the Pro 
Football Hall of Fame. 

Joe Namath promised not to cry, 
but he did. 

Pete RazeUe, the NFL comjms- 
sioner for [he past 25 years, said he 
would not be long-winded, but his 
anecdotes flowed freely. 

Frank Gatski vowed not to get 
excited, but he celebrated as enthu- 
siastically as he did when he scored 
his only touchdown in 1946. 

O J. Simpson said he would be 
serious, but his smile was radiant. 

Roger Staubach said be would be 
humble, and he kept his word, “We 
have to be grateful to God for lon- 
gevity, latent and our collective 
achievements,” he said. 

Simpson, a running back, and 
Staubach. a quarterback, became 
the first Heistnan Trophy winners 
to be enshrined. 

Following the enshrinement, the 
New York Giants beat the Hous- 
ton Oilers, 21-20, in the 15th annu- 
al Hall of Fame game, the first 

From 1946to 1956. (jatskf^a 
center for the Gevdand Browns. 
He ended his career with the De* 
trait lions in 1957. 

Namath completed 1,386 passes 
for 27,663 yards and 173 touch- 
downs in 13 seasons. 12 with the 
New York Jets. 

Simpson rushed for 1 1,236 yards 
and caught 203 passes for 2,142 y 
yards, while scoring 76 touch* > 
downs, in nine seasons with the 
Buffalo Bills and two with the San 
Francisco Giants. 

Staubach completed 1.685 
passes for 22.700 yards and 153 
touchdowns in nine seasons with 
ihe Dallas Cow bens. He abo ran 
for 12M vand* jnd 20 touchdowns. 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 1985 


-J *>• 




SPORTS 




- *S* , 


In Case of a Strike, Baseball’s Fans Can Be Counted as Part of the Cost 


% Thomt? BoswdL 






WASHINGTON r- Ballard 
Sooth, president of 6c San Diego 
padres bftsdaIl M*»k lMs had & 
clubhouse meeting with ha tank 
book andtabwfigwrrfoat wind a 
strike w» dd ibeta to Jwn and his 
pfaycis. •' t ; 

*Tbewpi«<ase»eoaribistfdw 
strike state after rat Monday’s 


Multiply that by 26 major league 
wms end you have a guesstimate 
or the stakes in these labor talks: 
much more than S200 malum, plus 
to health of tasebafl. 

This point from Smith is most 
telling. “E«n If there’s a strike, 
well settle it sometime. This win- 
ter, nou spring. So, if we’re gone 
to agree eventually, why not do it 


Negotiations Broken Off; 2 Days Left Before Deadline 


• > .J* 


games and it 
the year.ipd 
lira." be said. 

"If toi:t 
somebody S3 
strike, if wo i 


oettoreaaf On die players’ side, too. there 
tte World Se- «e«ifia of reason. Scott McGre- 
gor, player representative of the 
ft*, we’d owe OtioAa, says he dunks 

n. If we don’t E^ 1 ® 5 a keady are overpaid and 
should be m>re ooo- 


....-a* A jl 


LeeMacPlufl.preiidm[oH 

strike, if westsor in the pamam 

race and draw 15 million os we , c health. make the fiasco of 1981 seem tepid. been so inundated with money. 

" 

Just say uwa 5« mmion swmg. 5at aB it is? That could very well reason why they were opumiSUA 


7V Assoaued Press 

NEW YORK —Negotiators for major league baseball players and 
the team owners, facing a strike deadline on Tuesday, broke off 
negotiations Sunday, just a few hours after the commissioner, Peter 
Ueberroth, predicted they would settle on a new collective bargaining 
agreement without a walkout. 

The negotiations were ended after owners rejected a union offer to 
lower its pension demands if management would agree not to alter the 
salary arbitration system, said tie acting director of the Major League 
Players Association leader, Donald Fehr. 

Lee MacPhaiL president of the 'owners' Player Relations Commit- 


tee. indicated thai members of tbe commute wasted ’o talk over the 
union's offer. 

The meeting then ended and no new talks were sched uled, although 
Fehr said the two sides would stay in touch. 

After an unsuccessful meeting Saturday, MacPhail said that “nd- wrilten-m-stone 33 percent, then 
tner side rauved on the major issues blocking an agreement: the there is a way to talk turkey'. The 

owners contribution to player pension fund and management’s difference between SI 5 million and 

request lor player concessions in .salary arburaiics. While he fhar^* - $60 millio n ought to be enough io 

icnzed the situation as a icmporary stalemate, he said he was «ule a strike, 

convinced that both sides still were “searching for yyrig new ap- The bottom line is that if the fra 

P roac "- market mechanism of free agency 

- and arbitration is left in place, then 

nn, c . . , . , the percentage of network T\'mon- 

wtjCTc! renr is not so adamant is rered to increase that lump sum to ey bardv matters. Why? tw^ i< y if 
on the vital issue of network televi- S25 million, although they did so the marketplace works, the players 
sion money. As nmone with a with a big string attached. They will end up with all the avaSBc 
soison ucket knows by cow, that stipulated that if salaries increase money, anyway. 


Let’s leave bodtoctog oui rf it • Sf- H? « 
J^ayilV^iTSKwmg. 3^.““ 

“Out players would lose be the trwh." 
J2^X» in pay iflhc wtote SaUf%am 


ich we want to 'play the This week's mantra seemed (0 
we still care about the &A “I'm optimistic." Everyone was 
it just money now? Is saying it but no one could give one 


Enough to make everybody in- 
volved Filthy rich. 


Jhe players' ' associations one season ticket knows by now. that stipulated "that if varies increase 
point of inflexibility is in the open- TV pot has quadrupled since the by more than SI 3 million in 1986. 

no of free-agentry and last contract. The players say they ibea any additional i n creas e would' 


joke because the union cannot pos- day — the owners need to stop 
sibly accept iL But, according to crying about their make-believe red 
one source close to the negotia- ink and abandon ail their proposals 
lions. “There’s finally a proposal except the issue of network dollars, 
on the table that both sides agree to And the union needs to say. 
m theory. Now it’s a matter of “Okay, what wiH you give us. S50 
putting the right [dollar] figures in million? Do we hear &0 million? 
the slots.’’ Speak up.** 

If the union will move off it’s Both sides should be aware of 


woolc »■ Smith’s commoo sense is so obvi- 
sco s shuck. ou*M<K3TegtK , smjwnanimityisso 

So. a strike would cost the Pa- refreshing, that it is both confusing 
dres’ players and omrers nearly J ! 1 and irritating to realize how close 


m ?? iel system or free-agentrvand 

fact,” said Don Fehr, acting head Jfi ^ UI J ,on 

of the union. foughl tor mi won - fajr 


will end up with all the available 
money, anyway. 

The owners’ problem is that they 
have used much of that TV money 


:V:r:.-^Sk 




miiHon. 


baseball is to a strike that could ly unnecessary. The game never has give that up," Fehr said'. 


22 2! U ^ 0n ^ a y s go*o n ^jM intl^ast.w be subtracted from the TV money, to sign players to long-teim con- _ 

of the union. “ ‘ 311(3 won ’ fajr 311(3 fork over the S60 million. The own- In theory, this means that the play- tracts. If die union gets the whole sense, they ainosi want these de- 

u" - . r • . , **«, ‘ , , .. , | , 5/A. ^y,! 1 w ? 5 J as1 a .ump sum of ers could get less TV money for $60 million a year, the clubs will, in ceivine owners and this ouick-to- 

, 01051 u ^ u ” al, . n g about 1 can t describe how unlikely it S15 million in S I and where is this their pension fund. In fact, they a v-no- have to oav twice anger hard-line union to push loo 

baseball’s myasse is that it is total- would be ihy the players would one-thirf stuff written down? couid^Tnoae. ^ ^elfth £land this SHrS fZ 


one new factor. 

Four years ago. fans wept and 
wrung their hands with worry 
about the game. 

Now, that patience and concern 
have bon worn down to nothing. 

One fan protest group, called 
“Strike Back,” has vowed that its 
members will boycott the parks for 
as many days after the strike as the 
strike lasts. 

The feeling here is that they are 
far from being alone. 

Many of those who have long 
loved baseball can feel a visceral 
anger welling up. In a perverse 


anger, hard-line union to push loo 
far, so the fans can teach them a 
lesson in bow expendable they are. 


Becker Wins Last Match, 




Unud Pnu imemtoaMot - “If anyone would have said three 
HAMBURG — West Germany or four months ago that we would 
knocked the United Slates out of win against America in the Davis 
the Davis Cup wodd zone tennis Cup, be would have been declared 
quarterfinals Sunday when Wim- oot," Becker said, 
biedon champion Boris B acker do- The U5. team, captained W Ar- 

feated Aaron Krickstdnm straight ihnr Ashe,h2dgainedadeiLZ-2in 


■WN 


-pi t r* ll r p — » >UI nvw - — wiu mu ioi, JV um. uuu wi.ii iuu,u 

i uesdaj . the owners Finally of- As written, such a proposal is a baby will go until 1 1 :59 P.M. Mon- lesson in how expendable tl 

Dodgers’ Welch Foils Reds on 2-Hitter 


A.-..^5SS 



^ •-..werobog? . 
■- -iteoUtC- 

- • ’ - .. 1 f Of;' 

. ". • ™ sndiolt-' 

- V 

r-cJoDuir a^- 
-.‘ifl ^JLtadaa^ 


Hinjjkhf 

r::rj;Ai h & wtf cte. 

»srjtal paraulc 
•- : v-e luans In 5mA 
— ”■ & -’bsence inti 
iWlarcprflHP 
v ctfaru, odrus 
-.sj BuiiiujcoiAfe 
■ :i. j :* .Vaih. an ^ 

TnsiisB& , 
. •: iiJ. jj 

SOBTH F 

•ji 4 , 1 V 

'.ilhl 

*; 

Eisrd 

t. - vm 

fSBtf 

jji'SJCf- 

iOUTB 

:lh«* 

4* 


W ' 

.-****» 


sets pf the find match. - 
Becker, 17, who stunned the ten- 
nis world this summer by winning 
the Wimbledon tide, bat Kricfc- 
strin, 6-2, 6-2, 6-1,' to’ give West 
Germany a 3-2 victory — its first 
over the Americans in the ax times 
their Davis Gup teams have met 
since 1913. Their last meeting was 
in 1970, when the United States 
triumphed, 5-0, in Ohio. • 

Cram Breaks 
3dWoddMark 

Umud Presslnumational 

BUDAPEST — Steve Cram, 
of Britain jet lais tod world 
record in 19 days when he 
shaved one-hundredth of a sec- 
ond off the 2,000-mcter mark 
Sunday, clocking 4 minutes 
5L39 seconds at Nep Stadium. 

Cram, 24, who brake the 
1,500-meter and mile (1^09- 
meter) records m July, ran the 
last 1^)00 meters aloneand was 
so close toNew Zealander John 
Walker’s nine-year-old mark of 
4:51.40 that it took several min- 
utes of defibantion before the 
record was confirmed. 

X>he stadium dock showed 
him to be uxrhimdicdxhs of a 
second outskfe ’tte mark and a 
second dodepst him even with 
it, but scrutiny of the photo- 
finish revealed that he had bro- 
ken the record. . 


the day’s first singles when Eliot 
Tehscher defeated Hansjoerg 
Schwaier, 64, 2-6, 5-7, 64, 6-1 
- That grading five-set battle last- 
ed 3 hours 45 minutes and was 
interrupted three times by rain. 
Becker said afterward that for him 
“the waiting was just unbearable." 

*T just wanted to get my game 
over with, win ar iose,” he said. 

. -Kziekstetn, who celebrated his 


.hisfirct match point in the final set 

It was Schwaier, 22, from Mu- 
nidi, who kept the German specta- 
tors on the edge of their seats. He 
won afive-set, see-saw contest with 
KrifJc stein on Friday, when Becker 
beat Teltscher, only loJosejust as 
narrowly Sunday. 

- Schwaier was forced to struggle 
against Tdtscher’s surprising net 
attacks that helped the 26-year-old 
American win the first seL But 
Schwaier maHg a strong comeback 
in the noci two sets with a shrewd 
base-line game until the Tdtscher 
proved stronger. . 

When it was over, the Gomans’ 
coach, Niki KEc, could only shake 
his head a say, “Too bad." 

The USl team, down by 2-0 after 
twin singles defeats Friday, got its 
fir? *xanl from the world champi- 
onanp doubles team of Ken Flach 
and Robert Seguso on Saturday. 

They defeated Becker and An- 
dreas Maurer. 6-2, 6-8, 6-1, 4-6. 7-5 
to band the partisan Hamburg 
crowd its first disappointment. 



Compiled hi l tut Stuff From Dapncha 

CINCINNATI — Bob Welch 
pitched a tWL»-hitter and Mike 
Scioscia and Pedro Guerrero hit 


SATURDAY BASEBAIL 

Giants 7. Braves 4: Rookie Chris 


home runs Sauirdav night as the Brow ° 4 tod-inmng grand slam 
Los Angeles Dodgcn, beat the Cin- Francis;r0 iv > ™ lor y “ 

cinnati Reds. 2-0. Atlanta. 


in the AL East to 9'- ganw-c over 
New York. It was the Rangers’ fifth 
consecutive loss. 

Lamp, 7-0, entered with one out 
in the third after starter Jimmy Key 
left with a blister on his left index 
Finger. The right-hander scattered 


, ; -7- . .. . Astros 4. Padres 3- In Houston. ,m B CT - ine ng&i-hander scattered 

7-1. struck out fire and M k 3^-.^ Iw(vnin in three singles, struck out two and 
walked three en route to his fourth bollom ^ niTihhmSui w-alked Me - m ^ fifth 

complete game The right-hander ^ Bailev's hit capped a three-nin Toronto P'teher, worked two in- 
ha> won ax straight decisions, a!- ft, nines for his 14th save. 


na. v won ax straight decisions, al- ~ y „ ^ nings for his 14th save, 

lowing seven earned runs in the C g The Blue Jays had 11 hits, each 

tave m PhflBes 6. Canfinab 4: In Sl slarler ai !ea s l one. 

Mario Soto was d^nive L 01115 - pinch-hiner Derrel Thom- Tigers 9, Brewers 3: Lance Par- 

aiLmriS onk f^r'hSc £ ^o-out, two-run double in the drove in three runs with two 

one amf smtek^ui ,0lb «■« Philadelphia its victory homers in Detroit and Kirk Gibson 

“SaWSES---, is **»* by S D«di e™, - k.tand 


struck out seven. 


Cincinnati’s player-manager. uciuvroiwux py tuul 

Peie Rose, went hitless in four at- ^ ^ narrowed Sl Lotis s lead wih the bases 
bats. He still needs 25 hits to break ?rer New ^ork m the NL East to 


homers in Detroit and Kirk Gibson 
and Darrell Evans each homered 


with the bases empty to help beat 
Milwaukee. Dan Peiry, 12-10. won 


Ty Cobb's record of 4.191. 


Scioscia save ihe Dodpin: a 1A 0D, - V onc ” clo O' <> r Met loss to 
lead in the fifth, homeringwer the themsdvo of first place on 
right-field fence; he now- has fire 1““^'; ]J5“ the P lavcre 8° 


1‘.6 But the Cardinals for just the fourth time in his last 12 

onlv one victory or Met loss to decisions, while Danny Darwin, 6- 


homers, tying his career high for a 
season. Guerrero hit his 26th with 
two outs in the ninth. 


out on strike. 

Blue Jays A 
American Leas 


Cmd^tiSdootget its first hit doubled honte two runs in’ Toronto 
until there was one out in the fifth. Dennis Lamp ^pitched 3% m- 


; place on got his ninth straight defeat, 
rsmaygo Yankees 8, WKte Sox 4: In New 

York, rookie Dan Pasqua high- 
1: In the lighted a four-run first inning 
AHenson against Chicago with a two-run 
1 Toronto homer, and. Ron Hassey followed 
d 3% in- with a solo shot to help halt a four- 


Prqi \mrraasni 

A spectator at the game Io Oakland made his feelings 
known about die possiblity of a baseball strike Tuesday. 


when Dave Concepcion singled. 
Then Eddie Milner doubled with 
two outs in tbe sixth. 

The Reds got one runner to 
third. In the second. Buddy BeQ 
.and Nick Esasky walked and Bell 
moved to third on a double play. 
"Welch then snared Ron Oesier’s 
.line drive to end the innin g* 

Mets 5, Cubs 4: In Chicago, 
Howard Johnson’s two-out homer 
in the top of the 10th rallied New 
York, after the Mets tied the game 
with two out in tbe ninth. Wally 
Backman beat out an infield single 
. and scored on Keith Hernandez’s 
4 double down tbe right field lint 
Expos 6, Pirates 5 : Mike Fitzger- 
ald drove in two runs and Hubie 
Brooks hit a solo home run for 
Montreal in Pittsburgh. Jeff Rear- 
don got two outs in the ninth for his 
27th save, most in the majors. 


time in their last 14 games. 

Their victoiy, a club-record 10th 
straight at homt raised their lead 


run of his career. 

Indians 10, Orioles 4: Julio Fran- 
co drove in five runs and Brett 


Butler went 4-for-4 in a 16-hit at- 
tack in Oevdand that backed new- 
ly-acquired Cun Wardle in his first 
major-league stan. Floyd Rayford 
and Mike Young homered for Bal- 
timore. Mike Boddicker lost for the 
11th time in his last 15 decisions. 

Mariners 6, A's 2; Gorman 
Thomas hit his 24th homer and 
Mike Moore pitched a seven-hitter 
as Seattle triumphed in Oakland. 
Moore. 10-6. won his sixth game in 
eight derisions since coming off the 
disabled list June 21. 

Red Sox S, Royals 4: In Kansas 
City. Missouri, Bill Buckner hit a 
three-run homer for Boston and 
Roger Clerams re turned from the 
disabled list to post his First victory 
since May 27. G emeus, who car- 
ried a no-hitter into the fifth, was 
replaced in the sixth by Steve 
Crawford. The Royals had lost 
only once in their Iasi 10 games. 

Angels 5. Twins 4: In Anaheim, 
California. Doug DeCinces hit a 
two-run homer off Minnesota’s 
Bert Blyleven in the ninth to rally 
the Angels. California’s Rod Carew 
got a single in the game, leaving 
him one hit shy of becoming the 
16th player to get 3,000 hits in the 
major leagues. ( UPI.LA TAP) 


Xanana Pitches 1-Hitter for Tigers 


Baseball 

Friday’s and Satorday’s Major League line Scores 


Tennis 


yin&uw i 


0 off * 01 

-- 




- ' .'O''. 

• r-' 

. : •r' ( : 

• i ? 


PHIDAY-S RSSULTS Saallta Ml QM DM— I 4 B 

. NATIONAL. UBAGUE ■ OoUud Ml W Rx — J 4 0 

HM» Y«rk - . WM <M— 1 4 • LMottan. Lons (71 and Unw; John. 

CMcaso MIH »tx— a 7 1 Lnntfcrd (41, CMhoras (71 and HmMl W— 

r ama ioWB . Ug M UUSMfc (71 dud Cdrtsr; unstoM. K O— LaranXan. H. Sw-Ontl* 
edwilw, firantar (71 and Dawte. W— Eck- vorat UJ- hr— O akland. Oavts 130). 

'eriMv. S4 Lr-LntK M." Sa-BniMlar (4». _ 

HH-ouoasok Matinow* (tl. VSSESfF fJSVa 75 

'(Ftnt oaiM) . kaTkwal leaoue 

n im«Mm "SHr * 

CtecteaaH Ml M TM 3 f ■ ““B* ' MMW •—* f I 

HMshlMr, Niodanfiior UU and Scko«iK. 'm' 

Robinson. Siwor «l. Franco «J 

and Bifordella W-Herttlwr, TM. L-finbln- * rK ^Tii 

Mivsasv— NMtnhitr 19}. HR*- LasAnoe- , V* n,m MR ~~ 

Ms, Londrooax ff), Owmni 04). "" Tof *' JoOWO " <7} * 

(Smd Gam) Co» d mnios N1M Ml— a 4 I 

LMAnwtaS WWW-1 5 ■ CMcMOdH MS MS MS— • 1 I 

OndnooH ms ON «»— s k l ■m mptma Sctado: sm» nt WtonMrto. 

HonovcuU, OBOUa (II. Diaz (4). Powoti (7) VBnGordsrin.W- Wtlcn, M. I — Solo. TIM 2. 
aid Y co«er. IS); rtbta ond Von HRs — Los AnOoMs, Sdosda IS), Guorrara 

Cordw. W-TMk. 5-11. L-Hwwvodl. *-7ft «»>• .... 

HR»— Lao Ananias. OucmKa43S>.CIiidf»all, MaMreal mm *00-4 U ■ 

Esasky no). p ti l sa urati Wl W dw w ■ 

Montreal M0 3MM4 — S 7 1 Smith. Rooeroo 13), But, a). Rnarton m 

W HMua h 0M IN #00-7 2 1 and FffrotraW: MeWIUIam, Wlm (3), do- 

Hasketn. Rtfrdon (7) and Fttzsarald; moms W.OuonM Wand Paw. W. - natu re#. 
RaiMdioL-Wkin (I) and Paw. M. ■ — McWIHtoms, M. Sv— Roaocn 07). 
4. L— RMCMi. K 5v— Worrfo n «M. HR— Montreal. Breaks (B). 

Son Francisco «M OB MB— 7 12 I Ml Madia 1M MO MO-7 12 0 

Atlanta 220 OH 3SX-12 M 0 A lt a nt a TM OB BOB-4 9 2 

LaPoint, MMan (7>. Garretts (D.waKctm - Krvkow, Da vis («, Garretts OJ and Tre- 
(M-ieKcaat (Oand Trovtna; B*droslan,Dod- vino: CompM). Johnson liJ.Oarbor 

mon (7), Garbor 17), Sat tar (V) and Caron*. (9| and BmotBci. Corona <9).W— Krvtow.7-4. 
W— Garter. 2-1 L— Williams. 231 HR— San L— Matter. 154. So— Garretts IM. HRs-Can 
Frandsca Davis 4 9 ). Pronctscv Brawn 41U. Attanta. WaMnaon 

PMadMoMa 0M IM OH-2 7 2 111). OterMHI (2). 

SI.Lootl ON BOB M»-0 5 0 son Dtaao • 120 MB BOO— 3 | | 

Hudson, Cannon (t) and Dtau Tudor and HcBStta 1MMM02-4U t 

Partsr.W— radar, U4.L— HudSon.20.HR— . sttaw.LoHorts4»)andKMMdi’;Ryon.Cal- 

PnnadefpaJa. sewnkir (MJ. noun «). KaMdlt) and BaCtoV. W-KorWd. 

las Dioaa . OH IIS MS— * IS 2 M. u-uttorts. 4-S. 

Moast a n ‘f* Y ? PklkodeloMa OM 2J1 «M 2-4 f 1 

Hoyt. Thurmond (3), Wolno tf), Jateain jtXsals BM IM 071 0—4 « $ 

tf). Stoddard W and Kanwdr. BoeftV (B; Koosrow.Tofcuha 111. Carman (D^Andw- 
ttekno, Dowlav (fl.DiPIno (lJ.SmRri 181 and ^ (1# , ^ vlrslls Kenhlre. Farsch (*). 
Botev. W-NIOftra, ML L— MdVt, IM. w— Gamptell (0). LOh« (Ml and (Mo. w-car- 
Sndtti (14). HRs— San Dtaao. wattlos 1121. ^ ^ L _Lnn«, m. sv— Andarsen (3). 
Houston. Duran W- HR—PtdladdoMa, SchmJcU 1171. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

MteaufeM III •» «l-t t t AMERICAN LEAGUE 

tetrad IM 030 Ms-4 I I aaeut* MOWltO-4 12 I 

Vittkovlch, watts (71 omSSctinjader; Tana- ^ 401 031 Dto— 113 • 

no and Parrish, w— Tanona Ml- L— Vudcd- Lona,Gtooiwi (41. Stanton u)andSkkinor,- 


Mdtto III MW 1 4 0 Blvtovon and Lowdnar j Zohn. Sanchez (5). 

oMaad 001 1ST Ms— 3 4 a Holland (7). Cittern (*) end Herron. W— CO- 

Lanostan. Lons (7) and Knarnav; John. 


SATURDAYS RESULTS 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 
NOW York SOI IM 001 1-1 IS 2 

CMcbm • 0M 2M SM 0— I 5 I 

- DBrnna,OraMb(S),MeOawtU(10)ondCar- 
Mr; Rutnwun, MwWMh (7). Gwnoart (0), 
Smltti ITLFnutor 118) and DovtS. W-Otmco. 
M L Brm kr.KL te- Mc OM MB 19). HR- 
Hmw York, Jo hn so n (7). . 
los A wn s uui . Mi sea mi- 7 4 o 

>*— i|| MO MO MO— 4 9 ■ 

wolf* and Stfoodn : Mo ate Bttardolto, 
Van Carter IfJ. W-%*ateft,M. I — Solo. W-12. 
HRs— Las AnnteA Sdosda IS), Guorrara 
(2d). 

Montreal 122 010 100-4 13 ■ 

P tfM wrotl Wl 130 000-41* 0 


moms (S).GuoA(u (Uand PonaW— Rofcaroo. 

M. I McWIHtoms. 5-4. Sv— Rourdon 07). 

H R Mo nt real. Breaks (B). . 

Saa Pnmdsca IM MO SOB— 7 ' 12 • 


Hrtek (14). CaUionwt, Janos (10). DoCJncos 
(13). 


Major Leagne Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
CON MMSioo 


1-L L— LoftOrtS, 4-5. 

PkflBMMo 211 0M 2—4 « 1 

SLLMte M8 TM 071 0—4 | 0 

KossmOfLTOtuteo 111. Carman (Sl^Antef- 

stn (10) and VlrriJ; KcosWre, Fondi (0). 
CmnpOri! (I), cahtt (M) and (Mo. w— Car- - 
man. A3. L-uWfc H. Sv— Andwion' (3). 
MR— PtdtoddnWa. Sdwntdt (17). 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Chkfert ON tat 110-4 12 I 

Now York on on BOX-113 I 

Lono,GMo*on (O.Slaotan (0) and SMmwr; 



' w 

L 

PCt 

GB 

Toronto 

47 

38 

A38 

•_ 

Now Yorit 

S4 

44 

549 

9W 

Drtrott 

Si 

44 

■545 

10 

Barton 

54 

49 

524 

12 

BaHimora 

a 

50 

JJO 

13W 

MNwauKM 

44 

54 

.440 

UM 

Clavatand 

34 

WM DMdM 

<9 

-330 

32 

Caittornto 

S9 

44 

sn 



Kansas Cttv 

SS 

44 

545 

2 

Oakland 

54 

49 

524 

5 

Chicaao 

51 

49 

.510 

dtft 

Saattta 

49 

54 

A16 

10 

Mfmasata 

44 

SS 

ASS 

12 

Tsxos 39 44 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Rost MvWoa 

■379 

30 


W 

L' 

Pet. 

GB 

SL Louts 

41 

'40 

504 

— 

NaW Yorit 

' to 

42 

5*8 

IVS 

Montreal 

51 

46 

SSM 

4V4 

Oticogo 

54 

to 

529 

7W 

PMIadtePhto 

47 

55 

541 

14W 

Pittsburgh 

37 

WM DhrislM 

49 

J17 

29 

Loa Angalsi 

to 

42 

50 

— 

dnctenall 

u 

41 

JOB 

i 

Ban Dtaao 

55 

49 

529 

4 

tawM 

to 

54 

■442 

13 

AKanta 

45 

57 

541 

15 

San Francisco 41 

43 

J94 

20 


DAV15 CUP 

WORLD ZONE QUARTER FINAL5 
«M Cor m aav vs. Un4Md State 
(At Homtera) 

Woo t Oort naay wit*. 3-3 
Slaoies 

Elior Tollsdwr, us. oof. Hanstooro 
SdMAter, M, 7*. 5-7. 6-4. 4-2; Baris Backer. 
Wsst Germany, dot. Aaron Krlcksieliv 0-14-2. 
R 

Doubles 

Kan Flach and Robert SoauSA UA, del. 
Bodwr and Andreas Mmiror.42. 40. «-l. 44. 7- 
S. 

Aartrtfa vs. Pte u ooay 
(At Sydney) 

Amdralia wins, u 
Sfeiolca 

Pawl Mctiamoe, Australia del. Victor 
PaccL 4-A 7-5, 04, 9-7; John FtmorataL Aus- 
trada del Frandsco Gonzales, 4-3, 9-7, 7-5, 

ooabls i 

Gonzal ez and Peed del McNomoo and Ed- 
mendeon. a-x HI H.I -4 41 


(At aonoolore. indlo) 

Sweden wins. 4-1 
smoies 

Vltov Amrttro). ln«a<W. Mats Wllonder. S- 
4, 9-7; Andort Jarryd. S uw d sa del. Ramesh 
Krlstnaa 4a 4a 4-1. 

DeoM es 

JarrvdandEdburedelVliav Amrlirol ond 
Anand AmrttraL 21-19, 3- 4. 4-3, 44. 


Compiled bn OurSlt^f From Diipauhes ~ ‘ 

DETROIT — Pitching master- _ _ _ _ _ 

fiiUy with his curve ball, Frank YcuJsBeS Slip Up 9 - 
Tanana allowed only one hit. Ben ^ ir* 

Oglivie’s home run in tbe fifth in- United Pro. 

rung, to give the Tigers a 4-1 victory NEW YORK— The Yankees 

Friday night over the Milwaukee never seen anything like iL He hi 
Brewers. In the seventh inning Friday 

“When you throw the stuff I Meacham at second base and Da 
throw, yon have to be sharp," Tan- hit a drive over the center fielde 

ana said. look off from second and Berra c 

Tanana faced one baiter over tbe Luis Sabrc a r threw to shortstop C 
minimum, Oglivie, and struck out to cat cher Carlton Fisk. Fisk cau; 
eight. He walked one baiter, bat be 8-6-2-2 double play, 
was taken off tbe bases when Ogli- “At fust I just wanted to catch 

vie grounded into a double play. those things when you know twog 

“He’s way ahead of everybody To make it worse for Martin, ns 

else," said the Tigers' manager, was pierced by an injection in ' 
Sparky Anderson. “He knows bow Guillen from second base with th 
to pitch. Every pitch is for the next Salazar hit a grounder down tl 
pitch or the pitch after " Bonh fielded. Bordi had no play 

T anana , acquired ei ri» er thi« running. 

year from Texas, made his only 

mistake when Oglivie hit a 2-1 

pitch into the upper deck in right, Tony Perez singled borne Bell, then 
his seventh home run, tying tbe Bobby Castillo relieved and gave 
score at 1-1 in tbe fifth. - up a home run to Nick Esasky. 


Mexico leads sene* m pncti or tne pitcn alter. 

Francisco Model, Maulco. tef. Staphane Tanana, acnnjfi^ ^ r|i» T this 

Bonnoau. 44. 44. 7-s, 6-2. year from Texas, made his only 

mistake when Oglivie hit a 2-1 
,A, , ^^ T 2liS^K l a) pitch into tbe uppri deck in right. 
Q oar t o r n ua ii his seventh home run, tying the 

Claudia Kohde-KJIsdi. West Germany. OH. jeore at 1-1 in the fifth. 

Mono Monolltovo. Czechoslovakia 74. 7-5, u 

Pam Shrivor.U^wdof. Beth Horr,U^.6-L43; “ we were playing better, he 


Yankees Slip Up, Are Doubled Up 

United Press Irucnuukmal 

NEW YORK — The Yankees manager. Billy Martin, said he had 
never seen anything like it He hopes he never will -t gam 

In die seventh inning Friday night, with the Yankees' Bobby 
Meacham at second base and Dale Berra at first, Rickey Henderson 
hit a drive over the center fielder’s head. Meacham stumbled as he 
look off from second and Berra caught up with him as center fidder 
Luis Salazar threw to shortstop Qzzie Guillen, whose relay was right 
to catcher Carlton Fisk. Fisk caught both runners at the plate, for an 
8-6-2-2 double play. 

“At fust I just wanted to catch the baU,” Fisk said. “You think of 
those dungs .when you know two guys are going to run into your face." 

To make it worse for Martin, managing his first game since his lung 
was jpierced by an injection in Texas, Salazar’s infield hit scared 
Guillen from second base with the winning run in the 1 1th inning. 

Salazar hit a grounder down the first rase line that pitcher Rich 
Bordi fielded. Bordi had no play ax fust and Guillen never stopped 

r unning. 


York's three-game winning streak. 

Braves 12, (Sants 7: Bob Homer 
and Terry Harper drew consecutive 


Pam siwivor. u^. <to(. Both Horf,ua.4-L43; “If we were playing better, he In the first game, Pedro Guerre- two-out walks with the bases load- 

coriino Besson. Canada dot. Eva ptart, wosi could be 7-1,“ Anderson said, ro hit a three-run homer and Ore! ed and Ken Oberkfel! singled home 

temJw 1 “And if he’s playing for a dub Hershiser and Tom Niedeufuer wo runs in a five-run eighth io 


Sam moo K 

KaMa-KIlscft tel Bassarf, 6-4, 44; Shrlvor 
tei Garrison. 74 (7-21, 44. 


Transition 


FRIDAY BASEBALL 


pitched Los Angeles to victoiy. 
Cardinals 3, PfaUBes 2: Ozzie 


Atlanta dial beat San Francisco. 
Astros 12, Padres 9: In Houston. 


that’s scoring runs, he could be 8- Smith’s RBI single began a three- Joe Niekro beat San Diego for the 

q - 11X10 run seventh inning that beat Phil a- 25th lime in bis career. Bill Doran 

’ In eioht starts oner- he joined delphia in Sl Louis. John Tudor highlighted the Astros' four 

[Wre-T J^h a > L33 won for the 12th tune m his last 13 s^nd inning with a three 

earned-run average. His resold is 6- Mels 1: C3ary Matthews ^osS.Pbatesl: InPittsbu 


Detroit, Tanana is 4-3 with a 233. 
earned-run average. His record is 6- 
10 . 

Blue Jays 5, Rangers 3: George 


aeiprna in at. louis. Joan luuor hignugnted tne Astros lour-nm 
won for the 12th tune in his last 13 second innin g with a three-run 
decisions. homer. 

Cobs 2, Mets 1: Gary Matthews Expos 3, Pirates 2: In Pittsburgh, 
hit his third home run in five Tim Wallacb atoned for an error 


bostoh piocad Rick Minw. ooHioter. . - RflrK ^_ •». fienrae Wl th “' d 1*®“ run in five Tim Wallacfa atoned for an error 

sssssrjErsssfi: r^ at r,T d o oub .lf ai,dJ 0 t", cs - 

i)m 31-nov msotted us). R-»rirt* Wiiiimits’s snln shot heat wind, m the fifth inmngm Chicago, keth and Jeff Reardon pitched a 

That ended a '-1 lie and New to Mt—tetf. ^ 

Ruflno Unaroo.oi4f)aidor. Io Eamoaionol tno Orioles S, tudfemc fc In ClCVC- 

^Ew^K^?Mor k coooar.Pi.ct, l n B Cal Ripken doubled home the 


(At GwavoquH. Ecuaderi 
Q o c i telovo M o Itate 2-fl 
OnUM 

ivanLondLCuchoolawaklatel.AndrosGo- 
•maSO, wtthdrovm i AUrailav Modr, Cxoetto- 
itevoAta, tef. RMM VhW, 44 4-1. 40. 


rich. «. HR3-AUIwookM, OBIiMR tl). D»- RlgMlU (« and hsteV. W-WWt 


**** 

' . ^ '■il.'t. i»0 


trot), Laman (5). 

Tin . 1*2 BH MS-3 I • 

Taraato « W1 

I Cook, Note (4), Harris (7) and Pmrow.' 
AlNWidf,HfWc» W end WhHt- v ^ A i ?g n ’ 
Mr. IM, ^-Coofc,M.SY-H«M itlfc 
VTnaub Harrah [B>. Toranta Btfl (SOLMvUAi- 
tts-(l). 

BMEmara in Ml EM 14 2 

rtiiYotiiiiit inwum-4 9 2 

. McGregor, stemrt IS) and OwnPMv; 


Auto Racing 
German Grand Prct 

Rooitsat SMdar*s Ooram fireod Prix « 
tei b woi tea W9«l Oarmony (47 law.304jl4 
KBom*Hrs/»9 Miles): 

I.MfcMa Afcoreta Italy, Ftrrori 1S44S. l 


EUROPEAN ZONE A SEMHINAL3 ur “ r auw ' 

Romooia vs. Bav*t ■ — 

” European Soccer 

PlortnSeBarcearMi. Ramaniaittf. Tarek El * 

Sakka,7-S.SA4A4>2; Androi Dlreu, RomanJa, PRENCM FIRST DIVISION 

dW-Aftmoa El MoMmy.lt 44 4-1; Soaer- Barteaus i. Nancv 0 
esanu dot. El Moteimv, 44 M; £1 Saka dal. LBTOl 1 Pdrts-SG 1 


er. to Caloonr. 

HatteoW Ltaote 

LOS ANGELES— Activate RJ. RavnoMs. 
auffloiter. Pknd Davo Andorsefl. InfMter. 
on IM lS-dav suaplamoniel WGebM Ikn. 


. „ son.7-7.L- Lonad-I-Sv — RfWwtlHIfl.HR*-- av - UAiri 

« • cuicnoa GmnM* M). Now York, Pomuo (4), jwr. M mlnulw. 31 SMtete. nv. 111177 

* ' HatMY 14). Malilnolv ITS), . 9 amki p net. Franco. Metarwi-TAfi- 


MwtM* | 1 

Oefratt W «! «*“• 15 » 

Darwin. McClure HI* Ladd U> ond Moore i 
parry and PorrBlL W - P otnr . 12-tO. L-Oar- 


'■ 2. Alain Pre*». Franco. McLoren-TAG- 

3MM9«e-3 I I Pared»MP42B. ):35M2J9t 
393 911 42*— ♦ 13 l i Jacques LnMte, FronanJoior-Roream 

Ladd (4) and Moore j jsjs. l:3e:2147L 
Mnr. 12-tO- L-Oor- 4. TiterryBounon, Be tofu m, Arrows- BMW 


wJr, 4-U HRs— Gteon Ufll. Porrisn 2 1151. AL 1:36:24414 


£vom (23). 
Ttan 


3L Nifct Lowtt, Auotrta. McLorw-TAG- 
MO Ml IDS— 1 9 a pared* MP+2B,l:34:4SJft 
Ml 193 Mt— 4 tl 1 A Nfpei MonuU. Britohw WliUam-Honda 


Dlreu, 44, 4-1 

EUROPEAN ZONE R SEMIFINALS 
Aoriria vs. isred 
(At Harifawra A vUrio) 
m« wtas, 3-2 
EteH 

SMOBM GOdoMo, lareoLdaL Banora Plls 
7-9,4-4,44>44r4-l; Ames Mansdorf, Israel dof. 
Pith 34, 7-S. 4-1, 4-Z 

P mhly g 

Sftonor PorWM an« GncksMn, Israel, tef. 
PTerFafgi and Alexander An)nntsaL7-L 74 . 


coodLandonnagneedrMvrauMbrreai&ianed tying run for Ba l ti mo re, and scored 

ptthlnteoraealiauon. Named Bm Monbou- [he w inni ng nm OU Eddie Murray’s 
auetiepttcMng coach. Acttvafod Butch Wvne- pi_ 

oar.caicher. Opilencd Sant SrodNv.coroier. Single m tbe Sp^th liming, Rip- 
10 Columbus ol ttw Inrefnatkmal LeowM. ken got three Of IheOliOieS 16 UltS. 

S EATT LC — Recalled Joefc ppxnwe. soc- Romaic A Red Sox 3: Lonnie 

ond basemon. from CaMorv 0) me Podllc e u— i„ a 4«l 

Coast Leaauo. OWtoned Brian Snvter. mtrJv- Smith S One-OUt, baSCS-loaded Sm- | 

er. to coioorv. gle in the 10 lb beat Boston m Kan- 

Hottoow looooo sas Citv, Missouri. 

LOS ANGELES— Actlvalod RJ. Revnalds. -I , ^ _n-.L ! 

ouffloidor. Placed Dave Andorsefl. InfMder. Dace Iorg Singled le adin g Off the 
on tne lMov suoalomernol otGdbied list. I Oth and Jim SundbCTg bUDled 

Sheridan to second. After Mark 

i r« c Clear’s wild pilch sent Sheridan to 

European Soccer third, intentional walks n-exe issued 

k to Jorge Ona and Willie Wilson 

MrteteTT^S *1 a«i Bob Stanley was summoned 

LBwi i Por^-sc 7 frotn the bullpen, bul Smith singled 

aasiia z Teuton i sharply up the middle. 

ESLYEr, A ’ s 3, Marinos 1: In Oakland, 

umz a, Martin « three pitchers held Seattle 10 four 

Monaco 2, sirattooro a hits and Mike Davis hit his 20th 

1 homer. Rick Langford, who 

l» Havre i. ni» 2 pitched three scoreless innings af- 


Blanc paiN 


Bteiio z Teuton i sharply up the middle 

Mmritei B Lam 3 A ’ s 3, Marinos 1: In Oakland, 

mmz a, Monte « three pitchers held Seattle to four 

Monaco 2. sireBboura a hits and Mike Davis hit his 20th 

' homer. Rick Langford, who 

l» Havre i. Nice 2 pitched three scoreless innings af- 

FniMtsiondioas: Parts-s Gi.- Barte ou* ^ taking over in the third inning 

Lem, Toulon, NatWn 7; Lille, Monaco 4; Aux- “T^T 6 . “ “ , 

HYt, S; Sochoui. /M, TouUMei Nicti for tbC LQJUT&d TOflUfiV JOuD, W 3S 
UMiLNmn, RofUteLa Havre LMoreHBo, credited wilh his first victoiy rinre 
Sirtebewu 2; Bcffto 2. t”) 1QRT Irthn hurt hie fhrmu. 




-• ’i: i j i p j. gf 

-i. 




W— WoworL *4. L— ThoriWRXV. HR*- 

BaHImorr, Sheets t»). Youoa (O). Clew 
tareLThoraaon (71« Jocolw <121. 

Mtoa 2M IM DM 9-a IS D 

-Wtete cur an an an i-4 t • 

V H4raf,Clear TO.Staolev (1« and So*. Sujn- 
voniU); Blade, Jones (9), Quhenftwry (IB) 

ateifteu»ere.«--QuhenberrY.5^— Qeor. 

~V£r " ■ . 

Watt " - Ml 0M 000 71-4 u l 

iPnm York , 2M BDI OM V-5 » .« 


IB)- Kev. Lanui (». Acker (7). Lavelle (7), 7. Gerhard Boner. Awlrta, Arrow- BMW 

raMU (|) and Ailernon. W— Lama. re. L- A8. l lap beMna. ‘ 

m. 5 v c»«q i f (U). Xjttofon Bond. »te» Garmonv, Tvrratt- 


**‘ rtfl * 7 a 7-SNfte Jd*»i 

( pniirt OM BM W— 7 7 0 . , 

Moore and neonier; Kmegao Bhjra M). ^ ^ 

VOW (W ** T eUtete. W — MJOT . Tfr^ L— 0]z t lgpk 

Kfueaer, B-Ul HR Soalttei Tnomaa (241. 

um mere Ma3M«*-« * ■ ov« 

lea 22B U*-M IB a i. Mietwie Am 


Renaull 01< i k» ' 

V.SMfab Jdwn9»*v Sweden. Ferrari 154- 
M,I loo. 

Wl Morrtn Brand® Britain. TvrreiKa* 


Row York , annw — ' - * Cleveland ™ » w**« » ■ 

1 BwiiL GtelM tlttt. Slanlon H«. aocftScker. Davis (2), T. MarlliM (4) anfl 


S O end Plek; Bvelfwn. oemm; word*. MMfl ff? L 

I, Bonfl, Ol) and Wytiepor. 2-3- L-Boddckar. ifrll HR^~ 

■ L— OortSj 3S(, HRs— Eew Vork. MOHirM, 2 ^idmore, Ravtart <5L Youw (13). 

(M),WlnflMf 04). . ‘ , _ 0M MB 093-6 I 2 

JWNMMfa •: . m MB B9G-I | J - oM S» #0-1 S 3 

OOtonta - MB M2 01»"^ * * lt y?* nn , erawted (71 and Gerfmon; Go- 

Scbrtun, eufamla (?)» FIWH CM» nicrti,M.Jen«* 17), Beckvfltti (8) and Wfoitxjn, 

0^S(UasiMcCcBUlt««^ “Ti 8 ?!!?*; jjgS^ywZetewnfcy* L-GuMem. 


W-MeCasua 7-7. L— Scftrom. Sw«mwo HB— Boelwv 3udw 

tb»em »«. SMOUev W- l^-Cro-mro 

Cbltforeia, Downtaa (lit- _ 


overaR Standton 

1. Mietwie AJbareta, Itotv. 44 Petals. 

Z Akin Pn»N. Prwiew el. 

1 ette do Ano*H*. Italy. 24. 

4. Koka Roeboro. nnland, IL 

1 Stefan JonanHen, Swedwi. IL 

- 4. Nefeoa Pbud. BrisH. 13. 

7 . Patrick Tambov. Franca. II. 

L Jft CT te LoHlta, Franco, ML 
9. (tie) Ayrton Senna, BradL and Thierry 
Bouten. Betakim, 9. 

It. Nigel Maneed, Britain. 4. 

». NKt Lauds. Austria, S 


Rrttata Y*. SwttMriagd 

(Al Eastaounw, Englend) L ... .. 

Rritata w(m,m J _ u ri _ 

Steam i "L'l ( 

Jeremv Bates, BrUtMn,tef. Ketar Guentlv 
arte, 44 44,24,4.1. 

DeeMc* 

John Utrrt ana Colin Oowdrewefl. Britain, uintnal 
tetJteoBHteHk0ndGuenlhardL7S.34.M. Z.T 

**« SSL 

’ ‘ - Hamlttea 

AMR RICAN ZONE SEMIFINALS 

Brian w. Cofeeibte Brit Clmb 

(Al Porta Alegre, Brazil) Edtpantan 

Brian >ea«t 5-1 Spskakhw 

Debbtes Winnipeg 

CarttelUrmayr and DodaCampai, Brail. Cotaary 
def.AtvaraJonfDnMidileMGomas.t-4.4^L4- 


Canoda v*. Mexico 
(Ai CMoutiml. Quebec) 


Football 
CFL Standings 

EASTERN DIVISION 

HI T PF P» « 
Montreal 3 2 0 103 IM 4 

Ottawa II l 11 l« * 

Toronto ) I oil Ol * 

Hamlttea 1 1 0 It l« 2 

WESTERN Ol VISION 
BIN Clmb 5 • 0 177 45 10 

Edmonton 3 2 0 13 121 4 

Soskakhwn 2 2 0 111 » 4 

Winnipeg 2 2 0 85 « 4 

Coioary 0 * 0 a 102 0 

FRIDAY'S RESULTS 
Hamilton 39, Montreal u 
Edmonton «9, Ottawa M 

SATURDAY’S RESULT 
Sateatchnmn X, Cotaary II 


Sept. 12, 1981 John hurt his throw- 
ing hand. 

Angels 3, Twins I: In Anahrim, 
California, a rookie, Kirk McCas- 1 
kill, held Minnesota to two hits for 1 
innings and Brian Downing de- 
livered a two-run homer in the sixth 
for the Angels, who had won only 
one of their last seven games. 

Dodgers 5-2, Reds 3-5: In the 
National League. Jay Tibbs 
pitched a five-hitter to help salvage 
a split of the doubleheader. after 
driving from Denver to Cincinna ti 
on Thursday following his recall 
from the Denver Triple-A team. 
The Reds backed Tibbs with five 
runs in the third, all with two ouL 
Buddy Bell doubled in wo and 



- H OTOLOGISTS 

16 Haw flvd Saea Maylar Uwto Wt 
01-4936916 














Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL. HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 5. 1985 


LANGUAGE 


Yaphet Kollo: The Role-Winning Ways of a Hollywood Heavy Medical Terminology 


By Desson Howe 

Washington Pan Service 


W ASHINGTON — Yaphet 
Kotto. 43. has Keen a screen 


▼ ▼ Kotto, 43, has been a screen 
heavy ever since he was the first 
black major character to kill a 


raenL My career has been practi- 
cally breaking all ihe traditional 
rules. People say Hollywood is 
reticent to use black dramatic ac- 


tors in starring roles. In my case il 
isn’t true at all Walking down the 


v wro UHIIVI VIUUUMM IU bill U , - . i 

Caucasian. The movie was “The streel 111 any^ given American city 
Liberation of Lord Byron Jones," w “ly city in the world, people 


directed bv veteran William ^ 1“°™ w ho Yaphet Kotto [i> 
Wyler in 1970 and a predecessor when I go around the block. 

.. .1 IILI 1 A ' A niL.1 n oM VI. 


to the “blaxploitatioir movie era Q. What nhn would you attri- 
of films such as “Shaft" and “Su- bute that to? 
perfly" during the 1970s. A: It’s a buildup of films over 

Kotto broke into television act- past years. I've become some kind 
» in the 1960s. appearing in of an institution. It’s like a build- 
lonanza," “Daniel Boone," up or a groundswell. Particularly 
he High Chaparral" “Guns- the black kids, young people, and 
ike." “The Big Valley," “Man- now more white kids than ever 
t" and “Hawaii Five-O.” before. 

His movie debut was at the age Q Have you lost friendships 
23 in “Nothing but a Man,” with other Nark* if they don't 
?64), directed by Michael tfdnk you're acting the way they 


ing in the 1960s. appearing in 
“Bonanza," “Daniel Boone," 


“The High Chaparral" “Guns- 
moke." “The Big Valley," “Man- 

nlw" nnri u Uon.'Qii Piink-D ” 


nix" and “Hawaii Five-O.” 

His movie debut was at the age 
of 23 in “Nothing but a Man,” 
(1964), directed by Michael 


Roemer. His first starring role was should? 


with Anthony Quinn in “Across A: P ainf ully, yes, 1 must say. 
1 10th Street,” ( 1972). Some of his Some very heavy-named people. 


i iulo street. iiyic). aoiue ui ui* some very heavy-named people, 
more notable roles were in But I don’t really keep on an 
“Alien." (1979) “The Star Cham- individual cross. Nobody's out 


ber," (19831 “Brubaker" (1980) 
and “Blue Collar," (1978) and 


there paying my rent but me and 
bringing up my children but me. I 


“Live and Let Die" (1973). He have only one' thing to do, man, 
also played a memorable perfor- that's to be a father to my children 


mance as tdi Amin in the TV qnd an actor. And because I do 
special “Raid on Entebbe” (1977). not have the right e thni c sound. 


He lives with his wife, Antoi- boom, there’s a problem. There’s 
tie Kotto. and six children in even a problem of people Hying to 


Washington state. 

Excepts from an interview: 


push cocaine, marijuana on me in 
Hollywood. I won't get involved 


Q. Do you think you've opened with it. I think Pm an oddball all 


doors for other Mack actors? 


the way around. I’ve been an odd- 


A: I don’t know if f personally ball ever since I was a ldcL This 
did it but it started in the late ’60s name, Yaphet Kotto. which is 


when everyone was very political- mine, not made up. That always 
ly aware. I did a film called “The put me on the outs in my neigb- 


Liberalion of L. B. Jones” only to borhood. 


find out that there had never in 
motion -picture history been a 


Q. Where (Ed you grow up? 

A; In New York City, where 


black man to physically be aggres- everybody else was bring half-ln- 
sive toward white men on the dian and half-Mohawk and all the 



certain kind of role, a straight- of black people going by scratch- 
laced black guy. I’ve been allowed ing their head and taking it and I 
to play black guys who were just swore when I was 19 1 would nev- 
equal It has to be God. And it’s er do that on the screen. I would 
continuing. The drum hasn't always stand up tall and straight 1 
stopped beating. was not going to leave an image of 


By William Safire of the swollen vans surrounding a 

ASHINGTON - A month ( Cm far 


from Cameroon? 


held that Pve upheld that in every 


A: RighL And his friends were angle film rve done. I have never 
all over Africa. He spoke about 9 bowed my head down and I re- 


y 10 languages and so did all of fused for a long time to do come- 
iis friends. When I was a kid, HiV*, because I'm not going 


W«^hKB bW somaine to the same origin, but came to 

me 3 n“ute.n% r th^ f o f 

bly get this answer: "one dot above 

good pedanl “grammatical discon- Sol Strinmetz ^ 

SHwre m-donged than that “many people born under thatsga 

S^SnicXbutnptas 


there were thousands of languages ^ ^ n mke the white people 
going on and all different colors of laugh. I remember William Wyler 

»_ n i„ i i, 1 : 1 , „ . . , i ■ ... . .. 


people. People who look like yon, coming to me and ask ing me to 
people who like me, people who cry m “The Liberation of Lord 


jook like brown, all these different Byron Jones.” Before (I threw] 
races. That was very confusing. As this gay into the thresher he wam- 


] got older, an eastern mysticism ed me to cry. Just a year before 
brought me back to Christianity. Sidney Poitier had slapped some 


But my life has never beat one dude in his face and everybody 


apart from God. 


went, aaeehhhhohhhhhh! Ana 


Q. What (fid your father do in here I’m getting ready to throw a 
Cameroon? guy in a threshing machine. 

A: He was a merchant marine. o. And would erv afterwards? 


I'm proud of that I have become a 


Q. And would cry afterwards? 
A: I would cry before. There 


cultural thing in the black com- was this image of what M ack men 
m unity in terms of my last name were supposed to be. A black 


and African heritage. These kids man Do you realize this, when 
who don't have that, whose par- you look at me on the screen it is a 


eats came from slavery. I am black man standing up there, 
looked at as an oddity. With all Upon the screen, finally after all 


this publicity about blacks not centuries and years and the 
getting jobs in Hollywood, they all injuries a black ma n, standing 
say to me, “Wait a minute, look at right there along with Marion 
that Yaphet Kotto. Come tell us Brando and A1 Pacino and all the 
how you are doing it!” I can't even ^si of those dudes in a quiet. 


handle my mail anymore. 

Q. How many letters do you get 
a day, do you drink? 


dignified way. I realized (hat when 


the guys came to me and say, cry, 
and I say, I can't do il I said no. 


A: In a month I get about 2,200 I'm playing a guy that's out for 
to 3,200 fan letters. I’m their lead- revenge. People who are out for 
er. I know I'm a leader. I dreamt revenge don't cry before they 


about this, man, but I never really commit their acL 


believed it till it k 
fans would come. 


ened.1 knew 
t not fans of 


Q. So you didn't do It in the end? 
A: No, I didn't cry. I wouldn't. 


screen, to the extreme of actually rest 
killing someone in defense of his 
honor. After that picture proved Q 


Actor Kotto: “I’m an oddball aU the nay around.” 


this serious nature. They're not He understood. I explained it to 
saying, “Send me an autographed him. William Wyler, God rest his 


to be a success, a whole rash of American? 


Q. So you're find- generation where a gentleman discovered roe. shoL I played incredible roles. 


1 started spending my s ummer s 


whai they called blaxploilaiion A: Yeah. My mother and her going to the theater. I went to off- 


came ouL Even though it was a family came from Panama, and Broadway in New York and did a 
class picture, people saw that father is African; he came mimfenf RmnHwav eimra Finai- 


there was money in what 1 did. from the Cameroon. He worked in ly, I got on a Grey hound bus, took 


Until "Live and Let Die" I construction. My grandparents ^ f w three days and nights to 
don't think any black actors had brought me U P- My mother was a California and the rest is history, 
been used in ah adventurous kind 5®°°°“ lieutenant m the United p m about 23. 1 got into a play out 
of manner. Prior to “Alien," peo- States Army. She had me for a there, got noticed, got cast from 
pie were saying how come they °f ^d then left me the stage into a number of guest 

HMn’i nw hiiint ariiirs m cn»n» with her mother and rather. shots on television. 


pie were saying bow come they 
didn’t use black actors in space 
pictures? “Alien” made over $200 
million. Then a rash of black ac- 
tors [were cast] in honor and 
space films . For some reason I’ve 


They would create roles that were 
not typical black roles. On “Bo- 
nanza I played a horse thief. A 
thief and a gunslinger. 1 had to 
believe the role was written for a 
white guy. I loved it because I 
played a real live cowboy. Not a 
cowboy with black problems who 
was a slave or anything, but a 
gunslinger and Hass was trying to 


saying, oenu me an ouwgrapucu him W illiam Wyler, Uoa rest fllS 
picture with your name on it” ^ being the kind of man he is 
They are saying, ‘Tdl me how you ggjd, “Let's go with iL You’re 


complete as that indicated by a 
period.” 

Since President Ronald Rea- 
gan's operation, however, the first 
pi«ming that comes to everyone's 
mind is “the large intestine, from 
the cecum to die rectum.” 

The root of both, kaion, is a 
transliteration of ancient Greek. 
With no mark over the first o. the 
word means “food, meat, or the 
place in the belly where it goes”: 
with a mark over the first syllable, 
however, the meaning baronies 
“limb, member, portion,” which 
took Greek grammarians into using 
kaion for independent clauses and 
then applying that word to the 
mark between some clauses. 

Now to a word that used to be 
whispered, and even now is often 
spoken with dread: cancer. The sur- 
geon who briefed the press after the 
operation at Bethesda Naval Hos- 
pital opened with a matter-of-fact 
stunner: “Ihe president has can- 
cer” In that sense, the word de- 
notes a disease marked by growth 
of malignant cells. When laymen 
ask surgeons, “Did you get it all 
out?” tire implication is that cancer 
— a cancer — can be removed, and 
the patient thus cured. Many can- 
cer specialists (who call themselves 
oncologists, from the Greek onkos, 
“mass,” for the branch of medicine 
Hauling with 1 amors) think of can- 
cer as a con tinning threat that can 
be arrested; they hesitate to use the 
word cured preferring remission, 
or, to remove that term’s connota- 
tion of temporariness, permanent 
remission. 


have not wanted the ominous con- 
notation of the disease and refer to 
themselves as moon children be- 
cause of the supposed influence of 
the moon on the bouse of Cancer." 


Polyp, ihe name for the type of 
tumor in the president's colon, 
comes from “'many-footed," 
named for the shape projecting 
from the membrane. (Wags 


promptly called Reagan's Cabinet 
“the PcrivD-bura.'') 


“the Polyp-bura.") 

The most worrisome word in this 
vocabulary b metastasize. Greek 
for “to change from one place to 
another”: in cancer, such metasta- 
sis takes place if cancer cells are 
transferred from a tumor through 
the bloodstream to other parts of 
the body. 

"He’s champing at the hi/," said 
the White House spokesman dur- 
ing Reagan's hospital stay, indicat- 
ing a healthy desire to get back to 
work: the phrase was quoted in The 
New York Times headline. 


To champ means "to munch, 
chew vigorously, bite down on 
snnwfhing hard." The first applica- 
tion to a horse was in Thomas 
Phaers 1558 translation of Virgil's 
“AenekT: “The palfrey ... on 
the fomy bit of gold with teeth he 
champes.” William Makepeace 
Thackeray, in 1832. immortalized 
“Horses . - . champing at the 
bit” 


me on no drugs, they don’t see my Look, I took a stand. Those peo- 


carrying on going 
from community 


get calls pj e were getting ready to fire me, 
all over man. And those blade actors and 


the country, Texas, Georgia, ask- hi ark leaders who were saying I 


Strictly speaking, an oncologist chom) 
is a tumor specialist, not a cancer empli 
specialist, because not all tumors Capp 


On the newscasts I was monitor- 
ing, that verb was pronoun cec - 
chonping. In Britain, champ is stan- 
dard and chomp is dialect: in the 
United States, champ is less ofter » 
used to describe chewing lhaz. 


ing me to [visit]. 


haven't done anything. Who took 


Q. And when they see you in 51 5,000 out of his own money and 


Q. How <fid you break m to 
acting? 

A: I was taken to upstate New 


Q. Were the roles satisfactory? 
Weren't you always being the gay 
who was shot? 


talk me into putting my gun away. 
We were both two white actors. I 
never played any stereotype black 
guys. The only other person that 
came dose to what rm doing is 
Sidney Poitier and he played a 


person is it kind of rioted? 


found 10 black women quietly 


been at the forefront of a move- York to Boston, to the Cape, A: I was never the guy who was 


A: Oh man, crazy, especially and put them into school so that 
black people, Mack women. I'm they could study and they arc now 


omen. I'm they could study and they are now 
lot of rear employed in the motion picture 
wavs want- industry as script supervisors? 


happy about that for a lot of rea- employed in the 
sous. First of all fve always want- industry as scri 
ed to be a man on the street When There wasn't any 
1 was a kid 1 could see these films there are. 


ore, bat now 


are cancerous. A tumor may be 
benign or malignant ; although the 
adjectives benignant and malign ex- 
ist, and you would think that paral- 
lel construction would call for be- 
nign vs. malign, that’s not the way 
the language goes in this case. 

Cancer is the Latin and Greek 
word for “crab”; the disease, ac- 
cording to the Greek physician Ga- 
len, was named for the resemblance 


Thus, to spell it champing at the hr 
when most pcopie would saj 
chonping at the bit is to slavish!) 
follow outdated dictionary prefer- 
ences. The word is imitative, so ii 
should imitate the sound that most 
people use to imitate loud chewing 
Chew that over. lexicographer 
(chomp, chomp). 


.Vo, York 7 lim Service 


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hr. Short/Iona term. No fee. Tel Paris 
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Weekends 321 42 91. 




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1005 Tri Sang CooenenU Btridbig 
24-34 Henrmey Read 
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HAPPY BK 1 HDAY MR4ND9 - Al my 
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MOVING 


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PARK PALACE 
MAGNRCENT 3-ROOM 
APARTMENT 


8 Awe de awsrine 
75008 Pewit 

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quarte r, 80 sqja, splsnrid 
raOOO. Afl camtarts. August or more, 
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AGSM 

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Manta Crete, MC 98000 Monaco 


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FOR SALE 

ANTONY PEVZNBl 
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ATHJER 

. H PARS 

Sfucftd in the 17th. near fVxe Charles | 
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I tOVELYOWB high up, near i 


nan, tin KUn. 2 bsdraorns, 
ed garden £ sqm. 56? 031 


Aston Campcny Formations 
ipi Tl . 8 Victoria St, Doucla 


Dcpi Tl . 8 Vidoric 
we or Mas. Tefc 


Telex 627691 SWA G 


SWITZERLAND 


THE AMERICAN DOUAR latflM fa 
value sfaee this txhwiisamsrf was 
placed. TWi is me man yaw annud 
mterest Became toe awmr of one of 
the krgert and mart uiqie demands 
in the world. U2JM ant in told. 
Aocarring to ipaddbed pjUcalioni 
tod danand e rcrind as one of the 
kroon norm ewr found and rood m 
the same category as same of the 
toast fanous dromonds m the world. 
Bated in the same dost c&i Giknan 1, 
owned by the British Crown Jwots, 
WRsny. owned by Tiffany end Co. 
liSA, hferdtcBi, owned by Staras 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 

CLOSING BANK - FOR LOAN trare- 

ciMicxif onmai or a Dabon Dank. LOS 

Zurich 361 6500 or 056/491 M. 


T»N5CAR 17 ov de FrietW 75008 

Pans. Tefc 256444. Moe S 95 31 


Poo xrant arioa, sfappng etc. 
USA our spedoby, 

Tate advantage or aur toqpsience. 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


Artwnrfr 233 99 B5. Graes 39 43 44 

AUTO CONVERSION 


HUGHES MOTOR COMPANY 


NY ONE WAY $1 SO. fa 

West Coast $145. Poris 


(01 202 7446431 
x 41254 HUGHES G. 


DIAMONDS 


LAKE LUCERNE 


md, 




bt Ihe world famous resort Bnmnoi at 
toe Lake Lucerne wo sofl fast doss 
apartments 6 penthouses wdh an unfor- 
gutaUe view over the late. Prices from 
StlMDOO up la SF8 800000. htort- 
goqes d low Suns btarest rales. 

Free far sde to foretflner i 

EMBIALD-HOME LTD 

Darfrir. CH-8872 Weesen SG 
Tefc am-431 778. 

Iha 876062 HOME OI 


CCM.LID 

Canxxxiei farmed UK. & wotMwide 
kidw6ng bb of Man, Turks & Cabal, 
AnguHo, Ptrama end Iberia 


Shopping in Europe? Visit 

DIAMONDLAND 

The krpst showroom fa 

Antwerp, Diamond City 


EPA / DOT 

^ CONVERSIONS 

* Crete* brttedga/boreiiig service 

* * ** 

* using only toe 


HOTELS 

SWITZERLAND 


10 YEARS 

We Deliver Can to the World 


UKSM. GRAND HOTEL BJROP 
hat toanxi Tel Ml 
301111 Telex 72657 Switzerland 


TRANSCO 


— Trcxneo 5 a. 95 Noorddra^ 

2030 Antwerp, gritow 

Tel 3237542 62 «L TS CTrT8ANS 8 




304 East 42nd St. 


hficrrfws. Athens, Star of Peris, Affrimawtr 33A. TeL 323/2343612. 
owned by Horry Windor, New York 


New York Cty. la Fo s hi n na hle , Ecs 
Sale Manhanon. 1/2 block from UN 
double* h on S8S 
ftn ad* 20% drtuotftf 
422951 . Tefc 212-986-8800. 


Your ureqpe opporturrfy to become 
the owner of ns prestige and nta 


i nve s tm en t. Afl manes w# be trad- 
ed stridty « mb*bI Tefc 11217} 


OFFICE SERVICES 


FOR SALE & WANTED 


22917 or 20546 Bite, South Afara. 
Telex 3217H7 SK P.O. Box I84S, Bnb 
80250 5oiithAtnc8L 


EMBIALD-HOME LTD OFFSHORE COMPANY 

Darfrir. Ot-8872 Weesen SG U*- pan rarifanr axppaniet. 

Tefc Ofc-58-431778. Nomnee rfreetort & bearer share*. 

Ibu 876062 HOME Ol Canfatenhd bonk cexiunt. 

Fw support sennas. 

P t xxmxt & Uberian ampome s . 

LAKE GgCVA + LUGANO. Mat- Offshore bonk. 


COMPUIER PORTRAIT SYSTEMS 
fflOOTO -ttSM FOB) mi smpfor 
T-eheti, ribbons, pcsterL dean, 
punch etc. Major credo earth ae- 
Kara te, totfach 170340 
fSSifart. Tefc 7g808Tx 412713 
ANTIQUE DEALERS, DECORATORS, 
invesfan, French Antiques Irate 
prices. oSjprcjeds corwdarad. Write 
to. Bn 2536, YCrfd TAtn#, 92521 
Neuily C*dex.Frence 


PARIS 

near CHAMPS ELYSSS 


ROT 

YOUR OFFICE 
with afl fae£6w 


If SATHIJT^ 8 rue Copemic 
75116 Pais. Tefc (331) 7V 15 59. 
Trinu le wtel 620 183P. 


18 cl Gdd, Steel «3nd 18 cf Gold. Steel,- wafer resistant 30 m. Quartz 
For infomalion write EBEL SA.. 2300 la Chau. ■de-F.^nds.'SwifzerlaixJ 


xn>x. V&nGsiaadRaepon. tecomo &.CS- 17 VMraota a, tender Neuilf Cetefc, ftro 

/ Axnnc & irray famous mountain E17HP. Tefc 01 377 1474. TUs 89391 1 G PANAMA UBBUL CORPORATIONS YOIM OFFKI M PARS RIGHT ON i 
resorts. mooniScert NEW APART. ’ i Minn i-l.i. r_, mm —- M . > ..„ . 


resorts, tnamificer* NEW / 
MS4TS / OWffi / V1UAS 


able fat Foreigners. From U5S5000& 
choice. Mor^cges a 6^% inter. 


"S* TWJCLWT UMOjSIG on large c»HjD6M 20240. Tefaiu 628352 tSLANO 
3,f»a tatordaed loans. The only armer=~j~tj. (yw UK). ' 


from US$403 ovnriabta new. Tel TUE CHAMPS PIY<iFPC 
inStfi omen Tak.. kianiti 1 Inc tenMnnTj CLTjtD 


est. Swna ressdcncy pou6le. H. SE- 
BOLD SA Tour Gr« f. CH-1G07 
LAUSANNE 21 -35 26 1 1. lUGttJO 
91 68 76 48 


SEi »et PI T 35 31 


, , ^UPOAIY ffltVKBJ OFWB 

oof ixri vwth a rcttosemgftreafficc4~~ ~~ — ZZ — I T«4ept»ra arewe'irtg, Tclei. Fa* 

m London speaafang in too se-wctjl ACTTVS INVBTOR. ™ K> I s egetonat. meeting too"> 
Arti CWieas Bark & Trust fW U>4 S200/KO mh la bu» c xchtaSe ACTE. 66 <-Namps Bysees P*-s 8to 
Ud. 28 BkxA PnncE RmC l<rdanl F-enel’ buvness W'-to J P D Bc» TH 562 e* fc Tf, e49‘57F 


Reaching 
More Than 
aThirdof 
a Million 
Readers in 
164 Countries 
Around 
the World 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE far famadohs teCvery 

FROM STOCK 

Bert renrira, rnam*. 

head, ca m wnfao m USA 

RUTEINC 

TAUNUSSTl. 52. 6000 H tANKFURT 
w Gam, td (0^-232351, 0 * 41 1559 


RftNTUBE & HfCTlUCAL 

ptienees. Paris 325 08 91 


PAGE 11 
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— WORLD FAMOUS JEWELLERS — • 
FNCLI SIAT JEWELS & WATCHES . 


2*1957 l>» Anqekrt CA 9»r« U5A 


j Hfralb SribuiK 


LONDON 

153 NEW BOND STREET. 

TEL.: 01-491 1405 OPEN SATURDAYS 


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