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No. 31^69 



INTERNATIONAL 




Published With The New York Times and Hie Washington Post 


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PARIS, WEDNESDAY, Al’GFST 7, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


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' By iW Lewis 

Nev ToikTima Stmce '’ 
PARIS — TfeSovttt Unioa has 
agreed ttrqptt two Of its nnrVyr 
reactors to international I 
this month, ' 'Western dii 
repotted.; . ' 

It would be the first time for 


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Moscow* s support for nonprolifer- 
ation and as a way for it u> distract 
attention from lad of progress at 
the U-S.-Sovk4 arms control talki 
Diplomats and officials of the 
International Atomic Energy 
Agency say that the same purpose 
might nave been behind Moscow's 


eactors to Inspection 


Moscow to; aflowTmjanial outside announcement last week that it 
inspection afany of its nudear in- would suspend underground nude- 



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or military, to 
determine how they work and veri- 
fy what they arc doing, 

'in the next two to three weeks, 
experts from the International 
Atomic Energy Agency, based in 
Vienna, are to examine two Soviet 
reactors erf the pressurcssd-waier 
type to ensure that they are being 
used ro generate electricity and not 
for military purposes, - 
The inspection inviatiou pre- 
cedes the Aug. 27 opeoina in Gene- 
va of a monthlong amfa my of 
128 countries to review the working 
of the Treaty on iheNoaprolifera- 
± lion of Nuclear Weapons. _ 

* At the coitferenoc^ both the Sovi- 
et Union and the United Stases are 
likely to face. charge* by Third. 
World countries and other? that 
they have not honored their treaty 
commitments to promote disarma- 
ment and to share peace! ol nuclear 
technology with other nations. 

Western analysts see the Soviet 
decision:, as a demonstration of 


cow’s refusal to allow inspections 
has thwarted attempts to negotiate 
a comprehensive test ban treaty 
and has hampered other arms con- 
trol negotiations, officials say. 

The Soviet decision on inspec- 
tion also puts pressure on China, 
they say. to sim the nonprolifera- 
tion treaty and allow inspection of 
its nuclear power plants. 


Sow officials say the Soviet move could have 
wider political significance. By agreeing to 
inspection of civilian nuclear plants, it may be 
moving closer to accepting on-site inspection 
of nuclear activity with military implications. 


Aft cfarSnrig neighbors Tj- 
real.^SMmoeder’s son Tors 

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ar testing from Aug. 6 until the end 
of the year. 

They saw similar motives behind 
-President Ronald Reagan's invita- 
tion to Moscow the same day to 
send observers to monitor a U.S. 
atomic test 

Seme officials say the Soviet 
move could have wider political 
rignificanos. By agreeing to inspec- 
tion of Chilian nuclear plants, it 
may be moving closer to accepting 
on-site inspection of nuclear activi- 


OrdinariJy, countries signing the 
treaty renounce nuclear weapons 
and agree to open all their nuclear 
installations to International 
Atomic Energy Agency inspection 
as a safeguard against cheating. 

But Britain, the United States 
and the Soviet Union, which had 
nuclear weapons when the treaty 
was drafted, were allowed to retain 
those weapons and were exempted 
from international inspection. In 
return, these so-called “nuclear 
weapon states'* agreed to work for 


nuclear disarmament and to share 
their hot military nuclear technol- 
ogy with other countries. 

As a sign of support for the trea- 
ty. the United States and Britain 
opened their civilian nuclear instal- 
lations to inspection during the 
1970s. although the international 
agency makes only token checks 
since both countries have the right 
to build weapons. 

France, which has not signed the 
treaty but agrees to behave as if it 
had. also allows the Vienna-based 
agency to inspect its civilian plants. 

The Soviet Union agreed in Feb- 
ruary to do the same, and in recent 
weeks it rushed through the prepa- 
rations for inspections this month, 
the sources said. 

Widespread feeling that the 
United Suites and the Soviet Union 
bad not carried out their treaty’ 
commitments on nuclear disarma- 
ment and technology-sharing 
caused the breakdown of the last 
review conference, in 1980, when a 
majority of delegates refused to 
sign the communique. 

Prospects for this year’s confir- 
ence appear little better. 

Many Western experts fear that 
a second failure risks seriously 
weakening international confi- 
dence in the treaty, thus undermin- 
ing the elaborate system of imema- 

( Continued on Page 2, CoL t) 


4 West Bank 


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ic visit 


LEGAL SERVICES 


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By William Qaibomc 

Wmkmgfm tort Service 

In the face of 

was verv emotional; u.5. Stale uepartmem criticism of 
tied a lot” Mel Schroeda s the revival crfhaish ' security mear! 
Ir. WiHtflm DeVries, who x*- sores in the occupied West i&nk, 
arade's grand marshal, aid' the Israefi autiuoties have arrested 
four Palestinian, coflegt students 
under “admimstrative detention” 
and have aksved to dqport sevcu 
Palestinian detainee? who were re- 

leased from confinement in May 

immigration & BUSINESS* under 'prisoner. exchange, the so- 
curity nitbonlics confinned Toes- 

don from Fndoy Augusi 2 to fc day. 

ii. Call for o pownfp ctrt « to Israeli ntfay th said diat despite 
the US. criimsiB of the' renewed 
use of^ ^deportatiwis and indefinite 

and other measnres wocld be used' 

to cxwifrat terrorism in the bccir- 

LOW COST FLIGHT! pied territories and in brad. 

The Israeli defease minister, 

Yitzhak Rabin, said of U.S. offi- 
cials during a tour of the West. 
Bank on Tuesday : “Fm sorry that 
they are sony. we wffl crattimie to 
do all we find nax»ary so assure 
security, for tfao Arab whuhiianit 
who wish to Ewin peace, and secu- 
rity for the Jew& ^habitants. We 
will fi^it terreff without any play- 
ing around; and; we wffl maintam 
law and order-" - 
Mr. Rabin added that the Israefi 
govenmunt “wiB search for ways, 
including administrative deten- 
tions and deportation, against 
those who actively agitate for ter- 
rorist acts and disturbances." 

The U.S. Sta^ Department, re- 
acting to Sunday’s cabinet decision 
to impose stronger new measaresm 
the occupied wesi Bank arid Oaza.j 
Strip, said in a s tatement Monday 
that it deplored the rioleoae that 


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Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin of Israel, right, during a 
20-imnute visit to the occupied West Bank city of Nablus. 


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led to the cabinet decirion. but add- 
ed: 

"Nevertheless, we regret the cab- 
inet’s deti&m-and hope that these 
measures will not be implemented. 
As we’ve said in the past, we con- 
sider such measures as likely to 
Cosier further ten sons." 

The mfiiiary command said that 
the four held under administrative 
detention, afl students at An-Najah 
University in Nablus, were local 
leaden of the el-Fatah military 
wing of the Palestine liberation 
Organization, the Popular From 
for the Liberation of Palestine- 
General Command and the Demo- 
cratic Front for the Liberation of 
Palestine. 


Palestinian sources in the West 
Bank, who asked that they not be 
identified, said that the closure of 
An-Najah — the biggest Palestin- 
ian university on the West Bank — 
and the arrests of the student lead- 
ers was designed to thwart student 
elections scfcd tiled for this week- 
end, in which Palestinian national- 
ist candidates had a clear edge. 

The sources said further that the 
ultimate goal of the Israeli govern- 
ment was the permanent closure of 
the university. 

The seven Palestinians who have 
been scheduled for deportation by 
Sunday were among 1,150 Arab 
detainees exchanged in May for 
three Israeli soldios. 


Ulster Role 
For Dublin 
Is Reported 

The Jssocuued Prtst 

LONDON — Ireland will be of- 
fered a consulting role in the affairs 
of British-ruled Northern Ireland 
under a joint council of ministers 
and a security commission to be 
established by the two nations, the 
British Broadcasting Corp. report- 
ed. 

The BBC said Monday that a 
draft agreement will be completed 
in September. 

It said that Prime Minister Mar- 
garet Thatcher of Britain and 
Prime Minister Garret FitzGerald 
of Ireland will meet, probably in 
October, to consider the agree- 
ment 

The BBC, which did nct.pvc the 
source of its information, suid that 
the agreement would establish a 
permanent joint council with gov- 
ernment ministers from Dublin 
and London. 

Ministers from Ireland will make 
suggestions to the British govern- 
ment and pass along complaints 
from Northern Ireland’s Roman 
Catholic minority, the report said. 

The agreement also would set up 
a security commission to bring to- 
gether police officials from the 
Irish Republic and Northern Ire- 
land, rite BBC said. 

Other provisions indude giving 
Irish names to some streets and 
making it legal to fly the Irish flag 
in the north. 

Tbe agreement would not meet 
Irish demands for tbe abolition of 
the Ulster Defense Regiment, a mi- 
litia composed almost exclusively 
of Protestants, the BBC said. 

Britain also will not allow judges 
from Ireland to sit in on terrorist 
trials in Northern Ireland. 



1 h* AiuaoMd P r«u 



Hiroshima 
Marks Day of 
Devastation 


By John Burgess 

It'ttshins'ion Post Serene 

HIROSHIMA, Japan — With a 
minute of silent prayer, the release 
of 1.500 doves and "the offering of 
ritual flowers to 138,690 dead. Hi- 
roshima markftt the 40 ih anniver- 
sary Tuesday of its devastation in 
history's first nuclear attack 
About 55,000 Japanese and for- 
eigners gathered for ceremonies in 
Peace Memorial Park, an oasis of 


The psychological legacy of Hi- 
roshima persists. Page 3. 


Relatives of Hiroshima bombing victims, top, floated 
candle lanterns Tuesday night on Motoyasu River. 
Pacifists staged a “die-in” at the city's bomb memorial 


trees, monuments and relics of the 
bomb, code-named Little Boy, 
which was dropped at 8:15 AM, 
Aug. 6, 1945. 

The assemblage fell silent Tues- 
day at the precise time the bomb 
fell 40 years earlier. Several hun- 
dred people threw themselves to 
the ground in a “die-in*’ at the 
“Atom Bomb Dome,” the only ruin 
that the city has preserved. Other 
people prayed in apartments, by 
riverbanks and in nursing homes. 

Prime Minister Yasuhiro Naka- 
sone. speaking at the ceremony, ap- 
pealed to the United States and the 
Soviet Union to achieve real pro- 
gress toward nuclear disarmament 
in the summit meeting their leaders 
have scheduled for this fall 

Mr. Nakasone also pledged to 
uphold Japan's own 1, three nonnu- 
clear principles" — never to pro- 
duce nuclear weapons, never to 
possess them, and never to allow 
them to be introduced into Japa- 
nese territory. 

Hiroshima's mayor. Takeshi 
Araki. a survivor of’ the bombing. 

(Continued on Page 2. CoL 2) 


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For New Moves to Ease Debt Burden 


Lebanese 
Plan Wide 
Reforms 

Gemarel Foes 
Meet to Expand 
Moslem Power 


Tne .-(uirorn/ rVw« 

CHTAURA. Lebanon — Oppo- 
nents of President Amin Gemayel 
met here Tuesday to create a Na- 
tional Unity From, aimed 3t re- 
forming the Lebanese political sys- 
tem as a condition for ending the 
country's 10-year civil war. 

The main ’aim of the coalition, 
which brings together the most 
powerful Moslem militias, is to end 
the Christians' dominance of gov- 
ernment and to rewrite the consti- 
tution to give Moslems an equal 
share of political power. 

Moslems now make up about 55 
percent of the nation's four million 
people, but the apportionment of 
power continues to reflect an earli- 
er time when Christians were in the 
majority . 

About 100 leaders of leftist, 
Moslem and moderate Christian 
groups spent the day discussing a 
draft program. 

In a declaration, they called for 
increased resistance against Israel 
to "liquidate the enemy’s direct 
and indirect presence” in the south. 

The reference to "indirect pres- 
ence" evidently meant that the 
South Lebanon’Army, die predom- 
inantly Christian militia that serves 
as an Israeli surrogate army in a 
security belt established by Israel. 

The meeting was held at the 
heavily guarded Park Hotel in 
Chtaura. in the Svrian -dominated 
Bekaa Valley. ' 

Some Sunni Moslems, long the 
majority Moslem sect in Lebanon 
but now being eclipsed by Shines, 
voiced opposition to the new coali- 
tion. 

Representatives of 15 mainly 
Moslem political parties and mili- 
tia groups attended the closed 
meeting with 30 independent poli- 
ticians, including a few Christians. 

Foremost among the delegates 
were the Druze chief, Walid Jurab- 
lat. the transport and tourism min- 
ister; Nabih Bern, the Shiite Mos- 
lem Amal mfliiia leader, the justice 
minister and Munir Abu Fadhel 
the deputy speaker oT parliament, 
who is Greek Orthodox. 

Mr. Jumblai drove to the meet- 
ing escorted by a jeepload of 
guards. Mr. Bern was flanked by 40 
Amal security men when he ar- 
rived. The Druze leader was quoted 
Monday as proposing that the pres- 
idency be rotated among Leba- 
non's six major religious sects — 
Maronite Christians. Greek Ortho- 
dox. Greek Catholics. Sunni Mos- 
lems. Shiites and Druze. 

Sources close to Mr. Beni and 
Mr. Jumblai said they might press 
for a constitutional amendment to 
shorten the president's terra of of- 
fice from six years to three years. 

Mr. Gemayel a Maronite Chris- 
tian, reaches the midpoint of his 
term SepL 23. and the sources said 
tbe amendment could provide a 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 



S WlTzS tL^ 

PACE 


By Robert J. McCartney 

Washington Post SehUx 

MEXICO CITY — Larin Ameri- 
can governments are feeling in- 
creased political pressure for new 
fi nancUr a rran gements that would 
as ye (heir foreign debt burden and 
allow more rapid economic growth 
after three years of austerity, ac- 
cording to re gional economic spe- 
cialists. 

A consensus is forming in tbe 
region that the measures adopted 
since tbe debt problem emerged as 
a major j jf ffna in 1982’ have been 
only partialN saxessfuL the spe- 
cialists sj rid, >nehtdmg Mexican of* 
fi rfafc and US. banbng sources. 


More debtor countries are think- 
ing erf sock kind of limit on their 
interest payments, or an interna- 
tional mechanism to subsidize 
those payments, die sources said. 

The growing dissatisfaction was 
evident in two developments last 
week. Peru's new president. Alan 
Garda Perez, announced that his 
country would limit its debt pay- 
mratt to JO percent of export earn- 
ings in die coming year, and partic- 
ipants at a Cubanrsponsored 
conference, most of them unofficial 
and an ibe political left, called fora 
regional suspension of debt pay- 
ments. 

Most of the public calls for 
chang e have come from Latin 




ideal HeraM 
jailers own 

iares, Bonds 
Dodities. 


INSIDE 


■ The United States has been 
ordered to impose satictiODS on 
Japan for violating internation- 
al whaling quotas. ■ Page! 


■ In the Ages trial 
grew about the erratic 
erf the chief witness. 


Uons 


PageS; 


■ Mayor Teddy Soltek has 

Jerusalem 

into a cultural center. Page 6. 
BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ BankAmeriea Corp. reduced 

its quarterly dividend on its 
common stock for the first lime 
since 1932. Page* 

■ Hie Dm Jones industrial av- 
erage plunged 2 1.73 1° 1,325.16, 
the sharpest one-day . loss since 
Feb. 8, 1984.- " ° 



AtM-un 


Don Fehr, acting direc- 
tor of tbe association of 
major league baseball 
players, announced that 
a strike would begin 
Tuesday nigfrt Page 15. 


America's leftist intellectual com- 
munity, which is vocal but politi- 
cally weak. Peru's action indicated 
that some erf the region's smaller 
debtors might take positions that 
tbe larger ones could fed com- 
pelled to adopt to save face. 

"The problem is that the issue 
has become more political now,” a 
senior American bank executive 
said. “People are saying that those 
who wanted radical measures, such 
as a capping of interest payments, 
were rignL" 

Latin America’s debtors general- 
ly have sought to avoid confronta- 
tion with U.S., West European and 
Japanese banks and government 
agencies that bold the region's debt 
ofS350 billion. 

The banks' nightmare of a "debt- 
ors’ cartel" styled after the Organi- 
zation of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries has not occurred; the 
debtors have accepted the banks' 
position that each country's debt 
should be handled individually. 

The three largest debtors — Bra- 
zil Mexico and Argentina, respon- 
sible for almost three-quarters of 
the debt total — have publicly re- 
buffed President Fidel Castro’s 
proposal for a moratorium on debt 
* payments. The three did not send 
official delegations to the Havana 
session. They also have rejected or 
shied away from Peru’s unilateral 
action, which was viewed by many 
as a populist publicity stunL 

“1 don’t think that Peru wants to 
declare itself an outlaw in the inter- 
national financial community." 
said a senior United Nations offi- 



Tutu Defies Ban on Politics at Funerals 

Bishop Defuses Confrontation With South African Police 


T>» AnocOTd Fieo 


Bishop Tutu confers with a police officer in Daveyton. 


By Glenn Franke! 

H'asktngtor. Pest Service 

DAVEYTON. South .Africa — 
Bishop Desmond M. Tutu openly 
defied the government's ban on po- 
litical demonstrations at funerals 
for the first time Tuesday and then 
interposed himself between black 
mourners and white security forces 
to prevent a violent confrontation. 

Bishop Tutu's intervention and 
negotiations with the police de- 
fused a situation in which blood- 
shed had appeared inevitable. 

In a show of force, dozens of 
armored vehicles and hundreds of 
heavily armed soldiers and police 
officers had encircled an angry 
crowd of about 1,500 mourners, 
most of them teen-agers. 

Bishop Tutu, winner of the 1984 
Nobel Peace Prize, pleaded with 
youths not to provoke a clash. 
“You are young." be said, i would 
urge you. don't do anything which 
will give the system a chance to 
hurt von," 


The Anglican bishop of Johan- 
nesburg persuaded the police to 
supply seven buses to transport the 
crowd to a local cemetery for the 
burial of a 16-year-old victim of 
previous unrest and he persuaded 
the youngsters to board the buses 
and conduct themselves peacefully. 

Last month be intervened to pre- 
vent a crowd from attacking a 
black man accused erf collaborating 
with the while authorities. 

Meanwhile, the police in Brand- 
fort in the province of Orange Free 
State raided the house of Winnie 
Mandela, the banished wife of the 
imprisoned black nationalist leader 
Nelson Mandela. Mrs. Mandela 
was not at home during the raid. 

The police arrested 30 persons 
after firing tear gas and rubber bul- 
lets into a crowd. 

h was one of several incidents of 
unrest reported Tuesday in areas 
outside the government's declared 
state of emergency. 


Bishop Tutu came to tbe black 
township of Daveytoo. about 20 
miles (32 kilometers) east of Johan- 
nesburg. to preach at a funeral for 
three women who were killed two 
weeks ago in clashes with the po- 
lice. but the police ordered the fam- 
ilies to hold separate funerals. 

Speaking at the home of one of 
the victims, he condemned the reg- 
ulations, announced by South Afri- 
ca's white-minority government 
last week, that prohibit any men- 
tion of political issues at funerals 
for victims of South .Africa’s con- 
tinuing unrest. 

Citing defiance of the high priest 
of Jerusalem by the apostle Peter in 
the New Testament. Bishop Turn 
told the crowd: "I do not want to 
defy the government. But the Scrip- 
tures state quite clearly when there 
is a conflict between the law of God 
and the law of man we must obey 
God and not man. And so at funer- 
als I will continue to preach the 
gospel" 


In Macao, Priests and Nighthawks Fret Over Chinese Future 


By Jim Mann 

La Angela Tima Servict 

MACAO — The Reverend Domingos 
Lam, vicar general of the Roman Catholic 
diocese Of Macao, sat in his office one day 
recently and contemplated the uncertain fu- 
ture of his church after this four-century-old 
Portuguese enclave becomes part of China 
"We have to face a new horizon.” said 
Father Lam, 57, an urbane, garrulous Hong 
Kong-born Chinese who acknowledges hav- 


cial who monitors Latin American ing laid down an occasional dollar or two at 

... o.. — 1 .. Macao’s gaming tables. “We are no longer in 

a colonial system. We have to open our 


economies. “It wants to provoke Macao’s 
the banks, and get better terms lat- 
er on." 

But the debtors arc thinking 
(Continued on Page % CoL 7) 


minds a little further. What 1 hope is. every- 
thing wOJ ran by law." . . 

Yet, eager as be is for an accommodation 


with China, the vicar genera! is willing to go 
only so far. A picture of Pope John Paul II 
hangs on his office wall, and Father Lam 
said he is aot planning to take it down 
despite Bdjing’s efforts to create a “patriot- 
ic” Chinese Catholic Church independent of 
the Vatican. 

"There is no Catholic Church without the 
pope," Father Lam said. “If you goltogo :o 
prison, then > ou got to go to prison. So many 
people martyr for their faith in the world, 
and Macao is no exception." 

Throughout Macao, there are thousands 
of people like Father Urn, preparing for the 
rhnnff K that may come when this blend of 
Mediterranean architecture. Las Vcgas-style 
casinos and Chinese back ailevs is governed 
by Beijing, rather than by Lisbon. 


Macao probably will be the first test of the wheeling weekend getaway for residents of 
Chinese concept of “one country, two sys- Hong Kong, an hour's ietfoil ride awav. 

’ ■ ------ - D i« _ TL-j _r w ' i. : J 


lems." which is the doctrine of official toler- 
ance for different ways of life that the Chi- 
nese leader, Deng Xiaoping, devised in 
negotiating the eventual return of Hong 
Kong to China. 

Two months ago. China announced that it 
was ready to begin talks with Portugal con- 
cerning the future of Macao, thus indicating 
its willingness to take oontrol here. For the 
past two decades, Portugal has been volun- 
teering to vacate the colony but until now 
China had always politely turned down the 
offers. 


Roughly a third of Macao’s income oomes 
from tourism, mostly from its casinos and 
other forms of nightUfe. 

Chinese officials have suggested that they 
intend to apply the “one country, two sys- 
tems” concept to Macao, but no one knows 
for sure just now much China will be willing 
to accept. 

The denizens erf Macao’s nightspots are 
getting ready to defend their turf. 


“We are a monument here now. We are an 
institution." asserted Jerome Steph, director 
of aij Europe- of the "Crazy Paris" review, a show in which. 


an trade and contact with East Asia. It sur- 
vives mainly as a tourist resort and a free- 


(Cootlnued on Page 2, CoL $) 



Iv 


.iX 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 1985 



U.S. Ordered 
To Penalize 
Japanese on 
Whale Quota 



Cabinet Post for Human Rights Critic ~ WORL3& BRIEFS 
Seen as Move to Build Uganda’s Image Arab Simtmil 


United Press International 

WASHINGTON — A federal 

r ate court ruled Tuesday that 
United States must impose 
sanctions against Japan for violat- 
ing international whaling quotas. 

- A three-judge panel of the Cir- 
cuit Court of Appeals for the Dis- 
trict of Gohnnbia, rejecting argu- 
ments of the administration, said 
that Commerce Secretary Malcolm 
fialdrige was required by law to 


Prime Minister Nakasone carried a wreath Tuesday to the 
Hiroshima memorial for victims of the nuclear bomb. 


Mr. Baldnge had asked the court 
to exempt Japan from the sanc- 
- tions, which would halve Japan’s 

■ fishing quotas in U.S. territorial 
waters at a cost to Japan of about 

■ 5462 mfllion a year. 

In March, the two nations an- 
nounced a pact that would have 
allowed Japan to kill up to 1,200 
sperm whales without facing sanc- 
tions, in exchange for ending all 
- commercial w haling in 1988. 

The Inte rnational Whaling Ctim- 
ndssion, of which Japan is a mem- 
• ber, has voted to end commercial 
' whaling by 1986. 


Hiroshima Marks Day 
Of Nuclear Devastation 


By Sheila Rule 

Hew York Times Service 

KAMPALA, Uganda —The ap- 
pointment of Paul Ssemogcrere as 
minister of internal affairshas been 
viewed by same commentators here 
as an attempt by the new govern- 
ment to improve Uganda's human 
rights record. 

An outspoken critic of human 
rights abuses under President Mil- 
ton Obote, Mr. Ssemogercre was 
one of two members of the main 
opposition party to be named to 
uw Aimrimrf Ptm catenet posts Monday by the nuli- 
ried a wreath Tuesday to the taiy government that removed Mr. 
tinw of the nuclear bomb. Obote on July 27. 

The military council also ap- 
pointed Gard Wilson Toko as oe- 
f I ^ feose minister. Mr. Toko, a retired 

UtfKS JL/Uj “te force colonel, is general manag- 
J er of Uganda Air Lines. 

1513 wrintment was a surprise 
fCT(ZSIUWOfl to scone, who expected the post to 

„ be offered to Yoweri Museveni, a 
The main ceremony began with «*el leader whom tbe conned has 
the dedication of a list ofoames of becn to J cnn new 




CASABLANCA Morocco (Reuters) — Arab teados began arriving 
The new leaders plan to meet here Tuesday for the first Arab summit "in nearly three years. otU many 
Mr. Museveni on At«. 12 in Bun* beads of state will be absent • •‘fe ' • - 

gama, Kenya, near the Ugandan Saudi Arabia. Kuwait and some otiw Gulf gate s win not nave 

infer Mr Museveni. who led a wnrecniteffm ai tifc! omimiL which is to boon Wtsaacsday. The 


gnma Kenya, near the Ugandan 

border. Mr. Museveni, who led a m 

four-year bush war against the ma ting is being boycotted bv Syria. Algeria, South Yemen andlefaantaL 
Obote regime and whose support ^fab diplomatic sources said that the Gulf war, the popime return of 

for the new government is viewed £mpt to the 2!-raetnbcr Arab League and the Jor dmiat ^Pal^imaa 
as crucial, has been living in- Swe- accor( j signed in Amman, Jordan, in February would be duaissed. But 
den but was last reported to be in frat no breakt hr o ug hs werctikcfy. partkauany without icp-tewti 

Tanzania. Saudi representation. 


Tanzania. 

Entebbe Airport winch serves 
Kampala, reopened Monday for 
the first tune since army units over- 
threw the Obote government 

•n 'r L 


The former president's home is ^ ^ dear has been 

m shambles. According to the sol- and iniurks" after the collision S 


F mp^h Rail Official Charged in Crash 

CAHORS, France (AP) — Tbe statkranaster responsible for assuring 


Paul Ssemogercre 


whom are top members of his par- security giurdc; they said, many of 
ty- wfacan were killed in later fighting. 


ty. whom were killed in later fighting. 

Several persons knowledgeable Bn gaHty Qfr efl p hat maintained 

about Ugandan politics said it ap- that hS military forces HifeH no 


pcarca unu the. military rulers, one among tbe coup. ' xinmi-ju nioln 

most of whom are members of the The sources salt some of ' n ™ 


“ anri in] unes alter me coiiuHn jmuiubjw h™ u-w 

diers who allowed viators into the ^ Tuesday. Thirty-five people were luBed and 165 iqfurod. 
home on Monday, as wdl as other yves gal ffK, 37 was in charge of the small station at Asaer oa the 
sources, Mr. Obote escaped min- Rodez-Brive line from which a focal tram set Ota cm its coffision com* 
mes after the fall of the Uganda ^dt an express from Paris. The trains oofl id ed n ear the Flatqac station, 
radio station. He left a force of ^ m;w m3 kflometers) southeast of Bordeaux, 
security guards, they said, many of Operations on the surate-lradc line arccaotroikd by telephone calls 
whom were kOIedm . later fighung. betwen nrighboring stationmasters wbo cfcedt that the trade is Clear 
Bngadier Okeflo has maintained before aflowSg trains to depart it was not yet certain bow tbeacrident 
that his military forces killed no oca ^ TK j > but a report by the state-run national railway was delivered 
one daring the coup. Monday night to iW Quitts, the minister of tnmspott 


(Confrere Pagel) ^SSSSSSSSSS been urging tojoin the new ^ H 
also appealed for nuclear disarms- ^ ^ victims. Tbe names of meaL am 

hocitniinn T^Tc . > about 4,200 persons who survived The two. appointments were an- out 
-h 10 ■ j" it in 1945 but have died in the past nounced after the military council bas 
were formally added to the met with leaders of the country’s ere 
“The fates of all of us are bound ^ 13^90 «,« 


Acholi tribe that dominates che Mr. Obote's guards who escap ed 


*“*■ army, wore so far trying to cany came later and rounded 

The two. appointments were an- out their promise to form a broad- about 12 people with Acholi erf 


Writing for a 2-1 majority, Judge 
kefly Wright said, “Where a for- 


Skefly Wright said, “Where a for- 
eign nation allows its nati onals to 
fish in excess of recommendations 
set forth by an international fishery 
conservation program, it has per se 
diminished the effectiveness of that 
program.” 

In such cases, the judge said, the 
imposition of sanctions “is manda- 
tory and nondisaetioaaiy 

The ruling was a victory for 
Greenpeace and other conserva- 
tion or ganisati ons, which filed Suit 
against the UJS. government in 
1984 requesting that Mr. Baldrige 
be ordered to certify Japan as a 
nation that had violated anti-whal- 
ing quotas. 


together here on earth. There can including 

be no survival for My without Nakasone and the speakers 0 
peaceful coexistence for aJL upper and lower houses of the 

More than 50 smaller memorials anw<> parliament strode to 


nounced after che military council based government. Mr. S$e 
met with leaders of the country’s ere ana Mr. Toko are from 
fractious political parties, whom ent tribes. 


Then, dignitaries including Mr. the leader of the military coop, 
Nakasone and the speakers of the Brigadier Basilio Olara OkeUo, 


and demonstrations began to un- Atomic Bomb Cenotaph, the main killing . 

fold in other points around the city pe ace monument in ffa* paHr, m lay Mr. Obote's role was marked by 
to climax its year-round, interna- wreaths Of flowers, ’ • 


to keep memories 


l group 
rid Coffi 


known as the First 


Conference of Mayors for 


Peace Through Inter-City 
ty brought officials from about 95 
dries in Japan and abroad to Hiro- 
shima. 


the leader of the military coup. Soon after the coup, tbe council ' 

Brigadier Basilio Olara OkeUo, leaders appointed Paulo Muwanga, ■ Keoel Leaser Gives Tenns 
urged to practice dean politics and vice president and defense minister Mr. Museveni said Tuesday 1 
not tbe politics of tribalism and under Mr. Obote, as executive would only cooperate with tl 
killing. prime minister. He is a member of country's new leaders if given a hi 

Mr. Obote's rale was marked by the Baganda tribe, the largest in the representation within tbe rolii 
detentions of political opponents country and one that has given military council, Reuters report* 
without official charges or trial, strong support to the Democratic from London, 
and the reported murders of tens of Party and Mr. Museveni’s insnr- He rold tbe British Broadcasts 


■ U.S. Commemoration 
Thousands of Americans oh- 
served the anniversary of the SseaiORfin 

bombing with viols and rallies 


or trial, strong 
of tens of Party 
gents. 

d of the Hoi 


Bfr- SseaMgerere, head erf the However, highly placed diplo- he was wilfing to meet with Ugan- 
Denwcratic Party, blamed the min- matic sources in Kampala say there da’s interim head of state, Lientcn- 
^? ss , t " ll ^, DCT L , t *^ s ? istry that he now is to oversee for have been two attempts to loll Mr. ant General Tito OkeUo, at a neo- 

muci of tire situation. There were Mowanga at his home since his tral site. General OkeUo is not 

unconfirmed reports that he might appointment. If true, this under- related to Brigadier Okeflo, the 

andgovenimmt buildings. release political prisoners, somTof scores the fragile situation. coup’s leader. 


In recent days, the city has been 
filling with peace activists, high 
school students, a few international 


S SEESSSE Journal Ex-ReporterGeteJaflTerm 

£r- nam es anamurdoed them in a tin NEW YORK (AP) — R- Foster Winans, a former raxmer for The 
er- shack within tbe presidential com- Wall Street Journal, was sentenced Tncsday I0I8 months m prison, five 
pound. years of probation and a 55.000 fine for using his position at the paper to 

tcil ____ _ make qmck profits in the stock market. ■ . . ' 

ga, ■ Kd»ei Leader GSves Terms U^ Distnct Judge Charles E Stewart Jr., wbo ruled in Jmre after a 
ter Mr. Museveni said Tuesday he nonjury trial that Mr. Winans was guilty of conspiracy, securities fraud . 
ive would only cooperate with the and wire and mail fraud, could have sentenced Mr. Winans to as mod] as r 
of country's new leaders if given a half five years in prison. The j'udge allowed him to remain free on bail pending 

the representation within the rating an appeal. 

en military council, Reuters reported Judge S.tewtut was to sentence MhWinanste roommate, David Garpeo- . 

tic from London. ter, later Tuesday for playing a lesser rde in the scheme. Another 

ir- He told tbe British Broadcasting defendant, Kenneth P. Fehs, a former stockbroker, is to be sentenced 
Corp. in a telephone interview that Wednesday for his cmiviction oa the same charges as Mr. Winans. 


ana govorunrai Dumungs. release poUtical prisoners. 

Children folded paper cranes erf ytm pnsoncra. 

peace, and painters traced shadows 
of the human form on asphalt as __ 


celebrities and much of the leader- I ^ ders of victims vaporized by 


ship of Japan. 


Soviet Opening 2 Reactors 


the atomic explosion. BBC Upholds Ban on Ulster Program 

T understood why the bomb was J. (7 

dropped, but I stiD apologize for 

it" said Mayor Ralph Russo John- Rouen After an emergency meeting vices are funded by tire foreign 

ston, Rhode Island, who witnessed . LONDON -—The governors erf Tuesd ay, th e BBC governors issued Office. 

the bomb’s destruction as a marine the British Broadcasting Corp. up- a statement saying that the pro- The program, “At the of 
serving in Japan after World War held a decision Tuesday not to ff^m had been withdrawn because ^ Unions contrasted the fives 
II. “Let us all learn from that sen- ' screen a documentary on Northern it was flawed in its present form.” and views of two Northern Irish 


Beatification Asked for Pope Paul VI 

VATICAN CITY (AP) —A cardinal proposed .Tuesday that Vatican 
officials study the “heroic virtues*' of Popc Paul VI and consider making 
him a saint. 

The proposal came during the edebrafon of a Jtfass by Cardinal 


(Contained from Page I) 
tkmal safeguards to ensure that 
civ ilian nncwar plants are not used 
for military ends. 

The Soviet Union, along with the 
Western industrial countries, is a 
strong supporter of the nonprolif- 
eration treaty, refusing to allow its 


Warsaw Pact allies to acquire nu- “e bomb s aestn 
dear weapons and insisting that all 
civilian iudear installations in 


WITUJIUi U U MInli uuumauuud 111 ____ 

Warsaw Pact countries be under 0,15 niistaice. 

international safe guards . I Goman Protesters Arrested 


The proposal came dunng the eele 
Sdnstiano Baggio marking tire seventh 
A dedskm to begin the lengthy proc 
wbo was pontiff from 1963 until 1978. 
John Paul CL 


of beatification fra 1 Paul VL 
ild have to be made by Pope 


For the Record 


A group of more than 80 United West German police said Tnes- 


S tales. European and Japanese day that they had arrested 18 dem- 
companies in the midear industry onstrators, including Petra Kelly, a 


Ireland that has provoked a furor They denied charge s that they feados at 
over media freedom and govern- had bowed to goyernmenlpressure. lineal and 
meat interference. The intervention by Prune Min- _ 

The decision meant that a Magna Thatther. who i has vJfL™ 


YogoelavJaM for Nari 

The Associated Press 

BELGRADE — A 27-year-old 
m echani c from Dnbrovnik was 
sentmeed to nine months in prison 


issued a statement this year warn- leader of the Greens 
ing that another deadlocked review tried to blockade a l 
conference could damage prospects base at Mutlangen to 1 
for trade in peaceful uses of nuclear niverxanr of the bomb 
energy. reported. 

Any w eakening of confidence in A spokesman for tb 


and views of two Northern Irish 
leaders at opposite ends of lire po- 
litical and religious di vide . 

The two men featured were 
Gregory Campbell a Protestant 
who supports continued British 
rule over the province, and Martin 
McGninness, an elected member of 


the safeguard system, the group said that about 100 persons had 
said, would encourage govern- gathered outside the main entrance 


for drawing Nazi swastikas in pub- meats to impose “a plethora” of of the Mutlangen base, where Per- 
Kc {daces, tbe daily newspaper No- cumbersome restrictions on nude- shing-2 nuclear missiles are de- 


vosti reported Monday. 


ar exports. 


day tnat urey nan arrestfia aem- „ “ dedared her intention to denv “ter- w&xy <~ampoeu, a ^ 

onstrators, including Petra Kelly, a 244»our nationwide radio and ttde- oxwxn of oubbeitv" '■* 0 sapporn continued 

leader of the Greens party, who vision news blackout, calle d by . ^ J? uolitioi rule over the province, and 

tried to blockade a uT hidear journalists protestmg aCeged^- ^o^j caisauons of political MoGnil ^^ declrfmo 

base at Mutlangen to mark tire an- ernment interfaenoe, would go pnvernors’ meetine tire Northern Ireland Assembly 

niveisaiy of the bombing, Reuters ahead at rmdmght Tuesday. took place amldrcports that sever- who** said to be chief of staff of tire 
reported. The BBC governors last week al senior BBC executives were plan- 

A spokesman for the protesters acceded to a formal request from ning to resign if the program was On learning of the pr o gii 

said that about 100 persons had the Conservative government to not aired. isrence. Home Secretary Le 

gathered outside the main entrance cancel tbe program, which includes The state-chartered corpora- tan wrote to BBC governor, 

of tbe Mutlangen base, where Per- an interview with an alleged leader lion’s domestic services are funded th«*m to withdraw it. Neitl 
shing^ nuclear missiles are do- of the outlawed Irish Republican by a license fee fixed and collected Brittan nor Mrs. Thatdx 

ployed. Army. ... ty the government. Its external ser- seenthe program. - — 


Tbe fifth congress of tbe Burma Socialist Program Party has an- 
nounced the re-election of General Ne Win as chairman of the Central 
Committee. Selection of a vice chairman was expected Wednesday. (AP) 
Km Young Sam, the South Korean dfpwfent , has announced plans to 
visit the United States in September and make speeches at four universi- 
ties — Harvard, the University of California at Berkeley. Chicago and 
Emory. (AP) 

Thomas R. Picketing formally took up his post Tuesday as the UiL 
ambassad or to Israel replacing Samuel W. Lewis, who served for eight 
years. (Reuters) 


wva WWW Iiyvri j mat JV'W TT> A 

BBC governors last week al senior BBC executives were plan- -tKA. 

d to a formal request from ning to resign if the program was On learning of the program's ex- 
mservative government to not aired. isrence. Home Secretary Leon Brit- 


Thc U S space shutt le Challenger returned to Earth cm Tuesday, 
mding at Edwards Air Force Base in California after an eight-day 


ployed. 


isrence. Home Secretary Leon Brit- The trial of Richard W.Mffler 

tan wrote to BBC governors asking Investigation ever charged will 
them to withdraw it Neither Mr. court in Los Angeles to decide 1 
Brittan nor Mrs. Thatcher have documents to the Soviet Union, 
seen die program. - - 


landing at Edwards Air Force Base m Cahfonua after an eight-day 
misaon. (AP) 

The trial of Richairi W. MlDer, tire only ageut of tire Federal Burean of 
Investigation ever charged with espionage, began Tuesday in federal 
court in Los Angeles to decide whether he had c onsp ired to pass sec re t 
documents to tire Soviet Union. (VPl) 


Prospect of Chinese Future 
Unsettles People in Macao 


A military judge in Santiago ruled Monday that 14 Chilean policemen 
involved in a terror squad responsible for kidnapping and assassinating 
three leftist leaden must be tried in civil courts. (VPl) 


(Continued from Page 1) 
after five minutes, women bej 


1 36 Jteral 


tribune 




isijjgl 


Opemng for Talks 
Is Seen in Moscow 

■Sj.IM.IIb 


omit Leaden Vow to Fash 
an Economic Recovery • 


0&&n«7 

b'Bftmr. 




W i r 








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GxdotBOurtf 

— : ' number i — r j — r — i — 1 — i — i — > — r — r — i — r— i — t—i — i 


appear on stage dressed only in 
boxing gloves. 

There is no fixed lease between 
China and Portugal for Macao 
such as the one under which the 
British willgovera Hong Kong un- 
til 1997. Tbe Portuguese settled 
Macao peacefully in the mid-16th 
century and have stayed on, more 
or less at tire sufferance of the Chi- 
nese, ever since. 

Now that China has signaled 
- that it wants Macao back, there are 
‘ many wbo say they believe that the 
Portuguese flag may come down 
here well before Britain’s Union 
Jack descends in Hong Kong. In 
fact, Macao may wdl be used as a 
proving ground in which the Com- 
munist government wOl seek to re- 
assure Hong Kong of its ability to 
run a place that is radically differ- 
ent from the rest of China. 

The negotiations over Macao's 
future are to open next year. China 
has not yet sard when it wants the 
changeover to take place or wheth- 
er it will give Macao the same de- 
tailed list of- guarantees for eco- 
nomic and dvd liberties that was 
given to Hong Kong last year. 

Pengfri, head of China's Hong 
Kong and Macao Affairs Office, 
told a group of Macao businessmen 
last month that tbe Chinese-British 
pact for Hang Kong “cannot sim- 
ply be copied* fra- Macao. 

But Macao officials say they be- 
lieve that the colony of 400,000 
residents needs many of tire same 
economic assurances given to 
Hong Kong. 

“It’s not a question of just keep- 
ing the casinos, but of keeping ev- 
erything else that comes with the 
casinos, a different way of life,” 
said Rnfino Ramos, deputy direc- 
tor of Macao’s Department of 
Tourism. 

It is impossible to overstate tire 
importance of gambling to Macao. 

It is so imbedded in the colony’s 
folkways that the Portuguese gov- 
ernor ushers in each Chinese New 
Year with a visit to tire casinos. The 
revenues from gambling alone 
make 30 percent of the Macao 
government's budget of S100 mil- 
lion a year. 

Across the border, the Chinese 
government has been, tryingits best 



Tbe deputy bead of Ptoteram’s mobile police squ ad , Antonio Cassara, 
who led a recent roundup of suspected Mafia members in ScOy. was shot 
dead tygnmnen outride his home Tuesday, police said. (Reuters) 

The separatist BasqwegaeniHa Wg auizat ioo ETA damned rcsponsitel- 
ity Tuesday for kiHing two policemen last weekend. The daim was made 
in a statement to Basque newspapers in Bilbao, Spain. (Reuters) 


Correction 

Because of an editing error, an item in Tuesday’s People column 
implied that Stephen Joyce, grandson of James Joyce, said that a museum 
near Dubfinhao owned two death masks of tire writer and had sdd one. 
The unsold mask belongs to a Zurich collector. Mr. Joyce said. 


Latin American Countries 
Pressured on Drift Burden 


for 36 years 'to eradicate the mil - A- • fvJWIM CxJL nJrett JL 

lenia-dd Chinese passion for gam- „• . . „ 

bfing. In June, w en investors in (Continued from Page 1) . 
Ch in a’s special economic zone of more about seeking structural 

Slvit'/ltPfi rmPnivl ra rmrlnA f)iA 4innn^ m iU* _^nr (Lai iL. J.V* I- 


Shenzhen qjrened a casino, the Chi- 
nese authorities dosed it in less 


y that the debt is 
[y because debt- 


economies shrank 2.1 percent in 
1982 and 3.1 percent in 1983. 

Mexico and Argentina have had 
to apply austerity programs this 
year m tire fourth year ca the debt 


- — ” puuoLuj uvvougc UWL , _ _ 

than two weeks. service payments are siphoning off “ tire I<mrtn war the defat 

Li Han, another official of Chi- so much money that domestic ixo- desorbed as berug the 

nn’« Hnmt ifnna ««<( Minu At. .u i.. j onJv Latin American counirv that 


□a’s Hong Kong and Macao Af- uomic grov 
fairs Office, told Macao journalists according 


last month that the colony win be sources. 

^ -Tfac maijutream 0/ opinion_ in 




But the usemainty lingers. For ficial said. “It recognizes that the 
the Portuguese, the prospect of los- debtedwuMcoutimielobecouadr 


ing Macao is not a happy one. No ered on a ease-by-case basis, but it 
care here believes that Portugal alro is definitely saying that relief is 
could bold onto Macao in the face needed.” 
of Chinese opposition, but the The problem of continuing cco- 

wnn f iiwol tiw hkm 1 Li ■ w __ .1 


of Chinese opposition, but the The 
emotional ties here are strong and nnmir 
tire departure win be painful of the 
“I wiD feel sad about it,” a high- growti 
ranking Portuguese official sard. Caribl 
“Noi because of any imperial nos- from l 
talgia, but. because the Portuguese perccu 


zambique or Angola. 


-i" - 10 a. Muwuuvru UJ a 

“We have never been here stria- sionm almost all of tbe countries of 
ty for economic interests. We’re the Latin America,” said a senior «xon- 


1 nrJ. , , , * ■ "• *«** a aouiwi wuu- 

only Western people who have rrev- oaust at the center, which isare- 
er had a war with China. Ihc^>ewe search organization set up ty the 

can leave with dignity ” mirni’g iwifnt kanlrc TK» mi#,.'. 


uicn money roar aranesuc eoo- ■ . " I : ~ •'-“'or'- 

ic growth is sharply reduced, . ^ 

jrding to Latin and U.S. 1 \ CT ’ 

ces. ports, has performed beater than ; 

- .... tire other major debtors. 

[Ire mainstream of opinion m The regional recession and sub- 
-- j* Amenca is very reasonable sequent stow growth were the rcsuU 
— SUrofresS^eoonomicpoIi. 

¥ cies adopted under plans drawSup 
sshouM continue to beamed- ^th ^taternati^T Monmiy 

h f mU< ^ 1 abletoresdiedureor^^onepay- 

VSS? 5 " £*%X%^ ,,obcmoC 

- ■ a , ait m 1984, according to tbe -n.;! fj ■■3nam ll .. L , w nm«M 

atetude to Macao has always been Center for Latin American Mone- m * 

differeni from that towards Mb- tary Studies in Mexico Gty. ' 

zambique or Anaola. ‘ 

Latin government, or - 


nation is behind much 
scontent. Economic 


sard. Caribbean is likely to slow this year 
nos- from the already low rate o£ 24 


percent in 1984, according to the 


“There is a slowdown or a reces- 


Bnt me e t in g tire interest 


It is impossible to overstate tire T j __ 

Lebanese Plan fide Reform 


regioii'a cmtnlbants. region's 

' year the region paid tire banks 


$38 J billion in interest and $12.9 
billion in principle, according to 
the Center for Latin American 


Monetary Studies. 

(Continued Cnxn Page I) increase pressure on Mr. Gemayd TocjbtamuKxefandstoSnaice 
to ease him out <rf office while to leave office. Since tire Franjieh- domestic growth, the Latia 
ring him to save face. Hobeika affiance, Christian Fha- now would like to bersfe® 


“j ^ ix uu vui uuu« wmic ~ me i taujiap uk i j jim 

lowing hnD to save face. Hobeika affiance, Christian Pba- f^^nowwooMUkeiobeft&w 

His Christian opponents also ten^st offices have been hit ty- somehow of paying a part erf 
qiped up their campaign Mon- roctets and bombs, but no casual- “iterest payments. '■■■ 
ty to force him to reagn. hes have been reported. One proposal is to cawertapa? 1 

of the interest pajfnreaB»pria°’ 


stqjped up their ca^aign Mon- nxtets and bombs, but no casual- 
day to force him to reagn. oes have been reported. 

Two erf Mr, GemayeTs Christian Also in Lebanon, Israel Army 

opponents —fomrer President Sn- R*Jto reported Tuesday that a sri- 

ferman F r anii »l i EIm riAm lininh— J* ■ _ f ■ <■ 


Sweden 

Swbwtnd 


no. n 

SJCr. l.CT 



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to of Europe, NnrfiAfrra, form Frandi 
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■ Send detuned resume 

: forfmvvaluatioa j 

PAOHC WESTERN UNWERSnY 

1 600 N.SflPUlVBdO BlVtL 

Los Arts* to. Californio 

soo4»;Doot.aa.uAA 


tet . wedt of Hasbaya. "me radii saidtoS IMF orW orid 

Mr. Franjieh, 75, said he would bomber and ihedontcvwt : KJ , I | uco um wndn*” lo prynp* 1101 

, and flat one I^baneseciSiin^ ^ c0 “ m “ ■■ 


600 N-SepulvodQ BivdU 
Los Arts* to, Californio 
90049/ Dept. 23* UJ5A* 


• P HoSm SMOMlSw 
iwonwiS«iK*i-Mtam 


An . . . tow Peru and seek td MB 

, JrS L*? 1 ®®. “ lh ® ■ Mos- debt paymans to a-pexcq MyJ^ f 

tem Amal anhtia said, that three their Sort rarmags.Tbey * 10 ^ 1 


near Nabatiyeh, Chie of’lhe dead 


“ “* 0010 K«wr. Most proposals fl ® 
Aim] commander, the past haveboa in tire 20(0 


sources said. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 1985 


Page 3 


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iawtsaiyaf the pope's^ 
fofcbeatificatijon for ftdv, 

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1 1 

ffifist 'Pr^ram Pam bait 

m as chairman of toe Cot 

BSmcpected Wednesday, ui 
irfe^bas announced plam 
jakespeeches at four unhc 
ilia At Berkeley, Chicago c 

Vi- V - u 

bis post Tuesday as the H 
CLctos, who served forq 

amed to Earth on Tuest 
California after an dgN 

?.v v '- ' » 

^pit of the Federal Bnrea 
p, began Tuesday in fcfc 
: bad conspired to pass ss 

J (F 

ay that 14 Qrikffli pohae 
iruTnap ping and assassins; 
hurts. ; . (01 

ofice squad, Antonio Can 
iia maribeES in Skth wife 
y, police said. Omni 

Sot ETA damned rap# \ 
weekend. The dainitta!! & 
Qbao, Spain. 


Tuesday’s People ate 

Joyce, said thtf i®*- 
i writer and had »»* 
; Mr. Joyce said. 


buntries 


AMERICAN TOPICS 



iNnMil 

pTLYING BLIND — Karen Preodergsst, 36, of Dnxbory, Massachusetts, who has been 
W™ lor nearly a decade, flew a single-engine plane Saturday, Sunday and twice 
Monday accompanied by her flight instructor. Mbs Prendergast, who flew the plane 
™n takeoff to huaBng on Moray's flights, said she felt “just like any other pilot.” 



Sweet dad Soar 

Writing m ihc ament issue of 
GQ. * stick men's tubkm maga- 
zine. Karen Hdfcr, * Washing- 
ton writer, says the best “ 
that can be arid about the 
Washington mile is that 
duD and obsessed with wort. 

However, she adds: “The 
Was hin gton man has d is co ver ed 
fMmwwn.ThwiwiiM [y dwi^ K 
the restaurant. doerdnates the 
conversation," and rise “ridi- 
coks your job** and ‘“stares at 
oilier women” but “aflowsyou 
the privilege of phdong.ap half 
iteebedkT - 


Short Takes 

The jayridatrist who treated 
John Hraddey Jr. before he dan 
President Ragan, John Hopper 
J^says . he probably Jooks 

ThcE v ergregn, Cofo- 
radb, psychiatrist treaed Mr. 

foraboui five months 
before the Match 30^1981, assas- 
rinatten attempt Three other 
men injured in foe shooting filed. 
anMjfeg tncelasreoilfaSWiint-. 
Son tad. the courts dismissed die 
suit. To probably more care- 
ful,*' Mr. Hopper sat(L “Thaft 
not to say dial I was cavalier or 
superficial before] fiat I Think 
tmeeyou M. ’ " * ** 

took for hofc3L. J 


£tfe Coadn\ on Manhai- 
. fan's West 54th Street, the Iasi 
s urv i v or of (he jazz dubs that 
centered era 52d Street during the 
postwar years and made mid' 
town Manhattan the jazz capital 
of the world, has dosed. The old 
four-story brown stone that 
housed the dub is being tom 
down to make way for a sky- 
scraper. The dub actually his 
moved twice since it started in 
HM 5 . bat Mr. Condon died in 
1973, and the current managers 
say that rents in other midtown 
riles are prohibitive. Bui they are 
sriH looking. 

Shorter Takes: American 
black men are six times more 
Ekdy than white men to serve 
time m a state prison, the US. 
Justice Department says, and 
men as a group are about 14 
times more medy than females to 
be imprisoned. No figures were 
available to comp ar e imprison- 
ment rales for buck ana white 
females. . . . The United States 
had 176 cities with 100,000 or 
more people as of July 1, 1984, 
according to die US. Census Bu- 
reau, the same fijgore as for 1982. 
although three a ties dropped off 
the list and three dries made it 
forthe first time:... Since Wash- 
ington is the national capital, it 
perhaps is only to be expected 
that , the District of Columbia 
telephone directory has more 
than six pages of listings that 
begin with ‘‘rational." Manhat- 
tan, with many more commensal 
linns, has only four such pages. 


A Liberal Knocks 
And Praises Reagan 

Welfare isn't just for poor peo- 
ple, says Sar A. Levitan, profes- 
sor of economics at George 
Washington University and au- 
thor of more than 30 books, most 
recently “Beyond the Safety Net: 
Reviving (he Promise of Oppor- 
tunity in America." Some de- 
ments of welfare. Social Security, 
Medicare and unemployment 
compensation, for example, also 
:t old people and workers 


rom poverty, he said. 

“Ronald Reagan appealed to 
all our prejudices," be told The 
New York Times: But although 
the middle class has turned 
against welfare, when it comes to 
grandmother “getting her Social 
Security check, her children get- 
ting an education in a network of 
subsidized state and local col- 
leges, or her husband working in 
a safe workplace, they're all for 
it." 

Mr. Reagan nonetheless per- 
formed a service, Mr. Levitan 
said, in calling attention to some 
of the welfare system's excesses: 
“Ronald Reagan made us realize 
that, in a lot of things, we went 
too far. Permissiveness is the key 
word. We gave up on old-fash- 
joned standards like punishment 
for crime, and family values. A 
society needs law and order. We 
opened up college to everybody, 
not just those who could bene- 
fit" 

— Compiled by 

ARTHUR H1GBEE 


Gauging the Psychological Fallout of Hiro shima 


By Walter Goodman 

Vw York Time: Senice 

NEW YORK — Scarcely had 
the atomic bomb been dropped on 
Hiroshima than Americans began 
to ponder its lasting effects: Would 
the event- sear the national psyche 
and significantly change their lives? 

The issue remains as unsettled. 

NETS ANALYSIS 

and unsettling, today as the issue of 
whether the bomb should have 
been dropped 40 years ago. 

A prominent exponent of the 
view that the atomic bomb has 
transformed American life is Rob- 


Pott Shorn Animosity Fading in U.S., Japan 



lege ol the City University 
New York, who has made studies 
of the survivors of Hiroshima. 

Mr. Lifton contends that the 
bomb has undermined man's sense 
of immortality, as expressed in the 
family, work and faitk He discerns 
(he influence of this “sense of radi- 
cal futurdessness" in such things as 
increased divorce, “significant im- 
pairment of the parent-child 
bond,” and the recent growth of 
religious fundamentalism. 

A critic of the Reagan adminis- 
tration’s arms policies, be bails the 
“worldwide struggle to get rid of 
the weapon," and has been criti- 
cized for what a fellow psychiatrist. 
Dr. Seymour C. Post, of Columbia 
University's College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, calls “his politically 
motivated activity.” 

The views of Dr. Lifton and oth- 
ers who believe that the bomb has 
had profound effects on American 
life appear frequently in The Bulle- 
tin of Atomic Scientists, an influen- 
tial magazine established almost 40 
years ago by scientists who worked 
on the bomb. 

Dr. John Edward Mack, a pro- 
fessor of psychiatry at the Harvard 
Medical School, surveyed children 
in Boston, Los Angeles and Balti- 
more between 1978 and 1980 and 
reported that they are “aware of the 
threat of nudeor war and live in 
fear of it.” 

Such concerns for the nation’s 
children gp bad: to the 1950s, when 
classroom air-raid drills sent 
youngsters crawling under their 
desks for shelter; some reportedly 
had nightmares about the bomb. 

Dr. Mack says that “the immi- 
nent threat of nuclear annihilation 
has penetrated deeply into their 
consciousness," leading to “cyni- 
cism. sadness, bitterness ana a 
sense of helplessness.” 

Dr. Mack is also a critic of the 
arms race. He has written, “There 
can be no differences between the 
United States and the Soviet Uni cm 
which warrant the level of risk of 
nuclear annihilation we are now 
creating for each other and for the 
rest of humanity.” 

His surveys nave been criticized 
for attempting to obtain desired 


Vifft Tims Sm-iff 

HIROSHIMA. Japan — Forts 1 years after 
World War 11. large majorities erf both" Americans 
and Japanese regard their countries as friends, 
with old hostilities apparently receding into the 
background, according re a poll by The New' York 
Times, CBS News and the Tokvo Broadcasting 
System. 

But the poll found that war memories can still 
stir emotions on both sides, with 44 percent of 
Japanese saying they held the U.S. atomic bomb- 
ings oT Hiroshima and Nagasaki against the Unit- 
ed States and 27 percent of Americans saying they 
held the attack on Pearl Harbor against Japan. 

Current trade frictions have not altered their 
basic attitudes, most people in both countries said 
But the corrosive potential of the trade issue was 


evident. Those who reported that trade had 
changed their opinions were three times more 
likely re say that they now felt less friendly about 
the other country. 

In the survey of 1,569 adult Americans, SS 
percent viewed "relations with Japan as friendly, 
with 23 percent describing them as very friendly, a 
position that was most marked among wealthier 
people and those claiming to be knowledgeable 
about Japan. Only 7 pe r cent said relations were 
unfriendly. 

Of 1,428 Japanese adults surveyed. 73 percent 
described two-way government ties as amicable. 
They were not asked for their personal attitudes. 
Only S percent called relations very friendly. 

In both countries, the margin of sampling error 
is plus or minus three percentage points. 


Court in U.S. Reveals Statements in Navy Spy Case 

Mnir Vafe Said He Was Recruited by Brother While in Money Trouble 


iBurden 


cra* : 
783. 
brft 
ins i 
thefc 


By. Scepben Erx 

Nen>Yo*71ma 
NORFOLK, Virginia — Arthur 
. J. .Walker has told fedoal investi- 
gators that be was recxiHttd as a 
spy his yoongerbrotherin 1980, 
whBe despondent over the failure 

of a car radio busmcs^ accordiDg 
to statements unsealed here. 

The statements were made pub- 
lic Mooday by onto of a judge as 
Mr. Walker went' on trial on 
charges of espionage. • - 

They were part of. legal papers 
filed by the prosecution, which 
plans to use tfaem as evidence. Mr. 
Walker has pleaded riot guilty to 
seven counts of espionage. 

The statement by Arthur ^ Walt. 
eroftothefidteLpkauresdfsof 
the methods he says were used by 



r* i? 


most extensive Soviet spy ring un- 
covered in the United States m 30 
years. 

- Arthur Walker says his brother 
kept maps hidden in a wall in his 
home to guide him re clandestine 
meetings with Soviet operatives. 

He foM investigators that , his 
younger brother began his activity 
as a spy by driving re the Soviet 
Embassy in Washington and park- 
ing oat front for several days to 
.attract *m»nrinn so the embassy 
would contact him. It did. 

In statements to the Federal Bu- 
reau of Investigation, Arthur Walk- 
. er said that John Walker had once 
used his mother as a courier of 
p aym ents made in Europe by Sovi- 
- a agents. John, he said, “strapped 
a. money belt on her,” when they 
were returning from a trip to Eu- 
rope. . 

Arthur tokf the authorities that 
. JbhnapiHoachedliuntospyforthe 

Soviet Union in 1980, when he was 
deeply m debt, “down in die 
‘ dumps” and about to ay ewer the 
. failure of a car radio business. The 
two brothers talked over the sama* 

. tionand Jotm Walker said: “I haw 
friend? who wiD pay toe dasafied 
information.” . ... 

Arthur Waite, saying he had 

-suspectedancel975thmnislwjtn- 

had an iBxcdl source of income, 
said be understood instantly. He 
iqjlied; “Now I know where you 
get your bucks.” . 

As the two men sat in John s 
pickup trade outside a restaurant, 

, Arthur recaned, John "bragged 
about the money." 

John Walker reged his brother re 
get a job where he would have ^ac- 
cess to classified information. A 
• month later, Arthur said, he took a 
fob as an engineer a t VSECon?^ 
unitary contractor m Cnesapeaxc, 
Vi rgjmfl. ’ 

Arthur, who mired from the 
ns Maw as a Deutenant com- 
mander: deried in his fust suiuj 
medfeio the Federal Bureau of 



Arthm- J. Walker 


Investigation that he had any in- 
volvement in spying. Bat in subse- 
quent interviews, he offered an in- 
creasingly detailed picture of 
becoming revolved after 20 years of 
navy duty. 

Awaiting trial on similar charges 
are John Walker, Iris son, Michael, 
and a friend, Jerry A. Whitworth. 

Judge J. Olvilt Clarke Jr. is con- 
ducting the trial without ajury. 

Barbara Walker. John Walkcr’- 
fonner wife; contacted the FBI last 
year. She has said that John’s spy- 
ing began in 1967 or 1968 in sn 
attempt to shore up tire couple's 
financially ailing bar. 

At the lime, John Walker was on 
active duty as an enlisted man, 
serving as a communications spe- 
cialist aboard the nuclear subma- 
rine Simon Bolivar, according to 
navy records. 

John Walker was so desperate 
for money, according re Arthur, 
that he told bis wife “sire could 
sleep with people in order to raise 
money to pay for t be bar” 

Arthur Wriker also provided 
new details about the type of infor- 
mation his brother sought. At the 
iop of the Usi he said in the docu- 
ments, were cryptographic ke^ 

The government has charged 

” WHIle 

in Madrid 
Remember 


that Mr. Whitworth, while in tire 
navy, passed on keys that could be 
used re decipher tire most sensitive 
communications. 

John had several specific ques- 
tions for his brother, who wonced 
as an engineer handling relatively 
low-Jevd documents at a military 
comracior in Chesapeake, Vi rginia. 

At one point he asked whether 
Arthur could find out anything 
about changes in “Defcon,” tire top 
secret mOilaty posture, which a 
changed by the Pentagon according 
‘ to world events. Could Arthur find 
out, he asked, whether an unusual 
amount of ammunition was being 
ordered? Arthur said he did not 
have access re such information. 

Arthur has been charged with 
providing two sets of doormen is to 
his brother. The authorities charge 
that John Walker 
them and passed them re 
agents. The defense says tire gov- 
enmieni cannot prove the data 
reached the Soviet Union. 

One set involved rraorts of dam- 
age from 1976 to 1980 aboard a 
class of amphibious ships used by 
tire US. Marine Cops. The other 
contained plans for a communica- 
tions ship. 


Arthur void tire FBI that neither 
of these had apparently impressed 
tire Soviet Union much. Arthur 
said he had been told by his brother 
that the material he had provided 
was not worth the risk. 

Later, Arthur said he could find 
out a year in advance when ships 
might come in for overhauling, ne 
sowed at the idea that anyone 
would pay ter such information. 
John encouraged him, saying. 
“They might." 

John, he said, wanted informa- 
tion only on new equipment “Art" 
bis brother quoted him as saying, 
“1 bring something re them. I may 
be tire 80th guy with tire same 
rtapi nfd tiring.” 

In one conversation, Arthur 
asked his brother how he delivered 
film of secret documents. John re- 
moved a cover from an electricity 
wall outlet in his bouse, the docu- 
ment continued, and “took out a 
map of Vienna, Austria." Arthur 
said it was a street map with “an 
ink line or arrow" drawn on it, the 
brother said. 

John explained, his brother told 
the FBI, that “all he had re do was 
memorize the map for where he 
had to go” 


j t mf|T IUm *« of Art- Witches 

Mainditanbutor 

PIACST- BALM &MEROEJI ■ ftOL£X 
Grtm\ituLTiUi2 K0r. 

^SSSmtSniSnDtaDmmmim 


PiageT 



BOW, 

itarnrufagm. 


qumxmevwiMOL 
U*n»ftt tim naww dunflt. 


Aldebert 

PARIS: 16. plaf,(' Vc- nriomf 1, bd do l.i rVhidcleihe 
70, (g Saint-Honoro Palais do:. Concjres. Porte Ma.iiot 
CANNES: 19, U CroiseUe 


answers, and be has conceded that 
his sample of 10- to 12-vear-olds 
may have been “somewhat" biased." 

Ruben Coles. Harvard's best- 
known qjiild psychologist and a 
supporter or a nuclear freeze, 
■many of the reports on children's 
fears of a nuclear holocaust “senti- 
mental balderdash." 

Another way to try to a«g« ibe 
bomb's impact is through the treat- 
ment of the subject in fiction and 
on film. Since tire late 1950s. when 
Tom Lehrer was singing “We Will 
All Go Together When We Go," 
there has been no shortage of works 
dealing in some manner with tire 
bomb. 

The mushroom doud quickly be- 
came a trite symbol. Among tire 
more notable works is Stanley Ku- 
brick's movie “Dr. Strangdove. or 
How I Learned to Stop Worrying 
and Love the Bomb.” ft treats’ the 
subject comically, as though, like 
observers at atomic tests, its cre- 
ators avoided staring directly into 
the blast lest they be blinded. 

The film's theme is that tire 
weapon has escaped the control of 


reason and that finaDy tire nuclear 
button will be pushed by some 
highly placed lunatic. That idea 
was behind tire commercial used in 
Lyndon B. Johnson's 1964 presi- 
dential campaign, which suggested 
that tire election of Barry Go! dul- 
ler would hi^t i nuclear annihila- 
tion, and it recurs in films and 
plays about tire Vietnam War. 

Reviewing what he calls tire “epi- 
sodic and inconclusive” nature of 
America's cultural and intellectual 
engagement with Hiroshima, Paul 
Boyer, a historian and author of the 
forthcoming study, “By the Bomb's 
Early Light: American Thought 
and Culture at tire Dawn of the 
Atomic Age,” maintaint that Hiro- 
shima challenges both the United 
Stales' view of World War II and 
“the myth of American inno- 
cence," tire belief that “our motives 
are higher, our methods purer" 
than those of other nations. 

It has remained for nonfiction, 
like John Hersey's 1946 report, 
“Hiroshima." and works contain- 
ing descriptions of the possible ef- 
fects of a nuclear blast, such as 
Jonathan ScheO's “The Fate of the 


Earth," published in I9S2, and 
Freeman Dyson's more recent 
“Weapons and Hope," to deal most 
directly with the world after a nu- 
clear holocaust. 

An enormous audience was 
reached in 19S3 by tire U.S. televi- 
sion production, “The Day After," 
a simulation of tire effects of a 
nuclear strike on the Middle West. 

Public opinion surveys do not 
reveal any large-scale change in 
what worries people. A poll taken 
this year by the Atlantic Institute 
for international .Affairs and The 
International Herald Tribune 


found that the main concerns in 
industrial democracies were unem- 
ployment and crime, and that the 
threat of war and soda] injustice 
were subsidiary preoccupations. 

But such responses may be writ- 
ten off by psychiatrists as examples 
erf what Mr. Lifton caQs “psychic 
numbing," a defense against mai- 
ler; too frightening to acknowl- 
edge. 

Nearly half of the people ques- 
tioned in a Gallup poll at the end of 
1983 felt that the Reagan adminis- 
tration's defense policies had 
brought the United States closer to 
war, as compared with slightly 
more than a quarter who believed 
tire nation was closer to peace. ■ 

Along with this, however, ac- 
cording to a recent Harris survey, 
goes the belief that “the situation 
where the U.S. and the Soviet 
Union both know that any use of 
nuclear weapons will result in in- 
stant retaliation has helped to keep 
tire peace of the world.” 

While tire polls have for some 
time indicated overwhelming sup- 
port fora mutual verifiable nuclear 
freeze, they have recently suggested 
that many Americans feel more 
threatened by the United States* 
falling behind in nuclear weapons 
than by a continuation of the arms 
buildup. 

So there are a lot of .Americans 
who believe that deterrence has 
worked, yet would like to see a 
world free of the bomb. 


Burnham, Guyana’s Leader, 
Dies Undergoing Surgery 


The Atsoaated Pros 

GEORGETOWN. Guyana — 
President Forbes Burnham, 62. 
who led the former British colony 
of Guyana for 21 years, died Tues- 
day of heart failure while undergo- 
ing surgery, state radio announced. 

Prime Minister Hugh Desmond 
Hoyie, who was named by the cabi- 
net to succeed Mr. Burnham and 
was sworn in as president, made 
tire announcement in a radio ad- 
dress. 

Mr. Burnham was elected prime 
minister in 1964 and led British 
Guyana to independence two years 


later. He presided over the estab- 
lishment of a republic in 1970 and 
in 1 980, and with the adoption of a 
new constitution, assumed the title 
of executive president. 

He had checked into George- 
town Hospital on Tuesday because 
of hoarseness that had forced him 
to cancel two recent speaking en- 
gagements. 

Mr. Burnham had suffered from 
a heart condition for the past 10 
years, and his health had reported- 
ly worsened after he returned from 
last month's Caribbean Communi- 
ty heads of government meeting in 
Barbados. 


The American Evprw, < jrd. 
Lk»n‘t lejvc home uithour ir.“ 

Before 

Lincoln Center 
or after 
Broadway: 
The 

Four Seasons 
$35 Dinner. 

Complete Dinner 
from 5:00 to 6:30 pm 
and 10:00 to 11:30 pm 




OjLul.* 


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Paul Kovi ■ 



THE FOUR SEASONS 

99 East 52nd Sheet, New York. NY 
PL4-9494 


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Page 4 


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 1985 


Heralfc 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribitnc. 


PtaUkhcd WS* The New York Taw naA TV WatiagMi fat 


Gold Can’t Save Apartheid 


-More swiftly than anyone foresaw. South 
Af pea’s choices are being natrowod. The coon- 
tiy's white inlets seem incapable even of a 
gesture of conciliation to nonviolent blacks 
such, as Bishop Desmond Tutu, and this has 
thfe effect of encouraging civil, if not revdn- 

tionary, disobedience. Though Isolated as nev- 
er before and the taiga of multiplying sanc- 
tions, South Africa’s leaders no doubt have the 
power to put down this summer’s defiance. 
But they seem to be condemning their coontiy 
to a cycle of repression and recession. 

To a degree, South Africa's economy is 
sanction-proof. Its resources and economic 
reserves are sufficient to weather most short- 
term calamities, even the strike now threat- 
ened by the union of black mine workers. Most 
whiles live comfortably by Western standards, 
luxuriously by Africa’s; a bottle of scotchis 
still $6. South Africa is wdl p re p ar ed for 
foreign retribution; it can get by with its 
own energy and weapons. 

Yet the future must look bleak in Pretoria 
these days. President Pieter W. Botha’s two- 
week-old state of emergency for many black 
areas has failed to restore order. And in the 
unsentimental verdict of money men, the 
country’s future is uncertain. In a fortnight, 
the value of Sooth African gold stocks has 
plunged by one-fifth. This follows a two-year 
worldwide decline, from $460 to about $325 an 
ounce, in a commodity that provides half (be 
country’s foreign exchange. 

The emergency has dramatized a parallel 
decline in the dollar value of South Africa’s 
currency. One day last week, on the mere 
report that a major American bank would no 


longer lend to South Africans, the rand dipped 
by 6 cents, or 12 percent. The bank turned out 
to be Chase Manhattan, and its largely sym- 
bolic action is sure to be followed by others. 

Often enough, Pretoria has been able to 
shrug off market fluctuations, diplomatic os- 
tracism and domestic turmoiL Its hard-boiled 
calculation has been that tbe world’s desire for 


its comer of Africa safe for apartheid. But 
the application of sanctions abroad and the 
agitation of black unions at home suggest that 
the regime cannot count indefinitely on buying 
its way out of trouble. 

Underscoring that messagp is certainly the 
intent of the US. Congress, which seems likely 
to vote Tor at least mild sanctions this faH 
Even President Reagan, who has wanted to 
appear as Pretoria’s friend, has hinted that he 
may sign such a measure. Though the presi- 
dent perceives more positive reform in South 
Africa than do most observers, he sees tbe 
need for “fluctuations" of tone, as be put it 
Monday, in pressing for an end to apartheid 
Incredibly, in these circumstances, Mr. Bo- 
tha cannot bring himself to meet with Bishop 
Turn or other black moderates whose influ- 
ence ova - younger blacks is fast fading. Having 
falsely branded tbe bishop an extremist, Mr. 
Botha is trapped by his own propaganda and 
unable to justify political negotiation with 
blacks to ms more extreme white followers. 
Looking back upon this summer, the Afrika- 
ners may one day wish they could recapture 
the moment when blacks still stood ready to 
en gag e them in nonviolent ba rgaining - 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Demystifying Islamic Fundamentalism 


W EST POINT, New York — In the after- 
math of the Beirut hostage crisis, many in 
Washington are searching frantically for a US. 
policy toward Isla m ic fundamentalism. This is a 
foolish search for a policy that is not needed. 

Spurred by the nod to render complex events 
comprehensible, many scholars and policy-mak- 
ers have grossly amplified Islamic f imHammtfll - 
isra. Reiving on. demonology rather titan analy- 
sis, such people frequently assume that the 
fundamentalists' raison d’etre is fighting the 
United Stares. At best, the Islamic movement is 

ictof 

inscrutable East Neither approach will ! 
in imdersmnding or dwiimg with fundament 
ism. The fact is (hat it is a rather familiar kind of 
political phenomenon, far less difficult to grasp 
than is sometimes assumed. 

Although fundamentalism is widely varied, 
many of the Islamic movements share common 
traits. The most important of these is a deeply 
felt sense of disfranchisement. 

Few Middle Easton states offer their 
an effective voice in government. Political partic- 
ipation — in the form erf plebiscites or ejections 
— is often more show than substance, and politi- 
cal representation is generally rigged to benefit 
the representatives rather than the represented. 
So Islamic movements offer a cruoal ctumnri for 
participation. In stales where the secret-police 
budget often rivals the public-health budget, the 


.meats r 

Stales — enemies whose demands cannotpe met 


America dries or fails to dp. Such orgarez^kss 
need an oie»y in order to nwWfize support Itfc 
easier to Mope America than to takc rcqwnsiba- 


By Augustus R. Norton 

mosque is often the only place where cine can 
meet without unwanted observers. 

Islam bas not been rediscovered; it was never 

“lost." It has; however, been ^appropriated for a • *v — 

new purpose. For many Moslems, ithas a re- a^formsta^asKrts: 
nevredappealasafamiHarandatiturallyaiithen- dar : caia5ttqphes. With such visccraliy mb- 
tic idiom of protest and political action. And Amcncan gwups,. there ts 
imiiln» ry mTTTnmigTn liberalism and soriafcan, Is- for dreiogre Bui not all fundamentalists are 

lam is untainted by recent failure or by assoda- anti*American or pro-tenon*. 

rion with the West. Islamic politics arc just that To be sure, many Moslems, 

— politics. And like any political stirring, Islam not, objot to sqme a^ects of in toe 

is subject to exploitation and manipulation, in . M*»le East 3®! objecting to pdky and agrtat 
this case by clencs and former army officers. — .* Afferent tfunss. 

What tins means is that many of the Islamic 
movements can be surprisingly pragmatic in 
_ In Egypt, for exam- 
ple, m the general elections in Slay 1984, the 
Islamic Brotherhood joined in an electoral coali- 
tion with the New Wafd Party, the political 
descendant of a traditional bitter rivaL The op- 
ponents of President Hafez ai-Assad of Syna 
also clothe tbemsdves in Islamic rhetoric, but 
when we peel away tbe spiritual l ang u ag e, we 
discover an essentially political complaint — that 
the Sunni Moslems of Syria, the majority of the 
population, do not wield tbe political power 
warranted by their numbers. 

There is no denying that the Islamic mow- 


ing Violently against it are very different things, 
and . the small, cells of fanuriail terrorists who 
have forced their way to our attention in recent 
years are hardly representative. ... , 

F undamental i™ is not a monoSthac body of 
fanatical extremists whose idea of a good time is 
frying Americans and humiliating tM U.S. gov- 
eminent. Tbenotion. that such behavior is some- 
how typical is a bigoted idea that can only 
obstruct efforts to come to terms with an impor- 
tant qew political movement 

The writer, on associate professor of comparaure 
politics at the US. Military Academy \ a a ccmtrib- 
utmg author of “The Emergence of a New I*ba- 
iwfl .” This fimqppeandinThe New York Tana . . 


HowHanoi 




r 


By Stanley Karmw 

rrnOKYO — Few issues atone 
1 ematioos in the United State* as 
modi as thetpestwnof ifae American 
f pldi fiy; t jiicnng m MlllOflin Vjfiiiaiu. 
The subject® a (ariora way, is now 
- no diplomatic importance. 
For years, the Reagan admnaatr a- 
tmaias been accusing Vfcnaa’s 
Gemmanisi leaders of fading id co- 
optxxie soffioattiy m deftveriag the 

Vietnam^fearftdof 

aSeaeirOmtese 


Apartheid: 
U.S. Draws 
A Fine Line 



Stand by for mare anniversary journalism. 
Tuesday nwAwt 40 years since the atomic 
bond) was exploded over Hiroshima, and the 
anmvasary an Bplna^n of com- 

mentary; the Nagasaki anniversaiy is Friday. 
D6 not rmsmrierstand os. It is not the com- 
memoration to which we object, but rather the 
fitful, artificial quality of it. This year bas been 
one public-issue anniversary after another. All 
fed duty-bound to acknowledge these remem- 
brances. But does the suddeai festival of com- 
mentary do justice to the size of the event? 
Does it show that we have been nsrfiifly in- 
structed and chastened by that event, or merc- 
ly that we have teamed bow to talk about it? 

There is a sense in which (me could say the 
whole world has been properly instructed and 
chastened: Those countries that have unclear 
weapons or have tbe capacity for quickly as- 
sembling and nmng rfwm have, for the most 
prirt, proceeded warily in areas where conflict 
might quickly en gwp nuclear weapons. No 
nuclear weapon hasbeen used, except in tests, 
sitice Wodd War EL One theme of this anni- 
versaiy has been that governments and peo- 
ples around the wodd are not sufficiently 
concerned about these weapons. But this, 
seems tons to be false: Concern — anxiety — ‘ 
is. all but univeisaL extending, though some 
self-righteous critics find it impossible to be- 
lieve, to the very governing aides that are 
responsible for these weapons. Rom the day 
the first bomb was used, people have under- 
stood what was unleashed, the magnitude of it 
and the consequent reason for fear. 

What has been missing has not been con- 
cent. What has been missing has been resolve, 
concentration, ingenuity and restraint. This is 
what makes these birthday bursts of attention 
so troubling: Urey are by their nature fleeting. 


that’s-enongh-now-let’s-forget-it sort of 
thing*, and fhm has been the pattern in public 
thinking about nuclear weapons issues almost 
since the b eginning . The concern is constant; 
the interest in what to do about it is noL 


have been deployed, principally by the Soviet 
Union and the United States. The lime it 
would take them to reach their intercontinen- 
tal destinations is calculated in mmoles, not 
hours. The command and control structures 
governing their use are necessarily elaborate, 
and in many respects outmoded and frafl. All 
this is in the background of a ferocious and 
legitimate political conflict between the Unit- 
ed States mid the Soviet Union, and it is in the 
wings where other mutually hostile countries 
are concerned as they pursue their efforts to 
get die bomb. Is concern, as distinct from an 
abiding, unflagging interest, really enough? 

Nudear issues come and go. When they are 
in. fashion me tends to get largely wishful 
proposals that concentrate on what the United 
States should stop doing and thal ignore what 
goes on in the Soviet Union and the fact tied 
the two have a certain relationship. Both when 
they are in fashion and when they are out, 
another school, cheered on by the defense 
contractors and the more mindless among the 
military and civilian authorities, persist in 
their nudear piling-on: The pursuit of ever . 
mare and fancier nudear weapons whose nris^ 
skm they have scarcely thought through. The 
Russians have tremendous blame in all this. 
But so have those Americans who have refnsed 
toga serious — except about fighting with one 
another — as the wodd marched on to its 
present nudear pass. Maybe we will do some- 
thing about itin the 41st year after Hiroshima. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


By Flora Lewis 

P ARIS — Whatever America’s 
moral involvement in South Afri- 
ca. the Reagan administration's de- 
clared policy of “constructive en- 
gagement” amounts to political 
involvement beyond previous com- 
mitments by the United States. 

The rationale is that gentle persna- 
sion can be the most effective way for 
tbe United States to posh the Sooth 
African regime away from apartheid. 
There is something to the argument 
that sanctions would hurt Somh Afri- 
can Macks and surrounding states 
mare than they would pro-apartheid 
whites, and that they would serve to 
stiffen Afrikaner intransigence 
But the situation is getting worse, 
not better. And the official American 
attitude is an increasingly important 
factor. Therefore, hard as it is to 
agree on specific measures that have 
fl clmnw nf prod nring pvm marginal 
results, Washington needs to provide 
a coherent explanation. 

There has bear no shortage of 
dear, sharp Hgn imcfatinns of apart- 
heid from Washington. No responsi- 
ble administration figure has apolo- 
gized for the racist system that denies 
all political and most dvic rights to a 
mqority of its population. 

The chasm opens with the next, 
inevitable question. Why protea Pco- 



South Africa has withdrawn its US. ambassador f or cansuhai ions. 


you also deplore its exporting of its 
troops across its border, not to men- 
tion its illegal occupation of Namib- 
ia. In one case you have Hup med 
sanctions, in the other you are speak- 
ing of constructive engagement. Why 
the double standard?* 

Mr. Annaoost dwdfwt nmrnhlmg 
about US. interest in negotiations 
with both countries. Besides, he said, 
Nicaragua is a small country where 
sanctions can cause real “disloca- 
tion”; they would not make a signifi- 
cant difference to Sooth Africa. 

But the Stale Department knows. 


Other Opinion 

The Two Edges of Progress Sanctions Aren’t the Answer 


toria? It was pnt quite directly' to " that itis not just distant affies that arc 
Michael Annacost, the underscore- ha ' ' 

tary of state for political affairs, by 
Australian reporters in a recent U.S.- 
sponsored interview by satellite. 

“Nicaragua is a country whose 
gover nm ent you do not tike and 
which you accuse of trying to export 
revolution,’’ they said to Mr. Anna- 
cost “South Africa is a country 
whose system of government and no- 
tably apartheid, you don't Eke, and 


into the arimtmflranon’s prodarined 
“crusade for democracy. 

It is also a problem for Radio Free 
Europe, the congressunaDy funded 
station that broadcasts American 
views to Easton Europe. Broadcast- 
ers at Radio Free Europe have re- 
ceived grariance on how to handle 
the tickfisfc issue. 

An internal memo instructs writers 


and speakers mentioning South Afri- 
ca “to bring out two key points.” 
The first (alms the irigh road: 
“Any system founded on inequality 
before the law and the willful viola- 
tion of basic human rights is abhor- 
rent to us. This is true regardless of 
die poGtiod' coloring of tbe oppres- 
sive reg ime , and regardless or the 
criteria upon which the discrimina- 
tory practices resL be they race, rdi- 
gioQ, class, ethnic origin or whatever. 
Sbch. shaky foundations undermine 
the security of the entire pofitv, as the 
South African leadership wm sooner 
or later have to- recognize.” 

That is indeed America's message 
to 'Comnnmist-cmtroiBed Eastern 
Europe, presumably to the mole 
wodd. But the second point pnfls way 
back. It attempts to make a moral 
. distinction tbat goes beyond even tbe 
reafeolitik that inspired the former 
UN delegate Jeane Kirkpatrick to 
(fifferentiate “authoritarian” friends 
bora “totafitarum” enemies. 

It said: “However wicked aj>art- 


heid may be, Sooth Africa, unEke the 
U-SS.R-, does not constitute a mar- 
ace to tbe Free Worid, and its system 
does not require aggression against 
foreign co un tries to assure its sorviv- 
aL Pretoria has intervened in neigh- 
boring stales to remove threats to 
its own borders, but it bas not tried, 
to export a partheid.” 

The note says tins explain: sanc- 
tions against Nicaragua and not 
South Africa. It adds: **A, similar con- 
trast illustrates the reasons behind 
A m erica n poEcy toward Cuba and 
v%"«n the one hand, and CMc 
' and Paraguay on die other.” 

This is the answer Mr. Annacost 
kneW better than tp ghe m pubfic. 
Thfe abject excuse is (bagging Ameri- 
ca. into sharing tbe haane before 
wodd opinion for Sooth Africa’s bo- 
Kavior. If Wa shin gto n cannot man- 
dge anythmgmoreusefi^tisbotdd at 
least seek consistency and tty to Emil 
the damage that the mounting crisis 
wiB do to the nation's standing. 

• ; The New York Tones. 


In a Peaceful America, Mom Boom for Differences 


Prayers for peace are being heard an 
the 40th aunrversary of tbe arranfc bombings 
of, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but mankind 
must heed too the dangers of science that 
created the nudear age. 

There is a dark side to science and technol- 
ogy. Science has opened the way to the ma- 
nipulation of life itself, and if this knowledge is 
abused the sanctity of life may be threatened. 
Progress in information technology makes in- 
formation available to so many [that it] raises 
the problem of violating fa""”" rights. Pro- 
gress in urbanization has separated man from 
nature, and no one is sure how that will affect 
man’s health. Man is interfering in the work- 
ings of nature, replacing forests with deserts. 

■HowhonibtethecxmsequencesifmanKeks 
cmly material accomplishmoits not accompa- 
nied by spiritual and moral values! The horror 
of the atomic bombings is a case in point. 

— The Daily Yontiwi (Tokyo). 


I think thai the South African regime needs 
to have a country as powerful as the Umted 
States' breathing, literally, down its neck. I 
don't think that you are going to change it by 
remote control and I think that if you are 
going to remove tins only leverage which you 
have in the United States, of having your 
corporations operating in South Africa, that 
you remove the only leverage winch you can 
apply as far as economic justice for my people 
is concerned. Because after all is raid and 
done, I believe, myself; that the mterdepeo- 
dence of black and white in that country is the 
thing that wiQ make the cookie to cnunble in 
that country. So 1 believe therefore ... the 
more the economy is dependott on black peo- 
ple . . . the better position black people would 
find themselves to flex thdr muscles and force 
whites to come to the conference table. 

— The Zuhi chief Gatsha Buthekzi, 

. speaking on NBC-TV's Meet the Press. ’ 


FROM OUR AUG. 7 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: A^ 'Grim Shadow 9 Across China 

PARIS — A pessimistic sketch of the political 
outlook in China was drawn by Mr. B. Lenox 
Simpson, tiie British author. “Japan mil link 
up Northern Corea with Central Manchuria 
by railway. This will give Japan a second line 
into Manchuria. The Russians seem prepared 
for rtii.c , and have abandoned all idea of reas- 
serting themselves in Manchuria. Thor policy 
henceforth [will] concentrate on Mongolia,” 
Mr. Simpson said. “In regard to America,” he 
added, “Chinese feeling is that, however much 
she may lend her moral support, this wfll count 
for nothing unless Washington can agree upon 
some line of policy in combination with En- 
gland. If those who pretend to protea her 
stand idly by, then other means must be 
found to dissipate the grim shadow which all 
Chinese see lying across their land.” 


1935: Roosevelt Wary on Ednopia 

PARIS — President Franklin D. Roosevelt 
undoubtedly express e d the opinion of 99 per- 
cent of Americans when, replying to questions 
about Ethiopia, he remarked thal the United 
States would seek to keep from becoming 
involved in foreign incidents which did not 

directly concern it While President Woodrow 
Wilson expressed a similar sentiment at tire 
outbreak of the World War, and for months 
the United States refrained from h«xvning 
involved, it was ultimately drawn into tbe fray. 
Fortunately, no immediate parallel exists be- 
tween the Ethiopian-1 talian dispute and the 
Atstro-Hungarian ultimatum to Serbia.. But 
abstention from becoming involved in quanels 
is not always easy. In particular is it difficult if 
the American people insist that Unde Sam 
dhall be tbe moral policeman of the world. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
JOHN HA Y WHITNEY, Omrma n 1958-1982 

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BBur ALAIN LECOUR 

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W ASHINGTON — If a nation at 
peace is less tolerant of govern- 
ment intervention titan a nariAn at 
war, so also is it more tolerant of 
.diversity in its own ranks. 

A nation at war is, literally, in 
uniform. It stresses the thing that 
bind it together. It necessarily cele- 
brates its unity and 
■ The America at peace in the I 
. docs quite tbe opposite. 

. The aHtfomnty that so many ob- 
servers noticed about the United 
States of the 1950s has not always 
been a feature of American history, 
which is full of cantankeronsness, ec- 
centricity and variety. It was an arti- 
fact of the shared experiences of de- 
pression and war, which made 
Americans want to be more alike. 

There were stffl divisions — region- 
al, economic, ethnic and racial — but, 
as the years went on, those divisions 
tended to War. The end of racial 
segregation made the regions men 
alike; the decline of discrimination in 
daily life and the ongoing march of 
the generations submoisea many eth- 
nic and racial differences, and the 
rising tide of affinence pnt the very 
large majority of Americans into an 
economic class that only a few en- 
joyed in the Roosevelt years. 

Yet at the same time, these in-, 
creases in afflaence and toleration 
were tending to prcxnote greater cul- 
tural variety: Americans could afford 
to choose their own identity. 

So mcreaamghr American politics 
come to be basea on cultural variety. 
PoBtirians, particriiaiiy Democrats 
who still timk their party has a “nat- 
ural majority” want elections dead- ■ 
ed on New Deal economic issues and 
along the old ethnic and regional 
lines. But for most Americans the 
unsettled issues erf ctdmral values and 
ways of life — from school prayer to 
homosexual rights — are more im- 
portant anri pr ana ng than die mostly 
sealed issues of ecxmocHC policy and 
ethnic division. 

Those issues do not cut in only one 
direction. Tbe Democrats expected 
to be big winners in ' 1984 off the 
series of adtusti issues they summed 
up in the phrase “gender gap." Yet it 
was the KqmUicans who made large 
gains among two colitiraBy defined 
segments of tbe electorate. Ronald * 
Reagan’s strong showing among the 
young and the technology-friendly 
gave him an unexpected boost 
America is not the first country to 
have a gender gap, nor was 1984 the 
first time a difference between men’s 
and women’s vexing choices had ap- 
peared in the United States. In 
.France and Italy, women have long 


By Michael Barone 

Tins is the second of two articla. 
voted more conservatively than men;, at a country chxt many Dsnocxats 


politics revolved around questions of 
church and state, and women wen: 
the ones who went to church. 

In the United States, womea typi- 
cally have preferred those candidates 
whom they co nsi dered most adverse 
to ride and most Hkriy to seek peace. 

Tbe odd thing about the gender 
gpp of the early 1980s was that this 
time women were voting more liberal 
. than men, and tbat the cuff erence was 
celebrated most conspacnously by 
feminists and others who wanted to 
remake society. But in another sense 
the impulse was conserv ati ve: Many 
of tiie women, particularly young 
women without spouses and m the 
labor market, who voted against 
Ronald Reagan did so because he 
seemed to threaten the thmgs most 
important to then^ from welfare 
checks tp the legitimacy of being 

is not to sot that the 
gender gap does not exist But under- 
neath it are other gaps-Married peo- 
ple are now a lot more Republican 
than unmarried people; divorced 
people wfe. differently from the wid- 
owed (even when age is controlled 
for), and so on. 

Those who thought the gmder gap 
would swing the 1984 election to tbe 


and news commentators and grown- 
ups had been saying was in the teemir 
nal stages of. decay and saw that it 
was actually a pretty decent place : a 
nation of wkJdy shared affluence, of 
tolerance, of acmevnnent. 

■ They gravitated to the one potiti- 
dan who had been deliv ering this 
message all along ^ — Ronald Reagan, 
Though it was ran notiaft as 
much, so did America’s tedmMOgy- 
urinded dii«m From the Sficon 
Valley in Califrniua to Route 128. in 
Massachusetts, there has bem'ftmoe 
the 1970s a noticeable movement 


It was making their fives better. 
* Walter Mandate ran a series of ads 
feitidzing President Reagan's Stralo- 
gic Defotoe Initiative; orTtar wans, 1 


touxxidbetterUJL ties. 

remains of tbe anrauig The com* 
plaint has been largely justified. 

Tbe Vietnamese seem to have been 
playing sanies with tiie issue, with- 
bolding information on dead Ameri- 
cans in for some form of 

US. recognition, which they want to 
offset then conflict with Quia. 

Vkmamese intransigence served 
the Reagan a dminist r ati on, since it 
gave American offiriah m excuse to 
iqect Vietnam's overtures. 

Lardy, however, the Vietnamese 
have been dananstratixK an tmusual 
wiSmgness to dear up the question. 
They "have pledged to furnish the 
Umted Stales with a fuH a cco un ti n g 
of those missing in action, tbe MIAs. 

NgnymCoTiadh, tbe shrewd and 
flexible Vie t n ames e foreign minister, 
even stated a tear weeks ago that U.S. 
wain* wodd be welcomed in Vtet- 
nam to survey the sites where Ameri- 
can aircraft crashed (hiring, the war. 

What tbe Vietnamese dearly are. 
trying to do is toget the United Stales 
to establish a p e r m an e n t investigat- 
ing mission m Hanoi tbat conkl, far 
V &namese p ur pose^ be adted an 
informal UJL diplomatic entity. 

• The Yiefitarnese are evidently n»v- 
ing in tins direction as dry perceive 
rial tbf mb Soviet leadership bead- 
ed by Mikhail Gorbachev is striving 
to repair its differences with Ohm. 
The Russians, meanwhile, have been 
giving Vietnam a backseat 
For a decade the Soviet Ibtioa bas 
been Vietnam's only supporter in its 
conflict with China. A rapp r oc h e- 
ment between fee Co nm a m rst riaats 
wodd iso toe fee Vietnamese. Ibis is 
wiry tiny are at t e mpting to improve 
ties with the Ui&etf States. 

Reagan cannot easily 
spurn Vietnam's ra it nriv es without 
appearag to t ran s g r e s s fab repeated 
prom i ses to obtain aHpossibfemfor- 
matkn on tiie fate of toe neatly 1500 

Anwiawt ni m g m Inrfnrtim» 

So what osenriafiy is a hmnamtar- 
fam issue b giving tbe Vietnamese the 
wedge they hx! sought to creme tbe 

It would be premature, cf course, 
to expect a (pack improvement in 
U-S.-v i e tian iet e nefarious. Still out- 
standing s tbc iBStLr of the Viet- 
namese occnparian of Cambodia. 

One cf the US conditions for rec- 
ognition of Vietnam — or even a 
docusskm of the possibility — bas 
been the withdrawal of the Vietnam- 
ese forces From Cambodia. In tbe 
present donate, though, a deal of 
some sort cannot be exdbded. 

Tbe Indonesian foreign minister, 
Mocfatar K nsnmaatntg a, has been 
trying to act man intwm e dia ry role 
between tbe United States and Viet- 
nanx He befieva (bat progress oo the 
MIA issue o odd spur movement on 
the Cambodian qaesrion. 


as dangerous. But viewers apparently Bat hb views arc not entirely 
shared the president’s confidence shared by tbe other natio ns of South- 

east Asb^Hufiand, winch maintains 


that tins new tedmaiogy coaid ro- 
dnee (he chances of midear war. 

After all, no (me was voting for war 
in 1984; Mr. Reagan won because 
most voters thought he stood for 
prosperity and for peace; in a nation 
that they recognized, after yeais of 
negativism, as a prosperous and 
peaceful place. 

Whether that prosperity and 
peace, both external and internal, will 
be mam tflmad, no one can say. But 


. those who are looking for pofitical 

away from the Democrats and to- upheaval or realignment, for a left- 
ward Reagan Republic anism - ward lurch in response to economic 

The environmental and cultural is- troubles or the emergence of a icfi- 


soes tbat once mobilized sodi voters 
now seem, to many, to be settled. The 
economic policies — notably town- 
taxes — ofReagan Rep ubficaos seem 
unmistakably to have stimn&ed a 
round of tednwlogical innovation 
and economic growth. 

The Democrats tend to see tech- 
nology, from smokestack industries 
to nuclear power, as a threat. But 
by the middle 1980s, when millions 
of Americans were baying vkteocas- 
sette reoaniers and home computers, 
technology seemed “nse^fitentSy.” 


abteRojubljcanm^OTitymafqmwal 
of aH of Mr. Reagan’s poficks, seem 
fitehr to be dbamomted. 

The 1 984 eteebons portray Ameri- 
ca as a nation al peace — and Ameri- 
cans as a people who, fa a time at 
least, have reached art eq u i librium 
they would Eire fn mainta i n 

The writer, a member of the editorial 

pa&staffofThe Washington Peat, Is 
die co-author, with Grant Ujifusa, of 
* The Almanac af ^American PoEsks 
1986,” from which this is adapted. 


dose oonnecrirais with China, is 
sk ep t i cal about negotiations with the 
Vietnamese. The Umted States can- 
not approach Vietnam until a mea- 
sure of unity bas been achieved 
among the Southeast Asian nations 
toward Vietnam. 

The complete story on tic missing 
Americans wfll not surface swiftly, 
even if tbe United States and Viet- 
nam reach an agreement to pursue 
tbesnbject more vigorously. Locating 
rcmaixxs in tbe dense Vietnamese jan- 
gles, years after the war has ended, 
will not be a picnic. 

Despite all this, the VtetnaiBese are 
scoring points. They are re- 

spectabdity, which they seem to want 
more than ahydsog. 

The stupendous popularity of the 
movie “Ramhoc Fist Blood Part 
in winch Stfvestcr Stallone rescues 
Amtt Han s held in Vietnam, is tests- 
memy to tie passionate interest in the 
subject. Bat in the real world, the 
issue will haw: to be resolved by pa- 
tient diplomacy of tbckmd that, for 
better or worse, is now under way. 

Tribune and Register Syndicate. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


enthusiasts did in fact create its own 
backlash, sfcjUfally exploited by tiie 
Reagan strate gi sts who targeted cer- 
tain types of women as wen as men 
Mio were tinned off by h. 

To the extent tha gcndcr-gap en- 
thusiasts were protesting things as 
they wo£ tfaqy had to fight thestroqg 
(mthnisite trend of opinion that was 
me dea^ jgmdercnxrait in 1984. 

Working hi omHam with the s urge 
of optimism. In contrast, were two 
unanticipated cultural trends that 
boosted Ranald Reagan. Tbe first 
was the strong Republican trend 
among voters under 30. 

Tbe Democrats, who supposed 
that voters under 30 in the eazhr 
1980s wodd act like voters arakr 38 
( fid m the late 1960s, were caught 
utterly by surprise. 

The MOrral rebcffiocsncss of this 
generation of youth seems to have 
been directed, cot al the institutions 
tbat many AnifiriCTis have been cor- 
rosiveJy cifliazmg for the last dozoi 
years, but at the habit of corrosive 


U.S. stockpiling in the Strategic Pe- 
troleum Reserve fafls tomeotion4at 
it can only hold a three-month snp- 
pfy- By comparison, the exploration 
wd development of a major new res- 
ervoir takes 10 to 15 years. 

" MICHAEL J. ECONOMIDES. 

London. 


Tbe veqr title of Hobart Rowen’s 
opinion ootimm, “Cheaper Oil Won’t 
Sow Exploration" (Jufy JR), is ffafia- 
dons, besdering on the bmcronsu 
In deriding advice “peddled by o3 
nwtket experts” be concludes that 
the o3 riot will continue aid that 
prices wjB continue to. dedme. He 
-nnpkxes the oil-cansmQiitg nations 

‘ Soa^marimSMmaiewabfe ta *** *** 

resource. &nah additions to reserves Whites a Ckota ,n {Jtdy 

ponnafly require large mrr rrnwrt.; in . &Jty Andrew Young: 
npcn&mc, technology and the so- Mr. Young likens South Africa 
piusticaaoe tevd of workers. Whflc now to Iran at the time of Jzmmy 
stmte oftMp fes^giutresnlB^rcffli Cartel’s election and caadkfiy states 
conserranonand divenificatijfa of ^we had known three years into the 
energy Soarces, im mod os Baser .adnurastfatioo Iran was Sana to ex- 
por^^coms from me expiffiftw ’ ' 


arid'derefepmoit of formerly 
cesabteteserroin: sod from ihehmo- 
dbcuoa of new technology. 

• Tbe world off situation is an un- 
steady process^ Statements on the 
fliKiiwttfm of supply ami demand 
mart be kept in respective. Mr. 


ptode; we wmJd haveforcedttedah 
into a constitutional monarchy. We 


on- it is tragic that they did not 
Nobody likes apartheid. AH wbct 
care about tbe future of the people cf 
Sooth Africa want a jost stereos to 
tbe grave and conmlDt problem fort 
coontiy is faring, little help can be 
given with three from psaps who in 
recent history didn't know 
going cm in a “SHEtflar” skoarioa. 

ARMANDO BECCARIA. 

HbnoWu- 

ParadfeeRefoirad 

I moved to Standee from the Us&- 
ed States 12 yean am On 6c wjtl 
met a woman who fived os the Rne 
de Pararfisin Parii I proposed to her. 
and now we have an IHearold 
daughter and arc firog happily og 


f . m 

criticisra itsdf. They looked, around Roweo’s exhortation of continued 


sharing with the mullahs.” Since the 
dim was pot into and maimainM jn 
-.power by the United States, Ameri- 
can diplomats certairiy could have 
worked oat a better solution for 
— had they known what was going 


next to ysafcaows Rae de 
many faeri* was a 


-j 
i _ 

■ "Sr. 


heydays when I IivrdJ06 Step* 
umfisr a mxnsard nx£. IfrnriK 

..BRAaarwg 

. aWJWt a 










1 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AVGUST 7, 1983 


PageS 


jp in Court: Erratic Behavior Casts Doubt on Conspiracy Case 


***** *■* «* bizarre of Mr. Agcas pn>- 
weeks, as Italian Mr - ^ ih OT “affir. 


«i an extreme synthesis, of a delirious 


Few 

assaagss 

-jemjfoe~ ^ 5Qr "“- 


5 SSskth » sse «* ™ — *- 



fka. k . tfflplicaiion was that Mr. Agca. whatever 

• CIDeigfid is the truth of his accusations, shouldbe declared 
case rostson the testimony of a incapable of giving valid testimony. 

'TTirnVr.rrrM .7 After 31 sessions, testimony in the first phase 


s^;qpMOTe< at the 
Dnwti^ to have the pope murdered. 

- Mr. Asa* who did t&eshooting, has constant 


NEWS ANALYSIS 




£“““8 tofies and distort 

A — 


has 


.he 


joemed until nrid-Scptcmbcr. The trial recon- 
ciled Monday for a special four-day session to 
take evidence from two Turkish witnesses. 
Though some. Hke Mr. Mandli, doubt Mr. 


written by a Turkish reporter. Ugur Muracu. 

Part of Mr. Agra's behavior, some court offi- 
cials say, may be intended to shield Turkish 
accomplices. Despite his statement that three 
other Turks were with him in Su Peter's Square; 
investigators hove found scant evidence of their 
presence in Rome. This statement was probably 
the most significant departure from pretrial tes- 
timony. in which be admitted to only one Turk- 
ish accomplice the day of the shooting. 

Ah American photographed a man fleeing 
from the square with a gun in his band, but the 
snapshot is from behind and the man has not 
been identified beyond dcuhL 

An automatic camera in a Rome bank filmed 
Mr. Agra and another man shortly before the 
pope was shot. Mr. Agra has said ihc man was 


Turkish accomplices, who never left a trace in 
Rome, no matter where they staved. \ou never 
offered a single clue." 

Others, including the prosecutor. .Antonio 
Marini. sa> they suspect Mr. Agra’s behavior 
might be deliberately designed to destroy his 
own credibility. Mr. Agra lent credence to that 
view when he reacted to Mr. Mandli’s descrip- 
tion of his pronouncements by grinning broad- 
ly. even laughing. 

Such suspicions seemed to be reflected in a 


recent remaii by Judge Santiapkhi, who said he 
found it curious that Nfr. Agra reacted ealmh- to 


uf l-iian If — , 1 UAW i*Mi iTituivui, 4**4 « ••ua 41 _ 

mA .u. - - n mmseif to DC Jesus, predia- Agra’s sanity, there arc others who say he is Oral Celik, accused of acting as backup, but 
ea toe jnomnent end the world and caSed n*rdy a spinner of tales woven from bits and there is no proof. 


«-• i# •■» . ... — — .T “““7 “ auum . i ui uuo »u*tu iiuiu U1U duw 

^^aM&pto^wiih dose Vaticratitt who pieces of information gleaned from newspapers 


deplored violence for poji 
Domenioo MartelH has 


yioleocc fw political ends. and television. 


the task of deft 


, . Mr- Cctenk, imprisoned in Turkey since his 

-usOT of bring Mr. Agra's hnk arrival July 7 from Bulgaria, says he knows bow 
intelligence services. Recently. Mr. Agca was able to weave Iron into the plot 
ame the first defense attorney Mr. Cdeak says Mr. Agca read newspaper »c- 


d*e proposed psychiatric test. 

Contrasting that reaction with a violent out- 
burst after a similar proposal during his trial is 
1981, when Mr. Agca was convicted of shooting 
the pope, the judge said; 

“You would have jumped through the tyrfifg 
In contrast with the dearth of evidence, Mr. at your lawyer and everyone else, saying; ’Cra- 
Agra gave investigators a flood of details about zy? My God! No, because if they declare me 


i 


Bekir Cetenk, accused of being Mr , 
with Soviet Woe nnefl' 

Mr. M^became tne first defense attorney Mr. Cdeak says Mr. Agca read newspaper 
toastiftat Mr. Agca be subjeocth© psychiatric counts of Mr. Gdenk's reported involvement in 
testlII 8- . Bulgarian-inspired arms and drug trafficking. 


the Bulgarian defendants, including descrip- 
tions of their apartments, hobbies and even their 
dentures. 

Judge Severmo Santiapichi, a Sicilian of im- 
mense patience, recently with visible an- 
noyance, "When we dealt with your alleged 


crazy. Ill remain in jaiL, or in an asy lum and 
then, good night, they’ll close my account’ " 
Mr. Agra replied laconically; “I had no reac- 
tion because the Turkish government subjected 
me to psychiatric tests. Certainly. I talian justice 
can do lie same. It's not difficult" 


SUU. court officials say Mr. Agra has often 
said he is using his information like a bargaining 
chip. To bny his freedom either from the Italian 
or the US. governments, which he evidently 
feels will one day reward him for implicating the 
Soviet bloc, or from his accomplices, who he 
says promised to obtain his freedom, if need be 
by abducting on important person and making a 
trade. 

He has frequently cited the kidnapping of 
Emanuda Oriandi. an Italian schoolgirl abduct- 
ed by unidentified criminals, who have fre- 
quently called for Mr. Agra's release in ex- 
change for the girl. 

Despite numerous reversals, Mr. Agca has 
never budged from his baste contention that 
Bulgaria, and thus the Soviet Onion, commis- 
sioned and financed the plot to murder rite 
pope. With equal insistence, he continues to 
deny he w as ever coached to say so, as Bulgarian 
and Soviet officials have suggested. 

In a brief statement in response to the plea 

that he undergo psychiatric testing. Mr. Agca. in 
eloquent Italian, told the court; 

“CenainJy. do your analysis. I have a con- 
science, a mentality, that is different. You men 
of the planet Earth have yours." 



Enter, 


Mehmet Ali Agca 


seem to have 


*?*■*•*. 


on dead An-i 
g.cacpange for some fAZr 1 ’ 

ife.amflict with Cfo^ 10 

M^-nuransig cm* ^ 

.administration, sm» ■ 

&W official, 
fa overtures. 


French Steel Town Raises 



^fcwwer. the Viem**. 
eesdknrionstrating ar™** 
JjCsS to dear up 3* que^ 


FStaies 


an 


Plant Qosurein Industrial North 
^ BetraysDrift of Government Policy 


to furnish d* 
a «dl acewunj, 


i the shrewd aai 

i^gLfew' weSaS 
ywottl be welcomed in Vk 
sites where Am® 
craft ratted during the wo 
*^;Vtetnamese clearly b 
tedoatogetlhe United St% 
a permanent invesW 
sswri in Hand that couldjJ 
i^jnnjposes, be called a 
tajJjjL diplomatic entity. 
Yktnmc s t are evidently m 
fht£ifirEctioa as they percae 
e rie^Spyka leadership bo i 
Mikhail . Gorbachev is siriv* 

(hr jts differences with cW ^ 
iffiiaus^ meanwhile, have b® * 
Vietnam a backseat. 

I decade, dm Soviet Union ks 
jfe&am’s only supporter ins 
tr wilh Ctrina. A rapproch 
ixtKm the Communist aaa 
isdatetbe Vietnamese. Thd 
ey are attempting to impm 
h the: United States, 
dent Reagan cannot ead 
yktnanfs initiatives wither 
ing to tran^ress his repeat 
s to obtain all possible info 
on the fate of the nearly 2* 
arts tdsscng in Indochina 
hat esseh tiiuiy is a humus? 
e is giving the Vietnamese! 
they, had sought to create i 

ndd be premamre; of mns 
act a : quid improvenenjr 
etnamese relations. Still oo 
g is the matter of ik Vfo 
occupation of Cambodia, 
af the US. conditions fa no, 
i .of Vietnam — 
on of the possibility 
e withdrawal of the Vkaef 
as from Cambodia.^ 
cfinatc. though, a# 

« cannot be exclude 
fiidoncsiari foreign s3>> 
r. K usumaanna <ha- lu® 

0 act in an intennalis!^ 

1 the United States aJ* 

; believes that progress* 
are could spur moves* 6 
ibodian question. . 
iris views are not 
ty the other nations « 3* 

Z Thailand, which 
onnectkHis with Ck® 
Tabont ncgotiauoDS 
isi The United States* 
roach Vietnam unuljE 

- unity has been . 
dbe Southeast .Asun s®"- 

mplete story mijcjj 
its wfll not surfaet » ^ 
the United States mi* 


By Richard Bernstein 

tine York Tima Soviet 

TRJTH-ST.-LEGER, France — 
A conflict within Fiance's govern- 
ing Socialist Parry is centered these 
days on this depressed sted- mak- 
ing town of stained-brick, working- 
class rowhooses; 

“This is the kind of place where 
for generations a trade passed from 
father to son." said Patrick Leroy, 


their leftist credentials. Rather 
than attempt to build a new coali- 
tion, as Mr. Fabms apparently la- 


vras, Mr. Jospin wants to win sup- 
tot 


port from those who migl 
otherwise vote for the Communists. 

hi Triih-SL-teger. the dispute 
has arisen in a new form, pitting 
Mr. Fabtos not only against Mr. 


Matiroy, but against the local So- 
and file: 


liras for IW : 

- or ewuL 
rilin' -fc C* 
heitef 


7,000. “If your father was a smdter, 
you were a smelter. After yon fin- 
ished grammar school yon.went to 
the factory trauma; center; you 
started towork, andthaf s the way, 
it was." % 

“Now." Mr. Leroy went on, “the 
fathers have been pot our of work 
and the children have not been 
trained for other ihmg t So, not 
only is the.okter gaaerafion suffer- 
ing but there is no-future for our 
children." 

ThisisairiiKh-benioanedfi^in 
the northern Industrial districts <rf 
France. In thedfidmingsteel-xnak- 
ing and coal-mming towns hear the 
Bdgian border, the long, often idle 
factory sheds at beside rusty ^ rail- 
road tracks leading out ra -.the 
towns through rotting wheat fields 
and pastures. 

Prune Minister Lmueot Fabius 
announced recently, that Unimeial 
one of the few remaining sted 
plants herd, woflld dose nexf year, 
and J thnrthe p{a^s 770 woiiers ‘ 
would be tooved^ tisewhot. .. 

The jriant, nationalized in 1981, 
is one of the few modem sted mills 
in the region, and locals saw it as h 
possible opening wedge into ahigh- 
tech future. Mr. FaWus’s predeos- 
sor, Pirne Mauroy, whose political 
base lies in this part of Fhmce; had 
personaltyvowed to .'keep the sted 
industiy hatgoing. 

Mr. FafainsVdeasioa provoked 
a local sense (rf betrayal and re- 
newed a national debate. ‘The few 
remaining steelworkers have been 
marching m the streets carrying 
signs saying “Hands off our fac- 
tory." Sane demonstrators once 
set up a buriring barricade across 
the railroad 


cialisi rank 
“For ns, the grass-roots activists, 
it was the way . firings were done 
that was unacceptable," said Chris- 
tian Falala, one of the four mem- 
bers of fiie mmricipal council who 
left the party. “In the local context, 
it serins that aB the preparations 
made by the government to create 
new enterprises and jabs have 
amounted to nothing.'’ 

“When we saw that," Mr. Falala 
went on, “the four of us who arc on 
the mmridpal council decided to 
resign. It seemed to us that to gov- 
ern, you have to take a nrinimum of 
precautions."- 

- And so Trith-SL-L^er remains a 
place of fading prospects and grim 
statistics, a testament to the gov- 
ernment's failure to reinvigorate 
fire industrial north. In the last sev- 
eral years, about 1,000 of fire 
town's residents have left. Many 
who stayed had to take early retire- 
mem or received severance pay for 
lost jobs; but they are s&Q tmem- 



i KseqEF 




i. n>"< \W . 


i* 


5“ V v - & ■■ 

- .. -i y. hv'v • '£■ 




-T . jm. 

:■ ..... qtv. 


Ha Aaoomd Prea 

AFTER TIDAL WAVES — Two small tidal waves swept along six miles of the 
Mediterranean coast of France on Monday night, flooding campgrounds near Salin-de- 
Girand. The regional emergency center at Chateau de Valadre reported that about 900 
campers were given shelter in schools and sports halls. A girl drowned at Port Guardian. 


Papandreou Seems Likely to Focus 
On Economy During His 2d Term 


By Loren Jenkins 

Itatw’W Aaf Smitf 

ATHENS — Having spent his 
first four years in office trying to 
establish Greece's independence in 
foreign policy. Prime Minister An- 
dreas Papandreou appears bent in 
his second term on turning the at- 
tention of his government to the 
more intractable problems of the 
economy. 

Thai at least, is the message of 
the series of cabinet and sub-cabi- 
net changes that fire Socialist prime 
minister disclosed during the past 
week before members of Greece’s 
political elite left for their August 
vacations. 

Two months after his Pan-Hel- 
lenic Socialist Movement won a 
four-year electoral mandate 


June 2, Mr. Papandreou, 66, an- 
nounced a new “streamlined” 16- 
member cabinet. He said he hoped 
it would help break the traditional 
bureaucratic logjams of Greek gov- 
ernment. 


Though he named a new ft 


minister and a new minister 


oreign 
of the 


national economy, he made it dear 
that the focus of the government 
would be the economy and not for- 
eign affairs, which had dominated 
his attention during his first four 
years in office. 

'Hut emphasis was further un- 
derlined last weekend with the ap- 
pointment of the new ministers’ 
secretaries-general who will run 
the bureaucracy. 

Mr. Papandreou has repeatedly 
blamed the bureaucracy for the 
slowness of the economic and so- 
cial changes he promised when his 
Socialist movement was swept into 
power in 1981. 

Appointing the 21 new secreiar- 
ies-general Friday. Mr. Papan- 
dreou said be expected them to 
establish a “new rhythm and ag- 
gressive spirit in government po- 
licy." 

Since becoming prime minister 
in 1981, the U^.-educated econo- 
mist has bemoaned the “dead- 
weight of the dvil service bureau- 
cracy” that he inherited, often 
terming it “an obstacle” to the 


Air Force Chief Says Jets Were Mobilized on Day Aquino Died 


afl, since the early 1970s, ' 
Trifit-SL-Ugex has virtually ceased 
to exist as a major industrial center. 
"■ -It has lost about 90 percent of its 
sted industry robs and now, ac- 
cording to JotiHolin, a sted union 
official whose wife, Betty, was one 
the munidjrel councilors who left 
the party, only 1.000 workers re- 
main out of a force that once num- 
bered over 20,000. 

If Unimetal doses, the town will 
lose nearly 800 of those 1,000 work- 
ers. 


By William Branigin 

Washington Pott Service 

MANILA —The commander of 
the Philippine Air Force, Major 
General Vicente Redo, has ac- 
knowledged that fighter planes 
were ordered into fire skies over 
Manila at about fire time that Beo- 
igfio S. Aquino Jr. was flying there 
on Aug. 21, 1983. But he denied 
that fire action bad anything to do 
with the opposition leader's assas- 
sination. 

President Ferdinand E Marcos 
ordered an inquiry Tuesday into 
the allegations that air force jets 
had tried to divert Mr. Aquino’s 
plane. The presidential palace said 
that Mr. Marcos told the Foreign 
Ministry to ask the U.S. Embassy 
to provide information regarding a 


U.S. Air Force logbook that is re- 
ported to indicate that Philippine 
Air Force jets had tried to intercept 
the plane. 

General Picric said Monday. “It 
was a routine scramble and it had 
irothing to do with the China Air- 
lines flight which was coming in 
from Taipei." He charged that the 
U.S. Air Force logbook entry had 
been “doctored" to indicate the 
planes were intended to intercept 
the airliner carrying Mr. Aquino. 

Mr. Aquino, a leading opponent 
of Mr. Marcos, was assassinated 
seconds after military guards es- 
corted him from a China Airlines 
jet upon his return to the Philm- 
pines following three years of sett- 
imposed exile m the United States. 

Twenty-five military men and 


one civilian currently are on trial in 
connection with the murder of Mr. 
Aquino and Rolando Galman, an 
alleged professional gunman whom 
the military has blamed for fire as- 
sassination. Mr. Galman was killed 
by military guards moments after 
Mr. Aquino was shoL - 
General Picrio was reacting to 
efforts by lawyers prosecuting the 
Aquino case to shew fire existence 
of a military conspiracy in the as- 
sassination. The lawyers raised the 
issue of the air force scramble after 
the San Francisco Examiner news- 
reported last month that two 
tine F-5 fighter jets imsuc- 
FulJy tried to intercept Mr. 
Aquino's plane and divert it to the 
Basa Air Base, 35 miles (55 kilome- 
ters) northeast of Manila. 


The 


In late JuWr the four Socialist 
members of Trith-SL-1 


dL-sn agreement w Pgj 


V 


5«-*| 


^anything. ^ 


lister StoUoi* 

B hdd in VttPSi# 

fepasaoflaic^ 1 ^*! 

But in the red « ^ 


s mu- 

niripaT council resigned from the 
party to protest the government's 
decision to close the sted plant 
Their move was an unusual one 
and received much, press coverage. 

Mr. Mauroy,' who was replaced 
by Mr. Fabius a year ago, con- 
demned the announcenient of tbc 
plant closing as a betrayal of gov- 
ernment promises made to the re* 
giofl. His charge reflected a fear 
among many Socialists that, fire 
centrist policies pursued by Mr. 
Fata us would weaken the party's 
standing with one erf its most im- 
portant constituencies, the working 
class. 

In this sense. Trith-St.-Lfcger is a 
hi ghly viable example of the pre- 
dicament faced by fire Socialists, 
who, when ibey came to power in 
1981, nationalized banks and some 
industries, such as fins town’s steel- 
works. promising a better deal fo r 
the country’s hard-pressed working 


Afghan Guerrillas 
Said to Intensify 
Attacks on Kabul 


The Associated Press 

ISLAMABAD — Afghan guer- 
rillas are stepping up an offensive 
against Kabul, attacking fire capi- 
tal with rockets and batthng Soviet 
and government soldiers in fire 
streets at night. Western sources 
said Tuesday. 

The diplomats said that guerrilla 
activity increased after a major at- 
tack last month against a Soviet air 
base at Kabul. Guerrillas were fir- 
ing missile* into fire capital. 

Kabul was being shaken almost 
daily by explosions, artillery fire 
and mi gales, according to the re- 
ports, and gunfire was audible ev- 
ery night. ‘ 

Afghan government and Soviet 
uoops have responded by tighten- 
ing security in tne city and expand- 
ing searcb-and-destroy missions in 
the surrounding countryside. 

There are reports that Kabul mfl- 
itary hospitals are full of Afghan 
soldiers wounded during heavy 



Deng Assails U.S. Proposal 
For Space-Based Defense 


Deng Xiaoping 


By Daniel Southerland 

Washington Past Service 
BEUING — China's paramount 
leader, Deng Xiaoping, has formal- 
ly criticized President Ronald Rea- 
gan’s Strategic Defense Initiative, 
describing it as a plan that would 
add a dangerous new dimension to 
fire superpower arms race. 

Mr. Deng’s remarks on the 
space-based missile-defense system 
came in an interview with Robert 
Maxwell, chairman of Pergamon 


g^gd Mon. u.S. Embassy Service Contracts Scrutinized 


Soviet A- Test Freeze in Effect 


da**- wninci’i y«^ai| ixi«i uiMUAjL aajm 

'rSEfZX&SSS fish-fag inwtovdlcy. 

have moved away from such funda- 
mental socialist tends toward an £q I talian T a^HRlfltn ra 

economic pragmatism not so far w % ‘ ; 

from traditional rightist tbmking m fijgn Pica on Sakharov 

The Associated Press 


ih«i’ 


WMWJS K 

apartte ■ 


France. _ , , , 

The anxiety Mr. Fabius s actions 
have aroused in his party has risen 
. in aotiapatioa of legislative dec - 
tons next March. Recent polls in- 
dicate fire Socialist Party will lose 


ttbcfuanco.-^ 


andcompl«P hdp 


ROME — Sixty-nine members 
of die Italian parliament have 
signed a petition asking President 

Francesco Cosaga to intervene 

its parliamentary majority* and its with Moscow <m wall of Andrei 

ki since January 1980. 

The initiative for fire appeal 


fsnng. 
atsf 
didi 


LX-tr didnt 


at 3 ^ aeriA^ 
kRM AND° 


e government, 

ri^itei (^poafioa. 

Several weeks z%p. Ms- ^ a ^ aus 
publidy debated the party s seae- 
tarv-fieneraL Lionel Jospin, over 
Sretion strategy. Mr. j0S P m . “; 

1 at a party conference a June 

at the Soriaiists should maint a i n 


came from the Italian ma g azi n e 
ttive nd Mosdo. a monthly 


Renters 

MOSCOW— The Soviet Union 
began a five-month freeze on nu- 
clear tests Tuesday, linked to the 
40th anniversary or the dropping of 
the atomic bomb on Hiroshima. 

The Soviet press, meanwhile, in- 
dicated a cool initial response to 
President Ronald Reagan’s offer 
Monday to join Moscow in a nucle- 
ar test freeze, but only after finish- 
ing a series of tests under way. 

The Soviet moratorium was an- 
nounced by Mikhafl S. Gorbachev 
on July 29. The United States dis- 
missed it as a propaganda stunt 
and said it was not m fire US. 
interest to match fire moratorium. 

On Tuesday. Radio Moscow said 
in its English-language service that 
Mr. Reagan's offer of an ultimate 
freeze was “hazy." 

Tass, the Soviet press, agency, 
said in a report from Washington 
that Mr. Reagan had “tried to as- 
sure his audience that the United 
States would be ready for a morato- 


Announdng fire freeze, Mr. Gor- 
bachev said that the Soviet .Union 
would continue the moratorium 
into next year if the United Slates 
stopped testing too. 

Western diplomats said that 
Moscow was unlikdy to welcome 
Mr. Reagan’s latest offer. The rea- 
son, they said, was that Moscow 
Tdl there had been a relative bal- 
ance between the superpowers’ 
forces, and chat this would be dis- 
rupted by a U.S. testing program to 
develop a new missile warhead. 

Moscow and Washington have 
each regularly rejected the other’s 
public proposals on the tortuous 
issue of nuclear arms and space 
weapons in the run-op to the No- 
vember meeting between Mr. Rea- 
gan and Mr. Goriachev, to be held 
to Geneva. 

At fire time of the Gorbachev 
offer, Mr. Reagan invited Moscow 
to send observers, to witness a U.S. 
nuclear tesL Moscow commenta- 
tors scorned the 


Press and the Minor Group of 
newspapers Friday at the north 
Oin« s umm er resort of Beidaihe. 

A summary of Mr. Deng’s re- 
marks was provided by the official 
Xinhua press agency over the week- 
end and carried Monday cm the 
front page of the English-language 
newspaper, China Daily. 

A Western diplomat said Mon- 
day that Mr. Deng’s comments 
constituted the first definitive high- 
level rejection of the defense sys- 
tem by the Chinese. 

Some other Western diplomats 
said recently that the Chinese had 
adopted a critical attitude toward 
the proposal, partly because it 
helps them maintain a public p0S- 
ture that is independent of both 
superpowers. But the diplomats 
also said that the Chinese have sub- 
stantive objections to the plan, sim- 
ilar to those expressed by France. 

“The SDI would make the Chi- 
nese nuclear deterrent a nondeter- 
rmC a diplomat said, “and they’ve 
got to assume that the Soviets are 
working on it, too.” 

According to the Xinhua ac- 
count of Mr. Deng’s interview with 
Mr. Maxwell, the Chinese leader 
said that the space-defense plan 
“must not be implemented because 


genera) denied the U.S. 
newspaper report as "just a sensa- 
tionalized barracks story of the 
usual type bandied about in air 
force operations rooms." 

Lawyers close to the prosecution 
in the Aquino murder trial have 
said that fire scrambling belies the 
military’s contention that it did not 
know which plane Mr. Aquino was 
arrhing on during the last leg his 
much-publicized homecoming. 
That, the lawyers say. points to a 
conspiracy. 

Some lawyers say they believe 
that an attempt to divert Mr. 
Aquino’s plane could even indicate 
that ranking officers knew of the 
plot to assassinate him and tried to 
prevent it 

According to the San Francisco 
newspaper, U.S. Air Force person- 
nel said that Filipino officers had 
taken over UB. radar scopes at 
Wallace Air Station, about 200 
mOes north of Manila, to keep 
trade of their scrambled fighters. It 
said they had asked U.S. officers to 
order UB. jets into the air as well, a 
request that was denied. 

The newspaper said the U.S. of- 
ficers. interviewed after leaving the 
Philippines, bad questioned what 
one called the “highly unusual ac- 
tivity” and were told by the Filipi- 


nos that it was none of their busi- 
ness. 

Bui a U.S. airman assigned to the 
Villamor Philippine base near Ma- 
nila International Airport said that 
a senior Philippine Air Force colo- 
nel told him later that the jets were 
trying to divert the China Airlines 
plane to the Basa base, but had 
failed to intercept iL 

General Picrio’s admission that 
the scramble took place came after 
the U.S. Embassy in Manila turned 
over to the Foreign Ministry a copy 
of the U5. Air Force logbook entry 
concerning the action. The U.S. 
ambassador, Stephen W. Bos- 
worth, pledged cooperation last 
week with “any appropriate gov- 


changes he was committed to en- 
acting. 

The economy has been crippled 
with a lack of investment, an infla- 
tion rate in 19S4 of more than IS 
percent and a foreign debt that 
totals 37 percent of the gross do- 
mestic product. GDP is the total 
value of a nation's output of goods 
and services. 

The surprise of the new cabinet 
was the elevation of the former ag- 
riculture mini.ster. Constantine Si- 
mitis. to the post of national eco- 
nomics minister. 

He succeeded the former “czar" 
of Greek economic policy. Gerasi- 
mos .Arsenis, a former central bank 
official who was once close to Mr. 
Papandreou. 

According to European and oth- 
er Western diplomats. Mr. Simitis 
impressed his counterparts when 
he presided over the European 
Community agricultural commis- 
sion when Greece held the rotating 
presidency of the economic union. 

“He is a smart, capable and ex- 
cellent man for the job." said a 
European diplomat. *‘w*ho has 
clearly been appointed because in 
the next few years the improvement 
of the economy is going to dictate 
the success or failure of the Papan- 
dreou government." 

The focus on economic issues, 
however, will not mean any change 
in the independent foreign policy 
that marked the Papandreou gov- 
ernment's first term. 

A senior Foreign Ministry offi- 
rial said: “You will note that of all 
the changes in the government the 
one ministry that has been least 
effected is ours. For us. it will be 
business as usuaL" 

The official added: “Anyone 
hoping for a shift in our foreign 
policy is going to be sorely disap- 
pointed. Economics may be the 
new focus erf government activity, 
but in foreign policy there is going 
to be no change at all." 


eminent agency" in providing in- Store Mannwr 

formation requested for the 30Viei 3rore JMauager 

To Be Executed in Theft 


Aquino murder trial 

According to a press release 
from the presidential palace. Gen- 
eral Picao asserted that “certain 
quarters" had attempted to “doc- 
tor” the logbook to link the scram- 
ble to Mr. Aquino's incoming 
flight. 

He said that in the log entry in 
question, the words “aircraft in- 
bound from Hong Kong’’ and 
“Aquino" were wmien in hand- 
writing different from the rest of 
the entry “after the logbook was 
written.” 


Reuters 




stale-operated grocery in Rostov 
has been sentenced to death for 
taking food for himself and friends, 
according to the newspaper So- 
vietskaya Rossiya. 

The conviction was revealed 
Sunday in an article written by the 
Rostov public prosecutor and con- 
tained the account of a sweeping 
purge of corrupt officials in the 
region. 


By Joanne Omang 

Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — At the U.S. 
Embassy in the Ivory Coast, the 
employees' association nearly went 
bankrupt after it bought L200 
cases of beer. At the embassy in 
Turkey, workers running the asso- 
ciation snack bar were being paid 


out of embassy funds. In Egypt, the 
1,000 profit 


it would cause a qualitative change 
i, which would Be 


in the arms race,’ 
different from simply adding a few 
more midear warheads or changing 
a few new types of missiles. 

Before this, the Chinese had crit- 


icized the proposal through press 
reports and comme 


commentaries, slate- 
roents made this year at a disarma- 
ment conference in Geneva, and 


association made an S80.000 profit 
from its contract to provide ser- 
vices to the embassy, when it 
should have broken even. 

These bits of information sur- 
faced lost wed: at a congressional 
hearing into the contract arrange- 
ments between U-S. embassies 
abroad and employees who are 
hired to act as chauffeurs and 
guards, to provide building mainte- 
nance and landscaping and to op- 
erate snack bars and other services. 

The contracts involve 7,000 peo- 
ple at 130 embassies and S39 mil- 
lion in contracts. The employees* 
associations grossed S77 million in 
1983, the last year for which figures 
ore available, the State Department 
said. But the associations have had 
little or no supervision. 

John Condayan, acting assistant 
secretary for State Department ad- 


Mr. Condayan told the House 
government operations subcom- 
mittee on legislation and national 
security that some of the associa- 
tions suffered from inadequate or 
total lack erf accounting, poor man- 
agement, inadequate supervision 
and some questionable contract 
practices. 

When the State Department 
tightened its budget in the late 
1960s, Mr. Condayan said, new 
personnel ceilings and funding cuts 
ended the service contracts most 
embassies had had with local com- 
panies. Embassy employee associa- 


te prove that embassy associations 
are cheaper." 

Mr. Condayan said it helped 
spouses' morale to have something 
useful to do, and often they were 
the only recourse under local con- 
ditions that involved '‘difficult po- 
litical problems, corruption, unac- 
ceptable labor standards and 
various work ethics, extremely low 
raies of literacy and competency 
and other unique, country-specific 
problems." 


lions, mostly made up of spouses 
me vac- 


ant! volunteers, moved into 
uum. 


The General Accounting Office 
looked at only three embassies and 
found that employee associations 
had a hard time being objective 
about needs or the embassies. Per- 
haps, it implied, that was intention- 
al 

Joan M. McCabe, association di- 
rector of the GAO's national secu- 
rity and international affairs divi- 
sion, said, "There are no 
indications that posts have actually 
canvassed the local market for 


In addition. Mr. Condayan said, 
embassy employees are by defini- 
tion less of a security risk ’than the 
locals. "We cannot rdy solely on 
cost factors when we determine 
who shall have access to our embas- 
sies," he said. 


Representative Jack Brooks, 
Democrat of Texas and the sub- 
committee chairman, said that the 
testimony regarding the employees’ 
associations was "alarming and 
cannot be tolerated." 


Prospective nd Mondo, a monthly blatfis wouia oe reaay ror a moraio- tors scorned me in vita non as a ment conference m Geneva, ana secretary iw state Liepanmeniao- canvassed me tocai market lor 

published by members of the rium when it had completed its hasty counter-proposal barely wor- through a Foreign Ministry spokes- ministration, said: ‘The results available services, or that posts 

Christian Democrat Party. ouclear lest programs.” thy of consideration. man here. haw been spotty” have made cost-comparison studies 


Mr. Condayan testified that the 
State Department has now set up a 
special office io oversee the associ- 
ations and will recruit professional 
managers, write handbooks and 
provide information and guidelines 
to them. 


ge 





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Page 6 


INSIGHTS 


A J ug gler With a Vision, Teddy Kollek Keeps Jemsale 


By Thomas L. Friedman 

' New York Tima Serna 

J ERUSALEM —The walls of Mayor Ted- 
dy Kollek’s office are lined with pictures of 
Jerusalem in its many different historical 
poses. Ever Lbe tour guide, the mayor loves to 
Cake visitors on a spin around his office, dis- 
pensing stories about the history of each of his 
photographs and lithographs. 

' But there ore three in particular that hold his 
fancy. They hang to the nght of his desk, and, in 
a way, they say everything one needs to know 
about Teddy. 

. if these pictures had titles, they might be 
called "Jerusalem as It Was,” "Jerusalem as It 
Is” and "Jerusalem as It Could Be but Isn't.” 
Jerusalem as It Was is a picture taken in June 
1967, jurt as the walls between the Arab and 
Jewish sectors tumbled down. Jerusalem as It Is 
features a colorful panorama of the united city 
of today. Jerusalem as It Could Be is a picture of 
Berlin, taken near the wall that slices the Ger- 
man city in half. 

By virtue of both its history and its volatile 
population mix, Jerusalem should be Belfast or 
Beirut — or Berlin with many walls instead of 
one. Contrary to ail the clicfa&s about it, Jerusa- 
lem has not been a dry of brotherly love and is 
not one today. The fact that it is 1 not Belfast, 
Beirut or Berlin, and that it has been, thus far, 
spared their fate, is due largely to the unique 
character and leadership of its mayor, the man 
called by everyone simply ‘Teddy.” 

- Yehuda Amichai, the modem Hebrew poet, 
said: Tn a time of war, and continuing wars, 
Teddy has created a coexistence of a real land. 
He doesn't brush it over with sappy sentimen- 
talism about how ‘the world is one.' He is not 
sentimental at aH He is a romantic of realism. 
He believes that you can stick to reality, and not 
paint things over, and you can fall in love with 
reality as ftis. He has made Jerusalem work, not 
by mairiftp it something different, but by mak- 
ing it work as it is." 

■ If you stand at the Damascus Gate to Ihe Old 
City of Jerusalem on a Friday afternoon, you’ll 
see going by Jerusalem as it is: a Noah’s Ark of 
hooded Christian monks, tnrbaned Moslem 
sheikhs and blade-robed Orthodox Jews. 

• They pass one another on the white stone 
steps, each one silently contemplating his own 
grand vision for Jerusalem in which the people 
wafiting next to him have no place. Hie mayor’s 
achievement has been to coax, juggle and force 
all of these people into living together even 
though they themselves have not yet found any 
explanation or justification for their coexis- 
tence. 

Theodore Kollek is about to complete his 
20th year as mayor of Jerusalem, and if he had 
done nothing but keep the peace among Mos- 
lems, Christians and Jews since the aty was 
forcibly united following the 1967 war, it would 
have been a major achievement. But his accom- 

t in the last 

) years hasbeen transformed from a provincial 
backwater, a dull overgrown village that used to 
pmpty out on weekends, into a vibrant center for 
culture and the arts. 

* The traditional signs of urban alienation are 
missing here, when, if one considers tbepopula- 
tion rmx, they should be prevalent Even for 
those who hate the political order, Jerusalem has 
become hard to resist. 



even recognize the Jewish state, that they should 
tolerate one another would be a futile exercise. 
Instead be coaxes, appeals to their self-interest, 
makes deals, forces tradeoffs and plays rough. 
Usually it is done subtly. 



SttSSiKSSMSK &«£?**• **>*”* 


right one?" 

If what ‘ 
hood is fray 


in the Har Nof neighbor- 
there may be reason for 


minister, but rather by recognizing the Arabs as 
a disaffected political minority and toying to 



» , f - r 


R ABBI David Hartman, the Israeli phi- 
losopher, notes: “Jerusalem is a city that 


that at ha w some of Teddy’s politics 


deal with tiwr f< 
wi thin the confines 
over the dry. 

As a result of las 


as much as portable 
continued lsriefi role 


Tha Now York Tbm 

Mayor Teddy JKoflek, now in his 20th year as peacekeeper among Moslems, 
Christians and Jems, has tamed Jerusalem into a vibrant cultural center. 


It is not that Teddy is nasty. It is just that he 
has no time for chitchat unless it wul help him 
improve Jerusalem. He has been known to tell 
autograph seekers that he will give them his 
signature if they will give him theirs — on a 
traveler's check marie out to the city. 

Teddy treats his constituents with equal doses 
of irreverence and respect. He does not hesitate 


to explain his continual electoral success, politi- 
cally, the man makes no sense. He is a liberal in 
Israel’s most hawkish city, a secularist who 
works cm Saturday in the country’s most Ortho- 
dox religious center. He is a European Jew, an 
Ashkenazi, in a town where the majority are 
Jews from the Middle East or N> 


ality and _ 

reality ana walk where Jesus walked, or King 
David And then along comes Teddy, who says, 
"Look, m fix your sewers if you knock off the 
sermons.’ He is the epitome of Machiavellian 
reahty in a city which denies the whole notion of 
reality.’' 

While it is widely assumed that the greatest 
threat to Jerusalem cranes from AraWsracfi 
tensions or Sephardi- Ashkenazi class conflict, 
□either is the case. 

The Arab-Israel conflict grabs the he a dl ines, 
but a rather stable modus vivendi is operating 
an that front, and the upward mobility of the 
Sephardim and rhwr intermarriage with the 
Ashkenazim have taken the edge off that issue 
as wed 

In fact, it is the tension between Ultra-Ortho- 
dox and secular Jews that tends to be the most 
explosive issue on a day-to-day bass. 

The Orthodox population of Jerusalem, 
winch could be defineaas those Jews who would 
prefer to live in an exclusively religious neigh- 
borhood where they can observe the Sabbath in 
complete peace ana quiet, is growing far faster 
than either the Moslem or the secular Jewish 
population and is making its influence felt ac- 
cordingly. 

Add to this the fact that what little immigra- 
tion Israel is experiencing these days tends to be 
Orthodox Jews coming to live in Jerusalem, and 
the trend 
cent of the 
as Orthodox 
Shachar, director of the Hebrew University In- 
stitute of Urban and Regional Studies. 

The professor added: “The proportion be- 
tween the Orthodox and non-Orthodax is 
rfnmptig all of the time in favor of the Ortho- 
dox. The problem arises from the fact that the 
Orthodox tend to live separately.” 

“Before 1967 most of the Orthodox lived in 
the Mea Shearim neighborhood, near the border 
with Jordan,” Mr. Shachar said. “It was an 
isolated dead end, and they conld live there 
however they wanted without disturbing anyone 
else. But when the border was swept away in 
1967 and new neighboxhoods were built, the 
rehgious felt engulfed. New roads were cut 
through their communities and suddenly a hid- 
den conflict came out in the open." 

The conflict has taken many forms, from 
stone- throwing at cars violating the Sabbath to 
attempts to block the building of mixed swim- 


of Emits, — . . 

.. - „ Har Nof is one of the many new neighbor- 

L aspires to fanaticism. This wty is mesaa- howls on the northwestern edge of the aty that with ihe Arabs or 
nisra, it’s revenge, it’s the muse of eternity, it’s have popped op in recent years. It was irnmedi- described as 
the city of pEgnms and dreams- You get away ate j y populated by_a wide range of religious 
from reality and come hoe, you get away from andahandfm of secular families. 

The different kinds of religious Jews can be 
identified by the kind of head coverings the men 

wear, says Sarah Kammkcr, director of an ex- r _ . . , , _ 

nerimental program in neighborhood sdf-gov- population takes pm m Jerusalem is nmniapal 
emmenL whidiTeddy hasbeen backing. elections for the sole purpose of ro-decting 
Jews wearing knitted yannulkss are religions Mayor Kollek. Toddy's politics of li mits. as 
but tend to be Eberal and nationalistic; they applied to the Arafat, means insuring them of 

semi-autonomous control overall Moslem *•***■ 


Teddy’s rotations 
would best be 


VirtnaBy all of the people from Jerasafcnft 

annexed Arab ara» refuse to take part in Israeli 

national deaions,bccauscof the political rec- 
ognition that voting would imply. But nearfy JO 
percent of the predominant^ nak Arab votin g 


'A 

M 


{ By navigating between nil 
of these different religions, 
all of these competing 
visions and all of these wild 
hopes, Teddy has created a 
functioning reality for all 
the people who want to live 
denying reality. 9 

Rabbi David Hartman 


places in. the OW City and over the education 

their children. 

But some Jerusalem Arabs complain that the 
mayor is nothing more than, a foreign occupier 
with a velvet glove, and that wink he is prepared 
to preserve some rights Tor the Arabs, it is only 
the bare minimum. 

Sari Nusseibeh, a young Arab inteflec m al 
from oat of Jerusalem's most prominent Pales- 
tinian families, said: “What KoUek has done is 
to separate the problems of the West Bank from 
those of Jerusalem. But be has not provided 
equal services to Arab areas. Compare the light- 
ing, roads, asphalt and garbage collection is 
Arab rraghbenhoods with those of the new Jew- j 
ish nei g hborhoods. There is no comparison. 
Sure, he goes to meet all of the Arabmuktaraon 
holidays, but I fed there is a kind of condescen- 
sion there. He is not treating them as equals, but 
as people to pacify.” 

But perhaps Sari Nussdbeh's father, Anwar. 
nunc op best the somewhat schizophrenic Arab 




* * 


have been a major achievement But his accom- of irreverence and respect. He does not hesitate Jews from the Middle East or North Africa, mmenools or a soccer stadium wfaoe “Hdiaris- ‘Keen the roads ooen.’ We told them alL ‘Look. pta yfr noran es. roue 

blishmentsgoMyondthaL Jerusalem in the last tostop care in tire mu&Taf the street and bawl Sephaidicimmigran^ IrtQBTO^teaiid^wl^ t teay 

& vears hasbeoa transformed fhnn a movincial out the passengers for throwing garbageout the man in the biggest stronghold of the Likud, the stay could not afford. Because the ftxmdat 

me Sabi 


window. Teddy’s home nnmberls listed in the 
phone book (02-4536 147), and people call him all 


TCJITH only 440,000 inhabitants 
\1/ (3 16,000 Jews, 110,000 Moslem Arabs 
TV and 14,000 Christians), Jerusalem has' 
about 200 paries and gardens, three world-class 
museums, two orchestras, an international book 
fair, a music festival and movie festival, a thriv- 
ing cinema center and Zubin Mehta conducting 
the Israel Philharmonic. Much of this was in- 
spired by Teddy in one way or another. What 
should have been Belfast has turned out more 
Eke prewar Vienna, the city, incidentally, where 
the mayor was raised. 


ayorw 

But tor all its culture and tram 
lem also is a worried dty. The 


the time. 

Most mornings, Teddy ism the office by 6:30. 
He can be toughest on the people who work 
around him. He does not suffer fools gladly or 
otherwise, and when he does not get the perfor- 
mance he wants he can bellow with the nest of 
them; although he invariably forgets in five 
minutes who it was he yelled at 

Because of the long hours he puts in, Teddy is 
notorious for falling asleep at public functions, 
and it does not matter if he is sitting next to the 
Israeli president, under the baton of Zubin 
Mehta or in his chair during a City Council 
debate. He even fell asleep drama a ceremony at 
the Hebrew University in 1977 at which an 
honorary doctorate was presented — to him. 

Why do people put up with his behavior? The 
answer is almost always the same: Because there 
is nothing vindictive about him or his frequent 


man in the biggest stronghold of the Likud, the 
conservative political coalition. Yet be has won 
every election since 1965, and he has done it 
winks often teffing people what they don't want 
to hear. 

Amos Elan, the Israeli author, said: “Teddy is 


attempts to force all public institutions, even 
museums, to dose on the Sabbath. 

One must note that the Orthodox were the 
city’s first Jewish settlers and that until the eariy 
20 th century, Jerusalem was almost entirely 
populated by religious Jews, as the Orthodox 


and' they send their children to private 
religious schools (which also are funded by the 
state). Finally, there are the ultra-Orthodox 
Haredim who wear black hatf over long, carting 
sideburns and do not recognize the secular state 
at all- 

What happened in Har Nof was that the 
religious f amilie s got together and formed a self- 
rule council, dominated by the most Orthodox 
elements, swd Mm Kaminker. One of the conn- 
dTs first acts was to write the municipality and 
ask that all the roads in the neighborhood be 
closed to traffic on the Sabbath, because it was 
disturbing their day of rest 
Mrs. Kaminker said: “The 40 or so secular 
families in the neighborhood got wind of the 
letter and made an affiance with the knitted 
yarmulkas, who also, did not want the roads 
dosed, against the velvet yarmulkas and the 
black bats. They wrote to die dty and said, 

“Look, 
oat 


ty.Jerusa- outbursts. Whether Teddyisin a rage or rail of 
ious extrem- joy it is almost invariably over Jerusalem. 


Ruth Cheshin, director of the Jerusalem 
Foundation, a nonprofit organization founded 
with Teddy's blessing to sponsor projects 
around the dty, said: “Sometimes I want to 
throw my desk on him But no one can stay 


tnrow my desK on nim_ Hot no one can stay 

S at him for very long. Teddy’s greatness is 
s is real. He wul take risks if he thinks that 


ile 


ists of every stripe are becoming more en- 
trenched in each community, and tensions 
between the Orthodox and secularists, particu- 
larly in the Jewish community, constantly 
threaten to explode. And while, fra: now, the 
Arab-Israd conflict within Jerusalem is at a low 
boil, it takes only one incident to remind the 

dty"s residents j ust how fragile the current peace he is right He is not worried about what 
is. win say. He is political without being a 

Worst of all, the maestro is getting old- Teddy dan.” 

Kollek is 74, and there is no apparent successor Despite Teddy’s bnisqueness, Arabs 
to step up on the podium. Like many historic Jews are not afraid to approach him on the 
figures, the mayor has failed to nurture a sucoes- street with their problems, which he records in 
sor. Although there have been a few unsuccess- the notepad he keeps in his pocket Teddy 
ful candidates, it has been difficult for anyone to usually refuses to have bodyguards, because of 
grow intis broad shadow or next to his wricanic the distance it would pm between him and tis 
personality. constituents and because it might create the 

What is it about Teddy KoHek’s leadership impression that Jerusalem is not safe, 
that has made him so successful as mayor of in the end, Teddy is just another Jerusale- 
Jerusalem and will make him so hard to replace? mite. He drives around ld a tittle white Ford 


and 


o replace? 

Unlike so many of the new generation of Israeli 
politicians, Teddy is not one to sugarcoat his 


Sierra, has lived for many years in a modest 
three-room apartment and has blocked the 
words just to make them politically palatable, many attempts to name buildings, parks and 
He does not play “kiss the babies.” other monuments after him. 


a metapolitical jffienomenon. He runs counter are caQed. 

toev^ cticbfc. Rabbi Mar Porush, a dty councilman from 

- Indeed, Teddy’s success as mayotof Jernsa- ultra£rthodox Ayidai lsrad Party* sakt 
lem probably owes a lot to the fact that his “Even tho ugh Jerusalem ha* a secular majority, 
tough, no-nonsense temperament is wedded to a a is a special city in IsraeL God is looking over 
unique political outlook that is ideally suited^ to Jerusalem from the beginning of the year to the 
*” ■ s politics are ; the politics end. We, the Jews who represent Jewish tradi- 

tion, have the right to demand that Jerusalem be 
mare holy. We are fighting to keep it a special 
aty.” 

Most of the new neighborhoods on the north 
of Jerusalem, such as Ramot, are being taken 
ova- by Orthodox families who have expanded 
out of their traditional enclaves for lack of 
space. 

EDDY has dealt with the situation in 
typical Teddy fashion. He has sought to 
satisfy what he believes to be the Inti- 
mate demands of the majority ofrdigious Jeru- 
salemites, while at' the same time vigorously 
fighting what he sees as a violent extremist 
minority of ultra-Orthodox who want to impose 
their values on o titers. * 

“They would turn this into a sterile dty,” he 
said.- “No m u seums, no concerts, no theater, no 
muting, no exhibitions, no libraries, no fun. 
There are many people in this dty wbo want to 
be religious, but in a friendly way. They are 
being driven 

fanatid^i. ’ 

. The mayor is currents 
the Mormons to build a religious center in 
Jerusalem against titter Orthodox opposition. 
He has demanded, though, that the Mormons 
agree not to engage in any proselytizing activi- 
ties, which the Orthodox fear most. Trudy's is 
the art of a juggler with a vision. 

“You have to pay your homage to the fact 
that this has been the capital of the Jewish 
people for 3,000 years,” the mayor noted. “But 
there is a limit to it,” and the Orthodox “will not 


of limits, which might be summarized as fol- 
lows. 

Jerusalem always has been a dty of ghettos. 
Since there is no tinw to writ for the resiaents df 
these ghettos to restive their differences — 
whether between Arabs and Israelis, Christians 
and Jews, Moslems and Christians or secularists 
and Orthodox — the city must have a function- 
ing reality that works. Now. 

That means two things: first, everyone, in- 
ducting the Jews wbo are m chai^ Ira to accept 
limits on his vision of Jerusalem; second, people 
whom fate has thrown together do not have to 
learn to love each other, merely to live with each 
other. Teddy's ideal for Jerusalem, is not inter- 
marriage between the many communities, bat 
civilized interaction. Or, as the stamp the mayor 
pats on every official letter says, “Let’s be more 
tolerant" 

“What l am after is small steps, not tremen- 
dous concepts,” said Teddy, chomping on a 
agar. “The idea of peace like Versailles is not a 
modern idea. What we are learning in Jerusalan 
is neighborhood relationships; what we hope to 
learn is tolerance.” 

He argues that everyone has his comer, and 
that each group's daim has to be balanced 
against those of all others. 

Teddy, who ran for mayor as a third career 
after having been a founder of Kibbutz Em Gev 
and director general of [be prime minister’s 
office under David Ben-Gunoo, rarely goes 
around trying overtly to sdl his politics of limits. 
He knows that io tty to convince fundamentalist 
Christian's or ultra-Orthodox Jews, who do not 


amongst yourselves?* 

OR two months, the various factions held 
heated negotiations about which roads 
should be opened or dosed. Eventually, 
they reached a compromise: No roads would be 
formally dosed, but signs would be pin op at the 
entrances to the neighborhood explaining that 
this was, a religious afrea and requesting that 
people respect the feelings of the residents. 

“It cost them Mood,” said Mrs. Kaminker of 
the negotiations, “but the most important thing 
about it ad was that they learned how to talk to 
each other. They didn't tike it, some of them, but 
they learned.” 

As it turned out. the road problem was the 
least of the neighborhood's worries. Like all new 


out because they cannot stand this 


becomes thefts. In the long run, unless a plun 
istic sensibility takes hold, unless Jerusalemites 
learn to see the dignity of Emits, then with 
Teddy’s passing, said Rabbi David Hartman, 
“will eventually come an explosion of fantasy 
which mil warn tins city with Wood.” 

Teddy is not so sure, or maybe not so pessi- 
mistic. It is just not his style. He dismisses a lot 
of this pjiilasopfaiziba 2 with a flick of the Cuban 
cigar in his land. He is, after aD, a builder, 
impatient. He doubts that the day will ever 
conrc when the entire entty quill ti ha constitu- 
eucywill leant to love limns and not just respect 
them. - 

This artide was excerpted from The New York 
Tones Magazine. 


,*.y;i Mi'' 


... 


extension of Israeli jurisdiction over 
Jerusalem Ira never been accepted by us and 
can never be accepted." be said. “ With Kdkk at 
the bead of the municipal administration, he is 
the focus for the resentment. But the fact is, 
Arabs mid Jews coexist here against the nature 
of iHmgg, and the tact that they do is to Koilek's 
credit lie is a pragmatist wbo tries to operate 
within the political Emits of his environment; he 
is an earning bulkier with a human touch.” 

Mr. Nusseibeh added, “I tike him immensely 
personally, and I disagree with everything he 
r epresents polilically.” 

Besides his unique personality, another attri- 
bute that may hare enabled Teddy to march to 
the beat of he own drum has been his abOity to 
raise money on his own through the Jerusalem 
Foundation, the nonprofit pfcuanthrqpic arp- 
niz&tkxi established in 1966 to provide rands for 
community carters, {days, libraries, education 
rich the city trear 
sory could not afford. Because the foundation is 
not associated with the government, it can move 
to meet needs quickly and with a mmhnnm of 
red tape 

Since its establishment, the Jerusalem Foun- 
dation has raised more than SI40 nuffion. Un- 
tike many Jewish philanthropies, the foundation 
allows people to donate money to fund specific 
projects. ... 

Teddy's fund raising is enhanced by his knack 
for nudong peopie who have known him only 
briefly fed intimate with him. 

Sfcncha Dinitz. a former Israeli ambassador 
to Washington said: “Anyone Teddy does not 
know is not worth knowing, and anyone Teddy 
does know is useless to know because their first 
loyalty is always to him. Whether it is Frank 
neighborhoods of the dty, Har Nof had one Sinatra or Isaac Stem or Willy Brandt, ttey all 
sd^fOTaU titecfaiWjmoftltearea,buiUforit count themsdves as personal friends of his. He 
by the gowmmenL This was not good enough, stays in touch with all of them, rc mcni bcis all 
The knitted yanmilkas insisted on sending their their birthdays. He is very thoughtful about 
children ttischool with boys and girismixed, but keeping up wiih everyone.” 
the velvet yartdulkas insisted that boys and girls Wffich always scans to lead bade to the same 

be separated. question. What happens after Teddy? Who is 

Mrs. Kaminker said,: “We bad to divide the going to provide all the steam? 
school in JbalL Wp cut two new doors in the “No one will succeed Teddy,” said Mr. Din- 
stone so the more Orthodox boys and gids could itz. “When he goes, it's the aid af an era." 
enter separately ” Although the physical experience of living in 

aoang her file of papers on Har Nof. she Teddy Kmlek's Jerusalem is one of Emits, the 
sighed aloud: “How do we live in this city? How mind-set of many of the city’s people is still one 
do I have lhe strength to live here anymore!” of utopian fantasy in which, in the end, their 
Eighteen years after its “uniBcation,” Jexusa- vision triumphs over all others and the at 
lan still is a divided city. The physical walls * *' ' ’ ’ 

came down, but the psychological walls stayed 
up. There is very little voluntary social mixing 
between Arabs mid Jews mid there are virtually 
no mixed xwghborboods. Most Jewish Jerusale- 
mites have nevcr been in an Arab home and vice 
versa. ’ • 

While Teddy is as committed to the continua- 
tion of Israeti sovadgnty over a united Jerusa- 
lem as any Israeti official, he parts company 
with many of his colleagues over how to 

strengthen the Israeti claim on Jerusalem. come wtteut&e entire craty quilt of Ins constitu- » 

It has always been Teddy’s view that the best “ — i ._ i — u * — -* ■ 

way to win the world's teat or explicit recogni- 
tion of the Israeli administration is not by cram- 
ming it down people’s throats, moving embas- 


A Yen for Din: Most Japanese Coexist With Cacophony 


* U * « i v> 


ing any small pockets of silence that still can be 
found. 

Rare is lie Japanese street with no loudspeak- 
er. Tiny loudspeakers dole out schedule infor- 
mation at bus stops, issue greetings to customers 
at supermarket doom and tell pedratrians it is all 
right to cross the street, but please be careful. 

The daily newspaper Asahi Shrmb nn recently 
found that (he government of Katsuta Gty, 
north of Tokyo, operated 88 loudspeaker towers 


By John Burgess 

Washington Post Service 

N AGOYA, Japan — It is 21 years since 
Tomoyo Hanabusa enjoyed peace and 
quiet m her tiny wooden home in this 
thriving industrial city west of Tokyo. 

stands ^concrete trestle that siiicefl^G# has 
carried Japan’s bullet trains at speeds of up to 
120 miles (193 kilometers) an hour. They bqrin 
passing her home at 6:43 Aid. and run until a 
few minutes after 1 1 P.M. — more than 300 
times a day. 

“When I’m downstairs in the kitchen, it’s like 
gening hit by an earthquake every five min- 
utes,” she said. Flowerpots wobble and conver- 
sation stops. 

After eight seconds, another blue and white 
buQet has hurtled out of right and things are 
quiet for a few minutes. 

1 Mrs. Hanabusa is angty about the noise and tha t i^ept [jje local populace up to dale on such 
she is fighting back, but that makes her unusual subjects as animal husbandly, the start of police 
in Japan. Ten years ago she joined with sereral recruitment and personal comportment, 
hundred neighbors to sue the state-owned Japa- Collectors of waste paper, who mice sang as 
nese National Railways. Most of them won ^hey walked the streets to advertise the ir pres- 
about $4.000 each in damages, but they now are ence, now switch on open-loop umed announce- 
appealing the court’s refusal to slow the trains, ments. Hiere are an estimated TOO such trucks 
Unlike Mrs. Hanabusa, most Japanese seem plying (be streets of Kyoto, 
to accept the cacophony. Norio TaniwaJa, a 

noise-complaint specialist with the Tokyo dty ■ t VEN temples and shrines are not im- 
goverament, says, “The Japanese are forgiving ri mune. Several years ago, a Tokyo man 
when it comes to noise." - 1 — J wrote to the Japan Times to complain 

Much of the noise is inevitable, the result of that loudspeakers at a famous Zen garden had 

informed him that “this garden symbolizes the 


Introduced 10 years ago, karaoke — which 
translates as “empty orchestra” — has dug in as 
an established entertainment form. At the last 
count during a year’s period aiding in July 
1984, they were installed in 882 Tokyo drinking 
establishments and countless hrang; That cam* 
year the police got 10,429 complaints about 
karaoke. 

Yoshii Takagj of Tokyo turned into a citizen 
activist after a snack shop 10 feet (three meters) 


■120 million 


.pie and 46 million motor vehi- 

_ f OT space fr a country of 146,690 essence of quietness.” Another great enemy of 
square miles (381,394 square kilometers). silence in Japan is the karaoke machine, a (ape 
* Indeed, a case can be made that what Japa- player that provides background music for 
uesesodety today fears is silence. Certainly, the songs, witii the user providing the vocals, which 
Japanese have put modern science to work fill- the machine then amplifies. 


A case can be made that what Japanese society fears is 
silence. The Japanese have pat science to work filling 
any small pockets of silence that can still be found. 


from her apartment installed one in 1978. 
“Sometimes the music ran until 4 AA1T she 
recalls. “I couldn’t sleep.” She finally forced a 
lowering of the volume after dozens of trips to 
the police and dty government and health of- 
fices. 

Tokyo recently has enacted a law that sets 
specific limits on the times and volume levels for 
karaoke playing. 

Every now and then, frustration with the 
noise level leads directly to violence. In 1974, a 
man murdered a neighbor and her two daugh- 
ter after iu becanK enraged ova piano practice 
by the girls. More recently, a motorcyclist was 
killed in Tokyo when he struck a line strung 
between two trees. The police believe it was 
someone angry over motorcycle gangs using the 
street for joyriding. 


The government officially recognizes that Ja- 
pan has a nose problem, ana for years has bad a 
set of fairly stringent national laws in force, 
including ones for cars and factories. 

T HEY were enacted as part of a national 
backlash against all kinds of pcSutiai in 
the early 1970 following Ihe Minamata 
Gty mercury poisonings and other celebrated 
cases. The government has spent millions erect- 
ing sound barriers along highways and. fitting 
bouses with double windows along the ballet 
train lines, Mrs. Hanabusa’s-induded. 

Those who live next ta ordinary railroads, 
however, receive no government assistance be- 
cause, in the words of one official, “We’d have 
to pay for half the houses in Japan.” 

DecHmng complaints show that the Japanese 



i are trying to relocate night landing 
practice by U.S. jets, following long-standing 
complaints and tegal action frampeople living 
around the Atsugi Air Base near Tokyo. 

But other fields need attention. A recent gov- 
ernment surrey, for instance, found that only 
two of 17 aizpons included in the study were 
meeting aviation noise standards set in 1973. 

The government s o meti m es fails to move 
against citizen nouemako's on the ground that 
such action might violate the public interest. 
For instance, reining in the sound trades of' 
Tokyo could be considered acnrtaflment of Jree 
speotfi, the police said. 

Likewise, tbt eoun that rejected the demand 
by Mrs. Hanabusa and her fellow plaintiffs held 
that slowing dm trains for them would mean 
slowing the trams for SO other neighborhoods 
along, the lines. -That, it ; was argued, would 
disrupt Japan’s transportation network. 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 1985 



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ARTS /LEISURE 


Anouilh’s Holhouse Comedy Rings False in Open-Air Setting 


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By Sheridan Morlcy 

Intentatuval Herald Tnbune 

L ONDON — li is hard to think 
/ of a postwar comedy that did 
quire so much good to' quite so 
many careers as "Ring Round the 
Moon** when it first opened in Lot- 
don in 1950. Apart from cstablisb- 

THE LONDON STAGE 

ing Jean Anouilh in Britain, it gave 
(he Stratford partnership of Peter 
Brook (director) and Paul Scofield 
(star) their first big West End hit, 
created the career of Claire Bloom 
as a leading player, and set Marga- 
ret Rutherford up as the eccentric 
aunt she was to go on playing in 
movies for most of the rest of her 
life. 

As translated by Christopher 
Fry. then at the height of his poetic- 
drama fame, this was no ordinary 


icing-gun on gossamer,” and 
thought that Oliver Messers set far 
the flimsy conservatory in which 
Anouilh's young losers flirt and 
part was one of the best he'd seen. 

There was a Haymarket revival 
in the late 1960s with John Stand- 
ing. Nearly 20 years later we should 
be grateful to David ConviUe and 


l» l me an unlAe!;. latecomer. Never raisers. “Red Black and Ignorant" 


high on m> ibi of the dramatists 1 

would most like in spend eight rtronz on dunacr tx ; pJol. he is a ' a "nd "Die Tin Can People." have 

hours m a hoi studio with, and that olea* poet of the Holocaust. Very hw*n 

is what is bring asked of us by the curb ir. w has appears to have been 

three-month 


Royal Shakespeare Company at 
the Barbican Pit. In an uncharac- 
teristic lapse of quality control, the 
RSC has allowed Bond i presum- 
ably i n deference to such w ell-loved 
hits as “Saved" and "Lor") to 



don. But the years have not been 
kind to it, and the alfresco setting is 
less than ideal; constant references 
to a ghssrenclosed winter garden, 
and a feeling that all the characters 
arc hothouse plants wbo need to be 
inspected through frames, ore de- 
nied by the vast open spaces and 
the fact that it seems to take about 
20 minutes to cross the permanent 
set in the park. 

Nor do ihe planes on their way 
out of Heathrow help: when the 


days and nights m this subterra- 
nean studio space. 

The privilege of the marathon 
three-part production has hitherto 
been reserved for Shakespeare and 
Dickens and the Greeks, and in 
that august company Bond 


a three-month rehearsal period 
somebody should surety have 
asked him to cut about three hours 
of mcaadering text from this 
sprawling and often repetitive nu- 
clear uraler.. 

What we might (hen have had. 
and what can occasionally be 
glimpsed ia the first two short plays 
that make up this sequence; is' a 
chilly rerun of all Bond's old obses- 
sions about violence to babes in 
arms and the dangers of any orga- 
nization. even if it is only the nucle- 
ar farailv. These two curtain- 


been published, and read a lot bet- 
ter than they play. No! even lan 
McDiarmid can make much of pre- 
tending to be a charred monster on 
a park bench, though in ibe second 
play we do get some son of a coher- 
ent narrative about a group of sur- 
vivors wondering whether to let a 
potentially plague-carrying strang- 
er into their midst. 

Then, however, after a welcome 
intermission (during which you'd 
be well advised to inspect two stun- 
ning art exhibitions about Corn- 
wall and Patrick Heron in the Bar- 
bican Gallery, or to go home 
altogether) we are faced with a 


thrce-and-a-half-hour disaster 
called “Great Peace" in which 
Bond gives us a cut-price Mother 
Courage (Maggie Sieedl drifting 
through the post-nuclear landscape 
saying not a lot over and over 
again. .As an audience endurance 
test. Nick Hamms's production has 
a certain ghastly fascination. As 
drama, this trilogy leaves almost 
everything to be desired. 

It is only fair to add that ! saw it 
at the final preview. But fewer than 
16 hours elapsed between the end 
of that and the start of the official 
first day-into-night, and 1 think it 
unlikely that Bond achieved in that 
time the total rewrite that would be 
desirable here. 


French-coun try-housc-party come- out of Heathrow help: when the 
dy. Kenneth Tynan, in one of his P«k company is doing its usual 
earliest reviews, called it “a com- "Midsummer Night’s Dream, 


Recycling the Good Life at the Wellesley Dump 


pletc wedding cake, traced with an 


McffheAi* naSr, - 
.ttewalmidofconS f 
rtTOtmgthemasequS ! 

f- r - i 

iJNnsseibeh’s father An*. > 


% 


New Showtime at New York’s Apollo: 



3dy KoUck. Mi. Nussaff, ^ 
cabinet minister, has w»rJ - 

fbrput 18*eai ^ 

: of Israefi jurisdiction ote r ' 
to been accepted by qjj/: 
u^7be said -With KoftJ'i 

untctpal admjnistxa&QB i v 
.resentment But the fa - *: 
^arist bene against the n®^ l : 

actflmttheydoisujKoft*;- 

ighttist wbo tries to opo* : 

L taints of his environ mr ^ * 
jW with a human touch." ' 
added, “I like him immaa • 
'disagree with everythimi i 

r \%j 
jue personality, anoUw®; 

*t enabled Teddy to manii i 

n drum has been his abffiijr : 

is: bwn through the Jem* ; 

looprofit philanthropic «& ; 

^in^66to provide fondsl; 

ra, p%ys, libraries. eA™> 1 

and paries which the city to ; 

tad. Because the foundation ; 

h the gpvennnent it can tu : 

ickly. and with a mimraaf 

ishment the Jerusalem R»i 
more than S 140 mtQioB.lt [ 
jhilamhropics, thefounfoef 
lonale money to fund \ 

ising is enhanced by fBhdj 
e who have known bnodi 
ite with him. |j 

a former Israeli ambuss^ 
ad*. ‘‘Anyone Teddy doasi 
i. knowing, and aintne Jd- 
esjs-to know because iWrfc: 
tcr taxCL Whether h is FnaJ 
ten or Willy Brandt, thrcj 
aS personal friends of feS * 
tfi «R of them, renwdffli 1 
He is very thoughts* 
WByone.” r 

to lead bad bk*f . ; 
ippens after Teddf^‘K 
fee steam? ... f: 
Kxad Teddy," said u 
s,it’s the end of an ® 


ernsakanisoneofW*! 

of the city’s people 
y in which, m 
over all olhen uj *3 
i the long run. unless tpj 


sane an 


ices hold, uQj^.{ 01 Wi 
dignity of hnuti J" I 
Rabbi David HJJ, 
explosion « “ 

. 

giffiSfif-*; 

excerpiedfronTtet* 1 * : 


By NGchael Zwcrin 

liatnathmnl HmM Thb*te 

E LVIS PRESLEY, a "young, sdS-raw hayseed," 
sat 1 there night after night "transfixed by the 
pounding rhythms, the rfanritig and prancing, the 
sexual spectacle of rbythm-and- Blues matrwy ttkf Bo 
Diddley.” When the Beatles and the Reeling Stones 
fust came to the United States they west uptown to 
hear the sources of thdr ins^rarion. Jams Jqiliii 
caught a: show whenever Ae was in town. The Police 
beaded far the Apollo the first time they hit New 
York. ’ 

“Showtime at the Apollo" (Quartet Books, 322 
pages, 150 ffinstrations), Ted Fots Biography of the 
(heater on 125 th Street in Harlem that was once the 
mecca of black entertainment, has just been published 
in Britain. And last May. having been dark smee 1976, 
the Apollo itself reopened, refurbished for S5. 5 million 
as a-perfornung arts center with a cablo-TV stadia 
editing rooms, a 1,400-seat theater and a memorabilia 
museum. : ' 

An enacefr kkJced. qg a rccostitated Amateur 

offfifce anxtov. Thoonl/^g^^ng was a 
legendary character named Ptrto Rico who once es- 
corted contestants deemed unworth^by the audiroce 
offistage .with his hcok and cap ^ pistol. On the odier 

rSdcsa 


han[d thueinitxDdK ng 'annf iiw Jadoon fine, James 
Brown or Hla Rtzgerald — -all of whwn ^got thdr start 
cm Amatem Night at the Apollo — among them. 

Amaiear Ni^ was one in a series of events dial 
launched the combination reopening and 50th anni- 
versary celebration- The white som duo Hall and 
Oates perfonneda benefit for the United Negro Fond. 
“O^^vgnay much inWadtn^^ftu^^ 

-NBC-^iaped^ - the 

Apcdlo" special (hfanownhasjust acquired film rights 
to Fax's book.) And later this memth, BBC-TV wu air 
a twchparti^Mdlo doenmentary. 

Fo^s eathanstively researched book was carnally 
published in the Umted States by JEWt, Rinehart and 
Winston in 1983. Nearly ewenr black performer inter- 
viewed tdd him: “Dm Apollo was home." With its 
killing fnm shows a day, tbe^ "black Grand (Be 
or “uptown Met” has - also been called “the 
house? or ?the penitentiary.” The singer Dkmne War- 
wick^ ^says: “Toe theater ^was tezribte; drafty, dirty, 

: snmhy. — ^wfnl; and we loved every minute of sl" 

It was owned and run by Frank Sdnffimm, and later 
by his son Bobby, who told Fox: “Write about the way 
the Apollo realty was, the good and the bad.” There 
was bound to be an ambiguous relationship between 
blade performers and white Jewish management, but 
the ScrafTmansdid not fit into theeiploitariveclich&s. 
Thw tried to be part of the cammnmty, kept their ears 
to the ground to know what the commomty wanted. 
After a" riot in Harlem during vduch roost of 125th 
Street was trashed, the Apollo remained miraculously 
intact 

Joe Tex, Ella Fitzgerald, MHe Holiday, The Orioles 
— too many. to. mention - — got their start here. Once, 
“a guy in the house band heard some blind kid playing 
piano 1 and- singmg up a storm between shows radc- 
$tage. He told Bobby and they^ went to bear him and he 
was so good Bobby pm him m a couple of numbers in 
the show, and that was Ray Charles." 

White performers used the ApoDo as a research 
center: Martha 
theater 
form 


; A - wto r: 'r‘rctrtZ(i »»». * , 

S HOT CHOCOLATES I \ 

. i ■ *-• •:.« • ..»U’ » i .o i ‘ 

: l : •<»OVS fucov SMlIKi I’AOCUffE t ‘ 

' J1 • j ^wiMP JjwtfROfAW : 

Tilt AeK OKU.~4fcG-.ssP<K, Hl3uu!^6cVattV -*‘h 



Poster for 1936 ApoBo show. 

Harlem. They'd have a giri with a pencil and short- 
hand paper and steal comedy from all us boys.” Ed 
Sullivan scooted talent up there weddy. 

The Schiffmans booked white bands like Harry 
James, Woody Herman and Charlie Barnet during the 
swing eral One of the first white bandleaders to hire 
Made museums, Barnet wasparticularly papular with 
the mainly black audience. (Die white aumence gradu- 
ally diminished as Harlem grew racially tense.) The 
audience was pan of the snow. According to Fox, 
performing for them was like “schussmg downhill for 
the World Cup, raring at Le Mans." It was “an 
exhilarating but nerve-racking experience." Sammy 
Davis Jr put it: “It wasn’t just being accepted as a 
performer. It was .being accepted by your own 
pcxiplfc” 

Doors opened at 10 AAC: “Night workers, houso- 
wives and hooky-playing schoolchildren would (Eg 
deep for their nickels aim dimes and enter a dream 
world ... a little elegance to offset thdr dreary 
lives . . . where they were welcome to stay all day if 
they liked" for the swing, rhythm and blues, jaaz, 
gospel, comedy, dance, funk or soul 

aular with white 


schoolbook memories can usually 
fill in the lines that get drowned by 
the jets, but Fry’s poetic extrava- 
gances are inevitably less familiar, 
and it would help if one could al- 
ways hear them. 

Moreover a plot entirely depen- 
dent on one character playing twins 
requires some nifty backstage trick- 
ery and that too is hard to achieve 
in the middle of a park, which may 
well be why the otherwise admira- 
ble Patrick Ryecan makes an only 
minimal distinction between the 
two contrasted characters he is sup- 
posed to be playing. 

Margaret ta Scott is in cascading 
form as the old aunt, but Sarah 
Finch lacks the sense of budding 
stardom that is needed for the bal- 
lerina, and the pace of Conville’s 
production is often not so much 
slow as stopped. The open air 
seems to play hell with mood and 
tuning, though after a distinctly 
shaky start the evening did grow in 
confidence thanks largely to a mar- 
velously sinister turn from Michael 
Denison as the milli o nair e industri- 
alist and an equally strong one 
from Helen Lindsay as the balleri- 
na’s appalling mother. 

Having shamelessly lifted his 
plot from a mix of "Pygmalion” 
and “The Corsican Brothers.” 
Anouilh did have the grace to end 
his last act with a fireworks display, 
which of course the park manage s 
superlatively. Everything else 
about this production would how- 
ever improve considerably were it 
popped back indoors behind a pro- 
scenium march. 

□ 

Edward Bond has never rated 


By Dudley Gcmdinen 

Vo IV-ri Twws Ser-ice 

W ELLESLEY. Massachusetts 
— Summer is the time when 
residents of the historic Boston 
area show off the special sights of 
Massachusetts, so when Joseph J. 
In candela and his niece got back 
from Martha's Vineyard he took 
her to the Wellesley dump. 

“This is fabulous.” Laura 
Canes&a said. looking around at the 
manicured grounds, the green 
benches in the shade of locust trees 
and the neatly lettered bins, one for 
each element of household trash. 

Its formal name, reflecting rite 
town’s elevated approach to trash. 


is the Wellesley Recycling and Dis- 
posal Facility. But ‘“the dump" it 
commonly re mains 

To a verifiable extent, life in this 
highly educated, highly affluent 
college town of 27.000 in the sub- 
urbs of Boston revolves around the 
dump. People go there to leave 
things but stay to swap and social- 
ize, picking over one another’s 
trash and the events of the day. 

That morning Mrs. Thomas 
Kennedy, as she gave her name, 
dropped off a well-used badminton 
set Jn the "Re-usable Items Cor- 
ner" next to a microwave oven and 
an air-conditioner. Ingrid Morri- 
son took u home. 


The dump is a re gular forum in 
election campaigns for town select- 
men. but its influence reaches high- 
er, too. When Elliot L. Richardson, 
the patrician former U. S. attorney 
general ran (unsuccessfully) for 
the Senate last year, be took his 
candidacy to the dump. 

More routinely, though, this be- 
ing Wellesley, it draws residents 
rummaging for a good book. On 
the shaded bookshelves set up at 
the dump, people deposit what they 
have redd and lake home what oth- 
ers have left 

Wellesley has never had a gar- 
bage collection system. When the 
town incinerator at the dump uas 


shut down about 10 years ago be- 
cause of federal emission stan- 
dards. and an environmental group 
began lobbying for trash recycling, 
the rudiments of (he system came 
into being. 

Recyclable material is sold as 
salvage. There are bins for card- 
board, newspapers, magazines, 
milk cartons, paper bags, alumi- 
num foil plastic bottles of certain 
sizes and colors. There is a Good- 
will Industries trailer for old 
clothes, a bin for old tires — and a 
bin for simple household garbage. 

The dump made STS. 000 in sal- 
vage sales last year, said Fat Ber- 
dan. director of public works. 


AUTO SHIPPING 


were m the 



trademark- According to the black comedian 
Dewey (Pigmeat) Markham: “You oouldnt get into 
the -Saturday midnig ht show for the white comedians 
— MIhon Berie, Joey Adams — all the guys came to 


As Wade performers grew more 
a u dien c es, the Suprerces, James Brown, Stevie Won- 
der, Nancy Wilson and the others could earn much 
more money performing for mass white andiences in 
stadiums. Radio Qty Music Hall and Las Vegas. 
Though in the 1970s many lowered thdr prices out of 
gratitude; occasional favors were not enough. Die 
Apollo dosed its doors. 

Now that they are open again, Frands (Doll) Thom- 
as,, who estimates his age at “about 91," who came to 
woricat the Apollo as manager and technician 50 years 
up and was caretaker while it was dosed, says: 
“Performers learned something here in the old days 
that has almost died. How to throw love out to an 
audience and gpt it bade." 



Concertgebouw Renovation Work Begi 


. Reuters . 

A msterdam —a aty appeal 
.h!as' raised 35 million guilders 
'(about SH nuDion) for urgent, res- 
xoration woik on the Concertge- 
bonw, home of one of the world s 


foundations is begtanng, but Ger- 
dt Wagner. chairman of the appeal 
said funds for a complete renova- 
tion would be sou&l •. 

When the.imposing concert hflU. 
designed by Dolf van Gendt, was 
SSaoiSeSas. The concert hall completed m 1888, it was intended Mart* 1988. in the 
^dfSSdngonitscniin- to host 70,000 concengpecs at 100 bouv/s cent ennial year. 
- Minor wooden foundations, accord- performances. Today it has five 
jMroa survey con^Ieted two years thwx as many cOTCertsarrf half a 

million visitors. As a result, many 

^With the appears first target of the fittings need replacing. 

Work on the foundations wfll 


take at least a year, during which 
the Concertgebouw will stay open. 
If funds continue lo come in, resto- 
ration of the interior could begin in 
early 1987, Wagner said. It is heped 
that the prqect wifl be finished by 
March 1988. in the Concertgc- 


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ENTERTAINMENT 





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king 

Cellar 


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fa de n Afoehren 91 
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Special CondMam at U» Iwfag 
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Pufr-up aB orer Europe “ro7 ro-diips. 


TRANSCAR 17 nr da Fradtand. 75008 
fW Td 225 64 44. Met 839531 
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WORLDWIDE Cor 0 »l 
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Tx 31533 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


AUTO CONVERSION 


EPA / DOT 

GONVBESiONS 
» Custom broker oge/boncfc!0 senrioe 
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• Professoral wort using only Ihe 
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* Gg ra e uu d EPA / DOT approved 
CHAMPAGNE IMPORISMC, 

2294 North Pm RA, Hatfield. 
PA. 1*94* USA Tot 215 82268* 


ZURICH’S BBT 




LANCASTER 

Champs- Efy st es 
Aa oasis of caba 
in the heart of Paris 

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spawns 

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The bookstore 


is open in August 

every day 

from noon to 7.30 pm 


c .„ . u )74 u .orrfn from all countries and all urm s 
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fiction, essavs. documents. < lass* < ; 

'children's books, talking books. 


74 rue de Sein^ 

75006 Pans -Te!: 329 30 7S 




numem 


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7. fa Boeea aPatWer WJUB. 
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nuurm 


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MocMUene *e sUm re uon oe In tok 
fa F7U0. My. 36 IMfak miUi. 


mmm 


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Muurvi 


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Ut fart Tdx 727 WS7. 

Ofaanema hRfa M e ex pMre tafann. A 
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MwM* fahfa her. far ifaefa 
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wfafaed Bum. On NowvJ^m 6 Apm- 
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Fast njrrvaroind time. A1 work done 
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Hit 322234 201-4880667 


EPA/ DOT 

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OR For Free Conndtafion 


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LH.D. Mercedes Tea Free 
Limousines 3ft' & 44“ 

Armored cars and tmusines 
Coach budr cars 
Other moles & probes 

Over 100 unrts m stock 
World wide delivery 
Direct horn source 
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Tel: London UOfl) 629 7779 
Telex (51) BK6022 TEAS G. 

Trasco London Ltd 

6667 Pork km. London W.1 

S w uw rl ad - UR - W. Germcny 


US AUTOMOBBES 
EXTRA ORDINAi RES 
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H you are fa owner of a Sene* 
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prowde rf s endee c a d eptwe port * yi 
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o: 469370 MCE MC 




PORSCHE, fer u nmed iom delivery 

ROM STOCK 

Beet enrvtc* rfaniin g.. fc—r—fa . 
bend, Mtnmn ie e i n USA 

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W Gem, tel (0^9-232351. «lx 411559 


10 YEARS 

We DefiMe- Can to the World 

TRANSCO 

Keepmo o constonr nock of rixjre than 
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Send for free mutocclor aroog. 
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2030 Atfawp, Bdaure 
Tel 323/542 6240.1b 3525? TBANS B 


DAWAJI TRADE 

INTL DELIVERY 

We keep o leaesraek of 

most COT OTQAJS 

Tel (Q'643 55 !3 
Telex 65653 
42 rje Lera. 

1050 BnAMsi*. 


ALTOS TAX FREE 

OCEANWIDE 
MOTORS GmbH 

Smoe 1972 experienced cor voder for 
Mercedes, Porsche. BMW. Immefate 
dekvery. Full service import /expert, 
U5. DOT & B»A. shtepng fertoorw 
and deofa. Oeeenwafe Motor-. GmbH. 
Tcrsteegenrir. % 4 Duesseldorf, W. 
Germany (0} 211-434646. lb Bsfcti. 

SJROPORT TAX 
FRS CARS 

Cd or write for free entoton. 

Box 12011 

Rotterdam Airport. HeBond 

Te^rf62SJ77 

Telex «I71 EPCAk NL 

TAX FRS CARS 
P.CT. 

Al make*. c4 model*, hrond new 
hdefa. 147, 2018 Antwerp, Befaym 
Tel iJni 36 00. Tl* 35546 PHCA&T B 
Send USS5 for catalog 

BMW M 1 RACING DBVBl 
advries you: Buy your BMW, new or 
laeet AfOnee, irve it .leave itMukh 
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TAX Free can, d mefas & model*. 
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85 MHKSJE5 380 SEC, KJy 
oqjippBd. mekA c, Win, brond- 
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NEWMBKBB.BMW.8HD tax free 
export IX (09331 76099. Tlx.- 312242 

LEGAL SERVICES 

DOMINICAN DIVORCES. Bax 20802 
Santo Docxngo. Domiracan Repabic. 

LOW COST FUGHTS 



HOTELS 

SWITZERLAND 

LUCERN, GRAND HOTa EUROPE 
■ ho* vocunde*. Tel 041 / 

301111 Tehx 72657 Switetond. 

uax. 


TRANSMUNU BBGMM, 2? Geitel- 
sebaaa. B-22*l Zoersd. Arawn Tri; 
01384.1054 Tlx 32302 T/cram i In 
stock: Mercedes. BMW. ASOl 


TUDOR HOTB, 304 East 42nd Sl, 
New York City. I" (oshwnchie. East 
Side Manhattan. 1/2 black from UN. 
Undo hprn 570; dcwUe* hem 535. 
Upon sh o wing this ad- 20% fasurt. 
TV: 422951. TeL 212-9864800. 


HOLIDAYS* TRAVEL 


THE MAGNIFICENT 
STELLA 
SOLARIS 

7 AND 14 DAY CRUISB 

To fa Greek Islands. Turkey. 
Soling EvvyTfondoy from Piraeus 

THE YACHT-UKE 
STB1A 
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3 AND 4 DAY CRUISB 

To fa Grerii Ufad* & Turkey. Sating 
every Monday & Friday from Piraeus 

Phase apply tojraa T rpvel Agent ar : 

X Kar. Serves Si, Athens 10562 
Tefac: 215621, Phone 3228883. 


Paris let 265 80 36 
Munich tek 395 613 
Geneva tek 327 110 
Zurich tefe 39? 36 55 


SAILING TOUR HOOD 38 YACHT. 
Greek Aeaeaa Sea, need 2 more Aug. 
11 - Sept lVS750- Munch 98 32 WT 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


Cruise in Elegance 

to the GREEK ISLANDS 
EGYPT, ISRAEL & TURKEY 

CHOICE OF 7-4-3-2-1 DAY 
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fflOflW) 

THE MODBtN taXURY SHIPS • 
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ATLAS, OGEANUS. H&MES 
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1213) 


FOR SALE & WANTED 


FURNITURE fc ELECTRICAL ap- 
p&enns- Pari* 325 08 91 


BOOKS 


FOR YOUR STATESIDE BOOK Needs, 
write or pfane BOOK CALL, c/a 
New Canaan Bookshaft 59 Bra St, 
New Canoai CT 06840 USA. 203- 
966-5470. Mail order* welcome. 



of International Herald 
Tribune readers own 
Stocks, Shares, Bonds 
and Commodities. 


Trib ads work. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

satvia 

USA & WORLDWIDE 

Head office m New York _ 
330 W. 56ft Sl. N.Y.C 10019 US t 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAXNt CRHXT CARDS AND 
OCCXS ACCEPTS 
Mm to Me mb e rrfi lpi AvafeUe 

This ti wred-w faik tg service has 
been fefarsd as & tap 6 mod 


USA 8 fafanefaned news meda 
fa aid TV. 


* USA & TRANSWORLD 

A-AMER1CAN 

ESCORT SERVICE. ^ 
EVStYWraE YOU ABE OR GOi- 

1-813-921-7946 

Cd free From LL1: 14X0-237-0392 
Cat free from Herd* 1 - 800 - 2S7 0892 
Lewefl Ecnem weleomn you badt) 


CAPRICE 

BCORTSaVKE 

IN VBN YORK 

TEL- 212-737 3291. 


LONDON 
KENSINGTON 

ESCORT SaVfCE 
10 KBtSNGTON CHURCH ST. W8 
IEU 937 9136 OR 937 9133 
Al ewjor oedR cords uaeptod. 


LONDON 

BBGRAVIA 

Escort Service. 

Tel: 736 5877. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 

LONDON 

Portmen Escort Agency 

67 Oriftam Sfart, 
Usndoo WT 

Tek 486 3734 or 486 1158 
AS mater emit card* accepted 


* LONDON * 

EXECUTIVE ESCORT SERVICE 
01-229 2300 or 01-229 4794 


ARISTOCATS 

teedfa Escort Service 
128 Wfgmae &. lartte W.l. 

All mayor Crrtfc LBTdl Accepted 

Tet 437 47 41 / 47<2 
12 noon - ndnght 

LONDON 

Af® HEATHROW 

ESCORT SERVICE OI-834 6601 

REGENCY NY 

WORttiWK ESCORT SERVICE 
212-438-4027 or 753-1*64 

MAYFAR CLUB 

GUSE SBVta from 5pm 
ROTTBIDAM TO) 10-254155 
THE HAGUE (O) 7060 79 96 

MADRID INTL 

BcORTSStVJCT 
TEL 2456541. CRHXT CARDS 

** GENEVA-FIRST ** 

DAILY ESCORT SERVICE 
Tel: 022/32 34 1* 

+ WBXZND + TRAVEL 

ZURICH-GENEVA 

GBttBn BCORT ffitVTCE 
TSj 01/363 08 64. (Q2/344I86 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


AMSTERDAM 

* JASMINE * 

Escort Service- Tefc 020-366655 


ZURICH 

A1BCIS ESCORT SERVICE 
reu 01-47 SS 82 / 69 55 04 


ZURICH 

Gnfatine Enart Service 
Tel; 01/252 61 74 


ROME CLUB EUROPE ESCORT 
Guide Serytee-Tel: 06/589 2604- 5E 
1146 (from 4 pm to 10 prtj 


GENEVA ESCORT 

senna. Tel: 46 09 28 


•■•MADRID CARM0J** 

Escort Service Tek 2330X19 


GB4EVA * BEAUTY* 

ESCORT SBtVKL 022/29 51 30 


**ZURJCH 558720 ** 

PRIVATE TOURISM GUIDE SBtVKZ 


r AMSTERDAM SHF * 
ESCORT 8 OUK5. 020-227137 


******GENEVA BBT 


, CHBSEA ESCORT SESVKE. 

51 Bea u dwwp Ploce. London SWl 
T ik 01 584 6513/749 (4-12 pm] 


AMSTERDAM BARBARA 

ESCORT SBMCE. 020-954344 


LONDON TOP BCOftT SBtVia 


■awF** 1 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 

RANKRIRr AREA. SABBIFS fe- 
mde and male bdngurt Escort and 
Travel Service. TefcfflW-62 88 05. 
GeA cord* oaxsrfea. 

fMNKRMT. + SUOOUNDMGS 
Caroline's Escort + Travel Service. 

Spanrsh pro- 
ton. Tefc (0691 43 57 63. 

DUSSBDORF - COLOGNE - BOM4 
Esduave Eseort + Travel Sennca 
Tefc 0211-6799863. 




■*yj J » 

MM^iliiii^ 








NEW YORK: RBCF* Escort Service. 
TeL 2)2.581-1946. 









FEW YORK MONiQUE. CHBSDNA 
Beth Escort Senwa 212-807-1756. _ 


ZURICH LORN ESCORT SSV1CE. 
Tel. 01/ 69 SB 71. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


BRUSfflf OIANTAL ESCORT Ser. 
wer Tot 02/520 23 65. 


DBCBMNG BCORT SBtVKE Ion- 
don (01) 961 0154. 


LONDON BAYSWATER ESCORT Ser- 
vice. TeL 0? 229 0776. 


LONDON FRENCH/ GERMAN Alb- 
cnee Euort Service. Tek 381 6852 


MADRID saaCTIONS ESCORT Ser. 
W 4011507 Ge*c»dk 


MACRO LOLA ESCORT SERVICE. AB 
Cretkt Card*. 2331596 


MADRID MALE ESCORT SERVICE 
2331633. Credt Cent*. 


VB4NA CD - ESCORT SERVICE 
0222/92 05612 


COtOGNE/DUSSBDORf/Bom Erv 
stehaoortierv.ee. 0221/55 57 8& 


FRAMQRJRT AKA. SIMONES Ej- 
eon & Travel SftvKe. (0)69 ■ 62 S< 32 


089/33 50 20 or 089/35 94 212 


cat 


wee. TeL 069-68 34 42. 


via-WP/SMoa 


TeL 91 84 59 


Service gp] 20-964376 


OMWA AMSTERDAM ESCORT 
GuKte Service. TeL 1020) 762842 


Seotteh Etcart Senate 


Gwde Service. TeL 22 69 54 



vice. TeL 040/58 65 35. 


vice. TeL 994 6682 


Service M 20329716 


bcort Service. TeL 02/7317^41 


ayfajiaf^Y 










































\ 



Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 1985 




I NYSE Most Actives 



VaL 

Hies Low 

LOW 

a>*. 

BnkAm 


IS* 

is 

ISW 


Ethyl a 


23V 

23W 

23* 


SteafCo 

1— Mi 

33V 


37V 

+ V 

PonAm 

21932 

7W 





21308 

22* 

221% 



mgmuo 

185® 

23ft 

23V. 

23ft 


AT&T 

J 





Chryslr 

I23B2 

37 

35* 

35W 

— IW 

MoryfC 

11046 

13W 




MHSUt 

1X13 

12 

11* 

11* 



1C754 

131* 




EosiAlr 

10497 





SFeSoP 


33 




NlSeml 


14ft 




Gush 


saw 

snv 

51* 

— V 



Dow Jones Averages 


on* Hbta 


Last Cbs- 


IMul 134588 I350J2 ITT? y? 1325.16— 21.73 
TTOM 6?L17 *W8S tfVS «171- 
Ufll mjl 154-44 1510 1543*— 0.W 


Comp 555.73 S5U* 54U6 S4J75 — B*1 


NYSE Index 


Composite 
Industrials 
Tramp. 
Uitmtea 
Flu 


HM Low One Ofti 

11037 Will lOtfll — 1.46 
12L64 13434 I24J4— 1J3 
11237 lliun TlOO —233 

sta sue ssse— M4 

115.91 11431 11431 — 1.4* 


Bands 

Utilities 

Industrials 


Qm Wh 

Too —an 

7L22 +M? 

8172 -0.14 





1 ! NYSE Diaries i 


Close 

Prav. 


2*6 

458 

Declined 

1354 

1156 


JE 

410 


2037 

2024 

New Highs 

70 

19 

New Law 




1B72SJ10 


Volume down 

75.908,120 



Odd- Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Aus. 5 . 
Aus-2 . 
Aua 1 _ 
July 31 


July 3D . 


-Included In tfw saws flsvres 


BOV 50ta* *StlYT 

142.131 487332 1/07 

ishaq 404382 <bs 

I7&347 3 4£M7 1M 

184714 400512 1345 

174337 42X7*3 1JS9 


Tuesdays 

MSE 

(losing 



mnaw 

Prey. 4 PAL raL 

7M1MOO 

fYev coasol Mated dose 

9&SBU50 


Tobias Indude Itw nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street and 
da net reflect lata trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 



HMgnm 

HU* Low Stock 


Ufa. YM. PE 


Sb. 

uesHhtfiLaw 


ciw 

0110110 


35) 


23ft 16 AAR 
. 1714 Oli. AG5 
14ft m AMCA 
' 21ft 13 AMF 
■ 13* 129k AMF Ml 
50* 24* AMR S 

22ft 1814 AMR Pt 218 «A 

25ft 2214 ANRPt 267 1M 

23 If ANRPt 212 105 

14W 784 APL 

lift 43V A5A 280 44 

27 12ft AVX J2 23 20 

28ft 17ft AZP 272 ITJ 7 

40 3414 AM Lab 170 

2Sft 70 AcCoVW s 50 


2414 13V, AcmeC 
Iflft 7ft AoneE 

19 15ft AdaEx 

20 13ft AdmMI 

l*ft 8ft AdvSn 
41ft 22ft AMO 
12ft 6ft Advest 
1544 Oft Aerflex 
49ft 31ft AetnLf 
57ft 53ft AML Pi 
37ft 18ft Ahmra 
57 42 Air Prd 

24ft 15 AlrbFrt 


*9 22ft 21ft 21ft— ft 
BS 16ft 16 16ft — ft 
7 12V 12V, 12ft — ft 
205 13ft 13ft 13ft — ft 
B 1314 1314 1314— 14 
3404 50ft 48ft 48ft— 1 
4 22ft 2214 22*4— ft 

1 23ft 23ft 23ft 

2 33% 2014, 20ft + ft 
35 10ft 10 10ft 

953 44 43>b 43ft + ft 

164x14 1314 13ft 

... *33 25 2444 2414— 14 

26 15 1583 55ft 54 54ft— 1ft 

2.1 17 351 23ft 23ft 73ft— ft 


40 It 51 15ft 15ft 15ft— ft 

-32U 4.1 10 IT 8 714 7ft— ft 

1.92*103 41 IB 17ft II 

.32 1.9 7 24 17 16ft 16ft 

JJt 44 19 146 12ft 12 12 + 14 

17 4539 29ft 28ft 29 — ft 

.12 1.4 IV 138 814 8 ft 8ft 

13 104 1414 14 1416 + ft 

264 53 16 2341 47ft 44ft 46ft— ft 

5J9elU 2 56 54 56 

131 19 0 I486 31ft 30* 3014— ft 
120 21 12 718 5*44 55ft 55ft— ft 

60 28 12 248 211* 21ft 21ft + ft 


NYSE Prices Fall on Rate Fears 


nMmm 
HWlM Shell 


Pw.vw.re 


as. 


United Press International 


NEW YORK. — Fear of rising interest rates 
sent prices on the New York Stock 


into their sharpest decline in a year and a 
The Dow Jones industrial average 
21.73 lo 1,325.16. the sharpest one-day 
since Feb. 8, 1984. The Dow transportation 
average plummeted 13.23 to 681.41, the biggest 


drtgnn nearly a year. 


. m 

1 AIMOOS 



452 

ZW 

2 

2 


23* AIOP a 

£740 9J 


1 

28 

28 

78 — * 

8* 


J7 IU 


8 

7* 

7* 

7* + to 

82 

63W AIOP a 

9JD 11 J 


67b 78 

77 

77 —1 

86 

47* AlDP a 

974 117 


56b B4Vk 

83 

83 -2 

74 

sa* ajop a 

H.16 117 


22b 72V 

7IW» 

70W— 1* 

' 75 

57 Alppa 

828 117 


30b 71* 

71 W 

71ft + * 

tow 

11W AlOOKt 1J4 7J 

10 

36 

14* 

14V 

14V — * 

24* 

lift AfSkAlr 

.16 J 

9 

701 

25* 

74 

24*— ft 


HM> AlbrM* 


17 

29 




33V 

X* Albtsns 

.76 £7 

12 

548 

29* 

28V 

28*— * 


31ft 23ft AKon 1.20 4J 27 
38ft 27ft AlcoSId 120 32 12 
22 17 AlexAlX 160 17 

29ft Km, Aiexdr 31 

89ft 77U AllsCp 1-541 20 24 
. 2*ft 24ft AloCppf 28* 102 
. 28ft 90ft Alfllnt 160 AO 
20ft 15ft Alain of 219 114 
98 85 Alai ptC1125 114 


1904 2714 24ft 2**k— ft 
115 37ft 37ft 37ft — ft 
1410 28 27ft 2714 
21 24*0 23ft 23ft—l , 
98 7BVr 7714 77ft— ft 

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lines outnumbered advances by a 3-1 
ratio. Volume totaled 1019 milli on shares, up 
from 79.6 million on Monday. 

The market opened mixed and drifted lower 
until it became apparent that bidding for the 
Treasury’s new securities had been “cautious.” 
Stocks then moved lower on the expectation 
that to attract buyers, yields on the 1(>- and 30- 
year securities being sold this week would have 
to rise. 

The market’s failure to retain sui 
1,340 level triggered a number of 
at major brokerage houses, sending 
into its skid. 


at the 


market 


“The 1*340 area on the Dow was just a 
temporary resting period for the sellers before 

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we went lower,'* said Alfred Goldman of A.G. 
Edwards, St Louis. 

“Aggressive market participants should be 
positioned for a lest of support between 1,280 
and 1.300," he said. 

Peter Fumiss of Drexd Burnham Lambert 


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was the “handwriting on the wall” 
Tor the market's move down. 

Mr. Goldman forecast the market would 
move to the 1,280-1 ,300 area on the Dow over 
the next two to three weeks before attempting a 
late summer rally. 


But he said without some concrete develop- 
ments on cutting the federal budget deficit or 
some signs that an economic pickup is more 
yh.m “an economist's pipedream," the market 
would settle into a “boring and frui 
ing range in the 1.250 to I *350 area. 1 

Harry Villec of Sutro & Co., Palo Alto, dis- 
agreed. Though the market could go as low as 
1,240. it wiD more likely break below 1300 and 
bounce from the 1,280-level, he said. 

Forecasting 1*500 for the Dow by the end of 
the year, Mr. Villec said the current move down 
provides “a fantastic buying opportunity.” 

' BankAmerica Corp. was the most active is- 
sue, falling 1 to ISft after cutting its dividend 
for the first time in S3 years. 

Stocks of some other major money center 
banks also weakened. Chase Manhattan Rank 
lost ft to 56, Citicorp % to 47, Chemical Bank % 
to 39% and Manufacturers Hanover % to 3 6%. 

Ethyl Corp. was the second most active issue, 
adding ft lo 23ft. 

Beatrice Cos. followed, tacking on' ft to 32ft 
as it continued its climb following the ousting of 

its eha irman James L DutL 

Among airlines. Pan American World Air- 
ways finish ed unchanged at 7 in active trading. 
Other airlines felL Eastern Airlines lost ft to 
I Ift, UAL Inc. ft to 57ft AMR Corp. 1 to 48ft 
and Delta 1 to 48ft. 

Other transportation issues also weakened. 

folk Southernfell 2ft*tc?67ft and Burtington 
Northern lost 1ft to 63ft. 

. TWA lost ft to 22ft after New York investor 
Carl C. Icahn raised his stake in the earner to 
40.61 percent. 


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Grow Group 

Awtgrip, Devoe, Amerrtone, three of our welMtnown brand ■ names. 


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^^Europeaii Executives 
J®rotoArtefor Guidance 

! •/ > By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

■‘ : - »V ; 'jlii'te International Herald Tribute 

T^l COr Poratwns are sending executives 

"* ^ -* - 

M^s see 

Executive LeSship 
Maaachiueto, Md 


Page 9 


lias seminars are 
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Tennessee. 

■-V -And although Europeans 
arewiparenUy morereluctant 
to finance their execa lives’ 
jAflosophical or cdtural ac- 
tivities, there are some courses 
offering a respite from techni- 
. caV Snanciai or management 
•riffling. . 

_.The Geneva-based Institute for International Management 
:■ VMJJ. «« of Europe’s leading business schools, givesanannual 
semmar to btnnS directors on foreign-policy issues, international 
ixsd&ano social pobdes. No philosophy or literature courses are 
on offer there, 

■P too* what I need to know about business. What I like about 
tins seminar b that I can get current thinking about foreign- 
pquiq^ issues for i n stance I don’t have tin*p to analyze day-to- 
day, says Henri Pradier, the drief executive of Shdl Franeaise 
SA, the French subsidiary of Royal Dutch/ SheD GrouprHe 
attended an IMX seminar. 

A LIBERAL arts cunicuhina for executives is offered by the 
Salzburg Se m i n ar in Austria. This year, the seminar in- 
cludes a course in contemporary American literature, 
tdecom m u n i ca tio ns, trade policies and UJS.-Europcan relations. 
Created by three Harvard professors in 1947, the seminar draws 
450 persons to its 10 annual sessions. But only a third are 
corporate man a ger s. The rest are academics and cavil servants. 

“We have to work at persuading European corporations to 
send their people here. They wonder why they should send 
executives non rather than to more f«4*nirat instituti o ns , ” says 
Thomas B. Ragle, director of the Salzburg Seminar. “We try to 
bring in midcareer executives who win be in leadership posi- 
tions.’* 

IBM Europe and thwKreditftnitffllt f»r WiwW »iifhfln t a F pmlt - 
furt-based development bank that finances West German invest- 
ments and exports to developing countries, send their executives 
to courses that have some relevance to their businesses. They find 
it hard to justify a seminar's cost — one week in Salzburg costs 
SI, 000 -—-if it has no immediate benefit for the company. 

“The course they attend should have some beanng on our 
work/ 1 says Konrad Busse, a Kredxtanstalt adviser who has sent 
staff to the seminar for the past 14 years. “The point is not the 
money, it? s the time. To spare one of our best people for a session 
of up-. to four weeks is not ea sy. v . 

. British Petroleum Co. PLC sends one or - two of its legal 
executives to the SakbcrgSeminar’s course on UJS- Iaw and legal 
institutions because of BPs grinring business involvement in the 
United States. “We don’t send our executives to get a better 
appredation erf-operaand the arte. We b^evtthal the education 
process up to the age of 21 takes care of that,** says Roger Often, 
director- trf hnman resources at BP- in London. 

For European executives,- theseseminars are like melting pots, 
providing a neutral ground for pohticaQy antagonistic actors 
from many countries to exchange views. - -- 

Luigi Di Paolo, director of corporate staffing at ITl Europe in 
Brussds, attended the Salzburg seminar on tdfaxmunnmcatioos 
in June: He was interested in exploring the problem of excess 
labor due to new technologies. “1 didn’t get the answers I was 
looking for” be smd. “In that sense you can say it wasn’t worth it. 
But, on the other hand, it’s a great forum where views can be 
exchanged." 


Lloyd’s 
Members 
Fail Test 

Record Number 

Called Insolvent 

By Bob Hagerty 

Inlmtatwnal HenuJ Tribune 

LONDON —Lloyd’s of London 
said Tuesday that a record number 
of its members failed to pass their 
annual solvency us t 

The high failure rate reflects 
huge losses facing some members 
of the insurance exchange and alle- 
gations that part of the hisses arose 
through fraud. 

Ian Hay Davison, chief executive 
of UoycTs, said the 300-year-old 
exchange was prepared to use its 
reserves if necessary to cover the 
liabilities of the distressed mem- 
bers. 

“Lloyd’s solvency is as impreg- 
nable as it ever was,” be asserted at 
a news conference. 

Lloyd’s said 517 of its 26,000 
members had failed to submil 
property audited solvency certifi- 
cates, required once a year to show 
that members can cover any lasses 
on insurance underwritten in their 
names. 

The assets pledged to Lloyd’s by 
these members, or “names,” fell 
short of projected losses by a total 
of £65.5 million (SB8.4 nuflion). 

A year ago, 120 members failed 
ih^w^but about two-thirds of 

end. Mr^^^son^rautioned^^l 
the percentage of members who ul- 
timately pass this year would not 
necessarily be so high. 

Those who did not meet last 
week's deadline for passing are be- 
ing riven another 28 days to show 
sufficient assets. 

If they fail to do so, the members 
are to be suspended from under- 
writing. 

Most Lloyd's members are 
wealthy individuals who are not 
involved directly in the insurance 
. business but seek profits by pledg- 
their wealth to bade pobdes 
about 385 syndicates, man - 
>y “working” members of 
yd’s. 

profits are often high, but 
when losses occur members are lia- 
ble to their last penny if necessary. 

' Lloyd’s said 325 of the members 
< who failed the test belong to syndi- 
cates managed by Richard Beckett 
■Underwriting Agencies Ltd, or 
. RBUA, wnki was formerly known 
^as PCW Underwriting Agencies 
'lid. and is owned by Minet Hold- 
ings PLC, a British insurance bro- 


hnbers of the RBUA sysdi- 
(Continued on P&ge 11, CoL 4) 


W. German Biotech a Late Starter 

But Concerns 
Are Confident of 
Long-Term Role 

By Warren Gctler 

Itamuiumol Herald Tribune 
FRANKFURT — Despile its 
heavyweight status in the world's 
chemical and pharmaceutical in- 
dustries, West Germany has yet 
to make iu muscle fdt in the 
promising arena of biotechnolo- 
gy- 

Being a late starter, however, 
has failed to unleash a sense of 
panic. 

Although start-up companies 
in the United States and Japan 
have been quicker to realize the 
industrial potential of genetic- 
engineering breakthroughs, ex- 
ecutives of West German chemi- 
cal giants say that they are 
confident that the market will be 
long in maturing, allowing (hem 
to bring their financial clout and 
broad technical expertise to bear. 

“At Hoechst, there’s not much 
talk about short-term in vestment 
in biotech.” said Klaus Weisser- 
xnd, Hoechsi’s chief of research. 

“Instead, we think in terms of a 
long-range program under what 
we call Tu-chem.’ " 

Robert Hides, president of 
Ceres Co„ the first major genet- 
ic-engineering company to 
emerge in the United States, said 
big West German and other Eu- 
ropean chemical groups “ulti- 
mately can be extremely compet- 
itive —it’s just a matter of time. 

They’ve got the money to put 
things together” 

In the meantime, one of the 



Biotechnology research at Hoechst AG. 


best kept secrets among Germa- 
ny’s chemical triumvirate — 
Hoechst AG, Bayer AG and 
BASF AG — is who has been 
talking to whom in the United 
States, as West German compa- 
nies scramble to establish re- 
search and licensing agreements 
with American biotech compa- 
nies that currently have a com- 
petitive edge. 

“We’re talking with a lot of 
American biotech companies, 
but I won’t say with whom or 
about which products,” said one 
BASF executive, echoing the 
competition. 

The allure of biotechnology 
today is that it promises to be a 
cost-efficient way of mass pro- 
ducing often rare substances 
through the use of microorgan- 
isms. Genetic engineering, or 
gen&spliring, is biotech’s now 
long-established tooL 

By placing specific genetic ma- 
terial of a desired substance into 
a host organism, genetic engi- 
neers are able to replicate the 
substance on a large scale and in 


pure form. Purity has taken on 
new significance because biotech 
companies are raring to produce 
a genetically engineered version 
of Facto: VIII, a blood-clotting 
agent produced from human 
blood plasma. Because vast 
quantities of human plasma are 
needed to make Factor VIIL 
there is a risk that potentially 
lethal blood viruses, such as 
AIDS, would be contained in the 
plasma. 

Because of a lengthy process 
for regulatory approval, com- 
bined with a market that will 
lake time to define, Hoechsi’s 
Mr. Weissermel said major fi- 
nancial returns on investment in 
biotech cannot be expected until 
the 1990s and beyond. 

By the year 2000, the world 
market for biotechnology prod- 
ucts in the medical sector alone 
could reach $25 billion, up from 
the current level of $100 million 
to $200 million, according to es- 
timates by SRI International, a 
California-based consulting 
firm. The second most-promis- 
ing growth market, the agricul- 
tural sector, was expected to be 
about $8 billion by the turn of 
the century, SRI predicts. 

Luther H. Smithson, head of 


SRI's biotechnology division, 
said a British biotech group, 
Celhech, has a jump on its Euro- 
pean competition, having 
emerged five years ago — well 
before independent biotech ven- 
tures perked up in West Germa- 
ny, France and elsewhere in the 
past two years. 

He said Switzerland, with its 
strong pharmaceutical industry, 
will run head-to-head with West 
Germany in the race to comer a 
segment of the biotech market, 
while France will need tocreatea 
larger pool of its own genetic 
engineers working in industry if 
it js to stay competitive. 

“Our strength is that, indepen- 
dent of cycuca] swings in the 
economy, we are in a position to 
invest steadily, ” Mr. Weissermel 
said. Hoechst’s biotech invest- 
ment is focused on both blood- 
related pharmaceutical products 
and crop-protection agents. 

Hoechst, one of the world's 
largest pharmaceutical concerns, 
is investing 152 mfllkui Deutsche 
marks ($535 million) this year in 
its biotech programs, up from 
125 million DM in 1984. 
Hoechst's investment, Mr. Weis- 
(Continued on Page 13. CoL 6) 


BankAmeriea 
Cuts Dividend 
By Nearly Half 


The Asuxmed Preu 

SAN FRANCISCO — BanfcA- 
merica Corp. has reduced its quar- 
terly dividend on its common stock 
to 20 cents a share from 38 cents, 
marking its first decrease since 
1932. 

The corporation posted a sec- 
ond-quarter loss of S33S million. 
The loss, primarily caused by a 
huge increase in its reserves for bad 
loans, was one of the largest ever 
for a U.S. financial company. 

BankAmeriea, the second-larg- 
est U.S. bank holding concern, is 
the parent company of Bank of 
America, the Largest U.S. bank in 
terms of deposits and the second- 
largest in asset-terms. 

The dividend reduction was rec- 
ommended by management and 
approved by the board of directors 
during a meeting late on Monday 
attended by H. Joe Selby, acting 
U.S. comptroller of the currency. 
The cm was announced following 
the nine-hour board meeting. 

Mr. Selby’s office recently com- 
pleted a four- month examination 
of Bank of America. The findings 
of the audit were presented to the 
board but details were not avail- 
able. 

It is the company's first com- 
mon-stock dividend decrease since 
1932, a BankAmeriea spokesman 
said. 

“We are keenly aware that a re- 
duction in the dividend will be dif- 
ficult for many of our shareholders, 
and consequently this was a very 
hard derision [or us," said Samuel 
H. Anna cost, president and chief 
executive officer. 

The company had previously 
been paying 38 cents a share since 
1980. 

Mr. Armacost said the reduction 
shifted that key parts of the UJS. 
economy, which have a major im- 
pact on the corporation’s loan port- 
folio, “remain under considerable 
stress and are responding unevenly 
to the improvement in general eco- 
nomic conditions.” 

He added that the dividend re- 
duction is "one of a number at 
ongoing actions focused on maxi- 
mizing the corporation’s ability^to 
generate profitable growth and 
products for customers." 

The other actions include “the 
sale of assets that no long fit the 
corporate strategy, continued re- 
ductions in the growth of operating 
expenses and the vigorous pursuit 
of new revenue opportunities,” Mr. 
Armacost said. 


The bank is presently seeking a 
buyer for its headquarters building 
in central San Francisco and an- 
other major building in Los Ange- 
les. Sale of the San Francisco world 
headquarters is expected to pro- 
duce around S5D0 million. 

At Monday's meeting, ihe board 
declared dividends on the corpora- 
tion's preferred stock, which are set 
by formula or fixed. They were 
51.16875 for Series A preferred 
stock; SI .8375 for Series B pre- 
ferred stock; and S0.71S75 for spe- 
cial series preferred stock. 

Dividends on the corporation's 
common shares will be paid on 
Aug. 30 to shareholders of record 
Aug. 15. Preferred dividends will 
be paid on Aug. 31. also to share- 
holders of record Aug. 15. 

The dividend cut follows i;tM 
month’s announcement by Bank ol 
America that a reorganization of ii:- 
world banking division would elim- 
inate 2,000 jobs, or about 10 per- 
cent of the division's staff. 


Rates at ’83 Loic 
As UJS l Treasury 
Auctions Notes 

. The Aavaaied Press 

WASHINGTON - Yields ! 
on three-year Treasury notes j 
fell in Tuesday’s auction to the 1 
lowest level since 1983. 1 

The U.S. Treasury Depart- 
ment sold S8.5 billion in three- 
year notes at an average yield of 
953 percent, down from 10 per- 
cent at the last auction, held on 
May 15. 

The rate was the lowest since 
9.48 percent for three-year 
notes on May 16, 1983. 

The sale, which attracted 
bids totaling $205 billion, is the 
first in a series of auctions the 
government is holding this 
week to raise a record $21.75 
billion in new debt financing 

In addition to the $8 5 billion 
in threo-year notes, the depart- 
ment will auction $6.75 billion 
in 10-year notes on Wednesday. 
On Thursday, the Treasury will 
auction $6_5 billion in 30-year 
bonds. 


j Currency Rates 


Brazil’s Economic Boom 
Causes Concern at IMF 


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.. . By Juan de Onis 

Las Angela Tima Service 

t RIO DE JANEIRO — Four 
months after the restoration of ci- 
vilian government in Brazil, the 
largest marketplace in Latin Amer- 
ica, an unexpected economic singe 
is under way. 

Automotive factories are adding 
new workers and night shifts to 
raise production and meet domes- 
tic ana foreign c o n s u me r demand. 

Sales of tractors and farm equip- 
ment are up, and fanners are Har- 
vesting abundant crops under gen- 
erous government credit and 
price-support programs. 

The major private banks are all 
reporting large profits for the first 
half of the year. Interest rates have 
kept ahead of inflation rates. 

Unemployment in the big indus- 
trial centers is down, and wage 
earners have more purebaang pow- 
er as a result of the slowdown in 
inflation. Supermarket sales levels 
here and in S3o Paulo are 10 per- 
cent above what they were at the 
end of last year. 

The buoyancy of the domestic 
market grows out of consumer de- 
mand spurred by a combination of 
price controls, consumer subsidies 
and an expansionary wage policy 
that includes public employees. 

The cost is a public deficit that 
has been estimated by a mission 
from the Internationa] Monetary 
Fund at over $10 bfllkxi this year. 
It is bring financed by uKreaang 
the money supply and a bigger in- 
ternal public debt at high interest 
rates. 

According lo ibc IMF, if the def- 
icit is not eliminated, inflation win 


UJS- M— ey 

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tem and destroy the economic re- 
covery. Since March, when ibe new 
government took office, prices have 
increased at an average monthly 
rate of 8 percent, compared with 12 
percent a month in the first three 
months of the year. 

The government's target for m- 
lerniti borrowing this year was set 
at 27 trillion cruzeiros (S4.18 tnl- 
lion). Through July, it borrowed 20 
trillion cruzeiros, so spending must 
be reduced to avoid the money- 
supply increases that would drive 
inflation over the planned kvd of 
about 200 percent this year. Last 
year it was 227 percent 

Government economic planners 
annic that : a spending cutback 
would stifle growth and reduce tax 
revenues, deepening die fiscal deft- 

° 'president Josfi Saroey, who came 


to office when President-dect Tan- 
credo Neves died on April 21, is 
reaping political benefits from the 
expansionary economic perfor- 
mance. His popularity rating has 
gone up in recent public opinion 
polls. 

Mr. Saraey has identified bis ad- 
ministration with economic 
growth. He has promised a growth 
rate of 5 percent to 6 percent a year 
in an economy that is producing 
$220 billion a year in goods and 
services. He has publicly re- 
nounced austerity measures that 
would restrain demand as a way of 
cutting back inflation. 

This has produced disagreement 
between the new government and 
the IMF. Brazil and the fund are 
far apart on the terms of a standby 
agreement under which Brazil 
hopes to ask international creditors 
to stretch out over a 16-year period 
the repayment of about $45 billion 
in debts due by 1991. 

Brazil is the developing world's 
largest debtor, owing banks and 
governments more than $100 bQ- 
hon. Its relationship with the IMF 
is a key factor in international 
management of the 11101 ! World’s 
total debt of $360 biffion. 

Brazil is under pressure from the 
IMF to make new cuts in public 
deficits as a condition of obtaining 
refinancing of its debt. Bui there is 
strong political and business resis- 
tance to this course. 

Mr. Sarney has derided that 
moderate, controlled inflati on is 
beuer for Brazil than a period of 
recession. This position is backed 
by international reserves of S8 bil- 
lion and prospects for a 512-biHion 
trade surplus this year. 


1 

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This announcement appears as a matter of record only. 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 1985 


as 


*i 


House of Beef 


*J(AtT« lutUr W^itattMwriw 

• OUR S9ch VeaR-'- 




ADVERTISEMENT 


<CPR»> 

ammina» ft* m fiupi ISli 
ar Km A*oo»fie N. V_, Spok- 


“aSaU. «« Ya. /imuroim . <U».q}.oo,2S (*> 
pwnproied hr wt. "AflkWTo75»o CDRa 
Oi;» Tb« DiHcA-Kawa Bank LoL, will be 


lUtwill 

P«yaUe w* Ml 4,ftltaf Mt CD*, 
repv. IMdcnd MUifflk ^JO aet 
per CDS, nar. 1,006 Oi (dir. per re- 
conltaa <R3LhX&_n«ai Yea 33tf ’pub.] 
trftcr d«huioii.cf 15% Japan ese fag “Yen 
525 - D(k -flO pec CBfc jg*. 100 ^ 
Ten SZ5> » DQi 7i Ptt CDS, not. 1500 
■bn. VhhotfnJ^mWlB - Yea 
70,--. Dfls. 5H-per Cr«. m 100 ri*. 

Yen 700^ “ Dfc $49 perCMCrepr. 1500 
abL. wilTbo ckdaoed.' Aft® KL3U98S de 
<fir. wiUonlybe paid under of 20% 

h^.I)£t3,77i D0 l 37.70 
CDR rapt mb. 400 and 1500 thu eadrk 

■ rcnr rf anw i yytt At- Ja p ngae to regnliluna. 

• DEPOSITARY 

COMPANY N.V. 




+7V. 





uWfi 

oasiU, 

;,fi ank(* 


A™ttnb“i 30 Jdj 1985 


ADVERTISEMENT 



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ft. ..-;\Ar -°UtetiQ5; 


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in inunoj 
>j^raythiqi 


Schiumberger 


He nndeaJipeid annoenc** tiaras from lafa 
MX Km-AmodaSe N.V, Sod*- 
-UmM 172. Ajrtenfam dSv rpn nn 47 *d 

TTW nepr. 5 tbs, of coaunoa doek td 
wr wine, wffl b« j^nMe 
Mb. 4A» net per Cmtf&ta rear. S 
riu. ami vbh Dfls. 9*^ net per tirtlfi- 
cae rear. lOO sfa*. (dir. per tw^W 

odiaMteLUs t-.3o.per tatTi**** 

dead dhtpbutioaisiietMdijuata mt witli hn M. 
mg at source- ... 

P ARIBA S 

. ADBCDOSTRAHEKAIYTOOK R.V. 

. .AbMIHIS^LfflnSuMTOOB -' 
VAKDF 

BANQUE DE PARC 
S PAYS-BAS B.V.) 


ETDES 
A m d tadrui . 29tb July. 1965. 


Page 11 


W. German Spending Test Failures 

Seen Ready for Rebound At Lloyd’s 

Hit Record 


BUSINESS PEOPLE 


Schmidt Is Picked to Head New Du Pont Group 


. By Nick Doaghry 

■ Rctnm 

FRANKFURT —West Gcrma- 


peara ready for a strong rebound in 
coming months, a move that should 
effect a possible decline in export 
earnings, winch have been fuelling 
die Dalian's economic growth, ac- 
cording to many economists. 

The softer dollar could cut ex- 
pon growth to around 55 paccnt 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


in 1986 from around 85 percent 
this year, they said. 


profits, should put more disposable 
income in pockets. 

Although a ; lower dollar win 
moderate West German export 
performance, it will make imports 
cheaper, economists note. Since 
West Germany draws heavily on 
the U5. market for consumer 
goods, this should boosi the retail- 
ing sector. 

In a recent study, Hessische 
Landesbank Girozeolrale predict- 
ed that a softer dollar would not 
necessarily harm export results 
since German companies had not 
fully used the last few months to 
realize additional profits amid the 
dollar surge. 


(Continued from Page 9) 


By Brenda Erdmann 

huemantmal Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Du Pont Co„ in a 
move designed to bring a common 
, cii'k —lL focus to lts health-are and bio- 

rates vAo . technology operations in Europe, 

Kent ana Aanan Kasppggk ““ w a biomedical-oroducts stoud 
S audi businessman — face losses 

TP.-.sasfiSSa, 

about 350 of 

tlv wndinates and “ VLW W1U1 U1V: » C U1 the pharmaceu- 
Sn^^uld not be required !o pay 

donal SA in Geneva. 



the full bOI. 


The committee advised RBUA 


Du Pool, the U5. chemical and 


eueT Sy concern, has appointed Pe- 
sohrency test even if they had the ^ M _ Schmkll M dili;clor ^ ^ 



ADVERTISEMENT 


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jm nw-i 

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'.-«r it is ft 
r'.jrandi. 6a 
.^endsofla\ 
remember' 
ughtful 6 

ck totbei 
'eddv? Hit 


I 


MARUBENI 

CORPORATION 

. (CDRa) 


„ iaflnoances that as firm -X4A 
Aafiisl 19 BS>iKm Awsociatk N.V^ &jds- 
tnat 172, Amstetduu, dhAH..ZS be- 
. campanM by *n "AffiAaft") af dw' CDm 
M* rab*ui ComwaiEJam,- wiB be anable 
with Dfla. 265^ per CDS, nor.^UMO 
dm. «Ev. per raxtrd-d^ 0351 J985; 

Yen 2,50 pish.) •fltt- detbction of 15% 

» to-^Yi 375i-%Dlfc 5B9 per 
tepe. tOOO xhs. Wnboot in Aflb&rii 20% 
Jqkto * Yen 50ft- “ DO*. 6.79 perCDB, 
mk. 1.000 lb*, -Mil be Axiwrtwl After 
105L1965 tbe £f. wd) only be paid under 


AMSTEBDrAMU EPOSITARY 
, _ OQMPA1YY N.y. • _ _ 

An«en]aiii.31st July 1985--.' 


ADVERTISEMENT 


NEC CORPORATION 

(CDRa) \ 


The 


imx n in cga tfal m 1 3A 

•I Kb». A anomie N.V^ Spras- 



luepjnw 


0 ttrftiwat 
l Un niQi ; . 


*35? 

■ nut 

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said Mr.fi 
: rf an era. ’ 
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: of limffi! 
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the end.c 
- and tiff 
inlessj|fc 
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.iit>. llBH c 
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dismisS; 

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not just & 


tzaa 172. -Am ste nfai m . Er^uu. 26 Jie- 
win«D>od'by 'an'**Amdsvil M y of d» CDRi 
NEC Cocponrkxa, will be payable with 
■tper CDR, repr. 200 1 

sK&s 


Dflo. . 
wdvbbOik 

LOOOdn. Idiv-pcr reeoiMau 0831. 

Yen 4*50 wdij o&a- drdncfwn of 15% 
in -'Yen 13S.- - Dfla. 151 p« 
r.~200eb«^ Yen 675.- = DQs. 955 
per UK. rat LOOO da^ Wilboul an Affida-. 
»it20% - Yenlflft- - Dfk. 2.42 per 

CDR. inpc.aOOdb*; Yaa 90ft- - Dfla- 15U0 
per CDR, rent. LOOO b!*-. wiQ be deducted. 
Afer llX3Ll985 tba ifiy..«31 tody be nud 
odder dcdndhm of 20% Jaiuax ton. Dfla. 



b Jaiuax ran. 

95ft Dfk. 4750 nerperCDR rape. rwp. 200 
and - LOOO each ta aoDontapee with *e 

JapcoeietoregalabonB- 

AMSTKRDAMDEPOSrTARY 
COMPANY KV. 

A w Be nhM . 3(M» July 1965. ... . 


;v • day * 

of his 


ADmrBEHENT 


The S<* ^ 


/TOSHIBA 
CORPORATION 

(CDRa) - 

ibataaftm 14A 


The 

AagMtl! 

tint 172; Am at o dam . 

^3*«e>rp«r*lto^ will be payable wilh 

Dflo..2Sai neb per CDB, riem 500 dm 
moA wkl ^ 4^22 b« per CDR. 
3.1700 /4m. (div. mu- rrcard-dalo 035L 

uro— Yen 4, r pj«li.) after dndnainn of 15% 
jHat Ux-Yen30a- - DBe. 4,07 per 
aS/ror- 500 d ml. Yen 60ft- -= Dflfc W4 
pev(3)R; rapt L000d», WitbeaU an Affida- 
JmSc — ^ Yen 40ft- - TSk. 5A3 pet 
Yen 800, - DOa. 10§ 
per CI^ rcpr d»n will be deducted. 
Aftw l03L198S die 4v-,win enly ta jwd 
mb- ikAvrion at 20% Jaivto zeap. DUa- 


-bodac Jedndion of 20% 
2L7SrDfl8.4ftS0wapera»rtjit 
500 ad LOOO sbb, each in accordance with 
fte Japtneselax nffllatHHg. 

- AMSTERDAM DEPOSITAKY 
COMPANY N.V. . 

~ Arae t radun. 31R Jtfy 1W5. 


I .1 








SONT-CORPORATION 

(CDR*) 

The mx^KKned arinounce# *« “ 

****** by » «b«| _ i# ^ 

— . 20 Aa. 

, Jk^ 

um. 20 al*_ Yffl 33ftp » Wh- ^JS 

a& So t wa-g -.“*=^5 

jip** - YenSft- - 

wi lv (k nud mater (Mtidioa o 120% 

£ri E5K.78; Dfla. 2350 n« per 
^^Mpittlrao aS 100 she- in 
tax regnlatkx* 



n eenf dan H 


■^**SSBSSfSS^ 




Ane tod a ni, 29d» Inly 1965. 


should -boost de- 
mand and keep the economy on 
target for 3-percent growth next 
year, they said. 

to Helmut Henschd, 
an economist for Westdeutsche 
Landesbank Girozentrale, consum- 
er spending will get a m^or boost 
next year from a banned tax cut of 
10 billion Deutsche marks (S35 bfl- 
licmL- 

“These are cuts across thd 
board,” he said. “The economic 
outlook is lor inflation- to stay low, 
so (here will be a considerable 
boost to real incomes.” 

He added: “The building sector, 
which helped drag gross natinnn] 
down to a decline 
of a real J .0 percent in the 1985 first 

ment measures to boost^m^an re- 
newal investment and depreciation 
incentives to increase industrial 
building." 

Other economists said that last 
ar'spusb by oigamzed labor for a 
shorter workweek, which led to a 
seven-wed: strike in the metal- 
and engineering sector, 

has bf«i ynpqwi flHl by p miilrnKj 

to work longs hours far more pay. 

This, coupled with fewer layoffs 
as industry continues to see strong 


from a stronger mark, and new 
electrical equipment such as vid- 
eos, where new developments are 
expected to attract consumers. 

But domestic consumer demand 
is unlikely to take over completely 
from exports as the Ger man econo- 
my’s major driving force, econo- 
mists agree. 

Expectations are for consumer 
spending to grow by between 25 
and 3.0 percent next year, after 
only a 15-percent increase this 
year. 

Mr. Henschd said the steady 
growth and low inflation seen since 
1983 was partly to blame for slack 
consumer demand. 

"With inflation just over 2 per- 
cent, wage increases are smaller," 
he said, adding “consumption has 
become highly selective." 

. According to the Federal Statis- 
tics Office, West German retail 
sales volume has stagnated at its 
1979 level after adjustment for in- 
flation. 

In addition, household real dis- 
posable income has hardly risen 
since 1980, economists say. With 
real interest rates comparatively 
high and looking stable, West Ger- 
mans have become a nation of sav- 
ers rather than spenders, they said. 


rescue package for the members. 

“Why should we put up money 
to be lacked in the face again?" 
asked Michael Baws, a spokesman 
for the committee. 

Geoffrey Lawson, a leader of the r m ue - J ?“ iD S “ 3c P ien J- 

ooS responsib^ty for devd- 

against Uoyd? °P?| busies m West Gmnany 
Minrtand certain Trirmer RBUA ** d Switzerland. Mr. w Huner 


in Paris, is Ed van Welv, who previ- 
ously was with Du Pont in the 
United States. 

Credit Smsse First Boston Ltd. of 
London said Francois von Huner 
win be joining the bank in Septem- 
>r dt 



Pearl Assurance PLC of Lon- 
don has appointed Sir Austin 
Pearce as a nonexecutive direc- 
tor. Sir Austin is the ch a i r™*" of 
British Aerospace PLC and of 
WUfiams & Glyn's Bank. 


British Caiwiw HMi Airways has Wagner Frdre. who has become 
appointed John Story executive director of exploration for Peiro-' 
vice president. North America, br “- , „ 
based in Houston. Mr. Story joined Bade Securities (UJL) Inc. has 
the carrier on Aug P 1 and tairw up recruited G. Edwin (Ged) Smilh III' 
his new pest on a full-time Haov os head of Eurobond syndication 
Jan. 1. He will' succeed H.W. anti new- issue trading. Mr. Smith 
(Rocky) Cox. who is to retire. Mr. previously was an associate direc- 
Stoiy joined British Caledonian l0r of Merrill Lynch Capital Mar-. 
From British Airways, where he was k® 15 * “ London. Bache is a London- 
general manager, lo gistics based unit of Prudential-Bache' 

Drexei Burnham Lamb«r Sea*. Inc- the New York- 

rities Ltd. in London has appointed s . tc ^ tbrokera g t !, b T 

Michael Ayien to lead ^ Euro- PnuknUaJ Insurance Co. of Amen- 

bond trading in short-dated issues. F?" U - U S n |: 10 u^A De 3 
He formerly was with Fust Cbica- P^f “ the^urobpndmar- 
go Lid. in London. keL panioilariy by arranging rnier- 

Manrijeni Coqu, Central Aid Co. ^jS^Steel Corn the world's- 
and Clmo D isWj. Co. all of Japan, appointed 

are to set up a tdecotnmtmotions Yo^Owada, who is heaTof its 
company m Britain m Oaober. London office, as general 


executives accused of misusing 
funds from the syndicates. 

The Lloyd's central fund, which 
is available to pay valid claims on 
Lloyd's policies when members are 
unable to do so, totaled £167.2 mil- 
lion as of last Dec. 31. 

Mr. ' Davison said that the re- 
serves are adequate and growing 
rapidly but that they could be in- 
creased if necessary by raising the 
annual levy on members. 


Mexican Debt Accord Nearer 

A gmee Fnmce-Presse 

NEW YORK — The second in- 
stallment of a plan to reschedule 
S20.I billion of Mexico’s foreign 
debt will be signed here on Aug. 29 
by (he Mexican government and 
international creditor banks, Citi- 
bank officials announced Tuesday 
in New York. 


CURRENCY MARKETS 


currently is a principal of Morgan 
St anley International in London. 

ITT Corp. said Heinz F. Roessle. 
a corporate vice president and also 
vice president of its ITT Europe 
Inc. subsidiary, has been appointed 
to the new and additional post of 
group executive, electronic compo- 
nents, for the parent. He will be 
based in Freiburg, West Germany. 

Saitama Bade Ltd of Japan has 
appointed Hiromi Kitagawa gener- 
al manager of its London branch, 
succeeding Koichi Akita. Mr. Aki- 
ta has moved to Tokyo as director 
and general manager of the bank's 
international p lannin g department. 
This is the department in which 
Mr. Kitagawa worked prior to his 
move to London. 

Exxon Corp. of the United States 
has named Elliot CattarulJa vice 
president and secretary. He takes 
over that post on SepL 1 from 
Richard E. Faggioli, who is retir- 
ing. Mr. CaLtaniUa currently is ex- 
ecutive vice president of Esso Mid- 
dle East. 

FNAC, the French retail chain, 
has apDointed Michel Baroin presi- 
tor general He is also 


-n j . -| -j « a -w- ucm-uirctwi gcuuai. nc is aiso 

Dollar Up Sharply as Pound Continues Lower sSSS??KS£lE 


Compiled by Our Stuff From Dispatches 

LONDON — Thfr dollar rose 
sharply in U.S. and European trad- 
ing Tiwsday and the British pound 
tumbled in reaction to falling inter- 
est rates in Britain and the prospect 
of higher interest rates in the Unit- 
ed States. 

. Dealers said that markets were 
hesitant to be short dollars in ad- 
vance: of the-Ti 
fui^Eog-anctioh, 


“Instead of buying at the lows, daily given the weakness of sterling 
people now seem willing to wait and strong bank lending. 


until it goes up to sell the dollar,’ 
one said. “This could keep a lid on 
any rally." ; 

• Other dollar rates in New York 
Tuesday, compared with Monday, 
included: 25650 Swiss francs, up 
from 25220; 1,900.0 Italian lire, up 
from 1,886.0, and 35025 Dutch 
nrs huge re- JpiDders, op from 3.1900. The cur- 
m'was widely '. raugr dosed at 238.60 yen, up 1 


«q>ected tbV^ U5,lntdest rates from 23730 oft Mooday 

higher^ JExtmsve. intererf in the . The pound, meanwhile, fell to its 

lowest levels since July 8 on 
.stepped up corporate selling, deal- 
os. said. in London, the British 


utves- 
thedol- 
for the 


Tbeasuzy side from ft 
tors,hasakb 
lar By creating a 
currency, dealers noted. 

“There’s a lot of concent about 
how well theauction win be bid by 
foreigners with the dollar losing 
strength, especially in the longer 
maturities,” one dealer said. 

In New York, the dollar rose 3 
pfennigs against, the Deutsche 
mark to dose at 2.8550, and 10 
cattimes against the French franc, 
to dose at 8.7000. The British 
pound fell 3 cents from Monday’s 
dose, to $15415 from $15710. 
Dealers noted, however, that 
tesday’s session was noted for a 
lack of corporate demand for the 
dollar, despite the belief that the 
current will gp at least to 2.880- 
2500 DM mooes before the Trea- 
sury auction is completed. 


currency ended at $15458, down 3 
cents from its opening and well 
“below Monday’s dose of $15685. 

• Against (he Deutsche mark, the 
pound fell 3 pfennigs, to 3.8343 
from 3.8648 cm Monday. 

Fears that British broad-based 
money supply figures might show a 
larger than expected fall when an- 
nounced Tuesday afternoon con- 
tributed to the currency’s early 
weakness, .dealers said. 

; The Vi-to-y* percent drop later 
reported for the M-3 aggregate in 
(he month to mid-July was in the 
middle of analyst expectations. 
-.Although the decline was the 
first since December, analysts said 
it was not sufficient to allow a fur- 
ther reduction in base rates, espe- 


From its highs over the last week 
or so, sterling has shed more than 8 
cents against the dollar and some 
20 pfennigs against the marie 

“There was a lot of short-term 
money just parked in Britain, and 
now that interest rates there are 
coming off, funds are moving else- 
where,” one dealer in Frankfurt 
said. - ... 

In earlier trading in Europe, 
meanwhile, the dollar was fixed in 
Frankfurt at 2.8394 Deutsche 
marks, up from 2.8198 on Monday. 
In hectic post-fix trading, however, 
the dollar rose to close at 23500. 

Dealers there said the dollar 
could breach 2.85 DM this week 
after Tuesday’s runup, but that it 
would meet heavy upward resis- 
tance much beyond this point. 

Other late dollar rates in Europe, 
compared with late Monday’s lev- 
els, included: 25635 Swiss francs, 
up from 25205; 8.6520 French 
francs, up 5 centimes from 85985; 
1,89850 lire, up from 1,891.00, and 
57.25 Belgian francs, up from 
56.95. 

In Tokyo, the dollar closed at 
237.50 Japanese yen, up from 
237.45 Monday. Later; in London, 
tbe dollar was quoted a 238.68 
yen. (UPI, Reuters ). 


des Fonctionnaires, which agreed 
in June to buy 50.1 percent of 
FNAC 

General Motors Overseas Distri- 


bution Corp. has appointed Ed- 
mund (Thu area manager for export 
sales in China. The company, a unit 
of General Motors Corp. of the 
United States, is responsible for 
marketing and service for all GM 
vehicles and those of CM'S affiliat- 
ed companies outside their country 
of origin. 

British Airways has named Peter 
White as general manager for West 
Germany, effective SepL I. Based 
in Berlin, Mr. White will succeed 
Captain Dick Twomey, who is re- 
luming to flying duty. Mr. White 
currently is in the carrier's bead 
office at London's Heathrow air- 
port as hub-development manager. 

Canadian Imperial Bank Group 
has named Trevor Wicks a manag- 
er in its export and trade finance 
department, based in the European 
operations office in London. Mr. 
Wicks joins the bank from Midland 
Bank PLC, where he spent 15 years 
in trade promotion and export- fi- 
nance managemenL 

Bangchak Petroleum Co. of 
T hailan d said Sophon Suphapong, 
acting managing director, has as- 
sumed the full managing director- 
ship of the company, which is slate- 
run. In doing so, be relinquished 
his post as deputy governor for 
logistics and r dining at the Petro- 
leum Authority of mail and. 


The new concern, Telecom Interna- 
tional Ltd., wfl 1 be headed by T. 
Kawasome, who was manager, 
communications, in London for 
Marubeni Corp. and Marubeni 
U.K. PLC. Initially it will offer 
telex services and plans include 
links with U.S. and European data 
bases. 

MerriB Lynch & CO. of the Unit- 
ed Slates said that Colin Whitbread 
has joined its international re- 
search team in London as a senior 
automotive analyst, responsible for 
coverage of the major British and 
continental automotive companies 
as well as tbe European operations 
of major U.S. ones. He was motor 
industry analyst at Qoilier Goo- 
dison. 

Legal & General Group PLC 
one of Britain's largest insurance 
groups, has appointed David Plas- 
tow a nonexecutive director. He is 
managing director and chief execu- 
tive of Vickers PLC. 

Aitken Home International PLC 
has appointed to its board Stuart 
Gramm, formerly group chief ex- 
ecutive of Midland Bank PLC. He 
will help in the development of the 
group’s banking subsidiary, Aitken 
Hume LtrL, and its specialist bank- 
ing services. 

International Commercial Bank 
PLC of London stud that following 
the retirement erf Keith Parsons as 
general manager . Richard hasten 
and David Hulbery, who were dep- 
uty genera] managers, have beat 
promoted to joint general manag- 
ers. 

Braspetra, the international ex- 
ploration arm of Petrobras, Brazil’s 
national oil company, has appoint- 
ed Antonio Seabra Moggi execu- 
tive vice president He succeeds 


manager 

of Nippon Steel International Fi- 
nance PLC, a new London-based 
unit to be opened later this month. 


C0MPA6N1E F1NANCIESE 
MICHELIN OVERSEAS N.V. 

U.S. 860,000,000.- 
9.25% Guaranteed Bonds 
due 1988 


Holders oi ihe above mentioned 
bonds are herein' informed that the 
annual redemption instalment due 
September 15, 1985 amounting to 
UJ*. 64,000.000.- has been entirely 
repurchased in the market. 
Consequently a drawing by lot will 
not take place this year. 

The amount of bonds remaining 
outstanding after the redemption 
date will be US. S46.000.000-. 

BANQVE INTERNATIONALE 
A LUXEMBOURG 
Soettte Anonym* 

Fiscal Agent 

Luxembourg. August 2. 1985. 


Net Asset Value 
on August 1, 1985 

Pacific Selection Fund N.V. 
1.S.JU2 per U.S.J1 unit 

Pacific Selection 
Fund N.V. 


U.S. Consumer Confidence 
Shown Increasing in July 


Market Ends Firmer Ahead of U.S. Auction 


JR euros- 

LONDON — Tbe Eurobond 
market generally aided firmer 
ahead of the auction late Tuesday 
of 585 billion of three-year notes 
by the U.S. Treasury, which opens 
its $21.75-biHioii quarterly reftmd- 
ingprogram, dealers said. 

T rading In the dofiar-straigjht 
sector was inhibited by the auction, 
with most operators umrilltng to 
ten new positions before tbe actu- 
result was known. 

Meet dealers expected the auc- 
tion to attract a fair amount of 
interest, although they were not 
prepared to predict the outcome. 

Most dollar straights ended with 
paiwc of V6 to Vz. point from Meat- 
day’s close, :d though retail interest 

was again ntimmaL 

Dealers said that despite dull 
trading in the secondary market, a 
pie of new dollar-straight issues 
were launched. These both ap- 
peared to be aimed at Japanese 
investors. 


over 10 years, priced at 101 per- 
cent. 

' Also launched was a S50-mflfion 
issue for Toyo Engineering Corp. 
that has a lOtt-pcrcent coupon and 
matures in 1990. The issue was 
at 101ft percent, but was 
too late in the day to 
trade actively. 

As expected, the dual-currency 
issue for American Express Credit 
Corp. emerged as a 25-bflli on-yen 
bond paying 8 percent over 10 
years ana priced at 100ft percent 
The total redemption amount is 
$1203 million, which gives an ef- 
fective exchange rate of 208 yen to 
die dollar. 

In the Australian-dollar sector, 
the anticipated issue for the Aus- 
tralian Telecommunications Com- 
mission emerged as & 60-millioo- 
doflar bond, paying 13 percent over 
seven years with a pnee of 100ft 
it. It did not trade actively. 
Bank Ltd. is the lead 
manager and total fees are 2 per- 
cent. 

In the New Zealand-dollar seo 


Mitsubishi Corp. issued a $100- 
oaiioa bond paying 10% P«at_ 

Ean-daDar bond paying 16ft per- 


advertisement 


cent over three years. It was priced 
at 100ft percent and did not trade 
actively. 

In other secondary-market activ- 
ity, the floating-raie-note sector 
finished firmer after a fairly busy 
day’s trading, dealers said. 

However, the market remains 
professional with very Hide retail 
interest apparent. 

Sterling-straight bonds were 
largely u nchanged from Monday 
with the news that Britain's M-3 
money supply dropped ft to ft per- 
cent in banking month of July hav- 
ing little initial impact, dealers 
said. 

Japanese convertibles saw a little 
buying interest during the after- 
noon and some sectors of the mar- 
ket dosed firmer, dealers said 
However, the two recent issues for 
Japanese banks dosed easier with 
the Sumitomo Bank bond off about 
] ft points at around 104ft to 105ft 
percent. 

The 3-percent Canon Corp. 
bond due 2000 dosed at around 
81ft to 82ft percent against Mon- 
day’s finish of some 78ft to 79ft- 
percent. 


- • The Auoeitucd Pres 

NEW YORK — Consumer con- 
fidence in the United States in- 
creased slightly in July, according 
to a survey released Tuesday by the 
Conference Board an industry- 
backed research organization. 

The Consumer Confidence In- 
dex advanced to 92.4, about one 
point higher than it was in June, tbe 
group said 

Its Buying Plans Index dropped 
to 88.9 from 107.6 in June. 

National Family Opinion Inc., 
based in Toledo, Ohio, conducted 
ihe surveyor 5,000 U.S. families for 
tbe board. 

The study showed more than 28 
percent of the respondents rating 
current business conditions as 
“good" compared with 29 percent 
in June. 

The percentage of those expect- 
ing improved business conditions 
in the second half remained the 
same, at 20 percent. 

The percentage of those plan- 
ning to buy automobiles declined 
to 75 percent in July from 8.8 per- 
cent in June. Planned bouse pur- 
chases were down to 3.1 permit 
from 35 percent. 

The survey also showed 28 per- 


cent planning to buy a major appli- 
ance in the next six months, com- 
pared with 30 percent in June. 


BANQUE NATIONALE DE PARIS 

US $400,000,000 floating rale notes 1984- due 1995 

The rate of interest applicable to the interest period from August, 
6 1985 to February o, 1986 as determined b y the re ference agent 
is 8 l Vu% par annum namely US $444,02777 per bona of 
US $10/ 


Trade Development Bank (France) S.A. 


Nouveau sifege social : 

12-14 Rond-Point des Champs-ElysOes 
75008 PARIS 

S.A. au capital de 91.343.600 Francs. 

R.C. Paris 572 006 674. 



American 

Express 

Bank 


Les actionnairss de la society TRADE DEVE- 
LOPMENT BANK < FRANCE i SJV. se sont rfu- 
nis en Assemble* G£n6raJe Extraordinaire le 
31 Juillet 1985 au 20, Place Venddme 75001 
PARIS. 

L'Assemblte Gen6rale a proefide a la nomina- 
tion, en qualite de nouvel Administrateur, de 
Monsieur Frangois GISCARD D’ESTAING, Ins- 
pecteur General des Finances. 

Ont egaleraent iit£ el us Administxateurs, Mes- 
sieurs Robert SAVAGE, Vice-Chairman Ameri- 
can Express Bank Limited, New-York, Jean 
BENARD, President Directeur Glndral Ame- 
rican Express Carte France, James 
SCHLAGHECK, Senior Vice-President et 
Henri C. van ZEVEREN. Senior Vice-President 
d’American Express Bank Limited. 


UAssemblte G6n6ra)e a 4galement reconduit 
les mandats d'Administrateurs de Monsieur A. 
BENEZRA. President tf American Express 
Bank Limited & New-York et Premier Vice-Pre- 
sident du ConseU d' Administration de la TVade 
Development Bank & Gentve et de Monsieur E. 
SAADIA, Directeur G4n£ral de la Ttade Deve- 
lopment Bank & Gen&ve. 

II a 416 decide & l'u n a niin it4 de transf&rer le 
Si£ge de la Sod6t6 du 20, Place Vendflme au 
12-14 Rond-Point des Champa-Elysees 75008 
PARIS. 

fr-ade Development - American Express Bank 
dispose d'un rfseau de quatre agences ratuees & 
Antibes, 43, bd Albert Ier, k Cannes, 3, La 
Croraette, k Nice, 2, rue du Congrta et a Mona- 
co. 3/5, av. de Monte-Carlo. 



RUMS AND SPENDS PIC 

(CDRa) 


ADVERTISEMENT 


The urdasagned announces that sa from 
18* August 1985 al Kas-Assoaxtii- , 
N V Spuistraat 172, Amsterdam. 

27 of the CDRa Marim 
| Spencer PLC, each »pr. 25 
shares, will be prable with Dlls. 
*62 (w final dividend for the year 
ended 31st Man* 1985) 232p per 

^ Tax credit £-^24855 - im - 

12 per CDR- Nonresidents m t » ; 
jntodKiratloffl can only claim tiufl tax 
crediiwben the relevant tax treaty meelK 
ibis facility. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
• COMPANY N.V. 

Amsterdam, 30th July 1985- 


CANADIAN PACIFIC 
ENTERPRISES LIMITED 

(CDR’s) 



rec-dsie 
aft^r Mac- 

ta LIB* OnAVjOT “ D[k -,T! 

pgr CUR. under nareoda' of m Affidnir, 
mihbk tf the flffiee of Aendainiad; cata 
ta d)« ksdlaar owner e a resident of ta 


■ rnncakr prefocntiil at t of Qratfin tfQL _ 
two to taMsetatfivideod ^jwpadtaer 
widtaltta of2S% Cm. tax wfch DO*. 357 net 

' AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY . . 
CMBPANYN.V. 


Antatav Jvfy. 19BS. 


ADVERTISEMENT 


CHAMPION INTERNATIONAL 
CORPORATION 

(CDR>) 

The undersigned anmnaca tkri as from 
MO* AagBsL, 1985 at Kat-Aseodarie 
N.V., SpuiGtrut 172, AUBlerdan. 
drvj^pjio, 49 of ta CDRV Qiamnion 
lubjiutioiiil Corporation, each 
10 ubxree, will be payable with Dfls. 
nnl fefir. per rccniAdate 06.131985: 
t -,10iuh,j after deduction of 15% US 

-*-4S-Dq*.-A7perCDR. 
ftvjcpi. bcfefflfflng to um-rendesa of the 
Ntthnnawk will DC paid after dedodion of 
an additional 15% USA-ox (*■ S -.15 = 
Dfla. v47) with Dfk. 2,17 net 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

Aimtenkm. 31u July, 1035. 


This announcement appears as a matter of record only. 

$45,250,000 

Convertible Bonds with Warrants (Gtd.) 

Finacopro N.V. 

a subsidiary of 

Industrie-Consultiiig 8C Promotion 
Copro Vevey S. A. 


We have acted as agent for the private placement of these securities 
comprising separate Principal Certificates and Coupons, with Warrants. 


Merrill Lynch Capital Markets 


July 3, 1985 







Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 1985 


US. Futures 


. Season Semen 

High Low 


awn Hiatt Law Oos* Cha. 


Grains 


WHEAT (CBTJ 

SHOO bu minimum- dollars par bushel 
3J«ft 183 sen 184 288 283% 284ft — 81 

X43ft 2.92V! DM 296 2.97% 19 * 196% —DO ft 

174ft 2.93V] Mar 196% 199 Z95M 2W% +.81 

*sn 184 Mav 186% 188% 2JMft 188 +80% 

172V! 165 Jill 247ft 169% 237V, 169 +80% 

US 172»i Sep 171% +80% 

Est.SalM Prov. Soles 1714 

Prov. Day Onen mt. 38J9Q up 478 
CORN ICBT) 

1000 Du minimum- dollar, w bushel 


X21ft 

225V 

Sap 

2J6ft 

a* 

225% 

126V 


295 

224 

Dec 

224V 

225% 

223 

224 

—81% 

xia 



233 

283+1 

232 



3J1% 

236'6 


2J6% 

236V 

235% 


286 

236 

Jui 

236 

236ft 

233% 

234ft 

—83 

286ft 

227 


227 

227 

22S 

225% —82V 

226V 

2J0% 


223 

223 

221% 

2Z1V 

-22ft 

Es). Sates 


Prev. Sates mt* 1 





Prev. Dav Open IM.116J46 up 984 


7J6 

116 


119ft 

5j7ft 

119ft 

177 

+84% 

6.71 



5.15ft 

5J3 

5.15 

5J0V 

+82ft 




S3D 

SJt 

5JD 

5J4V 

+81% 

6l77 

5JB 


130 ft 

534 

5J9% 

133 

—87 




581 

584 

SJSft 

583 

—81% 

7.79 

585ft 


548 

5J1 

585 

54B 










tj* 

584 

Aug 

587 

587 

£85 

586 

-82 

638 

SJ8 

Seo 

5J9 

SJt 

537 

5J7 

—81 

631 

131 

NOV 

133 

534 

S30 

531 

-m 


Ext Sales Prev. Soles 26410 

Prev. Dm Open I nt 6003 uo 31! 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT) 

100 Ions- dot lore oer Ion 

ISOlOO 117.70 Aug 12480 I2SJ0 12150 125.10 +140 

Sep 12400 1 27 JO 1200 ISAM +140 

Od 12480 12880 12430 1 27 JO +1.10 

Dec 12130 130® 12748 129.70 +80 

Jan 13080 10180 129X0 13080 +JS 

Mar 13280 13150 1J180 1J2J0 +80 

MOV 13380 735.10 13280 13170 +30 

Jul 13580 13780 13480 13580 —180 

Aug 13X70 -1J0 

Prev. Sales 78800 


17980 12040 

10080 12130 

18180 126J0 

16380 12780 

20680 13080 

16280 13280 

16780 735.70 

74180 13780 

Eri. Sales ... 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 41833 oH3fll 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 


60800 lbs- dollars per loO lbs. 
31-95 2239 Aug 2385 

2353 

2X50 

2X90 

+.10 

31.10 








3037 



2X55 

2385 

2X50 

2X79 

+87 

2936 



2XSB 

2380 

2X41 

2X65 

—a 

2987 

2LU 


2X85 

2179 

2180 

2XA5 

—89 

2840 








Z7.45 

2X00 


2X95 

2X95 

2X70 

2X73 

—JO 

25JS 

23.75 


2354 

2480 

2X75 

2X75 


25.15 



2385 

ZX90 

2X87 

2X89 


2485 

2X50 

5cp 


2X05 

2380 

2X53 

— J2 

Eri. Sales Prev. sales 11301 

Prw. Dev Open Int. 49805 oHSBO 





OATS (CBT) 

5800 bu minimum- Oaf Ears per bushel 


1J9 

1J1% 

Sop 

IJI 

IJI 

182ft 

IJI 

Dec 

1.27ft 

lJ7ft 

187*6 

1J9 

Mar 

1J0V 

1J0V 

183 

IJI ft 

May 

IJI 

IJI 



Jul 

1JO 

1J0 

Esi. Sales 


Prev.Sries 

573 


1.16*1 1.17V, — 84V5 
134 184 V, —83V, 

186%. 186% —83 

ijv —an 
1 J0 7 JO 


Prev. Day Onen Int. 1559 up 106 


Livestock 


CATTLE ICME) 

«jooo lbs.- cents per B». 


6787 



54J7 

55J0 

54J0 

5480 




5730 

5787 

57.15 

57.45 

6785 


Dec 

5985 

59 JO 

5290 

59.17 

4785 



4055 

AOAO 

S982 

5987 




6185 




66JS 

58.10 


6275 

6275 

6180 

6187 

6580 

sxra 

Aug 

4130 

6180 

60.90 

A1J» 


Eri. Sales 22.971 Prev. Sales 77.950 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 41393 off 912 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMS) 

44000 lbs.- cenh ner lb. 





6535 

6580 

6485 

6430 

— je 

7X00 

5785 


6485 

6485 

6X05 

6X25 


7232 



6X15 


6280 

6280 

—37 



Nov 

6480 

643B 

6X70 

6X02 

^50 









7035 

61.10 

Mar 

6635 

6635 

6590 

6680 

—30 




64J0 

6635 

4680 

6680 

—80 

6585 

Eri. Sales 

6120 May <A30 eS20 
2396 Prev. Sates 2800 

6520 

6530 

—80 


Season 

High 


Season 

LOW 


Onen HWi low Close dig. 


PORK BELLIES ICME) 
SB800 ibv- cent* per lb. 


B085 

4985 

Aug 

56.92 

57.15 

7420 

5285 

Feb 

6388 

6140 

7580 

5280 

Mar 

6270 

6270 

7U0 

59.70 

may 

flW 


7680 

6030 

Jul 

6X00 

6X50 

7X15 

5980 

Aug 

6120 

61 JO 


Col. Sales 4JS7 Prev. Salas 2.950 
Prev. DovOeen int. 8814 up 76 


55.10 
4140 
6183 
6230 
6177 

61.10 


5U7 —12 
6J.72 -185 
6137 -185 
6190 -140 
61*0 -1M 
*122 —183 


Season 

Law 


Open 

High 

Low 

aose 

out. 

638 

sea 

4023 

40-a 

68-11 

68-11 

—7 

sr 

oec 

Mar 




6745 

47-9 

—7 

—7 


Hiptt 

72-27 
72-18 

69-14 .. , 

EsL5akK Prev. Sotesl22840 

Prev. Dav Open M£4n up 281 7 
BNMAfCBT) 

(10X000 prln- pfS&MndJOf lOOnd 


J 


1 Food 1 

COFFEE C (NY CSCE) 










15020 

12780 

Sop 

13200 13X3G 

13171 

13208 

+85 

13080 

129J5 

Dec 


13X10 

13583 

+81 

14975 

12830 


13780 13185 

13670 

137.75 

+29 

UDM 

13189 

Mav 

13X20 13985 

13775 

13980 

+30 

14X00 

11530 

JUI 


13X30 

13980 

+.10 

14730 

13275 


13980 13980 

13988 

139 JJ 

-JO 

13BJN) 

13880 

Dee 




—30 

EV. Soles 

Prev. Sates 1397 




Prsv.Dav Open Int. 11863 a« 134 




SUGAR WORLD 11 (NYCS4X) 




1 12AD0 KK.- cants par lb. 





9.75 

284 

Sea 

4J4 4.75 



—29 

985 

174 

Ocl 


463 

*33 

—.18 

775 

100 


5.15 SIS 

495 

491 

—.17 












580 

SJI 

—87 

689 

379 

Jul 

575 578 

ua 

£69 

— l09 

6.15 

482 

Oct 




—88 

Est.Scle5 

Prev.Saiei 1386* 




Prev. Day Open Ini. 9U0O oft 02 




COCOA (NY CSCE) 





lOmetrlc lorn- 1 per tan 











—IS 

2337 

1M5 



2100 

2115 

—to 

2207 

1955 

Mar 


21a 

2140 

—14 

2217 

I960 

May 

2151 2140 

7151 

2161 

—17 

2105 

I960 

Jul 



21K 

—15 

3333 

20a 

Sep 



2194 

—IS 

2235 

2055 

Dee 



2221 

—15 

Eri. Sales 






Prev. Day Open int. 20J07 tmm 




ORANGE JUICE (NYCBI 




15800 lbs.- cents pot ib. 






13035 

Sea 

3530 13625 

3SJS 


+80 


12780 

Nov 

3180 13275 

3180 

3280 

+1.10 

180X0 

1ZUD 

Jan 

2780 12880 

2780 

12X00 

+1.10 








16230 

13130 



12680 

+35 


14230 

Jui 

2735 127.75 

2775 

2680 

+35 






Prev. Day Open Int. 5879 up 127 




Metals II 


77-26 

59-13 

Sep 

7+19 

74-20 

744 

7+10 

76-20 

5W 

Dec 

n 

7+1 

73-22 

73-22 

768 

58-30 

Mar 

738 

72-10 

7381 

72-31 

75-17 

5B-2S 

Jun 

72-22 

72-22 

73-13 

72-13 

75-2 

65 

Sep 

72-5 

72J 

71-26 

71-26 

Eat. Sales 


Prw. Soles 

130 




Prw. Day Open Hit. 4823 off 39 

CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

51 million- pis al 100 pci 

Scp 9284 9285 
Dec 0182 9184 
Mar 
Jan 
Sep 
Dec 
Mar 

Prev, Soles 112 

prev. Day Open int 1380 up 4 
EURODOLLARS <IMM) 
trmlliton-etsofiooi 


9278 

0580 

9237 

8SJ4 

9173 

0636 

9180 

8643 

*1.15 

87J6 

9033 

BX34 

8991 


Est. Sales 



91.99 

9181 


9189 

91-52 

9184 

904? 

9U1 

89 JB 
8987 


+1 

+1 


+83 

+85 

+85 

+Jto 

+87 

+88 

+80 


Tuesday^ 

AM 

Closing 



13 Month 

Utah Low Hock Dlv. Via PE 
241k IS*, ForriCB 89 3 9* 

32W 13W Forestl. 34 

2 % Fotomt 

43% 30V» Frants 80 1* U 

7*k 4% FrtJHIv 333 

26 14 PrepEI 18 

lOVfc 7>k Ftledm 38b 34 12 

law 5 FrleiE n • 

15% 9 FfniHd <7 

7% 4ft FrtAert .179 28 
12% SV FirrVIt 1 31 


iss4r»iaTa| a t 

30 23ft PerTWC 88 

B’fc.SSft.ui 

70% 6ft MMjJ J** 

716 1% PTtiPLD 

8 
7 

Sft 

n 


5W £» 2 n 9*v-i% 

38 i** J** J* 

B 38 M *5 “ £ 
« 7 u 7 7 — Ik 

ffl }i D 23 -1% 

12 0% 8V. 8%- ft 

37 |i 109k II 
309 154* 15ft 15ft- ft 

11 35 6% *%— % 

39 TOft 1M 10ft 


r* pfcoPo 

TVs Pier 1 wf 


17 


JeelM 3 


Tables tndoOe tne nationwide prices 
up fa the ektsira on Wall street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via Vie Associated Pres* 


12 Worth 
HWi Low stock 


Div. YM.PE 


SIR 

nfetflOftLQW 


Owe 

OwH.Ctrge 


80 

80 


9285 

8433 

Sen 

91.71 

91.74 

9136 

9136 

+81 

9200 

B4B0 

D*e 

*1.18 

912* 

91.17 

91.18 

+85 

9136 

SA.10 

Mar 

9027 

9080 

9X74 

9X74 

+86 


0673 




9035 



9084 

B7JB 

Sep 

90JD 

9084 

9X00 

19.99 

+88 

9033 

B3D 

Dec 

0937 

8971 

DBAS 

B936 

+89 

9024 

KM 

Mar 

m 37 

8980 

0935 

8935 

+ 09 

09.95 

0X84 

Jun 

0985 

09.10 

0985 

8986 

+JV 

Ext. Sales 


Prw. Sates 19350 





COPPER (COMEX) 
25800 tbs.- cent* per lb. 


6215 

5X65 

Aug 

BX1D 

5730 

Sep 

Oct 

S4JS 

SOJD 

Dec 

B4J0 

5930 

Jan 

0080 

5930 

Mar 

7480 

61.10 

MOV 

7430 

600 

Jul 

7030 

6230 

Sop 

ma 

BITS 

Dec 

7020 

6480 

Jan 

6730 

65. TO 

Mar 

6730 

Eri. Sales 

6730 

Mav 

Prev.! 


59.90 6085 5985 

6085 6140 6045 


6180 

6Z30 

6285 

6230 

64.10 


MW 

6240 

6285 

63J0 

44.10 


6185 

6380 

6280 

6385 

A3JD 


4580 4580 4540 


Prev. Day Open int. 78444 uc T*2 
ALUMINUM (COMEX? 

40800 Ibe.- oen I* per ns 
Aug 

7430 4190 Sop 

Oct 

7040 44.90 Dec 4X75 46J5 

7680 51-75 Jan 

7340 *05 Mar 47-75 *735 

6475 5X95 May 

6345 4785 Jul 

52.10 5180 Sep 

Dec 
Jan 
Mar 
MOV 

EsL Sales Prev. Sales 349 

Prev. Day Open int. 1,727 up 73 

SILVER (COMEW 
5800 tray ok.- cents per trey es. 


60.10 

6045 

««i 

6185 

6185 

6240 

6285 

6230 

6275 

605 

6680 

6485 

6580 


45.10 

4540 

4570 


4640 4640 


4745 


4675 

4740 

4210 


5080 

5140 

5230 


+.15 

+.15 

-MS 

+80 

+85 

+85 

+85 

+85 

+85 

+85 

+85 

+85 

+89 


—70 
—70 
■ — 70 
-JO 
—70 

—70 

—70 


Prev. Day Open lnt.129826 up 1753 
BRITISH POUND (IMM? 

SPer pound- 1 eolnt equals SCL00DT 
14450 1JB00 Sod 18450 18470 18130 18355 

14190 1.0200 Dec 18390 183S0 18230 18260 

14160 18600 Mar 1J2S0 18300 1J1S0 18195 

18990 1.1909 Jun 1-34*5 

Est. Sales Prw. Sales 12519 

Prev. Day Onen Int. *2471 off 2393 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMMJ 
S per dir- 1 paint enrols S08001 
.7505 7025 Sep .7363 7366 7349 7390 

7566 .7006 Dee 7350 .7350 7327 7330 

7904 4981 Mar 7318 7320 7310 7315 

.7368 ,7070 Jun 7325 7325 .7300 .7300 

EsI. Sales Prev. Sotos 492 

Prev. Dav Open int. 7446 off 112 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM? 

I ner franc- 1 point eauois kuhooi 
.11600 JHaOO Sep .11520 .11520 .11520 .USD 

.11450 89670 Dec .11500 

.11425 .11425 Mar .11450 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 3 

Prev. Day Open int. 402 up 4 
GORMAN MARK (IMM) 

S per mark- T point swats 508001 
8607 8939 Sep J533 8536 8511 8516 

8646 8971 Dec 8566 8560 8542 8546 

8663 80*0 Mar 8569 8569 8569 8576 

8700 J335 Jun 8663 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 29747 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 51460 off 521 
JAPANESE YEN I IMM? 

S per yen- 1 point equals KLOOOOOi 
00*268 803870 Sep 804202 804305 804194 804190 

004350 803905 Dec 804223 804225 80421S 804221 

004307 804035 Mar 804260 804210 804245 RM245 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 6456 

Prev. Dav Open int. 29,990 off 454 
SWISS FRANC I IMM) 

Spar franc- 1 point eauois $08001 
4830 8400 Sep 4273 4281 4230 4244 

4449 8531 Dec 4310 4318 4276 4281 

4400 8835 Mar 4332 .4352 4130 4323 

Est. Salas Prev. Sales 22479 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 32.358 off 767 


12 

1B% 

6 % 

4% 


—315 

—320 


82 


.14 


30 


” £ 
39 

7 

8 17 
14 12 
61 

18 20 


97 


85 4 64 


—24 

—25 


7% 3ft ADI n 26 

17ft 5% AL Lofts » 

22ft 12 AMCH .IS 7 IS 
5ft 2ft AM Inti S 

BSV 65ft ATT Fd 5870 68 

2ft AonePr 
Sft AcmeU 
Hi Action 
1ft Acton 
ift Admit* 

30ft in* AdRwl 
21ft 1S% Adobe 
Sft 4ft Aerenc 
51ft 29ft AHIPbS 
9% 5% Air EJa> 

12 5ft AlrCal 
13% 9ft ATCalPl T80 

4 ft Alamco 
|10Bft 6Sft Aim! ton 
9ft 6ft Albert* 

9% Sft Aloha 
19 9ft Alphaln 
ift ft a Hex 
36 30 Alcoa Of 375 118 

28ft 12ft AhnCp 
10ft 10ft Amdahl 
lift SftMmedco 
13ft Sft Am Birr 
fft 4 AmCan 
43ft IBM AExpwt 
9 Sft A F rue A 
9 5V6 AFrucB 

12ft 7ft AHIttlM 
8 4ft A Israel 
19ft 12ft AMzeA 
IBft T3ft AMuB 
3ft ft AMBU 
6ft 3 AfflOII 
62ft S6ft A Pott 
16 12% APrecs 

left lift ARovfn 
3 ASdE 
Ift Ampd 
4ft Andal 
aft AndJcP 
5ft Angles 
ft Angel wt 
ft vfAnglv 
3ft AraoPt 
5ft Artovn 
4ft Armtm 
714 Armels 
15ft Arundl 
4ft Asmrg 
l Asrraic 


3ft 
6 

Bft 
12ft 
2ft 
2ft 
6ft 
7ft 
lift 
lift 
24 
7ft 
3ft 
17ft 
1ft 

eft - 

mi 13ft Avondl 80 15 13 


7ft Astrotpf 180 1X6 


15 5 5 

120 I7ii 16 16% —1ft 

8 17ft 17%. 17ft — ft 
2B7 4 3% 3ft— W 

B6 on so eo _i 
49 3 3 a 

16 10 9ft 9ft 

152 12*1 U 13ft 

4i aft aft aft 

589 4ft 4ft 4ft— ft 
44 26ft 2Sft 25ft— ft 
130 17ft 17ft 17ft— ft 
10 4ft 4ft 4ft 

105 45ft 45 45ft + ft 
159 5% 5ft Sft — ft 

27 10% 10ft IN 

154 .2ft ,=£ 

U ft 95 95%. — ft 

67 7 6ft 6ft— ft 

S3 Sft Bft Bft + ft 

17 1J£ 12% 1^ 

13 7SBl 34ft 34 34 —1 

35 305 22ft 22 22 — ft 

18 17 290x 14% 13ft 13ft— ft 
M 56 Sft Sft Sft 

1J 5 46 lift lift lift— ft 

19 26 6ft 4ft 6ft + ft 

134 34ft 33ft 33ft— I 
2316300Z Sft 6ft 6ft— ft 

24 IB89z 6 6 6 

10 17 Bft Bft Bft + ft 

72 6ft 6ft 6ft + ft. 
27 14ft 14ft 14ft 
10 13ft 13ft 13ft + ft 
329 Sft 3 3 — K 

7 3ft 3ft 3ft + ft 

3 59 5* 59 

27 15ft IS 15ft 

236 13ft 13ft 15ft— ft 
32 5ft Sft 5ft— %| 
25 2ft 2 1 

226 Sft Sft Sft— VI 
24 2ft 2ft 2H 
20 8 B > — Ml 

e lft i ift + ft 
1 1U lta 1ft + ft | 
IB 3ft 3ft 3ft 
1 Sft Sft Sft — ft I 
7 51« 5 5ft— ft 

4 Sft Bft Bft— ft 
4 20ft 20ft 20ft + ft 

693 Bft 8ft Bft— .ft 
Ift 1% Ift— ft 


4ft 2ft GTI 138 

15V. 10% GolBxC 9 

3 1ft GalxyO ^ » 

33 24ft Goran 180 48 13 

18ft 7ft Gafijr 

4ft 2ft Gemco 
18% 12ft GDefrn 
5 2ft GtiEtnp 
eft 2ft Genisco 
16ft TVs Gerrvor 
14 -7W GeaR« 

4% IftGeaRwt 
12ft Oft GeaftsptlXlO 
28ft 13ft Getty* .16 

22ft lift GtanF s 80 
14ft 8 Gnrng 
25ft 19ft Glattlt 

37 XPh Gtnmr 

5 2ft GIObNR 

2lft 13ft Glaser 

8ft 3 GaMW 
1 U ft GW Fid 
19ft 1 » GOTRPS 76 48 7 
2716 20ft GooMT Jtr J 7 

11 6ft GrahMC 1850278 
24ft 16ft GmdAu AD Z.1 13 

12 7ft Grant * 

2ft ft Grant wt 

15ft 10ft GrTech 17 

44ft 27 GrtLkC M U 17 

36 12ft Grown s 14 

13 4ft Greiner 13 

13ft Oft GraCH Jflb 48 9 
1 5ft 11 GltCdg 82 

36ft 22ft Glfstr AD 18 14 

IjW 8 Gull J05D A 24 


U i 

5-9 13 

18 14 
5 

B8 

8 

14 


80 28 7 
T-OBb 16 23 

84 12 10 


3 9ft 9ft 2ft + » 

» 12% ^ T* - 14 

»ft Wk * ft 

US «h 9 M 

™ 3S 9 

12ft 12 12% + » 

Mh M6 % 

»ft 20ft 20V*— ft 
13 irw 12ft — ft 

34ft 34 + % 

28% a a — w 
» m 

19%. 19ft >2? ,, 

3% 3ft 3ft- »• 
9k ft +• 
uft 18ft IBft 
a 26ft 2414 »« + ft 
IDB M » '* 

4 19ft 19 19ft u 
14 7ft 7ft 7ft— % 
10 'ft ft ft 

31 13 12ft 121b. 

330 43 41Vk 41ft— ft 
451 28ft 27M. 27ft— 1ft 

is lift lift “ft — J? 
62 lift ’Sft 11 — ft 
13600 Mft 14ft 14ft 

a 34ft 34ft 34ft— ft 

32 IJft IJft 13ft— ft 


TVS 
3*« PtonrSv 
4ft PHWVe 


10 


3M 

12 

1 

15 
47 

5 

10B 

W 

65 

si 

16 
2 

11 

89 

I 


86 108 

15% 10ft PHDM „ 

Mft 64 Plflwoy 180 2-5 » 
17ft 6ft P^OIB ■“ 

30ft 1 5ft PlcrOO JO 
MW 12ft PlrGffi* 

4ft 2ft PIvRA 
4% 2'u PlyRB 
7ft 3U PoceEv 
12ft 7ft PgflSvs 

i7i*i law postipr 

30ft 1W: Pratt L 
■ft 6ft PiWtR8 
Ift ft premRs 
12ft 6ft PresR B 

5tu 3ft PresM . . 

22ft » PrpCTs 182 JJ ’J 
3+ta We PravEn ZB* ^ 7 
22ft 15ft POtBlC 284 |;J 
34ft 28% PgtpfE 4J7 1X3 
23ft 14 - “ 


9 



SV 


V.v 

*« 

* * -3 


29ft 

i** 

Wft- V 


l?» 

Ills 

IS a 


trt 


Dl*4. 

179 


7*4 

?ft * 

7C 

' ' ri 

> '41 

: 





6 

Wi 

14% 

14 k. — ^ 

36 


3 

3 - 4 


X* 

r-. 

i S * V 

m 

4% 

6ft 

»v 


r* 

3*# 



5ft 

Fit 

S-i 


18 25 
19 


5 

46 

70c 18 U 
7! 34 11 
881 

t! U I 
IS 


Bft 

■2ft 12' t 77ft— 

* 7H ?ft_ 

lei, :9 *.9 — 

IS - * li '. 15-1 — 
4 Ft 
I'* y- i% 
3 ft 2*1 
10ft l(ft luft *+ 
17 ; 73 ft 13' f 
25'e 25S. 25%- 
7ft 7=-, rft 

ft 4 + 
17ft lift V. , — 

4 4 4 

5! ft Sl»v 2 ; ‘i — 
31 37ft 31 ▼ 

30ft W»e 25ft * 
U 32ft 11 * 

72-i 72ft — 


H 


2 

82 38 43 
82 38 42 

10 

380 &4 34 
J4b 18 19 

■" 50M 32 

* “l? 



6% HAL 

.Me 1.1 

32 

T9Vi 

9% HUBC 

30B XI 

12 


7*k Henwtl 

331123 

7 


33 Hndymn 

8Se 

2 



17V Hontedi 

30 

ID 



V Harww 




39ft 

19 Hasbrs 

•IS 

A 

II 


; m 
73 
IB 


0% B9k— Vi 


30% 19*6 IBS + ft 

.. 7*k 7ft TV, + Vi 

89 2416 234* CTk- ft 

57 34ft 34 34 — V. 

300 2ft Ift n 

1316 34% 32% 5**— » 

43 ' 22ft Hasbr pf 280 5.1 19 39% 39 39 

43ft 2Bft Hast! rig 80a U 6 2 34 34 34 — ft 

25*6 16ft HHtlCra 2JMOBJ 10 300 24ft 24ft 24% — ft 


5ft HlttlCh 
Bft Hllh Ex 
6U HeinWr 
9ft Hetnlck 
2ft Holder 
3ft Helton! 
ft HeimR 
4 Hersno 
lft Hlndri 
9ft Hlptran 
2ft Hetman 
6ft HallyCp 


I* 
22 

: 2J 9 
J TO 
83 


10 


165 9ft 
40 10ft 
3 Bft 
SO 16 
2 2ft 
40 5 

163 ft 

30 4ft 

31 lft 


9 9ft— ft 
9*6 9ft— ft 
Bft Bft + ft 
15ft 15*6— ft 
2ft 2ft 
Sft 4ft 
ft ft— ft ! 
4ft 41h— ft 
lft lft— '8 


| 



— 

O 

— 



"~1 

10V 

3V Ouebgs 




19 

5V 

V* 

cvj a ;* 

1 1 



851 

58 

1) 

77 

r 

A r n 

7 \ t 

IB% 



8 


n 

IV- • 


hi 


15 Ransng 

72 

48 

45 






V Rattsrr 









10ft Raven ■ 

32 

3J 




ia "M 






9 

7 





I7Ti RHSaan 




0 














IDl'i RKJBI5 

IO) 58 

10 

7 



•p * -■ 














14 



S 



9Vt RlftWIP 

3D 

28 

10 

D 

X0-. 









■ B 

“te 




36 

13 

25 

91 

3Mk 

Wr 







27 


Aril -4 

A-'A — Vl 

















6 : 






1 

3« 


eL 1 









* 3 — '• 



JO 






1. — 2 

29ft 

14 RVkOH 

30 

18 


62 

3 l . 


?"*4 “ V* 

1 — E ' 


AtttCM 

Audfotr 


^7 13ft 13£.3£-ft 


3U 3ft J» 
14ft 14ft 14ft 


84 L7 II 

21 90 HmlnspfZ9S 148 

29ft 28 Horml 188 28 13 
16ft 8ft HrnHar JU 88 15 
Ok lft HmHwt 871148 
IBft 17% HoftPtv 180 98 17 
6ft lft HOtfPwt 
6ft 3ft HouOT 81 el 97 
Uft 9ft HavnE 9 

1316 Sft Howl in JOcU 7 
46ft 32ft HubeM 182 3 A 12 
46ft 31ft HubeSS 182 X3 13 
21ft 17*6 HudGn AD 12 U 
H 6ft Hustcyg 86 5.1 


7 16ft 16 14 — *6 

•£ 14H 14% I«1 + ft 

^s:rf- s 

^ ?5 HS 

35 18*6 1M6 1B6- ft 
7 5*6 Sft Sft— Vi 

1250 4*6 4*6 4*6 + ft 

18 13ft IJft 13ft + ft 

3 10*6 10V, 10ft— ft 

7 45 4446 44*6— ft 

52 45ft 45% 45ft 

2 17ft 17ft 17ft 
239 7V6 6ft 7 


.10r 18 1 
88 105 


56 2.1 13 
.10 18 

8 

80 9 S 


Industrials 


1 I 


.U 


Prev. Day Open ltd. 8864 0H751 
HOGS (CME) 


30800 lbs.- cents per lb. 
54J7 41.97 Aug 

4535 

4535 

45J0 

4532 

—.13 

5175 

3085 

Ocl 

41.11 

41.15 

40 JO 

*4035 

—35 

SOBS 

3930 

Dec 

4X30 

4X30 

4257 

4277 

—33 

5037 

4070 

Feb 

4435 

4435 

4385 

4X07 

— JB 

4785 

3880 

Apr 

41 JO 

41 JO 

4080 

40.97 


*985 

4180 

Jun 

4935 

4X95 

4X50 

4X57 

4985 

42 IS) 

Jul 

44J0 

44J0 

4380 

4190 

—^9 

5T.5® 

.32.95 

Aug 

4210 

4210 

4210 

4210 

—1.15 

4180 

*0.95 

Oct 

41.10 

41.10 

4000 

4182 

—80 

Est. Sales 4334 Prev. Sales 6726 
Prev. Day Open Int. 1X171 oN46 





6*08 

«mn 

Aug 

4108 

6118 

4108 

4129 

11838 

5738 

Sep 

6158 


6118 


6348 


Oct 

6188 

ATIfl 

6188 

6203 

12308 

5908 

Oec 



62X0 

4398 

12158 

5958 

Jan 




119X0 


Mar 

6438 


6378 

6421 

10*88 


May 

6478 

45X0 

6478 

651.1 

9458 

63X0 

Jul 

A60J 


6918 

6607 

9408 

6418 

Sep 

6308 



67X9 

7998 

6608 

Dec 




6063 

7098 

6788 

Jun 




6923 

7708 

6778 

Mar 

7000 


7008 

70X7 

72B8 

6938 




7157 

Est Safes 





Prev. Day Open Hit. 7X75* 0H229 




LUMBER (CME) 

130800 bd. H.- s per 1800 bd. R. 

19750 13350 Sep 13190 13680 1300 13480 —A0 

186.10 13450 Nov 13780 13820 13580 135J0 —80 

10780 14280 Jan 14X60 14500 14X20 14240 —180 

1 9580 14TJ0 Mar MOJO 15180 14B40 14980 —1.10 

T7640 15380 May 155.10 15450 154S0 ISajHJ —80 

18380 15950 Jul 16180 16180 15B40 15040 —.90 

17680 16350 Sap 16380 16380 16250 16250 —180 

Eif.Salet Prev. Sates 1808 
Prev. Dav Oaen im. 8842 off is 


40 


X7 10 
17 
34 


COTTON 2 (NYCEJ 
50000 R>&- cents oer lb. 


—S3 
— 55 


PLATINUM (NYMEi 
50 trevaz.- dollars per trovoz. 

39180 25000 Oct 2*050 28280 27650 27880 — £20 

37350 25750 Jan 28580 20550 28180 28130 -550 

32950 26450 Apr 29180 29150 2B780 28X20 SJV 

30280 271t:3 Jut 29380 29380 29150 29340 -680 

KiLOO 3EL5Q Oct 

Est Salas Prev. 5a lea 273 

Prev. Day Open Int. 6864 oft 481 9 


7730 

5930 

Oct 

6030 

6030 

9935 


—32 

7X00 

5930 

Dec 

6X30 

6035 

«0L1O 

6035 

—.15 

76.73 

6080 


6130 

61J0 

4090 

61.12 

—80 

7080 

59 JJ 

MOV 

61.10 

61.10 

607V 

6180 


7X05 

5930 

Jul 

6075 

6075 




6530 

5420 

Oct 

5530 

553Q 

5530 

5532 

—.11 

59J5 

5X15 

Dec 

5430 

5453 

5435 

5430 

—.10 

Eri. Sales 


Prev. Sates 2393 





4ft 3tk BAT In 
25*6 lift BOM a 
3ft lft BRT 
lift 10K BSN 
13ft 8 Badoor 
17ft 7ft Baker 
W4 7ft DoldwS 
6ft 2% BatyMwl 
24ft 21ft BanFd 243o 95 

7ft 4% Banstrg 

9ft 6ft BnkBId 40 48 14 

4ft 3V« Barco 

4ft 2ft BarnEn 18 

10 6ft Bomwl 80 2.9 
4ft 4 BarvRG 
13ft 10% Baruch 87t 3J 19 
12 4ft Beard 
22ft IT BetdBIfc 180 164 
5ft ft Betirn v 2 

32*6 20ft BeraBr 82 1.1 14 

»■ 21*6 BIcCP 72 2J 9 

ISft Vft BttfV 40 27 IB 
24 20ft BlnkMt 180 45 10 


Prev. Day Open Int. 1*876 off 147 
HEATING OIL (NYME) 

42800 oaf- cents par oal 


40 24 


27 



PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Options strike 

Underlying Price 

_ Sep Dec fi 

Ojob BfWMi peandi coof per owH. 
BPoand 110 2440 r 

13X94 ns r r 

13X94 120 r r 

13154 125 r r 11.90 

11X94 — ~ ■“ " — 

13X94 
13X94 
11384 
13384 


Aug. 6 


Pets— Last 
Sep Doc M, 



5.90 


050 


1258B0 French Fraocs-IBfh* 
FFranc ios r 

11489 115 . r 

1MJB 120 0/Jffl 

6830808 Japaoeie Yen-lfiottw 


JYrfl 

40 

r 

41.90 

41 

1JM 

4170 

42 

031 

41.90 

43 

aio 

41.90 

44 

084 




■nit 
r r 
0.10 044 


1J8 


6UK Serin Fnmocents gar onH. 


SFrnnc 

36 

631 

r 

r 

r 

r 


4225 

37 

r 

4JB 

630 

r 

r 


4225 

39 

r 

r 

r 

r 

0J3 


4225 

40 

23B 

jj$ 

r 

OJB 

r 


4225 

41 

r 

259 

r 

076 

r 

1.12 

*225 

42 

177 

2 JJk 

r 

X57 

r 


4225 

43 

JIB 

1,56 

r 

185 

r 


4225 

44 

028 

r 

r 

r 

r 

234 

4225 

45 

X14 

ass 

r 

r 

r 

r 


Total cairvaL 6,111 Call open Int. 

Total pat voL 5441 Pot open Int. 

r— Not Iradea a — No option offered. 

Lost Is premium (purchase price). 

Source; AP. 


19*474 

137444 


PALLADIUM (NYMEI 

100 trovoz- do) Ian per ox 


763S 

6630 

Sea 

7130 

71 JU 

7180 

7159 

—51 

77.10 

6735 

Oct 

7231 

7235 

7130 

7285 

—36 

7435 

6030 

Nov 

7375 

7375 

7250 

7292 

—39 

7X25 

69.15 

Dec 

7195 

7335 

7X20 

n« 

—at 

7630 

6930 

Jan 

7475 

7475 

7X65 

74.10 

—32 


7X00 

Feb 




7X10 

—.15 

7380 

6B80 

Mar 

7075 

7075 

7X25 

7030 

— .15 

7480 

6880 

APT 




6835 

—15 

6X00 

A&JU 

May 




6730 

-.15 

Eri. Sales 


prev. Sales 7871 





45 


80 


14135 

9030 

Sep 

9930 

9930 

9780 

9735 

—205 

14130 

!27^ 

9180 

Dec 

9980 

9975 

9775 

9770 

—XUS 

91 JO 

Mar 

9935 

10080 

mss 

9775 

— X2S 

114J» 
Eri. Sales 

9130 

Jun 903} 
Prev. Sales 

9930 

9X50 

9735 

—385 


Prev. Day Open Inf. 22406 up 2*4 
CRUDE OIL (NYME) 

UlOObOL- donors per bbL 


19 9ft BUR As 
39 l«ft Blesngs 

2ft ft Block E 

19ft 13ft BtoUhlA 

19ft 13ft BtountB 

23 lift BolorPs 

IBft 10ft SowVol 

5ft 2ft Bawmr 19 

19 12*6 Bonne .44 25 17 

26ft 19!i Brscng 148 

37ft 25 BmFA 180 Z7 11 
40ft 27ft BrnFB 180 25 12 

4ft 3ft BmFpf 40 97 

5ft 3*6 Buckhpf 50 108 

34*6 24% Buell 40 27 6 
13*4 7ft Blistin 7 


.140 3J 6 2951 4ft 4% 4% 

27 35 24ft 24 24ft— ft 

8 119 3 2ft 3 + ft 

6 12ft 12ft 12ft— ft 

75 I) 10ft 10ft + ft 

2 14ft 14*6 Mft 

4 946 9ft 9ft— ft 

7 3ft 3% 3ft 

5x 25ft 25ft 25ft + 16 

2 7ft 7ft 7ft 

3 Bft Oft Bft 

28 3ft 3ft 3*6— ft 

19 2ft 2ft 216 

IS Bft 6ft 6ft 

61 Sft 4ft Sft— ft 

2 lift lift lift 

295 lift lift lift + ft 

5 11 II II 
10 ft ft ft 

306 30ft 30ft 30U>— ft 
135 32*6 31*6 31*6— *6 
15 14ft 14*6 14ft 
14 22ft 22*6 22*6— ft 

6 18 17ft 10 

sJ 2 ? 

33 16*6 16 16 

4 16 16 16 — ft 

242 lift 18*6 19 —I 

77 II 10*6 10ft— ft 

62 5ft 5*6 546 + U 

234 17ft 17ft 1716— 16 
321 22ft 22 22 — ft 

7 36ft 36ft 36ft— ft 
91 40ft 39ft 39ft— ft 
12 Sft Sft Sft 

7 4*6 4*6 4*6— ft 

10 77% 27*6 27V 
9 Bft BV6 8*6 


It 



6 ICEEn 



11 


6ft 

Bft 

4*1— ft 








4ff«b 


7ft 

2% ICO 



275 

30 

7ft 

2*4 

2*4— ft 






47 

TV 

7ft 

Jft 

17V 

6ft 1 RT Cp 



36 

57 

16ft 

« 


2V 

Ift ImpGp 

.lie 

4 A 


35 

7ft 

2ft + Ik 

7% 

1% Imp Inn 




7 

lft 

1% 



27ft ImPOila 130 



17 

36V 

36% 


13% 

Bft Inflght 



13 

31 

11V 

lift 

11V + ft 

22ft 

11 Instras 

70 

18 

a 

40 

TOV 

19Vk 


2*6 

lft tnriSy 



a 

217 

lft 

IV 


3V 

2ft InsSypf 

751103 


1 

TV 

TV 

2ft— ft 

12ft 

Aft intctyg 

30 



35 

11V 

Uft 


IBft 


■ T2b 

8 


75 

14V 

14V 

14V + % 


2% IntBknt 
<ft IntBkwt 




313 

3V 

3ft 

3*6— ft 







lft 

1ft 


AV IntHvd 



21 

a 

7V 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft 

3ft intPvn- 



45 

77 

Aft 

6% 

4%— ft 

IOV 

6 intThrn 



29 

90 

£V 

6*4 


TOV 

A InThrnt 




169 

Aft 

Aft 

6*4 

22*6 

12*- 1 aikas 



13 

176 

20% 

19V 



19ft iraaBrd 



36 

21 

*0% 40 

4(5 

4ft 

2ft Holy 

86 

28 

26 

3 

2V 

29k 

2V— ft 


8*6 4% 5FM 

Bft 7 SFN (rfA 
32*6 lfl SJWs 
5% 2ft SMD 
lift 6*v Sage 
Mft 5 Satom 
2*1 16 SCarlO 

9 6ft SOOO pf 
87ft 69 SDoaPf V-M Ji- 
ao* 18 SDOOPf 2f; 

39V 32% SDsopt +65 1XT 
30V S Sondote 80 15 7 
Sft 3*6 Sanmrk . A3» J6 '? 
6*6 Sft Sound A 8 11 1 

11 9ft Sound Pf 180 117 
1516 11V Searren 
5V 3ft Soeptrn 
28 17*6 School 

7ft JV SclMgt 
35 12V SCILSO 

IBft 11 ScurRn 

62 35 SbdCp 

2ft Ift Seoaort 
15ft IM SecCap 
47k 7Va SelsPra 
*6 seusn 
3ft SengAs 
2% Semteh 
5ft Servair 
10V 11V Solans 
ISft Bft ShoerS 
T* '% Sharon 
19*6 10ft Shopwf 
Uft 12ft SlerHSn 
ISft M StorSpn 
Uft 7ft Stored 
TVi 5 Sltco 
15V Oft sik esA 
6% 3ft Sllvrcsl 
20ft 10ft SmthA 80 
iev io 5m mo M 
25V 25 Smrhpf Ll! 

BV 5% Satltran 
IBft XT* SorwPrn 
lft ft SoTW 
Mft 7ft SCEdal 1JB 108 
lift Tft SCEdal 186 104 
B SCEdPf 18B 108 
Bft SCEdPf 1.19 102 


5 M2 Sft 4 •— 

t* B 7i» ;■> 

? 31 36% X 4 - 

is JV 3 3% * 

30 1% * 

1 bV 4V 6% — 


7 Bft BV EV * 'to 

50s Bs-w 8*% B4% -1 
1 23% 73% 33« - '< 
IT 38% 37-* 5B% + . 
? 71 23 ?J - -S 

10 Si ! 5 

10 5% Vs 5 :- ■} 

15 10*6 10 d 10 . — to 
04 14*. Mft M% 

? ?-| 

34 26% 2»% 76 , — % 
f-‘% — - y • 


6’t J’, 

16ft 16ft ij., 

IS k IE : If : - 
S7-T Stz 


2ft 

5*6 

4V 

12ft 


IJ 8 
75 


II 


lft 

•3 

3 


1ft 

11% 

3 

5% 


Ift 


Mt 6.9 20 
.12 J 10 
100c BL0 7 

.16b .« 

48 

871 20 32 
40 48 14 
.101 IB 
80 18 13 

80 38 
60 35 
8J 


53 


lift 

12*6 


IS 1 x — V* 
•4 — 

i: i 

13+i 
b - 5 


Sft 

2 


17V 12V Jodyn 
7% 5V« Jacobs 
2ft Jot Am 
ft Jet Awl 
41% Jetran 
3 John Pd 
716 JohnAm 
Sft Jetmlnd 
3ft JmpJkn 
24*6 Jupiter 


Sft 

lift 

11V 

7ft 

36 


■71t 95 M 

50 XI 13 
4 
9 
10 


14ft T4V6 14ft 
6*6 6*6 6*6 

* X V* 

7*4 7ft 7ft— V 
3*6 3*6 3*6 
996 9*6 9*6— ft 

7*k 716 7*6 
3*6 346 3*6 

35V 35V 35V 


23ft 17ft SCEdpf 
2314 17ft SCEdpf 
B5ft 61 SCEOPf 


Prev. Dav Open Int. 7804upl77 
GOLD (COMEX) 

100 fray a%- del lars per trey az. 

4BS80 29180 Aug 320J0 37150 31980 320L70 —200 

32030 31550 Sap 3222! — UB3 

49380 29780 Ocl 32450 32580 32250 3M.40 —200 

40950 30150 Dec 32850 32940 32780 32BS0 —280 

48550 30680 Feb 33150 33X70 33150 33380 —280 

49680 31470 Apr 33650 33680 33680 33740 —280 

43SJO 32050 Jun 34080 34080 34080 342-30 —280 

42B40 33180 Aug 34780 34780 34780 347 JO —280 

395l 70 33S.80 Ocl 35250 —288 

39X00 34280 Dec 05780 35780 35780 35780 —280 

37480 3S5JH Apr 369 JW —2X0 

Jun 375.10 —280 

Est. Sotos Prw. Sales 25829 

Prev. Day Open mi. 122863 up 655 


2930 

2480 

Sep 

2739 

27X5 

2730 

2737 

—416 

29JM 

2445 

Oct 

2638 

26JB 

2631 

2669 

— 39 

2930 

7U9 

140* 

HM 

26X0 

2633 

26X7 

—m 

2930 

2180 

Dec 

2687 

26.11 

2681 

2689 

+81 

2930 

24JB 

Jan 

S5JM 

2386 

2575 

2587 


2936 

2433 

Feb 

2535 

2335 

2960 

2530 

—82 

2935 

24.13 

Mar 

2935 

2936 

25X5 

7530 

— JD 

2786 

2X65 

Mav 

2sjn 

2580 

2580 

25J» 

—.11 

2+70 

2X7B 

jun 

2430 

2471 

2430 

2471 

— JS 


28ft 11 V CD I s 
1236 516 CMI Cp 

Sft IV CMX CP 
19*6 13V CR5 


Est. Sales. Prw. Soles 9330 
Prw. Day Open Int, 1UU up 633 


Stock Indexes 


Flnoncioi 


US 7. B1LL5UMM1 

11 million- Pti of 100 pel 


9133 

06.94 


9271 

9273 

9267 

9267 

+81 

9107- 

8577 

Dec 

9232 

9236 


9231 

+JU 

9X59 

8630 

Mar 

9180 



9183 


9238 

8781 

Jun 

9133 

9134 

9130 

9131 

+84 

9201 

0080 

Sep 

91X2 

9U2 


91 JO 

+84 

91.78 

•985 

Dec 

9180 

9180 

9180 

9184 

+85 

91 Jf 

S9J5B 

Mar 

9080 

*080 

9079 

9079 

+84 

9083 

9X30 

Jtm 




9084 

+87 

Eri. Sates 


Prw.Sakra 5,120 





Prw. Dav Open int. 37.996 up3B 
10 YR. TREASURY (CBT) 
I100800prln-pti&32ndaaf WOpct 


B8-21 

75-10 

Sep 

8+20 

0+25 

8+10 

8+11 

■7-13 

75-13 

Dec 

S3-10 

8+36 

83-10 

03-11 

0+2 

75-14 

Mar 

02-25 

0246 

82-14 

03-15 

05-7 


Jipi 

01-31 

81-31 

81-20 

HI -21 

04-4 

BO-7 

Sep 

BM 

81-8 

80-TV 

00-30 

03-11 

B0-2 

Dec 

BO-19 

00-19 

BM 

809 

Esi. Sales 


Prev. Sale* 9346 




SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
eaintaand cento 

19H80 16080 Sep 191JS 19180 18780 10780 —280 

20OB5 17270 Dec 194J0 19450 19035 19045 —380 

20X75 190.10 Mar 19780 19780 19X45 19X45 -540 

20650 19080 jun 19645 19645 19645 19645 — 130 

Ect. Sales 64,112 Prev. Sato* 47805 
Prev. Day Open Int. 6140B up 1853 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 

Paints and cents 

21X20 1BS75 Sop 20X30 20X90 19980 1998S —425 

21785 2DQX0 Dec 206J5 3ML9S 20180 20185 — 4JS 

20940 20980 Mar 20485 204.95 20485 20485 —585 

Est. 5a toft Prw. Sates 5419 

Prev. Day Open Int. 12327 up493 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
points and cento 

11BX5 9185 SOP 11180 11185 10085 10X70 —215 

11780 101 JD DOC 11280 11280 11035 11085 —280 

11275 109 JO Mar 1MJ0 11430 11240 11280 —225 

12080 11540 JUn 11X73 11X75 11X75 11X65 —230 

Est. Sates 13425 Prev. Sales 10JM1 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 11X52 off 25 



2B 20 28 — ft 

12 lift lift— ft 

IV IV IV 
19V 1BV 1916 + ft 

7 11V 11V 11V— ft 

6 6 6 6 

76 12% 12 1216 + 16 

*07 ’Si *§V a 5V + * 1 

0 V V V 


.10 


861165 
J»b 54 
2200 7 J 

187el2l 

80 


Commodity Indexes 


Prw. Dor Open Int. 6X450 up 1890 
US TREASURY BONDS (CET) 
(BpCt-5100800-PtS A32ndsof lOOpd) 


79-12 

57-10 

Sep 

75-14 

7S-15 

7+29 

74-31 

78-13 

57-0 

Oec 

7+9 

7+12 


7+27 

77-29 

57-2 

Mar 

73-14 

73- 14 


72-27 

7+6 

56-29 

Jan 

72-9 

72-12 


71-29 

75-31 

5+29 


71-14 



71-2 

7+3* 

56-25 

Dec 

70-23 

70-25 

70-7 

70-9 

7+15 

5+27 

MOT 




69-19 

7+26 

63-12 

Jun 

<*■12 

*9-12 

60-30 

68-30 


Moody's. 

Reuters _ 

DJ. Futures. 


Close Previous 

90580 f 902J0 f 

1,715.50 1,711.80 

_ — 114.98 11439 

Com. Research Bureau. 72030 221.20 

Moodies : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
p- preliminary; f -final 
Reuters : hose 100 : Sep. 18. 1931. 

Daw Janes : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1974. 


X2 11 

ia 

.16 8 19 

.16 4 20 

1800 64 11 

.17 8 30 

180b X5 B 
170 38 9 
1.930 5L1 
780 27 10 
8Se 27 9 

.16 1.1 12 

70 21 9 


16 

47 

2 

B 

21 

1 

10 

384 


Cash Prices 


Commodity and Uan 
Coffee 4 SantDAlb- 



London 

Gxnmodhles 


Printdoth M/30 Eft, yd _ MB 

Stoat bllleto (PffU. ten 47380 

Iran 2 Fdrv. Philo. Ion 21180 

Steel sow No 1 hw Pitt. _ 72-73 

Lead Soot, lb ljwn 

Copper elect, lb — »7l 

Tin (Slratft), lb 62113 

Zinc. E. St. U Basis, ft Ml -47 



Zinc. E. St. U BaNs. ft . 
Palladium, oz , 

Silver n.y. di . 

Source: AP. 


90.101 

6.11 


D 1 VI Futures 
Options 

W. Gurnee wrHStE nw r to asft per purl 


Aug.6 

HOHG+CONG GOLD FUTURES 
U8J per oonco 

Close. ^ Previous 
Low eld Ask BU ASK 
N.T. 321JU 32380 32280 32480 
N.T. 32280 32480 32480 32680 
N.T. 32X00 32580 32680 32880 

NX 32B80 33080 33080 33200 

Feb - 33480 33480 33280 334 JM 33480 33680 
Apt _ N.T. N.T. 33680 33880 339JSS MUSS 
Jun _ 34280 34280 341.(39 34100 34X00 34580 
Volume: 23 tots of 100 az. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UJJ per peace 


Sep. 


Aog. 6 
Ptwloos 
EM 


See 

Dec 

Mr 

Sa 

111 

275 

X2S 

184 

180 

2 JB 

230 

0.15 

033 

135 

187 

036 

032 

0.99 

156 

185 

087 

035 

I.K 

180 

ntn 

034 

086 



U 


3) 

31 

35 

36 

37 

38 

entmetod mm voL 4870 
Crib: Mon. vri. U95 ogee lot 3UB5 

Pvt* : Mon. vsLVJM seen tot 26427 
Source: CME. 


Aug. 6 
Pun- Settle 
Dec Mo 
SJi 063 




291 

170 

176 

233 


Volume: TOIotoaf lOOOz. 

J KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
| Malaysian cento per kilo 
Cine 

Bid Arii 

Aug 191 JO 193J0 

S» 191 JO 19100 

Oct 191J0 19X50 

htov mm rnxoo 

D« I92J0 19450 

Volume: 0 lots. 

I SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Shigaiwe cento pgr KUo 


Web 

prev. 

Settle 


Dec 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

32180 


Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

32170 


Jlr 

N-T. 

H.T. 

QSiO 


Sea 

32980 

32980 

32980 

33130 



Prev low 
BU 
19050 19180 
19075 19175 

19180 19280 

19200 mm 
19X80 19580 


Nov offering 
CBOT 


BOND 

FUTU RES 

& mmmm 




FUTURES 

OPTIONS 

Also Futures and 

Futures Options <m 
COMEX-GOLD & SILVER 
IMM -CURRENCIES 


bmwvm 

s. 15 


anuNnniRN 
i«y ami 
OVERNIGHT 


'.ififtfies iui/i - id Inutn 
iBwtvriiifQ JVi tiur/niito fvr 
uttmuhir nttmth Fin/ jw 
u minuit SJ5 ruiinif Ihin. 

( all i me iHir ptKlt+MiHiah' 

2 1 2-22 1 -7 1 3H 
Tvltrx. 

BEPUBUC GLCiUUNG 
COBPOBATION 


HepehfcllaffaMlBBBfcaliMrfck 

\ 91/ Blllkn t imnmmil lunt 


RSS 1 Aup_ 
RSS 1 Sep_ 
R5S2AUP- 

RSSSAua. 
RSS 4 Auo_ 
RSS 5 Aug ^ 


Bid 

17380 

17150 

1605 

16225 

15825 

17375 


17X50 

17280 

16525 

16375 

16025 

15575 


Prwtoos 
Bid Ask 
M 17380 
I71J0 17280 

16475 16575 

1*275 16X75 
15B75 16075 

15175 155J5 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Matayskn rtaegHipar 25 lea 


Aug , 
5 op- 
oci . 


Mar , 
Mav . 
Jiv. 


BM Afk 

BBO 920 

BU 90S 

BM 900 

650 900 

SS0 B90 

840 190 

B40 BM 

B» 870 

820 B70 


volume: 0 tots of 25 tons. 
Source: Reuters. 


BM 

880 


B40 

&m 

830 

839 

B20 

BIO 


Ask 

939 


890 

BBO 

880 

H70 

860 

BU 


Owe 

High LOW BM Aik 

SUGAR 

Starling per metric ton 
Oct 13X80 12780 12980 13070 13180 13170 
DOC 13&80 13X09 13X40 13X60 13480 13440 
Mar 14880 14040 14380 14X2D 1448S 14580 
May KOBO 14480 14580 14670 14880 14SJSB 
Aug 14940 14940 14980 15180 15240 15X00 
Oa 15580 15380 15X20 15448 15680 15740 
volume: 3L434 tots of 50 font. 

COCOA 

Sterling per metric too 
Sea 173* 1JB 1711 1720 149* 1497 

1719 1708 1716 1717 1498 1499 

I.™ 17» 1711 1719 !71_I 1712 

1735 1728 1731 1732 

1753 1746 1747 1748 

1745 ITS! 1760 174* 1J« 1761 

1772 1372 1771 1773 1772 1773 

Volume: 34» toto of 10 tons. 

COFFEE 

Sterling per metric ton 
Sep 1469 14£ 1452 1455 1465 146B 

1307 J4tt 1491 1492 1702 1705 

1769 

1790 

N.T. 1810 1850 1800 1850 
Volume: 2400 toto of S tens. 

GASOIL 

UJS. dollars per metric ton 
Aug 232J8 23080 23075 22280 23025 23X80 
22675 Z257S 22575 22680 22450 22475 
22675 22580^25 22580 22680 226125 
226J0 22S2S 22SJ0 22575 2262S 226J0 
2Z775 22450 22450 22675 22675 227.00 
N.T. N.T. 22450 22SJ0 22580 23&8D 
NX NX 22040 22380 21780 22180 
N.T. N.T. 21580 219J0 21580 21 
21 500 7T475 71475 21575 21580 21: 
Volume: 1807 lots erf 100 tom. 

Sources: steuten and London Petr ol e u m ex. 
change taaaoHl. 



1734 1742 1744 
.755 1765 1770 
1780 1787 1.795 
1800 1812 1815 


Sep 
Oct 
Nov 
Dec 
, Jon 


API 


j Dividends 


Coavany 


Aug. 6 

Par Rec 


To Our Readers 

The S & P 100 index options 
were not available io this editoa 
because of transmission delays. 


Per Amt 
OMITTED 

Bibb Co 
Mw)e Star Inc 

REDUCED 

Banfcamgrlca Cp Q JO MO B-15 

STOCK SPLIT 
I RT Prooertv Co 5-for-4 
USUAL 


Amato Industries 
Black Hills &U. 
Cenvlll Invosfon 
OnamptonSarkPtB 
Chicago Pneum. Tl 
aneMnaN B«ll 
Commerce Bncshrs 
DaJa-Deslgn Lab 
Dean Foods Co 

National Convenience Net Off eeconk™ 

FlneJ Inst, Svcs 

United Press I/uenutional fndlSrS* 

HOUSTON— National Conve- 
nience Stores Inc. of the United ^J¥S* plta * 
States reported Tuesday net earn- Km£p£»erfics 
mgs of $15.5 million, or 76 cents a uiSISg acffg 
share, for ll« i fiscal year ended Jiae SSJBltUJSim 
30, down 16 percent from $18.5 gg *”p sinc 
million, or 93 cents a share, a year SSSS nc 
earlier. Sales totaled $927.5 mi]- 
lion, up 13 percent from $819 mil- 
lion in fiscal 1984. 


Q .15 
0 4B 
O 40 
O .10 

3 .10 

n 

5 -o 

O . 86 
0 .14 

Q .S3 
Q 80 
Q 84 
9 AS 
S 83 

a 46 

Q J7ft 
Q 88 
Q -SB 


9-3 B-19 
M B-16 


10-4 

9-13 

9-27 

1H 

MO 

108 

M3 

M 

9-1 

8.30 

9- 10 
HI 
IM li 
9-1 I 
9-6 

10- 18 


MO 

M3 

9-13 

94 

9-13 

9-2S 

M2 

8-14 

B-19 

B-16 

B-15 

B-19 


O 42ft IMS 
0 M MO 
_ 70 

8 .16ft 
JJTft 

a jo 
O .11 
Q m 
a js 


9-10 

9-1 

M3 

9-16 

9-5 

M7 

9*3 


16 

B-16 

HM, 

KM 

8-20 

*-20 

B-16 

BOO 

8-23 

B-16 

B-24 

B-20 


M-MenflHr; Muorterfy; S-Srml- 
Seurcor (ip/. 




SUGAR. ^ ““ 

Fimctt ftana per medic fna 
Oct 1JU 1720 1745 

Dec 1765 1765 1760 

Mor 1445 1415 1425 

Mav 1483 145B 1455 

Aug NX NX 1J00 

Oct N.T. N.T. 1845 

Eat. voL: 1800 toto of 50 tons. Prw, actual 
Saha: 1891 krixOggn Interest: 1*076 
COCOA 

preneb traxs per KM kg 
Sep 2825 2019 2825 2830 +25 

Dec 20W 18*5 1895 1890 +25 

Mar N.T. N.T. 1891 2809 +30 

May NX N.T. 20M — +30 

JIV N.T. NX 2825 — +30 

Sep N.T. N.T. 2830 - +30 

DOC N-T. N.T. 2035 — + 30 

Est. w«L: 23 lots of 10 tom. Prev. octual 
sales: 22 lato. Open Intereri: 7B4 
COFFEE 

Freech fraici per 100 kg 
Sep N-T. N.T. 1800 1815 —5 

Nov 1865 1,965 1,945 1864 —5 

Jan NX N.T. 1.984 — —4 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2810 2840 —7 

Mav N.T. N.T. 2840 2870 +W 

Jty NX N-T. 2850 — +s 

lap N.T. N.T. 2860 — +1 

.Est. yqj.: 4 to to ef i.to tML Prev. actual soles: 
22 tots. Open Interest: 402 
Source: Bourse du Cotnmeroo 


. ss 

H 4ft Cardl ft 
4 iv ca ran 
15V 7ft Corea 
15V 7ft CareA 
13ft Sft CareEn 
48ft 37 CaroPpI 
6V. 3ft Cushion 
22ft 14ft Cast LA 
3Zft 26V CoaFd 
1ft ft Central 
toft iov Cents* 

19 14ft CtryBu 
9ft 5V Cetec 
4V 2ft ChmeH 
29ft 17ft ChtMAs 
29 lTftdltMas 
21ft 16ft ChlRv 
12ft B OifUvg 
30ft 14ft Chlltn s 
33ft lift atodei 
30ft 17 atFSI 
30ft IBft CtvGOS 
42ft 30 Oarait 
12ft 6V CtarkC 
45 22ft Ctartwt 
22ft 10ft CJopaVi 
6ft Sft Cagnltr 
10ft 6V Cdhu 
BV 2V CqIF nt i 
22 BV Comfcd 6 

12ft 8ft Com Inc .16 
lift Bft Comm 
19ft 4Vi CnipCn 

10ft Sft CmpFct 15 

20ft 14ft Cnchm 40 22 18 26 

12ft Bft Cooed F 15 22 

15V 6V Com hr 8 39 

Wk 5V Conqst 93 1931 

5ft lft Conq wt 470 

10 Sft CemOG 43 

21ft 16V CnStorn 231 

15ft 5V vIContA 4 2® 

20 ,7V vICntApf 

16Vfc 15 ConfMtl B 

IMk 10ft Convrin 
19ft 19V C o pl e y n 
2 ft Corodkm 
3ft 2ft CoaCrn 15 

ft CesCrwf 

5*6 CntCrd JOr 21 19 
ft Crwfnf 

7V» CrstFo .1 5e 14 10 

24 Cross 144 48 15 

9ft CmCP 5fl 

7V CrCPB 48 

av 16V CwCPPf 182 87 
2V V CratcR I 

IV CrvstO 
13*6 Cubic 


93 

14 

11 

Bft 

BV 

BV + ft 

1.9 

10 

ia 

17 

l+ft 

16*6— H 



4 

TV 

7ft 

2ft 



60 

IVto 

15% 

15% — V 



a 

71 

23 

21 + ft 


10 

36 

a 

32 

33 — V 

120 

65 

9*6 

TV 

9V 



40 

IV 

m 

IV + ft 


19 

4 

ISft 

15V 

15V— ft 

3 

17 

20 

Mft 

14ft 

14ft— ft 


a 

11 

12V 


12ft— ft 

1X9 

50z 

45ft 

45ft 

45U+1U 


39ft 

30ft KnGepf 

430 128 


7Dz 37ft 

36ft 

37Vk + ft 

4V 

lft KoeohC 



9 

31 

3*6 

3ft 



10 KavCp 


13 



13ft 






10 

X 

12ft 

12W 

12ft + % 

left 

9V KeorNI 

3D 

28 

16 

a 

14V 

14% 

MV + V 

23V 

14% Kenwln 

80 a X7 

10 


71V 

21*6 

21%— V 

13ft Ketchro 

JBt 

XI 

19 

49 

19% 

IBft 

1B*6— % 


SV KevCo 

JOe 33 


5 

BV 

BV 

BV 

17ft 

a KevPti 

JO 

18 

20 

9a 

11 

10% 

11 

■ 

4ft icevCo 



9 

.1 

4ft 

4ft 


9ft 

SV KeyCoun 



a 

Sft 

SM 

5ft— ft 

4V 

2% KJddewt 




78 

3ft 

3ft 

3ft— V 

5% 

3V Klnork 




J0 

4 

3V 

3V— ft 

5V 

TV Kirby 




215 

4^ 

2V 

TV 

Sft 

3ft KltMfg 



15 

7 

4*6 


14 

10ft Knogo 



16 

12 

15 

toft 

15 — V 

16*6 

IO'a Knoll 



15 

a 

16 


ISft- ft 

30ft 

22V KouerC 

232 

XI 

02 

97 

25V 

28ft 

28ft + ft 


3ft SwScsn 
4ft SnedOP 
4 Spencer 
Sft Spndlhn 
1 Sendtwt 
BV Bft StHovn 
21ft 16V 5 hi Prd 
IDKi 7*6 Stonwfl 
21% 12ft StorrtH 


3ft 

7% 

toft 

lift 

3 


as* 93 


SI 

•T'* 

91 , 

9: 

2J0 106 


15 

22 

?'"i 

21 

221 105 


40 

21 


11 

A7D 1X5 


4 

a 

a 

U 

8.96 1X0 


•1 

u 

B3 

02 


u 

2 

3ft 

r-s 




10 

5’- 

5 * 

i 

06j 

22 


yj # 

7J, 



45 

526 

r. 

5- 

4"y 

1 

j 

.00 IJ 

23 

J 

5 

AV 

6-r 

i 


5% 

)•* 3% 

IJ i :?■- 
16' r If, 

IJft IJft 

IB% IB“s 
14% I* 

13. 15% 

10 *c 
5% i 
:rv 

4% 4% 

Wo 18ft toft — % 
lift -.ti + b 

25 . k a 25 
e sv a , 3 
lft 17% 12% — H 

t*J r * 9% 

ICft 1C ts 

10% «% to — % 

'IV ;; 1 :tft + % 
IJ lift IJV 


•% ■%- f-n 


11V 

5*6 

3V 

23 

!lft 

7 


6*6 


132 

19 


141 

=S 

E 


X : — % 


4% 5 TrlCon 
IV SletlEI 
10% SlrlEkt 
SV SiertSft 
IV StnitW 
4*6 SumltE 
14% lift SumtE PI180 138 
9ft 4 SunSL 
2Mk lift SunJr 

JK ,?% SSS? 1 

6ft 4V Susaueh 
lto SwftEne 

6?i SystEns .18 1.1 11 


bp> 4 e- 

13% Uft t»ft 


1* 5*» S , 


.lie 18 26 


41 27 13 
446 14 I* 


% 


JO 

76 


1J0 


14 9 

21 II 

7 

8 

5L6 32 


5 - 

r i 

rsLj t; »- 
*% 

2-j : 

4't 

13 

1? 13 -• 

29 33 ■» 32ft 33ft 

37 Jft »'» Ift - - 
s Hi t3% i?%— 1 m 
n |7V ir iTft— * 
56 5 5 


IS 

210 

14 

tt 

5 


IJ% 
10 t 
.ft 
r: 

w 5-» 
30 19 


t: — 


7lft 31ft ::ft- 
4% 4% 4% - 

9 9 •» — 


4*6 

14V 14*6 14*6— ft 
3016 30ft 30ft— V 
lft ift in— u 
13 T2V 13 — ft 
T6V 16V 14V 
Bft Bft Bft + ft 
2*6 2ft 2V 
2B0 26V 2SV 25V— IV. 
2 27ft 27ft 2716 + ft 
TBV 18V 1BV 
bv ev BV— ft 
33V 32 V 32V — ft , 
30V 30V 30V— V 
20ft 28% 2BV — V 
32V 30V 32 +1V 

38V 30 30 — V 

9*6 9V 9V — ft 
39V 38*6 38*6— V 
MV Uft 14V +1V 
5V 5V 5V + ft; 
ft W ft 1 
7H 6V 7V + V 
55 21ft 20ft 20ft— V 
23 10 V. 10ft 10ft— ft 
55 BV BV Bft— ft 
B 7V 7*6 — ft 
6V 6V 6ft + ft 
18*6 lift 18ft + V 
8 7ft 7ft 
14% 13*6 13*6 — ft 
9V BV 9% + V 
Sft 4V 5 + ft 

6 5V Sft- V 
21ft 20V 21 + ft 

355 13ft 13 13ft 
38 IBft lift IBft— ft 
36 22V 21V 21V— V 
14 12 1TV 11V— ft 
147 19V 19V 1196 + ft 
11 9k 


1 

26 

141 

112 

22 

61 

17 

5 

6 
141 

5 

IS 

65 


37 


ift 

IV LSB 




2 

ift 

lft 

1ft 

3V 

zv LaUorg 




3 

2ft 

2ft 

2ft 

7V 

Sft LoPnt 



6 

1 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft + ft 

15% 

11V LndBnn 

30 

43 

0 

17 

13V 

13V 

13V 

Wft 

11 Lndmk 

30 

3J 

10 

U 

18*6 

18V 

10V- ft 

14V 

9ft Laser 



42 

74 

11 V 

10V 

11 + ft 

13 

9 Lauren 



22 

71 

9ft 

9V 

9ft 

27*6 

21ft Learpp 

380 133 


II 

22% 

22ft 

22V 

9ft 

2ft LeePh 



11 

177 



5V— ft 

31V 

15ft Lehigh s 

.!« 

3 

ID 

to 

20ft 

3ft 20ft— V 


3*6 LolsurT 



6 

3D 

5V 


Sft 

8ft 

5 Lmrtft 



10 




TV 

30% 

7ft LbtFPh 

30 

13 

10 

a 

20% 

20 

2D —ft 

3ft 

lft LlteRri 




a 

IV 

IV 

IV— ft 

3V 

Sft utfld 




3D 

3ft 

3V 

3ft + ft 

3ft 





I 

IV 

IV 

IV 

3*V 

27% ummr 



10 

374 

34ft 

34V 

34ft— 2ft 

toft 

10% Lumex 

88 

5 

30 

» 



15 + ft 

Uft 

B LundvE 



10 

77 

Mft 

13V 

13V— V 

16 

9ft Lurta 



9 

a 

sC4a 

10ft 

10ft— ft 

. 14V 

ID Lvdat 



5 

3 

13V 

13% 

13V 

Mft 

13 LvnCSs 

JO 

15 

9 

a 

14 

Uft 

im— v 

10ft 

Bft LvnchC 

JO 

22 

a 

12 

9 

BV 

9 + % 


73* 27 21 
.16 IJi 19 


38 
18 to 


.40 29 II 


70 23 


M 


CuslEn 


18 12 
37 ID 


* V 

9ft 9*6 9V — ft 
ft ft ft 
10V 10ft 10ft— ft 

3Z*k 32 32ft— V 

83 16V lift IBft 

12 13ft 13V 13V 


V 
2ft 

nw + v| 


3* 

4 

36 

2 

36 

231 


13 

19* 


23V. 

V 

349 

2ft 

2 

8* 

22V 

29ft 

32 

29,. 

78 

1 





j London Metals 


BM 


Aog. 6 

dose 

„„ BM Ask 
ALUMINUM 
Sterling per metric ton 
SP0I lUm 76400 75580 

Forward 78580 7B6JK 77780 

COPPER CATHODES (High Grade) 

Sterling per metric too 
Spot 10S28B 105X00 104980 105080 

Forward _ 106480 1 06450 105680 105780 

COPPER CATHODES (Standonl) 

Starting per metric tee 
Spot 101100 10158D 100580 101X00 

Forward 103780 103980 102580 102780 

LEAD 

StcrllM per mettle tan 
Spat 297JB 29880 29580 29X0D 

Forward 30050 30180 29050 279 JO 

NICKEL 

Sterling per metric ton 
5P0f 371080 372880 36*080 365000 

Forward 377580 378080 368080 369080 

SILVER 

peace per tray guca 

Spot 45X00 45480 44980 45180 

Forward 46680 46780 4000 442JJS 

TINJStOBdord) 

SterOng per mgfrictm 

Soot 93580 922880 917580 918080 

Forward 920880 920280 915580 915880 

Sterling per metric ton 

S*R S4480 56880 54080 S4280 

ord 5*380 54480 53X80 53780 

Source: AP. 


3 IV DWG ,!3t 4J 
27ft 21V DaleEn 72 1 A 
15V 12ft DamEA 280 151 
15*6 12ft DamEB 270 17J 
7v 3V Damson 
30ft 17ft Dams pi 250 127 
MV 19ft Darnel 3J5 1BJ 
23ft 10V DataPd .14 17 
7 3V Dal arm 
BV 3V Do Rase 
6ft 3*6 Decrats 
37ft 3SV DelLob 
15ft 12V Deivai 
5V 2ft Delmed 
10M> 7ft Desun I 
16 UV DevICD 
11V 10 DvnRsn 
IOV Sft Dtag A 
10 5V DtOOB 
37V BV DtaStll 
3V IV Dlglcan 
ft V Dlglcwt 
76V 30 Dlllrd s 
AV 3V Dtodee 
9ft 6 DIrAcfn 
w# «n Dixk» 

2ft lft DomcP 

ft V DnwP wt 
16V 11V Damirs 
28V 7V Downey 
IV Driller 
23ft Oucom 
ft Duntoo 
71V Duplex & 

13 Dui-Tst 
9ft Dynlct 


2ft 

39 

16V 


J2 18 II 
185 11J 9 

-93127 |0 
23 

70e 29 

56 

47 

JO 8 21 


JO J 17 
B 
12 

,10a 18 10 


80 29 17 


24ft ion Dvnacr 


46 25 12 

80a 28 16 

-27e 21 9 

80 37 10 


12 IV Ift IV 
6 '22V 22V 22ft— V 

45 13ft 13 13V + ft 

39 13ft 12V U — ft 
293 3ft 3ft Sft 

10 19V 19V 19V + n 
35 W* 20V 20V + ft 
945 12V 12V 12V— ft 

40 5V. Sft Sft— ft 
4 3V 3V XV 

3 3V 3V 3V 

10 36 3Sft 35V— ft 

4 un 15 15 

512 2ft 21b 2ft 

40 7V 7ft 7ft 

23 14ft 13V toft— ft 
743 IBft 10ft 10V— n 
7B Bft 7ft 7ft— ft 

343 7 6ft 6V— V 

780 31% 77!% 30V +1 

”s '* 'it * 

289 6B 67V 67V— V 

13 W IV 3*6 

313 7ft TV 7V 

115 10V 70V 10V 

2093 Sft 2 3 — ft 

60 V V— K 

113 15 14 V 14V— ft 

238 22ft 20V 21V— IV 

2 IV IV IV 

732 ** *V *% + tt| 
9 IBft TSV 18V 
19 13V 15ft 15V 
2B4 13ft 12ft 13 — V 

3 2*ft 24 24ft— ft 


HVj 12ft MCOHd 6 

3 in MCO Rf 

«ft 7ft MBA n Me IJ 63 

lft 1 MSA wt 

12V 6*6 MSI DI 

47b 3*6 MSR 

15V B MacGfV 13 

17V Bft MdeStfi .14 .9 28 

2% V Macrod 
10% 10ft MePS -351 22 3 
15% Bft Malortg JOe 

9*6 4 IMrthOf 73 

ISft 3*6 MrtdVt 74 

22ft 21% Marmot 235 10J 
26ft 15V Mrriiln 72 

54V 9*6 MartPr so 

1HV 9ft Madrid J0a I J 6 
22ft 11V MOIRmli .12 18 10 

SO BV MotScn 8 

29ft IB Matrix J 30 

16V 12ft May Eng 280 148 15 
26V 12ft Mavfli «#»23 11 
7ft 416 McDow 24 

79b IV McRae A .I0e 22116 

7% lft McRae B 97 

SAV 56V AUdla 1.76 78 15 
22V 13V Medki JO J 20 
35ft 26ft 6AEMCO 1.16 24 13 
10 5V Mores L J4I 78 7 
2SV BV AMlPra .15 8300 

20ft .17 BMtexs 6 

25 16V MctroC • 00 

Bft 4ft MCtlGn 19 

12 Bft MMAm 84 44 13 
33V ISft MKJtod 80 78 9 
9ft 7ft MbsnW J4e 28 31 
38ft 13V MICh IE 31 U 22 
13% 9ft MMiMg 80 XI B 
17ft 10ft MOOOB 30 IJ 16 
17ft sen MOOSA JS 13 14 
19ft 15V MMM n 
4V 2% MtgRt wt 
19V 13V MtgGttl 1J6 B8 7 


« 

13% 

13 

13 — 

ft 

67 

IV 

IV 

IV — 

ft 

29 

9 

Bft 

BV — 

ft 

31 

1% 

lft 

lft — 

ft 

24 

0% 

Bft 

Bft 


15 

3V 

3% 

3% — 

ft 


lift 4V T Bar 
13% Th TEC 
»4V 4ft TIE 
MV 4V Tit 
21% 13% TabPrd 
1 Oft 4% TanoEr 
15% 9V Tasty 
4V TV Team 
4% in TenAm 
22V 14V TcitSvm 
m 38V TecflOp 
7V 3% TechTp 

20% 10% Techtrt 

4ft 3 Tetecen 

34ft 24 Tetflex 
lift B% TeiDfa 

16V bV Teisa 

5V 2% Tetesah 

6V 4 Tenney 

mft 23V TexCda i jo 
20 6ft TexAIr 3 

10ft 4ft TexAE 391 78 19 

22% 16ft TexAE pf2J7 138 
8% 2 Txsoon 33 

3ft lft ThorEn 

Sft 2 Tldwett 


4ft Tortet 




:a 


s* ft Sk- 
im IOV IV-i 
09 6% S% p 

JO »0V 10% 10% * 
73 19% 19 - 19% * 
r% r -t 7 « — 
1* I3'B 13% — 

4 T% 4 * ■ 


84 1J 15 
J6dX3 14 
21 

II 


69 in 17-: lzft— V 
39 75% 72 72e-3V 

64 4‘k 3% 3%— % 

31 1JV 13V IJ*> — % 
37 T+ 2V Ti— ■ 
62 34V 34% 34% + % 


a 

11 

10% 

irv 

a 

TV 

5'i 

? 

r.| 

20 

5 

5 

*■» 

*0 

4V 

4-t 


9 2? S% 23 - V 
1765 1BV !-% 17- + % 
70 S% *■« S 

12 19V 79% 19% T % 
109 Ti I 2 - ft 

2 2 2 n 

36 2% ?<- >» 


45 

19 

3 

21 

22 

22 

33 

18 

31 


10 

IV 

6V 

9V 

5*6 

2% 

13% 


it: 


MtgPln 
_ Mortm 
2V MtMed 
4U Movie L 
lft Mbnvln 
to Mine wt 
Bft Mverln 


Jib 28 10 


40 13ft 13 13V 

523 77ft 77ft 17ft— ft 

bi m i m + n 

15ft 15V 15ft + V 
12ft 12V 12ft— ft 
4*6 Jft 4ft 

14V toft 14V— ft 

22 21V 22 + ft 

79ft 79% 79% — V 

S3 51ft 53ft— 1 
17V 17V 17V— % 
12ft 12ft 12ft— V 
717 77V 17ft 17ft— ft 
65 22ft 22V 22*6— % 

41 14 13ft 13ft- ft 
121 24% 24Vk Wt 

16 5V Sft 5ft 

M 4V 4ft 4V— ft 

9 3ft 3ft 3V— U 

B2 7B 76V 76*4 — 7% 
25 22ft 22ft 22V— V 
5 34% 34 34 — ft 

84 8 7V 7*6 — U 

43 24ft 24 34 — V 

15 13 12V 12ft + %■; 

. 9 19ft 19ft 19ft 

248 5V Sft Sft 

2 !TOs TO 10 — ft 

9 29 28ft 2tft— V 
5 Bft Bft Bft— % 

207 13V 13V 13V— V 

17 12ft 71V 1IV— ft 

3 76ft 18 16 — % 

37 1AV 15*6 16 — % 

2 1AV 16V 1«V + ft 
15 3 3 3 

224 18V 18ft IBft— ft 
1W 10 9ft 10 + ft 

iv in 

5n +n 

BU 
3 

n 


IJ6 TotlPtg 


PV 
TS 

2V IfcTotPtwT 
to BV True Lx 
19V HftT/njTec 
!!V TV TrtSM 
6V TrtaCp 
n> TrlHme 
3V Trtdex 

2ft TubMex 

22V 19 TurnBn 
31V Z1V TurnrC 
10 9ft TrnEq n 
3V 1ft Tylrwts 


12ft 

6ft 

14% 

4 


435 128 


3TSr 34'. 

3J- 


080 124 


l*Oz BO'S 

(ftvj 


X9t 03 


11 

4% 


*v— r. 

J* 


317 

13^ 





90 

14, 

l-j 


JKr A 

13 

50 

IJ'k 

12V 

12 to— 

34 4 J 


47 

to 1 . 



30e X7 


20 

10'* 

I3's 


391 55 

38 

32 

IT-: 


Uft + V 



20 

4": 





S3 


BV 




2J 

2V 

) + 

TV + % 


<0 

14 

IVV 

19 


130 O 


7 

r/to 

27V 

TTt + tk 



230 



9V 



514 

T.’s 

Tl 

3- — ft 


& 5J 

r 


4% lft UNA 
2*V B*h Ultra te 
131k Bik Unice wl 
1SV lift Unfcppf _ 

11 % BV urrimrn lAalXi 
an 15*i UAtrPd JUb 25 12 
23 16ft UnCO»F % JO 28 II 
2ft lft UFoodA .M 4J 
2V 1% U Foods 
16% lift UlMed IS 

22ft 74 USAGwt 
8ft 5% UflUofV 24 

14ft BV UnvCm 14 

10ft 6ft UnlvRs 1« 

23V 15V UntvRu 
15V 10ft UnvPoT 


JOe *8 


11 IV ift lft — ‘i 
241 13ft IP. MV— V 
118 lift 11% Mft + V 
31 14V Mft 14% + to 

539 II 10% 11 + >b 

B 21ft 21% n%— U 

26 1+V 17V 17V + V 
37 lft lft 1ft— ft 

12 IV !*■ lft 

142 14V 14ft 14V 

23 IT’S 19V 19-.-; + 

3 a 7v e + v 

22 JIV 11% Tift + ft 
19 7 6ft 6ft 

2 left 14V lcrV— V 

60 13V Uft 13ft + ft 



116 

lft 

15 

19 

Sft 


13 

8% 


59 

3% 


4 

ft 

10 

3 

11V 




17 

13ft NRMn 

230 19,1 







14V 

UV NtGoO 

30b 11 

9 

27 

re» NfPOtnt 

.10 

3 


IV 

ft Nets+B 




25V 

12ft NAUxAr 

JW 4X 

14 

I7ft 

11% NPtnRl 

182 



21ft 

13 NPrec 

iJOe S3 


49% 

31 NYTlme 

M 

U 

14 


4% N*wbE 



17V 

10V Npwcor 

32 

2 Jia 

16ft 

12ft Hevrtjn 




17ft 

12 NWPEI 

15D 

98 

10 


7 6 • Nletilnn 

73V Aft Nichols 
3Ui 2% Nolex 

MV ion NordRs 
17V 14 NgCdOB 
5V 2V: NuHrzn 
!1V 6V NudDt 
12V Bn Numoc 


.12 

180 4J II 


9V 6ft EAC 
16V 12V EECO 
7ft 4V ERC 
Aft 2Vi ESI 
sn 2n Eooia 
40 31% Estop 

14V 7V Echos g 
3 1% ElAudD 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 1985 


Page 13 



Icahn Raises TWA Stake to 40.6% 


‘•"▼mb W uv staff Frm DUpatcha 

WASHINGTON — Carl C. 


Frzmcv-Prtssg 

: ’MANAfc^jBahram — The 
Bihra&^asctf Arab Banking 
Ojipr aaBt THestfay that the bank 


™ mierestm Trans World Airlines 
*nc. to 13.9 million shares, or 40.6 
percent of the total outstanding, 
Bom the 35-percent stake he had 
amassed earlier. 

In a CUne with the U S SmirL 


SBSSmSSiZSiSt secun- 

this vear-trolB -nercent fmm ra w. ^ said he bought 2,688,000 


^oaaWeadier. ' ' ** n 

rose bv 19 S? Au &5forS59.8nulliOT,oran 

^ per^^^bOfi^in^ ^tedOTagepnceofSI^a 

%ysts said the disclosure, 

5 harc bid lor TWA, raises doubts 
about the toty of Texas Air C<»p. 
£» *b mJtme tins gear. ABC said. to consummate a previously an- 


• -5 -> <J 
;.- *>.*» 45 

A3 e 

v.% .. 9 


'■'Vt -r. t* 
'- ■» 20 n 

• -5 13 


Analysts said the disclosure, 


ABC; jointly owned by 
eminents of Kuwait, U1 


the gov- preferred paper, is a nominal Sl-a- 


te ^ *"1 e st offer to shareholders “in the 

C. event they turned down Texas Air's 

dis- '' I Wm^ bid.*’ He said his group intended to 

ised vote all its shares against the Texas 

ines AirproposaL 

40.6 V Since a majority vote is required 

ing, g > • '• .. to pass the lotas Air bid, analysts 

had said that Mr. Icahn’s increasing 

IjLff '3BRW- stake in TWA raises doubts about 

uri- . whether the Texas Air proposal will 

ion, '■ h ■ '~"Jw I . succeed. 

000 raME^v'af' "■ After the Texas Air-TWA agree- 

r 12 ■ ment was reached June 13, the 

ran W^WflB union for TWA's pilots announced 

15 a m> ■ an agreement with Mr. Icahn under 

W . ‘ which the pilots would take a 20- 

ire, j . percent paycut if he gained control 

Mr. 1 . ' . of the earner. 

La- [ _• On Monday, Mr. Icahn said he 
ibis r . r - - had reached new agreements with 

*p. '~ ar * ^ ^ ca ™ both the pilots’ union, the Air Line 

an- . Pilots Association, and with the In- 

t w as co mmon stoat fell 30 teniacional Association of Macbin- 
for oratsa share to dose at $22. l2Vi on and Aerospace Workers, under 

\ in J? 6 Yoik Stock Exc h a nge , which tire machinists and pilots 
La. Texas Air S com m on Stock rose 50 «uniiM mvive stack nwnmhin and 


ibya and. share higher than the bid by Texas *?*** a s ^ are to ®°d $18-25 on profit sharing . 


which tire machinists and pilots 
would receive stock ownership and 


"M. i nclude s the parent Afr Coi P- wW< * w* accepted by ^ American E xc h a n ge., Ulrich Hoffmann, TWA's gener- 

m Bahrain, Arab iBank- TWA ere June 13 after Mr. Icahn Mr. Icahn, who initially offered al counsel, and a Texas Air spokes- 
-D*u?& Co. GmbH,' an -made his initial offer to buy the S18 a share for TWA, asked the man declined comment, 
rt bank in Frankfort, and earner. carrier’s directors to submit his lat- (AP. Reuters) 


Aba Dhabi, hinludes the parent Air Coip. which was accepted by 
.company in Bahrain, Arab rank- TWA ere Jure 13 after Mr. Icahn 


: L -.rec i s 8 
- ■M ms 

v*i4 m 
'.Jja n 4 
;JW ijj 
. lB as ? 
S a* i: 

i as a* j 

* 


3 ^ 
R, 

a> bi“ 
r, SJ'ii 

1 ?:» 


investment bank in Frankfort, carrier. 

. Banco. Adannco SA, a retail bank 
iaSpnit ■ 

k dsohas the merchant banking ™oNfckd Mine Reopens 
subsichanes of. ABC InLematuHim Reuters 

tid. in London and ABC Banqne NOUMEA, New Caledonia — 
InteMtnmalede Monaco in Mon- SbditfkNi^d’sThiomckdmhre 


(AP, Reuters) 


Laly of Norway 
In $133-MUUon 
BidforKosmos 

Reuters 

OSLO — Norway’s Laly 
shipping company offered on 
Tuesday 1.1 billion kroner 
(5132.9 millionl for 50.1 per- 
cent of {Cosmos, an industrial 
group. 

Kosmos has controlling in- 
terests in Norwegian shipyards, 
large tracts of forest land, Euro- 
pean passenger ferries and off- 
shore oil platforms. 

Analysts described the bid as 
one of the most daring mows 
seen on the expanding Oslo 
Stock Exchange. They said 
Kosmos. based in Sandefjord, 
in southern Norway, was likely 
to resist the takeover. But a 
Kosmos spokesman said the 
group would examine the offer 
before responding. 

Northmans Bank Zurich, the 

Swiss bank, is the largest share- 
holder in Kosmos, ana analysts 
said Laly was confident the for- 
eign shareholders would be 
willing to sell. 


W. Germany Late Starter in Biotech 


(Continued from Page 9) 


to increase what be described as his on 
company's “good trill" stake in soi 


sermd said, accounts for nearly a company’s “good will" stake in 

third of what be estimated to be a Cenentech. 

total 480 million DM earmarked Boehrinaer's current focus is on 


on “emerging technologies" spon- 
sored by SRI International- ana- 
lysts Suggested that West Germany 
has lagged behind in biolech, and 


total 480 million DM earmarked Boehringer's current focus is on 085 la &8 M behind in biotech, and 
for biotechnology this year by West competition at home. The corapa- ^ «■““ t0 d <> so. largely bc- 
German companies. ny. with 1984 sales of 4.1 billion industries are too heavily 

But, as Mr. Weissermel pointed DM. is running head-to-head with panted toward traditional chem- 
out, the 5200 million in combined Hoechsi. which is 10 rimes larger. *?tiy. with relatively little use of 
industry and government spending to bring tissue plasminogen acriva- organisms in the production 
on biotech in West Germany for tor. or TPA. to market. Through ? roces& - 
1985 still pales in comparison to cooperative efforts with Genen- "The problem at German chemi- 
whatbeesnmatedwillbeSl biffion teen. Boehringer hopes lo intro- cal giants BASF. Bayer and 
m expenditures in the United duce TPA, a genetically engineered Hoechst is that their boards are 
States and to the S300_ nrilHion in produa designed to dissolve blood nearly completely staffed with 
spending he projected for Japan, clots during heart attacks, in Eu- chemists with little experience in 
Investing millions of marks, rope by 1987. the biological sciences." aM Mr 

sr^:w&s ,0 an" e S jE e .“ nual for TPA> & sw ' s “® di - 

desen bed as a “serious shortage of ® oe |j I j”S er ^exccutivK estimate, 

ktahlu COuld be well over I billion DM. “Rather than outline biotech 


“Rather than putting biotech 
teams under the bureaucracy of 


highly qualified scientists" in bio- COUJQ 00 wcu ovcr 1 01111011 “Rather than putting t 

technology and more specifically. The company also has high ex- teams under the bureauen 
genetic engineering, in West Ger- pecta lions to market in 1987 — cbemisuy-oriented R & D 
many. ayin in conjunction with Genen- the big German com 

Hoechst is one of the few West tech — gamma-type interferon, a 0011111 benefit," he said, by 


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ofHong Kong. 


Foiti Discusses Venture in China 

United Press International 

-BEDING— - Feud Motor Co. is holding exploratory talk* with 
Chinaon setring up ajmnt venture to marmfsnmre. v ririrtoK, the 
vreepreadriat wtteUS. automwkrr, Lindsey Halstead, aid Tuesday. 


vt . . BMW said it will introduce a services for use in the production erf Debenhams. which ended last 
diesel version of its BMW 324 so- specialty glass. Coming said it will week. 

Carift Tlu» mr»r sTnmmdcdiiHiie figs of autos for the first time in bold a &-peroent share in the com- Istituto per la Ricostniziooe, Ita- 

inisitinn. Mom P rodl f :tion October. A company spokesman pany, Shanghai Coming Engineer- Iy’s government-run industrial 

h a week40Dg dosure, wbdi mure declined to say^w' ^aSjTdiesds ingtorp. lading group, dedined comment 

«ik~Lbl ^ ^ senoas *3 r “pset 324s were expected to be sdd in the Empresa Nadonal de E3ectrki- on Italian press reports saying that 

~ 1t P at P^aa*- first year but said West Germany dad del Rfbajptzana SA, the Span- it plans to sell a minority stake in 

• and Italy were likely to be the mod- isb gov em m en t-own ed electrical Alfa-Romeo to Technit. whidi said 

eTs biggest markets. utility, was to sign a syndicated the article was “without any foun- 

a rem China J&JSgZK&Zt 5ra"i5SK523Sffi &**»»»»* a™- 


output plans. 


I. IJB Ki= 
# 'At Ks 
f-tJW !0£ 
A -4 1 * 
*■■**> its 

t-L54 ffj 

i »ao 73A 

i S3F»- ic.i 

f. 070 7C, T 
4 U» l?S 


''i re,lj 
'■HR 
?• 


i-, Mk Halsfeadj visiting China at the invitation of the China Aatomo- 
tivt Industry Coip, nretMtmday with Dqmty Prime Mimster Wan 
Ii, tbeIXhmua news agency sakL 
Chma Automotive would be the Chwiwawr partner in any joint- 
! venture agreement, according to die agency. The venture would 

mwftfaft int roducing thft btf qp tn China, Tt aAWI 

“We are bolding very exploratory talks this time and expect to have 
many more tfiscusions before we can make a dedskxl,” Mr. Halstead 


first year but said West Germany 
and Italy were likdy to be the mod- 
el’s biggest markets. 

Citicorp’s international stock- 
brokering subsidiary, Vickers da 
Costa Ltd, and a Melbourne stock- 
broker, Clarke & Co„ will set up a 
50-50 Australian joint venture, G- 
ricorpsaid. 

GJ. Coles & Co. will offer 325 


Empresa. Nadonal de EJectrici- 
dad del Rfinguzana SA, the Span- 
ish government-owned electrical 
utility, was to sign a syndicated 
loan on Tuesday of 20 billion pese- 
tas (SI 20.9 million) to cancel S100 


mini on of its foreign currency de- Wallace Inc. have stopped some co mp a n ies. Some of these compa- 
□ominated debt, a company clinical testing of a heart-disease p*«> are struggling to meet the 

because of deaths 


spokesman said. 


Genoa] Motors Corn, and Ake- among pmients in a study group in 
bono Brake Industry Co* Japan's the United States, spokesmen said. 


st brake manufacturer, will es- 


ordmaiy share for Myer Emponum op^t and production of brakes 


Ltd. umter a merger plan dial re- j^theUmtedSta 
places Coles’s previously an- dais announced 
nonneed bid of 3 doQais a share. House of Frast 

the companies said in a joint state- ^ Monday it h 
ment nnUnom cnorw 4 


in the United States. Akebono offi- for its treasury. 


ras likely many. ayin in conjunction with Genen- tors, the big German companies 

a Hoechst is one of the few West tech — gamma-type interferon, a cowW benefit" he said, by setting 
, German companies to have made a gene-spliced agent used for com- U P, “independenL small business 

(rffer direct investment in the UJS. bio- bating viruses and, it is hoped, can- units managed by people intimate- 

technology industry. In 1981, it cer tumors. ly familiar with the subject. That's 

■ signed a 10-year rKearch contact Boehringer last month estab- 

on motec^ biology, v-aJucd at bshed a jom [-venture cancer-re- ^op® 1 P«»nal computer, 

tihefnr- about S60 million, with a promt- search center with Genentech in Another brake on biotech devd- 

ould be ^ n ’j bio technologist, Howard Vienna and wQl raise outlays for op men is here, Mr. Smithson and 
Goodman, of Boston s Massachu- biotech programs by 60 percent others pointed out, has been the 

sette Genial Hospital- this year to 40 million DM. Next reluctance of biologists and genet- 

1 . °^r not a pie exception year. Mr. Waldeck said, spending ic-engineers in academe to start up 

came m March when Boehringer on biotech is to increase to 60 mil- their own biotechnology- venture 

- Tngelheim Zentrale GmbH, a Don-65 million DM. companies. 

- smaller West German phannaceu- . ... . , , _ , , 

ided last ticals group, paid $40 mffli n n for a addition to nearly 1 billion The West German technology 
5 percent stake in San Francisco- DM °‘ g° venunent support for minister, Heinz Riesenhuber, said 
none. tm. based Genentech Tut. one of the biotech planned during the next in an interview that stan-up bio- 
^dustnal oldest and largest biotech compa- four n ^ 0Sl m ^‘ or Wesl Oo- tech companies were virtually non- 
comment nies in the United States. chemical and pharmaceuucal existent until early last year. To- 

avingthat Franz Waldeck. head of research “®Pani« are stepping up then day. there are about 10 West 
V stake in at Boehringer, said German com- o*? spending on m-house research German genetic-engmeenng cotn- 
which said panies maybecome more interest- anddevdopmenL The>- arealso pc- pames, most of them clustered 
any foun- ed in buying into U.S. companies in P™&ng}*ni-v<xiiu<x wth markei around four new siaie-supponed 
anticipation of a potentialshake- , “ dcre m Umted St2Ces and basic research centers m Hodef- 
id Carter- out among those start-up bknech Ja P an ' ^ L weU “ bceimng agree- berg, Munich. Cologne and Berlin, 
ped some companies. Some of these compa- nKals ““P 3111 ® abroad. ^ center& employing the re- 
nt-disease are struggling to meet the BASF has cooperative research search facilities of some of West 
of deaths heavy costs involved in waiting the agreements on a tumor-fighting Germany's biggest universities, are 
y group in fw* 10 seven years it lakes for U.S. substance, TNF, with Biogen and is being financed by the federal gov- 
men said. regulatory approval of gene-spliced understood to be holding talks to eminent and by Hoechst, Bayer, 
will mai»» products. expand its cooperative links to that BASF. Sobering AG and other 

ip to $200 “I bet within the next few years com P an y- leading chemical and phannaceu u- 

non stock many small U.S. biotech compa- Bayer, through its Cutter Lab- ^ groups. 

nies will find it hard to survive. I oratories Inc. subsidiary in the “At these centers, as well as our 


oldest and Largest biotech compa- ,our - f* 1 - “P* 1 ™ 
nies in the United States. nan ch ^ Tmcal a™ 1 

Franz Waldeck, head of research com P an,e f. 316 H 6 ! 
at Boehringer, said German com- spending on in 
panies may become more interest- 3110 development. T 


the United States, rookesmen said, regulatory approval of gene-spliced 
Merck & Co. said it will make products, 
additional purchases erf up to $200 “I bet within the next few years 
million worth of its common stock many small U.S. biotech compa- 


nies are struggling to meet the BASF has cooperative research 
heavy costs involved in waiting the agreements on a tumor-fighting 
five to seven years it lakes for U.S. substance, TNF. with Biogen and is 


iks to that BASF. Scheming AG and oilier 
leading chemical and phannaceu ti- 
mer Lab- 031 group*- 

y in the “At these centers, as well as our 
ved with so-called national lab for genetic 
imentofa research in Braunschweig, we're 
rf Factor striving to assemble a critical mass 
eathemo- of expertise," said Mr. Riesen- 
roducesa huber. “Our goal is to recognize 
/III from important developments early on 
and gel our best t«nn< working on 
onference them." 


AG and other 
and phannaceu ti- 


Reed International PLC said it is wouldn't rule out that German and United States, is in 


: Japanese automakers are also talking with tbe Chinese about (he 
Mme joint venture. Western business sotmees said. 


Corning G3ass Works of the Debenhams PLC. Fraser acquired 
United Steles said it has set up a a 24.97-percent stake in Deben- 


j corn-venture company m Efftangnm hams during the course of the Bur- 
that will provide equipment and ton Group PLCs successful bid for 


ordinary shares or 26.1 percent of Reed Building Products Group to 
Deb enhams PLC. Fraser acquired an investment group that includes a 
a 24.97-percent stake in Daren- number of financial institutions 
hams during the course of the Bur- and members of management of 



Reed Building Products. 


BV» 4'* Kevex 4 

m 7M KeyTm 387 

II >4 3>& Kimfirfc 1 

21V: 13 Kinder S M J 1553 


yet financially pressed companies, philia. Cutter currently prodi 
be said. natural form of Factor VIII 

For the moment, Mr. Waldeck human blood plasma, 
stressed, Boehringer has no plans • At a recent Frankfurt conft 


conference 


141* 44* KrOY 

IM AVS Kruser 
2Vta 13 Kulcke 


M 2 tS3 
32 13 9* 

J2J X 509 


t*, Mi tfi— Vi 
8» S% Kft 

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Ttt 74b 74b— y 
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MW MVa 144b 


MW 12 OwmiM AO 1J 308 
Mi V< OUCO 79 


224k 224b 22W— U 
4« 4b 4b 


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1« 54b l_JN 

50 «41 LSlUw 

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MW BU La Pels s 
4744 29% LaZBv 1^0 
204b 12W LodFm .16 
18W II LQkJtw 30 
17 104b LamoT M 

17V. 14 Lancost M 
214k 124k LndBF M 


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18 17 17W— Vi 

14% 14% 144k 
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47 47 47 

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I4U T4 1CU + U 
16U 15% 16U 
19% 19 19 — 


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36 

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29%— % 

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law 

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220 

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7U Lvnhos 



1001 

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27W 

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29 



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& 
127 

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2054 
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Bn 40 11 IU 


29% 28% 
45% 45% 
13W 13U 
144k 14 
15% M% 
B% 8 
24W 24% 
13% 13U 
744 7% 
I2W 12% 
12W 12% 
16W 16 
I&% 16% 
26W 5SW 
V/i 9% 
34% 34 
30% 29U 
M_ 13% 
27% 27*6 
7% 7% 
10 % 10 % 
14% MW 
*% 2% 
26% 25W 
22 % 22 
36% MW 
9% 9 
MU 13% 
19% 19W 
2SW 25% 
2U 2% 
13 12% 

11W 11% 
30 29W 

8 7% 

4W 4 
10% 10% 
55% 56% 
11% MU 
4U 4% 
39% 39 
13% 13W 
16% 15% 
6% bW 
23% 23% 


28U 

45% — Vj 
13% 

14W 

15 

8 — U 
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J1W 

7U— % 
12% — Vb 
12 % — % 
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”9*1% 
34U + U 
29W- % 
13% 

27% • . 
74»— % 
1BU + « 
MW— U 
2U— U 
25W— W 
22 — % 
34 W— % 

9 

13% — W 
19W— % 
25% 

2% 

12W + V. 
11% — W 
39 + % 

7U + U 
4W 

1BU+ U 
55% + % 
114b + U 

39% + % 
13U + W 
15% — U 


744 srrofua 
264b SlrwQ C M 
19W Stryxer 
91% Sutwro U8 
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14% SyAsoc 
3W Svstln 
6% Svsirrto 
6W 5vnGa 
12% Systml U4 


18% 17% 17%—% 
35% 3444 35% — % 
35 34% 34% — % 

171U 165 169W +3W 
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12% 11U 12 
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8 % 8 % 8 % 

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11% 10% 11 — u 

13 12W m» , 

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1BW 18% 18% — % 
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4% 44k 4%— V» 

9% 9% 9% 

10% 10% 10% 

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JBRSti J6 12 100 
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6 SU 5%— « 
34 35% 35%- V, 

n% ttvj i7% 

5% 5% 5 %— % 
2H 20% 20% 

6% 4% 6% 

n m m 

18 17% II 

isu m im— u 


20 

J6 W 298 
■ 153 

JSOr 3J 78 

mo m a 

JO 15 300 




444 VLI 
7% VLSI 
4% VMX 

7 VSE -lie 12 
7 VaiULa 

7% VQIFSL 

24% ValNH 120 12 
21% ValLn -40 U 
11% vonDua AO 15 
6% VUnzetl 
24b venlrex 
13% Vlcarp J»e A 
BU viedeFr J2» 2.1 
9M vikina 
13% vrrwek 
6% voctavl 
14% vonint 


8 7W 
13W 13% 
5% »■ 

S« 8% 
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164b 16W 
37% 37W 
22 22 
1644 16 
7W 7% 
34* 3W 
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low low 

14 UW 
15W 15 
8% SW 
19W I8W 


7W— W 
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544 
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15W + W 
8U— W 
18% 



































Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 1985 


** 



PEANUTS 


HE'S FOOOUHN6! 
ME, 5IR.. 




IGNORE HIM..BUT1W5 15 
A PUBLIC 5U0PHN6 MALL 
SO IF HE'S BOTHERING VOU. 
REACH UP, ANP PUNCH 
HIM IN THE NOSE.. 


HOW ABOUT 
REACH DOUJN7 

XT 




BOOKS 


m B ring into i room and fist 

woman who would bcoocoe her Bfc 



WHAT IS REMEMBERED _ 

By AUtx B. Toklas. 59.50, paperback; 224 iSriMte 

pages. North Point Press, 850 Talbot Ate- her until bw death, and att then empty oo 
rare, Berkeley, CaBf. 94706. 


ACJBOSS 
1 Foundations 

6 Book by Julian 
Huxley 

10 Pan ora 
harness 

14 Expenditure 

15 Baltea, Po 

feeder 

10 Press 

17 Go silently 

18 Declare 
frankly 

19 African big 


55 Liquid 
refreshments 

561 


20 Yippee! 

22 Charter 

23 Hamilton-Burr 
contest 

24 Consumed 

20 Neck ruff in 

Shakespeare's 

day 

30 City in SE 
Spain 

32 Bereft 

33 Restrain 

35 Hot under the 
collar 

39 Kin of a 
quahog 

41 Use of new 
words 

43 Canadian 
peninsula 


40 fixe 

47 Pointless 
49 Paint solvents 
51 Choler 
53 Jardin 
publique 


glances 
02 Actor Edmund 

: 1892-1971 

C3Tbe 

Adamsons’ pet 

64 Simile, e.g. 

65 Victim 

66 -do-well 

■67 Frost’s “The 

Road Not ” 

68 Withered 

69 Maty 

Lincoln 

70 Some 
Nebraskans 

DOWN 

1 Trough for 
cooling metal 

2 Auburn or 
Marmon 

3 Manuscript 
mark 

4 Old mild 
expletive 

5 Three-dimen- 
sional figures 

6 Saw 

7 Boccaccio's 
tales 

8 Meadowlands 
gait 

9 He painted a 
fence 

19 Absquatulate 
llSlammin'Sam 
rival 

12 Emulate 
Electra 


a/r-85 

13“ Petit 

Pladdam . . 
(Mass, mono) 
21 Poet Edgar 

25 Height: Prefix 

26 Droop 

27 Diva PonseUe 

28 Gaifunkel and 
Unkletter 

29 No way! 

31 Present 

preceder 
34 Car! Ed’s 
comical 
creation 

36 Vein of glory 

37 City 5W of 
Miskolc 

38 Fuchsin and 
woad 

40 Quebec’s 
Levesque 
42 First month in 
Cdrdoba 
45 Took a nap 
48 Sliver 

50 Renata of the 
Met 

51 Revere 

52 More recent 

54 Henry 

Wallace 

55 Range in 
Europe 

57 Kitchen staple 
SSPartof Q.E.D. 

59 First name of 
Lennon’s 
widow 

60 Blunted sword 

61 City of the 
Huguenots 


BLONDIE 

DASWOOC^X ) 

CWsCP 


I'U_ 0ET FT POOBAENLV 
HAC? ©OMBTHINS TO DO 
WITH H© MARRIAGE 




BEETLE BAILEY 


GEE,S\fZ,Yoa 
HAVE THIS 
REGULATION 
ALL WRONG 


You'Re ALL 
WET/ IP 
THERE S ONE 
THWGX KNOW | 
ABOUT, IT'S 
REGULATIONS! 



.tor 

imz? 



ANDYCAPP 


Cm Duj wn Nmewn lw 1 



THANKS, VICAR. IT/WUSTBE 
NKETO WOW M3U FOSSE9S 
THE WHEREWITHAL TO HELP 
SOMEONE LESS 
FORTUNATE 
>~ THAN ~ 

^YHSELREH? 

N- 



WlZARD of ID 



Reviewed by Lisa Mitchell 

~\T OU WONT won’t fall all in a 
X differences between what is ret 
by Alice B. Toklas and what is remembered 
about her. . No major surprises, no intimate 


almost totally aamea ay ns 
another's. For apart fiom her edehra ted cook- 
book — most widely popularized, by that 
Irasdnch” recipe — Alice wasn’t wary apart. ■ 
As Gcrtnxie Stem’s “secietaiy-conipamOii 
for nearly 40 years, she was typist (“Myfingera 
were adapted rally to Gertrud e’s wte k"), cook. 

Hid not wish to se& ^tnod vegetables a 
passion” and “talked to the wives of gaunscs” 
while Stein talked to geniuses themselves: Pi- 
casso or Hemingway or Sherwood Anderson. 
Even that first occasion of reflected glory, 
“The Autobiography of Alice B. TokJas" by 
Gertrude Stein, was, of course, Stein's vefaide 
for wamining Stein. And while “What Is Re- 
membered,” originally published in 1963 and 
out of print for 10 years; is not a case of Toklas 
trying to get back some of hex own, a unique 
voice comes through. 

M. F. JL Fisher, m ba foreword to the latest 
edition of ‘Tbe Cookbook,” says that Toklas 
“was probably one of the ugliest people anyone 
had ever seen, to draw or photograph. Yet . 
people reported “that when this small, ugly 
woman was in a room, they were keenly aware 
of her, before they ever recognized her as 
Toklas. She seemed to send out waves of inau- 
dible sound, Hke bells rfatigfng somewhere in 
another space than oars," A fnmd of Fisher's 

even went so far as to say that Tolklas's “strong 

black mustache made other faces look nude. 

Toklas herself makes no reference to her 
mustache or her looks, though she is quire 
vocal about everybody rise’s. (Who but Alice 
B. Toklas wooM say that Edith Sitwell had “the 
most beautiful nose any woman had”?) Toklas 
is wry and funny and deliciously bitchy: “Clive 
Bril was in those days witty and amusing 
before he became pretentious." 

The most lumiooDB paragraph tells of Toklas 

Solution to Previous Puzzle 


efrr* then. She was a golden brown preSeac 
burned by the Tuscan son . . . She woe 
large round coral brooch and T ien she USce 
vcty foie, or laughed, ayod deri.1 
her voice rame from this brooch." 

1 wish Toklas had mid as more about ft 
relationship — or, more to , the pocri, abn 
bow she frit about herself within the rriitia 


Lisa Mitchett, a critic and writer 
wrote dds renew for die Lxn Angrier 

BESTSELLERS 


TUsBasbrnd 
tfu o mj b mu ibc 


Hr NnrYarit Tints 

i tn MBnret fcnJ j nB bopfcai 
.Wctfcso&Estm&Nh 


nt» 


fiction u - t 

SKELETON CREW, by SKpfara King — l 
THE FOURTH DEADLY SlN', byLw- 

pray S«kn . — -- 2 

THE HUNT FOR RH> OCTOBER, by ^ 
THE ^CH^HOliSE RULES,” bjTjofan ^ 

5 

6 


tMcMortiy 

JUBAL SACXETT.by LoupTMaour _ 
HOLD THE DREAM, by Butw T«ytar 

* ■ 

IF TOMORROW COMES, by Sidney 


Sfaddoa 


THE LOVER, by Mwsoenie Dm - 

FAMILY ALBUM, by Dandle Sted > 

A CATSKILL EAGLE, by Robert B 


Padter .. . 

12 INSKDE. OUTSIDE, by Herman Weak - 

13 THE CLASS, by Ericbtol 

14 THINNER, te TGcfasi-d Bscbnwa -- 

15 FALL FROM GRACE. by Larry Godins 

NONFICTION 

1 YEAGER: An Autobiography, by Clock 

Yea ur ax>d Leo tens 

2 IACOOCA An Anlobjo|Mph 5 . by Locla- 

m—T w tnim Novafc — — 

3 A PASSION FOR EX CE L LEN CE, by 

Tom Bimi and Nbdct AoMin 

4 SMART WOMEN. FOOLISH CHOICES, 
by CooacB Caenat and Mefrys Kinder _ 
MARTINA, by Martin Nanntilom with 


George Veat y - 
NUTCRACKER 


K, by Stent Alexander _ 
Md^MndewidilkA 


THE MICK, by! 

Gbnk 

S CONFESSIONS OF A HOOKER, by Bob 
-* Noland 


New York Time*, edited by Euge ne Maleska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 



'MtfSKET SttSl UCKSM/TOiNSU^. 60 W 0 

AW ASK ME SCMEIHfH' I WT LISWLY KM0W* 

I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
by Hand Arnold and Bob Lae 

UnscmmbteltnMfnrJumbiea, 
ana Wtorto onch aquwu, to form 
four onSnary wads. 




OTHER, by Leo Bmcag- 


Hope with Dwayoe ! 

LOVING EACH OT 

Ea 

10 FUNNY M ONEY , by Met Sayr 

12 


MOUNTBATTEIS, by Pbi^ ZxxKr 

THE DANGEROUS SIMMER, by &■ 


13 AUGHT 


hb 


ATTIC byShdSQwx- 


BREaKING WITH MOSCOW, by Ar- 
‘ rN. SicvcbcoLo 


BRIDGE ACROSS FOREVER, by 

Ricbant Bad) 


- tl 


ADVICE, HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 

DR. BERGER'S IMMUNE POWER 

, tw Stuart M. Btner I 

FRUGAL GOURMET, by JcfT 


DIET. 

THE 


SMART COOKIES DON’T CRUMBLE 
riedmaa _ 
r DOWN. I 


by Sonn Friedman __ 

Nothing down, by 

WEBSTER’S NINTH NEW 


B/r/ta 


GIATE DICTIONARY , 


Robert G. Alien 
COLLE- 


3 

4 

5- 


BRIDGE 


GARFIELD 


p.r/w 

riNGr voo 
OH A PIET 


ORXAB 


n 

_L 


1 RAFIE 


znz 




l 


Ml 



I KNOWVOO HATE PIETS. IF VOO 
CAN THINK OF A BETTER WAV 
TO LOSE WEIGHT; I'M WILLING 
v 37=?^^— 0° LISTEN ^ 




By Alan Tmscott 

M ANY leading practitio- 
ners of the Prcriaon 
System use an intoxnediaie 
range no-trump opening, 
showing 14 to 16 points. Bus 
seldom runs into trouble, but it 
did here, when East made a 
penalty double. 

If the bidding had ended 
here, the penalty would have 
been either 500 or 800, but 
South took Ms partnership out 
of the frying pan into the fire 


in the hope of finding a major- 
suit fiL His conventional re- 
double required his partner to 
bid two dribs, ana he then 
passed, with the idea that any 
undoubted contract would be 
welcome. When be was dou- 
bled, he retreated to two 


heart s, which impherj he was 
prepared fear spades. 

Against two hearts doubled, 
West led a spade, which was 
moo in dummy. Sooth began 
die long process of drawing 
tramps try leading the trine 
around to the queen. Another 
spade lead was taken in dum- 
my, and another heart lead 
taken by East with the king. 
Hie defense took three dub 
tricks, and East then cashed 
the bean ace, before tearing 
the last drib. 

South had no way to 
more than two more tricks. He 
discarded a spade, refusing to 
raff, and East drifted to alow 
diamond. The day of the ten, 
jade a nd gneca left the declarer 
stranded u the dummy with 
no way bask to his hand to pull 


the missing tramp. The be 
jack eventually scored 
fourth and last trick, for ’ 
penalty of 1,100. 


Nans<D) 

*AK( 

V 1 43 
OKQ74 

4QI1 

EAST 
4<S 
WAKU4 
4 A I 3 
*K J7t 
SOUTH 


WEST 
41»«« 
OQ* 
CJtl) 
*At4 - 


* Q 733 
03732 
« IBS 
*»32 


NB0B ' 

East 

Sank 

Wn 

1N.T. 

DM. 

BoAL 

Paw 

2* 

Ppob 

Fan 

DHL 

Pass 

Fan 

IV 

Pam 

FW8 

DHL 

Fan 

Paw 


Wt lad tte spate Jack. 


IWARBOR 



■■1 


HE WAS THE 
(TYPE OF WAN SOME 
WOMEN TAKE TO— 
ANP ALSO THIS. 


Now anange the circled iattars to 
form the surprise answer, as aup- 
gBStad by ttw above cartoon. 


W)rid Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse Aug. 6 

Gosing prices in local amentia unless otherwise indicated. 


•ncm 


terinniefe 


Print answer hem. 


(Answers tomorrow) 

JumUn: MAXIM WAFER MAGPIE THRASH 

The waller finally comas to this— 

HIM WHO WATTS 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


HIGH 
C F 
34 75 
U 41 
31 M 
37 «1 


LOW 
C F 
17 43 
* « 
21 70 
U 


CKHMM 


FrwUWt 


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in* Palma* 


Manus 

Nice 


Ports 


StaeMnlm 


VenJc* 

vtcwio 


35 VS 14 41 
77 *3 15 59 

17 43 n 54 

36 U 11 44 

X) 90 14 41 
'm 44 M 57 
30 II 23 33 
15 5V I 44 
14 41 » 48 

21 76 21 70 
M 41 13 55 
14 57 12 54 
U 41 12 54 

a m a a 

as 77 21 7D 
B 73 IS SB 

18 44 V 48 

33 73 « 54 
21 JO n 55 
V 75 14 41 

14 47 13 55 

27 n n 44 

15 5* tz 54 
17 13 13 55 
15 55 U 57 
15 3» V 41 
24 7V 22 73 
« ■ 44 14 57 
21 » 14 47 
31 75 If 44 

34 75 IV 44 

35 77 14 41 
15 55 12 SI 


fr 

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fr 

fr 

fr 

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0 

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fr 

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fr 

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d 

0 

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sh 

r 

fr 

fr 

fr 

0 

fr 

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0 


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HH3H 

LOW 


C 

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31 

as 

74 

75 

I&JB1E8 

31 

* 

73 

73 

Hano Kona 

D 

90 

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28 

82 

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77 

Haroni 

a 

82 

34 

7S 

S&'Wi 

31 

n 

24 

75 


33 

91 

75 

77 

Staassfarp 

31 

80 

26 

79 

mu 

34 

93 

27 

81 

Tokn 

30 

N 

a 

7V 

AFRICA 

AMn 

28 

82 

25 

77 

Caira 

33 

91 

34 

A 

CmlMn 

— 


11 

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77 

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19 

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41 


26 

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75 

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17 

63 

7 

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35 

95 

23 

73 


LATIN AMERICA 


Una 

Mexkndtv 
Rio ea Jon ln 


11 52 V 48 
26 79 19 M 

15 39 

34 75 13 55 
39 84 20 48 


ABN 

ACF HotCHflO 
AEGON 
AlOD 
AhokJ 
A MEV 

ATJcmi Rubber 
Amro Bonk 
BVG 

Buthrmomi T 
Colend HMD 
Efaxrirr-NOU 
FoUter 

GUI 

HehMfcen 
Hoonovma 
KUW 
Noordan 
Net NmMct 
N edllevd 
OaVoMtrG 
PoJdMod 
PtiDIn* 


501 JD 500 Horten 

234 338 Hus*d 

100 V930 IWKA 
133 13476 KnH+Solx 
238-50 237 Kentodt 

267 247, Koufhof 

845 S45 KtoMfuwrH-D 

BJD 


1T « 


33^ » 

277 279 


35B_2H 


106 


301-50 aOL50 Knm> Stahl 107 

101 -E0 TO1J0 Undo 45050 ... 

3&50 3640 Lofttnnso 214 3U5B 

12840 128 MAN U5 163 

7850 81J0 Mranesmonn 190 ]<71.7D 

S16JG 215 MoCMiRuM* 1750 1710 

ISl JO 152 Nlxdorf 

•8.10 6690 PKI 

62J0 63J0 PonOm 

49 JO Prainwt 

74jO 7440 PWA 

HIL30 TOO RWE 

SO 3 OSS Rhdnntrtnll 

a ft? JO SUtartno 

4720 47 JO SEL 

„ 7540 2150 Steams 

Rodomco 132J0 132 Thyssen 

Sold, ,» ffc-ardo 

Unilever 3050 3050 , BOCGnw 

von Ommenm 29 29 ComnanbaUK lodn : H87JI Boon 

VMF Stark 3*0 240 FTevhws : M88J0 Bowotarlodus 

VNU 208 20150 BP 

ANPJCBS Own Index : 21198 I S — I BrM 81 


m 

m 






^ e ' j 


B ■ 1 /T: ^ l : :'. 




B r jlT 





pTT 1 i! 








Her 





1 ' FT 






■ 

jm 



Fuiitso 
HJlacM , 
HBocWCobta 
Honda • 
JaoanAfr Uiws 
Katana 
Konsal Power 
KawosaM Start 
Kfrln Browonr 
Kamatsa 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7, 1985 


Page 15 




SPORTS 


Baseball Players Strike 


The Associated Pros 

NEW YORK — Major league 
baseball players weal on stnke 
Tuesday when a last-ditch effort 
Failed to resolve a contract dispute 
over the game's salary structure. 

. “We are on strike.” said Gene 
Oiza, a lawyer for the Major 
League Players Union. “That's 
based on an assessment of where 
we are now, and an assumption 
that it won't change between now 
and 7 o'clock. The strike does not 
begin until the first game tonight.'' 

Orza said the players’ walkout 
would formally begin with the full 
schedule of 13 games, the first of 
which was to start at 7:35 PJtl. 
Eastern Standard Time. 

The strike announcement fol- 
lowed a meeting between the two 
1 sides, called by Commissioner Pe- 
| ter Ueberroth in an llth-hour at- 
i tempt to avert baseball's second 
midseason strike in four years. 

In office for 10 months. Ueber- 
roth had pleaded with the players 
and owners by saying, “The fans 
deserve the last ounce or everyone's 
energy to resolve the current im- 
passe." 

Tuesday’s meeting was at fust 
described as “informal.” but the 
rwo sides apparently found some- 
^ oing to talk about They bargained 
for more than six hours. 

At one pom, a player represen- 
. tatrve who had been in contact with 
union headquarters said it had 
turned into a “serious negotiating 
session." 

But after eight and a half months 
of negotiating and increasingly 
hard-line statements, the two sides 
remained too far apart. 

The strike was on: Baseball came 
to a halt two months to the day 
from the scheduled end of the 1985 
season. 

The 1981 strike, the first midsea- 
son walkout ever by pro U.S. ath- 


letes. tore 50 days and 712 games 
from the middle of the schedule. 

The issue then was free agency, s’ 
player's ability to sell his services to 
the highest bidder. It was a right 
the players won in court: the ruling 
struck down baseball's reserve 
clause, which had bound a player 
to one team unless he was cut. trad- 
ed or sold. 

A single issue — salary arbitra- 
tion — again is the key. Arbitration 
stoned in 1974. and the owners say 
its has helped salaries snowball to 
this season's average of S 363.000 
per player. The owners want to 
increase from two years to three the 
amount of lime before a player can 
file for arbitration, and they want 
to restrict an arbitrator's award to 
□o more than double a player's 
current salary. The players want no 
changes. 

Another major issue involves 
how much money the owners will 
contribute to the players' pension 
fund, but union chief Donald Fehr 
said the chasm between the sides 
was “not centrally money.” 

“It appears to be a rerun of 
1981." Fehr said. “I'm not talking 
about a 50-day strike. What I mean 
is it is now apparent that this is not 
now and never has been about 
money. 

"This is about putting the play- 
ers in their place. This is about 
denying to Lhe overwhelming ma- 
jority of the players . . . any oppor- 
tunity to either be a free agent and 
have a market value set for their 
services, or to be in a circumstance 
in which a third, neutral party sets 
a fair salary.” 

Lee MacPhaiJ. the owners’ chief 
bargainer, look issue with Fehr s 
remarks. Said he: “That's an incor- 
rect statement — ‘putting the play- 
ers in their place.' This is no stab at 
the players. The players are being 
well compensated." " 

The players set the Aug. 6 strike 


deadline on July 15. the day before 
the 56th annual All-Star Game. At 
the time, there was widespread op- 
timism that a setlemsm would be 
reached in time to head off a walk- 
out. But positions hardened and 
rhetoric grew louder. On Monday, 
with those three weeks reduced to 
one day. no formal negotiations 
were held. 

Fehr did get together with Mac- 
Phail on Monday morning, to de- 
tail a plan suggested Sunday. Fehr 
offered to take less than a one-third 
share of network television revenue 
— which would amount to S60 mil- 
lion annually for six years — and 
instead accept about S40 million 
each year for the pension fund. The 
resulting difference, about S125 
mil li nn from a total TV package of 
Sl.l billion, would be redirected to 
the teams that most need it. 

The players made the proposal, 
however, provided the owners 
agreed not to change salary arbitra- 
tion rules. 

MacPbail called Fehr's proposal 
“alarmingly destructive.” Coun- 
tered Fehr: “In this situation, 
there's not much more we can do.” 

By late Monday, it was dear that 
only a dramatic change of position 
could keep the players on the field. 

“There s a strike," Fehr said as 
Monday night's final games wound 
down. “The strike is on as of the 
end of games tonight 

"As a technical matter, the strike 
does not begin until the starting 
lime of games Tuesday. As a practi- 
cal matter, if we don’t have an 
agreement, we've told the players 
that they should just be wherever 
they wflnt to be and do whatever 
they want to do. This is the way it 
has to be." 

MacPhail conceded that another 
meeting was unlikely to deter a 
walkout. "I can't sav that I'm opti- 
mistic at this point, he said. 



Strawberry’s 3 Homers Put Mets in First 

throwing error by pitcher Bill Swift 
led to two runs that gave the Angels 


Lee MacPhail 

'This is no stab at the players . ’ 

While, negotiators gave it another 
uy. ballplayers waited to see if their 
work would continue. 

Til get up and listen to the news 
and see what happens,” said Scott 
McGregor, the Baltimore Oriole 
player representative. McGregor, 
scheduled to pitch Tuesday mght 
against the Blue Jays, had flown to 
Toronto early Monday. 

As time was called, the National 
League division leaders were the 
New York Mets in the East and the 
Los Angeles Dodgers in the West. 
In the American League, Toronto 
led the East, while the California 
Angels were on top in the West. . 


, A Club— Maybe a Sport — in Receivership 


International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The receiver is at 
the Wolves' door. 

Second of course to the haunting 
loss of human lives at Bradford. 
Bi rmingham and Brussels — re- 
criminations from which now min- 
gle with the call of a new season — 
comes a fear for English dubs 
themselves. 

The Wolverhampton Wanderers, 
whose old gold has been a master 
thread in the fabric of a game that 
spread out of England to become 
universal, are days From extinction. 

Unless the dub owners, two 
property-dealing Anglo-Pakistan 
brothers, produce their promised 
$15 million by Friday. Wolver- 
hampton will be finished. And if 

Rob Hughes 

the Wolves go, who is to stop a 
panic wave of creditors bringing 
die whole pack down? 

Portents are there. Two-thirds of 
England's 92 professional clubs 
have not been able to pay their way 
for years. They have survived on 
goodwill and on belief that soccer 
was a community thing not to be 
ruthlessly brought to book. They 
have been a shop window, a world- 
wide advertising tool via television. 

None of those attractions es- 
capes the carnage of last May. 
Quite rightly, soccer grounds are 
being subjected to cripplingly ex- 
pensive safety criteria and it will be 
astounding if even last season's 
small crowds have the stomach to 
risk terrace warfare anew. 

And with the 1985-86 kickoff 
barely two weeks away, the English 
League, still convinced of its prod- 
uct's magnetism, is deadlocked in 
negotiations with television com- 
panies. Doubtless seeing soccer 
down, TV is trying to exploit the 
’.'situation for more “live” coverage 
but no additional cash. The league 
demands less of the first, far more 
of the second. 

Without all this, without the 
ramifications of Brussels in partic- 
ular, the Wolves had long pursued 
their own destruction- The golden 
years of Wolverhampton, a 
founder of the league 97 years ago 
and untouchable during the post- 
war boom years, are faded history. 

It was glorious while it lasted. 
Throughout the fifties — managed 
bv Stan Cullis and led by England 
Captain Billy Wright — the Wolves 
of the roaring long bail were cham- 
pions four times, runners-up three 
and completed the decade with the 
FA Cup in their trophy room. 

The dub pioneered the English 
challenge in Europe. It led the way 
to floodlit night competition. Its 
gates were regularly locked on full 
* houses of 60,000. Now, relegated to 
’ lhe Third Division, the team will be 
lucky to attract a tenth of that. 

Not everything can be laid at the 
feet of inferior players and mis- 
management. A glance at the dere- 
lict wasteland surrounding the Mo- 
lineux ground, separating it from a 
following that once was automatic, 
hints at wider malaise. 

The metropolitan borough of 
Wolverhampton is a slice of West 
Midlands industrial decay. Its 18.6 
percent unemployed include more 
than the average number of blacks 
and Asians, for wham the tradition 
and the priority of Wolverhampton 
Wanderers arc meaningless. 

Blind to what was going on. the 
ttfub’s directors accelerated its de- 
t'ane. The year 1979 symbolized the 
insanity. Falling to the hype of the 
million-pound transfer, the Wolves 
bought Andy Gray for £12 million 
(then about S2.66 million) and sold 
Steve DaJey to Manchester City for 
£1.4 milli on. A daring, dashing in- 
ternational goal-scorer — Gray — 


for a moderate midfield runner, 
surely good business at balancing 
the books. Alas. no. 

Gray, known to have had his 
ankles kicked to pulp, was a misfit 
who seldom played, never mind 
earned his £50,000 salary. Worse, 
Lhe understandable salary demands 
of other players doubled the 
Wolves' bills at a time when anoth- 
er financial albatross weighed 
heavily on the dub's neck. 

In 1979. ignoring the plights of 
others who had erected new stands 
on the quicksand of falling atten- 
dances. Wolverhampton built its 
own white elephant — a £2.8 mil- 
lion stand, for which a Lloyd’s 
Bank loan cost it £250.000 in annu- 
al interest. By 1982, with match 
receipts of £817,000 and expendi- 
tures of £1.5 million, the official 
receiver took his first bite. 

Cutbacks demeaning to pam- 
pered stars depressed morale. How 
could the lads give their best when 
they had to buy their own boots, 
pay their own dental bills, make 
personal calls from their own 
homes? The nerve of it! * 

The club's demise was set for 5 
P.M. on July 30. 1982. At 4:57, the 
new mess i ah came. Derek Dougan, 
the Irish showman center-forward 
of the club’s past, arrived with a 
consortium's £2.8 milli on check 
and lhe oratory of a zealot. 

He weal out to the people, telling 
them how his backers. Allied Prop- 
erties of Manchester, planned to 
convert the Wolves' J4h acres into 
a £22 million fulcrum of communi- 
ty life. He called on the local social- 
ist council to develop the surround- 
ing 35 acres into “the most vision- 
ary project this town's ever had.” 

He foresaw 1 ,000 jobs, a leisure 
complex, an office block, a gigantic 
department store and a science 
park to serve an adjoining technical 
college. “The Book of Proverbs,” 
he said, “tells us where there is no 
vision, the people perish.” 

Three years later, after a brief 
resurrection and an amazing com- 
ing and going of unheralded talent 
(including lads straight from the 
welfare queue). Wolverhampton is 
in bankruptcy court once again. 
The West Midlands Council seeks 
the club's closure. Dougan has de- 
parted as chairman and chief exec- 
utive and is among the creditors. 
He claims the club owes him 
£109.000: Allied S3vs it will sue him 
for £300,000. 

The club has no chairman, no 
manager and no big names among 
players who are also claiming un- 
paid bonuses. A former manager, 
Graham Hawkins, has just sued for 
wrongful dismissal. .Another. Tom- 
my Docherty, uses Wolverhampton 
as lhe buu of sick wisecracks. Even 
the milkman is under orders not to 
deliver without being paid in cash. 

And the clock ticks away toward 
Friday's deadline, set by a court for 
the winding up. That allows time 
for a check said to be on its way 
from Lhe United States to inject 
S2i million into the ailing club. 

If it arrives, its signature will be 
the same as that behind Allied 
Properties. The Bhatti brothers are 
shy benefactors, too preoccupied 
with business (which reportedly 
last year included £1 million profit 
on a single London house) to rise to 
the bait of a local council leader 
who had insinuated that -Allied’s 
in t rests did not lie with the team. 

But a year ago Allied rejected, 
indeed ignored. ~a mysterious take- 
over bid that fell far short of the £5 
million-plus the Bhntiis might have 
considered 

On the town's crest is the motto. 
“Out of Darkness Cometh Light." 
For the Wolves, ami for a sport that 
would Feel the ripple effect, it will 
have to be a golden shaft. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

CHICAGO — Suddenly it has 
become a what-mighl-have-been 
season for Darryl Strawberry, the 
developing New York Met super- 
star. Strawberry had the best game 

BASEBALL ROUNDUP 

of bis 216-year career here Monday 
when he hit three home runs, sin- 
gled, drove in five runs and scored 
four times to lead the Mets to a 7-2 
victory over the Chicago Cubs. 

The victory was the Mets' third 
straight and pushed them into first 
place by a half-game ahead of Sl 
L ouis in the National L e a gu e East 
following the Cardinals’ loss Mon- 
day night to Philadelphia. 

Strawberry hit a three-run homer 
in the first innin g and bases-empty 
shots in the third and seventh (be 
singled in the ninth). The only oth- 
er Mets to hit three home runs in a 
game were Jim Hickman in 1965, 
Dave Kin gman in 1976 and Clau- 
del] Washington in 1980. 

New York made up three games 
on St. Louis in three days, but the 
prospect of Tuesday’s threatened 
player strike took away much of the 
excitement. 

“1 never thought that this might 
be our last game,” said Strawberry. 
23. “I had a real good day, but 
knowing yon can't come back to- 
morrow and play. . . . It's going to 
be tough. It'll hurt the fans and 
players.” 

The strike aside, much of Straw- 
berry’s season was spoiled when he 
missed seven weeks because of a 
thumb injury. He was out 43 
games, du ring which span the Mets 
were 20-23. He came back on June 
28 and had a 215 average with 6 
homers and 12 runs batted in. Since 
returning. Strawberry has raised 
his average to 263; he now has 15 
home runs and 41 RBIs. 

Pfaflfies 9, Cardinals 1: In Sl 
L ouis. Ozzie Virgil hit two homers 
and John Russell added another to 
give Philadelphia its third victory 
in a four-game series. 

Dockers 6, Braves 1: In Atlanta, 
Steve Sax drove in three runs with 
two singles and Pedro Guerrero’s 


three hits extended his hitting 
streak to 15 games as Los Angeles 
breezed past the Braves. 

Expos 5, Pirates 2: In Pittsburgh, 
Andre Dawson doubled home the 
tie-breaking run in the ninth and 
Hubie Brooks followed with a two- 
run single to assure Jeff Reardon of 
his major-league leading 28th save 
of the year. 

Reds 8. Padres 7: In Cincinnati, 
Dave Parker went 4-for-5, includ- 
ing a three-run homer, to lead an 
11-hit attack that rallied the Reds 
past San Diego. Cincinnati player- 
manager Pete Rose went l-for-4, 
leaving him 24 hits from Ty Cobb's 
career record of 4.191. 


Astros 7. Giants 5: In Houston, 
rookie Glenn Davis drove in three 
runs with a pair of singles and Ke- 
vin Bass had two RBIs to lead the 
Astros to their fourth straight vic- 
tory. 

Yankees 7, White Scot 3: In the 
American League, in New York. 
Ron Guidry ( 14-4) struck out seven 
and walked none in registering his 
ninth complete game of the year. 
Don Mattingly and Rickey Hen- 
derson hit badc-to-bacfc first-pitch 
home runs oFf Floyd Bannister in 
the fifth inning. It was Mattingly’s 
fourth homer m four games. 

Angels 3, Mariners I: In Ana- 
heim, California, a sixth-inning 


their fourth straight triumph. 

A's 5, Twins I: In Oakland, Cali- 
fornia. Brace Bochte had three hits 
and drove in two runs and Tim 
Binsas scattered six hits over 834 
inni ng s to lift the A's past Minne- 
sota. The Twins lost their fifth 
game in a row. 

Tigers 8, Royals 4: In Kansas 
City, Missouri, Chet Lemon dou- 
bled home two runs in the seventh. 
Kirk Gibson and Lance Parrish hit 
back-to-back home runs in the 
eighth and Lou Whitaker added a 
two-run homer in the ninth to lift 
Detroit to its 12th straight victory 
at Royals Stadium. (AP. UPI) 



IbeAeoodtfnm 

Danyi Strawberry: 1 had a real good day, bat knotting yoa can’t cone bock tomorrow and pby. ... ’ 



SCOREBOARD 



Major League Leaders 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

G AB R H Pd. 
McGee St.L 97 Ml 69 131 Mi 

Guerrero LA. 97 W 75 IM 331 

Harr St.L 102 383 61 130 JI3 

Gwvrm S-D. 101 414 56 127 J07 

Parker CM. 103 406 54 123 303 

Cniz Min. 93 364 45 108 797 

J. Clark SLL 103 374 56 110 .294 

OHln On. 95 327 34 96 394 

Hernandez N.V. 102 373 54 10* 292 

-Hamer All. -85 319 46 - *3 3»2 

Murphy Ati. 104 397 84 116 292 

Rum: Murphy, Atlanta. 84: Guerrero, Las 
Angeles. 75; Cate men, St. Louis, 74; Bafnes, 
Montreal. 73; McGee. St. Louis. 69; Sandberg. 
OlICOBP. 69. 

RBIs: Parker, Cincinnati. 80; J.dorfc. 
St. Louis, 79; Murphy, Atlanta 78; Herr. 
51. Louis. 76; Homer, Atlanta. 68. 

Hits: McGee. SL Louis. 131; Gwynn, San 
Dieoo, 127; Parser. Cincinnati, 123; Herr, 
St. Louis. 120; Garvey, Son Dieoo. HB. 

Doubles: watloch, Montreal. 28; Parker. 
Cincinnati, 25; Hernandez. New York. 24; 
Gwvrm, San Diego, 23; Herr. SI. louts. 23; 
J. Clark. St. Louis, 21 
Triples: McGee, Sf. Louis, 13; Coleman, 
SL Louts, 9; Raines. Montreal. 8: Samuel. 
Philadelphia. 8; Gladden. Sen Francisco. 6. 

Home Rons: Guerrera Los Angeles, 27; 
Muratiy, Atlanta, 27; Parker, Cincinnati, 71; 
Horner, A Mama. 20; J. Clark. St. Louis. 20. 


Stolen Boies: Coleman, Sl. Loots, 74; Lopes, 
Chicago. 41; McGee. SL Louis. 41; Raines. 
Montreal. 39; Redus. Cincinnati 39. 

PITCHING 

Won-Last/ManiM PcL/ERA: Franco. Cin- 
clnnatL9-1.J00.ZI3; Gooden. New York. 17-3. 
SSO. 157; Hawkins. Son Olega, 14-3. 534,3.12; 
Hershlser. Los Ananias. 12-1 500, 142; 
B. Smith, Montreal. 12-4. .730. 189. 

Strikeouts: Gooden. New York, 179; Soto. 
OndnnatL 156; Ryan, Houston, 154; Valen- 
zuela Los Angeles. 143; Darting. New York. 
117. 

... Saves: Reardon. Montreal, 28; Le. Smith, 
diicago. 23; Oanaae. San Diego. 21; Power. 
Cincinnati. 19; D. Smith. Houston, 18. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

G AB R H Pet. 
Boggs Bos. 102 410 59 145 154 

Brett ICC 97 346 64 121 550 

R. Henderson N.Y. 90 350 92 122 M9 

Bochte Oak. 88 257 30 84 727 

Lacy Bal. 73 314 47 100 518 

Mattingly N.Y. 102 412 56 131 518 

Whitaker Dot. 100 407 75 128 J14 

P. Bradley Sea. 102 408 58 125 Mt 

Butter Cie- 104 414 57 126 504 

G«d man Bos. 93 312 45 95 J04 

Runs: R. Henderson. New York. 92; Ripken, 
Baltimore. 75; Whitaker. Detroit 75; Malltor. 
Milwaukee. 71; M. Davis. Oakland. 68; Win- 
field, New York. 68. 

RBIs: MatHnalv. New York.87; E. Murray. 
Baltimore. 80; Rtoken, Baltimore. 74; Fisk. 
Chicago. 72: G.BeJi# Toronto. 71. 


Hits: Boaas. Boston. 145; Malting Iv, Now 
York. 131 ; Wilson, Kansas City. 1 30; Whitaker. 
Detroit. 128; Garda, Toronto. 127. 

Doubles: Mattingly. New York. 33; Buck- 
ner. Boston, 31 ; Boggs. Boston, 30; G. Walker. 
Chicago, 26; Cooper. Milwaukee, 25. 

Trwes: wnson, Kansas aty. 14; Butler, 
Cleveland, IT; Puckett. Minnesota 10; Coo- 
MT. Milwaukee, I ; Griffin. Oakland. 6; Hern- 
don. Detroit, 6; P. Bradley, Seattle, 6. 

Home Haas: Fisk. Chicago. 29; Da. Evens. 
Detroit, 24; G. Thomas. Seattle. 24; Presley, 
Seattle. 24; Baibani. Kansas Cttv, 21 
Staten Bases: R. Henderson, Nsw York, 50; 
Butler, Cleveland, 32; Pettis, California 32; 
Wilson. Kansas City, II; Mosehy. Toronto. 26. 
PITCHING 

wop-Lost/Wtantno PcL/ERA: Blrtsas. 

OaktoncL8-2,50a. 300; Guidry. New York. 144. 
378,308,- Romanic*. CMHornlatM. 761352; 
Saberhagen, Kansas City, 12-i J7D& 285, 
J. Howell. Oakland. 9-4,591 1.95; Key, Toron- 
to, 44. 592. 264. 

Strikeouts: Blyleven, Minnesota, 131 ; Mor- 
ris. Detroit, 131; F. Bannister, Chicago, 121; 
Burns, enkago. 119; Witt California, 117. 

Saves: Qubenherrv, Kansas CHy. 24; 
J.HaweJL Oakland. 23; He rnan dez . Detroit. 
22; □. Moore, Conform a, 71; RlgHetll, New 
York. 19. 

Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Division 


PGA Leaders 


Leaders on Itw Professional Goiters Asrnd- 
affoit tear through the Western Open, which 
ended Aog. 4: 

EARNINGS 


1. Curtis Strange 

S5Z7J81 

2. Ray Floyd 

349579 

X Lanrty Wadklns 

337578 

4. Corey pavln 

328515 

X Mark CTMeora 

304515 

4 Cahrin Peel* 

295589 

7. Craig Stodier 

277726 

8. Bernhant-Lanaer. 

257515 

9. Hal Sutton 

261524 

10 Fuzzy Zoetler 

217539 

11. John Mohaffev 

207546 

IX Roger MaNble 

206511 

IX Sew* Ballesteros 

2(0730 

14. Larry MUe 

20X136 

15. Andy North 

186568 


Monday’s Major League line Scores 


Hie Anooajd Presi 

Andy Gray (airborne, left): A misfit at Wolverhampton. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Worldwide 'Goodwill Games’ Planned 

NEW YORK (Reuters) — Cable television magnate Ted Turner 
announced on Tuesday an agreement with the Soviet Union to hold 
“goodwill games” starting in Moscow next year and open to amateur 
athletes worldwide. He said the agmes would be held every four years, 
with sites alternating between the United States and the Soviet Union. 

Turner said the event is to feature track and field events and other 
summer sports. The agreement with Soviet sports and television authori- 
ties was signed in Moscow on Tuesday. 

Amateur Russian and .American athletes have not met competitively 
since the 1976 Olympics. The United States boycotted the 1980 Moscow 
Games and ihe Soviet Union boycotted the 19& Games in Los Angeles. 

Russians Set N. America Hockey Tour 

MOSCOW (AP) — The Central Army hockey team wifi tour North 
America in December and January- for six games agains t National 
Hockey League teams, Tass reported Tuesday. 

The army team, which has produced many of the Soviet Union's best 
national players, wifi begin its series against Los Angeles on Dec. 26. 
followed by games against Edmonton (Dec. 2fi). Calgary (Dec. 29), 
Monueal (Dec. 31), Sl Louis (Jan. 2) and Minnesota (Jan. 4). 

Egypt Readmitted to Pan-Arab Games 

RABAT. Morocco (AP) — The general assembly of the Arab Sports 
Union, the organizing body of the Pan -Arab Games, has voted to readmit 
EgypL In Monday's 1S-I balloting, only Syria voted against: four other 
nations. Libya, Tunisia, Algeria and South Yemen, abstained. The vote 
did not affect the Pan-Arab Games currently in progress in Morocco. 

Egypt was excluded from the union in 1979. Following its expulsion 
from the Arab League for signing the Camp David peace agreements with 
Israel. The union normally includes all members of the .Arab League. 

USFL Players Union Sues G unsling ers 

SAN ANTONIO, Texas (UPI) — The United States Football League 
Players Association filed suit Monday against the San Antonio Gunsling- 
ers for the more than S550.000 owed the team's former players for the last 
four games of this season. 

The 46 players were waived July 22, when owner Clinton Manges Failed 
to meet an arbitrator's deadline For making good on the missed two 
payrolls in June. The players were waived hours before they* would have 
automatically become free agents under grievance procedures. 

Meza to Defend Title Against Pintor 

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Juan Meza will defend his World Boxing 
Council super bantamweight title against feitow Mexican Guadalupe 
Pintor here Aug. 18, it was announced on Monday. Meza won the 
championship by knocitiung out American Jaime Garza Iasi November. 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
New York 381 D2B 188-7 13 8 

Chicago DOO 811 818-4 8 • 

Lynch, McDowell (8) and Carter; Balelho, 
Sorensen (5), Meridltfi (71. Brusstar (91 and 
Davis, W— Lvnctv 9-5. L-BatoRM, 0-1. HRs— 
New York, Strawberry 3 1151. Chicago. Davis 
(ID). 

Lot Angelas 188 822 108-6 18 1 

Atlanta 101 888 888-1 5 8 

Renss. Niedantoer (8) ond Sctoscta; Bark- 
er. Camg (61, Forster (71. Dedman (9) and 
Cerane. W — Rem. 9-7. L — Barker, 1-5. 5v— 
Nledenfuer (10). HR— Las Angelas, Lon- 
draaux (9). 

Montreal 208 800 083-5 6 1 

Pittsburgh 100 100 008-3 6 8 

Schatzeder, Roberge (4). Burke (6), Rear- 
don (9) and Nicosia, Fit zgeral d (I); Tunnel I. 
Winn (9), Revsdiel <9; and Pena W— Burke, 
M. L— Winn. 2-«. Sv— Reardon (281. HRs— 
Montreal. Dawson (11 J. Pittsburgh. Almon 
(5). 

San Diego 040 030 908-7 12 8 

Cincinnati 013 318 OOX—8 12 0 

Hawk bis. Stoddard (31. Jackson (51, Let- 
torts (8) and Kennedy; McGafflgan. S toper 
(31, Buchanan HI. Hume (51, Robinson 16), 
Francs (■). Power (9) and Van Gorder, Btlar- 
detto (B>. W— Home. 2-3. L-JadcscaO-X Sw— 
Power (19). HR-OndnncrtL Porker 121). 
Philadelphia 211 318 811—9 14 8 

SL Louis 010 000 000—1 3 8 

Rowley and Virgil; Cox, Baever (4), Forsch 
(61, Campbell (81 and Nieto. W— Rowley. 8-6. 


L— Co*. 1*7. HRs— Philadelphia. Virgil 2 113), 
Russell 12). 

Smi Francisco DIB 008 183-5 tJ 8 

Houston 088 311 28*— 7 12 0 

Hammnker. Williams (6), Davis (7) rod 
Brenlv; Knepper, Kertold (8), Smith 19) and 
Brilev, w— Kneoper.9-9. L— Hammaker, 3-10. 
5v— Smith (18). HRs— San Francisco. Brown 
(12). Brenlv (14). Youngblood (31. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
.Chicago 888 188 HB — 3 f 0 

New York 100 328 Olx-7 8 1 

Bannister. SpiUner (51, Wehrmatstar (7). 
James (8) and Fisk; Guidry and Wvnegar. 
W— Guidry, 14-4. L— Banoisier.M.H Rs— Chi- 
cago, Ftsfc 129). New York, Henderson (17). 
Mattingly (161. 

Detroit 900 010 322-8 9 8 

Kansas City BOO 208 101—1 9 1 

Terrell. Hernandez (8) and Parrlsn; Jack- 
son, Jones (8), Beckwith (9) and Wothon.W— 
Terrell, 11-6. L — Jackson, 18-7. 5v— Heraon- 
dez (22). H Re— Detroit. Gibson (21), Parrish 
(16), Whitaker H6I. Kansas aty, Balboni 2 
(23). 

Seattle 000 001 000—1 I 2 

California 010 012 Bln— 9 6 I 

Swtft. vande Berg (7). Long (81 and Keor- 
nevzwm and Boone. W—Wltt,9-7. L— Swift. 3- 
*. HR— Seattle. Bradley (Ml. 

Minnesota 080 M0 608—1 6 1 

Oakland 200 83* Ito-S I 1 

Smithson, Risen (6) and Loudner; Blrtsas, 
Howeir (9) and Heath. W— Blrtsas. 8-1 L— 
Smithson. 11-6. Sv— Howell (231. HR— Minne- 
sota Engle (5). 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
American League 

NEW YORK — Sent Dan Pasaua. outfielder, 
la Columbus of toe international Leoeue. Re- 
called Mike Armstrong, pttfiher, tram Colum- 
bus. 

Texas— optioned Glen Cook, pllcher, to 
Oklahoma City of lhe American Association, 
notional League 

ATLANTA— Placed Zone Smith, pitcher, on 
me 21 -day disabled list. 

CHICAGO— Recalled pitcher Derek Bo- 
let no (ram lawo of the American Association. 
Designated pitcher Larry Guro lor reassign- 

nWrt BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Association 

PORTLAND— Placed Tam Schemer, cen- 
ter. an waivers. 

SEATTLE— Made David Thompson, guard, 
a free agent by not picking up toe option year 
of his c o ntract. Cut Brett Vroman and Les 
Croft, centers. Eart Walker end Lou Stefbno- 
vle. forw a rds, and John StfiweltL guard. 

FOOTBALL 

National Football League 

ATLANTA— Waived Ben Bennett, quarter- 
back, Sian Gar. defensive back; Blana Gal- 
son. safety; Austin Shanks and Tommy Nor- 
man. wide receivers, and Allman Young, 
guard. 

BUFFALO— Stgnea Andre Young, ond Er- 
nes! Adams. Hncoackers. Cut Steve Potter 
ond Mark Weller, linebackers; Ran Govnar, 
quarterback : William Devon*, nose tackle; 
Golden Tow and Darryl Emerson, wide re- 
ratvers: Scott Fulhage. punter; Jim Gallery 
ond Brian Speelinon.DlaeeklCliers.and David 
ThurkllL tight end. 

CHICAGO— Signed William Perry, defen- 
sive lochie, to o tour-year conrracT.ana Steve 
McMlchoet. defensive tackle. 

CINCINNATI— PMCM Mike Lewis, wide 
receiver, and Larry Godins, running back, an 
waivers. 

DETROIT— Placed Jeff PleTzvnsfcl. line- 
backer. on waivers. 

GREG N BAY— Cut Mike Farle*,«taCOfciCk- 
tr; G*no Kniekrehm, tactile; Ken Walter, 
guard, and Andre Moselv. defensive bode. 

L-A. RA M S - S ign e d Russ BoUmw, offen- 
sive lineman. 


MIAMI— Released Dwayne Crutchfield, 
fullback, and Mark Smyth*, defensive end. 
Stoned Lvie Blackwood. safety, too two-year 
contracL 

NEW ORLEANS— Traded Tim Golden, 
linebacker, to Indianapolis tor future consid- 
erations. Signed 5tan Brock, tackle. Cut Chris 
word, lock i*. Reggie Lewis, defensive end, 
and Wayne Dawson, linebacker. Announced 
mat Clavten Wetshuhn. linebacker, will miss 
the season because of knee surgery. Ploasd 
Dean Sanders, defensive end. an waivers. 

N.Y. JETS— Signed Joia TawnselL wide re- 
ceiver, and Ben Rudolph, defensive end. 

PHILADELPHIA— Signed Leonard MIKh- 
eiL offensive tackle, to fhreo 1 -year can tracts. 
Signed Herbert Harr is. wide receiver. Waived 
tree agents Derek Carter and Myron DuPree, 
defensive bocks. 

5T. LOU IS— Signed Freddie Joe Nunn, de- 
fensive end. 

Sandi EGO— Signed Tim Saenoer. running 
back, to a series of one-vear contracts. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Placed John Harfy.de- 
tensive end, on the physically unable to per- 
form net Signed Garrett Moore, running 
back. 

TAMPA BAY— Signed Ron Holmes, defen- 
sive end. to o 4-vear contract Signed Robert 
Brannon, defensive end. Waived Yogas Per- 
gusan, running baric; Model* GilliaitL Fred 
Bohannon and Ken Calhoun, defensive bocks : 
Kelvin Epps, wide receiver; Mike Sommer- 
field, defensive end. and Lonnie Kenneil.nose 
tackle. 

WASHINGTON— waived Jofiv Bran ton. 
comerba ek. Mike Keneiav.satetv.and Derry] 
(Jrserv, tackle. 

Willed States Football League 
ORLANDO — Claimed John Reaves, quar- 
lerbaek. an waivers tram Tomoa Bay. 
HOCKEY 

National Hodwy League 
DETROIT— Signed Roy Stozsak. rioM 
wing. 

COLLEGE 

ARIZONA STATE— signed John coooar, 
football coach, to a one-year contracL 

HOFSTra— N amutfOirlsMotlwaond Jett 

Enefc assistant football coaches. 


Toronto 

W 

67 

L 

39 

Pet 

■530 

GB 

Detroit 

57 

47 

.548 

9 

Hew York 

57 

47 

-548 

9 

Boston 

55 

49 

■S» 

11 

Baltimore 

S3 

50 

J15 

12Yj 

Milwaukee 

45 

57 

Ail 

20 

Cleveland 

34 

70 

J27 

32 

California 

West Division 
61 

44 

J81 



Kansas aty 

55 

48 

J34 

5 

Oakland 

56 

49 

J33 

5 

CMcogo 

52 

50 

S10 

7Vi 

Seattle 

49 

56 

M7 

12 

Minnesota 

46 

57 

MT 

14 

Texas 

40 

64 

-385 

20Vi 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Dtristoo 

W L 

New York 62 42 

pa 

796 

GB 

SI. Louis 

61 

42 

592 

to 

Montreal 

99 

47 

JS7 

4 

CMcogo 

54 

50 

-519 

8 

pniktdeiphla 

49 

55 

.471 

13 

Pittsburgh 

33 

70 

320 

28W 

Los Angelas 

west Division 
61 

43 

-587 

_ 

Cincinnati 

56 

4S 

-53B 

5 

San Dlasa 

ss 

51 

.519 

7 

Houston 

50 

56 

.472 

13 

Atlanta 

46 

50 

AO 

15 

Son Francisco 41 

65 

■387 

21 


SCORING 

L Dan Poo Icy. 7053. 2. Rav Floyd. 7054 1 
Corey Pavln, 7057. 4 Larry Mize. 7059. 5. 
Lam WMklns. 7037. 4 John Mohaffev. 70J1S. 
7, Craig Slaiflar. 7U97.8. KeRh Fergus. 715)1. 9. 
Curtis Strange. 7152. 10 Mark O'Meara, 71JCL 
AVERAGE DRIVING DISTANCE 
1, Andy Bean, 277.L 2. Fred Coup les. 2755. 3, 
Greg Norman and Mac (TGrady, 2745. 4 
Sandy LvlwZ735. 4 Greg Twiggs. 27XZ 7. Bill 
Glosson. 2727. 4 Joev Sindeiar, 2725. 9, Tom 
Purizer. 2725. ML Jim Dent, 27Z1. 

DRIVING PERCENTAGE IN FAIRWAY 
1. Calvin Peete. 520 i David Edwards. J99. 
X Larry NeisaaJ644 Mke Reid. JV0. 5. Jack 
Renner and Hale Irwin, 353. 7, Tim Norris. 
740 4 Doug Tewell, 746. 9. Bob Murphy, 742. 
ML Two tied wtttv 741. 

GREENS IN REGULATION 
1. Jock NIcfclaML 712. X Bruce Lletzke, 711. 
3, John Mohaffev, 704 4 Carey Pavln, 701 5, 
Dan Pohl and Calvin Potto. 599. 7, Roger 
Maltbie, 5*4 o Doug Tewell, 585. 9. Three tied 
with 589. 

AVERAGE PUTTS PER ROUND 
i, Bobby Ctampeft. 2057. 2, Craig Startler, 
2856. X Frank Conner, 2858. 4. Rav Floyd. 
2870 5, Mike DanoKL2084 4 Ivon Smith, 2854 
7. Dan Foreman, 2094. 4 Morris Hotolskv, 
28.95.9. Don Poofey.2879. 10 Ran 51 reck. 2950. 
PERCENTAGE OF SUB-PAR HOLES 
1. Crtrtg Stwfler, 515. 2. Tom Watson, 714 3, 
Lonnv Wadklns, 707. 4 Philip Btackmar and 
Rov Flovd. 7B3. 4 Tl»Chung Chan ond Fred 
Couples. 701. 9, HaJ Sutton. TOO 1 0, Larry Nel- 
son, .199. 

EAGLES 

1, Corey Pavln. 1Z Z Philip Btodanar. 11. X 
Larry RJnfcer. 10.4 Curtis Strange and Joey 
Sindeiar, 9. 4 Nino tied wtto s. 

BIRDIES 

1. Hal Sutton. 308 2. Joey Sindeiar. 294 X 
Wayne Grady. 291. 4 Craig Stadtar, 204 5, 
Bobby Clompett, 2*1. 4 Curds Strange, 280 7, 
Buddy Gardner. 274 8- Fay Flo yd. Z7*. 9, Corey 
Pavtn. 271 10, Larry Mize, 271. 











Page 16 


OBSERVER 


Portrait of a Painter 


By Russell Baker 

N FW YORK — Writers have 
to do something besides write, 
or he-men will thin if they are sis- 
sies. This is why Ernest Heming- 
way went around shooting things 
and attending wars. There are 
■ many other famous examples. 

George Plimpton, for instance. 
He tries to play the gan^ with pro- 
fessional athletes, woody Allen 
makes movies, David Hafberstam 
rows, John Irving wrestles. Or used 
to wrestle. Norman Mailer has run 
for mayor of New York, made a 
movie, got arrested for a cause. 

My career as a writer was gravely 
hampered by tny refusal to develop 
a sideline. When I took up the 
typewriter, I scoffed at the writing 
men of action. Could one imagine 
Henry James plodding around Af- 
rica, in the Hemingway mode, 
shooting poor inoffensive beasts? 

• MareeT Proust, I pointed out, 
bad written profusely without play- 
mg quarterback for the Detroit li- 
ons or pitching to Willie Mays. 

, And what about Cha rles Dick- 
««? He would have been outraged 
n told he ought to take up rowing, 
$r wrestle, or run for mayor be- 
cause he-men would think him a 
pantywaist if he just sat around 
dribbling ink 

□ 


Yes, I had decided 
house-painting. 


to take up 


What was good enough for 
James, Proust and Dickens was 
good enough for me. I sat around 
dribbling ink. 

And failed, of course. 

He-men would not buy my 
books. If Lhey wanted to read 
books written by somebody who 
didn't sweat and struggle at irrele- 
vant sideline activities, he-men 
said, they could read books by 
women writers. 

So my market was taken over by 
Fran Lebowitz, Jane Austen and 
Edith Wharton, whose writings 
were lean, muscular and energetic 
because they did not have to ex- 
haust themselves going on safaris, 
making movies, rowing, wrestling, 
pitching to WiQie Mays oi running 
for mayor. 


I acknowledged the way of the 
world and took up a virile sideline. 

There was consternation in the 
house the day I rose from my type- 
writer, strode into the parlor and. 
with muscles buckling under the 
weight, spilled a gallon of white 
alkyd primer on the Aubtisson rug. 


That was many years ago. Now 
the years spent scraping paint, put- 
tying wall cracks, removing wallpa- 
per and smelling like paint thinner 
at elegant writers’ conferences have 
given ray writing a manly weight, 
which, if developed, might yet 
place me among the great authors. 

This summer — if I may share a 
confidence — l intend to take on 
Henry James. His “Portrait of a 
Lad jr was probably good enough 
in its time, but does America these 
days want to read a sexist novel 
about women in hoop skirts? 

This was the question I asked 
myself one day while removing 
green and blue polka-dot wallpaper 
from a second-floor bedroom in a 
boose I had bought so I would have 
something to paint between books. 

As soon as I asked it, I realized 
that the great novel waiting to be 
written would have to be titled 
“Portrait erf a Woman." And while 
I soaped hard at a particularly 
obdurate piece of wallpaper, I de- 
bated whether it should bear the 
subtitle “Without No Clothes On. 

Foot weeks have passed since 
that first conversation with myself 
and, believe me, getting off that 

ffi -dot wallpaper was not easy. 

i a vinyl finish that refused to 
soak up the hot water applied to it. 
and Innally had to go after it with 
a rotary sander. After that the walls 
had to be robbed with steel wool, 
but the sander had chewed up the 
plaster so badly that — 

Where was I? Yes. “Portrait of a 
Woman,” possibly subtitled 
“Without No Clothes On," provid- 
ed America seems ready for a great 
satirical novel I have been up on 
the ladder all day trying to save the 
wall with patching plaster, and 
wondering if a better title wouldn’t 
be “Portrait of a Gentleman." pos- 
sibly subtitled “Without No nuns 
On," and I'm now too tired to make 
great artistic decisions. 

That’s the trouble with house- 
painting. By the time you finish 
washing the brushes, you’re too ex- 
hausted to sit down at the typewrit- 
er. And if you sit down anyhow, the 
writing comes out exhausted and 
pointless. Like this. 

Where was I — ? 

Well, at least they can’t call me 
“sissy boy." 

New York Tuna Service 


Fi ghting Wildfires With Technology 


By Jim Robbins 

New York Tuna Service 

H ELENA, Montana — For 
more than a week, opaque 
columns of smoke rose into the 
sky at HeDgate Canyon, near 
Missoula. As darkness gathered, 
dozens of wind-driven blazes 
flickered in the thickly forested 
mountains. 

Crews struggled to dig a line 
around the 1,000- ant (400-heci- 
are) fire. Bombers dropped loads 
of fire-retardant slurry before the 
flames, leaving dusty red streaks 
on the ground. 

Each day that week in the mid- 
dle of July, decisions had to be 
made on how to fight the fire and 
what its course might be. In this 
case, the fire boss and crews had 
the assistance of a U. S. Forest 
Service computer program called 
Behave. 

The system cannot cover all 
possibilities; shifting winds in 
HcMgate Canyon undid the com- 
puters projection of the fire's 
course. Last year on a 27,000-aicre 
blaze in North Hills near Helena, 
however, a computer successfully 
predicted that the fire would bum 
itself out and that 8 miles (13 
kilometers) of new fire line would 
not be needed. 

That prqection is estimated to 
have saved £670,000 in labor and 
materials. And it meant that fire- 
fighters did not have to risk their 
lives dig g in g a ling. 

Forest fires in the West earlier 
this summer killed three persons, 
destroyed 200 homes and caused 
more man 560 mi [lion in damage. 
At the peak of the season, the 
Forest Service, U. S. Bureau or 
Land Management and state for- 
est agencies were spending SS.6 
million a day fighting fires na- 
tionwide. The Interagency Fire 
Center in Boise, Idaho, said more 
than a million acres had burned 
this year in the West. 

Until 1940, forest fires were 
fought by people who hiked into 
a fire. Directed by radio from 
aircraft, they used shovels and 
poleaxes. Thrir missi on was the 
same as it is now: to dig a trench 
around the. fire to contain iL 
In 1940 firefighters began to be 
flown with equipment to the fire 
area and parachuted in to get an 
early assessment of the blaze. 

In the early 1970s Forest Ser- 
vice researchers began to apply 




Charles Bushey 
(above) charts 
potential tine 
hazards; forestry 
officials used 
calculators to predict 
movements of blazes 
and a computer 
(DeDora Gauger, 
right, with printouts) 
to monitor 
lightning strikes. 


Doifcnt/naKWratr* 



PEOPLE 


Stockman Book Contract 


• David Stockman, who resigned 
Iasi month as director of the white 
House Office of Management and 
Budget, has sold book rights to 
Harper & Row for more than 52 
million. The book, to betitled “The 
Triumph of Politics," win be a 
“personal memoir and a revealing 
study of the process of politics god 
government in our country." said 
Edward L. Burlingame, vice presi- 
dent and publisher of Harper’s 
Trade Book Division. The book 

will be released next spring, he said 


The largest legal brothel in the 
United States, the Mustang Ranch 
□ear Reno. Nevada, has been sold 


Thirteen years after she proem- 
sd Richard M Nixes with a small 
bouquet during his first lop to Cftr- 
na. Shea Ding has become a newly- 
wed is Michigan. She says she in- 
tends io write the former U.S. 
president io thank him for improv- 
ing relations with China. Sen 
Ding, who was 12 when she pre- 
sented the bouquet in the Great 
Hall of the People in Beijing, said 
"AU Hus. my marriage, none of it 
avid have happened without ha - 
visit." site and JraSotier, 32. me! 
in Beijing Iasi September when 
Butler, who works for Drtron- 


as pan of an SI 8- million based Burroughs Crap- spent three 

uuskuod muahsmsnOmg computers for a 

necred Nevada s move into legal- — ■ * - ■ - 


----- - - - . Chinese- oenmanv. Tbev married 

ned prostitution. Joe and Srify two owatfc ago and Live in a Dc- 


[ ethnology developed for other 
uses, including the military. In- 
frared cameras, for example, are 
used over fires to detect hot roots 
and to get a picture of the perime- 
ter of the fire despite smoke. 

Now, as in many other fields, 
computers have taken a big role 
in making derisions. 


To gather data, federal agen- 
cies have developed devices that 
can detect more than 95 percent 
ofall lightning strikes in 11 West- 
ern states. Together with comput- 
er programs and portable weath- 
er stations, the system is raliwi 
the Initial Attack Management 
System. The $7-million network 
began operation this year at the 
Interagency Fire Center. 

Four categories of data are 
needed: the type of fuel, whether 
(pine needles, large branches, 
grass, standing trees), the amount 
of moisture in living and dead 
plants, tiie angle of slope and the 
wind speed. Helicopters fiy ahead 
of the fire to take samples and 
examine the terrain. 


Given these, the computer 
plots how quickly, how far and in 
what direction the fire will 
spread, how hot it wQI be, the 
length of the flames and how long 
it will take to contain the fire. 

In the evening the firefighters 
estimate what each fire will do 
daring the heat of the day, said 
Richard Rothermal, a research 
scientist in the Northern Forest 
Fire Laboratory in Helena, and 
they plan their suppression strat- 
egy accordingly. If the flame 
length, for example, is expected 
to be more than 4 feet (12 me- 
ters). alternatives must be found 
to digging fire lines: flames long- 
er than four feet are considered 
unsafe. 

For several years the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Ad- 
ministration and the Interagency 
Fire Center have been using satel- 
lites to map 1 1 Western states by 
terrain and moisture content. 

The maps have been sent to 
regional offices of the land man- 
agement agencies around the 
West, and the Automatic Light- 


ning Detection System works 
from this base of information. 

Foresters used to rely on look- 
out towers on. ridgetops and hflla. 
Now 32 remote sensors report 
lightning strikes. 

“We can detect 95 to 99 per- 
cent of all lightning," said Steven 
German, program manager for 
the system. When a large number 
of strikes hits an area, especially 
one that has beep mapped as par- 
ticularly dry, a plane is sent out. 
It is estimated that 75 percent of 
the fires in the West are caused by' 
lightning, so the system is expect- 
ed to produce a dramatic reduc- 
tion in the number of fixes that 
become mqjor problems. 

Despite the advances of tech- 
nology, though, fire lines are sriH 
dug by hand. “We’ve tried a lot of . . 
machines,” said Bill McQeese, 
the Forest Service’s assistant di- 
rector for fire management in 
Washington. “But with the kind 
of terrain we work in there’s 
nothing to replace the human be- - 
ing with a shovel." •'* 


Conforte, who say they owe as 
much as £10 million in luck taxes, 
sold the business to Strong Point 
lnc„ A southern California compa- 
ny. The brothel is two buildings 
with a total of 108 bedrooms off the 
Interstate ffl) highway about 10 
miles (16 kilometers) east of Reno. 


troii suburb. „ . - 

□' 

Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher of Britain and her bus- 
band, Denis, have signed a contrai l 
to bay a house in the tugb-secarilv 
Dulwich Gate development in 
southern London, Recording to Da- 


Barratt GnuTKL Ltd The 

SMKSiiSS jtfsBSSHOS 


had “engaged m this very profit- 
able and provocative business." 


Bruce Springsteen brought his 
“Bora in the USA" tour back to the 
United States for a well-behaved 
Washington crowd of 53,000. The 
tour has been seen by three million 
people in almost 140 cities from 
Tokyo to Dublin to Steattle/At least 
36 more concert dates are planned 
before it ends in October. 


Rock Hudson has approved a 
plan tosetupa foundation to fight 
acquired immune deficiency syn- 
drome in his name, a spokesman 
says. Hudson, who was visited at 
UCLA Medical Center in Los An- 
geles by Elizabeth Taylor, “is gain- 
ing strength and is in gpod spirits" 
but is sml in fair condition, the 
hospital said in a statement Tay- 
lor, (me of the organizers of a gala 
benefit planned for Sept 19 to raise 
money for research into AIDS, 
starred with Hudson in the 1956 
movie “Giant" for which the actor 
received an Academy Award nomi- 
nation. Hudson. 59. was admitted 
to the UCLA hospital for treat* 


in call y operated, entrance gales 
and dosed-circuh idevisror cam- . 
eras. Pretty' refused io give the priccv 
but said the 23 houses m dredevel- 
opmesit ranged from £380.000 to 
£475.000 (about 55 15.000. to 
$645,000). 

D 

Franz Josef Strauss, who tnm> 

70 next month, has acquired a jet 
pilot's license. Munich newspapers 
reported that the Bavarian slate 
prime minis ter, who has flown pro- 
peller planes since 196S, made a 
perfect landing in a twin- engine 
Cessna Gtatioa to pass his jet test 
with flying colon. He said he 
would use the Cessna for quick 
trips to Bonn. Strauss's Christian 
Social Union is pan of the Bonn 
coalition but he spends most of (us 
time in Bavaria. 

□ 


Sir Freddie Laker, whose cut- 
price trans-Atlantic airline went 
bankrupt in 1982, married Jacque- 
line Aim Harvey, a former Eastern 
Airlines flight attendant, on Tues- 
day, his 63d birthday. Harvey. 41 
an American, is a public relations 
agent. 


PERSONALS 


THOMAS WELLS 


Birth 01/20/58. 2S7-47-4209. 
Fbtnfly Emergency! Cal Horn or NJ. 


MASCO C. MAHGAN. We low you. 
Tina and Orphan. 


PAUL MONSOUR - Hcppy Birthday! 
Min you. Martha. 


MOVING 


FOUR WINDS 


INTERNATIONAL 

OffieM Worldwide 


PAW (31 036 63 IT 
- «(6i) 


LOMXJN 


578 46 11 


ftKST OASS SBtVKE 
ASSURED EVBIY MOVE 


CON1TNEX. Small mow*, cars, bon- 
idwide. CaDOiarRe: Pan 
1 81 {new Opf o). 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


A touch of 


PARIS 

GUIDE 


ON SALE NOW1 


— » — »* - »»- 


Srfngw, Jon WJmoth 
«— H many other*, 

ilm ti u ta d by N«rw 
Yorfcar cartoonist 

$im A perfect flW. 
Soon (heck or manoy 
order Io - 
a touch of Pori* 

36, nwdo CoCrtw 
Paris 73008 for 
$TO In du Jw g a i r mail 
NAME 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


COUfUS UNABUE TO 
HAVE CHBDKN 

For infor m ation an surrogate mother 
births contact! Noel P, Kean Attorney, 
930 Ma»n St. Decrbom, Mi 
USA 48124. 313^8-0775. Reanfeed 
world wtefa ai e>perT in the told. 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS ... 
En^FWs fcfaOy} 634 59 65. fame 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


ST NOM LA BRETECHE 
SUPERB STATE 


217 iqjn. riving tpace. 

Private indoor r ‘ 

Jouna, owrriso i 
vm i 
Justified price 

13J 462 50 71 after 6 pm 


W+JD. _ . . 

xir Mimnnmd, finrkih 

SY KSS GAS? IR parte. 


1 61H. BID MONTMORENCY. luxury 
duplex, terrace, roawtian. 2 maids 
rearm, parting. raSofcOQO. 727 B* 76 


SWITZERLAND 


SWITZERLAND 


STUOtOS/APAST- 
LAMEG84EVA 
... World famous 
resorts ; CB ANHWONTANA. IK 
MARKETS. VERBXR. VH1ARS. 
JURA & region of GSTAAD. From 
SFIKWOO Mortgages 40% at 6M. 
interest- 

, REVACSA. 

52 Atortfarilaiit. CHI 302 GENEVA. 
Tefe 022/341540. Tele* 23030 


HAVE A MCE DAYl 8QKB- Ham a 
, mce day! floiei 


LAKE GBCVA 4- LUGANO. Men. 
treux, VJa-i, Gstaad Region, laccrno 
/ AiGona & many famous: mourn* 
resorts, mogrifiranr hRW APABT- 
MB4TS / CHALETS / VILLAS avaife 

Big cno*co- Mortgages awns 

Sdency pwdMeTR SEBOp SA 
Tour GnwXCHlOQ/ LAUSANNE. 
21/25 26 11. LUGANO 91/68 76 48. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


LAKE GENEVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Iwdy apartments with magnlicet 
views of udia Geneva and mourtans. 


Morvreux, Vilart Vetter, Las Drabter 
ate, Owtocw aOex near Gstaad. 
leysm. Excellent Opport u nists 
Far Foreianere 
Prices From Sri 23,000. 

Liberal mortgages flt 6ta% rter«j. 
GLCHtnAN SJL 
Red Estate Speddiatf 
Ay Mon Ibpas 24, 

Oil 005 Lausanne, Switzerland. 
TeL (21J 22 35 11 Tto 251 85 MBIS 
' Since 1970 


ST. MORITZ -MADCAA1N 


Apartments 54 h*ju up to 90 sqjit, 
gwxxoudy designed in the Engodn 
style, lop quotfy + built-in kitchen. 


Parting sauna, indoor mnminmg pool. 


Beaut™ surrouixings. sttrig, 15mm to 
5f. Moritz. Rnat SRlOjbO up to 
SF420JXKL Freeter sole to forwgnerz. 
Manages erf low Swiss interest rates. 

EMERALD-HOME LTD 

Dcrfstr., CH-8872 Weesen 
Tel: CH-5 8-43 1 778. 

Tbc 876062 HOME CH 


USA GENERAL 


LAKE TRAVIS 
AUSTIN, TEXAS 


TOO Acres 

4 Miles Ldtt FrOrtoge 
Unique Cove With 
Strong Devdopment PotentuL 
xfndder/Kng Co. 

3703 Speedway. 

Aiatirv Texas 78/05 
P12) 477^827 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


MOUGMS 
EXCetlONAL 
New Prmmned House of 378 sqjn. 
aompnsmg: 

- Main Home veih 3 badroonc, each 
with its own bothroont ’En Sute Ma- 
ter has fireplace; Kitchen with all Mod- 
era Conveniences Dhng Hoorn: Study; 
Large Stton with HreplacB; Powder 
Rotmt; Officer Warkshap. 


- Separate Guest Aportmert of 2 Bed- 
reams, Kitchen, bring Room with Brer 
fJooe & Bathroom. Separate Staff Slu- 
rfio. Covered HetfedStrimniig Pool, 3 
m. Health SPA-Jaaca Style, oompletBly 
enclosed 


Over 400 sqm. of lenaces fur erfer 
toinmg. fCor Garage + Cor Port . 
fufiy equipped far OauHeur to it av 
ntin oars. 


-Lotest Laser Beam Security Systems & 
Owed Greuit Tdevioon, 15 m. Commu- 
rricxmoni Arttema, Trfex, 300 sqm. put- 
hnggraen. Expensively knbeoped 
gttdons complete with womrittS, faun- 
t om & remote control garden tgtteng 


- Situated m 5,000 sqm Paris, bacti'ng 
on to the Natiand Forest a» entrtree eff 
Goff Oub of Cannes -Mougins. 


lendance far Embassy, m Consumer Of- 
fibd, or IntT Excutwes searching com- 
fotdble & Secure reddence in South of 
France. 15 mins, ham Nice Airport, & 
space for private Hefcoprer iandmg, 


Tttd investment of FF9J0QJXU, how- 
ever, owner needs to sel far penanal 
reason. ThereforewS consider reason- 
able offer. 

Cell MontoCarlo 
33 ra . 25 74 79 days, 

25 63 91 evenings, 


SJUNT PAUL OE VOKt estcepliand 
sm view, new Pone property, 450 

Piomotion McBOrt, PVsca Mazmt, 
Nice 06000, (93) 87 08 20. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


ROQUEBRUNE 

Amogr i fneri Meddenmetetayter 


and paho. 


AGHW 

26 bis, Bd ftineesM Chortatte 


efc 1 93) SO 66 OOJext 
Teiere 479 41/MC 
or Agenoe St. Radi - Menton, France 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


CANADA 


My hunt 
bedoom 


IT*. Canada. (41fl Bffl-IQW. 


QtEAT BRITAIN 


MfMMiviH ivQjr Utel MAUML 

■quipped, E57 per day. Tel Ale 
Aportmente, London, 01-636 4 
Tfcl W4130 MBBF G. 


Park 352 fill!. North of Pc 
5T35. Telex 27846 BESDE G. 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSEE5 8 th 


5tudk>, 2 or Sroom apartment. 
Ono manth or more. 

LE OARDGE 359 67 97. 


Tet 32S08 91. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

Embassy Service 

„ 8 Awe i Muter 

v 75008 Pa™ 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 

PHONE 562 7S 99 

Bysees-Concorde 

Aportmenb/houses 

Short tone ranlab . 

ABP. 9. Rue toy*, 75000 Pori* 
Tefe fa MS 11 WTTeta* 640773F. 

SHORT TWM STAY. Advantages of i 
hotel without inconvenienoK, feel a 
home in nice H»idio*,onB bedraon 
oid more in (fato SORHiMc 80 ne 
de njnivereM, Pbri* Ttfe 544 39 40 

16TH tfireef owner, tuxuriam, loot 
term,doubfeKving,bedroain, latcfaen 
both, togma daB bwldmg 

F6100 + elwra«. Tet 74744 72 

AV. MOZAKT 16TH. 2 room apaf- 
ment, 70 sqm. quiet, sunny, complete- 
ly renovated. Short term. F5Q00, ne- 
gotiable. Tefe 527 5779. 

BfTGL TOWHL SptondkL tong term, 
shxfio, takhen. bath, bdkony. F4400 
+ charges. 747 44 72 Diced ownur. 

LATM QUAKTBL Canvenenlfy locat- 
ed apartment. F5000/month. Avai- 
abto until Sept. 15. Tefe 601 6604. 

MONTPARNASSE 3 roam duplex, 
lovely furniture. Even short term. 
WOOL Tefe 320 80 51 

6TH ST.. MICHB. View on Seine, c 
unique site. Owner rent* short or tong t 
term Stucfio & 2 rooms Tefe 634 15 99 

8TH: GEORGE V chartnmg firing + 
one bedroom, wrf famished, newly 
redone, qimt F450a Tel: 720 37 99 

SHORT TERM in lotto Quarter. 
No (VHih. Tefe 329 38 63. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA RIBNISHED 


KAUKXHG. Kgh don, modem 
wiry rot studkx F295Q. Tefc 553 23 22 


HUMS. Very comfortable studio. 
' F3000 l Tet 272 92 34 


USA 


Braid New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E 50th 
New York 10022 


A Unique 

Hotel Suite Residence 


offering 


pre-opereVtg savings on 


feat u ring 


Studio, 1-Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
AH magnificently 
furnished and all with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 


Model Suites 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


DUTCH SALES BK90, 52. Expari- 
ena & good OBteortr m of&nore, 
petitenened wtitfriGS, pwnr 
nudwv power skteons & 


m . .. ons & n n gne nng 

offices oi Over Europe. Engfidi, 


French, Gerttot Wont to reprweni 
company on. the conrimre. Write 


oO m oonv 0 . 

Odeuraan. GeneentWoon 5 7, 23 90 
Weefcfe, Bekyunv Tefe 321*^905. 


MIEUOBfT LADY, own eoropaiy 
experience, teaks executive Job with 
trowL Tet London 0KB2 2® 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


iJNIQUEOPPORTUNTTY 


Hie princqid of a private 
worldwide meaner* grow seehi a 
- btoguttfWt/EngUi 


PA / EXECUTIVE 


To ctMordnrie Me buna activities, 
organize his homes, inducing at 
historic Chari**, each with staff. 


Exadtenl terms, condtiom. and 
fcture prospe ct s. 


Please apptt with short hmziWten 
teller and recent pf wto gr cp h tor 

Bax 2566. Herald tSmT%521 

Nnwly Cedes, France 


ENGLISH SPEAKING I 

■ Tet 770 80 69, or pnfl 

person at lunchlrma, P fll . 

net du Holder. Pont 9, Metro Opera. 


GENERAL 
POSmONS WANTED 


OBCVA - IRISH GRADUATE MA 
(Sr. Andrews), ftiert French & Ger- 
man, several yean! mwCatoge gen- 
erd office & travel agency mpen- 


enoB UJC & Gennarnr, seeks part-time 
pasffion in Geneva October T{5 - Sep- 
tember "SA Any brtmdi of education. 


'86. Any branch of education, 
/tourian/conmieite of industry con- 
sidered. Fhcse contact via Bax 41500. 
LH.T- 63 Long Acre. London, WC2E 
9JH. or byMnharw at 5t Andrews, 
Scotland pSC74610 Monday - Fri- 
day 10 am. - 1 pm. & 2-5 pm. 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


GERMAN FA5HK3N MODS. WeB- 
ed u o^ed^u ritifc tftat. tools lot *•- 
etling position London 24S0080 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


BtTL SERVICE OSGAMSARON 


with a small coordinating office in on- 
md tait is looting for an ettcutnre 
SBcro*ary/aej*mt. h U n miu f Engbft / 
trendy to work far its Orecfty resporr- 
Stele tor O targe 5 growing 6*Dpeon 
Mcnagomnrt uwdtopQr Drapoa 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


UNUSUAL 

Lady Kgh dost, exodert eduemen 
Mjho to Id* ratpnmibJity of 
hotae and fortify ft necesscxy) for 
several months dwmg Jher Bawnce. 
Complete trap ood c&erefton oftuwl 
rteis photo |1J 325 II 25 


Base rea m s u een U an good prattv 
sms pee of modem ee pe pmete 


nonal , . , 

with micro experhmee a definiie aduon- 
togeL ehorltwnd. A good telephone 
mmier, experience m orgon U mg & 
amrroftrg moetingt. atttiy la organae 
& wori wider prasura, irteAve & a 
sease of humor. 

Knowledge o* accounting & Eurapecet 
languages wotid be cm advantage. 


Sumdde candbates should send fftw CV 
Mh photo] to Bar 25(50, HeroW Trh 
oune, 92571 Neutfy Cedex, France 


5BB0NG YOUNG LADY, with to* 
fMter experience, mnwdnte employ- 
meat, mterashng sdary, mother lan- 
guage French with g good knowfedgs 
STBuieh. Send CVTta Box ^ 
HeraNMMimie f '~92S21 Nenly Cedex, 
nance 


UVGENL Trandction agency ieda 
pot-time or fid time English m other 
tongun aucEo-tyreO with worttem P» 
pm. TeL Paris 3X3 32 85. 


SEOUETARIES AVAILABLE 


DC3NT l£T IT HAPPHU Bags of vitai- 

. (wivtmni waccna was, M 
mudi much man besides. Teh r 
774 92 56 eves. 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


AU PAM. Orie 1 l/2vr. ddbcy. 214- 
385-4050. 61Z7 la dwa. Mbs,' IX 
75248 USA 


SWSS GML M, SBXS AU PAM tab 
■mUSA Wr»e or phone; Bmher Ma- 
ria. Hutofiweg 3, OM052 Zeflfahn 
pwitMttattCw tHi/oai/gagi ■ 


INGUSH NANNB & mothers helps 
Nosh Aowicy, 53 Oadtt. Hove. 
5usstocQATst Briflfiscm <2731 2904X 

AUTO RENTALS 


CHAHC DO A CAR. Pastige an 
with ptone: Rah Spnt, Mertndn. 
Jagaa-. BfiftV. Entounnes, snedi cars. 
46r Rerre Charm 75008 Pans. Tt* 
720304a Tele* 6XP97 F OiAROC 


AUTO SHIPPING 


HOW ID IMPORT A EUROPEAN 
CAJtJNTOIHE U5.A. 


Ties docMHmr eqsfan My vvto one 
neat do to bring a enr ato the U5. 


and tegaffy. B mdodes new ft 
DOT ft BPA cowe niuu addresses, os- 


tom dedrarict ft shppmg procedu <es 

a wefl as legal points. Because of he 


stem dolor, you can save up to 
USSI8JXX) when buying ( 


. _aMeraedej.» 
BMW m Europe ft wtporhog it to the 
Sate*. To recwve itn raaouoL send 
US»8^fi^USSI JO for postal to 
PL SchmicB, Paslfach 3131 
7000 Shritgctt 1, West Germany 


SHM YOUR CAR TO ft ROM USA 
VIA ANTWOTAND SAVE. Free ho 
M. Re^ar H*igs. Airport dnSvmv. 
AM^m” Xi*bmtroat Z Antwerp. 
BdgMTfefc 231 42 39. ftc- 71469. 


PAGE 7 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


v; 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 


in the Merited ianal Handd fit- 
buna, whore nsoni (fan a AM 
of a nM o n randan war id- 
wide, moat of whom ®f In 
butkiOM aid industry, wflf 
raod It Amt Mtz ur fftrii 
6135951 bofora iOoJiu, an- 
wring dud we ttm Hdon you 
bade, mi your .ineimpn w3f 
appoor win m 48 hour*. The 
rate a OJL $ 9.80 or teed 
•qamwbNf per Arm You mutt 
esdudn ranyf e i e tut d mrifi- 
abio tiding add rmc . 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OfRHORE & UK 
LTD COMPANIES 


Inascparattan and teanagement ft UK, 
Mi of Mem, Tortt AnguOp, OiotiJ 
Islands, Pmiam Libarto, GSsnsba’ and 
matt other offshore areas. 

• Confidents odvice 

• t m meciate awSabBty 

• Nominee serricH 

• Bearer share 

• Boat registrations 

• Accounting ft odninisirttoon 
e MaL telephone & tele* 

Free ejqw snotory booklet Cram 
5BHT CORPORATE 
SatVKB LTD 
Head Office 

Mt PteamL Davdas, Ue of Man 
.. Teh Daedal (06M1 23718 
Tele* 62BS54 SELECT G 
London Bearesentdive 
‘ 15 OH Bond SiLlandqn Wl 
Tel 01-493 4244, Th 18247 SC5LDN G 


ntesnahonal offshore 

, COMPANY INCORPORATIONS 
ROM £710 

' Comprehenava A d iwitis lr ol i on 
Noei nee service. Powers of Attorney. 
Be^stered offices. Telex, tetiphone, 
moB fivw ndma . 

■ id Bee 


Bcttmme House, 
SumnMrhd, 

TA TSSWS?r 


•"Mou. 10676 Athens. Greece. 




International Business Message Center 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


AUGUST 12th 

ON SALE AUGUST 5th 


BUSINESS WffiC 
INTERNATIONAL 


The Third World's 
Growth Crisis 
Fed Up With 
Japan 
• South Africa 
The Days of Rage 
Gives Business 
Second Thought 


NOW ON SALE AT 
All INTERNATIONAL 
NEWSSTANDS. 


ROWAUSJL 


From $50,000 

M* From 110,000 


firegrate to Ftorida ft enjoy 300 days «rf 
wwttS- H]h firing itendandf. Benefit 
from the pound* Rowing strength. 
Derided brochure*! 

„ . British American Gnukanh 

Tet 01-404-5011 UK TU= 466 740 USA 


rffiOUBffi GBUNElfiNDSS of fund 
matogen to service prime mondteM 
vnth prune bank guarantees m form 
ofprinte bar* vonnsonr note US. 
Doflars or Swiss Praia 10-20 wars. 


no ttricM pterae. criyapl 


p^r to Ba* 4h«L l JtT w 
Btdoq. WC26 9JH, qe 
B3147fief. HEPQ 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


JOJOBA - LIQUID GOLD 


The nerade Jojobo oil, produced from 
a plant grown m the LULA which fives 
far o»er 100 yuan, ho* unique, cut- 
jtopefing qioSis aid am favorably re- 
pface minerd ft anenai bcaed tifarv 
cemt*. . Other estobfehed uses: 
eremga, . phamaceuticals, food, 

aierujffTXtunng. 

Eriring B mh fani Already Pro- 
vide Retara on favestmerd to Fust 
Yev. By End Of 6A Year, RMum 
Eqwd^tnBM Amoent Lreeted. 
Tiwestfter, proicctionj show average 
annual mcame of 33%. For DDnmtetc 
detafc contact! ALfOBA KESEAXOi 
Dm 2502, Herald Tnbune, 

92521 NeuiSy Cedmt. France 


INVESTOR A BROKER 
B4QUBK5 WELCOME 


UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 

Newly to be aeatsd offshore- trad 

"jmneing worldwide mojeel*. rartfato 
of enetma efienb and btmk proof of 
fwlds ovdlabte. Operationd wiAin 90 
batting day. Pmapab only- 


Write fa 8 cm 41503. IJiT, 

63 Long Acre, London, WC2E 9JH. 


k J?OW« TO WEST IN USA? 
NmtonoBy (mown jumor/cnrfefnponary 
qwtsw** -importer a tooting far in- 
jKtnwte. Prwrtty dang in excess of 
SllndjcnConpanyhasnevirhodan 
improfrtoble yeor. Breefieffl patoftd 




rotated product 


MONEY TREES ? 


YES Inrest oi one of Aranas'* most 
B»rit*ig tedmotomcal brerititvough* in 
a b»on daBor mauslry. We have platt- 
ed more nut trees in 1984 Mian any 
other dewtaper m our State. 

Htoh amreaT erenlnax preMed far 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


PROFESSIONALS »4 XMAS Decora- 
ha^mwfiy^oniieec bogs, eyeglan 
ptpes ft com puree*. piLmdodureri 

& Bmorten) Mamhih Hmficraft Mfig. 

oHS PO Bcec 22398 Tpe Turn, Bx 
6fl, 4T See 1 Han Sheng NBd, Tama, 
Tmw on Ho c Tefe toSSi 53 ® 
10^553087.^26232 


tee torn 

BROlffl® 


'ytoiatiMgvi 
three fnvwstmanl 


— _ Bnuses tHwro. 

Muterid available m English. French, 
Germ an. Box 2358, Herald Tribune. 
92521 Neu3y Cedex, France 


Mi 


•at - US$7,950 


TIC AMBUCAN DOI1AR last 16% in 
value since this adverttwnvant was 
placed. The a more than your annud 
intcrrV. Become the owner of one of 
the largojt and mod unique d iam onds 
in Hm world. 11284 aval it total 
Accmcfcig to spedofaed puhfcohons 
thb dtamond it rated es one of the 
longest stones ever found and rated m 
the same category as some of the 
mast fiunous damondi in the world 
Bated in the seme dau as CuErm 1, 
owned by (he British Crown Jewels, 
Trfft*ry, owned by Tiffwnr and Ca 
USA, Nnrcfos. owned by Slavta 
Nianhw, Atoms. Star of F«ia, 
owned by Horry wimian, New York. 
Your ureem oyortu rety to become 
Ihe owner of Ins prBSfrge and rate 
investraeni, AU mores wifl be treat- 
ed s tarty confidential. Tel (1211) 
22917 a 20546 Brits, South Africa. 
Trie* 3217B7 SA, P.O. fla* 1045. Bnts 
00250 South Africa 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 


UJC non reorient com p c r ee*. 
Nc*n^_*«Jm & bemer (hares. 
Gonfide n ted bonk account 
Full support sennan. 

Panama ft Lfaerian campsite. 
Offshore bank. 


*7 .Wid eoaa S_ London 
E17HP.1A01 377U74T7k-8«91t G 


HNANOAL GROWTH W CANADA. 
We ore on estabtohed trade ft bus.- 
neei eensritann offering irTvestmerr ft 
sereicei Profit from toe 
raw wm«5on Boon by coniodina 
Sordot International Coraornfen 
2045 Stanley Street- Suite WSK! 
HJKd, O.C Canada H3A 1R7. Teb 
(5U1 042-1760 Ha 05560440 


HONORARY CONSULATE Aopomt- 
num evafafaie os Consul Ad Hon 
oram ftt wsl reputed seiwere paten 
m vanous areas of the globe nceef 
London, Paris, New York, Wntern 
confidence qramg den* of bock, 
aratnl, soon contacn, present aaivt- 
trns la Box 41477. )HT„ 63 Lang 
Acre, London, WOE 9JK 


.* SAffiTY RRST * 

When in ter e sted in a second travel 
document, please get in touch with m 


t'DUQAEY BANXMG on large cot 
towefed bans. The only eon n ner- 
dd bank vrito a reprcMototM office 
m London smcxAbim te this service. 
Arab Ovenoas Barf ft Trust (WJU 
Ud. 28 Block Prints Rood. London 
SE1. tet 01-735 9171 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


, „ SWnZBHAfC 

Safety first far you and your fisnhnWfe 
help set up burirem and readomid 
property, dtan perm an e n t residency 
Iperinl H, work pviri, pwrnf C ft natu- 
rofexion). C unfid e n te d infarmctfian 
only by a persond interview in Europe. 
Send us your telephone number ft we 
inform you promptly. Necauary invest- 
ment around USSSL00O ■ U5S66JJM. 


Hecu write 

Bax 2176JKT^ Frttdridstr. 15, 
06000 Frankfixt/Man. 


FMANCE AVAAA8LE far any mofar 
prefect toons from USS50 mSon to 
US$20 Mfian. Feretoikte report. Col- 


bteral aid pome bam guarantees 
Wiired inrtialy. Deaston- one week. 
SticteW oonfidence. Box 2561 . Herald 
■ Trgxme. 92571 Narife Cedex, France 


lOOMNG FOR ASSIST ANT man / 
woman with knowledge of used ax 
huytog ^taoghout Ewope for export 
on monthly bss*. Satory or comma- 
sen negotiable. W3T be in Europe 

S?iM^5g5 S’" s 


COMPUja ^PORTRAIT SYSTEMS 
- 2UQ0 FOB) and wta 

apw cf- 170340 

Frankfurt. Teh 7^08 T« 412713 

MEW LM OF COSMETICS avdfabie 
far Hack .women. Tamtams wabble 


worldwide. Interested prmdpafc 
t,3WBra 


qvirtft President fflC Inc.. SMBroad- 
wy Unirence, New York 11B9 ISA 


ORSHORE BANXMG • Fiducny ser- 
me, oottateral, L/Q, bank nates ft 

“mmererri toon son-tees. Write 

Proewm 2fl N. Huron St, StAe 
800, Toledo.. Ohio 43604 USA, 


woppRcyufflg 


fa import/ expert to- from Goncria 

Pfane tefca 062TB661 Lrin 


— Lriner or Bax 

851, Herald Trfaune. 9S21 NeuSy 
CmWi Prance 


OFFSHORE COMPAN&5 
BANKS 
INSURANCE COMPANIES 

Mb&m - Tetoftopne - Telex 
Ful secretond urvxmt 
Me or Man, Jeney, Guemesy, 
Gtbroftnr. Prewna, l*ena. 
4wmbour» Affies. UK. 
8«d)rro«eof spead. 

Free explenrinry booUaL 
Boat regefrObans 
London representative 


„ ftsfaj Oampany f onnol i ota 
Telex 627691 $P|VA G 


IffiSOiNCY IMMIGRATION 
NATURALIZATION 

Gwenwwnf authorized . nvestmanF 
program specffially dtffawd 
far person* seeking full dtizerehip 
status or a new homeland m enotoer 
country. 

MO MIBMATIONAL 

P.a Bex 263, PO. Box 26? 
Mmbela {Matogej London N1 
Spoei United " 


r^mm f £ (iLfflS 


Telex B953471 


ANTAKHCA MUTUAL SURVIVAL kv- 
BNrn & bust of. World Genetics, 
pnrate stock, 42 Mil* at SB milfan. 
Herow, 3509 det Erottes. 

MoflWci 


uln 

Hoenf 


WANT MORE SAIEST 
profationoL 38, ve 

fteneh/Gcrmcn seeks 

nan ded London 01 1 99^6755. Rob- 
ert SevicMr, 2 Hatfield 8d, Lor W4. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


from 


en*™ write 

G.fvkmq, 


GumnBis 


JUJ 


taeneFmdwtiiai 


^Servimex 


11. Telex: 8537* 


ACTIVE NVE5TOR. 
mono ah to 1 


NY 10471 USA. 


Ktoomenou 106 76 wim, Greece. 


2ND PASSPORT 35 COUNTHB. 

GMC, 26 Kleomenou, 106 76 
Greece. 


15. OH. COMPANY mferetfed in 
vetapng anoadton* with nwestor* or 


xTvnstor representatives to rate copi- 
to 1 fa oi <nl fia* u xttoixe iu r i aoni- 
tm in 1 1 ? /niwwiv th-iT In J “ ■ 


kx ror o« one gee enwaaon aam- 
Ms to LL5. Company that hat (Med 
50+ wtib over 3 year period with 
SSb uses role. Serious nqum 
»^P1 ^ ryfie Mr; E etiaund G. 


PANAMA COM>AME5 with eomosee 
*w*«attdixnfidBnBd Swiss / Pan- 

cna batik aoooant fantud in48 hours 

orrwtiyfliccte Offshore banks 
farawd fa tDOO. Curruaes or fend* 



BUSINESS SERVICES 


HOW ip or A 2nd PASSFOKTr 
- <2 «wtn« ancflyzed. De- 


Suite 




Imprime par Offprint, 73 rue de I'Evangfle. 75018 Paris. 

J 


BUSINESS SERVICES 

financial 

EWESTMEVTS 

“ ffm. 

ri . BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

0 UMUWTB} MC 

UJSJL ft WORLDWIDE 
s, 

a AcMnpiMpertemri&biBraajervic* 
2 ja wue^coledion of 

“ todmduoii fa all raddY* 5 * 

procoot imd occoBon*. 
212-765-7799 
212-765-7794 

GAS WB15/USA 

strong nptoramn group with TOOK 
vxnss record lfta-wrib, 106 ccafle- 
vonri Gucrameed protfactiun on mefe- 

"W uauQOS. uCHVJKIfRMi w 

tong term meorne toJUSDalart. WA 
priced from US) $2 uQmX> to SSOOjEW 
endv Contort OtfOTUS/USA, Lmu- 
oa Flrifa TX 76634. HT7)757-604rTfc 
341982 GAS WBiS U5A. 


BSiiiiil 

PANAMAMAN aorporation* prpride 

toe odvontuge* of miiidwi cunnden* 
tiaEty, zerefax tiabSly & LG ddfar 
eurrency emiranaeoL We offer com- 
pany formation services on a fori, 
rriictok and competitive bash.- We 
are pretiaJady etoreited to toting 
up vwth affitoarv bunnew conadmx 
to other countries. Contort H. k Dar- 
Sngtan, POB 1327, Panama 9^ Pana- 
ma Tfc 3121 KeNKA P& Tet 23. 

- 0834 or 234019 Jews 236779). 

DIAMONDS 

diamonds 

- , Vtof fa* buy. 

fine efenoon* m any price range 
ft bra) wholesale pnae 
drert from Antwerp 
confer of tbedaraond world. 
Mguarortee. _ 

fata 

pr , bfagffiro 

Peflltooruhuul 62 0-2018 Antwerp 
- TtelTm ^ 23d 07 51*^ 
n* 71/79 *yi L At Hie Diamond Od>. 

Heart of Antwerp Diamond toefafry 

OVERSEAS EMnOYMRIT Newdet- 
ter, tt-montHy with hundreds of job 

wfarmutiair write Mydeast ConwL 
tant* bd, 8 Victoria SL Doughy U« 
or Man, L1X 

PRIVATE DCTECT1VESCANDMAVIA 
ft fvtiand, ad Norway: 24 faun JK- 

G. Refctov, farmer ptSafettHy oS 
cer, contacts worldwide, ftast to Jem- 
_ba«9orget4, N4)154Qdo 1 Norway 

Shopping in Europe? Visit 

DIAMONDLAND 

Tfa torged dtowiporn in - 

Antwtip^ Diamond City 

Appefamratr 33A. Tefe 

FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 

IF YOUR MONET COULD 
TALK - it WOULD SPEAK 
TO US 

FA. (SB OVERSEAS 
Investment Comuftants 

*siMSSf&rf k ' 


OFFICE SERVICES 

LUXEMBOURG ' 

EXECUTIVE SBtVKB 

^one, tetonOndfaS homes sennas. ~ 

a&siraw v 

Trie* 3251 DWG5A-LU. 


OFFICE SERVICES 


ZUUCH>ZURfCH-ZUXfCH 

BAINMVIKASSE 52 

. THE HNANOAL CBsfl® 

• Let our utoguAd busmen lerriatt 
oamp i y praride .your offio* needs 
-Tenoporery execMM office*. 
-Defeated phone fine. 

■Trias service + Menage renter. 
-AWranrex* recepnonos, 
s e ae ta r ra 

• Yoor office away from home 
Berirte J* Servicw Co rmrft Grip. 
flchntia fal ioMe [570*8022 Zuruh. 

Tefe 01/211 92 67. Tlx 813 062 


NEAR CHAMPS B.YSEES 
*h* 


V Y- 750MRf» to!. 

Tel: 723 7008 Telex 612225 


XARSTBBIUSMBS 

sennas _ 


0 


8S, 5 ifa de Cfaa, 1207 GeMM 
Tefe [22J86 ]7 .30» «8388 WSS 


ve tenet. Shri*ogoijitefaefi- 


tfe* / lervieec, Metisff affire, Evape- 
oo mnagrant con & ton t io l . sews 
MBI. MKTpO^ox 1569, MAtoda. 
Tefe 817-4187 {5 Incite 22232 


V.- 


Tt* 


S73XTkS»u;