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The Global Newspaper 

Edited in Parij 
Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London. Zurich. 
Hong Kong. Singapore, 

The Hague and Marseille 


WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 14 




INTERNATIONAL 



No. 31,870 


Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 

ZURICH, THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1985 



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ESTABLISHED 1887 



U.S. Says Navy Spy Sold Data 
On Military Message Network 


By Philip 

iVrw York tin 


Jerry A. Whitworth 


Shenon 

Fima Service 

SAN FRANCISCO — Jerry A 
Whitworth, one of four men ac- 
cused of spying on the U.S. Navy, 
provided the Soviet Union with ex- 
tensive information about a com- 
puter system used to transmit con- 
fidential military messages, 
according to U.S. officials. 

A 12-count replacement indict- 
ment, announced Tuesday, charged 
that Mr. Whitworth also gave Sovi- 
et agents photographs and docu- 
ments on “classified activities” on 
the aircraft carrier Enterprise, on 
which he served in 1982 and 1983 
as a communications specialist 

The communications network, 
the Remote Information Exchange 
Ter minal, is used by the navy to 
send written or coded messages to 
the Department of Defense. Offi- 


cials said it was possible that the 
Soviet Union used information 
they say was obtained from Mr. 
Whitworth to get access to secret 
information of other military ser- 
vices. 

“It’s not clear exactly what he’s 
given up.” said a Pentagon official 
who asked not to be identified. 
“But it certainly is more serious 
than we had thought." 

Officials said previously that Mr. 
Whitworth had divulged informa- 
tion about satellite transmissions 
and use of cryptographic material. 

IT prosecutors are correct. Penta- 
gon officials said, it appears that 
Mr. Whitworth provided the Soviet 
Union with much wider informa- 
tion about military communica- 
tions systems. 

The 21-page indictment, re- 
turned by a federal grand jury here, 




Pope Hopes to Blunt Islam’s Growth 
As He Begins His Third African Visit 

By Loren Jenkins 

Washington Past Service 


VATICAN CITY — Pope John 
Paul II is to embark Thursday on 
his third trip to Africa in five years, 
hoping to reinforce his Roman 
Catholic Church against a growing 
Islamic revival on the continent 
that the Vatican considers one of 
its success stories of the century- 

in a 12-day swing through seven 
African nations, John Paid is ex- 
pected to urge his African bishops, 
priests and followers to step up 
their already highly successful 
evangelization on the continent to 
counter Islam’s new push south. 
The new presence of Islam already 
is being felt in a wide belt across 
central Africa from Sierra Leone 
on the Atlantic Ocean to Sudan on 
the Red Sea. 

While diplomacy and formal 
commitments to ecumenism mil 
restrain the pope from speaking out 
directly on the issue of the Islamic 
renaissance in Africa, senior Vati- 
can officials have quietly made 
known that the issue of Catholic- 
Moslem competition for converts is 
one of the church's major concerns. 

One of the pope’s key themes, 
according to Vatican sources, will 
be the beginning of the “second 
evangelization” of Africa, which be 
will refer to during his series of 
masses and conferences. The pope 
also is to consecrate a new cathe- 
dral in the Ivory Coast, ordain 



THIRD VISIT OF 
THE POPE IN AFRICA 

August 8th - 19th. 1985 


Tbe itinerary for Pope John Paid ITs trip. 




priests in Togo, beatify a massa- 
cred nun in Zaire and visit a game 
park in Kenya. 

Making his 27th trip abroad 
since assuming Lhe papacy in 1978. 
John Paul is to visit Morocco, 
Togo, the Central African Repub- 
lic, Cameroon, the Ivory Coast, 
Zaire and Kenya. All of those na- 
tions are relatively stable and pros- 
perous by African standards and 
have not been greatly affected by 


the famine that has affected many 
of their neighbors. . 

Vatican sources said the pope 
had hoped to visit Sudan, one of 
the poorest nations most affected 
by the African famine, but the 
country’s Moslem rulers had de- 
clined to invite him. 

Tbe pope attaches importance to 
Africa because Catholicism is 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL I) 


detailed information officials say 
was passed on by Mr. Whitworth. 
Officials have said that his infor- 
mation was tbe most valuable of 
the data handled by tbe suspects in 
the case. 

The indictment also provided 
new details of the operation of a 
spy ring the government says was 
directed by John A Walker Jr„ a 
retired navy communications spe- 
cialist Mr. Walker's brother. Ar- 
thur J. Walker, and son Michael. 
22, a yeoman on the U.S. aircraft 
carrier Nimitz, have also been ar- 
rested. Tuesda/sjmlkrmeni re- 
placed a morMfmkcd indictment 
announced in June. 

The three Walkers and Mr. 
Whitworth, 45, of Davis, Califor- 
nia, have all pleaded norguilty. Mr. 
Whitworth's trial is to start later 
this month in San Francisco, with 
an arraignment ou the new charges 
scheduled for Thursday. John 
Walker and his son face trial in 
October in Baltimore. 

Arthur Walker's trial was in its 
second day Tuesday in Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

According to the charges di- 
vulged Tuesday, Mr. Whitworth 
sold “documents, writings, photo- 
graphs, sketches, plans, notes and 
information” about the Remote In- 
formation Exchange System. 

Pentagon officials said it was 
used by the navy to send messages 
on the Autodin system, which the 
indictment described as the “naval 
c ommunicati ons system” used in 
1980. Actually, tbe officials said, 
Autodin is used for message traffic 
by all branches of the military. 

The indictment said Mr. 
Whitworth also provided the Soviet 
Union with information about the 
Remote Information Exchange 
System's “impact” on Autodin. 

The indictment also charged Mr. 
Whitworth with several counts of 
tax evasion. The tax charges re- 
ferred to S328.000 that Mr. 
Whitworth is accused of receiving 
for secret materiaL 

Sometime in 1982 or 1983. the 
dtaraes said, Mr. Whitworth gave 
the Soviet Union a document titled 
“Annex K to Comideastfor Opord 
4000-82(11)." Law-enforcement of- 
ficials earlier identified the docu- 
ment as a navy communications 
contingency ^an to be used in a 
Middle East -«ar. 

Mr. Whitworth, a retired radio 
man who lived in northern Califor- 
nia, has been accused of joining 
with John Walker, described as his 
closest friend, to sell secret material 
to Soviet agents. Both men had top 
secret security clearance in their 
navy careers. 

From November 1982 to Octo- 

( Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 



RnAn 


FLAMES AT HIS DOORSTEP — A resident of Bastia on the French Mediterranean 
island of Corsica used a bucket Wednesday to battle a brush fire near his house. A large 
area of the island was scorched by fires farmed by high winds. Tbe blazes were among a 
rash of weather-related incidents causing death and damage in Europe. Story, Page 5L 


Arabs 

Convene 

Summit 

4 League States 
Boycott Session 
On Unity Crisis 


By Judith 

Mew York Tim 


U.K. Radio, Television Blacked Out 
To Protest Ban on Ulster Program 


By Bob Hagercy 

fnumaaonal Herald Tribune 
LONDON — Journalists and 
politicians argued about freedom 
of the press Wednesday as national 
television and radio news programs 
were blotted out by a strike to pro- 
test the banning of a television pro- 
gram on Northern Ireland 
j National Union of Joaraal- 
isti, which led the 24-hour strike, 
sponsored a private screening of 
the program for journalists and 
other guests. Many of them after- 
ward described it as a fair portrayal 
of the viewpoints of both Roman 
Catholic ana Protestant extremists. 

The program, “At the Edge of 
tbe Union,” was to be shown on 
British Broadcasting Carp, televi- 
sion Wednesday night. It was can- 


celed by the BBCs Board of Gov- 
ernors after Home Secretary Leon 
Brittan urged them not to broad- 
cast the program cm the ground 
that it gave, valuable publicity to 
terrorists. 

The strike also dosed down the 
BBCs World Service for the first 
time in its 53-year history. Instead 
of the usual radio p r o gr am s in' 36 
l a nguage s, the BBC played music 


member of Smn Fein, the political 
wing of the outlawed Irish Repubh- 
can Army, was shown dandling a 
baby on his knee in one scene and 
gritting his teeth while pa«mg 
through a military checkpoint in 
another, lhe program also featured 
Mr. McGttinn ess’s mother, softly 
defending her son’s role. 

As a counterpoint. .the 


io programs m 36 As a counterpoint. .the program 

iBC played music offered Gregory Campoefl, a hard- 
mouncements ex- line Loyalist leader, lhe cameras 


and periodic announcements ex- 
plaining the interruption. 

The banned program depicted 
the private lives of two opposing 
extremists in Londonderry, and 
gave them unusually generous 
amounts of lime to express their 
wdl-known political views. 

Martin McGuinness. 8 senior 


Loyalist 

showed him eating breakfast with 
his family, loading a pistol before 
leaving Ins heavily guarded bride 
rowbouse, and singing a hymn in 
church. 

His wife, Frances, told the inter- 
viewers: “I have to live with the 


Miller 

: Times Service 

CASABLANCA Morocco — 
Seventeen representatives of the 21 
active Arab League members 
opened an emergency meeting here 
Wednesday nigh t that was de- 
scribed by a senior Moroccan offi- 
cial as a last-chance effort to save 
the organization. 

The meeting, called by King 
Hassan II of Morocco to discuss 
“issues dividing the Arabs” and the 
“Palestinian question in all its as- 
pects,” is bong boycotted by Syria, 
Lebanon, South Yemen ana Alge- 
ria. 

It was to have brought together 
all Arab League heads of state. But 
less than half were presen l Wednes- 
day, along; with the chairman of the 
Palestine liberation Organization, 
Yasser Arafat. 

The leaders were reported to 
have met Wednesday afternoon in 
advance of the evening summit 
conference in an effort to agree on 
a limited on Arab unity and 

the Palestinian question. 

Morocco’s foreign minister, Ab- 
deHatif Fflali, said earlier that Mo- 
rocco and other more politically 
moderate Arab participants in- 
tended to form an ad hoc commit- 
tee to meet with “absent” nations 
after the meeting to heal the rift 

Unless participants can agree on 
a date for a regular conference, 
which has been postponed for three 
years, and can bridge the ideologi- 
cal differences between Arab na- 
tions, Mr. FUali said, “then maybe 
the Arab League is finished.” 

Other participants were even 
more pessimistic. In interviews 
Tuesday, they said it was too late to 
avoid a rupture in the organization, 
formally known as the League of 
Arab States. Since its creation in 
1945, the organization has stood as 
a symbol of the Arabs' search for 
strength through unity. 

' Indeed, some- senior Arab offi- 
cials said' that the holding of an 
emergency meeting over tbe objec- 
tions of more hard-line nations ap- 
peared to have solidified divisions. 

Yusef d-Alawi. foreign minister 
of Oman, which closely and openly 
supports the West, said: “The big 
question at the summit is whether 


Hiroshima Aftermath: 
Effects of Radiation 

Long-Term Impact of Nuclear Blast 
On Survivors 9 Health Is Monitored 

By Clyde Haberman 

Hew York Times Service 

HIROSHIMA, Japan — In looks and in feel there is not much that 
is obviously unusual about the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Hospital. 

The low-lying building, across the street from a bicycle shop, could 
be any hospital anywhere, its facade streaked with dirt, its rooms in 
need of fresh paint and new wallpaper. Corridors bear the familiar 
stale smell of illness. Patients offer a mosaic of despair, hope, pain, 
relief and resignation. 

From die name alone it is evident that this medical facility is unlike 
any other, except perhaps for the smaller Atomic Bomb Hospital in 
Nagasaki To qualify for admission to either, patients must prove that 
they lived through tbe blast and the aftermath at Hiroshima or 
Nagasaki in Augist 1945. 

About 367,000 men and women carry official certificates attesting 
to their survival. Their ailments include a range of cancers, heart 
problems, headaches, lung diseases and skin irritations. 

Forty years after the first atomic bombs were dropped, the long- 
term health consequences are still not fully understood. 

The Hiroshima facility was built in 1956 mostly with money raised 
through postal card lotteries. It has 170 beds, medium-size for this 
country. On a stiflingly hot morning in late July one of them was 
occupied by Isamu Minamoio. 66, hospitalized for a liver disease. 

When the atomic bomb exploded over Hiroshima, Mr. Minamoto 
could feel the blast, but he was relatively safe in a Mitsubishi Heavy 
Industries plant 15 miles (4 kilometers) north. On Aug. 9. a second 
bomb hit Nagasaki. That same day or the next — he could not 
remember dearly — be entered central Hiroshima and received 
enough radiation to make his gums start bleeding within a few weeks. 

Under a law enacted in 1957, he qualified as a hibahuha, the 
Japanese term for the survivors; it literally means bomb-affected 
people. Hibakusha get free medical treatment and special welfare 
payments. 

Most were exposed directly to the bombs or. over the next two 






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(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) (Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 

It’s That Time Again: 
Halley’s Comet Nears 


I Totally burned and 
demolished 
1 Totally demolished | 
EU Half demolished 
-City limits 


TfaaKhwVbkTa 

Map shows extent of damage at Hiroshima radiating from the bypocenter, on the ground tfirectfy below die Hast 


weeks, came within two kilometers of the point on the ground directly 
below the center of the explosion, the hypocenter. In Hiroshima the 
bypocenter has been placed at 1,900 feet (580 meters) in the air. and in 
Nagasaki at 1,650 feet. 

All survivors know to a tenth of a kilometer where they were Aug; 6 
or Aug. 9. Distance from the hypocenter defines them as much as 


occupation or age. Such definitions did not terribly im p o rtant to 
Mr. Minamoto at first. After his gums slopped bleeding hishealih was 
good for three decades. 

Then about 10 years ago be learned he had tuberculosis. He 
to suffer from a chronic liver ailment that required surgery in 1982. 

(Continued on Page 3, CoL 2) 


By Thomas O’Toole 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The biggest 
and the brightest of 900 known 
comets, the one bearing the name 
of Edmund Halley, tbe 17th-centu- 
ry astronomer, has swung from be- 
hind the sun. heading for its closest 
pass to Earth since 1910. Three 
astronomers sighted it after it start- 
ed its approach. 

Halley’s comet wQl not 
pear behind the sun nntil 
February, moving away from! 
toward the deep freeze of space, 
□ot to appear again until 2061. 

The comet's approach to Earth is 
the 30th to be recorded — the first 
time being in 240 BG Halley noted 
a pattern and predicted its return in 
1758. When it did, after his death, it 
was named in his honor. 

Its long journey around the son 
late this year and early next year 
will be history’s most ooserved, ex- 
amined, studied, photographed 
and picked-over astronomical 
event. 

By tiie time the comet begins to 
darken and fade from sight, it will 


time,” said Raymond Newburn of 
the Joint Propulsion Laboratory in 
Pasadena, California. “Nothing 
like it has ever happened before.” 
Astronomers consider Halley’s 
comet their favorite, in part be- 
cause it is so big and so bright, very 
far from being burned oat, and it is 
the only active comet to demon- 
strate a wen-determined orbit and 
reliable behavior. 

The Soviet Union plans to have 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 1 ) 


and analyzed hundreds erf ; 
of times by astronomers using 
ground, airborne and space tde- 


wffl be times when Hal- 
ley’s is so dose to us that 200 of the 
world’s best telescopes will be ob- 
serving the comet at the same 


INSIDE 

■ brad analysts attempt to ex- 

Itabbi Mdr^hani^^^^e 4. 
SCIENCE 

■ A form of crystal deemed im- 
possible tinder classical rules of 
crystaDography is 
scientists. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Ted Tomer, the cable-TV en- 

trepreneur, agreed to acquire 
MGM-UA for S1J billion in 
cash. Page 9. 

SPORTS 

■ A tentative jqp-eement was 
readied to end the day-old ma- 
jor league baseball strike. Play 
is to resume Thursday. Page 15. 


5 Nations Are Found to Account for 90% of AU Foreign Investment in South Africa 


By Erin MacLellnn 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — More than 90 percent of foreign 
investment in South Africa is accounted for by Britain, the 
United States, West Germany, France and Switzerland, 
according to a survey of information available from for- 
eign governments, the United Nations and other interna- 
tional agencies. 

The survey reveals that at 3 time when many nations are 
grappling with proposals to ban new investment in South 
Africa until it changes its policies of racial segregation, 
relatively little precise data are available on actual levels of 
investment. 

It is apparent from the survey that Britain is by far the 
largest single investor in South' Africa. 

The government of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, 
while condemning Pretoria's apartheid policies, has made 
dear it does not believe that economic sanctions will work 
and has indicated it would not take part in any Western 
move in that direction. 


The West German government also opposes economic 
curbs, and President Ronald Reagan has continued to say 
that sanctions would make things worse for South Africa’s 
black majority. 

However, the decision by France to freeze new invest- 
ments. the recall of the ambassadors of the European 
Community to consider joint future action and the move 
last week by the U.S. Congress to force American econom- 
ic sanctions have focused new attention on the question of 
who invests in South Africa and how much. 

South Africa itself does not provide a country- bv- 
country breakdown, but reports investment bv region. ’ 

Officials at the South African Embassy in Washington 
said they bad no figures on investment and refused to 
discuss the subject. 

John Chettle, director for North and South America at 
the South Africa Foundation in Washington, explained 
why he believed Pretoria did not issue figures on individ- 
ual countries. 

“The South African government no ! eager issues those 


figures for political reasons," he said. “I believe they fed 
able 


that it enables groups to bring pressure on individual 
countries.” 

An advance copy of a report expected to be published 
soon by the UN Commission on Transnational Corpora- 
tions says lhaL at tbe end of 1983 the total amount of direct 
foreign investment in South Africa was in tbe range of 
S15.5 to S17 billion. 


Winnie Mandela Is in Hiding 

The Assoeiaied Press 

JOHANNESBURG — Winnie Mandela, the wife of 
the imprisoned black nationalist leader. Nelson Man- 
dela, has gone into hiding after a police raid at her home 
in the Orange Free State, her lawyer said. 

Mrs. Mandela took refuge in a safe place folkwing the 
raid by the police, who fired tear gas into her home to 
drive out demonstrators there, the lawyer said. 


This represents about 10 percent of the country’s total 
investment, the report sakL An Additional 20 percent of 
capital stock was odd by foreigners in the form of portfo- 
lio investment. 

Foreign direct in vestment is substantial in sectors like 
petroleum, motor vehicles, chemicals, electronics and 
banking. 

The UN report said that in 1984 there were 1.068 
transnational corporations with subsidiaries in South Af- 
rica. About one-third had headquarters in Britain, while 
companies based in West Germany and the United States 
each made up one-quarter of the total. 

Based on this and a number of reports and interviews, 
“ '""owing information has been compiled about in- 
11 and trade in South Africa: 


the foil 
vestment 


BRITAIN 


South African ties to Britain go back to tbe 18th 
century, when British settlers started arriving at the Cape 
of Good Hope, and strong ties still exist. 


In March, the British newsmagazine The Economist 
reported that British companies were the biggest corpo- 
rate investors in South Africa. They account for- about 58 
billion, or half the S16 billion in direct foreign investment 
in tbe country. The Economist said. 

Directly or indirectly, Britain has more than 514 trillion 
invested in South Africa, according to tbe British Depar 
mem of Trade and Industry. 

Britain’s investment in South Africa is about 10 percent 
of total British foreign investment, according to a survey 
on Britain by the Financial Mail, a South Afncan publica- 
tion, in November 1984. Britain ranks third in trade with 
South Africa, after the United States and Japan. 

Experts say that the British economy would be hart bv 
sanctions and could aggravate the country’s unemploy- 
ment rate of 13.5 percent 9 

The number of British jobs directly dependent on South 
Afncan trade is estimated to be about 150.000, according 
to John de Sl Jorre, in a recent article in Africa Notes, 
(Continued on Page 4, CoL 5} 







r 


'fa-. 


Pupr 2 


1YTKRN \T10.Y\I. IIKRAIJ) TKIBI'Mv. Till RSDAV. Al Gl ST 8. 1985 


It’s Time Again: 
t 76-Year Wait, 
’s Comet Near 


Aftet 
Halley 


(Coutumed from Page I) 
at least 10 major observatories 
watch the comet, and it has moved 
two smaller telescopes to Sooth 
America to get southern exposures. 
Britain has constructed a telescope 
in the Canary Island s and a Euro- 
pean consortium has put up a tele* 
scope in southern Spain, all just to 
observe the cornet 
AD major U.S. observatories wiQ 
be looking. The four lamest tele- 
scopes are in Hawaii, which will 
provide the best U.S. viewing be- 
cause of the islands' position — 19 
degrees north latitude — in relation 
to the corn’s path. 

The comet’s visit has the focused 
attention of die world’s astrono- 
mers as they seek to unravel its 
secrets, and those of the first mo- 
ments of the universe, when Hal- 
ley’s comet probably congealed. 

Comets are among the most un- 
usual objects in the solar system 
and are at least as old as the system. 

Although they look like burning 
stars, win fiery tails, comets are 
made, according to theory, of ice 
imbedded with dust-sized bits of 
rode, formed into a something like 
a dirty snowball about the time the 
solar system was created. 

Although comets seem to be 
coming from deepest space, all in- 
habit the solar system, swinging 
around the sun or clinging m a 
mass of trillions of icebaUsTcalled 
the Oort doud, after a Dutch as- 
tronomer. 

Away from the sun, Halley’s 
comet is cold and lifeless. When it 
nears the sun, “solar wind" radia- 
tion vaporizes some of the comet's 
surface, creating a great “coma," or 
head, around the mile-wide comet 
and blowing dust and gas in the 
direction away from the sun. 

This is the comet’s tail and it is 


iThrfrrinated by twilight reflected 

from the shower and fluorescence 
created as the gas is heated. 

Donald K. Yeomans of the Jet 
Propulsion Laboratory has said the 
passage closest to the sun will occur 
IL6 hours earlier than predicted be- 
cause of a disturbance on Jupiter. 

No comet has appeared to come 
from as far as even a neighboring 
star. “We’ve never seen a comet 
caning in with the kind of hyper- 
bolic velocity you’d need to escape 
another star, said Mr. Newborn of 
the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. 
“This is what you'd see if you cap- 
tured an interstellar comet, and 
we’ve never seen it.” 

Halley’s comet was last seen at 
the end of May in 1911, heading 
away from the sun, then 40 years 
ago it slowed until the sun began 
pulling it bade toward Earth. It has 
been racing bade ever stncc. 

The first posable righting mme 
July 19 at the European Southern 
Observatory in Chile, but it was not 
confirmed. Another si ghting mnv» 
from Japan. Then, finally, at 
Mount Palomar, in California, in 
the last days of July, James Gibson 
locked onto the comet for three 
successive nights. He measured and 
image-enhanced it by computer 
and confirmed that it was Haney’s. 

In the next few months, the com- 
et wiH became increasingly visible. 
The best way to observe its passage 
will be with instruments mounted 
nearest it an spacecraft The Euro- 
pean Space Agency’s Giotto craft 
two Soviet craft and one from Ja- 
pan named Planet A are expected 
to be in the comet’s vicinity next 
March. 

Two U.S. space shuttle flights, in 
January an d March, are to be de- 
voted to observations of the comet 
from low orbiL 



Arab Leaders Meet 
For Morocco Talks 
In a Mood of Crisis 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Prosecution Opens in FBI Spy Trial 

LOS ANGELES CIAI) - An 


group or “constructive alliance if 
the "more radical Arabs prevented 
the Arab League from meeting. 

A FLO official said that the fact 
that the meeting was ta king place 
at all was “a victory” for the PLO. 

“We wanted the meeting, and we 
wanted a discussion about the 
plig ht of Palestinians in Lebanon,” 
be said, referring w 
ported attacks by the 


National Union of Journalists members formed a 
tine Wednesday outside the British Broadcasting Corpus 
Television Center in London during their 24-hour strike. 

U.K. Radio, Television 
Blacked Out by Strike 


(Continued from Page 1) 
fact that some day Gregory may be 
shot and JaBed.” 

The program described both 
men as young, working-class, reli- 
gious teetotalers. 

When pressed, both men de- 
fended violence. Mr. McGuinness, 
who has denied charges that be was 
the lop milita ry leader of the IRA, 
blandly argued that peace would 
ultimately be achieved not through 
voting but through “the cutting 
edge of the IRA.” 

Mr. Campbell said he would 
have no choice but to fight the IRA 


in the streets if British troops were 
pulled out. 

“You either be killed by the IRA 
or kfll them, and I want to see them 
dead," he said. 

Several foreign journalists who 
viewed the program described it as 
fair. A Canadian broadcast jour- 
nalist said both men “gave me the 

creeps." 

An American newspaper report- 
er who has reported extensively on 
Northern' Ireland said, “It was bal- 
anced, it was fair, but it didn’t shed 
any dramatic new light on North- 
ern Ireland.” The 


(Continued from Page 1) 
this is the last summit of the Arab 
League. I think it will be." 

Mr. Alawi predicted that the 
Morocco meeting would signal the 
beginning of a division of Arabs 
into regional groups alliances. 

Heiosaidihai the mati n g was 
a victory for the radicals, whose 
influence, if not presence, is being 
keenly felt here. Mr. Alawi said 
t hat the foreign minis ters, who met 
on Monday night, had failed to 
agree on an agenda for the Wednes- 
day meeting despite heated debate. 

Moreover, be said, they had suc- 
ceeded in riiqaiarfing all but a few 
leaders of the more moderate Arab 
nations from attending. 

The Omani foreign minister do- 
dined to single out any Arab na- 
tion for criticism. But other Arabs 
voiced disappointment that Ring 
Fahd of Saudi Arabia, one of the 

mare infim-ntial figures among the 

moderates, had decided to send 

Crown Prince Abdullah. TT Q Cntr 

Of the radical Arab bloc, only ( )j» lOCtfjS tjffj 
Libya sent a representative to the J X J 

foreign ministers' meeting Monday c\ II O • - 

night The leader of the Libyan ijO/jU, tjOVWt 
delegation left Morocco on Tues- 
day night without explanation. 

Libya had been pressing to have 
the delegates condemn Iraq, for its 
war wilh Iran, and Jordan and the 
PLO, for their joint initiative for 
peace with Israel 
The absence of King Fabd and 
President Saddam Hussein of Iraq 
was construed by Arab officials in 
Morocco as a major blow to efforts 
by the more moderate Arab bloc to 
isolate Syria and the so-called re- 


agent. Richard W. Miller, to pass secret 
Union was only a begnmingstep on a “road to obbwOT'a ^hhe 
would have been used “mereflesSy'’ as a Soviet spy made the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation, according to a federal prosecutor. 

U.S. Attorney Robert C Bonner made the comm«J» f 
statements Tuesday at the start of Mr. Milkr's espionage tnal “ 
court in Los Angeles. Mr. MiUcr, 48, is the first FBI agent ever charged 

^hfcJtormer said that Mr. Miller’s arrest on Ocl 2 came only a w eefc 
before he and Svetlana Ogorodnikova had planned to trawl to Warsaw 
for a meeting with officials of the KGB. the Soviet sca ct pouce and 

intelligence network. “After the agent was thoroughly compromised. 
Mr Bonner said, “he would be mmalessly pumped for information by 

the KGB outside the United Slates and seat back as a Soviet spy. 



ponea aiucxs oy me jvuik , . _• - v v 71 _» 

rahtia on Palestinian camps in Ba- Soldier Is Injured by Bomb in Ulster 


raL 

The PLO official said he hoped 
the rruwtrno would “bless the con- 
cept" of the accord that the PLO 
chairman, Mr. Arafat, and King 
Hussein signed Feb. 1 1, outlining a 
joint bid for peace with IsraeL 

The proposal to discuss Jordani- 
an-PLO accord was said to have 
been the issue that led to the boy- 
cott by Syria, Lebanon, South Ye- 
men and Algeria. 


Message Data 


( Continued from Page I) 
ber 1983, Mr. Whitworth was a 
senior chief radioman aboard the 
Enterprise, a nuclear-powered car- 
rier. He supervised communica- 
tions personnel, including those us- 
ing secret cryptographic 
equipment 


BELFAST (AP) — Bombs wrecked a dairy and slightly injured a 
British soldier Wednesday, the day after asnspkted guerrilla was killed 
and another injured when a homemade rocket exploded prematurely. 

^The^tacks «me as a delegation from the New Yoric-based Irish 
Northern Aid Committee was touring the province: Both the London and 
Dublin governments say the group is a fund-raising arm of the Irish 
ReoubbcsD Army. 

the injured soldier, a member of the Ulster Defense R eg i m e n t, was 
injured near Carrickmore, where the Irish Northern AM Committee had 
scheduled a rally later in the day. 

U.S. Defense Firms Set Pace in Profits 

WASHINGTON (WP) — Defense contractors' profits have substan- 
tially mitpyy** there- of other manufacturers during President Ronald 
Reagan's program to build up the nati on's de fenses, but have not bees 
unreasonable, according to a Pentagon report. \ 

The report, the first comprehensive review of defense industry profits 
and accounting practices in a decade, was released Tuesday. It was based 
on an 18-month Defease Department study and nsed a special comymc 
ywn dH to show that weapons contractors averaged annual profits of 4.7 
percent from 1980 to 1983, while manufacturers of durable goods 

averaged losses of 3.65 percent. 

In absolute terms, defense profits were lower in the recessionary years 
1980-83 on average than in the 1970s, but compared to those of nonde- 
fense manufacturers they were consistently higher. Pentago n analy sts 
said the profits, which rose from an average of 2 percent in 

1980 to 9 percent in 1 983, represented “an eqmtaWe return, reflecting 
Mr. Reagan’s military buildup and the decline in inflation rates. 


jeetiemist camp that it leads. In this period, the indictment _ . T t J 

Mr. Filali, and other Arab offt- said. Mr. Whitworth obtained Paper KepOrtS lietCliUOIlS 111 UfiSUlClR 
fjak said the y amid not confirm a “photographs, plans and docu- r r ° 

report in a Kuwaiti newspaper, Al- meats concerned with the national 


Pope Aims to Counter Islam’s Growth 


(Continued from Page 1) 
growing faster there than on any 
other continent in the world. 

“Along with. Latin America, Af- 
rica is considered one of the reser- 
voirs of world Catholicism for the 
future,” said Joaquin Navarro 
Vails, a Vatican spokesman. 

“AO you have to do is took at the 
figures," Mr. Navarro said. “In 
1901 at the beginning of the centu- 
ry there were only 1.1 milli on Cath- 
olics in all Africa, making up about 


one percent of the continent's pop- 
ulation. Today we are adding about 
two million Catholics a year and 


there are a total of 65 million Cath- 
olics on the continent, or 16 per- 
cent of the total population. By the 
end of the century we expect to 
have 100 million." 


The reason for the church's suc- 
cess in Africa, Vatican officials say, 
is the inherent spiritualism of Afri- 
cans. 

The church sees Christianity as a 
force that can unite the diverse, 
often antagonistic tribes and lin- 
guistic groups that make up the 
modem African nations. 

“In Africa the. tribal bonds are 
stronger than the national bonds," 
Mr. Navarro said. “You need 
something that can be a homoge- 
nizer to unite the country and we 
believe, and many Africanpolitical 
leaders also believe, that Christian- 
ity, or Islam,' can do that" 

On the flight bade to Rome, John 
Paul is to stop at Casablanca, Mo- 
rocco, at die invitation of King 


Hassan II and address a gathering 
of Moslem young people with the 
king. 


program was 
startling to tbe British, she said, 
mainly because they are used to 
seeing IRA leaden portrayed only 
as monsters. 

Suppression of the program has 
provoked vehement debate be- 
tween people worried about press 
freedom and those intent on starv- 
ing terrorists of “the oxygen of 
Prime Minister Mar- 


■ Pone Repudiates Apartheid 

.ttssesaws exsssst 

Lord Annan, who headed the 


his trip to Africa, 
day his repudiation of apartheid in 
Smith Africa, United Press Inter- 
national reported from Vatican 
Gty. 

Speaking for the first time about 
the wave of racial disturbances in 
South Africa, tbe pope called die 
apartheid system of racial separa- 
tion “inhuman" 

“Our repudiation of every form 
of racial discrimination is con- 
vinced and totaL” he said. “It is 
founded on the awareness of the 
dignity common to every man.” 


Seyassa, that Syria was preparing 
to arrange the release of seven 
Americans abducted in Lebanon 
and presumably held hostage by 
The 

newspaper said the release of the 
seven would be an effort to disrupt 
the s ummi t or divert attention from 
it 

Asked if such a release would 
afreet the deliberations in Moroc- 
co, Mr. Filali said, “I don’t see the 
link or connection." 

Another Moroccan official said 


Committeeon the Future of Broad- 
casting, which i ssued a landmark 
report in 1977, said in a debate 
after the screening that it was un- 
derstandable that Mrs. Thatcher 
was sensitive about coverage of the 
IRA. An IRA bomb last year near- 
ly killed the prime mini«tw 

But Lord Annan said Mr. BA- ‘ the best possib 
tan had “behaved like a demen tifi. mg. 
poodle” in writing to the BBC gov- King Hussein of Jordan warned 

emois, & move widely denounced last week that moderate Arab na- 
as an attempt to pressure them. > tions ought form a new working 


defense of the United States con- 
cerning fined fiq t operations in- 
volving the U.S.S. Enterprise.” ' 
The Middle East contingency 
plans were stolen from the Biter- 
prise, the indictment said. 

■ Value to Moscow Described 
In Norfolk, a top-ranking civil- 
ian of the Naval Sea Systems Com- 
mand te stified that the classified 
documents Arthur Walker was 
charged with passing to tile Soviet 
Union contained “significant tacti- 
cal information" that could aid 






. , _ - _ . . | «■ ww uuui iiw»rou Him wuiu mu 

that if tbe Syrians were holding Moscow in computing the rehabd- 
Americans hostage and tuning iry ^ capabQjtY of U.S. ships and 
their release to suit political goals, ^v^anOTSsystemi the LosAngeles 
“then they are the terrorists. reported 

The Jordanian officials and rep- The statement by Walter Kone- 
resentatives of the PLO, both of fy, deputy director of a Norfoflc- 
whom have pressed hard for the based naval unit that supervises the 
special meeting, continued to put overhaul of amphibious landing 
[ possible face on the meet- ships, was mad^ m the second day 
ofMr. Walker’s espionage trial in 
U.S. District Court. 

Mr. Konefd said that Soviet in- 
telligence could use tbe data alleg- 
edly provided by Mr. Walker to 



A soldier in Kampala show- 
ing a cowboy pendant. 


KAMPALA, Uganda (AFP) — 
More than 1,000 people, mostly 
former security officials under the 
deposed president. Milton Obote, 
have been detained at a maximum 
security prison near here, the Ro- 
man Catholic newspaper Munso 
said here Wednesday. 

The new interior Hamster, Paul 
Ssemogerere, confirmed that same 
members of Mr. Obote' S security 
agency were defamed. Mr. Ssemo- 
gerere said he was more concerned 
about the large number at political 
detainees in the prison than about 
tbe fate of the security agents. 

Meanwhile, Brigadier Basilio 
Olara Okeflo, the leader of the 
coup, was named army chief of 
start and promoted to the rank of 
Beutenant general Radio Uganda 
announced. It also said that Ugan- 
da’s representative to tbe United 
Nations, Olara Otuonu,was named 
foreign "tirorfer and that Henry 
Obonyo of the opposition Demor 
crane Party was appointed health 
minister. . . 


* 


listen to your mother. 



Lebanon Christians Wary of Coalition 

ter-careying amphibious assanlt BEIRUT (Reuters) — Lebanese Christian politicians reacted cautious 


M * 


ter-carrying amp. 
ships, the most ri«Ffi«ilt mi 
the ships could carry out and their 
readiness. 

“You can do things like compute 
reliability tor various systems,’’ be 
said. “If the ship’s air radar is down 
TO percent of the time, then it’s np 
90 percent of the time. Yon can 
assess the capability of getting all 
five ships away on a green day.” 

The authorities say Mr. Walker, 


BEIRUT (Reuters) — Lebanese Christian pofftidus reacted cautious- 
ly Wednesday to the new National Unity Front, a coalition of Modems, 
leftists and independent Christians 

Moslems have gamed the majority. 

A former president, Suleiman Fi 
backed parts of the manifesto made _ 

pr eferred the changes he and Pterideni Hafez aMstad of Syria proposed 
in 1976 to end the civil war. 


to change the method of 
Christian and Moslem 
since 1943, but in recent years 

a Christian, said Bat he 
V but added that he 


4 




Christians 'and Modems Jmt would have continued the system under 
50, a retired Navy lieutenant com- wind the president is a Maronite Christian, the prime minister a Sunni 
mander, had told them he stole two Moslem and the speaker of parliament a.Shnte. “The situation in 

Lebanon does not permit big strides, but one step at a time,” Mr. Franjiefc 
said. 

The dominant Maronite political party, the Phalange, had no axgumau 
with the new front on many of its basic p rin ciples, according to a senior 
official, Alfred Madi, but he said that details remained vague. 


classified documents from his job 
at a local defense contractor. 

Arthur Walker’s attorneys have 
argued that the information avail- 
able IO their client was of minimal 


All that good advice doesn't 
have to be a thing of the past just 
because you're apart. Keep in 
touch with your family by phone. 
You'll stay close even though 
they're in tne States. 




to national security 
that he was unaware that his !?—_. *l,„ - 

W Mn WaHrw ms a Soviet X OST til© ItGCOM 

The Bm» SodaBst Projpwai Party on Wednesday elected U San Yu, 
president of the State Carnal to the new post af party vice chairman, 
directly under tbe chairman, U Ne Win, official sources sakL (AFP) 
At least 180 people were killed and tens of thousands left homeless by a 
typhoon that hit coastal Zhejiang province a week ago, according to 
reports reaching Beijing. (UP I) 

A U-S. Army bc Bcopter pBot taking pan in U.S.-Egyptian military 
exercises was killed when ms helicopter crashed in the desert west of 
Cairo, the Pentagon announced Wednesday. (AP) 

' Ministers from 17 European countries participating in tbe E ur e ka 


brother, John Walker, was a Soviet 
agent at the time their ctiept pro- 
vided the documents and received 
two 56,000 payments. • 

Both of those arguments were 
challenged in testimony Tuesday. 

Tbe first data was designated as 
extracts from a file of “casualty 
repots." 

Another document Arthur 
Walker has been charged with pro- 
viding his brother was a “damage 
control book" for the Blue Ridge, 
the amphibious command ship of 
the Seventh Fleet in the western 
Pacific. The book is used by spe- 
cially trained crew numbers in 
emergencieft- 


Germany, in November to diaenss plans for its development, the West 
German Foreign Ministry said Wednesday. . (Reuters) 

The U3, Immigration and Natm afcatf i o n Service has halted deporta- 
tion proceedings against Edgar Chamorro, a former Nicaraguan rebel 
leader who has criticized Reagan administration policies. The agency said 
Mr. Chamorro, who is living in Florida, has a valid visa (NYT) 


f Every piece of jewelry has a story to tell. 







ilias LALAoUNIS 


PARIS - 364, RUE 5T-HONQRE (PLACE VB*©QME) 
GENEVA - -BON GENIE', ZURICH - 'GR/EDER' 
ATHENS - 6, PANfflSTlMlOU AVENUE 
HOTEL GRANDE BRETAGNE & ATHENS HILTON . 
• MYCONOS, CORFU, RHODES 
NEW YORK - 4 WEST 57 TH STREET & FIFTH AVENUE 


Meese Says He Kept Out 
Of U.S. Teamsters Case 

Los Angeles Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Attorney 
Genera] Edwin Meese 3d has said 
that he did not participate in the 
Department of Justice’s decision 
last month to drop a labor fraud 
investigation of Jackie Presser, 
president of the Teamsters union, 
in order to avoid appearances of 
pofitical interference, 

Mr._ Meese said Tuesday on a 
television program that career at- 
torneys at the dqurtment, rather 
than officials appointed. by Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan, “found it was 
not appropriate to go ahead" with a 
32-month federal grand jury inqui- 
ry into allegations of payroll pad- 
ding. 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


BACHELQfTS « MASTERS - DOCTORATE 

To Vhtk. Amdmit , Bh BqmiwiM . 

Send detailed mum* 
for free avaJuaHoo. 

PAOHC WESTERN UMVBtSfTY 
6 qo n. Sepufveda aiva. . 
Lok Angeles. Coufomta . 
90049, D«pt. 23, U.3JL 


it 


■-V . 











I 








vx-rvi 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1985 


Page 3 


W Trial 

gBB&fes 
MSSSf^S 

K«ie-<s6n!imputs ; n 
^rai-^nteverj^ 

pofc 

s-aS? 

?SaSo via^" h > 

in Ulster 

Sany and sli gh tly 

?«es!3g 

^the' New York-baavt i . 

... *™jgarm of the jJJ 
ster Defense 


’ tun&Sy 






■■'- Juan<b Oriis 

•• 1 . Afigetes 7t*tej Service 

ta VAZ, Bofivia — Victor Faz 
E^jajssorotoaian office as pres- 
kfcm of .Boljyra, anmjundng eco- 
nbiri«*ef<5ci»-to save the country 
', frocryimt- recalled ‘‘the list of 

1 - • tlBMllM.* 1 ' ' . 

_ .-" : r_- 

if iK .MfcftS Esamsioto, Ti: on Toes* 
day Silcs Znazo 

in thefirstordedy transfer of pow- 
esrin 23 yeaa;f9iactuatctf by seven ■ 
. mi Sla iyco u p s . ' • 

ant Urt^ray ioc^_ on, Mr. Pe. 
.-• Tsiereg orosaBtin an inanguraLad*’ 
dress, that lie would defend democ- 
racy and human, rights and -.‘*pn>- 


m 

S^’.proCts have subZ 

g&»ig 

agssssss 

of durable goo* 
«r m the recessionary v»- 

WwitothoseTiS 

'*$»• Pentagon anah® 
v an average of 2 peroai^ 
actable return.'' reS 
ac m inflation rates. ^ 

>iib In Uganda 

ffALA, Uganda (ah* 
^1.000 people. mL 
security officials imdoT 
i president. Milton oC 
CT detained at a mating 
near here, the R&. 
at&jfic new spaper Muano 
« Wednesday, 
aew interior minute. Paul 

grot, confirmed (tat sane 
8 rf Mr. 0 bote's seenrity 
were.de tamed. Mr. Ssemd- 
**d he was more concerned 
* large number of political 
s in the prison than about 
of the security agents, 
iwiale. Brigadier Basflio 
the leader of the 
/as named army chief of 
d promoted to the rani of 
at general Radio Uganda 
zed. It also said that Ugm- 
resemative to the United 
, Oiara Otunnu. was named 
minister and that Henry 
of the opposition Dzath 
irty was appointed heafth 


y of Coalition 

* 

opticians reacts annua- 
at. a coalition d Mateo, ... 
to change the wtheid ’Jflf 
jng Christian snd Mrrion (j£ 

3 1943. but in reoem years ?. 

a Christian, said that he 
uesday. but added that he 
ti-Assad of S;-tu proposed 

x eoualiv divided bewws 
atinued ’the sy«roi imda . 
be prime minuw a .* >UIID • 

‘-The situation ® 


But he said 1 that the “national 
disaster” of Bolivia’s economic disr 
ts» ^called far wodc discipline, 
economic policy -changes and a 
fight againtt corruption. 

. Mr. Eaz Estenssoro aanbimeed 
that he woold free Botrvia’r con- 
- trolled official exchange rale, now 
. Gne~rrinth_ the Mack-market rale.. 
> Under Ml Sles Ziiazo, unrealistic 
exchangerates fostered a huge con- 
traband economy and conmbuted 
to an annual inflation . rate of 

Mr. $E&teossoro raM^thaibe 
would renegotiate Bolivia's $3J- 
billion -farctgn debtwith interna- 
tional banks and governments 
“without taking the bread from the 
mouths of oar needy people.’' 

: : He also stiff that his government 
would welcome-foreign capital for 
now investments manning and pe* 
trolenm projects. 

j The nfew exchange polic^ m 

BoEvia rm^to^^Ksennal 
inroortSL Forogn^ ^mvestment in ml 
Adds could boost Bolivia's waning 
.production of petroleum and natu- 
ralgas, a n^or oqxnt resource. . 

BoBvia’s econom y has been kq>t 
afloat by its cocaine industry, 
which earns about $1 Mlionaycar. 
Mr. PazHsteos^onjsaid thatBofiv- : 
iahad an “unaVoidaHc obligation” 
to cooperate. in international drug 
confitrf programs, buthesaid that 
he Would a&fcfr subs tantial finan - 

to 

make oocame, with otfier crops; V' 

A-modcratepopufist, be re«ived 
only 26.4 percent of the popular, 
veto, ; but ruled oat. any. coalitions 
andstaffedMs 1 8-mcmber tahind 
with menibeispf ^his Revbltdionajy 
NalianaHst Movement ,; l’ : 



Alter a Poor Start, Shuttle Flight Ends in Success 


Unted Praa Infcmctenoi 

A schoolboy In Hirodhinia in 1946 bore scars from die Mart. 


Monitoring the Health 
Of Hiroshima Survivors 


1 Mr. Fnnjid 


Shiite. 

epataume.' 

%alanse. had noaremo® 
pies. accordi^S w 2 s®* 
remained vasu^ - 


inesday elected USwH , 
st cf party vice chajjg 
iaJ source* j# 1 '*- jJL, , 
oi Bands ieu i 

i week ago. a.'corou^^ 

in U.&-E§>T ua "S : 

bed in die d&en ^ ■ 
nidpaim? , ir- 

ssaassSs, 

a policies. The -» en A>jfl 

valid viiU- 


(Coutuned from Page I) 
was diagnosed last year as having a 
blood-vessel disease. New he was 
once again in the hospital The liver 
problem had retained. So, too, had 
the question whether his health 
problems were due to exposure to 
the radiation. 

“AH this may wdl not be directly 
related to the bomb. batlH proba- 
bly neverknow; will IT Mr.Mma- 
moto said. There seems to be 
some relationship, but I can't be 
sure. How can any of us be sure?” 

• The answer, physicians and biol- 
ogists say, is that -they cannot 
Across Japan, thousands of sur- 
vivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki 
lead normal lives. Yet thousands 
also endue a broad assortment of 
serious diseases and minor com- 
l& Some are deafly bomb-re- 
; others most likely are uol 
M ost conspicuously, men and 
women exposed - to the blasts and 
. the fafloni had higher cancer rates 
■.than' '.the nonesposed pt^olarion. 
Early ot, the risk of lenkama was 
e^preiaDy grrat, according to the 
Radiation Effects Research Foun- 
dation in Hgnshima, tbe prindpal 
cramiler of statistics. 

*_ The ffi midarinn ~«e timfltes that in 
1950, When its s tatis tical studies 
b^anj ibt smvivors had absorbed 
an average of IS to 20 rads each. 
The average. pecson ; receives onc- 
temh to twoAmths' of a rad in a 
year. Many hihaknsba survived at 
least -100 mds and some endured 
400 or more. 

Tjaikrmw b^an to appear after 
two years, peaking in the early 
1950s and staying at a high level for 
another decade. 

At the peak, the leukemia ride 
bibaknsha who had ab- 
100 rads was 20 times that 
oT other Japanese, For those ex- 
posed to a more typical IS rads, the 
risk was lhm times greater. By the 
mid-1960s, leukemia rates had lev- 
eled off. ■ 

But bomb victims appeared 
more tikety to develop cancers of 
the thyroid, breast, lung, colon, uri- 
nary tract and stomach. A bone- 
marrow malignancy, nmltiplc my- 
eloma, had a notably high 
incidence. Those who had received 
200 ot more rads ran a fivefold risk. 
In fairly large percenta g es, high* 

a vd r h r mnrycrwrvfli aberrations in. 
blood lymphocytes, research foun- 
dation figures show. 

Children, especially those less 

than 6 years old, grew up to be, on 

Tarija, where the country's best average, an inch or two shorter .and 
wine is produced. He stayed in the a pound or two lighter' than con- 
region until be left to study law in temporaries, accoramg to a 1975 
La Pat ‘ study in The American Journal of 

His. professional career has al- Public Health. : ~ . 


New fort 
Times reported from La Paz: • - 

' When his opponent. announced 
victory the day after Bolma’spresi- 
dential dections, Mr. Paz&tens- 
soro wailed patiently for the offi- 
dal taBy to.be completed. In the 
end, he lost&e general ^decoao by 
2 peroent bot wonlii Congress, 
becoming the first- civilian to take 
the presideacy without a majority 

oftbe popular vote. 

• It is such patience and knowl- 
cd^; of theBohyian political scene 
that has^ characterized Mr. Paz Es- 
! tensswo’s success ; in winning, the 
presidency four times. 

A forceful figure in Bolivian 
notifies for more ^than five decades, 
Mr. Paz E ste nssoro is known to 
supporters and opponents as a bril- 
fiaht man whose administrations 
have never qmte. lived up to the 
expectations raised by his in teDetd. 

S om e diplomats and' offioals 
here say he has failed fo build a 
strong party and has never pitted 
the role of mentor to devdop new 
political leaders. 

Mr. Paz Estenssoro was bom 
into a family of landowneri on Oct 

2, 1907, in the southern town of 


Perhaps most affected were 
many of the approximately 4,000 
victims who were fetuses and are 
now nearing a 40th birthday. Some 
woe born mentally retarded or 
with a small head, or 

In other vital areas of 
little has emerad to separate hiba- 
kusha from other Japanese, in the 
views of Japanese md American 
researchers. 

The most seriously afflicted died 
at once or within three months: 
about 130,000 people in Hiroshima 
and up to 70,000 m Nagasaki 

It is estimated that 140,000 oth- 
ers died over the next five years; 
many shown acu te, immediate 
effects of severe exposure to the 
bomb: bums, nausea, vomiting, 
bloody weakness, hair 

loss and, within a few months, dis- 
figuring excess scar tissue, or ke- 
loids. 

But statistics compiled by the 
research foundation mid by clinics 
that treat victims in Hiroshima and 
Nagasaki show that snee those ear- 
ly days hflMknsha have not shown 
demonstrably higher mortality 
rates for any disease other than 
cancer — not for tuberculosis, cir- 
culatory ailments, heart fail ure or 
Alnesses of the central nervous sys- 
tem. • - - 

Even when cancer deaths are in- 
cluded in the total bibaknsha life 
expectancy has proved only flighty 
lower than the rest of the 
tion. Japanese live longer (ban any 
other people, with an average lire 
expectancy of 80.2 years for women 
and 74 5 years for men. 

More important for the long run 
was the lack of evidence to confirm 
that atomic bomb radiation pro- 
duced genetic defects, despite the 
presence of chromosomal breaks in 
parents and some of the children. 

Children of bibaknsha complain 
that they cflfch colds that last un- 
usually long. They find they be- 
come easily fatigued, they say. Sta- 
tistically, nothing supports 
conclusion that these “second-gen- 
eration” bomb survivors differ sig- 
nificantly from any other Japanese 

ihar flgft. 

Tf there was any big surprise, it 
was the lade of significant genetic 
defects thus far," raid Dr, David G. 
Hod, an American who is 
neat director of the research foun- 
dation. 

Other researchers ray that the 
fact that genetic problems cannot 
be proved does not mean they can 
be ruled ouL A Japanese researcher 
on radiation, Yataro Tajima, pub- 
lished a study in 1972 suggesting 
that recessive genetic trails induced 
by the bomb could be spread, to 
later generations. 


Says He 
}. Teamsters C& 


Sen* 


Angdes ' T;Wi 

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UNIVERS ,tY 

DEGR E ^r. 

■* 

****£? 
*0^ . 


jiti« 


ways been centered on economics, 
as an adviser or a professor. His 
piAitical" .career, has bem based an 
the Revolutionary Nationalist 
Movement which he founded in 
1942 with the dqntrting presiden t 
Mr Sites Zu«to . and the labor lead- 
er Juan Lechtn. 

■ The party was at the frarfironlof 
the 1952 revolfition. which brought 
land redistribution, universal suf- 
■ frage and natitmalization of the 

m^br tin nisus* - 
By the 1960s, the affiance of the 
thrcc mim had broken up. Mr. Sits 
Twarp, who moved to me left 
Ml Paz Estenssoro, a conservative, 
formed waiter groups of the 
ty. Mr. j- f*4nn buflt one of Latin 
... America's strongest amortized la- 
l\ bpr groups: 

Many officials in Bolivia say 
they believe some of the couators 
troubles can be ascribed to the ri- 
valries between Ae three men. It 
.wmMlLkWo wiw gave Ml Sto 
7n*m his most difficult moments 
as president by calling strikes every 
timethe peso was devalued. 

: Mr. Paz Estenssoro retnmed 
from cxite in Argentina to serve as 
Bolivia’s first president after the 
• I9S revolution. He was roetected 
in I960 and 1964. Ifis dnrd term 
wascot Aort by a ntiDlaiy coup. 

The new. president has lived is 
forced exile three aans and has 
-fc acted as ambassador to Britain and 
the Ndberiands. In oak m tlKlare 

ro fifle ]»'■ taught economics m 

Lima; Peru. In the late WOsJn his 
LkTctIc, he taught 
UCLAandthe University c£ New 
Mexico. 

. lAk 77'he wffl be the dd«t Latm 
. American kader and the 9^? ?" 
viHan tb ever take office m Bolivia. 


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% Sandra Blakcslee 

New York Times Stfriec 

EDWARDS AIR FORCE 
BASE, California — The VS. 
space shuttle Chaflengw, which 
lost one of three main engines on its 
ascent to Dibit, has returned safely 
io earth after an eight-day mission 
that an official called “superbly 
successful” 

CoJonel C Gordon Fullerton of 
the U.S. Air Force graded the 108- 
ton spacecraft to a landing Tues- 
day, returning a aw of seven men 
and the largest, most advanced sci- 
entific instruments ever built far 
space fHehL 

On this mission the Challenger 
an orbiting astronomical 
observatory with more than $72 
million worth of telescopes and 
other sensitive instruments to study 
the sun, the stars and distant galax- 
ies. 

Burton Edebon, an associate ad- 
ministrator of the National Aero- 
nautics and Space Administration, 
said that some instrument prob- 
lems had seemed “insurmountable 
when we started out.” 

“But we met more than 80 per- 
cent of all science objectives of tins 
mission,” Mr. Edelson said. “We're 
absolutely driighied We know we 
had trouble getting started.” 

Eugene WTUrban, the chief mis- 
* si on scientist, was the official who 
rfiafartWTTflri the flight SS SUpefl). 

“Everyone has collected tantalizing 
new data,” he said a a briefing. 
“It’s going to take a long time be- 
fore this data is analyzed and really 
fully appreciated. We've made 
some interesting new observations, 
and some have been very spectacu- 
lar” 

Before the landing , one of the 
astronauts, Loren W. Acton, 48, a 
solar physicist, thanked engineers 
on the ground for help in trans- 
forming “a fairly anomalous mis- 
sion” into one that produced “what 
we trust to be some excellent sri- 


12 caused the mission to be 
scrubbed seconds before liftoff. 

The mission finally got off, but 
to a harrowing start, on July 29 
when one of the shuttle's main en- 
sues shut down after liftoff, the 
first time that had happened on an 
American manned space flight. 

The Challenger limped on its 
other twp engines into an orbit 
about 50 miles (81 kilometers) shy 
of its goal of 240 miles above the 
earth. 

Space agency officials said the 
shutdown had been ca used by 
faulty heat sensors on the engine 
that apparently caused computers 
aboard to turn the engine off pre- 
maturely. 

Jesse Moore, an associate admin- 
istrator of the space agency, said 
that the sensors on the Challenger’s 
failed engine world be inspected 
and that an improved type of sen- 
sor would be used on future shuttle 
flights if the Challenger sensors 


proved faulty. The next morion is 
scheduled to start Aug. 24 with the 
shuttle Discovery. 

Once in orbit, the Challenger's 
astronauts struggled with a number 
of balky instruments, including a 
560-million system that was to 

track a djme^afthe distance'oftwo 
miles. The system did work, but 
only after days of false starts. 

The crew focused some of the 
telescopes in the shuttle’s 60-foot 
(18-meter) payload bay cm the 
sun’s corona and outer atmosphere, 
and others on the cosmic rays, X- 
rays and infrared radiations from 

stara and distant galaxies. The solar 

telescopes allowed astronomers on 
the ground to view the sun with 
about five times greater accuracy 
than ever before 

The crew also fired the space- 
craft's small maneuvering jets to 
punch temporary holes In Earth's 
thin upper atmosphere, allowing 


radio telescopes on the ground to 
peer deeper into space. Some of 
these experiments in the iono- 
sphere are said to be of interest to 
scientists working on the U5. Stra- 
tegic Defense Initiative, a project 
to determine the feasibility of shad- 
ing laser beams and beams of sub- 
atomic particles through space to 
destroy intercontinental missiles in 
flight. 

Despite the 17-day delay in the 
Challenger's launch, Mr. Moore 
said the shuttle program could hold 
“pretty weD” to its schedule. 

■ Japan Names Astronauts 

Japan's National Space Devel- 
opment Agency announced 


Wednesday the names of three fi- 
nal candidates who will be trained 
to board a space shuttle flight witii 
UJS. astronauts in January 1988, 
The Associated Press reported 
from Tokyo. One of the three is to 
become the first Japanese in space. 

The Japanese payload specialist 
is to conduct experiments on metal 
alloys and life science, including a 
study of the effect of space monon 
sickness on carp. 

The three candidates, chosen 
from 533 applicants, are: Takao 
Doi, 30, a researcher at NASA's 
Lewis Research Center in Ohio; 
Mamoni Mori. 37, an assistant pro- 
fessor of nuclear engineering; and 
Chiaki Naito. 33, a cardiosurgeon. 


The Challenger’s flight was de- 
layed for more than two weeks af- 
ter a problem in the second of the 
shuttle’s three main engines on July 


h U.S. a Christum Nation 9 ? 
A Reagan Official Thinks So 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — When Gerald B. Lab of Mountain View, Califor- 
nia, wrote to the U.S. Department of Education to complain that an 
official there had called the Uni led States a “Christian nation,” he was 
startled by the sharp reply. 

Christopher C. Sundseih, who is a Reagan administration appointee in 
the Treasury Department, somehow got hold of Mr. Lab's postcard and 
sent off a stinging response, calling Mr. Lab an “amazing, pathe tic 
creature." 

Mr. Sundseth said he believes he obtained the card from (me of four 
Christian activists who, he said, regularly file Freedom of Information 
Act requests with agencies for letters on Christian k^h-s 

He said these friends, whom he declined to identify, forward such 
letters about Christian questions to him and he sometimes s e nd s respons- 
es to the writers. 

“We are indeed, like it or not, a ‘Christian nation' as more than 85 
percent of adult Americans consider themselves ‘Christians.’ " he wrote. 
“This country was founded by Christians who were escaping the s 31 ™* 
land of small-minded tripe you espouse.” 

“P.S. When you die," Mr. Sundseth added, “you will be gi ving account 
to Jesus Christ, your creator, who happens Himself to be Christian. I 
hope you are prepared.” 

Mr. Leib complained to Representative Patricia Schroeder, a Demo- 
crat of Colorado, about Mr. Sundseth’s “gratuitous proselytizing.” 


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Page X 


Kahane Erodes Support of Israel’s Likud 

■ From 'Wness’to 'Epidemic 1 : Rabbi’s AndrArab Extremism Gains Acceptance 


By Thomas L Friedman 

ffetu York Tuna Service 

JERUSALEM — When Rabbi Mdr Kahane 
was elected to the Knesset, Israel's parliament, a 
year ago, most political commentators here dis- 
missed him 35 an “American import” and a 
“racist lunatic'* who would never find a serious 
following in Israeli society. His election, they 
said, was “a fluke." 

Today, nobody .is dismissing Mr. Kahane, 
who advocates expelling all Arabs from Israel 
and the occupied territories and turning the 
country into a purely Jewish state that would be 
run according to Jewish law. He is the most 
talked-about politician in Israel, and by all 
indications his popularity is soaring. 

Frightened by Mr. Kahane s rising populari- 
ty, the Israeli parliament on July 30 passed by a 
vote of 66-0 a bill designed to outlaw his party. 
It bans from parliamentary elections any party 
that incites people to racism or negates Israel's 
democratic character. 

Mr. Kahane, who did not vote that day be- 
cause he was ejected from the Knesset for mak- 
ing inflammatory remarks, says he intends to 
get around the law by having a supporter who is 
an Arab convert to Judaism run on his party’s 
list for the next parliament 
Political commentators here say the appeal of 
Mr. Kahane’s ideas, especially strong among 
young voters, has several roots: Arabs and Jews 
are treated differently under the law in the 
occupied territories, nationalism has become 
increasingly acceptable, personal violence be- 
tween Jews and Arabs has increased, and confi- 
dence in the leadership provided by Israel’s 
major parties has weakened. 

“Before his election a year ago, Mr. Kahane 
was just an illness; now he is an epidemic," said 
AJouph Harevea. associate director of the Van 
Leer Jerusalem Foundation, a private research 
organization that sponsors education programs 
to promote tolerance. 

“Kahane is beginning to be acceptable in 
centrist Israeli society,” said Gerald Cromer, a 
professor of criminology at Bar-Ban University 
in Tel Aviv who has been studying Mr. Ka- 
hane's support 

Mr. Kahane. who moved to Israel 14 years 
ago after founding the Jewish Defense League 
in New York, says he believes his success is' 
based on the mounting fears that Israelis have of 
Arabs, and on a desire by some Israelis to end 


whai they call the “Arab problem" once and for 
all. 

“I have touched a simple and honest i aen# on 
the part of the people," Mr. Kahane said in soft, 
measured tones in an interview at his Knesset 
office. “Not all of thesepeople out on the streets 
are fools. Obviously, when parents come to me 
and say that they are afraid to let their children 
play in the streets, something is bothering than. 

“I have spoken about this for theiast Myegn. 
f have not changed. It is the situation that has 
changed. Everything in Israel has a time, and 
this is an idea whose time has come.” 

All the major political pollsters in Israel 
that if national elections were held now, 
Kahane’s party —which holds only erne of the 
120 seats m parliament — would increase its 
representation to five or six seats, virtually all at 
the expense of the rightist Likud bloc. Such a 
showing would make it the biggest religious 


The increase in right- 
wing nationalist ideology 
under Begin, laid die 
groundwork for Kahane/ 

— Alonph Harevea 
Associate director of the Van 
Leer Jerusalem Foundation. 


tions or permits solely to those businesses which 
pmmisp to employ only Jews and which do not 
<*aghii$h joint enterprises with Arabs.” 

The coalition agreement also suggested, at 
Mr. Kahane's insistence, that driving be banned 
on the Sabbath. 

On July 30 Attorney General Yitzhak Zamir 
declared the coalition agreement “null and 
void" because “it discriminates on the baas of 
radst considerations." Nonetheless, the Kiryat 
Ariu counrilmen vowed to cany it out. 

Israeli analysts attribute Mr. Kahane’s suc- 
cess partly to the fact that the generation now 
coming of voting age was bon after Israel 
occupied the West Bank and the Gaza Strip 
during the 1967 war. 

“Since the 1967 war Israel has been a state 
with a doable message," said Mr. Harevea, a 
retired senior military officer. “ChDdren born 
since 1967 don’t know what the border is be- 
tween Israel and the occupied territories. For 
them all Arabs are the same. And for them pan 
of Israel is democratic and part is not Fort and 
a quarter million Israelis live in a democracy 
and 1 .25 million Arabs in the West Bank and 
Gaza Strip live under mill 
have elections. Tb 
organize politically, 
governors." 

The call to oust the Arabs from Israel Mr. 
Harevea noted, no longer strikes many Israeli 
youngsters as shocking, given the differences in 
treatment they have observed in daily life for the 
last 18 years. 

“I have raid it a millio n times," Mr. Kahane 
explained, “Western democracy as we know it is 
mconmatible with Zionism. Zionism came into 


milli on Arabs in roe west trank ana 
p live under mititary rule They don’t 
tions. They don't have the right to 
politically. They are ruled by military 



Rabbi Meir Kahay addressing the crowd at a rally in Jerasakni. 



ve broken' through into a S "3J ^2, A ^ factor that the commentators ray they 

" -- " have the right to decide then own fate. So ^ contributed to the rise of Mr. Ka- 


Kahane already 
governing coalition. On June 25 two members of 
his Kach Party were elected to the nine-member 
city council in tbe Jewish settlement of Kiiyat 
Arba, outride Hebron, on the occupied West 
Bank. 

In order to put together a ruling coalition, the 
settlement leader, Shalom Wadi, agreed on July 
19 to sign an accord with tbe two Kadi repre- 
sentatives in which it was stipulated that the 


t to decide their own fate.' So 
Zionism and' democracy are at odds. I say dear- 
Jy that I stand with Zionism. I want a Jewish 
state, not a Hebrew-speaking Portugal" 
Moreover, the analysts say, the ground was 
prepared for Mr. Kahane by the rightist T-ilryH 
government of Prime Minister Meoachem Begin 
from 1977 to 1983. 

“The increase in right-wing nationalist ideol- 
ogy under Begin, winch gave primacy to obe’s 
nation over another, which limited the Arabs’ 


of 

at- 


“Iocal council will take action to immediateiy 
dismiss all Arab latamc^lpyed bythe loca! 

3* Ody laid the ground^for Kahane;" 


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hane is an increase in personal violence between 
Jews and Arabs inside Israel. After the Israeli 
Army crushed the Palestine Liberation 
ration in Lebanon and left it incapal 
launching cross-border raids, Palestinian 
lacks on Israel took on a new form. 

Apparently acting in most cases on their own 
initiative ana " ri n g crude homemade weapons 
or pistols stolen from Israelis, Arabs living in- 
side Israel and the occupied territories in tbe last 
two years have been blamed for killing 1 3 Jews. 

As a result, the Arab-Zsraeh conflict seems to 
have become more personalized, making indi- 
vidual Arabs much more frightening to individ- 
ual Israelis. It is in this new atmosphere that Mr. 
Kahane’s simple solution — to get rid of the 
Arabs — found its audience. 

What Mr. Kahane has done, according to 
Aviezer Ravitzky, professor of Jewish philoso- 
phy at the Hebrew University and a leader of 
the religious peace movement, is to create an 


tysJ 

is at the back of the minds of many 
“My is dear," he said. “I don't say 

we have to do something about the Arabs. I say 
we have a problem and here's my answer: 


But people only have one vote, and 1 ooald not 
beat Brain. He was a legend. When be left the 
scene I said tins is tbe first time we really hive a 
good chance." 

Since Mr. Kahane won his seat in parliament 



soldiers afraid, oar women afraid, our children w Knesset stationery under a government 
afraid. We left that in tbe ghetto.” 5 ^ The underlying is that his views 

A fourth factor that Israeli analysts say has ^ within the range of those legitimate to ex- 
pushed Mr. Kahane to the forefront is what they press in a democracy, Israeli analysts said, 
describe as a leadership vacuum in Israel P**" 
ticnlariy obvious on tbe right since Mr. Benin's 
retirement 

“Shamir never replaced 


as the super 

father, the strong figure, so Mr. Kahane did," 
said Mr. Ravitzky. Yitzhak Shamir succeeded 
Mr. fo-gin as a Likud prime ministe r and now is 
foreign minister in the national unity govern- 
ment with the Labor Party. 

“1 always said to our people that as long as 
Begin is around 1 am not going to get elected,” 


One recent afternoon, as Mr. Kahane was 
talking to a reporter in the hallway of parSa- 
ment . a group of Israeli Army officers in train- 
ing walked by on a tour. The last half of the line 
recognized Mr. Kahane and raised lbeir fists in 
solidarity, shooting, “Kahane, Kahane.” A 
broad grin crossed the rabbi’s face, and he 
responded by shaking his fists aloft. 

“I have the young people,” Mr. Kahane said. 
“That s for sure: They’re mine." 


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INTUEVEtn85 

International Telecommunications Conference 
Cannes, France, September 22-24,1 985 

Fcxusincj onlhe 
evolution, impact and 
future of competition 
in tne telecommunications 
industry worldwide. 


JombcxJersinttav^raH^ 
mu morions Id discuss tdeaxnmurications 
policy development in the US. f Europe and 
Asia and the global implications. 

The outstanding group of more then 
thirty speakers af this fourth annual confer- 
ence vwU indude: 

— Richard E Butler, Secretary General, Inter- 
national Telecommunication Union. 

— Bryan Carsberg, Director General, Oftel, 

UJC 

— SirDorv^Matic^.Chcanncriofthel^ 
dependent Commission for Worldwide Tele- 
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— Sir Eric Sharp, Chairman, Cable & Wire- 
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(Coa tinned from Page 1) 
published by the Georgetown Uni- 
versity Center for Strategic and In- 
ternational Studies. 

The Institute for European Eco- 
nomic Studies in London calculat- 
ed a higher figure,' saying that 
250,000 jobs would be lost in Brit- 
ain as a res ult of s anctions. 

UNITED STATES 

The United States is the second 
largest investor in South Africa, 
with between IS and 20 patent of 
total direct investment in the coun- 
try, according to a number of dif- 
ferent reports. 

U.S. dnect investment in South 
Africa has gone from $ 490 nuUitm 
in 1966 to a peak of S2.6 billion in 
1981, to $2J billion at the end of 
1983. 

South Africa accounts for about 
1 percent of total U.S. foreign in- 
vestment, according to the Investor 
sponsibflity Research Center in 
Washington, which describes itself 
as a nonprofit research body on 
issues of corporate and social re- 
sponsibility. 

When direct and indirect invest- 
ment are considered, tbe United 
States has about S13.78 billion in- 
vested in South Africa, according 
to a July 5 article in the Christian 
Science Monitor, which said it ob- 
tained the figure from the U.S. Em- 
bassy in London. 

The UJS. State Department said, 
however, that the figure for 1983 
was $2.3 billion in direct invest- 
ment and $7 billion in portfolios. 


for a total investment of $92 bil- 
lion. 

While figures vary, “the trend 
seems to be toward a decline in 
UJL investment by businesses," 
said Mr, Cbettk erf tbe Sdtoh Afri- 
ca Foundation, an agency based in 
W ashing ton representing South 
African^ businesses. 

‘The big U.& companies I’ve 
talked to have told me without ex- 
ception that they will remain in 
Smith Africa, but the smaller com- 
panies seem to think the harass- 
ment is not worth the candle," be 
said. 

The United States has been 
South Africa’s largest trading part- 
ner. South African exports to the 
United States were worth S1 j 45 bD- 
honlastyear, and imports from the 
United Stales totaled $227 Mhon. 

Pending U.S. legislation would 
impose a ban on the import of gold 
krugerrands and bait new UJS. 
bank loans to South Africa. 

WEST GERMANY 

West Germany wiafc« up about 
10 percent of total foreign invest- 
ment in South Africa. 

West Germany’s direct invest- 
ment in South Africa in 1983 was 
$1.4 billion, according to the South 
African Embassy m London. 

Investment by West German- 
based companies jumped about 30 ' 
percent in 1983, mainly because of 
increased investment m the auto- 
mobile industry, according to the 
report done by UN Coammssioa on 
Transnational Corporations- 

The International Monetary 


Fund said that in 1984 South Afri- 
can exports to West Gennany were 
S676 minion and its imports were 
S2J htffion. West Germany was 
South Africa’s fifth largest custom- 
er, behmd The United States, Ja- 
pan, Switzerland and Britain. 

The result of economic sanctions 
wouldbe thclossof 130,000 jobsin 
West Germany, according to die 
Institute of European Economic 
Studies in London. 

FRANCE 

France is said to make up be- 
tween 5 and 10 percent of total 
foreign investment in South Africa. 
In 1984, total French foreign in- 
vestment there was $1.66 USion 
and represented 10 percent of total 
direct investment, according to the 
French Embassy in Washington. 

Two weeks ago, the French gov- 
ernment announced it was freezing 
new investment in South Africa. 
The French amb assa d or to South 
Africa has been recalled. 

In the trade sector. Sooth Africa 
exports to France in 1984 totaled 
$385 million, and its imports from 
France came to $568 muhon. 

SWITZERLAND 

Experts estimate (hat about 5 
percent of total direct investment 
in South Africa is Swiss. 

The South Africa Trade Associa- 
tion in London reported that in 
1982 total Swiss investment is 
Sooth Africa was 5124 Ullkm. 

CANADA 

Canada’s direct investment in 
1984 was $99.9 million, down from 
$140 mfiHan in 1983 and $148 mil- 


lion in 1982, according to Clifford 
Garrard, political counselor at tbe 
Canadian Embassy in Washington. 

The Canadian snare of total for- 
eign investment in South Africa 
was 1 percent, he said, noting that 
the tread seems to be tawanLa 
dariitw m in ve stm ent. 

“I drink all the unrest in South 
Africa is a major detenmnmg fac- 
tor;” he sakL “It's a deterrent to 
i n vestors." 

Mr. Garrard Camut» did 
not offer Canadian businesses in- 
vesting in South Africa the support 
structures it normally offered com- 
panies investing abroad. 

JAPAN 

Official Japanese policy prohib- 
its direct investment m South Afri- 
ca, but it does not prohibit Japa- 
nese companies from establishing 
subsidiaries there. 

Mr. SL Jarre wrote: “By tbe ear- 
ly 1970s, all of Japan’s major trad- 
ing companies had estaUimed out- 
lets in South Africa ami many <rf its 
car, motorcycle, tire and electronic 
manufacturers bad franchised local 
companies to assemble their prod- 
ucts. All of the franchises are South 
African-owned and managed." 

South Africa crooned $12 bil- 
lion to Japan and unporlcd 51.9 
biffioa in 1984, according to the 
IMF. 

OTHERS 

Denmark and Sweden have 
banned new investment in South 
Africa, and tbe Dutch parliament 
has been dirimtinj a simila r mca- - 
sore. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1985 


Page 5 




ys Bulgaria Forces 
ange Names 


' Yodt Tima Service 
^ANKARA— Scaior Twtish of- 
•fcab assert that Bulgaria bL 
B&d at (east 

^ mtfusauA Several thousand 

m * canmaan to force Own 



- ^ P 1- ; 8 * 5 POttot of Bolgar- 

raspopulfflaoa, remain sealed^. 


Bulgaria has ngected Turkish re- 
qnwts for talks on the problem, as 
as an offer to accept Bulgaria’s 
ethnic Tories as immigrants. No re- 
ply has bees received to a letter 
1 xt Prcsidcat Kenan Evrca of Tur- 
key sent rariy this year to Todor 
Zhivkov, the Bulgarian leader. 

. TJto actions- Mwe renewed ten- 
sun between the two neighbors. 
Bulgaria, an ally of the Soviet 
ujwb; bred five milder 


tek “Even, lias I Wa ,u - 
0> *040. you would 

a legend. Whft, S i- 

J&ahane woe his seat m ^ 

^e»mg m poor neubbifcS - 

ag^onen- under 3eo ^j- 
POTing message » ihinJT : 
Arrange of those 

Israeli 2n&^ ; • 

slnficrnoon. as Mr. Kaj., : 




halfaft- :: 

rjjtm K a har .e anc raised ■■■ 

exoaei’ iite 'rabbi** £*?,. ( 
shaking his fi,a ^eft. ? 

iw3^pePrie.\\!r.K i j a H : : 
Mre. They're ^ 


Mith Africa 

5."_. • 1- 

jiao in 1 SS 2 . ^erds^s® 
Garrard, pc’ui:c a cotatm 1 
Cwariiag Et.?-s;;. tcWac .- 
' ThC-Cacaiar. '■ 

OfBiEwsLrr:: Li Sg&: 
yw ! pace::, zt saiiac 
the tread fcsz-j. » m w • 
denar' in inr*:-=r.:. 

:: *1 dxirLk :: :■ ±: ^se: 
Africa is a r.av: kicks 
ror“ he sa:; “!:‘j ’ csss 
awestirs." \ 

Mr. Osrr-'Z Cafc. Z 

Mt offer Cnaiai 
tasting v-'-" Af-csiss? y 
structures :: 

ponies evsfxiz ao.vii ; v 
J\P4N f 

.;0Clida;;a?5=fteK?S , 
iO dim: : ~ \ crrjrtr : z sp~ 
a. fcui •• "f '■ - 

oc« ecir.?u=:& :::» - 

riibsiiar.^ _ : 

Mr.si k-re ; 

iy j9to>. j; ? 

u^cerer--*'?' — '• 

tebinSiv* • 

aaittc-*- *•*■’• * — 'Z-*r. ■, 

ssmps^ic- v : 

Afoaa-O*^ •: 

ikh™. if • 

bail’s f 


Sedaf Sini Kadean testified be was not in Rome when Pope 
Jobn Paul II was shot, contratfictiiig Mehm^ Afi Agca. 

Turk Contradicts Agca 
On Role in Plot on Pope 

By John Tagliabuc ■ 

New York Times Service ,. 


< f 


ROME —A Turkish leftist who 
Mehmd Aft Agca has said was with 
him in Sl Peter’s Square on the day 
he shot Pt^e John jPinl H in 1981 
has testified that he last saw Mr. 
Agca in 1979 in Thrkey, and that he 
had never traveled outride Turkey 
before this week. ■ - 
Thetestmkoaycame 
the tori (rf-ei^t men;' i 
Mr. Agca, are accused of con- 
spiring to a ssassinate the popc. The 
focus of the testimony -by' Mr. 
Agca, the prosecutkm’s mam wit* 
ness, is that therdot was abetted by 
the Soviet Umbn^ through BolgariiL 
In pretrial testirUipaoy, Tie tdd 
Italian investigators that the Tink; 
Sedat Shri. Kadcrii, iriw is fiom 
.Maiatya^ Mr. Agfa’s, hometown, 
had taken him to Gaziantep. on the 
Syrian border^ea route to a Palesr 

amuner of 19T7^”aa^ kmpdnced 
him toTednn Tore, another Tudt ' 
. But Mr. Kadem, who described 
himself as a student and occarianal 
esupet mezciaht, . said .he had told 
the Turkish police after the shoot- 
ing of the popfe^that “Agca was 


until today.” He added that be had 
never bear outside Turkey before 
his appearance in Rome on Tues- 
day. 

Mr. Kadem; 30, lives in Istanbul. 
He volunteered to testify after Mr. 

Agca began aomring Tmn of Hmyt 

compHtily in the shooting. 

The other Ihrks who Mr. Aepa 
says were with Urn are Oral Ceftk, 
who is being tried in absentia, and 
Oiner Ay, who is serving a life sen- 
tence in Turkey for murder. 

: The court, winch is trying three 
Bulgarians and five Tads in the 
conspiracy case, is meeting in spe- 
cial session 'tins vkA, after ad* 
jouming in July until mid-Septem- 
ber. 

Eadier, Mr. Agca identified Mr. 
Kadem in photographs .taken by 
tourists on the dw of the shooting. 

' ’When' Judge T&ntiqrichi ariced 
Mr. Kadeni on Tuesday whether he 
knew the man ixnnled out in the 
photographs, Mr. Kadem, smflmg 
thinly, reptied: “That is not me, 
and 1 do not know who it is.” 

Mr. Kadem described himself as 
a political activist in the Revofai- 
tioiuuy Youth, a nwHfl in t arm of 
the luridrii People’s Liberation 
Movement. He said he had been 


Ottoman Empire rule, which even 
in casual conversations in Sofia is 
described as The Turkish yoke.” 
“There can be no good-neigh- 
borly relations for the foreseeable 
future,” a Turkish Foreign Minis- 
try official said last week. 

According to Turkish accounts, 
corroborated by Western embas- 
sies in Sofia, Bulgarian policemen 
and troops forced entire villages at 
a time to HD out or signfonns 
requesting that their Turkish 
names, mainly of Morion origin, 

be changed to Bul garia^ names , 

which are Slavic andaften drawn 
from the names of Christian saints. 

In many instances the Turks re- 
sisted. Although the Turkish au- 
thorities ray they have lists of 
names of people trilled or arrested, 
they declined to make than public, 

fam ili es of the^dead or detained. 
Bdene, a camp on a Danube island, 
is the main detention center. 

Last month, Bulgaria implicitly 
acknowledged that the name 

changes had been meeting resis- 
tance. Stoyan Stoyanov, party lead- 
er of the Khaskovo District, said in 
a speech that some ethnic Turks 
had not yet maimed enough politi- 
cally to accept new names. 

As reported in a local newspa- 
per, Mr. Stoyanov said there had 
been, “sporadic instances of anti- 
social meetings,” an apparent eu- 
phemism for protests. He said they 
had been the work of people favor- 
ing outdated traditions, such as re- 
ligious burials, circumcision and 
attendance at mosques. 

Mr. Stoyanov said such people 
should be subjected to political said 
atheistic education to strengthen 
their Bulgarian identity. 

Stanko Todorov, chairman of 
the National Assembly and a mem- 
ber of the Politburo, said in a 
in March, after Turkey had 
fend to accept ethnic Tuns as 
immigrants, that those who wanted 
to go to Turkey would be forcibly 
resettled within Bulgaria. As re 
ported bythe newspaper Slivensko 
Ddo of Sfiven, Mr. Todorov said: 
“Those who want to leave their 
villages to go to Turkey, we win 
move them within three or four 
hours. But they will be moved not 
to Turkey hut to other parts of. 
Bulgaria, where they will live in 
peace and tranquillity.” 

The Turkish officials said that 
Bulgaria had permitted no ethnic 
Tories to visit relatives in Turkey 
this year. Thousands were allowed 
to come last year. 

Similarly, Turkish truck drivers 
who cross Bulgaria on their way to 
Western Europe are no longer per- 
mittedtoleave themain highway to 
visit Turkish villages. : - 



'Mass Defections ’ Alarm 
U.K, Jewish Community 

Study Shows Numbers Are Sh rinking ; 
Drop in Religious Marriages Blamed 


By Alan Eisner 

Roam 

LONDON — Leaders in Brit- 
ain’s Jewish community are 
alarmed about a wave of secular- 
ization that is bringing about 
“mass defections' 


Flood waters poured into the road at the 
and high winds lashed Europe from Italy to 


Storms and Fires Hit Vacation Areas 
In Europe; More Than 20 Are Killed 


Catrpikd bf Oar Staff From Dispatches 

VIENNA — Storms packing 
high winds, heavy rain and even 
snow have swept Europe from Italy 
to Denmark this week, causing 
more than 20 deaths during the 
peak summer vacation season. 

At least 10 persons were killed as 
storms and torrential rains hit 
western Austria. Rainfalls contin- 
ued Wednesday, prompting wide- 
spread flooding. 

In Italy, the authorities said that 
six bodies were recovered after a 
wave of bad weather and brush 
fires hit the country on Tuesday, 
the total death toll to nine, 
heavy snow fell in the 
Italian Alps. 

Along the Mediterranean coast 
of France, high waves whipped up 
by the wind flooded beach camp- 
sites, trifling a young woman and 
injuring 12 other persons. 

Violent storms at sea sent the 
waves into the Rhfoe River delta 
region, which is filled with thou- 
sands of campers at the height of 
the summer. Witnesses said the 
waves reached heights of eight feet 
(2.4 meters) as they broke along six 
moles (10 kilometers) of the Ca- 
mar giie coast late Monday night 
and early Tuesday. 

On the French Mediterranean is- 
land of Corsica, three major forest 
fires continued to rage Wednesday, 
officials said. 

On the mainland, two fire- 


fighters died battling a blaze north 
of Saint Tropez. 

This rash of fires, propelled by a 
strong northerly mistral wind, 
came less than a week after a fire in 
the hills above flamM-s claimed the 
lives of five firemen. 

The harsh weather also hit skiers 
and climbers in the French Alps, 
where rescue teams were searching 
for two climbers missing since 
Tuesday. High winds prevented he- 
licopters from joining (he search, 
officials said. 

Tracked vehicles rescued about 


on the 1 1 ,000-foot-high (3^0l)-me- 
ter-high) Jandri glacier in Savoy on 
Tuesday. 

Fires destroyed several thousand 
acres of woods in various regums of 
Spain, forcing the evacuation of 
several villages but causing no inju- 
ries. Dense ash clouds darkened the 
sky over the Mediterranean resorts 
of CasteQdn and Benicasim. 


chiding four West Germans whose 
car plunged into a swollen moun- 
tain creek. 

Two people, including a rescue 
worker, died in Salzburg province 
and one person in Upper Austria. 

As the rains spread to the East, 
the Danube and its tributaries rose 
to flood levels, overflowing farm- 
land and houses in low-lying areas. 

A flood alert was annlmmeeri in 
several areas, including Klostcr- 
neuburg, six miles norm of Vienna. 

In Italy, fires fanned by the wind 
near the village of Marina di Cam- 
po on the the island of Flhn sur- 
rounded and trapped a group of 
young vacationers, killing three 
and seriously burning two others. 

In southern Italy, two swimmers 
drowned in waves whipped up by 
winds and two others were missing 
in the Ionian Sea. 

A man was killed hy li ghtning in 

the Tuscan hills outside Florence, 

while a hydroelectric worker was dren and grandchildren live in af- 


A study conducted by the demo- 
graphic unit of the Board of Depu- 
ties of British Jews said the Jewish 
community shrank by about 21 
percent in the past two decades to 
an estimated 3J7.000. 

The report said four factors con- 
tributed to the decline: 

• Deaths among an a g in g popu- 
lation. 

• A kw birth rate. 

• Emigration. 

• Intermarriage and assimila- 
tion. 

“The decline in religious mar- 
riages among Jews was faster and 
steeper than m the general popula- 
tion,” the survey discovered. 

“Since the synagogue-married 
popujatian is the main source of 
recruitment for the community ami 
the main resource for all cnmnumpl 
activities, political, cultural, «*«l 
and charitable, as well as religious, 
this is a serious problem," the re- 
port said. 

■ Lionel Kqpdowitz, newly elect- 
ed president of the Board of Depu- 
ties, attributed the decline to the 
comfortable life enjoyed by most 
British Jews. 

“In the past, we had to fight for 
the right to be equal,” he said. 
“Now our major concern is how to 
be equal but different.” 

“They say that one in three 
young people marries outside the 
community. It's catastrophic. Only 
by educating our children about 
theix heritage can we stem the 
flow” said Mr. Kopelowhz. 

Most British Jews emigrated 
from Czarist Russia at the end rtf 
the 19th centmy. They lived in 
slums in London’s East End, but 
their culture was vibrant, highly 
political and fervently Jewish. 

Today little of that culture re- 
mains. The majority of their chil- 


swept to his death by swiftly rising fluent suburbs. 


between Denmark and Sweden, 
birds soiled by an oil spill were shot 
by the hundreds, and experts said 
as many as 20,000 birdsnright die. 

Wind had aggravated the spill of 
fuel oil from a West German tank- 
er, Jan of Bremen, that struck a 
lighthouse during the weekend. 
But Austria was the worst Ml 
I n -the western Tyrol 
alone, seven persons died 
in weather-related accidents, me 


The dry, gusty arocco wind from 
North Africa stirred up clouds of 
dust near Rome as well as sparking 
fires from Fnggia, 225 miles south- 
east of Rome to outside Florence, 
141 miles to the north. 

On the island of Elba, west of the 


They have gained pro minence in 

virtually every sphere of British life 
from business to politics and the 
arts, but many have lost or re- 
nounced thrir Jewish identity in the 
process. 

“There must be 150,000 Jews on 


Italian mainland, a fire killed two the periphery who take no part in 
persons — one a teen-age bay who Jewish life,” said the pariiamentari- 
appareotly rode Ms motorsoooter an of the Labor Party, GrcviDeJaii- 
too near the flames. aer ' who is past president of the 

(AP, UPI, Reuters) Board of Deputies. 


The British Jewish community 

still controls impressive financial 

resources and can wield consider- 
able political clout 

“It’s one of the best-organized 
communities in world Jewry," said 
Shimon Cohen, director of the Of- 
fice of the Chief Rabbi. 

“It runs a kind of mini-welfare 
stare, providing for the old, blind, 
deaf and handicapped, organizing, 
cultural activities for aB ages ana 
for every conceivable shade of po- 
litical and religious opinion,” he 
said. 

The powerhouse of British Jewry 
is generally acknowledged to be the 
Joint Israel Appeal, a group that 
raises the equivalent of 556 milli on 
annually for IsraeL 

But the events of recent years, 
especially the 1982 Israeli invasion 
of Lebanon, have Hirwrwt the tradi- 
tional loyalty to Israel Mr. Cohen 
acknowledged that the war in Leb- 
anon has hurt “a great deaL" 

One sign of the weakening at- 
traction of Israel is a growing de- 
bate within the. community on 
whether some of ihe money raised 
by the appeal ought to stay in Brit- 
ain. 

“Even the businessmen now real- 
ize that r aising money for Israel is 
not enough and that without edu- 
cation, the future of the community 
is threatened,” Mr. Cohen said, 
adding that several leaders of the 
appeal had formed an organization 
to promote more Jewish schools. 

Thirty-five percent of the Jewish 
children attend religious day 
schools. With two new secondary 
schools planned for London by 
1988, the number is expected to 
rise. 

“The key question, which will 
determine our future as a commu- 
nity, is whether our efforts today in 
Jewish education will pay off to- 
morrow,” Mr. Kopelowitz said. 

“If a person who has knowledge 
of Judaism rqects it, 1 would view 
that as a matter of regret," he said. 
“But what would bother me deeply 
would be for people to leave Juda- 
ism without ever having had the 
chance to find out what they were 
abandoning." 

43 Arrested in Drag Scheme 

The Associated Press 

ATLANTA — Forty-three per- 
sons, including 12 doctois and 13 
pharmacis ts, were charged Tuesday 
in an alleged scheme to obtain pre- 
scription drugs at discount paces 
ana resell them, sometimes under 
false labels, federal officials said. 
Drugs valued at $620,000 were 
seized. 


Russia Spurns U.S, Offer 
To Observe Nuclear Test 


. M* «■ M * . ,« _ f r_ _ V\_1 V KM I vui. aav »ww i uv imiu um*u 

tdlmghes" about ttKtnpw a M- deuin^immemus times m the lau 
estimap.camp aim that he.knew 1970s by the Turkish police and 


Mr. Tore “pnty from newspaper 
reports.” - . - ' 

YakmOzbey. aTurirish rightist 
now sentipg-a jail sentence in west 
Germany on a drug charge said 
later that. Mr. had accom- 

Mr. Agca to Sl Peter’s, 
;ari the day of the shooting. 
After first denying this, Mr. 
Agca later tdd the court that It was 
true.. , : 

Asked by Chief Judge Severino 
Santiapicm whether he had ever 
obtained a passport to' travel 
abroad, Mr. Kadem replied, ^lo, 


was acquitted in 1 984 on charges of 
possessing more than four kilo- 
grams (8.8 pounds) of drugs. 

- He raid he and Mr. Agca had 
been classmates and be described 
Mr. Agca as a “man of no quality” 
who had “mental deficits." As an 
example, he cited what he said had 
been Mr. Agca’s delight as a youth 
in hearing stories about the Nazi 
campaign to exterminate die Jews. 

At that point, Mr. Agca leaped 
to Ms feet and shouted, “Political 
power cannot have recourse to hu- 
man psychology!” 


United Press ftaavadantd 

MOSCOW — The Soviet Union, 
spuming President Ronald Rea- 
gan's invitation to observe an un- 
derground midear test in Nevada, 
urged the United States on 
Wednesday to adopt a “responsi- 
ble” approach to nuclear experi- 
ments. 

In an editorial, the Communist 
Party newspaper, Pravda, dis- 
i the U.S. invitation as a pub- 


weapon tests by sendMg its observ- 
ers to the Nevada testing ground,” 


the 


said. 


want nothing less than 
that the Soviet Union, winch uni- 
laterally stopped nudear 
sioos, bless American nn< 


IMF 

Per.: 

Naar.n’. 

Africa- 

aas 


OTHE3> ; . 

;p - .. j ’ 



r* fr ■ 

FSi .i;:^sTSSS^ : 


_.F----^rr3C0F 

OK. 

1 


Reagan Letter Splits U.S. Governors 

By Phil Galley 

New York Tones Service 
BOISE, Idalw— A bitter politi- 
cal dispute has disrupted a meeting 
of- the nation’s governors, with 
Democrats forcing Republicans to 
withdraw a fund-raising letter 
aigned by President Ronald Rea- 
gan that one governor described as 
“a pack of Hes.” ’ 

After three hours of negotiations 
Tuesday that delayed the dose of 
the annual porivention of the Na- 
tional Governors Association, Re- 


mafling of the Tetter in which Mr. 


i 


m \ 


■ !r 

' rSEWfe. 


dois of blocking his efforts to bal- 
ance the budget 

Governor Richard L Thom- 
burgh of Pennsylvania, chairman 

of the R^bBcan Governors Asso- 

dation, read a statement that said, 

m part: “The letter was not intend- 
ed to unfairly —and I repeat, un- 


fairly — characterize the position 
or record of any particular Demo- 
cratic governor and we obviously 
don't believe we should do so.” 

Later, Governor Charles S. 
Robb, a Democrat of ^ Virginia, said 
that Mr. Thornburgh's statement 
“represents a clear victory for the 
bipartisan process” of the gover- 
nors’ association. 

The Republican Governors As- 
sociation sent out I20JXX) copies of 
the fund-raising letter earn last 
month and, before Tuesdays de- 
velopment, planned to mail 80,000 
more this month, according to Tim 
Crawford, the group's finance di- 
rector. Mr. Crawford said that the 
White House had “OJC’d the lector 


plans aimed at balancing the feder- 
al budget" 

Mr. Reagan also said in the letter 
that Democratic governors had 
wiped out the benefits of federal 
income tax cots by raising state 
taxes. 

“Clearly," the letter continued, 
“the huge majority of Democratic 
governors represent the last un- 
challenged stronghold of the liberal 
tax-ana-spend philosophy that 
nearly brought America to its 
knees.” 

The letter touched a sensitive po- 
litical nerve among Democratic 
governors, many of whom are fac- 
ing re-election next year, and it 
threatened to »n terming the bipar- 
tisan tradition and harmony of the 


S. Gorbapev, the Rus- 
sian leader, announced last month 
that the Soviet Union would halt 
nudear tests after Aug. 6. the anni- 
versary of the atomic bombing of 
Hiroshima. He said it would rib- 
serve the unilater al test ban until 
Jan. 1, 1986. 

Pravda said, “The United States 
shows race again that it is not seek- 
ing to discuss in a businesslike and 
concrete way and, most important, 
to resolve practically, the issues re- 
lated to the nnnlwir arms timft a- 
tion." 

Pryvdp dismiss ed armni eu tS that 
an agreement on verification of a 
test ban must be signed before 
WasMngton would stop testing. 

“It is dear, even to a layman, 
that a nudear blast is not a child's 
cracker and one cannot miss it or 
fail to hear it,” Pravda said. Vcifi- 
cation and control it said, were not 
the real issues. 

Compliance “can be undoubted- 
ly ensured with the help of existing 
national technical means of con- 
trol,” it said. 

“They in Washington continue 
to stick stubbornly to the course 
toward continuing the race of ar- 
maments, building up nudear arse- 
nals and perfecting nnrfcar weap- 
ons,” the newroaper said. 

It said tiffi United States “should 
realize the rides which accompany 
the continuation of the militari st 
course.” 


ami gave us the president's signa- governors' association, 
rare.* The convention's host governor. 

In (he letter, Mr. Reagan asset- John V. Evans of Idaho, said the 
ed that Democratic governors had letter comamed “a pack of lies” 
“teamed up with other liberal that Mr. Reagan “is trying to make 
Democratic leaders to Mode our believable^ 


Seoul May Re-educate Demonstrators 



**: 

— - f —--TV * -. 

•■are •: 








John 

Washington Post 

SEOUL — The South Korean 
government is conadering passing 
flaw to provide for the ptfitical re- 
education of radical studmtsm- 
volved in anti-govenHn^pro“^> 
according to Korean and Western 
sources here. , . .. 

TT^predsefonntbelawwo^i 

rake remains unclear. But accord- 
ing to one Western diplomat, there 

more special camps to vrfuch (rf 
fSgstodents wc^beratto 
iSSfc notified ideas dUfid. 

AltemativeS; v slnde "£J 
main free but be required to attoid 

Se ^JSmnent officials d<$cj 
>sed “campus stabilization 
as. a humane alternative to 


students under stringent 
security and anti-Commu- 
nist laws, which provide for heavy 
prison terms and criminal records. 

South Korean officials often see 
the country’s student movement. in 
terms of naive young people fram- 
ing their fives” after bring seduced 
by false ideas. 

**The purpose is to prevent 
the growth of left-leamng ideolo- 
ey "aid Kim Si Bek, a spokesman 
f^Lhe Ministry of Education, and 

to set up a system to turn bade their 
wav of tMnfcing to a safer side- 
W fhe lrnTnowbeing detatedm- 
skJc the government and ruling 
- «~*u cranes m 


Its adoption is not assured, how- 
ever. In the National Assembly it is 
certain to raise strong protests from 


be opposed in some normally pro- 
governmeni aides. 

The proposal for re-edneation is 
highly sensitive in Seoul, due in 
part to the concept's association 
with Communist systems. South 
Korea's 


response to escalating oobobu^ 
the government of 
president Ctwa Doo Hwan, a for- 
mer army general. 


reported that a new campos law is 
bong considered but it has said 
nothing directly about the reedu- 
cation concept. 

By most accounts, only a small 
fraction of South Korea’s 900,000 
college and university students are 

faking part in the protests. Still, 
government figures show that 1,792 
student raffles were held in the first 
six months of this year. ■ 



yjaccakat 

30 bis. Rue de Paradis 
75010 PARIS 

(thru the archway) 

Tel.: 770 64 30 

When in Paris... 
visit dur Museum 
and showrooms 

Open Monday * Friday 
. 9tm.lo6pjn. 

Saturday 10 - 12 am - 2- 5 pjn. 
Abo in selected stores 
near your home. 
Catalogue on request 


WHY THE OWNER 
OF A PATEK PHILIPPE HAS MORE 
THAN JUST MONEY’S WORTH. 



The Golden Ellipse. 

Tt takes nine months 
shown here. Some- 
complicated Patek Philippe 
Every element is micro- 
ance which represents 
hair. Every wheel, gear; 
until it is virtually friction- 
just as most Patek 
from one generation 
Patek Philippe watch- 
heirlooms that have 
dispensable. 

After 600 hours 
as near absolute per- 
can achieve, each 
it takes less than a 



complete the Golden Ellipse 
even several years for a 

-odd. 

copically hand-finished to a toier- 
Vaction of the thickness of a human 
pinion and cog is polished by hand 

Philippes are handed down 
the next, so are the tools that 
makers use to perfect them - 
1 become as precious as they are in- 



of testing, regulating and refining to 
fection as human hands and minds 
watch is lubricated so delicately that 
cupful of oil for an entire year’s production. 

Everything about agold Patek Philippe that can be gold, is gold - 1 8 ct. gold - 
right down to the dial, the winding crown, the strap buckle, and the spring bars 
that hold the strap to the watch. In automatic Patek Philippes, even the winding 
rotors are of solid gold, since the additional weight increases the winding 
ffiriency. 

But the real cost is in the time, patience, traditionand absolute dedi- 
cation to flawlessness that makes it a Patek Philippe. 

Like any other work of art by an acknowledged master, a Patek 
ippe appreciates in value because the scarcity of such quality is grow- 
ing at a disheartening rate. 

Thus, if you are aiming for perfection you need patience. Persev- 

erance too. And perhaps a streak of the stubbornness required to 
achieve the best things in life. But isn’t it this that relates Patek Philippe 
watches to their owners? 

Which makes one think ... why not invest in a Pktek Philippe? 


A 


PATEK 

PHILIPPE 


GENEVE 


Wh 1$ loi coidoguo to. 

Porek Pinkppe 5 A *:* fus du B"6n© Ch-i?*' 


>e"e/o 2 


FOR MASTERS OF THEIR TIME. 






THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1985 


Rerafo 


INTERNATIONAL 


Pnbfabed With The Npw York Hon and Hv WuUngkxi Post 


! Hr TMUngbm Post I Nonprottferation Will Have to Be Vertical 


MSshnsasb 
In lien cl 


Let Garda Pass the Word 


aSHINGTON — On Aug. 27 toe j 26 B y Elliot L. Richardson 


ons." The study urges the United Sates to re- 
sume and pursue seriondy its test oan_ treaty 

. . .< J :<L >L> Tlnvun lltul TtfltSUL 


The Third World’s debt crisis will echo 
round the planet for years. In Latin America 
and elsewhere, television relays attacks by 
local politicians on the rich creditors in 
general and the Interna tional Monetary 
Fund in particular. The international bank- 
ers try to play it philosophically in their 
pariorc, maintaining that patience, quiet ne- 
gotiation and a touch of economic ortho- 
doxy can cure all financial ills. But the 
public, in both north and south, reacts un- 
easily. The struggling citizens of the indebt- 
ed countries wonder confusedly why poverty 
and hyperinflation persist whether their rul- 
ers are imposed by the military or elected at 
the ballot box. Elsewhere, depositors large 
and small wonder bow safe tbar money is in 
banks that lend it out abroad. 

The leaders of the indebted countries, and 
the bankers and governments to whom the 
debt is owed, must be judged by their deeds, 
not their words. Led by Brazil. Mexico and 
Argentina, Third World governments have 
taken important action to try to get inflation 
and debt under control, with help from the 
IMF and flanking moves by the internation- 
al banking system to reduce their more im- 
mediate obligations. Inevitably, the hard- 
ships resulting from the past provoke hard 
words against an international monetary 
system alleged to be only to the benefit of 
the rich. This system insists on reasonable 
sanctity of contract — in this case (he con- 
tract between borrower and lender. 

More hard words are in the pipeline, be- 
cause more hardships are. Debt problems 
for which no quick and easy solutions are in 
sight are still welling up — in Egypt and 
Nigeria, for example, where falling oil prices 
are exacerbating an already painful situa- 
tion, and in IsraeL, where the fog of war and 
internal political dispute push financial pru- 
dence well down the scale of values. 

Peru has now entered the disputed arena 
with ah the charisma of its new 36-year-old 
president. Alan Garda Perez’s decision to 


limit debt servicing to 10 percent of Peru’s 
export earnings over the next year is the 
nearest that any country has recently come 
to unilateral repudiation. At the same time, 
Mr. Garda asserted Pern's intention eventu- 
ally to honor all its obligations, turning his 
back on the siren calls from Fidd Castro, 
who wants aQ Latin American debtors to 
renege and sgn up as outposts of the Soviet 
Union (which doesn't believe in default). 
Equally interesting, Mr. Garda promised a 
program of economic reform that would be 
applied without the intervention of the IMF. 

Mr. Gar da, too, must be judged by his 
eventual actions, not his present words. A 
young president must be allowed exuberant 
statements for home consumption, just like 
the elderly presidents. When it comes to 
devising stabilization programs, be might be 
as capable as the IMF staff. His unilateral 
near-repudiation of imme diate debt may be 
less wise: For years to come Peru is going to 
depend on foreign capital, mainly from the 
private market, and his inaugural address 
will not help here. Perhaps one should not 
worry too much. In a year or so he may And 
scope for statesmanlike re-entry mto good 
relationships with the IMF and the banks. 

But deep down, in the messages from Pent 
and other debtors, a fallacy cries out for 
correction. Is it true that the IMF — suppos- 
edly the tool of rich governments and thezr 
hard-faced bankers — is unnecessarily im- 
posing deflationary conditions on the poor? 
The argument is suspect. 

What a country can spend to support jobs 
and Jiving standards depends on what it can 
produce and borrow. Letting inflation rip 
will encourage neither, because it discour- 
ages productive investment, savings at hone 
and capital from abroad. This should be the 
message to Mr. Garcia, and from him to his 
friends in the developing world. The rich can 
hdp the poor in many ways — but only if 
they help themselves. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


more to the point, has not achieved to date. At 
stake will be the future of multilateral efforts to 
constrain nuclear weapons and keep local wan 
from becoming global confrontations. 

The review conference is likely to be content* 
nous. The 1970 treaty is an inherently lopsided 
document, under which only the United States, 
the Soviet Union, Britain, France and China are 


Krmitied to possess nuclear weapons. In return 
or this restraint by the nonnuclear parties, the 


The Greenback in Hock 


nudear weapons states have pledged under Arti- 
cle 6 to pursue good-faith negotiations leading to 
disarmament. Nothing could be more damaging 
to the nonproliferation regime than for the nucle- 
ar weapons stales to assume an air of complacen- 
cy — as if tbar jpale efforts to reduce nudear 
arms should satisfy the rest of the world that they 
had lived up to their end of the bargain. 

At the second of the five-year treaty review 
conferences, in 1980, the failure of the weapons 
states to live up to their disarmament pledge 
made agreement on a final document impossible. 

Since then the United States has broken off 
negotiations wjhtb the Soviet Union and Britain 
on a comprehensive test ban treaty, winch most 
non- weapons states see as the key stqj to fulfill- 
ing the obli g ations of Article 6. The Soviet dele- 
gations watted away from strategic and theater 
nuclear anus negotiations, then returned with a 
prickly attitude. And the Reagan administra- 
tion’s emphasis on the Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive has added fuel to an already intense Soviet- 
U.S. arms competition in outer space. If these 
trends are not reversed soon, the nonprolifera- 
tion treaty may not survive past 1995, when its 
signatories must decide whether to renew it 
The alternatives are frightening. Experts esti- 
mate that by the year 2000 more than 30 coun- 
tries will have the capability to build nuclear 
weapons. The detonation of a single nuclear 
weapon in a volatile region, snefa as the Middle 
East or South Aria, could spark a global holo- 
caust. Meanwhile, the development of nudear 
capabilities by ever more countries douds the 
international climate, raises the stakes in region- 
al disputes and further unravels the postwar 
system of norms and institutions that has pre- 
vented small conflicts from escalating 
A report issued last June by the United Na- 
tions Association of the UJLA. provides a series 
of recommendations for U.S. policy that would 
help reassure the world that the United Stales is 
senous about arms control. The report, ‘‘Nudear 
Proliferation: Toward Global Restraint,’’ was 
the end product of a nationwide study that for 


the first tune involved a broad cross section of 
American society in a detailed examination of 
the policy questions that arc involved in Hying to 
control the spread of nudear weapons. 

Panels from communities around the country 
agreed overwhdmindy that, as the Pasadena 
study panel noted in its contribution, “the prob- 
lem of midear proliferation cannot he treated in 
isolation" and America "cannot expect to hold 
the line on horizontal proliferation when it con- 
tinues to increase its own stock of mickar weap- 


drawing in the other nudear weapons states if 
possible. Once achieved, a test ban treaty should 
be opened for signature by all countnes. 

At the time, major new efforts shouw&e 
n yiHf to reach an agreement to halt the proanc- 
tion of fissionable material for weapon purposes. 
This would comply with tire arms control i* 


directly affect the 
availability of nuclear weapons matenaJ for Ott- 


er nations. If production is 
States and the Soviet Union 


the United 
y to induce 


heavy casualties can be soot notaii 
tactical mhgudgEwmt but ui gafcmf 
effort. Not so with Med dqatafflacjj; 
scarcely anybody says “nice tty,- 
“Retreat” mils “defeat,* whkfc ht 



the other n pdear weapons states to do likewise. 

Cooperative international efforts have been 
remarkably successful in slowing dm ® 

the number of countries that moose to buna 

mirUar weapons. An edifice of international in- 
stitutions, treaties and export agreements has 
constructed, and has helped m ak e the ac- 
quisition of Tiririfcftr weapons a t e chnically more 
difficult and politically more risky. Bui wc must 
avoid complacency or a false sense of security. 

It is ti me to redouble multilateral efforts to 
inhibit further proliferation before it is too late. 


There fe; tire cane of the mow 


By Ban In SOddautscha Zaituna (MunlchJ. 
C ar t o onists & Writers Syndicate. 


77* W Her, a former U.S. cabinet member and 
ambassador, is chairman of die United Nations 
Association of the U.SLA. He contributed this com - . 
ment to the Los Angeles Times. 


Moscow’s Moratorium Is Progress 

By Eugene J. Carroll 



W ASHINGTON — Mikhail Gorbachev’s 
suroririne announcement on July 29 of a 


W surprising announcement on July 29 of a 
unilateral moratorium on nudear testing has just 
as suddenly aud surprisriigly become a nanevent. 
In an alarming display Of unanimi ty, the major 
American print and electronic news organiza- 
tions have uncritically promoted the White 
House view that the Soviet initiative is nothing 
more than a propaganda ploy. 

In truth, Moscow’s firm commitment to halt 
all nudear tests from Aug. 6 to next Jan. 1 even if 
America continues an active nuclear test pro- 
gram is the only significant aims control devel- 
opment mice SALT-2 was signed rix years ago. 

During the last 15 years, aS arms control 
efforts nave been within the “talk-test-buOd” 
format. While talks drag on, both superpowers 


States ou nested 


test and build new, more destructive systems far 
faster than they agree on measures to limit them. 
In consequence, each side has tripled the number 
of strategic warheads it aims at the other despite 
12 arms agreements signed in the last 15 years. 

Now Moscow is committed to stop all tests for 
at least five months, and for as long thereafter as 
the United States refrains from testing. Negotia- 
tions can go forward at Geneva with both parties 
confident that the other cannot be testing new 
devices to gain some theoretical advantage. For 
the first time in tbc nudear age, agreements can 
be readied that would actually reduce the num- 
ber of nudear weapons rather than merely set 
high upper limits on new weapons. 

If outing without simultaneously testing new 
weapons could lead to genuine arms reductions, 
why does the Reagan administration rq’ect tins 
opportunity out of hand? None of its stated 
reasons survive dose examination. 

The Reagan administration charges that Mos-' 
cow broke the last test moratorium, in 1961. 
False. Tboe was no moratorium to break. In 
December 1959, President Eisenhower ended the 
1958 moratorium by formally stating that the 
United States considered itself free to resume 
testing. Moscow was under no legal or ethical 
restriction to refrain from testing in 1961,partio 
ulariy after issm'ng repeated protests against 
French nudear tests that began m 1960. 

The Reagan administration also asserts that 


The exchange rate of the UJ>. dollar has 
been declining at a dignified and tolerable 
pace for about five months. So far it is down a 
little more than 10 percent from the peak in 
early March. That means it still needs to crane 
down another 25 percent or so to reach the 
dollar's actual value in terms of the goods that 
Americans export and import. 

If the rate comes down too slowly, the over- 
priced dollar will continue to generate tremen- 
dous trade deficits and, in Congress, protec- 
; tionist legislation. If it comes down too fast it 
will create a surge of inflation as imports 
suddenly become mare expensive; and that 
; would be followed by sharply rising interest 
■ rates. The past half year’s decline seems to 
have been at just about the right pace — fast 
enough to show visible improvement, but 
’ without malign side effects. The question is 
. whether it is going to keep going that way. 

Exchange rates are now being set in the 
• mmute-to-imnute trading among banks and 
. brokers that deal in foreign currencies. Since 
last winter, foreigners have become a little less 
.' wildly enthusiastic about holding dollars. One 
prominent reason is that interest rates in 
! America have been falling, making investment 
’ slightly less inviting. Another is that these 
. foreign investors already hold enormous num- 
bers of dollars, and tbdr eagerness to keep 
, adding to those holdings at last year's rate 


seems to have weakened mar ginally . That 
slight cooling of ardor is faithfully reflected in 
the daily movements of the exchange rales. 

Americans need about S2 billion a week in 
credit from foreigners to finance their trade 
deficit. The foreigners arc making Americans 
pay a little more for their money as the dollar 
keeps dedining a little ai a time, from week to 
week. It has all been very orderly aud serene. 

So why worry? Because the next step in this 
process is always unpredictable. If the eco- 
nomy begins to grow faster this autumn, as 
the Reagan administration expects, corporate 
profits wfll improve and interest rates wul rise. 
That could reverse the trend in the foreign 
exchange markets, sending the dollar higher 
and foreshadowing still wider trade deficits 
and still more vehement political reactions 
against imports. That is the nature of the 
dilemma in which America now finds itself. 

The real point of vulnerability is the weekly 
52 billion of foreign leading that the United 
States must have, regardless of cost, to finance 
its trade deficit As long as it needs that mon- 
ey, its economy will operate subject to terms 



By KobovoaM In MaMdil Shim bun {Tokyo). 


the Soviet Union gained a major advantage by its 
surprise resumption of tests m September 1961. 
False. From Sept- 1. 1961, until the end of 
atmospheric testing on Aug. 5, 1963, the United 
States ou nested the Soviet Union at a rate of 
nearly two to cue — that is, 137 to 71. 

It is contended that the Soviets conducted a 
spurt of testing immediately before declaring the 
moratorium, thus gaining an advantage over the 
United States. False. According to US. Energy 
Department announcements, America has con- 
ducted nine tests and the Soviet Union only four 
in all of 1985. Authorities in Sweden report four 
recent Soviet tests not yet announced by the 
department America, with about 765 tests, re- 
tains a solid lead over the Soviet Union with 564. 

Why does the administration raise these argu- 
ments against an end to nudear testing? The 
answer is provided in a June 17 letter, written on 
behalf of President Reagan by Frank J. Gaffney 
Jr., deputy assistant secretary of defense, to the 
Center for Defense Information. Mr. Gaffney 
says that "nuclear testing is indispensable to 
nuclear weapon development,” In other words, 
the a dm i ni s tra tion is determined to expand its 

order to derelop the new weapons. 

How can the media accept the White House 
contention that the Kremlins declaration of a 
unilatera l moratorium on testing is mere propa- 
ganda? The Russians have committed themselves 
to forgo the nudear testing that Mr. Gaffney says 
is “indispensable to nudear weapon develop- 
ment-” They have broken die sterile talk-test- 
build format of arms control negotiations. 

An end to nudear testing is not a panacea that 
will instantly make us all safe in a world with 
50,000 nudear weapons, but it is an essential and 
practical step to slow, stop and reverse the node- . 
ar arms race: The Soviet proposal deserves fair, ' 
objective debate. It may be the moa important 
arms control development of the decade. ' 


At the end of the rood, 
theoretically, lies a 
physical blockade . . . 


The writer, a retired rear admiral, is deputy 
director of die Center • for Defense Information, a 
private organization Inal researches and analyzes 
military policies and spending. He contributed this 
comment to The Hew York Times. 


set by the perceptions and prejudices of for- 
eim investors. The United States is now a 


eign investors. The United States is now a 
debtor nation, and debtors have to realize that 
their debts always mean a certain unwelcome 
loss of control over their affairs 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Don’t Expect Juicy Chunks in the Stockman Broth 


cared about morality, they would not 
be tightening the screws of apartheid 
And yet, tf you were looking at the 
collective performance of the US. 
government in recent days from the 
perspective of the powers that be in 
South Africa, you would wonder 
what there was to worry about. You 
know that Americans are outraged by 
the trill the iaDinjs and the re- 
presstoMmt what do you see? 

You see the House of Representa- 
tives voting overwhelmingly for rela- 
tively modest and selective economic 
sanctions, with the promise of a grad- 
ual ti ghtening if the South Africans 
do not shape up in one way or anotb- 
. er withm a year. You hear this action 
described by the rhnimum of the 
House Foreign Affairs Comminee as 
“a moral statement that far exceeds 
economic leverage." And then you 
see the Senate knuckling under in the 
threat of a filibuster and putting off 
.ritswwn vote' until September, after it 
has bad a vacation And you bear the 
White House threatening that the 
president wffl veto the bill and seek to 
regain the initiative by using execu- 
tive authority to impose sanctions. 

That is not exactly carrying a big 
stick. It is not even speakmgkxrdly 
with one voice. Rather, it is a classic 
example erf bow competition for do- 
mestic political advantage can make 
mush erf foreign policy. 

The mush gets even mushier in 
light of the dismal history of econom- 
ic sanctions as a conclusive instru- 


M 

! k 


rv 






W ASHINGTON — An informal 
auction among publishers has 


He Needn’t Have Waited 


YV auction among publishers has J 

produced the hilarious result of win, which reflects his understanding 


By George F. Will 


The tiny skin cancer that President Reagan president waited for a reporter to ask about his 


disclosed on Monday, although it comes after health. And wait is just what Mr. Reagan did. 


his colon cancer operation, appears wholly 
coin d dental. Cancers of this sort present no 
great risk, at least no medical risk. But the 
White Home plainly fears risk of a different 
kind. Spokesmen have been uniafarmative, 
even truculent on the subject, and thus the 
president's news conference offered an unusu- 

• al biopsy of the political moment. 

It is easy to imagine Reagan aides debating 

; damage control cm the health issue. Should a 

■ spokesman volunteer the information about 
(he skin cancer on the president’s nose? Proba- 
bly not. It would better demonstrate that the 

■ problem is uuly minor if the president were to 
say so in person. All right, but should he 

,* volunteer the information? Probably not It 

* would very likely attract less attention if the 


The minutes and the questions passed on 
Monday without a word about the president’s 
health — until at last someone asked him 
about it and his relief showed: "Well, I'm glad 
that you finally got around to that subject and 
asked that question. I was worrying.” 

For anyone concerned about Mr. Reagan's 
health, that comment offered reassurance. 
When the president is more worried about 
public relations than health, it says something 
positive about his health. But it also says 
something negative about his public relations. 

Mr. Reagan is 74, and it would be a miracle 
if he escaped all the* infirmities of old age. 
These need not be disabling, but only a policy 
of forthrightness wiD maintain confidence that 
his capacities remain unimpaired. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


a $2_5-miIlion contract from Harper 
& Row for David Stockman's mem- 
oirs. He deserves the money as de- 
ferred compensation. Government 
service has been costing him $1 mil- 
lion a year in salary forgone. And be 
needs it, since his current occupation. 


When I called to congratulate him, 
he had just finished the morning 


that in contemporary government 
honest mistakes arc more important 
than dishonorable motives. 

His bode wiD be valuable as a 
study of intellectual chemistry — 
what happens to ideas in the heat and 
pressure of the political crucible. But 
it wiD not be a page-turner full of 

T„ 


52.5-imllion title should be ”1116 
candor in private councils. Such can- OMB Diet for Thin Thighs." A long 


ment of policy. At most the effects 

coin's Vcl” Today Mr. Stockman's have been marginal and indecisive. 
$2J~jn31km title should be “The At various and in various 


dor wiD be a casualty if frenzied com- title, summing 
petition among publishers for Wash- might be “Hot 
wgton memoirs produces an Eco- Off Her Trojan 
nontic Law of History Writing: As Stopped to I 
contracts become astron om ic, dacre- Trough.” A sho 
non becomes a drag on the market story of the met 
It used to be said that best sellers balancing them 


steamy “inside” stones. In Washing- 
ton the “inside*’ story is often less 


were about animals or medicine or tine, 


im- title, summing un four long years, 
sh- might be “How Rosie Scenario Fell 
co* Oft Her Trojan Horse When It, Too, 
As Stopped to Feed at the Public 
to- Trough” A short title, telling the fnD 
i. story of the meeting between budget- 
ers bal a n ci ng theory and political prao- 


be-Oqpsr 


the Civil War — ideally. “I was Lin- Washington Post Writers Group. 


Salomon Brothers. 


investment 


FROM OUR AUG. 8 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


* 1910: Party’s Over at the Brewery 

1 NEW YORK — Everything will be made dear 
. now to those residents in the vicinity of Bern- 

• betmer and Schwartz’s brewery who have seen 
firemen and policemen in fuD uniform running 

- into the hop-devouring pavilion at all hours 


1935: Ike CtaAgamst Protesting 
PARIS — “Events in several parts of the 
world,” writes Walter Lippmann, “have raised 
the question of what the United States is to do 
in defense of its ideals. Russia, Germany and 
Mexico are engaged in religious persecution. 


and who have been patiently awaiting signs of Parallel with ih^ae denials of religious tree- 
smoke or flames or the noise of a rioL If some dom, there are breaches of international trea- 


patriot with fatty degeneration of the fountain 
pen had not written to Mayor Gaynor com- 
mending the “brave boys” for their efforts to 
save (he brewery, lie fire would still be smoul- 
dering. But the Mayor got suspicions and di- 
rected his Police and Fire Commissioners to 
investigate, and as a result fourteen policemen 


ties. The feeling exists that the United States 
ought to be able to exercise some moral au- 
thority. The question involved in official pro- 
les: is whether ic docs good or harm. Tbc most 

seasoned observers think that the chief effect 
of official protest is to undCTumie the position 
of the liberal opposition in the persecuting 


and tea firemen who have been in the habit of countries. The fact that they are liberal tnalra, 


irrigating their interiors will have a chance in 
the immediate future to put their thirsts on the 
witness stand in an effort to save their jobs. 


them stuped to the dominant mob, and, when 
foreign governments support their opposition, 
(hey are not strengthened but weakened.” ; 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM $. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


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Jy. but in just 12 years Rachel will 
need an orthodontist In 18 years she 
will ueed college tuition, which may 
be $250,000 a year if the monster 
deficits stretching “as far as the eye 
can see” (Rachael’s father's words) 
produce proportionate inflation. 

Mr. Stockman once was, like some 
other Reaganite intellectuals, a keep- 
er of Karl Marx's flame, in this sense: 
He subscribed to an Economic Inter- 
pretation of Histoty. He betieved that 
economic calculation — rationality 
— roles the world. Reasonable mea- 
surements of marginal utility make 
the world go round. So, dever poli- 
cies should cause economic variables 
to vary in ways certain to alter mass 
behavior in predictable ways and en- 
hance the wealth Of nations 
Now Mr. Stockman is the benefi- 
ciary of an outbreak of economic 
irrationality among publishers. Their 
animal spirits — the heat of the 
chase, the lust to win — resembled 
the bidding for free- agent athletes 
that has afflicted basebalL 
The publishers’ behavior reveals 
somet hing of the social soil in which 
the publishing houses are rooted, 
something erf the provincialism erf 
addtawa Manhattan. The publishers 
probably assume that his book will be 
a vinegary exercise in settling scores 
and spilling beans, brimful of bitter- 
ness and “inside” stories. 

Manhattan's in telligentsia mari- 
nating in its an i mod ties, takes all 
disagreements ^passkmatriy and per- 
sonally. Washington is diffe rent, and 
(he difference is not the lassitude of 
cynicism. The difference is, in part, a 
reflection of this axiom about aca- 
demic politics: Bitterness is inversely 
proportional to the stakes. Also, an 


interesting and usually less important 
than what is done in full view. Be- 
sides, prudential and ethical consid- 
erations will combine to produce in 
Mr. Stockman a seemly reticence,. 

He is 38 and might be —will be, 
I hope — in the cabinet in the year 
2015. He will not now want to betray 
confidences by revealing conversa- 
tions that occurred when the partici- 
pants were ajsunring that there was 
no memoirist on duty in the room. 

What about “the public’s right to 
know”? More often than not, that 
incantation is less a thought than a 
substitute for thinking. It gives writ- 
ers an easy conscience about behav- 
ior that is, for them, fun and profit- 
able. A right to know should be 
related in some way to a need to 



know, and an appetite is not neces- 
sarily a need. The public does need 
good government, which depends on 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Hie Bomb and Prisoners Repression in East Timor V-s.™ 


In response to. "The Bond?: Was 
Truman Justified?” (Aug. 5): 

The qpmkn col umns by John 
Connor rYes, It Was a Necessary 
Evil”) ana Gar Alperovitz (“No, He 
Had Other Opticus”) overlook the 
hundreds of thnmumh* of prisoners 
of war and the even greater number 
of Indonesians and otters who were 
forced to work by the Japanese like 
slaves on the railway tracks through 
Burma and Sumatr a at well bdow 
subsistence fevds. 


The 

Connor 


The repent “Indonesia Hoping Se- 
al Gains in East Timor Win Still 


dal Gains in East Timor Win StiH 
Guerrillas’ Guns” (July 20) was dis- 
turbing. The writer either ignores the 
teickgromid of the Indonesian pres- 
ence m East Timor or just takes the 
stand of the Indonesian officials. 

Of course Indoneria is spending 
money in East Timor, but for what? 


UiL side. This is no casual matter, 
riven the experience that the United 
Stales had with Cuba. The fact that 
the Sandmists no longer claim to as- 
smrebet groups might just be a result 
of Washington's recent policy. 

Nicaragua is a Gmmmmst stale 
with all the trappings of perpetual 
power. Democracy takes more than a 
few years of harsh discipline to in- 
stall, but the freedom it eventually 


To build roads, for i ns tanc y the bet- brings is something that the Unfi 


After nearly four years many had 
already died fra lade erf food and 


tirians is their emotional equilibrium. 

Arthur Balfour wrote to a friend: 
“1 dined last night with the Asqtnths, 
and Asquith and I had a rather sharp 
passage in the House after dinner. 
I fdt a mild awkwardness in replying 
to a man in the strength of his own 
champagne! I did it all the same, and 
with considerable vigor." Mr. Stock- 
man's reader* u ill find a similar good 


medicine against tropical diseases. A 
prolongation of the war by a few 
more months would haw killed most 
of therm An invasion trf Japan would 
have added a staggering number of 

soldiers on both sides. 

The bomb, horrible though it was 

far the civilians of Hiroshima, saved 
thehves erf milKoas. It aatainly saved Niparap iijin TKnm 

my wife and an infant son, who were » 


ter for tanks to roll into areas hdd by 
Fretilin forces; or to senrh die people 
the TnHftnwaan lang ua ge fp th a t tpew* 
culture win be destroyed; or to settle 
people from Java and Bali who will 
eventnally make the East Timorese a 
minority m their own county. 

According toour information from 
East Timor, imprisonment, tortnrc 
and massacres are still going on. 

LUDWIG KLEMENS, 
Sodety for Endangered Peoples. 

Gottingen. West Germany. 


chfldrea hdd in the Japanese camps, 
not to mention mysdf and so many 
other prisoners of war. ' 

. .• J.G.A. GEYSEL 
Blonuv. Switzerland 


Regarding the opinion oakum “Oth- 
er Voices in die Nicaragua Debate” 
(Aug I) by Jonathan Power: 

By supplying and supporting other 
Marxist groups in Central America. 
Nicaragua made itself a thorn in the 


States above all nations shnnlri be 
ready to champion — by force of 
arms if necessary. . 

FRED A. KING. 

Antibes. France. 

CjrcoiiMasion in America 

In response to the report “Female 
CiraBiiasum: A Norm in Africa" 
(July 29) by Blame Hardav 

I don’t believe that Americans can 
look down their noses at Africans 
when it comes to female drcoinci- 
skm. AnyoM growing up in the Unit- 
ed Stales in toe 1930s, at least toe 
Southern part, knows that female cir- 
cumdaon (infibulation, but without 
constriction of the vagina) was not 
uncommon at that time. 

J C. DIXON. 

P:iri>. 


ways, UiL economic pressure has 
been applied to Libya, Iran. Iraq, 
South Yemen, Syria. North Korea, 
Carribotfiu, Cuba, Poland — and 
even South Africa. 

Herewith some random blurbs: 

• James R_ Schlcsingcr. farmer 
cabinet secretary and CLA director, 
speaking in I98Q: “Economic sanc- 
tions are a relatively weak tooL They 
appeal to Americans because they 
seem to be a substitute for the stiffer 
measures that may be required.” 

• Helmut Sonneafddt, a former 
adviser to the Stare Department: 
“Really airtight policies of denial 
have proved to be politically infeasi- 
ble in virtually all countries where, 
they have been attempted over the 
tot several decades.” 

• Andrew Young, while ambassa- 
dor to the United Nations: “Eco- 
nomic sanctions look like an easy 
answer, but South Africa is one of the 
most self-sufficient nations in the 
world. It could get along without ns.” 

As mayor of Atlanta, Mr. Young 
now argues for a cutoff of aitime 
service to South Africa (IHT. Jufy 
22), although be concedes that effec- 
tive sanctums would have to include 
“the Europeans and the Japanese.” 
However, with the notable exception 
of France; the Europeans have re- 
cendy shown themselves to be weakly 
divided and uncertain about how far 
they are prepared logo. 

True, a crashing, comprehensive 
economic squeeze might give toe 
South African government second 
thoughts. But “graduated measures,” 
as envisaged in die congressional leg- 
islation, can be treacherous. Under 
pressure, resistance is likely to hard- 
en- The pressure must then be tough- 
ened _and broadened, malting ft. in- 
creasingly difficult to sti^r^rT 1 with 
international At the end of 
the road, theoretically, lies a physical 
blockade — that is, anact of war. 

If the United States is ready even 
to start down tins, road, the recent 
performance of Congress and the ex- 
ecutive branch is at worst a danger- 
ously indecisive way to demcaotxare 
tire necessary national resolve. At 
best it is no more Than a ctornsy 
expression of frustration overaprob- 
lsn that America could bopctoamc- 
borate but cannot hope tosefre: - 

Washinpon Post Writers Group. . 


L ■ 


Letters intended for pubBcethm 
sfwld be oddressed“Letien to the 
Editor" and must amimn the writ- 
® ,,J signature, name and fd i ad- 
dress. Letters should bt brief and 
ore subject to editing. We carnal 
be responsible far the return tf 
naudit tn-tl manusirtpts. - ■> 




t* 




















PfTERWATlONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1985 


The Other Gulf War 


With Iran’s help, 
the Kurds fight on 


Kurdistan is a land that is 
noi a country. The Kurds, 10 
million strong, are a major mi- 
nority in three countries — 
Iraq, Iran and Turkey — and 
spill over into Syria and Soviet 
Armenia as well. Since the late 
19th century, they have waged 
intermittent war for a home- 
land of their own, which, if they 
could claim it, would center on 
the area where Iraq, Iran and 
Turkey 'come together in the, 
Zagros Mountains. 

Their last great leader, Mus- 
tafa Barzani, died in 1979 in the 
United States, where he had 
gone for medical treatment. 
Four years earlier, the shah of 
Iran had withdrawn the sup- 
port that had enabled Barzani 
to fight a guerrilla war against 
the Ba’athist government of 
Iraq. 

Now Iran, locked in its own 
protracted war with Iraq, again 
finds the Kurdish revolt useful, 
and Barzani’s sons are back at 
war. They fight from two 
mountain strongholds inside 
Iraq,; one in a “liberated area” 


lB » tffcnjwn 
Siipymonlycti 


along the Turkish border, the 
other in southern Kurdistan, 
where they share a common but 
irregular front with Ir anian 
forces. 

In June, a French journalist, 
Chris Kutschera, visited the 
Kurds who are fi g h t in g on both 
of these fronts. He entered 
from Rezaiyeh, Iran, where the 
Kurdish refugee camp had just 
been bombed by the Iraqi Air 
Force. 

His pictures provide a rare 
glimpse of the Pesh Merga. 
which means Forward to 
Death, of Massoud Barzani's 
Kurdistan Democratic Party. 


Near Shirwan Mazin, in Hie comer of Iraq dose to the Turkish border, Kurdish guerrillas are briefed before a military operation. 


efave p erformance of ibe 
rtmeoi-in recent days [romi£ 
aeflfiwof the powers ihaibeh 
a 'Africa, you would w**. 
1 there was to worn about fa 
fthat Americans are outrage 
the jailings and tl** 
son. but what do you sec? 

M sec the House of Repre» 


little but an exhortation was intact after Iraqis attacked a camp near Rezaiyeh in Iran. 


Hetauii Sc 


Pesh Merga on patrol between Chwarta and Penjwin. 


his anti-aircraft weapon. 


1 It ccul^ 


A woman of Pesh Merga and her husband, members 
of the Kurdistan Democratic Part) in Sulaymanfyah. 


commando, identified as a second lieutenant, flanked by his Kurdish captors near Sulavmaniyah in late June. 



t 2223 

i * 





















Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1985 


ft* 

y . . ■ #' . .. * 


SCEENCE 


'I - 1 * 


>, 4 t 

■,r . - :i O- - 




'Impossible’ New Crystal Form Baffles and Excites Scientists 


IN BRIEF 


***£ 


By Malcolm W. Browne 

Aftw Kari Times Service 

N EW YORK — Most solid thing s are made of 
crystals, and for nearly two centuries scientists 
assumed that every crystal must have an orderly struc- 
ture, its constituent atoms fixed at predictable, period- 
ic pc^ticmwiLirin a lattice timieworfc. But the disoov^ 
ery of a type of crystal that violates some of the 
accepted rules has touched off an explosion of conjec- 
ture and research that may lead to the founding of a 
new branch of science. 

The finding has galvanized micros true ture analysis, 
math ematicians, chemists, metallurgists, and physi- 
cists in at least eight countries. According to one 
estimate, scientists around the world are producing a 
paper a day relating to the discovery, and an end to 
this torrent oT research is nowhere in sight. 

Whether the discovery wQl have practical conse- 
quences remains to be seen. But as one investigator 

as peculiar as its stru^^tETs^f seems certain 1 to 




number, because it contains an i nfini te number of German Tree Problem May Be Virus 

digits in non-periodic order). HAMBURG (AP) —A riant virus, not air poOntiOT, may be pnmax2y 

He then created a second pair of tiles by dissecting off Wot Gcanag 1 * forests, a bakjgl ajfc 

kites and darts and reas s e mb l ing the pieces to make a profttsor at Stuttgart Unrwxaiy. told the Ham- 

pair of rhombuses aAhrides of identical lengths bin w^t am Saontag that he fotmd evidence of rad 

with different interior angles at thm coniers. The and jSeajLples taken from 24 forest regus 

-)^ri«^tacmi£r«agksofl08d®«and72_ 


f. Li,... >>• ^ 

. . f M *■** 




iar rnomonsiias ctJJBer angles oi Jt» asgtm auu ix . odhitioiL 

degrees, while the “skinny" rhombus has comer angles 

of 144 degrees and 36 degrees. iJ^^S«^^Sndariinals. Similar tests on amp ta beta 

H dnp either pairs of fat and skinny rhombuses or heaithv forests in central France tamed no vnus, Prefaar nemo 


^equivalents ^f niar ^T mTlk TfftCS FoiUld HI OlIIK I 

to function in - 


find important uses. That's what one would expect in 
the field of condensed-matter physics." 

Among the many post achievements of condensed- 
matter physics was the discovery of semiconducting 
crystals, which provided the basis for most electronic 
technology: broadcasting and communications de- 
vices, computers, and much more. 

The new crystal form — known technically as a 
quastpcdodic icosahedral phase exhibiting fivefold 
symmetry — poses so many puzzles that scientists will 
need time to come to terms with it. Three years have 
elapsed since the crystal was identified, but only 
recently has experimental evidence overwhelmed ini- 
tial skepticism that such a form of matter could exist. 


X HE apparent arrangement of the crystal seems so 
paradoxical that theorists have to consider it in terms 
of six-dimensional hyperspace, rather in the 
three- dimensional space of the everyday world. In 
trying to understand how such structures could fit 
together, scientists have also turned to an arcane field 
of mathematics called tiling theory, and to a game 
invented in 1974 by an English physicist, Roger Fen- 
rose. The game involves pairs of veiy subtly designed 
building blocks, called tiles, from which an infinite 
number of non-repeating patterns can be built up, 
leaving no empty space between tiles. 

This scientific ferment began three years ago at the 
National Bureau of Standards in Gaithersburg, Mary- 
land, where a group of scientists working on behalf of 
the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency was 

looking for new, ultrastrong alloys or al uminum Their 

interest centered on alloys containing what are called 


Dmd Setsr. Tfai Now York Tn 


Electron-microscope image of alloy in which atoms are arranged in icosahedral crystals. 


dy resembling^. soccer ball with 20 Mai 

of them equilateral triangles. The found 
of the forms known since antiquity home 


Using dther pairs of fat and skinny rhombuses or h^uhy forests in central France tamed vp no virus, natesor nesnn 

kites and darts. Dr. Penrose found he could complete- the newspaper. . .. . - -or 1, ,~_ inn „ D 

ly M two-dimensional space with either pcnodic or »i wonld rather say dmtanp^htrents^lhetaqis c we tt a m oonn iyg 

non-periodic patterns, some erf which included the ^ted Professor Frcnzd as saying, ^hen tins problem woum y 
supposedly fartuddenpentagoo and a related geomei- «KitroUaWc;Butifirisvinises,luiiiianlxaigscanscan^ctoanytniiigto 
ric form, the 10-sided decagon- Mp our woods." 

thmSomb^roM-^S^SimS equivalents g miar ftiT nmlc Trftfifi Foimd HI Offllft 

ffioi ^ amw(*Br-Ap^jfa?g ^^ *ag 

SSfidinbvo dinSrioos. Using the same comer minks has been discovered m aoutiieast Zh«^ provmce, 
could bnfla np structures in which icosahedrons 00- province s best-known city, mngznoa. -. - 

2 Ovaryless Women Impregnated 

After seeing the report of Dr. Shechtman’s discoy- JERUSALEM (Renters) —Two women without ovaries hwc b ecame 

ery, Dr. Levine and Dr. Stemhardt lost no time in pr> w>am us in g anew method of te nnoari treatment, dooms at Jentta- 
pnh lishmg their discovery about three-dimensional f^^ Hndassah Hospital sav. The fertiSzatum was beoeved to oe tne mst 
Fenrosetffing and the remarkable match of theory and of its type. , 

ffp e ri meni, and scientific exdtement mounted. tv m^yvi tnwqveg a^minictering tbehonnonesairogqi ana progw" 


province’s besfrtnown city, Hangzhou. 

2 Ovaryless Women Impregnated 

JERUSALEM (Reuters) —Two women without ovaries hare become 
pregnant uang anew method of h ormonal treatmrat.^OMsat Jo^a- 

lonsHa<^3 Hospital say. The fertffizaton was beheved to be the fiisr 


representing something clearly impossible under the Kfa pncai faces, an of them equilateral tnanj 
dasrical roles of crystallography. icosahedron is one of the forms known since : 

Scientists use beams of electrons, X-rays, neutrons as a Platonic solid, a geometric solid having i 
and other particles to study the atomic structure of equilateral faces. 


crystal lattices. The beams strike individual atoms and r> swii fman 'c diffraction ^rrv^m^ t in iqiw “It sounds harder than it actually is,” said John W. Dr. Joseph Schenker, chairman erf the hospital’s obstemes and gw- 

are diffracted away at varying angles, depending on 1Qrnc ^ m sodt & crystalline fcsuTtaan alloy of a National Bureau of Standard s physicist «fco cdogy department, said a 38-year-old victim of tte syndrome wg- he 
the nature and position of the atoms in the crystal. altmiimim and rnanean esc and since then other i^sa- has made nugor contnbutions to thenewwork. “You first to be successfully impregnated, wtii48 : hou^CTbi^fermuaro 
Some of the diffracted beams interfere, either ranforc^ ajo^ n f ai iimin iim have been found. may not be able to visualize something in, say, six bv her hnsband’s sperm- She is ciqpectedrognre farm within t wo moro ns- 

ing or canceling eacb other, and tbe results produce a The icosabedron is almost inconceivable as a build- dimenaons, but you can certainly visualize a prqjeo- TV doctor said a similar method had been used m 1983 to 
pattern of spots on a photographic film or electronic in f , hinric fnr rryttak h^uw it canno t y. pnrVM lion of it in two or three dimensions. Moreover, most a woman in Anstratia suffering from premature menopau se, but tac 
sensor. From such a pattern an investigator can do- other icosahedrons to fill a space completely Leaving of the mathematics involve nothing more complicated Tcrs*H woman was totally dependent cm hormone irqections whereas the 
doce many <rf tiw properties of the crj^ that pro- no eans. Mathematicians riassia^edronsas ihree? than sets of simultaneous linear equations — high Australian woman’s ovaries played a partial hormonal rale. 


faceznaay of the properties of the crystal that pro- 00 Mathematicians dass icosahedrons as ihree- 
_ dimenaonal equivalents of pentagons — two-dimen- 

Diffraction patterns reveal the symmetry of a crys- sioaal Eeurcs havine five eoual sk£s — and oentaaons 


tal, among other properties, and knowledge of a ciys- ^ same deficiency: They cannot fill a flat 
tals symmetry is vital to assigning it a propCTdassifi- surface without leaving gaps, 
cation. If a crystal is rotated around one of its axes, the stffl, many other latSWies repeated and coa- 

pattera of atoms seen looking down that axis most finned Dr. Sheditman’s woik. Scientists in the United 
always repeat itself at least ooce every fuH turn. If the States and France made electron micrographs of the 


pattern is identically repeated at every half turn, the new material, showing individual aioim. 
axis is said to have twofold symmetry ; if there is sMms m nStaPon form were H. 


atoms arranged in pentagon form were dearly visible 


ns — two-dimen- school algebra, in other words.” 

— and pentagons O 

annot fill a flat SCIENTISTS must now try to find out srinch atoms 
go where in the new structure, a task that an advanced 
peated and con- apparatus called an atom probe may resolve. The 
lists in the United atom probe uses beams of atomic nuclei to knock 
icrographs of the single atoms out of a lattice structure. The dislodged 
toms. Groups of atoms «m then be counted and studied, 
ere dearly visible David R. Nelson, a physicist at Harvard University 


... . * _ . “ , . , x 1 . - . - • - # ,, uw u u mia i iK w xxx *vim wmv mvwij twiwu- i/avUI HU&UU, A UUTWtf kM Udivatu L«iufw»sy 

transition metals: manganese, iron, cobalt and repetition at every third of a turn there is threefold ^ and there danonrtrating that the crystal had soedaliziim in metallic glasses, said the main impart 

.'hfnmhmi cvmmrtrv and ennn • t J TT 7 . . f^T’- . :■ ■ 


chromium. symmetry, ar 

None of these ordinarily alloys with aluminum. But t 
when mdien mixtures of aluminum with these metals XNTHE 19i 
are cooled at rates of millions of degrees centigrade 


symmetry, and so on. ^ 

T i 

XNTHE I9th century, crystaBographers developed a his 


icosahedral structure. 


of the work for the time bong, is cm theoretical 


per second, too fast to allow the ronsntuept meta ls to According to dirt system, all 


that until three years ago re- scribing what they had done. for one of the physical sciences what the discovery of 

According to dirt system, all By coind deuce, the physicists Dov Levine and Paul oon-Enctidean geometry did for mathemati cs; It has 
etched or squashed cubes and J. Stemhardt at the University Of Pennsylvania had demolished an axiom and taken same of the smugness 


■ iU *T:,r known crystals — stretched or squashed cubes and J. stemhardt at the university of Pennsylvania nan demolished an axiom and taken some of the smugness 

rapid, ihe result is arnetallic glass that, like au glasses, rhombuses— could be cataloged according to seven been studying the possibilities of 4 hypothetical “qua- oot of the field. Uused tobelhoughtthrtparalldlines 
laefa crystalline structure and 1 in which atoms arc 0^5 [ai systems, 14 unique unit cells, 32 pomt groups ^crystalline" structure dial was ordered but not peri- can never inert and that crystals must be orderly and 
distributed chaotically. U solidification is a httle skiy- and 230 possible structures. Until Dr. Shechtman's odic. and cooduded that such a structure could be therefore must have periodic structure. Well, we know 
er, very small crystals form, but the metals rcmam discover M exceptions to these categories had ever created uang Penrose tiles. now that parallel lines on a sphere do meet, and we 

alloyed. heen seen. Dr. Penrose, who divides his time between Oxford Imrw that icnsubedral^hase ervstak have orderly hut 


created uang Penrose tiles. 


now that parallel lines on a sphere do meet, and we 


alloyed. . been seen. Dr. Penrose, who divides his time between Oxford know that icosahedraJ-phase crystals have orderly but 

Among the scientists wonting op thepr qe ct was an The traditional rules of crystallography also state University in England and Rice University in Hous- non-periodic structures.” 

Isra^etertrtm-microsoopist, Damob. bbraitman, on jjiairotaiionabouicertamaxeso/cmamcrystalsniay ton, invented the tfl»whflestodyipg ways to fill space There are also practical considerations. Dr. Ndson 

sabbatical leave frran the land Institute of Technol- prodace identical patterns of atoms with every single with non-repeating patterns of the amplest possible said he believed a deeper understanding of metallic 
ogy, lechmon, ai liana. turn, half turn, third of a turn, quarter of a turn or building blocks. In 1974, he hit Upon two pairs of glasses could result from the’ work on icosahedral 


It happened on April 8, 1982,” Dr. Shechtman sixth of a turn. Natural repetitions occurring at fifths 
recalled. “I had been making systematic diffraction of a turn (fivefold symmetry) or sevenths of a turn 
measurements of a long series of ahnnmxmHnanga- (sevenfold symmetry) were assumed to be rnled out by 
nese alloys when I saw something that was such an the mathematics of solid geometry, 
anomaly I couldn’t believe it. I assumed I had made a Geometry defines the ways objects can be packed 

mistakeofsamekhid,andItiiedanidtiiedagam,but together. The amplest solid object possessing fivefold 
it wouldn't go away.” symmetry along several of its axes is called an icosahe- 


blocks that filled the KB? • 

signed one such pair of ti fo , called kites and 


(sevenfold symmetry) were assumed to be ruled oot by darts becaure of their shapes, by dmding up a lhom- 
the mathematics of solid geometry. bus uang the marhematiwil -rd »«wTn«twp known to 


crys tals, some glass seems to have pro pert i es first phase of tin 
related to such crystals. The explorers 

Dr. Nelson concluded, however, «>»», “for the mo- man far Mkhig 
meat, the ™rin satisfaction - we're yetting from time conducting the 3 


as the gdden ratib — the ratio of one crystal work is the intellectual excitement. For me, 

ma nlno iha wnalrtk /vf Rum dniufo#! bImhi Tka'i tLo t Tl_ . Jmniim f ii—in aF 


The doclOT said a similar method had been used sxl 1983 to impregnate 
a woman in Australia suffering from premature menopau se, but the 
Israeli woman was totally dependent <m hormone injections whereas the 
Australian woman's ovaries played a partial hormonal rale. 

Dim New Type of Supernova Seen 

LONDON (LAT) — A new type of supernova, or exploding star, thrt 
is modi dimmer than any supernova previously observed has been 
discovered by California astronomers. 

Alexei V. Fifippcziko of the University of California, Berkeley, and 
Wallace LW. Sareent cf the California Institute of Technology in 
Pasadena reported in the British journal Nature that the new type of 
supernova seemed to have been a star that lest most of its outer layer of 
hydrogen and hefimn before it exploded. 

They said the discovery should give themists new insight into the 
lay&ed structure of dying stars and into how tin heavy dements that are 
produced in a star’s nudear furnace, such ss iron, are disposed into space 
and recycled into planets. 

Depths of Lake Superior Plumbed 

MARQUETTE, Michigan (AP) — Scientists have made an expedition 
to the depths of Lake Superior, 1,320 feet (402 metes) below the surface 
of the world's largest freshwater lake, in a 22rfoot, four-person subma- 
rine: The dive provided more data than had been discovered in decades of 
research, said the expedition coordinator, WiTHxm Cooper. 

The dive from about 40 miles (65 kilometers) off Michigan's Upper 
Fcmnsola was the lowest depth reached by humans in the race and was 
pomibty the lake’s deepest point, said David Lon& dorf scientist on the 
Erst phase of the four-week expedition, which began July 23. 

The explorers found few life forms, aid Charles R. Downs, a spokes- 
man fog- Michi g an State, which with the University of Con ne ctic u t is 
conducting the $500,000 study financed by the National Oceanographic 
and Atmospheric A dmin istration. Dr. Lang said one animal foimd, the 


togethrt. The amplest solid obfert possessing fivefold to the sum of oaeplns the square root of five divided that’s plenty. Isn't that really the driving farce of hydra, a gnall creature rdaled to the jeOyosh, had not been known to 
symmetry along several of its axes is called an icosahe- by two, or 1.61803398 (this is called an jnational science?” exist at such depths.- 


NYSE Most Actives | 

VM. HM l» LOT ClW. 


POTWm 

35178 7ft 

6* 

7* 

+ ft 

MOMUd 

21166 25 

23ft 

24* 

+ * 

Culbftf s 

E0183 24ft 

18ft 

18ft 

—6* 

BeatCo 

8053 31* 


33* 

+ ft 

BelUca 

2490 39* 

38* 

39 

+ ft 

AT&T 

1097 21* 

20ft 

71 

+ * 

MldSUt 

0041 12 

lift 

lift 

+ ft 

SnkAm 

9988 15ft 

IS* 

ISft 

+ * 

East Air 

9618 lift 


lift 

+ ft 

IBM 

95M 129ft 

129 

129* 

=* 

RoUnEs 

9017 26ft 

24 

24* 

viManvi 

8998 6ft 

6 

6ft 

+ ft 

Mocy 

7538 46* 

45ft 

45ft 

— * 

Moron a 

7448 m 

47ft 

47ft 

— ft 

Fs»Pa 

7314 6ft 

6* 

6ft 



Dow Jones Averages 


I Indus 133079 unai 13101 T325JM— 0.0 

Tram 47172 40.17 672J7 OKO— 1M 

Utn 1S3JB 15479 1S24D 153-11— ITS 

Comp 54549 54973 54X05 540.10— 175 


NYSE Diaries 


NYSE index 



PrvriOM 

l 

TOPOY 

Men 

Law 

CteM 

1PJL 

11827 

10871 

19KJ1 

18X58 

BUI 

12AM 

049* 

12471 

11227 

nojn 

11X03 

18979 

5658 

55.98 

5578 

5549 

11591 

UA71 

1M71 

11A1S 


Hfednesr M 

MSE 

Closing 


AMEJCDiarles 


. AdwnOMl 

Unc ha n— d 
Total IM 
Now Worn 
Now LM 


174 1*4 

3SS 349 

30 247 

777 780 

1 V 

17 7 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Docllnod 
Uochtmpod 
Total im 
Now Highs 


434 391 

951 1253 


UHlUIPt 

Industrials 


7872 7U5 

7472 7&7S 

SM2 VUS 


AU0.5 — 

AUU.2 

AUS.1 

July 31 . — 

‘indaMIntai 


hay Sates *Stm 
174715 UO 

14Z131 417732 1427 

1.584*2 404782 4*5 

175747 442447 1494 

1*4714 400512 1745 

sflouras 


WalfllBM 

BMM 

Prvr.JPM.nL 


PravaoBMaiadcten 

19645773 


Tables tadiNfe the natkmwkta prices 
up to tbe ctatlng aa Wall street pad 
do not reflect hrte trades etaewbere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Standard & Poors Index 


HM Law CtaM 3 PM, 
IndMdrtOte 2123* 2S97S 20940 29974 

Tram. T7I49 17444 174J9 1 M. 1 I 

UlOmm 8242 8142 8142 *147 

Plnanct im •nm tisb ZL 99 

Composite 19072 1*777 1S7.93 1*779 


NASDAQ Index I 

S S2SS M te. 

• 30021 29*44 30029 *4979 

■ 30097 3047* 31071 XLM 

3*140 — 3M7B 2025 
r 349-T0 — 34920 251 .97 

29043 — 29174 21*77 

295.1* — 29X71 2N44 

27*74 — 27293 22572 


AMEX Sales 


AMEX Most Actives 



VoA 

HIM Law 

Lmr 

Oft. 

WldOH 

9132 

■4ft 

4M 

. 4* 

-K 

GtfCdi 

3414 

Mft 

14* 

M* 


HMtB 

3156 

17ft 

.» 

17* 

+ * 

WldoMPf 

2640 

29ft 

29 

29 

— ft 

BAT in 

2232 

4* 

Aft 

4* 

— h 

AMInH 

T422 

Sft 

Sft 

3ft 


I ra!3 v 

1480 

1ft 

Tft 

1ft 


EdpBg 

1719 

13 

12ft 

Q 

+ * 

TbxAir 

1144 

lift 

17ft 

19 

— * 

Totlpto 

WM 

13ft 

13 

U* 

— ft 

DotaPO 

res* 

12* 

12ft 

12ft 

— ft 

Hmlnspf 

988 

39ft 

201% 

30ft 


Htabrs 

938 

33* 

X2ft 

33 

— n 

MBMIx 

938 

KW 

3* 

34* 


MchOn 

922 

5ft 

Sft 

5* 

— ft 


3PJA. volunw 
Piw.lPM.wim 


AMEX Stock Index 


J 


:4 -*** 

... ^ * 







• • If* 

----. - tRgft 


( umiiT 


ffos* BjU4-3 


HWiLaw Stack 


Dtv. YM.PE HttHMlLaw QimLOTBS 


23V* 16 AAR 46 24 14 

17H 9U. AGS 13 

16tb *1* AMCA 

2IM 13 AMF 231 95 

13H 179* AMFwri 

50% 241b AMR 8 

22tk ISte AMR Pf XI* 94 

23 19 ANRpf 112 1 U 

MB. 7te APL 

611b 431* ASA 270 44 


27 121b AVX 72 24 19 153 
2BVk 17te AZP 272 117 7 1954 

40 36M AbfLall 140 24 15 1197 


14 M 2T1b Site 2Mb 

13 140 1591 15(5 15*— 9b 

10 171b T2Vb 121b— 1b 

95 165 13H 13V. 131b 

*7 JTte 131* 131* 

0 2564 49tb 49 + % 

40 ZFH 22H Hte . , 

1734 201* 2Mb 20te + 9* 

34 101* 10W TOW + 1b 

165 459b 441* 451b +lVb 


NYSE Trading Is Moderate 


United Pros Iniematioaal 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange were mixed in moderate trad- 


34 row. in* io» + jb The Dow Jones industrial a 
72 24 T9 IM tSS nS uM-te 0J3 to 1,325.49 an hour before 


24(*t 239b 241b— 1b 
54M 531b 54(b + Vb 


average wi 
e the dose. 


was up 


ACCOWtfl JO 22 17 118 23te 221fc 2214— H 


Declines led advances by a 3-3 ratio. Volume 


24 V. 1W AontC 40 24 
Wb 79* AemaE -eb 4.1 
T9 151b Add Ex 172*107 

20 11U AdmMI 72 1J 

im «H AdvSra SH 45 
411b 221b AMD 
129* 49b AdvM .12 14 
151* 91b Aoritax 


17 15V, 151* 1»b— Vb 
Q n TV 794— Vb 
1U 179b 17(* 171* — IS 


AX* m T j» d*4P.M.cU™inNe»York. 


411b 221% AMD 1i 2440 29tb 2Mb »J* + H 

121* 49b Advast .12 14 19 120 Ubi BV, 84* 

15(b 9Vi Aorftex 13 « 14tb MJ6 MH + 1b 

491b 314* AatnLf 244 57 14 1032 4«* 45(b 451*— lb 

571b 521* A«H.*f 579*107 _3 5* 54 » 

379* 1*U Ahrrtna 170 U I 734 311* 30>b 33 + 1b 

31b 2Sb Alloan 1 21b 29b 29b 

57 42 AlrPnl 170 XI 13 1U0 568b 559b 541* + 9* 

241* 15 AlrttFrl 40 27 12 291 ZMb 21M 2IM 


AMhoutfi prices in cables on these pages are prom 
the 4 P.M. dose in New York, for tone reasons, 
this article is based on the market at 3 P.M. 


21b 1 AIMOO* 

331* 271* AtaP pIA 372 124 
01b MS AtoPdOf 77 117 
82 639b AloP Pf 970 1L7 

HM 94 AMP Pf 1170 104 
74 581b AtaP Pt X14 117 

IS 57 AMP pf 828 114 
161% 111b Alone ■ 174 74 10 
2*9* lllb AMcA/r .16 J 9 
241b lllb Alarm 7 u 17 
331* 241b AUn 76 17 12 
311* 231* Alan 120 AA 28 
389b 271b AloaSnd 120 32 13 
37 17 AtexAIx 170 34 

5V« 20H. Aloxdr 21 

•91b 77V. AJIbCP 1441 27 
2B4* 2HS AMInt 140 4.1 
M SS Aw pfCITJZS 114 
349b 2*1* AITvPw 2JO 9.1 9 


225 21b 2 2 

372 124 23 3114 31 31— 14 

77 117 13 79b 79* 79* 

970 117 *0*761* 7*9* 769*— V* 

1170 104 4ttrt04 104 IM —Mr 
5-1 A 1U 219te 721* TTYi 72V, 42 

82* 114 34*Qi 711b 709* 71M 

174 74 10 34 141b 14 W — 1b 

.1* J 9 449 245* 239* 34J* + lb 

JB VJ 17 SZ 22V. 219ft 22V, + H ! 

Jb U 12 491 2Ste 28V. 2Mb 

120 44 28 1IW 37 2*1*27 +Jb 

120 32 13 9J 37V. 37 37 — }ft 

170 34 388 2714 271* 271b + 1* 

21 121 239* 331b Wk 

1441 27 104 771b 7Mb 771b — 9* 

140 4.1 M J» 091 221b— 1b 

7-25 114 12 97 97 97 

220 9.1 9 87* 299b 291b BA* + 1b 


Z3Vj 1514 AJKnG 40b 2* 15 120 221* 22Vb 2H* 


461* 31V* AlMCP 170 4.1 I 
M 571* AMCP Pi 6-74 10-4 
IIW* 99 AMCPPH270 104 
23Vb 1» AlldPd 13 

SOVb 451* AMdSir XI2 37 8 

mb _nbAiiaai 
141* 24 AlhCpf 
291* 311* ALLTL 174 67 9 
gfc »b AULT pf 276 57 
391b 299* AtaM 120 15 31 

27» W* Amax .101 . 

40 321b Amax of SM 87 

34 221* Am He 1.10 AI 22 

2* 19b ArnApr 

21lb 16 ABoS? « 

30 571* ABraad 3.90 *4 9 

25S ?£?■ ABrdpf 273 92 
AH* 509* ABrdnf 247 47 __ 
W 569b A Bool 140 14 17 


170 4.T 0 10W 441b 44 4<Vb— 1b 

474 10.4 282 45V* 641b <5 

270 104 10 HM 1121b 1129* + <A 

12 172 1*4* 171b 179b— IV. 
XI2 37 * 6*5 56 Vb 55Vb 561b + 9b 

136 51b 49b 5 

2 n 301b 3Mb 

174 67 9 70 2791 27 Z7 — »b 

276 57 I 361* 3616 34<6— 4b 

120 15 31 1949 341b 331* 341* + 1* 

,101 490 ISVb 149ft 15 

SJS3 87 S SS 34V. 341* — 1* 

1.10 AI 22 701 271b 271b 27Vb— Jb 

70 19b 11* lib— lb 

8 21 191* 191b 19«b— lb i 

3.90 64 9 422 41te *11* 611b— lb 

175 92 687 29H 291b 2W* + 1b ■ 

247 47 1 *ZVb 621b 4Bb— 1b i 

140 14 17 BOO 114W1MW. 1141b + tb 


The Daily 
Source for ^ 
International 
Investors. 



amounted to about 87.4 millfon shares, up from 
843 million in the same period on Tuesday. 

Analysts said the market’s primary concern is 
whether Tuesday’s 21.73-poini drop in the Dow 
Jones industrial average was an aberration or 
the start of a hi^ tJoraside niovEL 

“The market is definitely wounded and heal- 
ing it will take time,” said Jem Grovanan of 
Ladeabnrg Thalmann & Co. 

Analysts said investors were keeping a dose 
eye on how weD the bond market would receive 
Wednesday’s Treasury’s sale of 10-year notes. 

“The success of the Treasury’s refunding may 
weU determine Che fate of this market on a 
short-term basis,” Mr. Groveman said. 

Good demand for the Treasury’s new seesri- 


n Month 
Htfilmr Stetfc 


MfcHMlLOQ QuolCWw 


3Mb 191b ABMM 7* 37 15 38 291b 2gb Wt— te 

28 Jb 2Mb ABiaFY 44 24 14 7 2flb 2fl* MJb— Jb 

601b 4SVb AmCon 250 57 11 92] 57V. SMb 571b + (k 

2 SH 22 AGonpf iW 112 71 25 2«r 21 

521b 401* ACcn pf 370 67 17 50 58 

114 ira ACanm 1375 12J im T« 112 

209b mb ACOPBO 22* 11.1 7* 20 I9Jb W*— J* 

309b 251b ACapCV 2J1* 87 10 2W» 28VJ 2W + ^ 

II M) ACntC 1*1 29 79* 7Vb 71* + Vb 

561b 441b ACyan 1.9* 37 14 27M 5flb 534b 541*— J* 

2716 181* ADT 72 3734 

MW 171b AElPw 22*alU 9 1720 El* 211* 2TW— 16 

4916 301b AmEn> 12* M IS 40*4 Oh Oft S*— H 

25W 111b AFomlO A U 14 381 S5 £5 JL. 

3*16 21 ACdCP 170 XI 9 1712 3296 3Z9b 32H 

1* 69b AGnl Wt 28 TJ9W 1» 15*— Vb 

toft 4216 AGfilrfBSJQ. 62 3 2 S’ 4 SS* S*" “ 

77 4SV> AGnlpf 335 47 ■ 10 70 70 

71V. AGnrtDiM 4.1 

369b 2514 AHWfl 120 Xt 10 9 341* 3M4 MU— lb 

131* 71b AHOtet , 1» 12 111* 12, t 

449b 4416 A Home 250 AS 12 JH9* 5Wb S9 5*16 + » 
46 Vb 2*1* AHOXP VI? X5l5 3440 449b4flb*gfc 

97V, 6916 Amrlcfl 440 7J 0 1145 W6 8M 8714 + J* 

9016 5BW AlnGrp 44 A M 104 8SH 84H »51b 4- 1* 

150 112ft AIGPP» SHS 47 ^ 1« 145 145 

2M lift AMI 73 19 12 2782 25H 25ft H16— ft 
Sft 29b AlTWMOt 344 JVb 3 3 — ft 

29 16ft APreadS 251 12 5 CD 21» 20 2OTJ 

U» J ASLFJa 10 155 4ft 4ft 4ft + ft 

18ft 121* ASLFIPI2.19 154 .34 14ft M . M —lb 


25ft lift AFcanl* 4* 32 14 
3*1* 21 ACnCP 170 XI 9 
14 4ft AGnl wt 

«6ft 4216 AGnl pfBSJQa 42 

77 4516 AGnlpf 325 44 

7116 43ft AGnpfD 244 41 

3*ft 2514 AHarR 120 16 10 

lift 7ft AHOtet 

449b 4416 A Home 270 AS 12 

46ft 261* AHOXP Via X5 15 

97ft 6916 Amrftft 440 72 0 

! 9016 58ft AlnGrp 44 A 34 

150 112ft AIGppf SHS 40 

Sft lift AMI 72 25 12 


Sft lift AMI 73 25 12 2782 25ft 25ft Hft— ft 
Sft 29b AlTWMOt 3*4 3 3 — ft 

29 16ft APrcsd 8 251 12 5 CD 30 2» 

13W J ASLFlD 10 155 .4ft 4H 4ft + ft 

18ft 121* ASLFlPt 2.19 154 3* Mft 14 14 — ft 

14 II ASWP 70 42 10 1 « IJft 1»* 13 + W. 

3Sft 24ft AmSM 140 52 10 344 31ft 30J6 30J6- ft 

67ft 3514 AmStor 44 17 11 227 61ft 4116 Mft— }* 

78 44ft AStTPfA 428 41 *■ ZIH 2L. S 

57ft 51 AStTPfB 470 122 34 * 

34ft 1716 AT&T 120 57 161100 2Tft 2Wfc 21 +ft 
41ft 3216 AT&T Pf 344 92 10 38ft 38 . 3W6 + ft 

43 33 s * AT&T pf 174 94 2223 3916 39ft 39ft— ft 

2716 14ft AWOfrs 170 41 8 147 H 2*H 24ft 

131* 10 A WQl Ot 125 107 7Br 12ft 12ft 12ft— ft 
28ft 19ft AmHott 240 H4 • 83 71ft 20ft 21ft + ft 

TBft 59ft ATlW S44 &5 9 66ft 6* 44ft— 16 

IB Oft ATrSc SO Mft 13ft U - H 

0916 64 ATrVn iM 7.1 4 H 80 M - ft 

601b 26ft Ameron 140 42 0 35 381b 30 30 — ft 


ties would bdp interest rates ease. If demand 
for the notes and bonds were weak, yields would 
have to rise to attract buyers. 

Pan American World Airways was near the 

t °^eatrice Cos. was shgfalf^fcgber in active 
trading. 

Cullmet Software Inc. was sharply lower. The 
company said after tbe market dosed Tuesday 
thrt it expects to report lower earnings for its 
first quarter. 

MGM-UA was up slightly. It is in a definitive 
merger agreement with Turner Broad ca sting. 

Telephone issues were mostly higher. AT&T, 
Bell South, Pacific Tdeas and Bell Atlantic 
were up while Nynex was off slightly- 

Rollins Environmental Services was sharply 
lower. The company’s hazardous waste opera- 
tion in Baton Rouge; Looriana, was ordered 
dosed by state officials. 

Stop & Shop was also down after saying H 
experts earnings for its second quarter will be 
hint by the pafonnance of its Bra disc's divi- 
sion. 

Meredith Carp, lost ground after it said its 
first-quarter operating net earnings may drop 
20 percent from a year earlier. 


12 Menu 
HWlM Stock 


MV.YM.PE loos HMi Low Qmtoroe 


50 24ft AnwsO 20 4 22 3S6 45 44ft 44ft— ft 

29ft 37ft Amctefc 70 32 13 24Z 24ft 241b 34ft + ft 

2846 ttft ARrioc 180 271b 27ft 27ft— ft 

14 4ft Am tec 4 31 6ft 44* 4*— ft 

*9 5DU. Amoco 320b 52 I 1892 63ft 62ft 43ft +1 


381b 28ft AMP 72 22 33 1974 33ft 33 

34 lift AntPCD 20 22 1* 42* 13ft 13 

23ft 12ft AfflNPI 12 74 21ft 21ft 21ft + ft 

3* 211b AmStti 14 41 9 42 33ft 33ft 33ft + ft 

43ft 30 Airatod 140 37 1* MS 43ft 42ft 43 — ft 

4ft 1ft Among 787 3ft 3ft 316— ft 

24ft 14ft AfWoss 20 431 B 22ft 22ft— ft 

27ft 19ft Andnr 148 54 718 2*Vb 26 Mft— ft 

4*1* 29ft AnOoy 122 32 34 223 40Vb 39ft 40 + ft 

12ft 94b AndrGr 20 17 14 125 121b lift lift 

27ft 17 Anodic 40 22 15 4*9 2Mb 25ft 2C9b + ft 

341b 20ft AnlMUSS JO . 23 12 431 32W. 31ft 32 —ft 

711b 4016 Anhw pf 340 SA IBS 64ft 64V6 44ft— ft 

T9ft 13ft Ai« Ixrr 28 17 18 75 14ft 16ft left + V* 

14ft * Anrtwm J* 2 19 171 139b 13ft 13ft— ft 

151* 109b Anttmr Mb 39 9 11 IS 149b 15 

13 99b APOdM 21 24 10 113 10ft 10ft 1Mb 

2 ft Apctrf* wt 92 ft 9b ft + ft 

19fb 151b ApdiPutAW 112 504 lBft 18ft ISft 

741* 55ft ApPWPf 8.12 1VS )0Qz 701b 70ft 70ft + ft 

47 S3 ApPraPl 740 112 2£4te 4Mb 44ft 49H +lft 

34% 28ft ApPdPf 4.1* 125 2 33ft 32ft 32ft— ft 

31ft 2*16 ApPw Pi 379 127 21 30ft 30 30 

39ft 22ft Aurora 1761 77 24 1*45 2616 2416 25 — 

15ft > APOiMa _ 43 42 13ft 13ft 13ft 

24ft 1416 ArdlDn ,1tt 4 13 1514 22ft 2Tft 22 — 16 


13 — ft 
12 74 211* 21ft 21* + ft 

IM 43 9 42 33ft 33* 33ft + ft 

140 37 1* MS 431* 424b 43 — ft 

787 3ft 3ft Sft— ft 
29 431 23 2216 22ft— ft 

14* 54 711 2* Vb 26 Mft— ft 


J0.25124SH 32ft 31* 32 — ft 
340 54 IS25 6416 64K 44ft— ft 

7* 17 18 75 14ft 1616 14ft + ft 

44 J IV 171 139b 131b 1316— ft 

Mb 29 9 11 15 149b 15 


506 ISft 1B1* 18ft 
>0Qz jmb 70ft 70ft + ft 
2S0ta 65ft 64Y1 45ft +lft 
2 33ft 32ft 32ft— ft 
. 21 30ft 30 30 


I Mta Low Sttcb orv.VM.P6 WteHtebUnw Bfijfc 

27ft 17ft AKPGP . 2M 21ft 219b Zlft— ft 

37 H AsWOU 140 47 211 31ft 22ft 32ft— ft 

44ft 3316 AlMOpf 440 115 2 43ft 43 43 — 1% 

441* 311b AsWOpt U* .94 48 42ft 4IVb 42ft + 1% 

0ft 49 ABdDG UO 44 II 2018 *4* C3ft 63ft— ft 

110ft TV AdfOpf 475 47 - 1 102 1(H 182 — * 

34* 18ft API tone I40 87 11 12 2Dft 20 20 — ft 

29ft 2999 AtCyEI 2SB 97 9 231 26* 26 36ft— I* 

*41* 42 A11FU Cft 439 U 1766 59 SBft 59ft— 1% 

434ft Ml AHRCPf 370 J 2 399 399M 399 —5 

41 32V] AHRCPf 375 97 350i 40 39ft 3Mb 

153 1DW* AMRcpf 2J0 27 4 148 140 140 —2ft 

18ft 10ft AffcaCp 44 121* 12ft 121b— 16 

321b 1016 Aina) 40 17 25 55 24* 231% 24 

54* 34ft AutaOt 41 14 21 *6850*50 50 — 1* 

5 4* Avalon n -* 23 4ft 4* 4ft— 1% 

311* 17ft AVEMC 40 24 14 14 30ft 299b 299b— * 


Ste. ocw llMtab 

Div. YU PE BfltHtetlLowr {toot-OTBi HWLte Stock 


Pte.YM.PE WteHtoOUm S^CMra 


E* If* Bowotr 72 3J 9 165 211* 9* 23ft 

31ft 26 BrteSI 140 55 13 T97 29ft »U 29ft + ft 

664b 43* BrMM 17* 12 1* 3369 59 5*16 58* — * 

30 51* BrttPt IJOv 63 7 197 2** 28ft 29ft 

27ft 22 BTTT2PP 41« 24 IB 3* 25ft 25ft— 1% 

5* l»b Brack *4 3* 2ft 2ft 


IS Sir 2?? 22 , Stw SO Chawpf *49*114 IT 5S1* 55ft 55* + ft 

12 + ft 57ft 51 Ompfl044bl93 221 Mft 55ft 55* — ft 

Smj. SS SS~ ft 27* 15ft Chdna 72 34 • 21 20* 20ft 20* + ft 

IS SS .. Mft 36ft atanmt 1 J2 il 12 2*6 30*A 29ft 30 

’S ^ ft 4*1b 27 CTMlHY Z48 64 5 2877 3»ft 3Bft 39 — ft 

M Jft _ 44* 27 OtNYpf V87 4J 2 39 39 39 


IS! lieSfTr K a , 110 »b 25ft 25ft — ft } 5*ft 51 QtWY pf 4J9* 87 5 5* 5* 56 + 1b 

Sfty®. 2-5 .H 7 ■ 2** / 79ft 32 aiopfc IM XS W H 75ft 35U 35ft + * 


41 29H BkyVG 3.12 MJ 7 . 712 77* 74* 34*— ft . 

25* 19Vb BkUGPf 247 10.1 1 24Vb 2«Vb 341b— 1% 

37* 29 BkUOpf 375 1U 14 3416 34 74ft +.ft 

26* 13 BvmStl 21 9 * 13 22ft 22 2216 

30* ZH4 BrwnGp 17* 44 19 122 29ft 29 29ft + ft 

5* 5* BrwnP 148 22 M 1313 509b 49* 491b— 1ft 

4N6 28ft BRIRNk 1 JO 27 I **0 37ft 3*Vb 37 — 1% 


3916 29ft A vary 
IBVb 10 AteVHIn 
41 ■ 27 Avttef 
25* 179b Avan 
3096 T«ft Artlla 


40 17 14 *43 35ft 241% 351% + ft 
10 62 17ft 17 17ft +lft 

40 1J 19 475 33 32 ft 33 

2J0 M 11-1*53 22ft 22ft 22ft— ft 
It .25 21ft 31ft 2W6— ft 


19ft lift Bundy 40 44 9 

20 15ft Bunkrfi XI* 117 

21ft 141* Burlna 12 

30* 34 Burllnd 144 SS 


27 I 660 37ft 36ft 37 — ft 
L* IS 405 32ft 311b 32ft— * I 


2* 19ft IB 18 — ft 
1* 19ft 191% 18ft -f 1% 
42 14* 16ft lift— ft ■ 
911 28* 27* 28 — ft 


«ft 43* BrlNtll 140 « 9 1366 64ft 61ft *19%— 1ft 


18ft 016 BMC .T2| . *7 9* 91% 9ft + ft 

35ft 24 Baimco 50 U 11 269 28ft 28 39 — ft 

19* 15 BJo-liffl .92 11 15 2239 IK* T7ft lift + * 

34* 1M6 Baktor J* 17 14 31 21ft 21ft Zlft 

2ft ft vIBOMU 467 1ft 1ft 14% + ft 

57ft 33ft BcdICp 144 U 14 224 SSYl 57ft 51ft + It 

23V, lift BelteMf JB VI 1141 17ft 17* I7Vb 

1216 Pft BairrPk 13 102 11* lift lift 

4Aft 33* BaOGE 340 14 I 1478 40ft 40 4016— 16 


796 4ft BrlNopf SS SO 
ZFh If BrINPf lit 9.1 

52 4*lb BriN pt 57>104 

lift II Bvmdy 44 37 20 

*6Vb 50ft Burrs* 24* 47 11 

Wft 13ft Baftrln 42 37102 
7 14b Butte* 

15 3ft Bctepf VOS) 


17 7 6ft 61b 

4 23ft 22ft 23ft + ft 
309 50ft 50* SVft 
236 12* 11* U — ft 
1915 63 62ft 62ft— ft 
71 16* 16* 16*— ft 
172 2* 2ft 2ft— ft 

79 41b 41% 4* 


32 CTvnmk L24 XI Iff H 35ft 35* 3Sft + * 

31* 31V, OtePn 2J0 6J 10 535 34 33ft 33ft— * 

39 29* ChovRt 240 tS 9 7193 37ft 36ft 37 + 4% 

100 130 CMMIW 11» * 135 135 135 —ft 

29ft MH'CMPnr 78* 17 I 49 2*ft 2Sft 25ft— 1% 

lift 716 ChfcPufl J4f 30200 35 81% * 9—1% 

5* 9Mb ChrteCr 4M 1 J 63 48ft 4 481% + 1% 

13ft 3 Qyteta 7 10 * to* 10ft— 1% 

139b 9ft CBromo 40 -<05 12 11* 12 

56 44U Chnmof 13 54ft 54ft 54ft 

3Mb 3Sft QHnralr UJ0 U 3 *180 Sin 3«9b 35ft— 1% 

77., n 270 U 12 3M 70ft 46* 68*— 1* 

63ft 50* QnAibpf 473 7.1 57 591% 59ft S9ft 

20* 12* Church 1 44 U 13 19S2 I* ,5ft 75ft 4- ft 

27* 20 CUcorp 272 9J 9 149 23ft 23ft 23ft— ft 

51 361b OnBdl 112 65 I 19 47ft 47ft 47* + 1% 

194% lift ClnCE VI* 123 7 1082 17ft 17* 17ft 


3116 214% Cft! In 1400 60 11 334 231b 22* Sft— 1% 
125 *6ft CBS 300 24 19 433 108 1071% 107ft— ft 

108* 184ft caswd _ 2225 10** 10«ft W*ft— ft 

Bft 4* CCX 8 15 5* Sft 5* 

n jib cotpf us lu 20z iwb left loft 

Mft CIGNA 340 47 3SlS79 54* 54ft54* + ft 

2* CIGpf 173 89 *2 37ft 301b 31 — ft 

Oft 49ft CIGpf 4.70 62 299 50ft 50 50— ft 

99ft 25* CHA Fn 1« MQ 52* 51 5116— 1ft 

Il«b 9* CNAJ IJI 114 66 101b 10* 18ft 

30ft l«ft CMW 213 22* 21ft 22 + ft 

4** 35* CPC In, 220 52 11 1191 42ft 41* 42ft + * 

2* 14* CP Nil 149 62 * 17 22* 22ft 22ft + ft 

22ft 19ft CRIIMI 2B7«100 . 97 30ft 294% 29* + ft 

.25 OX^ 1-16 63 9 2508 35* Z*ft 2*ft + ft 

148ft >30 CSXpf 7J0 44 3 164 1 58 158 —TO 

40 * 27*cra UO 29 273534ft 34*— ft 

12ft „7ft C3IPC 104 199 9ft 8* 9ft + ft 

»* 34* C oPOt <92 33 10 76 26ft 26* 2Mb 

16ft 8ft Cobsor 15 2238 Mft Mft 14ft 

25ft lift CcHPbd 49 23 3 3492 21ft 39ft 21ft— 1% 

54* 35* ColFdpf 425 U 091 51* 50* 50ft— ft 

20ft 13ft CoHhn 25b 14 87 18* 19 181%— ft 

is 12 Comm I .12 4121 54 Mft MW Mft 


99ft 25* CHA Fn 
lift 9* CHA/ 
30* 16ft CNW 


25 15ft CRLkO AO 
71% 3 CmpRB J6I 

40* 30ft comspa 
tSH lift CdPoc* 48 
22* 14 ConPEs 49 


3D* 24* ArlPpf 158 72 2 
1C 79 ArtPpf 107B-1U 
24ft 14 ArkBD 40 V7 9 

24* I* ArKJp UK SS 25 1 

ft ft ArtnRt 

lift 11)% Anraoa 

13ft J* Arrow 1: 

23 ISft AnncPf X18 94 
24ft .144% AnmRb 48 U S 
39* 24* ArmWIn IJD 33 9 : 
37ft 29ft Armwpf 175 9.9 
34ft 19ft A/pCp US C 7 
25ft 12ft ATBbrE 40-14 10 

30ft 16 Artra 32 4133 

27 IS Arvtn* 40 34 9 1 


3 29ft 29* 29ft— ft 
75*95 94 95 +46 

. 64 23Vb 23 23ft + ft 
1(03 19ft 18ft ISft— ft 

U 13ft’ 13 13 —ft 

13M IBVb 10* 10*- Vb 
7 21* 21ft 21ft + ft 
46 15 14* .15 + ft 

379 3SV. JS* 3S*—ft 
250z 39 37 38 : -4-1 

17 37ft 9ft 27ft ft 
IS ISft ISft 15ft— 1% 
72 26ft 26ft 36ft— * 
167 23** Mft 23ft - ft 


46* 33ft BaOGE 340 84 8 1478 40* 40 4816— ft 108* I84ft CBSwd 

48 28 ’ BaUpfB 440 104 ' 288z 45 44 44 —1 8V1 4* CCX 

35ft 22* BncOne 1.10 34 11 *& 32ft 22 12* 12 8V3 CCXPf 145 11J 

m* •* BncCtrp 54b 54 I 9ft 9ft 9ft 60* 32V, CIGNA 240 45 

5ft 2ft BanTbb 135 3, 2ft 2ft— Vb E* 23* CIGpf 275 45 

62 44* BaodaO 140 11 II 77 57* 5Mb 56ft— ft 53* 49ft CIGpf 4.10 «J 

ISft ST* BABCS 240 4J $ 126 52 .411% Sift— ft 59* 25* CHA Fn 
53* 44* BkBpfA 691b *4 . 10 M* SJ 53* 4- ft lift 9* CHAI 

52* 49ft BKBpfB 49b 14 99 32V) 22 32ft + ft 30* Uvb CNW 

471b 27* BkNY 3M 44 7 1699 42ft 41ft 42* + * 46* 35* CPC In) 240 S3 

33* lift BanfcVa 1 J2 44 • 8 203 27 '46* -Mb + ft 26 1 4* CP NH 148 63 

22* 15 BnfcAm 40 SO 9979 15ft 15ft 15ft + ft 22ft ly» CRIIMI 247blU 

47 40 BkAm Pf Vital VI 411 421b 42 42ft + * 3ft Zlft CSX 1-16 4J 

76ft 65* BkAm Pf &27B113 155 67 66* 47 + ft 168ft TOO CSX pi TOO 44 

IS* 12* BfcAmpf 248 431 16* 15ft 161% + 1% 40ft 27* CT5 

Sft 24* BfcARtV 240 14 12. 71 28* 29* 9ft— * 12ft 71% CSJnc 

75ft 43ft BantTr UO 4.1 7 U2S 67* 64* 6«b— ft 24V. Cabal 

V 28* BkTr Pf V50 9A - (82 26 ta 36 +* 16ft 8ft Cotsar 

44ft 35 B fcTrpf 02 94 ■ 59 4416 44* 44* + * 25* lift CtriFbd 49 23 

13 8* Bamvr 43* J 15 69 II* 10ft 11* + ft 54* 35* ColFdpf 473 9J 

39ft 19 sard 48 .14 14 1571 341b 23* 34ft— ft 20* 13% CaHftn 25b 14 

241b 19* BamGP 49 U IS 21 34* 34 2416 + * 15 12 Cranml .12 4 

41ft 25ft Bam*f» V04 2? 18 1112 34* 39 3Sft— ft 25 IS* CRLkO AO 
S3 ft 17 B O YWY 40 2J M 362 22 38* 21ft +1* 7ft 3 CmpRB -Ml 

Oft. t BASIX .12b V* II 631 9* * 9 — * 40* 30* gSSspb 

28ft 21ft BOUKh J9 24 17 451 Bib 31 31*— * 15ft 11* CCPocs 48 

18ft lift BaxtTT JE> 24 71 3957 14* 14* Mft— * 22* U COT PE B 49 

Z7* ltft BarFM 20 4136 13 34* 34* Mft— ft 228* 150* CaeCOs 78 
34* 53ft BoySXS 240 8J 9 C 31ft 30ft 31ft + ft 27ft 16% CopHdS 31 34 

79* 31* twarfw 14 UI2 39 36 35* 35*—* KVA IflSb SSSp? 742b 72 

XS6 Mft BbalCo 140 54 7180S3 33* 3] . 304% + ft Mft IQ CteSsO 40 

61ft 40ft BbOtPf 349 SS 17 61ft 61 41* 40* 29* Carlbl* UD U 

15ft 12* BbCOT 44 24 62 381 155b 15* 15ft— ft 26* 1* CoroFI 40 17 

50* 34ft EUdnD 120 VI 14 811 56* 55* 56ft— * 38* 21 CBTPw 248 94 

8ft 2ft BbkW* 481 . 349 I* 31% 3* 48 35ft CorTbC 110 S3 

11 4- Bator pf 170 324 53 Sft 5ft J* 111% 9* Corral 47 9 

17ft rm. BekteH 40 37 9 61 15ft 14ft Mft— ft 24* 17* CBrPlr* 

Sft 221% MIM SL 17 11 304 33* 37ft 33ft— ft 31 20 COTtHw 172 42 

35ft 22 BbMwpf 47 10 9 33 XM 32*— ft 46ft 32 — 

ft ■ 72ft BrtlAH 440 77 9 J671 98 17 17* + ft 191b 9ft 

33 24 BCE 8 U8 <49 71ft 71 31ft— 1% Mft 9ft CasftCk 

27* 19ft BbUInd JZ U 16 51 Mft 23ft 34* 29 IS* CMC pi Vttk 

44* 29* BettSoo 249 77 913490 39* 99ft 39 ft 15 12 CsttCpf 70 64 

57 41ft B446AH 49 14.72 ..127 flft A 51ft— ft «% 2Sft CalfOT 41 14 

3T* 2216 Bbfllte 140 VI TO 117 31ft Tift 31ft. + * ZPf I 10ft CbCO 76 VI 

(Sft 27* BbRtCp 240 44 It I T* Ob! 41ft 42 — ft IWft <7* Cbionw 440 34 

40ft 33* BbntfPf 440 117 ... 40r 49 4Q 49 +1 44* 34* CektePi 440 104 

m% 17ft Bbto«n 170 At 17ft 17*17*- ft 15 7ft Cefwrn 43e 4 

6ft 3* Benpta 471 .. . 5 rt ft 4ft— W *i M* C*fVJ#l 278 S.9 

tft }ft p#rtoY ' 49 45 7ft 7ft 7ft— * 2Mb 17 Centex n 75 14 

15 Mft BestM 74 14 » BB 13ft U 13 - 16 27 Mft OmSoW 242 14 

71ft 14* Bdhdtl 49 ZC V ’ W Wft Hft Mft— ft 31* 19ft CtoHud 296 197 

49ft 37ft B40l$»pfvoo Ilf. 79 45ft 44ft 4A8— ft » 201b CHUtfpf 247M9L9 
24* IBft'BemSIpfVSO 11.1 3B 22ft 2216 22ft— ft ilft 15ft CnllPS 144 94 

49ft 27ft Bevortr J2 X W--15U N6 25 35ft— ft 29ft 19 CftLoEl 249 83 

2Mb 19ft BIBTW JB 37 19 1W Wt B . »% +ft » 30ft CUiEIPfVM IV9 

34 Vb 13ft BtecRn -29 48 20ft 29 > SOH + ft 13ft Oft CeMPwr 140 11 J1 

24ft IMBocfcO 46 V4 14 27*9 19 Wb. * 31ft Wft cVtP* UO 99 

34ft Zlft BWtHP IBS! I 45 32* Bft Wb lift 2ft CantrOt 

»ft m* BJanrJn JM v-f : jg 19 !>*, WV + * izft 7* cntryn 70 74 

59ft 29ft StekH* 24 U W W Sft 54*’ 55ft— ft. 23ft 19* CenvfU 240 1X4 

9ft 33ft Bobtaot 149 U 16 -tm 49 ft 49ft + ft 2Btb IS* CrMMd JO 73 

51 34* HotatC IJ0 «» g* 4g* 4W + ft Mb. 16ft CbtfAlf 40 14 

41 ‘ 41 BOteoCpfiOO 94- ‘‘- ■» 57 »b 5«b— ft 25* »ft dimoJn 40 14 

29* 19* B one* 79 A » SS S? ^ £7* 2* Cten'Bt tJQ 44 

""Se* 15 f! 3 H S £5 S - 5 sw, *sy> a*ai pf 

Mh-.19» BPfOWB 92 47 12:2299 Sft 22ft 7Xh— ft W - I 5 wt«5p 

95% . *% Bonnns _ 14 34 ■ - 7ft 79b 41% I vlCnrtC 


an si* so* soft—* 

_ 87 W* || 191%—* 

21 54 141b 14* 14ft 

567 23* 23 23* 4- * 

_ 17 3* 3* 3* 

12 719 37* 36* 37*4-11% 

499 13* 13ft 13* 

^ 44 19* 191b Wb— ft 

» 159 219ft 30»ft 309ft— ft 


37* OpHdS 37 U 9 1366 22* 21 21ft— * 

tom lotm caoHPt 7 JOb r.i 3 » 7* iB7* 107*—! 

Mft 10 CDrtna B 49 51 10* W* 10* 

«* W* coritelb un 27 * 1331 31Vb 30* 31ft 4- ft 

1} Coro« AP 12 11 TO Zlft 33 2Mb— * 

38* 21 CBTPw 248 94 7 T286 26 Vb 26 26V, 

*!* 110 H 15 109 40ft 40ft 40ft 

lift 8* Corra l JO 9 11 3(1 9ft a «%— ft 

I?* Qgpy» „ I 96 32ft 21ft Zlft— 1 

31 20 CarTKW 172 42 TO 3048 29* 28* 28* 

46* 22 Cortwl JB U II 702 34* 33* 34ft + ft 

l?ft W% C toCMO 178 X4 7 28 16ft 15* iSSZ ft 

Mft 9ft Caatqc 466 12 11* 12 + ft 

29 IS* Csttc pi Vita 563 26 25* 25* -I- ft 

15 3 one Pf TQM la Mft U Mft + ft 

«J% 28* CotTPT 49 14 4459 36* 35* 36* 4- * 

V2k 18ft CbCO J6 3.1 11 39 25 24ft 24* _ ft 


IWft <716 Cbtetob 440 X4 11 3U 121 120 120ft + 2 
44* 3£6 Orton Pi 458 104 _ 2 Cft 42ft Sft— ft 

15 TftCerwrn me A 72 439 7ft Tft 7ft ft ft 

« 34ft CbMtl IM 59 9 an 41 40ft «ft— ft 

ta* IT Centex n 75 14 10 34 231% 23ft 23* + ft 

B Mft OmSoW 24214 7189(23*22*23 —ft 
3U6 Mft CtoHud 294 197 4 100 29 38* 28*— ft 


THCefwrn 43e 4 22 439 7* Tft 7% + ft 

34* Cental 7M &9 9 822 41 40ft «ft— ft 


» 201b CHuOpf ZJ7MU 


1 26* 26* 24*— ft 


21ft 15* CnllPS 144 U 19 245 19 181% 19ft— ft 


»% 19 CrLpEI 24987 7 95 25* 25ft 25ft + ft 
37 30* CLaEIPf 4.M TV9 4 S* 35* 35* + ft 
M6 CeMPw 140 llJm 209 12* 12* 12* 

21* nw cvtpo UO *9 4 51 19* 19 1?*— ft 


lift 2ft CteifrOt 

12* 7* CntryTI JD 79 

23ft 19* CenvfU 240 1X4 


2(5 4* 4 4* + ft 

243 IT* 11* 11*— 4b 
27 19ft W* If*— ft 


47.20 HOT 45* 6<* 45*4-W 
9* 19-57 S6ft 54*— * 


29* 1191 B ower 79 A » 1» B* BVt V* 

Jin XBft Bontena 172 49 19 1034 31* 37* 3796— ft 

Mta-.18» Bo fOWB Jl 4.1 12:2291 23* 22* * 

n 4* Borrnns 14 M • - 714 7* 

44W 27ft BptClf 376- SJ^T 'Vl 37ft 37 3Mb— * 

K 64* BotEpf 948 114 - »0E 92 90ft 81 +66 

"ft 9* BmEpt 1J7 1V1- S 191% 10ft Mft. 

14* M*8«EPr VbS 117 14S13 12 13+46 


2Btb IS* CrMbed JD Z7 12 151 26* 2Mb 25*— ft 

2g% .16ft CbttAlf 40 14 21 406 22* 22* S- * 

W% 18ft CTmoln .40 U 1582 26* 21 26*— ft 


27* 19* etuninf 170 44 
54ft 4fft Onrtlpf 440 84 
10 - ■ Srawao 40 47 
4* I vlCftrtC 
-I* * vjCWwf 

4ft 1ft vi Owl Pf 


70 44 28 26ft 25* 26* + ft 

KB “ 43 57ft Oft SZft + ft 

4047 18 960 91b 9* fft + * 

153 2*2* 2*— ft 
1» * ft ft— ft 

„ 3B 3 3 3 


^,W*gig6. 3» 47 4 971 54ft 55ft 55ft- ft 
499* 39 draw pi 529 114 2 44 4SU> 44 + £ 


34* 24* ClnGnf UO 1X7 
39* 27 ClflGaf 4J5 124 
Wtt «* OnGM 744 124 
73 52* CtoGof 971 127 

75 54* CinGM 9.52 Ufl 

2Sft 18ft CMMI JX 34 
37 25* OrcJK .74 24 

31 20* OrOty .10 3 

30 15 Ctrcu* 


440 1X7 7ta 31* 31* 311b— ft 
475 125 - 200r 38* 38* 38* + M 

744 124 2S0z 98 58 B 

971 127 49b 73 fi* 71 

*5 ^ - S 2 * 2 . 73 73 “«* 

3* J4 27 xn n* 28* XI* + * 

M 24 13 299 31* 30* 31 —96 

.10 3 IX 61 22* 32 22* 

_ _ . . 15 104 Z7W 26* 27* + ft 


27 2H OrcJK 74 24 13 299 31* 30ft 31—46 

31 20* OrOtr -TO 3 IX 41 22* M S* * 

30 15 Clrcu* 15 |04 27* 26* 27* + ft 

51ft 3Kb Oricrp 226 44 7 1789 47 2ft- * 


MO* 82* CHeppfAUh 9A U 0 99ft 99ft 99 ft 4 . * 

7 ^,n, 1 “ S St 2«S-* 

Jy* MtOoMr J 2 103 & 9} 7 M 7 

SS * CtolrSi .18 4 33 299 27ft 22ft 2 Z* — * 
M* ^ SSSS™ 1.10X433 3613Z*31*12* + ft 
,5 ,fc S2X2 ,n .. 15 166 If* T3ft Mft + ft 


16 tft CkryHm 15 IM 

®} 17 Ovot UC s.1 TO 14 19* if* m£ i * 

2* SSals 12 * 22. S' 31*- * 

64 47* ClvHl Pf 748 123 20 Qe 60 60 40 — * 

149 b 9* ObVPk ' JM 182 72ft 12ft 12* - 

13ft 10 OvpJCPf 1.1JI ' U 14* M 14 

40* Mb it » J? IS* «* T3M + * 

SB? Sj2g„ 33 12 441 3*ft 36V, 56ft + * 

*ft Mft gwBa .10b 4 2D 153 24* m* 24* * 


I Sf&b&SS !S a 19 

I** it* SSff INS !S ^ u E 

ass 

SJ S” 12® H 39 STB ! 37ft 27* 27b. — ft 


ss sss-s s o ijr^ sg gt 

wt §SfSS* i« « ’S IS St “ft SS— ■» 

St-s^SnSa iss ; “ sg f5s +it 

35 Mft CoiGra &» 105 aS w? 22 

S3 45* CotOSPI 5790107 IB TOW — 

l»ft W* CSOpf nlSJS 14.1 2»rfS* »S W ft 

50 32* Combi Q 2J6 47 9 1144 4S'6 S 

37* 29* CmBEn Ml 4.1 11 M9 30 ft 5? . 7 


33ft I* Comdr* 


•» 111% 17ft 17ft- 
26 17* 17* 17* 


j 3»j lift 11 * 11 *—* 


33ft 36ft CmwE 3J0 103 7 5413 94 * 29 m 
3Zft ZAfcCwEPl 142 S 7 ȣ W* S*_Xt 

M 13* CwBpf 170 113 12 3ft i! 

19ft 14% CwE pf 200 IU 37 TO* It2 1 £ 

2ft M* oSH pf S U 7 ^ 71* 71 * 71* + ft 

aMozSfaiSSivi ™ £2:* 

Wt SbcSlS 7M 117 Tni 71*-ft 

» S if? li s 4, i?Sia 41 * sjsi a 


a cSiL. 5 « » ra 29ft 29 29*- ft 

^ wOfHp^P JO 22 I 7| 77\k 7711% 

,24;; 

LSBfrVBl ill £5* 

* zS % Jaw SS*.g*ZZ 

5 465 10.1 109X44 44 44 + ft 

5 ” p» fW IM 14 49 48 to — * 




*.r- -•?. 




r *»i 


JS -n CraFri Vio 21 

“ 

“ . SS CnPBfE 772 TAJ 
56 32* CnPpfG 776 144 

SS !I5 « 145 

2H6 13* CnP prtj X4Q 14J 
28ft M* CnPp^T X7« TS 

S 3 S? "» M 

3046 MU CnP nr R 00 1U 


>•» « H CT 35* 34* 3 — * 


SU “ M ■ 51 awa 49 -ft 

IS » 

pSetStw? 51* S3ft— * 

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WV 4^40 145 3 1 27¥h Wfr Wh ^ ^ 

•SV afl KS IS-* 

. UB MpO J* 27 . a# 77 

•SoiSlu «=S6* 56* 54* _ ft • 

ptr 400 1U 30 27 Wt 26* — ft 

(Continued on Page 10 ) 


. ’ 

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iSufttpos'lndex 


ArijEX^PrtiO- Pja 
giMOTtfata^owfcp.n 
-rtv*rerfc** " *.-■• 
pv$E Mtfuflnw p.io 
KM 
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Eom> WM rtnorti pju 
FUmratanota p.o 
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hiMmf ratal . p„y. 
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RmlO^Sribunc. 


JgBBSDAV, AUGUST a, 1985 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 


Page 9 


WAIL 5TBEET WATCH 






7“ China ^ 

® trees 


oi ocmug leaves 
xmfusion in the Market 


S-TL 




--S of trees anii> 
l province, U»efe 

feet) tail wiu,^ 


- /gnated 

sasgasife 

wwuirfs estrogen and ^ 

"■‘MsS-i 


Some drink the 
earnings stream 
will buoy Wall 
Street prices. 


obstetrics and ^ 

Ssasi5s.5a«J! 


the syndrome 

«AW^ml9S3toimS 

Mttnrc menopause. wT? 
injections 

(tonal ro | e B 


•vaSeen 

•P® n 9 va, , or exploding st*.* 
.&&naasZ$ observed' U’k 


of California. Berkeley.* 
Institute of TedmoU, 
jtHfUtTNature that the ne* 15; 
IC^IBtoU most of iu outer fa 



ierior Plumbed 

« j 


^ave ir-ade aa apa^ 

__I(4Q2 me ten.) brio* Lheae^ 
MaViMots. foui-per»on «= 
^Jpgdbcen discovered a deofc 

Mbc.WU]iain Cooper. 


BV uj uwiwin ajm* ollp 

1 M Look, chief mentis i- 
(«,- which heg^n Jul'. 23 
lisud. Grades R. D.-^.ispr 

itfeeUmvcrsity of C-rxeac 
eedby ^Nnaooi Ccsaras 
fcXonjK sririooe anir:^ tad 
ejdft^b. had not rssaca 


AMEX Most Actives, 



V* 

Hiea 

Ls* 

5S 

*« 

U*i 

i - 

• ''251 

»7ta 


1 MS 

31>i 

T- 

•xm 



us 

J*» 


■ uco 



11** 

rs 


• u« 

it' » 

’I ' 


ictf 5 

a » 



rnsEx Stock irdj * 





SM^MH 

IPtavr 


— .. ; 1* ; 


WP>»* 


IJE :: .- 


it :■ ;; 

rr- } • 4 -f 



r. 1 ■ ii; 






■' .-i 


it- c J a*. 


-il; 

■8ii 

IV ^ 


A ’:>* 


.<• V-1 


- • V 

J » 


1 . 1i< 

pi? • 


. — r j into economically sensi- 
tives locks on the . bet that 
business will pick up tw<wo» 

.of the money pumped into the 

system by tfie Federal Re- 
serve. • 

“The second quarter was 
- the Hist time in seven quarters 
. that as a group money manag- 
os have outperformed the §&P average,” Mr. Schmaltz noted, 
and they’re worried about keeping the bag returns they’ re 
looking at," . 

He also, .sees signs that foreign investors are “losing their 
appetite* for U.S. assets. He pointed out that for the first tima in 
several years rising interest rales have not led to any sustained 
strength in the dollar. 


I N ADDITION to worry over the currency, Mr. Schmaltz 
believes new waves about Washington's political ca pacity to 
lead, stemming from the budget deficit and President Ronald 
Reagan’s health, have dampened Wall Street’s attractiveness to 


new lrjishi m i 
p&ov.tbe heavy elements ihsgK 
JM&piRn, are dispersed m ^ 


investors living on both aria? of. the Atlantic. 

Yet Kidder Peabody, which caught the market's ri fting tide by 
turning strongly bullish, in early May, is still telling cheats to keep 
wet in stocks. “We flunk the rannings c t r w» m w31 buoy Wall 
Street for the rest of the year,” Mr. Schmaltz said. 

As head of the firm’s stock selection committee, he highlighted 
these companies on Kidder’s recommended fist Westmghouse, 
Squibb, Schering-Plough, Allied Corp. and Hewlett-Packard. 
Gannett and Dun & Bradstrect are “back in buying range,” he 
added. 

The water is also muddy at OppenhdnKr & Co n where 
Mkfaad Metz and No rman Weinger write in the firm's August 
“Portfolio Strategy” publication: 

“Rarely has the investment environment presented such a 
generous array of paradoxes. Among the more intriguing is that 
the consensus of professional investors seems quite bullish about 
long-term prospects for financial instruments, especially com- 
mon stocks, as mstinguished frtHnhard assets. Moreover, there is 
an underlying optimism that the alterations in economic policy 
implemented by this a dmi n i str a tion will have a dnrahly .positive 
effect on the economy, allowing, of course, for the sporadic 
interim dislocations. •'. 


“Bat wi thin this context,” they add, “even the most euphoric of 
participants admits to .great difficulty in identifying specific 
attractive vehicles. The complaint Is tbit fwe can’t find stocks to 
buy-”*. • 


- Csqatal Hriffir^s is ihe^ only, new stock named this month to 
the firm’s engjhaas fist, accormng joStef an Ahram^ chairman of , . . 
the stbcksdectionoommin^ . o = »■ .■ 


ChariesComer, the Sim's technical analyst,caled themaritefs 
collapse through 1,340 on the Dow average “a watershed." He 
thmks the risk now is a break to the 1^280-1300 levd. “Thertfsno 
real sdfing pressure," he said. “Just a lade of buyers. C onfiden c e 
has been lost." - 


Martin Zwdg, editin' of Zweig Forecast, noted that the vicious 
cross-currents cansod by r so-cafied “program" artttrage trading 

■ (Conttaned on Fage.ll, CoL 5) 


Aug. 7 

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EC Pact 
On Steel 


By EDVARD R0HRBACH 

International Herald Tribune 

.kS^S^CA* 1 * mStaed ’ iVs because you haven’t 

community is split down the middle over 
SSS.T? rates beaded,” «id Richard 

Portfobo managers, he added, do not know now whether to 
raxsecash, slide with conservative issues that haws performed well 
tms past year, or move aggres- ' _ 


Approved 


Exports to U.S. 
To Be Cut 25% 


Ream 


BRUSSELS — European Com- 
munity industry ministers have ap- 
jwoved an agreement with Wash- 
ington. cutting thar steel exports to 
the United States and have agreed 
on how to pared out the reduced 
sales, officials said Wednesday. 

The agreement, reached late 
Tuesday after more than seven 
hours erf bargaining, was hailed by 
diplomats and officials as a break- 
through that had prevented a trade 
dispute with the United States. 

“This is an equitable agreanent 
which takes into consideration the 
vital interests of the steel industry 
in the U.S. as wdl as in the commu- 
nity." said Willy de Clercq, the EC 
commissioner for external relations 
■mi t rade. 

The ministers agreed toa25- 
pcrcenl cut in exports of II catego- 
ries of sted products for the rest of 
this year. 

The agreement fallowed a con- 
sultation request made by Wash- 


ly increased exports. The United 
Slates had made Aug. 1 a deadline 
for European restrictions, threaten- 
ing unflateral action otherwise to 
slash community imports. 

Diplomats said the nstriction 
only applied to the remaining five 
months of this year and (he com- 
munity expected to export 198,000 
metric tons more during that peri-' 
od. 

The community had exported 

514.000 tons through the aid of 
June and the diplomats said that 
despite the 25-percent cut, total ex- 
ports this year would exceed the 
1984 deliveries of 632,000 metric 
tons. 

Under a January agreement, the 
rornmnnity had been granted a 7.6- 
share of the UJS. market for its 
exports. 

West Germany pushed hard for 
an extra share within this quota of 
the European total of 233,000 met- 
ric tons and was given an extra 

15.000 metric tons. 

Diplomats said all West German 

riflims have been satisfied with this 
agreement. 


G.MJV.C/S Performance 


*5.0 



■81 ’82 '83 '84 

IndudM G J4 A-C.^ ’a contribution 
to net Income 


Iba Nm> York Tin 


Auto Giant Moves Into Finances 

GM Expands Its Home Mortgage and Loan Services 


By Robert A. Bennett ' 

New York Tun * Service 

DETROIT — General Motors is known, of 
course, for being the world's biggest maker of 
automobiles. But it has other ambitions, too, one 
of which is to be a leading financial institution. 

In fact, its captive finance company, General 
Motors Acceptance Corp., which has long beat 
primarily engaged in maxing car loans, already is 
trying to expand its franchise into a host of other 
financ ial businesses, ran g in g from home mort- 
gages to money management to credit cards. 

And despite the finance company’s conserva- 
tive, even stodgy, tradition, most financial ex- 
perts are betting that, with GM*s deep pockets 
and depth of management behind it, GMAC will 
emerge as a key competitor, challenging the likes 
of Citicorp, Merrill Lynch and Sears, Roebuck. 

“GMAC is in a particularly strong position 
because it is the largest finance company world- 
wide, backed by a huge and powerful parent, and 
pan of a massive organization with great depth 
of management,” said J. William Chariton, a vice 
president at EP. Hutton & Co. 

GMAC is not the only captive automobile 
finance company to expand. Only last week. 
Ford Motor Co. arm ram red that it would acquire 
First Nationwide Savings & Loan Association, 
based in San Francisco, one of the largest and 


savings organizations in the 


most profitable 
United States. 

Similarly, Chrysler Corp., through Chrysler 
Financial Corp., recently acquired EF. Hutton 
Credit Corp., a specialist in leasing and equip- 
ment ftnaneing. 

For GM, building a diversified finanrial busi- 
ness is part of its strategy to even out the cyclical 
earnings of the auto business as well as enhanw. 
profits over all Last year, the auta giant spent 
S2J billion to acquire Electronic Data Systems, 
one of the largest U.S. daia-ptocessna compa- 
nies, and more recently it won a heated bidding 
contest to btw Hughes Aircraft Co. 

Although GMAC originally was conceived to 
help GM sell more cars by providing financing to 
potential buyers, it now represents far more than 
that Last quarter, for example, GMAC was 
responsible tor a fifth of GM^ net income. 

And Robert F. Murphy, GMACs president, 
promises that this is simply a starting paint. 

“We’re already the fifth-largest bank in the 
country,” said Mr. Murphy, 63. “We don’t have 
far to go to overtake Gticorp if we wanted to.” 

That is a bit of hyperbole, but only a biL 
Although in terms of assets GMAC is still far less 
than half Citicorp’s size — at the end of the 
second quarter GMAC had assets of $64 J btl- 
(Contiaued on Page 13, CoL 6) 


Turner Agrees 
To Buy MGM-UA 
For $1.5 Billion 


NEW YORK —Turner Broad- 
casting System signed a definitive 
agreement to acquire MGM-UA 
Entertainmeat Co. for $29 a share, 
or a total of $1.5 billion, the com- 
panies announced Wednesday. 

Turner Broadcasting’s chairman, 
Ted Turner, also announced that 
he had officially dropp ed his earlier 
proposal to acquire CBS Inc. in a 
transaction valued at about $5.4 
billion. 

TBS and MGM-UA said their 
definitive agreement to metge was 
approved by both companies’ di- 
rectors, but remains subject to ap- 
proval by MGM-UA’s stockhold- 
ers and government regulators. 

Once completed, the companies 
said, they would immediately sell 
MGM-UA's United Artists Corp. 
film-production subsidiary to Tra- 
de da Corp. for $470 milli on. Tra- 
cinda is a holding company con- 
trolled by Kirk Kerkonan, a 
financier, and currently is MGM- 
UA’s largest shareholder, with 50.1 
percent of the stock. 

“The acquisition of MGM repre- 
sents an excellent opportunity to 
improve the strength and stability 
dT TBS,” Mr. Turner said ina pre- 
pared statement “We think the 
business of MGM is highly com- 
patible with TBS’ existing opera- 
tions.” 

He did not indicate how he 
would finance the acquisition. 

Atlanta- based TBS operates 
WTBS-Superstation, a nationwide 
distributor of sports, movies and 
news to cable-television systems, 
and Cable News Network. 

MGM-UA a broad-based enter- 
tainment company, has interests in 
commercial filmmaking and distri- 
bution, television production and 

music publishing. 

Despite a $14.3-m31ioD net prof- 
it in the latest quarter ended May 
31, the company has piled up a 
nine-month loss of $662 million. 
Last Thursday, while the company 
was negotiating with Mr. Turner, 
studio executives announced a 
$1 75-nriIlion film-production bud- 
get for the next fiscal year. 

The assets of MGM that would 
remain after the United Artists di- 



Ted Turner 


vestiture include a vast film library 
of about 2200 titles, the MGM 
film studio, and distribution and 
syndication operations. 

Mr. Turner has been seeking ad- 
ditional programming for bis cable 
network. He turned to MGM and 
its valuable library of films — in- 
cluding “Gone With the Wind” — 
less than two weeks ago when his 
hostile takeover bid for CBS ap- 
peared doomed. 

The companies also said that af- 
ter their merger is completed, Tra- 
cinda has agreed to offer other 
MGM-UA stockholders the oppor- 
tunity to buy United Artists stock. 

Mr. Turner's agreement to ac- 
quire MGM-UA came only days 
after his unwelcome offer to ac- 
quire CBS ran into serious prob- 
lems. 

The major blow was CBS’ pur- 
chase of 21 percent of its stock 
from shareholders, a buyback 
whose terms included limitations 
on the amoum of total debt CBS 
would be allowed to accumulate. 


Since Mr. Turner was offering 
debt and other securities, but no 
cash, it was likely his acquisition of 
the network would have violated 
those limitations. 

As a result. Turner Broadcasting 
said Wednesday that it “is termi- 
nating and withdrawing its current- 
ly outstanding offer.” 

(AP. Reuters, LAT) 


U.S. Trade Gap Readies 
Record $33.42 Billion 


By Jane Seabcny 

Wmkmgim Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
merchandise trade deficit, on a bal- 
ance of payments basis, reached a 
record $33.42 bilfion in the second 
quarter of tins year, the Commerce 
Department reported Wednesday. 

The government cited sliding ag- 
ricultural and manufactured goods 
exports and a strong rise in imports 
or Japanese cars. 

The second-quarter data sur- 
passed the previous record of 
$3251 bflficm in the third quarter 
last year and exceeded the $29.6- 
bQHoo deficit in the first three 
months of the year, the Commerce 
Department said. 

The trade figures are calculated 
on a balance of payments basis, 
meaning that they exclude military 
trade of US. defense agencies and 
reflect adjustments for tuning, cov- 
erage ana valuation to trade data. 

The new report confirmed paral- 
lel figures released last week sbow- 


U.S. PanelLUsety 
To Press Reagan 
For Sioe Tariffs 


Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
U5. Economic Policy Council 
is expected to recommend this 
week that President Ronald 
Reagan impose tariffs, not quo- 
tas, on shoe imports. The cabi- 
net will discuss any recommen- 
dation on Friday, Larry 
Spealces, the White House 
spokesman, said Tuesday. 

The International Trade 
Commission recommended in 
June a quota system under 
which the government would 
auction the right to import cer- 
tain amounts of shoes. But the 
administration does not favor 
quotas, under which foreign 
companies could raise prices to 
make up for lost volume and 
reap higher profits. 

With tariffs, the U5. govern- 
ment would get the benefit 
from duties imposed on im- 
pons. The president is required 
bylaw to deride on the issue by 
Sef*- 1- 

Shoe importers maintain that 
import restrictions would result 
in higher costs for consumers. 
Government and private econo- 
mists have estimated that shoe 
quotas would cost Ameican 
consumers between $50,000 
and $80^X10 for each job saved 
in an industry where the avo 1 - 
age annual wage is about 
514,00a 


ing an even bigger merchandise 
trade deficit of $37.9 billion for the 
April- June quarter. 

The new report shows a smaller 
deficit because it omits such factors 
as military sales and the cost of 
dripping and insurance Full fig- 

the bottom line of all tra^uSisac- 
tions, including all goods and ser- 
vices — mil be released later. 

Wednesday’s report said that de- 
veloping countries fared wdl as 
their exports to the United States 
rose for the quarter and the first 
half of the year, while indebted 
Latin America was able to seD few- 
er goods to the United Stales. 

Relaxation of Japan’s automo- 
bile import restraints in April con- 
tributed to a sharp rise in sales in 
America of Japanese automobiles 
that helped push that country’s sur- 
plus with the United States to re- 
cord levels. 

Congress has been calling for 
more import restrictions to help 
stem the influx of foreign goods. 
An earnest fight over protectionism 
is expected to heat up in the fall. 

However, Commerce Secretary 
Malcolm Baldrige bigtrad marie a 
pitch for a tough deficit-reduction 
p a c kag e in Congress to hdp lower 
interest rales, leading to a lower- 
valued dollar and improved trade 
balance. 

“Recent declines in the value of 
the dollar will hdp i mp rove the 
trade balance only in (he longer 
term because buying patterns re- 
spond slowly to shifts m exchange 
rates," Mr. Baldrige said. 


“Reduced federal budget deficits 
could hdp to bring down the dollar 
further and increase the prospects 
for growth in export and import- 
conmeting industries. The budget 
resrautton recently passed by the 
Congress is only a first step and 
further cats in spending must be 
enacted to bring the deficit under 
control," he added. 

Imports rose I percent during 
the April-June period to $86.3 bil- 
lion, dm the nse was aB in price 
and not in: volume, the Commerce 
Department said. Additionally, pe- 
troleum imports, whose prices have 
declined in recent months, surged 
strongly white other imports de- 
clined. 

Broods declined 5 percent dur- 
ing the soood quarter and all of 
the c ha n ge was in volume, not 
price, the report said. Agricultural 


For the first half of ibe year, the 
trade deficit ran at a $126 btOion 
annual rate, compared with a defi- 
cit of $1082 billion for all of last 
year. Commerce said. The deficit 
with Japan increased to a $45.9 
billion annual rate and that with 
-Western Europe rose to a S2L3- 
bilfion annual rate. The deficit with' 
Latin America declined to a $15.7 
bDlitm annual rate. . 






•• 


•: ................... 

• mmmm mwmmmm 

m vaaa aaaaa 

•mmm Mas 

% •••• •• ■••• 




Growing strength of 
BNP Group 


The 1984 results reflect the strength of 
our efforts. BNP completed the year with 
its financial structure larger and stronger 
than ever. The national and international 
involvement of the Group makes it 
imperative that we should maintain our 
efforts. This will continue to be our 
objective in the years to come. 

Net profit increased by 14.2% to 
FF1.7 billion and shareholders' funds by 

Rent Thomas (Group Chairman ) 25% to FF16.2 billion. 



In France. Additional services were provided for private customers. Over 600 
automatic teller machines were installed by the end of the year. Customers 
with Post Office personal computers were able to handle their accounts from 
home. Special savings accounts were introduced for young people. 

For businesses, new ventures were helped by means of specific 
development loans. Small and medium size companies also received special 
help. BNP appointed financial advisers throughout France to assist 
companies, and access to the bank's computing facilities provided a valuable 
service. Banexi, BNP's merchant bank, invested FF133 million in industry. 

BNP's mutual fund business increased by almost 50%. The bank was 
manager or co-manager for over 100 new issues, more than any other 
French bank. 


Worldwide. BNP increased the size of its network in Europe, North and South 
America, Asia and the Pacific Basin, it is the leading French bank for the 
provision of export finance services. The total of BNP export credits is more 
than a third of the total granted by all French banks. 

in the international capital markets BNP is again the leading French bank and 
tenth in the world ranking. In the new ECU market the bank has confirmed its 
leading position. 


* 

I 


> 


Consolidated figures 

FF million 

% Increase 

Net revenue 

26,094 

+ 6.9 

Profit before tax and provisions 
Provision for doubtful debts 

7,988 

+ 1.6 

and general risks 

5,145 

0.0 

Net profit 

1,768 

+14.2 


i 


Banque Nationalede Paris 


•I 


% 


BNP Group Head Office: 

16 Boulevard des Italiens, 75009 PARIS 
Telephone: (010 331 } 244 4546, Telex: 280605 




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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1985 


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97% 72% DME pf 972 107 210* 95% 95% 95% — % 

20* 14* DME pr 278 114 6 19* 19* 19* + % 

24 18% Dexter 80 38 11 2121 2D* 11 + % 

16% 10 Dldor 64 U 285 15* 15* 15% + % 

26 17 OtGtapf 88 34 300x 24% 34% 24% — % 

21 15* DfamS 176 103 1972 17* 17 17%— % 

38* 34* DIdSHpI 440 104 22 37* 37* 37* 

11 6* DlanoO* 30 34 3 27 9* 9* 9* + % 

St 36% D Le£ Id I 140 27 11 797 36* 36% 36*— % 
125* BS* Dloltal 13 3142 HO* 100* 100*— * 

95 53* Dtoner 140 1J 48 1061 90 0B% 89*— * 

28% 15 DEIS 140 44 7 40 22* 23 23*— * 


4* 4 Dlvnin 

11* 6* Dame a 


58 5 4* 

641 8H 8* 


34% 23* DomRs 272 94 9 2900 29* 29* 29* + % 

31% 16% Donald 40 34 9 49 18* 18% 1B%— * 

OHi 43* Donley U6 21 15 932 55 54* 54% + % 

33% 23* Dancy 140 44 13 67 30* 29* 30 — * 

42% 32* Dover 42 22 13 19S 37* 37* 37*— % 

37% 26% DowCd 140 54 14 347735*35 35* + * 
51% 36* DawJn 78 14 31 1739 42* 41* 42* + % 

15% II Drava 40 37 4? 13* 13% 13* 

34* 17* Drear 40 37 10 982 21* 21% 21* 

21% 15% D rexes 240 104 27 If 18* I? 

05% 30* Dreyfus 40 14 )4 411 60 St 59% — * 


51* 36% DowJn 78 14 31 1739 42* 

15% II Drava 40 37 49 13* 

34% 17* Drear 40 37 10 982 21* 

21% 15% Drexfl 240 104 27 19 

05% 30* Dreyfus 40 14 14 411 60 

01* 40% dupont 340 40 13 2191 60% 

5D 39% dupntpf 440 94 4 46% 

ssm M4I 

80% 01* Duke pf 420 100 110*78 

n 57% Duka pf 740 HU 4ttX 74 

27 22* Duke pi 249 104 4 20* 

35 29% Duke pf 345 11-1 5 30% 

87% 60% Dun PtM 844 185 30602 84 

83% 57* DunBrd 240 24 21 831 70* 

17% 13% DoaLt 246 120 7 772 16* 

16* 11% Dua Pf 147 114 SOU 16% 

18 13% DuaprK 110 124 1 17% 

20% 14% Dua pr 241 124 730x 19 

47% 43% Dua pf 740 124 740x01% 


77% — % 
74 + % 


62% 43% Duapf 
18% 8% DycoPf 

20% 20* OvnAm 


■60 44 II 

40 4 12 


110X71 77% 77% — % 

40* 74 70 74 + % 

4 20* 36* 20* 

5 34* 34* 34*— % 

B00ZI4 84 84 —3% 

821 74* 75% 74 — * 
772 10* 10* 10* + % 
500X10% 14% 10% 

730*19* 18% 18% —4% 
4 24* 34* 24*— U 



Wk- % 

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2* + % 
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54% — % 
26% — % 
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32 

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20* + % 
40% —1* 
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11* + % 
22% — % 
20 - * 
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140 34 882 29* 28% 29* + * 

140 64 10 0460 28* 27* 21 — % 

48 54 17 117 1% 1* 1* 

'pf 44 £7 72 10% 9% 9*—* 

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lXTolOJZ 50 14* 14% 14* + M 

144a 94 53 20% 17* 20 

E JO 14 13 629 23% 22* 22* 

40 JJ 19 50 18* 18% 1S% 

2.1 34 33 19 18% 19 + % 

14 17 778 02% 62 02 — % 

14 21 165 34 32% 34 +1 

34 1135 11% 11% 1J%— % 
134 2110 25% 24% 25 + % 

76 407 28% 28 28% + % 

24 10 11 29% 29* 2816—1 

34 12 589 27* Z7* 37* + * 
7 70 U M* IS +% 

148 43 11 179 29* 29* 29* 

148 37 10 241 35* 34* 35 

140 114 II 20 16* 16* 16*— * 
144 74 9 118 21% >1 21% 

-30e 34 8 34 10* 10 10 

40 14 10 01 29% 20% 29% + * 

42 25 19 34 13% 13 13 — * 

25 306 21% 21% 21% — % 

9 .We 4 97 23* 22% 22%—* 

146 19% 18% 19*— % 
48 24 78 14% 13% 14 + % 

JO 14 *21 17% 16% 17 + % 

48 25 12 248 19% 19 19 

40 74 JO 82 27* 36% 27%— % 
140 34 14 B03 53 S2% 52% + % 

19 553 20% 19 19% 

14 27 562 19% 19% 19% 

42 12 1603 39 38% 3*%— % 

31 262 17 10% 10*— % 

54 20 30 29* 29% — % 

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140 3.1 12 141 45 44% 44%—* 

43 7% 7% 7% 

If _ 1 11* 11* ll»— % 

k 42 4 17 4829 37% 36% 36*— % 

-60 24 16 3520*30*30* + % 

JO 24 9 107 71 'A 20* 20*—% 

J7 U I 11! 12* 12% 12* 

J4 2.1 14 1020 26% 25* 25*— % 

140 34 13 397 61* 59* «*— * 

■33. 1.1 10 398 30% 30* 30* 

140 17 13 586 52* 52 52% 

140 1429 4872*72 72 — * 

25 1386 12* 12% 12* 

0 806 21* 21% 21*— H 

1.10 118 47 9% 9* 9% 

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40 24 5 24 14* 14 14 — * 

40* 7 9 794 58* 58% 58*—% 

240 3.1 13 859 44 63* *3% — % 

1.11 JJ 9 148 29% 28% 28%—* 

2*8108 3 27* 27% 27% 

53 S% 5 5% + % 

40 1J 13 1683 48% 47% 47%—* 

240 92 13 20 20% 28% 28%— % 


14 18 301 

1 44 10 47 

11 10 767 
1 40 44 914 
1SJ 40 

14X 98 

92 I 145 
40 8 47 

15 M 901 

52 14 304 

1 J 31 149 

SJ 12 1095 
13 16 42 


5* 1% Qaklod 
30% 24% oakftdP IJ2 
34% 23% OcdPet 230 
14* 9% OCdPwt 
111 85* OccJPpf 160 “ 

108% 81% OcdPat 400 a/ 
24% 20% OedPPf 2J0 116 
57 48* OedPPf 675 113 

118 105* OcdPPflOJO U3 
ID? 101% OcdPf 1462 114 

iio too accfpvnojo 122 
38* 20 ODECC 1JJ0 4J 
34% 24% Oadan 180 U 
10 10* OtdoEd 188 12.1 

30 24% OhEdPf VO 128 

37 27 OtlEdpf 444 1Z7 

62% 43% OtlEd Pf 736 124 
66* 47 OtlEdPf 820 127 
29% 20* OtlEdpf 150 124 
31* 22* OflEdpr 382 129 
10* 11% OhEdPl 1J0 118 
71 52% OtlEd Pt 9.13 12J 

70 49 oaedpf 844 127 

92% 77 ODE Pf 1076 115 
17% 11% OMMtT 40 30 
70 54% OilPpf 884 128 

113 9S% Oft PptP 1480 118 

76% 58% OtlP pfE 841 116 
70 53% OftPafD 770 IU 

K% 19* DkloGE 280 9.1 
9% 7% OktoGPf 80 94 

36% 2BH Onn IJD 47 

17% 5% Omncre 
19* 12 Oneida JO 54 
33% 24* ONEOK 2J6 88 
29 21% OrwiRk 114 84 

12* TV. Orange J3t 57 

28% 20 OrlonC 76 38 

12% 8% OriwP 
9* 6% Orton Pt J0 07 

33* 24 Orion Pt 275 94 
31% 19* OutbdM 44 27 
36* 27* OvmTr 72 2.1 
19 13 OvStlLo JO 10 

37 28* OwenC 140 48 

51* 37 Owenltl 180 34 
15% 10% oxford 44 36 ' 


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103% 103%— % 
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V* 14% OkRen 740 LI 14 598 21% 20* 21* 



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46% XerwtPf 5MS 98 5 55% 54% Mk 

19*XTRA 84 28 9 315 24% 24 24%-% 


30* 29* ZaleCp U2 48 9 18 27 26* 2> + * 

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38% 32* Zvmln 18 un IS 34% SS 34*- % 


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) V . 

• * 


II 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1985 


Page II 


Ll& fixtures 


Staton Seam 
High Low 


Aug. 


Open Hleh low Close Oa. 


Groins 


WHEAT lean 

MUD bu minimum- dollars oar bushel 
3X6% XM Sep 257 2J&W 

2X2% Dec XM 381% 

X74V* X9J% mar 383": 

4J» 284 MOV 259% 2MV . i 

3-77% J5S Jul Z70*3 2X2V5 

145, 2X2% Sen 

EM. Seles Prev. Soles 4,787 

Prev. Dov Open far. 38.904 UP 114 
CORN (CBT) 

SJOD bu mlnlmum-dol Ion per busbel 
MJW 2-&U. Sep £2*% 231% 

2-J3 123 pee I2svs ztaw. 

2.10 132 Mar 133 1343k 

121U 2JJV. May 134 £38% 

214 13314 Jul 13SW 2J7% 

184W 125 Sec 2XS% 227V3 

128M 23014 Dec 123 224 W. 

E«. Sales Prev. sales 2U40 

Prev. Day Open im.i 18.155 ueMO? 
SOYBEANS (CBT) 

MM Du minimum' dollars per Dusnel 
7.56 
ATI 
AM 
AT? 

712 
72? 

A58 
A74 
428 
4J2 

EsJ. Sales 

Prev. Day Ocen ml. 45,106 up 203 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT1 
100 ions- dal Ian per ton 


1844. 18744 +2114 
Z97 2-79*. +83 

19?1m 102 +JI3W. 

xa?% z?i% +jn% 

2X0% 2X0 to +81% 
173*2 +214. 


2274k 

2244k 

2224k 

134 

13514 

2X5% 

2214k 


22BL. +31% 
2J5U +211. 
X3S% +21 '4 
127V4 +214. 

137 +mv* 

2261* +4)114 
223 +21 '4 


£.16 

Aug 

SJ1 

5J3 Ys 

£2993 

£29*. 

+87b 

£1316 

Sep 

£24 

5J69S 

£23% 

£24 

+83 V* 

£18 

Nov 

£Z7V» 

£30V» 

£27% 

528'-* 

+83% 

£38 

Jan 

£36 

£33*. 

£36 

£36+. 

+83*1 

ua 

Mar 

5*6 

£47% 

£45% 

£46'* 

+83 ’6 

£45 

Mav £53 


£51% 

£53 

+85 

£47 

Jul 

553 

555% 

553 

£54 

+86 

£44 

Aug 

589 

£51 

£49 

£49 

+83 

5J7 

Sw 

£42 

£42 

£40 

£40 

+83 

UO 

Nov 

US 

5J6 

£33 

£33 

+82 


Prev.Sales 26831 






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SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 

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ft. r.t | 




I-t;| 



K 'tY' 

ft.. ^ji| 


m 





■ H 

ft • vj J 








ft /f'.| 


ft - ^ L | 


ft A V.'l 




ft«^>.| 





ftj-FH 









Prev. Day Oaen In*. 48.914 off 971 
OATS (CBT) 

£000 bu mini mum- dollars per Diis/tel 









E 







ElTJH 

E j 1 r i j- i 




ftft 




Ei'it?' - ! 







IK 


lr 




Ir.'in 





Est. Sates Prev. Sales 954 

Prev, Day Oven ini. 3800 up 241 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 


ESI. sola 24287 Prev. Sam 20X87 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 43241 pf(iS2 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 


44800 tbs.- cents per lb. 



73.70 

5830 


65.00 

6525 

7X08 

5755 

Sep 

6170 

6X85 

7X32 

57.15 

Oct 

6280 

6355 

7120 

5820 

Nov 

6485 

64 JD 

7980 

6060 

Jon 

66.10 

6625 

70 J5 

41.10 

Mar 

66X0 

66.75 

7055 

61.15 


66.70 

6620 


6120 

Mav 




Esi. Sales 2077 Prev. Sales 1.9B4 
Prev. Day Open im. 1294 e« 70 
HOGS (CME) 

30800 IBS.- cents perlb. 


54 J7 

41.97 

Aug 

4£*0 

4555 

512S 

3885 

Ocl 

4050 

40.70 

5085 

39 M 

Dec 

4X77 

4285 

5057 

4070 

Feb 

4385 

4485 

47 85 

3880 

Apt 

4023 

4185 

4985 

4180 

Jun 

4X45 

4X45 

4985 

4280 

Jul 

4380 

4320 


4425 4A50 

4300 6142 

4155 6187 

63.80 6420 

6520 6580 
6406 6AI0 
6420 6420 
6520 


4400 4420 
39.15 39.15 
4122 4185 

4145 4180 
3985 4080 
4285 4190 

4380 4135 


+.17 

+27 

+28 

+25 

+.10 

+20 


—.92 

-122 

—187 

—.97 

—87 

—85 



PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Option R Strike 
Underlying Price Calls— Last 


Aug. 6 


Puts— Last 

Sep Dec Mar Sbp Dec Mar 


B Pound 

110 

2450 

r 

r 

r 

r 


13X94 

115 

r 

r 

r 

r 

050 


133.94 

120 

r 

r 

r 

r 

150 


13X94 

125 

r 

r 

11.90 

UM 

250 


13X94 

138 

520 

730 

935 

1 JS 

455 

£90 

13X94 

135 

X25 

580 

655 

3J0 

650 


13X94 

140 

080 

108 

425 

7.10 

950 


13X94 

145 

0J0 

200 

r 

1050 

r 


13X94 

ISO 

r 

1.10 

r 

r 

r 



SUM Canadian DoHars-centS per unit 
CDoiir 70 r r r r 088 

7183 73 r r r r 073 

7383 74 021 r r r r 

7383 75 087 021 r 186 r 

7383 74 r 025 S r r 

42800 West German Mario-cents per unit. 


DMark 

30 

528 

r 

£69 

r 

086 

r 

3500 

31 

r 

r 

474 

r 

r 

r 

3580 

32 

£11 

156 

191 

003 

021 

r 

3580 

33 

220 

226 

r 

087 

0J9 

r 

3580 

34 

1J1 

r 

r 

0JB 

051 

090 

3580 

35 

058 

157 

282 

155 

189 

r 

3580 

36 


183 

1-58 

I.H 

150 

r 

3580 

37 

an 

058 

1.18 

r 

s 

r 


13S800 FnmcJi Francs-iottis of a cent pot untt. 
FFranc 105 r r r 0.10 

11489 115 r r r 2.10 

1148? 120 080 r r r 

4354000 Japanese Yea-lMtta of o ant nor unit. 


JYen 

4a 

r 

230 

r 

r 

r 

r 




41.90 

41 

184 

IJ9 

r 

0.10 

054 

r 



41J0 


051 

1.10 

r 

r 

r 

r 

83-21 

75-18 


8+15 

85 

84-5 




054 

181 

r 



■7-13 

75-13 

Dec 

83-9 

B3-30 

83-6 




r 

r 


r 







82-12 

4X508 Swiss Fnmcs-cent* per unif. 











SFranc 

36 

6J1 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

84-4 

HK7 





4225 

J/ 

r 

683 

650 

r 

r 

r 







4225 

3V 

r 

r 

r 

r 

033 

r 







258 

X58 

r 

088 

r 

r 



4225 

41 

r 

259 

r 


r 

1.12 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 





















79-12 

57-10 

5«tp 


75-19 

7+24 









78-13 

57-8 

Dec 

7X25 

7+16 

73-20 





Call open Int. 19(574 | 



Mar 




trrrr^rrri 





7W 


Jun 


72-16 











70-24 

Lost Is premium (purchase price). 





7+15 

5+27 

Mar 

69-13 

70-26 

JIM 

69-13 









7+26 

63-12 

Jun 

69 

69-15 

69 


Seacen Season 


High 

Low 


Own 

High 

Low 

Clou 

aw. 

51.90 



4X10 

8? ifn 


4X15 

+85 

41.10 

4080 

Ocl 

4025 

4025 

4025 

40.95 

-87 

Esf. Sales 

£447 Prev. Sales 5.103 




Prev. Dav Open int. 1B550 un 37V 




PORK BELLIES (CMC] 






38800 lbs.- cento pgr ID. 







*985 

Aug 

5520 

5585 

5X37 

5X37 

—200 

7LM 

mm 

Feb 

6155 


6022 

6055 

—127 


SiM 

Mar 

6180 

6150 

5980 


— IJ0 








—120 







*150 


7X15 

5950 


*120 

*120 

*005 

*055 

—1.17 


Prev. Da v Open inL 7778 on 284 


Food 


COFFEE CINYCSCE) 

37800 lbs.- cents per IB. 

15020 12780 Sep 13225 13324 13140 13133 +45 

15080 \792$ Dec 13480 13485 13585 136.15 +22 

14925 12050 Mar 13780 13020 13780 13785 +.10 

14880 13180 Mar 13020 139.15 13885 13925 +25 

1*400 13580 Jul 13925 13925 13925 139.05 +85 

14780 13175 Sep 13980 +.15 

13880 13880 Dec 13980 —25 

ESI. Sales 1243 Prev. Sales 1833 
Prev. Day Oaen i nt. 11845 off 390 


925 

254 

Sep 

423 

*88 

4.13 

+15 

—22 

985 

224 

Ocl 

*80 

480 

*22 

423 

—.40 

725 

380 

Jan 

580 

581 

451 

422 

— J9 

9J3 

U4 

Mar 

£35 

£35 

487 

420 

— v47 

7.15 

xsa 

Mav 

557 

547 

581 

585 

—5* 

*59 

329 

Jul 

551 

552 

119 

£20 

—59 

£15 

482 

Ocl 

583 

£87 

£40 

£46 

—54 

EsI. Sales 


Prev. Solos I7J8A 





Prev. Day Open rnt. 91855 off 425 
COCOA (NYC5CEJ 
10 metric tons- 5 per ton 


2415 

1963 

Sen 

2061 

2073 

3055 

2071 


2337 

1945 

Dec 

210S 

2124 

2100 


+8 












7151 

2165 

2150 

2165 

+4 

218S 

I960 


7180 

2188 

2180 

2180 

— 3 

2330 

2023 

Sep 




2191 

-3 

2215 


Dec 




2218 

-3 


EsI. Sales 1819 Prev. Sales 1324 
Prev. Day Open ini 20834 up 229 
ORANGE JUICE (NTCE) 

1£000 IDS.- cents per R>. 

18100 13085 SeP 13585 13585 

18180 12780 Nov 13120 131.70 

19080 12380 Jem 12880 13am 

17780 12380 Mar 127.10 127.10 

16280 13180 May 

15780 127.75 Jul 

Est. Sales 250 Prev. Sales 412 

Prev. Day Open Int. 4841 aft 138 


13385 13485 
13020 13020 
12625 127.10 
12485 12685 
12685 
12685 


—180 
—120 
—.90 
— 85 
—23 
—25 


Metals 


COPPER (COMEX) 
25800 lbs.- cents per lb. 


6X15 

5855 


60.10 

40.10 

60.10 

JUI 4ft 

+.10 











Oct 




6050 

+.10 

84X5 

5880 

Dec 

*155 

6150 

*1 JO 

6155 

+.10 

84X0 

5980 

Jan 




6155 

+.10 

earn 

5950 

Mar 

6X15 

6250 

62X5 

6X50 

+.10 







6X00 

+ 15 

7450 

61 JO 

Jul 




6X55 

+XS 

7o.ro 

6X38 

Sep 

6480 

6480 

6480 

6485 

+.30 

7OJ0 

6X70 





64J5 

+50 

70X0 

6450 





6495 

+55 

67.90 

6X10 

Mar 




6555 

+80 

»7J0 

67J0 

May 






Est. Sales 


Prev. Sales 8.144 





Prev. Oav Oaen Inl. 70823 «NSU 
ALUMINUM [COMEX) 

40800 lbs.- cents aer lb. 






4550 

4525 

7050 

4490 

Oct 

Doc 

45J0 

4435 

4130 

7680 

7X60 

51.75 

4655 

Jo 0 
Mar 

47 JO 

4750 

47 JO 


64.75 

4385 


5195 

4785 


4585 

4525 

4585 

4635 

4620 

4725 

4885 

4825 


—85 
— 85 
-.05 
— 85 
—85 
— 85 
—85 
—85 


6787 

50L72 




53.77 

5482 

— J8 

5X10 

5180 Sep 

4955 

—85 

6580 

5X65 

Ocf 

5785 

5885 

5680 

57.12 

— J3 


Dec 

5080 


6785 

5S.15 



5980 

5885 

5887 



Jan 

5085 

—85 

6755 

5400 




59 JO 

5985 

— J2 


Mar 

5)85 

—85 

6787 

57J0 


6150 


6080 

6080 

— JS 



5X35 

—85 

6425 

5410 


61.90 

6X00 

6155 

6180 

— J7 

Esf. Sales 

Prev.Sales 465 



6550 

58JD 

Aug 

6080 

6080 

6080 

4080 

—80 

Prev. Dav Open im. 1,711 otfio 




SILVER (COMEX) 

5800 troy or- cents per troy az. 


6408 

6010 


61X0 

6138 

61X8 

6145 

+14 

I1BX0 

57X0 

Sea 

6188 

6198 

6140 

6188 

+15 

6340 

6188 

Oct 

621.0 

6218 

421.0 

6225 

+15 

12308 

5908 

Dec 

6318 


62B.0 

6305 

+14 

13158 

5*58 

Jan 




635.1 

+15 

119X0 

6078 

Mar 

6438 

6458 

64X5 

64X6 

+15 

10488 

6218 

Mav 




65X6 

+15 

9458 

ati n 

Jul 




66X2 

+14 

9408 

6418 

5ep 




6724 

+15 

7W8 

6408 

Dec 




6888 

+14 

7B9J 

6788 

Jot 




69X9 

+14 

7708 

6778 

Mar 

7068 

7098 

7048 

7b£2 

+14 

7X8 

6938 

May 




717X 

+15 

Est. Sales 


Prev.Sales 14322 





Prev. Dav Open Int. 73231 up 477 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

SD I ray oz_- dollars per troyoz. 

39100 75080 Oct 27920 28280 

37150 25750 Jan 28450 28480 

32950 24450 Apr 29080 29050 

30280 27180 Jul 29480 29680 

34580 30350 Oct 

Est. Sales Prev. Soles 22*4 

Prev. Day Open Int. 12880 up £ 216 
PALLADIUM (NYME) 
lOOIroy or- dollars per oz 
14125 
14150 
17750 
1 1480 

EM. Sales . 

Prev. Dav Ouen Inl. 4812 oft 192 
GOLD (COMEX) 

100 fray az.-doftar*aer troy az. 

48580 29180 Aug 32180 32220 

320.33 31550 Sep 

49100 29780 Oct 325.10 22480 

48950 30150 Doc 32980 33040 

48550 30680 Feb 11480 33480 

49480 314. X) Apr 33880 31880 

435.70 32050 Jun 

42840 331.00 AUB 

355J8 33580 OCt 

39100 34280 Dec 35880 35880 

37480 35580 Apr 

Jun 

Est. Spies Prev.Sales 19.970 

Prev. Dav Open Im.l 22880 up 17 


27980 

28450 

28950 

29480 


28150 

28480 

29080 

29480 

30150 


+2.70 

+170 

+140 

+240 

+240 


9050 

Sea 

9950 

9950 

9750 

98X5 

+50 

9180 

Dec 

«880 

9980 

9880 

9BJ0 

+50 

91X0 

Mar 

9950 

9950 

9850 

9X35 

+50 

9150 

Jun 




9855 

+50 


Prev.Sales 

919 





32180 

32480 

32890 

33480 

33880 


32250 
22420 
22480 
33420 
33470 
33980 
34410 
349.10 
3S4J0 
359 JO 
37180 
37490 


+180 

+1J0 

+140 

+1.60 

+1J0 

+180 

+180 

+180 

+180 

+180 

+180 

+180 


Financial 


Season Season 
High Low 


Open Hiatt Low Close Cho. 


72-27 63+ S«P 6W 68-28 68-8 68-28 

72-18 63-24 Dec «■« 

69-16 47-5 MOT 47-26 

Est. Sam Prev. Sales 126.174 

Prev. Dav Open int830597 uo 4517 

GNMAICBTI 

3100800 prlit- ats & 32ruts at 100 pst „ 

77-26 39-13 SOP 7+8 7+19 7+4 7+20 

74-28 59+ Dec 73-20 7+3 73-19 74 

74- 8 58-70 Mar 73-26 73-13 72-26 73-9 

75- 17 53-25 Jun 72-12 72-23 72-12 72-J2 

75-2 45 Sep 

EM. Sales Prev. Sales 

Prev. Dav Oaen Int. 4810 off 13 
CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

SI ml lllon- pis of 100 net 


9182 

9083 

9048 

9015 

B984 


+17 

+17 


72-3 


9X78 

8580 

Sep 

9X01 

9X37 

B5J4 

Dec 

•154 

91X5 

■456 

Mar 


91.40 

B&43 

Jun 


91.15 

8756 

Sea 


9033 

8834 

Dec 


■9.91 

88X0 

Mar 


Est. Soles 

80 Prev.Sales 


Prev. Dav Open inl. 3896 off 90 


9X45 

8*53 

Sop 

9159 

9141 

9156 

9X00 

8*50 

Dec 

91X2 

9134 

91.19 

9156 

0410 

MOT 

9050 

9051 

90X7 

91.15 

8473 

Jun 

9038 

9051 

9038 

9054 

87.08 

Sea 

9005 

9089 

9084 

9053 

87X8 

Dec 

■959 

0987 

■959 

90X4 

8754 

Mar 

89 J? 

8941 

8939 

BV55 

8884 

Jun 

89.12 

89.12 

89.12 

Est. Safes 


Prov.Sntoi 27.273 



+.14 

+.15 

+.14 

+.16 

+.17 

+.17 

+.17 


+. 1 * 

+.15 

+.16 

+.14 

+.17 

+.17 

+.17 

+.17 


Prev. Day Open I nt. 129877 uaSl 
BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

5 per pound- 1 coJnteaualsMJItfO! 

1+450 18200 SOP 1-3365 13440 15285 IJJ10 

1+190 18200 Dee 1J265 1J330 15180 1 92 IS 

1+160 18680 Mar 15225 15255 15150 151SD 

15990 1.1905 Jun 15100 15100 15100 15110 

ESI. Sales 15854 Prev.Sales 18.997 
Prev. Day Open int. *4,125 up 1+34 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

Sperdlr-tpaln!equalst08001 

.7585 X023 Sep X346 X349 X327 .7333 

J564 J006 DOC .7332 .7332 J3OT J3 M3 

.7504 59B1 Mar .7300 J2M J29B . 7295 

J360 JD70 Jun .7300 J300 5275 .7280 

Est. Sales 1530 Prev.Sales 1446 
Prev. Dav Open ltd. 7805 up is? 

FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

Sper franc- 1 point mwaliSCLOOOOl . „ 

.11600 89680 Sea .11400 .11400 .11400 -1H00 

.11450 89670 Dec -lljg 

.11425 -H42S Mar .11300 

Est. Sales Prev. Soles 

Prev. Day Oaen Int. 399 gffj 
GERMAN MARK (16AM) 

S per mar*- 1 palnrvauaisSmQOI _ 

5407 59 30 SeP 5514 5537 5511 5591 

5644 5971 Dec 5542 5546 5540 5551 

5662 5040 Mar 5580 5592 5580 5501 

5700 5335 Jutl 5624 

Est. Sales 24862 Prev.Sales 29591 
Prev. Day Open IM. 49,139 off 2471 
JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

Sper yen- 1 oofnt equals HUJOOO0I 
004248 803870 Sen 804193 .004221 804191 804194 

004350 803905 Dec 804317 804242 804215 J»C1B 

D04307 804035 6AOT 804251 804251 804245 .004245 

EM. Soles 8506 Prev.Sales £771 
Prev. Day Oaen int. 28.948 oft 1842 
SWISS FRANC (14AM) 

S per tnmc- 1 point equals 808001 
+030 5480 Sep +262 +270 +248 +253 

+449 5511 Doc +300 +317 +286 XZ»2 

.•MSB 5835 Mar .4334 

Est. Sales 19572 Prev.Sales 77580 
Prev. Day Open Inl. 30819 oft 1839 


—17 

—17 

—20 


—150 

—150 

—150 


+S 
+5 
+5 
— 39 


+11 

+9 


industrials 


LUMBER (CME) 

130800 bd. IL- s per 1800 bd. H. 

197 JO 13150 Sep 134+0 135 JO 


116.10 
18780 
19580 
176+0 15380 

18380 158+0 

17680 16250 


134J0 Nov I3i.il) 12550 
14280 Jan 14180 14250 
140+0 Mar 14950 149 JO 
May 154+0 154+0 
Jut 157 JO 157 JO 
Sap 16180 161 JO 


EsI. Sales 1823 Prev.Sales 1542 
Prev. Day Open Int. 8807 up 65 
COTTON 2 (NYCE) 

50800 lbs.- cents oer lb. 


13150 134-90 
133J0 134-70 
Ml 80 14280 
14850 14950 
15250 15480 
157.50 157 JO 
16180 161-00 


7750 

59.40 

Oct 

60.10 

60.12 

59X5 

7X00 

5950 

Dec 

60J7 

6040 


7475 

6080 

Mar 

60.90 

6036 

6050 

7080 

99X5 

Mav 


6080 

6070 

7085 

9950 

Jul 

6050 

6050 

60 JO 

65 JO 

54X0 

Oct 

S£40 

5550 

55.30 

59X5 

5X15 

Dec 

54 JO 

5450 

54J7 


Esr. Sales 1800 Prev.Sales 1J7? 
Prev. Dav Open In). 18.970 a If 306 
HEATING OIL (NYME) 

42000 goi- cents per pal 


7445 

6490 

Sep 

7150 

7X35 

7175 

77.10 

6755 

Oct 

7X50 

73X0 

77A5 

7455 

6850 

Nov 

7X40 

7199 

7335 

78X5 

69.15 

Dec 

7485 

7455 

7480 

7490 

6980 

Jan 

7450 

7490 

7455 

74.10 

7080 

Feb 

7X80 

7400 

73X5 

7380 

6880 

Mar 




7480 

6880 


6950 

6950 

6980 

6880 

6880 

May 




Esi. Sales 


Prev.Sales £339 



7U5 


Prev. Day Open Int. 22+82 up 276 
CRUDE OIL (NYME) 

1 800 bbl.- dollars per Ml. 


2950 

2488 

Sep 

27 J5 

27 J9 

27X0 

27 JO 


2455 



IK 

6**1 

2672 

2950 

2450 

Nov 

2652 

2653 

2434 

2650 

2950 

2X90 

Dec 

2412 

26X5 

2687 

2417 

2950 

24JS 

Jon 

25.95 

2683 

2585 

25 JO 

2956 

24X5 

Feb 

25X5 

25X5 

2556 


2955 

24.13 

Mar 

2550 

2553 

2£40 

2555 

2955 

2X93 


2£30 

2SJ0 

23X5 

25X5 

27.96 

MM 

May 

25.15 

25.15 

25-15 

25-15 

26X0 

2178 

Jun 

Dec 

25.10 

25.10 

2478 

.16 

Est. Sales 


Prev.Sales 11517 




— +0 
— 1.10 
-1JC 


—59 
— 41 
—82 


— -3D 
—.17 


+87 

+187 

+182 

+86 

+80 

+80 

+J5 

+J5 

+JS 


+84 

+83 

+84 

+80 

+87 

+86 

+81 

—82 

+JJ3 

—87 


Prev. Day Open Inl. 56597 up 1811 


Stock Indexes 


US T. BILLS (16AM) 

SI million- pts at 100 pet. 


9133 

8494 

Sot 

9258 

9250 

9256 

92X7 

+.10 

9X07 

85X7 


92JI 

9255 

9X30 

9251 

+.10 

9259 

8650 

War 

91X7 

9287 

91 J5 

9286 

+.11 

9X28 

8781 


91*9 

9159 

9158 

91X2 

+.11 

9281 

8880 

Sep 

9134 

9IJ4 

9134 

9151 

+.11 

91X8 

8985 

Dec 




91.15 

+.11 

9139 

8950 

Mar 




90X0 

+.11 

90.93 

9050 

Jun 




9055 

+.11 


EM. Sales 7.1B9 Prev.Sales £128 
Prev. Day Open Int. 3£513 up 51 7 


84-29 

83-78 


+18 

+17 

+11 

+17 

+17 

+17 


+17 

+17 

+17 

+17 

+17 

+17 

+17 

+17 


(indexes complied shortly before market dose) 
5P COMP. INDEX (CME) 
points and cents 

19800 14080 Sen 187 JO I88J 

20085 175J0 Dec 19020 191 J 

20X75 190.10 Mar 19X20 1948 

20680 19445 Jun 194*5 1964 

Est. Salas _ Prev.Sales 69800 

Prev. Dav Open int. 96401 up £223 
VALUE UNE(KCBT) 
pa mts and cents 

21350 185.75 Sea 198.95 1994 

21785 20080 Dec 30180 2024 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 7567 

Prev. Day Open Int. 11959 up 632 
NYSE CO MP. I NDEX (NYFEI 
paints and cents 

11085 9155 SOP 10885 109.1 

11 7 JO 101 JO Dec T10J0 1108 

HOTS 10980 Mar 11250 IIX3 

12080 11X75 Jun 11X95 11X9 

Est. Saras Prev.Sales 15425 

Prev. Day Open Int. 10J81 aft 1571 


18755 

1S8J0 

+50 

190.15 

191,10 

+55 

19X20 

19445 

19255 

19655 

+X0 

19850 

198.95 

-.10 

20150 

20X05 

+.10 

10855 

108.90 

+X0 

110X0 

1W50 

+3S 

11150 

11X30 

+30 

11X99 

T1X9S 

+JQ 


Commodity Indexes 


Moody's- 

Reuters. 


DJ. Futures. 


Close Previous 

901 JO I 9Q&20 f 

1 ,7154*0 1,71550 

NA 11498 

Com. Research Bureau- NA 22050 

Moody's : base 1D0 : Dec 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - Anal 
Reuters : base 100 : 5ep. 18, 1931. 

Dow Janes : base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


London 

Commodities 


Aug. 7 

Close PtbvImo 
H lah low Bid Ask Bid Ask 
SUGAR _ _ 

Sterling per metric ton 
Oct 13220 11780 11950 119,40 12980 13050 
13540 ram 12420 12580 13340 13108 
14540 13340 13450 13440 14389 14120 
14880 138J0 13680 137 JO 14580 14620 
>4580 14580 1*040 14180 14980 15180 
N.T. N.7. 14580 14680 15X20 15440 
Volume: £690 lots of SO tons. 

COCOA 

sterling par metric far 
Sep 1 J28 1J05 1515 1,716 1X1B 1X20 

1 220 1206 1 JIB 1220 1216 I2T7 

1235 1211 1225 1226 1210 219 

1247 1220 1.739 1240 1231 1232 

1260 1250 1254 1255 1247 1246 

1275 1262 1268 1269 1260 1266 

1204 1270 1272 1279 1271 1273 

Volume: 2805 lots of 10 ions 
COFFEE 

Sterling per metric ton 
SOP 1890 1850 1857 I860 1452 455 

NOV 1232 1880 1200 1202 1491 1892 

jan 1,770 1.730 1245 1JAS 1223 1234 

Mar 1290 1254 1262 1267 1230 255 

Mo? ' ‘ ' 

Jiy 


Mar 

MOV 

Aug 

OC2 


Dec 

Msr 

May 

Jlr 


1406 U65 1203 128* 1.749 1200 
1815 1815 1811 1820 1290 1800 
N.T. N.T. 1800 1850 1810 1850 
Volume: 2.996 Mis of 5 tons 
GASOIL ^ „ 

US. doUan per metric Ion 
Aag 237J0 231 JO 23280 N O. 23025 23280 

Sn 228J5 226J0 22880 228J5 22523 22680 

Oct 227-00 226m 23625 237m 22X25 32550 

Nov 22780 22680 22625 27780 22X50 :»* 

bee 227X5 22780 227 JO 22725 22650 H6.75 

JOP 227 JO 227 JS 22680 227 JO 334 JO 275 J O 

FM N.T. N.T. 2»m 23480 22050 ZOM 

MO- N.T. N.T. 21780 22080 21580 219.50 

AM N.T. N.T. 315JS 21675 21425 21625 

volume: 1859 tots of 100 tons 
Sources: Reuters and London Petroleum Ex- 
cnonao toasoii}. 


Asian 

Cbnunodities 


Aag. 


HONG-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
ujj par ounce 

Close Pi ■» tons 
HIM! Low Bid Aik BM Art 
Aug _ N.T. N.T. 32080 32280 32180 323m 
SOP — N.T. N.T. 322m 32480 32280 32*80 
Oct — 32580 32580 324m 3080 32380 32580 
Dec _ N.T. N.T. m00 33080 32880 33080 
p rD _ N.T. N.T. 33X00 33480 33280 33480 
AM _ 33780 33780 33680 33880 33600 33880 
Jun _ H.T. .N.T M1IM 34X00 34180 34380 
Volume: 23 lolxof 100 az. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UJJ par ounce 


Oct . 


Dec . 


HIM LOW 
N.T. N.T. 
N.T. N.T. 
N.T. N.T. 
32aS0 327 JO 


Volume: 63 lots of 100 oz. 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Moltnrvl on cents per kilo 
dose 


Settle Some 
32040 32140 

32X40 32170 

ra m wtui 

338J0 32940 




Effil 



»■ * l 

Kr^naai 

brb^B 1 X ft 




hK* . v V 

1 

• ■ 



SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cents per kilo 
Close 

Bid Ask 
RSSlAug- 17380 17X25 

RSS 1 Sep— 139X5 17125 

RS5 2 Aug - 16480 16580 

RSS 3 Aug- 16280 16380 

RSS 4 Aug- 15380 16080 

RSS S Aug- 15380 15580 
KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
MOMvsran ringgit* nor 25 ten* 


GommSdities 


Aug. 7 

HIM Low BM Ask Ctroe 
SUGAR , ^ 

French francs pw metric ton 
Oct 1J3S 1850 1JS0 1454 +6 

Dec 1385 IJ85 1J65 IJflO +8 

Mar 1415 1478 1416 1418 — 11 

May 1475 1452 1454 1460 —3 

Alto N.T. N.T. 1495 1J20 UtlCtL 

Oct N.T. M.T. 1J3S 1465 —8 

Est. ml.: 2400 kits of 50 tons. Prev. actual 
sales: 1.944 lots. Open [Merest: 18.117 
COCOA 

log kg 




1,995 

2805 

— 27 



1.970 

1.974 



1.984 







— 



N.T. 


— 



N.T. 


— 





— 


25 fats 0f.H 

tens, 

Pr«v. actual 


JIV 
Sep 
Dec 

sole*: SkrtTOMB tolerest; 780 
COFFEE 

PreMCb francs per 100 kg 
Sap 1^20 tjna 1480 1,915 —8 

»tov 1.960 1460 l.nn 1468 —7 

Jan N.T. N.T. 1.975 — -9 

Mar N.T. N.T. ZOM - -10 

May N.T. N.T. 2JQ0 — —15 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2830 — UlKlL 

Sep N.T. M.T. 2855 - -5 

E*t. voL: 7totsot5ton*.Prev.qcTuai sale*: 4 
km. Oaen inicmi: 401 
Source: Bourse du Commerce. 



Close 


Prg 


BM 

JUk 

Bid 

Aug ■ ■■ 

no 

933 

690 

Sot 

■60 

«00 

860 

Oct 

860 

900 

860 

NOV 

BS0 

TOO 

050 

Dec .. 

350 

890 

850 

Jon... 

840 

aw 

B40 

MOT 

840 

880 

8*0 

Mav 

830 

BTO 

■30 

JIV 

820 

870 

820 


Previous 
Ask 


Prgvkwi 
aw Ask 
17380 17X50 

171 JO 172m 
1MJS 16525 
16X25 16X25 

15025 16025 

15X25 15523 


Ask 

920 

TOO 

900 

TOO 

BTO 

890 



Per Anri 
INCREASED 

Carlisle 0 27 

CB8.T Bancsharos a .11 

Energy Nlh a JO 

Goody ProtfiJCtS Q .10 

Intercity Gas Q .13 

Leggett A Plan Q .13 

Now Plan Really O 26 (A 

source Capital Q 82 vs 


8- 30 8-16 

10-1 9-20 

9- 16 9-3 

HF1 9-15 
9-30 9-13 
9-16 8-23 
1G1 9-16 
9- IS 8-23 


OMITTED 


Movie Star Inc 


Comr Food Mart 
Eledrowoce Svs 


Volume: e lots of 25 tons. 
Source: Reut er s 



Aug. 6 


Psts-Lap 

in le on in 

i/u im it it — 
int to K L5/1# 
V) in 7 

h n A a 
i* n i 8 


Shew Ms-Led 
prfte Anto M IB 
17? HIS 14 17 — 

175 W W U 114k 

181 M 5 F6 • 

11} 4 Ji H ft 

m 1H6 13116 Hk nv , 

m in* l li/it isn4 m an it - 
n — 1/16 tk 9/M 

Tatnl cell mum MUG 
Total adl BPan BL 61U4I 
Total pul where HUM 
Total But DBWI Bf. 4*6717 

wanwsjs Lowituo Oownut— ist 

Source: OBOE. 


STOCK 

.25 PC 9-2 8-17 
.25 PC 7-3* 9-10 
STOCK SPLIT 
1RT Cora — 2-for-t 
IRT Property Co 
MCA Inc— 3-tor- 2 

USUAL 

Adams Mills Carp 
Altmanson IHF) 

Baktor Electric Ca 
Cal REIT 
CBI Industries 
Cenl ill Pub S»c 
Cenvlll Investors 
Champion Spark P 
Chicago Pneumatic 
Coke Consolidated 
Cooper Indus 
Daniel industries 
Data-Oestan Lob 
Diamond Crystal 
EIP Microwave 
Etoctressacn Svs 
Emerson Electric 
F toasted Ind 
Holl I Frank B) 

Hanna (MAI Co 
Hersov Foods 
inoersoli-Rand 
IMM Elec Light 
IRT Property Co 
Kansas a tv P8.L 
Keamev-Natl 
Kldde Inc 
Kooer Co 
Koger Properties 

UbertvCarp 
Limited IRC 
MacMillan Inc 
Marlon Labs 
MCA Inc 
MCORP 

Monarch Mach Tool 
Motorola inc 
msa Reairv 
Murphy Oil 
Nantsen Carp 
Nth Carol Nil Gas 
Olsten Core 
Peoples Energy 
Pioneer Core 
Pioneer Greuo 
Plan Realty Tr 
RafcMiotd Chem 
Republic Gypsum 
Revco D 5 Inc 
St. Pam Cos 
Scherer (RPl Core 
Scoaram Co LM 
Southdown Inc 
5 »»ediow Inc 
Thomas 6 Betts 
TNF Enterprises 
Total Petra 
U jS. Health Care A 
Were n boro Shoe 
XTRACara 


Q 88 B-31 B-17 

O JO B-14 

O 8? 7-30 +0 

Q 22 10-4 9-5 

Q 25 9-13 8-20 

D 41 9-18 S-l? 

Q 40 IM 8-30 

Q .10 9-73 8-23 

Q .10 7-27 9-13 

B .14 M0 8-26 

Q JS IH 9-3 
Q M Vi 7-25 9-4 

Q 86 10-9 9-25 

O 20 fl-30 Hi 

Q JD 10-1 9-16 
Q 82 8-23 8-16 
a 45 M0 8-23 
O .12 9-9 £3 

Q 25 11-12 10-18 
O .10 9-12 8-19 
Q J5 9-11 M3 
. 45 9 -3 8-71 

a 47 VS 10-1 9-13 

Q J7 9i 9-1 816 

Q J9 9-20 8-29 
O .10 94 0-71 

Q JO 9-30 9-16 

§ J8 10-18 70-1 

47(b 10-18 10-1 

G .18 9^» 9-13 
O 8* 9-34 9-12 
0.13 L, 10-15 9-30 
Q 87 10-18 9-20 
O 22 9-16 828 
O J5 W0 9-13 

S J0 9-3 871 

.16 1815 9-20 

O 28 9-20 816 
Q 25 81 816 

Q. 16 V* 9-27 8» 
O 46 9-14 9-30 

8 86 7-3 819 

JO 1815 9-19 

§ 31 94 821 

87 V* 9-10 9-3 

a 26 V, 181 91* 


O SB 9-16 823 

Q JS 1817 9-30 

Q 88 181 9-17 

a 20 Ml 823 

3 25 9-3 820 

87 94 823 

a J4 181 M3 

Q .31 % MS 8to 

O 86 9-70 830 

a 82 827 M2 

O 24 181 M 

Q .16 8-30 8-21 


AJMaeal; /W-moaTbly,- G-Guarterlr; 8Som+ 


jounar: uPt. 


SATIRE IN WORDS AND PICTURES 
DOONE5BURY 
DAILY INTHEIHT 


j Cash Prices 


Com tnodRy Bftd Unit 

Coffee 4 Santos, lb. 


Prlntcfoth 64/30 38 Vi, vd „ 

Steel billets (Pitt.), ion 

iron 2 Fdry. PnUo. ton 

Stoel «rgp Na 1 hw PHL _ 
L*od Soot, lb - 

Copper elect, lb 

Tin (Straits), lb . 


ZtotE. St. L Basis, lb . 
PoitadJutn-az — 

SHYor n.Y. oz 

Source: AP. 


Aug. 7 
. Year 
wed t 
147 143 

•JO 0J7 
47980 47X88 

2IXIM 21188 

7873 sr; 

19-21 2832 

487T 4447 

6-1829 629IB 

MI-47 4850 

78101 129% 

6.14 7J6 


I IxMidon iVletols 


Aug. 


S-7 

Prevtows 
Bid A6J 


Ciasg 
Bid 

ALUMINUM 
stMloa per metric ton 

ssUra k 5ss sa 

^ H p£^S, (HW,Cro “ , 

Spat 105880 106080 105200 1QSX00 

f ° t ^ TO r ° _ 107980 108080 106*80 1D64J0 

CATHODES (Staneard) 

Star Bno par metric ton 

LEAD 0 >®00 10 5X00 103780 103980 

Storting per mottle ton 

297^ 29880 

NICKEL ZWJ0 XlaX 30180 

Storting pgr mettle tog 
Sr _ SXkLOQ 37108 0 371080 372080 

SILVER I75UO ° Jmo ° 777580 378080 


Sp ot ' 457X0 4SL00 45380 

?S?&danl) * MD 471J ” 44AW 
Storliiig pot metric tea 

72K80 928780 922S80 922880 
9ZS580 92SB80 920080 920X00 

H^lng per metric ton 
Soot 5*&m 55180 5*680 

Farwnro S47J10 54880 54380 

Source : AP. 


j Treasury’ Bills 


Aug. 6 


3-manth 
6*noath 
Oneysar 
Soww: Solenm Brothers 


Offer 

BM 

Yield 

Yield, 

7X5 

7X3 

75» 

751 

751 

75* 

786 

7J7 

740 

751 

£17 

1X1 


DM Futures 
Options 

to OrwaiMcrt-azoOO’nartsaMiBtrmor* 


Co flpSdd? 

J!** 5f* Dee Mar 

33 222 171 125 

34 182 “ 

35 042 

36 022 

37 086 

38 am 


Citomctao toW TOL4717 

On: Tue-ygL 3J6SOPM hd. 37461 
put*: Tut tel 158* ASM ML 26272 
Source- CME. 


Aug. 
PMHHfBa 


Mar 

225 

% 

o*c 

BJ3 

Mar 

051 

2*0 

OR 

ow 

DM 

un 

041 

0.97 

US 

156 

180 

157 

1J6 

1.14 

144 

111 

233 

Mi 


246 



BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


Guinness Sweetens Bid 
For Bell, to £370 Million 


Reuters 

LONDON — Guinness PLC, 
the big brewing company, said 
Wednesday that it would raise its 
offer for Arthur Bell & Sons PLC 
by about £22.8 million ($31 mil- 
lion), to £370 milli on, or 262 pence 
a&hare. 

Bell, a Scotch whisky distiller 
based in Perth, Scotland, swiftly 
rqected the new bid. The distiller’s 
chairman, Raymond Miqud, noted 
that the new offer represented only 
a small increase over the previous 
one and said he would advise share- 
holders to reject it 

Guinness had received accep- 
tances from holders of only 5.35 
percent of Bell ordinary shares un- 
der its earlier offer, which dosed 
Tuesday, he noted. 

Guinness’s chief executive, Er- 
nest Saunders, said at the time of 
the first offer that a marriage of the 
two companies would “put two 
great brands together” and enable 
Bell, using Guinness’s marketing 
muscle, to reverse a decline in 
Scotch whisky sales. 

Analysts, however, were virtual- 
ly unanimous that the brewer’s of- 
fer for Bell was too low. 

Guinness said Wednesday that 
its increased offer would be made 
on the basis of four new Guinness 
ordinary shares and either £2.65 
face value of 8 Vi -percent convert- 
ible unsecured loan stock or £2.65 
in cash for every 5 Bell ordinary 
shares. 


It is also offering a full cash al- 
ternative that values Bell at 245 
pence a share. 

Based on Tuesday’s dosing price 
of 261 pence For Gmnness ordinary 
shares, the previous offer valued 
Bell shares at about 235 pence. The 
previous cash alternative was 225 
pence. 

On the London Stock Exchange, 
Guinness shares Srmed 2 pence on 
the announcement and then 
dropped bade to their opening 256 
pence after a dose Tuesday of 261 
pence. Bell shares opened lOpence 
higher, at 250 pence, but feu after 
the news to 246 pence. 

Guinness said its increased offer 
was final, but that it reserved the 
right to raise it should a competi- 
tive bid arise. 

Guinness said the convertible 
stock offered under the bid would 
be turned into Guinness ordinary 
between 1988 and 1996 at the rate 
of one ordinary share far every 
£2.90 face value erf convertible. In- 
terest would be payable in April 
and October of each year, it said. 

Guinness said full acceptance of 
its offer would involve the issue of 
about 105.8 mQlion new ordinary 
shares and up to £70.1 million face 
value of convertible stock. 

Up to a further 7 J million shares 
and £4 j million face value oT con- 
vertible could be issued for Bell’s 
916-percent convertible unsecured 
loan stock due 1999/2001, it said. 


HutchisonSeBs 
Part of Stake 
In HK Electric 

Reuters 

HONG KONG — Hutchi- 
son Whampoa Ltd-, the Hong 
Kong industrial conglomerate, 
said Wednesday that it has sold 
a 10-percent stake in Hong 
Kong Electric Holdings Ltd. in 
private placements with several 
international insulations for 
1.1 billion Hang Kong dollars 
(5141 .4 million). 

A Hutchison spokesman said 
the company said 133.75 mil- 
lion HK Electric shares at 8.20 
dollars each through Wardley 
Ltd. and Vickers da Costa & 
Co. It stiB holds another 24 per- 
cent of HK Electric. 

The sp okesman said the sale 
would result in a substantial ex- 
traordinary gain with some of 
the proceeds to be used to elimi- 
nate Hutchison’s bank debt 
outstanding. 

Hutchison acquired a 34-per- 
cent stake in HK Electric for 23 
billion dollars, or 6.40 dollars a 
'share, from Hongkong Land 
Co. in February. Hutchison’s 
rfurirman Li Ka-ShiSg Slid St 
the time that the purchase was a 

long- term inves tment 

; However, the company said 
Wednesday that Huldrison in- 
tended to retain a strategic 
-hedding in HK Electric and take 
advantage of suitable new in- 
vestment opportunities. 


Halliburton Has 
2drQuart£rLoss 
Of $475 Million 

The Associated Press 

DALLAS — Halliburton 
Co., the U.S. oD -field services 
and construction concern, post- 
ed losses for both the second 
quarter and first six months of 
this year. 

day a n^^'olF^^^nnllion 
for the quarter, compared with 
$92.8 million net profit a year 
earlier. Most of The loss was 
attributed to an anticipated 
$7S0-m31ion settlement of a 
protracted legal battle over a 
South Texas nuclear project 

The company took a one- 
time, S328- milfi nn writedown 
to pay for the settlement over 
seven years. It also took a $195- 
million writedown on marine 
construction vessels and related 
investments. 

Excluding those charges, net 
for the quarter totaled $48.2 
million, or 44 cents a share, 
down 48 percent from $92,8 
million, or 78 cents a share, a 
year earlier. Sales totaled $1J2 
billion, down 14 percent from 
$1.4 billion. 

For the six-month period, 
Halliburton reported a loss of 
$418.4 million, compared with 
income of $168.5 million during 
the first half of 1984. Six-month 
sales were $14 billion, down 1 1 
percent from $2.7 billion a year 
earlier. 


Accord on Danish Plastic Car Is Seen 


Agencc France - Prase 

COPENHAGEN — Denmark’s 
plastic Logjcar could go into pro- 
duction at Viborg, Jutland, in Feb- 
ruary 1987, a spokesman for the 
project said Wednesday. - 
He said 150 investors are inter- 
ested in the project, which would 
be finalized on Ocl 1 if share capi- 
tal of 55 million kroner ($5.4 mil- 
lion) is raised. 


The Logicar has been designed 
by a H arriott technician, Jakob Jen- 
sen, who has been design chief at 
the radio and hi-fi company, Bang 
& Ohifsen A/S. 

The car would be powered by a 
Ford engine using gasoline. For- 
eign engineers and technicians 
would be consulted on further de- 
sign work, the spokesman said. 


COMPANY NOTES 


British Electric Traction Co. 
PLC said U is discussing fu- 
ture* 1 of its tdeviaon-mamifactur- 
ing twit. Rediffusion Consumer 
Manufacturing LtiL, with a num- 
ber of major overseas companies. It 
did not elaborate. 

Cehtnese Corp. said its Specialty 
Operations unit obtained an exclu- 
sive license, from Sanyo Chemical 
Industries to make and market 
Sanyet super .absorbent polymers 
in North and South America. Gu- 
ianese said it would build a manu- 
facturing unit for the polymers, 
which are widely used in disposable 
diapers. 

European Asian Bank AG, a unit 
of Deutsche Bank AG, said it has 
acquired 1 00 percent of the Austra- 
lian merchant bank, European 
Asian of Australia Ltd, after buy- 
ing out the 5(Hperceat stake held fay 
the State Bank of New South 
Wales. Tams were not disclosed. 

Ex-Cefl-O Corp. said it is con- 
solidating most of its principal 
North American machine-tool op- 
erations into a single division. Ex- 


Cell-0 said the move was part of its 
program to restructure its industri- 
al-equipment business and return it 
“satisfactory profitability.’’ 


to 


Frank B. Hafl & Ca, the tirird- 
largest publicly traded insurance 
brokerage in the United States, 
said it had placed control of the 
company in the hands of Saul P. 
Steinberg, its largest stockholder. 
Mr. Steinberg, a director since May 
14, was named chair man of the 
executive committee, succeeding 
Albert J. Tahmoush, who resigned. 

Guest Keen & NettJefohfa PLC 
said its first-half pretax profit rose 
15 percent, to £70 J million (about 
$912 million), from £61-2 million, 
with the aid of an accounting 
change. It said profit would have 
beat only £66.1 million without the 
change, which involved the use of 
average exchange rates for the peri- 
od instead of end-of-period rates. 

PfaeE & G, holding company 
for the interests of Italy’s nreffi 
family, is planning to merge with a 
Milan-based finance company, Ca- 
bo to Milano Centrale, bourse 


an inx 


sources said. The company, known 
as PireHina, is majority shareholder 
in the Pirelli SpA industrial group- 
Officials of both companies do* 
dined comment. .■ 

L-F- Rothsddd, UBtnbag,Tow^ 
bin said its management committee 
unanimously agreed not to pursue 
discussions with General Fdt In- 
dustries aimed at 
terest in the investment-! 
firm. It did not elaborate. 

Tianjin Automotive Industry^ 
Corp. will begin manufacturing 
automobiles designed by Japan'? 
Daihatsu Motor Co. in nun? nextS 
year, Daihatsu said. Details of pro^~ 
viding technical aid for the project! 
are being completed, a spokesman* 
said. 

Weston Uraou Corp. said it had 
reached a tentative two-year agree; 
meet with two striking unions and 
that it expected workers to rerun! 
to their jobs immediately. The 
7,000 employees walked off that 
jobs two woks ago in a dispute 
over company proposals to cut 
costs. 


Professionals Monopolize a Steady Market Again 


Reuters 

LONDON — The Eurobond 
market remained fairly steady 
Wednesday, with the 'dollar- 
straight and fioating-raie-note sec- 
tors awaiting the results of the two 
remaining UiL Treasury auctions, 
dealers said. 

The Treasury was scheduled to 
auction S6.75 billion of 1' 
notes Wednesday and $6 J 
in 30-year bonds Thursday. 

The Tuesday auction of 58.5 bil- 
lion of three-year notes produced 
an average yield of 9.53 percent 
and helped to boost sen timen t in 
rhe market. However, dealers noted 
that trading remained entirely pro- 
fessional with retail operators 
staying an the sidelines. 

The doDnr-straighi sector gener- 
ally ended K point on either side of 


Tuesday's finishing levels, if The sources said the 
changed at all dealers said. Actual would consist of a $335-i 

trading was way Quiet though. “It’s 
just professional book-squaring 
really,” a trader at a U.S. bank said. 

Some dealers said that a tittle 
nervousness was prompted by a 
Tokyo report quoting banking 
sources as saying that the Finance 
Ministry had given a dear sign to 
Japanese trust banks ihir they 
must stop using loopholes allowing 
them to buy foreign bonds using 
trust funds. 

The most noted feature in the 
Boating-rate sector was the 5300- 
millian issue for Credit Fonder, 
which was laiinrii/yi in the after- 
noon. 

Also laimrfwd during the day 
was a further issue in the New Zea- 
land dollar sector. The three-year, 


that will nse in the final years ot its 
life: There wQl also be a zero-cou- 
pon 5165-million convertible issue 
that will be redeemed in 15 years 
for $730 million. The issue price 
will be 2258. 

The package forms part of a fi- 
nancing program for the company, 
which was only formed recently, 
that also includes a $600- million 
share offering in the United States. 

The sources said the innovative 
structure of this package has al- 
ready attracted strong interest 
from investors. 


$60-milliofl bond was for Dart £ 
Kraft Finance Corp. and pays 16!4 ; 
percent. It was priced at 100H, and 
lead. managed by Morgan Stanley 
International. It did not trade ac* 
lively on the market 

Late in the day, bond-markef 
sources said they expected $50(fe 
million package of convertible 
bonds for Rockefeller Center Prqp^ 
erties Inc. to emerge Thuisday un- 
der (he lead management of Gold-' 
man Sachs International Corp: 

Unusually, the bonds are expect-^ 
ed to be convertible into the comi, 
puny’s shares at a discount instead 
of a premium, the sources said. „ 


Selling Squall Jolts Market 


(Continued from Page 9) 

this week are not only 

but are giving Wall Street “a 
name." 

He complained: “It's getting 
more and more difficult to ten 
which buying and selling is artifi- 
cial and which is for real" 

Not rocked by the recent selling 
wave is Laszlo Birinyi Jr, head of 
equity market analysis for Salomon 
Brothers. 

"Stocks have been ‘ratcheting’ 
upward in nice, steady progression 
since May 1 without any significant 


Shoring up ids optimism is belief 
(hat u!s. interest rates mil decline 
over the long term and that eco- 
nomic growth will be moderate. 

“While short term the decline in 
rates may be over, most economists 
think 1986 wfl] be a good year and 
that should encourage a higher 
stock market,” he said. 

But he called problems with cut- 
ting the U.S. budget a “negative" 
and something non-Americans 
will be increasingly less 
to finance by sending 
funds to the United States. 


(-pullbacks, so tins one shouldn't be 
1 terribly disturbing," he said, point- 
ing out that the first 60 days of this 
rally featured more days when 
stocks advanced than “up days" in 
the comparable period this timi* 
three years ago when Wall Street’s 
big bull market began. 

He contrasted the “deliberate" 
investing shown tins summer by 
institutions with the “panic buy- 
g" evident in the last three major 
ivances (hat later gave back much 
their gains. 

ABM in Amsterdam sees “up- 
ward potential" for U.S. stocks, ac- 
cording to Abraham Rodse, depu- 
ty manager of research at the bank 
and its specialist on Wall Street 



MTBNATIOIIA1. EXECUTIVE 

Unrnrsity graduate, British naboodiry, 
Bumf Ara&c, 25 yean a x pgrienee in 
Europe, North America and Middle 
Eau, proven trade record m marketing 
automalivB and capital goods, «cperi- 
ano* m all area of management and 
marifeluig, is Malang a now position in 
the Middle Eatf, Europe or North 
America. 

(Resume w3 be sent upon request). 

Hwt reply to tin BaxD 110, 
ta Hw bitanxxKonal HetvW Tribune, 
181, Avt. Charte* dg G wi fl e, 

92321 Nw» y Codon Franca. 


Hcralb«^fc t gribunc. 

BUSINESS /FINANCE 

rJCFR 

ETIER 



The Trib's business section is now 
bigger and better than ever. 

, Every day it’s padked with the business news 
you need. And much, much more. 




Monday/Euiobonds. 
Tuesday/F utures and Options. 
Wednesday/Intemational Manager. / 
Thursday/Wall Street Watch. 

Friday/Tedmology. 
Satuiday/Economic Scene. 

And the latest financ ial figures ■ 
every day. 


Myer, Coles j 
Announce 
Merger Plan 

Agence Frtmce-Presse 

SYDNEY — Two major Austra- 
lian retailers, Myer Emporium Ltd. 
and GJ. Coles & Co„ have agreed 
on a merger worth more than l- 
billion Australian dollars ($719.4 
mini mi), creating one of the world's 
biggest stare chains. 

Directors of Myer accepted mi 
Tuesday an offer worth 1.12 trillion 
dollars in cadi and shares from' 
Coles. 

The merger, expected to be com-: 
pleted next month, will give the 
new Cdes-Myer consortium total; 
sales of around 10 billion dollars a 
year, ranking it dose to the lop 1ft 
retailers in the world. 

Coles, Australia's biggest retail-a 
er, currently has about 13 percent' 
of the country’s retail market. Myeti 
has a 7-percent share. * 

The merger follows a breakdown 
in negotiations between Myer and" 
Woofworths LuL, the Na 2 retailer 1 
in Australia. .r 

Myer’s board said it would be,, 
advising shareholders to accept thee 
Coles offer, valued at 3.25 dollars a 
share. Analysts on the Sydney 
Stock Exchange said there was tike- 1 
ly to be no opposition to the merg- 
er. 

The latest offer follows an earlier, 
proposal from Coles wrath 3 dol- 
lars a share. This was opposed by 
Myer directors. 

The Myer family will retain more 
than 10 percent of shares in the 
merged company. 

The Coles family interest in 
Coles has been gradually diluted 
over the years, and the family wfll 
hold no more than a 1 -percent 
share of Ccries-Myer. ~ 

The largest shareholder of Coles 
is the U&-based K mart, with 20 
percent. 

In a jerint statement the two conk 
parties said their stores would re^ 
main separate entities. 
































Xted nesdjjjfe 

AMEX 


Closing 


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INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) August 7, 1985 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1985 


Page 13 


U.S. Begins Probe of Hitachi Prices 


By Victor F. Zonana 

Las Angeles Tines Service 

SANTA CLARA, California — 
the U.S. Justice Department has 
launched an antitrust investigation 
to determine whether Hitachi Ltd., 
the Japanese electronics giant has 
engaged in predatory pricing of the 
semiconductor chips it sells in the 
United States. 

Existence of the investigation 
was disclosed Tuesday here in the 
Silicon Valley by Senator Pete Wil- 
son. a Republican of California, at 
a hearing on trade practices of Jap- 
anese computer chip companies. 

Mr. Wilson and three other sena- 
tors called for an e xamina tion of 
Hitachi’s pricing practices after an 
internal memo from Hitachi Amer- 
ica was released in June. The memo 
to the U.S. unit's distributors urged 
them to aggressively cut prices for 
certain types of computer memory 
chips. 

Hie document reads in part: 
“Win with the 10-percent rule. 
Find AMD and Intel sockets. 
Quote 10 percent below their price. 
If they requote, go 10 percent 
again Don’t quit till you win!” 

AMD. which stands for Ad- 
vanced Micro Devices, and Intel 


Midland Changes 
U.S. Operations 

Reuters 

LONDON — Midland Bank 
PLC said Wednesday that it is 
restructuring its business in the 
United States following the ac- 
quisition of 100 percent of 
Crocker National Corp. in May 
of this year. 

Under the reorganization, all 
of Midland's domestic banking 
and multinational wholesale ac- 
tivities in the United States 
would be managed there by 
Crocker’s chairman. Frank Ca- 
li oueL Mr. Cahouet is Mid- 
land's chief executive officer in 
the United States. 

Also, all overseas banking of- 
fices of Crocker would be inte- 
grated with Midland and man- 
aged as part of Midland's 
international division under 
Midland chief executive-inter- 
national Herve de Cannoy. 


Corp- are leading U-S. competitors 
of Hitachi. 

Hitachi has disavowed the 
memo, saying the idea was con- 
ceived by three low-level marketing 
employees “without the knowl- 
edge, let alone the approval" of the 
company’s top management. The 
company said it took steps to en- 
sure that the notice was disregard- 
ed by distributors. 

[Hiroshi Miyamoto, a Hitachi 
executive, said that the company 
would not comment until it learned 
more about the investigation. The 
Washington Post reported. 

[“We welcome the investiga- 
tion.” said Daryl Hatano, spokes- 
man for the U.S. Semiconductor 
Industry Association.] 

“The antitrust division has 
opened an investigation into possi- 
ble predatory conduct by Hitachi 
and is actively pursuing it,” accord- 
ing to an Aug. 2 letter to Mr. Wil- 
son from Charles F. Rule, the act- 
ing assistant attorney general who 
heads the antitrust division. 

“While predation is often quite 
difficult to establish, the division 
takes seriously any credible allega- 
tion of predatory behavior in U.S. 
markets and is fully prepared to 
proceed against such conduct when 


warranted by the facts." the letter 
continues. 

The Justice Department's anti- 
trust investigation has started amid 
heightened trade tensions between 
the United Stales and Japan. 

The American semiconductor in- 
dustry has recently called on the 
government to force Japan to open 
its market to U.S. chips. The anti- 
trust investigation could signal that 
the Reagan administration is losing 
patience with the Japanese despite 
recent Japanese promises of con- 
cessions. The LIS. trade deficit 
with Japan is expected to reach S5G 
billion this year. 

Hitachi's aggressive behavior has 
led to previous legal entanglements 
in the United Stales. In 1982. the 
U.S. Justice Department filed 
criminal charges against the com- 
pany as a result of an FBI opera- 
tion that uncovered a Hitachi plot 
to obtain and transport stolen IBM 
materials to Japan. The company 
eventually pleaded guilty and was 
fined the maximum S 10,000. 

Hitachi has recently sought to 
dampen rising protectionist senti- 
ment in this country’ by promising 
to buy 5120 million of U.S. goods 
over the next year. 


Taiwan Growth 
Slows in 1985 9 
Minister Says 

Reuters 

TAIPEI — Taiwan is unable 
to achieve the 7 Ji- percent eco- 
nomic growth rate target set for 
1985. according to the econom- 
ics minister. Lee Ta-hai. 

A ministry official said Tues- 
day that Mr. Lee made the pre- 
diction in a report that blamed 
a slowdown in exports and do- 
mestic investment for the low 
growth rate. 

He said that Taiwan’s eco- 
nomic growth rate, adjusted for 
inflation, was 6. IS percent in 
the first quarter of 1985 and 
5.28 percent in the second quar- 
ter. Thai compares with 12.32 
in the first quarter of last year 
and 11.7 percent in the 19S4 
second quarter. 

Mr. Lee said that Taiwan's 
exports grew only 1 percent in 
the first half, compared with 12 
percent in the first half of 1984. 

Many Taiwan and foreign 
companies postponed new in- 
vestment projects planned for 
this year. 


CURRENCY MARKETS 


Pound Declines, Dollar Stronger in Europe 


British Steel GM Expands Into Financial Services 

Agrees to 
Restructuring 


[Con tin ued from Page 9) 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — The pound contin- 
ued Wednesday its d eclin e against 
major currencies but regained some 
of its losses toward the close of 
trading in Europe. The dollar 
gained against most leading cur- 
rencies and dealers said the mar- 
ket's underlying perception of the 
U.S. unit remains bearish. 

The pound ended at 51J388 in 
London, down from SI-3458 on 
Tuesday. “It's been a real bash- 
around today.” said a currency 
trader at Citibank in London. He 
attributed the volatility to move- 
ments of investment money from 
all over the world in and out of the 
pound. 

The pound has declined since 
last week because of falling British 
interest rates and the prospect of 
lower world oil prices. 

British dealers said they antici- 


pate little impact on the dollar 
from U.S. money-supply data, due 
Thursday. An average of forecasts 
shows M-l for the week ended July- 
29 rising about S1.3 billion. M-l is 
a measure of mooey supply growth 
that includes currency in circula- 
tion, travelers checks and checking 
deposits at financial institutions. 

In Frankfurt, the dollar ended at 
2.8612 Deutsche marks, up from 
2.8394 DM on Tuesday. West Ger- 
man dealers described trading as 
hectic at times and cited the ster- 
ling-dollar movement as the deci- 
sive factor for the market's direc- 
tion. 

Some Frankfurt traders said they 
believed the Bank of England bad 
been intervening during afternoon 
trading in Europe to support the 
pound. 

The dollar also gained agains t 
the French franc, closing in Paris at 


8.7105 francs, up from 8.652 francs 
on Tuesday. But in Zurich, the U.S. 
currency ended the day at 2.3515. 
down from 2.3635 previously. 

Despite its good showing in Eu- 
rope. the dollar traded lower 
against most major currencies in 
early New York trading. 

The declines followed an unsuc- 
cessful attempt to break out of the 
upper end of its trading range, 
which sparked some late morning 
profit- taking, dealers in New York 
said. 

However, the dollar retained un- 
derlying support from the negative 
bias of the U.S. credit markets go- 
ing into the second leg of the Trea- 
sury's refunding program. 

By midday in New- York, the 
dollar had eased to 2.84775 DM 
from 2.85400 at the previous close. 

I Reuters. AP) 


Reuters 

LONDON — State-owned Brit- 
ish Steel Coro, has reached agree- 
ment with the government on a 
major restructuring plan that in- 
cludes closing a arid roiling mill in 
Scotland that employs about 800 
people. 

The agreement was announced 
Tuesday and must be approved by 
the European Community. It also 
calls for the acquisition in 1986 of 
Alphasteel Ltd’s hot strip mill at 
Newport, South Wales, with pro- 
duction quotas. No financial de- 
tails were given. 

Under the plan, British Steel will 
main i .-A n steel-making at its five 
integrated mills for at least three 
years, subject to market demand 
and the corporation's performance. 

Guest, Keen & Nettlefolds PLC, 
the London-based industrial 
group, and British Steel also have 
reached agreement in principle 
with the Department of Trade and 
Industry cm proposals for a joint 
venture in engineering steels, Brit- 
ish Steel said No financial details 
were given. 

British Steel said that measures 
will be taken to fill an expected 20- 
percent deficit in its coking capaci- 
ty in the early 1990s without invest- 
ment in in new coke ovens. 

British Steel will acquire from 
Alphasteel two single stranded 
continuous slab casters and a semi- 
-continuous wide hot strip mill 
with a capacity of more than one 
million metric tons a year. 

After modification of its Llan- 
wem works, near Newport, British 
Steel will improve operating effi- 
ciency and enable Llanwern to 
meet increasing demand for cast 
steel qualities. Alphas leel's wide 
hot strip mill will eventually be 
closed British Steel said that mea- 
sures will be taken to fill an expect- 
ed 20-percent deficit in its coking 
capacity in the early 1990s without 
investment in in new coke ovens. 

British Steel’s chairman, Robert 
Haslam, said that the long-term fu- 
ture will depend on mantel devel- 
opments and British Steel’s perfor- 
mance and is vital to avoid new 
borrowing Mr. Haslam seeks pri- 
vatization of British Steel as early 
as possible. 


lion, compared with $159.6 billion 
for Citicorp — its earnings com- 
pare favorably. 

In 1983. for example GMACs 
record year, it reached Gticxnp's 
still-unattained goal of warning 
more than $[ billion. Last year, 
however, GMAC’s net income 
dropped to S784.8 million, less 
than the $890 million wtnwi by 
Citicorp but far more than any oth- 
er banking conmany in the United 
Stales. 

Despile its size, the credit com- 
pany's business has remained rela- 
tively limited: the financing of GM 
cars, and trades. At the end of 
March, it had more than $41 billion 
is loans and leases to individuals 
and small businesses both in the 
United States and abroad, and an 
additional $18 billion in loans and 
leases to GM dealers. 

To finance these loans, it bor- 
rows most of the money it needs 
from other big companies and in- 
vestors in the commercial paper 
market, and it also sells its IOUs to 
individuals in denominations rang- 
ing upward from $25,000. 

For decades, GMACs business 
changed little. It was organized by 
GM in 1919 because most banks 
then refused to lend to individuals 
to finanrg car purchases. The pur- 
pose not only was to increase sales 
but also to reduce the car market’s 
cyclical nature. To this day. 
GMAC nuts efficiently and with a 
staff that is considered relatively 
small for an operation of its size: 
about 10,000 employees, many who 
have been with the company 25 or 
30 years. 

But GMAC is quickly moving to 
change its focus. Earlier this year, it 
purchased two large mortgage- 
banking companies, which will 
make GMAC the second-largest 
mortgage banker in the country, 
smaller only than Texas-based Lo- 
mas & Nettleton Mortgage Inves- 
tors. And one of Mr. Murphy's 
highest priorities is to expand that 
business. 

“Is it so different to grant credit 
on a home than on a car?" Mr. 
Murphy asks. “We have six and a 
half million people paying their 
bills on their cars each month, we 
know what we're doing” 

That main* GMAC a major fac- 
tor in the financing of the two most 
expensive products Americans buy, 
their homes and their cars. And m 



Robot F. Murphy 


its posh to become “a household 
wokT* in lending, GMAC has 
raised its annual advertising budget 
to $20 nriflkm to $30 million a year. 

The finanra company aim has 
begun a number of pilot programs 
to determine which other new busi- 
nesses it should enter. It began test- 
ing its own credit card m June 
1984. bat Mr. Murphy said “it 
hasn't been as successful as we had 
hoped.” He attributed the poor re- 
sponse to the fact that “there are 
200 million plastic cards out there, 
and I have a feeling another credit 
card is not what people want” 

Mr. Murphy, who has worked 36 
years for the finance company, is 
ai<n expanding the company’s in- 
surance business. Motors Insur- 
ance Corp., from motor vehicle in- 
surance into homeowner's 
insurance and group credit life in- 
surance. 

To Mr. Morphy, GMACs ad- 
vantage in the financial services 
business is its size. For one thing, 
he believes it has a natural market 
among die 65 million individual 
borrowers from GMAC, among 
GM*s 10,000 dealers, and among 
Gh^s 800,000 employees. 

Its own size, plus that of its par- 
ent, helps GMAC raise money 
cheaply and the hngw amount of 
business generated by the GM fam- 
ily enables GMAC to be a highly 
efficient processor of paper, a ma- 
jor part of the workload of any 
finanrial company that is geared to 
serving the general public. As a 
result, although the number at 
GMACs borrowers more than 
doubled in the last five years, the 


number of its employees has not. 
riiangflri- 

Meanwhile, GMACs aequisi-; 
tion of the mortgage-banking com- 
panies is pushing it into stflF other 
firida — such as real-estate broker- 
age. Mr. Murphy declined to com- 
ment an it, but executives in the 
investment banking industry said.' 
that GMAC was planning to sc-[ 
quire a large real-estate brokerage 
firm. The concept is (hat the real-: 
estate brokerage would sell the : 
houses and steer the buyers to 
GMAC for financing just as GM 
car dealers steer automobDe buyers 
to GMAC for their anto loans. 

For this type of business, GMAC 
already has a built-in clientele. Mr. 
Murphy estimates that each year 
GM moves Z000 to 3,000 enqrioy- 
ees from one city to another. 

GMAC also is using GM em- 
ployees to try out its other new 
ventures. About 18 months ago. for 
example, it began a money market 
mutual fund for its own employees. 
That pilot project has worked wdt 
enough so that this month it will be 
extended to all GM employees. 
And later tins month, riuyhng ac- 
count privileges will be added to 
the money market mutual fund. 

In another experiment, GMAC 
has started a pilot program in 
which it offers the equivalent of 
money marker accounts to some of 
its de a l e rs . If it is successful, it will 
be extended to GW’s 10.000 dealer- 
ships. Under the p rogr am , a AmtUrr 
deposits its excess cash in the 
GMAC account, and the balances 
in the account are credited against 
GMACs loans to that dealer. 
Thus, a dealer’s cash flow is used to 
reduce its borrowing costs. 

Mr. Murphy said that GMAC 
might expand this service beyond 
the automobile business. “It leads 
you into other types of small-busi- 
ness financing," he said. "If we can 
grant credit to automobile dealers, 
can’t we gram credit to other medi- 
um-sized and small businesses?” 


Sooth Africa Inflatio n Slows 

Ratten 

PRETORIA — South African 
producer price inflation eased to 
1659 percent in June from 16.91 
percent in May, but rose on a year- 
to-year bass from 8.13 percent in 
June 1984, the government an- 
nounced Wednesday. 


Wednesdays 

ore 


Prices 


NASDAQ prices ns Of 
3 P.«1. New York time. 

I'io The Associated Press 


TJ Month 

Utah Low Stock 


Soles in Net 

Dl». YM. UK Hfah LOW 3 PM. ChUf 


11 ADC Tl 
19* AELl 
16* AFG 
10ft ASK 
16 AnmRt 

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Acolrtn 
16* AcuRov 
2M Adeem 
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17ft 13ft AHBSti 
35V, IB AsCyRt 
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24 1 2V, A Kin 

18* At Alporex 
2414 10* AtHWt 
225* 15* AlleoSv 
26* 20*11 ATIdBn 
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11th 5V. AloflMc 


1* 

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lift 

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lift 

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44* 23* Amrirrs 130 13 
2S* 12* AmrwK 
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29* lift AmskS 
20* Mft A moods 
15* 9 AnlOBlC 

15* 7* Ana ran 

39* 17 Andrew 
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30* 16* AnotoC 
31* 14* AutileC 
27* 11* AplEMos 
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22* 15* Aroo5v 
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25* A AvniGr 
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217 

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24* 23* 24* +1* 
7* 7 71% 

27* 27 27 

18* IT* 18 — * 

14* 14* 14*— * 
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18* 17* 17* — * 
10* 10* 10* 

18* 17* 18 — ft 
14 15* 15b * ft 

25* 25* 25’1 + * 
14* 14* 1<* 

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16* 14* 
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12 Month 
Wan Low Stock 


Soles in Mel 

Dlv. Yld. 100s Hieh Low 3 PJto CK'ee 


3 Ilk 

18* 12 

A 3* 

13* 5* Carom k 
16* 6* Carter! I 

21* 7* Case vs* 

11 5* Cencnrs 

asv, 21* Cntrflc 1.80 56 
191% 8 Centcor 

56* 32 CcnBcp 2315b AO 
36* 21* CnBshS 1J2 44 
44 3.1 


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31* 15* CFdBks _ 

44* 23* Centran 20 
0* 1* Cermtk 

13* 8* Cetvs 
6* 3* ChapEn 

21* 13* CnrmS s 20 
21* 11* ChkPrrt 
11 5* 0*Td! 

31* 21 ChLwn 
7* 2* ChcfiMX 

15* 9* CbrvE 
18* 9* ChlCtil 
31 22* Chi Poes 

11* 6* Oironr 
19 9* OvDws 

12* 5* Owns 
44* 22* Clntas 
34* 14* Cipher 
12* 6 CIPTlU 
7* 4 arena 

23* 15* ClzSGa 

S * 21* ClzFld 
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38* 23 CIzUIB 
14* 9 OtVFed 

29 22* CtvNCo 

28* 22* CSortU 
19b 12* aearOl 
21* 15* devtm 200 112 
28b 7b Cltnfrrw 
17* 11* Cecil F 
20* 9 Cube Lb 
46* 22* CocaBII 
19b 12* Coeur 
5* 1* Cwrenlc 
26* 14* Cohmls 
6* 2* Co lab R 
IS* 8* Calonen 
6* 4 Collins 

36* 22* Co I Li Ac UH 
30* 14* CoJrTI# 


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23 

176 

548 

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150 

96 

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131 

144 

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14 8 

1.1 132 


71* IS CotoNt 
19* 6* Comers 

20* 10* Contests .12 
15* 10* CcmdTq .16 
5* l* Comatal 


16 
1014 

463 

44 

18 

175 

4 

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1.96 56 23 

MS 2.9 1788 

68b 11 77 

-38 17 46 

31 
78 
550 
26 
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45 
111 

71 
291 
57 
143 
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87 


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11 * 10 * 11 — <4 

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34* 34* 34* 

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14* 13* 14* +1 

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33* 33b 33b — * 
39* 30* 39b 
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13* 13* 13* 

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24b 23* 24 
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18* 18* 18* 

20* 19* 19*— * 
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19* 18* 18* — * 
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3* 3 a* — 


17 Month 
h tan Low Stock 


Sales n 

D«v. YM. IKK 


Net 

Hub Low 3 PM. Ch Bf 


ID* 5* EffiBAir os 

18* 5* Errulec 582 

9 2* Endla IS 

8* 4* End* aj U 

17* ]* Enaocs 1163 

36 15V EnaCnv 80 

M* 7* EnFocJ 82 

17* a* EnOPha JO U 1 

21b 10 EraBI 128 

23* II* Eauot 1157 

8* 5* Eaton JO 27 55 

46* 26* Eric n .350 17 34 

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16* 2* Exovlr 82 


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18b 10 10* — 1% 

5 4* 5 + * 

24* S* ZFb — * 
7* 7b 7b — * 
16* 14* 16*— Vh 


77 Month 
Htati Low Stock 


Sales In Net 

Div. Yht 1«S Htati Lew 3 PAL ditae 


8* 2b Joekeot 
41b 25b jockLfe 
27b 14b jaroWtr 
8b 5b JefMort 
22 14b -tart co 

7b 3* Jonlcbl 
13* 6* Josohsn 
19 9* Juno 1 

20* 12b Justin 


1*6 
433 
160 
41 

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111 

15 

40 27 » 




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18 17* II + to 

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4* 4* 4* 

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49 "3 49' s 49b— b 
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21b 20'S 20*— * 
17 It Vs lAft 
14 14 14 — * 

19b lA 1 * 16*— ta 
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25* 17 HaraGs J4 11 
34b 23ft HrrtNt 163 

10Va 5ft HOttrw 5 

14* 4b MamkB .141 

5b lb Hlthsvn 

33* 14 KchaAs .14 .9 

34V, 14 * nchaBs C3 .« 

9b 3ft Helen 7 

37b 21V; Belli 
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34b 15* HibtrCs 1X39 4J 1 

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15 3ft MOS»n 2:* 

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23b 12 HwBIJJ 135 

28 ft 17 HuntJS J5e J 81 
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74ft 13* Hntc3 S 36 17 ii 
27 12b HvtriTc 52 

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22ft Eft Eft + * 
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73* 

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14b 4* IntlSv 

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77b 11b MervG 
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7b 7ft MdPcA 
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41- 23ft MtaJBk 1.12 13 370 
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41* 26b MIOHr 

8b 2*ft Mil Kan 

44 30to Millar 

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27b 15b Minstar 

1616 7V, MGask 

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IIP? A Moleclr 
39b 26 to Mota JO 

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12 7b MonAnt 5A 

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2* 22 MonuC 160 43 5S 
av. lib MorFia j01 77 

If . «OrKs .ft 1J 205 

22v* ISft Mqr r*n 68 14 215 

7ft 3to Meselev 209 

44ft 30 Mullrnd 64 1.1 159 

26V. 10ft Mvlans .10 J 1591 


12b im lift- Vi 

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S 7 7 — * 

4b 4b— ft 
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27ft 27* 27ft— to 
nib li* li* 

25 24* 24ft— ft 

8to Bft Bto 
13b 13ft Ub + to 
15ft 14* 14b—* 
23b 23VS 23ft— ft 
64 63ft 63ft— ft 
18 17ft 17ft— ft 

lOto 10 10 — to 

30ft 3 Oft 30b 
67to 66b 67b 
2ft 2b 2b 
30ft 30 30 — ft 

20ft 20 mi- * 
12* TZ* 12ft + ft 
5 5 5 

4ft 4ft 4ft + to 

33ft 33 33 — to 

Uto lito iito— to 
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14ft 14 iito — va 
18V, 17* 17*—* 
34ft 35b 15b— ft 
58 57b 57b— to 


n Month 
HWiLow Sleek 


sin Net n Month 

Pita m lOte Htah Low 3 PM. OTaa HWttflw 5t0<* 


Dlv. YM. S loS ln HlBtl Lew 3 PAL Ow ‘ 


9to 4b Mumrax 13 

71 to 17ft Numeric A U 17 

10ft 6b NutrIF 221 

13b 6b NgMedi 53 


7ft 7ft 7ft 
28 to 27ft 27ft— b 
8* 8ft Bft— to 
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17ft 12 Octltas . 37 

46b 29b OonGa US 25 494 
67b 39ft OhtaCO 260 46 75 

32b 14b OMKntS 1J0 13 241 
41b 23 OkJRn J 24 21 498 

22W 18V6 OidS pfC 260 12J5 10 

23b 9ft OrwBcp 29. 16 98 

-Vft- 3b OnUlW ■ -■ 10 

23ft 13ft OpftcC 440 

48b 22ft OotfcR 1078 

19to 11* OrtocrtC ' 70 

Aft Sft Orbit 382 

7 3b OrtoCo 107 

2lto U Odmn JO 1J 20 
34* 25* OttrTP 27A 9X 8A 

15 9to OvrExp 111 

24ft 12 OwenM 60 1J 179 
4b to Oxaca 524 


2b 2* 2*— ft, 
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45 44 44 — b 

61* 60* 60*— ft 
Jlto 30to 30* — b 
34* 34* 34b— 1ft 
21b 21ft 21b— ft 
Jl*-21ft-Jl* + ft 
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37ft 36ft 36ft— 1 
IS 15 IS 
6b 6ft 6ft— to 
4* 4to 4to 
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31* 30b 30b— * 
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22b 22* 22ft 
* * * 


21* 11* SofNvA 
28ft lib SonecPs 68 25 182 
27ft 14* SonrFd 65e 23 
6* 4 SaHaO 
38* 21to SthdFn 
28* 16ft Soul rst 
9* J* sovran 
47to si to Sovran 
19to 8b Speedy 
27ft 8to Spctran 
8b 5* SpecCtl 

16* 12b Spire 
19b 3ft SiurSri 
9* 5 StafBW , ... 

30 -19b Standvj 14)0 II 
25* Uto SMMk 
68* 33b StaStB 
6ft 4ft StuleG 
7ft 4ft Steiger 
17ft 9* 5tewStv 
25 T7ft Stwtnf 
8* Sto Stffel 
18ft 7b Stratus 
38ft 26* StrvrCls 26 22 
35to 19ft Stryker 



JO XI 


23 10 


32* 19ft PNC a 2339 

53to 39b Paccar 120a 22 144 

15* 7 PocFst 988 

» 10 PacTel JO 57 38 

19ft tOft POCOPtl 27 

Sft 6 PoncMx .13 16 X 

24* 10* Ponsptl 1002 

2D to lJto Park Oil 60 A6 20 

8 4 PatntM 54 

12b 5* PoulHr t 523 
13b Sft PauiPt 40 

16ft 7b Poychx 38 

25ft 9* PeakHC 1227 

27* 20ft Pearl H 1159 

Mft Sto PeaGta M 2 195 

35 19* PeooEn 150 44 39 

31 to 2»to Pentar s 68 26 130 

14ft 7* PeopEx 5351 

32* 34ft Prtrtla 1.12 4L0 72 

13ft 4 Phrmct 79 

12* 7to PSFS XB# J 763 

17* 14* PSIlGt J0r 35 1602 

28* 17b PicSov 1177 

34* 16ft PicCote 60 27 52 

37ft TJ PlonHi 72 25 215 

lift 7 PkxiSt .12 1J 8 

14* Sto PoFolk rs 

34b 19 PtayMs 1038 

9 19* Po »»x 107 

3* lb Pavratl 18 

17ft 9ft Pawrtcs 52 

11* Sto PwCorrv 40 

37b 11 PrecCst .12 6 121 

9 4to PrpdLo 38 

Bft 3 Priam 84 

16* 5* PrfcCro* 28 

M 34* PrtceCO 254 

22b 9 Prfrtxuc 1B2 

6 4ft ProdOp .16 33 113 

42 20* ProoCs .12 J 94 

15* 12b ProolTr 1J0 9J 77 

19* 13* P ravin 1065 

7* 3ft Potrmn 462 

24b 12* PurtBn 60 17 7 


-29 28* 28ft — ft 

45* 45to 45* 

13* 13b 13ft + ft 
14* 13b 14 — * 
15 14b 15 

Sft 8 Bft + ft 
34 22ft 23 —1* 
13ft 13ft 13ft 
7ft 7* 7ft 
12b Ub Ub— ft 
12ft 12 12 — to 

16ft 16 16b— b 

16* 16ft 16ft— b 
2Aft 25b 26 
9b 9 9ft— ft 
34ft 34 34ft + ft 
29ft 28b 28b— 1 , 

14 t3b 13ft + ft 
28 27* 28 + to 

7ft 7to 7* + ft 
10* 10ft 10b 
14ft 14* 14*— U 
25to 25to 25b + ft 
22 21* E 

36b 36ft Sift 
9 9 9 

13ft 13* 13* — * 
19* 18ft Wi— * 
25ft 24b 24b— ft 
2* 2b 2* 

12ft 12b 12* — b 

lift 11 11 — * 

29b 29 29b— b 

Bft 7* Bft + * 

4ft 4 4 

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56ft 55b 54* — * 
Ub lib lift 
4ft 4b 4ft 
» 39 39 

13b 13* 13* 

16 15ft 15ft + ft! 

6b 6ft 6* 

23* 23* 23* — to 


171ft 

91* Sutwru 

168 

S3 

47 

69 

35ft SubrB 

192 

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2ft Surnrna 



111 

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7 SumtHI 

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383 

3ft 

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166 

10ft 

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5 

6* 

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50 

8* 

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14 


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14ft 6* Syatech 
6 2ft Svntrex 
18b 11ft Syseen 
36* 14* SrACOC 
7b 3Vs Systin 
lib 6b Svslntg 
11 6ft SystGn 
25ft 12b syatmt 


16 


34 

179 

230 

294 

10?? 

38 


15ft 14ft 14ft— * 
27ft 27 27* 

Eto 19ft 19ft— b 
4b 4b 4b 
24* 23b 24 
18 17ft 17ft— * 
7ft 7ft 7ft + Vk 
42* 42 42 — * 

17 16ft 16ft— ft 
2Sb 23b 25* 4-1* 
7ft 7 7 

15ft 15 15 — * 

5* 5* 5* + ft 

6* 6* 6* 

26 25ft 26 
16* 15b 15ft— * 
99ft 5Bb 59 + ft 

4ft 4 4ft 
4to 4ft 4ft—* 
15 14ft 14ft— * 
24b 24* 24* 

6b 6* 6* 

17* 17 17 — b 

35* 34ft 35* 

34 33b 33b— b 

171ft 170 T71ft+2 
60ft 60* 60b— ft 
3ft 2ft 3 +ft 
lift 11* lift— * 
lb lft iW-ft 
9 Bb Bb 

ns ns ns-ft 

u ioft ioft— to 

13ft T2b 13ft + ft 
3* 3ft 3ft 
18 18 18 
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13* 13b 13b- ft 
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12, IlS Ub 
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7ft 7* 7*— ft 

13ft 13ft 13* 

17ft 17* 17ft— * 

14 1 « 15b— to 
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15 SS w 

9ft 9ft 9* 

46* 44b 44b— 1* 
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17 16b 17 + * 

6* 6ft 6ft— * 
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13* 12b 12b— * 
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7 7 7 (te 

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345 

68 

437 


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13* 12* 17*— ft 


43* 28ft Ytawft uo 14 436 41* 41b 4Tb + ft 


30ft 3 Zen LU I 
13b 10* Zlealer 

40b 29b Zlenut 
8 2* Xitel 

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Page 14- 


I.XTER NATIONAL HERALD TRIBl'NE* THIRSDAV, AUGUSTS, 1985 



PEANUTS 

UIHV ARE UE STANP1N6 
W THE TELEPHONES, SIR? 



tl MALLIE5 , 'ALUlAV5 HAN6 
AROUND THE FAY 
TELEPHONES, MARCIE... 


fT MAKES U5 LOOK. 
LIKE IjUE'VE GOT 
50METHIN6 60IN&- 


U)E COULD/ ARE YOU 
60 INTO f OUT OF 
THE BOOK W0URM1ND?! 
STORE... 


BOOKS 





BLONDIE 

17 CENTS (CHS 
POSTAtSEf MR.J 

roue 


THE MOUNTAIN OF NAMES: 

A History of the Human Family 

By Alex Shoumaoff. 293 pages. $17.95. 
Simon & Schuster, 1230 Avenue of the 
Americas, New York, N. Y. 10020. 

Reviewed by Neil Postman 


ACROSS 

1 One of the 
three B’s 

5 Give a 

(boost) 

IS Actor 
Crawford's 
nickname 

14 Kind of hemp 

15 One of David's 
mighty men 

1C “CavaUeria" 
temptress 

17 Antitoxins 

18 say die 

19 Neighbor of 
Hung. 

28 Constitutional 
22 Exam taker 

24 "Brils on her 

25 Stretch out 

26 Probe 

36 Subleased 
31 Tempered 

36 Sr. citizens’ 
nest eggs 

37 Erhard’s 
therapy 

38 Big cat 

39 Faithful 

42 Roborant 

43 Probe 
46 Spectacle 
56 A teacher of 

Liszt 

51 Too 

52 Orders 


56 Red stain for 

marking 

lumber 

57 Hanker 

53 Foraminous 
item 

66 "Like 

without a tail”: 
Macbeth 

61 Mud volcano 

62 Kind of plate 

63 Macerates 

64 Where Trajan 
built an 
amphitheater 

65 Columnist 
Abeison 


1 Low 

2 Ha ley or 
Comfort 

3 Gist 

4 Cruel 

5 He wrote 
"Song of the 
Chattahoo- 
chee" 

6 Early center of 
Christianity 

7 Endow 

8 Deux preceder 

9 Serving 

10 Ruin 

11 Itinerary 

12 Comedian Ole 

13 Passe 

21 Mudhen 


23 He had his 
grief in a fief 

25 Effort 

26Sevareidor 

Coates 

27 Dry: Comb, 
form 

28 Device 

29 Discernment 

32 Transcripts 

33 Moon goddess 

34 Discharge 

35 Chub 

37 What Gay 
called "a kind 
of praise" 

46 Cash drawer 

41 Wall Street 
seer 

42 All even 

44 Meager 

45 He seeks hides 

46 Senegal's 
capital 

47 Grenoble's 
river 

48 Kind of shop 

49 Aster's 
collection 

52 Where 
Bamako is 

,53 Jimmy or jack 

*54 Columnist 
Bombeck 

55 Understood 

58 Dr. Meniere’s 
specialty 



BEETLE BAILEY 

Y'KNOW, THAT'S 
REALLY A GREAT 
SLOQAM/ 



coowe must've 

*7 BEATEN ME TO J 
W-TT-E &A|s»C 


•ffcag I 
\!)o§o£mm\ 





YEAH, BUT I r 
PONY THINK 
YOU'RE @ 
INTERPRETING % 
IT RIGHT /C 


as itch.' what is itching Alex Shotunatoff is tbe 

long- term trend toward the dissolution of (he 
family. “The lies and the demands of kinship" 
he writes, “have been weakening, the family 

has bem getting smaller and . . . less influen- 
tial, as im individual, with a new sense of 
autonomy • . • has come to the loteffounA." 
Shoumatoff argues that a radically different 
mental order — self-centered instead of kin- 
centered — has taken over in the United Siaets 
Europe and in most countries that are 
developing along European lines- He does not 
categorically lamen t the rise of self-centered- 
n eps, which he sees as having brought with il 
undeniable benefits. But one of its clear vic- 
tims, he says, has been the warmth, sanity, and 
support that long-term intimate bonding (Le.. 


family life) brings. As one indication among 
the many he offers of how far the disintegra- 
tion of kinship has gone, he notes that a sur- 


ge ALL THAT i 
YDU CANGE/ ! 


= 1 Ik# 
8-8 | MW 


prising number of Americans are unable to 
fume all four of their grandp arents. (I have 
tested this claim with my college-age students, 
and found that only 30 percent of them can do 
it) 

But Shoumatoff derives little satisfaction 
from describing die decline in the continuity 


ANDY CAPP 


hi, pet. looks 

UKEAIOVFW . 
v /MOKNINS 
( OUT THERE 1 


F* AFTERNOON?. 
WHVARBVTVOU 
AT WORK .THEN? 


f 1 gN*T I 
AFTERNOON 


. I HAD A 
► tVW^S < 
HOUDAsr 
s. OWING r 
7 TOME } 


I PlMS My WWIO, lu—pmn. LU. 
DW 0» NeeeAaertceSpMlfcsW 


STREWTHfTHE 

> AMOUNTOFt^ 

THESE C*VS-r 


© New York Tones, edited by Eugene Moksha. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


WIZARD of ID 

TIMER* ROLL CALL 




SMITH 




\fmrWz\k fN 
■m rom&H leeAOH 





w mi 

MliISm 

mi 

it 


REX MORGAN 

I'VE BEEN 1 

WORRIED ABOUT YOU, DARLING' 

I SAW YOUR BRIEFCASE HERE — 
SO 1 KNEW YOU'D BEEN HOME/ 
i WHERE WERE YOU'? jy r — — <W 



and teas e of belonging that traditional irinichip 
provides. What wiS rSieve his itch is the sur- 
vival of family life. And. indeed, his bode is a 

richly d^ralUrt histor y of kinship, the point of 
whim is to encourage his readers and himself 
to believe that tbe prospects for the future of 
kinship are good. 

To accomplish this, he dram on just about 
cvenr academic field to be found in a university 
catalog, from anthropology to zoology. Tbe 


Solution to Previous Ptzzzle 


□dodo aaas aana 
ECOBa naan ansa 
DCODB nnsn senna 
EEDBncaaaQo □□□□ 
□nan nanan 

QDDD3Q 00030 
qeqc] Qnan 00000 
oDonaoa aBanasa 
EGBQB □□□□ OQ0Q 

naaaa Qaaaao 

DQBaQ aaBa 

□GOB 0300E00E300 

□ESQ soon aaana 

□eqo aaao aaasa 

0E0E 0300 00300 


reader is thereby immersed in a torrent of 
information, much of whichis fascinating. Fra- 
example, more than 90 percent of aS birds are 
mnnrtga m mis. The oldest known Wiln f&tiflv 
was a group of U hommids whose, retsatss 
were found in 1975; it appears dm they met 
with an accident about 212 nriBran years ago in 
tbe Afar Triable of Ethiopia. At present, 
American couples are having an average of 
only 12 children, which means they arc baidy 
replacing themselves. The practice of pdyga- 
L my was adopted by tbe Mormons tp 1843. 
when their prophet, Joseph Smith, dagned he 
bad received word from God tihat having awe 
than erne wife would be all right with Han. 
Researchers have found a connection between 
1 a honoooedike substance caBcd serotonin and 
competitive behavior. Not only do males have 
higher levels of serotonin than females bid 
c frai rrnffi nl acad emi c d e partm ents and Nobd 
Prize winners have much higher levels than 
their subordinates. The greatest concentration 
of single people in the world is New York City, 
which has approximately two million “an- 
cles.” And since about 60,000 people pass 
through Blooraingdak/s every day. most of 
them stogies, it would appear that the store is 
an excellent place fox one single to meet anoth- 
er. 

One of tire troubles with all of ibis informa- 
tion is that it puts a severe strain on one’s 
short-term memory, which is to say that Sbou- 
matoff tells much more than even a leisurely 
reader can assimilate. Another trouble is that 
the line of argument being pursued here is 
cominuotislv obstructed by Sboumatoffs eru- 
dition. He wants us to behove that the need for 
kinship is acute, that it has always been a , 
characteristic of human life, that the condt- i 
dons of modem Western life have led lo a 
decline in tbe capacity for loog-tenn intimate 
bonding, and that there is a rebirth of interest 
in famil y life: But an encyclopedia is not as 
ar gumen t, and. in any case, a reader can easfly 
be worn down before coming to Sboumatoffs 
denouement — a moving and wefl-foettsed 
final chapter that takes its name from the title 
of the book. The Mountain of Names refers to 
the U billion names of the dead (hat are 
contained in a nuclear bomb-proof repository 
near Salt Lake City. Shoumatoff describes in 
loving detail this singular Mormon project, a 
tiring monument to the idea of kinship, “ft is 
the closest there is," he says, “and tbe closest 
there wifl be. to a ‘catalog of catalogs' for the 
human race." Were it ever to be completed 
(that is, contain all the names of everyone who 
had ever lived), there would be dose to 1 10 
billion names. And what would this Everest of 
remembrance prove? It would show whaL in 
the end. Shoumaiofrs books is mainly con- 
cerned to tel 1 us: that we are all kin. a vast 
extended family who need each other more 
tb an we allow ourselves to know. 

Neil Postman teaches communication arts and 
sciences a New York University. His latest, 
book. “ Amusing Oursebies to Death." will be 
published this jalL He wrote this review for The 
Washington Past 







forfc ( 

jfi ltd"! f i 


COME AND 'SIT DOWN f 1 
I VE GOT A LOT OF THINGS] 


TO TELL VOU f FIRST, 
YOU'LL BE HAPPY TO 1 
KNOW, IVE QUIT MY J 

mm. job' .iiuiiiiiiMi 


HCW 

MUCH 


S NOTICE A 
DID YOU 
GIVE THEM, 
^ CL AUDI AT . 


WHAT DID 
YOU SAY? 


K 


BRILEV 

tDSrtBJj 


* Most people/ 5 ^ a heawoc coming on.. . 
I CAN SEE MINE CQWIN 6 .- 


THAT SCRAMBLE) WORD GATE 
9 by Henri ArnoM arid Bob Lae 


Unacnmbto Biaae tour Jumbtae, 
one tatter to each square^ to form 
four ordnary wads. 


GARFIELD 

AH/TH £F£ IS NOTHING MORE 
REFRESHING THAN A LEAF OF 
LETTUCE 
FOR THE 

cSSSSoos 


THANK VOO SO MUCH 
FOR THE RELIGHT FIX. 
^-v_pier LUNCHEON 


WHERE ARE 

yoo GOING?, 


p m GOING 
TO PIE NOW 


TAING 


URUGA 


KRODEF 


CHINTS 


(Answers tomonow} 

Yesterday's I Ju ™i*’s: BORAX ARRE FOMENT BARROW 
I Answer He was the type of man some women 
take to and also this— FROM 




By Alan Truscocr 

A declarer who looks for a 
small improvement in his 
chances can sometimes reap a 
big bonanza. An example is the 
diagramed deal that follows. 

The North hand was d iffis 
cult to bid. containing great 
strength bat not quite enough 
for a forcing opening. After the 
modest one-dub bid. North 
had rebid problems when his 
partner responded rate dia- 
mond. 

He showed his great 
strength with a jump to two 
hearts, a bid that does occa- 
sionally have to be made with a 
three-card suit, and rightly 
subsided when his partner 
eventually bid three no-trump. 

The declarer was North and 
he thought carefully when 
West led a spade and the dum- 
my appeared. It was vital lo 
establish dubs quickly, and the 
routine move was to lead an 
honor from the dummy in the 
hope of an even split. 


BRIDGE 


This would have led to de- 
feat, however, and perhaps 
heavy defeat. A three-trick 
penalty is posable if South 
goes all-out m diamonds when 
the clubs do not break evenly. 

North was concerned to im- 
prove his chances in dubs. If 
West held a singleton 3ce. it 
would be important to make 
the fust lead from the dosed 
band. He therefore decided to 
enter his hand with a diamond 
to the ace. and just for kicks 
tried the queen. He had no 
intention of finessing, but East 
would not know that and 
might be induced to cover if he 
hdd the king. 

East played low, and as 
.planned the ace was played. 
The king popped out from the 
West side, and the table froze. 
When he had unfrozen. North 
led a dub. winning with the 
queen when West played low. 

South now finesed die dia- 
mond seven, willing to ran the 
slight risk that West, through 


accident or cunning, had 
played a long that was not an- 
gle ion. Dummmys heart loser 
was discarded on the diamond 
jack and another dub lead es- 
tablished the dummy. 

North harvested three over- 
tricks, a match-point bonanza, 
on a deal on which many play- 
ers failed in the same contract 

NORTH (D) 

*AK 

VAX* 


O Q 6 

♦ KQS75* 


MW” 111 ;fS! 

OK Hnmi 0 101)0 

♦ AIM 

SOUTH 
* J» 

vm 

4 A J B 7 3 
**33 

Nona and Sown were vntanbto. 
Tbe bidding: 


NOrtto 

Em 


Went 

1* 

Peas 

1 G 

Pew 

IO 

PWs 

3* 

Pew 

3* 

Pan 

Few 

Feat 

3N.T. 

Pwe 


West M the sped* bar. 


jcogi 


WHAT THEY CALLED 
THE STAR OF 
THE MONSTER SHOW. 
L 

Now arrange tfio cfcctad tetters to 
tom tha surprise answer, as suo- 

Oestad by the above cartoon- 


W>rid Slock Markets 


Saan Hofcunm 


Via Agence France-Presse Aug. 7 

Chmng prices in local currencies unless otherwise i nd i ca t ed. 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


LmPalnm 

UAn 


KeyklmM 

Room 

SbcfctMlfli 


29 84 20 48 tr 
IS 64 t St tr 

31 SB 2J 72 fr 

26 79 13 H tr 

23 73 17 a a 

18 64 13 SS a 

1( 64 IQ 90 cf 

31 88 17 63 fr 

20 68 14 57 sh 

1* 66 12 54 el 

29 84 21 70 fr 

15 99 II S o 

14 17 9 4* r 

26 79 ;I6 61 fr 

15 64 9 48 cl 

17 63 10 SO cf 

13 S 12 $4 r 

28 82 21 70 Ir 

25 77 21 70 Ir 

27 81 M 61 fr 

16 61 10 50 r 

26 7« 11 52 fr 

27 61 16 61 fr 

» M IS 59 fr 

15 99 IQ SO Sh 

26 79 19 66 fr 

18 64 16 61 st 

SO 61 12 54 cl 
u ss ii n r 
12 54 # 4S o 

26 79 16 64 fr 

19 66 11 52 a 
19 66 W SO cl 
23 73 15 59 o 
M 57 72 54 r 


Bangkok 
MM 
Hobo Kong 

Manila 
N*w DeBil 
SMaf 


AFRICA 

Abler* 

Coi™ 

Cope Tam 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

30 86 25 77 
33 *1 22 72 
33 91 27 81 
X 86 24 75 
32 90 24 75 

31 SB 24 75 

32 90 26 79 
30 66 2S 77 
3S 95 28 82 
30 86 24 75 


28 82 14 57 
32 90 23 73 
17 61 10 50 
25 77 16 61 
23 73 TO SO 
27 01 24 75 


ABN 501 

ACFHoMbB 239 

AEGON 99 JO 

AKZO 120 

Ahatd 237 

AMEV 268 

ADam Rubber 850 

Amro Bank^ 88 

BVG 202 

BuMirmaniT 99 

CafandHlda J7JD 

EMtvfer-NDU 127.50 

Fukkar 7* 

GW Brocade. 21150 

Helnekan 15120 

Haanavens 66.10 

KLM 59.40 

Naarden 49 

Not NeOOer 7350 

Neffltovd 179 

OceVondarG 341 JO 


Rarai Dutch 194.10 

Unilever 341 JO 

Van Omm ani 29 

VMF Stork SI 

VNU 2O6J0 

*89X81 Getfl Index : 2*7.00 


hum 

IWKA 

KMI + Sotr 

Korjtudl 

Koufhof 

•uoeekjier H-O 

KJoecfcnorWorife 

KnowSfONl 


HhreMMeel 

Kloof 
Nedbonk 
Proa Stern 
Rusutot 
SA Brewa 
St Helena 


Prenwau 

PWA 

RWE 

W HMi M i n K o lf 

if T" 8 


Teel* 28 H2 20 60 fr 

i-AT I H AMERICA 

■mom Aire* 11 52 5 41 p 

Cum* no 

Lima — no 

Mexico CITr 25 77 II 52 d 

fUodeJmeJre — — _ — na 

WORTH AMERICA 

Andwnm is ST 9 48 a 

Atlanta 29 84 20 68 if 


EGES 

GB-lma-BM 

GBL 

Bwet 

Hoboken 


*?- 

yft 

::: 

T* 


II 64 IS W 
16 61 18 SB 


MIDDLE EAST 


38 66 13 55 
30 66 24 75 
35 95 19 66 
26 82 U 61 
30 16 21 70 


IS 99 7 45 

14 57 II 53 


nunw 

Denver 

Detroit 

Honsfote 

Meartea 

La* Angeles 


Nassau 
New Yet* 

San Frenetics 
Seattle 
Tnreafa 
Wusi ia wtB ii 


15 39 * 48 cf 

29 84 » 68 st 

26 79 IB 64 PC 

29 B4 20 68 PC 

31 « IS 59 fr 

N 66 20 M it 

31 H| 24 73 pc 

35 95 24 7S tr 

31 88 15 64 fr 

31 BB 24 75 st 

31 68 T6 61 pc 

29 84 17 63 ti 

26 79 21 70 pe 

V 64 20 66 pc 

SB 48 IS 55 pc 

19 66 14 57 sh 

26 79 19 M d 

29 84 21 70 pc 


SocGanerale 
Soring 
Sohray 

Trod ton Elea 
UC8 
Unera 

VMItaMentaene 
^r-Shgtaje*:^ 


Bk East Asia 
Cbeuna Kono 
Cbtaourid 
G rsen litaid 
HmtMSafi 
Hewtoi 
OW n Gas 
HK EtadrlC 
HKRmailYA 
HK Hotels 
HKLlM 

HK Wharf 
Hutch Whomaoa 


Kawtopa Motor 
MlranwHoM 
Ffw rrona 
OrtfMQvaraat 
|HKp™p, 

Swm PodftaA 

TrtawonB 

WbhKwana 


AEG-Tatefimkan 129 129 
AOanzven .1395 1415 
35*50 35550 
BASF 219.10 7T&J0 


129 129 2£l? ,CB 

2£Sfinri 


d-cUMidvi to-togavi fr-folr; Mmll: o-overam: pc-aaniy doudv: ruiofnj 
slvsrwmra; iw^now; sf-stomn'. 



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BBC 2S7J023850 I r— I 

sas"" 1 L **™«*^ i 

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H5LSS52L ™ AnutoAmerlcon 2a$Q 

Dgjmler-Beni 657 163 AiratoJUnCaW I£S9 

2»S" _ 285 360 Barlom 1DB 

Dewsdie Babcock 156 157 JO Blwaar HJ75 

Pytsche Bank Sti549JQ BuftaU aso 

Bank 265 3S7M On Been l ire, 

1721700 I Drtefmfeirt 4200 


AA Coro 
Aiiied4.vens 
Anglo Am GoM 
Ass Brft Foods 
An Dairies 
Barclay* 


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BP 

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MR I BrtlAennaoce 

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838 Ca*orv Sdiw 
4650 awterCm 
1373 Commercial U 
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■is OaurlauMs 
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39 D* Beers, 

L65 OUflllers 
7JS fflrtnWn 
160 Flsons 
3XB Free St Get) 

6J0 Gee 
2690 oen Accident 
flJJ GKN 

OJd GtaxsC 1 

S3 

085 GMnness 
42 OU5 
7JS 7JS Haneon 
US 2.15 Hawker 
1X10 13,10 ICl 
2J0 2J0 Imperial Groan 
253) 2520 Jagucr 
268 215 Land Sew rifles 
.100 UTS Legal Genera) 
Sun. _ UavdsBank 
L74 L60 Unriw 

£28 £59 Lucas 
1225 2J8 Marfa and Sp 

MekjiBmc 

W8J6 Mldlaad Bank 
NgfWMfSm* 
PandO 

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rataandLyte 1 46 

Tosco 263 

Thorn EMI 332 

T.I.GfOOP ^ 33D 

TrafafgarH*# 364 

bm-I T HF U1 

Ultnsmor 211 

m pn« UnOeverc 1045/4410 

Tsso^l V8£j u * ajn * SS 

^ « F.T. 29 Index : 9S5J0 

IS8 fSSESbo^k : 1804JO 

1g ig 

2900 2725 

*65 HA. I — 

4900 4900 I *«■— 


did llal 

1 ErtSpita 

No I RymffoHa 

SI 106 Suva Gwwran 

234 226 IF 1 

S71 870 llalcamenfl 

222 222 l taiga* 

144 144 Itahneblllgr i 

S £ S3SSS? 

£S B4 

TO 188 R AS 

5W 511 SIP 

294 297 SM£ 

m 196 5£a 

310 311 StWda 

S3B Ml SKI 

lS 194 MWCPTT Pmi 
34 5 343 Pfiwwi • 


472 Cold Storage 

648 OBS 

263 Frasw Heave 



367 Ma/Banfcfns 
U1 QCBC 
216 DUB 
27/32 DUE . 

179 ShanorHa 
263 Stma Darby 
49 Slore Land 
Spore Press 
f ata w nwi h i 
StT ra dk ei 
Jtaltpd Oeereecw 
HOB 

HrattsTtoMS led 
Pravtam : 79191 


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AMo Laval 

4 SSS”“ 

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SET*** 


U2 zj7 

123 ZZ3 

SJ0 5 JO 

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7J7 170 

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tea IA6 

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164 3J8 
index : 757 j* 


I Dot wa House 
Dobra Securities 


Fuiftsu 

HltocW 
KWacW Cable 
Hontla 

Japan Air Unes 
Kaflma 


GntmBmstodauiaAP 


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U£ 247 

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340 24Q 


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Rocal Elect 


•ii®™ 1 liar-** e» 


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213 2U AtsMWlML 94 

424 422 A»»wauH IDS 

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_348 343 corretoor 

siBta $1746 en a mours 

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633 631 DarfV 1«8 

710 220 Outaaz TO 

13/64 ijfc EtMauflOifl* 19150 

303 310 Eun»e 1 7AS 

733 733 Gen Bau* Ol 

2S6 261 HodWtta 106 

05 635 LotargeCBfl 534 

202 SB iS^atd 2151 

385 383 Lodeijr 61S 

67? £74 rorsat 2« 

176 U1 MarM J® 

^ Ji5 MMra 1MJ 

293 394 MW»n 2069 

*72 *74 MKMkl 1JS 

40* 407 iMetlt wHlfW 1«» 

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Magellan 

MIM 

MVW* 

Hat Aus) Bank 
Hews corn 
N Broken Hill 
Poseidon 
Did Cool Trust 

rfjl JI-f.TJ 

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Thomas McMan 
Western Minina 


146 173 

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6J2 6J4 

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2J2 155 

19 117 
103 107 

180 120 
170 168 
135 19 
482 US 
688 6J0 ! 

132 2J3 . 

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4.12 49 
443 44} 
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Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec Inds 
Matsu Elec Sob 
M touMshl Bank 
Mitsubishi Qwm 
MftsuOWil E)oc 

MnsubWd Heavy 
Mitsubishi Carp 
Mitsui and Co 
AVtsu luahl 
AWtSumf 
KEC 

NGK insulators 
Nikkosac 

Nippon Koaaku 
Nippon OB 
Nippon Steel 

Nomura Spc 
O lympus 
PToneer 
Ricoh 
Sharp 
SWmani 

SMnetxu Chemical 
Sony 

Sumtfomotiank 
Sumitomo Chem 
Swnwsme Marine 
Sumriomo Meie6 
TetaelCerp 
ToMm M anna 
TgeaoChem 

TeOta 

Takto Marine 
Tefcye Elec Power 
Toppon Printing 
Tonnr Ind 
Toshiba 
Tama 

YamaKMSec 

NMke l/D-L Index : U42L15 
Pres ton* ; 0417-21 
West l adex : 1WTTI 

Praweas : W80JS 


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Bank Leo 


JO70 1040 

ss ss 


Ravai Dutch c 
RT2 


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«9S fLA. ISKury 


300 387 

4MU521/M Ago* 

«■ 6B 3tej 

330 338 F4*> 


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Prerlees ; 937J* 


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AsoMCBem 
Asehl Ghm 

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lafertjijosurrf 

JaeaOSorfvx-d 

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Nestle 

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Roche Bator 

Sandaz 

SGWidler 

Saber 

BurveHte nce 

Sr" 

unfanBak 

Winterthur 
Zurich Ins 


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533 3JW 32Vk — 1W 
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0296S Nva AHA t 
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2i4220snmeaAI 
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4431 Pamour 
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4265 Phaat* OH 
39400 Pine Paint 
1500 Place GOa 
44318 Pfocer 
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3870 Oue Store a 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1985 


Page 15 



SPORTS 


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Tentative’ Agreement Reached in Strike 

BastbaM Commissioner Announces Breaklhnnigfy Play to Resume Thursday 


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Today's press-box Imenp board in Atlanta, where the Braves were to play Los Angeles.' 

World Cup Alpine Ski Season 
To Get a South American Start 


f 


By Herman. Pcdeignana 

United Press International 

ZURICH —Almost 20 years af- 
ter the itlea of aa Alpine World Ski 
Cup was bprii in South America, 
the 1985-86 cop season starts next 
week with tfe first-ever World Cup 
races to be staged in tie Southern 
Hemisphere. . ■ . 

Although they are move accus- 
tomed to starting their competitive 
winter season in December, most 
of the top men’s Aiw nbflTers wfll 
compete m races at the Argentine 
resorts -of las Lena*. on Aug. 26 
and I B and BarQodte on Ang. 2A 
- Theskieis have frequently visit- 
edAr^aatma and Chflefor what is, 
to them, smmncx tiaimng. Bat in 
their fir® races in' South America, 
thcy will.be facing the conations 
they are ftunQiar with in Bnopeon 
Decembers --lack of snow. 

.“The downhill comse. at Las 
Ixsas is ready for training," a 
spokesman for the International 
ad Federation (FIS) said on Tues- 
day.”Thereis very fitfle snow, but 
it wiB be suffickat for the aces." 

The grinding ’Warid Cup circuit 
was created throng the 1966 Wodd 

Alpine Championships, bdd in 

PortiBo, -Chile. "It’s called the 
World Cup —the International Ski 
Federation has many member asso- 
dations in the South — wit’s tune 
we shifted some races there,” said 
originator of the cup. 
it of the World Cup 

Committee. 

FIS wanted to commemorate the 
20th anniversary of the cup by 


holding races in South America 
next year, bm that could not be 
worked into a 1986 calendar al- 
ready crowded because of world 
dranqnrauhips scheduled for that 
winter 

So thetrip to Argentina is this 
year — bankrolled by the owner of 
the Las Lena* resort, Ernesto 
Loewenstdn, who is anxious U> de- 
velop ids station as a major ski 
holiday area. 

Another reason behind the ex- 
cursion to Sooth America was lob- 
bying by the world’s leading down- 
hill ers for more races, which 
translates into mare prize money 
arid bonuses for them, With the 
threat of a professional circuit 
looimiiig, FB was qukk to consent 

The project of a' separate pro 
downhill arcuit, however, remains 
stillborn. Most of Us ardent sup- 
porters in the racing community, 
mduding US. Olympic downhill 
.champion BUI Johnson, have made 
quick turnabouts amirgained their 

national fi]d twrnia 

Johnson, who is not in physical 
to race, announced that he 
ypass the Argentine events 
and wffl begin competing in De- 
cember. 

But apart from Austrian Franz 
Klammer and Swiss Peter LOscher, 
who both retired, all the.other top- 
echekm racers are expected to be 
present. 

“Whoever wants to belong to the 
world dass in winter must be in tog 

saUpAustrian Karl Frehsnerhead 
coach of the Swiss mm’s team. 


Freh&ner was seconded by Sepp 
Stalder, the team’s downhill coach. 
“A guy who is physically fit just 
takes 10 or 14 days of racing prac- 
tice on snow to be ready,” Stalder 
said. “Of course, fellows who are 
known as fast starters have an ad- 
vantage.” 

It just so happens that three of 
Stainer's charges — Karl Alpiger, 
Peter Mailer and Pinnin Ztfrbng- 
gen. — are known to peak quickly 
when the season opens (they also 
head the FIS seeding list). World 
champion Zfirbiiggen, a superb all- 
round skier, will join Ms tea mmates 
on a two-week break from military 
training. 

But tiie ski industry, which foots 
much of the bill for the cup circuit, 
has been having some second 
thoughts about going to Argentina. 

“The economic situation in the 
Sou than Hemisphere is such that 
we cannot see any important mar- 
kets opening up there,* said Jurgen 
Schenkenbach, who heads ski man- 
ufacturer Kestle’s racing depart- 
ment, “and the publicity gained in 
the North is limited. The public is 
not particularly interested in such 
races.” 

Still, all manufacturers have sent 
top-flight technical service staffs to 
Argentina, partly fra 1 testing pur- 
poses. Testing new skis, wax and 
boots on snow in winter conditions 
produces more accurate perfor- 
mance results than, as is usually 
done, trying them out on European 
glacier runs during the summer 
months. 


ContpUtdby Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — A tentative 
agreement was reached Wednesday 
to end the day-old major league 
baseball strike, Commissioner Pe- 
ter Ueberroth announced. Play is 
.to resume Thursday. 

A union source said the settle- 
ment included changes in eligibility 
for salary arbitration, a form of 
revenue sharing for financially 
troubled teams, increases in owner 
contrihukxis to players pensions 
and no salary cap. 

Ueberroth, who had vowed to 
prevent a strike and that had 
brought the sides together Tuesday 
for what turned into desperate, 
daylong negotiations, said in a 
statement released by his office 
that “a tentative understanding has 
been reached between thepaniesin 
settlement of the strike. Ueber- 
roth scheduled a news conference 
for S P-M-, Eastern Daylight rune. 

Said Donald Fehr. bead of the 
players union, “The commission- 
er’s office can announce whatever 
it wants. I'm not confirming it or 
denying.” Fehr would only say that 
the parties would meet at the play- 
ers’ association headquarters be- 
fore the news conference. 

But player representatives began 
polling their teammates on ratifica- 
tion Wednesday afternoon, and 
teams were making plans to resume 
play on Thursday (many clubs were 
trying to locate players who scat- 
toed when the strike began). 

They have come to an agree- 
ment,” said Scott McGregor, play- 
er rep for the Baltimore Orioles. 
“Now, it’s a matter of getting it 
down on paper and getting it rati- 
fied. I’m estatic about it. It’s a Mg 

relief.” 

“We are going to play tomorrow 
night against California," said Tom 
Mee, a spokesman for the Minne- 
sota Twins. 

There was no immediate word on 
when or if games called off Tues- 
day and Wednesday would be 
would be made up. 

There was no formal announce- 
ment of terms, but a union player 


representative, who asked not to be 
identified, said the tentative agree- 
ment contained: 

• No cap on salary arbitration 
awards. 

• Increase in eligibility for arbi- 
tration from two years major 
league service to three, but the in- 
crease would not take effect during 
the first two years of the general 
contract. 

■ A $40 million annual contribu- 
tion from the owners to the players' 
pension fund, up from $15.5 mil- 
lion. The players originally had 
asked for $60 million a year. 

• Redirecting pan of'the differ- 
ence between the $60 million and 
$40 million to financially troubled 
dubs. 

The full 13-game slate Tuesday, 
the first day of the strike, was 
wiped out. There were 12 games on 
Wednesday's schedule, and Phila- 
delphia Philiie spokesman Larry 
Shank said the National League 
had informed dubs there would be 
no games Wednesday night. Texas, 
Oakland, New York and California 
in the American League said their 
Wednesday games would not be 
played. 

□ 

Negotiators for the players and 
owners met for 1 1 hours bn Tues- 
day, their busiest day of the &£- 
month-old bargaining talks , but 
could not reach agreement in a dis- 
pute centering on salary structure, 
and the second midseason strike in 
baseball in four years was called. 

They continual talking Tuesday 
nighL, but broke up shortly before 
midnight, with the union saying the 
sides remained far a pan on arbitra- 
tion. 

They met again Wednesday, at 
10 A.M. An hour later, the commis- 
sioner’s office announced that the 
two sides were meeting with Ueber- 
roth for the first time m the negoti- 
ations. And, shortly after noon, the 
“tentative understanding” was an- 
nounced. 

“This was a critical 24 hours,” 
said the Orioles’ McGregor. “They 
were doing a lot of talking, and that 


was important, I was concerned 
fhai if it got beyond 24 as 48 hours, 
it might break down, 

Tm surprised it happened so 
quickly and worked out so welL 
After what happened yesterday. I 
figured it would be a little while." 

The commissioner last week of- 
fered a set of seven proposals to 
averL baseball’s second player 
walkout in four years, bm his sug- 
gestions were criticized by both 
sides. 

And even late Tuesday, there 
were signs that a settlement mighL 
be far off. “We are bung up stilL" 
Fehr said Tuesday night. “If the 
matter proceeds very long, the 
players won't be willing to settle for 
what they would have settled for 
earlier.” 

But Fehr and Lee MacPhaH, 
chief of the owners' player relations 
committee, both indicated they 
were more concerned about salvag- 
ing the rest of the season rather 
than losing a day or two of games 
that could conceivably be made up 
later. 

The idea, they said, was to avoid 
a repeat of 1981, when a strike 
eliminated seven weeks of play. 
“The object now is to find a way to 
end it as fast as we can,” Fehr said. 

As office workers and shoppers 
broke for lunch on the East Coast, 
it looked as if Fehr and MacPhail 
had done just that. Instead of 50 
days, it was one. 

Fehr and MacPhail had squared 
off during four separate meetings 
Tuesday. “Lee expressed the opin- 
ion that they had nude some pro- 
gress, not overwhelming, but some 
progress, especially in the area of 
salary arbitration and the benefit 
plan,” said Bob FisheL a spokes- 
man for MacPhail after Tuesday’s 
final meeting ended around II 
P.M. 

All day the central issue had re- 
mained salary structure, particular- 
ly the rules governing salary arbi- 
tration. 

The two top negotiators began 
Tuesday with an 8:45 A.M. meet- 



Tho Anccofsd Plan 

Baseball Commissioner Peter Ueberroth 


mg. one that was prompted by Ue- 
berroth. 

“It could all fall apart in two 
minutes or il could last all night.” 
MacPhail said before it started As 
il turned out. that first meeting 
lasted about three hours and start- 
ed players, owners and team offi- 
cials on a daylong seesaw. 


Ueberroth kept a low profile on 
Tuesday, remaining in the back- 
ground and allowing the two sides 
to hammer away. 

“I haven't heard from him," 
Fehr said Tuesday nighL ‘Tm sure 
if Peter wants to be helpful and 
thinks he can be, it will manifest 
itself somehow.” [AP, UPI ) 


SCOREBOARD 


Football 


Canadian Football League Leaders 


ptOai 

iCase 

iintf 

Auomev 

has sad 
te in 

decision 
>or fr aU “ 
F res** 
ri unto* 1 ; 


RWwqy, Soak 
PoMOtffe. B.C 
Jenkins. BjC 
Kanmrd. 1VH 
Grow. Tor 
Dorsey, Ott - 
Kurts, MH 
Dixon, Edm 
lleslc. Tor 
Ruoff, Ham 


■ Jenkins, BJC 
Reaves, Woo 
Cowan. EAn 
Donhm. Edm 
GUL Mfl 
El Its, sask 
James. Ham 
Wttan. Mfl 

Ofiaw 

junto cum 

Umdn. Edm 


Poapaa, Sask ’ 
Pontoon. Edm 
Barnos. cm 
Pewntt,&c 
Hnllovmv. Tor 


SCORING! 

TD C 
« * 

0 21 

5 0 

o a 

6 o 
0 * 

0 ID 
0 W 
0 13 
0 1 

RUSHING 

No Yds 
71 504 

sa m 

33 214 
32 714 
39 MS 
45 17B 
27 153 
<T W 
13 142 
25 123 
PASSING 

AH Com YUS 
in 111 1547 
145 mt 1531 
- 143 92 1285 
148 Mllti 
133 04 1144 


R5 S Pts 
13 8 54 

7 9 51 
i M 
ID S 41 
0 0 34 

7 4 34 

7 1 32 

4 4 32 

3 ■ 30 

4 7 M 
Aw TO 


waits, ott 
Clemente, Woo 
GUI. Mtt 
Cowan. B.C. 
Tedtord. Horn 


130 *7 fW 5 7 

130 74 950 7 2 

135 73 8U 4 5 

50 S3 481 2 4 

78 48 444 4 1 


Ruoff. Ham 
PCKSOOlta B.C 
uesic. Tor 
McTaeue. Mil 
Hav. Col 
Lescnuk, Sask 


70 

44 


47 


5 
1 
0 
3 
1 

40 3 

SJ 1 
3.1 1 


100 

49 


PASS RECEIVING 

NO Yds Avo TO 
Greer, Tor 30 489 140 4 

Eloaanl Satk 34 (77 140 2 

Woods. Edm 16 <37 27 J 3 

Ferna n dez, B.C. 31 425 137 2 

Kelly. Edm 24 414 170 3 

PWlawskk, WOO 24 414 170 1 

Taylor. Tor 30 4B2 114 

Murphy. WPD 3D 354 11.9 

Sandusky. B.C, 21 352 140 

Tolbert. Cdl 71 351 147 

PUNTING 

No Yds AVO 

Clark. Ott 33 1641 500 

Dixon, Cflni 35 1402 458 41 

Came ran. Wpb 29 1313 450 76 


42 1891 450 49 
44 1976 440 44 
49 31 \0 43.1 48 
44 1974 42.9 45 
44 1952 424 43 
24 1044 4&2 57 
PUNT RETURNS 

No Yds AVO TD 
38 422 11.1 0 
16 287 170 1 
IB 140 80 0 
12 153 121 0 
23 



OH, BROTHER — John McEnroe, left, consoled his brother Patrick after trouncing 
him in ’Mb/s opening round of a grand prix tennis event in Stratton, Vermont The 
draw pitted them in a tournament for me first time, and die world’s No. I player breezed, 
^1,6-L His 19-year-old brother, in las first year on the tour, is ranked 437th worldwide. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

U.S. Freeslyler Sets 100-Meter Record 

MISSION VIEJO. California (AP) — Matt Biondi lowered the world 
record in the men’s 1 OQ-meier freestyle twice on Tuesday at the U.S. long- 
course swimming championships. 

Biondi became the first ever to better 49 seconds when be swam a 48.95 
to win the finals. In a preliminary earlier in the day, his 49.24 broke the 
world mark of 49J6 set by fellow American Rowdy Gaines in 1981 . 

Biondi, 19. swam the thud leg of the U.S. gold medal-winning 4-x-lOO 
relay team at the 1984 Summer Olympics. 

NHL Players Threaten Strike in 1986 

TORONTO (AP) — The National Hockey League Players’ Associa- 
tion on Tuesday threatened a strike during the 1986-87 season. Alan. 
Eagleson, the association’s executive director, said “the players will strike 
next fair if owners remain unyielding on making substantial changes on 
the matters of free agency ana pensions. 

The existing agreement ends SepL 15. 1986. It was a five-year deal with 
an option to caned in the fourth year. The players association has 
exercised that option. 

Eagleson said that after an NHL player completes his contract he is 
technically a free agent bat subject to compensation in the form of draft 
picks and or players. No players have moved under the current system in 
three years, be said; the NHL PA is seeking total free agency. 

Eagleson also said the players want an independent pension fund, to 
which they would contribute $5 million and the dub owners $15 million. 
Players who skated five years in the NHL would receive a lump-sum 
$200,000 at age 55 or 60, or could choose to spend the money earlier for 
continuing education. 

Quotable 

• Retired National Hockey League forward Steve Shu it, on owning a 
stable of horses for his new passion — polo: “The best pan of this sport is 
that you get to change your legs after every period." 

• Seattle Mariner outfielder Gorman Thomas, on the major league 
baseball strike: “If I were an unbiased person. I wouldn't know wlucb 
side to believe,” 


A Middle-Distance Sensation Races Toward His Limit 


Int TD 
8 4 
10 6 
6 ft 
4 7 
3 ft 


Transition 


awh. B.C 
Zone. Ott 
Carlnd, Tor 
Sanduikv. BX- 
Fraser. Sort 22 US Aft 8 

Traftlln, Edm 13 134 1U 8 

Potivnon. MH 20 129 45 0 

Nettaa. WM 15 12! 8-1 0 

woods. Edm T1 97 U 0 

McDarmott, Sask 9 14 90 0 

KICKOFF RETURNS 

No Yds AVO TD 
ZanaOtl ID 274 27J 0 

Photon. MH 9 245 270 0 

Flows. Hum * 176 290 0 

Cofertww. On 4 149 210 0 

Tcnwraand, Tor T1H Rft 1 

Jenkins. B.C. t 147 270 0 

Etorms. Sort 5 US 310 0 

Hinds. TOT 4 114 280 0 

Holliman. Edm 5 112 224 0 

Jonas, Edm 4 in 270 0 



FOOTBALL 

Canadtan Football Loam 
TORONTO — Col Lsstor Brawn, nmnfiw 
bock. Stoned Kerry TavMr. running hack. 

! Football 



rand* 


of 


Major League Standings 


ii\ «> s 
;areer at- 
at. wthtf 
bv Fr*'; 
nidil^ 
uT* lth3 

in tnquj- 
,TOi\ 



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ne 





AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Ed it Division 

W L 

Taranto a St 

CWrolt St 47 

How York * l ° 

Boston 55 ^ 

Mttrnare 53 W 

MUwaokM 45 P 

Omfcmrf 34 7® 

West DhrWon 

CflUtorMB 41 44 

Kansas env 55 * 

Oakland “ 49 

:CMesn> 52 50 

aaffto 49 » 

Mtonema . 4ft S 

Tanas 40 ft* 

national league 

East MvMon 

W L 

i NDw. York 42 42 

St Load “ g 

Montreal » *L 

Ottawa *[4 g 

PHUodetoMa «? » 

. PlMsburali 33 n 

vest Division 

las An»toi jj * 

-Onctomm ^ 

Sao-Dlega B J] 

Houston * “ 

Ailtonla 44 58 

-Sari Fnmcbco 4t 4S 


Pel. GB 
020 - 
M 9 
sa 9 
sn n 
015 ww 
041 a 
027 32 

081 - 
034 5 
033 5 
010 7 » 
047 17 
047 14 
085 SOW 


Pel. . GB 
09ft - 
092 to 
057 4 

019 8 

071 « 

020 21 to 

087 — 
038 5 
019 7 

072 12 
A4S 15 
087 21 


HOUSTON— Announeod tlw ratlrwiMof of 
Gram Btoonun. fbnbocfcsr, who will lake an 
otonwirmw lob wttb Hie dab. 

NEW ORLEANS— Stand Rictnnj Todd. 
marterbock. »a om-vaar corrtraa. Agreed 
to terms with Doran GUborl, l&ddft. 

SEATTLE— Stoned Dmrtd Haofios. running 
bock, la a s*rtai of om-voar ramrods. 
Waived Data Doming, dotensfvo and; Harry 
GrbnmlMW and John Tushar. guards, sntf 
Torn wrtco. detensh* bach. 

WASHINGTON— Stand Ran E«Wf. ttoW 
md; MWicwt »arloa rawing back and Stu- 
art Anderson. llM&adw. ftoloand Gregory 
Rogers, mmartack. 

united States FoottoH Lnaooe 
LEAGUE— Eliminated ft* tab of Gary Ft- 
terra* to, director at ptoyar personnel. 
HOCKEY 

Nattoaa! Hocfcar uwaa 
MONTREAL— Stoned Ptarre«Mmtou.cen- 

ter.tedonMweoafrodPinonoi^viwr. 

WINNIPEG— Stoned Brian HaywanLoonl- 
tender, to a nwUVreor eenlratt. 

COLLEGE 

ARIZONA STATE— Namod Clyde Dwiedn 
ct— ^ i^awofnwiraand woman 1 * Irocfcowd 
cross country. _ _ 

KENTUCKY— Mamed Douo Bame« assis- 
tant Basketball coach. 

MONTANA TECH— Homed BJcK Oesslffl 

nslonohon of Lonny Wedhroo*. wresflino 

°sJjpPERV ROCK— Named Rostm Holl 
women's IWd Imam coach- 
TEXAS AAl— 1 Named Richard CundlH «■ 
tensive line anti llnrtwfcec «“*■ 


Tour Leaders 


MEN 

Eoralogs 

1. John McEnroe. UIA8SZ, 2, Ivon Lendl. 
5409,393. 1 Mote W1 tender. 5414017. 4, Jimmy 
Coftrwrs. 5375071, 5. Botes Becker, S2712H7.L 
Tim Aftoyette. S25S.nL 7. Anders JorrvU 
5340.133. A Tomas Solid, IP2D L043. 9, MlWUmr 
Motor. 5209.172. m Yannick Noah, 5202099. 

ATP Cootootar R o ri do Di 

1, jotm McEnroe, 1490OPOlnte.t Iran Lendl. 
UAJELlMateWUander,lOS0l.4,jlmmvCon- 
non. M20A A Kevin Curran, 009. 4. Anders 
Jarryd,4205.7 r Yaredck Noah, 5977. 8. Andres 
Gontezi 5801 9. Barts Beckar.SULlftJookim 
Nystronv 5100. 

Grand PrW Patels 

i.JtouiMcEnroe.3023.7. ivanLaoffl.2J»i.3. 
Mote Wllonder. 10S8. 4 Itto), Jimmy Conrwrs 
and Boris Seeker, ijua.4. Yannick Noon. 1051 
7, MItostov Mcclr, 1054. 1 Anders Jorrva 
1071 9, Kevin Curran. 1031. 11 Tim Mavotta, 
1014- 

WOMEN 


By Jo Thomas 

New York Tunes Service 

NEWCASTLE, England — The wind that 
roars off the nearby River Tyne could be a 
mighty opponent Friday, when Steve Cram, 
the golden boy of British runners, tries for 
his fourth consecutive world record. 

Before a hometown crowd at Gateshead 
International Stadium he wifi try to beat 
countryman Sebastian Coe's time of 2 min- 
utes 12.18 seconds for 1,000 meters. To do 
that, the new king of middle-distance run- 
ners will have to ran faster than he has ever 
run before. 

Tm going to have to be right at my Emil, 
and the weather will have to be perfect,” 
Cram said on Tuesday. “It will be a home 
track and a borne crowd, and I hope theyTl 
spur me on." 

Cram, who at 24 is the toast of British 
sports, broke the world records for 1,500 
meters and the mile in the space of 12 days; 
he rested a week and then cm Sunday broke 
the record for 2,000 meters by one-hun- 
dredth of a second in Budapest in a race 
gainst the dock (he was so far ahead that at 
the finish line he was all alone). 

In just 20 days he had equaled Coe's 1979 
feat of three world midrfiA^jgancf. records, 
accomplished in 41 days, and now is dream- 
ing about record No. 4. 

“It's difficult physically, and mentally it’s 
more so," said the unprepossessing Cram, a 
slender man with a quiet race. 

“In Budapest there was no competition 
and I had to nm half the race on my own. Tm 

I ' f 1 I 


competitor with considerable grace: “We 
could meet another four times this year,” he 
said, “and no one could say for sure who 
would win. You are only as good as y oar last 

. - *4 


race. 

“The man is obviously inspired,” respond- 
ed Coe. “He's positively dying at this mo- 
ment. I'm not sure if even at my peak, which 
comes at the end or August, I could run like 
that." 

It is a long way from Budapest to tbs route 
around the Coke Works in J arrow, Cram's 
home in the northeast of F.ngland. where he 
has been r unning since he was a skinny 11- 
year-old with his hair plastered down by rain 
and sweat, chasing a dream — which then 
was to become a professional soccer player. 


T. Martina Navratilova. W94079. 1 Chrl* 
Ewart Lloyd. 541X749. 3. Km MOndllkova. 
5304072. 4, Hatano Sokova SZ7U12. 1 Pam 
Ste-tvor, 5244053. 6. Clattato KoMS'KIKtoi, 
5729095. 7, Zina Garrison. 5192057. s. Kotov 
jenJtn, pJBJGL 9. ElhaMIk EmyD A 5134033. 
10, Mroota Motown, stJfclU 
Grand Prfa Potato 

l.Chrli ErarruovAI45& 2, Martina Navra- 
tilova. 1300- 3. Zina Garrtoaa 915. A Claudia 
KBteto-Kltotovua.S.PamShrtvar,a4a.4.M«v 
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some of the lads can stay with me until the 
last lap. Competition — that's the great 
spur.” 

The heat (rf competition helped Cram beat 
Coe and Coe’s world mark for the mile on 
July 27 in Oslo. He stopped the dock at 
3:4631 with energy to spue. Roger Bannis- 
ter, who in 1954 first broke 4 minutes, would 
have been 97 yards behind. 

Although hie beat Coe's- record by more 
than a second. Cram afterward praised his 



Unfed Plan ImoibkiuI 

Steve Cram 

Dreaming about record So. 4. 


“It never entered his head, even as a boy, 
to go in for a race and have a nice easy ran,” 
his coach. Jimmy Hedley, would say many 
years later. Hedley, a shipyard worker, was a 
talent scout for the Jarrow and Hebbum 
Athletics Club when he first saw Cram win a 
400-meter schoolboy race. 

“It was just a tuppermy-ha'pomy grass 
track with three schools competing against 
each other,” Cram’s father Bill, a policeman, 
would recall when his son had become fam- 
ous and a sportswriier from The Daily Mail 
came to call. “After the race, Jimmy intro- 
duced himself and said: ‘Do you realize your 
lad has just beaten a county champion? He 
looks like a promising toiler.* " 

Six years later, he was competing in the 
Commonwealth Games, “almost like one of 
those legendary boxers who explain they 
never went into the ring until they were 12 
but did have a few years of streetfighting 
before that," observed Neil Alien of The 
London Standard. 

Cram was born Oct. 14, I960, in Jarrow, 
where the accent is distinctive and peopk are 
proud to call themselves Geordies. It is an 
area where unemployment is high and sports 
are loved, where competiton produced three 
medalists in the Los Angeles Olympics — 
Charles Spedding, Mike McCloud and Cram 
— from homes within a five-mile radius of 
each other. 

His mother, Mia, insisted that he stick 
with his studies; he did, and he got a degree 
in sports studies from Newcastle Polytech- 
nic. Both parents gave him the support one 
finds in the biographies of great athletes: 
“AO through the winter," his mother recalls, 
“we’d stand around watriting them up to ocr 
ankles in snow and ice.” ms father would 
work all night, drive to London to see his son 
run and then drive back for another night 
shifL 

The rewards started craning in. Cram took 
fourth place in the English Schools 1,500 
meters at the age of 14. He became European 
junior champion and was also chosen for the 
1978 Commonwealth Games in Canada. 

In 1 480 he found himself at the starting 


line in the 1,500 meters at the Moscow Olym- 
pics. He was 19. tall and fair, with a face easy 
to call handsome. He recalls saying to him- 
self, “This is the Olympic FrnaL I've made it” 
— as the starter’s gun sounded. The other 
runners took off and he remained momen- 
tarily motionless. He recovered to finish - 
eighth. Coe and Steve Ovett finished first 
and third. 

In the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics, Cram 
came in second behind Coe. “You never 
forget that feeling when someone just zips 
away from you, well before the end, and you.' 
know you can’t haul them back," Cram said 
later. 

On July 27 in Oslo, in a race billed as the! 
“Dream Mile,' 1 it was- Coe’s nun to watch 
Cram run away. “I can go even faster,” Cram . 
said afterward 

It was. most observers agreed the end of' 
an era. No longer would Coe and Ovett, 
dominate the world of middle-distance run- 
ning. For all his blistering speed. Cram also. 
has a fine tactical sense and a competitive-' 
ness that stands up under pressure. 

The OIso victory, Cram said, “gave me 
confidence: If you train well, you still need' 
confidence. It’s when things aren't going' well ■ 
it’s hard. Last year there were so many prob- . 
leans. That’s when it was hard.” 

On July 16 in Nice, Cram, who is 6-fooi-i ■ 
and 152 pounds (1.85 meters. 68.9 kilo-' 
grams), broke Ovett’s two-year-old world , 
record for 1,500 meters with a time of ; 
3:29.67, then celebrated until dawn at the 
official reception. 

After Oslo, the festivities were more mul- 
ed Steve and his wife, Karen, helped his.' 
parents celebrate their 28th wedding anni- 
versary. 

His dazzling success may mean that the 
family’s financial struggles are over: British 
amateur athletes* earnings stay in a trust 
controlled by the Amateur Athletic Associa- 
tion, but bonuses from his sponsors and' 
equipment company have reportedly pushed 
his earnings into a top brackei for British 
athletes. 





VATICAN POSTCARD 

St. Peter’s Enshrouded 


By Qare Fallon 

Reuters 

■y ATICAN CITY — A shroud 
“ of scaffolding and safety net- 
ting is creeping across the front of 
St Peter’s Basilica, heart of the 
Roman Catholic Church, as the fa- 
cade undergoes the first complete 
restoration in its 370-year history. 


the basilica, the largest church in 
Christendom, will find the scaf- 
folding moving gradually across 
the facade as the yearlong restora- 
tion project progresses. 

Increasing atmospheric pollu- 
tion and simple age have nude a 
mayor operation necessary for the 
first tone since the building was 
completed in 1614, die Vatican 
said 

“Every so often sane minute 
fragments fall from the facade after 
coining away because of the aging 
of the building,* 1 said Giuseppe 
Zande r, technical director of the 
. restoration work. 

Previous work on the 115-meter- 
wide (377-foot) facade has bom 
carried out piecemeal and some of 
the repair techniques added to the 
deterioration, a Vatican report 
said. 

During the 19th century, iron 
supports were put into the 13 stat- 


11 of the Apostles, which stand 
along the top of the facade. The 
iron has rusted and expanded 
damaging the 5.7-meter-high stat- 
ues, Zander said 


French Start Working 
On Liberty’s New Flame 

The Associated Pros 

NEW YORK — Ten French ar- 
tisans from Les Metalliers Cham- 
penois have begun fashioning the 
flame for the Statue of Liberty’s 
new* torch, hammering sheets of 
copper to form its shell using a 
model based on photographs of the 
original 19th-century design for the 
flame. 

The new flame will have a gilded 
copper shell that will reflect sun- 
light and artificial light that mil be 
directed on the flame . The Old 
torch, rusty and wind-battered was 
removed from the statue's right 
aim last year. A spokesman for the 
Statue of Liberty-EUis Island 
Foundation said the new torch 
would be unveiled next July 4. 


monuments, thanks to the expanse 
of Sl Peter’s Square, which stretch- 
es between the basilica and the 
road 

But water has seeped into cracks 
in the travertine stone of the facade 
and these most be sealed with resin, 
the report said 

The restoration work will not in- 
dude cleaning the front of the ba- 
silica, Zander said M A coating has 
built up over the centuries and cre- 
ated a protective film. To lake that 
off is not always a good thing.” 

The facade has often been criti- 
cized for being too wide in. propor- 
tion to its 455-meter bright 

Mademohad to alter his original 
design because the pope for whom 
he was working, Paul v. wanted an 
extension on one side to link the 
basilica to the Vatican palace.. 

A corresponding extension was 
added to the other side for the sake 
of symmetry but the height of (be 
facade could not be raised to com- 
pensate for the extra width without 
obscuring the dome, designed by 
Michelangelo. 

Art Bucbvald is on vacation. 


I\TKR.V\TlOY\L HERALD TRIBI NE, THURSDAY, .AUGUST 8, 1985 


Small Revolts on the 


“We will substitute the supports, 
where possible, with inoridizable 
steel and with brass, because the 
oxidized iron expands, then splits 
and causes sometimes sizable frag- 
ments to faff off" be said. 

The Vatican is not disclosing the 
cost of the project but Archbishop 
Lino Zflnim, head of the Vatican 
office overseeing ihe work, has said 
itwflf be high in terms of labor and 
materials. 

Any costs beyond the Vatican’s 
resources will be met by the 
Knights of Columbus, a charitable 
society of Catholic laymen founded 
in 1882 with the aim of service to 
the church. 

rid for* otar work at Sl Peter’s, 
including the enlargement in 1982 
of a Polish chapel to mark the 
600th anniversary of the shrine in 
JasnaGora, Poland, to the Madon- 
na of Czestochowa, who is especial- 
ly revered by Poles, Zanini said. 

The columns, doorways, win- 
dows and balconies that make up 
an elaborate pattern on the facade ; 
will all be restored, says a report 
from the Reverend Fabric of Sl 
P eter’s, the committee responsible 
for the upkeep of the basilica. 

The facade, designed by Carlo 
Maderoo, has escaped the auto pob 


By Fox Butterfield 

l New York Tima Sendee 

S HEFFIELD, Massach u setts 
—The way Arthur A Ddmo- 
lino sees it, not ufBch has changed 
since the last battle of Shays' Re- 
bellion was fought in a pasture 
near his bam nearly two centuries 
ago. 

On a winter day in 1787, a 
band of Massachusetts fanners, 
angered by heavy taxes that were 
forcing them to surrender their 
land to the state, made their final 
stand in this secluded valley in 
the Bericshires. They were routed 
that day but eventually won some 
of their demands. 

To Ddmolino, a dairy farmer, 
the only difference now is that it 
is the National Park Service that 
wants some of his land and that 
of other residents of Sheffield. 
The Park Sendee, acting on a 
1978 congress Mai mandate, is 
trying to relocate the Appala- 
chian Trail as it passes the village, 
moving it from a back din road to 
what the service contends is a 
more scenic route, through woods 
and farmland. 

The Sheffield action is part of a 
S 90- million program to relocate 
huge sections of the Appalachian 
Trail, Much traverses about 2.100 
miles (3,400 kilometers) in 14 
states, from Springer Mountain 
in Georgia to Mount Katahdin in 
Maine. 

The App alachian Trail, winch 
was started in 1921 and for many 
yea/s was ran by private groups, 
was declared a National Scenic 
Trail in 1968. 

Park Service officials say that 
much of their work in acquiring a 
1,000-foot-wide (300-meter) cor- 
ridor for the trail, and thus pro- 
tecting it from future develop- 
ment, has gone smoothly. 

But in some areas, such as 
Sheffield, die service’s actions 
have touched oft bitter disputes, 
pitting residents and their towns 
against an unlikely combination 
of hikers, environmentalists and 
the Reagan adnunistratioo. 

“It’s 200 years and the issue is 
still the same as Shays’ Rebellion, 
the government taking land from 
people,” Delmdino said. “I don’t 
understand why I should sacrifice 
my property and 60 years of hard < 
work by my parents and grand- i 
parents clearing this land to bene- i 
fit a bunch of hikers in fancy i 



9m Mv/The Nsw York Ti 

Arthur Debnofino at marker for Shays’ rebeffion. 


In some of the trouble spots 
residents say the Park Service has 
told different stories to different 
landowners and bullied people by 
threatening to take thrir property 
by eminent domain. 

Ddmolino says he accidentally 
discovered th»» his land was on 
the proposed new route when he 
attended a regional planning 
meeting in the spring of 1984. By 
that time the Park Service had 
issued an “environmental assess- 
ment " for Sheffield that said “re- 


locations have been carefulh 
planned in cooperation wito 
landowners.” 


Yet the proposed route called 
for the service to acquire 32 acres 
(13 hectares) of Delmolino’sfarm 
and divide one of his cow pas- 
tures with fences to protea ink- 
ers. He says he is worried that the 
new path will threaten the spring 
that supplies water to his house 
and his animals 
With 10 other families in the 


village on the new route, it was 
voted m a Sheffieki town meeting 
last May to prohibit further fed- 
eral land purchases for one year. 
In response, (he service is soon 
expected to ann o unce an alterna- 
tive route through Sheffield in- 
volving 21 landowners. He ser- 
vice says it would be less 
disruptive. 

"They’ve been deceptive, devi- 
ous apd dis honest, ” Hjigmfc J. 
Fawcett, a teacher who lives in a 
200-year-old Shaker house in 
nearby Tyringham, aid, refer- 
ring to the Park Service. 

The sendee wants almost 100 
acres of Fawcett’s property far 
the new route so hikers would be 
dose to the duster of six Shaker 
houses and haras that her family 
has owned for a century. She ana 
several neighbors have refused to 
sell land to the Park Service and 
face being taken to court, where 
the government can take their 
land by eminent domain. 


“We came here for solitude, 
but our houses are very vulnera- 
ble and the hikers wflf be intru- 
sive,” Fawcett said- 
David A. Richie, the project 
manager for the Appalachian 
Trail at the Paric Service, insisted 
that the criticisms of his 3 gency 
as being devious were “totally out 
of line? 

“You have to make a judgment 
about what’s best for the trail and 
the American people,” Richie 
said. “On the other side, you have 
people who own a lot of land and 
don't want to be disturbed.” 

Since the relocation project 
was authorized by Congress in 

1978. Richie reported, the Park 
Service has acquired 55.669 acres 
through purchase and easement 
along 372 miles of the trail By 
contrast, he said, the service had 
gone to court to seize 2,687 acres 
along 17 miles of the new path. 

Of the 271 miles that remain to 
be relocated, 177 are in Maine, 
where the property is owned by 
large timber companies, Richie 
said, and negotiations are expect- 
ed to be easy. The trail is jointly 
managed by the Park Service, the 
U. S. Forest Service, state govern- 
ments «td the Appalachian Trail 
Conference, an umbrella organi- 
zation for more than 60 private 
chibs. i 

The lar^st trouble spot, Richie 
said, is a 15-mfle section of the 
trail where it crosses the Cumber- 
land Valley in a rapidly develop- 
ing section of Pennsylvania. The 
trail currently follows two-lane 
and four-lane roads, without side 
paths, and the Park Service has 
proposed switching it to two low 
ridges that are part of the little 
remaining wood and farmland in 
the valley. 

But 143 landowners would be 
affected, and Arlene Byers, who 
lives on a 120 -acre farm along the 
ridges in South Middleton, mid , 
“The trail would come so dose 
they could take our barn.” 

The local township and county 


and even the Pennsylvania Legis- 
lature have recommended new 
dirt paths along the present route* 
as an alternative, but Richie said 
that was not acceptable. 

“We're not against hikers — we 
like having the Appalachian Trail 
in our vaDey,” £)«rs said. “But let 
them compromise: Now it looks 
lit* a special iniwtsi group tak- 
ing away our way of fire.” 



Fulfilling a Iong-stawftng desire. Queen Efizabetfc the 
Queen Mother, who turned 85 Sunday, was taken on a foor 
of Britain's coast at speeds of dp to 1,3S& mfles &J6D 
kilometers) an hoar in a sopersmac anfiner Monday. 

PEOPLE 

Judaica Seller Dismissed 


r i 


Alexander GuttmcnB, 83, the 
professor involved is the contested 
auc tion of 56 Hebrew books aid 
aaausa ipis Sotheby’s last year, 
has been dismissed by Hebrew 
Union. College in Gnrinnati, where 
he had taught since 1940. Gutt- 

mann was entirized by ta rabbini- 
cal seminary last week for consign- 
ing items for sale that he (fid not 
own. Guttmann reached retirement 
in 1974 and had been teaching only 
part-time. His contract had been 
renewed yearly since then by facul- 
ty recommendation, this spring the 
faculty did not bring him up for 
renewal, a spokesman said. The 
books m anuscrip ts consigned 
by Guttmaun originally belonged 
to a rabbinical semmary in Berm 
Gut tmann says he smuggled the 
books out at “great personal risk" 
before the seminary was destroyed 
by the Germans in 1942. A final 
decision has been delayed on a ten- 
tative court agreement under which 
Sotheby’s would waive all profit 
from the sale, recall tire items and 
reimburse tire buyers. 

O 

Hngfi Hefner has agreed with 
Leo Janus, co-writer of tire top- 
seffing biography of tire former pi-, 
tot Chock Yeager, and Bantam 
Books Inc. to produce an autobiog- 
raphy. The exact amount of the 
seven-figure advance was not dis- 
closed. Kathy Robbins, the New 
York literary agent who represent- 
ed Hefner and Janos, said all par- 


ties involved considered the project 
to be “an esfraonfmary and com- 
plex financial- armqymeiu for . 

world publishing rights in a single- 
voiunre autobiography.” Ban him 
said it planned to publish the book 
as part of its Bantam Books hard- 
cover Ene in late 1987. The book, as 
yet untitled, is expected to docn- 
meat the growth of Playboy mags- Jr, 
zinc from the first issue, published * 
when Hefner was 27 and fe a t uring 
what Bantam calls the “sow-fam- 
ous calendar photo- of MnSyn 
Monroe.” 

□ 

Lndano Pavarotti will give a free 
outdoor concert for an es ti mate d. 
6JOOQ people next week in Modena, 
Italy, local officials say. The con- 
cert trill be held in the main square; 
tire piazza Grande, on Aug. 14. The 
tenor will sing popular arias from 
Italian operas. 

• P 

An Englishman running around 
the world to raise money for the 
World Wildlife Fund has left Ma- 
laysia for Singapore after raising 
7.580 ringgps (about 53,079). Hen- 
ry Weston, 23. who set out from 
London two years ago. said tire \ 
seemingly small response in Malay- r 
sia was actually overwhelming 
when compared to that in other 
Asian countries he had passed 
through- The money wifi be shared 
by tire World Mid Life Fund Ma- 
laysia and the Swiss-based parent 
body. 


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