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INTERNATIONAL 


_ . Su^3pore v . 

; ToeHague and Marseille 





(tribune 


Published With Tbe New York limes and The Washington Post 


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PARIS, FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 




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2 Americans Are Killed as Car Bomb 



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3V amooud Press 

f *j: FRANKFURT — A bomb Kd- 
r ' deavm a -parked car exploded 
Thursday -morning outside the 
Beavfly guarded headquarters of 
tbe 13JS. Rhein-Main AirJBase, kiD- 
ftigtwb persons and injuring more 
yran.20, the authorities *ak£ 

, No group claimed responsibility 
for tbe attack. But fans) prime 
Add they were -seeking 12 members 
oftheRed Army FactXHL,thc leftist 
terrorist gi«ap, in conMctipn with 
the esplosiofa. ' . . .. : . ‘ 

The USL-EnropeanComm^ 

heflrln iiflffftt m SteWgart idmrifiw! ■ 

One trf the -dead as Airman First 
Pass Frank HI Scartod, 19, of 
Woodhavea. 1 MjdngxrcWest Ger- 
man ptifice saidlbesecoQd victim 
was an An^^ womatc. 1 : •* J ... 

Mwe 4ban 20 people injured in : 
thepplosion, mbstof them Amerir, ; 
cans, were trealedandiefeasedat 
the Rhem-Main ineefieal dime the. 
mOit 
two. 

wan wcMtao, 


Barber, authorities said 16 or 17 
persons had been injured. 

Security, which always has been 
strict at the facility six miles (10 
kilometers) from Frankfurt, was 
further tightened after the blast 
lit Washingto n, Larry Speakes, 
the White House spokesman, read 
a statement condemning the attack. 
“Prdimmary informatio n available 
. toils here indicates a violent, radi- 
cal group has targeted our military 
and other Western service person- 
nel, as wd! as i^mnegnt ci vilians, 
for acts of violence,” it said. 

He said the Umted States would 
woric cfosefy with the West German 
. local and federal authorities in 
tbefr investigation. 

' [Chancellor Helmut Kohl sent a 
cable fa President Ronald Reagan, 
saying he would do everything 
sibte to find those 
United Press Tnt^nrarfnnal report- 
edfrotuBoim. “Tbe citizens of our 
ooimtiy have reacted with great 
1 sadness to the 
■ txmt’emptible attack,” it said.] 

/. - '^ixMnb'wentoS , at7; 1 5 AM 
rna parianglot near iheljeadquar- 


ters building of the 435th Tactical 
Airlift Wing as many base person- 
nel were reporting to duty, investi- 
gators said the bomb was in a 
Volkswagen «ri»n dial had false 
American Forces license plates. 

The air force reported that the 
bomb exploded between the head- 
quarters building and a nearby dor- 
mitory. Wreckage was thrown onto 
the roof of the building and strewn 
as far as 200 yards (about ISO me- 
ters). 

The radio reports said that a 
“very, very strong bomb** caused 
the explosion. The type of explo- 
sive was not known. Witnesses said 
the explosion left a crater about a 
yard deep and two yards wide. 

■ The base has bring quarters and 
offices for 4,000 U.S. Air Force 
personnel and 4,000 dependents. 

Tbe Red Army Faction has been 
linked to several attacks on U.S. 
and North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation military installations in 
West Germany in the past decade. 

The group’s last major attack on 
a U-5- nriliiar y base was tbe J9$l 
^Continued otiT’age 2, CoL 6) 


Gemayel 

Endorses 

Moslems 

Meets Assad, 
Supports More 
Power-Sharing 

The Associated Press 

DAMASCUS — President 
Amin Gemayd of Lebanon said 
Thursday tha t he supports his Mos- 
lem opponents’ demand for a 
greater share of power and blamed 
bis country's 10-year civil war on 
the Palestinian presence in Leba- 
non. 

Speaking at a news conference in 
Damascus after a five-hour meet- 
ing with President Hafez al-Assad 
of Syria, Mr. Gemayel said he was 
now “a little more optimistic” that 
the Lebanese conflict was nearing 
an end. 

Mr. Gemayel a Maronite Catho- 
lic, echoed the thinking of Mr. As- 
sad, who has been pressing Mr. 
Gemayd to make sweeping politi- 
cal reforms and patch up ancient 
rivalries with the country’s Mos- 
lems. 

“It is time to renovate Lebanon’s 
constitution,” Mr. Gemayel said. 
“But the reforms must safeguard 
Lebanon's independence and sov- 
ereignty as well as the equality 
among its citizens, their liberty and 
free economy ” 

As Mr. Gemayd spoke, Prime 
Minister Rashid Karami of Leba- 
non. a Sunni Moslem, nodded ap- 
provingly but made no comment. 
The Lebanese president's au- 



Tta AnabcKd Prm 


Pope Arrives in Togo to Open His African Visit 

Pope John Paul n with President Gnassinghe Eyadema of Togp at the airport in l/)m£, The pontiff, 
beginning his seven-nation African tour Thursday, said churches in Africa are at a stage in which 
their faith should mature. and bear “authentically African and authentically Christian fruits.” 
Chartges in the style erf worship in Africa since colonial tunes have troubled the Vatican. Page 4. 


tbority has been increasingly erod- 
ed by calls for his ouster from his 
Moslem foes and new alliances that 
cut him out in his own Christian 
community. 

Mr. Gemayel praised Syria's ef- 
forts to help him restore govern- 
ment authority. But he entidzed 
other Arab governments for fading 
to help Lebanon, especially for ig- 
noring his calls for joint Arab ac- 
tion to face a U.S. boycott of Beirut 
International Airport in retaliation 
for the hijacking of a Trans World 
Airlines plane on June 14. 

Lebanon and Syria were among 
five nations that boycotted an Arab 

(CoatiaWied OB x*age % Cot 6 ) 


Managua Rebels Got Military Advice 
From Aides on U.S. Security Council 



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‘ ' By Stanley Mefsler . • 

Los Angeles TumrSerHce 

PARK —The French goveco- 
irait, J on duect'ortiqr^ from Presi- 
deal Fran^^Nfitterrand, opened 
an frrresagation TBursday into 
charges: tfiiff TrKich - intdfigence 
agents .bombed: and sank ihe- 
Greenpeace ship Rainbow Warrior 
ui.Nav Zealand ^last month. . 

: The importance attached to the 
case:wa5 underscored when Prime 
Minister Laurent Fabins appointed 
Bernard Tricot, ;_65, a highly r&- ' 
special member .of tbe Council of 
State and drief'rif staff to General 
Charles de Gaulle, to head the m- 
quiry.. 

According to the mandate laid' 
down for Mr. Triart by Mri Mitter- 
rand, any guilty French officials, 
“at whatever level they are found, 
must be severely punished.” The 
investigation follows charges by 
two French weekly magazines of 
involvement by French intelligence 
agents.- . 

N ; J4r. Fabius said Mr. Tricot’s 
cbocluMons would be made public, 
tfis "appeuxtmem was seal as un- 
; preoedehted because French gov- 
erntneots in the past have hot put 
brrestigations of security issues m 
. the hands of nonmilitary civil ser- 
vants. 

- ' -The 7 Rainbow Warrior, which 
Was preparing to lead a flotilla of 
-protest ships into the. French mide- 
ar testing. area in Mnnzroa Atoll in 
Polyncria, was bombed in Auck- 
land harbor on July 10., Armando 
. Pereira, a Portuguese-born Dutch 


photographer, was killed in'the ex- 
plosion. 

The New Zealand police arrested 
a French-speaking man and wom- 
an: who are believed to -have at- 
tached two bombs to the bull of the 
Rainbow Warrior. The couple, who 
have been, charged with sabotage 
and murder, carried Swiss pass- 
ports that identified them as Alain 
Jacques Turengue and Sophie Frb- 
derique Claire Tbrengneu 

But the Swiss government de- 
scribed.the passports as' false, and 
the two French magazines, L’Evfen- 
emenldu Jeudi and VSD. accused 
the Turengues this week of working 
as agents of France’s intelligence 
agency. The agency, tbe General 


a Mitterrand appointee. 

in setting Up the 'investi gation, 
Mr. Fabins said it was neoessaty 
because a Tink had been claimed* 
between the couple arrested in New 
Zealand and French mtefligenctL. 
The prime minister did hot say who 
had made the accusation, but it is 
doubtful that ah' investigation of 
such a nature would have been un- 
dertaken solely on the bass of mag- 
azine stories. 

For this reason, it is considered 
probable that the .accusations that 
prompted the investigation came 
from the New Zealand govern- 
ment Mr. Fabius, infact promised 
that the French would cooperate 
fully with the New Zealand police 
on the case. 



Alain Turenge, 33, and Sophie Tnrenge, 36, who were 
charged in Auckland, New Zealand, with murder and arson. 


By Joel Brinkley 
and Shirley' Christian 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Rebels 
fighting to overthrow the Nicara- 
guan government have been receiv- 
ing direct military advice from 
While House officials on the Na- 
tional Security Council, senior 
Reagan administration officials 
and members of Congress have dis- 
closed. __ ' , ’ ! 

A senior administration official 
said the direction had included ad- 
vice and “tactical influence" on the 
rebels’ military operations, as well 
as bdp in raising money from pri- 
vate sources. 

The officials and lawmakers said 
the direct White House involve- 
ment in the rebels' operations 
against Nicaragua began last year, 
after Congress ended military aid 
to tbe rebels. Congress has since 
agreed to send the rebels $27 mil- 
lion in nonmxhtaiy assistance. 

Although some members of Con- 
gress say they believe that the NSC 
operation flouted the intent of leg- 
islation banning direct aid to the 
rebels, they add that they do not 
believe it violates U.S. laws. 

“If the president wants to use tbe 
NSC to operate a war in Nicaragua, 
I don’t think there’s any way we 
can control it," said Representative 
George E Brown Jr„ a Democrat 
of California and a member of the 
House Select Committee on Intelli- 
gence. He and other members said 


they had discussed the operation. 
“But,” Mr. Brown added, “we 
haven't taken any formal action." 

[Larry Speakes. the chief White 
House spokesman, confirmed 
Thursday that there were NSC con- 
tacts with the rebels, but he said 
that they were within the spirit and 

Anti-Sandinist rebel leaders say 
their forces are bade la Nicara- 
gua to resume attacks. Huge .2,.. 

letter of the law. United Press In- 
ternational reported. 

[He sidestepped questions on 
whether the council was giving di- 
rect military advice to the rebels, 
but said: “Contacts have been 
made from time to time for the 
purpose of receiving information 
and fostering contacts."] 

The contacts have been handled 
by a military officer who is a mem- 
ber of the NSC. Officials said the 
officer, who has wide experience in 
intelligence work, meets frequently 
with rebel leaders in Washington 
and on trips to Central America. 
He briefs President Ronald Reagan 
and also gives speeches and lec- 
tures on Nicaragua. When asked, 
he advises people on how they 
might give money to the rebel 
cause. 

A senior While House official 
said Wednesday that the officer 
was “a very important player." 

In an interview Wednesday, a 
senior administration official who 


has discussed the matter with him 
said tbe officer was in frequent 
contact with the Central Intelli- 
gence Agency, the State Depart- 
ment and tbe Defense Department 
as part of his work with the Nicara- 
guan rebels. 

A senior administration official 
involved with Nicaraguan issues 
said the officer had, on occasion, 
been advised in advance of planned 
rebel attacks and had offered ad- 
vice and direction. 

He cited as an example an attack 
early last month on the Enrique 
Campbell Express ferryboat that 
travels between Q Rama and Blue- 
fields in southeastern Nicaragua. 
The Nicaraguan government an- 
nounced later that Sandmist sol- 
diers on the boat had fought back 
and that four of them had been 
taken captive, two killed and one 
wounded. 

White House officials have been 
telling members of Congress this 
week they are planning to set up an 
agency associated with the State 
Department to administer the $27 
miUioD in renewed, nonmilitary aid 
that Congress approved last week. 

Representative Dave McCurdy, 
a Democrat of Oklahoma and a 
member of the intelligence commit- 
tee. said that officials had told him 
the new office would be called the 
Agency for Humanitarian Assis- 
tance. 

It is unclear who will serve on the 
new agency’s staff, although the 
(Con tamed on Page 2, CoL 1) 


S. Africa, 
U.S. Aides 
Confer 

Pretoria Sets 
New Strictures; 
Unrest Spreads 

United Press International 

WASHINGTON — Robert C. 
McFarlane, tbe U.S. national secu- 
rity adviser, and Foreign Minister 
R_F. Botha of South Africa met in 
Vienna on Thursday to discuss the 
tense situation in South Africa, the 
State Department said 
The meeting at the U.S. Embassy 
in Vienna, the first known high- 
level session between U.S. and 

' South African Mucks are split in 
opinions about who killed a dvfl 
rights lawyer. Page 4. 

South African officials since Pre- 
toria declared a state of emergency 
last month, was at the urgent re- 
quest of the South African govern- 
ment. according to Bernard Kalb, 
the State Department spokesman. 
He revealed the talks under ques- 
tioning from reporters. 

When the subject of a meeting 
first was raised by the South Afri- 
can government two weeks ago, the 
Stale Department said there were 
no plans for one. 

Mr. Kalb said Mr. McFarlane 
was joined at the talks by Chester 
A Crocker, the assistant secretary 
of state for" African affairs. Mr. 
Crocker is the principal author of 
the U.S. polity of “constructive en- 
gagement,” which is designed to 
keep channels of communication 
open with the Pretoria government 
to influence its policies. 

Mr. Kalb said he had no infor- 
mation on other participants or de- 
tails of the talks. 

The meeting came as the South 
African government announced 
broadly expanded special police, 
powers under its state of emergen- 
cy following deepening violence 
that claimed at least 16 lives over- 
night and attacks on Asian busi- 
nessmen in the area around Dur- 
ban in the eastern pan of the 
country. 

The newly imposed measures in 
South Africa included a curlew in 
the black townships around Port 
Elizabeth and an order confining 
black children to their classrooms 
in Johannesburg. 

The measures were announced in 
a special edition of the Govern- 
ment Gazette a few hours aftei 
President Pieter W. Botha warned 
that such steps might be taken il 
there were no end to the nation'. 1 
unrest. 

Earlier, in Pietermaritzburg, 50 
miles (SO kilometers) north of Dur- 
ban, about 100 black youths 
smashed windows in an Asian trad- 
ing area and terrified shopkeepers 
after a memorial service for Vic- 
toria Mxenge, a black civil rights 
lawyer who was killed Aug. 1. 

Police reported that they killed 
rune persons overnight in battles 
with Zulu youths that spilled into 
Asian suburbs outside Durban. A 
hospital said 16 bodies were deliv- 
ered overnight and a radio report 
put ihe death toll at 19. 

A curfew of 10 P.M. to 4 A.M. 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


Mr. Mitterrand, according to his 
office, sent a letter to Prime Minis- 
ter David Lange erf New Zealand 
on Thursday pledging “the deter- 
mination of France to shed all light 
on the affair.” - • 

A grace France- Presse, a French 
news agency, reported that the 
New Zealand pobce are convinced 
of a link between French intelli- 
gence and the bombing and that 
the French police, after 
their own inquiries, have 
with their New Zea l a n d counter- 
parts. 

Greenpeace, a private organiza- 
tion founded in Canada but sup- 
ported throughout the world, pur- 


sues two programs, disarmament 
and environmental protection, of- 
ten using dramatic means. It in- 
tended to steam into the French 
nuclear testing area in the South 
Pacific to disrupt the tests. 

In its report on tbe case, the 
newsmagazine L’Ev&nement du 
Jeudi said that the New Zetland 
police suspected that the Turen- 
gues were agents of the French in- 
telligence organization. The maga- 
zine said tbe French agents 
bombed the ship because they 
wanted to keep it from finding out 
about the construction of a new 
airstrip on the island of Hao. a base 
for the Tahiti nuclear experimenta- 
tion station. 


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INSIDE 

■ Summer 1945: As Japan 
aeded itself for the invader, 

I- US. troops in the Pacific woe 
deterred by tbe prospect of a 
Moody attack. 3. 

WEEKEND 

.■.Tbe Cefis, from. Scotland tp 
Galicia, are gathering in Bziitar 
ny — im identity in search of a. 
‘country. Page 7. 

BUSINE^/ITWANCE 

■ Royal Dutch/Shefl Group 
posted an unexpectedly saatp 
dedmeof 17 percent in secand- 

■ quarter net income. PagS ”• 

■Prime Minister Lee Kuan 
Yew -acknowledged that Singa- 
pore’s economy had taken its 
worst fall in 20 years. PagelL 

TOMORROW 

Souren Melikian examines the 
relationship between dealers 
■and auction house® in the first 
of three articles on Christie's 
* falsification of sales informa- 
tion and art market practices. 


Arab Diplomats SayPLO Drops Call 
For Support of Accord With Jordan 


Return 

CASABLANCA, Morocco — 


tion will not insist that Arab lead- 
ers endorse its accord with Jordan 
on a joint approach to the Arab-Is- 
radi conflict, Arab diplomats said 
Thursday. 

Jordan is pressing for frill sup- 
prut for the accord from ibe 16 
Arab League members attending a 
two-day summit meeting here 

The conference, which opened 
Wednesday night is being boycott- 
ed by five nations —Syria, Algeria, 
Libya, South Yemen and Lebanon.. 

The sources said that the PLO, 

while eager to have support for tiw 

Amman accord — which calls for 
joint Jordaman-Pakstinian talks 
with Israel — does not want to 
force the issue, bearing io mmd 
that key moderate states, such as 
Saudi Arabia, want K> avoid exac- 
erbating the deep Arab divisions. 

Arab attitudes to. the Amman 


accord were mixed even among 
moderates, and the PLO leadership 
itself was divided in its first reac- 
tions to the agreement after it bad 
been announced. 

A PLO spokesman said that the 
organization was presenting a for- 
mula to the summit meeting asking 
Arab states to “give their blessing” 
to the Amman accord as a mecha- 
nism Tor carrying out the peace 
plan agreed to at the Arab League 
summit-at Fez, Morocco, in- 1981 

That plan reiterated most of the 
standard Arab positions, demand- 
ing a separate Palestinian state and 
withdrawal of Israel from all terri- 
tories captured in the 1967 war. 

But tbe spokesman added: “If 
Arab stales are unable -to accept 
this and merely reaffirm the Fez 
plan, that is their right.” 

Diplomatic sources said that the 
summit meeting would set up two 
committees to deal with particular- 
ly pressing Arab problems, one for 


% 


disagreements between Jordan and 
Syria and the other for the rift be- 
tween Iraq and Libya. 

The first commilteeis to be made 
of Tunisia, Saudi Arabia, and 
Arab League, and the second 
will include the United Arab Emir- 
ates, Morocco and also the Arab 
League, the sources added. 

They said that Iraq was pressing 
for a finn date to be agreed for the 
next regular Arab summit, provi- 
sionally set for November in Ri- 
yadh. 

“An agreement on a summit date 
could salvage something from this 
meetmg,” an Arab diplomat said, 
alluding to the fact that fewer than 
half the 21 members of the Tunis- 
based organization sent top leaders 
to the conference. 

The Arab leaders are expected to 
e mp has i ze common ground and 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


Soviet Moving 
To Raise Quality 
For Consumers 

United Press International 

MOSCOW — The Soviet 
Union has taken steps to raise 
the quality of consumer goods 
and eliminate obsolete prod- 
ucts, Pravda said Thursday. 

The major revisions of eco- 
nomic policy were approved at 
a recent meeting of tbe Com- 
munist Party Central Commit- 
tee and Council of Ministers 
folio wins regional experiments. 
They will be put into effect in 

Tbe wholesale price of quali- 
ty merchandise will be in- 
creased by up to 30 percent. 
whDe wholesale prices of out- 
dated and low-quality goods 
will be reduced up to 70 per- 
cent . 

Thus it would be profitable 


for tbe collectives to produce 
gh quality 

unprofitable to produce out-of- 


prodnets of high 


and 


date models, the newspaper 
mid. 

Tbe state will make up for 
reduced income by taxing bo- 
nus funds of tbe workers. 

Spending on new equipment 
for factories would be in- 
creased. and suppliers would be 
penalized 5 percent for late de- 
livery or delivery of incomplete 
equipment. 

“The success of the re-equip- 
ment depends, to a large extent, 
on the quality of the equip- 
ment," Pravda said. 

As an added incentive, a 5 
percent bonus will be paid to 
suppliers who deliver the new 
equipment on time and in good 
condition. 


Employees Try to Block 
Earlier Bids for TWA 


The Associated Press 

KANSAS CITY. Missouri —A 
group of Trans World Airlines em- 
ployees said Thursday that it had 
raised SI billion in financial back- 
ing to acquire the airline and block 
takeover attempts by the financier 
Carl G Icahn and Texas Air Corp. 

TWA officials said that they 
would consider the offer if it was 'a 
serious one. But officials of two of 
the airline's three main unions said 
that tbe employees’ group was too 
late. 

Mr. Icahn disclosed Wednesday, 
in a filing with the Securities and 
Exchange Commission, that he had 
accumulated 15.6 million shares, or 
45 5 percent, of TWA’s approxi- 
mately 34 5 million total common 
shares outstanding. 

That left him on the verge of 
taking control of the New York- 
based carrier, despite TWA's tenta- 
tive agreement to be acquired by 
Texas Air for cash and securities 
valued at 5793.5 million. 

Spokesmen for Mr. Icahn and 
Texas Air declined Thursday to 
comment on the effort by employ- 
ees to take over the airline until 
they could review the plan more 

thoroughly. 

A different group of employees 
made a similar offer in June but 
abandoned the proposal when Tex- 
as Air made its bid. 

Ihe new group is aided by a 
former Missouri governor, Christo- 
pher Bond. It has received commit- 
ments for financing “in the range 
of $1 bOlion” from UB. and Euro- 
pean lenders, said John Kreamer. a 
senior partner with the Kansas Gty 
law firm of Gage & Tucker, where 
Mr. Bond also is a partner. 


Mr. Bond, a Republican, served 
two terms as governor, 1972 to 
1976 and 1980 to 1984. 

Mr. Kreamer said that the TWA 
Employees Committee was evalu- 
ating whether to accept the condi- 
tions of the financing package. Tbe 
price of any offer would “depend 
upon the situation that exists at the 
time of the offer," he said. 

He said that the employee com- 
mittee, headed by Donald C. Ul- 
rich, hoped to make a bid in 10 to 

20 days. 

However, officials of the Air 
Line Pilots Association and the In- 
ternational Federation of Flight 
Attendants unions were skeptical 
about any effort by employees to 
buy the airline. - 

“He’s just a little too late," said 
the pilots union leader, Harry Hog- 
lander, referring to Mr. Ulrich. 

The pilots union, along with the 
machinists union, have agreed with 
Mr. Icahn to 5300 million worth of 
contract concessions in exchange 
for TWA stock and profit-sharing 
in an effort to avoid a takeover by 
Texas Air. The Texas Air chair- 
man, Frank A Lorenzo, has a repu- 
tation among union members as 
being anti-labor. 

Tbe president of the flight atten- 
dants’ union, which has not agreed 
to the concessions, also expressed 
doubt about the employee propos- 
al. 

“Mr. Ulrich is essentially a day 
late and a dollar short.” said Vicki 
Frankovich. “Since Carl Icahn has 
so many shares, I don't see how any 
other parly will be able to acquire 
them. The numbers are just not 

there.” 

TWA’s general counsel, Ulrich 



WT 


Carl C. Icahn 


Hoffmann said that if the empFoyi 
group submitted a “bona fide" o 
fer the airline's board of directo 
would consider it 

Texas Air, the Houston-base 
parent of Continental Airlines an 
New York Air. agreed to pay S 1 9 i 
cash and $4 of a new prefern 
stock in TWA for each existir 
TWA common share. 

TWA also granted Texas Air a 
option to purchase 6.43 millic 
newly issued TWA shares ; 
$19,625 each. 

But Mr. Icahn improved on Te; 
as Air’s proposal earlier this wee 
by offering $24 a share in cash an 
preferred stock for those shares h 
group does not own. 

Since (hen, TWA has been silei 
while Mr. Icahn has continued bu] 
ing the airline' s stock. TWA dose 
Thursday at 521.875 per share o 
the New York Stock Exchange, u 
12 j cents. 




1 


Page 2 



Anti-Sandinist Leaders 
Say Most Rebel Forces 
Are Back in Nicaragua 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 1985 


** 


By Edward Cody 

Washington Post Service 

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras — 
The leading anti-Sandinist rebel 
force, under new arrange men is 
with the Honduran Army, has sent 
the bulk of its forces back across 
the border re-equipped to resume 
regular attacks against government 
targets inside Nicaragua, according 
to guerrilla leaders. 

The large-scale movement into 
Nicaragua, confirmed by Hondu- 
ran and other sources here, is de- 
signed to end a seven-month period 
of relative inactivity imposed by 
the cutoff last year of financing 
from the U.S. Central Intelligence 
Agency, rebel leaders said. 

It was financed with money re- 
ceived this spring from undisclosed 
sources outside the U.S. govern- 
ment and now translated into arms, 
ammunition and other equipment 
shipped through Honduras into the 
hands of rebel combatants, they 
said. 

The accelerated pace of anti- 
Sandinist guerrilla activity was dra- 
matically demonstrated last week, 
when one rebel squad controlled 
the town of La Trinidad on the Pan 
American Highway for four hours 
and another inflicted more than SO 
casualties in an attack on army 
forces at Cuapa. near Lake Nicara- 
gua. 

The attacks, one on Nicaragua's 
main road a short drive from large 
army installations in Esteli and the 
other deep inside the country, were 
seen as bold declarations of rebel 
strength in regions that Nicara- 
gua's Popular Sandinist Army has 
taken great pains to control. 

“Cuapa is clear on the other side 
of the country from the Honduran 
border," said Alfonso Robdo Cal- 
lejas, a member of the latest guerril- 
la umbrella leadership, the Nicara- 


guan Opposition Union. “This is 
very important." 

The guerrillas' re-equipping had 
nothing to do with $27 million in 
nonlemal aid for the insurgent 
movement provided last month by 
the U.S. Congress, rebel leaders 
said. It still is unclear how that 
money can be spent and what pan 
of the U.S. government will admin- 
ister it here and in Washington. 

Adolfo Calero Portocarrero, the 
chief political figure of the Nicara- 
guan Democratic Force, said that 
rebel leaders already had found 
enough money to resume attacks 
inside Nicaragua and maintain the 
consistent presence there that his 
troops were forced to abandon last 
winter. 

Mr. CaJero, whose group is the 
main guerrilla force, said, for ex- 
ample. that be bought 5,000 G-3 
automatic rifles on credit earlier 
this year and since had purchased 
and shipped ammunition for these 
weapons, for the group's AK-47 
assault rifles and for support weap- 
ons such as rocket-propelled gre- 
nade launchers and mortars. 

About 50.000 pounds (21300 ki- 
lograms) of supplies, amounting to 
nearly a million rounds of ammuni- 
tion. have been shipped inside Nic- 
aragua in the last few weeks, he 
said. 

Honduran sources said that the 
Nicaraguan Democratic Force had 
been using a recently acquired DC- 
4 cargo plane to aid in the trans- 
port. 

Mr. Calero and Frank Arana, 
FDN's spokesman in Tegucigalpa, 
said that the group had more than 

17.000 men under arms, with 
enough guns on hand to equip 

5.000 more. About 15,000 rebels 
have moved inside Nicaragua. Mr. 
Arana said. 



Witness for Peace members on the Costa Rican side of San Joan River before their capture. 

Nicaraguan Rebels Release U.S. Peace Group 


New Delhi 
Expands ; 
Its Nuclear 
Capa bility : 

The Associated Pros 

NEW DELHI — A large, new 
nuclear-research reactor, reported- 
ly capable of producing weapo os- 
grade plutonium, began operating 
Thursday in India, authorities an- 
nounced. 

The 1 00- megawatt reactor, 
named Dhruva. is the largest re- 
search reactor in the country, offi- 
cials said. 

Because it was designed and 
built by Indian engineers and uses 
no foreign fuel the reactor is not 
subject to inspection by the Inter- 
national Atomic Energy Agencyor 
other international controls. The 
reactor is part of the Bhabha Atom- 
ic Research Center outside Bom- 
bay. 

Previously, plutonium produced 
by India relied heavily on technol- 
ogy from other nations, which in- 
cluded restrictions on its use and 


WORLD BRIEFS 


BBC to Air Re-edited Documenlary 

LONDON iWP) — The editorial chief of the British Broadcasting 
Corp. told the BBC staff on Thursday that he wiB broadcast a banned 
documentary on Northern Ireland, but said it would be in amended form 
and would not be aired before the end of the year. 

Alasdair Milne, the BBC director general, assured his staff that the 
corporation would continue to make programs about Northern Ireland 

Mr. Milne made his comments as Britain’s broadcast journalists 
returned to work after a 24-hour strike to protest government pressure, 
and the acquiescence of the corporation’s board of directors, to caned a 
documentary that included an interview with an alleged member of the 
outlawed Irish Republican Army. 

The changes to the program that Mr. Milne has ordered include the 
addition of scenes of IRA bombings and murders to supplement the 
verbal descriptions of such acts given in the program. 

Nixon Has Skin Cancer Removed 

NEW YORK (NYT) — Richard M. Nixon underwent minor surgery 
last week to remove a cancerous tumor from the skin behind his left ear. 
according to his doctor. 

Dr. Plulip G. Prioleau, who performed the surgery last Thursday, said 
that the former U.S. president's tumor was similar to but much further 
advanced than one removed from President Ranald Reagan's nose last 
week. 

Dr. Prioleau said that the cancer, a basal cell carcinoma, was about one 
inch long and was removed in a four-hour procedure at New York 
Hospital-Cornel! Medical Center. He said that the tumor was a common 
kind of skin cancer that rarely spreads to other organs. Its chances of 
recurring were small, he said. Dr. Prioleau said be grafted apiece of skin 
from Mr. Nixon's left shoulder over the wound. 


The Associated Press 

MANAGUA — Twenty-nine 
American peace activists and 18 
journalists, reportedly kidnapped 
by ami- Sandinist rebels, were freed 
on Thursday, a spokesman for the 
Witness for Peace organization 
said. 

Rafael Pina said the activists 
were heading for San Carlos, a 
town on Lake Nicaragua, where the 
Nicaraguan government had orga- 
nized a reception for the group. 

“We understand they are all un- 
harmed and that there were no con- 
ditions for their release.” said an- 
other group leader, Yvonne 
Dilling. 

The peace group said the activ- 
ists radioed their Managua office 


on Wednesday and reported that 
the Nicaraguan rebels had forced 
them off a boat in which they were 
traveling an the San Juan River, 
near the Costa Rican border. 

The Nicaraguan government 
' ‘ : UA-backed 


A spokesman for the guerrilla 
group asserted Thursday in Costa 
Rica that the abduction was a 
“show" put on by the Nicaraguan 
government. 

In San Jose, Costa Rica, a gov- 
ernment spokesman, Armando 
Vargas, said Thursday that Costa 
Rican officials flying over the area 
saw the group's boat traveling in 
Nicaraguan waters. He said it an- 
ally 


said Wednesday that 
anti-Sandinist rebels had intercept- 
ed the boat carrying the Witness 
for Peace members as it sailed on 

the San Juan River 11 miles (18 . . .. . 

kilometers) west of an abandoned pe3CC * 

rebel camp at La Penca. and without escort. 

p The Witness for Peace activists 

It said that the group was taken are in Nicaragua to protest the 
into Costa Rica by the Democratic Reagan administration's expressed 
Revolutionary Alliance, a rebel support for the rebels and to cam- 
force led by Ed 6 n Past ora Gomez, paign for peace between the United 
a former Nicaraguan rebel leader States and Nicaragua, the group's 
and Sandinist government official. Washington office said. 


requirements for inspection. 

Raja Ramanna, head of India's 

maridng^l^^^ing of the plant, Soviet Jewish Emigration Rose in July 

J " J ~ ‘ L GENEVA (UPI) — The Soviet Union allowed 174 Jews to emigrate in 

July, the highest monthly total in 31 months, the Intergovernmental 
Committee for Migration said Thursday. 

July arrivals at the committee's reception center in Vienna brought the 
total this year to 675. There were 37 arrivals in June, the second-lowest 
figure since the resettlement program began in 1971. 

Most of the Soviet Jews who -arrive in Vi enna travel directly on to 
Israel Others go to Rome to be processed for settlement in other 
countries, mainly the United States. 


Managua Rebels Got Advice 
From U.S. Security Aides 


(Continued from Page 1} 
White House has assured Mr. 
McCurdy and others that neiiher 
CIA nor Defense Department offi- 
cials vdll be included. The legisia- 
. lion authorizing the new aid for- 
bids their direct involvement 

Before Congress approved re- 
newed aid. the administration was 
forbidden to assist the rebels di- 
rectly and, as a result, the White 
House encouraged private donors 
in the United Stales and abroad to 
give money. An official said that 
the rebels got $20 million in the last 
.year. 

• Another official who has talked 
with the officer, said he had played 
an indirect role in the fund raising. 

The officer would not agree to an 
interview. But another senior NSC 
official said in a recent interview 
that the council took a leading role 
last year's in directing the adminis- 
tration's Nicaragua policy because 
of quarreling at the State Depart- 
ment However, the official (fid not 
acknowledge that the office had 
been directing the rebel forces. 

Often in past ad minis trations, 
covert actions like the aid to the 
Nicaraguan rebels have been isolat- 
ed from the White House, giving 
the president and his staff what 
came to be known as “plausible 
deniability ” But the NSC is an 
Executive Brandi agency. 

A former senior official who has 
extensive experience in intelligence 


mailers, said the NSC program had 
□ot been operated under the specif- 
ic rules and procedures of the presi- 
dential executive order that covers 
covert intelligence operations. 
"They found a way around it,” he 
said. 

Officials said that the NSC offi- 
cer often meets with Adolfo Calero 
Portocarrero. leader of the Nicara- 
guan Democratic Force, the largest 
rebel group, and with Arturo Josi 
Cruz, another opposition leader. 

A Nicaraguan exile leader with 
dose ties to the rebels said that the 
officer was “a very important man" 
in the continuing efforts to reorga- 
nize and better coordinate the op- 
erations of the two main rebel 
groups, the Nicaraguan Democrat- 
ic Force in Honduras and the Dem- 
ocratic Revolutionary Alliance in 
Costa Rica. 

Now that Congress has approved 
renewed aid to the rebels and the 
operation is to be moved to a new 
State Department agency, a senior 
official said that the administration 
hoped to build the rebel armies 
from their present combined 
strength of about 20,000 “to 35.000 
in the next six months.” 

The aim, he said, is to move from 
the guerrilla warfare stage of the 
last several years to frontal attacks. 

A rebel force seized and briefly 
held a small town in north-central 
Nicaragua late last month. 



did not directly mention the weap- 
ons-grade plutonium that Dhruva 
reportedly will produce. He em- 
phasized instead its importance as 
a research tool in the fields of medi- 
cine, agriculture and industry. 

A spokesman for the Interna- 
tional Atomic Energy Agency in 
Vienna declined comment Thurs- 
day on whether the Indian facility 
could be used to produce weapons- 
grade plutonium. Other sources in 
Vienna said, however, that it was 
dear the new reactor was capable 
of producing the plutonium needed 
for nuclear weapons. 

India sharply criticized what it 
described as plans by neighboring 
Pakistan to build an offensive nu- 
clear capability. Pakistan, which 
fought a war with India in 1971, 
consistently denied such sugges- 
tions. 

But the Indian government told 
its Parliament on Thursday that it 
was keeping its “nuclear options 
open” and that it would “respond 
suitably” if Pakistan manufactured 
atomic weapons. 

“We know what we have to do. 
and what actum we have to take,” 
said Khursheed Alam Khan, the 
minister of state for external af- 
fairs. in an address to the lower 
house of India's parliament. 
“There will be no complacency,” he 
said. 


%* 


New Office to Direct Philippine Police? 


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Yasser Arafat, the PLO chief, chats at the summit meeting. 

Arabs Say PLO Drops Call 
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(Continued from Page 1) 
gloss over their differences when 
the draft a communique on the 
conference. 

■ Hasson Said to Hold Finn 

John C. Whitehead, the deputy 
U.S. secretary of state, has told 
Israeli leaders that King Hussein of 
Jordan refused to reconsider a list 
of Palestinian candidates for talks 
with U.S. officials. The Associated 
Press reported Thursday from Tel 
Aviv. 

Mr. Whitehead, who briefed Is- 
raeli officials Wednesday on recent 
talks in Egypt and Jordan, said that 
Washington was “disappointed,” 
the sources said, because some of 
the candidates were active mem- 


bers of the Palestine liberation Or- 
ganization. 

A Western diplomat said that 
King Hussein told Mr. Whitehead 
that if U.S. officials were to met 
with the joint delegation it could 
lead to further developments in the 
peace process and a change jh the 
outlook of Mr. Arafat, who is pre- 
sumed to have approved the list of 
Pales tinian names 

The diplomat said that the Unit- 
ed States would not decide whether 
to go ahead with the prdiminaiy 
talks with the mixed Jordanian- 
Palestiman delegation until after 
the Casablanca meeting. 

Israeli leaders have objected to 
U.S. participation in prelimmaiy 
negotiations with such a delega- 
tion. 


Dublin Role 
In Ulster 
Is Opposed 

United Press International 

BELFAST — Rival Protestant 
groups said Thursday that they had 
joined forces in a new organization 
to resist any attempt by Britain to 
gjve the Irish Republic a voice in 
administering Northern Ireland 

The group will be called Ulster O JmAn/VTnfi 
United Loyalist Front, and its “ -zjLflfC/f HamM 
backers said it eventually would 
unite 750,000 Protestants. It was 
organized in Portadown on 
Wednesday night at a meeting at- 
tended by 650 Protestant leaders. 

The dosing of ranks by Protes- 
tant politicians and paramilitary 
groups followed reports from Dub- 
lin and London that die two gov- 
ernments were near an agreement 
giving Dublin a role in monitoring 
Northern Ireland's minority Ro- 
man Catholic community. 

The British Broadcasting Corp. 
said in London on Monday that 
Dublin would be offered a consult- 
ing role in Northern Ireland 
through a joint council of ministers 
and a security commission to be 
established by the two nations. 

A Protestant source, who asked 
not to be identified, said the new 


MANILA (Reuters) — President 
Ferdinand E Marcos, who faces 
local elections next year and a pres- 
idential election by 1987, said 
Thursday that he was creating an 
office in the presidential palace to 
supervise the Philippine police 
force. 

Opposition sources said the 
move would pvt Mr. Marcos direct 
control over the police. Mr. Marcos 
said he was trying to make the force 
more effective in fighting insur- 
gents. 

He said that the new office 
would supervise the administrative 
National Police Commission and 
the 51,000-member Integrated Na- 
tional Police, previously under the 
Defense Ministry. Mr. Marcos did 
not say who would head the office. 



hwn tlB 

Ferdinand F. Marcos 


Die in Blast 

(Continued from Page 1) 


Seoul Arrests Rights Campaigner 

SEOUL (Reuters) — A leading South Korean human rights campaign- 
er, the Reverend Moon Ik Hwan, was placed under house arrest Thursday 
for denouncing a proposed law armed at curbing campus protests. 

Mr. Moon, who staged a 19-day hunger strike in 1983, said that about a 
dozen policemen surrounded bis house and ordered him not to leave for 
three clays, forcing him to mi« a seminar with a Christian student group 
on Saturday. 

The bouse arrest followed police confiscation of a statement by Mr. 
Moon's United People’s Movement for Democracy and Unification 
against the proposed law, which would allow a prison tmn of as long as 
seven years for inciting students to perform anti-state activities. 


bombing of the U.S. Air Force’s 
European headquarters at Ram- 
stein, near Kaiserslautern in south- n n*n* a • v nm 

western West Germany. Twenty Kcagail DlgDS $25-BllllOn Aid Bill 
persons were injured. WASHINGTON (APJ) — President Ronald Reagan signed a $25.4- 

That year, members of the group billion foreign aid bill Thursday, saying he was “particularly pleased” it 
also were believed responsible in an provided for the resumption of UJL aid to the rends in Nicaragua. 
^“V. l . on T *5® “ e o» .General But Mr. Reagan also criticized the measure — the first such legislation 

”“*“*- 7 . - a 2P~ by Congress in four years —as offering “substantial reductions ' 

rope. A rifled ann ched grenade was The bill authorizes $12.7 billion in foreign aid for each of thenext two 
fired at his car m Haddberg, but years, awarding the hugest amounts to Israel and 
he was unhurt ” — ~ 


U -A- Army m tu- m military assistance, a development he termed “disappointing . 1 
netted grenade was The bill authorizes $12.7 bfibon in foreign aid forearm of then 
m Haddberg, but years, awarding the Laigest amounts to Israel and Egypt- The bill provides 
- spending authority of $3 billion for Israel for each of the two years, plus a 
one-time infusion of $1.5 billion in emergency economic aid Egypt will 


In December 1984 and January 
1985, the Red Army Faction was 
blamed for more than 30 bomb and 
arson attacks on NATO facilities 


Ulster organization was planning and government buildings. 

u a IJ /-l ° Tl— I— * J 


4 Armageddon” for October. 

John McMichaeL spokesman of 
the Ulster Defense Association, an 
umbrella for several pro-British 
paramilitary organizations, said, 
“Well have to go at least to the 
very verge of an armed conflict. We 
believe Ireland covets Ulster.” 

[A series of explosions badly 
damaged buildings at a golf dub 
□ear Ballycastle, in County An- 
trim, Northern Ireland, Agence 


The last slaying claimed by the 
Red Army Faction and confirmed 
by the federal authorities occurred 
Feb. I, when terrorists shot and 
killed Ernst Zimmermann. the 
chief executive officer of Motoren 
und Turbinen- Union GmbH, West 
Germany’s biggest maker of mOi- 
taiy aircraft engines. 

On June 19, a bomb in a busy 
passenger te rminal at Frankfurt 
Airport, which adjoins Rhein- 
Main, tailed three persons and in- 


emergency economic aid. Egypt will 
get $2.1 billion for each year plus 5500 millio n in emergency economic 
aid. 

As approved by Congress late last month, the measure froze foreign aid 
at the levels approved for fiscal 1985, which ends Sept. 30. The adminis- 
tration had asked for-S13.2 billion for each of the two years. 

For tlu; Record 

Two members of the rufing Congress (I) Party were killed and nine were 
injured m West Bengal in an attack mounted by supporters of the 
Communist Party of India-Marxist, the Press Trust of India reported 

. (Reuters) 

A tram was derailed m Mozambique's northern Nampula province, 
killing 58 persons and injuring 160 on Saturday, the official news agency • 
AIM, reported Tbureday. (Reuters) 

A w Soviet diplomat iBsappeared last week during a visit to Rome, the 


France-Presse reported from Bel- jured 42. Callers claiming to rcpre- 
fast Police announced Thursday sent the Red Army Faction and a 
that they had arrested eight persons previously unknown Arab revolu- 
after an explosives cache was found lion ary group, among others, 
in the central county of Tyrone.] claimed responsibility. 


Soviet Embassy announced. It said that Vitaly Yurchenko. 50, who is 
based at the Foreign Ministry in Moscow, was last seen Aug. 1. (Reuters) 
Kenneth P. Fefis, a former stockbroker, was fined $25,000 in New York 
and sentenced to six months in prison for his role in a scheme (hat used 
advance information, from a reporter for The Wall Street Journal, R. 
Foster WInans, to profit from stock trading (AP) 


Swedes Move to Improve Soviet Ties Moslem Aims 


United Press International 

STOCKHOLM — Sweden has 
announced that it plans to improve 
relations with the Soviet Union, 
after several years of strain caused 
by intrusions of Soviet submarines 
into Sweden's coastal waters. 

Only hours after the announce- 
ment of steps for wanner relations, 
however, the Foreign Ministry filed 
a complaint Wednesday against the 
reported seizure by Soviet seamen 
of a merchant sailor attempting to 
escape to the West. The seaman 
was said to have jumped into the 
Baltic while in Swedish territorial 
waters. 

The announcement of steps lor 
improved relations was made by 
Pierre Scbori. undersecretary of 
state for foreign affairs, after two 
days of talks with a visiting Soviet 
first deputy foreign minis ter, Vik- 
tor F. Maltsev. 

“We have taken the temperature 
on our relations and it was nor- 



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maL” Mr. Schcri said. “We shall 
now intensify the contacts in order 
to strengthen bilateral relations 
and defend our national interests.” 

Mr. Maltsev was the highest So- 
viet official to visit Sweden for 
talks since a Soviet submarine went 
aground off the Kaiiskrona naval 
base in October 1981. 

That incident, and later suspect- 
ed intrusions, strained ties between 
Stockholm and Moscow. 

Mr. Scbori warned that an im- 
provement in relations did not 
mean Sweden would no longer con- 
tinue to monitor Soviet submarine 
activity near its waters. 

“We remain on the alert," he 
said. “We have not decreased our 
ability to hunt foreign subma- 
rines. 

Mr. Schori said that Prime Min- 
ister CMof Palme and Foreign Min- 
ister Lennart Bodstrom had tenta- 
tively accepted invitations to visit 
Moscow, dependent upon the out- 
come of September elections. 

In the complaint filed with Mos- 
cow on Wednesday, about the at- 


tempted escape of a Soviet seaman, SllDDOTtsd 
the Foreign Ministry said the il 
trawler crew had violated Swedish 
law by apprehending the sailor as 
he was swimming in the Baltic to- 
ward shore. 

Details of the attorn) ted defec- 
tion were given by a Soviet stow- 
away, who leaped into the sea with 
the crewman and managed to reach 
shore, the Foreign Ministry said. 


U.S., South African Officials 
Confer on Racial Violence 


(Continued from Page 1) 
League summit conference now 
under way in Casablanca. 

“No one has offered the Pales- 
tinian cause and the Pales tinian 
people as much as we have of- 
fered,” he said. “But unfortunately, 
what we harvest was the divisions 


Hong Kong Sets Roles 
For Money Changers 

Reuters 

HONG KONG — Hong Kong 
came to the aid erf 1 millions of tour- 
ists Thursday when the government 
imposed tough new rules on money 
changers, in response to complaints 
over rates offered outside of banks. 

It warned the changers that they 
faced heavy fines or jail terms of as 
long as six months unless custom- 
ers sign a form agreeing to the 
terms of any transaction. 



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in our nation and attempts to de- 
stroy the infrastructure of our gov- 
ernment” 

■ Relief Worker Freed 

Gunmen kidnapped a Canadian 
relief worker in southern Lebanon 
on Thursday, but both his organi- 
zation and die Canadian govern- 
ment said he was freed later in the 
day. The Associated Press reported. 

The police said that Robert P. 
Burkholder, 30, of East York 
Township, Ontario, was seized in 
the Shiite Moslem town of Naba- 
tiyeh by unidentified men with 
guns who bundled Him into a car. 
He works as an administrator for 
the South Lebanon Project of the 
Mennooite Central Committee. 

Earlier, the Lebanese manager of 
the ABC News bureau was freed 
unharmed by abductors. Shakib 
Hmeidan, 50, walked into the 
Commodore Hotd in West Beirut 
on Thursday morning. 

Meanwhile, Israeli warplanes 
were reported to have attacked a 
Bekaa Vallqf guerrilla base of the 
Popular Front for the Liberation of 
Palestine-General Command. 


(Confirmed from Plage 1) 
was imposed in black townships 
around Port Elizabeth, the area 
worst hit by 11 months of blade 
political violence that has claimed 
at least 500 lives. The townships 
also were dosed to nonresidents of 
all races. 

In 13 administrative districts in 
and around Johannesburg, black 
students were confined to class- 
rooms during school hours and for- 
bidden to join any activity not ap- 
proved by teachers. 

The possession of gasoline was 
prohibited except in the tank of a 
vehicle. 

President Botha said in Pretoria 
that the state of emergency im- 
posed in 36 districts on July 21 had 
been somewhat successful and that 
he would like to lift the regulations. 
But he said he would toughen them 
if necessary. 

Asked if the government 
planned to extend the emergency 
provisions to Durban, the center erf 
the most recent disturbances, he 
said, “Not at this stage. But if nec- 
essary we will do it. 

“If necessary we can even intro- 
duce stronger steps.” he said with- 
out further explanation. 

Police said the rioters in Pieter- 
maritzburg ran through the white 
town to the Asian trading area, 
where they smashed shop wmdows, 
threw paving stones at Asian busi- 


nessmen aito lotted stores until po- 
lice arrived. 

In Durban, Denis Dawber, d 
uty medical superintendent at 

bodies were broughHtom* Umlazi 
and Kwamashu townships and six 




were brought from from nearby 
Ntimma overnight He said ] 02 
people were admitted with injuries. 

Capital Radio, based in Durban, * 
said 19 people died in 48 hours of "•* 
racial violence. 

Hundreds of Asian families, ap- 
parently recalling the massacre of 
142 Asians by blade rioters in 1949, 
fled their homes in Inanda, north of 
Durban, to escape the Zulu rioters 
who looted and burned their homes ■ 
Wednesday night 

In Washington, Mr. Kalb said 
the U.S. government agreed to the 
meeting with Mr. Botha “because 
of the importance of our having " 
direct contacts with the South Afri- 
can government" 

Shots Panic New York Riders 

United Press International b T 

subway rider •• 
fired two bullets uxa the chest of a 
fellow passenger Thursday, criti- 
cafly wounding him in a rush-hour 
argument over a se4t Five persons 
were injured as they (were trampled 
in the panic, police dfficers sud. 




** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 1985 


X* 


Page 3 


Summer 1945: Japan, Beaten but Intransigent, Prepares to Repel a U.S. Attack 

' By Richard Halloran Japan thus prepared For a final battle with one of two “By pouring 20 divisions into the battle within two weeks them; it was rotated each day so each had a turn carrying by a saDor toward American shrp_J. 

.. , _ i:i. _t_. .... , ... „ .r?. 1 : _ i ni nnt tn/w hnw fn I lrcuttt? lift th T non noimds Of eXDlOSIVi 




By Richard Halloran 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Id the summer of 1945, as U.S. 
m f“ ta p r . fon *s prepared w invade Japan, a Japanese high 
school girl named Yukifco Kasai was given a carpenter's 
.awl and told to be prepared to use it as a weapon. 

“Even killing just one American will do," she was told. 

You must prepare this awl for self defense. You must aim 
at the enemy’s abdomen. Understand? The abdomen.” 

A’t about the same time, a kamiir-w pilot. Jun Nomoto. 
sat in the cockpit of his fighter plane waiting to take off 
and asked a friend to write down his Iasi letter to his 
parents: 

“I will do my duty calmly. Words cannot express mv 
gratitude to vou. It is my hope that this last act of striking 
a blow at toe enemy will serve to repay you in small 
tneasure for the wonderful things you have done for me." 

By that lime in World War u,* Japan was beaten but 
would not quit. American B-29 bombers had burned 
Japanese a ties into a wasteland. American submarines 
had sunk 9.5 million of Japan's 10 million tons of wor- 
ships, merchantmen and tankers. War production had 
plummeted Living conditions were miserable, with an 
entire nation slowly starving. 

Not far away. 0.5. Marines had taken Iwo Jima, the 
island that was administratively part of metropolitan 
Tokyo, and American soldiers and marines bad overrun 
Okinawa, Japan's southernmost prefecture. An invasion 
of the main islands was imminent 


Japan thus prepared for a final battle with one of two 
likely outcomes. One would be that the United States 
would be lured into an invasion so cosily that it would 
haw to negotiate, allowing Japan to retain its sovereignty 
and emperor. i 

The other conclusion was 'what the Japanese called 
gyokusai, “the shattering of jade." Every man. woman, 
and child would be mobilized and final hope would be 
placed in the kamikaze, “die wind of the gods.” If that did 
not save the nation. Japan would perish. 

For more than a year) the Tokyo government had 

a uieily sought peace. But Japan's leaders had misjudged 
is military power arrayed 1 against them and, blinkered by 
their insular politics, failed to grasp how to deal with the 
Western democracies. 

In addition, the Allied policy of unconditional surren- 
der stiffened Japanese resistance. It was an ill-defined 
demand, and uncertainty about the future dissuaded Ja- 
pan from considering it. Perhaps more important, four 
years of deadly enmity gave the Japanese no reason to 
believe the Americans would be lenient in victory. 

In January 1943, as the. Americans started bombing in 
earnest, Tokyo drafted plans to repel an invasion. In 
February, the country was divided into six military dis- 
tricts to exercise control over the garrison of six million 
soldiers in Japan. 

As that plan took shape. Lieutenant General Shuichi 
Miyazaki, a senior operations officer, told other generals: 


“By pouring 20 divisions into the battle within two weeks 
of the enemy's landing, we will annihilate him entirely and 
ensure a Japanese victory." 

Late r, drat was refined into a plan calling for Japanese 
defenders to destroy a quarter of the invading force while 
at sea. another quarter on the landing beaches, and the rest 
with human wave tactics as the Americans fought their 
way inland. 

After the firebombing of Tokyo that took I00.0QQ lives 

In the spring and summer of 
1945, about 5,000 Japanese pilots 
died in suicide attacks. 


e govt 

lized all but the youngest pupils to grow food, produce 
munitions, become air raid wardens and prepare to repel 
the expected invaders. 

Next came the People’s Volunteer Army, in which men 
and women aged 13 to 60, except for the rick or pregnant, 
were to take up arms. 

One student. Susumu Nagara. was in a squad of 20 
people, all but himself more than 40 years old. They were 
armed with bamboo spears and had but one rifle among 


them; it was rotated each day so each had a turn carrying 
it. Most did not know how to fire it. 

The recruits were taught to hide in foxholes, armed with 
food and 35-pound( 1 6-kilogram) bombs strapped to their 
backs. As American' tanks appeared, they were to climb 
out and throw themselves under them. 

While there was a widespread lack of enthusiasm for 
such measures, only a few openly protested the rush 
toward national suicide. The newspaper Yonriuri, which 
had supported die militarists for years, said in an editorial 
in July mat Japan’s leaders should be “realistic." It was a 
sharp word at the time. 

The quintessence of Japanese determination to repel the 
Americans were the kamikaze pilots. The “wind of the 
gods" recalled the typhoons that drove off Mongol invad- 
ers in 1274 and 1281. 

The kamikaze were generally pilots who flew sukade 
missions, but they included other warriors. The oka jinraL 
or “cherry blossoms of heavenly thunder,” were manned 
rockets strapped under bombers, then cut loose for the 
pilot to glide to the target Few' did real damage. 

Similarly, old aircraft laden with bombs were bidden in 
mountains overlooking likely invasion routes. When the 
Americans attacked, they were to be maimed, catapulted 
into the air and steered down into the warships and 
landing crafL 

At sea, 6,000 small bundles loaded with two tons of 
explosives were rigged with engines from cars and guided 


by a saDor toward American ships- Manned 
loaded with 3,000 pounds of explosive^ were 
submarines. Neither type of weapon- was e ffective. 

In the spring and summer of 1945, about 5,000 pilots 
died in suicide attacks. "ITiey sank three -small aircraft 
carriers, 13 destroyers and 18 smaller vessels. - About 300 
other American ships were hit but were soon back in 
action. 

Most of the pilots were college students who had been 
drafted and then volunteered to become kamikaz e, often 
signing their applications in blood. 

In their last days, the pilots put their affairs in order, 
paying debts and giving personal belon g i ngs to frien ds. In 
the ancient tradition otJapanese warriors, they completed 
diaries, wrote last letters and composed poems that illumi- 
nated their motives. 

Yasuhiro Shiomitsn left this poem: 

Saluting the mountains and rivers 
Of the land of my ancestors 
To which I shall never return, 

I turned my plane up. 

A young naval officer, shortly before he embarked in his 
human torpedo, told a new volunteer that he was certain 
Japan would lose the war, no matter what anyone did. The 
new man, stunned, blurted out: “Then why did you 
volunteer to die?" 

The young naval officer's reply was calm: “A man must 
do what he can for his country.” 


Documents in Spy Case 
Called a Sabotage 'Bible’ 


By Bob Secrcr 

Los Angela Times Service 

NORFOLK, Virginia — Docu- 
ments that Arthur J. Walker is ac- 
cused of helping pass to the Soviet 
Union are a “bible for sabotage" 
that could help attackers sink US. 
ships, high-level navy officials have 
testified in federal court here. 

Captain Robert Johnson, chief 
staff officer for the navy’s Norfolk- 
based amphibious squadron, said 
Wednesday during the third day of 
Mr. Walker's espionage trial that 
one of the documents, a damage 
control book, contained “very good 
information” that could be used to 
knock out the Navy’s two most 
sophisticated communications ves- 
sels, the Mount Whitney and the 
Blue Ridge. 

Those two ships double as the 
command posts for the U.S. fleets 
patrolling the Atlantic and West- 
ern Pacific, he said. 

Captain Johnson said the so- 
called DC book, which outlines 
' procedures Tor dealing with poten- 
tial damage to ships in both peace 
and war, not only contained data 
on the fuel capacity and steaming 
range of the vessels) but also could 
provide clues as to the most effec- 
tive weapons to use against the 
ships and “how many weapons you 
need to sink them." 

Another government witness. 
Captain Edward D. Sheaf er, die 
senior intelligence officer for the 
Atlantic Command, said the bode 
also divuiged the structural and - 
mechanical weak points where the 
ships are most vulnerable to attack, . 
“The book is really a bible for sabo- 
tage," he said. 

Mr. Walker. 50. is charged with 
stealing government secrets from a 
Norfolk area defense contractor for 
whom he worked as an engineer 
and passing the material to his 
brother, John A. Walker Jr„ a re- 
tired UJS. Navy communications 
specialist, who is also accused of 
spying. . 

The government contends that 
John Walker. 47, led the spy ring 
that also- included his 22-vear-ola 


son, Michael, a yeoman on the air- 
craft carrier Nimitz. and a close 
friend, Jeny A. Whitworth of Da- 
vis, California, a retired navy radio 
man. The others are scheduled to 
go on trial later this year. 

Although Arthur Walker con- 
fessed to the FBI and to a federal 
grand jury that John Walker gave 
him $12,000 in exchange for navy 
documents, he pleaded not guilty. 

In Wednesday’s trial session, 
prosecutors presented testimony 
from the navy officers in response 
to defense attempts to minimize the 
value of the classified documents. 

The government contends that 
Arthur Walker also took a sensitive 
report detailing a history of me- 
chanical and technical problems af- 
fecting the navy's newest and most 
sophisticated amphibious helicop- 
ter assault ships. 

Also testifying Wednesday were 
FBI agents who detailed Lhe inves- 
tigation that led to the May 20 
arrest of John Walker and broke 
open the spy case. 

One agent. Francis McKenzie 
Jr- said he was part of a large FBI 
team that trailed John Walker's van 
from the Norfolk area to Mont- 
gomery Countv, Maryland, where 
he was arrested. 

Bruce K. Brahe, another agent, 
said he and two othere were sent to 
search a wooded area where John 
Walker was believed to have 
stopped briefly shortly before. He 
said a shopping bag placed at the 
base of a telephone pole caught his 
attention because, unlike most til- 
ler, it was not soggy or full of in- 
sects. Inside, he said, under some 
empty plastic alcohol containers, 
empty soda bottles, used cotton 
swabs and a container of hand lo- 
tion. was a container wrapped care- 
fully in white plastic. It contained 
secret navy doounents. he said. 

Mr. Brahe said he and the others 
hid and waited. Over the next two 
hours, Mr. Brahe said, John Walker 
drove by three times, twice getting 
out of the van to inspect the pole in 
an apparent effort to ascertain 
whether the bag had been retrieved. 



The U.S. Dilemma: Ending the War 

Troops Were Deterred by Prospect of a Bloody Invasion 


The Aauaatad Pmn 


Prime Minister Bob Hawke of Australia signing the treaty to make the South Pacific a 
nuclear-free zone. From left: Crown Prince Tapouto’a of Tonga and Prime Minister 
Tofilau Eti Alesana of Western Samoa. An unidentified aide holds the document 

Pacific Nations Sign Nuclear-Free Pact 


Police in U.S. Recapture 
Master Thief and Killer 


By Kevin Klosc 

Washington Post Service 

CHICAGO — Bernard C. 
Welch, a fugitive master thief and 
' convicted murderer of a Washing- 
ton cardiologist, has been recap- 
tured by police responding to a 
routine car parking complaint near 
Pittsburgh. 

Mr. Welch. 45. had been the ob- 
~ ' ject of a nationwide manhunt since 
May 14. when he and Hugh T. 

■ Colomb. another convicted mur- 
derer, escaped from the sixth-floor 
maximum-security area of a high- 
rise prison in downtown Chicago. 
The two broke through a slit-like 
window and a concrete outer wall 
and slid 75 feet (23 meters) down a 
chain of knotted extension cords to 
ihe ground. 

Mr. Welch was arrested about 
3:30 A.M. Wednesday by two 
Greensburg. Pennsylvania, police- 
men who found him asleep in bed 
in an aparunem he was renting 
under the name of Robert Wilson. 
. f a young woman was with him. po- 
' lice said. 

Several hours elapsed before po- 
; lice learned that the man they had 
arrested on suspicion of auto theft 
was one of the most hunted crimi- 
' nals in the United Stales. 

.£ Police in Fairfax County, Virgin- 
ia, say they believe Mr. Welch com- 
mitted thousands of flawless bur- 
glaries in the Washington area in 

■ the 1970s to support a lavish life- 
' style. He had a mansion in Great 
•FaBs, Virginia, and operated two 
. smelters in his basement 10 melt the 

silver and gold that he had stolen 
from affluent Washington homes. 

■ He also had residences in Duluth. 

' Minnesota, and the Finger Lakes 

• region of New York. 

Police said a search of the car 


Mubarak to Visit New York 

The Associated Press 
CAIRO — President Hosni Mu- 
barak of Egypt will visit New York 
\ this fall to attend celebrations 
marking the 40th anniversary of 
the founding of the United Na- 
■ tions, Egypt's ambassador to the 
UN, .Ahmed Tewfik Khalil, said 
here Thursday. 


after he was taken into custody in 
Greensburg turned up a stolen pis- 
tol, two stolen rifles and stolen jew- 
elry. indicating that Mr. Welch had 
resumed his life as a burglar. 

Howard Safir, associate director 
of operations at the U5L Marshals 
Service, said Wednesday that Mr. 
Welch had been taken under heavy 
guard to the Marion. Illinois, feder- 
al prison. 

Mr. Welch, serving a 143-year 
sentence, had been confined there 
in 1981 but had been moved to less 
secure facilities after allegedly Idl- 
ing federal prosecutors that lie had 
information about white neo-Nazi 
activists at Marion and other pris- 
ons. 

Mr. Welch was convicted in 
Washington Superior Court of 
first-degree murder for shooting a 
Washington cardiologist, Michael 
Halberstam, who surprised Mr. 
Welch in a burglary at the phys- 
cian’s Northwest Washington 
home Dec. 5. 1980. Mr. Welch fled 
the boose and shot Dr. Halberstam 
when he pursued. 

Dr. Halberstam headed for a 
hospital by car. Accompanied by . 
his wife, Elliott Jones, he sported 
Mr. Welch in the street and ran him 
down. Mr. Wdch was arrested at 
the scene, and Dr. Halberstam died 
' later at the hospital. 

Greensburg, about 25 miles (40 
kilometers) southeast of Pitts- 
burgh, is a small residential town. 

But the Marshals Service, which 
bad been leading the search for Mr. 
Welch, said it had been targeting 
the Pittsburgh area because of 
more than 65 recent burglaries in 
which rare coins, antiques and oth- 
er exotic items were taken. 

The arrest was the result of a 
chain of events that began before 
dawn Wednesday when two- 
Greensburg officers, responding to 
a complaint, found an illegally 
parked BMW sedan in front or an 
apartment building and discovered 
that its license plates bad been re- 
ported stolen from Carlisle. Penn- 
sylvania. 

The policemen learned from oth- 
er building tenants that the car be- 
longed to a man they knew as Rob- 
ert Wilson, who was arrested 
without resistance. 


By Lena H. Sun 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Leaders of 
eight South Pacific countries, in- 
cluding New Zealand arid Austra- 
lia, have signed a treaty to make the 
region amiclear-free zone and have 
asked the five nudear powers to 
agree to ban the use or threat of 
nuclear weapons and the testing of 
nuclear explosive devices there! . 

The treaty, signed Tuesday in 
Rarotonga in the Cook Islands, 
would ban the manufacture, acqui- 
sition or receipt of nuclear explo- 
sives. It would also prohibit testing, 
stationing of nuclear weapons and 
export of nuclear material without 
strict safeguards. 

But the treaty allows the transit 
of nudear-powered and nuclear- 
armed warships through the region, 
and would leave port visits by such 
ships to the dedsion of individual 1 
countries. This provision would 
protect, and possibly even enhance, 
U.S. security interests because it 
■guarantees the maintenance of im- 
portant international legal safe- 
guards on transit, according to dip- 
lomats from Lhe region. 

These diplomats emphasized 
that the pact would not interfere 
with the security requirements of 
the ANZUS alliance that links 
Australia, New Zealand and the 
United States. 


U.S,PanelSays 
RuUng on Media 
r Coerces Speech 5 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON— The Federal 
Communications Commission has 
said that ihe Fairness Doctrine no 
longer serves the public interest. It 
added, however, that it would con- 
tinue to enforce the rule, which 
requires broadcasters to cover ma- 
jor community issues and present 
balanced reporting and differing 
views where there is controversy. 

The regulatory panel labeled the 
policy constitutionally “suspect” 
on Wednesday, adding that it 
“chills and coerces speech" and in- 
hibits coverage of major issues. 

The unanimous position of the 
five-member panel following two 
days of public hearings lost spring, 
is certain to heighten debate in 
Congress over the merits of retain- 
ing the rule, and could figure in 
future court tests of the policy, ac- 
cording to commission staff offi- 
cials. 

The Fairness Doctrine has 
evolved over 50 years from a blend 
of regulator/ decisions and statu- 
tory policy. Its roots are in the early 
day 5 of radio, when the govern- 
ment was seeking to assure that 
listeners would not be subjected to 
only one side of a political cam- 
paign. It was recognized formally 
in federal law in 1959 with the 
“equal time" provision, and the 
doctrine was written in response to 
the congressional act. 

The commission said the consti- 
tutionality of the doctrine was 
questionable because more stations 
ore broadcasting now than in 1969, 
when the Supreme Court upheld it 
in a landmark case known. 


But a U.S. analyst said the treaty 
could be used by the Soviet Union 
to complicate. UB. access to the 
Pacific. “It would be logical to as- 
sume that it would be .used in a way 
to make it look like the United 
Suites is pushing its nuclear policy 
in parts of the world" where it is 
unwelcome, the analyst said. “It 
would not help the U)S. image." 

In addition to Australia and 
New Zealand, the countries that 
signed the treaty are Western Sa- 
moa. Tuvalu, Niue, Fiji the Cook 
Islands and Kiribati. 

Prime Minister David Lange of 
New Zealand, spokesman for the 
group, said the five other members 
— Tonga, Papua New Guinea, 
Vanuatu. Nauru and the Solomon 
Islands — had endorsed the treaty 
and were expected to sign it within 
a few months. The treaty would go 
into effect after ratification by 
eight countries, diplomats said. 

[Walter Li ni , the prime minister 
of Vanuatu, said Thursday that the 
treaty was not strong enough, and 
said he would not submit it to his 


parliament for ratification. He said 



Fgi. The Assoca- 
-a ted Press reported from Raroton- 
ga-] \y- 

' The idea of a midearTree zonein 
the South Pacific, simitar to the 
Latin American nuclear-free zone 
established in 1967 and to the non- 
nuclear provisions of the 1959 Ant- 
arctic Treaty, has been endorsed by 
the South Pacific countries for sev- 
eral years. 

h was originally directed at 
France, which still conducts under- 
ground nuclear tests on Mururoa in 
French Polynesia. 

It was not until the recent return 
to political power of Labor Party 
governments in New Zealand ana 
Australia, however, that the con- 
cept gained momentum, according 
to diplomats from the region. 

The five countries that will be 
asked to sign protocols are the 
United States, France, Britain,, 
China and the Soviet Union. 


7 Held in Nagasaki March 


United Presi International 

NAGASAKI. Japan — Seven 
demonstrators were arrested 
Thursday as more than 8.000 peo- 
ple chanting “no more Nagasakis" 
marched through the streets here 
on the eve of the 40th anniversary 
of Lhe atomic bombing of the city, 
the Kyodo News Service reported. 

The seven were arrested for ob- 
structing police officers, Kyodo 
said. Police said the arrest was the 
only incident at the peace march, 
which followed the opening of a 
conference on banning nuclear 
weapons. 


The demonstrators, including hi- 
bokusha. the Japanese term for sur- 
vivors of the bombing, chanted, 
“No more Hiros him a*;, no more 
Nagasaki's, no more hibakusha,” as 
they paraded through the second 
city nit by a UJS. atomic bomb. 

The Nagasaki commemorative 
ceremonies were scheduled to be- 
gin at mid-morning Friday at the 
city's peace park. Officials antici- 
pated a crowd of 25,000. More than 
55.000 people attended the ceremo- 
nies Tuesday in Hir oshima mark- 
ing the first use of the atomic 
bomb, on Aug. 6. 1945. 


By Charles Mohr 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — By the sum- 
mer of 1945 the United -Stales had 
strategically won the war with Ja- 
pan. But America faced a certain 
and severe clawing if it finished its 
enemy at dose quarters. 

The United Stales had achieved 
total victory on the outlying island 
of Okinawa from April 1 to June 
21. But the historian Ronald Spec- 
tor says that Okinawa had the curi- 
ous effect of encouraging the Japa- 
nese and discouraging the 
Americans, who looked to an inva- 
sion of the Japanese main islands 
with “anxiety and dread." 

An American force of 650,000 
men, more than 4,000 planes and a 
naval armada were being assem- 
bled to invade the southern Japa- 
nese island of Kyushu on Nov. 1, 
after the typhoons of au tumn sub- 
sided. The largest island, Honshu, 
was to be hit in March 1946. 

The landing s were expected to 
initiate one of the greatest land 
battles in history, an amplification 
of previous Pacific campaigns that 
had claim ed the lives of 105,563 
American and more than 300,000 
Japanese fighting men, and great 
numbers of Japanese civilians. 

About 100,000 civilians had died 
an Okinawa alone. At Saipan, one 
of the few Pacific garrisons with 
sizable numbers of civilians, Amer- 
ican troops watched with awed sor- 
row as mothers cast their babies 
into the sea from cliffs and then 
leapt to their own deaths. 

American troops who were 
poised to do the fighting to Japan 
viewed the enterprise wife a mix- 
ture, of .reagnatiotf, ffistasre and, 

. their generals womett, some feseht- 
menL There also was concern that 
many American troops scheduled 
for reassignment from Europe, 
where victory had been achieved on 
May 8, would fed they were bring 
asked for unreasonable sacrifice. 

Although planners for the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff were estimating 
40,000 dead and 150,000 wounded 
for the decisive part of the cam- 
paign, they warned that the casual- 
ties for the whole operation "are 
not subject to accurate estimate." 

A former U.S. Marine Corps 
commandant. General Lemuel C. 
Shepherd Jr„ commanded the 6th 
Marine Division, one of three ma- 
rine and 11 army divisions assigned 
to invade Kyushu and later Hon- 
shu. 

A few days after Japan capitulat- 
ed as a result of the atomic bomb- 
ings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 
General Shepherd toured the inva- 
sion beaches near Tokyo Bay with a 
Japanese Navy commander. The 
commander showed the American 
the deeply dug-in, eight-inch guns 
commanding the area and said with 
quiet pride: “We would have hit 
every ship that tried to enter the 
bay.” 

“Yes, I think you would,” the 
general recalls saying. 

That there ultimately was no in- 
vasion “saved ray pants," General 
Shepherd said. ^Thousands of 
troops would have been lost.” 



KOREA 


HONSHU 
Tokyo 

JAPAN 

r? KYUSHU 


OKINAWA 

9 


IWO JIMA 


Pacific Ocean 


SAIPAN, 


Politicians were as concerned as 
military officers about casualties. 
President Harry S. Tr uman said at 
a planning session that he hoped 
the United States could prevent 
“an Okinawa from one end of Ja- 
pan to the other." 

The fight for Okinawa cost the 
lives of 7,000 soldiers and marines 
and 5.000 sailors. It was the most 
costly naval engagement in UJS. 
history. Casualties, which included 
wounded, ran about 35 percent. If 
they were as high on Kyushu, they 
could have reached 227,000, with 
perhaps 56,000 dead. 

Joim Popham, who made nine 
Pacific combat landings, was a cap- 
tain with the 3d Marine Divirion 
and recalls that the divirion staff 
believed it would “have to be with- 
drawn after 10 days, it would be so 
shot up.” 

Mr. Popham, a former editor of 
The Chattanooga Times, said the 
mood was: “You may have made 
some landings before, but nothin g 
like this is going to be." 

Having witnessed the suicides of 
civilians on Saipan, he remembers 
the “shocking" realization that 
“you’ll just have to shoot women 
and chiidren if they want to die for 
their emperor." 

The military historian Stanley 
Falk rays die Japanese had about 
23 million regular troops on the 
home islands, many of them .of 
good quality, and mat the Ameri- 
cans expected to have to kfll large 
numbers of poorly armed civilian 
militia. There appeared to be no 
shortage of artillery and small-, 
arms ammunition. 

The outcome, however, was not 
in doubL 

Mr. Falk said he believes that the 


The Anocxaod Pmi 

Japanese had little chance of mov- 
ing troops to crisis points, especial- 
ly from islan d to islan d. The Unit- 
ed Slates had achieved complete air 
superiority and planned to “plas- 
ter” everything that moved. 

But a quantum advance in fire- 
power — the atomic bomb — was 
to surprise the fi ghting men on 
both sides. 

Admiral 'William D. Leahy, Tru-. 
man’s chief of staff, said later that 
he regretted that his country had 
used “this barbarous weapon." 

Even General Curtis E LeMay, 
who was then in the business Of 
delivering conventional weapons 
such as ordinary bombs and incen- 
diaries, argued that such bombing 
alone could have won the war. 

Most of the navy’s top officers 
believed that a continued blockade 
would win the war and some offi- 
cials thought the impending entry 
by the Soviet Union into the Pacific 
war might force a surrender. 


World War II Weapons 
Salvaged Off Sardinia 

The Associated Press 

ALGHERO, Sardinia — Police 
frogmen searching for explosives 
planted by fishermen have found 
350 World War II ammun ition 
cases, containing more than a mil- 
ls, off the< 


lion rounds, off the coast of Sardin- 
ia. 

The police said that the cases, 
found Wednesday at a depth of 95 
feet (30 meters), contained ammu- 
nition for rifles and automatic 
weapons. The boxes are believed to 
have been dumped by Italian sol- 
diers near the end of world War II. 



Suvsmet Exhibition Of 
Rare Jewels Of THe World 


(Wt 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 1985 




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DURBAN, South Africa — To ^ d^ve offiar, 
the junior law partners in the firm ‘J 

of Mxenge, N^ngweni & She* “ 

Victoria was “raore of Reagan or m> own i 

n mother than a senior colleague." Blade activists ? 

They fdt so warmly that they there have Dew 
decided she should not travel alone ^mg* of radicals.; 


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r Join F. 
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i him up. even dirts rresw 
agan or my own mother. ^ 

Black activists ptfct ouizj 


when Chief Butiidft&j welcomed a 
government anMWiceineni it ■at- 
tended to incorpot^e jorac of the 
townships into His KwaZufu tribal 
homeland. This pfcuT brought pro- 
icsis From radicals who oppose the 
homelands. 

Mrs. Mxenge and Mr. Xuods, . 

the man who was with her when she 

was killed, were at the center Of tins* 


from a dvfl rights organization, the *tc ;no arrests have .bcumOtU ^ Mxenge’sdeaiklnlaAtfflj* 
United Democratic From, which the killings. The police force hasa s , tllcked Mr. X unto 

said it had received information high success rate in capturing black c |j Urc jj | n Lamontvdle. where 


■about a hit list 

There was reason for concern. 


guemllas. Democratic From groups meet ■ - 

The Detained Persons Support Mr. Xundu said that when Mi! 
Committee, which monitors police Mxenge was shot he rushed to a 


TAUNUS5T8. 52. 6000 FRANKRJXT Four yeare earlier. Mis. Mxenge' s Comnnitee. which mom tors police Mxenge was shot he rusoca u 
wGernvtd rift-232351, tb«4ii5» husband, Griffiths Mxenge. the actions under the stringent security police station a mile away. 

founder of the law firm, was laws, reported last month that six j t0 thc sution." 


stabbed to death on his way home persons had been found ravsten- --j 


7 i to the sution." he 
six or seven minutes . 


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from the office. - . . _ . . 

The man who drove Mrs. pcared since September. in a car and headed for the house. 1 

Mxenge home was a witness to ber The dead include Matthew Gon- followed them. By the time we got 
murder Aug. 1 as she stepped from iwe, one of the country’s most ef- there Victoria s ; body had already 
the car in Durban's UmLazi Town- fective political organizes The been taken to the hospital, 
ship. charred and mutilated bodies of Mr. Xundu is not the onljr one 


ously tilled and that 27. had disap- armed detectives got 


in a car and headed for the house. 1 


Mr. Xundu is not the only one 


+h- m „ n Yiinrlii is a Mr. Goniwe and three companions who thinks the system is implkat- 

™ found June 27 besidTa road ed. so Mrs. Mxenge lakes her place 
near Pbrt Elizabeth. beside Mr. Goniwe as another 


U 1 U 1 UIU auiu a Ilium vi n , n'.ilmK 

lawyers. He said that four black near Port Hflabeth. 
men brushed past his car as Mrs. No arrests have been made in 
Mxenge stepped out with an armful that case, nor in two similar cases 
of parcels. Mr. Xundu remembers near GraafT-Remer in eastern Cape 


No KIWI have tan nude in bta* honor* * a victim of .part- 
that case, nor in two similar cases , , , , . , 


iviAOIXG atcuuiAl UU4 W1UI 046 OI 1UI UI mat mu, uvn ui nuuuw www , , . * 

of parcels. Mr. Xundu remembers near Graaff-Reiner in eastern Cape T wo weeks before her death, she 
how she screamed and ran before Province and Duduza Township, hung a poster of Mr. Goniwe over 
they shot her and split open her east of Johannesburg. her bed. Distributed at Mr. Gon- 

- iwr’s funeral the poster read: 



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The government has denied ^ston anartbdd kmin? 

“Whoever did this, we are sabs- complicity in the death or Mr. 
fied they are operating with the Goniwe. His friends have said he ° 

protection of the system," Mr. and the others might have beet 
Xundu said. victims of black rivalry. 

It is a view that is widely held in Gashes have occurred betweer 

the black community, although vi- members of the mul tiracial Unitec 
dent confrontation has frequently Democratic From and those of lh< 
occurred between black groups black Azanian People's Organiza 
over the last few years. Some peo- tion, which shuns white partidpa- 
ple say Lhey think that Mrs. uoq {q its fi gh t against apartheid. 

Jtfaasa 

mast the govemmem is involved. ^ blun ^g acti ^ 

A wave of anger at the slaying accusations of official complicity. 


Victoria Mxenge 


nquavm Mrs. Mxenge. a woe. was work- 
muwe. His friends have said he ; n g ; n an GmJazi clinic when die 
and the others might have been ^ thenalawstu- 

victims of black rivalry. deDl A Natal Unmraty- They 

Gashes have occurred between were married in 1964. 
embers of the multiradal United Soon E f ter ward! Griffilhs 


i unity, although vi- members of the mul tiradal United 
tion has frequently Democratic From and those of the 


Democratic From and (hose of the Mxeoee was sentenced to nine 
ilack Azanian People’s Organize- y^rsmaprisonon Robbcn Island 
icm, which shuns white parti apa- f Qr ^ ^ omhwed Afri- 


qualified in 19S1. became a junior^ 
partner in the firm. 

Ten months later, the Mxcnges 
left their office together bw drove 
home in separate cars. He never 
arrived. The next morning his muti- 


tiou in its fight against apartheid. c^^tionalCongress. 

The killing of Victoria Mxenge . He completed his law studies in 
took place amid feuding between prison and, upon release, set op his 


lated body, with 45 stab wounds, 
was found in a stadium. 

Mrs. Mxenge took over the fanr- 
pffactice. modeling herself ov-Jpa 
husband and quickly establishotg 
an equal nputaxioa as a vigorous 


practice in Durban and soon was 


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sparked rioting . in the townships 
around Durban, which had been 
relatively free of unrest. 

The white authorities deny com- 
plicity or cover-up. “I don’t protect 


Trouble flared between black activists. 


recognized as a defender of black defender of pofitical prisoners. 


radicals and members of Grief Mrs. Mxenge left nursing and 
Gatsha ButhdezTs more moderate joined her husband as a dent. She 
Inkatba movement five years ago, began studying law and, when she 


When slain, she was workingeo 
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Vatican Is Troubled by African-Style Catholicism 


By Charles Mitchell 

United Press International 

NAIROBI — On Sundays, Nai- 


and especially Roman Catholicism, mm Catholic missionary in the the legal system that hdped lead to 


was introduced on the continent to field sometimes encourages it Major General Nimdn s removal 


robi’s “Holy Corner" pulsates to “lomal powas. 


further the aims of the European Like the clerics in Central Amer- in ApriL 


the beat of tribal drams while con- 
gregations give praise to Mungu, 


which means God in Swahili 
Of the three Christian congrega- 


Romaa Catholics in Africa are more poZici 
abandoning the Christ taught by fug human 
the European colonialist ana trans- mg rebel gi 
forming Him into an African, wor- -against gov 


ica, African tehops are becoming In Kcnya> ^ {isuxdl hicraxcby 
more pohacaiiy active, coodemn- directN chaflenged (he govtan- 
um human rights abuses, support- 


colonialist ana trans- ing rebel groups and 
into an African, wor- -against government p 


abuses, support- mI OVCf fg^y planning and 
odspotongnu 


dons at the corner of Uhuru High- 
way and University Way, it is the 
Roman Catholics that rollick the 


shiping Him in a traditional Afri- 
can way. 


A few days before the July 27 
coup in Uganda. Kampala's Ro- 


“It is time that Rome saw the man Calholmarchbishop. Cardinal 
need for making our sendees more Emmanuel Nsubuga, urged MSIton 


Kenya has the higt 
tion growth rate in the 
percent. Its popolatioi 
lion is expected to do 


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actressy soft yacw, cannb. I pendent African Roman Catholic participation?’ senior cabinet post - 

Urge* sd«. £ 64000 . c *JW- The growth rale of the Roman fn Zaire, the dmrch hi 

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— to seven Afncan nanons high- bon converts join yearly, straining independence. Zaire’s churih was too P san 9 s “ dfvttopmem 
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the church in Africa. 

As the colonial period in Africa 
was ending in the late 1950s there 
was one African bishop. Today 
there are more than 400. Yet de- 
spite the greater numbers of native 
African priests, there remains in 
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puts the number of Roman Caiho- African-run trade rations. 


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than 12 percent of the 621.6 million ^ Zubeir Wako, is s ne d a condem- 


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Indians Who Fled Uganda to Be Repatriated 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


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The Associated Press 
NEW DELHI — About 270 In- 
dians who fled Uganda following 
the coup there last month wfl] "be 
flown to India. Khuzsheed Alam 
Khan, minister of state for external 
affairs, said Thursday. 

Mr. Khan told parliament that a 
passenger jet from the government 
airline, Air-In dia. was on standby 
and would fly to Kenya, whjre the 


Indians fled, when preparations property in the subseouent footing, 
were completed. . -j " He said the new Ugandan gov- 

The government ot .President emmem had assured India through 
Milton Obote was overthrown on diplomatic channels that it would 


July 27 in a coup that installed “make every eff on” to protect In- ttuougnoul Uie comment 
Lieutenant General Tito’ Okello as dian lives and property. The resurgence of Islamic funda- 

Uganda's head of state: - ■ The new government also told mentafism also is a factor. Saudi 

Mr. Khan said none of the esti- Indian diplomats ra Kampala that Arabia. Libya and some other 
mated 1,000 Indians who lived in any Indian who wanted to leave countries donate money for 
Uganda was killed during the coup, Uganda temporarily would be al- mosques for minority Moslem pop- 
but said many of them lost then lowed to go, Mr. Khan said. illations, in the Christian stales. 


that insta lled 


frican-run trade mums. The soda] services of (he African 

The archbishop of Sudan. ’Gabri- Raman Catholic Church have cre- 
Zubdr Wako, issued a condem- azed another phenomenon in Afti* 
nation of Resident Gaafar Nimriri ca: the “maize Chri s tian ,’ ’ or Afri- 
lien Islamic law was introduced in cans who convert to get relief 
•83, and he is credited with start- maize. Roman Catholic sourcesin 
g the popular campaign against Kenya said lens of thousands of 

— i converts were enrolled during the 

recent drought. 

3 R ATlQl pm I Aft Intbdrdiscussons With the Vat- 

■ **-vJIOU IaIaaX iaxK Alton clergy main ta in that 

operty in the subsequent (tooting. * hB must make worship 

He said the new Ugandan gov- JDOre reJcvai11 1 °. ro « 3 compennan 
ament had assured India through from *** 5 > 000 mdigenous Chris- 
plomatic channels that it would cb , urch£S ^ sprung up 
aake every' effort" to protect In- throughout the continent, 
ra lives and property. The resurgence of Islamic funda- 


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FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 1985 


——————— ; -|||| 



Page 6 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc 


FabUicd WHfc The New York Tinen rad Ifee Washington P«t 


Out of the Marcos Trap 

noL The five-year bases agreemsil calls for a 
total of $900 million in military and economic, 
aid, to be apportioned by Congress, 

Rather than call Mr. Marcos's bluff. House 
conferees yielded to Senate wishes, raising 
military aid to $70 million and agreeing to 
recommend, rather than require, that food aid 
be distributed by private groups. The problem 
of diversion of food aid should be taken seri- 
ously by the administration. There have been 
damaging charges of extensive overseas invest- 
ments by senior Maras officials. 

A second wise step would be to begin an 
energetic search for alternate sites — Guam. 
Australia and Saipan among them — for the 
U.S. naval and air bases in the Philippines. As 
long as Mr. Marcos believes that Americans 
wilJ swallow anything to keep those bases, be 
can disregard , America’s worried attempts to 
press for constitutional change. 

Nor is military aid (be first requirement in 
mniiining the insurgent challenge of the New 
People’s Army. Its guns have come from the 
government’s demoralized and sometimes bru- 
tal army, and its most potent slogan is opposi- 
tion to the “US.-Marcos dictatorship." 

Most Filipinos rqect that linkage, and are 
still bound to the United States by lang u ag e, 
culture and political tradition. To maintain 
them, the United States needs waystoescapea 
desperate dictator's embrace. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


It is rare for the staid American Bar Asscxia- 
tion to excoriate friendly foreign countries for 
human rights abuses. It has now done so in the 
scandalous instance of the Philippines, where 
lawyers who defend victims in political cases 
are mysteriously killed. At least three have 
been murdered and five arrested, one on the 
peculiar charge of “human rights lawyering." 
As the rule of law totters in the Philippines, a 
Communist guerrilla movement grows, its 
chief asset bong the rickety and corrupt re- 
gime of President Ferdinand Marcos. Mr. 
Marcos can shrug off the ABA protest and 
others like it for two bad reasons. The United 
States can do something about one of them. 

His own democratic opponents are so divid- 
ed that be has threatened them with an instant 
presidential election to prolong bis 20-year 
rule. His other card is America's reliance on 
Clark Air Base and the naval base at Subic 
Bay. He used it again to fend off a prudent 
move in Congress to put more distance be- 
tween Washington and the Maras dynasty. 

The House voted to cut $75 million from a 
Reagan administration request far $100 mil- 
lion in military aid, while increasing economic 
aid from $95 million to $155 million — with 
the requirement that a fourth of food aid be 
channeled through private groups. Manila in- 
stantly threatened to abrogate the bases agree- 
ment, arguing that the 5 100-mihioD military 
aid figure constituted “rent," which it does 


A Slim Chance to Seize 


In this space last Friday we talked about 
missed opportunities, the kind for which there 
is going to be much regret and nostalgia a short 
time hence when people realize that those 
opportunities are no more. The subject that 
day was reducing the budget deficit. The sub- 
ject today is South Africa. But the underlying 
principle is the same. There is a slim, remote 
jast chance to uy to reach a peaceable and just 
resolution — but it is being kicked away. 

We thought of it the moment we saw the 
picture and read the account of that brave 
man. Bishop Tutu, coming between the South 
African police and black mourners to prevent 
a bloody confrontation the other day. “Please 
allow us to bury our dead with dignity." he 
said. “Please do not rub our noses in the dust 
We are already hurt; we are already down. 
Don't trample on us. We are H uman bangs; we 
are not animals. And when we have a death, we 
cry like you cry." If things proceed as they 
have been proceeding and if the government 
continues its cruel and senseless policies, there 
will come a day when it mil sorely wish that it 
bad only to yield such things as Bishop Tutu 
has been asking — political freedom, dignity 
and decency — and that there were such peo- 
ple as Bishop Tutu with whom to negotiate. 

_ The fact is that over the years Pretoria has 
obdurately and suici dally refused to recognize 
or credit legitimate, peaceful civil protest on 
the part of nonviolent blacks. It met such 
protests with violence, repression, gunfire and 
lockups. It has done everything it could think 
of to weaken the hand and undermine the 
leadership of those whom it should devoutly 
wish to be the leaders of the restless, growing 
Mack resistance to apartheid. Most recently 
President Botha declined a meeting with Bish- 
op Tutu. The moderate leaders of Desmond 
Tutu’s generation are bong defied and often 
ridiculed by their own young for the scant 
results, as the younger ones see it, of their 
moderation and insistence on nonviolence. 
The trend in that unhappy land is such that 
you must believe that in a short time white 
South Africa will look back with real regret cm 
these lost days and vanished opportunities. 


In America we have readied a policy stale- 
mate. Within the president's own party there is 
some objection to moving toward a stronger 
condemnation of apartheid in general and of 
the South African government's misguided 
new wave of repression in particular. Outside 
his administration, on the left and to a consid- 
erable extent in the center as wdl, there is 
increasing dissatisfaction with the so-called 
“constructive engagement" policy of the past 
several years, a belief that it has yielded little. 
Congress, before it left town, sent the presi- 
dent a bill that would impose relatively modest 
sanctions against South Africa. Mr. Reagan 
fa as spoken of vetoing it, but be is leaving the 
matter open for discussion. 

We have never favored the disinvestment 
program that many have advocated over the 
years, believing that it would hurt its intended 
beneficiaries. South Africa's blacks. The cur- 
rent legislation seems to us to contain much 
milder and more reasonable measures than 
what was once in the works. It also seems to us 
that, despite an the argument that has been 
going on, there is a fairly broad general con- 
sensus available on the land of pressures that 
should be applied to hasten the end of racial 
repression in South Africa, and that this con- 
sensus extends from w ithin the Reagan admin- 
istration to many of the critics on the outside. 
There is common ground there that could be 
seized upon, so that a single, strong American 
policy could be fashioned. 

Nothing is more important at this time. 
America must not, at so critical a moment, 
descend into an internal political squabble 
over what it should be doing. The American 
opportunity is now, and it may not come 
again. The country must speak with conviction 
and a dear voice and use its influence to press 
the South African government away from a 
mad and morally squalid course. It is possible 
for the administration and Congress to agree; 
(hey are not that far apart. Bishop Tutu speaks 
and acts for those who do not wish violence, 
but who insist on freedom and decency. That is 
what the United States should be for. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 






'Actually, after forty years, I rarely give it a thought 


Realistically: The Way to Stop Is to Stop 


H IROSHIMA — When I found my mother, 
her whole body was burned. I couldn't tell 
where her eyes were, her nose, her ears. But even 
though she was dying, she war happy to know I was 
there. And I was lucky to see her before she died. 
— Mrs. Masako Hironaka, 71, resident of die 
Atomic Bomb Survivors' Nursing Home. 

Since the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs in 
1945, the United Stares bas manufactured 60,000 
□udear warheads of 71 different types, for use in 
116 weapons systems. The cost so far has been 
5750 Whoa. So far ... 

America is now spending more to make nucle- 
ar warheads than it did on the Manhattan Pro- 
ject, the emergency atomic effort of World War 
IL That cost a little over $16 billion in terms of 
current dollars. The MX missile win cost over 
$30 billion before it is done; the Trident sub- 
marine and its missfies as much as $100 billion. 

Those Spires come from an article in the 
Bulletin of the. Atomic Scientists by Robert S. 
Norris, Thomas B. Cochran and William M. 
Aririn. It tells us in unemotional prose that eight 
types of U.S. nuclear warheads are in produc- 
tion, with a total of 30 types in the stockpile. The 
stockpile contains 25,500 warheads. 

That is the American side. The Russians have 
almost as marry warheads. The roughly 50,000 
nuclear warheads now on Earth cany an explo- 
sive force more than one million times the power 
of the bomb that devastated Hiroshima. It is 
enough to destroy the world many times over. 


By Anthony Lewis 

We have become numb, most of us, to the 
figures on weapons, megatonnage, overkill They 
are enormous abstractions, beyond our imagina- 
tion , beyond our controL In our numbness, we 
leave the problem to the politicians — and they 
say we must have more, newer, better weapons. 

In Hiroshima the abstractions are reduced to 

human scale again. There arc no words to express 
what happened hoe; the survivors themselves 
say they cannot convey what they experienced. 
But ibar understated accounts teQ ennng ft- One 
thinks not of megatons or cotmterforce or war 
gflnws but of human beings. 

People prefer to express their grief privately 
here, visiting the Peace Park at dawn with flowers 
or incense. But they feel they most use the 
experience of Hiroshima to work for world 
peace. On this 40th amriversary of the bomb they 
invited mayors from around the world to cam- 
paign for n nrif * ar disarmament. A declaration 
read at the commemorative ceremony on Tues- 
day called on the United States and the Soviet 
Union to stop nuclear tests. 

In the realpolitik of Washington, the meetings 
and resolutions of Hiroshima may have seemed 
hopelessly naive. But who are the realists in fact? 

Consider the mid ear test issue. In brushing 
aside the Soviet proposal for a test moratorium. 
President Reagan said the United States would 


consider a ban on tests after “{we} catch up." 
That notion is just what has produced 40 years of 
pointless escalation- Fear that the other side is 
gaining an edge in ovcriaB bas faded a race for 
new weapons that make us all leas secure, not 
more. The only way to stop the race is to stop. 

The Reagan policy-makers do not want to 
stop. That is made dear in a letter from Frank J. 
Gaffney Jr, deputy to Assistant Secretary of 
Defense Richard Perle, thearchitect of US. arms 
control policy. Mr. Gaffney was answering a 
letter to Resident Reagan from Admiral Gene R. 
La Rocque, retired, of the Center for Defense 
Information, urging a moratorium. “Testing is 
indispensable to nuclear weapon development," 
Mr. Gaffney wrote. “So long as we are obliged to 
rdy on retaliatory nuclear capabilities to safe- 
guard deterrence, nuclear testing and a strong 
deterrent posture null remain inseparable." 

In other words, America mast go on forever 
developing new wea p o ns of mass destruction. 
That is so even though it already has 50 times the 
number it needs to create an overwhelming fear 
of retaliation — enough, indeed, to destroy us alL 
Professor Victor Weisskopf of the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology, one of the Manhat- 
tan Piraectphysiasis, hadu exactly right when 
he said; “Future generations, if there are any. 
will regard [the arms race] as a virulent case of 
collective mental disease. 

The realists are in Hir oshima. 

The New York Times. 


Restraining the President: State Has to Be Cautions 


Other Opinion 

To Many, Helsinki Means Hope 


W ASHINGTON — Presidents 
always grow frustrated with 
State Department bureaucracy, and 
their most ideoiogicaLsupporiers find 
ihai mim bureaucracy even more 
frustrating than presidents do. 

The ideological right is now waging 
a concerted attack on Secretary of 
Stale George Shultz. He is an im- 
probable conservative villain, but the 
right’s attack is not surprising. Nor is 
the central indictment: that he has 
become a captive of State Depart- 
ment bureaucracy and thus the key 
figure thwarting a conservative presi- 
dent's foreign policy objectives. 

Conservatives inherently distrust 
the career Foreign Service because of 
their perception — often correct — 
that it attracts and promotes a dis- 


By Raymond Price 

The writer, now a syndicated cohwmisL saved an die Nixon White Hoax staff. 


In their 10 years, the Helsinki accords have 
provided a rallying point for people struggling 
for freedom and peace. They have done so by 
encouraging private citizens in all European 
countries to “know and act upon their rights" 
by monitoring their governments' behavior. 

True, many who took up this challenge soon 
became vi ctims themselves. Yet courageous 
individuals continue to speak out, bearing wit- 
ness to the sufferings of others. I have seen (he 
Helsinki spirit at work in meetings in Moscow, 
Prague, Warsaw, Budapest, Bucharest, Bel- 
grade and Istanbul. Voices may lower, but eyes 
light up when the word “Helsinki" is men- 
tioned. To these people, Helsinki means hope. 

If the United Stales were to pull cmt of the 
Helsinki process, it would be abandoning 
these people and others like them who put 
their faith in the accords, sacrificing their free- 
dom and sometimes their lives. It would be 


squandering the moral force the Helsinki ac- 
cords have acquired as a result of those sacri- 
fices. For the Russians, the withdrawal would 
be an ideological victory. 

— Jeri Laber, executive director of 
Helsinki Watch, a New York-based human 
rights group, writing in The New York Times. 

Notwithstanding the Helsinki Final Decla- 
ration, and despite the recently arranged East- 
West summit, Europe remains divided and 
nothing will change this so long as Moscow 
denies freedom to its subject-nations. The 
West has no alternative but to maintain ade- 
quate defensive deterrence to the totalitarian 
threat, while preserving its own freedom as an 
attractive and potentially infectious alter- 
native. Within this scenario, which will inevita- 
bly lead to conflicts, the “Helsinki process" 
can perform a limited function, and may even 
exert a degree of civilizing influence. 

— Neue ZQrcker Zeitung (Zurich). 


pan for the purpose of frustrating 
presidents. They arc an essentia] pan 
of the president’s fail-safe system. 

Presidents always want Bold New 
Initiatives. Their more zealous ideo- 
logical supporters want Bolder New 
Initiatives. One function of the pro- 
fessional bureaucracy is to tell mem 
why they often cannot have them. 

Of every 100 new ideas, one may, 
with luck, be a good idea. Presidents 
have a somewhat higher batting aver- 
age, but they don't bat a thousand. 
And their zealous supporters have 
even lower batting averages. 

Anyone who has worked closely 
with a president knows that the ideas 
. that cascade from the Oval Office 

are not alone in their frustration with need to be critically examined. Those 


the Foreign Service. One of the recent 
presidents most vocal in his disdain 
For its timidity was John F. Kennedy. 
The basic conflict here is not ideo- 
logical but institutional 
Professional bureaucracies exist in 


ideas that do not measure up need to 
be shot down. A rigorous process of 
examination is necessary not only to 
weed oat bad ideas and strengthen 
good ones, but also to keep the' presi- 
dent free to put forward more new 


ideas without fear that half-baked 
ones will be acted on. The better this 
fail-safe system works, the more cre- 
ative a president can afford lobe, and 
the neater arc his chances of success. 

Whatever their philosophical ori- 
entation, presidents are pragmatists. 
They have to be. The job imposes a 
severe, result-oriented discipline. 
Theorists deal in the abstract, but 
presidents deal with the concrete. 
Their acts arc measured not by inten- 
tion but by conseq uenc e: And in the 
real world, actual consequences sel- 
dom follow theoretical patterns; 

American conservatives can be di- 
vided into two categories: the ideo- 
logical conservative, whose touch- 
stone is how well a policy agrees with 
his own theoretical construct, and the 
procedural conservative —in today’s 
jargon, the “pragmatist” — whose 
touchstone is caution and who places 
the burden of proof on the person 
proposing a new idea. Phflosopmcal- 


and Congress Polices the Mandate 


, FROM OCR AUG. 9 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1910: Why Sbtraldn’t Turkey Arm? 


PARIS — [Today’s editorial says:] “Diplomat- 
ic and naval circles hove been following the 
negotiations that have aided in the sale of 
Goman warships to Turkey. Why should Tur- 
key be forbidden to build up a naval force? is 
she not following the example of the most 
civilized nations? For decades the English 
press and English demagogues have been 
preaching the necessity of reform to Turkey. 
Now that she is beginning to reform, do they 
realize that they have made a mistake? Turkey 
under the old regime was a menace to no 
Power. But a reformed Turkey, with a well 
organized army arid an efficient navy, and a 
population animated by a newly awakened 
sentiment of national pride, may cause Eng- 
land to regret the old state of affairs." 


1935: French Workers Fight Decrees 
PARIS — Strikes and demonstrations against 
government wage-cutting decrees brought out- 
breaks of increased violence in two naval bases 
in France [on Aug. 8], while the walkout at Le 
Havre continued to bold liners at their piers. 
At least two persons were kffled in Toulon in a 
dash between arsenal workers and police. At 
least 80 were injured. Brest, after a day of 
calm, saw fresh demonstrations which resulted 
in several being injured when Mobile Guards 
sought to dispose a large mob. Meanwhile, the 
second batch in the senes of decrees by which 
the French government hopes to eliminate the 
budget deficit, reduce the cost of living and 
unemployment, lower interest rates and stimu- 
late business generally were approved and 
signed by President Albert Lebrun. 


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0 1985. International Herald Tribune. Ait rights reserved. 



W ASHINGTON — With Con- 
gress in recess, it is timely to 
ask why President Reagan is unable 
to translate his near-record high per- 
sonal popularity with the public into 
more congressional support for bis 
major programs. Why is be unable to 
duplicate the eariy successes of his 
first term, following an election vic- 
tory even more sweeping than his 
• defeat of Jimmy Carta in 1980? In 
the answers lie some fundamental 
truths about the presidency. 

Since iris inauguration, the presi- 
dent has seen his fellow Republicans 
in the Senate join the Democratic- 
controlled House to brake his mas- 
sive first-term military buildup. 

His budget proposals for the new 
fiscal year, which his budget director 
characterized as the president’s 
chance to reorder federal priorities, 
lie in shambles, treated with little 
reverence by either party in Congress. 

His tax reform proposal, a genu- 
inely bold initiative that was to be the 
domestic centerpiece of his second 
term, bas lost public support and is 
unlikely to pass both houses of Con- 
gress this year in any form. 

In foreign policy, both houses have 
rqected his South African policy of 
“constructive engagement" by pass- 
ing economic sanctions legislation. 

Even lus few successes have been 
severely circumscribed. The MX mis- 
sile will be deployed at only half the 
proposed leva. The “contras" in Nic- . 
aragna will receive only nonmilitary 
assistance, and without the direct role 
for the CIA that the president sought. 

Some of Mr. Reagan's difficulties 
can be ascribed to breaking in a new. 
White House team, diversion of re-* 
sources because of tbe TWA hijack- 
ing, his cancer szngery and his lame- 
duck status as political jockeying 
begins for the 1988 presdential elec- 
tion, But these are secondary. More 
fundamental factors are at work. 

First, hfr. Reagan did not use the 
1984 campaign to lay out a second- 
tom blueprint. His mandate was 
simply not to rock the boat and not to 
return to his predecessor’s policies. A 


By Stnart E. ELzenstat 

The writer, a lawyer,.was President 
Carter's chief domestic po&y adviser. 

campaign gives a candidate his best 
opportunity to impose his views on 
the political system after election, by 
cfaiming a public endorsement 
Ronald Reagan had based his 1980 
campaign cm deep budget and tax 
cuts for the troubled economy and on 
increased military spending to bol- 
ster national security. He got from 
Congress what be campaigned for. 
But presidents rarely succeed with 
major initiatives for which they did 
not seek an election m a nda t e. 

Lyndon Johnson’s 1964 campaign 
called explicitly for a war on poverty, 
and be got congressional support for 
the Great Society by legitimately 
claiming popular backing. He did not 
seek election support for tbe Vietnam 
boildap, and that buildup proceeded 
to undermine his presidency. 

A central, error of Jimmy Carter’s 
administration was malting his 1977 
energy plan the domestic centerpiece 
of his first year, when energy had 
barely been an issue in the 1976 race 
and he could claim no public man- 
date for a sweeping energy program. 

Tbe Reagan tax reform is in the 
same position. He has tried to make a 
top priority oat of an issue for which 


Mr. Reagan seeks. In his first term be 
achieved as mudi of a major mid- 
course correction as (he system per- 
mits. Ironically, its natural conserva- 
tism and dispersion of power prevent 
full achievement of Mr. Reagan’s 
conservative revolution, whose cen- 
tral tenet is further decentralization. 

Congress's greater assertion of 
power since Watergate compounds 
tbe difficulty that presidents have in 
implementing their agendas. 

For Mr. Reagan, his second term 
may seem longer in time and shorter 
in achievement than his fust. He mil 
probably leave office with his popu- 
larity untouched, but without fully 
translating it into achievements. 

The New York Tones. 


ly che two often agree. But the prag- 
matist — the George Shultz ana, yes, 
frequently the Ronald Reagan — 
puts less trust in ideology, his own 
included, and responds more to -the 
promptings of omerience, inrfrufing 
that of others. The ideologue views 
compromise as evfl. The pragmatist 
views it as necessary. 

Ideologues tend to peraqmdize 
politics, seeing their own positions as 
nnassaflably correct and therefore as- 
cribing any faflurt of their side to 
someone's personal vfflahrjr. 

The State Dep et Qu oi t bureaucra- 
cy does not deal in heroes and vD- 
lazos. It acts as an institutional mem- 
ory. Its role is to evaluate situations 
and proposals against a background 
of detailed knowledge of particular 
countries and their history, culture, 
economy, politics; interests, beliefs, 
personalities and behavior, *and to 
anticipate unintended consequences. 

. Psotessumal diplomats come natu- 
rally to their habit of caution, limy 
have seen too many Bold New Initia- 
tives- Mte the dun, and they have 
cfaofcbd cm a lot of that dust them- 
selves. In Hying to protect tbe presi- 
dent from mistakes, the career For- 
eign Service can seem overprotective. 
BoL. on balance, overprotective is 
better than nnderprotective. 

Presidents takepride in those occa- 
sions on which they have prevailed 
against the “timidity" or “nay-say- 
ing" of tbe State D epa r tment. They 
seldom talk about the other times 
when that timidity saved them from 
costly errors, or even from disaster. 

Conservatives should be the first to 
.recognize that tbe past holds lessons 
and that avoiding avoidable dirasters 
is one of the cardinal functions of 
government. But that recogniti on 
comes more naturally to pragmatic 
conservatives than it does to ideologi- 
cal conservatives. And this; more 
than any question of “hardness? or 
“softness” toward the Soviet Union, 
is at the heart of the struggle between 
Mr. Shultz and the ideological righ t 
G 1985 Raymond Price. 


No Choice 
Bat to Shift * 
The Burden 

By Benjamin J. €tfa 

ik BEDFORD. Mssadesefe 
JV1 Latin Amelia's debt probfen 
is bade is the beadfins. la QAk 
Fidel Castro is cafltog tor* Ma- 
son ofafl debt payments fay Latin 
states. In Pern, mcomifig President 
Alan Garda Efeet bis . aa MM y 
set a Kuril on tbcddti service . that 
his country wffl pay foreign crofo 
ore. Pfttitks is rapdiy shCKicmagftc 

fuse oftbe debt boedL 

For months, financial cmmKtts- 
tors have been a ss uring « dm the 
debt bomb hod been defused. They 
thought so because they focused oeiy. 
on & rmumps pf U* CTOS, OQO- 
venientiy ignoring tbe poKtkal di- 
mension. Nothing cam have bran 
more da ng ero us . As the Latins are 
now making quite clear, the chiflmg: 

is as much diptorasoc as commerew. 

At the heart of the problem a* 
political question: Who should bear 
the burden of adjustment? Until now 
the debtors have been obfiged to 
shoulder most of the burden, (not# 
austerity and reduced living sub- 
darfs prescribed by the Imenutiooal 
Monetary Fund. Few concessions 
have beat forthcoming from either 
banks or creditor countries. 

The results of thelMFs lough do- 
mestic “stabilization" programs have 
sot been unimpressive. In 1984 die j 
payments deficits of most of. the ' 
debtor nations fdl dramatically, mer- 
chandise trade showed a collect i ve 
surplus and domestic output rxpanrt - 
ed by about 4 percent on average — 
twice the rates achieved in 1982 and 

1983. These results were not adriered 
without cost, however. Most of the 
improvement in trade came throwh 
reduced imports rather than expand- 
ed exports; and while living stan- 
dards did recover slightly in 1984, 
they stiH remain Far bdow level s 
achieved in the previous decade. - . 

In effect, domestic development 
has been postponed mdefiniiay for 
the sake of preserving credit-worthi- 
ness in inter n FmnnntA mar- 
kets . Despite these determined ef- 
forts, however, very Kttie new ataxy 
has been forthcoming from private 
sources. As a result, debtors now find 
themselves transferring resources . 
outwore!, to creditor countries and V 
their banks. In 1984 that outflow 
amnnnteri to some $15 biffiWL That 







V*- 


N»ft V 


f* 




y r . 


b: 


was nearly 10 percent of the debtors’ 
total export revenues. 

Patience , is the key, debtors are 
told: Thor development will gradual- 
ly resume if only they keep playing ly 
tbe rules. If the debtors stick to tnexr 
srabtfizatioa programs, the IMF says, 
their payments defeats wifl continue 
to decline, expo r ts will rise and out- 
put wiH contmne to grow by some 4 
percent a year. Eventually, it is as- 
serted, there improvements will spark 

“spontaneous” near bank fending. 

The risk, of course, is dial the pot 
wiB reach -the bettiag-poiat before 
that time. Annual outputgrowth of 4 
pei c ua wifi not provide, significant 
increases in per capita Kvmg stan- 
dards. Worse, the IMF's projections 
mqriy years of net outward transfers 
of resources by less developed no- 
tions that should be importing capi- 
taL not oqxwrng it, - 
The people of the Third World 
have begun to conclude that the poor 
are being adeed to subsidize the rich 
— to make painful sacrifices to keep 
banks from suffering losses — and an 
for the sake of new financing that 
may bever materialize. As this per- 
ception spreads, the pot beats up, 
raisiim the risk feat more Latin lead- 
era wifi heed Fidel Castro's words or 
follow Alan Garcia’s example: 

In reality, the only way the debt 
bomb win be defused is if banks and 
creditor countries agree to shoulder 
more of tbe burden of adjustment 
Mare concessions are need e d. Banks 
must be prepared to rewrite out- 
standing debt on more favorable 
terms and perhaps to wriie off their 
most dubious loans, even though this 
woald mean a “hit" on corrent earn- 
ings. Creditor countries must be pre- 
pared to bdp cushion tbe restating 
losses, even though tins would mean 
some cost to taxpayers, too. 

Why do this? Not for some vague 
principle of internationalism' or , 
equity. Such concessions are m the 1 
interest of banks and creditor coun- 
tries, too. Creditor countries would 
gain, as the very real risk of financial 
disruption was reduced. Banks would 
gain, as debtors’ capacity to service 
their obligations was enhanced. And 
the debtors would g ain, as develop- 
ment and lending resumed. Only then 
could we breathe more easily. This ts 
not charity but common sense. 

Die writer, professor of bnemotonal 
economic rims a Tvfts UidmatjA 
Fletcher School of law and Dplmoty, 
contributed this to The New York Thao. ; 


<nrt 








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bitr 




LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Helicopters for Toarism? 

In response to “U.S. Blacklist Up- 
sets West Germany” (July 16): 

When Ddta-Avia sells 87 Hughes 
heBcopiers to North Korea — tbe 
same helicopter that South Korea 
buys for its military —we are sup- 
posed to believe that North Korea, 
arguably the most militaristic coun- 
try in Aaa; is buying them for civilian 


fair and hardly accurate. Democracy 
and political representation have 
come a long way since the Knamin- 
tang moved to Taiwan in 1949. 

Taiwan was a Japanese colony for 
50 years before it was returned to 
China in 1945. During the Japanese 
occupation, the Chinese on Taiwan 
bad no political freedom whatsoever. 
Today TO parent of the Kntmrin- 
t&ng’s two mini on members are na - 


MeatHere, Poison There 

In response to “ Manila P ress u red to 
Ban Sale of Dogs. Cats to Ea” flub 2^: 

What amazes me is the profound 
ignorance of the 80,000 fo M. 
nwwt of them probably Amsott 
and British, who sent griSedtftgfe 
postcards to the Philippine Nation^ 
Assembly in protest again* dog and - 




uses. The helicopters will be used for **** Taiwanese, and they are steadily consumption. In tnfflty iy»r - 

he never sought an election m a n d ate . mm nngiBaiw. an d to t mn<p nrt i<-r_ rising up the ranks of government, u world, meal that B acospHbfctOX 

lib kM. M ‘ rorists and/or troops for attacks on * 5® 75-year-oM preadrat, Chiapg Vest**** « 

South Korea. These art the purposes Chmg-ku^.were for some reason un- 
for which they were bought. Did aWe 10 complete lus term, he would 
Hughes or Delta-Avia ever doubt it? ^ succeeded by a native Taiwanese, 




His pledge had been ho tax increase, 
not comprehensive tax reform, 

Absent a dear election mandate; 
only a crisis permits a president to 
make major chang es Without having 
campaigned for a policy, a president 
needs an Intervening riraimstance to 
focus public and congressional atten- 
tion — See a sharp economic down- 
turn or a Soviet presence in Nicara- 
gua. No such dramatic ’event has 
given Mr. Reagan a peg on which to 
hang -a second-term program. 

The president's difficulties reflect 
America's.political system, which dif- 
fuses power. It was created to pro- 
mote continuity, not change, and to 
avoid abrupt redirections like these 


D. PAUL SONDEL 
Daegu, Somfa Korea. 

Democracy is Tuvan 

Begarfng “Contest for Pobical Lay- 
ahies Divides Chinese in US. (Jufy 24): 

This report's assertion that “the 
Kufanintang has ruled Taiwan under 
martial law, denying significant poE t- 
ical power to the^ Taiwanese who con- 
stitute 85 percoxt of the island’s 19 
million population,” is extremely un- 


Vi cc President Lee Teng-hui. 

Moreover, astounding progress 
that has been made in the e conom ic 
realm over the last 35 years. 

Democracy may not be perfect in 
Taiwan, but when the rate of progress 

is conqjared with that in otbo- devel- 
oping nations, it certainly cannot be 
con&dered slow. As the economy and 
edurauan improve, one can expect 
tins dnve toward greater represema- 
uon and participation to continue. 

STEVEN LAI. 

Taipei. 


Westerner is either too eweiiaiieof: 
unavailable in sufficieni qanmriefr 
Many of the 80,000 protests* jsr 
suitably feed to ibar p ets wmf 
majority of the world’s parents worii - 
be lucky to Teed their dO&est' 
i suppose it’s all . 
pet-lover activists if ^ 
pie continue to eat rats. 

TIMOTHY 


A Classified MaOer 

About the “Have a L 
Does anyone know wfco i . 


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■wihcomiag frompriS f 5 

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,mjr > ! " F«wnt of ihe debioi « 
meauss. il 

;? c< ;• key. debtors arc 

- .risrcsveaopment wilintU- 

»"W?:> they keep playing bv 
I* 13= dcbiors slick tomdr 
■****'■•"' Kocrains. the IMF says, 
'itT.cnis deficits wiiJ con tunic 
•■- '■ "?cns win rise and mi- 
*:•• Mtaa to grow by some 4 
;r : -=i* Eventually, it is as- 

- ■’*=~rro‘nnents»'ffls|Mii 

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'< "•*- e/ Mine, w that the pen 
before 


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August 9, 1985 


WEEKEND 


Page 7 


About 'They’ and 



ers 


Add the Underground 


■by Michael T. Kaufman 



r " 7 “ The most sought- 

aRer book in Warsaw these days 
is ^extraordinary, illicitly pro- 
_ dneed volume called “They.* Its 
only rivals among the unofficially published 
books that have proliferated in Poland over 
the last few years have been “A History of 
Solidarity" and u Konspira," a compilation 
of uie self-critical recollections of fugitive 
waders of Solidarity’s clandestine wing. 

*ney" has been so popular that the free- 
niarket price of the 256-page, small-print 
paperback is roughly one-tenth of a doctor's 
monthly salary; copies, secured through sc- 
cret-pouce-dodgmg book runners, are lent or 
even rented -out, carefully .wrapped in paper 
to avoid soiling 

Essentially, “They” is a dialogue, or rather 
an interrogation, of seven old and for the 
most part disgraced Communist leaders who 
collaborated with thdr Soviet mentors in the 
first decades after World War n to advance 
an ideology of atheism, ceatraHzarion, police 
authoritarianism arid farm collectivization 
on a largely unwilling, mostly Roman Cath- 
olic, significantly anarchistic and romantic 
nation. The interviews were conducted and 
taped by Teresa Toranska, a pro-SoBdarity 
journalist, who in the course other questions 
reveals that her father was deported to the 
Soviet Union when the people she inter- 
viewed were in power. 

, If the subjects of To ranska ** interviews 
are “they” — exponents of alien beliefs who 
are now shunned even by their political heirs 
— then Toranska’s aggressively interroga- 
• five voice is that of Poland’s “we,” a nation 
of often quarrelsome citizens who periodi- 
cally, as m the case cf Solidarity, come 
together in defiance of oppression. It is a • 
nation where, after 40 years of virtual mo- 
nopoly by tlw Communist Party on educa- 
tion, propaganda «i*d information, manna! 
workers kiss women’s hands, scorn the word 
“comrade” and regularly go to church, thus 
affirming the difference between “we” and 
“they." ’ . ' 

Toranska’s book does much the same 
thing . Butin addition to confirming national 
self-esteem, it has teal value as a work of 
history. For peihHps the first rime in any 
Communist country, leaders who have not 
defected or recanted reveal — often with : 
defensive seh-justfficatkm — -how they ma- 
nipulated, cheated, threatened, . denounced, . 
imprisoned and^pndepmed in the name of, : 
power a$4<- jzL thdhop£ of jnoldmg history. 
These pages^of -^transcribed, tape, recordings, 
ccmiam-^amissions that, the 1946 ref cam- 
dum paving the way for the Commmrist 
takeover was riffled; that major policies, for 
. P oland were in tact established in Moscow 
and implcanented by Rnsrians; and that kill- 
ings, persecution and torture were condoned 
as historical necessities. 


and pamphlets, as wdl as much poetry. 
Works combining political commentary with 
moral philosophy abound; Adam Michnilc, 
now serving a two-and-a-half year sentence 
for advocating an aborted 15-minute strike, 
is often praised not only for his political 



%::.i > m. 

1 - vVH»*K--- 

l tfa 


Marek Nowakowski. 


Tha Nbw YcrV Ta 


arguments but for his literary style. He is 
some Poles to Tom Paine, by 


others to John Stuart MilL 

Some months ago, while Michnik was in 
detention awaiting trial, his fiancee, Barbara 
Szwedowska, took a Western reporter to a 
performance of mildly political songs from 
the 1960s, including one that asks, “What 
would Mr. Adam and Mr. Jtihusz be writing 
today?" The reference was to Adam Mickie- 
wicz and Juliusz Slowadd, the 19th-century 
poets and prophetic nationalists whose vi- 
rions and romantic deeds continue to define 
Polish literary life. In that theater, with 
Szwedowska m the audience and the actors 
singing about Mr. Adam and Mr. Juliusz, the 
sense of historical continuity, always a factor 
in Poland, became even more acute. Mich- 
nfle’s first dash with the law came in those 
same ’60s, when he protested the cancella- 
tion of a play by Midriewicz; the play had 
been ordered suspended in response to Sovi- 
et diplomats’ complaints at its portrayal of 
czarist officials as colonialists. 

Between prison terms, Michnik served at 
one point as secretary to the late Antoni 
Skjmmski, a renowned poet who stood in the 
tradition of Mickiewicz and Slowadd and 
was a precursor of today’s greatest Polish 
poets, the Nobel laureate Czeslaw MSosz 
and Thi ffni e g Herbert. There was a palpable 
recognition in the theater that if Mr. Adam 
and Mr. Juliusz were alive today they would 
be writing about the. same things that con- 
cern Michnik, Milosz and Herbert: freedom, 
destiny, nation, hope and redemption. 

Some days later, Tadeusz Konwicki, Po- 
land’s best-known novelist, explained the 
moral obligations of literature in his country 
over lunch. “What you have to understand/* 
said the author of “Tbe Polish Complex,” “A 
Dreambook for Onr Time" and, most re- 
cently, “Underground River,” “is that for 
almost 200 years we have judged our writers 
not by what they wrote but by how they 
behaved at the barricades." 

It is again a case of “they" and “we,” with 
the line drawn in this instance between those 
who are published officially and those whose 
works are produced by the clandestine pob- 



Jacek Fedorowicz. 


lishing houses, between those who belong to 
the official writers’ union and those who 1 


those who do 
not In die eyes of much of literate Polish 
society, Konwicki i^-on the right side of the 
barricades. HO is not a member of the writ- 
os’ onion and has offered his last books for 


TObBcarioa by underground printers. His 
Bctic 


•TPJk OOKS like “They” and “Konspira," 
' r"C involving reminiscences, mcmqiis and 
1 9 history, are much more common in 
Poland and, it would seezn» more widely 
read, than fiction. “Konspira,” for example, 
has set off a debate in Sofidarity aides as to 
whether the disdosuzes of thoa; who set up 
clandestine networks for dues collection, ra- 
dio broadcasts and literature distribution 
were unnecessarily indiscreet. Tbe atmo- 
sphere is thick with open letters, manifestos 


ion, ^often characterized as absurdist in 
tone, is m the author's view only a mirror of 
the world in which'he writes: ’T am not a 
fabulist, I am a realist, it is life in Poland that 
is absurd.” Just back from a visit to Australia 
and the United States, he is working on an 
autobiographical book that describes his role 
in a wartime resistance group in his native 
VOna (now in Lithuania) and his arrival in 
Warsaw after the war. 

Another writer who finds himself some- 
what reluctantly at the barricades is Marek 


publishers, a fact that no doubt contributed 
to the short period he spent under arrest last 
summer. 

His stories — about drunks, lovers with- 
out apartments and taxi drivers — are politi- 
cal only insofar as life in Poland is political. 
He is not ovetjoyed by the issues dividing his 
society. “Personally,” he said, “I do not 
think a writer should stand with anyone, 
neither with Solidarity nor the government-” 
But given the split into official and unofficial 
literary cultures, be sees practical as well as 
moral advantages to the uncensored publish- 
ing enterprises. 

“In the official culture," he said, “there 
are three focal points: the writer, the pub- 
lisher and the censor. In addition to the 
problems of conscience this situation cre- 
ates, it is cumbersome, and the minimum 


time required for a book to appear is two 
e the process is 


years. In the unofficial culture 
quicker and cleaner.” The flexibility of that 
culture was revealed when a collection of the 
Reverend Jerzy Pqpieluszko’s sermons was 
produced within a month of his murder by 
secret police officials. 

Recently, the police have stepped up their 
pursuit of illicit publishers. Every week there 
are reports of people being arrested as “kol- 
porters,” or bookleggers. Trucks on the 



-English translation. These days 
kowsld gives a lot of readings in churches 
and ho, too, offers his work to c l a nd estine 



Among those seized recently were people 
Continued on page 9 


Out on the Celtic Fringe 


by Stephen Williams 


I ORIENT. France — The Celts invaded 
southern Brittany this week, 
. scorching ihc earth with music and 
«• ravaging the pedestrian malls with 
poetty. 


The_ pipe-playing, harp-plucking tribes 
U-Known comers of 


came from the four well 
the Celtic Fringe — Scotland, Ireland, Wales 
and Brittany — and from three “nations” 
that would seem to qualify for the event just 
under the wire — Cornwall, ihe Isle of Man 
and Galicia, in northwestern Spain. 

Loxient, in the wooded and wind-swept 
Morbihan region about 160 kilometers U00 
miles) up thejagged coast west from Nantes, 
is the annual venue for this gathering or the 
turbulent Celtic cousinhood. the Festival ln- 
terceltique, which is more than just fish soup 
and folklore. 

For 10 days (and nights), 4.500 musicians, 
singers, dancers, artists, writers and athletes 
have asserted their Celtitude in the concert 
halls, public parks, cafes, saloons and streets 
or this city of 65.000. The uprising — ihk 
year’s is the 15th — ends this weekend with 
the Breton Pipe Band Championships and. 
on Sunday, the Grand Parade of the Celtic 
Nations. 

Nationhood is the key, and along with the 
songs, art shows and liquid cheer, there is a 
feeling here of an identity in search of a 
country. Yet, besides their position dinging 
to the headlands of Western Europe, the 
richness and similarities of their folk music 





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if lk •, ’s' mBmL. 



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1, 

iE^isss 


and mythology, and their legendary 12- 
month rainy season, what has brought the 


seven “nations” together under the as-yet- 
un created banner of Celtia? 

Jean- Pierre Pickard, secretary-general of 
the festival’s organizing committee, puts it 


down to tbe long history of the un- Roman- 
ized, insular Celts — the Romans barely 


penetrated Wales, walled-off the Highland 
Scots, or Piets, and never attempted to meet 
the Irish head-on. This excentricity was car- 


ried over to Brittany when the Anglo-Saxons 
id the 



proved too hot to handle, and then on to 
Galicia. And in their remaining redoubts, 
the Celtic character was preserved. 

“They have always been minorities lost in 
the extreme west of Europe with their own 
specific culture,” says Pichard, who sees the 
common bond among them as the boulevard 
maritime , the ocean, and the Festival Inler- 
celtique as a “communion of tbe peoples of 
the sea.” 

But although the Celtic Connection is ob- 
vious enough in some ways, such as kilts and 
fiddles, there are differences as broad as the 
Celtic Sea and as sharp as tbe Irishman’s 
celebrated wit 

Does Celtitude signify the preservation of 
an ancient language group, a musical tradi- 
tion, a certain nostalgia for a “country” or a 
shared gloom over a lost historical cause? 
The unhappy (for the Celts) fact that all of 
die major regions of Cdtia have suffered 
from their powerful and better-organized 
neighbors since the Middle Ages does not in 
itself make for the strong sense of solidarity 
that raises its sha ggy head here every August. 

Take language, and the Welsh, for exam- 
ple, take it very seriously: Cenedl heb iaith, 
ceneeO heb galon (A nation without language 
is a nation without heart). But bow many 
tongue- lashings do children of the Fringe get 
nowadays in the original Scots-Galhc- 
Manx-Insh-Welsh-Brelon? 

The festival's map of the seven “nations” 
was color-coded by a whimsical cartogra- 
pher with the Celt’s typical disdain for mere 
truth. A tourist from Vienna or Milan, 
searching for cultural, geographical or any 
links among the western tribes would find 
that the map includes all of Scotland, Ire- 


Putting the shot, Celtic style . 


Hen4 tc GcuaBec La Lbert* dki Morbhy 


land. Wales and Brittany, plus the lesser 
three. Linguistically, this is nonsense, and by 
no stretch of even the luxurious Celtic imagi- 
nation could Edinburgh, Dublin and Cardiff 
be described as speaking anything but a 
highly colored brand of English, while it is 
doubtful that Rennes, the Breton capital on 
the eastern edge of the province, has ever 
heard Breton spoken outside the walls of its 
university. And the last native Cornish 
speaker (Cornish is related 10 Welsh and 
Breton in the Brythonic brand! of the Celtic 
family) took a whole culture to the grave in 
the late 18th century. 


north-south line, with the western part bre- 
tonnant, or Breton speaking, and the east all 
French. From a million Breton speakers 15 
years ago, the number has dwindled to about 
half that today. 

Then, there are the Manx. Once upon a 
time, an Irish giant, probably angered at the 
results of a Glasgow Rangos-Celtic soccer 
match, scooped up a piece of Irish turf and 
hurled it in the general direction of Scotland: 
It landed about halfway between the docks 
of Liverpool and the shipyards of Belfast 
and became the Isle of Man. Now, the Manx 


did speak a dialect of Irish, brought by Saint 
ries, and even tbe Vikings’ 


\\ T ORTHY efforts at language reviv- 
W/ al notwithstanding. Wales, thecoun- 
▼ ▼ try that has best guarded the secret 
of keeping an old tongue alive in the face of 
foreign attempts to cat it out has lost Wdsh- 
speakers over tbe years and nowjust over 20 
percent of the population of 2.8 million can 
properly pronounce a word ]Ske ynfydrwydd 
(foolishness). Scottish Gallic (the Scots 'use 
“Gallic” to differentiate their brand of the 
Goiddic branch of the Celtic group from 
“Gaelic," which tbe Irish, in turn, logically 
eschew in favor of “Irish”) hdds on by its 
fingernails to the Western Highlands and 
Islands, while the native Irish speakers do 
the same desperate balancing act along their 
indented coastline from Kerry to Donegal. 
Tbe teaching of Irish is, on the other band, 
entrenched in the republic’s schools. 

Brittany is divided linguistically by a wavy 


Patrick’s missionaries, . 
tough methods of persuasion could not con- 
vince them to change, until the 19th century 
relegated the Manx language to scholars and 
culture enthusiasts. 

Here again, as in Cornwall, the revivalist 
spirit has gained precious ground in the last 
10 years or so, helped by night-school class: 
es, language associations and events such as 
the Lorient fling. 

For Pichard, 39, who is director of the 
Regional Conservatory of Brittany, a bas- 
tion of traditional music, the festival has 
given the Fringe a greater sense of confi; 
dence. “The Celts have lost their complex- 
es,” he says. Such a problem might come as 
news to the Scots or Irish, especially the 
stem-faced members of the Upper Crossgare 
Pipe Band from Northern Ireland, who, in 
full war paint, skirled through the streets of 


Continued on page 8 


Modem Art Museums: Too Much of the Same Thing 


by John Russell 


I N my line of work, I get to go to a great many museums of 
modern art. I prowl through them, one and all, with an 
undiminished curiosity. But sometimes, after a week or two on 
the road, 1 catch mysdf forgetting which one I happen to be in. 
There can be nothing of that sort at the Pompidou Center, where 
the celebrated silvery light and an incomparable series of distant 
views says “Paris!" loud and clear. But when there are no windows 
and no natural light, and when the museum caf 6 is much the same, 
the museum bookshop is much the same, and even the public is much 
the same, and above all the collection is much the same, a certain 
lulling quality sets in. 


UJIU5 uiuui wj ~ — 

„o Question at such times of “If it’s Frank SieHa, it must 
or “If it’s Baselitz, it’s Barcelona.” Frank Stella and 


he Amsterdam/* or “If it’s Baselitz, it s nairaoim. ’ Frank Stella and 
, are everywhere— consecrated, mandatory, mescap- 

a degree that was not paralleled even 30 years ago. the same 
A? itrSFhand of living artists gets into virtually every museum of 
quite small ban vmg much whether the museum will 

Hemy Moore, a George Segal, a 
If 1 * * Johns, a Roy Lichtenstein, an Anselm 

is likely 10 a oct From recent years there may 

Judd - ■ ^ 


an R. B. Kitaj, a Cy Twombly, a Richard Long, a Gilbert and 
’George, a Robert Ryman, aSandro Chia, an Enzo Cucchi, a Richard 
Serra, a Jennifer Bartlett, an Elizabeth Murray, a Susan Ro then berg, 
an A. R. Penck, a David Salle and a Robert Longa 

Permutations can be rung on these lists, and there is never a lack of 
new candidates, but fundamentally this is tbe kind of team tha t goes 
to bat for living ait. It is a very good team, but when we meet it the 
world over, from Los Angeles to Eindhoven in the Netherlands and 
from New York to the Ludwig museum in Aachen, West Germany, it 
finally ceases to surprise. 

It is, in fact, the buildings, and not what we see in them, that are 
Tull of surprises. Where museums of older art differ hugely in the 
range and depth of their interests, museums of modem art on the 
whole do not. They operate as if all had become known, once and for 
all, and as if recent art were, in fact, “a given,” in relation to which 
not much maneuver was possible. This is not how it was when the 
Barnes Collection was being built up in the suburbs of Philadelphia, 
or the Phillips Collection in Washington. 

Those were wayward assortments, personal down to the last 
doorknob, and the regular visitor to modem museums must wonder 
whether things have changed for the worse, or for the better, and why 
it should be, in either case. It is true that Dr. Albert G Barnes and 
Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Phillips were spending their own money and 
did not have to adapt or adjust to anyone dse. Even so, a different 
. aesthetic was in operation, and we havefo ask what has been lost if it 
can no longer go to work. 

I first faced the change at full strength when at table a few 
summers ago with Rudi Fuchs, director of the Eindhoven Museum, 
who at the time was organizing the last “Documents” exhibition in 


Kassel, West Germany. Much to the discomfiture of some of those 

E resen l he said, “There are no undiscovered artists!” Whether or not 
e meant it literally, it is true that many museums now seem to 

S ierate on that principle. It is a situation that necessarily disappoints 
e vast majority of living artists. 

Fuchs, a galvanic Dutc hman, was at that moment on German soil. 
Hardly had we returned home than we received in the mail an eight- 
volume set of books on younger German artists — more than 300 in 
all — who had a certain status in their immediate locality. Much of 
what they did was a faithful imitation of the fashionable styles of the 
day. Stifl, some of the elsewhere unsung artists in question looked to 
be just as good as the handful of German painters who have lately 


turned up everywhere. (Some of them were women, too, which is not 
the case with the i 


few who are now in high favor.) 


S O what is it that gives certain artists so conspicuous an edge? Is 
it superior energy, superior marketing, superior connections, 
personal magnetism or a combination of all these things with a 
little luck thrown in? Are there within the current situation elements 
of conspiracy, corruption, favoritism, quick money and (here and 
there) a governmental push? Or are the best artists the best, without 
qualifications, and recognized as such? 

If we take these notions seriatim, I for one have no doubt that 
artists today can and do penetrate the armored eiderdown of public 
indifference in ways that did not exist even 30 years ago. There is an 
enormous public that is eager for the new and doesn’t want to miss 
out on iL Gifted artists of our time find this intoxicating — why 
shouldn’t they? — and undeniably it gives some of them a built-in 


booster that makes them develop fast, at the risk (often posited in 
envy and hatred, but also sometimes in sympathy and compassion) 
of burning themselves out in a year or two. 

As for art dealing, it has certainly changed beyond recognition 
since Ambrose Vollard stocked up with Cezannes and sat on them, 
apparently half asleep, until he felt like selling one. Gone forever; 
likewise, are the procedures of Darnel-Henry Kahnwefler. the Ger- 
man-bom Parisian dealer who at one time bad the exclusivity of 
Picasso, Braque. L6ger and Juan Gris but who never advertised, 
never had an opening and never offered anyone so much as a cup of 
tea. 

For better or worse, the art trade today is a multinational affair, an 
unproved and microscosmic version of the United Nations in which 
everything works to mutual advantage. To name even some of the 
dealers wbo excel at this can only be invidious, but anyone who 
monitors the activity of such New York dealers as Leo Castelli, 
Ueana Soon abend. Xavier Four cade. Paula Cooper, Arnold 
Glimcher of the Pace Gallery, Lawrence Rubin of Knoedler’s and 
Andr6 Emmerich will sense what it is to have the international touch. 

These people have their counterparts in London, Paris, Berlin. 
Basel and elsewhere. They function not only as dealers, where their 
artists are concerned, but as bankers, brokers, translators, marriage 
counselors, bookkeepers, unpaid therapists, travel agents and wiz- 
ards at real estate. Contrary to what is often said, there is nothing 
wrong with artists making the kind of income that lawyers, brokers, 
bankers, venture capitalists, entrepreneurs and chairmen erf the 
board take for granted. There are still many people who think t 


Continued on page 8 t 



J 4T!!dB^tl96b{Ale Caar 

fuh Mondrian Paintmg, 





HENRY MOORE: 

“ Reclining Figure: Holes,” 1975-78. 


FRANCIS BACON: 

“ Self-Portrait With Injured Eye” 1972. ■ ‘ 


, -vrt * 













INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 1985 


Page 9 ; 


FOR FUN AND PROFIT 


Getting Your Money Back 
If Travel Firms Default 


by Paul Grimes 


N 


EW YORK — Paying for travel 
is easy. But trying to get your 
money back when a travel compa- 
ny defaults can be one of the most 
frustrating and fruitless of experiences. You 
may wait years as bankruptcy proceedings 
slog through the courts, and even when a 
ruling is handed down in your favor, there 
may not be enough money to repay you. 

Sometimes travelers are lucky. As de- 
scribed by Leslie Trott, manager of special 
projects for the American Society of Travel 
Agents, such was the case in December 1 983, 
when Specific Tours of Los Angeles, which 
operated tours to the South Pacific, filed for 
protection under the Federal Bankruptcy 
Code and suspended operations. Specific 
Tours was a participant in ASTA’s Tour 
Payment Protection Plan, established in 
March 1982. This meant, among other 
things, that the company had posted a 
S 100,000 bond or the equivalent. It was this 
money, Trott said, that was used to repay in 
full everyone who had bought a Specific 
Tours package through a travel agency that 
is a member of ASTA but had not yet lefL 

In recent years there have been several 
major cases m which both consumers and 
travel agents suffered because of defaults or 
because companies, without going bankrupt, 
simply curtailed operations sharply or sus- 
pended them. Laker. Continental Air Lines, 
Braniff International. Air Florida, Value Va- 
cations, Travel Headquarters, Jet Exchange 
— these are some of the nam es that are well 
known to travelers who either were stranded 
far from home or found that the tickets they 
had bought were worthless. 

How to improve the situation is a major 
issue in the 0. S. travel industnr. Everyone 
seems to agree that current default protec- 
tion is tokenism, at best Yet most attempts 
to do more have been thwarted by fear of 
ruinous costs. For example, under a 1982 
agreement, more than 100 U. S. airlines 
promised, under certain circumstances, to 
honor the tickets of a defaulting carrier. The 
agreement collapsed, however, when Conti- 
nental filed for reorganization under the 
Bankruptcy Code and sharply cut opera- 
tions. Few airlines would honor Continental 
tickets, contending that the line had not 
actually defaulted. 

Some travel agency conglomerates, such 
as the American Express network, provide 
their own airline default protection for trav- 
elers who purchase tickets through them. 
Meanwhile, some default insurance is avail- 
able to the general public through travel 
agencies. Without insurance, your chances 
of default protection depend on the type of 
travel you buy and how and where you buy 
it Here is a rundown of some situations you 
could face: 

Risks With Tour Packages: If a tour oper- 
ator defaults, you could be in trouble on 
several grounds. If your trip has already 
begun, you may find that hotels will no 
longer Honor the prepaid vouchers that the 
operator issued you, and you may have diffi- 
culty getting an airline to honor your ticket 
home. While you will have prepaid your trip 
in full, except for incidentals, the operator 
may not have passed on more than a deposit 
to the airlines and hotels. It is hotel and 
airline pressure on the operator to pay over- 
due bibs that often causes defaults in the 
first place. 

If the default occurs long before you are 
scheduled to leave home, probably only a 
deposit is at stake. Within a few weeks of 
departure, however, you are likely to have 
paid in full and could lose everything. Even 


the $100,000 bond required by ASTA s Tour 
Payment Protection Plan may not be avail- 
able to help, because by Latest count the plan Roger Collis is on vacation. 


Polish Writers 


Continued from page 7 


associated with Kritika, probably the most 
prestigious Polish underground quarterly. 

Bul while the police may be intensifying 
their efforts to quash the country’s under- 
ground culture, the writers and artists are 
branching out Nova, one of the clandestine 
publishing houses, is producing and distrib- 
uting audio tapes canying speeches, patriot- 
ic songs and humorous satin cal monologues 
by people such as Jacek Fedorowicz. Fe- 
dorowicz, once Poland's foremost television 
personality, has been supporting himself 
since martial Jaw was declared by selling his 
comic p ainting s in churches and factories. It 
is widely believed — and he does not exactly 
deny the assertion — that he drew and wrote 
. a hard-cover comic book portraying Solidar- 
ity’s creation and its subsequent suppres- 
sion. 

In another recent innovation. Solidarity 
Underground's radio division has developed 
the technical capability to insert slogans and 
instructions into government television pro- 
grams. Some weeks ago, viewers in a Warsaw 
suburb were surprised to see the slogan “Sol- 
idarity lives” flash over the commentators’ 
heads on the nightly news broadcast. 

There is also the case of “The Interroga- 
tion,” a film made by Ryszard Bugajski. who 
is in the process of emigrating to Canada. 
The Elm. detailing the prison torture of 
woman in the 1950s, was made in a prison 
; during the free period when Solidarity flour- 
ished. Before it could be released, martial 
law was imposed. Prints of the movie were 
ordered destroyed, but at least one survived. 
It is being shown to the informal videoclub 
groups that gather to view that and other 
imsanctioned tapes. 

One effect of such popular outpourings 


has been to make the products of officially 
sanctioned culture more candid and critical, 
and thus more competitive. While much of 
the writing in the clandestine publications is 
supplied by unpaid volunteers, their publish- 
ers still pay the better-known authors royal- 
ties and are said to make money. With few 
esteemed living writers willing to risk their 
credibility by submitting to censorship, the 
official publishing houses are producing 
more and more works by dead but once 
forbidden authors. For example, a big seller 
last year was Maury cy Mochnackfs two- 
volume “History of the Polish Uprising," a 
bitterly anti-Russian history written in 1832 
and not published in Poland since 1862. An 
anthology of Jewish poetry in Polish, pre- 
pared for publication 25 years ago but held 
by the editors, has finally appeared. At the 
same time, curbs on sexual themes and nudi- 
ty have been relaxed. A few years ago. Play- 
boy was seized at the airport; now calendars 
printed by government {winters and adver- 
tising government enterprises regularly show 
photographs of naked women. 

Theater and the movies are mosL visibly 
free of official restrictions. Nearly every the- 
ater piece and cabaret act offers digs at 
government policies and ironic references to 
prices or economic reform. One highly ac- 
claimed and very bitter play, “Gowns," de- 
picts a circus in which everyone has to be a 
clown. As the actors cavort gymnastically 
about the stage, gradually shedding their 
makeup, an iron cage is constructed around 
them. When the last bar is in place, a voice 
offstage announces, “And now. do whatever 
you like." One Warsaw theatergoer com- 
mented, “If they didn't allow any criticism, 
there' d be no theater at alL" ■ 

C IVIS The Nm h- York Timex 


TRAVEL 


Ithaca: Odysseus’ Craggy Island Home 


by Edward Tick 


had only 47 participants, and you would 
have had to have purchased your tour 
through an ASTA member agency. A similar 
$100,000 bond for consumer protection is 
required of all members of the United States 
Tour Operators Association, but they num- 
ber only 37 — mostly giants of the industry 
whose chances of default are considered 
slim. Yet thousands of other companies and 
yof 1 


My home is on the peaked seamark of Ithaca 
Under Mount Neion’s windblown robe oj 
leaves, in sight of other islands . . . 

/ shall not see a place on earth more dear . . . 


W= 


: problems . 

Protection for Air Charters: Though many 
travelers are wary of charters because the 
chance of delays and other inconveniences 
may be higher than with scheduled airlines, 
on paper they offer greater default protec- 
tion than tour operation generally. Federal 
regulations require a charter operator to post 
a $200,000 surety bond and to keep pay- 
ments from travelers in an escrow account 
until a trip is completed. 

Problems have occurred when the opera- 
tor or the bank does not scrupulously ob- 
serve the escrow rule and the operator sus- 
pends business, leaving an empty tifl. If you 


Protection plans 
exist, but pitfalls 
are frequent 


are buying a charter nip directly from the 
operator, therefore, be sure that your check 
is made out to the escrow account at the 
specified bank Never pay for a charter in 
cash or by credit card, advises Thomas A. 
Dickerson, a consumer-oriented travel law- 
yer, since you have no assurance where the 
money will land. 

Defaults of Travel Agencies: Existing de- 
fault-protection plans won’t help if your 
travel agent goes bankrupt or, as sometimes 
happens, simply disappears. Your chances 
of recourse diminish even further if your 
agency is not at least accredited to, and in 
good standing with, the Airlines Reporting 
Corp.. a regulatory trade group and ticket 
clearing house that requires payments every 
seven days. Agencies accredited to the cor- 
poration must post a bond of $10,000 to 
$50,000, depending on sales volume, to cover 
payments for tickets issued just before de- 
fault occurs. 

This bend means that if vou hold such an 
unused ticket, the airline will probably hon- 
or it. However, if you paid the agency for a 
ticket but never received it, you are out the 
money. And you also might Have difficulty if 
your ticket is marked nonrefundable or non- 
endorsable to any other airline, since that 
may be interpreted as a sign that you paid 
less than an established fare. 

Many hotels show little tolerance for trav- 
el agencies that don’t pay their bills prompt- 
ly, even if they don t default. Therefore, 
unless you are buying a reduced-rate pack- 
age that requires prepayment in full, ask 
your agent to accept only one night’s deposit 
for each hotel stay, or better stiH, a credit- 
card number to guarantee payment for the 
first night. Then, should the hotel refuse to 
accept the voucher the agent gives you, at 
most you will be out only one night’s money. 

“Whether a voucher is accepted often 
comes down to a business decision by the 
hotel,” Ray Greenly of ASTA said. “It’s a 
matter of how much goodwill they get from 
accepting it against how much they are going 
to lose out of their pocket” “ 

© 1985 The New York Times 


ITH these words, in Homer’s 
“Odyssey," Odysseus revealed 
his identity and homeland to 
King Ahtinoos on the last leg of 
his 10-year journey home from the Trojan 
War. 

Odysseus was returned to Ithaca by a ship 
of Phaeacians whose men, in Homer’s words, 
“bent forward at the oars and caught the sea 
as one man, stroking." Today, a ferry crosses 
Patras or Kemni on the western coast 


from Patras 


of the Peloponnesus to the largest of the 
seven islands, Cephalonia. On this crossing, 
through sea have and the glare of sun on 
blue-gray waters, the first sighting of Ithaca 
may be as it was on Odysseus' return about 
3,000 years ago. A high gray crag, rocky and 
desolate, rises out of Lhe Ionian Sea like a 
mammoth whale, swathed in mist and mys- 
tery. 

Cephalonia, often called the island of 
wonders, is green and lush with high moun- 
tains and deep valleys planted with orange, 
lemon and olive groves. Crossing roads that 
snake up, down and around the verdant 
island, a bus arrives in the village of Same on 
the eastern shore. Across the channel to the 
northwest lies Ithaca. One ferry a day, arriv- 
ing from Patras, leaves Same at about 5:30 
'P.M. for Vathy, Ithaca's port 
The channel between Cephalonia (its 
name is sometimes transliterated as Kepnal- 
lenia) and Ithaca is only a mile wide, but it is 
a long, slow ferry ride around the southern 
tip of Lhe second-smallest island in the Ioni- 
an chain. Ithaca's rocks are studded with 
bushy growth, broken occasionally by nar- 
row goat paths that plunge straight down to 
the sea. Numerous coves containing small, 
protected beaches, resemble the one where 
Odysseus landed with his gifts of bronze and 
gold treasure. As Homer described it (in the 
Robert Fitzgerald translation): 

Two points 

Of high rock, breaking sharply, hunch around 
it. 

Making a haven from the plunging surf . . . 
On the inmost shore, an olive tree 
Throws wide its boughs over the bay; nearby, 
A cave of dusky light is hidden . . . 

After an hour of circling the desolate low- 
er peninsula of Ithaca without sight of vil- 
lage or farm, the ferry enters a deep bay from 
the northeast. In the shelter of the bay is 
Varhy, Ithaca's only port and home of naif 
Lhe island's population of 4,000. 

Vathy rings its bay like a horseshoe. The 
ferry pulls through the narrow harbor en- 
trance guarded on the east by ancient gun 
emplacements set into the bilk. It docks by 
the Town Hall and tourist office on the 
western side of a quay lined with single- 
masted fishing vessels and dinghies painted 
in bright whites, reds and greens. 

Vathys main avenues, Odisseos. Pinelo- 
pis. Tiiemachou, Laertou (as the maps and 
guidebooks show them), recall the ancient 
family that made the island famous. Shorter 
terraced streets begin along the harbor front 
and pass two hotels, Odysseus on the west- 
ern loop. Mentor on the eastern: art and 
textile shops: a bank, pharmacy and restau- 
rants and back-street groceries set among 
white-washed houses roofed with red tiles. 
Tbe streets finally fade into vineyards and 
dive groves in the surrounding hills. 



gold, 

the western hills, turning a burnished red as 
it dips below the horizon toward Cephalo- 
nia. 

Dusk in Vathy. In the seaside tavemas on 
Ef lathi on Dracoli Square, wizened local 
fisherman tell tales of the sea and enjoy 
coffee, ouzo and pastries. The omnipresent 
b ackgammo n game — lavli, the Greeks call 
it — appears. Political arguments rise from 
small groups huddled around tiny tables. 

A modem Telemachus, dressed in white, 
struts through the square canying his grand 
catch of the day by the gills, showing it off to 
everyone he meets. Carts from the villages 
arrive and parents in peasant garb lecture 
their fidgety children. A landscape painter 
from Athens applies the last dabs of color to 
the darkening waters on his canvas before 
packing his prints for the day. In the dis- 
tance, lights flicker and duster like constella- 
tions against the black backdrop of the hills. 

Morning in Vathy may be overcast or 
sunny, for Ithaca lies west of the mainland 
and is open to the sea. It thus has more rain 
than most other parts of Greece, giving it a 
year-round mild climate and lush vegetation. 
In mid-May, with the temperature hovering 
between 80 and 90 degrees, the residents say, 
“It is still winter here." 

Among the places worth visiting in and 
around Vathy are the Vathy Museum, with 
an extensive collection of vases excavated 
from two shrines at nearby Agios, the Grotto 
of the Nymphs (half a mile west of Vathy) 
and the Fountain of Arethusa (three miles 
south of the town), both identified with 
scenes in “The Odyssey." Bul more exciting 
than these are the dues to the life and times 
of Odysseus to be found elsewhere. 

A narrow isthmus. less than 2,000 feet 
wide, connects tbe northern and southern 
halves of Ithaca and shows its shape to be a 
double island. The western road leaves the 
harbor and winds up the edge of the horse- 
shoe ring, circling the northern shore of the 
lower half of Ithaca. About three mfli-s from 
Vathy, a road forks in from the left This 
road climbs steeply to the pinnacle of tbe hill 
named Aeios. height 2,195 feet On this hfll- 
around 1868. Heinrich Schliemann, the ar- 
chaeologist who discovered ancient Troy, 



Ithaca, from the coast road near Stavros. 


Erich Lasing. Mognwn 


went searching for Odysseus' palace. He did 
not find the king ’s court, but unearthed the 
walls of buildings that formed part of the 
post-Myoenaean settlement of AlakomenaL 
Past this site, the road plummets to one of 
Ithaca's many pleasant beaches. 

Beyond the isthmus, the road continues 
along the western face of the island, with the 
heights of Mount Neriton overhead on the 
east and steep drops to low-lying beaches 
and scattered houses on the west Across the 
channel, much of Cephalonia, from Same 
toward the south to its northern point at 
Fiscardo, is visible. This wide view is reput- 
edly why Odysseus’ father, Laertes, chose 
the smaller, rougher island as the seat of his 
kingdom. In his day, Cephalonia and other 
islands were part of the Laertian-Odyssean 
kingdom. Ithaca, with its craggy peaks and 
central location in the island group, provid- 
ed vistas from which the entire kingdom 
conld be surveyed. 

The road passes through the quiet hamlet 
of Leflti to arrive in Stavros. 11 miles from 
Vathy. From the central crossroads in Stav- 
ros, a northbound road leads through the 
remote village of Sholi Ornou to emerge in a 
wide, northou-fadng cove with tbe beauti- 
ful Afales beach. West of Sholi Omoa, but 
approached by the same road out of Stavros 
is Exogi (Old Church) perched on a moun- 
tain. An eastern road from Stavros leads 
through Frikes and past its rock-studded bay 
polka-dotted with dinghies. Beyond is the 
fishing village of Kioni, nestled in its cove; 
with streets beginning at the water’s ed ge 
and rising sharply into the hillsides above. 
Kioni has four sunny rock beaches and, on 
points looking east toward the mainland, 
three windmills, now unused. 

The western road out of Stavros winds 
downward to the bay of Polls. There, when 
the weather leaves the dear waters calm, a 


swim 50 yards out from the beach provides a 
full view of tbe r emaining walls and founda- 
tions of an underwater city. Polis Bay was 
once larger and in the classical period was a 
port of call for Greek ships bound for Italy. 
“Hundreds of ships,” Homer says, “are 
beached on sea-girt Ithaca.” 

In Odysseus' time, the underwater city 
was a thriving port community. There is 
some evidence that this was the harbor of the 
Odyssean palace from which his son Telema- 
chus set forth to search for his father. Across 
the channel Same can be seen a mile away. 
Near the opposite shore is a tiny islet called 
Das kali on, thought to have been Asteris, 
where Penelope's suitors lay in ambush for 
Telemanchus, “planning the death plunge.” 

In caves around the Bay of Polis and on 
Feliks ta HiR about one-half mile north of 
Stavros, British archaeologists in about 1932 
discovered Mycenaean walls and pottery 
datitig from the time of Odysseus. 

Near the same site north of Stavros is a 
museum, locked most of the time. In the 
square of Stavros, inquiry must be made in 
the school or one of the tavemas for Fontini 
Kouvaras, the museum keeper. Mrs. Kou- 
varas, a South African, with her husband, a 
local schoolmaster, 'have been volunteer 
keepers of the Stavros museum for the last 20 
years. She escorts curious travelers from all 
over the world, at a rate of about one a day, 
through the plaster one-room museum 
whose leaking roof has caused tbe ruin of 
urns 2,000 years old. She carefully and lov- 
ingly points out the many treasures of her 
small museum that were found in Polis, on 
Pdikara. or dug up by local peasants tending 
their g^rHms. 

A wooden cabinet bolds the museum’s 
archeological treasure. It is the only shard in 
existence bearing Odysseus' name that dates 
from his own time, suggesting that he may 


R: 


ETURNING south from Stavros. 
about halfway back to Vathy, a road 
.cuts into the face of Mount Neriton 
in fiddler’s elbow fashion. It is graveled and 
slippery. The climb by motorbike up tbe 
three and a half miles is heart-st raining ; the 
dimb by taxi takes an hour. Partly up is an 
archaeological rite unmarked on maps, Laer- 
tes Farm. This is the “loved orchard” of 
Odysseus' father, ripe with olives, fis and 
musk-grapes. In Kazantzalds' epic, Laertes 
returned to this place in his final moments of 
life to sow fistfuls of seed in rain-soaked soiL 
The monastery summit, 1,969 feet high, is 
crowded with goats herded by an old couple 
in traditional dark dress. If the priest is in 
residence, the treasured El Greco icon, “Je- 
sus Being Led to Martyrdom,” can be 
viewed. Toe heights offer a magnificent view 
of all of Ithaca — its two large peninsulas, its 
s kinn y isthmus. Vathy like a toy village far 
below and everywhere, in blues, greens and 
grays, the splendid “wine-dark sea.” 

With the passing of the Odyssean king- 
dom, Ithaca disappeared as a rite of histori- 
cal importance m the development or 
Greece. But Ithaca, craggy, sea-girt sparsely 
populated gave birth to the first Hero in 
Western civilization who triumphed by 
shrewd intelligence rather than brute 
strength. This tiny island, unrestored, as are 
so many ruined sites in Greece, seems stiH to 
perch in the mist of myth. 

The 7 A.M. ferry pulls out of Vathy harbor 
“under the cloudy gloom.” It is leaving a 
land where, as the poet Cavafy wrote in 
“Ionian Song,” “the gods did not die” but 
rather, “a vigor from their life moves 
through your air.” ■ 


Edward Tick is a writer who lives in Albany, 
New York. He wrote this article for The New 
York Times. 


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have been a historical as well as mythological 
figure. Also in the museum is an Attic le- 
kytbos bearing portraits of Athena. Odys- 
seus and Telemachus. 

Mrs. Kouvaras leads the way to a nearby 
olive grove from which bays can be viewed to 
the north, east and west. She cites the refer- 
ences to this view in Homer and points 
beneath thick, gnarled, ancient trees to a line 
of three squared-off boulders, each heading 
a stone wall that snakes through the orchard. 
These, the local people believe, were corner- 
stones of the palace of Odysseus. Here, as 
described by Nikos Kazan izakis in his mod- 
em sequel to “The Odyssey.” 

Odysseus readied his hairy hands in his wild 
court 

And double-barred his copper-banded groan 
ing gates . . . 

It seemed the guardian lions moved their 
strong jaws. 

On the northern road out of Stavros is a 
sign reading Homer’s School A village guide 
in tbe center of an munowed field and small- 
er stones surrounding them in the shape of 
an amphitheater. Here, it is believed, Homer 
came to gain inspiration, instruct aspiring 
poets and compose and recite verses of his 
epic. 


M 


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; i* 

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I 3 

I - 


! t 














Page 10 


NYSE Most Actives 



Dow Jones Averages 


HMl U* eio» Ol-w 
CoiYWaJle 109 j»0 10077 109.40 + 082 

Industrials I25J? 12L77 12SJ9 + Wg 

Tronic. 11(102 I HUM 1WX2 + >-22 

Utinttes MM 5433 S« 3* 

Flounce 11 SX2 11464 1T&42 


tiYSE Diaries 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

Vtlimer 

Industrtots 


Advandd 
Daellmd 
unchanged 
Total Issues 
Mew H lefts 
New Lows 
votumaim 
VMumedown 


1093 *W 

486 949 

439 457 

50M 5040 

30 20 

11 11 

6VJ55J80 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 1985 


• 4 - ' ■- . 


NYSE Index 


Hieft Law OMe CMw 

Industrials 21022 2 tnffl 51022 + 1X2 

Tramp. 175X3 17X78 I7f51 + JJ8 

UtUHlea 8292 njj BIX + us 

Ftma 2225 21.97 22J5 +03 

Composite 188.94 1873 1BSJ5 +127 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Spy Sous -Stitt 

Auo.7 , 147,955 SI*® 2.1M 

Aus.4 17*265 SHm 1X02 

Auw-S 162,131 487® 1X27 

Ann 1 ISBJSS 41*28 685 

AU0.1 1TU47 442.147 MM 

"included Hi iha sales figures 


Thursda y 

NiSE 

Closing 


fi 


AMEX Diaries 


Advanced 
padmad 
Un ehtmpad 
Total Issues 
New Hloh* 
New Lows 
Votumeun 
volume down 


Unlfriinp , 

1BU7UOO 

Prev.4PJA.voL 

1MMU0B 

Prev comMated ckne 

I1WJ19 


Tables Include the nattonwMe srices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street amt 
40 not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Standard & Poor's Index 


Open HMh Lew Last aw. 

■nous imjl 1U4J9 ! 31432 Wf J6 + -UK 

Trow 47UB MSI* 67X92 61X41 + 2K 

Util 15X04 1*72 ISU9 WM3' + ZM 

Com» 54169 55143 SttM sS» + IK 





am 

-Oiw 

j.= nut 

WJ» 

23251 




NYSE Recovers From Slide 


’25% 

:T *% 

.56(4 51% 

■r as 

■71* 43U 
36% 25* 
7Vj 
644k 44* 
441* 24* 
97* 49* 
90* 55* 
;sa i!2Vi 
28% 1«V> 

lftVi 12 * 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York If 7 ff n fl»7 Q 
Stock Exchange registered their first clear-cut jrj i Up ^1.0 DUMUJtl 
gains in a week Thursday as the ULS. Treasury The Associated Press 

completed its quarterly sale of new bonds and NEW yoRK — The naiTOwest measure of 

a «™Fo f 30 f“ dUS? S a w^! 

4.82 to 1,329.86, rebounding from jis 30.58- ^ Thursday 

pornt decline over the four previous ‘ sessions. M-l rose to a seasonal- 

Advanang issues outnumbered! dedmes by $ 595.7 billion in ihe.week ended July . 

more than 2 to 1. Volume came to 102.87 29 from S595.4 billion the previous week. 
mUhaa shares, up from 100.04 million Wednes- M _ 2 includes currency in circulation, travel- 

... , , ers checks and checking deposits at financial 

Analysts said some traders were encouraged institutions 
by the reception investors gave the offering of 
£21.75 billion in government securities this 

week. Icahn, who is bidding 10 acquire the company in 

The three-day auction was concluded Tburs- spite of its previous merger agreement with 
day with the sale of $6.5 billion in 30-year Texas .Air, reported Wednesday that he owns 
bonds, which brought an average yield of 10.66 more than 45 percent of TWA’s stock. But on 
percent. Interest rates on easting Treasury Thursday, a TwA employee group said it was 
bonds declined in the credit markets. preparing its own offer for control or the com- 

With the refunding out of the way, analysts pany. 
said, investors are likely to turn their attention Pan Am Corp. led the active list, up % at 8 V 6 
back to the outlook for U.S. economic growth in trading that included a 1 .2-miiiion-sfiare 
and corporate profits. block at 7*. Other airline stocks were fraction- 

There has been widespread talk of a pickup in ally higher, 
the pace of business activity be ginning before Beatrice Cos. climbed 114 to 3414. The stock 
summer’s end. But doubts persist about how has been strong since the company announced 
strong and durable such a revival might proveto changes in (op management last weekend, 
be. ' Harper & Row, which declared a 3-for-2 

Regional telephone issues were strong, re- stock split and said it planned a dividend in- 
spondtng to reduced concerns about the inter- crease, added 134 to 30%. 
est-rate outlook. Pacific Telesis gained 1% to Retailing stocks were mixed with small price 
74%; Nynex 1W to 8234: Bell Atlantic 1J4 to changes as leading companies in the industry 
88 %; U.S. West 1 to 78; Ameritech IK to 8914. reported generally weak sales for July. Sean 
and Southwestern Bell 2 Hi to 81. Roebuck rose ti to 3534; K mart slipped H to 

Trans World Airlines rose 'A to 22. Carl C. 34 %, and J.C Penney was down at 4914. 


3 tz 



bade to the outlook for U.S. economic growth 
and corporate profits. 

There has been widespread talk of a pickup in 
the pace of business activity beginning before 


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BUSINESS / FINANCE 


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Report, M-l, Page 10 


Page 11 




W. 

it s- n ‘ 3 '^ 


TECHNOLOGY 


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NW Software Is Key 
To Wind-Shear Radar 

; : d ayid e sanger 

' ■ '"’nsiiT'i Wen 1 York Times Service 

- . N£W YORK No sooner had wind shear been identified as 

. ^probable cause of the Delta Air Lines L-101 L crash that killed 
*33 pe ople last week than several government and Industry 
erts ass^tcd.that the accident was probably avoidable, 
said existing technology, in the form of Doppler radar 
. »*yy ^gp t, could track movements of the deadly “mkaobuists” 

: of air capable of thrnsting a low-flying plane to the ground. But 

- budgetary politics and bad planning, they have delayed 
installation of the system. 

: .^^hen pressed, however, both the manufacturers of Droplcr 
radar systems and some meteorologists concede that significant 
refinements in technology are needed before airport systems 
can go into production, even ' ------ 

;ihdugh a research version was j i ► 

successfully tested at Denver Ine OntlOOK IOr 

Iflstsummer. * i _• 

The federal government has an earl J SOtaUon 

a system caDed Nexrad (for to airport hazard 

- Next Generation Radar) that b 

has developed experimental is nnliltply . 

. set-ups ideal for detecting tor- 1 — 

■ nados, hurricanes and other 

H large storm systems. But in its current configuration, the system is 
. - not suited for airports — where faster, more accurate radar -is 
needed and where trucks, taxiing planes and buildings create 
. “ground clutter” that can interfere with the detection system. 

More important, almost do work has' been done on the com- 
puter software needed to interpret microbuists and provide a 
- quick warning to flight controllers and pilots. - 

“It’s not an issue of technical breakthroughs because we have 
the framework for the system," said Stephen DclHgath, who 
brads the Sperry Corp.’s effort to beat Raytheon Corp. as -the 
[ prime contractor for Nexrad. “But to make a really workable 
. airport system, these is a lot of work to do." 

R ADAR measures the distance to an object - by t iming the 
round trip of a microwave signal. If the s ignal is stro ng, it . 
means the target is dense — such as a heavy rainstorm. 
Conv entional systems, however, cannot detect motion. 

Doppler radars by contrast, detects motion by comparing, the 
' frequency of the pulse it emits with the frequency of the reflected 
pulse it receives a split second later. The most familiar example or 
the Doppler effect is the changing pitch of a passing trams 

whistle. ’ . r . 

From its antenna, the IXippIer system surveys a cncular area 
4 with a radius of about 200 mi te (324 

picture of the weather patterns between 10,000 and 70,000 feet 
. (tavern 3,000 Mid 21,<fo0mrtcB) oB theorand. 

Last 10 minutes tocpnqdete tte picture- TWs delay can be deadly 

81 are smafl W short-lived, and the signalretons 

from them are often weak," said Antho^r Dmha^ihe director . 
of Nexrad for the National Weaker 'Service. “Ideally at an 
airport, yon want a system that covers a lot toss territory — 
msSfc M miles but ~ Snd looks at patterns very dose- to the 
grburuL" Tho^rctiro heeds to be updated eve^mmme OT sa _ . 
Nexrad, as even. its stron^st suppbrters acknowledge, is not;? 

k . .. ^'Th^SM^foir eariy sblutibns is dm. The competition be-.; 
tween Sperry and Raytheon m Nexrad will not end rntil the 
year- It willbe jnid-1988 before the fir^pro^ 

' — miaoi . a GnUo at looct n w»r nr iWft UDOttS- 


i ■- 

Austerity 



■SJ 2“- 

cs'*t 


Singapo 

Sharp Decline 
In Growth Cited 

Reuters 

SINGAPORE — Prime Minister 
Lee Kuan Yew, acknowledged 
Thursday that Singapore’s econo- 
my bad tafrqn its worst fail in 20 
years and called residents of the 
island state to tighten their belts. 

; My. Lee said Singapore's econo- 
my shrank L4 percent in the sec- 
ond quarter and that the outlook 
was poor for the rest or the year. 

“Our economists have revised 
their forecast to zero growth for the 
whole of 1985, provided the U S. 
ixonoiny picked up. Otherwise 
negative growth is likely," he said. 

This was a sharp downward revi- 
sion. from earlier government fore- 
casts of a 5- to 6-percem increase in 
the gross domestic product tks 
year. GDP measures a country s 
total output of goods and services, 
minus income from operations 
abroad. , , , 

Mr. Lee said that one of the key 
reasons for the decline was the ero- 
sion of Singapore's international 
competitiveness compared with 
economic rivals like Taiwan, South 
Korea and Hong Kong. 

Mr. Lee said, “the high costs of 
doing business, including » 
wages” had adversely effected 
[Singapore economy. Another rea- 
son was poor economic growth m 
ihe United States, which is the is- 
land’s major trading partner and 
‘investor. 

“Several sectors of our economy 
face a decline in demand, like ship- 
yards, oil rigs, oil refi nin g and pet- 
rodiemicals,” he said. “We have 
more capacity than anticipated de- 
mand for some years ahead." 

He said 36^00 people lost their 
jobs in the first half of this year. 
Most were foreign workers, he said. 
“If they were afi Singaporeans, w 
would win big trouble," he added. . 

Mr. Lee said Singapore’s mam 
task was. to increase productivity 
and reduce costs. 

“We must be supple, flexible, 
and elastic on wages, rents, taxes 
and fees," he said. Then we shall 
regain our competitiveness withm 
two years or, at the outside, three 
years." 


Shucking Myths About Eating Com Shell Group Net 


Europeans Learn 
Maize is More 
Than Cattle Feed 

By Barbara Bell 

International Herald Tnbuiie 

STRASBOURG -When Pe- 
ter Schubelin moved here 10 
years ago. he planted a few rows 
of sweet com in his garden. He 
had developed a taste for com on 
the cob during yean of work on 
Long Island, near New York, but 
could not find any in Alsace. 

Last year, be sold 1 .5 million 
cars of fresh sweet com in the 
two-month picking season, mak- 
ing him easily the largest single 
producer in France. He exported 
70 percent of that to 32 cities in 
West Germany, shipping by re- 
frigerated truck four uroes a 
week through August and Sep- 
tember. 

This season, he expects to sell 
more two million ears of 
fresh com and is expanding into 
large-scale production of frozen 
com kernels and other corn-re- 
lated products, such as com cobs 
pressed into briquettes to bum 
like charcoal and fritters, which 
are deep-fried com baiter. 

“My goal is to colonize Europe 
with sweet corn." said Mr. Schu- 
bdin, a Swiss- bom. naturalized 
American nuclear physicist who 
moved here to take charge of a 
French high-energy research lab- 
oratory. 

He "is the only person in Eu- 
rope producing “really good” 
sweet com. he says, mainly be- 
cause, undear an exclusive con- 
tract with a U.S. seed company 
whose name he will not reveal, he 
is the only one growing Super 
Sweet hybrids, in which genetic 
manipulation dramatically re- 
tards the conversion of the corn's 
sugar into starch. 

The hardest part of selling 
sweet corn to Europeans is am- 
ply getting them to taste tt, ac- 
cording to Mr. Schubelin, who 
constantly fights the misconcep- 
tion that sweet com is the same 
as the field com grown to feed 
livestock. 

“In rural areas, people say, 
•Oh, somebody’s selling sweet 
com in the shop. 1*11 have that at 
home,’ " he said. "They go out to 
the field and pick some feed com 
and boil it and . . . well, you’d 
have to ask a cow how it tastes. 



Down 17% in 
Second Quarter 

_ a:. Fmm 


By Bob Hagcny 

Imenuinonal HcmhJ Tribune 

LONDON — Royal Dutch/ 


Shell Group, hit by extraordinary 
i refining, shipping and met- 
als, reported Thursday an unex- 


MM |!<f )K\ \ K-M*v 
-wr*»>.if* m >»iv*. .sir »* ■ ,■ '■ 

Piwko b, lows Ban 

Peter Schubelin is pushing com on the cob. 


ys.\ ~ 

i.i 

• Lett 




middle ot nexx year. — - 

SS^ara dfiffiril * wffl take . at toast * year or two snore-. 
before 4hc sy^tepiis '■ ~ * 


His neighbors in the village of 
Bossendorf, 25 kilometers (15.5 
miles) north of Strasbourg, liked 
sweet com from their first hesi- 
tant tastes and he himself quick- 
ly got intrigued by the problems 
of growing iL After 1979. he 
phased himself out of die Nucle- 
ar Research Center to devote 18- 
hour days to com and in 1980 
founded his Unicom Sweetcom 
company. 

Marketing gimmicks are es- 
sential in inis battle. He orga- 
nizes a “Uttle army" of Alsatian 
youths with hot plates, kettles 
and com to offer samples in 
West German supermarkets, 
where he says 80 percent of shop- 
pers buy after their first taste. He 
distributes posters featuring his 
two photogenic children. Diana, 
8, and Rodrigue, 6. and sells a 
95-page booklet of sweet-corn 
recipes written by his wife, Mir- 
jam. 

And with each two ears of 
Unicom com. he packages five 
recipes and two yellow plastic 
corn-shaped skewers which are 
jabbed into each end of the cob 
so that eaters can hold the cob 
without getting messy fingers. 

When President Ronald Rea- 
gan addressed the European Par- 
liament here May 8. Mr. Schube- 
lin traded his customary 
conservative tie and business suit 


for a Stetson, cowboy boots and 
Western shirt and "was inter- 
viewed about the sweet-corn 
business on Eurovision at a 
Franco- American friendship fes- 
tival in Strasbourg's main 
square, where 5.000 ears of his 
com on the cob — frozen last 
season — were eaten in four 
hours. 

Converting Europeans to 
sweet -com eating dearly amuses 
Mr. Schubelin. 45. but he is dead 
serious about the quality of his 
product, which he follows per- 
sonally from field to consumer. 

The Super Sweet hybrids — 
also known as Everlasting Heri- 
tage or EH. varieties — that he 
plants for all fresh com are about 
30 percent more expensive to 
grow than other types of sweet 
com and yield only half as many 
ears per hectare, about 20.000, as 
the others that Mr. Schubelin 
lumps together as "industrial va- 
rieties." 

Ordinary sweet com differs 
from field com by genetic ma- 
nipulation that slows the conver- 
sion of sugar into starch in com 
on the plant Super Sweet variet- 
ies, however, contain genes that 
completely block the sugar-to- 
s torch process on the plant and 
so retard it after picking than an 
ear of com. properly refrigerat- 

(Coatinued on Page 15, CoL 3) 


peciedly sharp decline of 17 per 1 

cent in second-quarter net income. 

The Dutch-British oil pant said 
net income declined to £646 million 
(about $872 million) from £778 
million a year before. Sales in- 
creased 6-5 percent, to £15.67 bil- 
lion from £14.7 billion. 

Most analysts had predicted 
Shell to report earnings or well over 
£700 million, and disappointment 
at the report helped push the com- 
pany's snares lower Thursday. 

Shell Transport & Trading Co., 
the group's British arm. fell 15 
pence after the report, to close at 
683 pence on the London Stock 
Exchange. In Amsterdam, shares of 
Royal Dutch Petroleum Co. closed 
at 190.40 guilders ($5950). down 
4.80 guilders. 

For 1985's first half, the group 
reported net income of £1.73 bil- 
lion, down 1.7 percent from £1.76 
billion. Sales climbed 1 1 percent, to 
£33.18 billion, from £29.98 billion. 

As expected, the group made a 
provision of £100 million for the 
expected cost of closing a refinery 
in Curaipto. In addition, the group 
made unspecified provisions for 
mothballing two giant crude-oil 
tankers in line with efforts to 
streamline its bloated fleet. 

It also made provisions _and asset 
write-downs oi £22 million in its 
metals business. _ . 

The group said its underlying 
performance was much better than 
the raw figures suggest. Leaving 
aside the Curasao provision, the 
group said profit on an “estimated 
current cost of’ supplies basis," 
which strips out the effects of 
changing currency rates on inven- 
tory values, rose 5.6 percent, to 
£815 million from £772 million. 

Without the exceptional items, 
“they’re doing quite weE" said Da- 
vid johnson, an analyst at the Ed- 
inburgh siockbrokerage of Wood, 
Mackenzie & Co. 

David Gray, of James Capel & 
Co. in London, termed the results 
only “marginally disappointing" 


Oil production from fields in 
.which the group has equitv rose 4 
percent in the quarter, while gas 
sales volume grew 3 percent. 

In the refining and marketing 
outlets, profit margins outside 
North America widened as average 

sale proceeds declined more slowly 
than the costs of crude oil and 
other raw materials. Even so. some 
analysis had expected a stronger 
performance. 

The profit contribution from 
Shell OH. the U.S. unit, shrank to 
£227 million from £249 million, 
partly because or lower prices for 
oil products in the United States. 

Group operating profit from 
chemicals slid 30 percent, to £t>2 
million, from £88 million. The 
downturn partly reflected mainte- 
nance work at a petrochemical 
complex in Moerdijk. the Nether- 
lands. , . . 

The long-suffenng metals busi- 
nesses showed a loss of £58 million, 
compared with a vear-earlier profit 
of £1 million. The group cited con- 

. _f .^in.rtinrtnn ■inn 


tinuing cost of restructuring and 
streamlining metals operations. 


T-Bond Yields 

Fall at Auction 

The Associated Press 
WASHINGTON — The U.S 
Treasury said Thursday that it 
sold $6.5 billion in 30-year 
bonds at an average yield of 
10.66 percent, the lowest level 
in more than two years. 

The rate for the new issue 
was down from an average of 
11.38 percent for last quarter’s 
issue of 30-year bonds on May 
9. and was the lowest rate since 
10.29 percent on May 5, 1983. 

The sale, which attracted 
bids totaling $15 billion, was 
the third and final auction of 
this week’s quarterly refinanc- 
ing, in which the government 
raised a record $21 .75 billion in 
new debt financing. Dealers 
said the “cover," or amount bid 
above what was actually sold, 
was “acceptable." 




Bate Cuts, Official Says 


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By Warren Gctlcr 
International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The West German 
Bundesbank is considering a cut in 
its two key lending rates, but a 
fledsion will largely depend on the 
direction of the dollar and UJS. 
interest Tates before next Thurs- 
day’s policy-setting meeting, a se- 
nior official of the central bank 
indicated .Thursday. 

, A cut in West German rates is 
widely anticipated by the Frank- 
furt financial market 
The official said in a telephone 
interview' that parallel half-point 
. cuts in the central bank’s two key 
rates — the discount and the Lom- 
bard — are under serious consider- 
ation. But, be said, much will de- 
pend on whether the dollar 
continues its softer trend and 
whether the interest-rate differen- 
tial between the United States and 
West Germany can be m ai n tai n ed. 
The differential as measured by 


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China Breaks Up 
CentndTreasury 
After 35 Years 

Reuters 

BEIJING — China an- 
nounced on Thursday the es- 
tablishment of a decentralized 
treasury system in a move that 
Western bankers said! was di- 
rected at excessive economic 
growth and foreign exchange 


The China Daily said that 
treasury departments were be- 
ing setup al central provincial 

and county levels to replace the 

single central treasury estab- 
lished in 1950. The change is 
“to ensure efficient handling of 
the national budget that has be- 
come more conplex since the 

irirolementation of economic 
reforms," it said. _ 

The new treasuries will be 
controlled by the People’s Bank 
of China, the central bank, 
whose president, Chen Muhua, 
is the head of the central trea- 
sury, it added. Mr. Chen was 
appointed president in March 
and has played a key role in 
controlling domestic credit and 
reducing foreign exchange 

spending since then, one West- 
ern diplomat said. 

“The setting up of the trea- 
suries under PBC control is a 
dear sign PBC intends to exert 
a more powerful influence as 
the central bank," said one U.S. 
banker. 

China’s foreign reserves have 
/alien from a record $16.67 bil- 
lion at the- end of last Septem- 
ber to about SIO bilfion, a PBC 
official said. 


long-term rates, is currently about 
3 points on an unadjusted basis. 

The Lombard facility, currently 
at 6 percent, is the rate at which 
commercial banks get emergency 
loans from the Bundesbank on de- 
posit of securities as collateral. The 
discount rate, now 4J percent, is 
the rale at which commercial banks 
borrow medium term using trea- 
sury bills as collateral. 

With money-market rates ap- 
proaching parity with the discount 
rate, West German financial mar- 
kets are convinced that the next 
logical step for the Bundesbank is 
to cut its lower rale, the discount, 
by at least one-half point at next 
week’s policy-council meeting, the 
first after a month-long recess. 

The Bundesbank official cau- 
tioned, however, that a cut in the 
discount rate to 4 percent is not a 
foregone con elusion. But he added 
that if a cut were to come, it would 
involve parallel cuts in the discount 
and Lombard for technical reasons 
related to banks' refinancing costs. 

“At the moment, we’re seeing an 
upward trend in market rates in the 
U.S., and the dollar hasn’t shown 
much willingness to stay under 2.80 
marks," the official said. 

With little flexibility to be seen 
in the tight fiscal policy erf Finance 
Minister Gerhard Stoflenbeig, the 
Bundesbank is expected to face 
growing calls for lower interest 
rales to help eradicate sluggishness 
in the West German economy, par- 
ticularly in the job market^ 

However, despite the Bundes- 
bank's interest in providing a boost 
to the domestic economy where 
possible, senior officials at the cen- 
tral ivink indicate that it remains 
quite concerned that a lowering of 
official rates in West Germany 
could spark large-scale capital out- 
flows, particularly if the dollar 
should climb again or if U.S. inter- 
est rates were to firm. 

The result, the Bundesbank 
fears, would be a weaker mark and 
the accompanying threat or a new 
round of inflation through higher 
import prices. 

The Bundesbank, sources dose 
to the central bank say, does not 
want to be faced with the potential 
embarrassment of having to lift 
rates soon after a rate cut 
Separately, the Bundesbank offi- 
cial noted that the German econo- 
my appears to have picked up con- 
siderable steam in the second 
quarter, after a dismal firct-quaner 
performance that was largely at- 
tributable to severe weather. 

Based on June production fig- 
ures and incoming orders for that 
month, the official estimated that 
second-quarter gross national 
product grew at an annual rate of 
about 3 percent, compared with an 
estimated pm^ialired decline of 1.5 
percent in the first quarter. 


\ j. 

v-A \ 






i'"Y ■iiimiii 

R>r private banking in Switzerland, 
an exceptional bank. 


T hrough our offices in Switzer- 
land we offer a full 
sophisticated banking services, 
from foreign exchange and pm* 
dous metals - to private banking. 

And now that we are part of 
American Express Bank Ltd., our 
private banking has taken on a 
whole new dimension. Through 
this global link, we provide access 
to the unique investment oppOF 
tunities and asset management ser- 
vices offered by the American 
Express family of companies. 
Moreover, for certain clients, we 

also provide such valuable “extras 


as Gold Card® privileges and the 
exclusive Premier Services, for 
round-the-clock personal and travel 
assistance. 

While we move with the 
times, our traditional policies do 
not change. At the heart of our 
business is the maintenance of a 
strong and diversified deposit 
base. Our portfolio of assets is also 
well-diversified, and it is a point of 
principle with us to keep a conser- 
vative ratio of capital to deposits 
and a high degree of liquidity - 
sensible strategies in these uncer- 
tain times. 


If TDB sounds like the sort of 
bank that meets your require- 
ments, visit us on your next trip 
to Switzerland. Or telephone : in 
Geneva, 022/372111, in Chiasso, 
091/44 19 91- 

TDB offices in Geneva, London, Paris, 
Luxembourg, Chiasso, Monte Carlo, 
Nassau, Zurich. Buenos Aires, Sao 
Paulo. 

TDB, the 6th largest commercial bank 
in Switzerland, is a member of tk 
American Express Company, which 
has assets of US$ 64.5 billion and 
shareholders 1 equity of US$4 -8 billion. 


Trade Development Bank 


The Trade Dei elobment Bank building in Geneva, 


at 96-98, rue du RhSne. 


An American Express company 






Grains' 



COFFEE C(NYCSCB) 

sh n ss ™ sa 

14U0 131 JB May 

14ftM 13528 -lul 

147.50 132X5 Sew 

138J70 I38M P* 

Esf.SafO Rnev.Sato l&i 

PrevTDayOnenint. lUH oflSSI 
SUGAftWQRLD II (NYCSCE) 
lllOOOID^- cents perm. 

9X5 1M Sen 420 420 

*.« ZJ* Oct 4J8 440 

725 MO JWi *2 *g 

9.J3 U4 Mar 4.9J 

7.15 1 i\VTV 5m £13 

Ut 3X9 JUl 520 520 

US 4JB OCf fc* MS 

Jan 

Esl. Series Prey. Sato *«17 

Prev. Day Open Ini. 914*1 UOB36 
COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric fora- 1 per ton 

ZtiS 1 9*3 Sea 20W 

2337 IMS Dec 2143 2152 

2207 IMS Mar 2170 2100 

2217 1«0 May 21p 21*8 

21 as 1*60 Jul Z» i 2201 


133.1 1 13443 
13430 13747 
137-2$ 

13773 
13773 
09.73 
139 AS 


408 4.10 

425 422 

M3 452 
AM AM 

520 5.10 

£19 £27 

544 £51 

541 


3077 3087 

2135 3150 


2217 1«0 MBV 3107 21*8 

3185 1*40 Jul 220i 2201 

2330 3023 b*P 

2335 mss OK 

EsI. Sales 2454 Prav. Sates 1483 
prev. Dav Open int. was* up us 
ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 
iSJno lbs.* cents Mr u*. _ 

18100 13055 Sop 13440 13440 

101 jOO 12740 Nov 13145 131 js 

lfiOjn 12350 Jan 12715 128X0 

17750 mi Mar 127X0 137X0 

16250 13150 May 


31AI 3180 
2117 3106 

2201 3223 

3236 
2263 


14 
18 
314 
zu o 

7.02 14 
1J0 79 
173 64 
3X2 102 
1X2 6.1 
1X0 17 

£ 25 

■ u J - a 


34 6 % «* o* + ft 


13040 130X8 
127X0 13750 


15750 137X5 Jul , — . 

Est. Sales 3M Prey. Sato ___303 


117X0 12750 
,36X0 «g 

136X0 


Prov. Dav Open Int. 4X30 nftlii 


Metals 


COPPER (COMEX) 

22LQQD ltn_- LB f tfl DOT lb. 

5 5845 Aug 4025 60^ 6025 6030 

82,10 5750 Sep 6065 6005 6035 «U0 

Oct 41X0 

0425 5850 Dec 61X0 62X0 6145 41.75 

8420 5940 Jan _ *105 

8000 5950 Mar 6240 61X5 4250 6240 

7*X0 61.10 Mav 6320 6320 63X0 6110 

7440 61X0 Jul 6340 6350 6325 6340 

70.90 6220 Sep 64J0 

7020 61X0 Dec 6450 65X0 6450 64X0 

7020 64X0 Jan JSX0 

47.90 45.10 Mar 4540 


67 JO 67X0 Mar _ 

Est. sales Prev. Sales 4727 

Prov. Day Open int. 77X0* off 61* 


CATTLE (CM E) 

40xoo ibv cents per lb. 

6757 5022 Aug 54X0 5457 

4550 5355 Oct 5720 57.95 

67X5 55.15 Dec 59.10 99S7 

6745 54X0 Pet) 2920 40X0 


6425 58.30 Jun 6150 61X5 

4&40 5820 Aua 

Ext. sales 18X04 Prev. Sato 34X41 
Prev. Dav Omen fitf. *<IU up 893 
FEEDER CATTLE ICMEJ 
44X00 lbs.- cents par 1b. 

7320 5020 Aua 6457 64.90 

7300 5745 Sep 6320 63.77 

7133 57.15 Oct 43X0 6142 

7320 5020 Nov 64.15 6447 

7950 6050 Jan 45X5 6425 

70X5 61.10 Mar 66.15 6455 

7055 61.15 Apr 6625 6640 

65X5 6120 Mar 

Est- Sales 2X40 Prev. Soles 1X63 
Prev. Dav Open int. 8X72 otf 22 
HOGS (CMEJ 
30X00 iw.- cents per lb. 


ALUMINUM (COMEX) 

ADMOOibOr canto per lb. 

74J0 43X0 Se« 4540 4540 45.15 4SJS 

Oct 4545 

7050 44X0 Dec 4640 46X1 46.15 46.15 

76X0 51X5 Jan 4650 

7350 4425 Mar 47.15 

6625 5195 MOV 47X5 

. 6345 47X5 Jul 4X55 

5110 51X0 SOP 4921 

Dec 5030 

Jan 5045 

Mar SiJS 

May 52X5 

Est Sales 275 Prev. Sato 470 
Prev. Day Open int 1X42 up 31 




521* 

4*W 
25 
i 38 
E 72 
S9YV 

106 26* 

550z 70* 

20* 

30* 

UOO 
E 65 
tTl 
4016 
24 
47* 

15* 

32* 

57* 

27 
6V. 

254 
37* 

»M 
16* 

3* 

49 
23* 

52 V. 

41* 

16* 15* 

53 53 
: 64* 64* 

10* 10* 
108 100 
10* V* 
: 50 56* 


13* 13 M* + ft 


SILVER (COMEX) 

5X00 travel.- cents per trav oa. 

6402 6<BX Aug 6115 6110 6113 6142 

11810 5710 Sen 6t*X 6204 6154 6175 

634J) 6164 Oct 62L* 

1235JJ S.m Dec 6334 6334 6274 6294 

12110 S95j Jan 634X 

11*34 m.o Mar 6464 6464 6444 6422 

10484 6214 May 6504 6504 6504 6515 

9434 6334 Jul 6634 6634 6624 6009 

SM8JJ 6414 SOP 6714 6732 6714 6702 

7994 6604 Dec 6*04 6*04 6084 6862 


7894 6784 Jan 


5427 41X7 Aua 4445 45.15 

51X5 3845 Oct 3*55 3940 


SOM 39M Dec 41S0 ASM 

5047 *15.70 Fob 42X5 4320 

<725 3840 Apr 4045 4020 

49JB 41X0 Jun 4110 4328 

4945 4100 Jul 4325 4325 

5120 4105 AUO 4110 4118 

<1.14 *01.75 oar ABAS ABM 

Eat. Sales 5X15 Prev.Saies 6X82 
Prav. Dav Open int. 11X77 oH73 


7704 6774 MW 7064 707.9 7064 703.1 

7204 693.1; May 7I4X 

Est. Sales 9200 Prav. Sato 6X23 
Prov. Day Open int. 71X86 off 1245 
PLATINUM (NYME1 
5D irav at- do Oars per trav oz. 

393.80 2MLW Drf 2B320 28320 28000 28020 


37150 25720 Jan 28840 28B40 2(540 2S4X0 

32920 26420 Apr 2*240 2*340 20920 20920 


Currency Options 


30100 27340 Jul 2*720 29720 2*6X0 294X0 

345JM 30320 OCf 300X0 

Est. Sales Prev. Salas 1.193 

Prev. Day Ooenint. 11X97 o«B3 
PALLADIUM (NYME) 

1 00 Iroy ox ■dollars per az 

141X5 *020 Sep *9X5 9945 9040 *820 

OCt 9825 

14120 *140 Dec *9X5 9920 9830 M 

12720 91 JO Mar 98X5 99J5 *£50 «X» 

114189 *120 Jun *920 *920 9920 98X0 

Est. sales Prev. Soto 232 

Prev. Dav Open lot. 6X90 oH22 


Aug. 8 

PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 

Sadmtotog price Calls— Last Puts— Last 

sop Dec Mar Sop Dec Mar 
12200 Brttttb Poands-ceats per aMt. 

BPound 105 r r r r 110 r 

134X6 115 2840 r r r r r 

134X6 130 1145 t r r 1X0 r 


134.96 130 r 740 925 145 

134X4 135 225 540 &S5 3J® 

134.96 148 140 133 4X0 6.15 

13LM 145 r 115 r r 

134X6 I® US 1.10 r r 

SUM cornelian OoUars-catts nor oart. 

CDollr 72 r r 129 043 

7157 73 r r r 833 

63X00 West Carman Marks-ceats per unit. 

D Marie 30 T T t t 

3523 32 r r r 042 

3523 II U7 W Ml r 

3523 34 128 026 175 0.13 

3523 35 044 1X5 f 04 

3523 36 026 I IJB t 

3523 37 0.14 074 l3 r 

6258600 Japanese Yen-lMOis at a cent per imH 


GOLD (COMEX) 

100 trey az.- dollars per trav az. 

4854a 2*140 Aua 33340 32160 32140 32240 

32020 31520 sen 323X0 

49340 29740 Oct 317X0 327X0 32320 32SX0 

48*20 30120 DOC 331X0 331X0 32720 32*40 

48520 30640 Feb 33520 33640 33340 33440 

49640 314X0 A«r 339.90 339X0 33940 33140 

435X0 32020 Jun 34460 34460 34460 34320 

43840 33140 Aua 348X0 348.90 348X0 348.10' 

395X0 33540 OCf 353X0 

39340 34240 Dec 36020 36850 36020 35850 

37400 35540 Apr 36*40 

Jl/n 37£40 

Est. Sales 21400 Prev.Sato 14603 
Prev. Day Open irrt.134917 up 2437 


8* 6* 
71 51 

63 45 

63 


S AA 

13 

AS 

33 

3.1 

123 

X 

26 

4A 


1J 

38 

9A 

8 

1U 


no 


123 


AS 

13 

72 

9 

10.4 


19 

19 

52 

• 


15 

2 

29 

43 

14 

Zl 

22 

X4 

U 

9 A 

9 

103 


114 

10 

143 


1U 


119 


142 


143 


144 



+ * 
16* 4- * 
53 + » 

64* +1* 
10* + V% 
108 

10* + lb 
56*— * 
W6 + Vk 
120 
1T2 

77 — Vi 
6* —1 
58VS— 1 


SSVk 3556 Xerox MO 5X 14 TJT2 57* ST.* J7* ' 

nu, jam Xerox at UI W 3 55 55 55 - 

n me xtua ja v * ** i**)2n » ■ 


36* — 16 
30* + * 

W* + lb 

76* + * 21V. 9* ZonalO J< ** 16 177 9* *V* 

5* S74h 314L Zavrel 41 VB 16 1154 4** It 4m « 

my ■*. 16 M 1 m zSSe 12 1357 I** tra ** 

17* - & 25 KM * 5 M M 3S 34H 34 * EE 

ane— h sn 22 * ZwnM ia 1 * 11 203 34 * 34 
77 * +2 
32* + 4b 
108b + * 


-Vi— lb 
8b + 4b 
W* + 16 
40M— 116 
3>M + 4b 


NYSE Ffighs-Lows 


MU. 

22* + 1b 
»*— Vb 
224b— 16 
34* + 46 
325b -f 46 
32*— 16 
32*b + Vb 
54 

29* + 1b 

*m— 86 

3Vfe 

.15*—* 
29* 4- 16 
29V. + Vb 
4 +* 

SI*— 1* 

** + W 

36*-* 
T7* + Vb 
IS* 

mv— Vb 


NSW mow 30 


CranwHCns 
IIIPw420pf 
ML Incan 
POdcp4B7p 
Plan Resrcti 
UnEnRa 


Avion n Bkltoiadlpt 
Beatrice BefitC33Saf 

EastnAfrL EstnAb-pfC 

LancSton 53 LuweuJtoln 

NSPw4Sspt OcdPMO* 

Pan Am PaoAmwt 

Rsrdmi UMiBAlr 

VaEPOMM 


BbBasodipt 

BeralsCa 

CutfAprn 

SAGM-UAwt 


MEW LOWS II 


BAS1X 

LACMblrin 

StoniCaved 


Oiy invest Caftbwto 
ML Catty n Ma ut iat t N H 

SonTrstBkn S uP erilntvto 


KeaoiCa 

PagaPnm 




14*4- tb 
4* 4- Vb 


r r r 0J2 r 

227 I*! 141 r 025 

128 026 175 0,13 028 

024 125 r 022 098 

S3 0X5 « r £ 

Yen-1 MOM at a teat per writ 


1*2 r 

041 IBS 
r 061 
r 025 


42200 Swiss Francs-cents per unit. 

SFronc 37 5J0 r r r r r 

4175 38 4X3 £IT r r r r 

42X5 39 3X5 r r r r r 

4275 40 2X2 347 r r r r 

4175 42 1X5 115 183 r 1X9 r 

42X5 43 068 126 r OB4 r T 

4275 44 r 1X5 IJM r r r 

4275 45 r 0*0 146 r r _ r 

Tefal all vnL MM CaUaminL lfMfl 

Total put voL MM Putapeo lot 13*2*7 

r— Not tradea s— No option offered. 

Last Is premium f nor chase price). 

Source; ap. 



SF COMP. INDexCCME) 
points and cents 

19800 MOM Sep 18050 18945 

70045 1 7570 OK 190X5 1*105 

203X5 19010 Mar 193X5 1*425 

20620 19600 Jun 1*620 1*620 

ESLSato 53232 Prev. Sato 51X68 
Prev. Dav Open Iru. 66258 up 227 


19* + * 

T* + * 
10 *—* 



VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
paints and cents 

213X0 185X5 Sep 199X0 20065 

21705 20000 Dec 202X0 20320 

2ffi?40 204X5 Mar 

EsLSaies Prev. Sato 5X31 
Prev. Day Open Int. 124S7 off 272 
NYSE COMP. INDEX CNYFE) 
paints aid cents 

118*5 *1X5 Sep 100*5 10*25 

117X0 101X0 Dec 110X5 111X5 

II8X5 M920 Mar liloo lino 

120M 113X5 Jun 1)445 11445 

EsLSaies 1Z775 Prev.Saies 11X11 
Prev. Day Open int. 9X04 off 597 


IB* + * 

g-* 

r- £ 


- (Other Efttabjp QB 15) 

Relhtotois - - MqUBw I tUII - 

nwGiiinw StoOwr. MW 7 HE 

Au i i t G o fc uu It of ten lB in iSSu?^ie)m* w 

1st Half ins HM FerMiwe— — 078 

From uu ifiox nt mm ins i*M 

Per Share—. 324 328 R e ven ge— Z3M. 2458. 

. Met me — ^ (aMNU uos 

m FerShare — — 122 

SliifMparr «.-ta 




WE Oversea s Me 

1« 7*84 4th Dear. 


Commodity Indexes 


Cash Prices 


Commodities 


Cbm motflly and Unit 

Coffee 4 Santo to 

P.rinfclatti. 64/30 38 V£ Vd _ 


Steel billets iPltU.ton. 
lren2Fdrv.Phlla.ton , 


Steel pgtof No 1 hvv Pitt, _ 
Lead Spot, lb 


Omoeretect. lb . 

Tin (Straits), lb — — 
Zinc. E. St. U Basis, lb. 
Palladium, az ___ 

silver N.Y, m 

Sauna: AP. 


Aag. 8 
_ Year 
The Am 
147 144 

060 177 

<73j» mat 
21320 . 213X8 
72-73 Ml 
17X1 28-32 

66-70 6447 

6.1773 6X958 

■4V 47 48-50 

*7-W 129* 

6.H5 724 


Dividends 


STOCK 

DeVoe-HoIbdn 
International nv 

City-Clock 

International nv 



London 

Commodities 


Comnmiities 


dose 

High Low Bid Ask 

SUGAR 

Storting per metric ton 
OCt 12140 111X0 12040 12040 

Dec 126J0B 12LW 12440 124X0 

Mar U630 UU& 13AM 13AM 

May 13840 13440 136X0 13720 

Aug N.T. N.T. 14040 141J0 

oar 146X0 146X0 14520 147X0 


Aug.8 

£ET% 


Volume: 2X79 lots of 50 tons. 


119X0 11940 
124X0 12520 
13L2D ISAM 
13620 137X0 
14040 141X0 
145X0 146X0 


COCOA 

Sterfleg per metric ton 
Sep 1X37 1X07 1X34 1A8 

Dec 1X39 1X10 1X33 1X14 

Mar 1X49 1X23 1X47 1X48 

MOV 1X58 1X40 1X56 1X50 

Jly 1X70 1XM 1X70 1X73 

Sep 1X86 1X84 1XM 1X88 

Die 1X95 1X13 1XSS 1X88 

Volume: 1319 lots W10 tofu 


1X15 1X16 
1X10 1X20 

K5 83 

1X54 1JS5 
1X68 1X69 
1X22 1X79 


COFFEE 

Sterfiag per metric toe 

Sep 1463 140 1465 1466 

Nov 1XU 1478 1X16 1X20 


Jop 1X70 1XM 1X67 1X69 

Mar 1X95 1X30 1X90 1X92 


Mav 1206 1X65 1206 1210 

JIV 1204 1204 IM 1245 

SOP N.T. N.T. 1230 1240 

Voliima: 2257 tots ot 5 tores. 


1457 1460 
1X00 7X02 
1X42 1X45 
1X62 1X67 
1X83 1X84 
1211 1270 
1200 1250 


GASOIL 

U2L dollars per eiefric ton 

AdO 23520 msa Exp. —23220 NJO. 


Soonot: ttauaa dtt Commma. 



DMItitinnes 

Options 


K Gemot Msflt-UUH marl* cwtt MreMrt 


!2 a, * 0, i2 9? ■» \**> Of M up 


Estimated total vaL 1X30 
Cobs: Wed. to. 139 spa 
Ms:WMLv*L12M«w 

Saurca: CME. 


Intemab'onal nv 2 % 3% 

Quotes as of: August 8, 1985 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
HcrengrachH83 
1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone: (0)3120 260901 
TeJex; 14507 fircon) 


_aes9 Provtmu 

Bid Ask Bid Ask 

ALUMINUM 

Staffing pgr metric ton 

Spot ^ 75120 75140 75920 76000 

Forward 77420 77520 78150 78220 

COPPER CATHODES (High Grade) 

Stcrl lug Per metric ton 
Spot l«3Jffl 104420 IWJB 106020 

Forward 106650 106720 107920 108000 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Starting per metric ton 

Snot lOUJO 102020 103020 103320 

Forward 103720 106120 105000 105320 

LEAD 

Staffing Per me trie ton 

Spot 294X5 19SJ00 St JO MS0 

Porward 29820 298X5 799M 29940 

NICKEL 

SterllH per metric too _ 

Soot 368020 369020 370020 371020 

Forward JTSOlOO 376000 377000 377520 

SILVER 

peace per trav ounce 

Spat 45220 45420 45720 458.00 

Forward 46520 46720 47000 47120 

TIN (StandUrd) 

HerUngperinefricfM _ 

Spot 923520 933620 928520 *28720 

Forward *21020 *31120 925520 925120 

Staffing Per metric ton „ 

Spot 53920 54020 540.00 SSI20 

Forward 54320 54420 54720 54820 

Source: AP. 


no - t» H - 
175 A H m - 


M M 6H 716 
limn » a 


1/U U/U W K A 78 78 71 

fm b % . ivy u% i!» im - 


1716 1/16 3/16 — 

1/16 S/14 * 15/16 

Jam 23/u 
» & i A 

A 78 n 7« 


raraonauttiw 

TeMPut wluine l&ae 
ToW art anon M.4SMN 
mex: 

HMttur Larrnus OmelSU4B66 
Source: CSOE. 


Italy’s Industrial Output 
Dropped 1.1% in June 


RONS — Industrial production 


Treasury Bflb 


in Italy fell 1.1 f 
in June, after a f 
in May, the nati 
tutesaid Tbursc 
T he uofidjusi 
duedon index. 


at year-to-year 
eremt increase 
statistics insti- 


cd industnal pro- 
box 1980, regis- 



Otftr 

Bid 

TMd 

Yield 

TkiMnth 

7.18 

7.16 

741 

741 

tmenth 

723 

7.41 

7 23 

724 

One yew 

757 

m 

8.15 

SIS 

Source: setamen Brothers 





tered 100.9 in June compared with 
106 3 in May this year and 102.0 in 
June of 1984. Output for the six 
months ending June 30 was 1.1 
percent higher than in the corre- 
sponding year-earlier period. 


56W 37Vb 
1ZV) 91b 
32* 19Vb 
20 15 

21* 16 
20* Kit 
11* 5* 
2* 116 
38* 23*6 
34* 24* 
35tb 24V, 
23 16* 

11 * 9 * 
9* 3* 
05* 24* 
54 51 

28* 19 
** 6 * 
mb a* 
51 31 

25* 19* 
35* 23* 
46 28* 

3M 29 
1** MV,- 
2216 15* 
9* 5 
1316 9*6 
38* 19* 
52* 33 
49* 34* 
13* 8 
33 22* 
fllb 4846 
44* 2Mb , 
16* 12Vb 
4316 23*6 . 
45 23* : 

13 9* : 

16* 12* ; 
h* 12*: 
27* 17*! 
54b 31b ! 
44* 35* ! 
21 lb 13 « 

31* 2Z% J 
32* 22*1 


® U.S. Retailers Report V 

* Poor Sales During July : 

* The Associated Press 

J NEW YORK — The top UJ5. rdjuiefs'm- 
ported on Thursday poor sales For July asm* 
pared with a year earner. 

Sears, Roebuck & Co., the largest, said its 
sales for the four weeks ended Aug. 3 fell 0.6 M 
percent. K mart Corp_ the No. 2 tFtaiter, said 
its sales fca-tbemomh rose 4.] percent BolsaJes 
for stores open more than a vear — called same- 
store sales — fell 5.9 percent. 

J.C Penney Co„ ranked third, said its four- 
week sales declined 0.6 percent F.W. Wool- 
worth Co„ No. 8. said its four-week sales in- 
creased 3 pereenL Wal-Mart Stores Jnc4 naW 
seventh, said its sales spurted 34.7 percent, with 

(MnMtni* c«l«c m n 


same-store sales up 12 percent. 

July's sales reflected continuing softness in 
the U it economy and highly competitive coo* 

ifitiiHN in >tu — — * *■ |f ■ l»mi 


etnons in the general merchandise industry, 
said Edward R. Telling, chairman and dj» 
ttemtive officer of Oricagthhased Sears. • 
Jeffrey Fcmer, an analyst wiih the New York 
investment firm Merrill Lynch, PtameFetBStf & 
Smith Inc. said tie July sales, “continued d£ 
disappointing trend that has been evidence 
the last several months." ' T . 

Some consumers have been inlubibsd fid® 
buying by high fevds of debt, added. 

Bernard M. Faitber, chairman and chief os* 
Jf®* officer of K mart, said the aoinl of fcB 
fashions and unproved consumer ooafideocr 
will spur sales in the second half of die J**-. 






































































'■ ■ Si '"J: . : 

* -::s .:•< 






BUSIIigSSROUHDW 


INTERNATIONAt HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 1985 


Page 13 


CURRENCY MARKETS 



rs 




Reuters 


:ermg 


' r Wfi^^TBbusabds of in- 
to t^sat'ihe Thursday 

2mgrt2 

ofi^ 't^rsufis^feL The British 
is selling most of fa 
■ c ag«ntHg 49-perceat stale in the 
cdtt^uiXv'- 

Rrotfcers, the merchant 
banKsaid the offer was sold oul 
. life wasfq a»tf?a to 1982 when 
^^^n^ftsakof 51 percent 

UBdrjiiie new offer, valued at 
awuntTWSO naffion ($600 million). 


80 percent of the shares being sold 
wffl go to British investors: The rest 
™* be sold in Europe and Canada, 
. Britoil is one of tbc world’s larg- 
cst ou exploration companies. 

The shares in the current sale 
weft offered at£1.85, down from a 
1982 price of £2.15.. 

Successful applicants will appar- 
ently be able to make aswift profit 
on their invesaasDi, of which £1 
was payable upon appfication and 
the rest on Nov, l. Britoil sbares 
traded Thursday at £116, 

lhe government mil retain a 

nominal slake in Britoil, plus the 
option, to block any foreign take- 
over. 


Forstmann Little Offers to Buy 
MTV Networks for 8469 Million 


The Associated Pros 

NEW YORK — MTV Networks Iikl, which provides moric 
.videos and other programming for cable television, said Thursday 
■' that Forstmann Utile & Co. had offered to acquire MTV for $31 a 
share, or $469 million. 

Forstmann Little is a privately hdd investment firm in New 
'York that specializes in taking companies private through lever- 
; aged buyouts. In a leveraged buyout, a company is acquired 
; largely with borrowed funds that are repaid either from the target 
■'o&nmany’s- operating revenue or from the sale of its assets. 

MTV Networks mainly provides three programs for cable 
television- They are MTV (Music Television) and VH-1, both 
music-video channels, and Nickelodeon, a children's channel. 

■Forstmann Utile's offer comes one year after MTV Networks' 
principal owner, Warner Am ex Cable Communications, sold 34 
percent of MTV Networks' stock, or 5.13 milli on shares, to the 
public 

■That stock dosed Wednesday unchanged at $27,125, down .25, 
in over-the-counter trading. 


Earnings Down 37% in 4lh Quarter 


M 


■“''iV 


» ii j. 

h 

- ^ at 


i-' Reuters 

rffENITLE — Boeing Co. said 
Tmireday that it plans to add 3,100 
en^npyees in the United States be- 
tween now and the end of the year 
with about 2,600 of the expected 
additions to be made in the Puget 
Sound area of Washington state. 

During the first seven months of 
the year, the company’s nationwide 
.employment increased by 5,900. 
-Jvhich induded 4,600 in the Puget' 
Sound area,- Boeing said ' It said 
employment at the end of July 
stood at 99,000, with 70,400 of 
those Located in Washington state. . 


The Associated Press 


iVflgt 


-'*a 


ONCINNATL Ohio — Procter 
& Gamble Co., the huge consumer- 
products concern, said Thursday 
that its profit for the fiscal fourth 
quarter plunged 37 pe r cent while 
its profit for the whole year 
dropped 29 percent 

In the three months ended June 
30, PAG said, net income dropped 
■ to $115 million, or 69 cents a share, 
from $183 nrilbox^ or $L 10 a share, 
a year earlier. 


Sales in the 
cent, to $3.34 


rose 3 t 
from S3 


COMPANY NOTES 


L'^V^fcu 

■'“i 




iur* * 


,| T».rj£ 


icm 


N-r,« 


«s; 


•*. ^ 


7.;j} 




Akauet-Hiomsoo of France said 
ithadcomrectedrosi^^ihedeo- 
tronic components for China’s first 
satellite Earth station network and 
that, m return, it would buy anten- 
na dishes for sale in Europe. . 

■ Robert Bosch GmbH and Zahnr 
radfabrik Friedridishafen AG said 
they had agreed to qtpand existing 
jomt-operating agreements to in- 
dude additional buds of gear box- 
es as well as pemerateeringr sys- 
tems. 

Caesars World Inc. management 
Aas been asked by Martin Sosnoff, 
a New Ycffk investor, for a seat on. 
its board of directors. Mr. Sosnbff 
heids 28 million Caesars shares, .or. 
9.5 percent' erf the total outstand- 
ing. and said he intends to buy 
more... ■' ? ' 

Chevron Corp. said it wbqld shot ' 
down its crodcH)3 procesringplant 
in Freeport, Bahamas, which js op- 
erated 6y its affiliate, Ra Karans Off . 
Refining Co, because of “econom- 
ic difficulty.” ' 

GJ. Coles and Co.Ts proposed 
merger with Myer Emporium Ltd. 
has been ^approval by. Australia’s . 
Trade Practices Gommiss&mr The. 
merger* valued at' 3.1 biffiqn £*& _ 


traliao dollars ($704 million) will 
create Australia's largest retail 
group- 

Fuqua Industries be. of Atlanta 
said that the board of directors of 
Georgia Federal Bank has voted in 
principle to accept a $220^n£Dion 
offer by Fuqua to buy Georgia 
Federal, the biggest saving? bank in 
the state. 

Malaysian Airfine System, the 
government-owned carrier, said it 
bad a 382-percent increase in its 
after-tax profit, totaling 131.85 
nriDhm Malaysian dollars ($526 
mini on) in die year dbded March 
31 compared with 95.190 million 
dollars the previous year. 

Montgomery Ward said it ex- 
pects to become independent of its 
parent company. Mobil Corp„ 
within three years. It said it had 
been fondisgits own growth with a>, 
positive cash flow since 1980. 

. The New York Times On. said it 
had reached agreemen t in principal 
with NEP Communications Dae.; 
for The -lanes to purchase tdevi- 
suui station WNEP, which serves 
the' Scranton and: Wilkes-Barre 
area mPennsyl vania, for an undis- 
closed amount 1 : v - 

■ '4* t . '••• I 




New Eurosterlmg-Bond Issue 
Is Said to Be First of Kind 


LONDON — Eurobond- prices 
edged up Thursday in fatriy _ quiet 
proesaonal-doinin 

^^and final stage of the uS._ 
Treasury’s record $21.75:bilhon 
qoarterfy refunding program, deal- 
ers said. The Treasury was sched- 
uled to auction $6J billion m 30- 
year bonds Thursday nighL. 

Most dollar straights moved up 
Vk to % of a point, in line with New 

York’s finner opening, while float- 
ing-rate notes were up by five to 10 
basis points, they said. 

A novel issue of £30925 million 
of zero-coupon Eurost erting bonds 
by Qoadrex Securities Ltd. and 
Ghartorhouse Japhet PLC, stud by 
Quadrat to be the first of their 
kind, was the most innovative of 
the day’s new offerings. 

The Eurosterling bonds, known 


1016 percent a year ova 10 years, 
priced at 101M percent. The issue 
was led by Banque Paribas Capital 
Markets. Dealers said it did not 
trade actively on the market be- 
cause it appeared to have been 
largely preplaced. 

A SlOO-tmOion. five-year bond, 
paying 10W percent, was also 
launched for Sumitomo Metal In- 
dustries. Ltd. Priced at 101% and 
lead-managed by Yamaichi Inter- 
national (Europe) Ltd., it was is- 
sued too late in the day for an 
active market to develop. 

- Citicorp followed with a $200- 
mfllkni bond, paying 10 percent a 
year over three years and priced at 
200ft. It was led by Goldman Sachs 
International Carp. 

IBM Credit Corp. became tbq 
fourth borrower to launch a dual- 
currency bond this week, with a 
25 -biIli on-yen transaction paying 8 


deemable for SIMJ mflEon ; 




■ * are backed by — — - 

• bonds and conastof a flOO-mfllion 
tranche and 27 other traricha of 
£7.75 nrillicm each, ran^ng in ma- 
turity from 1985 to 1998. They are 
Biwiiar to certificatK of accruals 
Treasury, securities, or CATS, 


deemable for $120.2 mOfion at a 
rate of 208 yen to the dollar. 

Dansk Naiurgas tapped the 
Danish krone market with a seven- 
year, IB-percent, 30O-ntiffi6n-kn> 
nor issue, priced at 100%. while 
Belgium's 500- million- Deu tsche- 




^'jS^nnLr in the ma5 floater emerged as a 12-yrar 
wfachhave proved paying 1/16 point ova the 
United States since th«r mtrodoc- mtabank of- 

ticri se^y«rsago. _ a(irluJn fere drate. 


Dealos said « was too Mriy Although definitive term for the 
say how the issue would be rora veo ^QQ.minJoQ package for Rockefd- 
fay the market: "Vft are ler center Properties Inc. have not 

ing through the details and yeI announced, dealers said 

it with a amount of caution, a J <omected $335 -uuIEoq of 15- 




it with a fair amount of ^ ufc | 0 P* t the expected $335 -uuIEoq of 15- 
trada at a British menaunt Danx hoods with a rising coupon 
said. : . ' cmicnire was already trading on 

Among the day’s other nmv ^ al around 99ft. 

bonds woe several that o^^sai expected zero-coupon 

woe an^ at Jawnese uwestorj ^ quoted at less 25 basis 

including a points to issue price, 

for Kawasaki Sled Corp- paytog ^ 





a ?***-.?? > 


J '_V . 

x30***:.**'- t ■ 


JW 

+al 0* 

tel* > 




, i 

J '.i > ' 




(I*corpontied*l*g™> 

.jj*, nf the Notes, notice is 


* 

i rf-v 1 , • 

.... 


^W,vw,— - • ( • 

. - „ rt c t\> c Notes, nonce is 
soordaace with the P r °^ n hs inWres t period from 9 
by given that for the stfitiomh i wil , ^ ^ 

j?t, 1985 to 10 February- in<eresl payable on 

est Rate of per ® date JO February, 1986 
relevant interest pay **®' ■&' u. S .$4432.29 and 
ist -Coupon No. - in denominations of 

S443.23 respectivclyfor Notes 

5100,000 and U.S.J10- 000 


- -v 




D ,_b w A., London, 

lyTheCTa^Ma^twB^ • 


9 August, 1985 


billion a year ago, the company 
said. 


Fra- the year, net income fell to 
$635 million, or $3.80 a share, from 
$890 million, or $535 a share, P&G 
said. It was the company’s first 
annual decline in profits since 
1952 

The year’s sales increased 5 per- 
cent, to $133 billion from $129 
billion. 


“Needless to say, we are disap- 
pointed in the earnings results for 
this fiscal year," P&G's chairman, 
Owen B. Butler, and president, 
John G. Smale, said in a joint state- 
ment “However, we believe the 
strategy which led to those results 
is correct" 


P&G executives had said previ- 
ously that Lhe company's heavy in- 
vestment in new products and their 
marketing would hurt near-tom 
earnings. Mr. Butter pronounced 
the company “stronger and healthi- 
er" because of its investments in 
new markets. 


Tbc company spent $400 million 
during the fiscal year for research 
and development. 

Industry analysts said Procter & 
Gamble, maker of a variety of 
household and personal-care prod- 
ucts, also has been hurt by the ad- 
vances of competitors in tradition- 


ally strong P&G markers, including 
diapers, toothpaste and detergent. 

Earnings from international op- 
erations in the quarter amounted to 
$96 million, a 23-percent decrease 
from the previous year. Procter & 
Gamble executives blamed the de- 
cline on heavy investment in new 
products and losses froth currency- 
exchange rates. 

Capital spending totaled 51.1 
billion, a 24- percent increase from 
fiscal 1984. lhe company said it 
spent approximately one-third of 
that money to rebuild and modern- 
ize manufacturing capacity for dis- 
posable diapers in five countries. 

The remainder was spent to re; 
duce operating costs, improve pn> 
ductivity and increase manufactur- 
ing capacity for other products, 
company officials said. 

Procter & Gamble officials said 
fiscal 1985 was the second consecu- 
tive year of significantly increased 
spending on new products. 

The company’s new proa nets in- 
troduced nationally during the fis- 
cal year include cookies, decaffein- 
ated coffee, liquid detergent, 
potato chips, toothpaste and hair 
conditioner. 

" "The only healthy way to build 
increased earnings is by increasing 
volume," Mr. Butler and Mr. Smale 
said in their statement. 


SYRIAN ARAB REPUBLIC 
MINISTRY OF OIL AND MIFfflKAL RESOURCES 
GENERAL COMPANY OF HOMS REFINERY 


CdJ tor Tender No 1894- 
for Base Lobe Oil Complex Project 


Genual Company of Homs Refinery, a (Uie ornnuukra of tbe Syrian Arab 
Republic, announces ha imoaioB to invite Una in (20th Inly 1985) from 
qualified contractor for engineering aappty. and counnactkm (on tarn key job 
butt). 


Tbe acope of lhe work includes mainly tbe conatzuctioa of the fallowing proems 
unity 


i” 1 Grade oil tan rephcric dutiJhliim id tbe Ubvin crude* 

- Light- Syrian - -IJriK Amman 

-Lwhalnnmn - light. Kbknk 

Uml capacity 2L5 milhoa CT* Hgjbi erode oil and/or 3 mUEom heavy Syrian 

erode mL/year. 

In addition LPG treating unit (Meros) capacity 50,000 MT/year 

2. VaenmB diadOation turn c apa c i ty 700JOD MT/year 

3. Varum residue deaspbattutg capacity 30QX100 MT/year 

4. ’ Furfural extraction unit capacity 250,000 MT/year 

& MEC/TOL dewaxing unit capacity 150.000 MT/year 

and wux mamdectanng (fmettocanoo 
fcjdrafi nwhin g, packing of finished 
mx) 

6. Hydrogen finishing amt capacity 120,000 MT/year 

AQ ofwdn are bued on feed charge la each anil. 

7. Gieaw manufacturing unit capacity 5.000 MT/year 

finished fiddnm grease (in be filled is barrel* and outs) 


The offer ia to consider a gyam ram plant whb 100.000 MT/year. 

amity of lobe oil baac s mel t * , namely: 
neural advent (BVI 55) 

200 neutral aoWem (BVf 65) 

300 neutral solvent (BVI 95) 

500 neutral Gofrem (H VI 160) 
brigfu atock (BYl 650) 


with a near optimum product able for each feed stock. 


AB of 
mote dun 


More technical details and info rmatio n are to be me hid ed in Project Specifica- 
tion VoL (Q and ED). 


Tbe bidder abonld satiafy hiawdf of the aftHementiooed nmlcapac&ica, aa far as 
to meet the overall capacity of tbe wfaole bbe complex, with requited prednei 
■late, and to make cha ng es whoever he finds It neeemsrj. 


Bidder ghenld conclude am agn a ane al before b i ddin g with one w more of tbe 

*^3^ 4. Esso 

2. Texaco 5, IFP 

3. BP 6. PbDman Keflog 


Sudi «groereeu afumld cover the ficences of nmts noa 3, 4. 5 and 6 of tbe writ* 
wwiiawrf above and also ft. rfwuld cover tbe know how, project ape rificat ion, 
engineering, performance pmmea at lhe nnits. 


Tie lioeoce igreeinent duoid be on behalf of the General Co mpan y nf Homs 
Refinery which obonld be (he Eeunee after lhe ancce s afiil go an i ntoe test ran. 
Tbe agreement with tbe licensor ahonld be one of the offer dn c unmu l s and 
abonklbave Home Refinery acceptance. Tbe agreement dtonld arip nl me that 
both the Eeenaor and the coanacur will give tbe uecemary gnaraaeu wpanaely 
and jointly to Homs Refinery. 


General Company of Host Refinery would prefer to Until tbe number of 
contractors pntitapating for this project. 


Thraufore, bWh&ng i* opened rod restricted lo intcnatio c slly qualified contran- 
tors and firms who have a nit experience in ooattraefioa of rads project*. 
Bidden inmrested in exeentfaw of this projeci may obtain the necesmy 
doconmu from ContractinK Dcpsnmeu. General Company of Horn Rcfiaety, 

How. Syria. Bunting Graft 15J-.IS8S. 


The value of the tender docaeaent is VS$7fiOO to he transferred to General 
Company of Hotna Refinery, account no 3001/28 in tbe Commercial Bank of 
Syria, Hores - Branch no L 


There fore General 
ibeir bids with any other i 


of Homs Refinery invites those firm* to ralanit 
; data addressed toe 


Homo - Bam tribe OH Conmlex Prow* Com m ittee, 
General Company of Horn* Befineiy, 
]TOBm3S2, 

Horan, S y ri a * 


Trier ao - HRC 441WH 5Y 
Cable addreM > Horn* Beffnery, Syria 


TV IbtuVt ■honld be Babmitied inside three cloaed envelopes: 
L The one for (he had hood 

2. Tbe second one for the technical offer 

3. The tWid cawlope fee the financial sad commercial offer 


These tfcrae enwhwes ahonld be cotnained in a ftnmh eavelopc on which the 
nnntbcr «rf the tender, the subject and dosing date should be tndkated 


The lanriiri dale for sa h rajamon of tender doeumeua is 13.00 afternoon local 
time. «t Sunday. 15th December 1985. 


Tbe offer should (dll stand vaRd sir months from terminal date. Bid bond 
Aould be issued by Gmnaerefal Bank of Syria, Hems - Branch no Lat lhe me 
of 2% of the total vabe of the offer, the perfbnnaree bond «t 10% of the total 
.value of the coniiucL 


fiw nqeetfoa of any offer uiH not he gvea. 


He B^atorr Deerce no 195 dated 2S.7.1974 and Syiian hw and regtdnunw 

will gn*ea tfau tender. 


Tbecoobatf stamps m the rate of L24fft and theadv aOvem cntcosM wiflbe 
dsdneted ftont the total sum of L/C 


• jST means Metric Ttm 


Horan Refinery 
Dr. KLK. Kirfonl 
General Director 


Phamuum Dollar Eases Lower as Pound Gains 


Profit Rose 
17%inHalf 


Compiled hy Our Staff from Dispatches 


By Juris Kaza 

International Herald Tnhune 

STOCKHOLM — Pharmacia 
AB. the Swedish pharmaceuticals 
and biotechnology group, said 
Thursday that pretax earnings in 
tbe first six months of 1985 in- 
creased 17 percent from a year ear- 
lier, lo 368,2 million krouor (5435 
million), from 315 million kronor. 

Sates rose 25 percent, to 1.703.8 
billion kronor, the company said. 

The company reaffirmed its ear- 
lier forecast that earnings for all of 
1985 would rise by about 20 per- 
cent from the 1984 level of 636.9 
million kronor. 

The company did not report sec- 
ond-quarter results. On the basis of 
stated first-quarter results, howev- 
er, it earned an indicated 1862 mil- 
lion kronor in ihe second quarter, 
virtually unchanged from 182 mil- 
lion kronor in tbe first quarter. 

Sales rose to an indicated 865.7 
million kronor from 838. 1 million 
kronor in the first quarter. 

Analysts termed the results dis- 
appointing. With earnings up only 
17 percent in the first quarter, one 
said, Pharmacia will have to boost 
second-half earnings by more than 
20 percent to meet its own forecast 
for the year. 

Pharmacia said its biotechnology 
business recorded the fastest 
growth in the half, with sales up 33 
percent, to 420,9 million kronor. 
Health care, the company's largest 
business area, posted a 23-percent 
sales rise, to 1.1722 billion kronor, 

By division, the company said 
that rapid growth was posted by its 
oplhalmics unit, with sales up 42 
percent, and by the hospital- prod- 
ucts division, where sales rose 45 
percent. 


NEW YORK —The dollar con- 
tinued (o drift lower in inactive 
trading Thursday, reflecting ner- 
vousness over the Treasury's 30- 
year bond auction. Dealers said tbe 
markets were also awaiting further 
data on which to base another ma- 
jor upward or downward move. 

The British pound, meanwhile, 
rose following reports that the cen- 
tral Bank of England had inter- 
vened in the markets Wednesday to 
stabilize the British currency and 
on renewed speculation that the 

European Monetary System float 
arrangement would be realigned. 

In London, the pound closed at 


Sl.3550. up nearly 2 cents from 
SI 3388 on Wednesday. In New 
York tbe currency rose to SI 3500 
from 51-3400 on Wednesday. 


'‘Sterling moved ahead at the ex- 
pense of the dollar." one dealer 
said. ‘’Most attention focused on 
the pound as the market awaited 
results of the U.S. Treasury's bond 
sale." 


After the markets dosed, the 
Treasury announced that it had 
sold 563 billion of 30-year bonds 
at an average yield of 10.66 per- 
cent. the lowest yield for that matu- 
rity since May 1983. 

In Frankfurt, the U.S. currency 
was fixed at midaf ter noon at 


28373 Deutsche marks, down 3 
pfennigs from the Wednesday fix 
of 2JB612 It dosed lata in New 
York at at 28300, down from 
Wednesday's dose of 28485. 

Other late dollar rates in New 
York Thursday compared with late 
Wednesday, included: 2J590 Swiss 
francs, down from 23570; 8.6450 
French francs, down from 8.6925, 
and 1,893.00 Italian lire, down 
from 1,898.00. 

Late dollar rates in Europe, com- 
pared with late Wednesday's levels, 
included: 2.3445 Swiss francs, 
down from 23515; 8.6690 French 
francs, down from 8.7105. and 
1.896.00 Italian lire, down from 
1.90425. (VP1. Reuters} 


Geneva 


We have pleasure in announcing the following appointments: 


MOHAMED BEN ABDALLAH 
Manager-Stock Exchange / Private clientele 


ALI BENOUARI 

Deputy Manager-Foreign Exchange & Treasury 


SAUDI FINANCE CORPORATION 

Member of A I Saudi Bank Group 
2, rue Thalberg 

P.O. Box 901 - Phone (022) 32 64 00 
CH-1211 GENEVA 1 - Switzerland 


INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE 


A FAIRYTALE CHATEAU 
IN AN ENCHANTED SETTING 



XVI-CENTURY 
RENAISSANCE STYLE 


1V6 boon drive from Paris 
L» Fert^-Benurd, Suthe 


For ide with elegant fanristriiig rad contents 
Recently renovated ud tastefully decorated 
Full ositnl heating 
Farmhouses and gatekeeper's cartage 
French park of 75 acres, gardens, 
fruit orchard, forest surrounded 
by walk and fences 


Contact: Ldbenmtrasse 45 E, CH- 6300 Zng., Switzerland. 
TeL 042-21 57 68. 


OFFERS around U.S $750,000 
Should contact tbe above address or teL no. 


EAST HAMPTON, N.Y. USA 
SECLUDED 6 ACRE 
COUNTRY ESTATE5 A 

An East Hampton town on the of Long 

1 stand Seven beq^J^^veodecl un- 
developed. 5!fe, Id 8’A acres. 

Fully 

Special Places For Special People 

LONA FHJBEIMSTEIN INC. 

02 Pork Place, East Hampton NY n 937 (516)324-8200 

Subject to Eori Hampton Town Aepraval 


IK 


- _ ALGARVE - PORTUGAL 

THE DEVELOPMENT 
^ ^luiua OF DISTINCTION 


Ocean front property, with luxury village apartments, fully 
furnished/ equipped from £23,800. 


Beaches, pools, tennis, squash, sauna, restaurants, bars, shop- 
ping center all on site. 

Please contact for detailed information: 

S AO RAFAEL, URBAN1ZA£&£S, LDA 
SESMAR1AS 
8200 ALBUFHRA. 

’ Tel.: 089/53384/53324. Telex: 56952 RAFAEL P. 


MADRID- SPAIN 
UJXllHY PROPERTIES 


on 


PRIVATE ESTATES 
with security 

Beautiful living areas, from 4 lo 
10 hedroomi, 3-7 bathrooms. 

double garages, swimming pool. 
Plots varying between 
Vi acre - 2 acres. 
Constructed areas comprising 
S^OOaqjL- 12000 sqJL 

Prices from 
£60,000 - £340,000 
SJtf. PROPERTIES 

TeL: 073781-3913 
and 073783-2981 
Tekac 261901 SMG G (England) 


LAKE TRAVIS 
AUSTIN, TEXAS 

700 ACRES 

4 MILES LAKE FRONTAGE 
Unique Cove With 
Strong Development 


CALDWELL 
LOCKHART, TEXAS 
824 Acres 
Vi Mile Froau&e 
on Co. Rd 


SCHNHPER/KINC Co- 

“Nay arm 

v Austin. Texas T8705 


(512) 477-5827 


ARIZONA 


SCOTTSDALE - PHOENIX 


millionaires only 


Former state of Arizona Gover- 
nor's Mansion can be yours. Be- 
gan* in design wWi a superb loco- 
tfon and panoramic view. FuSy 
secured 24-hour guard, six baths, 
five bedrooms, pooL WHi indude 
1963 Rolls Royce Silver Shadow. 
Will trade for airplanes, listed 
stock, gold or silver. A bargain at 
US $2,195,000 currency. Call: 
Federal Realty Investors Inc. 
"Owner" 4256 N. Brown Avenue, 

Ste. A. Scottsdale, 

Arizona 85251. |602) 949-1822 
l -80042 1 -0078 Outside Arizona. 

Other properties also available. 


SHORT HILLS, NEW JERSEY 
EXECUTIVE RANCH 
$1,400,000 

UMarf oty 30 minufes from naftown M»- 
hoftan k» prengjaut Short rffe. AS bndi 
haw wiHi dot fad on oftwtf ana acre of 
betxafwOy Imfeasped proparty. Exquoitriy 
daeoroiad and 

privraa settrej. Spacious marbla miry ftA 

stick** Bvifla room fevreol Map non; wop- 
nSami Sawyi araw ba rfe o w wah “ho & 
ddraurn 
eh wrih mi 


I faadroona 


ibolh. 


pha o nvadTa room & boh. Bwd ddng 
gto. doon^Md io ifabrnrivl 


foot: Barbara Damon, Btfaanon Dvi 
AliSOPP Baabon, V Man St, 
Attbura. NJ 070*5-1370. J30I-V6-3366. 


MOUGINS EXCEPTIONAL 


New Provencal House of 378 sq.m, comprising: 


AAain House with 3 bedrooms, each with Hs awn both room "En 
Suite", Master has fireplace; Kitchen with all Modem Conve- 
niences; Dining Room; Study; Large Salon with Fireplace; Powder 
Room; Office; Workshop. 

Separate Guest Apartment of 2 Bedrooms, Kitchen, Living Room 
with Fireplace & Bathroom. Separate Staff Studio. Covered 
Heated Swimming Pool, 3 m. Health SPA-Jaeuzzi Style, complete- 
ly enclosed. 

Over 400 sq.m, of terraces for entertaining. 4-Car Garage + Car 
Port • fully equipped for Chauffeur to maintain cars. 

Latest "Laser Beam" Security Systems & Closed Grcuit Televi- 
sion, 15 m. Communications Antenna, Telex, 300 sqjm. putting- 
green. Expensively landscaped gardens complete with waterfall, 
fountain & remote control garden figthing system. 

Situated in 5,000 sq.m. Park, backing on to the National Forest at 
entrance of Goff Gub of Carwes-Mougins. 


ideal for Embassy, or Consular Official, or Infl Execu- 
tive searching comfortable & Secure residence in South 
of France. 15 min. from hfice Airport, & space for 
private Helicopter landing. 


Total investment of FF9^500,000, however, owner needs to sell 
for personal reasons, therefore will consider reasonable offer. 


CaH Monte-Cario 33 (93) - 25 74 79 days, 25 63 91 evenings. 
Weekends 75 75 52- 


Own land in the greats 


American West 


Five or more 
acres of 
this land can 
be yours. 
Easy credit 
terms 
available 


Here's an outstanding oppor- 
tunity to acquire a sizable 
piece of America's ran chi and 
at a very modest cost. 

Sangre de Cristo Ranches Inc., the land de- 
velopment subsidiary of Forbes Magazine, 
the American financial publication, is now 
offering for sale scenic ranchland in Colorado's 
Rocky Mountains. Spectacular land for a 
homesite and a lifetime of appreciation. 
Minimum 5-acre ranch sites starting at 54,500 
Send today for fact kit and full color brochure 


FORBES EUROPE 


SANGRE DE CWSTO RANCHES INC. 


P.O. BOX BS. DaoL WT 
fllSUT 




LONDON SW11 
ENGLAND 


Name. 


Address. 


Texas 


Outstanding one story air conditioned 
176,600 sq. ft. building on 20 acres. 


IIBINSWANGER 

i rac Walnut <5t Philn PA 10103 • 715-448-0000 



1845 Walnut SI.. Phtla.. PA 19103 • 215-448-6000 
New York. NY • Chicago, IL ■ Atlanta. GA ‘Charlotte. NC 
Raleigh. NC • Winston-Salem. NC • Columbia, SC 
Dallas. TX • Orlando. FL • Oxford, MS ■ Denver. CO 
London ■ Brussels * Rotterdam - Amsterdam • Pans 


COMMERCIAL & INDUSTRIAL REAL ESTATE 
COUNSELING • MANAGEMENT • APPRAISALS 


PEARCE ITRSTADT 
JMAYER&GREER 
Exclusive 3WC 
Luxury Rentals 

Our experienced staff provides in- 
dividual service and expertise to 


meet vour residential needs. 


By appointment, contact 
Iria Hevxnan 


<212) 988-6100 
135 E. 65th St., 
N.Y., N.Y. 10021 


INTERNATIONAL 
REAL ESTATE 


appears every 

FRIDAY 


To piece an Advertisement 
contact our office in yout country 
(fisted in Classified Section} on 


Dominique Bouvet, 
181 Ave. OariesJf-GanDe, 
92521 NariDv Cedes, France. 
Tekpboae 747.1Z65. 
Telex: 613595. 



.-Cf" .. ./ 




Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 1985 



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18ft 19ft + ft 
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Hojiting-Rate \o*es 


Dollar 




24W Mft 
22* 15ft 
12 4 

toft 4* 
18* 13ft 

3*]S£ 

7* 3V. 

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13ft 
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13ft 
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18* 

17* 

21* 

45ft 
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13* 13* 
13* 12* 
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1* 1* 
2 * 2 * 
13* 13* 
6* 


21* 21* 21* + * 
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7* 7V9 7ft 
15ft 15ft 15ft 
21 2D* 71 + ft 

24* 24* 24ft— H 
6 6 6 
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Seize the vwrkL 

Thelntanatiooai Herald Trihont 
Bringing tbc World’s Most 
Inyortant News to the WaricTs 
Most Iiqpcrtant Audience 


ADVERTISEMENT 

1 NTE RNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) August 8/ 1985 

net aaet wtfue quateffoas are mipp<M by the Foods Haled wtlta tbe «xoapttBB of sene ooetoa baaed «a beet arte* 

Tbe marginal symbols Mkate freaeoacy of wo Wflw * idppIIM:IiI> - dally; (w) -.weekly; {b)-W-moalWy; ir)-rewrtarty; (O-lranflarty. 


NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 

FIDELITY 
DISCOVERY FUND 

Society dlavesdsseiiieiit A Capital Variable 
37 me NoCre-Dame. Luxembourg RXLLmcembomy B 22250 

Notice is hereby given ihai the Annual Geoertd Meeting of tbe Shareholders of FIDELITY DISCOVERY 
FUND, a Societc dlnvestissetneat A capital variable, organized under the lows of (be Grand Duchy of 
Lmamboun(the“Fumn.win be bddt the principal and regi s tered office of (he Fund. 37 rneNoue-Dame. 
Luxembourg, ai 1 LQOaji. on August 29. 1985. spe c ifical ly , but without limhariorL ibr (be following purposes: 


1. Presentation oT (be Report of tbe Board of 
Directors; 

2. Presentation of tbe Report of (he Statutory 
. Audi ton 

3. Approval of ibe balance sheet at April 30 , 1985 
and income statement ior the period ending 
April 30. 1985; 

4. Discharge of Board of DirectoR and (he 
Statutory Auditor 

5. Election of six 16) Directors, specifically the 
re- ejection of all present Directors. Messrs. 
Edward C. Johnson 3nJ, William U Byrnes, 
Charles A. Fraser. Htsashi Kutofcawa. 

John M. S. Panon, and Errim trust; 

6. Ejection of tbe Statutory Audhoc. specifically 
the re-election of the present Statutory 
Auditor, Maurice J.Scigant: 

7. Declaration of a cash dividend to (be 


Shareholders, and authorization of the Board 
of Directors to declare further dividends in 
respect of fiscal year 1^5 if n e c e s s ar y 03 enable 
tbe Fund to qualify for "distributor" status 
under United Kin&Jora tax law. 

8. Consideration of such other business os may 
property come before die meeting. 

Approval of tbe above items on the Agenda wiH 

require the affirmative vote of 8 majority of the 
shores present or represented at die meetin g, with 
no min imum number of shares req u ired to be 
present or represented at die Meeting in order to 
establish a quorum. Sobjeer to the limitations 
imposed by law and the Articles of Organization 
of the Fund, each share is entitled to one note: 

A shareholder may act at any meeting by proxy 

By order of the Board of Di r ectors 

Dated: July 29, 1985 


the Fond invests In a eoaemtraled portEolo of caicfaOysekcfed US equities. Emphasis a placed an under- 
researched stock*, chow for tbdr low relative asset price, good recovery prospects nd strong babnea 
dbeot The portfolio cw nrody unqiliariieiEacrp/MitEriabl^l, Services 119%), l udu shM (18%) and 
Comwni»r|t2%|. Tbe Fend was hmicfcedoa 21 Jaifiy B>85 rathe offer price of SBUfoTheFtaad was 
valued St S47re M llw offer price of SlUl on 23 Ji^y 1985. 

C o pfcj of tbe OfleffegCbcalar nod latest Q nfcrfy Report can he obtained Iron FMrfhy l^a mltim l ate 


RO. Box 670. Pembroke HaQ 
EsA Broadway, Pembroke 
Hamilton. Bermuda 
Til: (809) 295 0665 
Tbfcn: 02803318 


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Tdex; 4192260 


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Non Dollar 

























































ic fe'fv'iti r - ;^f rj i; • ■ * : Sr .'-.- -' 




^ Major U.S. Airlines Will Raise Fares 

’ 3? Sarah Oaccs manager erf corporate mmmnm o low or even nonexistent on popular 

; _ : ^Wi^unPmSer^ *= ' * — Waw th * 


INTERNATIONAL HERAU TRIBUNE , FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 1985 

businesspeople 


Page 15 


SSTSS Stock Exchange to Of Arthur Young & Co. 

gave the first large discount to fly- airline can fill a pbne with custom- — - TnnP^trtlS ^ Jr%±tMX “o 

ere eight years ago. “We play a very ere paying the full fare. TOrBlgil ITaJcoU/ia KfUjm corporate officer 

refined game of how many seats to Tt* heavydisosunt lajes_we NEW YORK — Arthur Young based in Lusaka. He s 

sdUlwfiat price.” unec^nncafly low, said LMtas ..« ARTA _ Indonesia & Co. said Thursday that William Fortunate. who has i 

1 . Mr rvmam -The earner mans on jAJvail i a . '.r . ™ , > lL, « i t.’. 


,’H 3 5.‘ ! J; 3y Sarah Oaccs . . manager of corporate commmuca- low or even nonexistent on popular 

>;% {; ! 3 . > u Wash ington Past Serna tions at American Airlines, which routes at peak times because the 

i ; *;£. - WASHINGTON, — Air travel- gave the first large discount to fly- aiiike can fiU a plane with custom- 

■ aswill fere to search harder for ere eight years aga “We play a very efs raying the full fare. 
rj £7 baremsasaTCSultof dedaonsby refined game of how many seats to . The heavy discount 

gmorO^L airhneR to increase both sell at wfiat price.” unecononuca^ low, said uetus 

- discoimt and regular fares lait>r iKk • In fact, an airline can wait until Wr. Coggrn. the caiTier plans on 

1: ' 1 ; p nwnfiL ; 15 nunuus bdorc ffighi time to Ai^ I fto add 8 to 11 pcrcmi to 

•5, hi. Orated Airiines.tbe largest U.S. detdrajjzm whether seats can be fares with the largest discounts, al- 
’r'l ' carrier, udnijowt all of its discount »M at the discount price. though the company may hma 

l *> u ■■ super-coadj fares and two-thirds of Airline officials say that the new bade fare changes .until ^Eastern 

.14 its xc^dar faxes by S2 to $70 for. ' are pegged to the distance puts its new fares mw ettot on 

fi ; j*; *>' • purchased after Aug. 16. flown but admit that factors such Aug. 24, according to Mr. Logpn. 

■V r; Eastern Air Lines, American Air- ■* competition and popularity of American will raise prices of its 
•d ] h i; . tines, Republic Airlines, Delta Air *be route contribute io ihe pricing lowest fares by 120 for each round 

lines aryl other carriers p1at> to of afligfa. nip. Some fares will drop in mar- 
s’: i;] , raise sense rates to coincide with “Fares are really based on a com- hers where American faces sun 

-‘i \ ■:$%* TTnjiaft nu roay bination of nrikage and compcri- competition from other earners, 

j; U- Since, the introduetkm of air-farc ton,” said Robert Cqggin, assis- people Express, the no-frills, dis- 

r >• discounting in 1977, travelers and 1801 v ^ ce prcadcut erf marketing caa a.t airline responsible tor air 

]'» in i ■ travel -agents have Fought to snag development at Delta. _ faw ^ in several dues, is also 

i. ; > discount seats, which can beas Plans by ratines to increase the a rate increase for 21 out 

: S’ i ; '■ mnph as' 70 peiceat che^er than a P^e bfbargain seats indicate that ones, which will go into ettea 


Indonesia to Open Gladstone Nam< 3 d Chairman 


much as 70 peiceat cheaper than a 
full-fee ticket 

TOiy_ gi^ily today 

; ah the farther a ticket is bou^Thi 
advance, the greater the savings. 

UA airimes have profiled from 
- the complex strategy of balancing 
discoani and full-fare customers to 
fill tiieir planes. According to Air- 
tine Economics Inc, 84 percent of 
airline revenue in the first six 
months of this year came from tkk- 


thdr popularity has grown so much g_j L 5 
that the industry is cmifident that irUnewiD raise its fare from 

travelers on Inmted budgets will Newark. New Jer- 

figbiior the discount seals even al 539 

slighdy highH- prices, according to K 5 to 559 

ffaarsttrsws J™ 

new “Super 14" plan that allows a Fares to London, 

travderTkvesC45p«ooitif md ^g^S^tjSsSSUy 

the ticket is bought two weeks m Oti^ rate increases win vwj 


ssr tiss-j •-«-» 


of all revenue cooks from business 
travelers. 

££ “To optimize those profits, we 
’y want as- many of those seats to be 
full as possfble,” said John Holard, 


are going up more rapidly than fuQ- 


“Like any 
t no ” Mr. 


iy, your costs 
la said. 


todi^^lri^bevery keep fares low in some anes. 


plans to allow limited foreign 
participation on its stock ot- 
Sange in a bid to revtiaiize 
trading, an official said Thurs- 
day. 

Nonvoting shares and certifi- 
cates will be offered abroad if 
the government approves the 

plan, the bead of the Jakarta 
exchange board. Barb Halim, 
said Thursday. 

A foreign joint venture in- 
vestment trust company will be 
established to issue shares and 
certificates for sale abroad, Mr. 
Halim said. The board will set 

the amount of shares each com- 
pany can sell he added. 

The exchange hopes that lim- 
ited foreign participation will 
boost trading and reverse a 
trend that has seen the prices of 
the 24 listed companies [ailing 
for several years, Mr. Halim 
said. . i 

The composite index of share 
prices stood Wednesday at 66.4, 
down from 100 when the ex- 
change opened eight years ago. 

The policy is part of a pack- 
age of new measures aimed at 
improving the stock market, 
Mr. Halim said. 


Renters corporate officer for Zambia, 

NEW YORK — Arthur Young based in Lusaka. He succeeds Tony 
& Co. said Thursday that William Fortunate, who has moved 10 Ciu- 
L. Gladstone has been named as bank’s Milan office. Mr. Aslam 
chairman, succeeding William S. turns over his duties as head of 
Kan aga. who will remain an advis- Citibank's corporate banking 
er after his retirement. group in Zambia to David Costd- 

The accounting firm also said loe, who previously headed the 
that Jesse Miles was appointed to bank’s branch in Cork, Ireland, 
the new position of deputy chair- Ddwa Bank Ltd. in London said 
man-international. Mr. Miles also pgjgf Barnett has been promot- 
was named chairman of the man- ^ lo manager, new business deveU 
agement council of Arthur Young ppmenL He will concentrate on cx- 
Intematioual. succeeding Mr. Kan- panding the bank’s syndicated loan 
aga. and capital markets- related busi- 

Mr. Gladstone joined the firm in oess jjj Austria, Belgium, France, 
1951 and was appointed managing Luxembourg, Ireland and Italy, 
partner in 1981. Previously, be was Dai wa Bank's headquarters are in 
New York office managing partner Osaka. 


and metropolitan region managing 

partner, the company said maker, has named Tomo RazmDo- 

Rfttereiser Gets Exna Post 

** l,er * __ „ bility for these operations from Pe- 

NEW YORK — E.F. Hutton ter Bonfield, who continued to look 
Group Inc. said Thursday that us l y >eEn af ieT becoming manag- 
presidem. Robert Rutereiser. has •„ director of STC International 
been named to the additional post c ompiJters Ltd. Mr. Razmilovic 
oT chief operating officer. He re- j oins ICL from Encore Computers 
places Thomas P. Lynch, who was w h CTe hg was president, inter- 
named to the post of vice chairman nal j ona i operations. He also will 
under a reorganization plan an- j 0 i nl h e boards of STC Iniernation- 


ICL, Britain's largest computer 
taker, has named Tomo Razmilo- 


HiR Samuel 
Names Tjioe 
To Thai Office 

International Herald Tnfcwif 

LONDON — Hill Samuel & 
Co, the London-based mer- 
chant bank, plans to open what 
it says will be the first represen- 
tative office of a merchant bank 
in Thailand. 

The new office, which is 
scheduled to open in Bangkok 
on SepL 16. will be headed by 
David Tjioe. a Thai national 
with 14 years' experience in the 
Thai economic and financial 
community. 

Most recently he was with 
PICA (Thailand) Ltd. as gener- 
al manag er and director. In that 
post his responsibilities includ- 
ed identifying, developing and 
finalizing all aspects of PlCA’s 
new equity investments in Thai- 
■ land. , . 

Hill Samuel said that ns 
opening of a representative of- 
fice in Thailand demonstrates 



David Tjioe 


ihe bank’s “recognition of 
Southeast Asia as one of the 
principal growth points of the 
worlds economy.” The new of- 
fice, the bank said, will engage 
in capital markets activity and 
trade finance. 


nounced June 3. ‘al Computers and the main opera 1 - 

By Brenda Erdmann ing company, IniernauonalCom- 
lntenumonai Hewtd Tribune puters Ltd. STC acquired ICL last 
LONDON — Citibank has year for £411 million (S546 mil- 
named Atman Aslam as country lion). 


Swiss Bank Coipu said Christian ster Bank PLC KJ? 

Engi will become ® _ , loves 

inToky-oonSepLLPrCTousy.he JSSSS-U, Swpxu he will 

was with Swiss Bank Coip. Inter- have respons jbility for market 
national Ltd. in London. strategy and investment research. 

Countv Bank LUL, the merchant Mr. Lyon formerly was with Scrim- 
bankmg'arm of National Westmin- geour Vickers & Co. . 


Earnings 


4 mprwan Is Attempting to Persuade Europeans to Eat Com on ihe Cob 

/imerwan IS ,± na ,^.forhta IMhud frozm packingsMoasw 


Revenue and profits* In millions, are In local eurrwKte 
unless otherwise Indicated. 


Nava. Alberta 
"M Quar. W*5 

Revenue 

OMr He *. — 


(Continued from Page 11) ( 

ed, stays “perfectly fresh-tasting” 
for 4 to 5 days, according to Mr. 


corr.nowisavBibbl^beremmmy 

XS ^ Sir physicist under the “Casino" label by the 
nmHiirM com on 220 hectares French supermarket chain. 


mainly for southern France and stan rial loans from the imnnot 

Serland; the same com is sold under a scheme to encourage new com to be about million Festival - Aug. 24 and 

St-^SSSJSf. by ^ «n .984 were 1, ntUhon 


v . V* i 

■ 


Brlkabi C—ada 

1 BOC Group George westan 

9 Moons . ins m* mow. iw wm 

SS7Sb- ’® SSSKtr ’S ’® 

Per Shore ..HUM HIM per Shore — 1A3 1^5 

1st HaH 'ins ISM 

Tl Group Revenue 4«m XML 

■ iss SS K?fe= s ™ 

• Moore. 

BritrxlM/Neth. 35 ® 

, Royal Dutch/ Shell p^sSare ~ ES Sn 


ed, stays -penecuy former nuc iear physicist under tne uismo wa M Having consolidated marxeis m « iu« y™ . 

psss a WiSm SSI 

sasraresass -n«ri-i.w. Stsstjuaas ssssaa . 


Brltala/Netk. 


OwNef— 
Oper Shore— 


1985 19M 

1J0JL 1.900. 
firs ?4» 
015 1139 


Royal Dutch/ Shell 

ess-iK-iS 

'Proms - nut 

WHOM JW.'JSt 

Revenue ajffl®* 3 f52(- 

Rrofii van. ij/» 


per Share — ■ OJl 
Rusufts hr US. dollars. 


Thomson Newspapers 
•BtHU ]JW 

Revenue 4»3 3*J-< 

Praflt 7 9J • Jy 

ParSnrt— OA* >MT 

HmgKa^ 

Hk A Shanghai Hotels 


sive market potential amongEuro- for rr^marawc^ in the works. Mr. Schubdm srnd 

peans who nave tasted .L he cites for frozen ,subronwcimg uuuugu ^ ^ ^ compress ^ cobs 

Strasbourg. . company, that Gelcom strips — potentially 

In 1980 , when “nobody in Strair which producttl 15,000 cubic meters (529000 cubic 

bourg knew what fresh com was, mid is feetiof cobs a year by 1988 -into 

scheduled^) roughly _lripleprodiK- Wquclio^twrcr the heauug 


with both Unicom ana ueicora nemnuu* cooked with com) to classic com 

showing profiB. This yeaM ie^nt- ^«^who^ ^ 

Canada’s Trade Surplus FaBs ^ Mr. Schubehn prefers .t 


inaaas irauc;oiiipiu?« 4 u^ progession. . . 

Reutm Tiny Bossendorf has 

OTTAWA Canada’s trade from anonymity as the hub of the ^ogtraljan Jobless Rate r alls 


zero to one ear per person. In the 
United States, where com on tne 


jqno rui Lire IK" 

Mother company, Unicom Pro- from French pvemment poha« 

ven^^^ spring^ 


su^lus narrowed iol!l8bMon whole opeiition. Cars ^foreign — ^ 

Canadian dollars (S867 million) in plates are erreetfrom CANBERRA — - Australia’s sea- 

June from a downward-revised so^ Ssted unemployment 

1 61 -billion-dollar surplus in May the beginning or each August imoi sonauv J the esd- 

: .TiiLMllinn^nllar sumlus in late September, when private pur- rale to 


Ihasday^ 


Sto WHCdf 

0 M profit 

ParShara — 


■ tUMoam . . 

Hiah Low Stock 


— ssasssastts SSs teteatsg SSSStSk 

“ 31 said Thursday. ^y-p^eoruaid.eUu.eon, .ueeu 


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Ike Daily Soon »fcc 
Investors* 




















** 


books 


- Jj 


Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one latter to each square, to term 
tour ordinary woida. 


GOUNY 

nj_.rn fe 


ODITI ! 


md 

□ 

□ 


n 

3EDDEG 



_L J 


LADVAN 


txt: 

_u 


A BEAUTY SALON 
19 A PLACE WHERE 
ITHJS MIGHT HAPPEN. 


Now arrange ttie elided letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


h—t n: mi n mu 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 
Jumbles: GIANT AUGUR FORKED SNITCH 
Answer: What they called the star of the monster 
Show— A STAGE "FRIGHT’ 


WEATHER 


Amttpntam 

Albans 
— rco t ae e 

■mwd r 

Berlin 

Brussels 

Bucharest 


c— e n beean 
Coda Del Sol 
Dufafta 
Bdlnbaren 

Florence 

Frankfurt 


EUROPE H,GH 

C P 

30 U 
IV M 

31 88 
2s ta 

21 70 

22 72 
21 70 
2D 61 
IS 44 

18 44 

27 81 
IS SV 
14 41 
29 B4 

19 44 
19 64 
17 43 
24 79 
24 79 
24 79 

19 44 
29 B4 
24 79 

28 82 
IB 44 
26 79 

21 70 

22 72 
H 44 
13 55 
24 79 
21 70 

20 4B 

24 79 

19 44 
10 44 

20 48 

MIDDLE EAST 


LOW 
C P 

20 40 

14 57 
22 73 

15 59 
13 SS 

12 54 

13 55 

14 57 
11 52 


V 48 


HeWnkl 
istanbal 
us Palmas 
Liman 

LMdoa 

Madrid 

Milan 

Moscow 

MmlA 

Wee 

Oslo 

Parts 

Prneae 

Revfctowlk 

Rom* 

Stockholm 


Venko 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


17 a 
B 44 
7 45 
14 57 

13 55 

7 45 

14 57 
22 72 
20 48 
17 43 
9 48 

12 54 

11 52 
20 48 
9 48 
17 63 
9 48 

14 57 

8 44 
B 44 

13 55 

14 57 
13 55 

15 59 

12 54 
12 54 

9 48 


Ankara 
Beirut . 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
Til Aviv 


34 93 
32 W 
34 97 

29 84 

30 84 


13 55 
24 75 
18 44 

14 41 
22 72 


OCEANIA 


A51A 

HIGH 

LOW 



c 

F 

c 

F 


Baagkak 

32 

90 

24 

75 

0 

061 II no 

34 

93 

23 

73 

fr 

Haas Kong 

33 

91 

22 

72 

cl 

Manila 

29 

84 

23 

73 

0 

NOW DeM 

34 

93 

26 

79 

St 

Seoul 

35 

95 

24 

75 

If 

Shanabal 

35 

95 

26 

79 

Ir 

Slpoopore 

32 

90 

24 

75 

o 

Tatael 

3S 

95 

27 

81 

0 

Tokyo 

33 

91 

75 

77 

o 

AFRICA 

Algiers 

32 

90 

W 

57 

fr 

Cake 

34 

<73 

23 

73 

Fr 

Cape Town 

15 

91 

6 

43 

tf 

Casablanca 

26 

79 

20 

68 

fr 

Harare 

25 

77 

13 

55 

fr 

Loses 

28 

82 

24 

75 

0 

NalroM 

25 

77 

10 

so 

d 

Tonis 

28 

82 

17 

63 

fr 

LATIN AMERICA 



Bdhos Aires 

13 

-55 

4 

39 

a 

Caracas 

27 

81 

IS 

44 

cl 

Una 

20 

68 

13 

56 

a 

Mexico City 

25 

77 

11 

52 

Cl 

Mode Janeiro 

27 

81 

22 

72 

lr 

NORTH AMERICA 



Anchorage 

14 

61 

10 

50 

sh 

Atlanta 

29 

84 

21 

78 

PC 

Boston 

27 

81 

19 

44 

sh 

Chicago 

30 

86 

14 

57 

fr 

Denver 

34 

93 

15 

59 

ne 

Detroit 

» 

84 

16 

61 

fr 

Honofale 

31 

88 

23 

73 

PC 

Houston 

35 

95 

94 

75 

PC 

LMAnwiei 

30 

86 

18 

64 

fr 

Miami 

31 

88 

23 

73 

DC 

Minneapolis 

32 

90 

17 

63 

PC 

Montreal 

27 

B1 

18 

44 

d 

Nassau 

35 

95 

23 

73 

PC 

New York 

27 

81 

21 

70 

sh 

SanFrancbco 

23 

73 

11 

52 

fr 

Seattle 

18 

46 

13 

15 

in 

Toronto 

28 

82 

19 

64 

PC 


Auckland 16 41 4 43 o 

Sydney 18 44 12 54 h 

cl -cloudy; fo-fapavr fr4alr; hhalu o-ovbtcdst; nc-aarttv 
sh-s ho wers; sw-snow; si-stormy. 


WOMiMtM 


84 IB 
cloudy; 


44 d 
r-rahi; 


FRIDAYS FORECAST— CHANNEL: SHghllvetWPOV. FRANKFURT: Clowoir. 
Temp. 21 — 14 tTO—571. LONDON: variable. Tenw. 20 —JO 140 — SOL 
MADRID: Folr. Temp. 30 - 13 (86 —55). N EW YORK: FOl^ TemP. ®— 22 
(84 — 72J. PARIS: Ckjodv early, toir lator . TBtnn.24— 15 179 — 59). ROME: Fair. 
Temp. 27-15 181-591. TEL AVIV: NA. ZURICH: aoudy. Temp. 23-13 
173 - 551. BANOKOKr Thundwsiorms. Tamp. 33— 25 (91 - 77l. HONGKONG: 
Fair. Teem. 33—78 191—821. MANILA: ShOlMr* Temft 39— 24 (84 — 75). 
SEOUL': Showers. Temp. 34 —24 (93 — 75). SINGAPORE: Fair. Temp. 31 —24 
(88 — 79). TOKYO? Fair. Temp. 33 — 24 (90 — 79). 


YVbrid Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse Aug. 8 

dosing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated 


ABN 

ACF Holdlno 

AEGON 

AKZO 

Ahold 

AMEV 

A'Dam Rubbar 
Amro Bank 
BVG 

Buehrmam T 

Caland Hldo 

Elsevier-NDU 

Fokknr 

Glal Brocades 

Heineken 

Hooaavens 

KLM 

Naarden 

Nat Header 

Ncdilavd 
Oce Vunaor G 
PoklM*d 
Philips 
Robeco 
Rodamco 
Rolloco 
Rorento 
Ravel Duleti 
Unilever 
Vdn Ommoren 
VMF Slorfc 

VNU 


499 JO 
240J0 


BL50 

88 


121 
235J0 
267 
BJO 
tOM 
202 
101 99 

37 JO 37 JO 
129 127 JO 
80 79 

213 21X50 
151 150 JO 
4440 66.10 

40.10 59 JO 

49J0 49 

73.10 7Z3S 
179 JO 179 

341 341 JO 
AflJO 6860 
46.40 46.70 

75.10 75 JO 
132JO 13230 

48.90 69 

46J0 44 

191 JO 194.10 
334 341J0 
29 29 

237 JO 

211 206JO 


anp.cbs Gent Index : 215J1 
Previeai : 217J0 


Arbed 

Bekoert 

Cockerlli 

Gaboon 

EBE5 

GB-Intia-BM 

GBL 

Gevaort 

Hoboken 

info room 

Kredtatbank 

Pelmfina 

SocGeneraie 

Safina 

Salvor 

Traction El«e 
UCB 


Vlellfe Monlaone 


14B5 1700 
5440 5440 
217 217 

3445 3425 
2875 2875 
3440 3450, 
1B85 1090 
3820 3950 
5340 5J40 
2195 2200 
8900 8050 
5700 5670 
1780 1780 
7220 7230 
4443 4440 
3755 3755 
4995 4905 
1445 1705 
7010 7000 


Current Slack Index : 2304J4 
Previous : 2303.13 


Frankfurt 


AEG-Tetefunken 

AlliaiUVers 

AJlann 

BASF 

Barer 

Bay Hvna Bank 
Bay VerefnsMnk 
BBC 

BHF-Bank 

BM W 

Commerzbank 
Cont Gumml 
Daimler-Benz 
Deaussa 

Deutsche Babcock 
Deutsche Bank 
Ores dnar Bank 
OHH 
Haroener 


129J0 129 
1388 139S 
354 3S4J0 
22030 219.10 
220218J0 
359 358 

392 387 

237 217 JO 
316 313 

44030 421 

213JD209JD 
15050 148J0 
873 JO 841 
358 355 

159 154 

548J0 542 

288J0 2ta 
174J0 172 

298J0 298J0 



CMM 

Tev. 

Hochtief 

64C 

638 


218J0 218J0 



Horten 

184 184J0 


331 

328 

IWKA 

277 JO 

277 

Kail + Sab 

285 2B4JQ ' 

Korwadt 

234J0 231 JO 

Koufhof 

278 

266 

KloeCfcner H-D 

283J0 282JD 

Kloecfcner Werfcc 

41.10 

42 


lHja 


Unde 

492 

492 

Lufthansa 

215 21+50 

MAN 

140 

141 

Mamesmonn 

189 JO 189JO 

fc&iaiKh Rueck 

17SO 

1740 

Nbcdorf 

542 

529 

PHI 

650 642JD 

Porsche 

13051289V, 

Prews®3B 

267 26SJ0 

PWA 

137 

137 

RWE 


183 

Rhekitnetall 

315 

318 

Scherkia 

441 

443 




Siemens 

548 547 JO | 



VWjo 

B 1 1 

Volkswagenwerk 

3I9JD 

312 


605 

615 

I Commerzbank index : 1414J0 

1 

I 

l 



II II 


2120 

2130 


17J0 

18. 10 

China Ltphl 

1590 

1fc» 


BJO 

BJO 


47 

4825 


2325 

248 


1050 


HK Electric . 

US 

8.75 


12J0 

12J0 

HK Hoists 

38 



AJ5 



7J0 

7J5 

HK Telephone 

9 JO 

9 JO 

HK Yaumntel 

US 

3J5 

HK Whorl 

6.90 

435 

Hutch Whamasa 

27 

2630 

Htrsan 

0J4 

0J5 



037 


1330 

13J0 


15J0 

15L40 


830 

830 

Miramar Hotel 

41 

4135 

New world 

7JS 

735 

Orient Overseas 

2.15 

2.15 

SHK Props 

1230 

13.10 

5toluic 

235 

180 

Swire PodHcA 

2430 

2530 


220 

220 


1.10 

iJX 



mm 

Wins On Co 

.134 

134 

Wtnsor 

5.15 

530 

World Inti 

1325 1325 1 

Hone Steel ndox : 

147155 


Previous : 1498J4 



| Inhnu r 

*53 

□ 


AECI 

Anqlo American 
Artflie Am Gaid 
Barlows 
Blyvser 
Buffets 
De Beers, 
Driefonlmn 
Elands' 

GFSA 


80S 780 

2750 2490 
14000 15850 
1120 1070 
1140 1075 
6500 4350 
1015 1030 
4400 4200 
1575 1550 
2950 27W 


Harm any 
Hlvoltf Steel 
Kloof 
Nedbank 
PrasStevn 
RuMrfat 
SA Brews 
St Hel ena 
Sasai 

West HaUlne 


445 413 

4450 4300 
1X75 1350 
4700 45® 
1540 1540 
775 740 

3125 2900 
445 445 

5300 4900 


Composite Stack 
Previous : 182SJ8 


ndex: 1KSJ0 


AA Coro 
Allled-Lvons 
Anelo Am Gold 
Am Brit Foods 
Am Dairies 
B ar clays 


517 SUM 
225 224 


BAT. 

Bcacham 

BICC 

BL 

Blue Circle 
noc Gram 


575 

222 

144 

394 

559 

3U 

331 

193 

34 

501 


Bowaier Indus 

BP 

Brit Home 51 
Brit Telecom 
Brit; _ 

Brttoil 
BTR 
Burmah 
Cable wlrales* 
Cadbury Sctrw 
Charter Cons 
CarmncrdalU 
Cons Gold 
CourtauMO . 
Dafpety 
DeBoers* 
Distillers 

DrlefaifeM 
Flsans 
Free Si Gad 
GEC 

Gen Acekfem 
GKN 
Glaxo t 
Grand Met 
GRE 
Guinness 
GUS 
Ha man 
Hawker 

ICI 

imperial Group 

LardSecurttta 
Leoal General 
Lloyds Bar* 
Lemma 
Lucas 

Marks and Sp 
Metal Box 
Midland Bunk 
Nat w«t Bank 
PandO 
Pllktnghm 
Pi may 
prudential. 
Ratal Elect 
Randfantem 
Rank 
Reed int) 
Reuters . . 
Royal Dutch c 
RTZ 
Santchl 
SataSburv 
Sears He idlnn 
Shell 


533 

287 

194 


571 

222 

144 

392 

557 

310 

333 

193 

35 

504 

294 

196 

310 


215 

330 


297 

195 

345 

220 


280 

S IS 

TO TO 

217 . 213 

439 424 

132 130 


1 Close 


STC 

in 

102 

5M Chartered 

444 

447 


49Q 



446 

444 


243 


Thorri EMI 

334 

332 


345 


Trofaluar Hse 

343 

364 

THF 

133 



210 


Un Hover C 10 35/4410 45/64 


181 



358 

240 

yvoolworiti 



F-T.3B index :95M8 


prevtotn :95S3B 



F.TJX.W latSe* 

129400 

Pravkns : 12S468 



f| MBbb || 

Banco Comm 

23400 23999 


3251 

325D 

Cleahatots 

10420 

10300 

Cradital 

2730 

2747 

ErManla 

11000 11180 

Formlfona 

13500 13410 

Rat 

41®8 

4198 

Generali 

56790 56790] 

IFI 

9895 

Hvl 1 

ItatcemenH 

47900 

4K0Q ] 

Itafcas 

1430 1446ft 1 


vsaOG 

99550 1 

fiftssMwmcn 

1188X8120000 


2090 

3H8 

Olivetti 

4345 

6260 

Pirelli 

3115 

3110 

RAS 

99050 

97308 


847 

870 

SIP 

2560 

2575 

SME 

13*7 

1361 

Snta 

3390 

3400 


16110 14280 1 

Stot 

3145 

3340 

M1B Canenl Index 

: NJL 


Pievleas : MH 



II Ptorfe • 1 1 


480 440 

284 281 

*211* 518ft 

*£ 

'488 433 

218 210 
13ft. 13 13/46 
303 383 

745 735 

256 254 


290 

315 

-472 

183 

260- 

m 

482 

414 

162 

303 

151 

448 

384 

434 

384 

264 

144 

484 

154 

MW 

480 
484 

298 

MVi 

sst 

497 

332 

94 

481 


202 

385 

679 

178 

245 

292 

472 

404 

143 

301 

151 

443 

384 

432 

371 

.244 

>148 

479 

153 

58m 

400 

474 

300 


549 . 
498 > 


Air Uaulde 
Atsfhom AfL 
Av Dassault 
Bancalra 
BIC 

Bonprp ln . 

Bouveues 

BSN-GO 

Correia ur 

Charoeurs 

Chib Mad 

Dartv 

Dumcz 

Elf-Aouitohw 

Europe 1 

Gen Eavx 

HOChelte 

UrtarpeCop 

Leorand 

Lesiewr 

i-Oreal 

MarteK 

Matra 

Merlin 

Michel In 

Meet H e nn ess v 

Moulinex , 

Occ l dentale 

Pernod Rte 

Perrier 

PWJPOOt 

Priiilempi 

Radkrtechn 

Redout* 

Roussel Udat 

Sanofl 

Skis Rrasftnoi 
Telemeocn 
Thomson CSF 
Tefal 


590 


587 
284 
1120 1120 

1M 1771 
783 800 

2155. JIM 
2315 3255 

6X9 637 

519 518 

1415 1410 

8D1 782 

195 19SJD 
779 743 

628 630 

1427 1434 

514 534 

2150 2151 
612 618 
2240 2257 

1545 1529 
1740 1740 
2120 2089 
1159 1155 

1814 1820 
8250 8120 
734 7Z7 

494 494 

485 4ML50 

342 358 

2745D wom 
290 285 

1540 1545- 
1517 1521 
481 494 

1400 1380 
2550 2500 
521 522 

227 jo mao 


330 


toevtous : 26&M 
JAC Index : ZI&J8 
previous : 2UJB 


Cold Storage 
DBS 

Fran- Neovu 

How Pur 

inchcone. 

Mai BanklnB 

OCBC 

OUB 

DUE 

ShenorHa 
Sim* Darby 
StwreLond ' 


2J5 245 

530 530 
545 540 
2.15 216 
123 223 


NA 5JD 
aS 835 


S Steamship 
St Tro d uw 

United Mod 

UOB 


272 2J2 

2)7 236 
WO NjQ. 
1J0 1J9 
234 235 

5J5 335 

290 0J0 
122 124 
144 JJ7 
N.O. 164 


Strolls Times ind Index : 7S7J9 
Previous : 757 Je 


AGA 

AHa Laval 


Scopo 

sw 


115 115 

190 191 

316 
444 450 

112 111 
NJO. 190 


SanOvHi 
Skanska 
SKF 

Iw edl UM Blcti 

Vahro 


244 244 

370 UJX 
173 174 

3JB 205 
N.Q. NA 
«s «0 
B8J 88 


194 195 

245 240 


ARoersvc 


Previous :3B2M 


i Index :38UI 




AO 

ANZ 

BMP 

Boral • 

Bo u p ah wlUe 

CastlemoJne 


COnKHCO 

CRA 

esn 

Duntoo 

Blder o ixt 
ICI Australia 
Mop aU an 
MIM 


Nat Aust Bank 
News Cara 
N Broken Hill 


QidCeal Trust 


Thomas Hatton 

Western Minks 

wasmoc BanUiH 
Woodslde 


244 248 
114 5.18 

436 472 

3J0 351 
1J8 U8 
7J8 7J6 

180 180 
1.90 WO 
5JKJ 578 
128 138 
250 253 

in 120 
2JB1 103 
230 230 
244 230 

125 135 
4J0 457 

430 430 

23S 232 
4.15 4.15 
1.74 1.79 

&78 5JD 
225 222 


ig « 


__ 4J2 

L2B 130 


ADOnflnariet index : vjsjo 
P ravfaus : 93U0 


Tokyo 


Akol 
AsaMChem 




Bonk i . . . 
Bridgestone 
Canon 
Caste 
citoh 

■Dai Nippon Print; 
DahmHouse - 
Dahm Securities - 
Fame 


388 3«3 
859 840 
821 S2S 
791 814 
S29 518 
974 977 
1540 1400 
428 419 
1040 1059 
785 799 
915 930 
7470 7748 


CINEMA OF PARADOX* 

French FUmmiiking Under the Ger- 
man Occupation 

By Evelyn Ehrlich. 235 pages. Illustrated. 
$25. Columbia University Press, 562 W 
113th Street, New York, N. Y. 10025. 


saees dealing with the French cmcmsuiJoiqpJi 
Goebbels' diaries as a key sotw*. and iT you 
woe to take his connwnis ai ftos value yoa 


would assume that the 


Reviewed by John Gross 
XT WHATEVER, else may have been amiss in 
W France in the late 1930s, ttwas abnmant 

• >■ — - nrlfriv finimnSl 


epoch for cinema. Desmte its rickety finmoai 
condition, the French film industry turned out 
a remarkable number of outstanding movies 
during those years, some as good as any ever 
made; in the summer of 1939, fa 1 example, the 
Li “i » Tom- se live and 


new releases included “Lc Jour se I tie 

“La Regie dujeu.” . . 

Then l ^ rmp war and Nazi domination . imr- 


ing the phony war of 1 939-40. only a handful of 
f ilms were made, and after the fall of France 


the prospects looked even bleaker. To all 
pearances, the French cin e m a was faced intn 
something dose to complete destruction. Yet 
during the four years that foUowed, the indus- 
try recovered and even flourished By the dme 


reeled toward stealing talent from 
for their own studios and comjnmg 
French output to the merest froth. Why ad 
they permit and even positively encourage a 
hign wvd of production? 

Tfliriirh , who has made use of many previ- 
ously un examined German documents, con- 
cludes there were two main reasons. In the 
early years of the occupation, for strategic 
reasons — they did not Want to have to diven 
military resources From the Sovie t Uniqn o r 
North Africa — tire Germans favwed gwing 
the French a fair degree of latitude m 8=*™: 
They «i<ri beheved a thriving French film in- 
dustry would enable them to compete effec- 
tively with the United Stares in the internation- 
al ma rket, establishing an opening that would 
ul tima tely be used to insure the purchase of 
their own films, Whether they realized it or twt, 
French filmmakers were meant to be serving 
long-term German interests. 

It could of coarse be argued that tire very act 

■ • m.4law »L. ilieoMi w mt irai 


m the liberation, more than 200 feature ^ns 
had been produced, many of them of mgh 
quality, some of them classics; new talents had 
emerged, new traditions had been devetopaL 
This is the first of the paradoxes Evelyn 
Ehrlich sets out to examine in her study « 
filmmaking during the occupation, . A second, 
related paradox is tha> most of the fiuns pro- 
duced, and virtually all the ones of any note, 
were made in the occupied zone, under direct 
Nazi rule. (In unoccupied Vichy France, by 
contrast, attempts to establish a major produc- 
tion cen ter- — '“Hollywood on the Cote d'A- 
zur” — ended in failure.) 



Moreover, one of the companies occupying a 
in the French cinema of the 


central position - 

period. Continental, was set up by the Ger- 
mans. Ehrlich has some valuable pages on 
Continental and on the little-known figure who 
ran it: Alfred Greven, a former. German pro- 
ducer and a dose friend of Hermann Goring. 

Greven was interested in malting money, not 
propa ganda, and only 2 or 3 of the 30 films 
produced under his auspices aroused objec- 
tions fromtbe Resistance. Indeed, since h was 
not subject to Vichy censorship, Continental 
offered its filmmakers greater artistic freedom 
than any other c ompa ny operating at tire time 
(another paradox), and on occasion they even 
managed to shp in a veiled patriotic message. 

Earlier writers have tended to treat tire pas- 


w IfcUWV J — : O _ 

the deviL But at least it can be daaned <m toe 
other side that none of the lams made daring 
the occupation offered tire Germans expbert 
support, and that only one fuD-len gt h feature 
— an attack on Freemasonry called “Forces 
Occultes” — was made at their direct behest 
Most of the films produced were staple com- 
mercial fare, but the more ambitious ones 
represented a marked departur e from the char- 
acteristic achievements of tire prewar French 
cinema. Ehrlich sums up the change neatl y: 
“Where once tire lured ana irregular features of 
Jean Gabin had suffered in tire misty lower 
depths of the French urban landscape, the 

« r ■ r ; — -( Tm9i U«y«yc 9 nvrMp 


~IjCS VlSuCUTS CUI Oim uausaw* *** 

phasis on fantasy and all^oiy, and a new wy 
of looking at tilings — theatrical, stylized, 

sensibility in Preach 


remote. 

This was the — „ — „ . 

movies until the l»0s. when a new generation' 
tumed against what it called “tire cinema of 
quality” (and it did not intend the phrase as a 
compliment). Today, most of tire products of 
this era are still out of fashion, and some look 
decidedl y pretentious. But their historical in- 

- ■ _ * »* - - -*—1^1— (A Ti illlW 


terest is mdisputabk — it is hard to befieve a 
moment like the one in “Les Vaateurs du Sait* 


Sotudoo to Previous Puzzle 


□ □ 

0 

□ naEiaa 


DO 

0 

E □ 


naan 

DE 

□ 

□ □ 


□□□a 

ED 

m 

□sn 

□□ a 



H3Q3 QDEinaCia 
BDanaaaaniaia 
□□qeiq □□□anaaci 


when the lovers’ hearts go on beating after they 
have been turned to stone will ever lose its 
place in the mythology of the occupation yean 
—and perhaps tire nme has come for a ended 
reassessmen t as wdL 

Such a reappraisal is not pan of Ehr lich's 
purpose. She s mot concerned with the comfi- 
tious under which films were made, and her 
book is chiefly valuable far the information h 


ji 




□□□□ 

■□□a 

□aa 


itics^ attitudes and institutions. Bat when she ’ 
does pause to mmtine an individual work — ! 
Henn-Georges Qouzofs rmrch-denonnad 


masterpiece “Le Corbean” (The Raven), far • ‘ 

'most always 


nmm 
ana 
ana 

□□□□□ anna 


instance — her comments are almost _ 
iU irminattrig rnongfa to make you witii die had 
given more space u> them. 


hi fr i 


John Cross is at the staff of The New York 
Times. .. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscotc 


A FTER leading the dia- 
mond king on the dia- 
gramed deaf, it might seem 
that 13 tricks would be avail- 
able, with the help of two heart 
ruffs. But that is an illusion, 
for if South takes two ruffs he 
has no way bade into his hand 
to draw trumps. South saw 
that one ruff vrould give him 12 
tricks, assuming a normal 
crump position, with an excel- 
lent chance of a 13th, 


chRncB of m even spade splic. 
West would be squeezed if he 
held spade length as wdJ as the 
diamond king. And East 
would be sqperaed if, as oc- 
curred, he hdd the heart queen 
and spade lengtiuThe contract 
would fail only if West protect- 
ed botii red stats and ust hdd 
spade length. 

The expectation was that 
this success would win 11 


pamts.bwitproved to win 14, 
1 more than tire mar] 


He woo with the diamond 
ace. led to tire heart ace and 
ruffed a bcj^rt. He then played 
five rounds of trumps^expect- 
ing to exert pressure on the 
defense. Apart from the 


: margin of vic- 
tory. In the replay North- 
South had a bidding misoiider- 
standing and rested in game, 
South's bold effort now had an 
ironic flavor, he could have 
taken his team to the final safe w 
ly by bidding six dubs, but 


bidding the grand slam risked 
Arfeat in the match as weB as 
the contract 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 1985 


Page 17 


SPORTS 


9 Months of Dispute Took 1 Hour to End 


By Murray Glass 

New York Times Senior 

NEW YORK — Negotiators for 


the baseball players and the dub 
lid wcdnes 


owners Wednesday that they 
had resolved nine months of dis- 
agreement in only one hour, thus 
ending thesceond baseball strike in 


ftveyears. . 
The scast 


season, which had been in- 
terrupted after Monday night’s 
games, will resume Thursday. The 
2 S games missed will be made up as 
parts of doubleheaders or on 
scheduled open dates. 

Shortly after noon Wednesday, 
the commissioner, Peter Ueber- 
roth, announced that a “tentative 
understanding” had been reached 
on a five-year contract The negoti- 
ators then went to the Major 
League Players Association office, 
where they put the agreement into 
contract language. A news confer- 
ence to announce the agreement 
was scheduled for 5 P.M., but the 


lawyers needed much more time 
with the 


One Army That’s Not on the March 


•w),‘ 

- Marcos 


Arrarfd PalmeT wasrtotexrired by Wednesday's practice round for the PGA Champion- 
ship, b ut tb eahe ifid not play welL Hie prestigious tournament ^beg^T2iursd^ at 


language, and the formal 
announcement was not made until 
10:45. 

The critical step in the talks came 
at the start of the 10 A.M. b; 
tng session at the apartment of Lee 
MacPhafl, the owners’ chief negoti- 
ator. While seven other members of 
the negotiating, teams waited in 
separate rooms, Donald Fehr, the 
union chief, and Barry Rona, Mac- 
Phail's counsel, met privately. 
Rona told Fehr the owners were 
willing to drop their demand for a 
cap cm the salary a player could 
receive from salary arbitration. The 
players already had indicated a 
willingness to agree to a change in 
the eligibility requirement for arbi- 
tration. 

The miles proceeded smoothly 
and quickly from that point. By the 
time Ueberroth arrived at Mac- 
Phail’s apartment at about 11 
A. ML, a new collective bargaining 
agreement, to replace the one that 
expired Dec. 31, had been worked 
out. Ueberroth, who had said be 
could not allow a strike, congratu- 
lated the negotiators, and everyone 
shook hands. 

Thus ended a strike that threat- 
ened to eradicate the last two 
months of the season, which so far 


i*:=a 


days in June and July and forced 
tbe creation of a split season. 

The issue that had induced that 
strike, compensation in the form of 
professional players for the signing 
of free agents, was a matter that did 
not receive much attention this 
tune. In fact, the two sides agreed 
to eliminate it altogether, meaning 
dubs that lose certain high-ranking 
free agents will no longer receive a 
professional player as compensa- 
tion. 

In tbe meantime, clubs and play- 
ers were instructed to prepare to 
play Thursday. Tbe season resumes 
with the New York Mels in first 
place in the National League's 
Eastern Division, the Los Angeles 
Dodgers leading the National 
League West, and the Toronto Blue 
Jays and the California Angels in 
first place in the American League 
East and West, respectively. 

Officials decided to treat the 
games, in effect, as rainouts that 
will be made up. Players' pay for 
the two days lost wifi depend on 
when the makeups are played. If a 
game is rescheduled as a separate 
te, players will receive their en- 
ure pay for that day. If a game is 
uled as pan of a double- 
header, players will receive half 


pay. Thus, players could miss no 
pay at all. or they could Jose the 
equivalent of one day's salary. 
They will not lose service-credit 
time for the strike. 

Although the owners' contribu- 


tion to the players' benefit plan 
started out as the central issue, it 


was eclipsed in recent weeks by the 
dispute over salary arbitration, the 
procedure by which a player can 
have a salary disagreement settled 
by an arbitrator. 

The players wanted to leave the 
J 2-year-old system intact, which 
called for an arbitrator to select 
either a figure submitted by a play- 
er or the one submitted by nis team. 
The owners, saying they wanted to 
retard the rate at which salaries 
have increased, demanded two sig- 
nificant changes. They wanted to 
raise the eligibility requirement 
from two years of major league 
service to three, and they wanted to 
restrict an arbitrator' s salary award 
to 100 percent over the previous 
year’s salary. 

The players, though, were ada- 
mant in their stand against the 
maximum increase. 

“Once we educated everyone to 
the consequences and the ramifica- 
tions of the cap," said Buck Marti- 


nez of Toronto, the American 
League's alternate player represen- 
tative. “we had tremendous 
strength.” 

The owners clung determinedly 
to tbe idea, refusing to relinquish u 
until the session Wednesday morn- 
ing— the sixth in three days held at 
undisclosed sites. 

One source said Fehr first goi a 
hint of the owners' willingness to 
abandon the arbitration cap at the 
fourth and final meeting Tuesday, 
tbe first day of the strike. 

The players agreed to add a year 


a year. The owners will add to the 
1984 and 1985 contributions so 
that the total will be $25 million 
and $33 million instead of Sl5i 
million. The contribution will be 
$33 million for each of the next 
three years and $39 million for 
1989. ‘ 


to tbe eligibility requirement but 
not until 1987, tiu 


the third year of the 
agreement. The only current major 
leaguers who will be affected by the 
extra year are those who at the end 
of this season, will have less than 
one year in the majors. 

The two sides reached agreement 
on the benefit contribution issue 


when the players agreed to accept 
suv less t! 


significantly less than the one-third 
snare of the national television rev- 
enue they had received in previous 
contracts. The contribution under 
the expired agreement was $153 
million. 

Under the new agreement, the 
owners will contribute $196 mil- 
lion. or an average of S32.7 million 


When the players offered to re- 
duce their demand of $60 million a 
year to $40 million, they proposed 
that the difference be used by the 
owners to help “disadvantaged” 
dubs, those that play in the small- 
est markets and have the lowest 
revenue. That plan, though, was 
not pan of the agreement 

Among other elements erf the 
agreement, the owners agreed to 
abolish tbe free-agem draft so that 
free agents may negotiate with all 
clubs- However, if a player's old 
club wants to retain rights to him. it 
has to agree to let him go to salary 
arbitration the following February 
if he desires. The draft has been 
used for Learns to select negotiating 
rights to players since free agency's 
inception in 1976. 

The minimum salary will be in- 
creased from 540,000' to $60,000, 
with a cost-of-living adjustment 
made in ensuing seasons. 


Another Big Winner Was Commissioner Ueberroth 


ChemrylfiDs Country Club in Denver, where 


; 55, won the U.S. Open In I960. 


had produced record attendance 
for the maj< 


.major leagues. In 1981, 
when negotiations were abrasive 
and stormy, players struck for 50 


By Kenneth Reich 

Los Angeles Times Sen-ice 

NEW YORK — The settlement of the base- 
ball strike after just one day has added to the 
already impressive reputation of the commis- 
sioner, Peter Ueberroth, as a man who can get 
things done. 

Ueberroth said Wednesday night that he had 
oo role in the events that led to ending the strike. 
But knowledgeable sources said he had made 
few mistakes in handling the dispute, and cred- 
ited him with a series of behind-the-scenes ma- 
neuvers that helped smooth the way to Settle- 
ment- 

Weeks ago he quietly adopted a policy Df 
leaning toward the union ana leaning on the 
owners as a means of bringing about a settle- 
ment. Friends in whom he confided said his 
reasoning was that since there was no way he 
could compel the players not to strike, he had to 
see that the terms of Fered them were so satisfac- 
tory that they would not want to strike. 

As for the owners. Ueberroth had concluded 
that, if necessary, he could use the powers of the 
commissioner’s office to act “in the best inter- 


ests of baseball" to compel them to accept 
certain terms. 


Ueberroth did not want to act in such a 
dramatic fashion, but after he dropped enough 
hints that he would, the owners became worried. 
Even the owners' chief negotiator. Lee Mac- 
Phail, alluded Wednesday night to a fear the 
owners had of outside intervention. He could 
only have been talking of the man the owners 
themselves had hired as commissioner last year, 
Ueberroth. 


This effectively cut the ground from the own- 
ers' key negotiating position, and although Ue- 
roih 


berroth backed them on some of their other 
positions, be had sent a key signal to the union 
that it could effectively bold firm against the 
proposal it haled most' — the salary cap. 


At the same time, Ueberroth was building 


strong public support for his position by ap- 

to vocally 


The owners feared that if the strike went on, 
Ueberroth might offer his own terms, which the 
union could accept. The players then would 
come back to play and the only option the 
owners would have would be to lock them out, 
something that undoubtedly would have been 
highly unpopular with the fans. 


After June 1. in a series of clubhouse meetings 

sr that he 


with the players. Ueberroth made it dear that 
was opposed to the owners' proposal for a cap 
on players salaries. He remarked that he 
thought it was unfair of the owners to blame the 
financial problems caused by their mismanage- 
ment on the players. 


pea ring on numerous television shows i 
support the opposition most fans felt toward a 
strike, and to proclaim that he was going to 
support neither the owners’ nor the players' 
positions but would be the fans' commissioner. 

In Wednesday's editions of tbe New York 
Times, columnist Ira Berkow remarked that 
Ueberroth had emerged from tbe situation with 
a polished image. He noted that most of the 
serious proposals that Ueberroth made last 
week bad been accepted, and he added, “Ueber- 
roth all along has said that the fans were his 
major concern, and that he would act in their 
benefit above all others — theirs and the game 
of baseball. At this point it seems that there is 
considerable substance behind those glossy re- 
marks.” 


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PHILADELPHIA— Recalled Damn Dot- 
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IMKETUa.; 

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CINClNNATt-«lon«d to*, idraftafek, Ed- 
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. MINNESOTA— Signed Kyle Morrell, soit- 
tv. ‘ . 

N EW ORLEANS— Signed freetaaent Bobby 
Hrtwn.<wortot»c*. too series of five Wear 
contracts. 

. SAN DIEGO— Announced that Douo WO- 
kersan, guard, reitred. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Sinned Wynton HeiF 
dersotveomertodti Mart Shuoe, cento.and 
center dais Jodaoa. 

HOCKEY 

N atural Hockey League 

JUtRangers— Stated UMwcrstty of Atoska- 
Foirbanks Steve Marta, toward. 

COLLKS 

MERCYHURST (Pa.) ■M o rt m l Joe Sofcv 
«UL asolstant basketball coach. 

‘ NEVAOArLAS VEGAS— StanedalMetlctS- 
nsdor Brad HoWwrme l te a 3-year contract. 

WAKE PO REST— Named Bab Steak bas- 
kotbail coach. 

WASHINGTON— Nomad RanoM N. Conor 
men's soccer coadt. 

WIUJAMAND MARY— Mamed John Ron- 
dotett afWeHc director. 


Golf 


5X7 — 
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Forts and Agere* ter the <7*0 P« aatloeat 
dMmpWntep Is Denver: 

At Stoke: 67th PGA National Chamrion- 
shin. 

Dates: Aug. Ml. 

Site; Cherry KtUs Country Club course. 

Yards: 7 m. - 

Par: 3fras-7t- 

Fermat: 72 notes (18 doUvl stroke otov. 

Playoff Of necessary ofttr 72 holes) : Sud- 
den death Aua. it 

Cat: Law 70 scorers and all tied for 70tti 
place after 3* holes aualKV to ttnai two 
rounds Saturday and Sunday. 

Field: ISO. 

DetemSOB ctwmplae: Lee Trevino. 

Fanner ctammtans In Held: Hal Sutton. Roy 
Fiayd, Larry Netsoa. Jock Nkklaus, David 
Graham John Mohoftev. Lonnv Wodklna. 
Dove Stockton. Gory Plover. At GNberoer. 
Bobby Nkhois. Dow Fto stownid. 

Purse: nOQJMXL 

WleuTi Shore: SI2SAOO. 


By Jennifer Gill “ 

international Herald Tribune 

LA TRINITE SUR MER — The 
two-hulled caramaraos and three- 
hulled trimarans swung gently with 
tbe tide, dwarfing the trawlers and 
day-sailers moored in this small 
Bnttany fishing village. But aboard 
the giant sail boats, crews were 
busily making final preparations 
.before safiing up the English chan- 
nel and into the North Sea to Kid, 
in Germany. There, the Round Eu- 
rope Race, the first of its kind for 
open class mulriholls, is to start 
Friday. 

This race, sponsored and partly 
pnnnr*rf by the European Commu- 
nity, but mostly financed by the 
Saudi owned TAG Group, has 
drawn a fleet of the largest and 
swiftest racing boats ever to put to 
sea. Their 3,000-mfle (1,864- kilo- 
meter) course will take them from 
Kiel to The Hague, to Zeebntgge in 

Belgium, Torquay hi England, Lo- 
rieDiin France and Lisbon, to Ben- 


almadena in Spain, Toulon in 
France and Prato Cervo in Sardin- 


ia, where they are due to arrive at 
early in September. 

One of the 25 boats entered, the 
80-foot (24-meter) catamaran 
named Formule Tag, holds the re- 
cord for most miles covered in 24 
hours crossing the Atlantic, having 
averaged just over 21 knots (about 
25 mdes or 40 kilometers an hoar) 
— a phenomenal figure when com- 
pared to the 10 knots a singled- 
hulled 40-foot yacht can do under 
full saH Bui the ocean-going multi- 
hnfls in the Round Europe Race 


are 


capable of reaching speeds of 32 
knots. 

They range from 42-foot trima- 
rans to the maxi-catamarans of 85 
feet, ocean-racers still very much in 
tbe development stages since tbe 
lost multihulls were sailed in the 
Single-Handed Transatlantic race 
in 1964. But these prototype boats 
are ultra-sophisticated, from their 
design to the epoxy or fiberglass 
and carbon kevlar materials of 
which they are built. 

Into the streamlined, three-foot 
wide hulls are crammed berths for 
off-watch crewmen, the galley and 
the chart table, the latter surround- 
ed by a battery of electronic and 
computerized navigational aids: 
VHr and long distance radios, sat- 
dhte navigation systems, radar and 
wind speed and direction instru- 
ments. Scone boats are equipped 
with generators, some of the small- 
er ones with solar panels, to run all 
tbe efectronics. 

This also is a fleet of some of tbe 
most expensive racing boats ever 
constructed. Tbe Formule Tag was 
bfdt in Montreal in 1983, under 
the direction of the British boat 
designer, Nigel Irens, and cost ‘lust 
under a millio n Canadian dollars 
($735,000 alpresem rates)," ac- 
cording to Mike Birch, its skipper. 
The mast, he added, cost “approxi- 
mately 40,000 dollars," but that is 
less than one-quarter of the price of 
tbe wing mast with which many of 
the boats now are equipped “It’s 
an expensive game,” said Birch. 

His boat is sponsored by the Ca- 
nadian affiliate of the TAG Group, 
owned by the Saudi rnnhhnillion- 



Fhao br Bnen Kono^hoo 

Formule Tag, an 80-foot catamaran entered in the Round Europe Race starting Friday, can reach speeds of 32 knots. 


aire, Akram Ojjeh, whose activities 
include aviation, building con- 
struction, hotels and agriculture in 
the Middle East, Europe and the 
United Stales. French sponsors 
range from regional commercial 
backers to the gasoline giant Elf 
Aquitaine, Royale cigarettes and 
the sausage maker FJeury Michoo. 

The boats they are backing will 
be racing for the first time under 
regatta conditions. Some of the legs 
of tbe Round Europe Race will be 
as short as 60 miles, a distance over 
which the bigger boats will not lose 
sight of each other and where, un- 


like long transatlantic races, tactics 
as well as knowledge of local waters 
wfil count as much as speed. 

Over these relatively short dis- 
tances. calling for a lot of maneu- 
vering and sail chang ing, the boats 
will need huge crews. Birch’s crew 
of seven is almost all French. 

“There are more French 
around," he said, “who've got the 
time to sail on boats all the time. 
There are lots of good people sail- 
ing in Panada and who are con- 
nected with boats, but obviously 
there aren't as many people to draw 


on. 


Birch, 53, is a Canadian veteran 
of ocean racing. “No other country 
except for France, and maybe En- 
gland a little bit, has gone into this 
mulrifaull sailing for money at aft," 
he said. “There are people trying in 
the United Slates — but over there, 
it is a more established way of 
spending mosey in yachting and it 
is pul into 12-meter America’s Cup 
yachting." 

Unlike most French sponsors, 
who will benefit directly in selling 
their products, TAG is hoping the 
publicity gained will boost its im- 
age of high-tech dynamism. 


“I’m very lucky to have a spon- 
sor, particularly as there are many 
very good sailors struggling to gel 
boats," Birch said. 


“I was lucky to come in at the 
beginning. The thing is, you have to 
gp on winning or else somebody 
will come in and take your place. 


“This Round Europe Race 
should be a good race," be said. 
“Everybody sails their boat just 
about as hard as they can, it doesn't 
make a lot of difference whether it 
is across an oc£an or in coastal 
waters." 


n ce 


sio^ 




Coors Bike Race 


• By Bob Lochner 

Los Attffda Times Sendee 

'RENO, Nevada — Under the 
cpvet of expanding the sport of 
• - T * • * racmg into 


" 4 


S^G^n§tate, J plus a opra* 
of Ncvada, in search of a greater 
market share te xts prodncL 
; Drafting along behind were a 

. D ■ ■ - * NM ffUTVi 


\v^'A 





n gmftnge -Sttire 

v, a power-tool manufacturer 
assorted other enterprises, all 
•.teams of-cycKsts wearing 
jail commercial logos to make 
SCAR- and CART of the auto 
ig worfd very envious. 

jsrina few trational “aroawtr 

® -Iran France, Colombia, 
ico, Holland. Ireland, CuK 
I- Germany and the Soviet 
a, and youhave, as advertised, 
3 Lfiddraoray could buy te 

fm m _ _ T^urtHiMial DlCy- 





to urana ~ 

Ko-ilS' will 

Jestrfrariitg during a RHiay 

yinlhfr Rockies. 


At this prant, the leader in the 
0 veraD standings is Greg LeMond, 
the former Reno resident who last 
month became the only American 
to finish as high as swond in me 
prestigious Tour de France. He 
L* the lead Wednesday after- 
jmon by winning the tij-xmlj raos 
from Incline Vfflage, Hnh, to 
Raio by Virginia Oty, out- 
spnnting Andrew Hamwten rf 
Colorado, after they bad 
left the pack more than four nan- 
nies behind. . . , , , 

Not far behind LeMond m me 
overall standings arc Davis ftm- 
nev. the 1984 Olympic bronze med- 

S from Wder, SMjM 
the Canadian silver medalist, and 
Hinault, of France, who 
this year won his fifth Torn de 

Ft Sprcsence of Hinault and Le- 
Mood has made this a m^or event, 

SStfasSs 

attract the sport s top namtt. 
^SS^Heisstiflreoover- 



jDWe 

in two places during tins years 
tour, and some observers had Ques- 
tioned whether his visit to the Unit- 
ed States was a sort of vacation. 

LeMond, 24, is Hinault’s team- 
mate, for La Vie Claire in Europe 
and, with Bauer, for Red Zinger in 
the Umled Slates. It has been gen- 
erally assumed that Hinault would 
help him win here, as LeMond had 

done for Hinault in France. 
LeMond, who moved with ms 


ing stages. I also want to enjoy each 
one and lake tune to look around at 
the beautiful oountryade as I ride." 

Still, Hinault stayed alert enough 
to capitalize on Phinoey's mistake 
Tuesday as they sprinted, wheel to 
wheel, around the final bold: 

Said Fhinney: “We were never 
given a dear picture of the finish, 
so when 1 saw this banner across 
the street, I really went all oin. The 
sun was in my eyes, and I couldn't 


jjcmuuu, 

family from Los Angeles to Rm 
when he was 7, last Saturday had 
said, “Now, it's my turn. This is my 


read it By the time I couki, it was 
too late. I v 


race. ' 

But the theory that he would get 
top billing in his native land was 
shaken a bit Tuesday, when Ifin- 
ault won the toughest stage so far. 


102 miles from Nevada aty to 
Truckee, California. LeMond 



courses: “See, 1 am not on vacation 
here. I did not care for the cri cer- 
iums,” the doed-course races on 
San Francisco’s Fisherman’s 
Wharf and in Sacramento's Old 
Town, “so I took it easy. But now, I 
am looking forward to the imnain- 


was committed." 

The banner said, "Truckee Ro- 
deo, Aug. 10-11 ” 

The finish -fine banner was an- 
other block down the street, and 
Hinault, who prefers to speak 
French, obviously is able to read 
English. At the properinoinent, he 
shot by the spent rairmey. 

Tbe Fisherman’s Wharf course 
was called by winner Atec Steida of 
Canada “the most dangerous 
course rve ever been on." LeMond, 
who finished a dose second, said, 
“1 stayed out front through fear. 1 
didn’t want to get caught in the 
middle of a pack going into one of 
those tight nuns." 

Scuba divers tread, water in the 
bay during the race, waiting to res- 
cue cyclists who went off a pier. 



SPORTS BRIEFS 


Dorset. Accuses Cowboys of leak* 


THOUSAND OAKS, California (AP) — Tony Dorset l, the Dallas 
Cowboys' running bad: who says he may retire or ask to be traded if his 
contract demands are not met, has accused the National Football 
League's team president, Tex Schramm, of “spreading my financial 
business all over town." 

Do red t, whose problems include an IRS claim of $400,000 in bade 
income taxes and a $250,000 divorce settlement, has not come to training 
camp. He told the Dallas Times Herald that Schramm promised him two 
years ago his contract would be renegotiated, and that “once Schramm 
found out what my problems were contractually, he leaked my informa- 
tion to the media and made my business public information.* 

Schramm, who claimed "that the things he said are not accurate,” has 
shown at least two reporters copies of Doran's contracts. Schramm said 
that ad Cowboy contracts include a confidentiality dame, bnt that ; 
Dorseti broke his by discussing details of his contract with tbe media. 


Bans on Liverpool, Juventus Upheld 


ZURICH (Reuters) — The European Football Union has rejected . 
appeals by the Liverpool and Juventus soccer clubs against sanctions 
imposed after rioting at their European Cup final match in Brussels last 
May. 

UEFA said Thursday (hat Liverpool would be banned for throe years 
from European competition, starling when the general indefinite ban 
ends on all English clubs. The Italian team Juventus has been ordered to 
play its next two home UEFA matches in an empty stadium. 


For die Record 


West Germany defeated host China, 4-2, to gain Friday’s semifinals of 
the Under-16 World Soccer Cup tournament. Brazil which will play 
Greg LeMond, who won Wednesday s nwH;>itHinous, 69- West Germany, beat Saudi Arabia, 2-1; Guinea beat Australia on a 
mile race to Reno, Nevada, leads in tbe overall standings, penalty shoot out and Nigeria beat Hungary, 3-1. (UPI) 







Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 1985 


OBSERVER 


Handle With Brawn 


: \ 

i i 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — The news these 
days is mostly about anniver- 
saries of interesting events that 
happened long ago. Last week, for 
instance, it was the 10th anniversa- 
ry of the Helsinki agreement. This 
week it's the 40th anniversary of 
the atomic bombing of Japan. Next 
week it will be about the 40th anni- 
versary of Japan's surrender. 

We had a lot of news in May 
about the 40th anniversary of Nazi 
Germany's surrender. That pro- 
duced a big news bonus because of 
President Reagan's embarrassing 
visit to the Bitburg cemetery, where 
Nazi SS troops were among the 
German dead. 

The Bitburg cemetery visit origi- 
nally was scheduled because the 
president had enjoyed such a suc- 
cessful photo opportunity at the 
Omaha Beach cemetery in 19S4 
during the 40th anniversary of D- 
day. 

Unfortunately, only 49 weeks 
elapsed between tbe Omaha Beach 
appearance and the one at Bitburg, 
so the press was unable to hail the 
German appearance as the first an- 
niversary of the president’s first 
European-cemeierv photo oppor- 
tunity. 

□ 

Once next week’s big story about 
the 40th anniversary of the Japa- 
nese surrender is out of the way. we 
will go on to one of the more inter- 
esting anniversaries. The date: 
Aug. 19. On that day 15 years ago, 
the decision was made by tbe bed- 
ding industry to cease putting han- 
dles on the mattresses of America. 

Chiropractors, spinal surgeons 
and manufacturers of plaster casts 
and steel -reinforced girdles all re- 
ported sharp increases in business 
within weeks after the market was 
flooded with new mattresses lack- 
ing the fabric handles that once had 
been stoutly affixed to both sides of 
everv decent mattress in the coun- 
try. 

The decision to drop the mat- 
tress handles, little noted at the 
time it was made, is now intensely 
controversial. TTie justification 
cited by the bedding industry in 
1970 was that Americans were be- 
coming dangerously soft as the na- 
ture of their work became increas- 
ingly sedentary- and the tendency of 
their culture increasingly glutton- 
ous. 

Mattress spokesmen asserted 


that flabby Americans were drop- 
ping like flies with diseases result- 
ing from sissified living, diseases 
their grandparents would have 
been ashamed to die of. even had 
they existed in the nigged old days. 

The American Bedding Council 
— "determined." it said, “to do our 
bit to save the free world from flab" 
— ordered the mattress handies 
dropped from their products. "The 
opportunity we extend to our coun- 
trymen to handle vast, bulky and 
intractable mattresses without .the 
assistance of mattress handles 
should encourage millions to un- 
dertake physical-conditioning pro- 
grams that will enable them, after 
turning their mattresses, to wrestle 
successfully with the largest and 
most formidable opponents, in- 
cluding bears." 

□ 

Industry spokesmen concede 
that the Bedding Council saw tbe 
estimates that forecast hundreds of 
thousands of back problems, but 
judged it sensible to accept "a little 
lumbago and a few popped verte- 
brae here and there 1, io save the 
United Slates from "a devastating 
onset or flab." 

Critics of the decision say this is 
self-serving nonsense. For one 
thing, they say. at the time mattress 
handles were abandoned, the first 
joggers already were in the streets 
and 97-pound female weaklings 
were starting to work on weight- 
lifting machines. 

The Bed ding Council critics say, 
had no interest in improving the 
nation's health. It was simply tak- 
ing advantage of the new muscular- 
ity to add a few pennies to mattress 
profits by doing away with the han- 
dles. 

Arguments like this are never 
settled, not as long as anniversaries 
roll around every year giving new- 
speople a pretext for filling their 
space with lively controversy. This 
year's ceremony, designed as' a pho- 
to opportunity for the president, 
was to feature Reagan carrying a 
king-size mattress, with no handles, 
from the White House basement to 
the Lincoln bedroom. 

Reagan has canceled, though re- 
luctantly, on doctors’ advice, and 
asked Vice President Bush to sub- 
stitute for him. Bush has been visit- 
ing the National Zoo after closing 
hours to practice by wrestling 
bears. 

New York Tima Service 


A Private Audrey Hepburn 
Remembers William Wyler 


By Stephanie Mansfield 

M'flj/ufljtofl Pou Service 

N EW YORK — The plane is 
late, there are no cabs and 
Audrey Hepburn is waiting. Tbe 
last time she talked to the press, 
they were still using linotype 
Still reedy in navy trousers, 
blue and white high-collared 
blouse, a demure strand of pearls 
and chestnut brown hair swept 
back into a neat bun, Gucci bag at 
her feel, she is 56. meandering 
into middle age playing tbe peren- 
nial princess. 

"1 was just sort of launched on 
this career." she said. "I went 
from one picture to the other, 
really, trying to son of catch up 
with myself. I was totally unaware 
of the great significance of doing 
my first movie." 

That would be her first Ameri- 
can film. "Roman Holiday." co- 
starring Gregory Peck. In 1953 it 
rocketed Hepburn to the kind of 
stardom now reserved for punk 
rockers and hostages. She won the 
Academy Award for best actress. 
Beauty parlors in Tokyo were be- 
sieged' by bevies of girls wanting 
the Hepburn haircut (short, with 
spidery bangs). When she wore an 
oversized man's shin or a bateau 
neckline it became the rage. Smit- 
ten by her waiflike figure idue in 
pan to wartime malnutrition), the 
director Billy Wilder said. "This 
girl single-handed, may make bo- 
soms a thing of the past." 

No one was more surprised by 
the hoopla than Hepburn. 

“I remember being very in- 
volved with the classical ballet, 
and the movies were really not 
serious. 1 did bits in movies, but 
that was to earn an extra buck. 
That wasn't going to be my ca- 
reer." 

The man responsible for it all 
she said, was the director William 
Wyler. He discovered her, nur- 
tured her. That is why Hepburn 
had flown to New* York from her 
home in Rome: Cathy Wyler is 
making a PBS documentary 
about her late father, to be shown 
this fall. 

Hepburn agreed to be inter- 
viewed briefly after the taping. 
Reticent about her private life, 
she requested that the questions 
be confined to Wyler. 



Audrey Hepburn in 1953. 


"I didn't know what a camera 
was," sbe said, recalling her 
screen test for "Roman Holiday.” 
"I didn't know what was going 
on. It was still new to me. I had no 
idea how to play a scene or any- 
thing. 

"I didn't know who William 
Wyler was, so I wasn't nervous 
like I might be today. I'm much 
more nervous about this today 
[the interview] then I was then 
because T was working in the the- 
ater. and I thought it was exciting, 
but 1 didn't really know what it 
was all about.” 

She was 24, appearing in the 
Broadway production of “GigL" 
For Hepburn's screen test, Wyler 
asked the cameraman to keep the 
camera rolling after she finished 
her lines. 

“Willy had said, ‘I’ll never 
know what this girl is really 
like,' ” Hepburn recalled. 

Reclining on a bed. she read 
her lines. Someone called' “Cut." 
T hinking the test was over, she 
flopped back, stretched her arms 
out, looked around to tbe crew 
and asked, “How was it? Was I 
any good?" 

Wyler was hooked. 

“I was awfully young. I was 
younger than most 15-year-olds, 
mentally, if you like. I was 


brought up that way. I wasn't ex- 
posed the way young people are 
today. I had' a totally different 
background. I was very young in 
my behavior." And that was ex- 
actly what Wyler wanted 

“There was a scene in ‘Roman 
Holiday' at the end, when I leave 
Greg and go back to being a prin- 
cess and I'm supposed to say 
goodbye to him and sob my heart 
out and go rushing back into my 
palace. 

“I couldn't cry. 1 thought I was 
crying. I was pretending to cry. 
but it was no good at aLL There 
were no proper tears. They tried 
glycerin. Take after take, it wasn't 
any good. Willy came over and 
gave me absolute faefl. He said. 
’How long do you think we're 
going to wait here? AH night? 
Can't you czy, for goodness' sake? 
By now you should know what 
acting's about.' I was so ups cl He 
was so angry with me, I just start- 
ed to cry. He shot h, gave me a 
hug and walked off." 

Bom in Brussels in 1929. Hep- 
bum was the only child of an 
English-Irish businessman and a 
Dutch noblewoman, the Baroness 
Ella van Heemstra. At the age of 
4. Hepburn was sent to a private 
British school. Her parents di- 
vorced in 1935; four years later, 
Hepburn returned to Arnhem to 
live with her mother and stayed 
there during the German occupa- 
tion. 

In the spring of 1948 she re- 
turned to London hoping for a 
career in ballet finding work in 
revues, nightclubs ana chorus 
lines. In 195! sbe appeared as an 
extra in several British films, in- 
cluding “The Lavender Hill 
Mob.” Then she was spotted in a 
Monte Carlo hotel lobby by the 
writer Colette, who exclaimed, 
“That’s my Gigi!" 

No one knew how to present 
her better than Wyler, whose 
credits include “Jezebel” “Wuth- 
ering Heights,” “Mrs. Miniver," 
“The Best Years of Our Lives," 
“Ben Hut" and “Funny Girt" 

Hepburn worked with other 
celebrated directors, including 
Wilder, Fred Zumemann, King 
Vidor, Stanley Donen and 
George Cukor. Among her lead- 
ing men were Humphrey Bogart 



Now Koy*. for TKb WaahnBUi Po«r 

Hepburn today: “I couldn't cry." 


Gary Cooper, Gregory Peck, 
Henry Fonda, Fred Astaire, Cary 
Grant. Peter Finch. William 
Holden, Rex Harrison. Albert 
Finney, Peter OToole. Sean Con- 
nery and Ben Gazzara. 

Her film credits, sparse by Hol- 
lywood standards, indude “Sa- 
brina," “War and Peace," “Funny 
Face,” “Love in the Afternoon/ 1 
“The Nun's Story,” “Breakfast at 
Tiffany’s," “Charade." “My Fair 
Lady," “Two for the Road" and 
“Wait Until Dark." 

In 1954, Hepburn married the 
actor Mel Ferrer. She gave birth 
to a son. Sean, in 1960. and decid- 
ed to put her career second: “1 
started having children and that 
was so terribly important to me 
and I couldn’t do both." 

She relumed to the screen in 
1962 to collaborate with Wyler on 
“The Children's Hour." Four 
years later she starred opposite 
Peter OToole in Wyler’s “How to 
Steal a Million." Neither was as 
successful as “Roman Horiday.” 

Their fourth film would have 
been “40 Carats," but Hepburn 
said Wyler, who died in 1981, was 
not well enough to do the film. 

Hepburn re-emerged in 1976 to 
make “Robin and Marian." Three 
years later she starred in “Blood- 


line" and in 1980 she appeared in 
Peter Bogdanovich's “They All 
Laughed/ All were box-office di- 
sasters. 

She and Ferrer were divorced 
in 1968. A year later she married 
an Italian psychiatrist, Andrea 
Dotti. Their son. Luca, was bom 
in 1970. They were divorced in 
1980. She has been linked roman- 
tically with Robert Wolders, wid- 
ower of Merle Oberon. 

Now she is anxious to resume 
her career. “If I read something 
that I liked, I would love to dp it/ 
she said enthusiastically. But she 
finds the scripts she does read “so 

dull more than any thing ." 

Many actors dreaded working 
with William Wyler. He was 
known as a nag, a man who would 
keep the cast and crew for hours. 
Hepburn said: “I think I was very 
lucky, because I was sort of Wil- 
ly's baby. He was very protective 
of me. He was never rough on me 
or hard on. me or frightened me in 
any way.” 

Was he in love with her? 

- She bhished. “I don't know. 1 
think he loved the and I loved 
him. I think it’s rather different. 1 
think it’s better than being in 
love." 


PEOPLE 

Baryshnikov Hurts Knee, £ 

mf 

Has to Undergo Surgery 
Mikhail BanshnOtdv will under- 
go surgery For damaged cartilage ia 
his rijpu knee next week and will 
not perform for several months, 
according to a spokesman for the 
American Ballet Theater in New 
York. The Soviet-bom dancer. 38. 
hurt his knee during a class Iasi 
week in Geveiand. flew io New 
York for diagnosis and was told 
that he could continue dancing, 
said the spokesman. Bob Pontar- 
elli. But the knee, which required 
surgery two years ago. worsened. 
Baryshnikov will be operaied on 
Tuesday in New York by Dr. Wil- 
liam Hamilton. Pontarelli said it ^ 
was hoped that Baryshnikov would r 9 
be able to ngoin the ABT on tour 1 
by January. He will continue as 
artistic director of the troupe. 


The Salzburg Festival manage- 
ment has dismissed Piero FaggionL 
the Italian opera director who 
slapped the festival director-gen- 
eral. Otto SertL ia a row over cast-, 
ing topless witches in Verdi's 
“Macbeth." Faggioni confirmed 
that he had struck Sertl but said 
Sen! hit him first. 


Otina is about to get a dose of 
Johnny Rambo, the disillusioned 
Vietnam War veteran played by f 
Sylvester Stallone. “First Bloody * 
the first Rambo movie, has been 
dubbed into Chinese by a Shanghai 
studio and will premiere soon in 
theaters nationwide, the Beijing 
Wanbao newspaper reports, calling 
“First Blood” “a serious film with 
healthy content, profound social 
significance and a high degree of 
artistic material" and “an out- 
standing work in recent American 
cinema." The newspaper notes that 
the film “criticizes the U. S. inva- 
sion of Vietnam.” China was Viet- 
nam’s major ally during tbe war. 


“It was one of the greatest days 
of my life — and 1 will never do it 
again," said Taylor Smith, a 2£ 
year-old American, after climbing 
Europe's highest mountain for a 
Soviet- American student "sum- ^ 
mit" conference. Smith, a Prince-jp 
ton University student from Jack- 
sonville, Florida, was one of eight 
Americans who, along with 10 So* 
viet youths, climbed Mount Elbrus, 
an 18,841-fooi (5,736-meter) peak 
in the Caucasus Mountains. 


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world wide as expert in lbs field. 


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PERSONALS 


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Two and Orphee. 


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life. Bond. 


MOVING 


WORLDWIDE 
Nol MOVER 
FOUR WMXfNTL 

CALL US FOR YOUR NEXT MOVE 
PAMS [3] 036 63 11 
LONDON (01) 578 66 11 


MOVING 


ALLIED 

VAN Liras INTL 
ova 1300 omcB 

WOODWDE 

USA AHwdVrm Limit InfICorp 
‘(0101) 312-681-8100 
Office Address: 2ati Av & Roosevelt Rd 
Broadview, linak 60153 USA 

Or cal our Agency offices: 

PARIS Desbocdo f International 
(01) 343 23 64 

FRANKFURT 

(069) 250066 

DUSSEDORF/ RATINGEN 

(02102) 45023 LMJ. 

MUNICH ijls. 

(089) 142244 

LONDON 

(01) 953 3636 

BRUSSaS: Ziegler S-A. 

(02) 425 66 14 

«NEVA Gmu 5S. 

(022) 32 64 40 
CaB for AffecTs free estimate 


BEAUDART 

Franco t fntumatfcnal Moving 
Fdly (eoressiond - Reasonably priced 

PARIS (1) 867 42 46 


GONTNEX. Small moves, can, bog- 
— S, worldwide. GaR Otarfe: Pcra 
18 B) (near Opera). 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FOR MORE REAL STATE 
OPPORTUNITIES SS 
PAGE 13 


CORSICA 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


10 MINS. MONACO 
FRENCH RIVIERA 

A unique properly in quiet residential 
oreo, with vistas to the sea, mountains 
and hakm astatine, beautifully land- 
scaped garden with swimming pool 
For further d eta ils pleree contact: 

AGEDt 

26 bis Bd Princess* Charlotte 

Monte Carta. MC 98000 Monaco 
Tel: (93) 50 66 00 Erf. 155 
Ik 479417 MC 
or 

Agence St. Roeh - Menton, France 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


’. 25 Av. Beousejaur. Ted {931 ! 
67 <() or Meritfa (93) 94 55 6 5. 


SOUTH OF FRANCE Cote Basque on 
SpcrahFrendt border, 6 rales from 

aae pork, rosorny, superb trees. 
Bidding surface; 6300 soft sold with 
ravnre furniture F3 ,500.000 or with- 
out: F2 ,500,000. Located 1 mSe from 
St Jean-d&Luze famous bead], dase 
to 4 aotf-courMi. Deep-sea fishing. 
Trad ftshna in the Pyrenies mourv 
tons with da resorts m winter, etc 
Evening (3) 055 35 39 Mr. CartJier / 
Write: loupe Morfolo-Bcrta, 64122 
Unu^n e, France. 


CAP FERRAT 

A ia t gelw i 

Lovely snxd fVovencnle vflb 
on an estate 

Living with fwplaCB, 3 bedrooms, 
2 baths, perfect condition 
400 sqjtn. garden 

FrtooJxio 

AGENCE BOVI5 
BP 03. 06310 BeauGeuw-Mer 
Tet (93} 01 00 36 


DORDOGNE SPECIALISTS: 


ben, <17- 

don SW6. UK. Tel: 01-387 OllI 


COTE D’AZUR, VHYCE Newly buil 
VI Bo, 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, pool, pv 
anomic view sea & mountains 
S2B0 J00. 1951 24 03 66 / 24 24 49. 


(16-99) 23 03 77 


GERMANY 


BADEN-BADEN. 96 sqm shop, 1- 
sam. apartment wfrubie as office i 
t«t. Z7 sqm. stadb. dl in represent 
live bidding loaded in Soph* 
strong, the weBfrnown afoy betwei 
Cosmo & thermd both. Please rep 
to Bax 2179, LH.T., Fnedrichstr. 15/1 
6000 FronWwt/Mdn, or phone ( 
7271-25524. 


FRANKFURT. Furnished office suite, 

S elegad, 5 rooms on lit floor, 
location hart dstrid. phone & 
_ Scfe.SlSMQO. 


telex. Rent: $1500. 

Teh (06105) 7lfcl71x 411571. 


YOUR ESTATE AGENT N MUNCH. 
Enqure in wnftna to-. John SdtmHw , 
Onon GmbH, Bnenner Str. 3. CWQOd 
Munich Z 


GREAT BRITAIN 


CALVi ICAR SU, 14 stadias & private 
home. Each with large terrace. fuOy 
•quipped and fumshed. AU are set in 
4,000 sqjn. part. Aiport. ihoppng 
c enter nearby. Cofl fiance p5] 
650207. 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


COTE D'AZUR 

Fantastically beautiful properties nghr 
an the sea on the paint of Cap if An- 
tibes end in the Cannes area 
feody for ocapahon. These properties 
we expensive but worth every data of 
the money invested. Come end visit 
them with m We have the best. 

JOHN TAYLOR SJL 
55 La Goiserte 
0MC0 Comes 

Teh (93) 38 00 66. Teleu 470971 F 



COTE D'AZUR 
5 Manatee Fran CANM5 
Tory- tote view on sea 
and Fort of G otfe-J um 
IE MONTEVERDI 
IB oportmwfevi lqt oi 3 rooms. 
1 dost brformrtKxt 


Av. de 


06220 GaHeJuan. 
63 85 42 


70URAINE X3NG5 CA5TLE5 country 
Fuly restored farmhouse, oak beams 
al rooms, 70 sqm. living room. 250 
sqm. Irving space, fined kitchen, 2 
baths, shower. 5 bedrooms, 250 sqm. 
addWanal 2nd floor, guiuu e, game 
room 12 sqm, new stable tar 3 
hones, pond, 25000 sqm. 


ST. JOHN'S WOOD by Lords Cndt* 
Ground, ultra madam blodc, 2 double 
bedrooms, large reception, modem 
kitchen, bathroom, doefcroom. bricp- 
ny, storage garage. 88 

/ ----- 

01 


... Teh weekends 
01-870 4703, weekdays: 


LOFBON A BfGUSH SHRES. Bdo- 
ttAe the h assle out of 
. _ renting. PROPERTY FWDE85. 
12 B Manners St, Bath. Avon. W 
(0225164491 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

GREAT BRITAIN 

IRELAND 

ROYAL TRUNGU Gfaucestershtre, in 
historic house, newly restored luxury 
flat, 2 bedrooms. £62,000. Tefc 06652 
4344. 

OAREMORRIS, MAYO. Now 7- 
room bungdow in 16 acre, 9 miles 
arport £ 274)00. flepfy: 8 Braemar 
House, Mcido Vata, London W9 TUT. 

LARGE RECANT KNK5HT5M0DGE 
house near Hcxrods, long lease with 
its awn mews house + 3 pnmnpc 
Unique offer. 01-589 3016/235 7%5 

MONACO 

MONTE CARLO 

Private mansion, near Monaco Prince 
Palace, ponoromg sea view. 

Tet (93) 30 46 54. 

WIMBLRK3N COMMON, exqusMy 
finished charoder property staadina 
in own wefed mounds, freehold. For 
deftdi, 01-879 3096 evcnngv 

MONTE CABO, owner seib very 
targe new penthouse. For ittainoiton 
tet (931 2J61 87 7(931 50 30 99. 

GREECE 

PIRAEUS OFHCB in new bufirtnq 2 
inter correcting flams. 430 sqm. tar 
sale or in exchange with property m 
UXjU-SA, French Bvwra. Pace: 
U5S200.000. Contact Ftncxera, 126 
Kalofrori Si, Piraeus, Greece. Tbu 
212196 STAR GR 

MONACO, Dutch owner seili renovat- 
ed vJb-oparnnent with pmrerto cfevn- 

lor. F4J0CL000. Tef (93) 25 51 79. 

PARIS & SUBURBS 

SEVRES-MEUDON. Resideutia) apart- 
ment. 3 bedrooms, double String, 
equftacd kitchen, brehroong, _ ter- 
races, cellar. Garages pks prxldna. 
Walk to Ohmm: pbol. horaridrm 
in*L school, St. Ooud Park & train, a 
mm. to Montaantcase}. Free for sale 
now. FF l,180j00QOa. By owner or 
rant an spead mntroct FF 6JD0 
monftiy, fumehad, charges included. 
26 flue 6nefl«. 72 Caravge 534 46 
67, Sevres or owner, Houston, Texas 
713-164-1907. 

POROS HOUSE of 4.000 sqjn. over- 
taoktag Aegean. Private, near beodi, 
town £ Artwe. Tet 0281 '28440 

HOLLAND 

DCMBURG 80 mb from ROTTERDAM 
. EXCEPTIONAL ESTATE. 
Wafting ({stance from North Sea 

rooms, jl Dun Booms, jz.uuu sqjn. aor- 
den mxl meadow, twin hone stable, 
paddock, mdoor heated pool, garage, 
targe pentam spew, passfcki protes- 
«wd use. US$400 1 £KW. For deft*, 
wnte ta Mr. (r. T. fcogerd. 4357 NN 
Domburg or tefac 79087 Burrit hL 

5 ft, RUE DC SEVRES (across from 
Nabe DtsnoL extremely charmtag 
16th century building, beourifui smd 
apartmere m pteto condtton. tivira 
with separate bedroom space, Ib% 
eq«PF*d bufr-in tatehen, mcrifle 
bah, beams, enormous character. 
F6504XXL Tet 720 37 99. 

AM5THVEEN-NEAR SCHIPHOL dr- 
pvt. We offer you an apartment of 
180 sqm, targe taring room. 4 bed- 
rooms, a study, kitchen and bath- 
room. Quiet neighbourhood. 10 n#rv 
utes tram center of Amsterdam. Crf 
HoOond (0) ZW33129 

MONTPARNASSE, Compagne lere. 4 
Itxmnd chonring 4/5 rooms, over- 
taoking frees, garden, sun, quiet, 10 
windows, EkeDou condition. 

n/QOjm Teh 320 38 65. 

FEAR ST. GBIMA1N BN LAYE: HER, H 
FCW V1UA perfect txxxfiltar.lving- 
7*»"a 5 berfroatra, 3 batfo. otrt- 

LK»4, VBtMffll TYPE 17 th Century 
oond house. FuSy furnished. 4 bra- 
rooms, mriet. garden. Schpfrof, The 
Hague Mim. Tet 01719^9206. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SPAIN 


MALLORCA 

AMBASSADOR PARK 

PARADISE FOR THE HAPPY RW 

An exdudw Me tfietm iean vflage is 
being bunt right by sea on the mast 
beautiful site an MaSorca. Ided loca- 
tion, 20 mmites tram Pcfma Spacious 
apartments, 1 to 3 bedroom s, all wWi 


largo terraces. Very high qucnycon- 
tlnmrai rad finishings g wu i ile e tl 


VHT AMBASSADOR PARK AND 
KqoNVMCED 

For information: 

GLOBE PLAN 5A. 

Av. Mon-Repos U, 

CH-10Q5 LAUSAh^Swtaeriand 
iefc (211 22 35 12 Tin 25185 MHJS CH. 

prour n "F w '** tvwconw 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


rtrve bod harbor. VrUo 3 bedtxBm, 2 
btuht Smktt fifly furnished, spa- 
aaw bedroom £ bath an, covered 




US$1 

. 5, 2 oaths, general descrip- 
tion suiAir to v*oLBS40^(M. + 
reotab oisoowJaUe for v3Ja & town- 
house. CtM ibiza (34/1) 330269. 


WTA BIANCA. Javw, Span, ttgh 
esan 2 bedroom, seafront houses 
and 1 bedroom maisan- 
and ferraoE 


ettas 

Pnom 


18/Gata De Gcrgcn/Aficcrte/! 


C/Lepcnto 

mte/Spoin. 


■ ■i wwei w- umniwi UUVWHIUIM « 

cfex apartment, 5 beds, 4 baths m 
bie floors, gameyocm. Superby _ 
M^fumhhed. S85JXXL Tet Aicante 


ranera wen 

spina and hurt end olive orchards for 
00,000. Assume existing 10-year 


International Business Message Center 


03TC D'AZUR. For sole by owner 3 
bedroom apartment, furnished or un- 
furnished, move-in co ndi tion, north- 
laudi mew of sea & mou ntains , pool, 

ni B n wonaiig raoron area Of PtoCB. 
Please call hfca (93) 81-97-01, (93) B6- 
35-82, or contact owners: Assataurimi 


TOURAINE. 50 KM TOURS. 2K hours 
Paris by highway. Beautiful stone 
house. 245 sqja, excelen! condition. 
1.680 sqjn. enclosed perk: 3 brings, 6 
bedrooms, 2 baths. 2 WCs, bfcrwn. 


coflen 

mng i«w, 6 marble 


, . . . B»< 
n>o centre 
(replaces, new roof. Telephone. AB 

srs 

Pons. Morirc Moniofan (49] 86 4QQ7. 


MAGNUFKB4T COUNTRY STATE, 
great for family and/or bed & break- 
tost, 30 acres, povai* bridge. 3 large 
grante bukfngs. Ifth & 19th century, 
now hra resta urant, 5 miles to U. 

moges outstanding university. She* 
aSets, deluxe enemas, 2*6 hows from 
non-stop From Para or plane. Aik for 
br ochures M rs Thg vemn, D omdnc de 

crf^lSfare noon lisT^OSO 40. W 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 

«rr thm tntmmationci Hontd^rt- 
fwift when* mere than 0 fainf 
et a mSEcrt m a tes world- 
widm. mart af whom arm ia 
business end indmtry, wS 
rood it. Jbsf Mbs us (Pant 
613595 f baform 10 am, on- 
soring that wm cm fetes yam 
bode, and year message vril 
appear within 48 he in. The 
rata a US. S9.80 or local 
•quhndant por Rom. You mud 
indudm cornpimtw and verfff- 
abte btiling a ddr mn . 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


I-ANT1BES, near 

Comes, Noe, in superb rradenc e 
with pool & terns. saasKle, beautiful 
ap ar t m e n t. 90 sqm., living, 2 bed- 
rooms, 2 baths, equipped kudwn. dl 
comforts, gam*. 600 sqm. private 
mrden. 5T35.0D0. Perfec awition. 
U-. (93) 74 74 95 til Seer. 9. 


VAN CLEEF& ARPIiLS 

LONDON 

■ 153 NEW BOND STREET. 

TEL: 01—191 1405 TELEX: 266265 


COTE D'AZUR NKE. Red taue 


buyinQ on oponnwi? or a 
vuo? Solvff a snout problem wirh a 
serious company. Promotion MtBOrT 
a*, for oif brochure: 19 Aw Auber 
or Hotel Menden 06000 Nfca let 
(93187 08 20 - 9143 80 


(YOUR CONTACT IN FflOTOCE. 
Houses with dtaraaer. Qxrmii 


Otatung 

GAROK 

55, 13532 5T4EMY-DE-PRO- 
VB4CE Cede*. TeipO) 9201 58 4-. 


properties. Estates. &nle 
IP 55, 13532 “ 


JOJOBA - LIQUID GOLD 

The invade Jojoba ad. produced from 
a plant gown m the UJLA whch kves 
far ow 100 years, has unique, out- 
Bjwdng quefites and ost favorably re- 
pkn mineral 8 annul based lubri- 
“mts. Other atabfidted uses: 
g^meecs. phcnnaceuteafs, food, 
nwiWDdunnp. 

Entering Wuita l i e ni Already Pro- 
mte Return an inva sl ment fa Hist 
Year By End Of 6ft Yaw, Return* 
Emrdl mM Amount nvwded. 
Thereafter, projections stwv average 
amual income of 33%. For 

detah i contact: AUOBA 10 

Box 2502. Herdd Tnbune. 

92521 Narily Cedsx. France 

MVBTOR 6 BROKE! 
ENQUIRES WELCOME 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MONEY TREES? 

YES Invest m one of America s most 
e xu t m g technofo^ad breakthroughs m 
a bSon doBar industry. We have plant- 
ed more nut trees m 1984 that any 
ether deve l op er in our State. 

txmvd earning* proje c ted far 
marry, awq r j v c n qnd. wiy sui- 

BROK^“ r 0«UIRIES INVITH). 
Material avdiabte in EngEsh, French, 
German. Ban 2358. Hendd Tribune, 
92521 NeuOy Cedex, France 

- US$7,950 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


LOOKING TO INVEST M USA? 
Ntfiotiofly bpwn jum or/axtenyrory 
tpwkviw importer is leaking tar in- 
vestment. Preseiriy doing m excess of 
511 nvAon. Gampony has never hod an 
w^msfitable year. Excdfant potential 
for growth. Can supply djrribution in 


USA for 
Enes. Fine 


related product 
* team in ' 

to-. Box 2569, 1 

1 Neirily Cedsx, Fratae 


FIDUCIARY BAfBONG on targe coi- 
tatendemd bora. The -only ranmer- 


COMFUTB! PORTRAIT SYSTEMS 


(510.000 -28,000 FOB) end supp£ra 
T-ihirts. nbborts, pasters, calendars, 
ptnseis etc. Motor eredtf cards oc- 
ceptud. Kama L6 Poslfaeh 170340 
Frgnlrfurt. Tel: 747808 T* 412713 


QUICK RETURNS. Leotfing Tamai 
manufacture & export group seeks 
worldwide partners to shve its profits 
under very generous terms A trust- 
worthy bora With ewer 50 sahfrs 
faetanes in our organization, vnde 
expenenee in export, we am supply 
any tneratandae you can htmdb or 
require. Extremely low pnetB & exod- 
lera quafity. We hope to extend our 
good service to you & assure you a 
OH fortune. Please contact us right 
to pave. the way to another 
a. T£ 11753 NRSEA. T ft (02] 


5950457. 4F. No 26, Nung An Slrtetl 
Topa TawcBt, R.O.C AJtrt Jones 
Goo lExport Monoqerl 


U.S. A. 

EXCITING OPPORTUNITY 

Indus*™ located in the Sun Belt, estab- 
fahed 3 yntnv seeks capital ta expiaii 
mtvarmg technotogitd kxeokthrougK 
rtrsf pnose oomphled sueeesfuly. 
equity cwnership with rrarxmum mvest- 
meru of $50,000. Substantid 


OPHCAt 7RAME5- Seeking jeenf-ver- 
lute with a reputed European firm to 


Codex. France 


Neuily 


ANTARTICA MUTUAL SURVIVAL !r- 

wgncf: & T-usr cf Wcrld Genenc 
pnvcti? Podr. uniH ct 5S t-Aci 
*fe Pvra rtfcrou * 3509 des “-cites, 
Montreal 


preactiori can be expected 
■qwty protection. 

Write m confidence to- 
B™ K64. Herald Tribune. 
92521 NecaSy Cedn, Francs 


WOKING FOR ASSISTANT man / 
vtaman with tanwfadge of used oar 
buymg tfromhout Europe far export 
on mortr»,y bras. Safety Or comnss- 
»on rwgot ta fale WiB be xt Europe 


Lid. 28 Block Prince’ Rood. London 
SE1. tet 01-735 8171 


PANAMA UBBBA. CORPORATIONS 
from US$400 avtrfoUe now. Tel 
ga2^2^a Tde* 628352 ISLAND 


COMPUTERS - Consultonl services, 
sides, export. Motor brand; - lowtst 
prices. Mr. Lawrence, Pans Thr 213822 
Tel : fl) 563 29 89 or (1) 348 30 00. 


BUY-USA BUSft£SCS-6EUL We han- 
dk) your bueness n ee d s, fnxicfasa], 
‘ - jP Inti Bra 

USA. 


DUSWESSE5 WANTED. We arc buy- 
ing businesses in UX., W. Germany, 
Austria. Sellers send detoh BOP Inti 
Box 6344. Lincoln. NE 68506 USA. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


INTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNLIMITED MC 
U^JL A WORLDWIDE 

A comptete personal & business service 
p rovittei g a inque coOeckon of 
toitrt e d . uersaHe & irtufrSraual 
x nfcnducte for oM sood £ 
crofDotenai occownSt 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 

330 W. S6rfi St, N.Y.C 10019 

Senna Barx ese iftjtives 
Needed Woridwxte. 


HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT. 
>raert . 12 cnmirito analyzed, Do- 
«ra WMA, 45 KynSwV Tenqct, 
Sum 508, Central, Hong Kong. 

Impnme par Offprim, 73 rue de TEvangile. 750/ 8 Paris. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


RWEST 2 WEEKS in Bettor Heath. 
Enter Ganfioc Risk Prevention & 
Health Reconc&ionna Praaram now, 

qualified mttfcS 
. . _jtan Metficd Cen- 

(042)8792233. 


cowtrysidA ¥ 
suparvnioa Visit 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


LOOKING FOR 

VOmiRE CAPITA!. BWESTORS 
Wide fine of test marketed fishing 
tadde rxoduett Became part aF ravalu- 
j»d fishmo industry. 62 M fisher- 
m US cfene. 25M + + + paten- 
tid. Write or rail: 3334 Parade Grcle 
Bast, Coieroda Springs, Cota. 80917. 
303-591-8716 or 303®4)6!5. 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 

, Your bwl buy. 
fine cfiunwrels m any price range 
at lowest wholeraie prices 
•free from Antwerp 
center tf die diamond world. 
Fu4 guarantee. 

For tree price Hit wnte 
Joadrim GoMeatririn 


Estafafahed 1928 

PrikqansinMt 62B-3018 Arawera 
3) 234 (XT 51 

Tfc TTr/y syl b. Al the Diamond Oubi 
Heart or Antwerp Diamond industry 


OFFICE SERVICES 


EURO BUSM5S 
99 Kecengracht . 1015 CH Aoeterdoa 
Tel, 31 3036 57 49 TeteTUTBl 
World-Wide Bumeu Cedrn 


YOUR OFFICE IN PAHSr TBfX. 

ANSWBUNG SgVICE. lecrS/ 


PARS AD DRESS. Otamps-SvsteL 
Snce 1957L£p3rawdes nS, jfeae, 
iqoms. 5 rue aArtw, 


Tel: 359 47 04. Hu 642504. 


SWITZERLAND 

FAMOUS RE50RT AREA 


DO YOU WISH - 

• TO BUY AN APARTMENT 
ORAHOUSS 

• TO RETlffi IN S wnZBU AND? 

• TO INVE5T N SWITZERLAND? 

CONTACT 115: 25 YEARS OF EXPSH- 
fNCE IN BUUXNG AND SELUNG 
FINE SWISS REAL ESTATE 

CALL MRS HAMMOND 01-352 21 25 
50DIM SA. 

P.O. Boar 02, 

1884 VafcraSwrtrariand. 

Tfc 456213 GBE CH 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


LAKE GENEVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Lovely apartments with magni fi c e n t 
viewi af Late Genem and tnourtbns. 
MontretA, VStars, Verbier.'LcH Diabler- 
ett. Chateau tfOex near GOadd, 
Leydn. Cxc eUe nt Opp 


Far F orefrexeri 

from Sl23J0a 


Prices from 


Liberal m ortge gw at 61 6% mtaresL 

aoreHAN sjl 

Rerd Ectate SfMddtds 

Av Mon Repos 24, 

CH-10Q5 Lausanne, Switzerland. 
Tefr (2lj 22 35 1Z He 251 85 MflJS 

BAftlUwd Since 1970 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


USA GENERAL 


LAKE TRAVIS 
AUSTIN, TEXAS 

- TOO Acres 
4 Aflm Lde Frontage 
Unique Cove With 
Strong Development PotmitwL 
SftaeirfarTKfaa Cau 
3703 Speed vray 
Aiatin, Texas 78705 
(512} 477-5827 


LAKE LUCERNE 

In the world famous resort Bnmnen at 
the Lake Lucerne we seB first dm 
upuitinerits & penthouses with an urfbr- 
getdita view over the take. Prices from 
SFE.160.OMI up to SFR 800JXXL Mort- 
gages at low Swiss interest rates. 
Free far sole Io foreignen. 

EMERALD-HOME LTD 

Darfstr. 04-8873 Weesan SG 
Tel: 04-58-431778- 
Tbe 876062 HOME CH 


LAKE GENEVA 4- LUGANO. Man- 
b««, V3on, Gstmd Region, Locarno 
/ Ascona & meny tamoat mou ntai n 
r»ori l uuu iif im tt NEW APART- 

ments / Chalets / vuias ami. 

able for foreigners. From USS50.000. 
Big choicer Atortgoges at 6WX Swiss 
nwdency paSBeTH. SfflCXD SA 
Jow Gnse 6, 04-1007 LAUSANNE 
21/2 26 11. LUGANO 91/68 76 48. 


NEAR VjUARS, DBBBCTIY from the 
owner, 1980 conrirudad chdet-opart- 
‘ My furnished to sleep 6. 
views, 1V4 hows from 
& summer resort. 
I & [PQrtpoge ovofaWe. Tel 
29/0- 



ZURICH 
htaw 200 sqm. late view house, 30 
nxnutes from Zurich, for sale ta forenxv 
■f*. Please ratlr ta Box 2180. LH.T, 
Fnednchstr. 15/D-6Q00 Frarifwt/Mjki 


GENEVA COUNTY 
(FRB4CH FRS ZONE 
NEAR LAKE GBffVA) 

VBas, opartmertts & bulcfctg land ror 
ede. No restrictions for foreigners. 
HELVE SUNBELT SA. 

PO Box 40 
1^ Rte dUermance 
04-1245 CbBo nge-BeB erive 
GS4EYA - SWITZERLAND 


Ml 
Telex: i 


•52 35 95 
r 603 FMS 04 


LAKE OF GBtfVA 

house, 1^00 sqm. woody land, 
t. Private port. Oie hour foam 
Geneva. Free for tale to forogniTj. 
PasutJities to Kfa up one s 
rasdenrain Snitzerfand. 
P rnmoservw SA. 

PO Bw 263, 1211 Geneva 11 


USA GENERAL 


FARM FOR SALE BY OWNBL Devet 
pp your own relraet and own a dory 
farm, 60 acre exceCant ferm boariing 
2 rivers with over 2 rnfes of frontage. 

■ nil 0 - ^ aa ^* 6t * ™ rt- 

mq filing, siding & educofaon avail, 
able, dose to im. arport. Prime ap- 
portimrty for dev e kyment Owner 
wiling to wart with buyer. Write 
Oiorfa Dicmond, Box 217, E 
W1 USA 5*635: 


ARIZONA USA - Owner ___ 
ranch. Tides over bafrnce due an 
acres beautiful i m di fa jiKJ In amine 
orea. Totalprioe 52)300. Just 5300 
dawn & 533203 monthly, No citizen- 


MVE5TMB4T OPTOKnjMTY 
Southwest Ftarida Guffront condos, 
homes hamsiles on presfigtaui 
Mare a bland. Lowesfprices in yeon. 
Write P & D Er*_ c/o Deftana’i 
Mara Realty, P.O Bok 368, 
Morra Watd, H. 33937 USA 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


GRraiWICH, CT USA 

A LOVELY "ENGLISH” 
COUNTRY HOUSE 

On 5 park-kite oara 45 mm. from mid- 
town Mathatton. Or stone, bridt&ma- 
sarwy with Ludovid Re roof, flu house 
wtn bedt in the craftsman's ora and has 
been briEantly modernized & decorat- 


Hetfed pool with pavi 


SF 

DOUGLAS HUMAN 

Picturing Acsodatos he 
30 Milbcnk Ave, Greenwich CT 06830 
203869-7800 


NYOMSr SOE-UJXURY 
hteprjfioBfe unobsiructed river views, 
30m floor, emt-so u th- weit smdrerKhed 
mtsmspadous 3 bertaoms, 2 172 
baths, duung area, luge Eying room, 
torrara, eaftn kitchen, 10 closets, 7 
wafcm, parquet Boon. 1500 sa ft. 

31,2X1000. 

Write JB Hcflcnd, 

PXX Bax 1334, Grade Sq. Slcrion, 
NY. NY 1002a Teh (21^33® 


PAGE 4 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


> « 


HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


ACCESS USA 

From P»i» OneWay R ound Tr ip 

New Yort 

Las Angeles 
Qvrago 
Mean 
Data 

US$189 US5339 

and more dea ma n ora ._ 

159& diicount on In dass 
PARIS tai: II) 221 46 94 
(Car. lie. 1502) 



STUDENT * YOUTH FLIGHT! Pans 
London from F225/USS25. NfceLon- 
don From F490/USS55. For bookings 
amtacfUST VayoEps, 6 rue de Vau- 
ora d, 75006 Pare, rrarce.Taf 329 65 
DO (Metro- Luxemboiird. And 10 r de 
B«lgqua, hfce 06000. Tel (93) B73496 


USA 5UMMBI 5PEC1ALSI Los . 
from £199. New York frexn £130. 
Airtoin London 01-551 4451. 


NY ONE WAY $150. . 
Weir Coast 5145. Paris 


N.Y.. 

90. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


For mere HOLIDAY & TRAVEL ADS 
PLEASE TURN TO 
PAGE 8W 

IN THE WSKEND SECTION 


TO B RAH. end when in Israel - use the 
first don travel services of ~Dror" 
Travel and Tours, Asa House, 4 Wen- 
mam St.. Tet Aviv, Israel. Tel 3- 
210718. 262035. 


YACHTING N GREECE. Charter a 
mpuficem yacht wah VIP service. 20 


lei. Aftem 9831667. 


THROUGHOUT BRAS. SoWay opart- 
ments 8 vita ovalabie all year 
round. HOMIS London 01-437 2892 


SAILING TOUR HOOD 38 YACHT. 

Greek AegeatSeq need 2 ewe Aml 

11 - Sept. l. 5750. Mortcfi 98 32 9f 


HB1A5 YACHT1NG. Yacht Charters. 
j*rade»n as 28, Athens 10671, Greece. 


HOLIDAYS A TRAVEL 


LUXURY 7-DAY 
Mediterranean 
CRUISES 

aboard die flagship 
Ocean Princess 

■ Weekly departures from Versa* 
or Nice Saturday through 
Oct 12. 

Coda 


Tunis, So+y, Corfu, Oubrovnk. 

Aboard tfw yadii-tika 
Ocean Islander 

■ Weekly departures Front 
Venae or (tame 
(Gvitavucehio) Sesurdays 
fruoogh Oct 19. ^ 

"™ an Zadar Kornoti 
Dubrovn*, Corfu, 

Toornta] Seri'h^nds. 

Ng ptas. 

Far bmetScfe reservations rantact: 

OCEAN CRUI5E LINES 

Venae: San Mara 1497 
Teh (411 709822 
Niea Gtaude Travel 

37 Awe. Marecha) Ftaeh 
Teh (93) 856986 


OWKia A YACHT IN GREECE. Di- 
rect from owner of largest fleet. 

American management. Exailert 

ferns, govt, bonded. Vcfcf Yachts. 
Ake Ibemktakhous 22 C Piraeus, 
Greece. Tefc 4529571, 4^486. W 
21-2000. USA af&a. Fir Road. Am- 
bter. PA 19002 Tri: 215 6411624 


ADVENTURE HOUOAYS AuStrcfia. 
5hrek-frjhing o speaafity, buffalo 
hunmg ophond. Enquinas, brod w e 
Vic Sanmtan Adventures Unfanted, 
54 Goomich Rood, East Dulwich, Lon- 
don SE22 UK, telephone (01)6939566 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


AVAOABU «OM 73rd AUGUST: 
btndmu Small seif-catering holiday 
flo<, 2 roams, kdchen & farfinxH'n. 
deta4, rampferteiy equipped, free 
parfaia I«e of garden, 7 mmutes 
wgk from bus & rodwov stofion, doic 
Wimbledon. Rentd 
eve. Teh 01 942-2920 ofta 6 gn. 


FRBKH FARM VACATION. Enay 
hqrrei, organic garden, vegetarian 
awtete m gnxaous 17th century coun- 
try manor. Surrounded by 15,000 
aoe forest, near FontnneWeau/Paris. 
Col (6)06$ 47 48. 


HOTELS 


FRANCE 


PAWS - HOTEL DUMMY-VENDOME 
,** •fr*'!. 7? rooms with bath, entire. 

renovated. In heart of Para, dose 
Concorde/ Tideries. Gafcn & ramfm. 
^ rue fitont Thabar, Pans 
1st. Tet 260 32 80. The 213492 F. 


PAHS - Phsa Mirdbem **”NN_ tn 


C3LEAT BRITAIN 


q CN PLAZ A HOTH, \X3tOXM~ 
to seuemon frj busta*; 
roon « *»th / show. 
? 7 TV / totajftane / racio / hafr 
dryer, etc, fastaurant / bar / man/ 
Suites £38, doubles £52 


induave 




SWITZERLAND 


DJl3SNt GRAND HOTEL EUROFQF 


tis^ 


ttsssiMsfcaur*