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INTERNATIONAL 



WEATH& DATA APPEAR.ON PAGE 14 


>> 

No. 31^72 

W2L*£ 


Sri bit nc 


Published With Hie New York Times and The Washington Post 


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PARIS, SATUKDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 10-11, 198S 


ESTABLISHED 1887 
















Xs$. 


‘ By David HoHmaA 

Washington PanSerriee. 


an Is Warned Pretoria 

icits Considers 
Reforms 


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lion to more recent and pcssanisuc 
ocOTionric assumptions, as wdl as 


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I7.S. Is Reported 
* Encouraged 5 


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WASHINGTON — President tikely increases m future spending 
Reagan and his cabinet and pendmg major legislation, 

nave be^jtoW that, despite the new In the current Sscal year, winch 

Spaubng. atts approved by Con- mds Sejrt- 30 . toe budm deficit is 
gress last week, federal deficits are estimated at as high as $220 billion. 

likely to exceed $200 teffion for at exceeding S2O0 Wtoon for the first 

teastthft'Bea two fiscal years with- *»*- n !/• ~ m n 

oat further action, according to ad- Coogrea approved a compro- xfV rietUUl lolks 

nni«Wn»tion oC fidals. . misa deBch-reauci io n pin-imy i» st ■ * 

- Tn a dosed sessioa at the White after six months of hegotia- 
Housc; toeacting budget director tions toal in the end pitted Mr. 

Joseph R. Wright Jr„ told Mr. Rea^ ***&*> against his fellow RepubK- 
ganfthn the cabmetthaL tire deficits esns- Thatpacfcagp estimated defi- 
*o«4dj?main at over ftmn A - cits of $172 bilKon in fiscal 1986, 
for fiscal 1986, which begins OcL 1 billion in 1987 and SI 12 bQ- 


it 


and & fiscal. 1 987. 

Tie. official attributed the pro- 
jections of deficits above $200 bil- 


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I Plan to Cut 
Aid to Farms 


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By Peter T. Kilbocn 

New York Tima Strvhx 

■ WASHINGTON — Reagan ad- 
ramstrafion- officials say t£e^ are 
searching for a new approadi to the 
increasing problems of tanners and 
tbdr banters while putting aride 
the White House’s earlier ptans fOT 
fundamental changes in govern- 
ment agricultnre programs. 

An increase m loan defauta 
among U 5 .. farmers and the sjnead 
of associated bank failures have 
to the White House’s worries 
the security of the narioo’s 
financial stnictnns: . 

In addition, -ttw» d« , * p«»»nc agri- 
cultural recession, diaxactemed fay 
falling farm prices; has led to- a 
large rise in fedmal payments to 
farmers, which threafieqs to under- 
mine efforts by'the adinhiisttaikm 
and Confess to. cot budget 1 defi- ! 

CitS. • ' •••' ■ ■ - 

Political restraints have led Prcs- 


AKE T4AVB 
JSTtN, WL 


lion in 1988. 

The president told the cabinet 
Thursday that he wanted to ask 
Congress next year for many of the 
d«p cuts in the domestic budget. 
- that were mected this year, offi- 
cials said. Mr. Reagan urged cabi- 
net members to incorporate these 
cuts in budget requests they are 
preparing. . 

Officials also said there was 
agreement Thursday that the ad- 
ministration should once again 
seek to trim deficits from about 4 
percent of the gross national prod- 
uct, the nation’s total output of 
goods and services, to 3 percent 
and finally to 2 percent over three 
years. The budget resolution ap- 
proved last week by Congress fell 
short of this 4-3-2 fommla. 

A senior official said these agree- 
ments marked “a hell of a start” for 
a budget process: that was begin- 
ning unusually early this year. The 
targets set Thursday are for the 
fiscal 1987 budget; which Mr. Rear 
gan win submit to Congress early 
next year. 

The higher deficit projections 
outlined by Mr. Wrikfat. acting di- 
rector of theOffice of Management 
and Budget, amount to a declara- 
tion that die fiscal 1986 congressio- 
nal budgrt resolution passed Ang.^ ) 
wfll not pot a major dent in the 
deficit without funner action. 

The projections of deficits that 
Congress used, m approving die 
budget have been widely criticized 
by private economists ns far too 
low. Mr. Reagan said last week the 


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United Press International 

WASHINGTON — South Afri- 
ca is considering policy changes be- 
cause of growing racial violence, 
U.S. officials said Friday. 

Reagan administration officials 
said they were encouraged by two 
days of confidential talks, held at 
the U.S. Embassy in Vienna, but 
died an urgent need for talks be- 
tween the white-minority govern- 
ment and black leaders in South 
Africa. 

The White House national secu- 
rity adviser, Robert C McFarlane, 
briefed President Ronald Reagan 
on Thursday's meeting between 
himajf and other U.S. officials and 
Foreign Minister R.F. Botha of 
South Africa. 

The White House spokesman, 
Larry Spbakes, said that the South 
Africans had said they were consid- 
ering a policy review that could 
take weeks. Asked if the South Af- 
ricans had spelled out possible 
in their laws mandating 
separatum, Mr. Speakes re- 
plied, “They discussed some specif- 
ics, yes r 

“1 would think we are encour- 
aged by what we’re bearing," he 
said. 

A second meeting between Mr. 
Botha and the U.S. assistant secre- 
tary of stale for African affairs, 
Chester A. Crocker, was held Fri- 
day. 

To its credit the South Africans 
are taking. into consideration the 
views of me United States govern- 
ment and of other countries,” Mr. 
Speakes said. "We expect this pro- 
cess in South Africa to continue for 
a matter of days, perhaps weeks.” 

But he said he did not know if or 
when any actual policy changes 
might be announced by the Pre- 
toria government 

A senior Reagan administration 
official said there was reason to 





An angry crowd of 1,000 
blacks armed with sticks 
and knives moved 

die township of 
KwaMashu on Friday 
during violent conflicts 
with Indians in the Dur- 
ban area. Above, For- 
eign Minister RJF. Bo- 
tha of South Africa 
after his arrival for talks 
Friday in Frankfurt 


V ■' 


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..v 

Blacks, Indians 
Clash as Durban 
Toll Reaches 54 


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ident Roiaki Reagan to largely 

abandon for now his plan to over- - „ . . 

haul die U5. &m edonoHiy by -iMulgctresc^tUHi was pnly abe- 
reducitig government re gu l a ti o n, ■ gnmrn& not an end- , • 

inphH% : nrv»» .Mipriftrt*. At rim- : ; ;A cdanet. member who was at official said there was reason to 
samiS^aiSK^^ the.jh«ting Tbasdsy ^d,. The believe tharoneof thedementsofa 

say 'tb<wthic^'fceg^lfa«mad^ (fiatT work South African announcement 

other measipts fanners. -r oat «no w«3l,»cd it ha&ipwoxk next would be opening a ‘‘dialogue" bc- 
Some of tbe plans imda- consd- 4ycar, audit -wffl. -j ■ . ‘ ' rocen the government and opposd- 

erauxL like a federal bonk to- take A'mmqr.aammrtnflkn.omcm tion leaders, 

over bad to fkmas^ depait srid *at die White House chief of [Mr, Botha said Friday on arrival 

frcraitte broad sweeoofMr7^-' ^ Df ^\ Ri ^‘^ l ?P 0 ' in Frankfort for talks with West 
Ban's program to reduce the role of % .» drive the budget, giving German officials that the state of 
- (Confined on Page 2, CoL 8) emergency 


last month would be lifted as soon 
as his government brings rivQ strife 
under control. The Associated 
Press reported. 


{“As soon as we succeed in get- 
ol in 


declared by Pretoria 


ting the position under control 
those few areas where turbulence 
does occur,” he said, “the emergen- 
cy measures wiD be lifted.” Mr. 
Botha also said that the South Afri- 
can government would continue to 
consider reforms, but declined to 
elaborate. '■ 

[Mr. Botha met later with Wil- 
helm Hass, the head of the division 
of the West German Foreign Min- 
istry that monitors developments 
in Africa, Asia and South America, 


according to Bonn government 
sources.] 

The State Department spokes- 
man, Bernard Kalb, read a state- 
ment that said: 

“We've had serious exchanges in 
Vienna with the South African gov- 
ernment. These exchanges were im- 
portant in providing candid U.S. 
views on the situation in South .Af- 
rica and the neighboring coun- 
tries." 7 

CBS News reported that in the 
first meeting, the United States 
warned South Africa that unless ii 
gives more concessions to blacks, it 
will “be difficult for the R eaga n 
administration to defend its friend- 


ly policy toward the Pretoria gov- 
ernment " 

A State Department official re- 
questing anonymity, was asked if 
any pressure was pul on South Af- 
rica, and replied: “The United 
States slated us.views with candor, 
very straightforwardly 

■ Botha Pleased With Talks 

Mr. Bo»ha said Friday that he 
was pleased with his tails with U.S. 
officials. Reuters reported from 
Frankfurt 

He denied reports that the .Amer- 
icans had set an ultimatum for an 
end to emergency’ rule and for 
changes in the policy of apartheid. 


By Glenn Frankri 

H'oshinpcm Past Sercicc 

DURBAN, South Africa — 
Armed Indian vigilantes dashed 
repeatedly with black rioters bene 
Friday. At least 30 more people 
were killed in what has now be- 
come the worst violence in the 
country since the current political 
unrest began 1 1 months ago. 

Some of the worst fighting was in 
Phoenix township, northwest of 
Durban, where mobs from the two 
sides fought with rocks, clubs and 
machetes at the Gandhi Settle- 
ment then looted and burned the 
site. The settlement was founded 
by Mohandas K. Gandhi, who led 
the independence movement in In- 
dia after leaving South Africa in 
1914. 

The toll Friday from four days of 
violence around Durban was at 
least 54 dead and as many as 1,000 
injured, according to police and 
hospital reports. Other corpses may 
lie amid the charred ruins of houses 
and shops in townships that even 
the police and army do not enter. 

There are 821.000 Indians in 
South Africa, compared with a 
black population of nearly 17 mil- 
lion. 

The conflict between them pre- 
sents South Africa’s white-ruled 
government with a new crisis only 
two days after police spokesmen 
were claiming that violence in the 
country had eased since a state of 
emergency was declared on July 21 
in 36 cities and towns. 

[Police said they were imposing a 
curfew in the eastern pan of Cape 
province under the state of emer- 
gency imposed last month, Reuters 
reported from Port Elizabeth. 
Some of the worst violence has 
been in the eastern Cape area. 

[Colonel Genie van Rooyen, the 
local police commander, said he 
had ordered a curfew in black 
townships from 10 P.M. to 4 A.M. 
The stale of emergency does not 
cover the Durban area.] 

The black-1 ndian violence casts 
doubt on President Pieter W. 
Botha’s reported plan to announce 
political reforms at his ruling par- 
ty’s provincial congress here next 
week. 

Analysts say that Mr. Botha had 
hoped a return to relative peace 
would allow him to go ahead with 


the proposals without appearing to 
have gjven in to pressure. 

The political dimensions of the 
crisis were underlined Friday in a 
tough statement by one of the ar- 
ea's principal leaders, Chief Gstsha 
Buthelca. whose Zulu followers 
roamed the streets of several town- 
ships Friday battering opponents 
with spears and dubs to enforce an 
uneasy peace. 

Chief Buihelezi, a political mod- 
erate caught between the rightist 
white government and its leftist op- 
ponents. condemned the unrest 
and the radical black factions he 
claimed were behind it. But he em- 
phasized his view that the main 
culprit was the government be- 
cause of its refusal to negotiate gen- 
uine reforms with black leaders. 

“We are as much reaping the 
whirlwind sown by white political 
ineptitude as that' sown by those 
committed to violence for political 
purposes." he said. 

“Just as it was wrong for blacks 
to turn anger into murder and de- 
struction.” he said, “it was wrong- 
for whites to maintain a political 
system in which rising black anger 
was an inevitable consequence of 
the whiles’ refusal to share power.” 


■ Outbreak Tied to Slaying 

Alan Cowell of The AVh- York 
Times reported from Inanda town- 
ship: 

The violence in Durban started 
on Tuesday night, apparently 
linked to protest "among black ac- 
tivists about the assassination of 
Victoria Mxenge. a black dvil 
rights lawyer. 

But since then the unrest, taking 
place far from the areas around 
Johannesburg and Port Elizabeth 
under the state of emergency, has 
taken a different turn, seeming to 
lose direction in a morass of racial 
hatred between blades and Indians 
recalling the massacre of 142 Indi- 
ans by Zulus in 1949. 

This is not 1949 " a young Indi- 
an shouted Friday after his col- 
leagues fired shotguns at a black 
crowd. “This is 19S5 and we are 
ready for them." 

“As soon as we chase them on 
one side.” a white police officer 
said, referring to black 


(CofUmued on Page 2, CoL 51 


Reviewing 
lems in a 


utatreY prob-._ 


ft5>iPE>1W 


jgN'tfv' C ^ 

>VELY 




_ fanners 4ast. : 

week in Cedar. R^aWsy. Jowa, Agri- 
cariture’ Secretary Jolm R- Block 
said the adnomsttarkm ifidnot yet 
have a.so&tion to itod^issne.: 
However, iM adtkdj Tfae federal 
government wfl) . probably haw 
some repe at an ^n^jnate'time in 
the future.” ■ ' 



RebefaAicait Concessions 




Weak fannprices combined with, 
the ema- gjng tmwJKngness of the 


By 





Anne Fitzgerald who is not related to the brigadier, 
Wiahbjpm Pox Service. has offered Mr. Museveni four 

w _ _ FORT PORTAL, Uganda — seats in a proposed 28-member 

House and Senate agriculture com- *pfo quiet town in western Ugan- ca b inet- Mr. Museveni is holding 
njittees tn make major changes in th P shadow nf what are called out for higher stakes. He wants half 

“the mountains of the moon," has the seats in the military councfl. 
been ruled by Toro kings, British 
cokjmsts and several Ugandan gov- 
ernments. Now it' takes orders from 
a:taH young man in camouflage 


.--V -* m basic fann^apport laws, which are 
?l/GiA5 up for renewal 'this yeav portend 
^ heavy federal spending for agricul- 
ture- ‘ • ' ‘ ” ' r ‘ 

From less than $10 billicra. a few 


Mr. Museveni has been playing 
the coup 




years ago,- annual outlays to sup- . fatigues, 
port commodity: prices and ■ His nom de guerre is FredRwm- 




-V « 




?OB ^ 

lassif'® 5 . 


ere* income rose to- a record $18.9 
billion in 1983. Although this 
spending fell to$7.4i>niionml984, 
for technical reasons officials say 
are hot tikety to recur, an increase 
iL to $16.8 billion is estimated for 
‘^fiscal 1985, which. ends Sept 30. 
Under presentlaw. the estimate tor 
1986 is $15.2 billion and for 1987, 
$16-7.bEliorL : 


bard to get. At the time of 
he was m Sweden, where be was 
tho ug ht to have gone on an anns- 
buying trip. Since then he has been 
g^n din g messages to Uganda’s new 
re^^^alpcans.mdud- 
of the National Resistance Army, a ing an interview with me British 
guerilla group led by fanner De- Broadcasting Corp. 
fense Min is t e r Yowen .Musevem. was defense minister in the 
Tim group had been waging war for carela j :er government that pre- 
more than four years against toe the 1980 elections returning 

now-deposed .Ugand 



ERA Backer, 
At Funeral, 
Defies Ban 


ment 


depose 
of Mill 


ton Oboie. 


Mr. Rwingema led his troops 

• ■ - ........ . . - into an unresisting Fort Portal on 

Spending to the other major , . five days before the leader 
,k. (aitanl aonmUiire nro- ‘‘.I - 1 ! n. 



Js&atkm, has risen to S 3.6 hfflon in 
tbi4 fia«il year from S1.7 billion m 
1983'as fenners'have defaulted on 


more 


Mr. Museveni, who is bdieved to 

-have an estimated 8,000 fighters 
compared to about 20,000 m the 
^^rtoT^of'lastr^ Anuy, is the linchpin in 

- rtj- n^tiations to tom a government 

sorflor farmery has increased tnc the country to 

writer of 'its loans, fopart^. SrmleXough elections 
credit'Eyear, but farm The roHng inffitai^councfl of 

: i^duaiMgeiCAS) lieutenant General Ti 


8° vem ’ SrObote to power. But he fared 
badly at the polls, coming in third. 
Since then, be has been waging a 
war against the government. 

TWo reporters, who traveled the 
200 miles (380 kilometers) west 
from Kampala to Fort Portal after 
the town fell into guerrilla hands, 
found that the guerrillas operate 
fredy throughout a large pan of 
western Uganda. 

Guerrilla officers said that they 
did not back General (Mo’s gov- 
ernment 


rilla spokesman replied, what have 
the party leaders “done for democ- 
y? We are its true defenders." 


racy? 

The new strength of the guerril- 
las can be traced to dissension in 
toe Ugandan Army rather than to 
toe guerrillas’ military strength. 

Major Okwera, toe Acholi com- 


manding officer in this town, was 
1 Jul 


When asked if they endorsed toe 
appointment of Paul ! 


fito Okdlo, 


toe Democratic 
minister of internal 


Ssemogerere, 


Party leader, as 
al affairs, a guer- 


told in July that be was the target of 
an assassination squad of junior 
officers of the Lango tribe, dis- 
patched tty Mr. Ooote, a fellow 
Langa. 

Major Okwera routed the assas- 
sins, then fled to join (he Acholi 
troops of Brigadier Okdlo. Briga- 
dier Okdlo subsequently captured 
Kampala. Major Okwera was 
killed in a fight between Acholi and 
Lango troops days before toe coup. 


The Associated Press 

LONDONDERRY. Northern 
Ireland — Ignoring a British ban 
for toe second consecutive year, an 
American IRA sympathizer. Mar- 
tin Galvin, sneaked into a funeral 
procession of about 2,000 mourn- 
ers Friday and helped cany the 
coffin of an IRA man. 

Mr. Galvin joined the procession 
for about 100 yards before disap- 
pearing back into toe crowd Police 
had little chance to arrest him. and 
there was a report that they were 
under orders not to try. 

He appeared a second time in toe 
city Friday evening, eluding toe po- 
lice to meet with reporters for 
about 20 minutes. 

Last year, a man was killed and 
20 persons were injured when po- 
lice trying to arrest Mr. Gdvin at a 
Belfast rally charged a crowd. 

Mr. Galvin, who is publicity di- 
rector for the Nw York-based 
Irish Northern Aid Committee, 
walked for about 100 yards Friday 
alongside Martin McGuinness, an 
officS of toe Irish I^iublicaD 
Army’s political wing, Sinn Fein. 

Mr. McGuinness was one of two 
men featured in a British Broad- 
casting Corp- television documen- 
tary on Northern Ireland that was 
canceled last week by toe BBC 
Board of Governors foUowing a 




INSIDE 



rocco without 


■■■ 


.a Pal - 

— s' » 

stutiaa -Jordanian plan tor 
|- peace talks. 

. Bln die first trial of an alleged 
VS. Navy family 
tour J. Walker was founding 


% 


on all counts- F®? 1 ® ' 

■ business/finance 
■Japan's trade ^ 

■*. Jttiy but rose to a record aga^ 
•toe Umted States. Page* 

- M Hoffis Broth** PLC sad » 

. tad abandoned A 


■ r-'* 




MONDAY 




As the dollar slip s, there is JJ 

• imeresEin bonds denonunatea 
in Biropean currency mm In 
llhvestingr 


Tk-tmi from American iririie P®*J caa »lJ n 1 ?^ ,e 

7. 


-NT N' 



U.S. Asks Vietnam 
ToMeetonMIAs 


government request. 

• Mr. Galvin's appearance at toe 
funeral followed a night of violence 
throughout toe province by IRA 
reoDorfers marking the I4to i 


WASHINGTON (UPI) — The 
United States proposed to Vietnam 
00 Friday that a delegation of 
Americans go to Hanoi to resolve 
toe question of US. citizens still 
listed as missing in action in South- 
east Aaa. 

But a State Department spokes- 
man said that the U.S. delegation 
would focus only on toe issue of toe 
missing servicemen and toe Doited 
States would not make any move to 
normalize relations with Hanoi un- 
til toe Vietnamese withdraw their 
invasion force from Cambodia. 

In toe message sent through the 
U.S. Embassy in Bangkok, toe 
State Department proposed that a 
team go toHaaoi “soon.” The Viet- 
namese have made an offer to re- 
solve the issue within two years. 
The VS. spokesman said, “Wearc 
taking advantage of that offer” 


supporters marking toe I4to anni- 
versary of the practice of holding 
suspects without trial. The practice 
was dropped in 1978. 

Mr. Galvin helped cany toe cof- 
fin of Charles English, 21. Police 
said Mr. English was killed Tues- 
day when a grenade launcher be 
was holding during an attack on a 
police "patrol exploded. 

Mr. Galvin has been banned 
from Northern Ireland on toe 
ground his presence would provoke 
violence. 

His organization has been idenu- 
fied by a U.S. court and toe British 
and Irish governments as a fund- 
raising group for IRA arms pur- 
chases. ft claims it only raises funds 
to help families of IRA prisoners. 

The BBC decision to cancel toe 
Northern Ireland docwneniaiy led 
to a one-day strike by radio and 
television reporters Wednesday. 
The BBC since has said toe pro- 

(Continued on Fag* 2 . CoL 3 ) 


On Aug. 9 , 1945 , Smog Saved a City 


By Clyde Ha berm an 

New fork Times Sot: re 

KJTAKYUSHU, Japan — 
The ouce-independem city of 
K.okura. now carved into two 
wards of this industrial center, 
is toe lucky stepchild of Japan's 
nuclear suffering. 

Jt is toe city toai escaped toe 
atomic bombi and even now, 40 
years later, it looks back with a 
bittersweet mixture of relief 
and guilt common among many 
survivors. 

On Aug. 9. 1945. a B-29 
bomber called Bock’s Car set 
out from Tinian Island in toe 
Marianas with toe intention of 
reducing Kokura and its 
130,000 people to cinders. The 
U.S. ami lory's “short list” of 
candidates for nuclear attack 
contained the names of four cit- 
ies — Hiroshima, Kokura. 
Nagasaki and Niigata. Three 
days earlier. Hiroshima was de- 
stroyed. Now it was Kokura’s 
turn. 

The crew of Bock's Car was 
under stria orders to have a 
clear view of its rarcei, a huge 
arsenal that supplied toe Japa- 
nese Army with everything 
from bullets to bombs. 

But up high, in Bock’s Car, 
the target could not be seen. 
Haze and smoke kept ii hidden. 
Three times, toe B-29 passed 
over the city with its bomb bay 
doors open. Each time, toe 
bombardier, Kermit Beahan, 
looked in vain for toe arsenal 
and announced, “No drop.” 

Finally, low on fuel and start- 
ing to receive flak from toe 
ground. Bock's Car abandoned 
Kokura and darted west to its 
secondary target 

At 1 1:02 A.M. that Aug. 9. it 
dropped a plutonium bomb, 
dubbed Fat Man. on the grace- 
ful port of Nagasaki It was 
Nagasaki that gained the un- 
happy distinction of becoming 
toe second dty to suffer a nu- 
clear attack. Kokura became a 
footnote. 

Months later, word spread 
about what might have been, 
and "people fell, of course, like 
they’d bad a narrow escape,” 
according to Saburo Yonezu, a 
local historian. 

“We have complicated fed- 
mgs” Mr. Yonezu said. “We 
are half grateful that we sur- 
vived. But toe other half is that 
we also fed sorry that Nagasaki 
suffered instead of us.” 

The arsenal is gone now, re- 
( Continued on Page 2. CoL 51 



The observance Friday at Nagasaki of the bombing. 


Nagasaki’s Bells Toll and Doves Fly 
To Honor 70,000 Killed by A-Bomb 


Reuters 


NAGASAKI. Japan — Five hundred white doves were released 
Friday as 24,000 people joined to commemorate the atomic attack on 
Nagasaki 40 years ago. 

Bells lolled at 1 1.02 A.M. in Buddhist temples and Christian 
churches to mark the exact time that a U.S. B-29 bomber dropped 
“Fat Man,” the atomic bomb that killed an estimated 39,000 people 
immediately and perhaps 40,000 more since toe bombing. 

Participants included mayors from 81 communities in 23 countries 
attending the First World Conference of Mayors for Peace through 
Intercity Solidarity, jointly sponsored by the mayors of Hiroshima 
and Nagasaki. 

The mayors agreed in a statement to call for an early opening of toe 
third special session of toe United Nations General Assembly devoted 
10 disarmament. 

They also called on “toe heads of nuclear superpowers of toe 
United States and toe Soviet Union, as pari of the summit talks 
scheduled for this fall in Geneva, to visit Hiroshima and Nagasaki to 
realize the true nature of the atomic bombings.” 










A r 


71 


rrf 







Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL WF.HAT.n TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 10-11, 1985 





Arabs, Ending Summit, 
Reject Peace Talk Plan 
Of Jordan and the PLO 


The Associated Press 


••CASABLANCA— Aiatr leaders nizailon. 


and the Palestine Liberation Oiga- 


ended an emergency summit Fri- 
day, failing to endorse a Palestin- 


ian- Jordanian pro 
talks with Israel, c 
by King Hussein 
they back it 


King Hassan n of Morocco 
called the summit meeting chiefly 


jroposa! for peace to discuss the Palestinian issue and 
, despite an appeal the Palestinian-Jordaman agree- 
in oi Jordan that menL 

Sixteen Arab League delegations 


the two-day meeting’s attended. In addition to Syria, Al- 
final resolution reiterated support 8 fi ria, Lebanon, Libya and South 
for a plan adopted at the Arab Yemen boycotted the session. 
League summit meeting in Fez, The s ummi t resolution made no 
Morocco, in 1982. mention of reconciling differences 

2 That plan called for an indepea- between the PLO andsyria, which 


dent Palestinian state and peaceful supports PLO factions that have 
coexistence of “all states of the re- split away from Mr. Arafat’s main- 
gion.” stream El- Fatah group. 

- The summit meeting here was The resolution urged the PLO 
marred by the absence of five Arab and Lebanon to “cooperate and 
states, including Syria, which boy- coordinate” to protea Palestinian 
rotted it to protest tile Feb. 11 refugees in camps in Lebanon, him- 



Christians, 


WORLD B! 


Togo TribeS Paris Still Studying Role itfjet Ffe 

Must Coexist, 

P nn p Slows P ’wm G annS? Wainjm?ilrfy decHri taiwclttogoj*^ 

X U lie OdtJ * the S30-bflUon venture and gave France axaiSpain, vhiUiwatia 

" in the eariy discussions, un** 1 iiwwwarfleof Annsl loaectoeymn 


Italy derided fast week tog atopfam 
e France and Spain, 

ie middle of Ai^ wdepwjtittfeto 


The Associated Press 

PYA, Togo— Pope John Paul IL 
cheered by crowds singing in Po- 
lish, “We .Greet You." urged To- 
go’s Christians on Friday to live in 
peace and harmony with the 70 
percent of the population who fol- 



low tribal religions. 

Tens of thousands of people 
turned out to see the pope as he 
arrived is the northern pan of this 
West African country to meet with 
President Gnassingbi Eyadema 
and to ordain 11 priests. 


hoped that France would jam in the EKflfg* 

contacts were continuing between the Bye cotmines invowea* ; 

Marcos Says an Exile Must FacfrTfaB^; 

MANILA (UPD r-Presideat Ferdinand E. 
opposition leader.Raul Daza, 
to the Fhilippixies. Mr. Daza is repartwHy on bs way home from Eye**. f 
of self-exile in tbe United States. . ■ ^ 

Mr. Daza and several other persons woe charged wit h sqbv uflfo- 
araon and homiddc in some 1979 fires attributed to a rebd gPOtye tiSpt 
itsdf the “Ught-a-Fire Movement'’ He is of mv oriTOJCtt ig&g 


Agreement between King Hussein dreds of whom have been killed in Martin McGumness, left, and Martin Galvin flanked the coffin of an IRA-member Friday, 
and Yasser Arafat, the PLO chief, recent months in battles with Syri- 


7 -The agreement calls for prelimi- an-backed Shiite Moslem militia- -rn A vi ¥ T1 
nary talks with the United States men. f §\ /\ ip fljf'JfJpT' tl 

jrading to peace negotiations with Mr. Klibi announced tbe forma- 

lyaddesignMtoleadtoaJordam- non of a committee including rep- (Continued from Pane 1) 
an-Palesuman confederation, resentatives from Saudi Arabia and gram will be re-edited and broad- 
W Arab cn tics have said that Tunisia to reconcile differences be- Sst later, 
such a confederation would be less tween Jordan and Syria and also Several members of Britain’s 


IRA Backer Defies Ban to Attend Funeral 


such a confederation would be less tween Jordan and Syria and also 
than an independent Palestinian between Iraq and Syik 


governing Conservative Party 


^ Ul *** Mauritania to reconcile- tan’s request to the BBC not to 
sem representatives. differences between Iraq and Libya show the documentary. 

■ The Arab Leagues secretary- ^4 ^ PL0 and Lij^ ■ “i : shows how wise the home 

general, Chedli ^ Klibi, who an- Mr. Klibi said the summit “cot- secretary was to say that this sort of 
nounced the final resolution, said; demns” Iran’s refusal to accept any. man should not appear on British 
"We have noted with appreciation peace proposals in its five-year war television, ” said John Stokes, a 
the ample explanation that King with Iraq. He reiterated threats that Conservative of Parlia- 

Hnsseu and Mr. Arafat gave about Arab countries would “reconsider” menL 

the harmony of the Palestmian-Jor- their relations with Iran if (he war Mr. Galvin refused to say how he 
d aniaa plan with the Fez plan. continued, and pledged continued crossed into Northern Ireland from 


danian plan with the Fez plan. continued, and pledged c 
,. “We reiterate the need for unam- financial support to Iraq, 
mous Arab abidance by tbe spirit _ ^ _ ■ . _ 

and resolutions of Fez’s plan?* he * Peres Tefls of Peace 
added. Prime Minister Shimi 


the Republic of Ireland. “Tve am- 


at tbe highest level to prevent more 
trouble. 

Situ Fein supporters hailed Mr. 
Galvin's appearance as a triumph 
against British security forces. 
Protestant leaders expressed out- 
rage that Mr. Galvin evaded the 
ban. 

The Reverend Ian Paisley, leader 
of the hard-line Democratic 
Unionist Party, said: “It shows that 
the British government have not 
the will to rigorously apply their 
own laws against Republicans.” 

Meanwhile, police clashed with 
protesters in several towns late 
Thursday and Friday. They said 
they hit six persons in western Bel- 
fast with plastic bullets. One man 


idence. the pope stressed the Ro- 
man Catholic Church’s desire for 
harmony with Africa's tribal rrii- 

in o( an IRA. member Friday. ^ iB fiddi(y ^ BiMA” 
T __ John Paul said in French, “the 

m/f ff| imyffl / church thereby helps to weave ever 

•'* ldl> A u#wC7f closer links of solidarity and mu tu- 

. al respect between the social and 

dcr, police said. They said four of ethnic groups, between different 
the can wore gutted by fire. Police cultures an i religions and among 
evacuated the train after a radio nations of the entire workL" 
station in Newry received a warn- i n .he mid-1970s. fieneral F.va- 


In remarks at the president’s res- group, although he was said to be in the 
snee, the pope stressed the Ro- was accused of setting blazes thatsauiL.. 

m Catholic Church’s desire for ^ imaged three five-star holds in Manila. 


Lebanese Shiite Wary of Gfflnayel 


statiem m Newry recavea a warn- 
ing call from the Irish National 
Liberation Army, an offshoot of 
the Irish Republican Army. 


recavea a warn- the mid-1970s. General Eya- 
ie Ins h National d&na, a ProtestanL embarked on a 
» an offshoot of ramp ai g n of “African authentic- 


BEIRUT (Renters) — Nabih 
Beni, tbe leader of the Siiiie Mos- 
lem militia Amal, was quoted Fri- 
day as having said that President 
Amin Gemayd’s stand on political 
reform in Lebanon gave Bttk cause 
for optimism. 

“Our experience with the regime 
does not encourage one to be opti- 

x. D M U .k. dJ«.i 


ity,” his own first name mis tic," Mr. Bern told the Barut 

From Etienne to Gnasanabfe and newspaper Al K ak ika. 


In Durban 


Prime Minister Shimon Peres else to say," 

id Thursday that Israel intended Police in armor-reinforced i 


Mr. Klibi said the delegates sup- said Thursday that Israel intended 
ported the idea of seeking a com- to offer self-government to Pales- 


to offer self-government to Pales- were only 200 yards (about 180 
tintans in the occupied West Bank meters] away but no move was 


— — — From Etienne to Gnassingbi and newspaper Al Kaku 

compelling other Togolese to adopt Mr. Gemayei said 

T]ll ‘ 1 /'Tl 1 African names. He ran into opposi- with President Haft 

OiaCKS f tion from local Catholic bishops, Syria on Thursday : 

some of whom were arrested. that broad outlines l 
wti IT 1* Since then, be has relaxed the stitution and politi 

With InniDTlA campaign considerably. Lebanon could be 

muimuimia Tbejope, on the second day of soon. 

g ins 12-day African tour, appeared . Mr. Gemayd’s tal 

IT! I mrhnn to respond to the contention of cua followed the l 

1 1 *■ MA Af CUA. some Africans that Christian week of a national i 

r r . .. . . n .. dmrehes are a Westem-nm vestige Moslem parties ai 

(OxitBMKd from Page 1) of colonialism. Christians, demandi 

:rowds,“they go to tbe^otha' side “The cbmtib is not an enterprise Lebanon’s sectarian 
ind stert more trouble. 0 f pmely bwnan inspiration,’’ he tem as a basis for en 

Indtan traders had a thlrerent ^ «j t ^ to ^ 0 f in the country, 
jerspective, reflecting a mood . emnoral CO moetition.” The 


UN framework, including the 
United States and the Soviet Union 


in a gotiations b^an with Jordan, The 
the Assodaied Press reported from Tel 
ion Aviv. 


■ ply come to pay my respects at a fast with plastic One ^man (Continued from Page l) 

■ Peres TeflS Of Peace Plan funeral," he Si “I harenothing had head ^^Tgjr-ddit C rowd S .“tlwy go to the other side is not an enterprise 

Prim#- uinict^r Shimon Pm-t aThiauv'' sons appeared at Belfast Magzs- and start more trouble." - «- , n ,, ■ »: l, 

Dor^rinffflccd jeeps ^'f^ ^riday dwgedlria differem S 

I yards (about llo disorderty behavior and noung. p^pactive. reflecu^ a mood SSp“ tl ^.^ 

but no move was Four incendiary bombs explod- among Indians that white an than- m^rm , he yiid. is to 

into tbe procession, ed on a northbound DubBn-to-Bd- ties had abandoned them. spread the “gospel of love of God" 

on. Britain's domes- fast express train Friday shortly “Where’s the army." an Indian ujJ 


Mr. Gemayd said after meeting 
with President Hafez al- Assad of 
Syria on Thursday that be hoped 
that broad outlines tor a new con- 
stitution and political system in 
Lebanon could be agreed Upon 
soon. 

Mr. Gemayd’s wll« in Damas- 
cus followed the formation this 
week of a national unity front of 
Moslem parties and moderate 
Christians, demanding an to 
Lebanon’s sectarian political sys- 
tem as a basis for ending civil wa^ 


Nabih Beni 


Press Association, Britain's domes- fast express train Friday shortly “Where’s the army," 


tic news age 
not to arrest 


said the decision after it had been evacuated in - man wielding a shoigtm shouted as uticrty 
■_ Galvin was made Newry, just north of the Irish bar- his home caught on fire. *T11 tell _ 


and to help guarantee individual 


INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


mg the whites, not usT the Christians of Togo were 

“you know that the authorities can 


in the Durban area as the violence 


Freed U.S. Activists Arrive in Nicaragua 

SAN CARLOS, Nicaragua fAF) —Twenty-nine U.S. peace activists 
who said they were kidnapped Wednesday by rebels fighting the Nicara- 
guan government, and 18 journalists traveling with mem, arrived here 
saldy Friday after rcporteAy being hdd captive tor a day in Costa Rica. 
The activists said they were freed Thursday. 

The Witness ‘for Peace group said Friday that ^independent anti- 
communist" rd)els abducted their members at gmqxsat Wednesday near 


SCHILLER ^ 

INTERNATIONAL ; 
l MVKP.SH V 


Hu Americas Umwattgr 


‘ — “you know that the authorities can conmmmsr reocs aounoeu mar nnmocp m gaty*** tt 

en white surfers lolled on thar ho TTwTgnrt ^ tasks Based on radio conversions they had with tbe group. Witness for 

bo^ aramga frd, Wgwaverf citizens.” Pea« spokeswomen in Managua had idaitified the irtds earlier as 


ETdtftai SMSS a! thm await ±em asdrizens." 
diLcV tnaoera headed for the General Eyadfana welcomed the 


Based on radio co nve rs a tions they had with tbe group. Witness for 
Peace spokeswomen in Managua had identified tire rebels earlier as 
members of the Revolutionary Democratic Affiance, the second-largest 
of four anti-Sandiiiist insurgent groups. 


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B1LOIUM 



ssess^e^^ — 

in the Phoenix u singnlarhm^^^h^ivai Activists Stymie Danish ExpuMoilBid 
township that Gandhi developed T< ^?' ___ _ . - VIBORG, Denmark (AP) — Sixty-rune peace activists have been jatied 

his theories of nonviolent protest. Pf t 35?J2^5 nS’ here and the authorities say they may not be freed until they identify 
Rur thrvtft thmrirs hnre on hr irrde- vate With thepreSjaenL Later, Ku mkim mIhw tKa« RimclHim awl MeoecaVt TIi* rw-tnnen 


But those theories bore only irrele- 
vance to Friday’s looting, which 


John Paul ordained 11 Ti 




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luvttauuuu Vi tiviuuwv vu l> !#■<««. - It *- TV——. UCUIUIOUMHAU UEU IU UKOI 

of peaeft. rxjetc^s) from _ ■} the two Japafidse dtiesL 

The windows of his former More than half of the 182 active The polnx said they had o 
home, a small square bouse with Roman Cathobcpnests m Togo are protesters. “But without pa 
while walls and a pink corrugated white expatriates and Ihe develop- aBcn," a police official sad. 
roof, were smashed, and commemo- meat of African-born priests has nassoorts were exodled Thu 


roof, were 


nitive photographs of his life lay beat one of tbe major challenges 


outside, trampled and broken. 

In a library and museum, books 


facing the church in Africa. 

The pope’s visit will take him to 


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had been ton from shelves, and. in tbe Ivmy Coast on Saturday, then 
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read: “Mahatma GahdhTs Chair." 
The chair itself had been looted. 


Republic, Zaire, Kenya and Mo- 
rocco. 


In 1945, SmogSaveda City 

(Continued from Page 1) way station for feudal lords making 


public library. As a municipality, ^ - m jcdkora where the 

Kotaira is also gone. narion’s center of noHriM and cnL 


In 1963, it 
er cities in 


region’s center of politics and cul- 
with four oth-' ture lies, and they quickly assure 
st Kyushu to you tlrat it is not in any of tlK other 


form a metropolis, Katakyushn, four cities that make Kftakyu- 
whose size qualified it for greater shu. 

local autonomy. It is a city of one There r emains, some say, a resi- 
nnUion, a churning port and Indus- due of ill will against the United 
trial town. States, both for seeking to destroy 

Kokura, with 400,000 residents, Kokura and for occasional un- 


VIBORG, Denmark (AP) — Sixt^nine peace activists have been jaded 
here and the authorities say they may not be freed until they identify 
themselves by names other than Hiroshima and Nagasaki The activists 
were arrested after dimbing fences around two Danish sar bases during 
dem on s t rations tied to fhry aun i yqo >i i ryr>f ri»» 17$. afrynie Fyinghir ig cnf 
the two lapafiese dties. ‘ . ? - 

protestera/^But without passports it’s very ccra^ficaite^ to eapd an 
afien,” a police official sad About 40 demonstralOR who did produce 
passports were expelled Thursday to Britain and West Germany. 

In Stockholm on Friday, seven demonstrators occupied die Danish 
Embassy for about seven norns to demand the activists' release. 

8 Nations Consider a Warning to U.S. 

LA PAZ (IAT) — : A meeting of Latin American foreign mutisten has 
been called to consider issuing a regional warning to the United Subs 
against military intervention in Nicaragua. 

The meeting, to be hdd Aug. 28-29 in Cartagena, Colombia, is an 
expanded version of the Contadora group. That group is cconprised of 
Mexico, Panama, Colombia and Venezuela, which have been working 
together to forge a Central American peace and security agreeme nt 

Paz for Sen^uguratiaii of Pnxidra^Vfcior Paz Estenssnoo? liobvia — 
met Tuesday with the foreign ministers of the ConiadorH nations. Abo an 
hand were Presidents RaulAlfonsm of Argentina, Bdisario U rt Mi m f of 
Colombia and Julio Maria Sanguioetti of Uruguay. 

For the Record 

Two imssmg Kaftan efinbera were found frozen to death Friday in the 
Swiss Alps, rescuers said. (Rotten) 

Spain’sfust two legal abortioas wereperfonned Friday in thenortbenn 
d tycrf Oviedo, ho^rital officials said. The abortions were done there after 


trial town. States, both for seeking to destroy doctors in the nearby city of Gijto refused to perform fa n, (Reuters) 

Kokura, with 400,000 residents, Kokura and for occasional un- The International Teteconununicath» Union has opened a six-week 
thinks of itself as the new city’s pleasantness caused by soldiers conference in Geneva to seek ways to assign positions in a thin band of 
pace-setter. Centuries ago, it was during the postwar occupation. space for a growing number of geostationary satellites. (Reuters) 


Reagan Seeks New Ways to Aid Farmers U£.Wdrned 

(Continued from Page 1) spending that would far exceed the years’ market prices, thereby pro- 




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(Continued from Page 1) spending that would far exceed the 

experts say their problems are be- ' 

ine delayed, not solved. . ttas,year the admuustrar sharp price deefanes. 

When Congress returns from its tion soviet sharp reductions in the spcct, afarmlawanth 
summer recess it is to resume writ- ^gc^emment to ^vrouIdmEkan 

mg a new, four-year farm law to sdrzecraps. 7hese pnoes, generafly “ThM woold be a wah 
rake effect in fiS 1986, which ^ above market pnccs, give for- Cad Sdpvensen, beat 
starts Oct 1. Members of Congress, ^ room to i^eipnce wmal Association of \ 

Hke the administration, contend An Sf a L^ e ^°?r f* WodA ** 
that reductions in the budget defi- 

cits would brinz down int^t rates ment agrees m _buy (annas’ prod- 


tccting farmers 


On Deficits 

does. In that re- " 


(Continued from Page 1) 




•PWU awn. mgl AV i |/|licay 5ITC 1UI" Carl Scbwenseo, head erf the Na- thwn ,„ - v . - . - rt 

eign fanners room to underprice tional Association of Wheat Grow- JSv 

Ameriom tam n the wodd m P ” 1 *. 

markeL Because the UA govern- However, the agriculture com- 525J3SJ2L ^ 
meat agrees to buy fanners’ prod- nrittees have imposed any immeefi- n3 7v a . ““ ycar ; 
nets at the higber price, the pro- ate reductions m the target prices. . “fP™ 1 ™* the hi^ rer deficit 
gram also saddles the Bovenmjeni Beyond the problems of price P 1 ^ ections, Mr. Wright tirfd the 
with immense stockpiles of farm and income supports. Congress prosweot^and cabinet that Con- 
products. and the administration now face useA econo m ic assutop* 

Ai the same time the administra- “ defaults on fanner goustitat slewed stronger growth 

tion has wanted gradually to efimi- loans ** problems the pay- 

nate another price system. Qualify- difficulties pose for (he feder- ad im ? t!tt l ^g a :* 

ing fanners ran iSa payment d and the ramfann econo- if sump 52“ s :'f e ?***? 

Wthego^STeS^ m US farm debt now totals ^Wbfover KOObiffion for the 

the differaratoSema^arget ah ° 01 1213 billion, about two- ^ ^ c ? ax P sas ^ 

price” and ihe market priccS amount owed Western 

m^rif ff price for wheat last week banks by the Latin American conn- jfe yuot wqtiM be over S200 bfr 
was aboul^.90 a bnsteLTbe price face recuning repayment three years, be was quoted 

set by the government program Affixes- assaying. 

that bnvs nrMurts w« svwi »nri “During the past 12 months.’’ A second reason for the Msfer 


dts would bringdown interest rates 
and the dollar. They say this in turn uc® «■ tne 
would help farmers export their ^ . . 

goods and reduce the government’s wim , m ™ ense stodqjfles of farm 
spending for farm support. products. 

But Congress has balked at re- ^ Ai thesame to^^ministra- 
dnemg^^te by cSuftodod ^ gradually toehmi- 
SSgforagrSuim^IawS- P^te another pnee syston. Quabfy- 
osfSr that railing farm prices ran recetye a payment 

would force thrSds of farmers 


the pro- 
erumem 
of farm 


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cent lower than a year ago, the !*** wce ^ 

Agriculture Department rqxaned 
bstweek -- 

Even as the two bouses of Con- the target price was S4J8. 
gress agreed in late July on a 1 9B6 Befrae Congress departed for its 
budget, the Senate and House ago- August recess, the agncultureoran- 
culture committees were moving nrittees accepted the aoal of anttny 
toward legislation calling for subsidized prices 


as saying. 

t 12 months,” A second reason fra: the higher 
; a Federal JRi- deficits is tbe expectation that cco- 


serve Board economist wrwe in a grcssion&i 


previous 


port last month on farm banking, sjantially exceed the budget restrfu- 
arm financial conditions deterio- tion, and that Congress will vote, 
rated further at perhaps the sharp- supplemental appropriations in the 
ea rate of this decade as judged by next few years that were not cores- 


OYSTERS FOR YOUR FACE H and ebargeoffsj 


declines in land prices and in- ed in the resolu tion 

Fman^fc^de&aodmW 


One of tha finotf canfemporary KologisU, Mad. Doctor LMARCEROH has 
created tha gmazrngly effidiV foca cr*am cofad Da. O. Ao.-OltAM, bcaad 
on Ihe vnM creawstrao (PorluguaM) syslar. Wa quote tfw BAC "Who knows. 
Tha (rooesfraa wild oyster may be the amww to Ihe mKon dolor question; 

“AN mcnvE ANnoore to wnmner* 

TRY IT AND YOU WILL DISCOVER A NEW BLESSING! 

Sold in ham* ***** <* IL5, $20 indUalv* ef rsgfetorad pottage; W 
dh^poat prafamcL than odd $3. • 

Write kx LABORATOIRE I.T.C 

I7 # ftwdu CoUq, 73008 PAJUS, fence 
(Chomp»6]ra* e« ). M* TRAHOM— ROOSEVBT. TeL: 563 6678. 

In fexica on sola in Drugstores, Haoithfood stone, etc. 


Mexican 

Restaurant-Cantina 


assume Congress may add more 
spending for such meacnrHc as die 
farm bin, toxic waste cleanup and 
food stamps next year, officials 
said. * 















3 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATUKDAY-SUNPAY, AUGUST 10-11, 1985 


Page 5 



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AMERICAN TOPICS 



J w ‘ ‘ ' Ponta Ptyaxoloau/TVg Wmtg^c w 

: Vork “boom boxes,” are banned. At Coney Island, Raymond 

;• Reyes and Michael Reyes say they Eke their music loud. 


£81 


Koch Lowers Boom 

For bathers who can take the 
teat &tit not the dinofpop-mit- 
'sc . hits and Cqppertone ads. a 
! beach h ead of serenity has been 
established in New York this 
sommer. radio-free zones. 

Nearly ahalf-aule of the city’s 
14 miles f2L6 kilometers) erf 
beaches and. 15 of Central Park’s 
840 acres (338 hectares) are cov- 
ered by the ban, which took ef- 
fect May 27. People playing; radi- 
os in these areas -without 
earphones are subject to a $50 
fine and may have their radios • 
impounded. . • \ 

“The law doesi’t restrict your 
right to have a radio,” said May- 
or Edward L Koch, “ft simply 
restricts your right to play a ra- 
dio in areas where it might annoy 
othcrpeople.’’- 

Large, heavy radios with pow- 
erful speakers,called“boom, 
boxes” are the primary targets of 
the ban, established m response 
to hundreds ^complaints rare-, 
cent months, according to Henry. 
J. Stein, the city's jiatkyandre- 
creation coiinmssioiiec.;Snoe the 
zones were established^ said a 
spokesman for the . parks depart- . 
Toent, six persons have been cited 
and neariy 50 warnings have : 
been issued. ■■■ ••- •• • 

Pul^reactiomto.^ . 

been mbrerL Some savor the a- 
knee of the qmet zones, while 


others give the mayor a thumbs 
down for lowering the boom. 

“I can’t wear airy jewelry 
here.” said Dolores Viiella, lis- 
tening to a small portable radio 
at Coney Island. Pm afraid of, 
you. know, rfiain snatchers. Tm 
sitting bene worried that some- 
one will steal my hubcabs. The 
beaches are dirty, and there 
aren’t any restrooms. And Koch 
worries about radios? Give me a 
break.” 


IRS Tracks Students 


Faced with billions of dollars 
in defaults ort student loans, the 
federal government is pulling out 

**r Fu» n fatriate tnwn p card” In ml. 

lect or- the Internal .Revenue Ser- 
vice. The Department of Educa- 
tion announced last week that it 
had asked the IRS to hdp recov- 
er about- SS billion m overdue 
loans by withholding the debt- 
ors’ tax refunds. . 

“This is a major step which 
should show loan defaulters that 
we are dead serious about col- 
lecting these debts to American 
taxpayers,” said Secretary of 
Education William J. Bennett in 
announcing the crackdown, 
which could recover an estimat- 
ed $50 million in outstanding 
debts this year. - 

Notices will be mailed telling 
debtors theyhave 60 days to be- 


gin malting payments on their 
loans. If a debtor fails to do so, 
the department will ask the IRS 
to withhold his federal income 

tax ref »"Vk tip tn then nretanding 

amount of the loan. 

Nearly a milli on debtors — - 
former undergraduate and grad- 
uate students who borrowed 
from the Federally Insured Stu- 
dent Loan and National Direct 
Student Loan programs — will 
be affected. 


Short Take 


In Its first major marketing 
change in 53 years,' the Zippo 
Manufacturing Co. has unveiled 
a new upscale cigarette lighter 
tailored Tor the trendy yuppie 
market Zippo, renowned for the 
clastic wmaproof lighter and its 
unconditional guarantee, will in- 
troduce in September “Con- 
tempo.” a refillabk butane mod- 
el. 

The new model will sell for 
$29.95 to $59.95, as opposed to 
the $6.95 to $10.95 retail price of 
the standard Zippo, but the com- 
pany has no intention of phasing 
oat the traditional tighter. 

T idl our sales people, ‘Don’t 
forget to dance with the date that 
bnmgyon,’ ” said Robert Gaky, 
president of Zippo. 


AMYHOLL 


Compiled bv 
EXOWELL 


Ex-GA Chief Criticizes 
White House for Aid 
To Nicaraguan Rebels 


wrawiiiTiom positions 



THE FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 
ORGANIZATION 

v> ^ „ OF THE UNITED NATIONS 

VK/ Wan opening of 4 

INFOEMA^^ (RADIO) 

»=- ""■*» far m * 

j5o»fio BBtoi* ■ Esnarieiieei Unixerrity Aeme in jomml- 
■ T*mii mill 5r*“ HfjwdnBS and in radio hroadcutr 

W or related fi«U- of Owe wo language* 

Sdnmlfct inrindiiig nred aOmrsnca 


FnmKirity «»h JW ^ trem US$25,474 vttM 

and fringe benefits ofihe /pfiS quoting VA 4 1-GD to: 

SenddeuUedCy yL. A-uTtSdc di Onenlla, 


officer 





Exceptionally this week 


THE ikTERNATIONAL 
POSITIONS RUBRIC 


will appear on 
Tuesday August IS, 1985, 



Richard M. Nixon 


Nixon Limits 


Travel After 


Operation 


By William R. Greer 

New York Tones Seniee 

NEW YORK — Richard M. 
Nixon has curtailed his public 
schedule after a complication arose 
from surgery he underwent on Aug. 
1 to remove a large cancerous tu- 
mor from behind his left ear, ac- 
cording to his administrative assis- 
tant. 

John Taylor, the assistant, said 
that the former US. president was 
forced to postpone an appointment 
in Washington on Thnreday with 
the Pakistani ambassador. Mr. 
Nixon had scheduled the meeting 
in preparation for a trip to Asia 
later this month. 

Mr. Taylor said Thursday that 
Mr, Nixon also had to miss a din- 
ner at the Chinese Embassy on 
Wednesday night. 

Mr. Taylor said that Mr. Nixon’s 
doctor. Dr. Phitip G. Priotean, told 
him Thursday rooming to remain 
at home, to cut bade his schedule 
and to return to the doctor’s office 
in New York daily for observation. 
Dr. Prioleau performed the sur- 
gery. 

Dr. Prioleau said the cancer, a 
fyigal cell carcinoma, was similar to 
but Timch further advanced than 
one removed from President Ron- 
ald Reagan’s nose on July 30. The 

doctor said the tumor was about an 

inch long and was removed in a 
four-hour procedure. 

The complication arose because 
of an anticoagulant Mr. Nixon was 
fnkiTio for phlebitis, an inflamma- 
tion of the veins that can cause 
blood dots. Dr. Prioleau said that 
as a result of the drug Mr. Nixon 
began bleeding under a skin graft 

covering the wound. 

Dr. Priolean said Mr. Nixon had 
stopped bleeding by the time he 
examined him and changed bis 
dressing Thursday. Dr. Prioleau 
said the bleeding did not pose a 
serious health threat 


Confuted by Our Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON —Members of 
Congress and the head of the CIA 

during the Carter administration 
have criticized the direct involve- 
matt of the National Security 
Council, a branch of the White 
House, in aiding anti-government 
rebel operations in Nicaragua. 

The Reagan administration ac- 

taowledgedTbursday that officials 

on the council were directly in- 
volved in aiding the insurgents, 
who are seeking to overthrow the 
Sandinisl government in Nicara- 
gua. 

Administration officials and 
President Ronald Reagan said, 
however, that the administration 
had not violated U.S. laws regulat- 
ing covert operations or prohibit- 
ing direct American assistance to 
the rebels. 

“U just makes it unmistakably 
d ea r that it’s our war,” said Repre- 
sentative Anthony C. Befieuson. a 
California Democrat and member 
of the House Permanent Select 
Committee on Intelligence. ‘They 
are waging it in every way except 
with American troops.” 

Stansfield Turner, who headed 
the Central Intelligence Agency 
and was an adviser to the National 
Security Council as President Jim- 
my Carter’s director of central in- 
telligence, said that “it’s most im- 
proper” for the National Security 
Council to play a role similar to one 
that Congress bad barred the CIA 
from performing. 

Tt may not break the law,” he 
said, “but it’s ridiculous when the 
CIA had to be kept at arm’s length 
from the coniros to have another 
arm of government doing exactly 
the sayne thin g.” 

The criticism came in response 
to news reports Thursday that the 
rebels, who are often referred to as 
contras, had been receiving direct 
military advice from officials on 
the council in an operation run by a 
mili tary officer in the White House. 


The reports said the officials had 
begun giving the advice last vear 
after Congress refused Mr. Rea- 
gan’s request for more military aii 
Congress also barred any “agen- 
cy or entity of the United States 
■ involved in intelligence” from help- 
ing the rebels militarily. 

Representative George E. Brown 
Jr„ a Democrat of California and 
member of the House inteliig 
committee, said the National Secu- 
rity Council was not exempt from 
the ban because the current CIA 
director, William }. Casey, also 
serves it as an adviser. 

“They’re up io their ears in intel- 
ligence ” Mr. Brown said of the 
council. He added, however, that it 
would be difficult for Congress to 
investigate the council's role be- 
cause the principle of executive 


privilege prevents presidential ad- 
sin: 


visers from being forced to testify. 

He said that, nonetheless, the in- 
telligence committee and the 


House Judiciary Committee mi|hi 


investigate the council’s role, 
said its actions could involve “aid- 
ing and abetting violations of the 
Neutrality Act." which bars attacks 
on governments at peace with the 
United States. 

Mr. Brown said the posable of- 
fenses “could be impeachable” if 
they were proved, bm he doubted 
Congress would press an investiga- 
tion that might lead to such a con- 
frontation. 

“We're not violating any lawsu” 
Mr. Reagan said Thursday* in sign- 
ing legislation that provides $27 
million in nonmilitary assistance to 
the rebels over the next two years. 
The measure was pan of a $25.4- 
billion foreign aid biff 

Larry Speakes, the White House 
spokesman, said: “No member of 
the National Security Council staff 
has, at any time, acted in violation 
of either the spirit or the letter of 
existing legislation dealing with 
U.S. assistance” to the rebels. 

fNYT. AP) 



A policeman stands guard near a car used in a bombing in front of a Lima police station.* 


Lima Police Detain 1,400 After Rebel Attack 


The Associated Press 


LIMA — Peruvian police have 
detained nearly 1,400 people in re- 
sponse to a rebel attack that- 
blacked out the capital and injured 
four people when a car bomb ex- 
ploded. 

Meanwhile, the Peruvian gov- 
ernment has extended for 60 days a 
slate of emergency that was first 
imposed more than four years ago 
in 25 Andean provinces. 

The government said Thursday 
the extension was necessary be- 
cause “terrorisi attacks continue 
against lives and private and public 
property.” 

The blackout, and bombings 
Thursday were the first io l ima 
since President Alan Garcia Perez 


took office July 28. He has pledged 
to seek negotiations with the Shin- 
ing Path, a Maoist guerrilla group, 
to end political violence that has 
taken at (east 5.000 lives since 1980. 

Major Luis Cuba Quintana, a 
spokesman for the Civil Guard. Pe- 
ru's national police force, blamed 
the attacks on the Shining Path, the 
hugest of three rebel groups operat- 
ing in Pern. 

The major said that the police 
detained 1.390 people in Lima's 
slums on Thursday for questioning. 

A spokesman for Electroperu. 
the national power company, said 
that rebels dynamited a tower car- 
rying power lines 30 miles (48 kilo- 
meters) east of Lima. Ther attack 
left the city and its pon of Ei Callao 


in darkness for more than an hour 
late Wednesday. Some neighbor- 
hoods still were without electricity 
Thursday. 


Elec trope ni said the power fail- 
ure affected an area of the Pacific 
coast from the pon of Chimboic, 
250 miles north of Lima, to the 
desert cilv of lea. 185 miles south 


of the capital. The company said 
workers were checking the power 


system for other evidence of sabo- 
tage. 


A car bomb exploded Wednes- 
day outside the office of the Lima 


prefect, who is in charge of main- 
taining public order. A policeman 
and three women were hurt, the 
authorities said. 


Louise Brooks 
Dead at 78; 
Ex-Film Star 


The Asseaaud Press 

ROCHESTER, New York — 
Louise Brooks, 78, a star of silent 
films in the 1920s and 1930s, has 
died at her home here of a heart 
attack. 

Miss Brooks, a cult figure in Eu- 
rope and the United Stales who 
shunned Hollywood after she had 
appeared in two dozen films, was 
Found Thursday in her apartmenL 

The daughter of a Kansas law- 
yer, Miss Brooks began as a dancer 
while in her teens. She appeared on 
stage in New York in the Ziegfdd 
Follies and George White’s Scan- 
dals. “I learned to act while watch- 
ing Martha Graham dance.” she 
said, “and 1 learned to move in film 



New Reagan Plan on Shuttle Price 
May Hinder Role of Private Industry 


By Thomas O’Toole 

Washington Post Seniee 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration, which had suggest- 
ed that space should be open to 
private enterprise and that the 
space shuttle might be turned over 
to industry, sent Congress a new 
shuttle pricing policy last week that 
could make it uneconomical for 
private industry to take that step. 

The pricing policy is designed to 
help the shuttle compete with the 
European Space Program's com- 
icnproi 


three satellites could share a mis- 
sion and pay the National Aero- 
nautics and Space Administration 
a little less than $25 million each 
for use of the shuttle, or about $1 
million more than they now pay for 
shuttle launches. 


Arianespace, a subsidiary of the 
European Space Agency, charges 
$25 million to launch a satellite 
using the Ariane booster rocket. 


compete with NASA and Ariane- 
space. 

General Dynamics Corp. has 
signed a letter of intent with NASA 
to use the Atlas-Centaur rocket, 
and Transpace Carriers Inc. has 
signed to use the Della rocket to 
carry satellites. The companies 
have said they cannot compete with 
a shuttle price of less than $40 
million to send up a single satellite. 


Louise Brooks 


from watching Chaplin. 

r film debut i 


After her l 


in 1925, she 


merer al satellite launch program. 

For the three years starting Ocl 
J, 1988. the White House said it 
wants to auction the shuttle's cargo 
son and film actress who was bay to foreign and commercial cus- 
nominaled for an Academy Award tomers at a minimum rate of $74 
in 1964, Wednesday of cancer at million fora full bay. 

New York Hospital This would mean that owners of 


The new pricing policy repre- 
sents a victory for NASA and a 
defeat for the U.S. Transportation 
Department- The department had 
argued for a full-bay price no lower 
than $129 million, which it said 
would encourage private industry 
to get into (he launch-vehicle busi- 
ness on its own. 


At least two companies want to percent 


The Transportation Department 
argued for a higher shuttle launch 
price to improve industry's bar- 
gaining power. NASA, however, 
said that a higher charge would 
send customers to Arianespace, 
which has booked more than a 
third of the world's future commer- 
cial satellite launches. Four years 
ago Arianespace had less than -20 
of the comm era al market 


quickly gained stardom and a cult 
following in flapper movies of the 
era. She appeared in the 1928 films 
“A Girl In Every Port" and “Beg- 
gars of Life.” 

Miss Brooks, known for inde- 
pendence and contempt for the 
American film industry, later said 
that intelligence and seriousness 
were handicaps. “1 found myself 
looked upon as a literary wonder 
because I read books,” she wrote. 

Of Hollywood, she wrote: 
“There was no other occupation in 
the world that so closely resembled 
enslavement as the career of a film 
star." 

In the late 1920s, she went to 
Europe; where she remains popular 
through revivals of her films G W. 
Pabst, the German director, guided 
her as Lulu in “Pandora's Box” and 
its sequel, “Diary of a Lost Girl” 
■ Other Deaths: 


Study Finds Lung Cancer 
Killing More U.S. Women 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — The “tragic 
consequences" of smoking have re- 
sulted in a greater than fivefold 
ji> cr«ig» in the number of lung can- 
cer Heqihs among American wom- 
en aged 55 and older from 1960 to 
1982, according to a report bjMhe 


Metropolitan Life Insurance 
The report, released Wednesday, 
said that lung cancer wiQ surpass 
breast cancer as the primary cancer 
killer erf women by 1986. The re- 
port also said that the lung cancer 


David Golden, 77, executive pro- 
ducer of the film “Love Story” and 
production manager of “Kramer 
Versus Kramer” and “Fame.” 
Wednesday in Oregon after an 
automobile accident. 

Dr. Murray A. Geisler, 68, an 
authority on military logistics and 
operations research, Tuesday of 
leukemia at his home in Los Ange- 
les. He pioneered a method erf sup- 
plying spare parts for military air- 
craft at bases around the world. 

Grayson Hafl, 58, a stage, televi- 


had tripled from I960 to 1982. 
Breast cancer mortality rates have 
remained virtually unchanasd. 
“Breast cancer is Still ahead of 


from 31.6 in 1960 to 104.6 per 

100.000 in 1981 

From 1960 to 1982, the mortality 
rates for breast cancer increased for 
all women aged 35 to 84 from 515 
to 54 per 100,000. 

In contrast, the death rate from 
lung cancer for women of all 
rose from 1 12 to 46.8 per 100, 1 

In 1 985, the statisticians said, an 
estimated 119,000 new cases of in- 
vasive breast cancer will be detect- 
ed with a projected five-year sur- 
vival rate of 70 percent. About 

46.000 new lung cancers will be 
diagnosed among women, with an 
overall survival rate averaging just 
13 percent, they said. 


Major Manhattan Stores 
Charged With Tax Scam 


United Stales.” the report said, 
“but the percent difference be- 
tween the mortality rates of these 
two diseases is shrinking rapidly." 

cer among women started t arin g 
World War II when smoking by 
women became socially acceptable. 


Gas Container Blast 
Injures 14 in Greece 


The Associated Press 

ATHENS — Police blamed a 
leaky gas container in a basement 
kitchen for ah explosion Thursday 
at a seaside hotel near the Athens 
airport that injured 14 persons. 

The blast started a fire that 
swept through the hotel, where 
about 230 people; mostly Britons 
on a package tour to Athens, were 
staying. 


NEW YORK — Two fashion- 
able Manhattan stores have been 
charged with scheming to help cus- 
tomers evade city and state sales 
taxes on expensive purchases. 
Indictments were announced 
the Buigari 
two of its top 
against the Christie 
Brothers Fur Corp. and six of its 
The retort said that major in- executives. Officials said the stores 
creaks ^deaths from h?eneer mailed empty bmtes to outvie 
^CTeregisiered in almost every age addresses, makmg n am 
^omSied. The largest increase customer* were not subject to city 

group suiui °T ce tn M and state sales taxes, 

was among women aged j j Y*- 

Deaths in mat group rose From 15.4 


per 100,000 in 1960 to 81 J per 
100,000 in 1981 

In 1982, the lung cancer mortal- 
ity rate was 11&3 Pf 1M 1.000 
among all women aged 65 to 74, an 
inmast of 390 peroni war tte 
I960 rates. For those aged 75 to 84, 
lung cancer mortality rates went 


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SATURDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 10-11, 1985 


Uml 




Pnbtfchrd With The New Yori Tim and TV Warirfngtoo Port 


The People Can Complain 


Sribttnc. The Tost Sea of Chinese’ Threatens to Swamp Tibet 

Thr Wsrtdnatoo Port %F , . . « \ nn to... 


- >,The season demands a tribute to John Peter 
■ . Zenger, publisher of New York’s fust indepen- 
! * oem newspaper, and Andrew Hamilton, his 
* lawyer. Last Sunday, Aug. 4, was the. 

250th anniversary of the libel (rial at which 
.'they turned common law on its head and 
; ' established the freedom of America’s press. 

I The Zenger legend dwells on the martyrdom 
■ " of an immigrant printer abused by a tyrannical 
‘ ^ agent of the Crown. The legend thrives be- 
: - cause Zenger and Hamil ton roused a city of 

■ 1 40,000 to their cause and, while their oppo 
’ • $ents sulked, had the wit to print the only 
► * sfcord of their heroics. But Governor William 
■ . Cosby did run a land-grabbing, vote-rigging 

■ * administration. HLs efforts to silence his critics 

■ 1 provoked a crucial test of democratic printi- 
‘ - |le. The Zenger case planted seeds that flow- 

- * ered half a century later in die First Amend- 
■ , meat it destroyed thepemidons doctrine that 
I ' pfitidsm erf government is seditious even if 
■ ' trtie. It showed how juries, backed by public 
' - Opinion, can enlarge the spirit of the law.' 

. * , Zenger was brought to New York from 


jury was Finally picked, but only after Delan- 
cey had disbarred Alexander for protesting too 
much. Little did he dream that this would 
bring Hamilton, the Colonies’ foremost law- 
yer, riding to the rescue from Pennsylvania. 

Hamilton quickly confounded the case bv 
conceding that Zenger bad printed the offend- 
ing papers. Since the judge and prosecutor 
were asking the jury only to confirm that fact, 
they stood triumphantly ready to receive a 
verdict, “apply" the libel law to the jury’s 
finding of fact and pronounce sentence. 

Yet Hamilton insisted that there could be no 
libel unless either the prosecutor proved the 
criticism false or the defense failed to prove it 
true. Nothing doing, ruled Delancey. When 
seditious words undermine authority, their 
truth is irrelevant; indeed, in such a case, “the 
greater the truth, the greater the libel." 

If that hoary precept sounds absurd today, 
just substitute the words “national security” 
for “authority." Wien governors feel threat- 
ened by criticism, they are not easily deflected 
by its truth. That Americans learned to resist 


‘I. Bavaria in 1710 at the age of 13 and appren- such censorship owes much to Hamilton’s next 


I - peed to the city’s only printer, William Brad- 
• ' feud, who gave him more craft than grammar 
' - arid a taste for independence. In time Zenger 


opened his own shop cm Smith Street, three, to you we must now appeal.” If his evidence of 


■ r blocks east of Broad Way. near Wall. 

\ • l By 1733, with Bradford monopolizing the 
< ; official printing work from Cosby, the new 
~ l royal governor, Zenger turned to printing the 
\ - broadsides of a liberal opposition, agitations 
• ' that grew into pamphlets, finally a newspaper. 
' - The New- York Weekly Journal listed Zenger 
T ■; as printer but its guiding spirit was James 

* „ Alexander, a lawyer and mathematician who 
l' anonymously eadi Monday unleashed bold 
. ^ assaults on the governor’s machinations. 

* - ' ^ The furious governor asked the Assembly to 

* - endorse a public burning of the paper, but it 
r ' refused. He asked a grand jury to indict the 
' ■ Bpstart printer, but it refused. So Cosby had 
. “ Zenger jailed on his own information. The 
'Icharge was printing “false, scandalous, maE- 
' - pons and seditious" articles that had accused 
' ' the governor of horrendous misrule threaten- 
' - Ing nothing less than “slavery.” 

‘Not for the last time did such overwrought 
■ I opinion drive authority to overreaction. Cosby 
1- gent his henchman. Chief Justice James Ddan- 
- c&y, to run the trial Zenger s bail was set 
“^ateurdly high and his jailers began drawing 
1 2 jhrora from the bottom of the dear. A proper 


A Rest for Marginal Land 


' - ' -In the 1970s, American farmers were led by 
„ •* government policies and favorable markets to 

- ’ expand their production enormously, mainly 
Mar export They did so partly by moving onto 

- * nMrginfll lands. The result is that about an 
' - eighth of the land now in agricultural prodne- 
* ' Bon across the country is highly erodible. The 

- * farmers probably should not be using it Cer- 
' - ffflnly the government should not be subsidiz- 

- ~ hag them to use h, not in a time of towering 
' 1 surpluses and budget-bending support costs. 
' - But that is what it has been doing. 

- “ - 'Now, however. Congress and the adminis- 

tration have fastened on the good idea of doing 
the opposite. In a m^or reversal of policy, they 
would pay farmers to restore the land, setting 
im what is called a conservation reserve. The 
! bin now in the House Agriculture Committee 
• Would create a reserve of 25 million acres ( 10. 1 
million hectares), about half the 53 million 
considered erodible. The Senate bill calls for 
iO million acres. The administration, which 
earlier had said a reserve was too costly, has 
Shifted position and favors 20 million. 

The argument in favor is that a reserve is a 
rare opportunity to many economic and envi- 
ronmental concerns; it would achieve both 
price support and soil conservation. The gov- 
ernment already imposes acreage set-asides 
1 each year to limit production of staple crops 
and prop up prices. The reserve would come 
on top of these, and augment them. At the 


same time it would prevent gullying of land 
and sd ting-up of streams. Would-be partici- 
pants would bid against each other the gov- 
ernment would sign with those offering to 
leave their land idle for the least amounts per 
acre per year. The government would share the 
cost of putting the land back into grass and 
timber. The estimated total cost is about the 
same as continued production subsidies. 

There is always a certain awkwardness in 
giving people money not to do things, and 
especially in paying them not to misbehave. 
Here the government would be paying farmers 
to stop abusing their own land; In a sense a 
reserve program would be rewarding past 
greed. Bui the government was complicii in the 
expansion of the 1970$, when grain exports 
were seen as a way to finance oil imports; and 
soil erosion is now a national environmental 
problem, requiring a national solution. 

The farm bills in both houses remain stuck 
in committee on the same firsi-foik-m-lhe- 
road issue that has held them up all year. These 
are bad times in (he Farm BelL The commit- 
tees must nevertheless reduce price supports 
both to make U-S. products competitive in 
world markets and to stay within budget 
guidelines. It is a difficult political task, but 
the reserves that both bills now contain should 
make it easier. They can serve as balms to the 
fanners as well as to the land. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


China on Nuclear Disarmament 

' Even if the two superpowers were sincere in 
demonstrating willingness to reduce nuclear 
’ weapons, limited reduction would have no 
practical significance at all Both the super- 
powers already have enough nudear weapons 
. to destroy the world several times over. 

Deng Xiaoping said rightly last week that 
China upholds two cardinal principles regard- 
ing nudear disarmament. First, the two super- 
; powers should undertake not to be the first to 
. use nudear weapons. Second, they should re- 
duce their nudear arsenals step by step until 


all such weapons have been destroyed. People 
around the world cannot feel reassured unless 
and until agreement is reached on the above 
two principles between the Soviet Union and 
the United States. China is ready to do its 
share in contributing toward the reduction of 
nudear arms if the superpowers take the lead. 

China is against the “star wars” proposal 
Outer space is an asset shared by aH humanity. 
All military activity there should be categori- 
cally banned. While the Soviet Union opposes 
the [U.S.] Strategic Defense Initiative, it has 
long been engaged in «mflar research itself. 

— The China Daily (Beijing). 


FROM OUR AUG. 10 PAGES, 75 AM) 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Mayor of New York Is Shot 

• NEW YORK — Mayor William J. Gayoor 
- was shot and seriously wounded [on Ang. 9], 
' when about to go aboard the Kaiser Wilhelm 

• ger Grosse, by J J. Gallagher, a recently dis- 
' charged employe of the Department of Docks. 
.It is stated that Mr. Gaynoris condition is 
satisfact or y, pending an operation. Photogra- 
phers bad just aimed their cameras at Mayor 
Gaynor when a heavily built man with a Pana- 

’ h& hat pushed forward, drawing a revolver. 
One shot was fired almost in the face of Robert 
Adamson, the Mayor's secretary. A second 
. was fired at the back of Mr. GaynoFs head and 
! struck the neck. “I shot him because he took 
the bread out of my mouth.” Gallagher said. 
New York was appalled by the attempted 
assassination. The news created a sensation 
comparable only to Presidential tragedies. 


1935: Toward Conflict in America? 
PARIS — [A letter to the editor says:] “In the 
opinion of many we are marching to another 
GvQ War-in the United States and the vitality 
of your ‘Mailbag’ discussion about one of the 
great personalities of our last one, General 
Robert E Lee, shows bow lasting are the 
hatreds engendered by such wars. Fair warn- 
ing, civil wars are expensive playthings. Our 
Gvil War set back the dock on the South for a 
hundred years, ‘freed’ its slaves to new misery, 
gave new lease of power to greed in the North, 
made possible vast accumulations of wealth, 
let in mfllkms of new slaves from Europe to 
serve this wealth. Today the old battle is raging 
on the same old front. Mr. Roosevelt is trying 
to meet it by acting as arbitrator between 
wealth and the slaves. If he fails we may grow' a 
new Lee or Grant to enforce civil peace” 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 
KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM 5L PAL£Y. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairm en 


LEE W. HUEBNER, PubMer 
Executive Editor 
Editor 
Deputy Editor 
Deputy Editor 
Associate Editor 


Deputy Publisher 
Associate PubBsher 
Associate Publisher 
Director of Operation! 
Director of Circulation 
recur ef Aihertumg Saks 
International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Chartes-de-QwUe. 92200 Neoffly-sur-Seine, 

France. Tel.: (1)747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8052. „ 

Dir?aatr de la publication: Waiter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters. 24-34 Hmnessy M, Hong Ktmg. Tel 5-285618. Telex 61170. 

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Fnedndmr. 15. mDaMmIM. 71 (069(726755 Tlx 41021. ^e» 

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U.S. subscription: 5322 yearly. Second-das postage paid at Long Island City, N. Y. 1 1101. BK3 
© 1985, International Herald Tribune. AU rights roared 


D HARMSALA, India — It is more than 
30 years since China forcefully occu- 
pied Tibet. In this period our religion and 
culture have been destroyed The people of 
Tibet have suffered tremendous physical and 
economic deprivation. At least 12 million 
have died as a direct result of the occupation. 
Bul never, even in the worst of times, did the 
Tibetans lose their distinct national identity. 
That is the threat we face today: complete 
assimila tion and absorption by a vast sea of 
Chinese settlers streaming across our borders. 

Early this century, the Manchus were a 
distinct race with their own culture and tradi- 
tions. Today only two to three million Man- 
churians are left in Manchuria, where 75 
miHio n Chinese, hare settled In Eastern Tur- 
kestan. which the Chinese now call Sinkiang, 
the Chinese population has grown from 
200,000 in 1949 to seven million, more than 
half of the total population of 13 million. In 
the wake of the Chinese colonization of inner 
Mongolia. Chinese now outnumber the Mon- 
gols by 8.5 million to 2J> million. 

The area where I was bom, the Kokonor 


By the Dalai Lama 

The Dalai Lam, the spiritual and political leader of Tibetans, is now living m exile. 


That Tibetan haw 
records. Not a on 
that Tibet has ever 


be based on. Tffxtta 
Tibetan record satter 
m a pan d Chose ... 


move at this critical moment in the trial. 

Turning his back to the chief justice, be 
announced, “Then, gentlemen of the jury, it is 

* - .1 « If -f 


oese newspaper report The Chinese claim to 
be giving special care and attention to the so- 
called Tibet Autonomous Region, which 


comprises only the western and central pans 
of Tibet And yet they are sendhig large num- 
bers of young Chinese colonists into the east- 


ern and northeastern parts of our country. 

Almost all of Tibet’s great wealth — espe- 
cially the priceless religious statues, images, 
paiminac and icons that adorned our thou- 
sands of monasteries and temples —has been 
plundered and ijden to China. Virtually all 
of the 5,700 monasteries and 500 temples 
of which we have records have been de- 
stroyed Among our greatest losses are the 
irreplaceable ancient Sanskrit, Pali! and Ti- 
betan texts destroyed by the Chinese. 

It is impossible even to begin to estimate 
the immanw* material loss that the Tibetans 
have suffered under the Chinese. Yet the 
Chinese have the arrogance to boast that they 
have spent $2.7 billion to develop Tibet over 
the last three decades. What they fail to men- 
tion is that this figure includes the tremen- 
dous expense of maintaining at least 250,000 
Oiinest* troops and 1.7 million civilian per- 
sonnel in our country. Anyway, this sum is 
only a fraction of what the Chinese have 
destroyed or taken out of Tibet 

By any social, moral, religious or legal 
standards, the theft of the belongings of one 
individual by another is strongly condemned. 
Surely when such robbery is committed by 
one race against another inis must be a crime 
of immense magnitud e 

1 am pleased at the slight improvement of 


conditions that has taken place in Tibet since 
1979. More food is available, a small depw 
of p cpnomic freedom has ban rei ntrod uced 
and the movement of people is less restricted. 

I am also encouraged to note that the Chinese 

leaders are more open-minded and moderate 
today than in the past. 1 hope tint theywin 
try to better understand the situation in Tibet 
and will adopt a policy that is both pragmatic 
and morally principled. . . 

Fulfillment of the basic needs of food, 
shelter and clothing are not sufficient for 

human* Animals probably experience a 
yntf of satisfaction when they are fed, shel- 
tered and kindly treated, even if it is tempo- 
rary. But in hircmm society, freedomis a basic 
need, an inalienable right that can never be 
replaced by temporary improvements in food 
supplies and economic conditions. _ . 

Tibetans are not against the Chinese peo- 
ple. All we demand is that which is rightfully 
ours. We believe that the Chinese, too, have a 
rig ht to happmess and prosperity, but not at 
the expense of another nation and people. 
rhma does not possess any right whatsoever 
to decide the fate of the Tibetan people. . 

Recently the Chinese have been taking 
some interest in Tibet's history. This is good- 
just as it is important that Cnmese history is 
based on Chinese records, so it is important 


There have certauriy been-periotb m £» 
past when the Mongols and tbt Motthm. 
widded some influence over Tibet Ba sk 
there a nation in tbewrid that has nql itaBc 
time or another, been subjected Bihea to 
ence of outride powers, wpetha mffit ay^po- . 
litkaL cultural or rerigboS? Strooga pows 
have used, and at does stiff dp as ^ tteg 
influence in an aggressive way 10 advance 
claims of sovereignty over weaker natiduL 
But Hahns have no basil and sum ac- 
tions cannot confer sovereignty. -,.-‘ 

It is my view that die issue af Tibet is not 
the concern of the six miffioa Ttbettw «« 
Because of Tibet’s qg^oid with «* “fe* 
bois and its strategic unportacoc. wh at fag - 
pens in ami to Tibct has a direa 
cant impact on the region and the^ worm. Tne 
future of Tibet is therefore certainly not for 


Throughout the history of ma n kin d, sotu- 
tions achieved by fora have inevitably been 
transitory. A solution can be genuine and 
lasting wily if and when it is to tire ifi 
satisfaction of the people concerned. In tire 
fmal analysis, it sfaw&f be tedreooocerocd 
people themselves, in this case the Tibetans, 
to decide what they want I have always 
believed that human determina t ion and arry 
rq n<a- that is uulyjust will ultimaofy triumph. 

The New York Time*. 


troth was to be suppressed, why. that was his 
best evidence. And whether words are libelous 
surely depends on how they are understood. If 
upstanding New Yorkers understood the Jour- 
nal's words to be true, how could those words 
be condemned as scandalous? 

Judges may understand the words different- 
ly, Hamilton argued, but citizens have a “natu- 
ral” right to complain, and duty to protect 
every citizen's privilege of truthful conmlainL 
“Of what use is this mighty privilege if every 
man that suffers is [kept] silent? Ana if a man 
must be taken as a libder for telling his 
sufferings to his neighbor?” 

The jury “in small time” ruled not guilty. 
Whereupon, while “a mixture of amazement, 
tenor and wrath appeared in the bench," the 
‘jubilant crowd then adjourned to the Black 
Horse Tavern to celebrate.” 

Across the ages, then, an added toast: To the 
Zenger jury, for registering the public's under- 
standing erf a vital yet always difficult Ameri- 
can idea — that the freedom of tire press to 
challenge authority and convey complaints of 
the citizenry is indispensable in a free society. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


The War Is Over and Interdependence Remains to Be Learned 


W ASHINGTON — Between 
1960 and 1980 (he proportion 
of Japanese homes with telephones 
rose from 2 to 77 percent Grasp that 
one remarkable statistic and you can 
fathom die gathering crisis in Ameri- 
can-Japanese relations. Societies 
need tim* to adapt to chang e* , and the 
rapidity of Japan’s economic rise has 
been too fast for both countries. 

The Japanese have acquired global 
responsibilities before being capable, 
psychologically and politically, of 
discharging them. And Americans 
have trouble living with the idea that 
a nation they defeated in war now 
challenges economically. 

H is difficult to be optimistic. The 
irresistible force of American preju- 
dice and the immovable object of 
Japanese inertia seem bent on collid- 
ing. In the U.S. Congress, protection- 
ism — shorts ghled and self-defeat- 
ing — is in tire air. in Japan, tardy 
and insufficient “action programs” to 
overhaul its economy fan American 
anger- At best, these efforts will take 
time to produce the higher Japanese 
imports and higher Japanese eco- 
nomic growth that Americans want: 
at worst, the results may be meager. 

Both sides are prisoners of their 
pasts. Japan's trade surpluses are 
commonly blamed on protectionism, 
but this is a half-truth. The central 
cause of those excessive surpluses is 
an archaic financial system geared to 
an earlier era of underdevelopment; 
perpetuated ipto the proem, it per- 
versely restrains domestic expansion 
and spurs the search for expert mar- 
kets. On the U.S. ride, resentment of 
Japanese success has become an ob- 
session that grossly exaggerates Ja- 
pan's role in economic problems. 

Writing in The New York Tunes 
Magazine, for example, Theodore H. 
White — author of “The Making of 
tire President” series — accuses Ja- 
pan of “dismantling American indus- 
try.” If it continues, he broods, Japan 
will have “finally won the war." 

The war? Wasn't it fought for 

shares? $evci mind, for Mr. While 
reflects America’s raw mood: He dis- 
likes the Japanese. As a young report- 
er in China he was shot at by Japa- 
nese. His Japanese are still soldiers, 
not people. They are “on the offen- 
sive,” “wiping out” American indus- 
tries. You sense that he wants B-29s 
to wipe out their factories. 

His story is less important for its 
content, which is unoriginal, than Tor 
who he is. As one of America’s pre- 
mier journalists, he legitimizes eco- 
nomic scapegoating. Bul Ins powerful 
polemic is sloppy reporting. It ex- 
cludes facts that put Japan's perfor- 
mance in a larger context 
Japan is not the major cause of 
America’s trade deficit and the defi- 
cit is not e liminatin g American in- 
dustry. The strong dollar and rapid 
American growth are critical causes. 
Between 1981 and 1984 an $8.7-bil- 1 
lion trade surplus with Europe be- 
came a $13 J-btllion deficiL The defi- j 
dt with Japan, although rising in 1 


By Robert J. Samuelson 


dollar terms, dropped from 45 to 30 
percent of tire loud during that peri- 
od. And, despite the deficit. Ameri- 


can industrial production in 1984 
reached record levels. 

Trade is not tire only problem of 
distressed U.S. industries. Use of 
plastics, al uminum anri reinforced 
concrete has cut demand for steel; 
steel use finduding imports) was 
about a firth less in 1984 than the 
1 973 peak. And Japanese steel is only 
a Quarter of all imports. 

The distress in the semiconductor 
industry mainly reflects disappoint- 
ing personal computer sales. 

Despite recent advances, Japanese 
living standards remain more th*n a 


fifth bdow America’s. Japan’s effi- fives — buy a home, send children to 
dent global industries coexist along, college, enjoy retirement, 
with far less efficient service and re- Sawing has also been spurred by 
tail sectors. Many Japanese still work restricted consumer lending, 
five and a half or six days a week. In tire 1960s and early 70s, when 
So Japan is not quite tire economic business investment absorbed these 
juggernaut of American fantasy. But vast savings, Japan grew rapidly, fa- 
it still harms the world economy, deed, high investment was crucial in 
Since 1980 it has grown slowly at ending Japan’s economic backward- 
home and relied on exports for stnxui- ness. But now the high' mvings policy 
Jos, but it needs ro grow faster domes- is backfiring. Consumer deposit rates 
H rall y so as to import more. are still artificially low, but domestic 

Interest mi consumer deposits has investment is not absorbing all the 
long beat held down by law. Para- savings. The excess is invested in 
d o xi es Py, tin* restraint wimnintwi higher-yielding foreign — mainly 
saving because consumers, earning U.S. dollar — securities, 
less an their deposits, had to save Domestic growth suffers because 
more to meet their personal objeo- demand is drained away. And the yen 


is depressed, making Japanese ex- 
ports more compctitive. 

Low growth and high exports abet 
protectionism and create an anti- 
growth cycle. Breaking tins cycle re- 
quires Japan to deregulate interest 
rates ana liberalize c o nsu m er bar- 

^i^wdersl^nghi to press Japan 
for more open markets, and Japan 


are still artificially low, but domestic 
investment is not absorbing all the 
savings. The excess is invested in 
higher-yielding foreign — mainly 
U.S. dollar — securities. 

Domestic growth suffers because 
demand is drained away. And the yen 



r **swmimmrn » tlt ' 


1 Hf»l 1 

— ******* 


resists protectionism; it makes 
change easier. Unfortunately, in an 
interdependent world, growth is hos- 

tohow tiiey interact P °” eS 
America is no model. Its budget 
deficits and tax code (which subsi- 
dizes borrowing through interest de- 
ductions) prop up interest rates and 
thereby draw foreign currencies into 
dollar securities. America’s mistakes 
compound Japan’s errors. 

The central problem is the paraly- 
sis of old identities. 

japan cannot move energetically 
and independently. It retains the pro- 
tective mentality of a poor nation. It 
acts selfishly and invites resentment 
For Americans, Japan is only a 
symptom of deeper mange. Ameri- 
ca’s industries do face global compes- 
tition. and the world economy is un- 
settling, but Americans are too 
wounded by the toss of their econom- 
ic primacy to grasp the more subtle 
demands of global interdependence. 
America’s images? is increasingly 
savage. The vision of xefightmg 
World War H is mindless jingoism. 
When men of Teddy White's suture 
exploit this sleazy rhetoric, you know 
you are 00 a slippery slope. 

Newsweek. 


_ j 

Why Americans Should Thank Japanese Exporters % lL 


W ASHINGTON — America 
owes thanks to Japan and oth- 


er foreign competitors. 


an and oth- 
ere is why. 


By Herbert Stein 

The switch to an excess of imparts not importet 


In 198 1, in & mood of euphoria and was a great help to the United States, 
sdf-congramla cion, the United States not a threat, it was essential to the 
embarked on a new economic policy, desired increase in investment, con- 
It would sharply increase military sumption and defense, 
spending; radically change the tax Certainly Americans wanted in- 
treatment of investment so as to stun- creased military spending; the gpv- 
ulate investment; cut income taxes eminent initiated it with strong pub- 
across the board, so that individuals . lie support The measures chat led to 
would retain more of their income to the increase of investment, and the 
spend for themselves, instead of pay- subsequent actual increase, were al- 
ing it to the government. most universally applauded. And 

'In real terms, domestic investment, Americans dearly wanted the in- 
personal consumption and military crease in consumption. Otherwise 
spending rose sharply. But prodne- they would have saved mom 


tron did not rise nearly as much. Americans should be grateful to 
Measured in- 1972 dollars, domestic countries that have produced more 
uses of output increased by nearly than they consumed, exporting goods 
$280 billion, while total production and services to meet American needs 


increased by $196 billion. 


or desires. They are benefactors. 


So there was a big gap between the Chief among them is Japan. Some 
goods and services America was us-, people compare Japanese exports erf 
ing and what it was producing. This video cassette recorders with the 
gap was filled in the only way it could bombing of Pearl Harbor, but that is 
be — by drawing goods and services silly. Americans want the VCRs, 
from the rest of the world. Exports Critics will say .two things about 
diminished and imports increased. this. The first is that if America had 


No Phone Calls to Reread in the Attic 


B OSTON —Somewhere, in the 
boxes 1 have moved from one 
address to another, are small pack- 
ages of summers past Letters from 
my parents. Letters from school 
friends. Love letters. Private history 
wrapped neatly in rubber bands. 

Most of them are, by now, more 
than 20 summers old. The datelines 
remind me of camp, college, trips. 
And also erf my father's humor, the 
rhythms of my mother’s daily life, 
the code words of adolescent 
friendships (S.WAJC, sealed with 
a loss), the intimacy of the young. 

My friends, my family and I rare- 
ly mail our thoughts anymore. The 
mailman brings more catalogs than 
correspondence. The letters that 
come through our mail slot are 
mostly addressed in robotype. The 
stamps we buy are to go on bills. 

We direct-dial now. Spoiled by 
the instant gratification and the 
ease of the phone, we talk. The 
telephone call has replaced the let- 
ter in our lives nearly as completely 
as the car has replaced the can. 

When we were kids, I remember, 
long distance was reserved for an- 
nouncements. The operator was al- 
most an evil omen. If we called 
from camp or campus our parents 
would answer the phone with 
“What’s wrong?" Today our chil- 
dren have grown up knowing area 
codes before they knew addition. 
They bounce intercontinental calk 
off satellites just to say “Hello.” 


By Ellen Goodman nnances and tones of voice to dis- 
J tract. A letter does not take us by 

surprise in the middle of dinner, or 
I am not railing against this pro- intrude when we are with other pro- 
gress. A frequent dialer with the ple> or ambush us in the midst erf 
bills to prove it. I often choose the other thoughts. It waits. There is a 
give and take, the immediacy of the pnvate space between the give and 
phone. I accept from chfl- the take for thinking, 

drat with an uneconomical glee. A t have known lovers, parents and 


not imported the goods and services, 
it would have produced them at 
home. That is almost certainly not 
true. It is now producing as much as 
it can produce. It has had a Ing in- 
crease in employment since 1980. 
Unemployment has been stable at 
around 12 percent of the labor force 
for about a year, while inflation has 
been steady. This suggests that the 
country is dose to tbelowest unem- 
ployment rate consistent with avoid- 
ing a speeding up of inflation.' 

Growth of real output at an annual 
rate of 2.6 percent since 1980 was 
probably as nmch as could be expect- 
ed, given the need to go through a 
period of disinflation and the failure 
to recover from the slump of produc- 
tivity growth that began about 10 
yeans ago. Growth of the economy 
has not been bdd down by deficiency 
of demand. If there had been a rea- 
sonable expectation that faster 
growth of demand would yield more 
real output without more inflation, 
domestic monetary polity could have 
provided that In a real sense Ameri- 
ca wanted the rate erf growth .of real 
output that it got, either because a 
higher rate was not achievable or be- 
cause it could not have been achieved 
without a dangerous inflation. 

So J think it is fair to say that the 
rest of the world has mainly supplied 
goods and services that the United 


States would not have produced if it 
had been unable to import them. 

The second point that will be made 
is that the rest of the world did not 
give' America these goods and ser- 
vices — they loaned mem. Japan and 
other tradingpartass invested in the 
United States, lending the money to 
buy Ae goods and services from 
than. America made a derision to 
borrow when it derided on a budget 
deficit and a tax policy that stimulat- 
ed business borrowing for invest- 
ment. The rest of the world made it 
easier by bring w illing to lend. 

It is surety not the responsibility of 
Japan to “discipline’’ America by re- 
fusing to lend the money it wants to 
borrow. Any American who doesn’t 
want to be part of this borr o w ing 
process can opt out of it by saving 
more and becoming a creditor. He 
can write his congressman and his 
president urging them to reduce the 
budget deficit. But as long as Ameri- 
cans are in the market to borrow, 
they should be grateful to those who 
wQl lend to than. And as long as they 
want to use more goods and services 
than they produce, they should be 
grateful to those who provide them. 

The writer, senior feBow at the Ameri- 
am Enterprise Institute for Public Pobcy 
Research, was ckainnmof die Council cf 
Economic Advisers in the Nixon and 
Fordadnaastradons. He contributed this 
comment to The New Yak Times. 


From ) 


I am not railing 
gress. A frequent 


this pro- 
wi th the 


bills to prove it. 1 often choose the 
give ana take, the immediacy of the 


friend and I, separated by hundreds 
of miles, have declared our phone 
bills “cheaper than therapy. It’s 
good to hear a voice. 

But it isn’t the same. 

Sometimes 1 think that the tele- 
phone call is as earthbound as daily 
dialogue, while a letter is an ex- 
change of gifts. On the telephone 
you talk; in a letter you lelL There is 
a pace to the writing and reading of 
letters that does not come from the 
telephone company but from our 
own inner rhythm. 

We Hve mostly in the hi-tech, 
reach-out-and-touch-someone 
modem world. Communication is 
an industry. It makes demands of 
us. We are expected to respond as 
quickly as computers. A voice asks 
a question across the ocean in a 
spbt second and we are supposed to 
formulate an answer at tbs high- 
speed rate <rf exchange. 

But we cannot, blessedly, “inter- . 
face” by mail There is leisure and 
emotional luxury in letter writing. 
There are no obvious silences to 
anxiously fiQ. There are no inter- 
ruptions to brook. There are no 


children, husbands and wives, who 
send each other letters from one 
room to another simply for the 
chance to complete a story of 
events, thoughts, feelings. I have 
known people who could not bear 
to “hear* what they could read. 

There is this advantage to slow- 
ing down the pace" of comm tmlca- 
- tions. The phrae demands a kind of 
simultaneous satisfaction that is as 
. elusive in words as in sex. Letters let 
os take turns, let os sit and moll and 
say exactly what we mean. 

Today we are supposed to travel 
light, to live in the moment- The 
put is, we are told, excess bag gage 
There is no question that thepnone 
is the tool of these times. As fine, 
and as ephemeral as a good meaL 

But yon cannot hold a call in 
your hands. Yon cannot put it in a 
bundle. You cannot show it to your 
family. Indeed there is nothing to 
show for iL It doesn’t leave a trace. 
TeD me how can yon wrap a life- 
time of phone calls in a rubber band 
for a summer’s night when you 
want to remember? 

Washington Past Writers Groty. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Who Was the Enemy? ... 

Regarding the opinion column “ The War and the Bomb"); “So we may 
Charge Cm_ Finally _ Be DrtmetT conclude that the dropping of the 
(July 25) by Stephen S. Rnscnfeld: bombs was noi so much mclWi mflf- 

Mr. Rosenfdd complains that “re- uuyari of the Second World War as 
visionist blame- America historians of the first major operation of the cold 
the 1960s and 1970s” are responsible diplomatic war with Rnsaa.” 
for the idea that the Japanese bomb- General Leslie Groves, testifying 

mgs initiated “atomic diplomacy” later at the Oppenhrimer 
a g a inst the Soviet Union. said: “There was never, from about 

The Japanese initiated peace fed- two weeks from die Hnv I took 
ets in the summer of 1945. Ignoring charge (of tire atomic bomb project^ 
the feelers, the United States bdd to any illusion on my part that Russia 



. -i*- 

*• - ... 

■=>: * ■ ... 


‘ ’J. S 

X.-. ' 


its demand for unconditional surren- was our enemy, ana the Project was 
der — which denied the Japanese conducted on that baas.” 


both dynasty and emperor -— until 
the demand was relaxed after Naga- 
saki; surrender thereupon eamg . 

The Russians, in consultation with 
Churchill and Roosevelt, promised to 
invade Japan. Without consulting the 
Russians, the United States bombed 
Hiroshima and Na ga sa ki . The Unit- 
ed Slates was preparing to invade 
Japan, but not until November — 
three months after the bombings. 

The meaning of these and other 
facts was set forth explicitly not first 
in the 1960s and *70s tatin 1948, bv 
P.ALS.' Blackett, a Nobel Prize win- 
ning British physicist, fa his book 
Military and Political Consequences 


DEXTER MASTERS. 

Tomes. England. . 

The atomic bomb contributed to 
shaping world trade as we know it 
On Aug. 8, between the bombings of 
Hiroshima and Nagasaki, ibe Sovkt 
Union declared war on Japan,- and 
the next day it invaded Manchuria. 
Shortly before, at Pbtsdsn. it had 
been revealed that Stalin's voracious 


Had his Red Army nraded Japan. * 
was to be expected, Japan fright sti 
be under Soviet infleesce. 

manuel gomez rubio. 

Baden,. Switzerland. 








i 








** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY -SUND A Y, AUGUST 10-11, 1985 


TheFmns Take Politics, Pleasures Quiedy 


Page-5 


By Qdcscine Bohlen 


i|~75KKS 

steSSJSK 

Cooplisalnndcrslr 
beer and eating t 

** main 

paa, past rose beds, f ouniainsand 

^^^’SNOTEBOOK 


tents. 


•> 


S 


ned 


. . r c ited benches as a sea of 
btoncT Beads listened raptiy lo a 
band pWg ja2z . N 0 c^e spoke. 

No one hummed. No one even 

tapped a foot . ^ 

‘ ' □ 

t J°f K * a ab ™t Finland 
foreigner viators find almost 
* 4.9 mflKon Finns 
bad settled into a state of unani- 
mous serenhy. 

Homogenaty has something to 
do with il The population is 89.8 
Percent Lutheran, 93.6 percent 
FinmA-speakmg and overwhdm- 
ifagly blond. But this also is a coun- 
try of the happy medium. Helsinki 
if 5° attra cove capital of almost 
half a million people, not too big. 
not too small People 'are reserved 
wit pleasant, efficient but not offi- 
oous. Restaurants are crowded, 
but there almost always is a table 
free. 

Finns, like Russians, do not jay- 
walk. They will wait for die green 
light even on an empty street And 
even the punk crowd wears fash- 
ionable pastels. 



f Can you name a 
country where 
market forces 
operate so freely, 
where there is no 
terrorism and 
where prayer in the 
schools has been 
part of daily lifer 

Kalevi Sorsa 

Finnish prime minister 


Politically, people agree that the 
country has reached a consensus. 
Mino r parties have joined in the 
competition for the average voter, 
ever fewer are left on the fringes. 

The Rural Party, once consid- 
ered a party of protest, mellowed, 
too, once its leader was invited to 
join the coalition government 

sector tha^some of its Nordic 
neighbors and controls 16 percent 
of industry. Its standard of living is 
behind Sweden and Norway but 
ahead of France and Japan. 

Dk national sense of well-being 


and of pride at minin g socialism • 
and capitalism was evident in com- 
ments last year by Kalevi Sorsa, the 
Social Democratic prime minist er. 

“Can you please nam e a country 
where market forces operate so 
freely as to frighten some firms, 
where there is no international ter- 
rorism and never has been, where 
prayer in the schools has been port 
of daily life for decades?" be said. 

•o 

Even the Communist Party, split 
between pro-Moscow and Euro- 
Commumst camps, is hard-pressed 
to challenge the status quo, since its 


main issue — relations with the 
Soviet Union — was long ago co- 
opted by national consensus. 

In the past decade, politicians of 
virtually all persuasions have come 
to share the view that Finland is 
better off promoting good relations 
with its giant neighbor. 

In the 1960s. Finland's unique 
relations with Moscow gave rise to 
the term “Finlaiidization.” a con- 
cept used in Western Europe to 
warn against crippling neutrality 
and gradual loss of autonomy. 

The pqorative use of the terra 
brought protests from Finnish em- 
bassies, and dow it is beard less 
often. But for many Finns, the ac- 
commodations with Moscow are 
easily defended. 

Finland lost its fight against the 
Soviet Union in World War II and 
shares a border 762 miles long. 
Furthermore, trade with the Soviet 
Union is a key factor in protecting 
the Finnish economy from the buf- 
fering of Western recessions. 

□ 

The 10th anniversary celebration 
last week of the signing of the Hel- 
sinki accords on European security 
and human rights was an affirma- 
tion of success at balancing be- 
tween East and West. 

‘Tor Finland, it has been a natu- 
ral principle in a divided world to 
deal with all sides, to be open in all 
directions, to show others the con- 
fidence dial we hope others will 
show us.” said President Mauno 
Koivisto at the opening ceremo- 
nies. “That is our policy of neutral- 
ity.’* 


Poland, Uneasy About Elections, 
To Try Pop Concerts and Patriotism 


• 4 - 


By Robert Gillette 

L/k Angela lima Serna 
WARSAW — With only two 
months until national elections, the 
Polish government is showing si gns 
of anxiety about voter turnout It is 
a contest that many Poles view as a 
test of strength between the Com- 
munist authorities and the out- 
lawed Solidarity labor movement 
Solidarity’s underground organi- 
zation has called for a boycott of 

the Oct 11 parKamenfary ifcri/ww 

Some Roman Catholic clergy- 
men have openly questioned the 
usefulness of voting /or members of 
a parliament that never rejects gov- 
ernment-sponsored legislation. 

The government, on the other 
hand, hopes to use a strong voter 
turnout as evidence of itseknm that 
Solidarity is dying and that nor- 
maKzaiion. of political life in Po- 
land is all hat complete. Polish vot- 
ers are not obliged to vote but 
failure to do so might be noted with 


trier: 


a is no exaggeration to say that 
the whole world wiH again be 
watching Poland this October,” 
said General Wqjdech Jaruzdski, 
the Polish leader, last week at a 
meeting of the Communist Patty’s 
Central Committee. He confidently 
predicted victory, 

“Friends will do so with the hope 
n the 


.-iff that the voting will confirm 

Llli’ r 


process of stabilization and con- 
soHdatkm of agreement among the 
Poles,” the general said. “They mil 
not be disappointed. Foes will har- 
bor opposite expectations. These 
wiD not materialize," 

The dearest indication of the 
government’s concern about the 
outcome was a decision last 
Wednesday, winch was not made 
public, to grant Polish radio and 
television an immediate budget in- 
crease of 36 percent — nearly a 
billion zlotys, or $6.5 million — for 
a major pre-election campaign. 

In its budget proposal, the Com- 
mittee for Radio and Television 
said dial the money would be used 
in part -far 160 hours of program- 
ming to create “a feeling of satis- 
faction” toward the authorities; ac- 
cording to a copy of the document 
obtained by Solidarity activists and 
passed on to Western reporters. 

■ The document said that radio 
and television broadcasts would 
seek to attract younger voters in 
pan by introducing candidates for 
the Sqm — the parliament — at 
pop concerts. Broadcasts over the 
next two months are to feature 
songs with patriotic themes select- 
ed to “arouse optimism and hope." 

The government has offered no 
public forecasts of voter turnout, 
but Communist Parly officials have 
suggested that participation by 80 


percent to 82 percent of the elector- 
ate would be considered a victory. 

Other Soviet bloc countries rou- 
tinely claim to bring out 98 percent 
or more of the voters. 

Anything less than the 75-per- 
ceui turnout rlaimerf at local elec- 
tions in June 1984 — a figure that 
Solidarity charged was inflated by 
at least 10 percent — would be 
regarded as a propaganda disaster 
for the Jaruzdski government 
Some parly figures, however, 
have said privately that they fear 
the turnout might be no greater 
than 60 percent 
The last parliamentary elections 
were in March 1980, before the 
wave of strikes that gave rise to 
Solidarity, the independent trade 
union movement Elections were to 
have been held in March 1984 but 
were postponed. 

Recent public opinion surveys 
taken by the government do not 
augur well for an enthusiastic turn- 
out at the polls. One survey, report- 
ed in the official weekly Pobtyka 
last week, dies an “alarming” 
growth in pessimism about the 
country’s debt-burdened economy. 

Just under half of those polled 
said that the government’s efforts 
lo avert an economic crisis were 
inadequate, while 64 percent said 
no when asked whether Rovera- 



Reverend Henryk Jankowski 


man policies were likely to solve 
Polands problems. 

■ Priest Tells of Warning 
The Reverend Henryk Jan- 
kowski a Roman Catholic priest in 
Gdansk who is close to the Solidar- 
ity leader. Lech Walesa, said 
prosecutor warned him Friday that 
he risked arrest if he continued 
“anti-state activities,” The Associ- 
ated Press reported from Warsaw. 


From Yerevan , the View Is Great (but Infrequent) 


By William J. Eaton 

Los Angeles Tima Serna 

YEREVAN, UASJL — The an- 
dent city of Yerevan, capital of 
Soviet Armenia, is blessed with a 
splendid view of the biblical Mount 
Ararat, but sometimes il is hard to 
see the mountain because of the 
smog. 

The Communist authorities have 
undertaken a series of measures to 
reduce the pollution but, like their 
counterparts in the West, they are 
reluctant to crack down on the 
growing number of private cats 
that aggravate the problem. 

“There would be a real protest if 
they tried to interfere with private 
motorists,” one driver said. 

From a revolving bar atop the 
17-story Palace of Youth, thick 
black smoke can be seen rising 
from Yerevan’s factories, adding to 
the layer of smog embracing the 
legendary mountain’s twin peaks. 

Ararat, where Noah’s ark is sari 
to have been deposited by the 
flood, lies across the border in Tur- 
key. But Armenians regard it as a 
symbol of a lost homeland, from 
which they fled or were driven at 


the time of the Turkish massacre of 
Armenians in 1915. 

Yerevan traces its history back 
2,767 years, making it the oldest 
tity in the. Soviet Union. It has 
nearly 1 2 milli on people, a third of 


the Armenian Communist Parry 
started a campaign to reduce air 
pollution to more tolerable levels 
by 1990. 

Among other things, taxis, buses 
and trucks owned by the state will 


Armenians in Yerevan own more private 
cars per capita than the people of any other 
Soviet city, including Moscow. And that is 
the problem. Exhau st emissions added to 
industrial smoke make it difficult for the 
inhabitants to see nearby Mount Ararat. 



CHURCH SERVICES 


A: 


mats 

AMERICAN CATHEDRAL IN PARtS, 23 Aw*. 
Grants , 7SW 

Joom R. too, Doan. **•*»» Cs0 ^!, Z 

AhfK^Atercsau- Sunday^? ’vfa£ 

Church uho oJ and iMV ' “*• 


.255151/253115. 




STOOO-KX* 

*MANua 

Z1&I 314051. 1 51 225. 


To °&*** anen ‘ 

^ in Autecdon 


fa Eii-beth 

“ffiSSPl 


don of Armenia, the 

_ lest of the 15 republics in the 
Soviet Union. 

The ambitious Annenians of Ye- 
revan own more private cars per 
capita than the people of any other 
city in the Soviet Union, including 
Moscow. There are 60,000 private 
cars here, one for every 20 people, 
compared with a ratio of 1 to 47 for 
theSoviet Union as a whole. (The 
U.S. ratio is about t to 2k 

Public transport consists mainly 
of buses, although the city has a 
new, six-station subway system 
that may help reduce congestion. 

Earlier this year, the Politburo of 


th g' 


be converted to use liquefied natu- 
ral gas. This will be costly and spe- 
cial refueling stations will have to 
be built, but the authorities say 
believe the step is essential, 
addition, 10 or more factories 
will be moved outside the city to 
reduce their impact on air quality. 
New pollution control devices wiD 
be installed at other plants. 

Spartak Hachaturian, deputy 
rTiairmfln of the city council said 
that the smog is much worse in 
winter, when the winds subside and 
foul air settles in the bowl-shaped 
valley of centra) Yerevan. “There is 
much to be done,” be said. 


He was noncommittal, however, 
on measures to restrict private cars, 
measures that have been men- 
tioned in the Communist Party dai- 
ly for Yerevan. 

* “This question is also impor- 
tant.” he said, “but no final deci- 
sion has been taken.” 

The city has monitoring stations 
to determine whether auto exhausts 
are emitting pollutants at excessive 
levels. Mr. Hachaturian said. But 
many vehicles in the busy streets 
were spouting thick black fumes. 

Yerevan has devoted special at- 
tention to planting trees, bushes 
and grass to help clean the air, even 
though they require watering be- 
cause of sparse rainfall 
“In the last 10 years, we man- 
aged to increase the land with 
greenery by 10 square meters (12 
square yards) for each person," he 
said with pride. 

The ultimate control on pollu- 
tion may be a pap on the growth of 
the city. State planning officials 
ruled that Yerevan was growing too 
fast and called for curbs. 

As a result, residence permits 
have been limited and restrictions 
have been placed on the creation of 
new jobs in the city. For example, 
students graduating from Yere- 
van’s 14 institutes and universities 
may stay in the capital only if they 
were residents there before they en- 
rolled. 


U.S. General Cites Assurance 
By Soviet on Liaison Patrols 


New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
Army commander in Europe says 
be bas been assured by Soviet op- 
cere ibat orders have been issued to 
their troops not to use force or 
weapons to obstruct U.S. mibtaiy 
observers in East Germany. 

The commander. General Glenn 
Kay Otis, added Thursday that a 
formal apology and financial com- 
pensation still were due for the fa- 
jaHshootmg in March of Major 
Arthur D. Nicholson Jr. by a Soviet 
sentry. The major was a member of 
a 14-member mOitaiy liaison team. 

U S., British and French teams 
oarrol East Germany and a Soviet 
Sun operates in West Germany 
under a postwar agreement- to ob- 
serve some maneuvers and 
SSfatioDS but irou according to 
General Otis, “areas of troop dis- 
positions.'* 


General Otis, in the United 
States for consultation, said that a 
recent incident in which a Soviet 
truck rammed the bade of a vehicle 
with a two-man U.S. observer team 
might not have been deliberate. 

The general said he had been 
told by Soviet officers that the Rus- 
sians involved in the traffic inti- 
dent had been “out of line" and 
had been “disciplined severely." 

■ Hot Line Improvements 
President Ronald Reagan signed 
a joint congressional resolution 
Thursday authorizing the Pentagon 
to provide the Soviet Union with 
equipment and services to upgrade 
the Washmgton-Moscow hot line. 
The Associated Press reported 
from Washingioo. 

Hardware and technical support 
would be provided on a reimburs- 
able basis. 


Yugoslav Court 
Cuts Sentences 

The Associated mss 

BELGRADE — An appeals 
court has acquitted a Yugoslav 
convicted of political crimes and 
reduced the sentences of two oth- 
ers. the state-nm Tanjug press 
agency reported. 

The Supreme Court or Serbia 
ruled Wednesday that Miodrag Mi- 
Iic. originally sentenced by the Bel- 
grade district coun to two years, 
would have to serve only 18 
months. 

Milan Nikolic. sentenced to two 
years for hostile prop aganda, was 
instead to serve eight months. 

Dragomir Olujic, originally sen- 
tenced to one year, was acquitted. 

The three were pan of a group of 
six Belgrade dissidents tried in 
1984 after the police arrested 28 
persons on suspicion of anti-state 
activities. 



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Judge Convicts Ex-Navy Man 
In First Trial of Soviet Spy Ring 


The Associated Prat The government built its case 00 

■NORFOLK, Virginia — Arthur Mr! Walker’s statements to the FBI 
J. Walker. a retired LLS. Navy ofil- and a federal grand jury that be 

documents on 
in 1981 and 1982 

government in exchange for $12,000. 
alleges was a family spy ring that A navy officer had testified that 
caused some of the most severe one of the documents contained 


cer. was found guilty Friday of spy- gave his brother 
ingfor the Soviet union. It was the navy ship repair it 
first trial in what the government in exchange for SI 


espionage damage to the United 
States in recent decades. 

A U.S. District Court judge, J. 
Calvin Clarice Jr, who heard four 
days of testimony without a jury, 
convicted Mr. Walker on all seven 
chdiges that he took classified navy 
documents from his employer, a 
defense contractor, and photo- 
graphed them for his brother, John 
A. Walker Jr. The government says 
ihat John Walker, a retired navy 
communications specialist, led 
ring. 

Arthur Walker, 50, a retired navy 
lieutenant commander from Vir- 
ginia Beach, stood and showed tit- 
tle reaction to the verdict 


information that could be used to 
knock out the navy's two most so- 
phisticated communications ves- 
sels, the Mount Whitney and the 
Blue Ridge, which would be used as 
command posts for the Atlantic 
and Western Pacific. 

Mr. Walker faces a maximum 
sentence of three life terms plus 40 
years and up to 540,000 in fines. 
Sentencing has been set for Oct 15, 
after Mr. Walker’s lawyers request- 
ed a two-month delay. 

John Walker is scheduled for tri- 
al Oct 28 in- Baltimore. Also 
charged with espionage are John 
Walker's son, Michael L. Walker, a 
yeoman on the aircraft carrier 


Nimitz, and Jerry A. Whitworth of 
Daws, California, a retired navy 
radio man who the government de- 
scribes as John Walker’s closest 
friend. 

Military experts have called the 
alleged spy ting one of the most 
damaging in recent history. A sena- 
tor has introduced legislation to 
restore the death penalty for peace- 
time espionage, and there have 
been calls in Congress for militaiy 
contractors to tighten security. 

Tommy E Miller, an assistant 
U.S. attorney, who prosecuted Ar- 
thur Walker' would not say if he 
would recommend a sentence or 
whether Mr. Walker would be 
asked to testify in other trials. 

Defense attorneys, who present- 
ed no witnesses, argued that the 
government did not sufficiently 
corroborate Arthur Walker’s ad- 
missions to the FBI and a federal 
grand jury in Baltimore, 

They contended that Mir. Walker 



Leftist Groups Omni Responsibility 
For Bomb at U.S. Base in Frankfurt 


•min 


Prosecutor 


By John Tagliabue 

New Vert Tfmej Serme 

BONN — Extreme leftist orga- 
nizations from West Germany and 
France jointly claimed responsibil- 
ity Friday for the car 


foutovUfl 

Arthur J. Walker 


bed the documents from 


VSE Corp. of Chesapeake, Mary- bomb, which killed two Americans 

a his employer, " " J — "* 

er and aid not 
the United States. 

In dosing statements, Robert J. in the Battle for the International 


in European extremist circles as Ugence service nest” outfi tted w ith 
manyra against the state. “computer, planes and hdicqpips 

George Jackson, the author of for the 
“Soledad Brothers,” a collection of lanes 
prison letters, was one of three 

nj numj iui black convicts accused of killing a j, 3 

Thursday of a UJS. air base near white guard at California’s Soledad apd Hwsi eyer. 

Frankfurt. Prison m 1970. He was killed in 

They described the base as a 1971 in what the police said was a theft of explosives from a qwny. 
“clearinghouse for wars in the prison 
Third Worid from Western Eu- porters 
rope. 

In a three-. a .. . 

agencies, the Red Army Faction, a calling themselves the Patrick the green car tmtaunng 

West German group, and Direct O’Hara Commando killed Ernst- was bought July 28 m a rranKt mt 

Action, a French extremist organi- Zimmennann. the chief executive suburb 

ration, said they had planted the of West Germany’s biggest manu- identity 

* ■■■ factum- of military aircraft en- 




flenan .... 

BONN — Thff We* German 

aovcnunenl rebutted on Fndwi* 

E^asassassss 

consisted of explosives in at Kasi Hl 


i norau or jwrraj jmu uiu ub «»«««■ r. — . , . n 4M ntunn WBSBlspcncu w pquxa»v. 

The police noted that, similarly, two propane gas tasks Dieter spokesmanii 

letter to news members of a Red Array Faction by steel nuts and brats, Economics Ministry, saidat a 

a miiin* thvmc^uM »hi« P*tnrV iiw mM car containing the bomb - ■ M 


sews conference there was no evi- 


a young woman whose 

y are s eek in g. 

[The police said that the s.uerri!- 



Seidel Jr„ an assistant U.S. attor- 
ney, said that Mr. Walker had his 
eyes open when he began helping 
his brother spy for the Soviet 
Union. 


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tary school in Bad Eras, in October 
1983, and an the nulftaiy section of 
die French Embassy in Bonn in 
December 1984, the Los Angles 

Times reported from Beam.] 

The attack Thursday was the 

seventh this year against U.S. and 

the designation underscored the at- French Defease Mimsay official. North Atlantic Treaty Organi za- 
lackers’ multinational nature and la (he letter, the groups said that tion facilities in West Germany, 
their reverence for figures viewed Lhe Rhein-Main base was an “raid- but the first to cause fatalities. 


Revolution" and said that the 
groups took responsibility in the 
name of^ “Commando George Jack- 
son.” 

Amo Falk, a federal police 
spokesman in Wiesbaden, said that 


hunger strike. 

In January, a Direct Action 
group calling itself the Elisabeth 
Van Dyck Commando, for a sus- 
pected German terrorist killed by 
(he police in a 1979 shoot-out, mur- 
dered General Rene Audran, a 


had been a spy during ber 12yean 
with Mr. Bangcntann. 

He denied speculation that afae 
had been demoted for security rea- 
sons. ‘There was never any suspi- 
cion toward her and than siiH 
isn’t." Mr. Vogd added. 

Deaute h& assurances* Mr. Vo- 
gel said that Mr. Bangrmnnn was 


Lange Can’t Link France to Sinking 


W m Coast SI 45. Paris* 


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EDUCATION 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches man of the ship was killed in the 
SUVA, Fiji — Prime Minister explosion. 

David Lang! of New Zealand said The Greenpeace drip, a convert- 
Friday that there was no evidence cd trawler, was in New Zealand to 

tha; ihe French government bad lead a protest fleet to France’s nu- _ ^ 

been mi pUwitwi in the July 10 sink- clear test site in the Pacific atoll of public, focusing an unusual 
ing of the Greenpeace vessel Rain- Mururoa. The environmental amount of public scrutiny on 

----- - - group had sought an end to nuclear “ * ’ - ” 

in the area. 


eminent should defuss anyspecu- 
lation that the Socialists under Mr. 
Mitterrand were attempting a cov- 
er-up. - - - 

Mr. Tricot’s report will be made 


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bow Warrior in Auckland harbor. 

Mr. T.ang e mad e his remarks 
when he was asked about a letter 
from President Francois Mitter- 
rand telling that him France would 
investigate the dniring 

Two French weekly newspapers 
have alleged that the bombing that 
caused the sinking was carried out 
by France’s counterintelligence 
agency, (he General Dxrectoratefor 
External Security, to thwart Green- 
peace attempts to disrupt nuclear 
tests in the South Pacific. 

Speaking rinrmg a visit here, Mr. 
Lange said: 

“1 have consistently said that 
there is no proof available to the 
government of New Zealand that 
there is any government instrumen- 
tality involved in that crime. 

"That is not to say it is not in- 


In Wellington, Detective Super- 
intendent Alan Galbraith said the 
police had theories other' than that 
advanced by the French publica- 
tions. But he would not elaborate. 

“I can't see that there is any 
special French connection attached 
to it," he said, “and I am sure any 
country’s trained divers could han- 
dle this." 

Mr. Galbraith said that three 
New Zealand detectives would pur- 
sue the inquiry in France. 

One detective who was sent to 
Paris, he said, is checking the iden- 

arresied in Auck^^md^ho^vc 
been charged with murder, arson 
and conspiracy to damage the ship. 
They were identified as Alain and 
said 
pass- 

tion." ports. 

In the letter to Mr. Lange, Mr. In Paris on Thursday. Prime 

Minister Laurent Fabius appointed 
Bernard Tricot, a former aide to 
Charles de Gaulle, to lead the 
French investigation. The press 
said that Mr. Tricot’s credentials 
crew- and association with a righttstgov- 


French intelligence. 

Relations between Mr. Mitter- 
rand and Fiance’s intelligence 
agency have been nrwrtfarf, a lega- 
cy of a Socialist electoral pledge in 
the early 1970s to abolish the agen- 
cy. The Mitterrand government 
took office in 1981. 

Rightist governments had their 
own problems with scandals in the 
agency that preceded the ament 
one. u was said to have been be- 
hind the bracking in 1956 of the 
rebel leader Ahmed Ben 
who later became Algeria's 
president; bomb attacks against 


breaking oft a lour of the Far East 

The prosecutor’s offi ce said 
Thursday it had begun air investi- 
gation of Miss Lfindwg, 60, on 
suspicion of espionage activity. It 
said she vanished last weekend. 

T n^^nce sources* who said 
Thursday that there was evidence 
to link her to espionage, said Fri- 
day that further investigations 
eased their concern. 

In 1979 six Bonn secretaries were 
exposed as East German spies fal- 
lowing the defection of a senior 
Communist intelligence official 
Four evaded capture. 

The intelligence sources said 
they believed that tl 
office had been justified m 
its investigation, tat fdt H 
have shown discretion. 

- Mbs LOndwng bec ame M r.Baa- 
gemann’s personal secretary in 
1973 and remained in cbepost after 
he became economics minister in 
1984 and chairman of tire Free 
Democratic Party six months ago. 

Six weeks ago she was trans- 
ferred to work as a mmistiy aide. 

The prosecutor's office said 


meat suitable for 
meats bad been found in tire wom- 
an’s apartment and (hat there were 

signs a hasty departure. 

The secretary told neighbors last 
pro-Algerian rebel supporters; the weekend thatshe was reaving to 
1965 disappearance of the Moroc- visrt friends. She frfled tottaapto 
can opposition leader Mehdi Ben work Tuesday as scheduled. Smce 
Barka and coups in Africa. 


volved but, of course, that [would] Sophie Turenge, but the pdice; 
create an endless wefi. of specula- they were carrying false Swiss p 


Mitterrand promised full collabo- 
ration with New Zealand detectives 
now in Paris. He said Ire intended 
that the investigation of the bomb- 
ing be handled “with the greatest 
possible severity." A Dutch on 


After the' Ben Barka affair the 
agency was placed under the con- 
trol of the Defense Ministry. 

France has many former intelli- 
gence officers and undercover op- 
eratives. French press commenta- 
tors have speculated that tire team 

responsible for the attack on the ^th tettos from ihe public. But a 
Rainbow Warrior may have been trusting relationship oevdoped bo- 
recruited from this circle. tween tf-ks Lflncburg and the irwn - 

(Reuters, AFP) j^ter, Mr. Vogd sakt 


then the authorities have found no. 
trace of her or her car. 

Mr. Vogd said (hat throughout 
her years as Mr. Bangemann s as- 
sistant, Miss Lftneburg never had 
legal access to secret documents io 

tire normal coarse of her work. 
Most of bre activities involved 




wa si i 


Srifatne 



Leaders Vow to Push 
an Economic Recovery 

tLS.Smj*7 

U’Bm oT 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY -SUNDAY, AUGUST 10-11, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


e 7 s 


of Dealers, Auction Houses 


> SOBREW MBTnnAA , 

* 

i^e against the anctWhouse, 

^^^da iiMsidp tb« tasK££5 

S™yZT£' UXS Md 

rfjfc publtod auction of 

was hdd at Oris- 

.fes^lsSsI 

Mlaod. Joduho, a one-time adviser of toe late 
fTOTWce Gould, is reported by those who have 
met him m.Zbe art . world to have had close 
professional contacts with one of the three Iead- 
In^resaonm dealera in the world. No one 
would, describe him as a naive, helpless amateur 


Of the eight paintings, only Edgar Degas’s 
ortrait of Eugene Manet brother of Degas's 


portrait of Eugene Manet, brother of Degas s 
fellow Impressionist painter Edouard Manet, 
was sold, for wfaat was then, a huge price. $2 2 
nuIUon. All the others remained unsold, includ- 
ing* landscape by Van Gogh of houses lining a 
.village street and a still life by Paul Gaugum. 
Aftcr the sale; however, David Bathurst, then 
Christie's New York president, announced that 
these two paintings had bees sold. When taken 
to court by CristaHma, Bathurst said his aim 
had been to protect the market and the consign- 
or. To quote his' deposition, “if a picture, any 
.work of art, is offered for auction and is bought 
in, it makes it tougher to sell it afterwards." No 
professional would disagree in principle. 

One point that has been overlooked is that 
while Bathurst lied to the press, Christie’s did 
not conasteniiy back up his statement. A press 
release issued in New York said the two paint- 
ings had been sold. Within days, most dealers 
ana other buyers with a potential interest in 
such paintings knew .'or suspected the truth. 
Christie's did not Slnstrate or mention the un- 
sold Gauguin and Van Gogh in its “Review of 
the Season," the glossy art-paper album it pub- 
lishes every fall to celebrate its feats and thus 
boost sales. If Bathurst intended to “protect the 
market,” his was a half-hearted attempt, ft nev- 
er stood a chance of working. By the faS of 198 1 , 
a slump was hitting the market that was to last 
for more than a year. The Cristalhna flop proba- 


bly heralded its beginning. True, on May 21, 
Sotheby's sold Picasso’s 1901 self-portrait for 
55 J million in New York. But after that there 
was a long wait w"*i| the Havemayer sale in May 
1983. also at Sotheby’s, New York, where huge 
prices were registered once again. 

Times were so hard during the 1981-82 season 
that Sotheby’s was in the red for the first time in 
deca de Not much has been said about this 
dump during the shouting matches between 
Cristaffina and Christie’s or Christie’s and the 
media. Yet it bighfigbts the limits of any at- 
tempts at manipulating the market of which the 
auction houses have been accused. 

The most startling amission in accounts of the 
Bathurst case has been that of the dealer's role. 
Auction house? naturally prefer trig prices bo- 
cause the 10 percent they levy on buyers — 8 
percent in the case of Christie’s Lo ndon — and 
the varying percentages they extract from sellers 
are proportionately bigger. Above all, rising 
prices induce art owners to sell, which is what 
auction bouses are really concerned about. 

But those who benefit most from price boost- 
ing are not, as has been suggested, the auction 
houses but those who get the full price — the 
vendors. With increasing frequency, these tend 
to be dealers and "investors," a refined word 
that covers the same reality, buying and selling 
for profit The CristaDina affair illustrates the 
poi nt , The sate was a financial undert akin g. In 
recent court papers Cristaflina’s attorneys note 


that "Mr. Bathurst . . , had been asked to 
make a selection of paintings ... to e nable 
Cristailina to raise 510.000,000." Three paint- 
ings were declared “unsuitable for auction" by 
Jodidio because Bathurst's appraisal did not 
meet with his approval The reserves recom- 
mended by Bathurst for the right paintings to be 
sold totaled $9.3 million. Bathurst saioin his 
deposition that “possibly” he suggested an in- 
surance value of S10 million. It is standard 
practice to set insurance values at the highest 
conceivable leveL Then, the court papers make 
clear. Jodidio decided that the reserves had to 
match the insurance values. The pressure to 
raise the reserves apparently came from the 
seller rather than the auction house. 

That is the fundamental problem; Dealers 
now use to the full the aucuon system to sell 
their wares. They cannot do without it. nor can 
the auction houses do without them. 

For dealers desperate for cash or stuck with 
an unwanted work of art, selling by auction is 
the answer. My guess is that half of what is 
churned out by auction houses, particularly in 
Impressionist and Modem Master sales, comes 
from dealers. 

The proportion must be higher if unofficial 
commercial sources are included. Here is an 
example of how a commercial act is mad* in the 
guise of a private sale. The S5.3-milIioa Picasso 
sold by Sotheby's in 1981 was owned by a 
French businesswoman involved in industry. It 


was bought for her by a French dealer, who said 
he recommended it in 1970 at a London sale 
where be got it for £147,000 (then 5353.000 
according to the saleroom). At the time, the 
price seemed enormous, but the dealer was 
perceptive enough to recognize that the preju- 
dice against early Picassos in the Fauve manner 
would not lasL The dealer again look the initia- 
tive of suggesting the resale (and the reserve), 
sensing rightly that May 1981 was a peak and 
hoping — wrongly, as he later said — to get his 
unofficial commission. Private speculative at- 
tempts of this type are now frequent, if rarely so 
successful as this was for the businesswoman. 
They do not get reported. 

For auction bouses, the involvement of deal- 
ers in the auction system as a source of goods for 
sale is a necessary evil The unpreceodented 
expansion of an buying in the 3970s has dried 
up the supply. Certain categories have disap- 
peared from the market. Prices have risen, as 
have auction-house overheads as a result of 
attempts to attract vendors, and things have 
been made correspondingly easier for dealers 
trying to force high reserves on auction houses. 
Traditional dealers are careful, new investors 
less so. As long as the system works, there are no 
complaints; The pubbe never hears about the 
coups pulled off by dealers at auction. Here is 
an example. 

On Dec. 12, 1983. at a Drouot auction held by 


the La min. Guilloux, Buffeiaud and Tailleur 
group, a pair of giltwood consoles or crescent- 
shaped side tables of the Louis XVI period were 
bought by a French deafer for just under 
450.000 francs (then worth a little ewer $54,000) 
including the sale charge. He had them restored, 
regilt and packed off to Sotheby’s New York. 
On May 4. 1984. they were sold for 5473.000 
after a heated contest between American coflcc- 
tors. 

Such high profits are seldom made so quickly.' 
But the principle of buying here and reselling 
there with reserves incorporating the desired 
profits is applied by most important dealers. 
There are variations according, to the field con- 
sidered. Rare books are least affected. Old Mus- 
ter paintings stand somewhere in the middle. 
For excavated antiquities, of which many come 
from illicit digging in the poorer countries, and 
for Islamic art. dealers seem to be the main 
source tapped by the auction houses. Several of 
the most expensive Islamic pieces offered at. 
Sotheby's April sale in London had been held 
by dealers, including one acquired at Drouot for 
less than 30,000 francs, restored, and resold for 
£28,800. within Sotheby's “estimate'' of £25,000 
to £30.000. 

Other pieces carrying equally impressive “es- 
timates/ however, were bought in. 

Next week: The role of “estimates. " 


By Max Wy kes-Joyce 

L ONDON Of the great natu- 

/ ral-history artists, John James 
Audubon (1785-1851) could have 
been considered the artist least 
likely to aicceed. Indeed, he was 
thus considered by his contempo- 
raries until his 53d year, when his 
arammeutal “The finds of Ameri- 
ca,” with its 435 color plates, was 


The bicentennial of his birth is 
bripg celebrated at the Natural 
History Museum in “Drawn from ■ 
Nature,” an exhibition tracing his 
life and work and placing him in 
the context of other naturalis ts . - 
He was born Jean Jacques Fou- 
K 2 gfcre Audubocu the Hk^umate son 
of a French sea captain who was 
the owner of a plantation on Santo 
Domingo, now Haiti. His mother, a 
Creole woman, died soon after Ms 
birth. He was taken to France and 
adopted by. Captain Audubon's 
childless wife; At 18 he was sat to 
the United States to administer iris 
father’s properties at Mill Grove, 
Pennyshrama, and to avoid con-: 
scrip tion into Napoleon’s army. 
Thar be met and eventually mar- 
ried Lucy .Bakewefl, a. young En- 
glish woman who was . an amateur 
ormthologist. Her interest had . 
probably been- encouraged by the 
j Bakewriffanp^ doctor inEagia n d, - 

• Erasmus Darwin.-^J7H-l^G); - a - 

physician, poet — • author of two 
volumes of heroic couplets, “The 
Economy of Vegetation and “The 
Loves of Plant?* — and^ grandfa- 
ther of Charles Darwin. 

Before their mar ria g e, Audubon 
and Lucy used bird-watching as a 
convenient reason to meet in the 
C s countryside. Audubon waxed lyri- 
£v cal about Ms earliest excursions 
into ornithology. He wrote of dis- 
covering a nest of phoebes, a not . 
overly colorful bird that lays a pris- 
tine white egg — "so white and so 
transparent, the right was .more, 
pleasant than if 1 had met with a 
diamond the same size.” He must 
have had an exceptionally tare skiD 
with wild birds, for the pboebe al- 
lowed him to lift her from the nest 
to examine the nest lin g s . 

unskilled at estate admin- 
istration, and anxious towed Lucy, 
he returned to France, hoping to 
petsuade bis father to finance some 
kind of business. The captain did 
so, on condition that John James 
went into partt«sbip in a store 
with one Ferdinand Rozier. Baat 
in the United States, Audubon left 
to Rozier the organization of their 
store and became an apprenuce 
clerk in New York for Benjamin 
« BakewdL Lucy’s uncle. 

•* Honest but incompetent, he was 
soon invited to ltave- There fol- 
lowed a new Auduban-Razier gen- 
eral store in Louisville, Kentucky. 
*<** he 




Lucy's brother Thomas opened a 

s^Stoat 

ful for some years, but Audubon s 

heart was nm in cnmmace. 

In pre-photograph days there 

d oonesbury 

[sssi]gs& 

.ass l wss* 

"^gSSR 


Daguerreotype of John 
Jjunes Audubon by Mat- 
thew Brady, which was pre- 
ae nt eJtoflre Cindnnati Art 
. Museum fins week. Is be- 
lieved to have been made in 
1847 or 1848. It is the opty 
known photograph of him. 

was no way of observing a wild bird 
for any- length of time except by 
killing it and posing the body. Au- 
dubon never killed a bird when live 
observation proved sufficient, as in 
the case of the “Snowy OwL” But 
when he had to, he wired the dead 
speomenm. a lifelike posture on a 
godded board and drew the crea- 
ture on squared paper, a technique 
illustrated in the Natural History 
Museum show. 

As his sheaf of bird images grew, 
the business suffered- Audubon 
also persuaded people to invest in 
an manner of projects, such as a 
steamship with which he lost a lot 
of money for George Keats, broth- 
er of the English poet John Keats, 
and a sawmill at whose failure in 
1819 he was jailed for debt and 
declared bankrupt 

He and Lucy by now had two 
sons. Audnboa eked out a living as 
an itinerant portrait painter and 
drawing master, aided by Lucy’s 
«uT >in g<i as a governess and teach- 
er, but spent most of his time paint- 
ing birds and compiling the field 
notes tint ultimately became his 
five-volume ’XhtutiiokjacaJ Biog- 
raphy.” In the grounds oi one man- 

■ riori, where be was tutor to a teen- 
age heiress {“a well-form ed girl, but 
not handsome," his artist’ s eye told 
him), be drew, painted and anno- 
tated nine different birds, includ- 
ing the American redstart, the Ten- 
nessee warbler and the Mississippi 
kite. 

Each spring to fall from 1820 to 
1836 he went on field trips, pausing 
in the first months of 1824 to visit 
Philadelphia md New York in the 
hope of finding a pubKtoer who 
would produce ms work. It evoked 
much admir ation but no concrete 
support. After two more years of 
travel he borrowed . $1,600 that 
Lucy had contrived to save, and set 
sail for Britain with more than 400 
sketches and drawings. 

Arriving in Liverpool he was fftt- 
ed by the mteOigentsia, mounted a 
successful show at the Royal Insti- 


WTATAiuiers 
01 JU5TMOPBHDCNB 

FWSOUT ABOUT . 
5ENB6AL fiUDGWm. 


e to Audubon 


tutian there, and went on to Man- 
chester and Edinburgh, where he 
was elected a Fellow of the Royal 
Society of Sco tland and where he 
found the engraver William Home 
Lizars, who agreed to produce 400 
plates to be issued to subscribers in 
folders of five each. 

In London, however, Audubon 
le a rne d that Lizars had had a strike 
at the Edinburgh press after an 
initial run of the first 10 engravings 
(an example of the famous plate 
No. 1, “wild Turkey male," with 
the ori ginal painting made in Loui- 
siana in 1825, is in the show). 

Audubon bad to commission a 
new engraver. He was fortunate in 
London to come upon a team of 
fatherand son, both named Robert 
HavdL who added aquatint to en- 


rich cokus and textures of plumage 
and habitat so carefully portrayed 
by Audubon. 

When he commissioned the work 
from the Havdls, fewer than half 
Ms paintings were in reproducible 
form, so Audubon returned to the 
United States and renewed his 
wanderings, sending batches of 
fresh paintings to London, where 
the Havells engraved copper plates 
to fit the largest format of printing 
paper then available — Double EL 
ephant, 46 by 28 inches (122 by 71 
centimeters). In 1838 the last plate 
was engraved by the younger Ha- 
veil (the father had died six years 
before) and 175 sets of “The Birds 
of America," each consisting of 
four huge volumes, were printed. 

One set forms the centerpiece of 
the exhibition, which also has on 
display souk of the copper plates. 
These remained the property of 
Audubon and his family, and were 
taken in 1839 by the emigrating 
Robert Havell to New York. Some 
were destroyed by fire a few years 
later. In 1871, Lucy Audubon, by 
then a penurious widow, sold many 
of the remaining plates, most for 
their scrap metal value. 

Some were rescued from the 
smelter's furnace and in 1885 pre- 
sented lo the American Museum of 



4 Excellent Shows in Southern France 


jr*- ' 

| ?- *:*• 

[•» . - :!’A ' 

. » , 5" «» « 

fcUw 


. w 


“Wild Turkey -male,” Plate I in “The Birds of America.* 


Natural History. Six of these plates 
provide a further section erf the 
exhibition — a new printing of 
“Wild Turkey male," “Wild Tur- 
key, female and young," “Snowy 
Owl" "Canada Goose," "Mallard 
Duck” and “Great White Heron." 
One plate took 500 hours to re- 
store. They have been printed on a 
copper plate rolling press, and 
hand-finished in waiercolor. by 
Alecto Historical Editions in Lon- 
don and published by Alecto and 
the American Museum of Natural 
History in New York in a limited 
edition of 125 for $30,000 each. 
Proceeds of their sale will be used 
by the American museum to endow 


a fund for natural history research 
in Audubon's name. 

The quality of the 1985 prints 
probably would have pleased the 
wildlife artist, whose work was 
rightly described by the French 
naturalist Georges Cuvier ( J 769- 
1832) as “the greatest monument 
ever offered to Nature by Art." 

“Dram From Nature: The Life 
and Work of John James Audubon," 
Natural History Museum, Cromwell 
Road, London SW7, through Sept 
29. 

Max Wykes-Joyce writes regular* 
fy in the IHT on London art exhibi- 
tions. 


A Swiss Textile Restoration Center 

By Mavis Guinard puzzle, and sewn toother or placed seretary general Javier Pfer 

R IGGISBERG, Switzerland — cm a sheer fabric. “We try to hang Cueflar, over Peruvian textile 
Five hundred years ago, a on to everything. When part of the The airy Molding, overlo 


JV Five hundred years ago, a 
merchant of Venice packed linen 
shirts, a dark wool beret and a bolt 
of t fomask into an iron-banded 
chest and set off to trade in the 
Orient His ship was sunk off the 
coast of Yugoslavia, but today, in 
the museum of Zadar, bis shirt, 
beret and tbepuiplc damaskcan.be 
seen in mint condition. 

Scrims of doth, whether raised 
from the sea, found in tombs or 
rescued from an attic, have been 
restored at the Abegg Foundation, 
a center of textile study in tMs 
Swiss-neat village dose to Bern. 

Since it was founded in 1967, the 
foundation has trained about 80 
restorers, now working in private 
ateliers or museums such as the Los 


| f tr — ■ — - j 

HA,MIJUST 

w&teBom 
0&SUME- Fuxmm 
\ mqcmxsi 





Music des Tessas or the Bayer- 
isches Nationalmuseum in Munich. 
More than 250 applicants a year 
are screened for expertise in textile 
arts such as weaving and by gra- 
phology tests. “We have found we 
must dinrinUB basically creative 
people who became terribly frus- 
trated to only recreate other peo- 
ple’s work, even centuries old," 
said Alain Gruber, director and cu- 
rator of the foundation. 

The three successful candidates 
chosen each year are given an esca- 
lating grant until it amounts to a 
regular salary, and they are put 
directly to work on priceless ob- 
jects. “We don’t want them to be 
afraid of handling them," Gruber 
said. 

At specially designed work ta- 
bles, under iheguidanceof a restor- 
er, Mechuld Rury-Lemberg, they 
wash out encrusted grains of sand, 
salt, dirt or rust with demineralized 

water. They sponge the doth dry, 
handblow or stretch it into shape, 
never using 'an iron. Then they 
stitch and repair a few square inch- 
es a day. until a tapestry can be 
himg again or a dress seems fit to 
dance in again. 

It toot five months to pluck out 
each stitch of one garish 19th-cen- 
tury re-embroidery to reveal the 
exquisite Gothic design beneath it 
Glued lacking must often be soft- 
ened by solvents and removed. The 
pieces are reassembled like a Jigsaw 


puzzle; and sewn together or placed 
on a sheer fabric. “We try to hang 
on to everything. When part of the 
original cloth is P riarin^ the linen 
support is dyed to march the back- 
ground. Tbs restores unity to the 
eye." 

After restoration, textiles and 
garments belonging to the founda- 
tion are filed in fitted wardrobes or 
laid into shallow drawers. These 
cabinets and the 60,000-volume li- 
brary of warts on textile art have 
provided a treasury of patterns and 
models far historians and fashion 
designers. 

The guiding principle of the 
foundation’s museum, which the 
late Werner Abegg bmlt out of a 
lifetime's collection, is the interre- 
lationship of art and textiles. 

Abegg, a Zurich industrialist, 
rame from a family that had im- 
ported or manufactured textiles 
since the 16lh century. His interests 
were shared by his American wife, 
Margaret Daniels Abegg. a former 
enrator of the Department of 
Prints in the Metropolitan Museum 
in New York Her fascination with 
pattern books extended the depart- 
ment's collection and provided 
background for her book "Apropos 
Patterns," illustrated with costume 
details from portraits by Lucas 
Cranach, Albert Durer, Hans Hol- 
’ bein and Jean Clouet. 

A trim 86, Margaret Abegg is an 
enthusiastic president of the foun- 
dation, but plays down her part in 
its creation; “My husband and I 
did it together," she said. “The fact 
is it just grew and is still growing." 
An extension to the museum is 
scheduled for next year. 

The Abeggs chose the pastoral 
setting of Riggisberg in the late 
1960s, for its pure air. “Ancient 
textiles must not risk any pollu- 
tion," said Gniber. The restoration 
and study center was designed to 
bring a tittle life to the museum, 
although the 12-mile (20-kilome- 
ter) dove from Bent through post- 
card scenery with the Eiger, Monch 
and Jungfrau in the background 
hardly deters visitors. Prime Min- 
ister Margaret Thatcher of Britain 
came here to admire an Elizabe- 
than nightcap. Queen Sophia of 
Spain lingered over treasures from 
her native Greece -and the U.N. 


seretary general Javier Pfcrez dc 
Cuellar, over Peruvian textiles. 

The airy building, overlooking 
forest and Helds, was designed by 
the architects Gyulia Szechfenyi 
and Michael Stettier. Steltler, who 
became the museum's first director, 
imagina tively laid out the textiles 
and objets cTart- The permanent 
collection includes archaic pottery, 
bronze fibulas from Luristan, a la- 
pis lazuli ram's head with golden 
horns, a medieval sea horse of rock 
crystal Coptic tapestries and a 
Chinese waD-hanging describing 
the silk industry from cocoon to 
thread. The foundation draws on 
the tho usan ds of pieces in its re- 
serves for a new exhibit each year. 

TMs summer, Gniber has chosen 
to show grotesque patterns, so 
named after the Roman grotto 
where murals from Nero’s palace 
were unearthed in the 15th century. 
Symmetrical compositions of unre- 
lated, almost surrealist elements — 
human, animal floral or architec- 
tural — the grottesche were made 
famous by Raphael in the Vatican 
Loggias. As their vogue spread over 
Europe, they picked up other local 
motifs or the medieval buffoonery, 
giving a new meaning to Ihe term 

“grotesque." An ornamental style 
that lasted into the late 19th centu- 
ry, when findings in Pompeii and 
Herculaneum gave it a neoclassic 
impetus, the genre is shown here 
interpreted in metal porcelain, 
wood and in textile patterns in- 
spired by Louis MV's designer. 
Jean Berain, in embroidery, lace 
and cut velvet. 

Abegg-Stifiung Bern. Riggisberg , 
to Oct. 27. Daily from 2 P.M. to 5 
PM. Buses leave Bern station at 
1:45 P.M- and return at 4 and 5 
P.M. ■ 

Mavis Guinard is a journalist 
based in Switzerland. 

i 

Stamps for British Him Year j 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — The Post Office | 
will mark British Film Year by is- 
suing a set of stamps m October 
featuring David Niven, Peter Sell- 
ers. Alfred Hitchcock, Vivian Uigh 
and Charlie Chaplin. 


By Michael Gibson 

International Herald Tribune 

M ARSEILLE — Despite Par- 
is's blockbuster shows and 
scores of museums and galleries, 
the capital is not the only place in 
France to view art this summer. 
The arts have been becoming more 
dynamic ia the south of France in 
recent years, as witness a number 
of shows on view in the region. 

A visit to the “New York 85" 
exhibition organized by an ambi- 
tious new gallery in Marseille 
brought to mind a remark by the 
curator of a major American muse- 
um attending a Yecenl UNESCO 
symposium; “The public is under a 
misapprehension about big inter- 
national exhibitions. It supposes it 
is looking at the best an currently 
being produced. In fact, however, it 
is only being shown the constella- 
tion of power actually dominant in 
the art world." 

For “New York 85." at the gal- 
lery founded and directed by an 
energetic young businessman, Rog- 
er Paiihas, 37 artists (30 American, 
three French, two Italian, one Ger- 
man and the cosmopolitan Christo} 
who work in New York were select- 
ed with the advice and support of 
Leo Castelll one of the most influ- 
ential dealers in New York. 

The "New York 85" title is mis- 
leading since it is essentially Castd- 
li's New York that is on view, and 
the selection, while eclectic op to a 
point, can not claim to represent 
much more than that. Each artist is 
showiog one work. There are also 
23 works by stars of former decades 
— Pop. Conceptual and Minimal 
— including jasper Johns. Roy 
Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol Carl 
Andre and Sol LewilL 
The younger generation of 
American artists includes New Ex- 
pressionists and graffiti artists — 
two tendencies that have enjoyed 
CasieQi’s support from the outset 
(Julian Schnabel and Loren Munk 
are among the former. Jean-Michel 
Basquiat and Keith Haring among 
the latter). 

Jt is pretty well established that 
the New Expressionism — which 
assumes different names and ac- 
cents in Germany, Italy, France, 
the U. S. — is a commercially 
strong tendency, generally marked 
by a self-assertive, free-wheeling 
and extraordinarily aggressive sub- 
jectivity, an expression of private 
whim and fantasy that manages 
paradoxically to be devoid both of 
true Fantasy and of content. TMs 
does not apply to the graffiti art- 
ists, whose work is not necessarily 
pretentious though it tends to per- 
ceived as such in this context 
What we have here, then, with a 
few exceptions, is a display of es- 
tablished celebrities of recent de- 
cades, all of them canonized in the 
standard books of an history, pre- 
sented together with the young pro- 
tagonists of certain strains of a 
highly fashionable art as it is cur- 
rently practiced in New York. 

This should not obscure the fact 
that Paiihas ’s gallery, ARCA. is a 
noteworthy achievement that regu- 
larly shows young artists of quality 
from Marseille and its region as 
well as elsewhere. He acknowledges 
that he has high viability in Mar- 
seille. but the gallery would rate 
quite well if it were in Paris. ' 

“New York 85," ARCA. Centre 
iTArt Contemporain, 61 Cours Ju- 
lien. Marseille, through Oct. 6. 

□ 

Ask almost any art dealer in Par- 
is and he will say that his clientele is 
essentially foreign (German. Bel- 
gian, American. Japanese), and he 
will add that the French just do not 
buy art. The new director of Mar- 
seille’s city museums, Germain 
Viatte. has successfully diminis hed 
the credibility of this by org a ni z i n g 
an excellent exhibition devoted to 
works borrowed from private col- 
lections in Marseille. 

The show at the Mus6e Cantini 
presents about 150 works by 116 
artists, including Arman, Balthus, 


ANTIQUES 


ORANGE (84) 

c5ju*h o: Frcr-ce) 

ANTIQUE FAIR 

August i 0 to 1 5, 1 985 

PALAIS DE LA FOIRE 
PARC DES EXPOSITIONS 

Op9~ng Avgust : C a' ~ a.m. 
Daily rrom Aug. ? : 2 0 arr.- 7:23 

BAR Tel: |50)5t-76-4" " MEAIS 



Van Dongen nude on exhibit at Saint-Tropez. 


Baselitz, Bonnard, Cesar. Sam 
Francis, Giacometti, Jeancfos. 
Yves Klein, Henri Michaux. Joan 
Mitchell. Dennis Oppenhdm, Ber- 
nard Pages, Jean-Pierre Raynaud. 
Germaine Richier, Kurt Schwit- 
ters, Joseph Sima, Cy Twombly 
and Jan Voss. 

This show is clearly intended to 
pump some self-recognition into 
local cultural interests by demon- 
strating that the French provinces 
have an informed public of art lov- 
ers and collectors and a vitality of 
their own. 

“Marseille: Us collectionnent 
Musee Cantini, 19 Rue Grignan, 
Marseille, through SepL 23. 


Kees Van Don gen (1877-1968) 
looked at life and at women with 
pleasure, humor, sensuality and a 
freshly imaginative eye. A collec- 
tion of 39 of his works from the 
Fauvist years (I901-I9I3) is on 
view at the charming little Musfe 
de rAnnondade in Saint-Tropez. 
Once again it brings borne to one 
the strong independence and origi- 
nality of this Dutch artist, who 
avoided fitting into the established 
patterns of an history. 


His work does have some points ■ 
in common with that of Toulouse-, 
Lau tree, in part because of the. way ' 
he uses artificial light in his numer- ■ 
ous portraits of women, though 
Van Dongen is less tan and comes 
more easily under the feminine 
spell. Women are, without a doubt, ‘ 
his chief theme. Thirty of the paint- 
ings presented here are portraits or ■ 
nudes, but only a few represent' 
men. Nor is there any stereotype in 
his treatment of the subject; his 
women are strongly individualized 
and present a broad variety of char- 
acters and moods. 

“Kees Van Dongen , " Musie de 
rAnnondade, Quai Sl Raphael 
Saint-Tropez through SepL 30; then 
the Refectoire des Jacobins. Eglise 
des Jacobins, Paris des Jacobins, 
Toulouse, in October and November. 

a 

The Jean Dubuffet retrospective ■ 
at the Maeght Foundation this year 
exhibition includes about 150 
works and is in presented with the 
excellence one has come to expect 
of the foundation's director, Jean- 
LouisPraL 

“Dubuffet," Fondation Maeght, 
Saint- PauI-de-Vence, through Ocl • 
6. 


INTERNATIONAL 
ART EXHIBITIONS 

M0*nt-CA*10 

MASTERS PAINTINGS 
XIX e - XX e 


HOTEL LOEWS 

EXPOSITION . 2-X AOL'T 



MONTE CARLO 

TEUPHONC Mil 5n.b5.00 


PARIS 

GALER1E MERMOZ 


PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 

6, Rue Jeon-Mermoz, 75008 PARIS. Tel: 359.82.44 H 


ssMUSfE RODINs: 

77, rue da Varenne {?•) 
Metro Varenne 

KIRILI 

Sculptures exhibited 
in the museum gardens 
Daily, except Thuesday, 
from 1 0 a.m. to 5.45 p.m, 
Si June 26 September fdS 


^ART EXHIBITIONS” 
"ANTIQUES" 
"AUCTION SALES” 

appear 
on Saturday 


BROR HJORTH 

at MUSfe BOURDELLE 

16, Rue Antoine BourdeOa 
M° Montparnasse 
Dofly except Monday 
from 10 urn. to 5.40 pjn. 

« ROM JUNE 5 TO SEPTEMBBi J5_ 

PAUS/MEWYOftK 


ZABRISKIE 

BRIGGS, KERN, 
POIVRET ' 

724 Fifth Ave. New York 

WILLIAM KLEIN 

37 rue Quineampoix, Paris 






INTERNATIONAL JTFRAIgTRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 10-11, 1985 




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Robert Capa, The New Look, Paris 1947 


David Seymour, .Arturo Toscanini, 1954 


David Seymour, Disturbed orphan 1948 





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Henri Cartier-Bresson, The Ascot Train, Waterloo Station, London 1953 


Ench Lessing, RaUroad workers, 1956 



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Photographs by Werner Biscbof. Renfe Bum, Robert Capa, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Elliot Erwitt, Ernst Hass, Ench 

From the archives of Magnum Photos, a photographic record of Europe in 
the immediate postwar years — striking images of a continent shaking off 
the debris of destruction and coming to life. 

Mary Blume, the International Herald Tribune’s distinguished feature 
journalist, sets the postwar scene and interviews many of the photographers . 
in her introduction. The I.H.T. is pleased to present this unique volume that 
• captures a decisive epoch and commemorates the work of some of the 
20th century’s master photojoumalists. 

. Here you’ll find some of the most famous images and faces of our 
time. Once you open its pages, you will want to spend hours poring over this 
magnificently produced collection. Truly this is a book to treasure for 
yourself, and a beautiful gift as well 

Available from the International Herald Tribune. Order today. 


1 ?£***&*■: 





% 


Lessmg, Inge Morath, Marc Riboud, David Seymour, and other Magnum photographers. 


AFTER THE WAR WAS 


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^ I^NOWICSCB tt 

Economic Gap is Widening 
Awong American Blacks 

By GLENN C.LOURT 

PW *"* TtmesS **« 

' appears tomT AJU ^ ougb a n»«w of some dispute it 

A :-3:-- ThecbS ^ nong A^encan Macks. 

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t&xonsjst mainly of women 
•without a husband present 
and tfuar children, while pov- 
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fimoies have been reduced 
dramatically. 

■ . rBnt female-headed families 
are shbstaiitiallY more com- 


( . are suostantiaUy more com- 

discrimin ^ 

for b«h rac^ the.™ 


Poorly skilled 
blacks have not 
gained as much from 
government anti- 
discrimmation efforts. 


die other hand, a traditional source of racial disparity — - 
®Wmait discrimination — has diminichM m ^gntfrramv* 
dining this penod. The passage of civil rights le gislatio n and the 
growth nt enforcement activity by the courts an** the state 


employees. 

S TATISTICAL studies Of dba ^minHli rtn' tinif nirmly shows 
significant reduction over the past two decades in the gap 
.between black, and white workers’ compensation not ac- 
counted for by productivity differences. Indeed, in some special- 
ized; highly skilled segments of the labor market, there may now 
be a slight premium paid to blade workers. 

Thus it is at least arguable that, in some in^portant respects, 
"P economic and social class position has become more important 
' than race per-se in accounting for black-white disparities. 

A history of racism and discrimination has helped to create an 
inner-caty underclass that, because of economic and technologi- 
cal devebpments in American society at large, has became much 
more difficult to integrate into theeconomic mainstream than the 
urban poor of previous years. ,: 

For blades with job drills or a high level of educational 
attainment, many if not all of fee historic barriers to achieving 
parity, with whites have bear removed. For those blacks who 
remain poorly educated and trapped in urban ^rettoes, however,' 
enormous problems remain. This distinction, between the eco- 
nomic positions of the black middle class and the blade under- 
class, has great importance for the formulation of public policy. 
The key issue here is whether the extensive activities underta- 


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Hrralb^^eribunc, 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks ;v 
Report, Page 10 

V 

Page 9 ;+• 


Japan’s 
Surplus 
Near High 

Z7.S. Trade Gap 
A Record in July 


Buyouts: Products of a New Era 


TOKYO — - Japan posted a pre- 
tmmry trade surplus of S4.6bH- 


Hxmmry trade surplus of S4.6bU- 
lioo in July, up 44 percent from a 
$3_2-bfllion surplus a year earlier, 
but down from a reewd S5 billion 
in June, die Finance Ministry an- 
nounced Friday. 

But the country’s surplus with its 
largest trading partner, the United 
States, rose to a monthly record of 
$3.7 billion, the ministry Enures 
showed. The previous record was 
$3.46 billion in April 

Japan’s exports to the United 
Suites rose to a record $5.83 billion 
in July, up 4.7 percent from the 
same month last year, while im- 
ports from the United States Tell 
3.6 percent, to S2J3 billion, the 
Finance Ministry said. 

Ministry officials attributed the 
record surplus with the United 
States to a plunge in imports of 
food and materials, including com 
and soybeans. 

However, it said that car exports 
to the United States rose 20 percent 
from a year earlier, to a value of 
$1.85 hOtion, while the value of 
video- tape-recorder exports rose 
17.7 percent, to $395 milli on. 

The announcement came just 
one day after visiting U.S. con- 
gressmen warned hoe that such 
figures -were fueling pressure in the 
United States for protectionist 
measures. There are now 57 such 
bills pending before Congress. 

“Political’ pressure for protec- 
tionist measures is bring driven by 
monthly trade figures,’' Represen- 
tative Donald J. Pease, an Ohio 
Democrat, said here Thursday. 
“That’s what is driving Americans 
wild,” 

-The ministry said that Japan’s 


Goals Differ 
From the Old 
Conglomerates 

By Daniel F. Cuff 

Nnr York Times Service 

NEW YORK. — Machine 
i tools, trucking, construction, 

I lodging, retail stores. An emer- 
| prise with all of those businesses 
under the same roof could be an 
old-fashioned conglomerate. 

Actually, the owner is Kohl- 
berg, Kravis, Roberts & Co„ a 
| Wall Street investment firm that 
specializes in leveraged buyouts, 
the . popular takeover strategy 
that results in a heavy debt load 
for the acquired company. 

Kohlbera and several other 
concerns nave completed so 
many buyouts in the past few 
years that they have quietly built 
up stables of diverse companies, 
just as the conglomerate builders 
did in the 1960$. 

And the resemblance to those 
empire builders has become even 
more striking of late, with Storer 
Communications Inc.'s accep- 
tance last week of Koblberg’s 
$2.03- billion takeover bid. 

Until recently, nearly ail of (he 
acquisitions by the buyout con- 
cerns had been of private compa- 
nies or di virions of public com- 
panies. Lately, however, they 
have been going after large, 
widely known and often publicly 
owned companies, such as 
Storer, and they have frequently 
been involved in well-publicized 
bidding wars. Kohlbeig beat out 
Comcast Corp. to add Storer to 
its collection of 17 companies. 

Similarly, Wes ray Corp„ an- 
other major buyout concern, 
which has more than 15 compa- 
nies under its wing, recently 
completed two highly visible ac- 


Leveraged Buyout Empires 

Major investment-firm conglomerates and a selection of their 
current holdings. 


HtBkln Canine. 

(Gen manufacturer) 

Wcflond Glam Company 
(Glass manufacturer) 

Permian CcMporatkm - 
(Off pipeline company) 

Simplicity Tractor 
■ (Lawn tractor maker) 
Waar-Ever/Proctor-SBex 
(Maker of consumer appliances) 

, Western Auto Supply Company 
(Auto parts dtolrfttuter) 

Wltaon Sporting Gooda Company 
, (Consumer sporting goods producer) 

I ‘ToteaiMm National imerBroup Inc. 


Beverage Management Jne. 

(Operator ol aoR drink botttng 
factities) 

I Dr Pepper Company 

(Third largest soft drink franchiser in 

the U S.) 

Emb-Taz Corporation 
(Embroidery manufacturer) 

F.L Industries 

(Diversified manufacturer of electrical 
products and automobile plastics) 
Toppa Chewing Gum Inc. 
(Confectionery maker) 

Unicom Inc. 

(Owner of WRGB-TV, In Schenectady, 
N.Y.) 


Arnold Food Company 
i (P rim arily bread makers) 

I Kux Manufacturing 
(Manufacturer of preaaure sensitive 
| materials) 

Navamar Corporation 
(Maher of high pressure decorative 
'laminates) 

PiBod Cabinet Company 
[Furniture maker) 

Untroyal Inc. (pending) 

(Tire and chemical company) 
W.GLM. Safety Corporation 
(Maker of Industrie safety products) 


Maxwell Group 
Withdraws From 
Sinclair Rescue 


Amttar Corporation 
(Manufacturer and dtotributor of 
nutritive sweetener) 

Eaton Leonard Corporation 
(Manufacturer ol computer controlled 
tube bending machine tools) 

HoudaMe Industries 
(Manufacturer of pumps and machine 
lads) 

Sterer Communications (pending) 
(Media company) 

U S- Na tu ral Resources Inc- 
<CoM producer and (umber ntBHng 
machinery maker) 

Wometeo Ente r pr is e a 
(Entertainment, automatic venting and 
tetovtoon company) 


quismons: Western Auto Supply 
Co., for $600 million, and Wilson 
Sporting Goods Co., a $ 1 50-mil - 
lion transaction. 

Clayton & Dubilier Inc., 
which is arranging a buyout of 
Uniroyal Inc, the big lire and 
chemicals company, has five 
companies that it controls. 

And Fprstmann Little & Co., 
which recently acquired a diver- 
sified group of 12 divisions from 
ITT Corp., has a total of .six 
companies, including the Dr 
Pepper Co. and Topps Chewing 
Gum Inc. It lost out to Cooper 
Industries in a $ 1 3-billion bid 


The Now Ycri Tunes 

for McGraw-Edison Co. this 
spring 

The way a leveraged buyout 
works is that money is borrowed 
to make the purchase and is re- 
paid out of the company's cash 
flow or by selling assets. 

The buyout companies are go- 
ing after larger, more visible prey 
because in most cases they have 
attracted huge pools of cash 
from pension funds and wealthy 
individuals. Typically, those 
cash pools, often together with 
funds supplied by incumbent 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 7) 


Reuters 

LONDON — The Pergamon 
Press group, owned by Robert 
Maxwell, said Friday that it was 
abandoning its proposed rescue of 
Sinclair Research Ltd., the ailing 
British maker of home computers. 

A spokesman for Pergamon 
Press Ltd. said that after detailed 
study, (he proposed takeover of 
Sinclair Research could not go 
ahead. The proposal involved a 
capital injection of £12 millioD 
($16.2 million). 

Sir Clive Sinclair, the British in- 
ventor who founded and controls 
Sinclair Research, said Friday that 
ihe buyout no longer was necessary 
because of recent sales. 

He said that Sinclair Research 
recently signed a contract with 
Dixons Group PLC, the British 
photographic and electric-goods 
concerns, worth £10 million over 
the next three months. 

“Our problems were always of a 
short-term nature and whilst we 
were grateful to Bob Maxwell for 
his support, we are happy to be 
continuing as an independent com- 
pany." Sir Clive said. 

Sinclair Research was hurt last 
winter by low demand for home 
computers. A bid to seek a public 
quotation for the company’s shares 
on the London Stock Exchange 
earlier this year had to be aban- 
doned. 

In May, cash flow problems at- 
tributed to high inventory levels 
forced Sinclair Research to ask its 
main suppliers. Thorn- EMI PLC 
and Timex Corp.'s British unit, for 


a two-month moratorium on £10 
million in debt payments. 

Under the Maxwell rescue plan. 
Sir Clive — designer of the elec- 
tronic pocket calculator and other 
electronic devices — was to relin- 
quish control of the company and - 
become life president and research ' 
consultant. Mr. Maxwell was to be- . 
come chairman and establish a new * 
board of directors. 

Last month. Sir Clive named a * 
new chief executive, Bffl Jeffrey, 
with Mr. Maxwell's backing. The 
company said then that the take- 
over proposal was on schedule and 
due for completion in mid-Septem- 
ber. 

The Maxwell rescue plan was to 
have been made through Hollis 
Brothers & ESA PLC, an office- 
equipment supplier and timber 
merchant based in Hull England, J 
and 75-percent owned by Perga- * 
mon Press. ; 

Under the proposal. Hollis' 
Brothers was to buy a controlling^ 
share in Sinclair Research for a- 
nominal stun. Sinclair Research ‘ 
was to issue new shares worth £12 ' 
■ million and Hollis Brothers was to » 
buy the bulk of those shares, end- ; 
ing the transaction with about 75 
percent of Sinclair Research. 

The proposal was announced' 
June 17 in Mr. Maxwell's Daily' 
Mirror. The newspaper said then, 
that the proposed agreement would 
meet the cash needs of Sinclair Re- 4 
search, which said in May that it* 
was trying to raise as much as £15* 
million for growth and res true tur-' 
ing plans. . 


•Million 


m July, to $153 billion from $14.8 
billion a year earlier, while imports 
fell S3 percent, to $10.7 billion 
from 51 1.5 billion. 

. Ejqjcats to the European Com- 
munity in July rose 7 percent, to 
$1.69 bflhcni while imports fell 2.7 
percent, to $808 million, for a sur- 
plus of $879 million, it said. 

Japan's surplus with China, 
which expressed strong concern 
over its growing trade imbalance 
with Japan in ministerial talks here 
last month, rose to 5648 million 
from 573 million in July. 1984. 

Exports to the Middle East were 
down 17 percent, to $1.02 billion, 
while imports from the area 
dropped 16i) percent, to $224 bil- 
lion, leaving Japan with a $122 
billion deficit, the ministry said. 

(Reuters, AP) 


China to Buy 
GE Engines 
For Its Navy 

By Daniel Southerland 

Washington Past Service 

BEUING —China has signed a 
major contract with General Elec- 
tric Ca of the United States for gas 
turbine engines for use in China’s 
naval modernization program, ac- 
cording to diplomats and business- 
men here. 

Terms of the contract were not 
immediately available. 

The turbine-engine sale is only 
the second large nritiiaxy transac- 
tion between the United States and 
rhitm to date. The previous major 
sale was for 24 Sikorsky helicop- 
' ters, for use by the Chinese Army, 
valued at $150 million. 

GE recently ended several 
months of negotiations with Chi- 
nese experts and signed a contract 
to sell rive gas turbine engines, a 
shipbuilding industry analyst said. 

General Electric officers here 
confirmed that the negotiations 
bad been successful but said they 
could not provide details until they 

(Confirmed on Page 11, CoL 8) 


By Bob Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — STC PLC report- 
ed Friday a £8.7-millicrn ($1 1.7- 
million) first-half loss, canceled its 
dividend and warned that recovery 
is not imminent. 

The gloomy report by the maker 
of tdecpmmunications equipment 

Profile of die new chairman of 
STC, Lord Keith. Page 11. 

and computers knocked its share 
price down 6 pence to dose on the 
London Stock Exchange at 96 
pence a share. In after-hours trad- 
ing, following a two-hour meeting 
with investment analysts, the 
shares plunged to 86 pence. 

“Most of us came away with the 
feeling that we didn't have the an- 
swers to any of the Questions," said 
John Tysoe, an analyst at Grieve- 
son. Grant A Co. 


The results came a week after Sir 
Kenneth Corfield abruptly re- 
signed as chairman and chief exec- 
utive of STC which is 243-perceni 
owned by ITT Corp. Lord Keith, 
who was named chairman and act- 
ing chief executive, said Friday that 
Sir Kenneth and the rest of the 
board had agreed on the need for a 
new approach at the company. 

For the first half, STC reported 
pretax profit of £21.4 million, 
down from £762 million a year 
earlier. The loss arose after tax- 
ation of £8.5 million and extraordi- 
nary charges erf £21.6 million. 

About a third of the charges re- 
lated to the costs of closing a plant 
in Brijtiitoa that made telex equip- 
ment The rest involved closures or 
disposals of smaller units. 

Sales rose 1 percent to £988.1 
million from £9782 million. 

Sr Kenneth promised a month 


ago to maintain last year’s interim 
dividend of 325 pence a share. But 
his successor. Lord Keith, said that 
the company would make no 
payout until it knows the results for 
the full year and has a dearer pic- 
ture of prospects for 1986. 

STC blamed its performance 
largely on weak markets for semi- 
conductors and telecommunica- 
tions equipment It also cited cur- 
rency-translation losses of £18 

million: the company buys many 
key parts priced in such strong cur- 
rencies as the dollar and yen, while 
exporting finished products to such 
markets as Australia and South Af- 
rica, whose currencies have weak- 
ened against the pound. 

Sales of telecommunications 
equipment to British Telecom- 
munications PLC. STCs dominant 
customer, slumped 16 percent to 
£142 million. STC also reported 


“difficulties" arising from some of 
its recent investments in U3. soft- 
ware and da la-processing compa- 
nies. 

ICL PLC the computer maker 
acquired last summer for £41 1 mil- 
lion. contributed £26.1 million to 
STCs operating profit That ac- 
counted for just over half of STC s 
total but it was down from ICL's 
operating profit of £29.8 million a 
year earlier. 

Lord Keith said that STC is 
searching for a chief executive from 
outride the company. In the mean- 
time, he promised a review of the 
company’s operations of “consid- 
erably greater intensity” than one 
led by Sir Kenneth last spring. The 
company wOL seek to identity its 
“core" businesses and dispose of 
other units, perhaps embracing 15 
percent or so of the company. Lord 
Keith said. 


Analysis said that the company > 
might seD units involved in distri- <* 
bution of electrical supplies and i 
semiconductors, manufacturing of ' 
certain electronic components, 
such as capacitors, and a wide van- ; . 
ety of other peripheral businesses. ' 

STC officials hinted that they * * 
might seek an outride partoer for . 
STCs semicoflductor-makmg op- ’J 
erations. Though the company is 
building a £60-millioa scmicanduc- . ' 
tor plant in Kent, Lord Keith ob- : 
served that there is “massive over- . ~ 
capacity” in the business. 

Analysts generally said that it ' w 
was unclear how STC would sort . 
out its problems. “They can’t af-. 
ford a grandiose strategy of con- * 
verging technologies and taking on - 
IBM and all the nonsense they were.' 
talking about,” said Douglas Haw-1 
kins of James Capel & Co. ' ' > 


Tougher U,S. Trade Policy Expected 


By Claude H. Farnsworth 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The Reagan 
administration is moving toward a 
more aggressive international trade 
policy to try to forestall passage of 
protectionist legislation in Con- 
gress, administ ration officials and 
congressional aides report. 

ihe first indication of the tough- 
er policy is expected to come soon 


SttiMi : ’ 1,17 tI !z 

s=r n» »*» 


5 5 

t* 6 3/U 


Sm: CammerJmnk, Cmd» 

tiwMfc, hint af ran* 




aders Business People column 

and Friday W ^ 


— U.S. Firm Halts 

G old Krugerrand Sale 

United Press Ituenmaml 

Aug- 9 NEW YORK — Deak-Per- 
am. ym. fliihe largest US. currency 

its dealer, has suspended the ale 

gra a,* of South Afric^JUugerrand 

rai*ii2j*Bai ^ jus -0« because of that cman/s 

low** 32a ‘ <0 1** +A50 policy of apartheid, a spokes- 

w * wy#fk ^andLonfimofncM**- woman for the company said 
Luite mbour9 ' K ^ S anii Zurich opening aaB Friday. 

Deak-Berera stopped seffing 
** (he one-ounce gold coins, which 

Source: Reu»rs. _ ^ abom $337, toCUStOflWSia 

— the United States on Thursday, 

the spokeswoman said. 

She said Deak-Perera would 
pinole column continue to buy back the Kru- 
l^^Todav the gatands and resell them to ex- 
Fndays. Today porters because "a great nrnn- 

ber” or people have recently 

— — - ~ " been selling the coms because 

of South Africa’s racial policy 
and the company wanted to 
for a snppoft tbon. ■ 


wiih a decision by (he president to 
protect the U.S. shoe industry 
against imports that have captured 
nearly 80 percent of the American 
market 

A faction within the cabinet has 
recommended that the government 
itself initiate unfair-trade cases to 
give bite to the tougher policy. That 
idea is opposed by free-trade advo- 
cates. 

Congress is watching closely. 
“Unless they can show that the 
trade laws work and are credible, 
you're going to see a real protec- 
tionist hinge in Congress," said a 
Senate aide specializing in trade 
issues. “One industry after the oth- 
er will demand that we rewrite the 
laws." 

Legislators have introduced 
more titan 300 bills to protect ev- 
erything from textiles to waterbeds. 
A Democratic bill to impose a 25- 
percent tax on aD imports from 
Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and 
Brazil is given a good chance of 
passage in the House when Con- 
gress reconvenes in September. 

“A harder line is inevitably” one 
congressional aide said. “Ether 
they do it, or we will do ft." 

It is still an open question wheth- 
er the administration wiD succeed 
in its strategy toward the congres- 
sional trade debate. “It really de- 
pends on what they end up doing or 
are perceived to be doing,” another 


licy Council which advises the 
president on major economic is- 
sues, is preparing a trade policy 
paper that would enunciate the 
more activist approach, adminis- 
tration officials reported. 

“They are trying to figure out 
some way to preempt Congress, but 
they don’t have a clear view yet," 
said one official familiar with the 
internal debate. “1 would guess that 
when they finish thinking about it 
well have a more aggressive po- 
licy." 

The initiative to harden the line 
has been taken by the “political 
realists," who are led by the UJS. 
trade representative, Clayton K. 
Yeutter, and the secretary erf com- 
merce, Malcolm Baldrige. The 
chairman of the Economic Policy 
Council is the Treasury secretary, 
James A Baker 3d, also one of the 
realists. 

“The administration is clearly 
vulnerable on trade issues, particu- 
larly at the congressional level," 
said Charles S. Pearson, a trade 
expert at the Johns Hopkins School 
of Advanced International Studies. 
“It’s difficult to know bow it wiB 


is that government fiscal policies 
are widely seen to have contributed 
to the strength of the dollar, which 
in turn has hurt exports and made 
imports cheaper, driving the trade 
deficit toward a record of perhaps 
$150 billion this year. 

John M. Albertine, former chief 
economist for the Joint Economic 
Committee erf Congress and now 
president of a coalition of growth 
companies called the American 
Business Conference, said the 
Democrats view the trade issue as 
driving a wedge between the ad- 
ministration and its traditional 
supporters. 

.“The manufacturing communi- 
ty, which normally supports Rea- 
gan, is off the wall cm this issue,” he 
said. The protectionist pressures in 
Congress are coming chiefly from 
manufacturing interests. 

. Mr. Yeutter has told legislators 
that the administration recognizes 
the high level of concern in Con- 
gress over trade issues. 


play oul 
The re 


reason for the vulnerability 


On the French Riviera 

THE ONLY FRENCH 
CASINO WITH A FULL 
COMPLEMENT OF 
FEMALE DEALERS 


The presided underscored the 
new emphasis on trade in his open- 
ing remarks at Monday’s news con- 
ference, saying the issue would get 
"special attention." 

The cabinet-levd Economic Po- 



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EVTERiVATIOjXAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATORDAY-SUNPAY, AUGUST 10-H, 1985 



NYSE Most Actives 


VoL High Law Last CM. 


3BM7 a<A 
23387 M ft 
T2913 12» 
1111) 43% 
10*75 23 
9743 12% 
9374 27% 
•lit 36 
3615 25V- 
B57B 21% 
MIS 2 SVb 
7343 20% 
7283 29% 
7037 7% 
6899 T2Sft 


0% + ft 
14% + ft 
19% + % 

43% — % 
22% + ft 
12% — % 
27% + % 
X + * 
24% 

21% — 1% 
IS - % 
20 — % 
99% 

7% + ft 
127% — % 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 

Utilities 

Industrials 


Dow Jones Averages 


Own High Low Last Os. 

Indus 132885 123148 131765 1320.79— • 967 

Tram 48223 4B5J1 476-50 67989— 152 

Utfl 15M3 1S6J4 I5«5S ISM— 041 ■ 

Coma 549 JS 53092 S44JS 54042— 2.70 


NYSE Diaries 


Adwneed 

Ds^llnad 

Unchanged 
Total Issues 
Ntw High? 
Now Lows 

Volume up 
V olume down 


Close prow. 

459 1094 

m 4>4 

434 425 

1984 2008 

21 30 

8 11 


NYSE Index 


fitofe case On» 
Camomile 109.3? 1DB95 109,04 -0J4 

Industrial i 1&21 12487 124.97 -047 

Tronso. 11087 11054 11083 +051 

Utilities SU» 545* 5*49 — O® 

Finance 11532 11S07 1156? —035 


'le- ^ . T ^i TTifr Ersall 


Alio. 8 168.167 397,161 

Auo.7 147,955 SHOT 

AuO-6 174J6S 527 . 30 

Auo.5 142.131 4*7,232 

*00.2 — — 150882 40*282 

'tnetudsd tn the solas figures * 


frida>s 




dosing 


1 Vat of < PJV. 

tissues 

Prtv.8PJA.90l. 

152J7B6C0 

PrevansolidaMCio» 

1ZV45&2S 


Tables liidade me ngHonwfde prices 
op to tbe closing an Won Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


F 


AMEX Diaries 



AOvancad 
DeeKneo 
unenonsed 
Total issues 
New Hlote 

New Laws 

Volume uo 
Volume dewi 


255 292 

247 228 

254 273 

*3 ^ 

17 U 

2J7OS0B 

W4a.no 


Finance 

Insurance 

ihums 


dose CM M» M» 
2*9.14 +042 3M53 m» 
jo? js +052 tarn jkm 

Snx +om mat vnB 

^;|il 

tftJJ-US *61 £3 


Standard & Poor’s Index 


AMEX Sales 



industrials 

Tronsp. 

Utilities 

Finance 

CB m o os lle 


tdee law dace arm 

SiiSgffigrS 

8H» 8253 S26J-M8 

7177 77 U MW —005 

15945 18011 18832 — 043 


4 pjw. volume 

PfM.4 Pjovotama 





□Month 
HMtiLow Stock 


98 Oou 

Dhf. YW. PE BBS High Low OP.* 


69 50% 

38% 28% 
24 11% 

23% 12% 
34 Z1% 

43% 30 



70 70 + % 

45% 65% + % 
33% 32% — % 
12 % 12 *.— % 

T=l 

■7% + % 
147% +1 

1% + ^ 
14% 

S -* 
62 + % 
5 


89% 

34% + % 
20% — % 

aS? + % 

r*s 

P=S 


27 
32% 

67 
14% 

14% J3A 
15% 15 

h io s 
18% 18% 
30 
24% 

14% 

22% 




M% ®% BMC .121 128 9% 9 9 — % 

35% 24 BtririKD SO 10 11 JOl 27% 27% 27% — % 

19*. 15 Dhrlrm 42 5.1 15 1340 18% 17% 17% — % 

2«4 18% BaMor 34 17 14 ID 2T% 21% 21% — % 

2% % v BolHU 144 1% 1% 1%— % 

9 2 vlBldUpf 10 5% 5% 5% 

S% 33% BallCn 144 23 14 30 59 56ft 58*. + ft 

23% 11% BonvMl JO 1.1 844 17% 17% 17% + It 

12% 7% BaltyPk 13 219 11% 11 11 — % 

46% MV. BoltGE 040 BJ 0 2332 41 40% 41 + V, 

22J6 Bncone 1.10 34 11 374 33% 32% 3W — % 

23% 15% BacOn v»l 1 22% 22% 22% 

5» 214 BtmTex 341 3% 2% 3% + % 

62 46% Bandog 120 2.1 II 50 54% 54% 54% 

32% Bit BOS 140 AJ 5 141 51% 5096 51 — % 

57% 49% BkBpfB 49el6 10 52% 52% 52% 

47% 37% BhNY 104 45 7 540 46 44% 45 —11* 

33% 10% Bank VO 1.12 4.1 * 133 Z7 1 * 27 27% + % 

22% 15 BrtkAm JO SO 3801 14% 15% 1S%— Vh 

47 40 BSAm nf <*1ell J 1399 43 41% 41% — 1% 

76% 45% BkAmpf 743011.9 429 47 45% 65% —1% 

16% 12% BkAmpf 2J8 278 15% 15V. 15% — 7k 

32% 241* BkARty 260 84 12 147 28% 27% 28 — % 

75% 43% BonkTr 2J0 4JO 7 2234 47% 67V. 47% + 'A 

27 20% BkTraf IX 97 871 26 25% 25% 

44% 35 BfcTrpf 4-21 93 20 441* 44U 44 u + 44 

13 B% BemW JOB -3 14 17 111* II 11 — % 

39% 19 Bard M 14 14 492 34% 34% 34%— U 

25 19% BamGp JO 12 16 SO 24% 24% 24% 

41% 25% Bomets )J4 ZO 10 246 37% 26% 34%— 1* 

33% 17 BarvWr JO 16 17 230 23% 22% 23V. + % 

13% 8% BASIX .12b 1J 11 266 9» 8% 0%—% 

35% 21% Bliuich 30 ZJ 18 173 32% 31% 31%—% 

18% 11% BaxfTr J7 24 71 1197 14% 14% 14% — VS 

27% 10% BUyFIn JO J 139 29 25 24% 25 + V. 

34*. 22*. BaySfG 260 86 9 37 32 31 31 —1% 

38*. 311* Bearing UJO 2.9 12 17 35% 35 35 — % 

34% 26% BmtCO 1J0 56 7 5167 34 331* 33%— 1 

63 48% Beat of XJS 54 SB 63 62 42% — % 

15% 12% Bear ,44 29 41 39 15V. 15 15% 


_ 1 22% 22% 28% 

341 3% 27k 3* + % 
50 54% 56% 54% 

141 51% 50% 51 — % 

IB 52*5 52% 53% 

540 46 44% 45 —II* 

133 27% 27 27V, + % 

3804 16% 15% 15% — 1* 
1399 42 41% 41% . — 1% 

*39 *7 65% 65% — 1% 

275 15% 15V. 15% — % 


871 26 25% 2S% 

W 441* 44U 441* + % 

17 111* II 11 — % 


NYSE Has Worst Week of Year 


12 Month 
Hit* Low Stock 


Dhr.YM.PE 


SB. C3BM 

UPtHWiLow OggLOTos 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The New York Slock Ex- 
change closed out its worst week of the year 
with a moderate decline Friday amid uncer- 
tainty over chances for a revival of U.S. eco- 
nomic growth. 

Tbe Dow Jones average of 30 industrials fefl 
9.07 to 1 .320.79, extending its loss for the week 
xo 3L26 points. The last time the average 
showed a bigger weekly loss was SepL 17-21, 
1984, when it dropped 35.78 points. 

About four issues declined in price for every 
three that gained ground. Volume slowed to 
81.75 million shares from 102.87 million Thurs- 
day. 

Investors showed some enthusiasm for stocks 
Thursday as the Treasury completed a three- 
day, $21. 75-billion sale of bonds and notes. The 
auction drew a better response than some ob- 
servers had expected. 


owns more than 45 percent ofTWA's stock. Mr. 
Icahn said he might increase his investment in 
TWA. 

An employee group has said it is also ready- 
ing an offer for control of the company. 

Pan Am, which has also been discussed as a 
possible takeover candidate, was the volume 
leader, up 54 at 8W on turnover of more than 3 
million shares. 

Losers among the blue chips included Gener- 
al Motors, down ltt at 69; DuPont, down 2 at 
58; General Electric, down Vt at 61%, and Inter- 
national Business Machines, off % at 127%. 

Precious-metals issues were mostly higher as 
the price of gold jumped S6.50 an ounce to 
$328.50 on the Commodity Exchange in New 
York. 

Homestake Mining gained % to 27!4, Camp- 
bell Red Lake Mines ft to 23ft, and Dome 
Mines % to 8ft. However, ASA Ltd. was un- 
changed at 45W. 

Loews Cop., which reported sharply highe. 


But analysts said there were still widespread Loews CorPv I ?P orte f sh ^ 
doubts on Wall Street that interest rates could £ J uarterl y eanungs on Thursday, rose 1 ft to 

go much lower in the near future. . c , M r -.. 

The New York Stock Ex c ha n ge s composite 
Without a drop in rates, many Wall Streeters index dropped 34 to 109.06. 
believe. US. economic growth and corporate Nalk)nwide volume in NYSE-lisied issues, 
profits must show some significant n^roye- inrhl Hi - m ±ox slodC5 on regional 

men of stocks are going to resume the rally they ^ ^ d^^ter nErket, 

staged from eariy-May to imd-Juiy. roSedlOO.12 million shares. 


There are hopes that that will happen, but Standard & Poor's index of 400 industrials 
hard evidence of it is still relatively scarce. fell .79 to 209.43, and S&Ps 500>stock compos- 
Trass World Airlines climbed ft to 22ft in iie index was down .63 at 188.32. 
active trading. The NASDAQ composite index for the over- 

Texas Air raised ils offer to acquire the com- tbe-coumer market rose .42 to 299.14. At tbe 
pany to $26 a share in cash and securities, American Stock Exchange, the market value 
seeking to outbid Carl C. irahn who already index dosed at 23238, up .08. 


Tbe NASDAQ composite index for the < 
tbe-coumer market rose .42 to 299.14. A 




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Pprv AM 15J 
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PIN 73* 09 
FTR4J0 147 
OTP 3L98 148 
OrN 185 142 
Pffll ZX 144 
2J3 144 

tSX 


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Cento 
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4»% 47% 
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7% 7% 
32 
52 
53% 
54 
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34% 
25% 
34% 
26% 
26% 
27% 
17% 
15% 
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70 53 FMC 2jax*2tUtotf%64% *»**-- £ 

28 18*. PPL Co 1 M 7.9 I 1IW 2 »» 34%_+ £ 

13% Mil FoOCIr J 17 a 2 ,’22 % 

U% 10 Facet • 77 1SW 11% 11%*— * 

20% 13Va Fatocha JO 1J 2626 V5 1* 1^ * * 

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6% 4% Faaers J 8 » 4% 4% + % 

41% 29% FgtUCo 1J4 46 -9 17 40 3Mfc 3W— 

52% 31% FrdExp » 891 48% *5% ** + % 

4J% 31% FdHmpf 1J4* 4J IS 24 % 34H, 34% — % 

29 30% FOMog 152 41 11 V 371a 37% J7% 

22% 12 % FgdNM .16 J 73*3 20% 19% 20 — % 

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23 17 F«dR|l U4 63 14 53 23 TWk 23 + % 

19% 13% FtJSgnl JO U1J S J» % +* 

45% 48V, FetfOSt 23* 44 8 2238 S8% OT* 37?*— 1- 

22 27% Ferro ISO 43 16 30 28% 27% VPf* + % 

35 25V. FWal 1-00 X4 14 123 29% 2»W 29W 

11% 4 FlnCM JSl 1237 6% Wt + % 

38% U% FlnCPpf *61920.1 43 32% 32% 32 % + V. 

6V, 2% FaSBor 67 6% 6Vfc VU 

22% 14% Flrestn J04 j0 9 690»%20 20V. 

27% 13% Ft ATI & 68 21 9 216 24% 2J% 34%— % 

43 23’4 FlBICSv 160 42 8 209 38V. B[% + % 

32% 22 FBkFIs 1 JO 13 13 4 31 XP4 3«*— % 

46% 23% FBaST X 13 106 92% 4 Z C% , 

27 19% Fstailc 1J» S3 3447 34% B%— % 

54% 44% Failapf5J6ol03 20 49 48% 49 • 

11% 11 FtBTw 60 31 11 1537 11% 11% 11%-% 

3* 35 FIBTk of 396«t4.7 7 41% 4(7% I 

49 32V. FIBT* of S68B14.9 1 38 31 38 — 1 

20% 8 Fiaty I « 8% ft 8% — V. 

14 U 10% FFrdAx 68b 3J 7 64 21 20% 20% — % 

60 38 FFB 112 37 8 3* 55% 5fl* 35 + % 

55% 35V. Flirts* 230 S3 7 258 49 48% 48% + % 

04% 23% FlnlS Ot 237 8.1 42 30 29V, 29% 

11% 7% FtMtss 24 U * IB I* W 8%— % 

30 16 FlNatnn 19 72 29% 29% 21% + % 

T7m 5 FSPO 192 6% 6% *%— % 

30% 21% FltPQ erf 262 9J 35 28% M% »%— % 
21% 25% FtUnRj 1.96 7-0 IS 47 2*% 28% 28% — % 

2B% 17% FIVoBk J8 16 10 14S 24% 24% 24% — % 

33% (9 FfWtoc f JO 63 9 37 J7% JO J0% + « 

48% 29 F Irene 1J0 3.1403 14 32% 32% 32%—% 

11% 8% FhbFd JtSe J 94 11% 11% 11% 

43 22% F1IFnGs1J2 36 9 218 37% 36% 37 +% 

50% 42% FIIFof 4J>e U 500 49 49 *9 — M* 

28% 18% FltOtEit 64 2J 8 1511 TV% 19% + % 

39% 26% Flemng 18 U O 67 38% 37% 37%— % 

13% 10% Flffxlpt 161 126 18 13% II IS — % 

39% 18% FI0M3IS .16 6 19 13* 24% 34% 24% — % 

34% 141* Float P*t 18 95 31% 31 31% 

45% 31 FlaEC .16a J 13 18 42 41% 41% — % 

29% 20% FloPrg 216 7.9 9 1432 27% 27% 27% — % 

18% 11% FklStl 60 26 14 572 16% 15% 16% + V* 

6% 3V. FtwGgn 78 5% 5% 5% + % 

21 13 Flaws 6* 23 16 356 17% 17% 17%— % 

20% 14% Fluor 60 2J 1*45 17V. 17 17%— % 

59 47*. Fool PC 230 4.1 U 36 S*% 54*. 54% 

51% 40% FortM 2.40 36 3 3819 44% 44% 44% — 9t 

13V. 10% Fioaar 1J* ioj 2s 12% n% n% „ 

79% 56% FtHowJ 144 11 17 409 77% 77% 7716— % 



+ % 

6 % 6 %— % 
28% 2t%— % 
18% 28%—% 


S%-X 

41%-% 

27%—% 

)M+V> 


151V 10% FoSTWh 64 33 11 157 
111* 7% FOxSJP 41 4J IS 3* 

33% 24% FOkbro 14* If II lit 
27 22 Foxrnvr 16 422 

22% 18% FMEPn 3Sg 27 38 

lo2 7% fK" 2J7B276 S! 

2%'CT*Fr£tro 60 IS 31 *28 

28% nu Fruahfs 60 26 6 174 
32% 25% Front pf 200 67 4 

36% 36% Fuaoa 60 1J 9 170 


572 16% 15% 16% + % 
78 S% 5% 5% + % 
356 17% 17% 17% — % 
1945 17% 17 17%—% 

36 S*% 54% 54% 

409 77% 77% 77% — % 
157 13% 13% 13% 

if, ££ % iStrX 


16%+ % 
5% + % 
17% — % 

a-* 

449b— 9b 


139 9% 9% *%— % 
561 19% 19% 19%— % 
28 27% 2Mb 35%—% 
174 25% 23 25% — % 

4 30 29% 30 — % 

170 31% 30 31% +1% 



7^* 


33% 17 BarvWr 60 16 17 23023%22%23% + W 
13% 8% BASIX .12b 16 11 366 9% 8% 8%— % 

35% 21% Bluncn 78 23 18 17J 32% 31% 31%—% 

18% 11% BmrtTr J7 26 71 1197 14% 14% 14% — % 

27% 18% BayFIn JO J 139 29 25 24% 25 + % 

34*. 22*. BaySIG 260 86 9 37 32 31 31 —1% 

38*. 31% Bearing UJO 2.9 12 17 35% 35 35 — V 

34% 26% B«1C0 160 56 7 5167 34 33% J3%— 1 

63 48% Beal Of 138 56 SB 63 42 63%— % 

15% 12% Bear 44 19 At 39 15% 15 15% 

58% 34% BectnD UO 11 15 322 57 56% 56% + % 

B% 2% Befcer 691 38 3% 3% 3%— % 


49% 

5% 

39% 

3* 

33% 33% 
15% 15% 
88% 88% 
74% 74% 
64% 65V. 
53% 63% 

a 


B% 2% Beher 691 
If 4 B«<ter Of JJO 326 
17% 12% BeWnH 60 27 9 
35% 22% BelHwl 66 17 10 


72% BellAtr 660 77 9 1209 88% 88 


49 5% 5% 5% 

32 14% 14% 14% 

70 33V. 33% 33%— 1* 


33 24 BCS8 1» 577 31% 31% 31% + % 

27% 19% Bell I ltd J2 U 16 10 24% 24% M%— % 

44% 29% BMISou 260 72 8 3414 29** 39 39% 

57 41% BgtaAH 60 16 23 193 51% 51 511*— 4* 

32W 23*. BemK 160 11 11 164 3Z% 32% 32% + K 

45% 27% BemCo 260 44 10 199 41% 41% *!«.— % 

40 30% Betwf pi 4J0 116 ,1 ,38% g% + % 

201 124% Bane! of SJO 2J W 187% «% 

22% 17*9 Benrl Pi 260 1M «»» 2J% 21% 21% + % 

19% 17% BeneotPlJO W » 1?% W 
6% 3U. BflfWlB 671 34! 4tt 4H «6 + % 

8% 3% Berne* 82 131 7% 7% ,7%— W 

15 JOH BestPtf 2* W 34 45 )g* 13% 13%- ft 

21% 1414 BertiStl 60 2J 2953 l?H 1JH 17% — J* 

49% 3 TU Bemsiplioo ll.l ?3 4J*. 45 *5% 4- ft 

24% 18% BeltlSfP*2J0 1B.9 94 23% K% 23 — ft 

40% 2716 Bovefly J2 .9 18 614 35% 35 35% + ft 

26% 19% BloThr JO 4.1 19 93 26 M* M%— ft 

24% 13% Biocftn 30 » 21 20% 31 + ft 

25% 18% BlackD 64 13 16 793 19% l|ft Wft f ft 


73 45ft 45 «% + ft 

94 23ft 23% 23 — ft 


24% 13% Biocftn 30 » 21 20% 31 + ft 

»ft 18% BlackD 64 13 16 793 191* 10ft 19ft + ft 

3£ft 2J1* BldtHP 174 U 8 SB 33ft 32% 33 + ft 

30ft 141* Blolrjn Jfl[ 159 17% 17 17V4— ft 

58ft 39% BICkHR 260 4J 14 68 56V. 55% K%— ft 

»ft 33% Boeings 168 22 16 4680 49% 49ft 49ft ,, 

51 36k. Bailee 370 4.1 20 736 46% 45% 46ft +1 

61 48 BaneC afSJO 86 28 58. 571* SB ♦ ft 

29ft 18% Ball Bn .10 6 30 136 28% 28ft 28ft + ft 

42% 28% Bordens 1J2 4J) II 900 38% 37ft + ft 

24ft Uft Bore Wo S3 19 « 925 23% 33 23% + ft 

9% 4V. Bormns 14 40 8ft 7ft 8 — ft 

44ft 27% Bos EO 3J4 86 7 272 38ft 37ft 37ft— ft 


ft* ?7ft BosEd 12* 86 

u., lT3 

.SJ Bose or 1.17 m* 

“jj; !5?4 §osE pt 166 lftt 

25% U*. Bowatr .77 3.1 


40 8% 7ft 8 — ft 
272 38ft 37ft 37ft— ft 


272 38ft 37ft 37ft— ft 
1QOZ 79% 79% 79%— ft 
54 11 >0% 11 + ft 

11 13% 13% 13% + ft 
156 23% 23% 23ft - ft 


1- 00 5.1 

2- 52 116 
IU4allJ 

J« 

1.111 

P2I 

1J6 15 12 
-10a A 20 
IjOO 27 19 
IjOO 4j 
60 XI 17 
60 1J 12 
296 4.1 15 

1J0 4J 21 
lJ8b<7 39 
64 28 8 
.16 J 16 
160 4.9 9 
ISO 42 f 
118 106 
SJtallJ 
365 

262 126 
1525 14.1 
I5J5 HI 
2.16 46 8 
1J4 6,1 II 
X 1.1 9 

J6 Z1 16 

3M HI 7 
1.90 1IJ 
2JK llj 
237 96 
267 llj 


50 
329 
57 

6*5 27% 
198 33% 
250 15% 
76 19% 
525 23ft 
55 100ft 
367 12ft 
14% 


69 

301 U 
085 44 
76 17* 
268 56% 
761 35 
3fl* 
12ft 
76% 
&2ft 
74% 
6% 
23 <% 
730 17% 


964 40% 
54% 
36 4% 

171 13% 
618 Mft 
47 f% 
133 44ft 
lOQz IZft 
SOI 12% 
SOz 77 
234 3% 

273 14% 
52 34% 
459 
454 





7—1 


42ft 42 42 

34% 34% 34% 
39ft 39% 39ft 
14% Uft 14% 
17% 17% 17% 
17ft 17% I7ft 
• 8ft 8% 8% 
22% 22 23% 

3TO 32ft 32ft 
18% ISft 18ft 
54 55% 56 

12ft 12ft T2W 
18% 18% 18% 
36ft 3U* 36% 
22% 22% 22% 
22ft 22 2214 

15ft IS 15 
41 Mft 38ft 
15% 15ft 15ft 
17 17 17 

84 84 84 

54 53ft 53% 
35% 35ft 35% 


M 36 
264 U 
64 4.1 
170 8J 
1.10 36 
1JB 46 
68 33 
1 JO 36 
2-32 19 
J* 21 
ISO 96 
■32 1J 
60 AS 
639 36 
ZOO 46 1 
69a u : 
60 16 1 
63g 16 1 
M AS 


2J2 KJ 
66 15 
1.14 XI 
129 X9 
68 23 
160 5.1 
Jl 16 
60 36 
60 36 
ZOO 105 
60 16 
360 SJ 
460 96 
260 82 
*20 106 
760 106 
269 102 
365 106 
2J0 28 
246 113 
2-00 125 
210 TU 
IW 116 
227 122 
60 42 
-20 4 


530 30% 
86 5ft 
34 34ft 
1783 3R* 
98 15 
lift 


48 
311* 
84 S3 
73ft 72% 
26% 28ft 
35% 3S 
77% 77ft 
18% 18% 


43 29 

17% % 

Wt 23 

281* 70 
20 % 12 
12% 3ft 
S i% 

22 % 6 % 

» * 7% 

33% 9% 
28% 21% 
33 % 12 % 
52 41% 

MU 47ft 
15% Mft 
32% 20 
32ft 26ft 
18% 14% 
34ft 22% 
24% 19% 

2H* 26% 

29ft 28 

191* TOM 

n 8% 

5ft 2% E 

30 ft 19ft E 
M lift E 

12 % 3% e 


4% 

27% 

57% 

9% 

84ft 35 

a 

12ft 


39 

18% 

MI 

m 

, M 

Uft 

47 

19% 

1434 

39% 

1874 

23V. 


11% 

ll 

31 

ITT 

W 

.9* 

51% 

MB* 

•3ft 

s 

25% 

36% 

25* 

12ft 

ru 

32ft 

1U 

am 

n* 

26ft 

m 

47* 

58 

<ft 

534 

38 

*00 

«2ft 

3264 

36ft 

16 

8% 

36 

Z*ft 

2299 

14% 

63 

32 

17 

Uft 

30 

13% 

113 

29% 

30Z 

30% 

2 

IN 


Jl 


w. 

ft/? 


, hvkligi 


yr- 


ay* 27% 

30ft 30ft 
15% 15% 
72% 72ft 

S M 

2ft 


40U0? 

WB4 22% 
Idt 8ft 
383 31% 


m 


St + V. 

23% — % 


37% 22% 
47% JOft 
3Tft IS 
23ft LJV. 
Mft lift 
2016 13*. 
46% 31% 

n s% 


BaprAH- 

POCLTB 3J2 U 13 511 iRj 

asi!!j 










































































































r>-i 






.'-■ '4r.*:-'cr-: ‘ : 

:. ■ v L --f * ■• - . 



s £gg n Season 

*?W»- Low 


Osen HIM Low close On. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 10-1 1, 1985 


BUSINESS PEOME 


Page 11 


Seam Season 
HIM LOW 


Open HUi Low Close 


5ttsqa Soosdn 

. <*« hm 


* — • Eood 

ccitrcscei 

tenS S-2 Son 135,10 T3S75 

I«K IS-5 Cec UU» 7386® 

1AM MB' 139J90 13965 


witu^Asn 


ilalS MOT 139J0 13965 

lffi S IS-g “W W75 MtUS 

lSS US & 14T2SM12S 

e»= ,3 “ 

Prov. Dor Open ink ivm^paro . 

|g £ JS 

I<2 L«3 JCol LB ■ 467 

?■& Mar SR3..S2P 

221 L5B MOV 5-19 5-39 

H! LjJ Jul £36 CSS 

CIS. 4X2 Oft 40 Sm 


13450 13440 
H76D 137 Jt 
T3XK 13XS2 
13975 139X0 
WlJS 141X5 
14028 
139X1 


CERT. DEPOSIT I IMM) 

Si ml J Hon- Jits of 100 oct ... — „ 

nn sun s« nu 922 s 9111 922 s 

nS m3 ok «ts 91X1 917s 91J7 

9123 6*56 Mw ££ 

91x0 84X3 Jl«l jug 

91.15 57X6 Sen 

9823 8824 Dt< *■£ 

89.91 8820 MW *»■“ 

Est. Sales 546 Prev.Sateo M 

Prev. Day open I rtf. 090 off 86 


Sea 

420. 

463 

*15 

Oct 

465 

.469 

*27 

son 

*2 

457 

*55 

Mar 

583 

-577 

*» 

May 

Jul 

Lie 

536 

5J9 

555 

IS 

OCt 

567 

553 

151 

Jan 




EURODOLLARS (I MM] 

Slmllller-etncrflOSKt. 

9245 84X3 Sea 91X4 91.96 91X4 91X3 

fZCO S4J0 DK 91X9 9)J? ■ 91X0 91X4 

91X6 S3 MW 9M9 91.15 9M0 91.12 

91.15 86.73 JM 9060 9075 9W9 1W 

9054 S7 m Sen MLS 9039 KL25 9038 

90S ?£ BM3 9006 8973 9MS 

9024 SU4 Mor 89X3 8974 8963 8974 

K» S3 j£t wS 89X6 0923 89X6 


P«V-SOte* 11289 
Prev. DayOnen lm. 91X38 off 453 ■■• 
COCOAU4YCSCK} . 
1<l Bft lc l88 | 3.WflW 

24W 1963 Sep 2075 2096 

Dec 7I4J 3169 

J®7 1955 Mar 2175 2195 

25? IS" “OY 2191 2210 

228 : SS ■ «* si7 

zoo 7023 

2235 2C& Dfg 

TXWPw.SOteo 26*6- . 
Prov. Day Open Int. 20X12 off 20 . 

OMA9I9E JUICE (MTCE) 
WxpOHm,eentsporlii. 


EoL Solos 30754 Prav, Sate* W4SS 
Prew. Dav Onon int 127220 off L996 


2870 2095 
2140 2164 
2171 2192 
2190 2213 
2212- 2235 

2273 


1&32 HH5..S0P 132B5 13920 

?5-22 HM8- “b* 131125 

?5»S Jan 127X0 727.50 

12-12 iMxo.iajs 

IS2-59 131 JO May 

J5-S0 12775 • JUl 

1^; Sate* -200 P rev. Soles 19 
Prev.Day open lot 4X38 up ■ 


13255 132X8 
129415 129.25 
nsjB '«<if 
12560 12SJ0 
124X0 
124X8 


BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

S'33r^iS in, |S B,1 ,^ ,n iX60 S 1X435 1X645 
1X190 TJMC Me 1J40C 1JM0 1J3« 1.M5 

1X1*0 1X600 Mar 13300 1J490 13225 JJ50S 

17990 1.1905 Jun _ 7X4*5 

EeL Sales 11X68 Pttev. Sales 14X27 
Prov.DovOoenlnt. 42X91 upA 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

Spot air- 1 point equals soJcci. 

7S8S 7ms 3w> JK1 7K4 7329 3X3 

75 66 7006 D*C -7325 .7325 73® 73E 

7504 6981 Mar 7300 7306 7300 .73»7 

■7360 7070 Jim _ 7300 

Est. sales 1798 Prev. Sales UK 
Prev. Dav Often int. 7X82 off 232 





r 













Metals 


(COMER) 

2SXOO lb«.-cont*P«r lb. 

0.15 58X5 AUS 

- 82.10 57X0 Sep iDSS 

84L2S SBL5D Doc 6170 

*420 59X0 -Jan 

*0X0 59X0 Mar 62X0 

7400 61.10 MOV 63.10 

«■« 6120 Jul 6365 

70X0 62X0 S*P 

7030 6370 Ooc 

70 JO 64X0 Jon 

67.90 65.10 Mar MM 

67X0 67 JO MOV 65X0 

Est. Sates Prov. Sates 4J 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 7774 aftXI 


FRENCH FRANC UMM> 

Jpcr/rorx> ) pcKnfffauatt 30X0001 
.11480 X96B0 S«P .11630 

.11453 X9670 SS .1M20 .11420 .1M20 -11» 

.1 1425 .11425 Mar .11530 

Est Sales 1 Prev. SaM» 

Pnev. Day Open Inf. W 

GERMAN MARK |IMIA> 

S per rrwrk-1 point eouaBSUJOOl 

X407 jno Sep XS42 J58B -3S31 XSB4 

xSw Sec X574 J6M Jma? Jmm 

X662 JIM Mef 75*8 J646 J998 X644 

J>W X335 Jun X682 

Est. Sales 21J53 Prev. Soles 27X59 
Prev.Day Open Irrt. 51J13 up 2X65 

JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

NONNOII 

004250 Sons Dee X04222 JM4230 X0421 9 X04237 

004307 004035 MOT X0429I 

EsI. Safes £291 Prev. Sates 5X18 
Prev. Day Open WtL 31739 un 1X34 
SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

Soerlranc- 1 polrrfe<w:f»S0£pflt 

XS30 J« Su -® ® ^ 

X44? X531 DOC X33S X389 X310 X3S8 

.4400 ^5 Mar X3» X420 X39S X428 

Eat, Sates 24X3 Prev, Sates 20J14 


ALUMINUM (COME XT 
40000 cents per lb. 


Prev. Dav Open IrH. 3DA01 ub 397 
Est Sates 24X52 Prev. Sates 20X14 
Prev. Day OacninL 30401 up 397 



7*30 

4190 

Aug 

Sop 

Oct 

Dec 

4520 

4SJ0 

*520 

7060 

-4450 

4625 

4*35 

4620 

7650 

7360 

5175 

46JS 

Jen 

Mar 

4725 

4225 

4725 

6*75 

6365 

52.10 

5195 
47 AS 
51 AO 

MOV 

Jut 

Sop 

Dec 

Jon 

Mar 

MOV 




Est. Salas 


Prav. Sales _ 

271 



Industrials 








-B ' rw'.'i 


imObd.lt. 

Sep 13870 138X0 137X0 137 JO —2X0 
Ktev 138X0 138X0 136X0 l»X0 —170 
Jan 145X0 145X0 143X0 143X0 —2X0 
Mar 150 4 0 150X0 150X0 15QX0 —200 

May 155X0 IBM 1S4W 1 SX 0 -ixo 

M 15970 140X0 159X0 1S970 -l>g 

•re^Saiei 2304 
t 9X16 Up 2D 


il4X 6140 
117.0 633X 

35X 62SJX 
29X 645X 


64SX. 6560 
649X 66SX 


+K6 
+145 
+145 
+145 
+145 
+145 
+*4S 
+145 
+145 
+145 
+145 
X +145 
'A +145 


5495 59X0 5875 S9X3 —.14 

59 JS 59X5 59J5 59X3 +J1 

60X0 6030 60X0 60.10 —.10 

60JH 60J5 60X0 60 JO +.15 

59X0 40X0 5975 59X7 +X7 

S5X0 — X7 
5415 54x0 5415 5422 — X3 









'.-j 




l' H.:v / j 



-4- g , -4i 


=L:W 



Stock Indexes 


Oin^Opfiaiis 






12X00 British Pw 
BPound 105 

137X5 115 

%% ■■..S 

137X5 no 




ids r • -r. . r 

115 . r r . r 

Ut . - £•■-.• r- : r 

125 10X8 • r -■ r 

130 r r 9X0 


Dec -M*r sop Dec 

Tr— V- f M0 
f ,? S 

f 070 LK 


137X5 133 365 M T 2X0 5X0 

137X5 . M8 US - 3X5 f t- *J8 

137X5 US r 250 r r r 

137X5 ■ 150 <U5 1J8 - r . r r 


CDaUr « r 053 r r 

75 r r r 145 
,!> 73X8 _ 7* . r. B.1? r 

l 4- 62500 West Oeraae Mwta-twtfs per mOL 
DMork 31. 4X0 r r r 

3SA7 32 725 4X6 4-10 . r 

3S67 33 244 f IS T 

35X7 34 1JQ r .3X0 0-10 

3*LA7 35 1X8 • 1X5 r P 


WMW ■ 

S3 «i 


35X7 34 1X2 . r . 3X0 0-10 057 - XXfr 

35X7 35 1X8 - U5 r . . r . 

35X7- M OH U» ’ f W • f 

35X7 37 53 076 1-22 r . *- 

12SXM FreKR RancteMfht of a cent imt ML 
FFranc 115 r r t 200 r 

4ZU0M jaeaoni Yea-ieoths ef a coat per writ. 
jY«a » 3X0 r r r r 

J 43X5 3» 2J6 r r r r 

<2X5 on ixo r r r r . 

<2X5 41 1X2 r r 0X9 r 

42X5 42 0X2 LD3 ,r OJD r 

42X5 43 r H65 057 - r J 

42X5 44 r r r M7 r 

62J0B Swiss Fraaa-cnN Per «NL 

^ T? M ? r f J 039 
o LJ9 2.M 2X5 .r 

^ S 15 ? - ? ?S ^ 

45 aii 1X5 jr r 

toSS’jsl 4^ pptsasift iSS 

Last It premium (jwrdKjao pocei. 

Source: AP. ■ 


UST.^IIJLSIIMM} . ..• 

SI mliuan-ptsaf 108 ecL 
9333 86X4 Sep 9239 92X9 

93X7 . ■ «S77 Dec 9245 9258 

9259 MAO MOT 92.10 9225 

9228 37 JJ1 Jon 91X2 91X8 

. 9201 BBXO S«P 9L51 91X7 

W78 ,89X5 Dec 9122 9129 

91 J9 - 89X8 Mar . 

9093 ‘ 9431 JlPl „ ^ 

Est Sates Prev. 501^10444 

Prev- Day Open Int. 39X04 oHM 
M YR. TREASURY (CRT) 

SI 00X00 pr 1 IV pts A 32003 oflOO Pd 
88-21 75-18 SOP 8S-7 ' 86-2 

.87-13- 75-Q DOC 84-4 85 

■6-3 . 76-14 Mar 83-9 S+5 

15-7 - 74-30 Jun 

■SM JM SeP 

B3-11 80-2 Dec 

Est. Sates Prev. Safes 20X41 

Prav.DayOpealRL 63,120 af<2734 
115 TREASURY BONDS tCBT) 

•JS 

2$ ^ 

764 • 56-29 Jun 72-28 n-19 

75-31 56-29 SOP 72-4. 7MJ 

7+24 56-25 .Ooc 71-1* 71-31 

7+15 56-27 MOT 70-35 71-8 

Si* 69-25 69-31 

72-18. 62-24 Dec 

69-16 .0-5 Mar 

Esl Sedas Prev.saics22B4?0 

Prev, Dow OpeainL24M88 up 11789 

GNMA(CBT) 

5100X00 prlrvpts 8. 32nH of 100 pet 
77-26 9M3 Sea 75-2 75-16 

7+28 " 594 Dec 7+15 7+M 

7+8 58-20 Atar .74 7+2 

75-17 58-35 Jlft 7J7 73-19 

75-2 65 Sm 72-25 72-28 

EeLSale» .^PTwvSalO* . 104 
Prev: Day Open Int 4362 


92J8 92X6. 
9245 9255 

92.10 92J1 

91 J9 91X7 
91X0 91X6 

9U2 91-21 
91X3 
. 9078 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME1 
Points and cents 

198X0 160X0 SOP 18940 189-50 

200X5 175JD Dec 192X0 192.10 

203J5 19ai0 MOT 194JM 194X0 

20A50 196X0 Jun 19645 19645 

Est- Sates 42405 Prev.SoIrs 50X11 
Prev. Day Open int. 64X57 oHIXOi 

VALUE UNE OCCBT1 

Points and cents 

21120 1X575 SeP 20075 »1X0 

717X5 200X0 Dec 204X5 20420 

20940 2MXS Mar 

Est. Sates Prrv-Sgto 

Prev. Day Open I M. 12.183 off 584 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 

oobm and cents 

1IRAS 91 JS SeP J09B 10945 

117 JO 1O1J0 Dec 111J0 11140 

I1R7S 1X9X0 Alar 11240 1UX0 

120X0 11375 Jun 11*50 11+50 

Est. Sales Prev. Safes 9.963 

Prev. Day Open int. 9454 off 30 


18845 18870 —40 
19095 191.15 — X5 

193X0 19*10 — 3S 

19645 196X5 —40 


199 JO 2DCJD +X5 
202X0 203.45 +XS 

20*70 +.10 


109X0 109^ —.15 
11070 111X0 —10 

11240 11275 — X5 

114J0 114X0 


854 8+34 

84-4 8+23 

83-9 83-28 

83J 
82-13 
81-23 


Commodity Indexes 


75-26 7+13 
7+83 75-9 
73-25 7+9 
73-27 73-11 
72-4 72-16 


71- 11 71-23 
70-25 71 

70-11 
69-22 69-24 
6F6 


Close 

Moody's ,22?5S f 

Reuters 

DJ. Futures 11^ 

Com. Research Bureau- 21940 

Moody's : base 100 : Det 31, 1931. 
p • preliminary.' f- final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. IB, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31. 1974. 


Previous 
90110 f 
1.70340 
114.30 
219-20 


Market Guide 


75 75-10 

7+D 7+23 
73-29 74 
73-7 73-13 

73-25 73-28 


NY CSCE: 

KYCC: 

COM EX: 

NYME: 

KCBT: 

NYFE: 


Otlcago Bear X of Trade 
CNcauo Merccmtlte Excbpape 
international Monetary Marvel 
Of CWaso Mercartfite ExrJtanu* 

New York Cocoa. Sugar. Coffee Exchange 
New YorX Cotton e*chanse 
Commodity Excnanoe. New York 
New York Mercantile Exchange 
Kansas City Board of Trade 
New York Futures Exchange 


London, 

Commodities 


Commoctiiies 


Coima^fities 


Cash Prices 


Aag.9 

Close Prev tow 
Hteh Let Bid A« BW «k 


HONG- ICONS GOLD FUTURES 
UJA per ounce 


S^MtSSnW) «MI Ml 

dk mxo inxo it*» ; 2+« i 


Hlab Low Bid AM 

AUO _ N-T- N.T. 32DX0 322X0 
SlaZ N-T. H.T.3ZM32UB 


T3640 BAJB 136J0 137J 
140X0 14140 140-W 141J 


35 - 

Dec _ 329.00 329X0 m00 3X40 


Oct N.T. N.T. 145X0 14540 *esw 
Volume: +51* Ids of 50 tons. 

COCOA 

Hi i m 

SS- 1J32 1J« i^n ^ 

a s? ® is as ii ™ 

Vototpe: 3.196 teHotlO tons. 


fS" H.T. N.T. 332X0 334X8 
At*Z N-T. M.T. 334X0 338X0 
jSZ N.T. N.T. 341 XG 343X0 
vdtome:34let*oM0BO8. 



Aog.9 

dose 

High Low Bid Ask CVee 
SUGAR , 

Fraecbftwncs per metric ton 
I Oct UK 1J45 1J64 1J65 +28 

OOC U» 7J7B 3474 1JS4 +7? 


Csntmodttr nod Unit 
CoHfe4.Saofos.Ri 


1413 1495 14M 1411 +22 

May 1441 1441 1452 1454 +27 

Adc 1492 1485 1484 1X00 +15 

act N.T. N-T. 1X32 1X45 + 19 

Ext voL: woo tote Of 50 tom. Prev. actual 
Krios: 1X52 tots. Open Interest: 18X30 


Steel scrap No 1 hvy Pitt , 
LeadSPCf. to 


Cooper elect, lb . 
Tin (Slnjlte). lb - 


One. E- St. L. Basis, lb . 
PallacUurn.0* - — —— . 

Silver N.Y- oz - 

Soarcr: AP. 




BW Ask 
N-O. — 


188X0 189X0 

187X0 187-3 


Prev tow 
«U Aik 
191X0 193X0 

189X0 19050 


K1 - 186X0 1»-® 

52 I«k50 187X8 

Volume: 27 late. 


K « 


190X8 192X0 


•™£5L u .52£?Jf8SS 


Volunte: 1909 tots cf 5 fans. 

u£amers per metric tea 

Se* »X0 226* Vm &j&%£jsxni0 


“-"T* 

BS i 1 1 1 

NOV IS 880 850 W8 

a n w S 


Jtm . so nil M 

B20 860 - no 


MOV S 10 S» 930 870 

J ^olum«To tote of 25 tons. 

Source: Reuters. 


prana trnees per ioe kg 
SOP 2X50 10*5 2X33 1044 +8 

DK 1028 lOM 1816 1X20 +5 

MOT 2X40 1032 2X34 2X40 +11 

t a;: at as = :s 

IS. K: K: 3SS = tjf 

Eat voL: 75 lets of 10 tom Prev. actual 
sates: 37 lots. Open Interest: 798 
COFFEE • _ 

FraraiMBHriNU - 
Sep 1X50 1X30 1X40 1 ^ +44 

5Sr W! W JS 1J = II 

T £?:. hj: = X% 

^.vef.TB ^ots' temPrev.oclitol sates: 
SB tots. Open Merest: 420 
Source: Sourer du Cearnmcn. 


Dividends 


Aug- 9 

Per Amt Par Rec 
INCREASED 


Amer RacreaLCntre Q X3V0 +17 i+8 

Dehty Cbeck Pfutrs O J6 9-3 +19 


Fst Fidelity Bncp 
Park Chemical 


Q J* 10-1 9-5 

O JS 9+ +23 


ST 

tear St. N-T. 714X0 21+75 New 

lassaass-w-M 

cna a ee. fg ta a Uf. 


IS?®” 

Index Options 


Dili Futures 
Options 


W. Germ Horn-asm art* arts rer mark 


London Metals 


fag- 9 

nnI - Frerfo* 1 *.,. 
bS 8 ** a* Bif «* 


A*g* 

SW ado Me* 

m D m* n 1X6 * Tl/l* 1 1 1'N 

« Sf>»!kS 




jg . uu * * 


Axg. 9 

strike CNMBiito 

Price See Dec Mer «P Dee tear 

34 iS S JB ■« W ?72 

35 1X4 U4 241 - 021 (L72 IAS 

5 £S S ut om ui Li* 

1 £ hi is a a ». 

PftoiTlwr.vqL822eOBiM.374B . , 
Source: CMS. 


Harper B, Row— Wor-2 
Third Nailenel — 3-for-l 


Sm* 1044.00 1KUS 

SS'mSxO 1066X0 10Wi)0 

tr ten — .hWM 




'SCTJ- 

iXrraiCBOE. 


iST 298X0 2hJ 
go 299X0 2*“° 




Treasury Bills 


Is agss ss 


6-monlh 

One rear 

Source: i 


Aug. 9 

PfW 

9HK Bto Tteto r-d 

7.16 >.« « “ 

*« -7J9 744 

S S U9 « 


Hong Kong lifts Ban 
On Argentine Imports 

Reisers 

HONG KONG — Hong Kong 
on Friday lifted a ban chi imports 
from Argentina, imposed in 3982 
when Britain and Argentina fought 
a war over the Falkland islands. 

Trade between Hong Kong and 
Argentina was worth more than 
550 million in 1981. Britain lifted 
its ban on imports from Argentina 
early last month 


Altai Orson ce 
, Amer Ship BtHWna 
Ariuainc 
Burtiom Carp 
COPBatHokSng 
Otottal Praoerta 
Carpenter Teat, 
Coastal Carp CLA 
Conroe 

Crown ZHIerbach 
Oovstas & Lamoson 
EaultyOB Co 
Eastman Kodak 
; Foster CLXL) 

Cererol Hosewares 
Cuorctoman ctiein. 
HmnmennUI Pg«r 
Hiram Walker R» 

I HUBCOine 
MBa 

Mercantile Baoctep 
i Merrill Lynch V Fd 
I Moore Products 
Montord 
Newell Co 
Noble insurance Ltd 
I PSFS 

I Pty-Cem inOuf 

Safety, Kl ee n Curp 
: Stoaer 

I ST. Paul Securities 
SunshfawOr.SIre 
Ttad Pte - Intend 
Third Natl Carp 
I walker IH1 Rsrcc - 
i Wtorthhtew >nd. 
o-canunt, m-t a c a tehr; 


X6 9-13 B-9 


JO 5-30 +T9 

q sa 9-i3 +23 

O 45 9-6 B33 

Q .19 * 12-13 11-29 


a a +» 8-i5 

Q X M 521 
Q .10 10-1 BOO 
O .10 9-15 8-23 
Q JS 10-1 9-10 
O .10 930 9-9 

S .18 1+7 M3 
O J8 10-1 M 
. X2 Mi HWl 1M5 
O > MO MB 
O .12 Vb 9-24 MO 

8 -34 MS +21 
JS W-l 9-5 

S -15 M B-16 
-25 MB +9. 

a w-i mb 

- SU7 +21 +9 

0 X M Ml 
Q .1316 10-15 947 
0 .12 Vt 93 +19 
a X9 +27 +20 

8 X5 T0-] W 
M 912 +21 
Q .10 926 912 
Q .10 9-15 +21 
m .ID 916 +26 
Q .12 913 +22 
& .16 9-13 +30 
Q ,U 1+1 7-18 
a JS w-l 95 
a .16 925 94 
lyeu a rt ertyj p«sjJ- 


2 Are Named 
Quefs at First 
Interstate 


STC Turns to Lord Keith 
For a Change in Direction 


China to Buy 
GE Engines 
For Its Navy 


By Brenda Erdmann 

Iniemajional Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Firsi Interstate 
Capital Markets Ltd. in London 
said that Allan S. Wilson and Wil- 
liam A. Page will become joint 
chief executives. Mr. Wilson will be 
responsible for the bank's security 
trading and sales, swaps and corpo- 
rate-finance activities. 

Mr. Page will focus on expand- 
ing the bank's client -marketing ef- 
forts globally, as well as managing 
the increasing integration of the i 
bank's activities with those of its 
parent. First Interstate Bank Ltd. 
These changes follow the previous- 
ly announced assignments of two 
former managing directors of First 
Interstate Capital Markets, Ken- 
neth Cunningham and David 
Gates, to First Interstate Bank Ltd. 
in Los Angeles. 

NEC of Japan and General Elec- 
tric Co. of the United States have 
appointed Yukio Mizuno. manag- 
ing director of N EC, as president of 
C&C International, a new jointly 
owned company that will be based 
in Tokyo and develop and market 
value-added communication net- 
works worldwide. 

National Westminster Bank PLC 
has named Peter Hurst senior inter- 
national executive for its Africa, 
Middle East and India region, 
based in the London headquarters. 
He was senior manager, export fi- 
nance section, international bank- 
tag division. 

Vulcan Materials Co. has named 
William J. Grayson Jr. executive 
vice president corporate develop- 
ment. Succeeding him as president 
of the Mideast division is Robert L 
Mayville. B.E McCrary takes over 


By Bob Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Lord Keith of 
Castleacre opened his Gist news 
conference as chairman of STC 
PLC on Friday by muttering: 
“You're about as surprised to 
see me ritting here as 1 am to be 
here.” 

Five years ago, upon retire- 
meat as eftajnnfln of the mer- 
chant bank of HiO Samuel, he 
told an interviewer, “I don’t 
want to run anything any- 
more.” But last week STCs 
board decided it needed a sud- 
den change of direction and 
turned to Lord Keith, who 
turns 69 later this month and 
had served as an outride direc- 
tor of the company since 1977. 

One of his first tasks is to find 
a chief executive to succeed the 
departed Sir Kenneth Corfield. 
Until someone is found. Lord 
Keith is acting as chief execu- 
tive and overseeing a review of 
the direction for die maker of 
telecommunications equipment 
and computers. 

It is not the first thne that be 
has been called in to clean 
house — he took over as chair- 
man of Rolls-Royce Ltd. in 
1972, shortly after the govern- 
ment acquired that maker of 
airplane engines in a rescue 
package. 

Under Lord Keith, the com- 
pany eked out marginal profits 



(Continued from Page 9) 
reached agreement with China on a 
joint announcement. 

General Electric competed with 
Rolls Royce of Britain for the con- 
tract and won despite a lower price 
by Rolls Rpyce. the industry ana- 
lyst said. 

’ The analyst said the sale of the 
five engines to the Chinese was 
“just the beginning'’ of what was 
expected to be contracts for en- 
gines and related equipment 
amounting to “several hundred 
millions” of dollars. 

in the initial stage, four of the 
engines would go into two navy 


destroyers to be built by a ship 
design institute in Wuhan, be said. 


Lon) Keith 


for most of the 1970s. But in 
1979 and 1980. Lord Keith's 
final two years before retire- 


ment. Rolls-Royce slipped 
deeply into the red, sapped by a 
combination of recession and 
the soaring firitisb pound, 
which choked off exports. 

After studying to be an ac- 
countant and winning the Croix 
de Guerre while serving in the 
Welsh Guards during World 
War II, Lord Keith spent most 
of his career in merchant bank- 
ing. He oversaw the 1965 merg- 
er of Philip Hill & Partners with 
M. Samuel & Co„ which creat- 
ed today's Hill Samuel 


design institute in Wuhan, be said. 
These would be prototype or pilot 
project, engines, the specialist said. 

The General Electric sale sur- 
prised some industry observers, be- 
cause it was agreed upon at a time 
of lighter controls over Chinese 
foreign exchange reserves and fol- 
lowed a failure to agree on a U.S. 


Navy port call to China. 

The postponement of an antici- 
pated visit in mid-May came after 
the United States said it would re- 
fuse io confirm or deny (he pres- 
ence of nuclear weapons aboard 
any navy ship visiting China. 

The Chinese agreement with 
General Electric seems to indicate 
that although the aborted port visit 
was a symbolic setback, it had liule 
practical impact on U.S.-China de- 
fense relations. 

U.S. diplomats ‘said talks were 


from Mr. Mayville as president of Lid, companies in Saudi Arabia in 
(he division in Chattanooga, Ten- each of which Vulcan holds about 


nessee. Mr. McCrary formerly was 40 percent. Mr. McCrary will not 
chief executive of Tradco-Vulcan be succeeded by anyone ta either of 
Co. and Saudi Arabian Vulcan these posts. 


dilation ta China of U.S. anti-tank 
missiles. A recent Chinese military 
delegation to Western Europe ap- 
parently also has studied the possi- 
bility of purchasing Italian anti- 
tank missiles and technology. 


Floatin^RateNotes 


Dollar 



I* 
to • 

7* 1989 
to SMI 
te 1M8 
9«k 1908 
9% ■ 
to 2981 
9V| I1-1Q 

9 88 


18 2748 
Wk - 
7*6 nx» 
U1S23-U 
» C9W 
69 17-12 
10 2M>» 

7*. OMI 
7* 53-12 
Bto 3+09 
1W. 3609 
822 25-H 
Sto 3M1 
syj 2911 


2911 
to 07-11 
Ml 251 688 
815 21-458 
8* 22-11 
786 1689 

n ls-ii 

8*4 34-10 
BN 1581 





8% 1+11 
8N 1912 
BN 2911 
70. 10-13 
8N 15-10 
m o9io 
BV, 05-13 
UN 2888 

0 JMS 

BN 2900 
SN 09M 
8 1889 

7* 1889 

8 3KB 
>14 1912 
BN 2901 
IN 2+12 

1 1912 
«N 31-10 
ION 0609 
BN 2+10 
10*6 0489 
BN 1HI 
816 1917 
8*. 30-01 
BY, 3089 
78. 23-12 
3W 0981 
to - 
*N 2181 
914 1+10 
9% 14-70 

9 25-18 

»N 13-11 
ID 23-01 
96 09-11 
IN 24-12 
BV. 14-01 
9 1911 

BN 20-11 
54k 2911 

n-io 

BN 84-12 
BY, 2M1 
8b 2381 
BN 04-12 
ION 2780 


1582 
m. 1889 
7J453U89 
13 3081 
»to 0910 
1+11 
BV> 1581 


Non Dollar 



Issuer/ Mat. 

Coapoe 


1296 

Bk Montreal 94 

ITto 

Bit Takve BB/VQ 

1216 

Bo Indtnueifl 

121* 

BeteutaiM 

12W 

Otkaro 89/91 

1146 

Con Goto Fln95 

12V. 

CepmeN „ 

I» 

Cr Fonder OS 

12*6 

Cr National 91/95 

17*. 


IT* 

in M 

I2to 

lretQnd93 

12** 


12* 

Lfcmti Eunifli 

12V. 

MJaBfc Den96/H 

Uto 

MtaBIcDBI 91/94 

u% 

MW 10 

12 

RbsOS 

119* 

Sod 90/91 

12* 

Stand Chart Sto Peru 

17*6 

Yorkshire Int 91/94 

17*6 



Source : Cremt Suisto-Plrct Boston Lftt. 
London 


fag. 9 

• Frt Y jST 
J8 in 

473X8 473X0 

1927 2922 

4+78 44-67 

Aim 63*63 
8AH47 4B-58 

9789 132-137 
6.U 139 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) August 9, 1985 

Nat BMt vti itia Quotation are sappiied by the Funds listed with the ocmOIm of some Quotes based on Issue price- 
TTterntarutwniYiKhKlK (Wl -weekly; (M-umwrtt.tr; (r> -mumm; (O-Hregolarly. 


Ai. MALMANAGEMENT -I" ^™r:. V °! UM J '52? 

j mi l alu- i Trust * a 5 16661 -Cd Fidelity Amor. Assets— — — * 6»6i "(diLrossA — — 

RAN KJIJL U5BAER ACO. Ltd. -id Fidelity Australia Fund .8 .?Xg -|w I Class B - UX. . ■ 

rji nr *** SF 89765 -id Fidelity DlaCOVgry Fund— - * 1060 -(« J Ckos C- Jonem 

~ sF119IX5-(d Fidelity Dlr.Svgs.Tr S 12550 OBUFLEX LIMITED 

.* 2 ! PT 1 *??!-. 1^. s 1747X0 -to Fidelity For East Fund- s 2Q17 -l w) Muulcurrancy , — .. . . 

-i?i CC i sTi wi Jd Fidelitv inrL Fund 8 6366 -|«1 Dai tar Medium Term. 

"52! If iinro J d FUMliv Orient Fund S 36.91 -{wl Dollar Lang Term 

-'2!S^.5? efPocmc - fSSiK Frontier Fund * USD JapaneM Yen 

i2!S252£.T~ SF 10*80 -id Fidelity Pocmc Fund S 13182 Hw Pound Sler too 


-fdl Baerbond 

-ld> **"1 itoar — - — 

•Id} Equlboer America 

-tdl EoulUaer Europe 

-(d) Eauluaer PocHic_ — _ 

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. si747J» -(dJ Fidellly Far East Fund. 

SF 122*001-1 d I Fidelitv mrL Fund- 


SF 115780 H 2 > Ftertlty Orient Fund. 




SF 99780 - d > Fktomv Frontier Fund * -<w> J d pa n eee Yen- 

SF 1576J0 -(d) Fidelity Pocfflc Fund S 133^ -4w» Po und Sterling . 

-< d 1 Fidelitv 5ed Growth Fd. — * " w S^V5 c ?T^ l V rk 

S I0J0 -< d I Fidelity WorW Fund __ — t 3366 -(w) Dtdch Ftortn — 

SF B*25 FORBES PO B857 GRAND CAYMAN l"> 

% tojs London Agent 01-839-3013 ORANGE NASSAU C 

S UJ9 __ _ S 7.95- PB 85578. The Hogue 

* 1L11 ^wl Forte* High tnc. Gilt Fd — c S"21 

S tern - i~— .. _ S 887* PARISBA5-GROUP 

| imjv . wj Gold — 3 *51 -I d > Cnrtexa Interne 

1 1019M - mi wratorSdllte -..1— Z s Lis -(«) obu-dm—- 


-I w > Swtss Franc 

ORANGE NASSAU GROUP _ 
7.95- PB 85578, The Hogue (07t» 46967D 


0.971 -(d) Bever Betoaalr 
887* PAR IStoAS-GROU P 
*51 -Id) Cnrtexa Interaatianat. 

L15 -iwlOBU-DM- 

-|1*J DBLIGESTION 


lasses 


QJS7 -4 w) East investment Fund. 
9_S2* -Iwj Scottish World Fund — 
1JS4 -l w) states* American 


X 34121 l-(w) OBLI-OOLLA 

C 109.04 Uv»j OBLI-YEN 

S 14857 -IwJOBLI-GULDEN. 


(wl Convert, Fd. Inn B Certs — S. 2870 

S 89J0 (w) Do i wo Japan Fund, Y9Jt4 

S 99J6 !wl OJSXJ — , 8 8631 

S 8188 Idl D. Witter WW Wide IvtTst S ll.U 

( r ) Drakkar Invest. Fund N.V S 114L28 

S 11J6 I d ) Dreyfus America Fund S 10.14 

S 1078 ( d ) Drevhn Fund mt-L % 3987 

S 1059 (w) Dreyfus interconttneiit S 3*34 

_s n jo tw) The Establishment Trust 8 1.16 

4 10J6 id) Europe Obligations 6UJ 

DM IflJB (wl First Eagle Fund J 14JS1-55 

.FL 10.44 (r) nitv Start LhU_ S B93J8 

.SF 957 (w) Fixed Income Trans S 10-37 

(w) Fcnsafex Issue Pr. — .... SF 198J0 

i w) Farexhmd * 7 JO 

. S 3260 (wl Formula Selection Fd. SF 8759 

( d > Fendtlalla f 7960 

. S 89 J7 ( d ) Governm. Sec. Fund* S 9054 

DM 1225.95 I d I Frankf-Trast Intern ns DM 43.94 

SF 9*50 Iw) Hauesmam Hldgs. N.V. S 12*48 

. S 119076 (wj Hestto Fonda S 10766 

Y 1036201)0 Iw) Hartnxi Fund 5121561 


FL 110071 (m) IBEX Holdings Ltd. 
. S 9*31 ( r ) ILA Inti Gold Bond- 


OM1TTED 

Pltteburgh-Des Moines 

REDUCED 

Fst City BdCPtn O .IS +M +5 

REVERSE SPLIT 
AiTMritMgtth — 1 -tar-50 


CAPITAL INTERNATI ONAL f 

c re Drrsu iue°( iuue prices) * 

«iaawia== & 


i lj&J oSBALlSsBTMAftAGEMEOrT COUP. -fd) PARiNTER FUND__ * ?!«• f r > 

S C 0730 - mi GAMATOitraoe fnc—ZHI I 13*59 -+fwl RBC Conodion FundT?S~. S l tig jwj jntermarlmt Fund^_ 

t nrxr - ■ w GAAtertS lr^l S 14164 +lw) RBC Far EtntiPacHlC Fd. 8 11 AS i a InterrnJntea/AA Fd. CUB 

S - w GAMAiSrulkj lnc.—_mr * 10179 -«w> RBC InQ CopBal Fd * ZL97 1 1 ) nllSjcurfllM Fund 

1 nre • wl GAM Boston Inc * 11770 4-1 w) RBC Inn Income Fd.. s 11.19 (d ) nveste PWS. 

S 10X1 ! S gyS ~ S Itw -+ldJRSCMarXurTWlcvFd S 24ff t r 1 1mff lAtlonnw y .. ■ 

% 39J5 - w] GAM FrtmcSS SF 10367 -f-tw) RBC North Amer. Fd S UP jr ) Italforhine Infi FyndSA — 

1 isS -f wi GAM hgmKw Jnc 5 ltXUXl 5KANDIFOWD INTL FUHD (4+6-236270) I w) Japan Selection Fund 

il ™ I ^ fifflfodl IS 

ip S -£} iw * 2«K BBSSSLBram XXXt&JSh IS « 


. I 10766 
. 5 121561 
SF 111J6 1 
. S 9.96 
5 1007 . 

S 1X43 
. S 1650 
. S 306J2 
. 8 68263 i 
■ * 1X00 I 

DM 5LS4 | 

. 8 861 I 

. S 15J7 , 
. S 11*38 
S 10564 


STOCK 

CSM Systems . 25% +29 +30 

STOCK SPLITS 


CREDIT SUISSE OSSUE PRICES) S i6£2 -ivilAti.: Bid S 533 Offer S 5.95 lm) JeHer PtnL Inti Ltd S 112IU7 

4C Adians Suioes |F m3S jWI AjSjSuicIZ S 1D7.19 sVENSKA lNTeRNATIONALJ.TD. (di Klefnworf Benson Inn Fd. — J M.90 

■ 3 !*2 Ii2lS fsls* DM iizffl 4w) GAM N. America Unit Trust- 186J8P 1? DwSfHWi* S»jjyi(lorvOl-377-«MO jw) KWnwort Ben* Jw- Fd m.t2 

ti gaarngL* " 6 i £3 S8BffiSSbES3 = zl 

-Id Bend Vptor.Vf rt — Y sf IitS - w GAMSteW^e/MaiOV l(IC_ S lOftJM 5WIS5 BANKCORP.OS5UE PRI«S1 1 • Idjul cwnF iad-^ 8129774 

: % gsS«S&0LLAh-3 jg| SHES!fcz=irf*l ^ H 

is i M M¥^te== I » ^dteggiS— FL* S3 Stt&jKZ = {.ig 

- 9 CS FonttaJnH , — C.T. MANAGEMENT IUK) Ltd. „ -I d irdervatar— SF 84J0 ( d j Medtotanum SeU Fd. ,5.. 17-55 


$F 7*75 Hwi GAM WorWwWe Inc— 
SF nTj5|-lml OAMTvche^^ACk^ ; 


s 12*97 -i d 1 Florin Bond Selection 

is! § , «i 4Siiss!rssB5B== 

S li?SRS! |T.^HpSCF3== s rrx jSIMjSSUK 


FL 125.18 1 lm) Atosnotund M.V.. 


SF 8450 (d Mediolanum SeLFd.. — . 

931 -I d J Jopan Portfolio SF 81760 IriMeteore Y 105.15*00 

*33 -(d > Sterling Band Selection C 70555 tw) NAAt .. .. . S 7032 i 

156 -Id) Swiss Foreign Band Sel — SF 107.95 ld> NlkkoGrawth Podonoe Fd — 5790X16 

197 -(d) Swtssvator New Series— — SF m5Q (*) NlwW Fu«L_ SJ152l! 

uh j d I Universal Band SdKl._ SF BADO (ml NOSTEC Porttolto $5133112 

IS -id) Universal Fund 5F 1)7.34 (w) NovotK inwatlJWl) Fund S 9SJJ 


— 8129774 

_ $ 18433 
_ 8 133X00 
_ 8 7239 

_ S .18*54 

8 1755 I 

Y 105.15*00 1 

- S 7022, 


•(d) Ertergto-Volor _ 

-Id) ussec— — — fS™ ' " l «Tt j 3*88 -j d 1 Universal Band Seted SF .8400 lm] NOST6C Portfrtto___. — SSlgta 

-f d > Eampd-Votar — |E 5 1IJ6 -fd) Unhrarai) Fund 5FJ17J4 iw) Niiwtec Investment Fund — *.9*2 

-(dl Podfte -Voter — rj. mibcd r INC* 44 * -twl (XT. luraTsmall Cos. Fund. 5 1259 -l d ) Yen Bond Selection Y 1022850 It) NA6AF. ■ S 16351 

DREXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC .i * I G.T Doltor Fund S U.92 UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND m N5P FJ.T -■ *,!»■« 

Winchester House . 77 Lon don well { 2 1 ^ T SLi Fi~j $ 1XM -( d ) Amco UA «*■ SF 3675 ( d J Pacific Horton Imrt. F d i 106*36 

LONDON.EC2 *» -)Vi OT GtaSjITschftlOV Fd S 1106 -(d) Bc«»-lnv«t SF OX Iwj PANCURRIJnt^-— 

g!Bg5a WB!flg g= 1 sj li £J:!S!SsSSc= 3 I “ ttlSKSSEEE: SE fflS 

dssattsSs?— - f| iig i si a %% = \ If 

iSSSSSSfflSS^ !'«* zr: BS SS !?!Ra'^±lzr=; I mS 

SMS KBgr — n gg fif&SSftiJBEnF « MBB a = — 8S .H WpBBp=S==^*| 

Ig!!^, 1 ^! 1 ^ - ", SR Other Funds id) Rewryelrawred Depertls — M 

:!Sjl I 5S SiagM r" mM ‘? di 1 “ fflSKS^KSrirasr. V « 
aags gag jgffi ^SSSSJ^fcrr \ «, iriase j"-— i!!SSL®fflftK= t II 

TRADED CURRENCT FUM^ S1X485 -( r ) J.F !SljSconv_^_ Y' w)TrSoort«n Fd-(AEIF) S 1DJ6 I w)T6Clino Growth Ftmd- SF 8*71 

£td line; Bid — A jr jlFjSSnTYiS- v 437i (w) BNP intaraond Fund s u« (*) Tok«Pot HoW. IS«I S 89^ 

et d )CM*LgMrrr^iI-;?ff5ffan 1 1 -{ r > J.F Japan Technology Y 1*450 (wi Bondselox-liiue Pr. SF 13570 Jw) TakysPoc N.V S W39 

l)ITERNAT pO**A .^. ll *^Q ) *F. ^ 5 itgfi -| r) if Pndflc SeciCAoc)— S 5.92 (m) Canada Gtd-Mortgage Fd J 9*0 JwlTranSpacIteFund S JtC 

-(d) ShorfTerm A (Acajm*— ■_ lloyDS BANK INTI. POB 48+ Geneva II (dl Caaltal Preserv. Fd_ Inti. S 1169 id) Turquode Fw d. . . 

-1 d 1 Short Term ;adwt)- — * ^1 LL^IrdlDclior -——TTiiilO [w) Otnctei Fund * 162 (w) Tweetfy^rowne n.y£taBA_ smt.n 

•td j Short Term B, {*^7* i nwS ^+(S1 L^yS lrt* J l Europe SF 11650 (d) Cj.R. Awtrdi 0 Fund 1 951 tw) Jrowe n.yCfagB— 


SF 89*0) l-{wj G.T. Asia Fund. 

SF vaS -ld>G.T.Au8trolIo Fund. 


drkeMwm la^tinc^H^} 


.Y 1022*06 1 1 w) NAJAF.. 


WtaSStef Haw, 77 London Wall | £.T. 

LONDON ja « Wja* -1 d } G T.' GtoW TschftldV R 


(mj Wi nchester B I ?§« ^5! gIt! I -(Si 


1^« :{g| I ss =!5}iSS 

1*1 wSSSfc sSSS^iW^Z $1^21 H lliwMU^L 1 K4{Mi 

n- -i h _ j] ib 


S 11454 ( w) Tokyo Pat Hold- (Sea)__ 5 W3S I 

F 13570 (w) Tokyo Pac.Hrtd.N-V S mn 

S 963 (w) TranspacWe Fund S 78 jO 

S 1169 Id ) Turauode Find — n „ , * l«K| 

S 152 (w) Tweedvirowne ilvXJobA — S22»-’D 
s 951 twl Tweedyjrowtie iLwCfcissB— Si5»5i; 
$ 1X55 (ml Tweedy .Browne (UX1 tov S 100874 


SF 13570 j twl Takyg Pac. Hrtd. N.V, 
. S 963 1 twl Transpacific Fund— 


•tdl Short T erm B shmS -+(wl Ltoyda inf l Europe SF 11650 (d) Cj.R. Awtrolio fum„ 

.( d 1 Shar i T erm B tDWr) - -Hwl LtovUs Irrrl Growth SF 17X80 ( d 1 CJ.R. Juaan Fund - ..... ■ -7^--^--;- r»*i a 

-jwj tjg.I*rr ^ ~ iP4v APV r SE RS -tlw) Uoycto Inti Ineame SF 31*50 (mi Oevdonfl Offsnor 0 Fd. . 5271257 (dl UNflMFumU- * 

FAC MOWT -LTP^IWy. -+(w) LtovSllrtl N.AnarlCD S 1065S tw) ColumblQ Securltlei FL 107Jg HH! — 51SS 

1, Lnurenca Poumv Hill, sanwit* -+(wi Ltor+r '"tr bnrifir 5F 171,151 irirnuFTt S 79762 l r ) UNI Ctmlial Fund - - SIM 

-tw)F&CAi!grti c_ I Its ^SJiOTiiJRsnSS&aGL 5 1*18 (w) CM. m mn a certs— s 954 jwi * 

-tw) FirL bur wfwy *'' c wh I a ) wona rvno > ,** > • 

nS) E /ffiSvo'« Coee«on_SWf° 


Mar*; bF - Bafglutn Fronts; FL- Dutch Ftortnf LF_- LimemBaura Francs.- SF- Swiss Fratcs; a-tnkerf; + - Otter Price s.-fl- bid Oxgige P /V310 T ^ 

^«S5?^^NoKtemmunlcntBd;a - New: S ■ suswided:!/* . stack Spill; • - Ex-DlvkKmd; -* - Ex-Rta; — ■ proa Per f ormance index July: • - Redempt- Price- Ex-Coupon. - 
FMTTMriy v^dwteFund Ltd- - 9 -Offer Price ted. 3% preHm. charge; ++- dally stee* price ui on AmrtentemStot* ExctxTOe 


-Swiss Francs; a-a 
ii ■* - Ex-Rta; — 
e as on Amsterdam ' 















Fridays 


NYSE 


Closing 


ToHes Inchitfe ttM nationwide prices 
1 until the dosing on wall Strwet 

and Ho not reflect tatc trades efeewtier c. 

"n z)Ri ouokOi lJj s* {g 
23* 16* OWrtSO 80 17 J2 
M stock m. YU re HtoHWiLw owt-ogj io* « gSg. ut an 

26* U* aKRfrfl ata 1.1 13 

(Continued from Page 10) 

18* IBM IB* 

16 IS* IS* 

74* 7m 74 

28ft 27* 20 
33* 33* 33M 
30V? 301% TOY 

38* a* an* 

35* 34* 351b 
3VU. apt 3B* 

Bft 8ft 8* 

» M W 
IT* lift 16* 

9M am 

7t> n M 
If* 19V* 19Hl 
10 * 10 10 
13* 13 13 

s 4* 4* 

34* 34 34 

19H 19* 19* 

2* 2* 2ft 

13* 13* 131b 
IB* 17* IB, 

X X X 

s*s*s* 

25* 24* 25 
30 38 38 

40 39V» 40 

71* 71* 7110 

29 » 29 

26 Vl 26* 2*9* 

70* 70* 70* 

28* 20 28* 

30* 30* MW 
65 65 65 

71 TO* 

40 39«b 

24* 23* 

47* 46* 

14* 

21 * 

571 57V* 57 
296 27* 2M 
439 
251 
58 
24 
32 
23 


949 40* 47 47* — Ok 

49 2 m 21 * 2 m 

61 8 7* 7*— * 

232 31* 30* 3044— Mr 

199 a* am 2» + ib 



35* UAL 1 JO lj 72 
26 U7U.pt 2-40 7J 
9 UCCEL 1* 

25* UDCn 

17* UGI 2-04 93 II 

0* UNCRes _ , 
10* URS 70 U 15 


21* USFG 
26* USG * 


70 37 15 
220 6.1 51 
176 77 7 


12Tb Uni Fret JO 12 14 
45* UnUvr ZI2e 38 9 
00* UlUNV 526c 58 10 
31* UComp 184 48 13 
32* UnCarb 380 62 13 
4* UnlonC - 
13 UnElec 184 92 6 
25* UnEl Pi 480 118 
41 UnElPf 640 118 
25* UnEl pfM480 128 
19* Unfit pf 288 II 3 
14* Unfit pt 2.13 11J 
20* Unfit pt 272 108 
SO* UEIpfH 880 1X1 
22 unExun 
37* UnPoc 180 38 11 
87* UnPc Pt 785 67 
12* UnJrovI .18 8 13 

50 UnrylPt 880 1X9 
3* UnttOr 


1644 57* 
141 34* 
69 15* 
91 27* 
65 22* 
151 U* 
33 11* 
1007 36 
470 38* 
3 16Tb 
2 56* 
163 104* 
1240 38Tb 
2353 51 
144 6* 

1411 19 
lOOz 34 
501 54 
25 31* 
16 25* 
12 lBTb 
5 26* 
150z 66* 
419 22* 
060 48 
9 109 

1539 21* 
19001 42* 
37 3* 


56* 56*—* 
34 34*—“ 

15 15 — 

27* 27ft — 
22* 22* 

10* 10*— Hi 
11* 11* 

35* as* + * 
38 38*— 

16* 16*' 

S6M 56*— 1 
104 104* —1* 

38 38ft— 1 

50* 50* 

6 * 6 * 

18* 18Tb 
34 34 

54 54 

HM 37* + * 
25* 25* 

18* IB*— 

26 24 — 

66 66* +1* 
22* 22*— Hi 
47* 47*— Ml 
108* 108* 

21 * 21 * 

62 62 +2 
3* 3*- * 


Solo flourao are umffldaL Ycqrty Mata ^ to«ro*|ctf 

tticpriMtx«52i9eck*p*uittieanT»tU'd^birtriotmclra» 

trading day. Where o nMtt or stock dtvtdwd cpnowrthWtoH 
percent or more hen boon pol<tttw»»ortMBtH*w» ' ro w* ^ ei d 
dhrldend or* mown hr the new stock 
ooled. rates of dividends are annual dtahutiiemanf* based on 
Hie latest deetarottoa. 

0— dividend also extra (i 171 . _ 

b— tmaual raff of dMdand plus stock dlvtdbwl/1 
c— Itauldatfria dlvklend/l 

dd— cailed/i 

d — new yearly towTI „ 

•—dividend declared or Mid In erecedlOB 12 moamssi 

itwr. 

1— dMdenddedorvd otter ipIISw or stoefc dividend. 

I— dividend paid this year, omitted, deferred, or no oemn 

token at latest dividend ineeMna 

k — dividend declared or paid this Year, an accumulative 

Issuewflti dividends In arean. . 

n neielMue ln1Miitm*T7— ***** ’n—Mah+ww range begins 
wlfli Hit start of trodtaSL 
nd— next day del tverv. 

P/g— mn e-c umtn gi ratio. _ 

r— dividend de clar ed or paid bn pneescHne 12 monm* P#» 

dock dividend. _ 

s— stock spilt. Dividend basins with dale at wQL 
sit— silts. 

t— dividend paid in stock In prvcedbw H months. estfmoled 

cash value an eauitvldsnd or wdtatrfbullon date. 

u — new yearly Mott 

v— tradlne halted. . . _ 

vl— In bu nk nip lcyer recelveritilpor betooreareatiMduo- 

der the Bmdmipfcv Ad. or eecurUlee amuened by sue* com- 
panies. 

wd — when cash-touted, 
wt — when Issued, 
ww—wttta warrants. 

x— ex-dtvktondorex^tohts. 
mfls— axMstrlfiutlan. 
xw— wDhout warranta. 

v— ex-dividend and sales In fuH. 
vid— yield, 
z— sales m toll. 



NEW KMM* 21 


Alteon lac 
BrawnGrp 

Oatoontwi 
LILGopS 
Pan Am 

AmBdcst 4-k>jlri 

as'ss*" sssisfe 

MQMHIA Elfl 
viRcvWeCaP *a«Vich 

gSK 

LILC* 

owiPi 

WHNR 

UnEnRes 

NSW LOWS 8 


Arm« Rub 
MoahottNIl 

■aUAraodl* B*jl5. 

PoaoPrad jtenoiLa ** 

CarraK 

Texeec 


AYIEXHsMjWS 


NSW HfOMS to 

CMmat CRvGfldPto CtoRMMfBdh 

52®fprpe g»*«iad_ ******* 

Scarry Rn Trlppc* ■ 


H8W LOWS 17 


AHtmcrMBP OootleA Al 
Copley Prawn fiar teyot 


CktotOee* 
O rn n il n* «t 


Earnings 

<»irf profit ar itlnlx ai currwfla 

- unless otherwise ta&catoa. 


HetaiResc Lyw^gvo* wtCW? 

starratam a k uW dn Tesocon w.*.™ 


BHtata 

STC 

id Half 1«S «■* 

Revdnue WO-l 97X2 

Oper Net 417 

Par Share — MB* 

UiiMdSUtei 

Capital HoWIn* 
tetf QitHf 19CS IfM 

5SSSSS-— SE 4608 

Oper Net — *65 61 J 

Oper Share— . 063 057 

id Halt ms rn* 

Revenue 18ia 8j*j( 

Oper Net *60 408 

Oner Share— ™ , riff 
IMS /m/s lactudw pain* of. 

jT25/TT/ffton In quarter out of 

SJ4 million ia half. 

Ctorex 

enaaor. W® JJf! 

Revenue 1W "65 

Narine. 367* 2 J*' 

Par Shore— _ 858 68* 


Year IMS M* 

Revenue 189£ JJji 

Net Inc. *612 7YJ1 

Per Share — 3J7 ' Ml 

SS' 

OtMTShorL- OM «■ 
191 HON T1W 

Revenue *705 3178 

Oper Net — 'V. 

Oner Share— 08* 

Tesoro Petroleum 
HOW. 1*» MM 

Revenue 5204 7194 

Oner Net X3 L7 

9 Months 19» MM 
Revenue—. l» 231& 
oper Mer — • 1U 1U 
Oner Shane— U0 081 
Mg/Mto.Tigbidh eha n m.ot 



of Interaational FferaW 
Tribune readers own 
Stocks, SSiares, Bonds 
and Commodities. 


fi ridayk 

AMEX 


Closing 


Tabtes Include the nattonartdfl prices 
up ta me doolng oa Wan Straat 
mid do not reflect Iota trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


CDIl 
CM I CO 
CMXCp 
CHS 
CPrtNJ 
CaofeA 
i Cal RE 
Calmat 
i Gallon n 
, Colin wt 
Cornea 

CJiAorca 
CdnOcc 
ewine 
CardlH 
i Cardii 
CareEn 
Carpppf 
Cosbkm 


J4 18 15 
18 
5 

138 103 10 
80 23 21 

34 

32 18 10 
JO 

M 18 
12S 


1 27* 
35 11* 
12 1 * 
26 18* 

19 n* 

34 6Va 
41 12* 
318 2M 
21 5* 

30 W 
66 1Mb 
231 15* 
1 20* 

20 3«t 

56 10 
SO 3Bb 
33 19* 
40X45* 
4 3* 


4* + fc 
23* -4- * 
3 — * 
12* 

10 *— * 
3* 

26 

7* 

8* 

3* + * 
4* 

11 * 

lOTb— * 
II 

* + * 
29*— * 
33* + * 
16* 

22 *— * 
16Tb + * 

im + vk 
at*— * 

14*—* 
16* + * 
18*— * 
10*- Up 
I ff* + * 
5* 

17* — * 
22* + lb 
35Tb— * 
38*-* 
3* + * 
4* + * 
8* + Vi 


27* 27*— * 
11* II*- * 
1* 1* + * 
18* 18*— * 
11 * 11 * 

5* SW— Vb 
12* 12* + Vb 
27* 27*— 1 
5* 5* 

* * 

16* 16* + * 
15 15* + * 

20 * 20 *—* 
32 32* + » 

IB 10 
2 2 * + * 
11* 11*—* 
46* 46*— * 
3* 3*— * 


; « 

14* 

14* 

14* 



29* 

29ft 


3ft 

3ft 

3ft— * 



1* 

1* 

200Z2V* 

29* 

zw? . . 


6* 

6* 

6*+ * 


2* 

2 Ml 

2*— * 



14* 

14*— * 


25ft 

24* 

25ft + ft 



26 

26 — ft 


7* 

7* 

7*— * 

32 

33* 

32* 

33* + * 


30 

30 

®. . 



2Vft 

29* + * 



40* 

48* + * 


33ft 

32* 

33ft + * 


916 

9 

9*— * 


30* 

38* 

38*— ft 



16 

16* + * 


5* 

4ft 

flb 

20 

9* 

V* 

9* 


7* 

7 

7 

51 

20* 

20* 

20* + ft 

173 

111 

9Tb 

10 



8* 

9* + * 


7* 

7* 

7*— ft 

148 

8* 

8* 

8* + H 



6* 

6*— ft 

1? 

18* 

17* 

17*— * 


7Tb 

7* 

7*— * 


14 

13* 

14 + * 

219 

9 

r* 

8* 


4ft 

4* 

4Tb— ft 

40 

ISO 

65 

5* 

5* 

5ft— * 

20ft 

20 

20*— ft 

137 

13 

12* 

12*- * 

2 

16* 

16* 

14*— * 

32 

21* 

21 

21* 


11* 

11* 

11*— * 

190 

X 

18ft 

10ft— Jb 

13 

* 

*— * 


2* 

2* 

2* + * 

33 

9* 

9* 

9Sb— * 


ft 

ft 

ft + * 

233 

33 

32* 

3216 + ft 

30 

16* 

16* 

16Tb— ft 

7 

13* 

13* 

13* + U 

2 

26 

5Tb 

* 

% 

5* 

* 

522 

3 

1* 

2 — * 

S 

22ft 

23 

22ft + * 

1 

62 



26 14* Frisch s 32 .9 21 

15* 9 FmtHd 47 

7* 4* PrtAwt .171 27 


13 33* 23* 23* + * 
SO 15* 15* 15* 

16 4* 6* 6H— Hi 


UMmtti 
MMiLnw Stock 

15* " 11* LndBti n 
19* 11 uidmK 
14* 9* Loser 
13 9 Lauren 

27* 21* LearPP 
9* 2* LeePh 
31* 15* Let] tens 
6* LMsurT 
8* 5 Levitt 

30V. 7* LWFPb 

3* 1* UfeRd 
3* 2* utna 
3* 1* Lodor 
39* 27V. LOrtmr 
14* 10* Lumox 
14* 8 LundyE 

16 9* Lurta 

14* 10 LV«X>1 
26* 1» L/tlCS S 


MPfHkaUwr Qunt-CbUe 


80 « 8 56 

“S iJ 
21 2 
wo ,28 m 

* ,0, - ’2 iJ 
11 10 
40 14 10 63 

26 
26 
6 

IS 1277 

- n 

* 37 

5 5 

30 U 8 160 


13* 13* 

18* n* 

11 * 11 * + * 
7* 9* — Vb 

22* 23V. + * 
6 4 — * 

28 28 + * 
4* 4*— * 
7* 7V.— * 
27* 27* + * 
1* 1* 

3* 3* 

1* 1* „ 
36 36 + 18 

15* 15*— * 
13* 13*—* 
W* to*—* 
13* 13*— * 
13* 13 — * 



10* 6* 
14* 10* 
2016 9* 

10* 7* 
29* 23 
34* 17* 
2* * 
39* 19 
43 22* 

25* 16* 
10* 5* 

19* 8* 

15* 11 
9* i* 
17* 916 
4* Z* 

X 

6* 4 
5 1* 

5* 216 
15* 6* 
21 » 
29* 2fl 
16* 7* 

6* 1* 
19* 12* 
6* 3*. 

18* 9* 
46* 32* 
46* 31* 
21* 17* 
10 6 * 


HAL .108 1.1 22 
HMG -60 54 
HUBC 80a 12 12 
Harriot) 331126 8 

Hndymn J5e 3 
HanfrdS 88 28 15 
Harvey 

Hasore .15 A 11 
Hasbrpf 280 53 
hi mere 28* 83 10 

HltltCh 19 

Him Ex . 32 

HettnM 84 53 8 

HetnWr 30c 24 9 

Hotel ck .10 7 10 

Hddor 79 

Hatlont 

HetmR _ 

HershO M 

Hlndrl 21 

Hofman 

HonvCP 34 17 11 
Hm1nspf29S M3 
H until 188 28 13 
Knew Jit 84 16 
HmHwt 371135 „ 
HotiPtv 180 9J 17 
HauOT 890174 
HovnE 9 

HubetA 132 33 12 

HubelB 132 38 13 
HUOGn 80 23 14 
Husky B 36 52 


it in n 
I 1Mb 11* 

3 IS* IB* 

17 7* 7* 

15 23* 23* 
49 34* 34 Vi 
70 2 1* 

442 33* 33V. 
52 37* 37* 
30 25V. 25 
40 TVb V 

30 10 .9* 
15 12* 12* 

10 8* I* 

49 15V. 14* 
21 2 * 2 * 
17 4* 4* 

57 * * 

27 4 4 

7 1* JJ6 
14 3 2* 

14 1416 1416 
953 30* 30* 
26 38* 38 
87 I* 816 
102 2 2 

11 IS* 18* 

873 5* 4* 

6 13* 13* 
32 44* 44 
120 45* 44* 

4 17* 17* 

103 7 6* 


l* + * 
11*— H 
18* 

7*— * 
23*—* 
34* + * 
1*— * 
33* 

37* 

2SV. 

9 

9* -t- * 
12 * 

8* 

ISM 

2*-* 

?=; 
i* + * 
3 + * 

1416— * 
20 * 

38* 

8* 

.2 + M 
18* + * 
5* + It 
13* + * 

44 — * 

45 — * 
17* 

6*— M 



9* 6* 
16* 12* 
7* 4* 
6 * 2 * 
3* 2* 
23* 17* 
40 31U 

14* 7* 

3 IV. 
25* T5M 
5* 2* 

8 * 6 
13* 10* 
6 2 * 
* lil 

10* 4* 

17 * 10 * 
12* 5* 

IT* 5V. 

32* 18* 
4* 1* 
36* 22* 
«* 6 
9* 6* 


AO 

54 


13* 

7* 

7Tb 

7* 

32 

23 

28 

34 

14* 

14* 

14*— ft 



18 

44 

6* 

6* 

6Tb + ft 



10 

B 

5ft 

5* 

5ft + tt 



16 

35 

3 

2* 

2Tb— * 

180 

52 

9 

2 

19* 

1Mb 

19Tb — * 

6J4C20J 

6 

7 

33* 

33* 

33* + * 

.13 



5574 

13* 

12* 

1M + * 




20 

1* 

1* 

1* 

130 

6.1 

11 

4 

1ft 

22Tb 

c 

22* 

c 

22* + ft 



47 

IB 

74 

6* 

a 

6 

6* + ft 

83e 

3 


3 

11* 

11* 

11*_ * 



8 

81 

51b 

5ft 

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.•>V •^E>«AwctefBrf)>ns8 

~ Texas Air Corp. 
;.£j^tsase3 toFriday its offer to ac- 
qnireTrahs World Airlines Inc. by 


_ — «» mrpAi.n TRIBUNE, S ATUBDAY-SUWDAY, AUGUST 10-11, 1985 

UP ; “ : ■ ~~~ ' ” r THE EUROMARKETS 

leases Bidfor TWA I For Bladks P STAGS Are Novelty of Quiet Week 


Page 13 



^caisedver “battle for thcNew 
;Todeti«ed carrier.- 

offer by Texas Air, the 


* • Texas Air's Chairman, 

. TWA made earifer 
■/-•tins smE Carl C. I cahn xhe 

- . '■ Tfixas Air alre ady has an agreo- 
TWA. It was Mr. 
^fc^^paraiase earlicr this year of 
»*dBGqi» of TWA’s common 
,l»ocJC, and a subsequent offer to 
>biiy.&e anfine. that drove TWA to 
. accepLtbeofTer from Texas Air. 

' ^tefe tohn’s investor group 
‘ aSrtad?is-da the verge of takm» 
^oatright^cqntrol of TWA. The 

^^wofid 45 J percent of TUVA’S 
totalsiock outstanding. 

■*'*“* Mcr icahn- offered to buy the 
-TWA4Aock.his group does not at 
ready.ownfar $24 a share in cash 
and securities after Mr. Lorenzo 
had itached a tentative agreement 
<m-Jsmel3 to pay S23, also in cash 
and securifes, for each of TWA's 

• .j^ ygiririrtMtdy 34.5 million total 

ibim 

' w * '\ • ' 

'Tkitoil PLC said it received ap- 
’(djcalkms for about L25 billion 
shim® under the British govern- 
ment's offer to sdl 242.6 million 
dares^mbst of its 49-peroent stake 

at£?85 ($2^) 



Frank A. Lorenzo 

common shares outstanding, or 
$7933 million. 

Mr. I cahn made his offer after 
reaching an agreement with two of 
TWA’s three major unions under 
which the unions would exchange 
sizable wage concessions for TWA 
Stock and profit sharing . 

Texas Air’s sweetened bid has a 
total value of about S897 minim. 


The proposal calls for Texas Air to 
pay $20.50 in cash and $530 of a 
new issue (rf preferred stock for 
each TWA shsie. 

TWA’s common stock closed 
Friday at $22.50 a share, up 25 
cents, in New York Stock Ex- 
change trading. 

Further complicating the TWA 
battle was the announcement 
Thursday that a group of TWA 
employees, aided by a former Mis- 
souri governor, 1 Christopher Bond, 
is considering making an offer to 
acquire TWA. 

The group is poised to make the 
offer because it received commit- 
ments “in the range of $1 billion” 
from U.S. and European lenders, 
said John Kreamer, a senior part- 
ner with the Kansas City law firm 
of Gage & Tucker, where Mr. Bond 
is a partner. Mr. Kreamer de- 
clined to identify the lenders. 

Mr. Brad said he was leading the 
employees’ effort because they fear 
TWA would be dismantled if ac- 
quired by either by Mr. Icahn or 
Mr. Lorenzo, thereby jeopardizing 
TWA employment in Missouri. 

TWA’s primary domestic airport 
is in Sl Louis and it has a mamie- 
. nance facility in Kansas Gty, Mis- 
souri. Together the installations 
employ about 11,000 people. 


Swiss Report 
Sharp Rise in 
Watch Exports 

Roam 

ZURICH — Swiss watch ex- 
ports climbed 19.5 percent m , 
the firat half of the year, the 
industry’s association. Federa- 
tion Horlogerc, said Friday. 

Overseas sales totaled 2. 1 bn- 
bon Swiss francs {5900 mfllion) 
with exports to the United 
States reaching 364.6 million 
francs, up from 237.4 million in 
the first six months of 1984. 

The increase was the result 
partly of sales of plastic watch- 
£“ such as the Swatch, Much 
the Federation said had gained 
by almost 400 percent. 

Introduction of the Swatch m 
1983 marked a turnaround in 
■ ‘the fortunes of the Swiss indus- 
try after its craft watches had 
suffered competitive pressure 
from low-pnced electronic 
watches made in the Far East. 

The federation warned that 
sales growth might slacken in 
the second half, partly because 
of uncertainty about the U.S. 
economy and the chance of a 
further fall in the dollar. 


(Continued from Page 9) 

are capable of reaching those 
blacks whose plight constitutes the 
core of the group inequality prob- 
lem. 

There is evidence to suggest that 
they are not. Poorly skilled, poorly 
educated blacks have not gained as 
much from the efforts of the ami- 
discrimination agencies and affir- 
mative action practices as have 
bladks with more education and 
skills. 

For example, between 1959 and 
1979 the productivity-corrected ra- 
tio of black-to-white earnings 
among professionals and manage- 


rable rauo for operatives and la- 
borers remained constant at about 
85 percent. 

During the 1970s the black-to- 
white earnings ratio for male col- 
lege graduates rose to nearly 80 
percent from 70 percent, while 
blacks with one to three years of 
high school actually lost ground to 
similarly educated whites. 

Mr. Loury is professor of political 
economy td the John F. Kennedy 
School of Government at Harvard 
University. Leonard Silk is on vaca- 
tion. 


Reuters ( 

LONDON — Hie Eurobond i 
market ended a quiet day slightly 
firmer Friday as short-covering 
ahead of the weekend emerged in ' 
both the dollar-straight and float- 
ing-rate-note sectors, dealers said. 
“No one wants to go home on a 
Friday with short positions out- . 
standing." a trader said. 

Sentiment in these sectors was 
dominated this week by the U.S. 
Treasury's refunding auctions, 
which passed off to the market’s 
satisfaction. “Everyone's relieved 
that the auctions are out of the 
way," a dealer at a U.S. bank com- 
mented. 

There was a steady flow of new 
bonds during the week, which in- 
cluded several innovative issues, 
dealers noted. 

Probably the most surprising 
new issue of the week was Quadrex 
Securities LttL’s package of zero- 
coupon bonds backed by British 
government securities. The issues 
are known as Sterling Transferable 
Accruing Government Securities, 
or STAGS. 

The principal tranche of £100 
million, widen is due in 1998, was 
quoted by the lead manager at the 
dose at around 27%, compared 
with the issue price of 26%. Howev- 


er, dealers said that trading was not 
active in the issue. 

The 27 other tranches of the 
package, each totaling £7.75 mil- 
lion, were quoted at discounts of up 
to a frill point below the issue 
prices, dealers noted 
A S 100-million bond was 

launched during the day for United 

Technologies Financial Services. 
The 10-year issue pays 10% percent 
and was priced at 99%. It saw 
quotes of about 97% on the market 
immedia tely after the launch, but it 
eventually ended at about 97% bid, 
compared with .the total fees of 2. 
Lead mw"»E er was Goldman Sachs 
International Corp. 

Also launched was a 75-miIlioD- 
Canadian-dollar issue for the Ca- 


nadian Imperial Bank of Com- 
merce led by CIBC Ltd The 
five-year bond pays 10% percent 
and is priced at 100%. It closed on 
the market at about 98 13/16. 

The RockefeDer Center Proper- 
ties Inc. package of $500 million of 
convertible Eurobonds had still not 
been formally launched by the 
dose Friday. However, on the gray 
market both tranches of the issue 
were bid just below the issue prices. 

In the secondary market, dollar 
straights dosed with gains of % or 
% point dealers added However, 
{bey ag ain noted that trading was 
almost entirely imer-professioQal 
with retail operators either on vaca- 
tion or reluctant to enter the mar- 
ket bfcausE of uncertainty about 
the dollar’s near-term trend. 


A New Look for Buyouts 


[-Jkom & Sharpe Manufacturing 
Co-machinists on strike have lost 
the backing of their parent union, 
which has cut benefits and decided 

the longest-running major U.S. 
strike has failed. The strike began 
OcL 19, 1981, over a company pro- 
posal to allow job transfers regard- 
less ofseniority. 

-r- C ontinental Telecom Inc. said it 
has agreed to acquire Fairchild In- 
dustnCs" Inc,’s interests in Ameri- 
can Sateffite Co. and Space Cora- 
Munri cations Co. for $lu5 million. 
Continental Telecom and Fairchild 
were equal partners in the venture. 

Charterhouse Petroleum PLCs 
planned merger, with Saxon 03 


PLC will not be referred to the 
Monopolies and Mergers Commis- 
sion, Britain's Department of 
Trade and Industry said. When the 
merger was announced in July, the 
companies put their aggregate mar- 
ket value at about £183 million. 

Exco Inte rnational PLC of Lon- 
don said it had completed the dis- 
posal of its 52-percerit holding in 
Telerate Inc. after obtaining the 
necessary clearances under UJL 
antitrost laws. Exco said last month 
it would sdl Telerate far $459.8 
miltirtn to Dow Jones & Co. and 
Oklahoma Publishing Co. 

Henke! KGAA, the West Ger- 
man applied chemicals group, said 
it has bought a 40 -percent stake in 
Indian Chemicals tto-Diamand 
Shamrock Ltd. from Diamond 
Shanmick Chemicals CcL,New Jer- 
sey. Die subsidiary has been re- 
named Henkel Ouanicals India. A 
spokesman declined to give finan- 
cial details. 


Hngtiw Communicatious Inc of 
El Segundo, California, said that it 

will invest $300 million in three 
pew satellites, related group equip- 
ment and launch services. It said 
the -satellites will be built by its 
parent company, Hughes Aircraft, 
and may be launched as early as 
1988. 

Janfine Matheson Holdings Ud 
of Hong Kong said its wholly 
owned unit. Atlas House Matheson 
Properties Co„ has agreed to sell 
Adas House in London to Mitsubi- 
shi Estate Co. for £34 million. 

Toko Corp. of Japan and Beijing 
General Corp. of Agriculture, In- 
dustry and Commerce have agreed 
on a joint venture to build a 7- 
bflbon-yen ($293 million) com- 
pound m Bering with 136 villas for 
foreigners and. a 13-story office 
building, the China Daily said. 
Toko is putting up 70 percent of the 
capital for Bey mg Gn a n gm i n g In- 
dustry & Commerce Co. 


CURRENCY MARKETS 

Dollar Slides in U.S. on Kaufman Projection 


The .*ssocuned Press 

NEW YORK — The dollar fell 
sharply a gains t other major curren- 
des in light U.S. trading Friday 
after posting modest gains on Eu- 
ropean markets. 

As the dollar fell, gold prices 
rallied. At 4 P.hL, Republic Na- 
tional Bank in New York quoted 
gold at $328 a troy ounce, up $6.40 
from Thursday’s tale bid. 

Currency dealers said the dollar 
slumped after Henry Kaufman, the 
chief sconomist of Salomon Broth- 
ers Ixkl, said the Federal Reserve is 
unlikely to tighten credit condi- 
tions because of continued softness 
in the economy. 

The forecast renewed specula- 
tion in the foreign-exchange mar- 
kets that interest rates — and hence 
ihe yields available on doQar-de- 


no minated investments — might 
not be rising any lime soon. 

“The market's been looking for 
some land of direction of late, and 
Mr. Kaufman's remarks came at a 
time when it was vulnerable," said 
Marlin S. McAuley, vice president 
for foreign exchange at Continen- 
tal Illinois National Bank & Trust 
Co. in Chicago. 

A notable example of the dollar’s 
slide came against the Deutsche 
mark In New York, the dollar fell 
nearly 3 pfennigs after Mr. Kauf- 
man’s report was released, but sta- 
bilized at 1800 marks. At the close, 
Lhe dollar was quoted at 2.8050, 
down from 18300 Thursday. 

Similarly, the British pound 
jumped 2 cents in its best one-day 
gam against the dollar in several 
weeks. In New York, the British 


currency closed at $1.3720 up from 
$1.3500 on Thursday. 

Other late dollar rates in New 
York compared with late rates 
Thursday, included: 23110 Swiss 
francs, down from 23390; 83775 
French francs, down from 8.66450 
and 1375.00 Italian lire, down 
from 1.893.00. 

In earlier European trading, the 
U.S. currency was fixed in Frank- 
furt at 18313 DM, little changed 
from 18373 on Thursday. In Lon- 
don, the dollar slipped to $13573 
against the pound, from $1.3550. 

Other late rates in Europe on 
Friday, compared with Thursday, 
included: 23480 Swiss francs, up 
from 13445; 8.660 French francs, 
down from 8.669, and 1,895,40 lire, 
down fractionally from 1,896.00 


(Condoned from Page 9) 
management, supply 1 to 10 per- 
cent of the cost of an acquisition 
and represent most of the equity 
ownership. The buyout companies 
bring in some of their own money 
or, in lieu of a fee, take an equity 
interest 

But if the portfolios of the 
buyout companies are reminiscent 
of the conglomerate era, their man- 
agement practices are just the op- 
posite. 

Synergy was the buzzword for 
the supposed benefits of conglom- 
erates. It was believed that the suc- 
cessful conglomerate builder, such 
as Charles Bluhdom of Gulf & 
Western Industries, could put di- 
verse companies together and make 
their sum greater than their parts. 

-That's all been debunked," said 
Samuel L. Hayes of the Harvard 
Business School. “Instead of the 
presumption that the corporate en- 
tity can add value, the current le- 
veraged buyout fad suggests that if 
management is given its freedom 
unencumbered by corporate bu- 
reaucracy, it can do a lot better." 

These days, the investment con- 
cerns make few attempts to put the 
companies together to effect any 
efficiencies. At Wesray, for in- 
i stance, a rare hint of synergy is that 
, one company. Atlas Van Lines, so- 
, ficits business from the other com- 
panies in the group. Wesray also 


combined two acquisitions, Proc- 
tor-Silex and Wear-Ever Alumi- 
num Inc, to streamline operations. 

For the most part, however, 
companies stay in their own back- 
yards even if they are in related 
businesses. At Forstmann Little, 
for example, Beverage Manage- 
ment Inc, a 7-Up bottler, has no 
connection with Dr Pepper. 

The only link between the com- 
panies it owns, said Theodore J. 
Forstmann, general partner in the 
firm, “is the dinner everybody 
comes to here twice a year.” He 
described leveraged buyouts as “a 
hybrid business — not a corpora- 
tion, not a holding company. 
Things are not hooked together 
through any structure." 

To be sure, there are risks in 
assembling leveraged buyout com- 
panies. In a weak economy, the 
heavy debt loads of the companies 
may make them more vulnerable to 
collapse than the average corpora- 
tion. 

Also, the buyout companies are 
not active, day-to-day managers oi 
their portfolio companies. As Jo- 
seph L. Rice 3d, a partner in Clay- 
ion & Dubilier, said: “We are the 
link between a group of sophisti- 
cated investors and the manage- 
ment tftfltn- We don't purport to be 
the people who are going to ran the 
business.” 














































Pape 14 


ACROSS 

I Dramatist 
Hart 

5 Fuddor 
Gantry 
10 Crop 
13 Patrimony 
19 Island in the 
Taiwan Strait 
2® Roulette 
relative 
22 “Chances— 
Mathis hit 

22 Placed at 
intervals 

23 Thunder in the 
library? 

29 Just missed a 
birdie 

27 Winter wear 

28 Urged (on) 

29 Highway 

30 Elects 

31 Likesome 
seats 

32 Soprano Petina 

33 Runs off 

36 Photographer . 
Adams 

37 Activity in an 
attic 

41 Motorized bike 

42 Juliet's phrase 
for parting 

45 Litigation 
appellation 


DOWN 

1 Sow chow 

2 ■•Typee” 
sequel 

3 Rubaboo or 
skink 

4 Elisions 

5 British term 
for foes* 
vessels 

6 Hits a fly 

7 Dishevel 

8 Double this for 
a Hebrew song 

9 Free 

10 Beets, for 
short 

11 Like a rainbow 

12 Henbic is one 

13 Cordage 
grasses 

14 Weaverbird 


ACROSS 

46 Don of the 
P.G.A. 

47 Confidence 
game 

48 Victory 
symbols 

49 Heap 

50 White-tailed 
eagle 

51 Bird and 
Ragman 

53 Color nr 
novelist 

54 Conspiracies 

55 Closed anew 

57 Photo finish 

59 Beard type 

60 Use a joint 
rudely 

61 Laissez 
follower 

62 Conduits 

63 Diacritical 
mark 

65 Layer of skin 

66 Apparatus on 
some ships 

69 Transgression 

70 Stew 

71 Zoroastrian 

73 Wine container 

74 Deuce topper 

75 Alum 

76 Calendar obbr. 

77 Sugar source 


DOWN 

15 Dental 
calculus 

16 Ten square 
chains 

17 Golfer, before 
driving 

18 MacDonald’s 
co-star 

24 Stupefied 

25 Everglades 
denizen 

31 Sulla, to 
Marius 

32 . the sky 

Matt. 

16:2 

33 Live coal 

34 River to the 
Bay of Biscay 


ACROSS 

78 Blab tothc cops 

79 What days do 
in full 

83 Gopak nr 
hopak 

84 Cached grain 

86 Of a region 

87Enjoyeda 

siesta 

88 Aloha, in 
Milano 

89 Lend 

(hearken) 

90 Afflicts 

91 Resources 

94 •‘The Saga of 
KingOlaf" 
composer 

95 Hems in 

99 Design 

100 Role for a 
B.Ed. 
candidate 

'102 Cajoling one 

103 Half sole- 

104 Explosives 
ingredient 

105 Some kind of 
nut 

106 Late bloomers 

107 Forage plant 

108 Gary Cooper 
role 

109 Oriental 

■ legumes 


DOWN 

35 Things 
ostensibly, but 
nor actually, 
hidden 

36 Genie or Clio 

38 Retardate with 
an area of 
brilliance 

39 Actor Nick 
from Omaha 

40 Foolish ones 

42 Ship’s 
propeller 

43 Shaped like 
some leaves 

44 Poet Sully- 
Prudhorame ' 

47 Arty party 

49 Factory 

51 Kind of grind 

52 Brisk 


IINTKKNATIOISAI. UKRAIJ) TRIBUNE. SATUBDAY-SHNDAY, AUGUST 10-11. 1985 


Oxymorons by peter g. snow peanuts . 



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PEANUTS 

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BLONPIE 

AND I'LL. TELL. VOU 
ANOTHER THNS... 



196 197 198 


BEETLE BAILEY~ 

1 WISH THP/'P JUNK 
THIS CHAIN-OF- 
COMMAMP NONSENSE 



*ir JUST A UT 
TRW— 


» I DON'T 1 
TWETOF 
r WMXEHI 


FORGET 

IT 


DOWN 

53 Latigo, e.g. 

54 Composure 
56Crazy!egs 

Hirschof 

football 

58 Goal 

59 Yawns 

61 Nourishes 

62 Electronic 
device 

63 Concern of 
Spender or 
Spenser 

64 Island in the 
Flith of Clyde 


DOWN 

65 Dgg fail, in 
wrestling 

66 Heartless 

67 John 

Gamer 

68 Mount 

70 Baggins, a 

Tolkien hobbit 

72 Perfume base 

75 Lubricators 

77 Choristers’ 
garb 

79 Sparkle 

80 Certain 
' phobias 


© flew York Tima, edited by Eugene fSalaka. 


DOWN 

81 One or Pan’s 
companions 

82 Type of 
collision 

83 Donald Duck’s 
cousin 

85 Toof for Hil- 
lary 

87 Kitchen uten- 
sils 

89 Hitching post 

90 Chipped in 
one’s chip 


DOWN 

91 Medieval 
silken fabric 

92 Signs loved by 
angels 

93 Source ’ 

94 Boiardo’s pa- 
tron 

95 Major follower 

96 Chick chaser 

97 Hard to hold 

98 Mmes. in Ma- 
drid 

101 Berliner’s re- 
fusal 



ANDY CAPP 


TCH.'IJUST 

CANTSEBW 


THE INTELLIGENCE MEN: 

Makers of the IQ Controversy 

Bv Raymond E. Fancher. Illustrated. 269 pages. 
$17.95. W, W Norton & Co. Inc, 500 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y.- 1 01 10. 

Reviewed by John Gross 

D SYCHOLOGICAL theories have a way of tefl- 
J-tng you something about the men who propound 
them as well as about the problems they are meant 
to explain. The debate over the meaning and nature 
of intelligence is a, case in point, and Raymond E. 
Fancher, a professor of psychology at York Univer- 
sity, Ontario, whose previous books include “Pio- 
neers of Psychology." has had the excellent idea of 
tracing the history of the controversy in terms of the 
major personalities involved. 

The first great dispute about intelligence has also 
proved the most enduring. How far are differences 
between individuals to be explained by external 
circumstances, how far by parentage? The battle 
lines between “nature" and “nurture" were original- 
ly drawn up more than a centtiry ago, with John Stuan 
Mill and Sir Francis Gallon as the principal oppos- 
ing spokesmen. Mill was a convinced environmen- 
talist, Gallon believed no less staunchly that heredi- 
tary factors were all-imponnnL One thing these two 
eminent Victorians had in common, however — 

DENNIS THE MENACE 





BOOKS 

they had both been child prodigies, who received an 
intensive education at a very early age. 

How did they come to derive such diametrically 
opposed conclusions from their experience? The 
chief reason, according to Fancher, is that they grew 
up with sharply contrasting self-images — "Mill 
was assiduously prevented from knowing how ad- 
vanced be was. while Gallon was constantly re- 
minded of that fact" Gallon’s precocity was also 
more superficial; coddled by his family, above all by 
a crippled elder sister, his hothouse development 
did not prove much of an advantage once be was 
sent away to school and as a student he failed to 
achieve the honors that he had set his heart on. In a 
sense his theories can be seen as providing a respect- 
able explanation for his disappointing academic 
record: he simply lacked the innate gifts for this 
particular kind of su excess. 

With Mill, one suspects, the situation was more 
complex than Fancher allows. There was a side of 
him that rebelled against his father’s notoriously 
crushing educational regime — the ride that for a 
tmn» attracted him to Thomas Carlyle — and he 
must surely have had moments when he jibbed at 
the idea that his great gifts (much greater than 
Gallon’s) were primarily the product of his envi roa- 

Solution to Last Week’s Puzzle 


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menL If be insisted quite so strenuously on the 
overwhelming significance of “outward circum- 
stances," it was for moral and political reasons, 
because be saw the tendency to regard differences 
between individuals as innate as “one of the greatest 
stumbling blocks to human improvement" 

By contrast Gallon's conception of “human im- 
provement" led straight to his espoasal of .eugenics 
(he coined the term), and when be originated the 
idea of the intelligence test it was. as Fancher says, 
as “a eugenic screening device." Paradoxically, 
however, the first workable tests were devised by a 
man whose views were much doser to Mm’s, 
the French psychologist Alfred Binet, who saw 
testing as a useful means of gauging subnormality, 
but who also believed that intelligence was fluid and 
shaped to a Luge extent by social and cultural 
forces. 

Unfortunately those who built most directly on 
his work after his death — men like the American 
psychologists Robert Yokes and Louis Tennan, 
who perfected the notion of the IQ and turned 
testing into a major industry — did so in a very 
different spirit, the spirit of unrestrained Galton- 
ians. It is symptomatic that Henry Herbert God- 
dard, his American translator, should have rendered 
his term for people with mildly subnormal mental 
abilities, “deOife f’ (literally, “weak ones"), with a 
harsh new term of his own — morons. 

Fancher describes Goddard’s views on the possi- 
ble dangers of unrestricted immigration, though 
without quoting the dire pseudo-statistics about the 
alleged degree of feeble-mindedness among various 
immigrant groups that were proffered in order to 
make his point To be fair, Goddard subsequently 
backed down, but a good deal of da ma ge had 
already been done, and m the 1920s other psycholo- 
gists went even further. 

Fancher brings the story up to dale with an 
account of the revulsion against the “IQ mystique" 
that began in the 1960s, of the controversy sur- 
rounding Arthur Jensen, and of the campaign 
against the hereditarians waged by Leon Kamm. En 
route, he gives an account of the British psycholo- 
gist Sir Cyril Burt, only one of a number of episodes 

in th« lwJ> ihni ciiooMt fViof fh# hietnrv of erimK 



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WHAT'S HAPPENED TO'YCXJ LATELY , m 
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WHY DID YOU TELL ME THAT DR- 
MOR6AH 


GARFIELD 


[ THERE ARE OTHER THlHGS THAT 
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John Gross is on the staff of The New York Tones. [ EWf6 Bio 



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77*1 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 10-11, 1985 


SPORTS 


Page 15 


s One-Hitter Gets Cards 
as Baseball Resumes 


The Associated Press 

— Villi Dwight 
Gowten tnd JoaquiB Andofir 
makiiffi h eadli n es virtually eve™ 
tm» xteyjazeh, and FernandoV*-. 
toda accepted as the 

Natrond League's top left-handed 
pitcher, John Tudor has not re- 
caved much notice, 

£?But his anonymity cannot last 
Such longer unless the Chicago 
Cobs can be persuaded tofowt 
what he did to ' them Thursday 

BASEBALL ROUNDUP 

nightwhenthe Cardinals won, 8-0 
» “W?? 1 eague baseball resumed 
fouowmg the players' two-day 
strike. J 

■ “He's probably the best left- 
hander I’ve faced aD year," the 
Cubs’ Gary Matthews said' after 
Tudw pitdbnd a one-hitter, win- 

nmgTor me 13th time in his last 14 

starts. His sixth shutout this year 
hrtflte a three-way tie with Gooden 
and. Valenzuela for the maior- 
kagne lead. 

xifKs a good streak," said Tudor, 
^uoas second one-hitter in the ma- 
jors raised bis record to 14-8 after a 
1-7 start “I really have never had 
otic like this. I can't relate to it" 
-In two games against Chicago 


Cubs Get Triple Flay, the Hard Way 

The Associated Press 

#1 J*v LOUIS— The Chicago Cnhs pulled off a bizarre triple play in 
the eighth inning Thursday night, the first in the N atinnnl rjwg n p thi* 
scMm and first against the speedy Cardinals in neatly five years. 
n "?■ Jack Clark and Andy Van Slyke on base, the 

^aramals Terry Pendleton lined out to first baseman Leon Durham. 
YVnnam, attempting to force Clark at second, was too late with his 
wow to shortstop Chris Sprier. 

As Van Slyke retreated to first, Speier’s return throw hit him on the 
hornet But Van Slyke raced around second and passed Clark, who 
was trapped m a run down. 

The official play, determined long after die game had ended, went 
from Durham to Speier to seco nd Ryue Sandbar* to Speier 

to third baseman Ron Cey and. finally, to.center fielder Bob Dernier. 


this season, he bag given up just 
three hits, struck out 12 and walked 
two. He beat them 7-0 on June 23. 

Tudor retired 14 straight batters 
at one point and faced just 29 in the 
game. The only Cubs to reach base 
were Leon Durham, with a fourth- 
inning single, and Matthews, who 
walked an inning later. 

The Cardinals made it easy for 
Tudor, scoring five times in the 
first inning. Andy Van Slyke hit his 
first home run in nearly two 
months, with a man on, following a 
homer by Terry Pendleton. 


Some Returned , Some Did Not 

The Associated Press 

-NEW YORK — - There were a few major leaguers who did not 
resume playing Thursday night 

The New York Yankees* outfielder and star base stealer, Rickey 
Henderson, apparently was caught at home in Oakland, California, 
and “will be fined heavily,” according to the team’s owner, George 
Stembremux 

Pedro Guerrero, the slugging outfielder of the Los Angeles Dodg- 
ers, failed to make flight connections from the Dominican Republic i 
and missed the game against the Cincinnati Reds. 

And pitcher Fhscual Perez, who had disappeared once before this 
season, vanished as the Atlanta Braves left for San Francisco. But he 
) reappeared and was in uniform before their game ended. 

‘There is a discipline on this dub that Rickey is going to find out 
about in a hurry," said Stembrenner. “If he had gone somewhere and 
not been told by our own player rep to hang tough — if be went to the 
West Coast and couldn't get a flight bade — but he left at 1:40 
yesterday and the announcement" of a strike settlement “was made 
around noon." 

Henderson, Who is batting . 349 , leads the American League is 
stolen bases with 50, 

Said his manager. Bitty Martin: “Maybe hell stay out there in 
Oakland. We get titerc in a week." 

Steve Brener, the Dodgers’ director of publicity, said Guerrero had 
flown to Santo Domingo mi Wednesday, arriving too late to catch a 
flight back, and failed to receive a wakeup call that would have 
allowed him to get Thursday's flight Guerrero is the National 
League's second-leading hitter, with a 331 average, and has 27 home 
runs. 

Perez, who left the Braves in New York on July 21, which led to a 
. 12 -day stayon the' suspended and restricted fists,' finally got to 
Candkstidt Paric and said fader, “1 thought it was a 4:05 game." 

The starting time was indeed 4:05 PAL — Atlanta time. Bat that is 
1 :Q5 P.M. in San Francisco. 

Two of the Giants’ pitchers, Dave LaPoint and Mike Krakow, had 
gone home when the strike began and were absent Thursday. They 
reportedly were en. route to San Francisco. First baseman Dan 
Driessen reported to Candlestick Park just 20 minutes before game 
time; and was scratched from the starting lineup. 

Gerald Perry, a first baseman for the Braves, had permission to 
miss Thursdays game. His wife had a baby Wednesday in Atlanta. 


Reds 6, Dodgers 5: Pete Rose's* 
two-out bunt angle in the top of 
the 13th scored Cesar Cedeno with 
Cincinnati's winning run and 
brought to an end a contest that 
lasted 4 hours 14 minutes in Los 
Angeles. 

Batting right-handed, Rose 
bunted down the third-base line. 
Pitcher Carlos Diaz fielded the ball 
but his throw to first was too late. 
Rose got two hits in the game and is 
21 shy of tying Ty Cobb's major- 
league career record of 4,191. 

Cincinnati relievers retired 19 
straight batters, a string broken 
when Ken L&ndreaux walked with 
two out in the 13th. 

Mete 14, Expos 7: Keith Her- 
nandez got five of New York's 20 
hits and drove in three runs in 
Montreal, whDe teammates Darryl 
Strawberry, George Foster and 
Gary Carter homered. 

Patties 6, Astros 5: Pinch-hitter 
Jeny Royster singled in the win- 
ning run Ln ihe bottom of the ninth 
as San Diego rallied for four runs 
on four hits and three errors by 
Houston, winch wasted 14 hits. 

PUffies 7. Pirates 3: In Philadel- 
phia, it did not take long for Pitts- 
burgh, the league's worst team, to 
continue losing as Mike Schmidt 
hit a three-run homer during a 
four-run first inning . 

Braves 2, Gants 0: in San Fran- 
cisco the home crowd — all 3*557 
of them — bad little to cheer as 
Atlanta's Rick Mahler, supported 
by four double plays, pitched a 
four-hitter and the Giants were 
shut out for the 12th time this sea- 
son. Mahler also drove in a run. 

Bine Jays 7-7, Orioles 2-4: In the 
American League, Toronto contin- 
ued its dominance of the East as 
Jesse Barfield went 6-for-6, scored 
four runs and stole two bases, and 
Tony Fernandez contributed four 
hits and five RBI to the sweep of 
visiting Baltimore. 

Yankees 8-7, Indians 1-6: Dave 
Winfield homered twice and drove 
in six runs in the first game in New 

York, then Don Mattingly hit two 
home runs in the second game 
against Gevdand. 

Royals 184, Tigris 3*4: Detroit, 
which had not lost in Kansas City, 
Missouri, in almost two years, was 
stopped by Bret Saberhagpn's nine 



'.-'V , : - 

■ ‘ Jh v‘ 


: • ‘ '..' v 
• * 


- " u - * i 


. . .M 


The AuDQQJeri Kmi 


Doug Tewell and his caddy, Ralph Coffee, lined up a putt 
that help bun shoot a course record in PGA Championship. 


strikeouts the first game, then Hal 
McRae drove in three runs in the 
second. In the opener, the Tigers’ 
starter, Frank. Tacana, was beaten 
by the Royals for the 20th time. 

'Brewers' 7-3, Rangers 4-1: in Ar- 
lington, Texas, Ben Oglivie's two- 
run homer and RBI single led Mil- 
waukee to victory in the first game 
and he hit two sacrifice flies in the 
second. 

Twins 4. Angels 2: In Minneapo- 
lis, Bert Blyleven won his 100th 
game for Minnesota — his first 
since rejoining the team in a trade 
with Geveland on Aug. I — hold- 
ing California to seven hits while 
sinking out four. 

The .Angels' Rod Carew, who got 
his 3,000th hit on Sunday, collected 
two to pass Roberto Clemente on 
the all-time list. Carew- trails A1 
Kaline. who is 14th all-time, by five 
hits. 

White Sox 7-L Red Sox 64: 
Ron Kittle hit two homers for Chi- 
cago in the opener, one going over 
the roof at Comisfcey Park. In the 
second game, Wade Boggs ho- 
mered and drove in three runs for 


Boston and teammate Rich Ged- 
man homered and doubled. 

A’s 1L, Mariners 2: Dusty Baker 
scored two runs and drove in two 
during an eight-run fourth inning 
that gave Oakland a victory in Se- 
attle. It was the A's first triumph in 
an indoor stadium this season. 

■ Offer Made for Pirates 

A public-private coalition that 
includes Westinghouse Electric 
Coip.. U.S. Steel Coip. and ai least 
10 other investors has made an of- 
fer to buy the financially troubled 
Pirates. The Associated Press re- 
ported from Pittsburgh. 

The coalition, which would form 
a partnership called Pittsburgh 
Baseball Inc., made the offer 
Thursday to the National League 
team’s owners, the Gal breath fam- 
ily and Warner Communications. 

Pittsburgh's mayor, Richard Ca- 
liguiri, announced the offer but 
would not disclose the terms. Tele- 
vision station WPXL quoting un- 
named sources, said the offer was 
substantially lower than the $35 
million to $40 million the Gal- 
breaths were seeking. 


Tewell Shoots Record 64, 
Can’t Shake PGA Favorites 


By Gordon S. White Jr. 

•Vew York rimes. Senior 

DENVER — The first round of 
the 67 ih PGA Championship was 
reminiscent of the first round of the 
1 14th British Open last month, be- 
cause one or the tour s steady but 
average golfers, Doug Tewell. set a 
Cherry Hills Country Club course 
record of seven-under-par 64. 

His effort Thursday came just 21 
days after another journeyman. 
Christy O'Connor Jr. of Ireland, 
shot a course-record 64 for the 
first-round lead in the British Open 
at Royal Su George's. O'Connor 
did not go on to win the British 
Open. 

Tewell is not among the favorites 
to win the PGA title, the fourth and 
Iasi major tournament of the year, 
because he has won only two times 
in 1 1 years on the tour. He also has 
missed the cut three times and has 
withdrawn once in his last five out- 
ings. and he is suffering from back 
ailments so painful that he takes six 
aspirins during each round. 

But the primary reason that 
Tewell, 35, might not win is found 
in the list of golfers in dose pursuiL 
This includes Jack Nicklaus, win- 
ner of each of the four major tour- 
naments at least once; Tom Wat- 
son. who has won each of the first 
three major tournaments at least 
once but not the PGA Champion- 
ship, and Lee Trevino, the defend- 
ing champion. 

It was a day of thrilling shots 
executed in mile-high altitude, in 
bright, hot, windless weather, over 
a 7.089-yard (6.490-meter), par-7f 
course that Peter Jacobsen said was 
“easy." Jacobsen was one of four 
golfers in second place, just two 
shots behind Tewell at 66. The oth- 
ers were Nicklaus, Trevino and 
Corey Pavin. Watson was tied with 
Hubert Green and Danny Edwards 
at 67. 

Despite a bogey 5 on the 18th 
hole, Tewell broke the 25-year-old 
Cherry Hills course record of 65 set 
by Aroold Palmer in the final 
round of the 1960 U.S. Open. That 
65 gave Palmer his only U.S. Open 
title. Thursday. Palmer shot 75. 

“My qard will be hanging on my 
wall at home until someone breaks 
the record," Tewell said. “I hope 
it's a long time." 

He had a chance to finish at 63 
when he got an eagle 3 on the 555- 
yard, par-5 17lh hole. That got his 
score to eight under par before he 
took the bogey on the 491-yard, 
par-4 18th. He pul his second shot 
into a bunker and could not get up 
and down with one putL 

“1 had no intention! of going for 
the green in two when 1 teed up at 
I7,“ Tewell said. “It’s too risky a 
shoL” 

That hole is straight, but the 
green is a tiny island tucked a few 
feet beyond the fronting water haz- 
ard. It is a daring move to go for it 
in two, because the green does not 
necessarily hold the long iron or 



Gary Player searched hard for a way to escape this tree off 
ninth fairway at Cherry Hills bourse in Denver. He shot 72. 


long wood shot on the putting sur- 
face. 

“When I g oi up to my ball we 
had a long wait for the group ahead 
of us," Tew elf said. "I was 236 
yards from the pin and needed 210 
yards to cany the water." 

Laughing at his gamble, be said: 
“1 can hit a two-iron 212 yards, so I 
had plenty to spare. That's why I 
changed my mind and went ior it." 

He barely got that two-iron sbot 
over the creek, missing the far bank 
by about a foot. The ball bounced 
to a stop six feet ( 1.8 meters) from 
the cup. and he sank the putt for 
the eagle 3. That he hit into the high 
grass between the creek, and the 
green prevented his ball from 
bounding over the back of the 
green. 

There were other lucky shots. Ja- 
cobsen holed out from two bunkers 
in a row, at 15 and 16. after chip- 
ping in from the fringe for a birai'e 


at 1 1. Morris Hatalsky finished at 
68 after holing a 198-yard five-iron 
shot for an eagle 2 on 18. 

And Trevino, who at age 44 last 
year won this title at Show Creek in 
Alabama, got the lucky bounce of 
the day. He had just taken a dou- 
ble-bogey 6 at the I6th hole to fall 
back to three under par. Like 
Tewell, Trevino went for the green 
on his second shot at the 17th hole. 
Using a three-iron. Trevino did not 
get the ball up high and it came 
down into the creek But the ball 
skipped, on one bounce, over the 
water and up onto the green, stop- 


ping five feet from the hole. Tre- 
vino sank the putt for an eagle to 
get back to five under. 

Bernhard Langer of West Ger- 
many, winner of this year’s Mas- 
ters. finished in a tie with Tom 
Kite, Hal Sutton, Calvin Peete and 
four others at 69. Thirty-one golf- 
ers in the field of 149 were under 
par on a course where most used 
their driver- only three to five times 
from the lees. 

■ Fans Are Not So Locky 

As Watson, Greg Norman and 
Andy Bean were playing the 12th 
hole before one of the biggest gal- 
leries of the day, the bridge over a 
small creek on the Cherry Hills 
Country Club course sagged Into 
the water under the weight of spec- 
tators, soaking several people. 
United Press International report- 
ed. 

About 100 spectators had crowd- 
ed onto the metal and wood bridge 
to the left of the 12th green to get a 
glimpse of Watson’s tee shot. The 
bridge spans a shallow creek and is 
normally used by cans. 

The middje of the bridge caved 
in, slowly dipping into the water 
and taking several spectators with 
it. Some got wet up to their knees, 
but no one was injured. 

A club spokesman said the 
bridge likely would not be fixed 
before the end of the PGA Cham- 
pionship. Meanwhile, spectators 
will be routed around it, he said. 


SCOREBOARD 

Baseball 

TTnrrsday’s Major League Unescores 


NATIONAL LEAOUEx 

Pirecwra* me iee-^j s o 

PMtottfeWa «* 1W 7 >• 1 

ReOhusn awnenta (SI. Scurry (7) cmd Or- 
tiz; Danny, Carman (B) nm»VlraU.W--Oefwv. 


Saamd Gams 

Ctovskmd tUtHHMN 1 

Nsw York m 111 W»x— 7 7 » 

Romero, Reed 121, Rutile (71, Thompson (9) 
and Banda; NMcro. Fisher (SI. RJsftotff (>] 


Hz- Denny. Carman (B) and vlnULW—oenw. 1 ' 

51 tXwSStr. Sv-Corman W. HRs — and 

.. iimi fiii.Mu Riatwttf (201. HR*— Cleveland, ftrfftr 2 IS). 


7-O.L — mwiraw, r/.*, — 

Philadelphia, SchmkR (»>. VJmtl fUJ, SdW 

131. 

Atlanta *M "1 1 4 4 

Son nimi urn 00# OH M0- • 0 0 

MaMer tmd Canone; GoM. Minton I6I . WU- 
Itams (7), Jeflcoat (9) and Brtnhr. W— Mas- 
ter, 16-f. l — M inion, 3-3. 


Rfotiettl (Ml- HR*- Cleveland, Suffer 2 is). 
Primes M), Thornton (8>. New YorV,Matilno- 
ty 2 IM), Bov lor 119). 

Detroit on eee eon-3 7 0 

kuhw dry » on ou-w u o 

Tanona. Berenaaer (6), Bair {«). Loosz IB) 
and Parrish, Melvin IB); Sdberhomn and 
Sundbera. w— Softertwoen, 13-5. 1—- Tanana. 
4-11. HR — Detroit, Evans (25). 

Second Gome 

Mtrott 101 Ml W0— • B • 

cur M0 JB MR-4 » I 

P* try, Lopa 4) and Cstlllta IWvIh (7), 


Hew Yet* IU M ff!9-~IS 20 • 

Montreal ■» in on we-* » • 

AnuUtra. Uadi 16) m d Carter, *M IB* M»-4 » » 

^RDbero. r3), Palmer ^St^, lSU* 4) and Cottllkv NWvUt (7); 

" ndFltaawaMLW— pit Gohtam IS). Outaenher rv (7> and 
9-S.Sv— Leocft (11- HRs— New York, Carter • yu_GublCHJ. M. L P elrv, 12-1 L 

04), Foster CM), Strawberry (14). HR-DWrelT, Evans 

BM 000—0 t t U6>. 

sTloS. m 030 m* — * W o on hi w-» u 2 

Sanderson, Brusstar (5), Sorensen (6>, Pro- Tems 0M 120 100-4 Ml 

iler (B) and Lake; Tudor and Porter. W— one n wower, Wotts 15), 

Tudor, 14 - 0 . L — Sander so n. Si HRs— SI. sctinoeder; Russ eU. Ho rrta (4). Stewart (0) 
Louis, Van Styko (7), *4). 

012 Ml 010— d H ) (fl. Texas. OHrlon (14). 

Saa EMobo 814 888 Second Game 

Ntokra, smith IB) and BaUev; IW.TW- MnwalAM no on 200 — a 10 0 

mono (7), LoHerts (9) and Tews 000 BM 100—1 S 0 

fern. 7i L— smith. Si HRs- Haimton, Flnaers (7) cmd Moore. Srhroe- 

MumrtWYtn. San Diene. Garvey IMI.mo^ ^ m: Hooton, Rarnmo (7) and'Brwmnw. 
Hnez (ML p strain (B>. W—Vudovlch, 44L L— Hoafon,5- 

Ctodaaatt an MO » 0M 1—4 11 0 4- Sv-Flnoen na>. 

Ua^UwNs «0 0J4 lio 000 0-5 > 5 CaHfomto m m 7 1 

(13 Imlnas) M lnn eM to 1 

^ m.Prtce (71. Franco (81. Power RonmnlclL_5a«h«r 


CtaCtooori WNIMONWU « 

LoeAnoetos «0 034 HO 000 0—5 B 3 cHfontto 

(13 Undoes) M lna Md tn 

Stto.Kumero.Prl»ro.Fiwl«.Poww Rom»k 


sSSSsS^ SSSasasasE 


II l|> noaiuw . i-w— -- Ormu. 

Dtoiw-tf 

er, «. l -O ta, 3-1. 5w— *”• 


BM too 021—n M e 
^tto • 0M2MM d-3 7 » 

r yd mil. Youna (B), Lsnetord 19) and 
uhjHi; Lansston, Wills 14), Beattie (7),Niewz 


AMB RICAN US40UE uanwi; Lansston, Wills 14), Beattie (1 

^AMHRIGA* , e W— CraHraH, 10i 1 

S,— .-ssstw »—■ — 

Major league Standings 

Mosatrv (7). *«• DHW 1 * 


^qr-re, 1 5 1 Toronto 

- BoAfeker. w«n Boston 

C7}; FTfer. Hw*e (7) and BaWmore 

'~ 9 ~~ M . srJS £ SWE wu,wouk * e 

Baltimore, Youno <nj, WurW cievwttnd 

IW). 


— fgvi t iB t Can fornto 
■Won ■* u 0 Citv 

OtodaKbon I6»,Ctoor auawa 

m: Bums, «<>). seome 

fttoistor (4). James I*J W«ws«w 

wtotor. 1i L — Klson. W , Tex0 s 

HRs— Gaston, Armas H4). ChK»A Kl»» 

IWI. W 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Cast Dhriston 

W L PCI. GB 
Hf V - 
59 47 S5) 9 
57 49 J38 T1 
54 50 -528 12 
53 SJ 505 14Vj 
47 Sf ^SJ 30 
34 72 .321 « 
west DMstoo 

41 45 STS — 

y sr « « » 

y 57 49 J3B 4 

S3 51 JT® 7 
4# 57 Ml 12 
47 57 ,452 13 

40 M 30 H 


Second Gw™' , a i 

Boston “I i • *** V<rt 

CMeMo 618 ueKon. si. uwls 

Klotter. Crawford W Mon, ' ro, 

.' ROONe M).stntan 17) art) HRS _ CWe«» 

* l — Natecn 7-A Sv-Orowtora «*• Philadelphia 

Boston, Gedman IW- Bows <»■ PlHsBuro" t 

-■ a**eu»d 8,9 * * u b los Awestos 

New YetH ^Tviitort, CtoetoM** 

Wartto. Cta * (51. Ru* 1 *" ‘fJ.^irtey (B). San OUxa 
Bcndo (WiBvstrom, Fisher i.j.l— Houston 
- An«rn(y|araJW»Twanr.w-S1^^L , ^ [9)- Ationja^ 
wanae.2-AHRd-Oev«« 1 ' BernD ” Son Frtmctscn 

^ New Yarn. WWfcid 3 (M). 


national league 
EO 0D hfW» 

W L FcL 



PGA Gbampionship 

First round tenders hi toe 47U» PGA nottonoi 
dtomptonsdlp at Owny HHt% Gwnrtrr Ctofc 
Denver. Cotorade, (7AVnrard, iwr 3S-3fr-71 > : 
Dona Tewell XM2-A4 


Corev Pavin 
Lee Tnvtoo 
Peter Jacobsen 
jack Nicklaus 
Hubert Green 
Dcmnv Edwards 
Tam vuatsan 
Morris Hatcdskv 
Gil Mwvan 
Bernhard Looser 
Bob Lour 
Tom Kile 
CaMn Peete 
Ha) Sutton 
Tie NUno Chen 
Robot Maltbie 
Mark Lye 
Scon Hodi 
Ron Streets 
Nick Pakto 
Bruce Ltotoke 
Mark MoCurnber 
Lon Htokle 
Iflinv Wudklns 
Larry Nelson 
Prod Couatos 
Don Pooknr 
Ed Fieri 
Mark Pfe» 
Howard Tertttv 
Mike Smith 
Lorry MIee 
Tim Narrie 
jav Haas 
Donnie Hammond 
WHile wood 
AndV Bean 
Fuzzy Zoetter 
Jack seltzer ' 
Sieve Benson 
joey SlndMar 
BUI Glasson 
Mark WMse 
Mark O'Meara 
Dcrve Barr 
Rex Caldwell 
Frank Conner 
Larry Gflbert 
PMI Blacfcmcr 
Hale Irwin 
BUI Krertxert 
Brett Upper 
Mike Ram 
Jim Colbert 
Croto Startler 
Steve Vertoto 
Gary Ottrw 
Kevin Mortis 
Wavne Levi 
Georoe Archer 
Clarence Rose 
Dove Stockton 


3303-44 

M-34-4A 

34-33—44 

34-32—44 

32- 34-44 
34-33—47 

34-33 — 47 

37- 35 — 47 
34-34—4 B 

33- 34 — 47 

34- 35—49 

33- 34-40 

34- 35—69 

34- 3S-49 

35- 34-49 
34-35-49 

34- 35-49 

35- 35—70 
35-35 — 70 

3S-35 — 70 
35-35 — 70 
33-37—70 
34J4 — 70 

33- 37—70 

34- 34—70 
3444-70 

34- 34 — 73 

35- 35—70 
34-34-70 

34- 34—70 

35- 35—70 

38- 33-71 

34- 35-71 

35- 14—71 

34- 35-71 

33- 38—71 

35- 36—71 
35-34—71 

34- 35— 71 

34-35—71 

3407—71 

34- 37 — 71 

35- 34—71 
37-34-71 
15-34 — 71 

34- 35—71 
53-38—71 
23-38-71 
37-34-71 
33^6—71 
3534-71 

35- 37—72 

36- 34—72 

33- 39—72 
3*38-72 
3434-73 

34- 34—7? 

3533-72 

3434-72 

3434-72 

3434—32 

3436-72 

3438-72 


Football 


63 

42 

MX 

— 


62 

42 

JK 

to 

Montreal 

59 

4B 

J51 

5 

Ottawa 

51 

51 

SM 

9 

Taranto 

50 

55 

A 76 

13 

Hamilton 

33 

BUM 

41 

71 

J17 

29M 

Brtt a mb 

44 

.521 

— 

Edmonton 

57 

48 

SC 

4 

Wtonipeo 

56 

51 

SO 

6 

Soflcatchwn 

50 

57 

467 

13 

Catoonr 

47 

» 

Mi 

M 

Winnipeg i 

41 

M 

J23 

2! 


CFL Standings 

Eastern OftUfea 

W L T PF PA Pis 
jeWtfreai 3 2 9 W IK 6 

Onowa 2 3 0 104 183 * 

Taranto 7 3 O 132 U) 4 

Hamilton i 3 0 to UM 2 

Western Dhrlskm 

Brtt a mb 5 0 6 2 J* 10 

Edmonton 3 3 B ** f 

Winnipeo 3 2 8 143 112 4 

Soflcatchwn 2 2 0 113 B? 4 

Catoary 11 4 0 40 102 0 

Tbarsdart fteso« 


Geonre Bums 
Dan Pohl 
jadt Renner 
Bobby Wadklns 
DA WeXOrins 
Gary Player 
Andy Norm 
Woody Blackburn 
Scott Simpson 
Pavne Stewart 
BoD Eastwood 
Keith Fergus 


3636-73 

34- 36—7? 

35- 37-72 
3537-72 
3434-72 
3537—72 
3438—73 
3537-72 
34.30-72 
3434—72 
34-38 — 72 
3438-72 




Transition 

BASEBALL 
American Loom 

BALTIMORE— OntlanM L*nn Sakatasec- 
una bosemon, to Rochester ot th« internation- 
al Leanue. Activated Nate SnelL Pitcher. 

CHICAGO — Stoned Steve Rotters, pitcher, 
la a minor league contract with the Triple A 
Buffalo Btsons. 

KANSAS CITY— Colled UP Steve Farr, 
pitcher, and Bod Heaman, infieKJer. from 
Omaha of the American Association. Sent 
Mike LaCass. pitcher, to Omaha. 

National League 

AT LANTA— Recalled Joe Jahneon, pitcher, 
from Richmond of Ihe International Leasue. 

CINCINNATI— Activated Joe Price, pitch- 
er. Sent BoD Buehancai, Pitcher, to Denver at 
the American Association. 

PITTSBURGH— Recalled Sammy Khalifa 
shortstop, from Hawaii of the pacific Coast 
Leapue, Returned Johnnie LoMastw, short- 
stop. to the 15-day disabled list. 





Ihe Associated PrcM 


ONE LAST WORD: BLUB — Stuart Anderson, a 
linebacker for the Washington Redskins, was doing a 
television interview at training camp in Carlisle, Penn- 
sylvania, when teammates Mel Kaufman, left, and Mon- 
te Coleman informed him, not subtly, that it was over. 


An Accidental Plunge Muddies Track 


By Andrew Beyer . 

Washington Post Service 

SARATOGA SPRINGS, New York ~ New York- 
ers are suspicious souls, and New York harness bettors 
hold an especially orospiiaioriaj view of the world So 
it was very easy for the crowd at Yonkers Raceway on 
a recent night' to conclude that it was witnessing a 
brazen display of larceny. 

Cagey Hero was the 3-io-5 favorite and Mr. Escort 
the 5*io-2 second dunce as the field approached the 
starting gate. There was so much money in the wager- 
ing pool that even a big bet should not have affected 
the odds, but when the tote board blinked for the final 
time, Mr. Escort’s price plunged to 4 to 5 while Cagey 
Hero rose to 8 to 5. 

That final flurry of betting was so strong that it 
suggested the outcome was a foregone conclusion, and 
the crowd started booing as soon as the race began. 
After Mr. Escort had won with ease, irate bettors 
serm, tried and threw debris at him in the winner's 
circle. The crowd was in an ugly mood for the rest of 
die night, and numerous bettors probably went home 
with a renewed conviction that the game is hopelessly 
corrupt 

Rarely does the public learn wbat really happened 
in such seemingly suspicious circumstances. Bui not 
long ago, I luppoied to meet the gambler who was 
single-handedly responsible this time. 

Jimmy is a professional harness bettor, one of (he 
biggest plungers in New York. “He’s an absolutely 


fearless player," said a friend, who witnessed and 
verified the whole incident with Mr. Escort. 

-1 knew Mr. Escort was the best horse," said Jimmy. 
“It was just basic handicapping. I was going to bet 
somewhere between $4,000 and $6,000." 

Jimmy alwavs bets ai the last moment, so he went to 
the window just as the field was on gait and called out 
his wager. As he started to bet, however, one horse 
failed to get up to the starting gate and the starter 
ordered a recall The field had to regroup, delaying the 
start for a couple of minutes. 

4 s this was happening. Jimmy's mutuel derk had 
punched out a $1,000 wager on Mr. Escort and hit the 
“Repeat" button on his machine. The tickets came 
flying out — and kept coming. , , j 

The size of Jimmy’s bet kept growing. It had 
reached $21,000 when the race started and aD the 
mutuel machines at the track were automatically shut 
off. He had only a moment to decide what to do. “I’ll 
take it!" he told the mutuel clerk. 

Jimmy is wdl known at the track, and the mutuel 
‘ c [erk knew he was gpod for the money. But neither had 
to worry after the horses had gone a half-mile and the 
cascade’ of boos from the crowd told them that Mr. 
Escort was od his way to an easy victory. 

As he collected a profit erf $16,800, Jimmy might 
have been glad that harness racing is such a logical, 
honest game that he confidently could bet $21,000 on 
a horse who simply figured to be dose. He might have 
been the only person at the track who held that 
opinion- 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Gram Just Misses Setting 4th Record 

GATESHEAD, England (A P) —Britain's Steve Cram ran the second- 
fastest 1.000 meters Friday night, barely missing in an attempt to set a 
fourth world record in 24 days. 

Running on his local track. Cram, 24, was timed in 2 minutes 12:85 
seconds, jusi short of ihe record of 2:1118 set by Sebastian Coe of Britain 
in 1981. 

Cram broke countrynum Steve Oven’s 1300- meter record in Nice on 
July 16; 1 1 days Jaier. in Oslo, he broke Coe's mark for the mile and in 
Budapest, five days ago, he broke the nine-year-old 2,000-meier record of 
New Zealand's John Walker. 

Kohde-KUsch Upsets Navratilova 

TORONTO (UPI) — Claudia Kohde-Kilsch of West Germany upset 
Martina Navratilova. 3-6, 6-4, 6-3. on Friday to advance to the semifinals 
of the Canadian Open Tennis Championships. 

Navratilova, playing ter first tournament since her victory at Wimble- 
don, was unable to break Kohde-Kilsch. the No. 5 seed, in the final two 
sets. Last week, Kohde-Kilsch upset Pam Shriver to win a tournament in 
Los Angeles. 


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: ;= ! CHE&ft* PLAT? GSTAAD T& 03041)05 






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Page 16 


JAPAN POSTCARD 

The ' Survival 9 Warriors 


By Leslie Brody 

The Associated Press 

A TSUGL Japan — An import 
/x£rom the United States is be- 
coming a rage in Japan: the Surviv- 
al Game, where young people dress 
up in U. S. Army combat uniforms 
and spend weekends in the woods 
playing war. 

“Japan has been in a peaceful 
period for many years,” said Taka- 
shi Kawamoto, who brought the 
fad to Japan from California two 
years ago. “That’s not to say we 
want to wage war, but the game 
shares a fundamental point with 
judo; you're against an adversary.” 
The simple rules— steal the oth- 
er team's flag before you get shot — 
have attracted about 30,000 players 
across the country, Kawamoto 
said. Although most are in their 20s 
and early 30s, the game is catching 
on among junior high school stu- 
dents, despite a ban on purchases 
of toy guns by children under 18. 
The guns shoot plastic pellets. 

“Nobody thinks about gening 
shot, only about shooting the ene- 
my," said one weary “soldier” after 
a recent game near Atsugi airfield 
southwest of Tokyo. The Geld was 
a World War n base for Japanese 
kamikaze pilots and is now a U. S. 
facility. 

The dog-tagged players offered 
various reasons for joining the 
game on a sweltering Sunday; a 
chance to get out of the city, be a 
hero, find Friends, lose weight. 

Akiko Shibazaki, one of three 
women among 73 men, said, with a 
giggle, that s 1 * came to “hunt more 
than flags.” 

“The game’s a great way to get 
rid of stress,” said Shigeru Naka- 
sugl a storekeeper. “Japan may be 
rich, but life is still hard. There’s so 
little space, and you have to bow 
down to your boss at work. ‘Surviv- 
al’ is even better than baseball be- 
cause there are no fixed positions." 

Warning for Explicit Lyrics 

The Associated Press 
NEW YORK — Nineteen top 
record companies, which market 80 
percent of the recorded music in 
the United States, have proposed a 
label warning buyers of sexually 
explicit lyrics. The Recording In- 
dustry Association of America said 
in a letter to the Washington-based 
Parents’ Music Resource Center 
that wording of the label remained 
to be discussed. 


The participants dress up like 
U. S. soldiers, with combat boots, 
web belts and shoulder patches, 
and with plastic goggles to protect 
the eyes from the pellets. 

“Dressing up makes us fed like 
actors,” said Toshio Ami. a 25- 


face with camouflage painL 
“We don’t haw any direct experi- 
ence with war, so we know about it 
mostly from American movies like 
‘The Deer Hunter' and 
‘M*A*S*H.’ Besides, Japan lost. 
Tnctaad of continuing the losing 
Teding the older "eqple keep, we’d 
rather imitate winners." He 
thumbed his uniform collar proud- 
ly. “It's authentic from ’43.” 

“It would look really strange if 
we walked down the street dressed 
like the Imperial Army, don’t you 
think?” a teammate suggested 

“It’s josl a game,” said' another. 
“Don’t think about it too hard, or 
you'll think we like the military. It’s 
exciting to hide in the forest, with- 
out knowing whether there’s some- 
one nearby trying to get you. 

“It’s not like real life. We like to 
play war, blit don't want a real 
one." 

Japan’s postwar constitution 
limits its military to a defensive 
role,' and the government keeps de- 
fense spending below I percent of 
the gross national product. 

In an indication of the Survival 
Game’s popularity, Makoto Tobo, 
manager of the Ogen gun store in 
Tokyo, said his tiny shop made 
more than 30 million yen (about 
. $125,000) off the game Last year. A 
replica of a military rifle costs 8,000 
yen (about $34), with some of the 
most prestigious modds going for 
more than 100,000 yea. 

About 50 hobby and toy stores in 
Japan sell the equipment for. the 
game, according to Combat maga- 
zine, the bible for devoted players, 
who hope to form a national assod-. 
arion soon. 

One who expressed shock at the 
whole thing was an American writ- 
er, David Klass. He noted that a 
surfer’s haunt near bis home in the 
coastal resort of Atami had started 
selling toy guns. 

“At a time when American com- 
panies are desperate to get their 
goods into Japan, it's ironic that 
this game is what the Japanese 
choose to import," he said. 

Art Buchwald is on vacation. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATUKDAY-SUWDAY, AUGUST 10-11, 1985 

Video Age at the Vatican: TV Center Covers All 

.. . 5 . 1 W- rtf the romoac 


By E. J. Dionne 

Vw York Times Service 

R OME — The Vatican, which 
over the decades has devel- 
oped sophisticated press and ra- 
dio operations, is now trying to 
come to terms with the video aja. 
It is doing so by means or the 
Vatican Television Center, which 
was founded in 1983 with the mis- 
sion of documenting all of Pope 
John Paul IPs activities. 

The center, known as CTV af- 
ter its Italian name, is serving as a 
supplement to John Paul’s success 
in winning the' Catholic Church 

an almost permanent place in the 
secular media. More than just a 
technological device, the center is 
a symbol for the kind of papacy 
John Paul is conducting. His 
friends and critics alike refer to 
him as a “populist," a label that 
refers as much to the methods he 
uses as to the content of his ideas. 
His frequent trips abroad have 
provided him with vast new audi- 
ences. And the journeys are orga- 
nized not simply to reach those 
who turn out for the mass gather- 
ings but for the millions more 
who watch on television. By trav- 
eling so much, the pope has creat- 
ed a series of events — and back- 
drops — that the media often find 
themselves unable to resist. 

“Television usually finds the 
pope irresistible,” said Richard 
Roth, a Rone correspondent for 
CBS News who has accompanied 
the pope on 17 of his 27 foreign 
trips. “There are three factors, 
which I would refear to as exotica, 
spectacle and politics. His trips 
are a combination of aD three, 
and even when than is not news, 
which would be the politics, there 
is almost guaranteed exotica and 



were 


Uvfcri Poo Mmrfiand 


The pope has put the secular media, particularly television, to work for him. 


office chan a network “Just as Che 
words and actions of the pope are 
documented in printed form by 
the Press Office and The Osserva- 
tore Romano and in audio form 
by the Vatican Radio,” he said, 
“so they are documented in video 
form by CTV." 

In doing this, the center ah 
tempts to fill gaps left by secular 


try. Videotapes of the messages 
were shipped to the Vatican nun- 
ciatures in the various countries 
and used in effect as promotional 
spots for the pope’s visit. They are 
usually given free to state televi- 
sion networks and other televi- 
sion stations interested in them. 

Egidio Maggioni. an official of 
the Vatican television operation. 


is almost guaranteed exotica and fd^aon average. For rostance, ^ ^ Afiica trip under- 
spectacle. And what could be li^^ptibhc Uned another CTV service: “It's 
«w*> nntir and snw-tamlar than the pope, sodtusweelcly A ngel US. • . . . j i .i .l. 


more exotic and spectacular than 
going to the heart of Africa?” 

Given the secular media's fasci- 
nation with the pope, what func- 
tion is CTV to serve? 

“We are not a network or a 
television station,” said Fiorenzo 
Tagliabue, secretary-general of 
the center. Its primary task, he 
said, is straightforward: “We re- 
cord everything the pope does in 
public — in the Vatican, in Italy, 
around the world.” 

Archbishop John P. Foley, 
head of the Pontifical Commis- 
sion for Social Co mmunica tions, 
said CTV was more like a press 


These are mainly of interest to the 
devout, unless the pope uses the 
occasions to make statements on 
controversial public questions. 

The Africa trip offers other evi- 
dence of the role CTV plays. On 
July 31, 10 days before his depar- 
ture for Africa, the pope sat down 
with a CTV crew at his summer 
residence, Castel Gondolfo, and 
taped brief messages for each of 
tire seven countries he is to visit, 
Tagliabue said. 

Generally, they are simply 
greetings in which the pope says 
how happy he isio visit the coun- 


important to understand that the 
television stations in many Third- 
World countries have very little 
money. They simply cannot af- 
ford to cover the pope. We can 
provide them with the footage 
they want and need.” 

Thus, he continued, CTV plans 
to produce a documentary on the 
Africa trip soon after the Pope 
returns Aug. 20, aimed mainly for 
distribution to African television 
stations th-it are financially un- 
able to cover the pope’s visit be- 
yond their own countries. 

One of the most effective docu- 


mentaries resulted from the 
pope’s visit last year to Vietnam- 
ese rcfijgees in Thafland. The nar- 
ration was simply the pope’s ad- 
dress to a group of diplomats 
about the plight of the displaced. 
“The conscience of humanity 
must be made ever more aware of 
the evils of the situation,” the 
pope declares, while the pictures 
show naked mid half-naked chil- 
dren. 

Archbishop Foley said among 
the most popular videotapes are 
one of the pope’s visit to the 
shrine at Lourdes and another 
called “The Pardon," on the 
pope's prison visit to Mehmer Ali 
Agca, the man convicted of shoot- 
ing hirri- 

WQ1 we someday find a John 
Paul video next to the latest Ma- 
donna nx± tape? There have been 
some discussions between Vati- 
can officials and representatives 
of commercial distributors, but 
Foley said that so far the Vatican 
had preferred religious outlets. 

“We want to be certain of the 


character of the 

ud, alluding to 

pornographic 

videotapes. The Vatican sells the 
distributor the rights to rcprodoce 
the tapes, he said, with funner 
proceeds going to the distributor. 

One source of money for the 
Vatican Television Center, wmen 
under its charter must be self- 

financing, is the sale of videotapes 

from papal audiences. Bui to 
avoid a trade in putt “vanity” 
shots with the pope, the cento- 
sells videos that include the 
pope’s message during the audi- 
ence. “We try to ensure that n 
fulfills a religious purpose." the 
archbishop said. 

Tagliabue would not discuss 
the financing of the center. Al- 
though the constant videotaping 

of the pope is an expensive propo- 
sition. CTV is betievtd to be a 
low-budget operation. Its bead- 
quarters are crammed into a few 
rooms in a corner of Vatican Giy. 
and much of the equipment has 
been donated. 

The commercial networks have 
feared that the creation of CTV 
would result in their having less 
arry ss uj the pope. Traditionally, 
“pod" coverage was in the hands 
of RAI. the Italian state television 
network. Direct Vatican control 
of pictures of the pope Ted to fears 
of censoiship. 

Foley said that the Vatican had 
actively sought to avoid a “mo- 
nopoly” “we always try to in- 
clude other media,” he said. In the 
occasional situation where Vati- 
can television has an “unexpected 
monopoly” catching a scene just 
because it records the pope every- 
where, the center gives its film 
free to networks requesting iL 

In cases where networks could 
have had access to a papal event 
but chose not to come, he contin- 
ued, the cento charges a fee Tor 
the film. 

Foley said CTV was looking 
into projects on the Vatican’s art 
treasures, its museum and library, 
and on Sl Peter’s Basilica. Long* 
er-term projects might involve 
programs on the lives of saints 
and on the relationship between 
religion and col tore. 

But Foley and Maggiom both 
said these projects were still some 
time away. “We do everything ac- 
cording to tbe length of oar feet,” 
Maggjoni said with a smile, “and 
we’re still growing.” 


PEOPLE 



fa. the .name of i 
iVbraredv II of Di , — 
officially band over some erf far 
allowance to her bas haw . Henrik, 
After more than 18 ye ars M paacg 
consort, the Janus - Count Had 
Andri Marie Jean de Labonfe 
MonpezaiwtnaoapBjlSecfcto 

ginning Jan. 1, if theD^siftparffa,. 
ment approves, the prime quafe- 
ter’s office says. Hew& now. to i 
an undisclosed amount, to 
income, paid into fas teak Sebotte 
monthly by the queen's treasurer. 

“I get what I need, but the waylgt- 
it is unsatisfactory," Henrik, 51, 
said last year, asking for "a fitfle 

more equality ” . .. . 

• D 

Friends of OaisfinaOB^w^t 
tb^hmian Sea 

for a weekend of festivities for far 
6 - month-old daughter, Atitiaa. 
Onassisand the baby, her first, flew 
from Paris to Greece with her 
fourth husband, tire Freud jet set- 
ter Thimy Roussel, for tbeedetah 

two, family friends said. It is Alb- 
ina’s first trip to Greece. 

Jim Zdfer, a C anad i an hannot* 
ca player, says he found audiences 
in Moscow responsive to his brand 
of dec ironic blues. “They would 
really Bsten,” -Zeller, 30, said after, 
his return to Montreal from ibdj/ 
12th World Festival of Youth and 
Students. “They’re a very emotion- 
al people. They’re into creativity in 
any form.” Zefiet proved so popu- 
lar that extra concerts were added 
and he was invited by a Communist 
Party official to return next year 
for a tour. 

□ 

A group erf 52 artists and writers; 

j^ganS science fictroo’s^b^K 
Hfison, and Stan Lee, pribfisher of 
Marvd Comics, are creating a spe- 
cial iapi» erf ‘'The X-Man” to be 
sold as a benefit for African famme 
relief. The issue is scheduled toip; 
pear later this month. 

O ! 

Howard A. Baker Jr, the former 
U. SL Senate majority leader, bernuy 
out of power has its wight side; u tt< 
is only my highly developed sense 
of decency that keeps me from 
chortling when I see (curremMifr 
jority Leader Robert J.] Dote on 
television messing with that bod* 
g«-” 


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New Provencal House or 378 sqjn. 


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PARIS He ■hordes Intameiiamd 
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BRUSSELS: Ztostors-A. 

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I ■ Main House vrith 3 bedroom^ each 
with ib own bathroom "En Sute , Mas- 
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Law Solon wm fireplace) Powder 
Room Office; Workshop. 

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place & B m hroonv. Sncrate Strff Slu- 
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jtu Heahh SPAJocued Style, completely 
enclosed 

- Over 400 sqjtv of terraces far enter- 
toning. 4Ca Garage + Car Port ■ 
fully equipped far Craiffeo to mam- 
tain 

. latest laser Beam' Security Systems & 
dosed Graft Television. 1 5 m. Commu- 
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PARIS A SUBURBS 


MONTPARNASSE, Compare lent. 
Unususd chomung 4/5 room. Over- 
ladotg trees, oooen. sun, tot, >0 
windows. GtoeSenj canteen. 
FITKUWQ. Tel: 320 38 65, 


SWITZERLAND 


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> 1.1112 

111 


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|03)6523lM 
■■41166062 
[0421)170591 
[02)720.9543 1 
hfB863144d 
1)6190)2001 1 

02214&B5JM 
@1)961.41.411 
011671^450 
061)7072016 
■■1415036 
jMm78fA22l 

■65269342 1 
PHt2j935520j 
01)363.2000 


swith 

tour 4 remote control garden 
system. 

■ Shunted in 5,000 kjjo. Pair, boctina 

on to the Nrteonrd Fotot at ateranaeoF 

Golf Oub of Canrv&Moogint. 

Ided far Embany, or Consular Official, 
or inti Emitfve searching axnfortrtete 
& Secure rendenoe n South of Fnra. 
15 mins, from Nice Airport, & space far 
private H el i copte r landing. 

lord investment of FF9 ,500,000, how- 
ever, owner needs to sei far persond 
ns, therofan* wfl consider reason- 
abie offer. 

Cal MonteCorto 
33 m ■ 25 74 79 day*. 

25 63 91 evenings . 

75 75 52 enlefl 


GLOBAL 

YOUR BEST CHOKE _ 
FOR WORLDWIDE MCMNG 


AMSTERDAM 

BOGOTA 


BRUSSBS 

CAIRO 

CARACAS 

FRANKFURT 

HONGKONG 

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LONDON 

MAMA 

MEXICO OTY 


ataro 

STOCKHOLM 


TOKYO 

USA 


261 868 
277 0401 
44 Oil 

...won 

406064 
358 009 

■.MT 

854*37 


FOR SALE R4 

NICE 

Unusual, co w fart o bfa, 2-room attic 
apartment with 2 d eeping oaOerias & 
addffiond sleepirig opparfimities. Fyr- 
«*shed or unfurndwa Located <xi the 
Pronenade dm Analai next Id a beau- 
. Ufa) peril, 200 m. from the beam. P»- 
datnan eane. 200 rn. from under- 
□round cor pent. 

dPHH A5L3S3026, Pubfdtat 
0+40)0 Basel, Switzerland 


2161 
21 4C 
2) 35 
6105 


BBGBUC DORDOGNE 3 bedroom 


GREAT BRITAIN 


| LARGE BEGANT KMGHT5BRIDGE 
home near Harrods, fang lease with 
its own mews house + 3 atsaacs. 
Unique offer. 01-589 3016/2g7TCS 


MW 

525 899 

8 755 9216 
) 264 4311 
31707 0471 
ate) 223 2460 


GREECE 


A WORLD Of DIFFERENCE 


PIRAEUS CBKB in new birring. 2 
.noameding floors, 430 sttm. tb" 
sale or in extnongo writ properTy n 
UX, U5A. French Rrvwa. Pnct: 
20%p0a Con toe Rnttooa, 126 
tvwJrom St, Praeus. Greece. Rw 
212196 STAR « 


PERSONALS 


CATHBflNE, 
t*. Bond 


I LOVE YOU TOO. 


SHAIHOSi 58,000 sam. wiffiprivto 

heach, P^hy tor far a 450pereon 

hotel 2 bn from hma $230000. 


hotel 2 bn from hwa ! 
Ardutoct^rdmrt, tel 04Zf.; 


HAPPY VINTAGE BIRTHDAY, Pbdtol 
Utte, I6i- 


POKOS HOUSE irf dfiOO sqja. aver- 
n Private near beocn, 
.Tel: 0281/28440 


MARCO C. MADMAN. We love you. 
Tma and Orphee. 


HOLLAND 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


CORSICA 


AMSTavra+AEAR SCHPHOL air. 
, We offer you an apartment of 
180 sqjits targe tong room, 4 bed- 
rooms, a duay, kitchen tod bath- 
room, Qtot nteghbaurhood 10 min- 
utes from center of Amsterdam. Ccd 
HotoidM2IM331g 


CAIVI NEAR SEA Ustvdas&pmM 
home. Godt with large terrace, My 
taped and farnened AB are set m 
ft sqjn. peril. Airport, shop! 
c enter nearby. Cd France 
650207. 


hLVERMESR TYPE 17th Cert 
I name, fifly fimsiwd 4 t 
rooms, met, garden. Sdli phof, Tne 
Hmjue 20 own, TeL 01719-19206. 


LAKE LUGANO 
RESIDENCE BELLAV15TA 

Luxunoul apartments overlooking the 
Lake Lugano & tee beautrfd surround- 
irms. Apartments from 110 sam. up to 
I/O i].m. Each hat it's own firepktee, 
kameky, celer, wine osier & parlwig 
place m indoor garage. Indoor wen- 
ming pod & private beach wfch landng 
ones. Sales prices: SFWOtoO up to 
SFToeOTOO. Ftm for icde to foreigner. 
Mortgages at low Swm iiterest rates. 

EMBIAID-HOME LTD. 

VIA G. CATTORI 3 
04-6900 LUGANO 
Tel: 04-91-642913 
Telex 73612 HOME CH 


In the charming mountain resort of 

LEYS1N: 

RESIDENCE LS FRENES 

Overlooking a splenfid Alpine panora- 
ma 30 mei. from Motereux and Lake 
Geneva by oar. 

. you can awn qualify rmidonap 
with indoor swknnng pod and 
fanes fodfiM in an taeol 
envirormert far leisure and sports' 
Wd, gdf. rid. 

- Finanangat low SF. rates 
up to BMt mortgages. 


fa s Frene e, 1854 Laysfa 
swnzmAM) 

TeL (0251 34 11 55 Th 456 120 RLAI CH 


SWnZBUAND 

tigners can buy STUDIOS/ APART- 
. . _ Oft / CHALETS, LAKE GBCV A - 
MONTREIIX or ei these world famous 
resorts. CRANS-MONTANA. LE5 
OIABIBEI5, VHBia, VULARS, 
JURA & region of GCTAAD. From 
SFtlOroO Mortgages 60* at 6)4% 
interest. 

REVACSJC 

52 MortbrJJcnt, CH-1202 GENEVA. 
TeL 022/341540. Tetoc 22030 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


LAKE GENEVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Lovely uucutiu an C wrtfi moondicenf 
T Ldte Gem 


views of l 


i Geneva and moiintoto. 


Montreux, VilanL Verber, Les DaUer- 
ets. Chateau oOo neev Gstaod. 
loysin. Luceient Opportunities 
For rw sipiir i 
Prices from SF1 23AB8. 

at 4H% interest 

PLAN SJC 

Red Eriale Syttoili 
Av Man Repos 24, 

0+1005 Lausanne, Sviteertand 
Tefr (21)22 35 12 71* 251 H5 MELE5 
totolbhed Since 1970 


Ubenal 


LAKE G84EVA + LUGANO, Mon- 
neux, IMors. Gitaad Re^oa loaorno 
/ Alcona & mriy famous mounKm 
resorts, mqtoftcent h*W APART- 
MS'IIS / CHALETS / VXLA5 awfl. 
able for foreignen. From USS50J 
Big choice. Mortgages at 6/M. S 
raedency pose*. JHL SSWID SA 
Tour Gone 6, 0+1007 LAUSANNE. 
21/25 26 ll7uJGAN091/6a 764& 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


HOLLAND 


I PETHt BRUM MAKELAARDU 
InTI lleuiiwa S et v i m R entals 

^■^■■^■020-768022. 


VS 


CANADA 


TORONTO, CANADA - LUXURY. 
FuRy furmhed and equipped 13 2 
b e d o um suttt. Superior Serwces. 
Short term rentals. Hie Market Suites, 
80 Front St East, Ste. 222 Toronto, 
M5E 1T4, Canada (416) 862-1096. 


ITALY 


When in Rome: 

PALAZZO AL VHABRO 
Luxury apartment house toh furnished 
flats, avtoaWe for 1 week aid more 


USA GENERAL 


FARM FOR SALE BY OWNER. Deto- 
op your own retreat and own a dory 
farm, 60 acre excellent form boarding 
2 rivers with mmr 2 nifai of frontage. 
Pul Ine of madunwy. Excellent hmt- 
ing, tiding, siting & education aval- 
tole. class to rid carport. Prime op- 
portunity far development Owner 
wSng fa work with buyer. Writs 
Chafes Dicrrond, Box 2]/, bteflend, 
Wl USA 54835; 71S943-Zfa. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


AUSTRIA 


VOW'S HOUSING AGENCY. 
0222-527964, Hodosy, Graben 31. 
Rentals: defato flats & houses. 


HOLLAND 


Renthouse International 

020-448751 (4 lines) 

Nederhoven 19-21, Amsterdam 


DUTCH HOUSMG CB4TSE B.V. 
Defaxe rentals- VcdenusW. T74,_ 
Amsterdam. 020621234 or 623K2 


i6794325, 6793450. 
Write: Vto del Velabro 16, 
00186 Rome. 


VBBCE FUBRSHED HAT FOR one 
or two persons in Intoned 
avtotole now. Caf Venice 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


74 CHAMPS-EYSK 8th 

5tudk\ 2 or 3-room apartment 
One moteh or more. 

IE CLAI1DGE 359 67 97. 


SHORTTBIM STAY. Adwrtagei of a 
hotel without nconvoraanciB, fed Ct 
home in nice studfas, one bedroom 
and more in Peris. SORBJfA 80 roe 
de HlriversM, Ptos 7th; 544 39 40 


ST GBMAflNI DBS HIES. 18th Certury 
buUng. living & bedroom, bath, 
bfehen. Quiet Sunny. 3 - 6 months. 
Cafl from Sunday 325 8395. 


ESTB. TOWER, s 

da, krtdwn, bcS 
charges. 7* T 44 j 


. term stu- 

balcony.T^AOO + 
T. drug owner. 


TO RENT. GAMBETTA. 2 rooms + 
balcony. August and/or September, 
October. Novtttoer.' Tel: 633 1498. 


SHORT TERM in Latin Quarter. 
No agents. Tel: 329 38 81 


MARAIS. Luxurious 3 rooms , sun ny, 
quiet, F59QQ owner. Teh 857 5923. 


TO SHARE, F2500*2-room flat, 
Marceeu, 9th. Tel7H 70 61. 


Ave. 


International Business Message Center 


ATTBmON EXECUTIVES 

Pabtah yoarbmin* 


m 


Sm - fniteii e ito' J I Italrffl 

■* Mwm Mwnmnoumnoom o^m ■■■ — 

bone, toto * mere OnmalUra 
at a mMlort readme world- 
wide, meet at wham are m 
business mid industry, erii 
read H. Just Atom as (hats 
613595) before Warn, en- 
smbtg dsrt 


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ea year message wm 
wtfhm ABhtxirs, Ths 
US 59 JO or lead 
erj u Tva l mit par Bne. You must 
indude cnapfate and wam- 
aUm bating address. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


ITALY 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


MAONnCENT COUNTRY ESTATE, 
it for foroSy erd/or bed & brtok- 
, 30 aan, private brid®, 3 nge 
yerrie buWnp. 18th & IVmcantvry, 
now has restaurant, 5. rales to Li- 
moges o a tstgidng umvertity, me- 
cten, dduM toeracs, 2H hotofeto 
notHOop from Rons or plate. Ask far 
brachui« Mn Thevettin, Dtnem de 


(amair moo bin charming 

house, m krga grounds WOT mnw 
fruit trid alrifl freft private ibeodi 4 
swnunrig pool space for 2 poked 
can, 2 double l^gono, Jbnfr- 
rootm, lage terrace with kwy w 

PfaJTntotf toy: 8-2 Via Mp 
Quafro Fottfaiie 15. Rome 001 BA Teh 
06 463979 or 460981 1 Ufc Perrymtad 

l wts*#****-'"*" 


ST. QEZABSSUR SWO«f«. Stow 
vila for bourgeois, 500 sajn, tong 

Siiunamres 

/ 60 ini. 


SPOtETO, 15 KM, SRIBOID pov 
oKunic pootioij. Cottoge, 6 rooms, 2 



BROKERS 
INVESTMENT ADVISORS 

Your dienti eon invest in one of Ameti 
most esdfai bedtnofagied breok- 
tgfa « a IsiRbn deOar ttuf erius 
3d000 (nee abwady Planted _ 
Bfsidend* RouL FBgh annual oonwgi 
projected far many, maw yen Getv- 
erou* enwiluluiii idBene. Mate- 
rid crvoJobfe in &gfati French. Ger- 
man. Contact: 

GLOBE RAN SJL 
Aw Maoflepas 24. 

0+1005 Lausanne. Sw&ettand 
Tel. pi] 22 35 12-T1& 25 1S5MEUSCH 


Mfafa 


i lis wdm ewt - US$7,950 


COMRIfR PORTRAIT SYSTEMS 
(Sl 0,000 - 2SJCXX7 FOB) and uppEas: 
Ttoirts, nbbom, pasten. cabndcn. 
ousels etc Major aedt arch ac- 
cepted. Kama 16, Pt srfodi 1703fc 
Frotoftrt. Tefc 747808 Tx 412713 


ANTARTKA MUTUAL SURVIVAL fa 
sufimce & Trust of Worfa Gatos, 
privttfe stack, 42 unrti at $8 nstton. 
fir. Aerre Herous, 3509 des babkt, 
Monred, Gmcda 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


lOOIONG TO BWBT IN USA? 


sportswtear ... r . . „ 

vestmete. Presertfy doing ei excea of 
S11 mREan. CbnfMny has newer had an 
unprofitable yea. Excellent potential 
far growth. Can supply distribution in 
USA for oddtonditoxed protfad 
fares, fine management team in place. 
Inquiries rrepondto. Bar 2569, tWd 
Ttoune, 92521 NeuSy Cede*. France 


CONSTRUCTION, Engineering ACon- 
strurtton Alanossraent Ca. wry active 
In TTitoand ari Wddfe feat. Poobuo 
cash flow and profitable. Partner 
needed to buy out current owner. 
Management lean to reman intact 
taking equity pcwSoa ftifetaKfing 
ou ptriurity , about U5S3.4 m&n re- 
marotL The 76864 INVEST HX 


RffUTABLE EXPORT COMPANY m 
West Germany detong with al lends 
of material equipment, efadranlcs, 
etc from Europe having clients in 
■ many courdrin seeking American ifa 
porters far USA mtm : WiEng to 


toer any terms of caapwaMn. 
Tlfc 528C9: Or PX>. Bral90225, 
8000 Munich 19, W. Getmaiy. 


LOOKING FOR ASSISTANT man f 
woman with knowledga or used cor 
buying throughout Europe far tetport 
on tnortWy basis. Salary or oankW- 
sion negoli ab fa. WS be in Europe 
imdAuffto (lew «D ABwt 9 on ■ 5 
pm f41i 


DIAMONDS 


Shopping in Europe? Veit 

Of AMONDL AND 

The largest showroom m 

Antwerp, Diamond Gty 

Appafatoratr 33A. Tto 323^343612 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


BRTL 

BEAUTHUL PEOPLE 
uNUMnsmc 

ULSJL A WORLDWDE 

A complete personal 8> bubies service 
providing a unique cnifechon of 
tofantedT versMne & mulffinmid 
indiviauab far afl SO dal & 
promebond ucaww, 
212-765-7793 
212 - 765-7794 
3X W. 56th St, N.Y.C 10019 
Serviee “ 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


USA 


Brand New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 

A Unique 

Hofei Suite Residence 

offering 

pre-opening savings on 
6 mo., 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 

featuring 

Studio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and ail with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 

Executive Services Avaflabfe 

Model Suites 

(212) 371-8866 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENEBAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


AMERICAN ART SCHOOL in tads 
mb m kiwi s l n a me castor* 0 * 0 + 
aUe inmecSatefy. Reqrnd American 
IMverofy ewteneace. Written & spo- 
fan fluency Frrndi/Btgtnh. A jab «*■ 
voivng denai sk3s & constant con- 
tort wdi students and faofiy. Work 
papers. SuibMe eonJ Julei should 
send CV to Bo* 2573, Herald 
Trtaone.9252? NeuiPy Cedcc Fronce 


PJLOHKXR 
JOURNALIST 

sought by die International Union of 
loori Autnmilia& Write far fob dtnp- 
lion & qppSootesn fontt 

A. 41 Wnstetoarseweg, 2596 CG 
Don Hoag, The Nethertandl 


APARTMWT M WW YORK. F3fh 
Ave. neor Pierre Hotel 26 floor, 2 
beefroom, 2H bath, terrace. Com- 
pletely fumahed art deco style, very 
d vc. Avtdable far IS S250LM0. (W 
USS3000/montK Lease w3 be tinned 
over to new tonanL Contact immecS. 
<*ety Mrs. L, 217^88-2427 USA. 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


AMHUCAN WOMAN WANTS fur- 
nished Act, 1 yet*. 1 bedroom, in 
centrd London, pood rsferonceL 
Company let UK 0T4Q4 0231 


EMPLOYMENT 


roil MORE EXECUTIVE POSITIONS 
LOOK UNDER 

•rtNIHtNATlONAl POSITIONS" 
RAGE 3 


EXECUTIVE 

POSmONS AVAILABLE 


AEROSPACE 

Cimo nief Ma fa fag M ato ger 

Large American Aerospace corapari 
with major aroraft mechamad aid an 
oner Aerospace 
_ for Far Eatf re- 
man, e uy t mn s on PRC market. Superb 
oomnmmc u tiori afaity eswrtiaL 

Pavad resume in confidence to Ban 
2555, Hera« Tribune, 5252? Needy 
Cridex, France 


NRVKRflS AG04CY in hdy needs 
' erienced responsible {ournofist 
1 knawfedge of ahatonxtrket. Ex- 
celenf oppartwby fir qudHied appE- 
cant. Mutt be WngmJ. French post- 
port prefaTed. Sena complete resume 
to Bta 211, HetdU Trfaune, 55 via 
deto Merade. 00187 Roma 


HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT, 

report ■ 12 countries rndyzed. De- 
tafc WMA, 45 Lsmthirat T enact. 
Suite 508, Certtd, Hong totfl. 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


DIAMONDS 


Skfiam Diamonds, .Jewelry 

Export prices from factory. 
Otero IntamotJCod Rogw, Hermes 
EntixMt, PO 8m 266 /Site 1509, 
1210 Brtwalt TeL- 322/218 M 83, 
open w etid o ys 9om^piTl Ste, 34pm. 


IF YOUR MONEY COUD 
TALK - IT WOULD SPEAK 
TOUS 

FA. ISB OVERSEAS 
Investment Consultants 

TeL (0140/444 155 
Ilx> 21 64654 aD.Heiwfartr. 36, 
2000 ' 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 

■ The principal of a privet* 
worldwide mvedmen groin teeks a 
bfing u d (French/tngKh). 

PA / EXECUTIVE 

TaotaonSnen ho bums admins, 
ong o na e hi* how es , etdudmg 0 
historic Ojflteoo, eodt with srft 

btaelent tsnu, c ondfaans aid 
future ptotpees. 

Pfeeafl op pfy wuh short handwiiten 
letter aid recent photoorcch toe 
Box 2566, Herald Tribune, 92521 
Neuffy Cedes, France 


AMBRCAN BROKBL idky to the 
mifaay in Europe seeks safes repre- 
sentehn. Frankfurt. Germany area 
with tame arf-otcounlry travel 
Good salary and many company 
benehls prowefed- Eicpen«KB 
tarred but not necessary. Tran* I. 
peon Marketing Inc, Tet 069- 

missus. 


JffOURED MILITARY experienced or- 
ganizers and men to protect Smith 
American tantnesE - Grmrila warfare 
en ^ BrienoB prafaired- Areoc Foundo- 
lion, PO Boot 3493, 1001 AG Amder- 

dom. Holond 


SM KOSTES5B. Seaton B5B6. Amen- 
con ax. seeks for it's cfanteie in French 
sld resort, blnauai staff, send C.V. + 
to: Bac^l, Herald Tribune, 
Nealy Cedek, Eronoe 


HXTOMAL ASBTANT - typist proof- 
read*. Prefer v»nl processor experi- 


hmei 


Engfidi mother tongue, mu 
work papers. Paris 225 T089 


GENERAL 

POSmcmS WANTED 


DUE TO NONARRIVAL OF MAIL 
TO CX* ADVffiTm 
ANYONE HAVING PREVIOUSLY 
ANSWBtffi THE FOUOWWG AD 
PLEASE RECONTACT THRU NEW 
BOX NUMBS IN PASS 
AMERICAN WOMAN 30 years 61 - 
, trfncpid Frauds / Spanish / En. 
, qudified tcadier/aratanor (AM- 
neia Evefa Tutor/Governess post 
with Mod secwily ei USA bun bril 
“ or France. VVB dsa 
socretory 
part ISA 
Tribune, 


VKY POSOfMUf ctavtmng french 

aflSa. < isas.._. 

PubSc ReLvJiofis, seeks position, 

or wholesale. Europe or USA, fluent 
English, spansh. Write-. Ruoud, 15 rue 
Porte Brofanma, 03100 A4ontk*mn, 
Frasce. Tefe PH 28 18 79. 


MTBE5TMG POSmON sought in li- 
my far serious Cufert, 23, taadirg. 


Greece. 


more. Her- 
AlhwBv 


GBMAAN MALE 27, is faakmg for 
job in Los Angefes/New Yorkror the 
term of 1 veer (3/86-2/87). Edwation; 
High School gradutee. Offan re- 
1 to. Bar 2181, IJ+T, Fne- 
. 15. D6000 Prpnkfurt/Moei 


PR- JOURNAUST -TV mODUCB. 5 

years network expenenet- seeks pos 
tan m Eieape fliHit Genttcnv, wifci 
to iroveL Owen, Raitettwra 3,0731, 
Weiheim/Tndi. W. Germany. 


ATTRACTIVE Scondin o wcai lady, well 
traveled & educated sg&ks pateran at 
corapaniorv hostess. Prefer London. 
Ben 2576, Herald Triune. 92521 
Neuily Cedex, Frimce 


YOUNG B4GU5HMAN scab Iona 

dnhmcB drivmg auiarmwTt, eg. pn- 

wste car deivery in D^. Aug 6$ ~ 
Tel UK 44 742/680511, 


SHIP'S B4GWES SEEKS SHORE side 


GERMAN FASHION MODS. We*, 
eduaated, rafitawsl ioafa far wer- 
esnng position. Uytoun 2450080. 


MCE MIHUGENT HOSTESS. 24, 

g&8nsiiaseT& 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


SAUDI ARABU 

OITICEMANAGBMECREIARY 
Abie to raaka deoaons_ 

Good sH it correspondence' 
odwv, dvnanx; Uronp paioncny, 
Able » manage vtcrxfmm 4084*. 
Good fa tow ta dge Engfah, typing ikfls 
40 WPM W»rac shorthand - 
Apply: P.O. Bax 5S0Jedtfah 21432 


EMPLOYMENT 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


TYPtST WORD PKOCBSOK. Exjwri- 
meed. Perfect Enctah. Begin eaotere- 
teefy. Send CV. Awpmted begfa 


mtg 

(TAnicHi, 


37 qua 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


DOKCTOR Of ADMISSIONS, Dirao- 
SOT of PobGc ReltefaH needed for 
Ameneoti Uw versify p ro g r a ™ in at- 
rope with beadaiartere in Fra ncs. 

Box 2581, Herald Tribune, 92521 
Nenfly Cedex. France. 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS WANTED 


EXPSKNCB> aUAUFD EJFJL fal 
drodor seebful tot* porihoa m Eu- 
rope. Avalofafe immedatefy. Heawl 
reply toe Ban 7178, LH.T, PrefaMB 
15T&6000 Rra«w*/Mbia| 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


HOUSBCEBOI/AU PA* far hm far- 
ing fandy with am 14 year old boy. 
3 b rales outside of NIC in tfw com* 
try. Own roam, own car, mud be 
fluent in &»:+.+, raurt have drrion 
kerne. Prefer longer than 1 year 
camateueteL Mature panon. Send re- 
ply, photo & phone to Mr, End BB- 
raan, do Cbrponm Buririen Prod 
fefc^mJohoaTNY, 


, NY 10038 USA. 


AU PAHL 2 chfldmv 3 wan & a 
newborn. Must spwk fi^sh phn 
French, Spanbh or ttefcm. Some cook- 
ing & decxring. Mult love deUea. 
Dnveri Scsnse requried. {Veler plow 
ntuecal i ndrument Sand ptdura & 
resume to Midiael Doha, 53 Ghn 
Byron AW.S. Nyodc. NY 10960 USA. 
Tfa 4992537 TeE Piq 353-1666. 


AU FA* MYC Pratamanol coupte 
needs core for 3 month prf & 3 jna- 
boy. Light howekeepina ncumnohir, 
own room & batfi Start 5apt. 1 with 
sj o nxixuu eii l thro June. Send phteq, 
fetter with ' —• * 

MriAw 


2%-2&o3&7! 


HQUSSIEEPER. Gentle re^toiwfale ex- 
perienced Btgfah 


needed king h 

»4Kxban Ktw York home eih 2 
school age dxUren. Exmknt fan m 
conrtriora. Reply with photo & refar- 
enaet to FWd Trfaune, 

92521 NetxBy Cedex, Froncx 


AUFABL 


Evftia, can far 


enmn tpoqiong. poMnnar. noma 
with pool Send photo with refer- 


pool, 
ences, 

CoBeen 

PfankjfeorvFLA 


photo wit 
“ k nie 10 : Mrs. 
NW 11th St. 


AU P AX/SEPT. 15TH. hfewbom. 
5200/per month room & board, 
Prage home, ligfa hcxnekeefvi 0 .£>- 
gkrti speotong, southern atflege town 
near cam 5 mo urt cfai Send refer- 
ences & photo to: B. Rogers, 2207 
Brins Hi Durham, NC 1®T^712 


AU PAHL 2 soldi dridten, knawfedge 
«rf French pre ferred- N orth of Jorton 
on seaooost Private nxxtl ftafrli 
schedule, Anon fiesroe. Sete. 1. Stnd 
(fatea/ refenmres tot A Whams, 14 
Mendum*^ KflMsy ME <004 

P071 439463. 


MJ PAIR NYC AKA. Care of II yr. 
old dukL , Unfa housofaeopmg£ hoase- 
ateng durmg travel NotMteoker. 
Send reference, resume & phoia: V. 


AU PAM for energetic bright 2 year 
old few. Son FiwcacQ Boy <na fam- 
Iwuded xnmedataly. Conioa 
. Otostxn. do Sport, WOO fre- 
moal Avtv State C, Las Atos, CA 
94(H2 USA Tet 415fl414OTT 


AUPAB/nBBO 
■chadren. Eagfah : 


Y FAMILY. 2 smoB 
noovnok- 
U5-Send 
6441 5ondrtone, 
69-2262. 


AU-PAHL SBTEMBGI far 

Family. Tet 277 07 12 Paris 


Bostaa 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC - 
FOSZTIQPS AVAILABLE 


NAM4Y FOR 3 YOUNG cMfaw in 

SSJrarsajas 

wnt to Ban 2572, HaraU Tifaone. 
92521 NeJy Cedes, fttetra. 


AU RMt Neor NYC 2 yw dd & 
u ewban . Prefer nornraoW 1 . Enqfrh 
toed^ dnwn Iom find nfer- 


AU PAM Sobelpwirii 2 chfldrn 2 yxara 
ft 4 motet* lid* hoBufaeepinft 
moffier te home. Sind rssam. nhr- 
wears ft photo: Aky Pon ca »M t. 270 
Date Dr . Short Hfe, Nl tPOML - . 

PRMOI AU PUL 12 yr. atfc 


Grwnwh CT. French fl 
toxofangTCal coBect USA 
OTW 



■J!\> 


t ■ . ■ 

;•* ^ , 

e ■ 


AU PMR FOR 7 KKM. Nor^rndfa. 
rmirt ctavx. Oevekxid Crxa 
1772351 WbatfodShofari 
USA 44120 


f*,ONo j 


AU PAM- Oral 1/2 w. otatey-ZU; 
38S405a <127 la Caw, D Si. IX 
75248 USA. 


AU WUIt NY AREA, tatmcslate &*■ 
gHi ipeeMng. 9H4366439, 


DOMESTIC 
posrnoNS wanted 


wR omepo- 

dlnlD 


MmWf HUWI , 

lyj wefa domestc jtfa mj 
flare in USA Good experience, belt 
references. Notvsmobr. good educo- 
boo, wft stay far tang eanx u t m wto. 
Employer pretarrad, w * . sponsor, 
itaaM write Kc EmeSto Goto. Via 
VmtMao Tibxrlo 24, ffanriliofy or 
adL- 0564^81228 or 06390844. 


seeks 


NURSt French, 

a storting Jan. 1986, awpmr m 
famflymSanFrondtCO WOT good 
uxixuu fe ig to fl e ritefe sr. Wnfetorale- 
ber. 1 rue de la F. Afetodhte, 92100 
Boulogne. France. 


CANADIAN STUDCNT. Yale 1. 
may / tutor poririon. in Paris. I 
BCteic, fares to ring, pxma E . 

Cedtw, Franae. 


ENGUSH NANNKS ft mathere' h dps 
■ Nash Agepty, 53 Owch fcL Ham 
Straw. PCfib Btfahtan 03 29QM 


VBKY 5BBOUS French gel Meta pos*' 
bon to fade offer cfdtrien coy txse. 
Lree4n not naoeesary. Para 7B4 (H 51 


AUTOMOBILES 


Craw BBBOFE 
WE ra«ALi2£ CARS TO MEET US. 
SAFETY STANDARDS 

D.O.T. l ERA. 

5 YEARS EXPBE4CE 
J. RANK INC 

I n d a n cy ofa. I n dma 317-291-4108 


AUTO RENTALS 


OfAflC RENT A CAR. Prtshgi an 
with phone . Rob Sprit. Mmcedes. 
Jaguar. BMW, fcnouwua, smefl an 
46 r Pierre Qfaro p. 750 08 ftfas. tefc. 
72030.4a felex 63797 FCHAftOC 


A UTO STOPPING 


TBAfBSHB* 

Bjpi.-Srr fr.Slr. 58/60 

3300 Bremen 1 ■ _ 

Tefc 10)421/14364 Iht 246J84 Tram 0 
Bn de n Muehren 91 

Tefc (Q}4<Vy^ran^49aTiiwD ’A 
dto DOT/ffA -I- band is USA 
Member of AKA Wadfagtest 


PAGE 6 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


' MMXttdttft and Pbndw Can ■ 


CO-IMPORT / EXPORT 

Worfd YM* Tax-Frae Cars From Earopt 

Front 

^OOSpeod Cron in Stodr - fcu mt ilu M De B utwy . 

Turo Root Showreoas . Uafaro In f am 

450SE/L, 280SE/I 

«4. or not, P 930 Turt», f 94A f p yU. L90L, 

, 300 TD 200 ■ O new- etftl, 

5S SI^^L^ PDfl ^ 1 ^ Wt*X3lc*dn 

OfteStae greafart Mercedes end Porsche con * mWA, far 
OTpertrift European cars in the UJLK Spedd mieWnro far, 
wonsfannafion* to Amaricon norms. 

SL Tnri d ens teea ere g 298, Hreult W d, B Mgte ^ 

About 40 mn. from BrueeefeAlrpwrt Ju . ni n e. 
Toltea»J7ftCai,,|. . 

I Pfcooe: 01 1/27.23.44- 27 J3.91 -T7Mj66-V3*JXL±—* 


Imprimc par Offprint, 73 nude I'Evaneile. 75018 Pans. 


v