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DAY, AUGUST 15, 1985 




^|ork limes and The Washington Post 


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ESTABLISHED 1887 


First a 'Bang , 9 Then 'Pain, Pain 9 Wile Sees 

Mandela 
In Prison 


Jordan Insists 
Palestinians Be 
to Talks 

The Associated Pros 

AMMAN, Jordan — King Hus- 
sein met -with Assistant Secretary 
of State Richard W. Murphy on 
Wednesday to discuss plaaTtor a 
with a joint Jordani- 
ao-ralesanian' delegation to ad- 
■va^ Nfiddk East peai» efforts. 

The meeting followed he- 
tween Mr. Murphy, Prime Minister 
Zaid Rifffl and Taber al-Masri, the 

forei gn mini stay .... 

The official Jordanian news 
agency's report of the earlier talks 
indicated that Jordan maintain^ 
its insistence on. an international 
peace conference and a full rote for 
die Palestine Liberation Orgairiza- 
. non. Both of those conditions are 
opposed by the United States. 

The agency said Mr. Muiphy 
and Mr. Rifat “exchanged views on 
matters relating to arranging meet- 
ings between a Jordaman-Palestin- 
ian joint delegation to conduct a 
dialogue to pave the way for hold- 
ing an intemationnl conference for 
a just, comprehensive peace in tie 
Middle East/* . 

Such a conference would include 
“all parties concerned, inclu ding 
the Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion,” it added 

Two of the Palestinians put for- 
ward for the proposed initial meet- 1 
mg, Hanna Seniora and Fayez Aim 
Rahmeh, arrived in Amman on 

Tuesday- ' " . 

“All sides are waiting for darifi- ' 
cations to come out today.” said . 
Mr. Seniora, editor oftheArab- 
langnage Al Fqr newspaper of Hast '. 
Jerusalem. • 

U.S. officials havesaid they have ^ 
not deaded Aether to hold thfr 
meeting, sought by Jordan, and 
would do so only if it would , lead 
toward direct -tmi between Israel 
and its Aralr neighbors. - 

They said that such a meeting " 
was one option for M£ Murphy on 
fhh f t ri p, urhirhvrillaJsn mice him to : ' 
Egypt and Israel: 'On- Luesday.'a - 
State Departnmt spokesman stud 
Mr. Mii^hy would not engage in 
“indirect negotiations or prenego- 
tiations” with Palestinian leaders. 

Jmxianiaa officials hope such a 
meeting would lead to LLS. recog- 
nition of die- Palestine liberation 
Organization and PLO recognition 
of Israel’s right lb exist* opening 
the way for PLO participation in 
broader Middle Eist peace taDcs.- 

A senior Israeli official said 
Tuesday that Secretary of State- 
George P. Shultz had assured 
Prime Minister Shimon Peres of 
Israd that such a meeting would 
sot lead to US. recognition of the 
PLO. 

Mr. Peres has said that Mr. Sen- 
iora and Mr. Abu Rahmeh, a law- 
yer from the Israeli-occupied Gaza 
Strip, were the only pecmle on the 
list of seven possible delegates ac- 
ceptable to hnn as negotiators. - 

[Reuters reported from Jerusa- 
lem that Mr. Peres had talks Tues- 
day with the former mayor erf occur 
tried Gaza, Rashid al-Shawa, a 
leading Palestinian moderate. 

[But officials said the two-bour 
nwjin o was unrelated to Mr. Mur- 
phy’s writ to the Middle East. The 
forma* mayor said he had dis- 
cussed matters affecting Gaza but 
not the possibility of talks between 
Washington and a joint Jordanlan- 
- Palestinian delegation-] 

■ Progress Seen od Taba 

William Claiborne of The Wash- 
ington Post reported from Jerusa- 
lem.' . 

Opposing factions in Israels 
government are dose to agreement 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 


A Vietnamese workman prepares a lid for a box 

to be nrisfing U.S. servicemen, turned over to a U.S. 


: (me of 26 sets of remains, said 
Wednesday in Hanoi. 


Vietnam Agrees to Talks on MIAs 


... The Associated Pros 

HANOI — Vietnam made on 
Wednesday what may be the 
.hugest return of remains of miss- 
ing American servicemen and 
agreed ip principle to hold high- 
level talks with the United States 
-to resolve the issue of those miss- 
ing in action m the Vietnam War. 

. AJtera'brirf. solemn ceremo- 
■ wff. the 26 flag-draped boxes 
'were flown' from Hanoi to the 
US. Joint Casualty Resolution 
Centerin' Honolulu. Vietnamese 
officials also turned over what 


was called “material evidence,” 
including identification tags, 
from six other misting American 
servicemen. 

Vo Dong Giang, an official in 
Hanoi’s Foreign Office, said that 
Vietnam agreed in principle to 
the U.S. proposal last week for a 
high-level American delegation 
to visit Hanoi later this month 
for talks on a speedy resolution 
of the issue of Americans missing 
in action. 

According to diplomatic 
sources in Bangkok, the United 


States has named as leaders of 
the proposed delegation Paul D. 
Wolfowitz, assistant secretary of 
state for East Asian and Pacific 
affairs; Richard L Armitage, an 
assistant defense secretary, and 
Richard Childress; a National 
Security Council member. 

Excluding Wednesday's re- 
turn, Vietnam thus far has hand- 
ed over the remains of 99 Ameri- 
cans, but 2,464 U.S. servicemen 
and civilians are unaccounted 
for in Indochina, more than half 
of them in Vietnam. 


Car Bomb Kith 10 in East Beirut 


. " . ‘ Jletaen 

BEIRUT— A car bomb explod- 
ed Wednesday in East Beirut, kill- 
ing at least 10 persons and injuring 
scores, security sources and wit- 
nesses said. 

The rad-morning explosion in 
the Christian sector of the capital 
lore the facades off two seven-story 
apartment buddings and set them 
pu fire. It badly damaged four oth- 
er bu ilding s, sent g lass flying 100 
yards (90 meters) and wrecked 
about 25 cars. . . 

. The radio station of the Pha- 
lange, the dominant Christian par- 
ty, reported that at least 110 pa- 
sons were hurt, and said the 10 


dead included three children, it 
said the explosives had been in a 
car. 

Lebanon’s state radio quoted 
as saying the car 


mill ' 


i explosives equivalent to 440 
pounds (200 kilograms) of dyna- 
mite mingled with metal shards 
and shells. 

“Whoever carried out such a 
criminal act would not hesitate to 
IdU his own father or brother,” said 
Joseph Hashem, minister erf com- 
nnuucatioos, health and social af- 
fairs, who represents the Phalan- 
gists in the national unity 
government. 

The party leader, Ehc Karameh. 


Breakthrough Reported 
In Treating Liver Cancer 


INSIDE 

■ A Uendao pwreBte leader 

accused the new government of 
bad faith in its negotiations m 
end the rebdhoo. *• 

■ Despite biffions of ddlaisin 
f edSsdtild, the VS. 

Ara«*niotf«hvn remains 


known as Appalachia 
impoverished 



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with renewed vigor, r * ge * 
JSINESS/FINANCE 


Ksiness ssura 
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i period. 


SPORTS 

■ Wac* Germany won the the 
1 8-narion Admiral's Cu^yacfc^ 
ing senes. 


. By Lee May 

Los Angeles Timet Service 

WASHINGTON —The first ef- 
fective treatment for primary liver 
cancer, using radioactive antibod- 
ies to attack cancer cells, has tri- 
pled the average remission time in a 
group of patients and dramatically 
reduced the size of some cancers, 
researchers have announced. - 

The tedmiqQe also seems to ef- 
fectively treat Hodgkin’s disease 
and could have applications to oth- 
er cancels and acquired immune 
deficiency syndrome, or AIDS, the 
scientists said Tuesday. 

Primary liver cancer .winch orig- 
inates in that organ, is the most 
common form of cancer in some 
parts of the worid, with the highest 
rates occurring in parts of Africa 
and Asia. It accounts, for fewer 
than i percent of all diagnosed can- 
cel in the United States. 

In 104 cases of liver cancer stud- 
ied since 1979 in connection with 
the new treatment, almost half 
have gone into remission and 7 per- 
cent are in total remission, the re- 
searchers said The usual remission 
rate is 15 percent, and survival time 
■ i.. « mnnihe after diagnosis 


£ 


in 95 percent of the cases. 

Under the treatment described 
Tuesday, me patient has lived with 
no evidence of can«r for alrast 
four years, and a. 15-ponnd (6.7- 
Icflograrn) tumor in another person 
was reduced to two pounds, sad 
Stanley E Order, profesorofraj- 
ation onoolm at Johns Hop^ 
University m Baltimore. Dr. Order 
h mAk a te am that has conducted 
research at the University of Cali- 
fomia, San Francisco, and at Al- 
bert Einstein Medical Center m 

Philadelphia. „ . 

“We have the first effective treat: 
meat for liver cancer,” Dr. Order 

^In the treatment, patients are 
riven two injections of antibodies 
roil raining radioactive iodine. The 
Sdbodiet sot out antigens, or 
oroteins, on the surface erf the can- 
S;r cells and begin to irradiate 
This irradiation process is tem- 


irary in conventional therapy, al- 
lowing cancerous cells to repair 
themselves. But in the new tech- 
nique, Dr. Order said, the antibod- 
ies “never give up.” They continue 
“radiating around the dock, so the 
opportunity for repair of the cells is 
reduced.” 

Moreover, the new treatment is 
enhanced by the fact that, when 
anim al antibodies are injected into 
a human, an “alarm” goes off, 
causing the body’s immune system 
to work hairier and thus join the 
radiation in attacking the cancer 
cdls. Dr. Order said. 

The antibodies used in the study, 
called polyclonal antibodies, are 
raised in several species of animals 
that have been found to react 
a gains t h uman liver cancer cells. 

At present patients must remain 
isolated for days because the radio- 
activity from their treatment poses 
a danger to others. Bui Dr. Order 
said the treatment eventually wD 
be available cm an outpatient baas, 
and he added that he hopes that the 
remission rate will improve as sci- 
entists leant more about the tech- 
nique. 

He said that although it is not 
certain, that the radioactive anti- 
bodies can combat other d is ea s es, 
i ffiwnticts are exploring possibili- 
ties. 

When 37 patients with severe 
cases of Hodgkin's disease were 
treated with the new technique, one 
experienced complete remission 
and 40 percent had partial remis- 
sions, he said. 

Acquired immune deficiency 
syndrome may be another possible 
target for the antibodies because 
they involve the lymph fl0des 
weakening of the immune system. 

The ledmolcgy ' Vo As wherever 
yon put it," saioDr. Order, “and it 
can go in a private-practice envi- 
ronment as well as a university en- 
vironment-” 

The findings will be presented at 

a health care convention next week 
in Washington and published lata 
by the American Society of Clinical 
Oncology. 


said the blast was intended to ter- 
rorize citizens into accepting 
“plans harmful to the homeland." 

The bombing came raid politi- 
cal tension between Christian and 
Moslem factions divided ova Syri- 
an efforts to bring about a resump- 
tion of talks on constitutional re- 
form. 

President Amin Gcmayd said 
last week that be hoped a new polit- 
ical system could be agreed on 
soon. But rightist Christian leaden 
have rejected Moslem demands 
that Lebanon's Maronite Chris- 
tians give up their control of the 
presidency. 

The bombing Wednesday fol- 
lowed a night of shelling across 
Beirut’s Grain Line, which demar- 
cates the Moslem and Christian 
sectors. 

The fighting spread to lulls south 
of the city, where Druze militiamen 
traded artillery; fire with army 
troops and Christian forces for 
about two hoursi the radio stations 
said. ; 

On Aug. 2, a car bomb went off 
outside an office of the powerful 
Christian militia, the Lebanese 
Forces, causing damage but no ca- 
sualties. 

Christian radio denounced tbai 
bombing as an attempt to sabotage 
moves to end a seven-year blood 
feud between the militia and Sulei- 
man Franjieh, a forma president 
with a large Christian following in 
northern Lebanon. 

Thirty-eight persons were killed 
and more than 200 were injured 
when a car bomb exploded May 22 
in Sin el-Fil, a suburb of East Bei- 
rut. 


Survivor Recounts 
Final Moments of 
747’s Fatal Flight 

By John Burgess 

Washington Post Service 

. TOKYO— The Japan Air Lines 
'jumbo jet that crashed Monday 
night, apparently with the loss of 
520 lives, seemed to be flying nor- 
mally until a sudden, deafening 
noise occurred above the rear of the 
■ passenger cabin, according to an 
off-duty flight attendant who sur- 
vived the crash. 

The cabin filled almost instantly 
with white mist, often a sign of 
rapid decompression. The plane 
began wobbung through the air 
and descending rapidly. Passengers 
put on life jackets and assumed 
crash positions in their seals. At 
impact, there were two or three 
strong shocks. 

This account, from Y umi Ochiai, 
26, who is recovering from broken 
pelvic and hand bones, was provid- 
ed Wednesday by Japan Air Lines. 

. Searchers continued to find 
more pieces from the Boeing 
747SR’s tail section floating in the 
sea 90 miles (145 kilometers) south 
of the mountain onto which the jet 
crashed at about 7 P.M. Monday. 

Meanwhile, investigators at the 
crash site, about 60 miles west- 
northwest of Tokyo, recovered the 
plane's two flight recorders and 
wrapped them in blankets for re- 
moval to laboratories, where they 
will be analyzed. 

One is designed to record con- 
versations and noises in the cock- 
pit The other should yield an ac- 
count of the flight with such 
technical readings as altitude, air 
speed and manipulation of the jet's 
control systems. 

■? Tuesday, a 15-foot (43-meter) 
section of the plane's vertical stabi- 
lizer was found in the water. 
Wednesday, pan of its rod da and 
a glass fiber vent, which channeled 
pxhaust from an auxiliary power 
bnit in the tail section, were recov- 
ered 

Y These discoveries proved that 
the tail section was heavily dam- 
ped in mid-air. That left little 
loubt as to why the crew was un- 
ite to control the jet, but provided 
immediate answers as to how 
\e. damage occurred 
^Before the crash, the pilot ra- 
dioed a cryptic message about the 
right rear door bemg “broken." Bui 
Wednesday, Miss QtoiaL who was 
sitting across the cabin and for- 
ward of the door, said she had not 
been aware of any problem with il 

Transport Ministry officials said 
Wednesday evening that the door 
had been found at the crash site, 
banging on its hinges and its lock 
mechanism intact Thai cast doubt 



Upper rudder section 
that teU on over 
Saga mi Bay. 


Records show that 
plane had sustained 
damage to underside 
at tail sea ion during \ - 2 s 
hard landing in iS 7 & J ■ 

- n -rai — .1 

Site 

t Mi. Ogura^jr| 


MuiCi' -M«r* *» l—- 



buln 


Yumi Ochiai, 26, one of only four survivors at (he crash 
found so far, being taken to a hospital in Fujioka, Japan. 


on suggestions that it had opened 
accidentally, and seemed to elimi- 
nate theories that it had come free 
and smashed into the tail. 

Speculation about the cause of 
the tail damage includes metal fa- 
tigue, accidental explosion, colli- 
sion with another object and sabo- 
tage with a bomb. Most analysts, 
however, are discount a bombing 
idea because of a lack of direct 
evidence. 

JAL confirmed Wednesday that 


the jet, in service nine years, previ- 
ously had been in two minor acci- 
dents. In the first, in 1978, its tail 
dragged on a runway for moire than 
400 yards; in 1982, during a land- 
ing, the far right engine dragged. 
However, the plane was lata in- 
spected and judged airworthy. 

The president of JAL, Yasumoto 
Takagi, announced Wednesday 
night that he intended to resign “as 
soon as the situation has settled 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 9 


Botha May Ease 
Terms of Black 
Leader’s Release 

CtxnpiJat by Our Staff From Dispatches 

JOHANNESBURG — Winnie 
Mandela, wife of the black opposi- 
tion leader Nelson Mandela, met 
ha husband in South Africa's 
PoUsmoor prison Wednesday amid 
speculation that the leader of the 
African National Congress might 
be released alter 23 years. 

At least four more blacks died in 

Barclay's Bank of London is re- 
ducing its stake in South Afri- 
ca's largest bank. Page 9. 

unrest Wednesday in South Africa, 
bringing the unofficial death toll in 
the last 11 months to at least 616 in 
what may be the worst wave of 
rariaf violence in the history of the 
apartheid system. 

President Pieter W. Botha is ex- 
pected to announce major changes 
in apartheid at a congress Thurs- 
day of his National Party in Natal 
province. Some commentators be- 
lieve he may offer to soften terms 
for Mr. Mandela's release. 

In February. Mr. Mandela 
turned down Mr. Botha’s offer to 
free him if he renounced violence. 

South Africa's state-controlled 
radio said Wednesday in a com- 
mentary that reform of apartheid, 
the system of racial segregation 
progressively installed over the 
past four decades, had to come 
from evolution and not abrupt 
change. 

The radio said of reform: “It is 
an evolutionary process. Its gains 
are cumulative; they are not 
achieved by suddenly producing 
blueprints." 

The commentary was the second 
this week about Mr. Botha's speech 
in Durban, which the U.S. State 
Department has said will chart a 
course away from racial violence 
and towards more political rights 
for blacks. 

The minister for black affairs, 
Gerrit Vdjoen, said Monday that 
reform would leave intact corner- 
stones of apartheid such as racially 
segregated living areas. But be then 
warned whites Tuesday to prepare 
for drastic change and an end to 
domination. 

A spokesman for Mrs. Mande- 
la's lawyer said she met her hus- 
band in PoUsmoor prison near 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


Japan’s Military: Stepchild to Nation’s Commerce 


John Burgess 

Washington Post Service 

KAMIFURANp MILITARY RESERVE, 
Japan — On a cloudy afternoon, seven Japanese 
T-74 battle tanks designed and built by Mitsubi- 
shi are on maneuvers in a wooded training 
ground on the northern island of Hokkaido. 
Their crews are getting some rare practice with 
live ammunition. 

One by one, the tanks roll to a firing line. 
With aim sharpened by laser devices on their 
turrets, they lob high-explosive shells at wood 
and iron plates 1300 yards away. Many land 
square cm target. As the smoke dissipates, each 
shot is rated by gunnery instructors who look on 
like a quality control team on a Japanese factory 
floor. 

Forty years after its surrender ended World 
War II, Japan again has modem, disciplined 
armed forces at its command- They have never 
been tested in battle. Bui like this lank unit, 
their preparation shows the devotion to duty 
and detail that has served Japanese industry 
well. 

Japan, whose constitution prohibits war, lim- 
its military spending to l percent of gross na- 
tional product Nonetheless, it is conducting a 
sustained buildup, and its military budget is 


now the world's eighth largest. This fiscal year, 
the budget for its 245, 000-member military grew 
5.4 percent to the equivalent of $13 billion. Most 
other government programs were frozen. 

Watchful of Soviet forces, Japanese warships 
and aircraft patrol deep into the Pacific Ocean. 
Plans are being made for the defense of sea lanes 

The Pacific 

At War and at Peace 

Third of four articles 

1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers) from Japanese 
shores. 

Yet the Self-Defense Forces, as postwar poli- 
tics dictate the military in Japan be called, 
remain a stepchild in a society preoccupied with 
commerce. Many analysis say they remain seri- 
ously short on many crucial commodities of the 
soldier’s trade, including recruits, ammunition 
and public enthusiasm. 

Public acceptance of the military scans to be 
growing. The government stiQ conducts an 
opinion poll earn year to establish that a major- 
ity of Japanese support the existence of armed 


forces. More than 80 percent said they did in 
this year’s pofl. 

For the United States, which maintains 
48,000 troops in Japan and is committed 
1951 treaty to come to its aid in war, the built 
is wdcome. It comes as the two governments 
build closer cooperation between their forces in 
the field. 

Still, the United States continues to complain 
that the buildup is moving too slowly. This 
summer, both the U.S. House and the Senate 
passed resolutions calling for Japan to spend 
more. Many U3. officials say that Japan's 
spending on its military shirk its international 
Tides and unfairly subsidize its export 


It is difficult to measure what the percentage 
cap on military spending has meant for Japan's 
economic revival. But if Japan were to spend at 
the same rate as the United States, it would need 
the equivalent of $65 billion more in tax reve- 
nues this year. Thus, that money would not be 
available for new equipment for factories, re- 
search and development, education and other 
programs that figure in Japan’s economic suc- 


The United States is in larae measure respon- 
sible for today’s state of affairs. After Japan's 
(Continued on Page 4, CoL 5) 


In U.S . , It’s No Longer 'Unfashionable and UncooF to Be Older 



Bette Davis 


By Jonathan Peterson 

Las Angela Tima Service 

LOS ANGELES— A new U.S. 
television commercial concludes 
with a variation of Pepsi’s famil- 
iar slogan: “The choice of a new 
generation," But the generation 
on. the tube is hall a century older 
than the high-school crowd that 
Pepsi has championed for years. 

In May, Bette Davis, 77, be- 
came the oldest person ever fea- 
tured on the cover of People mag- 
az mc- 

Uus summer, one of the top 
movies is “Cocoon," a science- 
fiction tale set in a Florida retire- 
matt community. 

Angela Lansbuiy, 59, is a hit in 
“Murder She Wrote" on tdevd- 
sion, where she plays a detective 
who regularly vanquishes youn- 
ger villains . 

Popular culture in the United 
States no longer is synonymous 
with youth. In advertising, televi- 
sion and other areas, Americans 
have shown a waning devotion to 
all that is young and a growing 
fascination for the possibilities of 
being older. 

Pan of the reason is money. 


According to the Census Bureau, 
total income for those over age 50 
in 1983 was $777 billion. 35 per- 
cent of all US. income. Business 
has begun to pay more attention. 

Another pan of the reason is 
the march of time. The postwar 
baby boom along with its crop of 
image-making publishers, adver- 
tising executives and television 
programmers is getting older. 

So are tire generation’s pop mu- 
sic stars, once a dear symbol of 
youth. Tina Turner, Willie Nel- 
son, Mick Jagger, Paul McCart- 
ney and Eric Clapton are all over 
40, and stiO popular. 

Still another part of the reason 
is behavior. Many people in their 
40s and 50s now act in ways long 
associated with the very young, 
joining aerobics classes or pound- 
ing the running track. 

“Our concept of what a young 
generation does is dissolving be- 
fore our eyes," said Beta A. Mor- 
rison, a demographer at the Rand 
Corp^ “because old people are 
doing what only young people 
were doing before. You can be 
dtronologtcally old bu t physically 
young, and chronologically young 
but physically breaking down. 


The boundaries between youth 
and old age are blurring.” 

To be sure, American society is 
a long way from losing its infatua- 
tion with the young or its conuc- 
tion of the money-making poten- 
tial of a trend-setting youth 
culture. But many social research- 
ers and executives in advertising, 
television and publishing contend 
that both the hang-ups about old- 
er people and the stereotypical 
portrayals are easing. 

In 1978, “when I came to Peo- 
ple originally, there was a real 
reluctance to put stories about 
older people on the cover,” said 
Patricia Ryan, the magazine's 
managing editor. “I dotrt really 
think about it anymore. We’ve 
found they sell fine.” 

Last year, when NBC intro- 
duced a show called “Highway to 
Heaves," the director, Michael 
Landon. had to convince execu- 
tives that a retirement-home set- 
ting for the first show would not 
alienate the younger television 
audience. “He said the kids would 
watch it, and he was right,” said 

(Continued on Page 5. CoL 1) 





Angela Lansburv 










%2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1935 


U.S. Expects 
Pre-S ummi t 
Propaganda 
From Soviet 


The Associated Press 

SANTA BARBARA, California 
— President Ronald Reagan’s ad- 
ministration, bracing -for a Sonet 
propaganda campaign keyed to the 
U-o.-Soviet s ummi t meeting in No- 
vember. has said that the pr 
' ganda would hinder progress 
mg the talks. 

The While House spokesman, 
Larry Speakes. said Tuesday that 
the United States would have to 
deal at die s ummi t meeting with a 
Soviet Union that would go into 
the talks “with a real sophistication 
in bow to deal with the worldwide 
media." 

“And we’ll be prepared to deal 
with that,” he added. 

Mr. Speakes noted that a grow- 
ing number of Soviet officials have 
become “regulars" on U.S. televi- 
sion shows in recent months, and 
have used the opportunity to make 
policy statements. Mr. Speakes 
added, however, that the state- 
ments “don't hold water.” 

Another official, reacting to a 
Soviet advertisement in The New 
York Times and similar moves, 
said that a public relations battle 
could hurt toe outlook for progress 
at the s ummi t raHra 
“It'S obviOUS it’s going to impede 
and impinge on open and frank 
discussions," he said, “because ev- 
erybody win be playing to the me- 
dia." 

The advertisement in The New 
York Times on Tuesday accused 
the United States of stalling at the 
Geneva arms control negotiations. 

It was a translation of an editorial 
that had appeared in Pravda, the 



Ugandan Rebel Accuses WORLD BRIEFS 

Regime of Bad Faith Inquiries Joined in 2 Anti-U.S. Attacks 

° tt^ankfurT (Reuters) — The West Genpm auflmnlM fionfaaed 


Soviet Communist Party newspa- 
per. 

Officials said that Moscow was 
following a pattern set before the 
summit meetings of Soviet leaders 
with President John F. Kennedy 
and President Jimmy Carter. 

Mr. Reagan and Mikhail S. Gor- 
bachev, the Soviet leader, are to 
meet Nov. 19-20 in Geneva. 

Asked whether the United States 
planned a public relations counter- 
offensive, Mr. Speakes said: 

“I think if we stick by the presi- 
dent’s policy and spell it out in 
terms as we have, we don’t have 
anything to fear. On dose examina- 
tion, chits will bear up under public 
international scrutiny." 

■ Battle of the Booklets 

Wayne Biddle of The New York 
Times reported earlier: 

One of the Reagan administra- 


tion's notable innovations in mili- 
tary lobbying and public relations 
has been the annual edition of “So- 
net Military Power,” a glossy pa- 
perback booklet that purports to 
detail the full nature of the threat 
posed to the Western world by 
growing Soviet military power. 

The book’s colorful drawings' 
and photographs of the latest Sovi- 
et weapons have set new standards 
in the Often dowdy realm of U.S. 
government printing. 

Whether the book convincingly 
conveys its message may be diffi- 
cult to determine, but the effort is 
admired at least for its panache. 

But Moscow has a counter ploy. 
Lately, it has begun mailing to 
Washington policy-makers, poL’cy- 
influencers and journalists its own 
brightly illustrated assessments of 
the foreign military threat — in this 


rase a purported threat from the 
United States. 

Fust, the Russians published a 
direct opposite of “Soviet Military 
Power’’ entitled “Whence the 
Threat to Peace." 

Then, in the last few days, they 
mailed to many Washington mail- 
boxes still another booklet, also 
brightly illustrated, called “Star 
Wars, Delusions and Dangers.” 

“We live in a complicated and 
uneasy world," the text begins. 

“This pamphlet shows the tree 
a ims of the U-S. ‘star wars’ plan 
and demonstrates the substance of 
the Soviet and U.S. approaches to 
the use of outer space; it contains 
an estimate of the calamitous con- 
sequences for all nations of the 
U.S. president's ’strategic defense 
initiative,' which is being carried 
forward in the setting of a further 
buildup of U.S. strategic offensive 
arms.” 


Walesa Marks 5th Anniversary of Strikes in Poland 


By William Pike 
LONDON — Uganda’s new 
military government has failed to 
show gooa faith in negotiations to 
end a four-year rebel insurgency, a 
senior member of the country’s 
main guerrilla movement said 
Wednesday. 

Uganda’s new head of state, 
Lieutenant General Tito Okeflo, 
arrived in Dar es Salaam, Tanza- 
nia, on Tuesday hoping to hold 
talks with representatives of the re- 
bel National Resistance Army, but 
guerrilla leadas did not show up. 

Eriya Kalcgaya, second in com- 
mand of the guerrilla movement, in 

a telephone interview from Nairo- 
bi, accused the new Ugandan gov- 
ernment of constantly shifting con- 
ditions and venues for the talks. 
Negotiations had been sched ul ed 
to ta ke place Ttiesday at Arusha, 
Tanzania, n & tr the border with Ke- 
nya, bat that the venue was shifted 
at short notice to Dar es ^bam 

Despite this, Mr. Kategaya said, 
guerrilla representatives had a 
plane ready in Nairobi for the trip 
to Dax es Salaam. He said the guer- 
rillas' plane was refused .permission 
to land by Tanzania’s civil aviation 
authority. Aviation officials re- 
quired cl earance from Tanzania's 
Ministry of Foreign Affairs, but 
this has not been given, guerrilla 
sources in T-nqHnn said. 

In 1979, Tanzania sent troops 
into Uganda to help overthrow the 
regime of President Idi Amin. Mar- 
shal Amin toppled the former 
Ugandan president, Milton Obote, 
in 1971. Mr. Obote, who was re- 
turned to power, was ag pin de- 
posed by a mSitaiy coup on July 26 
this year. 

Mr. Kategaya, 40, is head of the 
gnerrillas diplomatic and political 
committee. He was in Nairobi at- 
tempting to set up talk* with the 
new Ugandan leaders. The where- 
abouts of Yoweri Museveni, chair- 
man of the guerrillas' hi gh com- 
mand and a former defense 
minister, are unknown. Last week, 
Mr. Museveni was Nairobi 

The guerrillas want peace talks 


not been celebrating as they did in 
J971 and 1979" 

In recent weeks Paulo Muwanga, 
Mr. Obote’s framer vice president 
and minister of defense, has 
emer ged as a dnmfnimf figure in 
the new government. He is thought 
to have played a key role in the 
coup and notv holds the post of 
executive prime minister. 

Mr. Mnwanga has begun efforts 
to form a new cabinet. He has 

avoided including many of Mr. 
Obote’s former colleagues from the 
Uganda People’s Congress and has 
persuaded the leader of the Demo- 
cratic Party, Paul Ssemogeroe, to 
jran the government as minister of 
internal affairs. 

Many rebel soldiers are former 
supporterscrftheDemocraticParty 
and die government is hoping that 
Mr. Ssanogercre’s derision will en- 
courage r fiwn to mil their cam- 
paign. Framed in 1981 tbeguorifla 
movement has grown into a wen- 
organized force of 9,000 fighters. 

Mr. Kategaya denied reports 
that the rebels were tired. “How 
cm they be tired when they are still 
taking over towns?” he asked. He 
said he was not wearied by the 
effect on his soldiers of Mr. Ssemo- 
gerere joining the military council. 

He said the presence of support- 
ers of Marshal Amin in tire new 
government would further disen- 
chant most Ugandans. 


wSL.,.1. «u nf Ha hands of He loal POto ^ ‘ " " » *■ = 

Fedetal Criminal Office becanre Ire saw a coonecfatotowBBffleamife 

m < :a ;« nmiiU invKtisste the OOSSJbfiUy UBt (fit 


Ulb UUU1VU 

jomdy by wo 
and Direct Ac 

Jail Sought for 3 of Argentine Junta * ■ ^ 

BUENOS AIMS (AP> — An Argentine mffitmy prosecutor toasted 

• ~ if to 12 years fra three focxncxjtmtamanbas lor 

r* IV land Idimm. awttHV 


1U1 piUUU I — — r 

their role in the 1982 war 
sources said 


jsa^^sasBssxStsg 


commander, . — 

and an eight-year term for 
commander. 

The sources said the 
Canale, asked that the 



General Htaor NfcoBs 
of aQ rank and privilege. The 
i tribunal « 

13 other < 



Monday. 


The Associated Press 

GDANSK, Poland —Lech Wa- 
les a placed flowers Wednesday at a 
monument to slain workers outside 
the Lenin Shipyard to marie the 
fifth anniversary of the start of the 
strikes that led to creation of the 
Solidarity free trade union. 

Mr. Walesa, who headed the 
union until it was outlawed follow- 
ing the imposition of martial law in 
1981, was applauded by about 100 
supporters and shipyard workers as 
be walked from the main shipyard 
gate to the monument. 

The monument, composed of 
three crosses, was built in 1980 un- 
der Solidarity pressure to com- 
memorate the scores of workers 
killed in clashes with security 
forces in Gdansk in December 
1970. 

Mr. Walesa wore a white Soli- 


darity T-shirt with the words 
“Lffamme de Fer" written across 
it. That is the French title of the 
Polish film “Man of Iron" directed 
by Andrzej Wajda about the cre- 
ation of Solidarity. 

The August 1980 strike at the 
shipyard lasted 17 days and ended 
with the si gning of an agreement 
between workers and Poland’s 
Communist government giving 
workers the right to form indepen- 
dent trade unions. 

Solidarity, winch claimed 10 mil- 
lion members before h was out- 
lawed, was the only independent 
trade federation formed in Eastern 
Europe ance World War II. Mar- 
tial law was lifted in 1983. 

Mr. Walesa, a 41-year-old elec- 
trician at the shipyard, was award- 
ed the Nobel Peace Prize in 1983 
far bis leadership of Solidarity. 


Scores of uniformed police pa- 
trolled tire plaza and streets near 
the monument as Mr. Walesa 
eme rg ed from work but did not 
prevent him from placing the flow- 
ers. 

Mr. Walesa placed a large bou- 
quet of pink and red roses under- 
neath a p laq ue on tire monument 
inscribed with the name Solidarity. 
He then bowed his head in silent 
tribute to the slain workers before 
raising his hand in a victory sign 
and leading the crowd in sin g in g 
the Polish national anthem. 

“T hank you very much," Mr. 
Walesa said to the crowd before 
leaving, flanked by aides. He made 
no further remarks. 

■ Agreement CaBed a Mistake 

Wladyslaw Gomulka, the late 
Polish leader removed from power 


in 1970, was reported by a newspa- 
per Wednesday as having said be- 
fore his death that the 1980 govern- 
ment agreement with the free trade 
union was a mistake, Reuters re- 
ported from Warsaw. 

The anniversary was ignored by 
tire official press. But tire Przegjad 
Tygodniowy weekly newspaper 
said Mir. Gomulka told a journalist 
that the authorities should never 
have signed the accords that creat- 
ed Solidarity because they were im- 
possible to cany out 

Jan Pta.sin.slri wrote that Mr. Go- 
inulVa told him: “The government 
should have been able to say, ~ 
is unrealistic.* " Mr. G omulka die 
in 1982. He was twice the leader , 
Poland, and twice removed from 
power. After a period of disgrace 
and obscurity, his reputation has 
been officially rehabilitated. 


in which the army 
attend on equal terms They are 
also effing for an end to corrup- 
tion and indiscipline in the army 
and trials for those responsible for 
the reported murders of tens of 
thousands of people under Che 
Obote regime. 

Mr. Kategaya said that the guer- 
rillas were still ready far discus- 
sions with the OkeQo government 
but he said, “our military control is 
than it's ever been." 
tor is the population im- 
pressed," he continued. “They have 


Mr. Pike, a journalist based in 
London, is an the staff of South 
Magazine, a journal devoted to 
Third World i 

UgandaDemes 
Rebels Hold Town 

Reuters 

KAMPALA, Uganda — Ugan- 
da’s new rulers denied reports 
Wednesday that rebels had cap- 
tured the key town of Masaka but 
rumors that the guerrillas were 
marching on Kampala caused pan- 


Sri Lanka-Tami] Talks Await Indian 

NEW DELHI (Reuters) — Sri Lanka rapresffltatives and Tamils 
adjourned peace talks Wednesday being held in Bhutan on the awe 
Sis on theSaad and awaited tire arrival of the Indian. framgn minister 
there Thursday to deal with a deadlock, a Tamil, spokesman sad. Tie 
violence in Sri Lanka pits tire Sinhalese mqonty against the Tamil 

minority's demand fra a separate state. . 

“The Sri Tankan delegation questioned our right to represent ail the 
Tamils of Sri Lanka, wbSewe asked them whether tirerewas any use m 
continuing tire talks if we were not considered absolute representatives of 

^rSEzStromd failure last month after Tamil groups 

rejected the government's proposal for limited devolution of power 

. . .. . ■ a „_.j — t h »» n Mnimw 


i* 


re. 

Brigadier General Zedi Marurn, 
a member of the ruling Military 
Council set up after the July 27 
coup, said that the rebels had not 
captured any town. 

Travelers returning Tuesday 
from Masaka, 80 miles (about 130 
kilometers) southwest of Kampala, 
said that the town, Uganda’s third 
largest, was overrun Saturday 
night When Kampala residents 
heard rumors that die rebels were 
marching on the they head- 

ed home in confuson. 


Survivor Tells of Jet’s Crash 


Own land in the great 
American West 


★ ★ 



(Continued from Page 1) 

down." He said he wanted to take 
responsibility. Such resignations 
are common in Japanese Dusmess 
and politics. 

■^Gss Ochiai and three other sur- 
vivors were found in the wreckage 
on Tuesday morning. No more sur- 
vivors were found Wednesday and 
it is 'believed that only four of the 
324 people aboard the plane lived 
through the crash. 

Onohundred twenty-one bodies 
or fragments of bodies were flown 
by helicopter Wednesday from the 
mountain to the nearby town of 



Figioka. Twenty-five bodies woe 
reported to have been identified. 

The jet took off from Tokyo’s 
Haneda Airport at 6:12 on Mon- 
day evening to make die 58-minute 
flight to Osaka. 

Miss Ochiai told JAL officials . , • 

that she was seated m row 56 , Pope Preaches Monogamy to Afncaas 


i>- 

ill 


A soldier presented arms as 
crowd Wednesday in Bangui, 


John Paul II Messed a 
African R tp u bti c. 


BANGUL Central African Republic (UFI) — Pope John Paul II caflod 
for an end to polygamy Wednesday when he visited tire Central African 
RepnbBc, a nation where one of every three men has more than rare wife 
“Do not ignore the sacrament of marriage that Christ has instituted to, 
sanctify tire melong union of men and women,” he told the con greg a tion 


at an outdoor Mass in 
three-quarters of the nation’s 2J8 


who account far 


people, marriage usually is a 
matter of contract between dans and is recognized only once a woman 
has given birth. 

The pope, midway through a 12-day tour of seven African states, flew 
Wednesday from Cameroon to Bangui, trine he was greeted by die 
nulitaiy nuer of Central African Republic, General Andrfc Kntingba. The 
prate spent ax hours in Bangui and then left fra Zaire. 




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fourth from the tail of the plane 
and not row 34, as first reported. 

She said she was reading a maga- 
zine when she heard a terrific 
“bang” from above her at about 
6:25. “It hurt my ears." she was 
quoted as saying. 

“At the same time, the interior of 
the cabin turned white," she said. 

Rapid decompression often can 
cause moisture in the air to tun 
into vapor, aviation experts say. 

She noticed that a section of the 
cabin ceding near a rear lavatory 
had been knocked out of position 

Asians Urged to Carry Military Bu 

The rate function to equalize pres- WASHINGTON (Rentas) — Vice President George Bush, marking 

sure in different compartments of the 40th annivetsaiy of Japan’s defeat in World War it, said Wednesday 

that the era of US. dominance in the Pacific was ending and urged Aaan 
nations to cany more of the military burden. 

“It is op to the other nations of the region to carry more of the burden 
fra preserving the peace,” he said in remarks pre par ed fra delivery at a 
San Francisco ceremony marking V-J (Victory over Japan) Day on Ang. 
15, 1945, when the fighting stopped in the war between the Untied Stales 
and Japan. Mr. Bush paid tribute to the 300,000 Americans who died in 

byh 

. . , „ w who had left the country unprepared for 

After a while, she saw Mount Japan's surprise strike against the US. Pacific fleet at Pearl Harbor, 

Hawaii, on Dec. 7, 1941, drawing the United States into conflict against 
Germany and Italy, as weD as Japan. “Let us cm this day of rememteanee 
pledge that we as a nation wfll never fall prey to complacency and 
unpreparedness again," Mr. Bush said. 


m • - 

r - 


a plane in the event of depressuri- 
zation in one. 

Oxygen masks dropped from 
above the seats and a recorded an- 
nouncement on their use began to 
The plane began what Miss 
‘ a “Dutch roll,” roll- 


U.S., Jordan 
Discuss PLO 

(Continued from Page 1) 
on a c ompromi se formula fra han- 
dling (be Taba land dispute with 
Egypt and avoiding a cabinet con- 
frontation that could force an eariy 
election, government sources said 
The “inner cabinet" of 10 senior 
ministers heard a proposal on 
Wednesday by Finance Minister 

radmeet tow^kran^etOTK^ of “S sinmlian eoody from wing tip to the war. The text of Ins speech was released by his office here. 

wms wand from nose WBO. Healsocmfciz^U.s/fe 

tier an international arbitrator or 
conciliator. Then they would re- 
solve the deadlock over whether the 
matter would be resolved in arbi- 
tration or condtiation. 

While the inner cabinet still has 
to meet again before presenting the 
proposal to the full cabinet, gov- 
ernment sources said that both Li- 
kud and Labor ministers appeared 
to favor Mr. ModaTs suggestion as 
a means of averting a showdown 
(hat could break up the govern- 
ment Taba is a strip of land on the 
Gulf of Aqaba that Israel retained 
when it puQed oat of the Sinai in 
1982. 

Mr. Peres was said to hope that 
CofE 


in 


President Hash Mubarak 
would agree to the reversal in 
order cf normal pr o cesses, thereby 
moving Egypt and Israel closer to 
the normalization of relations 
called fra in their 1979 peace treaty. 

Mr. Mubarak has insisted that 
the Tate dispute be resolved in 
international arbitration, a posi- 
tion to winch Mr. Peres ana the 
Labor alignment ministers have 
been generally agreeable. But they 
have been unable to accept because 
of opposition by Likud ministers, 
led by Foreign Minister Yitzhak 
Shamir. 


Fuji, which is about 60 miles south- 
west of Tokyo, out of a left-side 
window and concluded that the jet 
was going bade to Haneda. “Oxy- 
gen ran out after ten minutes but 
there was no trouble breathing," 
she said. 

A flight attendant announced 
the plane was experiencing an 
emergency. Miss Ochiai helped a 
women attendant on duty show 
passengers how to get into life vests 
and take up crash positions. 

Miss Ochiai then put on her own 
belt and assumed the crash posi- 
tion. The plane began 
sharply, when it hit the , 

"there were two or three 
shocks. Seats and cushions 
around me.” die said. 

When the motion stopped she 
realized that a seat was on top of 
ha. “I felt like my stomach ha 
been tom apart Pam, pain. With 
lot of effort 

get rid of my bell but my body was 
between two chairs. I couldn’t 
move.” Sometime lata, she saw he- 
licopters overhead and waved ha 
hand, but they did not seem to 
notice. Gradually, she fell uncon- 
scious. 

Ha place in the wreckage was 
not threatened by the fire that en- 


were found in New York 
agency were made because an 


For the Record 

Radiation levels far bdow any 
City’s water suotIy. The tests by a f< 

elevated level of plutoninm showed up in an earher sampling (NYT) 
A West Goman court in DOssddraf sentenced a fanner concentration 
camp guard, Hdnz-GOntha Wjsner, 68, on Wednesday to five yean fat 
prison on charges of aiding and abetting the minder of Jews. (Baders) 

Wife Sees Mandela in Prison 


!■- 


(Continue d from Page 1) 

Owe Town. The 67-year-old leada 


ploded in an elevator at the Ubend 
University of the Witwaietsrand ia. 
Johannesburg, where hundreds of 




UNIVERSITY 
DEGREE 

BtfH&Crs • MASTER •DOCTORAL 

For Weric. Acodamk. Uh Exporiaoc*. 
Send (Moiled resume 
for free evaluation. 

PACHC WESTERN UNIVERSITY 

600 N. Sepulveda Btvd* 

Los Ansries. California 
900i9. Dept. 2X U.SA. 


servmg 
lage. 

“It wasn’t a special meeting be- 
cause Mrs. Mandela still has allo- 
cated visits to use up,” the spokes- 
man said. 

Radio reports said the meeti ng 
was unscheduled and was linked to 
Mr. Mandela’s “imminent" release. 
In the black township of Duncan 
er, she heard men’s voices and real- at East London, in Cape 

ized it was morning. The voices p rov “rce» police said they shot and 
were those of rescuers, who pulled “Ned a black youth hurting rocks, 
her clear and flew her by helicopter ail d a railroad policeman snot and 
to a hospital. killed a blade man who was in a 

group fire-bombing Us home. 

In Sterkstroom near Fort Eliza- 
beth, also in Cape province, police 
shot and killed another Mack riot- 
er. in a township near Durban, 
police found the body of a black 
man who had apparently been 
stabbed to death. 

Early Wednesday, a bomb ex- 


UKASTER.DOCTORATE , 
EMnftKGKE EhemrMtt expenses a i 
BMMrtjaydMKNDrlanf am* i 
(■raesnen SMBHfipi 

IHUfBsn StU-pxea • sw Rennt ! 

For Ne Cct fwtatw I 

213-27*1094 : 

•SR® 

Wtttfe EW 

tr Pan 50 Benof wa s c«i iSA90?i ? 


spokesman said from the 

blast was slight. 

The main group fighting ^art- 
bad internally, the United Demo- 
cratic Front, says only un iv ersal 
suffrage and as end lo the control 
of the movement of blacks can had 

to a peaceful resdatkn of . 1 he 
South African crisis. The amah 
meat accuses the UDF of foment- 
ing the unrest and says it sate* 
fra the African National Coagresi 
The United De mo cra tic Front 'd* 
mes using violence. (UP I, Rem, 


Gems Stolen in New York ; f 
The Associated Prm 
NEW YORK— -A dnmondlbm 
her lost gems valued at ateft & 
mHfion wbe&abBsuKsszafr; 

peared with them while 

showing them to a cusrjbbs::? 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1985 


* \J >'■ 


Page 3 


By Ben A. Fra nk! iq 

• _• York Times Service - 

LOGAN,. West Vi rginia a 

new concrete highway near here. 
Appatotoan Corridor G, curves 
smoothly through wide, newlv 
masted granite canyons and soars 
ovct resculpted green mountains. 

But then, repeatedly, barricades 
appear; and the concrete ends. 
Long, tortuous stretches over the 
steepest mountains stDl arc tra- 
versed by the twisting, pot-holed 
two4aner blacktop of old US 
Route 119. - 

The sections of four-lane High . 

way are symbolic of the laDioiis of 

federal dollars invested over the 
past 20jyears in development pro- 


.’b Problems Defy Aid Effort 


reclaimed five-gallon paint cans 
stand beneath the high wall of a 
shea rock outcrop. Spring water 
dribbling from the rock face slowly 
fills the cane for some of the thou- 
sands in Logan County who arc 
without potable water m their 
bouses. 

The plastic puls also catch the 
block dust swirling off spading 40- 


Cve births in 1963 to 10.6 in 1984; 
the Appalachian infant death rate 
dropped in the same period from 
nearly 2? per 1,000 binhs to 12.1. 


tin- commission show that in nearly 
half of the 397 counties across the 
13 states that make up official Ap- 
palachia — from western New 
York to northeastern Mississippi 


'President Reagan is going to balance his 
budget on the backs of these people. 9 

Dr. Mark Spurlock 
President, Logan County Board of Commissioners 


- . ■ VlftU 

Society. 

And the frequent breaches in the 

momrav nr# iMtmnm, ■> t.i 


Sled promise of the Appalachian 
recovery - and development plan 
that attra c tedmore than $15 bfllion 
to die region, which includes 20 
million people in 13 states. 

Johnson signed the Appalachian 
Regional Development Act on 
Match 9, 1965, declaring optimisti- 
cally, “The dole is dead." The act 
established the first major Great 
Society program under a new Ap- 
palachian Regional Commission, 
assigned to bring industry, jobs and 
government services to an impover- 
ished, neglected region. 

That the “development high- 
ways,* 1 including Corridor G, are 
not the only unfinished work here 
is evident by the lack of many baric 
public sendees. 

Close beside the unimproved 
two-lane stretch of Corridor G that 
threads through Logan and its grit- 
ty, coal- tipple outskirts, a dozen 


ton coal trucks. Residents arrive ai 
dusk to fetch their buckets. 

Dr. Marie Spurlock, a pediatri- 
cian who is the president of the 
Logan County Board of Commis- 
sioners, said that 40 percent of the 
county’s 50,000 residents st3I did 
not have safe drinking water. 

Hundreds of the valley-bottom 
communities i tori give tins rural re- 
gion its dense clusters of human 
settlement have benefited from 
new vocational schools, libraries, 
'clinics and ambulance service 
bought with money generated by 
-the Appalachian Regional Com- 
mission, a joint federal -state agen- 
cy based in Washington. In a recent 
20th anniversary repeat, the com- 
mission reported that new public 
and private enterprises had created 
two million jobs in the two decades. 

Another improved indicator, re- 
flecting an array of medical and 
nutritional advances, is the Appa- 
lachian infan t mortality rale, which 
has dropped at a pace that matches 
national gamt The U.S. rate has 
fallen from 24.7 deaths pa 1,000 


— 1980 pa capita income still was 
about three-quarters the non-Ap- 
palachian national average, little 
changed in 20 years. And much of 
the commission's more recent, as 
yet unpublished, data are bleaken 

• While unemployment in the 
region always has been among the 
highest in the nation, the gap is 
getting wider. Until 1979-80, ac- 
cording to Salim Kublawi, an econ- 
omist at the regional commission, 
the Ap palachian and national un- 
employment rates fluctuated 
eno ugh seasonally to make the 
slightly higher mountain rate rath- 
er unremarkable. Since 1979-80, 
however, the Appalachian rate has 
r emained at leak two and a half to 
three percentage points higher and, 
in January 1983, as much as five 
points higher. 

• Both the population and work 
force of the central Appalachian 
region, not counting those who 
have given up looking for jobs, are 
de clining . While the economy of 
the rest of the country produced 7 
minio n new jobs from February 


1980 to February 1985, Appala- 
chian payrolls declined by 26,000. 
Recent Census Bureau figures 

show that the the permanently job- 
less are beginning again the pattern 
of migration to other regions that 
dramatically marked the decade 
before the commission was started- 

Contrary to Johnson’s 1965 
declaration, “the dole" in Appala- 

chia is far from dead. From 1970 io 
1980, while the cost of welfare pay- 
ments nearly quadrupled fa the 
Kintjnn as a whole, it increased four 
and half times in the Appalachian 
region. By 1984, measured by pay- 
ments under six major welfare pro- 
grams, including food s Lamps, 
school lunches and public assis- 
tance, Appalachian beneficiaries 

were recaving $219 pa capiwm 
federal assistance as a gains t S2tW 
per capita across the United States. 

President Ronald Reagan has 
said repeatedly that the Great Soci- 
ety programs were a failure, and 
none more so than the comrntomt 
by the administrations of Presi- 
dents Johnson and John F. Kenne- 
dy to Appalachia. Such regional 
development programs “serve no 
national economic purpose but in- 
stead cater, at taxpayer’s expense, 
to local and regional political inter- 
ests," the Reagan budget statement 
said this year. 

The Reagan administration has 
unsuccessfully proposed eliminat- 
ing the Appalachian Regional 
Commissi on each year since Mr. 
Reagan took office in 1981. Funds 
appropriated to the commission 
have been cut from $358 million m 
1981 to $149 million this year. The 
budget submitted to Congress by 
the administration for the fiscal 
year 1986 contained no appropria- 
tion for the commission, only a 
request that it be terminated. 


s <•;..! ■;/ " jrM .1 

SfoiaUs.riliL- ;• 


t- . \ - 1 >CVMLU 


R eagan Plans to Force Domestic Cuts 
Thro ugh Appropriations Bills in Fall 


Sinning ham 




r. • 




■Stiff* 


rat 

Logan, West Virginia, is 
near the center of the re- 
gion known as Appalachia. 

The budget plan passed recently 
by the House of Representatives 
and the Senate includes a $120- 
million Spending ceiling for the 
commission for the fiscal year 
1986. la the fall the appropriation 
committees of both houses are ex- 
pected to approve at least that 
amount. The final figure will co me 
out of a Senate-House conference 
committee, which, in the past, has 
been the salvation of the commis- 
sion. 

“President Reagan is going to 
balance his budget on the backs of 
these people,” said Dr. Spurlock, 
the 1-og an County official in an 
interview. “It’s easy for people to 
sit in judgment up there in Wash- 
ington and whack the budget, but 
down here it's people who are being 
whacked." 


By David Hof&nan s 

Washington Post Service jj 

SANTA BARBARA, California 1 
— President Ronald Reagan plans 
to use the appropriations process *! 

this fall to seek deepa cuts in do- 1 

meslic spending fh”n those con- • 
mined in the congressional budget 1 
compromise. While House officials r 
said. ; 

After a 90-minute telephone con- 
ference Tuesday involving admin- 
istration officials here and in * 
Washington, the presidents I 
spokesman, Larry Speakes, said ' 
that in many cases Mr. Reagan 1 
would seek to bold domestic spend- - 
mg to levels contained in the Sen- 
ate's budget resolution earlier this 
year. 

This would be lower for many 
domestic programs than the final 
House-Senate compromise ap- 
proved early this month. 

The congressional budget resolu- 
tion sets Raiding targets, but actu- 
al spending is set by appropriations 
bills. The president does not rip 
the congressional budget resolu- 
tion. but can veto the appropria- 
tions bills. 

Mr. Speakes said Mr. Reagan 
and Ins advisers would take a dose 
look at all appropriations bills that 
come through, “with an eye toward 
overruns on spending." 

“The president wifi be prepared 
, to veto," Mr. Speakes said, “and I 
would expect — unless Congress 
toes the One on spending — that 


study on possible cancellation of 
spending already approved by 


the strongest dgn*l yet that Mr. 
Reagan is hading for a confronta- 
tion with Congress ova spending 
this fall. In past years, Mr. Reagan 
negotiated his differences ova 
spending bills and rarely vetoed 
toem. ... „ 

But some admuustranoa otu- 
rials fear a series of vetoes could be 
politically risky. Such a strategy, 
they say, would antagonize Demo- 
crats whose support is needed for 


Mr. Reagan's other domestic prior- 
ity, revising the lax code. 

When Congress approved the 
budget compromise on Aug. 1, Mr. 
Reagan said it marked only a be- 
ginning. He had praised Congress 
for not i ncluding a tax increase, 
and ■mitt the compromise was con- 
sistent with the philosophy of his 
own February budget request But 
he promised at the time to seek 
deepa spending cuts. 

Mr. Reagan was not involved in 
Tuesday’s meeting. He worked in; 
his office in the morning and lata 
walked around his ranch. 


Ck CONCORD 

Mj lacosta. 


U.S. Unaware N.Y. Hospitals to Ask Families for Organs of Dead 


Of Danger of 
Leaked Gais 

By Michael Wines - 

Lea Angela Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Officials of 
Union Carbide Corp- apparently 
did not inform the Environmental 
Protection Agency of health haz- 
ards posed by aldicarb oxime, al- 
though the company had laborato- 
ry evidence ihat the chemical 
potentially could cause major inju- 
ry. .. • 1 

Aldicarb oxide injured- I35per- 
sons after leaking Sunday from die • 
company’s factory in Institute, 
West Virginia; ■■ 

The apparent .reporting lapse 
raises questions about whether 
Union unhide obeyed a federal 
law, the: 1976 Tkrinc Sobriances' 
Control Act, vflrich. requires imme- 
diate disclosure to the EPA when- 
ever a chemical is found to pose a 
■aernifioant risk of hum an injury, 

° •- .. . i A .CCmhIahAa 


New York Tima Service 


Hospital officials in Oregon, the 


nr J 2 UL 1 UJ sauuuw ~ - * - 

donations whenever a patient dies, regulation there could increase the 
-, The rule is the resuDof a new number of available organs m that 
state law that is intended to in- state fivefold, 
crease the avaflabilily of scarce or- The New York law is one in a 


appropriated to toe rommission — uxs the fine on spending - that 

<Ik ^County officii man you will see a number of vemotbia 

S ailed ioc4c*by jj e sajd Mr.. Reagan would seek 

no anoroDrb- mgton and whack the budget, but to hold spending very dose to the 
^ t dmvn here il's people who are otilag line of theSinaie resolution, 

nt ” whacked." “which is ihe only agreement that 

request that it be laminated. will be :ab!e lo produce true deficit 

reduction." 

n p T\ I A senior White House official 

r lilies for Organs of Dead 

v ^ v agement and Budget, had been di- 

A „„ tK „ law authorizes if they violated their religious be- reeled in Tuesday’s meeting to 

sSs^s«nn“ 

SSkns pSbwbssse ittiS;, 

fiA®- 

LranspUmls ' Frances Tarlton, a spokesman Reagan would detail his plans to 

. . . V 1.1 rs . . c nuikllMM ni i Whirs* 




a \ 




I * 

L • J ' 


&uuc jaw “ — - -- — — — i lauLu iiunuu, > a — — — • . 

crease the avaflabilily of scarce or- xhg New York law is one in a if ^ medical examina or the for the State Health Department, Senate Republicans at a white 
gans for transplants by lai rin g the genes of health bills signed by Gov- hospital knows that the surviving said that any hospital that violated House meeting on Sept 11. __ 

onus off doctors and hospital ad- gmor Mario M. Cnomo on Aug. 2. f amily or the person who died op- the regulation would be subject to a Tbe official also said the wmte 

mmistrators who are reluctant to health officials said the new posed organ or tissue donations or SI. 000 fine. House was undertaking a legal 

mtnirfe m a family’s grief. Muiatuu jffMivriv aits through — ■■■ 


intrude on a family’s grief. regulation effectively cuts through 

Hospitals soon wifl be given a ^ ndnetance by hospitals to deal 
scries of guidelines tiffing them ^ highly sensitive issue by 
bow to omnriy with the regulation, ^-p ^ng (hem to solicit an organ 
State Health Department officials donation, even if it means intrad- 
said Tuesday. ing on a family’s grief. 


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<aik tfiaT the state had had a chroii- 
Tc shortage of hearts, livers and 
kidneys for transpla n ta ti o n . 


„ _ , Ing on a family’s grief, 

of the rule “ . . , , 


They said that physicians had 
been particularly reluctant to ask 
for organs when a child died. 


J. WiQard Marriott, 84, Dies; 
Built Global Chain of Hotels 


\ u* caj 


asked not to be identified- : 
Union Carbide’s own internal 
rating s show aldicarb oxime “can 
produce myor injury" when acci- 
dentally released. The company 
said Tuesday that animal tests indi- 
cated it is highly toxic, although 
only one-tenth as toxic as methyl 
isocyanate, the chemical that killed 
at least 2,000 people in December 
in Bhopal India. . 

However, EPA officials said 
Tuesday that they woe unaware of 
those studies. The only inf ormatton 
in agency files are 1974 studies, 
financed by Union Carbide, that 
show die chemical is mildly toxic 
when fed to laboratory anim als. 

EPA officials consider faflurc to 
report hazards a serious violation 
oftheToxic Substances AcLLast 
March, the agency fined Union 
Carbide $3.9 million, the largest 
penalty of its type. fa. a dear 
Sarion” of the notificatwn nde? 
after the company waited four 

years to turn ova evidence that one 

Sf its chemicals causes cancer m 
laboratory a nimals . 


^disd^wtatdmco^ 
Of a moderately toxic eye untanL 

■ 2d Leak Is Reported 

Another Union Ca^de pl^ 
leaked a nontoric tal [ 


^ discomfort to 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — John Wfl- 
laid Marriott, 84, duunnan of one 
of the world's biggest hold chains, 
(find Tuesday at ms summer home 

in New Hampshire, apparently of a 
heart attack. 

His WashinRtan-based company 
grew to indnde chains of restau- 
rants as wdl as azdine and institu- 
tional feetfing services. 

A prominent leader in the Mt»- 
num Onnch and an active Repub- 
lican, Mr. Marriott, was chairm an 
of the board of Marriott Corp, 
although he turned ova the active 
management of the company, m 
1 972 to his sot, J. Willard Marriott 
Jr., who is president and chief exec- 
utive offica. 

The Marriott Coip, one of the 
largest UAL hotel chains, operates 
125 holds, as wdl as convention 
and- recreational complexes, and 
2400 fast-food restaurants. The 
corporation also is one of the cwm- 
tijns top proriders of.food service 
management and in-fiighl catering. 

Mr. Marriott was prominent in 
Republican Party fund-raisuig cir- 
cles and had served as c hm rma n of 
President Richard M. Nixon’s in- 
augural committee in 1968 and in 
1972. 

■ Other deaths: 

Xbu> Hua, 69, former directorof 
the political department of the On- 
aGsc anned forces RmOTAbcx of 

the Communist Party Central 
Committee, Monday. He was 

j a — — — rSilriirnl RfVmV 


tionin 1967 but rewpeared on the 
political scene in 1974. 

& Paul Johnston, 86, former di- 
rector of the National Air and 
Space Museum of die Smithsonian 
Institution and an authority on air 
power who advised Presidents 
Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. 
Truman and Dwight D. Eisenhow- 
er, Friday in Easton, Maryland. 

MBton Greene, 63, a Hollywood 


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Jimmy Stokky, 42, forma lead 

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in Richmond, Kentucky. He gained 
fame with the rock hit “Kiss You 
All Over" in 1978. 


Former Clerk for QA 

Heads Gidhy in Spy Case 

New York Tima Service 
WASHINGTON — A former 
dark fa the CIA, Sharon If 
Scranage, accused of engaging m 

esraonage whfle she was serving m 

Ghana, pleaded guilty to two 
counts of identifying a US. mtelh- 


B Xhe defendant pleaded noi 
guilty Monday to 16 counts of espi- 

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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1985 


U.S. Aide Vows Steps to Offset 
New Soviet Jets to North Korea 


By Don Oberdorfer 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON— A Stale De- 
partment official, falling the mili- 
tary balance on the Korean Penin- 
sula “extremely serious and 

potentially unsettl' J 

that North Korea 
mi tied to 
over 


has vowed 

not be per- 

led to gain major advantage 
a- South Korea through a new 
military simply arrangement with 
the Soviet Union. 

Paul D. WolfowiK, assistant sec- 
retary for East Asian and Pacific 
affairs, stud here Monday at a U.S.- 
Korean security relations confer- 
ence that the united States and 
South Korea’s combined forces 
would keep “a qualitative edge” 
despite the delivery to North Korea 
of advanced NOG-23 jets. 

U.S. military officials disclosed 
last month that North Korea re- 
ceived six of the MiG-23s in the 
spring. It was believed to be the 
first shipment of a substantial 
number of the advanced planes. 

The North Koreans have now 
received about 18 MiG-23s, ac- 


AptiL The F-16 is rated as superior 
to the MiG-23. 

lie comments of Mr. Wolfowitz 
came as a Ugh Soviet de le gat ion 
arrived in Pyongyang to celebrate 


Pyongyang with the foreign and 
domestic policies of China, its oth- 
er major ally. 

Mr. Wolfowitz said in a refer- 
ence to this Communist triangle in 


arrived m ryongyasg 10 aacuiuc o** p-- — 

the 40th anniversary Thursday of Asia; “TTmcompedtiaa andnvauy 
Korea's liberation from Japanese between China and the Soviet 


QfflBpflUffll. 

The prominence of the delega- 
tion, fawded by a Politburo mem- 
ber, Gaidar A. Aliyev, and a deputy 
defense minister, Marshal Vasili L 
Petrov, is the latest sign of improv- 
ing relations between Moscow and 
Pyongyang. 

[The North Korean press agency 
reported Wednesday that a unit cd 
; had arrived 


Union for influence in the North 
more often than not seems to be a 
preening, if not contrdliiig. factor 
in their conduct and in their po- 
licy.” 

Mr. Wolfowitz gave a guarded 
assessment of North-South politi- 
cal and economic talks that re- 
sumed last faH 

‘Little that has came of the talks 



Military: Stepchild to Co 

.. J nn ehaives arc so low that analysis say then 


(Continued from Page 1) 
surrender in 1945, UJS. occupation 
troops dissolved the defeated Japa- 
nese Imperial Forces and sent sev- 
en niiTUnn Japanese soldiers home. 

Americans negotiated a new con- 
stitution, in which Japan re- 
nounced war and pledged that whan the Soviet 

“land, sea and air force, as wdl as u^onlsr^rted to have stationed 
other war potential, will never be „„ j at\ 

main' 


many believed to be targeted on 

Japanese troops are deployed ac- 
cordingly. Army firepower is con- 
centrated in Hokkaido, which Ues 
only a few miles from the Soviet 
Union's Sakhalin Island and the 
Kuril chain of islands daimed by 



t 


destroyers could load up only apec 
Under constant cqojing from mxhtarv visitofSWith 

the United Slates, Japra u woriemg 
toward improvement. The current 

gfion comes at IwntW by wc 
main national ( 
the Japan Soar 


Benazir Bhutto 

Pakistan Awaits 


“Little that has come of the talks pv w TI«mi rAitpr 
the Soviet Pacific Fleet had arrived so far is inconsistent with the most XJHUUU uouguiti, 
at Wonsan, according to The Asso- skeptical and fradamental mter- rpmw. Co/wiritv 
fiaiwt press. ThcNorth Korean pretatron of North Korean mo- llflSllCIlS ^cCUIliy 

— 2 * -- " Mr Wnlfrmnh aflvii Hi* flfl* ° 


spending for ammunition 28 per- 
cent over last yearis outlays. 

Japanese legislators will prow- 

SsSsvia^ asatssa 

military 

. Japanese wodd”def«ad the rear spending ati 

lack into uniform mines; submarines and There van g, 

three mflilary services were & would close straits into 
4mter the U A oo- draCtf Janan to bottle up the 

that arms spending was increasing 
Members of Prime Minister Ya- 


the total delivery to be about 
The U.S. Air Force has 48 F-16 
jets at Kunsan Air Base and Wash- 
ington has agreed to supply 36 F- 
16s to South Korea starting in 


j said that the unit was under 

Vice Admiral N.Y. Yasakov, first 
deputy c omman der of the Pacific 
Fleet, who will take part in the 
celebration.] 

The wanning trend between the 
two Communist powers, which 
have often been at odds, seems to 
have begun with President Kim II 
Sung's visit to Moscow in May 
1984. It was his first visit to the 
Soviet capital in nearly 20 years. 

Same U.S. offirials have de- 
scribed the thaw with Moscow as a 
“pendulum swing” that may be in 
part a reflection of unhappiness in 


Rnaers 

KARACHI — P akistani 


au- 


tives.” Mr. Wolfowitz said. He de- 
fined these as an effort to weaken 

vi gilanc e and to promote U.S.- jvruw .w... 

South Korean divisions. thorities tightened security 

Two other possible North Kore- Wednesday in preparation fra the 
an motives for the talks, according expected return from exile of an 
to Mr. Wolfowitz, are “severe eco- opposition political figure, Benazir 
nomic stagnation” in (be North Bhutto, the police said. 

’ •"-■‘-marie isolation The daughter of Zulfikar Ah 

a 1983 terrorist bombing Bhutto, tbe prime minister who was 
- that killed 17 visiting overthrown in 1977 and banged in 

’■ r in mar- 


aud diplomatic isolation imposed 

onitaner ' 

in Rangtx 

South Korean officials. 

The United States supports the 
North-South talks, he said, and is 
“encouraged” that they are t a k ing 
place. 


hraelQeai* General in Death 


Washington Post Service 

JERUSALEM — Israel’s attor- 
ney general has accepted a recom- 
mendation by a special investigat- 
ing commission that an army 
general implicated in the beating 
death of two Pales tinians who hi- 
jacked a bus to the Israel-occupied 
Gaza Snip in April 1984 not be 
charged with homicide. 

However, Yitzhak Zamir, the at- 
torney general, recommended 
Tuesday that Brigadier General 
Yitzhak Mordecai be court-mar- 

■ DOONESRURY 

OHBBiALfOFBmVOCOXltte 
OFMaxae,lVlSB TO UBL- 
. cove TOUfiLL TO WB OPENING 
It SESSION OF’BCSlASf: WHfTHBl. 

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dated on charges of causing griev- 
ous bodily harm and conduct unbe- 
fitting an officer. 

Although the investigation com- 
mission repeat said that the panel 
had uncovered evidence that Gen- 
eral Mordecai pistol-whipped the 
two prisoners after they were taken 
off the bus for interrogation, it said 
it was impossible to determine if. 
the prisoners died because of those 
blows, or from injuries sustained in 
the original assault on the bus. 



Yitzhak Mordecai 


1979 for 

der, is expected to fly here s 
from France with the body of her 
younger brother, Shahnawaz. 

The brother, 27. was found dead 
last month in his Cannes apart- 
ment He is to be buried in the 
family plot outside Laikaim, 200 
utiles (320 kilometers) north of Ka- 
rachi, in Sind province. 

“Benazir is returning to Pakistan 
in a few days,” said a family 
spokesman. Another spokesman in 
London, where she lives, said the 
return had been put off until Mon- 
day or Tuesday. 

Benazir Bhutto has been Imogm 
exfle since military an thorities 
fried ho - last year after 34 months 
in detention. Members of the 
Bhutto party expect her return to 
attract huge crowds. Security 
checkpoints are said to have been 
set up around the airport. 


and . 

founded in 1954 mter the U-S- oc- 
cupation ended. 

They were called the Ground, 
Air and Maritime Self-Defense 
Forces, to support the fiction flat 
the actions were in accord with the 
constitution. Many terms erf the m- 
perial militar y lexicon, including 
names for rank, were pniged and 
replaced with less martial sounding 
ones. 

Substantive restrictions were 
built in, too, in deference to fears erf 
a recurring militari sm and loss of 
civilian control. Since the war end- 
ed, Japan has had no military 
courts and no draft. It has no ma- 
rine craps because it is thought that 
marines are for invasions. It has no 
centralized military intelligence 
agency. Defense gets only an agen- 
cy in the nati onal government, not 
a full minis try. 

The U.S. atomic bomb attacks 
rax Hiroshima and Nagasaki bare 
also left a special imprint on mili- 
tary policy. Japan has pledged nev- 
er to acquire nuclear weapons, al- 
though it accepts protection under 
the iXS. nuclear umbrella. Nor is it 
preparing Lis troops in any system- 
atic fashion to fight on battlefields 
contaminated by radiation. 

The army is the largest service, 
with 155,000 personnel and about 
40 percent of tne total rmlitary bud- 
get But it is the least modernized of 
the three. The air force flies Un- 
designed F-104, F-4 and F- 15 inter- 
ceptors, as wdl as Japanese-devd- 


the^Sea of Japan to bottle u p the 
Soviet Pacific fleet headquartered 
at Vladivostok. 

The Soviet Union, the Japanese 
assume, might attempt to land on 


Analysts give Japanese soldiers h i gh 
markg in morale and operation of 
equipment, but they find the milit a r y 
seriously short on recruits, amm u ni tion 
and public entbusiasin. 


Hokkaido to secure the strait that 
the island forms with Sakhalin. 
There they would meet Japanese 
tanks and infantry trained in snow 
and mountain operations and even- 
tually be driven back. 

That is how it is supposed to 
work. True combat readiness, how- 
ever, remains in question. In war 
gamwt last November on Hokkai- 
do, a Japanese tank regiment cast 
as a Soviet invasion feffee reported- 
ly rolled through fortifications to 
disperse defenders in 20 minutes. 
Holes in Japan’s air defenses were 
illustrated m 1976 when a Soviet 
pilot flew a MiG-25 undetected 
into Hokkaido to defect 

Most analysts give today’s Japa- 
nese soldier hig h marks in morale 
and operation of sophisticated 


conflict — conventional or gndnr 

— that erupts between ue Umtofl 
Sutes and Soviet Unhffl- 
Some critics say Moscow 
fed .emboldened to use xn 

gates would not respond in tad 
because the bombs aw not fallen 
on its own territory. 

g xpa pdwt military spending is 
also Questioned by some old-guard 
monbers of the ruling Liberal 
Democratic Party. They say_ the 
country has done wal with hunted 
budgetsover the yeaB and can oob- 
tinoTtp rdy oo Washington for 
protection. 

Critics fight legislative p re p a ne 
Aon fra: war. Because Japan has ao 
mobilization law, it is unclear by 
what authority the government 
would issue emergency orders or 

suhiro Nakasone’s cabinet. fcww 

ssefflffss g»2SSE? 

needs, not an arbitrary figure se- aged by bombs durmg a -™ubbl 


leered a decade ago. The can now 
stands in the way of Mr. Naka- 
soae’s plans and he appears to be 
maneuvering to scrap it, starting 


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with the vote to raise pay. 

Japan's military buildup has at- 
tracted wide international atten- 
tion under Mr. Nakasone’s out- 
ward-looking government. But, m 
fact, it has been in motion with 
hardly a pause since the day 
forces were commissioned in 1954. 

The continuing buil dup will 
m ffl n some purchases from the 
United States. But for the most 
part, Japan buys its arms from a 

anesc-devet- and operation oi sopmsuwiwu arms 

sS?2 

ward anti -submarine warfare and 
coastal defense; it has 14 submar 
tines. 

The armed forces' official mis- 
sion is deterrence of aggression 
from any quarter. Butin Japan, the 
Soviet Umon is seen as pursuing a 
menacing buildup. Moscow is said 

to hare expandeaits Pacific fleet to 

825 ships in recent years and to 
hare put in Siberia 135 SS-20 mul- 
tiple-warhead nuclear missiles. 


rated by 
Japan is 


pan , from streer cieaner uj oam. exports- --- . . 
president, is approached with duty by Mitsubishi is 
in mind, and soldiers would pre- foreign 
sumably do the same in combat coprodmang F- 1 5 jet fighter plants 

"Tliar strength is their people,” under hcense hem tte Umttd 
said a US. Army officer stationed States and is wrakmgona new 

battle ,nn k and shore- to-ship mis- 
sile. • 

In recent years, the bufldup hHS 
engendered suspicions in Chin a, 
Korea and Southeast Asia, which 


here. 

But 


se- 


Tbe opposition is abo battling, 
generally without success, dw clos- 
er cooperation betwera lLS. md 

Japanese units m the field that ha 

frccndc^oping sinc e the two g ov- 
ermnents signed an agreement for 
joint solitary phmnmg m 1978. 

Last September. 1.500 U.S. 
Army troops were flown from the 
United States for exercises with 
Japanese troops. Japanese and US. 
warships stage regular maneuvers 
in thePadfic. Twice a year.com- 
mand post exercises arc conducted 

*°liiiayuig plans of the sort, Japan 
pairing very much tbe student of 
the United States. Japan’s dedaon 
to attack the United States i n 1941 
is takoi by some Japanese as proef 
of a lack of basic strategic sense m 
the Japanese military mind. A Jap- 
anese lank commander joked that 
the world's best army would haw 
American officers, German sun 
and Japanese foot sol- 


Util I Ub jouauwv — 

riouly short in what mfliiaiy hand- 
books call “sustainability.” Japan 
has modem jets and tanks but few 
supplies to keep them in action. 
Stoats of torpedoes and depth 


Korea ana soumeast nso, wuw NEXT: After the swr tndtr m 
Japan occupied during World War 1945, Japan wept first in anpask, 
ILXn general, however, leaders then in relief . 


Finns Press 'Buy Soviet’ Theme, Even limousines 



International Telecommunications Conference 
Cannes, France, September 22-24, 1 985 

Focusing on the 
evolution, impact and 
future of competition 
in the telecommunications 
industry worldwide. 


Join leaders in the world of telecom- 
munications to discuss telecxsrnmunKXjtions 
policy development in the U.S., Europe and 
Asia and the global implicalions. 

The outstanding group of more them 
thirty speakers at this fourth annual confer- 
ence will indude: 

—Richard E Butler, Secretary General, Inter- 
national Telecommunication Union. __ 
—Bryan Carsberg, Director General, Ottel, 

U.K. £ , , 

—Sir Donald Maitland, Chairman of the In- 
dependent Commission for Worldwide Tele- 
communications Development, ITU. 

— Sir Eric Sharp, Chcsrman, Cable & Wire- 
less, pic 

Ucralb^Enbunc 


A UNIQUE SYMPOSIUM 
PRESENTED BY 
INTHEVENT, INC- 

COSPONSORED BY 

FINLEY. HXIMBLE^WAGNER, 
HEME, UNDteiSG, 
MANLEY & CASEY, 

EF. HUTTON &CO. INC, 

PEAT MARWICK, MITCHB1 
&CO. 

INTERNATIONAL 
HERALD TRIBUNE 



By Celestine Bohlcn 

Washington Past Service 
HELSINKI — Last spring, three 
of J^nland's top industrialists put 
in orders for Soviet-made fimou- 
smes, the big, black ones often seen 
whipping in and out of the Krem- 
lin! 

At $94,406 each, the purchases 
were considered unusual enough to 
nmiin* the Finnish newspapers. Tbe 
~ ■ 1 was that the limousines were 
, - b — y viable symbols of a Finnish 
“buy Soviet” campaign. 

Soviet-Finnish trade, long a key 
component in tbe delicate relations 
between 1 the two neighbors, has 
reached the stage where it needs a 
boost Thfe simplest solution — but 
not the easiest — would be for 
Finland to import more Soviet 
products mid materials. Other op- 
tions involve tinkering with the 
trade arrangement 
Under a system erf five-year bar- 
ter arrangements dating to 1951, 
each side is limited to buying only 
as much from tbe other ride as it 
sells to it The exchanges are made 
at prevailing worid prices, and han- 


dled through accounts at the cen- 
tral banks m Moscow and HririnkL 
Under the barter arrangement. 

money never changes hands, so the 

Soviet Union neither gets nor 
spends its hard currency — an asset 
that Moscow guards carefully. 

Finland and the Soviet Union 
pMTntain tint the so-called clear- 
inghouse system, unique among the 
Soviet Union’s Western partners, 
has served both rides wdl. 

The Finns say the Soviet market 
protected their exports at a time 
when Western economies were hurt 
by recession. For the Soviet Union, 
Finland has been both a guaran- 
teed market for energy exports and 
a source of high-quality goods. 

The Soviet Union accounted for 
21 percent of Finnish foreign trade 
in 1984, equaling about $5 bxDion, 
making it the top tradi n g partner. 
Among Western countries, Finland 
ranks second, after West Germany, 
in Soviet foreign trade. 

While no one expects the basic 
• there is talk now 


currency basis or by arrangements 
whereby a thud country would be- 
come. m effect, a hard-currency 
clearinghouse. 

“The history of Soviet-Finmm 
trade has been extraordinarilysao- 
cessful,” said Pentti Kouri, a Finn- 
ish economic consultant. “I don’t 
think the arrangement is going to 
rhnngfi but I rt»nk ft has readied 
the lmuts for the expansion of that 
kind of trade.” 

In recent years, the main prob- 
lem in keeping the balance has 
been the pnee of oiL Oil and otlw 
energy sources make up 85 percent 
of Soviet exports to Finland. When 

oil prices fdl in the early 1980s so 
<fid Soviet exports, and so did the 
rriTfng on Finnish exports to the 
Soviet Union. 

Since then, the issue for Finland 
has been what to buy from the 
Soviet Union as a way to increase 
Finnish exports. 

Many items and commodities 
that the Finns want — such as 
copper, scrap metal and mded — 
the Soviet Union does not want to 
sdL What Moscow wants the Finns 


to buy is madsnety and equip- 
ment, which make up 5 percent erf 
the Soviet exports to Fuuand. 

A small but visible part of tiro 
trade is dm Lada, tbe Soviet car 
bufitmaplanicoDstroctedbyHaL 

In Finbnd, the Lada— pmtica- 
tofy die cheapest modd that ooso 
the eqmvdotof $4,600 “*» re- 
garded more or less tbe «0f the 
Volkswagen Beetle was in its day. 

Even the more expensive Lada 
models, costing almost $8,000, are 
rare in HelsmkTs middle-class 
neighborhoods. Same people attri- 
bute the resistance to snobbtsm, 
mixed with latent anti-Sovietism. 

The Finns are looking at joint 
production arrangements that 
could count under both imports 
and expats. For example, Tamro 
Carp^ a large health-care concern, 
has signed an agreement to build 
ambulances on Soviet-supplied 

rhttTOR 

Another major project in tbe off- 
ing would involve Furnish compa- 
nies in a $1 billion presect to ex- 
pknt Kola Peninsula minerals. 


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» irthday . 



U.s. Social Security Looks Toward 21st Century With New Vig( 


*Syrs 


■ by tdcphoofi with 2,052 adults 

' WASHTNr^^T *?*? from April 20 to May 8. The mas- 

ebratert^SS^^lZ^ ^ miim ““plnig error was plus Of 
eprate the 50th anmversarv of So- minus T rvStat.fi wants. 


._ -< 




. i J 

a 

•- ■■■ .n 


: v* 


£ 


a qry uu*. a m ggH me erosion of 
nadence m America’s biggpst, 
ast important and most success- 
ful social program. 

In signing ihe Social Security Act 
on Aug. 14, 1935, Franklin D. Roo- 
sevelt said it was designed to pro- 

1K1 iwrnlp Miunalki >k. Lu- 


™ ph» 

mams 3 percentage pants. 

The people who created and 
guided Soaal Security hope to use 
its golden anniversary to restore 
confidence in the program, which 
now accounts far one-fifth of all 
federal spending. 

James ML Brown, a spokesman 

for the Social Security Administra- 
tion, said Tuesday: “We axe using 

that CAtK imniiWfcaM (vUiraliffl tO 


m 


iraiguca lo pro- con, sam i uesaay. wc are waug 
ally the edderiy, the 50th annivexsary cddnaiioo to 
« — e hazards and viriss- shore up confidence in Social Secu- 

tudes of life.'’ That is exactly what rity, to emphasize that it is not just 

it nils • . — fci ■ . m n mm Wet qIdaWIYV. 


The Social Security 
Act is "the most 
significant piece of 
domestic legislation 
enacted in the 20th 
century.’ 




Margaret M. Heckler 
Secretary of Health 
nn«t Human Services 



Camera Pra» 


curity Act, reported that children, 
friends and relatives bore the major 
cost of supporting the aged. 

But it added: “Many children 
who previously supported their 
parents have been compelled to 
cease doing so, and the great major- 
ity will probably never resume this 
load. The Depression has largely 
wiped out wage earners* savings.” 

Social Security often is described 
as a middle-class program, because 
benefits are paid without regard to 
financial need. But studies show 

that it is also the most effective 
anti-poverty program. About two- 
thirds of the elderly gel at least half 
their income from Social Se cu rity, 
according to the Social Security 
Administration. 


by providing benefits for depen- 
dents of retirees, as well as for the 
survivors of workers who died in 
their productive years. This began 
the t ransfo rmation of Social Secu- 
rity into a family insurance pro- 
gram. 

In to 1950siSociri S ecurity c ov- 
erage was extended to groups not 
included in the original program: 
farm workers, domestic workers, 
the self-employed, the military and 
some state and local government 
employees. 


In numerous 




roui Social Security officials are stress- 

But confidence in the system has ing that government actuaries have 
been undermined by four yeans of concluded that the program is ade- 

debate over the finsnr-ino nf Snraat mratelv frrmnrMt to keep paying 


pi 


— — — — MJ IUU1 JlbOU VA 

debate over the f inancing of Social 
Security, .its near- bankruptcy in 
1982 and proposals to freeze or 
restrict benefits. 

Younger workers express doubts 
about whether the program will ex- 
ist when they retire in the 21st cen- 
tury. 


quoits well into the next century. 
These are some of the major is- 
sues facing the program in its sec- 
ond half-century; 


chaHenge is to straighten ont the 
disability insurance. Thousands of 
lawsuits have been' filed by people 
who say thut the government un- 

American Association of Retired 
Prams fouKlthM only abontqee 

Social Security. Among people He dis.bil.qr pnyem. 

»ppd 25 to 34, two- thirds sard they • There is wide amcero about 
were “not too confident” or “not at the treatment of women under So- 
all confident" in the system. dal Security. Working often 

The interviews were conducted get little or no return. Thor retire- 


ment benefits may end up to be 
about the same as a spouses bene- 
fits they could draw if they had 
□ever worked outside the home. In 
addition, some say the benefits for 
divorced women are inadequate. 
Social Security officials say the 
r-ba n g re needed to meet these con- 
cerns would be complex and expen- 
sive. 


• The Sodal Security Adminis- 
tration has install ed new computer 
equipment at its Baltimore head- 
quarters and field offices, but fed- 
eral auditors say there sufl are criti- 
cal deficiencies and chronic 
problems. 

In the 1960s and 70s, Ronald 
Reagan criticized Social Security, 
suggesting that participation 
should be voluntary, and ms 1981 


proposals to cut Social Security 
benefits caused a furor. 

In the 1984 election, Mr. Reagan 
said that Social Security was, m 
effect, untouchable. Now, , on its 
50th anniversary, he says that So- 
cial Security has proven to be one 
of the most successful and popular 
programs ever established by the 
federal government-” 

Margaret M. Heckler, ihe secre- 
tary of and human services, 
calls the Social Security Ad “the 
most significant piece of domestic 
legislation enacted” in the 20 ih 

^Social Security was created with 


Tbe program is largely responsi- 
ble for the fact tha the poverty rate 
for the elderly, ai 14.1 percent in 
1983, is less than 0 j e overall nation- 
al rate of 152 percent. The poverty 
rate for the elderly was twice the 
national rate as recently as 1969, 
when the figures stood at 252 per- 
cent for the elderly and 12.1 per- 
cent overall. 


the United States in the depths of a 

depression. Mr. Roosevelt’s cabi- 

f , I •-»— -n C 


UCDICKHVU. . 

net-level Committee on Economic 
Security, whose recommendations 
formal the basis for the Social Se- 


Congress voted in 1922 to pro- 
tect Social Security benefits agajnst 
inflation by establishing an auto- 
matic annual cost-of-living adjust- 
ment 

When he signed the Social Secu- 
rity Act, Roosevelt said that it 
“represents a cornerstone in a 
structure which is being built but is 
by no means complete.” 

Even before the first monthly 
checks were issued. Congress in 
1939 voted to expand the program 


In 1956, Congress established a 
raA benefit program for disabled 
workers age 50 or older. In 1958, 
dependents of disabled workers be- 
came eligible for benefits, and in 
1960, the age requirement was 
dropped. 

The architects of Sodal Security 
considered inducting a heal th in- 
surance program, but dropped the 
idea for Fear it might jeopardize 
passage. Not until 1965 did Con- 
gress establish tbe Medicare pro- 
gram for tbe elderly and disabled, 
which receives a potion of Social 
Security payroll taxes. 

Alan Pifer Forrest Chisman , 
who have studied tbe tastoiy of 
Sodal Security, said that Mr. Roo- 
sevelt believed the payroll tax 
would create a continuing political 
constituency for the program, be- 
cause it would give people the feel- 
ing that they had earned and were 
entitled lo benefits. 

In Tact, current retirees often 
back more «han they contribute — 
payroll taxes, but Martha A. 
McSieen. the acting commissioner 


who has worked for the agency 
since 1947, said this concept of 
earned right was perhaps the most 
fundamental source of public sup- 
port for Sodal Security. 

The benefits are related to earn- 
ings, bultbe formula is weighted in 

favor of lower-paid worirers. They 
receive a larger proportion of past 
earnings in the form of benefi ts, rat 
the theory that they need the extra 
amounts. 

At present, according to James 
M. Brown, a spokesman far the 

Sodal Security Administration, the 

average monthly benefit for an in- 
dividual retired worker is S449. For 

a retired couple, tbe average is S776 

a month. 

What lies ahead for Social Secu- 
rity? 


The Census Bureau estimates 
that the number of people wed 65 
and older will more than double, 
gom 28 million now to 67 milli on 
m 2035 - Thedderiy, who constitute 
12 percent of tbe current popula- 
tion, will by then account for about 
22 percent, the bureau says. 

However, actuaries say that un- 
der current law the financing of 
Social Security is adequate to pay 
old-age, survivor ana disability 
benefits for about 75 years, assum- 
ing there is no severe downturn in 
tbe economy. 

On the other hand, lawmakers 
say there will almost certainly be 
extensive changes in Medicare. The 
last report on Medicare's hospital 
insurance trust fond said it would 
run out of money in 1998. 


In U.S., Older Gets Better I/X Asians 

7 n l n 1* 4* 


Auckland Court Holds 2 


- i* 


- - ■ ij 


mm 


(CdatimedTrom Page I) 

Bill Kfley_ a network spokesman. 

Sadi a question might not have 
come up in tbe 1950s and early ’60s, 
before the baby boom was old 

arough to establish a cultural iden- 
tity. m those days, television was 
hospitable to such middle-age stars 
as Jack Benny, Groucho Marxi Red 
Skelton and Mfltom Berie. . 

“As I go out speaking now, I find 

there's an awareness of what old 
people are really like,” said Lydia 
Bragger, who at 81 is national me- 
dia consultant to the Gray Pan- 
thers, an advocacy group for the 
elderly. “The stereotypes are not as 
oppressive.” 

This attitude contrasts sharply 
with that of the later 1960s ami 
*70s,when theyouthful countercul- 
ture was in full blossom. . 

During tins period, older actors 
rarely ptayedleading roles on too- 
vision. The elderly were wmcaUy 
portrayed as poor or tmbealmy. As 
Iwently as 1979 , Countiy Timc 
- lemonade used the device, m an 
old man’s deafness as an oteute to 
repeat the product’s name m a 
commercial. . . 

tive of old age 

!■ " "ko. 


Seek Relief 

3JUUM5 * “ 

*1Le older people are cwrid- prOTtl Attacks 
ered among the nation’s most beau- A 

nn.« VhviIa mo [ravin r asked _ 


tifuL When People magazine asked 
readers this spring who was the 
best-looking woman in America, 
the winner was 42-year-old Linda 
Evans. Runners-tm included Joan 
rnitinB, 52, and Elizabeth Taylor, 
53. 


Reuters 

LONDON —Asian imm igrants 
in Britain have appealed to Prime 
Minister Margaret Thatcher to set 
up police anti-arson squads to com- 
bat an outbreak of racist attacks in 

w , lan^prc 


— > — - pat an omoreax oi rauav oiuh-ao ^ 

“It’s no longf urfaritionaWe, L ^^ Dl ^ n ^J m incr^S S police 


l/UQU ! 

< and uncool to be old- 
er," declared Peter Schweitzer, a 
senior vice president at the J. Wal- 
ter Thompson advertising agency. 
“If s OX to be 50 and act 50. I 
rtiink you’ll see more advertising 
which depicts the gray generation 
in an open, honest way.” 

Putting it another way, a vice 


JUUUUt ; i« 

The plea for increased police 
protection from the Pakistan Wel- 
fare Society followed a series of 
deliberately set fires and other vio- 
lence in east London, winch has a 
large immigrant population- 
7afar MatiV, a community lead- 
er, y»id Tuesday that the imnri- 
erants wrote to Mrs. Thatcher re- 

“ :_v. J . 1 - .Ftor v oniK 


Reuters 

AUCKLAND. New Zealand — 
A man and a woman accused of 
sinking tbe Rainbow Warrior, a 
ship of the Greenpeace environ- 
mental movement, and of murder- 
ing a crewman appeared in court 
here Wednesday and were ordered 
to be kept in custody. 

The couple, identified m court 
documents as Sophie Frtderique 
Claire Turenge ana Alain Jacques 
Turenge, stood silent as Judge Bri- 
an Blackwood set their next ap- 
pearance for Ang. 22. He fixed a 
Nov. 4 date for a preliminary hear- 
ing of prosecution evidence. 


week's edition that officials of 
France’s presidential palace were 
linked to tbe sabotage. The Associ- 
ated Press reported from Paris. 

The Elysee Palace, which is the 
official residence of President 
Francois Mitterrand, denied tbe as- 
sertions in the new article, describ- 
ing it as “fantasy” and “full of 
lies." A palace statement said that a 
lawsuit would be filed. 

VSD. which appears on Thurs- 


day but made copies of the article 
available Tuesday, said that the 
French secret service decided in 
1978 to sink a Greenpeace ship, 
then resurrected tbe idea at the be- 
ginning of this year. 

The French magazine linked the 
Elyste to the operation through a 
scries of meetings among highly 
placed officials, but provided no 
firm accounts of those alleged 
meetings. 


f^Every piece of jewelry has a story to telL\ 

1 / • ■ T-ntm wr”ri-~ 


/•/A* - 



ilias LALAoUNIS 


PARIS - 364, RUE ST-HONORE 
rrtsffVA - “BON GENIE", ZURICH - GRIB3ER 
ATHENS - 6, PANEP1ST1MIOU AVENUE 
HOTEL GRANDE BRETAGNE & ATHENS HILTON 
MVCONOS, CORFU, RHODES 
NEW YORK - 4 WEST 57 TH STREET & FIFTH AVENUE 


g Ui pivawuuvw *■ - — - — i 

They are charged with planting 
the explosives that sank the Rain- 
bow Warrior in Auckland harbor 


\ . - _ ,* prnniS wrote iu jmas. — 

Putting it another wy, a via; ^ after a senes 

prestdent at I^on, ^ Gnsm 9 ^ mdoding one in which a 

^ her ,three 


as it is, and older 
it as it is, exist side 


are 

ing 


pnsnant woman and hCT three 

sons died in a fire set at their home 

on July 13. 

Newspapers said that the police 
bad recorded 144 racially motivat- 
ed incidents in the Tower Hamlets 
area, about a mile from central 


as enebantin] 
beauty, as 
by side?” 

■ Speaking of “Cocoon’s” success 
as a fib* David A. Wdmra.presi- 
dent of maiketing at20th€entiuy- 
Fox, remarked: “1 don’t think 


DOW waniui Ui nu i.»mu u 

on July 10 and with killing Fernan- 
do Pereira, a Dutch photographer 
for Greenpeace who was on board. 

The ship was to have led a pro- 
test fleet to the French nuclear test 
ate at Muniroa atoll near Tahiti 


WHY THE OWNER 
OF A PATEK PHILIPPE HAS MOR 
THAN JUST MONEY’S WORTH. 


Such nexauve 

- mewa wth adult thanes. 


i 


Nudists Land in Hot Spot 

S panish Trial May Cost Their Jobs 

r _ . ^ * i 1983, snipped seven midi 



By Leslie Crawford 

Reuters 

BARON A, Spain — TLe dKeit- 
ed beaches of nnal Galicia have 
long provided a perfect setting for 
nudists in search of a seamlMS tan, 
but a local priest is moving heaven 

and earth to stamp ont such carnal 

pursuits in his Miisb. . . • 

Don Sabino Lema is fighting a 
rear-guard battle from the tmy 
hamletof Barona to 
remote and conservative north- 


1983, stripped seven nudists of 
their professional qualifications 
and banned them from state-sector 
jobs for six years and one day. 

“The trial would be a joke, ex- 
cept that most of us stand to lose 
our jobs,” said Josi Sanz, a tetew- 
si on cameraman who was one oi 
those arrested. 

“Onl 
could 


ISJIX IU wuv mn , “ ---T 

hamlet of Barona to said. “The beach is shetoed by in a statement to 

remote and pine trees and morel ^ community, said that 

western regicmfrom.the^^P^ meters away from the v ^8e- ,. “everything possible is being done 

tan practices of Spams Mednerra- The .arrests spurred jxudis of these inci- 



On Tuesday, a judge scmencea 
four Asians convicted of throwing 
objects at a bar frequent^ by 
vrintes to community service m uen 
of prison terms. “1 take the Mew 
each of you overreacted to long- 
-standing and serious provoca- 
tion," the judge said. 

Mr. Malik said that arsonists 
usually strode in tbe middle of the 
night, pushing gasoline-soaked 
mgn through mail boxes to trap 
victims in their sleep. 

The community leader, who 
three yean ago helped to organize 
vigilantes to combat racist street 
gangs, accused the police of racial 

^^Tbere is no will on the part of 
the police to investigate arson and 
nd£i attacks,” he said. “Police and 
the government legalize such at- 
tacks by their reluctance to tackle 
the root cause.” 


The couple's claims to Swiss na- 
tionality have been dewed by tbe 
authorities in Bern. A French state 
radio station, France Into 1 , said 
Saturday that they were officers m 
the French armed forces attached 
to a department charged witn 
maintaining security at Muniroa. 

During the 30-minute hearing, 
Michael Parker, the prosecutor, 
told the judge that the police would 
call 100 witnesses for the evidentia- 
ry hearing. Witnesses would be 
called from France, the French Pa- 
cific territory of New Caledonia, 
Switzerland, Britain and Austra- 
lia’s Norfolk Island, he said. 

■ Hys6e links Alleged 

The magazine V]SD, which as- 
serted that the French secret ser- 
vice was behind the bombing of the 
Rainbow Warrior, alleged in this 



The Golden Ellipse 


Wwb Scandal Hits 

EheadandrPfaks 


The Associated Press 


s; 


ne Sm Sabino will not talk to jour- . cctc{1 more man t,vw 
naKsts. but from his pulpit m tor- for ^ legalization of nudism and 

invnkes the wrath of God to . hdddeiDonstiations “in for- mentary comi 
^f^ < S^cts.hon» : ^SgSonthebrach 

rfSXpit etoatsbyvinag- from Baugh 

who have invaded this isolated spot ere to bum tto^ahve. 
of the Galician coast ™.~m«a«misledbvasociolo- 


more than 4,000 signatures dents. 


MAINZ, West Germany — A 
state government m i n ister was 
to retire and two lower offi- 
cials have been transferred because 
of the wine sca n dal. Bernhard Vo- 

. , .r ill. nrnll^nm. 


A 

Y ' 


uon aaoiMM w-*. — -r-r ibcwu * anM The ^airman of a British pariia- 

mentsiy conunitiec thst is cxMM; 


» 1 




faced by immigrants 

Bangladesh said that his 
also would look into racial 
it 



saiu I wauay that he had asked the 
agriculture and wine minister, Fer- 
dinand Stark, to retire because of 
his handling of the affair. 


Mr. Vogel said after a stale cabi- 
set session that Mr. Stalk had re- 




acted “wrongly” and with “poor 
judgment” to tnedi 


* It takes nine months 
shown here. Some- 
complicated Patek Philippe 
Every element is raicro- 
ance which represents 
hair. Every wheel, gear, 
until it is virtually friction- 
Just as most Patek 
from one generation to 
Patek Philippe watch- 
heirlooms that have 
dispensable. 

After 600 hours 
as near absolute per- 
can achieve, each 
it takes less than a 



complete the Golden Ellipse 
les even several years for a 


lopically hand-finished to a toler- 

ction of the thickness of a human 

"pinion and cog is polished by hand 


•Philippes are handed down 
, S the next, so are the tools that 
makers use to perfect them - 
f become as precious as they are in- 


dflL 


t - 

1 


Reuters 

PARIS — Two French consumer 

. ^ ■ ^ ..:a Wulnouliiv that 

Tbe nudists of Barona,, 

them university teachm, 

U»,rces and students, will oe mw ^ v^pamsn pjoiuuiij-.* «-*- mestk: amine, ait mua. u 

JSfmSth and face sentences of rent of article to tte security checks were not nnproW 

««5 Sl-bs ««a.-.sssi 

in Gito, tat the TorkaK Trsni Cradi Kilk 14 

isn, however to nudists are not satined. &edp«^- 

by a High 0wxl j ds ^_ -We don’t want to be shunned, ^ a)nflWgroiI ps,theFed«- 

nrewortaBnn. Spaniard* they 

1 ** 


discovery of adul- 

tiarated wines inmorted from Ans- 
tria. Hans-Berad Ueing, the chief 
of the wine department m the 
stale’s Agriculture Ministry, and 
his deputy, Josef Koy, were trans- 
ferred to other jobs, Mr. Vogel said. 

Meanwhile, in Fels am Wagram, 
Austria, about 37 mfles (60 kilome- 
ter) northwest of Vienna, a wne 

tj p ttkr marketer, the B ruder 

Grill Co n was declared bankrupt 
Tuesday. It was the first known | 
financial victim of the scandal. 



Reuters 


***** nen 
— About 250 


please. 1 


ASbUUauumv. — 


l -j* - 


spokesman said. 


ANKARA — At least 14 per- 
sons were killed and five wer® in- 
jured when two cargo trains collid- 
ed Wednesday near the east 
T urkish town of Malalya, the Ana- 
tolian News Agency said. The 
cause of the accident was not im- 


of testing, regulating and refining to 
fection as human hands and minds 
watch is lubricated so delicately that 
ikes less than a cupfiJ of oU for an entire year's 

Everything about agold Patek Philippe that canbe gold,ts gold- 18 ct. gold - 
right down to the dial, the winding crown, the strap buckle, and the spring bars 
that hold the strap to the watch. In automatic Ptitek Phihppes, even the wining 
rotors are of solid gold, since the additional weight increases the winding 

L 

ffiC1 ftrfthe real cost is in the time, patience, tradition and absolute dedi- 
cation to flawlessness that makes it a Patek Philippe. _ 

Uke any other work of art by an acknowledged master, a Patek 
ippe appreciates in value because the scarcity of such quality is grow- 
ing at a disheartening rate. • p _ flw 

Thus, if you are aiming for perfection you need patience. Perse 

erance too. And perhaps a streak of the stubborn!,^ reqmmd to / 
achieve the best things in life. But isn’t it this that relates Patek Philippe 
watches to their owners? 

Which makes one think ... why not invest in a Patek Philippe. 



PATEK 

PHIUPPE 


GENEVE 


UI ■ ■ j ’ 

naffic is heavy. 


CH - ,2,, Genev0 1 



FOR MASTERS OF THEIR TIME.; 


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-7~. -n - 





THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1985 


Heralb 


international 


Published Tiih The Nrv York Timfn ami TV ffwUnpaa port 


AIDS: Reasons to Care 


Srib nnt The Dollar: Wobbly Base for America’s House of Cards 

! Tlie ffaUngw Port §/ V V 


Even before people began responding to the 
stories about (he actor Rock Hudson, attitudes 
toward AIDS were beginning to change. At 
firsi the deadly virus, discovered in 1981, bad 
been thought to be confined to discrete groups, 
primarily male homosexuals and drug addicts, 
for whom there was limited sympathy in the 
society at large. Some uncharitable persons 
even suggested that there was no public re- 
sponsibility to search for a cure, since the 
afflicted had voluntarily chosen to engage in 
the conduct that leads to the disease. There are 
other afflictions — alcoholism, drug addiction, 
venereal disease, even cigarette-induced illness 
— that have caused people to react this way in 
the past But all these have long since come to 
be regarded as ailments for which it is not just 
proper, but essential, that society use its re- 
sources to seek methods of containment and 
cure. The same, increasingly, is true of AIDS. 

There are reasons for tius. For one thing, the 
epidemic has continued to spread at an accel- 
erating rate. On Jan. 7 of this year, there were 
7,788 reported cases in the United States; 
today there are more than 12,000. and the 
figure is expected to double within a year. 
Since the virus was discovered, 73 percent of 
its victims have been male homosexuals and 17 
percent intravenous-drug users. But there have 
been others: hemophiliacs, people who have 
received blood transfusions, and the children 
of AIDS victims. The fact that the malady hit 
patients who received blood transfusions, a 
category anyone could be in at a moment’s 
notice, contributed to the general alarm. 

Scientists have now solved the blood trans- 
fusion problem by developing a test that al- 


lows them to screen blood donations for AIDS 
antibodies. Hemophiliacs and hospital pa- 
tients receiving transfusions will no longer be 
in a special risk category. They were never 
more than a small fraction of the victims, but it 
is right to capitalize on the interest and con- 
cern generated by their vulnerability. Research 
efforts — the U.S. government will spend 
S1263 million next year — have been consis- 
tent and productive. The scientific community 
was well ahead of the public oo this problem. 

But laymen must make a contribution too. 
Preventive efforts, particularly among homo- 
sexuals, should be increased. And education 
must be a priority. Some key facts need to be 
made widely known: Blood donors do not 
contract AIDS; victims do not contaminate 
clothing, furniture or other objects; and chil- 
dren most certainly do not acquire the disease 
by being in the same classroom with a young- 
ster who is a victim of the syndrome. 

Very few of us will lose our eyesight or need 
a kidney transplant, yet we do not hesitate to 
mobilize public sympathy and national re- 
sources in aid of those who do, just as we 
mobilize them to assault diseases associated 
with social and sexual conduct the majority 
disapproves. It is good that these things are 
understood. AIDS is being fought and its vic- 
tims cared for not because we all have an equal 
risk of contracting it or because a movie star 
we admire is a victim or for any reason other 
than that thousands of our fellow citizens, 
most of them young, are dying slowly, painful- 
ly and in profound despair — and we can 
do something to help. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


The War, in a Few Words 


Drawn from various sources, notably “The 
American Treasury,’’ Selected by Clifton Fadi- 
man. Harper & Rim. 1955. 


Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition. 

— Howell Maurice Forgy, on the cruiser New 
Orleans, Pearl Harbor. Dec 7. 1941. 

Yesterday, Dec. 7, 1941 — a day which will 
live in infamy — the United States of America 
was suddenly and deliberately attacked by 
naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan. 

— Franklin D. Roosevelt, Dec 8, 1941. 

The difficult we do immediately. The impos- 
sible takes a little longer. 

— Army Corps of Engineers slogan. 

If it moves, salute it 

If it doesn’t move, pick it up. 

If you can't pick it up. paint it 

— “The Sad Sack's Catechism. " 

We have not journeyed all this way across 
the centuries, across the oceans, across the 
mountains, across the prairies, because we are 
made of sugar candy. 

— Winston Churchill, to the Canadian Senate 
and House of Commons. Dec 30. 1941. 

Kilroy war here. 

— Army graffito 

Loose Lips Sink Ships. 

— World War II Poster. 

Suppose . . . your army is retreating ... and 
the captain takes you to a machine gun cover- 
ing the road. “You're to stay here and hold this 
position," he tells you. “For how long?" you 
ask. “Never mind," be answers, “just bold it" 
Then you know you’re expendable. . . . They 
are expending you ... to get time. 

— W.L White, “ They Were Expendable." 

The object of this war is to make sure that 
everybody in the world has the privilege of 
drinking a quart of milk a day. 

— Henry A. Wallace, May 8. 1942. 

Go to Hell, Babe Ruth! American, you die. 

— Japanese war cry. Pacific 1942. 

If you go long enough without a bath even 
the fleas will lei you alone. 

— Ernie Pyle, “ Here Is Your War. " 

Remember, you volunteered! 


— Sign in WAC processing center. Daytona 
Beach, Florida, 1943. 

Look at an infantryman's eyes and you can 
tell how much war he has seen. 

— BUI Mauldin, “Up Front." 1944. 

Back the Attack! 

— Slogan of Fifth War Loan drive. 1944. 

Austin White — Chicago. EL — 1918 

Austin White — Chicago, HL — 1945 

This is the last time I want to write my 
name here. 

— Inscription discovered by a reporter on a 
wall of the fortress of Verdun. 

Now that the Nazi armies of aggression have 
been forced by the coordinated efforts of Sovi- 
et- Anglo- American forces to an unconditional 
surrender. I wish to express to you and through 
you to your heroic Army the appreciation and 
congratulations of the United Slates Govern- 
ment on iu splendid contribution to the cause 
of civilization and liberty. 

— Harry S. Truman, message to Marshal 
Stalin. May S, 1945. 

It is odd that you dreamed about my trans- 
fer. It cannot happen. We will be invaded at 
any time and no one can then get off (he 
island. A commander in chief is never trans- 
ferred before a battle. Please step hoping that 
I can return alive. 

— Lieutenant General Tadamichi Kuribaya- 
shi, Japanese commander on Iwo lima, in a 
letter to his wife, January 1945. 

1 couldn’t help wondering what would have 
happened if I’d been a Jap entering Brooklyn 
after Japan had dropped an atomic bomb. 

— Sergeant Joe McCarthy to Yank magazine 
after entering Hiroshima. 

I have received this afternoon a message 
from the Japanese government. ... I deem tius 
reply a full acceptance of the Potsdam Decla- 
ration which specifies the unconditional sur- 
render of Japan. 

— President Truman, Aug. 14, 1945. 

Let us pray that peace be now restored to 
the world, and that God will preserve it al- 
ways- These proceedings are closed. 

— General Douglas MacArthur, speech after 
the surrender on the battleship Missouri. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 

Rumors of Mandela's Release Hussein on a Half-Sawn limb 


Even if Nelson Mandela [the imprisoned 
leader of ibe outlawed African National Con- 
gress] were released, the action would be at 
least as likely to become a missed opportunity 
as a new dawn of racial harmony. The need to 
lake this remarkable man seriously lest worse 
befall is not yet seen by the dominant minor- 
ity, which is still more scared of a while, right- 
wing backlash. Of course Nelson Mandela 
should be freed. But that alone should not be 
seen as ihe panacea for South Africa’s ills, nor 
as enough reason for easing external pressure. 

— The Guardian (London). 


The Arab League meeting in Morocco did 
not give Jordan's King Hussein ibe support he 
hoped for in his approach to negotiations with 
Israel but it also did not quite saw off tire limb 
be had gotten out on. The league again proved 
incapable of bucking the radical states. Such 
putatively influential moderates as Saudi Ara- 
bia were unwilling to confront the minority. 
The conferees indicated at least a willingness 
to see Hussein continue testing the direction 
he has taken. As long as he does that, he earns 
support that gives his approach promise. 

— The Atlanta Constitution. 


FROM OUR AUG. 15 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: 30 Die in French Train Crash 

BORDEAUX — A terrible railway catastro- 
phe which has cost the lives of more than 30 
pawns took place [on Aug. 14] at Saujoa Tbe 
fine weather preceding two public holidays 
had led thousands of people in Bordeaux to 
leave tbe city for watering places and coast 
resorts. An excursion for Royan which should 
have left at twenty minutes past eight left the 
State railway station six minutes late. It car- 
ried about a thousand passengers. At twenty- 
five minutes to eleven, when the train should 
already have arrived at Royan, it had gone 
only as far as Saujon. At 200 meters from the 
station, it crashed into a freight train which 
was standing on a siding, but the engine of 
which had moved on to tbe track on which 
the excursion train was traveling. 


1935: Dam Break Kills 400 in Italy 
GENOA — The death toll in the valley of the 
Orba River, where the hydro-dearie dam at 
Mdare broke [on Aug. 13] and a wall of water 
swept over the town of Ovada and nearby 
villages, was placed at 400. Rescue workers 
from Ailessandria and Genoa, who labored 
throughout the night and today, recovered 
only 70 bodies. But hundreds Of others are 
missing and, since many parts of tbe densdy 
populated district are still under water, it is 
feared the final total of dead may exceed the 
estimate. More than 200 houses have been 
destroyed, numerous bridges have been 
washed out and communications cut by waters 
from the dam, swelled by torrential rains. 
Most of the victims were women and children 
trapped in their homes during the siesta. 


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T OKYO — America's economy has be- 
come a house of cards, and the most 
wobbly pan is not interest rates or the budget 
or trade — it is the U-S. dollar. A major drop 
in the value of the dollar is not inconceivable, 
and Washington is poorly prepared for it. 

This would not be the fust dollar debacle. 
In the early 1970s, inflation and overspending 
forced President Richard Nixon to abandon 
the long-standing U.S. commitment to con- 
vert dollars into gold. During the administra- 
tion of Jimmy Carter, foreign governments 
had to rescue the plummeting currency. 

But there is a fundamental difference be- 
tween then and now. For most Americans the 
dollar's plight has always been primarily a 
foreign event, of significance mostly to Amer- 
ican tourists in London or Rome. No more. 

The greenback, which has risen some 70 
percent during the Reagan years, has made 
imports so cheap that 20 percent of ail goods 
in America come from abroad. It has made 
exports so expensive that American agricul- 
ture is in a depression, the California comput- 
er industry is laying off workers. Ford and 
Caterpillar are setting up shop abroad 
The strength of the currency is accelerating 
America's switch from being the world's man- 
ufacturing and minin g hub to being its bank- 
ing. software and insurance center. By suck- 
ing in so many low-cost foreign products, the 
dollar has become a powerful engine holding 
down inflation. Because it has been so over- 
valued, it has acted as a magnet for foreign 
investors, who now finance 50 percent to 60 
percent of the U.S. budget deficiL thereby 


By EWK in Ahonaadet (Sttdshdfii Cbnoond* X Wn*n SywfaWB. 


By Jeffrey E. Garten 


enlarging the U.S. pool of capital and keeping 
interest rates from rising further. 

But (here is a darker side to the dollar 
equation- Nearly everyone agrees that the 
dollar is greatly overpriced, even after the 
declines of recent weeks. Each time tbe ex- 
change rate has increased by 1 pe r ce n t after 
inflation, tbe balance of exports and imports 
has worsened by 52 billion to S3 billion. 

The 5145-bQhon trade deficit encourages a 
destructive protectionism of the 1930s vari- 
ety, threatening to set back world trade and 
ruin relations with countries such as Japan, 
Brazil and China. And other nations have 
become the principal beneficiaries of U.S. 
growth, because increases in American gross 
national product spell more imports but not 
more U.S. production and jobs. 

The dollar should drop, but slowly. A steep 
decline would scare foreigners who bold U 
and cause a rout Since the Uni Led States so 
badly needs foreign money to plug its budget 
and trade defiats, Washington would be 
forced to push up interest rates several points 
in order to make it attractive to continue to 
hold dollar -denominated stocks, bonds «nd 
other investments. Thor the dollar might sta- 
bilize. but Americans would watch tbeu hous- 
ing industry crumble and other investments 
dry up. They would be in a depression. 

A lot is outside Washington’s oontroL If, 
for domestic reasons, Tokyo jacked up its 
own interest rates and made 'it more profit- 
able to bold yen, Japanese buyers of about 


$40 billion in dollar investments each year 
could move back into their borne currency 
and the greenback would plunge. IT Argentina 
or Brazil were to slash interest payments to 
U.&. banks, as Pent just did, the mrino3 could 
cause a dollar crisis as welL 

Evexy day tbe situation becomes more pre- 
carious. During the Reagan years America 
has been transformed from the world’s largest 
lender to its biggest debun 1 . By 1990, U.S. 
interest payments to foreigners could top 
$100 billion a year. With so many dollars 
being sent abroad, overseas holders could 
easily cry “enough.” 

Proposals to correct the problem always 
begin with exhortations to reduce budget def- 


icits. which is right, of course. But that will 
not happen quickly. Meantime, some say that 
Washington and other key capitals ought 
jointly to buy and sell currencies to keep 
values steady. Others believe that central 
banks should closely coordinate their mone- 
tary policies. The Internationa] Monetary 
Fund could do more to guide currency devel- 
opments. A special link Detween Washington 
and Tokyo to maintain a desirable yea-dollar 
relationship is worth considering. 

But no plan stands a chance until tbe U.S. 
government fundamentally changes its atti- 
tude toward what the dollar means to Ameri- 
cans, and gives the dollar a much more impor- 
tant role in everyday policy-making. 

The dollar should no longs be an after- 
thought to decisions about interest rates. 


spending or tanufc or tariffs and quotas. In 
fact all of these policies should be designed in 
light of their effect on the currency. 

Whenever the greenback is fundamentally 
out of whack — when it is low enough to 
ignite inflation or high enough to expand 
unemp loyment — the government should use 
all its domestic and international leverage to 
push k back in line. .. 

All this is light-years from where Washing- 
ton is today. President Reagan, in a version of 
Ram bo economics, takes pride in watching 
the currency soar. His administration, blind- 
ed by a !9‘th-centiuy laissez-faire bias, has 
opposed international currency cooperanon. 

There is no consistent policy. The Federal 
Reserve Board chairman, Paul Volcker, said 
recently that a rapidly descending dollar pre- 
sented a grave threat At the same time, Com- 
merce Secretary Malcolm Baldrige said he 
hoped the dollar would drop by 20 to 25 
percent Treasury Secretary James Baker wof- 
fles somewhere in between (and recently abol- 
ished the post of undersecretary of the Trea- 
sury for international monetary affaire). 
Secretary of Slate George Shultz, head of the 
Treasury Department in the Nixon adminis- 
tration and the one present cabinet member 
with extensive global financial experience, 
has not said much at ail. 

And yet the alarm bells are ringing. 

The writer manages Far East investment 
banking activities for Shearson Lehman Broth- 
ers, the New Yak investment bankers. He 
contributed this to The New York Times. 



South Africa: No Evolutionary Answer 


L USAKA, Zambia — The agenda By Thabo Mbeki 

/ for change in South Africa is no J 


toria. It is bring decided in the town- 
ships of South Africa and among the 
voters of the Western countries. 

This poses a considerable dilemma 
for the policy-makers of the West, 
who still cling to the illusion that 
there is an evolutionary answer to the 
South African problem. 

Accustomed to treating the South 
African regime as a legitimate gov- 
ernment, the leaders of the West are 
now obliged to consider using tbe 
kind of measures that are normally 
reserved for what they consider pan- 
ah states. The policy-makers prefer, 
however, to avoid facing the embar- 
rassing truth — that South Africa is 
precisely such a state. 

Thus, it is possible for President 
Reagan to dmnniw. all itianngr of 


countries for their “violations of hu- 
man rights." Yet he breathes not a 
word about the horrors of the apart- 
heid system. He produces a list of 
“terrorist states.” Yet the Republic of 
South Africa is absent from the list. 
Washington had very little to say 
about the commando team that Pre- 
toria sent into Angola to blow up 
American-owned oil installations 
and loll American personnel working 
in the ad fields. 

The amazing thing is that those 
Western leaders who propagate and 
support these preposterous positions 
argue that they do so in defense of 
freedom, justice and democracy. 


The Reformists Walk a Narrow Path 


OHANNESBURG — The sheer By Peter Honey 
magnitude of anti-apartheid pro- J * 

re here and the viciousness of black 


revolt, which have become almost a 
way of life, tend to obscure the more 
immediate concerns of the country. 

South Africa has leaped into world 
attention with a primeval scream. 
Millions of people who once knew of 
the country only as a region of gold, 
wildlife and apartheid might now be- 
lieve that if is descending into bell. 
They open their newspapers, turn on 
the television set and are confronted 
by bonifying accounts of a South 
Africa that is in the process of self- 
immolation: riots, killings, political 
funerals, mass arrests, a state of 
emergency. Mob rule, police oppres- 
sion and human misery are presented 
as the omens of revolution. 

Governments of all stripes are 
prodded into action by public out- 
rage. Fifteen countries (the United 
States and European Community na- 
tions included) have recalled tempo- 
rarily, and in one case permanently, 
their ambassadors or heads of mis- 
sions. Tbeir excuses are various, their 
concerns the same: No longer can 
they afford to associate with a gov- 
ernment that is unwilling or unable to 
respond to the political demands of 
its greater population. 

But why the clamor now? Apart- 
had is less evident in the streets and 
buildings of South Africa than it has 
ever been in the 37 years of white 
National Party rule. First-time visi- 
tors are often amazed at the extent to 
which the country has become racial- 
ly integrated. This is a South Africa 
that, when seen superficially and 
from certain angles, is as orderly as 
any Western democracy. 

The oppression, though racially 
motivated, is no worse than it is in 
many countries of Africa. The unrest 
has not yet spread beyond the bounds 
of the blade townships — and even 
then not all are in uproar. While 
censorship exists, political opponents 
and newspapers are still allowed to 
criticize the government to a degree 
that is unheard of in many countries. 

In Johannesburg, Cape Town, 
Durban and other cities there are 
scores of restaurants and hotels 
where blade and white guests mingle. 
There are multiracial theaters, play- 
grounds, schools and universities. 
Membership in political parties is no 
longer restricted to a single race. Peo- 
ple of different races can marry or 
share sex without prosecution. Even 
though the law still prohibits blacks 
from living in white dries and towns, 
authorities have turned a blind eye to 
several suburbs that have quietly be- 
come multiradaL 

Township blacks are still denied 
land-ownership rights, or even full 
South African citizenship. Laws pro- 
hibit them from living or traveling 
freely, but government leaders have 
already indicated that these laws are 
about to be scrapped or “softened." 

Not all townships are squalid ghet- 
tos. Soweto, the huge black township 


the country. Tbe issue now is power. 

Chief Gatsha Buthelezi, who is 
hated by black radicals but is none- 
theless a powerful leader of the coun- 
try^ six million Zulus, has said that 
he is now prepared to shelve the ideal 
of a unitary one-man, one-vote sys- 
tem of government, “if negotiations 
between blacks and whiles can begin 
to find a compromise solution ac- 
ceptable to all population groups." 

He is not alone in calling for a 
constitutional conference of all races. 
Conservative white businessmen join 
opposition politicians, church leaders 
and academics of all races in calling 
on the government to act Some call 
for the immediate abolition of apart- 
had, others for gradual reforms. Talk 
to recognized black leaders, they say, 
even if it means freeing people like 
Nelson Mandela, the jaded leader of 
the African National Congress. Give 
equal living and voting rights to 
tbe black majority. 

Foreign Minister ILF. Botha has 
revealed that some members of the 
government agree that Mr. Mandda 


should be released. “The question 
now,” he said, “is how.” To under- 
stand that statement is a key to un- 
derstanding government resistance to 
the tide of opinion: There is a desper- 
ate need to save face. 

President Botha and his lieuten- 
ants recognize that apartheid is no 
longer a practicable doctrine. That 


was made dear by the reform initia- 
tive that began in the 1970s and that 
split Afrikaner nationalism. On one 
side are the apartheid purists who 
believe that it is the only way to 
maintain white supremacy; oa the 
other side are the reformists, like Mr. 
Botha, who are dismantling apart- 
heid, but only where it poses a threat 
to tbe people whom it was designed 
to protect: the whites. 

Coloreds, that is, people of mixed- 
race, and Indian people were given a 
stake in central government in 1984 
because, together, their population is 
numerically smaller than the six mil- 
lion whites, and poses little threat as 
an opposition. The major problem 
has always ban how to give political 
representation to the black majority, 
yet retain power in white hands. 

Now that events are forcing Mr. 
Botha to address this problem — to 
overturn the historical tenet of Afri- 
kaner white nationalism — he needs 
the support of his electorate. They 
bave to believe that he is in control, 
that he is not badding under pressure. 

Contained and undirected as it is, 
the current unrest is still far from 
threatening the seat of power. Until 
that happens, or until the violence 
subsides, the country seems caught in 
a cycle of indecision: revolt because 
of political rights denied, and a denial 
of rights because of revolt 

The author, a South African who 
writes fa Business Day, contributed 
this to the Las Angeles Times. 


Western policy-makers do when the 
people of South Africa rise up and 
are killed because they proclaim free- 


dom, justice and democracy and de- 
nounce a most order? The problem is 
compounded when those whom the 
experts are supposed to represent — 
in this case, the American people — 
also stand up and call for an end to 
minority domination in Sooth Africa. 

When this happens, the policy- 
makers must make an effort to catch 
up with their constituencies. At the 
same time, however, they are deter- 
mined not to treat tbe racist rulers of 
South Africa as a regime of outlaws. 

Out of this compound of ineconri- 
lables emerges a two-pronged strate- 
gy. First, ihe nonwhite people of 
South Africa — African, colored and 
Indian — are fed on a diet of words 
expressing hostility to apartheid. Our 
ears tingle to the thunderous an- 
nouncements of actions taken or 
about to be taken against Pretoria. In 
fact, however, the actions are de- 
signed to have the minimum posable 
impact on the apartheid system. 

What is incredible is that when we 
blacks speak out against such pusflla- 


For Reagan, a Bold Initiative on Arms 

By Joseph Kraft 

W ASHINGTON — When the Russians proposed Fust, both sides would renounce further devclof 
a joint moratorium on testing nuclear weapons, ment of strategic nuclear weapons. The Russian 


President Reagan asked his advisers what was wrong 
with the idea. He received a partial answer. So he was 
confused on the subject at a news conference last week, 
and the White House had to issue a correction. 

But the question is worth asking again. For the full 


outside Johannesburg, is probably 
better off than many Third World 
cities. Tbe township boasts several 
sumptuous residences. 

These are facts, but they do not tell 
the full story, just as the accounts of 
violence and insurrection are only 
part of the picture. For the issue is no 
longer apartheid itself but the reten- 
tion or relinquishment of power. In 
this coniext no amount of social re- 
form can safisfv the demands of 
blacks for a share in governing 


But the question is worth asking again. For the full 
answer leads directly to the challenge Mr. Reagan 
should set before the Soviet leader, Sfikhafl Gorba- 
chev, at their Geneva summit meeting in November. 

There are three reasons why the United States has to 
be wary of Soviet proposals for a joint froze on 
nuclear weapons testing. For one thing, tbe Russians 
have just finished tests of their mobile land-based 
weapons, the SS-24 and SS-25 missiles. The United 
States has not begun to test its counterpart, the Nfid- 
getman. A freeze would leave America behind. 

Mr. Reagan emphasized this at his news conference. 
Bui he then went on to say that once America had 
caught up, a moratorium would be acceptable. 

The second reason a freeze means trouble is that the 
United States has reason io fear that the Russians 
cheat To prevent trickery, the United Slates wants on- 
site inspection of testing. That is the point the White 
House made in correcting Mr. Reagan's statement 

The third reason, laigdy unspoken, has to do with 
the administration's Strategic Defense Initiative, or 
“star wars” proposal, for a missile defense based in 
space: Pan of the technology is tbe so-called X-ray 
laser. Triggering it requires a nudear explosion. 

The United States wants to test such a device under- 
ground. A moratorium wouklprevent the oiaL Talking 
about it would expose the hoDowness of the claim that 
the SDI can help do away with nudear weapons. So 
“star wars” enthusiasts do not like the moratorium. 

Once those problems are confronted directly, how- 
ever. they lead to a dramatic American offer that takes 
the propaganda initiative away from Mr. Gorbachev. 
It lends itself to a full-court press by the United States 
against Mr. Gorbachev’s peace offensive. 

The starring point would be a U.S. offer to join the 
Russians in a moratorium on testing nudear weapons. 
The ban would be dependent on three conditions. 


First, both rides would renounce further develop- 
ment of strategic nuclear weapons. Tbe Russians 
would have to drop plans to deploy the SS-24 and SS- 
25. The United States would have to abandon the 
Mtdgetman. But congressional support has been with- 
ering anyway. Tbe United States would still have the 
MX and other nudear weapons — sea- or air-based — 
that could not be wiped out in a first strike. 

Second, both rides would undertake to agree, by a 
specified date, to large cuts in their ars enals of offen- 
sive weapons. In this way the Soviet Finhn to be ready 
for reductions of 30 percent could be put to the test. 

If Soviet leaders agreed, Moscow would have to 
reduce substantially its truly threatening nudear weap- 
ons, such as the blockbuster SS-lSsTff the Russians 
refused or reneged. America could proceed with devel- 
opment of its second-strike weapons — the MX and 
Midge Oman. But these would not then be subject to 
perpetual withering attacks in Congress. 

Third, tbe moratorium would be conditional 
on agree men t, also by a specified, date, on improved 
verification procedures. In this way, Soviet hints about 
limited on-site inspection could be tested. The Ameri- 
can absolutists who insist on total certainty would have 
to argue their case against the practical reality that an 
imperfect system is much better than nothing. 

The Russians might not accept such an offer. It is by 
no means clear they are prepared to forgo their own 
version of “star wars,” or to cut down the blockbuster 
nukes that pose a first-strike threat But if they missed 
the opportunity, they would face what they seem to 
fear most — an all-out U.S. effort in a new arms race. 

There is at least a chance that Mr. Gorbachev would 
accept. He would thus cutoff the SDI and pm a lid cm 
the US. buildup. He would secure the earing of tension 
beseems to want as a backdrop for change at home. He 
would also make an indent for dealing with Soviet 
problems in Eastern Europe and ibe Middle F-wt 

Some wall oppose such an offer as too risky. The 


Boiled down to its essence, their argu- 
ment is dial the people of South Afri- 
ca are better off with the devil of 
racism that they know than the 
scourge of communism — and the 
experts in Washington are quite con- 
vinced that communism will descend 
on the hapless peoples of southern 
Africa once the democratic majority 
takes power there. 

Thus, the defense of the most viru- 
lent and pernicious racism in tbe con- 
temporary world is disguised as a far- 
sghied and principled promotion of 
freedom, justice ana democracy. And. 
in the meantime, the democratization 
of South Africa is firmly — and de- 
liberately — obstructed. ■ 

The problem arises when the South 
African regime acts in a manner that 
dearly reveals its abhorrent and un- 
acceptable nature: What must ibe 


mmily, we are reassured that it is for 
our own good: If a boulder were to 
fall on President Pieter Botha’s head, 
we are told, it would hurt us, the 
oppressed, more than him. 

The second prong of this strategy is 
to do everything possible to ensure 
that Mr. Botha does not get hurt, and 
to reassure him whenever possible 
that the major Western governments 
will do nothing to hurt him. Some- 
times these reassurances come as 
sheep dressed in wolfish clothes, 
measures described as sanctions but 
designed to have no impact 

Clearly this strategy is indefensi- 
ble: These who have elaborated it, 
including the American and British 
governments, know tins, but they try 
to disguise it by holding out the 
promise of an evolutionary solution. 

Tbe problem is that an evolution- 
ary process is predicated on the qui- 
escence of the oppressed, a quies- 
cence imposed and maintain ed by the 
oppressor. It is that relationship be- 
tween oppressor and oppressed — a 
relationship perfectly embodied in 
the brutal state of emergency de- 
clared last month — that allows the 


of South Africa either accept the sta- 
tus quo or would be satisfied by any 
meaningless “reform progranr that 
the racists choose to implement. 

The question that President Rea- 
gan and Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher of Britain have yet to an- 
swer is this: If there is no pressure for 
change, why should President Botha 
and the rest of white South Africa 
initiate change? 

It w31 not do to argue that our 
struggle inside South Africa is per- 
missible only if it is peaceful. The 
readier Matthew Goniwe, the lawyer 
Victoria Mxemje and many others 
have been murdered for their involve- 
ment in a peaceful struggle. Thirty- 
eight of their colleagues in the leader- 
ship of the United Democratic Front 
are facing treason charges for no rea- 
son other than that they encouraged 
South Africans to unite in a peaceful 
struggle for a democratic nation. 

We will emerge victorious in this 
struggle — however many people we 
lose in the process. We stul rail for 
meaningful sanctions to nrinimizc 
loss of life. We rely on the voters to 
whom even such people as President 
Reagan owe their positions to ensure 
that tbe West paroripales in bringing 
about a democratic South Africa. The 
Western governments cannot contin- 
ue to help perpetuate apartheid. 

The writer is director of information 
and publicity fa the African National 
Congress the outlawed group figftting 
white rule in South Africa, fie contrib- 
uted this to The New York Times 


LETTERS 
Competing for Souls 

Regarding the report “ Pope Hopes 
to Blum Islam’s Growth as He Begins 


to Blum Islam’s Growth as He Begins 
His Third African Visif' (Aug 8): 
This report could have been pub- 
lished during the Crusades. The 
pope, in his good offices, would like 
to encourage the spread of Roman 
Catholicism in Africa and elsewhere, 
but we know he is tolerant of the 
major religions of the world, includ- 
ing Islam. Islam has spread in Africa 


majority probably would approve. Bui at least Presi- 
dent Reagan should have all the information he needs 
to decide whether it is a risk for peace he wants to take. 
Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 


-“****'*_; ui^ gvAAi t umqjicb 

set forth by the early immigrant Mos- 
lems: high moral standards and faith. 

OSMAN SOROUR. 

Cairo. 

The CatbotioMoslem competition 
fra- African souls is nothing new, and 
tbe going has never been easy. Thirty- 
five years ago one Father Kaiser, who 
often flew solo through Central Afri- 
ca in his Cessna, carrying goods for 
the Catholic Relief Services, always 

took care to add a dash of missionary 

work to his practical charity. But af- 
ter one swing through the area, he 
said he hadn t had much luck with 
the conversions. “Some Moslem,” be 
told me. “had just gone through pro- 
claiming, There is only one God : His 
name is Allah, and Mohammed is his 
propheL’ After that it’s a miabtv 
tough job to sdl the Holy Trinity/’^ 

JOHN BOVEY. 

Paris. 

Editor andmust contain the writ- 
ers signature, name and full ad- 
drvss. Letters should be brief and 

be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. ' 





SCEENCE 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST IS, 1985 



Page 7 


Benefits of Lifelong Leanness Challenged 


HELLO BALLETS — Asrie worid waits for ttfley’s 
Comet to come within eye range, here Is a graphic 
ttrapop of the research aiid events connected with it 
The comet fe expected to be visflrfe to toe naked eye in 
November and mB approach to within 39 nriflion ndes 


of Earth on April 11, bat scientists say it will not be as 
bright as in 1910 s' 


— 0 1 and will be buried in the southern sky 

for most of its sojourn near Earth’s orbit The sky map 
below charts its passage. Figures on toe borders plotting 
its location are analogous to ladtute and longitude. 


By Erik Eckholm 

New York Tutus Service 

N EW YORK — A new contro- 
versy over the safety of moder- 
ate weight gains in middle age has 
been set off by a federal research- 
er's challenge of the prevailing 
medical view that lifelong efforts to 
stay lean are besi for health. 

_ The lowest death rates are asso- 
ciated with “leanness in the 20s 
followed by a moderate weight gain 
into middle age," contends Dr. 
Reubin Andres, clinical director of 
the Gerontology Research Center 
of the NattonaFlnstitute on A ging 
“This is, in fact, the weight pat- 
tern of most Americans,’' said Dr. 
Andres, who has the support of 
| some leading gerontologists. 

At the center of the debate are 
| the venerable height and weight ta- 
bles compiled by Metropolitan Life 
Insurance Co. The weight ranges in 
the tables are said to be associated 
with the lowest death rates. 

Dr. Andres’s analysis of actuar- 
ial statistics indicates that the 
weight ranges recommended by the 
insurance company, which are 
widely dicolaied by doctors, are 
too high for young people, too tow 
for middle-aged ana older people, 
and just light for those in their 
early 40s. With the backing of other 
medical experts, especially those 
who treat the elderly. Dr. Andres 
disputes the accepted wisdom that 
individuals should try to main fain 
the same weight throughout their 
adult lives. 

In another break with tradition. 
Dr. Andres recommends the same 
weight goals for men and women of 
the same height. His tables say a 5- 
foot 11-inch man or woman in his 
or her 20s should weigh 126 to 171 
pounds (ST to 77 kilograms). In the 
40s the same person should weigh 
149 to 190 pounds, and in the 60s, 
172 to 213 pounds. 

Acoordingto the 1983 Metropol- 
itan Life tables a man of that hagfat 
25 to 59 years old should weigh 144 
to 183 pounds, depending on body 
frame, and a woman of the same 
height should weigh 135 to 176 
pounds. 

v , “For some reason the idea has 
' grabbed us that the best weight 
throughout the life span is that of a 
20 -year-old,” Dr- Andres said. 



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MAJORITY of experts on 
obesity and on cardiovascular dis- 
eases disagree. A panel of authori- 
ties on obesity convened in Febru- 
ary by the National Institutes of 
Health declined to embrace Dr. 
Andres's conclusions, instead em- 
phasizing that “a body weight of 20 
percent or more above desirable 
body weight constitutes an estab- 
lished health hazard.” 

Experts on both sides of the de- 
bate warn against malrtn^ peace 
with a “beer belly” or “executive 
spread.” Recent evidence indicates 
that the abdomen may be the most 

feLAnd all the expetts^anphasizB 
the importance of .prudent nutri- 
tion and exercise at any age. 

Hie experts also agree that ex- 
cess pounds in the early decades of 
life are especially hazardous, in- 
creasing the risk of cardiovascular 
diseases. . . 


g 

. - i is 


Frew ~n» Conaf tfcmttax*.' far Dcedd C Yams* pohbhed far NASA ’ Dr. HlCOdOTe B. Van Ilftlffe, OH 


obesity specialist at Columbia Uni- 
versity who helped organize the 
N1H panel said his recent studies 
indicated that bong overweight 
was most harmful before the age of 
45. But be said that it was still a 
threat in later years and that he did 
not advocate the weight gains per- 
mitted in Dr. Andres's tables. 

Some critics say both sets of 
wright tables, which are both based 
on mortality data, overstate the 
hazards of leanness because of two 
factors: Smokers tend to be thinner 
than average, so their heightened 
death rates resulting from cigarette 
use skew the tables, making higher 
weights appear healthier than they 
really are lor nonsmdkers. Second, 
people with wasting, fatal diseases 
may be included. 

But Dr. Andres said his review of 
the literature showed that mortality 
associated with different weights 
changed with age in the same pat- 
tern Tor nonsmokers and snosos 
alike. He also said that severely ill 
people were excluded from several 
of the studies he analyzed. 

Metropolitan Life first provided 
tables based on correlations be- 
tween weight and mortality in 
1942. “Ideal’’ wright ranges were 
provided separately for healthy 
men and women according to 
bright, with no breakdown by age. 
A 1959 revision labeled the recom- 
mended weights as “desirable.” 
while the J983 version, which pro- 
vided wright goals several pounds 
higher than the previous one, was 
simply labeled <a beight-wrigbl ta- 
bles” For individuals between the 
ages of 25 and 59. For each height, 
ranges were provided for small me- 
dium, and large body frames. 

The 1983 tables were criticized 
by the American Heart Associa- 
tion. which said the recommended 
weights were too high. Obesity has 
been strongly linked to conditions 
that promote heart disease, such as 
diabetes and high blood pressure. 
Some experts argued that the 1983 
revisions reflected a general rise in 


the average weights of Americans 
but did not represent the optimal 
weights for good health. 

The 1983 Metropolitan life ta- 
bles were based on data collected 
by the Society of Actuaries from 
42 million policyholders of 25 in- 
surance companies. Dr. Andres, in 
developing his tables, analyzed the 
same data and drew on the results 
of recent studies from several coun- 
tries. He discarded the body-frame 
distinctions as speculative and 
found that the same wright ranges, 
according to bright, were safest for 
men and women both. 

Dr. Andres ytn ptiasjTwH that be 
was not advocating obesity. “It’s 
not my contention that the fatter 
the better," be said. “If you're very 
fat at any age, you should lose 
weight- There’s a range of safest 
weights. It’s my contention that the 
desirable range rises with age.” 
Not, he said, is there any reason for 
healthy individuals who fall below 
the recommended wright to strug- 
gle to gain. 

Dr. Andres also stressed that his 
recommendations did not apply to 
people with hypertension, diabetes, 
high blood-cholesterol and other 
medical conditions that promote 
heart disease and are exacerbated 


insisting that they meet the wright 
standards in the Metropolitan ta- 
bles,” Andres said. 

A little extra fat appears to help 
aged people endure illness, said Dr. 
William R- Hazar d, director of 
Johns Hopkins University's Center 
on Aging. “Those who gain about 
one pound a year seem cm average 
to do better." 

Experts on both sides of the de- 
bate are intrigued by recent studies 
' _ that the location as well 
amount of fat on the body 


as 


influences longevity. Some evi- 
dence indicates that when fat is 
mainly in the hips, buttocks, and 
thighs, a common pattern among 
women, its effects are relatively be- 
nign. Fat on the abdomen and up- 
per body scans to be more danger- 
ous. 


“I call it tbe paunch versus the 
haunch," said Dr. Van Italfie. 


by obesity, far whom weight loss 
may well be indicated. 


Many experts on aging are 
concerned about the impact of 
what they see as inappropriate 
weight goals the el deny, wbo are 

often prone to nutritional deficien- 
cies. Although Metropolitan Life 
states clearly that its tables apply 


only up to the age of 59, many 
individuals, including many doc- 


tors, have assumed that similar 
goals apply in later life. But Dr. 
Andies raid the few relevant stud- 
ies suggest that (he weight gain his 
tables permit into the 60s “should 
be maintained into very old age.” 
“There has really been some 
damage done to elderly people by 


Wlty “midriff drift” should be 
especially dangerous has not been 
established. One possibility. Dr. 
Van ItaDie said, is that fat of the 
abdominal cavity has direct influ- 
ence on the liver, with undesirable 
effects. Another is that abdominal 
fat cells, which are larger than aver- 
, mat 

more easily. 

Future findings on how distribu- 
tions of body fat redraw the picture 
of health may require radical revi- 
sions in tables of desirable weights, 
many experts believe. 

Dr. Van Itallie also noted that, in 
an age of advanced technologies 
for keeping sick people alive, it 
would be desirable to link weight 
tables to tbe absence of disease 
rather than to mortality, an ap- 
proach that might result in lower 
average weight recommendations. 
Others, while not disagreeing with 
that goal observe that data on 
health conditions are imprecise and 
that dea t h, whatever its disadvan- 
tages as a grade to ideal weights, at 
least presents statisticians with a 
defined event.” 


INBRIEF 


Hoping to Learn Why the Sun Shines , Europeans Track Elusive Neutrino 




Long Space Survival Bates for Spores 

LONDON (NY77 -— Astraphyadstsat the University of padenin the 
Netherlands say experiments on survival rates of bacterial spores in 
conditions simulating those of deep space support suggestions that q?ores 
might have spread tire throughout universe. _ ... 

Dr Peter Weber and Dr. J. Mayo Greenberg, reporting m the British 
ioumal Nature, said the survival rate of spores in the simulated cold, 
J ..j ononi aiii hrtter ste Mnmnitnrs! nrorrafid. Past 



: V- 




- -- -- ioumal Nature, said tne survival n»u*p«o® w 

■ i % vacuum and radiation of space got better as temperatures dropped. Rasf 
. • 9 ^ assumed that as temperatures m space lowered, radiation 

under some anannstanoes spore amid 

survive 45 nrilKoa years or more —sufficient time for spores to dtfftfr om 
raest^tystem to another, starting a process that sooreastronmiKis say 

might have started life on Earth. 

Stigma Impedes Leprosy Treatment 

shaWdRA, Indk (UB) — A treatment developed five years ago to 
Tn^VnrrmtisS Seeventual elimination of leprosy, but doctors say the 
SSattaSS to tbecLase inhibics peopk from seeking tte treatment 
< 3 f"Se worhfri i 1 cniiliocn lepers, 4 million are m India, more than m any 

° 1 ^ c C SSd multi-drug treatment, or MDT, “is very effective,” sad 
-Jh arwerara, head of the International Leprosy AssooatKm. 
Dr. R. rf, i **«hnrt«n the duration of the disease 


By Walter Sullivan 

New York Tima Service 

Tk J[ ANY years ago, scientists de- 
1VI duced that the primary ener- 
gy source of the sun and other stars 
was tbe fusion of hydrogen undo. 
Experiments intended to verify this 
fundamen tal presumption, howev- 
er, have indicated that something is 
seriously amiss. In theory, such a 
fusion reaction woul 
Earth with a stream of j 
atomic paitides called neutrinos, 
yet no rich flow of neutrinos has 
been observed. 

Now, deep in a vast cavern near 
Rome, a consortium of European 
institutions has embarked on the 
most ambitious effort yet to trade 
the elusive particles. If the effort is 
successful scientists wtil be a step 
closer to answering one of their 
most puzzling questions: What 
Tfiafa-s the son shine ? 

Neutrinos are extremely difficult 


other possibility is that neutrinos in 
flight toward Earth oscillate among 
three forms, only one of which, 
related to electrons, is detected. In 
this case neutrinos would not be 
totally without mass, as is generally 
believed. 

Still another explanation is that 
current understanding of what en- 



ergizes the stars is incorrect. In the 
words of Dr. HQ A. Kirsten of tbe 
Max Planck Institute for Nuclear 
Physics in Heidelberg. West Ger- 
many: “That would be rather dra- 
matic:” 

Dr. Kirsten is spokesman for a 
consortium of French, West Ger- 
man, Italian and Israeli institutions 
that has been rormed to find out 
what makes the sun shine. Their 
experiment, in a man-made cham- 
ber inside the Gian Sasso tumid 
east of Rome, will require 30 tons 


t, 


of gallinm, two-thuds of the 
weald’s yearly 


MDT * C °^b3r Scause^rosy in two weeks to three months. Dr. 


life MDT the disease 


New Delhi said; “Those Mto .suspect u 
ii, andpi® through iht infectious sm, 

Smoking Said to Affect Blacks More 

r^^Aivn — fiaaietfe smoking inflicts disproportionately 


matter virtually unobstructed, 
fact, they are thought to pass from 
the sun’s core to its surface, a dis- 
tance of about 430,000 miles, in 23 
seconds, while light does not dif- 
fuse to the surface for mote than a 
nriflion years, being constantly de- 
flected by atoms in the dense gases 
of the sun’s interior. After readring 


the surface, neutrinos and light 
alike speed to Earth, 93 mflhoo 
miles away, in 8 minutes 20 sec- 
ond*. Thus neutrinos provide sci- 
entists their only opportunity to 
“sec” what is happening now in the 
sun’s core. 

Even using the most elaborate rf 
available devices, only about 5 per- 
cent of tbe expected sdar neutrinos 
have been found- Bus has led to a 



saSggiSSSSS^ 

Solve a w* of CaW^-^rtportrfffl 

Tnhn T. Smiiey of w ' beetle larvae evolved an ability to 

fern willow 0*3.1 i^eos that prey on to lame. 

repel ants, wasp= 


some of 
i a tern- 
solar far- 

_ „ L not reach 

Earth for millions of years but 
would then cause an ice age. An- 


them bizarre: One 
poraiy shutdown of t! 


Indian Rhino Bom at Zoo 

Lot Angdes Tunis Service 

LOS ANGELES — Radha, a 
rare Indian rhinoceros, has given, 
birth to a 90-pound (41 -kilogram) 
male calf, named Chandra, at tbe 
Los Angeles Zoo after a record- 
setting 515-day pregnancy. 


. >ly of this soft, 
metallic cheiriical element 

The experiment has been 
blocked by the hunted availability 

and hi gh COSt of gallium, which IS 

used almost exclusively by the elec- 
tronics industry. Gallium was cho- 
sen for the tests because of its spe- 
cial sensitivity to the primary 
energy range expected for neutri- 
nos, about 420,000 electron volts. 
The matter used in current tests is 
peach] OToethyhaie, a cleaning fluid, 
which is sensitive only to the most 
energetic neutrinos. 

The chamber near Rome is near- 
ing completion. It is 422 feet (128.6 
meters) Ittoa, 60 feet wide and 60 
feet high. 1 m German participants 
in die project say they believe they 
are assured of the mare than 510 
mMon needed to buy the gallium. 
The chief batiaoeefc for the Euro- 
pean consortium is the shortage of 
the dement, a byproduct of alumi- 
num production. World consump- 
tion of galjinm matches produc- 
tion. Dr. Kirsten said in an 
interview that three to four years 
would be needed to accumulate 30 
tons once the money became avail- 
able: 

Two years after it gpes into oper- 
ation, the detector should have sig- 
nificant results. Dr. Kirsten said. 
This would be followed by one 
more year to verify the findings. 

The Europan experiment arose 


f/J/ 



Fusion reae- 
Don: eoiteton 
ofhydrooen 
atoms, with the 
escape of an 
extra electron, 
a neutrino and 
great enemy. 


Kt>ci«ai fu«*x<Jn Soo'Sc0r*3f<HiWcrcHjtt>fUi 

*»» Urtura ol ooutnr*a*_ ur*^b«5Ti>ct* f J »otho 1 

•cir* tn 2.3 sooxvU. Lstf*, V CrttW twvl. ' 

takes mom than * mURon *■»«-*, bounctog otf den»« 

fcfwify Xtrom flgrting tta way to ft* : 

vjt.» Ttiun, nmitrtfm pfOW tai W» j 

to BTHrtyring tfwcrudaJ ooratharvmw "andanl " 
Hovravw,n>oeic<thaaaor>oaH*^p>rtk^ >w a i * > 
capod detector £ 

#er»*Md»*oetof«. ... 'i.-:’ 


!be Nm Yorii limex 


after the collapse of negotiations 
for a multimiUfon-doUar venture 
by West Germany and the United 
-States. 

Efforts to detect neutrinos have 
been carried out for many years by 
Dr. Raymond Davis Jr. or Brook- 
haven National Laboratory, in 
New York, using a large volume of 


fluid deep underground in 
lafcQia. He 


South Dakota, fle assumed that 
higihenergy neutrinos radiated by 
boron 8 produced by fusion in the 
sun would hit atoms of chlorine 37 
in the cleaning fluid, converting it 


to tbe gas argon 37, which, because 
it is radioactive, can easily be mea- 
sured. But to the surprise of tbe 
researchers, only about 5 percent of 
the expected conversions were de- 
tected. 

■ Because the cleaning fluid tests 
record only the most energetic neu- 
trinos. Dr. Davis, who is moving to 
Pennsylvania State University, col- 
laborated with Dr. Kirsten and 
others to develop the gallium detec- 
tion process. The gallium will be 
incorporated into 100 ions of liquid 
gallium chloride. Within this fluid. 


atoms of gallium should occasion- 
ally be converted by neutrinos to 
germanium in germanium chloride 
motecnJes, which can be swept ont 
of the tanks by helium bubbles. 

A somewhat similar Soviet test is 
being prepared, but physicists here 
doubt that it will be sensitive 
enough to resolve the problem. 

Dr. Kirsten said he had been told 
that the Soviet test would use me- 
tallic gallium, of which- about 20 
tons is on hand. Precise detection 
of germanium produced in the met- 
al will be eri rente! v difficult. Kir- 


sten said. For unexplained reasons,- 


nty, the Soviet scientists are not 
allowed to convert the metal to 
pallium chloride, although recover- 
ing the metallic form would proba- 
bly be easy. 

Tbe Soviet test is to be conduct- 
ed in a neutrino observatory that 
has been tunneled several miles 
into the Caucasus Mountains. The 
Soviet scientists reportedly also 
plan a test like that of Dr. Davis* 
using 10 times as much cleaning 
fluid. 


r t 


t-‘ 

d 

is 

t- 


10 

id 

x- 

j-- 

ils 

0- 




■?. 


ii 

v.y 





















Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Niah Low l<»> 


72276 4 tAt 
3,737 u 
21139 Ml* 
19197 77% 
1737, JlVfc 
\toB9 33V. 
15*53 *Oto 
1133, 8’«« 

9B7H 53% 
*897 341* 
8770 a,** 

a ire s 

7199 46% 
7044 39% 
<714 48V. 


Dow Jones Averages 


OMR hw low Loi Cho. 

Indus 1318-55 1334-115 131186 1316.98 + l .68 

Trans 475-33 6 7*41 47006 674.16 4 0J7 

Util 155-57 L56J0 155311 156.15 + CUS- 
CO RID 54112 54646 341-94 54400 9- 0.73 


NYSE Diaries 


NYSE index 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Pro*. Today 

Close Nona 

79.14 7SJ9 

748S 7637 

BIX/ 8107 


Bonds 

Utlllllos 

industrials 


Adwancod 
Deainod 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
Mew Hfahs 
New Laws 


882 788 

4X TO 

503 517 

2004 3007 

38 I, 

16 1, 


Previous Today 

Hum low an IPM- 

ComaoyU* 108.05 108-30 10X5* 10874 

-industrials 124.70 13439 1243* 13*54 

Tran so. 11034 10947 109.47 10938 

lit limes 36J0 5037 5499 5648 

Finance 11477 >1*47 "*X7 11470 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y 


Bur Sales 
157-490 397441 
165478 428790 
M3LS94 410488 
148.1,7 397.1,1 
167.955 514593 


■included In the sales Haures 


Wednesd ays 

NVSE 

QoSBTlg 


VoLdt 3 PJA 71«M08 

Pmr.3PM.nL 51JKVM9 

Prey consolidated dwe lBi.M&m 


Tables include me nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

I Ta The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index 


amex Most Actives 


Clew Prer. 


Advanced 
□•eilnail 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New h lefts 

Hew Laws 


Composite 

Industrials 
F Inane* 


Standard & Poor’s Index 


Previous Today 

HWl LOW Clow 3 PAL 
Industrials 30930 20738 20638 20644 

Tronic. 17444 17221 17200 17232 

Ullllttes 8238 8227 8254 8284 

Finance 2218 21.99 2209 2217 

Composite 188.16 18631 18730 18737 


ltoik Y8or 
cute neon Ape 
297*2 297.15 30021 
303.93 30088 30497 
381.11 — 381 AO 

MS 96 — 349.10 

3*9.47 — 290X2 

296.42 — JM.1B 

275.99 — 27105 


AMEX Sales 


WK«a 

GtfCdO 

TexAlr 

WansB 

EcnaBg 

Balorps 

PGEBfR 

DemeP 

WKkespf 

PotLw 

DotaPd 

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Prev. 3 PM. volunt* 
prev. cons, volume 



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tta 

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13% 4 % 
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27*— ta 
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54 ta + ta 
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43% — % 
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65% 

33 — ta, 

13 4- ta 
59%— lta 
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20 

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M 

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20%- % 

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24V* — to 
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uvs— to 
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29ta— to 
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NYSE Advances Top Declines 


The Auochiird Press 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchage were mostly higher in late trad- 
ing Wednesday although most ot the market's 
key averages showed only moderate gains. 

Steel, retail, telephone and drag issues paced 
the gainers, but auto stocks retreated. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials was 
up 3.92 at 1J 1 9.22 an hour before the closing 
bell after gaining I.Ol points Tuesday. 

Advances overall held a 4-3 lead over de- 
clines. 

Trading picked up from the previous day’s 

A /though prices in tobies on these pages are from 
the 4 P.M. close in New York, for time reasons, 
this article is based on the market at 3 P.M. 

pace, with volume totaling 7 1 .96 million shares 
at 3 P.M. compared with 6138 million at that 
hour Tuesday. 

The stock market recently has struggled to 


sustain any son of upturn amid investor uncer- 
tainty about the outlook for the U.S. economy 
and interest rales. The caution on the pan or 
investors has been evident in the relatively thin 
trading recently, analysts said. 


Wall Street hoped to get a dearer picture of 
the economy this week from several government 
reports on business activity in July. But some 
analysts are now saying it appears the reports 
wQ] do little to give the market a strong sense of 
direction. 

The Commerce Department on Wednesday 
said overall business sales in June tumbled 2.1 
percent, the second largest decline on record 
behind the 2.8 percent plunge in March 1975. 



8 — ta 
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16 

42% — to 
64—99 


in the Trib. 


Get 

Ridary§ 

Closing 

Prices. 



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Mta 
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4 3Sta 
lita 7 
24to 17% 
31 21 ta 

4*ta 22 
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56% 50 
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„ [ 


' ^MBX pricn ‘ pn 

i .«WiftftUMM»n 
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HcralbS^ribune. 


THURSDAY, AUG1 JST~Ts~Too^ 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 



U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 


jj^U. STREET WATCH 




August ’82 Retrospective: 

No Time Like the Present 


'*■ 



Crfo 


By EDWARD KOHRBACH 
ARIC I,ao * a >«*lB* a U1 tribune 

^^ioS^SS^ ^middle of August. 

P«^V^S^i t0Cks *■ 

for a 

01 

lw ajkted. “You could seei 


A **Sa s 


} D£ economy was bounc- 
ing off the bottom, it was the 
start of the upturn, there was 
enonnous room for growth ev- 
erywhere.*’ 

But now, he said, “Wall 
Sonet’s focus is on narrow 
technical questions « nfl i as 


Zinsser thinks that 
investors lade the 
conceptual optimism 
of a lew years ago. 


tek 




r- \ 




ramparative values erf stocks versus bonds, the short-ienn out- 
w?n •“* interest rates. Conditions are OX on 

wan street ana other world marfrpfj^ hut nobody really wants to 
put any money down.” 

Declining interest rates could push stocks higher from here, he 
n fiowed,^ but basically he sees Wall Street drifting, perhaps 

C M^2?nsser F a German, said thru for non-Americans the U.S. 
president symbolizes the country’s economic strength. But he 
contrasted Ronald Reagan’s image when office — “ an 
inspiring figure who promised to promote capitalism in its purest 
form” — with his image abroad now as “an apparently weaker 
president with America in something' of a transition period 
waiting for a new leader.” 

“There’s just much less conceptual incentive for foreigners to 
invest in the U.S. now than there was three years ago," He said. 

To recreate that investment environment, he thirties that either 
a long consolidation period is needed, after which stocks can rise 
again from lower levels, or a “new dement, a new idea” is 
required to get a similar cycle on trade 

“Threeyears ago, high technology did it,” he said. ‘‘Computers 

Tmwt lunaft.tnnliivitinnF fiwttAili OAnnimaM on A Kuptnacf Diit 


ure «m_y mure m <lu nivcumcni nccause a 

much additional growth for the economy. 1 


E ITHER some “dramatic, fundamental” impetus like that 
must occur, he said, orpethaps “a very rapid adjustment of 
currencies that would mule* VS. industry competitive 
again.” He suggested that a plunge by the dollar to 2.10 or 2.20 
against the Deutsche mark would serve. 


Snresh Bhirud, head erf portfolio Strategy at Fust Boston, 
shares Mr. Zinsser’s czmuL The present mood on Wall Street is 


“basically Idah,” he said. 

While bullish long term on both the economy and stock 
market, be sees “lots of clouds” for the next few months and now 
thinks any strong rebound for business in 1985’s second half is 
unlikely. 

“Thrae’s been a dramatic slowdown in demand, with the 


XCoutinned on Page 13 , CoL 5 ) 



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Oman Orders 
8TomadoJets 
From Panama 


Routers 

LONDON — A European 
tighter-plane consortium an- 
nounced Wednesday that it has 
sold eight Tornado aircraft val- 
ued at $345 motion to Oman, 
marking the first expat success 
for the plane. 

Pans via, comprising British 
Aerospace, West Germany’s 
MessCTSchxnin-B6Ikow-Bk)hin 

GmbH and Aeritalia of Italy, 
said the accord was for ergot 
air-defense variants of die air- 


craft equipped with medhim- 
-range aur-io-air missies. 

The consortium said the sale 


would Oman's air force 
“up to and beyond die turn of 
the century” in terms of readi- 
ness. 

In Munich, a spo k es m an for 
Panavia said Oman had ex- 
pressed an interest in buying 
more Tornadoes later but he 
could give no estimate of how 
many might he sold. 

The multi-purpose, super- 
sonic jet is already in service in 
the British, West Goman and 
Italian air forces. 

A bid to sell the aircraft to 
Turkey has been delayed by 
Britain’s refusal to grant ex- 
port-credit guarantees after 
Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher said she did not be- 
lieve Turkey was a viable mar- 
ket for the planes. 


Page 9 


Compiled by Otr Staff From Dtsp&cha 

WASHINGTON — Business 
sales in the United States plunged 
2.1 percent in June, die second- 
largest decline on record, the gov- 
ernment reported Wednesday. 

The Commerce Department said 
that sales at the retail, wholesale 
and manufacturing levels plunged 
to $4 1 9JI bitiioQ in Jtme after rising 
0.4 percent in May. All business 
segments were affected, it said 

The decline was second only to a 
2.8-percent drop in March 1975, 
Commerce Department analysts 
said. 

The downturn resulted in busi- 
ness inventories rising 0.4 percent 
in June, foDowing a 0.4-pereenr 
May decline 

The bleak sales news came a day 
after the government said that an 
advance report on retail sales for 
July showed only a 0.4-perceut in- 
crease. Analysis said the projected 
rise was smaller than expected and 
dimmed hopes for a healthy upturn 
in U.SL economic activity in the 
second half of 1985. 

The Commerce Department said 
that sales at department stores, res- 
taurants and other retail establish- 
ments edged up 0.4 percent last 
month to a seasonally adjusted to- 
tal of SI 13.7 billion. 

The modest increase in retail 
sales in July followed two months 
of declines, including a 1.4-percent 
drop in June that originally was 
reported last month as an 0.8-per- 
cent fafl. 


“There is not a lot to be encour- 
aged about in tins modest uptick,” 
said Allen Smai, chief economist 
for Shearson/ Lehman Brothers. 
“This land of number won’t give 
you the rebound in economic 
growth the adminis trating is look- 
ing for.” 

Sandra Shaber, director of con- 
sumer economics at Chase Econo- 
metrics, said: “The question now is 
not how mnch the economy witi 
rebound in the second ha IE, but wiD 
we be able to avoid a recession.” 

Meanwhile Wednesday, the Na- 
tional Association of Manufactur- 
ers said that U.S. economic growth 
has been cot in half in the past year 
by the nation’s trade losses that 
threaten to trigger another reces- 
sion! 

“If policies are not quickly ef- 
fected that will reduce the trade 
deficit we run the risk of another 
recession and intensified pressure 
for a protectionist response,” the 
NAM’S vice president for interna- 
tional affairs, Larry Fox, said in a 
19-page report on the economy. 

CAP, UP!) 



Honda Accord 
SE-i 4~Door 

Sedan 


True Import made abroad 
and sold under a foreion 
name through Mg own 
deatefstBpa. 



Captive Import made abroad 
but sold under a Detroit 
nameplate by domestic dealers. 


Chevrolet Nova 



Pontiac Stated 


»J/i the U.S. by 
toretspn companies, with a 
varying amount of U.S.- 
produced content Sold under 
the parent company's name, 
through its own tamer network. 


Joint Ventura: assembled in 
the U.S. by a partnership of 

General Motors and Toyota 
Motor Co. called New United 
Motor Manufacturing. About 
70% ot the car's content 
comes tram abroad. 



tnvMbte impart: 
manufactured in the U.S. by 
American auto maker, but . 
waft many imported parts. 


Tto Niw Yofk Tm« 


Mixed-Breed Autos Are Taking Ovei 

A Confusing Stew of Classifications for the Industry 


By John Holusha. 

Hew York Times Server 


DETROIT — The all-American car is becoming 
increaringly bard to find, and the imported version 
increasingly hard to spot 
Consider the Chevrolet, in its various manifesta- 
tions. Buyers of a Chevrolet Celebrity pretty much 
have a domestic car, although Chevrolet executives 
say virtually all cars assembled in the United 
Stales cany some imported parts. 


But anyone who has a Chevrolet Sprint or Spec- 

site. It 


tnnn in the driveway has a Japanese automobu 
was made either by Suzuki Motor Co. or lsuzu 
Motors Ltd. and imported by General Motors 
Corp. to compensate for GM*s inability to make 
small cars as efficiently as the Japanese. 

And the new Chevrolet Novas, assembled in 
California by members of the United Automobile 
Workers union, are in fact thinly disguised Toyota 


Corollas, put together largely from imported parts 
at a factory co-owned and wholly 


managed by 

executives of Toyota Motor Corp. 

Not that long ago, there were only two sorts of 
cars: American-made and imports. But a cotn bina- 
ncaaiieven 


ican political pressures has blurred that simple 
breakdown and produced a stew or confusing 
classifications. 

Some cars are manufactured abroad, but sold 
here under brand names associated with Detroit. 
Other vehicles bear names like Honda and Nissan, 
but are assembled in the United States, largely 
from imported components. The direct imports — 
the cars manufactured in Toyota City, Japan, and 
sold in the United States as fast as they leave the 
docks are aO too obvious. But less noticeably, 
foreign-made parts are increasingly finding them 
way into farmhar Detroit models. 

Ford Escorts carry ma nual transmissions that 
Mazda Motor Co. makes in Japan. Engines for 
Pontiac Sunbirds are shipped in from Brazil, and 
Chrysler relies on Mitsubishi Motor Co. for op- 
tional engines across most of its product line: 

What all this means is that the foreign grip on 
the American auto market is even larger than it 
appears. Direct, outright imports command rough- 
ly a quarter of the market. But when the count is 
extended to domestic imports, transplanted im- 
ports (the ernes assembled in the United Stales), 


non of Japanese economic achievement and Amer- 


(Contmned oo Page 13, CoL 7) 


Barclays to Cut 
Stake in Bank 


In South Africa 


By Bob Hagen y 

International H mud Tmwte 

LONDON — Barclays Bank 
PLC said Wednesday thai it would 
reduce its holding in Barclays Na- 
tional Bank LtcL, South Africa’s 
largest bank, to 40.4 percent from 
50.4 percent. 

Although a surge in racial vio- 
lence has shaken confidence in the 
already depressed South African 
economy. Barclays Bank insisted 
that the move was based on com- 
mercial rather than political con- 
siderations. 

“The decision represents an en- 
tirely natural development and the 
timing is purely coincidental,” said 

Peter Leslie, chief general manager 
at Barclays, which is Britain's big- 
gest bank. 

The British bank's stake will faD 
because it has decided not to buy 
its portion of a 254-minion-rand 
($! 12-million) rights offering of 
preferred shares announced 
Wednesday by Barclays National. 
The shares are being sold to 
strengthen the bank's capital base, 
in anticipation of stricter require- 
ments by South African monetary 
authorities. 

Barclays Bank's rights under the 
offer have been transferred to An- 
glo American Corp. and Southern 
Life Association. Anglo’s stake in 
Barclays National wdl rise to 25 
percent from about 18 percent and 
Southern Life Association's to 15 
percent from 4 percent. 

The move comes four months 
after another lug British bank. 
Standard Chartered PLC, reduced 
its stake in Standard Bank Invest- 
ment Corp., South Africa’s second- 
largest bank, to 42 percent from 
503 percent by declining to accept 
a riehts offer. Several bie, British 


Philips Earnings Fell in 2d Quarter 


Japan's Wholesale Prices Dip 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Japan's unadjusted 
wholesale price index fefl 0.4 per- 
cent in July, the Bank of Japan said 
Wednesday. 


The Associated Press 

AMSTERDAM — NV Philips 
Gloeilampen/abrieken said 
Wednesday that second-quarter 
earnings fell 51& percent to 176 
million guilders (5563 1 milKo n) 
from 262 million guilders in the like 
period of 1984. 

Sales for the electronics and con- 
sumer products company rose T2 
pe r ce n t to 13.6 billion guilders 
from 12.1 billion guilders in last 
year’s second quarter. 

Earnings in the first half fell 19 
percent to 436 mrEian guilders 
from 544 million guilders, while 
sales rose 13 percent to 27.4 billion 
guilders compared with the year- 
eariier 243 bmion gnilders, Philips 
said. ■ 

The company said that almost 
half of the first-half worldwide 
sales increase was attributable to 
price changes and foreign exchange 
effects. 

“Viewed geographically, income 
from operations fell in the United 
States and Canada, while it in- 
creased substantially in Europe 


and Latin America,” the Philips 
statement said. 

The company reported sales of 
its “home electronics for sound and 
vision” product sector posted 
above-average growth despite a 
“virtually sta gnating ” market for 
color televisions. 

' The 1985 second-quarter and 
fim-half figures also reflect 15 mfl- 
tion guilders for discontinuation erf 
the company’s welding operations 
and the planned disposal of its 
Draka Kabd BV subsidiary. 

Philips said that it continued to 
have high inventory levels. As of 
June 30, its inventories as a per- 
centage of 12-month sales eased 
only marginally to 302 percent, 
from 30.6 percent. 

The company attributed the 
sharp dpHmr in its second-quarter 


in the U.S. semiconductor markrt 
sharply reduced the contribution of 
■Signetics. which last year had 
buoyant revenue and earnings. 
Philips said. The Dutch parent 
does not disclose financial figures 
for the subsidiary. 


ILK. Earning? 
Show Increase 


Return 


LONDON — Britain’s average 
earnings rose 92 percent in the 
year to June after an 8.8-percent 
increase in the year to May, the 
Employment Department said 
Wednesday. 


and first-half earnings this year to 
continued weakness of its UJS. op- 


erations, mainly North American 
Philips Corp. in New York and 
Signetics Corp. of Sunnyvale, CaH- 
foroia. 

A sudden and severe depression 


The June index was set at a 
visional, seas on ally adjusted 1 
base 1980. The underlying increase, 
adjusted for such factors as back 
pay and tuning variations, was 75 
percent in the year to June, un- 
changed from May, 


i pro- 
1703. 


ere. 


The officials also stressed that 
the move was in line with a long- 
term strategy of allowing local cen- 
tred in certain foreign markets, such 


Privatization in Britain Attracts Other Nations 


By Sten Stovall 

Reuters 

LONDON — Britain’s policy ol 
selling off its state-owned compa- 
nies has found favor with invesion 
and now is drawing interest from 
other countries, both capitalist and 
communist 

Delegations from more than 2G 
nations — including Canada. Bel- 
gium, China and Japan — have 
traveled to London for briefings on 
how to “privatize” public compa- 
nies. 

They have sought advice on 
bringing state-owned companies to 
market, a major weapon in the Brit- 
ish government’s strategy of rolling 
back the frontiers of the state and 
opening up areas of activity previ- 
ously the preserve of the public 
sector. 

The delegates have met the gov- 
ernment officials and financial ex- 
perts who have helped transfer 
companies such as Jaguar PLC 
British Aerospace PLC and British 
Petroleum Co. into the private sec- 
tor where they are unprotected by 
state-owned status ana government 
bankrolling. 

Each delegation has its pet con- 
cerns, but financial sources say that 
a common desire is to improve effi- 
ciency and reduce costs. 

Economists believe that interest 
in the British program is a reaction 
against post-war Keynesian eco- 
nomic theory and diafluaonment 
with the performance of public en- 
terprises ~ two themes long heard 


from Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher. 

. When her Conservative govern- 
ment came to power in 1979, the 
state-owned industrial sector em- 
ployed 1.75 million people and ac- 
counted for 15 percent of total in- 
vestment in Britain and 10.5 
percent of gross national protect, 
the measure of goods and services. 
Slate-owned corporations domi- 
nated transport, communications, 
energy, sten and shipbuilding. 

Since then, the government has 
sold all or most of more than a 
dozes major state-owned compa- 
nies, moved more than 400,000 
workers into the private sector and, 
in doing so, raised £6 billion {£83 
billion}. 

At least eight more major state 
hncinj»«<>B arc slated to be trans- 
ferred out of slate control by the 
middle of 1988. 

Last week’s sale of the govern- 
ment's remaining stake in the Bri- 
ton exploration company, the latest 
to be privatized, raised £450 tml- 
lioh, and was heavily oversub- 
scribed. 

As with last November’s sale of 
ftritkh Telecom, the Britofl shares 
were priced below the market, en- 


suring strong demand from private 
and institutional investors and 
helping the government achieve its 
goal of spreading share ownership, 
stockbrokers say. 

The offered prices on recent state 
sell -offs has led to complaints that 
the government is selling society’s 
assets too cheaply — charges that 
the government aenies. 

Analysts note that the British 
version of privatization is not nec- 
essarily a blueprint for other coun- 
tries. 

In Britain, analysts and econo- 
mists say, the policy is important to 
the Conservative government for 
several reasons, most notably in 
reducing union power, helping cut 
public Dorrowing, spurring the 
economy from the supply-side 
rather than the Keynesian demand- 
side, and broadening support for 
the capitalist system. 


“Privatization in Britain now is 
unstoppable,” said Dr. 
Pine, president of Lon- 
don-based Adam Smith Institute. 
“It is irreversible.” 

But in Third World countries, 
the most important consideration 
is simply that the money has run 
out. 

Burdened by huge debts and 
pressured by western banks and 
the International Monetary Fund, 
many developing nations are being 
forced to pursue austerity policies 
to shore up their economies. The 
selling of state-owned industries 
offers one alternative to raise reve- 
nues and spur activity. 

Brazil struggling under a current 
foreign debt of more than S100 
billion, last month announced that 
77 companies had been earmarked 
for sale to the private sector. 


Weekly net asset value 



Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 
on Aug. 12, 1985: U.S. $123.09. 
Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 


Info r mation: Pierson, HekJring& Pieraon N.V_ 

Herengracht214,l0t6BS Amsterdam. 


advertisement 


MSS PffiUC LIMITED COMPANY 

(CD Re) 


Tbs und crefened announces dial as from 
August ZU 1985 at Kas-Aasocatie 
N.v„ Spwstraat 172. Amsterdam, dir. 
ep. no- 24 of the CDH* Bass Public 
Lanitedl Company, eadr repr, 50 
■In. will be payable with Dfla.7 .86 (re 
interim dividend for the year ending 
September 30, 1985) 3.7 p. per share. 
Tax credit £-.793 =» Dfla. 3.45 per 
CDR. 

Non-residents of the United Kingdom 
can only claim tins tax credit when the 
relevant tax treaty meets this facility. 


AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.Y. 


Amsterdam. August 7. 1985. 



HARRY WINSTON 

c/?fau>^or/£ 



present 

their latest creations as well as 
a selection of their rarest stones 

CARLTON 

INTER.* CONTINENTAL 

Cannes 

August 14 to August 18, 1985. 


% 


New York 


Geneve 


Paris 


Monte-Carlo 


J 


as Nigeria. Since 1973, Barclays 
Bank has been gradually reducing 
its stake in the South African bank, 
which was acquired in 1923. 

Because of tax considerations, 
the officials said, the lower stake 
would have virtually no effect on 
the British bank’s net profit. South 
Africa’s economic slump and the 
plunge in the value of the rand have 
slashed the South African bank’s 
contribution to Barclays Bank’s 
worldwide net profit to just 0.9 
percent in this year's first half from 
about 16 percent three years ago. 

Groups opposed to SoutfaMfri- 
ca's apartheid policy have con- 
demned Barclays Bank for retain- 
ing its presence there: But the 
British bank has contended that it 
acts as “a force for the good” by 
allowing equal opportunities for all 
races. Mr. Leslie said he believed 
the -bank would still play such a 
role after it relinquished control of 
the South African unit. 

To reflect the change, Barclays 
National said it eventually would 
choose a new name, removing the 
word “Barclays.” 

On the London Stock Exchange, 
the price of Barclays Bank shares 
rose early , Wednesday when the 
bank said it planned a major an- 
nouncement After the statement 
however, the shares settled to dose 
at 389 pence, up just 4 pence from 
Tuesday. 


industrial companies, notably As- 
sociated British Foods PLC, also 
have reduced or eliminated their 
stakes in South Africa in recent 
years. 

Few other British banks retain 
major presences there, but HOI 
Samuel & Co., a large British mer- 
chant bank, still has a 72-percent 
stake in a South African merchant 
bank. 

D.C Moolham, a HID Samuri 
director, said his bank had no plans 
to reduce that stake but added: 
“Obviously, one is thinking about 
the policy all the time.” 

In the United States, some banks 
are reducing their exposure to 
South Africa. The New York Times 
recently quoted banking sources as 
saying that Chase Manhattan Bank 
had stopped making new loans to 
private borrowers in South Africa. 

Barclays Bank officials empha- 
sized that they were not cutting 
their investment in the South Afri- 
can bank, which totals the equiva- 
lent of about S184 mtihon, but 
merely declining to raise the invest- 
meut in line with other sharehdd- 


Spain to lift 
limits on 
Investments 


Reuters 


MADRID — Spain is preparing 
to lift almost all restrictions on for- 
eign investment, including the no- 
tation of foreign shares on the Ma- 
drid Slock Exchange, the secretary 
of state for commerce said Wednes- 
day. 

GuSlenno de la Debesa told a 
seminar on the European Commu- 
nity that the new rules would be in 
place by 1986, when Spain and Por- 
tugal are scheduled to became the 
ECs 11th and 12th members. 

The liberalization package 
would open a number of sectors 
from which foreign investors either 
are excluded or required to obtain 
lengthy official authorization. 
Those areas indude shipping, oil 
refining, commensal aviation, min- 


tn ^insurance and banking. 


May, the government took a 
step toward deregulation by raising 
the ceiling on investments from 
abroad, but it excluded the areas 
outlined on Wednesday. 

Investment from abroad is one 
of Spain's lop sources of foreign 
exchange, along with exports and 
tourism, both of which have shown 
sluggish growth. 

The government is eager to pro- 
mote foreign investment to help 
maint ain 3 current accouol surplus, 
which last year totaled 52 billion. 
Investment from overseas amount- 


ed to SL9 billion in 1984. 

Mr. de la Dehesa said that for- 
eigners would be allowed to use 
ordinary pesetas for investment, 
rather ihnn the special convertible 
pesetas backed by foreign exchange 
now required. 

He also said that foreign corpo- 
rations would be allowed to float 
their shares on the Madrid ex- 
change to stimulate overseas in- 
vestment in the Spanish bourse. 

Foreign investment on the Ma- 
drid exchange amounted to 27 bil- 
lion pesetas (S163 million) in the 
first half of 1 985, more than double 
the amount a year earlier. 

“I have not detected much inter- 
est by foreign companies to float 
their shares m Madrid.” said Moni- 
ca Morales, the head of Banff, one 
of Spain's biggest portfolio man- 
agement companies. “The market 
is too small to attract much inter- 
est.” 


button 


MANAGED CURRENCIES 
PROGRAM 


PERFORMANCE RESULT 
FOR BEGMMNG EQUITY OF 



AFTER ALL COMMISSIONS 


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bp to tbo dosing on WdO Sfreet 
and do not reflect late trades etiewbore. 


(Continued from Page 8 ) 


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20 

2.1 

20 

32 

24 

32 

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24 

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22 

12 

20 

32 


U&Ritures 



4 1* 

21 1316 

41M 32V 

■ » 

Si% 

21M 11M 

M 4 H 

r « 

2 M 

161k 


100 

22 

120 

32 

20 

22 

120 

92 

124 110 

104 iao 

X32 

72 

120 

42 

OSe 

2 

220 112 

*0 

22 

522 

72 

AD 

XI 

222 

XI 

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20 

22 

225 

70 

120 

14 

JO 

U 

20 

U 

220 

42 


SS 

9V 7V 
23V ISM 

28V 24V 
14 
2V 

S3* 3116 
24 1216 


16V 
31 2316 

35 25V 

HM 9V 
MR6 7* 
1016 7V 
m 100M 
74 54M 

«H 6 45 * 
40 4SM 
2316 1516 
«5V 7216 
2546 13V 
10V 
24 
2H6 
35V 
24 
25M 
StM 
34 


Season season 
Htaft Low 


004H Matt Low dose Cha. 


Grains 


4 l+r 


71 
63 
43 
TV 
15V 
1616 
24 

21 M jm 

22 9* 

IBM BV 
19* 8V 
29M 20V 
3216 23 
15 
39 
4BM 


& 25 ? l &as 


99k 6V 

38V 31M 
9V «V 
4V 3 
19V 12V 
14V BV 
46V 28V 
BV 5M 
21V 16M 
7V 2M 
75 51V 


J SS 

24 12 3143 

90 90 s 

4.9 1571 

S„ ig 

10 10 SB 
11 2 H 

“ 56 1*7 

« » „s 

J 27 7*2 





mum- dollars P*r bushel 

1.79 1.16M Son 151V 133V 121 

1JBV6 124 Dec UBV 130V 1-MV 

T27V 126V Mar 130V 132 UOM 

1J0V 13BM ST UOM UO* UOM 

Est.Salaa Prav.Sates 500 

Prav.DovOpeoInr. 1808 


122V 4JOM 

uom +■“£ 

132 +JBV 
122V +-02V 
UOM +30V 


Metals 



■industrials 


Livestock 


Currency Options 


825 1040 

450 7 JO 

220 490 

0l75 110 


stack indexes. 


messes ss "a sr assets 


30V 24V ZoteCP 122 U 9 , 17 a*M agk ag + 2 

21V 9V Zapata 24 94 « 1479 9 SV— V 

57«k 31 Vk Zayrc a M J 17 ill 52H 51Jk 5Zw t jli 

2BH 17M ZenmiE M + ^ 

niM 1 <U 7 am v 32 U 17 13 lWli lWl 1 “ 

3SV 72* zSSln 122 32 11 51 34V 34 34 - V 


NtSEH^hs 4 xws 


Gommwfities 


Financial 


US T. 01LLS tIMMJ 
11 mlflton- p*% of KM act. 

9333 84*4 Sep *284 

9327 8577 DOC 925} **« 

M w sw Mar 9221 9224 

9Z2B Bfl JOl »l» *35 

9221 MOO Sap 912* *1-5* 

9178 Sms Dae 9125 912S 

9129 8921 Mar 

9093 *028 Jan 

SKSSo-JRaSSiS? 
aasassKSSK.- 
£5 £S IE ® S 3 

»1 75-14 Mar 83*11 83-29 

85-7 74*30 Jim 

84-4 >57 SOP 

83-11 8W Die. . 

EitSaVl ftW.SalM 

prev. Day Open Hd. 62401 

US THWOr 9 080? ICgPL 
a pct-si «M»0-p4s & 32nds OM 00 p<=»> 
79-12 57- W Sep 75-8 

78-13 578 Doc 74-14 75-3 

77419 57-2 Mor 7711 W 

764 St-29 Jun 72-n JM 

75-31 56-29 SOP 71-28 »9 

74-24 5625 Dec 71-3 71-14 

74-15 56-27 Mar 70-14 70-25 

74-26 6>I2 Jun 69-38 7W 

72-27 4M Sao 69-15 49-17 

72-18 6*-3« DK 


9282 92*2 
9251 #25* 

9217 9223 
*184 9789 
PUB 9126 
9123 9124 
9099 
9073 


85-3 85-25 

84-7 8625 

83-11 *«9 
*3-4 
83-13 
• 1 -M 


75-16 76-7 
74-14 752 
73-13 969 
72-20 73-4 
71-98 7M 
71-3 71-14 

78-14 70-25 
8928 78-4 
69-15 49-17 
4931 


tindame awWW shortly MM 

SPCOUtf-MODKCMEI 

painteandcaais _ ___ 

19000 14MB Sop MOTS HMO 

aaus 17130 Dee l*i>8> 1912* 

anzs nan §mr moo nuo 

P«*- V4aa prev.Sates 70434 

prevUDayOoaalm. suw b«1273 

VALUE UNI pecan 

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StS 20000 OK 20170 30425 

lUSaio Prw.Sdhs 

Prev.DayOaanlBL ll* *17 
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paMVtmdcwA j|p 10925 10*20 
11720 tOUD DOC 11125 1J1-W 

11175 U920 Mar nZ3D 11230 

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Prav.DavOpaoInt. HUB ur i7* 


mafM cMm #1 


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193** mso 628 


19925 30005 *20 
20X15 20320 *M 


mM »t*« 

1107* 11075 ♦.» 

11235 11241 +JB 
IM IUJS *2* 


Commodity Indexes 


Odm 

Moody's 

nsutara 1 ^J-“ 

OJ. Futuras-..- ■ JA 

Com. RaMardi Burorai. NA 

MoodvS : base 100 :Oac . 3L1931. 
o- prollinloorv; f -fbiot „ 

Routers : bow 100'jSao. 10. Jpl. 
Daw Jones : base 100 : Dec 31 . 1974 . 


Previous 
899 J 0 1 
V 49190 
11422 
219.10 


Gomnmilties 


London 

Commodities 


Cash Prices 



NEW HKHtS 0 


Avtelln 

BrawnGn 

CmTDonB 

Ha mm POPS 

Loweratein. 
NtaMadI Pf_ 

BkBosodlpf 
CBS wd 
Deltona Cp 
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OrtanCapf 

BeatCMW 

CWE84MB 

ME1548PI 

IUPw1175P 

Mnraonddpf 

PubSvcNH 

BemlsCd 

Canenod 

Eonrch dppf 

LAC Mlnrl n 
MorKnud 
PSNH 281PfB 
Roydwn, 

Revton 

RevinevPf 

ThermaEI 

SeuNET pfB 
Unit Brands 

UnEnRre 

Utdlllumpf 

Vorco2pf 




NEW LOWS M 


BMC Ind 
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McDrmlntwt 

RdgBetadla 

atvlnwt 

LeorPetii 

MMSauUt 

StonolCowd 

HwneOepot 
ML Cony r 
MteUonlM 
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McDennim 
Mohwfc Dat 
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SUAAR. 
Fraodi francs* 

s i 

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EA. vol.: 1241 
solo: 3209 (St. 
COCOA 

Ftaocliiraacsy 
2010 
2015 


Law bm Ask ara* 
it metric tan 

U58 UU 1270 —14 

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IS » ^ -« 
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lets of 50 ton. Prew. actual 
Open Interest: 30693 

if no kg 

2*010 Z01D ZJ24 — 




X 




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27 + M 

3A6 +1V 


Famings 

Revenue arid nroffts. In muttons , on to lo cal currencies 
unless oHmwIse indicated. 


(Otfaa- Earnugs oa Page 13) 


London Metals 


United Stales 
Dresser Industries 
M Qoor. ,1W Wf* 

RevenM U57. MU 

Net int UO gy 

Per Short— 0J> 135 

tel HaH ME WW 

Revenue 3219. 2gX 

Net Inc. 524 WJ 

per Short— 049 075 

Handy & Harmon 

Ms_ 48 a 
sssss^r a a 

lit HaH 1* J?? 
Revenue — 3 ?S 

Netinc. 5JR jJ-S 

Per Share— MJ ■» 

Harris Oraphic* 

£££— 

BfrSSreT: OAJ 020 


WHOH 1JB im 

Revenue 8003 7192 

Net Inc. 553 264 

Per Share 207 139 

Ogden 

Manor. ms im 

RoveruM — 34an 2i?j 

©per Net 094 1044 

OperShare-. 046 024 

1st Half IMS T9W. 

Revenue 5023 433.1 

OoerNof — 031 1&.1B 

Oper Shore— 12S 0.64 

NWS excftjde fcw of XU mB- 
Uon mi ppm of SI mjffoa to 
aoartor amt loss of CZ* aUb 
Han w prvtnafSfmJmoa In 
toUtfuM tOsconnnuta aoer- 

OllUkUL 

ParkarHcmnffln 

eaaoar. INS 1*84 

feww WM MA 

Net Inc. 214 260 

Par Share— 0A5 0.97 

Yew IMS 1M4 

Revenue 1240- 

Net Eisc. — Ml 712 
Per Share— 306 228 


vomiw: Blots Of 25 tons. 

Sauna: Reuters. 





n 


SHvir N.Yv ae 

Source: AP. 


Dhidends 


Options 



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business ROUNDhup 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1985 


Page 11 


J >v 


Ultra marPLC 

PrefaxUp;Net 

Fhmges 30% 

"• InKrn xiona/ Herald Tribune 
- ' PARIS — Ultramar PLC 

^ P™** profit^ 
gesecond <pwrter rose 14percem 
fro® a year earlier despite 
M m sales caused by weak cxmdE 

Tbecomrany, a worldwide ener- 
gy p oup with interests in produc- 
tion, refining and marketing, said 

■£SiWMSB3 

£5MA million from £668TSfeon. 

For titt half, Uhramar said that 
pxetaxprofit rose 38.7 percent from 
ayf* ewher, to £160.6 million 
from £115.8 million. Sales fell to 
£1 37 bflhon from £1.49 billion, the 
oompany said. 

Despite the better operating re- 
ams., roe company said that higher 
taxation in the second quarter 
caused net profit to fall 29.6 per- 
cent from a year eariier, to £20?7 
million, from £29.4 minion. Ntt 
profit for the half rose to £653 
million from £62.8 million a year 

earlier, it said. 

It said, however, that marginc 
cod tinned to improve and tha t it 
should see increasing profitability 
from its operations in eastern Can- 
ada over the next 12 months. 

The group’s first-half oil produc- 
tion from Indonesia, the North Sea, 
western Canada and the United 
States averaged 30.900 barrels per 
day, a record for any ax-month 
period, h said. 

Improved cash flow, lower capi- 


Commercial Union Co. 
Posts Loss in First Half 


i subsidiaries through the 

issue of 250 million Canadian dol- 
lars ($183.8 minion) of preferred 
shares permitted a substantia) cut 
in long-term debt during the half, it 
said. 


Reuters 

— Commercial 
Union Assurance Co., the British 
“prance company, said Wednes- 
day that pretax profit in the second 
quarter was £5.4 million (57.4 mil- 
J 3 ^) compared with a £6.1-nrillion 
the like period last year. 

. ““ group said its pretax loss 
narrowed to £111 million in the 
™. half compared with a £143- 
nulhon loss in the first six months 
® 1984. The underwriting loss wid- 
ened shghtly to £173.6 mSion com- 
pared with £173.1 minion a year 
earlier. 3 

Most of the improvements came 
from operations in Britain, the 
group said. First- half pretax profit 
m Britain was £20 million com- 
pared with a £7.1 -million loss in 
1984. 

Commercial Union al so said >h»f 
Cedi Harris plans to retire as chief 
executive at the end of the year. He 
wiB be succeeded by Tony Bread, 
chief executive of the group’s US. 
subsidiary, Commercial Union 
Corp- 

Pre mium income from the Unit- 
ed States fell 27 percent, in line 
with its decision last year to reduce 
the scale of its U.S. operations, the 
group said. Premium income rose 7 
perc»t in Britain and 12 percent in 
the rest of the world. Commercial 
Union said. 

Overall non-life premium in- 
come was down 10 percent, after 
allowing for currency fluctuations, 
it said. 

Investment income remained 
near last year's levels. A lower U.S. 
contribution was offset by an in- 
crease in Britain, partly doe to a 
switch from equities to fixed-inter- 
est investments in the second half 
ofl 984. 

Losses posted in 1984 were 
blamed on difficult trading condi- 
tions in Britain and the United 


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Seize the worid. 

Tte Internationa 
Important 


States and Commercial Union de- 
rided a year ago to reduce opera- 
tions to concentrate on personal 
risks and smaller insurance lines. 

The U3. operation posted a loss 
of £23.9 million in the second quar- 
ter compared with £31.7 milli on in 
the first quarter. 

The company said that results 
from UiL operations should im- 
prove in the second half of 1985 
and in 1986. Premium rate in- 
creases there are now averaging 30 
percent on commercial business re- 
newals, the group said. 

The US. pension fund accumu- 
lated a surplus of about $60 milli on 
due to strong investment perfor- 
mance and reduced staff numbers, 
Commercial Union said. The fund 
wffl be tenmoaxed and replaced 
with another scheme providing 
staff with the same benefits, it said. 
The surplus will be used to 
strengthen claim provisions and 
will not affeetprofits, it added. 

Results in The Netherlands were 
helped by a 9-percent increase in 
life profits, although other business 
there continued to be affected by 
competitive market conditions. Ca- 
nadian results also were affected by 
competitive conditions and a tor- 
nado in May. Commercial Union 
businesses in other countries pro- 
vided a satisfactory underlying re- 
sult despite some large claims. 


Sanho Creditors Weigh Plan 
To Operate Bulk Carriers 


Reuters 


ese trading houses and leasing 
g of 100 bulk carriers now on 


TOKYO — Some of the 13 Jaj 
companies that financed the 
charter to Sanko Steamship Co. are studying the possibility of jointly 
operating them, shipping industry sources said Wednesday. 

However, no immediate decision is possible because operation of 
the carriers by Sanko would be vital to any plan to rehabilitate the 
company, they said, 

Sanko Steamship applied for coon protection from creditors on 
Tuesday after major creditor banks decided they could not provide 
further financing. 

Debts for the Sanko group are estimated at 520 billion yen (S2J2 
billion). 

Sanko ordered 125 sophisticated bulk carriers during 1983 and 
around 100 of those are now in operation. The order was pan of a 
program aimed at streamlining ana reorganizing its fleet. 

‘Trading bouses involved with Sanko will watch developments and 
avoid taking over, for the time being, ships thev have on charter to 
Sanko,** a spokesman at Marubeni Corp. said. ’ 

Marubeni owns 12 bulk carriers on charter to Snnl-n and six more 
that are being built, be said. The company will not deride what to do 
about the ships until the court has ruled on Sanko' s future. 


A spokesman at Sumitomo Corp- which has chartering contracts 
with Sanko for 24 bulk carriers and owns 12 of them, said his 
company had no firm plan for the ships at present. But he said the 
company could operate the ships if Sanko cancels the chartering 
contracts. 

Meanwhile, trading house sources said there is growing concern 
that Sanko ships might be stuck at ports if they are refused refueling 
or if longshoremen decline to handle cargoes unless they receive 
payment in cash. 

A spokesman at Daiwa Bank Ltd., one of Sanko’ s three major 
creditor banks, said the banks have agreed to give Sanko limited 
financial aid until the court rules. 

The agreement followed Transport Minister Tokuo Yamashita’s 
request to the creditors to extend emergency financial aid to help bail 
out the shipping line, ministry sources said. 


GAF Holds 5.6% Stake in Union Carbide 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK— GAF Corp. said 
Wednesday that it had acquired 5.6 
percent of the stock in the troubled 
Union Carbide Corp. 

The disclosure appeared to fuel 
speculation on Wall Street that 
GAP might mount a bid to acquire 
all or part of Union Carbide. 

GAF said in its filing with the 
Securities and F xc-hanff Commis- 
sion that it bought theUnion Car- 
bide stock because it presented “an 
attractive investment opportuni- 
ty." and that in doing so it has 
considered “the possibility of a 


business combination between 
GAF and Union Carbide.” 
However, the company said it 
“has no present plans or proposals 
with respect to Union Carbide that 
relate to or would result in any 
extraordinary transaction.” 

Union Carbide's stock was un- 
changed at $51.75 in eariy New 
York Stock Exchange trading on 
Wednesday, while GAF gained SI 
a share to $32,625. 

GAF said that it owns 3.94 mil- 
lion of Union Carbide's 70.4 mil- 
lion common shares outstanding. 
At the current price, Union Car- 


bide has a market valuation of ! 
$3.67 billion. 

GAF, based in Wayne, New Jer-1; 
sey, makes chemicals and building % 
materials. It earned $56.7 mini mi '< 
on sales of $731 j million last ^ 

Union Carbide is one of the ! 
est U.S. chemical concerns and re- 
corded $9_5 billion in 1984 revenue. 
But the company has had major . 
problems recently. Last year a tox- ; 
ic-gas leak at a Union Carbide - 
plant in Bhopal. India, killed 2,000 ' 
people. On Sunday, a gas leak at : 
the its Institute, West Virginia, ' 
plant injured 135 people. 


COMP ANY NOTES 


American Motors Corp. said it 
would transfer production of its 
Jeep CJ model from its assembly 
plant at Toledo, Ohio, to a facility 
at Brampton, Ontario, because of 
overcrowded capacity at the Tole- 
do plant. 

Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. 
said it would head a consortium to 
build Turkey's first nuclear power 
station. The contract, to be com- 
pleted by 1989, is valued at 13 
billion Canadian dollars (.$958 mil- 
lion). 

BASF AG of West Germany said 
it would make chimney gas-collect- 
ing catalyscrs starting in 1987 un- 
der license from Japan's Mitsubishi 
Petrochemical Co. ft said the cata- 
lysers, which have been used suc- 
cessfully in Japanese power plants. 


reduce the nitrogen oxide in chim- 
ney gas by 80 percent 

Commodore International Ltd. 
said it planned to take significant 
year-end inventory write-downs, 
resulting in an expected loss of $80 
million for the fourth quarter end- 
ed Jane 30. In the same quarter a 
year ago the company reported a 
net profit of $33.1 milli on. 

Geostar Coqx said it had won an 
injunction from the Ontario Su- 
preme Court against a bid by Man- 
ufacturers Life Insurance Co. for 
8.2 million common shares of Can- 
ada Truslco Mongage Co. 

Indosnez Rank said it has taken 
100-percent control of the Mer- 
chant Bank Indosuez- Australia 
Ltd. following a decision by the 
Australian government allowing 


full participation in the merchant " 
bank sector. 

Myer Emporium Ltd. reported it - 
had approved a merger with G J. : 
Coles k Co. under a revised offer., 
by Coles that included three Coles - < 
shares plus 535 Australian dollars . 
cash (53.78) for five Myer shares. 

Saxon Petroleum Ctep. PLC an- : 
nounced it had extended its offer 
for Charterhouse Petroleum PLC 
and Saxon Oil PLC until Aug. 20. 
The new company said it had re- : 
caved acceptances for 1016 mil- 
lion Charterhouse shares, or 75.8 > 
percent, and for 7.9 minion Saxon 
Oil shares, or 35.5 percent. 

Tricentrol PLC said it had 
agreed to acquisition by Ampol Ex- 
ploration of a 10-percent interest in 
a field off western Australia. 


IF YOU KNEW THAT REPUBLIC HAS OVER $1,300,000,000 IN CAPITAL, YOU’D BE PHONING THEM TOO. 


Republic National Bank of New York. Traditional banking in an age of change. 

LONDON («4- U-409-2426 ■ PARIS (33-1) 260-3864 LUXEMBOURG (352>-470.7n MILAN l39-2)-809(4 1 - A SAfRA BANK 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1985 



Wednesdays 

AMEX 

dosing 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
dp to tfw cknloa on Wall S ti eel 
ami do oof reflect Mto frada abawfttrt. 

Via The Associated. Pros 


tO 7* 
V* 5* 
34* 15* 
34V! Uft 

xtv, i m 
a * 
*3% am 
at u 
10ft 7* 
12* 5 
JM4 9 
7* 4ft 
12 * » 


FtXrtCM 

pttmiG 

FOJVCA .IS 5 
FotstCB SB A 
Forratt. 

Fotomf ■ 

Fronfr JO 2.7 
FnwEI 

Frhstim 3MB 14 

FrlesEn 

FrrfHd 

FilAwt .171 M 
FurVtt 


U 4VS 
130 * 

1 24ft 
17 34* 
327 24* 
19» I* 

3 STM 

37 10ft 

26 I » 

4 tft 

132 10* 


8* B* 

5* S» + ft 

24ft 24ft + ft 

wrn 

J3V> Bh— ft 
T* 146 
37ft 37M + * 

22* 33 
816 Bft — ft 
1046 10)6 + * 
15* 1546 
6* m— ft 
1046 lOVfc— * 


4* 2ft GTI 1 

15* 10* GataxC 
3 1ft GalxyO 
S3 3446 Garan 1-20 62 
IBM 746 GatUt 
1346 9ft GrtmS 
At 2* Geroco „ 

IB* 1346 GCHrira MM £6 

5 346 GnEmP 20 62 
1746 13 GnNlicr .10 3 

6 316 GwtoCO ^ 

1646 916 GonvOr 20 13 
14 TV, GeaRH 

4* 146 GeoRtft 

1246 0* GeoRsPllJO U 

2246 1146 GfOnFs MB 15 
IS* S GfilYlo 
35* 1946 Gtolftt M 25 
V 23* Cinmr 1A» 37 
5 3* GtotoNR 

7* 3 GoMW 

1* 46 GWFId 

194> 15* GcrRps J6 S5 
27* 20ft GOUMT 20r £ 
71 6W GrPflMC JJ562S.1 
206 1616 GmdAu AO 23 

12 746 Grom 

1546 1046 GrTedi 

44* 27 GrlLkC A* 1.1 

36 1246 Graims 

13 5M GrMner 

13* 846 GnJCti SOB O ! 

1546 II GtfCdB JB 

36* 23* Grtstr A0 12 i 

ISM 0 Gull -05a A 


5 2M 2* 
I 13 13 

I 196 1ft 
1 2846 28ft 
I 9 8ft 

> 13 12ft 
I 3* 3V6 
, 1596 15*6 
I 3* 3* 
' 15* 15 
1 4* 4V6 
i 1146 lift 
I 1396 12* 
3* 3* 
11* lift 
20V6 19* 
IS* 15* 
34 33* 

27* 26* 
3* 346 

* "S 

1946 1«V6 
26 ft 26M 
7V6 7 
IBM 10* 
8* IM 
1246 1246 
4116 41 
3816 27* 
II* 11 
lift MM 
14* 14ft 
3416 34* 
1346 1346 


2*— * 
fl + * 
1ft 

20ft + * 
896- h 
13 
3* 

15*- 16 

3* 

U -ft 
416- 16 
1146 + ft 
12ft + <& 
3* + 16 
1146— 16 
30 

1546 + V6 
34 + ft 

2716 + * 
3* +16 


if* + * 
2616 + * 
746 + 46 
IBM + 16 
81*— 16 
1246 

<1 46 

2BW + ft 
11* + * 
Tift + ft 
1446 
34* 

1346— ft 


HMor 
| HMll 

16* 

it* 

Jm Stock 
10* Knell 

Otv. 

YWL 

PE 

16 

m 

m 

HWh! 

IS* 

JBW 

IS* 

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IS* + * 

30ft 

22* KOBOfC 

2J3 

8.1 

02 

a 

29 

2 S* 

m- * 


fft 

Ift LS8 





1 * 


r* + ft 

3* 






2 ft 


2 ft 

15* 


50 

4J 

8 

34 

MW 

14* 

M* + ft 

1916 

11* Lndmk 

50 

32 

IB 

4 

16ft 

18* 

18ft 

14* 

9ft Laiar 



47 

78 

12 * 

11 * 

12 ft + * 

13 

9 Launm 



32 

2 

9* 

9* 

9* 

77* 

zift L*arPP 

100 128 


30 

23* 

23ft 

% + * 

9* 

Zft LwPh 



12 

26 

6 * 

6 

6 ft 

3* LatsurT 




25 

5* 

5* 

5* + * 
27*— * 

30* 

7ft LBlFPIt 

50 

15 

10 

80 

27* 27ft 

JM 

1* LlfeRW 

59 

1 * 

1 * 

1 * 

4 

2ft Uffld 




7 

4 

3* 

4 +* 

SVk 

1 * Loom 




32 

2 

1 * 

1 * 

39* 

27* Lorimr 



19 

178 

36* 

33* 

36ft + * 

It* 

ID* umwc 


5 

X 

66 

16* 

14 

16 — * 

14ft 




17 

18 

13* 

13* 

13* 

IS* 

9* Lurk 



9 

M 

10 * 

HI* 

10 * 

26ft 

11* LvnCSi 

JO 

15 

8 

4M 

12 * 

11 * 

11 *— ft 


Q Month 
HfahLff Sloat 
50* 3346 Rrtrt A 
57ft 40 Bnsrt B 
V* 546 RmUUC 
12ft 9ft RbstetF 
UH 1316 WflAlP 

3ft 14 RCJhvr 
30* 3M6 RwwfS 
4ft 1ft RoonrP 
7 3ft RoyPtm 
34 23* RMUck 

7ft 4ft KBW 
Mft lift Runvn 
29ft 15ft RVkOtf 


ptv, ym. pe 
2* 
33 
T5 

20 15 1* 
A0 11 „ 
56 15 H 
.12 5 13 


56a 22 9 

JD 1J U 
JO 12 IS 


SfcHMUtOM 

406 am »M 
Sb 44 44 

T a • 

32 io* ra* 
4 »7* J22 

9 2Sf 5f£ 

31 32* 2346 
55 1ft »ft 
UD 7 6* 

3 25* 25* 
401 Tft 6* 

» 17 I** 

2*6 26ft 26ft 


3846—46 
44 -* 
8 

Wft— ft 
17ft + 16 
34ft— ft 
Z»— ft 
146 + 16 
646— U 
25* 

**— ft 
16ft— ft 
34*- 16 


BEN&& 


5ft 
15* 12ft 
15* 12ft 
746 346 
24ft 19ft 
2396 10ft 
346 
8ft 3ft 
6ft 346 
37ft 2S46 
15ft 12* 
5* 216 

4 

7ft 
11* 
946 
5ft 
5M 
8ft 
I* 
76* 33ft 
6* 3* 
9ft 6 

Dt ft 


5ft 5* 5* 
5M 5M 5ft 
3* 3ft 3ft 
10ft 10ft 18ft 
12* 12ft 12* 
16* Uft 1646' 
13* 12ft 13* 
ft ft ft 
»* 18* 18* 
12ft lift fZ 
14ft Uft 14ft 
9ft 94k ?*■ 
4* 446 446- 


20ft—* 

3* 

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aft+ft| CIxe>«P*CftSJV,8.nud9V*Yr«am*-*«nnV7l7 

18*— * 

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24 +1* 

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4* + ft 
13* + ft 
* 


34* 

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13 

78 

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am 

21 + * 

22* 

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Mo 

4 

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19 

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12 

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23 

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3 

7* 

m 

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23* 

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AO 

15 

la 

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24ft 

24 

2416 + * 

27* 

10* Olsten s 

J4 

1.1 

18 

52 

22* 

22ft 

22*— * 

7* 

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1 

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4* 

4*—* 

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3* Oppenti 

JOSt 

5 59 

1 

5* 

5* 

5* 

8 

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.15 

XI 


1 

4* 

4* 

4* 

7* 

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JD 

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10 

5 

5 

5 + ft 

2* 

1 Ormond 




35 

l£ 

1ft 

1*— ft 

14% 

6ft oxfrdF 

521 60 

11 

07 

13* 

13* + ft 

lift 

8* Obsich 

JD 

18 

11 

377 

11 

10* 

10* 


17* 12* JQCtyn Job 15 9 2 14* M* 14* + 16 

5ft 2* JctAm 7 64 3* 3* 3ft— ft 

9* 4ft Jetnm Jit 91 15 M 7* 7* 7* 

6ft 3 John Pd 68 3* 3ft 3* 

lift 7* JoHlAm JO 11 13 85 9* 9ft 9* + * 

lift 5ft JOhnlnd 4 67 8 7* 7ft— K 

36 24* Jnpltvr 10 4 36 35* 36 + * 


>1* 0716 12 

5* CM1C0 22 

1* CMXCP 

1349 CBS M 1J) 15 
9ft CocaNJ 18 

4ft emtoA 5 

10* Came 1JB.I04 8 
18* Calmol JO 23 20 
3ft Column 24 

M cattnwt 

7V6 Catonm JWUUI M 
ID* Cameo J2 18 10 
1ft Canwm 
U* CMarcg JO 


3 27 

48 11*6 

3 1* 

12 >8* 

27 12* 

6 6ft 
15* 12* 

58 26ft 
26 5ft 

49 46 

7 SVk 

54 16ft 
5 2* 

207 16 


2696— ft 
II* 

1* 

15* 

12—16 
6ft + ft 
12 *— * 
26 — * 
5ft + ft 
* 

8 — * 
16* +* 
246 

16 + * 


8* FPA 26 

5ft FOIrFM 27 

17ft Forty pl 
3* FMoia 

fft FtCorm UXta 86 8 
11 FWwnB JO 62 11 
19* Fstcipn JO 24 7 
lift FtochP J8t £0 19 
6ft FttcGE 4 

23* FltGEpt4J0 14J 
7* F km fin 

28* Flaltt* JO U I 
22* Fluke 1-38t 52 11 
6* Foodrm 5 


7 9* 
3 1316 
140 18 
255 4* 
3 11 * 
21 13* 
14 21* 
7 13* 
13 10 
6 28 
7 m 
U 40* 
52 26* 
41 12* 


9*— * 

i IS* 

mb** 

11* 1- ft 
1196— * 
21 * + * 
13* + ft 
10 
28 
7* 

40*— * 
26* + ft 
12 * 


39ft 30ft 
4* 1ft 
14* 10 
13 10* 

16 9* 

23ft 13* 
17ft 8 
8 4* 

2ft 1M 
416 2* 
5ft 3* 
5* 2ft 
S* 3ft 
3* 2 
IT* 10* 


ICnGipf 450 12J 
KOPOkC 5 

KayCp JO 15 8 
Kayj it Aklj II 
KsarNt AO 28 19 
KOfefiin J8UII 
KevPh JO IJ 20 
KrvCn 9 

KmrCawt 
KWdflwt 
Klnorfc 
Kfrby 

KUAUb 15 

Kieerv J2r j 
KnOBO 19 


10*37 
31 3* 

24 13* 
10 12 
46 14* 
39 18* 
309 11* 
27 4* 
15 1* 

127 4ft 
S3 4 
84 3 

II 4* 
27 2* 

337 17* 


36ft— 1 
3ft + ft 
13 

12 + ft 

14ft— ft 
18 + ft 

11 * 

4ft— * 
116 

4 + ft 

3ft 

3 

4ft + ft 
2* + * 
17* + ft 


a i ;sr££T-i 
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AMEX Highs-Lcms 


AmMtoSBW 

KnodOCn 

BtactrSnO EmnlntCorB 

OHalnd FUMG 

GnfYcDOTve 






GTIGeir* PiMuSaite 

SmtaM 

TIiM-Cnvy 

Tarocranift 



4* 1ft 
Mft 8ft 
Uft Oft 
IS* lift 
II* 8* 
23 14ft 
2ft 1ft 
UK lift 
32* 14 
Sft 5* 
31 14ft 
1416 9ft 
10ft 6* 
22ft Uft 
15* 10ft 


UNA 

Ubmft 18 

Umcpwd _ 
nrdcppt -75 u 
UWmra 14*09 
unensF* 50 14 12 
UFoodA JO 5J 
UUM 14 

USAOWt 

UHIMV 23 

vmon L60 7J 7 

UnvOn U 

UnlvRS _ 19 

UMvRu 40* 47 11 

unvPai 


2 1* 
370 Uft 
402 lift 
304 Uft 
*6T M* 
U 19 
32 1* 

36 Uft 
2 18* 
17 7* 

» 31 , 

7 Oft 
64 716 

3 1716 ' 
34 IS* 


> 196 
1*6 + ft 
lift— ft 
14ft ♦ * 
Wft 
W 
F* 

Uft— ft 
18* 

7* 

30*— 14 
12* 

716 + 16 
1716 

13* + ft 


10* 3* Quabgi 


89 ** 916 9* + ft 


Wft 9* VST n JOtU 

II* 12* VDIlyRs 140 7 S 11 
27* 17* Vatmrs 44 u 15 
10 2 * Veni 

616 3ft VTRih 
ft ft Verna 

Uft 9* Vcmtt JO TJ 17 

10* 5 Vkrtech 

9 5M Vtam 12 

Ml 53ft Vnlntl 
Uft I Vaptai 40 35 U 


49 10 10 10—16 

1 17ft 17* 17ft— ft 
4 3316 25ft 25ft 

12 Bft 8ft fft + ft 

4 4* 4* 4* 

2 ft ft ft 

W UK 11* 11*— ft 

i n ik in— ft 

M 6ft 6* 6*— ft 

a 64ft 64* 64* 

a raft m* wft 


9ft 5ft RA I 
18* IS* Rosan 
TO 15 Ransbs 
3ft ft Ratliff 
14ft 10ft Haven 
4ft 1ft Rodlaw 
15ft 10ft RegatB 


W 7ft 7 7 

26 14 15ft 16 


7ft 4ft wrre 
j SB* 18* 9*Wbar 
+ vb 29ft M WansB 


7ft 4ft WTC IS 54 5* 5* 5ft + ft 

^*5 22 1 J* iSft il +ft ais*5sa M 23S SS S* S*z 5 

J2 3, 46 » ^ "J "St ft ”4 ■” 

34 8 2 12M 12ft 12ft— ft H* 4ft WttHs 4 3 8ft Bft 8ft — * 

54 3ft 3ft SJ-W 130 76 WUiPlt 56 J M 174 114*112 114 -1ft 

5.1 10 27 T2I lft lift »ft 12* WRITS 1.17 6J 19 173 19* 19ft 19* + * 


54 It* 17* 18* + Kt I 2W* M3* ftW C. 

5 * ft *+K 3ft ftwrncvrt 


> « « » -.a 

1173 2365 17* 17* 17*— * 

^ I7 5 


11* 4* W*HHs 4 3 8ft Bft 8ft— * 

130 76 WMlPtt 54 J 14 174 114*112 114 —1ft 
20V6 12* WRITS 1.17 4J 19 173 19* 19ft 19* + * 


Soviet Output Rase 
3.5% in the First 
7 Months of 1984 

Rmtm 

MOSCOW — Soviet industrial production in 
the first seven months of this vear rose 35 
percent from the like period of 19&4. the weekly 
Communist Party newspaper Economic Ga- 
zette said Wednesday. 

Inly production was 5.8 percent higher than 


4s rl H 


ADVERTISEMENT J 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) August 14,1985 

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-V -Viffrr- rrjSk 


A"- iWk;vAEB»3 


kfitiJ&l: 'J - •■ v. •■• ' - 


CURRENCY MARKETS 
^ Dollar Gains in Oi 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1985 


^Urt? 


Page 13 


_ . __ • ' a# - ' *w§MMKms 

LONDON — The dollar ended 

' ■23SrJS!SP? tt tI ?? n 8 

r®? for . Smdance from 
mo-Ua economic data. 

*■£.-. - 1 ** 4°par mined in early trad- 
ing afteL &e HS.govemment’s an- 
, noonconent Tuesday that retail 
• • sa ^ u l l° e United States rose 0.4 
peroenl in July, exceeding maria* 
■ forecasts. 

That prompted some buying by 


Firms Make 

111 Quiet European Trading Successor 

aits in West German there still is a general consensus /fl £*•¥•___ _ 
i 41 ®* arc expect- that the rates should come down in §0 jUICOil 
edThmsday. ^ response to the sluggishness in the 

AlUl MiwpfaJ «L:. I- . . ■ __ r .1 . . . Ti 


The 


Ai“ ^‘ , response to the sluggishness in me 

r / ~ ° ^pected this week are the American economyTout so far they 
j^«imTODq)aitment*srq>ortM have not. 

production and the In London, the dollar gained 
federal Reserve’s report on con- against die British pound for a sec- 
su^er crediL ood straight day. It dosed at 

dealers said that trading slowed SI 3825 compared with 513895 on 
considerably Wednesday after- Tuesday. 

noon in several European court* The currency dosed in London 
tries, including France, Italy, Bd- at 2.7930 Deutsche marks, up from 


Lot Angeles Times 

LOS ANGELES - 


(Continued from Page 9) 
and invisible imports (the parts un- 
der the bood), tne actual impact is 
about a third. 

And it is headed higher. Accord- 
ing to Lee A lacocca, chairman of 
Chrysler Corp., company studies 


mont, California, produces the Co- to seek busi n e s s with Detroit’s Big 
rolla-based Novas and has Three, 
announced plans to build a plant of Mr. lacocca blames federal pou- 

its own in this country. Mazda will cies, which he said have given Jftpa- 
sell about half of its American out- nese producers an economic ad van- 
pul to its affiliate, the Ford Motor tage in currency exchange rates and 

L» I C nnlinM f<V thp PJTKinn of the 


■ _ tn i M a i 9|W m chairman nf P UL io aiuuaic, urc roiu ivjwu. ia &* ^ ••■“■v . 

mg to Lee A. laco^ raairman oi marketed as Fords, and tax policies, for the erosion of the 

Lwe 


lying, sandy area about 300 mues mg quickly to capture a full 50 ''“****“• hirild some of mv stuff in yen and 

S of Sificon Valley. the symbol percent of the U* auw industry, Chiysta has been sdiing cm Sh tire magic 

of in the nigh-technol- when fully built cars, hybnds and imported from Mitsubishi plants in u “ 

oev business, commcrcia) applica- components are added together. Japan for 12 years under its own 01 lL . 

tions are being developed for a And, he concedes, they are doing it Plymouth and Dodge brand names The eroding distinction between 

semiconductor material even more with Detroit’s help. and Ford has established a new domestic and imported cm can 

veisatfle than silicon. It is called “Within 24 months our prqjec- model line, Merkur, to sell high- create some odd differences, rur- 
gfli iiwn arsenide. lion is that" the Japanese ^ill performance sedans made by iis chasers of Hond a Acco rds who live 

%%ree infant companies in a crack, for the first time, 50 percent German subsidiary. 

inree mian „ - Mr i-jmcca said r» f«r. scmbled in Ohio, regardless or any 


went to Japan," he said. Tve got to 


• - ■ ■ a , „ — . ~ -*““»** auiu oui- vt me Assumption 

motions that whm financial mai„ _ 

a , dosetL included: 2J045 Swiss franc 

deakTS “It was just a non-day," one said, from 12985; 3.1405 Dutdi 

was amoved Most of the business Wednesday dere, up from 3.1240 and 1,8* 
-‘ ^, L " 7 e ^~y s . De- was either technical or compulsory Italiannre; up from 1,865.00. 

pa rmamt repeat that business in- trading, dealers said. In Tokyo, the dollar finish 


of dominance in me wnen nuiy duui taxa, ujuuua mu uu^vi tw num i*uuuu™u « nf it' 

ogy business, commcrcia) applica- components are added together. Japan for 12 years under us own ™ 1L 
rams are being developed for a And, he concedes, they are doing it Plymouth and Dodge brand names T1 
.•mSmn^urfnr material even more wiih Detroit’s belt). and Ford has established a new doro 


inree uuani compauica a - . . — ^ .. 

stretch of Ventura County some 50 of everything, Mr. lacocca said 
miles f80 kflometers) north of Los recently. “We wBI have managed ^ to 


r 7 — --r*'** vuouiqo ii;— 

ventones rose 0.4 percent in June. 
Ttey also said that it already has 


« >rt.miwai or craupuisoiy itauam me, up uuui i,cku.uu. which Operate at nigu irequenuca, 

dealers said. In Tokyo, the dollar finished at computers to work faster 

VS. interest rates are brak- 23730, up from 236.75 on Tuesday. Aan would vriih silicon chips, 
denar’s slide. Dealers said (Reuters, AP) ^ companies _ CHgaBit Log- 


^ridhas^ver se^and give away 

STS(S M high fr^uenaa, 


Keywnu» and profits. In millions, are hi 
tocalcwmincJM unless otherwise 
. tn&catmt 


Brilahi 


Profits 

Per Shorn. 

lafHdf 

Rmnw 

. Prom* 

P*r Share. 


Ultramar " 
ms 


at, Lhe huge mfli 

Session Ends Slightly Higher ; has bc^un re^ni 
AustraUan-d ottar Issues Star 

Renters Orion Royal Bank Ltd. as lead ^ 

LONDON — The Eurobond manager. It w» quoted at a d»- io years. 

market diook off eariy losses to end count of about 1 'A well inside its 2 

cKoKtiv hiotiH 1 WwiiiM^ini m mnd. nmvni fees_ There are big 


aJurnni of Rockwell Intemalion- 
thc huge militar y contractor. 


of everything." Mr. lacocca said since cars assembled here by for- sembled m Ohio, regardless of any 
recently. “We will have managed to ^ compaidS^] have Lm^rted preferenceforimp^ NiKm^- 
take the biggest single industry the ag nes , Emissions another trasare now 
world has ever seen and give away m ^Jck m nnnentR T some American bly line m Smiyna, Tonus^ and 
over half Lhe total value." SSSBSi ray the figures re- withm a few^ be 

The success of unponed care, p^g ^es of imported autos PP l 
and Detroit’s efforts to find ways {Sdy^indererarehow deeply the 

The mmnanies GisaBit Log- around its S2,00^a^ar cost disad- ^^estic has \£A shut and Toyotas elsewhere m the 

vantage compared to Japanese pro- ^ by companies. 

hSS ducers - 15 f e Ln the Cheviblei Nova, for exam- Automobile fleet managers m 

wave MoiuMiuiics all American car somethmg of the 7 q p erceDl Q f the complex, companies wiib a mandaw lo ^>uy 

pasL costly components are shipped to American” are in for increasing 

Three Japanese auto companies, premom from Japan. headaches, according to industry 

Toyota, Nissan and Honda, are al- analysts. 

J . ... - .1 it, itn,npu> mmnflnenis 


The success of imported care, 
and Detroit’s efforts to find ways 
around its SZ000-a-car cost disad- 


ai, me u— j Three Japanese auto companies, Fre ^o m fr bm Japan. 

Only GigaBil of Newbury Park Toyota, Nissan and Honda, are al- 
bas begun selling the chips, and all r^y making cars in the United Major Japanese components 

° : „ In., nrw r i tJ n J. «nVl nmnlim lilp Nirmnnnenffl UHI}. 


three companies are a long way States and two others, Mazda and 
from making a profit. But these Mitsubishi, have announced plans 
cngjneere-turned-enLrqjrenenrs en- to build assembly plants. Toyota, 
vision their compound replacing GWs partner in New United Mo- 
stticon in a number of products tor Manufacturing Inc. in Fre- 


g* SBSJSa* Runzheimei A OuiMdint 

Mi^bUhi. onod - 


Mitsubishi, have announced plans wmen maKes eiecoicm uuujjjuucuw — i ll _ 

Tojoa klfdtatataiiMA SvSSiffi™- 
CM’S nartner in New United Mo- ing facthues in this country to sell cently tnat lAjmm wmjuw 
Sr MSSmriBg tac ta Frt Adr rstablishrd aaomcn and agm aarvayaJ sard d«y had for- 


mal or informal policies requiring 
them lo purchase American cars. ■ 
Runzheimer officials cautioned* 
fleet executives that' a domestic- 
nam eplate did DOt tllle OUt the pos- . 
HbihtytballhecarwasanimikirW 
with the possibility of service prob-; 
lems and parts shortages. 

To help clear up the confusion, 
the company has developed a four- • 
category system for classifying' 
cars, listing them as domestic 
nameplate-foreign made, domestic 
□ameplatendomestically made, for- 
eign nameplate-domestically made . 
and foreign nameplate-foreign 
made. 

The situation wiD only become 
more comphcaied as the world 
auto industry becomes more uni- 
fied, analy sts observe. Both Chrys- 
ler Cadillac have plans to build 

high-priced sports cars in affili- 
ation with Italian companies. In 
the case of the Cadillac, the chass is 
will be built in Detroit and shipped 
lo Italy where Phminfarina will- 
add the body and ship it back to the 

United Stales for assembly. 

A 1987 or 1988 Pontiac model 
will likely have the most complicat- 
ed ancestry erf alL The as-yet-nn- 
named car wifi be built in South 
Korea with the assistance of Isuzu 
from a design originally developed 
by GM^ Opel subsidiary in West 
Germany. 


Philips Gtoelkimp. 


microelectronics, is a narurauy oc- 

curring element found m abun- 4 o€UG U) LdlUltt 


. pATShor*. 

laltMT 

' RmnML 

Profit* 

ParShoro. 


y rwr 1UC. —p 1 ... 

Investors taking advantage of dance in ordinary sand. Gallium, 
the “mismatch feature” — interest on the other hand, is a rare element. 


Slmropore Alrfliws 


Profit* 3719 

PfMian DJI 

DaUedStatM 

.. .American Bakeries 

££5 L__ 1® 

OperHet 2. IB 

Oder Stwra — DJB 


market snook on eany losses to eon coum m aww * uuiu*. c;iirv>n 

^^ Ss - creditmaAa - fissassss^'isis 

Dollar straights made wins of % year life. curring element found m abun- 

to K point, while floating-rate Investors taking advantage of dance in wdinapr sand. Gadium, 
notes ended up 2 to 5 points. the “mismatch feature" — interest on the other hand, is a rare element. 

The main feature, nf the primary fixed monthly but paid twice annu- and must be processed with arsenic 
market was the issue of two Anstra- ally — are protected by its guaran- to produce gallium arsenide. 
Han-doflar issues, the first in more tee to pay Libor flat for the rest of As a consequence, gallium arse- 
thwn a week, for BFG Finance BV the interest period if one-month costs from three to 10 times 
and DG Rank , while Bank of Bos- Libor exceeds the six-month rate, whai silicon does — as much as 
ton tapped the floating-rato-note It was quoted at about 99.73 on $200 for a single gallium arsenide 
sector with a SlSO-nt hon “mis- the market, wdl within the total 75- jvafer. Because of the price, even 
match" issue basis-point fees. optimistic forecasts for gallium ar- 


U.S. Scud to Block Then and Now: Looking Back at August ’82 

A C/rlc td i rjtmn . _ . u/n _r .L. Iaai tl i TM Aumi 


OPvMt_ 

Op«rStnro. 


Anderson Clavtoo 


ton tapped the floaring-rato-note 
sector with a $150-Eim<Ht “mis- 
match" issue . 

The 45-m21ion-Aiistralian-dol- 
lar bond for BFG, paying 13 per- 
cent a year over five years, was 
issued at 100%. It is secured by a 
deposit at the London .branch of 
lhe R»nk fur Gememwirtschaft. 

mnnagnd by Banque Pari- 
bas Capital Markets, the issue was 


e to pay Libor flat for the rest of as a consequence gallium arse- 
e interest period if one-month [njm three to 10 times 

[bor exceeds the six-month rate what silicon does — as much as 
It was quoted at about 99.73 on $200 f or a single gallium arsenide 
e market, wdl within the total 75- wrier. Because of the price, even 
isis-point fees. optimistic forecasts for gallium ar- 

Chubu Electric Power Co.'s senide are that, by 1995. it wfll take 
[00-million bond was formally no more than 20 percent of the 
unched Wednesday. As expected, worldwide semiconductor market, 
it pays I0M percent a year over 10 projected to be about S65 btlbon. 

years and was priced at par. Gallium arsenide has been devd- 

Dealers said trading in the sec- oped primarily for military use. 
idarv market was affected by including _ high-frequency micro- 


MW B W. ■ 
4 Hat InoonM 
^ fW Short . 


■ Mattaeamt 

Par Short 

W/nwttf/nMM 


S5SS5S 

sSi!ssiS5J* SISKS ssafsasssf /as 

Ssa SS^ 


Reuters 

PARIS — The United Stales 
is holding up the sale to China 
of a communications system 
built by a French company be- 
cause of its advanced technol- 
ogy, a spokeswoman for the 
company said Wednesday. 

The salt made by Sodetfc 
if Etudes des Systemes d’ Auto- 
mation, involves a sophisticated 
switching system. It has been 
delayed since May, the spokes- 
woman said. 

Sources said the United 
Slates has insisted that the 
transaction be delayed, pending 
an investigation of its content, 
under Western guidelines that 
restrict the sale of high-technol- 
ogy products to Communist 
countries. 


(Continued from Page 9) 

service sector lately joining manu- 
facturing in the doldrums, he said. He suggesl5 ^ because of 
“The stock market will take ^ a f im ^ flm eTlla ] s takeover at- 

breather as long as this goes on. ^ vei ^ while warnmg that the 
But he predicted that in three or co-called defensive issues such as 

.1 rr I »i - ... . ■ i Li- ur 


one strategy that might gel results 
is to take rifle shots at individual 


DUt UC piouLibu uuu in huwv w SO-CdliCQ. UQCUMV& oaura auwi w 

four months the Federal Reserve soft d rinks, foods and publishing 
will be forced to cut interest rates ^ “very overpriced.” 
so that consumers will have an in- (Xhcrwise. he said, investors can 
cemive to spend. That should pick fmd - ]aces w hide" in dectric 
up stocks and the economy, which , itiVit -r n^innal banks, savings 


up stocks and roe (^nomyjijidi re ^ onal savings 

he thinks will expand 3 io 4 permit ^ loan ^^| nes . brewers, select- 
in 1986. about double the grow* e( j hospital management and 
he expects for the remainder of this ^ md Reeled retailers, 

year- _ , , such as V.F. Corp. and Liz Qai- 

I .U VoA m auk Vinu/t*Vf*T 3 Y 


year. a ,ch a 

Until the Fed moves, however, 
be fears Wall Street wffl decline 10 DO ™ c - 
percent, down to 176 on the S&P- Eric 


Eric Miller, chief investment of- 


oercetiL aown iu 1 /o uu uje , . _ . 

500 and to 1J40 to 1050 on the Ficer at Donaldson Lufkin & Jen- 
Dow industrials. rette, agrees ; flat investors taking 

“So with hardly anything work- August holidays can continue 
ins now, my best recommendation working on their tans without fear 
is to hold onto cash," he said. “But of missing a big rally. 


“Two of the last three Augusts 
were pretty exciting,” he noted. 
“Most who took any reasonable 
vacation time regretted it Probably 
not so this year .The case for being 
a little wary about the short term is 
reasonable, and 1 sense the need to 
regroup, rethink and to refresh in 
some fashion.” 

Yet he does see “key positives" 
in place for stocks, namely “some 
improvement in liquidity, a proba- 
ble re-acceleration in business ac- 
tivity and , until very recently, im- 
pressive overall market action, 
keeping in mind the market’s histo- 
ry as a leading indicator." 

Joseph Feshbach, technical ana- 
lyst at Pradential-Bache, thinks a 
“contrary opinion" has developed 
this year to “August's recent histo- 
ry of sharp upward advances." He 
anticipates a correction. 



UManth 
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NASDAQ nricctail of 
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Via The Associated Press 


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Page 14 


EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1985 



so 

51 



57 




80 




83 





ACROSS 

1 Menace for 
Cleo's subjects 
5 Goof 
9 Pirate pelf 

13 Alto 

14 Cattail of India 

16“ Smile 

Be...” 

17 Oppresses 

19 River isles 

20 Mister, in 
Messina 

21 Consuming 
totally 

23 Produce 
Pilsner 

25 Cardinal 
compass point 

26 Blind alleys 
30 Sadat's 

predecessor 

33 Fine silk net 

34 Kind of stitch 
or weave 

38 volente 

37 Of a period 

38 Brownish 
pboto 

39 Business abbr. 

46 “Darling 
buds” time 

41 Young 
haddock 

42 Kind of knife 

43 Soprano from 
W. Va. 

45 Coated a 
soldering iron 

47 Obsolete 


49 Mailed 

50 Some 
pedestrians 

53 London's 

Arch 

57 Garbo film: 
1927 

58 Softpedaled; 
de-eraphasized 

60 Home of the 
Cyclones 

61 Ten in two, on 
an alley 

62 Rough, nigged 
rock 

63 Stan suddenly 

64 Lustrous 
mineral 

65 Shoe size 

DOWN 

1 Naval 
noncoms 

2 Sitarist 
Shankar 

3 Cassini, the 
couturier 

4 Fuddy-duddy 
orschmaltzer 

5 Jacques et al. 

6 Garland for Ho 

7 Exhort 

8 “Borstal Boy” 
playwright 

9 One's opinions 

16 Overburdens 

1] Volcanic 
island near 
Russia 


12 Inhale 
suddenly 
15 Tallinn's 
locale . 

18 Less desirable 
22 Ayatollah's 
land 

24 German river 

26 Details 

27 “Dandy King" 

of Naples: 1808 

28 Took it from 
the top, 
musically 

29 Flavor 

31 Hair-raising 

32 Tethered 
tightly 

35 Proverbial 
non- waiters 

38 Tirades 

39 Kind of bridge 

41 Defeats a 
declarer 

42 Double 
44 Most 

meanspirited 
46 Moderate 
48 Stage devices 
56 Dressed 

51 Where the 
Tevereriows 

52 Quid-pro-quo 
deal 

54 Stable for 
Jersey’s 
Jerseys 

55 Like Cassius 

56 Barely bear 
59 Blue Eagle 

inlts. 


© New York Times, edited by Eugene Malabo. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



‘Au of us want a BROWER!' 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
|$ by Henri Arnold and Bob Lae 


Unscramble these lour Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to form 
lour ordinary words. 


DUG1E 


mmmm 

MB 


NASDY 

< 


mu 


himum 






FRYLUR 


■ 

m 

m 

■ 

in 


WHAT THE 
UNHAPPY' 
Pig V/Ag. 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form die surprise answer, a3 sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


teTTT ¥TTIIKIX7 


Yesterday's 


{Answers tomorrow) 
Jumbles: CROUP BARGE ADJUST EULOGY 
Answer How he tell about reeling bad— GOOD 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


HIGH 
C F 
27 
7S 
34 
27 
32 
31 
V 

31 

32 
22 
24 
16 61 


LOW 
C F 
81 20 68 
82 14 57 
93 26 7* 
81 20 68 
«» ia m 
88 20 68 
84 14 57 
B8 19 66 
90 19 66 
72 14 57 
18 

.. 12 
17 63 II 


79 

54 

_ .. 52 

100 20 68 
18 64 
15 59 
46 
72 


84 


AJgorve 
Amsterdam 
Athens 
Barcelona 
Belgrade 
Berlin 
Brussels 
Bucharest 
Budapest 

Copenhagen 

Costa Del Sol 
Dublin 
Edinburgh 
Florence 
Frankfort 
Geneva 
Helsinki 
Istanbul 
Lax Palmes 
Lisbon 
London 
Madrid 
Milan 
Moscow 
Men Kb 
Nice 
Oslo 
Paris 
Prague 
ReyklavUl 
Roma 
Stockholm 
Strasbeara 
Venice 
tflantM 

WU TMW 

Zurich 

MIDDLE EAST 

Ankara 33 91 10 64 

Beirut 12 90 27 S] 

Damnaii 43 109 16 66 

Jerusalem 36 97 20 68 

Tel Aviv 31 *8 24 75 


31 

29 _ 

21 70 

30 86 22 
26 79 20 68 

28 83 19 66 
20 68 14 57 

31 88 14 57 

32 90 19 66 
23 73 12 54 

33 90 15 59 

31 88 23 73 
18 64 13 SS 
23 73 14 41 

29 84 15 59 

17 63 9 48 

32 90 19 66 

22 72 11 52 

34 93 14 57 

35 95 21 70 

30 86 18 64 
32 n 17 63 
32 90 15 59 


ASIA 


Bangkok 

Billing 

Hoag Kona 

Manila 

New Petal 

Seoul 

3 bangtail 

Singapore 

Taipei 

Tokyo 

AFRICA 
Algiers 
Cairo 
Cope Town 
Casa Man eo 
Harare 

Lanas 

Nairobi 

Tunis 


HIGH 
C F 
32 tt 
10 86 

30 86 

31 SB 
36 97 

31 88 

32 90 

32 90 
35 K 

33 90 


LOW 
C F 

26 79 r 
17 It Ir 

27 81 Sh 
25 77 d 

25 77 cl 
22 72 cl 

26 79 » 

26 79 O 
26 79 cl 
24 75 d 


a u 19 

36 97 23 

18 64 7 

28 82 20 
25 77 7 

28 82 24 

19 66 12 
34 93 19 


it fr 

73 fr 
45 d 
68 fr 
45 fr 
75 a 
54 cl 
66 fr 


PEANUTS 

SCHOOL STARTS IN 
THREE UJEEKS..I 
HAVE MV CLOTHES 
ALL LAJP OUT... 




NOW, i'm GOING OUT 
TO 5TANP BV THE 
. BUS STOP... 



BOOKS 


BLONDIE 


LATIN AMERICA 

Beanos Ainu 22 72 9 

Caracas 28 82 18 

Lima 18 64 13 

Mexico CHt 25 77 12 

Rio do Janeiro 24 75 18 

WORTH AMERICA 


15 59 10 

32 90 23 

27 81 19 
29 84 21 
24 75 11 

28 82 21 

33 90 24 

34 93 23 
28 82 18 


OCEANIA 


Auckland 12 54 S 41 fr 

Sydney W 46 5 41 te 

ct-doudv: fo-fooav; fr-falr; fi-fwii. 
sh-stwwerv sw-snnw; te-teormy. 


A tlanta 
Boston 
Chicago 

Denver 

Detroit 28 

Honolulu 33 

Houston 34 

Las Angulos 29 

Miami 32 

MtaneaaoUs 36 

Montreal 26 

Nassau 33 

Hew York 32 

Sop Frond »co 21 

Seattle 31 

Toronto 33 

Wash teuton 35 

o-avarcast; oc-pcrtlv 


90 26 
79 14 
79 15 

91 23 

90 22 
70 14 
88 15 

91 12 
95 22 
doudv: 


SO r 
73 fr 
66 fr 
70 St 
52 oe 
70 st 
73 h- 
73 pc 
W fr 
79 PC 
57 PC 
59 d 
73 fr 
72 fr 
57 fr 
» fr 
54 d 
72 h 
r-rolrt; 


REX MORGAN 


f 


fLL JUST LEAVE THE 
SUITCASE PACKED/ IF SHE 
REFUSES TO DISCUSS OUR 
PROBLEMS. THEN I'LL MOVE 



SHE MUST STILL BE IU 
THE TUB! I'LL JUST 
WAIT HERE UNTIL SHE 






GARFIELD 





lBMCWPS 


Q-IS 


in 19BS UHM FMute RwvOrme hv 



SLOW HOMECOMING 

By Peter Handke. Translated from the Ger- 
man by Ralph Manheim. 279 pages. SI 6 . 9 5 . 
Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 19 Union Square 
West, New York, N. Y. 10003 . 

Reviewed by Stephen Koch 

B ACK in that busy springtime of 40 years 
ago when Hitler cheats 


what that decade so otien 

ucs”: The prose began to rdJ WIt ! 1 

codes, sign-systems, deconsirucuon and de 

mystification. Handke s 

itary. autistic, wordless purity 

maintained a certain patina of ^gcalisn^ 

though all his claims to be unmasking Lhe 

bourgeois lie could not prevent a ™ 

Brechl-besmted Hues from 


Peter 


leaied the 

— now a leading literary figure 



Kt) unfailing bellwether for the high- 
rtheacs that the '60s protest generation 



in the first generation of Germans to grow up 
after the war — lived in Austria. Handke, who 
is 43, came of age with the internationalized 
protest generation of the 1960s. Like that of 
many in his generation, Handke’s writing is 
programmatically modernist in ways not seen 
in German since the crumbling of the Weimar 
republic. His politics were formed less by the 
threat and taint of fascism than by the commu- 
nist and anti -communist establishments of his 
childhood. “Slow Homecoming" is his ninth 
book to be translated into English. At this 
muddled moment of German- American rela- 
tions he is in mid-career, and this may be the 
time to consider why he turns out to be less 
interesting than everything about him makes 
him appear. 

He looks wonderful. He is a man of real 
intellectual power and sometimes visionary in- 
sight. His fingers are never far from the pulse: 
From beginnings in the vanguard West Ger- 
man theater of the '60s, Handke has served as 
an (almost) unfailii 
hrow aesthetics that i 
(almost) invariably preferred: dissociation, a 
distaste for realism, and a half-moralistic, half- 

fsave 
i of the 
Tilled 

with lots of cooled-out classroom Artaudian 
“madness" and pro forma “contempt” for the 
audience. Their leading idea is a tailed -up but 
familiar Rousseauism (one play, inevitably, is 
about Kaspar Hauser) — all about the pathos 
and purity of the solipsistic mind and the 
corruptions of that evfl adversary, human soci- 
ety. 

led to nov- 
gave way to 


Sohrikm to Previous Puzzle 


□etna nanaa anaa 
naan nnnnm anon 
edqb QaaanHiiaQn 
EDEJDtaaa □□□□□a 
□an □□□□□ 
□□□□□ □□□□□□□ 
□□ana aana □□□□ 
□EamniHEu nnaanon 
cepe Bang aaann 
GEQQaaa □!!□□□ 

Baaaa man 
□osano anaaaaa 
HEnnaaaaoiii aataoi 
ebhg mason naan 
b ens nannig mass 


8/ 15/as 


tnrouen me muruciuua — - 

minefield of '70s literary-political chic. 
Handke emerged into the '80s seeming to re- 
consider (ibe terms now seem rather neo-Nam- 
ian) his shaky grip on the question of ine seu 
and liberty. 

“Slow Homecoming" contains rwo long es- 
says (one on fatherhood, one on Cezanne) ana 
one near-fiction, tracking a Handke sund-ms 
trip home, from Alaska, across the Urn lea 
States, to West Germany. The “slow home- 
coming" in question is a difficult, contested, 
intellectual and spiritual journey Lhat it is im- 
possible not to respect and honor. 

I find it alm ost incredible that a man of such 
gifts can make such rich material so stupen- 
dously dulL He had everything. Just look at his 
subjects: art and ethics in postwar Europe; a 
new German's dream of peace; the terror gen- 
eration. There are philosophy and home, par^ 
entbood and desolation. “Slow Homecoming 
is about exile and .America; about father love 
and mother Longues; about landscape from the 
tundra Lo the south of France; about solipsism, 
radicalism, modernism. 

Wefl, Handke brings to each new luscious 
bit the same clotted, undramatic. entirely self- 
obsessed intelligence that spoiled the last. The 
thinking wearies even as it impresses. This 
book bores with a tedium so uncanny as to be 
almost interesting, numbing the mind almost 
exactly to the degree that curiosity is piqued. 
This sado- masochistic transformation of inter- 
est into ennui is echoed throughout by the 
prose itself, which the unresponding intellect 
vaguely senses growing more gorgeous and 
confident as it sinks deeper into unreadability. 

The answer lies in the solipsism that has 
beat essential to Handke's artistic ind entity 
since day one. Handke has, in truth, only one 
subject, and it is not Cezanne. It is his own 
splendid self, or more precisely, his splendid 
self-absorption. Lesser issues merely test the 
staying power of this subject of subjects. True, 
be worries about his solipsism on almost every 
page, rather like the bore who keeps asking, 
“Am I boring you?” Nonetheless, that obses-. 
sion is all that really interests him. 

In one of his more memorable nasty phrases, 
D. H. Lawrence abused the poor, homy 
Blooms buries for their “sex in the head.” I 
submit that Peter Handke suffers from “self in 
the bead.” (Or. to wax neo-Kan tian. “history in 
the head”). The affliction was common to 
many of the '60s generation, on both sides of 
the Atlantic. 


Stephen Koch, a novelist who reaches writing, 
at Columbia University, wrote this review for The 
Washington Post 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscotr 

O N the diagramed deal. 
Sooth opened with one 
no-trump, nominally showing 
16 to 18 points, cenainly not 
an action that one would rec- 
ommend to a student The 
point count was insufficient 
and the distribution slightly 
eccentric. 

The rationale was his pos- 
session of several inconspicu- 
ous assets: a strong five-card 
suit, three aces ana two tens. 
Aces are undervalued in the 
standard paint-count, and tens 
while sienificanu are not val- 
ued at all 

North counted his points 
and raised to six no-trump, 
reaching an excellent contract 
It will always succeed if the 
declarer can avoid the loss of a 
dub trick, and has fair chances 
even if he misguesses the cru- 
cial queen. 

When a heart was led, he 


played lew from dummy and 
the' success of the finesse was 
both good news and bad news: 
he would still have chances af- 
ter a dub misguess, but six 
dubs would have been safe 
with any guess. 

After winning with the heart 
ten in his hand. South finessed 
the queen and then did the 
right thing in dubs by leading 
to his ace and running the jack 
to make his slam. 

This play was not based on 
good eyesight or a good hunch, 
but on good table presence. 
After the six no-trump bid. 
East had hesitated slightly be- 
fore passing 

At favorable vulnerability 
he was obviously contemplat- 
ing a save at the seven-level: 
assuming that six no-trump 
would make, he could afford to 
go down seven tricks and show 
a profit He was right to pass, 
for seven spades or seven dia- 
monds would have been too 


expensive, but he had given 
South the clue he needed. 

East could not have a angle- 
suited hand, for be would have 
make a pre-emptive bid as 
dealer. The only plausible ex- 
planation was that he held a 
two-suiter in spades mid dia- 
monds, which meant that he 
must be short in dubs. 


NORTH 
iKJI 
OAQ6 - 
0 K72 
A K 9 8 4 

EAST (D) 

♦ Q 10865 
<797 

9 Q J 965 

♦ 3 
SOUTH 

♦ A3 

<7 J 19 4 3 
$ A3 

* A J 10 5 2 

North and Sooth were vulnerable. 
The bidding: 

East South West North 

Pass I N.T. Pass 8 N.T. 

Pass • Pass Pass 

West led the heart two. 


WEST 

♦ 972 
’PK 852 
0 1084 

♦ Q 78 


Wbrid Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse Aug. 14 

Closing prices in local currencies unless otherwise i n dicated. 


j Amrtwilmn 


Close 

PltY. 


522 

50« 


248JD 

241 

AEGON 

97.10 

9SJH 

AXZO 

12130 

121 J) 


742J0 

2311 


264 

26 1 


SJ5 

BJi 


87 JO 

BMW 


203 

204 


102JD 

lauit 


3870 

38511 

Elsevlor-NDU 

131 

131 JC 


8BJ0 

BSJO 


213J0 



150 

147 M 

Hoooovans 

tSM 

65 


58J0 

58JC 

Naaraan 

*8-70 



75 

72.71 


175JD 

l7i 


337 

3385C 

L 

6860 

69 

Philto® 




7420 

14M 


132*0 

131 JM 

Roiincn 

6BJ0 

*8311 




Roval Dutch 

188 

188.90 



331 

Van Ommeran 


2851 

VMF Stork 




AHP.CBS Gem index : 216.10 
Previous 1 II8J0 


Arhod 

1630 

1650 

BofcDon 

5400 


CackerlH 

211 

215 

Cooopa 

3495 

« -V- 

CBES 


v ‘T> 


11 

,r t! 

GBL 

ifSl 


Govoert 

3945 

jV- 

Hoboken 

5490 

[’_L;i 


B-yl 

•Hi 


1.1 


Petroflna 

5890 

zV' 

Soc Generate 


Rit 

Soft no 

KVil 

7 ■ 


yT-V’tM 

vft < 



■ : - 1 

UCB 

5110 





Vlellle Montoane 

7190 

6M. 

Currant SHtec index : 333844 
Prevloue ; 2319A7 

1 

i 



AEG-Tolotunkflfi 

Alllora Vors 

Alima 

BA5F 

Bayer 

Bov Hypo Bank 
Bov Vorelnsaanfc 
BBC 

SHF- Bank 
BMW 

Commerzbank 

Cant Gumml 
Daimler-Benz 

DMBHS 

Deutsche Babcock 
Deutsche Bank 
pro Minor Bank 
GMH 

Ha manor 


357J0 357 

225.10 22X50 
223 224 

360 368 

384 389 

ZH 235 
31850 316 

438 436JH 
2HL60 30880 
148 149 

87150 >71 

360 356 

159 154JB 
54050 54850 
267 265 

172 172J0 
M0JM 3* 


I Close Prev 

Hochtief 

643 

64* 

Hoactut 

221 JO 221 JO 

Homcti 

110J0110J0 

Horten 

184J0 

184 

Hussei 

337 JO 

339 

IWKA 

278J0 274J0 

Kail + Sail 

285 

284 


237 JO 23850 1 

Kauftiot 

268 

268 

Kloeduw H-O 


Kloecfcncr Warke 

61 


Krupa Stahl 

106 

105 

Unde 


Lufthansa 

222J0 

319 

MAN 

1*2 I62J0 

If ^ 

m. t.i 1 ii 

J— .ii-illiL 

KZLl 

KlLII 

Nlxdoxi 



PKI 

. 956 

6*4 

Porsche 

1285ft 

1285 

Preussag 


275 

PWA 

137 13620 | 

RWE 


Rheinmetaii 

310 

309 

Scnerluu 

4685D 46250 

SEL 


340 

Siemens 


Thyssen 

H II 

Veoa 



VoUtewaaenwerk 

330 

318 

Wella 

610 

615 


HU 



1! »«*««■* 11 

Bk East Asia 

22J0 

23 

Cheung Kong 

1850 

1860 

China UsM 

16.10 

16.10 

Green I eland 

9 

9.ID 



46 


235 

2J75 


II 

II 

HKEIectrte 

830 

830 

HK Realty A 

1270 


HK Hotels 

3*35 

3673 



-AS 

HK Shcng Bank 

773 

775 


9J5 

9J0 

HK Vnmratri 

1825 

3J5 

HK Wharf 



Hutch Whamnoa 


27 JO 




inn City 

899 

895 





1570 

I860 

Kowloon Motor 

9JB 

890 


41 


New World 

770 

7M 


2 



1120 

1320 


275 

275 


2SJ0 

25L30 

Tol Cheung 

220 

220 

Waft Kwong 





— w 


1J3 

1J2 



520 

World lirt 

TAB 

140 


U9173 


Previous : M87J9 




■K— Bll 

AECI 


n 

Anglo American 


f .11 

AnoioAm Gold 

I'). 

Bertows 


1085 

aiwgor 

1270 

1240 

Birftote 
De Boors 

m 

MB 

Drlefomeln 

4500 

4m 


1635 

1635 


data Prev 

GFSA 3 W0 310 

Harmony 242S 240 

HIvoM Stool 475 47 

Ktoal 7050 490 

Ned bank 1400 140 

pros Stem 4700 490 

Rutalot 1625 163 

SA Brews 710 74 

51 Helena 2900 300 

Sraol 680 6* 

West Holding 6000 580 

composite Stock Index : 1B7890 
Previous : 1074.10 


AA Coro 

filll*tJ-Lvons 

Anato Am Gold 574V* 

Ass Brit Foocfe 226 
Ass Dairies 
Barclays 


B-A.T. 

B eech a m 

BICC 

BL 

blue arete 
boc Group 
Bates 

Bowotw Indus 
BP 

Brit Home St 
Brit Telecom 
Bril Aeresnsco 
Brltoll 
BTR 
Burmah 
Coue wireless 
Cadbury Schw 
Charter Cans 
Commercial U 
Cons Gold 
Courtaukts 
Da tasty 
Be B oors 1 
Distillers 
□rletontoln 
Flsons 
Free SI Gad 
GEC 

Gen Accident 
GKN 

GMut t 

Grand Mel 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

1CI 

Imperial Group 
Jaguar 

Land Securities 
Loaol General 
LJgyds Bank 
LanrtiD 


512ft S13ft 
225 224 

*78 
226 
144 
384 
552 
305 
330 

195 
34 

495 
277 

196 
310 
S38 
3S4 
192 
345 
201 
343 
281 
SB 
143 
17B 
216 
439 
130 
421 
517 
279 

Ol* 
351 
«0 


144 

389 

564 

303 

333 

198 

34 

49S 

277 

195 

315 


194 

351 

201 

356 


145 

17B 

229 

427 

T27 

418 

500 


li^Hl 

Prev. 


678 

673 


86 

B6 


4*4 

457 


510 

500 

1 1 -iii ■ * , 1 

445 

445 


263 

Z70 

K i , r l 

357 

351 

^ JW r J . ’ 1 ' ' 

353 

340 

w 1 1 '' Mi v J i 

363 

361 


137 

136 


206 

116 


■r ...i . .. ■ 

181 

184 

| Vickers 

265 

255 

I Wool worth 

465 

460 

F.T.N index : 964J0 


Previous : 959 JO 




1293.10 

Prevloes : 138570 



II 11 


32850 32870 1 

Central# 

3158 


OPOhoteta 

9805 

k . <_■ 

Cred Ital 

2685 

IpT* *i i 

Ertdanlo 

■ fiVl 

It y 

Farmltaiki 

iTvTil 

lrif',1 


3991 

Ir jTt j 

Generali 

54210 55010 


9525 

8 1 1 

Ifelonmenfl 

44300 45950 

1 taigas 

.1385 

1551 1 

■ n-ir^rin* 


II ■ 

ir-.-.fiHkJl 



r.i 

Olivetti 


l7,lj 


W' >1 

■■.'nil 

RAS 

L. ' .X. .711 


B50 


SIP 

2450 

24*5 

5ME 

1355 

1375 

Sola 

3260 

3299 


16000 16100 

site 



MIB Correal index 

: 1535 


Prev tons ; 1347 


■I 

1 


353 

119 

192 

653 

223 


760 

266 

850 

200 

385 

6S9 

180 

269 

305 

711 

417 

153 


648 

222 

748 

262 

840 


Marks and to 154 

Mteal Bax 490 

Midland Bank 3S9 

Not Wait Bonk 649 

P ana O ns 386 

PllklngtoO 265 263 

P lesser 148 146 

PTWMntW 704 702 

Road Elect 160 I5B 

Rondtontobi 184 187 

Rank 606 3*8 

Rood inti 694 mi 

Routers 304 2916 

Roval Dutch E 4331/6443 21/44 
RTZ 557 562 

Seel chl 690 693 

Salnsbury 328 330. 

Sears Holdings 98 97'? 


Air LiauMo. 
AtsthomAfL 
AvDasstaJll 
Banco Ire 

BIC , 

Mnoraln 


B5N-GD 
Ccrrefour 
Chareeura 
Club Mod 
Dotty 
Dumez 
Elf-AaultaJno 
Eunm l 
GenEaux 
Hacbtete 


Losrand 

Lestev 

roreol 

Mortoll 

Matra 

Martin 

Mtcholln 

Mate Hennessy 

Mouilnax . 

Ocddontate 

Pernod RK 


PrtnKSnps 

RodlotoCtoi 

Redout* 

Roussel Uekrf 

Sono ll 

SXlS Ho sSh teOl 

Tteomocem 
Thomson CSF 
Told I 


580 584 

2W 289 JO 
1100 1150 

09 635 

492 495 

1730 1824 

7B3 77* 

8165 2160 
2318 2299 

630 638 

519 517 

1416 1416 

„8I0 810 

194J0 194 JO 
765 777 

622 £21 
. 1425 1423 

530 530 

2120 2125 

617 60S 

osie vrn 
1SSS 1550 
1755 1748 

2075 MO 
1125 1150 
1821 1826 
77 JO 75J0 
726 730 

695 693 

475 477 

360J0 361-50 
PM 287 
390 299 

1480 1480 

1515 1515 
,679 «U 
1360 1380 

33S0 2600 

535 528 

226 JO 2Z7 


Aotel index :*ssM 
previous : 2M.10 
CAC Index : 11600 
Previous ; H7A0 


Close Pr^v. 


Cold Storage 
DBS 

Fraser Heave 

Haw Par 

IndKSPe 

Mol Banking 

OCBC 

OUB 

OUE 

ShartgrMa 
SI me Derby 
Stoore Land 
Steore press 
S Steamship 
SI Trading 
united r 
UOB 


AM 

■w 

223 124 

5J5 
8JB 
160 Z59 

125 
1JB3 
1J4 
123 221 
5JD SJD 
NO. 088 
320 3.10 

141 HQ. 
328. NJZ 


strolls nmos lad Index : 75156 
Prev tees : 7*558 


Sftochholm 


AGA 

114 

111 

Alfa Laval 

187 

187 

Asoa 

396 

305 

Astra 

425 

435 

Atlas Copco 

108 

JOB 

Bouden 

196 

N-Q. 

Electrolux 

274 

Z73 

Ericsson 

223 

222 

Essolte 

360 

360 

Handotstxjnken 

171 

17D 

Pharmacia 

187 

187 

Saab- Scania 

420 

420 

Saadvlk 

405 

410 

Skanska 

BSJO 

89 

5KF 

224 

225 

SwedlstiMatcti 

187 

191 

Volvo 

230 

235 


ACl 

ANZ 

BHP 

Borai 

BoueafnvUto 

Castletngftie 

Coles 

Camaloo 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunlop 

Elders Ixl 

ICI Australia 

Magellan 

MIM 

Mver 

Nat Aust Bank 
Notes Core 
N Broken Hill 


QW Coal Trust 


Thomas Nailen 
Western Mtoli 


177 

5.18 
7 

157 

155 

758 

4.10 

1.98 

6 

3.18 
258 
320 
2.17 
22S 
3J0 
341 
420 

7 

242 
4 JO 
126 
5A4 
228 
428 
427 
120 


7.72 

520 

7 

152 

LW 

758 

4.10 

MB 

6 

329 

256 

3.19 

315 

125 

2J4 

340 

428 

7 

241 

425 

127 

U0 

226 

427 

427 

MO 


1 Close 

sa 

Full Photo 

MM 

w, 


930 

A l 

Hitachi 

712 


Hitachi Cable 

571 


Honda 

1390 

H 7 



r ‘i, 

Knltana 

473 

i r 

Karual Pawor 

1770 


Kawasaki Steal 

ISO 

fr 


*19 

>■ , 


507 


Kubota 

345 

rr. 

Kyocera 

3810 

yH; 

Malta Elec Inds 



1 ■TTi i-n|q ~ 7 -^ ■ • ■ - - ra 

Bit 1 

r*i 



rr i 

1 ■ l\j 1 1 /j • ^ 1 u i 

474 

it 

1 

360 


I * , ^TTTM 




610 




j: 

| u,} 1 1 L| i • - J i l^i§f§|5gi£ 


t i < 

MUxuml 



NEC 


t ~ 

NGK Insulatore 

m7ru 


NlkkoSec 

775 

h 

l8:iT71.FTi.?TO 




■ ” 

•t 

II. Tt 

BrT] 

TTi 

Nippon Yu»sn 

K 

ir-Y* 

Nissan 


ft 

Nomura Sec 

■Yl ' 

1 / 


1T.7T 



a f 7 1 * 

. -’i 

Ricoh 

■Tty 

tt 

Share 




S' 

Zi‘ 

SNntesu ammlail 

H . ( - 

V, ' 



r.Vi 


IfT < 

t- 1 

5uiTiT:«nO Chem 

241 

zT 

1 ^g . 1 1 , 1 1 1 1 1 > \ 1 1 [ • ■ i , - 

■ 1 




Lj 





V 9 

r 

Toteda Cham 

■tr*j 

XT 


g- '■! 

Ii' 

Tallin 

471 

V. 


•47 

. _ft 

I ■§ lT sV-l 1 ^-Ji ■J'-'.T 'M 

y.-T'»ra 

y i i 


■rj 

i < 

Torav Ind 


v, 




1 

Ml f.'B 


YamalcM Soc 

820 


Mldul/DJL Wa : 


Prevhws ; 1233671 








■ 

1 1 1 1 


All Ortfinartas indoe : 
previous : 95*20 


Tefcy 


Akai 

Asahl Chsm 
ASOtH Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 
Bridge stone 

Canon 

Casio 

Citoh 

Dal Nlpoan Print 
Da two House 
Daiwo Securities 
Fanuc 
Fi/I* Ban*. 


381 387 
889 884 
810 B10 
790 716 
540 534 
970 953 
1550 1590 
420 422 
1050 1050 
BID 785 
901 TO 
7570 7570 
1550 1578 


Adta , 
AftnuteM 

Autochan 

Bonk Leu 

Brown Boverl 

CJbaGeley 

Credit Suisse 

Elocrrowatt 

HoWortMnk . 

Interdlseeunt 

Jae9b5uchard 

jobnall 

Landis Gyr 

Moavon pf ch 

Natela 

OorllkadkB 


Schindler 

Sulur 

Sarwoillanee 

Swissair 

SBC 

Swiss Retnsuronco 
Swiss VoUcsbank 
Union Bank 

Winterthur 

Zurich Ins 
SBC Index : 49*20 

Prsvtoes : &A. 


N.Q.: not qyoled: NA: not 
available; xd: ex-divrdend 


Tarents 


dug. 13 


Canadian stoda via AP 


Sales Slock 
9657 AMI Free 
6878 AsnlCD E 
400 Asm Ind A 
8170 Alt Energy 
519400 Alto Nat 
719Atoama St 
6M Andre WA I 
210 Aram 
1501 Argus Car 
4900 AlCO I I 
2D05 BP Canada 
23821 Bonk BC 
11222* Bank N S 
34410 Barrie* o 

900 Baton A f 

41«M Bonanza R 
4790 Brakxue 
6loa Bramataa 
3831 8CFP 
27785 BC Res 
70IBBC Phone 
1800 Brunswk 
400 Budd Con 
27635 CAE 
200CCLA 
2013 Cod Fry 
3500 Cam peaut 
BMMC Nor West 
1800 C Packrs 
400 C Tung 
500 CGE 
18038 Cl Bk Cam 
7000 Cdn Nat Res 
29538 CTIre A f 
700 C Util B 
9900 Cara 
4403 Cetanesa 
16580 Centrl Tr 
25150 anoptex 
20200 C Dlstb A 
213350 CDIstbBf 
3350 CTL Bank 
11SW Convantrs 
WOCowla R 
7200 Conran A 
4760 Crowiuc 
1900 Czar Has 
7950 Dam Dev 
IDO Doan A 
3034 Denison A p 
13200 Dteilsan Bf 
1B50Devulcon 
14630 Dldaun A t 
2300 Dkrkrtsn B 
36381 Dotasco 
2404DocnanA 
1490 Du Pant A 
27585 Dvtox A 
9125 EKthom X 
3600 Emca 
60800 Equity Svr 
1000 FCA Inti 
500 C Falcon C 
38418 Flcnbrdgo 
10950 Fed Ind A 
700 F aiv Flo 
100 Gendls A 
4900 Gone Comp 
9600Geocrude 
2200 Glbraiior 
26860 Goldcorp f 
100 Graft G 
25600 GL Forest 
1114 Grev ftraJ 
3000 Hrdlna A I 
25800 Hawker 
2650 Hayes D 
4950 Hens Inti 
5066 H BOV Co 
9074 imosco 
2300 Indal 
11565 Inland Gas 
5215 Hill Thom 
5550 Inter Ptoe 
200 Ipsco 
41000 Ivaco B 
zzoa Jamwck 
1734 Kerr Add 
19633 Labatt 
5850Locana 
248258 Lac Mnrl! 
1468 LobiowCe 
2249 mmanlcs 
4770MD5H A 
2700 MICC 
38606 fl*c'0n H X ' 


9tk+ VS 
3116 32 
516 S*+ W 


High Low Close Chg. 
mm 20% 20M+ 9* 
5181k 18% IP! 

m » n 

518 W 17* 18*41 + 'A 
51414 14 14VY— W 

S21Vi 214k 21WT Vi 
S26V6 2ft 36te + 14 
52146 214k 2146 
51146 11W 1144-4-46 
SWi 946 
S32 
554k 

5136k 171k 1716— M 
174 170 174 + 4 

51816 Wfc 7816 
360 345 345 

445 420 445 -WO 

5171* 17 17VX+ 9* 

1916 9Va 9Vl — 46 
240 238 340 +2 

527)6 224k 224u 
5154k 15)6 154k + V4 
S32S4 32)6 32)6— te 
5164k l6*k 1646+ 'A 
SIBU 174- lBte + 44 
5124k 12)4 12% 

S26V6 26)6 26W + Vk 
S22 2146 ” 

53414 36 . . 

SllVk 11)6 llh 
Ml 61 61+1 

53546 3556 354k + % 
25 25 “ 

591k 94k 

518 18 

516M 166k 

no w* 

51446 14)6 144- + Vi 
KVa 94k 94k— Vk 

5716 7 

5716 7 

511% 11 
SMk 64k 
794 290 


22 + V* 

341*+ 6k 


’Si- 

ts + Vk 

1 6*k— Vk 
io + Vk 


BV6 — 16 
2016 21 + 9k 

716+ V6 

IB — ire 


714 

TV* + Vk 
111*+ Vk 
64k 

294 

SI 44k -141* 144k 
522 214k 219S+1* 

170 166 166 —4 

440 438 >v& + 5 

423 423 425 +20 

S JVi 14 M 
34h 13VS 134k 
56 STi 6 + Ik 

S7Vk 716 7)6+ V6 

57Vk 7Vk 7% 

50% 276» 2746— % 
280 262 262 —13 

523 22% 234k— % 

5144k 14Vk 141s— H 
38 Va B16 - 

521 

5716 7 

51B IB 
5151k 154- 156k + Vk 
5211* 2046— % 

52546 25% 25V* 

513% 13 13 — V* 

5304k 3D4fc 304k + % 
5111k 11 11 + Ik 

288 287 287 +2 

584- B46 844— <4 

S7jk 7 714+ % 

5134- 134- 1346+ Vk 
5204- 2046 3046 
52516 25 23 

140 140 140 +5 

5204k 20% 201%— Vk 
513 124- 13 + 4k 

523% 23 23 — Vk 

52346 2346 23% 

52*46 26% 264k + 1* 
5164k l*)k 1646— V* 
S2046 20)* 2046+ 4k 
SOtk 9 VS “ 

543 42V] _ _ 

5131k 13VS IDS 
S214k 21ft 21ft 
51646 16ft 1ft ft— *6 
S16Vi 1* 1* — Vi 

528% 27>k 28)6 + % 
S12*k 124- 12ft ♦ 3a 
134ft 32ft ‘ 

S20H W . 

S2I»k 21'* _ . 

S17ft 16ft 1P-I + 

418 HO 415 — S 

SU 1J‘-. I3’i 


9 Vi— ft 

~ ' 4» 


34 +!ft 

20>%— 

21 Vk 


9055 Maritime f 
63574 Merland E 
10352 Mol son A I 

, 600 Nabisco L 

[297784 Naranda 
31293 Moreen 
10>1«2 Nvo AHA f 
377*8 NuWst Sp A 
1500 Oakwood 
1373 OshaMto A I 
25780 Pac W Alrln 
200 PanCan P 
550 Pembina 
50PhanlxOII 
1931 Pine Paint 
IBM Place GO o 
101930 PlOcer 
iWQQue Shire o 
400 Ram Pet 
6730 Royrocfct 
3000 Redaath 
1800 RdstentuA 
30W Rogers A 
11930 Raman 
10 Rothman 
6290 Sceotre 
7602 Score Can 
21350 SItoH Can 
2250 Sherrill 
ioo Stator 8 I 
72625 Southron 
8687 Soar Aero f 
25251 Stolen A 
3943 Sulptra 

woosyditovo 

5000 Talcorp 
10100 Tore 
200 Tech Cor A 
68453 Tccfc Bl 
33099 Tee Can 
32875 Thom N A 
21 78® Tor Dm Bk 
S150 Tontar B f 
JOOTradore A f 
6200 TrtlB Ml 
700 Trinity Res 
51173 TrtlAllg UA 
62070 Triton PL 
7355 Trlmac 
6937TriionA 
2 tfflOTrlrecAf 

288983 Turbo 
5300 Unicom A f 
IDOUnjtorWd 
12661 U Enlprlse 
1460 U Kano 
i«austa 

WOTVorstl Al 

ran Vostaron 
7900 Wostmbi 
'3*aw«o*i 

583709 Wood wd A 
4000 Vk Bear 
Total saiesl 


T5E 3oe index: 


5% — ft 
9U+ ft 


Htek 

515% 15ft 15V. 

360 350 350 —10 

516ft 15ft 15ft— ft 
528% 28% 28% 

1171* 16ft 17 + ft 
515ft 15ft 15Vk + % 
56ft 6% 64* 

39 38ft 39 
STft 7ft 7ft— ft 
532% 31ft 31ft— 1 
515ft 1544 15ft— ft 
533% 33% 33% 

516% 16% 16% 

SlOft 10ft 10ft+ ft 
524 23ft 23ft + ft 

4 IB 118 118 

126’+ 2 6 26 ft + ft 

445 440 440 +10 

S5ft SVi 5ft— ft 
59% 9% 9% + % 

•1346 13ft 13ft- ft 
S20ft 20 20 — ft 

S11 II II 
113ft 13V. 13% — ft 
537ft J7ft 37ft 
S5ft 5% 

59% 9ft 
S25ft 25% 2Sft+% 
57ft 7ft 7ft + ft 
51246 12ft 1244— % 
517 16ft 16ft 
OTft 29ft 30Vk + ft 
S22ft 22% 22% 

199 190 190 

25ft 25ft 25ft + ft 
180 100 100 —4 

520ft 20ft 20ft + ft 
$14ft 14ft 14ft + % 
5144k 144k 144k + ft 
5311k 31ft 3146+ % 

522% 22 2Zft+ ft 

5234- 23 23 — 4k 

2746 2S% + 46 
S2144 21% 2144 
SlOft 10 10ft + ft 
340 346 MJ —20 

5*544 25ft 25ft 
536 25ft 25% 

410 400 405 + S 

522% 22 27%+ % 

5271k 27ft 27ft 
50 4* 46 +6 

Wft Oft 9ft 
513ft 12ft 12ft 
S12V+ lift I2Vk+ ft 

5 ^ 

470 470 470 

S* 54k 57k— ft 

513% 13ft 13% 

« +ta 
3^615 sh^-es^ 


/ • 


6ft + ft 


Ctoke 

2.77620 


Preeteos 

2.77600 


Solos Stock 
37843 Bank Moat 
918 Botnbrdr A 
’^fambrdrB 
3775 CB Pax 
WM Cascades 
5750 Con Bath 
2593 DomTxtA 
731805 Gax Metro 
ffiMWTrn 
2OT0 NatBk Cda 
4^74 Power Coro 
36975 RoltandA 
8449 Roval Bank 
^0 RpvTrteca 


Mkwt real ^ jj] 


Hie 


Chg. 

28ft 28ft 


2550 Stein 
Total Sales 


■Satm^SL 


S14ft US* 14ft+ i* 
SUft 14ft 14'+— 4k 

B 

lii% 

512 

516 .— .o 

«1 ft 20ft 21 + to 

•19ft 19% 194k 

U1 3CRk SHu 
SJft 21ft 27 ft + to 1 
244- 25 


lift llSk— ft 
lift lliw S 
14 + % 


Industrials index: 


Osh Previous 
1214* 122.15 


MF6/S IN rPM Tiuc 

THE WORLD IN 16 PAGES 

DAHV If4 TH* IH- 


'y-i 























INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1985 



Page 15 


SPORTS 


n and Dam Back, in Form, Mainers Tighten Race 




■» 


j^and tightened the American 
f8d race Tuesday night. 
Langston, 'nbo won 17 games in 1984 
scattered- 10 hits in only htssecond conn 


drove in two runs with a bases-loaded 
and Jim Presley added a sacrifice Dy 
to give the Marines a 3-0 lead in the first 
Uiey made it 6-0 in the third when Dave 
Henderson singled to drive in Gorman 
Thomas and Jade Percome added a two- 
run single. 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


K piete game of the season, and Davis hit a 
home run as the Seattle Mariners downed 
; Caitfonua, 11-4, tranming the Ansels’ lead 
■*W totwo games over Kansas Chy. 

Jw * sore 


sn 




&V-; . 


ujr i 

efflxw tins season and was forced to go on 


17-^ 


'r ^'s: 


‘Si 

><cc.-T5 : 


, iviuu iu hu Ull 

the disabled list June 7. “I think iftfhe 
firrt time alf year Tve gone a whole same 
wttout said Langston, who rcg£ 
teed ins first victory since May 15. “1 fdt 
strong in the ninth, I've had enough of this 
and hopefully I can write it off and start 
, pitching again.” 

Davis; who was the tele's 1984 rookie 
of the year with 27 homers, has 11 in 1985. 

The. Marinas made it easy for Langston 
by reaching starter Ron Romanick for 12 
hhsand lO nmsin 3% imrnigt A1 Cowens 


Romanick was finally relieved in the 
fourth when Seattle sooted four runs on 
RBI sing l e s by Henderson and Bob Kear- 
U and Spike Owoi’s two-run double off 
Holland. Davis’s home run closed out 
Seattle's scoring. 

Orioles 8, Mas 4: In Baltimore, Mike 
Young homered from both sides of the 
plate to lead the Orioles past Cleveland 
Young, who has six home runs in his last 12 
games, hit his second of the game and 17tb 
of the season to break a 44 tie in the eighth 
off reliever Rich Thompson. Alan Wiggins, 
who had three hits on the night, tripled 
home two runs later in the inmng 

Twins 8, A’s 1: In Minneapolis, Mickey 
Hatcher hit a three-run homer, his first in 
four months, and Tom Brunansky hit a 
home run with a man on to pace a season- 
high 17-hit attack that buried Oakland for 
Minnesota. 

Royals 6, Red Sox 3; In Boston, Darryl 
Motley hit a three-run homer and Steve 


Balboni broke an Q-for-28 Fenway Park 
slump with an RBI single to highlight a 
four-run fifth that propelled Kansas City 
past the Red Sox. George Brett raised his 
league-leading batting average to J58.with 

four hits; Boston's Wade Boggs, who had a 

home run and a double in five at-bals, is 
hitting 356. 

White Sox 4, Yankees 3: In Chic ag o, 
pinch hitter Reid Nichols delivered an 
eighth-inning sacrifice fly that ended New 
York's seven-game winning streak. Held 
hitless for 4% Inning s, the White Sox came 
back on home runs by Ron Kittle and 
Carlton Fisk. Kittle, who has five homers 
in his last seven games, got the first hit off 
starter Marty Bystrom in the filth and Fisk 
tied the gamp-, 3-3, in the seventh with his 
major-1 eague-bigh 31st of the season. 


homer of tbe year, Lance Parrish doubled 
and Simmons singled him home. Willie 
Hernandez picked up his 23d save of the 
year despite giving up a home run to Ted 
Simmons in home 13th. 

Dodgers 2, Braves 1: In the National 
League, in Los Angeles, Mflce Marshall hit 
a two-out, two-run homer in the eighth to 
give the Dodgers their fifth straight tri- 
umph. The only Allan la run was a result of 
two errors in the third, extending to 43 the 
Los Angeles pitching staff’s suing of con- 
secutive innings without allowing an 
earned run. 

Giants 4, Astros 2: In San Francisco. 
Mike Krakow struck out a career-high 12 
batters and Bob Breuly broke a 2-2 tie in 
the seventh with his 15th homer of the year 
the Giants. Krnkow — who also 


to 


Blue Jays 5, Rangers 3: In Arlington, 
rs by Lloyd Mo- 


Texas, back-to-back homers by _ 
seby and Ranee MuOiniks highlighted a 
five-run first that beat tbe Rangers and 
extended Toronto's lead over New York to 
seven games in the Eastern Division. 

Tigers 5, Brewers 4: In Milwaukee^ Lou 
Whitaker led off the top of the 13th with a 
home run and Nelson Snmnons drove in an 
insurance run tha t enabled Detroit to bold 
off the Brewers. After Whitaker’s 17th 


hit his first home run of the season — 
explained his sharp pitching by saying,“l 
was inventing things today and getting 
than over for strikes." 

Expos 4, Cubs 1: In Chicago, Andre 
Dawson’s two-run double in the second 
tuning supported the seven-hit pitching of 
Joe Hesketh and Jeff Reardon and pared 
Montreal to its fourth victory in five 
games. Dawson also made what Expo 
Manager Buck Rodgers called “a momen- 


tum saver” to end the fourth, when he 
chased down a double by Jody Davis and 
made a strong throw that was relayed home 
by second baseman Vance Law to nip Ron 
Cey. Scon Sanderson became the Fifth Chi- 
cago starter to be lost to injury when he 
tore a ligament in his right knee in the 
second inning 

Mete 4, PUKes 2: Iu New York, roolde 
Rick Aguilera recorded his third straight 
victory and went 2-for-2 with an RBI as the 
Mets won their ninth straight The victors’ 
Wally Backman went Mor-4 and extended 
his hitting streak to 12 games. B arlrman is 
lS-for-31 this season against Philadelphia. 

Cardinals 6, Pirates 5: In Sl Louis, Joa- 
quin Andujar won his major league-leading 
19th game of the year as the Cardinals 
banded Pittsburgh its seventh consecutive 
loss. Darrell Pater delivered a two-run 
double after Terry Pendleton had tied the 
game with a single in the home sixth. 

Reds 3, Padres 2: In San Diego, Dave 
Parker's lea doff home run highlighted a 
three-run fourth and John Franco pitched 


three innings of scoreless relief to help 
lap a four-game losing streak 
The winners' Pete Rose got one hit; he 

i. .n 


needs 20 more to break Ty Cobb's all-time 
record of 4,191. (AP. UPI) 




West German Boats 
Win Admiral’s Cup 


there,” said Til ma r Hansen, Out- 
sider's owner, of a series that saw 
tbe fleet at times battling force- 
nine gales. “We sometimes gel 


Compiled ty Our Staff From Dispatches 

PLYMOUTH, England — West 
Germany won the 18-nation Admi- 
ral’s Cup yachting trophy here 

Wednesday for the second straight strong win as at me ocgumiug m 
year and third timp overall. the season on the Baltic Sea, but we 

On handicap-corrected time, never i npcriencrf^ydUng 
West Germany ^Outsider took sec- *Xt^“ Mn 

ond place overall in the cup compe- 1 -£, 17 ™ 

titiom Rubin VU was fifth and ™ nUn This time we dtdn t 


Diva G eighth, giving Lhe defend- 
ing champions 1,881 points. Britain 
(1 ,596 points) was second and New 
Zealand (1,467) third, followed by 
Australia, Singapore, France, Aus- 
tria and the United States. 

Britain and New Zealand each 
lost a yacht in the 605-mile (974- 
kilometer) Fastnet Race, the final 
leg of the five-stage Admiral’s Cup 
series along England’s south coast. 
But so commanding was its Fastnet 
performance that west Germany 
would have won overall even had 


suntan cream. This time we didn't 
have enough dry underwear.” 
Panda of Britain was the first 
cup boat on corrected lime in the 
Fastnet. The remaining British 
yacht, Phoenix, placed fourth on 
handicap and was the cup’s top 
individual boat overall (AP, UPI ) 



RUNTHROUGH — Henry Western, on a 14,400-mile 
(22^530-kflometer) worldwide marathon to raise money 
for the World Wildlife Fund, arrived in Singapore on 
Wednesday from Malaysia. Having moved through Eu- 
rope and Asia since April 1, the 23-year-old Briton hopes 
to be back in London early next year after jaunts through 
Australia, New Zealand, Japan and the United Slates. 


AlkmticCity 


Jade and Epic not bowed out on 
with broken masts. 


DOG DAYS: A little midsummer lassi- 
tude crept into major-league ballparks 
on Tuesday. In Chicago, Shawon Dim- 


ston and Ryne Sandberg, left, failed to 
communicate and so failed to catch 


Monday wii 
Sweden’s Carat crossed the Fast- 
net finish line first among cup 
boats; Diva G, second, was fol- 
lowed within two and a half hours 
by Outsider and Rubin VII. 

■ Jade and Epic were among 24 of 
_52.cup boats that didn't finish the 
Fastnet, many being dismasted or 
otherwise damaged, or capsizing in 
storms. 

'The total of retirements in the 


By Shirley Povich 

Washington Fan Service 

ATLANTIC CITY, New Jersey 
— Every Thursday night in the Re- 
sorts Hold there is a march toward 
the Cotillion Ballroom, the s mall 
area where the fights are held. 

The movement out of the hotel’s 


got an easy fight for you. The guy is 

made for your man, and we can 
make the match right now.’ That's 
the fight business.” 

ESPN cable had only 4.5 million 
residences wired when it went into 
business with Top Rank in 1980. 


heuser-Buscb kicks in something 
extra when the show is a special 
one, and from all parties, Aram 
gets a splendid expense account 
He also peddles tbe show to for- 
eign networks. “Italy is our best 
customer, and pays us $15,000 for 
every show,” said Aram. "When 


The uKwemenfout of the hotel’s D^Cui^y went over there to fight 

SJSr* Nino In Rocca — * he - 
$60 million. 

Aram gets a $31,000 stipend 


Terry Francona's pop-up during a two- 
run first inning that helped Montreal 
defeat the Cubs, 4-1. In Baltimore, 
Brett Butler hardly seemed concerned 
after t ak in g a third strike; the 


fleet of 236 had reached 142 by the 
time Carat crossed the line 


Wednesday. There were no serious 
injuries this year, but it was the 
toughest Fastnet since 1979, when 
15- people were killed as gales 
wrecked the fleet. 

‘It was auite incredible out 



CFL Leaders 


Tuesday’s Major League line Scores 


SCORING 
TO C 


KnnnenJ. Wwj 
RM 0wov. Bask 
PossobHo. 
Janfcim. B.C 
; Kurtz. AMI 

Klffi. Oartn. Olt 

1 RuofF, Hum 

Dixon. Bflm 
r Grwr. Tor 

. . Hov, Col 

llcrte. Tor 


TO 5 Pt» 

0 12 IS 6 43 

0 12 13 10 41 

0 21 7 * SI 


■ 0 
0 ra 
0 11 
0 IB 
« 19 
6 0 
0 6 
0 13 


0 4 * 

1 41 

5 37 
12 37 

6 37 
0 K 
W 31 

9 31 


RUSHING 
. No Ydi 


Jonklm. B-C. 
ROOMS. WPS 
^jtCowon, Eteri 
■. •fbunloon, Edm 
- GUI. MM 
EIIU, Sort 
Hobart. Horn 
jomos, Horn 
• Mfflson. MM 
Wain, OM 


AM TO 
72 56* 7 £ 5 

SI 438 S3 4 

37 Ml D 

34 228 &7 4 

35 220 U 1 

55 204 3.7 3 

16 201 1W ? 

30 174 4A 1 

53 164 3.1 1 

24 141 4J 0 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 

220 Hi HO— 4 11 1 

Hi 001 100-1 T 1 

Hodartft. Roanlon [81 ami Bwtera; Sander- 
son. Frazier 12), MerWtth [61. ond Gutnoort 
ffl. w— HertoMv WML l— S amtarson, 5-4. sv— 
Reardon [30). 

PMtodetoMa Hi 8H 110—2 I • 

New Yert 8H 202 Hw — i 10 ■ 

Hutenrv Rucker (61 , Andersen U) and Dau»- 
tan; AsdOera. Orosco IB) and Carter. W— 
Aouilcra. 6rl L— Hudson. S-Tl. Sv— Orosco 
tm. HR — PftUadWpWa- DauMon fl»- 
PftUbttrata HO 2H 130— 5 M 1 

St- Loots 811 BH It*— 6 12 1 


Golf 


PGA Leaders 

F under? oa IQe ProleHlonal Bulliri Asioc t-. 
otiao nor iwoort Ho PGA ONunoioartin. 


RoMnsoaOenients (7) and Pona; Andular. 
Lahti (8>,Davtev(9) and Porter. W-AndWar, 
106. L— Robinson, 2^. Sv— Oaylev CM. HR— 
Pntaburon. Gonzalez 111. 

Houston 000 101 060-3 5 • 

San Frandsco lie Hi llz— 4 6 l 

Niekro and Banov: Knifcow and Brenlv. 
VV— Krvkow, 8* L — Niekro. 9-9. HRs— 
SJ. Krakow 11). Brenlv (15), Leonard 1161. 
Cincinnati NO 300 MO— 3 8 I 

San DteOO HBWn 006-2 10 1 

Brawn (no. Franco (7) and Diaz; Hoyt. 
hrts IS). Jackson (7) and Bocnv. w— Brown- 
Ina. 199. L— Hoyt 18-7. Sv— Franco (4). HRs— 
ancmnattPartwr <22).San Dim Bochv 15). 
Atlanta HI BH 060-1 6 I 

LosAnoetas 8H HO 02x— 2 7 3 

Bedraslan. Garber 17). Forster (81 and Cor- 
ane; Henhlsor. Dkzt (8), Howell (9). Nledan- 
fuor (*) ond Sdasdft Yeaoer IB). W— Diaz. 3- 
1. L — Farsfer, 1-3. Sv-Nledenltier (11). HR- 
Las Angeles. Marshall (14). 


Poopoa. Sort 
Dunkxrv, Edm 

Borne*. Cal 
Clements, Wpo 
Dewatt. B.C. 
Honowav, Tor 
GAL Mil 
Watte. Ott 
Cosale, Tor 
Cowtm. SC- 


PASSING 

Alt co«Vrt iHTp 
211 133 1709 7 6 

176 107 
191 112 
155 92 
148 96 
133 M 
T79 ItO 
144 M 
70 44 
50 33 


1656 12 7 
1502 7 6 
1217 7 3 
1163 4 7 
1)46 3 6 

1127 8 S 

1041 6 7 

511 3 5 
488 2 6 


S52MB1 

S349J63 

5349.079 

5345.140 

S30B315 


}W 


ElaoanLSart 
Greer. Tor 
woods. Edm 
p«jhiwskl.wog 
KoUv.Edm 
Tavler. Tor 
Fernanda. ILC 
Murpnv.wpo 
EllteSask. 

■ M i ldOOb Ott 


RECEIVING 

No Yds 
42 434 
34 548 
IB 522 
28 485 
24 448 

34 435 
31 42S 

35 419 

36 393 
18 382 


Ave TD 

15.1 3 

14.1 
»J> 

17J 
173 
123 
133 
123 

105 
213 


dork. Ott 
RuafL Ham 
Dixon. Edm 
PdHapUa. AC. 
Cameron, Wpd 
lleslc. Tar 
Hay, cal 
McTa8ua.Mil 
Lesctwk, 5dsfc 


PUNTING 

NO Vd* 
42 1992 


52 2434 

45W 

11976 
15 


S6 24U 
S3 2384 
33 U29 


AM L 
47 A 78 
44 S 77 
444 * 
449 44 
U2 76 
4X3 4B 
411 77 
411 45 
4&3 SI 


,_n: 

EARNINGS 
1. Curl is Straw 
1 Lannv Wodkliw 
X Rav Flavd 

4. Corcv Pavln 

5. Mark ffMoara 

6. Calvin Peeta 

7. CralB S lad tar 
4. Bornhard Lanoer 

9. Hal Sutton 

10. Fuziv zooller 

11. Hobart Green 

12. JoW Mahaftay 
IX Roaer MottUo 

14. Larry Mize 

15. seve BaHesWo* 

SCORING 

, corm pavln, 70JB.X Don P°°l»V»7ll4Xl 
^^X44.LarrvMU^4XLan ? 

uuMUns. 7073- 4. John Mohoftev. ttL89- 7. 

JJ 0.1 Mark 0 -Me<ra. 71^8.9. 

™ AVERAGE DRIVING DISTANCE 
iJS I»9.1.Z Fred coupk».n68.X 
27X9- 4, Mae O'Grady, 2757. 5. 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
amud HO 812 010-4 18 1 

Baltimore 8« MB (Mto-8 9 2 

Romero. Ruhlo [41, Thompson (8) ond wil- 
lanL Banda (7); Boddtcker. Anse (7) and 
De mo eey. W — Aose. 7-5.1^— RuWe. X9. HRo— 
Baltimore. Yoono 2 tT7). 

* ** **** at Y 0M 041 010-4 16 1 

BMtaa eHilOOH-3 11 0 

Sobertiaoen. Fair 16), QwlsenberTV (9) and 
5un<fi»ra; Oltdo. TrulUlo (6). Stanley (9) and 


Sv-Qufaenberrv (271. HRs-Kansas City. 
Mottev til). Boston. Boon (41. 

Toronto 5H OH HO-hS ID ■ 

Tam «H HI Hi— 3 10 • 

Flier. Lame (6). Henke (9) and Whitt; Rus- 
sell. Mason 11). Harris (7) and PetrallL w— 
Flier, 5-a. L— Russell, 0-2. Sv— Henke (3). 
HRs— Toronto. Mosefav (8). Midllnllcs 19). 
Texas. Wriaht (2). 

P frtMr *! 808 OH SIB— 1 4 1 

H6 H2 60s — I 17 i 
jabn, Altwrton Ol. Krueoer (8) and Healft. 
O'Brien { 7 ); Vloki ond Lnodner.W— Viola, 1J- 
9. L-Jabn, 3-5. H Rs— Minnesota. Hatcher (3). 
Bnmansky (21). 

Hew Yarn §12 HO 800-3 I > 

Ctdcoao OH 010 21*— 4 5 1 

Bvstrom. FHber (7). RWeftl (B) and Wyne- 
gar; Bums. James (91 and Fisk. W— Burns, 
12-7. l— F isher, -3-X 5 v— James (20). HRs— 
New York, MoWnaly (19). CMcaao. Kittle 
(131, Fisk (31). 

Detroit 1H Olt 810 HO 2-5 12 2 

Milwaukee 3H HO OH OH 1-4 9 1 

petty, Sctwrrer (9). Lopez (12). Hernandez 
(13) and Parrish; VuckovldS, waits (7). Gib- 
son (8) and Moore. W— Lopez- 2-7. L— Gibson. 

5»— Hernandez (23). HRs— Detroit. WW- 
taker (17)- Milwaukee, Simmons (9). 
CaSfern ha OM 110 ill— 4 H 0 

Seattle » 4H 01»-11 14 i 

Romanick. Holland (4) and Boone. Nan-on 
(5) ; Lansston aid Kearney. W— Laaaston. 4- 
9. Romanick. 124. HRs— CaWontkj, Downino 
(13). Seattle. Davis (ID. 


Major League Sta ndin gs 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Division 

W L Pet. GB 

Tonxilo 71 42 438 — 

New York U 48 JM 7 

Detroit 59 53 .533 II 

Baltimore 54 54 J09 3Mi 

BO,,,,,, S6 55 JOS 14 

Milwaukee 50 59 19 

Cleveland 37 74 333 33 

WHI Division 

California 64 48 -57 1 ~1 

Kansas City 4 ^ 2 

Oakland 5* S3 .527 5 

Chicago 55 54 H M 

Seattle St 60 464 12 

Minnesota 51 59 AM 12 

Texas 42 69 378 21 Vi 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Division 

W L Pet. GB 

New York « -e .618 - 

51. < imk 67 43 Mf9 i 

Montreal 63 49 363 4 

Chicago 55 55 300 13 

Philadelphia 51 « 

Pittsburgh 33 76 J03 34Vs 

west Division 

Los Angeles 66 44 ^0 - 

Cincinnati 58 53 ^ 8 

San Diego 59 53 ^ ™ 

Houston J 1 60 AS9 JBb 

Atlanta 49 41 "iS JL. 

Sai Francisco 43 68 387 23W 


UwnuwAJ « w* | J . 

thump-thump of the slot machines, 
the soft flap-flap of the blackjack 
dealers, the exhortaioiy action at 
the ice tables, the whir-and-cli ek- 
ing of the roulette wheels. 

Fight night in the Resorts Hotel 
is in its sixth year as an ongoing 
success story. This is a Bob Arum- 
ESPN production. Vows in the 
boxing business are at best fragile, 
but nothing is as cohesive as mutu- 
al benefit, and Aram, ESPN cable 
television network and Resorts all 
know they're onto a good thing. 

Many a week, the Thursday 
fights are ESPN’s top-rated show. 
Five years ago, Resorts was beg- 
ging other cable systems to cany 
the fights and paid them for doing 
so. Now they ask for the fights and 
pay ESPN and Arum handsomely. 
The hotel also pays Arum, and rev- 
els in the advertising that brings in 
more casino clients. 

Tbe weekly fight cards are some- 
thing below title caliber, but they 
are more than a cut above the chib 
fights of a generation past, those 
bucket-of-blood carnivals that 
were balled as the incubators of 
future c hamp ions. 

Fighters and managers by the 


from ESPN every week to hdp pay 
’ie shot 


the fighters and stage the shows. 
Resorts Hotel provides the trap- 

- _ J Vl!^u. J I.UU. Hik.t 


hundreds are pleading to get on the 
l eager f< 


B3B382* 

S271JM4 

$262360 

5219403 

S2I&383 

$21X306 

*21 Ull 
X20&396 
5206438 


ESPN shows, eager for the expo- 
sure, for deliverance from obscuri- 
ty. They’ll take a meager $500 
purse, the going rate for a prelimi- 
nary six-rounder, looking to gradu- 
ate to the $2,000 and $3,000 and 
sometimes $5,000 paydays that 
come with the feature boots. 

Ray Mandni, the former light- 
weight champion, got his start on 
ESPN. So did his recent two-time 
conqueror, Livingstone Bramble. 
Roberto Duran began his come- 
back on ESPN 



Bob Arum 


astounded at the reception he got. 
The Italians already knew him, 
thanks to ESPN ” 

Top Rank started off getting a 
meager $10,000 a show from 
ESPN. By degrees it has moved 
past $30,000, and next year, said 
Arum, U I would say the increase 
will be, well, substantial." For 
ESPN it has been an excellent deal, 
often outpulling the big investment 
it has in United State Football 
i-cag ne games in the ratings. View- 
ing audiences have been averaging 
more than a million, and the reruns 
overran the daily programs. 

“Viewers don’t care whether it's 
live action if they see an exciting 
fight,” Arum said. “They can see 
tbe reruns next week, next month, 
any tune. For insomniacs, reruns 
go on as late as 3 A.M.. and every 
month there is a special showing of 

the highlights of recent shows.” 

Resorts Hotel is pleased with the 
deal. On fight nights the gambling 
action goes up an estimated 16 per- 
cent, nearly $400,000. It seems 
fight-going gamblers return to the 
tables after the bouts. 

The fight business isn’t thriving 
anywhere except on ESPN. The 
heavyweight situation with Larry 
Holmes at the top is a dreary mud- 
dle. Hagler is the only valid idol 
and he is without a solid opponent. 
The networks have cut far back on 
fight shows and have no continuity. 
That's what ESPN has, continuity, 
Aram says. And all parlies — fight- 
ers, fans, advertisers, promoters 


wv miwu uo, ihuoi — 

‘The increase will be substantial ’ and the casino — are eating it up. 


Transition 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

back on EsrN. — 

ih^TsPN 1 Sti^g? ^heuser- Weather Jeopardizes Cup Ski Raring 

Busch, The Wafl Street Journal, So- * * . rtmTv r ._, . . P 

. « . j nu f*_! «iml„ iiiitcnCT ACIT7MAC Aramtma (I TPT\ — HlPn WmuS OnTllCS(l3^ 


BASEBALL 
Amorim Loom 

BALTIMORE— A/i nouncad that Loan 5o- 
kafa. socond bowman, win Plav lor Roehestar 
of lt» International Loaouo. 

MILWAUKEE— Called UP Rav Seoraw, 
Bitter, wid Carlos Ponca InfMder. from 
Vancouver ol It* Podlle Coast Leoom. Sort 

Chuck Portmr.olteher, to Bololl of the Mldwwst 

LMOue. 

SEATTLE— Optioned Jim LjBwfa.pl tehe/ylo 

Canary of the Pacific Coa« League. Pur- 
cdused Iho contract of Jock L/tzorita, pltchar, 
from Coloa/V. 

FOOTBALL 

Canadian FaOttail League 
LEAGUE— Flood Ottawa defensive back 


5T. LOUIS— Sloned Pat Tlllav.wldo receiv- 
er, to a one-year contract 

SAN D! EGO— Cut Tim Fox, safety, Billy 
White, rannlna bock, and Billy Yancv, corner- 
back. 

SAN FRANCI S C O R ele ated Dertk 
Bunch, linebacker, and Gary Thompson, cor- 
nerback. 

TAMPA BAY— Cut James Owens, running . 


Tennis 


driving PERCOT^ LEAGUE— Fl nod Ottawa defensive back 

.tSBSSRSsrsa •"hkksskks 

MONTREAL— Activated 


Pro Tour Leaders 


PUNT 


Ckah, B.C 
Zeno. Oft 
CorineL Tor 
Steel o, Wpok 
Fraser, Sort 
Sanduskv, BX. 
Woods, Edm 
TrefHln, Edm 
Patterson, MH 
Hollos. WPS 


422 

MB 

197 

170 

156 

153 

MB 

134 

129 

122 


Art TD 
11.1 * 
1X3 

8j6 

iao 
43 
123 
82 
103 
43 
Xl 


Rich Thomas, 

running to*. *«ti 

HodoBol reothntl Lbobb o 
DETROIT— W aived HoOW EltetoHi^W 

IfeitefiHil l«vln ««J' S 

ilea; Gory Mu lien, wide receiver. KevInSptt- 

zls and Dwayne R<««. ond 

Tom 


REGULATION ^ 

m 5. Dan 
397. 7, Calvin MM 
BHLJU. 

“SSSSgritts PER round 

VWtem oalten. 

affiB3SSSS=w --a as — “• 


bock; Dwayne Dtnon and Zort Thomas, ^wtde 
receivers^ Phil Dorm and AIMChiwMI. 
defensive ends; Dave Burko.dotensive dock, 
Willie Moore, unobaekor and Carlton Guna 
nose tackle. 

HOCKEY 

Natteool Hockey itowo 

BOSTON — Signed Rav Bouraue. defense- 
man. lo 0 sfawear contract 
DETRO IT— signed Mi ke MCE wen, do- 
tanseman, la a one^fear contract. 

N.Y. RAN GERS— Signed Bill O'Dwver. cen- 
tar, and JWi AndanoH. defenseman. 

QUEBEC— Signed Paul GIllls. center, lo a 
multiyear contract. M 

TORONTO— Sloned Marian Stasmy, riBm 

whig. 

COLLEGE 

NCA A -Placed Cheyney Unlversllviinone- 
ye«r probation tor reCrtHlna vlolatlans In Its 
women's basfceftoolt proirom. 

ALF RED— Named Lawrence Hall laawse 

coach and oHWant taolholl coach. 
ARIZONA STATE Ua timi 


JL w. — 

VALLE DE LAS LENAS, Argentina (IJPI) — High winds on Tuesday 
i ^mwi the suspension of training for Thursday’s downhUL, the opening 
race of the World Cup ski season. The 93 competitors from 15 countries 
need at least one full day of training before the event. 

A s wYin d race is to be ran in Las Lenas on Saturday; organizers have 
already canceled the last of the three scheduled Argentina races — at 
Bariloche, on Aug. 24 — for lack of snow. 


1 


MEN 
EarntoM 

T, John McEnroe. S6S8352. Z Ivan LandL 
5430371. X Mate wnander, 5416437. 4, Jmmv 

CortWT. S38LOT1. 5. Boris Badw, 5279,430. 4. _ 


loflex and Old Spice arc regular 
Thursday night advertixers, at 
$5,000 per 30-second roieL TTie 
parage far Anheuser-Busch in- 
cludes its name on two of the ring 
posts; the other two are reserved 
for the Hotel, and all four get big 

flSwr’ftSnra^Bu^ser logo. 8 Nets of NBA Sian Wohl as Head Coach 

Where do the fighters come D _ _ _ 

from? Arum’s company. Top Rank EAST RUTHERFORD, New Jersey (API — Tbe New Jersey Nets on 

Inc., attends to that. It has the pick Tuesday named Dave Wohl 35, thdr nmth head coach and sixth m five 
of the top contenders among the seasons. For the last three years an assistant with the LcsAngete Lakers, 
estimated 3,000 boxers in this wnhi played in 47 games for the Nets from 1976-78. His three-year 
country and below the border, contract with the National Basketball Association team is for a reported 

$550,000. 

The announcawot ended a two-month search for a successor to Stan 
Albeck, who left after last season to take the coaching job with the 
Chn - flgn Bulls. In June, Vjflanova Coach RolKe Massimmo rqected a 10- 
m-imm that nr mi Til how* nsiH him zhnilt S400.Q00 annuailv. 


How do they pick them? Usually 

^Mateffiker Teddy Brenner’s 
assistant. Brace Trampler, is the 
father of the computer. With 
$50,000 from Arum, Trampler put 


Ml WUUOVl UlAV nvM*u uht« ' 

fflsap^^tiEg 42-40 during lhe 1984-85 regular seasoo. 

The records are scrutinized and 


taCKOFF 




Zone, Ott 
PIKBOn. Mil 
FteWs.Ham 
TowkPH 1U> Tor 
Elorma. Sort 
CnterooHftOtt 
jonkins, &C-* 
Moods. 

Fordtaond, Sort 
Edwards. Cal 


381 

267 

237 

J78 

174 

169 

M7 

160 

114 

124 


Art TD 

27a o 

au 

293 
223 
29 JJ 
2X2 
273 
323 
173 
113 


Rlnto- RMntncr and 


GREEN BAY— Announcod fto roMrement 
of Larry McCorrNV OHiter. 
la! rams— C ut ***** FW»r, comer- 

ENGLAND— Wkllved BUI CowttV, 
wide recolw. and Nkk Mullahw, auard 
iuyjeTG— W aived Phil Bills, oiaceklck- 
er; Derrick Franklin, wnert iocfc; Eri c 

ond Tom Mftoiter. cenlor- P toezd G4WW 


A Boris Beckor, 14514, Vamlek NMtffcU5IL 7. 
Mllaslav Modr, 1556, & Tim Mayotte, 1374 9. 
Andm Jarryd, 1372. 10, Kovtn Curnm. 133L 


, ITToinv-r. W. A Culll* Tam sehaiter. center. Ptoert G#or®« 

courtes, ^OT^ditansIve bock, and ftonny Coni, run- 

jooy SUKtekPS 9. ^ ’SSSmb** - ntao to*. « intm 

BIROI® , PHILADELPHIA-OiI OWUKJJ'WJOJ" 


1, Hal 
Crate Stadior. 


sunoo, 311 2 . Jaw SWetaC' J 


SSSSSsf^* 


P^vn^cu. and Mi« Irvtoa ranmnoows- 
pIttSBU RDH— Cut J#ff sanetwz. s atoty; 
Mlko Nassau, confer, ond Jim Moore, dsfon- 
zlvo ond- 


WOMEN 

RanlBH 

L (Martina Navratilova, $1307,779. Z Chris 
Evert Lloyd. 169X569. X Horn MamBHuwa. 
S31L522. 4, Hctono Sokova $28X687. 5. Pam 
Shrhw, $244453. 4 Claudia Kohdo-Kllsdi, 
$251320. 7, Zina Garrison, $192357. L Ksttiv 
jordaa$14974X 9, EUrabeth Smylii.SI3439X 
w. Monoola Maleeva^ $124,1 IX 

Grand pm Points - 
I.CtvtoEutriUayd, 1700. 2. Martina Havre 
tttova. 1400. X Ctowfla Kahito-KJISCh. 1010. 4. 
ZInaGarri8on,915.&Pan>Shrlvfr.ML6,MaiV 
ueia Motoova>aa.7,GaiwidaSobatlnl.79IL& 
Helena sukeva,62fi. 9. Hana Mandllkova, S70 
ia Kaihv Rinrtfl, sss. 


FAIRFIELD— Named BiHV Bawni tott" 

eni Bid hockev cnach and To m BlalwassK- 

^ml^'rrlS&^Nanwd Qu Intel MMl 
ftranirtn coach and oftanslve line cpob l_^ 
MISSOURI VALUEV CON F.— Named J* 
Mlteh fflSWurt corrunfcsstener. 

MONTANA STATE— Appointed D0U8 

terton men 1 * attilenc dlndar. 

NOTRE OAME-Namid Jim Baron ossfc- 

fturf t»ZMtt»n coach. 

PLYMOUTH STATE— Named L*i Des- 
ioM5 assktant football cooctw »,i_ 
-SAN .DIEGO. STATE— F lord UofV W* 
hHL othWie director: named RMwn 

1 ^XMTEO^Nto4d Carroll athletic dl- 

Valparaiso— named joe Ro»do ogsB- 
tent basketball coach. 


■ Yount Will Have Surgery 

Top Rank wants a special fight for 

ESPN, Brenner and Trampler go to 

■ • : 


wfjrk, in the cunning tradition of 

matchmakers. 

”1 call one manager,” said Bren- 
ner, “and tell him, ‘Joe, I got an 


MILWAUKEE (UPI) — Robin Yount’s troublesome right shoulder, 
which forced the All-Star shortstop to the less demanding outfidd, will be 
operated on for calcium deposits during the first week in September, the 
baseball club announced on Tuesday. . , , 

The American League's most valuable player in 1 982, when Milwaukee 


i ■«. r xiiici imu i 0 uivui » wmm vt y— j — • _ _ . - 

US, St to v^Y^nJaS^n? won ^ pennant and took St, Louis to seven games in the WoridSeries 


lead to a big shoL’ And on the other 
phone, Trampler is callin^the^oth- 


er manager and saying. ‘Charlie. I 


1 UUUI UtoFWUJJW JfiVVlWOM •» -r-r. — , ' 7- lj 

to desigcaied-hitter duty because he could not throw across the uuield 
Yount, 29. was operated on during the off-season and has played the 
outfield this year to ease the stress on his shoulder. 


or 


LSt- 

ac- 


30T 


ial 

ich 

su- 

its 

the 

ien 

ot- 


es, 

30. 

Ml- 

US. 

bo 

Jie 

mi 


ley 

'or 

he 

Jd 

ta- 

int 

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n pit ti ‘ ■**'. * ^ / .Li'ViR xir*.' v V :* V*' " ■ ■ ■' 

r-rz v J *!*t * — • — . t- 










Page 16 


SPAIN POSTCARD 

Fires on the Mountains 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1985 


By Victor de la Serna 

O ROPESA DEL MAR. Spain 
— Fire — wildfire, brushfire 
— here on Spain's Mediterranean 
coast. as elsewhere in southern Eu- 
rope. that is the big news this sum- 
mer. The other night, hundreds of 
residents and vacationers watched 
in powerless anguish as a blaze 
sped down the slopes of the coastal 
mountain range north of Castellon, 
destroying more than 1,500 hect- 
ares (3.700 acres) of prized wood- 
lands covered with pines, including 
all of the Desierto de las Palmas 
forest, the “green lung" of the La 
Plana plain, an unusual patch of 
wooded terrain among the barren 
mountains above the orange 
groves. 

Only barren mountains remain 
above the orange groves. The De- 
sierto de las Palmas is a smoldering 
memory. 

“This was a major, irretrievable 
ecological tragedy." said Josi Ma- 
ria Tarrega, mayor of Benicasim. a 
major resort where the Desierto de 
las Palmas forest once stood. “Only 
today, when we go up in the hills 
and see only charred remains, can 
we realize the size of our loss, the 
treasure we had up here." There 
were tears in his eyes as be spoke. 

Poorly organized firefighting 
services during the day and night of 
Aug. 6 were partly responsible for 
the tragedy. But here, as elsewhere, 
other causes were probably more 
important, from the increasing hu- 
man presence in once-solitary 
wooded areas now covered with 
urban izac tones (vacation- home de- 
velopments) to the wave of outright 
arson. In this, some terrorists are 
probably involved, as are people 
interested in forcing, though fire, 
revisions of zoning law's to make 
for room for more urbanizacione s. 
□ 

Since 1970, more than 100,000 
hectares of forest and brush have 
been destroyed by wildfires in Cas- 
t el Ion province — almost one- third 
of Lhe nonagricult ural land. 

The long-term ecological conse- 
quences ore ominous. Desertiza- 
uon has been very swift in Spain 
for Lhe past 20 years. Autumn rains 
on burned-out forests cause a loss 
of fertile earth and often irrepara- 
ble erosion. 

There is little doubt about the 
nature of the Aug. 6 Fire, which 
took place on the windiest day so 


far this s umm er. As a columnist in 

Mcditcrraneo. a CastcU6n newspa- 
per. put it in the Valendano lan- 
guage, a close relative of Catalan: 
“ Una Jiuen que aposta. D'ahres, que 
volem. " (Some say it was done on 
purpose. Others, that it was done 
intentionally.”) 

□ 

Now that the disaster is over, life 
goes on as usual. The tourists are 
amused witnesses of the continu- 
ing. low-key struggle between pro- 
ponents of a “Spanish" region of 
Valencia and those who roster the 
Palsos Catalans (Catalan lands), a 
sort of imperial dream that would 
unite all regions that speak Ca talan 
— Catalonia, Valencia, the Balear- 
ic islands. France's Roussillon, 
even the town of Alghero in Sardin- 
ia. 

The dispute, which has separatist 
overtones, is subdued in the toler- 
ant Valencia region. Vacationers 
from Madrid and Zaragoza quickly 
learn the basic words of Catalan, 
and the numerous French Lourists 
are glad to know that apples are not 
called manzanas in the local lan- 
guage. bui pomes, which is a lot 
closer to pommes. 

□ 

Meanwhile, just three miles 
north of the scene of the wildfires, 
the almost deserted Ribera de Ca- 
banes. a marshy coastal plain with 
no wooded hills to wony about, 
may be spending its last quiet sum- 
mer. The plain lias been mentioned 
in Spain as one or the likely sites for 
the proposed European" Disney- 
land, on which a final decision by 
Walt Disney Productions is expect- 
ed in Sep [ember. 

The Ribera de Caban es has un- 
common Mediterranean assets — 
thousands of undeveloped hectares 
of flat land and a long, unpolluted, 
undeveloped beach. Mame-la-Val- 
lee. near Paris, and Pego, between 
Valencia and Alicante, are reported 
to be its main competitors as the 
Disney site. 

Right now, a service station on 
the main Valenria-Barcelona road 
is the main local business. A tank- 
ful of gas is the biggest imaginable 
deal. A mention of Disney elicits 
only a shrug from the pump atten- 
dant. 


Victor Je la Serna is editor of 
Spanish Trends, a Madrid monthly. 
An Buchwald is on vacation. 



PEOPLE 


One of Christo's drawings of Paris's Pont Neuf undo' wraps. 

Christo: Bridging the Paris Wrap Gap 


By Frank J. Prial 

tVew York Tima Sen ice 

P ARIS— One afternoon in 
1961. a Bulgarian art student 
named Javacheff blocked the Rue 
Visconti, in the Latin Quarter 
here, with a wall of colored bar- 
rels. To anyone who asked, he 
explained that it was a protest 
against the Berlin Wall then only 
recently erected. The wall — 
Christo's wall — was torn down 
after a few hours and forgotten: 
not so its creator. 

Javacheff is now known by his 
first name, Christo, and next 
month be will be back in Paris. 
Christo is going to wrap the Pont 
Neuf. Paris's oldest bridge. Be- 
ginning SepL 23. Parisians will 
find their bridge covered with 

40,000 square meters (47.680 
square yards) of shiny nylon cloth 
in a shade of beige the artist calls 
“Paris stone." There will be more 
than six miles of rope. The wrap- 
ping will take about a week, ac- 
cording to Gerard Moulin, the 
general contractor. Christo hopes 
(he bridge will be allowed to re- 
main wrapped for at least three 
weeks. 

The wrapping will include the 
side and vaults of lhe 12 arches, 
the parapets down to the ground, 
sidewalks and curbs, all street 
lamps and the vertical parts of the 
embankment of the western tip of 
the lie de la Cite. Pedestrians will 
walk on the cloth and the street 
lights will shine through it. The 



Aerial view of Pont Neuf. 


pavement will be uncovered and. 
Christo said, traffic will not be 
impeded, either on the bridge or 
in the water. 

Since 1961 Christo has 
wrapped, among other things, a 
fountain and a medieval tower in 
Italy, an art museum in Chicago, 
a section of coastline in Australia, 
a tree in the Netherlands and a 
woman in London. Still to come 
is the Reichstag building in West 
Berlin and a floating package to 
be stationed off Newport, Rhode 
Island. He has "surrounded" 
with plastic a dozen islands off 
Miami and has stretched a 55- 
million fence across Sonoma 
County, California. 

“Aesthetically," Christo said 
during a recent visit to Paris, “the 
Seine and its banks offer a variety 
of visual impacts impossible to 
duplicate anywhere else in the 
world." Also, he added, he is 
wrapping the Pont Neuf to make 
Parisians think about the bridge. 


"How many ever look at it?" he 
asked. 

The Christo team in Paris in- 
cludes engineers, builders and 
electri cians as well as specialists 
in cables and in mountain climb- 
ing — for scrambling around and 
under the bridge’s arches — and a 
mathematician for computing 
weights and stresses. 

The Pont Neuf project is ex- 
pected to cost around $2.6 mil- 
lion. of which about 5500,000 has 
been raised. Christo says he will 
raise all the money needed for the 
project, mostly by selling draw- 
ings, and will accept no govern- 
ment “interventions." 

The idea for wrapping the Pont 
Neuf dates from 1976, when 
Christo came to Paris to seek a 
patron for the project. Paris was 
governed by a prefect then. 
Christo gpt nowhere. A year later, 
the city had its first mayor in 
modem times, Jacques Chirac. 
But Chirac had other things to do 


than entertain a Bulgarian- Amer- 
ican artist who wanted to wrap a 
bridge- In 1981, the Music de 
FAn Moderae de la ville de Paris 
mounted an exhibit on the pro- 
ject, and it still displays a large 
model of the project that visitors 
can switch on to see how it will 
look at nighL 

Last year. Chirac gave his ap- 
proval Then came seemingly 
endless meetings to seek the other 
necessary approvals: from the 
minister of urbanism, who is in 
charge of rite city’s bridges; from 
the director of historic monu- 
ments, at the Ministry of Culture; 
from officials in the Port of Paris, 
which is responsible for seeing 
that boat traffic continues to get 
underneath the bridge; and from 
officials in the Prefecture of Po- 
lice, which is responsible for city 
traffic, both human and vehicu- 
lar. 

One by one, they came arotmd. 
Finall y, several weeks ago, the 
project reached the desk of the 
president. Frames Mitterrand, 
who approved. 

"This is my most urban pro- 
ject” Christo said during his Par- 
is visit. “It's also my most civi- 
lized. The Pont Neuf is linked to 
the history of an. When Monet 
painted the cathedral at Reims, 
he transformed it completely. 
The Pont Neuf ... will for the 
first time become a work of art 
itself. It will be, temporarily at 
least a giant sculpture." 


Recordr Setting Proposal 

A Texas geologist has set a re- eating and drinking, mvs thus may 
cord for the fastest swim across the be his last title attempt doctors 


English Chann el from France to 
England and proposed marriage to 
his girlfriend on the way. Peter 
Johnson, 26, of Midland, Texas, 
took 8 hours, 20 minutes to swim 
the 21 miles (34 kilometers) from 
Cap Gris Nez. between Calais and hospitalized in San Francisco ww 
Boulogne, to St. Margaret’s Bay. acquired defi ^5^?, t ^ 


have warned ihat his hobby could 
be fataL 

□ 

Burt Reynolds's agent angry- 
over rumors that the^iar has b«n 


near Dover. Thai was 14 minutes 
less than the France- to- England re- 
cord set in 1984 by a Briton, Lyn- 
don Dimsbee, according to the 
■Channel Swimming Association. 
The fastest crossing ever was by an 
American, Penny Lee Dean, who in 
1978 swam from England to 
France in 7 hours. 40 minutes. 
Johnson, four hours into bis swim, 
proposed to JuKa Hughbanks, 28, 
also a geologist from Midland, who 
was in the escort boat. They said 
they would marry next year. 

□ 

Michael Anthony Schaefer, 30, 
of Winter Park, Honda, wants to 
put a cuddly pet thermonuclear 
warhead in every child's arms. The 
Nulde is a plump little velvet bomb 
with a mischievous smile and an 
American flag for a tail. "Consum- 
er thermonuclear warheads at pop- 
ular prices," goes the sales pi urn. 
Schaefer says the idea is to improve 
his financial future and promote 
world peace by poking fun at the 
madness of nuclear proliferation, 
but other peace people are not 
smitten with the Nukie. "This is 
depraved," said T. James Stark, 
president of the Ottawa-based Op- 
eration Dismantle, Canada’s larg- 
est peace organization. “If any of 
these sick toys show up in Canada 
I will personally spray-paint the 
things on the store shelf." Stark 
doesn’t have much to worry about 
yet: It's too soon to tell if'Nukks 
mil score a hit or be a marketing 
bomb. They are available only at 
one store in Winter Park, hand- 
made to order at S50 each. 


Thomas Greene, 45, claimed a 
world reoord Wednesday by down- 
ing a kilogram (2.2 pounds) of 
snails — about 220 of them — in 2 
minutes 43.95 seconds. At a show- 
down in a London restaurant, 
Greene, of Deale, Maryland, beat 
Peter DondesweO of Earls Barton, 
England, who bad previously eaten 
a kflo of snails in three minutes. 
DowdesweQ, also 45, who holds 
more than 240 world records for 


drome, or AIDS, says he will pay 

5100.000 io anyone who can prove 
rhai the actor has even been in San 
Francisco in the past two years. 
"This is ridiculous." David Ger- 
rfiwwin said in Los .Angeles. *|He s 
here looking and feeling fine. He 
said Reynolds was preparing to di- 
rect an episode of Steven Spiel- 
berg's television series, ".Amazing 
Stories." 

□ 

Gregg Allman has settled a pater- 
nity suit just before it went to trial 
in Daytona Beach, Florida. The 
rock singer, 37, confirmed that he 
was the father of Michael Sew 
Hendrick, 19, and he agreed to pay 

55.000 in support and S 10.000 w 
attorneys fees to the Hendricks 
mother, Mary Lynn Green, 37. 

□ 

James Irwin has left Ankara for 
eastern Turkey after obtaining per- 
mission from Turkish authorities to 
search for Noah's Ark on Mount - 
Ararat, but the former U. S. astro- f 
naut said he still had not been told 
when he would be allowed to make 
the climb. Authorities temporarily 
banned Ararat expeditions because 
of raids on climbers’ camps by 
groups believed to be Kurdish re- 
bels. 

□ 

Prism Minister Okrf Palme of 
Sweden look time out Tuesday 
night from his campaign for the 
SepL 15 general election to make a 
surprise appearance as a support- 
ing comedy actor at a Stockholm 
theater. Palme was onstage for five 
minutes as a police constable in 
Georges Feydeau's farce “The 
Haunted Hotel’' at the small Regi- 
na theater. The production features 
a surprise celebrity appearance ev- 
ery night in the constable's role. “I 
may not belong to the front line of 
the acting community, but I did 
know my lines." said Palme. The 
Social Democrat's delivery of his 
lines — “Come along here" and 
“Don’t try any tricks on me” — 
drew mixed reviews. 


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with super success. 

Stephen Hutton and Associates Ltd and 
World Media Consultants Co. Ltd 


CATHERINE, /INTENDS 

MUSICtUEET JE TAIML Jmv. 


TA 


MOVING 


ALLIED 

VAN UNES INTL 

OVER 1300 Offices 
WORLDWIDE 

USA Allied Van lines Infl Cap 
(0101) 312-681-8100 
Office: 25fc Avo t RoOMvdt Rd 
Broadview, Oman 60153 USA 

Or call our Agency offices: 
PARIS Decbordet International 
(01) 343 23 64 

FRANKFURT 

(OA9) 250066 

DUSSBLDORF/ RATINGS'! 

(02102)45023 I.MJS. 

MUNICH UM.s. 

(089) 142244 

LONDON JTKS 

(01) 9S3 3636 
Cal far ABetfs free an m ot e 


CONT1NEX. Small move, cur*, bag- 
gage. worldwide. Call Charter Font 
Si IB 81 (near Opera). 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


VILLARS 

WINTER & SUMMER 
MOUNTAIN PARADISE 

Apartments, rongng From stuioj 
to Srooms. AvaSaUe Far Sale To 
F ore ign er*. High dass res dermal ar- 
eas Mth room fic ut views. Prices from 
SFI95JM0 to SF635.0C0. long win 
mortgages at 6.5% interest. 

For information: 

GLOBE PLAN 5 -A. 
root estate spadafidi 

Av. Mon-Repos 2 4, 

CH-1005 LAUSANNE. Switzerland 
Tel. (21)22 35 12 Tb 251 85 MSJ5 CH. 
Established Since 1970 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


CARIBBEAN 


CAYMAN ISLANDS 

LEADING MTL FINANCIAL <BHBI 
NO DUT1B - NO TAXES 
financial poperty mvestmenls 
from USSeO.OOO. H igh retin a. 
Please reply lor infarmatKin.- 
HOMZON SX P.O. Bax 222. 
CH-1311 Geneva 12, Switzerland 


SPAIN 


FOR SALE WITH LHE TENANCY. 
Country house, near Pdflensa, Mallor- 
ca. divided into 2 apartments with 
1300 sq.ru. laid and own water. 
Write Boi 2596, Herald Tribune. 
9252' NeUfly Cede*. France or cm 
5oa>n (71) 532192. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/ SHARE 


CANADA 


TORONTO. CANADA - LUXURY. 
Fully fumahed and equipped 1 & 2 
bedroom mites. Superior Services. 
Short term rentals. The Market Suites. 
60 Front 5t. East. She. 222. Toronto. 
M5E 1T4. Canada (4161 862-1096. 


GREAT BRITAIN 


LOMX3N. Far lhe best fairwhed Bats 
and houses. Consult the Specialists- 
Philips. Kay and Lewis. Tel- South of 
Park 352 Bill. North of Pork 722 
5135. Tele* 27846 RESIDE G 


ITALY 


When in Rome: 

PALAZZO AL VHABRO 
Luxury apartment house with furrehed 
Hah. available lor 1 week cad mare 

Fhanei 6794325, 6793450 
Wnre: Via dd Vetabro 16. 
00186 Rome. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


USA 


Brand New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 

A Unique 

Hotel Suite Residence 

offering 

preopening savings on 
6 mo., 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 

featuring 

Studio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and all with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 

Executive Services Available 

Model Suites 

(212) 371-8866 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


HOLLAND 


DUTCH HOUSING CB4TRE &V. 
Deluxe rentals. Vaferiusstr. 174. 
Armterdtwn 020621234 or 623222 


HOLLAND 


AMSTODAM S. Furnished 5 roars 
SSOO/moaih Sepi-Jan. Private 6*6627 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


STAYING IN PARIS? 

FURM5HH) 6 UWURN1SHB) 
FIRST-CLASS APARTMENTS 

Mnimum rental 2 months. 
Abo (Into 6 bouMM far tab. 
ENTER UKBtS, 1, rue Mattel 
Paris (SVTri-- 563 17 77 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSEES 8th 

Stadia, 2 or 3400m apartment 
One month or more. 

LE CLAUDGE 359 67 97. 


SHORT TERM m Latin Quarter. 
No oflcrts. Teh 329 38 BL 


LEFT BANK. Lame 5 roan Hat. sunny. 
an nonden. FHJX10. Teh 331 1423, 


LATIN QUARTO, 2 towns, bath, latch- 
en. hear, phone. Tel: 354 65 69 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


GENTLEMAN, 25 years legrand setes 
/ merkering experience m the Far 
East, seda smor position. WeS 
versed «vth loccl trade practices, lan- 
guages cud fan) liar in Industrial or 
consumer products. Please contact: 
Robert Aim. 95 Joo Goat Waft, Srv 
qapere 1542 


IVY LEAGUE GRADUATE, Inti Rela- 
tions Degree, eagerly seeking em- 
ployment' m Pont Attractive, young 
women with wertabta knowledge in 
French. Limited Italian & 5 parish 
Available Sept. Write M. Joeban, 9® 
N. Beverly Dr, Bevwtv Mb. CA 
90210 Gafl (2131 274J139 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


YOUNG MAN IN HOLLAND would 
ike (a be an agent or TBjxBsenfcrive 
m Wry land of Dimness, part-time or 
Ml time. Wffing to travel. FOB 1829, 
228PDVgfswtft Hofianct 


RESPONSIBLE YOUNG Engfehram 
seeks any driving fab/s, in 0.5. eA. 
chauffeur; private car defivery Aug & 
Sept. Td lit 742 680511. 


ATTRACTIVE GOMAN Hastes 26, 
seeks part-time assignments. Please 
rnjiy IoBck 2185. LHX, fnedridistr. 
15. oOOO FraricfurtFIWAi 


SUP’S ENGIN&K 5B3C5 SHORE side 
vacancy, 2 years mo-gang experi- 
enee. Tei DubEn. hdcnKrW537 r ^ 


GOMAN FASHION MODEL Wei 

stArcated, muHilngud, looks far inter- 
estmq position. Ldrxfen 245-0080. 


SWBS HIM MAKH, won educated. 
™™™d. looks far position in fikn 
production. Tet Zundi5653 37. 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


NIBNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT 
Professionals, managers and skfflsd 
wa»en at dways needed a) world- 
vjde protects. We cat contact 
126.000 firms in 133 countnes and 
American M ul t inot imuls. Write far 
mfa and fees; Int ein ali u n u l Career 
Consultants, 2730 San Pedro Suite 
H. Albuquerque. NM 87110 USA. 


NEW LONDON AGENCY offers pasi- 
hoco (or models. Some Encfeh re- 
stated. Roam & bond avalable. Cdl 
TWeia 44-1-938-3604. 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


HOUSBraPBL Gertie responsible ex- 
perienced Engfcsh spookng woman 
needed long term far comfartnbte 
suburban New York home whh 2 
school age dxldran. Excellent hve in 
c o ndtuim. Reply with photo 8, refer- 
ences to Bo. 2583, Herald Tribune, 
92521 NeuiRv Cedex. France 


International Business Message Center 


ATTsNTXSN EXECUTIVES 

Publish your txninasc motsenm 
in tha International Herald Tri- 
burw. whan mono than a third 
of a mfflicn readers worfd- 
wjdo, moat of whom one in 
busmens caul industry, unit 
read it. Just Max VS (Paris 
613595) bifora 10am., en- 
suring that we con totox you 
bock, and your message ww 
appear wMm 43 hours. The 
rato h US. J9.SO or total 
oepjhraianl per lino. You must 
mdude complete and veriB- 
ofde bXing address. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE & UK 
LTD COMPANIES 

L-corporahor end management fa UK. 
Isle of Man. Turks. Anginla. Chonre 
Island:. Ponamc. Liberia. Gibraltar and 
most other alrihare areas, 
o Gxifideimd advice 
S hn mediate avmlabifcty 

• f-Iaminee winces 

• Bearer shares 

• Boai registrations 

o Accountant & adm initiation 

• Mdl, telephone & telex 

SERVICES LTD 
Hood Office . . „ 

Ml Pleased, Donate. “ J' 4 *’ 

London Representative 
2-5 Old Band St.. London 
Tel 01-49? A2«4. TU 28247 SCSLDN G 


ANTARTKA MUTUAL SURVIVAL fa. 
surcnce & Trust of World Genatxi 

private sfodr. 42 uivtl W 58 niton. 

Mr. Pierre Hercaa. 3509 des ErabhB. 
Montreal. Canada. 

HONG KONG; YOUR TAX Shelter, 
■emvoang ee.-iie*. nominees, J ro( »® 
rep. bridge far China market, at Room 
923. Star Hauut. T.S T Hang Kong. 
T!„. 396W DSMOT Tel 3.'72T1833 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


NORADEAN NEWSLETTER 

Send for your FREE 

LONDON 
METALS REPORT 


Registered London Com mod ly Broken 
we offer a concrete service in all 
COMMODITY FUTURES MARKETS. 
Also, far detail: of our 
COMMODITY INVESTMENT 
PROGRAM 

Tot London 621 1864 or wile to 
NORADEAN Lid (IHIJ. 4E Plantotui 
Hse, Feiehureh St. London EC3M 3DX 
Tele/ 654560 COMEXI G. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


FRANCHISE MANAGEMBIT 
YOU OWN - WE OPERATE 

We management any new or Biding 
franchise, we as&st in evaluating ana 
selecting wur franchise investment. 5 m- 

S te and multiple until available. Twtv- 
;y operations with mvnwfate cash 
How. Pta<z« cdl or 'Mile PL Concepts 
Inti. P.O. Box 566, Vienna. Virginia 
22160, near W ashingt on D.C. Tet (703) 
255 0204. Tic 387077 (Western Ifaon] 


OFFSHORE TAX SHELTER 

COMPANIES 

UK. hie of Mon. Turks, □tamel bfandj. 
Panama, Lbeta ond most offshore 
areas. Complete sipport facilities 
Very start conhdentarfly. 

Fibs consultation: 

Roger Griffin LLB, F.CA. 

Brochure- Ccr par me Manage mem Ltd. 

Western Home. Victoria Street, 
Douglas, hie of Mm . |0a24) 23203 ■ 4 
Telex 637389 CORMAN G 


HIGH RETURNS 

U. S. A. 

From evpfatatton of leralulwnar) 
lechmloacd breakthrcjigh in ag: "fai- 
lure. High Batumi Exported For Life- 
time Security. Material avolabfe ■« 
Enafah. French, German FcS detail-, 
from Box 2602, HeroJd Tribune 
92521 Neu% Cedes, France 

Enquiries from Brokers Welcome 


MCDONALD'S FRANCHISE 3ava<a • 
from owner. Top sales. Kgh pom. 
established 5 vrap. Only 
055700,000 F* plv to HT. Sar 2I6& 
Frted'sfaVr 15. oOOO F-ankfutt Mqin 


USA 

BUSINESSES A REAL ESTATE 
Business sates: co m mand, indmtnd & 
residential red estate-sales & leases. 
Property management 2. business de- 
velopment. Write wfh your require- 
ments i finanod specs to Wrcon Realty 
8 Busmess Brokers. 14795 Jeffrey Rd., 
— 210. Irvine, CA *2714 USA. 

7U-451 -8030: Tl» 5901W. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


saUNG CHEMICALS. Sdvem & lab- 
oratory equipment. Umvend Chemi- 
cds & Solvents r frerxe HI 293 60 50. 
Tt. 220064 


WE HELP YOU SOURCING maicfuc- 
hirers of mduflnd products, in Germo- 
Servimex GmbH. D-4000 DusseL 


ny serv 
dori 11. 


Telex 8587465. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


CONSTRUCTION. Engineenng & Csxv 
Sirudicui Manacement Co. very active 
n Thaland and Middle East Positive 
cash flow ond profitable. Partner 
needed to buy out current owner. 
Management tear to remain ml act 

taking equity posmen. CVlrtfjndng 
cfportutiily. about U3S3.4 milkon re- 
awed Th 7686* INVEST HX 


2ND OPINION ON YOUR Ui. stack 
and bond portfoka. Aa now Your 
finanoai hnrfih is as impartqnt as 
your physed health. Over twenty 
yeers eepenenae os ffaon o d consul- 
wnt. Write to : Second Ccnaon. 
Apartment 90 7, 2 Av. Giromers. 
Monte Carla *76000 Monaco. 


HDUQAKY BANHENG on large col- 
latercHaed loans. The only commer- 
cial bank with a leptesertunve office 
in London speoatsfag m the service. 
Arab Oversees Bonn & Trust JW.L) 
Ltd. 28 Black Pnnce Rood, London 
SCI. id 01-735 8171 


COMPUTER PORTRAIT SYSTEMS 
(S) 0.000 - 28JOOO FOB| and suppies- 
T-shirts. a boons, pasters, ederwn, 
pu=zeh etc Mcior creffll cards ac- 
cepted. Kema L6. Paafach 170340 
Fronkhjrt Tel: 747308 T, J1271 ] 


PANAMA LIBERIA. COTPCRATTCNS 
.■ram J55400 tsvadede now Tel 
(06?4| 50340 TetejL- 638353 ISLAND 
C- temtJKl 


wn. 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNLIMITED INC 
U.SJk. A WORLDWIDE 

A ccmpteto personal & business serr.ee 
providing a untrue ccflefaon cf 
tdented. versotve & muitilmcud 
indwiduois far dl sood 8 
Ctomabond occasions. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56lh St.. N.Y.C 10019 
Service Retxesentctives 
Needed Worldwide. 


HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT. 

report - 12 ctxmtaes onotyied. De- 
ux h WMA. *5 Lyndhurst Ter? 
Swte 509, Central. Hang Kong. 

FINANCIAL 
INVESTMENTS 


REQUIRE G84UR4E IB4DER5 or fvnd- 
nunaeeri la servKO pnme me rd stes 
with prime bank guarantees in farm 
of prime bank promissory note US 
CoUon ex Swiss From 10 - 20 -ean, 
no brokers dease P i m apat s any q> 
dy to 3or 41534. LRT.. 63 Lang Acre. 
Cndon, WC2E9JH or idex LK 33147 
Ref. HRPO 


37% ANNUAL RETURN, an ave-ege. 
hes been generated by the Can abean 
Baxn Invcsment Trusts Urtt T-ua 
Mortgage Pool Detail- First Interne- 
iwnoi Trust Go. Ltd . Dept. 850. PO 
Box 392, 1005 Son Jose. Costa tea. 
Tefajc 2B5T. 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


COUATBAL PROVIDED FOR art*- 
aege purposes. London based. Teh 01 
2*?9W2. 385 5492, 01 930 8924. Tlx 
895T622 TAERCO d 


EARN 30% - 35%. INVEST in dwrt 
Wrm co m merod paper notes, AlSed 
Ltd . PO Box 422. harnsonburg. Vir. 
gmo 22801, USA 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 

Your best buy 

Fine diamonds m any price renge 
at lowest wholesale prices 
died from Antwerp 

center of the e fcumuJ world 

Full guarantee 
Far free puce lot write 
Joachim GaUenstafat 


OFFICE SERVICES 


fatabfahed 1928 
Pefikacnstroat 62, B-2018 Arfwerp 
Bdaum . Tel: [fe 3) 234 07 51 
Th; 71779 syl b Aj the Diamond Qob. 
Heart of Antwerp Dromond ndustry 


OFFICE SERVICES 


PR OJECT F94ANCE WVESTM04T 

camoony cat arrange asmeteto peck- 
age from fccscfcikr* side ic com- 
ewt-on Tri- or 244 99>2 3?5 5492. 
9» 8? 2t>. Tfiex ?»5ie«' 7AJBCC G. 


GENEVA 

SWIIZERLAM] 

Full Service 
is our Business 

• I n t ern a ti onal law ota taxes 

• Mcfabca, telephone end telex 
services 

• Translation end seaeiand services 

• ronouSiun, domiciliation and 
admrjstrancn of Swiss <md farenn 
c o mp g ru es 

Fufi eorfidenc* ond ascrehcn csstred 

BUSINBS ADVISORY 
SERVICES SA 

7 Rue Mury, I2C7 GSU5VA 

W 36 05 40 Tele. 23342 


Your Office in Germany 

w» m "A» Yaw Service" 

• Complete office semoes of two 
pmtige addresses. 

• Wty equipped offices fry the short 
term or die long term. 

• fatwooticndly trained office and 
proteuKxul staff at your dvaioL 

■ Ccn be legafty used as your corpo- 
ra* domicile far Geraioiiy/fiswpe. 

• Your business operation con start 
immedialely. 

Lraroo BueiftMS Sorvieec GmbH 
loirooHaus am Hdzhousenpartc 
Jussnconstrosse 22 
6000 fruiA furt am Mam 1 
Germany 
Tefc 69-59 00 61 
Telefax.- 69-99 57 70 
Telex: 414561 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


AU PAIR/ ROEMJIY FAMAY. 2 nral 

dikknn. Engfah spedung. non-smok- 
er, private roam. Southern U5. Send 
reply to L 5tem byg.644i Sand s tone, 
as. LA 70808L 504-/69-2262 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


LADTS MACD, 6 years experienc e in 
one of the Royd Households, highly 
responsible person, good personality, 
free now. Fry Staff Ccnsuftonb, / 
Huh St, Aldershot. Kants UK: 0252 
315369, 1540761 wed UK iotneed. 


AUTO SHIPPING 


LET US BE YOUR 
OFHCE IN BANGKOK 

Start /long Mrm furnished offices, fill 
busmen services ■ secretard, telex, 
messenger, tamslonans. compmy 
represen ta tion / redstiohon. Universal 
Management and Office Services Co. 

Ltd.. Surwsngse Bldg. 2nd fL, 

1 13/5 SurawaKipa BeL fotgkok lfetfO 
ThoBand. TeL 23i»97. ST46S9. 
Tdex 21456 UMOS TH 


IMPETUS • ZURICH • 252 76 21. 
Phone .* tefcn / moabox. 


OmCES FOR RENT 


EXECUTIVE OFFICE SUBLET 
Newly famished executive office sun 
in presrigiou! Ptarfc Avenue, NYC office 
buUng with mognficenl view & pri- 
■ate te u etq n4 station in reception 
area. PaoSties iridode tetown. storage 
& bit space, large conference roam. 
Pfeme call 212-888-1 57T. 
rite. 971744 NAMC NTK. 


TRANSCAR 

THE CAR SHFPMG 
SPEOAUSTS 

PAWS 

CANNES/ MCE 
RIAMCFURT 
BONN / COLOGNE 
STUTTGART 
WJNKH 
BREMHHAVB'I 
NEW YORK 
HOUSTON 
LOS ANGBES 
MONTREAL 

AGENTS WORlb HfTO 
leave it to w to bang it to you 



AUTO CONVERSION 


EPA/ DOT 

CONV9SIONS 

* Custom broksrage/bandng service 

* Pick-up & dekvety cnywhere in the 
Eastern US. A Texas 
Profesaond work using only the 
highest quality comoonents 

* Gu tx ui item! B*A / DOT approval 
CHAMPAGNE IMPORTS INC, 

2294 North Penn Rd.. HaffieML 
PA. 19440, USA Tel: 21 5 822 6852 
Tefax 4971917-CHAMP 


AUTOMOBILES 


PlfASE SEND FOR the mast uModate 
car impart gufae US$59i5tftG. 
Ilex sin witm, 2390 Herabura, Kathar- 
inenstr. 12. W. Germany. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TRASCO 

INTHZNATiONAL 

LHD. Mercedes Tax Free 
limousines 36“ & 44" 

Annexed cars and firnowiias 
Coach hurt cot* 

Other makes & exotics 

Over 100 units in stack 
World wide deSvay 
Direct from source 
D.O.T. & EJA 

Teh LondanJ44in| 629 7779 
Telex (51} 8WOZ2 TRA5 G. 

Tratoo London Lid. 

65-67 Park Lane, London W.l. 

Switzerland - LUC - W. Germany 


LE5 AUTOMOBILE 
EXTRAORMNAiRB 
Cdfing j ECCt :':lUR owners 

If you ora the owner of a Senes IV 
Excakbur, with American speaficatfans 
we can upgrade yew la a 300 HP Euro- 
pean speaficahon Power Train and 
provide dl service and spare pexts you 
require far normd m dn ttnonce 

We have dso formed a Eurapecxt 
Owner's Oub aid wil be arganzmg 
speod events from fane to time. 

If you would Re mare in for ma tion 
contact 

Lei Automobile* I b d hu o n E n aSrat 
Monte Coda 

Telephone P3 257479 or telex 479550 
AUTO MC or 469870 MC5 MC 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


COOPS ST JAMB 

OFFICIAL AGENT 
OF BMW (GB) LTD 

WWe you are in Europe, we am offer 
considerable sawngs on brand new 
BMW ears to most specifications- FuH 
factory warranty. 

We am aha supply right or left hand 
dive tax free BMWj at taunst prices. 
We aba supply factory buA buflet- 
pn xd SMWi and the Afoma BMW 
rtmge tax free. 

Call London (01) 629 6699. 


10 YEARS 

We Deliver On to foe World 

TRANSCO 

Keeping □ constant stock of more than 
300 brand now con, 
rooking 5000 happy dents every year. 
Sena far free multicolor eddoa 
Transco SA. 95 Ncxrddaan, 

.2030 Antwerp, Belgium 

Te) 323/542 62 40. Tlx 35207 TRANS B 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE for immediate delivery 

ROM STOCK 

Best service, dtfapiag, fas w xetce, 
band, convenlon at USA 

RUTEINC 

TAIM1S5TR. 52. 6000 FRAMOURT 
W Genu., id (#-232351, the 411559 


EUROPORT TAX 
FREE CARS 

Cal or write far free cotdaa. 
Bax 12011 

Rotterdam Airport, Haloid 

Tey0ntf623077 
Telex 25071 EFCAR M 


TRANSMUNDI BaGWM. 21 GaM- 
sebcsatyB-2241 Zoersd, Antwerp. Tet 
03-384^034 Tlx 323M Ttatsm 1 In 
stack: Mercedes. BMW. ASO. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


NEWMBHSX&RMW. RHD tax free 
export UK. (0^1 76099. Tbt 312242 


LEGAL SERVICES 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


USA5UMMBS«aAlSI Lot Anqelw 
from £199. New York front ItSTUS. 
Airtoun London 01-551 4451. 

NYOME WAY $150. Eventaqy N.Y. - 
West Coast SI4S. Para 235 92 90. 

HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


HOTELS 



UJSA. 


EDUCATION 




PAGE 4 " 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


j 


Place Your Classified Ad Quickly and Easily 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

By Phoo*: Cod your local 1HT representative wrth your text. You wfil be informed of the cost immediately, and once prepayment is rode your ad will 
appear withei 48 hours. 

Cost: The bosic rate is S9^0 per Sne per day + load taxes. Thera are 25 letters, pgns ond spocm in the first Ene and 36 in th# foUowmg lutes. Mamruni 
space n 2 Enes. No aUbreviations ogepted. 

Credit Cards: American Express, Diner's Chib, Eurocord, Master Card, Access and Vba. 


HEAD OFHCE 

PARIS: For France and all coun- 
tries net listed below: 181 Ave. 
Charles-de-Gaulle. 92521 
NeuBy Cedex. TeL >47-46Ctt 

S or Classified only], Telaxi 
13595. 

EUROPE 

AUSTRIA 4 GERMANY: Stand 
Korrod, LKT, Fnedncharane 
15, D 6000 Frankfurt. T«L 
J0S9172 67 55. Telex: 416721. 

BELGIUM! LUXEMBOURG: Ar- 
thur Manner, 6 Rue Lous Hy- 
mans, 1060 Brussels- Tel.: 
343.l4.99. Telex.- 23922 AMX. 
GRSCE A CYPRUS: J.C Hermes- 
son. Pmdarou 26. Athens 
10673. TeL: 3618397/3602421. 
Telex 218344 IBS Gfi. 

ISRAEL: Dan Birtich. 92 UsdsNdn 
Street, P.O. Bax 11297. Tel 
Aviv. Telj 45 55 59/45 91 37. 
Tlx.- 341118 BXTYIL EXT 6376. 
ITALY 

ROME: Antcmo SambroRa 55 
Via delta Merced?, 00167 
Rome. Tel.: 679-34-37. Telex: 
620500 PPCSRA. 

MILAN: Lm 9 font. 20090 
Saar ate Milan S. Felice. Torre 5. 
TiC 7531 445.Tetex: 311011 
NETHERLANDS: Arnold Tees. 
ing/AUbns Gnm. P/of. Tufp- 
straat 17. 1 01 B Amsterdaii 

Tel.: 020-26 36 15. Telex. 
13133. 

PORTUGAL: Eta Ambor. 3? Rua 
das Jaieka Verdes. Luhon. 
Tel.: 672793 & 662544. 
SCANDINAVIA 
DENMARK: Aage Petersen, 
Inter -Ad, RC Andersens Boute- 
void, DJC-15S3 Copenhagen 
V. Denmark Phonft01J294S}. 
Telex: 16447. 

NORWAY: RognWd Moaner. 
Medta-Booking Inr'I. Hass^bak- 
ien 41 Her. Tel : (03) 845545. 
Teta- S' 2731 (Sm.|. 


SWHWk Mrs. Mane FeUbotn, 
FeSbom Morketinn & Distrfco- 
(ion HB, Utsktsvagen 2, 18352 
Toby Sweden. TeC: 08 7§69229. 
SPAIN: AKredo Umfauff Scr- 
miento, Iberia Mart 1, 6 D. Pe- 
dro teuteira 8. Madrid 28020. 
TeL 455 28 91-455 33 06 Tlx: 
47747 SUVA E. 

SWITZERLAND: Guy Van 
Thuyne and Marshall Waiter, 
Hes Viang .I5CheninDave( 
1009 Pully/ Lausanne. Tel.: 

BSSfe*- T "’” 

UNfTHJ KINGDOM: S. Child, 

Tefem 262009. 

U^Jk. 

Dfane S 0 ? 0 * 0 ' Her- 

aW Tribune. 350 Third Ave., 
New York. N.Y. 10022. Tel_ : 
212-752 3»a Telex: 427 175. 
Gmtm Mackm. Madcin Meek. 
300 Lombard St, Apt. 3, San 
FraitoiscixCA. 94133. Tel.: 
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LATW AMERICA 

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