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ESTABUSHED 1887 


Botha Urges 
Talks, Offers 




. Altboagh Assam has been rela- 
cdful recen ■" 

over ; the rigjils of -a. __ 

foreign' immigrants has simmered 
ever-smee ahMtimate(i.5XX)0 peo- 
ple were fcillcd during a state e!ec- 
tion1nT983. .. ' 

■ “ the immigrants were 

- - Modems fleeing poverty in neigh- 

Coring; Bangladesh, formerly Hast 
. ~ \ - PaJdswn. The population of Assam 

1 ; ; v “iii is Iflig^Hmaa. ■. : 

' - ' Under the accord signed Thore- 

> 4^»#‘?jf^^.tobehddsoonm 

• - ? Assam bat the government bowed 

1‘ 1 ^ to-a demand by Assamese protesl- 

k ers that many, of theimmigrants be 

barred Cfomtakmg part. 

All imntigrants who - arrived in 
Assam after 1965 are to be stripped 
of the rigfa io vote. In addition, 
inratigrib^^ alia- 1971 

% ape to be: 

' Thcm^ras*ti» question Thurs- 
day whefe«aniass dgxirtation of 
: himdT^s k | Of: th p uipinds df. people 
was practical or amid be dnm» 
wiftwutiwtihgoff to 
’ NerertheteS, newspapers and 
pofitidans proclaimed that theAs- 
sam dispme had bcoi solved by the 
accord. 




ft was the second time in less 
than a month that Mr, Gandhi bad 
sought ton 

• lution to a oomestic crisis. 

In late July he reached agree- 
nient with Sikh leaders aimed -at 
coding, a violent three-year con- 
frontation that also h a s cost thou- 
sands of fives. ' 

Speaking at an 

Day ceremcmy at the 350-year-old 
Red Fort in the old city section of 
New Delhi, Mr. Gandhi said he 
had reached agreement with As- 
samese protest leaders at 2:45 AJWL 
Thursdayafter three days of nearly 
roond-the-dock negotiations. 

“We hope that with the signing 
.of this agreement, another dement 
of teuton wiB be removed and the 
country will be able to devote its 
attention to development, -1 * the 
prime minister said as tens of thou- 
sands of people applauded. 

Mr. Gandhi was hailed as having 
brought an attitude that contrasted 
markedly on the Assam issue and 
others with that of his predecessor 
and .mother. Prime Minister Indira 
Gandhi 

In a typical comment, the gover- 
nor of Assam, Bhishma Narain 
Singh, praised Mr. Gandhi for 
“wisdom arid statesmanship** and 
also thanked the leaders of-the As- 
sam protest movement for their 
“foresigh redness, courage and spir- 
it of accommodarioa.*! ■■ 


No Changes 


BODIES TRANSFERRED — Helicopters flew the 
bodies of Japan Air Lines crash victims from the wreck- 


age site to Fujioka on Thursday. The government has 
ordered the inspection of aD Boeing 747 tails. Page 3. 


Reagan at Key Juncture in Policy Battle 


By David Hoffman 

International Herald Tribune 

SANTA BARBARA. California 
— Nine months after his landslide 
re-election victory, President Ron- 
ald Reagan has reached a turning 
it in his second term that could 
whether his far-reaching 


gin voting on a White House-spon- 
sored tax reform measure this fall, 
and some administration officials 
expect a concerted drive in the Re- 
publican-controlled Senate to mm 
it into a tax increase over Reagan’s 
objections. 


chance of his second term to push 
bis programs through Congress. 

These people predicted that after 
this period, Mr. Reagan's power to 
influence Congress would wane be- 
cause of pressures on members of 
Congress facing re-election in 1986 


Several other domestic policy - and the approaching end of his own 
goals that the administration pur- incumbency. 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


Security was heavy at. the ado- 
ration of the 38 th anniversary of 



bration 

Xn^’^ indepaidtoce from Britain. 
Mr. Gandhi spoke to the crowd 
from b ehin d a bullet-proof glass 
shield. The people in the crowd had 
gone through metal detectors. 

" Tho Assam accord calls for the 
current state legislature, elected in 
the dented voting of 1983, to be 
dissolyfid^vrazh a caretaker 
ment in control until after 
dectxus. 

.In addition, certain unspecified 
“le^flativc arid administrative 
saf^gria*&f* were promised by the 
ceottal governiBent “to protect the 
culiunih social and linguistic iden- 
" tity and heritage" of the Assamese 


are achieved 


-1 


....»* pebple..- 


domcstic 
or discarded b ; 

While Mr. keagan recuperates 
from cancer surgery by taking af- 
ternoon strolls at Ins ranch north- 
west of here, senior White House 
advisers have been looking for 
ways to recover from this year's 
legislative setbacks with a “fall of- 
fensive.” 

Only modest progress has been 
em- made this year in reaching the pres- 
new ident’s chief policy goals of sharp 
reductions in the federal deficit and 
die growth of domestic spending. 
Mr. Reagan faces new spending 
pressures in September, when Con- 
gress votes on appropriations bills, 
a new farm program and an in- 
crease in the national debt ceiling. 
Congress is also expected to be- 


sued in Mr. Reagan's first term 
remain unachieved. These include 
(he- institution of tax credits for 
private school tuition, “enterprise 
zones” to encourage businesses to 
locate in depressed areas, and a 
presidential veto on individual 
items in spending legislation. 

Public opinion surveys show that 
Mr. Reagan’s personal popularity 
has soared to levels not seen since 
early in his presidency, and he has 
often demonstrated an ability to 
rebound from periods of conflict 
and stalemate with Congress. 

Yet Mr. Reagan has dearly fall- 
en short of the expectations that 
were set after his 49-stale sweep in 
November. Then, many presiden- 
tial scholars and While House offi- 
cials predicted that Mr. Reagan 
would enjoy a nine-month to one- 
year “window of opportunity” in 
which he would get the biggest 


Now, some current and former 
administration officials are saying 
the White House has made few 
important gains during the first 
seven months of that period, leav- 
ing little time to recover. 

“Basically, the window of oppor- 
tunity has closed” for making sub- 
stantial reductions in the federal 
deficit, David A. Stockman, former 
director of Mr. Reagan's Office of 
Management and Budget, told For- 
tune magazine in an interview to be 
published in the upcoming issue. 

Mr. Stockman described the 
budget compromise Congress ap- 
proved Aug I as a “limp rag.” That 
compromise was the product of six 
months of efforts by the White 
House to make major reductions in 
federal deficits estimated at $200 
billion this year. 

Even before Congress left for its 
summer vacation. Republicans 


r 






Augi Agony of Surrender 

Somejapmese Saw Only die End, Not a New Beginning 




By John Burgess 

Washington Past Service 

TOKYO — Aug .15, 1945, the 
day that Americans would come to 
know as V-J Day, dawned for the 
Japanese with a momentous but 
enigmatic piece of news. National 
tio announced at 7:21 .-that 


“The enemy would come and there 
would be a great battle.” 

Many Japanese already knew the 
war was going badly. The day be- 
fore, 800 American B-29 bombers 
had appeared over the Tokyo area, 
unloading another torTenl of 


country had never been occupied 
r. It still had three 




P AS:- 
fSS 


morning that all citizens must lis- 
ten respectfully to an address by 
His Majesty the Emperor to be 
broadcast at noon. 

The voice of tire emperor, who 
was considered divine, had never 
been heard by ordinary people. It 
oould only mean some fearsome 
development in the war that Japan- 
had been righting for 14 years, ever 
since its troops moved mto Man- 
churia in 1 W 1 . Perhaps many pea* 
pic thought, it was news of an 
American assault on the home is- 
lands and a command to right to 
the end. 

“People believed there would be 
a final fight on the imperial sofl,” 
recalls Sboii Takahasin, who was 


ThePadfic 

At War and at Peace 


Last of four articles 


bombs. The dry was now 
defenseless Raids bad already laii 
waste to 50 percent of it. 

In three and one-half years of 
fighting after the Pearl Harbor at- 
tack in 1941, Japanese troops and 
naval forces had been pushed bade 
time and again in the Pacific and 
Southeast Asia with enormous 


word of the defeats had leaked 
bade to the homeland. 

Still, surrender was not in the 
-c.rSlii iheaa 23-year-old anny captain at vocabulary of the average Japa- 
T- a vehicle repair school in Tokyo, ncse. In its 2,000-year history, the 


byai 

ntillion soldiers in China, Korea, 
Southeast Asia and many Pacific 
islands and three million more in 
the borne anny, waiting for orders 
to fight. 

People believed that victory or 
death were the only posable out- 
comes for a war seat as a holy 
crusade to safeguard kakuud. or 
national essence. Although theene- 
my bad nuns soldiers, weapons and 
supplies, Japan's fighting spirit 
could prevail, in the way that a 
single kamikaze plane could sink a 
great warship. 

MDitaiy men were still dinging 
to hope of a decisive battle that 
would force the United States to 
give Japan an honorable peace. 
They ware remembering the peace 
that followed the great defeat Ja- 
pan had Inflicted on an Imperial 
Russian fleet in the Straits of Tsu- 
shima 40 years earlier. 

But as the sun rose on Aug. 15, 
starting another hoi, humid day in 
(Continued on Page 2, CbL 1) 


T 


-K 


INSIDE 


A Hezbollah leader implied 
e Islamic group had ties to 
nribings in Lebanon. Page L 

Zanzibar's leader has been 


picked to succeed Nyerere as 
president in Tanzania. PageZ. 


Coun- 


ai: 


■ The LosAngdes Cir 
rilpassed an ordinance I 
discrimination against 
victims. 

■ An Argentine court heard fi- 
nal testimony against nine for- 
mer military leaders accused of 
torture and murder, "sge *- 


WEEKEND 

■ JeanNegulesco, at 85, recalls 
for Maty BlunifiHs career as a 
film director in 

palmy days. • 

busbsess/finance 

■ The Bundesbank, tiyins 10 

booa the West GernmecMo- 

my. is cutting its two 
i4 rates by Vi point Psgell. 




on computes an( * . 
ariese officials said. Paee li- 


ft Output at U.S. factories, 
mines and utilities rose a rood- 
roJpo^tinJuly.lbe^- 

reoorted. Page n- 


emment reported. 

SPOUTS 

■ British powerboat sinks jest 



CONTROVERSIAL VISIT — Prime Minister Yasu- 
hiro Nakasone, right, visited a memorial to Japan's war 
dead Thursday in what some observers criticized as an 
attempt to mix religion and national policy. Page 2. 


WHO Aide linked to a Pituitary Project 


By Iain Gucsr 

International Herald Tribune 

GENEVA — The deputy direc- 
tor-general ' of the Wold Health 
Organization, Dr. Adeoye Thomas 
Lambo, has approached several Af- 
rican governments suggesting the 
collection of human pituitaiy 
glands from mortuaries for use by a 
Rome-based pharmaceutical com- 
pany. according to documents ob- 
tained by the International Herald 
Tribune. . . 

. According to the documents, the 
glands were to be supplied to Gali- 
bia SpA for use in production of 
i hormones to combat dwarf- 


merria] trade for profit in sub- 
stances of human origin. 

However, several medical spe- 
cialists and officials of the Geneva- 
based WHO expressed surprise 
about tire exchange proposal, citing 
the following two reasons: 

• Such use of pituitary glands 
could pose major health risks. 
Treatment with growth hormones 
was suspended in the United States 
in May after three patients died of 


Half dan Mahler of Denmark, was 
“totally unaware” of (he project- 
or. Mahler “has asked Dr. lambo 
to give him a full account of his 
activities in this connection,” the 
spokesman said. 

“The Lambo Foundation has 
never requested recognition from 
WHO nor has it reported oa its 
activities to WHO,” Dr. Mahler 
said in a statement 

.The pituitary is a small, nut-sized 


m 


In 1978, the Council of Europe opposed 
profiting in substances of human origin . 


i sm. 

In exchange for the glands, hos- 
pitals and research institutions in 
the African countries were to re- 
ceive drugs and pharmaceutical 
products from 'Gahbia for use in 
research and treatment- 

The documents indicate that the 
exchange was to be coordinated by 
the Lambo Foundation, a private 
group headed by Dr. Lambo s wfe. 

When questioned about this last 
week. Dr. Lambo said his relation- 
ship to tire private foim^honws 

that of an “unpaid adviser. The 
purpose of tire foundation, hesaid, 
is to promote scientific research in 

*Tlrere is no suggestion that such 
an arrangement would violate any 
tows. A 1978 Council of Europe 
^commendation, which has no 
binding force, and which is con- 
fined to Europe, discourages com- 


a neurological disorder, Creutz- 
fddt-Jakob disease, possibly trace- 
able to medicine made from con- 
taminated pi tui lanes. 

• The proposed exchange of 
drugs for pitnicartes highlights a 
lack of government health regula- 
tions in developing countries. It 
suggests an emphasis on spe- 
cialized diseases, affecting (dative- 
ly few, rather than concentration 
on widespread basic ailments. 
WHO has set improvements in 
both these areas as major objec-' 


lamination, pitui tones used 
growth hormones have to be ex- 
tracted from corpses by trained pa- 
thologists, then subjected to strin- 
gent laboratory analysis to assure 
the absence of disease. 

She doubled ibal adequate 
methods could be organized in de- 
veloping countries for safe collec- 
tion of pituitaries, given the gener- 
ally low level of health and hygiene. 

Dr. nbg, whose hospital pioneer- 
ed growth hormone treatment in 
Switzerland in 1 960, said she would 
regard any commercial trade in pi- 
tmtaiy glands as ‘’unethical.” She 
acknowledged, however, that de- 
mand for the hormone was strong. 

The doctor said the Zurich hos- 


gland, situated just above the roof . --- - , ~, , , ■ (c 

5fdw mouth, that controls human pdal traded io contact pathologists 
growth, since the 1960s it has been Md *» send ptmiaiy 

used in the production of growth diteedy to company, tn an 
hormones, an expensive process <®« <° I P* v “‘ 
that is complicated by a worldwide chases while soil assuring a supply 


tives. 

A WHO official also called at- 
trition to the organization's rules 
restricting staff officials from en- 
gaging in private initiatives without 
permission from the director-gen- 
eral. 

A sp ok p gnfln said last week that 
the director-general of WHO. Dr. 


shortage of the glands. 

A vice president of Nordisk In- 
sulinlaboraiorium, the Danish 
pharmaceutical manufacturer, said 
his company needed 70,000 of tire 
glands a year. A .Zurich endocrinoL 
ogist wire specializes in the treat- 
ment of dwarfism said two glands 
were required to produce sufficient 
medicine to treat one child for one 
week. 

The posable health risks raise a 
new set of complications. 

Dr. Ruth niig, a professor of 
pediatric eadocrinoloCT at the Uni- 
versity of Zurich Children's Hospi- 
tal, said that to protect against con- 


of the drug. 

Dr. Dlig said that in Switzerland, 
pathologists removing pituitaries 
did not require permission from 
relatives or advance assent from 
the deceased person, unlike the 
rules for' ocher organs. Rules vary 
from country to country, specialists 
said. 

Experts agreed that the recent 
growth hormone ban in the United 
States focused attention on the 
health factor and accelerated ef* 
forts to produce synthetic hor- 
mones in laboratories. New prod- 
ucts are l ying tested in Europe and 

(Continued on Page 5, CbL I) 


were debating among themselves 
why Mr. Reagan's track record this 
year failed to match his impressive 
victories of 1981. 

Some have faulted the new 
While House chief of staff. Donald 
T. Regan, who swapped jobs with 
Janies A Baker 3d. now Treasury 
secretary. Mr. Baker earned a repu- 
tation as a cautious legislative tacti- 
cian. but Mr. Regan has sometimes 
run afoul of congressional leaders. 

Mr. Regan, for example, struck a 
deal with Senate Republicans on 
limiting Social Security cost-of-liv- 
ing increases, touching off a rebel- 
lion among House Republicans, 
the White House backed 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispauhes 

DURBAN, South Africa — 
President Pieter W. Botha called on 
South Africans of all races Thurs- 
day to join in negotiations to chan 
a peaceful future, but he an- 
nounced no specific reforms after 
almost a year of black unrest 

Mr. Botha said in a much-await- 
ed address that it would be wrong 
to prescribe future political struc- 
tures Tor the black majority of 24 
million, which has few political 
rights. He said changes should be 
negotiated among the country’s ra- 
cial croups. 

He rejected the concept of a 
fourth chamber of Parliament for 
blacks to sit alongside the segregat- 
ed white, Asian and mixed-race 
parliamentary bodies. 

The president also (lashed specu- 
lation that he might free Nelson 
Mandela, the leader of the out- 
lawed African National Congress, 
the main guerrilla organization 
fighting the country's system of ra- 
cial separation. The president re- 
stated his offer to release Mr. Man- 
dela if he renounced violence; Mr. 
Mandela rejected the offer in Feb- 
ruary. 

There bad been expectations that 
Mr. Botha might announce major 
changes after meetings Foreign 
Minister R.F. Botha had last week 
with U.S. and European officials. 

“Reform through process of ne- 
gotiation is not weakness.” Presi- 
dent Botha told members of his 


groups on a road to abdication and 
suicide. Destroy white South Afri- 
ca and our influence and this coun- 
try will drift into faction strife, cha- 
os and poverty,” Botha said. 

“My government and 1 are pre- 
pared to press ahead with our re- 
form program, and u> those who 


prefer revolution to reform I sa£ 


that they will not succeed,” he sale 
“If necessary, we win use stronger 
measures." 

Government sources in Pretoria, 
explaining why the speech may 
have failed to meet world expecta- 
tions. said Mr. Botha wanted to 
avojd being seen domestically to be 
making concessions under foreign 
pressure. 

They said his draft speech bad 
been revised four times in recent 
days as external pressure mounted. 

After ibe speech, Robert C. 
McFarlane, the UB, national secu- 
rity adviser, said “the United States 
looks to the government and all 
South Africans to explore every op- 
portunity for negotiations and rec- 
onciliation." 

He said what was at issue was an 


t Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 


Later, 

away from the Social Security cuts, - ruling National Party at the Natal 
enraging the Senate Republicans, provincial congress. ‘Tailring, con- 


N orman Orest dn,. a political sci- 
entist at the American Enterprise 
Institute, said that Mr. Reagan’s 
difficulties this year could also be 
traced to institutional tensions on 


Capitol Hill. 

Senate Republicans 


attempted 
to tackle the deficit problem to 
demonstrate that they could govern 
effectively and keep their majority 
there in next year's elections, he 
said. This led them to vote for -So- 
(Continued on Page 3, CoL 1) 


suiting, bargaining with all our 
people’s leaders is not weakness." 

He rejected the idea of granting 
everyone in South Africa an equal 
vote, saying, “that would lead to 
domination of one over the others 
and it would lead to chaos." Mili- 
tant blacks say one-person, one 
vote is their goal in this country 
where 5 million, whites refuse vot- 
ing rights to the black m^'oriry. 

“I am not prepared to lead white 
South Africans and other minority 


Murphy May 
Not Meet 
Palestinians, 
Aide Says 


Sand Barrier, Electronics 
Wall In Moroccan Sahara 


By Judith Miller 

A'rw York Times Service 

AGADIR, Morocco — Within 
the next 10 days, Morocco will put 
ihe finishing touches on a huge wall 
of sand and electronic sensors that 
is revolutionizing ami-guenilto tac- 
tics, according to senior Moroccan 
military officers. 

The wall is designed to repel the 
PoUsario Front rebels seeking inde- 
pendence for Western Sahara, a 
former Spanish colony now mostly 
controlled by Morocco. The war 
has been going on for nine years. 

Begun five years ago, the wall 
stretches more than 1,550 miles 
(2500 kilometers) across the Saha- 
ra from the Algerian and Maurita- 
nian borders to the Atlantic. 

One official called the war the 
most conspicuous success in the use 
of high technology a g ainst a guer- 
rilla army equipped with sophisti- 
cated Soviet weapons. 

By building, dismantling , mov- 
ing forward and rebuilding a 9-foot 
(2. 75-meter) revetment of sand and 
stone, and by pushing it ever for- 
ward into the desert, the Moroc- 
cans have succeeded in cordoning 
off more and more of Western Sa- 
hara. Now, nearly all of the territo- 
ry, which is roughly the size of 
Italy, with a population of 150,000, 
has been brought inside the walL 

From a helicopter the wall re- 
sembles the pattern left on a beach 
after a stick has been dragged 
through the sand. Command posts 
are spaced about every two miles. 
On the ground, the view is one of 
unrelenting bleakness. 


The Polisario Front is no ordi- 
nary insurgency. The rebels have 
been fighting to make Western Sa- 
hara an independent nation with 
Soviet-built SAM-6 anti-aircraft 
missiles and T-55 

Brigadier General Abdelaziz 
Beonani, commander of Morocco's 
Southern Zone and one of the ar- 
chitects of the wall's defensive 
strategy, said the wall had enabled 
the army to set up a hermetic de- 
fensive fine behind which its forces 
could move without detection, and 
from which it could, through radar 
and sensors, detect and destroy the 
insurgents. 

Above all. General Beonani said, 
the wall enabled Morocco to do 
this cheaply. “Therein lies the 
beauty of n aD,” he added. 

A Western diplomat in Rabat 
said Washington was “shocked, 
dismayed, concerned and sur-. 
prised’’ when King Hassan II 
signed an accord with the Libyan 
leader. Colonel Moamer Qadbafi, a 
year ago. 

Although the concern continues, 
the diplomat said, from a military 
standpoint “it has been a success.” 
Libya has aided its arms shipments 
to the Polisario guerrillas. 

Military defeat of the Polisario 
Front may not signal political vic- 
tory. Recognized by more than 100 
countries and the Organization of 
African Unity, the Polisario Front 
continues to receive arms and aid 
from neighboring Algeria, Moroc- 
co's rival for dominance in the Ara- 

(Cou tinned on Page 5, CoL 1) 


United Press International 

JERUSALEM — Assistant Sec- 
retary of State Richard W. Murphy 
of the United States has apparently 
dropped the idea of meeting with a 
Jordanian-Palestiman delegation, a 
U.S. official said Thursday. 

Mr. Murphy, the assistant secre- 
tary for Near Eastern and South 
Asian affairs, met Thursday with 
Prime Minister Shimon Peres and 
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shannr 
of Israel. He had arrived earlier 
from Amman. Jordan, where he 
conferred with King Hussein. 

After the talks here, the Ameri- 
can official said that Mr. Murphy 
“probably won't meet with the del- 
egation, because they can’t agree 
on arrangements, people, places.” 

There had been speculation that 
Mr. Murphy might meet Monday 
in Amman with members of a Pal- 
esunian-Jordaiuan group in an at- 
tempt to revive regional peace ef- 
forts. 

■ Israelis See Deadlock 

Thomas L Friedman of The New 
York Times reported from Jerusa- 
lem: 

Mr. Murphy’s briefing of the Is- 
raeli leaders indicated max efforts 
to get peace talks going remained 
deadlocked, Israeli officials said. 

In his talks here Thursday, the 
U.S. envoy said King Hussein was 
still insisting that any negotiations 
with Israel be held in the frame- 
work of an international peace con- 
ference. with Ibe paitirmaiion of 
the Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion, Israeli officials said. 

The Jordanian king has not al- 
tered his demand that the PLO take 
pan in any joint Jordanian-Pales- 
tinian delegation that might meet 
with the United States or take pan 
in future peace talks, Mr. Muiphy 
told Israeli officials. 

As a result, there seemed to be no 
sign of any progress toward either 
an American meeting with a joint 
Palestinian- Jordani an delegation 
or direct negotiations between such 
a group and Israel the Israelis said. 

Israel apposes any meeting be- 
tween the united States and a joint 
Jordanian- Palestinian delegation 
before direct talks with Israel. It 

(Confirmed on Page 2, CoL Z) 


Shakespeare Meets Textbook Censors 


Hundreds of Ones Deleted from Plays, U.S. Group Says 


By Keith B. Richburg 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Textbook publishers have 
excised hundreds of lines from the Shakespearean 
plays “Hamlet" and “Romeo and Juliet," a lobby- 
ing group has reported. The group said the inci- 
dents were pan of a dramatic increase in classroom 
censorship m the United States over the tost school 
year. 

People for the American Way, a kberal group, 
said in a report released Wednesday that the pub- 
lishers have acknowledged removal of portions of 
the two plays that contained sexual innuendoes 
and swearing. 

One publisher, McGraw-Hill Book Co. in New 
York, said in a letter to the group that its policy 
was to “cut passages from the text that contain 
coarse or embarrassing language for 9th-grade 
students.” 

Harcoun Brace Jovanovich Inc., of Orlando. 
Florida, said it had deleted 300 lines of "Romeo 
and Juliet” because of "ribald or expressly sexual 
terminology." 

People for the American Way has reported a 40- 


percem increase in censorship in the past year. The 
report said that a major cause for the increase was 


successful efforts by conservative groups to re- 

i in me Rye," 


move such classics as “The Catcher 
‘Of Mice and Men” and “The Diary of Anne 

c r i 1 I.'I .i i 


Frank” from school library shelves. 

It said that liberals also had sought to bar books 


from schools, and died a group in Berkeley, Cali- 
fornia, that objected to a book it called “anti- 


Soviet,’ 

The report of People for the American Way 
listed specific inddents of censorship in 46 states. 

In one case in Virginia, the report said, the word 
“unalienable” was deleted from a textbook version 
of the Declaration of Independence, which led the 
state board of education to reguest 8 federal inves- 
tigation of textbook censorship. 

The American Library Association said that the 
report did not go far enough in citing cases of 
censorship. 

Nancy Herman, assistant director of the associa- 
tion's Office for Intellectual Freedom, said, 
“We’ve been documenting this son of thing for a 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD. TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 16, 1985 


**R 




New Tanzanian Leader 
Handled Zanzibar Crisis 


The Associated Press 

DAR ES SALAAM, Tanzania 
— The man chosen Thursday by 
President Julius K. Nyerere of Tan- 
zania as his successor is a main- 
lander who made his political name 
on the spice island of Zanzibar. 

All Hassan Mwinyi, 60. presi- 
dent of Zanzibar and vice president 
of the United Republic of Tanzania 
under Mr. Nyerere since January 
'.1984, has held a series of govern- 
ment posts, but it appears that his 
peaceful melding of the people of 
Zanzibar into Mr. Nyerere's system 
earned him the presidential selec- 
tion. 

Mr. Mwinyi replaced Sheikh 
Aboud Mwinyi Jumbe, who had 
been forced to resign amid ami- 
go vemmeni pressure in the island. 
Sheikh Jumbe had become increas- 
ingly independent of the central 
government, refusing at one point 
to pool proceeds from the clove 
exports that account for about 80 
percent of Zanzibar’s foreign ex- 
change. 

Some islanders openly advocat- 
ed dissolution of the union that 
merged Tanganyika and Zanzi bar 
into Tanzania m 1964, less than 
three years after Tanganyika be- 
came independent from Britain. 

Mr. Mwinyi was able to defuse 
the discontent left by Sheikh 
Jumbe by instituting changes to 
raise the islanders' standard of liv- 
ing. 

Although the republic shares a 


single political pony. Zanzibar 
main tains some autonomy Lh rough 
a separate constitution that pro- 
vides for a popularly elected presi- 
dent and parliament. 

Mr. Mwinyi. who also is a vice 
chairman of the ruling Revolution- 
ary Party, began his government 
career in 1964 os assistant general 
manager of Zanzibar State Trading 
Corp. 

In the early 1970s he was ap- 
pointed minister of state in Mr. 
Nyerere's office. In 1972, he be- 
came minis ter of health. During the 
next 12 years he served as home 
affairs minister, ambassador to 
Egypt and minister of state in the 
vice president's office. 



Tanzania Names Nyerere’s Successor 

Choice of Mwinyi for President Is Seen as a Compromise 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Ali Hassan Mwinyi 


dence in 1 961. When he retires, Mr. 
Nyerere will become one of the few 
leaders in black Africa to voluntari- 
ly leave office. 

He is expected to continue to 
exert great influence as party chair- 
man. where he plans to remain un- 
til his present term expires in 1987. 

The party can constitutionally 
overrule the government and Mr. 
Nyerere's prestige is regarded os so 
great that bis successor is virtually 
obliged to heed the advice of the 
“Mwalimu." or teacher, as be is 
cfllltfll by Tanzanians. 

[Mr. Mwinyi evoked loud cheers 
when he said in his acceptance 
speech. *T am aware of the fact that 
w = -’’'The 


Murphy May Not Hold Talks 


In 9 45 , Some Japanese Saw Only theEnd, Not a New Beginning 


(Continued from Page 1) 

also refuses to enter into talks with 
representatives of the PLO. 

“What we understand from 
Murphy is that the situation is as it 
was before,” said a senior Israeli 
official. “There is no change in the 
Jordanian position, no change in 
the American position ana no 
change in our position. 

“The main obstacle now is Jor- 
dan's request for PLO participa- 
tion," the official added. “We did 
not hear from Murphy any Jorda- 
nian readiness to have direct nego- 


tiations with us. The only way to 
proceed is if Hussein talks to us 
directly." 

It is understood from American 
sources that Yasser Arafat, the 
PLO leader, indicated to Mr. Mur- 
phy through King Hussein that be 
was not ready to openly recognize 
Israel without belter assurances 
that if he did. the United States 
would talk to him. 

The Americans are understood 
to have informed King Hussein 
that they are not convinced Mr. 
Arafat is ready to make the appro- 
priate declarations. 


Reuters 

DAR ES SALAAM, Tanzania 
— Vice President Aii Hassan 
Mwinyi who is president of the 
island of Zanzibar, was chosen 
Thursday by Tanzania’s ruling par- 
ty to succeed President Julius K. 

Nyerere, one of Africa's leading 
statesmen. 

Mr. Mwinyi, 60, whose choice 
surprised some observers, staunch- 
ly upholds Mr. Nyerere’s brand of 
Chinese-inspired socialism, but he 
is not regarded as a dogmatist. 

He is credited with improving 
living standards in Zanzibar 
through libera] economic reforms 

that were later promulgated 

throughout the country. Zanzi bar M walimu Nyerere is around, 
enjoys limi ted autonomy within the 
United Republic of Tanzania. 

Delegates to a special congress of 
the ruling Revolutionary Party vot- 
ed, 1,731-14, for Mr. Mwinyi in a 
secret ballot after Mr. Nyerere 
named him as his choice, it was 
announced. 

Party sources said Mr. Mwinyi 
appeared to be a compromise after 
the party failed to agree on the 
other main candidates. Prime Min- 
ister Salim Ahmed S alim, once a 
candidate for the post of United 
Nations secretary-general, and Ra- 
shidi Kawawa, the secretary-gener- 
al of Tanzania's ruling party. 

Mr. Nyerere, 63. who is regarded 
as one of the key leaders in the 
Third World, is scheduled to step 
down as president in October after 
leading his country since indepen- 


Associated Press reported. “When- 
ever be bestows a person in a posi- 
tion, he will not interfere with 
whatever he does.” 

[He continued: “Nyerere is a gift 
from God. Let Tanzanians not ex- 
pect to get such a gift again."} 

Mr. Nyerere has preached a doc- 
trine of socialist self-sufficiency 
and was earlier a proponent of 
wholesale nationalization, which 
he has recently admitted was a mis- 
take. 

Mr. Mwinyi is described by ob- 
servers as an honest and capable 
administrator and diplomat who 
tempers staunch socialism with 
deeply held Moslem religious be- 
liefs. 


Suspect linked to Rhein-Main Bomb 

FRANKFURT (AP) — The police said Thursday that one of W«j 
Germany's most wanted terror suspects was believed to have purenasw 
the automobile used in the bombing lost week that killed two persons a 
the U.S. Rhein-Main Air Base near here. t . t , . - . 

The federal police said they had identified the likely buyer of the car as 
Sigrid Stemebcck. 36. who his been sought since 1977. She is ?, n 

arrest warrant for crimes by the leftist Red Army Faction, the ppuce said. 
They have distributed photographs of her, and said a reward ot up u 
50.000 Deutsche marks (Si 8 .000) would be given for her capture. 

Ms. Steraebeck is wanted for renting rooms used as hideouts by tne 
Red Army Faction, the police said. She also is sought for having dose ties 
to terrorists who carried out politically motivated murders, in arrotner 
attack on the U.S. military, two bombs exploded early Thursday at an 
Armed Forces Radio Network tower in MOnchengladbach. There were 
no reports of injuries. 


Botha Urges Negotiations 
But Proposes No Changes 

(Continued from Page 1) Britain, meanwhile, expressed 

end to apartheid, and he called on disappointment that Mr. Botha 
the South African government had not announced the release of 
through negotiations with blacks Mr. Mandela, 
and other communities “to estab- i n J ohann esburg, speaking be- 
lish credible milestones that will fore Mr. Botha's speech. Mr. Man- 
lead to that outcome." 

Mr. McFarlane said in Santa 
Barbara, California, near where 
President Ronald Reagan is on va- 
cation, that “it is not for outsiders 
to prescribe exactly how that end 
will come." 


(Continued from Page 1) 

the capital the Japanese Cabinet 
had already reacted the final, 
wrenching decision to surrender. 

The process had begun the previ- 
ous spring, following the appoint- 
ment of Kantaro Suzuki as prime 
minister. His unspoken objective 
was to find a way out of war, hope- 
fully salvaging some measure of 
Japanese honor along the way. 

Japan would probably have quit 
sooner had the Allies made it dear 
that their demand for uncondition- 
al surrender of Japan's forces 
would not mean the removal of the 
emperor from his throne: After the 
Nagasaki bomb on Aug. 9, Japa- 
nese military leaders held out for a 
continued fight on the ground that 
Japan without the emperor would 
jiot be Japan. 

; It was Hirohito hims elf who in 
the end brought peace. The long 
war had been prosecuted in his re- 
.vered name and. in one of the few 
■decisive acts of his reign, he.put it 
to an end. 

On Aug. 14, the cabinet and em- 


peror met m secret in an under- 
ground bunker on the Imperial Pal- 
ace grounds to discuss a message 
sent by the Allies in response to a 
Japanese query about the emper- 
ors future role. The ultimate form 
of government, the message said, 
will “be established by the freely 
expressed will of the Japanese peo- 
ple." 

One by one, civilian cabinet 
members reluctantly argued for 
surrender; military men pressed for 
a fight to the end. The meeting was 
split and turned to the emperor. 

"If the war continues our entire 
nation will be laid waste." he said, 
according to John W. Toland, a 
historian. "Hundreds of thousands 
more will die. I cannot endure 
this." The war must end, and now, 
he said. Two of his ministers col- 
lapsed to the floor. 

Now came the task of telling the 
people that the struggle to which 
three million soldiers and civilians 
had been sacrificed bad been for 
nothing. The emperor offered to do 
it himself with a radio address, in 


part from fear that soldiers might 
otherwise conclude that traitors 
had taken control of the govern- 
ment and stage a coup. 

Those fears were real Word of 
the surrender decision had begun 
to leak. The same day the cabinet 
met. soldiers seized the palace 
grounds in an attempt to keep the 
war going The next morning, a 
mob sacked the home of Prime 
Minister Suzuki just minutes after 
he escaped in a car. 

At noon on Aug 15, the Japa- 
nese people dutifully assembled at 
friends' houses, in government of- 
fices. in schools and on parade 
grounds around the country. Sol- 
diers overseas crowded around ra- 
dio receivers. An announcer gave 
the order to stand. A hush fell over 
the nation and the emperor s voice 
was heard. 

It began: “After pondering deep- 
ly the general trends of the world 
and the actual conditions obtaining 
in our empire today, we have decid- 
ed to effect a settlement of the 
present situation by resorting to an 
extraordinary measure." 


Reception was bad on many ra- in Tokyo, where the souls of Ja- 
dios. To obfuscate things further, pan’s war dead are believed to rest, 
the emperor was speaking in his people prostrated themselves on 
usual vague manner and in the ar- the ground and wepL Young wom- 
chaic language of the court, unin - en walked the grounds in front of 
telligible to most of his subjects, the palace in tears. 

But after the initial shock, most 
Japanese seemed to have fell a 
•wave of relief, a sense of liberation 
from the air raids, the diets of sweet 
potatoes and the certainty of im- 
pending death in battle with the 
enemy. 


People listened and wondere 

“The war situation has devel- 
oped not necessarily to Japan's ad- 
vantage,” he said, continuing: “The 
enemy has begun to employ a new 
and most cruel bomb, the power of 
which to do damage is indeed incal- 
culable. 

“It is according to the dictate of 
time and fate that we have resolved 
to pave the way for a grand peace 
for all the generations to come by 
enduring the unendurable and suf- 
fering what is insufferable.” 

The word “surrender’' never revolt. 


passed his lips. Instead, the emper- 
or referred to accepting the Allies 1 
Joint Declaration, the call for un- 
conditional surrender of its forces 
made at the summit conference 
held in Potsdam. Germany, in July. 

All over the country, people 
cried that day. At Yasukuni Shrine 


Srlhune! 



2 PORI 


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dda’s wife, Winnie, had predicted 
more violence if Mr. Botha failed to 
meet black demands. 

“He will simply plunge this 
country into the worst violence any 
country has ever seen.” said Mrs. 
Mandela, who visited her husband 
Wednesday in Cape Town’s Polls- 
moor prison. She spoke at a news 
conference in her lawyer’s office. 

She said her husband asked to 
talk to Mr. Botha to “get his direct 
views." 


said, 

more repressive because the only 
way they know how to deal with 
opposition is to produce the iron 
fist. 

“ I hope President Reagan sees 
now the kind of person he has been 
trying to protect. Here is a man 
who is refusing hands that are ex- 
tended to him, the black Anglican 
bishop added. 

„ ... .... ... Meanwhile, the government im- 

^me wIdKa mcludjog Admi- posed j curfew on Sc niidon-sbig- 
ral Talqjiro Omshi, the founder of black township, Sowew, 
the kamikaze corps, shl Uiar stons- Wsday night, attending resnic- 
aehs open in muni strode, bothm titm! alria^ applied inJtiwnships 
personal anguish and » tale re- b eastern of Cape Prm- 
sponsibility Tor the defeat Otheu tace mder emergency porSek 
tried to rouse their comrades to . 

The government ordered a 10 
P.M.-to 4-A.M. curfew in the black 
township, where an estimated two 
millio n people live. The curfew also 
extended to Alexandra, north of 
Johannesburg. The order also 
placed stricter controls on school 
boycotts and the transportation of 
gasoline in Soweto and Alexandra. 

The measures came after arson 
and violence had continued despite 
the imposition of the state of emer- 


Iraq Says Jets Destroy Iran’s Oil Port 

MANAMA, Bahrain (AP) — Iraq said Thursday that its jet fighters 
had d emolish ed Iran's main oil export terminal at Kharg Island, m the 
northern sector of the Gulf. The report could not be verified. 

There was no comment from Tehran, bat the Iranian news agency 
reported that Iranian forces shot down an Iraqi plane Thursday over the 
northern Gulf. Maritime executives along the Gulf said that radio 
monitors had picked up reports of unusual air activity. A separate report 
said a Norwegian-owned tanker was damaged at Kharg. 

In Washington, the Iraqi repot was received with skepticism at the 
State Department. An official remarked that the island was especially 
well-defended and said that it seemed unlikely its facilities bid been 
destroyed. 

4 Warrants Issued in Greenpeace Case 

PARIS (UP I) — Internationa] warrants were issued Thursday for three 
men suspected in the bombing of the Greenpeace ship Rainbow Warrior 
in New Zealand and for a woman believed to have infiltrated the 
environmental group for the French secret service, news reports said. 

The reports said that aD four were French intelligence agents. The New 
Zealand authorities requested the warrants from Interpol, which notified 
the French authorities. The reports said the four included the three crew 
members of a sailboat seen crocked near the Rainbow Warrior shortly 
before it sunk, and a woman who befriended Greenpeace members in 
April or May. 

The Rainbow Warrior was bombed and sunk July 10 in Auckland 
harbor, killing one man on board, as the ship lay wailing to lead a protest 
into French nuclear testing grounds in the South Pacific. President 
Francois Mitterrand of France nas ordered an investigation of the attack. 

Bishop Desmond M. Tutu, win- TTCI TT _ 

"Tdf “He I ^uSd fcTbe *even ^ Urges Marcos to Ensure Fair Vole 

WASHINGTON (Combined 
Dispatches) —The Rea°an admin- 
istration has urged President Ferdi- 
nand E Marcos of the Philippines 
to ensure that any new balloting in 
the country be fair, according to 
U.S. State Department sources. 

The Philippine government an- 
nounced Aug. 8 that it might con- 
sider holding elections within a few 
months, well in advance of the 
scheduled 1987 vote. 


But with the word having come 
from the emperors mouth, resis- 
tance was morally impossible. 
There was now virtue to be ob- 
tained from accepting defeat. 

The Asahi Shimbun newspaper 
told its readera that day: “If the 
great voice says go -forward, we 
must obey. If the great voice says 
v we must also obey. Thai is the 
ly way of the imperial people.*' 
The Jai 


The U.S. ambassador, Stephen 
Bosworth, is reported to have ex- 
pressed U.S. concern about the 
fairness of the election process, es- 
pecially since Mr. Marcos named 
three persons believed to be Mar- 
cos loyalists to the national Com- 
mission on Elections last month. 
As a result, six of the seven com- 
missioners are widely considered to 
be Marcos supporters. 

In Manila, the rulin g New Soci- 
ety Party crushed an opposition bid 
Thursday to revive impeachment 
charges against Mr. Marcos. The 



Fertfinand E. Marcos 

opposition accused him of a “cul- 
pable violation" of the constitution 
but its measure was defeated in the 
National Assembly, 102-46, with 
one abstention. (WP, UP! ) 


fapanese tobk it ‘to heart 8®°^ ^ a 8°- 

When U.S. occupation troops be- The unrest in protest against 
gan arriving two weeks later at for- white-minority rule that has 
mer kamikaze headquarters at At- gripped South Africa for 1 1 
sugj Air Base, they were greeted, months, claiming more than 600 
Mr. Toland has written, by a recep- black lives, killed five more persons 
non party offering orange punch. Thursday. 


Nakasone Is Criticized 
For Visit to War Shrine 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Yasuhiro Nakasone 
made the first official visit by a 
postwar Japanese prime minister to 
the country’s mam shrine for its 
war dead Thursday, a symbolic 
move that stirred controversy at 
home and condemnation abroad. 

His visit to the Yasukuni Shrine 
to mark the 40th anniversary of the 
end of World War II was greeted 
by polite applause from hundreds 
of onlookers but protests from op- 
position politicians, among others. 


garded everything connected with 
the war as wrong," said Sdzaburo 
Sato, a Nakasone adviser. 

Earlier Thursday, Emperor Hi- 
rohito, 84, the only World War II 
bead of state still tivipg, told 8,000 
people at a memorial ceremony in 
central Tokyo: “On this occasion I 
think of the many who fell on the 
battlefield and suffered the ravages 
of war, and even now my heart 
aches.” 


Seoul Leaders Discuss Campus Bill 

SEOUL (AP) — President Chun Doo Hwan met with Lee Min Woo, 
the leader of South Korea's main opposition party, Thursday in an effort 
to prevent a showdown over a government bill designed to crack down on 
campus dissent 

The proposed legislation, which has been called unconstitutional by 
the New Korea Democratic Party, includes provisions for a maximum 
seven-year prison term for people supporting student disturbances, and 
for up to six months of “reorientation" at an education camp, without 
trial, for student radicals. 

In continuing protests against the bill, a 26-year-old dissident reported- 
ly was badly burned Thursday Mien he tried to immolate himself in the 
southern dty of Kwangju, and seven students were reported under arrest 
after demonstrating at the UJS. Embassy compound m central Seoul. 

For the Record 

Lesotho's first general elections in 15 years, scheduled for next month, 
have beat cancelled and Prime Minister Leabua Jonathan has been 
returned to power unopposed, it was announced in Maseru. (Reuters) 

Sudan's military leader, General Abdul Rahman Swareddahab, will visit 
Washington and the deputy chairman of the military council will go to 
Moscow next month, the daily El-Ayam said Thursday. The prime 
minister, Gazouli Dafaa Allah, will tour West European nations in 
October, thepaper said. (Reuters) 

About 10,000 Tmnnans bare been expefied by Libya in recent months, 
Tunisia smd Thursday. Libya had also stopped buying Tunisian goods 

intoTunisu 


and halted the flow of Libyan tourists into Tunisia. 


(Reuters) 


China said Wednesdayjhat the 
and an over 


of 


visit “would hurt the feelings 
people in China, Japan and all o 
the world.” Radio Moscow said it 
stemmed from militarist tendencies 
in Japanese government policy. 

Political opponents said that Mr. 
Nakasone had breached the consti- 
tutional separation of stale and re- 
ligion. They said he had raised the 
specter of a revival of the state 
using the Shinto religion to whip up 
nationalist fervor, as militarists did 
in prewar days. 

Mr. Nakasone sought to dispd 
such fears. “My visit in no way 
means a revival of militarism or of 
state Shintoism." he said. 

At the gates to Yasukuni which 
is dedicated to the 2.4 million Japa- 
nese who died in wars over the past 
century, groups of demonstrators 
scuffled with the police and waved 
banners protesting the visit. 

Masashi Ishibashi, leader of the 
opposition Japan Socialist Party, 
told a protest rally: “The Nakasone 
visit goes hand in hand with in- 
creased armaments, a step toward 
accepting new war deaths." 

Political analysts said that Mr. 
Nakasone's visit was part of an 
attempt to encourage a reassess- 
ment by Japanese of their sense of 
identity and place in the world. 

“Nakasone is challenging the 
postwar pacifist trend, which re- 


Publishers Edit Shakespeare Hezbal la h Hints 

Suicide Bombers 
Were Its Members 


In Textbooks, U.S. Group Says 


(Continued from Page I) 
long, long time, and our indications 
are very much the same." 

The report specifically blamed 
the increased censorship on a net- 
work of conservative groups allied 
with the Illinois-based Eagle Fo- 
rum. The president of that organi- 
zation is Phyllis Schlafly, the con- 
servative activist 
In a telephone interview, Mrs. 


Schlafiy said that she never has 
tried to censor books and accused 
People for the American Way of 
“maliciously distorting the issue." 

Malcolm Lawrence, president of 
the Maryland Coalition of Con- 
cerned Parents, said. This report 
indicates a healthy sign that par- 
ents around the country are look- 
ing at what’s being taught in the 
classrooms." 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


SAO-ffl.CK'S • MASTER'S • DOCTORATE 
For Wo*. AeoMc, Life Expor Imu. 
5«nd detoUrt resume 
For free evaluation. 

PACIFIC WESTERN UWYBtSITY 

400 N. Sepulveda BIvd„ 

Las Angelas. California 
90049. Dept. 23, U.&A. 


lines Deleted From Bard’s Plays 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Among the 400 lines from Shakespeare’s plays 
excised by textbook publishers were the following: 

Spread thy close curtain, love-performing night. 

That rude day's eyes may wink r and Romeo 
Leap to these arms untalk’d of and unseen. 

Lavers can see ta do their amaurous rites 
By their own beauties . . . . 

Lines spoken by Juliet, in “Romeo and Juliet," Act HI, Scene 2. 
Nay, but to live 

In the rank sweat of an enseamed bed. 

Stew'd in corruption, honeying and making love 
Over the hasty sty 

Lines spoken by Hamlet, in “Hamlet." Act HI, Scene 4. 



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noo 



The Associated Press 

BEIRUT — A leader of Hezbal- 
lah, the radical Shiite Moslem 
group, has hinted that the group 
was involved in snidde-bombing 
attacks on U.S., French and Israeli 
targets in Lebanon in which more 
than 400 people were killed, the 
paper An Nahar said Thursday. 

The independent daily quoted 
Sheikh Sobhr Tofdh, a leader of the 
pro-Iranian group in Lebanon, as 
nailing the suicide bombers as 
“holy warrior heroes." 

Meanwhile, the heaviest fighting 
in weeks broke out in Beirut. Pdice 
said four persons were killed and 
41 wounded Thursday, the day af- 
ter a car bomb killed 12 persons. 

Sheikh Tofeili was speaking in 
the town of Baalbek in a ceremony 
for three Iranian Revolutionary 
Guards killed in Lebanon. He said: 
“The brothers in the Revolutionary 
Guards came to Lebanon at the 
beginning of the Israeli invasion. 
They put their hands in the hands 
of others and with Hezballah." 

“The names of many of the Mu- 
jahidin heroes who knocked down 
the fortresses of the infidels and 
blew up the American Embassy 
twice, as well as American, French 
and Israeli military installations, 
"are still unknown,* he said. 

The bombings include the Aoril 
18, 1983. bombing of the U.S. Em- 
bassy in Beirut, killing 63 peoole- 
theOcL 23. 1983. bombings 
Marine Corps local Beirut head- 
quarters and a French paratroooer 
ba«. kfllmg 242 U.S. I £v«S£ 
and 58 French troops; and the 
Sept. 20, 1984, attack on a US 
Embassy annex that killed 14 








\ 


*•* 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 16, 1985 



Page 3 


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^ipspecchw tf£ i a n Li ? cs ‘*" caw h Iadcoi sufficient in/onna- 

-I* ^ of Boeing 74fS,°i SS ^ teB driihes Aviation experts have suggested 

-Thursday. '^mas The Washington Pon. reported ^ a device situated abnosUirect- 




.pursued theories that faatmhw ca ^ s ?^ hy structural Xartore te-thfr to the main body might have given 
vices or miMam. — -t. uusto- tail besnn 'mmmv' credence after way. That coold have pulled a hole 


X 1 ® K-i 






investigating the Un 'T W8shin S I “ 1 J - 
day crash of a Japan Air rheones. that the ‘.crash was 

Issued theoriesXt fe«^„ 7 , 47 “osedbys 

® SJa^SiWfcietWBfoiind 

■ tb '^ AfomWpwl0f 

wo4s ™ *5 

T;*s?^»c!ftSS3 

rA from Tokyo for 
"« found. 


ly above her seat that fastens the 
front edge of the vertical stabilizer 




.V J 78 ***&« by heli- 
•jopier, the pohee said. 


tThe US. Federal Aviation Ari- 
. nujustration said it was not putting 
out an inspection warning to ai? 


the taD, was found ifusday, 

Loss of the parts would not have 
been viable Cram the cockpit. But 
the loss could explain why the 
plane flew an erratic course for half 
an hour before crashing; In radio 
messages,, die pilot bad said, “Un- 
able to comm” 

Investigators have found” major 
pieces of the plaiteV vertical stabi- 
lizer, or taD firu- arlhe crash ate. 
The -horizontal stabilizers were 
found amid the crash debris. 


Yunri Ochiai, an off-duty flight 
jng the four 


attendant who was among 
survivors; said that the troubles be- 






US. Passengers Choosing 
Seats in Rear of Airliners 






'4- tl 7l 


* Fair \i 



r-t.T 


By-laurel E. Miller 

- fYasbiitgion PasiSernce ■• 

V WASHINGTON — An increas- 
ing number of U.S. atrling passeo- 

- gers are requesting scats in the rear 
ofplanes after two recent crashes in 
which most of the snrvivt&'s were 
seated m. the taD sections. 

' “I seated mysdf in the back of. 
the plane,” said Larry Boggs of 
Arlington, Virginia, reforing to his 
.flight into -National Airport fr om 
Toronto bn Tuesday. Mr. 
said that although he is a nojosmot- 
.cr, he fdt compdled to sit in the 

V rear df the plane, which is the seo- 
.'.■tibn usually reserved far smokers. 

Most of the 30.surwvors-of the 
-Bdta-Air Lines .crash at Daflas- 
•;Fprt Worth International Airport 
vtia.Aug.. 2, in: winch 134_ people 
I'ffied; were seated in the jet's taD 
•r section. Tbefour survivors of Mou- 
.. ; day's crash of a Japan Air’ Lines jet 
'ft. near Tokyo, which IriDed 520 peo- 
" -/pie, also were seated in the rear Of 
■'the i 


Agents for Western, Delta, East- 
ern and Fail Am also said that 
requests for seats in the back have 
increased since the Delta crash. 

Safety officials and organiza- 
tions associated with the air travel 


in the fuselage, causing the white 
vapor — a sign of rapid decompres- 
sion — that she also reported. 

Investigators were examining the 
jet’s two flight recorders. 

The Minisuy of Transport or- 
dered airlines to inspect a series of 
bolts, rivets and metal tabes that 
fasten the vertical stabilizer to the 
fusel ag e. They also were told to 
inspect rudder hinges, balance 
weights on upper rudders and 
equipment that controls the rud- 
ders, and to check for leakage of 
'hydraulic fluid. 

The inspection must be finished 
before 300 more flight hours have 
elapsed for planes teat have made 
fewer than 15,000 flights, and with- 
in 100 hours for planes that have 
made more than 15,000. 

The inspection takes several 
hours and fti uafl s visual examina- 
tion and tee painting of dye onto 
surfaces to detect otherwise invisi- 
ble cracks. X-ray machines and 
cameras teat can be inserted into 
the bodies may also be used. 


Ta8 Fin of 747: The Jet’s Rudder 


The Japan Air Lines 74? that crashed 
near Tokyo appeared to have lost part of 
its vertical tad fin w«n its Hinged rudder, 
which helps turn the aircraft Whatwasbe- 
lieved to he a piece from the fm was found 
in waters BO miles from the crash site The 
pdot originally reported the right rear door 
had "broken" and loss of cabin pressure 


Vertical 
tail fin 



Horizontal 

tail fin 


White House Draft Order Would End 
Anti-Bias Standards for Contractors 


By Robert Pear 

NW York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON - The White 
House staff has drafted an execu- 


numerical goals for hiring women 
and members of minority groups as 
a remedy for past discrimination. 

Existing rules require contrac- 


tive order that would repeal re- . tors to develop specific goals and 
quiremems for federal contractors timetables for the prompt achieve- 


to set numerical goals as a remedy 
to job discrimination. 

Since 1968 thousands of govern- 
ment contractors have bam re- 
quired to hire and promote blacks, 
women and Hispanic persons in 
rough proportion to the number of 
available, qualified candidates in a 
given labor market- 
white House officials contend 
that existing rules have not signifi- 


meat of full and equal employment 
opportunity wherever deficiencies 
have been found by either the em- 
ployer or the government. 

The draft order states: “Nothing 
in ibis executive order shall be in- 
terpreted to require or to provide a 
legal basis for a government con- 
tractor or subcontractor to utilize 


any numerical goal, quota or ratio, 
.or otherwise to discriminate 
candy helped blacks in low-wage against, or grant any preference to, 
jobs, have encouraged employers to any individual or group on the ba- 
discrimmate against white males sis of race, color, religion, sex or 



mg the type of plane involved and 
crash conditions. 



i 


icd any 

chastens on where you should sit in 
an airplane to survive the impact,” 
said ura Furman, spokesman for 
theNational Transportation Safety 
Board. ~ 

-Mr. Turman said teat post-crash 
fire is the most life-threatening de- 
ment for those who survive a crash 
impact, and because some planes 
(branding the DC-10, L-IOll and 
727 ) have engines in the taxi sec- 
tion,. fuel Hues running from the 
-fuel storage in the wings to those 
pose a potential fire dan- 
■gff./; ; . : ; : V.- 
“Because pf the complete unpre- 


und t. Vs* 


. les Ondbedc, a superidsor. .. 

- for New YodtAir at National Air- - tectahflity -oka. crash, you might as 

' poit’aud he has seen requests for - well flip a com” to ^ — 

seats in the; rear jump 20 percent to 
*. 30 percent since ’tee-Ddta crash. 

Before teat “people nevetciealfy 
asked about seats in; the rear.” J 
Debbi Spiegc^a ticket agentfoi 
Northwest Orient Airlines at Na- 
tional Airport, said that seating on 
four or. five, fights in recent days, 
bad bosnjiiggled toaccomnwdate 
! requests /pr seats, m rear sections. 


said Thomas .Tripp of the An 
Transpoi^ Association. 

• “fo/smne accidents the rear is 
safer,, and in -some accidents the 
front is safer” said Daniel John- 
son, the author cS “Just in Case,” a 
boot about aiitdane safety. Mr. 
Johnson added teat the only agreed 
upon “safest place” to sit was near 
an exit . . ’ 


■ Boeing Called for Checks 

Earlier, the Las Angeles Times 
reported from Los Angeles: 

The Boeing Co. began advising 
airlines in 1983 to increase inspec- 
tions for structural cracks in 
Boeing aircraft, including 747s, be- 
cause of concern teat potentially 
dangerous airframe deterioration 
coaid go undetected. 

The inspections were required by 
the Federal Aviation Administra- 
tion after an exhaustive analysis of 
a 1977 crash — in which a Boring 
707 jet came apart in the air — 
revealed that traditional inspection 
was not capable of ensuring the 
integrity of aircraft. 

The inspection was “developed 
to take care of airplanes that have 
been aging,” said Bill Zenker, an 
FAA inspector in San Francisco. 
The Boeing 747 was included “be- 
cause the 747 readies bade to the 
very eariy 70s; it is old now.” 

To comply with the FAA re- 
quirement, Boeing issued a series of 
“supplementary inspection docu- 
ments” to operators of the Boring 
747, instructing them to look lor 
deterioration in parts never before 
subject to inspection. 

Airlines were instructed to con- 
duct the supplemental inspections 
for cracks, corrosion and fatigue in 
virtually all areas of the Boring 
747, ind ucing tee taD assemblies. 


U.S. Says Soviet Halted 
A-Testing While Ahead 


By Gerald M. Boyd treaty prohibited nuclear blasts in 
New York Tima Senior the atmospbere. under water and in 

SANTA BARBARA, California outer space. 

The Reagan administration, re- “We welcome his recognition of 

sponding to a halt.in nuclear lest- the importance of tee verification 
mg by the Soviet Union, has insist- question in any serious discussion 
ed teat the moratorium was being of nuclear testing." Mr. Speakes 
imposed at a lime of Soviet nudear said of the Soviei.Ieader’s remarks, 
advantage. ■ Kohl Seeks Meeting 

1^ Speakes, tee White House Chancdlor Helmut Kohl of 
spokesxnan, was reacting Wednes- West Germany wants to meet with 

day to “ Mr. Reagan before tee U.S. presi- 

day by Mikhail S. Gorbachev teat dent ^ ^ Gorbachev ^ u, 


Moscow had not completed its lat- 
est test series, as the United States 
contends, but had interrupted test- 
ing to announce the moratorium. 

The Soviet halt is to last until the 
end of the year, subject to indefi- 
nite extension if tee United States 
were to join in. 

Mr. Speakes said that the Soviet 
Union, before announcing tee halt, 
bad finished testing and deploying 
an “entire generation of new mis- 
siles, tee SS-18s. SS-19s and SS- 
20s.” In addition, he said, it did 
substantial testing on SS-24s and 
SS-2Ss. 

He also reacted to Mr, Gorba- 
chev's assertion that a hall in rest- 
ing was verifiable by existing tech- 
nical means. Testing has been 
limited to underground explosions 
since 1963, when an international 


November, government sources 
said Thursday in Bonn, according 
to Agence France-Presse: 

Mr. Kohl's foreign policy advis- 
er, Horst Teltschik, is to visit the 
United Slates on Sqn. 4 for talks 
on the Strategic Defense Initiative. 
The sources said that Mr. Teltschik 
would explore tee chances of a such 
a meeting then. 


and have imposed costly compli- 
ance burdens upon employ ers. 

As drafted, the order also would 
forbid the Labor Department to 
use statistical evidence to measure 
contractor compliance. For years 
tee department has routinely used 
statistical evidence to assess wheth- 
er contractors were discriminating 
against women and members of mi- 
nority groups. 

[In Santa Barbara. California, 
the White House spokesman, Larry 
Speakes, told The Associated Press 
on Wednesday that the proposed 
revision “is a month-old draft that 
has no standing whatsoever. It has 
not been discussed in the Cabinet 
Council and certainly not present- 
ed to the president.") 

The executive order was drafted 
by members of tee White House 
staff. It would take effect upon tee 
president's signature and would 
have the force of law. Until 
Wednesday no text was available. 

The order is generally consistent 
with President Ronald Reagan's 
civil rights policies as be has de- 
scribed them over tee last four 
years, but his signature is not a 
foregone conclusion because the 
administration has been internally 
divided on tee Issue. Labor Depart- 
ment officials, including Secretary 
William E. Brock, have expressed 
more support for affirmative action 
than have Justice Department offi- 
cials. 

If signed, the order would elimi- 
nate most of the legal authority for 
tee Labor Department to require 
that government contractors set 


national origin with respect to any 
aspect of employment, including 
but not limited to recruitmenL hir- 
ing. promotion, upgrading, demo- 
tion. transfer, layoff, termination, 
rates of pay or other forms of com- 
pensation, and selection for train- 
ing. including apprenticeship." 

“Nor." it says, “shall any govern- 
ment contractor or subcontractor 
be determined to have violated this 


order due to a failure to adopt or 
attain any statistical measures." 

The Labor Deportments exist- 
ing rules for government contrac- 
tors were issued in 1968. 

The draft order directs the labor 
secretary to issue new rales within 
30 days. Compliance, it says, shall 
be determined on tee basis of each 
contractor's “demonstrated non- j 

discriminatory treatment” of its j 

employees, "irrespective of tee 
number of minorities and women 
recruited, trained, hired or promot- , 

ed by tee contractor.” 1 . 

The old affirmative action rules, 1 

according to the administration, 
have generated more than SI bil- 
lion in yearly business for lawyers, 
statisticians and economists who | 

help companies comply with the 
rales and defend their employment 
practices. 

Richard T. Seymour, an attorney £ 

with the Lawyers Committee for -J 

Civil Rights Under Law. said the 15 

draft executive order "would 
amend the present nondiscrimina- 
tion requirements for government - 

contractors by removing all their 
substance and leaving only window 6 

dressing." 


Hurricane Strikes U.S. Gulf Coast 


The A suxroied Press 
NEW IBERIA, Louisiana — 

The eye of the hurricane designated 
Danny hit the U.S. mainland 
Thursday morning just off tee 
coast between Lake Charles and ' has declared a state of erne 
Lafayette with torrential rain and in 13 parishes, but no dea 


More than 30.000 people had 
been evacuated from offshore drill- 
ing rigs and towns as far south as 
Galveston. Texas, officials said. 
Governor Edwin W. Edwards 
iency 
or 


rgen 

itns 


wind gusts above 90 mph. 


injuries had been reported. 



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L.A. Moves to Ban Bias 


mpu- El 









. . . Bjr Vicror Merina . 

- LosAngdn TumsSoyke . 

. . LOS ANGELES— The Los An- 
geles Qty Council, worried that 
AIDS., victims ra being created as 
“lepers,” has anarmpocsty adopted 

an rarti njtnw- h anging dwtriirunfl- 

tion^ajpunst people, who have coo- 

The ordinance, adopted 
Wednesday, was hailed as the fast 
of its kind in tee United States. It 
woufo aUow the atuxrney to sue 
employers who disnriK or refuse to 
lure victims of acqmied immune 
deficiency .syndrome, jestanrarits 
that bar people with the disease 
and landlords who evict tenants or 
who tuna down prospective renters 
because of AIDS. 

Schools also would be prohibited 
froor barring victims or tbdr ab- 


lings. 

s Smce 



‘1 


its discovery a few years 

aga AIDS has become a identiess 
killer,” said Councilman Joel 
Wachs, who sponsored tee ordi- 
nance. “And yet a society which 
should be showing compassion to 
people who are ill is often shunning 
teem like lepers.” 

The new lawwould take effect as 

soon as it is signed by Mayor Tom 

sign the measure before the end of 
the week. 

A Los Angeles County health 
report released W«bes£y raid 
that 1^256 cases of AIDS have 
been reported nationwide, includ- 
ing 1,0* in Los A^« Connhr. 

died of AIDS in tee county from 

January to June, an average of 
! more than one a day. 


Physicians who addressed the 
cranial Wednesday urged the mea- 
sure’s passage, saying teat it was 
needed not only to crack down on 
those who discriminate against 
AIDS victims but to reassure peo- 
ple who mistakenly believe that it is 
necessary to discriminate because 
the disease can be spread through 
casoaloontact. 

Dr. Shirley Fannin, associa t e di- 
rector of communicable disease 
control for. Lbs Angeles County, 
cold the council teat tee law, whidi 
she helped draft, was needed as a 
means of “educating the public and 
as a way of protecting people who 
are not able to protect themselves." 

Otherphysjdans joined in stress- 
ing that tee ADDS virus is transmit- 
ted ' through sexual contact or 
through a mingling of blood or 
blood products. Toe disease de- 
stroys the imm une system and 
leaves the body prey to various ail- 
ments. 

Dentists' and doctors’ offices, 
hospitals, hospices and nursing 
homes are included in tee ordi- 
nance. However, blood banks and 
sperm banks are exempted. 

Maureen Siegel, a deputy city 
attorney, said that tee ordinance 
provides; certain exemptions. Far 
example, it allows employers to clis- 
piicc or discipline people with 
AIDS under certain aroimstances, 
such as when a food worker has 
opea sores that could be a public 
health danger, whether or not the 
sons are the result of tee disease. 

It also would bar employers from 
twr ptfring homosexual employees to 
take tests to prove that they do not 
have the disease. Relatives of AIDS 
victims would be similarly protect- 
ed. 



Varied Virus 
Called Bar to 
AIDS Study 


The Assccmed Press 

WASHINGTON — The virus 
suspected of causing AIDS has so 
many variations in its genetic struc- 
ture that developing a preventive 
vaccine against tee disease may 
prove very difficult, if it can be 
done at alt researchers said Thurs- 
day. 


Mayor Tom Bradley 


York has reported that in 
AIDS was tee leai 


A statistician lor the dty of New 


19S4, 

leading cause of 
death of men in the caty between 
the ages of 30 and 39, United Press 
International reported from New 
Yoric 

Alan Kristal, director of New 

ic SumSance and Satisfies, sail 
Wednesday that the disease also 
was one of Lhe top five causes of 
death for New York City men be- 
tween the ages of 20 and SO. 

“AIDS is rapidly becoming tee 
No. 1 cause of death of all young 
males in New York Gty.” he said 

Although fewer women than' 
men have died from AIDS, Mr. 
Kristal said: “AIDS will soon be- 
come a women's health issue.” Al- 
ready, he said, the disease is the 
second leading cause of death for 
women between the ages of 30 and 
34 in New York City. 

In preparing the statistics, Mr. 
Kristal studied death certificates 
and checked them against lists oi 
AIDS cases reported by hospital! 
and doctors. 


Scientists at the National Cancer 
Institute said they looked at tee 
suspect vims found in 18 patients 1 
with acquired immune ddlciency 
syndrome or who were at high risk 
of getting the disease, and each 
isolated virus showed a different 
variation in its genetic structure. 


The findings, to be published 
Friday in tee journal Science, mean 
that it could be difficult to find a 
co mm on site on the viruses that can 
be targeted for preventive and ther- 
apeutic measures, they said. 

To develop a vaccine, research- 
ers say they need io find a common 
protein region, preserved in all 
variations of the virus, that triggers 
an immunologic response. 


Dr. Flossie Wong-Staal, Dr. 
Robert C. Gabo and Dr. Mikulas 
Popovic at the cancer institute also 
said there was no distinct viral pat- 
tern found in patients with AIDS 
as opposed to those with a similar 
immunity disorder called AlDS-re- 
lated complex, or even to those who 
were viral carriers without any dis- 
ease symptoms. 


Dr. Gallo, one of the discoverers 
of (he suspect virus called HTLV- 
fZZ, said that the viral diversity “is a 
worry when it comes to vaccine 

development-” 


■4 Time Running Short in Reagan Policy Fight 

_ ,v nn-adenfs visit to a cemetery ai pated an aggressive effort by Mi 


, president's visit to a cemetery at gated an aggessve effort by Mr. 

fOmteraedfitHnP 8 ^ 1 ’ Bitburg, West Germany, where SS Reagan lo hold down speudm& in- 

rid seariw benefit cuts ai* buried, and, most it- ctogsek^wasofspemhiig 

° • S !5KS-il ner3 to teeir 1986 Reagan’s cancer sur- bills, and to battle against a tax 

some political pero oratty, mt. ****** increase in the revisions of the tax 

cam p a jg n s,.he added. 


LsUia* OUU i*a vatuv ujyiuiiii. « ma-w 

increase in the revisions of the tax 
laws. 

Bui Nancy Reagan has insisted 
teat her husband’s official business 

. . . * L'P- L. 


m a av0 ;H anorner f itv »- ^ partially blotted bib 

chief coKOTwas io ^^ ^ umit/ agenda in be kepi io a minimnm while he 

flection reversal lu® u !£__ rf -| S },„*;„»« fmm tee recuperates at the ranch from sur- 

SB5I1-H-5.C— 

made Social Security p K^iddto Nicaraguan rebels, growth from his intestine. 

campaign issue- _ ^ flt tee too of tee list of Mr. Reagan also facts mlensifr 

ing demands on his time this au- 




iUC »»»»»-— - 

Mr. Reagan’S ^ xng aemanos on ms rare ui* a*- 

siSsSSsi js-’s-sttea stsis,ssx 

■ mnny^^ David Hoffman arms the White 

arrived 31 ^ attempt V®!5L a “ faU offciV 


staff, Mr. 
that “we’ve 
he 


ssk“ — saftaai™" - 

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government officials, diplomats doctors and priests. The important Wednesdav 

and victims, the proseendon has thing is that this doesn t stop here; Mr -. Str J^L 
tried to show that the nine were the trial has implicated many oth- that the foreign wnesewerc 
directly responsible for the disap- era." among the m«i importan . 

pearance of^e 5uu 9.000 dS More than 1.700 cases brought they gave 
ians during the military’s counter- againsi other mflimry officials are They also were MptuL n c sata m 




campaign of tte late TSS^uTlq ^ countering the defense's argnent 
ariy mb, other human rights ofurials have that the mflitai y juntas we re un- 

dons of an am- ' ' JL “ 

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tar President Rail the Carter administration, de- fp ]|lpl*OP lit 
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witnesses Wednesday. Early next txol of 


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cere. Admiral Massera looked up with 

The trial strained relations be- a big smile, she said, and in a rao- 
veeu the civilian government and tioo of washing his hands said. 


By Robert J. McCartney . 

Htata ycw Pag Sen** . 
MEXICO CITY — BSaitadort 


The maximuni sentence any of tween the crnhan goyeranmnt and non of washing his hands _■ gucniUa from has a& 

the nine officials can receive is 25 the military. The mflnary’s unhap- “Remember } nounced thaihplans to msne hi 

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a In the trial, witnesses ranging ing that sotk testimony bad made and condemned Jcsw ChnsL 
8 frean a retired Areemine president the armed forces “look like a band One former presidfflt. General 
- to blufrcollar workers described of scfaizophroiics and sadists, wid- Alqandro Lanussc, testified fw Ihe 
how the mflitaiy had killed inno- enmg the false dichotomy between prosecution, saying he could not 


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out an insurgent threaL Most of the defendants, indud- outside of the law without 

The final witnesses on Wednes- ing former Presdents Joxge Vidda, knowledge of the ruling juntas. 


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the unity in our political th ink i n g; so 
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LATIN amhuca I Pope John Paul H ascends to the attar to celebrate Mass in Kinshasa, Zafre, on Tbmdsy. 


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Pope Beatifies Martyred Nun in Zaire 

He Forgives Murderer and Troops Who Attempted Rape 

The Assaaated Pros In an Assumption Day Mass cei- The spokesman said that there 

VrMCHAtA 7ai« Pnru> J ._J I »_£_ n...l x, ... u m1ii .. 1«Km 


cal ann, said by telephone tint he 
doubted that such a merger would 
take place “in the short tertn. m •_ 

A change in its structure wodty 
not affect relations with the Dcafr 
trade Revolutionary Front, wtarh 
includes exiled dvifian pO&KhttC 
The suerrifla orgamzations and- 
Mr. Unco’s groop are fonnaflyat 
lies but Save dfaagrecd over tacticA 

UJS. officials predicied tbs a 
formal «wifiiaBi«n would not mask 
differences among the goenSa 
front’s member forces. 

The azmotmcemenl was issued in 
the n» ww> of the Farabundo Marti 
National liberation Front’s gener- 
al command, which comprises the 
top leaders of its five guenflla 
forces. It was made available in 

MoriroQtyby the leftist Sah'ador- 

an mews agCDCT, Salraess, and was 
broadcast in B Salvador on the 
front’s rftwiwdwte- Radio Vencere- 
moa. 

A merger of ic fortes cmdd less- 
en differences between the two 
largest groups, the People's Revo- 
lutionary Army and toe Poputtf 
liberation Fames. The former h 
active mainfjr in eastern B SaB i- 
dor and has consistemly empkari 
toqgher tactics than tire Iak 
which is based in the uorth-ceaml 
sector. v 

The People’s Revolutionary 


The Associated Pros In an Assumption Day Mass cei- The spokesman said that there Th® p«m!A Rovnlmin 

KINSHASA, Zaire -- Pope ebraied by Jt*n Paul Sister An- was “only an indirect request" . recnaKd 

John Paul U beatified on Thursday uarite Nengapeta was declared a through the newspaper editor who 

a Zairean nun who was bayoneted blessed martyr of the Roman Cath- had interviewed Mr. Okxnbe. This naSroU th« vear taSS 

to death for resisting a rape at- die Church, a major sup toward was “not good enough,” he added. hjn _ i£l iJ. .tipi 

tflitni and nuhlictv fnrvavc her nnmklo ninihiw) Tin* n«m whn and tfi»- Vatican mnlrt nnt act nn it OOOI KVOlQCa D) n3 l 


whole church, forave" the killer beatified. 
‘Math all my heart, the pope said M 

in remarks inserted at the las! mo- 
mem into his prepared homily. p “ , 7"f Ll - 


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Soviet Tells 
Of Troubles 
In Spaceship 

United Press International 

MOSCOW — Two Soviet cos- 
monauts shed special clothing 
against freezing afld and feigned 


poaMT^ithS mTStm. wbo ^theV&ancSotacioniL 

was killed in 1964 at the age of 25, He said, however, that Mr. IrYMC d 

woman lobe aombe TO wto be aid be warn- ..StoKSfattowSraSSo 
beatified. ed: papal absohition for lus dime. ■ ITJ™#*, 

th- wj-jc h-raw ,,,, Hcfly Father forgave not nJJJS 5S5? 

TJe Mass, before an estunared oionflje afll *he«Sw sol- 8 ? cral c P m maA q .W ” 1 M?» 
60,000 peopla took place under ^ h" yT ~, zAn province, according to the dec- 

overcast skies outside the People's lararioo. Northern Mcrozin is the 


Palace. At the same spot, mne per- vw ^ wa auwxx 

sons were crashed to death m a he? hSh? 

s_tampede shortly, before John SESffi ^ XL 


Paul's Mass du 
Zaire in May I 


hk^r vidtfo thrown into a 
his first vist to ^ ^ , 

and other reb 


l after she resisted 
Colonel Olombe 
soldiers in nralhr 


warmth during a television news said he hoped to be received by the 


A meeting predicted by church easton Zaire on Dec. 1, 1964. 
officials between the pope and Ss- Mr. Otoroba ^7 and a Catholic, 
ter An Halite’s convicted kfller, for- was condemned to death in 1964, 
mer Colonel Pierre Openge but his sentence was reduced to life 
Olombe, did not take place. A Vati- imprisonment. After serving five 
can spokesman said that Mr. years, he was pardoned by Presi- 
Olombe had not requested the dent Mobutu Sese Sdca 
meeting personally. Sister Amurite’s parents said 

In a newspaper interview, Mr. Wed n esday that ihey had forgiven 
Olombe, win lives in Kinshasa, their daughter’s killer longago. 


site of the headquarters of the Pco- 
pie’s Revotutionary Ann)'. Its lead- 
er ' Villalobos, is coorid* 

5SS ered lobe “first among equals" in 

fronl>s tadershiP- 

jJ OTnr The three smaller guerrilla Ibices 
tttoisr 111 fi* fro* 11 are the Armed Forces 
1 i%4 ** Na h° aJ l Resistance, the Armed 

1 to We Liberation Forces and the Central 
r -Z American Revolutionary Worken 

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missicHi, Pravda said Thursday in a and ask for forgiveness. 

rare Soviet acknowledgment of a 

crisis in space. 


paper interview, Mr. Wednesday that they had forgiven 
z fives in Kinshasa, their daughter's killer longago. 

I to be received by the On the pope’s arrival Wedncs- 

John Paul's two-day day, hundreds of thousands of pco- 
iirean capital- He ywid pie cheered him at the airport and 
i expr K i c his remorse along the motorcade route to the 
w orv en r- t c city center. 


Qnake Hits Eastern Europe 

Untied Press International 
BUDAPEST — An earthquake 
struck western Hungary and parts 
of Austria, CzechoslovaKa and 
Yugoslavia early Thursday. No in- 
juries were reported. 


Shiva Naipaul, Novelist and Journalist, Dies 

Ewers on Earth after Ihev arrived M. ' 


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viewers aa Earth after they arrived J. 

at the orbital Station June 8 and The Associated Press 

fomd tbiu the*** powers wstem LONDON — Shiva NaipanL 40. 

had fafled. the batteries dead and a prizc-wiruziug novdisr and iour- 
tiiemterior firezmfc Pravda raid. na fet, has died a: his Lomka borne 
NfissKxi control, knowing the »- of a heart attack, his fanriNreport- 
lar pan d s were not aligned, had ^ Wednesday 
prepared for the repair tup as ri tte Mr. NaipauL younger brother at 


educated at Queen’s Royal College nonfiction. His book "North of 
in Tnnidad and at Oxford in En- South: An African Journey, I97T 
S“““* . „ r , „ _ angrify accused tiie governments rf 

Mri Naqaurs first novd. Fire- Kenya, Zambia ^nri Tanzania of 
fhcs,_ about Sfe in Trinidad was exploiting tbdr peoples, 
pa Wished in 1970. Hailed as an Mr. Naipaul returned to fiction 
impressive work, it won three Bnl- in 1983 with “A Hot Country." a 
ish literary awards. novel sa in an imaginary West !n- 


waimsmts were imri^ warm rags, white," which reeonarnetei 
^bootsmd^tmdiraw; flie 1978 mass suicide and mart 
C ^T^i P ^ I ^ ad< nL ■ nioreihan 900 members of ihe Feo- 
Duringtte first hons rftheff pte’s Temple sect in Guyana, 
mission, Pravda raid, Mr. Dzham- He ^ bom in Trinidad 


bekov and Mr. Savinykh had to 
return to the SoyuzT-13 ferry craft 
every two hours to get warm. They 
had to avoid activity that -would 
cause perspiration, which could 
freeze in their suits. 

Shortly after their arrival, the 
two were shown on Soria televi- 
sion in normal space garb. 

“Not to alarm us, with the trou- 
bles they had, they 4x1k off aQ their 
medal warm dotting before the 
viemya broadcast,” a spokesman 
said, referring to the news program. 

The men realigned two solar 
pands and installed a third raw 
during a Eve-hour outride session. 

In two months, they have re- 
paired the solar panels, installed a 
command radio link and restored 
icat and water supply in the 


’ Ti? “wards., m novel sci in an imaginary West to- 

known for the book “Back and His second novel, “Ihe Chip- dian island. The book describes the 
White,” whidi reconstructed the Otip Gatherers” in 1973, also had effect that the island's turbulent 
1978 mass raaode and murder of Tnnidad as its background and atmosphere has on British expatri- 
more than 900 members of the Feo- won a literary award. ates living there. 

pie’s Temple sect in Guyana. He then turned from novels for & 

He was bom in Tnnidad and several years to concentrate on I ~~~ 


He was bom in Tnnidad and 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 16, 1985 


UN Aide Is linked to Plan to Get Pituitaries in Africa 

(Confintufal C w V 



PageS, 


'™*™mwPagei) 

•-^®w!? b!e for 

jear. wcsl Gcnnany next 


country when- >^^ =na ’ home 

Um£? fcsSbttf !L 0a leave - ] >- 

L coo P era ' 

as»i3£8WS 

iSS‘>«sfeiaa 

'SgS^s 

' gg@ 3 SS' 

re roo y alof pituitories. 

^THe actual collection, he said. 

a Bnal “political" de- 

‘^^fiwgovenunrats. 

Dr- Mongardi said from Gali- 

headquarters in Rome ihai, so 

"f* B ° P'tnitanes had been collect- 
under the Lambo plan. This, she 

«ud, wj* a resoit of “ lcchDi ;^’ m _ 

fiodtoes such as absence of elec- 
tnaty, refrigeration and fast trans- 
port. 

_ „ ^ Lambo called the proposal 
Sj ' rei y practical and very inmor- 
v tont, and added, “It's promoting 
the welfare of the countries.” 
However, several WHO officials 
nod medical experts who were in- 
terviewed suggested that such a 
prefect mightoe inconsistent with 


established medical practice and 
'WHO policy. 

Besides a ting the growing con-, 
cern about hazards from use of die 
srowh drug; they suggested that 
™e delivery to Africa of sophiai- 
jwed drugs contradicted WHO ef- 
forts to emphasize primary health 
* wf 6 * 10 ^ nBt *be use of expensive 
Western drugs in developing coun- 
tries and to establish a model list of 

basic, “essential" drags. 

The exchange called for the Afri- 
can countries to receive* in ex- 


Mongardi wrote to Dr. Lambo on 
May 25, 1984. and, after referring 
to “our previous discussions in Ni- 
geria and in Geneva,” proposed an 
exchange of the two Gahbia-pro- 
duced drugs as well as “other hor- 
mones and enzymes” for the pitu- 
i lanes. 

The proposal was taken up in 
principle by Dr. Lambo in a letter 
dated June 5, 1984. On July 16 he 
wrotesayiug that he had called a 
meeting in Nigeria of “all the pa- 
thologists at the teaching hospitals, 


ble “collection centere.” A note on 
the meeting slated that the mini- 
mum aim was 3.000 pituitary 
glands a month from Nigeria. 

In the interview last week. Dr. 
Lambo said the target of 500 
glands a day, in view of “cultural 
constraints, 4 was unrealistic. 

“Any famQy could refuse a post- 
mortem,” he said. “In most parts of 
Africa they don’t like it.” 

Dr. Lambo said that once the 
arrangement between the Lambo 
Foundation and Galibia had been 


Tf it is proven tbiat there are inherent dangers, the whole thing 

wonld be disbanded immediately.’ Dr . Adeoye 


change for the pituitaries, Grorm 
and Pergonal, two Galibia prod- 
ucts. Gronn, a growth hormone, is 
used to treat hypopUuhary dwarf- 
ism and Pfctgpaal is a ferttfity drug. 

Hypophtntary dwarfism is a 
rare, nonfatal condition for winch 
3,500 . people are receiving treat- 
ment in the United States. Figures 
are unavailable for African coun- 
tries. . 

A WHO official said last week 
that the model list of generic drugs 
of most importance to developing 
countries included no growth hor- 
mones. Genetic fertility drugs simi- 
lar to Pergonal are also not includ- 
ed on (he fist, according to WHO. 

Details of the proposed ex- 
change are laid out in the docu- 
ments obtained by the Internation- 
al Herald Tribune, winch include 
copies of correspondence between 
Dr. Lambo, the Galibia enterprise 
and African health officials and 
government ministers. 

According to the documents. Dr. 


provincial general hospitals, as well 
as medical officers in charge of 
public mortuaries.” 

The letter continued: “It was 
reckoned that we could get well 
over 500 specimens [pituitary 
glands] a day with bard work from 
all over the conn try." 

A footnote in me letter added: 
“Some of toy colleagues who took 
part in Lagos during my recent visit 
mentioned the possibility of col- 
lecting placentas, adrenals, ovaries, 
eiL, from various private and pub- 
lic hospitals. In Lagos metropolis 
alone there are 800 corpses collect- 
ed and unclaimed almost every 
week. 1 will like to have your advice 
and guidance on this proposal i.e., 
if the collection of adrenals, ova- 
ries, etc., will be useful to you as 
well." 

The documents said that by the 
time Dr. Lambo net with Dr. Mon- 
gardi in Rome, on Sept. 21, 1984, 
13 separate cities in five Nigerian 
-stales had been identified as possi- 


p reposed, be contacted the health 
minis ters from Ghana, Nigeria and 
Ethiopia at a WHO assembly in 
Geneva in May and suggested that 
they reach an arrangement with 
Galibia (hat could guarantee them 
finished drugs. 

Dr. Lambo said the ministers 
found the proposal acceptable in 
principle and asked him to write to 
them “in my capacity as a private 
person and a scientist from Afri- 
ca.” At the same time, he said, they 
sent the proposal to their medical 
advisers Tor further consideration. 

Dr. Lambo stated in the inter- 
view that the Ethiopian health min- 
ister appeared to want insulin, 
rather than growth hormones, in 
exchange for pituitaries. 

: In the documents. Dr. Lambo 
stated that no financial payment 
would be made in return for the 
pituitaries, although the cost of 
their collection and transport 
would be borne by the 
company. 


However, according to one of the 
documents, one African medical 
official did mention “an agreed fee 
for each gland collected." In a let- 
ter dated April 15. 1985. Dr. E. Q. 
Archampong. dean of the Universi- 
ty of Ghana medical school, wrote 
to Dr. Lambo: 

“The department of pathology 
has been collecting pituitary glands 
for Galibia since April 1982 with- 
out any formal arrangement. This 
arrangement could be formalized 
and based on Galibia providing lo- 
gistic support such as vehicles, deep 
freezers, etc. salary for a driver . . . 
and an agreed fee for each gland 
collected. The fee should be paid in 
dollars and deposited in a special 
external account to be used solely 
for the purchase of reagents, kits, 
equipment, etc- for ... laborato- 
ries and the department of patholo- 
gy" 

Dr. Lambo said Thursday that 
he became involved in the project 
in 1984 as a result of his belief that 
Galibia and Nordisk, the Danish 
company, might be buying pituitar- 
ies from Ghana and Nigeria with- 
out the governments' knowledge. 

Efforts to confirm this at Galibia 
were unsuccessful. But Nordisk In- 
sulin laboratoriura’s vice president. 
Leif KLnudsen. said the company 
had bought a consignment of about 
200 pituitary glands in Nigeria for 
$5 each. He said the company had 
dealt directly with a hospital in 
Ibadan and it was possible other 
purchases would be made. 

Dr. Lambo said in the interview 
that he had no plans to recommend 
cancellation of the project, in spile 
of the recent U.S. ban on growth 
hormones. 

“If it is proven that there are 



Khamenei’s Re-election 
Is Anticipated in Iran 


Dr. Adeoye 11100185 Lambo 

inherent dangers, the whole thing 
would be disbanded immediately, 
he said. 

He contended that the distribu- 
tion of Grorm and Pergonal in Af- 
rica would cot be inconsistent with 
WHO policy on giving priority to 
basic, essential drugs. He said that 
the model list was not exclusive and 
that it could be added to or sub- 
tracted from, depending on the 
needs of a country. 

Endocrinological problems, in- 
cluding dwarfism, are beginning to 
appear in Africa, be said, 

in a general defense of his pro- 
ject vis-i-vis WHO policy. Dr. 
Lambo said, “It promotes the well- 
being of mankind, which is the ulti- 
mate goal of WHO.” 

“There is nothing underhanded 
about it,” be added. “If 1 was gain- 
ing from it 1 would see it as a 
contradiction [with WHO staff 
rales]. I've already weighed that in 
my own mind" 


The Asiiniaied Press 

NICOSLA — A presidential elec- 
tion in Iran on Friday is expected 
to keep the incumbent. Ali Kha- 
menei in office and to reaffirm 
policies set by AyaioIIali Ruholiah 
Khomeini. 

Suggestions that Mr. Khamenei 
might not win re-election seemed to 
fade July 29. sources said, when the 
Council of Guardians, a govern- 
ment body of religious leaders, 
chose Mr. Khamenei and two lesser 
known men as candidates from 
among 50 Iranians who had offered 
themselves for election. 

There had been reports that Mr. 
Khamenei might choose not to seek 
re-election or that the defection of 
his sister, Badri, to Iraq in May 
would cause him to lose official 
favor. 

The reports that Mr. Khamenei, 
45. would step down had been fos- 
tered by an explosion in a Tehran 
mosque last spring while the presi- 
dent, a clergyman as well as politi- 
cal leader, was speaking. 

Mr. Khamenei’s predecessor. 
Mohammed Ali Rajal had been 
assassina ted in a bomb attack in 
1981, and Mr. Khamenei lost the 
use of his right arm when a booby- 
trapped tape recorder exploded 
next to him at about the same time- 

The other two candidates named 
were Habibollah Asghar-Owladi. a 
former commerce minister who re- 
signed in 1983 under pressure over 
allegations of corruption, and Mos- 
tafavi Kashanl a Moslem clergy- 


man who was the senior represen- 
tative at the World Court in the ■ , 
Hague in Iran's financial disputes'' 
with the United States. 

In 1981. Mr. Khamenei defeated 
two little-known candidates to bo' 
come president with 95 percent of 
the vote. 

■ Iraq Reports War Victories 
Iraqi officials said Thursday thar, 
Iraq's forces had crushed an Irani- 
an attack on the Gulf war's central 
front, about 235 kilometers (150 
miles) southeast of Baghdad. Reu- 
ters reported. ‘ m 

A military spokesman, quoted 
by the official Iraqi news agency 
INA, said that the battle occurred . 
about 10 kilometers from the Irani- 
an border. 

“Big numbers of the attacking- 
Iranian forces were killed and 58 
others were taken captive” the 

spokesman said. 

The Iraqi government said Sat- 
urday that its troops had attacked 
Iranian positions in the East Tigris 
sector of the southern front, inflict- 
ing heavy losses. 


Grenade Kills 2 Guatemalans 

United Press Intmiaihutul 

GUATEMALA CITY — Two 
Guatemalan workers were killed. 
Wednesday when a grenade ex- 
ploded on the grounds of the Mexi- 
can Embassy, government officials 
said. No group has claimed respon- 
sibility for the incident. 



A Jailed Turk Supports 
Charge Against Bulgaria 


“£/?■ 

Itautera 


Moroccan soldiers operating surveillance equipment at a post along the desert wall that blocks the Polisario Front rebels. 

Morocco Completing Sahara Wall Against Rebels 



(CortHHKd Pp&J) 

ltio-qKadting re^on <rf northwest . 
Afrira. • 

There is no independent means 
trf combining Morocco’s assertion 
that except far occasional “harass- 
ment^ tire war against the guecriP- 
lashas'virtodlybeen.wan. 

A reflection of Moroccan confi- 
dence, however, was tbemtiitarys 
decision to permit three American 
reporters to writ two. command 
prints on the wall and several cities 
in Western Sahara this week. 

Only inclement weather prevent- 
ed a scheduled visa to the ednstroo- 
don site of the newest and south- 
ernmost section bC.tbe wan, which 
will reach the Atlantic and ostensi- 
bly complete the seaL 

According to General Barnaul, 
the movement of the wall is what 
distinguishes it from suAKstoiical 
* cessors as the Great -Wall .of 
i or France’s Magiaot Lint , 


General Bennani said that at its 
widest print, the wall has been 
moved forward 600 mfles. But what 
has been, as General Bennani 
called it, a mobile bridge to the 
border will soon become a final 
defensive position. 

- At Command Post No. 1, threo- 
and-a-half miles from the Algerian 
border and 18 miles from the town 
of Mahbes, an American-supplied 
radar screen is mounted on a metal 
platform 36 feet above ground. It 
can detect a person’s movement 
more than 12 miles away. 

The colonel at the command 
post said that rebds had fired mor- 
tar rounds from six miles away, 
which fell ineffectively. 

.“So we picked up human move- 
ment on tins Tartar” he stud, “local- 
ized the fire with the assistance of 
equipment at the- adjacent com- 
mand post and returned fire imme- 
diately.” 


Western sources say electronic 
and seismic sensors are interspaced 
with anti-personnel radar to im- 
prove detection. “We can even de- 
tect a dog 30 miles away ” a colonel 
at a southern command post said. 

At Command Post No. 1, a ring 
of moats and mounds within the 


maze 

force. But the colonel’s pi 
weapon was a Moroccan invention 
of “Russian- American marriage” 
as be put it: a Soviet heavy mach in e 
gun mounted on an American ar- 
mored personnel carrier. 

Command Post No. 1 is among 
the closest Moroccan positions to 
the battery of two to four Soviet 
SAM-6 missiles guarding Polisario 
camps near the Algerian town of 
Tmdouf. 

Despite the proximity, Moroc- 
cans said, the last major battle oc- 
curred in October 1984, when a 


Polisario armored column of about 
1,000 soldiers attacked south of 
Zag. The rebels penetrated the 
wall. General Bennani said, but 
were quickly surrounded by Mo- 
roccan forces. 

He and others estimated that 
Polisario troop strength had 
dropped from 9,000 and now 
ranged from 3J5QO to 4,000. Their 
armaments include about 120 ar- 
mored attack vehicles, 50 to 60 
tracks mounted with rocket 
launchers, nine 122mm guns, an 
inventory of 9mm mortars and a 
SAM-6 battery of two to four 
launchers. 

Officers say Moroccan troops 
are under orders not to cross into 
Algeria, which has far superior mil- 
itary forces. 

“We want to stop a war here,” 
General Bennani said, “not start 
one." 


By John Tagliabue 

New York Times Service 

BOCHUM, West Germany — 
Members of an Italian court trying 
eight men accused of conspiracy to 
murder Pope John Paul U have 
interrogated a rightist Turk here 
about Information he says he re- 
ceived that the purported plot was 
arranged by the Bulgarian secret 
service. 

The testimony Wednesday from 
Yalcin Ozbey was given to six court 
members in special session in this 
Ruhr city after Mr. Ozbey refusal 
to travel to Rome to testify. He is 
bang held here on Forgery and 
weapons charges. 

{After repealed requests Mr. Oz- 
bey agreed Thursday to go lo Rome 
to testify. The Associated Press re- 
ported from Bochum. “Ozbey said 
this morning be is now willing to go 
to Rome,” said a spokesman for the 
court. “We are working out the 
details with the Italian justices 

now.] 

The court members traveled to 
the Netherlands last week to ques- 
tion Samet Arslan, a Turk who was 
arrested in May carrying a gun 
while the pope was in the country. 

Persons who were present during 
the session with Mr. Ozbey said the 
questioning had focused on the 
identity of Turks who, Mr. Ozbey 
said, were with Mehmet Ali Agca. 
the assailant, during the 1981 
shooting. Other questions dealt 
with preparations for the attack. 

The officials said Mr. Ozbey 
identified a man filmed with Mr. 
Agca in a Rome bank by an auto- 
matic camera several days before 
the shooting as Oral Celik, one of 
five Turkish defendants in the trial. 

Mr. Ozbey told the officials 


Tuesday that Mr. Celik, who is at 
large, and Mr. Agpa, had tele- 
phoned him in West Germany 
from Bulgaria several times before 
they traveled to Rome. They indi- 
cated, he said, support by the Bul- 
garian secret service. 

Under intense questioning, Mr. 
Ozbey was evidently unable to say 
bow he knew the calls had come 
from Bulgaria. He conceded that 
his knowledge of the purported 
Bulgarian backing was Wed on 
hearsay. 

Mr. Ozbey, who is of Kurdish 
origin , said two Turkish extremists 
whom he was able to identify only 
by their “battle names" — Akrf and 
Anted — were with Mr. Celik and 
Mr. Agca the day of the shooting. 

He said Mr. Ce&k and the two 
extremists fled to Switzerland and 
the Netherlands after the shooting. 

In evidence that contradicted ac- 
counts given by witnesses, who said 
more than one person shot at the 
pope, Mr. Ozbey said Mr. Cebk 
told him that only Mr. Agca had 
fired. 

In earlier testimony to Judge 
Dario Martdla, the Italian magis- 
trate whose 23-month investigation 
led to the trial, Mr. Ozbey identi- 
fied **AkiT as Sedat Sim Kadem, a 
leftist and boyhood friend of Mr. 
Agca. He said the fourth Turk with 
Mr. Agca was Orner Ay, a rightist 
Turk serving a life sentence in Tur- 
key for murder. 

But Mr. Ay denied any complic- 
ity when he was questioned in Tur- 
key last month. 

Mr. Kadem, testifying in Rome 
last week, said he had never been 
outride Turkey before his trip to 
Italy to give evidence. 



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iliiUSU., 






Page 6 


FRIDAY, AUGUST 16, 1983 


Rerali* 


II'TTERNATIONAl 



(tribune 


Pnblwbed Whli The New Yoifc Time* and The WnUnguxi Pbsl 


Just as the Emperor Said 


For most Americans, the first reaction to 
word of the Japanese surrender in 1945 was 
relief, pwe and simple. The surrender meant 
that the invasion of the Japanese home islands 
was a great and terrible battle that would never 
have to be fought. Currently there is a quarrel 
going on among historians over the numbers 
of casualties that the American commanders 
expected; but that Is irrelevant. The rerocity of 
the Japanese defense of Iwo Jima and Okina- 
wa earlier that year left no one with any 
illusions about the costs of the landings ahead. 

The announcement that the war was over, 
like the news of the attack on Pearl Harbor in 
1941, is sharply marked in the memoiy of the 
American generation that lived through it; 
there is hardly anyone who does not remember 
precisely where he was at each of those two 
moments, what he was doing, what he felL 
And the Japanese? “We have resolved," the 
emperor said in a radio broadcast to his peo- 
ple, 40 years ago Wednesday night, "to pave 
the way for a grand peace for all the genera- 
tions to come, by enduring the unendurable 
and suffering what is insufferable." 

For several months Japan's cities had been 
under an unremitting bombardment of which 
the nuclear attack was the culmination, yet the 
emperor's address was a shock to his Listeners. 
As the historian Masaiaka Kosaka describes it, 
"Few had remained confident of victory, but it 
was not until they heard the emperor's crack- 
ling, high-pitched voice that Lhe Japanese ap- 
preciated the full extern or the catastrophe that 
had overtaken them. They also realized how 
utterly exhausted they were." 


Two weeks later General Douglas MacAr- 
thur landed at Atsogi, and the occupation 
began — a time of achievement in which 
Americans are entitled to take great pride. 

World War U was one of the wars in which 
Americans knew, with a clear and certain mor- 
al conviction, why they were fighting — and 
that the fight was necessary. 

Perhaps that was also true of the Revolu- 
tion, among those pans of the population that 
supported the revoiu [ionary armies, and it was 
certainly true on both sides of the Qvil War. 
Regarding the other American wars, there are 
more question marks. Americans' ideas about 
war generally depend on which war they are 
thinkin g of. But it seemed self-evident in 1945 
that the world would be a better place with the 
unqualified defeat of the governments that 
had been in control of Germany and Japan. 
That judgment still seems self-evident today. 

Relations between the United States and 
Japan in the 1980s are rather scratchy, with a 
good deal of mutual irritation over matters of 
trade. That is not surprising, since their pros- 
perity has made them two of history’s great 
commercial competitors. But they are also 
allies, and that sense of common national 
interest is now supported by four decades of 
engrained habits and traditions as welL 
The remarkable thing about the military 
victoiy of Aug. 14, 1945, is that, precisely 
as the emperor promised at the time, it has 
introduced a “grand peace” that has now con- 
tinued longer than most of either country’s 
population has been alive. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 



Yes, American 

Has to Do Wih 

By George F* Will 

W ashington -^^1* 

Kam Bennett, the U.S. secre* 



Hire a minim? c raster* a 
to Penn*} Sana, tanks* 


tary of education, said recently that 
“our values as a free peoples ™ th e 
central values of the Judeo-Chnsuan 


tradition arc flesh of the flesh, blood 
of the blood.” The Washington Post 
said he was "borrowing words used 
during the consecration at a Mass. 
He was denounced by various protec- 
tors of “the American way. 

Actually, Mr. Bennett was borrow- 
ing words from a politician given to 
rhetoric with religious overtones of- 
fensive to many of today's defines of 
“the American way." The politician 
spoke on July 10 in Chicago. In 1 858. 

Abraham Lincoln said that all 
Americans, including immigrants 
who came after the Revolution, ac- 
cepted die proposition that all men 
are created equaL They knew it was 
“the father of all moral principle in 
them, and that they have a right to 
claim it as though they were blood of 
the blood and flesh of the flesh of die 
men who wrote that ■Declaration." 

Developing a theme to which he 
would return five years later when 


No, Democracy Isn’t a Judeo-Christian Monopoly 


Behind Agca’s Gowning 


What began in May as "the trial of the 
century" has turned into a farce by Pirandello 
— with eight more months to go. Having 
persuaded an Italian magistrate that Bulgari- 
ans hired him to murder the pope, Mehmet Ali 
Ages has made a buffoon of himself. To the 
dismay of those who believed him, he has 
claimed divinity, promised to perform mir- 
acles and offered conflicting accounts of his 
assassination attempt. “If he wanted to de- 
stroy his own credibility,” fumed the I talian 
prosecutor, “he has succeeded magnificently.” 
Why should anyone care what Mr. Agca 
says? There is no credible independent cor- 
roboration of his claim that he was recruited 
by Bulgarian and Soviet secret police to elimi- 
nate a troublesome Polish pope. He alters at 
will key details about time, places and people, 
and exults in the confusion when his inven- 
tions are exposed. Now another Turkish gun- 
man, who bad said he knew of the plot, turns 
out to offer only a hearsay account. 

Still giving Mr. Agca a forum was the way 
to test his devastating claims lint a superpow- 
er turned to a Turkish zealot to rid itself of 
John Paul II. His account was sufficiently 
convincing to justify this trial. If testimony so 
far has failed to establish the Bulgarian link, it 
has at least given weight to a simpler hypothe- 
sis: that the roots of this plot were in Turkey. 


As a student, Mr. Agca joined an Islamic 
terror gang, the Gray Wolves, which aimed to 
destroy Turkey’s secular democracy. He was 
convicted in 1979 of murdering a liberal editor 
In Istanbul but somehow escaped from a mili- 
tary jafl. He then sent this letter to the victim’s 
paper: “Western imperialists, fearful that Tur- 
key and her sister Islamic nations might be- 
come a political military and economic power 
in the Middle East, are sending to Turkey in 
this delicate moment the Comman der of the 
Crusades, John Paul, disguised as a religious 
chief. If this visit ... is not canceled, I will 
without doubt kill (he Pope-Chief.” 

Do those inflamed wends explain his deed? 
That now seems at least as plausible as his 
attempts to widen the conspiracy and magnify 
his importance. It is also plausible that he had 
contacts with Bulgarian officials on criminal 
matters unrelated to the pope or the Kremlin. 

These are matters that can be independently 
corroborated. Exploring this underworld may 
also show why Bulgaria gave sanctuary to 
Gray Wolves who fled Turkey when the mili- 
tary seized power there in 1980. Whether Mr. 
Agca dissembles for reasons of madness or 
design, some valuable truths may emerge 
about Turkey’s right-wing terrorists and thrir 
connections with Communist Bulgaria. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


W ASHINGTON — Secretary of 
Education William Bennett, 
who has emerged as the main advo- 
cate of the Reagan administration's 
position on religion in the schools, 
has demanded “a national conversa- 
tion and debate on the place of reli- 
gious belief in our society." In the 
Aug. 7 speech to the Knights of Co- 
lumbus in which he issuedthe call he 
spoke with sufficient provocation to 
guarantee that he will gel his debate. 

According to Mr. Bennett, who 
rarely resorts to understatement, the 
fate or American democracy is inter- 
twined “with the vitality of the Ju- 
deo-Christian tradition.*' He there- 
fore finds it alarming that “a new 
aversion to religion.^ disguised as 
constitutional interpretation, has 
“beguiled" the judges and in four 
decades of error "has led to “a kind of 
ghettoizing oT religion.” 

Moreover, “neutrality to religion 
turned out to bring with it a neutral- 
ity to those values that issue from 
religion.” Nowadays, entanglement 
with religion is viewed as “something 
akin to entanglement with an infec- 
tious disease. As a result of all these 
dangerous trends, America faces “a 
new source of divisiveness: the as- 
sault of secularism on religion.” 


By Edwin M. Yoder Jr. 


This is strong language, possibly 
divisive in ilseuT Certainly Mr. Ben- 
nett has launched a no-holds- barred 
assault on the line of church-state 
doctrine developed by the United 
States Supreme Court since 1947. 

There is a disturbingly theocratic 
tenor in his views, although doubtless 
it would be unfair to say that in 
arguing for tax aid to religious educa- 
tion he is arguing in effect for official 
religious indoctrination. 

But h is equally a distortion for the 
secretary to claim — in the non sequi- 
tur that binds bis dubious argument 
together — that anyone who favors 
stria separation of church and state 
is animated by some new, militant 
brand of “secularism.” 

Such a characterization fails to 
account for the traditional resistance 
to aiding church schools, or to hold- 
ing sectarian religious exercises in 
public schools, by such bodies as the 
National Council of Churches; such 
denominations as Baptists, Quakers 
and Jews; such eminent churchmen 
as tbep residing bishop of the Episco- 
pal Church or the president of 
Georgetown University, an eminent 
Jesuit priest, who are hardly to 


be called advocates of “secularism.” 

As for Mr. Bennett's underlying 
premise that UJS. democracy derives 
from and depends on the official 
propagation of Judeo-Christian val- 
ues, it is at best problematical be- 
longing to that class of sweeping as- 
sertions to which the intelligent 
response can only be; yes and no. 

Yes, in the sense that Western con- 
ceptions of individual rights and lib- 
erty descend to us from the medieval 
schoolmen — who, incidentally, bor- 
rowed the idea of natural rights from 
classical pre-Christian philosophers. 
And yes, in the sense (hat Western 
democracy emerged — with much 
sectarian bloodshed and disgraceful 
oppression of the weak and defense- 
less, especially the Jews — within the 
fold ami bosom of Christendom. 

But in equally weighty senses, no 
— an emphatic no. The preponderant 
religious influence at the time of (he 
framing of the Constitution was nei- 
ther prophetic nor evangelical as is 
the conception of public religion fa- 
vored by the Reagan adminis tration 
and its spokesmen, but cool digni- 
fied. rationalist and deist 

That pres u mably explains why the 


preamble to the American Constitu- 
tion makes no declaration of demo- 
cracy's dependency on godliness, Ju- 
deo-Christian or otherwise. 

Indeed, if you suppose, with Secre- 
tary Bennett, that the framers were 
vitally concerned with this link, they 
were oddly selective. They left no 
constitutional directive concerning 
religion, except the directive that no 
religious test for office shall ever be 
imposed. Strictly construed, can 
ennymean that if a Buddhist or Mos- 
lem or atheist musters the necessary 
votes, he or she can hold any Ui>. 
office within the gift of the people. 

It is also inconvenient, from Mr. 

Bennett's p e rspect iv e, that in the 
leading contemporary treatise on the 
intentions of the framers, the Feder- 
alist Papas, there are far more, and 
more extensive, references to the pa- 
gan Greek and Roman experience w 

with self-govenunen t than to lhe“Ju- piertiaps 
d co-Christian tradition.” jw j$ izxlrinsicallv 

None of which is to disparage (he - - 
complexity of the issue. It is to say. 


rather, that if the 
tkm seeks a real 
guisbed from a _ 
will have to stow 
review its history. 


administra- 
as distin- 
nda war, it 
and 


Washmgfon Post Writers Group. 


Other Opinion 


A Program to Save Forests 

Driven by the desperation of poverty, mil- 
lions of people in Africa, Asia and Latin 
America are devastating the forests of their 
nations faster than replacement trees can 
grow, converting once fertile fields to deserts, 
eroding plateaus and hillsides, silting up reser- 
voirs that once promised long-lasting supplies 
of irrigation water and risking global climate 
changes. By every measure, disaster is develop- 
ing. From despair, however, new hope is 
emerging. Expats have concluded that the 
deterioration of the tropical forests can be 
arrested and ultimately reversed. They have 
assembled a catalog of successes to prove their 
poinL And they have drawn a detailed plan for 
action to begin the long and costly process. 

There is a major uncertainty, nevertheless. It 
has to do with political commitment and with 
funds. Without a commitment by leaders of 
the 58 most affected nations, and a wfllingess 
of donors to double their appropriations for 
forestry aid. Lberc can be no hope of ultimately 
reversing the ravaging deforestation. 

The extraordinary opportunity to do some- 
thing has emerged, not by coincidence, in the 
midst of the International Year of the Forest, 
an observation sponsored by the UN Food 
and Agriculture Organization. The plan of 
action was drawn by nine Internationa] ex- 
perts, sponsored by the World Resources Insti- 
tute in Washington. It has been endorsed by 
the Ninth World Forestry Congress held last 
month in Mexico City. High officials at major 
development agencies, including the World 


Bank, the UN Development Program and the 
U.S. Agency for International Development 
are already reviewing the recommendations 
even though the final report of the action 

f rogram will not be released until Oct 10. 
Very element of support will be required. 
Foreign aid officials from 14 nations and the 
major international development agencies will 
meet at The Hague on Nov. 20 to decide 
whether to proceed. There is optimism, but not 
yet dollars, to support an initial five-year pro- 
gram that could, above all create teams of 
barefoot foresters and extension workers [for] 
a rapidly expanding forest rescue program. 

— The Los Angeles Times. 

Australia and Japan Together 

Both protected by alliance with the United 
States, Australia and Japan now assess the 
strategic problems of the West Pacific in very 
similar ways. This fad has led more than (me 
Australian prime minister to herald a new 
“Pacific Community" and one Japanese leader 
to propose Australian membership of the dub 
of seven major industrial nations. [However,] 
our regional strategic understandings have not 
always been matched by equally profound 
cultural understanding. Australian suspicions 
of Japan are not unique, but for half a century, 
from Japan's victory over Russia in 1905 until 
well after 1945. they had an especially irratio- 
nal and racist quality. We can be thankful that 
remarkably few residues of those attitudes 
exist today, 40 years after V-J Day. 

— The Sydney Morning Herald. 


The Revolution in China 
Is About Fresh Tomatoes 

By Anthony Lewis 

B EUING — Private traders sell a society in which products and 
food and clothes and house- s_ ' _ 


hold goods in hundreds of street 
markets around the city. Billboards 
on tire main avenues advertise Gen- 
eral Electric, Xerox, Soay. A lead- 
ing publishing house has issued 
Chinese translations of Plato, Sir 
Thomas More, Ricardo, Schopen- 
hauer and Freud (“An Introduction 
to Psychoanalysis"). 

Change is not an adequate word 
for what is happening in the China. 
The monochrome that presented it- 
self to the visitor in 1972 — the 
uniformed dothes, the rigid ideas, 
the monopoly of state power and 
wisdom — has been transformed. 
Outsiders who come frequently say 
they see striking change after an 
absence of only a few months. 

How far will it go? Will the com- 
mitment to economic reform last? 
WBl Western ideas be admitted 
along with technology and capital? 

A visi tor has to begin by recog- 
nizing his ignorance of such a vast 
and shrouded society. Even the ex- 
perts cannot tell where the process 
of change will go. The uncertainties 
— economic, political social — are 
too great. All one can do is record 
impressions of what is happening. 

The street markets are m a way 
the most dramatic sign of chany 
What is so significant about selling 
consumer hems from tables along 
the alleys and avenues? But imagine 


prices were rigidly controlled for 
decades — and consumers suddenly 
have a choice. That is drama. 

In a walkway between big apart- 
ment buildings, some people began 
selling antiques a few months ago. 
There were half a dozen tables, each 
with its Beijing city license. Now 
there are dozens, with crowds of 
Chinese and foreigners 
for beautiful ginger jars and' 
canes and brass locks. One man 
sells Kuomintang currency with 
Chiang Kai-shek's picture on it. 

Food is where private traders 
have had the impact, though. They 
sell so much now, newspapers re- 
ported the other day, that some 
state groceries are bong forced out 
of business. Everywhere one sees 
peasants offering tomatoes, peach- 
es, melons, peppers, com. 

How does it work? A peasant 
living 60 miles (100 kilometers) 
from Beijing grows sweet com, 
making hrs own decision on that 
under the “responsibility system” 
instituted for peasants five years 
ago by Deng Xiaoping. One day be 
picks 300 ears that he brings to 
Beijing by bicyde. 

He expects to sell the com in 
three days, he says, for a total of 60 
yuan (about S21). He stays two 
nights in a hotel for three yuan a 
night and spends two yuan a day for 
food. His expenses are 10 yuan and 



CP0& 

, g53SU\ 
\ 


r Looks lihe President Li’s visit to America wentwdL 9 


bis net is 50. That is as much as his 
usual income for a month. 

It sounds primitive, and it is. Chi- 
na is a Third World country, with 
especially inadequate transporta- 
tion and communications. It is a 
country in which peasants hove 
enough incentive to move their 
crops long distances by bicycle. Bat 
incentive is what matters. * 

Fanners have been getting used 
to the idea of incentive and choice 
for five years. Now it is the consum- 
er’s turn. To adjust to those ideas 
may sound easy, but it is not. 

Prices of significant consumer 
products had not changed since 
1952. For 30 years they were a given 
of life. Last May food prices were 
freed from controls except fora few 
essentia] staples: grain and cooking 
oil for example. Vegetables were 
scarce, and prices shot up. Then 
peasants at a distance were allowed 
to bring their crops to the capital 


to r the first time. They flooded in, 
and prices stabilized. 

For prices to move that way after 
being frozen for decades is not just 
economically but also psychologi- 
cally trying. On the other hand 
there is the advantage of choice — 
and quality, I asked a young woman 
how she fdt about vegetable and 
fruit prices. “I Hke fresh tomatoes,” 
she said. “It's worth iL” 

Scone think the idea of dunce has 
taken hold so strongly that the state 
would have trouble returning to ri- 
gidity. Others worry about public 
reaction to higher food prices as 
subsidies are increasingly removed. 

And then think about the uncer- 
tainly as the market idea moves 
from agricultural to industrial pro- 
ducts, as it is just doing. Orange of 
that character would be staggering 
in a small country, and tins is a 
country of a billion people. 

The New York Times. 


dedicat 

southern . 

that the Declaration a the caul 
American document. Tins was so be- 
cause America is a nation defrag-g 
to a proposition, one about eqedty 
and the endowment of rights by &e 
Creator. Att Americans are eqwfiy 
American, he belated, by ivqk of 
shoring the essential moral senti- 
ments of Judeo-Christian naditNB. ' 
Mr. Bennett said that “theft* of 
our democracy is intincaidy mfcr- 
iwmed — 'entangled.' if you wifi — 
with the viultlv of the Jofe&Gbnt? 
tian tradition. (He w» staking 
oblique reference to the Supreme 
Court's fevered worrying about "car- 
tanriemeni” between refcpous and 
dvti institutions.) A spokesman fora 
liberal Jobbv. Ptcple for the Ameri- 
can Way. charged that Mr. Bennett 
“seems to he bait on bang the secre- 
tary of evangelism." A similar 
spokesman for a similar lobby called 
Mr. Bennett's views “outragewB." 

Such extravagant rhetoric is reflex 
ive. almost perfunctory. It issues 
from persons paid to stand by in 
Washington and he “outra ged” when 
someone like Mr. Benefit — some- 
one reflective, someone not homoge- 
nized by the Washington bbndncss 
machine — says anything offensive 
Offensive to whom? To the people 
whose names are on the matting tisb 
that rake the money that finance Jbe 
“outraged” lobbyists. 

But what, exactly, is outraging the 
lobbyists? This newspaper could be 
completelv filled with statements 
similar to’ Mr. Bennett’s, statements 
from the central acton in Amenafs 
drama, from Washington and Lin- 
coln through Justice William Doug- 
las, who said that Americans “are x 
religious people whore institutions 
pr e supp ose a Supreme Being.” 

One reason why Mr. Bennett's crit- 
ics are so shrill is that hr has criticized 
some recent Supreme Court derisum* 
as unfaithful to the intentions of the 
framers of the First Amendment 
danre proscribing “establishment of 
religion.” The court says that the 
clause requires epvenunsil to be 
neutral not just between sects bat 
between religion and secularism. 

Court’s pal- 
eraNe to that 
of the framers. Perhaps ibe evolution 
of the United States has made the 
framers’ intentions anachronistic 
What is passing strange is the argu- 
ment that the court is faithful to me 
framers* intentions — Of that faith- 
fulness would be outrageous. 

Mr. Bennett's critics bring the 
same manufactured indignation to 
the subject of the Reagan adnunistn- 
tioo’s attempt to get the Supreme 
Court to reverse itself regarding abor- 
tion. The indignation is designed to 
stigmatize as dishooorable any at- 
tempt to alter tbe court's comse. 

liberalism's path into tbe wilder- 
ness has been paved with just such 
ideological quukiness, such willful 
ignorance and dis in ge nno u stress, 
such distortion or disregarding of 


liberals forgotten that the 
civil iqjns movement ins a cam- 
paign to reverse the court, espeoafly 
the “separate but eqtuT doctrine? 

America’s noblest political career 
was ignited by. and mrifc around, a 
determination to undo tbe oosvfs de- 
cision concerning Dred Soon. Sop- 
porters of thm decisrai, like support- 
ers of the abortion derision today, 
thought that it would end the comm- 
versy. lincoln thought that it dtodhi 
not. The transcript of ins JFnhr %, . 
1858, speech reads: 

“Sonrebotty has to reverse thaid* 
rision, since it is made, and wemeat 
to reverse it, and we mean to doit 
peaceably. ... The sacrcdnesrAs 
Judge I Stephen] Douglas throws 
around this derision is a degr ee of 
sacredness that has never before boon 
thrown around any other 

[Laugh ter] It is a new wonderofi^ 
world. [Laughter and applause]” 

Some of today's msrcadmg of 
American history is tendentious, in- 
tended to have a drilfffa g effect on 
public discussion by shrinking tbe 
agenda of discussable po&xs. But 
some is honest ignorance. Some peo- 
ple are so busy defending “the Amer- \ 
nan way” that they wiB not lake taae 
to acquaint themselves with even Ac 
central themes and great c areer s of 
the American stray. 

Washington Past Writers Group . ' 


FROM OUR AUG. 16 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Union Drops Smoking Guuqge 
SAN FRANCISCO — Fearing to incur lie 
displeasure of Mr. Theodore Roosevelt Jr., a 
mass meeting of the Golden Gate Christian 
Endeavor Union has refused to adopt a resolu- 
tion condemning the alleged cigarette smoking 
habit of Mrs. Nicholas Long worth, daughter 
of Colonel RoosevelL At the moment they 
were showing this deference to the son of the 
former President, young Mr. Roosevelt, in his 
apartments at the SL Francis Hotel was ex- 
pressing his personal indifference to the agita- 
tion against his aster's reported use of ciga- 
rettes. “I have given absolutely no attention to 
these charges against my sister,” be said. 
“There has been a lot of trashy stuff printed 
about her, but I seldom see these things and 
never pay any attention when I do.” 


1935: Adviser to King Zog Murdered 
VIENNA — A murder of great significance 
occurred [on Aug. 15] at Irena, in Albania, 
which can have repercussions not only on 
Yugoslav relations but on the whole political 
situation in the east of Europe. One of the 
most prominent military advisers of King Zog 
of Albania, Major Leon Gagliari, was shot 
while in a motorcar in the streets of Tirana. 
Major Gagliari was a Croat by birth but be- 
came an officer in the Bulgarian Army. After 
the war he became an Albanian and chief of 
the Albanian general staff. His murderer is 
named Tchekrcu, an Albanian journalist He 
had recently received an amnesty from prison, 
where he had been serving a three year term 
following charges that he was a member of a 
secret anti-Albanian organization. 


When the Asylum’s Napoleons Meet, Their Conclave Isn’t Funny 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 
KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
. ROBERT K McCABE 
CARL GEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Publisher 

Executive Editor REN& BONDY Deputy Publisher 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Associate Publisher 

Depm Editor RICHARD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

Deputy EAwr STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director Operations 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMA1SONS Director trf Gradation 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Direaor of Advertising Soto 

International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Charies-de-GauIk, 92200 NemDysur-Seine, 

France. Tel; (1)747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN; 0294-8052. 

Directew de fa pMcatiottl Waiter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters. 24-34 Hennessy Rd, Hong Kong TeL 5-285618. Telex 6/170. 

Managing Dir. U.K.: Robin MacKkhtm. 63 Long Acre. London WC2. TeL 336-4801 Telex 262009. 

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U.S. suhscrqnion: S322 yearly. Second-class postage paid at Lang Island City, H. Y. 1/101. 

1985. International Herald Tribune All rights reserved. 



B RUSSELS — On a fine Sunday 
afternoon recently, in the Flem- 
ish market town of Diksmuide, mem- 
bers of some of the diverse neo-Nazi 
groups of Western Europe disported 
m one of their annual conclaves. 

The center erf the gathering was a 
circus tent near the Yser River. Sever- 
al hundred people mille d about un- 
der the humid canvas. Most wore 
variations Of paramili tary gear — 
black hiking shorts, khaki shirts, 
thick black boots — decorated with 
scarves and insignias. There were 
shoulder patches from West Germa- 
ny, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium 
and Sweden, while other participants 
chose to remain anonymous. 

Some were young with hair cut 
back to scarred scalps, looking as if 
they had just left a rock concert or a 
motorcycle gang. Others were plump 
and middle-aged, with garrison belts 
and silver braids run through epau- 
lets of their brown shirts. There were 
a few uniformed children beside uni- 
formed parents. Waitresses in white 
aprons brought trays of beer. 

All along the tent’s perimeter were 
ideologues behind their literature ta- 
bles, seeking the attention of the uni- 
formed crowd. Earnest young men 
and a few earnest young women 
thrust leaflets in half a dozen lan- 
guages into the hands of passers-by. 
touting Friends of South Africa, Or- 
der of the Eternal Return, Young 
National Democrats, Mysteries of 
tbe Runes. Anti-Immigrani Coalition 


and many more such causes. Aging 
didacts in dark suits, with bulging 
briefcases, sold books with titles like 
“Is Hitler Really Dead?” and “Jewish 
Crimes Through the Centuries." 

By the end of the Diksmuide gath- 
ering, the police had arrested 49 men 
for brawling or for carrying dubs, 
chains, knives or bayonets. Many of 
those charged were West Germans. 

• In past years Britain's National 
From had provided about half of 
those arrested, but it was not in evi- 
dence this year. That presumably had 
to do with allegations that National 
Front supporters instigated the May 
29 riot at the Brussels soccer march 
between Liverpool and Juventus of 
Milan, at which 38 people died. 

As memory of Nazi crimes in Eu- 
rope grows fainter, there is a tenden- 
cy to regard neo-Nazi gatherings with 
disdain or even amusement — a late 
20th-century version of the old car- 
toons in which all the inmates in the 
asylum think they are Napoleon. Of- 
ficials responsible for public order 
have come to take a less benign view. 

Members or former members of 
represented at Diksmuide 
ive been implicated in murders, 
bombings, bant robberies and arms 
and narcotic trafficking. For every 
harmless lunatic who dresses up in ah 
SS uniform there seems to be another 
prepared to use a gun or a bomb. 

Authorities seem agreed that ter- 


By Paul L, Montgomery 

rorism by the extreme right has di- 
minished since 1980, when a bomb in 
the Bologna train station lolled 81 
people and a bomb at the Munich 
beer festival killed 13. Bat there are 
stiD enough cases io keep poEce busy. 
The “loony tunes" ami squalid crimi- 
nals President Reagan referred to in a 
July 8 speech on terrorism can be 
found on the right in abundance. 

A case under investigation in Bel- 
gium might serve as a cautionary ex- 
ample of where tbe extreme ri g ht can 
lead. It began two years ago, when a 
former paratrooper was arrested af- 
ter he had shot at his brother in a 
drunken rage. A search of his apart- 
ment uncovered aims and top-secret 


NATO documents. The man said he 
was part of a previously unknown 
group called Westland New Post, 
founded to defend the cultural and 
genetic patrimony of the white race 
against North Africans. Turks, Slavs, 
South Americans and leftists. 

The trail led back to Paul Latinos, 
a 38-year-old nudear engineer who 
had held political jobs m Belgium 
and had been arrested in Brussels for 
illegal arms possession. In 1978 he 
belonged to a far-right youth group 
and tned to infiltrate environmental- 
ist groups. He said he attended para- 
military training camps in Smith Af- 
rica and what was then Rhodesia. 

Westland New Post, founded by 


LETTER TO THE EDITOR 


The Spartans Won Then 

In “Without Science’s Stars, No 
‘Star Wars”*. (Aug. 2). Daniel S. 
Greenberg writes that “Lyastraia 
achieved uimortaKtyty organizing a 
bedroom boycott against tl» waning 
armies of Greece and Sparta." Tbe 
Peloponnesian War was « course be- 
tween Athens and Sparta. 

The Athenians were beaten and 
obliged to raze the Long Wall be- 
tween their dry and its harbor, Pirae- 
us. Tlrat was rise end of Athens as 


mistress of tbe seas, and victoiy for 
the leading continental Greek power. 

Aristramanes’s comedy was per- 
formed during the war, in liberal Ath- 
ens. Rigorous Sparta would have put 
him to death — or in a psychiatric 
efinic? A majority of the f - ’ 
population were serfs, and 

had a system of police terror to' r 

them down. Let u$ not ac ce pt any 
land of ceruorship. But let us not 
either allow todays Spartans to wim 
PETRU DUMITRIU. 

Boon. 


Mr. L a ti n os in 1980 as an infanm- 
tion-gathaing organization, hid a se- 
cret police section modeled on the 
Gestapo and another called the Bop 
reau for Zionist Affairs. It apparently 
never had more than a few dozen 
members, but among them were sev- 
eral who worked in the code room at 
the Belgian general staff, 

71)6 members apparently bad sto- 
len copies of NATO messages to tire 
Belgian Army as well as a decoding 
grid for a NATO code. 

The ex-paratrooper also confessed 
topolice that Westland New Post had 
received training in shadowing sus- 
pects from a member of the Belgian 
security services. Among tbe targets, 
be said, were a couple tfiqj suroened 
of bang Soviet spies. A month after 
the practice session, the couple were 
found shot dead. The ex-paratrooper 
said he took part in the murder. 

Last year, m the midst of the tan-, 
glcd investigation, Mr. Litmus was 
found hanged in his basemenL The 
death was at first nded a suicide but 
the case has been reopened. 

An investigator of the Westland 
New Post case said it was unlikel y 
that his department would again kx» 
quite so skeptically at extrane-ririn , 
groups they came across. “U wastike ■ 
Hurting over a rock.” he said. “Insects 
were crawling in an directions.” 

The writer, a fanner fompi com* 
spandettt. Uses m Brussels. HewaSnb- 
wed lids to the Las Angeles Tines. 









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Jean Negulesco in his Hollywood days. 



■ijf- 

vV - ' 



Memories of Falling Upstairs 

P ARIS — Some days it seems as if Hollywood film where of a night one could The hate was enough 
there isn't one old-time Hollywood see all together Modigliani, Matisse, Pascin. gulesco said, 
director who hasn't had his horn- Foujita “and the wild Soutine." Having He went to Turkey to 

rruive at the CLnfcmatheaue ithe lat- painted Queen Marie, he landed in Holly- (“an adventurous time 


P ARIS — Some days it seems as if 
there isn't one old-time HolJywood 
director who hasn't had his horn- 
mage at the Cinematheque i the lat- 
est to be feted by the creme de la creme of 
French cinephiles was Joseph E. Lewis, excit- 
edly identified in a newspaper headline as 
the' prince of B pictures.) 

One stranger to (he homage circuit whose 
pleasanL progress through the high life is 
unencumbered by any cult following is Jean 

Mary Blume 

Negulesco. who made 36 feature films from 
193 1 starring such formidable names as Joan 
Crawford. Bette Davis. “Headache” Lamarr 
as he calls her. Ida Lupine. Deborah Kerr. 
Betty Grable, Lauren Bacall. Marilyn Mon- 
roe. June Allyson and Jeanne Crain: who cut 
a sleek swath through the studios, swimming 
pools, beds and croquet courts of Hollywood 
at its palmiest; and whose films include 
“Humoresque." “Johnny Belinda," “Three 
Coins in the Fountain" and “How to Marry 
a Millionaire." His first film job was as 
technical adviser for the rape scene of a 1931 
version of William Faulkner's “Sanctuary.” 
At 85. jaunty and charming as ever, he 
lives mostly in Marbella. Spain, with his wife 
of 3S years, the former model Dusty Ander- 
son. He hasn’t made a film since he tried in 
1970 to help out his friend Darryl F. Zanuck 
in a fruitless attempt to launch Zanuck’s 
latest girlfriend. He is, fatally as far as hom- 
ages are concerned, a commercial director. 

“Nothing wrong with that title,” Ne- 
gulesco said. “When one is under a long- 
term contract and gets a high salary every 
week for years in a row, the studio's prob- 
lems are your problems, too. and when the 
boss assigns you to a costly problem-project, 
they feel you would do a better job than 
others. A good film falls into place like a 
perfect mosaic, but a problem assignment is 
a challenge. Commercial directors who never 
refused an assignment — Hathaway, Henry 
King. Mike Curtiz, Woody Van Dyke, 
Walsh. Wellman, etc. — were rare, profes- 
sional and an asset to their studios. 

“Their pictures made money, they kept 
studios out of the red and showed enough 
profit to finance other projects, gambling 
projects, which sometimes turned out to be 
masterpieces. The commercial directors 
made tne industry — the cinema." 

Negulesco is an uncombative. worldly 
man with a penchant for Hollywood rascals, 
which is understandable, and for the paint- 
ings of Bernard Buffet (he once owned 190), 
which is not His cheerfully checkered past 
includes an interlude as a professional gigo- 
lo-dancer on the French Riviera at about the 
same lime as his chum Billy Wilder was 
doing Lhe same thing in Berlin. Negulesco 
tactfully suggests he may toive been the bet- 
ter dancer. “I had more sisters. I had four 
sisters who made me dance. Billy." he adds, 
“was supposed to be very successful." 

Negulesco recently published his autobi- 
ography. “Things I Did and Things I Think I 
Did.” “It’s a coward's title. I can hide behind 
it. If people say something's not true, I can 
say, ‘Look at the title.' " He is planning next 
to write a cookbook called “First I Cook, 
Then We Make Love." “My wife says that’s 
not a good title, vou’re a better cook than 
that.” 

B ORN in Craiova. Romania, the long- 
awaited first son after four daughters. 
Negulesco says, as ladies' men tend 
to, that his mother was a saint. With John 
Houseman and Edward G. Robinson be was 
one of the few Romanians in u Hollywood 
dangerously dominated by Hungarians. (“It 
isn’t enough to be Hungarian; you have to 
have talent,” read a sign over the w-riters’ 
table at the MGM commissary). 

“A Romanian is every cliche about Hun- 
garians in spades. We dunk we are more 
honest because while both will sell their 
mothers only a Romanian will deliver. 

“Edward G. Robinson was a perfect Ro- 
manian. We played gin once at his place. I 
lost 558 and gave him a check. The next time 
we played with my cards and I won S59.” 
Robinson returned Negulesco's check and 
gave him SI in cash, to Negulesco's dismay. 
“Eddie, mv check was no good." he ex- 
plained. “Thai’s vour problem," Robinson 
said. Negulesco recalled, “That was the most 
Romanian thing 1 ever saw.” 

Negulesco left home to become an artist in 
a Pans garret. He met fellow Romanians 
(Brancusi. Tristan Tzara) an d d escribes an 
artists' bistro that sounds straight out of a 


Hollywood film where of a night one could 
see all together Modigliani, Matisse, Pascin. 
Foujita “and the wild Soutine." Having 
painted Queen Marie, he landed in Holly- 
wood in 1928 as “the royal Romanian paint- 
er." 

Before leaving France. Negulesco be- 
friended Isadora Duncan at the Colombe 
d'Or in Saint-Paul de Vence. “She was a very- 
exciting personality but absolutely a fat slob. 
Americans used to pay her to be around, 
especially when she would talk about her 
mad, mad Russian husband, Yesenin. She 
was foolish because she hated wives. She 
would sleep with any man so she could 
punish the wife. I don't know whv.” 

Negulesco did not hate husbands. In Hol- 
lywood he was found charming and dashing 
and was quickly employed. An early attempt 
at a never-released an’film turned" him into 
an obedient director who was more interest- 
ed in exploiting his skill than in developing 
his talent. He learned his skills from making 
96 shorts, each shot in one day. 

He received a bi° check every Friday and 
was handy in a crisis. For example, when 
20th Century-Fox wanted to show that its 
new Cinemascope process, which had been 
used onlv for a lumbering epic. “The Robe." 
could also serve for more intimate films. 
Negulesco used the process for “How to 
Marty a Millionaire.” with Betty Grable and 
Lauren Bacall, and with Marilyn Monroe 
giving the most relaxed performance of her 
career. 

Negulesco felt a wary affection for Mon- 
roe. whom he described as being “as helpless 
as a sharp knife.” Her mist in him was such 
that he directed her in 101 retakes and extra 
scenes in other people's pictures. 

He danced with Vivien Leigh the night of 
the premiere of "Gone with the Wind,” dat- 
ed Luise Rainer, cooked gourmet meals for 
Howard Hughes and was Zanuck's intimate. 
“Zanuck was impressed by Johnny and peo- 
ple like him who were European and 
smooth," says an acquaintance. “They had 
something he didn't have and yet Zanuck 
was stronger than they were." And he never 
failed to show it 

Negulesco describes himself as a selfish, 
egotistical adventurer. In sum. he was insou- 
ciant. In his book many people are described 
os ruthless, but the word is not used in 
condemnation. He had a lot of fun; Even the 
hideously competitive ritual Hollywood cro- 
quet games were fun. although croquet, with 
its opportunities for cool vengeance, was 
known as “the hate game.” 

“We never bet any money on the game. 







- '•*** 


tVt-.. .- 


N EW YORK — Mary Day can no 
longer climb steps two at a time. 
When she first opened the Wash- 
ington (D.C.) School of Ballet in 
1944. her body had the spiy, athletic jaunt of 
a dancer, and she would lope up the stairs as 
she went from studio to studio, checking on 
students. Leaching classes and stealing a pir- 
ouette or two in front of an empty mirror. 

Now her knee is calcified and stiff, and she 
holds it rigidly as she walks among the stu- 
dios at the Wisconsin Avenue school But 
while her step may have slowed, her pace has 
not. She still auditions students and teach- 
ers. sits in on classes and even gives lessons, 
tending her pupils like a gardener. 

It is that attention and care that people 
say is the reason so many of Day’s students 
blossom into elegant, gifted dancers and why 
over the years many of the most talented 
have joined American Ballet Theater. 

Man- Day is one of many teachers who in 
cities and small towns across the United 
States nurture the talents of the young danc- 
ers who may eventually be members of one 
of the leading .American dance companies. 

There are. however, few schools with the 
resources and few students with the talent 
for such achievement, or for entry into simi- 
larly noteworthy companies. Some leading 
companies, like New York City Ballet, have 
schools that feed their ranks. As well, there 
are many good quality regional schools that 
serve as conduits for their dancers to enter 
less competitive companies. 

Every year, about five or six dancers leave 
the company, and in turn, five or six new 
dancers take their places. The; 88 dancers 
who perform with the company have had 
different trainings and different teachers.' 
Some have studied under one master, others 
have been to a number of schools, and some 
have danced with European or regional com- 
panies before their acceptance. 

While there is no set path to assure a 
dancers success, time has proved several 
schools lo be precious cultivators of young 
dancers. Mikhail Baryshnikov, director of 
ABT. said he was impressed by the “many 
distinguished and fine ballet pedagogues in 
America who have developed children into 
dancers.” 

But there are three schools that have set 
themselves apart from the rest, said Barysh- 
nikov, “that have been particularly interest- 
ing and productive for us” as a company: 
Mary Day in Washington; Sonia Arova and 
her husband, Thor SutowskL who run the 
dance faculty at the Alabama School of Fine 
.Arts in Birmingham, and the School of 
American Ballet in New York Gty. 

Day’s students fumble a little when they 
try to describe what it is about her teaching 
that encourages young dancers to succeed. 
She has a raw elegance that leaves images of 


The hale was enough of a reward.” Ne- 
gulesco said. 

He went to Turkey to aid its film industry 
(“an adventurous lime filled with Balkan 
promises”); the U. S. government sent him 
and his wife to Moscow’, where they were 
convinced their room was bugged. “Dusty 
talked to every’ piece of furniture saying I am 
an American and you should be ashamed of 
yourself. One day 1 found her talking to a 
toileL” 


H E once won this plaudit from the 
intellectual critic James Agee; “A 
director l had not expected to praise 
is Jean Negulesco. who has always reminded 
me of Michael Curtiz on toast. {Mr. Curtiz, 
in turn, has always seemed like Franz Mur- 
nau under onions).” His great regret was that 
he was never allowed to make a western. 

“I had ray cowboy hat and my walk was 
ready.” He got up and turned into John 
Wayne, shoulders rolling, knees clenched. 
“In Hollywood they’d laugh at me although 
the best western was made by a Viennese. 
Fred Zinneraann — ‘High Noon.’ I had my 
costume ready and instead they would say. 
Johnny, we have a story for you about three 
naughty little girls and three naughty little 
boys. We'll get Hathaway for the western.” 
Such regrets were minor: He was a lucky 
man and knew it. Even in World War II he 
was lucky. Classified as an enemy alien, he 
was able to pull out a telegram that Stalin 
bad sent him praising one of his shorts. 
Later, in the McCarthy era, having Stalin as 
a fan could have caused trouble, but Ne- 
gulesco never had a care. 

“When Zanuck was checking my political 
affiliations he found that the one thing I 
belonged to was the Peter Pan Woodland 
Gub. a club for rich men who owned bunga- 
low’s. I used to take my female stars there for 
story conferences.” 

Negulesco hasn't won an Oscar, although 
his stars have. No one, to his knowledge, is 
planning a homage or a critical study of his 
oeuvre. He has, however, been called Holly- 
wood's best-dressed director (“69 pairs of 
sports trousers, 53 waistcoats! 500 lies, 3 
dozen hats,” said a news report). Sunny and 
suave at 85, he is planning another film and 
another autobiography, called “Falling Up." 

“They talk afiout the ladder of success.” 
he said. “But my impression of a career in 
Hollywood is that you fall your way upstairs. 
On the way up, you fall down. If you have 
the humor, sull being happy f allin g down, 
it’s a glorious thing.” ■ 


by Esther B. Fein 




Katharine Hepburn lingering after you meet 
her. Her pupils said that gracefulness cam e 
across when she taught them how to stand on 
pointe, how lo arch their backs or even when 
she bumped into them in the hallways. 

“Mary has a wonderful eye for detail" 
said Marianna Tcherkassky. a former stu- 
dent of Day who joined ABT in 1970. “But 
what has always touched me most about 
Mary is the way she motivates her students, 
bow she inspires them to be the best they can 
be without developing neurosis. On a human 
level her students seem down to earth, not 
obsessed or possessed.” 

Baryshnikov said that he, too, noticed that 
"zest and ease” in Day’s students and how 


Mvflym K. tvi. Th* York Team 


Mary Day, in black, 
works with students in 
Washington school. ' 


with a relaxed, self-confident manner they, 
were able to “analyze knotty choreographic ■ 
problems.” • 

For Day, the lessons she teaches extend • 
beyond the realm of dance. “Dancing is the 
best preparation for life,” she said. “It teach' . 
es you discipline, how to handle your body, - 
poise and self-assurance. It is very good for 
everybody. I think that dance is for every- 
one, but not everyone can necessarily be a 
professional dancer” ' 

Day also has several other proteges cur- 
rently with ABT: Kevin McKenzie, who has, 
been with the company since 1979; Hilary! 

Continued on page 9. 


Cold Winds on the Golden Slope 


Negulesco sketch of Marilyn Monroe. 


by Frank J. Prial 

P ARIS — Anyone who has driven 
south from Paris to Burgundy in 
winter quickly realizes that it's not 
like driving south from, say. New 
York City to Virginia. Here, at least until 
one comes lo the Rhone Valley, it gets much 
colder. 

Paris can be its usual miserable, gray self. 
Burgundy, three hours away, can be snowy 
and frigid. It's not hard to -see why. The 
whole area, from Dijon to Lyon, lies practi- 
cally at the foot of the Alps. There are days 
and nights when the cold winds cut down' 
from the mountains with a vengeance. In 
Aloxe-Corton, just outside Beaune, the vil- 
lagers say that from the top of the tuH on 
which their vines grow, one can see Mom 
Blanc — 120 miles (about 200 kilometers) 
away — four or five limes a year. 

Burgundy is the most northerly region in 
the world to produce such great red wines, 
and it’s not uncommon to experience one 
bad vintage in three in the vineyards of the 
Cote d'Or. Modern science has developed 
techniques to counter many of the ills mat , 
because of the weather, affect the Burgundi- 
an vines. There are sprays to counter rot in 
the fields and sophisticated new vinification 
methods that can make good wines from 
extremely unpromising grapes. But there are 
also times when nature takes over and man 
realizes once a gain tha t his best skills go 
only so far. These thoughts come to mind m 
reading some statistics about what the frost 
did to Burgundy last winter, and in estimat- 
ing wbat they mean to Burgundy harvests for 
the next few years. 

By most responsible estimates. 1,250 acres 
<505' hectares) of appellation controllie vines 
must be replaced. There are approximately 
1 00,000 acres of such vines in Burgundy, but. 
even so, the damage was severe. The acreage 
to be replaced does not include that which 
was partly destroyed or severely damaged. 

Chablis. the northernmost section of Bur- 
gundy. was the most seriously affected. 
Some 330,000 vines will have to be replaced, 
mostly these at the lowest altitudes and 


Those who bought fu- 
tures on the excellent 
1983 Burgundies — 
that is, contracts to buy 
at prices set last year — 
probably are going to 
be smug. 


those on slopes exposed to the northwest 
winds. 

The Cdte de Nuits and the Cdte de Beaune 
suffered less, but of some 17,000 acres in 
vines, up to 750 will have to be replaced. 
Almost all of the famous wine communes 
suffered damage: Gevrev-Charabertin, 
Morey-Saint-Denis. Vougeot, Nuits-Saint- 
Geoiges. Beaune, Volnay, Meursault and 
Santenay among them. According to some 
growers, as many as 3,000 acres of vines will 
have to be replanted, at least in pan. This 
comes to more than 3.5 million vines. 

Farther south, lhe damage was less exten- 
sive. In the Chalonnais — Rully, Givry, 
Mercurey and Montagny — some' 75 acres 
lost up to 50 percent of their vines, and 200 
additional acres were damag -H somewhat 
less. About 600,000 vines were lost. In the 
Maconnais. the region that produces Pouil- 
ly-Fuiss£, Saint- Ver an and a half-dozen oth- 
er white wines, damage was very limited. In 
Beaujolais, about 250 acres suffered the loss 
of up to 30 percent of their vines, while 30 or 
40 additional acres suffered losses of up to 
50 percent- Since Beaujolais comprises some 
38,000 acres, the loss there was negligible. 

W " HAT does all this mean for wine 
drinkers? It means tbat the relentless 
upward pressure on Burgundy 
prices, already exceptionally high, will in- 
crease again, in Chablis, production will be 
down 50 percent in most areas. That should 


write finis to a long period in which fine 
Chablis has been one of the best bargains on 
the French wine mar ket 
On the Cdte d’Or, production this year is 
expected to be from 10 to 15 percent less 
than last year. No great loss, except that 
Burgundy is always in short supply and any 
diminution in quantity is invariably fol- 
lowed by a quick price increase. Then there- 
are those five million or so vines that will 
have to be replaced; someone is going to 
have to pay for them. Good Burgundy wnes 
that have been damaged by frost often need 
five years of care to come back to full pn> 
ducaon. Newly planted vines need even 


more. And. unfortunately, it is often prized 
old vines that are killed off most readily bv 
bad weather. 


The good news concerns the size of the last 
two Burgundy harvests; more specifically,' 
for wine-lovers outside France, that portion 
of them that will be made available to export 
markets. In 1983, for the first time more ih.-rq 
a million hectoliters, or about 25 million 
gallons; of wine were exported. Twenty years 
earlier, the total would have been less than a 
fifth of that. The 1984 vintage was somewhat 
smaller overall than the average, but exports 
actually exceeded the 1983 figure by 12 per- 
cent, or about three minion gallons. To be 
sure, more than half of that was Beaujolais 
Even so. exports of red Burgundy were ud 
almost 20 percent over 1983 and for whites 
almost 17 perc ent " 

Taking inflation into account and the fact 
that there will be a shortage when the 1985s 
are coming on the market, it is not surprising 
that the Burgundians themselves put a hieh- 

1983, As of last February — prices have 
undoubtedly gone up smee — 1984 exports 
of both Burgundy and Beaujolais were vaN 
i *v me mill ion, up from about S2fl 
million m 1983. Enthusiasts who bought 
futures on the excellent 1983 Burgundies^-* 
that is, contracts to buy at prices set last year 
— r probably are going to be smug. The hiah 
pnees they paid could well looflike S 
bargains m a year or two. 

® 1985 The New York Times 









Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 16, 1985 . 


TRAVEL 


Tenderfoot Among the Sherpas — An 8-Day Trek in Nepal 


by Steven R, Wetsman 

T dawn the sun creeps over a high 


ridge and you can feel the morning 
lice calls 


A chill in your bones. A voice 

from outside the tent, offering hot 
tea. Shaking off a ni ght 's sleep, you grpggily 
splash yourself with warm water from a tin 
bowl. After a breakfast of oatmeal, dry bis- 
cuits and coffee, you are off for another day 
of trekking up and down the steep foothills 
of the Himalayas. 

In the small mountain kingdom of Nepal, 
there are only two ways of getting a glimpse 
of the tallest peaks in the world. One uto fly 
over them. The other is to walk, because 
there are virtually no roads in the interior of 
the country. Some 30.000 people trek in the 
shadow of the mountains each year, but the 
enjoyment goes far beyond the thrill of see- 
ing the Himalayas rise up ahead, like jagged 
snowy monsters cloaked in misL A trek in 
Nepal offers the only way to experience the 
ancient villages, terraced farms, religious 
shrines, rocky streams and alpine forests of 
rhododendron trees that are the essence of 
one of the most romantic and remote regions 
in the world. 

For me, trekking offered another type of 
opportunity, a challenge to see if I could 
make it through eight days in fairly rugged 
mountains and return to tell the tale. 

My wife had backpacked through the 
Smokies and spent many summers hiking in 
other parts of the United States. But I am 
definitely an amateur. To save my life, I 
probably could not pitch a tent and certainly 
could not start a fire without a match. Be- 
cause my back still keeps going out, I had to 
give up r unning last year. I prefer bathing 
every day and wasn't at all sure about sleep- 
ing bags. So when friends asked us to join 
them on an eight-day trek, I didn't jump at 
the chance. But I wanted to see iff could do 
it, and I wanted to see Nepal. 

The counuy offers a full range of chal- 
and mine was actually one of the less 
L The more adventurous can test 
their endurance at the higher altitudes, in- 
cluding the regions around Mount Everest 
and Annapurna. Others can go into the hills 
without a guide, live more or less off the land 
and find lodging in the villages along the 
route. 







INDIA 


7-% ? NEPAL 


Metomdhl 

b>j'?Gaon 

WJP** 


Katmandu 
I MOM 10 


I Mia, 300 Pul- 


My trek was organized by Mountain Trav- 
el Nepal, foremost of the many professional 
agencies based in Katmandu. Mountain 
Travel supplied the tents, sleeping bags, food 
and kitchen gear. Its crew pitched the tents 
and cooked the meals. The 16 trekkexs in our 
group (nine men and seven women) brought 
their own clothes and camping parapherna- 
lia in duffel bags. But everything was carried 
up and down the slopes by nimble-footed 
porters practically half our size. All we had 
to do was carry day packs and somehow 
keep going on the trail from 7 in the morning 
to usually about 3 or 4 in the afternoon, with 
a break for lunch. When we were ready to 
leave for the day's outing, the crew had 
already moved on to the lunch site so that 
when we arrived, the meal was almost ready. 
The crew brought some food along, includ- 
ing live chickens, and bought some en route. 

Our fellow trekkers ranged from the 20s to 
50s in age, but it is not uncommon for 
children to come along on treks. I have met 
vigorous people in their 60s and know of 
people in their 70s who have gone on ardu- 
ous treks. 


Wt 


ITH our rednue of 45 Sherpas and 
porters, we fully realized that we 
were not about to qualify for the 
sequel to “Indiana Jones and the Temple of 
Doom.” In fact, we may have looked ridicu- 
lous. But the hiking was strenuous. We start- 
ed out in blazing heat (in the upper 90s) so 


pu nishing that we didn't feel foolish using 
our umb rellas as parasols. By the end of the 
week we were up to 12,000 feet, making our 
way through snow-dappled forests and crisp, 
thin mountain air. Among our group we 
experienced all kinds of ailments — altitude 
sickness, colds, diarrhea, blisters, muscle 
aches and nausea. But when it was over, we 
had seen some of the most breathtaking 
landscape in the world, and we could say 
that we hiked 50 miles up and down the 
Himalaya Mountains. 

Our trek took us through a region north- 
east of Katmandu known as Helambu. also 
known as Hdmu. To the north is a wall of 
mountains more than 16.000 feet high, bat 
the ridges and valleys in Helambu itself run 
north and south. Because of its proximity to 
the capital, the area is ideal for shorter treks. 
Surprisingly, it is also one of the less spoiled 
areas because so many trekkers are beck- 
oned by the romance of the Annapurna 
range or Everest area. 

After being dropped off by a bus at a flat, 
barren and hot outpost east of Katmandu, 
we made our way along the Indrawad River 
bed to the site of our first camp at Melemchi 
PuL Some of the other experienced campers 
came equipped with special trousers and 
hiking boots, but I trudged along in shorts 
and a pair of old running shoes that were to 
serve me quite welL At only 2,000 feet, we 
sweltered that first day and wondered when 
we would feel like we were hiking in the 
moun tains. But we were able to cool off at a 
green bend in the river, where the water 
rushed by in a refreshing torrent. It was the 
last rime we could bathe in a river until the 
end of the trek. 

I began to see that this trek would give us 
an extraordinary look at how people live in 
Nepal. We passed through tiny villages of 
ola stone houses and on the hillsides we saw 
men plowing the terraced farms, shouting at 
their bullocks or water buffalo in the hot sun. 

Elsewhere, groups of women stooped to 
plant seedlings in muddy rice paddies. Chi 
the trail itself, men strained under the weight 
of bags of rice carried to the market. Farther 
on the trek, these men could be seen taking 
enormous sacks of grain on their backs up 
the rugged mountains to Tibet. There they 
trade the grain for exquisite jewelry ana 
trinkets that are then sold in the tourist 
shops of Katmandu. 

The nation’s commerce thus unfolded be- 
fore our eyes, and so did its biggest prob- 
lems. Nepal is one of the world’s poorest 
countries, with a per capita income of S140 
in 1983, and its population is growing SO 
rapidly that the country is running out of 
land to cultivate. The search for a livelihood 
has led the Nepalese to cut down most of 
their nation's forests, and to carve corrugat- 
ed terraces into every inch of available hill- 
side. When the monsoons come, they wash 
the denuded soil into the rivers, a problem 
that some scientists believe contributes to 
the silt deposits and devastating floods 



A hillside camp in the Himalayas on the sixth day of the journey. 


where the Ganges and Br 
systems empty into the Bay of 

The Nepalese government, with the help 
of an array of agencies including the U. S. 
Peace Corps, has undertaken an ambitious 
program of reforestation to hall the erosion. 
But many experts say it's a losing battle, and 
what the trekker sees is hill after hill of 
terraced farms. 

On the first day ] walked part of the way 
alongside Lhakpa' Norbu. our Sherpa leader, 
a lean, hawk-faced man with a thin mustache 
and a friendly manner, ready always to listen 
to suggestions from the group. During the 
week, we shifted the planned itinerary some- 
what, deciding that one campsite was too 
windy and drab. So we later walked an extra 
half day and spent two nights at Tarke 
Ghyang, where some people took time out 
from trekking to go shopping for souvenirs. 
Norbu told me that most groups get along 
well, but that arguments sometimes develop 
over the pace and itinerary. 

Ours was a congenial collection, and it 
turned out the biking was hard for almost 
everyone, as proved by the second day. It 
seemed as if we were going straight' up, 
mostly in intense heat, through steep trails 
carved into the dusty mountainside. Setting 
the pattern that prevailed for the rest of the 
week, we awakened at 6 and were on our way 
an hour later. After a morning of sweating, 
straining and grunting, we feasted on fried 
potatoes, fried eggs, bread, honey and mar- 
malade for lunch. The cook also gave us 
pieces of watei buffalo liver that had the 
consistency of wet suing. 

By now I was beginning to get over ray 
initial fears that I was going to die of hepati- 
tis or some other disease on this trek. Visitors 
are warned not to eat uncooked vegetables 


or to drink the water, even from the most 
pristine- looking streams. The crew kept wa- 
ter boiling at every stop, and we used it to fill 
our water containers. Some trekkers like to 
take the extra precaution of bringing iodine 
solution or water purification tablets, but I 
found that drinking thoroughly boiled water 
worked fine for me. 


B 


Y the end of the second day, we final- 
ly felt we were in the mountains, jn 
the distance to the north we could see 
the snow-covered peaks of the Himalayas 
The hills were still terraced and covered with 
tiny folds, making them look from a distance 
like a rich grain of wood. 

On the third day I felt that the hard work 
was paying off in one of the rare privileges 
offered by a trip like this: the opportunity to 
see what only those willing to hike through 
the mountains can see. 

A certain magical quality of the moun- 
tains began to bewitch us, even though we 
were exhausted at the end of every day. 
There was the silence broken only by blear- 
ing goats or baiking dogs. Occasionally we 
simply stopped to take in the silent majesty 
of the vista to the north, where the high and 
snowy ridges were cloaked with clouds. The 
spectacular views of the valleys below were 
ail the more satisfying because we knew we 
had strained up every inch to the bop of the 
ridge in order to look down. 

Scattered along the trail were ancient Bud- 
dhist stupas, or shrines. We were often invit- 
ed to stop at Buddhist temples and monas- 
teries, adorned with exquisite, brighliy 
colored paintings. We took: pleasure in the 
moist, silent air of contemplation that per- 
vaded the temples' interiors. The hillside 
monasteries had tall flagpoles with prayer 


Da NMf Ywi TkoM 


flags flapping in the wind, making the braid- 
ings seem like silent ships pacbed in the dry. 

Few of the Nepalese we met spoke En- 
glish. Along the trail, however, small chil- 
dren contmnaUy pestered us with shouts of 
“chocolate,” for they have learned that trek- 
kers often bring candy to give them. Indeed, 
one of the bizarre effects of the thousands of 

incidence oMooth decay "among Nepalese 
children 

In the town of Tarke Ghyang, where we 
pitched our tents for the third and fourth 
nights, a group of beautiful, willowy women 
came to oar campsite and beseemed us to 
come to their shops in their homes to look at 
trinkets and other souvenirs. Each shop was 
immaculate, with a polished floor and orga- 
nized displays of bottles, copper pots. pans, 
jars and Buddhist or Hindu decorations. It 
was impossible to resist buying a ntrirhu* 
made of yak bone or an intricately embossed 
and inlaid jewelry box, especially since these 
elegant women with plaintive almond eyes 
and darr ling yirriles had the persistence of 
vacuum-cleaner salesmen. Ba rgaining was 
intense, but the cost for several pieces did 
not exceed $10 to S20. 

I decided that I had done so well on the 
tide so far that T couldtake a day off and Jell 
around Tarke Ghyang on the fourth day, 
while some of the others climbed up and 
down a nearby ridge. I slept and read m the 
pale sunlight/enjoying the occasional driz- 
zles but nursing a quiet sense of dread that 
from now on the climb might be more brataL 

Sure enough, the next day we plunged 
down into a valley, crossed a rushing stream 
that was driving an ancient stone mill, ami 
headed bade to to a camp in the forest above 
the village of Mdemchi Gaoa. 


Shortly after lunch. H began wnnWj 
it rained harder, ration* the an fragrart wtt 
forest scents. With walking *ta*s 
hand umbrellas in the ot her.y e trudged 

through gdiis- spongy unoeigro wtt a rid 
muck. The splatter of the r^wpoacaw- 
cdby groans from waterfaege^hde to y 
ing a steep mountainside covered wrorlw- 
est jagged rocks and shppoy fflwL jh- 
seemed like hours before 
campsite in a pasture inbabntediw yakLSfe. 
ks were not overjoyed to be parted «de 
a collection of bedraggled trekkers and 
iheir entourage. 

T HE accumulation of hardships wsb 
now taking its to3L I had accom- 
phshed a tot, of course. I had baron) 
how to turn over in nY snug sjcqan gba&J 
become used to the dinners of flWWw 
potatoes, thin soup, boiled cabbage and sat- 
ewy chicken. I had became practiced ^ at 
squatting over a hole m tbe privamr or *- 
latrine tent usually erected on a teBsde near . 
the camp. And 1 bad recovered f ront a 
pounding headache, a symptom of attnode 
sickness, the previous night. 

’ The rain soon stopped, and when it did we 

could see through the nrist that only a couple 
of hundred feet above os there was snow on 
the ground. It was hard to believe that a two 
days earlier, we were sweltering in shorts ted' 
T-shirts. Now we gathered around a fesra&e 
to keep warm, bundled in sweater and wad 
hats. I was glad to have an extra pur of dry 
shoes. Some of the women in tbe group tttig 
to cheer the rest of us. As they serenaded the 
campers, the displaced yaks brayed in the 
background. . .1 . ' 

The reward for this misery came the next 
day. Dawn broke cold and crisp, and spaa 
we were climbing through magoificexii rhB- 
dodendron forests with thousands of blos- 
soms of red, pink and white. It was an alpine 
fairyland. 

We kept climbing, this lime past fkkbof 
purple primroses and beneath canopies of 
rhododendron trees. In the background were 
the peaks of die Himalayas, soil lowering 
above ns film sentinels, even though we baa 
reached 12,000 feet. The air was bracing and 
dry, as inioxkaimg as wine. I felt drat I was 
on top of the world, which, in a manner of 
speaking I nearly was. 

The seventh day proved, if I had- not 
realized it already, mat trudging down a 
miwnmin am be OS BlduOUS as I 

My running shoes by now had 
apart, and! was relying more ; 
my w alking stick. 1 was also 
aware that I had not bathed in a week 
the luxuries of Katmandu began to beefcen. 

The last night of oar uric was spent on a 
wind-buffeted hfltajd* on a ridge not far to 
the west of die route that we had dzmbed 
when we went north. Now we were malrinug 

our way south, dismayed to discover thai wc 

had many steep ridges to scale on the way. 
We were working hard, and on the morning 
of the eighth day of our trek, everyone was 
ready togo home. We madeour way quickly 
down to the village of Sundarijd. uaa some 
of ns took a last swim in an icMoW stream 
just above a green reservoir used by thedljr 
of Katmandu. , 

I had to admit that Iwas glad lobe back, 
but exhilarated with a sense of aocomplisb- 
ment at haring trekked through pan of the 
Himalayas and seen rare tixu 
sights. After Bring is smith Asa for five 
months, however, I have rediscovered , the 
ciicheof<xiimtl£ssiravelera.TheBdve2d»er 
here are many. It can be an adventure togs 
to the local market. But almost emyjoanaey 
becomes a bask exercise in self -discovery 
I have just bought a new pair of takari 
boots and am ready to try trekking again, m. 

CIQSSThc Ncw York Tima 


£ l„-“ 

s' 

f 





ji 


w 




BREGENZ, Festival (lei: 2181.10). 
BALLET — Aug. 18 and 20: Marseille 
National Ballet, “Die Fkdennaus" 
i Petit. 3. Strauss). 

OPERA — Aug 17. 19, 21. 22: "Die 
Zauberflflte" (Mozart). 

VIENNA, BOsendorfer Hall (tel: 
65.66.51). 

RECITAL — Aug. 22: Kdko Aio pi- 
ano (Beethoven. Mozart). 
•Kunsxlerhaus ( tel :57. 96.63). 
EXHIBITIONS— ToSepL 30: “ 1984 


Youth Orchestra, %audio Abbado 
conductor, Jessye Norman soprano 
(Mahler). 

•Siaatsoperftd: 53240). 

OPERA — Aug. 21 : “Die Csardasfur- 
stin" (Kalman). 

Aug. 22: “Die Hedennaus" (Strauss). 

•Theater an der Wien (id: 57.71.51). 
THEATRE — To Aug. 31 “Cats" 
(Webber. TJS. Eliot). 


DENMARK 


INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 


EXHIBITION— To Aug. 18: 
Masks." 


'Nob 


•Museum of Decorative Art (td: 
14.94.52). 

EXHIBITION — To Aug. 25: “Nor- 
dic Decorative .Art." 

•Tivoli Concert HalL (tel: 15.10.12). 
CONCERTS — Aug. 23: Tivoli Sym- 
phony Orchestra. Gary Bertini con- 
ductor (Mahler). 


ENGLAND 


— Looking Ahead to- 
To Oct. 6:^'Vienna 1870-1930 Dream 
and Reali tv: The greatest names of the 
Viennese fln-de-aide." 
•Musikverdn(iel: 65.81.90). 


COPENHAGEN, 

(let: 14.94.52). 

EXHIBITION — To ScpL 2: “Char- conductor/ piano (Mozart, Salieri). 


louenborg Painters." 


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FRANCE 


DLION. Musfe National Maurice 
MagnintieI:67.H.10). 


EXHIBITION — To Nov. 18: “XIX 
Century French Portraits 
NICE. Gallery of Contemporary An 
(tel: 62.37. II). 

EXHIBITION— To Sep 1. 22: “Tout 
Ben." 

PARIS. Centre Georges Pompidou 
(tel: 277.1223). 

EXHIBITIONS— To Aug. I9:“Jean- 
Pierre Bertrand." "Palermo.” “David 
TremletL" 


EXHIBITION — To SepL 2: “Re- 
noir." 

•Musee du Louvre (td: 2603926). 
EXHIBITIONS — To SepL 9: "XVIII 
Century French Pastels, “Drawings 
in Genoa: XVI - XVII Century." 

To SepL 30: “Ingres Portraits.’" 
•Musee du Petit Palaist id: 265. 1 2.73L 
EXHIBITION —To SepL 29: “Gus- 
tave Dorii." 

•Music Rodin (td: 705.01 34). 


German Romantics." 

•Suaugakric modemer Konst (id: 
2937.10k 

EXHIBITION— To SepL 15: “Ger- 
man Art since I960." 


LONDON, Barbican Centre (tel: 
u . . . 638.41.41). 

Helhgandshuset CONCERTS — Aug. 23: London 
Symphony Orchestra, Howard Shelley 


Aug. 18: London Concert Orchestra. 
Fraser Colliding conductor (Mozart. 
J. Strauss). 

[Aug. 22: Academy of Andem Music, 
Christopher Hogwood conductor, 
Emma Kirkhy soprano. Margaret Ca- 
ble alto (Handel's “Messiah. Mozan 
[version). 

EXHIBITIONS — To SepL 1: “Pat- 
rick Heron," “Painting in Newlyn, 
1880-1930." 

■Through December: “Matthew 
lSnuth._ 

[THEATER — Aug. 17, 19. 20. 21: 

, Love’s Labor Lost (Shakespeare). 
lAug 22 and 23: "Richard IIP (Sbake- 

[•British Museum (td: 636.15.55). 
EXHIBITION— To Jail. 1986: “Bud- 
dhism: Art and Faith." 

National Portrait Gallery (tel: 
930.15.52). 

EXHIBITIONS — To SepL 8: "How- 
ard Coster." 

To Ocl 13: “Charlie Chaplin 1889- 
1977." 

Royal Academy of Arts (tel: 
734 90-52). 

EXHIBniON — To Aug 25: “217th 
Summer Exhibition." 
•TaieGalleryfld: 821.13.13). 
EXHIBITION — To August 18: 
“Paintings by Francis Bacon: 1944 to 
Present.'^ 

'Victoria and Albert Museum (td: 
589.63.71). 

EXHIBITIONS — To October 22: 
“Textiles from the Wellcome Collec- 
tion: ancient and modern textiles from 
the Near East and Peru." 

To September l: "English Caricature 
1620 to the Present-" 

To September 15: “Louis Vuiuon: A 
Journey through Time." 

Aug 1 4 - Ocl 6: “Julia Margaret Cam- 
eron 1815-1979." 

STRATFORD-upon-AVON. Royal 
Shakespeare Theatre ( tel: 29.56.23). 
THEATRE— Aug 21 and 22: “Troi- 
lus and C res si da." 

Aug 19 and 20: “The Meny Wives of 
Windsor." 

Aug 17. 22. 23: “As You Like It." 


OF SPECIAL INTEREST 


PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY' ORCHESTRA 
1985 EUROPEAN TOUR 

The Pittsburgh Symphony Or- 
chestra. under the direction of 
Lorin Maazel, will tour the ma- 
jor European festivals through 
September 7. The 17 concert 
tour will be performed in II 
cities and will include: 

CONCERTS — National Con- 
cert Hall Dublin. Ireland (tel: 

71.15.33). 

Aug 17 and 18: Lorin Maazel 
conductor (Berlioz, Dvorak. 

Stravinsky). 

•Usher HalL Edinburgh. Scot- 
land (tel: 228.11.55). 

Aug 21 and 22: Lorin Maazel 
conductor (Bartok, Mendels- 
sohn). 

•Royal Albert Hall. London. 

England (tel: 927.42.%). 

Aug 23 and 24: Lorin Maazel 
conduductor (Berlioz. Schu- 

man). 

•Grosses Festspielhaus. Salz- 
burg. Austria (tel:4254I). 

Aug 30 and 31: Lorin Maazel 
conductor (Bartok, Stravinsky). 

•Palais des Beaux Arts (td: 

51230.45). 

Sept. 5: Zdenek Macal conduc- 



Alicia de Larrocha 

tor, Alicia de Larrocha piano 
(Beethoven, Tchaikovsky). 
•Theatre Musical de Pans Cha- 
tclet, Paris, France (tel: 
261.19.S3). 

Sept. 7: Lorin Maazel conduc- 
tor. Alicia de Lar ro c ha {nano 
(Bartok. Mozart). 

For further information tele- 
phone in U.S.A.: (412) 
392.48J5. 


•Eglise St. Germain-des-Pres (td: 
227.1168). 

RECITALS — Aug 21: Jean Guillou 
organ (Bach). 

•HowldeVilbtid: 276.40.66). 
EXHIBITION — To Oct. 5: “Victor 
Hugo and Paris." 

•Maine du ler arrondissement ltd: 
260.38.01). 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 29: "Four 
Centuries of Ballet in Paris." 

•Musee Camavalei ( id:2722I.1 3). 
EXHIBITION —To Ocl 27: "The Big 
Boulevards of Paris." 

•Musee d'Art Moderne Mel: 
723.6 1.27). 

EXHIBITION —To Sept, 8: “Robert 

and Sonia Delaunay." 
•MtufedeClimvdd: 274.22.22 •. 
EXHIBITION— To SepL 2: “Rome- 
Archeology and Urban Projects." 

• Musee du Grand Palais Mel: 
26 1.54.101. 


ATHENS, Festival (td: 3211439). 
BALLET— Aug 20 and 21: The To- 
kyo Contemporary Ballet. 
CONCERTS— Aug 19 and 20: Hun- 
garian PhflajTnomc&xhcsna, Dimitri 
Agrafioris conductor (Brahms, Tchai- 
kovsky). 

DANCE — Aug 20 and 21: Tokyo 
Cont emporar y Dance. 

THEATRE — Ang 17 and 18: “He- 
cube” (Euripides). 

Ang 17: “Pkmtos” (Aristophanes). 
Ang 22-25: “Baccfaae” (Euripides). 


•National Museum of Modem Art 
(td: 21425311. 

EXHIBITION— ToScpt 29: "Modi- 
gliani Exhibition." 

•Ofcura Shukokan Museum (tel: 
583.07.81). 

EXHIBITION — To Aug 25: “Indian 
Ink Paintings and Ceramics-" 

•Sun tory Museum of An (tel: 

To SepL 1: “Bril- 


nory Musei 

o.m 

IBmON— ■ 


470.10.73 
EXHI 

liant Cut Glass." 

•Zdt Photo Salon (id: 246.13,70). 
EXHIBITON — To SepL 16: “T: 
knbaGty." 


50- 


EXHfBmON — Through Aagnu 
“LuisTortiasdlo: I937-19ML" 
•Museo Municipal ad: 2223732). 
EXHIBITION — Through August: 
“History of Madrid: XVf-XXCfefe- 
ries." 

SANTANDER. Festival ltd: 
21.05.08). 

CONCERTS— Aug 17: PudKncCtt 
CharnberOrchestni (Bacfa. Htudd). 
Aug 19: Orobeus Chamber Orebettra 
ofNew York. Ahcu<k Larrocha piano 
(Handd. Mozan). 

RECITAL — Aug 23: Nazriso Ycpcs 
guitar. N ican or Zabalcta harp. 


NETHERLANDS 


DUBLIN, Abbey Theatre 
(td:74.45B5). 

THEATER — To Aug 19: "All the 
Way Back" (Farrell). 

•Gate Theater (td: 74AQ AS). . 
THEATER — Through August: 


“Blithe Spirit" (Nod Coward). 
•National Concert Hall (tel: 
7I-IS33L 


CONCERT— Aug 23: RTE Concert 
Orches tra , Iain Su t n e ria n d conductor, 
mrh soprano. 

[ery fu± 6QJ85J . 

— To Aug 24: "Music 


Marilyn HULSmilh 
•National Gallery (id: 6QJ8533). 


EXHIBITION 
in Painting" 


ITALY 


EXHIBITION —To SepL 15: “Alain 
Kirilli." 

•Salle Pleyd(id: 563.88.73). 
CONCERT — Aug 20: European 
Community Youth Choir. London 
Symphony Chorus. Vienna Youth 
Choir. Claudio Abbado conductor 
(Mahler). 

GERMANY 


BERLIN. NauonaJgalerief td: 2666). 
EXHIBITION — To Aug 25: “New 
acquisitions from 1975-1985." 
MUNICH. Ancurial Gallery (td: 
29.4J.3i). 

EXHIBITION — To SepLS: "Ecole 
de Paris *Les NaifsT 
•Kunsthalle der Hvpo-Stiftung 
(iel:23.9!.?4). 

EXHIBITION — To SepL fc “The 


lais: Illustrations from I 
ry to the Present." 

•Palazzo Piti(td:2l J4.40). 
EXHIBITION —To SepL 29: “Mod- 
ern Masters from the Thyssai-Bome- 
misza collection: Corot, Manet, Picas- 
so." 

VERONA, Arena di Verona 
(td^3520): 

OPERA — Aug 17 and 22: “Auila 
(Verdi). 

Aire. 20: “UTrovworc" (Verdi). 

Aug 21: "Aida" (Verdi). 

JAPAN 


TOKYO. Idemitsu Art Museum (td: 
21331.11). 

EXHIBITION— ToSepL i.“Maner- 

pieces from IdenriUM An Gdkry: Ori- 
ental CcraniKX Crafts and Pain tings.’’ 
•Kokuritsu Noh-gakudo (tel: 
423-13.31). 


FLORENCE. Museo Archeologico 

EXH1BITTO& — To Ocl 20: “The 
Etruscan Gi/ffization." 


AMSTERDAM. Amsterdam Muse- 
u rn of H istory (td: 253832). 
EXHIBITION —To SepL 8: “Imagi- 
nation Seizes Power: a brief survey of 
European protest movements in the 

•Koninklijk Paleis op de Dam (td: 
24.86.98). 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 8: “French 
Bibliographic History in Tire Nether- 

•Maison Descartes ( td: 22.6 1 34). 
EXHIBITION —To SepL 27: “Des- 
cartes and The Netherlands.” 
•Nieuwe Kerk (td: 23.6432). 
EXHIBITIONS —To Aug 20: “Out 
and About in Amsterdam: From the 
Fairgrounds to the Theater, 1780- 

To Aug 20: “Anarchism in France and 
Tbe Netherlands." 

: 73.21.21). 

N — To SepL 29: “Rem- 
brandt." drawings. 

•Westerkerk (tel: 24.7736). 
EXHIBITION — To SepL IS: “The 
World of Anne Frank. I9z9-1945." 

PORTUGAL 

ESTORIL. Casino (tel: 268.4521). 
EXHIBITION— To Aug 19: “Naive 
Palming: ]9tb Anmvowy of Albino 
Jost Moreira." 

•Music Festival (td: 268.39.00). 
MIME— Aug 20: Marcd Marocau. 
RECITALS — Aug 17 and 18:Zuzana 
Rnzkkova harpsichord (Bach). 

SCOTLAND 


EDINBURGH, National Gallery of 
Modern Art (td: 5563921). 
EXHIBITION — To SepL 8: “SJ. 
Pepsqe. 1 871-1935."' 

•National Portrait Gallery (td: 556. 
8921). 

EXHIBITON — To SepL 29: “Trea- 
sures of Fyvie." 

SPAIN 


GENEVA. Music de rAthinte (td: 
29.75.66). 

EXHIBITION —To SepL 29: “Cha- 
gall. Picasso, Ernst. Klee, User and 
Crider: Tapestries and Engravings.** 
•Parc LuDm (td: 74.10.16). - . . 
EXHIBITION —ToSepL 8: “Prome- 
nades." 

•Petit Palais (td: 46. 14J3L 
EXHIBITION — ToSepL 30: “Mom- 
paroasse ‘Beflc Epoque*; From Cha- 
gall to Buffet." 

UJCBRNE. Festival (id: 2335.62). 
CONCERTS— Ang 18: PUBp Jones 
Brass Ensemble (Bach. Scarlatti). ' 
Aug 18: Festival Strings Lucerne, fth 
dolt Baumgartner conductor. Eba- 
a P* 1 ® (Badi, Moan) 

Aug 1 9: European Cranaxnmy Youth 
Orchestra and Choir. Claudio Abbado 

conductor (Mahler). 

Aug 20: Academy of Andem Music 
London. Christopher Ho gw ood con- 
ductor (Handel). 

S . wiss Festival Orchestra, Jsi 
Bdohlavek conductor. Andrt Wens 
P* an o(BeetiKwarcH«ndesmrthj. ' 
Villa Favorite (tel: 

5Z.17.41). 

EXHIBITION — To Oct 15: **<7 

from the Museums at 

BudaptsL 

UN ITED STATU 

^ UC - American Museum of 
WJJM* ■■■ 

EXHIBITION — ^ To Awl 3h**M^W 
t reasures of an Andem Civtfczrefcn/' 

535 77?®? ,Un Museum 01 A* 

To SepL 5: “Revivals and 
“as m European decorative 
•Museum of Moder 
(td: 708. 94.00). 


Modem Ait 


MADRID. Museo _ 
Comempor4neq(td: 


de Ane 
.7130k 


§Kin5.- N “ 70 0cL 

KWsmONS — To SepL 2. rQ+ 
»™mfor a King CHd Matter Nat 
*** Picture Gd- 

iSn«M en,bra!,dI - v * n P,ct 


Dam 


•( 





~ t _ 


I 







E 

'I 


Page 9 


FOR FUN AND PROFIT 


Electronic Route to Being 
Your Own Travel Agent 


by Roger CoQis 


I 


TS half past midnight in Amsterdam. 
After a business dinner you find a 
telex from Burnt Plains (nothing scary 
this time) asking you to attend a meet- 
ing in Zurich in the morning instead of flying 
direct to London as you bad planned. Not 
much hope of raising airport reservations at 
this time of night, so you book up your 
Banana PC to the telephone — either by 
modem or acoustic coupler — and make a 
local call that puts you on line to your 
friendly electronic airline guide. 

After entering your ID you call up a menu 
of flights around a time you want to travel. 
Yes, there are seats on the first plane out — 
KLM at 9:30 — so you book a business-class 
seat and tell the computer that you’ll pick up 
the ticket at the airport and pay with corpo- 
rate plastic. (As an experienced traveler you 
know it is often cheaper to buy a new ticket 
locally and cash in the unused coupons when 
you get home). Alternatively, if you had been 
concerned with cost rather than conve- 
nience. you could first have called up a menu 
of fares, along with restrictions that apply, 
and then matched them with fares available 
on a particular flight- You could also have 
booked a hotel and a rental car in Zurich. 

This scenario is aot entirely futuristic. 
Electronic guides with this kind of capabili- 
ty, and accessible to the individual traveler, 
are rapidly being developed by the two com- 
panies that dominate the world airline time- 
table publishing business: the British-based 
ABC Travel Guides — a subsidiary of the 
Reed paper group, and the U. S. -based Offi- 
cial Airline Guides (OAG) — part of Dun & 
Bradstreet, the world's largest business in- 
formation company. 

So far, ABC: Electronic and OAG Elec- 
tronic Edition provide access only to fares 
and schedules; access to seat availability and 
the ability to make reservations is limited to 
airline systems, as a rule only accessible to 
travel agents or major coiporauons. There 
are exceptions; for example U. S. travelers 
can make reservations themselves through 
TWA’s Travelshopper, available through 
ComputServe. In Britain, you can make res- 
ervation requests to four airlines (TWA, Pan 
Am, F innair and Qantas) through Pres tel. 
British Telecom's public viewdata system. 
OAG says it will have a reservation capabili- 
ty in the United States for certain airlines 
“toward the end of this year." 

ABC and OAG printed and electronic 
guides are a valuable tool for the business 
traveler because, unlik e the airlines’ own 
computer-booking systems, they provide im- 
partial information. Airlines, 'on the other 
hand, invariably first show you their own 
direct flights, then the airlines with which 
they have pool and other commercial ar- 
rangements and the connections that give 
them the best 1ATA “pro-rate," that is, the 
most money for the segmenL 

Says Mike Mullany, director of electronic 
marketing at OAG in London: “If you ask 
an airline for a flight on a day they don't fly, 
they'll suggest the day before or the day 
after. Some will only show competitors' 
flights as a last resort or maybe not at aH Or 
they may offer a devious routing based on a 
segment which is under capacity." Accord- 
ing to John Mar chant, marketing services 
manager of ABC, "A number of airlines 
have said to me that they don’t want people 
to have access to an unbiased system: they 
want people to call them up.” 

Many travelers aren’t aware when they go 
into a travel agency that they may be offered 
biased information from whichever airline 
reservation system they are working with, or 
that the agency may favor a particular airline 
because it gets an override commission as an 
incentive to deliver more sales. 

So it is important to be able to control 
your own travel arrangements. According to 


Tony Clarke, London-based area director of 
OAG, 70 percent of business travelers in 
Britain are doing just this. A recent survey by 
the International Airline Passengers Associ- 
ation,, a frequent fliers organization with 
more than 100,000 members worldwide, 40 .5 
percent of Americans use a flight guide com- 
pared with 32 percent who consult a travel 
agent and 11.3 percent who use an airline 
brochure. Outside the United States, 36.9 
percent of business travelers choose a flight 
after consultation with their travel agent and 
26 percent after referring to a flight guide. 

Both ABC and OAG have published air- 
line timetables and fare guides for several 
decades. They each have worldwide editions, 
massive tomes that are updated twice a 
month (OAG publishes a separate North 
American edition as well) and monthly 
pocket guides for the individual on the move. 
ABC has two pocket guides; Europe-Middle 
East, which contains air and rail schedules 
and connections to key U. S. and Far East 
gateways, published m conjunction with 


Computer guides 
offer unbiased 
information 


American Express, and an Asian edition. 
OAG has three pocket guides, Europe-Mid- 
dle East. Pacific and North America. 

Although ABC and OAG are directly 
competitive, they tend to be complementary 
in some respects; most people say that OAG 
is best far North America, while ABC has 
the edge in Europe. Ibis was the conclusion 
of a major European airline that found dis- 
crepancies in the two guides' published 
schedules. 

Useful as they are, neither ABC nor OAG 
hard-copy guides can hope to keep up to 
date with the st ream of new schedules and 
fares resulting from deregulation in North 
America and elsewhere; hence the electronic 
editions. OAG started in May 1983 and 
ABC in the last quarter of 1984. Both com- 
panies are gradually extending the scope of 
information. OAG’s main gap at the mo- 
ment is fares between Europe. Middle East, 
Africa. Central America ana the Caribbean. 
According to Mullany. OAG takes into ac- 
count every month 125.000 schedule changes 
(an increase of 30 percent so far this year) 
and 1.14 milli on fare changes from a total of 
700 airlines. Schedules are updated weekly 
and fares daily. Airlines themselves can 
make direct changes to their own data base 
in the ABC and OAG computers. 

Both electronic systems are comparable in 
content and form and are. user friendly. You 
tell the computer where you are, where you 
want to go and roughly at what time. You 
can either target a specific flight, or series of 
connections, and view the fare alternatives 
or target a specific fare then view the flights 
that offer that fare. 

The main difference is that whereas ABC 
electronic is now available only via the pub- 
lic viewdata systems in Britain, West Germa- 
ny and France and Travi scorn Executive in 
Britain, OAG can now be accessed in the 
United States and Europe with a local call 
via any telephone-linked word processor or 
computer. Both systems are expanding fast. 
In November OAG plans to add a reserva- 
tion facility for 30,000 hotels (17,000 in the 
United States). Airlines, however, are under- 
standably wary about allowing a traveler 
direct access to their reservation system. Ev- 
ery business traveler would become a puta- 
tive hacker, imagine being able to hook up 
your PC and fill a 747 of your least favorite 
airline with John Does. ■ 


TRAVEL 


Rolling With Europe’s New Rail Technology 


by Paul Hofmann 

T HE first-class railroad ticket from 
Zurich to Rome was exactly 150 
Swiss francs, which at the day s 
exchange rate worked out to 
S58.14. The one-way economy air fare be- 
tween the two cities would have been 
S2Q0.76. Had I rented a car. the trip, what 
with expensive European gasoline and the 
tolls, would have also cost considerably 
more than what 1 paid at the Hauptbahnhof, 
that 1 14-year-old monument to the railroad 
age. 

Money, though, wasn't the only reason I 
preferred the train. I had Just arrived from 
the Urn ted States, where I had been follow- 
ing the debate about the fate of Amtrak. 

The trip to Rome was relaxing and pleas- 
ant. New concepts and new technology in 
European railroading are enabling trains to 
compete with the overpriced air services on 
the Continent (trans- Atlantic air fares are 
comparatively lower) and with cars and bus- 
es that must travel on roads increasingly 
clogged with huge trucks. 


•V 

.. 



I ps 

>lemenl of about S15, or at 10:50 P.ML 
without supplement and with lime to stretch 
my legs in Milan. 

However, since I wasn’t in any particular 
hurry, I caught the 1:04 P.M. in Zurich. 
There were also trains at 9:04, 10:04, and 
11:04 A.M. and at 2:04. 3:04. 4:04 and 9:04 
P.M. that would all have taken me to Milan 
and, with transfers or directly, to Rome. 

This pattern of regularly spaced departure 
times of trains between major cities on the 
Continent — across national frontiers — 
and in Britain is characteristic of European 
railroad services. Just as there is a train from 
Grand Central Ter minal in New York to 
Stamford. Connecticut, say, at five minutes 
after the hour during nonrush hours, so is 
there an Inter-City train from Hamburg to 
Basel at 50 minutes after the hour, or from 
Brussels to Frankfurt at three minutes to the 
hour four times a day. 

On European railroad schedules Inter- 
City tr ains are marked with a special IC 
symbol They include first-class and second- 
class coaches and often diners or buffet cars, 
and as a rule use the best equipment avail- 
able. They go at speeds of up to 75 miles 
(about 120 kilometers) an hour. 

Coaches come either with compartments 
opening to the lateral corridor, or with pas- 
sengers seated on both sides of a central 
aisle. There are small folding tables at win- 
dows. First-class coaches have a little more 
leg room than in second class. 

Signboards in statibn concourses and the 
signs at gates and tracks frequently identify 
Inter-City trains with squarish IC logo. ICs 
are fast and make few stops. Passengers have 
to pay an extra charge on some of these 
trains, but those carrying Eurailpasses are 
exempt. Passengers with Eurailpasses do, 
however, have to pay supplements for berths 
on overnight trains, which generally are out- 
side the IC system. 

The increasingly close-knit Inter-City net- 
work, a Continent-wide long-distance com- 
muter system, is about to supersede the elit- 
ist Trans-Europ Express (TEE) trains. On 
the TEE trains, composed only of new first- 
class coaches, one has to pay extra charges 
that may nut up to almost 70 percent of the 
basic first-class fare; seats must be reserved 
in advance. These luxury trains, introduced 
in the 1960s are favored by officials of the 
European Community, executives and other 
expense-account travelers. 

The latest advance in the Inter-City sys- 
tem is represented by the Trains 4 Grande 
Vitesse (TGV) whereby France has reassert- 
ed its lead in rail transportation. The TGVs 
now run between Paris, Lyons, the French 
Mediterranean coast, Geneva and Lausanne. 
The Paris-Lyons-Geneva TGV regularly 
runs at an average speed of 168 mph. 



TGV arrives at Lausanne. 


Tracks and roadbeds are being modified 
on the Paris- Bordeaux and Paris-Frankfurt 
routes to expand the TGV services. Rail- 
roads in West Germany and some other 
European nations are also experimenting 
with new technologies that would permit 
greater speeds. 

In addition to the crack TEEs and ICs, 
many thousands of other trains, a few still 
with steam locomotives, move on the Euro- 
pean rail network daily — from locals to 
expresses that link Calais to the Balkans and 
Denmark to Italy. 

Majestic Alpine scenery can be enjoyed 
from Switzerland’s Bernina Express (St Mo- 
{112-111300) and Glacier Express (Sl Moritz- 
ZennattX or from the Transalp in and similar 
trains linking Zurich with Salzburg and Vi- 
enna. Most railroads in Spain and Portugal 
have a wider gauge than the European stan- 
dard. Trains in southern Europe, especially 
in second class, are usually more crowded 
than those in the rest of the Continent 


A: 


S for my southbound train from Zurich. 
I shared my first-class compartment 
.with only one other traveler. After 
the stop in Zug, the small lakeside city that 
has lately received some publicity as a cozy 
fiscal shelter, my travel companion walked 
to the diner. He reported later that he had 
had a hearty meal of soup, veal potatoes, 
and cheese with a bottle of beer at around 
$11 

The train had just been climbing curved 
upgrades and was about to enter the 9.4-mile 
long Sl Gotthard Tunnel a historic achieve- 
ment of railroad engmeering. On the other 
side of the mountain massif, as we were 
rolling down the Ticino Valley, I decided to 
stay over for the night in Lugano. On Euro- 
pean railroads passengers may interrupt 
trips without any formality wherever they 
want (in Spain, however, stopovers should 
be noted on the ticket by station personnel). 

Next morning I caught the Holland-Italy 
Express, which stops in Lugano. This is one 
of the old-type European long-distance 


trains with equipment, sometimes dated, 
from the railroad companies of the various 
countries through which they run. The train, 
which had left Amster dam the night before 
and picked up additional coaches in West 
Germany, was supposed to arrive at 10:20 
A.M. in Lugano and depart four minutes 
later. It did. 

At Chiasso, near the Italian-Swiss border, 
a civilian with an official badge in his lapel 
walked through the corridor of our coach, 
glancing into every compartment and saying 
from time to time “Swiss customs" in Italian 
and German, without breaking his stride. 
There was no It alian passport or customs 
control at all 

Milan, where we arrived at noon, is one of 
Europe's major railroad hubs. The HoQand- 
Italy Express stops there for an hour as it 
sheds a few Venice-bound coaches while 
some others are hitched on. Our coach was 
shunted from one .track to the other, and 
passengers got out to sip an espresso. 

Milano Centrale, the huge terminal com- 
plex that scoffers call Stazione Alda (liken- 
ing its bombastic architecture to Verdi's em- 
phatic opera), is a good place for train 
watchers. 

They can see there the Simplon Express, 
one of the impoverished heirs to the tabled 
Orient Express, which used to run between 
Paris and Istanbul The Simplon Express 
connects Paris with Belgrade by way of Mi- 
lan and Venice, and is now often filled with 
Turkish and Yugoslav migrant workers and 
Lheir families. 

As the Holland-Italy Express was crossing 
the plains of the Po Valley I went to the 
buffet car that had been added in Milan. AH 
compartments of the three second-class 
coaches through which I had to walk were 
fairly crowded. 

The cafeteria-style buffet car offered pre- 
cooked and reheated pasta and veal stew 
with vegetables (at around $4 the plastic- 
covered container), ham, sausage, cheeses, 
other snacks, fruit, beer, small bottles of 
wine, soft drinks and, of course, espresso. 
Self-service cars are becoming the norm on 


the entire Italian railroad network. More 
and more travelers pack their own picnic 
bags for the joumev. and buy only cold 
d rinks err coffee on the train. 

In Bologna uniformed policemen boarded 
the Holland-Italy Express, and peered into 
each compartment, seeking out luggage that 
might look suspicious. This is routine since 
15 people were killed and 180 injured in a 
train tunnel between Florence and Bologna 
when a bomb, planted by unidentified ter- 
rorists, went off just before Christmas. 

In Florence many travelers from northern 
Europe left the train and other people took 
their place. In Arezzo an elderly couple 
joined me in my compartment and genially 
insisted that I taste the Chianti they had 
brought with them in a straw-covered flask. 
We were all quite merry when the train 
arrived in Rome's Termini Station shortly 
after 7 P.M, a few minutes behind schedule. 

Many long-distance night trains in Europe 
carry coaches with rather spartan berths 
(couchettes) and sleepers, which are more 
comfortable. A journey in an individual 
sleeper compartment, comparable to a 
roomette in a train in the United States, may 
cost as much as a business-class flighL There 
are also sleeper compartments with two and 
with three berths. 

While daytime Inter-City travel is now a 
rail tourist's best bet in Europe, I myself 
have a soft spot for slow trams in scenic 
regions. A personal favorite is the route from 
Fdigno in Umbria to Terontola-Cortona in 
Tuscany. The 50-mile voyage lakes an hour 
and a half, and the second-class coaches may 
be of the archaic type with four passengers 
abreast on a wooden bench. Bui the vistas 
from the windows are magnificent: olive 
groves and vineyards, the hill towns of Spello 
and Assisi the city of Perugia and Lake 
Trasimene, where Hannibal triumphed more 
than 2^00 years ago. ■ 

Paul Hofmann, a former correspondent of 
The New York Times, is the winner of the 
1985 Ci ty of Rome International Journalism 
■Prize. He wrote this article for The Times. 


Dancers 


Continued from page 7 


Ryan, who joined in 1981; Bonnie Moore, 
who joined in 1984 and Susan Jones, who is 
now the company's regisseur, but who 
danced with ABT from 1971 to 1978. 

Jones, Tcherkassky and McKenzie stud- 
ied under Day in the days when the school, 
which she founded with Lisa Gardiner, a 
former dancer and teacher with the Anna 
Pavlova Company, included a full-time aca- 
demic program. Another of her students, at 
that lime was Virginia Johnson, now a prin- 
cipal dancer with Dance Theater of Harlem. 
The scholastic portion of the program, be- 
gun in 1962, included music appreciation 
and dance history courses, but was forced to 
close in 1977 because of insufficient funds. 

Day no longer has the advantage of that 
holistic approach, yet she continues to devel- 
op the gifts of her young dancers. In 1981, as 
a 17-year-old, McKerrow became the first 
American to win a gold medal at the Mos- 
cow International Ballet Competition and 
Bonnie Moore took top honors the following 
year in the Prix de Lausanne. 

“It boils down to having a certain kind of 
eye for choosing which pupils to work on,” 
said Day. whose school has about 600 stu- 
dents, 60 of whom she considers “serious 
dancers." “But to be a good teacher, the 
most important thing I can say is that you 
have to think of the other person, the young 
student, and you have to get satisfaction out 
of seeing his or her development as a danc- 
er." 

Situated in the heart of Lincoln Center 
and New York City’s cultural world, the 
School of American Ballet consistently 
draws high-caliber students. Although the 
school is an arm of New York City Ballet, 
and is the primary source of dancers for that 


company, its students have also gravitated 
across Lincoln Plaza to the Metropolitan 
Opera House and ABT. 

Fernando Bujones, who became a member 
of ABT in 1972, studied at SAB, as did 
Elaine Kudo, who joined the company in 
1975, Victor Barbee, who joined in 1975, 
Lucette Kateradahl a member since 1977 
and Elizabeth Carr, who has been with the 
company since 1980. 

There is no set way to audition for Ballet 
Theater, since the company does not hold 
open auditions. Dancers sometimes are in- 
vited to join the company after Baryshnikov 
spots someone he considers talented in a 
regional company. Occasionally, a dancer 
like McKerrow or Moore is solicited by the 
company after exceptional showings at com- 
petitions. The usual audition course is for a 
dancer to ask or be invited to take a class 
with the company, and for Baryshnikov to 
observe his or her technique then. 

Some of the dancers who studied at School 
of American Ballet said that when they 
joined ABT. they had to adjust their training 
from the neoclassical style espoused by 
George Balanchine, who directed the school 
until his death last year, to the classical style 
favored by ABT. 

“The change was a little difficult," said 
Elizabeth Can-, who studied at the school for 
five years, was a member of a Balanchine- 
oriented company In Europe for three years, 
then joined ABT in 1980. 

“I would never be where I am without 
Sonia and Thor," said Kathleen Moore, who 
attended the Alabama School of Fine Arts 
for four years and has been a member of 
ABTs corps de ballet since 1982. “They 
didn't only train me physically, and believe 


me they did a lot of thaL They also gave me a 
great emotional support base. Sonia would 
always tell me, 'Dance, don't just go through 
the motions. Enjoy it because it’s a lot of 
hard work and if you don't enjoy iL it’s not 
worth iL’ ” 

A ROVA and Sutowskl both of whom 
j\ had distinguished dancing careers. 
jLJl came to Birmingham nine years ago. 
The program they direct is a residential one, 
frith about 80 students who take both their 
artistic and academic classes there. Being 
around their students for so many hours a 
day, said Arova. gives her a chance to devel- 
op unusual insight into them and to use that 
information to better direct their growth. 

“You groom a dancer like you bring up a 
child,” said Arova, a native of Bulgaria who 
danced with Royal Ballet in London and was 
a member of ABT in the 1950s. “You watch 
them, you talk to them and then you find a 
way to connect the parts.” 

One of the staples of the Alabama pro- 
gram is that the school performs several full- 
length ballets each year, in addition to stu- 
dents giving demonstrations at other schools 
around Birmingham. That exposure to 
“working on stage instead of in a studio." 
said Sutowskl gives their students a sense of 
comfort with themselves as performers that 
is unusual in dancers so young. 

Arova said that people who hear of the 
success of their school often ask “Why Bir- 
mingham?" and her response is that seques- 
tered on the Birmingham campus, they can 
“keep out of trouble and concentrate on 
what they are doing." 

“There are not so many distractions as 
there are in New York." she said. “But of 
course once a dancer achieves a certain level 
there are very few who would not rather be 
dancing in New York." ■ 

Z 1985 The \e* m York Times 


P OONESBURY 

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§ 


Reagan Cutouts and Conventioneers: 
Tourism Is Booming in Washington 


by Sandra Salmans 


Wi 


ASHINGTON — Just down the 
street from the White House, 
President Ronald Reagan is pos- 
ing for a photograph with a troop 
of Boy Scouts from Yarmouth, Massachu- 
setts. Turn the comer, and he is narrowly 
avoiding a tourist's clenched fisL All told 
seven life-size cardboard cutouts of the pres- 
ident have popped up around town, and 
tourists are invited to pose with them for $5 a 
photograph (“Use own camera, $2"). 

It isn't much money. But as one cutout 
concessionaire said, “It's enough to make a 
living." 

And it adds up. 

The 17.2 million visitors who stayed in 
hotels here last year ate at restaurants, took 
tour buses and posed with real and ersatz 
Reagans, contributed 51 billion to the capi- 
tal’s economy and generated 45,000 jobs, 
making travel and tourism the second big- 
gest industry here, after the federal govern- 
ment, and making the city one of the nation's 
great tourist and travel centers. 

By comparison, roughly the same number 
of visitors generated $2.4 billion in New 
York, also one of the country’s great tourist 
and travel centers, confirming that it is a 
more expensive place to visit. Predictably, 
too, the international makeup was different. 
Fewer than one million of the visitors to 
Washington came from overseas, while New 
York played host to more than two million 
foreign visitors. With the strong dollar, that 
difference helps explain why Washington's 
tourism, has surged this summer while New 
York's has suffered a slight decline. 

To economists, travelers divide into two 
important categories — ■ expense-account 
and other — and the dichotomy may be 
greater in the nation's capital than else- 
where. 

The businessmen and women and conven- 
tioneers stay at S170-a-night hotels and dine 
at pink-linen restaurants; they account for 
more than 80 percent of the rooms of mem- 
bers of the Hotel Association of Washing- 
ton. D.C. The tourists who pay their own 
way, on the other hand, often stay in suburbs 
such as Silver Spring, Maryland, or with 
family, or come just for the day, they eat hot 
dogs and visit the free museums. 

The two groups rarely meet; convention- 
eers peak in the spring and fall and tourists 
converge on Washington in summer. 



Nn Vorfc Tinrn 


Last year, according to the Washington 
Convention and Visitors Association, one 
million conventioneers spent about $630 
million while here, which works out to $630 
per conventioneer. By contrast, the 1.4 mil- 
lion tourists who arrived here on bus tours 
last year spent $180 million, or $129 apiece. 

“There’s a big difference between the 
business visitor and the tourist," said Mi- 
chael Maher of toe Restaurant Association 
here. Still he noted, “They’ve all got to eaL" 

B ECAUSE conventioneers and busi- 
ness visitors and even tourists wine 
and dine a lot, toe per capita spending 
on food and drink in Washington is weu 
above toe national average. In 1982, the last 
year for which census data is available, per 
capita annual sales by restaurants and fast- 
food outlets here was $636; toe comparable 
figure for toe United States over oh was 
$357. The capital ranks first in alcohol con- 
sumption. “Due to toe out-of-towner, those 
figures are tremendously skewed, like Las 
Vegas's,” Maher said. 

This summer tourists are eating, and sight- 
seeing, and spending handsomely. Guest 
Services, of Fairfax, Virginia, the sole con- 
cessionaire on toe Mall and ] 1 other sites 
around toe city, says sales of food, T-shirts 
and film were up more than 20 percent last 
month over June 1984. 

“The tourist is terribly -important right 
now,” said Tim PfI aging, vice president Tor 
marketing and development, who credits a 
succession of sunny weekends and a splen- 
did Fourth of July for toe boom. 

Greater numbers of people are crowding 
on board tile buses run by Tounnobile Sight- 
seeing, perhaps toe largest sightseeing orga- 
nization here and one of toe city’s largest 
black-owned businesses. Tounnobile, a con- 


cession of the National Park Service, was 
operated by Universal Studios until four 
years ago, when the entertainment company 
sold it to one of its executives, Tom Mack. 

The service shuttles people around 18 of 
toe capital’s main attractioons, on an all-day 
ticket of S6J0; other tours are to Mount 
Vernon, Arlington National Cemetery and 
toe home of Frederick Douglass, toe aboli- 
tionist. 

“We cater to Joe and Jane Tourist, coming 
to Washington with the kids," Made said. So 
far this year, Tounnobile has carried 78,000 
more Joes and Janes than in the same period 
in 1984, and it is predicting it will have 
carried 1,950,000 by toe end of the year. The 
number of passengers surges after every 
presidential election year, Mr. Mack said. 

It is a good time, too, for the merchants 
who cater to the tourist trade. Until recently 
shopping here tended to mean Woodward & 
Lotnrop. Hecht's and Gaifinckel's. But in 
toe last two years more than 100 boutiques 
and small restaurants have opened a few 
^ rom the White House, initially in the 
Old Post Office Building, then next to the 

The Shops and toe Old Post Office are 
more popular with Washingtonians than 
wito out-of-towners. “The tourist here* 

“J d f iai ■ IOC said Karm 
Kozemchak, marketing manager for tk. 
Shops. They’re not yoSr 
Even so, more than one-third oT The- 
Shops sales m the summer come from 
tors, she said. That has helped boos^S 
square foot - the key retail measure 

* 3 heaIthy 5300 - Thj 

» 1985 The New York Times 










Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 16, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 




NYSE Index 


Vo*. High Low 

22m ru rvt 
I*a*7 iq* 1QU 
11951 45ft 44ft 
10S«9 Jin 27 
10430 X* »ft 
10237 40ft 39* 
Mil J4ft 33% 
8881 Z3V* 23 
BTU feto 25* 
8173 25% 255, 
B0B4 45% 45b 

7708 21ft 21ft 
7m SZft 30ft 
7309 19ft 19b 
7234 127U 12S* 


7ft 

10ft + ft 
44ft — ft 
279k — 5ft 

20ft 

«to + to 
34 ft + ft 
23 

®b — ft 
25ft + ft 
43ft — ft 
21ft + ft 
32 ■*■ ft 

17ft + ft 

123ft -ft 


□pen Hteh low Lon Cbg. 

Indus 131044 1324.71 1368.13 1P7.76 + 0.78 

Trona 474,13 *7779 46SJS *71JJC— lit 

Ul« 1S6J4 15747 13SJ7 I57J6 + 107 

com* 34X17 S4U2 540J1 S444J + M3 


NYSE Diaries 


Pow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

utilities 

Industrials 


Advanced 
Defined 
unchn« 
tow Inn 
New Hiats 
now Law 

vntwnacB 

vatomecfwn 


Oase Pm. 

7*5 883 

712 *1* 

524 303 

2001 2004 

41 3 

14 1* 

34422.990 
3UI9J40 


Him Low Close CStoe 
Cammlte 1D8J2 10848 10849— 043 

industrials I24J8 12441 I24JS -0.13 

Transn. 10949 10848 1083—043 

(jllllrin 93.98 53J6 56.70 +049 

Finance 11442 I14U 114*1 —OiQ 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y 


Bur Sales ■Sft’rt 

A us. 14 155419 333419 883 

Auo- 13 157490 397441 142 

Aua.12 1*5.978 428490 873 

Aug. 9-, 10504 401*88 490 

Aug. B 148.1*7 397.1*1 14*2 

‘Included hi the sales futures 


Thursdays 


Km » 


Closing 



Tobias UidudB ttit nationwide prtc»* 
UP to the doting on Wall Street and 
da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Wo The Associated Press 


13 Month 

High Low Stock 


23ft 1* AAR St 34 

17ft 9* AGS 

21 to 13 AMF 251 

SOft 34ft AMR 

23 18ft AMR M 2.18 94 

Kft 27ft AMR (rf 247 UA 

23 19 ANRpf 112 10J 

Mto 7ft APL 

4lft 43to ASA 100 L5 

27 12ft AVA J3 13 

28ft 17ft AZP 172 10.9 


Sfs, OM4 

100s Hign low Quot.Qiue 


Stocks Edge Higher on NYSE 


St 34 14 50 Zlft 2lto 21ft — to 

13 155 16 15ft 15ft — ft 

451 9* 589 13W 13'. 13ft + to 

B 2048 45* 47V, 47ft— 1 

L18 9 S 413 23ft 22ft 23 + to 

147 114 2 Hto 72ft 23ft — ’4 

LI2 10J 2 20ft 20 ft 20 to + ft 

33 10 10 10 

>40 «4 703 44ft 44 44ft 4- to 

22 13 19 102 13ft 13to 13ft 

32 10-9 7 851 25to 24ft 2S 


28 to 17ft AZP 172 10.9 7 851 25W 24ft 25 
*0 36ft AbtLOb 1.40 15 15 105* 56to 55ft 55ft — to 

257, 70 AccoWd S JO 22 17 22 22ft 22ft 32ft 

24ft I2to AcnwC 40 17 119 15ft 1} 15 — ft 

10 to 7ft AcmeE J2D 4.J 10 34 7ft 7H 7ft 

19 I5to AdaEx 1.92,10.9 7* 17to 17ft 17ft + to 

70 13ft AdmMl J2 1.9 7 7 17 16ft l*ft— ft 

I9to Oft AlfvSvs 531 4* 19 121 12V. 12 12 — ft 

41 to 22to AMO 17 1409 20* 27ft 28 — ft 

T2to 6ft Aduest .12 IJ 30 29* 9ft 8ft 9 — ft 

15ft 9to Aertlen 13 140 14to 14ft 14ft— to 

49ft 32ft AelnLI 244 SJ I* 1807 46b 4a 4ib— to 


57to 57ft AcILpI 5.79,102 
37ft left Anmns 12) 17 I 
3ft 2to AtMn 
57 43 AlrPra |J0 12 12 

24ft IS AlroFrl 40 18 13 
7to I AIMOQS 
29b 23ft AlaP Pt 174a 92 
33ft 77b AlaP pfA 192 113 
Bto 4* AloPdPf 47 109 
82 63ft AlaP pf 9.00 114 
10* 94 AlaP pf TIM 104 

lAto llto Alagscs 144 72 10 
25ft llto AlskAIr .1* 4 10 

24ft llto Albrtos JO 14 19 
33 to 26ft AIMsns .76 ZJ 12 

31* 23* Alcan 120 44 28 

38ft 27to AlcaStd uo 13 13 

32 18* AlexAlx 140 3J 

2Sto TOft Alexdr 21 

89W 72* AlloCp 1441 10 

28* 20* Alolnt 1.40 *4 

20* toto Aigtnpi in U4 

98 05 Algl pfCU.25 117 


5.79,112 421 56* 5Ato Sito + 1* 

IJO 37 8 335 32* 31ft 32* + to 

SO 3ft 3* 3to 

I JO 12 12 275 55ft S5V, 55* + ft 

40 18 13 87 21ft 21* 21* — ft 

5* 2ft 2 2Mi 

174a 97 M2 2B* 27ft 28ft— to 
192 113 10 31ft 31ft 31ft + * 

47 119 30 flto 7ft 8 — ft 

9.00 114 14m 79 79 79 

It M 104 502104 104 104 — to 

144 77 10 49 14ft 14ft I4to 

.1* 4 10 981 251b 24ft 25 

78 14 19 90 24 * 24ft 24ft 

.76 27 12 138 28ft 2B1« 28* — ft 

170 44 28 940 27ft 26ft Z7to + to 

1J0 13 13 79 36ft 3*ft Mft 

140 37 69027 25ft 26ft — to 

21 76 23ft 23 23 

1741 10 37 78ft 77ft 77ft— to 

1.40 65 138 22ft 21* 21ft— ft 

LI? HA 3 19 18ft 18ft 

175 117 II 95ft 96* 9tto— to 


34ft 26* AlloPw 170 8.9 9 1104 30to 30 


23ft 15* AllenG AOfa 17 15 68 22* 22ft 22ft + ft 

46* 31 to AlfdCp 140 4j 8 1062 43* 41ft 42 — ft 

56 57V, AldCppt A 74 104 ISO 65 54* 65 + to 

115* 101 AUCAPniOO 117 44 112ft I12U TI2to + to 

1 06ft 100* Aide Of 1157,11.1 257 104ft 104* 104U. 

23ft 15* A I Id Pd 12 13 18* 18ft 18ft— ft 

Mft 45* AlldS Ir 112 37 8 319 57ft 54* 56ft— to 

12ft 4ft AlltsCh 285 5 4ft 5 + ft 

34ft 34 AffsC Pt II 31 30* 31 + ft 

29* 21ft ALLTL 154 4* 9 95 28to 27ft 28 + M 

39ft 29* Alcoa 130 35 31 1528 34* 34 'A 34* + ft 

22to 13ft A max .101 372 15to ISto 15ft + ft 

34 22* AmHes 1.10 4.1 22 1172 27ft 26ft 27 — ft 

2* lft AmAgr 88 llh 1* 1ft 

21 to 1* A Baler 8 30 20* 20 20ft— * 

70 58 to A Brand in 55 1 917 59ft 59* 5?ft + ft 

30ft 25V. A Bra pf US 91 109 29* 29V, 29* + to. 

115ft 56to ABdesr IA0 1A 17 387 IIP* 115V, 115ft — ft 

30to I9to ABIOM 56 10 15 59 2815 3* 28* — to 

28V, 20ft ABusPr A4 15 14 11 25ft 2Sft 2Sft 
Mft 45ft AmCan 2.90 45 11 1911 59* 59 59ft + ft 


The A a oc died Press “ * 

‘ NEW YORK - The node maikeibad an- J|| . J SOOTS $5,3 BUUoTl 
other case of the summer doldrums Thursday v 

with prices finishing mixed in lackluster trad- The Associated Press 

ing. NEW-YORK — The narrowest measure of 

Retail, mining and oil issues were among the the U.S. money- supply, M-l , soared S5J billion 
gathers, while computer, chemical, airline and in early August, the Federal Reserve Board 
drug stocks retreated. reported Thursday. Analysis had expected an 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials increase of SI J billion to Sl-5 billion, 
finished with a gain of 0.78 to 1.317.76 after The Fed said M-l, which includes cash in 
bring up nearly 4 points early in the day. The circulation, deposits in checking accounts and 
average has risen three consecutive days, bat nonbank travelers checks, rose to a seasonally 
has gained only 3.47 points over the period. adjusted average of S601.9 billion in the week 
Advances and declines were nearly even on ended Aug. 5. 
the New York Stock Exchange. Volume rose to For the latest 13 weeks, M-l has risen at a 
86.10 million shares from 85.78 million in the lZ5-percent rate of gain from the previous 13 

previous session. weeks. The Fed has said it would like to see M- 1 n a fmc -» x* a 

The session extended the market's pattern so grow between 3 percent and 8 percent from the u 2! 

far th i s week, in which prices have moved ahead second quarter through the fourth quarter. i*% 10 foci 
early only to surrender roost of the grins later in • yn f £??3 jao ioj 

“"Lr 3 *- . Iraqi report could not be verified mdeoendent' 77 isu Fumon jo .» z 

The market is struggling to sustain an upturn j y _ ^ IsJt fSISi * 1 « V v 35 

because Wall Street remains very uncertain * m j nM * u. »«<i«, u n ym»iitem S 9 Fo»Drg jo 23 u 12 a 

atal the economy's outloot analysis said » to -tSsafSB df d I 8 

ance traders are cannons. n.ey me mdng any P 801 S'* SS fSSS? u. o 7 , 

nrnup in pncH u> lake ! P^ti-htch i m trims uanq^tio,, ^cor, amr dropped 1 §* IS! i£!Xi JS aS ,t 

tarnts the market s abihty to keep a raUv going. I0 47 ^ rS 2 ^ir Lines TeU Si to ^ fS L! „ 

“ “" 3lysls Burlington Northern lost IK to 60. JJg "I E“S1 s2 fi “ 

Brokers initially thought a host of govern- * Greyhound jumped 1W to 27?i after saying it g 553 <* >s 

ment economic reports tus week might give the planned a major downsizing of its bus nniL 11 * < Fmcm asi 

market a stronger sense of direction. But with Revlon fell 1 to 44H after spurting 14 on ^ 'rS 5^^? 4ATe2tL2 

several of the reports already out, the figures Wednesday amid speculation Pantry Pride was g* ISS R37 3 i« * 

appeared to be having little effect. mulling an offer to acquire Revlon. Pantry n f«a»i p» jAtoia* 

Oil stocks moved up and some transportation Pride was off V* at 7 J 4. S", tl fbi<fi * im u 13 

issues fell after Iraq said its jet fighters demof- Standard & Poor's index of 400 industrials 27** \x s* 19 

isfeed Iran's main oil export terminal at Kharg fell 0.26 to 208.03. and SAP's 500-stock com- S2 to** FouSmT^lii 

Island in the northeastern area of the Gulf. The posite index was down 0.15 at 187.26. Jf 1 ” JJgTe* 40 u 11 


41* 29ft FMICo 1A4 u 


llto 4 FlnCoA 4HI 
37ft 14* FW1C8 Pf 4*1,207 
6ft 2"1 FnSBcr 
22* 16ft Flrestn JSO <1 

27ft 13ft FtAtlS AS 2 M 


25* 22 ACon of 280 11.1 II 25ft 25ft 2Sft 

52* 40* ACon pf 300 55 17 52 51ft 52 * ft 

114 103 ACon pf 13,75 12.1 52 114*113*113* 

20ft 7 /to ACtlPBd 220 10.9 IB 20* 20 20* + to 

30’« 2Sft ACopCv 251c 9JJ ID 28 27* 28 + ft 

56 to 44 to AC von 1.90 35 14 814 54* 54 Mft— ft 

27* 18* ADT .92 18 23 190 24ft 24* 34*— * 

24ft 17ft AElPw 2260103 « 17M 21ft 21 to 21ft 

Mft 30ft Am Em 1JS &0 15 3512 43to 42* 42ft— ft 

25ft 12to AFoml i M 2.1 14 199 22ft 22ft 22ft 

35* 21ft AGnCp 1.00 31 9 824 32* 32to OZto— to 

16 4ft AGnl wt 345 14 13ft 13ft 

56* 51ft AGnl pfA 087,105 41 S«* 56 5* — ft 

9&to 629, AGnl PfBS50c 6J 134 08* 87* 88* 

77 45>4 AGO I Pi X2S 4J 1 66V, 48to 58to — to 

71* 44 AGn pfD 2A4 A0 10 55* 65* 65* 

36ft 25* AHwII IJO 1* 10 I 33 33 33 


32to 22 FBkFI % 1O0 32 13 
46ft 23to FSoSfl 13 

27 l?ft FslOrte 132 SA 
54to 44 to FCflJapfSJAell.l 
83* 70 FCM pfB 760-104 
18"2 11 FfBTec SO 50 11 
53 35 FIBTxpf 554,135 

20* • FfCJfr , 

24 >k 10ft FFMAZ 600 32 7 


13ft 7V> A Hoi st 


824 32* 32to 32to— to 

345 14 13ft 13ft 

41 56* 56 56 — ft 

134 88* 87* 88* 

1 6Bto 48ft 48to— to 

10 65* 65* 65* 

I 33 33 33 

267 13 12ft 17ft— ft 


66ft 46* AHOfTM 190 SA 12 4224 59* 58* 58ft— ft. 

4613 26* AHOSP 1.12 25 15 8084 45* 45* 45* — ft 

97ft 69ft Am rich 660 72 • 536 90* 89ft Mft 

90* 61* AlnGf-p .44 5 22 622 BSft 04* S4ft 

28ft I Bto A Mi .72 29 12 1648 25ft 24ft 74ft— to 

Jto 2ft AmMot 603 3ft 3 3ft 

2« 16to APrasds J51 1J 5 203 20 W* 19*— to 


90* 61* AinGrp M 5 22 622 U 

28ft ISto AMI .72 29 12 1648 25 

Sto 2ft AmMot 603 3 , 

29 I6to APrvsds .2ST TJ 5 203 20 19ft 19*— to 
lift 5 ASLFta 10 45 6ft 6* 6ft 

189: 12* ASLFIPf 2.19 T55 64 14* 14 14ft 9 ft 

16 lift AShtp 50 62 9 71 13 12ft 12ft 

35ft 26* AmSta 1 60 SA H> 422 X 29* 29ft— ft 

6711 35* AmStar 64 t.l 11 202 60 9*h 59*— ft ; 

78 46ft ASIr pf A 4 JB 6J S3 6** 69* 69* 

57to 51 ASfrpfB 6A0 12.1 I 56 56 Si 

24ft IT* AT&T 120 IS104M 10* Mto 20ft 

41ft 32* AT&T pi 344 «5 137 38ft 38* 38ft + to 

43 33* AT&T Pf 3.74 9A J7D 3F 



35* 23* CFSVC 36 .9 21 908 29ft 29ft 29ft + * 

35* 25 Camper A0 22 8 31 27to 27ft 27ft + to 

21ft 12ft Com DSC 11 2010 23* 20* 23* +7T4 

46* lift Cptvsn 994 15* 14ft 15 + ft 

39* 24 to ConAg, JD 23 14 323 37ft 36ft 37ft * 

20 13ft ConnE 160 SA 10 14 19to 19 19 — * 

31 20ft CMING 2.60 6.9 9 11 29ft 29ft 29ft + to 

ISto 17to Conroe .40 33) 6 43 13to 13ft 13ft— ft 

38 «A'4 CoraEO 240 72 7 354 33ft 33ft 33ft— * 

47’k 36 to ConE pf 4A5 I0J 95300 / 45 43ft 45 +1 

50 39 ConE Pf 5J» 106 7 47ft 47 47 — to 

36 23 CnsFrt 1.10 3J 12 161 34* 34 V, 34ft — * 


27* 16ft AWatrs IJO 60 
69 to 42 to AWatPf 1A3 23 
13* 10 AWatpf 1J5 I0J 
2Bto IVto Am Ho It 240 12J) 
72to 59ft ATrRr 5A4 84 
18 6to ATrSc 
89* 66 ATrUn 564 70 
40to 26 to Amcron 160 43 


370 39H 39ft 39ft 
116 Mft 24* 24* 1- * 
20z 62* 63* 62* + * 

’S'£ii£ 

.3 f? +Ml 

I 01 81 81 — to 



47* 33ft CjkNG 2J3 56 
Pi 4to ConsPw 
33ft 19 CnP d (8 4J0 13J 
54* 31* CnP of O 7AS 14J) 
56 32* CnP pfE 7JZ I4J 

56 33* CnP Of G 7J6 M.1 

31 V; 15ft CnPprV 440 1A9 
25* 13* CnP orU 260 146 
387, 14* CnPprT 3J8 I4J 
55ft 31ft CnP of H 768 144) 
28* 14* CnP orR LOO 168 
28* 14* CnPprP 198 147 
2S* 14ft CilP OrN 3AS 142 
!8to **1 CnPprMZJD 146 

17 BTi CnP or L 233 144 

29 15 CnPprS 432 146 

18 9to CnPprK 143 14A 


421 41* 4Tto 41* +lft 
540 7to 7ft 7ft 
lOOt 32to 32to 32to + to 
isb a* s2to 53* i-i* 

15b a 54 54 + to 

lOOz 55 55 55 — 7t 

49 3 Oto 29ft 29to— ft 
72 24ft Mto Mft + V. 

7 27ft M 26ft— V 
5b 54* 54* 54ft 
at 27V» 26* 27 
I tO 27ft 26ft 27 + to 

22 27* 2*ft 27V* + ft 
14 17* 17 17ft— ft 

14 15ft ISto 15ft— to 
II 27ft 27ft 27* + to 

5 17 16* lift— Vi 


47* 28ft CflNCP 260 63 19 516 41ft 41V, 41to 


6to ATrSc 14 14 13ft |4 

66 ATrUn 564 78 I 81 81 81 — to 

26to Amcron 160 43 8 46 37ft 37* 37*— to 

24 to AmesD 30 A 22 152 46to 46 46ft + * 

B ft Amctek 80 3A 13 399 23* 23* 23* — to 

to Amfoc 95 26ft 26* 26to— to 

6to Amfrsc 5 199 7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 

50* Amoco 3J0b 53 0 4190 63* 63* 63V, + ft 


10ft «ft Coni I ll 
4* ft Confll rr 
4ft ft CillHdn 
12 4ft Catlafo 


48 7ft 7 7 — to 

316 Ift lft 1ft 
244 1 ft »» 

92 11* 111* lift 


34’, l*ft CooTTol 180 7 S 8 1 000 27* 22ft 


. 4190 63to 63* 63ft + ft 

38to 28ft AMP 37 22 23 1140 33* 32ft 32ft— ft 

ZJto lift Ampco JO 2A 17 20 12* 12ft 12ft + to 

Zlft 12ft Amneos 12 la 21to aft— to 

3* 21 ft AriSUi IAD 4J 9 106 33ft 33ft 33ft + to 

43* 30 Arrnied tAO 36 16 465 45 43* 45 *3ft 

4* 1ft AnaanA 733 2to 2* 2to 

Mto 14* Anloas 20 135 Hft 22V. 22* + M I 

27ft 19* Anchor IA8 SJ 111 26ft 26ft 26to 
46to 27V# An Cloy IJ2 3J 34 44 40 39ft 39ft— ft 

1211 9ft AndrGr 30 17 14 56 12 12 12 + ft 

27* 17 Angelic A0 ZA 14 Ml 26 25* 25ft— ft 

34ft 20* Anhauss 80 24 12 242: SPn 32* 33ft + * 


71 to 48* Anheu of 3A0 53 
19* 13ft Anlxtr 38 18 

16* 9 Anthem 84 J 

IS* lOto Anfrxry A4b Z9 

U 9ft Apacha 38 2 a 

2 ft ApchPwt 
l»ft 15ft APCtlP 1R12.T0 IIJ 
34ft 28* ApPwpI -LIB 128 
31ft 26* ApPwpf 380 125 


LAO 53 *6 69ft 68* 69ft +1 

38 18 17 4*0 I** 15ft 16 

84 J 20 « 13to 13ft 13ft— * 

A4U29 9 146 IS* 15ft 15ft 

38 2a 10 220 10* 10ft 10H + * 
97 to ft + to 

110 HJ 149 lgfe |8to Tift — ft 

.18 128 5 Bto 3Z* 32*— to l 

80 125 5 30ft 30ft 30* + ft | 


39ft SSft AAlDta 1361 72 24 420 24V, M Mft + ft 

15ft 8 APPlMg 64 81 Mft Mto Mft — ft 

24* 16* ArchDn .14b .7 12 970 20ft T9to 20* 

30* Mft ArlPpf 3JB 111 15 29* 29ft 29ft 

HE 79ft ArlPpf 1030 113 117b 95ft 95ft 95ft + ft 

24ft 14 ArkBst A0 13 9 40 23ft 23ft 23* + ft 

24* 16 Ark la 188 55 26 5005 19* 19* 19ft + ft 

1W * ArtnRI 110 ft ft ft— 

13ft 6* Armco 566 10* 10 lOto + to 

23 151; Arrnc of 210 10.1 1 1 20ft 20V, 30ft + ft 

Mft 14ft Arm,Rb A8 3J 8 159 M* Mto 14* 

39* 26* ArmWIn IJO 17 5 132 15 34ft 34*— * 

38 aft ArmW pf 335 10.1 lOOx 37 37 37 

Mft ivy, atoCp ijo 4J7 3a a a— to 

24ft 12ft ArowE 30 1 j 16 140 13ft 13ft 13ft— ft 

30* 14 Anra 32 8 135 I a 77 V + to 

Z7 15 Arvlns 80 3A9 13 a* 23to 23* + ft 

27* 17ft Asorco 220 a* 73 73 to 

17 22* AshlOII 1 A0 58 119 31ft 3|ft lift + ft 

45 33* AahlOpf 480 108 17 45 44ft 44ft— to 

44* 31 to Aahropf 196 9J 77 42ft 42ft 42ft 


M* 22ft CfDoTO 32 3J 
40', 33ft CnDIpf 4JD TIA 


70B2 23ft 21 Z —lft 
5640r39 Mft 35* 


35ft 36* Conwd _ 1.10 11 12 213 55* 3Sft 35ft 


2* 1 vlCookU 

3? 27* CpOPr 182 48 14 

41* 31 Cooolpf Z90 7 A 

20ft Mto COPrTr A0 2A 7 

27 15 Cooovb AO 13 14 

19* ** Coowld 32J 


19* Ta COPwkT 32J 
27ft 17l» Cor dura 84 16 15 
IV- it Carein it 45 n 
48ft 305, CarnGS 180 73 11 
48* MV, CorS I* 180 20 
77* 4 S Cm Cm J4 8 21 
10 fi Cnng 
39ft 32 Crone 160b 44 10 
100 44', CrovRs a 

50 a CravRwi 


50 a CroyRftl 4 46* 45% 45ft— 1* 

19* TP, CrckNpfZIS 118 ID lift lift IB* + to 

a* 49ft CrckNof 2A3e 5.1 241 Sift aft aft 

24 18ft CrmpK 130 S3 12 72 23* 23ft 23n— * 

t9ft 3»ft CrwiCk 13 31 Mto 65ft 65ft 

Mft 37ft CrwZel 180 26 18 423 38V, 38* 3SH + to 

50ft 43* Crzet pf 481 98 46 47ft 47ft 47ft * ft 

65* 55ft CrZel pfC450 7.7 7 58* 5 5* 58* + ft 

35*. 22* Cirtoro 80 27 17 4 30 29* 30 + ft 

33ft 18ft CuUnets 23 3020 18* 18 18*— to 

88ft 58* CumEn 230 3A 4 350 45 44% 64ft— ft 

10* 8ft Currinc l.WaiOd 23 15% >0ft 10ft + ft 

38* 30* CurTW 130 33 14 937 34*® + % 

S2"a 33ft Cyclops 1.10 28 7 15 43*.% 43tt 43* 


50 1* 1ft lto 

14 181 38ft 38% 3S* + ft 

55 39 18* 39 6ft 

7 70 15ft 15ft ISto 

14 4ie aft 22* ar, 

S 9to 9ft 9ft + ft 

15 50 23% 23ft 21ft- to 

T2 37 12ft 12ft 12ft— * 

11 5p7 45ft 44ft 44ft— ft 

50 49* 49 49* +1 

21 2 74ft 74ft 74ft 

56 9ft 9ft 9ft * ft 

10 20 M* Mto 36* 

a 004 92V, 90% 91% 

4 46* 45% 45% —1* 

ID lift lift II* + to 

241 sift aft aft 

12 a 23* 23ft 23V»— to 

13 31 Mto 45ft Mft 

11 4a 38% 38* 3SH + % 

46 47ft 47% 47ft to 
7 58* 5** 58* + ft 
17 4 3# 29* » + ft 



10 S2 FMC 230 3A M 44* 65% 65% MVk— % 

38 18* FPL Gp 1.9* 73 8 1654 25% 25* 25% 

13ft 9* FcbCfr 38 27 23 JT 10ft 10% 0% 

14ft 10 Foci 7 ffl ll io* io*— to 

20ft 13% Co'ixtwl 30 1.4 430 Mto 13* 13ft— * 

39ft Mto Fofrcpf 160 10J 148 35ft 347 a 34ft— ft 

16* lift Foirfd .18 15 9 37 lift lift lift 

77 IS* FmriDI* 30 .9 73 413 2? 21% 21% 

19ft 13* Fonstel 60 4.0 13 56 15ft IT, 15% 

a* 15ft Foron M 49 7 M 18% 17*, 17ft 

13 9 FovDrg 30 23 16 la ?ft 9ft 9*, + ft 

6ft 4* Federx 84e .9 8 a 4* 4% 4ft— ft 


S2to 3V% FtoEw 79 4342 4Pt 47 ■*£*— \ 

39 30* FdMoo 132 48 II BO 38- 37* 37*— to 

22% 12% FadNM .16 A 2042 20* 20% 2DU— to 

77 16% FedlPB 70 Ji 10 IS 2ITI W » 

30ft 25* FPoopf 2J1 7.9 20 29% T^.h 29% 

3 17ft Fee R II IA4 6A 14 11 22* ZR, 23.5— to 

19ft 13ft FdSonl 80 43 16 32 18ft 18% I8’» - ft 

65ft aft FedDSt 284 45 8 429 57 S6H 56, + ft 

31 2Tto Fern, un 4A 15 M 27to 77% 7T--3— ft 

35 25* FI dal 180 36 M 1312 29-V 29to »% 


851 4M 6% ift *%— - 

> 61,203 m aft a* — ft 

IX 6ft 6% 6%— '■ 

80 4.1 9 807 JIM 19ft 19*— ft 

68 28 9 544 25 Mft 24ft 

180,106 40 57% 57ft 57% + ft 

60 4.1 I S76 X ISto Mft + ft 

80 33 13 16 X*!l 30% 30% 4- ft 

13 365 42 41% 41ft— ft 

32 56 90* 23ft 23% Zlft 

■JAell.l 5 48to 4Bto 4lto % ft 

'60el0A 20 73 ?3 73 

60 58 11 337 12% lift 12 — to 

>34913.5 2 41 41 41 

9X9 »ft 9 + ft 

68B 33 7 2S3 21% 20% aft % % 


60 39 FFB 112 5.5 B 41 57 56% 56* + to 

SSft 35% FlnWe 250 51 8 789 49% 48% 49% 4-1% 

Mto 23% Flntstpf 237 7.9 a X 29ft 30 + H 

lift FfMbs 34 28 9 91 8* 8'-: Ift— to 

X 1* FTNotnn 19 1% 29% 79"s 29VU— ft 

71* 5ft FSIPO 641 6% 6% Ift 

JO* 71% Flip a of 262 93 a 28ft 28% IBto 

31*1 25% FfUnRI 186 73 IS ai 27* 27% 77ft— to 

aft 17ft FIVaBh 8B 36 10 713 24V; 21* 24% + % 

33% i«, Frwne ijo 4j 9 ax* x* mm— to 

47 79 FfcKhb 180 11 to 33to 37* S* 

lift r W FlinFd 85e .4 61 11% llto lito 

43 23 FltFnGS 1J2 38 9 70 37% aft 37* + ft 

78* lift FteefEn A4 23 • 674 19% 191, 19% 

3** 26% Flemno IX 17 13 IS 36ft 36to 36ft -I- to 

13% lift Fieri pf IA1 12A 77 T3ft 13 13 

29* 18ft FlohtSI s .16 A X 63 26% 26 Mto— ft 

34(« 14* FtaafPf II 739 31ft 31 Jlto— % 

45ft X FloEC ,16a A 13 11 41 V; 41V, 41ft 4- to 

3f9t Xft FklPro 116 7.9 9 3350 77ft 27% 27ft 

18% 11% FtaStl A0 13 IS 42 17ft 17 17tT + ft 

6% Jto FlwGen M 5* 5% S%— * 

n 13* Flowrs .64 2A It 84 IP, IT* llto + to 

Mft Mft Fluor AO 2A 1177 16* 16% 16H— ft 

59 47* FoofeC 120 48 II a 54* 54 to 54* + * 

51% 4<r., FordM 26) Si I 304? 43* 4Jto 43% + ft 

IJto 10% FIDeor 136 WJ a 12% W 1 17% * ft 

79ft 54ft FIHorfl 184 2A a 473 77* 77 77 V, + ft 

15ft 10* FoBWh A4 3J 13 111 13% 13% 13%— to 

Itto 7* FortfP 68 AJ 13 41 Wc 10* 10ft 4 ft 

33% Mft Fmtro 184 48 T* 420 26ft 2S», 25ft— % 

77 a Foxmyr 14 2U 254 25 25to + % 

22% 18ft FMEPn 8Se 18 M 20ft 19ft M 4 V, 

12% 9% FMGCn 1490 17ft 12V, 12% 4 * 

10* 7ft FMOG 157C27.I IBS 91% »% 9% 

Bft 14% FrntMc AO 11 14 734 19* I9»n 19% 

Mft 23* Frlgtm BUS 19 8k 9 27% + to 

2B* Tito Fru9N 1 60 24 6 389 2Sto 24% 2S 4 % 

3J--2 25* Fruhlpf 280 68 Ml 27ft 2? 2? to— V, 

36% Mto Fiona AO IJ I 90 31% 31 31 —ft 


to'i a » 43- 1 — vm 

14 21S 254 25 3'i + v. 

28 M 20% 19ft a 4 Vi 
1490 12ft 12V, 12% 4 * 
27.1 IBS 9% V% 9to 


ija* 11 
. 80 10 * 
29 49 n 
W 4.9 11 
180198 
JE 9X M 
37 17 IJ 
IN 41 U 
280 OJ 
220 68 7 

Ml W H 

80 34 IS 
130 97 N 
44 19 V 

44 19 a 

stun 


K* 

20% JV9T * 

Ltt 

314 

11 

117 

32% 

37% 

32* 4- % 

37 

23* JRMtr 

56 

13 

11 

■86 

34% 

a* 

33* — .ft 

VI 

Mft jamm 
It* JaonF 

.12 

8 

9 

9* 

BV» 

a* 

19ft— ft 

IS* 

143,118 


137 

12% 

13ft 

Mft 

47% 

31ft JeffFII 

137 

ix5 

6 

1494 

47V, 

41% 

45% + % 

66 

49 Jtrcef 

8.12 


KJb 65b 
ijatrMJ 

65b 

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106 

91* JcrCPf 

1330 133 


M9ft 103ft— ft 

M* 

13* JtrCF 

XII 1X5 


» 

17* 

17ft 

l»ft— to 

12% 

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19 

a 

llto 

llto 

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49ft 

X VJ. JMPlin 

130 

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2856 

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44ft 

45ft— to 

46ft 

37% JflMCfl 

1J4C4J 

9 

167 

43% 

43% 

43% 

27* 

21% Jargon 

IX 

40 

10 

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ah 

34* 

24* 

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17* -loot ms 

JO 

33 

M 

89 

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75 

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27% 

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1A0 

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15 

99 

Mto 

23* 

23ft— to 


19% MM. 
25% 25% 

44% «3% 43% 

21% a 73 

Mft Mft WV» 
X MU. Mto 
85% 3A 36% 
a 71% 2 HO 
im a% 12% 

2T6 »% 9* 
18% 19% lift 
Mft 13% 13% 

1% a% 2% 


t 77 77 a 4 % 

13 23’M 23% 23b 4 % 

220 a* a a + % 

119 31% 31% 31% 4 % 

17 45 44% 44% — to 

27 42* 42ft 42% 


9% 7% KDI 34 23 11 *32 9 I* 9 

20% lOto KLM9 A7e 24 9 7355 19* 19* 19% 4 ft 

42% 335, KMIRl 4150 105 18 43% 41% 43 41% 

41% 32to Kmart IAO 4.1 9 mo 34% Z4* 34% + to 

40% 36 KNEne 1A8 33 17 73 39* 39% 39ft— ft 

16% 12% Kotor AI .151 7971 16% IS* 15% 4 ft 

61 4?V. Kol66Pf 4J3 74 2 61 61 61 41* 

21 to 151. KatoCt 30 l.t MO 17% 17% 17% — % 

19 IS* KOlC Ft U7 7J 5 17% 17% 17% 4 to 

13* 7* Kaneb A0 48 159 B% 8* 0* 

iar.5 87 KOM&P«2A6al23 MOOblOl 100* 101 
24 to Mto KClyPL 236 IQJ s 344 22* 22ft 73 4 to 

34 2SVh KCPL pf 180 113 30b 32% 32V, 32V, 4 to 

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21% 16 KCPLVf 2J3 113 S 20 19ft X 4 % 

571, 39ft KC5ou 180 18 9 » 56* 56% 56%— to 

14% 10* KCSoPf 180 SO 15b 12% 12% 12% — % 
19ft 14% KonGE 236 112 A 946 lift 17ft 17<h— ft 

41% 29ft KonPLf 296 &l 0 142 36ft 36ft 36% 4 ft 

23* 18% KoPLPf 233 103 4 22* 22% 22* 

73 II KaPLPt 233 103 4 Mto Mft 21* 


69% 49 ASUDG 280 43 10 886 64% Mft 64% 
u°% rt Aodppf 4.75 48 54 103 102* TO 

24* 18% A hi tone 1 a0 83 ID 9 19% 19% 17% 

29* 21* AtCvEI 25B fi 9 n 27% 27to 27b 

64U « All Rich 480 68 2285 S9b 58% 5? 

41 a% AtfRc of 335 9.9 98b 38% 37* 37* 

153 100% AtlRcpf 280 £8 <141 129*141 

18% 10 to AtlcoCp 117 13 12* 12* 

31* 18% Auwrt A0 1A 25 107 25* 24ft 24ft. 

54% 34% AulDOt A8 IA 21 587 49* 48* 49* 

5 4* Avalon n 9 25 4ft 4ft 4* 

AVEMC A0 28 M 3 29% 29% 29ft 

79% a* Avery A0 18 M ai 34 33% 33%. 

2> i? ATlolln 11 72 20 18% 19%. 

«* 27 Avne! JD IA 17 742 32b 37 J2 

g* 17% Avon 280 9A ID 697 22% 71% 21% 

29% Mft Aydln 18 49 21% 21 21 ■ 


C 13% Katvln 347 Mft Mft 14*— to 

a 13to Komex A0 2A S 1150 lift Mto Mft 

18ft 13 KoofPt 19 M 3 Mto Mto Mft— to 

DO 31* KeUOBB 136 XI 15 505 Mto 55ft 55% + Vm 

38* 23to K.Uwd 13 U 7 94 35ft 35to 35* 

2% ft Krnai 3%2 4. ft %— 

26 19b Klimt 80 Xi 15 15 22ft 72 22ft 4- ft 

27*. a* KyUffl 2A4&7 10 243 3to27%a +ft 
16* 9* KMTGf M 42 31 10% lOto 10% 

26% 17% KtrGfii 1J0 69 16 19 19 19 

33% a* KarrMC 1.10 u a 442 29% 29% a* + to 

31% 17ft Ktvak 1-30 43 I 45 21% 28% 28* + to 

15* 12 Kevlnft M 33 19 as ISto 14ft Mft 

37% 26% KfcKSe 180 3A 9 TO 35 34ft 34ft— ft 

85* 64% KtdprB 4J» 4.9 1 81 81 81 + % 

61% 43 KlmbCI 2-32 38 11 604 60ft 60% #Th 

40* 26 KnotnRd JJ 2.1 17 569 36% 35* 36% + ft 

V 23% Kow 2J0 98 SO 83 27* 27% 27* + ft 

29% 14ft Kotmor a Ufl 142 lift IBft 18* 


22% 17 KOper* 80 4J 131 17ft 17% 17ft + to 

37 30% Koorpf 480 11J 20b 35% 35% 35%— 1 

«M 96% Kopprpfiaoo mo 1 in in >x —1 
16% 12% Korean J> 38 1M If Mft 14*— to 

46 35% Kroger 280 43 11 553 42* 42% 42% + to 

32 35 Kubota Aft 73 31 2 28% 28% 28% + % 

24* «ft KuMfflS 28 16 46 30% 20% 20% + to 

67% 27b KrocW JM 18 16 52 32* 32% 32* + * 

a* 15% KVW JB 4J 7 77 19ft 19% I9%— ft 


LACn 

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~ •• .,*. •.: .- ■.• :-, 
v: ^ &:•.•'• ; 

? <>. V-^' 1- • ; 


• SOCIOLOGY 


g^enrng to Machinery 
PS S» e Sounds ol Damn, 


’ ^JOBNHOmsHA W 

J ■•St-C'T'' EW YORK^ tu^ ^"eriiWff 

\" “CTJ ^ ble? ^ ^ robot is in 

-7 - • -macfiiac down toriLi P®*?* “«J can shut the 

; ^?\ j^ aed ro^rateS^?d ** Bu L^. to . “romated 

• a t t S5? akS at 3 A - M -” 

may|w^7^^ 1 ^^ e ° cw technique bang developed that 

- l^bicdc^isinannn^ _ 

; £5 wbcn « % listening to the 

, % to<A js-Mttmg dun and needs . "^“*“6 w " 

toje changed. noises a tool makes, 

, r The process is call^/t „ , 

: “acoustical sensing.” In add? We can t«H when it IS 

‘ h^ngto^.’ 

-.. ■-m^ ooniiiig together that ~” — • 

'2MSj^”“ ftS2S"4E!3S 

. wm^scnsamuig that it is about to break. 

‘ b J mi F^ you can hear cracking sounds 

said Allen Green, technical director of 
Technology Corporation in Sacramento, 
10 ** noises * tool makes, we can tdi 
■wnen it is beginning to wear or that it is going to break.” Some 
flaunt he adds, are sensitive enough to hear the individual 
crystals in a piece of metal grind against each other as it is 
:.wowed... ~ ■ 

• ^ aacT 8 y released as materials deform,” said David 
uorarala^ , a manufacturing en^neering professor at the CJniversi- 
ty of Galifoixua at Berkeley. "If the Up of a tool cracks, that will 
..give a. burst of acoustical activity.” 

^ . -Tb fcTech n lque is an outgrowth of the space program and was 
developed as a means of rietec^rtg flaws in nigh-pressure tanirs an 
- rodeets. It is also being used for nondestructive fasting of ad- 
vanoed plastic composite materials 

l ■ ACOUSTICAL monitors for machine tods are designed to 
▼ £w filter out ..sound in the hearing range and to focus on the 
J- 100,000- to 500,000-cydo-per-second region. Although 
that ts supposedly beyond human, range, Mr. Green notes that the 
procedure is simply a mechanization of what drille d machinists 
now do oh the basis of sound and experience. 

“Those old craftsmen could tell by the sound of a tool when it 
needed to be changed,” he said. "We’re just applying hid 
technology by masking out the fobtional soundsand chedmig the 
. higher frequencies.” The idea, Mr. Domfeki said, “is to get data 
not clouded by the grunt and groan of tbe machine.” 

Most companies now deal with tool -breakage problems by a 
schedule of: preventive maintenance Based on past events, they 
change tools before there is much chance of failure.. 

“The attitude in mass piodudtknl sttuations is^ ‘change the tools 
after the first shtft,’ even if you are yanking them at half their 
jjoteatial Efe,” saitLMr. McBam, thq res<ardier. With a routine 

• ' V ^ ^(Gntiam J '• V ...... - : 


amage 


*By listening to the 
noises a tool makes, 
we can tell when it Is 
begmniog to wear.’ 


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tai commeKlal intnc (b) AmetoOs needed te bur one Pound (O Amotutts neetStd to bur am 
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of Totro (Tokyo); IMF (SORJ; BAll tdMor. rtyat dktam). 

OOteraota tram JRtuMrs end AP. 


Interest Rates 


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Mgrrttf LyiR* Ready Assets 

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Gold 


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v.rt ComeieOTwf 

Source: Reuters 


leaders 

i ^ys Thursday in Aus- 
Chile. France. s^tfa Korean and We>t 

k “^ p ^^^ Fridw “ Bds ‘“ 1L 


Umlh^gnbune. 

BUSINESS /FINANCE 


- I. 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, M-l, Page 10 

Page 11 


Japan 
To Gut 
Tariffs 

Market to Open 

For Computers 

Room 

TOKYO — Japan plans to abol- 
ish tariffs on computers and related 
equipment early next year as part 
of efforts to open its market and 
reduce trade friction, officials at 
the Ministry of International Trade 
and Industry said Thursday. 

Japan has a growing surplus in 
this sector, especially in equipment, 
although its computer trade with 
the United States is roughly in bal- 
ance. 

Abolishing the tariffs was part of 
a three-year plan approved last 
month by the Japanese government 
in an. effort to head off protection- 
ist legislation by the US. Congress. 

The present tariffs are 4.9 per- 
cent for computers and 6 percent 
for related equipment 

Japanese computer exports rose 

28.6 parent in 1984 to 1893 billion 
yen ($797 rrriltio n) while imports 
picked up 43.7 parent to 109.5 
billion yen. MTH said. 

Equipment exports rose 69 per- 
cent last year to 8925 billion yen 
while imports rose 29.6 percent to 

108 .6 bil lion yen. 

MTIT officials said that the Japa- 
nese plan will be presented Aug. 22 
in Hawaii at bilateral talks with the 
United States on electronics trade. 
The talks also will focus on the 
question of abolishing tariffs on 
computer parts. 

The United States is expected to 
maintain its 43-parent tariff on 
computer imports because of Ja- 
pan’s large, equipment trade sur- 
plus with the United States. 

Japanese equipment exports to 
the United States rase 76.6 percent 
in 1984 to 5717 billion yen while 
imports were 87.7 billion yen, up 
373 parent, MTH said. 

Japanese computer expons to 
the Uni led ‘States rose 29.4 percent 
to 79.7 billion yen last year against 
imports of 865 billion yen, up 343 
percent 

■ New Technology Age Seen 

The government said Thursday 
that Japan has entered a "new age” 
of high technology and informa- 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 6 ) 


520- 

500 - - The Surge of the 
Bombay Stock 
^ Exchange 

460 - waeKty ctawnfl W** 

olTHe economic T tmes 

440- share oner aide*. 
1970-100 





V 


K 

« 


Bundesbank 
Cuts 2 Key Rates 
By Half Point 


A M J J 
Source The Economy Times 


The New York Teen 

Brokers on the floor of the Bombay Stock Exchange engage in frenzied trading. 

It’s 'Buy, Buy, Buy, Buy AU Day 9 
At the Bombay Stock Exchange 


By Steven R. Weisman 

New York Times Sendee 

BOMBAY — A typical day oil the floor of the 
Bombay Stock Exchange: about 2,000 frantic, 
sweating brokers are packed into an immens e, 
sweltering room. They are pushing and shoving 
«>ch other and everyone seems to be screaming 

This exuberant roar can be heard blocks away, it 
is the sound of India's latest flirtation with capital- 
ism, and while most financial people are delighted 
by it some are worried. 

Prompted by the biggest burst of optimism ever 
to hit the Indian business community, the Bombay 
Slock Exchange is having a boom unlike anything 
since the country’s independence in 1947. The teji , 
or bull, has completely vanquished the mmuti, or 
bear. 

Stock prices have doubled and even tripled in 
just the last few months. The volume of shares 
traded here has more than doubled in six months, 
to nearly 50,000 transactions a day. 

Doctors, lawyers, engineers, students, clerks and 
a torrent of other first-time investors are getting 
rich. A few years ago, there were fewer than two 
million private investors in India Some say the 
number could grow to 15 million in the next few 
years. 

"I have never seen anything like this before” 
said BhogjUal Trikamdas, a white-haired, 70-year- 
old broker who has been trading stocks for 52 
years. “It’s buy, buy, buy. buy all day.” 

Along Dalai Street in the heart of Bombay, there 
is little doubt about what brought on the euphoria 
It was Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi's sweeping 
new economic package of tax reductions, business 
incentives and curbs on Government regulations. 

"We have got a very dynamic prime minister," 
said Mahendra N. Kampani. a broker who serves 
on the board of the Bombay exchange "He has 
changed the whole psychology of investors in this 
country.” 


While annual economic growth in India has 
been a healthy 5 to 6 percent in the last few years, 
these investors now clearly expect it to rise much 
more rapidly. And therein, many in the business 
community believe, lies the problem. They worry 
that rampant speculation is overheating the Stock 
Exchange, and that the companies listed — not to 
mention the economy itself — cannot live up to 
investors' expectations. 

Some fear that high times on the Bombay Stock 
Exchange — and most other exchanges in India — 
could very quickly crash. 

"This boom is not so healthy,'’ said DA. Parekh. 
another stock broker. “Not all these investors are 
mature. They're just buying anything at any rate 
they can get. If any adverse news comes, like a war 
or some other calamity, we’re in big trouble:” ■ 

The thought has created some nervousness 
among the leaders of the Bombay exchange. M-R. 
Mayya, its executive director, acknowledged that 
loo many investors were "not taking the long-term 
view.’’ 

"They’re out to make a fast buck, and that’s 
where the danger is,” be said, adding that the 
directors of the exchange bad lately established 
machinery to try to dampen some of the specula- 
tive fever. 

For example, the exchange required a cash down 
payment of at least 25 percent for any transaction, 
then recently raised the requirement to 40 percent, 
provoking a short strike by brokers. The exchange 
also requires purchasers to take delivery of the 
stock on the day of settlement 

The disquieting aspect of the boom is that many 
of the shares are considered overpriced. The price- 
earnings ratio has reached 30 or more in some 
cases, Mr. Kampani said. 

Without question, the stock market boom seems 
to represent a remarkable new phase in India’s 
economic history. Beginning with its first presi- 
dent, Jawaharial Nehru, an English-trained Sorial- 
(Conthmed on Page 15, CoL 5) 


By Warren Getler 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The Bundesbank, try- 
ing to give a boost to sluggish West 
Goman domestic demand, said 
Thursday that it would cut its two 
key lending rates by £ point each, 
effective Friday. 

The discount rate will fall to 4 
percent from 4.5 percent and the 
Lombard rate to 53 percent from 6 
percent. 

A senior Bundesbank official 
had indicated as early as Aug. 8 
that a tt-point cut in official rates 
was being seriously considered. 
The central bank last cut the Lom- 
bard and discount rates in March 
1983, when the Lombard rate was 
reduced to 5 percent from 6 percent 
and the discount rate to 4 percent 
from 5 percent. 

The discount rate is the one at 
which commercial banks borrow 
medium term — on a maximum 
three-month, revolting basis — us- 
ing Treasury bills as collateral, 
while the Lombard rate is the one 
used for emergency, overnight bor- 
rowing on deposit of securities as 
collatmL 

The Bundesbank president, Karl 
Otto PdhZ, said at a Frankfurt press 
conference that the central bank's 
move to lower the borrowing costs 
of commercial banks was aimed at 
encouraging them to offer lower 
rates to commercial customers, 
thus spurring private spending and 
investment. 

Mr. Fdhi indicated that official 
West German interest rates could 
decline further, particularly in light 
of moderate expansion of the na- 
tion's money supply. He noted that 
the Bundesbank’s money stock has 
been growing at the lower end of its 
3-to- 5- percent target range for 
1985. 

He cautioned against expecta- 
tions that the rate cut would imme- 
diately boost the depressed labor 
market. More than 23 million 
workers, or 9 percent of the labor 
force, were unemployed in July, a 
post-war record for that month. He 
said the West German economy 
was expanding now at an annual, 
inflation-adjusted rate of 3 percent. 
But he predicted that growth for 


the full year would slow to 2.5 per- 
cent after 1984’s 2.6 percent The 
23 percent is in line with govern- 
ment projections. 

Analysts said the official rate 
cuts were not likely to affect signifi- 
cantly the currency markets be- 
cause the moves had been largely 
discounted. But they noted, lhe 
rate reduction would help currently 
lackluster domestic demand at a 
t‘»r ne when export growth was ta- 
pering off, at least partly because of 
the weakening U_S. dollar. 

“The Bundesbank’s rate cut 
might give certain support to the 
dollar, out my view is that it won't 
basically change the trend of a soft- 
landing of the dollar,” said Franz- 
JosefTrouvain, chief economist of 
Deutsche Bank AG, in Frankfurt. 

Norbert Walter, chief macroeco- 
nomic analyst at the Kid Institute 
of World Economy, said depressed 
sectors of the economy — includ- 
ing home construction, agriculture 
and certain services — would bene- 
fit from the rate reduction, but only 
after a lag of some two to three 
quarters. During this time, be said, 
people will wait to see if rales have 
bottomed. 

He noted that, with net exports 
to the United States having gener- 
ated about a fifth of West Germa- 
ny's economic growth last year, the 
Bundesbank was moving fast in 
both interest-rate and money-sup- 
ply policy to try to push up domes- 
tic demand which nas been gener- 
ally weak, so that it can hdp offset 
the slowdown in exports. 

"Thursday's decision to cut key 
rates indicates that rate declines 
stand a good chance to continue,” 
Mr. Walter said. “Before the 
Bundesbank moves to cut the dis- 
count and Lombard further, it will 
lest the market by offering securi- 
ty-repurchase agreements at con- 
sistently lower rates.” 

Brendan Brown, an analyst for 
Phillips & Drew, the London bro- 
kerage, said that the Bundesbank 
may have decided to cut its rales in 
a deliberate effort to keep the mark 
weak against the dollar and thus 
secure strong export growth this 
year. 


U.S. Industrial Output 
Increased 0.2% in July 


American Express Bank 


By Martin Gutsinger 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON —The govern- 
ment said Thursday that output ai 
U3. factories, mines and utilities 
edged upA modest 03 percent in 
July, continuing the listless perfor- 
mance exhibited for most of the 
past year. 

The Federal Reserve Board said 
that the July gain left industrial 
production just 1.4 percent higher 
than it was a year ago. By compari- 
son, industrial production grew 
112 percent in the 12 months end- 
ed in July 1984 as the country 
pulled out of the steep recession. 

- Since (hat time, U.S. industries, 
battered by foreign competition, 
have found it difficult to make fur- 
ther production gains. 

This weakness in the manufac- 
turing sector has affected overall 
growth. The grass national prod- 
uct, the total value of the nation’s 
goods and services, grew at a barely 
discernible I -percent annual rate 
during the first six months of the 
year. 

The Reagan administration is 
predicting mat the economy will 
rebound to a growth rate of 5 per- 
cent in the second half of this year. 
But private economists say the re- 
port on industrial production and 
other economic statistics so far for 
July do not support that optimism. 

Prisdlla Luce, an economist at 


Wharton Econometrics, said that 
the weak gains in industrial pro- 
duction should continue for anoth- 
er 12 months 

“We don't expect to see a whole 
lot of strength in the industrial sec- 
tor until at least this time next 
year,” she said. "It will be the same 
story of manufacturing weakness 
as a result of the high dollar and 
imports.” 

Larry Speakes, a White House 
spokesman, welcomed the figures, 
saying, “AU in all. we view this as 
positive news and are encouraged 
that this news will allow the econo- 
my to continue moving forward at 
a steady pace, without the danger 
of drastically increasing prices.” 

The government also said Thurs- 
day that Americans took on 563 
billion more in installment debt 
than they paid off in June. The 
increase was the smallest monthly 
gain this year. 

Analysts said that it could be an 
indication that consumers have 
started to cut back on their pur- 
chases of big-tickel items because 
of the high burden of debt they 
already are carrying. 

Tbe report on industrial produc- 
tion showed the 03-percent July 
gain followed a revised 03-percent 
Jane increase. 

The changes left tbe index at 
124.9 percent of hs 1977 base of 
100. | 


Private banking 
with a Swiss option. 







Aviation Insurance Industry 
Foresees Record Losses in ’85 


' By Leonard Sloane 

Hew York Tunes Service ■ 

NEW YORK —Tbe crash Mon- 
day of a Japan Air lines jumbo jet 
— following two other airline di- 
sasters in the last two months — is 
likely to result in record 2985 un- 
derwriting losses for the interna- 
tional aviation insurance industry, 
according to U& experts. 

"We’re looking at a new record 
in terms of losses,” said John Bren- 
nan, president of United States 
Aviation Underwriters, a consor- 
tium of U3. insurers. "You can 
easily do a little arithmetic and see 
that we’re losing money." 

Tbe JAL aircraft itself was in- 
suredforJ35 million, while liability 
claims by survivors and estates of 

the more than 500 people killed are 

likely to add at least 5 150 million to 
insurance payouts. 

These sums are on top of the 
payment of about $150 million that 
the insurance industry expects to 
make for the Aug. 2 crash of a 
Delta Air Lines Lockheed L-101 1 
in Dallas, and the 5135 million or 
so expected to be paid for the Air- 


India Boeing 747 crash off the Irish 
coast on June 23. Both sums are for 

The Ddtt crLlvkiM 133 pas- 
sengers and crew, all 329 people on 
board the Air-India plane perished. 

So far this year there have been 
eight major civil aviation crashes, j 
and insurance coverage on the val- : 
ue of the aircraft and equipment 
alone has amounted to 3456 mil- 
lion. Those losses — over less than 
eight months of 1985 — already 
exceed the record sain 1983, when 
the amount paid out for hull cover- 
age totaled 5447 million. 

Liability losses for 1985, which 
have not yet been determined, mil 
add at least S300 million, and pos- 
sibly much more, according to in- 
surance experts. In contrast, world- 
wide premiums paid by all airlines 
for hull and liability coverage were 
about 5600 million. ’ 

“This obviously keeps the pres- 
sure on rales,” said Peter O’Grady, 
president of the Aviation Office of 
America, another insurance con- 
sortium. "One would anticipate 
that it would continue to push rate 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 6) 


N ow American Express Bank 
offers you the security, con- 
venience and confidentiality of a 
private account in Switzerland - 
with some important extras. 

To start with, you have your 
choice of a full spectrum of glob- 
al banking services: accounts in 
Swiss francs or other major cur- 
rencies, investment advisoty and 
asset management services, foreign 
exchange, precious metals. And 
all are provided with American 
Express Bank’s traditional com- 
mitment to excellence. 

Secondly your personal 
Account Officer at our Zurich or 
Geneva branches is folly com- 
mitted to handling your affairs 


swiftly, accurately and with ut- 
most discretion. He coordinates 
American Express Bank’s world- 
wide facilities (82 offices in 
39 countries) on your behalf, 
supported by one of today's 
most advanced telecommunica- 
tions and computer networks. 

Our private banking clients 
enjoy still another exceptional 
advantage: access to the world- 
wide investment opportunities 
available through the American 


offenngyou many additional ways 
to protect and increase your assets, 
finally, we not only meet your 


# - J) private banking needs; 
we also provide the 
broad range of personal 
and travel arrangements 
so valuable to the international 
client. These include American 
Express Bank Gold Card® privi- 
leges and our exclusive round-the- 
clock Premier Services^ for the 
personal and business travel needs 
of certain clients. 

As you see, our concept of pri : 
vate banking is truly exceptional 
in many ways. We’d be pleased 
to give you foil details on how 
American Express Bank can help " 
you reach your objectives. 

; Visit or telephone us today: 

. In Zurich, 01/2115520, in 
: Geneva, 022/326580. 


Location of American 
E.\prtis Bank 
offices in -Zurich, 
at Bahnbofstrasse 20. 




American Express Bank 

Exceptional service in private banking 


Amnroi L*i*r*» Riot I. 11 L 
An Amcncm h(»w iumjtmj 


1 






Page 12 


** 


US. Futures 



Season Season 
High low 

Ooen High low 

Aug In 
CIO90 Chg. 

a 

Grains 



WHEAT (CBT) 

5.000 bu minimum- Dollars per Bushel 
TlSl" J-SS'* 5en 2.95’S lto 2 .9Bta fJU 

: 2.JJI-: Dec 307 J.1I 107 111 +jm% 

J.74 j Z93\i Mar H2to lisa- no*, usb ++*% 

i§9 ;■« Wov UK'S 3 AS J01to U4to +JU% 

i J? ^ Jsl. i ul 2 - 80 ' J * ** zm ' m *62 +03 

145 177': Sen IBS +in 

Set. Solos Prev. Sales 9J*J 

Prov. Dor Open int. 39AOO off 273 
CORN (CBTI 
5.000 Du mi 
3J1"5 
3.95 
110 
121 '-. 

IBS 

131m 

Esl. Sales 

Prev. Day Onen Int.IMJOl up 404 
SOYBEANS ICBTJ 
1000 bu minimum- Bailors oer bushel 
7 +* 

*71 
BAS 
*.79 


2-25’. 

Sep 

262 

265 

231V 











Mar 

363V 






Mov 

2.36 






Jul 

268’^ 

2+0% 

268V 


■VO IV 

2_%5 

Sep 







Dec 

2.2A 1 — 






Prev. Sa'es 30579 





Season Season 
High Lom 


Onen High Law Close Chg. 


PORK BELLIES (CME) 

38-000 lbs.- cents oer lb. 

MU 
7*20 
75.40 
75AO 
74 00 

7115 

Esl. Sales 3.951 Prev. Sales 4.737 
Prav. Day Open int. 4.710 


44.05 

Aug 

46 40 

49+0 

46+0 

49+0 

+250 

5727 

Feo 

59.70 

*0-70 

5»+0 

59.95 

*■153 

54.93 

Mar 

5950 

A0JD 

5950 

5973 

+-+S 

SB JO 

May 

60.95 

6105 

60.95 

61+5 

+1.10 

58+5 

Jul 

*175 

6ii0 

*'+0 

*135 

+12S 

57X12 

Aug 

59.75 

59.75 

59+5 

59a 

+1.1S 


Food 


COFFEE C(NYCSCE) 

37JOU lbs.- cents per lb. 

15020 137.00 Sea 136.30 11675 13500 115-04 —5a 

150 A0 137.25 Dec 137A0 137.35 13770 137.71 —61 

147.75 128+0 Mar 139 JO 140.10 13860 13860 —67 

14860 13160 May 14060 14040 13760 13970 —67 

14860 13560 Jul 13765 —65 

14760 13275 5ea 13775 —43 

13860 13860 Dec 13860 —160 

EM. Sales Prev. Sales 

Prev. Day Open Inf. 1163? gtt 304 
SUGAR WORLD II (NYCSCEI 
1 12000 IM.- cents per lb. 


Season Season 
High Law 


Open High Law CtbM Cha. 


73-37 AJ-4 S«a 

73 18 43-34 Dec 

47-14 *7-5 MW 

Elf. Solos Prev. Sol esl 54-308 

Prev.Day Oaen mi732JiO aft 504 

ONMA (CBTI 


47-17 49-17 47-10 67-12 
4846 


$100500 grin- pK & 32nds of 100 PCI 

73-5 

75-11 




74-27 

74-30 




58-30 

Mgr 

73-30 

74 


73-10 


*5 


73-2 

73-2 



Est. Sain 


Prov 5aln 

IX 




— 5 
—5 

—5 


—1 
—1 
— 1 
—1 


Prev. Da v OMn Int. 8,133 up 7 
CERT. OEPOSIT (IMM) 

51 million- pilot 100 PCI 
85.00 Sap 


468 
4.74 
438 
*39 
Esl. Sales 


$i« 

Aug 

561-3 

&J4 

528 

563V 

+JQU, 

559 

Sen 

5.19 

521V 

5.16V 

521 ta 

+.05 

5.12 

Nav 

522 

525 

5.19% 

524% 

T.D4U. 

521 

Jan 

5J0V 

563 

528% 

563% 

+.04% 

560 

Mar 

540 

5.47 

568 

5+3 

+64V; 

56*73 

Mav 

5+7 

5+9 

S+5 

5+0% 

+.04% 

56+.’: 

Jul 

5+9 

552 

$47% 

$51 V 

+65 

535'^ 

Aug 

542 

SM 

S.43 

5+4 

+64 

US 

S» 

5.40% 

5+4 

$40% 

5+4 

+.0* 

528 

Nav 

567 

$41 

566 

5+1 

+M 


Prev. Sates 37JI7 


117.70 

Aug 

123+0 

174+0 

12360 

134+0 

+160 

130+0 

Sea 

12520 

125.70 

124+0 

12S+0 

+.90 

123J0 

Del 

124+0 

12720 

12520 

126.90 

+1+0 

12*60 

Dec 

12920 

130+0 

12060 

129.90 

+120 

12760 

Jan 

13160 

13160 

130 JO 

13160 

+60 

13000 

Mar 

IM.OO 

1M-00 

133.50 

13400 

+160 

13250 

May 

135+0 

135+0 

13560 

73500 

+20 

13460 

Jui 

13760 

11760 

117 DO 

137+0 

4+0 

135J0 

Aug 




1J7+0 


1*760 

Sep 

139+0 

139+0 

139+0 

139+0 



Prev. Soles 9J99 


Prev. Day Ooen int 46607 un 71 1 
SOYBEAN MEAL(CBT) 

100 Ions- dollars per ign 

150.00 

179J0 
18060 
18460 
16360 
208.50 
'6350 
14760 
14160 
16760 

ESI. Sain 

Prev. Da V Open Ini. 40,773 oil 150 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBTI 

oqisarsi Rert- 100 iba. 

11.75 49 94 

31.10 2^35 

J0J7 22J7 

M6S 2147 

7967 3240 

2860 WJH 

2765 2362 

2SJ5 23.0S 

25.15 23.10 

TAOS 23JJ0 ... 

Esl Sales Prev. Sales 11 JOS 

Prev. Dav Open ini. 52615 oil 705 
OATS (CBT) 

5600 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
1.77 1.16to Sep IJJ 164to 162% 164ta +61-17 

1-82^ 164 Dec 1J1 lJJ’i IJOto 1J3 +6280 

16784 16417 Mar IJIto 164% 1.32 164% +6284 

163, 1.27% Mav IJS'-V 1-34 84 1J217 164% +6215 

JJOJi l-381'i Jul 161 to +01 

Eat. Sales Prav. Soles 403 

Prev. Dav Open ini. 3-778 uni 



23+0 

23+3 

2102 

2157 



an 

23+5 

7160 



Oct 

23.10 

2368 

22J3 



Dec 

23.15 

2365 

22.92 

2361 

+2* 

Jon 


2140 

236* 

2140 


Mar 

23*0 

2170 

2120 

n art 



2141 

21*0 

23a 

2150 

—.03 

Jul 

2365 

2140 

2135 



Aug 

23+5 

2140 

ZJ.45 

2145 

+.10 


2320 

2140 

2130 

2325 

+65 


9 75 

2+4 

Sep 




4.1* 


2.74 

OCI 

4+4 

4a 

461 

4J2 



Jen 



470 



364 

Mar 

$69 

$09 

464 

46* 



Mav 




$u 

*.*9 

179 

Jul 

5+0 



563 

$15 

J63 

Oct 

Jan 

$47 

$70 

$40 

5+0 

$7] 

Ext. Sale* 


Prev. Sales 12+53 




Prev. Dar Ooen int. 726U up 1681 
COCOA (NYCSCEI 
10 metric Ions- 1 per Ian 


7415 

19*3 

Sep 

2100 

2109 

2098 

2107 

+ 19 


1945 

Dec 

217* 

2182 

2164 

2175 

+u 



Mar 






2231 

19*0 

May 

2215 


2233 

2235 



ItaO 

Jul 

2245 

2245 

2245 

2255 

+ 17 


2073 

Sep 

2250 

22*5 

2250 

22*2 

+5 









Esl. Sain 


Prev. Sales 2658 





Prev. Day Open Int. 17.751 oH78« 

ORANGE JUICE INYCE1 
15600 ibs.- cents per lb 

18260 13065 Sen 13330 134.75 13330 13460 

18160 127 A0 Nov 127.90 13160 127-75 13060 

18060 12360 Jan 12760 128.35 12760 12760 

17750 12100 Mar 12760 12760 12760 124-75 

162-50 12460 Mav 12660 12660 12M0 12460 

15760 127.75 Jul 124.00 

Eat. Sales Prev. Sales 203 

Prev. Day Ooen im. 4645 un 45 


+.70 

+30 

+30 

—65 


Metals 


7238 

92J? 

*1.75 

9160 

71.15 

9063 

B7.71 

Esl. Sales 


723* 7237 72.16 *2.17 

■« id Dee 71.W 71.74 9138 9138 

8464 Mar 7167 «1J7 9167 7165 

8*43 Jun 70.77 70.77 70.97 #0.93 


8764 Sep 
8864 Dec 
8830 Mar 

Prev. Salas 

Prev. Dav Cinen inr. 2689 
EURODOLLARS (IMM> 

Si mllllon-ptsaf lOOnci. 

*145 


9069 

«03S 

8*62 


7260 

7164 

71.15 

7064 

9063 

7034 

87.75 

Esl. Sales 


8463 Sen 9165 9261 7163 7165 

8460 Dec 7164 9144 9144 9164 

8*10 Mar 91.17 9132 9162 9163 

8*73 Jun 70.74 9061 7042 9063 

87.08 Sep 9038 90J8 9034 #027 

87 JB Dec 87.9* 89.74 8962 B9.*3 


Mar 8961 8763 8961 8961 
Jun 8963 B963 8962 8962 


8764 

w -j _ 

Prev. Safes 33634 

Prev. Day Open int. 12731 7 up 1 
BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

S per pound- 1 polni rauaW M0001 

1.4450 1 6200 Sep 13930 16975 168*0 1 6985 

1.41*0 1J200 Dec 16840 16«00 13770 16875 

1.4140 16480 MOT 1J73S 16850 13730 16840 

I J790 1.1905 Jun 13810 

Esl. Sales Prev. Sales 13.747 

Prev. Dav Onen Int. 41632 an 124 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

I per dir- 1 oalnt eauals 50.0001 __ 

.7585 .7025 Sep .7378 .7383 3371 .7382 

.75*4 .7004 Dee .7358 .734* 635* .7347 

7504 6*81 Mar .7340 6344 .73£) -7349 

.7340 .7070 Jun .7330 -7350 .7330 6335 

Esr. Sales Prev. Sales 754 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 8338 un 174 
FRENCH FRANC(IMM) 

S per franc- 1 point eauals 5060001 
.11720 69*80 Sen 3 1800 

.11450 69470 Dec .11750 

.11425 .11425 Mar .11900 

Eat. Sales Prev. Sales 

Prov. Dav Ooen Int. 1*4 
GERMAN MARK (IMM) 


—.07 
—66 
—65 
— 05 


—68 
—67 
—6* 
— 65 
—64 


+155 

+155 

+155 

+155 


+14 

+18 

+17 

+18 


+100 

+100 

+100 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 
40.000 lbs.- cents oer lb. 


47+7 

50.72 


55a 

5$ 72 

55.15 




53+5 

OCI 






A7.B5 

55.15 


5860 

59.15 

5150 

58+2 

+ 12 

*7+5 

5*60 







*7+7 

5760 

Aar 

60+0 

*0-70 

4060 

*060 


**65 

58.10 

Jun 

*160 

*1.45 

*160 

*1.05 

+ 05 


58-70 

Aug 

*0.10 

60.10 

*062 

*062 

+22 


ESI. Sales 12645 Prev. Sales 15,107 
Prev. DavOoen Int. 43689 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

44600 lbs.- cents per lb. 


7170 

5860 

Aug 

*467 

*640 

45.95 

4*60 

—67 


57a 

Sep 

*560 

*$45 

64M 

*4+0 

-25 

7262 

57.15 

Oct 

*150 

*460 

*145 

*152 

+.15 


5820 

Nav 

*$10 

65 AS 

*5.00 

*560 

+63 

79+i) 

*0+0 

Jan 

66.15 

*6+5 

*615 

*420 

+65 


61.10 

Mar 

*615 

*6+5 

*615 

*625 

+65 

70+5 

*1.15 

Apt 

4*J0 

*6+0 

4620 

6*20 

+a 

*$25 

4120 

May 




6560 

+60 


Esl. Soles 1J38 Prev. Sales 26*3 
Prev. Dav Open ini. 7618 

HOGS (CME) 

30600 lbs.- cenrs per lb. 


54J7 

41.92 

Aug 

4185 

4465 

4175 

4360 

+33 

51.75 

36+5 

Oct 

37.90 

38+0 

37.90 

JB60 

+J3 


39.15 

Dec 

40+0 

41.12 

40+0 


+.40 

50+7 

4065 

Feb 

*260 

42.70 

4260 

4227 

+52 

4765 

3760 

Apr 

3925 

J9+0 

3965 

3960 

++5 

49.05 

40 JO 

Jun 

42+5 

42+5 

4200 

4265 

+.15 

49+5 

4120 

Jul 

4250 

4265 

42+0 

42.72 

+.27 

51.90 

4| ft 

Aug 




41.12 

+52 

41.10 

38.90 

OCI 

3960 

3965 

39.10 

39.10 

—.15 


Esl. Sales 4624 Prev. Sales 4J4? 
Prev. Day Open Ini. 18-433 



PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
option & Strike 

Underlying price Colls— Last 

Sep Dec Mar 


Aug. IS 


12+08 British 


8 Pound 

105 

35.00 

140.15 

110 


1,0.15 

IIS 

r 

140.15 

130 

1060 

140.15 

135 

5.10 

140.15 

Ml 

260 

140.15 

145 

060 

ia.is 

ISO 

r 


Puls— Last 
Sep Dec Mar 


760 

S.10 

r 

260 


*60 

r 

r 


50600 Canadian Dollare-centi par unit. 
CDoilr 72 r r r 

7365 73 0.93 r r 

7365 74 062 r r 

7365 7* r 0.14 i 

*2-500 west German Marks-cents per will. 


r 

r 


0.15 

025 


0.15 


4.10 620 


060 


□Mark 

30 

527 

r 


r 

064 










3625 

31 

r 

r 

r 


r 

US T. BILLS (IMM) 






3625 

a 

r 

4-59 

r 

r 

0.12 

r 

SI million- pts oi lOOpct. 






3625 

33 

a 

r 

467 

062 

024 

r 

9363 

8694 

Sen 

92.94 

92.98 

92+3 

92+5 

—67 


34 

264 

362 

0.07 

068 

r 

9367 

8677 

Dec 

92A3 

92+4 

92+1 

9253 

—.04 

362S 

35 

1+5 

264 

2J1 

0.15 

069 

r 

9259 

84+0 

Mar 

9228 

9229 




3625 

3* 

0J5 

1+5 

r 

0+2 

16* 

r 

9228 

8761 

Jun 

91.9* 

91.9* 

9161 





061 

s 

r 

r 

s 

r 

926) 


Se« 

91+2 

91+7 

91+0 

9150 

—06 


r 

061 

r 

r 

r 

s 


8965 

Dec 

9123 

9123 

9120 

9120 

—06 

12S6M French Francs-lOihs ot a 

»nJ par until. 



9169 

8958 


90.91 





F Franc 

115 

3+0 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

90.93 

90+0 


9070 

90 JO 

90+4 

90+7 


118+5 

120 

r 

r 

3-90 

r 

r 

r 

Est. Sales 


Prev. Sales 7+20 






a 

41 

222 

128 

W 

r 

2L14 

42 

055 

1.13 

r 

43 

0.14 

0+8 

r 

44 

r 

06/ 

0+9 


jYen 
4222 
4222 

ss 

42600 Swiss Francs-cents per unit. 


142 

463 

172 

2.W 

244 

1.90 

160 


SFronc 

3* 

$05 

44.18 

J7 

7.18 

44.18 

a 

r 

44.1 B 

39 

699 

*4.18 

a 

4-20 

44.18 

41 

r 

44. IB 
44.18 

42 

43 

a 

44.18 

44 

054 

44.18 

45 

0+3 


024 

061 


064 

0.10 

026 

061 


0.15 

03* 

067 

123 


060 

0.77 

165 


Total call vol. 9618 

Tola) pal vol. 4,174 

r— Not traded, s— No oof ion ottered. 
Source: AP. 


Call open Int. 
Pat open Int. 


212607 

141611 


*215 

58+3 

Aug 




*165 

+65 

8210 

57+0 

Sea 

AIM 

61 J5 

*160 

*1+5 




Oct 




*1.95 


8425 

58+0 

Oec 

*220 

*320 

*2+0 

*275 

-.as 

44-20 

59a 

Jon 




6365 

—65 

80.00 

59- *0 

Mar 

*465 

*465 

*3+0 

*270 

—65 

7460 

*1.10 

May 

*4+5 

64J0 

*4+0 

4420 

—65 

74a 

*160 

JUI 

*560 

*560 

64a 

*4.70 

—65 

70.90 

*230 

Sep 

65+0 

65+0 

*520 

6520 

—OS 

7060 

*3.70 

Dec 




6$95 

—.05 

>020 

*460 

Jan 




*615 

-65 

*7.90 

4610 

Mar 




*655 

-65 

*760 

65.90 

Mav 




A69S 

—65 

Est. Sam 


Prev. Sales 9654 





74J0 

7060 

76-50 

7340 

*625 

4145 

52.10 


4S6 

45+0 

45.15 

45.10 

4530 

—JQ5 

46+0 

44+5 

4*25 

45+5 

4*65 

—JOS 

—OS 

47a 

4770 

47a 

4670 

47a 

—.05 

—65 


Prev. Dav Open Int. 79627 up 673 
ALUMINUM (COMEX) 

40600 IBs.- cen Is per lb. 

Aug 

43.90 Sep 
OC1 

44.90 Dec 

51.75 Jon 

4*19 Mar 

5X95 May 

4765 Jul 4860 

£160 Sep 49.SO 

Dec 5055 

Jan 50.90 

Mar 51.40 

Mav 5135 5365 5365 5260 
Esl. Soles Prev. Sales 332 

Prov. Dav Open I nl. 1203 Off 40 

SILVER (COME XI 
5A00 iroy or- cents per Irov or. 


48.10 


—.05 
—.05 
—AS 
—AS 
— A5 
— A5 
—AS 


4406 

*036 

AUP 




631+ 

+16 

11836 

5736 

Sep 

4396 

*426 

429+ 

033+ 

+1+ 



OCT 

*4*6 





12306 

5906 

Dec 

*52+ 

AKKtt 

4426 

64*2 

+1.S 

1215.0 

5956 

Jan 

4*06 

*606 

4546 

*50.9 

+1+ 

11936 

4076 

Mar 

4*46 

4*86 

6576 

*59+ 


10486 

4216 

MOV 




*487 

+16 

9456 


Jul 

4836 

*856 

*806 

*7815 

+70 

9406 

*416 

S«p 

*916 

*956 

4916 

40BJ 

+22 

7996 

4*06 

Dec 

7106 

7126 

7086 

7056 

+75 

7896 

*786 







7706 

*776 

Mar 

7256 

7276 

7256 


+76 

7286 

4936 

MOV 

7426 

7426 


7346 

+36 

ESI. Sales 


Prev. Sales 12+92 



Prev. Dav Open Ini. 72613 uallO 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 Irov or- dollars per trovax. 


27460 

27560 


30*60 

30460 

30460 

30560 

+060 

39360 

25060 

Oct 

30460 

307a 

30250 

30560 


373 50 

257a 

Jon 

30A+D 

31060 

30560 

307a 

+7.00 

329a 

2*4+0 

Aor 

311 a 





31360 

27360 

Jul 

31400 

31560 

31460 

31560 


345a 

303+0 

Oct 




320+0 

+720 


Est Soles Prev. Sales 4669 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. 12628 up 133 
PALLADIUM (NYME) 

100 troy os- dollars perox 

14125 9060 Sep 107.00 10760 105.75 10660 +160 

Oct 63 

14160 7160 Dec 106.70 10860 10660 106.90 +160 

17760 7120 Mar 10760 10820 10760 106.70 +160 

1 14.00 91.50 Jun 109.10 +160 

10560 10560 Sep 107.10 +160 

E it. Soles Prev. Sales 507 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 7609 up *0 
GOLD (COMEX) 

100 tray ax.- dollars per Irov ox. 

Aug 332.50 33460 33160 332.70 +4.10 
Sep 33460 33460 33250 33460 +420 
Oct 334.00 33860 33100 33420 +420 
Dec 33860 34260 33760 34040 +420 
F«b 34460 34*60 34IA0 34420 +420 
Apr 34*60 34960 34460 349.10 +*20 
Jun 35060 35360 35060 35460 +4J0 
Aug 35760 35960 35860 358.90 +430 
Oct 35960 3*760 35960 3*460 +430 
34920 +42C 
380.10 +430 

38560 +430 


48560 

29160 

Aug 

331 a 

31 5 JO 

Sec 

49360 

297a 

Oct 

489a 

301 a 

Dec 

485-50 

30*60 

Feb 

49*60 

31470 

Apr 

435 JO 

320a 

Jun 

428a 

331 a 

Aug 

39SJ0 

33560 

Oct 

39360 

34260 

Dec 

374M 

assa 

Apr 



Jun 


EH Sale 


Prev. Sales 25660 


Prev. Dav Oden Int. 128322 up 178 


Financial 


Prev. Dav Open Int. 38.1*2 
10 YR. TREASU RY (CBT) 

SI 00600 prln- pis & 33nds p(100 Pd 


88-21 

75-18 


85-29 

B6-B 

85-22 

85-27 


87-13 

75-13 

Dec 

84-31 

85-7 

84-22 

8+2* 


84-2 

75-14 

Mar 




83-30 

+1 

85-7 

7+30 

Jun 

83-11 

83-11 

B3-2 

83-5 

+1 

8+4 

80-7 

5co 

82-20 

82-20 

82-11 

82-14 

+1 

83-11 

80-2 

Dec 




81-25 

+1 


Esl. Sales Prev. Sales 1*293 

Prev. Dav Open In). 42.901 up 415 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 

(8 Pct-5100600-prs & 32nds Oftoo pet) 


79-12 

57-10 

Sep 

7+11 

7+20 

75-31 


78-13 

57-8 

Dec 

7+7 

75-14 

7+2* 

7+31 


57-2 

Mar 

7+7 

7+15 

73-1* 

73-30 

74-4 

5+29 

Jun 

73-9 

73-15 

72-29 

72-30 

75-31 

5+79 

Sep 

72-15 

72-20 

72-2 

72-4 

7+24 

5+25 

Dec 

71-17 

71-19 

71 ■* 

71-11 

7+15 

5+27 

Mar 

7M0 

70-28 



7+2* 

*3-12 

Jun 




*9.31 


—5 

—5 




+614 

+635 

+33 








+470 

6*45 

+6*8 

+34 




3705 

•3*84 


+35 


Jun 





+3* 

Est. Sales 

Prav. Sales 33643 





Prev. Dav Open ini. 54.90* of 1 75a 
JAPAN E5E YEN (IMM) 

5 per ven- 1 point equals SOA00001 

004268 .003870 Sen 604230 604239 604317 604228 +17 

WU350 003905 Dec 604248 6042SB 004341 604247 +18 

0WM7 604035 Mar 004270 004275 .004270 604270 +17 

EH. Sain Prev. Sales BJ34 

Prev. Day Open Ini. 32+62 alt 1647 

SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

S per Irene- 1 pelnl eaualiSOAdOl 

6830 6480 Sep .4411 A435 +391 +432 4*4 

+449 6531 Dec +450 +477 +430 +473 +70 

+480 2835 Mar +500 +520 6470 .4515 +70 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 20+87 

Prov. Dav Open Int. 33647 UP 747 


1 I industrials I 

LUMBER (CME) 




ikUN0bd.tt.-s per iagbd.it. 




197a 

13060 

5CP 132.70 134a 

130.90 

132-00 

—130 

18*10 

131a 

NOV 133a 13560 

131.70 

131.90 

-73KJ 

iB>a 

138J0 

Jan 139.70 14160 

I38J0 

i38a 

—230 

195a 

14$20 

Mar 147a 14860 

14530 

I43J0 

— 1JD 


isoa 

Mav 15130 15390 

T5OJ0 

151 a 

—230 

18360 

i$5a 

Jul 15*30 15*30 

i54a 

13*90 

—240 


150-50 

sep i*aa i*aja 

laOJO 

i«oa 


Esl. Sole 

1+9* Prev. Sales 1+77 




Prov. Dov Ooen Ini. $722 




COTTON 2(NYCE) 




506a lbs.- cenrs oer lb. 




77a 

57a 

OCT 58 JO 59a 

5862 

5890 

+30 

7360 

S8J* 

Dec 59.19 39a 

59.10 

5944 

+J1 

7*75 

59.13 

Mor *020 Ma 

*0.15 

40.40 

++5 


5925 

Mav *040 6000 

AUD 

4973 

+S3 

7065 

59.10 

Jul £0.10 6*35 

*061 

*043 

++3 

*sa 

54 JO 

OCT 5560 5570 

ssa 

5535 


5965 

5115 

Dec 54a 54AS 

5413 

5443 


Esl. Salet 


Prev. Sales 11*7 




Prov. Dov Open ini. 19+50 off 71 




HEATING OIL (NYME) 




42600 gal- cents per gal 




7*45 

**90 

Sep 74+0 74a 

7190 

7448 


77.10 

67+5 

OCT 7560 75+0 

7465 

7538 

+67 

7555 

68J0 

Nov 75a 7590 

75-35 

7SJ6 


7*25 

*9.15 

Dec 7*65 7*45 

75+5 

7*44 

+JS 

7+90 

6900 

Jan 7*25 7*75 

7*25 

7*75 

+J0 

75a 

7000 

Feb 7550 7*00 

75+5 

7590 

+40 

7100 

4860 

Mar 79711 79IK 

72JD 

72a 

+.10 

74a 

*860 

Apr 7050 7050 

7030 

70+5 

+.10 

*aa 

i860 

May 




Esl Sales 


Prev. Sales *250 




Prev. Day Open Int. 24+38 




CRUDE OIL(NYME) 




1600 DDL- dollars per boi. 




29a 

24a 

Sep 2762 28.10 

27a 

2865 

+62 

2?a 

24A5 

Oct 2737 2762 

27a 

27a 

+64 

29a 

24+0 

Nov 27a 27a 

27a 

27-ffl 

+64 


2190 

Dec 2*00 27.15 

2*79 

27.10 


29a 

2*38 

J«n 2*50 26-93 



+60 

29a 

2*25 

Feb 2*35 2*A4 

2*31 

2*64 

+63 

39a 

24.13 

Mar 2*00 2*43 




29a 

23.93 

Apr 2568 2*10 

25a 



27.9* 

21*5 

Mav 25+5 2*00 

25+5 

2*00 


2*70 

2178 

jun 25+4 2575 

2542 

2SJ5 

+61 

Est. Sales 


Prev. Sales 12.771 




Prev, Day Ocen Int. 5*955 




1 1 Stock Indexes 1 1 

SP COMP. INDEX (CME1 









19860 

16060 

Sep 188-30 18865 

187a 

187a 

—MS 

20065 

175J0 

Dec 1*065 19130 

18960 

190.10 

-M 

20175 

190.10 

Mar 191*0 19160 

19240 

192.90 

—65 

20*a 

19505 

Jun 19*60 19*60 

19515 

19560 

— J5 

Esl. Sales 55A37 Prev. Sales 51.1*2 




Prev. Dov Ooen int, *3615 




VALUE LINE (KCBT) 




paints anti cunts 





213a 

I65J5 

Sep 20060 20135 

199.10 

200-00 

—a 

2i7a 

200.00 

Dec 2IMa 204*0 

202a 

20340 

—a 

209a 

204J5 

Mar 207a 207X0 

2D740 

20*65 


Esl. Sales 


Prev. Sales 4307 




Prev. Dav Open int. 1)6*7 oft 251 




NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 




PolnH and cent? 





11865 

9165 

Sep 109a 10935 

10845 

108-80 

—65 

117a 

ioia 

Dec 110,93 Ilia 

110.10 

11040 

—45 

118J5 

wa 

Mar 112a 112a 

ma 

11265 

-45 

12060 

11175 

Jim 11430 11430 

11430 

113-70 

—45 

Est. Sales 

8689 Prev. Sales 10,933 




Prev. Day Open int. 9,954 up 235 



I 

1 Commodity Indexes 1 


Moody's. 
Reuters. 

DJ. Futures. 


Close Previous 

908 JO f 898.20 f 

1,698.00 1.699 JO 

115.83 115J9 

Com. Research Bureau. 221.70 220.50 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - finol 
Reuters : base 100 ; Sep. 18, 1931. 

Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1974. 


Ijondon 

Commodities 


Close 

High low Bid Ask 
SUGAR _ 

Sterling per metric Km _ 
Oct 12*60 119.00 11940 12060 

Dec 12*00 12260 12360 12460 

Mar 13760 13260 132*0 13X00 

£Jov 14060 135*0 13540 ]3*M 

Au« N.T. NT. 14020 1*1 JO 

OCT 147*0 147*0 14*60 14420 

volume: 2*80 lata of £0 Ions. 

COCOA 

Sterflog per metric tan 
Sep 1.718 1.708 1,710 1.711 

1,727 1,712 1617 1218 
1,736 1,725 1,728 1J30 
1.750 1,741 1243 1644 


Jug. 15 
Prev loos 
Bid Aik 


12560 125+0 
12960 12920 
137+0 137*0 
14020 14060 
14*60 14*60 
14860 M9*0 


Dec 

Mar 

Mar 

Jir 

Sep 

Dec 


1263 1.7S7 1,757 1658 
1274 1,7*8 16*8 1.749 
1.779 1,774 1,774 1,775 


1,714 

1217 

1232 

1247 

12*0 

1,772 

1,774 


1678 

1.714 

124* 

1.775 

1,795 

1621 

1625 


1215 

1218 

1233 

1248 

12*5 

1.773 

1.775 


1*80 

1215 

1.748 

1.780 

1605 

1629 

16*5 


Veiume : 2650 lots of to tans. 
COFFEE 

Sterling per metric Ian 
Sep 1*98 1*71 1*88 1*91 

Nav 1235 120* 1230 1.724 

Jan 1270 1.743 1.7*8 1.750 

Mar 1.792 1279 1.770 1JB0 

Mav 1607 1600 1285 1J90 

Tty 1625 1620 1270 -K» 

Sap N.T. N.T. 1620 1630 

Volume: 2*55 lots ot 5 tons. 


GASOIL , , , 

u.s. dollars per metric len 
See 23425 23125 23360 23360 231.00 23125 
Oct 7»JS 23060 23160 231.75 22960 229.75 
Ngv 73225 227*0 23160 23125 22725 23060 
Dee 2322 5 231.00 231.75 23225 23925 23060 
Jon N.T. N.T. 23060 23Z00 22860 23060 
Feb N.T. N.T. 22560 23560 224.00 228.00 
NUT N.T. N.T. 2 1 B 00 230i» 218 00 32108 
API N.T. N.T. 21960 219.75 21B60 21960 
May N.T. N.T. 20860 23X00 20560 22560 
volume: 1689 lots ol 100 tans. 

Sources: Reatarmna London Petroleum £*■ 
change t amain. 


STOCK I'SS ISS 

DeVne- Holbein ^ 

International n» « 1/2 

Giy-Cbick 

International nv 3*a 

Quoies as of: Aupusl 15. l^Sc 


Investors seekine above average 
capital gains in global siocfc 
markets can simp!> write us a 
note and (he weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
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Telephone: 101 11 20 260901 
Telex: 14507 firco nl 


AcScxn 

Commodities 


A ug. IS 

HONG- KONG GOLD FUTURES 
U66 par ounce 

Close Previous 1 
High Low Bid Ask Bid Aik 
Aug _ N.T. N.T. 32860 33060 32560 32760 
Sep- N.T. N.T. 32960 33160 32560 32760 
OC1 _ N.T. N.T. 33160 33360 32760 32960 
Dec _ N.T. N.T. 33560 33760 33160 33360 
Fob _ N.T. N.T. 33960 34160 33*60 33860 
Apl _ 34560 34560 34460 34*60 34060 342m 
Jun _ 348.00 34860 34760 351.00 34560 34760 
Volume: 23 lals at 100 ax. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U++ par nance 


Prov. 

Low Seme same 
N.T. 32860 32&50 

N.T. 330.10 32a.® 

N.T. 33260 327.70 


Aug . 
Sep - 


High 
N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

33*60 33460 33*60 334.10 


Volume : 75 lots of 100 oz. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malay lion cents per kilo 

don 

Bid Ask 

Sep 18450 184.75 

Otf 183.50 184,50 

NOV 184,50 185*0 

Dec 18460 IB560 

Volume: 7 lots. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cants per kilo 
Close 

BM ASk 
RSSISea— 1*4.75 1*565 

RSSlOct- 1*2-75 1*X» 

RSS 2 S«P— 1M.75 1*0-75 

RS5 3 Sap— 57.75 158.75 

RSS 4 S«P_ 15X75 155.75 

RSS 5 Sap— 14865 150.75 


Previous 
Bid Ask 
184 JO 15465 
1 84 JO 184.75 
184 JO 185 JO 
185-50 18*60 


Previous 
BM Aik 
1*2.75 1*365 

I *065 14165 

15860 15960 

15*60 15760 

15200 15400 

14700 14960 


Aug . 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malaysian ringgits per 25 tons 
close 

BM Ask 

- E*P. — 

- 830 870 

83! B70 

820 B70 

820 8*0 

„ 810 E*S 

or 810 850 

fly 800 840 

V 790 840 

volume: 0 lots of 25 tans. 
Source: Reuters. 


Oct - 
Nov , 
Dec . 


840 

830 

830 

B20 

820 

010 

810 

800 

790 


BSD 

870 

870 

870 

8*0 

8*0 

850 

840 

840 


S&PIOO 
Index Options 


Aug. 15 


Strike Coth-Lost 
PrK» Ml Ut Od Ml 

in - tin ns. — 

i» »>4 r; k < 

M 1 7'l*3vt 54 * 

1H vto IS.-|*77 , l»l'+ 
IS* t/T* Ik 1S.H l'-I 

i*j in* m* <- li.i* 

jn _ i/i* Mt ■. 


PHS-Lcat 

in kt Da in 

- 1/1* V - 

in* 4 in* in* 
•a 14 73>im 

Jik Jh s svi 
Ik t n I'-, 
ll'i U*i 13* — 


Total Call rtkiine 126*73 
Tbmi rob ooen mi 7*4+7] 

Total oul nWr* 17*43 
Toco' oui noai lax 4S453 
Indti. 

HW 1 81 82 LOv 1HU) Close UI.17- OS 
Source: CBOE. 


| Uwidon l>letols { Cash Prices 


Aug. 15 

Close Previous 

Bid Ask Bid Ask 

ALUMINUM 
Sterling par metric ton 
Soot 727 JO 72860 73860 73960 

Forward 75060 75050 7*060 76160 

COPPER CATHODES (High Grade) 

Sterling per metric ton 

Soot 1021 JO 1022.00 1 02060 1021.00 

Forward 104*60 1044JO 1045.00 104560 

COPPER CATHODES ( Standard J 

Sterling per metric ton 

Spot 99360 99S60 99560 99860 

Forward 102060 102560 102060 102560 

LEAD 

Sterling par metric Ian 

5POt 299.00 299 JO 30460 30*60 

Forward 29760 29760 29860 79960 

Sterling par metric tan 

Soot 350060 350560 35*260 35*460 

Forward 357060 357560 3*2760 3*3060 

Pence par troy ounce 
Starting per metric ton 
5001 442.00 44260 44260 44260 

Forward 4*460 4*560 4*460 4*560 

TIN (Standard) 

Sterling per metric Ion 

SMt 911560 912060 9151.00 915360 

Forward 908160 908260 9)1*60 911760 

Sterling per metric ton 
Soot 53060 52060 53460 53560 

Forward 52660 52760 53760 53860 

Source; AP. 


DM futures 
Options 

K Cermap /Mrt-nStOtmartx cents rarmorit 


Aug. J5 


Commodity and Unit 
Coffee 4 Santos, in 
P rlnlclotti 64/30 38 Vs. vd _ 

Steel billots (Pin.), Ian 

Iran 2 Fdrv. Phi la. ton 

Steel scrap No 1 fivv Pitt. , 

Lead Soot, lb 

Cooper elect, lb 

Tin (SlraJts), lb . 


Zinc E. St. L_ Basts, lb . 

Palladium, ox 

Sliver N.Y. ox 

Source: AP. 


Thu 

Year 

Ago 

162 

143 

oa 

DJf 

97100 

472a 

213a 

2isa 

72-73 

tut 

19 

28-22 

14-49 

*4-44 

*2913 

*24«4 

041-47 

48-50 

102.104 

132-127 

*305 

7a 


Company 


Baltimore Ba 
Bonponca Coro 
Champion Inti 
Enargas 

First ot Amer BL 
Fort Howard Pooer 

Frozen Food E+ 

Fruehout Corn 
KOI Cora 
Natl Haalin 
USLIFE Incm Fd 


069 069 085 
SJ* 09* 1.21 

' 168 


.Aug. 15 

SMM Cau-Setn Pot+Setlla 

Price Sen pec Mar Sep Dec Mar 

M 266 26* 3+1 062 035 068 

JS 1+4 VO US — — -- 

36 0.71 lil 117 

37 028 1.15 1+8 062 1+4 

38 009 0JS IJA 1J3 208 

39 — 062 063 — - 

Estimated total voL 9697 
Calls: wed. voL 123* oeon lot. 38+94 
PUN : WOL VOL 1682 oaaa Urt. HIM 
Source: CME. 


.Aug. IS 

Prev 

Otter BM Yield YMM 
34nonltl 737 735 760 732 

*-monlh 7+j 7+C 761 731 

One yeor 769 757 B.'5 863 

Source: Salomon Brothers 


Inflation Slows in Sweden 

Reuters 

STOCKHOLM — Sweden's 
consumer price index fell 0.1 per- 
cent in July, after a fall of 0 J per- 
cent in June and a rise of 0J per- 
cent in July 1984, the government 
said Thursday. 


Per Amt Pay Rec 
INCREASED 

Q .12 \1 10-1 9-15 
O -25 9-27 9-13 
Q .13 10-9 9-18 
- 32 9-11 8-28 

Q 35 10-25 9-27 
Q +* 10-25 10+ 
O JIB 9-1B 8-2* 
O .17 to 11-1 9-30 
O 0* 9-19 9-3 

a 64 8-23 8-15 
Q 33 9+ 8-26 

SPECIAL 

USLIFE Incm Fd . .14 9-4 B-2* 

STOCK 

Frozen Food Ex _ 25PC 9-18 8-2* 

STOCK SPLITS 
Baneonce Caro — 3- for- 1 
Fort Howard Paper Co — 2-tor-t 
Frozen Foods Express Indus — S-for+ 
Thetmedics Inc— 4-For-3 

USUAL 

ACCO World Core 
AfuerUrusr Core 
Anthem Electronics 
Barnwell Indus 
Belden & Blake En 
Coil Industries 
Current Incm Shares 
Dallas Core 
Eastern Co 
Family Dollar St 
Florida East Coast 
Fremont General 
Genl Instrument 
ISS inrtsvc 
Mark Controls Cara 
Macro Caro Lid 
Pioneer H Ml red 
PNC Fuel 
Pre-Med Caotlal 
Roadwov Services 
SAB Harmon Indus 
Safeguard Bus S vs 
Salewa, Stores 
Science Mngim 
Security Amer Fme 
Society Core 
Soo Line Cora 
5tcaan Co 
UW Energy Res 
USG Core 

washlnatcn Energy 
Wheeling & Une 


O .12 to 18-10 9-30 
Q +D 9-13 639 

- 62 to 9-27 M3 

Q 65 9-30 9-* 

□ +5 9-30 8-31 

Q 6* to 9-30 9-13 
Q 37 to 9-13 W0 
D .1* to 18-2 9-1 B 

□ 35 9-1* 8-30 

0 65 10-15 9-13 

□ 64 9-27 9-13 

□ .12 16-31 9-30 

O 6* 9-3 16-2 

Q .03 9-27 9+ 

a * 9-30 9-1* 
Q .18 10-1 9+ 

Q 33 9-10 8-10 
Q -33 10-1 9-* 

- .10 to 9-10 8-38 
a .65 11-1 10-15 
s 64 V 10-15 9-38 

Q 67 Vj 10-1 9-19 

- M 9-30 9-3 

O 62 to 9-13 9-3 

S 65 11-15 11-5 
Q +6 9-1* 9-5 

Q J8 10-31 10+ 

Q .17 9-15 BOO 
Q +2 10-1 9-6 

> +2 9-15 8-27 

- +4 9-1* 8-30 

Ql+3kt 11-1 10+ 


jrAMOOl; M- Monthly: Q-Guarierlv: 5- Semi- 
Source; UPt. 


Kffi 5 UP X3 DATE WITH 

BtsMEssreonE 

E/CH WH3hE5DMf 
A'JDrtSDLY 94 THEHT 


Hirsda^ 

MSE 

dosing 

Tables indude the nationwide prices 
UP to The ckulng on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


12 Month 
High Low Stock. 


Dlu. YU. PE 


Sfc. 

UlOsHfgn Low 


dose 
Quw.Chge 


(Continued from Page 10) 


art 234k PHH 160 26 U 

47V, 31 to PPG 1+0 3+ ID 

31 to IS PSA +0 22 20 

23to 13U PSA dpi 1.98 96 

l+3» U’i PocAS 1J4 10.9 

20’+ 13’*. POCGE 164 106 7 

W< 31*k PocLto 363 76 13 

29to 23H PcLum 1-20 46 18 

id 5to P oc Res SOe + 12 
19*, 13to PaeRspflOO M6 
17to I2to PocSd +0 27 11 
82 k, bOH PaeTele ST! 76 9 
13’- 9'/, PacTln +0 36 8 

31to 23**1 PadlCP 232 8.1 8 

3* 299. PocttPt 467 113 


— 





Rtwer 


35% 

34% 

35% + V 

37% 

24 

Rorer 

1.12 


44 u, 

44ta— 1 




28 

27% 

27% + V 

*2% 

4* 

RovID 

367e 


20% 


17 


Roy int t 


14ta 

14 

14% + V 

55% 

37% 

Rubrmd 

.96 





14% 

RussBr 



43 

43% + W 


15% RusTeg 

36 

atto 

78 Vi 

28ta 

KC 

19 

RvCmH 

ia 



8% + ta 





IBta 

18ta 

18b + V 

■ ll 

17 

Rylond 

M 

15% 

15 

15 — V 


8% 

Rymer 



43 ’.k 2»to PotoWb 
34 to 2*to PelnWp(2J5 
39 334, Palm Be 12) 

40to 28 to PonAflk JO 
B*k 4 PanAm 
4 IX, PanAwt 
21 13to Pandekn JO 
4ito 32to PanhEC 230 
8 JH PaniPr 
19*k IM Poprctt 
ISto 9to Pardvn 
21 to Tito ParhEI 


21 17 
06 

36 33 
1.9 11 


+01 


920 
315 
34 
21 
22*38 
874 

1J 23 *8 

66 11 387 
35 *554 
15 *88 

4*5 

10 


103 
15 
215 

120 73*k 73 Vo 7Sto 

lb 131k 13 13H + 

295 28'.k 28to 285k 

14 34*h 3415 344k — 

299k 28«* 2834—1 
28to 28 U, 28U> — 
34to 34to 344k— 
375k 373* 37V — 
7V 7to 74k — 
3to 3<A 3to + 
17 l«k l*to + 
34 33V 33to + 

8 T.k 7V — 
194k 19to 191k — 
io*t to 1 -* law, — 
13 13 13 








SV. 

5 

5ta + 






77 

33ta 

33% 

33% 

70 

14% PorkPn 

a 

3J 

4* 

SS 

19ta 

18% 


7 to 

1% PatPtrl 



4 

424 

2% 



li’k 

11% PavNP 

64 

46 

14 

71 

13% 



23% 


1* 

.9 

1* 

879 

18 

















111 

% 

% 


58% 




13 

580 

53% 

53% 





4.9 

9 

2123 




27to 

22 'a pa PL 

25* 

106 

B 

251 

25% 

25% 


4il% 

31 PaPLol 

460 

11.7 


1103 

38% 



78% 

57% PaPLPt 860 

11.9 





29% 


110 


12 

29 



77% 


11.9 


130: 70% 

70 


saw 

23% PaPi.Oor3.2S 

116 


11 

28 



31 ta 

25% PaPLOP(33S 

12 2 


18 

30% 




55 PaPL pr 

oa 

116 


170: *8 



nffi 


230 

S3 

13 

182 

39% 

38% 



20 Penwpf 

ia 

*6 


35 

23% 

23% 

23% — 

50 


230 

4J 

19 

413 

46% 

4* 

46% + 

18% 

lOta PeaoEn 

120 

74 

7 

308 

lAta 

15% 



244k 1455 PeoBv 3 
*0to 39to PepsiCo 1-78 
JOto 214k PcritEI M 
914 7to Pnmlan 


18 9* 214k 21 vs 21*k 

11 10 1824 57!k 57V» 571k — 
21 14 473 2*4k 2*4k 2*4k 

1.17*14 J 7 102 M M Bto 


26% 



.28 

1.2 

17 

189 

73 

22% 

23 + 

44 




36 


144 

37% 

37ta 

J7ta — 

28% 

24% PeiRs 

JJ2el44 


42 

2* 

25% 

25% — 


14 





II 

14% 

l«Vk 

16% + 

A% 

2ta prrinv 

■95e28.I 


40 

3% 

3% 

3% 

53% 

331k Piter 

148 

31 

15 

2*50 

49ta 

4Sta 

48ta — 







205 

22 

21% 

2I% — 


34 


sa 

94 



Etta 

52U 

53ta + 








41 

40 Mi 

40**1 — 

16% 

11 

PhtkiEi 

230 

146 

* 

1968k 15% 

15% 

ISto 


31 23 to PhllE of 180 123 

3a Vi 25Vk PhllE P( 4+0 129 
37to 2*14 PhllE pf 4+8 110 
67 to 51 PhllE Pf 875 117 
Uto 9 to PhllE of 1+1 111 
lOto 7to PnllE Pf U3 113 
10’k 74k PhllE Pf 1 3& 136 
{■26 100-r Phil pt 17.12 146 

74 54fe Pul IE pi 9 JO 112 
*0to 454, PhllE Pf 760 111 
*0 45Yi PtlllE Pf 7.75 115 
23<4 15to PhllSub 162 d + 12 
95to 72Vi PhliMr 4.00 
2Sto 13=to PtUlpln 40 
1814 11'/, PhllPts 160 
24 221. PhlPtpf 164e 4+ 

28 to 201k PtlllVH +0 1+ 11 
351k 23b PMOA 5 38 

34 24to PleNG 232 
25 to 141k Pier 1 v 
5*to 3*to Pllsbry ' !J* 

34 271. Pioneer 164 

+5Vk 29to PlmvB 1 JO 
90 *1to PltnBpf 212 
13to 9to Pltlstn 
8*h PlonRs 
7 Pkmtrn 
84k Playboy 
I9to P laser 
2714 14 to PoooPd 
33to 24to Polorld 
21 16M Pondrs 

2lto IS'A PBOTol 
22V 14H Portec 
217k 14to PortGE 
24«k 181k PorGPf 
351k 30 PorGPf 
J4Sfc 29 PorGof 
38Vi 28 PotllCh 
34 22 PotmEI 


25V: IBto P rein I 5 
40 28to Primrk 
20»s )41* PrtmeC 
35 to T6to PrlmMs 
59 to 50to ProctG 
1B>4 9Tg PrdRsti 
47to 34 to Prater 
24to 17Vk PSvCol 


l**k 

Uto 

Uto 

39 


lOOOz 31 31 31 

ISta 34 34 34 

Ittt 36 3* 3* + 

2502 45V: 64 44 

33 urn loot in* 

141 101k 10 10 — 

43 94fc 9to 9(k 
I0Z122to 122to 122 to +1 
*Ox 72 72 72 +1 

7602 59<k 5714 59to — 
lD0z57to 57to 57Vi 
39 2ffto 20to 20to + to 
4.9 10 3482 82to BDto 8IM1— lto 
25 13 51 24to 24 24 — to 
8J 8 *174 114k llto 114k— Ik 
443 24V# 235k 23Tk + to 

104 24H 244k 244k 

904 32 31 to 32 

10 30to 30Vi 303k + Vi 

65 23to 234k 234k + to 

801 S14k 51 to 514k 

30kx24fe 24to 24to 
434 41to 404k 404k + 16 

Ifl 82 82 82 + '* 

180 17to llto 12 

34 15to 15to 15to + to 

19 10to HP* 104% 


9 9 
7J 9 
I* 
36 12 
&1 S 
29 II 
2 * 


JO 13 17 
■l*b 1J 15 


ioto 

26 

9 

Bto 

51 

*3 

Bto 

ISto 

17 

2446 

2!to 

22 

lBVk 

194» 


«to PSInd 
20 PSlrpt 
i PS l n pf 
dV, PSInpf 
38to PSInof 
45 PSinpt 
3to PSvNH 
7'1 PSNHpf 
7to PNHpfB 
II PNHpfC 
9to PNHPIO 
946 PNHpfE 
84fc PNHpfF 
0*k PNH pfG 









40 ta 

30% Source 

330 

8 3 






70to 

20% + ta 

23 V. 





33 



i4ta 

|4ta— to 

25% 

rwxm 

fin 


ia 

12122 

308 

31% 

30% 

31% + to 


F?B??rT«Tl 

248 

96 

12 

« 


25 

no 

11% 

11% 

11%— H 




24 

10 

a 



47 

18’* 

17% 

IBta + % 


24 soetBk 

160 

3+ 

10 

M 

16 

38 

72 

72to 

Z2to 

22to 


6% SoetPS 

2.131316 

40 

1.90 

9J 

8 

*02 

19% 

19U 

19to— to 



till 

E 11 

8 

2a io.9 


* 

24 

23% 

23% — to 



162 

94 

A 





33% 

33% 


17% SalnGss ia 

7* 

fl 

462 12+ 


a 

33% 

33% 

33% + to 

44. 

30to SNETI 

2.72 

*5 

11 

1 V. 

46 

13 

82 

33ta 

.17% 

32% — % 

37to 

31% SON E ol 



2.1* 

76 

9 

2A* 

31 

30% 

31 + % 

SOta 

41% SoNEpt 

f'l 

Ol 


4a io+ 


life 43ta 

43 

43 — to 

27ta 

22to SoRypf 

2a 

9.9 


6* 

1+ 

18 

145 

34to 

24% 

24to— to 

31 

2«to SoUnCo 

IM 

*1 


260 


R 

390 

.19% 

18% 

39% + % 

39to 

24% Soutlnd 

iTl 

2.7 

10 



14 

3483 

19 

18 

IBta — % 

16% 

llta So Roy 

17 

.9 

13 

m 

J 

99 

174 

33 

32to 

33 + to 

8% 

6ta Soumrk 

a 

23 

6 

2M 

*5 

15 

7053 

S7to 

57% 

57% 

31 

16% SwAirl 


3 


65 

20 

77 

142 

17% 

1A% 

17% + % 

18% 

11% SwIPor 




140 

34 

13 

11 

41 ta 

40% 

41 

18to 

10% SvrtGos 

1.74 

69 

8 

2a 

9.1 

9 

*93 

23Vk 

21% 

22 + to 

B8to 

*2V» SwBen 

*00 

IA 

8 

2.10 104 


11 

20V. 

20 V. 

20V. 

29 

19% SwEnr 

a 

1.9 

11 

ia n.i 

11 

271 

9 

8% 

9 

28% 

ISto SwtPS 

la 

7.9 


aa 146 


aoz 25 

24 to 

24to— l 

17% 

llto Span on 

32 

3635* 

164 126 


1300z 

Bto 

8 

Sto + ta 

27% 

15% SpeCTP 





1.08 115 
7.15 14+ 
152 143 


29to 20'6 PSVNM 


as 


106 


IS 10’/, PSEGor 1+0 9+ 

39 28>k PSEG Pt A08 116 

40to 30-e PSEGPf < JO 116 
49 '6 J7», PSEGPf 538 113 
23to 17to PSEGPf 243 10,9 
K»Vk 94'-k PSEG pn 225 113 
«Bto 534k PSEGPf 7+0 116 

80 *9 PSEG at 9+2 TIJ 

4 to 24k Public*. 

5to 9'6 Puebla .1* 1.1 12 
94k 6 PR Cem J 

17 ioto PuoetP 136 113 8 

21M 13 Pultettm .12 6 19 

32 20Vi Puralat +41 36 

IQU 7 Pyro 9 


8 8 8 

500z 49to 49 49 + 4* 

300Z 59to 59V. 594k + 4k 
534 8 7to 7to— to 

700x 14 154* 1* + 46 
2 1646 1*46 1*46— V, 
14 24to 24to 2416- to 
12 214k 214% 214k + to 
43 22 22 23 

1 ioto iHto iBto— to 
*1 301% 19% 20 + % 

KBS 2*to 24to 2*4k + to 
3847 22% 29to 29to + to 
5 144% 144% 144k + to 
200x 37to 37V. 37to +• to 
200i 39 39 39 + to 

759: 47 47 47 — to 

2 22to 22Vi 22V. + to 

lOzlOH 108 108 

100x 67 *7 67 +116 

5Hz85to IHto B5to + to 
14 ft M 2to— Ik 
43 14to 144k 144k — 16 
10 «4k 64% 6to 

380 15% 151* 1516 
43 14to 144% 144% + to 
175 21Vk 207V, 21 +1% 

131 746 74k 74% + to 


30Vk QuakOs 134 
1*4% OuakSO 60 

*to Ouanex 
344* 24’+ Oumtar 1+0 


25 13 711 504% 494% 494k — 16 

46 10 1323 21 to 20 20 —lto 

21 40 Bto 71% 81k + to 

5.1 11 177 311k 304* 31to + % 


26to 14% Qfc Ret I 34a LI 14 138 22 21to 2144—1* 



Earnings 

Revenue and profits, in millions, are In local currencies 
unless otherwise tno/coted. 


Britain 

p lesser 

IstQoar. 1985 

Revenue 3333 

Pretax Net- ^JJj 
Per Share-. 06305 


Day co 

3rd Quar. 1985 


Revenue . 

Net Inc 

1984 Per Share 

J Men ms 

Revenue 

Net Inc. 

Per Share— 


426 

0634* 


22 *+ 

3+3 

0+8 

7985 

6*8.9 

8+4 

1,16 


1984 

22*5 

3-31 

0+5 

1984 

*59J 

KU5 

157 


Canada 


Fairchild Industries 

2nd Dear. 1985 1984 

„ „ . Revenue— 19*6 197+ 

Dome Petroleum Net me. (a)82J 7J4 

2nd Ouar. 1985 1984 Per Share— - 0J1 

Revenue 5*M Min 1st naif 1985 1984 

Profit 2JM (al*76 Revenue 380+ 392J 

lit Half jm ,'S? MnA 

Revenue—. 1JW. 1600. Per Share— — 031 

Net Lacs - 216 1016 o: toss. Quarter nets Include 


o: loss. 


Traders Group 

lit Halt 1?85 1W4 

Revenue 3346 3117 

Profits. 751 BJH 

Per Share — 1J0 152 


Denmark 

Nova Induslrl 

2nd Ctaar. . 1985 
Revenue— 16576 

Profits 157-72 

Per Share— *J4 


loss 0/ SSL! mnUonn vs vain 
ot SIM million tram rBscamn- 
ued operations. 

Fit Fed S&L sth Carol. 

«th Qoar. 1905 1984 

Doer Nat 035 15* 

Oner Shore.. 0.13 059 

Yaw 1985 1984 

□oer Net 0J1 (o)35 

Oner Share 068 — 

a: loss. iKUnets exclude tax 
credits ef SSS9M00 hi ouarter 
and 0/ SS97JH0 In rear. 

IntT Harvester 

1985 1984 

8856 8646 

2kii mo 

031 0.11 

1985 1984 

2+40. 2J9a 
826 446 

05* 027 


9123 3rd Quar. 
1*2.1 Revenue — 
635 Doer Net — 
Doer Shore— 
1608. 9 Months 
319JB1 Ppvenwe — 

12+0 Doer Net 

Oner Share- 


Long Island Lighting 

2nd Qoar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 4*25 -033 

Netine. 119+ 1025 

Per Share 089 0-73 

12 Months 1985 1984 

Revenue 2640. 1,900. 

Net Inc. 4*82 4085 

3+6 362 


Called Slates 

Amstor 

Year 1985 1984 

Revenue 1 J10. '370, 

NeMnc. — 292 392 

its* net Includes provision of Per share. 

SV million. 

NVF 

1985 
— 322+ 

65.9 
037. 

lit Half 1985 1984 ]|?J 

Net Lose 115 328 SSTfft ^ (alf*+ 

Qvoiw nett Indutii § pravi- ooer share QJU 

9 tens ot SJ.l mutton vs ^ 

SJAiMO and gains Of SAT mil- 

H*n*SU2M afSME* 


2nd Quar. 

Broadview Financial Revenue- 

2nd Door. 1985 1984 ^»er Net 

Net Lou 3.74 2+0 


Ooer Shore- 


1984 

ivin 

(a HU 


57V, 57“j RNYotA 6+1*115 
541* 44% RNY ptB 3+4e 9.7 
34to 24to RenBk 1+4 52 
24to 15% RShCflt 
32 to Z2to Revca 
!4to 9to vIRever 
Mto 32to Revlon 
241% 21% Revlnpl 

24'A 171, ReKhm 
17 111, Rererd 

32% 2*M Rem Ins l+O 
41V, 27to ReyMJi 160 
38% 2*4k RcnVek 
29 17i., RleaeiT 


32 

60 


164 


•7% 

"Sto RirrOVn 






44 to 

2* 

Roman 

ia 

24% 

to 

Robins 



14% 

RochG 


47 Vn 

79to 

RochTI 

244 


77% 

Raekwt 


rsa 

55% 

RonmH 

260 

r^tTl 


Rohr In 


77ta 

Uto 

RoJnC/n 

.a 




12% 

0 

Roillris 

4* 

3% 

2 

Roman 



13% llto Rvmerptl.17 


23 57% 571* S7U, — to 

13 56 56 5* +1to 

91 32% 313k 313*— to 

15 ~ 112 21*k 21 211k + to 

12 24 1278 25% 249k 25 — to 

2 9* 143k 14% 14% + to 

4.1 1411950 45% 44to 44% —1 

9 25% 25 25 + to 

JO 36 15 a 23’* 23 23% -» , 

6 II 11 28 15% 141* 15% + % 

5.1 A <73* 27% 27% 27% + to 

2.9 0 534 34to 34% 34to + to 

1+8 19 13 3732 38% 3*% 371* +1 
901 46 31 22% 22% 221k 

9 3* 4 3to S%— to 

35 8 20 34% 34 34 — to 

56 118 28to 2714 271* — % 

799 11% 11% llto + % 

93 6 2297 22% 22% 221k + % 

*+ |Q 275 379k 37% 37% + % 

26 10 1345 40% 39% 40 — to 

U 11 119 *7 M% **lk — to 

10 90 59% S»H 59% 

1+ 30 74 25V* 25 25 + % 

+ 25 1174 27to 24% 27 + % 

19 17 487 12 111k llto + to 

43 2ta 2 2% + to 

45 1* 84 14to 14% 141k— to 

12 1* 1107 33% 331k 33to — to 

1+ 50 1070 8% Bto 8% + % 

5.1 7 3434 *0% *0to *0% + V4 

17 791 14% 14to 14% 

II* 54 53% 53%— to 

43 21% 21% 21% — % 

18* » 194* 20 

144 2ff% 28% 28 V, 

293 281k 28 V* 28% + to 

532 Mto 3* 2* — V* 

AS 18% 17% 18% + to 

33 12to 12% 12% 


1+ 18 
14 
36 10 
35 II 
11 11 
35 1* 
5 


54% 37% SCM 260 1* 13 

12% 9% SL lnd 22 16 10 

324* 19% S PS Tec a 2+ 14 

194k 15 Sabine 64 J 35 

21% li SatHlRv 25M14+ 

20to ljto StgdBs 60 1+ 17 

11% 5% SfgdSc 31 

2% lto starts wr 


453 3*to 55 55 

13 ‘ 


+0 1.1 24 
MO 
52 

1.72 >5 
120 10J 


.1* 5 15 


164 

52 


36 10 
3 9 10 
14 
12 9 


38% 23to Safaris 

34% 24% Safewv 

35 24% Saga 

23 1*% StJOLP 

11% 9% SPaul 

«% 3% vlSatant 

354k 24% ScllleM . _ _ 

54 SI SadMPf 3+2t *6 

28% 19 SDIeGS 224 1* 9 

94k 6% SJuanB- .92* 96 11 
494* 31 Sonar 5* 1+ 18 

25% 20 SAnltRt 1.94 79 13 

35% 23% SF0S0P 160 12 14 

4* 28% SaroLte 1+4 3+ 11 

35% 29 Sgtwel 1+0 19 1* 

19% 14% Saul RE 2D 1.1 4 9 

22to 15% SavElP 1+0 82 7 

23% 16% SavE A Mi U 

9% 5 Savin 

13 to 9% Serin Of 150 116 

28% 19% 9CANA 2.16 83 

52% 33 SchrPto 1+8 

49 V* 34% ScftJmh 12D 

13% I SdAtl .12 

33 22% Scoalnd J* 

*1% 48% ScotFet 

44% 28% S coftP 

1*% 12% Scoftva 

43% 23to Srevlll 

45 23% SeaCnt . _ 

13 10 SeaCtpi \M 11+ 

16% 12% SeaC ufB 2.10 132 

1 *% 13% SeaC pfC 2.10 132 

27% 17% SraLnd +8 22 8 

5% 3% SeaCO 
44% 35% Saogrrn 

21% 13 Seagui 

314k 22to SeolAJr +4 

32% 22% SealPw 160 

*5% 45% SaarleG 160 

39% 29% Sears 1J* 

31% 22% SecPac s 04 

18% 11% SetaLI 

40 26% SvcCub +8 

lAto 11% Shaklce 

2*% 15 Shawln 

39V* 29% SIMltT 
30to 174k 5hetGkl 

40 25% Stirwki 

8% 5>k Shoriwn 

16% 12 Shawbt ... 

19% 13% SforPac 1+6 
44% 28% Signal 160 
44% 41% Staid wd 
*5 524* signlpt 412 63 

41 2*% Singer +0 1.1 9 

33% 27% Slngr pf 3J0 105 

IB 124k Skvllne +8 3+ 19 
2*4* 20% Slattery M 
15% 7% SmHtiln 32 
71% 50% SmkH 260 
79% 42'* Smuckr 168 
41% 31to SnapOn 1.1* 

15% 12% Snyder 
43% 30% Sonet 
19% 13% 5anvCP 
30to 22% Soo Lin 


11% 114k 114* 

17 30% 30to 30% 

139 15% 15% 15% 

157 174* 17% 17% + % 

786 19U 184* llto — U. 

37 11 104* 11 + to 

1* 2% 2 2 

.. 287 35% 344* 35 + Vk 

5.1 10 4385 314* 31 to 31%— % 
26 12 54* 26% 26 M% + % 

W 20% 20% 20% 

a 11% Uto llto + % 

110 5% 54* 5% — % 

409 32% 32V* 32% + % 

100 52% 52% 52% + % 


*99 26% 26% 26% 
T10 9% 9to 9% 

317 35% 35% 25% 
124 * — 


244k 34% 24%— to 

940 314* 31% 31% — to 

1237 40% 39% 39% — % 

35% 35to 35% + % 

19 19 19 

194* 19% !?%— % 

20 % 20 % 20 % 

746 7% 74k + 4k 

. 12% 13% 12% + to 
_ . 270 26% 25% 24% + to 

3+ 13 170 47to 464k 47U + % 
32 10 3537 37% 36% 36% — % 
9 18 *70 13% 12% 13% + to 
2+ 14 1313 31% 31% 31% — to 

10 1712 59to 57% 58% — 1% 

492 41% 414k 41%— to 

120 13% 13U 13to + to 

4 42to 42to 42to + to 

1204 36% 35 36 to— T to 

12% 12% 12% 

15% 15% 15% + to 

15% 15% 15% + to 

a 21to 21%— % 

4% 4% 4% 


32 

7 

43 

5 

323 

16 


10 

22 

*0 

818 

129 


60 26 11 1106 4046 40 40to — to 


19 
1+ 17 
36 8 
16 18 
56 0 

46 7 


25 17V. 17to 17% — Ik 

159 314* 30% 37% +1% 

343 2*4* 26to 26% — to 

276 *5 *4% *4% 

3151 39% 35 3Sto + Vk 

932 28to 27% 274S— to 

2* 18 IS 18 

16* 39to 38% 39 + % 

247 14% 14 to 14% + to 

42 24to 24 24 

zni 374* 37to 37% + to 

249 26% 26 Vk 26% 

39% 39 39 — to 

7to 6% 6%— Vk 

124* 12% 12% — Vk 

, 18 17% 18 + Vk 

2+ 1* 15*5 41% 41% 41% — % 

734 41% 41% 41% — % 

9 *3 61% 61% — 4k 

438x36% 36% 36% — % 
7 k 33% 324k 33% + % 

92 134* 134k 13to 

5 25% 25% 25% + % 

399 lto 8% 8% + to 
42 10 3230 66to 65% 66 —1 

15 17 38 73 72% 7Z% — to 

115 39 384k 384k 

U 15% 15% 15% — to 

820 34to 33% 33% — % 


+8 12 18 
22 46 22 
AO Li 1 
2J7e 62 7 
60 11 * 
.72 2+ 13 
9 

+0 46 12 
92 9 


XI 19 
36 


511 

112 

10 

M3 


„ 36 13 
260 1X1 15 
260 59 8 

-T5e 16 12 
120 42 22 


358 ISto 15% 15% — Jfa 


1.92 

152 

764 

126 

60 

56 

32 

360 


56 

168 


1200115 
.12 36 


25 T 
X9 a 
2 + 12 
2 + 13 
66 8 

26 10 
3.9 10 
32 11 
32 10 


-76 

76 

120 

120 


34% Sperrv 

38 30% Springs 

43% 3SV: SouorO 
72% 45 Sotiibb 
24 17% Staley 

23% imstBPnt 
20% II SIMotr 
50% 39% SMOOtl 
23% Ota StPocCs +0 
16% 12% Stondex 52 
31% 23% StonWk 
35% 25% Storrett 
llto 9 StaMSe 

3% 2% 5tacge 
20% 15 Stercht 
12% 9% StrtBcp 

34% 24%, SteiiDg 
23% 15% stavnj 
34 26% StwWm 1+8 

12 8% SlkVCPl 160 

45% 35% SioneW 1+0 

39 24 StotieC +0 _. 

51to 36% StapStlp 1.10 29 8 

21V 16Vk SlorEq 152 9+ 14 

12% 2 vIStorT 

08% 38% Starer 
21% 17% StrtMln 
19% 14% SfrMRt 

74* 3<b Suavsi 
39 26 SunCh 

17% 64« Sun El 

52% 43% Sun Co 
108V 904* SunCpt 
49to 40 Sundstr 
llto *to SunMn 
7% 7 SutlMpf 1.19 159 
38% 33% SunTrst 
23 14% SUPrValU S 


77 27% 27% 27% 

44 38V 38% 38V + to 

10 23% a 23 

T 24% 24% 24% — % 

29 27% 27 27 

61 42V 42% 4214 

78 3T% 30% 31% 

169 7% 6% 6% 

1855 24% 24% 24V* + to 

1470 20% 20% Kto + to 

167 23V 23to 23% + to 

219 41V 40to 41V +lto 

3 38 a a — to 

771 (ft 51 49% XV2 + % 

2 26ta 26to 26% + to 

74 20to 20to 28% 

1066 37 36to 36V + to 

127 13% 13% 13% 

. 7B0 Bto 7% I 

19 1723 29V 28V 28V— % 

124 12% 12% 12V 

in 18 17% 17% — to 

465 B1V Slto 11% + % 

84 27V. 26V 26V 

221 23% 23V 23V + % 

232 15V 14 V 14V— 1 

53 21% 21% 21%+ V 

46 8 2249 48% 47% 48% — V 

4+ 13 12 33V 32% 33V + to 

56 10 HOT 37V MV 37 — to 


**78 
15 13 


84 

19 

2*1 

SOI 


X 8% Tonkas 
53V 2* TootRoI 
52% 24to Trtfimk 

17% 10 ToroCo 

5 1 Tosco 

17V Bto Towle 
10V 6 Towle of +4 

41V 25ta TOVRUS 
BU 17% TWS 52 
33 8% TWA . 

1* 12% TWA Pf 265 146 

34% I Bto TWA afB 125 4+ , 

32% 24V T reran 1+4 f* 13 

21% 16% r ranine 222 116 

14 10V TARItv 160 LI *2 

Slto 1SV TmCdant.12 19 g 

57 1 * 44 Transco ii*o *3 10 

Mto 57V Tmscpt 367 76 

25V lOto TranEx 13* 'V , 

13% 8 Tmnscn _ . . 1 

85to 63 TrGP Pt 4+5 8.1 

102 B2 TrG Pf 10J2 1U 

9* 77% TrGP Pt 8+4 92 

25to 22 TrGPOl 2J0 HS.1 r 

13% 4% TrnsQh ‘7 « 

36to 99to Tronwv 160 55 9 1006 
41V* a TmwM +8 12 W 

23% 12 TwtdwtA 

34% I*ta TwM pt 260 *2 4 

49 to 31 to Travler 264 4+ 10 1418 

Uto Mto TravPt 4.16 76 

27% 22 Tricon 352e13+ 

30 21to TrtCn ot 1» «.l 

22to 7% Trialns 20 6 6 

31V 22% TrlaPC 160 35 8 

49VS 29 TrBxine 64 1.9 I* 

6% 4 Trlcnfr +9e 9.1 7 

8% 5% Trico 60 36 13 

1BV % Trlntv -SO 15 

25to ITto TritEng -10b 5 36 

14% 8% TrttEPl 1.10 8 + _ 

43% 30to TucsEP 360 7.9 9 
16% 9V Tultex +4 19 17 

19 16 TwWDs JO 43 10 

M TvcoLb 60 SJ 10 


O nr. YU PE 

r - W 2+to »»»- *• 


1SV :3T + to 


’A 


£ 'i 5% 3% 

44 ioto 10 10 

1 Bto 4to 0?; 

SB S5 iwl lit + to 

M 34}. Mi- 

149 


17V 13V Tylers +0 26 11 


2*V 2BVi 28% — to 

2W 2DU- to 
fi’.j IWl it% — 

i$ l , ir-» +> 

AA 45V, 45% 4-1 

. u 54to 55 +■' 

1*3 21% 21 % 

58 BV 8.« _fto— - 
502 831k 83to 82%— % 
2A100 100 100 +lto 

fl% »3% 93% , 

7 24'» 74to 3‘to- ? 

a it 10V 10V— 

32V 31% MV +1 V 

4O 39W 1*** + ft 

S2 S5= % 
g!S §*; Si - % 

27% 27 'J 27%— + 
M ISto 32% 24% +2". 

44 2Bto Bto 28V. *■ to 

277 4* 45 «Sto — % 

« 5% S’- S% + % 

27 Ato 6% + * 

1183 14% 14% 14% 

74 20 i««J!5'tE 

A 17V 12'1 17V *■ 

352 30 37V 37% 

52 15% 15% If** . . 

17 191k 19 19 + J* 

176 38V 38% 38% + % 

39 14% 14% 14'** — to 


97 

1 

1527 


99% 35% UAL 
36V* 2* UAL Pf 
17% 9to UCCEL 
30 29V UDCn 

24to 17V UGI 
I1V ffV UNCRes 
14 Mta URS 
38V 71% USFO 
44V 36% USG 1 
19% 12% UnlFrst 
110V 80V UnINV 
41V 31% UCamo 


160 16127 
2+0 76 

1* 

264 92 II 


+0 

120 

1+8 

20 


3690 96% 55% ST*— £ 
752 34V 34 34V — % 

117 15 UV MV ’* 
9* 27V Wto 27to .. 
01 22 71V 71%— to 

1*0 lOto 10lk lOto- to 
— .> 30 12% 12 , ITto 4- % 

6+ 49 188* 34% Jfto . -u 

7 427 38% 37% 38% t I* 
* 16V 16% 16% + 

*S 105 104% 105 + Vk 

550 fflft atk M% + V 


32 1* 


_ 12 14 

5J6e 56 10 
1+4 42 13 


7% 4% UnhmC 

19V 13Vk UnElee 164 V+ 

3t 25% UnEIPf 460 112 
40 29V UnEl pt 460 122 

34V 25% UnEl PtMAiH 125 
72 SI UEIPtL B60 11 J 
a a unEi pf 2JB 116 
20% 14% UnEl Pf 113 112 
2*% 21 UnEl Pt 3L72 HU 
a 48 UnEl Pf 7+4 11+ 
23% 22 UtlE+pn 
53V 37V UnPoe 160 36 11 
115% 87V UnPcpf 725 6+ 
71% 12% Unlrovl ..18 6 13 

70 50 Unrripf 060 13+ 

5V 3V UnltDr 
2DV 10V unBrnd 10 

l*V 9% uBrapf 
31% 16% U CO TVS 51 


56% 32V Uncurb 3+0 65 13 7499 S2% SVk 53 4- to 

133 AUb Adi 6*4 . „ 

7 2161 19% 19Vk Wi + % 
2003 35to 35V 35 1 * +■ to 
100, 37 37 37 — % 

» 31% 31V 31% + % 
1500x navj 68V: Aflto 4- to 
42 36% 25% 25V 
5 19 19 I® ■“ 

U 2*to 2SV 2SV — % 
SOI *4 64 64 4-1% 

248 23 22% 22% 

787 48% 47V 4S — V 
48 109% into 109% + v 
374 21% 21% 21% , 

78x 60% 59% 59% — % 
18 JV 3% 3% 

101 19V 19% l»V + % 
118 15V 15% 15% — % 

_ „ .... . _. 74 31 to 31% 31 ta 

40V 22% UnEnrg 2+8 62 3010257 fOto 39V 40to f % 


a% 11 V U Ilium 260 9+ 

21V UIIUlpl 3J7 112 

18% 12 Ulllupr 220 1Z4 

*1% ®V Ulllupl dJM 132 

14% 13 Ulllupf 1.90 mi 

a 15% Unlllnd +0 2+9 

43% 15V umtinn 32 5 36 

47 28V, UJerBfc 156 1+ 10 

16% 11% UldMM 

3 2 UPkMn 

38% 26% UsalrG .12 
Bto 5V USHam 
42% 37% USL+as a 

40V 23 US Shoe 66 

31V 22V USStBCJ 120 . 

55% 49V USSHpl *6lel(L8 
142% 115V USS1I pr!2J5 9+ 


31V 24% USStl Pi 225 
39% 32V USTott 1.72 
84% AD U 5 West 5-77 
13 6% Unstck 

45 a UnTeai 1+0 
39V 31V UTchof 255 
25 18% UnITel 1J7 

2 a nv uwr ia 
33% 21 Unltroe 30 
70% 15V Unlvor 60 
2B 21% UnlvFd 1.12 
73Vt 17 UnL+of 160 
53 7AVk Unocal LTD 
122% 52 Uplohn 25* 

43 25 USLIFE 1.04 _ 

10% 8% USlfeFd 168ald2 

2i% 20% Uto PL 232 9J 13 

27% 22% UtPLPf 260 10+ 

78% 27% UtPLPf 2J0 105 

20 16to UtPLPf 264 HU 

27 16% UtIUCa 1.40b 53 8 

23 10% UrllCapf2+t 112 

24V 18V UlllCanr2+l 112 
35V* 29% UIIICo Pt 4.12 122 


141 21% 2T« 21% 4- % 

3 30 30 M + % 

300r 17V 17V 17% + to 

9 30V 29% 30’* 

49 T4% 14% 14% 

75 24% 24 24% + VS 

10 42V 42% 42% 

83 46V 45% 45V— % 

74 13% 13ta ISto + ta 

39 27k 2% 2% + % 

364 33% 33% 33% — V 
457 7 6V 6?k— to 

31 35% 34V 35% 1- % 

. - 327 36 35% 36 + ta 

4.1 18 2484 29% 29ta 29%— V 
951 55» 55% 55% 4- % 
43 133% 132 113 — V 


11 

1 

+ 7 


23 10 
2+ 14 


75 1092 30% 30 30 

4J 11 911 35% 34% a 

7+ 8 1551 77% 76V 77 + V 

19 17 7% 7V 7V— ta 

3+ II 1842 41V 41 to 41V 4- to 

66 245 37% 37 37 

8J 8 209 22W 71% 22Vi + to 

66 12 29 1 Bto 18% 18% 4- % 

« 23% 23to 23’+ — % 

15 19% 19% 19to * to 

5 25% 25% 25% r to 

127 22% 22ta 22to 

32H5 28% a 28% — % 

492 113% lllto 111%— % 
244 36*k 36% 36% — % 

18 10% 10to 18% + to 

460 25 24% 24% 

2 0, 1. n/ ii AjQA 

dnl 6NTP «no 

57 27to 27to 27to + % 

2 19V 19V 19V + % 

92 24% 24% 24V + VS 

1 21V 21V 21V 

5 23% 23% 23%— to 

8 33V 33% 33V + U 


3 15 
42 7 

4+ 10 
45 8 
42 7 
2-3 21 
29 10 


*53 70 69V 

530 am Tovi 
213 23% 23% 23% 

76 12to 12VS llto — to 
2039 46% 46 4*Vk + % 
213 20% !9to 19V + % 
47 13% 13% 




t s s 

33 33 
» 


36 10 
65 9 


6+ 17 

»9 

37 9 
26 13 


+0 5 

62e 45 
a 43 43 

+0 1+ 12 

230 4.9 10 
225 23 
160 36 12 


13ta— to 
av 29%— to 

as Bto * a 

37 3% 3to 3to 

15 20 19% 19%- to 

42 UV 11% 11V + to 
46 12 2207 30% 29V 29V— % 
55 13 157 22to 21% 21V— to 

“ 45 26to 26U 26% 

200z 11% 111* 11% + to 
34 43% 43to 43U + % 
ia 29% Mto 29V + Ik 
1816 38% a 38% — ta 
132 20 19% 20 

308 2% 2% 2% 

2*7 86% 86 B6to + to 
47 18V 18% 18% — ta 
54 18V Wto 1BV + to 

43 5% 5to 5to 

38 34V 34% 34ta — % 
78 lOta 10 lOto— to 

952 471* 46% 47 + to 

1 96% Mto 96to — % 

_ 749 % 47V 47V 

54 12B4 6Vk 6% 6to 

626 7% 7% 7to— to 
238 34% M 33to — to 
508 19V 19% 19% + to 


41 

22% 

VF Carp 

1.12 

2.9 

10 

142 

39 

a 

38 ta— to 

14% 

5% 

Vat ere 




782 

11% 

li 

11 — ta 

25% 

14 

Vaicr pi 

344 146 


35 

24% 

24% 

24% — % 

4to 

2% 

Voteyln 




a 

3 

2% 

2to — to 

2Hta 

19 

Von Dm 

.92 

40 

7 

15 

23 

23 

23 

4 

2ta 

Varco ' 




182 

Sto 

3% 

3to + ta 

4*to 

26% 

Vartan 

36 

6 

20 

633 

30% 

30to 

30% + to 

13% 

9% 

Vara 

M 

36 

34 

95 

12% 

12ta 

12% — ta 

25% 

17% 

Veecs 

AO 

2.1 

15 

137 

l«ta 

19 

19ta + ta 

12 

3% 

Vende 



19 

73 

9to 

9ta 

Ota — V. 

11% 

9% 

Vests# 

1600100 


13 

im 

11 

11 

Slto 

29ta 

VtoCDtn 

48 

10 

22 

A*2 

49 

48% 

49 + ta 

49to 

36to 

VaEPpf 

5a 104 


20z 48 

48 

48 —lto 

73to 

55 

VoEPpf 

762 IDA 


50z 72to 

72to 

77to 

91% 

71to 

VaEPpf 

965 106 


530x 89% 

88 

I9to+ito 

73 

57 

VaEpfJ 

762 11.1 


3Dx«9to 

Wto 

Wto — to 

*8 

53 

VaEPpf 

7a ii6 


10z«5ta 

65V. 

ASta— % 

70% 

53 

VaEPpf 

745 106 


260c U% 

*8to 

68% + % 

27% 

13to 

vi shays 



17 

23 

25% 

34to 

25 + V. 

45% 

38% 

Vornad 



12 

10 

42% 

42to 

42to 

03% 

46to 

VulonM 

2a 

36 

13 

357 

85 

83to 

84% +1% 


w 


96 

3.1 


+ 24 
16 16 

U 16 
41 7 


1+ II 
26 10 






i 

- 





4 Bto 


AO 

1.1 

13 

331 

44% 

e-in 

43ft— W 



























43* 

4Jto 

43% + % 











2Vto 

RCA pf 

sa 

9+ 


3i0z a 

37 

37 + to 







F-]ji 


M2 

/V% 

RCA pf 

*a 

46 


2 

ms 

#9% 

99to + V> 





14 


iFZI 



as* 

27to 

RCA p# 

2.12 

69 



31 ta 

30% 

31 + to 










38% 

31 to 

RCA of 

3a 

96 


56 

37to 

37to 

37to 










9% 

Ata 

RLC 

a 

23 

14 

1S9 

av. 

8 

• 










4% 

3 

RPC 




32 

4% 

4ta 


■ 








1 

19U 

12% 

P.TE 

36 

36 

10 

57 

19% 

IHto 

lBTk + % 




— 




■ — — 


Uto 

Bto 

Rodice 



II 

35* 

Uto 

14% 

14to + % 

50% 

30ft TDK 

37c O 


22 




4*to 

ata 

RalsPur 

ia 

24 

■4 

1214 

4Vta 

41% 

42ta + VI 

34% 

25ta TECO 

26* 

76 

9 

733 

30ft 

30ta 

30ft— ft 

8ta 

5% 

Romod 



56 

930 

7!» 

Tto 

7% 

12to 

7ft TGIF 






9ft 


21V. 

14% 

Ranco 

64 

4.7 

IU 

19 

IB 

17% 

IB + to 

21% 

12 TNP 

1-25 

46 

9 

29 

IHto 

18% 

18% + ta 

7% 

2to 

RartgrO 




1014 

4 

3% 

3ft — to 

2*% 

llto TRE 

ia 

*1 

1* 

242 

74% 

23to 

24W + % 

/ato 

51% 

Ravcm 

44 

+ 

27 

148 

74to 

75% 

75% — % 

81% 


sa 

36 

11 

96 

77 

75ft 


I/M. 

9to 

Ravmk 




14 

12% 

ISto 

12to— to 

7ft 

lto TocBtKir 




33 

3% 

m 

2to 

53% 

J*ii 

Rayfhn 

ia 

36 

12 

1010 

49% 

49% 

49to— to 

B7ta 

52to ToftBrd 

1.14 

\A 

1* 

149 

81 

79ta 


llta 

7% 

ReodBt 

A0 

M 


4V 

7% 

7% 

7% 

19% 

12to Tallev 

-I0e 

3 

14 

1*4 

19ft 

IHto 

19to— to 

l*% 


BltRef 

1 J2el04 

10 

2 

12% 

12% 

12% + to 

21% 

15 Talley pfia 

43 


22 

1 L J 


21ft— to 

17’« 

a% 

RccnEq 



II 

l» 

10% 

lOta 

iota — % 

81 

541k Tcmhrd 

3a 

46 

14 

97/ 

EZ1 


7* —3% 

ITto 

7to 

Redmn 

60 

15 

14 

73 

Bto 

8to 

aw 

3* 

23% Tandy 



1* 

2208 

33ft 

33ft 

33to— ft 

12% 

Bta 

Reece 



35 

43 

Uto 

llta 

llta — to 

15% 

12ft Tnavcft 



13 

IA 

ISto 

13ft 

13ft— ta 

lto 

to 

Regal 




*4 

■)» 

to 

% 

Mta 

S4to Tefcfmx 

un 

1+ 

14 

072 

*1% 

*7% 

*3 + Mi 

43% 

27to 

RelehC 

a 


13 

B9x 37ta 

37 

37% + ta 

5ta 

2Vk Tricon. 



4 

10 

3ft 

3% 


10% 

4to 

RepAtr 



* 

2352 

10% 

lOto 

18% + ta 

302% 229% Teldvn 



10 

*3 251 248% 249% — % 



Rep A wt 




133 

27k 

2% 

2% 

24 

14% Teirote 

J2 

16 

22 

504 

17 

14ft 

14% + Mi 

12% 

5to 

RpGvps 

a 

15 

9 

74 

8% 

Bto 

ato— to 

48ta 

29to Telex 



10 

128 

40to 

J9ft 

40 Mi — Vk 


33% 

Rcpny 

1+4 

3+ 

8 

151 

44% 

4*to 

44to + ft 

40ft 

29ft Tempm 

+4 

1.7 

9 

250 


36% 

34% — to 


45% 33VS Tetmco 2.92 73 14 2418 40% 39V 40 — % 
104 ta 91 Tencpr 1160 10+ 4 icu IM im 

34% a Terdvn 12 695 22V* 22% 22% — to 

15 9% Teaaro +0 4.1 356 9% 9% 9V 

27VS 20% Tesorpf 2.16 96 113 22% 22 22to— to 

40W. 33% Texaco 3JW 8+ 37 aw 35% 3SVi 3SV 

38V 31% TxABc 152 4+ 9 8 Slto 31U 31VS— to 

4*% 30V TffltCm 156 46 7 1679 Mto 32% 32to 

2A% Tex Esl 220 *+ 8 2443 33to 32to 33% 

58% 52 TxETof 664el0J 34 5&to 56U 56to + to 

34% 25 Tex lnd 60b 26 13 13 28to Mto Mto— % 

147V 86% Texlnst 260 26 13 S3S 100 98%98V + to 

1996 3 2% 2to— V* 

12 10 3220 15V 15to ISto— % 
BJ 7 777 29% 29 2*to + to 


160 


35 11 
99 
20 

36 16 


3V 1 Texinl 
23% 15% TexOOk 
a?k 23% TmrtJtli 
4% 2 Texfl In 
59V 30% Textron 
llto svs mock 
34% ISto TnermE 
43% Mto TtnnBet 166 
T9to 13V Thom In +8b 36 10 
24 13% TlunMad +0 2+ 10 

m* 17 Thrttty M 11 13 
24% 13V Tfdwtr 
10to 5% Tloerin 
61V % Time 
23% 14V Tlmplx 
Mto Mto TlmeM 
HVk « Timken 
9ta 4% Titan 
UV nkThonpf 160 8.7 
39to 26% Toasnp 1-32 41 
21% 15V ToWxnj +8 £5 
21'* 14% TalEdlt 252 12+ 
2Vto 24% TalEdnf 172 114 
30% 22V3 Tot Ed Pf 375 113 
28 20V TolEdPf 147 111 

33% 25V TolEdPf 428 13+ 
20% 14% TolEdPf 266 137 
18% 13% TolEdPf 221 12+ 


JO 63 
160 


51 4 3V 3 V — to 

503 52% 51V 52 

12 H W 9%— to 

354 Mto 33V 34% — ta 

321 3*to M% 36% — % 

a 17V 17% 17V + V 

ST ISto 15% 15% 

364 19V l«to 19% 

119 Uto 14% 14%— % 

1T40 6V 6to 6% 

840 59 SOW 58%— M 

17 171 a 19% a + % 

166 2+ 15 1284 51% 51% 51% + to 

160a 3J 23 47 49% 48% 49% + % 

257 7to 7% 7to 

8 llto llto Uto 

19 32% 32% 32% + to 

S3 19 18V 19 + ta 

666 20% 20V, 20% + to 

33 27% 27V 27V + to 

M 28% 28% 28Vk— ta 

3 24% 2SV» 2AV5 

6 a 31% 32 + % 

3 18% 18% 1B%— Ik 

13 17% 17% ITto 


Sole* floored are .unofficial. Yearly titan* and laws reflect 
the previous 52 weeks plus the current week, but nol the forest 
trading dov. Where a sotlt or stock dividend amounttng to 23 
percent or mare has been Paid, the year's hlgh-taw range retd 
dividend are shown for 'the new stock only, unless otherwise 
noted, rotes of dividends are annual disbursements based on 
me idlest declaration, 
a — dividend ateo extra (s). 
b — annual rate of dividend plus stack dividend, 
c — liquidating dividend, 
eld — called, 
d — new yearly law. 

e — dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 months, 
a —dividend In Canadian funds, sun ecr la 15V non-residence 
tax. 

J — dividend doctored of ter spIHup or stock dividend. 

I — dividend paid .this year, omitted, deterred, or no octlan 
taken at latest dividend meeting. 

k — dividend declared or Bald Hike year, an aceumutattve 
Issue with dhrideitas in arrears. 

n — new Issue In the past 52 weeks. The htah-low range begins 
with the start of trading, 
nd — next day delivery. 

P/E — prlcc-earnlngs ratio. 

r— jftrichmd declared or paid In preceding 12 months, pmt 
stack dividend. 

— stock split. Dividend begins with date of spilt 
sis— sales. 

— dividend paid In stack tai preceding 12 months, estimat e d 
cash value on ex -dividend or ex-distrlDutMn date. 

— new yearly htah. 

— trading hotted. 

ri —In bankruptcy or receivership or bring reorg ani zed un. 
dor me Bankruptcy Act, or securitfes assumed bv such com- 

wd— when in sir United, 
wl— when Issued. 

ww — with war ranis. 

x — o« -di vidend o re* -rights. 

xdlx — exrilstributlan. 

im — without warr an t s . 

v — ex-dMdend and sales In hill. 

vid— vietdi 

x— scries In MU 


31 to 23% WICOR 2+2 
38% 25to WOOlOv 160 
10V 6'i Wtobioc 

56% 37ta WalMrt 30 
Mto 18V Walgm s M 
25*6 17% WkHRsgi+0 
39% 20 walCSv +5 
39ta 25to WaftJm t+0 .. 

9% 7to WaltJ pf 160 IM 
36% 17V Warned a 37 13 
32% 18V WrtiCm 
ato Mto WornrL 1+8 
23to 15% WashGs 1+6 
Mta 18% WShNat 168 43 7 
52% 34V WosNpf 2-50 5+ 
34% 16V WttlWI 2a 106 
66% 37V Waste 

28V 20ta Wafkjn 

12V 8V WoyGos 
12to 4ta WeaoU 
23% 1SV WeMBD 60S 16 10 

46V 9 WriSMk 35 13 16 

*2ta 37% WetlsF 2+0 4+7 

50ta 41 WriFpf 467e 93 

2?ta 23% WelFM 260 106 II 
I9ta 12 Wendv s 61 16 17 
271* 17 WestCo a 1 J 13 
45to Mto WPenPptUO 105 
45 35 WSIPtP 220 55 14 

14ta 9% WstctT g 104 31 

8 2% WnAlrL 5 

2V V WlAlrwf 
23% 8% WAIrpr 260 
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8% 2ta WhUpfS 
14V 4% WnU pfE 

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34% M WsJgE 120 
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NEW HJOH5 41 


AMRCppf 
BeatC 338pf 
CmRLko 
CarraanB 

Int Miner pt 

LevIStrauss 

NaWscaBrd 

PtHIPTrpt 

Rodice 
SauNETptB 
Vulcan Matl 


Ci rv Invest 

I UNIRIL/CPOT 

ManrwttNtl 

TexasDGes 


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Betti isCa 
CnHudGas pt 
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days 

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Carirnodities 

Column. 


v3 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 16, 1985 


BUSINESSPEOPLE 



Page 13 


% && 

IA * 

- - 

senk< 

. 




group of 24 


atj on System 

Besides .i . 



» was* 


‘TEe 


owned amT' reservaiioil s Cakdomaa Air- 

«-TwSSs?^- °P erate d by viw i bcn ?’ Ja P™ Air Lines, 

s WortdArfines. - ** Dutch Airime^nd 

the 


gr 2P»» called me *, — ~ 

are Northwest 

gsssaf^ssrjs 

u^ lw --^ K - piedffi °”‘ **■ 

-4 .--T P^A jrhasnrged TWA mgive 


nkan-effprt rp mak,. TWa unai- 


’■•Yotk^SSli? j[ oahn ’ ^ Ne * 

T Ymt^yestor who holds 45.54 Der- 
,%&!*$* Nfw. York-based caS- 

-^.Pro 



Aijiines. 


ang 


Western 


(flotfers; N77? 


Control Data Says 

sibsm It Hans to SeU 
: of ETA Stake 

-.^bolh^es ^discuSS- 

^.TWA has grapwd Texas Air an 
oWra.to buy 6.4 millSon shares at 
; 519.625 a sbarethat would increase 
the comnon stock omstandina to 
4L2 nnffion and reduce MrlcaStfs 
percentage to 37 JJ percent. 

.. - fAntilyto.said that soch steps 
.wouWmakeMr. kahn rebctantto 
huy'iB&it shares, since he wooki 
Wndup tdong control of a shell of a 
company, with Texas Air holding 
options oh- the airline’s most valu- 
- able ass&tsf . 


.Tbe.airiine group said it sent a 
letter Thursday supporting its offer 
toTWATs chairman, CE. Meyer. 
Edward Gehriem, TWA’s vice 
u for sales, said that TWA 


Nan York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Control Data 
t-t-wp. has said that it was seeking to 
sell a majority share of its super- 
comp n ter-man ufactnring subsid- 
iary in what analysts called an ap- 
parent effort to stem a deepening 
financial crisis at the company. 

The statement Wednesday fol- 
lowed industry reports that Con- 
trol Data was seeking a buyer for 
the entire ETA Systems unit Rich- 
ard C Reid, a Control Data 
spokesman, said that “for some 
tune” the company has so ugh t to 
reduce its interest in ETA to 40 
patent from 98 percent But he 
said that “we have no p lans to sell 
our entire holdin g .” 

Some analysts question whether 


Greyhound Corp. 
To Scale Down 
AilingBusUnit 

The Aaodami Arm 
PHOENIX, Arizona - 
Greyhound Line announced 
Thursday that it will abolish 
400 management jobs and lay 
off 1,500 workers to reflect the 
declining number of travelers 
using intercity buses. 

John W. Teets, chair man and 
chief executive officer of parent 
Greyhound Corp., said the mul- 
tiphase program will reduce the 
bus unit's facilities, fleet and 
personnel “to a level consistent 
with the current competitive 
and economic climate in the in- 
tercity bus industry.'’ 

The bus unit had revenues of 
S730 million last year, or 11 
percent of the parent’s total, 
but posted an operating loss of 
SI .3 million. 

Mr. Tests said that Grey- 
hound, as currently structural, 
was designed to serve the 64 
million passengers per year that 
buses carried in the 1960s. He 
said the current passenger 
count has dropped to about 34 
million a year. 

Phase 11 of the program in- 
volves a reduction m the com- 
pany’s terminals and fa- 
cilities, Mr. Teets said. He said 
Greyhound currently owns 127 
terminals around the country.- 


Plessey ' ’s Profit for Quarter 

Fell 6.7% to £39.2 Million 

By Bob Hagercy for £33 nriUion. showed a loss of 
Iwemarional Hernia Tribune £3.8 million ill the first quarter. 
LONDON — Plessey Co. re- Thai was more than the year-cariier 
ported Thursday that its pretax loss of £2.9 million, but Peter Mar- 
profit slipped b.l percent in the shall, Plessey's finance director, 
fiscal first quarter ended June 28, said Stromberg’s loss for the full 

year should be much smaller than 
last year's £20-imllion deficit. 

Stromberg recently laid off 
about 200 or us 1,800 workers. Mr. 
Marshall conceded that Stromberg 
still had not won any big orders 
from the seven regional telephone 
companies that dominate the U.S. 
market- The unit continues to rely 
on sales to smaller phone compa- 
nies. 


Ahmad M. Hijazi Joins Texas Eastern 


rst quaru 
largely reflecting lower returns 
from its tejecommunicaiions- 
equipment business. 

.The electronics company said 
pretax profit was £39-2 million 
(554.4 million), down from £42 mil- 
lion a year earlier. Net profit de- 
clined 1 1.4 percent to £22.5 million, 
or 3.05 pence a share, from £25.4 
milli on, or 3.46 pence a share. 

Sales, however, climbed 92 per- 
cent to £3332 milli on from £3052 
million. 

The results were in line with 
Plessey's forecast. Shares in the 
company closed on the London 
Stock Exchange at 154 pence, up 
from J4S pence Wednesday but far 
below the high of 212 pence early 

ibis year. 

The company is being squeezed 
by tougher bargaining from its big- 
gest customer, British Telecom- 
munications PLC; by heavy prod- 
uct-development costs and by 
sluggish sales of military-commu- 
nications equipment in the Middle 
EasL 

Plessey's Strom berg-Carl son 
unit, a UJ5. maker of telecommuni- 
cations equipment acquired in 1982 


long wii 
tioaal Corp. and ITT Corp., Ples- 
sey is bidding for a contract valued 
at around $4 billion to supply the 
U.S. Army with a battlefield com- 
munications system. The other bid- 
der is a partnership of GTE Com. 
and Thomson -CSF of France. Mr. 
Marshall said it could be several 
months before the U.S. govern- 
ment awards the contract 

Despite the worldwide slump in 
semiconductor sales, Plessey’s op- 
erating profit from microelectron- 
ics ana components slipped just 9 
percent to £42 million. Mr. Mar- 
shall noted that the company spe- 
cializes in custom-made microchips 
rather than the mass-produced va- 
rieties. 


By Brenda Erdmann 

international Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Texas Eastern 
Corp. has recruited Ahmad M. Hi- 
jazi, to serve as director, interna- 
tional affairs. 

From his base in the oil compa- 
ny's headquarters in Houston, Mr. 
Hijazi will assist the company's op- 
erating groups in matters relating 
to negotiations, agreements, joint 
ventures and prqject development, 
primarily in the Middle East and 
the Pacific Basin. 

Mr. Hijazi has more than 24 
years of experience in the petro- 
leum industry, having most recent- 
ly been with Gulf Oil Corp. as 
manager. Middle East and Asia 
government agreements. Prior to 
joining Gulf in 1975. he spent IS 
years as -legal adviser and special 
assistant to the manag ing director 
of Kuwait Oil Co. 

During his time with Kuwait Oil 
be was a participant in OPEC nego- 
tiations relating to governmental 
participation hr oil industry opera- 
tions in countries in the Organiza- 
tion of Petroleum Exporting Coun- 
tries. 

Svenska International Ltd. said 
that Hans- Eric von der Groeben 
will head a representative office to 
be opened Sept. 8 in New York as 
the first step in the establishment of 
a New York branch. 

Texas Gas Exploration Carp, has 
appointed Michael J. Phelan vice 
president* international Mr. Phe- 


Korb Quite Pentagon 
To Join Raytheon 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Law- 
rence J. Korb, the Pentagon’s 
overseer of the alt-volunteer 
force for the past 4V& years, is 
resigning Sept. 1 to become vice 
president for corporate opera- 
tions at Raytheon Corp-, the 
Defense Department said 
Wednesday. 

Raytheon, based in Lexing- 
ton, Massachusetts, is the 
ninth-largesi military contrac- 
tor in the United States and a 
major supplier of electronic, 
co mmuni cation and missile 
components. Mr. Korb. 46, a 
professor and former Navy 
flight officer, joined the Reagan 
administration in 1981. 


Ian, formerly a consultant in Jakar- 
ta, will be based in Houston and 
will be responsible for coordinating 
the company's international explo- 
ration operations through offices in 
Melbourne and London. He suc- 
ceeds R.G. Furse, who retired. 

London Interstate Bank Ltd. has 
appointed Steen Tage Langebaek, 
a Danish lawyer ana businessman, 
as a director, bringing the number 
on the board to eight 


Merck & Co* a US- pharmaceu- 
ticals and chemicals company, said 
Albert D. Angel has been elected . 
vice president, public affairs, effec-' 
five Sept. 1. Mr. Angel, who will 
move to Merck's headquarters in 
Rahway, New Jersey, currently is! 
in Hoddesdon, England, as chair- 
man and managin g director of two 
Merck units, Merck Sharp &. 
Dohme Ltd- and vice president of 
Merck Sharp & Dohme (Europe) 
Inc. Mr. Angel will be succeeded by- 
John V. Burke, who joined Merck 
Sharp fit Dome from GJ3. Searie & 
Co. in June 1983. 

Nashua Corp. has named Baity 
Blackburn managing director of its' 
British unit. Nashua Copycat Ltd. 
-Nashua, a U-S.-based maker of 
coated paper, computer products, 
office equipment .and phot o fi ni s h - 
ing supplies, said be succeeds Doug. 
Sawyer, who returns to a senior 
marketing post in the. United 
States. Mr. Blackburn was 
ing director of Nashua’s South . 
rican operation. 

CitOnuk said Pat Buckley has 
become the officer in charge of its 
branch in Cork, Ireland, succeed- 
ing David Costelloe, who has been 
named bead of Citibank’s corpo- 
rate banking group in Zambia. 

Midland Bonk PLC said John R_ 
Skae, currently company secretary 
of Dowty Group PLC, is to become 
group company secretary of the 
bank later this year on the retire- 
ment of Paul Wyau. 


COMPANY NOTES 


discus ^ campus, prepared to selfaii 


never indicated our willingness to 
seT’-llreresavatira system. 

. _“Wc don’rview it as a bundle of 
goods ftatbnesdlC he said of the 
syste m. •'It's an integral part of 
I W A Vstrncture as an airfine. 



man' 

. TWA officials made a presentation 
on the system to the group in nrid- 
-Jufyr-^a mouth after TWA agreed 
•yto merge with Texas Air. 

The airline group, which uses the 
nameNTBSIG, said it was formed 
June 20. 


would strip 

of virtually all of its leading- edge 
technology. 

ETA Systems, set op as an entre- 
preneurial start-up company by the 
Minneapolis-based Control Data 
two years ago, is the second-largest 
Unit- 
Research 


Industry experts r say that the 
need to find an investor or buyer 
far ETA is growing because Con- 
trol Data is unable to provide ETA 
with the capital needed to keep 
pace with Cray’s enormous re- 
search and development effort 


AHiamLebensversichenmgs AG, 
Stuttgart-based insurer, said the 
value of new business fell in the 
fust half to 5.7 bfltion Deutsche 
marks (about $2 billion) from 6 
trillion a year earlier. It said it ex- 
pects business far the full year to 
match 1984’s 1255 billion DM. 

. Bear, Steams & Co., a Wall 
Street brokerage partnaship, said 
it has decided to make its first pub- 
lic offering of stock and debt secu- 
rities. The firm said it may sdl 
about 15 percent to 20 percent of 
its equity to the public. 

BMW said it expect^ to produce 
and seD' more cars this year than in 
1984. The company said it pro- 
duced 40.1 percent more motorcy- 
cles and 19.1 percent more cars m 


the first half than it did a year 
earlier. 

Bond Corp. Holdings of Austra- 
lia said it will take a . 20-percent 
share in an onshore oil exploration 
contract on China’ s Hainan Island. 
Terms and value of the accord were 
not disclosed. 


Group for work on its Harcourt 
House project. 

K auf man & Broad’s application 
to take over the S4.4-bilHon insur- 
ance annuity business of Baldwin- 
United Corp., which was seized by 
regulators in 1983, apparently wiD 
not be accepted because of an ap- 


Gnhmess PLC said it has ac- preaching deadline, according to 
quired an additional 955,000 ardi- state insurance officials in Indiana 


nary shares of Arthur Bell & Sons 
PLC. Guinness said its latest pur- 
chases raise its holdings in the 
Scotch whisky distiller to 1 7. 1 5 mil- 
lion shares, or 1297 percent of the 
total outstanding. 

Hongkong Land Co. said it 
awarded a contract valued at 23.6 
million Hong Kong dollars (S3.02 
million) to Bachy Soletanche 


and Arkansas. 

WJL. Smith & Son PLC stud it 
has agreed, subject to shareholder 
approval, to acquire the Elson’s 
Group of companies in the United 
States for about 565 milli on- El- 
son’s operates 189 newspaper and 
gift shops in hotels, airports, office 
blocks and raO stations and whole- 
sales ma gfl7Tnes and ho oks 



i, Like Prosecutors, Has Trouble Fixing Blame at Hutton 


By C Nash prepared into sham practices, now 

New York Times Senior conceded to be illegal Approbo- 

■ WASHINGTON — ■ The U.S. tionflowed to branches that prqfit- 
Justioe Department Is bemusing to ed handsmndy from overdrafting, 
say we toldyoa so. ' ■ :• while those that dia not were repn- 

Far almost thro: «nii% ' mn. . nanded.- According to invesnga- 
eresssmal mvestwacra have bira " ^ wanting signals abounded 
d®gn«Iinio 390 ie taanch« 
fflrttoa A Ca amlkto & &stii* .excessive profits from bterdr^nng 
Department’s decision' to pennit and. that should have alerted the 
thes^fefinntopleadgml^to top mana^.w possible, abuses, 
defraudmgmorc than 400 banks of TJe Ju^Dej^oenthmcon- 

- — - - - tended that the Hutton oauxana 


nmHions’of doflars without at the 

N^AmYSIS r - 


5 } 



non 
aroused 
undue le- 


same tune 
executive. That 
unde, accusations 
xrienct . • • 

This subcommittee on crime at 
the ’House Judiciary Committee 
has sttopoeoaal tens at thousands 
of documents and conducted three 
days of hearings. It has found, new 
documents showing that top Hut- 
ton executives were aware that the 
firmaysteiimtican^ overdrafted its 
ac qqamts, and applauded the 
practice. 


stona] mvnstigatbrs have yet to torn 
up unmistakable evidence that peo- 
ple at the very top of ILK. Hutton 
prompted practices that, ethical or 


was . an achievement because the 
gmliy plea provided a precedent 
broadening the reach, of criminal 
law. Before the plea, the prosecu- 
tors said, certain overdrafting prac- 
tices -were not dearly Illegal, and 
thus convictions of individuals in 
court would have been almost im- 
possible to obtain. 

Mr. Murray, the chief prosecu- 
tor, safd' that for top Hatton offi- 
cials to be convicted, a jury would 
have to find that they knew such 
practices wercLdfetmctiy illegal 

Members of the congressional 
subcommittee dispute that conten- 
tion. They argue that a person does 
not have to know he is violating the 
law to be oonvicted of a crime. Bnt 
Mr. Murray maintains that the lack' 



7hs New Vort Tma 

Robert Fomon, chairman of E.F. Hatton & Co., at left; and 
George L. Ball, former president of the securities firm. 


By pleading guilty to 2,000 
counts of fraud, as Hutton’s chair- 
man, Robert Fomon, chose to have 
Hutton do, the Wall Street house 
faces the possibility that under US: 
securities laws, it could be banned 
from the mutual fund business. Se- 
curities regulators in several states 
have said they are reviewing the 
situation for possible violations of 
state statutes, and the Securities 
and Exchange Commission and the 


from bank accounts that were 
made late in the day. Mr. Morley 
recommended that each branch es- 
timate this amount and “add the 
late deposit estimate to your daily 
draw down calculations." 

Mr. Morley sent a copy of the 
memo to Mr^ Lynch, who was then 
chief financial officer- The return 
comment read, “Good memo — if I 
were a manager I would double the 
estimate, Tom.” 

It was the dearest indication so 
far that Mr. Lynch was aware of 
the aggressive overdrafting prac- 
tices. Mr. Lynch has declined to 
comment 

“But the Lynch document in and 
of itself does not reveal a crime," 
said Mr. Murray, the Justice De- 
partment’s chief investigator in 
Scranton, Pennsylvania. 

The key offense to which Hutton 
pleaded guilty in the criminal inf or- 


Insurers See 
Record Losses 

(Continued from Page 11) 
levels up. but we’re going to wait 
and see." 

The crash in Japan was covered 
by insurance written primarily by 
Tokyo Marine & Fire Insurance 
Co. and other insurers in the Japan 
Aviation PooL 

About three-quartets of this was 
then resold to reinsurers in other' 
countries. More than half of the 
reinsurance was handled by 
Lloyd’s of London. The rest went 
to reinsurers in other countries, in- 
cluding the United States. 

Aviation insurance experts note 
that the amount that may be recov- 
ered from an airline after a crash is 
often limited by various interna- 
tional agreements. The limits are 
based on the origin and destination 
of each passenger. 

There is believed to be no limit 
on liability for passengers traveling 
on internal flights in Japan. 


New York Stock Exchange are in- 
vestigating po^ble violations of 

mato^thS^Sition tenuous. ' sccunties OT excbMse n ^ ulat3 ° ns ‘ 
“Before May 2 when the guilty Congressional investigators have 


regional director. Bob Witt, for the 
"superb" performance his offices 
had in Much of that year. “How 
did Ride manage to generate a 48 
percent profit nwgmT Ball asked, 
referring to an unidentified subor- mation on May 2 was a scheme to 
dmate of Mr. Win’s. “Was it large- defraud its tanks by creating 
ly legal interest profit?" 

“What do we make of that word 
legal,’ " said one congressional in- 
vestigator. “Does that mean Ball 
knew there were illegal profits be- 
ing made?” 

Mr. Ball said he did not remem- 
ber the memo. ’ 

Another document involved 
Hutton’s current vice ch a i rm a n , 


amounts erf float out of bank ft 
without their knowledge or con- 
sent. Float is uncollected money in 
transit from one bank to anotba 
and the vast amounts generated by 
the Hutton scheme —said to be as 
much as 5270 million a day — had 
no relation to the firm’s normal or 


expected balances. 
By gem 


over where yew cannot say . T didn’t -Some contain brief scribbled cbm- 
know.’ If you now intentionally meats and opinions from top man- 
create float in the banking system, agers. Others refer totankin^prac- 
then yon may be prosecuted cwpo- rices lhat bordered cm illegality and 
rately and individually for a are now dearly prohibited as a re- 
scheme to defraud." suit of the Justice Department case. 

In order to get a corporate guflty The difficulties encountered by 
plea, the Justice Department grant- the subcommittee, which is not Em~ 

w. — . , ed immunity from prosecution to jted to courtroom rules of evidence, 

brought to ti ght do not provide g^me middle-level Hutton execu- ^ establishing individual culpabO- 
^ : — ^ -» — ■*- ■-** t Ko,w ‘ - ■- an Apnl 30, 


luwuuw — . , , , 

that would have been considered, 
said Albert Murray, the depan- 
meufs chief prosecutor in the case. 
“Bat that does not mean the out- 
%orane of the case would have been 
any different.” ' , _ 

Mr. Murray and other depart- 
ment contend that the 

score of new Hutton documents 


si vice presidents, detailing the 
practice of drawing down deposits 


generating this float, the firm 
' interest-free use of bank 
which totaled millions ol 
At the same time, official! 
point out that using the float on b 
company's own funds is not Illegal. 


Japan to End 
Some Tariffs 

(Continued from Page 11) 
tioo that will benefit both the cor- 
poration and the consumer, The 
Associated Press reported from To- 
kyo. 

Economic planners, in an annual 
government “white paper" on the 
Japanese economy, said that the 
private sector wiD lead the country 
Into tins era of infonnation-relaled 
and service-oriented industries. 

“The challenge for the future, 
the report raid, “is to realize the 
potential of the new type of eco- 
nomic growth. This will be accom- 
plished by calling on the will of the! 
private sector, not waiting for the 
hand of the government" 

The 'government, however, can 
promote the economy's growth by 
deregulating industries to allow the] 
private sector to “display its fun 
vigor," as wefl as promoting cre- 
ative research ana development 
the report said. 

“The importance of computer 
software cannot be exaggerated in 
a highly mfonnatized society," the 
paper said, and “the second base of 
ila; new growth age is service and 
. . . consumption expenditure." 


_ a new enquiry on 
as obstruction of j os- 


reason. to* 
such 

tiC 5SST f Hughes, ihe Dano- 
crat from New Jersey who is duur- 
mankrf the subcommittee on crime 
and was one of those who ques- 
tioned the Justice ac- 
tions, said tins week; 4°°^ 

meats have' cumulatively 

very directly toihe extern of 

edge that existed among tbe t0 P 
mSagas the company, l«t w 


fives who otherwise ' might have ^ illustrated 

been indicted. 1981, memo from „ 

“After granting all kinds of mid- president of Hutton, 
dle-level executives immunity, the ■ ... 

Justice Department found there In the memo, which was released 


L Ball, 


was no one mgnernp to prosecute," Aug. I, BaU — now president of 

said one at^ro^famDiar with the 


are' not 
illegal 

re of Hutton at voA 


^ branch managers appeared to oe 



. w ,SKSiSJ8*« 

IronHahftbnuJr a , 

I85/360ihs. and ^ 

[mm 12lh Au^- i 985 IO 
Febroan. 1986. 


INVITATION OF TENDERS 


The "SodOi BorldnaM des Fibres Textiles - SOFITEX" P» Box 147 
BOBO DIOULASSO, is starting an invitation of umdeo for the 
furniture of fertilizers m2 lots, Le~ 

Lot 1 20,000 tons of NPKSB fertilwens; 

Lot 2; SjOOO Iona of mea. 

EiScI ABIDJAN (Ivory taa) 

^^OUAGADOUGOU 

DELIVEHY T2M& 

Before April 15, 1986 

PARTICIPATION: 

The* 
of the 

in French lanenaae. mnsi reach either the SOFITEX, Po 
5* GFJD.T. 13, roe de BlonoM 75008 

®° RIS^ beSbTCSepieinher 13, 1985 on 18 o’clock, time *Ho»*L 

TATION Of TENDERS 
lulled from: 

of SOFITEX, Po Boot J65( 

147 BOBO DIOULASSO 

° r r parir^de Mooceau, 75008 PARK 
or CF.aJ- 1 m a* ^ An x? on nnn inr fT 

. . .-.r ca 




■SSSBS'a^— 

DOSSIERS OF INVITATION Of TENDERS 
The **?%; Pc B« 1650 OUAGADOUGOU 

Po Box 147 BOBO DIOULASSO 
rFDT^ii. nie de Mooceau. 75008 PABIb 

'rltTL, of CFA F. 20.000 (or FT. *00)- 


1985 English edition now available: 

“Manual 
of Selected 
Swiss Shares” 

This handy reference work contains 
salient facts and figures on an expand- 
ed selection of Swiss companies. It also 
includes information on the Swiss Bank 
•Corporation Index and its historical 
‘trend, it Is designed to be a useful aid 
when making investment decisions. 

Swiss Bank Corporation 

Schweizerischer Bankverein 
Societe de Banque Suisse 



Please send me 1 free copy" of "Manual of Selected Swiss Shares 1985 


, 7 ] 


MrsJMiss/Mr. 


Address 


*as long as available 
Mail this coupon to; Swiss Bank Corporation. General Management WE. 
' i. Box. CH-4002 Baile/Switzeriand ■ 


I Mailt 
I P.O.E 


tWE, j 


LmfesS£WN638S 


INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE 


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Sangre de Cristo Ranches Inc., the land de- 
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Minimum 5-acre ranch sites starting at $4,500 
Send today for fact kit and full color brochure 


FORBES EUROPE 

SANGRE DE CRISTO RANCHES ffIC. 

PX). BOX 86, Dopr. IHT 
LONDON SW11 3UT 
ENGLAND 



Name. 


Address. 


scot, Berkshire, UK 

Freehold for sale. 


_^L Magnificent mansion house. 20.000 sq.ri. net 

approximately plus landscaped grounds of 27 acres. 
Additional 13.000 sq.ft, offices subject to consent. Consent for 
? Residential units. Also suit hotel conference centre ^subject to 
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West find of London within 30 minutes. Substantial otters required. 

! nqutrvv rr ::v. named ret:.' erdy Che? t-.-rti rA. ret IKt 


Chestertons usa 

C!k: r t e re o Serve y o r s 
International Real Estate Csa'Aultams 


- " :• t ■ : 

\ . • ' .... \ •• :• • : : 


EAST HAMPTON, N.Y. USA 
SECLUDED 8 ACRE 
COUNTRY ESTATES A 

■&. 

An East Ha 
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developed 
FuHy pr 
assuring 
beac 
sou 

Special Places For Special People 

LONA RUBEIMSTEIN INC. 

82 Park Place, East Hampton, NY 11937 (516)324-8200 

SuOJect to East Hampton Town Approval 



ALGARVE - PORTUGAL 

THE DEVELOPMENT 
OF DISTINCTION 

Ocean front property, with luxury village apartments, frilly 
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Beaches, pools, tennis, squash, sauna, restaurants, bars, shop- 
ping center all on site. 

Mease contact for detailed i nf ormation t 

SAO RAFAEL, URRANfZA£dES, IDA 
SESMARIA5 
8200 ALBUFHRA. 

TeL: 089/53384/53324. Telex: 56952 RAFAEL P. 


Global Vision 

As the largest full service 
real estate firm In Texas' 
and the southwestern U.S., 
we provide expertise in 
property acquisitions and 
management 


Please note specific interest 
in request to 


AS 


HENRY S. MILLER CO., 
REALTORS* 

David Donosky. CEO 
Corporate Headquarters: 
2001 Bryan Tower 
Dallas, Texas 75201 
2W748-9T71 Telex 732459 

Tim Oriving Facet h Ant Rad Esaea. 
Partners m Service ivtth Grubb 6 Elfe 


ARIZONA 

SCOTTSDALE - PHOENIX ' 

MILLIONAiRES OMLY 

Former stole of Arizona Gover- 
nor's Mansion can be yours. Ele- 
gant in design with a superb loca- 
tion and panoramic view. Fully 
secured 24-hour guard, six baths, 
five bedrooms, pool, Will indude 
1963 Rolls Royce Silver Shadow, 
Will trade for airplanes, listed 
stock, gold or slver. A bargain at 

US $2,195,000 currency. Coll: 
Federal Realty Investors Inc. 
“Owner” 4256 N. Brown Avenue, 
Ste. A, Scottsdale, 

Arizona 85251. (602) 949-1822. 
1-800^21*0078 Outside Arizona. 
Other properties dso available. . 


fie 5 




I I . 


DM j 


HIT 

li 


ou. 


tin i 
A 









Thursdays 

AV!I{\ 

Closing 


Tables Include ttie nationwide prices 
ap to me closing on wall street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

I'M The Associated Press 


uwanffi 
HMflLM luck 


- MAOln 
6% AL Lao s 
12 AUC n 
2H AM Intf 
65V ATT Fd : 
2V AcrrtflPr 
8ft Acmcll 
94« Action 
1% Acton 
Ift AdmRs 
IBft AdRusI 
15% AdoM 
Ain A* rone 
29ft AKtPBs 
SIS AlrE«o 
STS AtrCal 
9 V ArCdlpf 1 
W Aiomco 
65ft Almllon 
6V AlbaW 

2 AlnTre 
StS Aloha 
9ft Alpndln 

IS Alls* 

It Aitex wt 
JO Alcoa pi 3 
13M> AlzoCP 
UPS Am dam 
Sft Amedeo 
Sts AmBHt 
MAS AConlrl l 

18ft AEtpwt 

Sts AFnuC A 
3% AFruC B 
SIS AHIRIM 
<H A Isr CSC I 

12*S AMnA 
T2ft AMieB 
ft AMBId 
J AmOH 
57 APfH 3 
12'* APnec 
S'* AmRItv 
HftAP.ovIn , 

3 ASclE 
Its Amool 
Tft AndJCb 
5V Angles 

V vlAnglv 
31S ArooPI 
5ft Aliev n 
4V Armrm 
7% Arme< * 

7V Arrow A 

15ts Arundl 
6ft Asmr O 
8% Astro 

1 AsTrolC 
AllsCM 

2 Audkjtr 


27 05 5% 

21 102 I71S 

1 14 37 ISIS 

B 1561 3% 

I 36 SO'* 
2 3 

I 2a BO IB!* 
36 160 12tS 

41 21m 

s is m 
i 16 21 24V 

i 12 20 17V 

si a 4<* 

I TO 1667 45t6 
206 6tu 

4 130 10% 

68 12V 
27 44 

7 4 91 'A 

14 6V 
4 2 

27 6 VS 

: 64 226 12*. 
38 S8 
20 ft. 
300. 35 
35 113 22V. 

17 176 13V 
145 5V 

5 14 llts 

13 I 453* 
103 33H 

25 8100. 6ts 

23 2100. 5% 

11 71 6V 

5 73 BVS 

45 6 14V 

41 8 136S 

739 3tS 
» 5 JV 

24 36 59V 

18 4 14V 

4 3 TV 

470 13'* 
31 29 SV 

7 60 2VS 

22 3* 

83 U M 
79 IV 
109 Sft 
A 1 5V 
3 5% 

u to a 

12 11 9 

14 !«? 20ft 

1612 TV 

II 47 11% 

530 '?> 
39 V 
5 2 


5ft 5ft — V 
17VS 17V. — V 
15V* 15% + H 
J4s 3V + IS 
BOli BOV + Is 
3 3 

10 10% — V* 

12V 12V— IS 
2% 3ft — V 

3 31* — V 
24 tS 246s— '* 
17 1 * 17V + V 

4 IS 4*4 

456* 45V + V 
6 Vs 6V + V 
10V 10V— V 
12% 12V 

V V 

97 71 — IS 

6V 6** + V 
2 2 

8 Vs IVj + % 
12VS 12V 

S i? +Vb 

35 35 + V 

21V 21V— V 
12V 13V*— V 
51* 5% 

lift Ills 
45V 45V + 'A 
22V 32V— V 
6V* 6ft — ft 
Sts 5V— V 
6V 6V 
B 8 + V 

Uft \4V + V# 
13V 13V + V* 
3’* 3V — tit 
3V 3ft 
59 59 

14V* 146*— VS 
TV 7V — V 
17V 13to 
5 5 

2% 2Vt + IS 
2V 2V 

8'* 8*4 + 1* 

IV IV 
3V Hh — % 
5ft 5ft — V 
5ta 5V— ft 
7ft 8 
9 9 

20V* 20ft— ft 
9 9ft + I* 
lift lift + ft 
IV IV 

V V— IS 

2 3 



Div. YM. PE MBs High Lon Oik*. Ow 


12% EECO 

32 21 

29 

lot 

15% 

14V 

4ft ERC 


18 

68 

6ft 

6V 



Id 

II 



2ft EaolCI 


1/ 

158 

3 

2% 

31% Estgo 

6-96.26* 

6 

17 

34 

33% 






14 

1% ElAudD 



to 

1% 

1% 

2% ElecSd 



69 

Sft 

5V 


5V E Ulnar 
10V EmAUn 
2ft EmCor 
ft EngMtri 


Sft sv 
11V 11V 
6V 6V 


6 EvrJ A 
6ft Excel . 


AOe 33) 10 
.40 1.9 7 

■72» 23) 52 
40 

.10 30 

20 24 29 
ADO 5.1 11 


7ft— ft 
15 + ft 

Aft + V 
SV + ft 
3 

34 + V 

14ft + V 
IV 
Sft 
SV 

11V— ft 
^*s-ft 

TV 

13ft— ft 
20ft + V 
36 

31 + ft ; 

8V»— v 
8 — ft 
7ft + ft 


17ft Lehigh s 

.101 

A 

10 

J% L.isirT 




7Vi LfitFPh 

M 



Ift LlteRst 




l% Lodge 








10% Lunw 

OS 







9ft Lurla 





2 + V 

•Jft 

14ft + ft 
1B*t — ft 
11V— V 
Oft 

23 — ft 
6ft — VS 
28ft + ft 
Sft 

27ft— V* 
IV— V* 
IV— ft 
35V— ft 
16ft + ft 
13ft + 1* 
10ft + ft 
13ft 

11V— ft 
BV 


131 TV* 9ft 9ft + ft 





26 

300 

9% 

9% 

9% 

.40 

XI 

7 

22 

19 

19 

19 — % 



28 

41 

14 

13ft 

13ft— ft 




7 

2ft 

2(X 

2ft — ft 




31 

18 

17V 

17V— ft 




74 

4V 

4ft 

4ft — % 

80 

6.2 

11 

11 

13ft 

12V 

12ft 

*at 

53 

19 

37 

13V 

13ft 

Uft— ft 



4 

45 

ID 

9ft 

9ft— ft 

4*0 1A? 


1 

2BH 

28V 

28% + V 





7V 

7% 


.70 

17 

a 

4 

40ft 

40ft 

4011 + ft 

1381 

SJ 

u 

39 

26V 

26% 

26V— % 



5 

13 

12V 

12ft 

12ft 




S 

Bft 

SV 

8ft +• ft 




1 






Tfl 

150 

6 

6 

6 + ft 

39 

* 

97 

1 

24ft 

24ft 

24ft— ft 



32 

101 

26ft 

25V 

25V 




1 

IV 

1ft 

IV 



18 

50 

23% 

23ft 

23ft + ft 





15% 



.171 

xs 


44 



6V + % 



21 

56 

10V 

10V 

1QV 4- ft 





13 

5 

7V* 

1 

7V + Va 





3V 






b 

IV 

IV 

IV 



44 

4 

Uft 

16 

16 

72 



47 

18V 






% 

V 

V 



8 

6 

12V 

13ft 

12V + ft 




14 

19 







3ft 

3ft 

3VJ + ft 



11 

12 

12 

12 + ft 





39ft 

38V 

38V + % 



33 

306r 44ft 

44 

44ft 4- ft 



15 

12 

S 

7V 

8 


13 

5 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft 

JO 

1.9 

18 

74 

10ft 

10ft 

10ft 




V 






2 

2 

2 — % 






ia 

16ft + V 




47 

34V 

34V 

34ft — ft 

.12 



13 

32 

22V 

23 + % 





IV 







6V 

6V 


2J 


I 

2Sft 

35ft 

25ft + ft 




7 


7 + % 




32 

171*1 

16V 

17ft + % 

*0 

23 

14 

131 

36% 

25ft 

25V— V 


4% 1« 

4ft 

246* BV 
13ft §> 
lift SV 
23» 1SV 
23 16V 

2W IV 
2ft IV 
16V lift 

22ft 14 
8ft 5 V 
14ft Oft 
lots 6W 
23ft 15V 
15V 10ft 


10ft TV 
IBS* 12V 
27V 17V 
10 2M 
23ft 16ft 
Aft 3ft 

ft ft 

14V 9W 
Aft 2ft 
10V 5 

* Sft 
5 3ft 
18ft 12 
9ft 6ft 
12ft 8 
19ft 14ft 


UNA 
USR Ind 
Ultimo 
Unlcpwl 

Untmrn lA4etl4 
UAIrPd -54b 2A 
UnCosPs JO X7 
UFoodA .10 6-2 
U Foods 
Utiwea 

USAGwf 

unireiv 

UnvCm 

UnlvRs 

UnlvRir 80e 46 
Unv Pol 


VST n -30e : 
VoflyRs I AO 
Valxpr 9 A4 

Verit 

VfAmC AOb . 

VlRsh 

Verna 

Vernll 30 

vortaie 

vmnrcti 

VI cor 

vmtpe 

Vtrco j04t 
VI& uaIG JO : 

vopiex ao : 

VuKCp 80 ‘ 



JO 1J> 14 
AO 28 12 


13 

JO 22 8 
JOe 2321 

A4 1J 14 
■36a 15 13 
30 


26 Sft 5ft 5V + I* 
25 9ft Bft 9ft— ft 
39S 5V SV 5V 
36 19ft 19V 19V + ft 
11 14V 14V 14V 

10 4ft 4ft 41S + V 

11 2V 2% 2V 

269 1 7V 16V 16V— ft 
8 <7 AAV AAV 
133 4ft 4ft 4ft + V 
5 14 13V 13V— ft 

200*184% 184 184ft + ft 

1 TV 7V Jft 

44 22> 32V 32V + ft 
36 10V* 10V 10V 
11 Aft 616 Aft 
137 Aft 4V 4V 
7 41* Aft 4>4 

2 23V CTV 23V + V 
673 19V 19ft 19ft— ft 


09t 

SJ 

23 

19 

4V 

4V 

4V 





331 

IV 

IV 

IV 

+ % 



30 

29 

1 ft 

1 ft 

1 ft 




189 

IV 

1 % 

1 ft. 

— V 

L2S 

1X1 


1002 

32ft 

32 

37V 


1.00 

12 * 


1007 

77V 

77ft 

77V 


*71 

84 

93 

12 

4V 

4V 

4V 


34 



769 

82 

W 

14 

IV 

’1% 

u 

LBS 

108 


9 

am 

26V 

26V 


J25r 

A 

12 

44 

13V 

12 % 

12 V 

+ ‘V 

M 

4* 

9 

35 

14ft 

14% 

14%. 

- V 

A* 

X* 

7 

3 

15ft 

15 

IS 




Floating-Rate Notes 


28ft UV CD1 a 
12V 5U CMICp 
Aft IV CMX CP 
19ft 13V CRS 
16ft 9ft CoesNJ 
Sft Aft CosleA 
14V 10V ColRE 
28V 18ft Caimot 
Aft 3's Colton n 
IV ft Coimwt 


_M TJ 15 
18 

5 

139 10A 8 
JO 13 20 

24 


10ft 7ft Cal Drop JOtHLO 14 
18V IOV Cameo 32 1.9 10 
20ft 13% CMarc a 30 
23V 1BV* CdnOcc M 
3SV 25ft CWIne 10 

13 Aft Cardiff 122 

Jft 1ft Cardll 

15V 7ft CoreB 17 

15V 7ft CnreA .10 3 17 

13ft SV CarcEn 17 

48ft 37ft CaraPpf 580 10J 
6% 3% CaNHan *6119* 7 
22ft I4V CraHA 300 5A 9 
32ft 26V CosFd 2J0a 73 
14ft 10ft CentSe l*7el2j 
9ft 5V Cetee 30 18 12 

4 2 OimpH 16 

17ft 12ft ChmpP J2 S.1 57 
29V 17ft OilMAS .16 7 18 

29 17ft OitMB 5 .16 * 18 

21ft 16ft ClilRv 130a 43 11 
12V 7ft ChfOva 
40V 34V OlllDpf ATS 
38ft 14V Chlltni .17 5 30 

33ft 1IV Citadel 6 

32V 17 CtfFst ljC0b3J 9 
S3 39V ClIFstpf ISO A? 
33V 18ft CtyGas I JO 3* 10 
42ft 30V Clartnl l*3e 5* 

12V 6V Clarice J8e 11 la 
4S 22ft Claras! *Se 11 10 
22V» 10V Clopav* .16 1.1 13 
6V 3ft Coonltr 
10V 6V Cofti JO 11 9 

BV 2V CalFwtl 

22 8V Camtfld 4 

12V Bft Comlnc .16 

11V 6V Carnpo 

17V 7ft CcmpO 

18ft Aft CmaCn 

10ft 5ft CrnpFct 15 

20V 14V Cncfim *0 12 17 

12% 6V CoocdF 15 

15V 6V Cotmly 8 

25ft 13ft CmrCp 9 

9V SV Concrsi 88 

5% IV Cano met 

10 Sft ConsOG 

21V 16ft CnSiorn 

1SV SV v I Coat A 4 

20 7V vlCniA pt 

26ft 15 ContMtl B 

14V 10V Canvstn 

19V 18ft Copley n 

2 rt Corodlan 

3% 2V CdjCt n 14 

T ft CosCr ml 

10ft SV CnfCrd JOr 12 18 

12ft 7ft CrsfFo -ISe 1J 10 

35 24 Crass 1*4 4A 15 

48ft 23V CrowIM 1 J0a 2* 8 

17ft 9’s CrnCP 57 

1JV 7H CrCPB «7 


1 26V 

61 UV 
13 IV 
24 IBV 
54 12ft 
27 6 

58 12V 

265 26 
34 5V 
42 V 

2 8 
32 17 

184 16ft 
20 21ft 
16 32V 

5 9V 

20 2ft 

2 14V 
42 14 
36 lift 
90. 46ft 
18 JV 
12 14V 

6 29V 
IS 127s 

405 7V 


1 7V 
IS 13V 

2 22 
64 BV 
44 4V 
36 SV 
49 19ft 

4T4 12V 
13 16ft 
4 21ft 

12 11V* 

n 

21 2V 

13 ft 

229 9% 

14 10V 
127 33ft 

9 38V 
20 TtfV 
3 13ft 


i 26V 26V 
i 11V lift— ft 

I V IV — ft 
ft lift— ft 
12 12 
5V SV— % 

, 12 12% + ft 

25V 26 
SV SV — ft 
I V V 
7ft 8 
16V 16V 
16ft 16V + V 
21ft 21ft + ft 
32ft 32V 
TV 9V 
2% 2% — ft 
14V 14V + *■ 
13ft 14 + % 

It II — ft 
44V 46ft +lft 
3% 3V 
14V 14V + ft 
29% 29W— ft 
12V 12V 
7ft 7% + ft 
2 2ft 
14ft 14ft- V 
24 24ft— ft 

24 V 24V- ft 
18ft 18ft— ft 
7V 7V + ft 
34 34 —1 

33 33% + V 

2*V 29V 
30 30V + V 

51 SI + % 
33ft 33V + % 
38ft 38V + % 
9ft 9ft — ft 
39V 39V + ft 
14V 14ft— ft 
SV 5V— ft 
9V 9V— ft 
7V 7W + ft 
20% 21 — ft 
9ft 10 + % 

10V 1DV 
7V TV 
7ft 7ft— % 
7ft 7V + U 
18% 18% 

7ft 7ft + ft 
13ft 13ft 
22 22 — V 

BV 8V 
4ft 4ft — ft 
SV 5ft— ft 
I Bft 18ft— ft 
12V 17ft 
15V 15V— V 
21ft 21ft + ft 
lift lift— % 
19% 19ft + ft 
ft ft 
2ft 2ft 
ft ft 
9 TV*— ft 
10 10ft 
32V 32V— V 
38V 38ft— ft 
16 16 — V 

13ft 13ft— Vt 


17 13ft N 

RMn 

2*0 1X4 


141 

Uft 

13ft 

14V 4- ft 

9ft 5ft r 

□nick 


16 

5 

9% 

9ft 

9ft— % 

14V UV t 

IGsO 

AOb 33 

9 

32 

12ft 



26V 12V K 

iPamt 

.10 * 


209 

15% 

15% 

15V 

1ft V t 

tlsLB 



335 

V 

V 

V— % 

23V i: 

> 

WxAr 

79t *A 

14 

10 

17V 

17ft 

17ft— ft 


“InRI 

UK 61 


81 

17V 

17 

17% — ft 

31ft 13 K 

3 roc 

1 JOe S3 

11 

64 

31ft 

2lft 

21ft + ft 


YTImes *0 13 



45ft 

44ft 44 V— % 

6% 4% f. 

wrtsE 

350 S3 


7 

5 

4ft 

5 — ft 

■ -j.; 

fweor 

32 22145 

23 

UV 

Uft 

Uft 

■ ' ■ ■ ■ . 

iwLsn 



21 

13 

17ft 

12ft — % 


m»EI 

T *0 9* 


1A 

15ft 

15V 

15V 

7 6 fi 

chin n 



5 

6 

6 

6 

13% 6V N 

Chois 


B 

16 

11 

10ft 

10V— % 

3 IV h 

>ellnd 



4 

2 

1ft 

12k— ft 

3ft 7% N 

Hex 


17 

173 

Jft 

TV 

2%— % 

14V 11 




9 

133 

14% 

13ft 


17V 1< 

lC 

□CdOg 



119 

16% 

16 

16% + % 

5% : 

n N 

uHrtn 


8 

47 

2V 

TV 

2V 

lift i 

4 N 

IdDI 


8 

U 

6ft 

6% 


12V 8 

ft N 

umac 



23 

9% 

9ft 

9% + % 


Dollar 


6% HAL .10e 1J 21 
10ft HMG A0 4* 

•% HUBC AOa XI 12 
4 Halifax -We 7 
7ft Hamori .931124) 9 
23 Hndym n JOe J t 
18% Hanfrds *8 1.9 15 
V Harvev 

19 HOSbrs .15 3 11 

22ft Hosbr Pt ZOO SA 
28% Hasting AOa 1 J 6 
16V HlthCre 206e 8J 10 

Sft Htmcn it 

BV HlttlEx 18 

II HelthM *4 5.1 8 

9% Helnlck .10 7 9 

2V Heidor 75 

3V Hellont 
ft HelmR 

4 HershO 33 

2% Hof man 

6ft HollyCp J4 17 II 

20 Hminspl255 14J 
28ft Horml 14)8 28 13 
14% Harm I wl 

7V HmHnr .711 79 26 
lVHmHwf J7I14A 
12V HolfPtv 180 9.9 17 
IV HatIPwi 
3ft HouOT 890 1 SJ 

9V HovnE 9 

16V HubelAs 12 

15V HubalB s 12 

17V KudGn A0 22 14 
6V Husky g 36 XI 


5 SV BV 
IS 12V UV 
15 19V 19V 
34 Sft 5% 
27 TV 7ft 
22 23V 23ft 
7 34V 34V 
400 2ft 2 
647 13% 32 
32 37 36V 

2 33% 33ft 
30 25% 35 
102 9V 9 
14 9ft 9% 
2 12V 12V 
63 14V 14ft 

11 2% 2V. 

232 4H 4% 

5 H ft 
27 4ft 4 
S3] 

50 14V 14ft 
715 20ft 20ft 
46 38% 37V 
2 19ft 19V. 
746 9ft BV 
Z74 3ft 1ft 
180 18V 18% 

1 5V SV 
234 Aft 4ft 

2 14ft 14 

12 22V 21ft 
72 22ft 22ft 

3 18 18 

273 7% 7ft 


Bft— ft 
12V + V 
19V + V 
5V 

7V + ft 
23ft 

34ft + % 

3 

33V— ft 
36V— ft 
33ft— V 
25 —ft 
9 — % 
9V + ft 
12V— ft 
14ft— V 
2% — ft 
4% — U 
V 

4 

3 — ft 
14ft — % 
2DV 

38 + % 

19ft + ft 
9 + % 

18%— % 
5V 

Aft + % 
14 

21V— % 
32%— ft 
IB + ft 
7ft 


24% 

16% OEA 



12 

21 

21 

30% 


22V 

15ft Oakwd 

88b 

A 

11 

184 

18% 

17ft 


12 

4 OdelAn 




4 

6 

Sft 

Sft 

16ft 

4 V Odets a 




12 

Fa 



18ft 

12V Oh An 

34 

1A 


1 

16ft 

16V 


24% 

18ft Ollalnd 

A0 

1.7 

IB 

17 

24 

33V 

23V— V 

27V 

10 ft QKten s 

24 

18 

20 

116 

24V 

23 

24V +1V 

7ft 

3% Opuenn 

85r 

8 

60 

1 

6 

6 

6 + V 


4ft OritHH A 

.15 

XI 


4 

4ft 

4ft 


TV 

1 Ormond 




15 

1% 

1% 


25% 

16 OSuIvtts 

.42 

1.9 

15 

15 

22% 

22ft 

22% + % 


6ft OxIrdF 

82f 5.9 

11 

112 

14 

13V 


lift 

8% OzcrkH 

JO 

1* 

11 

358 

11 

1DV 

10V— ft 



EE n 



11 

14 

6V 

6 V 

6V— ft 




B 

116 

47ft 

46ft 


-O 



2/S 

XI 

2% 

244 

2%— ft 




37 

8 

2V 

2ft 

2ft— ft 




JO 

17ft 

17 

17 — ft 

npGp 

.lie 44 


1 

42 

4V 

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a 

** 

2 ft— 

uHnd 




42 

IV 

i% 

IV 

inOfr g 1*0 



429 

38% 

38 

38ft 




13 

SO 

lift 

11% 


«T71! 

JO 

18 

23 

4 

20 


20 4- % 

SfSV 



I 

1365 

IV 

1ft 

Ift— ft 

SSvpt 

*51108 


6 

2ft 

2ft 

2ft 

um 

*0 







Itiwl 

.I2E 

8 


94 

15 



Bknt 




194 




Hyd 



20 

28 

rv 

7V 



*6 

9* 

to 

5 

IOV 

10ft 

10ft 

Pwr 




16 

6% 

6ft 


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3% 

SV 

3% 

!Thr n 



29 

484 

6ft 

644 

6fh 

torn 




56 

28 

6ft 

V 

* 

6ft + ft 
V 

lies s 



12 

!04 

19V 

1 9ft 


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26 

If) 

40ft 

40 

40 

ny 



36 

16 














AS 1J 31 
43 

M 48 10 
48 
30 

.13* 1.1 4 
■400 48 15 


2 13V 13ft 
4 lift lift 
51 lift 11 

23 11% 11 
31 II 10V 

24 34 31V 

25 32 31V 

74 28 27V 

12 22V* 22ft 
20 20% 20ft 

13 22ft 22ft 

14 23% 2 77, 
12 10 10 
20 21ft 20ft 

4 18ft I Bft 
11 18ft 17ft 
2 17ft 17ft 

15 19% 19ft 

7 18ft 18 

8 20ft 20ft 

9 9ft 9V 

160 21 20V 

31001 39ft 39 
1001 40 40 

20141% 41% 
10QZ43V 40V 

36 v. V 
162 39V 39ft 

37 Aft 6% 
4 25% 25ft 

28 7V 7H 

10 Aft Aft 
47 Tift 11 

11 10ft 10ft 


13ft— ft 
lift— ft 
11 — ft 

11% + % 
10ft 

33ft + % 
lift— ft 
28 + ft 

27V + ft 
20ft 

22ft— % 
22V— ft 
10 — % 
20V— ft 
18ft + % 
18ft + ft 
17ft 

19% — ft 
18ft 

20ft + V 
9V 

21 + % 
39ft— V 
40 

41% — V 
43V 
V 
39ft 

6V— ft 
25ft + ft 
7V + ft 
4ft + ft 
II — ft 
10ft +ft 


AMEX Highs-Lcms 


AmCont Ind BrownF p| Dixie* 

GntYeHond Hannafrds KnopoCp 

PUMG SCE 12pf SumtineJr 


CMtO pfB Elsinore 

NefHinLB PneuScale 

TumerBrdn 


Heidor 

Swlftinaep 


EcheBav 

LSBJnd 


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Tfdnetl 







J.t - 


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rjr 
















jtii 









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Fortune 5H. 92 
Full lot 94496 


Non Dollar 


9933 

99*5 

a 

Bl 

9935 

a 


ADVERTISEMENT 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) August 14,1985 


_ . w,t y" 1 ” ywhrtiow nro suppttad by M>t FoodtHtted wttti ttw exapWon of some quotes beat) on ta— ptIol . 

The marginal symbols indicate frequency of quotations supplied Udl-ddOy; CbO-wesMy; (b)-H-montbly; <ri -rooakuiy; 03 -Irrawilarty. 


An Invitation 
toOxforcl. 

The International Herald Tribune and Oxford Analytica 
present a Special Conference on 
The International Business Outlook. Christ Church, Oxford, 
':-y September 19-21, 1985. . 


*1 kWL MAHAuEmENT 

-1%) Al-Mal Trust. 571 S 1 

BANK JULIUS BAER & CO. LM. 

-I d ) Btwrbond SFT 

-4 d ) Ccnbar SF IT 

-id 1 Equlbocr America — S 11. 

-td) Eaulbaor Europe SF 12 

-[ d ) Eauleaer Pacific SFU 

46) Grobar SFT 

-IdlStockbar SF IS 

BANQUE 1NDOSUEZ 

• Cd I Asian Growth Fund $ 

-Cw) Divarftond SF i 

-fw) FlF-Amerlca, S 

-fw) FIF-Europe S 

-IwJ FIF-Pat3Bc S 

-Id) i ndasuez Mu 111 bonds A S < 

•fd) Indosuer Muli bonds B S li 

-fdl Indaa* USD IMJBLF1 S1K 

B R it ANN i AJ>OB 271, St. Heller, Jersey 


•Cm) Amer Values CumWref. 


S 164A5 - d) Fidelity Amor. Assets 

- d ) Fidelity Australia Fund 

SF 982*5 -fd) FIOHItv Discovery Fund 

SF 118X00 - d 1 Fidelity DlASvos.Tr 


S T02J6 Kw)DassC -Jooan_ 
S 6937 OBL1FLEX LIMITED 


: und S T 035 1 -iwl Mull (currency 

Fund S 1033 |-fw) Dollar Medium Term. 


. S 115430 -( d ) Fidelity Far East Fund. 

SF 122830 -< d 1 Fklenry IntX Fund 

SF 114930 -Cd) Fidelity Orient Fund — 
SF 98730 -fd) Fidelity Frontier Fund- 
SF 155230 -fd) Fidelity Padflc Fund— 


s 125*3 -iw Dollar Long Ter 
S ZU9 .(w Japanese Yen_ 
$ 6434 -fw Pound Sterling. 
5 2633 -fw Deutsche Mark. 

S 1X48 -jw Dutch Florin 

S 13372 -fw 5wlM Fronr . . 


. I FkteUtvSpcL Growth Fd. S 14*7 ORAN GB NASSAU GROUP 

S 1085 -< a I Fidelity World Fund S 3X55 PB 8S578, The Hague fD70) 46967D 

SF FORBES PO B887GRAND CAYMAN -f d 1 Bever BeftaalngerH-l- 

J X87 London Agent 01-839-3013 PARISBAS-GROUP • 

i '102 - wt Dollar Income — s 77S* -(d) Corftxa miemational 

• 17.11 -I w J Faroes High Nit Gilt Fd — t 0.971 -fw) OOLHOM 

5 -IW) Go« Income 8 B37- -Iwl OBUGESTION 


•Iw) BrltXkJHor Income— 

-Iwl Brit* MonooXunr 

-td) Brit. Inti* ManatLoortf. 
-i d ) Brlf. inti CMonag.Portf . 
•fw) Bril. Am. Inc X Fd Ud_ 


S 16451 -fw) Goid A pored of I on 
S 102133 -im) strangle Trading. 
W GEFINOR FUNDS. 


2-HZ -jwl East investment Fund — — S 33735 -id i PARO 

f-S 3* -fw) Scotilsli World Fund C TM87 -fdlPARIt 

-iw) State St American S 166.93 -IdlPARL 

1119 CaDtLTnntJ3dXonAseiir3V4714230 ROYAL B. I 

1386 GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. -+(w) RBC 


1 837- -(wl OBUGESTION 

S 4*1 -iwJOBLI -DOLLAR 

S 1.15 -(WlOBLI-YEN 

__ -twl OBLJ-GULDEN 

S 337*5 -id) PAROIL-PUND 

C 1W87 -fd) PARINTERPUND 

$ 166.93 -fd> PAR US Treasury Band 


— * 1078 d Eunwe Obligations-— - 
— S 1085 iw First Engle Fund— 

— S 11 JD ir Fifty Stars Ltd 

— f IMS IW Fixed Income Trons_ 

DM ift*3 fw Fanselex issue Pr. 

-FL 10*9 fw Foraxfund 

-SF 9*9 (w Formula SelacflOn Fd._ 
d Frmrilmiln 

„ fd Goverron. Set Fund* _ 
. S 32JO l d Fronkf-Trwet Interzlns— 
j* HoiHsmam Hkfos. N.V._ 

. * _89*3 iw Hestta Funds 

DM 1225*5 (w Horton Fund 

SF 94*0 (m IBEX Holdings LM 

. S1T9876 Ir 1LA lan Gold Bond 

Y 10343030 l r ILA.IEH --- 

FL 110071 (r ILA-IGS 

. S 9X58 ( d I n feri un d BA 
. 1 11431 iw Intermarket Fund 


US Treasury Band S 10638 1 < d j inlermlnlng Mut. Fd. CL'B' s 

. CAHADA3»OB 34LGUERN5EY | ( r Infl Secu rttlwiFuIft 1-* ° — * 
C Canadian Fund Ltd — S 11*2 1 f d i Inwesta OWS n«? 


-fd I C5 Fands- Bonds. 


5F 76*0 1 -fw) GAM Worldwide lnc_ 
SF 11030 l-fmi gam Tvche STL Class 


-fd 1 CS Money Market Fund — 5 108130 G.T. MANAGEMENT (UK) Ltd. 

-Id) CS Money Murk* Fund_ DM 106330 -fw Berry PoTf£ Ltd. , V , 

-fdl^Monev Market Fund — —C 101630 -fd G.T. Aoafled Science . .... 8 1439] -(d) universal Band 
"in !p 'i® &T.AeecnHJC.GwttLFd. 5 12*8 Mdj Universal Fund. 

: | H p aratttSStaia =r 5 -**u*l-v****** 

-fd ) Pocl tfc -Volor ___SF 15130 -fd G.T. Europe Fund— 


S 15538 -I d 1 Japan Portfolio— If 7SS (Si MSgSE S!? 1 f ’ octal ” 

S 12X08 -f d ) Stenina Bond Selection C 10584 (ml NOSTEC P^Hnib. 

. . -id) Swiss Foreign Band Sel SF 10838 (w Novotec InvestmmU Fund s S5 

S 9.17 -( d I SwHsevotor New Series SF 329*0 fw) N-AMp "" 1 Puno | 

8 1439 -(d) Universal Bond Select SF 8X25 (m) NSP F.I.f ZZZ I ifffS 

S 12*8 -f d i Universal Fund SF 115*2 id) Pacific Horton Imrt Fd ~ ein*n« 


* 1ZJ7 
10430430 

1 773636 

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DREXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC 

w J n *?' gsl rr. House . 77 Lond on Wall -f d ) G.t. Dollar Fund S 1536 -( d ) Farm Swiss Sh SF 14830 fwl PMT^RrTvf N “ '* 5 

101 12097971 -Id) G.T. Bond Fund. ■■■■■.. S 1136 Jri) i^icwi-inu^t 5 F 84930 ( w 1 P5CO IntL N_V ' " J 13250 

f ;!. a3l ? urY . Groyo L M S TM39 -fd j G.T. Glebol Technlov Fd S 1256 -(d) Soflt South Atr.SlL— SF 38630 J d ) PuhSm InH 1 

■j™ Wlncheiler Diversified S 2265 -f d 1 G.T. Honshu Pdthflnd«r__ 8 23*9 -fd) Sima tstedi price! SF oneui f r ) PrUidi "" ' 5 .67 JO 

■fSJ SIS255J5T Einsnsjs 1 L «-— $ 125 -ftf>G.T. Investment Fund. — _ S 18J8 UNION INVESTMENT Frankfort (wi olia^rn Fund mv 

-iwl Windiest or Holdings FF 1D4J7 -fdl G.T. Japan Small Co. Fund— S 39*8 -(d) Unirenta DM 4470 f d 1 R*ntn I=,M . 

•fwi worldwide securities s/Fj^. f iBo SH l S3? \tiS3E===== SJS \j) 

-+( d I Concentro— DM 2874 Berne. P.O, Bo* Tef 4131 224051 Ollier Funds }"; . SF 10X75 

ZSXST&S ^i'^J ’££ 5 l Jk 

3SI 5-442 : AradFIncncrl.F ;„,j7 i w I s * 

TRAOBP CURRENCYFUND. •} r I J* Hong Kong TftlSI S 3673 w tn6MlnM^.6^ SF 1K70 Id! 5 wS 


2584 UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

1 1.47 I -( d J Arnco U*. SK S 


-Iwl G.T. Euro. Smolt Cos. Fund — 5 12*6 1 -i d 1 Band-Invest 


1536 <d> Fonsa Swiss Sh. 

1136 -f d ) JaPim- Invest _______ 

1256 -(d } SafH South Atr. Sh. 

23*9 -fd J Sima (Stock price! 

T8J8 UNION INVESTMENT Fraakfart 


;«> guortwn Fund N.V.. 
fd) Renta Fund — 

(d) Rentlnwa*t - 


5,92120 


. . Jan «3ficsod iap :V 1 
managcmcnc cxocarives 
attcrrfFffi ^- mirhaTc; ; . 
overview of die Intematksial 
Sisiness Outlook. . . 


ft* 

74Ti26VTdoLUl!'>« r ' 


! G.T. Technoftev Rpi* J 26.13 -i d ) unHonde DM 2570 1 d ) RmutvJc* — — < }-C "JJOf 

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W.PXXBo* 2622, Tef 4131 2240SI Onier FUIMS *”{ acn^ra^Por mri ta _. SF 10X75 


■fm) wmetL .Llhsi Fut Pool *577« — l-Cd ITFFdfTetJmoloov)— 8 1X4) r mFE 

-fmi Trans World Fur. Pool 5907*3 — I -fa) o^eas Fd IN. AMERICA) _ 8 - 28J0 { r ) Artane. 

EK TRUST C^UERSEY] LTD. JARDtNS FLEMING, POB78 GPO Hg K» w TruSooi 


GM- Oeutsche Mart: BF - Belgium Francs: FL - Dutch Florin,- LF - Luxembourg Francs: sf . Swfiw Pmnrc; w ■ m*im- + - fHfnr tvir« h wh m „ — 

Avallobje: N. C. - NotC ofnmunlcnted:o: New,- S - suspended; S/S - Slock Split; - - Ex-OtuMJeftdr — - ex-Rts?— - -Gruyj 51 per afrit; njl- N at 

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1 

» 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 16, 1985 


Page 15 


CURRENCY MARKETS 


Dollar Off in U.S., Europe on Rate Concerns 


Compiled fa- Our Staff Front Dupatdia 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
closed lower again Thursday as 
bearish sentiment for the U ^.’cur- 
rency reasserted itself. Dealers said 
that markets focused on the likeli- 
hood of lower U.S. interest rates in 
coming weeks to combat continu- 
ing sluggish economic data. 

Dealers said the Federal Re- 
serve’s report of a weak 02-percem 
gain in July's industrial production 
and a slowdown in consumer credit 
pressured the dollar, which ranged 
between 2.7550 Deutsche marks 
and 2.7750 DM for much of the 
session. 

“It appears that the dollar is in a 
| 'gnificant decline." said Jill Cot- 
ter. international currency analyst 
at Prudential Bache. Other dealers, 
however, pointed out that trading 
was slow and that the bearish tone 
of the market may have been exag- 
gerated by the thinness of trading. 

The currency closed at 2.7590 
DM, down more than 2 pfennigs 
from Wednesday's close of 17825, 
at 8.4350 French francs, down 
from 8-5G75, and at S 1.4020 against 
the British pound, down from 


51.3890. It fell to 236.75 Japanese 
yen from 237.730 Wednesday and 
237.625 at the close in Tokyo. 

In earlier trading in Europe, the 
dollar closed in London at 17610 
DM. down Pi pfennigs from the 
opening and more than 2 pfennigs 
below Wednesday 's close of 17890. 


below Wednesday's close of 17890. 

In Frankfurt the currency was 
fixed at 17667 DM. down nearly 3 
pfennigs from Wednesday's fixing 
of 17930. In Zurich, the dollar feU 
to 2.2755 Swiss francs from 13045. 
Markets in Paris. Milan and Brus- 
sels were closed for the .Assumption 
Day holiday. 

London dealers noted that the 
dollar fell through the important 
2.76-DM downside resistance 
point in the afternoon session be- 
fore recovering slightly. 

The half-point cut in West Ger- 
man key [ending rates was already 
discounted and lent no support to 
the dollar, dealers in Frankfurt 
said. They said the Bundesbank 
rate cuts, the first since March 
1983. were long overdue and were 
anticipated by operators. 

Some said the cuts could under- 
line the softer outlook for the dollar 


by highlighting much higher U.S. 
interest rales, 'seen as responsible 
for slowing U.S. growth. Most op- 
erators expect the U.S. currency to 
retest the 2.72- DM level in coming 
days, they said. 

Attention is now fixed on an ex- 
pected downward revision in sec- 
ond-quarter UJs. gross national 
product figures due next Tuesday, 
dealers said. Economic data re- 
leased so far has led to anticipation 
that the earlier figure showing 
growth of 1.7 percent in the quarter 
will be revised to about lJ percent. 

The pound, meanwhile, firmed 
against the dollar on a signal from 
the Bank of England that ii intend- 
ed to resist any pressure for early 
cuts in U.K. interest rates. The cen- 
tral bank took the unusual step of 
announcing £655 million of direct 
lending to bond dealers for five to 
seven days, at 1 Hi percent. 

In London, the pound closed at 
SI .3960, up a cent from its Wednes- 
day dose or S1.3S25. it slipped 
against continental currencies, 
however, falling to 3.8545 against 
the mark from 3.8590. 

(Reuters, IHT, UP I) 


Market Firmer as New Perpetual Emerges 


' Reuters 

LONDON — Midland Bank 
FLCs issue Thursday of a 5500- 
million perpetual floating-rate note 
was the main feature of a day that 
saw most Eurobonds advancing 
abouL % to Vi point in generally 
lackluster trading, dealers said. 

The issue, which ranks os prima- 
ry capital, came two days after 
Standard Chartered PLC an- 
nounced plans to exchange up to 
$300 million of its existing perpetu- 
al floaters for new notes to be treat- 
ed as primary' capital. 

Expectations, as yet unrealized, 
that other banks would follow suit 
had focused interest on perpetuate, 
dealers said. 

Dealers said the new Midland 
issue, which pays M point over the 
six-month London interbank of- 
i'^red rate, was quoted on the when- 
->ssed market at 99.60, well within 
its 65 basis points total fees. 


Midland's earlier primary capi- 
tal perpetual eased 10 basis points, 
to 99.60/65 from 99.70/75 
Wednesday. 

Also in ihe floating-rate sector, 
lead manager Credit Suisse First 
Boston announced that Wednes- 
day's 15-year issue for Bank of Bos- 
ton Corp. would be increased to 
S200 million from an initial S150 
million because of strong demand. 

It was quoted at a discount of 
281a against Wednesday’s 274. but 
this is still well inside the 40 basis- 
point selling concession. 

With the exception of the Deut- 
sche mark sector, dealers said that 
prices were only marginally helped 
by Thursday s announcement of '■> 
point cuts in the West German dis- 
count and Lombard rates, which 
were followed by similar cuts in 
official Dutch interest rates. 

The cuts, plus a small increase in 
retail interest helped push mark 


floaters up to 10 basis points high- 
er, though overall turnover was 
kepi down by market holidays in 
parts of continental Europe. 

Dealers said prices were also lit- 
tle affected by the larger- than -ex- 
pected upward revisions of May 
and June U.S. industrial data, an- 
nounced along with the anticipated 
0.2-percent July rise. 

“Our market just seems to want 
to remain firm at (he moment 
whatever the U.S. data." one dealer 
said, noting that U.S. money-sup- 
ply figures due late Thursday 
would have to be way out of line 
with expectations to affect the Eu- 
robond market 

However, he noted that the mar- 
ket had been boosted slightly be- 
fore New York opened by a tumor 
that U.S. industrial-production fig- 
ures would show a 0.2-percent drop 
for July rather than the actual rise. 


^’1 






Loh Jen-kong 

Taiwan Aide 
Resigns Over 
Loan Scandal 

The Associated Press 

TAIPEI — Prime Minister Yu 
Kuo-hwa accepted Thursday the 
resignation of Loh Jen-kong, the 
second economics minister to step 
down this year over a scandal in- 
volving 7.7 billion Taiwan dollars 
(SI 90.2 million) in illegal loans ap- 
proved by a savings and loan insti- 
tution. 

Mr. Yu appointed the deputy fi- 
nance minister, Li Hung-au, 58, as 
Mr. Loh's temporary successor. 

On Wednesday an investigative 
committee said Mr. Loh and sever- 
al other officials should share re- 
sponsibility for the scandal involv- 
ing the Tenth Credit Cooperative, a 
banking arm of the Cathay Group. 

Mr. Loh's predecessor. Hsu Li- 
teh, resigned in March, and a num- 
ber of other government officials 
have been fired or reprimanded Tor 
dereliction of duty in the affair. 

The inquiry committee said 
Tenth Credit's illegal loans began 
years ago and reached 7.7 billion 
dollars in February before the gov- 
ernment took over its operations. 
The investigators said government 
officials were aware of the illegal 
loans but took no action. 

Tenth Credit's chairman, Tsai 
Chen-chou, has been sentenced by 
a district court to six 15-year prison 
terms for issuing almost 4,500 bad 
checks for 1.46 billion dollars. 


American Express, Lloyds Agree on Cash Machines 


By Bob Hagerty 

Internationa] Herald Tribune 

LONDON — American Express 
Co. and Llovds Bank PLC an- 


•'American Express is under The rest are in Britain. Norway, 
great pressure to pull off sharing Sweden. Australia. France. Spam, 
deals like this" to avoid losing , bu&i- Italy. Monaco and Puerto Rico, 
ness to such rivals, said Michael Visa says it has commitments to 
Laffertv. editor in chief of Retail 


SS SB? taSSuM a Lo^dcm- 
that marks a significant advance in d B h d 

Ihc race to set up international net- bankers p A^can Ex- 

works of cash-dispensing ma- pre J probaWy xvill find it difficult 


The rest are in Britain. Norway. Arne ^^ n1 ^ f ha,t sJanS'lm ** 
Sweden. Australia. France. Spam. so card W 

Italy. Monaco and Puerto Rico. 

Visa savs it has commitments to Skswiih banks in other 

bring die total to 11.000 machines «££•' hT 2 d fe 


chines. 

Lloyds. Britain's fourth-! argest 
bank, has agreed to allow overseas 


press probably will find it difficult 
to persuade more big banks to co- 
operate. largely because American 
Express is viewed as a dangerous 


inKn'SS European countries. He said the 

in 30 countries. comtranv especially wants agree- 

MastcrCard International, a menKjn west Germany. Italy. 
«w York-based organization, is Spainan d Scandinavia, 
are slowly developing such an in- Amer i can Express faces 

-national network. H^awwanhi onnosirion. Eck- 


New York 
more slowl 
temational 


some heavyweight opposition. E 


bank, has agreed to allow overseas &press is viewed as a dangerous American Express says about an van Hooven. a managing direc- 
American Express card holders to competitor. 4.500 machines acccpi us cards. tor of Deutsche Baltic AG. has re- 

withdraw cash from about 900 ma- Eurocheque, a Brussels-based but neariy all of them are m the peatedly warned trait the L.b. 
chines in Britain. The service is due organization controlled bv Europe- United States. Aside from seeking company is potentially a powerful 

1QS£ .nil . ■ ...... ", rl. Cnmim kinlrt m nMn UD thar QCt- umnMlinr 


chines in Britain. The service is due 
to begin in December 1986. and 
Lloyds is to collect a fee for each 
transaction. 

The agreement comes a year af- 
ter American Express announced a 
similar accord with Credit Lyon- 
nais of France covering 600 of that 
bank's machines. It also comes as 
eurocheque International and Visa 
International are rushing to build 
up networks allowing their card 
holders quick access to cash in for- 
eign countries. 


an banks, has ambirious’plans for foreign banks to open up their net- competitor. .. . 

expanding its own international works, the company is setting up its In London, the top credii-cjrd 
cash-dispenser network. For this own machines mils travel offices as official at a major bank said, 
summer, it has promised that 15 weU as in airports, railroad stations - M ost banks are now- pretty wan: 
million, holders of eurocheque “d other warm centos. Eight of American Express s intentions, 
cards will be able to withdraw cash such machines are operating in Eu- The worry is that the company wiU 
from dispense!* in four European “d «e company projects 75 ^ card operations to poach 
countries! by the end of 19S6. banks’ best individual customers. 

Visa, based in San Francisco and The machines are available only American Express’s Mr. Duncan 

owned by U.S. banks, says that to card holders who have signed up rejected such rears, tit some areas 
more than 4.500 machines accept few the program and received code we compete; in some areas ^ we co •* 
its cards for such transactions, numbers used to activate the ma- laborate." he said- I don t UiinK 
About half are in the United States, chines. So far. about 3 million of we’re a threat to the banks. 


Floor is Bustling at Bombay Exchange 


(Continued from Page II) 
isu India basically has looked to 
the government for economic plan- 
ning and growth. 

Private wealth and business deci- 
sions long have been viewed as sus- 
pect in the vast government bu- 
reaucracy, which for years has 
regulated virtually every decision 
made by the country’s biggest cor- 
porations. 

India's wealthiest industrial 
companies may be ran and even 
partly owned by Indian business 
executives. But a much larger share 
is held by government-owned 
banks, and' insurance and invest- 
ment companies. 

The turn toward the private sec- 
tor as a source of growth in India 
began a few years ago, with Prime 
Minister Indira Gandhi. Her son, 
chosen to succeed her after her as- 
sassination last Oct. 31, has greatly 
accelerated this process. 

Mr. Gandhi has reduced income, 
inheritance and corporation taxes. 
He also has freed all but the wealth- 
iest companies from myriad licens- 
ing requirements. 

He also permitted steel and ce- 
ment companies to raise prices and 
allowed sharply increased imports 


of electronics and other goods. 
Regulations were lifted from the 
textile and drug industries. 

Perhaps more important, busi- 
nesses now expect even greater re- 
laxation of government controls 


across the board. For the first time, 
a truck company can produce cars, 
and a cement company can pro- 
duce shoes, without fast going 
through an obstacle course of gov- 
ernment bureaucrats. 


Rockwell Gets $8-Bfflioii B-l Pact 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Air Force, moving to complete the 
congressionally authorized purchase of 100 B-l bombers, awarded 
Rockwell International Corp. an 58-bffion contract Thursday for 82 
airframes. 

Rockwell the prime contractor far the plane, had earlier received 
money for the fust 18 planes and delivered the first production 
version of the bomber to the air force on June 29. 

Thursday's contract covers the basic plane, but does not include the 
four jet engines that each requires or the sophisticated avionics 
systems that they use. Those components are acquired from other 
manufacturers under separate contracts. 

The B-l program is projected to cost S2R2 billion, meaning that 
each plane carries an estimated price tag of 5280 million. This makes 
it the most expensive aircraft in U.S. Air Force history. 

The B-l, designed to evade dense Soviet air defenses and to destroy 
strongly reinforced targets, is considered the replacement for Amen- 
ta's aging fleet of B-52 bombers. The first B-52 entered Air Force 
service 30 years ago. 

Rockwell shares dosed Thursday at $40, down 25 cents, on the New 
York Stock Exchange. 


'Listening’ 

To Machines 

(Continued from Page 11) 

repetitious process, companies can 
predict statistically when to change 
tools to minimize interruption of 
production. 

But when the goal is automated 
flexible manufacturing, there is no 
opportunity to build a data base. 
Flexible machines operate on in- 
structions from a computer, and 
could, theoretically, never perform 
the same operation twice. Each 
hole produced by a drilling ma- 
chine, for instance, could be of a 
different depth and through a dif- 
ferent kind of material. Managers 
would be unable to predict break- 
age without some means of check- 
ing the condition of the lool 

According to the researchers, 
acoustical fault detection is moving 
out of the laboratory and toward 
practical application. “Although it 
is not as easy as it appears in tech- 
nical papers, I think we are at the 
point of implementing these sen- 
sors in the industrial environment," 
Mr. Dorafdd said. “Fracture de- 
tection and chip formation will be 
first. 1 * 


Thursday's 

arc 


(Vices 


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3 mi N>w York time. 

Via The Associated Press 


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■^1 


































* * 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, AUGUST 16, 1985 



PEANUTS 

‘‘ DEAR SNOOfY. 

THIS IS HOUR. OL 
BROTHER SPIKE UJRJTIN6 
A6AIN FROM THE PE5KT " 


‘TOURISTS SEEM TO LIKE 1 ‘ ACTUALLY MY UEAflNS 

hanp woven* blankets" pipnt turn i out 

- ALL THAT GOOPJ 




BOOKS 




BLOND IE 

rr<STHE 
a^WEsr J 

TONIC IN S 
THE WORLD' 


rr REALLY 
PUTS PEP„ 
IN /O UR ) 
r STEP 


/ 


eiwiflM'Mn9rM*K e- ib 


t HE DOESN'T NEED 
£ ANY MORE PEP rf 




ACROSS 
1 Ebb 

5 Thick, flat 
piece 

9 Proverbs 

13 Attention 
getter 

14 Obsession 

16 Beehive State 

17 Hope/Crosby/ 
Lainour film 

20 Vein of 
mineral 

21 This has horns 

22 Feeds the kitty 

24 Slammer 

25 Fitting 

27 , 

encourage the 

J.F.K. 

29 Influence 
33 “The Merry 
Widow” 
composer 
35 Latin E word 

37 Concerning 

38 Lean-directed 
film 

41 Pl3tes in a 
galley 

42 Monk’s room 

43 Abounds 

44 Last 
46 Switch 

48 Simian 

49 Col. mil. group 
51 Bart or Belle 
S3 Neighbor of 

Brazil 


56 '*. . . strain at a 
gnat, and 
swallow ■’ 

59 Holden/ 
Bendix film 

62 Nix. to Fritz 

63 A Liszt 
offering 

64 Some are split 

65 Member of a 
d.a.’s staff 

66 Kind of billing 

67 Berliner’s 
budget 


1 What Mars 
never bars 

2 “Cat on 

Tin Roof 

3 Close by 

4 German naval 
baseinW.W. II 

5 Stag party 

6 Article in a 
Spanish 
newspaper 

7 Cuckoo 

8 Ties 

9 Over-nice 

10 Jot 

11 Sympathetic 

12 Type of butter 
15 Musical 

direction 


IS Turkic people 
19 Arabic 
alphabet 
starter 
23 Scaffold 

25 Having wings 

26 Charlemagne’s 
sire 

28 Olfactology 
subject 

30 "Terms of 

31 Pinch together 

32 Rib 
34 Rising 
36 UJS.A.F. 

ICBM 

39 Phonograph 
recording disk 

40 Cornell's town 
45 Debauchee 
47 Less f res b 

50 Saclike 
structures 

52 Street show 

53 J.E.C.’saima 
mater 

54 Abbrs. on 
some maps 

55 He wrote "The 
Angry Hills" 

57Galeazzo 
Ciano'swife 
58 Kipling's "The 
—■Legion” 

60 Umpire's call 

61 Government 
org. 


C* Sew York Tones, edited by Eugene Moksha. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 

) 

" 

V i) r 

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fML 


Ruff thought 

MR-WILS0N ' 
VUASA 

TREE. > 


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Unscramble these taw Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to torn 
four onftuiy words. 


THAT SCRAMBLE) WORD GAME 
• by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 

Wall'll the gang hears ^ 
N about THIS! 1 


RAWLD 


HEGIT 


BEETLE BAILEY 

&OV! X THINK \ 
MILITARY LIFE I 
HAS FINALLY / 
607 TO MS/ 


uAivz I 1 JUST CAUSHTMYSELF V^KRYlNS 

WHY - At that her buttons were unsuttonee? 


B-ttf I* 


ANDY CAPP 


TCH/TCH / ME COULD'VE AVADG 
yOU A QJPOFTEA.VlCAR.'x-' 
STTNCURSa-FDOWN--,-^ 


I DIDN'T WANT TO 


BARE IN THIS- 


THATjBANBf/.’ 

^hhh»-< 


k IT 0830*1^, 

SOMETHING 


WIZARD of ID 


mf mywtrmJT I 


-./rfe hafv to TRfcsr 

a wm tha t has w&z 

. m&GUMr&9 VNC0P 





REX MORGAN 


CLAUDIA , ARE YOU STILL IN 
THE 'TUB'? MAY I COME IN'? 
1 WAWT TO TALK TO YOU .' 


1 DON'T KNOW WHY SHE 
*0 LOCKS THE COOK i ■ 


I WISH YOU'D COME OUT/ 
WILL VOU ANSWER ME, _ 
fT ri i mu r PLEASE? MBw 


m 


1U4 

D 




ha BWjSv; 

| r CCMtSn > 

iff. 







GARFIELD 



ARROGANT AUSSIE: 

Hie Rupert Murdoch Story 

By Michael Leapman. 288 pages. SI4SS. 
Lyle Stuart Inc.. 120 Enterprise Avenue. 
Secaucus, N. J. 07094. 

Reviewed by Bill Hogan 

T 1 HE executive editor of The New York 
Tunes, A. M. RoscntbaL once character- 
ized the Australian media tycoon Rupert Mur- 
doch as “a bad element, practicing mean, ugly, 
violent journalism." Of Murdoch’s New York 
Post, the Columbia Journalism Review con- 
cluded: “It is 3 social problem — a force for 
evil.” The columnist Mike Royko, who jumped 
ship the minute Murdoch took over the Chica- 
go Sun-Tunes, offered the opinion that no self- 
respecting fish would care to be wrapped in a 
Murdoch-owned paper. 

What is it about Murdoch and his brand of 
journalism that inspires such outpourings of 
enmity? The answer is spread throughout this 


new biography by the British journalist Mi- 
chad leapman. Murdoch may be plenty arro- 
gant, but it’s his ruthlessness in business and 
recklessness in journalism that have aimed so 
many against him. His enemies list is loaded 
with an unusually large number of former 
friends, employees and business associates; 
familiarity with Murdoch and his methods, 
judging from this book, breeds contempt- 

Murdoch, as Leapman notes, has some ap- 
preciation for the dimensions of his image 
problem. In 1981, as he was taniaHzmgly dose 
to sealing a deal for The Tunes of London, he 
went before members of hs editorial staff in an 
attempt to assure them he wasn't ail (hat awful. 
“I can sell myself to you,” he sheepishly told 
them, “as the least of the alternative evils.” 

Leapman, a former U. S. correspondent for 
The Times (he left when Murdoch bought itX 
interviewed more than a hundred of Mur- 
doch's detractors and defenders, although his 
narrative reflects the relative scarcity of the 
latter. The stories behind Murdoch's cBmb to 
prominence and power are told, more often 
than not, through the voices of the vanquished 
and victimized. Many of these episodes are 
downright hair-raising. 

Nonetheless, “Arrogant Aussie" is not a 
hatchet job. Leapmau’s approach, considering 
that his subject declined to cooperate, is admi- 
rably evenhanded, even though the portrait 
that emerges is far from flattering. 

Throughout most of tire boc4c, Murdoch 
seems to be in perpetual motion: hiring, firing, 
wheeling, dealing, wheedling browbeating, an- 
gling for some way to ambush or bamboozle 
his rivals. He seems to relish his don't-mess- 


Sotation to Previous Puzzle 


EE30E QS9GKD □□□□ 

□dde □□!□□□ Dana 
EQDHEiaaEGlE □□□□ 
EDEEIHQ anODTOEEQ 
□□□3 ciEana 
odQoaaaa cinaniani 
debuei aaana aaa 
mHEJD aaaDa saaa 
QDD E3EQK3E1 EJECjiDD 
EBSQE3Q □□□□□□□□ 
0QS30EJ □EdQ 

EEHsaaaa □□□□na 
dedb HaanaHaaaa 
□moo E3SOQQ sana 
□nan aaam aa □□ 


with-me reputation, almost as onfchtf ■ deU' 

log comeuppances, ^onwone can rea you up 
or run over you." he once said. Jut if you 
don’t give them a few bruises in ret uni. they 
can dotito the next person who comes along. 

Leapman provides fascinating, and jcim-o- 
glimpses of Murdoch’s childhoodand ear 
S»His father. Sir Keith Mmdoch.had 

built a career in Australian journaJjsrn from tne 
bouom up. He shipped his son of f to Geelong 
Grammar, the most exclusive boarding school 
in Australia, even though young Rupert didnt 
want to go. For eight years, whenever Rupert 
returned to the family’s country estate, he had 
to camp out in a garden hut lacking heat, 
electricity and running water. (He was allowed 
inside tire bouse for showers.) Such a regimen. 
Sir Keith believed, would make Rupert into a 
worthy heir by strengthening his character and 
self-rctiance. 

On the death of his father in 195— Rupert* 
thwn 21, took charge of the family’s eveiung 
and Sunday newspapers in Adelaide. hrlvSS 
he bou^it a local television station, and two 
years later invaded the Sydney television ntar- 
keL In the late 1960s he picked up Britain's 
best- sellin g Sunday newspaper, the News ot 
the World, and a foundering daily. The Sun. 

After sna tching up three newspapers in Tex- 
as in 1973, he launched the National Star, a 
clumsy imitation of the National Enquirer. 
Nobody paid Murdoch much attention, 
though, until he bought the Post in 1976 and, 
soon after, acquired New York Magazine and 
the Village Voice. He bought The Times of 
London and its sister paper, the Sunday Tunes- 
in 1981, the Boston Herald American (which 
he renamed the Boston Herald) in 1982. and 
the Chicago Sun-Times in 1984. 

The truncated title of the Boston paper 
seems an apt reflection of Murdoch’s way of 
doing business. He has never been comfortab& 
with American editors, who seldom adapt very 
well to his management style. His most trusted 
lieutenants nearly always have been veterans 
of Australian and British tabloid journalism. 

To illustrate Murdoch's idea of journalism. 
Leapman points to a pre- and post-Murdoch 
study of the Chicago Sun-Times by Northwest- 
ern University’s Medifl School or Journalism. 
Under Murdoch, the Son -Times had more pic- 
tures, more coverage of crime (especially rape) 
and more stories on entertainment, celebrities, 
accidents and disasters. 

Murdoch came to hive faith in this formula 
with the success of The Sun, which he trans- 
formed into Britain’s biggest-selling newspa- 
per with the help of htjpFvoltage headlines, 
photographs of bare-breasted women and' cir- 
culation-boosting bingo games. His efforts to 
repeat The Sun's success m the United States* 
however, have largely failed. Advertisers ap- 
parently do not want to spend much money 
reaching the readers Murdoch's formula at- , 
tracts. (Leapman repeats the perhaps apociy^ 
phal story of the Bloomingdale's media buyer 
who, when Murdoch asked why the store 
didn’t advertise in the Post, said: “Bat Rupert, 
your readers are my Shoplifters. ”) 

These days. Murdoch is reshuffling his em- 
pire to make way for the acquisition of six 
major-market television stations from Metro- 
media. He has long dreamed of forming a 
fourth network in the United States. As the 
Canadian media baron Roy Thomson once 
said, owning a television station is a license to 

^So reatTLeapmans book, but don’t weep. 
Murdoch will probably be laughing, longer 
than any of us realize, all the way to the bank- 

• Bill Hogan writes for The City Desk, a Wash- 
ington news bureau for magazines. He did this, 
review for Tlx Washington Past. . 


By Alan Truscoct 

O N the diagramed deal. 
Sooth found the best line 
of play. In four spades. South 
received the lead of the heart 
king and made the first key 
play by ducking. When a heart 
was continued, she finessed the 
jack successfully and made the 
second key play by leading a 
club from dummy. 

This trapped East in a Mor- 
ton's Fork position. He chose 
to spend his ace by playing it 
and that returned a diamond. 
South finessed the queen, run- 


BRIDGE 


iiing a very slight but neverthe- 
less unnecessary risk tha: the 
diamond was a singleton. West 
won with the king and the con- 
tract was safe. The r emaining 
diamond losers in the dosed 
hand were eventually discard- 
ed on the dub and heart win- 
ners in the dummy. 

If East had chosen to save 
his club ace, Sooth would have 
maneuvered to discard his re- 
maining club loser on the heart 
ace. The defense would then 
have taken two diamond 
tricks. 


NORTH 
*A985 . 

?AJ4, 

<>983 

*QM 

WEST EAST 

♦ 10 7 3 j{|l| jj A J. 

9 ICQ 10* II . O 9-7 3 2 • 

« KJ 82 • 0 75 

*85 *AJ10B32 

SOUTH (D) 
*KQfi43 
985 ■ 

0 AQUM 

* K 7 

^Baa^ sfcfca mere vulnerable. The 

Book W*M North Eat 

1* Pam 3 * . . Pass 

4* P»s» Pam Pass . 

West led tbe heart king. 


TICPED 


ASANUE 


Answer here: 


Yesterday's 


-p. IF YOU'RE GOIN6 

- Lf K TO ACT LIKE 

A SKUNK JUST 

_twd k-J MAKE SURE THAT 

NOBOOY E70SS THIS. 

IUE 

— p— r ”] Now arrange the circled letters to 

i form the surprise answer, as sug- 

gesied by the ahewe cartoon. 

rrmmm ff 

(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles GUIDE SANDY NINETY FLURRY 
Answer What the unhappy pig was— 

"D1S-G RUNT-LED" 


WEATHER 

EUROPE HIGH LOW MIA HIGH LOW 

CFCP CFCF 

Mvnrvt 25 77 ZJ 73 Ir Bangkok 33 91 » 79 o 

Amsterdam 23 73 12 5* cl MUne 32 TO 22 72 o 

Athene — — 26 79 no Hone Kane 36 Ba 25 77 st 

Barcelona 27 « 19 M Ir Manila — — — — no 

Bderode 33 91 19 M Ir Now Deffll 3* TO 26 79 o 

Benin 25 77 21 70 si Seoul 29 M 22 72 o 

Brunets 22 72 11 S3 cl Shanghai » TO 2S 77 cl 

Bucharest 33 91 16 61 Ir Stoeapor* 29 W 2) TO a 

Budapest 33 91 TO AS Ir TaM » TO 25 77 el 

C open h ag en 23 73 16 »1 cl Tofcuo 32 TO 25 77 Ir 

Coslo Del Sat 27 61 20 68 Ir . p - |r . 

DeWln IS 59 11 52 r AFRICA 

Edinburgh U 57 11 52 * Algiers 32 TO 23 73 Ir 

Florence 36 TO 20 « Ir cWro 25 vs 22 72 ir 

Frankfurt £ 72 17 U cl cape Town — — B 46 no 


16 57 11 52 Sti Algiers 

36 TO 20 68 »r rZEr 

22 72 17 63 Cl 

28 S2 14 57 Ir rasiMa 


Geneva 3 82 14 57 ir casaWaoco 27 81 

Helsinki S S ,1 « Harare 24 75 

Isiantwl X » 24 75 Jr Logos 3 82 : 

Los Palmas 2? M » 68 Ir nabvjW 73 73 

Usbon 3* 7* £ ft ToB(1 J4 93 ; 

32 to 13 55 Tr LATIN AMERICA 

Milan 32 90 19 66 tr — — 


32 TO 23 73 Ir 

25 «S 22 72 Ir 

— — 8 46 no 

27 81 22 72 Ir 

24 75 10 SO tr 

28 82 23 73 d 

3 73 U 57 cl 

34 TO 21 TO Ir 


36 79 14 57 Ir Buenos Aires - - - - no 

3D B6 17 63 Ir Caracas 23 82 19 66 r 

31 a a 73 Ir Lima 20 68 14 57 o 

20 68 15 59 o Mexico ClhP 25 77 13 SS r 

a 73 14 57 Cl Hlo da Janeiro — — — — no 

S? }n S a NORTH AMERICA 


MOSCOW 26 79 14 57 tr 

Munich » 86 17 ^ Jr 

Nice 31 a a 73 Ir 

Oslo 20 68 15 59 O 

Paris a 73 14 57 Cl 

Prog u e Jl 88 15 59 Ir 

neyklovik 16 61 10 50 o 

Rome 34 93 18 64 ir 

Stockholm a 72 13 SS Cl 

Strasbourg 1A 75 14 57 SI 

veoice 5 II H 2 !l “wow 

Vienne 2 S 5* « I Denver 

Warsaw 33 91 17 63 Ir D«troJt 

Zurich 30 86 17 63 Ir 


MIDDLE EAST 


Ankara 
Beirut 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
Tel Aviv 

OCEANIA 

Auckland 

Sydney 


W « JJ " Anehoroo* 13 55 10 50 sh 
? 5 “ “ 5? AHanla 31 88 a 73 Ir 

J! ’J U 2 f! Boslon » 91 a 72 d 

5 2 S 2 1 . ewew 25 77 IS 59 si 

2 ” J* “ l; Denver a 82 10 a Ir 

5 DTOrall a 73 20 68 SI 

30 86 17 63 Ir Honolulu 32 TO 23 73 Ir 

ACT Houston a 91 a 73 si 

- ■ LOI Angeles 29 84 16 61 ir 

29 84 17 63 ir Miami 32 TO 25 77 PC 

38 86 28 82 ci MlnaeaaaHs 25 77 II S3 oc 

a 91 a 73 ir Montreal 31 88 13 55 ne 

35 95 20 68 fr Nassau - — — — na 

31 88 24 75 C> New York 33 91 U 72 SI 

San Francisco 21 TO 13 55 Fr 

Seattle 24 75 13 56 Ir 

12 54 7 45 Ir Toronto 31 88 19 66 el 

H 57 6 43 o Washington 34 TO 74 75 cl 


30 86 17 63 ir Honolulu 
act Houston 

- . . Lai Angeles 

29 84 17 63 ir Miami 

30 86 a 82 CI MlnaeaaaHs 

a 91 a 73 Ir Montreal 

35 95 20 68 fr Nassau 

31 88 24 75 C> New York 


ci-cioudy: lo logov; lr-lolr: n-hon. no-not available s o-avercasir 
pc-oarflv cloudy; r-rain; an- shawers; sw-sn ow; sl-slormv. 

FRIDAY’S FORECAST — CHANNEL 1 Sllghl'v Choaor FRANKFURT: Partly 
rhX Trmo 31-13 IB2—5SJ. LONDON! Showers. Temp. 26— ID (79— SOI. 
SSkDRiD^aVTlemo. 34-12 1*3-541. NEW YORK: Portly ^ouBv -rernp 
at -.74 (88—751 PARIS: Showw'S. Tetr». 3 — 11 177 — SJI- ROME, Prtr. 
1' 1 !z_ii ill-ill ZURICH: Slormv. Temp 76— 13 179 — 5SJ. 

■AMnicoK- ctoudv rerno jj— . 24 (91 — 7*1. HONG KONG: Ram. Temp. 
v. AN §J < <a6 t — ^MANIlS?' ^Tiujnae?Slorm». Temp. 31—21 188 -Ml. SEOUL: 
Fogg^ 72L SINGAfTORE: Thunoerslor—is. Temp 28-21 

ipT-- TO) TOKYO: Fair. Temo.a — 16 (91 - 77>. 


World StockMarids 

Via Agence France-Presse Aug. 15 

dosing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated 


Mol Bonking 
OCBC 
OUB 
OUE 

SHanorUo 
51™ Darby 
5 ‘pore Land 
S pore Prow 
S Steamship 
St Trading 
Untied Ovarseas 
UOB 


5J0 5JS 
s ao5 
259 260 
226 2H 
NA 153 
LS3 184 
222 123 
5-55 550 

085 NA 
TIB 350 
159 161 

174. 170, 


Amsterdam 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

AEGON 

AKZO 

AJioW 

AMEV 

A*Dom Rubber 
Amro Bonk 
BVG 

Buehrmonn T 
Cokmd Hldo 

Eisevler-NDU 

Fekker 

Clsi Brocades 

Helnehen 

Hoooovotu 

KLM 

Naarden 

Not Nedder 

Nediievd 

Oce Vendor C 

Pakiioed 

Philips 

Robeca 

Ho damce 

Rollnco 

Rorealo 

Koval Dutch 

Unilever 

van Ommeren 

VMF star* 

VNU 


[ ANP.CBS Gun 1 ! Index : 215.18 
Previous : 216.M 


Thyssen 12250 IK 

veba 334 233 

VoOuwagenwerk 32050 320 

Welle 615 610 

Cornmentbonli lode* : 142460 
Previous : 142364 


Fnmkfnrt 


AEC-Teletimken 

Allianz Vers 

Allona 

BASF 

Baver 

Bay Hyaa Bank 
Bav Veremsbanh 
BBC 

BMP -Bank 
BMW 

Coaimercbonh 
Cam Gummj 
Doimler-Senz 
Degussa 

Dovlscho Babcock 

Deulsehe Bank 

□reedner Bank 

GHH 

Haraener 

Hochtief 

Hoechsl 

Hoesch 

HOT ten 

Huswl 

IWKA 

Kali + Soli 

Korsladl 

kauthof 

Kiaeckner H-D 

Kloeckner werkc 

r.rupp slam 

Linde 

Luflnama 

MAN 

Maimesmann 
Wumcti Ruedr 
Nladarl 
PKI 

Porsche 

Preussao 

PWA 

RWE 

Rheinmeiall 

Sclwrlng 

SEL 

Siemens 


ULTO 131 60 
I3TO. 1385 
258 357 J8 
22350 225.10 
22260 TG 
34? 340 

«0 384 

23750 238 

319 31850 
440 43E 

20950 20860 
149-50 148 

833 87350 
339 3W 
i 15850 159 

56054350 
27070 247 

172 177 

301 30050 
453 643 

219 22150 
112 11050 

18* 18*60 

33950 33750 
278 278JO 
307 95 

2375023750 
27Q50 268 

280 27950 
6260 61 
10 * 106 
497 499 JO 
274 JO 22250 
163 162 

189 16050 
1730 1740 

542 535 

657 656 

12861285'.* 

. 276 27850 
1 37 JO 137 
>06 185 

314 310 

465 46450 

33550 339 

543 544 . 


Bk East Asia 
Cheung Kong 
China Uaht 
Green Island 
Ha n g Seng Bonk 
Henderson 
China Gas 
HK Electric 
UK Really A 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HK Sham Bonk 
HK Telephone 
HK Yaumatel 
HK Whorl 
Hutch Wh a m p oa 
Hvsan 
inn Cl hr 
Jaralne. 
jardbie Sec 
Kowloon Motor 
Miramar Holer 
New World 
Orient Overseas 
SMK Pros* 
SteUm 

Swire Podflc A 
Tai Cheung 
woh Kwong 
Wheetock A 
Wing On Co 
Wlnsor 
World Inf I 


92 en ?2 4ii 

18.70 1850 
16 16.10 

9 9 

• *6 46 

2575 2J5 

I0.TO II 
8.15 SJO 
1250 12J0 
37 JS 3*53 
660 660 
760 US 
9 A0 955 
365 ICS 
750 7J0 

2860 20-20 
065 064 

aw 0.99 
1360 1360 
1540 1570 
9JJ5 9JJ5 
42 41 

7.70 7JD 

2 2 

1330 OJO 

2.75 175 
MJ0 2550 
1175 120 

168 168 
Sum — 
166 163 

5.10 5^8 

140 140 


Haag Seng indn : 168455 

Previous : 147173 


AECI 790 790 i 

Anglo American 7950 2370 1 

Anglo Am GoW 16750 16750 


Barlows 
Blvvaor 
Buffets 
De Beers 

Driefcntein 

Elands 
GFSA 
Harmony 
Hiveld Steel 

Kk>of 

Nedhonk 

Pres Slevn 
Rusolal 
SA Brews 
Si Helena 
Satoi 

West Holding 


>085 IC50 1 
JOT 1270 
6459 6850 
1140 1110 
460P 4 SCO 
1*50 1635 

3075 3100 
2500 2425 
475 *75 

72S0 TPM 

1365 14QO 
5050 4780 
I 65C 1*25 
»« 710 

raw 2TO0 

*90 680 

6000 6MG 


Compaiiie Stuck laoex ■ mr 

Previous: IU7»JC 


BL 34 34 

Blue Circle 500 495 

BOC Group 277 277 

Boots 200 195 

Bowoter Indus 323 315 

BP S38 S38 

Bril Home SI 284 282 

BrH Telecom 1TO W4 

Bril Aerospace 355 351 

Brifoil 205 301 

BTR 3S8 356 

Bar mah 295 289 

Cable Wireless 540 530 

Cadburv Sdiw 144 US 

Charter Cons 180 178 

Commercial U 212 229 

Cons Gold 431 427 

Court ou las 127 127 

Oalgoty 420 4VB 

DcBeers> 505 500 

Distillers 293 285 

Drlefonttin S25BS nos* 

Fbons 351 353 

Free SI Ged 819 

GEC 192 192 

Gen Accident 640 653 

GKN 230 223 

Glaxo * 133/3213 13764 

Grand Met 315 311 

GRE 763 760 

Guhines* 271 2*6 

GUS 870 B50 

Honor, 204 TOO 

Hawker 389 385 

iCi 657 699 

i meerlal Group 182 ISO 

Joouar 276 269 

Land Securities OT 365 

Legal General 71/ 711 

uovds Bank 424 417 

Lonrpo 155 19 

Lucas 3U 308 

Mams and Sp 157 154 

Wal Bax 486 4TO 

Midland Bonk 392 389 

Nal West Bank 654 649 

PondO 393 385 

I Pilkmotan 268 265 

Plessev 154 148 

Prudential 7D9 704 

ROcal Elect 160 1*0 

Rendfonteln joJii M* 

Rank 408 406 

Reed Inll 714 694 

Reuters 314 30* 

Rmai Dutchc 4J'V43 31/64 

RTZ $61 557 

Saaictu *90 690 

Sainsburv 328 328 

Sewt Headings 99 98 

Snell *78 678 

STC 88 86 

Sia Chartered *59 4e4 

Sun Alliance SB 510 

Tate and Lvle 445 445 

Tosco 265 263 

Thorn EMI 357 357 

7.1. Grow. 406 353 

Trafalgar Hse 368 363 

TMF 138 137 

Ultramar J01 206 

Unilever c UP* 105'32 

umled Bisculls ISO 18) 

waters 378 265 

Weohmrth 473 46$ 

F.T. 30 Index : 976JB 
Previous : MOJO 
F.T JJE.IH index : 130220 
Prey lows : 129110 


Straits Times lad Jndax:7KM9 
Previous : 75TJ6 


| SmrhhohB 

n 

AGA 

114 

114 

Alto Laval 

Asea 

Astra 

188 

300 

400 

187 


100 

108 

Bolldeil 

NO. 

196 

Electrolux 

Sa 

27* 

Ericsson 

223 

223 

Esseife 

NA. 

360 

Handetebonken 

173 

171 


187 

187 

5sab-Scanla 

420 

420 

Sandvft 

410 


Skanska 

N.Q. 

8850 

SKF 

226 

224 

S’^rdishMoiefi 

IBS 

187 

vohm 

234 

ao 

Affaersvaerfdm Index : 37X68 
Previous : 3725B 

1 1 


AC I 
ANZ 
BMP 
Borg] 

Bougainville 

GMtiemalne 

Coles 

Comalca 

CRA 

C5R 

Dun Ion 
Eiders Ixi 
ICI Australia 
Magellan 
MiM 
Myer 

Nat Awst Bank 
News Carp 
IN Broken Hill 


178 2J77 

5.16 518 

7.12 7 

3-57 357 

1.91 1.95 

750 753 

4.VO 4-TO 
1J6 1.98 
5LM 6 

X20 XI* 
259 258 

118 120 
2.15 117 

125 225 

188 290 . 

350 351 

4J0 4 JO 

W 7 

144 1*2 

4 JO 450 | 



Close Pit*. 

da Coal Trust L72 1J6 

Santos 584 584 

Thomas Notion 125 128 

Western Mining 626 *28 

Westpac Banking 4J6 *77 

WoodsMc 1J0 ijo 

All OrxBoortes Index :9S7 M 
Previous : ntM 


Akal 

Asahl Chem 

ASOhi Glass 

Bank gf Tokyo 

Bridgestone 

Conan 

Casio 

Cltoh 

Dal Nippon Print 
Da hen Haute 
Dahva Securities 
Fame 
Full Bonk 
Full Photo 
FwUtBU 
Hiiachl 
Hitachi Cable 

i iraii In 

Jeean Air Lines 
Kallma 
Kamd Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Klrbi Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec Inds 
Matsu Elec works 
Mitsubishi Bonk 
Mitsubishi Chem 

Mitsubishi Elgc 
Mllsuolshi Heavy 
Mitsubishi Carp 
Mitsui and Co 
Mltsukosni 

Wllximl 

NEC 

NGK insukdan 
NlkkoSec 
Nippon Kaeafcu 
Nippon OR 
Nippon Sled 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 

Olvmpuc 

Pioneer 

Rican 


SMaetsu Chenriqal 
Sony 

Sum Homo Baric 
Sum Homo Chem 
Sumitomo Marine 
SumHomo Mefcrt 
TaiidGorF 
Taisho Marine 
TakedaChem 
TDK 
Trllln 

Tofcio Marine 
Tokvo Elec. Power 
Tapoan Priming 
Torav ind 
Toshiba 
Toyota 
Yamalchl Sec 


686 m 

3*50 37^5 
1820 1800 
241 241 

666 666 1 
151 150 

352 348 

567 555 

800 700 

4290 4260 
*78 *71 

882 847 

2060 mm 
810 BOO 
330 500 

347 346 

1180 1180 
827 820 


Cana£m aada da AP 


NBckei/DJL index : 1M84J02 
prevtaos : 12*1954 
New index : mSM 
Previous : new 


Adta 

Akrtoiste 
Auloohan 
Bank Lea 
Brown Bavarl 
Clba Gelov 
Credit Suisse 

Elect rowan 

■ ■ — ■ ■ — — ■- 

rtmwj uuhr 

intenflscount 
Jacob Suchard 
Jelmall 
LatxBsGvr 
Meevemlck 
Nestle 
Oerflkon-B 
Roche Baby 

S amo a 

Schindler 

Sulxer 
Survelllonce 
States® hr 
SBC 

Swiss Reinsurance 
Swiss vallcsbank 
Union Bonk 
Winterthur 
Zurich Ins 

SBC index ; 49K48 
Previews : 49AM 

N O.: not ousted; NJk: not ] 
available: xd: ex-dividend. ! 


7573 Matson A ( 
1300 Motion B 
600Murnbv 

— 7S0 Nmnseo L 

Hletl Low Qose Chg. 93667 Norondo 
77838 Moreen 
1 353434 Nva AHA f 

UOONawscnW 
43483 NuWst IP A 
1 Oakwood 
TTHOOshawaAl 
I 9420 PacW Aliin 
‘ 39MW Pamour 
f 5440 PanCan P 



4700 Sleep R 
900 Tara 
6600 Teck Ccc A 
2200TOTeckBI 
312*2 Tax Can 
*8345 Thom N A 
mo* Tar Dm a* 
18887 TersturBf 
iw Traders A I 
3280 Tms Ml 
M0 Trinity Res 
72774 TrnAlla UA 
46290 TrCan PL 
14048 Trtmoc 
12470 Trllon A 
1040 Trlzec A I 
889554 Turbo 
3-58® UnJcorp A I 
200 Un Carbkf 
«251 U Entarlsa 
300 U Keno 
1B0D Vei-*il A f 
nsDVestgron 
sztowaraoir 
ZOO Wefdwoo 
19*000 Westmki 
6125 Weston 
5478 Wood wdA 
2005 Yk Bear 
Total saiesi 


TSE3M Index: 


516W 16 16 — M 

S16 >6 16 

S?l% 31« 21^.+ 

OS 28 38 - W 

5175% 172k 17VJ+ U, 
SISfe 15H IBs 

rt 

SM 20 . 20 ■ 

40 39 39 — T 

171% 7H 75* 

132 3H% 32 + H 

S15H 15 15 — V. 

JBU 8 8%+ ly 

041U 34 34V, + fc 

51616 166k 16^+3 

524 24 24 + Ve 

24i% 24^- .64 

525 25 25 

470 450 470 ‘ +20 

591% 966 99% + % 

ST4 131% 14 H- Vt 
«1_, 20*i 20V+.<A 
511^ 1116 111 *— 14 
S14V6 1334 1411 + 6 % 
fig; 3*?* 36H+ *t 
■ ^9 T 16 
071% 7Ph 27*%+ (% 
59W 9>% 9%a+ va 

S36J2 MK, 26«J + A% 
av% av% S'A + 16 
51216 12% 12%, 

»1 T l&K 17 + Vj 
529 V* 2TO% 2W%— 1% 
Sift 20W + 1 
SZZ'4 22 T3\U 4- W 

w m in 

229 225 225 + 1 

201% • 2 dvy • 

512^* 352* 15%+- w 

JISft T5J% 15V, + 6% 
5XZ1 6 32W 32U+ Vi 
527V. 21%, 22 , o+ ■/, 
23-.% 23V. 

S9J% 29 29%, +IV% 

ni w a a — W 

9 s aia 

410 400 41D 

*zn% 2 rt% ■» - 

ans ms 27 w + »« 
SI 4 I 63+3 
59 9 ' 9 

5IZ> 121% 121a + V, 
5121% 11%% 12 
19U. 9V. 9'A + A 

** 480 +ljF 

*H 24W 24^1 ij 

li* E 

6JVU/n shares 4 '* 


3 '• +•% 

504%. 




o-° 








V ** 

\ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 16, 1985 


* 



SPORTS 



Page 17 


By Murray Chass 

' N ew York Times Soviet 

NEW YORX - Tun 


nGame 
c Solution 

what tlm of,,*. 


£?"»»»» 

l OCiv Plena bmm f— . , I 

not always work wdL 


sSIfSaSsss 

lerauela. increased 


S35p,ffl»« n e3«rirjrS®T 

next 

p.w^ffl P D la 3nd Valenzuela are 
ramrats A B and C m the owners’ 
case for wanting a 100 percent can 
Mjwi increases players conW gain 

They alsoarc 
exhibits A B and C m the playera’ 
argument against allowing the 
owners to impose that cap. 

Tte P^ym, of course, won that 
fwrticmar di sput e, which is why 
they now are r unning baselines 
picket 


*4 


instead of 

lines. 

A study of salary-arintration 
cases in recent years shows 


why the owners wanted to < 
the maximum increase and equally 
dtttfy Why the players opposed 
their effort. There is money to be 
made in arbitration, and there is 
money to be lost 

The introduction of salary arbi- 
^tration into baseball in 1973 
ctarfced the first time the playm ' 
gained any bargaining leverage in 


By itself, arbitration might, not 
beccftne so costly for the own- 

"jESS* SHEKSES 

played expensive games with 
club treasuries. 

In 10 years of arbitration cases 
r£3? lein was not used in 1976 
and 1977 — the chibs have won 103 
umes, ihe players 86. But both 
sacs know that when a player goes 
to arbitration, he virtually always 
wins. If he and his chib negotiate a 

sa *~ was Valenzuela, whose pay n 
hdn» ‘im ' thm am winds up “onjy” ]gg per ce nt but reached the 
tengdosertot^fi^retitega^ sSraiffiSSSiSS 
or arbitration. If his 5350,000 m 1983. 

In all, the 23 players who bene- 
fited from arbitration by more than 
it cost their dubs a total 


Here, from the last three years of basebaff’s safety arfrftnrikw, art the playera who gained increases of more than 100 percent. 
Previous 

Player salary 

1983 

TimLotlar $50,000 

Rudy Law 37,500 

Tony Pans 72.500 

Mookte Wilson ' 90,000 

Steve Howe 100,000 

D&maso Garda 130,000 

Fernando Valenzuela 350,000 
Bobby Gastfflo 65,000 

Joe Price 85,000 

Doug Bair 200,000 

Dan Retry 175,000 

Pedro Guerrero 275,000 

Mario Soto 295.000 


salary 

$300,000 

220,000 

365.000 

325.000 

325.000 

400.000 
1,000.000 

185.000 

210.000 

450.000 

390.000 

600.000 
625.000 


Amount 


Previous 

New 

Amount 

over 100% 

Player 

salary 

salary 

over 100% 


Lonnie Smith 

240,000 

500.000 

20,000 

$200,000 

145,000 

Roy Lee Jackson 

75,000 

155,000 

5.000 

Jim Barr 

135,000 

280,000 

10,000 

220.000 

145.000 

125.000 

1994 

George Frazier 

125,000 

425,000 

175,000 

140.000 

300.000 

Paul Householder 

72,500 

200,000 

55,000 

Juan Bonilla 

130,000 

325,000 

65,000 

55.000 

40.000 

50.000 

1985 

Dave Schmidt 

115,000 

344,000 

114,000 

40,000 

Mike Scioscia 

165,000 

435.000 

105,000 

50.000 

Doug Sisk 

110,000 

275,000 

55,000 

35.000 

David Palmer 

102,500 

375,000 

50,000 


Welch Wins His 8th 
On 5-Hitter; Streak 
For Dodgers Hits 6 


Law's leaped from $37,300 to 
5220,000. a 487 percent raise; 
Pena'shunped 403 percent, Moo- 
kie Wilson's 261 percent ($90,000 
to $325,000), Steve Howe's 125 per- 
cent ($100,000 to 5323,000) and 
Damaso Garcia's 208 percent 
($130,000 to $400,000). Then there 
was Valenzuela, whose pay rose 


submitted, for 

case is heard and be loses, he never- 
theless wins because the dub has 
probably submitted a higher figure 
than it wanted just to make its r as? 
a more likely winner. 

In the last three years, 23 players, 
winners and losers, hare emerged 
from arbitration with more than a 
100 percent raise over their previ- 
ous salary. 

Lollar’s salary soared 500 per- 
cent from 1983 to 1984. Rudy 


100 [ 

of $22 million over the 100 percent 
mark. If their salaries had only 
doubled, they would have collec- 
tively earned 56 J miHion; inttpari, 


they earned $8.7 million. 

So now the owners know how 
foolish they were in 1981 for insist- Chicago 


agent. They had to have profession- 
al compensation so badly they 

forced the players to strike for 50 
days. Before long, though, the own- 
ers realized the system was mean- 
ingless and, in the view of some, 
distas teful because a dub that was 
not involved in tbe free-agent 
transaction wound up losing a 
player. 

Now they have eliminated the 
procedure, remaining with only 
amateur draft picks as compensa- 
tion, and the names of Jod Sooner, 
nanny Tartabuli Steve Mura, Tom 
Seaver, Tim Belcher, Douuie 
Moore, Tom Henke and Argeois 
Salazar are forever linked in trivia. 

For trivia and posterity, the pro- 
fessional compensation selections: 
Skinner (from Pittsburgh) by the 
White Sox for Ed Farmer 


ing on getting a professional player (who signed with Philadelphia); 
as compensation for a ranking free Tartabim (Cindimau), by Seattle 


for Floyd Bannister (White SoxJ; 
Mura (St. Louis), by the White Sox 
for Sieve Kemp (Yankees); Seaver 
(Metsl, by the White Sox for Den- 
nis Lamp (Toronto); Belcher (Yan- 
kees). by Oakland for Tom Under- 
wood (Baltimore); Moore 
(Atlanta), by California for Fred 
Lynn (Baltimore)', Henke (Texas), 
by Toronto For Cliff Johnson (Tex- 
as) and Salazar (Montreal), by Sl 
L ouis for Bruce Sutler (Atlanta). 

Remember, loo. the names of 
Mike Armstrong, Jade Perconte 
and Dave Wehnneister. They were 
recalled from the minors just be- 
fore the strike, all of their clubs not 
necessarily having good intentions. 
Privatdy, in fact, sources on the 
Player Relations Committee say 
that if Armstrong files a grievance 
against the Yankees, for recalling 
him ihe day before the strike so 
they would not have to pay him on 


his 5325,000 salary, he very likely 
would win iL 

Wehnneister already has been a 
winner. He pitched two and one- 
third scoreless innings of relief for 
the White Sox in the first posts trike 
game and emerged with his first 
major league victory since 1978. 

Perconte, a Seaule second base- 
man, was sent to the minors earlier 
in the season, one day short of the 
three years of major league service 
that would have required his ap^ 
proval to be seat to the minors 
outright. Tbe Mariners brought 
him back the same day the Yankees 
summoned Armstrong, presum- 
ably to avoid paying him part of his 
$165,000 salary. However, that day 
was the one Perconte needed to 
give him the right to become a free 
agent if the Mariners want to said 
fmn down outright again. 


fi 

J 




Powerboat Sinks Just Short of Record 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — The British powerboat Vir gin 
Atla ntic Challenger, attempting to break the re- 
cord for fastest sea crossing ofthe Atlantic, foun- 
dered Thursday off the southwestern tip of Ea- 
‘ gland, within hours of its goal 

All nine crew members had gotten onto two fife 
rafts and were picked up by the British cargo ship 
Geestbay, a spokesman for the attempt said. Two 
Royal Navy helicopters woe in the area to pick up 
the crew from the freighter. 

. The Challenger sent a mayday at 6:20 PM. 
saying it was staking in 12-foot (4-meter) seas 138 
mites (222 kilometers) off the southwestern coast 
of England. It was less than two hours away from 
the SciBy Isles, its destination, bn the fourth day of 
its race from New York Harbor. . .. 

Before nmning into badweather, theCbalknacr 
was reported on course to cut two hours off die 
1952 record of 3 (fays, 10 hours and 40 mtmxtes set 
by the liner SLS. United States. - 

Oigaiiizeresaidtheniayd^wasrecdvedbytlie 
West German cargoshipBrtdgewater.which was - 
30 minutes sailing time away. The ChaBengePs 
radio went sOentuter sending the distress cafi. 1 


About an hour before, the boat’s sponsor, Rich- 
ard Branson, millionaire head of Virgin Records 
and Virgin Atlantic Airlines, radioed from the boat 
flint they were nmning into bad weather. 

“The weather is getting worse again, and we are 
not able to go Bat out; so it will be a close-run 
thing," Branson, 34, told Press Association, the 
British domestic news agency. 

Tbe 6S-foot launch had spent most of the monar 
ing cutting through waves of 3 to 6 feet asit erased 
at 45 knots, or 52 mites per hour. It rendezvoused 
with the navy vessel Green Rover to take on fuel 
for the final leg of the journey. 

Naw^tortwg Pike had declared by radiotete- 

thrown at It The only weak link seems to be the 
crew," which was exhausted. 

“We are as confident as we have ever been that 
we will wmfce it,” Branson said then. *T think we 
have a vwy good chance. The weather isn't so good 
at tbe m oment bat I think we can cope with il" 

On the voyage the crew had encountered a fuel 
tank leak that forced making an emergency refuel- 
ing stop Wednesday, some engine tremble in rough 
seas and, eariy in thejoraney, a change of course to 
avoid coffiding with a school of whales. (AP, IfPJ) 


SCOREBOARD 


B: 


Transition 


Baseball 


•ASMALL 


TEXAS— MatiM Dwayne HOT*. pUrtwr. 

• from Tulsa o I «* Twos League. 

FOOTBALL- 
Nafloaaf Football Loam 
.T INDIANAPOLIS— Arantref Malt Koflsr. 

- quarterback, from Mia Buffalo Blit* for an 
undtadand draft pick. 

--J MINNESOTA — Staned Brian Htotowav.de- 

- i tamlva and. cut NUIw Jams and David Lswla, 

rormlna backs, and John Haimt* and' Greg 
Smith, defensive Unemen 
: T n. Y. JETS — Claimed Luka PraUrfdoa. 
punter, from waters. Placed Dm Poona, 
award, an tbe Murad reserve IM. 

SAN DIEDO— Cut Dan Reaabani amtUav 
Woodard, oflenehw linemen, aid Dan Pass- 
more. wide receiver. Sig ned Curt Cole, tight 
end. 

United States Football Loam 
ARIZONA — AaeriredDarak HMfMVrVM* 
. receiver, and Ray Banltav. Itaebocker, from 
Oakland In exchange for financial consldar- 
'- atoms. 

HOCKEY 


Wednesday’s Major League line Scores 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
IFWOom) 

mi 


Sutton. Onftervm (M and Heath; Smith- 
■on. Horn <n <md Sotas. W Sutton. m. L— 
Smithson, 1M0. HR— Oakland. BocMe (*). 
(Sacead Gama) 

■MM4K-7 f • 
MS IM n* — l 7 1 
McCattv. Mia Mj.Onttverw (I) and Haathi 
Portugal. FI ban [7). R. Davis C7» and Sotos. 
W— Rile. 1-1. L— Portugal, 0-L Sv— Ontiveros 
(5). HR— Oaklmdi M. Davis (32). 


Kamos atr Oil ns Ml- 3 t • 

BQSfaa at xn «*- M » 9 

Black. Beckwith (1), Jones (31 and Sand- 
berg; Hurst and Gednxn Sullivan (B). w— 
Hurst, M- L — Block, Ml HRs— Kansas City. 
McRae (10). WMte (17). Boston. Evans (13). 
Buckner (131. Lvens (4). 


CBMorota 


{First Gamk) 

•U MON 


: 13 3 
-1 * I 

McGaskm. album {•), Moore (l» an d 
Boone; Moore, Nunez (13) told Kronwv.W— 
album. 7-2- Li— Nunez. 4-2. Sv— Moore (221. 


NEW JERSEY. — sinned Pat Conochar.cen- 
tar, Greg EvtushevskL rlgM wins, Writ 
McLeaa soalle. tan Perouson«w MWiel Bto- 
duc. de f e n s em en. 


OaHfomla MO MO «H ( 3 

Seattle . 003 Mi W»-4 12 2 

Zahn. Staton IS), Sanchez (7) and Narron; 
Beattie. Lazarko (7) and Scott. Kearncv (0). 
W— Seattle. 5-S L— Zahn. 2-2. HR— Seat! In, 
Cower* (111.- 


MN' 

m 


Hi 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Dorsett, NFL Cowboys Agree to Pact 

THOUSAND OAKS. CHtads 


*0 S^d'the Dribs Cowbc^s “toM* 

m Wednesday sfter motter agmt, 

1 Dorsett to bold oma. 1 ^ wo more 

ai n included deferred flxm^ ' ^ 7 not tooch his 


that 


% 


a ristrial und gpt KMwAMd Oser 
■ ■* — charges to start on Sept. v. 

itiaker said he would appeal the 


0M 201 OOP— 4 n 0 
030 3M 2Tx — fl » 0 
Clark. Reed (4). Easterly (7) and Banda. 
Willard 10); Flanagan. Snell («) and Demp- 
sey. W n onogan. 2-1 L— Clark. VI Sv— 
Snell (5). HRs— Cleveland. Thornton (10). 
Baltimore, Young (IS). Lynn (19), Dempsey 

m. 

Taranto Ml •» NO — I 0 > 

Terns 0M IN 000-1 4 ■ 

Sfleo and Whffts HoubA, Sdmkn «). Henry 
m and PetrtolL W-Stleik 114. L-Hawh. li- 
ra. HR— Toronto. BarfMd (W). 

Detroit Ml 090 BM f a 

Milwaukee mo om no-3 « 3 

Morris. Hernandez (9) and Parrtsh; Darwin 
and Simmons. W— Morris, KM. L— DarwirvO- 
14. Sv — Hernandez (24). HR— Detroit, Sim- 
mons 14). 

New York 030 «* «4— 1» IS I 

-Chicago 012 2M 020- 7 M 2 

WNhKin.Snirte’y u), Fisher (S). Rlghettl 19) 
and Haseer; SMUner. Aeosto CD. wonTmeb- 
tar C7l,G*eaton (7). Jomes (» and Fist w— 
Fisher, 4-3. L— Junes. 44. Sv— RMwtti (22). 
HRs— Hew York, Hassev If). Mattlnglv (20). 
CMoaao. Guillen (II. Fisk 02). 

national LEAGUE 
Montreal IM 4U 300-0 U 2 

Chicago 104 #M 091 — 7 0 2 

EL Smith, Burk* (7) and Butara Nicosia (*) ; 
Fontenot, Sorensen (4), Bruestar (8) anti Do- 
vfs. W-B. Smith, UA L— Sorensen. 34, Sv— 
Barks (S). HR*— Montreal, Webster (5), Bu- 
tara (1). ailcaM. Cev (14), Moreland (10), 
Hebnor (3). 

Houston 3>1 MO Ml— 7 I 3 

San Francisco DO 100 M2— S * • 

Ryan, Hoothcodc (4). Dawtev (7).Smllh (0) 
and Bailey; Got*. Davis (71. Minton (0). W— 
Heathcock, 1-1. L— Dovta,3-7. Sv— Smith (If). 
HRs— Houston Than (3). San Francisco. 
Or ta eae n (7). 

PhModelpMa 0M OM 101—2 7 2 

New York 0M Ml 001—1 i 1 

1C Gross. Gannon (M and VJrgB; Darting. 
McDowell (81 and Carter, w— K. Gross. IM. 
L — Danina. 104. Sv— Carman IS). 
OkMsH 100 ON SOI — 1 S 1 

sot Diego OM tee Mu— 4 4 B 

note. Robinson 17) end Diaz; Draveclcv 
md Kennedy. W—oraveckv. 1D7.L— ' nbbs.5- 

a 

toe mb see— e s 3 

M3 OH Mx— 6 > 0 

McMwrtrv. Oedman (5). Como (8) and Gar- 
one; Wok* end Setasda V»— WeWi, 9-T. L- 
McMurtrv, 0-3. 



Altanta 


Mistrial Declared in Tulane Case 

their minds Thursday, af 

scheduled a new trial on . 

Assistant District Attorney Bruce 

Major League Standings 

““ 

For die Record 

Souttirib gutter David ycSs and fined 

qw W‘ ei for ^ 

ot during oMic ^ 


Toronto 

New Yoric 

Detroit 

Stott more 

Boston 

MJtwoukM 

Clevetand 


l^^scSwbiauSC of a back ^ ^cc to be run in Las Un** 

Tbe first WocH 120! dhnri»(» 

Argentina, was postponed beca 


East Dlyldaa 
W L 
72 42 
64 4B 

60 53 
51 54 
57 SS 
» 60 
37 M 

watt Division 

45 49 
6) 50 

61 SI 
55 SS 
53 61 
51 61 
42 70 



odes) per hour. 

The first 
n 400-mile) . 
after a two-year delay ca 1 


coUfornla 
Kansas CUT 
Oakland 
Chi cow 
Seattle 
Minnesota 
Texas 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East DtVIttM 
W L 


Yankees’ owner had orderea 


New York 

SS 

41 

St. Louts 

C7 

43 

Montreal 

64 

« 

OrfcaSW 

SS 

56 

FhHodatpfcto 

52 

6ft 

Pittsburgh 

33 

76 

W«tt DtvUJaa 


LOS Ang6»6 

67 

44 

San Otago 

60 

S3 

Onctonotl 

5S 

S3 

Houston 

52 

60 

Attanto 

42 

41 

San Franctaeo 

43 

» 


A41 

JM 


The ANodaMd Pre» 


Tom Foley, the Phillies’ shortstop, was upended by Wally Hackman, but histhrowgot the 
double play in the ninth inning that ended the Mets’ nine-game winning streak Wednesday. 


Compiled by Oar SiajJ From Dispaidta 

LOS ANGELES — Bob Welch 
became the Dodgers' first pitcher 
since Fernando Valenzuela, in 
1981, to win eight straight games, 
throwing a five-hitter Wednesday 
night for a 5-0 victory over the 
Atlanta Braves that ran Los Ange- 
les* winning streak to six. 

Welch's shutout, in which he 
struck out eight and walked just 
one, also ran to 52 the Dodger 
pitching staffs streak of consecu- 
tive innings without allowing an 
earned run. 

In the thir d inning a botched 
bunt play, what the Braves' third 
baseman, Ken OberiddL called 
“mass confusion,” led io the Dodg- 
ers’ first two runs. 

Welch led off with his first extra- 
base hit in two seasons, a one-hop 
double to the left-fid d wall of 
which he said, “2 was jusi as sur- 
prised as anybody else.” 

When Mariano Duncan bunted 
down the third-base line, pitcher 
Craig McMurtry charged off the 
mound, spun and aimed a fast ball 
toward third base. But somewhere 
in mid-delivery, he belatedly dis- 
covered that OberfcfeU had left the 
bag unoccupied. 

Oberkfell was yelling for 
McMurtry to throw to first base, 
whDe catcher Rick Cerone was yell- 
ing for a throw to (hind — until he, 
too, realized that was no one there. 

What to do? McMurUy threw 
toward the only person he saw; Joe 
Amalfi tano, the Dodgers’ third- 
base coach, who ducked 
McMurtry's bullet but never 
slopped windmEUing his right arm 
as Weldi scored. 

In the fifth, Weldi walked and 
saved k fftin, on a wild pitch, and 
in the eighth he reached base a 
third time when he faked a bunt 
and singled to right 
“That’s the key to having a good 
year," said fellow pitcher Orel Her- 
shiser, “when your batting average 
is higher than your eamed-nin av- 
erage.” 

At the moment Welch, who is 
batting 231, is the only Dodger 
who can make that claim. He low- 
ered his ERA to 1.67 with his fifth 
complete game in his last six starts. 

Putties 2, Mets 1: In New York, 
the Mets’ nine-game winning 
streak ended when Philadelphia re- 
liever Don Carman escaped a 
bases-loaded jam in the ninth by 
getting Keith Hernandez, the mar 
jor-Ieague leader in game-winning 
RBI, to ground into a game-ending 
double play. 

. ..With two on and none out that 
inning, Carman replaced Kevin 
Gross, then threw Ron Garden- 
hire’s sacrifice into right field, al- 
lowing one run to scare and leaving 
men on second and third. But after 
an intentional walk. Carmen got 
Wally Backman. cm a 13-game hit- 
ting streak, to ground back to the 
mound lor one out and Hernandez 
bounced into a 4-6-3 double play. 
Hernandez has 19 g^e- winning 
RBI this season, but is 0-for-7 the 
last two games with runners in 
scoring position. He stranded nine 
Wednesday night. 

Ron Darling was the loser, al- 
though be gave up only five hits in 
seven innings; he last won on July 
18. 

Expos 8, Cubs 7: Run-scoring 
seven Lb-inning singles by pinch- 
hitter Scot Thompson and Tim 


Runes gave Montreal its victory in 
Chicago. Winning pitcher Bryn 
Smith, 144, hit nis first major- 
league homer; Ron Cey hit a grand 
slam for the Cubs. 

Astros 7, Giants 5: Dickie Then’s 
three- run homer as a pinch hitter in 
the seventh broke a 3-3 tie and 
Houston won in San Francisco. 

BASEBALL ROUNDUP 

Them later singled in a run, but tbe 
Astros' Nolan Ryan lasted only 
three innings and failed to win for 
the 1 1th consecutive start. 

Ptodres 4, Reds I: With two out 
in the third innin g in San Diego, an 
error by Cincinnati shortstop Dave 
Concepcion was followed by Terry 
Kennedy’s two-run single and 
Graig Nettles’ two-rnn double. 
Pitcher Dave Dravecky improved 
his record against the Reds to 6-1. 

Yankees 10, Write Sox 7: In the 
American League, Ron Hassey sin- 
gled in two runs in the ninth to win 
the game in Chicago, and possibly 
saved the job erf New York’s man- 
ager, Billy Martin. 

Before the game Martin an- 
nounced that he had canceled a 
mandatory workout scheduled for 
Thursday by the team’s owner, 
George Stembrenner; when tbe 
White Sox took a 7-6 lead in the 
eighth, it seemed certain that Mar- 
tin, who has been fired by Stein- 
brenner three times in the last sev- 
en years, would incur his boss' 
wrath once again. 

“We needed to win,” said Has- 
sey, who hit two home runs Mon- 
day in Ch teago and a third in the 
second inning Wednesday. 

Dan SpQlner started for Chicago 
in place of Tom Seaver, who had 
bade spasms Wednesday morning. 

Blue Jays 4, Rangers 1; Dave 
Stieb pitched a four-hitter in Ar- 
lington Texas, and Jesse Barfield 
drove in two runs and scored one 
for Toronto. Steib retired II 
straight batters be ginning in the 
fourth inning. 

Orioles 8, Indians 4: Fred Lynn 
and Mik* Young each hit two-run 
homers and Rick Dempsey drove 
in three runs, one with a homer, to 
beat Cleveland in Baltimore. 

Red Sox 16, Royals 3: Bm Buck- 
ner hit a grand dam in Boston and 
Dwight Evans and Steve Lyons 
wmh fait two-run homers against 
Kansas City as the Red Sox, with a 
league's season-high 21 hits, ended 
a five-game losing streak Wade 
Boggs, who went 4-for~6, regained 
tbe league batting lead from Kan- 
sas City’s George Brett, .360 to 
.357. 

Mariners 1-6, Angels 3-1: AI 
Cowens drove in three runs with a 
homer and a single to back the five- 
hit pitching of Jim Beattie and Jack 
Lazorko in the second game in Se- 
attle. California won the opener in 
the 12th inning when Rod Carew 
doubled in one run and Ruppert 
Jones singled in another. 

A's 5-7, Twins 0-4: Mike Davis 
hit a two-run homer and doubted in 
a run as Oa klan d won twice in 
Minneapolis. In the first game. 
Brace Bochte’s two-run homer 
helped Don Sutton get his 292d 
victory in the majors. 

Tigers A Brewers 3: Lance Par- 
rish drove in two runs and Nelson 
Simmons homered for two as De- 
troit won in Milwaukee. Danny 
Darwin lost Ms 10th straight, a 
Brewers record. (LAT, UPI, API 


The Philadelphia Syndicate Made It Big, and Busted Up 


By Andrew Beyer bonanzas at many 
Washington Post Service across the country. 

SARATOGA SPRINGS, New Brodie said the group 
York — Kenny Brodie describes profit of nearly So rniDi 
himself and his dude of friends as Ils streak came to an 
“iust a bunch of action guys who'd unpleasant end last mom 
bet on anything.” B " vm arac fn 

Indeed, the four young men from 
Philadelphia were typical gamblers 
in most respects, lnev had mis- 


oiber tracks 


made a 
ion until 
t and 
The 

group was barred from betting at 
Sportsman's Park and that much- 
publicized event touched off dis- 
agreements within the syndicate 
that finally caused its breakup. But 


$100,000 on a race,” Brodie said, 
“but he was definitely looking for a 
good spot” 

Opportunities for that wager 
arose as tracks began to offer exotic 
wagers — such as the Pick Six and 
the TWin Trifecta — with jackpots 
that kept growing day by day if no 
one hit them. Last winter, when 
Suffolk’s Twin Tri jackpot grew to 
hundreds of thousands of dollars. 


roll would give the syndicate an 
edge over everybody else at tbe 
track. The concept finally paid off 
at Sportsman's Park. 

Ihe track had introduced a su- 
per-exotic wager, the Super Bet, 
that consisted of two exactas and a 
triple. When he thought the time 
was right,- Brodie flew to Chicago 
and lost $80,000 in two nights of 
betting. Then, on the third mght, he 


, ■ _ - . ■ k in^ i e ei laei j tifllriTVAl T_i*a i -** — y-|r _ — 1 - — — — - —— » — — — — — — » v ■ » 

spent their youth at poker tables ^ ^h, ^ be back in Brodie said be flew to Boston with handicapped the three cheap races 

and race trades. They had taken a new alignments, and simi- one partner and a huge bankroll and concocted a play that consisted 

fling in the lar syndicates will be born, because 

bet .dogs and crottcre and, Brodie bis partners showed 
Brodie raid, “If there had teen what profits ^ from 

cockroach racing anywhere, we d ^e^ty exotic wagering. 


have been there. 

But Brodie and his pals were not 
entirely typical. For a period of a 
few months, they were the biggest 
horse bettors in the United States 
— the mysterious Philadelphia bet- 
ting syndicate that collected a 
5764,284 payoff at Sportsman's 
Park near Chicago and six-figure 


The Philadelphia syndicate had a 


of 30 combinations in one exacia, 
20 in another exacts and 120 com- 
binations in a triple — 74000 com- 
binations altogether at $1 apiece. 
When they hit for the record 
dicaie was off and 


Brodie handicapped, the partner 
dealt with the mathematics of play- 
ing so many combinations and they 
made a $105,000 bet on the Twin 
Tii 

a^‘7S^by7““^"^ys “We got buried,” Brodie raid. $764^84, tbe syndicate was off anc 
thoEghtSt was great,” Brwhe said, “But everybody saw the strength of "^-and 
“Jyou could gamble with tbe pCT- whai we were doing. ^ They Jut a Twin Tnfecut at Wa- 

centages in your favor. If some- They saw that if the jackpot for 
thinglooked good, we'd always try an exotic wager had grown large 
tobet on it” They also liked the enough, it made mathematical 
idea of betting big. “One of our sense tobet big money in an effort 
guys had always wanted to put 10 win. Tte sheer size of thor bank- 


Wa- 

terford Park for $247,000; a Twin 
Tri at Delaware for $149,000; a 
Pick Six at Longacres for $340,000; 
a Super Bet at Maywood harness 
track for $140,000. 


Pet SB 
J32 - 
JS7\ 7 
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STB - 
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PCt GB 
M3 — 
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JS66 5 
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jtn 34 

AM — 
■S31 ft 
SO V 
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18 

24ft 


Some Football Players Get to Have AU the Fun 

At the University of Hawaii, They and Coach Have Some Hot Times 


The Associated Pros 

HONOLULU —This practice session, if it 
can be called that, began after midnight for 
the University of Hawaii's football players. 
And that was not the hardest pan: their 
coach, Dick Tomey, then wanted them to 
walk across a pit of hot coals. 

Tomey, who conducts “positive impact 
seminars” between seasons, said tbe fire 
walking “will help our players in the class- 
room, personal life and may even help us as a 
team, although wo have no delusions it will 
make us a great football team." 

But Greg Tipton, a junior from Thousand 
Oaks, California, said he pictured it “as a 
satanic rituaL” 

Nose guard AI Noga, a sophomore from 
Honohiln said, “I reafiy was afraid. On the 
outside, I was saying, ‘Go for it’ But inside I 
was ceiling myself, ‘No way.' ” 


Tomey refused to allow reporters and pho- 
tographers to watch the fire walk Tuesday 
because press attention “would distract from 
what we’re trying to do and cause somebody 
to be injured. Its certainly not a publicity 
stunt.” 

He said he got the idea from attending a 
ami lar session earlier this year where be met 
Tony Robbins of Del Rey, California, who 
usually charges $125 per person to take part. 
Neither Tomey nor the athletic director, Stan 
Sheriff, would say how much money was 
spent for about 80 players to walk the coals, 
although Sheriff said Robbins was paid from 
a budget for consultation fees. 

The fire walk climaxed a six-hour seminar 
on personal development that Tomey, who 
beams his etahih season as the Rainbows’ 
coach, called ’'“probably one of the most en- 


riching blocks of time” for his players. 

And Tipton, after emerging from the 12- 
foot-long (3.£ meters) fire pit, said, “Satan 
was nowhere to be found. What I found was 
the potential within myself to do things I’ve 
never dreamed of.” 


hot embers, said, “The first time I did it my 
feet felt it a little, but 1 didn't feel a thing after 
that. It was unreal.” 

Tomey said there were no injuries, “but 
there ought have been a blister or two.” 
Offensive guard Brian Derby, a senior 
from Pearl City, Hawaii, said he got a small 
blister “when I stopped and looked down.” 
“The object is to look up, so you don't see 
what you’re walking on. And, you're sup- 
posed to think of something cooL We kepi 
repeating, ‘Cool moss, cool moss.'” 


Last month, as the jackpot for 
the Super Bet started to build dur- 
ing the harness meeting at Sports- 
man’s, Brodie returned to Chicago. 
“I went with the guy who was doing 
our siat weak, and we both fell it 
was going to be a long siege.” he 
said “On our first night J went to 
the window with a saichd to make 
kind of a goodwill play of $40,000. 
I was betting when a guy wearing a 
work shirt came up to me and said, 
real belligerently. You’re going to 
have to get on another line and give 
other pMple a chance to bet!' ” 

Brodie was perplexed. “Do you 
work here?” he asked. 

“I’m tbe president of the track,” 
said Billy Johnston. “And you guys 
from Philadelphia aren’t going to 
come here and get special treat- 
ment.” 

Brodie said, “I was bewildered. 
It was tbe theater of the bizarre." 
He finally came to understand that 
Johnston was barring him from 
betting because the trade, wanted to 
keep the jackpot building as a 
drawing card 

Brodie wanted to make a public 
fight. He knew his group was in the 
right and, besides, be has an egg 
that likes the limelight. His part- 
ners craved anonymity. Some of 
them were starting to resent Brodie, 
who was putting up relatively little 
capital but hogging the spotlight. 

So instead of fighting, the syndi- 
cate surrendered and split apart. 

Brodie was bitterly disappoint- 
ed He had wanted to correct the 
impression that he was pari of 
some sinister monolith instead of a 
bunch of straightforward gamblers. 

“On die night that we were 
barred," he said, “1 had handi- 
capped for an hour and a half on a 
trotting circuit Td never seen be- 
fore. There are five and one-half 
million posable combinations in 
the Super BeL and I bet 40,000 of 
them. 

“We weren’t covering the board. 
We weren’t betting any locks. We 
were really just a bunch of guys 
looking for action.” 







* 


Page 18 



OBSERVER 


A U. S. Rail Odyssey 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — That summer 
we took the boys out west by 
train. Easterners still said “out 
west" in those days when they 
meant Arizona, Utah, Colorado. 
Nowadays, when every place is the 
same plaix. old-timers' who remem- 
ber when the United States was 
many different places are probably 
the only people who find remote 
territory remarkable enough to be 
spoken of with the awe implicit in 
“out west." 

Even then, you could fly there in 
the ume it takes to drink' a couple 
of soda pops and eat a bad meal, 
but the point of the trip was the 
train. It was obvious that it would 
soon be impossible to cross the 
country' by train, and it seemed 
important for the children to expe- 
rience that trip, because the chil- 
dren were going to be around well 
into the 21st century, and it would 
be good for the country to have a 
few old galoots — as they would 
then be — who could remember 
what the United States felt like 
when it was a vast continental land 
mass. 

So we took a Pullman from 
Washington to Chicago. Two air- 
conditioned bedrooms with the di- 
viding partition removed was luxu- 
ry, compared to the Conestoga 
wagons in which Lhe real old-timers 
made the trip in the genuine, au- 
thentic old days, as 1 must have 
told the boys somewhere near 
Harpers Ferry, since by that time I 
would have taken two martinis, 
thereby reaching the state where I 
have always enjoyed idling the 
young what soft lives they lead. 

□ 

In those days the boys still lis- 
tened respectfully to lectures de- 
ploring the decline of the spartan 
spirit in America, for they were still 
in short pants and could be easily 
sent to bed for interrupting with 
sarcastic questions about whether 
Conestoga wagons carried ice 
cubes and martini pitchers. 

After a night on the B&O, we 
changed trains at Chicago. And 
there was time to take the boys 
outside to lei them feet their feet 
sink into the gummy asphalt, be- 
cause the streets were melting in 
that awful Chicago August heat. 

In the evening, we rolled out 
across the prairie and felt oursdves 
engulfed by the continental im- 
mensities. the dining car was all 


gleaming white linen, heavy silver- 
ware, ice tinkling in the glasses, real 
rood odors coming from lhe kitch- 
en. and afterward we sat in the 
darkened dome car and watched 
the lightning from distant storms 
bombard the Hat black earth, just 
as it does in movies about bad 
weather on distant planets. 

And of course, we actually were 
on a distant planet: this strange, by 
us mostly unexplored planet Earth, 
in the area called the United States, 
on a vast prairie hardly less alien to 
us than the surface of Jupiter, at a 
speed that would have been incon- 
ceivable to the old-timers with their 
wagons, horses, slow-poke oxen. 

□ 

1 let up on the boys about all this. 
Didn't tell them about the Mor- 
mons pulling those heavy carts be- 
hind them all the way from the 
Mississippi to the Great Salt Lake, 
or about grasshopper plagues, the 
cattle turned to ice by the blizzards, 
the leather hinges on sod shanties 
— O Pioneers! Children can get 
America into their bones if you 
move them across it not too fast 
and let them see and feel for them- 
selves. You don't have to pound 
this kind of thing into a child: you 
let it take him by surprise. 

Then the mountains. My god. 
the mountains! The beauty of 
them ! Out on the horizon Lhey are a 
vision of grandeur that, like the 50 
billion stars over the Grand Can- 
yon on a clear moonless night, 
mokes a human realize bov.- infini- 
tesimally inconsequential a human 
nmsL be. 

I like to think that a child who 
has seen those stars and those 
moun tains will ever after, surely 
without ever unders tanding why, 
understand that it is important to 
strive but absurd to strut. 

After three days we left the train, 
in Albuquerque. Three days is a 
fasL trip across the United States, 
except when compared to what the 
jets do. and what the jets do is wipe 
America out of your consciousness, 
out of your bones, marrow and 
blood. 

In Albuquerque we rented a car 
and set out across the desert, and 1 
made the boys listen to the Apache 
Lutheran Hour on the radio. That 
was 20 years ago. just a few weeks 
before every place became the same 
place. 

New York Times Service 


Director Martha Coolidge: 
A Real Genius With Actors 


By Paul Attanasio 

Washington Past Service 

N EW YORK — The term 
“woman director" has exist- 
ed in the Hollywood thesaurus on 
the same page as “dancing ele- 
phant." But lhaL's been changing, 
slowly, and one of the women 
changing it is Martha Coolidge. 
whose new movie, “Real Genius." 
promises to be a hit. 

Even now, having made a mov- 
ie she’s thrilled with, she can’t 
quite believe “Real Genius" will 
be a success. “There's so much 
going on that I don't have any 
control over. It's the theaters you 
get into and how many people get 
in the first weekend. And that’s iL 
It’s a very cold, cruel world out 
there." 

Yes. she is related to Calvin 
Coolidge: her grandfather. Ar- 
thur W. Coolidge, a lieutenant 
governor of Massachusetts, was 
cousin to the president. But what- 
ever gene kept Silent Cal silent 
has mutated out of Martha, an 
effusively articulate woman with 
a ready laugh. 

Historically, women in film- 
making have been relegated to the 
“soft.” intuitive, behind-the-cam- 
era roles: casting, publicity, cos- 
tumes and makeup, design, 
screenwriting. Only a handful of 
women directors are working at 
all regularly in Hollywood: Gil- 


lian Armstrong. Amy Heckerling, 
Penelope Spheeris. Susan Seidd- 
man. Martha Coolidge. 

Coolidge's father was a profes- 
sor of architecture at Yale and her 
mother was an architect, too, both 
students of Walter Gropius; she 
grew up in an intellectual salon in 
New Haven. “I remember going 
to Calder's house when I was a 
little girL and Josef Albers and 
Anni Albers were two of our best 
friends." 

Indirectly, architecture gave 
Coolidge her Erst lessons in Elm- 
making: “You’re constantly deal- 
ing with crews You're constantly 
dealing with the money people 
and the practicality of construct- 
ing the rather large item. I always 
went to sites with my father, and I 
always saw them meeting with cli- 
ents, crews working.” 

But it wasn't exactly a straight. 


Functional Bauhaus line to film- 
making. First, there was singing, 
then stage acting, a craft Coolidge 
continues to study. And there was 
woodcutting: Coolidge went to 
Paris in high school to study with 
the American prinunaker Anto- 
nio Frasconi. then enrolled at the 
Rhode Island School of Design. 

“if 1 had gotten into a rock 
band, I think 1 probably would’ve 
been a singer, and Goo knows I 
probably would be dead now.” 
But when she made her first film, 
an animated short, at Rhode Is- 
land. “I felt compelled to be a Elm 
director — it was not a small 
thing. The minute I did a film. I 
felt 1 had to do this. I felt that it 
brought together my visual sense, 
my dramatic sense and my tech- 
nological abilities." 

Coolidge directed four film* at 
Rhode Island but dropped out 
after three years to enter the com- 
petitive world of New York com- 
mercial-making. “People said, 
‘Don’t tell anyone you warn to be 
a director.’ It wasn't that you 
can't be a director because you're 
a woman, but that you just can't 
be a director. Because there was a 
real prejudice in the business 
then, which was very wort-your- 
way-up-f rom-the -bottom, biased 
against film school graduates.” 

Shortly after she enrolled at 
Columbia University's film 
school, the university closed dur- 
ing the student strike of 1968. She 
then tried New York University. 
“When I applied, the guy told me 
I couldn't be a woman director. 
He said. ‘You can't be a woman 
director. You can’t name five 
women directors in the world.' 
And I couldn't." So Coolidge 
moved to Canada, where she be- 
came the producer, writer and all- 
around factotum for a children's 
show called “Magic Tom." 

Frustrated by the seniority 
problem she had encountered in 
commercials, Coolidge did enroll 
at NYU. She made a documenta- 
ry about her brother, and a prize- 
winning portrait of her grand- 
mother with a grant from the 
National Endowment for the 
Arts. She won her third Erst prize 
at the American Film Festival 
with "Not a Pretty Picture." a 


docudrama about having been 
raped in prep school. 

While editing “Not a Pretty 
Picture" she received a call from 
Francis Coppola and the produc- 
er Fred Roos. who were starting 
up Zoetrope Studios. “They 
called , me tip and said, ‘We saw 
your films, we'd like to meet you.' 
Freaked me out. So they inter- 
viewed me. They said, 'We’re 
looking at women directors, and 
we think you're iL’ It just com- 
pletely made my year." 

But Coppola was making “One 
From the Heart" and r unning 
wildly over budget, so after two 
years Coolidge's project, called 
’“Photoplay,” was scrapped. 

Coobdge returned to Canada, 
where she began work on a film 
called “The City GirL" The mon- 
ey ran ouL Again a mentor rode 
to the rescue — Peter Bogdano- 
vich. who was just starting his 
own company. “He loved the pic- 
ture. He said, ‘I love this picture. 
I'm gonna buy it' By this time I'm 
really cynical. *Ohi, sure you’re 
gonna buy iL You know, every- 
body has” tried.’ He sicked two 
young lawyers on them, it took 
five months, but he got iL" 

Bogdanovich paid for the com- 
pletion of “The Gty Girl," which 
has yet to be released. In lhe mid- 
dle of finishing it, she got the offer 
to mak e “Valley Girl'’ 

“I went out to dinner with my 
friend who produced it, Andy 
Lane. Andy spent two hours at 
dinner selling me on this project, 
with me not realizing that that’s 
what he was doing. I was saying, 
*Good! Good for you! Good 
luck! Great great!' And finally he 
said, ‘Look, it's about girls. And 
we don't really understand girls. 
So that’s why we'd like you to 
read this. You probably wouldn't 
be interested, but we’d really like 
to have you direct iL’ " 

“Valley Girl” cost 5350,000, 
grossed SI 7 million and was 
something of a suoc&s (Testime. 
At 37Taner 18 years of making 
movies, Martha Coolidge had ar- 
rived. Sort of. 

“We were just getting into the 
crunch of teen-age sex comedies. I 
was offered every angle teen sex 
comedy in Los Angeles. Stacks of 



Norey Bare for Tin W te hngwo ftat 

Martha Coolidge: “Remember your own youth.*" 


them. Some of them I bad to read 
all the way through because I 
couldn’t believe that people in 
their right mind could offer this 
picture to me. a woman, even if 
they didn't know me. I was of- 
fered nothing else, so I took the 
one that was the least offensive 
and had the most promise, and 
that was ‘Joy of Sex.’ ” 

Paramount had bought the 
rights to the best-selling sex man- 
ual 10 years earlier and had spent 
mini ons developing iL By the time 
it got to Coolidge, all Paramount 
had was the title, a deadline on its 
option and a half-written script. 

And a strategy: Rush the movie 
oul mak e it as cheaply as possible 
and recoup the development 
money. 

“I figured, ‘Yeah, we’ll shooL 
two days and shut down. Well get 
ready and then we'U finish.' But 
nope, they wouldn't do that. They 
were trying to prove a point — 
that the picture could be made for 
nothing. It was the most disap- 
pointing single experience in the 
film business." In the end, Coo- 
hdge was pulled from the picture 
in post-production, and the stu- 
dio re-edited it 

“Joy of Sex" did not get her oul 
of youth movies. But in “Real 
Genius," as in "Valley GirL" she 
has pulled the youth movie out of 


the gutter. This is partly a result 
of her skill with actors and her 
t raining as an actress. More cen- 
trally still, it is a result of not 
pandering to her audience or con- 
sidering herself belter than her 
material: of taking the time to 
ground this highly artificial genre 
m reality (her production compa- 
ny is called the Real Movie Co.). 
For “Real Genius," the story of 
an advanced college science pro- 
gram that is secretly being used to 
develop weapons, she did months 
of research in laser technology 
and the policies of the CIA. 

There is a roundness, an emo- 
tional core, to the characters in 
her movies. “What’s important to 
me is that you can't judge young 
people by your own youth. You 
should always remember your 
own youth, and be in tonch with it 
— the most important, aspect of 
that bong not to forget bow im- 
portant everything is. 

“It's the first time, you know — 
the first lime you have sex, the 
first time you fall in love, the first 
time you're lied to, the first time 
you're disillusioned. . . . The 
biggest crime of adults making 
youth pictures is they forget how 
important everything is, and they 
make everything way too casual. I 
don't think anything is wiqial be- 
tween 16 and 25." 


people 


Jackson Reportedly Buys . 

Beatles Song Publisher > 

Michael Jackson has paid Sjtt- 
million to 550 million for ATV Mu- 
sic. a British music publishing com- 
pany that controls the copynghii to 
SoTooO songs, including most ofthe 

Beatles classics, the Los 
Times reports. Asked how the p 
star would finance the transaction. 

a source close to Jackson said. Out 

of pocket. It was probably one oi 
the simplest financing deals in his- 
tory" ATV controls songs by Ume 
Richard, Pat Benatar, the Pretend- 
ers and the Pointer Sisters in addi- 
tion to 25! songs written by John 
Lennon and Paul McCartney be- 
tween 1964 and 1970. It is believed 
that the only Len non-McCartney 
songs not controlled by ATV are 
“Love Me Do" and “P.S. I 
You," held by McCartneys MPL 
Communications, and “P‘* as * 
Please Me" and “Ask Me Why. 
owned by Dick James Music Ltd. 
An executive whose music compa- 
ny tried to buy ATV said of the 
company's Beatles holdings, 
“About 80 of those songs are what 
we call real serious earners." Many 
of the songs are still being recorded 
by other artists. The acquisition 
would make Jackson one of the 
world’s top 15 music publishers. 

□ 

A court-ordered auction 

will be held Aug. 29 Tor film and 
television rights to the life story of 
the anger-songwriter Marvin Gaye. 
who was fatally shot by his fathe r ! */ l 
last year. The auction was ordered'' 
by Superior Court Judge Bifly G. 
Mills m Los Angeles after three 
creditors with claims totaling 53.6 
million against Gaye’s estate ob- 
jected to the proposed sale of the 
rights to Motown Records, the la- 
bel for which the singer recorded 
some of his biggest hits. Gaye, 44, 
whose songs included “I Heard It 
Through the Grapevine." “What’s 
Going On" and, more recently, 
“Sexual Healing," died without 
leaving a wflL His father. Martin 
Gay, pleaded guilty to voluntary 
manslaug hter and is on probation. 


Gcdy Tyson has returned from a 
trip to drought-stricken Burkina 
Faso and Chad saying that “any 
amount of help, no matter bony-f 
minuscule it might seem, is an ad**r 
vantage to the people.” The actress. 
51. was name d We dnesday to head 
the 1985 UNICEF Halloween cam- 
paign for needy children. 


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BRUSSELS: zrogfarSJt. 

(02) 425 66 14 

geneva gJJsj. 


Cdl 


(022) 32 64 40 

I For Allied's free eslvnate 


0711 89.93.24 
01)961.12.12 


INTERDEAN 


WHO H5E FOR YOUR 
NEXT NTERNAUONAL MOVE 


FOR A FREE ESTIMATE CALL 


AMSTERDAM: 

ATHENS: 

BARCELONA: 

BONM: 

BREMEN: 

BRUSSELS: 

CAPI7- 

FRANXFURT: 

GENEVA: 

LONDON: 

MADRID: 

MANCHESTER; 

MUNICH: 

NAPLES: 

PARIS: 

ROME: 

VIBttIA: 

ZURICH: 


03 6523111 
1166062 
04211170591 
02)720.95.63 
9561863144 
06190J2001 


tt 

022143.85.30 
Imi961.41.41 
01^671.2450 


061 

089 

0811 


7072016 
1415036 
7801622 
3)0249000 
0615269342 
0222)955520 
01)363.20.00 


WORLDWIDE 
Nol MOVER 
FOUR WINDS INTL 

CALL US FOR YOUR NEXT MOVE 
PARIS (31 036 63 11 
LONDON (01) 578 66 11 


CONTINEX. Saial moves, cars, bao- 
— i. worldwide. Cdl Charte Para 
’ 81 [near Opera). 


SW 



VAN CLEEF&, ARPELS 

LONDON 

153 NEW BOND STREET. 

TEL: 01-491 1405 TELEX: 266265 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


MOVING 


BEAUDART 

/fooof Jt hit9ii\atio n ot Movny 
Fully professional - Reasonably paced 

PARIS (1] 867 42 46 


PERSONALS 


CATFSRWE TENTBiDS TA 
MU9QUEET JE fAlME. Jury. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FOR MORE REAL ESTATE 
OPPORTUNTIES SEE 
PAGE 13 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


COTE D'AZUR 

DeSgNfal modem country vila situated 
in chormmg surraundngs, til the roorrt 
of good sate including 60 sq/n. living 
room + drww room adjoining. The 
whale de-Bgned for sunlight 3 bed- 
rooms. 2 btahrooms. plus sepcxde sta- 
tic. half acre garden, fiberad pod. 
Good value P2L200.000. 

Rah 1860. Apdy 
JOHN TAYIOR SJL 
55 La Grataette 
06400 Comes 

Tel: (93) 38 00 66. Rx 470921. 


SOUTH OF FRANCE. Cote Breque an 
Spcrvth French border. 6 trios Iron 
Barit: tatl Airport ft hour ftoht front 
Parii) outstanding Basque vila an 2- 
oae port; rowdy. Rtoerb trees. 
Budding surface: 6100 sq.fl. sold with 
onvoue furniture F3^OOX0O or with- 
out: F2,500,D0Q. Located 1 role front 
St. Jeande-Lru Famous beach, dose 
io 4 gotf-rawies. Deepeea filling. 
Trout Idling n lhe Pyiinfas moun- 
tains with ski resorts m witter, etc. 
Evenng (3) 055 35 39 Mr. Gordier / 
Write: Laupre Manolo-BaUa, 64122 
Urru^ne, France. 


COTE D’AZUR 
5 Minute* From CANNES 
Fairytale view on sea 
and Port of Gdfe-Juan 
If MONTEVERDI 
18 anvtmnfrwlai of 3 roams. 
High das. tnformdion: 
COGICA Tranaactioiu 
Av. de Belgique. 06220 Gdfe-Juon. 
TeEra 63 35 42 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


TOURA1NE KMGS CASTLE5 country 
Fully restored farmhouse, ocA beams 
ail roams, 70 sqm Kving roam, 250 
sqjn. tving space, fitted kitchen, 2 
baths, shower, 5 bedrooms, 250 sqjn. 
additional 2nd floor, garage, game 
roam 125 sqm, new stable Far 3 
horses, pond grassland 25000 sq.m„ 
25 ha Weal horse riding, toning, 
new tennis nearby. Uraent leaving for 
USA. P950.000. 51 10,(300. Tel: France 
47-943705 


COTE D'AZUR. For iota by owner. 3 
bedroom apartment, furnished or wt- 
furnished, mavftm contfciorv namt- 
soiith view of sea & mountains, pod. 
pmate garage, storage, tennis courts, 
in high starring Fabron area of Nice. 
Ptadri col Nci (93) 81 -97-01 . (93) B6- 
3582, or contact owners-. Assatourion 
Properties, 9465 WWve BJvd, S/724, 
Beverly Hit. CA 90212 Tele* 194795 
ASTERN HIM. 


TOURANE. 50 KM TOURS. Vi hours 
Paris by highway. Beautiful stone 
house. 245 sqm, excellent condition, 
1 ,680 sqm enclosed pot 3 livings, 6 
bedrooms, 2 baths. 2 WCs, known, 
study, garage, outbuildings, ceBorv 
Fuel coined heating new, 6 marble 
fcepfages. new roof. Telephone. Ai 
shops, doctors, rdBway, tennis. 
F92U000. Mme Moreau 525 21 56 
Pons, Md»e Monjdon |49) 86 40 07, 


JUAN-LE5-PINS-ANTBIES, near 
Cannes, Nice, in superb re si dence 
with pool & tends, sea view, baai*ful 
opormenf, 90 sqm. living, 2 bed- 
rooms. 2 baths, equipped kitchen, ofi 
comforts, parage, 600 sqm. private 
garden. S 135.000. Perfect condition. 
Tel P3) 74 74 95 ffl Sept. 30. 


NEAR CAEN NORMAMJY. 17lh cen- 
tury 9-room residence, character, 
comfort + attaining 7-roam house to 
be renovated. Roof perfect condton. 
fireplaces, onow(tawdpOTBflir^2 

nowJU/BB 74 96. 8 pm I 10 cm. or 
01)9016 22 


COIE D’AZUR NICE. Red Estate 
Agency, buyttg an apartment or a 
vila? Solve a serious problem with a 
senous ownpony: Promotion Mosort 
ad for our brochixt 19 Avs Ad»r 
or Hotel Mencten 06000 Nee. Tefc 
P3| 87 OB 20 -81 48 80 


YOUR CONTACT IN PROVENCE. 

Houses with character. Ovnuutu 

S operties. Estates. EmJe GA&3N. 

» 55. 13532 STJffiMY-DE-PBO- 

VENCE Cede*. Tel [90) 9201.58 +. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


CANNES PARC MONTFtEUXY sta- 
dias, 2 rooms, high dass tens, pod. 
5eBing office on site at Hold Mont- 
fteury. 25 Av. Beousetour. Td (93) 38 
67 60 or Merida (93jy4 55 6 5. 


VAL DE LOIRE Very nice edde an 3 
ho, 14 roams, large outbuilding, sepa- 
rate house, stable, orange wove. 
150 tan from Pons by highway. 
F1.800.000.T9li 138(44 01 26. 


COTE D'AZUR, VINCE. Newly built 
vila. 4 bedrooms. 3 baths, pod. pwv 
aramie view sea & mountains. 
S28QJ00. [93) 24 03 66 / 24 24 49. 


CAP FBUIAT. Alpes Maritime*. Luwry 
ap artment. 2 bedrooms, furnished, dh 
reef acorn sea plus mooring for boot. 
Teh London 01459 5543 


DEAUVILLE marina triplex condo, fur- 
nished designer modem, own dodt, 2 
bedrooms, good invest unit. Astana 
STOjOOO. Boussand. ffl 948 4Q 69. 


DEAUVUEL 3 Luxurious residences, 
Jecm Ferrwwl 75006 Pons. 


NEAR AVIGNON. V3a & 3,000 sqjn. 
woods. SOOjOOQl tab (751 54 72 19or 
wnte Festin, Perou, 97290 Wcrriraque. 


GERMANY 


YOUR ESTATE AGENT M MUNICH. 
Enquire in writing to; John Schoitter, 
Onon GmbH, Bnenner Sir. 3. M00d 
Munch 2 


GREAT BRITAIN 


KENSINGTON, EXCEPTIONAL value, 
unusuedy spaooui townhouse. 4/5 
bedrooms, 2/3 receptions. 2 bath- 


i coratts, artwtt & tatdv 
en equipment. Tefc 01 -493 9941 , weefc- 
entis / evenings 01-870 4703. 


HYDE PARK. P«NCB GATE. London 
SW7. Bright attractive 2/3 bedroom 
upui tnienb in modem vert wefl ser- 
viced block, from £170,000 far 87 
year leases. Lira cns Ud.. PO Box 229, 
London W8 6DA. Td; 01-602 5554 


LONDON 8 INGUSH SHUtES. Beta- 


cohonipebcfetotethefiossieoutof 

buying/ renting. PROPERTY FINDERS, 
12 B Monvers St, Bath, Avon. Td 


(0225)64493. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


GREECE 


POROS HOUSE an 4,000 cqm. over- 
looking Aegean. Private, near beach, 

town X aSSto. Teh 028^/28440 


IRELAND 


ATTRACTIVE HOUSE FOR SA1E lo- 
cated in Dublin Mountains, 13 rides 
from city oeteer. House indudes 5 
bedrooms, 3 receptions, bar, fitted 
Idtohen & playroom. 3UX) sqit situat- 
ed on over 1 acre with grazing & 
pleasure rights aw 590 oats. Mog- 
nifreent p a nora m ic views, bnhm 
£160,000. let London 01-580 1077 
during office hours. 


ITALY 


AMALFI, MODERN CHARMMG 

house, n large grounds with roam 
fruit oind dlrus trees, private beach & 
swimming pool, space far 2 parted 
cm, 2 double bed ooms, 2 bath- 
rooms, large terrace with kwdy view 


of the sea. Centrd heatxia, etactriaty 
tel ephone mstaOed ltibOO roifion. 


and I 


Please contact My-. B-2 Via Dela 
Ouotro Fonttme 15. Rome 00184, Teh 
06463979or4609dl ; UK.-- 


Propariies, 55 Perrymecd 
SlwTTeir 01-736 


iPvtyamad 
I St, London 


UMBRIA - TUSCANY, 15 mins. Lake 
Trammo. mam raflrood +■ autostra- 
da, fully renovated farmhouse, 220 
sqjn. + terraces , large bans, 4.000 
njn. garden, possibitv more land 
C5 Switzerland 027/55 40 34. 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 

Private mansion, near Monaco Prince 
Mace, pa n o ramic sea view. 

Tefc (93) 30 46 54. 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


SEVREMffiUDON. Residential apart- 
ment. 3 bedroom, double firing, 
eq ui pp ed kitchen, bathroom ter- 
rtjees, cedar. Garages plus parting. 

bit!, school, a. uoud Port & train. D 1 
ran. to MontaonusseL Free far sole 
now. FF 1.180000X0. By owner or 
rent on speod contract FF 6,500 
monthly, famished charges ioduded 
26R 1 »«n^MConoerge53446 
67. Sevres or owner, Houston. Texas 
71S-464-19Q7. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS ft SUBURBS 


30 MM5. East of Paris at Chevty- 
Cosrigny. VBa, 350 «am~ 4 bed- 
roam 4 bathroom 70 sqm swm- 
mhn pool. 3,000 sam. garden. 
Raffia Tefc fl) 405 25 tfor 


28 04. 


876 


SPAIN 


MALLORCA 

AMBASSADOR PARK 

PARADISE FOR THE HAPPY IEW 

An exclusive Medtenatean village a 
being built right by the sea an the racist 
beautiful site an Mallorca. Ided loca- 
tion, 20 nimAes from Potato. Sparims 
opmlmerss. 1 to 3 bedroom d) with 
large terraces. Very high qwdiiy no- 
skudian and fMntgi geeranead 

VISrr AMBASSADOR PARK AND 
BE CQNVINQD 

For information: 

GLOBE PIAN LA- 
Av. Mon-Repos 24 
CH-1005 LAUSANNE Switzerland 
Tefc (211 22 35 12 Tbr 25185 MHIS Oi 

Broker Enquiries Welcome 


MALLORCA SPAM. 10 min from 


downtown (Fabric^. Modem vflo over 
faretrfhfcdring mo view. 6 room 7 
baths, 2 twigs. 1 powder roam, arcu- 
Itx latchen M80 dm« vmw| with 
modern appbances. 2 fireplace*, mcr- 
bto floor. Urge terrace with mo 
cert! view on mountain and sea 
bie garage, separate ap ar tme nt far 
servant Air conditioned with 2 
rwrrocd Carrior heat pumps- Bectrorv 
icd air filter + many extras. Owner. 
^£350£0Q or equivalent. Tefc [34 71) 


HHZA VELA 4 min. wok beadi 5 min. 
drive boat harbor. V*s 3 bedrooms, 2 
baths, firepksoe. fully famished spa- 
cious bedroom & bath area, covered 
terraces p ool, sslabbhed 
USS1 00.000. Townhouse 2 
2 baths, general descrip- 
tion junior 1a wlo US$40,000. + 
rentals oho ovriUtte far vila & town- 
house. Cdl Ibiza {3471) 330269. 


FOR SALE WITH UFE TENANCY. 
Gauntry house, near Pofiensa Mahx- 
cojdmded into 2 apartment with 
1300 sqm. land and own water. 
Write Bae_ 2996, Herdd Ti 


“92521 Neuffly Cstfex. 
Spain (71) 532192. 


Frame or 


International Business Message Center 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 


in tho In tomationtd Haretd tri - 
burnt, nebmrmmorm IfanoAM 
of a mUBort ruada n werU- 
wrrfe, most of wham are in 
buolnats and industry, wt3f 
road if. Just Mhi ns (Paris 
613595) baton 7 0 a.m., en- 
suring that wm Can fetor you 


bath, and ; 


no your massage on 
.... within 48 hours. The 
rant is US. $9.80 or load 
equivalent par Ena. You mast 
indado complete and verifi- 
able bitting addrafs. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


JOJOBA - LIQUID GOLD 

INVESTORS 6 BROKBtS 

The mu ode Jogoba od produced from 
□ plant grown in the U.5A urivch lives 
for over 100 yean, has unique, nn- 
ttancfcng quetaa aid can favorably rev 
place ranerd & ortmol based lubn- 
caits. Other esmbfahed uses: 
cosmetics, pharmoceuftcafs, food 
mmufacfunng. 

Existing P l an t ati ons Already Pro- 
vide Return on lu ue slro ent w first 
Year. By bid Of 6th Year. Returns 
Equal WSd Amount Invested 
Thereafter, proyBct ic ts show overage 
annual income af 33% For cenniete 
drab contact; AUOBA RESEARCH. 
Bov 2502. Herald Tribune, 

92521 New By Cede., France 


Minimum 


nt - USS5000 


FIDUCIARY BANKING on targe uf- 
loterofoed loons The i/ri't coraner- 
od bank with a representative office 
in London speocritgng in Oiij service. 
Arab Oversea: BonC & Trwt (W.IJ 
Ltd. 28 Hod; Prmce Rood Iordan 
SE1. tefc 01735 8171 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MONEY TREES ? 


YES I Invest m one of Americas mast 
evening teehnoioacal breakthroughs in 
a blicn dollar industry. We have plant- 
ed more rat trees in 1984 titan any 
other developer in our Stole 
High araual earnings projeded far 
years and we guaran- 

n» in ve stme nt. 

B4QUlRliS 1NVITH3. 
Material avaloble in English, French. 
German. Bax 2359 Hy oid Tribune. 
92521 Neudly Cede*, France 

Minimum investment - US$7,950 


U. S. A. 

UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 

ErtefcEshed c o m p a n y requires addition- 
al capital to exploit reuohrtoncrv teeh- 
nolagieal breakthrough. Unfirnted mcr. 
to p olen md. Meimicn mvestment 
USS10JD0. ttgh annual returns pro- 
id. Far data led mtarr na hor Sax 
I. Herdd Tnbune. 92521 Neufly 
Codex. Franca 


USA 

BUSINESSES B REAL ESTATE 
Business sales: co m mer ci al, industrial E. 
resdemid red estate-sales & leases. 
Property management & business de- 
velopment. Wn» with your require- 
ments & finuivnd specs ta Krs-sn iedty 
S Business Brokers. U79S Jeffrey Rd, 
*210. Irvine. CA 927M USA. 

7T4-d51-EQkfc Tlx 59019.5 


COMPUTSt PORTRAIT SYSTEMS 

a 10.000 - 38.000 FOB) and susd«>.- 

T rtrits. nbbans. pasters, cctendcrs. 
pucrels ere. Major crodi cards ac- 
cepted Kona L6. Pns rf ao i 170340 
Fiankfun Tefc 747808 T* 412713 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


ATTENTION MANUFACTURERS— 
New mdustrid products introduced to 
UJ market by experienced 38 year 
dd firm with cstabished moonwide 
drirnbtrtor natwortc. Submn 
and finonad references far r 

mduahan. P O. Bat 1193, Syrt 

NY 13301 USA. Tef CIS) 437-7055. 
Tl»; 937 259. 


ANTARTKA MUTUAL SURVIVAL h- 
surmce & Trust af World Genetics, 
unvote slock. 42 units at S8 mriSon. 
Mr. Pierre Her out, 3509 des Erodes, 
Monti ed. Conoda 


PANAMA LIBB0A. COKPOfiAKONS 
tram USS400 molabie now. Tel 
. 20240. Teles. 628352 ISLAND 
(via UKL 


E^ 4 ! : 

G. (via 


5EUING CHEMKAIS. Sofvents & U> 
orenory equipment. Urwersd Ch&n- 
aris&Solvents- France (I) 293 60 50. 
Tlx 220064. 


HONG KONG NIGHTCLUB far sale. 
Best potential. Sa> 2593, Herald Tri- 
cune. Q2521 New By Codex. France 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


NIT 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNLIMJTHJ INC 
U5A. I WORLDWIDE 

A complete penond 4 busmess service 
pravKtng a unique cohesion of 
talented, versatile & nuitilingud 
mcfiwduca far dl tocid £ 
promatioryil occasions- 
212-765-7793 
„ 212-765-7794 

330 W. 56th St, N.Y.C I0Q19 


Service Represertahves 
fed Wortdwida. 


Needed’ 


HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT, 
report . 12 countries ondyral. [fa. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


INVEST 2 WSQ ta Stater Hedth. 
Enter Cardiac Rot Prevention & 
Health Rccondtaonng Pro gr am now. 

countryside, hmi quafified ra e tfoo l 
wpervmon. v«t Entail Mtaficd Cen- 
tre, Enton near Godaim in g. Surrey 
GU3 5AL <5 nun. London. Bng 
(042) S792233. 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


REQUREGaHUVC 104DBB at fund- 
monu gers ta service prime rmnlrees 
with pnme bank guatmtees ta form 
of prime bonk pranMory note LLS. 
Dolors or Simss Francs 10-20 
no broken please. Pmapoh only op. 


ply to Box 41534 LKT, 
timdcm.WCre9J 


Ref. HRPO. 


iJHorMex 


147 


22% APMUAL RETURN, on average, 
fan been generated by the Caribbean 
Basin Investment Trusts Uwf Trust 
Atortagoe PboL Detdlfc Rut tajarog 
nonce Trust Co. LbL, Dept, BsO^rO 
Bo* 302. 1005 Sot 
Telex. 2feil 


EARN 30% - 35%. INVEST m short 
term con im erqd paper notes. ASed 
Ltd., PO Box 42Z H ornsonfawa Vrr- 
grog 22801. U, 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 

Yow best toy.. 

Fine diamonds in am prise rrmge 
or lowest whoiesde prwes 
direct from Antwerp 
center af lhe damand world. 

FuS guarantee. . 

For free pxe far wrrte 

Jaadrim GoMenetain 


Estobfahed 

PeCkaaretraat C. MM AnNjfP 

Tto^^y syl b?AJ the DonondOub. 
Heart erf Antwerp Dfamond mduslry 


OFFICE SERVICES 


Yow Office in Germany 

wm tarn "At Year Service” 

• Complete office services at two 
prestige adcfruaes. 

• FuSy equpped offices far the short 
term or the long term. 

• taternciioncJy framed offi ce exxf 
ptafassiend staff at your d ep end . 

• Con be legofty used as your corpo- 
rate daraole far Germany /Europe. 

• Ywr business operation can stmt 

I fill IIM TL 

iiwitDuu<ciy. 


Lairca Rut mew Services GmbH 
UwccvHaus am Hobhauserporfc 
JroiiisuiBtraste 22 
6000 Frankfurt era Mdn 1 
Germany 

Tefc 6P-59 00 61 
Telefax: 69-59 57 70 
Telex; 414561 


EURO BUSINESS CENTER 
99 Ken a rs g rn c ht. 1015 CH Amsterdam 
Td: 312026 5 7 49 Telex 16183. 

Worid-Wda Busetau Centres 


YOUR OFFICE M PAHS: TELEX, 
ANSWERING SERVO, secretary, 
errands, mexTbax, h* 24H/day. 
Td. PAT: 609 959s. 


PARIS ADDRESS. 

Since 1957 L5JP. provides mol. .. 

teto. meeting roams. 5 rue dArtott, 
75008. Tefc B9 47 04. Tbc 642504. 


OFFICES FOR RENT 


PRINCIPALITY 
OF MONACO 

355 sqjn. office mace to let. superbly 
decorated & famished, ready for unroe- 
Asm use, easy access to hefcport. 
Far further denfc please ronlod 
A-CJLfll 

26 bo Bd Prmeesie Chartotte 
Monte Carle. MC 98000 Monaco 
Tef: (931 50 66 00. Telex 479417 MC 


SPAIN 


HISTORICAL ESTATE with mineral wrf 
sxingand fruit and ofive orehards for 
$20,000. Assume existing 10-year 
mortgage for bafance. Apartado 47. 
. Moran de la Frontera Seme. Spain 


SWITZERLAND 


SWITZERLAND 

FAMOUS RESORT AREA 


DO YOU WISH - 

• TO BUY AN APAKIMBtfr 
. OR A HOUSE? 

* TO RETIRE IN S WITZERL AND? 
- TO INVBT IN SWITZERLANDT 

CONTACT USi 25 YEARS OF EXPERI- 
ENCE IN BUUXNG AND SELLING 
FINE SWISS REAL ESTATE 

CAU. MRS HAA4MOND 01-352 21 25 
SOOIMSA. 

P.O. Bon 62, 

1884 Vflan. Svriberiand. 

Tl» 456213 GESE CH 


LAKE GENEVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

lovely fBortmenb with magnificent 
views of Late Geneva and mountains. 
Montreux, Valors, Vertxer, Los Diabler- 
eh. Chateau a Onx netr GsSaaj. 
Leyyn EeceHe n t pppertwraBes 
Foe Foreianere 
Price* from sPmj300. 

Libertd mortgages at interest. 

- GLOBtPlAN SJt. 

Rod Estate 5pedaRits 
A* Mon Repos 24. 

CH-1005 Lausanne. Swftzeriand. 
Tefc (211 22 35 12. Tbe 251 B5 MSIS 
Knee 1970 


LAGO MAGGIORE 
ASCONA 

to this world famous resort we offer first 
das Lxxe tmant s and houses. Bgttt 
above Ine old vilagr of Ascona or on 
die Idie with indoor pad, you wil find 
your home. Ptkas from Sr320jD00 up to 
5FT,10Qj000. Mortgages at (aw Swiss 
merest rotes. These red estates are 
free for sofa to foreigners. 

EMBtALD HOME LID. 
RESJD0CA TTZ1ANA 
VIA LOCARNO 27 A 
CH-6612 ASCONA 
TEL Of-93-352184 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


USA GENERAL 


GENEVA COUNTY 
(FRENCH FREE ZONE 
FEAR LAKE GENEVA) 

VHku, (yu tm en ls & buBdtag laid tor 
tde. No restridioni for foreigners 
HH.VE SUNBBI SJL 
PO Box 40 
157 Rte d~Hermance 
CH-1245 GdBo npe-Bai sri.aa 
GENEVA - SWITZERLAND 
tefc (22) 53 35 95 
Telex: 4» 603 FMS Ol 


LAKE G8CVA + LUGANO, Mon- 
ireux, Vakxs, Gstaod Region, Locarno 
/ Alcana & many famous mquntren 
resorts, maanificenr NEW APART- 
MB41S / CHALETS / VR1AS ovt* 

able far fareignen. From USSMOO. 
Eg choice. Mortacgm d 615%. Swiss 
Sdency SBCXD SA 

Taw Grot 6, CH-1007 LAUSANNE 
21/25 26 11, LUGANO 91/68 7648. 


ZURICH 
New 200 sqjn. lake view house, 30 
minutes from Zurich, for sofa to foreiwi- 
‘ ta Box 2180, LJHX, 


ers. PWa* 
fiiedrichstr.l 


Frenlcfart/Main 


G5TAAD, Vh ROOM APARTMSiT. 
Near vmage, lutchen, bathroouLga- 
rage. No agents. Tafc 030/4 \777~ 


LAKE TRAVIS 
AUSTIN, TEXAS 

700 Acres 

4 Mies LaU Frontage 
Unique Cove With 
Strong Development Potent ial . 
Sduseidv/IOng Co. 

3703 Speedway 
Aistin, Tests 78705 
(512) 477-5827 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


GRSNWKH, CT USA 

A LOVELY “BIGUSH" 
COUNTRY HOUSE 

On 5 partflee acres. 45 mm. from n»d- 
town MuiJiuituL Of stone, brick & ma- 
sonry with Ludovia t3e roof, this hatse 
was buit in the atrftsrmn s en a «md has 
been brSaaily nxxfarnized & decorat- 
ed. 2 story entry, grooms laropubhc 
rooms, lavish master suite. Central air 
esnefaioning. Hetxed pod with povil- 
Son, greenhouse. 

DOUGLAS HUMAN 

Pickertag Awdates Inc 
30 Mflbonk Ave, Gresnwidi CT 06630 
203-869-7800 


USA GENERAL 


Major Hotels for Sale 

WA5HMGTON, D.C 

$17Sm9on (US) 

30- " 

17J - " 

NEW YORK CITY 

ST&nxEon (US) 

35 - ” 

20 - ~ 

15-' 

WORLD HOTELS GROUP 

Td ! 516-432-1000 (USA) 

Tbc 230199 WHG 

Confidentiality Assured 


MVBTMENT OFTORTWOTT 
Southwest Rsida. Guffrota' undue , 
homes, homesites an pMtigknfi 
Mar 00 Wand. Lowest paces ta yean. 
Write P & D Ent, c/a DdixtaS 
Mcvco Redly, P. O. Box 368, 
Marco bkni FL 33937 USA. 


NYC 4«tory CONDO 

Dag Hcanmarslqoid Tower 

2« EAST 47th ST. 

1 Blade To United Nnhatu 
-SPECTACULAR- 

1, 2, 3, A 4 Bedroom Apartments . 


New Fiji Service Bidding With 
SwinwninB PooL Hectah C3ub and 
Housekwping Services Avaiade 
R04TAL APARITAB^IS 
ARE ALSO AVA1ABIE 
For Info CJ 212-759-8844 
Sat, Sun 11 -4j Man to Fri 9-5 


50 MIN. TO NYC Began 10 roam 
home on landscaped acre, master 
suite 4 4 bedrooms, 3 W baths, fire- 
dact cfl appfianoes, best scfxMls. 
S^bOO. 35,11 Saodusty 8d. 
New Gty, NY 10956. 914^34-4209. 


DARIEN A NEW CANAAN Conned^' 
out. Executive type haws far renr &* 
sde- Pleasant MY. Ct¥ suburb. 
French spoken. Nationwide cameo 
riore.CS Tibbetts LL 2036557724. 


PAGE 4 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL 


LOW COST FLIGHTS I HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL I HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


ACCESS USA 

From Park One Way Round Trip 

New York 

Los Angeles 
Chicago 
ton 

Montreal US$189 , USS339 
and mare destinariam - 
15% dbcount on 1st don 
PARS fab fl) 221 46 94 
fCbr. tfa 1502) 



S1U9IT 8 YOUTH RIGHTS. Paris - 
London from F225/USS25. Nwe4on- 
dan from F490/USS55. For bookings 
contact USIT Voyages, 6 roe de You- 
rtrard, 75006 ParSftwoe. Tei 329 85 
00 (Metro: Luxembourg). And 10 r de 
8efcytoe.Nwe«00ara (931 873496 


USA WBTCOAST $295 oneway, 
S420 roundtrip. Around the wxtd 
from $695. Cdl from amr other city 
Malibu Travel, Darorak 30, Anuter- 

dcra. Tefc 313)274041 . Telex 14635 


USA SUMMER SPECIALS! Los Angrie* 
from £199. New York from E13QTU5. 
Airtoun London 01-551 4451. 


NT ONE WAY $150. Evvycfay NY. - 
Was! Coast 5145 Paris 225 92 90. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


ADVBRURE HOUDAY5 AuHrata. 

Shark-fishing a Speaofey. buffalo 

hunnrig optonaL Enqunes. brochure: 
Vie Sampson Advenhra Lkdanted, 
54 Goodridi Rood, East Dulwich, ton- 
don SE22 UK, telephone (07) 693 9566 


Far mere HOUDAY AYRAVEL ADS 
PLEASE TURN TO 
PAGE 8W 

W T« WEEKBD SECTION 


LUXURY 7-DAY 
Mediterranean 
CRUISES 

aboard the flagship 
Ocean Princess 

► Weekly departures from Venice 
or Noe Saturday through 
Od. 12. 


Dubrovnik. 

Aboard the y adti-Sce 
Ocean biander 

• W e o ldy dnxxturas from 
Vance or Rama 
(Gvitaveeehia) Saturdays 
through Oct. 19 . 

“ ” 1 01 Zadar, “ 


Toorminq, 

Naples. 

For iramecSate reservations oantacl: 

OCEAN CRUISE LR4B 

Verne® Sen Mares 1497 
. Tab (41) 709822 
Nice: Gfauda Trcwal 

37 Ave. Maraehd Fodi 
Tab [93) 856986 


P»*CH FARM VACATION. Erioy 
hqrea^ orgoixe flOTtan, regatonon 
axsina m graoous 17th enmury coun- 
try monor. Surrounded by 151100 


TWOUSIOUT ISRAEL holiday apart- 

monb • 4 vMas avalabla at year 
round. HOMTG. London 01-437 2892 


HBIAS YAOflWCL Yacht Owten. 
Acndernire 28. Attiere 10671. Greao» 


“SaiJSSS.! 


HOTELS 


FRANCE 


■t* 


PAns-PtaxaMMsaas-’-mjO 

Are. E-Zofo. 1-2-3 room fiots/b^ 
btehan, fridqe. Ttai 577 72 00 . 


GREAT BRITAIN 


aOi .PtAZA HOTH, LONDON -~ 
KereHyoi ^beMBtuaticri far burinau 
and pteorora. AD reams bath / show- 

aaRffiiswa-"" 


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tucBWE aw® wjia b xok 

i TtaMl / 30i?lf l ^£rwn Pofkw 8- 


USA 


EDUCATION 


TUDOK HOlfct, JU4 East 42nd 5" 

New York Gty. ta faSSnd* & 

BfEviSHSE' 1 


FASHION STUDY das^T i 


Imprint? ngr ftffprint 9? de PFsnreflr TSflW Pans. 


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