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No, 31,878 , 


Published With The New York Tunes and The Washington Post 

PAMS. SATURDAY-SUWPAY, AUGUST 17-18, 1985 " 


Meta 3SCOTI Twfay — TidOQflO 


r^S*; rtawtota-ana ui.Mi p.t-ae 

'lSSJMi Nkgara 170 K. Yuaotaiio— WO. 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


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wimm 


By Glenn Frankel 

Washington Past Senior 

JOHANNESBURG — A wide 
spectrum of leaders from South Af- 
rica’s blade and white communities 
reacted with sharp disappointment 
Friday to President Pieter W. 
Botha's defiant refusal to announce 
new reforms in South Africa's 


uwn mm iiLN 111 juum ruilbaa 

apartheid system, of while minority 
rule. 


D^smood M. Th!h 


!r\V 


^BothaTalk 



-m : ir ■ tVT ing the address, “I thu 

Most m West 




t>u_ 
■a v_£ 


: “ti*; 

& "St 


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Reuters 

. LONDON — Western govern- 
ments - expressed disappointment 
Friday that President Meter W. 
Botha’s speech brought no mqjor 
reforms in South Africa, and some 
predicted new international pres- 
sure on Pretoria. 

The United States stopped short 
of direct criticism of the speech 
Thursday mght bnt renewed calls 
far Mr. Botha to open talks whh his 
lOpponents land to free Nelson 
Mandela, die imprisoned black 
leader. • 

- U.S. advocates of sanctions 
against South Africa said Mr. 
Botha’s failure to satisfy expecta- 
tions of change had put new pres^ 

sureonMeBt lM Wi 

to bow to demands in Congress fin 
economic action gainst die. whi- 
te-ruled nation. \ 

In Ernpp^ IBriwbL .and west 

Gernmny arid, they : woe disap- - 

pamted-France^ydrich iastmandt , 
became the- first;. ma|oi [ Western ; 
power to inpose . s an c t ion s, said 

Mr. 1 

• lag -toitSm e m oii ri ttmrio gk- y f-r - 
Mr. Botha’s speech bar been 
widely awaited -as a response ■ to ;• 
intanaividfaiee 

sure for .change, but n contained 
only a pfeonse to coetmne present 
reforms. . 

Tbe sharpest reaction came irom 

Australia, which delayed the .return 
of its ambassador to Prctona as a 
protest and declared that toe gov- 

ernment would piocefid Monday 

with a. formal endorsement of sanc- 
tions. • , ' ' 

Multilateral, action was fore- 
shadowed by Norway, wtah smd 
that Sweden, Denmark, Norway 
Finland and Iceland would now 
? move to introduce new measures 

- against Sotnh.Afnfa^ fon^ 

minis ters' meeting in Octobe^_ , 
With the U.S- Congress expected 

r ' to approve sanction next k 

is US. reaction that * 

-• cany the heaviest immediate ran- 

i. KSSSKF 

\ quietpersnasion rather than eco- 
nomic pressure. 

; However, wme congressmen 
s^id Mr. Botha’s 

(L ; bending attitude had put new pres- 
>f * sure on Mr- Reagan. , c 

Chester A. Crocker, assist* 
^iretary of stale for African af- 
f*Sf d in San Francisco toai [the 
Reagan administration would con- 
* r ' 1 . Annrttf cccmotmc S3nc ~ 
The Associated Press report- 

^[Mr. Crocker, deUvemg *c^; 

SSg blacks and aStes and a> d 
(Combined on Pagni toLS) 


■ w MUU1 ua VI VUOUUAJ uuu 

was led by both black and W1UIA 
political moderates, some of whom 
said they fell betrayed by Mr. 
Botha’s speech Thursday night, in 
which he insisted he would not bow 
to continuing black unrest nor to 
intensifying foreign pressure to 
make chan ges or to dismantle 
apartheid. 

~ Desmond M. Turn, the Anglican 
bishop of Johannesburg, who won 
the Nobd Peace Prize in 1984, said 
he was "quite devastated” by Mr. 
Botha's speech. Appearing on the 
brink of tears at a press conference 
here. Bishop Turn said that follow- 
ing the address, "I think the 
nhanri*; of peaceful phang f- are vir- 
tually niL” He added, “We are go- 
ing to need a major rmrade.” 

Business Day, a major Engjfish- 
lan g na pp daily newspaper that re- 
flectsthe views of the white corpo- 
rate community, called for Mr. 
Botha’s resignation. 

“With the eyes of the world on 
Mm, he behaved like a hick politi- 
cian,” a front-page editorial said. 
“He made a mockery of the s 

port that he has received from — 

business community. He has made 
fools of our friends abroad.” 

Mr. Botha's speech had followed 
broad public hints and background 
briefings from officials who had 
p psnuiOTkt t f jcrnifirflnt new measures, 
few of whimwbrc even mentioned 
by Mr. Botha on Thursday nigit. 

South African analysts said they 
believed that the president had 
been angered by thu wedds press 
reports and by the intense buildup 
of expectations and had derided to 
delete announcement of the new 
steps so as not io appear to be 
- yieidihg to.snch pressures. 

He alsso announced no.cbflng 
: in the state of emergency he c 
■■ (Continued on Page2,CoL 3) 



Iraq Attack Called Blow 
To Iranian Oil Outpu t 



at one of the three jetties on the 
island, and estimates varied on the 
extant of damage done in the attack 
Thursday afternoon. 

“Iran ls expected to dose at least 
one jetty for repair, which might 


“We "sighted at least six French- 
made warplanes," he said. “The 
raid lasted more than half an hour 


the damage looked very big. 

when !t 


Our ship was unloading 
caught fire. 


UiUVtuiiMg 

lugui 1 UB. We had 10 abandonit. 

- - He identified his ship as tbe Pan- 

r . , f amanian- registered Orgol, which is 

Iran says Iraq s^t terrorists to no[ jested j£the Lloyd’s register of 


disrupt election. Page 5. 


uke two to three weeks,” said a 
European salvage executive, who 
refused to be identified. 

He said that the control room 
that measured how much crude ofl 
was pumped into jetty-side tankers 
had been hit. 


not listed in the Lloyd’s register of 
ships. Maritime shipping source in 
Bahrain and Dubai said they had 
no knowledge of damage to any 
chip other than the Norwegian- 

owned tanker TorriL 

The TorriL a 141,000-ton Mal- 
tese-registered tanker, was hit while 
loading at Kharg, according to 



NTT 


“If our information is accurate," tanker’s managers. Marine 100 Killed 


SSE3 


Pope Makes Rights a Theme of Trip 

leaders hv urbanization that creates misfor 


By EJ. Dionne Jr. 

Sew York runes Serna 

KINSHASA, Zaire — Pope 
John Paul H has made human 
rights a major theme of his papa- 
cy Daring his current African 
trip, he has brought that message 

to governments that have impris- 
oned people for espousing the 
same cause. , , 

In speech after speech. John 

■ ■ * .<■ « _ _ J niflf f/vr 


has never mentioned leaders by 
tiamp. But his message has been 
unequivocaL as it was Thursday 
at the palace of President Mo- 
butu Sese Seko of Zaire. 

The 7atrian government has 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


bm > critkazed for co rrupti tm 

Kn?H?hSo OTtidzed The pope, on the eighth day of ^ change I0r au imus ^ 

fSritTSi Sou^aS and his 12-day swing ^r^.sevm blocked by the disorderly exploL 
^paithod m aoun , African nations, merely said that tion of natural resources, by 

3r?S SS55S5E? 

In T"" Wn B his ennosms. he accymes, to 


urbanization that creates misfor- 
tune for too large a sector of the 
population." 

He also spoke of the impor- 
tance of “stria rectitude in the 
exercise of public administra- 
tion” and of “a fair distribution 
of resources and responsibil- 
ities” 

And in a passage on interna- 
tional relations evidently aimed 
at the major powers and at Afri- 
can governments, he said: 

“What conld represent benefi- 
cial change for all finds itself 


U Olir imuuiifluvu to a v -A. m mc LdlikCt b iiiaurifcWAOt ■ ■■ — 

said another shipping source, ^nna gpme nt of Norway, as saying 
“Kharg's loading capacity has been that the Torn! was ablaze and that - 

reduced by about 40 percent as a all crewmen escaped unharmed. 1/ |/)|pT)/ , P 

result of the Iraqi raid." Iran has said little about the 111' ¥ H/M/IW>4> 

Other sources spoke of more se- Kharg attack. But Tehran radio re- — -m 

nous damage. ported that an Iraqi aircraft did T Wm f /fflft'/l 

“According to radio messages re- m mn r damage to a Mahese-flag if(, Of h lAMWMi' 
caved here, the damage that befell , an VKr and was shot down by Iram- 
](^utinp facilities must be enor- ^ ground fire. 

— - " a fnarittnv «llV8H VL.m'b AafoncB rlf-nends OQ 

Bo- 


moos.” said a maritime salvage Kharg’s defense d_ r _ WEWpt .i.m— ^uam 

company officer. . weapons ranging from 40mm bo- _i_ werc rcDortedly killed Friday in 

In London, the lioyd s Shqying fors guns to Soviet an<T U.S.-made P ^^en^^^ortbem Sri Lanka. 
Intelligence Unit, a branch of miss iles. British-made Rapier nns- i n Colomba the Sri T-ankan cap- 
i Mnmmiv omm. mid Irani niai. .im mvirmllv are used. . . ■ IX > that 


Reuters 

NEW DELHI — About 100 peo- 

UH«I CnA«ir in 


missfles. Bntnm-made Kapier nns- Colombo, the Sri Lankan cap- 
sfles also rcpartally are us^. the Defense Ministry said that 

Iraq denied it lost any aircraft m persons died in the worst of 
the Kharg attack. *raj Tamil guerrilla attacks 


Lloyd’s insurance group, said Iraqi 
planes hit the Kharg terminal in 

two waves of four jets each. w iil 

The unit said there was damage Iraq fiist announced the attack iiSdmine”exploded near 

to the main installation on °J° Thursday, on the the town of Vavuniya. 

terminal which was described as tial elections m Iran, [fage 5 .] Iraqi Rut in the southern Indian ary of 

bring less important than the new sthte radio reported that “popular Mad _ a . Tamil ex- 

lerSnal on the island. rallies surged throughout Iraq in maintain offices, a guer- 

The Kharg faeflity, which is 140 jubilation^ after the announce- Sesman said the explosion 
miles (225 kilometers! southeast of ment. _ J - was Ktoffbvthe army, which used 

the Iraqi coast, handles about 90 i^te Thursday, Iraqi state teton excuse to stage reprisal 

pCTaatof Iran's exports of crude Bon^b^dOT ot 'i^kT 


[Traders in London said the 
Iraqi attack boosted crude ofl 
prices Friday but was unlikely to 
threaten world oil supplies at a 
time of excess, Reuters reported. 


njn -gsman for the E ria m 
Liberation Front, an alli- 
ance of four separatist guerrilla 
— :j — 100 civilians 




irca d of AIDS in Heterosexnafe 




By Marlcric Qmons 
Lcniingdes Times Service 
ATLANTA — A substantial xn- 
aease in AIDS in the te**™ 00 ™ 
noDulatioa is inevitable, but Inc 
greatest risk of the deadly disease is 
likely to remain mnong homosex- 
ual men, intravenous drug users 
and their regular sexual partners, 
according to the U.S. govanmenf s 
top AIDS expert. 

‘TThe 'straight' community 
doesn’t perceive the risk to be as 
: high, and it’s not," saidJXJames 
eSmm, chief of the AIDS task 


VS. Researchers Find AIDS Virus in Tears 

- . • ,hj> Vahnnsl 


Researchers report an alarm i ng 

increase in AIDS among hetero- 

f»««k in Africa. Page 3. 


force of the federal Centos for Dis- 
ease Control 


By Crisrine Russell 

Washington Post Serna 

WASHINGTON -The virus (bat causes ac- 
quired immune deficiency syndrome, orMDS,^s 
been discovered in the teardrops of a patient suf- 
fering from the disease, accprcbng ro 
the National Institutes of Health m Bethesda, 

^^^iscoveiy is the first evidence that the wrus 
ic oresent in eve fluid, and it raises new questions 
.could bcmmsmjtgd 


pver take n olace, said scientists from the National 
Eve Institute, the National Cancer Institute and 
& (Sal Center of the heriib to™** ■ 

But sources familiar with the new findings sug 
J'SJSmisrion of the v^f^d refuse 
Suired immune deficiency syndrome as wefl as 
S^mnesses, could, in theoiy, oooir through 
repeated contact with the tears of AIDS patients or 

‘TSK? 8 ®® of to Nation^ Career 
Institute’s laboratory of tumor-cell biology, said 


tough direct contact with toe tears or mi£ underatSgthedis^Hesaidiimi^es tot 

natimts, partkxflariy by eye doctors and then- ^ ^ preset^ mcreasm^y. tn mate body 

StiSts, £w^asthrra^i contact with the medi- Qaids than ongiiially thought, has been found 


covering vast army sweep fcough Vavtmiy^ 
imunwu ^ ^ rphe United News of India re- 

parts of the island. i . ^ ^ Tj>nkfln security 

^kS-a^ast 72 Tamil d^- 
^ rSJrCW ians in reprisals for toe mme explo- 

evitable 7 

C Y 1UUIIC tounder^I^’see^ny. not in- 

. . u into volved in toe incident,” the Tamil 

Atlanta. “We shouldn’t think that army had ™*Mman said. “The explosion 

what’s happating in Africa is going ^aq> juies ^ u ^ set off by the army in their 

to happrabereTwe don't necessar- Baghdad andtolled or wounoea ^ ^ ^ ^ 

Qy have the same frequency of sex- 650enemy troops. and massacred about 100 innocent 

toM it wll spread there, but I don’t ^ ^ ^ ^ _m£ea because of the 

(?N(tmdav. there had been battalions wcrcrotned in to ai- 
12,408 cases of AIDS reported in lack, code-r^ned 
the U^d States, with 6.212 said this raised to 1,150 the number 
me unucu o of Iraqi casualties since Ashourah- 

Oftoese cases, 8,980 were among 2 waslaimched early Thursday m 
homosexual or bisexual males; toecentra[^xor. ... . 

2,097 were among intravenous drug 

<im kanuinlliliaiV nr 


. 

army’s actions. 

In the Himalayan krnfldom of 
Bhutan, where representatives of 
the guerrillas and the Sri Lank a n 
government are holding peace 
♦ai^g, an Indian mediator tried to 


es; the central sector. . . _ _ talks, an lnman meouuor a 

run But Baghdad radio said that Iraq keep tbe negotiations gmngr 
^■"w'^'heramhfliacs ot had crushed an Iranian attempt ^ lDdiaD foreign ^ 
usere '. -ere early Friday to advance. toward Fa- Romesh Bhandari, who 1 


were Idled wi* BO Imj losses. (CootmoedonP^e2,CoL«) 

•« ivAA nn# aniAnff 9T1V 


were not among any 
i. The 


But he added: “It daem t mean 

toe heterosexual risk b niL It’s just 

lower. It may always be tovra. tort 
it will increase from where n is 
now. Further hetraosOTiai trms- 


primarily sfflids heiaoses- ^ 

|I»Ia _.m. AFrirfl MnmfflCt'’ 



pnnuniy snue. croeMybecru® «s»=con«Bed “ rf h^oSxusi 

"^tiseriadSdBlotorp^ 

^ JSs.over ao/o- « ““p, odd, for e^m- 

as last as gaj u»*, . 


■»psnn- ‘Do you have a c ase y ou 
positively know spread from a 
woman to a man from intimate 
relarionshipsT I don’t get many 
‘yes’ answers. 

“There is no question this aisj 

ease spreads from men to women. 

Dr. Mason said. “The questiaiiis. 


Belle Glade, Florida, for exam- 
le, with high poverty rate and a 
number of intravenous drug 
users, has the greatest total of 
AIDS cases among those wno are 


and 799 _ 

known high-risk groups. There 
have been 803 cases among women 
and 149 among children. 

New York state and California 
have tbe highest number of cases, 
with 4,433 in New York and 2,833 
in California, followed by Flonaa 
with 866. The Centers for Disease 
Control expects the ca^s to nse to 
about 34,000 by the end of 1986. 
The cause of AIDS, which de- 


& 


DU". 

Outside the United States, par- 
nculpriy in central Afnca, the dis- 


AEDS cases among those who ^ ^ bo ^ s immune system, 

not in any lStoan 5 teavSg its victims vulnerableto 

percent, compared wito less than ^ infections, has been 

^ for ..€^„°:^ f rrS SSTa .virus ^ « 

no known cure 

lor me u«««w, has there been 

there are heterosexual. instance where lost immunity 

SSsssffi" -™*a ss l£?! -.'ssfs—.- 

g^Sasjraas sssttsssA »-*»■ 


Strike Strands Thousands 
At Ferry Port in Britain 

Vf.. Pml 


The Associated Press 

DOVER. England — Thousands of tourists were stranded here 
Friday bv a striked ferry officers on the Towu^nd-ThoresenlmC; It 
was unclear whether service would resume Saturday for what is one of 
tbe port’s busiest weekends of the season. 

-1 _il.vM.fl Btralrd DIWU FridaV 


M<»nwh3e. the of a national railroad strike new Friday 

f Rriridi Railway Board dismissed 172 Scottish conductors 
wh“ plans . introduce mens 

operated by one man only. 

The police in Dover, Europe’s busiest ferry port, were called to bdp 
(Continued on Page 2, Col. 3) 


inside 


HSSP® 


747 aircrafl- ^ 

Hfireeki 

■fescssasM 


of to ™Sbcarf a 

.sssiiu- 


AKXS/UEJSHKE 


■cot*«-*£J! 5K 

«r«rimiaies a Bew biL 7. 


^ 7 - 


[ BUSINESS/FINANCE 

•d its smt 
toe Marc 
Pag* 9 - 


BSwitzeriafri 
against <rfficials _ 
Schtrading group 

■ New C0 “ ili y^Sj fe Stotos > ?> 
cent in Omtc0 page 9. 
July 


± ««* ' „r .. H trad human ancestor or a sp< 


By Erik Eckbolm 

New York Times Service 

KSSSSSaait; 

^tohumanteings, accoidmg toa 

SSfe'BSSBS 

8 *™ montoys, 


jamuy 


BJgssftsaa 

JSSSstfK 

'ISssSKS 

gap LCiochon.se- 


Science magazine, is dearly 
over toe boundary line but it also 
retains prosimian featirres.Jts a 
t ransi tional animal a link, between 

the two groups." 

The Burmese findings also sug- 
eest that tbe initial emergence of 
higher primates might {*■ 
Sod m soutomi Aaa, rather 
than, as is widdy beheved, m Afn- 
-ca, according to the 

Ss view, ud&h other saentistsdB- 

pate, anthropoids could have 
^ossid a narrow, swampBke sea to 
Africa, where their descendants lai- 
er evolved into monkeys, then apes, 
and then bumans. 

The ancient Asian primatj* 
which has the kuus name Ampta- 

Scus, Mr. Q&on 

k monkey, not an ape and not a 
human, but if s a common ancestor 
of them alL" 

Other sdentists warnrf that it 
could not be deiennmed. on toe 
basis of jawbone pieces alone, 

whether the Burmese spedes was a 


direct human ancestor or a speci- 
men from a side branch of anthro- 
poids that reached an evolutionary 
deadend. 

Bawd on the size of toe jaw and 
teeto, Mr. Gochon conjectured 
that toe animal was two and one- 
half to three feet tafl (75 to 90 
perimeters tall) and weighed 15 to 
20 pounds (7 to 9 kilograms). He 
Jaid it almost certainly lived in 
trees and ate fruit It looked lure 
nothing afive today, he said, al- 

« . 1 . _ ' .Lahv nnQlAril. 


HHKlgU Utojan wvuw — _ 

ical matures of both mwtkeys and 
modern prosimians. 

The finding was welcomed by 


other ^eontologjsts^who search 
forevioeu 


iot eviocnce, however fragmentary, 
about early primate evolution, Bui 
its interpretation will no doubt be 
subject to continued debate. 

In interviews, some experts said 
that, although they had not had a 
chance to study the new evidence, 
the assertion that the Burmese fos- 

(Coufimied on Page 3, CoL 1) ■ 



Greenpeace Might Sue 
Over Sinking of Its Ship 


has 


uid 


ave 


iis- 


ini- 


me 


Ded 


up- 


x n 


mly 

said 


ser- 

lical 


ally 

dof 


fh 


aary 

red 


lays 

man 


iFri- 

ilute 


toe 


of 


uing 

nion 


gnty 


l toe 
.tion 


Agence France- Presse 

PARIS —Greenpeace, tbe envi- 
ronmental protection gram, said 
Friday that a vessel would be rent 
to replace toe Rainbow Wamor. 

< . _r__a Lit vntTIAe 111 ! If 1(1 


W tWWlttWW ^ , - 1A 

the trawler ^gmk^ nm« ■ Jgy J.0 


in a New 


campaign 
tests in the 


David McTaggart of Greenpeace at Paris news 


baton 

conference. 


harbor, in the 

>1 French nuclear 

fin 

U 9 U 1 im> ■ _ , , 

The group’s diairman, Davia 
McTaggart, announced that legal 
action was being considered 
against tbe French government in 
connection with the bombing, 
which killed a photographer. 

The Paris newspaper Le Monde 
has j toned other French newspa- 
pers in linking the explosion on the 
ship to the French secret service, 
the General Directorate for Exter- 
nal Security, known generally by its 
French initials DGSE. 

“We win never forget the Rain- 
bow Warrior bombing." Mr. 
McTaggart said. “We mH never 
forgive those responsible." 


The environmental group said 
that the replacement vessel, named 
the Greenpeace, would leave Sun- 
day from Amsterdam for toe Paoi- 
ic. It reported Thursday that two 
other vessels, toe Alliance and toe 
Vega, were already under way. 

The Greenpeace, a 58-meter 
(190-foot) tug bought for >500,000 
early this year, is to iom smaller 
craft late next month for a protest 
at Mururoa Atoll against under- 
ground nuclear tests. 

Greenpeace members plan to 
visit a quail island dose to toe tret 
ate to check on toe health of inhab- 
itants and to monitor radioactmty. 

Mr. McTaggart, a Ca na dia n , 
said at a news conference that any 
legal action against France would 
^postponed until toe results of 
French and New Zealand inquiries 
were known. 

He said that France risked an- 
gering the nations of the Pacific by 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


ss 





■?;•>. v--.- 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY- SUNDAY, AUGUST 17-18, 1985 


— _ I iwtiV , r 

Soviet, Worried by Military Evaders, WORLD BRIEFS | j , Rci’k * 


„ \ilv 


Arab Bullfighter, 
First in 600 Years, 
Gets 'OlesV in Spain 


By Nancy Todd 

Reuters 

MARBELLA. Spain — Said Kazalc. who per- 
forms in the bullring as “El Palestine,” or “The 
Palestinian," says he is the first Arab bullfighter in 
six centuries. 


After fighting bulls for three years, be appeared 
Thursday for the first time before a crowd orfdlow 


Arabs in this resort, a favorite of Saudis and 
Kuwaitis. 


Front-row seats to the spectacle cost the equiva- 
lent of $150, compared with SI 10 when leading 
Spanish bullfighters perform, but they were sold 
out. Cheaper seats were largely empty. 

El PaJcstino dedicated the first bull of Lhe eve- 
ning to the enthusiastic crowd and the second to an 
Arab prince, whom he did not name. He dis- 
patched both in style, drawing loud applause. 

Local critics praised his performance, saying he 
had been particularly skillful with left-hand 
passes. While not winning the top prizes — the 
bull's ears or tail — he was awarded two rounds of 
the ring. 



Tightens Conscription Law, Penalties Syria DeniesKnowiedge of captives 

Th. hn that th» hir,h mi. i. WASHINGTON (AP) - An 


Kemn The fact that the birth rate is of Moslem troops in Afghanistan 

MOSCOW— The Soviet Union growing in Central Asia but dedin- in fighting Islamic rebels, 
has made it more difficult for ing in the European territories, the The two generals took note of 
young men to avoid military ser- generals said, meant that a much another problem; the use of Rus- 
vice, amid signs of growing disquiet higher proportion of troops now aan as the sole language of com- 
about duty in Afghanistan. came from Moslem ethnic back- mandL They said it was of prime 
New regulations introduced this grounds. importance “for all recruits to have 

month, among the first decrees to There are unofficially ackncwl- fluent mastery of the language of 
be signed by Andrei A. Gromyko edged qualms about the reliability the great people." 
in his new role as president of the - 








who seized them. . 

Representative Gcoree Cf Brien. a RcpubI 
officials pledged to stm* for the captive 
returned to the United States on Thured 


tires' release. Mr. v|q 

ursday, is the fin* Wt iriber of 


Sdthat the Syrians denied any knowledge of the tostagtf 


Soviet Union, provide for fines for 
supervisors who fail or delay to 


Said Kazak, “El Palestino T 


The posters, in Spanish, Arabic and En 
advertised El Palestino as “the first Arabian 


fighter in history." 

Mr. Kazak says be is the first Arab bullfighter in 
a long tune but not the first in history. He has a 
copy of a decree by King Carlos it dated 1385. 
when Moslems still ruled in parts of Spain. 

Since then, Mr. Kazak says, there has been no 


Arab b ullfighter , 

BorninHaifa, Israel, Mr. Kazak spent his child- 


hood in Damascus. His passion for bullfighting 
developed when be came to Spain to Study chemis- 
try. 

In 1973. Mr. Kazak joined his family in the 
United States and became a fashion designer, but 
love of the bullring brought him bade. He set up an 
import-export business and opened a boutique and 
bar in Madrid. 

At 3 1, he is still a j imior bullfighter, fighting only 
bulls under 880 pounds (400 kilograms) and less 
than four years old. 


supervisors who fail or dday to 
register young men for military 
duty. 

This indudes factory managers, 
heads of schools and housing ad- 
ministrators, all of whom are re- 
quired to furnish local military offi- 
cials with lists of men eligible for 
duty. 

It has become a punishable of- 
fense for anyone of military age to 
delay reporting a change of address 
or a' change of place of work or 
schooling. 

The new decrees appeared to 
shed light cm tricks that young men 
adopt to avoid military service in 
the Soviet Union. 

Employees in crvD registry of- 
fices now are liable to fines if they 
fail to report when anyone liable to 
conscription chang es his name or 
someone eligible for service is false- 


Pretoria Opposition 
Assails Botha’s Speech 


^^Sj^oi/Sericans, who were seized over a period 


The seven Americans, wno were seucu ova a nm n 

believed to be bdd by Moslem extremists in Synan-rn itroM ^ fote u 


Lebanon. 


(Continued from Page I) African law that could result in a 

dared four weeks ago to deal with J 8 ? * men ^- Previously. 

unrest that has claimed more than ^ SNwwrth s m 
600 fives in the past year Dons to bold off for 18 months to 

. “ _ “ Jr“- hun ware In aru*> orarmimml 


Bomb Kills 3 in Indian State ofArtaja., 

NEW DELHI (Reuters) — A bomb killed three pcry wi in hfltfs 
northeastern siaterf Assam on Friday, pa ce 

accord announced by Prime Minuter Rajiv Gandhi to end six yeas of 


UUICM Ulril 1Mb LLlUJiCU UiUIC 1 1 1411 1 - . .* ij cC f” TO ,.^.Tthr #A 

600 fives in the past year Dons to hold off for 18 months to 

Mr. Botha expressed amusement two years to pve the government 
Friday morning at a breakfast *° 'make ^changes, 

meeting ofmfing party membets in . He also said he saw httie point m 

°‘ BabeI 


Mastoccmradfa lhe northern law; c f Tepmjff Uh tejaa 
mainly from Bangladesh. 


Durban over what he called “the ,oim ^ °® tt M-day’s scheduled ;n T Emig rants who came to Assam between Jan. 1, 1966,« ad W7j of 
mntn.inn r>k»i nv »r meeting between Mr. Botha and a w added that these lmnngranis wouMbeiBowed to 


Sts S -SSSMEffi 


voting rights, but added that these imnngrams wouio oe aflo>MBj a 
roS in me state. They would be eligible to vote again after lOyta^ne 


speech,"k said, referring to his ffish^Ti ta tadbS 

bopc^by the speech. 

sk^t badly lMt night. * mv™ Andican bishoo. Sime- 


ly reported to have died. 
“Deliberate loss or carelessness 


down in South African history as a Bishop Tuni ^ ^ ^ 

statomm. behavmg mstead police informer from an an- 


leading to the loss” of call-up pa- 
pers on the part of conscripts or 


Pope Stresses Rights on African Tour 


delay in turning up at a duty pro- 
cessing point wffl bring fines of up 


(Continued from Page 1) 
rights of mm and mi respect for 
! their own cultural heritage. 

“And how can we not deplore 
the contradictions that we see 
1' many times between the declara- 
tions of generous intentions and 
' the reality of self-interested ac- 
tion." 

Africa is by no means alone as a 
. place where leaden rose to power 
an the basis of revolutionary slo- 
; gins, only loose the state to benefit 
themselves, their Hiwit.e and their 
tribes. 

' But such revolutions have been 


Pride in African Heritage Is Urged 


The Assoaared Press 

LUBUMBASH1, Zaire — Pope John Paul IL visinly tired on the ninth 
day of his African pilgrima g e , called on the peoples of the continent 
Friday to be proud of their heritage and Christian faith in a world racked 

by mafwifllism 

The pontiff flew to Lubiimbashi, capital of Zaire's Shaba province, on 
his way to Kenya. Throngs of Zaireans, ringing the Polish song “Stolen," 
or “May He Live 100 Years", greeted the Polish-bom pope at the airport 
in Lubumbashi, called Elizabeth vilie when the country was a Belgian 


cessing point mil bring fines of up 
to 50 rubles ($60) and possible 
criminal charges. 

Objection to militaiy duty for 
reasons of religion or pmlosqplucal 
conviction never has been recog- 
nized in the Soviet Union. Refusal 
to serve in the armed forces is an 
offense punishable by sentencing 
to a labor camp. 

The new regulations coincide 
with an increase in public aware- 
ness of lhe war in A fghanistan. 


the least informed and most racist” 
of his ruling party’s constituents. 

The bishop said he would con- 
sider calling for immediate interna- 
tional sanctions against South Afri- 
ca — an illegal act undo- South 


Botha Talk 
Reaction 


gSio hop?by the speech. Murphy* Peres Fail to End Deadiodt 

Bishop ^Tutu Htae president (A^chard W. Murphy, the UJ5. 

gjportunityto go Kwa Tbara ^ who a] 0 ^S uuy of state for Near Egeroand South 

Bishop Tutu saved the life of an Prime Minister Sbnnon Pens of IstikL an Isradi 

alleg^ pdke infomer from an an- theh second meeting mtww days aimed at rwolvmg a dewHoes: on Mdd!^ 

gry mob last month, said (hat the East peace talks, but little progress was reported. . ■ 

speech left him “bnrised and spin- Mr- Murphy, who earlier met in Amman jmtt i King 
^Tdevastated." met later Friday wiib the Israeli 

m riMi. wwi v«nn« then went to Eamt for nwe tings with President Hosm Muwno. A 

■ JPofice Oasi With Yo ths ^ Murphy probably would return to Wash^Jeo fitaa 

The police said that not squads r *\m apparent^ ruling out a meeting with a JonkmajwifleshBBo 
clashed with stone-throwing youths _ - 

and arsonists in nme black town- ThemMiing Friday came as suspected Palestinian guerrffl« setoff a 
ships around the country, but cited roadside bomb and ambushed an Israeli bus in the occupied Wat&mfc 
a “marked decrease" in the scale of in defiance of an Isradi campaign against tenrorism. militaiy sooittasaiL 
violence, news services reported No injuries were reported. 


speech left him “braised and spiri- 
tually devastated.” 

■ Police Clash With Youths 
The police said that riot squads 
dashed with stone-throwing youths 
and arsonists in nme Mack town- 
ships around the country, but cited 




* -f. . i' n - 

li.’M 


ness of the war in Afghanistan, (Continued from Page I) of Industries said they welcomed 
with much of the information, and jj ^vas necessary to “develop, rather Mr. Botha's commitment to uegoti- 
mismfonnatioii, coming by word of than withdraw, our influence and aw with the black mqoriry. United 
mouth. he prepared to use it”] Press International rroorted. 

An article Friday in Pravda, the The European Community. The statement added, however. 


from Johannesburg. . 

In a joint statement, the Afrika- . ittoc t j •_ tt»j» n- ' 

ner Trade Oraurizatian and the ACCUSCd 11.15, Spy AuBlltS mUIUff Dflg 
South African Federated Chamber 1 J 47 ° 

of Industries said they welcomed BALTIMORE fCombmed Dis- 


. • i 


colony. John Pan! cel rated Mass in the munidpal stadium before about 
30,000 people. 

He told the crowd, which repeatedly interrupted him with applause 
and song; “Free sons of Africa, give thanks for the encounter between the 
rich heritages of your people and the heritage of the Son of God." 


Communist Party newspaper, which with the United States domi- that they “regret that at this time of 
signed by two army major-gener- ^es South Africa's foreign trade, crisis the stale president, in ad- 
als, showed concern over the atii- k to review its oosition next month, dressing the world at large, was not 


Press International 
The statement a 


however. 


.esiecially costly on a continent 
where many people are in need, 
where cash is scarce and where cor- 
rupt or misdirected development 
ran ruin the life of an en- 

tire generation. 

The pope's insistence on African 


als, showed concern over the atu- is to review its position next month, dressing the wori 
tudes of young people and the but there was no imrmvfinn» cign more specific in p 
changing make-up of the Soviet that Mr. Botha’s speech in Durban more positively i 
armed forces, which now have had pushed the EC closer to joint reform and oat 


rather than to share with the ooor eminent and the dealings that con- 

r Ll!* *rc -. 1 . XI 


nations. 
The t 


lhe pope said much the same 
thing in Cameroon, f or example, 


self-rebance in his call on leaders to speaking of the unfair terms of 
get their houses in order balanced trade faced by the Third Worid. 


his equally tough message to the 
rich nations. 


And to those who might accuse 
him of meddling in politics, the 


cem public officials. Nonetheless, 
it considers it part of its mission to 
reflect on all that creates the good 
of humanity." 

A Vatican official offered anoth- 
er reason for speaking ouL 


changing make-up of the Soviet that Mr. Botha’; 
armed forces, which now have had pushed the 
greater numbers of non-Russians, sanctions. 

Urging more thorough pre-mili- Britain and V 
taiy political education, they said: opposition i 

“Among a certain sector of youth, try the 10 EC 
we have still not stamped out ele- Spain and Port 
meats of political naivete, and one join nex t y^ 
encounters instances of lapsed vigi- Baroness You 

lance and pacifist attitudes." u ty foreign mini 


Britain and West Germany have 


non. 

Two Afrikaans newspapers 


i«twp<»itiM to economic action Mntot^^ce^iM tion; withom admitting his guilt or 

by the 10 EC members and by Assoo^ reported from Jo- | nilocence 00 t h c espionage 


BALTIMORE (Combined Dis- 
patches) — Lawyers for John A. 
walker Jr n a retired US. Navy 
warrant officer accusal of partici- 
pating in a spy ring for 18 years, 
nave admitted m federal court that 
the night before Mr. Walkrt's May 
20 arrest be drove to a secluded 
spot near Washing ton and hid a 
grocery bag that the government 
claims was filled with navy secrets 
destined far the Soviet Union. 

By Mr. Walker's ac- 

tion, without admitting his guilt or 


La the past he has criticized “im- pope Thursday gave this answer 
perialistic monopoly" and argued “Assuredly, tne church as such 
that weal thy nations have preferred has absolutely no pretension to in- 
to bask in “luxurious egotism” tervening in the functions of gov- 


“The pope and the church," he clubs in which young people of 
said, “can often speak for people p re- military age would be instruct- 


To counter this, they said, there eminent wished Mr. Botha had 
are plans for more para mili t ar y been more specific about plans for 


Spain and Portugal, which are to hannesburg. The Oos terlig newspa- chaises, his attorneys had hoped to 
join next year. per m Port Bcabeth. raying thitt a U.S. District Court 

Baroness Young, the British dep- Mr- Botha had pledge rospok judge, Alexander Harvey 2nd, that 
uty foreign minister, said the gov- with blade leaders, declared that the bag was unlawfuHv seized, and 
eminent wished Mr. Botha had apartheid belongs to the past. should oot be admitted as evidence 
been more specific about plans for Ine whites are not doing tins Mr. Walker’s esnkm*«! triaL 


the bag was unlawfully seized, and 
should not be admitted as evidence 


who cannot speak for themselves, ed in skills such as parachuting, 
especially the people string in jafl.” flying and shooting 


of Mr. Mandela. 

Juergen Sudhoff, the West Ger- 
man government spokesman, 
voiced disappointment' that no 


Mut plans tor •« are u« unmg uus a t Mr. Walker’s espionage trial, 

for the release Mrfwgtesswto, B« the judge ^Sfeatlor- 



added. “South Africa’s blades can’t 
only take: They must also give." 

In Bloemfontein, Die Volksblad, 


Greenpeace May Sue France 
Over Sinking of Its Vessel 


voiced disappointment' that no another newspaper supporting Mr. 
concrete reforms bad been an- Botha, said that the president hod 


nounced, and added: “The govern- placed South Africa on a “new 
meat will continue to encourage road." 


steps towards rapid and peaceful Beyers Naude, secretary-general 
change in Soutn Africa which of the South African Council of 
would meet with the agreement of Churches, said that Mr. Botha's 


out tne judge rejected toe attor- 
neys* motion Thursday that be not 
accept as government evidence the 
bag and 129 classified documents 
found in it. The attorneys ’ admis- 
sion itself cannot be used as evi- 
dence. 

The judge refused Friday to 
throw out espionage charges 


John A. Wa&er Jr. 


all South Africans.’ 


against members of an alleged spy 
operation that included Mr. Walk- 


mm 



(Continued from Page 1) 
continuing its nuclear tests. He 
called on it to join a treaty for a 
nuclear free zone signed this month 
by South Pacific nations. 

Le Monde said in its article on 
the sinking that up to now it had 
been “delrberaiely careful" not to 
comment. “Such a serious accusa- 
tion must be hacked up by precise 
facts,” it said. 


Le Monde said it was clear that 
the operation had been coordinat- 


operation that included MrT Waft- 
HSiSSBrSHfi o'* Ante J. Walker, . 


ed “at one moment or another of its ton Post reported from Santa Barba- 
conception at a high level of the ra, California : 


US. Asks ‘Accelerated Change’ mmy whites, confused 

nT and despondent," United Press In- 
Dmnd Hoffman of The Washmg- uunational reported. 


retired navy officer who was found 
malty on espionage charges Aug 9; 
John Walker’s son, twbm L 
Walker, a yeoman on tbe wuraft 
carrier Nimitz; and Jmy A. 
Whitworth, a mired naif -radio 
man, of Davis. Gdifornia. 

rutm 


Marcos Rejects Charges Against Wfe 


DGSE hierarchy.” 


Robert C McFariane, the White 


Four international arrest war- House national security adviser, 
rants have been issued at the re- said the United States now insisted 


quest of Lhe New Zealand police in on an “accelerated pace of change” 
connection with the cast in South Africa. 

All four persons being sought are Mr. McFariane said that Mr. 
French citizens and all have been Botha’s speech to a National Party 


lOOKiBed 
In Sri Lanka 


(C ontinued from Page I) 


Strike Halts 
Channel Ferry 


linked in pras reports to the securi- ooro^inDm^ ^j^some to Bhutan on Thursday when the 
ty agency. The four are said to be m points expected by the Reagan ad- tones were falterine. 

foxing. . iS^SSlSrSiSZSSS The Tamil spokesman said that 

They arc charged with arson and rona^hanjh^ were reports he had received on Friday’s 

the murder of Fernando Pfirora, a expressed last w^k” whai he met negotiations showed the talks woe 
Portuguese-born photographer “ Vienna with the South African to 
who was a Dutch citizen. He was foi^mmrsier, lU^Botha. jhe stSncgotiations have 

on the Rambow Warrior when two tried to deal with^verament de- 
mines exploded. ^baenendat . Reagan is on yaxa- {hat ^ g1tPTT7 n nq stop 

Two other alleged French agents fitting and guerrilla insistence 

are in jail in Auckland, awaiting i!S’ ^ govo-nment recognize 

trial on s i m i ta r charges. The two, a ^ V, h!L 'wrthern and eastern Sri Lanka as 

man and a woman, entered New Tan& *“*■ nds, to be adminis- 

Zealand with false Swiss passports “«dbytbem. 

made out in the names of Sophie Bothas remaris 35 A first round of talks in Thimpu 

“ d ITit is seen tte war, the speech 


MANILA (AP) — President Ferdinand E Mateos said Friday!* was 
hurt by a charge that his wife, Imelda R. Marcos, had «m)n« d fagge 
wealth in the United States. He called the accusation a lie. 

In his first public reaction to an unsuccessful impeachment attempt 
against him, Mr. Marcos ridiculed a charge that Mrs. Marcos bad 
purchased the Philippines consulate building in New York, one of several 
properties allegedly acquired by him and his wife in the United Shtwand 
Europe. Their value is estimated at more than 5500.000.000. - 


SJlSStSXJS; The Tamil spokesman said that introduced Tuesday. 

^S’SS^S^VS 'Wte^fa^Scei^onFriday’s 

essed last week” when he met negotiations showed the talk* were TT G 

tenna with the Stmth Afncan Ll.l5.lS Call 

nnr stalled negotiations have PANAMA CITY 


2 FORI 


Take advantage of our special rales for new subscribers and 
well give you an extra month afTribs free with a one-year 
subscriptioa Total savings: nearly 50% off the newsstand 
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Subscription Mcnager, InteTiafoxii Herald T rfoune, 

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I Please enter my [ s^ddMmdudwyi^Mferiww^infcan! - ~ I 


(Continued from Page I) 

disentangle a hue: traffic jam that 
extended from the dock area to 
□earby roads. 

Management officials said they 
expected service on the line’s 12 
ferries to return to normal by day’s 
end. But the Press Association, the 
British domestic news agency, 
quoted union sources as saying the 
strike over pay differentials could 
continue through the weekend. 


Tte nilingparty, which bolds a two-thirds majority in. the National 
Assembly, lolled an impeachment resolution within hours alter it was 


Anrirni J-jh 
i\ < tw! 


U.S. Is Called ’Mistaken’ in Nicaragua 


tet tfie BT stop 


insistence 


“We believe the way to avoid a caasolidatkm of Mandst-Lenimsm is 

.ahmIi mJ «L. TU*. a J Ci a> _ A* 1 .. ^ .J •- L, 


Frederique Qaire Turenge and riff ' ■{ , . 

Alain Jacques Toiaige. 

Press reports have since identi- » 

Tied them as Captain Dominique 

Prieur and Major Alain, the com- ® rinid for IV 

mander of a school in Corsica for Twelve ILS 


teredby them. 

A first round of talks in Thimpu 


ECs ambassador for Latin America, of the situation in Nicaragua. 
“Europe has told the United States very dearly that it news the 

altiah'nn in rVnfnl Aimrm in o umr A lFT m. .. .t ” 11 . mI 


■ Fund for Mandela Home 

Twelve U.S. senators Friday 
contributed $6,000 to help rebuild 


I V ICUJC Dl MW III J 

subscription for: 


Britain’s Railwav Board had said underwater combat divers. contributed $6,000 to help rebuild ^Ve expect the talks to end and 

■at sfritinp rmJnrtnm in s* t Three of the four named in the the firebombed home of Winnie oar representatives to return to 


meat’s proposals and that is what possible solutions.’ 
we are fighting for," the Tamil 

spokesman said. ri i n t 

“We expect the talks to end and X 1 0 T tll6 UCCOrCl 


I n^morttis 
(+1 mortfi free) 


I □6monfa 
- (+2weektree) 

" □ 3 mortis 
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m □ My diode 

I sendcaed 


I Haase charge mys 
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I Country Currency 

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233 



that ctrikine rnnHnrtnn: in iiuecoi me lour aameu m me me nreoomoea Home OI w unite 10 icuuii io 

land and &uth Wales would hr warranls were aboard the Ouvea, a Mandela, the black Sooth African Madras by Sunday,” he said. 

dismissed if ihev did not return to sa ^ in g vessel based in the French activist, and the State Department Tamils comprise I!L6 percent erf 
aismissea u mey aia not return to c in rwi fr. r anira’c is mnii™ 


work bv noon Fndav Onlv Hoht nf possessicm of New Caledonia. The added SIQJJOO to rebuild a dinic in Sri Lanka’s 15 million population 
ISO stnkrnp condiirtrir; in'Swuland vessd was reported to have been in the country, United Press Interna- with Sinhalese the majority com- 

Aucilandjust befwe the sinking of tional reported from Washington, mmty. 

_ . _______ _ ' (no Vc ainKntu W nmrti* 


line, a British Rail spokesman said. 


Australia has readied agreement with Britain for the removal of the 
re maining constitutional nes between the two countries. P ri me Minister 
Bob Hawke said Friday. (AFP) 

The deposed president of Uganda, MBton Obote, has left Kenya for 
Zambia, airport sources in Nairobi said Friday. fitestmj 


h person being sought, 

.a woman who had befriended T 1 

Rambow Warrior crew members in I PnflDF 

rwrum ernvirre Auckland, was identified as Frfr- 
CHURCH SERVICES derique Bonlieu, New Zealand po- 

lice said. UrdteJ Press Inter 

WUtB The police said they had traced BEIRUT - Chrii 

central baptist church, 13 Rue du her to an archaeological excavation r,r* WrtH 

wcotomtef. 75006 Pork. Mrtre st- site near Haifa, Israel but when 

Sdpic. Swwfay wonhip in Engl 9 -m ic™^ yoy canymg_the West 


CHURCH SERVICES 


Lebanese Militia Fire at Bonn Envoy 


UntleJ Press International 


BEIRUT — Christian mDilia- 
m opened fire Friday on a con- 
y carrying the West German am- 


mostly Morion West Beirut, the 
station said. 

“The shooting took place," the 
radio said, “when gminen spotted 


Israeli pdia officers went to ques- S3S7 SuS^dBSS 

uon h» July 27 they found ste had sneakmg pictures m a suspicious 


PARK SUBURBS HumccU 

EMMANUa BAPTIST CHURCH, 56 Rim d« reasons. 
Bons-Roisins, RiMil-Matmaiten. English p 


ResfafBjrope, North Afiicn^ fatnw French Afncu, USA, French 
RolyiwiaMdifcEart . . . 

Si 322 1 174 1 * 

RrtrtA&vn. Canada Loin Amena% Guff Stats Asb: 

$| Ul\ . 238 f 13 


hurriedly left, citing urgent family 
reasons. 

The French governmeni has re- The Christian Voice 


Kl udio reports aid. Tii driver, a Diuzo Mos- 

The Christian Voice of Lebanon lem, was the only casualty, the ra- 


foftokfna i -iifL-rif nfl danorabatianL , v«vu p/rwuuiuu utu tw v* wvvhuvh »»»■ "*w wuuaij, uib i 

w^3S^Ttoh« 5_ othffr gttivWw. mained silent over Lbe press revela- radio said that three gunmen dio said, adding: “The gunmen 
Gafl Dr. SLC Thomas, Pastor, 749 , 1 5.29. Lions exc^it to announce that an opened fire on the motorcade car- were from the Lebanese Forces but 


The West German Embassy, 
however, has kept its mam offices 
in West Beirut despite a number of 
threats to bomb the barricaded 

b uilding. 

The killing came a day after both 
Christian and Moslem gunners 
shelled Beirut for six hours, killing 
16 persons and wounding another 
80. 


India Prohibits 
Skeleton Export 
After Protests 


inquiry would be conducted by ryingAntonius Eitd, the ambassa- were not named." 

Bernard Tricot, who was chief of dor. The shooting took place on the No further details were given. 


monte carlo i Bernard Tricot, who was chief of dor. The shooting 

1 teff [ or Charles de osteraafeof a 

pjn-Trf. 2551 51/2331 T5. Gaulle. between Chnstia 


between Christian 


ray running 
Beirut and 


were not named." ® TWA Retrieves Jet 

No further details were given. A Trans Worid Airlines jet. 

Most Western anbasses, includ- stranded at Beirut International 
ing the American, British and Ital- Airport since h was hijacked in 


Card expiry drte . 


.Sgnafure. 


Gard account f 

number [ 


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To place an advertisement 
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9252 1 Netdny Cedes, France. 
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Teks+tMi Ummi 


Rome on Friday by three American 
crewmen. The Associated Press re- 
ported from Larnaca, Cyprus. 

The TWA captain. Richard 
Vaux, 5 1, said after landing that the 
crew had been M a iitzle apprehen- 
sive going in and glad to get out” of 
Beirut He said that the security 
and airport officials he had met 
during a short stopover in Lebanon 
had been “very nice, and they ban- 
died us wdL" 

The airliner had sat on the tar- 
mac at the Beirut airport since June 
16. two days after the hijacking 
drama began. 


Rt niters 

NEW DELHI —India acted 
Friday to ban the export of hu- 
man skeletons, a trade that has 
earned the country as much s& 
$5 million a year but also has 
led to charges of body theftand 
hoodwinking of relatives. 

During an intense debate in , 
the lower house erf FaztiameA 
an official said that one trader 
bad exported 15,000 drikben's 
skeletons is the last few yeas. 

Finance Minister Vtshwao- 
ath Pratap Sn^i ended the dfr 
baa by annn imring re sto ration 
oT a ban on exportiitahamm 
skeletons and sku&s. The busi- 
ness has been conducted under 
license by 13 concerns, aB m 
Calcutta. India was the warMTs. 
largest exporter of skdetaas* 
used mainly far TDK 

strueiiott. • 

Comrovesy flared ate In- 
dian press reports that trades 
were persuading poor ffiftte. 
who often lack money to bay 
wood formaaJ burning, toms 
over bodies to them. 


















I INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 17-18, 1985 



Page 3 g^S 


1 

^59.. 
4Vm ^ 

. fc‘ 



of 747 s; 
ead Studied 


«soi P » 

$> 


. Room 

TOKYO— Th e Boeino Co - 

Thesug^siion 


checked ThS" '7*?,““ “, J “P™se 


washed Monday, killing 520 peo- 


®°*a* 


— ■77^^-,. W 




% 




L. i . . JA1 - P ,a ne s vertical tail fm 


W &5 

iZ2i- -r." -1 


•^ea& 

* !■'$ .O 


i % 


C • k 1 v .__ 


V- O- 

’ ^ . •» 


.^a™i i, ^ anfou!ldalwi < k ‘y 

■’ said the inspection was 

- °®*y - a precautionaiy suggestion, 
entirely optional for 

;* j a n«Si lh ^ T r 0kyo had ordwed^ 

' J SZ££ ma wUh 747510 

‘ ' *.£2 i, ® ll ® rs have b«n focusing 
attention on the tail of the JAL 747 
that crashed, oft course and out of 
control, into a mountain 70 mile s 
0 J3 kilometers) northwest of To- 

' {Japanese investigators found a 
-• badly damaged pressure wall, 
known asa bulkhead, from the air- 
hner. This supported a theory that 
. . ll . “ u ^ 1 during flight, causing the 
, ■ plane s tail fin to disintegrate, The 
-•; Associated Press reportedfrom To- 
- kyo. 


{Hiroshi Fujiwara, dqputy inves« 
(igator for the Transport Ministry, 
said at a news conference that the 
bulkhead, found, at the crash site, 
had “peeled like an orange." 

[The. bulkhead is an Umbrdla- 
like. aJuminttm^UpywaO that seals 
the. pressurized cabin from the 
nonpress ojrrzed r la it section. . If 
cracked or broken, said Hiroaki 
Kohno, a JAL technical manager, 
pressurized air from the cabin 
would rush mtb the mQ-andi^hdo 
the hollow stabilizer, causing it to 
bur$L] . 

Investigators, * including U.S. 
government experts and Boeing 
techhidans, visited the crash siteto 
inspect debris scattered over three 
miles: . . ' - 

- About 4.500 soldiers and police 
were removing bodies from the re- 
mote, wooded site. Military per- 
sonnel built a second helicopter 
landing site to speed removal of the 


bodies, made urgent by.tempera- 
ifc 30 de^ees cenli- 




o 1 



■y 


hr. '. Kz r t» 




'Arf! Got YouT 
Is the Latest in 
Com, 


iDUU 


The Associated Press ’ 

NEW YORK — In a new 
form of electronic vandalism, 
programs have appeared ‘ on 
computer “bulletin boards” 



the other 
computer 
user,. 

" According to PCma 
aimed at users of 
puters, there 


aDof 
in the 
unsuspecting 


izrae. 


com- 
are seyejaT ver- 
sions of the program tirculat- 
uig. . : • 

• In one case;- computer hobby- 
ists whp connected Their termi- 
nals to a New YorkbuEetin 
board were promised h nseful 
gravies program. WhehJihey 
tried to load the program into 
. their hmne system^ however, it 
destroyed aU^othier programs 
that were cmraitly loided’and 
printed the message; “Arf! Arff 
Got YqiirX . . ... 

Some- nsets fear more nhs- ■ 
chief is on the. way; such as 
“worms”thaieat awtwnt com-' 
puiennemoryradnafiyasdjcy 
are used, mad programs that 
may woric properly the Gist, 
second and third rimes they are 
used and then gobble your com- . 
puter library on the fourth go- 
round. -■ 

“It’s a little bit discouraging 
someone would go to all that 
effort just to creatc smnethmg 
this nasty,” .said Richard 


Streeter, a victim of the 
Arf!" scheme. 


‘Aifi- 


turns exceeding 
grade (86 Fahrenheit). 

Police officials tola members of 
parliament Friday night: “It is now 
a delicate .question whether all the 
bodies can be recovered." 

About 350 have been brought mi 
the mountain to nearby Fujiolca. 
About 170 have been claimed by 
relatives. 

Investigators went to Yokohama 
on Thursday to inspect tail frag- 
ments found in Sagami Bay, 125 
miles from the crash site. ' 

The bay is on the flight path 
from Tokyo to Osaka and in the 
area where the aircraft would have 
been when the pilot. Captain Mar 
sand Takahama. first radioed that 
he was unable to control the jet 

The fragments included a h 
section: of the leading edge of 
-vertical stabilizer, parts of the'rud- 
derand other fragments from the 
rear of the plane, officials said. 

. According to. (he Boring state- 
ment only about 50 percent to 60 
percent of the vertical tail fin was 
found at the crash site. 

Investigators were searching for 
a 15-inch (37-centimeter) inn that 
fastens the front of the vertical fin 
lb the fuselage. 

A JAL spokesman has said a 
defect in the pin coaid have set off 
a. of events similar to that 
described by Yuim Odum, an off- 
duty.ffight attendant who survived. 

. According to her, there was a 
“bang? above her am at the rear of 
the plane, the cabin decompressed 
and tire aircraft began to pitch and 
shake violently. 

In a tdevised interview from a 
the Sight attendant said 
screamed “Mother!" and 
“The plane was fufl erf screams as if- 
it was a pamc." .* 

. She said the passengers calmed 
down when they were told to use 
the oxygen masks and to put on life 
jackets during the last mmutes. 





Dn AdaodiM Plw 


PIGSKIN POWER — Del Bean of Gorham, Maine, got a firm grip on the mascot of 
the Mount Washington Valley Hogs football team of North Conway, New Hampshire, 
during the Chun Bowl Mud Football Classic on Sunday in Ipswich. Massachusetts. 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


Grotona Park Pool 
Is Pride of the Bronx 

How do residents of the South 
Bronx spell relief this summer? 
Croiona Park Pool- 
Closed in 1980, a victim of 
vandalism and neighborhood de- 
terioration, the pool on the edge 

n.JX i 4 -t _____ ren -1 


of Croiona Park's 147 acres (592 
hectares) was reopened last Au- 
gust after a S6-miHioo renova- 
tion. Ia its. first full summer of 
operation, more than 2,000 bath- 
ers a day find respite from the 
beat in the shimmering oasis that 
Robert Moses, former New York 
.City parks commissioner, built 
in 1936. 

“I guess you could say Croto- 
na Pool symbolizes the new 
South Bronx," said Teresa Gon- 
zalez, 25, a lifeguard who was a 
pool regular as a child. 


Short Takes 


The Cokc-Pepsi space race is 
finally over, and it ended in a 
draw — with neither soft drink 
winning favor from the astro- 
nauts who tested them on the 
space shuttle Challenger flight 
that returned to Earth on Aug. 6. 

At a news conference last 
week, the astronauts said that 
neither Coca-Cola nor Pepsi, 
consumed warm because there is 
no rrfrigeration on the shuttle, 
was enjoyable. Although they ex- 
teaced no ill effects from 
along carbonated beverages 
in space, the astronauts all pre- 
ferred the fruit juices that are 
normally flown on the shuttle. 


Let the record show the truth 
about those hard-working elect- 
ed representatives Americans 
send off to Washington, D.C 
According to a “RAsumd of Con- 
gressional Activity" in the Con- 
gressional Record, both the Sen- 
ate and the House of 
Representatives have been in re- 
cess more often than in session 
since first convening this year. 
Of the 209 days from the start of 
this Congress on Jan. 3 to the 
beginning of a monthlong recess 
on Aug. 2, the Senate was in 
session 101 days, while the 
House met on just 91 days. . 


Virgjiaty is making a comeback 
among one college's women, ac- 


cording to a 21-year study of 
‘ iami Uni- 


sexual behavior at Miami 


versity in Oxford, Ohio. The per- 
schooi 


cenlage of virgins at that 
has risen from 38 percent in 1978 
to 43 percent in 1984, reports 
Robert Sberwin. co-authorof the 
study in the September issue of 
Glamour magazine. However, 
men are not following the same 
trend, according to the study, 
which found that the percentage 
of male virgins had fallen from 
about the same rate as women in 
1978 to 28 percent in 1984. 


To further the government's 
crusade against tax cheats. Con- 
gress' Joint Committee on Tax- 
ation- has suggested that a long- 
standing ritual be amended: 
Each newborn baby will get not 
only a slap on the bottom and a 
birth certificate but a Social Se- 


curity card as well. Parents 
claiming more children than they 
bad accounted for most of the 
$8.1 billion the Internal Revenue 
Service estimates Americans 
overstated in personal exemp- 
tions in 1981. the latest figures 
available. If every dependent had 
a Social Security number, IRS 
computers could instantly spot 
exaggerated exemptions. 


Pentagon Announces 
Truce in Burger War 


The Pentagon has announced 
a trace in the burger war waged 
by fast-food superpowers Mc- 
Donald's and Burger King — on 
U.S. military bases, that is. 

In compliance with a congres- 
sional order, the Pentagon im- 
posed a moratorium last week on 
building new hamburger restau- 
rants on U.S. armed forces bases 
throughout the world. Congress 
ordered the halt in response to 
complaints by owners of restau- 
rants near military posts, who 
accused the Pentagon of subsi- 
dizing unfair competition. 

Since the military services be- 
gin permitting fast-food outlets 
on bases last year. Burger King 
has opened 16 restaurants and 
McDonald's has 17. Added as a 
provision to the Pentagon bud- 
get bill, the moratorium is in ef- 
fect until an evaluation of “the 
financial impact" of fast-food 
restaurants on bases is finished. 


AMY HO! 


Heckler Is 'Fighting for Her Job’ 
In Cabinet, White House Aide Says 


By Lou Cannon 

Winhuigum Past Serncr 

WASHINGTON — While 
House officials say there is dissatis- 
faction with the performance of 
Margaret M. Heckler, secretary of 
the Department of Health and Hu- 
man Services, and one official said 
she is “fighting for her job." 

Mrs. Heckler, who is at home 
recuperating from surgery, ac- 
knowledged Thursday that there 
have hem “recurrent rumors" of 
staff displeasure but said that Pres- 
ident Ronald Reagan has support- 
ed her and that she intends to re- 
main in the cabinet as long as be is 
satisfied. 

“I work for the president," she 
said. ‘T don’t work for the White 
House staff." 

I Larry Speakes, the White House 
spokesman, said that “Secretary 
Heckler enjoys the president’s fufl 
support and confidence and will 
continue as a valuable member of 
the Reagan cabinet,” United Press 
International reported Friday. I 

Mrs. Heckler blamed the reports 
of dissatisfaction on “disgruntled 
cabinet-seekers in the White House 
at high staff positions who never 
seem to tire of advancing them- 
selves." She did not name anyone, 
but several officials identified her 
main critic as John A. Svahn, the 
president's chief assistant for do- 
mestic policy development. 

Mr. Sv ahn, who was not avail- 
able for comment, served as Mrs. 
Heckler’s deputy and left after sev- 
eral disputes over management or 
the department. He has been 
pushed by some administration 
conservatives as a successor to Mrs. 
Heckler. 

Some of those officials have sug- 
gested that a face- saving job switch 
could be made by naming Mrs. 
Heckler ambassador to Ireland and 
replacing her with Mr. Svahn. Mis. 
Heckler, who said she is aware of 
the proposal, called the diplomatic 
post “a lovely position for some- 
body else even though my maiden 
name is O’Shaughnessy ” 

Mrs. Heckler said that the White 
House chief of staff. Donald T. 
Regan, had recently expressed sup- 
port for her in her cabinet role. 
However, other administration of- 
ficials identified Mr. Regan as an 
important source of White House 
dissatisfaction with Mrs. Heckler. 

The two sometimes differed on 


the White House staff. Administra- 
tion officials said that Mr, Svahn’s 
position has beat severely undercut 
by a Regan surrogate, Alfred H. 
Kingon, the assistant for cabinet 
affairs. The two men have dashed 
on policy issues, and some of Mr. 
Svahn's staff positions have been 
reassigned to Air. Kingon. 

“The Regan team wants Svahn 
and all the old guard out of the 
White House." said one White 
House official, “and putting him in 
the cabinet would be a convenient 
way to do it." 

White House staff disapproval 
with Mrs. Heckler has taken several 
forms. Some said that officials in 
the Office of Management and 
Budget have tried to “microman- 
age the department” and make 
more severe cuts in the Medicare 
health insurance system and other 
department programs than Mrs. 
Heckler is willing to accept. Several 
key appointments sought by Mrs. 
Heckler have been delayed by the 
White House Office of Personnel 
for many months. 

On Tuesday, officials said. 
White House officials vetoed a 
planned television appearance by 
Mrs. Heckler. Inside the Reagan 



Margaret M. Heckler 


administration, Mrs. Heckler has 
campaigned for rules that would 
make it more difficult io remove 
people from Social Security dis- 
ability rolls, supported a major ini- 
tiative against acquired immune 
deficiency syndrome and helped 
fashion a significant new chad-sup- 
port law. 

Many of her initiatives have been 
criticized by conservatives. 


Cancer-Linked Chemical 
Found in Tests at Carbide 


policy issues when Mr. Regan was 
Treasu 


reasury secretary. One official 
said that the “political style" of 
Mrs. Heckler, who served 16 years 
as a member of the House of "Rep- 
resentatives from Massachusetts, 
also conflicted with the “corporate- 
management preferences" of Mr. 
Regan, who reportedly has plans to 
bolster both the cabinet and the 
White House with a series of staff 
changes. 

One of these prospective changes 
could involve Mr. Svahn, one of the 
few surviving members of Mr. Rea- 
gan's original California team on 


AIDS Seen Spreading Among African Heterosexuals 


By Scevcn J. Dryden 

JVasMn&on Post Service 


Ancient Jaw 
Is Discovered 


in 


(Continued from Plage 1) 
sH was an anthropoid was plausible 
and consistent with other dues. But 
they emphasized the impossibility 

of^ermin^^^A^ the disease could spread from 
mthecus represented a aired anees- 


BRUSSELS — Belgian medical 
researches are reporting an alarmr 
ing increase in the prevalence of the 
fatal disease AIDS in some African 
nations where, in contrast to the 
United States, itis spreading chief- 
ly among the heterosexual popular- 
ton. 

The African nations where the 
/ hcpqto acquired immune deficien- 
cy syndrome, has been identified 
are Zaire, Rwanda^ Burundi, Ke- 
nya, Tanzania and Uganda. 

Researchers say they believe that 


natural immunity to other diseases. 

According to Dr. Nathan Qu- 
meck, bead of the Division of In- 
fectious Diseases at St Pierre Hos- 
pital in Brussels, the spread of 
AIDS in some African countries 
already is alarming. In Rwanda, for 
example, surveys have shown that 
about 10 percent to 18 percent of 
the adult population has been ex- 
posed to me AIDS virus, although 
many people show no symptoms of 
the disease. 

la Zaire's capital, Kinshasa, with 
a . population of more than three 
mini on, it is estimated that about 
26 om of every 100,000 residents 


under the League of Nations and 
the United Nations. 

Medical workers in Brussels be- 
gan tracking the AIDS phenome- 
non in Africa when victims of the 
disease from the continent were ad- 
mitted to Belgian hospitals in the 
1980s. 

The growing threat of AIDS 
leaves the African health authori- 
ties, who are facing limited budgets 
and growing challenges from tradi- 
tional tropical diseases and other 
maladies, with a difficult choice 
when considering where to conceu- 
trate tbrir efforts. 

The authorities have to deter- 


were examined in one study, 81 
percent had regular contacts with 
prostitutes, and had an average of 
32 sexual partners a year. AIDS- 
Related Complex is immune-sys- 
tem depression whose symptoms 
include weight loss, fever and swol- 
len lymph nodes. 

About 80 percent of the prosti- 
tutes surveyed in Rwanda were 
fonnd to have been exposed to the 
AIDS virus, which Dr. Gumeck 
said was (he same rate as among 
homosexuals in San Francisco. 

Other African factors the re- 
searchers said may encourage 
transmission indude unh: - ' 


in the more 


sects could 
rapid spread of 
Dr. Gumeck said he believes 
that AIDS first developed in Africa 
and spread to the United States, 


By Michael Wines 

Los Angeles Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Federal in- 
vestigators have concluded that the 
gas cloud that leaked Sunday from 
a Union Carbide Corp. plant in 
Institute, West Virginia, was not 
primarily aldicarb oxime but was 
about two-thirds methylene chlo- 
ride, a nervous system toxin and a 
suspected cause of cancer in lab- 
oratory animals. 

The chemical, a solvent widely 
used as a paint remover and liquid 
“carrier" for other chemicals, was 
placed under special review by the 
U.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency in May alter laboratory 
tests linked it to unusual numbers 
of malignant lung and liver tumors 
in mice. 

The EPA's Superfund office, 
which was set up in 1980 to admin- 
ister a program for cleaning up tox- 
ic wastes, said Thursday that the 
13S people hospitalized after Sun- 
day’s incident would be regularly 
checked by the federal Centers for 
Disease Control for evidence of 
chronic or latent health problems. 

Rick Homer, a chemical engi- 
neer with the Superfund office, said 
that although regular, large doses 
of the gas might cause human 
health problems, the chances of 
lasting effects from the angle Insti- 
tute release probably were low. 

Investigators had centered on al- 
dicarb oxime, a pesticide ingredi- 
ent, as the likely cause of the eye 
and lung problems that have been 
the major effects from the gas leak. 

Union Carbide and EPA tests, 
however, found that the gaseous 
mixture ihat burst from the Insti- 
tute plant's reactor tank was 65 


percent methylene chloride and 
only 35 percent aldicarb oxime, 
Mr. Homer said Thursday. 

Tests in the mid-1970s showed 
that even high air concentrations of 
aldicarb oxime produced only 
“transitory" effects in animals, said 
James A. Hathaway, medical ser- 
vices director for Allied’s chemical 
sector. 

The chemical's boiling point of 
210 degrees centigrade (4 10 degrees 
Fahrenheit) makes it "physically 
impossible’' to generate a cloud of 
this gas and have it travel very Tar, 
Mr. Hathaway said. 

Methylene chloride, however, 
boils into a gas easily, making it 
more likely to drift outride the In- 
stitute plant. When inhaled in large 
doses, it can cause nervous system 
and brain disorders; eye, skin and 
respiratory irritation: pulmonary 
edema; and the destruction of red 
blood cells. 


■ Warning Sow, Official Says 

Warren M. Anderson, chairman 
of Union Carbide Corp., said Fri- 
day that the company’s Institute 
plant was too slow to warn the 
public about the poison gas leak. 
He said he has told employees to 
“pull the cord” first in the future 
and worry later about whether it 
was necessary. The Associated 
Press reported from Charleston, 
West Virginia 

Governor Arch A. Moore of 
West Virginia said after meeting 
with Mr. Anderson that Union 
Carbide suffers from an “integrity 
gap.” 

“A 20-minute gap in alerting the 
public contributes to the question 
of credibility,'’ Mr. Moore said. 


Hygienic 
of hypo- 


then to Europe. The apparent first 
cases of AIDS in Africa can be 
identified as far back as 19 73, he 
said. Dr. Piot, who spends about 
two months a year doing field re- 
search in Africa, said he believes 
the African records were not suffi- 
cient to make such a claim with any 
degree of certainty. 

The notoriety associated with 
AIDS has led ai least one African 
country, the Congo, which adjoins 


nithecus represented, a direct anees- "Africa " md ha* contracted' AIDS Doctors at mme wtteiner B a pnonty, practices such as the reuse of hypo- Zaire, to discourage efforts to mea- 

he health problem than in the Unit- seeing about 1 


xs 




tree of humans. 

“We can't say that this 
the direct ancestor to all later an- 
thropoid forms," Mr. Ciochon ac- 
knowledged. “But it is representa- 
tive of the ancestral group. Once 
vou cross the threshold from lower 
' to higher primates, then all the later make Africans more susceptible to 
species are related in some man- AIDS, which destroys the body’s 
ner." 

“This is not just another 


ed Stales or Europe. 

This fear is based in part on (he 
fact that it is established among 
heterosexuals in Africa, and be- 
cause of the prevalence of such otb- 
er Ay**!** as malaria that seem to 


to 20 new cases 
each week. Dr. Gumeck said. 

The Belgians’ familiarity with, 
the health problems of Africa has 
its origins in their country’s former 
colonial role on the continent. 
Zaire formerly was the Belgian 
Congo, while Rwanda and Burundi 
were once Belgian trust territories 


at the tropical diseases are suspected of 
encouraging the development of 


department of microbiology at tii 
Institute of Tropical Medicine in 
Antwerp. “I'm not so sure that it is, AIDS, 
when you have thousands of people Mosquitoes have been ruled out 
dying from tuberculosis, malaria, jq far as transmitters of the d is e a s* ? 
measles and malnutrition." in Africa, because it has affected 

Rwanda, for example, has the only the sexually active adult popu- 
equivalent of about $1 to spend latioo. But if enough people are 
yearly for each person on health infected, Dr. Gumeck said, the in- 


the country, the researchers said. 

“Most countries don’t like to be 
confronted with a disease like 
AIDS,” one Belgian doctor said. 
The United States “doesn't like it 
when we say that AIDS was im- 
ported from America to Europe. 
The politics of this kind of disease 
are not confined to Africa, 


AIDS Virus Found in Tears, 


aes. 


KglSI U S. Research Team Reports 


, 1 17^ 


: i . 


Sa- 
nia, 

enlists, 

S'-rffiwrs; 

evolutionary record. 

The new report seems ito confirm 

an A^S rentiers the body’s ^ 


(Continued Page 1) 
not only in blood cells and lymph 
nodes,” be said, “but also free in 
SSSb Sod.ptoa.m^mcn,^ 


fh 


iVi »':* 


fragment in ite Ptmttomg Mn of 
central Burma that was later 
named Amphipitbecus and said to 
be an anthropoid. 


■ t 


pa,f those fassDs vwerc *9° 

< to convince Wgff 

■ iheorooer dassificauon of Amphi- 
i . ^ffldlbeoth^esbas 

; been in dispute 

In 


fection, is considered to be spread 
largely through sexual contact 
Other transmission oceans through 
contact with blood through con- 
taminated needles or transfusions, 
jt also has been shown to be trans- 
ferred from infected mothers to 
their unborn children. - . 

Researchers have emphasized 
repeatedly that the virus does not 


National 0™** Institute labora- 
tory, who isolated the virus from 
tears, said there is no evidence that 
AIDS actually has been transmit- 
ted among humans through con- 
tact with lean and that the chanoes 

ex- 

the virus is 


fragile and does not survive well 
outride (he body fluids. 

But because frequent contact 
with tears occurs dirrmg eye exami- 
nations. government physicians 
recommendations 


programs. 

“You can forget about screening 
blood donors" for the AIDS virus 
there. Dr. Piot said. 

Researchers acknowledge that 
AIDS can be spread from women 
to men by sexual activity, although 
documented cases are rare. Several 
factors appear to have contributed 
to the rapid spread of the disease in 
Africa among heterosexuals. 

In their studies of African AIDS 
victims, the Belgian researchers 
have discovered that sexual pro- 
miscoity plays a strong role in the 
rapid spread of the disease, whose 
victims are fonnd to be divided 
equally between the sexes. 

Of 58 mate patterns with AIDS 
or AIDS-Related Complex who 


AIDS Among Heterosexuals 
Will Increase, Scientists Say 


(Continued from Page 1) 

that detects AIDS antibodies was 
instituted in the U.S. blood batiks 
to halt the spread of the disease to 


tion period, the test is expected to 
prevent further infections through 
this route of transmission. 


“There are many unknowns with 


those who received transfusions th* 8 if nl -V l SK^ 

and to hemophiliacs who received disease, Dr. Mason said. Most 
Hood products. cases are due to an exchange of 


bodily fluids, or blood. 


Although AIDS cases within 
these groups are still expected to If drug abuse with hypodermic 
appear during the next several needles could be stopped, he said, 
years because of the long incuba- “we could stop a significant 


Bow** 


nations, 
are 

argmgi 

minimize direct 
tears erf AIDS patients, 
contact during routine 
procedures sxm as testing forglau- 


eooperatron with contact, but raJffjjKjjjSk inti- and fitting soft contact • 


log recraniBHluauum | fy -g | J _ 

CSSSS Gsilc Sondergaard, Actress 
On Stage, Screen, Dies at 86 


amount of transmission. If we 
could stop tbe exchange of bodily 
fluids among members of tbe ho- 
mosexual or bisexual community, 
we could stop tbis epidemic in its 
tracks." 


• of body flunk ££ 

- ■ site and discov- Dr. Salahnddm of the precautions might include 


\ 


cred new primal tossis. w 


Los Angela Tima Service ' Mr. Biberman, who died ia 1971, 
HOLLYWOOD — Gale Sod- becameoneof the Hollywood 10. a 
dm use of gloves by medical per- dergaard, 86, wbo was Hollywood’s group of actors, ^ tas and 


Yet Dr. Cnrran said that while 
behavior changes have “unques- 
tionably made a difference over 
what it would have been," it does 
not mean that the numbers of peo- 




of a lower jaw of j ri sonnd during eye exammaaons regningfemale villain in the 1940s tors imprisoned for refusing tots- pj e contracdn| AIDS has damned, 

, the rear pora MifmuMaYOrActstoEnd using bteaAm sterilize eqmp- tmd who won one of the the first ufy before the House Un-^fin- -because the risk is greater. 

with the frontal ,, . DJXnmf meat used to examine these pa- Academy Awards given for a sup- can Activities Cormmtlee.wmcn ««ns f i i« 

• ^ZvSind half a century Robberies onWgtUXPf -jgtiS. porting perforSance, died hdd hearings linto CtenM. m- ■ Bradley Signs LA Law 

nro^d^a nearly complete the Associated Pros A key question is whether pre- Wednesday. in 

■ j™*.--*—- .ax'ta-.-j- 

ssl&os,*-' Ssissetf asss: 


are able » who pny on passng 

d Mr. Fern’s aciion Thursday 
bones and_ 4 nthroDOid fca- _ r~,„ a»u« after three more 


several anthropoid fw- a few days after , 

pwsbo . a f| higher were robbed, bringing to jiw*w« .-~-, 

lureS ;i ;, « fuscd across the front, numb er or assaults reported until we know more, itj 

■ pn . m Sll to die middle as are ^ ^ ^ highways. be safe than any. 


“We haven't made jin official 
recommendation yet," Dr. Fu- 
My feeling is that 
it’s belter to 




Wednesday. 

She was also a veteran of Shake- _ 

spearan plays and America’s das- Fifth Amendment, saying later that 

rite was “proud to having taken a 
Her second marriage to a direc- stand." _ . 

tor, Herbert Biberman, brought her However, after 35 successful 

to Hollywood in the mid- 1 930s, movies, her position ruined her iihn 
where rite and. Walter Brennan career and she went bade to the 
were honored.for 
work. Hers was for her roie*J 

Paleologus in the . , . . 

thony Adverse. ” . sumed her work in the cinema. 



Mayor Tom Bradley of Los An- 
geles rigned into law Friday an or- 
dinance that bans discrimination 
against known or suspected victims 
of AIDS, United Press Internation- 
al reported. 

Mr. Bradley said the purpose of 
the legislation, the first of its kind 
in the United States, was “to help 
educate the public about AIDS," 
which is not spread by casual con- 
tact 



Table dock “Duomo", gold - and silver-plated 


BVLCARI 


10 VIA DEI CONDO TTl ROMA 
HOTEL PIERRE NEW YORK 
.10. RUE DU RHONE • 1204 GENEVE 
AVENUE DES BEAUX-ARTS MONTE CARLO 
HOTEL TLAZA-ATHENEE PARIS 


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Page 4 


SATURDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 17-18, 1985 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 

PuHishnl ^ rth Tbf ISpw York Thaw and The Wariringtoa Pnt 


Sribunc. 


Prisoners in Their Laager 


■The architects of apartheid. South Africa’s 
system of segregation and racial repression, 
are also its prisoners. Anyone who doubts that 
need only heed Thursday's long-awaited 
speech by President Botha. Pressed ax home 
and abroad for genuine change, the best he 
could offer was pitiful “reforms" unlikely to 
give even President Reagan plausible grounds 
for vetoing the mild sanctions that Congress is 
likely to vote next month. 

There is no longer much argument against 
imposing them, as long as it is dearly under- 
stood that the gathering tragedy is not one that 
sanctions can averL For all its wealth and 
armored cars, the Pretoria government is not 
strong enough to give demental political jus- 
tice to a huge, powerless black majority. 

Mr. Botha's prison is figurative, and also 
political. Of the multiple audiences be was 
addressing at a National Party conference in 
Durban, the most vital was Lbe whites who 
keep him in power to protect apartheid. Mr. 
Botha know, better than they, the bitter cost 
of defending a system even Mr. Reagan finds 
indefensible. Bui even if Mr. Botha wished, 
there are truths he dare not utter to whites 


taught that their privilege is God-given. 

what they wanted to hear on 


They beard 
Thursday: That South Africa is flourishing, 
that its racial policies are just and that spiral- 
ing violence is the work of Communists. And 


what did President Botha offer the huge black 
majority? A nebulous promise of consultation 
in revising the constitution. Wider citizenship 
for blacks who are now “citizens" of tribal 
homelands. Some loosening of influx controls 
that limit movement of urban blacks. 

Mr. Botha was not trying to appeal to the 
outlawed African National Congress or its 
imprisoned leader. Nelson Mandela. But these 
“reforms” were cold and meager even to Chief 
Gats ha BuLhelezi. the moderate Zulu chief. He 
did not bear a commitment to power sharing, 
meaning a willingness to give blacks political 
rights within a new constitution. 

That is scarcely utopian when 4J million 
whites tyrannize more than 20 minion blacks. 
That same goal is endorsed by the Urban 
Foundation of South Africa, the voice of es- 
tablishment industrialists. Its reform agenda 
calls for “the sharing of power," full citizen- 
ship for blacks and a willingness to deal with 
leaders like Mr. Mandela. 

Steps like these would begin to answer the 
concerns elsewhere, as manifested by the legis- 
lation for sanctions in the U.S. Congress. One 
need have no fflosxras about the potency of 
sanctions to believe that Mr. Botha has just 
made the case Tor them. It will take much more 
than these disappointing “reforms" to free his 
country’s blacks, and whites. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 




The Best 


10 


The Soviet human rights monitoring group has marked the tenth amuoersaty of iheHdsinkiaccords, 


! The Reagan administration is trying to find 


something upbeat and encouraging in the 
: South African President P.W. Bo- 


speech that i 

tha delivered in Durban on Thursday. You 
need a magnifying glass to do so, and even 
then the result is not convincing. 

- Nobody expected Mr. Botha to smack his 
head and exclaim, “Egad! We suddenly realize 
the whole system is wrong and we are going to 
change it!" Everyone knew that even if he were 
going to try to take the necessary substantial 
steps toward equity and racial peace he would 
have to do so in such a way as to protect 
himself within his own political constituency. 
But no one could have expected this either: an 
apgry, abusive, menacing tirade, full of self- 
pity and self-deception and bravado. It was a 
reckless speech and an insulting one: 

. The insult was first to the black majority of 
his country. Mr. Botha speaks with a stunning 
lack of even minimal sensitivity to what the 
uproar is about He applauds himself for his 
own “patience" in the face of provocation by 
people who have been denied their dignity and 
freedom of movement and right of political 
expression. He does not notice their patience 
Or the incredible irony in comp limenting him- 
self on his own. He concedes practically noth- 
ing. On Thursday Mr. Botha's concessions — 


if they could even be called that — were elusive 
and elliptical vague statements of intention 
and principle that turned up in the bombast 


and that you could interpret as you pleased. 
Mr. Botha also insulted R 


After the Time for Dialogue Has Come and Gone 


i Ronald Reagan and 
his administration. He showed what he thmlre 
of the administration’s prolonged and recently 
intensified efforts to get Pretoria off its de- 
structive course. He made his American inter- 
locutors look foolish, as if they had been had. 

The worst of what Mr. Botha has done is to 
deny sufficient help to those in South Africa 
who are themselves looking for a controlled 
process, as distinct from a violent, anarchic 
one, to undo the apartheid system. Bishop 
Tutu speaks for them, although he is far from 
the only one. These people have been rebuffed 
and humiliated by Mr. Botha, who seems logo 
out of his way to demonstrate that their brand 
of protest gets yon next to nowhere. Mr. Botha 
solicits all our gratitude — and theirs — for 
hinting that be might relax some of the most 
odious and oppressive features of the laws he 
and his constituents have imposed. He warns 
that the government will adopt “stronger mea- 
sures" if pressed. He tells the world to butt out. 
Optimist that he is, not even Ronald Rea gan 
should be able to take comfort from that. 


jpARIS — By coincidence, two 


meeting s are now taking place 


THE WA SHINGTON POST. 


Protection Won’t Protect 


„ By the end of this month President Reagan 
must decide how much if any import protec- 
tion to give the American shoe industry. The 
shoemakers are a f amiliar hard-luck case: a 
labor-intensive business paying wages that are 
low by American standards but four times 
those in the countries from which most of the 
competition comes — Taiwan, Brazil and 
South Korea. The U.S. manufacturers have 
repeatedly missed swings in style and fashion. 
Now, atop all their other troubles, like other 
American manufacturers they are beset by an 
overpriced dollar that makes imports cheaper 
than ever. Four years ago shoe imports had 
■ slightly less than half of the U.S. market 
Currently they have three-fourths of it 
The Reagan administration has reportedly 
decided against the most expensive and harm- 
ful form of protection, the import quotas that 
the U.S. International Trade Commission rec- 
ommended. Quotas are an invitation to raise 
prices. A dissenting commissioner, Susan W. 
liebder, calculated that those quotas on shoes 
would cost American consumers some 5800 
m il l ion a year, which worits out to about 
S35,000 a year for each job saved — a job with 
an annoal wage, on average, of 5 14,000. That is 
not much of a bargain. The administration is 
apparently divided between people who sup- 
port less drastic protection, in the form of 
higher tariffs, and those who would prefer to 


act only in cases of demonstrably unfair and 
illegal competition. But this case involves more 
than one small and shrinking industry. 

Those who want much more protection and 
those who want none both see it as a precedent 
for much larger industries. Senator John C. 
Danforth, chairman of the Senate's trade sub- 
committee, argues that a little protection now 
will mean less later. If the administration uses 
its discretion to refuse, it risks congressional 
action to limit that discretion. 

The choice here is not between more jobs or 
fewer. It is between existing jobs, some paying 
very low wages, and future jobs. Despite the 
tidal wave of imports, more people are em- 
ployed in America now than a year ago, or five 
years ago. But they are employed in different 
lines of work, and in different places. 

A vote for protection is a vote for a kind of 
social stability, at a broad and usually unrec- 
ognized cost in economic growth, incomes and 
opportunity throughout the economy. A vote 
against protection supports economic growth, 
at a cost in specific jobs held by people who 
bitterly resent the imports. Economic growth 
is not a gentle or considerate process. But 
when a president intervenes to slow it down 
through trade protection, it is important to 
keep one thing clearly in mind: The effects are 
not limited to one small industry. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. ■ 


place 

that will mark a watershed for South 
Africa. One, in Durban, is the Na- 
tional Pam conclave at which Presi- 
dent P.W. Botha spoke on Thursday. 
The other, in Lusaka, Zambia, is the 
rfHmrni of the African National Con- 
gress. which is p lanning its war strat- 
egy against apartheid. 

A spokesman for the ANC, Johnny 
Makhatmi said flatly on his way to 
Lusaka, “War is inevitable." 

He is convinced that Mr. Botha's 
decisions will not matter. The ANCs 
AemmA is simple, implacable; “ma- 
jority rule, nothing less." It does seem 
(h»t the tim« for gradualism ami dia- 
logue has passed. There is a dreadful 
stomach-smiting feeling in hearing 
that the long tragedy is moving inexo- 
rably to climactic bloodshed. 

Mr. Makhatmi call* the f-nsaka 
conference “a meeting with destiny." 
He is cool unemotional, but the ex- 
citement beneath his professional 
manner can be sensed. “This is a 
glorious moment that is approach- 
ing," he says. “We are seeing tne birth 
of Aaiania, the name black militants 

K ve fora future “nonrarist, political- 
pluralist" stale, which is the ANCs 
goal for South Africa. 

“We are as firmly committed as 
ever that South Africa belongs to the 
people who live in it, black and 


By Flora Lewis 


white,” Mr. Makhatmi says. “We 
don’t want whiles to leave, we need 
everybody really . . . The ANC re- 
fuses to emulate racists and terrorists. 
We could pm bombs in supermarkets 
and cinema*, but we won’t do that. 
The terrorists are the regime, not 
as. We want to avoid scars that we 
will have to beat when the time comes 
for reconciliation." 

He says young whites are starting 
to refuse “to take up arms for apart- 
heid.” He says “South African whites 
are going to surprise a lot of people" 
in refusing to defend racism. 

But that is all for someday. Now, 
be says, is the time to start the “hit- 
and-run war, a people’s war." The 
ANC. outlawed, operating from ex- 
ile, and the United Democratic 
Front, a mixed-race internal opposi- 
tion to the regime, would be over- 
whelmed in an uncontrollable explo- 
sion of chaotic violence, he says, 
unless armed struggle is organized. 
“We’ve got to take care of business. 
They are f ighting bare-handed, with 
sticks and pangas [machetes] against 
a regime that is armed to the teeth. 


Soviet bloc, “through the Organiza- 
tion of African Unity, and directly.” 
An OAU delegation “took our shop- 
ping list" to die Communist coun- 
tries, asking for “AK-47s, pistols, 
minus , grenades, rockets.” 


en the coming war and Emit casual- 
ties by showing that “South African 
intransigence has become intder- 
aWe.” The ANC believes, he says, 
“that paradoxically the only way to 
prevent mass bloodshed is armed 


struggle, to engage the enemy. People 
: in the 


“But we get far more help from the 
Scandinav ian countries, 512 


million 

from Norway and Sweden. We don’t 
use it for arms. They know we don’t 
need to buy armc 
“What's wrong with that? The 
world community joined to fight the 
Nazis. Roosevelt and Churchill 
worked with Stalin. We would like to 
see the world community side by side 


are going more and more in 
streets. An explosion is canting.” 

Mr. Makhatmi is hard. “Look at 
the rising we’ve been doing for the 


They^are shouting Xjive us guns.’ " 


IC targets win be “the police, 
the army, the collaborators^ Mr. 
Makhatmi says. He makes no secret 
of the fact that arms come from the 


He is pleased with increasing talk 
or sanctions, increasing support from 
“people in the West, not yet govern- 
ments." He has been talking to union 
leaders in the United States and 
Western Europe to get pledges of 
“political and material" backing for 
Mack strikes in South Africa. He 
hopes that dockers will refuse to load 
and unload ships serving South Afri- 
ca. “Thai type of action should offset 
the fears some people may have that 
the Soviets will play a dominant role" 
in the black movement's relations 
abroad, he suggests. 

He argues that unctions, a climate 
of stern isolation, is the way to short- 


last 300 years. Now let’s both die. We 
have mass funerals every week. The 
whiles have no mass funerals yet” 
But he doesn't hate. “We see the 
Western countries trying to become 
part of the solution." 

He knows the immense power of 
the regime and its capacity to kill 
minions, but he says he ranks tie 
war can be wan with fewer casualties 
than the 1.5 million in Algeria’s revo- 
lution, not counting the French. He 
cites Victor Hugo, saying that an idea 
whose time has come is stronger than 
all the armies of theworid. 

There is no way not to be sickened 
at the prospects. There zs a terrible 
time ahead, whethff Mr. Makhatmi 
is right or wrong in his expectations. 
So the rest of the world will have to 
watch the horror and decide where to 
stand. The choice cannot be to hol- 
ster apartheid. How sad to see the 
sands of peaceful hope run out 
77* Ne m» York Tams. 


The Bigger They Come , the Harder They Wake Up 


W ASHINGTON — If there ever was a sure By Charles Krautbammer 

thing, a hard fact in political life, it is that 
litefy spend S200 billion 


Other Opinion 


Japan Took the Correct Option 


The 40th anniversary of the end of the 
Pacific War presents yet another occasion to 
keep alive the memory of the misery and 
suffering which the conflict brought to this 
country. We should hand down to later gener- 
ations the experiences of misery in wartime. 

We believe that Japan took the correct op- 
tion and our relationship with the United 


States must be firmly maintained. Today our 
greatest threat comes from the Soviet Union, 
and it is impossible for Japan alone to cope 
with a nuclear superpower. But we must learn 
from the most painful experience in Japanese 


history, defeat m the war. We must learn from 
the mistake of starting a war winch could not 
be won and stubbornly refusing to surrender 
until this country suffered muss destruction. 

— Yomhai Sfdmbun (Tokyo). 


no country can indefinit 
more than it lakes in. Not even the United States. 

No matter bow fervent your belief in 
ride nostrums or Laffer curves, no matter 
fervently you worship at the temple of growth, 
you have to concede that at a certain point the 
bills come due or the lenders lose confidence, or 
both. It does not help to put things in percentage 
GNP terms: 5 percent of GNF sounds better 
than $200 billion, but it is an imp r ovement in 
sound only. Five percent compounded yearly 
makes for a debt no less malignant. 

This is all so obvious that it is no longer a very 
interesting question whether deficits stretching 
as far as the eye can see will bring ruin. The 
question is how a political system can look ruin 
so plainly in the eye and do nothing about iL 

There is no shortage of explanations — a 
stubborn president, allergic to taxes and pre- 
pared to mortgage the economy to pay for the 
allergy; a Democratic Party intdlectnafly ship- 
wrecked and dinging desperately to Social Secu- 
rity while waiting for a new idea to float by; a 
political system ingeniously constructed 200 
years ago to check and balance and foil a (po- 
tentially tyrannous) majority and, when it comes 
to foiling, working perfectly. 

These explanations are plausible as far as they 
go, bnt they don’t quite satisfy. Even for a system 
as fractured, partisan and rigid as America's, it is 
hard to understand so fatafa dissociation from 
so obvious a threat. Something else is gong on. 

Thai something dse is the extraordinary safety 


it that 


of American life and the habits of 
such safety breeds. There is a kind of 
belief that while catastrophe can happen, it can- 
not happen in America. Inis is not citric Ameri- 
can optimism, now resurgent, the feeling that 
things necessarily will get better. It is a variant, 
the reeling that thing s simply cannot fall apart. 

Safety is so pervasive a feature of American 
life that it has become invisible, except to a 
foreigner. “You live so very safdy here,” said 
Nadine Gordimer, the South African novelist, on 
a recent visit to Washington. “To make a protest 
and be arrested for a couple of hours can make 
you a hero. In my country it's quite different." 

Indeed. And in America one grows to believe 
not just that the individual is inviolable, but that 
the nation is, too. It is no mystery why. There is 
safety in American numbers: a quarter of a 
billion people, a $4- trillion economy, two vast 
oceans tor protection, two friendly countries for 
neighbors. This is, after aQ, a land on which the - 
last war to be fought ended 120 years ago. 

Milan Ktmdera, the Czech novelist, defines a 
small nation as “one whose very existence may 
be put in question at any moment. A small nation 
can disappear and knows iL” 

Czechoslovakia and Israel are small nations. 
America, by this definition, is a very large one. 
Foragreat power — a s up erpo w er — existence is 
never the issue. Its wanes are about interests. 
And interests, in the end, are disposable. Viet- 
nam or Lebanon can disappear from the Ameri- 


can horizon, leaving everyday life in America 
unchanged. Large countries have large mar g ins 
of error. They know failure, but not disaster. 

Security is not just a question of geography 
and size, but of wealth. In economic life, the 
safety of the American system is legendary. The 
whole world comes to invest because it considers 


the American system stable and the currency 
safe. That makes for a certain ca rele ss ne ss. The 
UJS. economy is such an enormously productive 
pne that it can sustain staggering waste, 
two weeks ago the Unites States foreclosed 


two weeks ago me u rated states foreclosed 
n synfuels, at a loss of S2 billion. A 543-billion 
udear plant lies completed and unused on Lots 


Island because the surrounding county has 
second thoughts. For the American economy, 
such g igantic blunders amount to spillage: 

Of course, Americans have not totally escaped 
disaster. There was the Depression. But it was so 
long ago that most of us are too young to remem- 
ber it and the president is old enough to have 
forgotten h. Memory fades. It’s morning in 
America. The president has a sunny disposition, 
even happier luck — neither falling oil prices nor 
overextended Russians nor even Paul Volcker 
are his creations — and the unshakable convic- 
tion that Providence has taken America in hand. 

Catastrophe is for smaller, less virtuous coon- 
tries. No hurricanes at thedly on ahflL Not even 
5200-billion deficits can shake that faith. Indeed, 
it is that faith that makes such deficits possible. 
On American safety. Miss Gordimer added, “I 
don't sneer at iL It’s an enviable kind of inno- 
cence.” Innocence it is, bnt enviable? 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


By Philip ■ Geyelm 

W ashington —fo less than 
four years as U S. ambassador 
to France, £van Galbraith drew four 
formal protests from the French For- 
dgn Ministry and a rebuke from ha 
own foreign mmisier. George S h»h> 
(“He should have his tongue tied for ■' 
him ") But h seems that PresBfcn 
Reagan and his political handler* 
couldn't care less. Otherwise they 
would have had no trouble finding a 
successor with self-evident creden- 
tials. That would have been a wav of 
saying to France: “Sony about dm." 
Instead the While Home has come 

successful multinu^Saiirb^^ 
contractor from NashviBe. Tennes- 
see. whose qualifications on paper 
are even less imposing dun those of 
his predecessor. Mr. Galbraith bad 
been posted in Paris for five yean by 
Morgan Guaranty Trust Mr. Rod- 
mts had visited France only four or 
five times “for several days, he jald 
senators at his confinnaboa beating. 

His command of the Fr e nch lan- 
guage began with a crash course this 
snnmrer. But be would 
“learn the beautiful 

" on the job. he uid A1 
l never master it, 1 ne 
s “managerial skill* mere 
more important. 1 hive run a 
iny of over 1,000 employees, 

is larger than an embassy." 

Mr. Rodgers is owed the benefit of 
doubts. If be could build a contact- 
ing firm from an annual volume of 
5230, 000 to 5140 milboft in K) yean, 
he must have a certain capacity for 
growth. Anybody who raised 5100 
milli on as finance chairman for tie 
1984 Reagan-Bush ca mp a ign was 
bound to catch the boss s eye. But 
why, in one of America's three or four 
most important diplomatic relation- 
ships, does Washington go out of its 
way to raise gratuitous doubts? 

Tins is not another treatise on 
political -verais-career ambassadors. 
Malcolm Toon, a recognized Soviet 
specialist who wound up his career as 
ambassador to Moscow, made the 
right point in reaction to the Rodgers 
appointment: “What is important is 
competence on the part of both polit- 
ical appointees and profesriooris. 
Same political appointees haveit md 
some professionals don L" 

Sending an ambassador “to a criti- 
cal country without asv knowledge is 
sheer stupidity," be added. “Our 
prestige suffers, we fail to get our 
across and. most important, 
around the world.” 
presented at the confir- 
mation bearings, the American Acad- 
emy of Diplomacy noted that the 
US. ambassadorship to France snee 
World War D hasbeen held by ca- 
reerists for 15 years and political ap- 
pointees far 25 years. But the group 
of former Foreign Service officers 
added that the political appointees 
“have almost invariably been individ- 
uals with extensive put exponnre and 
experience in France or with unroofr. 
ate senior ex p e rie nce in poiky-nafe- 
ing positions, or both . . . America 
ambassadors in Paris, under prtr. 
dents of both partis, have pro wiij 
been of higher consistent dislmctH 
than in any other single post abroad.” 

For a variety of reasons, the Aot 
Paris “may weO beat 


we 


In a 


emycon 

this particular lime the most diffioflt 
and important UJS. ambassadorship 
in the world.” Not the least at tie 
reasons is (hat the French can be, 
well difficulL They are prickly, pro- 
vocative imperious, proud to a fa* 
of their independence. 

Geography, a nuclear strike farce 
an aloof rdaiioaship with NATO, m 
impe nding constitutional crisis min- 
ing on next year’s parliamentary ejec- 
tions. a fieredy protective tram; pol- 
icy — all this accounts for fee 
Academy's conclusion that “tbs note 
American ambassador in Paris wiB 
face formidable problems requiring 
the utmost skill and capacity 

Mr. Rodgers was woe enough at 
his confirmation hearings to pnwaK, 
when prodded, that be would not 
meddle in French politics or play 
partisan American politics in Paris. 
(“It is definitely a position that repre- 
sents the whole country and all of it* 
citizens.") That those ware the right 
answers is some comfort. 

Bat when you look at the roster of 
those who lave followed Benjamin 
Franklin to Paris since 1778. you stiB 
have to wonder why such etemenlary 
questions had to be asked 

Washington Past Writers Group. 


from our aug. 17 pages, 75 and so years ago Uganda Needs Aid That Helps Restore Civil Rights letters 


1910: Russian Sorcerers vs. Cholera 
ST. PETERSBURG — Up to the present, 
81,000 cases of cholera have been reported in 
the affected provinces. The number of victims 
is in reality somewhat greater since those in- 
duded in this figure are only the cases reported 
by the Government doctors, whereas it is cer- 
tain that considerable numbers of cholera- 
stricken persons are receiving no medical at- 
tention whatever. The progress of the disease is 
aggravated by the hostility of the population 
to doctors. This hostility is largely provoked 
by sorcerers who go about the country preach- 
ing superstition of the most ridiculous kind 
Fires are built and the ill are told to jump over 
them as a sure specific against cholera. 


1935: Rogers and Post Die in Crash 
NEW YORK — Wiley Post, Oklahoma air- 
man who flashed to fame on the wings of two 
gbbe-grrdling speed records, and Will Rogers, 
cowboy humorist whose homely philosophy 
endeared him to millions erf Americans, 
crashed to their death [on Aug. 15] 15 miles 
south of Point Barrow, on the northernmost 
tip of Alaska, a few hours after they took off 
from Juneau on the second lap of what was to 
have been an aerial pleasure jaunt from Cali- 
fornia to Moscow. Post, uncertain of his bear- 
ings in the fog and rain, alighted on a smug 
river to ask some encamped Eskimos where he 
was. In taking off, the motor misfired and the 
plane crashed from an altitude of 50 feet 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1932 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M.FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL AST 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
Carl gewirtz 


Deputy Publisher 
Associate hMiskee 
Assocme Publisher 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Publisher 
Excaane Editor R£N£ BONDY 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR 

Deputy Editor RICHARD H. MORGAN 

Deputy Eihior STEPHAN W. CONAWAY . . 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Direaor q[ Cimdoskm 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director cf Adtertuu^ Saks 
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0 1985. fmtrrmional Herald Tribune. AO rights reserved 



N EW YORK — After the violent 
coup in Kampala last month, 
the conventional wisdom is that po- 
litical instability and uncontrolled vi- 
olence are to be expected for the 
indefinite future in Uganda. Such 
thinking is simplistic and unfair. It 
contributes to a self-fuMting proph- 
ecy of failure and prevents the west 
from helping this neglected East Afri- 
can state regain its former promise. 
A naturally rich country, Uganda 
in the 1960s after inaepen- 
, Despite ethnic divisions, it de- 
veloped an efficient civil service, 
strong local government, excellent 
schools, good health care md a stable 
economic system. In contrast to 
many embryonic African states, it 
seemed to have a bright future. 

This optimism was shattered in 


By Michael Posner 


Instead of waiting, the arimimstra- 


ber 1980 until the coup, the armed 
forces continued to commit large- 
scale rights abuses, killing tens of 
thousands of civilians. These abuses 


interior. A 'principled, decent man 
and a Baganda. he is head of the 
opposition Democratic Party and an 


1971 when an obscure soldier. Major 
Irol of 


General Zdi Amin, seized control 
the government Pledging to end eth- 
nic tension, unify the country and 
restore broad political participation, 
General Amin did just the opposite. 
In a reign of terror that lasted more 
than eight years, his army and securi- 
ty forces killed several hundred thou- 
sand of their own countrymen. They 
also decimated the country’s eco- 
nomic and political institutions and 
exacerbated tribal animosities. 

The three civilian governments 
that followed were unable to over- 
crane this legacy. Daring President 
Milton Obote's tenure, from Dccem- 


combined with renewed ethnic rival- 
ries in the army to erode the stability 
of the government until it was over- 
thrown by a bold insurgency. 

In its first few weeks m power, the 
new military government has sent 
mixed signals. Although proclaiming 
a commitment to democracy, the new 
rfnrf of state. Lieute n a n t General 
Tito Okello, has suspended the con- 
stitution and dissolved parliament 

Promising to step down when elec- 
tions are had, he and the Other mili- 
tary leaders in the government have 
said that elections may be delayed for 
as much as 12 months. listening to' 
their assurances, most Ugandans un- 
doubtedly recall Idi Amin’s first 
speech as president in 1971, when he 
declared: fl I am not a politician, but a 
professional soldier ... mine will be 
purely a caretaker government," 

Uganda’s fortunes will depend on 
whether the ruling military council 
follows through on its promises to 
end (he internal conflict with the Na- 
tional Resistance Army and include 
tire powerful Baganda tribe in a gov- 
ernment of national reconciliation. 

One very positive step in that di- 
rection is the recent appointment of 
Paul Ssemogerere as minister erf the 


His appointment and that of 
Oomnu, a moderate and experienced 
diplomat, as foreign minister are 
promising signs. Yet even with their 
active participation in an interim 
government, the process of reconcili- 
ation will be slow, and long-term uni- 
ty extremely difficult to achieve. 

A second key to the future is the 
extent to which the United States, 
Britain and other countries commit 
themselves to bdp rebuild the coun- 
try. The new government must work 
to attract their political and financial 
support and the backing of the inter- 
national financial community. 

Uganda has little bearing on the 
great East-Wen battles of oar time, 
and few Americans will know or care 
if Ronald Reagan loses it on his 
watch. Congress has paid so little 
attention to Uganda since 1978, 
when the United States imposed 
comprehensive economic sanctions 
on the Amin regime. No member of 
Congress will spend even a day in 
Uganda during tins month’s congres- 
sional recess, and administration of- 
ficials are likely to counsel that tire 
United States adopt a wait-and-see 
attitude in the months ahead. 

This would be a grave mistake. 


tkm should treat this period as a rare 
opportunity to press for democracy 
and human rights — and this can be 
done without in any way infrin g in g 
on Ugandan sovereignty. 

America can exercise considerable 
influence through trade and aid poli- 
cies, mid even a modest increase in 
financial support could make a criti- 
cal difference at this poinL U.S. rep- 
resentatives at multilateral develop- 
ment batiks should also use their 
considerable influence to ensure that 
those institutions continue to provide 
Uganda with vital economic support. 
The extension of additional aid 

and credit should be dearly linked to 
assurances by the Ugandan govern- 
meat: steps must be taken to achieve 
ra tal reconciliation and respect 
for baric human rights, and chose in 
n ? w . jBPycn fflBBt who support 
these initiatives must be given the 
authority they need to pursue the m . 

After Uganda’s recent history, 
there is no guarantee that these fa- 
forts wU succeed. But without the 
active involvement and support erf 
the United States and otberWesiern 
wuntries, the trauma of the past is 
likely to continue. 


Applause for the Show 


The Australian F inan cial Renew, 
died in your pages on July 19, caBs 
the Live-Aid Concert, the benefit to 


nrisdheded emotionalism which is 

likely to have a harmful effect o o fee 

starving people of the African frinare 

bclL" The rock concert was not in- 
tended to solve Africa’s food prob- 
lem. What it did do, and what no- 
body dse has done to die same 
degree, was arouse in people around 
the world an enormous amount of 
concern for the starving. Those 
norant and self-seeking figu res” cf 
the pop music industry did wdL 
DAMIAN BREEN. 
Abidjan, Ivory CoasL 


The Past Held on P^per 


The Hntfr is executive director of the 
utiy^ pmmta! for Harm Rigtts, 
Y<xkfased group that promotes 

n^as around the void. Heamributaf 

this to The New York Tones. 


My compliments to EBen Good- . 
man ("No Phone r*~ nth nj Reread id 
the Attic ” Aug. 10). I hope this 
cncoaragereadmtorc^xctfirevat- 
ueofa later agauL The lekpbcaeB* 
wonderful invention, especially 1 b 
emergencies but magic moments ire 
only captured in a fctter. Coopks 
who do their courting b y-tefepw® 
will never have thatbuiidle of krtc 
lettos to look hack cm. The imflrf&a 
fail in senility but the tetter cannot. 

MARY R WOESSNER 




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rbht r<J?u*? Ay*? 0 ® 8 ® 1 R»rf>oflah Khomeini, with tes son, Syed Ahmad, 

Kj?!® baBot at fais Tehran residence Friday as Iranians chose among three 
““Mates for presdentThe inannbent, AH Khamenei, was considered a certain victor. 

tranSaysIrpq Tried to Sabotage Election 


Reuters 

LONDON — Iran said that “subversives” sent 


been captured or failed, it added that the wring 
appeared to be unaffected and that President Afi 


Knamenei was expected lobe returned to office. 

Tehran Radio quoted Information Minister Mo- 
hammed Reyshahri as saying that 20 teams, of 
terrorists inmtrated the country two month ago cm 
the disruption mission. .■ ... 

He said the efforts had been ineffective and that 
all those involved had been captured or killed, 
according to the broadcast, as monitored here by 
the British Broadcasting Gotp- 
The Iranian press agency quoted Mr. Reyshahri 
later as saying that the terrorists” had planned 
murders in several dries, including Tehran, Isfa- 


han and Abvaz, and also planned to fire rocket- 
propelled grenades at the Presidential Palace. 

Mr. Khamenei, 46, an Islamic cleric, faced two 
challengers in the voting — former Trade Minister 
Habib Asgar-Owladi, 52, and Sayyed Mahmoud 
Mustafavi Kashani, 42, a lawyer. Both are link 
known to the people of Iran, analysts say. 

Mr. Khamenei took office in 1981, winning 16 
nriDion out erf the 16.8 million votes. 

About 20 mflUon people were eligible to vote 
Friday. The results are not expected to be known 
for several days. 

Regardless of the outcome, Iran’s spiritual lead- 
er, Ayatollah Ruhoflah Khomeini, is understood to 
remain the paramount power in the nation. 

The ayatollah cast his vote early Friday at his 
villa north of Tehran. 


By Jackson Diehl 

Washington Post Sendee 

CZESTOCHOWA," Poland — 
Flanked by tanners of the banned 
Solidarity trade union, tens of 
thousands of Pqtes atteaded Mass 
hiere a^iriii^ "parts, 

of tip. am imfjn annual pdgrimz • 
ages. V. ■ * ; ■ ; r 

Poland’s Roman Catholic pri- 
mate, Cardinal Jozrf Glemp, called 
far national unity in a . Sermon - 
Thnrsday outride the Jasna Gara 
monastery, which contains Po- 
land’s shnne of the Black Madon- 
na. Church officials estimated that 
more than 200,000 people attend- 
ed. Other estimates were slightly 
lower. 

Beneath Cardinal Glemp, on an 
iron fence facing the pilgrims; were 
dozens of red-and-white b oners 
muring the themes of (he ^ijdarity 
un to**-, devotion to Catholicism and 
continuing resistance to efforts by 
the Communist authorities to sta- 
bilize the country. One read: 
“Black Madonna — Hope of Our 
Enslaved Nation.” 

Church leaders, warned by the 
government against allowing the 
pilgrimage to be overtaken by poli- 
tics, unsuccessfully sought to pro- 
hibit from the Mass and marches 
banners and other demonstrations 
of opposition to the government. 

Cardinal Giemp, who in the past 
has used sermons at Czestochowa 

to call for freedom of political pris- 
oners, avoided any direct mention 
of Dobtics Thursday, speakmg 111 - 


good,” said Stamslaw, a pilgrim 
from Warsaw. “And by evil we un- 
derstood communism.” 

- The defiant tone was as tradi- 
tional as the pilgrimages tbern- 
jdves, which began from Warsaw 
•in 1711 during an -epidemic. The 
^QO-year-dd Jasna Gora monas- 
tery and its icon, a painting of 
Mary, the mother o£ Jesus, adorned 
with jewels and blackened by 
smoke from candles, has been a 
.symbol rtf Polish nationalism since 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUIVE, SATURDAY-SUWDAY, AUGUST 17-18, 1985 

■ US. Official 
Tells Liberia 
Of Concern 
On Elections 

By Joe Ritchie 

Wasftmgm Post Service 
WASHINGTON — US offi- 
cials have expressed concern that 
Liberia's military government ap- 
pears to be backing off from a 
pledge to hold elections and return 
to civilian rule. 

The State Department counsel- 
or, Edward J. Derwinski, flew to 
Liberia last week to express con- 
cern about election procedures, 

VS officials said Thursday. Mr. 

Derwinski and other officials also 
have mentioned their concern 
about the jailing of Liberian politi- 
cians. 

Sharply underscoring the con- 
cern about progress toward the re- 
turn to democratic rule was the 
announcement Wednesday by Li- 
beria’s trader, Samuel JC Doe, that 
an outspoken former cabinet mem- 
ber would be tried by a special 
military tribunal 
A former finance minister, Ellen 
Johnson- Sirleaf, a Hamid-educat- 
ed development economist who has 
worked for the World Bank and as 
the Africa representative for Gti- 
bank, was placed under house ar- 
rest July 31 and transferred to a 
htMun military stockade Aug. 9. 

is son, Syed Ahmad, Mr. Doe said that she would be 
chose among three tried for statements made last 
lered a certain victor. month in Philadelphia that he 
called “detrimental to the peace 
# and stability" of Liberia. Although 

> |f 1 /zv»h/lf| Mr. Doe refused to specify on what 

- L charge she would be tried. Justice 

Minister Jenkins Scott said last 
planned to fire rocket- week that she likely would be tried 

Presidential Palace. for sedition. . 

slanric cleric, faced two According to a text made avail- 
-former Trade Minister able by a Liberian opposition fig- 
and Sayyed Mahmoud ure; the former finance minister , in 

lawyer. Both are little her speech to the Union of Liberian 
in, analysts say. Associations in the Americas, 

ice in 1982, winning 16 called for less government inter- 
ion votes. vention in the economy and a real- 

le were eligible to vote location of resources, particularly 
t expected to be known from construction of large public 
buildings to rural devetomnem. 

ne, Iran’s spiritual lead- Mr. Doe also linked the centrist 
amrim, is understood to Liberia Action Party to an alleged 
ver in the nation. plot to overthrow ms government. 

'Ote early Friday at his Liberian opposition sources in 
Washington said they believed that 

Mr. Doe’s actions were intended to 

provide an excuse to postpone leg- 
— . _ islative scheduled for Ocl 8 and 

r ll ¥1 1't'YT presidential elections on Nov. 5. 

U ULllY US. officials said Thursday that 

w Mr. Doe’s comments caused "gnat 

1655, when besieging Swedish <»ncem" and noted that the Unit- 
forces were defeated by outnum- ed States had been encouraging Li- 
bered Po&fa defenders. » avihan role. The 

This year, the monks who main- US. officials noted that so far U- 
tain the shrine said that groups bena had made excellent progress 
from every major Polish city and 1 8 toward thaCgpaL 
countries arrived in Czestochowa. The officials also expressed con- 
cern about other Liberian politi- 
■ Solidarity Seen Weakening dans who have been jailed in Scent 

General Janzzelski told the A us- months, as well as several leading 

trian broadcasting service ORF on journalists and 14 students seized 

Friday that Solidarity was getting last month for allegedly passing 

weaker, Reuters reported from Vi- classified documents to Soviet dip- I | ^VT^TJTTTTTTT J 
enna. lomats. ■ A M i 1 1 i i'l 111 V A 


Page 5 







The Rimless 
Folding Glasses 
Die Rimless Faltbrille 
PORSCHE DESIGN 

bv CARRERA 


Greeks Unearth Ancient Royal Palace 


of politics Thursday, speakmg in- 
stead of his hope for a future with- 
out coofficL 

“The divisions in Europe and in 
our country will not divide us here” 
at the shrine, he said. “Instead, we 
wfll be led into unity”. i 
His moderate tone signaled the 
church's efforts to avoid new con- 
flicts with the government of Gen- 
eral Wqjdecfa Jaruzelslri after a 
year of turbulent relations, several 
observers said.. Cardinal Glemp | 
and General Jaruzdski met eaiher 
this summer for the first tune m is 
months. 

JZSS8SSEX5& 

through the coimayside 
Soved a reaffirmation of the mien- 

tarn they' W from PoWl 

“^“53 years oM and. the pil- 
g i 1 Z e i.&ficuH forn K mphys.- 
^ i i-! r rr ic ” csid a journalist from 
175 miles 10 


By Henry Karom 

fiew York Tima Service 

SALONIKA, Greece — The 
largest royal palace ever dSsoowsed 
in Greece is being excavated near 
here by the archaeological authori- 
ties of western Macedonia. 

Mary Caramanofr-Siganidou, 
regional director of antiquities, 
said in. a recent interview that 
chances were even that the palace 
was die birthplace 0 # Alexander the 
Great, king erf Macedonia from 336 
B.G to 323 B.G 

The palace lies within the con- 
fines of agricultural fields that cov- 
er the rains of the ancient capital of 
Pella. 

'The palace is either that of Phil- 
ip D, Alexander’s father, or Cas- 
sander, the next king," said Ms. 
Caramanoly-Siganidou. “Alexan- 
der himself was never hire long 
enough to build. His military cam- 
paigns kept him away.” 

If it can be established that the 
palace was the work of Philip, she 
said, there is no doubt that Alexan- 
der was bom there. “Perhaps in one 
of these rooms around the court- 
yard , 77 die said. 

advertisement 


At the center of the courtyard, 
the archaeologists have unearthed 
the square foundation of an altar, 
around which were found Doric 
fluted columns, then an open porti- 
co amt finally a rectangular flight 
of rooms. 

The biggest room, according to 
Ms. Caramanoty-Sganidou, mea- 
sured about 65 feet by 65 feet (20 
meteis by 20 meters), with walls 
more than six feet wide, which indi- 
cates the grandeur of the palace. 

Unfortunately, she said, classical 
literature contains no description 
of cither Philip’s or Cassander’s 
palaces. However, Livy, writing of 
an earlier long, who turned the vil- 
lage of Pella into the capital of 
Macedonia, described it as a city of 
great splendor. The king was Ar- 
chdaus, who ruled from 413 B.C to 
399 B.G 

The fragments dug from the pal- 
ace excavation have convinced ar- 
chaeologists that they date to a pe- 
riod later than Archdaus and can 
be only from Philip’s or Cas- 
sander’s royal residence. 

The exceptional size of the pal- 
ace complex became known gradu- 
ally, Ms. Caramanoly-Sigani dou 


said. On the basis of exploratory 
trendies, the archaeologists have 
concluded that the palace, consist- 
ing of six wings, covered about 15 
acres (six hectares). 

‘This is the largest palace in 
Greece and one of the largest ever 1 
found.” Ms. CaramanoJy-Sigam- 
dou said. 9 

The stage-by-stage discovery of ! 
the rains of Pella began in 1957, the 1 
archaeologist said, when a farmer 
digging the foundation for a new 
storehouse had found sections of 
Doric columns. Ms. Cara m an o ly- 
Siganidou said that the most telling 
discovery was tiles bearing the 
name of PdliL 

The discoveries of the first five 
years of digging, when funds for 
the prqject ran out, now are shown 
in a small museum on the site. Ex- 
cavation did not resume until the 
mid-1970s, when archaeologists 
were called in to give their approval 
to excavate for the laying of water 
pipes. 

Examination of the grounds dis- 
closed that the town and palace 
covered a much larger area than 
originally believed. 

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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-S UNDAY, AUGUST 17-18, 1983 


ARTS /LEISURE 


How 'Estimates’ Distort Auction Market 


homuflaul Herald Tribune 

T HE entire auction market operates on the 
basis of estimates, the prices that the auction 
houses believe bidders might be willing to pay 
for works of ait The estimate is pat forward by 
the auction house’s expert in a given Held. But 
on what basis? 


Take the Van Gogh landscape and Gauguin 
slifl life that were at the heart of the lawsuit 


SOUREN MELIKIAN 


of which were at the root of the Christie's case, 
are less prone to mid variations than most 
categories. -They have been thoroughly re- 
searched. virtually eli mina ting serious problems 
of attribution. The works of a given artist come 
up on the market with sufficient frequency for 
buyers to have some idea of their possible value. 
Compared with Old Masters, the situation for 
Impressionists is almost ideaL 
Consider the Guido Reni in an April 3 sale at 
Sotheby’s: It was estimated at £250,000 to 
£500,000 —and knocked down at £2 million. In 
November, the portrait of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 


and will frequen tly use the cliche “we have had a 
lot of interest” in this picture or that object. But 


in f3ct the expert is as much an opinion pollster 
inn else. 


against Christie's by Cristallina SA, the Swiss „ , ... , ^ , 

cn pany that wanted to sell the p ainting s One Column by Joseph Wnght of Derby sold at 
landscape by Van Gogh does not equal another. Christie’s for £1.4 million. Thai fell within the 
Even two landscapes identical in size will differ estimate r ang e. On the other hand, Nico las 
in composition, in color balance, in the rhythm P?™'* “Holy Fpity". one of tbe greaiest 


as anything 
The sad thing for those who sell at auction is 
that opinion polls can be diveigenL In the 
Cristallina case. Bathurst, as Christie's New 
York president, held one opinion concerning 
the prices that Dimiuy Jodidio’s pictures might 
bring, and Burge, the Impressionist expat, held 
another. Jodidio, the owner of Crisiallina, was 
incensed because he was never told about the 
difference of opinion: Christie's has admitted 

_• ■ h : ■ L. i 


this. Burge was so pessimistic that he instructed 
the New Yc ’ 


introduced by jhe brushwork. The sum total of 
all this results in the appeal of tbepaintmg, as 
Christopher Burge, then head of Christie's Im- 
pressionist and Modem Master department, put 
it in court papers. 

The trouble is that such a factor as “appeal" is 
fundamentally variable, regardless of whether 
the “market" of which there has been so m uc h 
talk is “optimistic” or “not optimistic." If it is 
true that no two works of art afe identical, it is- 


17th-century French paintings ever seen at auc- 
tion and one that was marvelously well pre- 
served because it had not been moved from 
Cha&sworih House for more than 250 years, 
failed to reach its reserve when it came up at 
Christie’s in April 1981. 

Its sale was negotiated after Lbe auction. Nor- 
ton Simon bought it for £1.65 million, the re- 
serve price. (Simon now owns the pain ling joint- 
ly with the Getty Museum.) Was the reserve 
ated? “ 


ork press officer. Elizabeth Shaw, to 
tell CBS-TV in a letter only one wed: before the 
auction that Christie's expected to sell the paint- 
ings at between 55 milli on and S9 million. The 
message that such an announcement conveyed 
to professionals was that there had been a 
dimbdown from Bathurst's initial estimate, of 
$9.3 million, and it can hardly have left them 
with a favorable impression. 

Differences of opinion within auction houses 
are not infrequent. I have more than once 
ken to experts who were unhappy because l 



y« 

Ovf 


f 


Pi* 1 .' 

Site f 


p- 


TURNIN’ IN THE WIND —A collection of windmills in 
the Texas Panhandle, photographed by T. Lindsay Baker, 
publisher of a quarterly magazine called Wmdnrillers’ Ga- 
zette. Baker, a windmill watcher who has spent years 


st alking the American species — - fixtures on tow fn» / 
the 1850s through the 1930s — has documented his find- 
ings in “A field Gttide to American WiudnfflS,” a hook " . 
published by the University of Oklahoma Press for SfiSL .«• 


were urged by their superiors to take objects 
with high reserves, which force 


equally tnie that no two art lows win pass an P™* exaggerated? Hardly m view of tterarity “J 

identical judgment on a given work or art And ct^aworKPo^b^muchh^ to SXbirk 

them to reveal this to a client 


Works of Siberian Exile Shown in Warsaw Fortress 


.. 

•ii. 
...* ” 


virtually any one who has been buying art over a 
long period has had several experiences of miss- 
ing an object at auction or in a gallery and 
buying it later from a dealer at twice the price 
after realizing how strong its “appeal” is. At 
almost every sale successful bidders are ap- 
proached by someone who was either day- 
dreaming or hesitant Receptivity to beauty is 
not necessarily instant; it can come in stages 
and is often linked to a certain mood, even 
among seasoned professionals. 


come by than Van Goghs. But as in the case of 
the Van Gogh, it is a work with few potential 
5: In the price 


Thus to quote one figure as a probable price 
of any item at auction is meaningless. Even to 
quote aprobable price range leaves a margin for 
error. There has never beat an auction where all 
the prices paid beautifully coincided with the 
middle of the estimate range. The price of art 
cannot be predicted, because human emotions 
defy equations. 

“I never expect anything in this business,” 
Burge said in court papers relating to the Cris- 
tailina suit, which, though it was later dropped 
by a judge in New York, led to the disclosure 
that David Bathurst, Bulge’s predecessor as 
president of Christie's New York, falsely said 
the above-mentioned Van Gogh and Gauguin 
had been sold. 

Still, there are degrees of predictability — or 
unpredictability. Impressionist p ainting s, eight 


pore 

buyers: In the price range exceeding £JJ mil- 
lion, there are probably fewer than 10 individ- 
uals and institutions worldwide combining the 
interest in such an artist and the buying capaci- 
ty. The fewer the potential buyers, the more 
unpredictable the outcome of the sale. 

In the old days, say 20 years ago, that did not 
matter. Reserves were not much used and were 
very low. Prices in any area were susceptible to 
wild variations. Now that vendors refuse to take 
such chancre and, in a penury market, are in a 
position to impose their reserves on auction 
houses, the latter resort to a new device to 
determine their estimate: They keep their ears to 
the ground, as Burge put it in court papers. 
Weeks before the sale, dealers and collectors 
come by to have a look at the works they are 
interested in. And they talk. Auction house 
experts are skillful at getting people to tefl them 
bow much they are prepared to pay for a work 
of art they coveL A majority of dealers know 
how to hold their tongues, but not all of them, 
and a majority of private buyers are incapable 
of doing so. As they naively disclose their inter- 
est in what they wul try to buy, they help push 
up the estimate and, often, the reserve. The 
auction bouses seem to be unaware of how 
objectionable this way of steering the market is, 


Jodidio told Christie's from the beginning 
that he wanted to raise 510 million. It is because 
Bathurst felt the eight paintings be selected 
would fetch this amount that he agreed to the 
auction, and that three other paintings were left 


By Michael T. Kaufman 

Kent Yak Times Service 


out of the sale. Many private individuals can be 
lidio may have been, by not getting 


historians, evoke the experience of 
exile, imprisonment and torture 

W ARSAW — In a badly light- with an immediacy and impact 
ed comer of an old Gzarist simflar to that conveyed by Goya’s 
fortress in Warsaw hang some re- well-known series, “The Horrors of 
markable paintings that, though War.” 

largely unknown even by Polish an The Polish paintings are the 




hurt, as Jodidio may 
the money they need on time. In the reforms 
contemplated by auction profesrionals as a re- 
sult of the Bathurst case, the estimate system 
and the publicity given to estimates deserve at 
least as much priority as the reserve price prob- 
lem. 


Second of three articles. Next week : The need 
to reform auction appraisal procedures. 


■ Settlement Final in Jndaka Case 
Judge Robert E. White of the New York state 
Supreme Court has given final approval u> a 
settlement involving Sotheby’s disputed 1984 
auction of rare Hebrew books and manuscripts. 
The New York Times reported. The most valu- 
able works will be repurchased from the buyers 
and redistributed to institutions where they will 
be made available to the public, and the seller, 
Alexander Guttman, who smuggled the books 
out of Nazi Germany, will receive 5900,000. 



work of a one-time rabbinical stu- 
dent. Alexander Sochac zcwsk i, 

bouncTand diaplrleffi hi ^the^aafa 

mines of Garist Siberia after be . . . 

was sentenced to death in 1862 for speaking communities in S3t>eri&,_ ii 
—i- ;« >i*» «Brur*«n« MWi Fears of arousing diner the ami-;** 

Polish noting • 


eral Wqjdeeh Jantzdda, afld his 
parents. It is widely beSewed m 
that there, are still Pbti*-, 


■ Detail from an untitled work by Alexander SochaczewskL 


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Goetbe-lnstitut 


his role in the anli-Czarisi Polish 
nationalist movement. 

After his release under Czar Al- 
exander's amnesty of 1880, tire art- 
ist painted scenes he recalled from 
Siberia, bearing passionate witness 
to pain, horror and barbarism. He 
lived and painled in Vienna, Brus- 
sels and Munich. At his death in 
1923 he bad not sold a single paint- 
ing. He left 124 pictures to a muse- 
um in what was then the Polish cay 
of Lwow (which earlier in his Kfe- 
tinre had been Lemberg in Austria- 
Hungary and is now Lvov in the 
Soviet Ukraine), with instructions 
that none ever be sold, b 1956, the 
authorities in Lvov presented tire 
works to Poland. A few were put on 
display at the Gtadd, the riverside 
fortress in which tens of thousands 
of Polish patriots, nationalists and 
revolutionaries were confined over 
the span of more than a century. 

The printings hang at the end of 
long corridors ot oeBs, many bear- 
ing the names of tire historic fignres 
who occupied them, such as Ro- 
muald Trangott, who was executed 
as leader of the 1831 uprising; Felix 
Dzerzhinsky, founder of (he Soviet 
secret police; the prewar Polish 
leader Jazef Pilsudrid; and Rosa 
Luxemburg, founder of SodaGst 
parties in Poland and. Gcnnany. 

The largest painting is a very 
large tableau entitled “Farewell to 
Europe,” depicting a group of ex- 
iles, men and women, pausing un- 
der guard as they cross the snowy 
Urals onthdr waytoSiberia. Some 
of the male prisoners have half 
thwr farads, mnqiiftiq and beards 
shaved, apparently to banker es- 
cape. Others have their faces ta- 
looed with identifying marks. One 
guard is threatening a manaded 
man with hisfisL 
There are smaller pictures, show- 
ing Jong lines of pnsonea moving 
over snowy wastes, watched by 
whip- bearing men on horseback 
Much in Polish art is macabre, 
evoking the martyrdom of saints or 
legendary figures, but the Sochao- 
zewski pamtmgs are among the few 
works of art in Poland, or anywhere 
for that matter, that depict the suf- 
fering of ordinary people tortured 
in contemporary times. 


rf- 


Soviet feelings of i 
or the anti-Polish teeungs « 
diplomats may explain why 
chaczewskL a patriot and a poisQr. 
worthy artist, is given so hole 
prominence and is so little fmowiC 
“He was a technically exedkaf 
painter," said Kate Freeman, ap* 


American artist who is working g, 


Poland on paintings for a show ; 
the Tatistcbeff Galleries in. New! 
York. “He was very modern forint. 
rim* and those images obrionsfy^ 
came directly from bis gut,” Free-" 
man said after sire had stumbled og 
the Socbaczewski paintings: 

Still, Sochaczswski's works are' 
not included in albums and anthol- 
ogies of Polish art. The last trend- 
ing exhibition of his an was in 
1935. Several Polish art critics and 


.*« 


ir 


historians who were asked ahouii^ ^ 


the man said they had never beard 
of him. 

What little information is avail- 
able about Urn comes largely from 
Jewish sources published in Poland 
between the wars. He was bom in 
1843 in Sochaczrw, where his fa- 
ther, Sonder Lob, was a sexton at a 
synagogue. At 14 tire young mm 
was studying ax a rabbinical acado- 
f. but left. Three yean buer, <fe- 
itscal pro 



was soxnrmgiaQiaWataw 
e^-Joref Zorin; and swing 
sketches with a Mortized 
taken fritm&rt hometown. 




r* 


rs 




■1 

* 


im hy narinnwfiq pMOonf I 

in a Poland ih&t bad been trisected 


into oblivion by Russia. Prussia 
and Austria. Sodtaczewski vat ar- 
rested in 1862 for working on ftUr 
destine journals. He was takes 10 
the CStadd and sentenced lo be 
hanged, a sentence that because of 
his youth was reduced to 22 yonr 
erf hard labor in Siberian exifc. 

He Spent most of this period ia 
Usolye, at salt mines near bkutsk- 
in Siberia. For the first two and a 
half years he was reportedly kepL 
constantly in manacles but fed ms 
hands freed for a few hours far tire 
afternoon when he was 


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Pedes, who come by in school 
groups, tend to be silent but to 
spend a long tune looking at the 
pictures. An American news corre- 
spondent based in Moscow was 
amazed that the works were al- 
lowed to be shown. He said that 
even though tire op press o rs in tire 
pain tings were tire soldiers and 
guards of a Garist regime toppled 
by the Communist revolution, the 
' i tings could not even now be 
1 in the Soviet Union since 


daughter of a visiting nobk foe. a. 
few months. .:■* 

At the fortress museum, an offi- 
cial said a book on Socbaczewskfc 
life and art was being prepared awt 
would probably be published with-. 
In two years. 






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also made in Poland. At least five 
generations of Poles have faced de- 
portation to Siberia, with the last 


dition from the north Pakistan 
town of Oflgit to Beijing, following ■ 
the trail of Marco Polo, the official 
Radio Pakistan reported. -, 

It said the journey would take> 
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camels, hoses and yaks where , 




F - - 


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poup of exiles being sent during there were no roads suitable for ■ 
tire first few years after World War vehicles, particularly in the desert. ' 
IL Less t han a d e cad e earlier, hen- Tourism officiate fn Tdamaiqii mM j 
dreds of thousands of Poles were the two. Harry Rutstein and MI- 1 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 17-18, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 



/\ j -rxuaii 

Site of Statue 


P terrand Mtt- 
France be decidMT d - pre&ldcT11 of 

J®* fflootaoems io^USS? 1 ’ 50016 
torical fiajSs ru un P Qrta, U h»- 

^D^ 0neofUl '*"£ 

»KuE 


Si 

gwssss 


his chiklren’s sake. The evidence 
Sfiainsi Dreyfus had been fabdaal- ' 
m to protect the rad culprit, Mqjot 
Ferdinand Walsin Esterhmy, a 
spendthrift in argent need of moo- 
The general staff believed that 
by iradeniomg Dreyfus it was pro- 
feting the honor of the French 

Army; die anchorin g mpa u n p iMP 

was that Dreyfus, as a Jew, was an 
outsider and conicqaesuly csqjcad- 
able. 

Fortunately, to htmor of France 
found some briHiaat defenders in. . 
people such as . Jean Jauris, 
Georges Ckmenc^aandthc wat- 
ers Charles Pfeuyand E n r»fc . 
the latter’s famous “J 7 Accuse® 
earned hun a ooe-yearjaxl sentence. 

“U Affaire Dreyfus* spBt France 
down the middle. Azainst Drievfns 


aSL^ 50016 choice, but it hS 

SSnl^ OVen ^ ment ^te that 
aa« spflletfover into publ£ debate. 

□ 

n; S*** I894, 3-year-old 

£.feexsis 

Sb*\B'- d S“M' 

the office of a colleague at the war 
“bnistry for what he thought was 
B0“g to be a routine meeting of the 
general staff- Instead, he was 
raarged with high treason and im- 

mmintplu j a i. 


setting military sccretsto me Ge^ 
mans, publicly stripped ctf bisraok 
and transported to Devil’s Island. 

Dreyfus later declared that he 
resisted the overwhe lming urge to' 
commit suicide because be wanted 
to be vindicated and reinstated for 


stood “the higher interests of the 
nation,®, the right, and various “par 
triotk? organmtions created in ihc 
beat of the moment. Far him stood 
justice, the left and the League of 
the Rights of Man, created m re- 
sponse to Zola's libel trial Bat 
things were not really that simple. 
PofiticaT parties were tom. apart, 
families divided, friendships 
wrecked and French society so 
strongly polarized that traces of 
that QOW distant ordeal, mrfndmg 
the anti-Semitism, lingered in the 
French mentality for a long time. 

Even the army did not present a 
united front in this matter: Major 
Georges Picqoart, who had jnst 
been named director of the army 
information service, became con- 
vinced that Estexhazy was the real 
culprit and be passed on the evi- 
dence to the president of the Sen- 
ate. As a result, Picquart was hasti- 
ly promoted and shipped off to 




C6*wr Thome Cdaoif 

11111 with model of his Dreyfus statue. 



Alfred Dreyfus •. r. 


i In time Dreyfus was vindicated. 
t hi 1906 he was reinstated in die 
army and awarded the Legion of 
Honor. By then, however, the pub- 
tic had lost interest The German 
. sntitaxy attach^ who had received 
:: the .secrets from Esterhazy pub- 
lished his memoirs in 2930, coo- 
finning Dreyfus's innocence. Al- 
fred Dreyfbs died five years later in 
Paris, atage76- 

‘ - . o 

The importance of these events 
for France, the way in which the 
. . outcome reflected favorably an the 
French sense of republican justice, 
and the courage and dignity that 
' Dreyfus had sbowji throughout ins 
ordeal nude him appear an obvi- 
ous choice to Mitterrand. But the 
decision, to erect the monument, 

; and above nil the proposed loca- 
. tion, haveoaiaed controversy. 


Mitterrand’s list was not a parti- 
san. one. It included, for instance, 
monuments to former President 
Georges Pompidou (on the 
Champs Bystes), the resistance 
hero Jean Moulin (facing the Pom- 
pi don Center), Pierre Mendes- 
France (in the Luxembourg Gar- 
dens) and lion BImn (in die 
Tufleries). Blum’s 1936 From Popu- 
tatre obtained social advantages for 
workers induding a 40-hour week 
and annual paid vacations — a fact 
that did not make him popular with 
the right — and when the Socialist 
government of the republic pro- 
posed flaring; his monument on 
Place lion Blum, tn the 1 1 th anm- 
dissemem, it ran into obstruction 
from Mayor Jacques Chirac's con- 
servative city government. 

The Dreyfus project had been 
kept secret until recently. The news 
broke when the minister of defense, 
Charles Benin, made a public' 
statement about it: In his view, the 
EcoJe Mflitaire was not an appro- 
priate location. “For one thing,” he 
said, “the place is not open to the 
public.” He suggested putting the 
statue in the old Ecole Polyiechi- 
que, which Dreyfus attended 

The French press has been 
tempted to describe this mild ex- 
change between Lang and Hernu 
and toe attending public debate as 
“une notnetie affaire Dreyfus.” 
L 'Express says “some people” feel 
the presence of the statue made the 


'Year of the Dragon 9 Is Grandiose Mess by Cimino 


By. Paul Atcanasio 

Washington Pat Service . 

W ASHINGTON — “Year of 
the Dragon” is the kind at 
sprawling, grandiose mess that 
only Michael Cimino could make, a 
sometimes vivi4 often hilariously 
overwrought thriller. ■ ■ : 

Chinatown is exploding m a tong 
war. Enter Stanley White (Mickey 

MOVIE MARQUEE 


RouriceX Vietnam vet and the most 
decorated flatfoot in New York. 
He's tough, he's honest, and he just 
won’t qmttDl Chinatown is cleaned 
up. As we’re endlessly reminded, 
he's got hundreds of years of histo- 
ry to contend with as wdl as & 
young upstart n a m ed Joey T8i 
(John Lone) who juntos to the 
throne of tire top triad, or crime 
family. Stanley's fellow cops won’t 

■ v. f *— — — J • TU p a vmrtir rtflrtWI 


aeip mm, ana » i r 

Tracy Tzu (Ariane) gives him a big 
pain, too. . _ „ . 

In part, “Year of the Dragon” ts 
an attempt by Cwudo to return to 
I- 1 his roots — he co-wrote“Mamim 
Force" and directed “Thraderoolt 


and LightfoaL" He has a flair for 
sequences {there's a spectacularly 
effective car chase and foot race) 
and a vague idea of what makes a 
killer toe, like “Dp I fed lucky 
todayT* KBs instincts are right — 
the movie is outsized, and one has 
the sense that he’d recognize the 
right dialogue if he heard it Bui 
what be comes up with is a series of 
outrageous hooters such as "Tve 
got scar tissue on my souT or ^1 
carried the cross with you, in 
Brooklyn and in Queens." 

Hminn defines the border be- 
tween greatness and the mere de- 
sire fra greatness. He’s so busy try- 
ing to elevate his characters into 
symbols of the American Dream, 
and where it went wrong (Viet- 
nam), that he never rounds them, 
out And he’s a bear for detail, a 
sort of nnQum-doDar research as- 
sistant who can’t stop showing off 
his homework. 

He is so in love with ins own 

stuff, to leaves the acuns out of the 
picture. Roinke’s great strength, 
rinre ids indelible cameo as an ar- 
sonist in “Body Heal,” has been his 
cultivation of quiet: IBs soft-spo- 





l -i'A" 

I - 

■ ' 4 

V ,(• 


-ts -'"-' - • 

• * 
t.. 

^ , v **‘ . 



ken mattering conveys a queer 
menace; playing the agitation, the 
braising rodomontade of Stanley 
White, he’s just plain silly. Lone is 
pretty but unconvincing. 

The movie is composed in deep, 
rich h ire s , but too much has been 
made of Gmino’s “painterly” eye; 
the movement of his big canvases, 
as the camera cranes against the 
grain of the mob, is hnpresmvdy 
organized, but he's such a_ sucker 
for crowd scenes, the movie ends 
up looking cluttered- There's a viv- 
idness to some of the images (par- 
ticularly the silhouettes of the di- 
max, and a confrontation between 
Romke arid Lone that’s shot with 
almost no SB-light); there’s also 
something sbow-offy about them. 

Cuomo might make a good mov- 
ie if lie were forced to shoot some* 
one rise’s script, and banned from 
hiring extras, but he’ll never do it 
He’s an auteur, and our best exam- 
ple of autenrism’s limits. 

□ 

Capsule reviews of other films 
recently released in the United 
States: 

Walts Goodman of The New 
Yodt: Tones on TtAintees”: 

The stray, concocted by Keith 
Cricchlow, with snappy dialogue by 
Kim Levine and David Isaacs, fol- 
lows the adventures of Lawrence 
Bourne 3d (Tran Hanks), ne’er-do- 
well scion of the family that owns 
Maine. Lawrence’s father (George 
Plimpton), who prefers to think of 
his son as an orphan, refuses to pay 
the Yale senior’s gambling debts 
degrite the prospect that a boride 
win have tto youth’s hips broken. 
So Lawrence, in dinner jadot bar- 
ters his way aboard a plane full of 
Jteace -Corps volunteers (it’s the 
’60s) beading for Thailand. Once 
there, Lawrence decides he would 
rathe r have his hips broken, but 
there's no getting out of iL His 
group, whose mission is to buDd a 
bridge in a remote jungle village, 
inrh vfrs John Candy as a rah-rah, 
setf-improving engineer and Rita 
Wilson as an earnest young wonan 
whose' bedtime reading is “Profiles 
in Courage." Nicholas Meyer di- 
rects, with a steady hand. 

(Pan! AHangrio of The Washing- 


dangerously self-effacing and obvi- 
ously infatuated with Ruth. She- 

*?!h5tel^£es”) based herau- 

e&y ifl imwiating screenplay on a . 
real-Hfe affair that grew into a cele- 
brated crime of passion. She and | 
the director, Mike Newell, are very 
good at keeping us off-balance as 
to which of these three will be 
pushed into violence. It seems im- 
possible that the film , named best 
foreign film at Cannes this year, is 
the theater-trained Richardson's 
first, and Everett and Holm are 
perfect foils for her. 


Morals Found at Royal Hideaway 


r The Associated Press 

1 0NJ50N — Morals painted in 
i T7W by the French artist 
Louis Lagoerre, a godson of King 
Louis XIV, were discovered two 
years ago % workers treatisgdiy 
rot in a sddom-used royal indc- 
sway^ west of London, press reposts 
base revealed. 

The . workers came across traces- 
of oil paint while removing hyers - 
of plaster in the hallway of Frog^' 
more Bouse near Windsor Castle, 
the British royal family’s country 
residence. A careful inspection by 


art historians and restorers turned 
up a series of morals depicting 
scales from Vergil’s AenritL 

Frogmore House, -near the vil- 
lage of Windsor, Zl miles west of 
London, has a resident housekeep- 
er and is used for informal royal 
parties. 

The discovery of the murals was 
kept secret by officials and histori- 
ans, A Department of tto Environ- 
ment official was quoted as saying 
that publicity would have brought 
demands to open Frogmore House 
to tbe.pubHa 


The Model Role of Elisabeth Vigee-Lebnm 


Eerie Miliiaire would be a form of 
provocation. Jean Daniel, editor of 
Le Notivd Observateur magazine 
writes that “it is not easy for tto 
-army to acknowledge a sin,” and 
suggests that it might be equally 
appropriate £o place the monumen t 
in front of tto Palais de Justice, 
where Dreyfus was tried. 

“In my monument," says Tim, 
“Dreyfus is provoking no one. He 
is shown saluting his ideals, which 
are tto ideals of an officer, and 
saluting, too. all those whose ef- 
forts ultimately saved him: Zola, 
Oemencean and Jaur&s, but also 
that portion of public opinion that 
forced the general staff to back 
down. Dreyfus's sword was broken, 
bat this did not prevent him from 
remaining faithful to the values it 
represented m his sight, doing ev- 
erything in his power to recover the 
lost honor of his calling. This, in 
my opinion, is the highest form tto 
military spirit can attain. 

“Tto monument could quite ap- 
propriately be placed elsewhere 
too, bat I would be sorry that tto 
army should lose the moral benefit 
of its presence. Dreyfus was an ex- 
emplary figure after all — a soldier 
who, against all odds, remained 
faithful to his idea oS what an offi- 
cer should to." 

Tto monument is scheduled to 
be finished in December, by which 
time some agreement on its loca- 
tion should nave been reached. 


By John Russell 

Nett York Times Struct 

N EW YORK — Some there 
were whose hearts leaped up 
when it was made known earlier 
this month that Wilhetmina Holli- 
day was going forward with her 
projected National Museum of 
women's Art in Washington. 
Women artists have suffered, and 
suffer still, from the indifference of 
curators, dealers and critics. Not 
least have they suffered from tto 
indifference, if not the downright 
hostility, of male artists. 

To have a museum of their own 
to go to is very tempting to women 
artists who know that if it comes to 
a choice between showing a male 
artist and a woman artist of compa- 
rable stature, most museums and 
many dealers will go for the men. 

Even so, my feding is that a 
segregated museum is no more a 
compliment to women artists than 
a segregated bus was a compliment 
to blacks. In this matter, the last 
word was said by Georgia O’Keeffe 
when she was invited to take pan in 
a women artists’ exhibition bring £ 
organized during World War II by 
Peggy Guggenheim. 

Guggenheim delegated the 
choice of tto artists to men. The 
fact that the men in question were a 
formidable bunch — Marcel Du- 




son Sweeney and James Thrall 
Soby — did not make the idea any 
more acceptable to O'Keeffe. She 
walked into Guggenheim's gallery, 
stared her straight in the eye and l. 
said. “7 am not a woman painter.’' 

All this was much in my mind 
when I read the memoirs of Elisa- r. . .. , . „ , _ , . 

beth Vi gee- Lebrun, arguably the Detail of Vigee-Lebnm sel 

most successful woman artist of all 

time and quite certainly the one Someone to be cherished, studied 
who seems to have had the best and if possible emulated? To an- 
time. Bora in Paris in 1755, she swer that, we have to know her 
died there in 1842. It was a very work at first hand, and we have to 
long life, and it traversed a great study tor memoirs. Her work is 
many convulsions — social, politi- widely scattered and often difficult 


cal and military. 


to see, and it was a misfortune that 


But Vigee-Lebrun had a great the Vigto-Lebrun exhibition that with justice, “the best society” 
flair for getting away in time. She was organized in 1982 by Joseph Rare were tto occasions on which 
moved from one country to another BaHlio for the KimtoQ Art Muse- she ate a bad meal or sat down with 
and was as famili ar with En glan d, um in Fort Worth did not have a a bore. Her work was unfailingly 
Russia, Germany, Austria, Switzer- wider circulation. Edgar Munhafl, successful. Portraits by the hun- 
land and Italy as with France. curator at the Frick Collection, said dreds in oil and pastel are recorded 
She was gifted, unaffected, fun- at the time that Vigte-Lebrun “es- in the 1869 edition of her memoirs, 
ny and staunch. Though she saw a tablished early on her individual and nobody ever seems to have 
lot of grand people, she habitually sense of color and elegant manner been anything but delighted by 
dressed down, rather than up, ana of painting: creamy and unctuous, them. 

she claimed never to have had any- as though she somehow mixed tor She had her troubles, though, 
one else do her hair. pigments with erase fraiche.” Her marriage at the agp of 20 to 

It was not every good painter, of Vigfce-Lebnin’s memoirs, like Jean- Baptiste Lebrun might have 


drel who had already committed 
himsdf to marriage with a woman 
who had helped him in business. 
Once he had wriggled out of that, 
he “looked afier nis new wife by 
“taking care oT her substantial 
earnings, leaving her with a sum in 
pocket money that a schoolboy 
would have despised. The only 
good thing dial can be said of him, 
whether bv her or by us. is that he 
stood up for her when it was said 
that she was a person of no talent 
who gave her name to pictures that 
bad been painted by nv ' Q - 
In France, in England and else- 
where, Elisabeth VigrivLebrun was 
the object of personal attacks 
prompted by envy, jealousy and 
malice, to which she replied with a 
spirited rebuttal. Even Jacques 
Louis David, an artist of high ge- 
nius, resented her so much that ne 
lent himself to every calumny that 
was fomented against her. (He also 
took care to keep ever open in his 
studio a book in which tor success 
was attributed to a disreputable as- 
sociation wilh a man whom she 
detested.) 

Incidents of this kind — and 
they were many — were the more 
absurd in that Vigee-Lebnm was 
an exemplary colleague. Though 
best known for her portraits of 
women, she came on good and 
strong in portraits of men whom 
she admired. Among them was the 
painter Hubert Robert, whose por- 
trait by her is in tto Louvre. Look- 
ing at the spontaneous, full-hearted 
individual she portrayed, we see at 
once the man who is the subject of 
one of the best of her portraits in 
prose. 

Detail of Vigfee-Lebnm self-portrait with her daughter. Hubert Robert, by tor account. 

could paint a picture as fast as he 
selves are endlessly amusing. They could write a letter. Convivial to 
adjust and correct whatever no- tto point of dining out up to 362 
lions we may have of Elisabeth times a year, he was physically 


Vigte-Lebnm’s life as having been reckless to topoint almost of mad- ' fgs 
one of privileged euphoria. It is ness — risking his life on the lop- Ji?!^ 
true that she was everywhere wel- most point oi to Colosseum m ’. W ^ 
come in what could then be called, Rome for a trivial wager, iaex- ®- ^ 
with justice, “the best society." haustible at ball games even in his ; SS- j c . 
Rare were to occasions on which 60s, and a master at that same age J '£■' LQ . 
she ate a bad meal or sat down with of acrobatic impersonations and ^ 
a bore. Her work was unfailingly impromptu circus turns. t ,:lf j] v 

successful. Portraits by to hun- It is for portraits of this kind that . . 
dreds in od and pastel are recorded Vigte-Lebrun's memoirs are a con- .--tUnj 
in to 1869 edition of her memoirs, tinual delight A discerning reader . '■ T 


i 


one else do her hair. pigments with crone fraiche.” 

It was not every good painter, of Vigfce-Lebrun’s memoirs, like 
either sex, who could win an acco- her paintings, are more talked 
lade of to kind that Vigee-Lebrun about than read. TUI 1984, they 
got from Sir Joshua Reynolds, first were available in fuB — when 
president of to Royal Academy in found at all — only in an edition 
London. Faced in 1781 with her published in 1869 and long out of 
portrait of Marie Antoinette, print (They have never been trans- 
Reynolds said that it was as fine as lated into English.) I reached out 
to work of any printer, living or an eager hand, therefore, for a two- 


and nobody ever seems to have will also admire to fortitude with 
been anything but delighted by which she dismisses to buns and 
them. rejections that in a another person 

She had her troubles, though, might have been matter for a life- 
Her marriage at the agp of 20 to time of whining and recrimination. 
Jean- Baptiste Lebrun might have In this and other ways. Elisabeth 
seemed like a good idea, in that Vig&e-Lebrun was a true “role 
Lebrun was in the picture business model.” Whether or not we gel the 
in a big way, had lent many fine National Museum of Women's Art, 




pictures to copy, and had in general there are not many women, and not' 


an established position. 


As it turned out, to was a scoun- human being. 


many men. who are in her class as a 


dead, and in particular finer 


Van Dyck. 
She had i 


a vast range of acquaint- 


volurue edition in paperback that 
appeared in Paris last year. 

A straight reprint of tto original 


ton Post, however, finds “Volun- 
teers” to be “an unsatisfactory 
comedy that yawns to a dose.") 

□ 

Stephen Holden of The New 
York Times on “The Bride": 

This loose, freewheeling remake 
of "The Bride of Frankenstein,” 
directed by Franc Rod dam, never 
makes up its mind whether it is a 
horror movie spoof or an earnest 
exploration of to genre's myths. 
The midgel Ronaldo (David Rap- 
paport) befriends Viktor (Clancy 
Brown), tto dimwitted lug who has 
fled to castle of his creator. Baron 
Frankenstein (Sting), who sounds 
tike a Nazi racial propagandist ex- 
pressing warped feminist sympa- 
thies as he concocts a “new wom- 
an,” Eva (Jennifer Beals). Eva is 
supposed to become an accom- 
pbshed equestrian and a cutting 
wit, but in tor riding scenes Beals 
communicates only fearful discom- 
fort, and when she wows tto local 
gentry with ban mots about Shake- 
speare to speaks in a near-mono- 
tone. 


Sheila Benson of the Los Angdes 
Times on “Dance With a Strang- 
er”: 

The teat and hunger of an obses- 
sive love affair are the background 
for tins rroe, dark British film. Ruth 
Ellis (Miranda Richardson) is to 
white-blond hostess of a London 
“private dub” with roans avail- 
able upstairs. David Blakely (Ru- 
pert Everett) is a sulky, pretty toff 
who is brought into her life late one 
night in 1954 by the stolid Des 


ance. Among others, to knew By- edition, on-indexed, it has only ves- 
ron. Talleyrand, Benjamin Frank- tigjal notes that are for to most 
lin, Catherine to Great and the part a travesty of editing. This, if 
future King George IV of England ever, is a text that calls for proper 
at to time when they were to key commentary. 


people in Europe. 

She also knew to best actors, to 
best angers, to best writers and 
to best painters of her day. Vol- 
taire, near death, kissed her por- 
trait over and over again. She made 
a great deal of money wilh tor 


That said, to memoirs in them- 

Duras Paperback Righto 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Harper & Row 


work and kept enough of it to en- has won to paperback reprint 
sure herself a carefree old age. rights to Marguerite Duras's best- 
Was she not, therefore, a para- selling novel, “The Lover,” for 


goo among women artists? A mod- $155,000 in an auction. It was pub- 
el of immunity from prejudice? listed in hardcover by Pantheon. 


French Gas-Powered Organ 
To Go on Display in Tokyo 

Age** France- Prose tone until Gaz de France marks its 

Q TRASBOURG, France — A 150th anniversary in 1988. 

fSS^ihVic rtSavin ioOvhwL* wilh a w <>- octave keyboard on 

wi uch each key corresponds to a 
The organ, rrcoasmimed after it burner of a ^ 

was found by chance m to “11*1 of ^ w£m a j^y ^ pIayedi tS 
a Strasbourg musenm 30 years age^ flS is mSd to to 

was been chosen by to organizers 

of an exhibition in October to ode- plpc ’ vibrations, 

brate to centennial of the intro- When found in 1954 during a 
d action of gas to Japan. The Japa- museum inventory, to organ was 
nese went to Strasbourg after missing parts. French |asengineei 
consulting Gaz de France archives rebuilt iL Its repertoire is some 
last month. what limited because to keyboar 

The French mil not get to hear is small and what one restore 
what a patent described as the pyr- called “acoustic inertia” affects tb 
opboneY “gentle and agreeable” pipes in to low notes. 



rebuilt it Its repertoire is some- 
what limited because to keyboard 
is small and what one restorer 
called “acoustic inertia” affects to 
pipes in to low notes. 


IWTER NATIONAL 

ART EXHIBITIONS 


Bo , «vn arD 

l/i lif/cnJ 


SAIBMttO 

festival exhibition 

24* July — 15 th September 198S 

P. Bonnard ■ E. Vuillard 

Pastds ■ oapaintings 

GALEREE SALIS 

A-5Q20 Salzburg • GoMgasse 13 • Austria 
— Catalog on request — 


PARIS 

GALERIE MERMOZ 


PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 

_ a. Rue JeorvMermoz, 75008 PARIS. TeL: 359.82.44 _ 


Sculptures exniDiraa 
fn the museum garden* 
Daily, except Thuesdoy. 
from 10 a.m. to 5,45 p.m. 

June 26 -Soptomber 


W ART EXHIBITIONS” 
"ANTIQUES” 
"AUCTION SALES” 

appear 
on Saturday 


TION SALE 


SOTHEBY’S 

FOUNDED 1744 

Geneva 

Entries are invited for the sales of © 

Fine Jewels, 

European Silver, Gold Boxes, 

Objects of Vertu, Ip 

Russian Works of Art, 

Carpets, Islamic Textiles 
and Works of Art, 
and Miniatures 
in Geneva, November 1985 


An emerald and diamond pendant, from the 
Estate of ihe but Kins Umberto fl from Italy, 
sold in Geneva in May 1985 fbrS.Fr. 375,000. 


FINE JEWELS ° 

Amsterdam Monday 26th August 
Brussels Monday 9th and Tuesday 10th September 
Cologne Monday 2nd September 
Copenhagen Friday 30th August 
Frankfurt Tuesday 3rd September 
Hamburg Friday 6th September 
Lausanne Friday 13 th September 
Monte Carlo Thursday 12th and Friday 13th September 
Munich Thursday 5th September 
Oslo Thursday 29th August 
Paris Monday 16th-Thursday 19th September 
Stockholm 'Tuesday 27th August 
Vienna Wednesday 4th September 

EUROPEAN SILVER, GOLD BOXES, RUSSIAN WO 
OF ART AND FAfiERGE 
Brussels Thursday 12th and Friday 13th September 
Cologne Tuesday 3rd September 
Copenhagen Monday 26th and Tuesday 27th August 
Frankfurt Monday 2nd September 
Geneva Monday 16th September 
Hamburg Friday 30th August 
Monte Carlo Monday 9th September 
Munich Wednesday 4th September and morning of Thu 
5th September 
Oslo Tuesday 27th August 

Paris Tuesday 10th ana Wednesday 11th September 
SkSne Wednesday 28th August 
Stockholm Wednesday 28th and Thursday 29th August 
Vienna Friday 6th and Monday 9th September 
Zurich Tuesday 17th and Wednesday 18th September 


If you wish to make an appointment to see one of our exp 
please telephone or write to us; 

102 Rokin, 1012 KZ Amsterdam Tel: 24 6215/6 
32 Rue de l’Abbaye, Brussels 1050 Tel: 343 5007 
St. Apera-Strasse 17-29, (Kreishaus Galerie), 5000, Cologne 
Tel: 221 249 330 

Bredgade 27, 1260 Copenhagen K. Tel: 13 55 56 
Steutiestrasse 7, 6000 Frankfurt/M. 70 Tel: 62 20 27 
24 Rue de la Citfi, CH-1204 Geneva Tel: 21 33 77 
Alsterkamp 43, 2000 Hamburg 13 Tel: 4 10 60 28 
Le Sporting d’Hiver, Place du Casino, Monte Carlo Til; 30 go 
Odeonsplatz 16, 8000 Munich 22 Tel: 22 23 75/6 
Bj^mveien 42, Oslo 3 Tel: 1472 B2 
3 Rue de Miromesxui, 75008 Paris Tel; 266 4060 
Arsenals ga tan 4, 111 47 Stockholm Tel: 101478/9 
Singe rstrasse 16, 1010 Vienna TU; 52477 2/3 
20 Bleicherweg, CH-8022 Zurich Tel: 202 0011 


■ ■- £ las 
.■£53! ike 


the 
|nd 
. to 
“ Veir 
5 •V’fta- 

If ' * aral 

2 ^,*be- 

> to 

'ilfat 












Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 17-18, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


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Hfeti Law eitMt am 

iul no. 107.72—067 

— - inSQ-0L7S 

— - 50105 —0.53 

— - 5452 -036 

— — 11103—078 


frida>s 

m m 

Closing 


AMEX Diaries 



Close 

prey. 

Aavonced 

192 

259 

Declined 

US 

247 

Undwnsed 

251 

29» 

Total issue* 

758 

785 

New Htoh* 

7 

11 

New Laws 

15 

•9 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 

Utilities 

Industrials 


Close Cine 

79J3 +M2 

7646 — 005 

4141 +aio 



Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


VoLaMP-M 57,71 MM 

Prw.4PJA.90i, felMM 

Prw consolidated dose W250JIO 


Standard & Poors index 



AMEX Motif AcftHitt 


Cdirtf 

BAT 

WIC4W 

T««Air 

Fdtond 

Da««P 

«mb 

TotfPte 

VKC9 

fnsfir 

Asmrfl 

TIE 

Detmetf 

wade* 

KtvPK 


t T M '»»' 
use n 41* 
4954 A Aft 
311* *•* 4*- 


ss s s 

3320 IM Uft 

lS Mft *5 

Its SS £ 

Wf Sft Jft 

|Dtl ft* 2 

fte *.? 14 

M2 fill. W% 


••.ft 

'stm 

A-f 

it! 


m 


AMEX soles 


‘Induded in the sales Retires 


Buy Sales *ShYt 
147309 3SX287 1.154 
I5SJ19 36X819 883 
157690 397 Jil 343 
165,973 428J90 873 
16X5W 40X6BB 490 


Tablet include ttie naHonwide prices 
up to tte closing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


i ndustr ials 

Tronsp. 

utiiitm 

Finance 

Composite 


Hftb low Close Obe 
OUD 2D6J0 204J0 — 133 
17187 171JS 171 J 5 — 0J7 
83.10 8143 8114—066 
O.U 21.98 71 JS —0.16 
1*73* 1*6.10 186.10 — 1.16 



464X000 

4P6A vohime 

Prev, 4 PM. voteme 


Pnv.com. volume 



2Ht 16 AAR Ji 24 M 

17ft 7ft AGS 13 

I6V» 9ft AMCA 
21ft 13 AMF 251 

50ft 24% AMR 
23V* 13ft AMR Pi 2.18 9 A 
25ft 22ft ANRpf 167 112 
23 19 AMR Pt 2.12 10.1 

14b 7ft APL 

*1 ft 43ft ASA ZOO 46 

27 12ft AVX JO 14 

28ft 17ft AZP 172 10.9 


Ji 24 M 38 21ft 21ft 27ft + ft 

13 84 16 15ft 15ft 

75 12ft 12ft 12ft— ft 

-251 96 776 13ft 13ft 13ft 

8 4138 48 47ft 47ft— ft 

118 9 A 430 23 U. 23 23fa + ft 

167 112 27 23ft 23ft 23* + ft 

ZI2 10.1 9S1 21 20ft 21 + ft 

1 10 10 10 

100 <6 088 44fa 43ft 43* — ft 

32 24 It 122 13ft 13ft 13ft— ft 

172 10.9 7 2371 25M 24ft 25 




60 36* AW Lot) Tj 40 Z5 15 2748 55ft 54% 55 — ft 

25ft 20 AccoWd* JO 22 17 75 22ft 22% 22ft 

34* 12ft AcmeC 40 17 50 15b 15 15 

10ft 7% ACmeE J2b 4.1 10 30 7ft 7ft 7ft 

19 15ft Ada Ex l.92elX9 68 17* 17ft 17% 

20 13ft AdmMI 22 1.9 7 31 17ft 16ft 16ft 

19ft Sft AdvSys 231 42 19 85 12 lift lift— ft 

41ft 22ft AMD 17 1148 28* 77ft »* + % 

12ft 6ft Advnsl .12 12 23 9S 9 Oft 8ft— ft 

15ft 9ft Aerflex 13 41 14b 14ft 14ft 


g pff m| Ik 

rT n 1 r^t.l 1 1 iKnTiTi^TTI 






49% 32% AetnLf Z64 52 16 1402 46ft <5% 46 — ft 


37% lBVk Ahmns 120 32 8 1083 32 31b 31ft— * 

3% 2ft Aiieen 83 3ft 3ft 3ft— ft 

57 42 AlrPrd 120 2.1 13 064 56% 56 56% + % 

24% 15 AirbFrl 20 18 13 46 21ft 31% 21% 

2ft I AJMea > 52 2ft 2 2ft 

29V. 23% AlaPpf Z74e 92 400 38% 2B% 28% + % 

33% 27b AlaP pfA 192 1Z3 8 31ft 31* 31% I 

Oft 6b AMP dpi J7 105 20 8 7ft B 

S3 63ft AMPpf 920 112 70z 79 7Sft 71ft— ft 

86 67ft AlaPpf 924 112 250z 83 83 S3 

16ft lift Alapsc S 104 7J 10 62 14% 14b 14b— b ! 

26% lift AISfcAIr .16 2 10 74 24ft 24* 24*— b | 

24% lift Albrtoe JB 14 It 

33b 26% Albtsns Ji 17 12 

31b 23b Alcan 12) 42 27 




Bggi ?i ! 5 m 8 


j 1 1 n ,► - m 1 • 'i* 


JB li It 42 24b 24 24 — ft 
J6 17 12 5H7 28% 28ft 28ft — ft 


31b 23b Alcan 12) 4J 27 1180 27ft 26ft 2.-%— b 
38% 27ft AlCOSld 13) 3J 13 105 36% 36 36 — % 


ii ■t'i'gf ■: ■; ,^1 KjSg ! 


1 f I U 1 I'-Lfl ») |»>~] » .- H i~ 


32 18* AtexAlx M0 11 472 26 

25ft 20% Alexdr 21 30 23 

89ft 77b AIIbCp 1341 28 JO 77 

26* 24ft AloCppf 3.B6 108 3 26 

28% 20b Aleinf 140 L7 837 21 

20* 16ft Alain nf 3.19 iu 6 18 

98 85 AMI P»C 1125 11.9 25 96 

34% 26% AIIOPW 270 BJ 9 633 30 

23ft 15% AllenG 60b 26 15 36 37 

46* 31ft AlltfCp ISO 43 B 2548 42 

66 57ft AktCppf 6J4 10-4 120 65 

115*101 AldCopflZOO 107 15 112 

106*100% AWCpf IlSeltTl 451 W 

23ft 15* AltdPd 12 49 IV 

60ft 45b AlldStr 212 17 8 SOB 57 


12% 4% AlllsOi 
34% 74 AlltC Pf 
29% 21% ALLTL 184 64 
39% 29* Alcoa 1 30 14 
22b 13% Amo. .101 


472 26* 26% 26% — ft 
30 23b 23 23 

10 77V, 77V, 77V— ft 
3 26ft 26ft 26ft 
837 21ft 20% 20*— % 

6 18* 18* 18*— ft 
25 96 914 Mb —2 

633 30% Xb 30ft 

36 27% 22ft 22* 4- ft 

1548 42 41ft 41% — % 

120 65 64* 65 

15 112ft 113b 112b— b 
451 104% 104ft 104% + % 
49 11* 18% 18% + b I 
500 57 56b 57 + b 
52 4% <* 4*— b 
13 31ft 31 3!ft + ft 
70 27% 27* 27% — b 




H mm 




120 14 31 2359 35% 34% 35 + 


456 15* l$b 15% + ft 


22* AfTIHOS 1.10 4.1 22 1273 27 26ft 26% — ft 


28ft 20ft 


2% 1% AmAor 110 1% 1* 1% 

21ft 16 ABokr 8 78 20ft 20b 20ft + % 

70 58ft ABi-araJ 350 6J 8 Ml 59* 59ft 59ft 

30ft 25ft ABrdpf 275 94 27 29% 29% 29%—% 

ABdcsr 1.60 M 17 641 115*115 115 —ft 

ABIdM JA 11 15 21 28ft 28ft 28ft— ft 

ABinPr A* 25 14 25 25% 25* 25* + ft , 




ABusPr A* 25 14 


Mft 45ft Am Con Z90 47 11 1043 59% 58% 59 — * 


ACanrt 280 1)7 


»ft 25ft AC 
11 6ft AC 


56ft 44ft ACvari 
27b 18* ADT 


X80 M3 9 25ft 25 25 — ft 

X00 58 15 52 51* 51*— b 

220 50.9 74 20b 20 20ft— ft 

251* 941 17 28b 27* 27% — ft 

169 103 7b 6% 6%— ft 

1.90 15 14 816 54% 54 54* 4- ft 

92 18 23 193 24ft 24b 24b 


34% 17% AElPw 276alM 8 3521 22 21% 21*— ft 

49% 30ft AmExP UB 10 IS 10616 42% 42ft 42b— % 

25% 12ft AFomlB At 2.1 14 742 22% 22ft 22% 

36b 21% AGnCp 1410 XI 9 1561 32ft 32ft 32%—% 

16 6% AGnl wi 122 13* 13% 13ft— ft ' 

56b 51% AGfllPfA587eIX4 120 56b 56b 56b + b I 

96ft 62ft AGnl PlBSJOa 63 30 87* 06% 84% — 1% 

n* 44 AGn pfD Z44 4.1 480 45 64% 44% — IM 

34% 25* A Merit 1.20 17 10 10 32* 32% 32%— % 

13% 7ft A HO 1st 52 T2* 1 2ft 12ft— ft 


ft 23b 12% CPtTlPSc 11 2099 Z1 22 22b— I 

% 46b lift Ceiwsn 462 15 14* 14% — ft 

39* 24ft OxiAgs 17 U 11 66 37% 37ft 37b— ft 

b 31 13% Comte 160 ms 19 16 18* 18% 18ft — ft 

% 31 20% CnnNG 260 3.9 9 34 29% 29b 29b — ft 

ft 15ft 12% Conroe 40 3J « 96 13ft 13b 13b— ft 

38 26b ConsEd 240 73 7 1238 33ft 33b 33b— ft 

47b 36ft CanE pi 465 10J 4101 45 4$ 45 

SB 39 ConEPf MO 106 17 48 47% 47% + % 


47% 47% + % 


CnsPrt 1.10 12 17 454 34* 36% 34% — ft 


66% 46* AHome 290 56 12 5907 SB* 58 5Bb— ft 

1.12 25 IS 3877 45% 45b 45b 

660 76 9 306 90 89ft 69% — b 

64 5 22 295 84% 84% 84*— ft 

-72 36 11 2213 24% 24 24ft— ft 


46ft 26b AHO— _ _ 
97ft 69% Amrtcn 660 76 
90b 61* AinGrp 64 5 

28% 18ft AMI J2 IB 
5ft 2% Anuwot 
29 !6ft APrmd 1 2S U 
13% 5 ASLFM 
IBft 12b ASLFI of X19 156 
16 lift AShlP M 63 


47ft 33% CnsMG 2-32 56 
8% 4ft ConsPw 
31 17b CnPofA 4.16 111 

33% IT CnPplB 460 14.1 
54% 31ft CnPpfD 765 I4J 
56 32ft OiPpfE 7J2 142 
31 W 15% CnPprV 460 143 


477 3b 3 3 — ft 

313 19% 19ft 19% — % 2S 


35% 26* Am5td 160 56 10 
67ft 35b AmStor 64 1.1 II 


78 46ft AStrpfA 438 62 . .... 

57ft 51 AStrpfB 660 1X1 2 56 

24% 17* ATVT 120 56 15 13255 21 

41% 32* AT&T Of 364 96 115 38ft 

42 33* AT&T pf 374 96 3724 39ft 

27* 16% AWolrs 160 41 8 58 24% 

13b 10 A Wot pf 125 106 700* 12 

I3U 10 A WO Set 125 102 lOCz 12ft 

S ft 19ft Am Hall 260 126 8 108 20 

6ft ATrSc 89 13% 

89b 66 ATrUn 544 76 2 80% 

40ft 26ft Ameran 160 43 8 47 38 

50 24ft AllNSO 2# 6 22 18<S 44* 

29ft 22ft Anwtek 60 36 13 297 23% 


30 6b 6ft 6ft— b 
39 Mft 13% 14 — ft 
139 Mft 12* 12* — ft 

SttS&R*“ 

10 69ftgbgft + b 
255 21 20* 20% 


13b CnPorU 360 146 
28% 14b CnPprT 328 143 
55ft 31% CnPpfH 768 140 
28* 14b CnPprR 400 145 
28b 14b CnPnrP 198 156 
28b 14% CnPBTN 365 143 


400 41% 41% 41% — % 
960 7ft 7b 7b— ft 
180x 30b 30b 30b— * 
74QX 33ft 32 32 —-ft 

120*52*6 S2b 52b— 1 
420* 54b 54 S4b + b 
33 30* 29% 30b +1% 
18 24% 24% 24% 


5 26% 26% 26% 

300x 55 54* 55 + b 

33 27% 24ft 27% + % 
37 26* 26ft 26ft— ft 

ss*s*s =s 

14 17 16* 16*— ft 


Mft 9ft QlPWM 2.50 147 

17 ■% CnParL 223 145 

29 15 CnPurS 4JE U.5 

18 9ft CAP prK 263 145 


89b 66 ATrun 
40ft 26ft Ameror 
50 24ft Ammo 
29ft 22ft AnMtak. 
28% 18ft Amfoc 
16 6ft Antfnsc 
49 50b Amoco 


’ISSESftS&lSIE 

TOO* 12 12 12 — ft 

100x12% Mft 12ft 
108 20 19% 19b— * 

89 13% 13% 13*- b 


47* 28% CnflCo 260 63 19 909 41% 41ft 41ft— % 


10ft 4% COW I II 
4b ftConlllrt 
51* 26ft Cnflll pf 


4ft % ClllHdn 
12 4ft Cntinte 


50b Amoco 3J0b 52 8 2530 63% 

38ft 28ft AMP JI 22 23 1790 32ft 

23% lift Amoco 30 36 17 41 12* 

12% Am rep * 12 55 21% 

21ft AmSltl 160 42 9 54 33ft 


3%* “tS 


69 7ft 7 7 

392 1% Ift Ift 

sn *»-«. 

9S ^ s 28=* 

4016 22 21% 21ft— ft 


23% 12% Amraps 
36 21ft AmSltl 160 


130 7% 7 7ft 

530 63% 63% 63ft 
r90 32ft 32% 32b— ft I 
41 12* 12% 12ft— ft ! 
55 21% 21% 21ft— b I 
54 33ft 33% 33% 


Amsted 160 36 16 121 45b 44% 44%— ft 


4b 1% Anoemp 

24ft 16b Anioa S 20 

27ft 19b Anchor 168 5.9 

46b 29% A/tCloy 132 36 39 

12ft 9% AndrGr JQ 1J 14 

27b 17 Aneaiic 60 zi 14 


519 2% 2* 2* — % 

20 444 22% 22b 22b 
14A 26% 25% 25% — 1 
39 50 39* 39 39 — % 

14 71 12 11* 11*— b 

14 94 25% 25 25 — % 


34% 20* Anheuss JO 26 13 6541 34% 33 


71% 48* Anneupf X6Q XI 323 70* 68b 70 + ft 

19* 13% Anlxtr 38 16 17 133 16% 15* 15*— * 

16* 9 Anthem -04 3 21 416 14b 13* 14b + % 

15b 10% Anfterv 64b X9 9 138 15% 15 15 — % 


271 18* 18% 18ft 

8 33 32% 33 + b 

5 30ft 30% 30ft + % 


13 9% APOChe 38 27 ID 117 10* 10% 10ft— % 

2 ft ApdtPwf 49 % % %— % 

19% 15ft ApetiP urtiLlO II J 271 18* 18% 18% 

34% 28* ApPwpf 4.18 127 8 33 32% 33 + b 

31ft 21b ApPwpf 3J0 1Z5 5 30ft 30% 30ft + % 

39% 22% APlDta 1761 76 23 467 24b 23% 23% — % 

15ft 8 AppUWb 64 56 14b 14% 14% 

2(* 16b ArchDn .1% 7 12 1034 20b 20 20%— % 

100 71 AMP Pf V J3e 97 lOOODx 99ft 99% 99% +1% 

30* 24% AflPpf 158 1Z1 2 29% 29ft 29% 

102 79ft ArlPPi KUO 11 J 1571*1 97 94 97 +1% 

24% 14 ArfcBst 60 17 9 109 23ft 23ft 23ft— b 

24b 16 ArMa MM 56 26 8*1 20b 19% 19% + % 

% b Ar In fit « ft + 

15% 11% Armoda 41 12% 12% 1Z%— % 

13% 6* Arm CO 1528 10b 10 10 — % 

23 15% Armed Z10 1X1 3 30% 20% 20% 

24ft 14% Arni»Rb 68 13 8 49 14* 14% 14ft— % 

39* 26% ArmWIn I JO 37 9 285 34% 34% 34% + ft 

38 29ftAnnWpf37S 9S TOte 38 31 38 +) 

34% 19ft AtdCp 170 O 7 29 28 27* 27*— b 

24% 12% ArwE 70 1J 16 81 13% 13% 13% 

30b 16 Artra 72 J13I 22 26% 26b 26b—* 

27 15 ArvteB JO 15 9 378 23% 23 23% — ft 

27* 17% Asarco 306 22 21% 21ft— % 

37 22* Ash foil 160 50 279 32 31% 31*— % 

44b 31% AshlOef 196 96 11 42% 42% 42ft— b 

,69ft 49 ASdDG 2J0 46 10 404 64% 63% 43% — ft 

llflft 79 AsdOpf 475 46 4 102% 102% 102%— % 

24* 18ft Athluna 160 X2 11 38 20 19ft 19% + ft 

29* 21'4 AlCvEI 268 9J 9 72 27b 27 27ft— ft 

64b 42 All Rich 4.00 6 6 5099 59b 58% 58ft— % 

41 32ft AtlRcpf 175 96 1500x 39b 38ft 39b +1% 

153 100% AH Red 260 26 4 141 140% 140%— % 



24% 19ft Centre! UO 86 8 t6J 22ft 22ft 22ft- % 

38* 21 Cl Data J7 33 4014 22 21% 21ft— ft 

40W 31ft CnDtpf 4.50 116 150x38* 38% 38* 

35* 24* Ccnwd 1.10 XI 12 74 35% 35% 35% 

3* 1 vICooJcll 114 lb 1% lb 

39 27* COOPT 162 46 16 423 38% 38V» 3Tb 

41b 31 Coop I pf X90 76 54 39 38* 39 

30% 14% CnprTr 60 26 7 385 15* 15% 15V»— '* 

27 15 Cooovts 60 1J 14 793 22% 22b 22ft— ft 

19* 9b COPwld 721 36 9ft 9b Pi— ft 

27ft 17V 4 Cardura 64 X6 15 74 23% 23ft 21% 

15b 11 Coretn 66 46 11 47 12ft 12b 12b— b 

48ft 30ft ComGS 161 X9 18 563 45 44 44% 

49* 26% Cor Bill 1 00 26 55 49* 49% 49% — b 

77* 45 CoxCm J4 6 21 27 75% 74% 75% -f b 

10 4% Crate 6 9% 9ft 9ft— b 

39% 32 Crane 160b 46 10 69 37 36b 36b— % 

00 45% CrayRs 22 641 91b 40 W%— 1ft 


27 15 Cooovts 

19* 9b COPwld 
27ft 17% Cardura 
15b 11 Coretn 


22% 22b 22ft — ft 
9ft 9b Pi— ft 


36 9ft 9b Pi— ft 
74 23% 23ft 23% 

47 12ft 12b 12b— b 


10 4ft Crate 
39% 32 Crane l-eOb 46 10 
100 45% CrayRs 22 

50 23 CrayRwl 

19* 17% CrckNpfZIS 116 
51% 49% CrckMnf 263e XI 
24 18% CrmoK 170 57 12 

69ft 39ft CrwnCk 13 


6 9% 9ft 9ft— b 

59 37 36b 36b— ft 

641 91b 40 90% —1ft f 1 *? 

6 45* 45% 45% <£■ 

21 19 18* 19 * b “J* 

«} + » " 

5 23ft 23% 23% il 

52 66* 65% 56% + b “ . 


44% 27% CrwZel 160 16 18 209 31% 38 1 A 38% 


50% 43* CrZOfPf 463 96 
A5b 50% Cr£e<PfC4J0 77 
35b 22b Culbro JO 27 16 


21 47ft 47% 47%— b 
10 58* S8b 58%— b 
12 29* 29% 29% — % 


33* 18 Cuilnets 21 2977 18b 17b 17%—% 

88% 58b CumEn U0 14 < 144 55 64% 64%— ft 


ArowE 70 16 16 81 13% 13% 13% 

Artra 72 J 131 22 25% 25b 26b — * 

Arvfne 60 36 9 378 23* 23 23% — % 

Asarco 306 22 21% 21%— % 

Ash foil 160 56 279 32 31ft 31*— % 

AshlOef X96 96 II 42* 42% 42% — b 

ASdDG ZB0 46 10 404 64ft 63% 43% — % 

AsdOpf 475 46 4 102% I02W 102%— % 

Athlone 160 87 11 38 30 19ft If* + % 

A 1C v El 268 46 9 72 27b 27 27% — % 

All Rich 460 56 SOW 59* 58* 58ft— ft 

AflRe Pf X75 46 15002 39b 38% 39b +1% 

. AtlRcpf 260 26 4 141 140% 140%—% 

18% 10% Atk»CD 74 13 12ft 12* 

31* 10* Ausot 60 16 25 7*4 25 24* 24* 

54* 34% AutoOt 68 16 21 905 49b 48* 48*— % 

5 4b Avalon n 9 111 S 4* 4% + % 

31b 17% AVEMC 60 Z0 14 14 29% 29* 29*— b 

39* 28b Avery 60 16 14 314 34 33* 33* + % 

20 10 Avlall n 11 234 19* 18* 19% 

40* 27 Avnef 60 16 17 803 32 31% 31ft— ft 

25b 17% Avon 260 96 10 1501 21% 21* 21ft 

29ft 15% A yd/l 18 _ ~ 


23ft 23 
26% 26* 
25% 25% 
39* 39% 
7ft 7b 
21ft 
29 
34b 
15% 

11% 

35% 

307 14b 
2433 35% 

55 25 

225 
1135 
£ 


10* Sft Currlnc l.lOalOS 
38* 30* CurtW 170 13 14 
52b 33ft Cyclops 1.10 26 7 


22 10% 10* 10% 

M 34% 34b 34b— * 
42 43* 43% 43ft + ft 


23% 17 Dallas 66 37 11 33 18b 18 18 

15* 9b DwnonC 70 17 104 11% lift 11% + % 

30ft 22 DcnaCp 178 X0 > 2721 26% 25* 25*— ft 
9* Sft Donohr 12 HO 9 8* 8ft— ft 

15 9ft Daniel .tab 16 101 9* 9* 9ft— % 

38ft 25 DarTKr S 166 46 II 593 35b 34ft 34% — ft 

76 31 DoteGn 16 433 35* 15* 35* — % 


76 31 DafaGn 

5% 4 Dahrtn 

12b 8% DIODSO 
22 Mb Doyen 


14 633 35* 15* 35% — % 
814 5% 4% 5% + % 
10 6 8% tft B%— % 


45b 29* DaytHd 74 16 14 


74 17 11 271 21b 20% 20%— ft 


20* 13% DaytPL 260 117 

65 48 DPlPf 768 126 

66 45% DPLd 777 1Z1 

40* 24ft DeanFd 66 16 

33% 26 Deere 160 36 


452 48 39b 39ft— ft 

529 18 17% 17% — % 

TOTS 59ft 59ft 57*— 1ft 
200x *1 61 61 

53x 38% 38 38 —ft 

986 29ft 29 29 — K 


40* 24ft DeonFd 6ft 16 18 53x38% 38 38 — % 
33% 26 Deere 160 362B 98629ft29 29 — U 
36* 19b DelmP 1.92 5 6 9 1326 24b 23% 24 — b 

52* 31ft DeltaAr 160 XI 7 1848 «% 48 48b— % 

7* 4b Deltona 671 8% 7ft 8 4- b 

44* 23% CHxCTll 164 26 18 288 40* 40* 40ft— b 

28% 20* DenMfS 170 46 13 61 25b 25 25% 

37% 29ft DeSoto 160 47 10 22 33* 33% 33% 


17% 13% DdEd 166 705 7 2006 1bV> )J% 16 — % 


30ft 20ft— ft 


18 7% BMC .121 

35% 24 Bolmco JO 26 10 

19b 19 Bkrinll .92 57 14 

24* 18* Bolder 76 17 14 

2% ft vIBcMU 
9 2 vIBIdU pf 

Sm 33* aallCP 164 26 14 

22ft 11% BallvMf 70 17 

11% 7ft BollyPfc 12 

46ft 33b BaltGE 360 75 8 
23b 16* BltGE Ml 
46 3B BaltpfB ASO 1X1 


.121 56 8b 7% 8% + b 

JO 26 10 B3 25* 25b 25b — b 

.92 57 14 397 17* 17% 17% — % 

75 17 14 44 21* 21* 21ft— b 

IW 1ft 1% )%— % 
10 5% 3% S% + % 
64 26 14 74 61% 50 60% +1* 

TO 17 1116 17% 15ft 15ft— b 

12 86 10% 111* 10ft— % 

60 76 8 42843*42*43 + % 

4 21* 21* 21* 

60 1X1 I IS 44% 44% 44% — % 



55ft 49b DetEof 765 117 
54* 48* DelE pf 7J6 116 
25% 20% DEptF Z75 116 
28ft 21b DEprR 374 123 
27* 20% DEpfQ 113 1Z1 
27% 20% DEPfP 112 122 
25% 20ft DEpfB 275 116 
29b 22* DEptO 140 122 
29* 22* DEpfM 142 122 
33% 26 DEprt- 4JJ0 126 
Mft 26% DEdK 4.12 12J 
116% 102% DEPfJ 1568 IX* 
20ft 15 DelE W 278 116 


3570x 63* 62% 40%— 1% 
6S0z 63% 62 63% +1% 

3 25b 25 25 

23 26% 26ft 26ft 

59 26 25* 25% + % 

2 25% 25% 25% 

4 25 23 25 

9 27ft 27ft 27% 

29 28b 28 28 

32 31% 31% 31b— % 
15 32* 32b 32b— % 
4 115 US US 
23 19ft 19ft 19ft— ft 


24 T8% Dexter JO 37 ft 169 22 21ft 21% 

16% 10% OIGter 64 47 161 15% 15% 15%—% 

21 15b Otams 176 106 2392 17b 17 17 — % 

38* 34* DteShPf 460 106 55 08 27 37* + ft 

11 6b DlanoCp JO XI 3 72 9* 9% 9ft— b 


58% 35% DfeUdS 160 27 11 844 37* 37b 77% — b 
125* 85b DtethJl . 13 3B99 100* 99% 99*— 1 


88 88 — b 

23 23 

4% 5 

9ft 9ft 4- % 


35b 22* BncOne 1.10 X3 11 414 33% 32ft 32ft 


72% ISM BncOnwl 
5* 2ft Bon Tex 
52 46* Bandog 170 27 11 


2 22* 22* 22* 

195 3 2% 3 + % 

23 55* 55b S5b — 1 


55* 33b BkBOS 260 46 5 3214 50% 49* 49ft— % 


47% 28* BkNY 264 46 7 

33b 18% BankVo 1.12 4.1 9 

22* 15 Bn* Am JM XI 
47 40 BkAmpf 4.91CU6 

74% 65ft B HAITI pf 7J3911 J 
16% 12ft Ilk Am pf 2JS 
32% 23% BPcARty 260 87 12 


735 44ft 44% 44%— % 

104 27* 27% 27% + ft 

2322 IS* 15ft 15ft— b 

154 43 42b 43 + ft 

409 56% 55b 64%—% 

105 15* 14* 15* + ft 
16 29ft 29% 29% — % 


BankTr 2.70 46 7 1555 58 67ft 47* + % 


95 53* Disney 170 16 48 63388*88 88 — b 
28% IS DEIS 160 XI 7 70 23% 23 23 

4b 4 Dtvrsln 3 62 5 4% 5 

lift 6ft Domes .12 4919 10 9* 9ft + % 

34% 23* DomRs 2J1 U 9 2195 30* 30* 30*— % 

71% 15% Donald 66 17 9 45 18* 18 18 — b 

61ft «* Donley 1.16 29 IS 894 54* 53% 53%— lb 

33% 23b Dorsey 1 JO AD 13 43 33 30b 30b— * 

42% 32b Dover 68 26 13 171 37ft 36* 36% 

37% 25* DowCh I JO XI 14 4343 35% 35% 35% — % 

50 36b Dowjn JI M 21 347 43ft 43* 43b— % 

15b 11 Dravo JO 18 99 13% 13b 13b — b 

24b 17* Dresr 60 16 18 3403 21% 20* 21 — % 

21% 15% Drrrxfl ZOO 105 57 19* 19 19 

55b 31 Dreyfus 60 1.1 13 249 57% 56% 56%— % 

Alft 46% duPcnt XM 3J 12 3351 57* 57 57 — ft 

50 39ft duPntPf 4J0 9J 6 46% 45b 45% + b 

35* 25% DukeP 260 83 8 521 31% 31b 31ft— % 


15b 11 Dravo 
24b 17* Dresr 
21% 15% DrexB 


37 21b BkTrpf 150 96 25 25% 25% 2S%— % 

13 8% Bonner 83* J 15 30 lift 11b 11b— W 
39% 19 Bard J6 16 14 418 34% 31% 34% 

25 19b BamGp 6 U IS 137 24* 24b 24b— % 

41* 25* Barnet S 1J»4 2J 11 310 37% 37% 37% — V. 

33% 17 BarvWr 40 17 It 143 22% 22 22 — 91 

13* 8% BASIX .12b 16 II 210 8% Bft B* 


13* Oft BASIX ,12b 16 II 
35* 31% Bausch JB 15 17 
17% 11* BOXlTr J7 2J 59 
27* 19b BavFin JO J M4 
34* 23b Bay 51 G 240 U 9 
38* 31b Bearing 160 Z9 13 


40 27 It 143 22% 22 22 — 91 

,12b 16 II 210 8% Bft B* 

JS 26 17 112 31ft 31 31% 

J7 2J 59 2512 14 13ft 13H— b 

JO JM4 37 26b 26 26 — % 

40 U I 27 32% 31* 31*— b 

DO 29 13 30 35% 34* 34*— H 


85% 56 Duke pf 8J0 1QJ 20Qx 81% Bib 81b— b 

BB% 61* Dukepf BJ0 116 250x75 74% 7«%— 1 

27 27* DUKffPf 269 106 46 28 25* 25* 

35* 39b Dukepf 185 11 J 42 34% 34 34b + b 

83b 57ft DunBrd 220 U 21 491 75* 75% 75b— % 

17% 12ft DuuU 265 126 7 2193 17 15* 15ft— fa 


34% 25* SeatCa 180 £1 I 5339 34% 33% 34* + % 


18% 15* Duo PfA 2IO 116 
16ft 11% DUOPf 167 II J 
17% 12% Duo Pf 280 1Z5 
18 13* BvaprK 2.10 126 

20b 14% Ouapr 231 126 

52% 43% DllO pf 7 60 126 
15% 8% DycoPt 60 42 12 


48* Beat Pi X38 SJ 


15% 12% Bear 


5 53b 53b 53b— M 


26% 20* DynAm 


lOOz 17ft 17ft 17ft— % 
107ta 15b 15% 16b 
430x15 16 16 — b 

2 17% 17% 17% — % 
2Mx 19b 19 19b 4- % 

15000x50. W% 50 —1% 
48 14* 14* 14*— ft 


13 23b Zlb 23b 


29 61 231 15* 15% 15b 


58* 35% BeCfnO TJO XI IS 560 56* 56 


8* 2ft Better 


Baker pf 1 JO 346 


17* 12% BetenH 60 26 
35* 22% BeiHwl 96 U 
97 72* Bel I At I AJ0 7J 

33 24 BCE 0 22B 

77% 19ft Belllnd 62 16 


715 3 2* 2* 

29 5b 5 5 — b 
25 Mft 14ft 14ft — b 


IJ 10 142 33% 33% 33b + % 


707 B9ft BS* 88*— fa 

106 31b 31% 31b 

62 24 23* 23*— b 


77b 19ft Behind 62 M 19 62 24 23* B*— b 

44% 30* BehSdw X00 76 9 3038 40 39* 39* + ft 

57 41% BeloAH JO 16 23 275 51% 51 51 — * 

32* 22* Bemis 14» 12 10 53 32% 31* 31*— * 


53 33% 31ft 31ft— * 


45% 27* BenfCfl 2*0 « 10 M0 fib «* 40% - ft 


40% 33b Benefpf 4J0 11J a 2B2» 39 » + ft 

22% 17* Benefpf 250 116 100*22 32 22 

19% 17* Bcneof 6 130 it 3 IW ’WJ T «J 
4% 3b BenefB 671 !2 3 S S* +,i 

8% 3% Berftey 203 7* 7% 7% — b 

IS 10* Best Pd -W )J 34 300 13* 13 13%— b 

71ft Mb Befhstl 60 23 802 18 17% 17ft + % 

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«% 27* Beverly J2 9 19 367 34* » 16ft— * 

J4* 17% BteThr JO 12 18 34f 25 »% 24*- b 

24ft 13% Btecffn 27 M 19% 19 19 


24% 
14* 
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14b 
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14% 

2 9 

40 29 

74* 59% 
19% 

32* 

2ft* 

2k* 

24* 

25 
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65* 

35 



24ft 11% Blpctfn 
?S% 1ft* BlockO 


64 XS 14 200ft Ift* t|% 18% — * 


S % 21* BIckHP 1.92 M $ 26 3M. 3B% 32tA 

b Mb BlalrJn J8J IM 17% 17b 17* 

»* 39* B lex HR 260 42 15 44 B 54 5481 + % 

a% 33% Boeings 168 2J IS 8354 Wu 44ft 47 -lb 

5J 34b BotaeC 1J0 4J » 942 4^ 45 45b— % 

SI 48 BOIaeCPfXOO &8 8 54% S6% 54* 

39* 18* BoltBer .10 6 30 181 38b 2* Wi 

«% 28% Bordens 1J2 40 11 523 38% »b Mb— * 

«* 19% BorgWa « 41 12 412 22* n% 22% — ft 

4b Barmns M 45 8* 8b _£*— b 

44% 28% BosEQ 1248J 0 34839*39 W% + % 
ff. 44b Bose pf XB8 116 2»88b 8Wfc BUb 

!>% 9b Bos£ er 1.17 106 M lift 10* 11 — % 

«% 10* Base or 1 60 147 » 13* >3* 13* -f % 

25* » BowQtr .72 36 9 123 23* 23% 23ft 


45 8* 8b fffa — b 

348 39* 39 3 9% + % 

20180b 80* 80* 

14 lift 10* 11 — % 
» 13* >3* 13* -f % 
123 23* 23% 23ft 


43 29 

17* 15 
37* 23* 
28* 28 
20* 12 
12% 3% 
5 1* 

7* % 

22* 6* 
25b 7* 
33b 9* 
28* 21% 
23* 13b 

g tib 

60 fa 47b 
15* 10b 
32* 2D 
32% 24b 
18ft 14* 
34% 22* 
29b 24 
19b 10* 
12 8 % 
5% 2* 
30b 19ft 
14 lib 
17ft 3* 
TBb 65ft 
li* (ft 
20% 15ft 
33% 25b. 
22% 15* 
S 3* 
Sfa 4 
ft 

37* 24% 
20 10b 

29* 17* I 



< jinrvfin 



32% 20ft Hall FB 160 12 1178 31b 31 31ft— ft 

34* 25b Hfllbtn 1 JO 46 13 901 23b 28 28 — ft 

1* * Herthid 66 5J 19 124 1% 1ft |» 

11* 5* htalwOPf 65 56 32 10 9ft 10 

39ft M* HamPs IJ4 36 14 6S8 38* 37* 37ft— ifa 

15% 11* Hams T67P1U 41 14* Mb Mft 

21ft 14% Haul 1640 9.1 . G »>fa 20ft 20ft 

30 14b Hotels 96 29 11 1241 20* !9» 19* —I* 

28* 18 HanQH 64 13 72 324 20 19ftl9* + ft 

Zlb 14* Hama 60 11 24 49 Wb 18* in- % 

48* 30ft KarBrJ 160 L7 14 1203 40* 59* 59*— lb 

35* 21* HOT Erte 5 65 16 19 140 31* 31ft 31b— ft 

12* 7* Homlsh 25 351 11* 11% IT*— ft 

28* 24b Horn of BIG US 14 25ft 25 2Sft 

29* 24* Ham pfC 2.13 7J 33 »'.« 28ft 29% + ta 

33% lift HrpRw JO V 11 13 29* 39% 29%- % 

35 74ft Harris JS 34 13 70? 24* 25* Mft— ft 

K* 10ft HorGrn > 38 15*% 15% 15% 

30b 91* Horses 1J8 4J W 227 29 28* 28*— % 

38ft 24% Horrmx 1JS IS 9 484 33* 32% 32%—]% 

17* M Hattie IX J0J 11 2 Mft 16* 14* 

25* 14ft HowEl 164 7J 9 345 21% 90* 91 
13* 9 HovesA JOeiO 8 TV 10 9* 18 

34* 22% Hozlefn 60 16 16 26 28% 28b Wi 

13* 9% HOCLOt) 62 26 2D 41 13* 13% 13ft 

30b 13* HllfiAm 37 493 23 22 22% + ft 

23% 71 HttCrP n ,T8e J 9 22 21* 21*— fa 

22ft 10ft Hltl)$A 45 14* M 16 — % 

15* 8* Hecks JB 1.8 128 Mft 14ft 14*— ft 

IS* 13b HecJcM JO M 2380 17* 17ft 17% + fa 

23* 14* Helimn 68 25 12 171 19b 19 Wft 

30b 14ft Halite 60 16 M 33 26% 24 26ft— ft 

54* 36% Heinx 160 26 M 950 55* 54* 54ft— % 

»% S3 KcAtzef UO 16 4 QJ T2J 1ZJ +3 

30 12* HehleC 18 40 18* W% 18% + % 

24* 18 HWmP M U 27 134 19* 19* T8* + ft 
40* 30* Herads 160 4J 12 568 37b 36* 36*— * 
19* 10% HerttCs 641 3S 177 17* 17ft 17* + ft 
34 20 Merited LSD 56 i M 29% 30 

21 16% Herman 16 8 IS* tt* is* + ft 


IX 10J n 2 14* 16* 14* 

164 7J 9 245 21% 20* 21 

JOelO I TO 10 9ft 10 
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62 26 » 41 13* 13ft 13ft 

37 493 23 27 22% A ft 

1 .We J 9 S 21* 21*— fa 

45 14* M 16 — % 
JB 1.9 128 M* Mft 14*— ft 

JO 1.T 2380 17* 17ft 17% + fa 

68 25 12 171 19b 19 Wft 

60 U 14 33 26% 24 26ft— ft 

160 29 14 950 55* 54* 54*— % 

ijo m 4 Q3 m ro *3 

18 40 18* 18% 18% + % 


177 I7ft 17ft 17*4-% 
6 30 29% 30 

a is* «% a* + ft 


49* 30* Hereby 160X2.12 3W 44* 43* 43ft— ft 


23to IS* MACOM 34 MS 943 20 


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47% 3iy, 

31% IS 
2r.li IXi 

lit 1n 

, 20% OVS. 

!!* » +.* 215 


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13% 9 Hestnpf 


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23* 74 Kexeet 60 26 16 29 30* » X — ft 

23* 13 HlSheor JO U 9 32 27ft 21 21 

13ft 8% HTVofl .17 16 f T45 f2ft I2b F2* + ft 


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BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks l 

Report, Page 8 


Page 9 


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ECONOMIC SCt HP 

\v - ' 

; Policy Changes Are Needed 

Jo Stem Farming’s Decline 

By marvin duncan and mark draben stott 

^ York Times Sorrier 


. ^ “^ess changes are made inpublic 

V c % 1 ^P ro Synee<£dS^ndS!^? e even morc ^leaLThc 

; /n« indirect effects would IT 

be even more important. Low- Pdidw fashinn pj 

: er mtexest rates mean further 

■ ■ -dfichncsm the dollar, and they w years ago are not 
. - : tales worldwide, 5 ] appropriate for 

export orientation. 

low more flexibility in U.S. ~ 

' ac,,ting “ mvir<mm “ t (OT 

-^a^aKm.tax policy may also be needed. With farm commod- 
■ 01 “ - 

r P olid « fashioned 5° years ago for an agricul- 

, -I?* 5 10 ^“estic markets are no longer apnropmtefbr 

curren i C3 5 >ort orientation. Current pricing policies 
;> to pot an umbrella over world markets, ralfingforth more 
-producrion than can be marketed at government-supported 

* P nces - A move toward market pricing seems both inevitable and 
^ se P° a ^ * or fanners to compete successfully in world markets. 

. * Dnnng a transition to market juicing, direct government pay- 
\ ®®B to farmers — necessarily generous at first — could be 
gradually reduced over a 5- to 10-year horizon. 

. -. ~~ e United States probably has excess capacity at p 
acceptable to fanners. A case could be made for retiring 25 
' mHbcHi to 30 million cropland acres (10 million to 12nufiion 
hectares) over the long run. Many of the idled acres c o u ld be 
‘ fragile or marginal land 

ARGE numbers of farmers and rural businesses are Hkefy to 
be farced out over the next few years. Benefits for rdoca- 
jM. ■ bon and retraining these people would be a cost-effective 
-T'. means erf providing aid. At the bum time, such a program would 

- encourage needed resource adjustment in rural America. 

Trade growth policies are increasing ly important to U.S. farm- 

- ers. Domestic consumption takes the piodnction from about two 
. out of three harvested cropland acres. Slow growth in domestic 

demand and rapid agricultural productivity g»rm imply that by 
. the turn of the century only half the current cropland output will 
, be needed for domestic markets. The rest will have to be exported 
7 — or the U.S. agricultural: plant win have to be scaled down 
sharply. Thus, the nation’s trading interests should become a 
more vital part of broader U.S. policy debates. 

Historically; the United States has sported raw agricultural 
. prodnets. Adding valueto products by processing before they are 
sold abroad could add .significantly toexport earnings. Greater 
emphasis on value-added prodnets .may be necessary, for contm- 
growth m report V^ tlpfitional bnt mature marke ts in 

• western Emope and Japan. 

Economic devdbpment in fhe'worid’sl6w-:and middle-income 
V (Continued on Page 13» CoL 4) 


E 


I Currency Bates 


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Aug. 16 

AM. PM- 

s :s 

sst M S IS 

HOioyark 

i , parts and London dffcfa/ Ik - 
£ open/ro ** 
Omm carnmt 

Spufco: Ruulen. 


: To Our Friday to Belgium for a Holiday 


S. African 

Currency 

Plunges 

Dealers Blame 
Botha’s Speech 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

JOHANNESBURG — The 
South African rand plunged cm Jo- 
hannesburg’s foreign-exchange 
market Friday in what dealers said 
was a reaction to President Pieter 
W. Botha’s speech Thursday night 
rejecting quick major reforms in 
the country’s apartheid polities. 

Dealers said disappointment 
that Mr. Botha had faded to an- 
nounce major reforms produced 
the fastest and sharpest drop they 
could remember in the rand’s val- 
ue. The rand closed at 413 cans 
Friday in Johannesburg, after hit- 
ting a record low of 383 cents 
shortly after the market opened. It 
dosed at 45.2-45.4 cents Thursday. 
Its previous record low was 41.9- 
42. 0 cents on Jan. 18 this year. 

Mr. Botha spoke in Durban 
amid intensif ying tmnnmir and 

political pressure for a major 
breakthrough in reform. 

Smith Africa’s finance minister, 
Barend du Plessis, ruled oat any 
new exchange. controls after the fall 
in the rand. He said, "There is no 
possibility whatsoever of any direct 
interventionist measures.'’ He said 
the rand’s drop was an emotional 
reaction to Mr. Botha’s speech. 


The dollar was mostly kwer Fri- 
day in trading on New York and 
European nuukets. Page 13. 

Gold prices rose Friday in Zu- 
rich and London in response to the 
decline of the U.S. douar and fears 
of continued rivfl unrest in South 
Africa, bullion traders said. 

One Zurich trader said that bul- 
lion was being underpinned by the 
dollar’s losses and the volatile situ- 
ation in South Africa, a major gold 
producer. 

Economists and financial ana- 
lysts said Mr. Botha's speech and 
drop in the rand could accelerate 
the nation's inflation rale, sow at a 
16.4-percent annual rate. It could 
also cause interest rates to remain 
high and seriously delay any recov- 
ery from the nation’s worst reces- 
sion in 50 years, they said. • • 

“The rand probably overreacted, 
but with the continuing stale of 
emergency, interest rates will re- 
main somewhat higher than they 
would have been otherwise, and 
that will delay an economic recov- 
ery,” predicted Johan Goete. chief 
economist at Barclays National 
Bank Ltd, the nation’s biggest 
bank. (Reuters, AFP, AP) 


. 1 ECU X 

• 1 SDR U 

Oostnes In London and Zurich, fixings la other European centers. New York rotas at* PM, 

• (a) Commercial franc (U Amoonts needed la buy one pound (c) Amounts needed la bur one 

• donor r) Units of 1 BO Ck) Units ofljmivl Utdtsaf}OM)HA:natmntudi ««-• aotvoMMe. 
’ W ToOmf oue p n m dr tUSXdfts 


/Oiher BaDtf Vates 

• f.njma bar » t« CurrMCir per US1 CuuwitV flf HAS Cniiocv nr IU3 

r 2ET2LE5 am eZmSuos sms Motor. rm. uas 5. tor.** BUS 

'-iZEt^wc S SiTEr ««» MM.!*- moo MM « itt.ro 
•,jSS*n two H—Klfll 7JW5 Nor**™* “J SKT*"" Ssl 

‘ ££££; JS SSS5S SSS.X-.tIS ^ 

SSSS no! tms Mrtrto WS TmtUtOn BUS 

- 1.4*550 StaflS 2JB4S UAS-lrlMsa 16725 

; SS.5S SS tSSSSJSl St.n- u» vmm k« 

- ■ ISMUr U4S5 IrWi t 

_ nmultrr IBn/ssets); Banco Commerda/e Ifotkna (tmm); Banoue No- 

rM ««= tSDOU BAH (ttomr.rtyoL dirham). 

" Other data tram Routers ondAP. 


' *** Df . ^ pound. FFJ; Uords Bank (ECU); Reuters 


PAWtodeyMarfcetlta* 

Aug. 16 

MertinLrtoiiawhrAw" 

30 dor momi rtoW: 7 - w 

•toterate tntereai Roto IwWt: 7J« 
Source: Merrill Lynch, AP 

AriailMtarVepMlu 

Aug. 16 

iimom 7 

1%% .4:" 

IZ£ 

1 nor 

Source: Heaton. 


New Steps Urged 
ForRecovery 
In Singapore 

Reiners 

SINGAPORE — Singa- 
pore’s economy can recover 
within two years if wages are 
kept down and productivity is 
increased, according to Prime 
Minister Lee Kuan Yew. 

Mr. Lee, in a speech to busi- 
ness leaders, said Thursday that 
the island could regain its rom- 
petitiveness without forfeiting 
its high standard of living. 

Singapore's gross domestic 
product shrank 1.4 percent in 
the second quarter, the first 
time in 20 years dial a contrac- 
tipn was reported. The island’s 
GDP rose to 9 percent in the 
second quarter in 1984 and re- 
corded a 13-percent gain in the 
first quarter this year. The 
growth rate for all of 1984 was 
$3 percent, GDP measures the 
total value of a nation's goods 
and services but excludes in- 
come from foreign investments. 

“Hold wages, up productivi- 
ty, make our wages mere com- 
petitive, and other (lungs bong 
equal, we should be all right by 
1987,” Mr. Lee said. 

Mr. Lee called on business- 
men to identify “new growth 
areas” to stay ahead of Singa- 
pore's economic rivals, includ- 
ing Hong Kong, Taiwan and 
South Korea. 


Cobbling Over Gucci’s Family Feuds 


By E.J. Di< 

New Yon Times 


P F 


The N»w Vori Time* 


Dionne 

New Tant Times Semce 

MILAN — The name Gucci is 
normally associated with wealth, 
frigh fashion, fine leather goods 
and a certain patrician style. But 
lately, it has been tied to go 
column stories about a father 
and a son at each other's throats. 

There have also been lawsuits 
by Paolo Gucci, who turns 54 
this year, against his father Aldo, 
the 76-year-old patriarch of the 
dan that owns the House of 
Gucci. Once, the company’s chief 
designer, Paolo has brought mul- 
tiple suits against his relatives 
and the family company. He also 
threatened to introduce his own 
Gucci handbags — a move that 
would confuse customers at least 
as much as Classic Coke and 
New Coke. 

Allegations made in the Gucci 
lawsuits helped to spark an In- 
ternal Revenue Service investiga- 
tion to see if dollars were being 
divertedfrom Gucci's U.S. oper- 
ation to overseas companies to 
evade taxes. 

Enter Mauririo Gucci, Aldo's 
nephew, Paolo’s cousin, who, in 
November, assumed the dual ti- 
tles of president of Guccio 
Gucci, the Italian parent compa- 
ny (Aldo Gucci continues as 
chairman), and chairman of 
Gucci Shops Inc., the U.S. orga- 
nization. Maurizio, 36, refuses to 
comment on the feud. “That has 



Maurizio Gucci and the firm's seal; Aldo Gucci (inset). 


to do with Paolo and his father,” 
he said. 

“1 know only that a board of 
directors elected me.” said the 
new president, who started in a 
Gucci package room at age 15. 
More seriously, he added: “It 
would be difficult to be in tins 
chair if Aldo didn't want it” 

Aldo Gucci's father, Guccio, 
founded the company as a sad- 
dlery in Florence in 1906, and it 
is Guccio's linked initials that 
adorn the company's products. It 
was Aldo, with help from Mauri- 
zio's father. Rodolfo, and a third 
brother, Vasco, both deceased, 
who took the company to the 
United States. 

The fust shop in the United 
States was opened in 1953, and 
there are now 25 shops in the 


United States alone. According 
to Maurizio, sales in Europe, the 
United States and Japan are 
roughly balanced, with 30 per- 
cent each. 

“1 was the only one to work 
seven years with my unde, who is 
quite a difficult guy," Maurizio 
said. “With him. it's not living, 
it’s surviving. If he does 100 per- 
cent you have to do 150 percent, 
to show you can do as well as he 
does." 

One thing already seems clean 
Maurizio Gucci will do things 
differently. He hopes, in effect 
to be the Gucci who presides 
over the transformation of the 
family company into a modem 
corporation. 

He favors “evolution,” provid- 
( Continued mi Page 12, CoL 1) 


Switzerland Halts 
Action Against 
Marc Rich Group 


By Anthony Williams 

Reuters 

ZURICH — The Swiss govern- 
ment said Friday that it would halt 
legal proceedings against officials 
at the Marc Rich commodities 
trading group in connection with 
supplying economic secrets to U.S. 
authorities. 

The public prosecutor’s office, 
explaining its decision in a state- 
ment released by the Justice Minis- 
try in Been. said that the Marc Rich 
& Co. case had been characterized 
“by the breach of Swiss sovereignty 
by "the United States.” 

Marc Rich’s trading house, 
based in Zug, near Zurich, has been 
investigated by the U.S. authorities 
in one of the largest tax evasion 
cases in U.S. history. 

Two years ago, after Mr. Rich 
started supplying company docu- 
ments to investigating authorities 
in New York, the Swiss intervened 
by confiscating papers as they were 
about to be airlifted to the United 
States. 

The Swiss also launched pro- 
ceedings against the company’s ex- 
ecutives, since supplying the docu- 
ments laid them open to charges of 
betraying trade secrets of third par- 
ties, which were deemed economic 
espionage under Swiss law. 

The case became a legal tug-of- 
war between Bern and Washing- 
ton. The United States accused the 
Swiss of shielding a suspected crim- 
inal. while Switzerland said the 
.Americans had no right to impose 
their laws here. 

The Justice Ministry said Mr. 
Rich had supplied documents to 
the U3. “under the pressure of 
coercive measures by an American 
court." 



Marc Rich 

The Swiss ban on supplying pa- 
pers prevented Mr. Rich from com- 
plying with U3. law. The U.S. au- 
thorities retaliated, imposing a 
$50,000-a-day fine on the company 
for ignoring a court subpoena for 
the documents. 

Only when the fine was dropped, 
last November, did Bern allow the 
documents to be handed over. By 
then Mr. Rich had already reached 
a S200-mfllion out-of-court agree- 
ment with the U.S. authorities that 
allowed his company to continue 
operating. 

WhDe the American case against 
the company has been settled, 
criminal proceedings in the United 
States are still pending against Mr. 
Rich personally and an associate, 
Pincus Green. 

Last September the Swiss gov- 
ernment rejected an extradition re- 
quest from Washington for both 
men. 


U.S. Housing Starts Fell 2.4% in July; Factory Use Steady 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Housing 
construction in the United States 
dropped 2.4 percent in July, while 
the operating rate at the nation’s 
factories, mines and utilities held 
steady, lhe government reported 
Friday. 

The construction report contin- 
ued to confound expectations for a 
rebound in housing brought on by 
falling mortgage interest rates. 

The Commerce Department re- 
ported that new housing was start- 
ed at a seasonally adjusted annual 
rate of 1.65 million units in July. A 
slight rise in single-family dwell- 
ings was overshadowed bya plunge 


of 73 percent in apartment budd- 
ings with five or more units. 

It was the fourth consecutive 
month that there has been no im- 
provement in factory use, the Fed- 
eral Reserve Board said in its re- 
port. US. industry operated at 80.8 
percent of capacity in July, the 
same level since April and 1 2 per- 
centage points below last July. 

The Fed's report included an up- 
ward revision in the June rate, 
which was originally reported as 
80.7 percent of capacity. 

The operating rate for manufac- 
turing industries was unchanged in 
July at 80.4 percent of capacity, 
while the rate for the mining indus- 


try climbed slightly to 82.6 percent 
from 823 percent However, the 
operating rate at electric and gas 
utilities dropped to 83 percent of 
capacity, down from 83.9 percent 
in June. The decline apparently re- 
flected lower than normal use of 
electricity for cooling during the 
summer. 

The July decline in construction 
starts followed a weak 0.8-percent 
June increase and a 13-percent 
plunge in May. The June figure was 
revised from an original estimate of 
1. 9-percent increase. 

The July level of housing starts is 
actually 4.4 percent below the rate 
of a year ago. when average interest 


rates stood at a 1984 high of 153 
percent for a conventional 30-year, 
fixed-rate mortgage. Since then, 
mortgage rates nave dropped by 
almost 3 percentage points but 
housing construction has not met 
expectations for a big rebound. 

In more ominous news, the Com- 
mence Department report said that 



Rapid growth in the nation's ba- 
sic money amply is making it more 
difficult for ihe Federal Reserve to 
respond appropriately to listless- 
ness in the economy, credit market 
analysts say. The central bank re- 


ported Thursday that the money 
supply surged $53 billion in early 
August, more than twice analysts' 
expectations. The increase left 
money growth well ahead of the 
target the Fed has set to permit 
steady, noninflationary economic 
growth. 

But earlier Thursday, the Fed 
reported a modest 03-percenl in- 
crease in July in production at the 
nation's factories, mines and utili- 
ties. The July gain left industrial 
production just 1.4 percent higher 
than it was a year ago. By compari- 
son, industrial production grew 
122 percent in the 12 months end- 
ed in July 1984. 


Japan’s Income Tax System; Looking for Loopholes to Close 


By Susan Chira 

New York Times Service 

TOKYO — Every year, Japan’s 
March 15 tax deadline comes and 
without any of the turmoil 
surrounds April IS in the 
United States. Most Japanese, in- 
deed, care nothing about the dead- 
line because they do not file income 
tax returns. 

The vast majoripr of Japanese 
taxpayers receive their paychecks 
with taxes already deducted. The 
Japanese taxpayer's main relation- 
ship is not with (he government but 
with his or her company, which 
calculates the amount of tax to be 
withheld, according to a govern- 
ment-furnished chart 

The system saves money, keeps 
personnel to a minimum and saves 
taxpayers time, Japanese tax offi- 
cials say. Bui there are problems. 

For one thing, tax officials ac- 
knowledge. Japanese taxpayers are 
not fully aware of bow much tax 
they pay aDd thus may not hold the 
government as accountable for 
spending as taxpayers in other 
countries do. 

On the other hand, some taxpay- 
ers have grown increasingly angry 
over what tax officials concede is a 
dear inequity in the Japanese sys- 
tem — the leeway given to sdf- 
anployed workers, who are al- 
lowed deductions forbidden to 
salaried workers whose taxes are 
withheld. Gingerly, politicians are 
beginning to talk about tax reform. 


but any changes are expected to 
come slowly. 

Under the present system, it is 
the employer, rather than the gov- 
ernment, who acts as the primary 
tax collector in most cases. 

Every salaried employee files in- 
formation with the company about 
dependents and other deductions. 
Based on this information, the 
company withholds monthly taxes 
from the employee’s salary and 
turns the money over to the govern- 
ment by the IDlh of the following 
month.’ 

Japan’s tax system is progressive, 
with tax rates ranging from 103 
percent to 70 percent, and the com- 
pany uses government-drawn 
charts to determine withholding 
amounts. Generally, few deduc- 
tions are allowed 

At the end of the year, the com- 
pany examines additional figures, 
such as tax-deductible insurance 
premiums, and adjusts the employ- 
ee’s paycheck, withholding less or 
more if necessary. The company 
then sends the employee a state- 
ment noting bow much salary was 
withheld for taxes. 

• This mandatory system applies 
to 403 million taxpayers, or 85 
percent of all the taxpayers in Ja- 


pan. For most taxpayers, that is the 
end of their responsibility. They 
file no tax returns, and they have 
no legal right to challenge the gov- 
ernment assessment of their taxes 
— although they may challenge the 
conqnny that withheld the taxes. 

A salaried worker is required to 
file a tax return, however, if outride 
earnings exceed $800 a year or if 
the salary is more than $62300. 

The government requires anyone 
making a payment — be it interest, 
dividend or fees for professional 
services — to first deduct the prop- 
er percentage of taxes and then fue 
a report to the National Tax Ad- 
ministration. 

The taxpayer then calculates the 
tax, often after consulting with the 
tax office. The National Tax Ad- 
ministration estimates that 3-6 mil- 
lion people, or 7.6 percent of all 
taxpayers, file such returns. 

Toshihiro Kiribuchl the Nation- 
al Tax Administration’s deputy 
commissioner for international af- 
fairs. said that Japan’s system is 
less expensive than those of other 
countries because employers — not 
tbe government — actually calcu- 
late and collect most taxes. 

Japan’s basic withholding sys- 
tem began in 1940, when its war 


with China was draining the trea- 
sury. The idea was to raise money 
for the war by instituting a low- 
cost, reliable tax collection system, 
according to Hirohisa Kitano, a 
law professor at Nihon UniveratY. 

Tokyo also hoped to restrict the 
numbm* of tax collectors, many of 
whom were leaving for Japanese- 
occupied territories or military ser- 
vice. 

The impact of withholding was 
swift. Tax revenues soared from 
355 billion yen in 1940 to 675 bil- 
lion yen two years later, when tbe 
system was fuDy established. Dur- 
ing the same period, the cost of 
collecting taxes dropped from 1.06 
yen for every 100 yen collected to 
0.75 yen for every 100 yen collect- 
ed. 

Since 1940, Mr. Kitano estimat- 
ed, the Japanese government has 
saved 223.1 billionyen on tax col- 
lecting, or about $938 million at the 
present exchange rate. Tie number 
of tax collectors, too, has stayed at 
about 52,000 in the last few years, 
Mr. Kiribuchi said, partly because 
of budget constraints. 

Very different rules, however, 
apply to farmers, people who own 
their own businesses and others 
who are not salaried employees. 


These workers are requited to as- 
sess their own income, file quarter-, 
ly (ax payments and then file a 
year-end tax return. 

These 3.4 million people — 
about 7.1 percent of all Japanese 
taxpayers — are allowed a range of 
deductions unavailable to salaried 
workers. 

The Japanese call the system 
kuroyon, or nine-six-four — mean- 
ing that salaried workers supposed- 
ly pay tax on 90 percent of their 
income, business owners 60 percent 
and fanners 40 percent. 


The stock market was 


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f Whra m 

Wuliinjihifl. DL |. 

* nnm.ii J' 

* ‘I&adkkfe.* 

- HouserfBeef®* * 

AJ|JW-ni m iht Wjshireun hiurmtt I J 

i OUR 59th YEAR- ’ 


“foil RESERVE 

INSURED OEPOStTS TRUST 


RES IN DEP 
An Account for the Coutious hwaslcr 
to Prated and Increase Capital 


LL5. Dollar Denominated 
Insured by U5. Govt. Entities. 
Important Tax Advantages 
Competitive 
Money Market Yields 
No Market Risk 
ImmetfiafB Liquidity 
Absolute Confidentiatity 


CHEMICAL BANK, New York 
Custodian 

CAYMAN NATIONAL BANK 
AND TRUST 
Registrar 

RES IN DEP 

Cose Poriate 93 

1211 Geneva 25, Switzerland 

Please send prospectus and 
account application to; 


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nmm 


Fridas 

mse 

Closing 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do net reflect late trades elsewhere. 


40 26% SVCCDS 68 10 18 323 39% 3B?S — it 

16% ms Shofclee 31 40 23 537 15W 14% 15 + to 

2o?i >5 Sfiowln M 25 B 79 24 to 23% 739k— % 

3»to 29% 5hellT ZJ7C fcj 7 430 jt% 374* 371s— IS 

30% 17% StMlCIo JO XI A 111 26% 35% 35%— 'A 

40 25% Sftrwin .92 24 13 74 39% IS 38%— % 

0% 5V* snoetwn 9 73 7 4% 4% 

14% 13 Stonfif 40 4J 13 37 )T% I2U 12Vj — % 

19% 13% SlerPac 144 M 9 141 IB 17% IB 

44% 20% Signal 1J0 Zi » 2190 el% 40% 41% 

44% 41'ASIanlwd 34 4lto 41 41%— 'A 

AS 53% signipr <13 u 1 61% 41% 61% + % 

41 26% Singer M 1.1 9 302 34% 35% 35% — % 

33% 27% Slfigrpf 150 106 7 33 37% 33 — 'A 

18 12% Skyline 68 34 T9 97 13% IJh I3vt 

20% 20% Slattery JOe 21 19 25 25% 25% 25%- % 

15% 7% Smith In 32 19 157 B% 0% Bid— % 

71% 50% SmkB 240 <L2 11 1582 66% 65% 66% + % 

79% 42% Smuekr 1.06 \S 17 24 72% 71% 71%— % 

41% 31U. SMpOrt 1.14 30 13 180 38% 38% 38%— % 

15% 13% Snvoer 100 112 15 94 15% 15% 13VS— % 

43% 30% sonat 100 44 ■ 545 33% 33W 33% — % 

19% 13% SonrCP .199 IJ 13 74M <5% 15% 15% + % 

30% 32% S0tu.ln 120 *J 23 39 77% 27% 27%— % 


(Continued from Page 8) 


25% 7% Tflolns 20 0 4 

31% 22% TrloPc 1J0 15 8 
49% 29 TflOtme J4 1-9 14 
8% 5% Tries 20 13 13 

18% ’« Trtatv JO X5 

25% 13% TrllEno .10b J 30 
14% 8% TrllE pf 1.10 84 

43% 30% TucsEP 100 7.9 9 
14% 9% Turn* M 19 14 


20 3 0 409 24 23% 23% —1 

JO 15 8 30 38% 28% 38% — ’A 

44 1-9 14 307 45111 45 45 — % 

20 13 13 113 4% 4% 4%— Vi 

JO 15 51 14% 14% 14% 

.1011.5 30 54 20% 20 20 + % 

.10 84 34 12% 12% 12% 

JO 7.9 9 133 37% 37% 37% — % 

44 19 U 47 151« IS 15 — % 


LLSt Futures 


Season Season 
HTflft Law 


Omi High La* Cfe** CM - 


44% 41% Slonl wtf 
AS 57% Slonl pr 4.12 87 
41 30% Singer 40 1.1 9 
33% 27VS Smgmf 330 100 
18 12% Skyline 48 30 19 

20% 20% Slattery JOe 12 19 
15% 7% Smith In 32 19 
71% 50% SmkB 2BD 42 11 


14% 9% Turn* 44 19 14 47 ISiS IS 15 

I9'y 14 T«VDs .90 4J 10 118 19% 19 19 

41. 30 T yen LB JO 11 M 28 38% 38% 38% 

17% 13% Tylers 40 TO 11 100 14% 14% 14% 


Season 5easan 
High Lo*r 


Jld 8 M 

Oct 545 

Jem 

Prev.aoleHajtt. _ 
prav Bay's ooen lot ttSHspOI. 


ijo ill 432 — JO 

75 S* ati 4 .M +m 

a #9 cert 4J7 81 1 tjOi 

8M IS 815 S* +3D 

ms »" *" iM *S 


Open High Lew Close Che. 


Grains 


29'A PccHpf 4JJ7 IU 


43% 30% sonat ZOO 80 I 
19% 13% Sanyo* .159 M « 
30% 22% SOOLIn 120 42 22 

40% 30% Source 130 85 

23% 1BW SreCprrf 240 104 

25% 70 SCrEpf 2-SO 102 

30% 32% SoJgrln 248 92 12 


31 S% 3SVi 38% — % 

4 21 23 23 

1 34% 24% 24% + % 

34 27th 27 27 


73 7 4% 4%— % 

4Z74 24% 24% 24% 


49% JB% SouOwn U» 24 10 144 42 41 41%—% 

35 24 SoelBk 120 19 10 87 31% 30% 31 — % 

10 6% SoetPS 2.131314 JO 73 7 4% 4%— % 

27% 20 seal Ed 2.14 89 8 4274 24% 24% 24% 

23% 15 South Co 1.92 94 4 4275 20% 20 20 — % 

24% 17% Solness I JO 74 0 1525 23% 23% 23% 

44 30% SNET1 172 84 11 302 41% 41% 4I%— % 

39% 31% 5oNEpf 142 10.1 2 38 28 38 

27% 22% 5a Rv nt 240 10J 4 24% 28% 24% — % 

31 24% SOUnCO 1 32 81 40 28% 28 28 — % 

3«% 24% Souftnd 1J0 ZB 10 774 34% 35% 15% —1 

16% 11% So Roy .13 9 14 313 13% 13% 13% + % 

1% 6to Soumrh JO 25 4 384 8% 8 8 

51% 47 somkpt 878ell4 1 50% 50% 50% +1% 


7% SoNEpf 3J2 1DL1 2 JO 38 38 

2% SaRvaf 140 10J 4 24% 28% 24% — % 

4% SOUnCO 1.72 81 60 28% 28 39 — % 

4% Saurbtd 1J0 ZB 10 776 34% 35% 35% —1 



31 16% SwAIrl .13 S 19 

18% 11% SwtPor 
18% 10% SwtGas 1J4 4.9 8 
B8% 87% BwBsll 6.00 76 8 
29 19% SwEnr S2 1.9 11 

24% 18% SwfPS 1 JO 80 9 
17% 11% Spartan J2 30 350 
27% 15% SpectP 


34% Sperrv 1.92 19 9 4942 


LS 4 384 8% 8 8 

L4 1 50% 50% 50% +1% 

J 19 824 29 28% 28% — % 

145 13 1314 13% 

i9 0 111 1$ 17% 17% 

A 8 401 81% 81% 81%—% 

.9 11 10 27 26% 27 + % 

J 9 270 23% 23% 23%—% 
3 350 75 14% 14 14 — % 
78 31% 21% 21%—% 


. _ 47% 48% + % 

» 30% Serines 1.52 85 13 83 33% 33% 33% + % 

43% 35% SquarD U4 M 10 285 37 36% 34% — % 

72% 45 SoulBto 1.76 20 18 462 69% 69% 49% — % 

24 17% Stolev JO 4J 22 347 20% 20% 20%—% 

23% 17% StBPnt J6 26 12 1 V? 23% 22% 22% — % 

20% 11 SIMOtr .32 24 13 313 13% 12% 12%— % 

50% 39% StdOOti 2J0 4.1 B 852 44% 46% 44 W— % 

23% 9% StPaeCS AO 11 9 180 19% 1B% 1S%— 1 

18% 12% Standex 5J d 10 ids 13% 13% 13% — % 

31% 23% StonWk .96 12 11 82 30 29% 29% 

35% 2Sto Stoirett 1JB 13 10 43 33 33 33 

11% 9 SlaMSe lJOallJ 34 10% 10% 10% 

3% 2% Sieego .12 3J 13 316 3% 3% 

2D 'A 15 Sterchl J4 3-9 10 18 19% 19% 19%—% 

1314 9% StrJBco .76 86 9 78 11% 11% 11%— % 

34U 24% SterlOg 1J0 4J} 12 1236 3Q 29% 29% + % 

23% IS’A StevnJ 1J0 5_5 13 302 21% 2114 21%— % 

14 26% SlwWm 1+8 66 17 32 24% 26% 26% — % 

3 B% SWcVCpf 1J0 89 100* 11% 11% 11% 


27% 

37 — % 
2S% — W 
16% 

3% + % 
48 — % 
22 + % 
S3 — % 

40% 

15% — % 


11% 9 SloMSc 

3% 2% Sieego 
20% 15 Sterchl 


43 33 33 33 

34 10% 10% 10% 

13 3% 3% 3% 

18 19% 19% 1«%— % 
78 11% 11% 11% — % 


45% 35% Stanevy 140 17 I 
39 24 StoneC jM IS II 


32 26% 24 (A 26%— % 
100z DM 11% 1116 
10 43% <]% 43% — % 
71 29% 29% 29% — % 


51% 36% StDpShe 1.10 19 8 120J »% M 38% + % 

21% 14% SlarEa 1JJ 93 U 150 20 19% 19%— % 

12% 2 vIStorT 1154 2% 2V6 2%— % 

88% 38% Slorer A0 J 009 46% B6W* 86% + % 

21% 17% SITTMtn J2o 86 71 1B% 17% 17% — % 

19% 14% StrtdRt JO 4J 42 123 18% 18% 18%—% 

7% 3% SuovSh 10 5% 5% 5% + % 

9 26 SunCh AS \A 11 14 34% 34 34 — % 

12% 6% SunEI 67 10% 10 10 — % 

52% 43% SunCo 2J0 69 10 843 48 46% 47 

108%. 90% SunCef Z25 13 11 99% 96% 99% +2% 

49% 4Q SundUr 1J0 3J 12 64 47% 47% 47V.— % 

11% 6% SurHVIn 58 4179 7 6% 7 + % 

7% 7 SunMof 1.19 ISJ 566 7% 7% 7% 

30% 33 SunTrst 129 33% 32% 32%—% 

23 14% SuerValus 1373 19% 19% 19% — V. 

48% 24% SvpMkf AS 1J » 271 42V, 42% <24- % 

17V. 14 Swank .90 59 n 115 15% 15% TSVi— U 

31% 14% Svtjron 1J8 86 11 139 17% 16% 16%— % 

16% 11% SvmsCe 15 111 13% 11% 11%— 1 

45% 41% syntax 1.92 3J 14 1650 58% 58 58% + % 

40% 30% Sysco J J 17 116 38% 38 38 



WHEAT 

y» bu minimum; dollars per bushel 
Sop 23% 298*2 193 ZSJVl -J4% 

Doc 110 110% 106 106% — JAi 

Mar 113% 114 110% 111% -MV, 

MOV JJB 103 '4 1M% 103 —.03% 

Jul 181 ZJ1 171% ISO —32 

See 2J3 —32 

Prev. soles 8345. 

Prev dtoVs ooen Int 39J04. UP 306. 

CORN 

5J00 bu minimum; dellan oer bushel 

Sap 134% US 130% 132 —SOVs 

Dec 12T4 127% 2J3% -J 2V. 

Mar 135% 135% Ul% 133V> — J2% 

MOV 2J9% 140 135% 137V. —JO* 

Jul 260 260 U4U. 137% — JRW 

Sen 2J0V. 2JCA ZZ7 2J7% —JO*. 

Dec 127% 138 203% 23 -20 

Prev. sales 21774. 

Prev day's ooen Int ISM ue 837. 


COCOA 

10 m etri c tons; S per tea 

See 2091 

SSe TUf. 

MOT BU 

May 228 

Jul 

5 w 

Dec 

Prev. solas 1144. 

Prev day's open InmftSt. oft 91 


3095 1,65 35 sffilj 1 

218* 2177 2W 
2218 2220 2208 2309 — 1 
2W1 2230 2TO —2 
we 
3242 
70S 


ORANQE JUICE 
t&moitas.iC8rt»PvaL 

nw mu 

jon 127JI 

Ato- 124JI 

AVIV 

Ju< ^ 

Prev. «*l«s 321 . _ 

Prev dcnPs ooen lot 4J34, oB 9. 


13140 135.15 13360 13460 +J0 

130.10 13L2S 

127 JO T2BJ0 12760 12100 +-» 

12890 127 JO 12890 IM 

12850 +50 


SOYBEANS 

5J300 bo minimum; dollars per budiet _ 

Auo 534 534 5JBVi 331% —.11 

Sw> Z2D% SJOV* 5.1 ITA 5.10% —.10% 

Nov 533 534 5.12% 113% —.11 

Jon 532 532 532 532% —.10% 

iSr SA SM 531% Wli -XS% 

May 565 565 539 560% -J8V. 

Jul 550% 550% 563 563% —34% 

Aug 567 567 538% 531% -37% 

See 537 — JI7 

Nov 539 560 535 535% —ASIA 

Prev. sates 17381 
Prev day's ae«i Ini 45.971 Olt 834. 


Metals 


COPPER 

3SJBO H>SJ cads per lb. 


SOYBEAN MEAL 

100 tans; dal ton per ton 

Aug 


22% VFCorp 1.12 19 10 140 38% 31 


14% 5% Valero 
2SH 14 Valcrpf 164 143 
4% 2% Valevln 
2 au 19 Von Dm M <0 
4 2% Vorco 

46% 26% Vartan 3ft J 
13% 9% Vara 60 36 

25% 17% Veeco 60 21 
12 3% Vends 

11% 9% VestSe IJOolO.9 

51% 29V. viocom 68 1J 
73% 55 VaEP Pf 732 186 
91% 71% VoIP Pf 935 11 J 
73 57 VaE plj 732 11.1 

68 53 VaEP pt 730 IIjO 

70% S3 VaEP uf 765 10J 
27% 13% VlshovS 
45% 30% Varaod 


2282 10% 1014 1016— % 
13 67 24% 23% 24 — M 

24 2% 2% 2% 

Lfl 7 6 23 23 23 

118 3% 3% 2% 

J U 734 31 30% 30% 


60 36 S3 272 12 11% 11%—% 
60 11 15 46 19% 19 19W— % 


II 128 9V. 8% 8%— % 

IJOolO.9 50 11% 11 11 

68 1 J 22 832 51 to 4914 50% +1% 
732 186 40z 72% 72% 72% 

935 11J 410z 89% 88to 8816—1% 

732 11.1 60z 49% 49% 69% 

7 30 11-0 SJi ASto 6Sto 65K— % 

765 1U 1040r 46% 68% 68% + % 

16 tt 25% 24% 24% — % 

11 91 42% 42 42 — % 


Oct 1 77.00 1 

Dec 129 JO I 

JOO 13030 1 

Mar 13400 1 

Mav 1 35-50 1 

Jul 13730 1 

Auo 137 JO 

See 

Prev. soles 8821 

Prev day's open hit 41J74.ua 281. 
AP- NY-04-1 6 1944GMT 


12400 mOO 12100 12170 —JO 
125.10 12560 12400 12440 ' U0 

12730 12730 12560 12530 —130 
12530 1 3030 12830 12930 —30 

13060 13160 130-30 130.90 —60 


May 

Prev. soles 76*4. 

Prev days open Ini 79658 up 229. 


•no -m 

61J0 4130 41J0 6160 -X8 

4170 61K 5235 

6270 6330 6360 6335 +35 

4415 64 44 4415 4A2* +35 

8450 4470 6450 A47S +3S 

65tt OM 4520 *53* +3* 

6^00 6tM +JW 

4460 +M 
4730 +J5 


13430 13430 13330 13360 —60 5300 trey oz3 ceats per troy oz. 

135-50 13560 13460 13560 +60 Aug 

13730 13860 13730 13830 +30 SB *34 

13730 13860 1373)0 13860 +130 Oct 

14030 +60 Dec « 


8380 450J 6356 6«6 +JJ 


SOYBEAN OIL 

60000 lbs; dollars 


LOCO Ux; dollars per TOO lbs. 

ug 2130 2130 2250 2267 — 130 

■O 2334 2368 2260 2264 -36 

Cl 2335 2110 2267 2260 — J7 

ec 2335 211D 2267 Z2.48 -J3 

Ml 2330 7370 77 W —JO 

IOT 2140 DAO 2235 2230 — JO 

BY Z363 2150 2295 22JS -65 

41 2155 2365 2130 2335 —65 

ua yi qi 7^<n 77 m nm « 

w ZUO 2130 2Z.91 2291 —J* 

Prev. soles 9J77. 

Prev days open Int 53671. up 1.156. 


industrials 


Dec 64*3 6633 6483 6555 +93 

ftEV xrtfl 6753 4*7 n 689.1 +96 

ESC 033 6640 6733 6785 +9J 

^ Sj tno 6873 6886 +103 

Sea .n n 5C7 JJ 6833 699.1 +103 

^ 7103 7223 7103 7155 +KJ6 

Jtei 7283 7283 7283 721 J +106 

m£- 7363 7420 7363 7336 +106 

MOV 7300 7303 7503 745J +113 

^■^^74301.001288 DJJ0 1*40 -1 * 

PLATINUM Nov 1W30 IJ160 t» 

r iiiiil $ summuM 

J^ “-5 Sep 


OATS 

5300 bu minimum; dollars per busheJ „ 

See 134 1J4 131% 121% —32% 

Dec 113% 133 to IJOto 130V. —32% 

Mor 134to 134% 132% 132% —37V, 

May 132% 132% 132% 132% — 37% 

Jul 139% -32% 

Prev. sales SCI 
Prev days opsn hit 3370, off 8. 


OCt 43960 ; 

Prev. sales 2691 „ 

Prev days open Int H71J. up 90. 


XBS> 32950 32960 34530 +2500 




PALLADIUM 

100 trev az; debars per oz 


03TTON2 

50JBO lbs.; cents per la. 
10768 10935 W63C 108J0 +200 gg. 
laniniK ini« mia +960 Mar 


Livestock 


St iwjo 

MC 10760 11035 10735 10930 +260 

for 10860 11060 10830 1«U5 +LD 

kjn 1B9J0 -3130 

M 1UL05 +295 

Prev. sales 497. 

Prev doYS open lot 737% up UL 
AP-NY6IB-16J5 M12EOT 


an <> 78 57 39 ffSO — ■* J8 

Sm 3 HS “is 

I> Ml K J1 TK 030 0M —Jrn 

*060 #03C 403» —6* 

SS *aS 5969 ».7» -4» 

«tn jyM 5505 5*6* **4{ 


Prev. sales 1 JOG. 


500 5430 5170 5330 — H 


CATTLE 

4O000 lbs.; cents per lb. 

AUO 

Oct 


Prev days open Inf I 
AP-NY-OS-1* aJZJGMT 


tat 19^29, up 179. 


5560 5565 54*2 5490 —60 

5730 5737 5660 5470 —65 

5853 5830 SUE 5*22 —30 

5935 59.40 5472 5832 —38 

6025 6060 59 JO 59J0 —20 

6130 6120 6060 6025 —30 

5965 9965 5965 5965 —37 


-travaz. HEATING OIL 

" 33660 34030 gSJO SJ-J} +f» «300gal; aatipergal Jta _ u 

Sion un 14250 34560 +530 Nov »35 7S.15 7SM -37 


Jun 4130 6120 4060 6075 ^30 

Aug 5965 5965 5965 5945 —37 

Prev. sates 13^44 
Prev days ooen tat 4260. off J07. 

FEEDER CATTLE 
44300 lbs.; cents per Its. 

Aug *425 *430 *530 *565 —65 

Sep 6440 6470 6170 8400 —60 

Od 6360 6365 6270 62JS2 -^70 

Nov 6490 65.15 6427 6427 — J3 

Jan 66.15 6820 8560 6545 -65 

Mor 68J» 68JJ5 8560 *525 -60 

Apr 6835 6835 6520 6530 —.40 

May 8535 6535 *485 *485 —45 

prev. sales l J70. 

Prev days open Int 764*, off 152 
HOGS 

30,000 idsj cents per th 

Aug 4410 4480 4400 4470 +J0 

Oct 3835 3062 3720 3725 -35 


yi»n 34&20 34250 34560 +530 Nov 7560 75.75 f>*3 -J 

niiiiS3i h i i i i 

M30 36730 36130 3MJ0 +520 Mar 72*6 72*0 7*60 T6C -.18 

3*440 37330 36460 37020 +620 APT _ •« 

mS 377^ 37110 37520 +8S May ° 

38760 4730 Prev. soles 4JS29. 

39360 +760 Prev dart ooen tor 24371 uo I.JTi 


Jl Prev. »Qtas 493S . 

Prev days open Int BUS. 


CRUDE OIL 
WWtbtoL; donors oerbM. 


To Our Readers 


Certain statistical data is 
missing from this edition be- 
cause of technical problems. 
We regret the inconvenience to 
readers. 


Od 39.10 ; 

Prev. aotas 4191 

Prev days open int 19,145, up 711 


4060 AL90 4020 4030 —60 

4235 4260 4123 4120 —27 

3930 3925 3860 3827 —63 

42J0 4100 4160 4122 —03 

4230 <230 <700 4112 —60 

4120 +38 

39.10 39.10 3935 3935 +35 


PORK BELLIES 
38300 itaj cents ner Ih. 

Aos 5030 

Fea 60.10 

Mar *020 

May 4760 

Jut 61 JO 

Auo 8030 

Prev. sales 3J04 
Prev day's open tnt 8628. of! 382. 
AP-N Y-08-I6 194GMT 


5030 51.10 <760 4485 —35 

*0.10 *035 5862 5822 —133 

*020 6020 5820 5865 —127 

41 JO «U0 6032 6030 —125 

SI JO 4LB5 60.10 60.10 —165 

6030 6030 5*30 5030 —135 


m 

675 RBInd 

041 J 


t 

BM 

7% 7% — Vt 

w* 

33% RCA 

1J04 

2 A 

13 

2 m 

43*1 

43 

43% — to 

40 

2948 RCA pf 

36t 

9 A 


«2 J7M 

37U 

37% + «i 

35ffl 

27% RCA Of 

in 

63 


795 

30% 

3 OH 

30% — to 


31% RCA Pf 

la; 




37N 

37V. 

37% 

m 

6% RLC 

30 

23 

14 

ft 

8% 

0 

0 

4M 

3 RPC 




191 

4% 

441 

4% 

19% 

12% RTE 

64 

U 

10 

122 

19% 

1841 

18% 

I4W 

8% Rod Ice 



10 

230 

14% 

13% 

13%—% 

4691 

28% RohlPur UG 

26 

13 

wu 


41 

41 — Ito 

«% 

5% Hamad 



50 

4884 

BU, 

7* 

8% + to 

21% 


J4 

4J 

IU 

34 

17% 

I IH 

17% — % 

741 

2% RarrurC 




859 

4 

H8 

3% 

nvi 

51% Rayon 

64 

J 

26 

Ul 

55% 

74% 

74to —1% 

17% 





31 

12% 

12% 

12% — % 

53% 

36% Ravflui 

160 

13 

12 

864 

49% 

49 

49%— % 

11% 


60 

52 


251 

7% 

7% 

7%— % 

71 91 

16% RdBtrf pf 2.12 110 


15 

17% 

17% 

17% + to 

24% 

19% RilBal pf 339el7.1 


23 

19% 

lVto 

19to + % 

16% 

11 RRRef 

IJSelOJ 

10 

9 

12% 

12% 

12% + % 

17% 

B% RocnEq 



II 

91 

10% 

lOto 

TOto 

12% 


JO 

36 

16 

88 

8% 

8% 

8% 

12% 

8% Reece 



34 

64 

11% 

11 

11 — U. 

1% 

% Rnoai 




77 

ft 

% 

% 

+!% 


JO 

22 

13 

215 

37% 

36% 

36% — % 

10% 

4% RapAlr 



S 

1122 

10% 

10% 

10% — to 

J 

1% RopAwl 




S3 

2% 

2% 

2% — % 

12% 


JO 

36 



B% 

8% 

8H— Mi 

49% 

33% RaaNY 

164 

15 

8 

27 

46% 

4*18 

46to— to 

27% 

23 RNY PlC 112 11 J 


16 

27% 

27 

27 — to 

57% 

33% RNYpfA661ellJ 



V 

57 


34% 

24% RepBk 

164 

52 

6 

769 

31% 

31% 

31% — % 

JO 

23% RepBk pfl!2 

7.1 


T7 

28% 

28% 

26to— to 

2<% 


J2 

16 



21% 

21% 

21% + % 

32% 


JO 

32 

24 

*40 

25% 

244* 

25 

14% 




2 

117 

14% 

I4to 

14% 



1J4 



5210 




25% 




* 

24% 

24% 

24% — % 

24% 


JO 

10 

15 

18 

23% 

23 

23 — % 

17 


64 

U 

10 


15 

14% 


32% 

26% Revnlni 160 

52 

6 

1751 

27% 

26% 

26% — % 

41% 


100 

2.9 

■ 

606 

35 

34% 

34% + % 

38% 


168 

19 

12 

1674 

37% 

37% 


29 


.901 

40 


72 

22% 

22% 

22% 

33% 


60 

10 

16 

20* 

26% 

26 

26 — to 

/a 




9 

19 

4 

3% 

3% 

364* 



3J 

8 

20 

34% 

33% 

33%— to 

44% 


160 

5J 


94 

27% 

27% 

27% — % 

24% 




520 

m* 

UW 

1 !%— to 

24ta 


230 

9J 

6 

S41 

22% 

22% 

22% 

42% 

29% Rodin 

264 

*6 10 

68 

37% 

37% 

37% — % 


COFFEE C 

37600 Ibsj cents Per lb. 

Sep 13430 

Dec 12735 

Mor IU 

May 13935 

Jul 14*50 

Sep 

Prev. sales 2697. 

Prev days aeon tat 1 1 3*1. up ZL 
A P- NY-08-1 MS H12EDT 


13430 13860 13430 USJ* +22 
13735 13SJ0 137.10 1520 +.99 

13834 13920 13835 T3720 +1.10 
13935 139J0 1*35 TJ9.9S +JB 
14060 MOJO 14060 MOTS +60 
141S +1J0 

140J5 +405 


SUGAR-WORLD II 
111000 IbSJ ONUS Mr B. 

S3 


408 437 406 420 +04 
437 441 435 <35 +23 


Cash Prices 


— ... ^ rmr MION B KOBB O OOLP FUTURES 

Cemmodby and Unit Frl Am lasjptroence 

Cof f ee 4 Santas, lb 132 US 

Prtatdoth *4/30 38 %, yd _ 040 03* 

Steel WllefsfPHIJ. fan 473J8 473J8 


30to 

24% ZotaCB 

1J2 

40 

9 

81 

27 

26% 

26% — % 










21% 

8% Zapata 

.12 

16 

62 

358 

8% 

8% 

8% 



68 

0 

12 

288 

52% 

52 

J7to — % 





II 

212 

19 

18% 

1B%— to 


15% Zeros 

J2 

16 

17 

35 

20% 

19% 

20% + to 

35% 

22% Zurtiln 

IJ2 

18 

12 

304 

35 

34% 

14% — % 


Steel billets [Pmj.tan 473J8 473J8 

iron3Fdry.PMta.lon moc JIM* 

Steel scrap No 1 hvy Pitt. _ 7373 m-m 

Lead Spot. Ib 19 2S-JJ 

Capper etad. Ib — 66- 69 6+68 

Tin [Straits), R>_ *3M7 63441 

zinc. E.SLI_ Basis, lb 06M47 48-58 

Palladium. az IB-Ik 1 79-141 

Silver N.Y. az 6JD 7J8 

Source: AP. 


NYSE Hghs4xms 


Comramlities 


AinsSed Anhews 

CmRLkO OeflanaCP 
FlFMBCPfB FrMcGId 
KCSouInd LN HOUS 

McKesson pf OcdP I463p 
PSNH3S6P4E PSNH32SpfF 


BtMICp 
Earn* 231 pf 
Gen Banc 
MGM-UAEnt 
Poc Tin 
RocJcwIntpf 


AntarHatei 
HanieDepat 
LaPwU 1930 
McDeraOaf 
Revnldlnds 


City Invest Culltaets 

lUIntCp iments^n 

LaPwLtpf ManhattNtf 

MidSouUt OrionCaef 

OtgnalCawd SunTrstBfcn 


FalrChldPf 
KenalCP 
vlMnvl540p 
Read ng Bat 
SvmsCp 


High Law Bid Ask CtTga 
S UGAR . 

Frmfc ■ PGf" vriBtrfc loo 

Od 1343 1311 1327 1340 —21 

Dee 1335 1320 13Z7 1333 —39 

Alar 1385 1340 1355 1340 —42 

May tLT. NT. 1385 1398 —41 

Aug 1630 1620 1630 1640 —50 

Od . N.T. N.T. 1670 1695 — <7 

Eat. voi.: 1.918 tots of 50 Ians. Prev. actual 
sales; 1354 lots. Open Interest; 20*86 


xdls — ft* -distribution, 
xw— without warrants, 
y — ex-dividend and sales In fulL 

yW— yteW. 


$300 Million Withdrawn 
From Accounts in Peru 


Reuters 

LIMA — Richard Webb Duarte, president 
of the central bank, has said that Foil had lost 
about $300 million to capital flight in the first 
seven months of 1985. 

Mr. Webb said Thursday that depositors had 
transferred the funds abroad from Peruvian 
doDar-denominated accounts before President 
Alan Garda Perez, a Social Democrat, took 
office on July 28. 

The flight was a factor in the Aug. I decision 
by Mr. Garda’s government to freeze for 90 
days an estimated $1.6 billion in dollar deposits, 
Mr. Webb said. 

Depositors can withdraw funds in soles, the 
national currency, Mr. Webb said. About S1Q0 
' million in soles was withdrawn this month, he 
said, partly to buy dollars on the free market. 

Withdrawals slowed after the central bank 
devalued the free rate of the sol last Friday to 
17.500 per U.S, dollar from its previous trading 
value of nearly 15.000 soles, Mr Webb said. 


78 


COCOA 

FranOi francs par M kg 
StP 2019 2010 2010 2015 —5 

Dec 2310 2310 2305 2310 —2 

Mor 2325 2325 2315 2325 UBOL 

May NT. N.T. 2325 — Urteh. 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2335 — Uncti. 

SOP N.T. N.T. 2345 — Unen. 

Dec N.T. N.T, loss — Uncti. 

Bat. voL: IB lata of 10 fore. Prev. actual 
aataK 2* tat*. Open Intaraai: 798 


Froocfi fra*a per TOI fcs 
S8P N.T. N.T. 1378 1388 —8 

Nov N.T. N.T. 1020 1050 —10 

Jen N.T. N.T. 10*5 - —10 

MOT 2315 2315 2310 2320 —10 

May N.T. N.T. 2325 — —10 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2333 — — 19 

Sag . N.T. N.T. Z04Q — —5 

EU. YOU 1 His of 5 tans. Prev. actual sales: 
TA lots. Open W*ra*t :396 
Soares: Bourse <tu Commerce. 


of International Herald 
Tribune readers own 
Stocks, Shares, Bonds 
and Commodities. 




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a* . CofcfeHto 

Frta StP ok mv leg Dec Mb' 

24 237 198 362 tUD 134 058 

}5 10 U2 UI M Ul US 

S u ui in . u (ln ij 
S *26 U2 102 169 162 148 

J W M L7I 2« - 

39 — . Ul 893 - - — 


ssffigstt sa 

Fata; Thu. vN. 2428 WOP W.2UK 
Source: CMS. 






















































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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURD AY-SUNP A\ , AUGUST 1^18, 1985 




Page 11 


"N Sank 


IPF. Confident’ on MGM-VA Sale 

‘.'•r r . ^By A! Dclugach t 

. '■■-■.Jm Ajigeta Tim&smi c . » wner Durchase price for MGM- gardcd as being able to back up its 

.LOS ANGELES — Dr^oi .? 4 s , hare - “highly confident" opinion after 

.&itnham'Lambert has saW w n,H UM ‘ - s chainnan. Frank arriving at the assessment, 

.^^dy confidenr that it can m. rwJ a 3 , « A ^ ■ “That is the signal that they have 

ranee financing for T»v* Burn ham s opinion letter, used in the oast," noted Dennis 



^ri^dyajnfidenr that it can ar rwJiL v r 8 * hght of . “That is the signal that they have 
nuwe financing for Ted Turner^ henmu wSr? S L °S“? on Ielter ’ >««* “ thc past." 11016(1 060015 
ll^aiifin purchase of MGM ^ i\l »;^I!^ir s ^ odo 4 bl theiransao- Forsu vice president of research at 
EnttSSSl^ M, ^ T ™5.S0 through. Stidler /tel* Securite in Los 


Intergroup 
Turns Down 
LmcudiaBid 


Maker That 1 


H5$31ion purchase of MGM if a t™,™*!! t. 000 ^ 1 loclransac ' Forsu vice president of research at 

EnttSSSl^ Uo ?. w ®S° •hra.Sh- Stidler /tad* Securities in Los 

sa iflvv • . ■ 1 “raer Mr. Turner, founder and chair- Angeles. “When they have said 

-.mw»e« !»*-. •?*» confident 


■e« 


mine past hasbcen that Diesel Burnham ftd." 

; taken as -a signal to the financial "5*® recognized the merits of this ni« rw«w»«i Wednesday that it 
community that it has rearStS transaction." , ™ "P 0 " 60 

-stage uuts analysis where it expects .So^cmertainmenl industry an- StffSSS 3r 

no^noWein m raising fund&^ dysts earlier questioned whether iSwuS b 

:V Turner’s announcement tZZ3^PS!&S*-*& — E 

«*V*gF **k nJSfB teS^v CT M^l^ ,0 ^ COTld SSXedefrorttobuyCBSInc. 

■ mgm-ua-s known for its 'The last annual report said that 

Thursday to dose ai sS in. Cen . ts ? ucccss with raising capital for ma- TBS was “unable to generate suffi- 
New YmV StnHf^vr*.' 875 oa ^ e J OT ventures by issuing high-veld, dent cash flow from operations in 
' “ Chanfie " ^ high-risk bondsTgoaaa^is re- 1984 to meet its needs.* 


The Associated Press 
PITTSBURGH — Directore of 
National Iniergroup Inc. Tqected 
on Friday a merger proposal from 
Leucadia National Corp., the larg- 
est single investor in the diversified 
petals and consumer finance com- 
pany. 


National Intagroup’s directors 
said that Leucadia’s offer was high- 
ly conditional and that it was an 
inappropriate time to sdl die com- 
panvLeucadia, a New York life 
insurance and consumer finance 
company, said that it was disap- 
pointed by the rejection. 

In March, Leucadia failed to 
block shareholder approval or a 
mercer between National Jbter- 
eroup and Bergen-Branwig Corp., 
a Los Angeles prescnpuon-drng 
distributor that later withdrew 
from the agreement And in June, it 
lost a bid for four seats on the 
board. 

Most recently. Leucadia offered 
io buy the 91 percent of National 
iniercroup that it does not already 
owruThe offer for $35 per share 
would amount to about $750 mu- 

^Lcucadia originally conditioned 
its offer on National Iniergroup s 
agreement to complete plans to sdl 
its majority interest in First Na- 
tionwide Financial Corp. to Ford 
Motor Co. for about $400 million. 

National Iniergroup said on Fri- 
day that it was continuing its re- 
vtov of a financial restructuring 
and other programs for the “en- 
hancement of stockholder value. 

Ln icadia later called upon the 
! board “to specify its plans to en- 
hance shar eholder value. 




Armco to Sdl 


"V 

rfness 


Group to (keens 

The Associated Press 

.MIDDLETOWN, Ohio — 
Anacolnc. said Friday that ft 

Tia/f 9 a ■ «» 


Spain Announces Plans to Merge 
Its Major Petrochemical Companies 


rviuuAT iAiv. muu i iiuaj vnai \\ 

had agreed to sdl its aerospace 
and strategic materials erous to 


— - u- — ■ 

and strategic materials group to 
-©wens-Corning Fiberglas 
-'C orp . of Toledo, Ohio, for $415 
(fiimnn in cariv. 


Armco’s president, Robert 
VBoni, said tim group consists of 
Prince businesses that primarily 
develop- and manufacture high- 
performance composite materi- 
als for the aerospace and de- 
fense industries. The group has 
24 plants with 6,400 workers. 

The aerospace division, with 
more than $500 million in sales, 
3ras Armco’s largest money- 
maker in 1984. Mr. Boni said 
that Owens-Coming initially 
will finance the purchase 
through, short-term borrowing. 


Arum 

MADRID — Spain plans to 
■merge its major petrochemical 
companies as part of an industrial 
restructuring designed to enhance 
the nation’s competitiveness before 
its entry to the European Commu- 
nity next year. 

The proposed merger will be su- 
pervised by the state oil holding 
company Institute) Nadonal de Hi- 
drocarburos SA, an INH spokes- 
man said Friday. It involves Alcu- 
dia Fmpresa Para la Industria 
Qumhca SA, Calatrava Empresa 
Para la Industria Petroquimca SA 
and Paular Empresa Para La Ind 
Q iiitmca SA. 

- Tire new company will be Spain’s 
largest producer of a variety of oil- 
-derivative chemical products such 
as polyethylene, butadien, synthet- 
i ic rubber and acrylouytroL 


The Spanish goverrunent has 
been streamlining its oil industry 
since 1981 when ft initially merged 
eight independent companies to 
create INK 

Since then, IHN has tried to pool 
capacity in an effort to improve the 
domestic industry’s position in the 
face of tough competition from 
large multinationals. 

Last month, mindful of the ECs 
anti-monopoly rules, the govern- 
ment passed legislation transfer- 
ring the assets of its oil-products 
marketing monopoly. CAMPSA, 
to a joint-venture agency. Those 
assets were valued at 77 billion pe- 
setas ($470 million). 

INH has a 58 . 1 -percent stake in 
the new agency through its two 
member refineries. The remaining 
stock is held by private sector refin- 
ers. 


By David E. Sanger 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — By all logic. 
Compaq Computer Corp. should 
be along-forgotten footnote in the 
personal computer industry. 

Like dozens of other start-up 
companies, Compaq rushed three 
years ago into the market for mak- 
ing IBM-compatible computers. Its 

first product was a 28- pound (13- 
kilo) portable version of the PC. 
Like the others, the company grew j 
rapidly in its first year, posting 
$111 million in sales, believed a 
record for a high-technology start- 
up. 

But unlike most of the others, 
and to the surprise of analysts who 
have time and again predicted di- 
saster for the Houston-based com- 
pany, it continues to thrive in the 
shadow of Internationa! Business 
Machines Corp. 

Compaq made it past the shake- 
out last year that left most of its 
early competitors in collapse or 
□ear it. It not only survived a series 
of deep IBM price cuts, but today 
outsells IBM’s own portable by at 
least 7 to t. 

And last week, Compaq became 
the only major personal -computer 
company to post impressive growth 
in the midst of the industry's deep- 
est slump. Second-quarter profits 
soared more than fivefold, to $5.7 
million, from a year ago, as sales 
jumped 80 percent, to SI 18 million. 

“By the end of the year," said 
Benjamin M. Rosen, the compa- 
[ ny’s chairman, who has doubled as 


Sales 

Quarterly safes 

in mdlions ot dollars 


Income 

Quarterly net income 
m millionso! dollars _ 


U B IV 
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Rod Canion, left, president of Compaq ComputerCo 
and Benjamin M. Rosen, chairman, witnlbe uesicpro i 


Compaq's lead venture capitalist 
and its most outspoken publicist, 
“this three-year-old company 
should be in the Fortune 500." Ap- 
ple Computer, he is' quick to point 
out, look five years to get on the 
hsL 

Compaq's success, and the ques- 
tion of how long it can continue, is 
of more than passing interest^ the 
reeling personal computer indus- 
try. Almost overnight, the compa- 
ny has become a case study in how 



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to compete against IBM, whose 
far-flung marketing might and 
quickness in obscure market niches 
has led other computer makers to 
contend that they stand no chance. 

More important, company offi- 
cials say, Compaq’s meteoric rise 
suggests that a piece of accepted 
wisdom in the computer industry 
might be false: 

“For years, we've been hearing 
that when vou elect to follow^ the 
IBM standard, you’ve essentially 
written off building anything inno- 
vative," said Rod Canion, the com- 
pany's 40-year-old president and 
one of three defectors from Texas 
Instruments who started the com- 
pany. “We are living proof that, if 
you do it right, you can have it both 
ways." 


What Compaq has essentially 
done is resolve a myriad of small 
complaints that users have about 
IBM’s machines while inking ex- 
acting care to retain IBM compati- 
bility and win the favor oT comput- 
er retailers. 

“I think they are perhaps one of 
the best examples of how to do it 
right." James D. Edwards, head of 
American Telephone & Tele- 
graph’s fledgling computer efforts, 
said earlier this year. “They know 
when to meet the competition 
head-on, and when to get out of the 
way." 

Many think Mr. Edwards should 
have followed his own instincts. 
Earlier this year the company in- 
troduced its first computer built 
around AT&T’s own operating sys- 
tem, called Unix. Now it faces the 


same problem confounding Ap- 
ple’s Marintosh: convincmg targe 
corporations — many with a huge 
investment in IBM software titat 
superior performance feawresarc 
more important than IBM com- 

pi Thift 1 ft a battle Compaq chose 
not to righL'THfibtisinasmarkcl- 
ptace has chosen its standard, said 

Mr Rosen, whose venture-capital 
concern, Sevin Rosen Management 
Co„ also financed Lotus Develop- 
ment Corp. the successful software 
company, in im start-up days. 
“Getting businesses to 
alternate is high nsk, he said, be- 
cause not many companies in this 
world have the power to create 
standards." . _ 

Compaq’s first portable was wen 
received in part b«ause of: its inno- 
vative design — it 
top IBMPC mio a portable, if 
bulky, machine that could be put 
into the trunk of a car. But the 
absence of big-name MurpeutOTS 
also helped. Its biggest threat ai tbe 
time seemed to come from makers 
of other “IBM denes," a somewhat 
derisive term used in the industry 
w describe companies like Column 
bia Data Products Inc. and Eagje 
Computer. Columbia is new m 
i bankruptcy proceedings, and Eagle 
| became embroiled in a 
. fringfiment swt with IBM from 
. which it never recovered. 

Preserving Compaq's innovative 
edge, however, is likely to prove 
f increasingly difficult, analysts say. 
i Although its newest line of desktop 

f machines, Deskpro 286, met mthu- 

- riastic reviews at Comdex, the m- 
s dustry trade show in Chicago earh- 
x er this year, Compaq now faces a 
n new class of competitors. . 
ie Mr. Canion, a calm, slow-talking 
Texan, seems unperturbed. ‘The 

d question is not how many of them 

« produce IBM-compatible ma- 
t dimes," he said, “but how many of 

it them understand what they can do 

s- with thoir computers and still stay 
ie compatible.” 


COMPANY NOTES 


SM *49 9955 9945 
MN 3MBMU2ia052 
BK 29-11 IDOJm 
rk 0841 inn 971 

vn »4i laummua 
IBSi 1149 1®2S 
BH 0419921*931 
9K 07-11 TaL60l0B20 
BK 2M1 99JD «040 
BN 13-92 100.1010021 
7N. 45-12 9*|9 99M 
7% lfrBl 9*27 *?J2 
7<N BH« 99-H W40 
IVi 29-11 *947 99J2 
(1* 2D- 11 100.UtO0.1B 


BN 0941 -10845100.10 
BVb 07-11 9922 9*32 I 
BK 20-11 

En" 0421002310033 

r* 

HN 09-301 

St nm 

BN 1442 9945 99251 

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1 BU. 1541 10030' 


Non Dollar 



Cal-Farm Insurance has been 
sued for $450 million in Los Ange- 
les by Errol and John Coughlan 
and their companies Eagle Bonds 
& Insurance Brokers and Califor- 
nia-Pacific Construction. The Cali- 
fornia businessmen contend that 
the Sacramento-based company in- 
duced them to write millions of 
dollars of worthless bonds. 

duett. Peabody & Co., the New 
York-based maker of Arrow shirts, 
has announced a “poison pill" plan 
under which its debt could be 
boosted if a suitor acquired more 
than 25 percent of its stock. 

Coca-Cola Co. plans to expand 
the licensing outride the United 


States of its new line of clothing, 
which is produced by Murjani In- 
ternational Ltd-, mainly in Hong 
K.oog and Macao. U 5. textile man- 
ufacturers complained recently 
when the clothing appeared in U.S. 
stores. . , . , , 

Control Data Corp. said ns banks 

have extended to Sept- 15 amend- 
ments to its revolving credit agree- 
ments, relaxing certain financial 
tests. The Minneapolis-based com- 
pany is in the process of offering 
S200 million in subordinated notes 
and $100 million in preferred stock 
that will be used to repay debL 
General Motors is to offer 7.7- 
percent discount financing on a 


range of 1985 model car and trade 
lines until eariv October in an ef- 
fort to dean out heavy inventories 
of unsold cars that piled up during 
a strike by U.S. car haulers. The 
cars and trucks account for 70 per- 
cent of GMs vehicle sales. 

Minebea Co. will borrow $200 
million to finance takeover bids for 
unspecified companies from two 
syndicates led by Lloyds Bank In- 
ternational LuL, according to a 
spokesman for Sumitomo Trust 
and Banking Co. whose Hong sub- 
sidiary is among the members of 
one syndicate. . 

Ford Motor Co. remained the 
leading car importer in France in 


the first half of 1985. but its lead 
over Volkswagen AG narrowed, 
according to figures gathered by 
the French car importer associa- 
tion. Ford’s 736 percent of the 
market fell from 7.93 percent a year 
earlier, while Volkswagen’s rose to 
6.27 percent from 5.63 percent in 
the same period. 

Sahgttter AG has rimed a $29- 
mitli rm contract to self equipment 
to manufacture 16-inch (42-centi- 
meter) steel tubes for oil and gas 
pipelines to the China National 
Machinery Import & Export Corp. 
The equipment will be installed in 
the Baqji tube plant in Shaanxi 
province. 


INTERNATIONAL positions 


writeef 


The United Nations Children's Fund 

With Headquarters in New York and 
the world, working with devdopmg courrtry 
to provide disadvantaged diiWren and Ihn 
the sosic services they need io survive and develop seeks 


Internal Auditor 

New York, U.S.A. (Ref.: VN 507). 


Responsibilities: to conduct reviews of ^g^orgor^ 
JSSTSnd functional IN 


£S£io carry out au* of EDP fundta and ta a^Hn 

3EWS4S: 

lent and/or Masters degree in »xour^w bus/ness 
adminisfration. Knowledge of 

mum 8 years of rfeNorA ■ gflg H ° e " Cy 

EngTsh; working knowledgeaf - 

Salary cornmem urate with qualifications and expert- 

ence. Excellent benefits package. 1005 

Send detailed resume no later than August 31, 1985, 

to-. 

Michael K. Corbett, 

Chief Recruitment and Placement 

unicef 11S , 

866 UN Plaza, New York, N.Y. 10017, U.S.A. 


The International Herald 
Tribune s daily paid circulation 
continues to break records, up 
5% in the past year and 24% in 
the past four years. More than 
a third of a million people in 
164 countries around the world 
now see each issue. And latest 
figures indicate that this rapid 
growth continues. 


InleTichoa - Heroic! T*»bune O'C-jiat'or 
Ficye orepered b- 0:0 a^dit pe^oc 
Pom jcrx-cy ?o Decerrijer 21. =984. 


1984 


160,709 


JOBSS 

u S./CANADIAN EXPATRIATES 

SSss.=•^!=ss 3 l.■s= , ' 

Call or send reaune n ow! jl J-M5-73M 

i BWBWESPBESBnEWB 

m wrseas im wci \m otkt 

Bonded- 



TheDafly 

Source for 
International 
Investors. 




































(Continued from Page 9) 
ed that ‘'the feeling of Gucci is 
always there.” He lends to be 
against rapid growth in favor of 
what h.’ called “a complete reorga- 
nization." 

"It has become too big,” he said, 
referring to the company. ‘‘We’ve 
gone from 10.000 handbags a year 
to something like 700,000. The 
growth is incredible.” The compa- 
ny is at present divided into rwo 
divisions, sales and operations, a 
simple organization suited to a 
family company. 

But the new president wants to 
break Gucd into product divisions 
— shoes, handbags and so on. 
“There will be someone responsible 


worked for Gucdo Gucd, the origi- 


nal company, first as a designer, 
then as marketing dee ores idem in 


son as part of an out-of-court set- 
tlement. 

But Paolo Gucd savs the terms 


then as marketing vice president in But Paolo uucct sa\s me terms 
the U.S- operation, until the board of the agreement were never earned 
dismissed him in 1980. He wanted out. The issue is under arbitration 


the company to update designs and 
to speed expansion by franchising. 


in Switzerland, with negotiations 
centering more on money than on 


The dominant faction, which in- principle, said Mr. Speiser. 


eluded Aldo and Maurizio. op- Sporadic efforts at reconciliation 
posed widespread franchising as a go back to at least 1 978. when Aldo 
threat to Lhe quality of Gucd prod- Gucd came to oversee the U.S. 


subsidiary. After his 1980 dismiss- 


Some say that the very success of al. Paolo was brought back in 1 982. 
Gucd may have made family lights only to find himself virtually ig- 


inevi table. “They have been ex- nored, said Mr. Speiser. 
iremely successful in an extraonii- The internal fights helped to pro- 
narilv chart timr* " sard Emilio VOke the COHIDSJIV'S difficulties 


narily short time," said Emilio voke the company's difficulties 
Pucci, the Florentine designer, with the Internal Revenue Service. 


for each category,” be said. “From 
the key ring to the crocodile bag" 

He also plans to edit the product 
line, adding new goods and prun- 
ing outdated items. And be wants 
to stress marketing, a previously 
unheard-of emphasis at Gucci. 
“For Aldo, marketing is a bad 
word,” Maurizio said. 

Another problem with which the 
new president must contend is the 
continuing proliferation of imita- 
tion Gucci products. According to 
Franco Crudeli, the president's as- 
sistant, local entrepreneurs in sev- 
eral lliird World countries, have 
registered the name “Gucd” as 
their own trademark. “We are 
fighting with lawyers to recover the 
ownership of our own nam e," said 
Mr. CrudelL 

Elsewhere, the problem is bla- 
tant counterfeits. Despite thou- 
sands of lawsuits and confisca- 
tions, the company has barely 
stemmed the flood of imitations. 
"In the Far East, there are more 
fake Guccis than real ones,” Mr. 
Crudeli lamented. 

“There is only one Gucci," 
Maurizio Gucci declared over and 
over again, suggesting at once an [ 


“But when a company grows, ev- The suits, which are still pend- 
eryone fights for a bigger part of ing. involve charges that Gucci 


Lindsey said, a Hoag Kong court 
enjoined them from funding any- 
thing over at all. 

Maurizio Gucci's strategy ap- 
pears to be: Settle and get the 
whole business — Paolo, the IRS 
and everything else — behind you. 
"Eveiybody has to be happy, he 
said. 

He has lifted objections to hand- 
ing over the records, getting the 
company’s banks out of a difficult 
situation. Gucci, he said, is cooper- 
ating fully with the Internal Reve- 
nue Service and hopes to settle the 
differences soon. And the company 
is also seeking reconciliation with 
Paolo, though that could prove 
more difficult. 

Maurizio treats the recent im- 
broglios as a distraction from his 
main task, which is to build on 


Friday 

MEX 


Closing 


Tables Include ttw nationwide prices 
up to the doting on Wall Street 
and do not reflect kite trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


HtgbLOf Stock 


to pe naiH»BPUw oaa-catt 


the cake." used a senes of foreign companies b rag I i os as a distraction from hi: 

The most spectacular dash be- to avoid U.5. taxes. Among other nufn task, which is to build or 
tween Aldo Gucd and his son in- things, the IRS says that Aldo his forbears accomplished, 
volved an altercation in July 1982. Gucci reported an income of less -He's doing the best he can in i 

when Paolo brought a tape record- than S 100.000 a year. “For some- difficult situation." a Milan politi 
er to a board meeting to make a one in his status that sounds like a ejan commented. "He works ver 


record of it, presumably to use in butler's salary." said Jonathan A. 
his continuing fight for influence in Lindsey, who worked on the case 


the company, or perhaps in law- when he was an assistant U.S. at- 
suits. This was said to anger Aide, tomey in New York. 


Accounts vary, but Aldo Gucd The IRS case had a peculiar side 


was dearly unhappy to see the re- effect, setting off a series of suits 


corder on the table. 


against Citibank and the Chase 


This prompted a damage suit bank over whether they should 
(hat was settled in June, according hand over Gucd company records 


to Stuart Speiser, a lawyer lor to tne prosecutors. At uie same 
Paolo. In inis agreement, Aldo time that a U.S. court was holding 


a lawyer for to the prosecutors. At the same 


Gucd was reported to have agreed the banks in contempt for not 
to pay S 200.000 in damages to his handing over the records, Mr. 


IMF to Loan $ 850 Million to Chile 


image, a strategy and 3 litany that 
serves him as a comfort in difficult 


serves him as a comfort in difficult 
times. His insistent evocation of the 
Gucd name underscores his inten- 
tion to preserve its uniqueness — 
even if he must fight not only coun- 
terfeiters, but also his cousin Paolo. 

Paolo Gucd or his company 
have brought at least six lawsuits 
against his relatives or the main 
company. Similarly, the Gucd 
company has taken Paolo and his 
company to court to prevent him 
bringing out products under his 
own name. 

Dissension began when Paolo 


WASHINGTON — The International Monetary Fund said Friday 
that it is providing Chile with an 5850-million loan to be drawn over 
the next three years. 

About $775 million will be provided to assist the Chilean govern- 
ment's economic reform program, the fund said 

The balance will be prodded under the Fund's Compensatory 
Financing Facility, which provides assistance to nations suffering 
from temporary shortfalls in export earnings. 

Chilean export earnings are off sharply because of lower volume 
and lower prices for copper, which accounts for about half of its 
exports. 

Declining exports have hampered Chile's ability to repay about S20 
billion in foreign debt. An economic reform program was initiated as 
pan of a debt restructuring pact with the IMF and commercial banks. 

Ail the compensatory financing facility funds and about 565 
million of the economic assistance money will be made available 
immediately, the IMF said 

The loan amounts are officially denominated in the fund's Special 
Drawing Rights currency and total 5820.6 million SDR. including 
$70.6 million SDR under the compensatory facility. 

The dollar values of the loans are estimates based on the current 
exchange rate of one SDR to 51.036. 


difficult situation." a Milan politi- 
cian commented "He works very 
hard and doesn't fool around" 
Born in Florence, Maurizio stud- 
ied “law with a lot of economics” at 
Catholic University in Milan, grad- 
uating in 1973. He worked seven 
years in the United States and is 
married with two children, aged 4 
and 9. 

Maurizio Gucci s office is an airy 
room overlooking the Via Momen- 
apoleone. Milan's most fashionable 
shopping street In one comer is 
model of Italia, the boat Maurizio. 
himself a sailor, is co-sponsoring 
for the America's Cup races. There 
is a good deal of leather, and the 
furniture is virtually all period, in 
Charles X style. 

Maurizio's description of the 
furniture matches the style he in- 
tends for Gucci. “Strong but not 
overpowering," he said. "Not 
show-offy. Softly elegant.” 

This blends with his understated 
personal approach. “I would like U) 
pass unknown in the company.” 
said the new president "I would 
like people to ask: ‘What did Maur- 
izio Gucci do? And answer: ‘Noth- 
ing. Gucci was alwavs like tint’ ” 



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Canadian Consumer Prices 


Reuters 

OTTAWA — Canada's consum- 
er price index rose 03 percent in 
July compared with a 0.6-percent 
increase in June and a 0.6-percent 
rise in July of last year. Statistics 
Canada said Friday. 



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AUTOS TAX FREE 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


EDUCATION 


M acro / rouse* 

New/und. hinwlule daSvwy. fa A VL 
Tet Germany (0) 6234-4092, lit 464986 


HOTELS 


SWITZERLAND 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


PENPALS 


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Be autiful, first don, ar-condhaned. 
nxedertrol fumijinj nimi iwpwk ana 


reedenhal funvshed rilin' iwpwk q 
stucSca. Fidfy equpped lotdien, 
daily maid service. 
WceUy aid monthly roles. 
Emcsfant location. 


THE MAGNIFICENT 
STELLA . 
SOLARIS 

7 AND 14 DAY CRUISES 

To the Greek March. Turkey, 
Egypt & hraeL 

Satmg Every Monday from Piraeus 

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MUtnUNGUALlAOY 57, seeks PM 
fab. Write to Box 2587. Herald Tri- 
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AMERICAN STUDENT EXCHANGE 
pr og ra m seels schools & orga nic - 
bens <*>ho wish to place studaoh in the 
USA far quoby summer homntayi & 
to reeove American st u dent* m ihe 
same way. Writ Mr. AnueAn 217 
27ih St, San Franoaoo, CA 94131 


A* in KewakC s 

16% N KavCo JID U I 
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16 946 KearNI JQ II II 

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23% ITU Kettfim J» U M 

I7ft I K*vPti JO 1.8 30 

a 4’.i KevCo a 

4% 2U KkftSewt 

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16*. in Knoll 15 


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11 % l|%— 4 
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3% 3to + to 
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2% ] 
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2*6 n + ft 
17*4 I7to— to 
15th in.— to 
2B« 29 + ft 


To ihe Greek islands & Turkey. SoSng 
■very Monday & Friday Cram Piraeus 


Please apply to vow Travel Agent or: 
SUN UNE 

2. Kar. Swvics St, Athens 10562 
Telex: 215621. Phone 3228883. 



Place Your Classified Ad Quickly and Easily 

Intis* 

INTERNATIONAL HBUUD TRIBUNE 


By Phone: Cal yaw local IHT representative with yaw tout. You 
wil be informed of the oast ■mmedicJety, and once prepayment is 
made your od will appear within 43 hows. 

Coft: The basic rate is S930 per line per day +■ local taxes. There me 
25 letsefs, signs and spaas m lhe first hne and 36 m the fallowing kites. 
Monmum space is 2 Does. No abbreviations accepted. 

Credit Cards: American Express. Diner s Oub. Eurocord, Master 
Gird, Access and Visa. 


lft LSB 
1 2to LaBarv 
IS* La Pat 
lit LndBan 
Ut* LMa* 
9 ; -= Loser 
9 Lauren 
51 to LearPP 
2. e LeePh 
17** Lemon* 
3*4 LetsurT 
S Lav HI 
TVs LOtFPh 
1% UteRjJ 
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Ito LO0BC 
27 -a LorlRV 
UTk Lomu 

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9to Lurlo 
10 Lvooi 
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a** Lvnenc 


6 

JO At 9 
40 XJ 13 
44 
33 

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.101 A 10 
7 

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46 2Xto 
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67 U 
42 T3«* 
740 IBS* 
1 W* 
664 lift 
3 M 


111 1ft— to 
3to 2ft 
41* 4 to— I* 
14V* 14V* 

ia u — to 

llto llto— to 
tv* t%* + to 
23V. 22%- to 
5% 5*1— to 
28 * - to 

sto sto 
m 7 to— to 
27W 2Tto + to 

1** m 

Jto Jto— to 
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w* »*— to 
15to 151k— to 
■M Uto 
M u%— to 
ijv* raw 
un iito— to 
a» on 


Paris: [For classified only]: 
747-4600. 


Bwenas Aires: 41 40 31 
(Dept. 312| 

Caraam: 33 14 54 



EUROPE 


Goayaqvfl: 51 45 05 
Lima: 417 852 
Panam a 690511 
Son Jom: 22-1055 
SantiaBoi 6961 555 
Soo Paulo: 852 1893 


Amsterdam: 26-36-15. 
Athens: 361-8397/360-2421. 
Brussels: 343-1899. 
Co p enhagen: (01} 329440. 
Fnadcftrrt: [069] 72-67-55. 
Lausanne: 29-58-94. 

Lisbon: 67-27-93/66-2544. 
London: (01] 8364802. 
Madrid: 455-2891/4553306. 
Mikes: (02) 7531445. 
Norway. (03) 845545, 
Romo: 679-3437. 

Sweden: |D8] 7569229. 

Tel Avhn 03455 559. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt 


MIDDLE EAST 


Bahrain-. 246303. 
Kawmeh 5614485. 
Lebanon: 341 457/8/9. 
Qatar: 4T6S35. 

SawS Arabia: 

Jeddids.- 667-T500. 
UAE^ Dubai 224161. 


Sto 

9*% f* «* 
7to As tto 
201* 
tto 
wto 
tto 
tto 
7Vt 7ta 

17** I7to 
7to Tto. 
tlMi 214*. 
Sto Sto- 
4to -fl*- 

* S S- 


EAJL EAST 


UNITED STATES 


New Yorta [212] 752-3890 
West Coast: (415) 362-8339. 


Bangkok 390-06-57. 
Hong Kona: 5-213671. 
Mania: 817 07 49. 
Seoul 735 87 73. 
Singapore: 222-2725. 
Ttewora 752 44 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 


SOUTH AFRICA 


Br yu ms t o n. 421599. 


M el bo ur n e : 6908233. 
Sydney 929 56 39, 957 43 20. 
Perdu 328 98 33. 

Poddesgton, Queensland: 
369 34 53. 





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220 im in* 

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ESCORTS & GUIDES | ESCORTS & GUIDES | ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS & GUIDES | ESCORTS & GUIDES 


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BELGRAVIA 


ZURICH-GENEVA 


TEL: 01/363 08 64 - 022/3441861 


Td: 736 5877. 


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AMSTERDAM NICOLE 

ESCORT SHVKX 020-954344 





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67 ChBtarn Streep 
londaa W1 

Tel: 486 3724 or 486 1158 

AH nsayar credit cards accepted 


Caroline Es cort Service 

Tab 01/2S2 61 74 


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ZURICH 


ALEXIS ESCORT SERVICE 
TBL 01-47 55 82 / 69 55 04 


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Tet 01 5B4 6573^49 (4-12 pn^ 


* LONDON * 


* USA A TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 


fiXEQJTIVE ESCORT 5BEV1CE 
01-229 2300 or 01-229 4794 


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* JASMINE * 


Escort Service. Tab 020-366655 



14to 14 
tto tto 
T7to 12 

im irwi 
1714 17 
21 2 Oto 

44to 431* 
S 4ft 
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ITto Wto 
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51* Sto 
IB% 1016 
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lOto tto 
IBto 12to 
27ft ITto 
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* LONDON * 

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Call free (ram Ui: 1-800-237-0892 HEATHROW / GATWJCK 

^ Morning « Midnight 834 7945 


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DAILY ESG08T SSIVItt 

M ou/» M le Heathrow. Amenean&prets. 352 C43 


Tab 022/32 34 18 
+ W ratEND + TRAVEL 


AMSTERDAM 182197 


LONDON - SUPBtSTARS ] BRUSSELS. CHANTAL ESCORT Ser- 
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Afl major Craft Card: Accepted 
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AH major crerfit conk accep t ed. 


MADRID INT'L 


* AMSTERDAM SHF * 

BCORT l CUBES. 020-227837 



FRANKFURT “TOP TEN” Eaort Ser- 
vice. 069/59-60-52. 


RANKRMT - ANGOA'S Exart Sv- 
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THc 2456548. CXEDTT CARDS 


AMSTERDAM BARBARA 

BCORT SStVKE. 020484344 



BMISSHS. ANTWERP NATASCHA 

6eort Service. Tot 02/731 7641 


AMSTBPAM . BERN ADETTE Escort 
Senece fflj 20329716 


AMS1BSAM JEANET Exact Serwee 
Tet (020) 336420 or 3401TQ. 


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a it lav* 

30 14 1346 

3 3ft 7ft 
79 TT** 17V* 

744 Sto 4V» 

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2 13 13 

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13 7ft 7ft 
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145 AUi « 

1 toft 24ft 
303 25ft 34ft 
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4 37ft 37ft 
» ZT* 22ft 
145 10ft I OH 
54 15ft 156* 
4 6ft Aft 
291 TO 1 *. 9ft 


tto + ft 
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14 + to 

2ft + ft 
ITto + '.* 
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13 4- ft 

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13to— ft 

J* 

28ft— ft 
7ft 

40to + ft 
26ft — ft 
ITto 

6ft + ft 
toft — ft 
24ft— 1 
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37ft + ft 
23ft— 1* 
10W— H 
Hto 

4to— ft 
10 —to 


1JU 11-0 
1-37 10.7 
1JS I1J 
1JS 1143 
IJS 1141 
TJ0 11J 
4 34 121 
4L1A 121. 
3-20 11^ 

237 11A 
132 113 
234 113 
163 11J 
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2J7 11J 
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139 113 
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450 113 
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36 llto 

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24 11 
35 34ft 
45 31ft 
73 to 

5 22ft 
41 20ft 
11 221* 
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8 IBto 
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19 tto 
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22% 23% + ft 
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18% 1B%— ft 
17ft 17%— ft 
It 19% 
in* 171* — to 
19% 1«*_ % 
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21 'm 21% + ft 
39ft 39ft— ft 
42 42 + % 

6B% 499* + to 
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7ft 7ft— U 
4ft 4ft 
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24% 24ft 
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0% B%— ft 
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12 IS* + ft 

7ft 7ft— ft 

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2 2 
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U 74 7ft yft r*- % 


AVBEX 



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Haneafrao 

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Nicninsin 
Turner Urdu 

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INTERNATIONA! 


jfcpUar Slips Again on U.S., Europe Markets 

•• T 'amnfW >m n f . » - . - • * 


tn-HA TT) TR IBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 17 - 18, 1985 

BUSINESS PEOPLE 



Page 13 







■‘i;!'.,. .1 

5 *-Si 

"z 

n-vL-as 

■pK* 

l y.'v* 


SSa » dealersco* 
imparts on the sIue- 

gSgKg. j* iSffi 

^ cmTen^^j 

-gwgm^narow range foNw 

^toS' na ‘“ dayoaE < m >- 

the dollar has 
Wen pressured all weft bv S 

V5 eCOT0 ^ c ^ indudE S 

dayswwsof a 2.4-poWdl^e 

EarhVto 


MotSB Lynch, He saidthartradhig 
JJ* ? ffectcd by the disappointing 
“^wng-slarts report, indicating 

“^T OCOOftmin omnitli • ■ 


- .-.-vuuv uunui. ... 

Mr. Mondschem also said that 
the dollar might find a little, more 
pressure, but added that be expects 
a rebound. • 


'J7Zi‘ — 


.^geaseatUpercenL 

,?fSqme^dtalers said that. further 
psp^. Of the dollar’s underiyine 
waSacsswa its failure tod<£^ 
.Hwntoy* largn- 

W<apected nse m the U5. n^- 
eyjaipply and the Bundesbank’s 
sWortion^ two key interest rates. 
a , rather q®« market with 
pressure on the 
dollar^ said Jeffrey Mondschem of 


Other dealers said that they ex-, 
pact the dollar to drop further, but 
now are waiting until early nod 
week for the next major move. 

The dollar finished in New York 
at 2.753 Deutsche, marks,.. down- 
from 2.759 on Thursday;. 8.425 
French francs, down from 8.435; 
2-256 Swiss francs,' down from 


2271; 3.1095 Dutdbi guilders, down 
236.75 Jap 


from 3.1136, and 
yea, unchanged. ... 

Traders in Europe said that.seri- 
timeni favored a further decline in 
the U.S. currency: but operators 
were unwffling to go into the week- 
end hoJding large short positions. 

The pound dosed in London at 
$1.3993, up from Thursday's 


SL3960. In Slew York, it* eased to 
SL4015 from $1.4020. 

The pound was unaffected by 
news of a drop in the British retail 
sales index to an annual rate of 6.9 
percent in July. It also showed little 
reaction to a hardening of North 
Sea cmdeofl prices and oQ product 
paces following reports of an Iraqi 
attack cm Iran’s main oil depot on' 
Kbarg T«i»nd in the Gulf. 

“Stadias is showing little sensi- 
tiviiy to ofl news at the moment,” 
one dealer said Friday. 

Other late dollar rales in Europe, 
compared with Thursday's lata 
rate, 2J635 Swiss francs, down 
from 22755; 56.0725 Belgian 
. francs, ■ down from 563400, and 


Turkish Growth 


Expected to Slow 


3;1145 Dutcfo guflders, ^^^from 


3.1090. It was fixed at 8.42 . 
francs in Paris, where banks were 
closed Thursday for a hdiday. 

Eariier in Tokyo, the dollar end- 
ed at. 23T.00- yen, down from 
237.-6J5. 

(UFI. Reuters, IHT, AP) 


^ r:?0 


7 K euromarkets 


' Reams 
■ ANKARA — Turkey’s eco- 
nomic growth rate is expected 
to decline this year and fall well 
short of government targets, the 
State Statistics Institute said 
Friday. 

Gross national product at 
1968 prices is expected to grow 
by 3.9 percent, down from 53 
percent in 1984, SSI said. Gross 
domestic product should grow 
by 3.8 percent, down from 52 
percent GNP measures the to- 
tal vahm of a nation's goods and 

services, indnding income from 
Foreign investments. GDP is the 
yim«i measure, g rindin g' in- 
come Iran foreign investments. 

The figures compare with a 
government target for GNP 
growth, of 5.5 percent and-for 
GDP of 5.1 percent. Industrial 
-output ' was expected to rise, by 
4.5 percent,, down from 8.8 per- 
cent last year, and agricultural 
output by 2.6 percent compared 
with 3.7 percent, SSF said 


U.S. Political Consulting 
Becomes Big Business 


By Adam Gymer 

Sew York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Political con- 
sulting in the United States used to 
be as seasonal as Christmas trees. 


Political consultants arc plan- 


ning their businesses, paying more 
idlooku 







turn 


Policy Shifts 
For Farming 


tember and Election Day in No- 
vember, pollsters, television com- 
mercial producers and political 
advisers spent 100-hour weeks try- 
ing to get their candidate-clients 
into office. Then they faded from 
sight until the next election. 

The industry has always refused 
to respond to inquiries about how 
nwinh money it makes, but one 
thing was chan Cash flow prob- 
lems abounded. As Joseph Cerrdl, 
president of the American Associa- 
tion of Political Consultants, put it: 
“What guys were doing was trying 
to "M»he a million in the election, 
and sitting bade and trying not to 
spend it all before the next elec- 
tron.” 

Bm the monetary peaks and val- 
leys have recently smoothed out. 
Campaigns last longer and produce 
more revenue. Political consultants 
have diversified. 


attention to profits ana looking for 
new clients. 

This can be sensitive: Candi- 
dates can be allergic to their advis- 
ers* joining forces with what an 
opponent could call a special inter- 
est This is particularly true among 
Democrats, said Dotty Lynch, a 
Democratic poll taker, who said, 
“Some Democrats tend to be anti- 
busmess.** 

Bui business clients, the consul- 
tants say, are delighted to hire ad- 
visers with political connections. 

Bl ade, Manafort Stone & Kel- 
ley, run by Charles Blade Jr- a 
leading Republican sera legist in Al- 
exandria, Virginia did just that for 
Tosco Itul, which sought a loan 



DirekxGets 


Top Finance 
PostatSGB 


By Brenda Erdmann 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Gfat&rale de Ban- 
qoe SA of Brussels has appointed , 
Andrfc Dirckx finance director, suc- 
ceeding Georges Ugcux, who has 
joined Morgan Stanley Interna- , 

>i nn al ux London. 

Mr. Dirckx turns over his duties 
as head of the bank’s Antwerp of- 
fice to Walter Corhiy. 

Esson Australia Lid. has named . 


Robert Sqiner 


David McEvoy general manager, 
exploration. Mr. 


miUion-dollar industry." sail 
Cerrdl, who did say that bis 


i." said Mr. 


itee for synthetic fuels pro- 

iucuon. Black Manafc 


r.By Christopher Pizzey 

' Reuters 


-J ^LONDON — The withdrawal 
- IR-ithe first stripped-bonds issue 
based: on British government debt 
‘5 was' the Eurobond market’s center. 
' oT attention Friday, but dealers 
; said the move was no surprise after 
its'indifferem reception. 

The £309 .2 5- mil lion issue, 
Munched! last week by lead manag- 
er^ Qnadrex Securities LtcL, was 
”T.‘; known 7 as “sterling transf enable 




1998,' had already been sold in the’ 
market - 

A sterling-straight trader at % 
British merchant bank commented, 
“I can’t say- that rm. surprised that 
h’s been pulled- We saw hardly.auy 
client interest in: it” Other traders 


agreed, one saying that the issue 
aiittle 


“was perhaps aiittle loo innovative 
for our market to take." 


The week’snew issue activity 
drib- 


or 


STAG! 


-Otherwise, the marital ended a 
quiet day slightly firmer, with 
prices given a boost during the af- 
ternoon by gains on U.SL credit 
markets, dealere said. 

An official at the co-lead manag- 
er for the issue. Charterhouse Ja- 
phet PLC, said it had failed to 


attract enough interest among po- 
added that 


jgmtial managers. He added 


he supplies of the government 
bond baaing the issue, the Trea- 
sury 1516-percent bond due in 


was featured by a rush of yen/ 
lar - dual-currency issues coupled 
with some activity among perpetu- 
al ftoalers, dealers said. 

Nflcko Securities Ltd. -said it 
would launch on Friday night a 25- 
bHhon-yen bond, redeemable for 
51 1 5.96 nnUum for an effective ex- 
change rate of 215.6 yen to the 
ddDar. Unlike the previous issues 
this week, which paid 8 percent 

over l&years. this bond win pay 7% 
percent over 5 years. 

; The total amount of yen/douar 
issues launcbed - during the week 
was 19ft bfflion yen, and dealers 
sudinorebemds erf this type appear 
to be hr the offing. - 


: Midland Bank PLCs $500-m3- - 
lion primary capital perpetual 
iloatiag-ratc note ended slightly 
lower on the when-issued market 
Friday at a of about 425 

basis points. However, this is still 
within the total fees of 65 basis 
points. 

One new floater was launched. 
Friday, a $125-million issue for 
‘ Quysler F inancial Corp. with an 
initial tranche of $75 million. The 
7-year note pays % point over the 
six-month London interbank of- 
fered rate. The lead manager was 
Morgan Guaranty Ltd. 

It ended within the 140 basis 
paint total fees at a discount of 
about 1125 basis points. . 

Dealers said that initial reactions 
to the Quysler issue were mixed. 
They noted that borrowers in the 
floating-ram-note sector tend to be 
hanks, countries or supranationals. 
However, some felt that the high 
coupon mi the note and the hefty 
fees could weD attract some interest 
from investors. 


V • (ContiiioedfriwiPiage?) 
countries, where population 
growth is rapid and people are of- 
ten low on the food ladder, B criti- 
cal to growth in U.S. agricultural 
export sales. 

Developing countries present the 
United States with an unusual op- 
portunity. By providing increased 
food aid and long-term develop- 
ment assistance, the United States 
can help these countries improve 
their national well-being and politi- 
cal stability. At the same time, im- 
provements in income in those 
countries will mean stronger de- 
mand for VS. exports, especially 
farm exports. Helping those coun- 
tries achieve faster economic 
growth and better income distribu- 
tion may be the only realistic way 
of matching growth in wodd food 
demand to prospective increases in 
United States agricultural output 

This column was written by Mar- 
vin Duncan and Mark Drabenstott, 
economists at the Federal Reserve 
Bank of Kansas City, Missouri. 


The old stereotypes bold that 
>lkans nave 


only Republicans have a strong 
business sense, but as Ann F. Lew- 
is, former political director of the 
D emocr atic National Committee, 
put it: “It is no longer true that a 

Democratic consultant *with a keen 
business sense’ is one who just 
knows enough not to let the cam- 
paign barrow his American Ex- 
press card.” 

The list of extracurricular activi- 
ties is lnng , Mr. Cerrdl has moved 
his Los Angeles company toward 
old-fashioned public relations. Pat- 
rick Caddefl, who helped promote 
Jimmy Carter, has dime market re- 
search for another Georgia institu- 
tion: the Coca-Cola Co. (he helped 
research the market viability of 
new Coke). David Garth, who 
counts Mayor Edward L Koch in 
New York and Mayor Tom Brad- 
ley in Los Angeles on bis client 
roster, has worked on advertising 
campaigns for the Dime Savings 
Rank and Avis. And Robert Sqirier, 
who worked for Hubert H. Hum- 
phrey in 1968, now makes public 
television films. 


fo rt offered it 

tips on who to see in which depart- 
ment and what ltind of arguments 
to make to members of Congress. 

Political experience, particularly 
knowledge of polling techniques, 
can be helpful in corporate market- 
ing. Mr. Garth argues that prevail- 
ing market research techniques of- 
ten are more expensive and less 
informative than political surveys. 
When he was hired by Avis to help 
devise a marketing strategy for fre- 
quent renters, be worked with Penn 
& Sch o ol, the poll takers he most 
often uses politically, to organize 
surveys of car renters, using the 
results to guide an advertising 
agency in devising a national cam- 
paign- 

The consultants are secretive 
about finances, although they 
sometimes confirm a particular fee. 
Mr. Garth, for example, said that 
his company, The Garth Group, 
receives 525,000 a month from Mr. 
Koch’s re-election campaign, for 
which he and his staff handle ev- 
erything from filers to television 
ads. They also get a 15 percent 
commission on aU the ads placed, 
which can ran into hundreds of 
thousands of dollars. 

But Mr. Garth's candor on fi- 
nances is the exception. There is 
virtually do information available 
about fees from nonpolitical busi- 
ness. “I just tell people it's a multi- 


pany, Cerrdl Associates Inxx, had 
net fee income of $13 million in 
1984. 

Larry Saba to, a University of 
Vir ginia professor, . estimated the 
industry’s national revenues for 
election work at between $28 mil- 
tion and $42 milhon for 1984. A 
senior Republican operative sug- 
gested that a hard-working consul- 
tant could expect to net $100,000 a 
year, and perhaps another $50,000 
in commissions for ads. 

Political consulting has corne a 
long way since its inception in 
1933, when proponents of a flood 


control and irrigation project in 


California hired" Clem Whitaker 
and Leone Smith Baxter to defend 
the project against the attacks of 
Pacific Gas and Electric. Appar- 
ently, they succeeded: California 
voters approved the scheme. 

California, with its wdl- financed 
referendum campaigns, proved an 
excellent breeding ground for the 
industry. Whitaker & Baxter, as the 
company the two formed was 
rattwl . were followed by Spencer- 
Roberts, whose Stuart Spencer is 
still active for Republicans today. 

The business started to flourish 
in the 1960s, with the spread of 
television commercials, polling and 
direct mail, techniques that de- 
manded expertise beyond most 
politicians’. Today consultants 
pitch themselves as specialists, of- 
ten referring candidates to others 
for different services (sometimes, 
insiders say, for a kickback). 


McEvoy returns 

to Sydney after six years in the 
United States with Esso Explora- 
tion and Exxon Corp„ the parent 
company of Exxon. He succeeds 
Bruce McKay, who was transferred 
io Houston to be operations man- 
ager for the division of Exxon that 
is responsible for the Atlantic and 
Gulf of Mexico. 

LP. Sharp Associates LttL, ^soft- 
ware consultancy sp eci a liz i n g in in- 
ternational business-communica- 
tions systems, has opened a office 
in Amsterdam headed by Ruud van 
der Linden. . , _ . , 

Barclays Bank PLC said David 
Acland has been appointed nonex- 
ecutive chairman-designate of the 
investment management arm of 
Barclays de Zoete Wedd. which 
will incorporate the investment 
management business of de Zoete 
& Bevan and Barclays Investment 
Management Ltd. Alan Foster, a 
partner in de Zoete, has been 
named executive deputy chair m an- 
designate and David Moss, manag- 
ing director of BIML, has been 
appointed executive vice chairman- 
designate. During the interim perh 
od, Mr. Acland will succeed Rohm 
Hoyer Millar as chairman of 


pointed Andrew Buchan a local i _ 
rector for the bank in Scotland. He 
comes to Barclays from Royal 
Rank Of Scotland, where he was 
general manager, central region. 

Empean Brazilian Baric Ltd., a 
London-based consortium, has ap- 
pointed Fernando Baptista Mar- 
tins its representative in Brazil 
Based in Rio de Janeiro, he suc- 
ceeds Marco Aurclio Machado da 
Siva, who retired. 



Plants have fed the world 
and cured its ills since life began. 


Now we’re destroying their principal habitat 


at the rate of 50 acres every minute. 


W e live on this planet by courtesy 
of the earth’s green coven Hants 
protect fragile soils from erosion, 
regulate the atmosphere, m a inta i n 
water supplies for agriculture and 
prevent formation of deserts. Without 
plants man could not survive. 





■ > ••K'K, • - 


an 
become 


our own 

alarming rate that it has 

a crisis - a crisis for ourselves and an 

even bigger one for our children. 

Thefigures alone should teD the story 
— we destroy a tropical rain forest three 
hrias the size of Switzerland every year, 
os wars only fragments of the 
f Indo nesian forests 




Photo; Mark. J. Pkrtkm 


What can be done about It? 

The problem seems so vast that there is 

a tendency to shrug and say “What can 

I do?" But there is an answer There is 
something that each and every one of 
us can do. 

The WWF Plant 
Conservation Programme 
The World Conservation Strategy, 
published in 1980, is a programme for 
conserving the world’s natural resources 
whilst managing them for human 
needs. A practical, international plant 
le has been ; 



sroseus. , , 

children who have stffind from leukaemia are 
now alhoe due to the properties discovered m 

tiwrosvperiaxnMe,uM(horiginatedin 


already destroyed. 


Who is the villain? 


There is no villain - except ignorance 
jss. The desperately 


Photo: ConrtMy of Riefawd Evans Sdhohe. 


pTirl short-sightedness. 1 _ 

poor people who live in the forests have 
to clear areas for crops and fuel, but 
they are doing this in such a way that 
they are destroying their very livelihood. 

Add to this the way in which the 
heart is beine ripped out of the forests 
to meet the demand for tropical 

timbers and we have a recipe for 

disaster. 



Botanical Museum at riamara 

spent 13 yean indie Amazon ntnffeamamg 

die 'magic’ fiords of myth and legend and' 


and science. "The drup of the future, he says, 
grow trit 


What we are destroying 

Much of the food, medicines and 

materials we use every day of ourhvw 

is derived from the wild species which 

rjowm the tropics. Yet only a tmy 

foction of the world’s flowering plants 
have been studied for poso Ue use. 
Horrifyingly, some 25,000 of all 
jflowemigspedes are on the verge of 
extinction. 

Once the plants go, they are gone 
forever: Once the forests go only 
wastel ands remain. 



The Vavilov Centres. Named after die Russian 
scientist who identified them. These an the 
regions in which our major crop plants were 
fast domesticated. Many of these regions 
contain wild or semi-domesticated relatives of 
commercial species which cart be cross-bred with 
crop plants to increaseyidd and resistance to 
pests and diseases. 


Ton can become part of it 
The WWF Plant Conservation 
Programme is a plan for survival which 


Programme is a plan for survival wl 
you ran help make a reality. Join the 
World WflffiifeFund now. We need 


Photo. WWf/H, Junghis 
enss- 


------ 7 

domestic varieties, ensure that baam will 


never t 


Save the plants 
!%x thatsaveus. 


wiped out its entire crop, leaving a mdHm 
people to die of starvation. 


& 


?e3 


your voice and your financial support. 

Get in touch with your local WWF 
office for membership details, or send 
your contribution direct to the World 
Wildlife Fund at WWF International, 
Membership Secretary, Wodd Conser- 
vation Centre, 1196 Gland, Switzerland. 


WWF FOR WORLD CONSERVATION 


Photo (FomtlBortCotemaii^dM Co«i» 


rat to 


if we 
prob- 
miri- 
ys are 


have 
were 
a" in 
“an- 
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oad. 
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Kttie- 


ragua 
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o the 
lions, 
those 
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"ndin- 
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reach- 
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i has 
entral 
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offer 


va- 


Js 
imid- 
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.t was 
lathe 
Marti 
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take 
laltor 
dor an 
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h the 
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their 
fonia- 


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aica," 
y be- 
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t con- 
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jaraie 
is but 
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has 
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is im- 
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— Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATORDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 17-18, 1985 




USA 


* I 


> 

EVE 


ACROSS 

I Inst- at 

Annapolis 
5 Kipling’s Kim 
18“ — —in 
Calico,'' 1948 

14 Quiche 

irgraftent 

19 Glut 

20 Author Paul de 


ACROSS 


ACROSS 


41 Range hie] 

44 Chiide 

Hassam’s 

“Summer 


21 Throwaway at 
Trevi 

22 Site of a main 
campus hi 
Maine 

23501 

28 More recent 

27“ Way,” 

Cahn-Van 

HeusenhJt 

28 Atop, 
poetically 


29 CARE concern 
31 Kind of rap 
321001 

38 Jokers, in two 
senses 

37W.W. Uorg. 

38 What Ben 
Adhemdid 

39 Perhaps 


45 Halberd 
follower 

48 Adman, in a 
way 

4954 

59 “Any port 
in ” 

58 Mescal 

57 Choice 

59 Certain trailer 
trfcs. _ 

60 Comfort 

61 Heart 

82 Lamb who had 
a Mary 

641 

72 Shade of blue 
or gray 

73 Seaver, twice 

74 Gave a 
piercing look 

76 "Di risible" 
director: 1931 

81 Italian spirits 

83 Rouse 

84 Product of 
Zeus’s head 


86 200 or 1050 

96 Wolfs activity 

91 Claire. 

Wls. 

92 Avocat’s forte 

93 Rocker 
contemporary 

94 Eavesdroppers 

97 Columns 

191 Doubly: Prefix 
183 Russian high 
spots 

104 11 

198 G.I. Jane 
109Spaceagcy. 

110 Caviar 

111 Word of honor 

112 Sacro adherent 
114 600 

119 Sylvan 


When in Rome bycharlesmdeber 


120 Geraint's wife 

121 Digital 
computer 

122 Wine valley 

123 Less irrational 

124 Phrontisteries 

125 Missouri 
campus town 

128 “Gang aft a- 

Bums 


DOWN 


DOWN 


1“. .. life’s but 
Shak- 

2 Signor Ponti 

3 Inclined 

4 Like pots gone 
to pot 

5 Actor Dennis: 
1908-1968 

6 Kin of mins. 

7 Out, in 
Innsbruck 

8 Lermaor 
Pflnnco 

9 Have the 


19 Winglike 

11 Hodges of 
baseball fame 

12 Punta , 

Chilean port 

13 Light beams 
141000 


15 “You 

what you eat” 

161009 

17 Ahead, 
narrowly 

18 Bellini opera 

24 British 
cleaning 
woman 

25 Like Willie 

, winkle 

30 Soprano 
Groberova 

33 Scottish goblet 

34 Aussie bird 

35 Genuine 

38 Most banal 

39 Cork fuel 

49 What a theorbo 
was 

41 Interruptions 

42 Within an 

(very dose) 


DOWN 

43 Pointed tools 

45 Off the cuff 

47“ tu," 

Verdi aria 

48 Realtor's abbr. 

56 Jungle noise 

51 And so on and 
and so forth 

52 ”. . . but now 

mine eye 

thee”: Job 42:5 

53 “Gigi” 
playwright 

54 me 

tang ere 

58 Writer Anais 

61 Certain pitchers 

63 B. Agr. 
aspirant 

65 Yugoslav 
island 

66 Hebrew scribe 

67 Skinflint? 


FIELD OF BLOOD 

By Gerald Seymour. 352 pages. $14.95. 

W. W. Norton & Co. Inc, 500 Fifth Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. 10110. 


Reviewed by Herbert Mirgang 

r p HE strongest international suspense stories are 
JL diminished when they are cubbyfaoled in book- 
stores or in book reviews simply as mysteries or 
thrillers. Even the modem master of the genre, 
Graham Greene, labeled seven of his books — 
including “The Third Man” and “Our Man in 
Havana* — as “entertainments,” as if to tell the 
reader that these titles did not cany the full weight 
of his seriousness. Of course, they aid; a fine writer 
cannot help doing his best, even when his subjects 
are designed to entertain. In recent years, Greene 
recognized this — now he lists his “entertainments,” 
along with such books as “The Power and the 
Glory” and “The Comedians,” simply as novels. 

In the field of the suspense novel the three British 
masters — Greene. Eric Ambler and John le Carre 
— have been joined in Lhe last decade by Gerald 
Seymour. “Field of Blood," his eighth novel is as 
good as ins first and best-known one, “Harry's 
Game.” It says something about Seymour's pre- 
science that what he wrote about 10 years ago still 
rings true, fictionally, in his latest book. In both, the 
scene is Belfast; once again, the heroes and villains 
are almost indistinguishable. There is no Yeatsian 
"terrible beauty” in this noveL “Field of Blood" 


DENNIS THE MENACE 




•8 Ginglymus 
attachment 
69 Tree resins 
79 Suffix with 
planet 

71 Kind of rocket 

75 Legal paper 

76 Fiacre 

77 One time 

781500 

79 Curb 
861100 


BOOKS 


offers only the terrible reality faced by the Protes- 
tant and Catholic militants in Ulster: unending 
urban guerrilla warfare. 

This is a territory that Seymour has carved ou t for 
himself in such previous novels as “The Glory 
Boys,” “Kingfisher" and “The Contract." He writes 
about terrorists, hijackings, assassinations and po- 
litical dreamers in the Middle East, Italy. England 
and Northern Ireland. These are regions he has 
covered as a former British television correspon- 
dent, but Seymour is not just rewriting old assign- 
ments. He has broken out of the journalistic stric- 
tures and created situations and characters from the 
inside out. His emotional landscapes are painted in 
hard-edged human colors. 

In addition to urban warfare. Seymour's knowl- 
edge of weapons, police and secret service organiza- 
tions lends authenticity. In “Fidd of Blood,” hid- 
den weapons are pan of the story. A character in the 
novel reflects; “Weapons were Belfast." 

Seymour’s novels usually build toward a cinemat- 
ic climax. Sometimes they seem a bit too cinematic; 
in his last novel, “In Honor Bound." a British agent 
armed with a ground-to-air missile launcher took on 
a Soviet MiG helicopter in the Hindu Kush or 
Afghanistan, followed by a “walkdown" between 
friend and foe that had a “High Noon” air about iL 
In the new' novel, there is a much more believable 
dimax because, in Belfast, nobody emerges as ric- 


burden of the long troubles. The prisoner thinks to 

~ jin " 


Solution to Last Week's Puzzle 



himself: “But a man who had blinded a Brit and 
taken out a constable could hardlv cuff his son on 
the ear if the kid wanted to follow his father into the 
Organization.” So tenor and death are passed on 
from one generation to the next. 

There is a wonderful scene that evokes Prime 
Minister Margaret Thatcher without mentioning 
her name or even saying that the leader is a woman: 
“The prime minister came at Christmas to be photo- 
graphed with the troops, particularly enjoyed bong 
photographed while wearing a Marine beret or a 
flak jacket.” When necessary. Seymour can be sub- 
tle. 

In “Field of Blood.” he proves — as Greene did 
on another battlefield half a world away in his 
Vietnam noveL “The Quiet American" — that the 
international suspense story can convey the har- 
shest truths about a country's crises through fiction- 
al characters who become all too real. 


Herbert Miigang is on the staff of The New York 
Times. 


London Ballet Plans Soviet Tour 


Return 

MOSCOW — The London Festival Ballet will 
jive 22 performances in Moscow, Leningrad and 
/ilnius, capital of Lithuania, for three weeks next 
May in the first tour of the Soviet Union by a British 
ballet company since 1961, the British Embassy 
here has announced. The engagement is part of a 
two-year agreement between & British Council 
and the Soviet state concert agency. 


CIm Pm. 


Wtrld Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse Aug. 16 

dosing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


‘ I LIKE YOUR REGULAR OU) FACE SETTER.: 


dm Pro. 


ABN 

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Veba aw an 234 I B OC G roup 

Votkavroaenwerk 317 32050 I Jr""*. , ^ 

WWto SOB <15 I ^T alar ,n * x ‘ 


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278 277 


WEATHER 




EUROPE 


LOW 
C P 


A mste rdam 

Athens 

Barcelona 


Berlin 

Brussels 


Budapest 

Cop e n h ag en 

Costa Del Sal 

DutlUfl 

Ed tabu reft 

Rb ran ee 

Frankfurt 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

IstaUMl 

Las Palmas 

Lisbon 

London 


Milan 


CoS 

;aV 

loo 


Munich 

Nice 

Oslo 

Parts 

Prague 

Reyktmrik 

Rome 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 

Whnaw 

Zurich 


HIGH 

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26 79 18 M 
IS M 12 54 
32 *0 25 77 

27 81 20 <8 
32 90 17 <3 
20 <8 16 <1 
22 72 II 52 

30 B< 15 59 

31 88 2D £8 

19 66 15 59 
29 84 19 M 
17 63 11 52 
14 57 11 52 
34 93 20 68 

21 70 17 63 

26 70 16 61 

22 72 15 59 

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24 7j 16 .61 Fr 

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31 80 U 55 
31 88 21 70 

24 75 15 59 

27 81 14 57 

29 84 23 73 

19 66 » SO 

22 72 W 57 

26 79 16 61 

12 54 9 48 

30 86 ZT 70 

16 <1 12 54 

26 79 15 59 

31 88 21 70 

29 84 19 66 

31 88 17 63 

22 72 14 57 


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fr 

fr 

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Bangkok 

33 

*0 

26 

79 

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BeiltaB 

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84 

Z 

72 

0 

Hong Kong 

71 

IB 

25 

77 

sh 

Maeda 


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— 

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New Deffil 

32 

W 

34 

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CJ 

Seoul 

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84 

34 

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Shoi^ial 

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88 

26 

79 

fr 

Steanpwe 

31 

HI 

24 

75 

a 

tb««; 

14 

93 

28 

82 

d 

Tokyo 

32 

90 

24 

79 

tr 

AFRICA 

Algten 

32 

VO 

19 


1 r 

Cairo 

33 

91 

23 

73 

Ir 

COpe Town 

111 

64 

5 

41 

fr 

CosolSianco 

34 

75 

31 

70 

d 

Harare 

24 

75 

10 

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fr 

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— 

_ 



Nairobi 

3* 

79 

10 

50 

Ir 

Tunis 

31 

88 

19 

66 

fr 




BueiMI Aires 

13 

54 

3 

37 

to 

Caracas 

21 

BZ 

19 

66 

r 

Lima 

— 

— 

— 

— 


Mexico aty 

23 

73 

14 

57 

DC 

Rle da Janeiro 

25 

77 

18 

64 

Ir 

NORTH AMERICA 



Anchorage 

15 

59 

9 

4A 

sh 

Attorns 

31 

88 

22 

72 


Boston 

30 

U 

23 

73 

d 

Chicago 

2B 

33 

14 

57 

PC 

Denver 

31 

18 

H 

S3 

fr 


AK_ 

Ahold 
AMEV 

ADom Rubber 
Amro Bonk 

BVG 

Buetirmann T 
Caiend HWa 
Elsevfer-NDU 

Fokker 

Gist Brocades 

Hetnelo sn 

Hoopovens 

KLM 

Naarden 

Not Nedder 

Nedlknrd 

Oce Vender G 

Pokhoed 

Philips 

Raheco 

Rada men 

Rolinco 

Rerento 

Royal Dutch 

Unilever 

VMOiftmtnn 

VMF Stark 

VNU 


510 520 , . 

250 247 jo Commenboiik lmi ex . 

96J0 96 I Previous : M2M0 

122 171.40 
2»J0 340J0 
275 273 

U 0 


BongKong 


ANP.CBS Genl index : ZMJ8 
Previous : 215.10 


flmnktel 


AEG-Teletunken 

Allianz vers 
Allana 
BASF 
Bovor 

Bov Hvpo Bank 

Bay Varelnsbank 

BBC _ 

BHF-Bafik 

BMW 

Commerzbank 
GontGumml 
Daimler-Benz 
Deoussa 


mn 

BfijO B7J0 5J 1 EasI A 310 
204 204 Cheung Kona 

105.90 10260 CfttaaUsStf 
tflo 3LM Green Island 
131 UOJO Harm Sen a Bank 

B3JD 7BJO Henderson 
21150 214 CtanoGos 

148 149AD Electric 
6UD MJO HK Realty A 
43 42 HK Hotels 

49.10 48J0 HK Land 

74 7530 HK Shang Bank 
17630 17430 »j< 

337 337 HK Yaumaltl 

47 JO 67J0 HK Wharf 

4530 Hutch Whampoa 
7430 7470 Hvsan 

132JB 13240 InnClly 
«* Mjo Jurat nr 
Af yi i t m Jardlne Sec 
137.40 U&40 Motor 

tw sn m Miramar Hotel 
SS_gg 28.90 Ne r l world 
24530 242 Offg "IOy»r yeos 

31530 21630 SHKPnxH 
5 reiux 

Swire Pod He A 
Tol Cheung 
WdhKwong 
WtMMock A 
Wins On Co 

,131 13170 1 vwrtdinri 

1375 13921 

3S 356 MHO Seng Index : 170837 
222 22350 1 PTOtowS : 148455 
22130 22260 


BP 
Brit Home Si 
Brtt Telecom 

Brit 1 

Brlloll- 
BTH 
Buriradi 


197 

315 

543 


200 


Generau 
I FI 

Itakamontl 

itatoos 

italmobMori 

Mediobanca 

ManhsdSsors 

OTvtm 

Plrefn 

RA5 

Rtnasceflle 

SIP 

SME 

Snia 

Standa 

Star 


Close Pr^v, 

223 
360 N.Q. 
173 ‘ 

IIS 
NO- 


173 


187 


420 


5*050 54210 Ericsson 
9471 9525 Esstftn 

4MM4«0 SSSet, 

1^ Ptrarmada 

Soob-Scanla 
sandvft 
2009 2006 Skanska 

Si? SK 5KF 

soa 3010 SwaflshMardi 
96850 9SBD Volvo 
060 850 

2474 2450 Altaeroanrldan Index : 3M3S 
SJ ^ Prolout : 17X48 

Min 16000 

3T9S 3190 


N-Q- 410 
*9 NjO. 
225 226 

188 li” 
235 234 


348 


^ I Ml*. Currant Index : 1548 
| Proteus : 1535 

3SS 
205 


Sydney 


363 369 
390 400 
236 237 JO 


Job 


MIDDLE EAST 


Ankara 
Beirut 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
Tel Aviv 

OCEANIA 

Auckland 
Svdoey 


30 86 18 6* 

31 88 27 61 

40 104 20 68 

31 88 20 68 

31 U 24 75 


11 52 3 37 
20 68 13 55 


Detroit 
HOnolota 
HenthM 
Los Angelos 
Miami 
Minneapolis 
Montreal 
Nassau 
New York 
San Francisco 
Seattle 
Teroatn 
Washington 


25 77 16 61 pc 

32 90 23 73 fr 

34 93 23 73 pc 

26 79 IB 64 PC 

33 91 25 77 PC 

25 77 14 57 Cl 

31 88 21 70 d 

33 9T 25 77 tr 

30 86 24 75 pc 

19 66 14 57 pc 

27 81 10 50 fr 

31 88 20 68 r 

32 90 20 68 Cl 


ssf^ mMd 

^ Blyvoor 

Deutsche Babcock 157 158OT BeBrars 

Deutsche toik BU a £fSln 

e kinds 

sJS GFSA 

Harmony 

t 7 ? £2 HMMSteel 

<14 219 KlOOf 

Nedtxmk 

5JS Pres Steyn 
3H3395& rms lot 
2S 2! SABTOw 

341 23ul |*ffi ,ena 

vubbuo 5^HokVno 

Z if ZBD 


2280 2280 Coble Wireless 
SREfl 18J0 Cadbury schw 
16 16 Charter Cons 

B8S 9 Commercial U 
46JD 46 Cons Gold 
2J75 1375 Court aukti 
10.90 ia90 Dahwtv 
BAS 135 Do Beers « 

12.70 12.50 Dlstlllera 
38 37J5 Drtefanletn 
6M 660 Ftaons 
735 760 Fro5t God 
935 960 GEC 
3-75 365 GenAeddent 

735 730 GKN 

2860 2060 dOXO E 
OM 065 Grand Met 

1 198 GRE 

1140 1140 Guinness 
15_50 15M GUS 
9.10 965 Hans o n 

45 <2 Hawker 

760 730 ICI 

2 2 imperial Group 

U.7U 1130 Januar 

23D 235 Land Securities 
26 2530 Legal General 

2.15 ZI73 Llovds Bank 

1 168 Lmrtto 

SUSP. — Lucas 
165 166 Marks and Sn 

5.15 5.10 Metal Bax 

2375 240 Midland Bank 

Nat west Bank 

PandO 
Pllklnaton 

Pies«vy 
, , Prudential 
gf 1 1 Racai Elect 


2? AlrUauWe 

A Whom All. 

Uo Av Dassault 

3 er™ 

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352 351 

smk ji9vj 

in 192 

438 640 

me mb Europe 1 
Gen Eaux 


543 

U3 

178 

zn 

422 

127 

416 

493 


230 230 

1361/64 133/32 
315 315 


740 

271 

865 

287 

385 

454 

182 

Z74 

305 

719 

419 

154 
331 

155 


LnfarpeCop 

Leo random 

Lesteurd 

rOn-al i 

Martelll 
Matra | 
Mertta* 

FmT MJchothi 
52 J Moot Hal 
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jjj | Ocddentcdel 

I 155 M 

313 
157 


743 

271 

870 

304 

389 

457 

182 


BS*Y 


Rnndfcmetn 


Pernod Rlc 

Perrier 
Peugeot 
Prtrdemw 
Rotf iotechn 

. Redout* 

S ^'Udaf 

S5 Skis Rosstanol 
jrn Tclemcam 
tV* t Thomson CSP 
Total 


AC I 
ANZ 
BMP 
Bornl 

Bougainville 

581 580 £°*H*'nalne 

2*4.10 284 

11)0 1100 £*™°° 

427 427 LRA 

€ ™ 

630 

cig iwrer 
Uls wot A ust Bonk 
810 0W Carp 
iSim!* n Broken HUI 
740 745 £Sf!22" Tlrt- , 

421 422 ““Coal Trust 

^ ^ SSsNuhen 
mn 2120 WlBSfBfii MWno 
^^Baoktap 
22*0 2248 wWxBlde 

AP OrtBoories lodex :*5A3> 

1144 1125 

S ai l . - Tofcy 

721 ^1 AkOl_ 380 386 

<75 


US 2J8 
532 5.16 
732 7.12 

352 357 
M3 L91 
7J0 7.50 

4.11 4.10 

1 JU U 6 

590 59* 

11 * 020 
255 ZS9 

3.15 3.18 

2.15 ZT5 

230 225 

290 268 
3L38 340 
430 4JD 
666 690 

242 264 

440 430 

LTD 132 
560 564 

234 225 

435 426 
433 496 
U2 130 


392 

454 


Dresdner Bank 
GHH 
Harpener 
ttochtiet 

Hoechst 
Hoesat 
Horton 
Mussel 
IWKA 
Kafl-hSolz 
Karsladt 
Koutnnf 
KkMcUier H-D 


geo 790 Rank 
S?j 2750 Reed Inti 

17000 16750 Byrtyg ^ 

HOT 1065 foval Dutch t 
raw 1270 f»TZ . . 

7100 <950 SopW? 

1150 1140 Sakabury 
wan 4400 Sears Haidln o s 
S Shell 

3100 3075 §I5~ . 
asaj. 2500 Sid Chartered 
500 m Sun Alihmce 
7450 7250 Tat# end Lvle 
1350 1365 Tesco 
5050 5Q50 Than] EMI 
1725 1450 T-l- Croup 
725 7 ® Tratalgor Hse 

3000 3200 tHI= 

<05 M U I Ira mar 
6000 6000 Unilever c 

* United Biscuits 


|MMl*4n:igUl 


394 
654 
399 
278 
MB 
712 

156 160 

S7>tt S82W 
405 

714 714 

4ML I CAC hKSn 2ZULM 

490 
SO 
99 
675 
« 

454 
520 
445 
263 
356 
393 
370 
138 
200 
10 15/64 


AseN Chem 
SI SS Bridgestone 

^ ^ isS- 


W7 925 

■g «s 

793 795 

525 537 

958 958 

1300 15BS 
420 417 


iro imI 2^*221™* >« 


mm «ni Datum Haus* 

2 “° 2580 1 DWa Securities 


536 535 

2» 22660 


% 

338 
99 

4 2 I Com Storage 
« DBS 

459 1 Frastr Heavt 


Fanuc 
RtT Bank 
Full Photo 
Fujitsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Cable 
Honda 

Japan Air Lines 
KoUflia 
Kassai Power 


cJ -cloudy; lo- lossy; l r- fair; h-FwH; na-not available; o-overcast; 
pc-partiy cloudy; tvnrtn; sh-showen; sw-snow; st*starmv. 


Klaeckner Work# 6190 62801 Cemuoslte Stack index: M8SJHI Vickers 


SATURDAY’S FORECAST — CHANNEL: SHfihlly choppy. FRANKFURT: 
Fair. Temp. 28 — 15 183 — 591. LONDON; aoudv. Temp. 31 — 15 (70 — 59). 

MADRID; Foir. Temp. 30 — IS W — 29IJIEW YORK; aaudy. Temp. 30—31 

164 - 701. PARIS; Fair. Temp. T 


, -13 (79- 55). ROME: Fair. Temp. 31—20 

(88 — 68). ZURICH: Fair. Temp. 26— 14 (79 — 57). BANGKOK: Showers. Temp. 


33 - 25 (91 —77). HONG KONG: Showers. Temp. 30 —26 186— 79). MANILA: 
Cloudy.. Temp. 31 — 24 (88 — 75). SEOUL: Shawm. Tamp. 30—30 (86 — 61). 


SINGAPORE: Thunderstorms. Temp. 31—25 (88 — 77). TOKYO: Fa)r. Temp. 
33 — 37 (91 — 81). 


Ktupp stain 

Linde 

Lufthansa 

MAN 

Mannesman! 
Muecicn Rveck 
Nix don 
PKI 

Porsche 

P rrussca 

PWA 

RWE 

Rhein metail 

Sehertiw 

SEL 

Stamens 

Thyssen 


109 IBS previews : 108520 
495.50 477| 

222224J0 
164 1631 

189.20 189 


Wool worth 


176 

278 

463 


Loadoa 


1758 1730 AA COOS 

536 SC | Alltad-Lvans 

660 457 Anglo Am Gold 571 V. 
1282 12861 Ass BrH Foods 224 
27750 276] Ass Dairies 
1354A 137J0] Barclays 
US IBs) Bass 
312 314 BAT. 

Baechaai 
334 33S5M BICC 
53630 5431 BL 

130-90 12iS>J Blue Circle 


FX 30 Index : 974JQ 
Proteus ;9»JB 

. F.TAE.iob Index i 1299.18 

msv 3129b I Previous : 1 saxao 
230 237 


SO How POT 
iff indtcoDe, 
£6| Mol Banking 
» OCBC 
££ OUB 
OUE 

iS Shangri-la 
Sima Darby 
WW Staere Land 
w s^ere Press 
SSiecxraWp 
St Trading 
United “ 
UOB 


170 268 Kawasaki Steel 
456 5 KlrtaBrawarv 

US 540 Komofcw 
i!4 ZU Kubota 
22S 123 Kvocera 
530 5J0 Matsu EtaC lads 
8JQ5 8 Matsu Etec works 
261 259 MHtutoWd Bmk 

XT) 226 Mitsubishi Cftem 
158 N.O. 

1JD 1J3 


930 910 
7400 7SD0 
IS30 158® 
2020 2B3D 
907 9T8 

SS ^ 

322 570 
1438 1410 
6210 6250 
474 478 

1» I860 

WO JW 

3 s 

3770 3840 
1320 1320 
815 860 

1MO 1600 
481 485 


Close Fro. I 


Mitsubishi Elec 

Mitsubishi Heavy 

Mitsubishi Corp 

Mitsui and Co 
MUsukoiM 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK I Mutators 
NikkaSec 
Nippon Kogotur 
Nippon 0(1 
Nippon Steal 

Nippon Yusea 

Nissan 

HomuraSec 

Olympus 

Pioneer 

Ricoh 

Sharp 

StPmazu 

Stibietiu Chemical 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bank 
Su mi tomo Chem 

Sumitomo Marine 

Sumitomo Metal 

Tabs! carp 
TalstM Marine 

Tcfeejia Chem 

TDK 
TeUtn 

Taklo Marine 


399 
344 331 

421 NA 
434 420 

ST n tS 
S % 

799 776 

925 NA 
*« NjO, 

174 169 

299 296 


a a 


1230 1700 
MOO 991 
1BO MO 

>35 835 91305 Bonk N S 

ITS 830 294300 BanrlAo 
*51 4*0 0*00 

*95 686 13400 

3700 3650 M 
1820 183) 1 

247 241 

646 666 7 

153 151 36 

347 352 14927 BC Phone 

564 547 3B0OBransWk 

B31 MB 2000 Budd Con 
<200 4290 121 

4*0 471 

866 862 23 

Tokyo Elec Power 2100 20*0 7200 Gompeou 

T npuon Printing a» BID 4aosc Nor West 

Torov tod 509 520 

Toshiba 347 347 597 

Toyota IMS tin 1 

YonxricMSec 828 BZ7 

New Index : Ml Ml - «“■» 




Mia. 

Aiuroljae 
Autochon 
Bank Lea 
Brawn D avert 
CBwGetay 
Credit Smsse 
Ctactruwutl 


OS 3490 i 
tag BID 
5*25 mo 
3800 37*8 
WB 1475 
3300 3300 
3000 2990 


l7Tl*5 CDtatbX 

178*77 CObfbd 


Jacob Suchent 

JMmo a 


LundlsGyr 

.. — - . 1 _ . 

iwuiia, ^ . 


Nestle 
OerUkan-B 
Roche Baby 
Santa 
ScMadler 
Suteer 
SwvaBtanci 


SBC 474 __ 

Swiss Reinsurance 2085 380 

SwfesVaikehaafc 1740 1748 

Union Bank 4235 4258 

Winterthur 5160 5060 

Zurich Ins 2320 2298 


660 478 

2525 2460 
6600 <600 
26n 2650 
1*50 mo 
■ 5375 5360 
6090 mo 

1440 7430 

9400 MO 

vms m» 

4300 4275 
37S 3*2 

4250 4230 

*2** 16554 EaoHvSvr 

*2 25200 FCA Intf 


SBC IMIBX: «HM 




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223 222 
MO 555 
NJO. MS 

9LW 

Ml M8 
172. 174. 


Straits Timas bid fntf«c75827 
PrevWOt : 75X49 


144 

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579 

298 

333 

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35 

506 


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234 

144 

392 

574 

306 

333 

203 

34 


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■ STDOtnaaB 


, 1 Comm 
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‘ Beta 
Jrefl Hal 
Erkkinta 

. Farmllalla 
500 ( Flat 


234*0 22850 AGA 
3155 3158 AHOLOVOt 
9770 980 i Asm 
»» Astra 

108S4 1 03111 Allas Copco 
I3M 13071 Bonder 
3971 3991 EleetrakH 


114 TM 

2! SSt 

293 
NA 

108 


The Ii^ernationalHcraH Tribune. 
’ Bringing, the Wockf s Most 
In^xxtiiitfNews to Ac Workf s 
Most Inqxxtant Aaficncc. 


,, .,- 8 -- 




274 























-m „ •> 




ir« .’>> 
* 

y .* 


. Urs day Was an Extremely Rough Day for Trying to Finish a Race 

Volict 1 , firing fv#>rx BUters to Untimely Hall Powerboat’s Rescued (jew Reports Collision 

iff 

Mr flr- i iilflii?jrB imAmm 


■ „ ' — "uro unsMa 

BOULDER, Colorado — >j 0 

assssssWiE 


. '-.w *■ 


• r ■■ , ' -•’t 


* — -r ^ — ® “ 1 uuaii nnr; 

. . ..Rt^b©cau«a5tretchof gravri 

<road™ tramd to be unsafe, tbm 

3gf a tast-nannte crause dtangt 
.&fore tostort of themen’s^J 
;ra-io-Boulder Mountain Road 
.Rmc on Thursday roaming. 

. It turned out that that reduced 


2J***®? tinre, plus it put die condu- 
aon « the women’s Boulder Mall 
JJHenum closer than-enwcted to 

the time the men's race finished. 

Because of that, traffic cooes 
k«w not be set up in-time along 
Broadway so that riders could be 
directed downtown. Then the city 
pohee determined that the area 
could not be seemed — and they 
cut short the race. 

They set up a blockade two.and 
one-half miles (4 kflometers) nerth- • 
west of the planned finish line 
downtown. 


>ir ■‘■1 S*: 


Deask 




SPORTS BRIEFS 

Boston Marathon Has $250,000 Prase 

5250,000. JQcst contmuallynm marathon would bave a puree erf 

SUC ^5 S Yodc and Chicago, offer more than 

Sd whfle *°* ksser known cS as the Houston 

Jor die Record 

■ Joe WaftoB, coach of the National Football League’s New York Jets, 
^*£5™ a sates of one-year extensions of his contract (AP) 

« The Mian® Dolpfews traded their NFL rights toU5. Football League 
<star Anthony Carter to the Minnesota Vikings in-return, for linebacker 
;Robm-Sendkin and a second-round draft choice in' 1986. (AP) 


Hiding^ : Quotable 


' ■ ?“ fr Y*?® ttHtonerrial. We wcm'tplay Beitne Kosar before his 

'rime. Art Modell, owner of the Qevdana Baiowns, on his 21-year-old 
[rookie quarterback. (AP) 


Baseball 

s Major League line Soares 


; ' ' RaTTOWAL LEAGUE ' iMmao IN ON OW-4 ( ■ 

• rniiiuu ui> lFlnt ’mb n»i_, a i, u» rami mmto-sw • 

* ? Johmon,FonftrlM,DMmenl5) 4 Svfi»rUJ 
, • •* Sda^w-VMmzueta. ML L-Sutter. 

RtMCM. M. Sw-Dpylw m. . tfjy (XII. Los Algols* WMHttf (St. 

, *• fSMWl Gams) AMERICAN LEAGUE 

.TOtEMmh MMWW-.1 n 1 *fMnA N1 M M»-i 1 • 

.St Lewis 1M Ml NS Wt— 4. II, 1 • RottliMiw - »MnM« S 

, 'Walk.ClMnwrtsm. Scurry m.GU««t*nil. WtWh Nalu tM, Harris W ami PMralUj 
, mewiuiora m> and Orm,*«io (Wj Cbk. PmrtXrSt*wartmrtD*r*w-W-Oovk[,7- 
. Horton (6). Baavar (9).Dayl«y WtCampMU Oammor^RJokwi (Ml. 


V 


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■ Conk*son,n-A L— EnootlKL HR— Montro- , 
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. . ^ ,Kn Vork INM Ok-HII t ' 

- , -Kocmatb SNpanoft 'Ul, Andorssa l*>«. 
■- . Rucker (7),COnnana>aindOoiiltaivUfiodMi. 

.Leach (A). Gorman [71, Sbk (71, Orosco 111 
' ” .and Reynolds. W-^Onaca. 4-4. L— Carman, 4*- 
,4 HRs— Pbltodetaiita.S4*m»d» taM,Sc»wM). 
New York, Podorefc 11), Carter H7fc KMaht 

- tn. 

- - .CtodanaH nWMM 7 • 

- San Wean MMNtM tl 

. McGatfhmn. Power (91. Fnejco m. Home 
tm price tW and Mb; Shaw, Uffortslfcj, 

. , ^ Stoddard Waller OOL Jackson (10) ml 

\ i? 7 ! r K: » Kennedy. W — Franca. 1M. L— Walter, M. . 

.Se— Price OL HR— OadonaH, Parker f27>. 
Hoassoa MMNM I > 

. San Francisco NS W0 MS-3 4 1 

' Scait and BaUoy; LoPoInt, wliuoms (S), 

. - 'jefftoat (U. Garreds (*) and Brsnly. W— 

— * : Scott, 12-4. L— LaPoint, 4-17. HB~ Houston. . 

.. Doran ( 12 ). 


mi and Nieto, Parlor W. W-Omvbttt. 3-i 
L— Goanto^LS. HRs— St Looi^Van Style W. 
, Ptmtxirah, Manisan (2). - 
■Maotrord y m «n m-v » • 

•gnewoe *.•- m «• waH7.11 I 


CtowMad iw 4*4—7 n « 

Detroit NtMZIM-t 4 1 

. SmttTvRoMe «), WorM (S). Reed (V) and 
. lMltordrTerToa.Haraandn m,Mierror m 
andPonmt W W ardteiA-LL^- H ernandex . 


GidlWwon. RoibenH P%SLC MratW anl ** ■ ? ^Hlto^Oeyetand. Therrdon 


tm.; Detroit, Evens (27), Simmons 1 UK 
soomoLv . mmm-su i 

Mkoia s ela Hi SSI Nn— 14 M ■ 

^-Vouna. Lo«*»W) , Vand* B«vo (TL Hurwi-iSi . 
dndiCearaev^caitUls Butcher, Euferalo (9) 
and Enot*. W— Butcher, *-11. L— Young. ML 
HRS— wanmuoict. Gaettl (731. HrlMk 051. S» 
ante. Bnrdtov (U). Phetos (U. 

CMcbh MMM-fU • 

MUweekee Ml Ml tax— 7 9 1 

Btmntotar and HHl; Htouens Fingers Ml 
and Moore. W— Htwera.TBA.Ij-Bannistsr.S' 
W. HRs— Milwaukee. Yount {»], Cooper (SI. 
Chicago. Fletcher m. 


. The racas were expected to stop 
I there. 

> A m^or problem with police 
teffing the rkfers “the race has been 

s stopped” was that a large number 

> of the ridos do not speak English. 
; Aiwtbff was that a speeding i^dist 
f ctHDpletiB® wbM was to be an 88- 
i mile race finds it difficult to just 
r stop short- Some did not believe the 

warnings were for real. 

y “A racer doesn't trust this kind 
’ of information,” said Michael 
! Satka, director of the LevTs-Ra- 
lerab teams. “It took us a lot of 
tatting to ridars to get them to stop 
riding their bicycles.” 

The winner, Doug Shapiro, said 
the blockade made things even 
more unsafe. Shapiro, who had a 
two-minute lead at that point, 
turned off the course and rode 
down ride streets before carrying 
his bike under a fence and pedaling 
across the finish in an “ official* 
time of 3 hoars and II minutes 

“You’re not going to stop a 
bunch of riders after going 88 
miles.” be said. He was declared 
the winner without much fanfare, 
and the glory of what some officials 
called the best Classic stage to dale 
this year was muted. 

Shapiro himself kept going “just 
in case” after passing the blockade. 

So did the overall leader and the 
spree’s second-place finisher, Greg 
LeMond. 

“We thought it was some bull,” 
he said. “We just continued. Thai 
Andy,” rider Andy Hampstai, 
“had to direct us back to the finish 
because we were all lost.” 

“We have 800 miles of bike race, 
starting in San Francisco, and ev- 
ery inch of road has been closed 
n»d, n said the race director, Mi- 
chael Aisner. “All of a sudden 
we’re in Boulder with competing 
traffic.” 

David Grimm, a spokesman for 
the Boulder Police Department, 
said Broadway’s east and west 
lanes were to have been separated 
by cones, so riders could have half 
the street and cars the other. But, 
he said, race nwwfrafc, who had 
been busy with the women’s race; 
did not get the cones in place in 
time. Wire the men about five min- 
utes from the city hunts, police de- 
rided on the blockade. 

“1 really don’t think in the final 
analysis they would have wanted us 
to send races down a street that was 
unsafe,” Grimm said. “We took the 
only decision we had at that min- 
ute. It’s hard to stop the locomotive 
once it’s left the station.” 

The troubled race also included z_ 
nasty crash five mates into fi. The 
Soviet Union's Sergei Voronin fdl 
when a tree branch became caught 
in one of his wheels; he suffered a 
concussion and facial cuts but did 
not bave to finish. (AP, UP I) 


pit* : ;p 








v ; .. v&: ^ 


Atlantic Challenger bobbed in ocean after hitting object 



. ' ' 

I ... • ’ " 


1 
I 



By Jo Thomas 

New York Times Service 

LONDON — The crew of the 
Virgin Atlantic Challenger, the 
powerboat that was on the verge of 
breaking the trans-Atlantic speed 
record, was safely ashore Friday 
and reported that their boat had hn 
a solid object in the water, cinHng 
within miniums 

The accident occurred in stormy 
weather Thursday evening, only 
about two hours from the British 
lighthouse that marked the end of 
the 2,850-mfle race. 

The crew of nine, including a 
yachtsman who had rowed the At- 
lantic and a millionaire sponsor 
whose experience was limited to a 
canal boat, had been rescued un- 
hurt by a banana boat, the Geest- 
bay, tii at lumbered up in answer to 
tbrir mayday calls. 

The $2.1 million Atlantic Chal- 
lenger, a 65-foot (20-meter), twin- 
hulled vessel with two 4,000-honc- 
power engines, was wallowing in 
the waves, only its bow above sur- 
face, 138 miles (222 kilometers) 
from the finish line at the Bishop 
Rock Lighthouse in the Isles of 
Stilly. There, champagne and rela- 
tives of the crew had been waiting 

[A floatation bag system kept the 
Atlantic Challenger from com- 
pletely smiting until a West Ger- 
man mg began salvage operations 
Friday. The Associated Press re- 
ported.] 

Ted Toleman, Atlantic Chal- 


lenger’s skipper, who with other 
crew members was whisked o(f the 
banana boat by helicopter, report- 
ed that his vessel mei disaster when 
it hit something beneath the sur- 
face. 

“It was something hard — they 
still don’t know what it was,” said 
Tim PaweH, the project chairman 
who talked with Toleman as soon 
as he arrived ashore. “Bur the At- 
lantic Challenger filled with water 
very quickly. They had no choice. 
They went through the emergency 
drill they had rehearsed and got out 
calmly into their dinghies and wait- 
ed to be picked up.’*^ 

[One theory was that the craft 
had hit wreckage from the Air- In- 
dia jumbo jet that crashed off 
southwestern Ireland mi June 23 
with 329 deaths. Two pieces of the 
jet’s wreckage washed up on the 
Sallies on Monday. The Associat- 
ed Press reported.) 

The evacuation was made so 
quickly that the crew had no time 
to use the radio carried to give an 
alert, Powell said. The mayday 
message was sent out auiomaticaUy 
by radio sets in the lifeboats. They 
were in the water about an hour 
before the Geestbay arrived. 

Along with Toleman, a former 
European and British powerboat 
champion, the crew included Rich- 
ard Branson, the millionaire chair- 
man of Virgin Records and co- 
sponsor of the project; Chay Blyth, 
a round-the-world yachtsman who 


has rowed the Atlantic, and Dag 
Pike, one of the world’s foremost 
navigators of offshore powerboats. 

lems, icebergs and whales, the At- 
lantic Challenger was averaging 40 
knots (46 miles per hour) on Thurs- 
day and her crew was hoping to 
sight the Isles of Scilly by 8:30 P JVL 
She had to reach the finish line by 
10:24 to beat the reconi set in 1952 
by the passenger liner S.S. United 
Stales. 

At 1:30 pjn. Thursday, the At- 
lantic Challenger made her last re- 
fueling slop, 24S utiles from the 
finish line. “We have a superb boat 
here,” Pike said by radio “It has 
taken everything we have throws at 
it, and the only weak link seems to 
be the crew.” 

Shortly before his boat sank, 
Branson said it and the crew had 
received “quite a battering.” One 
crewman, Chris Duggan, a Royal 
Marine, bad lost two front teeth in 
a storm, Branson said, and “alto- 
gether it’s been quite a gruelling 
experience.” 

Late Thursday night, the crew, 
all smiting, stepped ashore at Sl 
M ary’s, Isles of Scilly. 

“I feel pretty miserable.” Tole- 
man said. “We rook such a batter- 
ing for at least 2^00 miles, and to 
get within just over 100 miles and 
for this to happen is such a tragedy. 
We went through just about every- 

S to get here, although we are 
ted to be alive.” 


NL East Race Tied After Cards 
Win Two Games to Mets’ One 



!' *•-" v . 


i 


. . . ••• v. • 


The Aoobcxad Pt*n 


Crew drifted almost an hour before rescue by banana boat 


Compiled by Our Sittff From Dispatches 

ST. LOUIS — Pennant pressure 
is starting to build in the National 
League East, a division where a 
team sometimes needs to win more 
than once a day to stay atop the 
standings. 

The SL Louis Cardinals proved 
that Thursday night to the New 
York Mets. sweeping a double- 
header from the Pittsburah Pirates, 
3-1 and 4-3, while the Mets could 
manage only one victory, a 10-7 
triumph over the Philadelphia Phil- 
lies despite uncharacteristically 
badpitching from Dwight Gooden. 

That gave the Cardinals a tie 
with the Mets for first place in the 
East, each itepm having a 69-43 re- 
cord. 

With 50 games left in the season, 
the Cardinals and Mets have six 
games remaining against each oth- 
er, with three to be played during 
the final week of the season. But 
the Cardinals have the advantage 
of playing seven more games at 
home than do the Mets; moreover, 
the Cardinals, whose team is built 


Dodgers Have 8 Good Reasons for Routing West 

Bad nniiM O O 


Transition 

BASEBALL. 

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The Associated Press 

JCS ANGELES — Their names 
are Welch, Valenzuela, Hershiser, 
Ram, Honeycutt, Niedoofucr, 
Diaz and HowdL They pitched 52 
innings over &x days for the Los 
Angeles Dodgers without allowing 
an earned run. 

Hie string, which ended in the, 
first inning of Thursday’s 5-4 vie-' 
tory over Atlanta, surpassed the 
previous dub record of 48 ser in 
1966, when HaD of Fame members 
Sandy Koufax and Don Drysdalc 
led the staff. 

“This is the most complete staff 
I’ve bad since I’ve been here;” said 
Tom Lasorda, who is in his ninth 
year as the Dodgers' manager. 

“We’ve got five stoppers is what 
we’ye got,” said catcher Mike 
Sriosda after Wednesday night's 
game, in which Bob Wckh ran his 


scoreless streak to 16 innings and 
dropped his earned run average to 
1.67 in a 5-0 victory over Atlanta. 

Welch, 9-1 for the season after 
elbow troubles in the spring, had 
two complete games during the 52- 
inning streak that began last Friday 
night after be allowed a second- 
inning home run to Cmtixmaifs 
NickEsasky. 

Has eighth straight victory was 
the pitching staff's major league- 
leading 1 9th shutout this season. 

Also sharing the honors were: 

• Fernando Valenzuela, 14-8, 
who went all the way for a victory 
over the Reds on Saturday night, 
allowing only an unearned rum He 
gave up four earned runs in eight 
rnnfng s against Atlanta on Thurs- 
day, but got the victory when Terry 
Whitfield, batting for Valenzuela, 


hit a two-run home run in the 
eighth. 

• Jerry Reuss, 10-7, who hurled a 
complete-game shutout Sunday. 

• Orel Hershiser, 12-3, who 
pitched seven innings before going 
out for a pinch meter Monday 
night He gave up one run and it 
was unearned. 

• Rick Honeycutt, 7-10, who 
went six innings, and reliever Tom 
Niedenfner, who pitched the final 
three, as they got a shutout Tues- 
day night. 

• Relievers Carlos Diaz, Ken 
HoweD and Niedeufuer, who com- 
bined for two scoreless innings in 
relief in the game that Hershiser 
started. Niedenfuer also earned a 
save in Thursday's game. 

“This is like an epidemic and Tm 
glad it’s catchy,” said the pitching 
coach, Tom PerranoskL To get 


those pitchers “going all at once, 
that’s awesome. I don’t remember 
that happening. There’s usually 
one or two out of kilter.” 

The Dodgers had an 18-21 re- 
cord on May U when they began 
their charge back. Their record 
since is 50-23. 

Niedenfuer has contributed sig- 
nificant ! y to the resurgence, allow- 
ing runs in rally five of his last 31 
appearances. 

After Wednesday night’s shut- 
out, the Dodgers* staff earned run 
average for the season was just 
2.81. 

In 112 games, the Dodgers have 
scored 434 runs, 388 earned. Oppo- 
nents have scored 391, but only j] 8 
were earned. Los Angeles has a 
team batting average of 255 to just 
.227 for the opposition. 


Pro Athletes: Among Marvelous Feats, Feet of Clay 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 

around speed and designed for arti- 
ficial turf fields, play 38 of (heir 50 
games on artificial surface fields. 

The Cardinals’ Orrie Smith fin- 
ished off their doubleheader with a 
bases-Ioaded walk in the 12th in- 
ning of the second game, forcing in 
the w inning run. Later, he ac- 
knowl edged the growing pressure. 

“In many cases, it’s not always 
good to be in first place unless you 
can sit out there with a six- to 
seven-game lead,” Smith said. 
“When you’re having to win, it’s 
tough to win every day.” 

Darrell Porter’s two-run single 
and Kurt Kep shire’s eight-inning, 
five-hit pitching helped the Cardi- 
nals win the first game. 

They have won eight of their last 
nine, but for the Pirates the losses 
were Nos. 8 and 9 in a row. Since a 
6-3 triumph July 22 in Los Angeles, 
they have lost 14 straight away 
from Pittsburgh. 

They have failed in 60 straight 
games to win after entering the 
ninth inning behind in the score. 
They came dose Thursday, tying 
the second game on Jim Morrison’s 
pinch-hit home run in the ninth. 

“They just have to keep their 
heads up and keep trying/ said a 
sympathetic Smith. 

Willie McGee singled and, with 
the help of two balks by the Pirates' 
starting pitcher, Bob Walk, scored 
twice in the nightcap. McGee im- 
proved his league-leading batting 
average to .361 with five hits in tbe 
two games, but slightly sprained an 
ankle in the second. 

Mets 10, PbOlies 7: In New 
York, Leu Dykstra’s ground-rule 
double with two out in the eighth 
ended a 7-7 tie, then a three-base 
error by Philadelphia left fielder 
Von Hayes allowed two more runs 
and gave the Mets their 10th vic- 
tory in their last 11 games. 

After Tom Padorek, Gary Car- 
ter and Ray Knight hit home runs 
for the Mets in the first, Gooden 
gave up five runs in five innings. 
But the no-decision kept his 12- 
game winning streak intact. 

Terry^fttitfidcTs two-run homer 


off relief ace Bruce Sutter in (he 
bottom of the eighth beat Atlanta 
in Los Angeles, which built its lead 
in the West to nine games over 
Cmcwnati and San Diego. Both 
Fernando Valenzuela and tbe 
Dodgers won for the seventh 
straight time. 

Reds 5, Padres 4: Pinch-hitter 
Tony Perez’s two-out single in the 
top of the 10th gave Cincinnati its 
victory in San Diego. But as the 
Padres’ manager, Dick Williams, 
said, “The way the Dodgers are 
playing one of us really bad to take 
three out of four in the series,” 
which the teams split. Cincinnati 
has only six games left with the 
Dodgers, San Diego just four. 

Expos 7, Cubs 3: Vance Law hil a 
two-run homer and Hm Raines 
contributed three doubles to Mon- 
treal’s triumph in Chicago- 

Astros 4, (Sants I: Mike Scott 
pitched a six-hitter, retiring 16 of 
the last 17 batters he faced in San 
Francisco, and Dickie Thon drove 
in two runs for Houston. 

Indians 7, Tigers 6: In the Ameri- 
can League, Andre Thornton hil a 
three- run homer off relief ace Wil- 
lie Hernandez as Cleveland scored 
four times in the ninth to win in 
Detroit. 

Hernandez has given np 1 1 home 
runs in 85 inniny this year; in 
winning the league’s Cy Young and 
Most Valuable Player awards last 
year, he allowed only six m 140 
innings. 

But, said Thornton, “We’d like 
to have somebody with 24 saves on 
our ball dob. If you want to give 
him to us, well gladly take him.” 

Orioles 9, Rangers- 1: In Balti- 
more, Cal Ripken drove in four 
runs against Texas with a double 
and his 100th homer in the majors. 
Ripken, who played in his 5,000th 
consecutive inning and 554th 
straight game, climaxed a five- run 
second inning with a three-run 
homer. 

Tnins 14, Mariners 5: Kent 
Hrbefc hit a grand slam in Minne- 
apolis and Gary Gactti hit a three- 
run homer against Seattle 

Brewers 7, White Sox 5: Cedi 
Cooper ended the tie in Milwaukee 
with a seventh-inning grand slam 
against Chicago. (AP, XJP1) 


By Bill Shirley 

Las Angeles Times Service 

LOS ANGELES —In a recent game against the Chicago 
Cubs, the Los Angdes Dodgers’ Mariano Duncan, running 
from third base, was thrown out easily at tbe plate on a 
sharply bit ground ball to the first baseman. 

Why did Duncan run? There were no outs, the Dodgers’ 
two hottest hitters, Pedro Guerrero and Greg Brock, were 
craning up, and the first baseman, dearly: visible to Duncan, 
was playing in on the grass precisely to tty to prevent a run. 

Duncan, perhaps, could be excused for his base-rmmmg 
blunder. He is young, 22, and ineroerienced. Still, he is 
playing in the major leagues and ought to know better. 

So should Steve Sax, who is alder and more experienced 

than Duncan. The next day, m a dose game. Sax opened an 

Hmmo with a double down the left-field fine. As he beaded 
forsecood base. Sax had the left fielder in s^hL Sax 
tried to make it to third and was thrown out Mstiy. 
6 Why did Sax nm when there were no outs? IBs Wander 

cost to Dodger a in a game they won^by^ one. 

to just twoganws in that series, m fact, the Dodgm and 
Cubs made so many questionable plays one could have 


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Cubs’ Bob Deader made a wrong turn in center field, tost 

KjffllJwdxeaux’s fly ball and dropped il Landreanx was 

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Russell on third base, did not know what to do when, with 
tbe bases loaded and two outs, to batter swung at a third 
strike and the ball got away from the catcher and rolled to 
the stands. 

The catcher’s throw to first was too late lo gel that runner, 
but Philadelphia first baseman Pete Rose knew what to do. 

He threw home and the catcher tagged out Russefi, who 
would have scored easily had he not, unaccountably, 
stopped between third base and the plate. Russell did not 
know that a baiter becomes abase runner if the third strike is 
not caught when first base is occupied with two outs. 

In a recent game, to Yankees’ Dave Winfield struck out 
on a wild pitch and raced to first base. The umpire had to 

Many athletes perform with elegant 
perfection, bnt if yon watch enough 
sports today yon soon get the idea 
that professionals — and sometimes 
even the officials —do not always 
know the rules. 

send Winfield bade to to dugout; first base bad been 
occupied, all right, but there was oztiy one out. 

Bonebead plays have beat a pan of baseball ever since the 
infamous Meride boner. On Sept. 23, 1908, the Giants’ Fred 
Makle, who was on first base, forgot to touch second after a 
hit that would have driven in to winning run against to 
Cabs. 

While to Giants and their fans were celebrating, an alert 
Cub retrieved the ball and forced Matte at second fra; the 
thirdout. The game ended in a tie and, when it was iqilayed, 
to Cubs won it — and to pennant 
Baseball playas have not been to only athletes wembar- 
ibss themselves, of course. 

Jack Dempsey once lost the heavyweight diampionship in 
a fight when he forgot to go to a neutral comer alter 
knocking Gene Tunney down, and apparently out Instead, 
be hovered over his faJkn opponent and (he referee did not 


start counting until he retreated. Tunney got up on the count 
of nine and went on to defeat Dempsey. 

In to 1957 Kentucky Derby, ffiu Shoemaker misjudged 
the finish line, eased up on Gallant Man for a second and 
lost to race to Iron Liege and Bill Haitack. 

When it comes to blunders in sports, however, few can 
match to mistakes of Roy Riegels of to University of 
California and Jim Marshall of to Minnesota Vikings. Each 
ran the wrong way with a football, Riegels assuring himself 
of a place in history by doing it in the 1929 Rose Bowl game. ! 

Babe Meigs of to University of Chicago, legend has it, | 
once became confused and tackled his own punt returner. 

Race driver Joe Leonard was still in contention once in the 
Indianapolis 500 when his cal’s engine died on the back- 
stretch and he had to be lowed in. His car, his chief mechanic 

found, was mechanically perfect. Leonard had inadvertently 
hit to “kill” switch in his cockpit, shutting off to engine. 
Tbe switch is a safety device to be used in case of fire. 

In another Indianapolis 500, Lloyd Ruby was so eager to 
leave to pits tot he drove off with a fnd bose still attached 
to his car. Another driver, Jerry Grant, once pulled into the 
wrong pit — U was his teammate's — at Indianapolis and got 
a refiS. He was penalized several laps for tbe rule infraction. 

Even such seasoned golfers as Lloyd Mangnun have been 
guilty of embarrassing goofs in major tournaments. Man- 
gram once lost two strafe in to UJS. Open when he picked 
up his ball on to green — to blow a bug off it 

It is not surprising that athletes, who often achieve artistic 
ffxcrita teg ana perform as many marvelous feats of skill as 
professionals in other lines of work, make such errors and 
MpuNkiy and embarrassingly so often. Innxats, there is 
the inevitability of error, no matter who is performing. Even 
Pete Rose, to fellow who soon win have more base hits ton 
anybody in history, is limited in skill He hits safely less ton 
one-third of the nme. 

All professionals make mistakes. Lawyers lose cases, sci- 
entists blow experiments and journalists misspell names and 
report to wrong score. The athletes’ problem is that their 
sins are recorded, sometimes gleefully and often in embar- 
rassing detail, by critics in to press dox. 

gya jj, since it has been determined by many rows scien- 
tists that there is no correlation between intdnwmce and 
athletic skin, should not more athletes, professionals, at 
least, do better? As Rose is food of saying, what if a fellow 
who builds bridges failed two-thirds of to time? 


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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAY, AUGUST 17-18, 1985 


U. S. POSTCARD 

Adopting Greyhounds 


By Pat Leisner 

Thu Associated Press 

F ROM California to Massachu- 
setts. from Minnesota to Flori- 
da. an organization of two dozen 
volunteers in 13 states is findin g 
homes Tor hundreds of greyhounds 
that have run their last race. 

The volunteers are breeders, ani- 
mal lovers and adoptive owners 
committed to preventing the sleek, 
graceful racers from bein° de- 
stroyed. 

Linnea McCaffery. for example, 
borrows a van on weekends for a 
round trip of 140 miles (.225 kilo- 
meters) to can doss from the Plain- 
field Greyhound Track to her home 
in Manchester. Connecticut 
Joyce Milne took in a 2-year-old 
dog fn November. She and her hus- 
band. David, own a college prepa- 
ratory boarding school in William- 
stown, Massachusetts. 

“With two setters and a poodle, 
it was not essential that we have 
another dog.” she said. “But I was 
very taken. Charlie was so devoted, 
trainable and obedient that four 
weeks ago I got another greyhound. 
They’ve got so much love to give." 

In Watervliet New York, a ma- 
gician named Peter Monticup was 
so pleased with 3-year-old Sylvan 
that he worked 'the dog into his 
show, ferrying props on stage. 
Aleithia Bower uses her greyhound 
to demonstrate for obedience class- 
es at her dog- tr aining school in 
Houston. 

In Luiz, Florida, near Tampa, 
Becky and Brad Smeltzer had two 
dogs when they decided to take in a 
greyhound. Now they have six. all 
of which pile into a king-size wa- 
terbed with the couple at night. 

“The first just peeled back those 
lips in a smile and in three seconds 
that was it," said Becky Smeltzer. 
“The next had a leg injury and we 
were sure nobody would take care 
of her like us. Then came a brother 
and sister and my husband said 
they were just too cute to let go.” 

The Smeltzers said they were im- 
pressed with the docile nature of an 
animal they had seen only in a 
muzzle br eakin g out of a starting 
gate for a frenzied 30-second chase 
after a mechanical lure. They have 
placed more than 25 dogs in other 
homes. 

The volunteers' efforts have re- 
sulted in the placement of more 
than 1.200 greyhounds since March 
1982, though most of the place- 


ments have been made in the past 
18 months. 

The dogs, mainly between IS 
months and 3<£ years old, were 
marked for untimely ends because 
they were too slow, injured or ready 
to retire, according to Ron Walsek. 
founder and head of the Florida- 
based volunteer organization called 
REGAP, which stands for Retired 
Greyhounds as Pets. 

The successful racers are retired 
by Lheir fifth year, only the best are 
kept for breeding. 

Although no exact numbers are 
available, breeders and veterinari- 
ans estimate that 8.000 to 10,000 
greyhounds die each year by lethal ' 
injection or are used for animal 
research. 

The National Greyhound Asso- 
ciation in Abilene, Kansas, says it 
registers 26,000 racing greyhounds 
a year. 

“There is another choice. They 
make wonderful pets," said Wal- 
sek. a horticultural worker. He and 
his wife, Jan, keep two greyhounds 
in a modest one-bedroom duplex. 

Dr. Roger Barr, a veterinarian, 
bos taken in three greyhounds and 
placed 40 from his animal clinic in 
Coon Rapids, Minnesota. 

Through the ages, the smooth- 
coated, lanky but muscular breed 
has been popular because of its 
speed and hunting instinct. The 
greyhound was the pharaoh’s pride 
in ancient Egypt, the badge of no- 
bility in medieval England For the 
pa>t 60 years it has been the delight 
of pari-mutuel bettors in the Unit- 
ed Slates. 

Dog racing is a S2-bfllion-a-year 
industry, the sixth-ranked specta- 
tor sport, drawing more fans than 
hockey. Annual attendance totals 
22 2 millioii at 45 oval tracks in 14 
states. 

The industry has racing been 
slow to support the concept of 
greyhounds as pets. Inevitably, 
track owners say. they are criticized 
for difficult decisions' based on eco- 
nomics. 

“Bogs are put down for lack of a 
home. But there’s two sides to it," 
said Mary Lynn McNeill of Lake 
Worth. Florida, a kennel worker 
who has adopted two greyhounds 
as pets. “A kennel might have 30 to 
40 dogs. From a business stand- 
point, when a dog doesn't make 
any money they can't h.mg onto 
them." 

An Bucfavaid is at vacation. 


A Legendary Look at U. S. Character 


By Sandra Blakeslee 

Sew York Times Service 

L OS ANGELES — In Illinois. 

« driving around the house in 
low gear is said to cure a family 
member's illness. In North Caro- 
lina, if the first bird seen on New 
Year's morning is flying high 
there will be good health during 
the year. To professional Folklor- 
ists. such beliefs are a window 
into the psyche and a revelation 
of national character. 

“Folklore is not a matter of 
running down little wan cures." 
said .Alan Dundes, who teaches 
the subject at tbe University of 
California. Berkeley. “It is a seri- 
ous subject that deals with the 
essence of life." 

Scholars at the University of 
California, Los Angeles, are com- 
piling an encyclopedia of Ameri- 
can superstitions and popular be- 
liefs. Nearly one million entries, 
written on note cards, are being 
categorized and cross-referenced. 

“Folk beliefs and superstitions 
are found among people all over 
the world and apparently have 
always been a pan of man s intel- 
lectual and spiritual legacy, if not 
to say his residual thought and 
mental baggage." said Wayland 
Hand, professor emeritus of folk- 
lore and Germanic languages at 
UCLA. “Even with the advance 
of learning and the rise of educa- 
tion in most cultures, these an- 
cient mental heirlooms persist 
and even flourish. The encyclope- 
dia project thus documents an 
important aspect of human 
thought and activity.” 

Scholars say legends, myths, 
jokes, superstitions and popular 
beliefs provide a socially accept- 
able way for people to deal with 
anxiety, risk, danger — frighten- 
ing things that are not within 
their control. 

Roger Abrahams, a professor 
of folklore at the University of 
Pennsylvania, says folklore deals 
with central truths, such as the 
distinction between clean and 
dirty, pure and impure. “People 
are protecting themselves as a 
group and as individuals from 
malevolent forces,” he said. “In 
some societies it is witches. For 
Americans, it is germs.” 

Such central truths, folklorists 
say, are immutable; only the de- 
tails change. A quarter of the 



David Svtdc/Tho New York Tiros 

Frances Tally, Wayland Hand: A million tales. 


American beliefs collected at 
UCLA were traced to considera- 
bly older, European roots. 

“I did not expect to find so 
much of the old stuff turn up in 
modem collections,” Hand said. 
“It’s like finding new wine in old 
bottles.” For example, he said, 
entering the door with the right 
foot first, a practice followed by 
many modem Californians, was 
popular among Germans in the 
1 700s. .And hundreds of years ago 
one would walk, instead of drive, 
around the house to cure a rela- 
tive’s illness, he said. 

Contemporary events have 
also become the nuclei of folk- 
lore, Abrahams said. “We have a 
need to ratify one another's exis- 
tence by having things to talk 
about that are of a risky or thrill- 
ing sort.” Thus, after the hijack- 
ing of TWA Flight 847 from Ath- 
ens, innumerable people claimed 
to know someone who was sup- 
posed to have been on the next 
flight out of the airport or who 
had just missed boarding Flight 
847. “This is the equivalent of 
sitting around a campfire and 
making a circle against the 
night,” Abrahams said. 

Chang in g patterns of ethnicity, 
religion, occupation, class and 
migration have produced new 
genres of folklore in the United 
States — urban folklore, for ex- 
ample. These are expressed as 
“urban legends, ” stories about 
kidnappings from shopping 
malls, alligators in the sewers. 


pets that are put into microwave 
ovens to dry and end up explod- 
ing, or grandmothers who die In 
the back seat of the family car 
while the family is on vacanon. 

There is also a kind of corpo- 
rate folklore — none of it true, 
most of it reflecting a lack of trust 
in corporations: fear of devil wor- 
ship at Procter & Gamble Co„ or 
a tale making the rounds in De- 
troit about poisonous snake Kgs 
found in the sleeves of clothes 
made in Taiwan. 

“In terms of detail, these are 
purely American phenomena, but 
tbe attitudes they draw on are as 
medieval as you can get,’’ said 
Abrahams, referring to bdief in 
Satan and fear of competition — 
military and economic — from 
other countries and city-states. 

Medicine has become the sub- 
ject of many new entries to Amer- 
ican folklore, in part because 
modem medicine is rife with un- 
certainty. “So there is a lot of 
counteractive medicine around,” 
said Frances Tally, an archivist of 
the UCLA collection. In short, 
what modem medicine cannot 
cure, modem folklore can: for 
cystitis, there is a peeled onion in 
the sock and for high blood pres- 
sure a dose of garlic. Experts 
point out that, as in the case of 
garlic, which has been found use- 
ful in treating hypertension, 
many of these folk remedies con- 
tain a kernel of truth. 

Tally said American folklore 
did not exhibit significant region- 


al differences. In Pennsylvania, 
children are told that babies are 
found under rocks in the forest, 
while in Arizona the story is that 
babies are found under desert 
stones. Tbe basic stories are the 
same. “1 am firmly convinced 
that people all over the world 
think alike,” Tally said. “And 
they have been thinking the same 
things for thousands of years." 

In contrast to the almost struc- 
tureless folk tale, Dundes said, 
many superstitions follow a for- 
mula: If A then B with an option- 
al C. If you break a mirror, then 
you will have seven years’ bad 
luck, unless you throw tbe broken 
pieces into a moving stream. If 
you spill salt, then you will bave 
bad luck, unless you throw some 
over your left shoulder. 

Tbe meaning of these supersti- 
tions has often been lost to the 
conscious mind. Dundes said. 
“But,” he added, “behavior 
doesn't exist without meaning. 
People would not practice cus- 
toms unless they meant some- 
thing to the psyche.” 

Stories that idealize strangers, 
such as tales of tbe Lone Ranger, 
reflect an American fixation with 
the unknown, tbe frontier. A 
manifestation of this is the spate 
of movies on extraterrestrial 
themes. The U. S. concern with 
signs and portents of what is to 
come — including the obsession 
with polling and survey research 
— reflects an orientation toward 
the future. And reinterpretations 
of such things as Halloween, 
which in Europe honors the dead 
but in the United States cele- 
brates childhood, points to a na- 
tional adoration of youth. 

Americans are anxious about 
the forces of nature and science’s 
ability to control them. So Big- 
foot, UFOs, astrology and the 
like will never die in the United 
States, scholars say. “It doesn't 
matter that Bigfoot doesn't ex- 
ist,” Dundes said. “Its role in our 
culture is to ou tsmar t science. 
People need to believe in it” 

In a sense, Abrahams said, 
American folklore highlights not 
the American dream but the 
“American dread.” “We have a 
need to tell one another how dan- 
gerous modem life has gotten,” 
he said. “And we need to seek out 
rhinp that are threatening to us. 
We wony most that we won't be 
where something is happening.” 


PEOPLE 


f Dallas 


Donna Reed will receive more on a raero^ servKC and candk- 

than SI million in a settlement for light march thilt be P 1 ;L ^ j a . 
berloss of the role of Miss Hlie in day. Fans J&Sem* » 

“Dallas.” according toJMictad pan. Aujaraha and Sw«Jencome to 


Donaldson, her attorney. Reed will 
receive her regular salary of 
517050 a week for the 1985-86 sea- 
son and S19.838 a week for the 


Memphis on the anniversary 
Presley's death. 

□ 

sen ami iy»h*fla RosseDinL 32, daughter 

1986-87 season. A request to hall f Ingrid Bergman and the 

production of the show was demed. Roterto Rosseffini, has 

made her professional stage debut 
— a three-minute appearance m 
“Paris Bound” at the Berkshire 


IVCCU sutu lA'iun-* » 

$7.5 million for breaking her three- 
year contract after the company 
replaced her with Barbara Bel Ged- 
des, who originated the rale but 
dropped out of the series after un- 
dergoing heart surgery. ... A 
Greek weekly magazine says it will 
be revealed next season that three 


DUUUU _ . 

rin Stockbridge. Massaehu 
laying a giri hopelessly ir 


Theater i 
setts, playing - 

love with a man who marries an;- 
other. A local drama cmic sai- 
Rossellini, a model who has mane 

charact^^on “Dynasty, "~tbe^p- £r- 

ular rival of “Dallas, ’ were killed , .. f - K-cnjujer.’’ 

off in the terrorist shootout in last formed well for a beginner 

season's final episode. The weekly, Ll 

Tachydromos (Postman), reported Vernon A. Walters, the new U. S. 
that Lady Ashley, played by Ali representative to the United Na- 
McGraw, and Luke, played by WH- ^ seldom at a loss for words 

Bam Campefl, perished in the fire- ^ Fngiteh . Russian, Dutch and 

fight and that next season's shows. n... was 

DOW filming 

have Prince 


the raid by a ^ — r — - 

during the wedding of Prince Mi- recall ed an encounter some 
chael and Amanda Carrington ag0 with a Soviet diplomat in Brazil 
(Kathrin OxJbera). Final shots ^ complained that Americans 
showed the well-dressed cast being everyone to speak Ed.- 1 

mowed down by automatic- weap- “Although it was quite in 

* .l. nioiunitk' I mnMn'l 


ons fire. 


En- 

__ true dr’ 

thfTrimc, obviously I couldn't ac- 
cept it. I said to him in Russian, 
‘Mr. Ambassador, that’s a lot of 
nonsense' — the word I used was 
stronger — and that kind of stag- 
gered him- 1 stepped in for what I 
thought would be the kill and said 
to him in Russian. ‘Mr. Ambasador 


Princess Anne, once referrred to 
in the British press as “Princess 
Grump” and “Awful Annie, " was 
toasted as “our true princess” in 

the Mirror on her 35th birthday. ^ 

The tabloid, which once described " wa £ t ‘ t0 ^ ^ Portuguese?' He 
the only daughter of QwxmEEza- his finger at me and said, 

beth 0 as a sharp-tongued “sour- be good soldier 

puss,” praised the pnneess for her but diplomat you are not.’ " 
work as president of the Save the * 

Children Fund. She spent her 
birthday Thursday off the coast of 
Scotland on the royal yacht Brit- 
umia with her children, Peter, 7. 
and Zara, 4, Buckingham Palace 
said. 


Prime Minister Tin-gut Ozal of 
Turkey has left for the United 
States to have a cataract operation 
on his right eye, the semi-official 
Anatolian News Agency said. An 
official statement earlier said that 
diagnosed 


“ Ozal’s condition was — a 

Thousands of fans toured Elvis during a visit to West Ge rman y and 
Presley’s mansion in Memphis and that he was to have an intra-ocular 


visited his grave, leaving poems, 
flowers and photographs, to marie 
the eight h anniversary of his death. 

; of tributes and events dedi- 


lens fitted, which could not be done 
in T urkey . The operation will re- 
portedly be done in Houston. Pres- 
ident Kaum Evren named Kaya Er- 


caied to the singer, who died at age dan, deputy prime minister, to take 
42 on Aug. 16, 1977, was centered over until Oral 58 returns ti 


; 10 work. 


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GUIDE 

ON SALE NOW! 

A selective guide written by Ptene 
Salinger, Jon Winrotii among marry 
ethers, illuslrated by New Toricor 
wriuenli t Serna*. A perfect gift. 
On sale new n bookstore* end 
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PERSONALS 


CAi 


ATHSHNE. ,JTNTB*» TA 
MU5K3UEET JE TAIME Jmy. 


J&JNirai JOYCE welcome to Europe. 

Luck. Rok 


FANOU HAPPY FIRST of mcaiy to 

come. I love you. OO. 


WILLIAM FRANK VOUK Ul. Cafl 

homei! Not Emergency. 



DAKS CORNER 
. WELCOMES 
MEMBERS OF THE 
AMERICAN BAR 
ASSOCIATION 
TO LONDON 


■34 'ermyfi Street 
\'LwdeftSW1 ■ 


MOVING 


ALLIED 

VAN LINES INTL 

OVBl 1300 OFFICES 
WORLDWIDE 

USA Aliad Van Unas Inft Carp 
(0101) 312-681-8100 
Office Address: 25rh Av & Roawveft Rd 
Broadview, SSnoa 60153 USA 

Or cal our Agency offices: 

PARIS Dabanfe* Intamatiancd 
(01) 343 23 64 

fkankhkt 

(069) 250066 

DUSSELDORF/RAT1NGEN 

(02102) 45023 LM£. 

MUNICH i ms. 

(089) 142244 

LONDON JTZZZ 

(01) 953 3636 

BRUSSES: zb^s-A. 

(02) 425 66 14 

Call for AIM's free estimate 


CONTOEX. Smoi move*, con, bog- 

s, worldwide. CaS Chafe Pans 
1681 (near Opera}. 


m 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


CYPRUS 


OWN YOUR OWN HOME m the 

town & location of yow choice. Wide 

selection of Vila & ap atm e nu . in- 
spection fSghts avafcble. GD. Lordas 
& Sons LhC P.O. Bax 1175. Lunaaol. 
Cyprus. Tel- 77777. Telex 5136. 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


FRENCH RIVIERA 
BEAULIEU 5UR MR 

For sale: very luxurious 3room apart- 
ment in private park with pool & view 
over the Pori of Beouieu & Cap Ferre*. 
For further detais please contact 
A.G.E.DJ. 

26 B**. Bd Princeoe Charlotte 
Monte Carf* MC 98000 Monaco 
Tel: (93) 50 66 00. Telex 479417 MC 
or: International 
Beaulieu sur Mer, 


iA&Kt 
r, France. 


CHARMING SMALL VELA, .attrac- 

tively fomehed. gorden 
Mediterranean m the ol 
Rocwebrune, Cap Martin, 2 
bedrooms, 2 smgie bedroom, 2h 
baths. FF1 300 JPo TTer (93) 35 42 26. 


ovafoalmg 
the aid village of 
doubt- 


SOUTH FRANCE. Ideal hoUay, 
beach, swimming poaL etc led chalet 
49 sqjTL, furmfied. at conve ni ences, 

lounge, bath, kitchen, 2 bedrooms. 

qoXc Pace F1300DOO. Tefc pi] « 
68 82 or (42)45 39 747 


LOT IN RHONE VA11FT. Cell Gertno- 

rry. Kjrianoff 6172-71486. 


GREECE 


POROS HOUSE an 4,000 SCjjtl over- 

looking Aegean Private, near beach, 
town fl Athens. Tel: 0281/28440 


HOLLAND 


AMSTERDAM, NEAR CONCERT - 

Gebouw. Luxurious house, 3 stones. 7 

roams, 2 kitchens. 2 bathrooms. 225 

tqjn. Write: Lomanstroat 108 1075 
R« Amsterdam. Tet 020-715702. 


SPAIN 


FOR SALE WITH IK TENANCY. 

Courury house, near PaHema, Minor- 

ca. divided into 2 apartments with 
1300 Kim. land ana own water. 
Write Bo» ZSW. Herald Tribune. 

St2521 NeuAy C«te«. France or cal 

Spain (711 5321P2 


SEUiNG 10 APARTMENTS in Mar- 
be&a. Each far 520,000. Ako ex- 
change against fid in New York or 
vlla m Marbela, Sardna pacsUe. 
Bn 2605, Hen3d Tribune, 92521 
Nemly Cedw. France 


SWITZERLAND 


LAKE LUGANO 
RESIDENCE BELLAVISTA 

Luxurious apdtmems overlooking the 
Lake Lugano 3 the beautiful surround- 
ras. Apartments from 110 uxm. up to 
170 sq.m. Each ha* its own fireplace, 
laundry. eeSer, wme color & periwig 
place in indoor garage. Indoor swim- 
ming pod & private beach with jarring 
stages. Sates (ran SF640D00 up to 
STO8OD0O. Free for uie .» foreigners. 
Mortgages at low Swiss interest rates. 

EMERALD-HOME LTD. 

VIA G. CATTOB 3 
CH-6900 LUGANO 
Tefc 01-9T-542913 
Telex 73612 HOME CH 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


In the charming mountain resort of 

LEYSIN: 

RESIDENCE LES FRENES 

Overiooking a tptemtid Alpine pawo- 
itkl 30 ma from Montmix and Lake 
Geneva by car. 

- you can own cjuokty residences 

with indoor swimming pool and 
fitness foabhes in an ideal 
environment for leisure and sports 
>j,gdf,ete). 

- pmmongat low Sr. rates 

up to BTC mortgager 
PWzM c ow ta d! 

R es ide n ce le s Frie s, 1854 Leysin 
SWITZERLAND 

Tefc (025) 3411 55 Tht 456 120 RAICH 


LAKE GENEVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Lovely apartments with motpifieenf 
views of take Geneva and mountoms. 
Montreux, WIcjs, Verbier, Les Diabter- 
els. Chateau a Oex near Gstaod. 
leysin. Excellent Opportunities 
Far Fenlmei 
Prices fromSFmOOqL 
Liberal mortgages rt 6‘A% interest. 
GUraTFIAN 5JL 
Red Estate SpeddUs 
Av Mon Repos 24, 

Qf-1005 Lausanne, Switrerlcnl 
Tet (211 22 35 12. Tbu 251 85 MOB 
lefabHm! Since 1970 


INVEST ON THE SAFE SDH 
Avcdabie m Ihe famous mountaxi resort 
DAVOS SWTTZERLAM) 

1 end 2 Reams Condominiums 
With Hotel Service 

Quiet, near golf course interesting 
renting pouibitutt 

CONSULTINVBTMTBiNAT. MC 
40 North Dm St, 
Englewood. NJ 07631 
Phono, 201-569-2301 
SUBSIDIARY OF 
CO-IN CONSULT! NVEST AG 
Lugaisti. 47, 8021 Zurich 

Switzerland 


SWITZERLAND 

Foremnen can buy STUD 105/ APART- 
MENTS / CHALETS, LAKE GENEVA - 
MONTRHJX or ii these world famous 
resort s. CR ANS-MONTANA. IS 
MABLERET5, VBBJIER. V1LLAH5, 
JURA & reman of GSTAAD. From 
SF1IOJOO Mortgages 60% at 6HA 
interest. 

„ REV AC SLA. 

52 Monrbnlanl, CH-1202 GENEV A. 
Tefc 022/341540. Telex, 22030 


LAXE GENEVA + LUGANO. Mon- 
fiwi. Vflors, Gstaod Repon. Locarno 

/ Ascona & many famous moun t ain 

resorts, maaiificent NEW APART- 
MENTS / Chalets / villas o^a- 

abie lor foreigners. From USS50000. 
Big dsa«e. Mortgages at 6'^%. Swiss 
tendency pcss&teTH. SEBOID SA 
Tour Grlifl 6. 0+1007 LAUSANNE 

21 /2S 26 1 1 . LUGANO 91/68 76 48. 


GSTAAD, 216 ROOM APARTMENT. 
Near vRage. kitchen, 
rage. No opens. Tefc 030/4 12 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


AUSTRIA 


VENA'S HOUSING AGENCY. 
0222-527964. Hodow. Giaben 31. 
Rernak: define* Hats & houses. 


CANADA 


TORONTO. CANADA - LUXURY. 
FiAy fumuhed and equipped I & 2 

bedroom suites. Superior Services. 

Short term rentdb. The Marker Sutes, 
80 Front St. East. Sue. 222. Toronto. 
M5E 1T4. Canada. (4161 862-1096 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


PROVENCE 4 km Avignon Smdi bun- 

galows m country setting on wwkmg 
farm. Modern conveniences with rur<£ 
charm. FI JOQ/weefc. 9Q/B5 03 12 


GREAT BRITAIN 


GHH5EA. FURNISHED HOUSE, newly 


REGENCY HOUSE LONDON SB. 

'.’SBS’tSotS&l- 1 


yean, I 


AMSTERDAM. LUXURY FIAT. Bdh. 

String & (fang, open lafdwfl, batconv, 
race view in quiet area. Fiiy 
equipped & modem fumuhed, hone 
& phone. Phone Amsterdam 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


HOLLAND 


Renthouse International 

020-448751 (4 lines) 

Nederhaven 19-21, Amsterdam 


DUTCH HOUSING CENTRE AV. 

Deluxe rencab. Vdenusstr. 174. 
Amsterdam. 020-631234 or 623222. 


PETS BRUIN MAKHAARDU 

brtl Housing Smvke-flmn&ate 
Amsterdam- Tefc 020-768022. 


VHIMffit TYPE 17th Century 

amal house. Fully furnished. 4 bed- 
rooms. quiet, garden. Schitnal, The 
Hogue Z lmnt. Tel: 01 719-19206. 


AMSTERDAM S. Furnished 5 roams. 

SBOO/month Sept- Jon- Private 646607 


ITALY 


When in Romes 
PALAZZO AL VHABHO . 
Luxury apartment house with furnished 
flab, avafcble far 1 weriard more 

Phomt 6794325. 6793450. 
Write; Via del Veiabro 16. 
00186 Rome. 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSEES 8th 

Stvxfio. 2 or 3room upu tinc m . 
One month Of more. 

IE CLARDGE 359 67 97. 


SHORT ISM STAY. Advantages of a 

hotel without inamvenienats. fed at 
home in nice studios, one beriam 
end more m Pail. SOREUM: 80 rue 
de rUfivenirt, Pais 7th: 544 39 40 


ICAR MONTPARNASSE. Large ate- 

fier, reodyhs Eve in. deeps 3, garden. 
G* 325 7B 33 from 9 ora to il om. 


SHORT TBM in Latin Quarter. 
No ogens. Teh 329 38 S3. 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 

I SUNNY DUPLEX - MONTMARTRE. 

Very pleasant 90 sqm. double bed- 

room with large living area, fireploce 

■ ' - id fitehen freezer. 

No agent. Metro 

F5500 + charges 260 56 52 


& fuBy 
washmg i 
Lamora. 


SWITZERLAND 


NEAR ST. MORITZ. Nice antique fur. 
rashed house. 6 bed r ooms, 4 baths, 

every sport focBmes, 1 month a more 

Wi Winter season. Write Chesa 

Aba A/7 Satev • St. Monfc, Switzer, 
land or phone 00x1-82-48267. 


USA 


Braid New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 

A Unique 

Hotel Suite Residence 

offering 

pre-opening savings on 
6 mo., 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 

featuring 

Studio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and all with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 

Executive Services Available 

Model Suites 

(212) 371-8866 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVE 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


AHOSPACE 

Customer Marketing Manager 


large American 
with major dreraft 
ocac systems seeking career Aerospace 
Marketing Manager far Far East ru- 
gion, emphaes on PRC market. Superb 
communication qbiSty «senhaL 

Forward resume m confidence to Bax 
2555, Hwdd Triune, 92521 Neifly 
Cede*. France 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


FRB4CH SEOETARY (28). Trfcigud 
EngEdi, German, seeks challenging 
senous position as executive Maeny 
or PA. n Europe, preferabfy Pans or 
Germany. 3 ye ars experience xi Ger- 
many. Tefc 589 )0 65 or write ta Box 

2579, Herdd Tribune, 92521 NeuOy 

Cede*. France 


(GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


Arizona, U.S.A. 

Weti esKdtfished general red estate 
compcmy desires to have a Reprwerta- 
tive Manager. Top oomax ss wn ded. 
We me not subcividers or land pramot- 
nv We harie everything in generd 
ted estate. Write SLF.C. Bax 4142, 
Scottsdale, Arizona 85261 USA. 


HBP1 DtSABUS STUDB1T asking as- 

mttrtj to five & anist with persond & 

academic work, maximum m year, 

» beam in September. Aflowonoe for 
focd& podeef money n pad. Further 
mfunndion C Diner, 12 Christ- 
churdi Pose, London SW19. 


(■IHSBf 

GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 

RECRUilBL Excellent opportunity for 
nfividud or argcxrization to recruit 
for medical aid veterexry schools. 
Exclusive representation in your coun- 
try. Send resume to: Rob University. 
m West 34th a. New York, NY 
10001 



GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 

JKU 







EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


SWISS FRM MAKER, well eduedod, 

imhiingud. looks For panfion in fim 
prockicfioft Tdfc Zurich 56 S3 37. 


SECRETARIAL 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 


TYPIST WORD PROCESSOR. Experi- 

enced. Perfect Engfeh. Bogin iniiwfi- 
ately. Send GV.lexpectad begin- 
ning sdary. Gfabes c nn, 37 qua 
<f Arjou, 7X0i Pdis. 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


DHttCTOS Of ADMISSIONS, Direc- 

tor af Mac Motions needed For 
Amer i ca n Univanity pregnant in Eu- 
rope with heodaxxfBTS » France. 
Be* 2581, HttaU Tribune. 92521 
NouRy Codex. France. 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


COUPUE 
USA 

Oxjfc/Housekeoper -Butter /Qi 
New York Gty frxniy of five 
Jive-in couple. She must be an i 
ondteiaf 


-Butkr/Chauffeur 
’ seeks o 
. . uceltent 

should have experience as 


10022 


t photo with 
jfir.Dffler- 
445 Peek 
NY USA 


AU PAIR A RENCH TUTOR.vrantod 

to See veil cheerful family in largo 
home in suburb near New York Gfe. 
Bifagud- Private room, bath B> T.v. 
Wa s ponso r. Box 26CP. Herdd Tri- 
buoe.9K21 Nwdfy Ctcax. Fronca 


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Enquiries from Broker* Welcome 


MINERAL SPRING WATS 

Boding in picsfK PET. several sees n -i 
brand-new factory, with a torrent ct 
150D0Q Stars per hour, we tea al the 
assembly for me best offer or Yimaao, 
about 40 mfles from bsboraPortuga , 
Av. Comlheira Fananda de Soua 
N 1 - 1000 Lisboa. Atm. Mr. Canter. 
Tlx 42707 EMAV1M. Tet 6805(8. 


BUSINESS BASE IN CHNA. Estab- 

lished European go. center af Bemg 
•41 share furnished office and confer- 

ence rooms with a reputable firm. 
Direct rriephone/wJex and tnfingud 

Naan secretary /adnufKtrojar. Write 

m confi d en c e n G M C O, 22/21 
Arcotfia Avenue, London N3 2IU. 


COMPUTE?^ PORTRAIT SYSTEMS 
p 1,0.00 0 ■ 28DOO FOB] and lupptee. 
Trtfem, ribbons, posters, calendar!, 

pwzm etc. Major cede cords at- 

repxed. kema 16. Postfadi 1703«) 
Frankfurt. Tefc 747806 T» 412713 

SSWKMWOFT FTEMS for xi^scrtta 
UAA- Write in Englrjh or French to* 
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3mVoadSatid fas. EoH Unsmg,Ml 

SRStfST m " WB B 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


ANTART1CA MUTUAL SURVIVAL kv 

surance & Trust of World Genetics, 
private stock, 42 units at 58 m9on. 
Mr. Pierre Heroux. 3509 des Erables, 
Montreal, Caiada 



ed out. Price: SF1 
21/25 26 11. a SI 


IMMIGRATION OPPORTUNITY. 

French burinessmon seeks finondd 
partner for Hs business ei run. 
Write Box 
92521 Neu% 


2^Hydkl Triune, 


, France 


SELUNG CHEMICA15, Solvents & lab- 

oratory equipment- Universal Chemr- 

cds & Satvenh: Franca (1) 293 60 5a 
11*220064. 


2ND PASSPORT 35 countries. GMC, 

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BUSINESS SERVICES 


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A complete persona l & buBnets service 


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has been generated by me Co nb beo n 
Basin i nvest m ent Trust* Unit Trust 
Mortgage Pool Detab: first Inteino. 
tioncT Trurt Co. LfiL. Dept. 850, PO 
Box 302, 1005 Son Jour. Costa 
TehtXi 


EARN 30% - 35%. MVE5T «i short 
term wowed paper notes. Allied 
Ltd, PO Box 422. hfcmsonburg, Vir- 
gtna 22801, U5A 


DIAMONDS 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


ing fcBfliy i 
30 ndw on 


HOUSBOBW AU PAIR fer fun lov- 

y with one 14 year exa bay, 
outride of IriYC in the coun- 
try. Own roam, own car, must be 
fluent in EngWy must have driven 
Ecense. Prefer ranger than 1 year 

cnranitraeoL Mature persoa Send re- 

ply, photo & phone to hfr. End BB- 
man. do Corporate Busmen Proa 
Inc. Ill JohnStTNY, NY 10038 USA 


DIAMONDS 

Your best buy. 

fine tfiaraonds in any price range 
at lowest wholesale prices 
tfired from Antwerp 
center of the demand world. 

Fid guarantee. 

For free price fist write 
Jo odnia OoMe nde fci 
4umitfv>txMn 

Estalfch3T928 

P e B oocnstraat 6ZB-2018 Antwerp 
Belgium - Tefc (fa 3 234 07 51 
8x171779 syl b. At the Dkxnond Oub. 
Heart of Antwerp Diamond industry 


Shopping in Europe? Visit 

DIAMONDLAND 

The largest showroom in 

Antwerp, Diamond Gty 

Appefcnonstr 33A. Tefc 323/2343612. 


Sidksm Diamonds, Jewelry 

Export prices (frtd from factory. 
Centre International Rosier. Heriues 
Entrance, PO Bar 266, Suite 1509. 
1210 Brussels. Tel; 322 / 218 28 S3, 
open weekdays 9anv4pm, Sat 2 -4pm. 


OFFICE SERVICES 


Your Office in Germany 

we arm “At Year Service" 

• Complet e offi ce services at huto 

Fully nqirppod offices far Ihe short 
term or me leng terra. 

■ kiternatumaDy trained afficfi and 
pi uf t mi ond staff at your dsposaL 
Con be legally used as your corpo- 
rate domexa for Germany /Europe. 

• Your business operation can part 
emmediataly. 

Latrea Buriwesi Service* GmbH 

Leenoo-Haus am Hobhamenpark 
JustincnrtnBM 22 
6000 Frankfurt ran Main 1 
Germany 

- Tefc ©-SMB 61 
Tefefaub && 57 70 

- Tele*: 414561 


COME TO TEXAS. Ftenfly sedaaa 

perienced au pair to aw for 3e£- 
dren ages 6, 5 S 2 and do fight 
housekeeping. Private living quotes 
in beautiful setting with good sdcry & 
travel opportunities. Non-smokers 
please write to L Gottesman, 1107 
SSon Ave, Austin, 7X 78703 USA 
Endose photo. 


AU RAW, 

school 


school age disc 
during d by" if 
aounes. Cortivd 


free 

if mferestod In frfcna 
Honda Housework 
and coaling. Driven Ecense pre-j 
furred. Sana picture okI resume. Stadj 
as soon as possible. Write Mrs M 
' WRdnson 


Brawn, 732 
Honda 32803 USA 


St, Orianda 


AU PABt/HOUSBCSflS. Must dive. 


Road. Mdtxau VA 22102 orcol cofc 
led 71X3821^61 Position sterts 9/15 


t. References & phone ratnv 

ber : Mrs. H Roberts. P.CX Bax 8644, 
Cend Spring FI BO&S USA 


AU PAIR/HBENDLY FAMILY. 2 anal 

chiUrea Engfiih speabng, iwvsmok- 



AU PAIR to help with 2 dvUren 2 yean 


& 4 months, light housekeeping 
mother af home. Send resune. refer- 
ancm & photoi Mrs. Don na Roo t, 27D 
Dde Dr. Short His. NJ 07078- 


AU PA> FOR 2 KD5._ Nowmoker, 

. tohnsco, 

Ha, Ohio 


must drive. Oevekxid.Olfc. Johnson, 
1 7720 S-Woodond. Shaker 


USA 44120. 


AU PARL One 1 1/2 yr. old bay. 214- 

38S40S0. 6127 la Cosa, Odhs, TX 
75248 USA 


AU WUR/NAHNY. Contact, .Sutan 


AU PARI, NY AKA Immediate. En- 

gbh spedang. 914^3^6439. 


DOMESTIC 
POSTITONS WANTED 


FBB4CHMAN, 25., would ike to 
‘1 yearioManhatmlcaiirae 

French oonuexs a iioa 

Rdond Durand. 1 roe J Swcyat, 
38110 La Tourdu ~ 


i Pei. France. 


FRB4CH GODL 23, TEACHMG & chil- 

dren experience, serious,- references, 
seeks au-pdr position in USA Mcne- 
Loby, Chevincourt 60150 Thouiorte, 
France or cel erryfimfc 4-476 £7 30 


YOUNG MAN, speaks French/EngWi, 

working papers, 3 years dnvinaexpe- 
rience, seeks position as driver, house- 
work. Ttfc Pen 381 73 51. 


BKSUSH NAMES 6 mothers' haips 

SB9C AU PAK X» in Colorado or 
Texas. Tefc Gennany (0)511-4668 71. 


AUTOMOBILES 


MBMXDE5 trani EUROPE 
WE FEDERALIZE CARS TO MEET IL5. 
SAFETY STAhOARDS 

D.O.T. A EPJL 

5 YEARS EXPHOENCE 

A FRANK MC 

IndusnopaBs, IncSana 317-291-4108 


MSKSDES 450 SB. 1978, BOjOOO 

mfcs, Americanssecv. perfect aaind- 

nan. All OPTIONS. USSIO/XXL 


MONETS copy collection 

too car France (931391294 


AUTO RENTALS 


OtAHC RBIT A CAR. Prestige an 

with phoMi Rots Spirit, Mercedes, 
Jaguar, BMW, Stnananes, imei an. 


46 r Pierre Chornm. 75009 Paris. Tefc 
7301.40. Telex 630797 FCHAFLOC 


AUTO SHIPPING 


HOW TO IMPORT A BIROPEAN 
CAR INTO THE ILSJL 
This document explains tu&y wha one 
must da to bring o car na Ihe US 
saMy and legafiy. it indudes new & 
used European outo prices, buying kps, 
DOT & ErAronvers&aottmses. cus- 
tom decranoB & sfippmg pnxxdum 
as well as legal points. BeaxM or the 
strong dolor, you can save up to 
USjmOOO when buying a«ercides.or 
BMW m Europe 8. xa portmg it to ihe 
States. To receive ths timid, send 
USS1R50 k*M USS1J0 for postage) lo>; 

PL Sdimidt. PoW od»31jr 
7000 SKittgret 1, West Germany 


MADNA SHIPPING 
Shipping to/ from USA 

MAHNA: Antwerp (3) 234 36 68 
234 35 72 
Spndal CandHoas at the Ucxfiag 
Antwerp SwM EueoteL 


SW YOUR CAR TO A FROM USA 

VIA ANTWKP AND SAVE, Free ho 
teL Regular sadngs. Airport defivery. 
AMBCO, Krfcbestraat 2 Artwer 
Belgium, tefc 23142 39. fla 71 469, 


HtANNFURT/MAM-W. Germcmyji 

bwmam GmbH. Tel: 069-44*01. 

Pidc-<ta J over Europe to/radipi. 


WORIDWfflE Car dripping & remofe 

ds ATX, NV. Ankerns 22.2000 Ant- 
werp, BalgMTL 03/231 1 653Tx3153S 


TRANSCAR 17 av de Friedkmd, 75008 
Pons. -Tefc 225 64 44. Mae 8395 33. 
Antwerp; 233 99 85. Cannes 39 43 44 


AUTO CONVERSION 


EPA / DOT 

CONVBBX3NS 

* Custona brekerage/bancing service 

* Pfcfeup S deSwary anywhere m the 
Eastern Ui 4 Texas 

* Proftnsiond work using only the 
highest quaby amipJients 

*■ Gucranteed ff A / DOT cmproval 
CHAMPAGNE IMPORTS MC, 
2294 Narifa Pran RdL HaMeU, 

PA. 1 9440k USA Tefc 2W 822 6852 

Telex 4971917-CHAMP 


DOT -EPA 

1KBBD CBtrnCATlONS 

Wbanango dripping, aetons banting 
and U£. 5 year repair wa r ran ti e s for 
European autos. 

ATLANTIC IMPORTED MOTORS 
NEW JBSEY.USA 
Tefc 201 -322-781 1 1 Yfe 226078 
OuaRiy Cenveniant Sface 1978. 


HAVE YOUR BMW, 

PORSCHE JAGUAR converted la 
meeK&Sahty & onriaian standards 

for import to me US. Our vnrk is fully 

documented & guaraiteed to be ap- 
proved For cars 5 yean & older, orxy 
safety changes txe required, nrase 
cafl or write for cppoiatmenl. KE5 
AUTO OONVHaON, P.O. BOX 
700344, D-7000 STUTTGART 70. Tefc 
(0711) *60966 or 721013, Hx 7255966 
Please ask for JuGs. 


DOT/ EPA CONVERSIONS 

10 US BMC*. Shipping, boning, haur- 

cnce. European cxfcmoftua axnj*- 

ances. Europe to USA guaranteed. 
Sranpoitstraat 117, 2586 HC The 
HagueHdcnd Phone (0) 70-5W245. 


EPA/ DOT. Superior engineerina. 
Gatorcnfeed compliance. Banting S 
c u stoms dearance. COD. Auto Dis- 
nfoutors. P.Q Ban IS. Ptuiateadvilla 

PA 18949 USA. Tefc 2157667676. 

Telex.- 705514- free co nsubotian. 

[H»A/ POT Bro ka roge, 

Sd^^OTs^fTfadi^SSael 

ed to quakty convera ora . 1 week 

tumaraund. lab FatiEty avafcble. 
BJRO/SPEC Inc 2158257547 USA. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TRASCO 

INTERNATIONAL 

UtD. .Mercedes Tax' Free 
Lmxxwnes 36" & 44" 

Armored can and Rmo us nes 
Coac h buflr eon 
Other mokes & exotics 

Over 100 mils in stack 
World wide defirery 
Dirac) from source 

D.O.T. & EPA 

Tefc LondanUA IT) 629 7779 
Telex (51) BKSti&ffTRAS G. 

Trasco London Ud. 

6567 Park Lane, London W.l. 


Mtzndand - UK - W. Germany 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


HMOPE 8 USA SPECS. 

Afl makes for worldwide defivery from 
stack. Send for a TAX-FREE catalog. 

8MW - MERCEDES - PORSCHE 
VW - SAAB - VOLVO - PEUGEOT 

Brand new 1985 stodc indudm.- 

• Jaguar 4.2 Sowei[p, soge green 
/ doeskin leather + aptionds 

• MB 325E 3» brormt/rrtc blue 
/ cosmos bfcie +■ apMnab 

• MB 500 SEL c hampagne mefotc 
7 fight brawn leather 

• MTSOO SEC 2x bladt/light brawn 
feather + ophenefc 

• Porsche 928 S automatic, biedt 
/ champagne feather, loaded 

Europo Auto Broker* 

FOB 214, 3430 AR Meuvream Haflond 
Tefc (0) 340241346. Hsu 70)68 EAB NL 


MKCHXS SPECIALISTS \ 
FOR USA *HVUDDLE EAST 

for 20 yacn. 

LAR GE STOCK OF NEW 

mocbib cars 

280 5, 280 SL 280 SH, 500 SB, 

500 SK with bih, velours & 
lecdw ireenor. 

Shfomerd & defivery worldwide. 

NASSAR EXPORT GMBH, 

MAMZBl LAND5TR. 191, 

D-6000 ISAMCRjiT/M 
TB: (0)69-73 30 61 
Tut 414018 


10 YRARS 

We Defiver Cars to the World 

TRANSCO 

Keeping a constant dock of more than 
300 brand new ears, 

5000 happy cherts every year, 
for tree mrtbenlor catalog. 
Tr cnsco SA, 95 Noordolaon. 

2030 ArSwsrp, Belgium 
Tel 323/542 62 40. Tlx 3S2$7 TRAN5 B 


IMI.SA 

OFHOAL ROU5 BOYCE 
DEALS FOR BELGIUM 

TAX FRS CARS 
ROLLS ROYCE BENTLEY 
RANGE and LAN DROVER 

rue M1DDELBOURG 74412 
117D Brussels 
THj 2-673 33 92 
TLX: 20377 




NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE, for immediate defivery 

FROM STOCK 

Bert nnriae, stripping, iterance, 
bond conver si on in USA 

RUTE INC. 

TAUNUSSTR. 52, 6000 FRANKFURT 

W Germ., tel (0)&232351, fix 411559 


FROM STOCK 

Mercedes 500 SB, new, blue black 

Mwwfe* OO SB, new, efiamand Uue 
Bomdw 928 S automatic, new, block 
owier mooes and modeb upon request 
5cm clay registration passible. 

okovits 




Tet 


DAWAJI TRADE 

INTL D0JVERY 

We l»sp a large stock of 
most oar Brands 
Tel: 02/648 55 13 
Tote* 65658 
42 rwe Lens. 

1050 BnSS. 


EXCAUBUR 

Trt= l93 )'S , 5r?K , ^ UMMC 


rgteam 

SBSpSpftSBM : 


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