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ESTABLISHED 1887 


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rcion of Pretoria 









By David Hoffman Botha’s televised speech — said he 

WaMn&um Post Sentce wanted to wait and see whether 

SANTA BARBARA, CaBfonria negotiations took place. 

— Preskkai Ronald Reagan “re- One official described Mr. Rea- 
maiiis optimistic” about promoting g*®’* reaction as characteristic of 
change in South Africa through his tendency to find a ray of opti- 
pereuasktn rather than coercion, raism amid what may seem to oth- 
acctndmg to White House offiaak, ers to be a major setback. It was 

although some of them expressed — — 

disappointment over the speech South African police arrested 
last week by President P.W. Botha. 152 persons and reported the 
'When key foreign policy advisers deaths of two Macks. Page 2. 

telephoned Mr. Reagan at his 

ran *^h ^fter Mr. Botha's speech to consistent with his view that, al- 

™ mm a .» * 



m. 


Murphy Leaves 
Mideast; Did Not 

See Pales tinians 


*pr ■?: v 5;* 


The Associated Press 


wouJd stop in 


AMMAN, Jordan — Assistant turning to the Uni 


e before re- 
states. 


read him a statement of reacriioa though apartheid is repugnant and 
they had written, the president should be changed, the U-S~sh0tild 
toughened the l a n g u ag e to call for not push Smith Africa's leaders 
an end to apartbod. into making changes (ha t could de- 

Bat, the officials added, Mr. stabilize the nation, 
sagan did not voice disappoint- Even as they described Mr. Rea- 


Robert C. McFariaoe 


South Africa’s Rubicon: 
Racial Reform or Bluff? 


By Alan Cowell urban blacks in some kind of unde- notin" the share criticism I ™ ^eicena oomrang was me second in iout oays aimed ai umsnan cmnans. rage 5. I as weu as to isnuu ana Egypt. 

■: Ne.’ York runes Senioe fined political “structures," some enPaSsStSy^S I | US ~ ******* sppkesman said 

JOHANNESBURG — When form of citizenship for blacks who Desmond Tutu and others, a White 

President Pieter W. Botha spoke are not b the stalled homelands House official said it appeared the mT r,,, 0 ^ m # 

SsftStSrj&U EmS**' b *" 1 ** New Threat Seen From West German Terrorists 

« V. J 1 J ..... n .. &..< L.' .1... .k .1 . 1. J . *. .. . . . 


Reagan did not voice disappoint- Even as they described Mr. Rea- 
ment. The president — who is at his gan's views, some White House of- 
ranch and did not watch Mr. fidals were critical of the week's 

developments in South Africa. One 
* _ called them “very disappointing" 

i s Rubicon: 

lane, the president’s national secu- 
T17 f/Q rity adviser, said that the reaction 

m or Bluff ? 

speech. 

urban blades in some kind of unde- Later, noting die sharp criticism 
fined political “structures, " some of Mr. Botha's address by Bishop 


m 



Sccremy of State Richard W. Mur- “The objective remains to chan a 

phy of the United States ended a feasible and expeditious course for 
Middle Hast tour on Sunday after the entire process — not just one 
apparently making little progress meeting," Mr. Murphy said in a 
toward starting a new round of prepared departure statement, 
peace negotiations. “The U.S. remains willing to 

Mr. Muiphy said that the United bold a meeting with a joint Jordani- 
States remained willing to meet an-Palestinian group if it contrib- 


with a Palestinian- ro rrianian nego- 
tiating team to hdp start a new 
Arab-lsraeli peace process. 

But Jordanian and U.S. officials, 
and the fact that no such meeting 


utes to launching us on such a 
course,” the statement added. 

Jordan's foreign minister, Taher 
el-Masri, responding to the state- 
ment, said that such a meeting 


took place during Mr. Murphy’s would have a positive influence on 
stay, indicated that obstacles re- efforts to start a peace process. 


i ■ ' 


S.& 



BOMBING IN LEBANON — Fifty-four persons were killed wheat a car loaded with 
explosives blew up outside a-crowded supermarket in Antelias, a suburb north of Beirut. 
The weekend bombing was die second in four days aimed at Christian emtians. Page 5. 


mamed to the meeting. Jordan has 
sought the meeting as a way to 
promote a peace drive by King 
Hussein. 

Mr. Muiphy met the long for Lhe 
second time Sunday and then flew 
out of Amman, ending a six-day 
trip that took him twice to Jordan 
as wefl as to Israel and Egypt. A 
U.S. Embassy spokesman said be 


Mifcr- 


“’-•R-Jir 


trol win not be swamped by black in that session, the foreign min - rials say. 
rule. ister made a “persuasive, credible The latest attacks in West Ger- 

. Moreover, he said, the deal presentation" that reforms were many have worried the authorities 
wdoid be cui with “dec ted” black ^necessary and right." according to because they have been aimed at 
leaders, those given the status in a participant. random kflfing of the maximum 


~ ‘_ L ‘- ■' reform*" he declared that South Af- But he made dear that those 
rica was crossing the Rubicon. The changes were based on apartheid's 
."T''' message that (here was no turning premise that there is no black ma- 

’ back was not lost on blacks, either. ■ ■■■ ■ ■ ■ 

. But where Mr. Botha seemed to ... NEWS ANALYSIS 

- - ; give whites a vision, or a chimera, 

-■ ^ of a new nation on the other side of 

the divide, the signal to blacks was jority in South Africa, oily a series 
different rtf tribal and ethnic minorities. 

Excluded last year from a new none of which may dominate an- 
r -' Parliament that gave a r ole to olhei. This m ea n s that white con- 
Asians and people of mixed race, tid will not be swamped by black 
e - and with some black towndiipSiin- nde- . . - 

der virtual police siege, some blacks . Moreover, he said, the deal 
" t; : saw the speech as possibly the final wdoid be cui with “elected” blade 
. rebuff. ■ leaders, those given the status in 

Ifis talk struck many as a distii- the limited bodies tluit whiles have 
‘ T '"v'.'.t lation of mtr^MWB ooe '.lyr alitinp made available to blacks as appai- 

“ war, not peace, and a sign that dages to white stqnemaigr. 

j South Africa’s leader would not Historians may come to see Mr. 
* w • -r talk to those consider lead- Botha’s spredi as the pomt when 
ers of equal or greater stature, such. W** witherwL It may have 
i* ->«u -t',: as Nelson Mandda. - .. ■ been the moment that crystaUized 

What Mr. Botha said at the-N* . .the diyisiaa between an Afrikaner 
7: . ; ml congress of bis National Party dues --coayinced that force would 
was what be tad offered ^nce Jan- ' bring -l^dcqpiescenoe, as it did 
/. uary, without enacting: a plaqa for (0»tiinieiImPlagB2,Col3) 


“They haven’t achieved what 
they had toped," he said. 

Some officials also have said in 
private that the South African gov- 
ernment mishandled events by first 
raising expectations of dramatic 
change and then Has hing them. 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Post Service 

BONN — West Germany's most 


ganizers and the seizure of large an countries, such as Direct Action rial hot line to exchange infonna- 


cacbesof weapons. 

The nucleus of the group is said 


in France and Fighting Communist tion. 


notorious terrorist group, the Red to have doubled to about 20 zeal- 
Army Faction, has ob tain ed large ous - committed persons. They can 
amounts of money, weapons and rely on shelter and passive support 


Cells in Belgium. 

Efforts to thwart the terrorist 


“Things were not going as fast as 
we thought they would, but there is 
still a chance," Mr. Masri said. 

Israeli leaders strongly objected 
to any meeting that did not involve 
Israd and complained that most of 
the Palestinians proposed for the 
meeting were members of the Pal- 
estine Liberation Organization. 

U.S. officials have said they 
would take pan in such a meeting 
only if it led to direct peace talks 
with Israel 

Neither Jordanian nor U5. offi- 
cials, however, gave any sign or 
compromising on their stands. Jor- 
dan insisted on an international 


But West German officials say conference and the United States 


ierT0 T lsl they have been disappointed to- on direct talks, 
network by tightening cooperation the French have not shown a “'n.— k 


The expectations were created in explosives and seems poised for a 


rely onsbdter and passive support among European governments centos or tionS^d] 

other modem methodsm'tradting JS?KJ?W 


“There will be no direct nqgotia- 
ms with Israel before the confer- 
ee is told," Prime Minister Zaid 


attacks in West Gex- a major arsenal through raids on ven because of the long tradition in 
orried the authorities gun shops and explosives storage France of granting asylum. More 
have been wimM at .sites such as stone quarries. than 120 members of the Italian 


es into France. 


the limited bodies that wMtes have . Askedwhy the speech had failed number of people. In the past, the nearly 100 guns, including power- 
made available to blades as appen- to live up to expectations of re- Red Army actions were limited to fid rifles that fire fragmenting bul- 
dages to white supremacy. forms, the participant said there mfljtaiy property or were targeted 


Europe, police and security offi- Security and intelligence offi- counterparts do not pursue terror- — Mr. Murphy, in his statement, 

E y dais say ihe gucrrillasSve retaflt ist suspects, who hare found a ha- said he had a. “fnmi and detailed 

The West attacks in West Gex- a major arsmal through raids on ven because of the long tradition in exchange of views with the leaders 

many have worried the authorities gun shops and explosives storage France of granting asylum. More The latest terrorism campaign of Jordan, Israel and Egypt.’’ and 

because they have been "itnwt at sites such as stone quarries. than 120 members of the Italian began in December, when a prison added: “These leaders are urgently 

random lritimg nf ito mny«mnm They are said to have obtained Red Brigades are believed to be in hunger strike by 30 Red Army Fac- seeking ways to advance the cause 


dages to white supremacy. forms, the participant said there 

Historians may come to see Mr. were two explanations. 

Botha’s speech as the paint when _ 

black hopBvrithered.lt may have , The first, a cyrucal explanahon, 
been the moment that crystallized fi® 15 Mr- Botha slned 


France. The French 
has said that many of 


t tion members provoked a wave of of peace." 


in the bombings and arson aimed 


against particular individuals such explosives. 


lets, and hundreds of pounds of eyes of French law, are not guilty, at property linked to the N 


After the murders of General Atlantic Treaty Organization. 


, . . as judges, bankers, officers and in- 

The first, a cyrucal explanation, duOTialists. 


judges, bankers, officers and in- The Red Army Faction also is Rene Andran of France and a West ^ Ae jaM 

Sto. believed to lure amassed more Goman industnalisuHonz am- XlSeorS 

The resurgence of the Red Army than $1 million through bank rob- mermann, were claimed by the Red rL 4™, leaders such as Brtotte 
tTn- I,.. - in saV«4.re^i«n B Aiwv Fariinn »nH Ditwrt Action icaaers suen as ortgiue 


(Continued on Ptage 2, CoJL3) (Coatmaed oa Page 2, CoLl) 1982 after the capture of three or- links wilhradicals in other Europe- combat terrorism, including a spe- (Continued on Page 2, Col 6) 


Mr. Masri said the United States 
had pot said whether it would ac- 
cept a proposed list of Palestinian 
delegates for the meeting. 

The seven names were worked 
out by King Hussein and the PLO 
c h ai rm a n . Yasser Arafat, to skirt a 
U.S. ban on contacts with the PLO 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


:t l -n 




Gjunterterrorism Plan 


i-* 

■A^rjr: 

- •VT IWA' 




* By Joanne Omang 

- Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The State 
s Department has proposed a J53- 
mini em “regional counterterrorism 
program” for five countries in Cen- 
tral America as pan of its response 
to the murders last May in El Sal- 
vador of 13 persons, induding four 
US. marines and two US., busi- 
nessmen. . _. 

In a memo marked “cauuten- 
tial" to Robert G McFarlane. Pres- 

- US. aides say Washington’s 

* quarrel with the Sancfinists can- 
not be resolved. Page 3. 

ident Ronald Reagan’s national se- 
curity adviser, the department 
, described the program as one of 
four options for a supplemental ap- 
y propriationsrequesL^ 

The proposal would provide 
i million in militaiy support and 526 
i, million in police tnrinmg funds to 

1 El Salvador, Honduras, Costa 

; Rica, Guatemala and Panama 

“with a view towards improving 

counterterrorism capabilities of tto 

host governments," the mono said. 
Congressional critics have ex- 
, Dressed concern that the Proposal 

f uSexcuse to funnd 

■ mifitaiy aid to a re®on wh«e Con- 

gress has been careful to limit U.S. 

' Mr. McFarlane 

was expected to apP™« ** £ 
? gram for subnu^or i to 

this month. Congressm^ 

^cesmadeacopyrfthedi^t 

^Sle to Be Washington ^P osl 

Drafted shortly after the May 19 

included as one option a 


. i * % 


INSIDE 

John Pud Q "ssaifcd 
on trol and polyganiy 
i visit to Kenya- Page^- 

. _ Uft 


ests. 

caned for September 
i in Punjab, despite 

renewed ^ 

Pages. 


million Defense Department “wish 
list" that would make up all the 
xnSilary and economic aid Tor the 
region trimmed by Congress over 
the past three years. 

That version, listed as being pre- 
ferred by the Pentagon aim the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff, would be “a 
dramatic reaffirmation of our de- 
termination" to defend the region 
from Soviet influence, the memo 
said. The Central Intelligence 
Agency “favors a more narrowly 
focused program," the memo said. 

. - A senior Defense Department 
official said its recommendation 
lias been superseded" by subse- 
quent proposals. But he indicated 
there was “general agreement” that 
the Central American part of the 
program should follow lhe State 
Department proposal. 

A senior State Department offi- 
cial said changes baa been made in 
the memo to ensure compliance 
with laws aimed at making certain 
that national police forces did not 
receive U.S. militaiy aid to use 
against their own citizens. 

Training in intelligence collec- . 
tion and analysis, bomb detection 
and defusing, hostage rescue, sur- 
veillance and countersurveillance, 
border security and “basic law en- 
forcement" would be provided, it 
said. 

The largest part of the funding, 
$22 million, would go to El Salva- 
dor. where the memo said prepara- 
tions a gains t terrorism were “woe- 
fully inadequate." 

President Reagan had promised 
a crackdown on terrorism after the 
May attack that killed 13 persons 
string at an outdoor cafe in San 
Salvador- Responsibility for the 
shooting was later claimed by a 
leftist rebel group. 

Under the proposal, Guatemala 
yrtjuld get $5 million, of which S3 
million would be for police eqiup- 
meal and training and S2 million 
for military assistance. 

panama would receive $6 million 
and Costa Rica $9 million, includ- 
ing $3.5 million for a Bell 212 hdi- 
oopter. Honduras would receive 
$21 million. 

A protest in Honduras 

Honduran civilian leaders de- 
manded Saturday that the govern- 
ment halt joint militaiy maneuvers 
with the United Stales, United 
press International reported from 



Belgian Tanker Is Damaged in Gulf; 
Strike Seen as Iran’s Reply to Iraqi Raid 


a ** 

has ac* 

^mmedTWA’ 5 *- 
Ubc might iwerto 
he company- ws® 


T STof political. Roman 
Catholic, student, tead»r, labor 
and peasant groups m meprovmce 
SmSaletter lotto Honduran 
Congress, to Pmtat . Robmo 
c „Jn Cdrdova and fanned 
forces commander. General Waiter 
liypez Reyes, demanding that the 

operation be canceled. 


fe-- 


Paramedics aided victims of a toxic chemical leak Aug. 12 at the Union Carbide factory 
in Institute, West Virginia- At least 135 area residents were treated for injuries. 

Pollution Tales Fill f Chemical Valley’ 

But West Virginians RaEy in Support of Union Carbide 

By Ben A. Franklin chemical industry tore became a community issue 

New York Times Service on Aug, 11, when a toxic chemical leak at Union 

CHARLESTON, West Virginia — In the con- Carbide’s Institute plant sent 135 people to bospi- 
tetnporary folklore of “the chemical valky” of the tals with burning eyes, nausea and breathing dirfi- 
Kanawha River, maroon cars turn iridescent blue cutties. 

and blue cars turn metallic maroon. The chemical industry has been operating in the 

In the vapors of strong chemical nights, ahum- Kanawha Valley since World War f, when the 
mim storm doors weld shut, and in the morning natural confluence of water, coal, natural gas, 
mists, after overnight sulfuric add spills, the nylon brine and limestone thrust it into the war effort as 
panty hose of women walking to work suddenly the nation’s explosives producer, 
unravel a t the knee. The Monsanto Co. plant, which now produces 

These tales floated from saloon to saloon last chemicals for the rubber industry. Is at Nitro, a 
week in downtown Charleston. The point was, town named for and created to manufacture ni- 
native Charlestonians said, that if you didn't be- trogfyeerine. 

lieve that these thing s happened, something like Not surprisingly in West Virginia, where loyalty 
them doubtless did. to the company reflects a near-15 percent unem- 

Take, for example, the verifiable dissolution of ployment rate and:a xenophobic tradition of ra- 
the statue of St Anthony standing outside the sentment at national publicity of its problems, 
Roman Catholic church at Boomer, located on the there are two sides to the chemical debate, 
north bank of the Kanawha along U.S. Highway Union Carbide is virtually the only employer m 
60 near Alloy, West Virginia. South Charleston, and pays average wages of more 

According to the Reverend Gene Weber, the than $30,000 a year. A week of bad news like the 
priest in charge at Boomer, when the Union Car- last one with the leak at the Institute plant and 
bide Coro, ran the ehemicgl plant at Alloy, which then a second, nan toxic bat foul-smelling leak at 
is now owned by another corporation, the forearm the South Charleston works on Aug. 13, makes 
of St- Anthony rotted off the torso and plopped to loyal employees defensive, 
the ground. When the company comes under scrutiny, com- 

Union Carbide, which is the largest employer in muni ties stage *T tove Carbide" parades down 
the valley, paid to mend the arm. Against St Main Street 

Anthony’s progressive demise and the loss of an- [About 400 people, many wearing caps reading 

other limb, the company had provided a transpar- viremia loves Union Carbide,” marched 

ent plastic box for the prosthetic stint _ _ Saturday in support of the company. United Press 

Father Weber said that the protecto® ptestic international reported from South Charleston, 
display case also was attacked by, and filled by, ibc parade was ted fry children who wore T-shirts 
chemical fames. Under sunlight the air made- qtyi - n£> a Carbider Today." 

£VCDmaUy ' [Mayor Richie Robb of South Charleston said it 
i» mporunt f m bfcdtjr to show support for lhe 

melt or molt itnrfm the acrid emissions of the (ContimidUin Page 2, Col 7) 


Not surprisingly in West Virginia, where loyalty 
to the company reflects a near-15 percent unem- 
ployment rate and a xenophobic tradition of re- 
sentment at national publicity of its problems, 
there are two sides to the chemical debate. 

Union Carbide is virtually the only employer in 
South Charleston, and pays average wages of more 
than $30,000 a year. A week of bad news like the 
last one with the leak at the Institute plant and 
(ton a second, non toxic bat foul-smelling leak at 
the South Charleston works on Aug, 13, makes 
loyal employees defensive. 

When the company comes under scrutiny, com- 
munities stage ‘ Love Carbide" parades down 
Main Street 

[About 400 people, many wearing caps reading 
“West Virginia loves Union Carbide,” marched 
Saturday in support of the company. United Press 
International reported from South Charleston. 
The parade was led fry children who wore T-shirts 
saying, “Kiss a Carbider Today." 

[Mayor Richie Robb of South Charleston said it 
is important for ttis'tity to show support for the 
(Gontimied^Hi JPage 2, Col 7) 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

MANAMA, Bahrain — A Bel- 
gian-registered oil tanker was at- 
tacked Sunday by planes in the 
Gulf. Shipping sources said that 
the attack probably was retaliation 
by Iran for raids last Thursday by 
Iraqi aircraft on the Kharg Island 
oil terminal. 

“I have been attacked by planes, 
hit near the funnel" the Naess 
Leopard radioed in a distress call 
monitored here. 

The shipping sources said that 
the ship radioed at 10:06 AM. that 
it was 25 miles (40 kilometers) east 
of northern Qatar when hit. This is 
an area where Iranian aircraft have 
struck at least 18 vessels. 

One source said that tugs were 
alongside the Naess Leopard but 
the tanker was able to proceed. 
There was no word of casualties 
among the crew, most of whom 
were thought to be Belgian. 

Marine salvage companies, ex- 
pecting that Iran might retaliate for 
the attack on the Kharg Island oil 
terminal by striking at commercial 
shipping, deployed more than a 
dozen tugs in the southern sector of 
the Gulf, The Associated Press re- 
ported. 

Shipping sources said that the 
Naess Leopard, a recently commis- 
sioned vessel wbose owners could 
not be immediately learned, was 
believed to have been at Stni Is- 
land, an improvised oil terminal, to 
unload UJ>. kerosene for Iran. 

They said the ship was on a head- 
ing wton attacked that suggested it 
was bound for one of the terminals 
higher op the western side of the 
Gulf to load. 

The shipping officials said the 
attack, the 31st this year against 
Gulf shipping, appeared to have 
been the tost successful Iranian at- 
tack since June 1, when a Hong 
Kong container ship was hit 

One crewman died and two were 
reported misting in that attack, 
when two rockets slammed into the 
living quarters of the 15,002-ton 
Oriental Importer. 

Last month, two tankers, one 
British and the other Greek, report- 
ed attacks by mistite-firing Iranian 
helicopters. Neither was hit. 

Iran and Iraq have struck about 
100 tankers and other merchant 
vessels since the so-called “tanker 
war’’ started early last year with a 
drive by Iraq to blockade Kharg 
Island and strangle the ofl exports 
that Iran needs to finance its war. 

Arab diplomatic sources said 
Kuwait put its armed forces on 
maximum alert when the Iraqis 
struck Kharg. They said Saudi Ara- 
bia's defenses in the eastern prov- 
ince also were alerted. 

Oil and shipping industry 
sources awaited firm evidence of 



the extern of damage to loadtog 
facilities at Kharg Island, which 
Iraq said was “reduced to ashes.” 

Independent oil and shipping 
sources in the Gulf say several 
ships had been hit, induding a 
Maltese-flag tanker, and that one 
loading jetty on the east of the 
island was damaged in the raid. 

Shipping sources said that de- 
spite damage to the loading fatali- 
ties at Kharg, tankers were berth- 


mat in Istanbul dismissed the at- 
tack as unimportant, and repeated 
a Tehran threat to dose the Gulf to 


shipping if Kharg was ever serious- 
ly damaged. Iran has threatened to 
blockade the Strait of Hormuz at 
the Gulf entrance. 

Most of the Iran's oil exports 
have been moved from Kharg Is- 
land by tankers chartered by Iran 
to supertankers moored off Sirri, u> 
enable its customers to load out of 
range of Iraqi warplanes. 

Iran probably had enough crude 
at Sirri or on tankers en route for it 
to m ai n tain supplies for about five 
days. Any drop thereafter would 
indicate that Iran has bad to cut its 
exports, the shipping sources add- 
ed. 

In Baghdad, President Saddam 
Hussein decorated nine pilots on 
Saturday for their part in the raid 
on Kharg Island and he described 
the attack as “a major historical 
act" 

Quoted by the official Iraqi news 
agency, Mr. Hussein said that the 
raiding planes had met no op posi- 
tion ana suffered no losses. Iran 
said it shot down one Iraqi aircraft. 

Mr. Hussein said Iraq had de- 
layed a major attack on Kharg to 
leave the door open for Iran to 
respond to peace overtures. "But 
we found that the Iranian regime 
does not care for its property or 
wealth or even Tor Iranian blood," 
he said. ( Reuters, API 


Sri Lankan Peace Talks 
Collapse; Unrest Spreads 


Compiled bp Our Staff From Diipalcha 

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka — Peace 
talks between government officials 
and minority Tamil rebels lighting 
for a separate state have collapsed, 
and fresh fighting erupted Sunday 
on this island nation. 

Ethnic violence, which has 
steadily escalated over the past 
three days leaving an official death 
toQ of 71, ended peace talks Satur- 
day in the Himalayan kingdom of 
Bhutan despite Indian efforts to 
keep negotiations going. 

Reports conflicted about atroc- 
ities involving several hundred ci- 
vilians killed by Sri Lankan troops 
and guerrillas. 

President Junius Jayewardene 
put security farces on alert and 
extended a state of emergency as 
majority Sinhalese and minority 
Tamils fled centers of violence. 

The Eelam National Liberation 
Front, an alliance of four major 
rebel groups, said it was calling off 


a two-month cease-fire and pulling 
out of the peace talks. The group 
said government troops had killed 
200 Tamils in a raid Saturday near 
Trincomalee on the northeast coast 
of the island. 

An anda ti ssa De Alwis, the infor- 
mation minister, described the 
charge as “a total invention" and 
said the rebels had used the alleged 
incident to sabotage the peace 
Talks 

However, Vduppillai Balaku- 
mar, a rebel spokesman, said in a 
telephone interview from the 
southern Indian city of Madras, 
“We have got pictures of the mas- 
sacre." 

According to guerrilla groups, 
the incident occurred when resi- 
dents of two villages were pulled 
out of their homes, lined up and 
shot 

Ml De Alwis said 37 fishermen 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


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ions to 
3 their 
Conta- 

ilateral 
lexica, ” 
Uy be- 
ats un- 
sts are 
agree- 
ised to 
iat, the 
rack at 
verting 

■ion of- 
reasou 
ht con- 
ioi that 
iparate 
istsbut 
las will 
: cause 
an out 




i 






• ‘--ter 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 1985 


152 More Arrested in South Africa; 
3 Blacks Are Killed in Latest Unrest 


By Alan Cowell 

iYrw York Tuna Strike 


JOHANNESBURG — The 
South African police reported Sat- 
urday that they had arrested 132 
persons, one of the highest num- 
bers of detentions in a angle day 
since a state of emergency was de- 
clared in July. The police also said 
that two more blacks had been shot 
to death in violence in segregated 
townships across the country. 

Near Cape Town, the homes of 
two mixed-race legislators in Smith 
Africa's Parliament were fire- 
bombed early Saturday. The homes 
are near a settlement for mixed- 
race people where a grenade attack 
killed one person earlier last week. 

{Isolated rioting erupted in black 
townships Sunday and a black 
woman was killed when she was 
run down by a truck that was being 


according to an Associated Press chan 
report from Johannesburg. ban 

[Parts of Soweto township out- struc 


changes supposed to embrace ur- 
ban blades m undefined political 
structures while perpetuating while 


side Johannesburg and other black separation . and “seif-determina- 
areas around South Africa were put tioo,” a code word for white do mi- 


areas around bourn Atnca were put 
under a 10 P.M. to 4 AM. curfew 
Thursday, but Soweto's streets 
were full of people late Saturday 
and early Sunday, visitors said.] 
The authorities gave no reason 
for the surge in detentions, which 


Mr ■ 


The emergency was declared af- 
ter 10 months of violence in which 
500 people, all but two of them 
black, died. Since the decree, the 
violence has spilled beyond areas 




for the surge in detentions, wruen violence has spilled beyond areas 
brought to 938 the number of peo- affected by the earlier unrest, and 
pie, most of them blade, held under the death toll since the proclama- 


..'.iftr 





WORLD BRIEFS 


M" 




Near-Miss Involving Tfaatcfaer Reported 





the emergency decree. In the early 
days of the decree, arrests were 
running about 200 a day. The ar- 
rests had gradually decreased. 




lion took effect at midnight July 20 
has increased by more than 120. 

Since last September, virtually 
all of the confrontations have been 


month to avoid colliding with a neucopicr canju« kubwet, 
Margaret Thatcher. British newspaper* reported Sunday . ^ 

A spokeswoman for Britain's uvu Aviation AnthwiW OMTiaaedthat 
an investigation was underway into an nsadeal oaJ{^j5Tamna^i 
helicopter and a British Airways Boeing 7p, bound for Frenkfon with 

*^Two£nday newspapers said that the British Ainrayscrew hadiosbffi 
on the airplane’s brakes to avoid taking off in the path of * Roy al Air 
Force helicopter about to land at Heathrow Airport. Mis. Thatcher and 
six members of her staff were on board the heu gapeer, the Sunday 
Express and Mail on Sunday newspapers said. Aajmwwonmnftir Mrs. 
T hatcher confirmed that the prime minster did fly to Heathrow on that 
day in a helicopter to board a plane for Washington. 


released an “ onstrators or mobs in black town- 


It L 




Fo reign Laborers Expelled by Libya 

TUNIS (Renters) — The expulsion of thousands of fareigr waken & 




detentions began. 

The latest arrest and fatality fig- 
ures indicate little or no easing in 

k r „■ l 


South Africa’s racial conflict since 


run down by a truck: mat was bang 
chased by footers, the police said. 


ships. 

■ ANC Threatens Whites 
Oliver Tam bo, president of the 




President Pieter W. Botha renewed African National Congress, 
an offer Thursday of limited pledged Saturday to step up the 


Despite Speech by Botha, 
Reagan Rejects Coercion 


(Continued from Page 1) 
strong backlash" from whites that 
he would have been forced to re- 
treat. 

The second, more optimistic, the 


guerrilla movement’s struggle 
•m -» -*~k ■* against the South African govern- 

r»f» rx/lfrl/I ment and said that ’’many white 

t/T AWM people wffl lose their lives," United 
Press International reported from 

cts Coercion ''SEELt**.*** 

speech Thtusday was “an arrogant 
, , , ... ...... ... reaffirmation by P.W. Botha that 

be ended, addmgthatthe United ^ apartheid s^tem wffl continue 
States should avoid direct criticism. 


RaMn 

PERUVIAN REBELS — Members of the Tupac Amaru organization met with 
journalists at a secret location and offered the new government of President Alan Gar- 
da Perez a partial truce, while hinting at further attacks against 115. targets in Pern. 


Murphy Ends Mission to Middle East 


from Libya wul continue to trap uoya overcome aronouu^ prwiwuj nta 
redistribute its domestic work force, a Libyan Embassy official said 

SU SfohaimKd Sadok Abouda, the Libyan charge d'affaires in Tutus. sod 
that the foreign workers affected were mainly Egyptian and Transmit, 
while Moroccans and Palestinians could stay. He said t he tt pnlaag 
stemmed from economic decisions made by the General People's Con- 
gress, or parliament, in 1982. Libyans working in adnnnamnon were u> 
be moved to work in factories and agriculture to improve productivity, he 

About 16,000 of the 92,000 Tunisian workforce has pe al otpcfe tf from 
Libya in recent weeks, the Tunisian news agency, TAP. ratted. About 
830 Egyptians arrived in Alexandria from Libya on Sunday and another 
500 traveled by truck into Egypt, to the bonier town of Salem. 


Mr. Botha’s speech is expected to un ^® n 2 ec ^ 
intensify pressure in Congress for 111 -f. stateniOTl rdeased by the 
sanctions on SoSth Afri- guerrilla _ organization s offices in 


i ne second, more optimistic, the economic sanctions on aoutn Am- f” r~ 
official added, is thaiSoulh Africa S a move opposed by Mr. Itagan. 
is committed to negotiated chang es The Senate is expected to take up 


while giv ing the organization a planned meeting. 


when Mr. Murphy w 
that little progress had 


but wants to bold off on conces- sanctions in September. While Mr 
sions now so they could be used as Reagan has no t made a final deed 
“leverage" later. He said the South sion, some officials say they thin] 


■tZIlZZMluT face of his best friends intonation- 

The Wesl should realize, Mr. 


“leverage" later. He said the South 
Africans may have wanted to let 
black leaders announce the 
changes and take credit. 

The official indicated be gave 
more weight to the first explana- 
tion than to the second. 

The disappointment in the Rea- 
gan administration also reflected 
exasperation with South Africans. 
“They are so different,” one aide 
said of the whites. “They won’t 
bend an Hirh if they think their 
basic values are threatened." 

White House aides said they 
learned the night before Mr. 
Botha's address that it was not go- 
ing to meet the expectations for 
sweeping reform. They said that 
Mr. McFarlane then set to work 
with others to draft a reaction. 

The next day, Mr. McFarlane 
listened to Mr. Botha's address and 
then telephoned Mr. Reagan at his 
ranch, in a conference call that in- 
cluded Secretary of Slate George P. 
Shultz and Vice President George 
Bush. They told Mr. Reagan what 
President Botha had said. 


bssssssse vssatSKa 
SS£»essss “S 4 - 


voice in the process. a Jon 

One of the Palestinians proposed , 

for the meeting, an East Jerusalem 7 ~”“~ 
newspaper editor, Hanna Seniora, "Tr 
said that Mr. Murphy’s failure to aTUtrm ' 
meet the Jordaman-Palestinian Afte 


Jordaman-PLO View 


position Of Sanctions.” 

° W * mjr . . Of the U5. approach to South 

■ Envoy Sees Misperception Africa, he leader said: “Those who 
South Africa's ambassador-des- have tied themselves to the policy 
ignate to the United States said of so-called constructive engage- 
that Mr. Botha’s speech had been men tare now reaping the fnri ts of a 
badly misunderstood, Reuters re- policy which has encouraged the 


team was a missed opportunity, nosrn Mubarak m Alexandria, Mr. 

“They have left the door open,” Murphy said that talks with the 
be said. But in the future, “the Egyptian leader concentrated on 


conditions may not be as favorable peace issues, “problems of the mo- 
as now," be added. ment," and U ^.-Egyptian rela- 


.. w ..i n 1 . . UN Unit Becomes Separate Agency 

^ TlTlg Wf ltn i ales Limans VIENNA (AP) —The United Nations Industrie DevriopmemOiga- 

O ntranmi officially became a separate UN spec i alized agency when, a 

(Continued ftm Pnge 1) Israeli objections to the e-hen Mr. Murphy was in Israel FUipinp diptanat, Domingo Sutzon. watt coofinned as ,ts dnecar- 4 

planned meeting. thatUttk [n^ess had b«n ^ ^^g^iranon's general conference Samrday confirmed Mr. Sittou 

■ Jordaman-PLO View P J£' i after tiK 5 ^mber fadwtrial Development Board, the cop exaemne 

Judith Mill* 0 / The New fork [Sto organ, broke a thmoday doadlockon a replranffln for^l 

Tunes reported Saturday fivm Alex- age a process that wouMbegin with Khane of Algeria. The board agreed to discard a nderejWWg 
andria, Egypt: rmeSbetwccn U^offirials thirds majority for election m favor of a simple majority, and ccFrxky 

^sSsLASSt 

Murphy said that talks with the This, in their view, would then _ 1 _ 

Egyptian leader concentrated on lead to a Jordanian call for simufta- DefovS Bifl OH Student FTOteSt ■ 

peace issues, “problems of the mo- neous “exchange of commit- OWUl l/cuL^o uui uu umiu 

ment" and lf.S.-Egyptian rela- menis.” The PU) would recognize SEOUL (Reuters) —The South X - ^ 


that little progress had been made. 

Jordan and ibe PLO, which 
signed an agreement Feb. 1 1 out- 


After meeting with President 


meats." The PLO would recognize 


Mr. Seniora complained that 
“America's foreign policy is being 


Officials dose to the peace pro- 


ported from Washington. obduracy and a 

“What he announced — and apartheid regime, 
what is missing here in the media 
perception — was a major devi- m 

ation from the political status lg/T/ , I/y 
quo," said Herbert Beukes, named -i IHLRT 
as ambassador but not yet officially 
received by the United States. (Continued fi 

The diplomat said in an inter- ^ 1 ter Skarpevill 


obduracy and arrogance of the 


made in Tel Aviv and not Washing- cess found tittle ground for opti- 
ma," a reference to U.S. concern mism- Israeli offiaals indicated 


IsraeTsii^it to exist, as outlined in Korean government, in the face of 
United Naticms Security Council ^rr opporition, is postponing the 
Resolutions 242 and 338, which introduction of a law ait Txyt at 


call for Israel to return territory it 
o mipi fts in «rhang p. for the right 


student protests, 
temocranc Justice Party of 


Racial Reform: South Africa Rubicon 

(Continued from Page 1) death of everything the president given an impression, apparently by 
after Sharpeville in 1960 and stood for. Most blacks would prob- both South African and U.S. offi- 


to live within “secure and recog- president Chun Doo Hwan had 


nized borders.’’ 


planned to pass the bill at a special 


The United States woald then parliamentary session later this 
recognize the PLO, its right to self- month But the party chairman, 
determination endorse the concept RohTaeWoo, said Saturday that it 
of a Palestinian state federated would be introduced at a regular 


received by the United States. (Continued from Page 1) death of everything the president 

The diplomat said in an inter- *** Sharpeville in I960 and stood for. Most blacks would prob- 
view that Mr Botha had accented Soweto in 1976— and a radicalized ably view the release as a willing- 
theciS^of^i^p^SS movement amrag black youth and ^ ^ l^Mrtoh^s wl^J n- 
tion for Wacks, the rightof blaS black unemployed, sensing victory vab and suprorters would call it 

homelands to remain p£t of South through confrontauon. to 

. r - j l _ .i »■ Th«*! an» «>.lF-nercentions and The couinlexities also extend to 



AuT.i 


Africa and dtizenship tbr those liv- . T>^ sd t f ’ ac S°5 5 
ing in these “mtioS stales.” muapittanons that ptedode Mr. 

t . Botha from seeing his township 

The envoy said he saw bs most foes as anything other than barbar- 

rmsvliatf* fact nc rpctnriruf r.- v- 


for those Ihr- 
states.” 


dais, that Mr. Botha would an- 
nounce changes such as the scrap- 
ping of tribal “homelands” and the 

through confrontation. ^ ' abdication and surrender. creation of common dtizenship. 

There are self-perceptions and The complexities also extend to South African commentators at- 
interp relations that predude Mr. what seems to have been a bungled tributed that impression to Foreisn 
Botha from ewing his township attempt by some South African of- Minister RP. Botha, who led the 
foes as anything other than barbar- fidals to manipulate senior U.S. del egati on to Yienna. 
ic revolutionaries, and which keep officials who met with them recent- Toe result was a collision be- 

hic adversaries from seeing him as ly in Vienna and news organiza- tween expectations and realities, 
anything other than a tyrant out to tions into believing that the Dur- Mr. Botha could not deliver what 


with Jordan, as well as the indu- session in late S^pwmh w 


sion of the PLO directly in peace Under the proposed law, radical 


immediate task as restoring “some 
form of respect” between South Af- 
rica and die United States. 


It was during this call that Mr. 
Reagan suggested the statement be 
toughened to say apartheid should 


Sanctions would be an nnpio- perpetuate white power. 


talks. The final stage would be an students could be sent to “reorien- 
interoational peace conference, tation centers” for op to six 


sponsored by the permanent mem- months. The New Korea Demo- 
bers of the Security Co onriL crane Party, the ™in op po si tion 


ic revolutionaries, and which keep officials who met with them recent- 
his adversaries from seeing him as ly in Vienna and news organiza- 


ddegation to Vienna. 
The result was a I 


tiers ot tne security i_oanciL crane Party, the mum opposition 
U.S. and Arab offiaals agreed party and dissiden ts have de m^nd - 
that the United States was rduc- ed the bill be withdrawn, saying 



tarn to take the first step — that is, that it is unconstituikmaL 

to meet with the joint Jordaman- 

Palestinian delegation — if this i /*»■ 


President Chun Doo Hmn 


ductive punishment, he said, add- 
ing; “As long as they antagonize us, 
they cannot influence us.* 


If Mr. Botha freed Mr. Mandela momentous changes, 
unconditionally, he would be re- At briefings in Sot 
leasing a man committed to the elsewhere, some jot 


ban speech would be about had been expected, 
momentous chang es After the Durban 


Palestinian delegation — u tne 1 i i? • T • ~r» j I 

would lead only to u^. recognition Generals Check Foreign LegtonBram I — 

of the PLO, but not to braider p ARIS _ French Fonasn Lerion trooos were invdtmd I 


momentous changes. After the Durban speech, critics 

At briefings in South Africa and of the government judged his pro- 
dsewhere, some journalists were posals not by their departures from 


anrfthe PARIS (Reuters) — French Foreign Lcgjcm troops were involved 
peaa: talks between Israel and Saturday in violence in the port of Kourou in French Guiana, in which 

AraDS - one Legionnaire was killed and 19 people; moody Lmoomtirts, were 


Herald 


Opening for Talk*. 
b» Seen in Moscow 


omit leaders Vow to Post 
an Economic Recovery 


apartheid but by the shortfall be- 
tween them and the more funda- \\ i m f 1~w •! 

mental change that Mr. Botha is lV 1Q0T* f 0~|*j | 
not prepared to countenance. 

At one point, he said, “Let roe rx 
state explicitly that I believe in par- p 1*A|T| 

tidpation of all the South Afncan M. M. VrJXL 

communities on matters of com- m 

mon concern." The audience, un- I pppAl*! etc 
certain what this meant, was silenL o-dlUllolo 

“Why don’t you cheer me nowT J ^ ™ 

Mr. Botha asked. The answer (Coatim^d firom Page 

seemed to be that the whites, un- sages through then lawyers 
nerved by the township violence nf 

and uncertain of where Mr. Botha - J h ?„ ovt ^ n S*™ 011 *?, 
was leading them, had nothing to titms is said to have Mssed I 
cheer dbouL 

... . , - n beck and Stfke Maier-WitL . 
The focus of what are still pro- pochard von Seckendoi 


one Legionnaire was killed and ]9jpeopk, moody Legkanmrts. were 
injured. Paris sent two generals Sunday to investigate the imadwir 

The violence began when 50 soldiers, members of a regiment that 
guards France's space center north of here, stormed a district of the tora. 
attacking residents and gnashing windows. 

The troops were said to have been angered by a rumor that a an t in g 
comrade had been murdered in the district Witnesses said ivnrirBa ; 
fearful of attack, fired shotguns at the soldiers, killing one. Thejfefeoce. 
described as a “serious act of indiscipline" by Defense MimsttfCbarin 
Herau, follows a series of brands between Foreign Legion roerabtfliod 
residents. French Guiana is an overseas department of France. . 


Mcnr-i? 

Vll;::-'* 


7 L* 
: of 


.her Reagan Ui^es Restraint on Fann Bill 

terrorists. SANTA BARBARA, California (NYT) — President Ronald fteagm 

The overall direction of opera- said in his weekly radio address that the answer to farmers’ fimmrwl 
tions is said to have passed to three problems could not be found “in sticking with discredited pro gr am s and 
women: Inge Viett, Sgrid Sterne- increasing government controls." He urged Congress to restrain sp e nd i ng 
beck and Silke Maier-WitL A man. on farm support programs. . 

Ekkehard von Seckendorff-Gu- fa his remarks, delivered Saturday from his ranch near hare, Mr. 
dent, also is said to be important in Reagan sought to underscore his concerns over a four-year agricuhoff 
planning attacks. biD Congress is writing to take effect next year. Both the House and 

The new leaders appear to have Senate Agriculture Committees are considering legislation that corid 
been trying to attract recruits by exceed spending targets Congress set two weeks ago. 








jSSSiS.-SS-rr-S 
^ sn - iT mSS SfejiEss."? 



y&kfle EuA 


■ g’S W«aterBLeaderaOool« 
jj=gc= U& Btc onry’ ii Pawer 



po^s, since none that affects also is said to be important in 
blacks has yet gone mto effect, is planning attacks. 

thm eiinmrol iKrrtiinh cpfwrotimi • _ u • 


that survival through separation v j 
has been overtaken, and that new ^ 
ways must be found to ensure that q™ 
whites in general, and Afrikaners in 
! particular, maintain dominance. k-b 


•HHU IV UHW 

women: Inge Viett, Sgrid Steme- 
beck and Sflke Maier-WitL A man. 
Ekkehard von Seckendorff-Gu- 


11011 The new leaders iqipear to have 
“f* been trying to attract recruits by 
“*a^ gm pTiflcmng ^rfytrc qq U.S. and 


NATO-related targets to exploit .i j 

lingaing dismay over the failure of 1: OF Ul6 XlCCOrO. 


Mr. Botha, in his speech, seemed nonviolent protests to stop the do- r^,, • ... . , . , _ . tkt 

to be saying that there was yw trine ployment of new VS. Pttshmg-2 - ^ JWg?- 1 . Qggpatioa leader and daightg of the 

to achieve all this and, actine bv and enrise miwlw in Wesi Germa- f 0 ™® 1 Prime Minj^r Zulfikm* Ah Bhutto, said she woddfiy huu*f*Vifli 


to achieve all this and, acting by 
raw force in the townships and 
through co-optation of “moderate" 
blacks, undercut the protesters. 

. “He had the world at his feet," 
said an editorial in The Star, the 
Johannesburg paper, “and he 
spoke almost exclusively to the Na- 
tal Party Congress. Thou is hardly 
a smaller audience on earth. Iri- 


and cruise missies in West Genna- 


exile in London ot Tuesday with the body of her feotherSahnawaz. He 
“The arcoment they make is that "* f oml ? dad ** “ “ 1” »P»nine*u in Carnes. France. (Jtqml 
since peaceful action did not stop An lumtopuand nodes ^test was conducted Saturday in Nevada, the 


since peaceful action did not stop mmem asi was contracted Saturday m Nevada, tne 

the nS« from comma, violent first American rest since U S. officials rgected last month a Soviet oflfer 
methods are now necessary." said JpJ«n m a testfreeze. A UjS. mviiation to Moscow to send ohserveo to 
an official of the Ministry of Intcri- s lesI rq ected. (Rouen) 


stead of rising to the challenge, the thinking.” 
a’s leades 


methods are now necessary," said uai 

an official ot the Ministry of Interi- Sa ^ trday s ^ ^ rq ected. 
or. “There are some people, who *^ n ^ ed 

ordinarily would not be tenorists. French restaurant owner m I 
who are ready to accept that line of Pop de la Plana. 


Basque guerrillas dahned responsibility for the killing Friday of a - . 
ench restanrant owner in the Spanish Mali icrrancan resort of Cane- r \ 


French restanrant owner in the Spanish Mediterranean resort of Caste- ‘ 
Don de la Plana. (Rosen} 


2 PORI 


nation’s leader retreated into an 
insecure sheU." 


New members are believed to 
have assisted in attacks on proper- '-All 1 d/UUUo 

ty, such as the two dozen minor Because of an editing error, an item in the Business People '*»&««« in 
arson and bombing a tt acks on some editions of Aug. 17-18 incorrectly identified Generate de Banqoe 
NATO fuel pipelines. Some explo- SA of Brussels. 

aves and firebombs Med to go off a Business People column July 12 incotrectly identified the manager of 
because of amateurish faults, the SPL Deutschland Systems Programming GtdbH near FrankfinTnana- 
poiice said. Jergen Seebald has been named to that posL 

I net waalr wiawim * 


WORLDWIDE 

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You haven't seen 
Amsterdam 
if you didn't 
see 


i sives and firebombs failed to go off 
because of amateurish faults, the 
police said. 

Last week, cleaning women 

aboard a U.S. militar y train discov- 


ered blankets drenched in flamma- O * T T Tr . n j 

ble liquid that bad failed to ignite &Tt MJCOlKCttl UTUTeSt ODFeCUOS 
because of an improperly rigged I 


But recent murder plots and car 
bombs have shown a degree of 


(Continued from Page 1) 
ging to Sri Lanka’s majority 


rrr* yr* u Sinhalese commimiiy were found 

todmiMlskfflOm could be eainod murdered in the TrLomatens 


Sp»t»lloWc*XloryB» 

Pk» NbnenipnB *1(0*1 Fix newatxttxno*/. 

gfc>p»d«»«tWiMarfi3l.iWS} 



To: Stiiscripfon Manager, International Herald Tribune, 181, avenue Chariexte-Gautle, 
92521 NeuBy Cedex, Franoe.Td.: 747 0729. Telex; 612832. 

Please enter my subscription fon 

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19-8-85 


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out only by trained people. 

The murder of a20-year-old U.S. 
soldier on Ana. 8 and a car bomb- 
ing at ihe ILS. Rhein-Main Air 
Base a few horns later, in which two 
Americans ware kilted and 20 were 
injured, demonstrated a more ruth- 


murdered in the Trmcomalee re- 
gion. The government accused 
Tamil guerrillas of abducting the 


Tamil guerrillas commandeered 
a train Sunday with 500 passengers 
on board near the northwesters 
coastal town of Mannar, railroad 


less attitnde and a tame effective SSSSiO. Ttefi^hTtW- 
“ btca jack ended udien the driver derailed 

SflOWn OefOre ♦!,« fnmmAfnn « u .hi« m 1 .i m , ,. 


YEHTGALAHT 

IN THE HEART OF OLD PARIS 

42 Qoai des Or fil vm. tail T*f 

326-83-68 

Privata rooms for business meek 
P ari an^ 

Cbted Saturdays 


The pdice now are puxsiimg the 
hypothecs that thesdmez^ Edward 
Pimeaial, was murdered so that his 
military idoitity card could be used 
to gain access to the air base, where 
the explosives-iaden car was driven 
and left 


the locomotive 
“* the town <rf Am 


iy outside 
ora. abort 


125 miles (200 kilometers) north- 
east of Colombo, a railway spokes- 
man said. - : - 

Before escaping, the rebds ab- 
ducted IS train passengers bektag- 
ing to the nujority Sinhalese com- 
munity and later shot «h«n near 
Madhy railroad staikaa. accords^ 
to an uncon fi rmed dispatch fiutn* 
reporter in the area. 

Mr. De Alwis said he expected 
the peace talks aimed, at ending 3* 
country's two-year ethnic crisis ® - 
resume Monday. 

(AP, Rested- 


, 




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(Gutimed from Page 1) 


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PACIFIC WESTBN UWVStOTY : 


whose campus is side by side with Methylene chkmde was pta** 
the plant at Institute, saw a hopeful under a special review bv the 
Qj^ortuntty ia the recent problems, ronmentaf fto tectipn A&ucy p 
Paul Nochnus, as an professor May after laboratoty tests haksof 
«£cge.. propped staging a to unusual numbers of oOffm 


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Los Angeles. California 
MXM9. Dept. 23, U^A. 


“Great Chonical City FestivaT lung and liver imn on inimc&^ : 
and establishing a chemical muse- carb chloride is called a 


tmum ' by Union Carbide: 














Polygamy, Birth Control 


INTRItNATinNAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 1985 



Page 3 


r.yi s-ivi. 

o., ''i!. 


,<\ ' 7, 

:: ?t \\ s 

> ■ k-'. 


'^cV 




^ govermac^?- 1 ^^ where 


contro] to redi»Ji®““ uul ¥ H F ID 
growth. uce Population 




birth 


W3 , f ■<■ 


:r. u^- j. ■ ;■ 


men ft 
wife 


; - Hy'-'S': 


dbv 




“a country where 
. 'yuave more than one 

liff said .SS 1 cfuJ *W, the pon- ■ 
comi^Sf *0UM be“a 

•ssrSd ’ifi'-s? *s 

t polite ap- . 


" >'r 




“In the Old 
^wasrometimS 


xwyga- 
"fohn 




;w_ •- s 


lte -W 




dent Pr,v. 


our cavtnr j ‘*"wunn 

origSKS^ S2^- to its 

_T™ auuc as a co mmunion of 
and one woman/^ 

Kahtenf*? was , onc of the high- 
KfJ* ^ pope's wsir to Nairobi 

sev^-nahon African pfl^magt 
Oj. Staday, thepo^^Si. 
g^^tians to hdp the poor, the 
^™cl«s, the ack and the iinpris- 

« Mass that drew a^wd 

esumated at up to a nriffion. 

He said Const’s )ove must be 
skued by all: “With the neighbor 
t* pom- or homeless, with the 
npgnbor who is sick or in prison, 
with the neighbor who belongs to a 
dufttemt tribe or race or who does 
not believe in Christ,'’ 

The Mass marked the end of the 
43rd International Eucharistic 

Congress, the fim held in biarfr rale of more than 4 percent, the 
Africa. The spiritual conferences world's highest The government 
ore held every four years and am- has promoted artificial butb con- 
&st of liturgies, seminars and ex- trol as part of a campaign to curb 
Mbits. This year’s conference drew the growth rate. 

legates from 59 countries. The pope spent Saturday morn- 
The pope said Saturday that bus- mg touring the 720-square-mile 
band and wife must “be ready with (1,864- square-kilometer) Masai 
stout hearts to cooperate with the Mara Game Reserve in southwest- 
love of the creator and the savior, em Kenya, 
who through them will enlarge and During the 90-minute ride over 



Ua Aooooted Pnw 

Pope John Paid H watered a tree Sunday that he had 
planted moments before at the Uhmn Gardens in Nairobi. 


enrich his own fasrnfy day by day." 

“That is why anti-life actions 
such as contraception and abortion 


are wrong -and unworthy erf' good 
husbands and wives," he said. 


Kenya has a population growth 
rale of m 


bumpy, dusty roads, John Paul saw 
cheetah, giraffes, cape buffalo, ele- 
phants and a pride of lionesses and 
cubs lolling beside a newly killed 
wildebeest 

■ Papa) Am&ence for Rhino 

EJ. Dionne Jr, of The New York 
Tines reported from Nairobi: 

Sarnia flew 210 miles (340 kilo- 
meters) just to see the pope. 

Samra is a 6 -montb-old, 250- 
pound rhinoceros. She was flown 
specially to the Masai Mara reserve 
Saturday to make sure the pope got 
a chance to see a rhino. 

Those attending Sarnia took spe- 
cial care to make sure she would 


not run away when the pope ?p- 
preached. They have been wearing 
white robes to get the ririnooaos 

used to the idea of a man in white. 

Sure enough, according to a 
spokesman, the pope got a chance 
to touch Samia. 

The episode was testimony 10 the 

lengths to which black Africa has 
gone to receive John Paul. I ndy 
after city, his picture hung from 
light posts ana bu ildin g s . Presi- 
dents flow him to their palaces and 
traveled with him almost every- 
where he went 

In many countries the m ac h i n es 
of the single ruling party wen * 10 
work to turn out the crowds. At 
Niamtougou in northern Togo, sev- 
eral «hmi«md people attended an 
airport welcome. 

The same several thousand sal m 
the hot sun for five hours while the 
pope made his rounds, just to make 
sure they were on hand to cheer 
him when he left 

Ibrahim Daou, a leader of a dele- 
gation of Moslems, said his group 
was there to receive the popes 
blessing. He then explained with a 
large grin, “Oh, we’re all with the 
party . 58 This was a reference to the 
Rally of the Togolese People, the 
party erf President Gnassingbfi Eya~ 

d flm w 

Mr. Daou said that since many 
in the crowd had been bused in 
from far away, “there was no place 
for a lot of us to go, so we just sat 
here and waited." 

There were many explanations 
as to why the African leaden went 
to so much trouble for John PauL 

To be sure, even when Catholics 
are a minority, they are a signifi- 
cant one and, thanks to the Catho- 
lic schools, often among the edu- 
cated elite. 

But much of it is the sheer pres- 
tige of bring associated with the 
pope. Some presidents chose to 
hang their pictures next to his on 
podiums and light posts. Others, 
like General Eyadfcma, just made 
sure they were always at his side. 



Agca Judges Study Lin ks to Turkish Underworld 


Pi 






* , 

kv. j. 




By John Tagliabue 

New York Timor Service ■ 

BOCHUM, West' Germany — 
An Italian court has gathered evi- 
dence in the Netheriands and West 
Germany that seems to lend cre- 
dence to the view that the shooting 
of Pope John Paul U in 1981 was 
the work of a Turkish rarorist 
group with links to the Turkish 
underworld and to Bulgaria. 

The hearings, by the court trying 
three Bulgarians and five Turks ac- 


cused of plotting to lrill the pope in 
May 1981, may be significant be- 
cause a Turk imprisoned in West 
Germany, Yakm Ozbey, is the only 
witness to corroborate Mehmet AH 
Agca's contention that Bulgaria 
was behind die plot Court officials 
left West Germany for Italy on 
Saturday. 

- However, Turidsh reporters cov- 
ering the case have expressed the 
view that Mir. Ozbey may be embel- 
lishing a few facts and mures relat- 


ed to the case that are familiar to 
him either from dealings with the 
Turks involved or through news 
reports. 

Mr. Ozbey, who is held on forg- 
ery and weapons charges, seconded 
Mr. Agca's account of a wide net- 
work of Turidsh terrorists said to 
have been hired by the Bulgarian 
secret service to km John PanL De- 
tails of this network are among the 
new dements to emerge since the 
trial began May 27. 


Khamenei Leads in Iran 
With 89 % of the Vote 


However, Mr. Ozbey, unlike Mr. 
Agca, says the Bulgarians left the 
Turks hanging , failing to pay a fee 
erf 3 million Deutsche marks (51.1 
million). ■ 


item ri- 


Racers 

LONDON — President Ali 
Khameuri of Iran led with 89 per- 
cent of tire vote Sunday after more 
than half the votes from Friday’s 
preridenlial poll had been counted. 

The Iranian press agency IRNA, 
received in London, said that a law- 
yer, Sayyed Mahmoud Mustafavi 
Kashasi, 42, had 9 percent of the 
vote and that a former trade minis- 
ter, Habibollah Asgar-Owladi, 52, 
had 2 percent. 

The Council of Guardians, Iran's 


senior Islamic constit u tio nal , body, 
sof47 


turned down the applications of 
other would-be candidates two 
weeks ago. 


The total votes cast by the ehgi- 
than 20 rou- 


ble electorate of mere than 20 
lion will not be known for several 

days- , . 

Mr. Khamenei, 46, who is a cler- 
gyman, won 95 percent of the vote 
when he was elected preadent in 
1981. Friday’s poll was Irans 
fourth presidential election since 
the Islamic revolution in 1979. 

The president coordinates the 
work of Iran’s Majlis, or pariia- 
meet, the executive and judiciary 
y and presides over the Supreme De- 
fense Council. . 

The press agency said the elec- 
tion went smoothly after Iranian 
internal security forces last week 
arrested or ldfied « 
hit-squad members who had mm- 
naied Iran from Iraq to disrupt the 

P °Intemal security officials raid 
bomb disposal experts Saturday 
defused an 88 -pound (40-talogram) 
bomb planted “by countarrevoi^ 
dowries and agents of the fr»P 
regime" inside a car m front of the 
jSstiy of Agriculture in north 

Tehran. 



Court concede that ihe 

value of the week’s testimony 
hinges largely on the credibility of 
Mr. Ozbey, which has been doubt- 
ed by Judge Dario Martdla, who 
questioned him 18 months ago as 
part of a pretrial investigation. 

The Italian court officials, in- 
cluding Chief Judge Severmo San- 
tiapichi, traveled to the Nether- 
lands on Aug 8 to question Samet 
Arslan, a Turkish rightist who was 
arrested in May under circum- 
stances that prompted Italian offi- 
cials to presume some connection 
to the pmported plot against the 
pope. 

Mr. Arslan, who is sought m 
Turkey on terrorism charges, told 
the Dutch police that he was in the 
Netherlands to seek political asy- 
lum. 


the last day of a visit 
when tight security was in force. 
Mr. Arslan carried a badly forged 
passport and a pistol 

The Dutch police later traced the 
pistol 10 a latch of 21 weapons 
purchased In Switzerland in 1980 
by an arms enthusiast who smug- 
gled them into Austria, where four 
guns were later acquired by Mr. 
Agca and his associates. 

Numbers and letters etched on 
the handle erf Mr. Arslan’s gun 
matched similar markings on Mr. 
Agca’s pistol Mr. Arslan first told 
the police that his father had given 
him the gun. Later he said it had 
been planted on him by the Dutch 
police. 

Mr. Arslan was carrying a rail 
ticket from Frankfurt to the Dutch 
border with a telephone number of 
a Turkish video dealer in The 
Hague scribbled cm it Italian offi- 
cials said the number seemed to 
create a link to the rightist circles 
that supported Mr. Agca. 

The dealer, AH Tokman, first ac- 
knowledged then denied knowing 
Mr. Araan. Mr. Tokman has de- 
nied any wrongdoing. In the Turk- 
ish immig r a nt community in the 
Netherlands, he is regarded as a 
rightist, and the video business has 
led the poHce to suspect possible 
c riminal ties to Turkish video deal- 
ers in West Germany who of ten use 
such businesses as a front for con- 
traband and drug trafficking. 


Officials are puzzled by his entry 
e Netherlands on May 14. 


Italian court officials suspect 
: been 


into the 


that Mr. Arslan may have 
involved in a further effort by 
Turkish rightists to loll the pope, 


Ali Khamenei 


U.S. Court Brief Assails 


.. The Paris-based Mujahidin 
Khalq opposition group said its 
guerrillas set off 150 concussion 
grenades around Iran on Friday at 
the height erf a two-week campaign 
to protest tire election campaign. It 
said 150 pro-aovemment militia- 
men were 


'Comparable Worth’ Pay 


La t Angeles Times Service 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
adminis tration has taken its criti- 
cism erf the concept of “comparable 


The Iranian Interior Ministry 
said the only dection-day incident 
ram* when a guerrilla killed him- 
self with a grenade that he was 
about to throw at a provincial mili- 
tia base. 


worth" a step further, filing a court 
brief siding with the state of Illinois 


■ 30 Injured in Bombing 
The IRNA press agency said 
Sunday that a bomb planted in a 
van wounded at least 30 persons in 
southwestern Tehran, Renters re- 
ported from London. 




v; rr i 
' ' £ 


(Tiretap Evidence Admitted 
[n Trial «i U.S. Spy^ Suspect 

«... Times service pubKdty in the case. The two have 


against nurses seeking higher pay 
on the ground that they do not earn 
as pnneh as men in similar jobs. 

Explaining the administration's 
decision to file its first “friend-of- 
th e-court” brief in such a case on 
Friday, Assistant Attorney General 
W3Ham Bradford Reynolds, bead 
of the civil rights division of the 
Justice Department, said that tire 
comparable worth theory made “a 
mockery of the ideal of pay 
equity." 

The comparable worth concept, 
Mr. Reynolds said, advances in- 
stead “the thesis that equal pay 
should be provided to men and 
women in remarkably different 
jobs cm the baas of a subjective 
evaluation by some ‘expert 1 that the 
two jobs can be called ’compara- 
ble.' 1 ’ 

Filed with the 7lh U.S. Circuit 
Court of Appeals in Chicago, the 
brief urges the court to uphold a 

lower-court ruling in April dismiss- 
ing the nurses’ claims, rather than 
to allow it a full triaL 


have endorsed the concept and 
have voluntarily moved to begin 
basing wages on an evaluation of 
such factors as the skills required 
for a job and the working condi- 
tions demanded. 

In a study released in March, the 
UJS. Commission on Civil Rights 
rejected the proposition of < 
rable worth. In June the Equal : 


ployment Opportunity commis- 
sion ruled unanimously that 
federal law does not require em- 
ployers to give men and women 
equal pay for different jobs of corn- 
worth. 


AMERICAN TOPICS 



The Assocoted Pics 

WAITING FOR THE END — Charles Rumbaugh, 
who is on Death Row at the state prison at Huntsville, 
Texas, displays a coffin he made from matchsticks in 
which he wants his cremated remains placed. Mr. Rmn- 
baugh is to die Sept 11 for killing a jewelry store owner. 


10 Milliou Take Part 


In Anti-Crime Drive 


With porch lights, neighbor- 
hood parties and parades, resi- 
dents in cities across the United 
States went out in lire streets 
one night last week to “take 
back the night” from crime. 
Participation in the second an- 
nual National Night Out on 
Aug 13 was enthusiastic in 
some cities and apathetic in 
others, but organizers estimated 
that as many as 10 million peo- 
ple took part in the effort to 
drive crime out of their neigh- 
borhoods. 

In New York City, communi- 
ty groups coordinated 500 local 
events and Mayor Edward L 
Koch led a parade in Brooklyn. 
Organizers in Minneapolis said 
that 12,000 residents participat- 
ed in the show of solidarity 
against crime. A police officer 
in Hartford, Connecticut, 
called the program a great suc- 
cess, saving it was good to see 
neighbors “working together in 
a collective way." 

But response to the National 
Night Out was not enthusiastic 
everywhere. In Detroit report- 
ers for the Detroit Free Press 
found no ont-of-the-ordinary 
activity, and residents of the ex- 
clusive Tapglewood neighbor- 
hood in Houston said they 
thought that the National Night 
Out was a good idea, but they 
would not be participating. 


ShortTakes 


Massachusetts is expected to 
become the first slate to require 
a health warning on snuff. Dr. 
Gregory Connolly, chief of the 
state’s Denial Health Division, 
rays he recommended that all 
packages of smokeless tobacco 
carry the label, “Wanting: Use 
of snuff can be addictive and 
can cause mouth cancer and 
other mouth disorders " 


More than 50,000 taxpayers 
with total incomes above 
5250,000, including more than 
5,000 millionaires, prod less of 
their total income in federal 
taxes in 1983 than typical mid- 
dle-income families, according 
to a Treasury Department 
study. The study, requested by 
Representative JJ. Pickle; a 
Democrat of Texas, shows that 
many of those wealthy taxpay- 
ers paid less than $6, 272 in tax- 
es, which is the average amount 
paid by a family of four with 
income of 545,000. 


Forty-four U.S. law enforce- 
ment officers were killed in the 
line of duty by assailants during 
the first half of this year, up 
from 35 in the first half of 1984. 
The Federal Bureau of Investi- 
gation said that pistols were 
used in 29 of the killings, shot- 


guns in six and rifles in two. The 
bureau said that four officers 
were killed with motor vehicles, 
two with blunt instruments and 
one with a knife. The incidence 
of slayings was highest in the 
Southwest, where 21 officers 
were killed. 


A busier sticker spotted in 
South Carolina on a car with 
Ohio plates: “I owe, 1 owe, it’s 
off to work I go." 


Notes on People 


At the seventh annual Possi- 
ble Dreams Auction in Edgar- 
town, Massachusetts, a s ailin g 
trip with Walter Cronkfte, the 
former CBS News anchorman, 
went for $3,800, while a tour of 
The Washington Post, auc- 
tioned off by Katharine Gra- 
ham, chairman of Washington 
Post Co, sold for $750. The 
auction raised $33,000 for Mar- 
tha’s Vineyard Community Ser- 


vices. 


Stetson Hat Co., which last 
year produced the popular Indi- 
ana Jones hat, will introduce 
the Trail Rider hat next month, 
based on the Stetson that CEnt 
Eastwood wore in his latest film. 
“Pale Rider." 


Presidents rated most popu- 
lar among Secret Service agents 
are Ronald Reagan and Gerald 
RL Ford, according to “Protect- 
ing the Preadent," a forthcom- 
ing book fry Dennis McCarthy, 
a former agent Least popular 
was Lyndon B. Johnson, who, 
the author says, “was a royal 
pain to deal with." 


Nancy Reagan celebrated her 
62d — or 64th — birthday at 
the Reagan ranch near Santa 
Barbara, California, on Satur- 
day, in the company of about 70 
guests. “She hasn’t decided" 
bow old she is, a spokesman at 
the Whiu; House said about the 
ambiguity of the first lady’s age. 

Her birth register shows she was 
boro July 6 , 1921, but Che for- 
mer actress has said the correct 
year is 1923. The celebration 
had been delayed because of the 
TWA hostage crisis. 


When the Supreme Court is 
in session. Justice Sandra Day 
(yConnor likes to attend dady 8 
AJVl. exercise classes for wom- 
en in the courts gym. Some of 
her classmates sported new T~ 
shirts after Mrs. O’Connor's 
celebrated encounter last Janu- 
ary with John Riggins, the 
Washington Redskins fullback, 
in which the football star told 
her to “loosen up, Sandy baby” 
as they shared a table at a con- 
gressional dinner. The T-shirts 
read: “Loosen Up at the Su- 
preme Court.” 


AMY HOI 


— C.ompi. 


Changes Ordered in Rides for U.S. Aviation 


b* 


r \ *'*• 


a pretnai nw* Ti' -nder mg to Mr. waixer ww aisu u C 

Jower when the SW Walker’s brother Arthur, a 

SSbyanqthCTfrf^J®^ Navy lieutenant command- 

pring. He rqectfid defenses was convicted of espitmaffl (last 

Sts that the wiretap rogh ^ after a notgiuy tnal m Nor- 

approved. 


The administration's move drew 
immediate and sharp critiosm 
from advocates of the concept. 

The American Federation of 
State, County and Municipal Em- 
ployees union has led the court 
fight for comparable worth and 
won what it considered as impor- 
tant victory in a 1984 case in which 
a federal judge ordered the state of 
Washington to pay women em- 
ployees up to $1 bflHon in back 


By Reginald Stuart 

Nf* York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Major 
changes in the operations of the 
Federal Aviation Administration 
have been ordered by Transporta- 
tion Secretary Elizabeth H. Dole, 
who has made public a report high- 
ly critical of the agency. 

The report, produced by the 
Transportation Department’s Safe- 
ty Review Task Force, said it had 
found “no diminution of safety” 
because of the agency’s operating 
practices. Statistics, in fact, showed 
an improvement of UA air flight 
safety in the first five year of this 
decade over the previous five years. 

But the task force said that im- 
provements were needed in several 
areas if theagency was to keep pace 
with changes in aviation, particu- 
larly the increased competition re- 
sulting from deregulation of U.S. 
airlines. 


It also criticized the agency's in- 
ternal communications system, 
saying, for example, that aircraft 
inspection results were not always 
transmitted among regions. 

The panel recommended more 
centralized control of the agency, 
establishing a strict timetable for 
rale- makin g, imposing of uniform 
standards for interpreting and car- 
rying out rules, and a review erf 
internal and external communica- 
tions policies. 

Mrs. Dole, who appointed the 
task force, ordered its recommen- 
dations carried out. 


The Transportation Department 
said that aircraft accident rates in 
the United States for 1980 to 1984 
were “substantially lower" than for 


1975 to 1979, a conclusion s> 
ed in separate statistical studies by 
the National Transportation Safety 
Board, an independent federal 
agency. According to that agency, 
there were 0.224 accidents per 
100 X 00 departures of scheduled 
airlines last year compared with 
0.419 per idO.OOO departures in 
1983. 

Sources in the Transportation 
Department said that the aviation 
agency planned to increase its ros- 
ter of safety inspectors to 974 from 
674, a 46-percent increase, in the 
next two fiscal years. 

Earlier this month, the General 
Accounting Office made public a 


wide 

inspections 


in the frequency 
air carriers. 


udge also iipuwJ *® es ^ ^jK^^Wtworth, a rdred 
ndfciments 3 gainst Mj- ^ avy radioman from Daws. Cah- 
andhissonWi^a^d^ for 5a. charged in the case has also 
j^jSTrfSSS pl«ded not guilty.. 


In its brief, the Justice Depart- 
ment insisted that the Washington 
ruling was too narrow to be con- 
strue as a judicial endorsement of 
comparable worth. 

Some cities, such as Los Angeles, 


The report, released Friday, said 
that ihe agency had trouble formu- 
lating rules in a timely manner, 
citing delays of as much as eight 
years. Rules and policies were not. 
uniform around the country, the 
report said. 


AN INDIAN ISLAND OF GOURMET ADVENTURE 
MOORED ON THE SEINE 

L£ LOTUS, where detiguful mysteries of a “iM" nnfokL 
JARWN DE SHAUMAR, “The Garden of Romance’', 
where yon can feast, oo a bnffei at fundi and dine a la carte. 

Ouri Debilly, en face du 32. av. de New-York, Paris 16®. 
Telephone: 723.77.78/72330.97 - Parking 

Open 7 days c>f ibe wed f« touch aad limner. Last order. Ilpm J 



U.S. Policymakers Say 
Quarrels With Managu 
Cannot Be Resolved 


By Shirley Christian 

New York Times Service 
WASHINGTON — Reagan ad- 
ministration officials involved in 


Central American policy say that 
with Nic 


UJS. differences with Nicaragua 
cannot be resolved so long as the 
Sandinists remain in power, and 
some indicate they favor the over- 
throw of the Sandmist leadership. 

Robert C. McFariane, Preadent 
Ronald Reagan’s national security 
adviser, said in response to a query 
that it was “absolutely not the 
policy of the United States to over- 
throw the Sandinists. But other of- 
ficials, including some assigned to 
oversee and foster activities of anti- 
Sandinist guerrillas, said they saw 
no way to satisfy the concerns of 
the United States, the rebels and 
other Central American nations 
with the Sandinists remaining in 
power. 

In recent interviews, these offi- 
cials described U.S. backing for the 
guerrillas in such terms as a chance 
to “win one for Reagan" and to 
“push communism out of one 
counuy” or as a test case in what 
they called the global confronta- 
tion with the Soviet Union. AH said 
they did not advocate using U.S. 
troops for the purpose. 

“The ultimate objective is to as- 
sure a democratic outcome in Nica- 
ragua.” said an administration offi- 
cial who works closely with the 
rebels. “If these people can stand 
up and throw off c ommunis m, it 
goes beyond Managua. It goes to 
the gut of onr national interest.” 
"The way to go after the Soviet 



EnneivUPI 


Elliott Abrams 


Union is through the colonies,” the 
rial said, “we 


official said. “We have to find ways 
to help democratic resistance 
movements without sending 


T 


r. Reagan and Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz have not 
called outright for the overthrow of 
the Sandinists, although the presi- 
dent came close in February when 
he said that his goal was to “re- 
move" the “present structure" in 
Nicaragua. 

In May, Mr. Reagan sent a clas- 
sified report to Congress in which 
be said that the use erf UiL military 
forces in Nicaragua “must realisti- 
cally be recognized as an eventual 
option, given our stakes in the re- 
gion, if other policy options fail.” 

Elliott Abrams, the new U.S. as- 
sistant secretary of state for inter- 
American affairs, said that the ad- 
ministration felt the Sandinists 
would never abide by a commit- 
ment not to support insurgencies in 
neighboring countries. The only 
way to satisfy the security concerns 
of the United States, he said, was 
with a “democratic” government in 
Nicaragua. 

In an interview Wednesday, Mr. 
McFariane said that US. policies 
“remain to support the freedom 
fighters and in parallel to work for 
a diplomatic solution." 

But in recent months diplomatic 
efforts have encountered many 
roadblocks. The Central American 
peace initiative of the four nations 
working as the Contadora group 
came to a standstill in June when 
Nicaragua demanded that the par- 
ticipants take up the issue of Wash- 
ington's support for ami-Sandmist 
forces. The United States refused 
last month to resume talks with the 
Sandinists at Manzanillo, Mexico. 

Meanwhile, the administration's 
stress on support of tl» guerrillas, 
known as “contras," has grown. 

Officials hedged thrix comments 
about whether and when the guer- 
rillas might be able to defeat the 
Popular Sandinist Army, estimated 
at 64.000 men including active re- 
servists. Some said they could not 


where or being a military threat to 
their neighbors. 

“We’d be kidding ourselves if we 
thought we could solve our prob- 
lems that way," said one partici- 
pant in the debate. “These guys are 
self-described revolutionaries." 

The parameters that have 
evolved for the policy, he said, were 
to avoid both “another Cuba" in 
the Western hemisphere and “an- 
other Vietnam,” that is, haring 
U.S. troops bogged down abroad. 

Some administration officials 
maintaine d thaL a negotiated settle- 
ment of the conflict in Nicaragua 
might be possible if it was accept- 
able to the guerrillas and to the 
other Central American nations. 
Bui anything acceptable to those 
groups and governments, they said, 
would require so many changes in 
Sandinist policies that the Sandra- 
ist Front would no longer be the 
organization it is now. 

They said any negotiated settle- 
ment must be a multilateral agree- 


ment, for instance through the 
living the Nic- 


Contadora talks, involving L. 

araguan opposition, armed and un- 
armed, as well as the other Central 
American countries. They virtually 
ruled out any possibility of reach- 
ing a bilateral peace agreement 
with Nicaragua. 


The Sandinist leadership has 
proposed agreements with Central 
American governments in recent 
months that would address some of 
the concerns of each of them. 


The strongest Sandinist offer 
was made informally to Q Salva- 
dor in April Salvadoran officials 
said that the Sandiinsls sent a mid- 
level official to El Salvador who 
said that the Sandinist Front was 
willing 10 expel from Managua the 
leadership of the Farabundo Marti 
National liberation Front, the Sal- 
vadoran rebel organization; take 
other uasperified actions to hail or 
reduce support for the Salvadoran 
rebels, and resettle in Nicaragua a 
number of pro-guerrilla Salvador- 
an refugees now in Honduras. 


7he vehicle through which the 
Sandinists expect El Salvador and 
other Central American nations to 
extend tacit acceptance to their 
government is the proposed Coma- 
dora agreement. 

“I don’t think these bilateral 
deals will sdl to Central America," 
Mr. Abrams said, “basically be- 
cause the Central Americans un- 
dereland that the Sandinists are 
Communists and that such agree- 
ments are lies and will be used to 
destroy the contras, After that, the 
Sandinist Front would be back at 
its historical mission of subverting 
these countries." 


win an outright victory, but would 
uch fat 


have to rely on such factors as in- 
ternal dissatisfaction to bring 
about the collapse of the govem- 
ment. 


He and other administration of- 
ficials said that the primary reason 
the Central Americans might con- 
rider such arrangements is not that 
they wanted to make separate 
agreements with the Sandinists but 
that they fear the United States will 
abandon the anti-Sandinist cause 
at some point and leave them out 


Tbe rebels have gone on the of- 
fensive in recent weeks after an 
infusion of equipment and supplies 
made possible by about $25 million 
in private and foreign donations, 
and the expectation of $27 million 
in nonmilitary aid from the UiL 
government 

Officials said that the Reagan 
administration has debated con- 
stantly in recent years whether to 
work out a “Yugoslavia" situation 
in Nicaragua, meaning an under- 
standing that the Sandmisis would 
remain in. power in exchange for 
not promoting msurgpnries else- 


on a 


Seoul Rgecte Appeal by Dde 


Reuters 

SEOUL — Robert J. Dole, the 
UJ>. Senate majority leader, has 
urged South Korea to open its mar- 
kets to more American goods, offi- 
cials in Seoul said. But the officials 
said that Shin Byong Hyun, the 
deputy prime minister, told Mr. 
Dole, a Kansas Republican, on Sat- 
urday that South Korea was unable 
to speed up HberaHzation of its im- 
ports because of public opposition. 


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-Page 4 


MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 1985 


Heral 



tribune 


iMt? 


PnbJiahfd Thh IT* IVw York Tines and The Wnhiogfoa Pwl 


AIDS Will Stay a While 


AIDS is going to be with the world a long director of the Federal Centers for Disease 
while. How should society deal with those who Control “We don’t know of any risk to the 


-fall victim to the cruel disease ? 

; Last week the Los Angeles City Council 
- voted to ban discrimination against AIDS pa* 
dents in bousing, employment or health care. 
“A society which should be showing compas- 
-sioo to people who are ill is often shunning 
.them like lepers," explains the sponsor of the 
ordinance. Councilman Joel Wadis. 

. The U5. Navy has responded differently. 
'When Bernard Broyhill an enlisted man with 
AIDS, told a navy doctor that be was homo- 
sexual, the doctor betrayed the confidence. 

■ The navy lawyer then assigned to defend Him 
- — homosexuality is grounds for discharge 
• from the military — refused to meet in the 
same room for fear of the disease. 

As it happens, the more compassionate re- 
sponse to AIDS is also the medically warrant- 


public and therefore feel there should be no 
discrimination agains t the AIDS patient." 

Companies such as IBM generally let em- 
ployees with AIDS stay on the job as long as 
they can work, much as with any other long- 
term disease. The army says that is also its 
policy. For co-workers and neighbors to cast 
out people with AIDS, or for schools to shun 
afflicted children, seems, on the best available 
evidence, to be a needless cruelty. 

Still there is every reason for caution in 
special circumstances. The AIDS virus is dead- 
ly. It can kill anyone, man, woman or child, if 
it readies the bloodstream. In Amenta it pre- 
dominates among the groups at specific risk, 
homosexuals and intravenous drug users, but 
men and women in Zaire have the disease in 
nrarly equal numbers. That is probably he- 


ed response. From the considerable amount cause of some special factor, like the wide- 
now known, it appears that the disease is spread medical use of undean needles. 


spread only by actions that transfer it from 
bloodstream to bloodstream, either directly, as 
in the sharing of needles, or through the ex- 
change of body fluids, as in sexual contact. 
Casual contact is not a means of transmission: 
No nurses or doctors caring for AIDS patients 
have caught the disease from them; nor, in 
America, have fellow household members of 


The virus seeps from the blood into other 
fluids, like semen, saliva and tears. Should an 
actress kiss an actor with AIDS? Should den- 
tists take special care in treating AIDS par 
dents? Caution in such cases seems advisable, 
despite clear epidemiological evidence that the 
di $gn«» spreads only through in timate contact 
The number of new cases is doubling each 


AIDS patients, except patients' spouses or year and wiD keep doing so for several years 


■ children bom to mothers with AIDS. 

Because or such evidence, there is no good 
reason for firms to fire people with the disease, 
.as some have apparently done. “Employees 


after habits of sex and intravenous drug abuse 
have changed. Effective treatments and a vac- 
cine, actively sought are not yet available. 
While the disease rages, education and com- 


with AIDS should work to the extent of their passion are the only weapons at hand. 


physical capacity," says Dr. James Mason, 


-- THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


A Lesson in Responsibility 


After last Monday’s Japan Air Lines crash, 
the president of the airline, Yasumoto Takagi, 
took it upon hims elf to offer condolences, in 
person, to relatives of the 520 victims. As they 
arrived in Tokyo, Mr. Takagi stood at the foot 
of the airplane ramp and bowed low. Later he 
announced that he would take responsibility 
for the crash by resigning 

Contrast that with the response of Union 
Carbide after toxic gas escaping from a plant 
in West Virginia injured 135 people. As after 
last year’s accident at Bhopal in India, in 
which 2,000 people died, senior Union Car- 
bide executives made themselves scarce to the 
press and the public. The headquarters staff in 
Danbury, Connecticut, hunkered down, com- 
■ m unicflting only by press release. 

The differences might be summed up in the 
words liability and responsibility. Union Car- 


bide's defensive and faceless approach surely 
reflect a desire to limit liability in anticipation 
of lawsuits. Mr. TakagTs response was dictat- 
ed by a Japanese sense of personal responsibil- 
ity. Japanese custom also dictates reciprocity 
on the part of the victims' survivors, who are 
likely to forgo lawsuits and take settlements 
that American* might find unacceptable. 

To say that one response is better than 
an other is unrealistic and unfair because both 
are deeply rooted in cultural differences. Yet it 
is easy to believe that the Japanese emphasis 
on personal responsibility has much to do with 
tbe success of Japanese industry, a point that 
American managers might ponder. The next 


time someone speaks of “Japan Incorporat- 
ed,” we shall tbmk of tbe president of Japan 
Airlines bowing in front of a grieving relative. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


More Americans in Jail 


' At the end of 1984 there were 463,000 Amer- 
icans in prison, more than twice as many as the 
196,000 of 12 years before. This increase is all 
the more striking because the population that 
' commits most crimes and is most likely to be 
incarcerated — men from their mid-teens to 
their late 20s — increased by only a little more 
than 10 percent during that time. 

The causes and effects of this change tell us 
interesting things about American society. For 
the number of people in prison is not the result 
of a single decision but the collective result of 
hundreds of thousands of decisions by local 
juries, state legislators, voters, judges, prose- 
cutors and police officers. A national adminis- 
tration can make some difference, but only 
4 percent of prisoners are in federal institu- 
tions. Tbe mandatory-sentence laws and long- 
er terms that are the major factor in swelling 
the prison population are local initiatives, sup- 


in 1965 to below 200,000 in 1971 Those were 
tbe years when the crime issue was on almost 
every politician's lips. Yet the criminal justice 
system, representing a wide range of views 
from all parts of society, was imprisoning 
fewer people. Note also that the rise in prison 
population did not start with the inauguration 
of the Reagan administration. The figure rose 
to 250,000 in 1976. passed the 300,000 marie in 
1979, hit 350,000 in 1981 and 400.000 in 1983, 
and surged past 450,000 in 1984. 

One dear effect of this change has been tire 
falling crime rate of the 1980s — falling much 
faster than the number of men in the higb- 
crime age groups. Some prisoners would surely 
be committing crimes if they were out. 

Other effects may not be as benign. One 
is the likelihood that more people are being 
held unjustly. Another is that tbe mandatory- 
sentence laws and tougher sentencing by some 


ported by politicians. Decisions to build new judges are imposing unjustly long and dispa- 


prisons are made mostly by stare officials. 
Changes in prison populations are the sum 


total of milli ons of chang es of mind. 

To some extent, larger prison populations 


rare sentences on offenders. A third is that 
conditions inside what often must be over- 
crowded prisons may be inhumane^ 

None of these problems may seem tire first 


reflect an increase in crime rates and greater order of business to citizens who are cheered 
success in apprehending suspects and trying by the decrease in crime. But they are neces- 
defendants. Bui note that the rise in crime sary orders of business in a society that cher- 


success m apprehending suspects ana trying 
defendants. Bui note that (he rise in crime 
rates in the middle 1960s was accompanied by 
a drop in the prison population, from 210,000 


ishes its reputation for fairness and humanity. 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


A Need for South African Peace 


The Bolhas are trying to appease tbe whiles, 
placate tire West and pacify the blacks. This 
can be achieved only if the wool is pulled over 


somebody’s eves. President Botha is one of the 

. •«. j ' i ii .l. ru_..i it 


West’s interest lies in slow, steady and peace- 
fill reform. Britain, wore than any other cram- 
try, would lose heavily from a violent upheav- 
al There are a millio n South Africans who 
would be entitled to emigrate to Britain if 
revolution broke out; there are around 250,000 


more skilled wool-pullers in the game, [batl if jobs in Britain which depend on continued 

. . r f. i I _ A n«i<1 !a l%u far 


he does want to negotiate reform with black 
leaders, he cannot do it by alienating every 
leader with whom he might negotiate. The 


trade with South Africa, and Britain is by far 
the biggest foreign investor in the republic. 

— The Sunday Times (London). 


FROM OUR AUG. 19 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: A Whole Carriage for Hia Dog 
NEW YORK — The most pampered bulldog 
in rite world left tbe Grand Central Station 


1935: Dace Rcjecte Abyssinia Plan 

PARIS — The Three-Power Paris Conference 
called to settle the Italo-Abysrinlan dispute 


yesterday noon for San Francisco in a private collapsed completely [on Aug. 18]. Peace in 


raihvay carriage which had been specially East Africa now hang s on the decidedly thm 


chartered for hun at a cost of 52,065. His n a me threads of long-distance diplomatic negotia- 

* n . j:.— -_ -J 1 _:„ « Mr C 6 Hmu k'. I .L. f r- n : D. 


is Radium, and his owner is Mr. F.S. Drew, cions and the League Council session on Sep- 
ident of the White Lumber Company of tember 4. The Duce refused to consider tne 


San Francisco. Radium is a French bulldog compromise plan offered by French Premier 
that Mr. Drew purchased for his wife in Paris Pierre Laval and British League Affairs Minis- 



£ i I 


WTOM1S1T 

DQOBEIPWM) 


Apartheid 
Is a Recent 
Invention 


Jli-d. 


Oiri 


I Ki" 1 * 

,urffc> 

U-fian * 


By Edwin M. Yoder Jr. •' 

W ashington — T here * as 

Michael Kinsley of the New 


i *^%*v*m£ 





// Au ifral 

f • - ' I T ' ' - -'v: 






A South African Says No to Army Service 


G RAHAM STOWN, South Africa — The 
South African government recently amended 


VJ South African 
its Defense Act so 


cnent recently amended 
ite mall* citizens up to 


By Andre Brink 


the agp of 55 can be called for military service. 
] have informed the military authorities that I shall 


I have informed the military authorities that I shall 
refuse to undergo training or serve the army in any 
capacity. No matter what punitive action I may 
face, at age 50, this is not a regime and a system 
I am prepared to live or die for. It does not 
represent the South Africa I love and honor. 

Young white males have been forced since the 
early 1960s to accept increasingly long periods of 


Young white males have been forced since the 
early 1960s to accept increasingly long periods of 
military service as part of “the South African way 
of life^ — just as it has more recently become part 
of that way of life to live in cities under siege, with 
streets lined by anno red vehicles and by policemen 
and soldiers brandishing automatic weapons. At 
the age of 18 it is not easy to resist and face the 
grim consequences. Hence a growing stream of 


draft dodgers seeking refuge abroad. 

Among those who stay Behind, including many 
in the armed forces, unease and resistance are 
building up. Anyone who takes the trouble to talk 


any resort to violence involves an assault upon the 
overexposed and maligned yet indispensable no- 
tion of “human dignity.” But at the same time 
I realize that it would be naive simply to wish 
violence out of this world. Sadly enough, it would 
seem that some advances in h uman evolution can- 
not be attained except through violence. To men- 
tion only one example, every small reform in black 
education in South Africa in the last decade has 
been bought and paid for in blood. 

There may also arise situations in which it be- 
comes necessary for the individual to take up arms 
and fight for a fatherland. But it is necessary, in 
each case, to insist that such action has nothing to 
do with either an atavistic romantic notion of 
patriotism or an animal sense of the territorial 
imperative. The “fatherland” to be defended must 


be interpreted as a spiritual quality, a system of 
values: tbe kind of values whose defeat would 


been his call last week for negotiations for a 
peaceful future and his naive promise of a “mean- 
ingful open forum” in which mack and white may 
sit down together to discuss their future. How open 
is such a forum if the most import a nt item on the 
agenda — white domination — is excluded a priori 
as nonnegotiable? Can anyone still be surprised to 
find that more and more blacks fed driven to 
violence as the only tangnag e available to them? 

This, I believe, is thekeyto what is euphemisti- 
cally termed the “black unrest” sweeping Sooth 
Africa. Revolt has been begotten by the institu- 
tionalized violence of tbe government and the 
brutality of tbe system that has denied blacks, for 
centuries, the m os t elementary human values. 

What does one do Mien a black friend tells 
about police in armored vehicles who drive 
through deserted Grahamstown township streets 
at mjpu and shoot maO directions in the hope, it is 
alleged, of provoking an angry reaction so that 

•u.. ... 


Republic observed, a certain phom- ... 
ness in the suddenly [aslnonable US. - 
crusade against apartheid. Even-Re- 
publican conservatives have jumped ; 
qq die bandwagon. But Mr. Kmitey 
is fpietBUm in one respect: He ca& 
apartheid, the system of racial sepa- 
ration, a “feudal rcfic” — as if tosay 
an almost accidental remna nt ofa 
forgotten past. The misconception ^ 
suggested here is all bat total. ' * 

ffiyjn, if yon MU with John W; . 
Cell's “The Highest Stage of White 
Supremacy," a comparative study of 
racial separation in South Africa and 
the American South. Thai important 
book, now three years old, should be - 
read by every pundit, politician mid - - 
activist interested in the issue. 

Since that is unlikely. Jet two of 
Mr. Cell’s key points be noted. 

First, apartheid, if no* - d ep r av e d - - 
and cruel in practice, was is ori&n 
not the brainchild of crud or rabid 
oppressors. It was conceived by mod- 
erates searching, some 50 years no 
nnvmg what scented to them due 
alternatives, for the least evil solution 
to the “problem” of birariilttuiL 

The second point is that apartheid 
represents no codification of long > 
practice. Rather, it is a modem pdib- 4*. 
cal institution, deliberately designed. 
Indeed, the architects of apartheid 
dosdy studied tbe most notable 
working modd: U.S. Jim Crew laws, 
most of which also had been written 
in the 20th century. 

Having arisen by foretbougbi, in a 
nation less ’ban a century old, apart- 
heid is no “retie,” not eves in the 
Entiled sgi<e that Jim Crow might, 
once have been thought of as a “retie” 
of the pcsi-Civil War black codes. 

And from that newness, certain po- 


licy implications flow — as Comer 
Vann woodward, the historian of the 


defeat would 


they can “go into action”? 

Or when a black woman tefls about a policeman 
raising his gun at point-blank range and shooting a 
small 'Blade giri in the head as she comes past him 
on her way home from a game with friends? 

What one does is think even harder about an 
army call-up. Not cmly does this sort erf behavior 
illustrate tbe kind of system that one is required 
to defend with one's life, but it reminds one that 


endanger tbe essential humanity of a community. 

But to fight for South Africa — whether on the 
Namibian border, or in raids a gains t Botswana, or 
in the Fasiwn Pa pe against some undefined “in- 
ternal enemy" — has nothing to do with the 
protection of values that deserve to survive. 

In the first place, inasmuch as significant values 
are at stake — values acquired through thousan ds 


To fight for South Africa . . . has 
nothing to do with the protection 
of values that deserve to survive. 


to young servicemen or ex-servicemen finds that 
the military authorities may indeed have reason to 
worry about the morale of the troops. This wony 
will inevitably acquire more and more weight as 
the government continues to violate the integrity 
of neighboring territories in adventures that many 
reasonable people would regard as missions -of 
terrorism, murder and sabotage, the sense of which 
only a handful of cynical politicians can grasp. 

Much of the resentment among the young is 
inevitably muted; it is not easy to face many yean 
in jail when one is 18. But when it comes to men of 
more mature age, questions and resistance become 
more obvious. These questions have nothing to do 
with religion or pacifism. Many men approaching 
middle age learned long ago, whether reluctantly 
or cynically, that violence has to be faced as an 
inevitable component of their world. 

My own attitude in this respea would be that 


of years of history, not just the 300 or so years of 
white colonization — tne “enemy" is fighting for 
his own legitimate share of those values which are. 
moreover, vested in the same territory. It is a 
struggle with all the characteristics of civil war. 

In the second place, what the South African 
government is in fact fighting for has nothing to do 
with values at all but exclusively with the preserva- 
tion of a system that remains odious even to those 
Western countries which, for economic or other 
reasons, allow themselves to be seduced by tbe 
semantics of “reform" (the greatest confidence 
trick in South African history). 

Tbe nature of (he system which must be de- 
fended, and for which men up to the age of 55 may 
now be called up, has become more sickeningly 
evident in recent months. 

Tbe violence that erupted in the blade townships 
continues. Yet the most peaceful responses that 
President P.W. Botha has so far thought np have 


in the repression of black unrest since September 
1984, police action has been consistently backed 
up by the army “in a 


Vann woodward, the historian of the 
American South, argued 30 years ago 
in reference to American segregation. 
Apartheid’s defenders cm hardly ar- 
gue that this is the way it has always 
been, or that in dismantling h we 
tamper with ancient wisdom. 

Such a defense of Jim Crow vu 
Tnnrh heard in the embattled Ameri- 
can South of the 1950s and '60s. Fora 
generation and more, apologists for 
segregation had made h their anxious 
mission to conceal the real history of 
Southern race relations. For. however 
briefly and fitfully, here and there, 
mare often than not under the shidd 
or threat of federal force, the South 
h«d experi m ented with birada&sat 
dnrinK Keconstruction and the later 


To a large extent military involvement has made 
islcind of police action possible. In this atuation 


si uprising. 

No one in Ins right mind argues 
that having found the way mto 
this dilemma South Africa can find 
the same way out. The difference* are 
vast; and apartheid has been deeply 


this kind of police action possible. In this atuation 
an immediate and profo und moral dunce is re- 
quired of every man who faces a caD-up. My 
decision involves only myself. But by making my 
choice, and by malting it public, I bdkve Fan 
demonstrate the simple but immensely important 
tact that in every situation one does have a choice. 

That is perhaps the ultimate freedom erf the 
individual Every choice imposes its price, which 
may be daunting. But I have also made my deci- 
sion in the knowledge (hat it will impose rat the 
authorities the need to calculate from their side the 
price of whatever they have done or may do. 


shaped by tir peculiar character of 
the Afrikaner Thcu first great lead- 


The writer, a South African novelist, is author 
most recently of “ The Wolf of the Plague." He 
contributed this comment to New York limes. 


York Tunes. 


What Would America Do if Russia Entered Iran? 


W ASHINGTON — “It’s still 
pretty smoky down there.” 
said a U.S. official as he examined 
satellite pictures of Kharg Island, 
hit last week by Iraqi missiles. 

A haze of smoke hangs over tbe 
whole Iraq- Iran war. Since neither 
dictatorship permits news coverage, 
tbe bloodiest conflict of our lime is 
off tbe scope of our attention. But 
battle deaths are now estimated at 
] million. (Thanks to the nonprolif- 
eration enforcement of Menachem 
Begin, it is not a nuclear war with 
milli ons of civilian deaths.) 

Iran is suffering more, but could 
win a war of attrition. Iraq, which 
started the war, cannot settle it 
short of surrender, because Ayatol- 
lah Khomeini is determined to win. 

Unable to launch a successful in- 
vasion in the south. Iran has begun 
to move in the north, enlisting the 
help of Iraqi Kurds. In response, 
Iraq has tanreted Iran's oil shipping 
center at Kharg Island, hoping to 
cut down tbe 2-milBon-barrri-a-day 
oil shipments from there that are 
financing its opponent's war. 

If this is even partially successful 


By William S afire 


as the smokiness down there sug- 
gests. the ayatollah will strike at the 


Arab world’s support of has Arab 
enemy, Saddam Hussein of Iraq. 

The ayatollah has at least three 
choices. He can use the 150,000 
Iranian pilgrims now in Saudi Ara- 
bia during the Hag religions season 
to tear up the host country; attack 
pipelines and tankers carrying ofl 
from Iraq, Kuwait Bahrain or any- 
where in the Arab world; avenge 
Kharg by attacking the Sandi ofl 
export futility at Ras Tannurah. 

If escalation continues, oil prices 
win stop declining for a time, add- 
ing to inflation in America and per- 
haps leading to a reduction of Arab 
financing of the U.S. debt, leading 
to higher interest rates. 

On the whole, however, Ameri- 
cans ream to tbe Iran-Iraq war the 
way ihe dying Mercutio, in Shake- 
speare’s “Romeo and Juliet,” did 
toward the squabbling Montagues 
and Capnlets: “A plague o’ both 
your houses!” Iraq 5 leader is an 
aggressive despot, and Iran's leader 


has been the source erf grief to the 
United Stales fra years. 

That u n co n ce rn is a mistake. A 
strategic challenge may be in the 
making, and we would prepare. 

Assume that the war goes on. In 


from the Soviet Union through the 
part of Iran known as Baluchistan. 

We can hope Washington has a 
contingency plan to meet a conven- 
tional Russian military move down 
through Iran. It would be good to 
hear a reminder that America would 
interpret a Soviet attempt to take 


Iran, where male children are a fam- advantage of unrest in Iran with a 
fly’s security in old age, resistance is territorial grab as a threat to Paid- 


sure to rise to tbe continued con- stan, an Ame ric an ally. 


scription of youths for slaughter, A more subtle danger The Soviet 


providing a counterweight to fanati- Union might arrange fra a separat- 
dsm. As of now, most of the oiga- ist movement of the Baluchis, an- 
nized resistance to Ayatollah Kfio- other ethnic group, like the Kurds, 


memi inside Iran is strongly leftist. 
If Iranian anti-war sentiment 


grows, or if the ayatollah dies, tbe 
temptation to tbe Soviet Union can- 


temptation to tbe Soviet Union can - 
off 

to make the ancient Russian dream 
of a warm waterport come true. 

The port is Cnahbahar, on the 
Gulf, leading to the Indian Ocean. 
It is as desirable to the Russians as 


other ethnic group, like the Kurds, 
ready to swallow promises of auto- 
nomy. Cranes tbe revolution, and 
the Baluchis set up in Chahbahar 
and invite tbrir Russian sponsors 
down. Is the United Stales ready to 
sponsor a force inside or outside 
Iran to stop than? Hcflo? Anybody 
there in lire atuation roam? 

From mere single, mega-death 
wars, big conflagrations can start. 
To avert miscalculation, the United 


Danzig was to the Prussians. In time Stales should make certain that the 
of tunnofl, the Red Army could other big bystander knows what 


move down from its troubled base 
in Afghanistan, or toll its tanks 


America is prep ared to do. 
The New York Tones. 


li™** the Afrikaner Their first great lead- 
ex. Paul Kroger, is said to taw be- 
heved in a flat Earth, and tire Alrika- 
rr ner political sense still seems equally 
unburdened by modem notions. 

Yet even for South Africa, h&fOQr 
shows that it was not always thus (its 
Jf™ first great statesman. Cecil Rhodes, 
°- certainly did not envision the system) 

.. and that it can be otherwise. Bui how. 
autn&r ^ ^ y^a* pace? 

1 at One difficulty that American ad- 

1 wocates of a peaceful and controlled 
abandonment of apartheid need to 
reckon with is a fact intuitively fdl by 
defenders of any social system under 
siege: Once you begin to tanmer and 
tinker, you will lose control of the 
pace and character of change- Some 
chaos is certain. 

the Southern segregationist diehards 

m. so argued in the debates in the Amer- 

; a ican South 20 years ago, to be indig- 
m- nantly disputed by moderates. But 
vn the diehards were essentially right, 
to about this if about little dse. Once it 
dd was decisively assailed, tire Jim Crow 
ke system came tumbling down in an 
i a uncontrollable hurry. 

Id- Those of us who witnessed the wel- 

come downfall of Jim Crow can wdH 
let im a g i ne that the Botha government is 

it. all rail paralyzed by tire intuitive fear 
in- that tire door, once opened, wfl] fall 
is, off the hinges. It would be reassuring 
to- to predict otherwise, but that sense of 

ad the matter is probably right. And it 
iar would be honest of America's benign 

jts crusaders to acknowledge iL 

to The trouble is that tire hour of 
de measured reform has passed. The Af- 
iy rikaners must decide whether they 

prefer to negotiate the nation's fil- 
th tore, peacefully, with Christian prel- 

rt ates like Desmond Tutu, or contest it 

•d with furious mobs, in a donate of 
tie blood, fire and brimstone. 

at If no more than a “feudal relic” 
were at issue, the choice would be 
infinitely easier. 

Washington Post Writers Group 


Ik 1 4 hT;'* N i ff J | 

, kt a; i \ 1 


Cheer Up, Dear, Wedded Bliss Is Back in Fashion letter 


four months ago. When Mr. Drew went to ter Anthony Eden, even as a basis of discus- 


reserve for his trip to the coast he was told that aon. He demanded annexation of a large pan 
dogs could not voyage in the same carriage as of the Abyssinian hinterland of Eritrea and 


N EW YORK — I figured the big 
question about our 20th wed- 


passengers. When arguments proved to no Italian Somaliland. Faced with these demands, 
avail Mr. Drew chartered a special carriage which where described in French circles as 


for the trip. Radium had tire run of the car- “not of a kind enabling further progress,” 
riage, and Mr. Drew said on leaving; “I hope Eden and Laval were obliged to renounce 


he enjoys iL It is his and we are his guests." further attempts to negotiate peace in Paris. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


Drpwy Publisher 
Associate Pubfisher 
Asoaau Publisher 
Director of Ooentnm 


LEE W. HUEBNER Publisher 

PHILIP M. FOISIE Executive Editor RENEBONDY Dtpav PuNaher 

WALTER WELLS Editor ALAIN LECOUR 

SAMUEL ABT Deputy Editor RICHARD H. MORGAN 

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CARLGEWIRTZ Associate Etbtor FRANCOIS DESMAfSONS Director of Circulation 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director Adtems&g Saks 
International Herald Tribune, 18 1 Avenue Cbaries-de-Gaulle, 92200 Neuflly-wr-Sdne; 

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Managing Dir. V.K.: Robin MacKdm. 61 Long Aar, London WC1 Tel 836-4802. Telex 262009. I^«] 

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U.S. subscription. $322 yearly. Second-doss pottage paid at Long Island City. N.Y. 11 101. 

O 2985, international Herald Tribune. AU rights reserved. 


ding anniversary might be whether 
tbe local newspaper would send a 
reporter out to interview us, the way 
repraters always used to interview 
those old codgers who managed to hit 
100. (“Mr. Scroggins offers no for- 
mula for Jongevjty, although he ac- 
knowledged that he has polished off a 
quart of Tim Beam whisky every day 
of his adult life.”) I figured that might 
be the big question even though the 
local newspaper is The Village Voice. 

Or maybe I figured that might be 
the big question because the local 
newspaper is The Village Voice. In 
Greenwich Village, after aO, my wife 
and I are known rather widely for 
being married. We enjoy a mfla col- 
lateral renown for having children. 
Several years ago, in fact. 1 expressed 
concern that we might be put on the 
Gray Line tour of Greenwich Village 
as a nuclear family. 

It occurred to me that all this might 
be vaguely embarrassing. In recent 
years it has become common to hear 


intertwined with the music of Law- 
rence Wdk. In tire presence of some- 
one who has been married a long time 
to the same person, a lot of people 
seem to fed the way they might feel in 


By Calvin Trillin 

sic of Law- shelters and into chewing of haflud- 
ice of some- nogenic kudzu — he asked what I had 
I along time beoi up to. ‘Twentieth annivosary” 
it of people I mumbled. “Terrific!” he said, 
nigbtfeelm He looked at me as if I had just 


the presence of a Methodist clergy- revealed that I was in on tire ground 


man or an IRS examiner. 

When I asked a friend of mine 
recently how his 25th college reunion 
had gone — he had attended with the 
very same attractive and pleasant 
woman he married shortly after grad- 
uation — be said “Well, after the 
first day, I decided to start intro- 
during Marge as my second wife, and 
that seemedto make everyone a lot 
more comfortable.” 

Then I happened to ran into the 
old college classmate I call Martin G. 
C as hflow. In both investments and 
social trends, this Mr. Cashflow 
prides hfrnsrif an jnst having got out 


floor of a hot electronics issue. At 
least I think that’s the way be looked 
at me; I don’t have much experience 
at being looked at as if I nad just 
revealed that I was in on the ground 
floor of a hot electronics issue. 

Mr. Cashflow told me that among 
people in their 20s marriage has come 
back into fashion. As he explained 


that people in thdr 20s were now 
bringing back into vogue. 

She said that if die alternative was 
to be identified with those little striv- 

as mextricabl/tatertwined^^ 1 tire 
music of Lawrence Wdk. 

I could see her paint, bat I still 
looked forward to an interview with 
the local paper. I would be modest, 
almost to a fault. I would not men- 
tion Jim Beam whisky. The reporter 
would try to be objective, but he 
would not be able to hide his admira- 
tion fra my equity. 


A 1973 Phantom Ship? 

The full-scale U.S. aien on the last 
day of the 1973 war has remained an 
enigma, contrary to the analyas bv 
Walter Pincus (July 27) in the fourtli 
in his series of articles an tire history 
of the nuclear bomb. 

The CIA report of * 5ow« ship 


carrying nuclear warheads to 
could not have provoked the : 


the way tilings have been going, mar- _ 

riage is pan of a sort of *5Qs revival was excerpted by The New ior, 
package that is back in vogue, along from an ankle in The Naim. 
with neckties and naked ambition. 

“Best thing you ever did," Mr. — 

Cashflow said. “They’re all doing it Letters intended for pubti 1 


The writer is the author, mast re- 
cently, of “With AU Disrespect ” This 
was excerpted by The New York Times 


people all over America speak of 
long-term marriage in a tone of voice 


long-term marriage in a tone of voice 
that assumes it to be inextricably 


prides himself on just navmg got out now, outlook at tire equity you've got 
of what other people are about to get built up." I shrugged modestly. You 
into and just having got in on tbe don't brag about that sort erf thing, 
ground floor erf what other people Then 1 went home and told my 
haven’t yet beard about. wife that we were in fashion. 

After Mr. Cashflow had filled me “Not while you’re wearing that 
in on Ins recent activities — he had jacket we’re not,” she said, 
just got on} of jvheik-farming tax I told her about the '50s package 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed' "Letters to the 
Editor* and must contain the writ- 
er's signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are subject to editing. We cannot 
be responsible for the return of 
umohaied mamcripu. 


could not have provoked the global 
alert on Oct 24 because it was re- 
ceived on tire mor ning erf Oct 25 
several hours after tie akn was 
declared. Later, a Rand postmortem 
on tire crisis contained a contiusos 
that “there is no r eliable evidence 
tiiat midear weapons ever entered 
Egypt." Nor is there mention of nu- 
dear cargo in the memoirs of soch 
central figures at the time as Hemy 
Kissinger and Admiral Pi™ Zutft- 
walt. Is it possible that we are deafing 
with a phantom ship? 

It sacs to me that any attempt to 
explain Ihe U5. global akrt during 
the October war in nuclear terms 
does not hold water. 


! *Ut. 


"S 

i 1 w 

? i **■ 


f Jin 
i * 


SHEMUEL MESL 
-feffee Center for Strategic Studies. 

Td Aviv. 




ff* 


j -M 

] I % 

; t 

\ i :jT' 


5 







N 

5 


■4 




'-J m %j* _. 


- ■ .' ^ 

54 Killed, 120 Injured 
y Car Bomb at Store in 


irut Suburb 


at n,-'-! ' . .tr ,wur ua ys aimed ow-wccn v,nnsuan iacuons 

b] 5“2**®”^ v tiians. It blew sever- ? ou ^ not be rnled out in looking 
“£”*5 a coastal higbwav for the people responsible. But they 
Vin ^Mediterranean Sea, ^itwasunEkd^thatar^Chri&- 
Si “wters) away, and ^ militias would choose a purely 

“J, 01 ™ 5 charred and civilian taiga to settle scores 

“'rfj supermarket and in cars Bon * «perts estimated Satur- 
P^ked outside. StaokeldUed sever- blast was caused by 500 
"residents of apartments in the P 0 ®™*® (226 kilograms) ofexplo- 

jjyer floors of the stt-«orybiiiM- “**- 

Flames quickly en g^ifat the en- 
Therg was no unmertiat r ria f m 0 f trance of me supermarket, which is 


lolled 48 persons and wounded 250 blast knocked bystanders uacon- 
"®*or® Saturday’s attack. On SC * M1S and h* the remains of the 
Wednesday, another unexplained booby-trapped car dangKng from 
car bomb in a heavily populated <wdjead power lines. 
^ShbOTbood in East Bcmit killed ■ Photographer Is FVeed 


jumua, uuxatenea revenge rat. 
^J^tra™ 8 ihal to wewffli». Alfred Yaghotaadeh, 26, who 

S£^5 P?nse ^ ^ 9f works for StpaPresT a French 
dimensions as their agency, flew to Paris cm Sunday. 

JS **?*«* £r-"B5tS S 

accuse the Moslem imhtias. but it mediately available. 
h£L£. lear that was who Another 12 foreigners still are 

DU £f C “ . . „ .■■ ■•• missing in Lebanon. 

htduscmnmaie shelling of our Those who are Americans are 
areas and bombing attacks against WflKam Binkley, the U.S. Embassy 
our civilians have readied the km- political officer, the Reverend Bm- 
1 V jtbeLebanese Fences’ statement jandn Wax, a Presbyterian minis- 
said, ^nose c riminal s have tram-, ter; the Reverend Lawrence Martin 
pled on all norms and rejected *nko, a Roman Catholic priest: 
Peace, asking for a dirty war.” Peter Xilbum, a librarian at the 
[On Sunday, rival militias American University of Beirut; 
pounded Beirut and nearby hills David P. Jacobsen, director of the 
with artfflay and rocket fire, Reu- university hospital; Professor 
teKrcported. Thomas Sutherland, dean of agri- 

[The Chri stian Voice of Lebanon culture at the mrivenaty, and Terry 
% \ r ?fr 0 sa “* that two persons were A- Anderson, a ccirrespondeot for 
( killed and one waswonnded when The Associated Press. 

shells hit East Barm and Christian Missing Frenchmen, aS seized 
villages in nearby hills. Druze Mo$- this year, are Marcel Fontaine, pro- 
tein radio said, that Christian xniB- iooq 3 officer at the Fren ch Fmh«« - 
tta m en replied with, heavy arfiltery r sy; Marcel Carton, vice consol at 
rocket ha ndlers and tank guns m -the embassy; Jean- Paul Kauff- 
an “indiscriminate barrage bn maim, a journalist, and Michel 
mountain residential areas-”]- - Seurat, a researcher. 

Prime Minister Rashid Karami, . Also missing is a Briton, Denis 
a Sunni Mioslem, called Saturday's Hffl, a teacher at the American 
bombers “wild beasts” but ao- University., 
knowledged that he and the gov- ■ Anonymous callers have said 
ermnttit were helpless in the face of that the missing Americans arc be- 


EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 1985 




Page 5 


Muhomon Por?f*?y planting and executing” such acts. 
BEIRUT— -a mt if! 71 !!* , Jpsoce Minister Nabih Beni, 

ed outride a j ** 8*®*’ of the Shiite Modem militia 

with weekend ™kd who warned last week that 

turn suburb n<wtK^S^- m a ^w^^ptmish Christian units of 

54 persons aS t ^?^i[ ut ’ the Lebanese Army that he said 
120, many of al 16851 *9® launching attacks against his 

nnliti^araETtal that kradwas b* 

' , .,®W®On SatmriAv btmm_ - hind Satnrdsrv*e nrnlnctnn 






The GreeqKStce as it left Amsterdam harbor Sunday for the Pacific. 

Greenpeace Sends New Ship to Pacific 
To Protest Nuclear Tests by France 


die civil warfare. 


mg held by Islamic Jihad, which is 


“What can I say and what can I seeking the release of 17 persons 
do?” he asked. He said dot there imprisoned in Kuwait for a series 
were “msgor and faroqW powers; af bombings there in 1983. 


Raaerj 

AMSTERDAM — Another 
Greenpeace protest ship sailed 
Sunday from the Netherlands for 
the Pacific to continue the ecologi- 
cal movement’s opposition to 
French nuclear tests. 

The Greenpeace, a 218-foot 
(66-meter) converted ocean-going 
tug will replace the sabotaged 
Rainbow Warrior at the head of a 
fleet of boats taking part in a pro- 
test around Mururoa atoll at the 
end of September, according to 
Greenpeace’s chairman, David 
McTaggart. 

Mr. McTaggart said he would 
consult Greenpeace lawyers on his 
return to Pans on legal action 
against the French government 
over the sinking July lOof the con- 
verted trawler in Auckland, New 
Zealand. 

Two people are awaiting trial in 
New Zealand on charges, including 
murder, in connection with the 
sinking. Newspapers have alleged 
they were on an official missi on for 
the French secret service. 

The Greenpeace, which is larger 
than the Rainbow Warrior, would 
act as both supply ship and guard 
far the “peace fleet,” which com- 
prises scores of light sailing ships 
from the Pacific, Mr. McTaggart 
said. 

“The French have rammed our 
boats before and now they are both 
nervous and angry,” he said. “But 


the boats in the peace protest are 
very vulnerable and they must be 
protected." 

President Francois Mitterrand 
has ordered an Inquiry into posa- 
ble French involvement in the sink- 
ing, and has promised full coopera- 
tion with New Zealand. 

Mr. McTaggart declined to com- 
ment whether harassment of the 
environmental group’s new ship 
was expected, but suggested toe 
Greenpeace would not be capable 
of defending itself. 

“The Greenpeace is better than 
the Rainbow Warrior, more diffi- 
cult to attack, but we would stiH 
have very little chance in any sea 
doses with the French Navy,” he 
said. 

He refused to clarify whether it 
had new equipment on board to 
cc^pe with any intervention in its 
mission. 

The Greenpeace’s international 
crew of 19 wfll go to Murttroa to 
check the health of the inhabitants 
and test the ocean's radioactivity. 
It may proceed to Antarctica. 

In Paris, Bernard Tricot, the for- 
mer GauIHst government official 
appointed to lead the inquiry into 
the sinking, is expected to deliver 
his report in a few days on whether 
the bombing was ordered in Paris 
and who was responsible. 

Political sources said that De- 
fense Minisier Charles Hemu 
might be forced to resign. 


India Calls Early Election in Punjab 
Despite Fears of New Sikh Violence 


By James Rupert central government. Bui New Del- with the Indian government, an 
Washingion Poa Semcc hTs authority to administer the samese leader said Saturday, H 

NEW DELHI — The Indian 51316 0105 wl Ocl 6, and the gov- ters reported from New Demi 
government has ordered elections eminent chose to hold elections Giving the first details of 
SepL 22 in the predominantly Skh there rather than seek a constiro- number and fate of illegal im 
state of Punjab, acting less than a tkmal amendment necessary to grants who arrived in Assam a 
month after signing an agreement prolong its control. 1971, Aroop Bordoloi warned i 

with moderates^ at end- “The two sides will attack each if they wax not evicted, his foil 
ing three years of sectarian conflict. ot her intensively in an election os would resume a violent a 
India's Election Commission campaign aad will reopen the Pun- paign against the settlers. f 
said Saturday elections would be jab’s wounds," said KiiLdip Nayar, Mr. Bordoloi was one of the 
bdd to choose a 117-seat state leg- a syndicated columnist. samese leaden who signed a pc 

islaturc and fill 13 vacancies from Sikh extremists, who oppose the accord Thursday with Prime h 
the state in the national Pariia- agreement between the government ister Rajiv Gandhi to end a six-) 
meat. and the Akali Dal, have vowed to campaign in which more than 3, 

Some mainstream Sikh leaders violence to prevent its imple- people were killed in 1983 in 
have questioned the viability of mentation. northeastern state, 

early ejections, and extremists nave _ Uoi , « r » a _ uW -. u i Ba n gladesh has rgected Inc 

threatened violence. ■ Mfl * H>ns M»y Deported allegations that the settlers era 

Harchand Singh LongowaL who About Z6 million people will be into Assam from there and saic 
signed the agreement in July on deponed from Assam to Bang] a- attempt to push the lmmign 
behalf of the ™ain Sikh political desh or expelled to other Indian back across the border could s 
party, Akali Dal, said before the under a peace accord signed relations. 

announcement that “the situation — — • . ■■ — ■ — 

is not ripe" for elections in Punjab. 

He sought voting in February, after -m- j m y-j ■* ynrj f 

vw-ec-* Israeli General Cleared 

Many Indian political analysts __ 

and most i opposition leaders have O A 


with the Indian government, an As- 
samese leader said Saturday, Reu- 
ters reported from New Delhi 

Giving the first details of the 
number and fate of illegal immi- 
grants who arrived in Assam after 
1971, Aroop Bordoloi warned that 
if they wax not evicted, his follow- 
ers would resume a violent cam- 
paign against the settlers. 

Mr. Bordoloi was one of the As- 
samese leaders who signed a peace 
accord Thursday with Prime Min- 
ister Rajiv Gandhi to end a sax-year 
campaign in which more than 3,000 
people were killed in 1983 in the 
northeastern state. 

Ban gladesh has rejected Indian 
allegations that the settlers crossed 
into Assam from there and said an 
attempt to posh (be immigrants 
back across the border could sour 
relations. 


The French press has predicted 
that Mr. Tricot will blame the Gen- 
eral Directorate for External Secu- 
rity, or DGSE, the secret service 
that reports to Mr. Hemu, for what 
Mr. Mitterrand has condemned as 
“a c riminal attack that do excuse 
can justify." 

French defense experts say that 
so cosily an operation could not 
have been launched without high- 
level clearance. 

“It is indisputable that Hemu 
must have been informed," Jean 
Rochet, former director of the 
French internal counterespionage 
agency, said in a radio interview 
last week. 

The newspaper Liberation, de- 
scribing the affair as “state terror- 
ism.” said: “In most civilized coun- 
tries, the defense minister would 
already have given his resignation." 

Mr. Hemu, 62, is tied to Mr. 
Mitterrand by persona) and politi- 
cal loyalties dating back to the ear- 
ly 1960s. 

The rightist opposition has re- 
sisted the temptation to make polit- 
ical capital out of the affair mid is 
likely to accuse the government of 
incompetence rather than wrong- 
doing. 

It is not dear whether the French 
government is prepared to furnish 
New Zealand with the real names 
of the couple awaiting trial, who 
ate believed to be French, or Co 
hdp identify other French citizens 
sought by police. 


echoed Mr. Lcmgowal’s worries XlX X/C 
that an early campaign would re- 
vive tensions eased by the accord. 

By calling the elections. Prime By w tilts 
Minister Rajiv Gandhi will pit his wasHngu 
own Congress (I) Party against the JERUSALE1 
Akali Dal dpHnary board 

[The Press Trust of India news li Arrays chief 
agency said Mr. Longowal indicat- troops officer S 
ed Sunday the Akali Dal would “violent behavi 


In Deaths of 2 Arabs 


By William Gai borne 

Washington Foil Service 

JERUSALEM — A military dis- 
uHnary board acquitted the Israe- 
Army’s chief infantry and para- 

iolttit behavior" in of 


The disciplinary board’s chair- 
man, Major General Haim Nad el, 
ruled that the interrogation of the 
two suspects was carried out “in 
order to obtain vital and immediate 
information" in time to prevent in- 


dKGiH.y aom ivu, LA/ureirwai mmuu- uwwa auuuar w uioxru vi - . ■ . . 

ed Sunday the Akali Dal would “violent behavior" in the deaths of ^5 

participate in the ejection, Reuters two Arab hijackers last year. They ij 

reported from New Delhi. He said died after they were led handcuffed “JEudred bus April 1 3, 1984. 
a final derision would be made from a bus in the Gaza Strip to be investigating co mmissi on 

Monday. “But the Akali Dal has interrogated. ruled last week that the two hijack- 


never run away from the field," Mr. 
Longowal said. 


The board ruled (hat the injuries ers were taken off the bus to a field 
caused by General Yitzhak Monte- where they were interrogated and 


[An overflow crowd of 23,000 chai with the butt of Ins pistol were beaten. It said it had “turned up 
people greeted Prime Minisier Ra- “not unreasonable" in light of the pnma facie evidence regarding use 
jrv Gandhi in Hussainpur on Satin- circumstances surrounding the in- of violence towards the two terra- 
day on his first visit to Punjab since icrrogation of the Arabs, both of ists, via blows with a pistol, by 
last month’s peace agreement, but whom died afterward of skull frac- Brigadier General Yitzhak Morde- 
his plans to visit the Sikh holy city Dues. /-ha< 11 


his plans to visit the Sikh holy city mres 
Amrilsar were canceled m security ^ ^ 


grounds, Reuters reported.] 


da lions by Israel’s attorney general 


More than 2,000 persons have and a special inquiry commission 
been killed in the Punjab since Sikh that General Mordechai be prose- 
unrest turned violent in 1982, and cuied for causing grievous bodily 
the state is under direct rule by the harm to the two Palestinians. 

Youths Gash With Arabs in Cyprus 


The Associated Press 

LIMASSOL, Cyprus — Police 


pular resort with Arab tourists, 
ttnesses said that the clashes 


broke up gangs of Greek Cypriot started at about 10 PJM. when 


The pane) said that because it 
was inmosrible to establish from 
medical evidence whether the hi- 
jackers died from blows delivered 
by General Mordechai or from in- 
juries sustained dining the storm- 
ing of the bus by security forces, he 
could not be held directly responsi- 
ble for the deaths. 

But the commission said General 
Mordechai had committed griev- 
ous bodily harm to the two Arabs, 


youths early Sunday after fighting groups of Cypriots entered discos, and suggested he be tried under the 
began in the streets between the bars and restaurants frequented by penal code on that charge and un- 
youths and Arabs. A police spokes- Arabs and began beating up cus- dermiBtnry law on a charee of 
man said that more than 1,000 tomers. Discos and nightoubs were conduct unb«' rt rm« t ’ n n nffuvr 


man said that more than 1,000 tomers. Discos and nightclubs were 
Greek Cypriots and Arabs were in- ordered to dose early, but open-air 


law on a charge of 
coming an officer. 


vohred. 


restaurants and sidewalk cafes te- 


Tbousaads of Lebanese fleeing mained crowded with tourists, 
the civil war in their country and Radio reports said that fist fights 
other Arabs live in Cyprus. The continued past midnight and that 
Arab community in Limassol is the the youths had smashed shops and 
largest on the island, and the city is cars. 


A woman soldier was killed and 
eight other hostages were injured 
when a commando force stormed 
the bus, which had been hijacked 
by four Pales tinians . Two hijackers 
died during the assault 


Hanoi Shifts 
OnCambodia 
, SeatatlJN 

By Barbara Crossette 

New York Times Service 

PHNOM PENH — Nguyen Co 
Thach, Vietnam’s foreign minis ter, 
prid that this year Hanot wiB not 
attempt to seat the Phnom Penh 
gover nm ent at the UN General As- 
sembly, which it has been trying to 
do for more than five years. 

“It is useless," Mr. Thach said 
Friday after a two-day meeting 
here of the foreign ministers of 
Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos. 

Mr. Thach said he had proposed 
that high-level talks with U.& offi- 
cials be held in Hanoi on Aug. 2& 
The United States lists 2,464 Amc- 
v-anc ns missing in Indochina, more 
than 1,300 of them in Vietnam. 

Washington has no diplomatic 
relations with Hanoi. The Reagan 
adminis tration has made improved 
ties contingent on resolution of the 
v issue of the missing and on the 
1 withdrawal of Vietnamese troops 
from Cambodia. 

Vietnam supports the rtmom 
Penh government of Heng Satnrin, 
which iT installed in 1979 after m- 
TOiding Cambodia and dnvmgout 

m groups. ^Khmer 

Khmer People’s National L ftyr a- 
tion Front and the foro^ofPrm« 
Norodom Sihanouk, ^ former 
Cambodian leader, are fightmathe 
Vi etnames e and support a coalition 

•TSBassSir 

Endian mime minister, leads the 
KtaS PSde's National Utaa- 
SanFronr&gbf *» 
to 20,000 guemUaa. 

fonas nmnber about5W „ ^ 

“Pol Pot is at the ur*. *«»> 
r* 'rwh said "This wffl be a heavy 

" s«E?B?*!3sr 

bkssSsF 

hrifeved to have been kmeo. 

DO03NESBURY 



A Japan Air Lines official standing in front of the almni- 
nmn-aDoy bulkhead of a Boeing 747 at Haneda airport 

Tm Sure I Won’t Moke It , 9 Victim SaM 
In Notes to Family Before Jet Crashed 

The Associated Press 

TOKYO — Following arc excerpts of notes that a passenger, Hirot- 
saira Kawaguchi, 52, wrote aboard Japan Air Lines Flight 123 moments 
before the Boeing 747 crashed Aug. 12, kffling 520 peepte The notes were 
addressed to his son, Tsuyoshi, 21, and his two daughters Mariko, 24, and 
Chiyoko, 17. 

“Be good to each other and work hard. Help your mother. 

*Tm very sad but Fm sure I won’t make it. 

“It’s been five minutes now, 

•T don’t want to take any more planes. 

“Please Lord, hdp rat. 

“To fhtnV [bat our dinner last night was the last time. 

4 'Thae was smoke that seemed to come from an explosion in the cabin 
and we began making a descent 

“Tsuyoshi, Tm counting on you. 

“Mother — to think something like this would happen. 

“It’s too bad. 

“Goodbye. 

“It’s 6:30 now. , , 

“The plane is rolling around and desce n d in g rapidly. 

“1 amgrateful for the truly happy life f have enjoyed untfl now. 


Japan Issues 
New Order 
To Test 747s 

By Qyde Haberman 

New York Times Service 

TOKYO — The Japanese Trans- 
port Ministry has expanded its in- 
spection program for the country’s 


ing airlines to look fm defects in 
the rear pressure bulkheads of rela- 
tively old planes. 

The new order came Saturday as 
government investigators focused 
rat a possibility that bulkhead 
cracks were responsible for the 
crash last Monday of a Japan Air 
Lines 747 that killed 520 people. 

Apparently deciding not to wait 
lor the results of the investigation, 
the Transport Ministry tokf Japa- 
nese airlines to inspect rear bulk- 
heads on Boeing 747$ that have 
been through more than 15,000 
takeoff-and-iandmg cydes. 

The bulkhead, made of an alumi- 
num alloy, is a thin umbrefla- 
sbaped partition that seals the pas- 
senger cabin from the tail section. 

One theory under study is that 
pressurized air from the cabin burst 
through the partition, rushed into 
the hollow vertical fin and blew it 
apait. 

With much of its vertical stabiliz- 
er and rudders fallen away, the 
plane circled wildly off its charted 
course from Tokyo to Osaka. After 
more than 30 minutes of erratic 
flight, it crashed in the mountains 
about 70 miles (1 13 miles) north- 
west of Tokyo. 

At a news conference Saturday 
night, a senior government investi- 
gator, Hiroshi Fujiwara, said it ap- 
peared that “only a small portion" , 
of the vertical stabilizer was at- 
tached to the plane by the time it 
plowed into the mountains. 

Mr. Fujiwara, who is with the 
aircraft accident investigation com- 
mission of the Transport Ministry, 
said that “over all, we don’t know 
what the cause of the accident is 
yet.” 




ncM f&XU TODMFRDM 9&> AT £30, TNEMMIB/ENT. THOSE - 

rsa ateg .-s”^ 



WHY THE OWNER 
OF A PATEK PHILIPPE 
HAS MORE 

THAN JUST MONEY’S WORTH. 




» Nautilus. 

J* A Batek Philippe is 
for its owner, the real 
money. t 

The Nautilus model illus- J 
nine months to manufacture. 1 
outstanding addition to the M 
hundred pieces only, each Jg 
Patient hands of mas- Jlp 
the movement to near j||j&§ 
and minute screw is in- jjmM 
millimetre. 

In the men’s Nauti- 
mum winding efficien- ^S§l§|§| 
In the ladies 1 Nau- flfS W 


E e costliest watch to make. But 
tie goes beyond the question of 

d here requires, on average, 
erefore not surprising that this 
’hilippe range is limited to a few 

hmakers finish each part of 
l. Every wheel, pinion, pivot 
dividuaily crafted to a hundredth of a 



In the men’s Nauti- lus a solid 18 ct. gold rotor ensures maxi- 

mum winding efficien- j|g||g|| cy. 

In the ladies’ Nau- tilus, slimness and practicability are ensured 

by a quartz movement. Designed and crafted in Patek Philippe's own ateliers, 
this electronic marvel matches the quality criteria as stipulated for our 
mechanical timepieces. 

The two-piece case incorporates a water-resistant sealing system 
which completely protects the mens Nautilus toa depth of 120 m (396 
ft) and the ladies’ models to a depth of 60 m (198 ft). 

Eachlink of the Nautilus bracelets hand-crafted; polished orsatin- 
finished, and then individually assembled. In reality, it is only by being 
hand-finished that a timepiece can be turned into a masterpiece. 

If you are aiming for perfection you need patience. Perseverance 
also - and perhaps a streak of stubbornness - are often needed to 
achieve the best things in life. 

Queen Victoria, Charles Lindbergh, Richard Wagner, Franklin D. 
Roosevelt. . . and many other famous people have worn a Patek Philippe. Many 
more are wearing one right now. / 

All of them for more than just money’s worth. j 


phiupS 


© E N Evi 


Wrtt&tof catalogue to- 

Pate* Philippe 5 A . di. rue du Rhone. CH-12H Geneve 3 


FOR MASTERS OF 















































































HcraliQEEribunc. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 



Eurobond Yields 

For WMk Ended Aug. 14 

U.5.S Ig term. Inf I Inst. — 

U.5J long term. Ind. 

U.S-S medium term, Ind. _ 

Can.S medium term 

French Fr. short term 

Sterling medium term 

Yen medium term, inri Inst. 
Yen Ig term, (nt'l Inst. — 

ECU Short term 

ECU medium term 

ECU long term 

EUA long term 


inst. 


10.93 % 
1040 % 
1045 % 
11.11 % 
1Z05 % 
11.03 % 

444 % 

445 % 
843 % 
949 % 
944 % 
847 % 
941 % 
9.44 % 


LuxF med term Inf I 
LuxF medium term 
Calculated t>* (tie Luxembourg Stack Ex- 
change. 

Market Turnover 

For Week Ended Aug. 15 

(Miltons of U4. Dollars) 

Non-Mlar 
Dollar Equivalent 


Cedel 

Euroclear 


Total 
15481.9 11,235.1 
274514 234404 


4,1544 

34104 


EUROBONDS 

Failure of STAGS Issues 
Dominates Talk on Market 

By CARL GEWIRTZ 

International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — The most talked about issue on the international 
capital market lost week was one that aborted before it 
could be sold. The issue was to have been the first 
stripped British Treasury gilt issue — with the 26 semi- 
annual £7.7S- million coupon payments between now and 1998 
and the final £100-million principal repayment being offered as 
27 separate zero-coupon bonds. 

On Friday, a week after the fanfare introduction, the issue was 
withdrawn. Lead manager Quadrex Securities Ltd. was unable to 
form a syndicate to subunderwrite the transaction. A spokesman 
at Charterhouse Japhet, co-manager of the intended issue, said 
that “only two or three small 
banks” had agreed to partici- 
pate. 

Failures of this son are 
rare in the market and for 
Quadrex, it is the second. In 
1983, it proposed selling a 
bond issue bearing warrants 
to buy U.S. Treasury securi- 
ties. That novel concept 
failed because the price set 
for the warrants was judged 
too high, but the idea was 
immediately picked up and 
successfully marketed by 
competitors who set prices 
more appealing to investors. 

Critics argue that the pro- 
posed yields on the sterling 
issue were not sufficient to 
attract foreign investors wary 
about the future course of 
sterling. British taxes on zero-issues virtually eliminate the attrac- 
tion of such paper for domestic investors. 

Apart from that, marketing stripped issues is not easy. Bankers 
say that short maturities, those of less than five years, and the 
fmal principal repayment are relatively easy to sell. 

But the mid-portion is extremely difficult to market because 
the amounts are minuscule and trading therefore is likely to be 
impossible. Thus, finding buyers takes time, requiring assiduous 
scouting of institutions for whom those orphan maturities fit a 
particular need. And that requires a managing syndicate strong 
enough to hold the paper until buyers can be found. 

As for the investors who did commit to buy the Quadrex 
offering, the mana g in g director. Kurt Marthaler, says that the 
firm will take care of “our customers” who switched or swapped 
out of existing holdings to buy the zeroes. “No one is going to be 
hurt.” he said. He offered no" details on how this would work or 
how much money might be involved, adding only that the firm’s 
obligation to customers was a moral rather than legal one since 
the offering bad not yet been finalized. 

Quadrex and Charterhouse Japhet made some profit, although 
no one is willing to say how much, by selling the £100 milli on of 
the 15te-perceni 1998 gilts at a higher price than they had paid to 
buy the paper. 

T HE rest of the week’s business was largely tailored to 
appeal to Japanese investors who continue to be the 
dominant force driving the international capital market 
More than half the new issues launched last week were targeted 
for Japan and the bulk of these were dual-currency issues where 
the subscription price and coupon payments are made in yen but 
where the principal is repaid in dollars at a rate of exchange fixed 
at the outseL 

There were seven such issues offered last week totaling 185 
billion yen. Japanese investors can pick up I '/4-percent higher 
income on these issues over traditional yen yields. Concern about 
the foreign exchange risk of being repaid in dollars can be hedged 
if and when the actual exchange rate begins to move during the 
10-year life of these bonds. 

This fixed exchange rate, set at 208 yen per dollar on the issues 
marketed last week, virtually eliminates any appeal to foreign 
investors wanting to speculate on an appreciation of the yen. 
Japanese bankers say that more of these dual-currency bonds can 
be expected. 

The latest crop of issuers included British Petroleum, Ek sport- 
fmans of Norway, the Federal National Mortgage Association 
(Fannie Mae), Honeywell, Hydro-Quebec and Phibro Salomon 
who use the proceeds as fodder for a swap into very low-cost 
dollars. 

In the dollar market, two Japanese firms — Chubu Electric 
power and Chujitsuya — launched issues targeted to appeal to 
Japanese investors. Foreign currency issues made by Japanese 
domiciled companies can be bought by investors who want to 
skirt restrictions on the purchase of foreign currency assets. 
How much further this demand, as well as the much bigger 
(Continued on Page 9, CoL I) 


Last Week’s Markets 

All figures are as of dose of trading Friday 


Stock Indexes 


Money Rates 


tinted States 



United States i 

LastWk. 

PrevJffiL 

Lostwk. 

Prev.WlL 

Ch-ge 


7Vj 

7V4 

DJ Indus. 131272 

1,22079 

— 0 ^ 0 % 

Federal funds rote_ 

8 '* 

79/16 

DJ Util 157.16 

15586 

+ 1.50% 


9V5 

9<ri 

DJ Trans.— 606 J 8 

msp 

— 170% 




S&P100 — 17V 75 

18245 

— 1-50% 




SAP 500 786.12 

18833 

— 170% 

Discount 

5 

5 

NYSE Cp— 107.94 

1WJ06 

— 170% 

Coll money 

b'U 

6 >.i 

Saatx:Pnxlential'Bact>eSeaxities. 


40-day Interbank 

t#l 

6*8 




West Germany 






Lombard 

150 

6 

FT5E 100 U98J90 

178450 

+ 0.94% 

Overnight. 

480 

4B0 

FT 30 — 77430 

9573) 

+ 178% 

1 -month i nterDank— 

475 

480 




Britain 



Hong Song 



Bonk base role 

ll’/i 

ll'rj 

Hang Sens. IJ00J7 

1.67451 

+ 1.40% 

Coll money 

12% 

11% 

Japan 



3-monfri interbank _ 

11 

11 3/32 





Nikkei DJ _ 1158388 









Bk Enul index _ 13ST0 

138-50 

—174% 

West Germany 



Gold 



Commerzbk 1,41450 

U1X10 

+078% 

London am. fix. S 33135 

321.65 

+426% 

Source; JaraCapet&CxLloaOtxL 







Cress Rates 
s 

c 

DM. 

FJ=. 

IM- 

Oldr. 

88 . 

Aug. 16 
S.F. Yen 

Amsterdam 

3.1 US 

4356 

172*35 * 

36835* 

AM* 


585* 

137.16- 

13170 T 

Brussel sto) 

547725 

7849 

20275 

6637 

383 * 

160215 


74725 

2167- 

Frank fori 

2761 

3J7T 

— ■ 

32695* 

1.493* 

8877 * 

4926 - 

12185* 

7.167 • 

London <b> 

tjm 

— 

11508 

I187BS 

25»TJfl 

4-3518 

78815 

11625 

33182 

Ml km 

lasaso 

JJ9100 

67015 

71905 

— 

5*575 

net 

B1600 

7814 

Now YoriUe} 

— 

CL7135 n 

2753 

1435 

18* U0 

11095 

55*0 

2256 

23675 

Parts 

4456 

11709 

10585 

- 

456ES X 

27157 

15.0775 * 

5723 

35655- 

Tokyo 

237.00 

33273 

8574 

auk 

1179- 

7625 

42283- 

10468 



zarick 

27635 

1166? 

8201 ■ 

16835 * 

0.1274* 

7282 * 

48*6* 

— 

49564 * 

1 ECU 

0 XM 8 

45751 

2225 

61049 

1.49086 

25057 

451243 

18262 

1*0533 

1 SDR 

1A36BV 

074037 

286493 

874794 

1.97281 

12294 

541*1 

27506 

745224 


Closings tn London and Zurich, fixings m other European centers. New York rates at 4 PM. 
fa! Commercial franc lb! Amounts needed to Oov one eound lc> Amounts needed to buy one 
donor t‘) Units of ICO {<) Units of IjOOO tvl Units at tOMO MOL; no/ aualed: not mailable, 

fej re burone pound: 


Other Dollar Value** 


Currency per 

uss 

Cummer P or USA 

Currency per USA 

Currency per U 45 

Arsen, oostnri 

080 

Fin. markka 

58*5 

Malar, rfna. 

71*K 

S. Kor.wan 

88SJJ5 

AMtraJLS 

182*5 

Greek drac. 

12950 

Me*, peso 

moo 

Span, peseta 

14210 

» An*tr. «3rtL 

1980 

HongKenas 

7.790 S 

None, krone 

4165 

S wed. krona 

4245 

Reln. fln.fr. 

5638 

Indian ranee 

118*06 

PhU.PMO 

1750 

Taiwan 5 

4055 

Brazil crux. 688000 

UxtonuttA 

1,11780 

Pori, escudo 

16450 

TMUMM 

24735 

Canadians 

13534 

Irish I 

ASMS 

Saadi rival 

165 

Turkish lira 

53095 

Danlsfi kroae 

10015 

■ernell stiek. 

1885 50 

Sins. 1 

220*5 

UAEdh-ham 

1*725 

eoynf. pound 

07VJ7 

Kuwaiti dinar 0J019 

S. Air. rand 

2837 

Veim-boHr. 

14.15 


Icahn 
Warns on 

TWA Bid 

OtaUenge Aimed 
At Texas Air 

By Agis Salpukas 

Hew- York Tuna Service 

NEW YORK — Carl C. Icahn 
has warned directors of Trans 
World Airlines that be might lower 
his $24-a-share bid for the compa- 
ny if the board gives Texas Air 
options to buy valuable assets. 

Mr. Icahn’s letter to the direc- 
tors, released Friday, was his first 
response to discussions between 
TWA and Texas Air Corp. aimed 
at preventing the New York inves- 
tor. who owns 45.54 percent of 
TWA, from gaining control. Frank 
A. Lorenzo, president of Texas Air, 
won an agreement in July to ac- 
quire TWA and recently raised his 
offer to $26 a share. 

The letter warned the board that 
if it allowed Texas Air to gain con- 
trol some TWA unions could dis- 
rupt operations. Mr. Icahn has ob- 
tained agreements from the leaders 
of two unions at TWA the pilots 
and the machinists, for major con- 
cessions in return for his commit- 
ment to take over the airline. 

Mr. Icahn also suggested that he 
might challenge in court a board 
payment to Texas Air if the deal 
feD through. Texas Air could re- 
ceive about S5Q milli on from stock 
options, an IIS-million penalty 
and profits from shares it already 
owns in TWA if its offer did not 
succeed. 

“It is important for you to real- 
ize,” Mr. Icahn wrote, “ that the 
increased Texas Air bid should be 
viewed as nothing more than a 
thinly disguised attempt to strong- 
arm me to raise my 524 proposal 
purely so Texas Air could receive a 
greater price for its existing lockup 
options and the 2.2 million TWA 
shares which it presently owns." 

Mr. i cahn slopped short of top- 
ping Texas Airis bid. A higher bid 
would make the discussions about 
the proposed sale of valuable assets 
moot, because Texas Air has said 
that the options would not be valid 
if there was a higher offer. 

John V. Pincavage, airline ana- 
lyst for Paine Webber Inc., said 
that if Mr. Icahn lowered his bid, it 
might depress the price of the 
stock, which closed Friday on the 
New York Stock Exchange at 
$21375, off 373 cents. 

Mr. Icahn said in Friday’s letter 
that Texas Air raised its bid to $26 
a share only “when it knew it would 
never have to perform, realizing 
that my relationship with your 
unions motivates me to oppose any 
Texas Air bid.” 

Analysts say Mr. Icahn could 
easily block any attempt by Texas 
Air to acquire the company in a 
vote of stockholders. Analysts say 
Mr. Lorenzo has a chance only if 
the TWA board grants proposals 
made by Texas Air last week to 
issue more common stock to dilute 
Mr. Icahn’s holdings to about one 
third and to give Texas Air options 
to buy TWA’s computer reserva- 
tion system and its international 
routes. 

Such steps would make the com- 
pany less attractive to Mr. Icahn. 



The Now Varit limn 

William ML Isaac, who is ending his term as chairman of the FDIC; depositors line op 
outside the Penn Square Bank of Oklahoma Gty after the bank's collapse in Jidy 1982. 

Isaac Ends Eventful Tenure at FDIC 


By Robert A. Bennett 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — In his five 
and a half years as c hairman of 
the Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corp.. W illiam M_ Isaac has 
been put through the wringer. 

He was fated lo serve as one of 
the p rimar y guar dians of the 
confidence in the United States 
financial system during its most 
tumultuous period since the 
Great Depression. Bank failures 
soared amid a steep recession 
and record high interest rates. 
And conventional banking was 
turned inside out as bankers 
rushed into new markets opened 
by financial deregulation. 

Mr. Isaac found himself deal- 
ing with the rescue of hundreds 
of banks, ran ging from the s mall - 
est rural institutions to the giant 
Continental Illinois National 
Bank of Chicago, whose plight 
rallied the financial world, both 
in the United States and abroad. 

But Mr. Isaac has transformed 


y reactive 
force in' 


cy 


a sleepy, 
into a pow 
For all practical purposes, his 
agency has called the shots at 
Continental Illinois, hiring and 
firing directors, and it has played 
an increasingly active role in the 
executive suites at other banks, 
too. 

Moreover, he has sought — 
often successfully — to allow 
market forces to exert greater 

E ressures on banks, through 
igfaer insurance premiums, in- 
creases in bank capital require- 
ments, greater disclosure and 
more limited coverage of depos- 
its in failed banks. 

He has made some mis t a kes, 
too. His public comments on 
p ulling the agency’s traditional 
safety net out from under large 
depositors is believed to have fed 
the nervousness of money man- 
agers and, some say, may have 
contributed to the problems at 
Continental ffimois. 

“Many of our guys would say 


that some of Bill Isaac’s recent 
policies were very, very disturb- 
ing,” said Kenneth A Guenther, 
executive vice president of the 
Independent Bankers Associa- 
tion of America, the trade orga- 
nization of many of the small 
U.S. banks. “Despite this, we 
think history wQl indicate that 
Isaac’s tenure at the FDIC has 
been in tellig ent, pragmatic and 
that he hasnelped the financial 
system through some severe cri- 
ses.” 

Mr. Isaac's tenure is to end 
around Ocl 1. The Reagan ad- 
ministration has nominated L. 
William Seidman, dean of the 
College of Business at Arizona 
State University, to succeed Mr. 
Isaac. But when the 4I-year-old 
attorney departs, his mark on the 
agency and on banking will re- 
main. 

Until Mr. Isaac appeared, the 
FDIC had a limited role. It was 
<><tnhHchpri in 1933 to maintain 
(Continued on Page 1L CoL 5) 


Resorts Reveals 
Acquisition of 
8.8% of Pan An 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

New York Tuna Service 

NEW YORK — Resorts Inter- 
national Inc. has disclosed that it 
owns an 8. 8-percent stake in Pan 
Am Corp., the parent company of 
Pan American World Airways. _ 

Resorts, a hotel and eamblini 

concern, said Fridav in a , 

the Securities and Exchange 
missi on that it purchased the stock 
as an investment and that it does 
not expect to increase its share in 
the troubled airline to more than 10 
percent 

The announcement came two 
months after Resorts made a bid to 
acquire Trans World Airlines for 
$22 a share, or a total of 5759 
million, according to Wall Street 
sources. That bid was raected by 
TWA in favor of a higher offer 
from Texas Air Coip. 

Resorts has long sought to pur- 
chase an airline. Rumors of its in- 
terest in Pan Am have been wide- 
spread on Wall Street in the past 
several weeks. During that rune, 
about a quarter of Pan Am’s stock 
has traded h ? n d>> 

Pan Am Hi»dineri to comment on 
the announcement, saying it bad 
not yet had a chan ce to study the 
filing. Resorts officials could not be 
reached for comment late Friday. 

The announcement came after 
the close of trading on the New 
York Stock Exchange. Pan Am 
closed at $8 in consolidated trad- 
ing, up 25 cents a share 

The Resorts statement that it 

ently is basedon 104 mflHonaSares 
outs tanding However, Pan Am ac- 
tually has 127 milli on shares out- 
standing after the recent comple- 
tion of a convertible bond 
conversion, according to a Pan Am 
spokesman. Based on 127 million 
shares a takeover of Pan Am 
would cost at least $1 btition. 


Pan Am has been struggli ng fof 
several years. This spring it 
to sefl its Pacific routes to United 
Airlines for $750 million, reducing 
its by 23 percent and giving up 
its role as a worldwide carrier. 

The company has been plagued 
by financial problems. It l° s l 
$206.8 million last year and was 
hurt eariv this year by a 28-day 
strike by" the Transport Workers 
Union. In the second quarter. Pan 
Am lost $72 compared 

with a loss of 549.8 mUlioa in the 
second quarter last year. 

John V. Pincavage. Paine Web- 
bo's airline analyst, said he be- 
lieves Pan Am stock is undervalued 
and worth from $10 to S 15 a share 


Judge Approves 
Laker Settlement 

The Associated Pros 

LONDON —A British judge 
has approved a S48- million out- 
of-court settlement of Laker 
Airways’ U.S. antitrust suit 
against 10 competitors over the 
1982 collapse of the no-frills 
trans-Atlantic carrier. 

The judgment Friday was a 
defeat for the defunct airline’s 
founder. Sir Freddie Laker, 
who bad described the pro- 
pored settlement as “pitifully 
inadequate and ill-considered.” 

High Court Judge Sir Nicho- 
las Browne- Wilkinson said that 
the settlement prorides for full 
payment for more than 16.000 
small creditors, including about 
14,000 ticket-holders ana 2^00 
former employees. He made no 
mention of a separate $8 mil- 
lion offered to Sir Freddie per- 
sonally on condition he not pur- 
sue further legal action. 


U.S. Fails to Cut Steel Imports, but Sees Reduction in 2d Half 


New York Tima Service 

CHICAGO — The Reagan ad- 
ministration has failed to reduce 
imports of steel to the United 
States, industry executives said last 
week, despite a pledge made 11 
months ago to do so. 

Last September, President Ron- 
ald Reagan said he would seek, to 
negotiate with foreign steel produc- 
ers a five-year agreement to volun- 
tarily limit their exports of finished 
steel products lo the United States 
to 18.5 percent erf the domestic 
market a year. Semifinished steel 
slabs from abroad were allotted an 
additional 1.7 percent of the do- 
mestic market 

The American Iron and Steel In- 
stitute said last week that for the 
first half of 1985, steel imports were 
about 13 million tons, or 26.2 per- 
cent of the supply in the U.S. mar- 
ket The figure compared with 
about 11$ million tons, or 24.2 
percent of the market for the cor- 
responding period in 1984. 

However, administration offi- 
cials said that steel imports should 
be dramatically reduced in the sec- 
ond half of the year, as recently 
negotiated agreements take effect 



wr 


Donald H. Traatiein 


and importers nm up against quota 
limits. 

Donald H. Trautlrin, chairman 
of Bethlehem Sled Coip. and of the 
id on Friday: “We 


steel institute, said 
deeply appreciate the efforts that 
have been made and recognize that 
a great deal has been accomplished. 


However, imports to date remain 
unacceptably high and there are 
few indications in our order book 
that would lead us to believe that 
the availability of imports is about 
to drop dramatically. 

John E. Jacobson, steel analyst 
with Chase Econometrics in Bala- 
Cynwyd, Pennsylvania, said, “The 
surge in June import figures to 
dose to 30 percent of the market 
was alarming.” 

He predicted, however, that im- 
ports for the second half would be 
down to 10 million tons or below. 
Last year, imports totaled 2<L2 mil- 
lion tons. 

The 18.5-percent target of Mr. 
Reagan's plan will not be met pre- 
cisely, bnt it will have a “restrain- 
ing effect" this year, Mr. Jacobson 
said. 

“The program is working. Im- 
ports will be a whole lot less in the 
second half,” said Charles HL 
Blum, assistant UjS. trade repre- 
sentative for industrial trade po- 
licy. 

The 

ated agreements with 14 steel-ex- 
porting nations, including Japan, 
Brazil Mexico, South Africa. Spain 


Owner of U.S. Nuclear Plant Cites Cash-Flow Crisis 


and South Korea. The bilateral 
agreements cover 81 percent of 
steel imports into the United 
States, according to the Commerce 
Department. 

even representatives of steel im- 
porters agree that for the first six 
months of the president's program, 
which began last Ocl 1, uncertain- 
ties about quota limits and product 
categories encouraged foreign com- 
panies to ship the bulk of their 
expected quota eariv in the year. 

Fernand Lamesch, president of 
the American Institute for Import- 
ed Steel, acknowledges dial some 
foreign producers increased ship- 
ments. 

“They thoug ht that they couldn’t 
lose by slightly overdoing it,” he 
said. “But over the longer term, the 
import numbers will come down. 
They have ta If they don’t you 
don’t get a license for future ship- 
ments?" 

He said that the current high 
import figures reflect, in part, 
transactions six month old of U.S. 
customers with steel producers 
abroad. 

‘The fact is that there is little 
dynamic activity in the market- 
place for imported steel today,” 
Mr. Lamesch said. “I think you will 
see the numbers for July down sub- 
stantially, showing how dramati- 
cally the president's program is 
working.” 


Waller F. Carter, steel industry 
analyst whh Data Resources Inc. in 
Lexington, Massachusetts, said the 
effectiveness at the president's pro- 
gram would not be known until 
next year. 

Japan and the European Com- 
munity, which has a separate set of 
agreements limiting steel exports 
dating to 1982, each have allot-' 
meats of about 6 percent of the 
UR. market Canada, which does 
not have a formal agreement, sup- 
plies about 3 percent of the U.S. 
market 

However, according to Mr. Car- 
ter, it is the growing group of Third 
World steel producers that may im- 
peril Mr. Reagan's voluntary re- 
straint agreement The American ' 
Iron and Steel Institute estimates 
that 75 countries will export steel to 
the United States this year, up from 
59 nations in 1984. 

Mr. Blum, the government’s as-' 
sistant trade representative, said 
that additional measures needed to 
reduce import levels included ex- 
tension of the agreements with tire 
EC, most of which expire at tire end - 
of tins year; reaching an under- 
standing with Canadian steel pro- 
ducers who “pushed excessive 
amounts of steel into this country 
in June”; and tradting shipments 
from new suppliers streh as Ch ile, 
Al geria 


The Associated Press 

NEW ORLEANS. Louisiana — 
Middle South Utilities Inc. has ac- 
knowledged that it has a “very criti- 
cal cash-flow crisis” that cannot be 
resolved unless its subsidiaries are 
granted rate increases to cover the 
cost of nuclear power. 

A Securities and Exchange Com- 
mission report said there is a possi- 
bility that tire company may file for 
protection from creditors under 
Chapter 1 1 of the U.S. Bankruptcy 
Code. 

After the report was made pub- 
lic, 5.4 million shares of Middle 
South were traded Friday on the 
New York Stock Exchange — the 
most actively traded stock — and 
share prices fell S 1 30 to close at 
$9,125. 

The SEC'S top utility regulator. 
William Weeden, was quoted as 


saying that “Middle South is scared 
to death." 

Middle South’s treasurer, Drake 
Keith, demurred at that description 
on Friday, preferring to say that 
the company was very concerned. 

He said that the SEC report had 
essentially repeated what Middle 
South and its subsidiaries have 
been te lling , utility regulators in 
their requests for rate increases to 
pay for their shares of power from 
the $3 .5-million Grand Gulf 1 nu- 
clear plant in Port Gibson, Missis- 
a'PPji 

The system is in a very critical 
cash-flow crisis right now," he said. 

Mr. Keith said Middle South’s 
four operating companies paid 
more than 580 million Thursday 
for their Gist month of nuclear 
power from Grand Gulf, bnt can- 
not keep pairing those bills without 
rate increases Lo cover them 


Costs of Gasoline, Food in Britain 
Forced Retail Prices Down in July 


EStcrflm: Uissirfahs 

Sources: Banauo du Benelux i Brussels I ; Banco Commercials Indiana fMOan): Banoue No- 
Hondo de Paris I Paris); Bank of Tokva (Tana); IMF tSDRI; BAH (dinar, rival, dirham). 
Other data from Routers andAP. 


Reuters 

LONDON — Retail prices in 
Britain fell 02 percent in July, for 
an annual rate of 6.9 percent, the 
Employment Department has re- 
ported. 

In June, retail prices rose 0.2 
percent, and the annual rate was 
7.0 percent. The decrease in prices 
in July was the largest drop since 
December 1982, when it also fell 
0.2 percent. 

Employment Secretary Tom 
King said Friday that there were 
significant declines in July in the 
prices of fresh foods, vegetables 
and gasoline. 

Prices also fell in such other ar- 
eas as domestic appliances, heating 
oil and television lentaL The 92- 
percent decline in seasonal food 


prices in July was the largest since 
August 1982, when they dropped 
112 percent 

Mr. King said that be expected 
Britain’s mflatioo rate to show a 
decline again in August. 

Meanwhile, the Confederation 
of British Industry, said it expected 
inflation in Britain to drop to 
around 5.5 percent by the end of 
the year. 


“If you’re talking $80 million to 
$90 million a month, you can see 
that the numbers get real big over 
60 to 90 days," he said. “We're in 
the position any business is faced 
with when it’s not able to collect for 
a service it is rendering.” 

Middle South owns 90 percent of 
Grand Gulf. Its four operating 
subsidiaries are Louisiana Power & 
Light Co., New Orleans Public Ser- 
vice Inc, Arkansas Power & Light 
and Mississippi Power & Light. 

Regulatory agencies in Louisi- 
ana, Arkansas and Mississippi have 
rejected rate hikes to pay for Grand 
Gulf. They have said that they are 
concerned about the high cost of 
the plant’s power, the effect rate 
increases would have on the al- 
ready depressed economies of the 
three states and whether Grand 
Gulf power is needed at aH 

Louisiana Power & light filed 
suit Friday in Baton Rouge asking 
for a preliminary injunction forc- 
ing the Louisiana Public Service 
Commission to order rate hikes to 
cover LP&L’s 14-percent share of 
the plant 

LP&L went to federal court after 
the commission rejected its request 
July 30. The U.S. District Court 
said that it did not have jurisdiction 


but that withholding the rate in- 
crease might be unconstitutional 
deprivation of property. 

Asked whether Middle South 
was investigating the possibility of 
a Chapter 1 1 filing, Mr. Keith said, 
“I think it’s only prudent that you 
would investigate all alternatives 
that you might see down the road. 

“But there’s quite some time and 
a lot of things that would be done 
before you would get into a Chap- 
ter 11 type of situation,” be said. 
He said that hiring already had 
been frozen, but refused to give 
further details. 

Spokesmen for LP&L and New 
Orleans Public Service said that the 
utilities had to borrow money to 
pay their Grand Gulf bills — $8.8 
million for Louisiana Power & 
light and $12.4 minion for New 
Orleans Publi Service. 

Arkansas Power & Light said 
that its $32.8-mfllion payment was 
taken from the company’s general 
fund, while Mississippi Power & 
Light said that its $26.8-million bill 
was paid from a stock and bond 
sale last spring. 

Tire charges are different for 
each company because they buy 
different shares or the plant’s pow- 
er. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 198S 


Weekly 

International Bond Prices 


YMf 

MbBie . Ave ' 
NU Price MM LHtCerr 


Prices may vary acautfinv to market conditions arid other factors. 


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JM Price Mt UtoCwr 


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153* 17 Dec 1023k un low 


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Mo Morgan Jp Co Inc 111*72 Feb im 10L8J 


ISO Maroon Jp Hill Capita 


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S 125 CUyrnpkr 6 VarK CmSt KHkOOJun 

1 HOPodHcBeB 11*72 MOV 

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7 20000 Padflc Gas Electric 7 Or Sep 

S S PodficUdlWOO/I 8 51 Apr 


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f* 02 Jul 7B3* 107 

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11% 07 May Ml 1132 

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7*71 Jan H)i% 731 

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8 deOct Mi* 737 
7* "75 Feb MO* 735 
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ITALY 


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DENMARK 


FOREIGNTARGETED BONDS OF THE U5 
TREASURY AND OF ITS AGENCIES 


f INO UsTraoEury 
5 MM u* Treasury 
5 700 Fed Home Loan Banks 

S Mfl Fed Notional Mon ah 

y 54000 Fed National Man Ass 
y 2900 Studs* Loon Mar* Ax 


U*"B8 5eg 104% 7J8 
II "*0F« KB* 799 
II "87 DK 101 a&& 

11% "71 D« 101* 1IJU 

4* "92 Feb 100 AS* 

4* 12 Jan 79 431 


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7% "94 Apt 104% 7.15 >54 

7*14Nm 104* 7JH 74) 

7* U4 Apr H0% 634 411 731 

7WU6Dee 7JM 69 746 

4 90 Nov 78% U4 638 407 

8%WJan 103* IM 73k 617 

7%-TSFta Ml* 7,11 747 72 

7% 17 Jan ns* 535 U4 7J0 

7 17 Mov 101% 643 174 4J0 

IfcUBApr 101% 585 5J7 640 

0**3 Jul 104% 737 627 

8<ul4Nay Ml% 638 *14 613 

b* 17 Mar 101.1 5(3 523 6A5 

7* "88 Feb 101% *_H 621 7J4 

g%T0Feb 104* 720 Ml 

7 TO Jul 102 421 5*2 6M 

Sly U0 Jul KS% 7.17 K34 l 

7IV7IOCI BUL. 740 7JJ 


DM STRAIGHT BONDS 


AUSTRALIA 


* 

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m-a9jm m n a uai am 19 Australia P p 

7 % to Jul 79% KLU 971 am 29 Australia 

HU-729P 107% 1149 1254 dm 350 Australia 

«*-72Feb W 6S4 447 dm 250 Australia 

17*7100 M7* IIL93 HAS dm TOO Aoslroffo 

I ih to ctci >05 1655 1121 dm IN Australia 

8 TO May 77* 727 1007 623 dm TM Australia 
11*75 Aar 101 KUf3 1131 rim NO Aatnrila 

8 % "89 Jun 7714 744 734 654 dm 400 Australia 

14 77 May HOT. 1105 1144 rial » Auxtrefcm Ind Dev ( 

mhtodk Ml 1021 1077 rim IN Ktenenfey Iran Fki 

4*72 Feb 77* 474 648 B« MO Mount Isa FtaaKK 

M 75 Jul 78% mat Hus rim md Mount naFknncr 

12*TOOd 105* 734 1284 dm 59 PapuaNewCuAwa 

WkTSApr rtn KLn 1657 rim no flueOMtondAlurnlnc 

MW 73 Dec 77 1044 1644 

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7% TO Feb 77 79 IUI 723 dm MO Aidtrta 

13* "81 on M3 1054 1172 dm W Austria 

11* 75 May 103*11.14 119 dm MO AtSrta 


M 79 Jul 78% 1024 
12*TOOd 105* 734 
We 78 Apr in nui 
MW 73 Dec 77 1044 


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rim 9 PanuoNrw Guinea 
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7 TO Feb 101* 547 529 630 
9*TOOel 102% 673 605 

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» "ffiJSeo Hl% 548 571 

5* "79 Nov 100 174 523 575 

1% 70 Mar 104% 672 77S 

7* 71 Fab 112* 641 835 

7% 71 Doc IM* 601 635 

7* 72 Nov lot* 642 777 

t* "73 Jon H2% 643 471 

7* 74 Nov WTa 677 7JH 

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I 4* TO Jul IDO* 659 652 423 

7% 70 Mar 106* 4J1 7.18 

I*7IA pr 107 642 724 

4* TO Jul HD* 444 441 423 

a 8% TO Nov MI* 238 238 840 

AUSTRIA 


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dm in Denmark 4* 77 Dec IGtr- 441 657 03 

am too Oeomark » TO Feb v»* 607 *47 

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dm IN Denmark l* "89 Mar lS4".y 734 7J4 in 

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dm 158 Denmark i* "87 Nov HH* 644 

dm XB Davnark Pp r.'i ~K May 104* 7M 

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dm IM Denmark TO* 72 Mar 112* 7 m 

1 am WO Demnark I "V3May its* 7U 

1 am 150 Denmark 7%74Aor 104% 7.1 

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am M CDacnhagen Telephone 4% TO Apr 101% 585 
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dm 100 Mortgoae Bank Denmark M%tii«ov tij’i 775 
dm HO Mortgage Bout Denman 8% 73 Feb 107 724 

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9* TO Jui 77* 7JI1 
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lin-TONM 105 Ml 
11* 19 Jai TO* 1637 
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11* TO Dec MJ* HU2 
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11% "70 Nov Ml 1121 1121 

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8* TO Dec to 732162] 672 
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8* TO Jun «2% 169 ION 677 
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11% TO Jan 101* ttJB 11.14 

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7* TO May 94% 19 603 

14* TO Aw M4% 1284 Mil 

7* TO Nov N 675 734 Ml 


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Hi* 625 721 

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Tm TO Apr ID 459 704 

T* "TO Jan IM .72 IK 

2* NO Jan 87 117 245 

0* TO Dec 107* 5*7 657 

5% TO Feb 100* £39 547 

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HI "87 Mar HA? 1JI 13 ATT 

t TO ear «: * *X1 IP «m 

kiVSw itt Ui tee 

■ftfllMV Wn 12 79 *26 


U TO AOT 

toft TO Oct 


1ST- Alt 79 US CWI 

.. 118 Alt 73 >J2 ' 1 

15 re: Feb uo 7.* 5 ijo Tie 
E* TO JOT KE% 487 IU dm 300 Swiss Bank Card Ore TtaTOJpl tU 

■ TOJri m* in us *n a* Swot Bow carp w.-w TwretfiK a? 

r-TtlW* 105* 71* 639 730 . . — . .. ~ i|.rvfca 

7TkreiF*c 10% 724 707 74i UNITED KINGDOM 

n* TO Jul XR, 7JB T.M >n 

nreiNa* its* 727 7M 730 m 
•ft rei Ftp »6% 739 72* 725 S JS 

7%-HDeC ID 7II61IU SS 

7% red Mar uu if; in >21 £ 5 

7% 04 Mar IST% 525 524 79 ZU m 

TkiTOO a 161% A21 51* 744 

**07 JOT IBP* 543 IS S» 

•<1 *7 Jaf tOBta 6JB 53* 145 S H 

; to jot tm 540 443 uo £2 h! 

3'ATOAar nt w 511 644 S » 

6 TO Ivor Mlft Ut Ul 22 

5355 Snf £5 

& »“« £3 


SWITZERLAND 


Itfulu 7 il*l 


7 % to Feb tMri k-T 74 an, 

6* TO Mov kDta U* If W 

mrei JOT 7N% 74k f *0 UT W 

MTODK Mta T9 *B 748 

n-noct «b >« J6 'ii 

aqreioct IM :» >40 

■to remap ** ah iji 

MTOJim m 731 iu 

TtareiDrec Mft '« T2f 

MMIta mn IM IM IN 

«%x 7 ja mn ue an me 


in% M« SI4 MO 1 22 ® Esi’Sgai&K 

4*retFeb :c:.« o in iB n M EBEuraCoaiASiPb 
4* ef rTOJ .S... 64 1T2 6U dm U0 EaElPuCPOl A5toc« 
NEW ZEALAND } dm Inc Ea Eure am A Stoat 


Mutual 

Ruids 


Drexnl Burnfwm; £S5_ 

Burnt! 1924 2004 SJJTC 
Govt unovoU Equity 

Drreyfua Grp: ™tTx 

£££ BS Sfc 35h 

Drevl 1231 I4.lt 
GNMA 1512 NL Rj”?" 
intomt 1265 NL UWN 
Lcrvya TIL7Q incom 

CfhOp HL1B NL USG?' 
NYTX WII NL eJSSni* 
Spl Inc 741 NL 
Tax Ex 1147 NL 
TtWttC 164 NL EflrS 1 
WlGtfl 7J* 530 ®!IK. V 


Ffaurrs as d/ctaee <rf trading Friday 


NEW YORK I4PJ— Bid Ask 

The taltowtng quota- Boston Co: 

Hons, supplied by me CapAp 28.10 NL 


28.10 NL Thrct C 

Wvril lia NL EaalGtfl 7J* 820 C THY 

SaGIti 1579 NL EotmVanco: GIT IT 

wnar 14* NL EHSik nic iaju GTPac 

rucy 6920 NL GvtOb 11.77 1264 gMe Oa 

Ulii BDorCp: Grwm 590 744 BSgfc 

Cop«G VL22 NL HlYkt 491 524 

Euutty }B9 NL IncBes 940 1519 |NnTi 

Galen 1547 NL Invest 514 590 EJ*nT; 

H1YW 1444 NL NOUNS 1174 1192 55S 

UMot 1509 NL SnEql 1536 1960 *-i 

llvert Group: TaxM 1727 1517 

Equllv 17J3 NL VS Spl 11.91 I3JC gnNIEi 

. JHi Hi- gtnpaw i 1*22 

Social 1928 NL Evrpnir 1121 NL 

TxF LI 150 NL CvrrerTU 1624 NL 5 r ^ 5nE - 


National Afsectotton Sgtt, ,‘iro JJf- 

uf Secuririw D«L eaS&tr 'S 3 * NL 

ers-lnc-aremepric- Bruce 4920 NL 

rs at which itieso W K& B mn- Gp : 
securities could nave 15W NL 


Bid Akk 
IM 3Jlj 


Btet Ask 

343 NL 
526 NL 


HL1B NL 
1467 NL 


11.97 1264 O** . M 

590 744 Gen Eire Irrv: 


securities could nave 
been Mid INTO Asset 
Value) or bought 
lvalue Plus safes 
etioroel Friday. 


Bid Ask 

AARP invst: 

CaoGr I7J7 NL 
GlniM 1524 NL 
Gctl Qri 1526 NL 
Gthinc 17.14 NL 
TxFBd 1531 NL 
TxFSil 1517 NL 
ABT Family: 

Emro 1X42 1447 


Galai 154 
HIYW 144 
CdlMun 104 

Calvert Group: 
Eaullv 173 
Inca 157 

Social 172 
TxF Lt 105 


491 524 
940 1519 
514 820 
1234 1X92 
1536 I960, 


10 M !Bl» era 54 r 576 NL NYMun 1.14 . ----- 

5JD 542 Infl r 525 NL NewtGl 2743 NL Vbla 

1049 11.14 KPMr 1243 NL Nevetlnc 827 NL Vovao 

,542 ,?"2S — T« Ff f 7.99 NL Nicholas Group: [Ouasar 

1238 1X31 KJUFtoa r 1X47 NL Nlchal 3511 NL Rolrrtjw 

1543 1066 LMH 2520 NL Nkhll 1 a 75 NL ReoGr 

621 660 LcobMus 2X90 NL Nchlnc 337 NL RoctiTk 

639 732 LftlCOP 1BJJB NL NichsnGt TX02 

XIO 226 Lehluvst 1747 NL NE InTr 1221 

7JS 748 LPVrtK 730 NL NE InGt TX10 

6JB 465 Levina ton Grp: North Star: 

1437 1555 CLdrfr 1193 1367 Apollo 96» 

15*8 1167 GaWfd 360 NL Stand 966 

1125 NL GNMA 7.76 NL Rtolon IBJT7 

1031 NL Grow 582 NL Stuck 1X27 

931 NL Rest] 1643 NL NavaFd 1X99 

1631 NL Liberty Group; Huvtan 7.92 

1420 NL AmLdr 1165 NL OlODom 2167; 

v; Tx Fre 933 NL Omeoo 1257 

Ufl NL. USGvt 645 NL Dppenhelmer Fa: 


Bid Ask 
1524 NL 
1.14 NL 
2743 NL 


Gt TX02 NL RavreeTF unovott 


Ophlll 1137 1262 f row 1X261148 

Tax Ex 2233 2366 Gtobol l 3731 
USGfd 1447 1519 Gtobfl 1165 12J* 

Vbla 17.73 1577 Grsvth 1538 1124 

Vmrno 1730 1934 World .. 1137 M41 

5AI7 NL Thomson McKinnon: 
436 NL Otaltl 1X16 ML 

1X78 T52B - mca 1 511 NL 

962 1573 Poor unovatl 


cm 250 hew Zeeland 
am IK NcwZeaknvl 
dot 190 KewZedand 
am TOO NnZteknd 
dm U0 New^ataad 
am 100 NtwZeaiOTa 
am 700 NewZeciond 
dm n NewZeataW 
dm 150 New Zealand 
dm TOO NewZsahmf 
tan 250 New Zealand 
ant SO Hew Zealand 


' ™ dm UO CcsEipu Coal A Start 

ALAND dm KREaEunCMiAUeai 

am is EcsEmCpaf Akieii 
- tan m EoEaraCdtaAlteet 

J;*!® J2 fl! 15 *" M Eci EnrpCeS A Stool 
tSSSSf ^r- “* HS 13 *"»EaEOT>C05fcStata 
“J « flkn 730 Ecs EerotCeri A Start 

5"*SS2 SS? 55 .C, ^2 tar 200 E oc Euroa ECOTttn Com 

l SEP 5S AS tan ISO Etc Euroa EmvnCotr 

ftSfii !5 V 55 2 EpcEOTOTEtenaraCtare 

vftSu? Ht f2 IS *" W EecEOTOTEcanom cans 

13^” M? i£ *" S Ea*EaropES»tooiC«a 

”2=2. am Toe Etc EunoEcooom Cent 


5ft TO Apr or* ui 

r iSSRS 

Ita^S 5 £ft a 


JSS a 7J " is E12 

JS- 1% is £ m 


5 52T _ 

( TO Jot 104 


E woec lira 657 
ret Aar mr.. rii 


TftTlOet m% 654 

NORWAY 


tan 70S Eec Erne Eaeum Com 
Eec Europ Econom Cam 


E jin In IIJO NL USGvt 565 NL 

EltnTr 2539 NL LtdTnn unovoil 

EJfnT* 11148 NL UrtUDv 2149 NL 

S5S, 3590 NL Llndnr 1505 NL 

BBS Lb 1T.1I NL Loomis Soyfes: 


NE InTr 1221 NL 
NE IrtGI 1X10 NL 
Norm Star: 

Apollo 966 NL 
Bond 966 NL 
Resign 1507 NL 
Stuck 1X27 NL 
NavaFd 1199 NL 
twvtw 7.92 NL 
Old Dam 2167 2X90 
Onrooa 1257 NL 


966 NL 1 Equll 
966 NL I Grwm 


Raven 507 NL Trust Portfolio: 

ISSSacarf 5 ^ iSfif IS St 

sa s m st m » 

Inca 1X32 NL Grwth 1X62 NL 

AAunlc rrrt NL Select 2546 NL 

totadPT FortasT Ultra r 733 726 

COIT, “Sis HL USOV IM NL 


fff IS On m Eec Enron EeanenCta 

™* U* 7m mn Mo Eta Enron :nmt Book 

mn too ERi Euron ievesi Bom 
am Un EtaEume unmei Bank 
tan HO E J) Eornc loves' Barit 
13 V0K 131* 511 *44 tan Mt Eto Eoroa lmm»' Bart 

ID* 1* Jul 106* 367 1U7 tan MB Eta Europ invnt BtaW 

rftl*F*t nil* 665 627 7.2 *" IS Eta Ejjnm laved Bon* 

CtoVJOT TXft 646 661 673 dm IM EtaEurpp Invest Bta* 

6 reBMn TO* 605 60* 402 OB IS Eb Eurao invest bank 

TftTDMoy 101 ft 6X5 615 IM am =» Lib E stop laves 8a* 

6 TONov 7*% 6U 623 4JB tan 3C Eta Europ invest Bata 

rats Oc: 13D* xse 255 cxr «" TOT E>b E-pup inveetBanA 

8*87 Atar 3D 640 172 IS tan 200 Eta Eeroi covert Bane 

(ft 1* Jan TO* 637 6JI 437 tan SB Eta Earua Ineest Ben 


:et on 73i 
UH* 374 521 932 
1M% 71* 13* 136 

^ 199% All 4*7 

I reijn Mt 631 761 

1* 9] Jun in* 736 JM I 
StareiCrt TM* 553 75* 9JI ( 
»*retA4U 179 IM 734 336 . 

rereiiwu im rn im • am 

* rethau M4-7 731 6M 74* 

7* re* Feb Wh 737 6M 742 
ftregNa* q*y tn 7.18 
TvuttMar «B7 148 362 73t 

ftaTOOct to* UMfll* 
tbUMar 137% 4 76 Jf* 6JI 


raretOK «■ u» ah w 

•to VMlav MB': 441 AM 4to 

6% TO Aker MJft Ui 13 kk 

reilwe MQto 7J3 77k 

TO Feb upre 7i* rje 

reread m it ut 

reito UPk zr t3s 

TO JOT 111* fU IM 

TO APT MM AM 73* 

"II JOT to»to AM A4Q IJB 


TO JOT toBto tw Ut t3t 
TO Feta q* Ul (17M 
TO JM «• «J» AM 
*7 OCT f*to AJ2 Art AS 

IfNITCD STATES AMERICA 


7* re* oct nn 
4% IT Mar 1*7% 


I am l» PvoYtcv i Uimu 
tare MB BenHKirilMFpwK 
na jBjOTMOWir tM PM 
«n ■OtilpMMiO'I 


Sn a 

mn ii 


TXF Lo 1563 NL FPA Funds: 


1727 1867 @on Sec unovtril 
11.91 1UQ «M» K« 
16.12 1492 6*2^ 7JW 
1128 NL g *gfi n 9J9 
1*3* NL 5’S nEs T2_H 


9aeh At ijji 
P hrin Buttadc: 
kPUGl unovalf 
Baton 1X24 


Emro 1142 1467 D.lytd 

Gthinc 1405 1633 MIlBC 

Seclnc 10.99 1135 Manfh 

Util Inc 1761 155* TxFre 

ADTEK 1555 NL Cewlelo 

Acorn F 3423 NL Curtail 

Afuture 1X33 NL CirtShs 

AIM Funds: Chart Fd 


TUI NL Capff 1539 " 

«3T: N wlnc 593 

all Paont I4J0 : 

1X34 1X38 Prerren 1723 1 

1766 1*20 FrilnnT 19X57 

575 966 Frrn BG 13X0 

X30 361 Federated Funds: 
15661 11X8 CPCOT unavall 


1539 1129 GrdPkA 
5 W »S HbmHDA 
1420 1563 HarTGm 
1763 1936 

19XS7 NL ITOWOIT* 
11X0 nlHkmw 


mril COOlt 21 J] NL 

3565 NL Mil 1554 NL 

7763 NL Lard Abbefl: 

93* NL AffDtd unavall 
1X33 NL Bnddb HUS 1121 

1061 NL DevGI 7X3 512 

1861 2556 Incom 117 XX6 

424 662 TaxFr 963 1022 


1472 1527 
19.92 21 J7 
7X4 5U 
964 10X3 
763 768 
17.19 1537 


CufTx 1505 NL USOV VTXe Nft 

Devei 5669 NL 11 '2S B _r_ *& 457 

COPGI 16.12 NL USAAGruup; 

Grwln 1X73 NL £arnsf IOC NL 


NY To* 1123 1176 


1861 2556 Incom 
624 462 TaxFr 
1516 NL TXNY 
11M NL VQlAp 
969 10X0 Lulherar 
1168 1X23 Fund 


7X3 512 
X17 3X6 
963 1022 
1511 1061 
1518 11.13 
Bra: 


2512 2169 
1X33 1457 
1927 2166 
17.171827 
541 861 


Thne 1362 1489 
BlimOl 1563 1162 


Grwln 1X73 NL 
Incom 1X14 NL 
infl Fd 3489 NL 
MMB 519 NL 
NYTax 1556 NL 
TxFrTO 9.93 NL 
TkFr93 10J9 NL 
tacurffv Funds: 
Action 530 
Bond 721 530 
Entity 560 6.12 
Invert 861 963 
Uffra 579 961 
elected Funds: 


Gold 7JS NL 

Grwth 1444 NL 

IfKO 1165 NL 

SWI 1ST? NL 

TxEH 1236 NL 

TxEII 1L51 NL 

TxESb 10X7 NL 

Unified Mstrait: 

Genii 520 NL 

Gvrih irejo nl 

Inca 12X6 NL 

InOI 411 NL 

Mutf 1426 NL 


tan 50 Antal Ou Soman Pd 13 TOOK 131* 511 *44 I tan Ml Eta Earop owe*' Bore 

tab n Antal oaSunntai vert i DA TO Jai »s* 367 tort! tan W Eta Earppnwnf Bare 

tan a BeroenGtv r.«FcC 121* 665 427 7.13 1 rim t* Eta Lurao loves! Sock 

dm 59 Dm Non** Inoiunvuk 
tan I2S Den ftortke indostrick 
tan 30 N arses Hypotok lor tma 
tan to Haraesftypalekforento 

tan 30 Heroes KomnKcotDariE ratfOcl IBB* 251 253 ttf t dm itc EtaEuraplmeif Bank 
nd ZB Nsrucs Koaununotaack 

dm HO Naraes KacmuitoUtank . 

rim no MHUn KammomlOata 7 TOApr MF9 637 473 6*7 I w « 

rim in Noron Kammuraltm Pu TtoTOAua MCft 7 JO 7X7 73i riei 2BB Eta Eorwloeest Bonk 

rim an Nerars Komownauank 6 TO Dec era 40 422 60S tan » n& Borne iov*K ta* 

dm IDO NoraeyMomrounofBOIlk 6 reOAw 19% 4C 417 60] dm Ma Eta EeroA invert Book 

7*reiAri lor.k 607 6J7 7X4 dm 2n EtoEprou Invert Book 

SftrerDvc iso. 75* 761 791 Cm MB Elb Enron I avert Ban 
tan wo Norakw 8 38 JOT Ml* 727 U3 JM tan WO Eta Eurau lm«rt Both 

tan 200 Norplae 4 TONov T7% 60 410 40) dm 200 Eta Eurau hwreil Bonk 

dm U0 NonMSoi 7ft Si Dm no% 70S 4TO 721 dm a Elb Europ Invert Bonk 

•n no NomaCas 7 VJri Mlft 667 4X7 if! am n Eta Eurau meert Bank 

rim iso Norik hydro k* TO Jan lot 641 631 638 j tab M Eta Emu insert Book 

tan 108 Norsk Hydro 1% 92 jot lora 735 493 791 tan TO) Eta Eurau invert Bant 

OBI U0 Hank Hydra 9 rejste MOV* 726 7X9 145 rim no Eta E-jtoo lansf Boric 

be aaosiagrr ran jot nn 591 us 735 am 200 em Emup Krrew Bant 

hn IBOstoOv ( VMOT 187% 7.11 4J7 U dm 2H Eta Enron invest tart 


6. 13 Sep lfll% £71 34* 6*7 i g * OegjMF i etal OOl Pta 


S*«PeO 18; 431 403 648 

: TOAK »J to 6J1 60S *M 

C TO Feb IN- AJS 59* 

7% TO JOT W% *47 T3S 

6 TO Aug mi* £47 5X1 497 

rare* n*v m% 732 313 

5 ft TO Mur k 18 US U 

« TOOCI *7% 631 637 

raresoa mi% **j m 

»*.TOD«C m> 7J0 ut 


tamCMtoeMM I 

am W CJiaerpOroFiBciocri 

«■ MB Emberroro Cotton ■ 


am PS Ferre Cratai Ore Phi 
•" MB GaacOTOFtoOTct 


dm 7SCaPMWHPlTOKe 
•" Ml Gaels lac FjbototI 
tan MOiroiMOTearaEtoor. 


re-* tm 

TO* 411 

3 S g 

3E ffi 


dm 2B0 Nerars Kanmiunouank 
tan 100 Narea* KammunatoODt 
rim ISO Norge? kameuialWM 
rim 150 Norpa? KamBmaaaxrnk 
tan MONerato* 
dm 200 Norptor 
dm 130 NanaaGoe 
tan HB NarmGas 
dm UO Nanhftvdra 
tan IBB Norsk Hydra 
am UO Norsk Hydra 


A Ml Aug 
7*reiA*> 
-reiDnc 


am SB Eta EeroA invert Bata 
tan 23B C to Eeros HwtSBattl 
am Ml EtaEsraniwprtBm 
dm MB Eta Enron Invert BOTH 
rim 300 Eta Euroe invest Bata 
am TDD Eta Europ Invert Bank 
ant n Eta Euroa invert Bank 


dm ■ Oslo ah' 
dm TBQrtaCRY 
tan ID Oslo City 

tan n Oslo cuy 

tan IOO OrioCttv 

dal K0 Stated DOT Norske 


CvYW 1123 1X35 ChP Dir 

Gnrary 931 92D OMStnut 5X91 

HlYld ?M 10X8 CIGNA Funds: 

sunlit 563 Aarsv 116 

AMEV Funds: Grwth lXC 

Capm M.W 1166 HlYld 96i 

Grwlh 1X49 1X65 | naira 7JK 

SffK« 1JM NL MurtB 7X1 

US Gvl 962 1551 Value 1161 

Aiitance Cop: colonial Funds: 


1164 1222 Ext* 
HUB 1553 FT Int 
1X05 1X82 Fdllntr 
1X93 1413 GNMA 
16JM NL Gwfh 
*69 NL Milan 
1066 NL HlYld 
5X91 NL 


Hmeinvr TOX3 NL 
HOT Man 2X21 NL 


37.71 NLlHf^TonGrouo: 


1598 NL MFI 
10-10 1552 MFC 


1599 NLI Emrur 1174 NL MS Ma 
11X7 NL Gwthr 1363 NL MS NC 
1X07 1X91 OPtlnc 592 NL MS VA 


WX6 NL 

5X91 NL ITCO 1022 NL 
ds: Sheet 1515 NL 

116I1XM SI Orel iaa nl nymu 
1163 1414 3*Bd 1435 NL .J.0H? 
9JM 1536 Slue* 1513 NL 
7M 7X3 FWellh/ Invest: 

721 7J» CalAAu 1551 NL 
1161 1X54 Band 629 NL 
ids: Conors SWJ NL 

1464 1521 g"2Sl Vi^e NL 
uxe 14JU Uritov 71.14 
4XU55m t*"* “27 NL 

4724 M24 Ere Inc 2609 2662 
1433 15JM E ach 4572 NL 
15291 471 ™ 16X5 NL 

1166 1222 Frerftn 13J59 NL 
1066 165 GytScc 9X1 NL 
7*8 Hllneo 9.1B NL 


Cham 

HIGrd 

HlYld 

mn 

Marla 
Survey 
Tech 
Alpha F 


Amr Capital: 


961 1550 
1066 1120 
960 1867 
1X00 1421 
927 1534 
1367 1494 
1728 1869 
1556 2528 


703 768 
1X53 1479 
1X63 1100 
47.18 


Adaald 1464 1501 

OoejA 14X9 1564 

CpCsh 4903 30JJ3 

CPCell 49245024 ErejWC 

EnhAAf 14331504 
Fund 1529 1471 

GvSec 1166 1222 E™*" 

Grwm 1066 1165 g flSrec 

HlYld 7J5 768 HJIneo 

incam 765 766 H*Yld 

OPilnc 765 55B 

Odtl II 1122 1X37 S»»l 

Tax Ex 12X51107 MimBd 


Amerlcoii Funds: 


a Brel 

Amcp 

A Mull 

Band 

Eopoc 

Fdinv 

Grwm 

Incom 

ICA 

NECO 

N Pens 
TaxE 
WsJlMI 
AGthFd 
A Her ha 
A Invert 
Alnv In 
AmMed 
ANIGth 
ANfinc 
ArmvdV 
AnafyT 
Airama 


JI4! Columbia Funds: Ma*»T 

U-2 ]2SA 1151 NL SSL 

Gflh. 256B NL S““S 
1268 1406 Murilc 1557 NL NYTxS 

If" 'WJ CwRb 161 IJB NYTM 
CuemeCO 208 2-25 OTC 
1520 11.15 composite Group: Ovrae 

IJ5 q-g tSbo nl P« 2«n 

Fund 1085 NL 

-”5 ls - n incoFd 963 923 gJS* 1 
mds: Tax Ex 479 NL otEp 

•WM USGrey 1JK 109 
,B60 9M Concord 2762 NL friJ.H.2 
PM Conolel G 19.16 NL SriUri 
1X41 1466 card Mtarl 525 NL seUAtl 
1520 17.16 CoSev IS NL SefTch 
1X52 1368 ary Con 1366 1715 sroutn 
[« J OTOriSSFuSg? SPCSI* 

'15 JHI emree 1037 1163 


479 NL SfEir 
5922 NL JgflSr 
110 * NL ;mw 
11.14 IDfEaP 

2537 NL Rig 1 * 
2409 2662 

4572 NL Sfgrj 
16X5 NL JSfHjy 
1369 NL SfM 
9X1 NL [55 SO 
9.18 NL 1E££2* 
1123 NL JW™ 
553 NL {*£!_ 
3559 3728 
7.11 NL EIS™ 
1538 NL 
1463 1529 

1515 NL IS AS3S p: 
1000 NL S3™ 
1104 NL "SS, 
1428 1524 S* 1 

1435 1429 
1266 NL "W tfv 


IDS /Mutual: 

IDS Aar 475 NL 
IDSEqr 412 NL 


965 NL MIT 1127 1269 HlYld 10.17 1562 

1039 NL MIG 11J6 1X25 fnvGd 9.92 1066 

10X7 11.11 MID 7.57 10JM Qlymp 9X7 1535 

1Q37 1580 MCD 11X2 1X31 Tax Ex 100010X4 
HLB9 NL MEG U.74 15.91 PaxWW 11.94 NL 

821 560 /MFD 1166 1229 Ptonn5re 562 NL 

MFB 1X39 1444 Penn Mu 663 NL 
475 NL MMB 969 1068 PerraPrt n.17 NL 

412 NL MFH 495 7X9 Phlkj 563 9X3 

i|4 NL MMH 963 1363 FlWMllx Series: 

4,rn 498 MSP 700 809 Baku 7169 1228 

BASaW IMdltMTB 2001 NL CvFd 1665 1820 

*5 ‘■“KSSflrt 3* NL Grwm 1436 1569 

491 5.17 Merrlil Lynch: HlYld 924 904 

1704 17.95 Bade 1X98 1495 Stack 12X5 1X61 

414 465 CopH 2068 22.13 PC Co 1065 NL 

566 5.96 EreuBd 1208 1X58 PlterlmGro: 


utheranBra: Ref Gov 10641163 SplShs 1828 

Fund 1458 14X0 OTC See 17JM 1557 Seltoman Group: 

Incom 833 929 Pocific Horizon: GapFd 1168 1 

Muni 726 764 Aaresv 1901 NL Crust* 1X55 1 

cu Flnoncf: Calif 12J0 nl Comun 869 ! 

MFI 10X8 1IJ0 High Yd 1534 NL Growth 5X8 ! 

MFG 1518 1069 Pn/ne Webber: men 1265 1 

MS Ma 922 UUH Allas 11 JM 1X09 MossTx 7X61 

MS NC 1514 1565 Amer 1402 1562 MkJiT* 764 1 

M5VA 1002 1552 GNMA 921 T535 MinnTx _7J1! 

' 017 1062 


Am Sits 1124 HL Ufrifed Fundrt 
SpISftS 1828 NLl Aeem 720 863 


I* TO star HUto IX* 6» US tan HO Eta Europ lp*4U Bank 

AtoTOJri mb 6X4 631 647 dm 29} Eta Eerw Invert Bta* 

7tof3Mar HI* 7JH XH 7X7 dm 700 E» Euroe Weed Bonk 

t res See DflV. 551 5X2 497 tan » Elb Eerau Invert Bank 


ttore? mot tone *09 
NtTZAua TU* 7X1 

rvreroa »7 *« 

r-rejDw wi *q 

rare} Pet TM 419 
SrSAfar TO *30 
771TJMO? Ks* 648 
I reJAua IM% Aft 
r.TJSw 187% T0B 

• 74 MOT TOT S M 
I "74 jun UB% Ml 
eft TO AW IBPft 633 
7% 7400 We 635 


rn I *• m 

■34 tan too toBfiDnaoreEtoart 
teg tan HO HIAadlln^^OT 
*JJ P» 309 ItlAieinas^H 
vji •» HO ifiCeruenmOT^^^ 
(M an W# MatoriOUtaFWinoeCft 
75i tan n McdWaMi fhaa ce 
599 tan to# MotonMs Pereewt Ca 
727 tan in OccMtaM B dlflHOT 
■JO dm »■ etoMMSO/kF^TO 
721 rim no PMfcaMprraH 
771 tan MOPhUmMarraiwH 


DtoTODtC total A3* 
Tn TO App All *37 


sr ?5 ^ 

kiss & % ?f 

raw Dec Wto 641 ear 

TtoTOjta ten* oji Fit 

J* TO Dec Ul Ato ATI *g 

[-■UNO to** 4JC Art 

PilTf* V 713 IK 

IftTOMOv TO AT 728 

’»!TOBk M 7 jr TM 

TOTOjot ter-: u: • . 

I TO JIB tfift 133 ?#f 

7ft TO Mor RM AT rr? 

TftTOAwe W7>'i 614 Lie - J7 

* TOJoi ns* 724 us 

?ft ret Oct me* ax* tit 

TtoTOOfC tons KM 13* 


721 dm W mWAtarriiMiCe 
7 31 I tan m BemeMin Ota 


tan ra SaynofcftHO/tM 
dm 158 Saerry Ciptom ■_ 
tan 73fl rtemneeroahra pPra 
tan TO VviItVlFlrvs 

dm IBB TmaUI ■ 
tare WumtoOTeamoioiia 
tan we UndvO TvctnAoMoH 




7J| | dm N MMB Faroe Ml w/> 4% TO Nev USA 1181338 Xto 


IDSGrt 1706 1725 
IDS HIY 414 665 
IDS Int 566 5.96 

IDS ND 9.10 70S 

IDS Pro* 7037X0 
Mot Rot 5J0 £57 

/Mull 1168 1227 
IDST* 660 X79, 

PrecMt 464 4JB9 

1451 1760 
502 545 


AS* NL MMH 
4JB0 498 MSP 
546am IMorthere 

622 606 Mescfirt 
491 417 Merri/I L 


1517 1062 
9.92 1066 
967 1535 
1500 10X4 
ILM NL 
B62 NL 
483 NL 
11.17 NL 
■43 9X3 


1X55 U£d 
569 9-5C| 
5X8 521 
1265 13X3 

7X6 7 JM 
764 Old 
761 7471 
7.58 796) 
766 7.90 
769 724 
408 4371 
421 45U 
764 7.93 
7X6 7 ia 
7X2 7291 


Bond 66* 416 

GvtSec 505 567 
IntGm 122 42S 
Con Inc 1420 17 JD 
HI Inc 1X61 1487 


CONVERTIBLE BONDS 


Incom 

Muni 

NwCcpt 

Retire 

ScEno 

Vonu 

UfdServia 

GklSiir 

GBT 

Growth 

Inca 

LoCap 

Prsocl 


1X99 1529 
476 706 
4965X2 
609 6X4 
860 9X0 
521 424 


p*** — Cwv.Prerted —Caere. Pika e/«r— nWsR 


EUROPE 


43S NL 
M NL 
723 NL 
JttM NL 
721 NL 
05 NL 


Brekm W44 11X1 VtiFr* 1023 NL 
Band 6X1 701 Vtiue Line Fd: 


10X6 11X1 
560 9X0 
1524 T720 
13X1 1466 
1520 17.16 

1X52 1308 
1431 1504 
1122 1X81 
11.91 13JH 
1498 1556 
8X0 9.18 
7.98 18X8 
966 1556 
531 908 
3X8 NL 


31-2* 1 302 invQl 1007 1554 

’S-2 'MS Cowry 900 lOJSl 

MS ,2-IS PIW 575 7-56 
J"?? JM? QUOIT 9.91 1028 

M* Sunbtt 1521 1663 

HI USGv 1506 1579 

MS DFASm 165n NL 

Z-S Eif- DFAInf 101.15 NL 

9-K NL Dean wmar: 

35X7 NL CalTF 110* NL 

,199 626 DvGIr 528 NL 

1507 19.« DtvGt 1451 NL 

.408 400 HlYld 1X35 1413 

14002 NL indVIr 1124 NL 


1000 NL Grwm 466 728 PocFd 
110* NL ‘"“IL 339 414 Plmlre 

142B 1524 TrM »> ”09 SdTch 

I42S 1*%9 H »k . 1022 11.17 SPlVal 

1XM NL jndostrv 434 NL NTIRsc 
|4« NL Int BOOT r 1555 NL IMidAJM 

K/n ILM ln * lnw “ 1113 11jnr »wahi 
1554 1026 ,nvs * PurMoHo: MSB Fd 

2503 Ereottv 9X6 NL W«iw*M 1 
2423 2421 GvtPI BJI NL MJCr 
15X1 1524 HlYld 192 NL LGCvt 
936 936 Oritn 546 NL Ben 
T9J825IB I TB Group; Mutual of 

1929 19,79 invBoe 10X71120 Amer 
1X00 1X40 Hllneo 14X5 1508 Grwm 
1023 NL MoTF 1418 14M Incom 
4100 NL Inv peril 5U6 5-53 TxFre 
1929 NL ls«i. 11* NL WlIQual 
ran; IvyGth 1418 NL Mul Shr 


351 nl SefTch 1928 25 IB ITS Group; Mutual 

U36 1715 StiUtn 1939 1929 invBas 10X71120 Arno 

JS? ,7 - 15 SpSlt 1300 1X40 Hllneo 14X5 15J8 Grwf 

“HUMUS Thrift 1523 NL , MoTF lflB liW Inc* 

1007 1054 Trend 4100 NL Inv Reeh S06 5-53 Tx Fi 

9OT ion* FlduCap 1929 NL lsMI WX0 NL WIQuc 

arc !S Fimnciol Proa: IvyGth U.18 nl Milt Shi 

991 1028 OY"ri 727 NL Ivylnil I24JD NL UOf.Avl 

1521 1602 FncfTx 1419 NL JPGrth 1422 15J7 «* Ind 

uillMV HlYkt 518 NL JP'™ _ 156 *J0 ftotse* 

169.93 NL loriurt 454 NL Jam* Fund: yam, 

181 .W nl Iridom !H5 nc E 5S. I3-JS Sf- a«w 


SOI Vol 1109 14JBI 
NtlRx 1506 NL 
4d AM 472 7J4 
JdAHl 500 5X6 
SB Fd 2525 NL 
Idvrem Group: 
ini©y 1023 NL 
LGGvt 100* 10.98 
ut Ben n.19 1X33 
utual of Omaho: 


Band 6X1 701 

Cams 1549 3521 

Grwth U35 15681 

sreuala 4100 nl 

•firry 1102 I2_S 

hearsan Funds: 

ATIGt DJI NL 

AnrGr 1121 1100 


339 436 
1407 19.75 
408 450 
14a!B NL 
704 NL 


: n Select 4 

I1JM NL MfrtdT 7. 

«*■ nl Pot invertors: 


655 NL Vohie 11.19 NL 
7.15 nl] Venhir 2439 NL 
l; [John H ancock! 


Axe Houghton: 

Fnd B 1571 1164 

Incom 40D 529 

Stack 701 804 

Batson Group: 

Bond 107 NL 

Enter? 12.1? NL 


DIvGt 1451 NL 
HlYld 1X35 1413 OOa 
IndVIr 1124 NL 
NY TXF HUT NL 
Nil R»c 7.14 nl «£« 
Option 928 NL ln»S- 
Setri-Tx 1004 NL 
TOT Adv 10X8 NL NYT 
Tax Ex 1533 1576 »]£ 

USGvt 10X3 NL OPln 
WrkJW 1599 NL Tom I 


BrtJAp 1245 1366 Bond 


Band 1492 1421 
Grwth 1202 1401 incom 
USGvF 829 901 
TOXEx 95 1066 SgHf 
uSGvT Itun 1127 riSe* 
ouhnn l.TI NL TofRe 


W* Ben 1109 1203 TxFrH 1513 NL 

tutuat of Omaha: TxFrSi sjm nl 

Amer iq .18 NL PrlnPTE 908 922 

G rwm 638 493 Pro services: 

Incom 858 924 MedT 1004 NL 

Tx Flto 1537 1137 Fund 10X9 NL 

rilO™ 1 1*07 NL Incom 541 NL 

Shr ST-1® NL rrodwitlal Bcehe: 

^.Ayla 1064 1163 Adi PM 34X4 NL 

Blind 1108 NL CalMur 1549 NL 

Bt Securities: Eqtyr 1 X« nl 

Ha km 1193 1402 GTkrtl r 1121 NL 

B«W X33 X59 S’S'P ,a - n NL 

CaTxE ll03TlS ,CL34 NL 

Fed Sc 1165 12X9 GthOppr 

Grwth 556 933 NL 


UMBSt 1106 NL 
UMB B 1533 NL 
BLCGI unavall 
BLC/rtC unavall 
Sort BY 1102 NL 

BeacGM 1SX3 nl 
B mc HIH 19.95 NL 


1T36 NL Delaware Group: 


Tax Ex 9X1 
FloprtUp Group: 


1108 1X11 Grwth 120 
11.99 T2.93 USGvF L 
44T 701 Tax Ex 922 
5.92 447 USGvT 1031 
1205140* Kaufmn 1.11 
5J4 504 Kemper Funds: 
1205 1305 COtTx 1201 
1261 1X78 Incom 801 
S.13 ,503 Grow 120/ 
9X1 1515 HlYkt 10X1 
kip: InltFd 1433 


724 535 
456 7.07 
839 599 
803 902 
004 9J3 
412 460 
9J9 1036 


Qcfthfun Canlh7l; 

CaTFL 1519 


1519 NL 
906 NL 


CalTFI 906 NLPGDIv 
CapNT 1044 NLJDodCx 
Beruer Group; [DOdCx ! 
100 Fd 1161 NLbtMTx 


mss 1069 CpCsh 4578 NL JUrt B 

1403 1705 MWlDb 9J1 922 Orfn 
2577 22.92 _OnMOb 7X7 928 Swnm 
762 533 Fto« 1E46 NL Tecfr 

7.11 746 44tMEq X98 402 Tot Rt 

1247 1303 44 Wall 323 NL USGvt 

1207 NC FndGm 451 493Kewhme 

■AG 1921 NL FoundtireGruiro: QtaBl 

Cl 909 NL Grwth 742 NL Cus §2 

Div 3423 NL ln«»m 14SS NL COTB4 

CxBI 2B0B NL MrfWJl 1514 NL CJtaKT 

Cx St 2471 NL ^.Speel S01 NL 


937 928 Summ 
1046 NL Tectr 
XTO 402 Tot Rt 
323 NL. US.Gvt 
451 403 Krystane 


Keystone Moss: 

OtaBIr 1409 NL 


1.11 NL TetRe 412 460 
nda: Fulrfd 939 1526 

’JS '•“‘J** 0 '2-« 

80T 905 4afirenwlde Fds: 

1204 1320 NatFd 1102 1265 
]?49 1135 NOtGIh 9JX 902 
1433 1566 Nat 3d 907 10X5 
496 gEUf* Fond: 

1573 1123 EauH 1904 2167 
2SX1 2727 Gnrih 2204 2403 
1547 1254 incom 10.7T 11x4 
1430 1563 Ret Ere 2567 2369 
906 9X4 TOXEx 7,15 749 


703 10X9 PAR 2X34 2X70 AorGr 11211101 

1X14 NL GNMA 1526 14X2 Appre 20212131 

516 000 PflMaa 704 806 CalMu 1406 153: 

'2-S 3!S PDbMI 1u >49 FdVol 7.15 7 Si 

1536 1T32 Pioneer Fund: Gluhoi 2228 236! 

10-83 IIJH Bond 930 1516 HlYld 1078 1927 

927 907 Fund Mm 77 77 MsGvt 1X11 IXW 

949 909 II Inc T7.12 1021 MMun 1195 1464 

738 70S III Inc 14*6 1500 NYMu 1402 1521 

1706 1025 pilfrod 1225 NL (ShermD 6X0 NL 

1I.W1X77 Price Funds: Sierra Gt W23 NL 

8.?* 9.77 Grwm 1540 NL Slnma Funds: 

1309 14J» Gminc 1119 NL CapM 1407 1592 

1006 NL HlYld 1047 NL >nco 509 80* 

622 73* incom 0J9 NL Invert 519 595 

M8 5X6 Inti 1403 NL SpCtn 703 023 

3525 NL N Era 1494 NL Trust 1702 12.14 

NHM-ta 1X54 NL V**a 1040 1137 

SJiTrB jjjb NL Smith Barney: 

TxFrl 065 NL Ereut T42S NL 

TreFrH 1513 NL incGro 9X5 1003 

TreFrSI SJM NL U5Gvt 1143 1426 

TlnPTE 938 922 SoGenin 1497 1560 
ro Services: stnestGf W-S NL 

/MedT 100* NL Swminc 433 NL 

Fund 1069 NL Sow In 2103 2113 

Incom 0X1 NL State Band Gro: 

njdptitlal Beene: Com SI 304 6J75 

AdiPM 34X4 NL Dhmrs 6X3 707 

CalMur 1569 HL Proors ajl 9JM 

Eqtyr 1562 NL StFrmGI 1040 NL 

Gtfltdr 1201 NL 5tFrm Bl 1424 NL 

GvPIr 1511 NL SIStreeMnv; 

GvtSe 1534 NL E*ch 9106 NL 

moppr Grwth r 5747 NL 

1303 NL Invrt 7162 71.99 

HlYld r 1009 NL Steadman Funds: 
HYMr 14-75 NL Am ind 224 NL 

MuNYr 1039 NL AWoc 05 NL 

OplGr 1439 NL UTMSt 102 NL 

Qtvlnr 1536 NL Ocean 5JH NL 

Rseh r 9.14 NL to tain Roe Fds: 
urn r 1105 NL* Bend 00* NL 


20-34 21 21 1 Von Kampen: 


1265 NL 
1516 NL 
IZS4 NL 
648 NL , 
1599 NL 
1035 NL 
1250 NL 


Gminc 1119 NL 
HlYld 1047 NL 
incom B39 NL 
Inti 1403 NL 
N Era 1494 NL 
NHorta 1X54 NL 
STiTrB JJJB NL 
TxFrl 065 NL 
TxFrH 1513 NL 
TxFrSi SJM NL 
rlnPTE 9J8 922 


MuNYr 1039 NL 
OptGr 1439 NL 
Qtvlnr 1536 NL 
Rseh r 9.14 NL 
Ulllr 1105 NL 


InTxF isx5 t«Jre 
TxFrH 1430 1S01 
USGvt 15X9 1436 
Vance Exchange: 
COPEX 67x3 NL 
DB«t 4331 NL 
□Ivor 7501 NL 
ExFd 110X2 NL 
ExBp* 9455 NL 
Fid Ex 59X3 NL 
..SeeFtd 6321 NL 
vjypu airt Group: 
Ekplr 3117 NL 
tSembi 7531 NL 
[vert HUM NL 
Mora 9X19 NL 
NOMT 3703 NL 

QD/Vl 1034 NL 
QDfvll 415 nL 

QDvIll 2325 NL 
STAR 10X5 NL 
TClnt 3565 NL 
TCUsa 3302 NL 
GNMA 960 NL 
HlYBd 565 NL 
'GBnd 8.12 nl 
S hrtTr IQJB NL 
IndTr 21.91 NL 
MUHY 907 NL 

MuLs 901 NL 
MlnLa 1550 NL 
MuShl 15.24 NL 
VSPGd 730 NL 

V|PHt 1160 ML 
VSPSv I46S NL 
VSPTe 1561 NL 
WWISi 1409 NL 
wemn 1X74 NL 
Wndsr 1409 NL 


«ji0 1332 Putnam Funds: 


2234 2433 
10.71 1164 
2569 2169 
7.15 749 


1007 ll.ll I FraiWIn Group: 


C«sB2r 1559 NL 
CuSB4f 709 NL 
CuSKlr 572 NL 
Cu£K2r 7.T1 NL 
COT 51 r 20 JW NL 


ieuberoer Berm: 
Enrov 1908 NL 

Guard 4105 NL 

temtip 

lm NL 
Ubty 440 NL 

MOhftt 767 NL 


15^5 HiYld 
14.16 1407 5p_] 

7.11 NL r. 

4563 3908 Stock 
45054928 TaxEx 
11091267 TaWet 
1147 1204 Only 
1552 2524 Strategic 
1106 T3J77 QTOt 
11281264 Invst 
1527 1927 ,Slhnr 
1103 1220 WrotidJv 
1501 16X2 sjratGth 
704 705 Shwiuln 
1554 1102 StntoT 
1543 1420 TeHnSl 


Bond 804 NL **11 NL 

cap da 2107 nl Aitviewr*: 

DiJCV 3513 NL HJV« ,*6* *X4 

2Z2 iSSS at J£p f . m 

Stack liM NL nfi&t 749 8M 

TrtRet 2X15 NL WrtSra* 1 1069 n6li 

fSS f 2 !« Sf ulr aL6V NL 

^ l SS & 

EPSx ft? K. L NL- .No tarots^ 


1506 nl dem| 

itfl SS doy-s 

17.11 1728 TOMta. r . R edemption I 



J*r 178 -ikr 261*79 i» 1.77 

Mll?T48-MlH55a 5X2- 4*7 

5585% ATI 902 

w SQI&440 «0» 727 

Ml *0. M- Ml 34009 IU8- 408 

D 113 -D 141213 7X1 507 

*1014 £52 177 

12882/8 4077 Z37 

in 2.M- 188 

»m -PTOSIS Ub- 271 

PT82-OM2JU3 07 5A1 

1613 321- UB 

SSm 23-277 
*1250 1-to 2J9 

_ *058 LBS- 101 

WI51Z2- hfl7S042 U8t- 281 
5ia" 159 - (kr 302343 807 222 

. if 046.100 7S0 2X0 

m 208 


P40-D62JU 

Mfq-M827ia 

phQ 

D*40 - s 571661 
p 3BS -Dtnxt: 
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D3M-P31U87 
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5474 

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ta2BXt-ka2.nl 
PII5 - 02t£fl7 
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8173 

P2tt- 0416338 
DM-P473JM 
11200 
*7*273 


505 238 
433- 235 
2735 4X3 
23* 131 
1822 238 
VO 837 
72X8 280 
1£» 4W 
302- IJB 
IJO 133 

ns- la 

43* 254 
11X1 221 
2X7- 64 
146- 01 


Y 1157 ■ 
Y 470 ■ 
reran . 

Y 1742 . 

Y»- 
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Y 7223 - 

YH0- 
Y3I230- 
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y *73 - 
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Y 4*4 - 
T 422 - 

Y 195830- 
Y 19*330- 
YJW- 
YHBI0O- 
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Y605J0- 
Y636XB- 
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Y9C3D- 
Y5RJ8- 
Y54M- 
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1559 >107 I Tempt etun Group: 


dtsroe may apply. 

*— Exdtvwena 


7716 

Si 

MISCELLANEOUS 


7737 u 

IJO- 166 

7X3 01 
8JX 53 
8U3 71 
742 01 
AM III 
07 07 < 
HUO 120 
X4- 01 
1865 IXI 
H28 08 
3X0 .74 
478 06 
408 .« 
LS7- 231 
237 12k 
MJ6 74 



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JUS 153 

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2693 467 
ZU5 JC 
** 
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71 JO 
SJi tn 
4134 375 
rill- 1*S 

■xe:» l,-» 




Hie Daily Source for Inteniatioiia] 


Investors. 


48 Bow Valiev inYC 5102 I TODfC 

UO EM*nNv3S5LM 11% TO Jui 

80 Mil Owraa* 111906 UMTOJui 
30 Rand Se/ecflon 12108 6% TO Mar 


m Utanrsi maturity eszil25ai»lfcll0 TlMO T0I 

ra aseol* 7JatH eta lit- art 1333 27.B x*8 

5 ’.teS &iMaavm hm uo 

W* ISw71 31 JOT U illd £878*3 2/9 J*- 08 


UNITED STATES AME R ICA 


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3005 377 ■ 
1184 270 
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LV- 3i$ 
8BJ1 „ 
3X0 4)7 


HIGHEST CURRENT YIELDS 

p™*.. 


1140} W 

am 

&& 



7% res Mgy 
| KJe 

fft TO Apr 

8_ TOjai 


W% ISeoa monjrLiv 

iE'sl’ap 


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i* 

rart ’ i| 

-j- I— 

wrozew; 


S& 1 E «SB SS 


BftTODee 
TMTOSeo 
8 00 Doe 

TOTOSW 
0 TO Mar 
7 TOOd 

5 9& 

TtoWMsy 


BTO-B4>7xa 

*?: 

1'i-TO 


® i££ '/SS 


,5 > "oy »l tsar 

IS JAorBI SAwOO 
Inre. traBnrHv 

T 7S2 USwf * 

J2,. t?Kn nebrih 
»“£ J-taB lAsr** 

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USeoTt SMhH 


“■ 1 * - » r 361*79 

52*5 * s 1420*1 

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7220 *.«8 
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Explanation of Sobols 


CHf Conixtlan Dollar 
ECU EuroManCurraanuMi 

s 5 o saanur.w 


*^ F Frensne-- n; 










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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 1985 



Page 9 


&&TObond Issues 

/-Ksvumesfrom information supplied by European bold traders. 


Issuer 


«- G s p - p™, 2? 

■week 



Terms 


*v 


Standord 

Chartered 


PLC 


$300 


9971 Over 6-mortb Libor, set monthly, unless 1 -month Liber is 
higher, in whidi case coupon wfl be pegged to flat Libor for 
tfca retf erf tbe mfered period- Maximum coupon 194%. 

Cbm>atporin1988> Fees &75%D M wnMnofaw $50^00. 

1992 % 100 9875 Over 6-foontf> Libor. NoncnBc&ic. VS mifion issued now aid 

S50 rnB&on reserved for tap. Fees 1.40%. Denomination! 
SIOLQOO. 

perpt V* 100- 9956' Over 6-mortfh Lfcor. Cefable at per it 199a Fees 065% 

Denominadom $10,000. 


Weakness Sanko Ship Detained in U.S. Port 
In Economy 
Pushes Up 
Bond Prices 


perpt 14 TOO — 


Over 6-month Libor. Caflofalo at par in 199a Ranh <a 
primary capital Bank is exchanging $10,000 principal plus 
$70 credit for each SlOjDOO note of Standard Chartered 
finance BVi $300 mfflkm perpetual junior debt inued in Nov. 
1984. 


^r>-I 

\:‘ T r: # 
* -• ^ 
M 

: 

3p 

'• • .1 

• - - r : £ ■ 


'. '••5 


V 

- - ; v. 




Lan 'pbefl Soun 

Urebu SedrfcPow^ 
Chujhsuya 

Q*s*erreichisqhe 

Kontroflbank 

$100 

$100 

$45 

DM 150 

1995 

1995 

1992 

1997 

m 

10W 

1014 

m 

8 s i 1 

9975 CtAUeanDlinmz 

98.63 Ncmcolcfcla. 

9875 Nonadabla. 

100.13 Cdkfcie atlOTO in 1990. 

— RnQn ^ *“*45 1990 13 10054 98.63 NmaJd U l 

'-rodnunsfedt 

Bankverein 

Aw$50 

1990 

12% 

100% 

9850 

Noncalable. 

DG Bank 

AU$60 

1990 

12% 

100% 

9913 

Norcdktfe. 

Nationals 

Investeringsbank 

NZ$40 

1990 

16 

100 


Noneaflabfe. 

W* Overzee 

Y 25,000 

1995 

8 

10154 

9975 

Noncalable. Redeemable m US. daVon af 208 yen par 

Boportfinans 

y 2 o,qoo 

1995 

zero 

54573 

51073 Yield 6244X Proceeds 107 btfon yen. NoncoJ latte. 


Y 20,000 

1995 

8 

101% 

9938 

NonadcMe. Redeemcfale in US. dollon oi 206 yen per 
dolor far a total of $96.16 mSon. 

Federal National 
Mortgage Association 

Y 50,000 

1995 

8 

101% 

9938 

Nonoalablo. Redeemable in US doDan at 208 yen per 
dolor far a total of $2404 mdfan. 

Honeywell 

Y 25,000 

1995 

8 

101 

9838 

NoncnAable. Redeemable in US dolkn at 208 yen per 
dakr for a total of $1202 mffion. 

Hydn>Quebec 

Y 25,000. 

1995 

8 

101% 

9950 

Nonadabfe. Redeemable in US dolkn at 208 yen per 
dolor far a total of $1202 mSon. 

PKbro-Sdamon 

Y 20,000 

1995 

8 

100.69 

9959 


doin' far a tdkd of $96.16 mi Eon. 

EQUmr-UNKH) 

Nippon Suisan Kaisha 

$30 

1995 

354 

100 

9650 

Semiannually. Callable at 104 in 1988. Convertible o! 406 
yen per dure and at 23875 yen per dollar. 


Eurobond Market Targets Japanese 


(Continued from Page 7) 
rush into U.S. Treasury papa, will 
grow is a matter- of debate. Japa- 
nese insurance companies already 
are near the government-imposed 
ceiling on the potion of foreign-' 
camency securities they can Solar - 

Amold Simian, a London-based 
economist, says he bdieves that to 
bluntmounting protectionist pres-, 
sures coming front Washington, the 
Japanese wiS move to assuage com- 
plaints about their huge trade sur- 
pluses by managing the yen ex- 
change rate up against the dollar. 

This could be done by traditional 
“gmdance” by the Ministry af Fi- 
nance to the Japanese financial 
oommnrnty to steer Jess cash into 
dollar securities. Such a move 
would have an nxqnict oil US. in- 
terest rates, lending to drive them 
higher. But Mr. Smdrin expects the 
exchange-rate move would hd^ re- 
duce the trade pressures. The cash 
directed away from the dollar 
could move into sterling, where the 
yield gain for the Japanese is about 
equal to dollar securities; and to a 
lesser degree , into the Deutsche 
mark or perhaps gold, he said. 

Despite last week’s jitters about 
the direction of U.S. interest rates, 
sparked by an unexpected large in- 
crease in the basic M-l measure of 
money supply, and renewed weak- 
ness of me dollar following the 
Bundesbank's long expected half- 
point cut in its key lending rates, 
demand for Eurodollar bonds hdd 
better than bankers said they had 
expected. , 

Campbell Soup, for example, ot- 
feredSIOO million of 10-year bonds 
bearing a coupon of Mm percent 
Including fees, the iripIe-A rated 


company paid 20 basis points over 
the comparable yield on Treasury 
securities in New York. Lead man- 
ager Credit Suisse First Boston es- 
timated that ' Campbell saved 15 
basis points over what it would 
have paid to seD the paper in New 
York. But by week's end, despite a 
deterioration in the Treasury mar- 
ket, Campbell’s bonds were trading 
at 10 baas paints below yields on 
comparably dared Treasury papa. 

In the same vein, managers re- 
ported good demand for United 
Technologies and Connecticut Mu- 
tual issues offered a week earlier. 
Also showing strong demand were 
the convertible bonds issued by 
Rockefeller Center Properties. 

Bankers also reported strong de- 
mand for Coating-rate papa. Bank- 
of Boston increased its 15-year of- 
fering by SS0 million to $200 mil- 
lion- Hie interest is based on the 
uns-maidi formula, with the cou- 
pon fixed at Vfc-jxant over the six- 
month London interbank offered 
rate but reset monthly. If one- 
month Libor is higher than the six- 
month figure, interest will be set at ' 
the one-month rate. A maximum 
crating of 19% percent was set on 
the coupon to conform with the 
usury laws in the state of Massa- 
chusetts. 

Chrysler Finance tapped the 
market for an initial $75 million of 
seven-year notes saying that an ad- 
ditional $50 million wffl be hdd on 
tap to be sold as conditions war- 
rant Interest is set at %-poinl over 
Libor — a reflection of the credit 
standing of the issuer and the fact 
that these are junior subordinated 
notes. 

- In the perpetual market, Mid- 


land Bank issued $500 million of 
bonds bearing a coupon of ’4-point 
ova Libor. This second perpetual 
for Midland, the weakest of the 
British dealing banks, brings its 
free capital ratio to more than 6 
percent from below 5 percent pre- 
vailing nine months ago. 

Meanwhile, Standard Chartered 
Bank, which last November used a 
formula that the Bank of England 
did not accept for inclusion as pri- 
mary capital, is seeking to ex- 
change that issue for a near identi- 
cal new one. The difference is that 
the new issue offers holders less 
protection — ranking just ahead of 
equity — in the event of liquidation 
of the bank. 

This is now standard for perpe- 
tuals and only Barclays and Na- 
tional Westminster still have perpe- 
tual outstanding that have debt 
features rendering the proceeds un- 
countable as capital as far as the 
Bank of England is concerned. 
Standard Chartered is offering 
holders a 0.7-percent cash bonus 
for making the exchange. 

The DM marker was buoyed by 
the long-awaited rate cuts. Bankas 
say that 500 million DM from the 
August calendar remains to be 
marketed. Finland is slated to lap 
the market this week for 150 mu- 
Hon DM for 10 years. 

German investors were reported 
to be big buyers of the Australian 
dollar issues launched last week for 
West German Banks. DG Bank's 
60- mill ion-doll ar offering was 
priced at 100% with a coupon of 
12% percent and BfG's 45 million 
dollars was priced at 100% with a 
coupon of 13 percent. 


By Gary Klott 

New York Tima Service 
NEW YORK— Bond prices re- 
bounded Friday on fresh evidence 
of weakness in the U.S. economy.. 

The credit markets, which were 
depressed T hursday by a surge in 

U.S. CREDIT MARKETS 

the money supply, were bolstered 
Friday by the government report 
(hat bousing construction fell 2.4 
percent in July. 

Prices on long-term government 
bonds gained Hapoints, mare than 
making up for Thursday’s losses. 
Short-term interest rates drifted 
moderately Iowa. 

The Commerce Department's re- 
port on July housing starts provid- 
ed yet another sign that the econo- 
my was sluggish, particularly 
because the drop came in the face 
of recent dechnes in mortgage 
rates. Thai reinforced the view that 

the Federal Reserve would find it 
difficult to tighten credit condi- 
tions. 

There was concern on Thursday, 
aha the Fed reported a $5.3-bfl- 
Iion rise in M-l. the basic measure 
of the UJL money supply, that the 
Fed would be forced to tighten 
credit because of the increase. 

“The money-supply number was 
a major reason for the Fed to firm, 
but the housing starts 'were an off- 
setting reason for the Fed to ease," 
said Philip Braverman, chief econ- 
omist at Briggs, Schaedle & Co. “So 
these two dements produced a 
standoff." 

Also bolstering prices was a re- 
port further detailing problems at a 
Maryland thrift institution. Com- 
munity Savings & Loan Associa- 
tion, a privately insured thrift unit, 
said that its mortgage subsidiary 
may drfanlt on mortgage payments 
by the end of August if plans to sell 
the subsidiary are not completed 
by then. 

In the secondary market Friday, 
the new 10%-percent Treasury 
bonds due in 20 15 were offered late 
in the day at 100 26/32 to yield 
10.54 percent That was up from 
Thursday's price of 99 1 8/32, yield- 
ing 10.67 percent 
Maria F. Ramirez, first vicepres- 
ident and money market economist 
at Drexd Burnham Lambert In cl, 
said prices were supported by con- 
tinuing strong demand for bonds. 
“Tbe underlying fundamentals are 
still bullish for the market" she 
said. 

A number of economic reports 
due out this week, including revised 
figures for second-quarter econom- , 
ic growth, she said, should provide 
further confirmation of weakness 
in the economy. 


U.S. Consumer Rates 

For Week Ended Aug. 16 


Passbook Savings 

- 550 % 

Tax Exempt Bonds 

Bond Buyer 20-Bond index 

_ 9.12 % 

Money Market Funds 

Danoahue’s 7-Day Average.-.-- 

-7.30% 

Bonk Money Market Accounts 
Bonk Rate Monitor Index — — 

- 670 % 

Home Mortgage 



World Bank 
To Increase 
Aid to India 


#• t 

* 


Spain Taps Market to Trim Loan Costs 

By Carl Gewirtz - 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The rapid develop- 
ment of the international commer- 
cial papa market —a reflection of 
tbe ® cash balances at financial 
institutions and corporations 

was expiated by Spain last wedt to 

reduce its borrowing a»ts again. 

Just over a year ago, Spam nego- 
tiated its first revolving tmderwnt- 

SYNPICATOP LOANS 

tag feeflity. At to to. it < * 



tamed tne cuumuu««- ~ . 

issue short-term papa at a ma» 

nmm cost of 13 baas pouts, orJ3 
percent, ova the Lotion mia 

bank offered rate, considered at toe 

time as very low for Spain. ^ 

That agreement has now been 

anendai tapenrit Sp™ !? 

asaw-SsS 

ssgg 

paper and if the terms a* 

■ basis points ova uoor- 


procedure, the saving of 9 basis 
points gees (Erectly to Spain; under 
the original agreement banks that 
took the paper- from Spain at 13 
points ova Libor would have pock- 
eted 9 bass points as profiL 

This is considered extremely 
cheap funding for Spain and re- 
flects, bankers say, me very high 
demand for shot-term assets. 

Normally, institutional inves- 
tors’ surplus cash would go into the 
imerbank market where a deposit 
would earn the bid rale, or 54-point 
below Libor, the offered rate. Thus, 
short-term papa priced ova Libor 
is very attractive. 

In the syndicated credit market, 
also starved of assets considered 
acceptable, Export-Import Bank of 
Korea has appointed 10 banks to 
raise $300 rmffion for right years. 
For the first six years, interest wfll 
beset at %-pant ova Libor. This is 
two years longer at the ft-point 
levd than on previous loans. F or 
the final two yeans, mterest is set at 
%-point over Libor. 

The South Korean bank will pay 
a co mmi tment fee of ft-peiceut and 
will have an option allowi ng it to 
draw in a variety erf other cufren- 
aes. Lenders have tbe option of 
selling off their commitments, as 


points uvci — — 

raiwan Official Offers Resignation 

LiU Mr. Lob and his predecessor, Hsu 

fievurs Li-tdi, were blamed by a pariia- 

— Taiwan’s d^uty “ ^tary commission for allowing 
lister, Li Sbtredit Cooperative .a bank 

S placed bis supomj owned by Cathay Industrial 
Greup! to make large Joans to its 
^lafotfered his own resig sut Jji aries . Mr. Hsu resigned m 

•j be had ^A C aibmet official said Mr. Vii 
li gaid Fnday that •-* — Mr Li s res- 


the loan wfll be made up of trans- 
ferable certificates. 

Bankers also report satisfactory 
progress in syndicating a renegoti- 
ated loan for France. It originally 
borrowed $4 billion in 1982. The 
amount bring resyndicated is for 
$3.6 billion but the 1992 maturity 
remains unchanged. 

A 35-percent portion of the total 
amount is designed as a term loan 
with interest set at 54-point ova 
three- or six-month Libor for the 
first four years and 3/16-pcdnt ova 
Libor thereafter. The amount avail- 
able under this portion of the lean 
diminishes as drawings are repaid. 

The remainder, 65 percent erf tbe 
total, is a revolving credit under 
which France can draw, repay and 
draw agfltn- Tbe interest charge is a 
steady 54-point ova Libor. 

The interest charges are down 
from the %-&point margin set in 
1982 and the commitment fee has 
been cut from 54 to 1/16 percent. 
After 1989, tbe commitment fee cm 
the revolving credit increases to 
1/10 percent. 

Bankas say that while France 
has not squeezed the market to the 
maximum for the lowest possible 
terms, the charges nevertheless are 
not up to what many erf the major 
banks consider profitable. As a re- 
sult, they say they are selling sub- 
participations to smaller institu- 
tions that are hungry for even 
Jaw-cost assets. 

The Tudrisb-lraqi pipeline is to 
tup the market this week for $400 
Ypfflinn. Tbe loan, which will run to 
seven a right years, wfll be guaran- 
teed in part by Turkey’s central 
bank and in fart by the Italian 
export credit agency (Italy’s $&- 
piem is building the pipeline). The 
Aral lams on the loan will repre- 
sent a blending of die 1 percent 
over Libor that Turkey would com- 
mand and the ft-tt-poml margin of 
the Italian state guaranteed nsk. 


Reuters 

NEW DELHI — Long-term, 
low-interest loans to India from the 
World Bank and the International 
Development Association mil rise | 
in volume ova the next five years, 
the president of the bank, A.W. 
Clausen, has said. * 

“The case for India to continue 
to receive concessional flows is a 
strong one. India should not be 
penalized for its development suc- 
cess," Mr. Clausen said Friday at 
toe end of a five-day visit to the 
country. 

Mr. Clausen said the flow of con- 
cessional audit from the bank and 
the International Development As- 
sociation, its soft-loan arm, would 
be much higher for India’s seventh 

riod^^^T9S^Aan for the previ- 
ous plan covering 1980-1985. He 
gave no figures. 

A World Bank official has said I 
aid to India from the bank fell to I 
around $25 bflliou for the fiscal 
year ended- in June from $2.7 tril- 
lion tire previous year. 

Mr. C lanc ftn said the Ending gov- 
ernment must increase its commer- 
cial borrowing to supplement the 
bank’s concessional aid. India’s 
commercial borrowing has risen to 
$12 billion k the past three years. 

. Indian leaders who met Mr. 
Clausen said cuts in concessional 
rid seriously threatened the coun- 
try’s development efforts. 

Interest-free loans from the In- 
ternational Development Associa- 
tion woe expected to fall to $650 
mini on in the year endin g June 
1986 from more than $15 billion 
five years earlier, officials of the) 
In djap Finance Minis try said. 

Mr. Clausen said that the bank I 
was trying to secure more funds for 
IDA and that a meeting of donor 
countries had been called for Seoul 
in early October. 

Austria to Cat DuconntRate 

Ratten 

VIENNA — Austria’s national 
bank will cat its discount rate to 4 
percent from 45 percent, effective 
Monday, a bank spokesman said 
Friday. 


Reuters 

TOKYO — One of the fleet of 
ships operated by Sanko Steamship 
Co. of Japan has been detained in a 
U.S. pot because of fears its debts 
would not be paid, a company offi- 
cial said. 

A Japanese television report said 
□ine Sanko vessels were bong hdd 
in the United States, Canada 
South Africa. 

The Sanko official said Saturday 
that the Sanko Diligence, a 26500- 
deadweight-ton bulk carrier, was 
detained in Portland, Oregon, last 
Thursday. But Sanko had remitted 
the necessary funds atid (he ship 
should be released soon, he said. 

Sanko Steamship, which owns 27 
ships and charters 217, accounting 
for about 4 percent of world ton- 
nage, sought court protection from 
.its creditors last Tuesday with 
group debts of 520 billion yen ($12 
billion). The filing esme. after ma- 
jor creditor banks decided they 


could not provide further financ- 
ing. 

Tbe size of Sanko Steamship’s 
debts made it the largest such filing 
in post-wax Japan. 

A filing for protection is usually 
Mowed by the appointment of a 
receiver to steer the company to 
recovery, or determine whether it 
should be liquidated. 

On Friday, an official at Maru- 
beni Corp. said the Sanko Crystal 
a 39,000-deadweight-ton bulk car- 
rier owned by Marubeni and on 
charter to Sanko Steamship, was 
being held at Camden, New Je 


mg payment in cash for their work. 

But the Sanko Steamship official 
said Saturday that the last con- 
firmed position of the Sanko Crys- 
tal was in Charleston, South Caro- 
lina, last Monday. 

Japan’s publicly owned NHK 
television reported lata that nine 
Sanko Steamship vessels had been 


detained in foreign ports until they 
paid their debts to local cargo load- 
ers and suppliers. These included 
six in the united States, two in 
South Africa and one in Canada. 

Sanko Steamship officials were 
not available for comment on tbe 
report 

Slipping industry sources in To- 
kyo said foreign ports, longshore- 
men and suppliers were worried 
about getting payment for their 
goods and services. 

These payments used to be 
made on a credit basis, but Sanko’s 
application for court protection 
raised concern among local firms in 
some ports as to whether they will 
get their money from Sanko," a 
spokesman fa Marubeni said. 

Shipping expats in Tokyo said 
Sanko Steamship's failure under- 
lined the serious problems faring 
the shipping market, with far too 
many ships chasmg too few orders. 


Caracus Reviews 
BTV Debt Pact 

Reuters 

CARACAS — Finance Min- 
ister Manuel Azpurua has an- 
nounced that the government is- 
reviewing a foreign-debt refi- 
nancing accord fa Banco de los 
Trab^ adores de Venezuela. 

BTV, placed undo- control of 
a government-appointed trust- 
ee in November 1982 because 
of sevoe liquidity problems, 
owes approximately $300 mil- 
lion to foreign banks. The trust- 
ee recently reached a refinanc- 
ing accord with BTVs creditor 
banks, but the government has 
object^ to some elements re- 
lated to its mixed capital status, 
banking sources said. 

Mr. Azpurua said Thursday 
that BTV was being treated as a 
special case because the govern- 
ment holds a substantial share. 


More Investors Put Money Where Their Morals Are 


By Nicholas D. Kristof 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — When the 
Working Assets Money Fund ret 
up shop in San Francisco two years 
ago. it had accounts totaling 
5100,000 and a determination to 
“do good." 

Today, the fund, which shuns the 
debt securities of companies that 
are involved in South Africa, pol- 
lute the environment resist unions, 
produce weapons a generate nu- 
clear power, manages a S6 3- million 
portfolio. With a yield of 8.76 pa- 
rent in the 12 months ended July 
31, it ranks a bit below average in 
its category of money-market 
funds, but is well above bottom. 

“This is a growth sector," said 
Julia Parzen, chief executive and 
portfolio manager of Working As- 
sets. Specialty funds such as hers 
have grown dramatically, she not- 
ed, “and what I’ve seen ova the 
last six monLhs is a number of tra- 
ditional brokerage houses bringing 
on staff people to do soda! re- 
search." 

Most financial experts still ques- 
tion the wisdom a usefulness of 
factoring moral beliefs into invest- 
ment decisions. Nevertheless, a 
growing number erf money manag- 
ers are making a good dollar by 
managing portfolios for investors 
— individuals, pension funds, uni 1 
versity endowments and the like — 
who choose to avoid certain com- 
panies fa moral reasons. 

By far the most common issue 
has been South Africa, and the 
Lraid has caught fire with the grow- 
ing unrest thoe. 

“There’s been phenomenal 
growth" in social-issue investing, 
said Donald W. Mitchell president 
of Mitchefl Investment. Manage- 


ment Co. in Cam bridge. Massachu- 
setts, which advises universities, 
cities and states on how to invest. 

Tbe biggest beneficiaries of this 
heightened concon with ethics and 
investment — most notably lire di- 
vestment of South Africa-related 


investment funds reflea concerns 
such as South African divestment, 
limiting nuclear power, slowing 
military spending and bolstering 
unions. None are known, for exam- 
ple, to shun coomanies doing busi- 
ness with the Soviet Union, aJ- 


'Maybe it’s yuppie,’ said one investment 
manager, *but people are talking about the 
social implications of investments’. 


stocks by vast pension funds — 
tend to be the huge, mainstream 
money-management companies. 
Without espousing a cause, they 
will nevertheless tailor a portfolio 
to whatever a client wants. 

Fa Ingfanra? Martin D. Sasa, 
president of M.D. Sass Investors 
Services in New York, manag es 
more than $1.7 billion, including 
$400 million in public money, such 
as municipal pension funds. “If 
you want to service the funds, you 
have to be sensitive to the issue," 
Mr. Sass said. 

“I’d say that 90 percent of that 
$400 million has some type of re- 
striction with regard to South Afri- 
ca. Three or four years ago, maybe 
it would have been 25 percent,” he 
said. 

“If you went back 10 years ago," 
said Mr. Mitchell “the amount of 
money in social investments was 
extremely small probably no more 
than $100 million. Beginning about 
two years ago it began to take off. 
Now the market is in the tens of 
millions of dollars, and probably 
will be in tbe hundreds of millions 
soon." 

All or nearly afl of the soda! 


though the mainstream money 
managers probably would accept 
such a condition. 

The amounts of “social money" 
still are tiny compared with the 
trillions erf dollars that slosh about 
the financial landscape without ex- 
plicit regard to ethical questions. 
But $100 minimi here and $1 bil- 
lion there add up, and have 
spawned a small industry. 

Three newsletters report on 
slocks that are involved in racially 
segregated South Africa or are oth- 
erwise frowned upon. A book, 
“Ethical Investing," has sold 8,000 
copies since its publication last 
year. And a group of stockbrokers 
and others this year formed a trade 
association, the Social Investment 
Forum, with 125 members. 

“Maybe it’s yuppie, but people 
are talking about lire social impli- 
cations of investments," said Mar- 
cy M. Mimrin gham, president of 
the social investment division of 
Mitchell Investment 

On the other hand, skeptics 
pant out the difficulties of judging 
the moral merits of com panies. In 
addition, they say, even if social- 


issue investors succeeded in driving 
down the price of an offensive 
stock, they would only create bar- 
gains fa investors with fewa scru- 
ples. Finally, they contend, impos- 
ing ethical constraints on 
investment decisions could ulti- 
mately hurt the economy by warp- 
ing the flow of capital away from 
its most productive uses. 

Two types of investors are most 
interested in social investments. 
The first group consists of middle- 
and upper-income people who have 
strong views about political a en- 
vironmental issues and warn their 
investments to reflect those views. 
Their money typically flows into 
the funds that specialize in social 
issues. 

The second and much larger 
source erf investment money is city 
and state pension funds excluded 
by law from investing in companies 
involved in South Africa, at least 
unless they treat black and white 
employees ihoe equally. Ten slates 
and at least 30 cities have approved 
some kind of divestment policy, 
and <imhar legislation is pending in 
many other states and a ties. 

Restricting the universe of possi- 
ble investments generally is 
thought in investment theory to 
lead to Iowa returns, because it 
limits choices without adding any- 
thing but volatility. 

In rebuttal social investment 
groups point out that in recent 
years South Africa-free portfolios 
nave frequently done better than 
those that invested without that 
constraint Analysts say that this 
was largely because they were able 
to invest that money in smaller 
com panies, which recently have 
done better than blue-chip issues. 


ANNOUNCEMENT 

FROM THE 

ISLAMIC DEVELOPMENT BANK 
JEDDAH, SAUDI ARABIA 


THE ISLAMIC DEVELOPMENT BANK (IDB) is happy to inform all Hajis 
that in the framework of the “Sacrificial Meat Utilization Project”, arrangements have been 
made for the purchase of 300,000 heads of sheep, conforming to the relevant rules of Sharia 
and health, from “NASIR MOHAMMAD AL-MUKA IRISH AND CO.” These animals will 
be made available to desirous pilgrims against payment of two hundred and ninety five Saudi 
Riyals (SR. 295) per head to any of the BRANCHES OF “AL-RAJHI CO. FOR CURRENCY 
EXCHANGE AND COMMERCE.” This amount includes the price of one sheep (SR 2 1 7.90) 
and part of the cost of slaughtering the animal and transporting the meat to the deserving 
people. A Purchase Voucher will be given to the pilgrim in lieu thereof. 

The IDB is participating in the “Sacrificial Meat Utilization Project” with 
the competent authorities of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia for the benefit of needy Muslims. 
The sacrificial meat of “FIDYA” will be distributed among the poor people of Al-Haram. 

The IDB will make arrangements for the transport by air, sea or land of the surplus meat 
from other kinds of sacrifices to needy persons and refugees in Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, 
Chad, Djibouti, Jordan, Mali, Mauritania and Pakistan. 

This project, which aims at making optimal use of the sacrificial meat, is 
a clear manifestation of the desire of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to extend all possible 
assistance to pilgrims in the performance of their religious obligations, especially to those 
who cannot go in person to the slaughterhouse under the scorching sun during the extremely 
hot summer season. 

A pilgrim has two choices: 

(a) he may authorize the Islamic Development Bank to perform the sacrifice 
on his behalf at Al-Moaisim Model Slaughterhouse; or 

(b) he may join a group of at least 30 pilgrims, one of whom would represent 
the group. In this case, the person authorized by the group will be issued a special permit 
that allows him admission into AJ-Moaisim Slaughterhouse to supervise the slaughtering 
personally. 

The pilgrim should indicate on the' Purchase Voucher (which also serves as an 
Authorization Form) the type of sacrifice he wishes to make (FIDYA/HADI, UDHIYA or 
SADAQA). The form is divided into 3 parts: the pilgrim keeps part 3, which is an acknow- 
ledgement of receipt of the price. Part 2 will be delivered either to the Supervising Commi- 
ttee assigned by the ISLAMIC DEVELOPMENT BANK to perform the sacrifice on behalf 
of the pilgrim, or to the person delegated by a group of 30 persons or more. Part 1 is for 
accounting purposes. 

The Authorisation Form will be available at all entry ports where the 
pilgrims may be arriving and at the branches of AL-RAJHI COMPANY FOR CURRENCY 
EXCHANGE AND COMMERCE IN MAKKAH AL-MUKARRAMAH, AL-MADINAH AL- 
MUNAWARA AND JEDDAH. 


V 





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MSD^ National Market 


Sates In nbi 

100s Hhm Low Close Cnsw 


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1907V: 101 

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17ft +|* 

Cured 


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a« flt « 

BOi 152 47 17541 Ota 40V 4- V 

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17 ft (A ft 
140 4 2 28148V 40 40ft -f ft 
145 80 SIS 30tt 30V — IV 
273 M 5431V 31 31 — V 

13# 3.1 6182* 32 32 — IS 


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277 U 
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1? 5% SV SV— ta 
371 2* A 2%_V 


ConsFn 3156 l.l 
ConWt s 1*40 5.1 


CntIBep 2*040 54 
CHF5L 


Ccurers 30 18 60623VS 2Sft 28 V +Tto 


CourDLs 

CowSPr 

Cownot 

CrkBrt 

CroffTr 

Cromor 

CrdlEs 

Crestk 

Cronus 

CroiTr 

CnAiii s 

CwnBk 

Crump 

CwtMFr 

Cultum 

Culp 

Cyeare 

CvprSv 

Cyors wt 

Cyprus 


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M 13 228 21V 19V 2DV— V 

442 V V Is— I'm 

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36 15 4616U ttVS 14V— ta 

II ft ft BV— ta 

147112V 12 12ft — V 
77 41S 4 4V— ta 

123115V 14V 14V- V 

JO 73 895Z7V 37 27V + to 

84 4 3VS 3* + to 
385311* |1 llta + V 
44 14 20833 32 32V* — V 

.94 44 412 22V 71V 71V— 1 
56 11 99727V 36V 26V— lta 

318 1.1 203 7W 7 7* + V 

30820V 19* 19* 

30« 13 25 B* 8* 8* 

60 1* l« I*— V 
13041 13V 179b 13W — V 


97 
1039 
177 
355 
15545 
55 
262 
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29 
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2689 
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40027 feta 26V 
35 36 

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155547* 
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486 7* 

69 6* 
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873 3ta 
426 20 
117448 
791 17, 

158 t. 

43517 
639 3= 


5- 
134 
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34 
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169 
281 
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4K 
17% 

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27 
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55% 

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30 
35% 

SB 
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14* 

17* 

18 
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25 
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12 * 

25* 

17 
27* 

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33V 34 
29*— 2911b 
53 56ta 
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18V 18* 
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13 33 

4V 
34V 


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30 U 17416* 15V I5V2— V 
139 2* IV IV 
392128V 3 26ta— IV 

M 3ta Zta 2ta 
33122V 71 ta 2! + V 

94 7Vk 4* 7 — to 
34312 1IV 11V— V 
BWMS 129 9V av 9% — ta 

UME 2781214 llta 11V— ta 

444 9 SV IV— V 
' 15 4V 4ta 4ta— ta 

4400 9% t* 9V + V 
Irm wt 7U ft ft M 4 lb 

nwtw 107324V 24V 24V — lta 

I 482 5VS 4ft 5 + ta 

10059 4* 5* Sta 
HI 5* ft lta 
1730 11V II Tito— H 
434 4 3* 3V + V 

368 16 15 15V — * 

127 7* 7V* 7* + to 
20871 29 26V 26V -Ota 

283 4* 4U 4* — V 
179 llta II Tito— V 

3940 6* 5* 5* + * 

■78 2 IV lta + V 
94 7 5* 4to 

17813 V 17V 17*— ta 
457 Ata Sv 5* — ta 
.14 12 37044V Uta 13* — ta 

IBM 123 179 8* Sta IV— V 
2728731V Z7ta feta— 7* 
49* Bta TV 7* + ta 

•9318V 14V 17 —lta 

145 8 7V 8 ^ 

9113 II llta— * 
29311V llta llta— ta 
103 4ta 4V 4to— V 
95914V 13* HV— 1* 
629 10 9ta 10 + ta 

» 5514 TO* 14 + to 

f 513 19* 19 19 — ta 

1352 14 t3ta 13* 

6902 7* 4* 7V— ta 

J6 53 137 6* A* 4* + ta 

849 % * % + ta 

1223 22ta 27ta — V 

354024 0319 23V— ta 

5713* 13 V 13*— to 
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32 3 2* 2*— to 

1JQ 1631V TIV 31V— ta 

3451114 |1 HV + to 
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MA 3J30I2J 16830 Z7V 20 +* 

D6e 3 736 7 Ata 6V— V 
374511V TOV 10* + ta 
160 84 747 44 to 45 45* — 1 to 
7211 10ta II + to 
2178 8'A 8 — V 

wt 288 4* 4ta 4 r *a— V 

P« 7140 39ta 39V— ta 


19* 
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94V 94V 
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6* Ok 


19* 
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32 


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i» n - jb . 


m i * - 

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MM 20V WV— tV 
34 Bta 34 


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05V 14V 
15V *£• 
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few MV 
13V 12% 
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5PW* Wta 
221 ftBT 

■IK IT to I 


LCSs 25410* 9 TV— ft 

LDBmk 984 7% 6V TV— V 

l_IN 12? 14’ 3 13ft 14 + * 

LSI Ltg 445ZFO 20* 2BV— 2* 

LSI LOU 826S 17ta ttto 14ft—* 

LTX 391 14* 13* 14 — to 

Lo Petes 1930MV MV MW 

Lai By 140 10 10647 44V 44V— ta 

LacJdSt 33* 14 373 19to 1SV 18V— ft 

UkJFm .14 .9 391 ir« 18to 18V— ta 


r* 


LadFm .14 .» Sfl tr- ir- iota— ta 

Laialw TO I.I 34717* 17 17ft— to 

LdITBS .16 IS 755 IV.* TO* 10*— V 

LorpR* 1457 9ft 9ft r.b— to 

LomaT JO SI 39816 15ft IS*— to 

LancDSI 41 4J 29916 15ft 15% 

Lances .V OS 67227% 37*- 27ft— to 

LdLnSL -22 1.1 8910ft tdto IT-— to 

LnUBF M 13 92919- 18ft 18ft 

LamkS *1717 Uta I* — lto 

LoneCo 92 13 >>053* 52% S3*- ♦ ft 

Lanoly SSeU 171 7ft TV 7Vftft 

Lorxens 643 21 L. IfVi 2C% +lto 

Uwmi 28 18 T5&I9J. »■« 28*— to 

LeeDto 1796 Aft Sta 4 + ft 

Leiner 143 * a* 8ft— V 

Leseo 8i« 13816% M 16 — to 


41 41V 

3 3 


& 

10* * W 
MV 4 % 
J% 

m 4 to 
17ft- ft 
I TV— ft 


IXOO IS 
259 24 
31 42 

231 
1233 4* 
7J8 34 27*429 


321 3ft 
23S 4U> 
88 8 ' 28 9 5 1 8ft 


«ft 

5% 

'£* v. 
%-v 

to 


J2 27 595 4V 
JBi IS 208219ft 


ISO M 2531 
SO .9 7391 


SB *% *% 9V * ft 
1398 7W Oft 4ft —ft 
MSB M lift lift— Ift 

713 * r- »*— * 

.MO 17 «7 9V 9 tbs 4 to 

3497 «ft Ata •«.— 1% 
1514% UV Mb 4 to 
Ui 27 20 JB 39 39 -» 

306779ft Uta 19% 4Jft 
.a U 47 4ft 6» AM— to 
1J8S 3S I1S 48V Am— ft 
ISO as Bta g ft 37ft 37ft— ft 
7319ft 18ft 18ft— % 
M 24 US 144 tSV >6 eft 
14 XS 81 Oft 4* *tai ♦ ft 
M 28 124 71 to 24 Uto-tft 
M 13 Ml lift Mft lift e ft 


am isv w tvs 4 ft 

14711ft lift lift * ta 


Matters 

S32 

VeloMo 


eci Tei 


2211 10 IDV— to 

Gene 

EH Int 


99 lto He lto + V 


EILInsI 


103 6 5* 5*— to 



.12 

1J 235 7V 6V 6*— to 


EMC In: 

Ml 

■45 35710% 10% 10* + % 


EMF 


76 1% 3% 3% 


EMPt 




1 EZEM 


23414* 14. 14* 4- * 


EoolCDt 


3S33 'p /“« 7. 


EoolTI 


1911 lta lta 1% 


EngTwW 



Eortcoi 




Eastovr 

280a 88 31 25 25 25 


EatnF 




EcanLb 

184 

11 386135 33% 13*— 1 


EdSaulf 

.I^Ob &8 1216V 15V 16 + * 


EdCmp 

■17m 12 1034 9V 9% 9% 


ErChfc 


48812% 11* 11%— ta 


El Pas 

IJ2 102 394015V 14ft 14ft— to 


Elan 


239 9* 9V 9V 


Eibita 


128710 9% 9% + * 


Etoo 

80 

42 17718% 17% 18* +1 to 


ElderB 

22t 

1.1 520 70 TO 


Eldons 

.16 

12 16813 12to 13 +* 


EldorB 




EldrM 


44 4V 4ta 4V + % 


ElecBlo 


Ba 2 Sto 7* 7ft— to 


ElCaths 




EteNud 


63017% 16V 16% — to 


ElcRnt 


42713% 13 I3to — % 


ElcSct 




ClcSera 


17 5 4% 5 


EldMis 


M2 12% 18* 12ta + % 






Emcor 




EmaAIr 




Ermibx 




Encore 




Endta 


103 4 3* 3%— V 


Endvco 




EndoLs 


3476 12V 10V 12V +!to 


Engass 

88 

U 32113* 13 13 r 


Enontti 

20b S3 4 4*1 20V 21 | 


EnFocf 


BlllSVk 14Wi 15U — qfe 1 


Enaatis 

20 

13 16 ISV 15 I5W •+• to 14 




33216 15to 15to— * M 


EntrOrf 


17410% 9V 7% + to H 


Envrdn 


558 5 4% 4* + ta H 

CW 

EnvrT a 



El I> 

EnwmP 


308 3W 3V 2ft— V h 


EnvTst s 


785 23V 21 21 —2V, h 


EnzoBI 


57212 llto 11V— to h 


Epslln 


40 9 9 9 + to [I 


Epsco 


58 9 8% 8ft— ta m 


Equal 


2452T2* l]% llta— 1W h 

eiesv 



H 

oud 


Lcwisp 88b 3J it4 |to 
LcKlcon 2817 3T 

Le*kJro 425 2 

LUtFCa JO 22 711 23 


1*4 |to 8. 8. 

2*17 3S Jft + ‘V 
425 2% 2% 2% 4 r* 


UJtFCfl JO 22 211 23 20V 22V fIV 

LWVHA 158 10* 10’- 10* 4 ft 

LtJtvH B 9310V 1TA TOV 

L03UBS 184 38 4435V 35 35 

UMTS 44SI17V L5* I7V 4 V 

Ltefart 87 J 87722* W% 20*— 1ft 

Lflavs 24 J 140 46V 45* 46 4 to 

UeCom 509 5 » SV Sta— ta 

Lilly A 1 38a U, 38214ft 14* 14ft + M 

UlyTuI JO 1J 2061 T9ta 19* 19* 4 to 

LlnBrd 235732 31% 31V— % 

LrncTrJ 220 64 6614ft 34* 34% 

Untttni .16 22 136 6 5* 6 4 ta 

LinefCp 777 3* 3 3% — ft 

LkjBo« 37 IS 3356V 5«V 55V— I 

LtadAlr 140 62 682SV 24V, 25V 4 % 

UfTtArl 70 Z6 6028 27 » +V 

LtrOas 25 8 7B6£b46V> 43V «3*— 2V 

LoanA 12818V I8H 11V 4 W 

LocdF .159 3 101817ft 17 17to— W 

LondnH 783 8ft 1 IV 4 to 


Versa T 
vieonF 
J Vtcmto 
% Wet Bn 

3* werno* 

,5 MODUS 
'5 Vledefr 
2 VUlns 

2 VOTtta 
V ttaBocn 
% VMTecft 
* vuram 

VBdevl 
vane* 

bfMUM 


urn ’ 7 - ft 

44 7ft AV 7ft 4 ft 

as u ns nv u ir«-t 
mi Sta 
tstlto nv >1 - to 

„ MAI 4ta 3V 3ft- ta 
1SSB 38 Jt» BV 27 - ta 

20 18 38771 19ft 19ft —1ft 
44 J 29k 3ft— to 
A 53342m 71% 27%— 1ft 

181 44 6327 21% 27*» 

581 3 2ft 3 — M 

21* 6% Aft Aft 4 V 

234 22 44314 ** 9ft eft— ft 

SW14V7 lift H 4ft 

mis mm. vi%— % 

86 25 5155a 9ft *to 9ft 91% 

rat 3 ita 1 * 9 * 

» 17 6» *V *V— b 

3B5 sn 7% Sta * ta 

49 A Aft 49k 4 to 

_ 1111 19 m. isv 

JOT 13 13034% 3S V 31ft— 7 
8B 2 US 9M 9 tft— ta 

2Af 1.1 2171% 21ft 21ft 4 % 

127 7 Aft *%— ft 


LoneStr 5164 I* ift lta— ft _ _ 

LonoF 121 52 16925 ZFW 34 — W '■» f* 

LoriCps 4461*6V 22V 3* SP^Xfj 

Lotus 1486426* 23V 24 —2% JJ 

LaBnch 37 48 826 16 15V, 15* + V £**5T .-1 * 

Lyntten 1032SV 24V 34V— I 255J. - ,2r * 

LypflQS 571425ft 21* 2ZV-3V 




MARC 

MBI 

MCI 

MIW 

MM1 

MP5IS 

MTS* 

MTV 

24 

1W7 

977 

28955 

165 

■4 

80 

V3 TJ5 
3601 

MDmdi 

ModrTr 

J2 

23 109 

1986 

ModGE 

MoamF 

220 

88 4482 

478 

MosBk 

MouOp 

88 

198 

4J 4441 

m Killian 

MaJRt 

120 

28 544 

491 

AVWrTTs 

MoJrrtA 

MBtSef 

8Ie 

2961 

1141 

39281 


[jtlMeek’s 

AMEX 


Last^fedcs 

NYSE 


AMEX Most Acfives 


NYSE AAost Acfives 


When in 
Wjthinptm. IH. 




House cfBeef W J 

.Vlwtm n» 1 hr WathiiKkin Mirrait' I 
OUR 39tfa YTL*.IL ■ 


mr Last 

Owe. 

b 4>. 
4ta 

% 


13% 

14% 

+1% 

14V 

2ft 

*# 

= * 

16% 

16% 

—m 

28ft 

30 

+1 

17ft 

19 

+ % 

13to 

13* 

+ V 

13% 

14 

— ta 

lto 

lto 

— to 

8% 

J'A 

+ V 

IV 

1ft 

— ft 

5V 

5% 


13% 

13V 

+ to 


1* 


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3% 

+ to 

28* 

29V 

— V 

4% 

4ft 

— to 

6V 

6V 

— % 

12V 

13V 

+ v 

9V 

10* 

+Jto 

20% 

20V 


12% 

12ft 

- ft 

3ft 

3* 

— ta 


3645 
2144 
62169* 
3030 2% 
42731 

931920 
7515 
1169 5V 
7723V 
186 4% 
67 9to 
107033* 
135' 

155: 
to: 

147 
261 
2501 
2335 
3182 
3701 
2*74 


18V 20* 
Sto «V 

MV 14* 
9% 9ft 
21 23 

Z7 27ft 
19% M 18V 
20V 19% 19V 
26V 26 26 

22% 27% 22V 
4 % 4ft Aft 
24V 23* 24ft 
17ft 17V 17V' 
27ft 27* 27% 
7V Aft 4ft- 
43% 41ft 


180 23 mm: 
220 48 66. 

t 175 


nv 
ww tta 


3%— v 

17V 4 ft 
36ta41ft 
AV — % 
13*— V 
2% 

14V— ft 

Sft 

*%— % 
21 4IM 
19V— V 
«%— V 
B« 4 V 
7ft 

15 — ft 
22% 4 % 
W 


40 59 

34V 34 
28* Z7* 

MM 178 
21ft 3Btt 
37V 36 
43 

’"ft 

12ft 


AMEX Diaries 


III! 


NYSE Diaries 


This me Last Wk 


TWsWk Last Wk 


Apollo Comp. 
Mr Gosicei 
Bitter Corp. 
Modulaire 
Rocfime 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


315 254 

4U 504 

Wt 147 

909 90S 

32 27 

40 37 


Advan ce d 
Declined 
unchanged 
Tefal Issues 
New H lofts 
New Laws 


895 616 

1044 1372 

297 3*0 

206 2 228 

88 04 

35 34 



39V — t* 

roncFO 4»u 193 19 MW Uta— ft 


.12 U 
84 3.1 
.106 12 IS 
86 22 87 

273 
SMI 
80b 12 192 
80 
312 
184 
154 
888 


AMEX Sales 


ilfi 


gfc WITH CGMPUMENTS Of 

Sf CONTINUAL AMERICAN 


Total lor week 
Week ago 
Veoraaa 
Jan 1 to dale 
1984 la date 
AMERICAN BONDS ' 
Total tor week 
Year 00 a 


77A1UU0 

lAtm nrr. 

31410JU0 

129ACWU100 

974.960000 


Total tar wwek 
week ago 
veer ago 
Two veers ooo 


SKLSJUno 

U6XUK0 


Jm 1 to date 
1984 10 dote 
1963 ra date 


4 17X3M8M 
4*1740000 
416X20000 
3848110011 
17JC1X87J31 
lA93TJ50tt# 
11849, 7® JHM 


6 2% 2% 
149 4 3% 

850 1.1 251 5 4% 

171 10% 9ft 
.16 J 30723V 77v, 
42 TV 1% 
245613% 13 
220 68 23437 35V 

1708 6% Aft 
JO 28 16130V 26V 

644 2% 2ft 
545 % V 
14« 5* 5ft 
207 T-Z J V 
389 S'- j- B 


5%-v 

4 * 

V 

28ft + 76 
2 V + v 
13W + to 
36% +1 
6V 




S jfces Datatrooics 
Files for Protection 

. ^ ni,e d Prat latmuaumd 

ROCHESTER, NroYori. 

Svtes Ofltalrftf. _ - 


nt 9«i 
too 23% 
259420ft 
107 4ft 

64010* 
212ft 
5622 
MB 13ft 
194 5% 
1484415ft 
8634 Aft 
6511 


110 27V 

uw 

239 9% 
4110V 

.mu 

347432% 
538110 
67713 
719849* 
72 5% 


■ r% gft— w 

■ a n - % 

i 19 am + ft 
1 <V AM— V 

> 10 IK + to 

1 12ft 12ft 
lift lift 
1 11% 12 —ft 
4ft Aft— to 
15 Uta— ft 
Aft Aft— to 
10V TOft 
5V 5V— l 
m 21V + V 
*V, TV— V 
Sto VW +• v 
M9V109V— to 
M% 15% 

32ft 33V— V 
9V 9ft + to 
*ta 13 +2ta 
U* TO* ♦.» 
5% 5to— % 


a.* n w — 

Syk« Datatronics lac. has 
sought protection from credi- 

n? tSrZ. 0 **!? 11 ^ ibe 
U5^BanJcniptcy Code after dc- 
lauiQUP on rtm , m -7 


fau^bng on pan of a S7.7-mi]- 
“OQtoan with two banks. 
iwSJ^" fiW late 


— was uiea late 

T^ay dw Chase Lincoto 
Bank and Chomcal Bank 


■ «“»■ *uu tonomcai Hank 

dana t«ifid “fuU and immediate 
payment. Chase Lincoln is 

owed shrmf n n -««- 


• UUWU3 « 

atom S3.7 minion ad 
Bank about S4 mil- 









































































































*i4 

S 

„ ,: C*. 

I 1 

?*V.* 

‘- ". -. V 
. 

"sap-.* 

•--' <; 


OWragoBsdw^eOpaong 

* Unsasof *o*:ortrnM * 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 1985 



Page 11 


Ofctoniwlc* Con, 


1™* O-tenipfle. 


TN 


716 


36% 


HMk % 

nut us 
m* jio 

ii!S I 

H a 


Calls 

7-1* 


no Friday. 


Pu ** I Osman A price Col to 


Puts 


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If 

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m 

lb 17-U 


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r 

r 

r 

IK 

43% 

65 

r 

1 7-16 

HI 

f 

AMP 

75. 

Tk 

r 

r 

f 

13% 

X 

We 

r 

r 


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35 

r 

l* 

T*2 

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Baxter 

13 

3ta 

r 

r 

r 

13% 

12% 

r 

1% 

r 

i 

r 

13% 

U 

r 

5-16 

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i% 

13% 

17% 

r 

% 

r 

r 

BUcDfc 

17% 

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r 

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n% 

X 

r 

% 

IK 

IK 

13% 

23% 

r 

3 -li 

r 

f 

M% 

» 

1-16 

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r 

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m 

r 

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46% 

45 

l« 

4* 

r 

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41% 

5D 

r 1 IM6 

3 

3K 


M 


M4 I Ml 


8 ISCrtMV 


Merab 35 

J6M 40 
34* 45 

Skvlto IS 
Sorthn 30 
, 2»4 22% 

(Tldswi 15 
141b 17V, 

, MM 20 
UAL a 
«* 45 

SM SO 
in B 
, 3S* 40 

lUTeeh 35 
41 lb 45 
41% ' 45 

41% SB 
I Walt 35 
WornCffl 20 
2*6 35 

MW. 31 


3M 

UM54 50 
54% 55 

. 3M IB 
BrtMftv a 
sm 60 

5M 65 
„ Wt 70 
| Brum 35 
, 3*4, 43 

com us 

114% 115 

114% 120 

. 1)5% 130 

lOxunia V 
Wk 22 to 
, 2M 25 
Oirvslr 30 
3» 25 

. ** * 
ICMnoSc is 


r u 
t* 1 15-16 


OMIan & or Ice Calls 


Puts 


I Oettan & price Calls Pwt* 


im 44, r % 

20 24, 316 >6 

23% % 1% 11-14 

N » » r 

3S in 1 15-14 % 

40 1-16 5-u r 


in 


llklttl* 


m ij n l* 

£ ’» r % r r 

s * >* r vu 

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1 I 4jte 1* 

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m 


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NarTel 

Mwlnd 

Pomtfv 

RCA 

43% 


Hierro 


n 12% H* >14 


1% 17-U 


m 4 

* 1% 
r . * 

1% r 

n 

3% 

3* 

r 

JV* 

r 

r 

114% 

1M% 

tu 

129 

56 

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1 

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46 

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life 

ju. r 

r 

r 

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Mi 

r 

r 

r 

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tent 

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7 

r 

4Mk 

45 

3» 

r 

r 

r 

r r 

r 

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15-14 

r 

rvi 

r 


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r 

r 

r 

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r 

1-16 

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3% 

r 

r 

r 

36* 

43 

% 

1% 

3% 

4 

% 

1% 

r 

r 

16% 

45 

r 

% 

r 

T 

4% 

5* 

>16 

% 

Wacom 

45 

4 

r 

r 

1% 

I 

1% 

1* 

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50* 

55 

3% 

424 

2 

r 

% 

1 

r 

r 

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as 

9-16 

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r 

r 

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r 

r 

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45 

4* 

7* 

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% 

3* 

3* 

7-16 

r 

S»tk 

a 

2% 

4* 

1% 

r 

H 

1* 

r 

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50% 

53 

% 

2»W 

4% 

4* 

11* 

r 

r 

r 

50% 

63 

r 

15-16 

r 

r 

4 

r 

3* 

s 



DO Tax 

Oct 

Jen 

3 

5 

5% 

r 

Alcoa 

X 

r 

f 

Vk 

* 

% 

3% 

r 

r 

35* 

X 

1% 

2 

r 

1* 

3% 

r 

r 

r 

35% 

40 

% 

7-1 A 

r 

r 

r 

1% 

>16 

r 

AmGam 

X 

2* 

r 

r 

r 

>16 

1M6 

2 

r 

A Greet 

X 

r 

f 

% 

« 

5* 

r 

r 

ft 

AT&T 

15 

6* 

s 

r 

4 

17-14371-16 

1>16 

ift 

30* 

9M 

30* 

3a 

"Y* 111-14 

7-H 

1VM 

% 

7* 

13-14 

7% 

4* 

r 

r 

ft 

•V 

33% 

25 

5-14 

% 

11-14 

* 

1 

r 

2tk 

4% 


I Tandem 
15% 
M% 
UPtotm 
him 
1IIM 
lilt, 
HIM 
HIM 
lilts 
HIM 

3616 


746 


4M MM 


Oarn lateral AMMO 


CKw-<he-Cotiiiier 

Consolidated trading for week ended Friday. 


Somin Nit 

H»s Hiatt Low Last Ch\w 


Sates In Mat 

]00> HW) Low Last OHM 


.15 


M 24. 0 
220 62 


U2 73 
.15e 2 
IjOOo 22 


142 51% 
. 30 3% 
183 44% 
137 3V% 
120031 
9B7 20% 


5V» 

3V6 + V, 


*1 « 


344 152 
LOO JLt 
IDO 11J 
120 144 
JPe 4.9 


3Vh 

W% 
216 

„ 1JH~ 

500 Mi 3*% 
275 3t% 216 
7336 35% 

1252616 15% 

12 4% 6% 
86 24% 2* 
637 51% 4% 

Si! 

16 n. w 

15720 19% 

- 31 - 31 
*46.6 
9371516 14% 

4 22% 22% 

m V* 


DtekanB 

Dk**v JOB 2 

DlEtrlb ,10 b 2JI 

Dhflun 

DotnMt . . 

nmkocl 

Dahlia .12 3L0 

DrasBtc UM 2.9 
DrtefCn 122 b 65 
DruaS s 40 104 

Dual Lie 
Dvofrn 


21 59% 5% 
16313 121b 

55 5% 5Vb 
221516 15% 
SI 416 4U 

1606 lS Ih 

16 4 4 

259716 94% 
310022V. 18% 
421 5% 516 

141 4% 4% 

• 29 236 2% 


5tV + % 
13 +16 

5V% 

1516 

1% + h 

^ « 
ion — m 

5V. + 16 
4% — 1% 
2% 


-14-. 


1 12% 12% 
30019 . U 
33 416 4% 
1182 8% 8% 
»49 1% 

5171 S%. 

u - i Br*s 

241 3% 3 

442 016 


” Sl ® 


23 SA 

M 93 68 7% r 

. . 31» 2% 2% 
48B 4.1 311714.,. Tl% 
421 5* 3682 Tff 7 
34112 1166 

. 125312% 1216 
431 IV 56 19 
40 U- JftW 2% 
45c 14 1839M 35^ 

114 2% 2% 

206 5% 4% 
120 2V. 2V. 
MB 54 6721216 11% 

692 1616 15% 
12 4% 4% 


12% 

1016-6 46 
416 + % 
B* + W 

R+-» 

■fcS. 

316— % 

7.-1% 

»-T % 

TWt 
12 +16 
12% 

19 

37V. 

35% —2% 

fits 
2% ' 
12% + V. 
15% + % 
4%— 16 


BKLA s _ ,, 

BMJ 37 1» 

BT Fnd «4 

BocarcU UTta 14 

fiSAS s 

g^CV 146.54 
ahLBu 

BfcNHm 128 34 
BnkPst 

BkTrSC 1^ ,3.1 
BfcMAin 1*40 13J 
Barbdr 
BsTnB 
BsRInI 
Brain 

BaukNo JO 74 
Beamns 

.isouianA 

33415% 
160 3 
72B 8% 
601 31% 
314% 
5540% 
246«% 
23 2% 
49B12J 38*5 * V. 

fi .5 l^l 
391® 


13 8% 
23231% 
3627 
6532 
1571 
2323V. 
16% 
4010 
216% 
537% 
190616% 
273 5% 
36246% 
2518% 
122 7% 
12 

6593 I 
04 3 
9% 


i * % 
-% 


■ % 


BestBv 
BlnaKo 
Borlswr 

Btedfpt IJK 124 
BfodO MO ft 


BlufcJSo 
Biueskv 

Blwaor 
Bahama 
Bowtrtr 
Brantr 
Sralrno -0*« 
BranW 

Brkwfr • 

Breiwer .!» 14 

BreTUB 24 U 
Brenlwd „ , 

BroadF 41 b J 
BrakHII -3*« 34 
BrokR s 

Bruce Rh 45 93 

Bck«F 

BufW, 339*114 
Burmh -1S9 3J 


S93 

628 7J6 
4331 41% 
4 7 
6310% 
636 7* 
110 3% 
413 10 
6VS 
215 4% 
3910.. 
we 33% 
158 * 


8% 1% 

23% 23% 

36% 25% — 

39 30 +1 

70 71 +1 

23% 23% + 
16% 16% 

9% 9% — 
16% W% 

37% 37% 

15% 16 + 

5 5V% — 

45% 45% — 

t r- 
1 

% »- 

"m ')* + 

\% if i 

2% 3 

8% ff% + 

3 3 

14% 14% ^ 

l§6 14% + 

% 

» 

r i «+% 

6% +% 

70 10% 

% 

* F- “ 

4% 

96b 966—16 

28% 2fl6b-2Vl 
3* 4 + 


2.12 3J 
5TB 73 


JIB 1.1 


CPI 81 
CFS 
CL Asst 
CMB 
CNLFn 
COMB 
CofSTP 
ChIBIo 
C olmar . 

CanoG wt 

Caraein 

Carvar 

Cefilbnc .10e 3 
umfni , . 

ChBkSv 40b 73 
CaJerSv 
CnPocC 
CPacMn 

CnSwnk - 

Centrst -JJ* H 
QiapE pf !■», 
ChaezD » 
atotint 
Cliasseo 
CWAut 

anlM 
CtzSLii ■* 


441 9% 
99613% 
-I 3% 

664 

27 77V 
,03913% 
404 «% 
25710 
13819 

95 3% 
105 4% 

-2S5 

'W 

2615 
112 7 % 

96 . 
310 17 
216 7%. 
102 10 % 
l«*5% 
1517 * 

10 5 
94131% 
671 6% 
14413% 
50 9% 


9% 96V 

T T 

i7» «nv 

SV. 4 
9% 966 

18% 19 
3% 3% 
4% ** 

18% WJ 
10 % 20 % 
13% 13% 
16 16 
u ’5,, 

7V4 7% 


CtzSUI 344 *>% 

CtvFd Pf a a 17 ȣv. 
CfFdpfB 2.10 8J 


CocatM 
Col Cm P< 
ColSvwt 
Once Am 

CwMtP 5 
CmwRt 
Cmpvid 
Cmptefc 
CHWOPl 
CmHsun 

CmaSvc 
Comirex 
ConcCPt 
Conno _ 
OiCalwt 
CnEal _ 
CtIHII W» 
CtIHIt un 
Cares p< M 7 
CoLcrn 


1^3613.9 
.136 1 2 

me 

jDS J 


HjsuH 

HHou 

ruridC 

rvmA 

ratCrs 

«Cun* 


16 

SjO 


2 i^ 

5 8» 

TO 

692 6% 
116 

240 «6 
413 

352 TV. 
» 4% 
2311% 

Rfi 

240 15 

6627% 

7 2% 
13620% 
45 6% 

J’ 0 

34 ?£ 
106 3% 
65 54V 


+ 46 
+1 

— % 

+1 

= * 

+ % 
— % 
— % 
+ % 

— 66 


— % 


is* is*-™ 

ifi 

^ V-fc 

4* <*- % 

,52 15% + % 
S 19% + % 

^j + % 

Fj* 

« s» 

it* 2 +, 2 

u ■*=* 

4V, 4% 

VS 

12 &-* 
18% «%- 2 
Z7 + % 

J5i 2fk — % 

6% rtfc 

24V J* 

19% *% 

6% 6% 

r g . 



j? 

V 9% 

Stv 

w, us 

242 ^ 

24 5* 
46 3% 
11045 3% 
2« 10% 
3010% 

1023 6% 
373 JS% 
II 13 
IB 44b 
65 2* 
1077 6% 


9k, 

8*- * 

13* 

5% 

r-» 

r*-% 

io5+jS 
12*- % 
6??+ » 


EBMar 
EooTwtC 
EasJrrit 325 

EatVan j 44 14 
EdaStl s 
Eictmvo 
EAC Co* 

EmpCas 1.28 25 
enrvnt 
EnoMoa . 

ErckGd 

EsexCI 252 U 
Exar • 

Expdtun 


FMI wt 
FalcLta 
FaMaft 
FodNtl 

FMdrpf 225 A5 
FkJNFn JO W 
Flnllnd 

FlnNBc JO 24 
FnTnts 1*10 40 
FlneAun 
FABCpf 121* 12 
FABkPB BJ9 2-1 
FBncTx M SO 
FtCaals 127 32 
F rearm 50 li 
FtCalBa J3e 13 
FDtMai 

FExscpt 2IB0O7 
FFdAust 

F Fid Be FttOO 7.1 
FtFlKI 1J66 44 
FFnerp 

F Herat XBO 62 
FJerpfB 2J8 03 
FtFoaNJ 

F Proof 159 126 
Fluids 
FtbnfcUl 
FStQMtf 
Fststti 
Flsons. 

FlocVln 
FlaCvpr 
FarBetr 
FtWyn 5 
Forum wt 
Form wtss 
FodfFn 
FrttiFn 134 
Fours tr _ 
Fmktd S 2JD0 40 
FmkBc 30c 34 
FraeSG 2WetL5 
FultPh 3 70 A 

Fdsnot 


W 4 * ^ \ 

1579 2% 2 2% 


1579 2% 2 
1039% 20% 
32321% 17% 
2281606 16* 
16714* 14 
14048* 45% 
11 0 0 
295'5* 5 V, 
921 3% 29k 

27* 27* 
176414% 11% 
19612% 11* 
23316* 1* ■ 


1210 2* 2% 
161 15%~15% 
197 6% 6% 
• 2* 2% 
13350% 49% 
821 MV. 
2 3% 3% 
037 37 

29 29 

5 5 

27060 67 

SI0 9% 
65 6* 6% 


+1 


2%-% 
20% —1 
20 — 1% 
16* 

14* + * 
40* 

^+5 

SJ-1 

11W— % 
16 — % 



GACLn 273B844 
Gatactc 

Gombn> SOB 3 
GTal 56pf .90 10.9 
GTeMp* IXe 114 
GonaB 1J00 29 
Geodvn 
GtaftiU 3*0 
GloxH 30B 1.1 
GoWCo ^ ,, 
GWFW 471 27 
GotOate 

Goodv -40 27 
GtAMs 
GrtoER W» 

GuorBn 


21 3% 3% 

1192915% ID* 
5*9 1D% 9% 

32 8% 8% 

54 8* 8% 

3941 40 

iS 1 ** 1 * 

1< S)6% ll* 

690 14* 12% 
1* 1* 
11815% 15 
16415% 15 
12710% 17* 
6812 11% 


3% 

13 +2% 

9*—* 
8% 

86b— % 
41 +1 

13*— % 
9% +2 
18 — * 
16% + * 
12*— 1% 
1* 

15 — % 
15 

T7*— % 
11% — % 



1.95 11.3 


351 .7. 

-08r 1 3 
140 *3 


9% 

5% 

17% 


7% 

5% 


109 9% 

59 * 

]% l7 Z 

38 4 
7% 

21 5% — 

3829% 29% 
812212% 11* 
594 4% 3* 

4 5% 5% 
1461 2 2 

946* 40* 

7021 21 

515 U* 
14810* 10% 

73 ns X 


9% 

5% — * 

”*+* 
3*— % 
7% 

5% 

29% 

r~% 

% 



JMB W 

javelin 
JeflBO* 

JWlfi* 1 ,ig it 

jastyn ‘■ 4U 


KilCtvLB H 
K»lm«t JO 73 
K*ve«i 
KevsHrt 
Kinsinf 
Kliwey 
Klahirt 
KiecfO 


. 10 * 1-2 


82 25* 25% 
1211% 11* 
4413% 12% 
18622* 30* 

g 

1678 33* 30* 
3036% 36 


25% — % 

11% 

12% — 1 , 
22* +2% 
6*— * 
*%— % 
6* 

30% — % 

36% + % 


c 


uSSESt *3f 

tdlTAS .1* 


819 9«. jj& 
3734 33 

2011 * 10 * 


9% + *» 
33%—^ 
11 — * 


Soles In Net 

100s High Low Losl Ch-ge 


Soles In Net 

IMa High Low Lost Ch'ge 


Lancer 

LndJPV .15B 1* 
Landsnv .I5e 1.7 
LmnCo 
LiBlns 

Line Fin 130 15 
UncLte 48 23 
LouGSot 135 105 
LouG pt 136 10.9 
Luskin 

LTdnPIt 37e 43 
LyanMi 


14 14 — % 

9% 9% 

9 9 

8% •% 

5% 7* +1* 
51 51 — % 

29* 29* 

11% 11* + * 
17 17 

ID 10*— 1% 
5% 5*— *b 
19% 19% 


M 


MCI wt 

MCMCp 

MSI El 

MasBJPt 

Magna i 

Magnet 

Makha 

Mar Pet 

MaitiAp 

Masco 

Maxtor 

AtechTc 

Melina 

MetMA 

MsMdB 

MetroSv 

MeyrPk 

MJchJ 

MlcrWa 

KAineSM 

MrirRs 

Mad kite 

MuttnA 

Musia 

MutREI 

MutOil 


34 U 


34a 19 


134 13 
30b 23 


I 73 


3383 1 

% 

%— % 

1510% 

?0% 

10% 

3 2ft 

3% 

2% + % 

96 3% 

3 

3* + V, 

1654X5% 

14% 

14% — % 

X 9 

8 

8 —1 

110 20 

i«* 

20 + % 


15% 

15%—% 

1 3% 

3% 

3% 

480 3% 

3% 

3%— % 

1948 12% 

13% 

1Z%— % 

IX 4% 

4% 

4% 

21513% 

13% 

13% 

46313* 

13% 

13% — % 

612*, 

U% 

13% 

29417% 

17 

17 -Vi 

114% 

14% 

14% 

2 B% 

BV. 

8* 

17 3% 

3% 

3%— % 


%fc 

67 ^1 

3134 9% 

9 

9% + % 

21 5% 

S% 

5% 

27TT 4W 

4fc 

4% + % 

32 9% 

9% 

9% 

12® 2% 

1% 

2% + % 


220 7 3 
220 63 


3JOel03 


1.76 16 
30O 23 
38 73 


38 6* 6 

1450 J* 3* 
4% 4% 
1880 Jt, 3 
923* 23* 
4 4 

1720% 28% 
632% 3 Tm 
260 7V. 7% 
635 35 

Ilk 1«. 
6 3 3 

831 9% 8* 
62 3* 1% 
3448% 48% 
515% 15* 
7421 20 

125913% 12% 
26636% 25% 
2410* 10* 
8 2% 2* 


sr* 

3% 

23* 

4 

28% 

32% 

7% + Vb 
35 

1% + % 
3 

9 — % 
3%— tb 

48% 

15% — * 
21 +1 
12% — 1% 
26 — * 
10* + % 
3% + % 



NarrgC 330a 73 
NtBusSy 
Nt Guard 
NPcraa 
NwAF n t 
NwCnty 
NwCtypt 
NY MOT 
NwttfB tm 
Nwpk wt 

Nissan J79o 13 
NCarSL A0 
NoTrusf 7J2 13 
NwEng 


383 4% 4% 4% + % 

9342 41% 41* + % 

26918% 17* 10% + % 
2594 12% 12 120b + * 

776 * * 

3213% 13% 13% 

1024 3% 3 3* 

199 3% 3 3Vb — tb 

142 34% 34% 34% 

4600 16% 15% 1S% + * 

wjfc & + * 

7% 7% 7% 

91171% 78* 70*— % 
IS 3* 3* 3% 

— 20% + % 


Nawsca JO 2.1 11414 U 14* 

,| ! 1 

I ■ -° I 

II Mono 199 13* 13 13 

ORci? MO 33 ’iWVi 12% 12%- % 

1 y =□ 


Odd Nab 
OcaiMd 

Oce-NY 32B 13 

OtLflPtA 

Offl-ogp* 

OtKntpt 132 6-1 
OtdNIB 

OWRflpf 130 23 
OneUX 1.770 113 
Opto 
Opttefip 

Osh BO A 31 1.1 
OstrkBB 37 13 


ovrsina 
Oxooo pf 


1001713 


386 8% 8% 0*— % 

43211* 10% 11 — * 
721% 31* 21% + * 
9 1% 1% 1% 

36 1* 1* 1* 
10031% »% 30 — 1% 
SI 15* 15 15% 

6945 44% 45 + % 

53 M* M* 74% — U 
693 4% 6% 6% 

342 5% 5% S% + % 
2306*8* 27% M — * 
73*6* 25* 26% — % 
5 2* 2* 2* 

S3 1* 1* 1* 


PCAInt 

PNC bf 130 63 

PNC pfO 130 64 

Poclnid 

Pod for 

Pocowt 

Ponx39c 

PtrpCppf 250 93 

PastnOl 

Potekun 


1J» 47 
30 23 


PemrtSh 

PberOl 

PenfnFd 

PoNaH 

pfetFIl 

PerPA pf 

PtHet W» 

PtHBtnv 

Pftrmun 

PhnxMd 

Phalron 

Pierce 

Pleao 

PittBr 

PlalnsR 

PlnRsPt 

Plytnsi 

Possls 

PWHits 

promFn 

PrsntCo 

PrsGM 

Press ty 

prism 

Pressed 

Proa FO 
Prow Be 
PrudFn 
PutnTr 
PvmtO 


.(4 13 
.M 1* 


M S3 


I34B104 
235e 103 


32e 73 
I 


138 23 


365 5* 5* 
1924% «% 
5528% 27% 
25 9 B% 
5321% 71 
5 S 
5925% 24% 
153 26* 26% 
288 8% 8 
6 9* 9* 
520 7% 7% 
265 8* BVb 
22 * 1 % 21 % 
25514 13% 

732 30 

11 * 11 * 
238517* 12 
23 7% 7% 

104 7* 
3210% 

35 6* 

20 3% 

45 

3160 Ik 
12616* 
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Isaac’s Eventful Tenure at FDIC Draws to Close 


(Continued from Page 7) 
confidence in the banking system 
and to insure small deposits.’ 

Its chief function was to insure 
deposits up to the maximum 
amount set by Congress —current- 
ly $100,000 per depositor in any 
one institution. For most ofits his- 
tory that was a minimal job be- 
cause rarely were there more than 
five failures a year, and the agen- 
cy’s insurance reserves were never 
under any pressure. 

But as the number of failures and 
near-failures rose during his tenure, 
taxing the resources of the insur- 
ance fund and his agency, Mr. 
Isaac needed to find ways to pro- 
tect the resources. 

The biggest bank rescue in the 
FDICs history was that of Conti- 
nental Illinois. But be also had to 
deal with the collapse of several of 
the biggest UJL savings banks; the 
failures of several large banks that 
specialized in energy lending, and 
the failures of 26 hanks in Tennes- 
see. 

Mr. Isaac has shifted the FDICs 
primary function from that of a* 
regulatory and supervisory body to 
one mainly concerned with protect- 
ing the resources of its insurance 
fund. Under Mr. Isaac the FDIC 
has placed far more emphasis on 
taking measures intended to lessen 
the risk of bank failures. 

Instead of merely examining the 
smallest banks, the agency now 
regularly examines all U.S. han ks 
with assets of $1 billion or more 
and all banks that are in trouble, 
even if their primary regulator is 
the Comptroller of the Currency or 
the Federal Reserve System. 

Also, under Mr. Isaac the num- 
ber of enforcement actions against 
banks and bankers has soared. 
Such actions include cease- and-de- 
sisi orders, fines agains t officers 
and directors and actions to termi- 
nate FDIC insurance. Ln each of 
the last two years, there were about 
250 enforcement actions, up from 


50 in 1980. In one case a fine of S5.4 
million was levied on three individ- 
uals; the highest fine in the past 
had been about 5151,000. In 1980. 
total fines came to only 52,000. So 
far this year, they total $8.8 million. 

Under Mr. Isaac, the FDIC has 
become far more aggressive in forc- 
ing the removal of senior bankers. 
This year, 25 bank officials have 
been removed by the agency, up 
from 23 in aH of 1984, tune in 1983, 
six in 1982 and none in 1981. 

For some time, Mr. Isaac had 
asked the major banks to increase 
their primary capital in relation to 
their total assets. Primary capital is 
the money that actually belongs to 
a bank and its shareholders; the 
rest is borrowed, largely in the form 
of deposits. 

Because they were not directly 
regulated by the FDIC, the major 
banks had been ignoring Mr. 
Isaac's capital requirements. Even- 
tually he drove his point home. In 
1982, several New York banks 
wanted to acquire a number of 
Tennessee banks that were failing. 
But Mr. Isaac said he did not allow 


them to bid because their capital 
levels were too low. 

Since then, the other federal 
bank regulators have come around 
to Mr. Isaac’s position and now 
they all require a minimum 5.5- 
percenl primary capital for all 
banks. 

Mr. Isaac took a law degree from 
Ohio State University, and later 
practiced law with Foley & Lard- 
no- in Milwaukee. Just before join- 
ing the FDIC, Mr. Isaac had been 
vice president, general counsel and 
secretary of First Kentucky Coip„ 
a bank holding company. 

During his days m Milwaukee, 
he became active in Republican 
politics but also became wdl ac- 
quainted with leading Democrats 
in Wisconsin. 

That was how President Jimmy 
Carter came to select Mr. Isaac in 
1978 to fill the Republican seat on 
the three-man FDIC board. The 
three members traditionally are a 
Democrat, a Republican and the 
Comptroller of the Currency. 

President Ronald Reagan ap- 
pointed Mr. Isaac, who shares the 


administration’s strong belief in re- 
ducing the role of government and 
in allowing market forces to pre- 
vail, to the FDICs chairmanship. 

Almost every banker who has 
dolt with Mr. Isaac describes him 
similarly. 

“He is not easy to get along 
with." said Ross Kenzie, chairman 
of the Goldome Savings Bank , 
based in Buffalo, New York, which 
became one of the biggest savings 
banks in the United scales as the 
result of FDIC-arrangcd takeovers 

of fading institutions. 

Partly because of Mr. Isaac's un- 
yielding position on capital 
strength, Mr. Kenzie gave up Gol- 
dome s slate charter and switched 
to a federal charter, putting Gul- 
dome under the Federal Home 
T /vfl p Rank Board, not the FDIC. 

Mr. Kenzie still praises Mr. 
Isaac, however. “He’s very good,” 
be said. “He’s tough, single-mind- 
ed; he’s clearly interested only in 
the soundness of the PDICTs fund. 
That’s what most people criticize 
him for, but that’s his job." 


IBM Japan’s JX Computer Has a Slow Start 

“JX was the first product that 
IBM had to offer in the storefront,” 
said Takeo Shiinn, head of IBM 
Japan. “We are still learning the 
process." 

NEC Corp., though it will not 
release exact sales figures, esti- 
mates that its comparable model is 
outselling IBM’s by several times. 

Analysts say lx’s slow start may 
be due in part to the fact that the 
home market, as in the United 
States, may not yet exist. 

IBM Japan's chief competitors, 
however, Fujitsu Lid. ana NEC. 
appear to be out-selling the JX be- 
cause of their superior retail-sales 
networks, according to analysts. 


New York Times Serace 

TOKYO — With great fanfare, 
IBM Japan introduced its JX per- 
sonal computer almost a year ago. 
More powerful than International 
Business Machine’s ill-fated home 
computer in the United States, the 
PCjr, and smaller than a PC, the JX 
boasted sparkling color graphics 
and the capability to use other Jap- 
anese or English software. 

Its introduction marked IBM's 
advancement in Japan's small busi- 
ness and home marketplace, poten- 
tially a huge base of computer users 
in a gadget-happy country. 

So far, however, the JX has not 
met with a kinder fate than its 
American relative, the PCjr, whose 


production was halted earlier this 
year. Carole A. Ryavec, a computer 
analyst with Merrill Lynch in Ja- 
pan, estimated 1984 sales at only 
6,000 machines, and some other 
analysts put the number even low- 
er. Nikkei Computer, a trade jour- 
nal, estimated JX sales in the first 
six months of 1985 at 2,000 ma- 
chines. 

IBM Japan will not comment on 
sales figures. But its executives do 
not claim great success, and that 
may be a idling sign for those in 
the industry who speculated a few 
months ago that the JX, made by 
the Matsushita Electric Industrial 
Co., might be brought to the Unit- 
ed States. 


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INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS A GUIDES I ESCORTS & GUIDES 


LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

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Tel: 736 S877. 


LONDON 

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TEL 01-47 55 82 / 69 55 04 


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MUMCH - NOTATE ESCORT 
Gods Service. Tefc 91 23 14 


AMSIBDAMJBAWr Escort Service 
Trt 10201 326420 or 340 110. 


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vice. Tefc 069 


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MlMQi- MICHAEL mde Escort Sa- 
vice. Tel: 099/ 98 24 18. 


DUS8BDORP - COLOGNE - Bonn E»- 

dw» Esoort Service. 0211-6799863. 


GBCVA - AMA ESCORT SBMCE 
MuMngxd- Tefc 34 29 55L 


ZURICH IORM ESCORT SBMCE. 

T3 01/69 5B 71. 


FRANWUET “TOP 1BT Escort Ser- 

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vice. 069/55 22 21. 


MUMCH WHCDME Escort Service. 
Tefc 91 84 59 


NEW YORK. MAHOGANY Escort & 
Guide Sendee. ffTB 383-1791 


AMSTBDAM POUR ROSg Esoort 

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JCW YORK KAIHHHW Esoort Ser- 
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STUTTGART -LADY ESCORT Service. 
Tefc 0711/64 98 415. 


An Invitation 

toQxfofld. 

The International Herald Tribune and Oxford Analytics 
present a Special Conference on 
The International Business Outlook Christ Church, Oxford, 
r.: . September 19-21, 1985. 


• . .r/ ; _ 





master riaatiai^oaf'. 
Sadness Otflioak 




x_ : . 




i l 


.li' 1 . " EVlljr-T;* 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 1985 


I LOOKED IT UP AT THE / YOUR GRANDFATHER 


illlHIIIIIilH 


auaua 

mum m 


CITY HALL ... 


LED THE GREAT 
.MIGRATION OF *79.. 


YOU CAN BE VERY 
PROUD OF HIM . 


m iff 




Actually, i made it All 

UP.. THERE WA5 NO 
MIGRATION OF '79. ANP I 
PONT EVEN KNOW WHERE 
THE CITY HALL IS! 



BLONDUE 


IRRST I L£T HIM RLW Ot=F 


MEN l SO WHEN, 

ms SAPTH i — 


I AFTER AtUI'M 
c I NOT RAMBO 1 r 


ACROSS 
1 Cinch 

5 Aegean island 
orU.S. 
satellite 

10 Important 
hormone 

14 Explorer 
Marco 

15 Trieste's NW 
neighbor 

16 Chinese 
dynasty 

17 Love, in Leon 

18 Helicopter 
blade 

19 Boxing 
program 

20 Retum-to- 
school blues? 

23 Zodiacal sign 

24 Where R.N.'s 
sometimes 
work 

25 Carpet fibers 

28 Carousing 

32 Tolstoy 

33 River dividing 
New York City 

36 Sculptor's 
piece 

37 Ready to oen 
an essay? 

41 “ Is Bom” 

42 Anagram for 
ache 

43 Third letter 

44 Preordain 

46 Cesar of old 

films 


49 Hudson Bay 
sight 

50 “Dum , 

spero”(S.C. 

motto) 

52 Teachers 
chair? 

58 Alone 

59 Wreck 
completely 

60 Tom of the 
P.G.A. 

61 Nay man 

62 Rage onstage 

63 College in N.C. 

64 “ Indigo." 

1931 song 

65 Sorrow, to 
Keats 

66 Accomplish- 
ment 


1 Health resorts 

2 Alaskan city 

3 Asymmetrical 

4 Door or gate 

5 Conjectures 

6 House of clay 

7 Pittances 

8 about 

idate-setting 

phrase) 

9 Homily 

10 Inure 

11 Reduce to 
carbon 

12 Ragged 

13 Paul Newman 
role: 1963 


Ae u- Tort Times, edited by Eu 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


21 Before, to 
Longfellow 

22 Declaim 

25 Homeric epic 

26 Import 

27 Casper's wife 
in comics 

28 Of the ear 

29 Sicilian site of 
Temple of 
Venus 

30 Lou Grant 
portrayer 

31 Western 
jamboree 

34 Bide 

35 Mrs., in 
Mexico 

38 Carnivorous 
snail 

39 City in Okla. 

40 Hitchcock 
film.e.g. 

45 Settled in 
cozily 

47 Paydirt 

48 Scoffed 

50 Sonoran's 
liquor 

51 Pupil of 
Socrates 

52 Up good 

53 Choir voice 

54 Singer Perry 

55 Mah-jongg 
piece 

56 Plains Indian 

57 Sever or 
sunder 

58 Browne or 
Houston 

e Maleskn. 


o~C*> 




l ! 

BEETLE BAILEY 

promise you wont 

GET MAD AT WHAT I'M 
GOING fTT\ 

HW' 


I PROMISE/ 

X PROMISE/ I 



TH at£ A 
FAKE PIECE 
OF CAKE 


ANDY CAPP 


I THINK ’ 
M3UNEED 
A DRINK ,« 

PET-^ 


kTHANK-rtXJ 


>OU£0 . 


f I THINK 1. 

> &yvr/< 

AND I CANT 
AFTORD IT, 

7 ANYWOV r' 


NEVER AUNDTHE 
ExPENSE'KXIR 


{ HIS ONE A W IN LI FE ). • , 
V ISTOAVM<EPB 3PLE A : • i i 1 
'happy- NpAw riBe } | 
ACTv'/VVJCHTTCYOBJSTT } ! 


K iSU Da»|i KKiwllMtiMpan LHJ. 
■1 m Mam tnanei S-ndlcMt 



WIZARD of ID 


w#wr 


r&A 

iw/rubitfr i 
f ycn&wv m 
CM&fi t M 


■me* dl&T 



REX MORGAN 


FINDING 
HIS WIFE 
CLAUDIA 
UNCONSCIOUS 
IN THE BATH- 
TUB, A PANIC- 
STRICKEN 
BRADY BISHOP 
CALLS DR. 
MORGAN f 


WAS HER 
HEAD UNDER 
WATER WHEN 
VOU FOUND 
HER, BRADY? 


NO— BUT HER MOUTH 
WAS, PARTIALLY' X 
THINK I FEEL A PULSE 
—BUT 1 CAN'T TELL 
IF SHE’S BREATHING.' 


X JUST CALLED THE PARAMEDICS? 
WHAT ELSE SHOULD I PO? 


IF VOU KNOW 
HOW TO GIVE 
MOUTH- TO-MOUTH 
RESUSCITATION. 
DO SO ' I’LL BE 
RIGHT OUT/ r 


’Birr if hitthe bau-.Joey, I cAKYHirn’i 1 ' 


Unscramble these lour Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to lom 
tour ordinary words. 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
* by Hem Arnold and Bob Lee 

| Pay you later | 


VOGEL 


FELCT 


TUSACC 


DOAFER 




COMEBACK: 

Case by Case, Building the Resur- 
gence of American Business 

By Ezra F. Vogel. 320 pages. SI 7.95. 
Simon & Schuster, 1230 Avenue of the 
Americas, New York, N. Y. 10020. 

Reviewed by Charles D. Sherman 

A JAPANESE diplomat in the United 
States said after reading "Japan As No. 
I," an earlier work by Ezra Vogel, that he liked 
it but that the title bothered him. "It's embar- 
rassing,” he said. "It calls too much attention 
to us." 

Immodest as the title may have seemed to 
them, the Japanese swallowed several primings 
with pride. The study of Japanese society, its 
successes, excesses and even apparent failures, 
represented recognition that Japan had caught 
19 with the best of the West, 100 years after 
emerging from feudalism and just a generation 
after a devastating war. 

Publishing houses have gushed with books 
on Japan in the last decade, from academic 
renderings of the country’s economic perfor- 
mance to a shelf of cultural work on West 
meets EasL But Vogd, a sociology professor at 
Harvard University, has been among the fore- 
most in explaining the threat and promise of 
Japan’s highly organized society to Western 
laymen. 

Six years after "Japan As No. 1," Vogd has 
returned with "Comeback," a broader and 
more polemical analysis of the ingredients not 
only of Japanese success but American. It 
opens with a warning that if the United States, 
or the rest of the industrial world for that 
matter, does not act, Japan's pre-eminence in 
international trade could lead to lasting global 
dominance in industry, technology and com- 
merce. 

Vogel explores eight cases of problem-solv- 
ing on a national or regional scale in Japan and 
the United States. The Japanese examples 
show how Japan in 25 years established itself 
from scratch as the world’s leading shipbuild- 
er, assembled an internationally competitive 
machine-tool industry, phased out its declining 
coal mines and is gearing up to lead what is 
envisioned as a revolution in computer tech- 
nology and information processing. 

Vogel’s Japanese accounts are energetic and 
colorful, filled in with interviews with many of 
the chief players in each episode. 

He uses each case to plead his central argu- 
ment: Leaders in industry and the country's 
elite corps of government bureaucrats have 
formed an alliance to advance Japan’s long- 


Sohition to Friday’s Puzzle, 


EOEJG anna anaa 
□can □□□nn Guana 
□EDBnHanaaaaaaa 
□DQBaa QDBaaaa 
□□□an aoaa 
□□a □□□□ □□□□□a 

□□□□□ □□□Q OC1CIS 

□□□aanaaaHaaann 
onciE Bants niaaEjEi 
BEQEC3B QQdd □□□ 
□Boa aaaaa 
QEiDHGjna oanman 
ondBaaaaQEsnaaHa 
dona Sanaa amias 
□ebb anna aann 


lerm interests. It is a seerninglv simple lesson. 
buL Vogel says, one that has been lost on the 

United States. - lhl » 

Turning to .American success stones in toe 
second half of the book- Voget and four cch 
authors coasider the L*.S. mission to » l^nd a 
roan on the moon, the achievement of a gov- 
ernment program to promote agricultural ex- 
ports. the government's pump-pnming ot tne 
housing construction boom after World 
II. and the generation of planning by North 
Carolina civic and business leaders that led 10 
opening of a major high-tech research ana 
production center. ... , . „„ 

Vogel complains that. unlike Japan s C3ic 
fully targeted policies, the United States s tri- 
umphs most often come in reaction lo ensa 
such as the launching of Sputnik, the shortage 
of homes for soldiers returning from the war- v i 
the decline of North Carolina's traditional in* 
dustries in textiles, furniture and tobacco. 

The conclusion he draws from the L.a. 
success stories is that the United States can 
perform when it musL though with less effi- 
ciency than Japan. U.S. government and in- 
dustry have worked together successfully, but 
if the United States is to meet the challenge of 
increasingly tough international economic 
competition, government and industry must 
perform not as traditional adversaries but as 
partners. 

Vogel and others who make this argument, 
such as Robert Reich, a Harvard economics 
professor, have become known as the "Alan 
Democrats." In last year's race for the Demo- 
cratic presidential nomination, their ideas 
formed a basis of debate between Gary Hart 
and Walter F. Mondale over how to keep the 
United States competitive internationally in a 
high-tech era. 1 

In arguing that the United States has much 
to learn from Japan, Vogel runs up against the 
contention that the United Stales s power and 
know-how cannot be tinkered with and fine- 
tuned the way Japan, with its homogenous 
population, has streamlined for success. But he 
asks how many more U. S. industries will de- 
cline and fail before policies are developed to 
meet the threaL Otherwise he fears economic 
retreat, the ruinous refuge of trade protection- 
ism, more unemployment and a decline in 
living standards. 

"The complexity of contemporary life re- 
quires national coordination,” he writes. "With 
a smaller percentage of GNP going to civilian 
government services than in the United States, 

[the Japanese] have devised a system that ob- 
■ tains superior information and analysis and is 
more flexible and faster in providing a broad 
range of possible solutions for companies to 
adapt to the international marketplace.” 

He also fears a scenario described by a 
Nissan automobile executive, who bluntly told ., | 
an American: “There should, of course, be a * 
world division of labor. Japan is very good at 
making cars. The United States is very good at 
growing soybeans." 

Charles D. Sherman is on the staff of the 
International Herald Tribune. 


First Complete Scots Dictionary 

Reuters 

EDINBURGH — The first complete dictio- 
nary of Scots, a variation of English often 
incomprehensible to other angiophones, has 
been published by Aberdeen University Press. 
.The 864-page Concise Scots Dictionaiy lists 
words from as Far back as the 12th century. 
Some, such as “pinky'" for the little finger, have 
passed into used in standard English. 


By Alan Truscorr 

O N the diagramed deal 
South landra in six dubs 
doubled. The heart king was 
led and the suit was continued. 
He ruffed, and had to find a 
way to avoid a spade loser. 

It is ea$y to see that he 
would have succeeded by 
drawing trumps and taking a 
diamond finesse. But he had to 
take into account the meaning 
of West's final double. “If this 
is a save-oriented auction," 
East told him in response to a 


BRIDGE 


question, “the double would 
show no defensive tricks by the 
partnership agreement." 

South concluded from this, 
wrongly as it turned out, that 
the diamond queen was on his 
righL In the hope, admittedly 
rather a faint one, that the dia- 
monds were divided evenly, he 
cashed the club queen and 
played the ace and king of dia- 
monds, saving dummy's dub 
king as a reentry. Unfortunate- 
ly, East ruffed "the second dia- 
mond lead, and a spade trick 
was lost eventually. 


NORTH 

*73 

OQ883 
O AK843 
4X4 

WEST „„„„ EAST 

Si?" SfSiV.; 

<■ Q 7 6 5 3 9 9 

*6 4193 

SOUTH (D) 

*A1 
VJ 
4 J 10 

*AQJ 108753 
North and South am vulnerable. 
The bidding; 


Sirtb 

Wort 

Nona 

Eut 

1 * 

Pus 

1 V 

DM. 

3* 

i * 

3* 

5 • 

Pub 

Pub 

Pus 

Pub 

8 ♦ 
Pan 

DbL 


Wert led the heart king. 


WHAT THE RUNNER'S 
DIET CONSISTED 
OF NATURALCY. 

/ 

Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


[ I I I ][ I I I I 

(Answers tomorrow) 

pndoy-j j Jumbles; DRAWL EIGHT DEPICT NAUSEA 

| Answer. If you're going to act like a skunk just make 
sure mat nobody does this— 

GETS WIND OF IT 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Alg orve 

Amsterdam 

Athens 

Barcelona 

Belgrade 

Benin 

Brunei* 

Bucharest 

Budapest 

Copenhagen 

Costa Dei Sol 

Dublin 

Edinburgh 

Florence 

Frankfurt 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

Istanbul 

Ln» Palmas 

Lisboa 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

Moscow 

Munich 

Nice 

Oslo 

Paris 

Prague 

navklavik 

(tame 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


HIGH 

LOW 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 




C 

F 



C 

F 

C 

F 



91 

19 

66 

lr 

EOH-am* 

33 

91 

26 

79 

d 



10 

50 

tr 

Ball too 

27 

81 

32 

73 

tr 




68 

lr 

Hong Kwra 

32 

90 

28 

82 

d 

28 

82 

30 

60 

lr 

Manila 

31 

W 

25 

77 

Cl 



18 

64 

fr 

n w doim 

31 

88 

27 

81 

0 



13 

54 

fr 

&BOHI 



34 

73 

Cl 




48 

a 

Shanghai 

31 

88 

25 

77 

r 




5* 

fr 

Slftfispor. 

28 

82 

Z7 

81 

sti 


6B 

17 

63 

st 

TalpeJ 

35 

95 

29 

84 

r 

21 

70 

13 

a 

a 

Tokyo 

39 

04 

27 

01 


2B 

19 

02 

66 

19 

13 

66 

55 

cl 

AFRICA 






17 

63 

7 

45 

sh 


30 

86 

17 

63 

fr 

34 

93 





36 

07 

23 

73 

fr 

18 

64 



o 


17 

63 

6 

43 

fr 

24 

75 



d 


26 

JO 

19 

66 

lr 

24 

75 



tr 







— 


29 

84 

21 

70 

fr 


26 

79 

24 

75 

r 

26 






25 

77 

15 

99 

fr 

28 

83 





36 

97 

20 

68 

lr 

22 

n 

95 

15 

59 

0 

fr 

LATIN AMERICA 




88 

17 

63 

fr 

Bvano* Aim 

20 

68 

8 

46 

lr 






Caracal 

— 










Una 





Q 

23 





iwsKScoOty 





DC 

73 

15 

59 

d 

Rio da JanaM 

2S 





20 

68 

11 

8 

S3 

46 

sh 

fr 

NORTH AMERICA 



30 

86 

23 

73 

tr 


18 

64 

6 

43 

PC 

22 

73 

14 

57 



X 

86 

21 

70 

PC 

23 

73 

10 


a 


24 

75 

16 

61 

ne 

28 

82 

11 


fr 


26 

70 

IB 

64 

PC 

30 

68 

13 




27 

81 

TO 

SO 

PC 

20 

68 

14 



Datroit 

30 

82 

16 

61 

a 


21 70 10 58 cl Momlalu 


MIDDLE EAST 
Ankara W 93 15 59 

SSIrSf 27 W 27 B 1 

Damascus S 2 

Jerusalem ** 84 19 66 

Tel Aviv 31 88 24 7 S 

OCEANIA 


AST Houston 

los Angeles 

34 93 15 59 fr Miami 

29 34 27 BJ lr Minneapolis 

30 8*4 22 72 lr Montreal 

29 84 19 M lr Nassau 

31 88 24 75 IT NOW York 


31 88 23 73 PC 

36 96 34 75 PC 

26 79 18 64 fr 

32 90 25 77 pc 

23 73 12 54 pc 

25 77 10 50 r 

32 90 25 77 fr 

25 77 19 66 r 


d nr* land 14 57 5 41 o loromu " » ™ " ■■ 

5J5E2" 0 16 61 10 50 cl Washington 26 75 20 60 r 

cl -cloudy; fa-foggy; fr-fair; h-hnll; na-nof available; o-overcasr; 
acseertly cloudy; r-ruln; sh-Jnrwors; vw-snw: st-stormv. 


NOW York 25 77 19 66 

Son Francisco 20 68 i« 57 

saettlo 26 79 14 57 

Toronto 27 fll 10 SO 


26 79 14 37 tr 

27 01 10 50 fr 

26 n 20 69 r 


Stormy Temp. 23— 15 f73 — »». ROME: Fair. TertlD. JO — in 100 — Ml. t 
Avn/^Falr-Tema. 31-34(06 - 40). ZURICH: Fair. Temp. 22- 10 172-501. 
BANGKOK: nn. HONG KONG; no. MANILA: no. SEOUL: no. SINGAPORE : no. 
TOKYO: no. 


Alpiger Wins 
2 Cup Races 
In Argentina 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

VALLE DE LAS LENAS. Ar- 
gentina — Karl Alpiger of Switzer- 
land won the first two downhill 
races of the World Cup season Fri- 
day and Saturday, in South Ameri- 
ca's first major ski competition 
since 1966. 

Alpiger was clocked in 2 minutes 
1.27 seconds for the 3,627-meter 
(11, 969-foot) course. Peter Muller 
of Switzerland was .11 seconds 
slower, and Markus Wasmaier of 
West Germany was third, .46 sec- 
onds behind. 

Alpiger won Friday's inaugural 
race of the 1985-86 World Cup cir- 
cuit at this Andean resort with a 
time of 1:47.74. Doug Lewis of 
Salisbury, Vermont, had his best 
performance ever with a second- 
place finish. .04 back, and Helmut 
Hoflehner of Austria finished 
third, 23 seconds behind Alpiger. 

The times were faster on Friday 
because gusty winds at the summit 
forced organizers to shorten the 
course, and because on Saturday 
above-freezing temperatures made 
the course slushy. Lewis, who was 
15th on Saturday, with a time of 
2:03.38, blamed his performance 
on the soft snow. 

“It was wonderful" said Alpiger, 
24. of Saturday's race. He said he 
had fulfilled a pledge to himself to 
race even better than on Friday. 

When it was suggested that his 
successive victories made him die 
world’s fastest downhiller, he re- 
sponded: “The rankings may say 
that, but maybe 15 skiers are on the 
same leveL l*m just the happiest" 

Muller, who had finished fourth 
Friday, was disappointed with his 
performance. "I made the some 
mistakes I made yesterday," he 
said. "1 was too careful. It cost me 
about half a second. 



Two Drivers SPORTS BRIEFS 

Escape Crash U.S. Swimmers Set 2 Worid Marks in Tokyo 

A| U AljAAnfAw TOKYO (AP) — The United States set its second worid record in two days 
l/l IlcIICUu ICl Sunday at the Pan Pacific Swimming Championships as Rick Carey, John Moffet, 
J. Pablo Morales and Matt Biondi won the 4x 100- meter medlev rel.iv in T mimiiH and 


Mnwi 

TASTING FRUSTRATION — Beth Daniel shared the 
pain with her putter Saturday after baD stopped short at 
LPGA Worid Championship in Georgia. Daniel, Amy 
AJcott and Patty Sheehan led after three rounds; Alcott 
beat Sheehan on Sunday on the second hole of a playoff. 


“Perhaps I am too old." said 
Muller, 28. “I pulled back at the 
final jump. You can’t win and do 
that.’ 

Pirmin Zurbriggen of Switzer- 
land. the defending World Cup 
champion, finished 24tb at 2;03.<& 
He said the tip or his right ski split 
after the course's longest jump, 
causing him lo nearly rail. “It be- 
came so slow 1 skied the last tuck 
on one ski" he said. 

Zurbriggen finished ninth on 


Friday, in a race in which five ski- 
ers fell. 

The races at this resort 800 miles 
(1.300 kilometers) west of Buenos 
Aires were the first major ski event 
in South America since the 1966 
World Alpine Championships at 
Portillo, Chile. They marked the 
first time in its nine years of exis- 
tence that the World Cup has 
opened its tour in August, or has 
staged any race in the Southern 
Hemisphere. (AP, UPI) 


The Associated Press 

LONG POND. Pennsylvania — 
A helicopter carrying race car driv- 
ers Michael Andretti and Kevin 
Cogan hit a power line and crashed 
Sunday morning as they were tak- 
ing off to a race, stale police said. 

No one was seriously hurt. 

Andretti's father, racing veteran 
Mario Andretti, and actor Patti 
Newman, co-owner of Mario An- 
dretti's race car. were taking off in 
another helicopter at the time. 

State police said the Bell Ranger 
helicopter crashed about 9:30 AM, 
as it was taking off from Mario 
Andretti’s home in Hawley. 

Cogan, interviewed later at Po- 
cono International Raceway before 
the race began, said the helicopter 
drifted bade into the power line as 
the pilot hovered to wait for the 
second helicopter lo take off. 

“The worst part of it was, I could 
see it coming," said Cogan, who 
said he realized the pilot was busy 
watching the second helicopter. "1 
yelled but he had those big head- 
phones on and he couldn't hear me. 
Then Don Henderson saw it and 
yelled to him, but by then it was too 
late, and all hell broke loose." 

Michael Andretti was X-rayed at 
a hospital for a possible back inju- 
ry, but none was found and he was 
released. Henderson said. The pilot 
was examined for lower bade pain 
and another passenger was treated 
for a small cut on the head. 

Henderson, Mario Andretti’s 
business manager, was not hurt. 
Also on board but not injured were 
Michael Andretti’s fiancee, Sandra 
Spinozzi of Nazareth, Pennsylva- 
nia, and Cogan's girlfriend, Tracy 
Sanford of Phoenix, Arizona. 

Cogan said they fell into a large 
tree and that the branches cush- 
ioned their fall as they broke off. 


TOKYO (AP) — The United States set its second worid record in two days 
Sunday at the Pan Pacific Swimming Championships as Rick Carey, John Moffet, 
Pablo Morales and Mail Biondi won the 4x 100-meter medley rdav in 3 minutes and 
38.2$ seconds. The old record, 3:39 JO, was set in 1984 by a Uj. mam 
On Saturday, in the men’s 4x100 freestyle relay, Biondi teamed with Scon 
McCadara, Mike Heath and Paul Wallace to finish in 3: 17.08, shattering the mark 
of 3:19.03 set by the U.S. team in Los Angeles at the 1984 Olympics. 

The United States won 24 gold medals during the meet, followed by Australia 
with three, Canada with two and New Zealand, Brazil and Japan with one 

SMTJ Football Is Given 3-Year Probation 

MISSION, Kansas (AP) — The NCAA, citing Southern Methodist University’s 
“history of involvement" in rule violations, imposed a three-year probation Friday 
on the school's football program. It is the progam’s fourth probation in 1 1 years. 

The NCAA also barred SMU games from bemg televised during the 1986 season, 
prohibited SMU appearances in bowl games after the 1985 and 1986 seasons and 
limited football scholarships to none next season and 15 in 1986. 

Among the NCAA's charges were: The program gave $5,000 to the family of a 
prospect and promised the prospect a $300 monthlv allowance during his SMU 
career; paid for repairs to players’ cars; gave up to '$2,000 to family members of 
other recruits, and provided improper expenses to recruits and their families. 

Chief’s Crown Takes Travers at Saratoga 

SARATOGA SPRINGS, New York (NYT) - Chiefs Crown, last year W>- 
year-old champion and the beaten favorite in the Triple Crown races ibis snrin^ 
won the $293,000 Travers Stakes by 2 h lengths Saturday ai Saratoga Race Track 
The 6-lo-5 ravorite in a field of seven. Chiefs Crown,' under Angel Cordero Jr 
stayed oil a slow pace, moved outside around the turn, and chased down rh^ 
leaders. Turkoman was second, in front of Skip TriaL 016 

For Ihe Record 

Spend a Buck, this year's Kentucky Derby winner, hdd off Carr De 
Saturday to win the $270,300 Monmouth Handicap in 1:45.50, a re£?dfor 
mfle(! 8-falometerl event at Monmouth Park in Oceanport, NewJersev' /l m 
Grade toe, a 49-to-I shot who cost $6,000 to buy asa; yeariinj?v«£ 
raang s richest purse, the Woodrow Wilson Pace Frida v nishi m na / ness 

in EastRutherford, New Jersey, and brought his owner STO.000 eadowl an^ 

. Sandy Lyle birdied six of the last eight holes for an 8-under 64 and -i 
victory Sunday m the Benson and Hedges International Open coif rrSmSE? 1 ? 1 
York, England. Ian Woosnam, also of Britain, finished second! after aSSSf* 1 5 
62. a record, 

Ken Green carded 5- under 67 Saturday at the the Buick Ooen coif ^ 

Grand Blanc, Michigan; he hdd a one-shot lead over Gen? 

Grady of Australia after three rounds. m ^ Wayne 

Quotable w 


from alumni. 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 1985 



SPORTS 



Page 13 


Baseball 9 s Foul Balls Have Deserved the Bad Name 


By Thomas Boswell 

Washington Post Serriee 

WASHINGTON — Every baseball fan warns to 
catch a big league foul ball. But last month in Balti- 
more, Wimam Joyner almost became the first to die 
for the souvenir. 

“I can't believe i almost killed myself over some- 
thing that costs, what, maybe two or three dollars.** he 
said last week. 

Sitting in the front row of the upper deck in Memo- 
rial Stadium, along the first base fine, Joyner leaned 
forward and sideways to try to stag a high foul hit by 
Frank White of the Kansas City Royals. 

An instant later, July 18 had become a dale he 
would never forget 

He does not remember precisely how befell, except 
that “my concentration on the ball was total" and that, 
as the boll curved away, he went over sideways. How 
be reached backward and grabbed the railing with one 
hand also is s blur. He does, bardy, recall gening both 
hands on something solid and clambering back to bis 
seaL “I sat there spitting out blood but 1 couldn’t have 
cared less. I just kept saying to myself, 'Here I am. 

back in my seat.’ " 

Joyner, who had not previously talked about the 
incident publicly, has taken the tack that, "It looked a 
lot worse than it was. As soon as I sensed I was going 
over, I grabbed the rafl." 

But those who saw him tumble though he was just 
one sweaty palm away from catastrophe: Only one 
person ever has fallen out of Memorial Stadium’s 
upper deck, in 1969, and he died. 

A construction electrician who works on industrial 


buildings, Joyner must be safety-conscious every min- 
ute of his work day. High voltages and high altitudes 
are routine. His father worked construction, once took 
a 20-foot (6-meter) fall and preached caution. 

What others now treat as an adventure and a mo- 
ment of fame, Joyner sees as “totally embarrassing." 
He said that "friends bad glossy prints mad*? up for 
me. like fd want to keep it my whole life to remember. 

“I'm trying to act rid of it." 

That has been hard. 

“The first two days after it happened, that's all i 
thought about 24 hours a day. Its a shaking experi- 
ence. On Saturday morning, my head was clear and 1 
said, ‘It’s finally over.* I tunied on CNN (Cable News 
Network) and there was a picture of me" hanging from 
the railing. 

“I said, ‘Ob. my God, it's not over.’ " 

The crudest twist for Joyner is that, as a front-row 
season-ticket bolder, he already had a finn point of 
view about such incidents before it ever happened to 
him. “Remember the guy" who in 1982 fell over the 
rail “in Cincinnati? It was on TV. I thought. “There’s a 
real jerk.* 

“That's the way 1 figure everybody in the whole 
world thinks of me." 

For this and the uadi lion of foul ball chasing, 
Joyner has one man to thank: Reuben Berman. Ber- 
man died eight years ago, but may yet become the only 
fan in the Hall of Fame. 

As recently as 1921, the Spalding Base Ball Guide 
rule book said that “all balls baited or thrown out of 
the ground or into a stand shall, when returned to the 


field, be given into the custody of the umpire 
immediately." 

Fans used to give the bails back. At least until the 
day Berman, silting in the Polo Grounds in New York, 
decided he was going to keep his. When ushers de- 
manded that he fork it over, Berman threw the ball to 
another fan rather than give it up. When officials 
dragged him out of the crowd, threatened to have turn 
arrested and ejected biro from the park, Berman took* 
the dub to court 

In the case of Reuben Berman vs. National Exhibi- 
tion Co., the Supreme Court of New York County 
ruled in 1921 that Berman should have been allowed 
to keep the baseball be caught. 

Berman was (he first fan to go to court over a foul 
ball, but he was hardly the last Last week, in a case of 
potentially huge significance to baseball, a state dis- 
trict judge, Robert Montgomery in Memphis, Texas, 
overruled a jury's finding that $180,000 should go to a 
woman hit by a ball as she was getting autographs 
above the dugout at the Houston Astrodome. 

Jurors had found the Astros' owners negligent for 
not warning fans of the danger of foul balls. This case 
has hung fire for seven years, since Karen Friedman, 
then 11, was struck by a line drive off the bat of Enos 
CabelL A facial bone was broken and an eye injured. 
Doctors bad to insert a plate in her head and, she says, 
she still has vision problems. 

Major league teams have been worried by this trial. 
Last week, the Philadelphia Phillies were making a 
public address announcement before the national an- 
them, saying that both balls and bats could be a 


dan ger to fart 5 and that “anyone wishing to leave the 
park now" could have his money refunded. 

No other such suits have ever been filed, according 
to the commissioner's office. Perhaps that is surpris- 
ing. A boy in Dodger Stadium once was hit by a line 
drive and later died. That is believed to be the game’s • 
only foul-ball-rdaled fatality. There have been, how- ' 
ever, many dose calls. 

The players themselves do little joking about foul 
balls. HaD of Fame pitcher Bob Feflex holds the 
undisputed record for bad luck. His hard foul ball hit 
his mother. Then there is the New York Yankees' 
catcher. Butch Wynegar. Two months ago, in Balti- 
more, be was kneeling in the on-deck circle when a 
foul struck bum in the temple. Although the ball hi this . 
helmet, Wynegar was knocked unconscious and taken 
to the hospital, where he was kept three days for tests. 
He ended up on the disabled list and lost bis starting 
job. 

The most famous foul in history probably was of 
recent vintage. With two outs left to go in the sixth 
game of the 1980 World Series, Kansas Gty bad the 
bases loaded and the go-ahead run at bat when a high 
foul drifted toward the Philadelphia dugout 

The ball popped out of catcher Bob Boone's glow, 
but Pete Rose made a reflex, knee-high grab on the lip 
of the dugout One out later, the Pfailaes had won their 
only world title in 101 years of existence. 

The m * n who hit that foul pop was Frank White. 

William Joyner can be thankful that the same player 
win not be remembered for hitting both of (he most 
memorable foul balls in baseball's history. 


Lowly Pirates Down 
High-Flying Mets 


-*0t Pififc 


! -•‘^.-1 f 

?,■ *0'- 






t -i.— - 


Britain’s Soccer Season 
Begins onaBadNote 

. The Associated Press 

LONDON — Rival fans chanting obscenities drowned out hymns 
sung by a bishop and a priest at the Uverpool-Arsenal match that 
helped open the British soccer season Saturday. 

The memo ri al service was held to honor the 39 people lolled last 
May in a riot at the European Cup soccer final in Belgium, in winch a 
Liverpool team played. Its fans were blamed for much of the violence. 

At another match Saturday, in Birmin gham, some fans tried to get 
at supporters of the opposing team but mounted police averted 
violence. 

Britain’s national sport is ou (rial (his year because of the Brussels 
riot Another spectator was killed in rioting at Birmingham at the 
dose of last season. As a result of the first tragedy, English teams were 
banned from European competition. The government cracked down 
by banning alcohol and installing dosedrcnont cameras for police to 
use to root troublemakers. 

The Roman Catholic archbishop , of liympod, the Most Reverend 
Derek Woriock, and the Anglican bishop, the Right Reverend David 
Sheppard, led the ringing or the hymn fi Abide With Me” before the 
Liverpool match. Bui supporters of the home team began chanting 
obscenities and Arsenal fans answered with their own chants after one 
verse. : ' . . 

Eventually, none of the service could be heard. 

Police took no action and there was no comment by either rtf the 
tea ms. ' . 

In Birmingham, the start of the match was moved to the monring in 
hopes that it would be too early for troublemakers. Bui toward the 
end of the ffnne- West Midlands Grief Constable Geoffrey Dear led a 
mounted police squadron into the crowd when Bi rm i ngh a m Gty fans 
began surging toward West Ham backers. 

“It could have been a very dangerous situation,” Dear said. “If the 
horses had not been there, the fans would have got at one another." 

He said he and about five other mounted policemen cantered into 
the attacking supporters, who then backed off; There were no arrests. 

On the whole, authorities said, the new domestic league season got 
off to a relatively raim and wefl-bebaved start with 44 matches. 
Attendance was said to be down about 15 percent from last year's 
opening day. 

A Scotland Yard spokesman in London said Saturday was a very 
good start to the season” with no crowd problems at any of the 
capital’s soccer grounds. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

PITTSBURGH — Although it 
has been a miserable year for the 
Pittsburgh Pirates and Bill Mad- 
lock, they had a game to be proud 
of Friday night as they played an 
important role in the National 
League East pennant race. 

Madlock hit a two-run homer 
and Rick Rhoden scattered nine 
hits as the last-place Pirates ended 
a nine-game losmg streak with a 7-1 
victory over the New York Mets, 
knocking them out of a first-place 
tie with St Louis. 

“I don’t expect to be here too 
much longer” Madlock said. “1 
hope Pm not It’s not because I 
don’t Kke the organization or any- 
thing, It’s just that I know the situa- 
tion" with the troubled franchise. 

Madlock’ s homer came in the 
fifth inning off Ed Lynch, 10-6, 
whose six-game winning streak 
ended. He had not lost since June 
28. 

“Everything 1 threw, they hit” 
Lynch said. “As good as those guys 
were tonight it's hard to believe 
their record." 

Rhoden walked one and struck 
oat seven. The only run he allowed 
was unearned, on Howard John- 
son’s single in the eighth after an 
error by left fielder Joe Oreulak. 

Cardinals 6, Expos 1: In St 
Lores, Jack Clark and Tito Lan- 
drum each hit a home run and Bob 
Forsch pitched a four-hitter to beat 
Montreal Forsch pitched his sec- 
raid complete game. 

Cubs 6, Pirilles S Chris Speier’s 
bases-loaded bunt with two outs in 
the eighth in Chicago scored Bob 
Dernier with the run that edged 
Philadelphia. Speiex's bunt placed 
down the third-base line, came off 
reliever Kent Tekulve, who had 
walked the bases loaded. The Phil- 
lies bad rallied from a 5-0 deficit 

Astros 5, Reds 4: Phil Gamer 
singled borne pinch- runner Dickie 


FRIDAY BASEBALL 

Thon with one out in the bottom of 
the ninth to beat Cincinnati in 
Houston. Reliever Dave Smith had 
allowed a game-tying home run by 
Nick Esaslcy in the top of the in- 
ning. 

Padres 6, Braves 3: In San Diego, 
Kevin McReynolds homered and 
Graig Nettles collected three hits 
against Atlanta. 

Drapers 5, Giants 1: Rookie 
Mariano Duncan went 4-for-5 in 
San Francisco, hitting a two-run 
homer. Jerry Reuss struck out four 
and yielded six hits before leaving 
the game qj the sixth inning . 

Royals 4, Blue Jays 2: In the 
American League, Hal McRae 
drove in two runs in Toronto and 
Lynn Jones collected four singles to 
back Charlie JLobrandi's eight-hit 
pitching for Kansas City. 

Ldbraudt struck out seven and 
walked four while picking up fus 
sixth complete game. He lost a bid 
tor his third shutout when Lloyd 
Moseby hit a two-out, two-run 
homer in the ninth. 

The Blue Jays squandered nu- 
merous scoring opportunities, 
stranding 10 base runners. They 
loaded the bases with one out in the 
second, but Lribrandt Struck out 
Gary Allenson and induced Tony 
Fernandez tq, fly out to end the 
threat 

Yankees 5, Red Sox 4: Boston 
reliever Bob Stanley walked Willie 
Randolph with the bases loaded 
and two out in the 10th ituting in 
New York. Randolph walked on 
four pitches; after the fourth ball, 
Stanley charged the home plate 
umpire, Drew Coble, to argue to 
the calls. 

Tigers 3, Indians 2: Rookie Nel- 
son Simmons' sacrifice fly in the 
eighth inning beat Cleveland in De- 
troit. The Tigers’ Juan Berengner, 



Guidry Wins Again, 
Yanks Close on Jays 


hUanUFI 


Tim Flannery, the Padres’ second baseman, was upset that 
QandeU Washington of the Braves had stolen die base. 


making his first start since May 16, 
allowed one hit and struck out 
eight over the first 5 Yj innings be- 
fore yielding. two runs on three hits. 

Brewers 3, White Sox 2: In Mil- 
waukee, Ben Oglivie doubled home 
the tie-breaking run in a two-run 
eighth and Ray Bums held Chica- 
go to six hits. Bums struck out 
seven and walked three fra his fifth 
complete game. 

Mariners 6, Twins 5: Gorman 
Thomas hit a tie-breaking single 


and scored on Jim Presley's double 
in the eighth as Seattle won in Min- 


4, Rangers 2: In Balti- 
more Mike Young's three-run 
homer in the sixth beat Texas. 

AqgdsS, A’s2: Brian Downing's 
three- run homer during a four-ram 
third beat Oakland in Anaheim, 
California. Left-hander John Can- 
delaria scattered seven hits over the 
first six innings to improve his re- 
cord to 2-0 since he was acquired 
from Pittsburgh. (AP, UPI) 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The Yankees, 
winning for the 10th time in their 
last 11 games, moved to within five 
games of Toronto in the American 
League East on Saturday with a 3-1 
victory over the Boston Red Sox 
while the Blue Jays were losing to 
the Kansas Gty Royals 

Kansas Gty remained in second 
place in the AL West, 2V: games 
back of California. 

Dave Winfield hit a two-run tri- 
ple in New York’s three-run second 
inning as Ron Guidry, 16-4, won 
for the 15th time in his last 16 
derisions. Guidry pitched 6V) in- 
nings before Brian Fisher came cm 
to strike out Jim Rice with two men 
on base and earn his sixth save, 
blanking the Red Sox the rest of the 
way. 

“I think the people are kind of 
feeling it,** the pennant fever, 
“around here,” said New York's 
Don Mattingly, who extended his 
hitting streak to IS games and 
drove in Ins AL-Leading 96th run. 
“The last two games," the fans are 
“getting up and getting crazy in the 
first couple of innings, lean fed it, 
I know that." 

Rayah 4, Bine Jays 2: Danny 
Jackson and Dan Quisenberry 
pitched a five-hitter in Toronto and 
Lonnie Smith’s bioop single scored 
two runs for Kansas Gty. Jackson 
tied a dub record by striking out 
six straight batters, Qtrisenbeny 
finished for his league-leading 28th 
save. 

White Sox 12, Brewers 7: Harold 
Barnes went Mot-6 in Milwaukee, 
scored two runs and drove in three, 
to help Chicago end a three-game 
losing streak. It was Baines' first 
five-hit game in five years in the 
majors 

Twins 2, Mariners 0: Bert Blyle- 
ven pitched a three-hitter in Min- 
neapolis and Kent Hrbek bit a two- 
run homer to beat Seattle. Blyleven 


SCOREBOARD 

• 


Baseball 

Tennis 

WOMEN 

| Transition 

BASEBALL 


'Gamer Winning 9 RBI: Are They? 


Major League line Scores 

erunim ORUI Tf 


? %UT 




FRIDAY’S RESULTS 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 
nttKKMlq aw ® **— 3 * • 

SSEi summ»-*n i 

Rowley. Andersen IS). Rue W W .a ijpcm- 
oH (7|, Tekulve (•) and VM; Botottx^Gunv 
psrf Ml, SoiW) (8) and Davte. W-Amim, M. 
L— Tekulve. *«. HR»-Phltodet(*ta. Sam* 
i (lll.viryll {ltt.CNMsa.tfcy OS. 

Hew YBrtl 808 888 01 ' 1 

SJJLIZl 020 B2B «3*-r IT t 

LVnch. Gorman (A). sl * 

Rtwden ana Pino. i:“ 

Lynch, IW. HW-^WWwrslLAtodtodi Ip. 

Montreal ••• 

830 Hi Afcc-A * • 

ujskov. 1 (4),S t. Oalne-MI. Burke (B> 
aofinM?**** and Porter. W- For** 
5*. l — L askey. 5-ift HR* — St Louis. park 
121). Landrum (3). 

SST SS1K’.! 

per. smith (71 end Bailey. W-S mrtL fr A 1 - 

Power, 4-1 MRS — ClndmwtL 
Houston, Ballev («. WallhQ (5). Ba» ttl»- 
OMnta N) Ml Ml— J V 8 

m Ui “*-* « 1 

Mahler-, Camp MI. Garter (81 and Corona. 

Kennedy. w-HawklM. 

It Sv— Medium* (*>. HR— 5tm CHeo* 

McReynolds (12). 

— lie at ms * \ 

LSI AW®*** im| Ufa WM^l 7 I 

ssasas 

lea. Duncon 141. 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
City MIWM-4U 1 

Teredo mb mm-* a b 

LettHuMt oral SuncWem; Key, Acker (5). 
Muemimon (>). Caudill l9)andAlton«cn.W— 
Letbrandt. n-4. L— Key, ML HR— Toronto, 

Moseby (*»- , 

develaiMf ««*« « 8 

Detroit M0 888 ■»-» • 8 

Heaton. Thompson (8} and Banda; Boren- 
auer. Lows (4) and Parnate W—Lopez, 3-7. 
L — Heaton, 4-11 

rmm Ml 881 *»— 3 * 8 

Baltimore 888 1SS * . 8 

Russell, Mason (4). Harris (4) and PetrnHI; 
D. MorttaM. Am* 17) and Porta. W-O. Mar- 
Ikies, 9 . 7 . L— Russell. 0-X HRs-Yesas. John- 
son MM- BaWmoro. Yowa (ML^ 

Chturn «• «• • 8 *~ 1 * 8 

lallwmAltll 888 Kl 83k— 3 S 1 

Oovtv wohr m o M or IB), AboBd (8) aid 

Fisk; Bums and Moore. W— BurrUt, 74. 1^- 
WMu-fnefeter. H HR— Chicago. Kittle (14). 

M1N2MM I I 
MwYork W lit 1-5 tt 8 

(10 innings) 

BovcLCrowfort tW. Stanley CM) ondej* 
man; QNrfrv. BcrxH (71, SWrlw in. FUher 
<91. RMheitl (10) and Kassey. Wvneoor lW. 
w - piff tiffWiJ-7. L — CravrtonLH HRs — Q m - 
JJrSZTs III). New York. PaaUanAo 

0»- 
saattte 


Toronto 

New York 

Detroit 

Baltimore 

Boston 

MHwauko* 

Cleveland 




1<» [ 


California 
Kansas Cllv 
Oakland 

Cnicoao 
Seattle 
Minnesota 
Texas 


AMERICAN | J£A» UE 
East ^ 

W L Pc*- 
72 44 
6i 48 
42 53 
40 S4 
57 i? 

52 41 
38 V 

west iMrttW 

19 


MB TO •»— 4 7 2 

Mrir1 mow NO-4 f 8 

^wTarerla (5). V«W» Bora 17). Nurm 
(•) and Kearney .Seed! (8>i Sdirom, Hew* 14). 

LoudMTW. w-vond- 
s-i, L-Howe. VL Sv-Wunm <«)- 

ewwewo-2 » i 

e ^S«.um«fcnl <3)iMuroI7) endHealh; 
QuvMaria. Cllburn (7> and Boorat W— Con- 
Ca, ”!TTr . w. sv— amum mi. 

114). 

SATURDAY’S ftlSULTS 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 

MMBM 3 8 
_ BBS iT Eli IT 4 0 

*21 ~ jean; BIYUWI and W- 

" ” 1W W8 0»-» 7 • 

Kansas laMm-ii 5 l 

T *SSm. Owtontarry C« and Wathm. 

tuuA^nOer. Hmkt 18) <md 


coiawnai 

m Wm Mortal 2-0- L— BlrtSflfc r-. 

* Major League Standings ««^-j 

1 BAIMJE . u .a,rM LB 


WonMe. Clark (3) and Bando; Tanma, O'N- 
eal IV) end Parrbh. W— Tanana, 7-41. L— War- 
die. 4-S. Sv— O'Neal O). HRs- Oevetand. 
France IS), Carter 171. Butter fSJ. 

Oaktand 600 480 108— S 7 1 

ceMerata 8S2 m m-e ii i 

CadlrolL, Kruatmr 13). McCattr 14), AJhor- 
ton 18) dih Heath; Wttt. Stolen 17) andBeane. 
w— wilt. 10-7. L-Codlrell, 10-1 0. Sv— Slaton 
(1). HRs— Oakland. CoHIns (4). California 
Jackson I1V). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
PhBadoMila m 7U 508-18 IS 8 

Oricaea 810 on 118-4 8 • 

DennvandDaulton; 5arefwea Brusstar (4), 
Frazier m.Merkflth (8) and Lake. Davis («. 
W— Omrmr.s*. L-SoreiweraW, HRs— Phi to- 
detpMa. Samuel (12). Wilson 111), Schmidt 
(21 ), Dairitan 2 (3), Seftu (51. CMcooe. Demter 
(1), Durhom (12). 

LM Aiwelss in on 006-2 > 2 

San Francisco 0W TW 630-5 7 1 

Honeycutt. Dkn (7). Casil Do (!) and Saos- 
cta; Hamm a fc er. Garretts (f) aid Trevino, 
w— Garretts. 7-1 L — Olaz, 34. HRS— Son 
Franduco. CDavts (10). Green (5). 

Now York 0W0W 000-4 10 • 

pmrourox wo on ooi—* s i 

Fernandez. McDowell (9) ond Carter: Tun- 
■toll. Scurry (71. Guante (») and Pena. W— 
Fernandes. S4. L— TunnrHL 1-8. Sv— McDow- 
ell (10). HRs— New York. Strawberry 117). 
Pittsburgh. Madlock (8). 

Chief onaU 48» It* W -1 r s 

Heaston 0W OW 000-8 4 1 

Brawntna and Din: Ntakro, Maddm (4). 
Oawley (7), DlWno (8) and Mterock. W— 
Brownbiq,11-4.L— Ntakra,W10-HRff— Clncln- 
nnH. Cencspden (7). Esaskv (13). 

Moetroat *20 001 011-4 II B 

H. LOU* 1W WO 120—4 7 2 

Ywman, Reardon IB). Burke (8), Lucas (?J 
and Butera, Fttzperold (W; Tudor. Campbell 
(8). Daviev (»> and Porter. W— Burke, 04 l L— 
Campbell, 34. Sv— Luce* (1). 


( At SL Louis) 

Fuels 

Chris Evert Lloyd. US- del. Hona Mandll- 
fcOva US. 7-4. <K 

(At Matiwah. New Jersey) 
Senriflnais 

Steffi Graf, 15), Wesf Germany, del. Go- 
tarwa SabatfalL (7). Aroentlna, 4-4. 4W 4-3 

Kathy Rina Its. (4).U^,deLCatar1mi Undq- 
vlsL (81. Sweden. 5-7. 4-1 4-1 

MEN 

(At Montreal) 

S em WHiats 

John McEnroe, US. dot Jimmy Camara. 
US. 4-2. ea 

Ivan Lendl. CzednsUvakia deL Jimmy 
Arias. U&, 4-4. 6-2. 


Soccer 


Amorkan Leogee 
DETROIT — Signed Randy Nosek. Ditcher. 
MILWAUKEE— Placed Pawl Molltor. In- 
flekler.or) the 15-day disabled Usr nrtnooc W ve 
n Aug. li 

N.Y. YANKEES— Waived Omar Moreno, 
outfielder, for the purpose of olvlno him hts 
unconditional release. Readied Don Pesoua, 
outfielder, from Columbus of Itw Internation- 
al League. 

National League 

Chicago— P laced Scott Sanderson, pitch- 
er. an Ihe 60 -dav disabled list. 

p 1 7TS8 U RGH-Acoulrtrd Bah Kipper. 
Pitcher, tram the Cal I lamia Ansnta to com- 
plete a six-plover trade on Aug. A Assigned 
Kimr fo Hawaii of the Pacific Coast League. 

EUROPEAN SOCCER 
LIVE RPOOL— Signed striker Ion Rush too 
three- yew contract. 


East Id) Brat Division 
Birmingham 1, West Ham B 
Coventry 1. Manchester City 1, tie 
Leicester X Everton 1 
Liverpool X Arsenal 0 
Luton i, Nottingham Forest l, tie 
Manchesser tinned 4, Aston Villa 0 
Quean Path Raman 1, Ipswich 0 
Sheffield Wednesday 1. Chelsea 1. tie 
Southampton 1, Newcastle I. tie 
Tottenham A Watford 0 
W. Bromwich Albion 1, Oxford United Mle 
5com*e First DMNaa 
come X Motherwell 1 

Clydebank A Dundee 0 
Dundee United I. Aberdeen 1, tie 
Hibernian 1, Ranaers 3 
Sf, Mirren A Hearts 2 


Golf 


Tew DBiMura and eonttogs la !M Benson 
aad Hedges International tomamsat to 
York. England (Par 22): 


Sandy Lyle S3X0M 
(an Woo sn cm 22 A 00 
Sam Torrance 1ILD00 
Rodger Davis HUH 
Dm Smyth NUUO 
Howard Clerk 4JB00 
Hugh BatoecM &000 
Mark James LSW 
Mark Mautond ASH 
Ian Baker-Finch AS* 
Ken Brawn 
Steve EUUngttm 


7044-71-44—274 
7B-73-70-43— 2)5 
70-47-71-48—2)4 
70-79-47-48— 274 
tHB-TIM-m 
71 -71-49-44 — Z77 
70-72-48-48— 27B 

48-794840*277 
74 484849— 279 
7X4948 48 - OT 
74-71 -4449-2W 
70-74-48-44— 2W 


New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — It seems almost 
certain that Keith Hernandez of 
the New York Mets will set a major 
league record before (he season is 
out, but be as closes in on the mark, 
the cry from basebalTs statistical 
skeptics is a resounding “So what?" 

The skeptics have nothing 
against Hernandez. What they 
question is the significance of the 
record he is chasing: most game- 
winning runs batted in during a 
season. With 19 so far and 48 
games to go, Hernandez seems a 
ranch to surpass the 22 credited to 
Harold Baines of the Chicago 
White Sox in 1983. That now 
stands as the record, records of 
“game-winning” RBI having been 
kept only since 1980. 

The problem with the statistic, 
according to skeptics, is that the 
grandiose name suggests more than 
it measures. By official definition, a 
game-winning run is one that puts 
a team ahead for good — a stan- 
dard, skeptics point out. that gives 
as modi weight to a first-inning 
single that poshes across the first 
run of an 1 1-0 rout as it does to a 
truly “game-winning** ninth-inning 
grand slam that turns a 3-0 deficit 
into a 4-3 victory. 


Some have suggested that a more 
meaningful statistic would limit the 
“game-winning'* designation to 
runs produced after the sixth in- 
ning . 

How does Hernandez measure 
up to this standard? About how 
skeptics would expect According 
to a gam e-by-game breakdown 
provided by the Mets, only 3 of his 
19 game- winning hits came after 
the sixth inning: a seventh-inning 
single that ended a 4-4 tie and led 
the Mets to a 7-5 victory over the 
Cincinnati Reds on July 8; a ninth- 
inning sacrifice fly that turned a M 
tie into a 2-1 victory over the Pi- 
rates on April 16 and a ninth-in- 
ning single that produced a 1-0 vic- 
tory over the Phillies on April 19. 

Of the others, one came in the 
fifth inning, five in the third, one in 
the second and nine, almost half his 
total, in the first inning . 

If Hernandez seems untroubled 
by such quibbles, it may be because 
he has heard it all before. In 1982, 
when with the Sl Louis Cardinals, 
he led the National Lea g u e , along 
with Jack Gaik, then of the Giants, 
with 21 game-winning RBL a total 
that is still the National League 
mark. 


SATURDAY BASEBALL 

struck out eight and walked four, 
since rejoining the Twins on Aug. I 
in a trade with Gevdand be has 
gone 3-1. 

Orioles 9, Rangers 2: In Balti- 
more, Mike Young, the hottest 
home run bat in the major*, hit a 
three-run shot and a two-run dou- 
ble against Texas, It was Balti- 
more's fifth straight victory, its 
longest winning streak this season. 

Tigers 7, In dians 5: Lance Par- 
rish went 3-for-4 in Detroit and 
drove in two runs against Cleve- 
land. 

Angels 9, A’s 5: In Anaheim, 
California, Reggie Jackson moved 
into eighth place on the home run 
list with his 522d, and drove in four 
runs against Oakland Jackson’s 
homer put him ahead of Ted Wil- 
liams and Willie McCovey. 

Mets 4, Pirates 3: In the Nation- 
al League, Darryl Strawberry tied 
the score in Pittsburgh with a two- 
run homer and later m tfae seventh 
inning Tom Padorek hit a two-run 
triple as New York, winning for the 
11th time in its last 13 games, re- 
gained a tie for first place in the 
East. Sid Fernandez held the Pi- 
rates to four hits and struck out 1 J 
over 816 innings. 

Expos 5, Cardinals 4: Pinch-hit- 
ter Jim Wohlford’s ninth-inning, 
two-ouf triple off Ken Dayley 
scored Vance Law to give Montreal 
its victory in Sl Louis. 

Reds 8. Astros fh In Houston, 
Tom Browning scattered six hits, 
Dave Concepcion hit his sixth ca- 
reer grand slam and CmrinnaiTs 
player-manager, Pete Rose, went 3- 
for-4. Rose needs 17 hits to break 
Ty Cobb's record of 4,191. He also 
drew his I,059tb walk to pass Lon 
Gehrig (or 10th place on that list 

Haffies 19, Cribs 4; Darren Da ni- 
ton hit two of Philadelphia’s six 
home runs in Chicago. 

Juan Samuel, Glenn Wilson and 
Mike Schmidt hit consecutive 
homers in the seventh and, after 
Von Hayes struck out, Daulton hit 
his second of the game. 

It was the eighth time Philadel- 
phia has hit six homers in a game, 
the last time coming on May 17, 
1978, in Chicago. For Schmidt, it 
was his 63d against the Cubs. 

Giants 5, Dodgers 2: Joel 
Youngblood doubled home three 
runs with one out in the eighth in 
San Francisco, ending Los Angeles' 
eight-game winning streak. 

(AP. UPI) 

■ Henderson Hurts Shoulder 

The Yankees said their center 
fielder, Rickey Henderson, was 
held out of the lineup Saturday 
because of a right shoulder jammed 
during Friday night’s game. United 
Press International reported. 

There were reports that Header- 
sou. the American League's third- 
leading hitter at .349 entering the 
game, had not paid a $100 fine to 
the league and was prohibited from 
playing until the matter was set- 
tled. But Bob Fishd, the league's 
executive vice president, said Hen- 
derson had paid the fine. 

Henderson hurt his shoulder in 
the fourth inning Friday night Bill 
Buckner hit a Tong fly to right- 
center that Henderson caught on 
the run before hitting the walk 



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Datratt 


MENS WORLD CUP DOWNHILL 
(A) us Lanas, Argentine) 

1. Karl Atpleor. Swttz. 2 minutes. 01.27 sec- 
onds 

2 Polar Mueller/ SWltaertand, 2:0138 
j, Marcus watmaJer. W. Germany. M133 

4 , petgr Wintoberoer. AusWa 2:0232 

5, Daniel Mahrer. Switzerland. 2:K31 
4. RuctoH Huber, Austria 2:0236 

7. Helmut HoaflitoW, Austria 2:0240 
R Gerhard Pfafienfafetfer, Austria 2:0238 
y. Marc Glreidelll. Luxembourg. 2:823* 
IK Stefan Nlederster, Austria. 2:0333 

11. Bnma Kenwn. Mrilartond. 2:BUU 

12. Todd Breaker. Canada 2:0.14 
11 Giorgio Plantonlda, Italy. 2:030 
14 worn weirottwr. Austria 2:037 

li Douoks Lewis, United States, 2:0338 

POINT TOTALS 

1, Kart Alpkw. 5wH»rt(iiel 30 Potato. 

2, Peter Mutter. Switzerland. 32 

3, Markus Wasmoier. West Germany, 25 
<, Hetawf Hafletowr, Austria 24. 

i Ctauo Lewis, United Stales, 21 

6, Mon GlronMIL Luxumttoura IX 

7, s rural Kenwn- Swttariond J3 
a prandt PtcoonL Pronca li 

9. Daniel Mahror, SMtaertand, 11 
j& Ructott Huber, Auetria 10. 


AuMrian Grand Prix 

(At zeltwea Austria) 

1. Alain Prcot. France, McLaren. $2 tans 
(308384 lam), I hour, 20 minutes, 12383 sec- 
onds, overact spaed 231.132 kM 
X Arvton Senna BraziL Lotus. 1:3042385 
1 Mlchcte . Alboreto, Italy, Ferrari. 
1.’2ft4 L939 

t. Stefan Johansson, Sweden, Ferrari, 
1;905M» 

5. Ella De Anpens. ffijiv, Lotus, 1 :7UL67S 

6. Marc Surer, Switzer land, Brabham, l tan 
behind 

7. Staton Bel toll. West Germany, TyireH, 
throe laps 

ft. Thierry Boutsen. Belgium, Arrows. Hire# 
tons 

9. Huub Ruthenuattw, HeOand, Oselta. tour 
taps 

id Patrkfc Tomboy, trance. Renault, sis 
taw 

For mu l a One l taa dtags : 

I. (Ned) Alain Pros), France, 50 points 
and Michele Alboreto. Italy. 5D 
x Elio de Aneoiis. Italy. 28 
« S total Johansson. Sw e d e n , 19 
5. Keke Rosbgrg, Finland. II 
ft Ayrton Soma. Brazil, 15 
7, Nelson PtauoL BraziL 13 
ft Patrick Tambov, Franco. 11 

9. Jaoaugs UrffWa, France. 10 

10. Thierry Boutsen. Botakim. 9 


Football I Prost Wins Austrian Prix; Lauda to Retire 


CFL Standings 


Montreal . 
Toronto 
Ottawa 
Hamilton 

BrttCUnb 

Edmonton 

Saskatchwn 

wtantoea 

Catoarv 


Eastern Dhrtslaa 

w L T PF PA 


0 )4D 131 
0 185 182 
0 123 187 
0 107 137 


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S 1 0 207 IM 


0 1 S 1 149 
0 ISO 135 
0 143 112 
8 »1 143 


Friday's Result 
Montreal 2ft Toronto 10 

Saterdaira Rosett 
Catoary 31 Britten Columbia 32 

NFL Exhibition 

Seattle 2ft Detroit 3 
Indianapolis 3L Chicago 13 
Cincinnati 24. now YqrK Jets 20 
Ctovetond 2ft PhitadetMila 14 
: /yUnnwnta U, Pittoburoh M 

Atlanta 23, Tampo Bay 17 
Miami 27, Buffalo 17 
New Yarlc Giants 1ft Greefl Bay 2 
Houston ZL N«* OrteatB 2fl 
New England 31. Kansas Clhr 13 
Dallas 27. San Pieao 24 or 


The Associated Press 

ZELTWEG, Austria — Alaiu 
p„ Prost of France, driving a 
to McLaren-Porsebe, won the Ausui- 

1 an Grand Prix on Sunday for the 

2 20th victory in his career. 

10 BraaTs Ayrton Senna, in a Lo- 
s lus-Renault, placed second, and 
4 the Ferrari of Michele Alboreto of 
2 Italy was third. Prost and Alboreto 
now are tied for first place in the 
Grand Prix point standings, each 
with 50 points. 

Prost’s victoiy came a day after 
his teammate, Niki Lauda of Aus- 
tria, the defending Grand Prix 
champion, announced that he 
would retire at the end of this sea- 
son to devote his attention to his 
air-transport business. 


through curves a 300 kilometers 
per hour," Lauda, 36, said. “I have 
come to the condtisioa that it is. 
ooiw time to do something else.” 

He qualified his decision, howev- 
er, saying, ’’Nothing is final in life." 
He was referring to his return in 
1981 after retiring in 1979. 

Lauda has won 24 races, second 
to the former triple world champi- 
on, Jackie Stewart of Scotland, who 
won 27. Lauda won his first two 
world titles in 1975 and 1977 in a 
Ferrari, and last year he became 
world Formula One champion in a 
McLaren-Pwsdie, 

But in 1983 Lauda has gotten 
only five points and has dropped 
out of tune races, including Sun- 
day’s, 

He led Sunday after the 26th of 
S2 laps, bul dropped om in the 39th 
lap. He said Ins engine had lost 
pressure. 



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Page 14 


25 Years Later, Brasilia Dismays Its Founders 


By Alan Riding 

New York Tima Service 

B RASILIA — Soon after a 
new civilian government was 
installed In Brazil in March, the 
three aging men who designed 
Brasilia were invited to return 
here to see what went wrong and 
what could be put right with their 
25-year-old project. 

They accepted with enthusi- 
asm. Having been ostracized by 
the military regime that ran Brasi- 
lia for 21 years, the urban plan- 
ner. Lucio Costa, 83; the archi- 
tect, Oscar Niemeyer, T7; and the 
landscape artist. Roberto Burle 
Marx, 76. immediately blamed 
the former dictatorship for mis- 
takes in the young city's upbring- 
ing. 

“We’re lucky that all three are 
still active.” said the capital’s new 
governor. Jose Aparecido de Oli- 
veira. “Those who say Brasilia 
was built to be beautiful but not 
functional are wrong. The mili- 
tary rulers did not try to keep 
Brasilia alive. They accepted II as 
a fact but without conviction or 
enthusiasm-" 

Asked to “rethink” Brasilia, its 
three “parents” have much to 
contemplate. They expected a 
population of 600,000 by 2000, 
but in 1 985 Brasilia has 1 .6 mil- 
lion inhabitants, two-thirds of 
them in eight dormitory shanty- 
towns nicknamed “anti-Brasi- 
lias.” 

They had designed a political 
capital but it operated more like 
a headquarters for a succession of 
military regimes, an arena for or- 
ders rather than debate. And, 
with no one protesting, new con- 
struction was permitted with little 
regard for the original blueprint. 

Niemeyer was the first to ar- 
rive. and he immediately request- 
ed the removal of a huge metal 
flagpole put up in 1972 in front of 
the presidential palace. He said it 
disrupted the harmony of the Pla- 
za of Three Powers. In its place, 
he proposed a Pantheon of He- 
roes, which he quickly designed 

Accompanied by Oliveira, he 
visited the cathedral and suggest- 
ed new windows to create the ef- 
fect he had intended. He said un- 
used land beside and opposite the 
cathedral could accommodate his 
long-shelved plans for a ministry 


of culture, city museum, national 
library and national archives. 

Niemeyer. a longtime Commu- 
nist, could do little abouL the tall 
new Banco do Brasil building, 
which, he said, violates -all regula- 
tions and plans. “This much it 
does." be said; “It reminds us of 
the power of money, of the money 
so badly distributed in this coun- 
try” 

Foreign diplomats are dis- 
mayed by assignment to Brasilia 
and politicians flee to Rio de Ja- 
neiro, Sao Paulo or hometowns 
on weekends. As a result, the 
character of Brasilia — of the Pi- 
lot Plan, as the designed urban 
area is still known — has been 
largely shaped by bureaucrats. 

For those with families. Brasi- 
lia has appeal. It brings a life 
untroubled by traffic jams or pol- 
lution. It is largely free of the 
crime that convulses other Brazil- 
ian cities, and it offers a healthy 
environment for children. “I can 
go home for lunch every day and 
have a snooze," a government of- 
ficial said. 

Complaints from well-settled 
migrants are rarely of an aesthetic 
nature. “On a plain with a lot of 
sun, a city of glass was construct- 
ed," a Brazilian diplomat noted. 
“This forces you to have air con- 
ditioning 500 days a year. You 
also have to put up curtains, so 
lights are always on." 

For newcomers, the city seems 
unwelcoming. Its central area of 
wide avenues and myriad ministe- 
rial buildings, with few trees and 
fewer pedestrians, is like a body 
without a souL The rest is divided 
into sectors — of hotels, banks, 
embassies, apartment blocks, 
mansions — that seem the antith- 
esis of natural urban growth. “It 
reminds me of a mixture between 
Pyongyang and Dallas." a newly 
arrived foreigner said. 

Social life is a particular prob- 
lem. In each residential section, 
there is a street with a row of 
stores that, by design, includes a 
bakery, a butcher, a pharmacy, a 
dry cleaner and so on. But it rare- 
ly serves as a gathering point for 
locals. That must take place in 
private homes and dubs. “The 
divorce rate is higher than else- 
where.” said an official in his 
ninth year of residence and his 
third marriage. “The diy doesn’t 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 1985 - 

LANGUAGE 

Dismays Its Founders Winging It Between the Right and Left 

“I I By William Safi* 


v*im 


Jos£ Aparecido de 
Oliveira (left) and 
Oscar Niemeyer 
before the 
cathedral of 
Brasilia. 


; r~, 

v-v 


ri s« 


■ I, 1 i_ 

■S anOENTiti*. 

i# :t C 


Tin New York Tnm 


have many outside stimuli It 
forces you to think." 

In the final years of the military 
regime, Brasilia became known as 
a capita] of mardomias. as the 
practice of living well off public 
coffers became known. “It was a 
tropical Versailles, a privileged 
dependent of the rest of the coun- 
try." Oliveira said. 

Without the checks and bal- 
ances of a strong Congress, senior 
bureaucrats and pro-government 
politicians determined Lheir own 
rewards, nepotism flourished and 
many corruption scandals re- 
mained uninves ligated even after 
being exposed by news organiza- 
tions. 

During the campaign preced- 
ing an electoral college vote to 
pick a civilian president in Janu- 
ary, opposition parties repeatedly 
attacked the military regime on 
the mordomia issue, focusing on 
the 41 state-owned mansions that 
were occupied rent-free by cabi- 
net ministers. These, the cam- 
paign slogans said, would be im- 
mediately sold. 

The new government has been 
plagued by “this pledge. Several 
ministers took over the homes oc- 


cupied by their predecessors, al- 
beit agreeing to pay rent. Others, 
more sensitive to public opinion, 
took modest apartments, even 
though “ibeir" mansions were left 
empty. In June, the government 
said two mansions would be of- 
fered for sale to test the market. 

The political need to exhibit the 
mordomias of the past, however, 
was satisfied by allowing report- 
ers inside the government-owned 
ranch long occupied by the for- 
mer president. General Joao Bap- 
tism Figueiredo. A stable for 36 
horses, kennels for 15 dogs, a sau- 
na, a gymnasium, a beauty salon, 
a movie theater and extensive liv- 
ing quarters on about 100 acres 
(40 hectares) of land were imme- 
diately made public. 

After the new president-elect, 
Tancredo Neves, died April 21 
without taking office, his succes- 
sor, Jose Sarney. announced 
pointedly that he would take up 
residence in the official Alvorado 
Palace; the last two presidents' 
wives had refused to live there 
because faulty air conditioning 
wafted kitchen smeUs into recep- 
tion areas. 


From the time of its construc- 
tion in the late 1950s, Brasilia had 
served as a magnet for poor mi- 
grants from the northeast. They 
found jobs on construction sites 
and built shacks nearby. Even be- 
fore it was inaugurated, the capi- 
tal seemed destined to minor the 
urban problems of other large cit- 
ies. So the poor were told to move 
— literally out of sight — Lo satel- 
lite Lawns 10 to 20 miles away. 

More than a minion people 
now live in these towns, spending 
up to one-third of their wages 
commuting to the Pilot Plan. 
Housing shortages are acute, with 
as many as five families living on 
a single plot And as the country’s 
economic crisis has slowed con- 
struction, the number of unem- 
ployed has grown. 

Now, paradoxically, the social 
price of Duilding a nonmd us trial 
capital may be paid by drawing 
industry — and new jobs — to 
Brasilia. “We can fmd factories 
Lhat don't affect the environ- 
ment.” Oliveira said. “For the 
people who came here, we have to 
make sure that the dream does 
not become one more nightmare.” 


wingers. We kind of resented lunatic fringe, the great 
coinage of Theodore Roosevelt, and Hide old ladies in 
tennis shoes was known to be a knock, but right wi ng 
had a sassy connotation — even the “moderate 
among us counted ourselves as part of a hardy band of 
conservatives, murmuring “I’d rather be right” as we 
consigned ourselves, legs bowed but heads unbowed, 
to the dubbmess of permanent-minority status. We 
could not understand why our counterparts on the 
liberal side winced when we called them left-wingers. 

Then everybody got into the conservative act. Some 
of us resented having to share our resentments, but 
nobody could dispute that the political center of 
gravity shifted in both parties. Suddenly most right- 
wingers started calling themselves rightists or neo-cons. 
short for neo-conservatives. At the same time, right - 
winger lost its appeal to right-wingers: it became the 
term used by those on the left to attack us. and instead 
or reveling m that attention, we look umbrage. 

The problem is in the wing. When the left was 
predominant (Franklin Delano Roosevelt's sdf-de- 
scription was “a little left of center” ), the left-winger 
label was resented because it smacked of radicalism, 
beyond left to pinko and fellow traveler. In the same 
way, when the right became predominant many on 
the right became eager to dissociate from tine nuts and 
kooks, troglodytes. Neanderthals and nuke-'em-back-to- 
ihe-Stone Age extremists. 

The political right hard and soft old and new, is 
sensitive to the use of language by ideological oppo- 
nents. Neo-con Daniel Patrick Moynihan, a soft -righ t 
near-left Democrat objected yearn ago to the Commu- 
nist assumption of such words as people’s, democratic, 
peace-loving and liberation, and launched a counterat- 
tack in the United Nations and in the United States 
Senate to recapture democracy from lotalitarians and 
peace from the bellicose. Imperialist was tacked cm to 
Soviet moves, and liberation was liberated to be used 
liberally on our liberators. No longer did we concede 
vocabulary victory to the other side. 

That was satisfying, but now a new and more subtle 
phase of the right's language awakening is under way. 
The linguistic battleground is no longer merely be- 
tween East and West; the new target for rightists is the 
leftists' hitherto- unchallenged lingo. (Note the clip- 
ping of both wings and the assumption of the suffix ist, 
as in centrist The center-winger has not yet appeared.) 

Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger, in a 
speech to Margaret Thatcher and other members of 
the International Democrat Union assembled by the 
right-winger Richard Allen, launched the linguistic 
counteroffensive last mouth. The name of the game 
being exposed is moral equivalence, sometimes called 
moral symmetry; those are attack phrases on the posi- 
tion of those who loftily try to put the Good Guys and 
the Bad Guys in the same bag. 

An inversion of the meaning of words, says Cap. is 
“the connotation that is always assigned to the term 
arms race." “It's flatly false,” because “il clouds the 
distinction between the reasons why we arm and the 
reasons the Soviets arm. Arms race doesn’t focus on 
the difference between arming for aggressive, offen- 
sive military action and intimidation and, on the other 


hand, building defenses to protect Lhe * e 

have.” This "rather flip Himmishrurat — the 
ZZ race-- “implies that our efforts to counter the 
S^ ihreaTStat we face are 
philosophical impulse, emptv of any broader sign* 
cance than a sporting event. 

Let’s think about that; Ask anybody ■‘Are you for 

an arms race?" and the answer is “No. Change ibai to 

“Must we counter the Soviet buildup? and the answer 
is likely to be “Yes.” That suggests that *»{*'**£“ 
effective pqorative characterization of the oeiense 
efforts of both supeipowers. You never hear nghues 
using the phrase arms race; it s a term used “J* 
hardliners, which includes neutralists, doves. lettists. 
and the group denounced by the right-minded with the 
mouthfilling derogation unilateral disarmers. 

S UPERPOWER is another word that turns off our 
defense secretary: “It’s become widespread pracuce, 
especially in Western Europe, to refer to the Urn tea 
States and the Soviet Union together as superpowers. 
That's O.K. if the word is used as shorthand for the 
militarily strong, but “its frequent repetition implies 
that the Great Divide in international affairs is be- 
tween superpowers and all the other nations, rather 
than between democrats and totaliiarians." 

That catchall term superpower, says Weinberger- 
“implies that the essential characteristic of the United 
States is its military power rather than^ibe political 
and economic freedom of its people." Here's the 
point: “In lumping together the United States and the 
Soviet Union in that single term superpower, one 
promotes the debilitating and essentially false aouon 
of . . . moral symmetry between East and West." 

Moral symmetry and moral equivalence ( the phrase is 
from “The Moral Equivalent of War,” a 1910 essay by 
the pragmatic W illiam James), is the rightist’s desertp- * 1 
tion of a position that superficially equates the United 
States and the Soviet Union. For example, when a 
critic of U. S. policy in Central America compares 
U. S. pressure against Nicaragua to the Soviet inter- 
vention in Afghanistan, or when the Israeli attack on 
the Palestine Liberation Organization in Lebanon is 
equa ted with the PLO’s campaign of terror in the last 
decade, many on the political right call that the prac- 
tice of falsely asserting moral equivalence: Although 
fighting is fighting, to ignore the moral chasm between 
fighting to achieve freedom and fighting to impose 
tyranny is to pretend that no difference exists between 
right and wrong. 

For sup&power, “The earliest citation for the mean- 
ing you have in mind,” reports lexicographer Robert 
Burchfield of Oxford, “which is ‘a natron or state 
having a dominant position in world affairs,' and 
usually refers to the United States and the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics, is a 1944 book by William 
T.R. Fox entitled ‘The Super-Powers.’” Fox is a 
professor of political science at Columbia University. 
His classic line: “There will be “world powers’ and 
‘regional powers.’ These world powers we shall call 1 
“super-powers' in order to distinguish them from the 
other powers . . . whose interests are great in only a 
single theater of power conflict.” 

Great word. Fox; now, who came up with the arms 


New York Tunes Service 


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Mituai or contested action, low cost. 
Haiti or Dominican Republic. For infor- 
mation, send S3J5 fcr 24-page booklet 
/handing to Dr. F. Gornafcs. OOA, 
. 1835 KTSt N.W.. Washington D.C 
20006. UiA. Tek 202-452-8331 


PERSONALS 

JENMFER JOYCE wetoome to Europe. 

Luck. Rod. 

WH11AM FRANK VOUK IlL Coll 
homell Not Emergency. 


MOVING 

ALLIED 

VAN UNES INTL 

OVER 1300 OFFICES 
WORtDWBE 

USA Allied Van tines bit? Carp 
(0101) 312-681-8100 
Office Address: 25th Av& Roosevelt Rd 
Broadview, Unos 60153 USA 

Or cal our Agency offices: 

PARIS Dasbardes Intematiandl 
(01) 343 23 64 

FRANKFURT 

(069) 250066 

DUSSRDORF/ RATINGS'! 

(02102) 45023 IJU. 

MUNICH ijils. 

(089) 142244 

IONDON 

(01) 953 3636 
Ctel for ASied's free estimate 


FOUR WINDS 
INTERNATIONAL 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

‘ CARIBBEAN 

CAYMAN ISLANDS 

IfADING INTI RNANCtAl CBMTBC 
NO DUTIES - NO TAXES 
fttvjnod property investments 
from US$60,000. High returns. 
Please r«dv for mrotiuuliuit 
HORIZON 5X P.O. Box 222, 
i 04-1211 Geneva 12, Switzerland. 


FRENCH PROVINCES 

CLOSE TO MONACO 

ST. JEAN-CAP-fEKSAT 

Beautifully decorated 3-bedroom resi- 
dence for sale in the nedde of Cop 
Ferral, with small I why landscaped gar' 
den, fully equpped modem kitchen and 
2 bathrooms. 

For further defat please contact: 
A.G.ED.L 

26 bis, Bd. Princesse CHoriolte 
Manle Goto, MC 98000 Monaco 
let (93) 50 66 00. TT* 479417 MC 
or: Agence du Littoral 
Sant Jean Cop Fetrai. France. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

HOLLAND 

AMS1BDAM, NEAR CONCERT • 

Gebouw. l u xurious house. 3 stories, 7 
rooms, 2 kitchens, 2 bathrooms, 225 
kuil Write: IcnunstnxX KB. 1075 
RA Amsterdam. Tek 02071 5702. 

SWITZERLAND 

LAKE GENEVA + LUGANO, Mon- 
treal, Villon, Gstood Region, Locarno 
1 Asccvxj & many famous mountam 
resorts, mgauficent NEW APART- 
MENTIS ' CHALETS / VOiAS avert- 
able for foreigners. From US$50,000. 
9*g chows. Mortgages at 6*4%. Swiss 
residency poo&S/H. SEBOD SA 
Tour Gnse 6. CHI 007 LAUSANNE. 
21 /25 26 11. LUGANO 91 /6B 76 48. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

PARIS & SUBURBS 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


15TH MONTPARNASSE STAYING IN PARIS? 


27 very ru* uncus flats i to a rooms. 
Prices from 1750.000 to FT ,750.000. Vs- 
it from 2 pm to 6 pm. 21 Rue Castog- 
nary. on Aug. 19, 20. 23, 24, 25, 26,2? 

REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

CANADA 


AJ8MSHB) A UNFURNISHED 
FUST-CLASS APARTMENTS 
Minimum rental 2 months. 
Aha flail 6 homes for Hfo. 
INTER UXBtS, 1, rue Molten, 
Paris m. Tek 5631797 


EMPLOYMENT 

GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


Arizona, U.SJL 

Wet estabtshed general real estate 
company desires to hove a Repesento- 
live Monger. Top cornmswn deal 
We ore not subdivided or land promot- 
er!. We hesidfe everything in general 
real estate. Write S.F.C., Bax 4142, 
Scottsdale, Arizona 85261 USA 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSEES 8th or ambulance network in the western 


EMPLOYMENT 

GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


l position- torteon 2450080. 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

AU PAIR/ HOUSEKEEPER to h 
mother care for infant son & far 


PARIS & SUBURBS 
FOR SALE 

ANTONY PEVZNER 

ARTISTS 

ATEUER 

IN PARS 





nvely Furnished, garden overlooking 
Mediterranean in the old village or 

Roquebnme, Cop Martin. 3 double 
bedrooms. 2 angle bedrooms, 2 W 
baths. FF1 ,300,000. Td |93) 35 42 26. 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS in WHY USE AGENTS? 

English. Paris (daily) 634 59 65. Rome 

67B 03 20. The Bmt Service from the 


678 0320- 

HAVE A MCE DAY] BOKB. Have a 
nice day! Bokri 


PERSONALS 

CATHERINE, JBfTBOS 
MUSK3UEET JE r AIML Jmy. 


The Beit Service from the 

■ ■ — ' lijkUM 

imuiii wwanawnum aww 

CALI PARK 13 ) 036 63 11 
LONDON (01) 578 66 11 


CONT1NEX. Small mows, cars, bag- 
gage, worldwide. Call Charlie: Pori* 
Sf 18 01 [near Opera). 


ATTRACTIVE HOUSE FOR SALE lo- 
oted in Dublei Mountains, 13 tides 
from dty center. House mdudas 5 
bedrooms, 3 receptions, bar. fitted 
kitchen & playroom. 3,003 sq.ft, situat- 
ed on over 1 acre with grazing & 
pleasure rights aver W) acres. Mag- 
rafreent panar arise views. Inshm 
ElfiQJMO. Td London 01-580 1077 
during office hours. 


Ha admirers have the po 
to ocqure THIS GREAT A 
last Parisian home. 


SUPERS 6 SPACIOUS 

APARTMENT - 
ATHJER 

Co mp rising: Living room, - alcove 
& bathr o om, mezzanine with bedroom 
+ kitchenette. 

[Very favdy interior stars & moldings.) 
PRICE: 1,500,000 

Contort Paris. (I) 297 53 64 
From August 22nd. 


Sturio, 2 or 3-roam aprtncal. 
One month or more. 

LE OAJMDGE 359 67 97. 


NBRILY 5T J AMS. 

3 roams, terrace, parking. 

LATIN QUARTER- Conveniently bear- 
ed apartment. F3000-' month. A wri- 
te*: until end Sept TeL- 354 IB 05. 

NEAR MONTPARNASSE. Large ate- 
Ser ready to Sw in, sleeps 3, gtxden. 
Cal: 325 78 33 from 9 cm toll cm. 
SHORT TERM in Latin Quarter. 

No ogettts. Tek 329 38 83. 

7th. MODERN kmirious superb 5 


hemisphere seels a European Repro 
tentative fandiqr with air taxi semen 
and able to iritiatB eonfr artud w 
ra n ge m ents with mecfaol air repatrio 
lion insurance companies ana mafa 
ides cafe. Contact: Vita too or ItS 
Hutner ar Hotel Centred. Zurich wed 
of 5ept. 8 - 13 or telex 003358 ir 
Miami Honda USA. 


nice view m quiet crea Fully 7th, MODERN knmrious superb 5 
equpped & modem furnished, house rooms, F27.00Q. Tek 256 29 96 

pKx "' Ph "’ e Amrtrtom PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


FAST EXECUTIVE KOMGFfNDtNG- 
Pons & Western suburbs. 551 09 45 


Embassy 

8 Ave oe 


Service employment 


8 Ave de Mesrine 
75008 feris 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 

PHONE 562 78 99 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

Don’t miet 
INTERNATIONAL 
SECRETARIAL POSITIONS 

TUESDAYS 

in the &TT Clonifi od Section. 
GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


apartment Longterm. Sendoofltpk 
information & photo to: EC. Corsrc 
120 SkformcMt Trace, Alkxtoi C 
3Q338 U5A. 

AUTOMOBILES 

CONFUSED? 

THE MOST UP-TO-DATE 
Crr import guide explains step by sfc 
haw easy it is to buy Direct, import 
drive a Mercedes, Porsche, BMW el 
Sand U5S59 JO m= 

S4S. Horctmana 2390 Fkmburg, 
Katharinenflr. 12, West Germany 

AUTO RENTALS 



AUTO SHIPPING 




MW LONDON AGENCY offers posi-. IAUY 26t o«*i«tt iwmnuricator, trv 
nans for models. Soma Encash re- tn^xd. seeks PuhtcRekmon/sales po- 
guwd. Room & board avalane. CaH Jtan- Wrrta to: Bax 2601, Herald 
Theresa 44-1-938-3604. Tribune, 92521 Newly Cedex, Ftbiob 



AUTO CONVERSION 


1 Place Your Classified Ad Quickly and Easily 1 


in the | 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

— fly Phan*: Call yww food tHT representative with your text. You 
will be informed of the cost immediately, and onos prepayment is 
made your ad wtQ appear within 48 hours. 

Coefc The basic rate is SWH per fine per day + kxte tares. There are 
®- 25 letters, signs and spaces in the fir* Sne and 36m the folfawing bies. 

Minimum space is 2 Snes. No abbreviabans accepted. 

— Orexfit Carries American Express, Diner's dub. Eurocard, Master 

Y- Card, Access and Visa 

7 JL HEAD OFFICE 

LATIN AMERICA 

fteis. (For classified only}: 
^ 747-46-00. 

f. EUROPE 

he 

rie Amaterdan: 26-36-15. 

4 Athens: 361-83977360-2421 . 

Brweeeb: 343-1899. 

Beenee Airwu 41 40 31 
(Depi. 312J 

Caracas: 33 1454 

Guayaquil: 51 4505 

Unto: 417 852 
ftonaroa: 6905 11 

San Jour 22-1055 

Santiago: 6961 555 

Sao PnakB 852 1893 

MIDDLE EAST 

_ riufririwt (069) 72-67-55. 

Bahrain: 246303. 

Lausaanto 29-58-94. 

Ushers: 67-27-93/66-2544. 

« London: (01) B36-4802. 

A Madrid: 455-2891 7455-3306. 

Maw (02) 7531445. 
Norwnjr: (03) B45545. 

Rente: 679-3437. 

Sweden: (08) 7569229. 

Tel Avhr 03455 559. 
ns Vienna: Contact Frankfort. 

1 UNITB) STATES 

Kuwvrih 5614485. 

Lebanon: 341 457/8/9. 

Qatar 416535. 

Saudi AitriMa: 

Jeddah: 667-1500. 

U-AX: Dubai 224161. 

FAR EAST 

Bangkok: 390-06-57. 

Hang Kan 5-213671. 

Mona* 817 07 49. 

5oowfa 735 87 73. 

Singapore: 222-2725. 

Tinware 752 44 25/9. 

Tokyo: 504-1925. 

New York: [212] 752-3890. 
Wext Coast: (41 5) 362-8339. 

L 

SOUTH AFRICA 

i BryumUen; 421599. 

AUSTRALIA 

Mefltaamo: 690 8233. 

Sydney: 929 56 39, 957 43 20. 
Perth: 328 98 33. 

Pochfosgtan, Qoeendand: 

369 34 53. 


International Business Message Center 


GBGL 

Tne A'cv.easor Tm; 


' ij 



ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 

Poblah your budres* menage 
os the I nt ernational HertSd Tn- 
bune, where mare than a tfmrJ 
of a nsRBoa reader! world- 
wide, most of whom ere in : 
fnnaMa trtd Industry, wN 
rood it Just telex us (Peris . 
613S95J before 10 am, en- • 
taring mat we eon Wax you 
back, and your message mV 
appear nano i 43 hour*. The 
rSek US. $9.80 or load 
equivalent per Enm. You most 
indude cor npie tm end veriB- . 
able tilting address. j 

BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE & UK 
LTD COMPANIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 
BANKS 

INSURANCE COMPANIB 

Moling - T el ephon e - Telex 
Full se cretarial services 
Ue o f Man, Jersey. Guernesy, 
Gforohn, Param o , Liberia, 
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Ready made or spedd. 

Free explanatory booklet. 

Boat regi str ations 
London representative 

Aston Company Formc no ns 
Dept T1. 8 Victoria St.. Douglas, 
Isle of Man. Tel. 0*2-1 
Telex 627691 SP1VA G 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

COMPUTER PORTRAIT SYSTEMS 


FINANCIAL 

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ERA / DOT 

CONVBSK3NS 

* Customs brofaerage/borefing service 

* Pick-up & dakvery anywhere in the 

Eastern US. & Texas 

* Pro fes s i o n a l wmk using only the 


AUTOS TAX. FREE 
10 YEARS 

We Denver Cm to the World 

TRANSCO 


AUTOS TAX FREE 

OCEANWIDE 
MOTORS GmbH 



U. S. A. 

UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 


hcorporation ond vnonogBiicn! mr UK- 
tie of Mot, Juries, AngudJa, Chcrmti — w> ■ 

hfand.. Panama libe rio, G brotar and Estafabhed company retuires oddtion- 
mast other offshore areas. d coped to exploit re-aokitujixry tech- 

• Oanfidertfid odvrte ndogical breaklhroot 

• ImmerSate ovatabSity ket potwurtd. Mm 


5HUNG CH&WCAI5. Solvents & lab- 
oratory equipment. Univusa! Chwra 
ads & Solvents: France (1) 293 60 50. 
Tbi 220064. 

LOW COST RE5H»mAL STATUS in 
food ptzotfse. No phySKd presence 
required. Apply Bax 85, Douglas, We 


— I 2294 North Penn RxL. Hatfield, 

22% AJU fUAl RET URN, on average, PA. 19440, USA Tel: 215 822 6852 
to been generate d^ by the farfcbean Tetox 4971917-CHAMP 

Basin Inveshnent Trusts Unrt Trust I 
Mortgage PoaL Details: Fnt Intma- 
uond into Co. Ud, Dept. 850, PO 
Box 302, 1005 San Jew, Costa tea. 

Telex: 2fel. 

EARN 30% - 35%. MVEST in short 
term comnerod poser notes. Aied 
Ltd, PO Bax 422 Harrisonburg, V«r- 
gnia 22801, USA. 

DIAMONDS 
DIAMONDS 

Your best buy. 

fine d ku nondi in any price range 
at fewest wholesale prices 
drasr bom Antwerp 
crater of the dtonond world. 

Ful guarantee. 

Far free price 1st write 
Joac hi m G otdendein 


u -f & Te*as TRANSCO ’^ exp&ieticed oar trader far 

* Profonionof wwfc using only the ■ I'NI’Uvk/ Mercedes, Porsche, BMW. (mmadale 

Kghert qudhY campwients Keeping a constant stock of more Itrxi cWvery. FJ service import/ export, 

* Giicxcxiieod ffA / DOT a pproval 300 brand new cars, LhS. DOT & B"A, shipping for tounst 

OUMPAGNE MVansnL making 5000 happy dfenfc every yerx. deder. OarewSMrtrys GntoH 

2294 North Penn RxL. Hatfield. Send far free miAtcolor catalog. Tersteegenstr. 8. 4 Duesseldarf, W. 
PA. 1 9440, ISA Td: 215 821 6852 Transco SA, 95 Noorddomu Genwxiy (0} 21 f -434646. Hx 8587374. 



Transas SA, 95 Nocxdetann 
2030 Antwerp, Belaum 
Tel 323/542 62 40. fix ^07 TRANS B 


dhxnantexport 

EstafaUwdT928 


PeBcoanstraat 6Z 8-2018 Antwerp 
Bd aium - TeL (32 3234 07 51 


AUTOS TAX FREE 

TRASCO 

INTBINATK3NAL 

LKD. Mercedes Tax Free 
L xnoitone s 36" & 4 4" 

Armored cars and Emourines 


IB AUIOAM3BUES 
EXIRAORDMAKB 

if you are in the maiket for an 
"extroord in ory' automobBe contact in 

WX provide Excafibur, Stutz, Genet, 1 
Zimmer, Stter Aston Martin, 

Rolls Rayoe, Bentley aid any Other 
"extraordinary' automook. 

Visit our rfiowroom in Matte Gate at 
t el e p hone (931 257479 or telex 479550 
AUTO MC or 469870 MCS MC 


TAX FRS CARS 
P.CT. 

* /I! 01 ??* brawl new 

Send USS5 for catdaq 


HEALTH SERVICES 



• Bearer shore* 

• Boat regst ro trais 

■ AcccHXilHig & admnsrretwr. 

• Mdl, telepione & telea 
Free eatetotry booklet from: 

SELECT CORPORATE 
SBtVICES UD 
Head Office 

MS Ffeaiant, Donato. Me of Man 
Teh Doudre (6624) 23718 
Telex 628554 SELECT G 


ndogied brecJdhrou^i. UnTunted mtr- ~ 

inwBtm * fl HONG KONG NtGHTCUJB for sde. 
USS10.M0. High annual returns pro- Bat parental. Bax 2593. Herald Tri- 

Cedes. France 2ND PASSPORT 35 countries. GMC, 

26 Meomenou, 106 76 Athens Greece 


[ TIE INTERNATIONAL Inc. UT. Your Bddun - TeL (32 3} 234 07 51 Armored cars aid Erna 
telex 6377 unlracable. Please Ifar no. Tlx.- 71/79 syl b. Ar the Diamond Oub. Coach built eon 
or petod address to fix no. 528479 W. Heart of Antwerp Diamond industry Other makes & exotics 

Germany. ■ — — 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE, for i mm erfote dekvery 

FROM STOCK 

Beet eervice, dripping, iRnian, 
band, cemnm in USA 



LOW COST FLIGHTS 


RUTE INC. 


London Representative 
2-5 Old BondS.. London W1 
Tel 01-4934244. Tbt 28247 SC5LDN G 


PARIS 

PRKTIGKXIS AVENUE 
ART GALLERY 

Sttocled antiques and contemporary 
fine nbiecu of art. Owner would study 

75002 Pan, who will forward. 


hong kong nkshtoub for sde. Shopping in Europe? Visit 

Best pwentat Box 2593, Herdd Tri- ^ 

bune, 92521 NemBy Ceaen. France DIAMONDLAND 

2ND PASSPORT 35 countries. GMC A _J 1 * ft^jhawraom 1 n 
26 WeawHiou, 106 76 Athens Greece Antwerp, Diamond Gty 
' Appetaanstr 33A. Tel: 323/2343612. 

BUSINESS SERVICES OFFICE SERVICES ~~ 


Ovw 100 units in stock 
World wide delivery 
Direct from source 
D.O.T. & EPA 


TAUNUSS11L 

WGmL.Nl 


6000 F RANKFURT 

>-232361, Ik 411559 


Tek London 
Telex (51) 8 


1)629 7779 
2 TRAS G. 


MTL 

BEAUTffUL PEOPLE 

UNLUWTB) INC 
USJL 4 WORLDWIDE 


18 ct Gold. Steel ond 18 ct Gold, Steel; water resistant 3? m. Quartz. 
For tnfonrwJfon write EBEL SA, 2300 la Ow^-de-^orids/Switerlcnd. 


SWATCH WATCHES 

MMmun q uml iiiee 500 item 
No InWt o ti om 
Serious offer* to: 

Stoxria Handi fe 8 Rnaa AG.. 

Ifodttemtein 

TeL- 075/2 13 90. The.- 778*9 

RDUOARY BANCOR; on large a& 
later ofaed loon. The only oOtaner- -- _ - - 

ad bonk with a rep r esen tat ive office (06*4] 23733. tfa 6279C 

in London speac5sxw in Ihs service. 

Arab Overseas Banf & Trust (W1J COIN OftEB, rmifcons. 
lid. 28 Bfadi Prince Road. London Bank to bank base. 
SEI td ; 01-735 0171 41545 BPKTHX 


C.CM. LTD 

Corap a n es formed UJL Si worfawida 
induing Isle af Man, Turks & Cr-r rt 
Anguilla. Panama ate bberc. 

For further infomtanon. please contort 


A c o rrelate penond & business service 
providing a unque cdleetMO of 
Ideated, versatile & muttiknaual 
■ndviduds for ofl sood £ 
promobond oeoanaRS. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th S>.. NXC. 10019 
Service Representatives 
NeeeWWoridwde. 


PARIS 

iwar CHAMPS aYSffiS 

RENT 

YOUR OFFICE 

with afl faeBBies 

LE SATBlira 8 rue Copenvc 
75116 Pah. TAP3U 
Teto le ictel 620 183F. 


T rosco London Lid. 

6567 Park Lane, London W.l. 

Switzerland - UK - W. Germany 


ENGLISH EXPERTS 


- HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSTORT, 

good r fryn mt* rep 0 ^ 1 - '2 countries oodyzad. De- 


YOUR OFFICE M PARIS RIGHT ON 

THE CHAMPS ELY5EES 

LUXURY SERVICED OFFICES 
T elephone answering, Tefav, Fax 
secretarial, meeting room 
ACTE 66 Chomps Bysees Pans 8th 
Tel: 562 fo DO. Thu M9157F 


curaentatai 
USA our 
sdvon ta gs 

»CS MOTOR COMPANY 

Bournemouth, Eagtod 

(M 202 744643. 

TU 41254 HUGHS G. 

GUGEOT, Land Raws. Range 
Toyota 4x4. tropKd specs. 
Zonneboan 18. Mcarsswv 
b-oek. Holfarte 10)30445*2. H» 47082 


moMSFoac 

Mercedes SOOSH, new. blue block 
Mercedes 500 SB. new white/ pdammo 
AtecedesMO ' SH. new, cSarriond bkie 
Porsche 928 S automatic, new, blade 
other rndtes and models upon request 
Sane day registration possible. 

K2KOVTTS 

Ooridentoan 36 048027 Zurich 
Teh 01/202 76 10. Teles 81SP15. 

saa2 r ^r onyn3 ® ?17 ’ 


BjMWSHD tax free 
) 76099. The: 312242 



NYONEWAY$150.Ev^ 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 

1 ^ camp ng 
3350- SafaricentiB London 437743? 

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