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RNAHONAL 



’.'SW 

;V DATA AP PEAR On page 

No. 31,880 



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Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


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ZURICH, TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 1985 






115 M Ngaria 170 K. Yi MID 


4 ‘.ESTABLISHED 1887 


Hassan 





MomcooStop b 
first Papd Visit 
To Arab Nation 


Morocco — 
^ W n, on tk to 
-- i<;; <***** £®Pd Itop 10 an Arab na- 

Vr-V P 00 * Omstiaas and Mos- 

- -y. «*« to abandon their 

- dd of war and polemics, 

and to bmy tueir differences. 

Vatican officials described tbc 
Moroccan stem as one of the Ro- 

- V. man Catholic Church’s most szeoif- 
jrant overtures to Islam. JofanPaul 

: ■> t ‘ from Nairobi, where he 

- aided a 12-day, six-nation tour of 
• black Africa. 

After celebrating Mass for Ro- 

- / ^ man Catholics, mostly French and 
S panish . in Morocco, an over- 

■~ .. j. whelmingjy Moslem nation, the 

- . ^ pope conferred with King Hassan 

? H, who claims to be a direct descen- 
r ? dant of the prophet Mohammed. 

•' The two men reportedly were to 
focus cm the Middle East and tt«* 

... issue of Jerusalem, which was 

tured by Israel in the 1967 

. Israeli war. Earlier, on the flight to 
. - ■ ; . Morocco, the pope said that the 

- world “cannot deny Israel the right 

to he a state.” But he said that the 

„ • status erf Jerusalem should be rc- 
viewed. 

. ’• The Vatican has suggested that 

, Jerusalem's holy sites be placed un- 
. ; /der an international authority 
equally acceptable to Christians, 
Moslems and Jews — a sentiment 

The pope's visit pointed up Afri- 
ca’s patchwork of refejoos and 
ammist befiefs. Page o. 

shared by Hassan. Israd maintains 
~ that Jerusalem is an integral part of 

7-^ti. r S 2 =r IsraeL 

John Paul addressed about 
irtl? TtTu'c 80,000 Moroccans at the Mcham- 
” mod V Stadium, the first time that 
' the pope has spoken to a large 
group of Moslems. 

finding Morocco's tradition of 
tolerance, wKchite saidis reflected * 
. in the presence of Jews and Grifc 
- -ir 1 tiang since ancient rimes, tbepope 
said that “dialogue between Chns- 
and Moslems is today more 
necessary than ever ” 

“Moslems and Christians have 
generally understood each other 
badly,” be said, “and sometimes, in 
the past, we have opposed each 
other and even exhausted each oth- 
er in polemics and wan." 

“I think- God invites us today to 
“Sii change our old habits,”, he said. 

“ We have iq respect each other and 
also stimulate each other in good 
works on the road of God.” 

Catholicism and Islam represent 
the two hugest religious groups in 
the world, with nearly BOG mOfion 
and 600 million followers, respec- 
tively. _ 

Noting “important differences 
between the two religions, the pope 
said that they could be accepted 
“with humilit y and respect in mu- 
tual tolerance.” 

“Every man expects to be re- 
spected for what he is," John Paul 
said, “and what he believes in con- 
science. Here is the true sense of 
religious freedom which respects 
both God and men.” 

Welcoming the pope to Moroc- 
co, crowds hned the 20-mile (32- 
- kil ometer ) highway from the air- 
* port to Casablanca- 

Giam color photographs of Has- 
san and John Paul taken an differ- 
ent occasions but pasted together, 
showed them as though kneeling 
before each other. The same pic- 
tures dominated the front page or 
the government newspaper Le 
Matin du Sahara. 

An estimated 98 percent of Mo- 
rocco’s 23 million inhabitants are 
Modems. The 65,000 Christian res- 
' citizensof France 



SAVED FROM CARNAGE — A distraught man 
hugged his son moments after they escaped death Mon- 


Tha *aooaicd Press 


day from a car bomb outside a West Beirut restaurant 
Another roan guided them from the site. Story, Page 5. 


Botha, Quire 



ers 


Fail to Agree in Talks 


New Zealand Says It May Sue France for Sabotage 


Reuters 

WELLINGTON, New Zealand 
— New Zealand wfli sue France if 
French involvement in the sinking 
of the Greenpeace ship Rainbow 
Warrior is proven. Prime Minister 
David Lange said Monday. 

Mr. tjmg y said that New Zea- 
land would seek damag es for the 
erologtst movement, for the family 
of a crewmember lolled Mien a 
bomb sank the boat and for itself if 
an pfffeal French role were estab- 
lished. [ 

The vessel sank in Auckland on 
July 10. It was tohave led a protest 
fleet to France's nuclear test area at 
Mururoa AtolL 

A french-leaking couple have 
been charged m New Zealand. with 
snkingtheship and murdering the 
c re wmem ber. President Francois 
Mitterrand has ordered a tcp-levd 


inquiry into suggestions that 
French secret services were behind 
the attack. 

An ocean-going tug, named the 
Greenpeace, left Amsterdam on 
Sunday to replace the Rainbow 
Warrior. 

In Paris, the chairman of Green- 
peace, David McTaggart, vowed to 
continue a campaign against 
French tests in the Pacific despite 
an order Sunday by Mr. Mitterrand 
authorizing the use of force against 
unauthorized vessels in the area. 

“This makes no difference at 
an," Mr. McTaggart said, com- 
menting on Mr. Mitterrand's direc- 
tive to the armed forces to keep 
intruders out of French territorial 
waters and air space around Mur- 
uros and Fangatau atolls. 

Mr. Lange described Mr. Mitter- 
rand's statement as “another exam- 


ple of the consistently insensitive French territory would be arrested 
attitude” of France over the lest and prosecuted. 


program. 

French officials said the direc- 
tive was a public restatement of a 
permanent ban on unauthorized 
vessels penetrating a limit of 12 
nautical mil*** around the atolls. 

They said there would also be a 
60-mile (97-ldlometer) “security 
zone" outside territorial waters bat 
this was equivalent to a danger 
warning to shipping, not a legal 
ban on entry. 

Greenpeace said that during its 
past campaigns in the Pacific the 
French Navy had violated interna- 
tional law by boarding its vessels 
outside the 12-mile limit but within 
the security zone. 

Mr. Mitterrand said anyone who 
made an unauthorized landing on 


The prospect of a highly publi- 
cized confrontation at sea with 
Greenpeace adds to Mr. Mitter- 
rand's problems over the scandal. 

Bernard Tricot, a Gauilist ap- 
pointed to investigate whether the 
sabotage operation was planned in 
Paris, is expected to report his con- 
clusions Thursday. 

Mr. Lange said be had no sus- 
tainable proof of an official French 
role but said Wellington was taking 
very seriously French press reports 
linking the sinking to France's in- 
telligence service; the General Di- 
rectorate for External Security. 

. IT true, the reports “would con- 
st! ute a gross breach of the prinri- 
piss of international law," be add- 
ed. Mr. Lange said Wellington had 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 2) 


The Associated Press 

PRETORIA — South African 
church leaders met Monday with 
President Pieter W. Botha, and Me 
said later they found themselves so 
far apart on how to deal with racial 
unrest that ,L we hardly began to 
communicate at all.” 

The meeting was called to dis- 
cuss a year of black anti-apartheid 
protests in which more inan 600 
people have been killed. 

Bishop Desmond M. Tutu, 
snubbed last month when he asked 
for a private meeting with Mr. Bo- 
tha, refused to attend. 

Mr. Botha met the Reverend Jer- 
ry Falwell, the outspoken Ameri- 
can fun damentalis t minister , for 
private talks before Monday's 
meeting. 

Mr. Falwell said after the meet- 
ing: “This country is making pro- 
gress." 

However, the nine South .African 
clergymen who met with Mr. Botha 
gave a gloomy assessment of the 
talks, and one said that Mr. Fal- 
well 's perception of (he problems 
involved was “totally inaccurate ” 

“There are two South Africas 
and there are two clocks running in 
South Africa, the one at past mid- 
night and the other one at long 
before midnight.” said the Rever- 
end Peter Storey, a white who is the 
head of the Methodist church in 
South Africa. 

“I think we were trying to repre- 
sent those for whom midnight has 
struck,” he said, adding that be 
meant “the South Africa where 
hopelessness and despair has 
welled over into rage.” 

There are two million Method- 
ists in South Africa x 75 percent per- 
cent of whom are black. 

“The two perceptions of South 
Africa were so different we hardly 
began to communicate at all, "said 
Archbishop Denis Hurley, based in 
Durban, who is white and is the 
chairman of the Southern African 
Catholic Bishops' Conference. 

[Radio South Africa, in a com- 
mentary that often presages im- 
pending government moves, said 
that action taken under emeigency 
powers imposed in 36 areas Jnly 21 
bad not curbed unrest, Reuters re- 
ported from Johannesburg. 


[“Hie protection that people are 
entitled to under the law is still 
inadequate, and lawless behavior 
continues to flourish because so 
much of it goes unpunished,” the 
broadcast said. 

[The emergency' powers, some of 
which have not yet been invoked, 
allow police to detain people indef- 
initely without trial, impose cur- 
fews, restrict movement and censor 
the press.} 

Bishop Tutu, the winner of last 
yearns Nobel Peace Prize, said that 
he did not believe Mr. Botha genu- 
inely' wanted to talk to blacks “who 
don't agree with him." 

Bishop Tutu is the Anglican 
bishop of Johannesburg and one of 
South Africa's best-known foes of 
apartheid, the race segregation sys- 
tem under which five milli on South 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 



Pieter W. Botha 


Dfweyton , South Africa : 
A Township Under Siege 


By Glenn Frankel 

Washington Post Service 

DAVEYTON. South Africa —It 
began on the bleak, littered streets 
of this township on tbc eastern 
edge of Johannesburg the same 
way it has begun i in dozens of other 
black communities — with the chil- 
dren. 

Some of them walked out of H.B. 
Nyathi High School one day last 
August, angered over regulations 
gating new age limits on student 
enrollment, over corporal punish- 
ment and, ultimately, over the re- 
lentless inferiority of the racially 
segregated education they receive. 

They marched, chanted and de- 
fied the police, who ordered them 
to return to classes. But the boycott 
grew to include three other schools, 
and inevitably there was a confron- 
tation with police Aug. 30. 

When it was over, high school 
classrooms had been set ablaze, ve- 
hicles had been stoned and police 
had shot dead four persons be- 
tween 9 and 22 years old. 


The deaths did not end the boy- 
cott. which by then had grown to 
include such other local issues as. 
rent increases and the presence of 
soldiers in the township. 

By then this was a township at 
war. More youths were killed by 
police, two of them in an abortive 
attack on the mayor's house. Fire 
members of a family were killed in 
a gasoline-bomb attack, allegedly 
because they refused to honor a 
two-day strike and boycott The 
bouses of four local policemen were 
burned and looted, as were half a 
dozen shops. 

And so last month Daveyton 
joined the list of 36 cities and towns 
designated in the government's 
emergency powers decree. More 
than a dozen persons hare been 
rounded up. 

While each of the 36 designated 
areas has its own chronicle of un- 
rest its own grievances and its own 
young martyrs, the story of Davey- 

(Continued on Page 6, CoL 1) 


li>F« '•’» • 


~a.-sxy 


• • 

• » -• 
.***•» - • 

♦** i ' s * . 
JUS* 
i.. ■«’ 


Daughter 
Of Bhutto 
Going Home 

By Steven R. Weisman 

New York Times Service 
KARACHI. Pakistan — After a 
and a half of self-imposed ex.- 
Ieader of the opposi- 


JltV- 


tion to President Mohammed 23a 
uI-Haq is scheduled to return to 
Pakistan this week for a family fu- 
neral and an emotional but uncer- 
tain welcome. 

Political leaders said Sunday 
that the returning exile, B enazir 
Bhutto. 31. the daughter of the late 
President Znlfikar Ali Bhutto, is 
certain to use her stay here to try to 
revitalize the opposition to General 
Tin, who has nded for eight years 
under martial law. 

Miss Bhutto is widely considered 
the heir to the onco-powerful politi- 
cal or ganiza tion of her father, who 
was overthrown by General Zia in 
1977 and later hanged amid much 
international criticism. 

In anticipation of posable trou- 
ble, the Zia government has placed 
several political allies of Miss 
Bhutto under house arrest and 
barred others from joining her 
when she returns with the body of 
her 26 -year-old brother to bury him 

at the Bhutto estate in southeastern 



Guerrillas, Political Allies 
Split on Raids in Salvador 


Benazir Bhutto leaving a mortuary at Cannes, France, after 
the coffin of her brother, Shahnawaz, was closed Monday. 


Pakistan. 

Government officials said that 

jdaatsare mostly citizens the^Swould be outin force body was rommj: uv- 

and Spain, which jointly ruled Mo- ^*xda y , when Miss Bhutto is mg room of his apartment m 
rocco until 1956. 


scheduled to arrive, and thar army 
troops might be summoned to han- 
dle the crowds that are expected to 
greet ha. 

Adding to the drama is the mys- 
tery surrounding the death of her 
brother, Shahnawaz Bhutto, whose 
body was found July 18 in the liy- 


rannes- France. A police investiga- 
tion had held up release of his body 
to her until Monday. 

While Miss Bhutto has spoken 
out from exile as an opposition 
leader, her brother played a more 
shadowy role. He and another 
brother, Murtaza, were said to lead 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 2) 


By Robert J. McCartney 

Washington Post Service 

MEXICO CITY — Deep fis- 
sures hare developed between El 
Salvador’s Marxist guerrilla leaders 
and the more moderate politicians 
allied with them. The politicians 
have begun to criticize publicly the 
guerrillas’ attacks on civilian tar- 
gets. 

The disputes reinforce the per- 
ception that the guerrillas often op- 
erate independently of the civil- 
ians. such as Guillermo Ungo and 
Rubdn Zamora, who live in exile 
and travel widely as spokesmen for 
the rebel movement 

This disagreement is likely to 
fuel assertions by critics of the Sal- 
vadoran left that the politicians 
lack significant influence. Included 
among these critics is the Reagan 
administration, which has main- 
tained that the military leaders 
wield the real power and the politi- 
cians help give the rebels a more 
moderate image than they deserve. 

There is a parallel in Nicaragua, 
where the Sandinisr rebels gained 
international support for then rev- 
olution in part occause they were 
allied with moderate businessmen 
and politicians. Since 1979, when 
the Sandinists took power, many of 
these former allies have become 
disillusioned and have turned 
against the government 


The politicians in El Salvador’s 
rebel movement had differences 
with the guerrillas in the past but 
generally kepi them private. Since 
the spring, however, leftist civilian 
leaders hare criticized the guerril- 
las publicly for burning town halls 
and, most dramatically, for attack- 
ing a row of sidewalk caffes in San 
Salvador in June. Four U.S. Ma- 
rines and nine civilians, including 
two Americans, were trilled in that 
attack. 

Mr. Ungo and Mr. Zamora is- 
sued formal statements objecting 
to the caffe attack. 

However, top guerrilla leaders 
brushed aside these objections at a 
rare meeting last month with 
American reporters in rebel territo- 
ry- 

“It is completely normal that in 
some situations there can be differ- 
ent opinions," said the guerrilla 
commander, Jorge Shafik Han dal 

A full rupture seems unlikely in 
the near future, but the disputes 
appear likdy to diminis h the credi- 
bility of Mr. Ungo and Mr. Zamora 
in their role as spokesmen for the 
Salvadoran left, according to Sal- 
vadoran and U.S. political observ- 
ers. 

Mr. lingo played down the dif- 
ferences in an interview, saying 
that some disagreements had be- 
come open this year because the 
guerrillas and politicians are con- 



GiriUenno Ungp 


suiting more closely on a greater 
number of issues than in the past. 

Mr. Ungo is president of the 
Democratic Revolutionary Front, 
known by its Spanish initials FDR, 
which indudes several political 
parties and professional organiza- 
tions that share an ideology dose to 
that of West European social dem- 
ocratic parties. The FDR is aided 
with the Farabundo Marti Nation- 
al Liberation Front, or FMLN, 
which consists of fire guerrilla 
forces. 

The FMLN declines to call itself 
Marxist, but its political statements 
and guerrilla warfare are firmly 
within the Marxist revolutionary 
tradition. 

Differences have arisen in the 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL S) 




InRussio, When All Eke Foils, There Is the Bread 

It Is life. People Say in Song, Verse and Legend, and It’s Always Delicious 

-■■■' J n ntch that « nnl men anvwhrre i 


By Seth Mydans 

New York V«ws Sera* . sugn . 

MOSCOW — The collective rich, black borvdinsky, with ns 

TT^ bread justifies the 


But the bread itself is deliciously Russian — 
from the soft, white kmd cafledsto/u^nv, to the 
slightly sweet, caraway-tasting r&uky, tothe 
ri£. black bomdiruky, with its coriander seafc. 

pride the nation takes m 




a gain a rush that is not seen anywhere dse in 
this nation of perpetual shortage. 

“Just because you have no trucks am 1 sup- 
posed to have empty shelves?” a store worker 
shouted into a telephone on a winter day in 
bread store No. 675. “The people are calling for 
bread. How are we going to feed the people?” 

Three or no suw*- — j - ujw 77-;Tr'^L_, In the bread start, as in few other places in 

Their crime: feeding bread to^ .^ twaimthandbu^crf ayi^^No^tf ^ the economy, one can find real pride, not the 

The very notion has an jdmos *8^ ^ tbe street are like Jt,wth ovej ^ [he mflitaty parade or the propaganda 

rinss to Russian ears. Pigs, after all, unswept Boors and listless, sometimes ty ^ ^ p^de of a Russian woman m 

-- — not only scarce wnotovees. . . „ tite warmth of her kitdKn. 

Bringing a special bag of hard, honeyed cook- 
ies known as pryoniks from a back room, a 
saleswoman sBps them to a small boy and shoos 
him away with the Russian expression to chil- 
dren, “Eat, eat and grow up big” 

When all dse fails, as during the siege of 

D - ■ fiSSSSSS s 53 £a- 



The bread justifies 

bio anybread aore and .you Mtta 


^^.---ssssrss 

vJredittd with saving starving pe^le 300 sorts in the nation. 

.sas»-— ‘■«® ’S&.sssupis 

H. . .... fhoi Bficred quicxiy, wuu , .4 ,u- Ir/w^Ve nr w 

One poet said: “BnaAHi 



—■ agHSKSSSS 520“ 


not been seen 
are no eggs or vegetables 


words. Write it 

used as aitiro 8 ^ feed. 




Srnce 1955, officials say, the price of bread 
has not grate up, although the cost of producing 
it and of importing gram continues to rise. 
With a loaf of mead generally costing less 
(Continued on Page 6, CoL 7) 



BBC Checks 
On Security 
Create Furor 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — The British Broad- 
casting Corp„ embroiled in its sec- 
ond public controversy in a month, 
said Monday that some members 
of its staff were secretly checked by 
government security officers. 

“The system of so-called ‘vet- 
ting’ of BBC staff was introduced, 
at the request of the BBC, in 1937, 
and has continued under successive 
■administrations," the BBC said in a 
statement. 

The system only applied now to 
staff members who are “involved in 
sensitive areas, or require access to 
classified information." it added. 

Earlier, parliamentary opposi- 
tion leaders demanded a govern- 
ment statement Monday after for- 
mer senior BBC officials said that a 
report Sunday in The Observer 
about such procedures was true. 

Only the BBC itself decided 
whether to invoke the screening 
procedure, the statement said. The 
BBC also decided independently 
who to appoint to any post within 
the corporation, it added. 

The revelation, coming less than 
a month after the banning of a 
documentary featuring an alleged 
leader of the Irish Republican 
Army, was seen as a new blow to 
the BBCs reputation for indepen- 
dence and impartiality. 

The BBC is publicly funded, 
with its political and editorial inde- 
1 pendence guaranteed by its charier. 

Alastair Hetherington, former 
controller of the BBC in Scotland. 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


The Ntw Ycrt Tunca 


A Moscow worker tends an automatic bakery line making oriovsky bread, a popular type. 


INSIDE 

■An overcrowded feny 
sized near Harbin. China, 
ing at least 110 people. Page X 

■ UJS. officials, more alert now 
to spies, seek curbs on Soviet 
bloc businessmen- Page 3. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Braz2 would prefer to post- 
pone a new agreement with the 
IMF until next year, its finance 
minis ter said. 


■ Americans' personal income 
rose 0.4 percent last month, de- 
spite only a modest gain in 
ies. Page 9. 


SPORTS 

■ Cocaine me among major 
league baseball players has be- 
come a widespread, and mostly 
hidden, problem. Page 15. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 1985 


Advocates 
Approval of 
Euthanasia 


Renters 

THE HAG UE — A government 
commission has recommended that 
Dutch law be amended to allow 
euthanasia in cases where patients 
in acute distress make a reasoned 
request to doctors to be helped to 
die. 

A Health Ministry spokesman 
said that a report by the commis- 
sion of 1 5 lawyers, doctors and aca- 
demics released Monday urged 
amendments to the penal code to 
allow euthanasia in certain cases 
and subject to guidelines. 

Politicians, however, say iL is un- 
likely that any amendments will be 
passed before general elections in 
May. 

The Supreme Court ruled in 
1984 that medical ethics must be 
considered along with legal statutes 
in euthanasia prosecutions in the 
Netherlands. 

Since then courts have let several 
doctors charged with mercy killing 
go unpunished, and a leftist minor- 
ity party has introduced a bill that 
would allow euthanasia. The bill 
has been held up. awaiting the com- 
mission's recommendation. 

The Christian Democrats, a ma- 
jority in the governing coalition, 
still oppose liber alizin g the law. a 
spokesman said. 

The Labor Party joined the right- 
ist coalition government in holding 
up the bill pending Mondays re- 
port. 

A Labor Party spokesman said 
that amendment of the penal code 
along the commission's guidelines 
was technically possible but that it 
was unrealistic to expea it before 
the elections in May. 

The Health Ministry spokesman 
said 13 of the 15 members of the 
commission, which has studied the 
legal and social implications of 
mercy killin g since 1982. favored 
euthanasia in cases where patients 
in acute distress made a voluntary 
and well -considered request 

The report recommended, how- 
ever. that a donor planning a mer- 
cy killing consult first with an expe- 
rienced colleague. 

Under present law, doctors who 
commit euthanasia or aid suicide 
are liable to up to 12 years in pris- 
on. 

Several courts waived prosecu- 
tion after the doctors pleaded that 
they acted in line with medical eth- 
ics. but in the most recent case a 
doctor was found guilty of murder 
and given a one-year prison sen- 
tence. 



WORLD BRIEFS 


Poll of U.S. Teachers 

Shows Wide Discontent Assets of PLO Estimated at §5 Billion 

Over Pay and Prestige 


New York Timet Service 

NEW YORK — Two-thirds of 
American schoolteachers polled in 
a recent survey say they will remain 
as teachers, but nearly three- 
fourths of them balk at recom- 
mending the career to others. 


NEW YORK (AP) — The Palestine Liberation Otganizauon s finaa- 
tial holdings are worth more than S5 billion and generate SI billion 
vear. The New York Tunes Magazine reported. 

The portfolio is managed bv the Palestine National Fund and a gro^F 
tion with major reservations and 22 of Palestinian-owned financial mstilution^ Lhe report sad Sunday toe 
oercent said thev would flatly ad- Arab Bank Ltd., an Amman-based bank with assets of S 12 -5 billion, plays 

a key role in selecting PLO investments, u said. 

The magazine quoted sources close to the PLO as saying that a growing 
share of the group's funds is invested in Europe and the United States. 
But it noted that precise information on the holdings is difficult to obtam 
because assets in the portfolio are held indirectly through private individ- 
uals and numbered accounts. The nonfolio rcoortedly includes 


percent said they would flatly 
vise against becoming a teacher. 

While one-fourth of the teachers 
said they believed the status of the 
occupation was improving, 44 per- 
cent said respect for teachers had 


teuton 


The coffin of Shahnawaz Bhutto being put on a plane in France on Monday. 


Bhutto ’s Doughtier Returning Home 


(Continued from Page 1) 
an armed opposition group to Gen- 
eral Zia, which according to some 
reports was getting assistance from 
Libya. Afghanistan and other 
countries. The Pakistani govern- 
ment blamed the group for the hi- 
jacking of a Pakistan International 
Airlines jet in 1981. 

For three weeks, rumors have 
been spreading here that 
Shahnawaz Bhutto may have been 
slain, perhaps by agents of those 
giving him assistance. Some politi- 
cians said that Miss Bhutto seemed 
prepared to accuse the Zia regime. 
She said recently that her brother' s 


death Bad come “under mysterious 
circumstances, and it had nothing 
to do with his health.*’ 

Such is the esteem in which the 
Bhutto family is held that even 
General Zia said he “shared" then- 
sorrow and- sent word that he 
would not ; disrupt her return for the 
burial. 

; But many politicians doubt that 
Miss Bhutto is strong enough to 
have a significant impact on Paki- 
stani politics. They point out that 
the political situation has changed 
greatly since she went into exile 
early last year after nearly three 
years in prison. 


New Zealand Says It May Sue 
For Greenpeace Sabotage 


(Continued from Page 1) 
been careful not to make allega- 
tions a gains t France. 

However, “you will observe that 
the French themselves have gone to 
work on that issue with a will," he 
said. 

The principles of international 
law are that if “an instrument of 
government has offended the sov- 
ereignty of another nation, then it 
is for the aggrieved nation to claim 
on behalf of those who suffer loss 
and for itself .-for ail the affront that 
it has sustained." Mr. Lange said. 

Roland Leroy, the editor of the 
French Communist Parry l’Hu- 
manite said Monday that, if the 
sabotage was the work of French 
agents. Mr. Mitterrand himself 
must have known about iL 


“Nobody can think that a deci- 
sion of this importance was taken 
without the consent of the presi- 
dent," he said. He accused Mr. Mit- 
terrand, Prime Minister Laurent 
Fabius and -Defense Minister 
Charles Hemu of approving terror- 
ism. 

On the French right, some politi- 
cians openly endorsed the sinking. 
Jacques Larche, a member of the 
Senate for the center-right Union 
for French Democracy, said 
France had legitimate interests in 
the Pacific and should defend 
them. 

“The price is sometimes a high 
one. but one must know what one 
wants to achieve," Mr. Larche, 
rhairma n of the Senate's Legisla- 
tive Committee, told a radio inter- 
viewer. 


Diplomats and politicians, in- 
cluding some sympathetic to the 
Bhuttos, said that the opposition 
movement was in disarray, plagued 
by personal rivalries and differ- 
ences over tactics. These people 
doubted whether Miss Bhutto, who 
bas been living in London, could 
put the factions together or con- 
vince them to accept her as a lead- 
er. 

The biggest change in the atmo- 
sphere has come as a result of the 
elections in February of a new Na- 
tional Assembly and assemblies in 
each rtf the country’s four prov- 
inces. 

Genera] Zia, who was army chief 
of staff when he seized power, 
promised in 1983 that after the 
elections this year he would move 
the country back to civilian rule. 
But he banned participation in the 
elections by organized political 
parties and said that no matter who 
was elected, he would remain as 
president Still, many politicians 
say they believe he will have no 
choice but to fulfill his promise and 
lift martial law soon. 

Last week, the new' prime minis- 
ter, Mo hamm ed Khan Junejo, who 
was chosen by General Zia, startled 
many people by saying that martial 
law would be lifted and that a 
“complete restoration of democra- 
cy” would take place by Jan. 1. 

“It was the first public commit- 
ment by the government to lift 
martial law by a date certain,’' a 
Western diplomat said. ‘The tim- 
ing was very effective, because to 
some degree it takes the wind out of 
Benazir’s sails just as she is about to 
arrive." 


The teachers said thev were un- diminished in the last Eve years. u»o nuu. : — --- r- — r _ - .u" u.wiw 

derpaid, but a dded that they were After paperwork and pay, the holdings in several US. corpora nons, a rani mis and 

moreworried iboutotcesave pa- teachers saidthe next mostserious Islands, hotels and office buddings in several Middle Eastern capitals and 
perwork than a bom low ' problem was a lack of parental in- real estate in the United btates. 

Tbe 1,346 respondents reported volvement with education. - ■ 

Although President Ronald Rea- j ■■ m n a o 

gan and administration education K fta gfln ^ShftVfl mflflflZ F 1 3.1 KS AfC SCI 
officials have suoken freouentlv of SANTA BARBARA, California (AP> — Foreign Minister Eduard A. 

Shevardnadze of the Sonet Union has accepted an invitation to meet 
President Ronald Reagan for talks at the White House on SepL 27. it was 

announced Monday. v-- . , , 

Larry Speakes, the chief White House spokesman, said the two men 
would renew all areas of U.S.-Soviet relations and help prepare for Mr. 
Reagan's meeting in November with the Soviet leader. Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev, in Geneva.- . • . 

The Geneva meeting, sfeefor Nov. 19-20, will be Mr. Reagan s first 
meeting with a Soviet leader. Mr. Speakes. in Cakfonna with the 
vacati oning president, said Secretary of State George P. Shultz and the 
1 ID iiv rhmrm**] president's national security adviser. Robert C. McFartane. would take 
-*-±UJ±rB uruwntxi next month's meetings. 

United Press International 

BEIJING — At least 110 per- 


an average salary of $23,345 a year, 
and they said the salary should be 
increased by more than $6,000. 

The survey was mailed to teach- 
ers in May by Educational Re- 
search Service of Arlington, Virgin- 
ia. It had a margin of sampling 
error of 3 percentage points. 

The study shows that the nation 


officials have spoken frequently of 
a need to curb violence in schools, 
only 2 percent of the teachers said 
they feared a physical at tack on 
themselves or on their students. 


Overloaded Ferry 
Capsizes in China; 


son. president of the research ser- 
vice. He said die teachers* major 
worries often differed from those 
listed by educational reformers or 
by teachers’ unions. 

Whether teachers will encourage 
others to enter the profession is an 
issue of increasing concent to 
school leaders. National studies 
have said schools are faring a se- 
vere shortage of teachers m the 
next decade, with about half the 
present teachers expected to retire. 
Some big-city districts such as New 
York already cannot meet their 
staffing needs. 

The survey found that only one- 
fcnirth of the teachers would whole- 
heartedly recommend teaching to a 
young person making a career deci- 
sion. Slightly more than half said 
# they would make the recommends- 


Rebel Rift 
Opening in 
El Salvador 


sons drowned wh<m SermJS- Peace Talks Suspended in Sri l a nk a 

ed ferry capsized near the north- DELHI (AP) The deadlocked peace talks between the 

gove rnment of Sri Lanka and Tamil rebels were suspended Monday when* 
the militants walked out, a rebel spokesman said. 

Salman Haidar, the spokesman for the Foreign Ministry, said that the 
suspension was to permit Sri Lanka to prepare a new proposal for the 
Tamil monority’s demands for more regional autonomy. “We trust the 
talks will be resumed later tins week." he said. 

The Tamils broke off the talks after alleging that the Sri La n ka n Army 
massacred 200 civilians Saturday in a raid on two eastern villages near 
Trincomalee on the northeast coast of the island. The government called 
the charges a “total invention." 



.S. Marines, 


'To walk the streets of Paris - without deadline or curfew - 
stalking everything wonderful to eat. 


To get lost and rained on. To find the most 
romantic spot for breakfast and the trustiest 
cheesemonger. To quarrel with butchers and 
descend into the great bakers celbr as he 
pulls the days bread from the oven. To be 
tempted and indulged by the ertys most 
brilliant chefs. Its the dream of every one of 
us in love with food. And Patricia Wells has 
done it- No serious hedonist should go to 
Paris without it, and reading it at home is a 
little closer to actually being there? 

— Gael Greene, New^foricMegesne 
"Jt is impossible to read it and not want to 
be in Paris. Now" 

- Ifv^ Hwnn Tfre Angeles Times 

"...one of the best guides in English. And, 
mon Dieu, if was done by an American. 
There will be consternation in high places." 

- “ - ■ “ ~ York' 


The "Food Lovers Guide to Paris? by the 
International Herald Tribunes restaurant critic 
Patricia Wfells, includes lively critical commentary, 
anecdotes, history and local lore. A great gift 
idea. Paperback, over 300 pages with 140 
evocative photographs. $ 11.95, plus postage: 
add $ 150 in Europe and $ 4.00 outside Europe. 

f^nte 

I 


International Herald Tribune Book Division. 

181, avenue Charles-de-Caufe. 92521 NeuSy Cedex, France. 

Please send me: 

copies or FOOD Lava'S GUIDE TO PARIS/ 

at $ 11.95 each, plus postage: 

odd S 150 each in Europe, S 4 each outside Europe. 

Please check method of payment: 

Enclosed is my payment. (Payment can be made in any 
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Signature 



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Address 




Country 


2D645 


(Continued from Page 1) 
past between the guerrillas and 
their political allies. 

Last year, for instance, senior 
political leaders criticized the guer- 
rillas — although not for attribu- 
tion — for confiscating the identity 
cards of Salvadoran citizens to pre- 
vent them from voting in the 
March presidential elections. The 
political front also quietly urged 
the guerrillas to halt forced recruit- 
ment, a practice that the guerrilla 
leadership now says was an error. 

In both of those cases, the politi- 
cal leaders avoided acknowledging 
their criticism in public, even under 
persistent questioning. 

Last March, however, Mr. Ungo 
publicly criticized the guerrillas for 
attacking and burning several town 
halls before the March 31 legisla- 
tive elections. He said the attacks 
were having a negative pohticai im- 
pact. 

A much more important dispute 
came to light following the ' ‘ 
of the four unarmed u.J 
who worked as 
and other diners at the 
caffes. 

Mr. Zamora's party, the Popular 
Social Christian Movement, issued 
a communiqufe five days after the 
attack condemning “the terrorist 
actions" at the restaurants because 
tbe attack violated the Geneva 
Conventions. 

• Mr. Zamora later said that the 
U.S. Marines were a legitimate mil- 
itary target, but his party remained 
on record as condemning the as- 
sault. 

Mr. Ungo waited nearly two 
weeks to comment, but his Nation- 
al Revolutionary Movement finally 
said that it “does not share in, or 
approve, all of tbe actions that 
some of our affies carry out, such as 
the lamentable events" of the caffe 
assault. 

There were several indications 
that even some dements in the 
riUa leadership were taken 
aback by the brutality of that at- 
tack. 

Tbe guerrilla front’s general 
command waited five days before it 
issued a formal communiqufe 
claiming responsibility, and all of 
its statements focused cm the kill- 
ings of the U.S. Marines and 
! steered away from discussing the 
| civilian death tolL 

It was unclear whether the criti- 
I dsm would help deter the guerrillas 
| In the future. 

Mr. Ungo said that the political 
' front had reached some agreements 
| with the guerrillas on protecting 
the civilian population, although he 


ferry capsized near tbe north- 
eastern city of Harbin, officials 
said Monday. 

Tbe authorities said that as many 
as 260 persons may have drowned 
in the Songhua River on Sunday 
after tbe sinking of a 65-foot f 20- 
meter) boat ferrying passengers 
from Taiyang Island Park. Esti- 
mates of the number of missing 
ranged from 40 to more than 150. 

The Beijing Evening News said 
that the boat capsized when pas- 
sengers rushed to one side of the 
vessel to watch a figh t. 

An official at the govemmenl- 
run Harbin People’s Radio said 
that the boat was overloaded and 
that it was not known how many 
people were aboard. He said it was 
unlikely that there would have been 
more than 300. 

About 1 10 bodies had been re- 
covered from the boat, the official 
said, and the search was continu- 
ing. 

The vessel, which was raised 
Monday, sank about 250 yards 
(228 meters) from shore, he said. 


Gap Remains 
After Talks 
In Pretoria 

■ (Continued from Page 1) . 

African whites govern 24 million 
blades. 

Mr. Storey said Monday, upon 
hearing that Mr. Falwril said he 
believed in Mr. Botha’s intentions 
to reform the country: 

“Mr. FalweU’s penreption of the 
situation here is totally inaccurate. 
He hasn't the slightest notion of 
what is happening in the hearts and 
lives and experience of the majority 
of people in this nation.” 

Mr. Falwefl, head of the Moral 
Majority movement that urges 
greater adherence to fundamental- 
ist Christian values in the United 
States, said after his 10-day tour in 
South Africa that he opposed U.S. 
economic sanctions to encourage 

change. 

More than 600 people have died 
in anti-apartheid violence since last 
August, according to South Afri- 
ca’s Institute of Race Relations, an 
independent monitoring group. 

In a four-page memorandum to 
Mr. Botha, the nine church leaders 
urged him to take specific steps to 
dismantle apartheid. They also 
asked him to convene a national 
constitutional convention, lift the 
state of emergency and withdraw 
troops from black townships. 

The group was led by the Most 
Reverend Philip Russell, a white 
and the region’s Anglican archbish- 
op. He is Bishop Tntu’s immediate 
-superior. 

The delegation also included two 
Roman Catholics, three Method- 
ists, two Congregaticmalists and 
one Presbyterian. Four are black, 
four white and one is of mixed race. 



Lieutenant General Tito OkeOo. : 
da, is welcomed to Kenya by Vice 


Aoocxaad Pnm 


Leader of Uganda in Kenya for Talks 

NAIROBI (AP) — The leader of Uganda’s new military government. 
Lieutenant General Tito Okdlo, arrived here Monday and met with 
Kenyan officials in what could be a prelude to peace talks with guerrillas 
in Uganda. 

General OkeOo, sworn in as head of state after a military coup July 27, 
was met by Vice President Mwai Kibalri and driven to the residence of 
President Daniel Arap Mai. 

The leader of the main Ugandan guerrilla group, Yoweri Museveni, 
was reportedly in Kenya at some paint in the last two weeks, while his 
National Resistance Movement and the new Ugandan government 
traded public statements about their attitude toward peace talks. 

The National Resistance Movement is the largest of several guerrilla 
forces that battled against President Milton Oboie’s government before 
he was deposed last month. 

Laxalt Says He’ll Leave Senate in ’87 

CARSON CITY, Nevada (AP) — Senator Paul Laxalt of Nevada, one 
of President Ronald Reagan’s closest friends and advisers, announced 
Monday he would not seat re-election when his term expires in 1987. 

“I continue to fed a deep and binding obligation to our state, our 
president, to my party and the United States Senate," said Mr. Laxalt, 
who is general chairman of the Republican National Party. But be said 
that obligation could be fulfilled outside the Senate. 

Mr. Laxalt said he could serve the president as a trouble-shooter or 
rial ambassador. The senator said he ttdd Mr. and Mrs. Reagan earlier 
month that he might leave the Senate. 


For the Record 


3 percent of tbe 
IRNAre 


President Afi Kh a m en e i of Iran was re-elected with 85 
votes cast in Friday's election, the official press agency IRNA reported. 
Monday. It said Mr. Khamenei, 46, received 12203,870 of the 14244,630 
ballots cast [Reuters) 

on baifby^Madrid courl^Mondayafrer being formally charged with 
organizing several bomb attacks in the late 1970s, court officials said. He 
pleaded not guilty. (Reuters) 

Air Canada plans to continue a normal schedule of flights despite a 

strike overpay and working hours by 32 11 flight attendants that began at 

midnight Sunday. 


■ Canberra Applies Sanctions 

The Australian government an- ‘ — 

nounced limited economic sane- T)|l/^ w-i Q »_ /w n 

FUTOTOii Security Uiecks 

ove toward re 


did not 


on. 

out 


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to move toward reform of its racial 
policies. United Press International 
reported from Canberra, Australia. 

Tbe sanctions, announced by the 
foreign affairs minister. Bill Hay- 
den, blocks all security-related ex- 
ports to South Africa and asks Aus- 
tralian banks and other financial 
insiimtions not to make new Joans 
to South African borrowers. 


(Continued from Page 1) But Mr. Hetherington said that 

said at an international media con- ' ®^ ances ? 01 S niy 10 se- 
ference in Edinburgh thatall senior °T pereoimd but to all reporters 


first Pyongyang- Japan flight 

Reuters 

TOKYO — The fust North Ko- 
rean aircraft to fly direct to Japan 
arrived here Monday from Pyong- 
yang, carrying a sports delegation 
for the Unrversiade international 
student games in Kobe next week, 
airport officials said. 



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staff members were aware of the 
security clearances. “I did not like 
it and was unhappy about it," he 
said. 

A former network executive was 
quoted mi the BBCs main televi- 
sion news program Sunday as con- 
firming that a system costed for 
clearance by MI5, Britain's internal 
security agency. 

The report identified John Ar- 
keU, director of administration at 
the BBC from I960 to 1970. as 
being responsible for the system 
and quoted him as saying: “It 
would be surprising if a broadcast- 
ing organization did not take some 
protective steps to prevent extrem- 
ists having undue influence over 
the air, in the interests of security 
and of fairness to the public.” 

The Observer said that the oper- 
ation was tun by a former brigadier 
working for the security sendee. He 
ran his team bom a room in Broad- 
casting House in London. It identi- 
fied seven journalists, film editors 
and producers who did not pass tbe 
security check when they sought 
jobs. 

Alasdair Milne, the BBC direc- 
tor-geaeraL dismissed the report as 
“greatly overdramatized. " 


and current-affairs producers. 


Foulkes, said that the report 
showed that the BBCs tradition for 
independence was “an illusion." 
David Steel, the Liberal Party 

leader, said that the BBC appeared - 

to be under Home Office control 
and asked Home Secretary Leon 
Britian to “come dean.” 

Mr. Brittan was at the center of 
the dispute earlier this month. It 
was at his urging that the BBC 
banned a documentary featuring 
Martin McGuinness, of the out- 
lawed IRA, and a rival Protestant 
politician. 

That incident prompted BBC 
journalists to call a one-day strike 
The ban, provoking cries of censor- 
ship, precipitated the worst inter- 
nal crisis m the network's 63-vear 
history, silencing its worldwide ra- 
«honews rervice for the first time 
The Observer said that the sur- 

r dU f nce ^operates, unknown, 
to almost afl BBC staff memh^d- 

from Room 105 “in S oS!35£- 

way corridor 

. The paper alleged that the off;- 
“ byTtormer SSSSm 

oct. Brigadier Ronnie sffiw 
who wotkwt* four assistants*™' 

(Reuters, AP) 



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.HOUSTON _ "Foryeais, for 
Ihe movanfflito the 

State has been atoSst a 

^J er “Jaaifesi destiny," Ar- 
f«3ldo T6n^s said. “IiKrcaingly, it 
*? becoming so- for ihecSttral 

Araeraan ^ weiL It’s a ^ 

They will do ' 
they have to do." 




Several large religious denomi- 
nations have endorsed the sanctu- 
ary movement, which assists and 
provides refuge to Central Ameri- 
cans who have come illegally. 

Two church workers are serving 
prison terms for transporting ille- 
gal aliens. Twelve others face -trial 
on similar char ges in Phoenix on 
whatever Oct- IS. Supporters of the move- 
. “"jj io oo. ' . mem said they are providing refuge 

■*!»■ . Torres, the former director 10 those fleeing civil strife m Cen- 
m the League of United Latin tral America and that the govep- 
Amencaii utizens, estimates that meat's investigation of their activi- 
oo& million to li million Central l * es violated their religious 
Americans, most of them Salvador- freedom, 
ans, are in the United States illegal' The administration, through (he 
v- Although govemmeni figures State Department, has maintained 
are slightly lower, everyone agrees that Central American immigrants 
the number, is growing rapidly. 876 fleeing hunger, not politics, and 

Many of the immigrants, like “hunger is not a political issue," as 
Antonio Hercules, 26, a busboy in a 311 immigration official in Miami 
Washington restaurant where half 
a dozen other Salvadorans al«> 
work, came for reasons that were 
almost purely economic — “to 
make a life,” as he pnt iL 
Others, like Antonio V., a Tuc- 
son doctor who has scars on hie leg 
from what he said was a mortar 
attack by Salvadoran government 
soldiers, assert that they ranu» for 
Ai political reasons and that they fear 
for their lives if they return home. 

Antonio V. works with the move- 
ment among churches and syna- 


immigration 
put iL 

Efforts to grant Salvadorans 
temporary legal refuge have been 
spurred by the difficulty they and 
others from the region face m ob- 
taining political asylum. Only 3 
percent of Central Americans who 
apply for asylum are granted it, 
immigration officials said, and the 
government 1ms deponed about 
23,000 of those who applied for 
asylum in the last five years. 

In January, for example, a 29- 
year-old Salvadoran who was a 




ity, are in the United States for 
both political and economic rea- 
sons. 

Under U.S. law, political asylum 
can- be granted to an alien who can 
prove that he or she has been the 
victim of persecution or has a 
“Vdl-founded fear" of persecution 
cm the basis of race, religion, politi- 
cal belief of membership in a par- 
ticular organization. 

Few Salvadorans who request 
such asylum are granted it, howev- 
er, and their supporters recently, 
have begun to- locus on another 
provision of the .immigration law 
r that allows aliens to remain in the 
United States if Congress; deems 
conditions .in their home country 
have deteriorated so that they can- 
not return home safdy. 

Refugees -from Poland, Afghani- 
stan, Ethiopia and Uganda, forex- 
ample, are allowed to stay under 
the provision: Bflls mtrodoced m 
the Senate and Houseof Represen- 
tatives would add H Salvador to 
that list 


brother had been kidnapped, tor- 
tured and decapitated. 

His testimony was corroborated 
by doctors for Amnesty Interna- 
tional, the London-based human 
ri gh ts organization, but the immi- 
gration service ruled that while 
“the problems of the applicant and 
bin family do not stem from perse- 
cution but from the civil strife 
which has torn HI Salvador apart 
over (he past five to nine years." 

Asylum was denied. 

A key question argued by those 
on both sides of the issue is what 

happens to those who are deported. 

A ttemp tin g last year to survey 
482 deportees, the U.S. Embassy in 
El Salvador was able to reach only 
120. Most of the others could not 
be found, and 78 were in areas that 
embassy investigators considered 
too dangerous to visit 
■ ! The American Civil Liberties 
Union sned to obtain the names of 
deportees. The government identi- 
fied 8,500. The organization 
checked these against its roll of 


Hie .Reagan administration,' ; 15,000 identified as victims of per- 
which apposes tbosebiCs. main- seen don. Ii found that 52 of the 


\ £ !..* { 


£ 

/ 


tams that most Central Americans 
have come to tire United Stales for' 
economic reasons. 

However, a recent study by WH- 
Ham Stanley of the political science 
department of the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, de? ,s "“ 
only with El Salvador, cond 
that “fear of political violence is 
probably the predominant motive 
behind the decisions of Salvador- 
ans to migrate to the U.S. since 
1979." - ' • • .... 

The study found a direct correla- 
tion between the levels of violence 
and increases in migration. 

such evidence; Senator 


8,500 had been killed and 47 had 
disappeared. 



U.S., More Alert to Spies, Seeks Curb 
On Communist Bloc’s 'Businessmen’ 


Th, Naw fork Tuna 

Delegates to the limit Circumpolar Conference from Canada, Greenland and Alaska, 
gather periodically to discuss issues relating to Eskimos and to strengthen ties. 

Eskimos Seek Land to Call Their Own 

Canada Moves Slowly Toward Creation of 'Nunavut’ 

By Christopher S. Wren 


3ph 

New York Times Service 

FROBISHER BAY, Northwest Territories — 
An Eskimo homeland may seem a curious goal to 
those who conceive of the Arctic as a frozen 
wasteland. But that is the aim of the Inuit, as the 

25.000 Eskimos who live in Canada call them- 
selves. 

It is called Nunavut, or "our land," in the 
Inuktitut language they speak. The homeland 
could encompass an area larger than Alaska. 

The Canadian government has already agreed in 
principle to carve Nunavut out of the Northwest 
Territories and has set a target of 1987 for its 
creation, but the details must be worked ouL 

Nunavut makes a certain amount of geographic 
sense. The Northwest Territories include what was 
left over after the provinces of southern Canada 
were created. More than 18,000 of the territory's 

49.000 inhabitants are Eskimos, living mostly in 
the eastern Arctic; the rest are Dene, or Indians, 
and whites. 

And even after the government of the Northwest 
Territories moved from Ottawa to Yellowknife in 
1967, Frobisher Bay, the largest town in the east- 
ern Arctic, was still more than 1.400 miles 0L256 
kilometers) from the new capital. 

While other residents of the Northwest Territo- 
ries may view the federal government with suspi- 
cion. the Eskimos in the eastern Arctic tend to feel 
doubly estranged. 

Jim Bell, who works for a weekly newspaper in 
Baffin Island, said; “The enemy is Yellowknife 
and Ottawa. People here fed ignored and misun- 
derstood, particularly by southern Canadians but 
also by Yellowknife/ 1 

Before the white man intruded, the Eskimos 
lived north of the treeline, the Indians south of iL 

Ron Mongeau, the executive officer of the Baf- 
fin Regional Council, said, "Geographically, cul- 


turally and ethnically, there is a unique Indian 
territory and a unique Inuit territory. The needs 
and aspirations are so different that there is no way 
a central territorial government can deal with iL 4 

The Eskimos began pressing for their own home 
more than a decade ago. In 1982. inhabitants of the 
eastern Arctic approved a proposal to split the 
Northwest Territories in two, with Nunavut in the 
east. 

In February, Ottawa approved a tentative 
boundary worked out a month earlier by delegates 
from east and west. Bui negotiations stalemated 
after the Eskimos living along the northwestern 
Beaufort Sea objected to being left out of the 
homeland. Nor did the Indians and whites in the 
west want a boundary that took away the Beaufort 
Sea, with its oQ, and left them with less than a third 
of the Northwest Territories. 

Even if that problem is resolved, others remain. 

Frobisher Bay, the likeliest capital of Nunavut, 
is even more distant from some communities in the 
central Arctic than is Yellowknife. And southern 
fanariians worry where Nunavut could lead. Ad- 
vocates have developed close relations with the 
F-drimns in Greenland and Alaska through an 
Inuit Circumpolar Conference. 

The Eskimos have assured Ottawa that Nunavut 
will be just a territory, and perhaps eventually a 
province. But the idea of a homeland also appeals 
to the Eskimo minorities in Quebec and Labrador. 

Mark R. Gordon, an Eskimo leader in northern 
Quebec, said that “we've limited ourselves to talk- 
ing about an autonomous region in Quebec, al- 
though we are very eager for Nunavut to be 
formed.” 

Louis Tapardjuk, who heads the Baffin Region- 
al Inuit Association, said there was strong interest 
in NunavuL “I guess it’s up to the politicians to 
work out the blueprints and settle the boundaries,” 
he said. 


By Jeff Gerth 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — U.S. offi- 
cials and members of Congress are 
seeking more tools to crack down 
on trade and commercial offices of 
the Soviet Union and Soviet bloc 
countries, which have long played a 
critical, largely invisible role in ob- 
taining U.S. military technology 
and secrets, according to public re- 
cords and law officials. 

Although far outnumbered by 
diplomats, the commercial officials 
are growing in number and have 
unique access to information and 
facilities. 

By operating as legitimate busi- 
nesses, they can obtain credit infor- 
mation on business executives, visit 
military sites and acquire technol- 
ogy ana documents, as well as ille- 
gally recruit spies, officials say. 

The access, ihev add. stems in 
part from loopholes in US laws 
and the status of some Soviet bloc 
organizations as U.S. corporations. 

Now, prompted in pan by dis- 
closure of several spy cases and 
renewed interest in counterintelli- 
gence, Congress and law officials 
are focusing on ways to limit and 
monitor such companies. 

An FBI official warns that U.S. 
executives are still unaware of dan- 
ger of dealing with concerns like 
the Amtorg Trading Corp„ a Soviet 
company m New York. 

“The "Soviets use a subtle ap- 
proach on American businesses." 
said James M. Fox, head of the 
Soviet counterintelligence division 
in the FBI's New York office. 
"Amtorg can run a credit check on 
a business, learn its financial 
health. If a company is in trouble 
they can get them contracts, gain 
financial leverage.” 

Mr. Fox said he recently wrote to 
the State Department about exam- 
ples of “clandestine activities,” six 
by Soviet officials at the United 
Nations and two by Amtorg em- 
ployees. 

Late last month, Congress 
legislation limiting travel by 
at the Unf 


„riei officials at the trailed Na- 
tions. But Soviet business officials 
can still travel almost anywhere in 
the United States, visiting naval 
shipyards, atomic energy installa- 
tions, computer equipment con- 
ventions and observation posts 
near military readiness maneuvers, 
according to reports by the Senate 
Permanent Subcommittee on In- 
vestigations. 

The chair man of the subcommit- 
tee, Senator William V. Roth Jr., 
Republican of Delaware, plans 
hearings this fall on proposals to 
restrict Soviet bloc organizations, 
an aide said. 

Amtorg, the largest Communist 
trading company in the United 
States, was incorporated in New 


York in 1924, before the United 
States established diplomatic rela- 
tions with Moscow. U.S. officials 
say it served as the first U-S- base 
for Soviet espionage. 

A 1982 CIA report noted “in- 
creased use of Soviet- and Easi Eu- 
ropean-owned firms locally char- 
tered in the United States and 
abroad to exploit Western-con- 
trolled and military-related tech- 
nology.” It said there were more 
than zO. 

According to an FBI official the 
□umber of East European trade 
and diplomatic groups in the Unit- 
ed States doubled in four years. 


By operating 
legitimate 
businesses. 
Communist trade 
officials can obtain 
credit information, 
visit military sites 
and acquire U.S. 
military technology. 


Over the last 40 years, some Am- 
torg employees have figured direct- 
ly or indirectly in at least half a 
dozen spy cases. 

In 1 980, according to a law offi- 
cial on Amtorg employee left for 
home after the FBI produced evi- 
dence that he and another official 
who bad already left, tried to ob- 
tain classified information from a 
defense contractor manager. 

The manager had talked to an 
Amtorg official at a university lec- 
ture in New York and had then 
been asked, over several years, to 
obtain information on gyroscopic 
platforms, gyroscopic computers 
and the Saturn- 5 moon rocket. 

Approximately a third of Am- 
torgs 58 employees are considered 
intelligence officers, according to 
U.S. intelligence officials. 

An Amtorg employee, Vladimir 
Y. Kramerov, a senior engineer, 
defected last year and provided the 
FBI with valuable information 
about intelligence activity, accord- 
ing to a source. 

U.S. officials say commercial 
employees play a variety of roles in 
Soviet efforts to acquire technol- 
ogy. One involves legal acquisition 
of published data. 

Amto 

ports an. , 

nuclear ana atomic energy organi- 
zations, according to information iL 


files with its required registration 
as an agent for a foreign power. 

Companies incorporated in the 
United Slates, such as Amtorg. 
"can legally purchase controlled 
U.S. technology and study it with- 
out actually violating U.S. export 
controls unless they attempt m ex- 
port the equipment or related tech- 
nical data" without a license, ac- 
cording to the 1982 CIA study. 

Agents of the U.S. Customs Ser- 
vice, which attempts to stop illegal 
exports, say that legislation passed 
Iasi month may give them more 
power to stop such activity. 

Commercial officials figured 
prominently this summer in the 
biggest spy exchange in recent his- 
tory, when the United States re- 
leased four accused East European 
spies in a trade for 25 agents held in 
East Germany and Poumd. 

Two of the four were intelligence 
officers operating out of commer- 
cial offices: Penju B. Kosiadinov, a 
Bulgarian intelligence officer for- 
merly attached to Bulgaria's com- 
mercial office in New York, and 
Marian W. Zacharskl an intelli- 
gence official formerly with Po- 
lamco, a Polish-owned commercial 
firm incorporated in Illinois. 

A 1982 report by Senator Roth’s 
subcommittee noted that business 
executives were sometimes fooled 
by Polamco. thinking it was “just 
like any other industrial company 
in the United States." 

The report also found that even 
though employees of Polamco, like 
Mr. Zacharski. have been convict- 
ed of espionage charges, “the Com- 
merce Department has no author- 
ity to deny Polamco export 
privileges." 

Employees of commercial orga- 
nizations are not subject to some 
travel curbs imposed on Commu- 
nist bloc diplomats. 


ora purchases expensive re- 
nd periodicals from various 


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• 'V IU- - 


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Dennis DeConriiii, a Danocralor by toe p 
Arizona, introduced ' 

Salvadorans now iu. — . ~ , 7... 

States ille gall y the same status as ters and plan to mom 

Immigra- .hounds rf 

tion and Refugee Policy of the Sen- men in the next , 
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S wact dn.the measure after Humberto Onega Saavedra last 

tongi 

There are an cauuuivu <»*,««- r — — - - - -■* . 

to 850,000 Salvadoran* making war end more rapiaiy. 


chief of staff for the five northern 
provinces. “They have not faced 
the army or dealt it a defeat and 
have not been able to stay in the 
areas they have attacked because 


they have no social base there.' 


By John Lantigua 

Workington Post Service 

' MATAGALPA, Nicaragua — 

Nicaraguan nrilitaiy leaders, con- 
fronted by a gnerriua army buoyed 

renewed U.S. Sandinist officials said that 
t 60 guerrillas were captured 

more than 100 were killed. 

Journalists were unable to verify 
the figure. 

The officials said they expected 
the guerrillas to continue to try to 
operate closer to towns. 

eo 10 aui on . ipe measure aiia 1 ■^LT! ” Luis Carridu Cruz, a member of 

Congress reconvenes in September, wjedc, because onhrwith me pro- ^ ^ e-man National Directorate 
- estimated 500,000 pie massively “oWtaa 1 ™U this ^ nJinin Front , 

vadoran* ■ making wm end more rapiaiy. ... has been assigned to oversee politi- 

ihpm bv fax the largest group of Mr. Ortt*a and other jrukmy - - • - 

{^alAiner^ now living ille- leaders said their grotradfOTOcs 
states. were working m a more coordmat- 

ga 2? m hv the Urban ed and effective manner with the 

i hdicopteis, despite two recent sor- 

J^S and H^ian^^esti- prise rcfc* attacks on towns m the 
rasyffr 750000 te 1.? milli on country^ interior. _ 

Genual Americans are in the cotrn- WistOTthplomai^NK^rag^ ^ wcek /g OTenmKnt media 

gffiff’"'"” gSSS sasssagtt 

gunships in recent fighting i 
an important change in the 


v< k 


1 nature 

of ib? three-year war agains t the 
guerrillas and a significant upgrad- 
ing of the Sandinist Army. 

TTm Sandinists have said that the 
mobilization and the use of heli- 
copters is part of a plan announced 
earlier this year to deal a crippling 
blow to the rebels, known as con- 
tras, by the end of the year. 

On Aug. 1, forces of the U.S.- 
backed Nicaraguan Democratic 
Force, entered the town of La Tnn- 
idAd, 80 miles (130 kflometers) 
north of Managua. The next day. 
another column entered Cnapa, 
about 80 miles east of the capital, 
sco . The guerrillas besieged the militia 

The case of the "Hollywood 1 iu both towns and 

*e movie mdusny^d least 65 Nwaraguaiis. 

^t^the.beginninsof ai»wd damaged Jhrre bridges and 

“Raid's 

■ Mr. Cole, were blacklisted ana un 
able to find work. 


UUJ WWU, ~ - — r 

cal and military activities in Nica- 
ragua's five northern provinces. 
Mr. Carridn said last week that 
guerrilla aircraft had been detected 
dropping supplies to rebels in rural 
areas and that he expected in- 
creased activity soon. 


Sandinist reserve battalions. There 
are thought to be about 20,000 re- 
servists, some of whom already 


were on active duty;. There was no 
mention of reviving the draft, 
which was suspended in April 

Mr. Chamorro said that the 
army had mobilized militia forces 
to meet the new threat, and that the 
militia would continue to be the 
first line of defense. The govern- 
ment wfl] not reveal the strength of 
militia forces, estimated by diplo- 
mats and journalists at 50,000 to 
70,000 people who hold other jobs 
but patrol their towns and dties at 
night. 

The militias often have been 
poorly trained, sometimes armed 
with vintage rifles, and cannot be 
depended on, according to some 
Sandinisl officers. 

Bat many militiamen now cany 

newer Soviet-designed AK-47 
automatic rifles and receive mili- 
tary training. Sandi n ist military 
leaders say that with regular army 
officers now leading them, the mili- 
tiamen are much better fighters. 

• Guerrilla leaders say they have at 
least 10,000 men in Nicaragua and 
hope to have more than 20,000 
soon. 


Lester Cole, 81, 

'Hollywood 10’ 
Figure, Is Dead 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Lester Cole 81, 
a screenwriter who was one of the 
lOMywood 

on in 1950 for refusing to testily 
before a House committee investi- 
gating Communist 
motion-picture indjistry. djd l ofa 
bean attack Thursday in San Fran 

cisco. 


ambushed and killed 29 Sandinist 
soldiers near the main htgh^y m 
their most effective week of fight- 

^Aimost two months ago, toe U.S. 

ff'Y? imllion in 


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ItSre be was subpoenaed to approved $27 milhon m 

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© 19BS MOW CcirfW'at’On 














Page 4 


TUESDAY, AUGUST 


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Man 

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dyna 

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blad 

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prog 

20 Reti 
scha 

23 Zodi 

24 Whe 
som 
wor! 

25 Can 

28 Can 

32Tols 

33 Rjvi 

New 

36 Scul 
piec 

37 Rea 
ane 

41 **— 

42 Ana 
acb< 

43 Thu 

44 Pr» 

46 Cesj 

film 


SoBotha ChangedHis Mind and Thumbed His Nose 


Top Priority for Trade 


"Trade Policy — Top Priority” That 
-should be the heading on an uppermost 
dossier on President Reagan’s desk when he 
returns from his summer vacation. The mul- 
titudinous protectionist bills now before 
Congress include a particularly vicious one 
seeking a 25-percent surcharge on imports 
from a selection of countries. These titanic 
pressures result from failure to bring the 
' dollar down smoothly over the past few 
years. Is it too late to quell them? 

In a bad situation, philosophers seek the 
least bad way ouL What sort of American 
protectionism would do least harm? To be 
acceptable abroad, it would have to be clear- 
ly temporary, declining by preordained 
steps. The form it should take is less clear. 

Conventional wisdom decrees that tariffs 
are better than quotas, because they permit 
some competition from those foreigners 
skilled enough to creep under the tariff net. 
But tariffs transfer trade profits unfairly 
from the foreigner to America. Foreigners 
might prefer quotas, which limit their ex- 
ports bin enable them to raise thdr prices on 
each unit of sale and thus have more funds 
to plough back into investment and Future 
competitiveness — as Japan’s automobile 
firms have found in the last few years. The 
truth is that there is no least bad way. 

Will protection help the weak firms that 
request it? In theory, protection gives the 
weak time to rationalize and reequip. In 
fact, it is hard to find an instance in modern 
history where this has happened. Either the 
protection is open-ended, so there is small 
incentive to the firm to modernize, or it is 
limited in tune, in which case there is small 
incentive to investors to lend the funds that 


the afflicted company needs. Just who is 
going to invest in an enterprise dependent 
on government support due to run out soon? 
The most likdy outcome is to provide an 
unexpected profit to the few efficient firms 
in the threatened sector, making the plight 
of the less efficient thereby worse. 

What will protection do to the American 
economy as a whole? By keeping out cheap- 
er goods it will raise inflation and thus 
increase the likelihood of restrictive fiscal 
and monetary policies — hardly the setting 
for more jobs. It will lead to retaliation from 
abroad: How can foreign politicians stand 
up against pressures for offsetting action 
when their own countries' exports are ham- 
pered and goods previously sold in America 
are diverted to their own shores? And inso- 
far as imports are kept out, a side effect mil 
be to keep the dollar high, with further 
adverse effects on American exports. 

The prospect is unpleasant for a world 
suffering from high unemployment, over- 
indebtedness and starvation. Nobody knows 
the full recipe for fast economic growth, the 
only cure for these ills. But there is general 
agreement that a major factor in the golden 
age of the 1950s and ’60s was the progressive 
freeing of trade from the shackles damped 
on it in the run-up to World War II. If this 
process is going to be reversed, economic 
prospects win be somber. You do not have 
to believe in Marx’s economic determinism 
to worry about World War HI. 

Titanic pressures for protection have to be 
repelled in Washington and other capitals 
this autumn. Protection is worse than a zero- 
sum game. It ensures that everyone loses. 
INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


D URBAN, South Africa — It was not a 
sudden loss of nerve that caused Presi- 
dent P.W. Botha to fail to announce the 
reform package that his lieutenants had been 
telling eveiyone be would present in his 
speech in Durban last Thursday night 
Nor was it pressure from hard-liners in his 
Cabinet that made him back down, as some 
commentators suggest. Mr. Botha is as much 
boss of his cabinet as dc Gaulle was of his. 

ft was President Botha’s own derision to 
turn the speech into a demonstration to the 
world that the Iron Man of Afrikanerdom is 
not going to be pushed by outside pressures, 
internal unrest or anything else on God's 
Earth. And it was that which brought out 
what a newspaper that reflects the sentiments 
of Johannesburg’s business community ca tied 
"the hick politician” in him. 

It was the expectations deliberately raised 
by the president's own ministers that myd ? 
him call the whole thing off and thumb his 
nose at the world instead. The expectations 
had been widely published abroad, causing 
him to fear that if he went through with what 
was bong anticipated he would be seen to be 
following the dictates of outsiders. 

In a fit of recidivism, the old machine 
politician of the 1940s and ’50s, whom South 
Africa's slick publicists have tried to retread 
as the modem reformist of the '80s, decided 
that that was intolerable. He strode into a 
cabinet meeting on Wednesday morning and 
announced that he had changed his mind and 
was going to strike out the few reformist 
passages his prepared speech contained. 

That was embarrassing for Pik Botha, his 
indefatigable foreign minister, who had flown 
to a meeting with British, American and West 
German diplomats in Vienna a week before to 
tell them to expect a dramatic statement. 

The word is that Pik Botha threatened to 


n An-* c t have “a constdcrable dial onaiWuda to- 

By AUister Sparks semb Africa m the UmtedSt iie^ ; 

r«™. bui no one here aqxxts faim to doso. That can be Ihtie " 

Cabinet posts are like life peerages m South went m for some oversell in Vienna, ine jU 

Africa, and they are not readily relinquished, ambiguous language that Pretoria has evolved Solare mamfuu Am- 

Reconstructing how South Africa came to to describe its policies enables it to say pSffJJ, nlha had likened NdiCto Mode. - 

buDd up such high expectations, only for ta in a manner that can be interpreted one W3y ntswni bwm 1 . ^ ^ . 

president t0 dash them and thus make the abroad and another at home. _ . 

uinarim mii.-h n inrw Fnr ft than If thmliail T# ttenowne rliw that the Western diolO' • OpuBBSUW ® ™ • 


build up such high expectations, only for its 
president to dash than and thus make the 
situation much worse for h than if there had 
been no sales pitch in the first place, reveals a 
range of psychological distortions, both in 
South Africa and on the part of those who 

What he tons going to say 
was in any event not 
particularly dramatic. 

deal with it, that complicates the already 
intractable problem of apartheid. 

Why did Ms Botha go to Vienna? Because 
while South Africa wants to tefl the world to 
go to hell and mind its own business, it also 
desperately warns the world to accept iL 
It may thumb its nose at the world and say 
that international condemnation will make it 
more bloody-minded than ever, which was 
the point President Botha was trying to dem- 
onstrate on Thursday, but the condemnation 
hurts, and South Africa will go to great 
lengths to counter iL That is why the Vorster 
government launched the extravagant “Mnl- 
dergaie” conspiracy to spend clandestine 
funds for propaganda in the late 1970s. 

So Pik Botha went to Vienna. Criticism of 
Pretoria's handling of the unrest, and the 
recalling of ambassadors for “consultation," 
had hadan effect The foreign minister, aware 
that his president planned to announce some 
reforms, decided to make the most of them. 


abroad and another at home. 

It atsn dear that the Western diplo- 
mats who went to Vienna, especially the 
Americans, who are anxious to have some- 
thing to justify the Reagan administration's 
policy of “constructive engagement," heard 
what they wanted to bear. Back home they 
presented an exaggerated interpretation of an 
already exaggerated intention. 

Yet g no tluT phase of magnification fol- 
lowed when the diploma is leaked the good 
news back in Washington. With journalism s 
natural tendency to dramatize, some startling 
predictions began hitting the presses. 

President Botha, according to Time maga- 
zine, was about to “the most important 
statement since Dutch settlers arrived at the 
Cape of Good Hope 300 years ago.” News- 
week, drawing on uk same diplomatic leaks, 
wrote that the president would announce a 
"giant step” away from apartheid, including 
power sharing with blacks, scrapping of die 
tribal “homelands,” common citizenship for 
everyone, repeal of the influx control laws 
and an invitation to Mack leaders to a nation- 
al convention to write a new constitution. 

Heady stuff to anyone with some under- 
standing of the glacicr-like movement of re- 
formist thinking in Pretoria. 

New York’s Representative Stephen Soiarz 
also got canied away, after a briefing by Pik 
Botha before the Vienna meeting. Mr. Soiarz, 
an old South Africa hand who ought to know 
better, said he expected President Botha to 
make a “declaration of intent" that would 


anno unce any meaningful reform* to Dm- 
baa," Mr. Sohrz added. Clearly Mr. Botha 
bad already undergone his change of coaxL 

What he was going to say «** 

not particularly dramatic: exte n d ing citizen- 
ship to all Macks, indmfcig bamdaodorv by 

drawing a semantic distinction between "an- 
zenshijr and "nationality", modifying but 
not abolishing influx controls: declaring g 
willingness to negotiate on ccttStrtuikJtuu re- 
forms with any black leaders prepared lo 
renounce violence, winch wadd preclude Mr. 
Mandela and the African National Congress. 

Without the buildup, the speech would 
have been welcomed as a small step forward. 
Blacks would run have been greatly im- 
pressed, and it would presumably have done 
little to rirfusc the unrest in the townships, 
but at least it would not have made 1 tangs . 
worse, which is what has happened now. 

President Botha will doubtless come back 
to these announ cements some time n the 
future, but (bey will make no impact (bed. 

In the meantime he has revealed his lack of 
s tatesmansh ip for all to see and taught the 
West a sharp lesson — not the intended one 
about Afrikaner determination, but never 
again to be »atr«i in by South Africa's politi- 
cal huckstering. It is a country to be judged by 
what it does rather than by what it up. 


The writer is a 
South A f next for 


mi ccrrespmJent corerutg 
Washington Post. 


A Brave Judge in Chile 


Chile’s military rulers adopted yet another 
form of repression in March: death squads. In 
Santiago, three C ommunis ts were kidnapped 
and murdered by armed men in civilian 
clothes. Five trade unionists captured in the 
same raid were beaten and tortured by electric 
shock. Offices of a leftist h uman rights group 
were raided and staff members were beaten 
and raped. For all its tyranny, Augusto Pino- 
chet's dictatorship was not previously known 
to cloak its crimes in civilian dress. 

How do we know the thugs were connected 
to the government? Because, in an unexpected 
sequel, that cloak was stripped away by a 
courageous judge. Jose Canovas Robles. As- 
signed to investigate the three murders, he did 
so with determination. He indicted 14 police 
officers, including two colonels. AH were ex- 
pelled from the hitherto immune force known 
as the Carabineros. Two generals offered to 
resign, forcing the departure of the head of the 
Carabifleros, a Pinochet crony. 

Despite the purge, the assaults continue. 


Armed men in civilian clothes recently seized 
and beat Carmen Hales, the 27-year-old 
daughter of a prominent Christian Da nocraL 

Nevertheless the rule of law. somehow sur- 
vives in Chile, even after 12 years of tyranny. 
This month a military prosecutor in Conoep- 
d6n was emboldened to indict three police 
officers on charges of murdering a student. 
Meanwhile, a divided democratic opposition is 
groping for a common strategy. 

These are stirrings that cry out for Washing- 
ton's encouragement and support The Reagan 
administration has been all over the lot in its 
attitude to Chile. Displeased with a seven- 
month state of siege that ended in June, it 
abstained when Chile applied for a develop- 
ment bank loan. But the value of the gesture 
was nullified when a State Department official 
visited Santiago in February only to affirm the 
administration's confidence in the regime. 
What is needed from Washington is something 
like the clarity of that brave judge in Santiago. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


No Strings Attached? 


Senator Russell Long, the Louisiana Demo- 
crat, did something this year that would seem 
to go against nature: He returned $360,000 of 
campaign contributions that he could have 
kepL Members of Congress who were serving 
in 1980 are allowed to pocket all their leftover 
campaign monies (and pay personal income 
tax on them) when they retire, and many do. 
Mr. Long, who is not running next year, decid- 
ed to return his unspent contributions. Now he 
can consider the pending tax bin knowing that 
he has received nothing from individuals or 
political action committees with economic in- 
terests in the legislation. 

That is more than you can say of the two 
senators who have succeeded Mr. Long as 
chairman of the Finance Committee, Robert 
Dole and Robert Packwood, both of whom are 
running for re-election in 1986. Mr. Dole took 
in about $833,000 in contributions in the first 
six months of 1985, including 5474,000 from 
political action commities; he now has the 
enviable total of $1.6 million in his campaign 
treasury. That is guaranteed to give pause to 
any Kansas Democrat who might be thinking 
of taking on the Senate majority leader. 

Mr. Packwood, the Oregon Republican, 
raised $2.6 million in the first half of this year 
— more than any other member of Congress. 
About $691,000 came from political action 
committees. Mr. Packwood’s 1980 campaign 
was supported in large part by individual con- 
tributors who appreciated his work as the 
Senate's leading opponent of restriction on 
abortions. His 1986 campaign, evidently, will 


be supported largely by those seeking favor 
with the chairman of the Finance Committee. 

You can make a case that an intelligent 
legislator with definite views on policy is not 
going to be unduly swayed by contributions 
that come from people with diverse interests 
on diverse economic issues; they win tend to 
cancel each other out; taken together, as a 
spokesman for Mr. Packwood has suggested, 
they tend to represent the whole range of 
American consumers and workers. You can 
make that case — but not many people with 
practical experience and a modicum of com- 
mon sense will believe iL They will know that 
some interests, typically those that benefit 
most generously from current or proposed 
laws, wQl be represented most vociferously 
and generously; while the vast majority of 
people may not be represented at all 

Mr. Dole has shown an adherence to princi- 
ple and a suppleness of political sinew not 
often seen in Washington, and his integrity is 
not in doubt; Mr. Packwood is an industrious 
and honorable legislator who has articulated 
his own views on taxes frequently. But by so 
assiduously seeking rampaign funds when the 
tax bill is pending, they have not set a good 
political example. They have what they must 
consider a worthy end in view: their own re- 
election. But they have helped contribute to an 
atmosphere in which legislators, not always as 
scrupulous as these two, have been unasham- 
edly raking in vast sums of money from those 
seeking favor from them. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


FROM OUR AUG. 20 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Whale Yields Harpoon Clue 
PHILADELPHIA — The German steamer 
Ballanza, arriving here from Hamburg, reports 
having struck a whale in mid-ocean and may 
have solved the disappearance of the little 
Canadian whaler J. Duncan. The whaler left 
Halifax with a crew of seven in 1903 and was 
not heard of again. The Ballanza, while steam- 
ing at full speed, hit the whale and nearly cut it 
in two. The monster was impaled cm the bows 
and died after a terrific struggle. Nine sailors 
began chopping the carcass away, when a 
harpoon was found imbedded in it with an 
iron band stamped "J.D. 1902.” The Captai n 
of the Ballanza looked op the records and 
concluded that the harpoon must have be- 
longed to the whaler. Probably the crew, after 
harpooning the whale, was beaten in the strug- 
gle which ensued and their vessel was sunk. 


1935: Nazi Penal Code Announced 
BERLIN — Criminologists, professors of ju- 
risprudence and directors of prisons from 54 
nations, including a delegation of 40 from the 
United States, heard Dr. Franz Guertner, the 
German Minister of Justice, announce at the 
opening session of the 11th International Con- 
gress of Criminal Law and Prisons that under 
the new Nazi legal code, which goes into effect 
September 1, criminals can be punished for 
offenses which were not crimes at the time they 
were committed. The Minister said thejudge is 
to have the power of deciding whether the 
defendant deserves to suffer for sins against 
“the popular sense of what is right,” and can 
commit him to prison even though there is no 
law on the books justifying iL Herr Guertner 
declared that "nobody can be lucky enough to 
slip through the meshes of the law." 


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The People 
Don’t Want 
These Wars 

By Thomas Powers 

S OUTH ROYALTON. Vermont 
— The “contras”- trying to over- 
throw the government of Nicaragua 
are not the first secret army orga- 
nized and financed by the United 
States. If you know where to look you 
can find remnants, generally in dis- 
mal exile, of UiL-oacked rebel ar- 
mies from the Ukraine, Albania, Bur- 
ma, Laos, Vie tnam, Indonesia, Tibet 
Iraq, Angola and Cuba. I am proba- 
bly leaving a few out Their fates have 
all been melancholy. 

In the weeks before tbe CIA- 
mounted invasion of Cuba at the Bay 
of Pigs, CIA Director Allen Dulles 
often fell back on bis argument of last 
resort when President Kennedy wa- 
vered and threatened to call it all off. 
What about the rebel army? Mr. Dul- 
les would ask. An army presents a 
serious "disposal problem.” 

The Bay of Pigs troops were per- 
haps the strongest single military 
force in Central America. They had 
already put down an armed rebellion 
in Guatemala. They wanted to invade 
Cuba. If you asked them to turn in 
their guns they- might not. Denied a 
chance to fight Fidel Castro, they 
might fight the United States. At the 
very least they certainly would not 
have anything nice to say about it. 
Better to let the plan go forward. 

Pres dent Kennedy bought the ar- 
gument. It would probably be fair to 
say that the United States backed an 
invasion of Cuba in April 1961 be- 
cause it could not think what else to 
do with the rebel army it had orga- 
nized for that purpose. 

Intended as a pliant tod, that army 
became a controlling fact. It is not 
hard to imag ine a similar role for the 
“contras" in Honduras and Costa 
Rica — a force variously estimated at 
10,000 to 20,000 armed men. Tbe 
CIA created this army for President 
Reagan's use in a war of nerves with 
Nicaragua, but last year Congress 
forced tbe CIA to abandon its role. 

We are told that the rebel army 
is now being “advised," “directed* 
and even funded {with “donations" 
from “private" individuals) by a mili- 
tary officer on the National Security 
Council It should be understood < 
from the outset (hat this “control” is 




Ms 

c3 




fie? 




an illusion. Running an army takes 
more than a deep pockeL The CIA 
had long experience and a large cadre 
of trained men; the NSC has neither. 

Thus, Americans - — the general 
public, watching tbe drama unfold in 
the newspapers — now find them- 
selves forced to worry about not one 
but three loose cannon on the deck; 


eramenc and the American people about the success of Soviet "salami 
paned wavs long ago on the subject tactics.” You may find it hard to 

^ mU- ,L . n (I,., __ U 


of the “Soviet threat." 

In dismal succession Washington 
has tried to defeat Soviet -backed mil- 
itary forces in Korea, Cuba, Vietnam, 
Angola, Ethiopia and Central Ameri- 
ca — secretly when posable, openly 
when there was no other way. Official 


The plain fact is that the VS. government 
and the American people parted ways long 
ago on the subject of the 'Soviet threat' 


believe that grown men would fed 
genuine alarm at tbe loss” of South- 
ern Yemen. Ethiopia. Afghanistan or 
El Salvador. The last is as poor and 
backward as the rsl What possible 
difference can it make whose ambas- 
sador has the leader of El Salvador in 
his pocket? But the national security 
people don't see it this way. 

In their view every toehold is a 


Import Quotas 
Would Worsen 
The Debt Crisis 

By Pamela Falk 

N EW YORK — The Latin tkfat 
crisis wiD not be robed. ernes 
significantly ameliorated, without 
help from U.S. trade policy. Prea- 
dem Reagan will have *n opportune ; 
ty to administer such help this I 
month, as he decides whether in ap- 
prove the US. International Trane 
Commission's recommendation to 
restrict shoe imports from Brazil. 

This year Brazil most pay its credi- 
tors (principally US. hanks) HO bil- 
lion m interest on $103 iaflion. hs 
trade surplus, without import restric- 
tions, is expected to be close to S12 
billion. With tbe quota restrictions 
under consideration in Washington. 
Brazil's hugest export, shorn, would 
be cut by 18 percent. How could 
Brazilians hope to pay the banks? 

The shoe industry is at tbebeuxof 
the problem. Brazil exported 5I.4M- 
lion worth of non-rubber shoes in 
1984. (Imported shoes accoumta 71 
percent of the shoes sold in the Uafr 
fsd State*.} But shoes are not Ike mb 
issue; Congress is consKtenagmue 
100 bills to block imports frooLr * 
America. Even a fraction d then 


1*5 $360 billion debt 
c debt is already at isstfeixm 


potential problem for the other side Americans are thinking cncr 


the “contra" army, which may not be 
wining to caS it a day when Washing- 
ton thinks it convenient; the NSC, 


Washington had few doubts about 
the Soviet role in these conflicts; the 
real argument was about limits — 


which may find it likes running secret just how far should the United Stales 
wars without kibbitzing from Con- go to defeat Soviet allies and proxies? 
gross; the “private” funding apparau The problem was the staying power 
which will undoubtedly expect some of the American public in a conven- 
sort of reward from a grateful prod- tional war — a serious consideration 
dent (just as conventional political for any president set on re-election, 
contributors do), and which, develop- Korea and Vietnam both suggest 
ing a taste for direct action abroad, that the public patience runs outran 
may draw up an agenda of its own hurry. Lyndon Johnson, like Harry 
going beyond tbe war against Soviet Truman, read the New Hampshire 
penetration of Central America. tea leaves and decided to retire. 

This awful but familiar mess is best Americans do not like long inconclu- 
understood as a constitutional crisis, sve wars. Hence the frequent resent 
triggered by the inherent difficulties to covert action and secret armies, 
of running a global foreign policy in a 
democracy when governors and gov- 
erned do not fear the same things. 

The plain fact is that the U5. gov- 


in the event of a big general war. 
Cuba. Nicaragua and El Salvador are 
not going to invade the United Stales, 
but while the United States w vs busy 
taking care of them in a major war, 
the Soviets might be halfway to (he 
Atlantic, or (o the Gulf, or both. 

But the American body politic ob- 
jects to dirty tittle wars, nates to pay 
for them and refuses to fight in them. 

Would the American public be 
much upset if the rebels came to 
power in El Salvador and followed 


set 


meral war. posal by President Alan Garda wk W 
alvadorarc of Peru to peg repayment to » per- 
ited States, cemage of export earnings. Thflf * 
s was busy also drawn to Fide! Castro’s cilfefi 
major war, moratorium on (merest payments, 
way to (he None of the big five oebcoo - 
r both. Brazil. Mexico, Argentina, Vaemeh 
politic ob- and Peru —is heating the cafilfot* 
lies to pay moratorium. But all have or mtodto 
lit in them, establish ties with Cuba. They fetea 
public be to Fide! Castro: "There ts no otter 
i came to choice — cancellation of tbe (WA « 

1 followed the political death of the democrat* 


In Washington, on almost any day 
of the week, one can find a room full 
of people from the national security 
community wringing their hands 


The Human Right to Die WithDignity 


the usual pattern — sent young men processes in Latin America.” 
to Bulgaria for pilot training, invited When Latin America iooined its 
East Germans lo ragamze the secret debt, in the 1 970s, it was rated aaiab' 
police, signed a coffee export agree- by military dictators. Today most 
ment with Moscow, denounced Israel debtor countries are democracies and 
in the United Nations, invited LLS. have constituencies to worry about 
church grams to send volunteers to These constituencies and their 
help with the harvest, doubled tbe leaders are increasingly dubious 
price of newsprint for the bourgeois about Washington’s altitude. Tte 
press, appointed the widow of a mod- United Stares and the IMF have 
erate leader to be minister of feminist asked Latin Americans to impose 
affairs and provided office space for austerity measures, devalue thofcnr- 
the national liberation fronts of Gua- renties, cut back on gmeuunmt 
temala and Honduras? I doubt iL spending and let foreign corpora ti ons 
The national security community set up wholly ownraindasnes no 
in Washington would be beside itself Latin territory. Most debtor cam- 
with fury and frustration, but the tries lave complied, "with the result 
general public of the United States — that their exports have dropped dns- 
and of Britain, France and West Ger- ticaHy, eroding fhwr only hope of 


\ 


sritain, France and West Ger- ticaHy, er< 


N EW YORK — F may be termi- 
nally 0L I therefore face; in an 
ultimate and personal way, the is- 
sue of my right to die. I am happy 
for those who are not iti, but they 
are te rminal , loo, and they should 
think about this question as it re- 
lates to themselves and to those 
they love as friends or family or 
simply fellow human beings. 

The issue first recrivedserious 
attention nine years ago, when a 
New Jersey court granted the re- 
quest of Karen Ann Quinlan's par- 
ents to remove life-preserving sup- 
port from their comatose daughter. 
There has since been an intensive 
inquiry into the ethical and legal 
aspects of the right to die. 

The issue is whether a te rminall y 
ill patient may confer the authority 
to withdraw lus life support. This is 
generally done by means of a living 
will, written when the patient is still 
competent, that transfers authority 
to a designated relative, friend, 
physician, religious or legal adviser 
or to a court. Thirty-five Tj-S. states 
have now passed living will laws, 22 
of them in tbe last decade. 

The question arises in the ease of 
any serious illness — including can- 
cer, heart trouble and a whole range 
of neurological and neuromuscular 
diseases — that deprives the patient 
of the ability to decide what is to be 
done for him. But once illness has 
struck it is often too late. The pa- 
tient is often no longer competent 
to express a wUL 
Birth and death are the most sin- 
gular events we experience. The 
contemplation of death, as of birth, 
should oe a thing of beauty, not 


By Jacob KJavils 

The writer, who is 81, was 
Republican senator from New 
York from 1957 to 1981. 

ignobility. Everyone must think 
about dying, young and old alike. 
Given tbe new medical technology 
that can sustain life even when the 
brain is gone, we must also think 
about tire right to die and the need 
for dignity in departing life. 

My mind is stul functioning, but 
if it should stop, I believe, I would 
be dead, and there would be no use 
in prolonging tire agony. We owe it 
to ouadves and the ones wc love to 
make provision for such moments. 
It is in tire highest interest of hu- 

manitarranimi that WB prepare for 

these moments wi th living will laws. 

From a legal point of view, living 
wills are no different from wills that 
leave property, appoint guardians 
for chudrea and establish trusts for 
charity, educaUm and research. As 
lawvers help people make such or- 
dinary wills, so they should help 
people provide for thdr hung and 
dying. The individual making tire 
wiD ffwia be of sound mind and 
have thecapaaty to express bis own 
wishes as to the disposition of his 
body. These wills amid also pro- 
vide foe the contribution, for use in 
transplants, of bodily organs that 
are no longer of any use to the 
individual Lawyers should have 

that responsibility, too. 

The authority conferred by a liv- 
ing wfll must not, of courae, be 
abused. Nothing could be more im- 
portant, after afl. than the right 


to life —and the right not to have 
it terminated prematurely. In the 
event of flagrant abuse, or any pos- 
sibility of it — when a decision may 
seem to defy tbe wishes of the indi- 
vidual who made the wiD. or when 
loved ones are unable to detemune 
if it should be invoked, — then, of 
course, the patient’s relatives must 
have recourse to the courts. 

Short of a living wifl. tire best way 
to provide that dignity is to use the 
durable power orattorney to ap- 
point an individual to medi- 
cal decisions when the patient con- 
cerned is no longer competent to 
make them. The appointed person 
could be a relative, a physician or 
a. legal or religious adviser. Here, 
too, confusion and quarrels can be 
avoided by conferring the necessary 
authority in advance. 

There is, finally, the question of 
money, which plays a part in even 
this sort of deosion. Many people 
were shocked last year when Gover- 
nor Richard D. Lamm of Colorado 


many — amply does not believe that 
a string of impoverished states with 
big mujtias ami a dull night life add 
up to a genuine threat, no matter how 
flowery tire annual cable of compli- 
ments to Moscow on the anniversary 
of the Bolshevik revolution. 

The break is complete. The makers 
of foreign policy in W ashingto n have 
been worried about Soviet “subver- 
sion” for 40 years. If tire public ever 
troubled itself about this, it has quit 
Ordinary citizens smrnly do not care 
who runs Vietnam, Af ghanistan or El 
Salvador — not enough, at any rate, 
to fund a serious war, murfi less said 
thdr sons to fight in iL 

Through long and bitter experi- 
ence, official Washington has learned 


V 


keeping up on debt payments. . 

Meanwhile, foreign aid to Latin 
America has plummeted. FortSP 
corporate investment decreases daily. 
Capital flight continues. Invest®®* 
banks turn away from the region- 

And now, agamst tins backgra®*- 
the U.S. Congress would el ect ne w 
trade barriers. It is haxd to um$u*a 
worse idea — for Latin Amenta or 
for tire United States. 

The writer is associate pnfessot oj 
international relations at Hunter Cpy 
lege in New York. She contributed bus 
comment to The New York Tones. 


UTTER 


£4 


pect of UTeto “get out of the way" 
and stop using resources that could 
be used more profitably by others. 
That sounded callous, and it proba- 
bly was, but it was the truth. We 
have not yet reached the point, even 
in America, where living or dying 
has nothing to do with economics. 
That is what makes (be right to die 
with dignity an issue of morality as 
wefl as of policy and law. 

Whether old or young, healthy or 
id, we carmot go on Shirking the 
questions of who sMl live, who 
shaD die and who shall drifrte 
The New York Times. 


that tire only way to conduct the 

J«t Protect Competition 

the public grows more sophisticated, Bravo to Hobart Rowcn for “ 
this gets harder to do. Refusing to Danger Is Not All From ftp*® • 
take no for an answer, tire admmis- Mug- U- When protectionist seen- 
(ration mna run further to get round orent reaches fever pitch, the ■ 
the end. Now it is stepping outside for the fever is the stra^ht train: ine 
the bounds of government (and of the BA trade deficit with Japan 
Constitution) m order to nwinfain a least as much the result of & ™onj 
degree of pressure cm Nicaragua that dollar and less competitive 
Congress is unwilling to support. products as il is of ramparts. ■ 

How Congress wifi deal with this Competition needs to be re«®* 
challenge is Sard to say. Legend idls *“**• That means uppadu^g^r 
us that when Benjamin Franklin reducing the US. budget 
came out of the Constitutional Con- working with Prime Mmisltf 
vemion he was asked by a woman sane and MTIL who seem 
what sort of government America “Y something. Tire wota weu&* 
was to have. He answered, “A rrocb- w^dd be American protectionism- - | 
lie, Madam — if you can keep ll” J It is a dichc. but excdjeneeB^ , 
begin to see what was troubling him ditionedby challenge. As for the—r 


/ 


least as much tire result of & tsufft 
dollar and less competitive Ametstf 
products as it is at raiqpans. , it 
Competition needs to be re«w* 
ized. That means upgrading qu®&; 


> 1 - 




The writer, author of "77tr Man 
IVho Kept the Semes: Richard Helms 
and the CIJL,*' is preparing a toe* on 
strategic weapons, lie contributed this 
comment to ihe Los Angeles Times. 


a woman and MI7L who seem wags®. 

[ America “Y something. The «ora wtaav 
“A repub- 'w^beAnrericmprotectioi|Oik- . j 

keep ll” I It is a dichc. but excdlenceBCca- , 

Whig him. dhioned by challenge. As for Jheftp- 
anese, my experiences with tb« JJ* 
The Man *«r country or elsewhere, cBhwjjg 
a rdHdna I 131 * hem beuer. Apparently mere 
a took on diings have to keep bang aid.’ .. . 
ibuted this WILLIAM H. GAMBiX . 











INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUTE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 1985 l[^ 

26 Die in Beirut as 2 Car Bombs 


PageS 


r •• •. 


.. V . 


p<>rtfe 
mid JT cr 
e Debt (j 

» 5 Pan* b;-. 


House in Arab Hebron 

Squatters Seek to Block Peace Talks 
And Revive Settlement Movement 


Claiborne 

COD fronta- 
* jBPWing coalition 

SfeL'iM J ^ wish in the 

JJji aty of Hebron imensi- 
Monday when Defense Minis- 
ter Yitzhak Rabin Med to per- 
suade rightist members of 
parliament to leave a house they 
have occupied in the Arab market- 
place since Thursday. 

. The rundown, four-room boose 
m Hebron's Arab casbah has be- 
come the focus of a eairma|p n by 
rightists in the Knesset to revive 
Jewish settlement in the heart of 
Arab cities. 

The squatters also say they want 
to prevent peace negotiations be- 
tween the government and a joint 
Jor d a nia n - Pales tinian delegation 
that includes members of thcPales- 
dne Liberation Organization. 

Mr. Rabin, who lias said the five 
Knesset members in the house will 
not be permitted to stay, visited 
Hebron and spoke, with three 
Knesset members from the conser- 
vative Tehiya Party for more than 
an hour but was unable to convince 
them to leave. 

The three, Geula Cohen, PHww 
Waldman and Gershon Shafat, 
said Mr. Rabin appealed to their 
consciences not to abuse their par- 
liamentary immunity from arrest 
and to end their demonstration. 

“We told him that our Zionist 
consciences demand of us to re- 
main here,” Mr. Waldman said lat- 
er. He said that Mr. Rabin made no 
threats to forcibly evict the Knesset 
members, a move that the defense 
minis ter last night said he wanted 


to avoid because it would 1 be “very 
undignified” for Israel 

After meeting with the squatters 

at the* Hebron military governor's 
headquarters,- Mr. Rabm briefly 
visited the formerly Arab-owned 
bouse, which was purchased by the 
Organization for Resettlement of 
Jews in Hebron through an Arab 
middleman. 

The protesters were visited Sun- 
day by Arid Sharon, the trade min- 
ister and former defease minister, 
who gave his support. 

About 28 Jewish families are 
now Jiving in Hebron, but virtually 
all of them are in die old Jewish 
quarter and not in the densely pop- 
ulated Arab casbah, a warren of 
narrow alleys in which there have 
been frequent attacks mi Jewish 



Explode in Moslem Neighborhoods 


Sharon, SfefcE 

wSSm? S hafat and Geola Cohen. 


Aharon Nahmias, deputy speak- 
er of the Knesset and a member of 
Prime Minister Peres's La- 

bor Party, also visited the squatters 
Monday and asked them not to use 
their parliamentary immunity dur- 
ing their protest 
Mr. Peres, appearing before the 
Knesset Foreign Affairs and De- 
fease Committee, accused the pro- 
testers of “ making light of the law” 
under immunity, according to the 
state radio, but he made no threats 
to remove them forcibly. 

Water and electricity in the 
house have been cut off, but the 
protesters have been using facilities 
at a nearby army guard post 
Mrs. Cohen said at the bouse 
Sunday that she and her colleagues 
would “raise the flag" of Jewish 
settlement'’ to protest “the atmo- 


sphere surrounding the legitunaU- 
zation of talks with the PLO." 

Mr. Waldman and Michael Ei- 
tan, a member of the Knesset who 
belongs to the Likud Party and is 
taking part in the sit-in, also criti- 
cized the joint Jordanian- PLO 
peace initiative and what they 
termed efforts by the U.S. assistant 
secretary of state for Near Eastern 
and South Asian affairs, Richard 
W. Murphy, to talk to members of 
the PLO. 

Mr. Murphy ended a six-day 
Middle East tour Sunday saying 
that the United States remained 
willing to meet with a Palestinian- 
Jordanian team. But his failure to 
do so thus far was seen as evidence 
that obstacles to such a meeting 

remained. 

While Mr. Peres appeared to be 
attempting to defuse the confronta- 
tion with the Likud faction of the 
government of national unity. 


members of the cabinet were split 
almost evenly along partisan lines 
over whether settlement in the 
Arab section of Hebron should be 
permitted. . . 

A former defense minister, 
Mosbe Arens, now a minister with- 
out portfolio, said recently that “I 
definitely justify purchasing of 
houses and land in the land of Isra- 
el everywhere in Judea and Samar- 
ia, everywhere in Hebron. I don’t 
see anything wrong with this." Ju- 
dea and Samaria are the biblical 
names for the West Bank. 

While neither side is seriously 
openly advocating a dissolution of 
the coalition government, some La- 
bor Party Knesset members said 
the crisis could reach that stage if 
the Likud continued to side with 
the Tehiya Party on the settlement 
issue. 

Meanwhile, Hebron s leading 
settlement activist Rabbi Mosbe 


Levin ger, and three followers were 
charged with disturbing public or- 
der Monday after they were pre- 
vented from shopping in the Arab 
marketplace by army troops patrol- 
ling Lhe area. Several Arab vegeta- 
ble stands were overturned by the 
settlers, the authorities said. 

■ Peres Rejects Proposal 

A senior Israeli official said that 
Prime Minister Peres rejected a 
proposal Sunday that Israel break 
off contacts on the Middle East 
peace process if Mr. Murphy met 
with a Jord anian - Palestinian nego- 
tiating team. The Associated Press 
reported from Jerusalem. 

The suggestion was said to have 
come from Mr. Arens. 

Mr. Peres advised the cabinet “to 
act calmly." and indicated that the 
United States did not believe such 
a meeting now would be helpful, 
the official said. 


Former TW A Tfij jt cking Hostage Took. Pictures 


By Warren Weaver Jr. 

New York Times Senice 

WASHINGTON — One of the 
39 Americans held hostage in Bei- 
rut after Trans World Airlines 
Flight 847 was hijacked on June 14 
hid a camera from his Modem, cap- 
tors and secretly took three dozen 
color pictures of his companions, 
the btnkfing in which the hostages 
were confined and the surrounding 
landscape. 

He later gave the photographs to 
the UJL authorities. 

The former hostage, Peter, W. 
Hill, a travel agent and tour guide 
from the Chicago area, said Sunday 
that his 35mm camera , had been 


pftfiwi in his suitcase, which was 
confiscated by the Lebanese Shiite 
Moslem hijackers of the TWA 
plane. 

Later, for reasons still unknown 
to Mr. HGH the bag was delivered 
to him in custody, with the camera 
apparently untouched. 

Mr. Jfill, 57, said he immediately 
ind the camera and. over the next 
few days, shot a 36-exposure roD of 
film at moments when he was not 
being watched. His main purpose, 
he said, was to record pjgraphical 
information (hat would hdp UjS. 
security agents identify the build- 
ing when: he and seven other hos- 
tages were held. 


In the process, he shot a few 
social scenes and caught one Mos- 
lem guard asleep. 

Mr. Hill said that the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation sept slides 
made from his film and 8-inch-by- 
1 0-inch (20J-centimeter-by : 25.6 
centimeter) color prints to him a 

few days ago, six weeks after he had 

turned over the roll “Some of the 
more sensitive stuff" was missing, 
be said, but he declined to describe 
those pictures. 

He said he had decided to sell the 

pictures to ABC News, The New 
York Times, Time and other publi- 
cations, with all income to be given 

to tbe Word of Life Assembly of 


God Church in Springfield, Virgin- 
ia. „ . 

Robert Dean Stethem, 23, the 
U.S. Navy diver who was killed by 
the hijackers aboard the plane in 
Beirut, was a member of the 
church, and a fund has been started 
to construct a youth building there 
in his honor. 

The Americans were taken hos- 
tage when the TWA plane was to- 
jacked after leaving Attorns. The 
last 39 hostages were held in groups 
in various locations in Beirut be- 
fore they were freed June 30. 

Attorney General Edwin Meese 
3d said after the hostages were 
freed that the Justice Department 


was “pursuing a number of legal 
courses of action relating to the 
events surrounding the hijacking." 
He has declined to comment on 
reports that a grand jury investiga- 
tion has been considered. 

Some of Mr. Hill’s pictures show 
his seven companions seated at a 
kitchen table eating “our first solid 
m e al," an airline portion of chicken 
after about 10 days of captivity. 

When an accidental shooting in- 
cident in the building's courtyard 
distracted the guards, Mr. Hill said, 
he grabbed tos camera and took 
several pictures of the building's 
surroundings from windows, bal- 
conies and the roof. 


The Associated Press 

BEIRUT— Two car bombs ex- « 
ploded 10 minutes apart outside a e 
restaurant and a mosque in mainly ri 
Moslem West Beirut on Monday. 
The police said that 26 persons , 
were killed and 84 were wounded. J 
The bombings appeared to be a Q 
revenge attack by Christians after ■ 
55 persons were tolled and 1 1 9 were 
wounded by a car bomb, blamed 
on Moslems, that exploded outside 
a supermarket near Christian East c 
Beirut on Saturday. i 

“We have a car bomb war on our « 
hands now," the Moslem Voice of 
the Nation radio said of Mondays 
attacks, which triggered off sectari- 1 
an fighting along Beirut’s Green 1 
Line. 1 

The police said that 22 persons 
were killed and 77 were wounded 
when a car laden with an estimated 
35 kilograms (77 pounds) of power- 
ful hexogen explosives detonated 
outside the Hamadeh restaurant in 
West Beirut's Karakol el-Druze 
residential neighborhood at 12:05 
P.M. 

Four others were killed and sev- 
en were hurt when a car rigged with 
an estimated 50 kilograms of TNT 
went off 10 minutes later outside 
the Rawdat al-Shadidein mosque 
in the Shiite Moslem suburb of 
Ghobeiri. 

A previously unkn own group 
calling itself the Black Brigades 
claimed in a telephone call to an 
international news agency in Beirut 
that it carried out the bombings to 
“counter a war of extermination 
aimed against our Christian peo- 
ple." 

The anonymous caller said: “Be- 
cause terrorism can be remedied 
only by terrorism, we proclaim war 
on terrorist organizations and their 
leaderships, wherever they may 
be." 

“We assert that we shall confront 
the war of extermination," he said, 
“with a counierex termination war 
and proclaim our determination to 
avenge all the Christians killed, 
slaughtered and displaced in this 
country." 

“We reaffirm that if Christians 
are not allowed to live in peace in 
Lebanon, no one else will be able 
to," he said. 

President Amin Gemayel dc- 
’ nounced the two bombings in West 
l Beirut and two bombings in East 
I Beirut last week, as well as the one 
i outside the supermarket on Satur- 
day and one on Wednesday that 

- killed 13 persons. The “cycle of 
I violence is not sparing anyone." he 
L said. 

k The state radio quoted Mr. Ge- 
s mayel as saying that the “c rimin al 

- hands are moving from one area to 
another." 


Mr. Gemayel said the bombings 
were aimed at disrupting Syrian 
efforts to reconcile Lebanon's war- 
ring sects. 

Education Minister Salim al- 
Hoss, a Sunni Moslem, said: “The 
criminal hand that is hitting in East 
ynH West is one." He blamed “the 
enemy." apparently Israel, and did 
not directly accuse the Christians, 


The Karakol el-Druze district is 
controlled by Druze militiamen, 
who Christian leaders blamed for 
Saturday’s bombing. 

Tbe Ghobeiri suburb is con- 
trolled by Shiite militias allied with 
the Druze in Lebanon's 10-year 
civil war against the Christians. 

Within minutes of the Karakol 
explosion, Christian and Moslem 
gunners began shelling each other 
along the three-mile (five-kDoine- 
ier) Green Line that divides the 
city. 

The dashes forced the closure of 
the Museum Crossing, the main 
gateway between Christian and 
Moslem sectors. 

The owner of the wrecked res- 
taurant, Ihah Hamadeh, said there 


were no customers inside when the 
blast occurred. Members of his 
staff sustained minor cuts from fly- 
ing glass shards. 

One witness said he saw a blond 
man in his mid-30s park a Peugeot 
in front of the restaurant. 

“The owner of a flower shop next 
io the restaurant told the car driver 
that he couldn't park there" the 
witness said. “The driver said he 
wanted to buy a sandwich from the 
restaurant arid would only be for a 
minute.” 

The witness said the man went 
into the restaurant, bought a sand- 
wich then ran away. Moments later 
the bomb exploded. 

■ Red Cross Aide Seized 

Gunmen kidnapped the Swiss 
head of the International Commit- 
tee of the Red Cross mission in the 
southern Lebanese port of Sidon 
on Monday, security sources said, 
according to Reuters. 

They said the official Stephen 
JacomL was taken from his car near 
the village of Adloun, 12 miles 
south of Sidon on the main coast 
road to Tyre. 


U.S. Navy Reportedly Called to Ship 
To Defuse Missile Fired in Gulf Raid 


The Associated Press 

MANAMA, Bahrain — U.S. 
Navy bomb disposal experts 
boarded a Belgian-registered oil 
tanker Monday to remove and de- 
fuse an unexploded rocket fired at 
the vessel Sunday by Iranian jet 
fighters in the southern sector of 
the Gulf, according to marine sal- 
vage sources. 

The 45,700-ion vessel the Naess 
Leopard, was struck by rockets and 
set ablaze Sunday about 25 miles 
(40 kilometers) east of Qatar, ap- 
parently by Iran in retaliation for 


raids Thursday by Iraqi aircraft on 
the Kharg Island oil terminal. 

The explosives experts were from 

the aircraft carrier Midway, ship- 
ping officials said. The ship is pan 
of the U.S. Navy task force serving 
in the Gulf and the Indian Ocean. 

The tanker, which was carrying 
kerosene, anchored off Doha, Qa- 
tar, Sunday night with the unex- 
ploded rocket still aboard. 

The stop sailed to Qatar under its 
own power despite serious damage 
to the crew’s quarters and naviga- 
tional equipment, the sources said. 
No injuries were reported. 


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*2 Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 1985 



ain Doctors’ 

By E.T. Dionne J 

New fork Times Servic 



Black Africa Is a Spiritual Supermarket 


) r - 

' Serv ice 

B AMEND A, Cameroon — It was a toss-up 
over whose God had done the work, but it 
seemed clear that Someone was on the job. 

When Pope John Paid II arrived Aug. 12 for a 
brief visit in this city 150 miles <240 kilometers) 
inland from the Gulf of Guinea, the rain was 
coming down bard and there was little likeli- 
hood that it would stop. 

“I've been working oere all week." said Em- 
manuel Ngwayi. a technician for Cameroon 
radio, "and it’s been raining every day.” 

But just as the pope's Mass began, the rain 
halted. For a little wmile during the ceremony, 
the sun even peeked out Cram behind the clouds. 
The pope proceeded with the Mass, waved 
goodbye, whisked off in his jet and the r ain 
started up a g ain 

Marlin Nkemngu, a reporter for the Camer- 
oon Tribune, was not surprised. A week before. 


the local “rain doctors,” animist priests who 
concern themselves with controlling the weath- 
er, promised him it would not rain during the 
pope's Mass. 

”1 know there are people who can stop the 
rain from falling,” said Mr. Ngwayi. the radio 
technician. U I firmly believe that." 

The story offers many clues about the reli- 
gious situation John Paul confronted during his 
12-day visit to black Africa. In this intensely 
spiritual continent, the incorporeal explanation 
is often preferred to accidents of man or nature. 
Christian and Moslem denominations compete 
with local faiths, making Africa a spiritual su- 
permarket, and many Africans pick and choose 
among aspects of the various beliefs. 

Mr. Ngwayi and Mr. Nkemngu are Roman 
Catholics, and part or the country's educated 
dass. Neither would think of giving up the 
traditional faiths. Christians and Moslems of all 


classes across black Africa return to their village “God," and each can have a slightly different Africans bridle at the notion that the traditional 
priests at limes of sickness, cam - traditional, connotation. But many ammists,and*Cbiisuaiis faiths “worship trees." 
good luck charms and make regular offerings to who retain ties to animism, argue that the van- “They don't,” said Augustin Ndi 
their ancestors. ous faiths acknowledge a supreme being. Catholic seminarian who defends the 


Ndi, a Roman 

their ancestors. ous faiths acknowledge a supreme being. Catholic seminarian who defends the traditional 

In short, animism is alive and wdJ. Of the six In Togo, one tribe’s word for God, “Yehwe,” failhs - “They*} 11 see a free in a village that is the 

black African countries the pope visited, ani- is close to the Hebrew word for the one God, 01051 sSjL 

r ..;, h r rt ,fr t„ ••Vahwh ’’ trees. And they will say that God is m that tree. 


man.” Mr. Nchami argued, "where yn used a 
ram for sacrifice." . . . 

The Old Testament analogy stats Chrataa 
missionaries. If Chmtiaffliy grew from .l oririia 
and sought to absorb aspects of other fmtfcs. it 
has done the same with .African nesgious tradi- 
tion. 


mism is the majority faith in four, according to “Yahweh." Animist priests in Togoville offered Y 66 *' ^ " siaer Marie Mo ocfca. a missjonaiy is aonh- 

Vatican estimates: Togo 1.64 percent). theKwy a oraver askine tlut "the matOid creator. It serves as a symbqL They offer saenfios to the 


Coast (63 percent), the Central African Repub- 
lic (70 percent) and Kenya (58 percent), in 
Cameroon and Zaire it accounts respectively 
for 40 percent and 45 percent of the population. 

To define animism is to enter a world of tribal 
beliefs that have much in common, yet many 
distinctive characteristics. Horace W. Pitkin, a 
political secretary at the U.S. Embassy in Cam- 
eroon. has been struggling with the problem: 
“Animism." he said, “is any set of beliefs wc 
can't label otherwise." 

A hundred languages or more have a word for 


a prayer asking that "the great God creator, 
transcendent and omnipresent." send His bless- 
ings upon the pope. Most Christians. Jews and 
Moslems could be comfortable with that. 

Y et there are also many “gods” in the animist 
faiths, and much more. One dictionary defini- 
tion of animism holds that it sees spirits in all 

living things. 

When a snake appeared in a shrine in Togo- 
ville where the pope was to appear, it was taken 
as a good sign, according to a local missionary, 
since the people of the area venerate snakes. 

And then there are the trees. Some educated 


tree as a way of offering 'sacrifices to God." «u Tog* said ** 

Near the airport where the pope landed in dose to theROTiaflQlho^L M 

Lome, Togo, a group of animisls were perform- clergy have been able to ^adopt \u 
ing a ritual that involved cutting a puppy with a tapum is easy. lOQ. ^-i^isanalmoRunro'- 

knife li ning its blood flow onto a totem sal symbol of life. sic S3ia. 

known as a Jegba. According to tradition, the But there are limits, as the popehas bora 
legba needed the dog’s blood as a sacrifice. It saying, not only on 

was an unseemly sight for lovers of puppies. a married priesthood bu. also on SOUK tribal 
Bui John Nchami, an ofDcial of the Ministry conceptions of Goc. . 

of Information in Cameroon’s northwest prov- “Some tnbal gods can be aunost evu, jealous 
ince. argued that ritual sacrifice has been part of for sacrifice and -quick to pinushmcnt. and 
the rites of tribal faiths around the world for Michael Niba. a Cameroonian Cathouc setm- 
cen tunes. “It's the same as in the Old Testa- narian. “That's not the Cnnsuan God. 




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Daveyton, South Africa: 
Township Under Siege 


(Continued from Page 1) 
ton under siege could apply to 
many of them. 

A pattern has emerged that helps 
explain why the violence has lasted 
so long in this white-ruled country 


and an occasional gasoline bomb 
or grenade. 

But almost a year of constant 
unrest, much of it aimed at blacks 
accused of collaborating with the 
system, has done permanent dam- 


'VUp Ui HU. I U3W kOIMiUJ tfj-wuh I «M J “Wt**. 

and why. as police quell distur- age to the government’s long-term 
bances in one region, they br eak strategy of maintaining the essen- 


out in another. 

The grievances are usually local 
and the instigators are usually 
young people, restless and dissatis- 
fied with their education, and with 
the dead-end prospects that await 
them when school days are over. 

Their anger takes them to the 
streets, where it is often compound- 
ed by the harsh response of an 
undermanned and undertrained 
police force that, critics contend, 
too often opens fire when other 
tactics might have calmed the situa- 
tion. 

Something similar happened 
nine years ago when Soweto. South 
.Africa’s largest black urban center, 
exploded in student violence that 
shook the country for several 
months. But the state's police pow- 
er crushed that uprising. 

This time the situation is differ- 
ent. many analysts contend, in 
large part because the children axe 
noi alone. In Daveyton and else- 
where, they have suppon from a 
relatively new web of local black 
organizations that did not exist in 
1976 and that often are led by peo- 
ple of the Soweto generation who 
intuitively sympathize with their 
young successors. 

The result, experts agree, is not a 
revolution nor even what might be 
called a “prerevolutionary" situa- 
tion. The state still holds almost all 
the guns in a contest against an 
opponent armed only with rocks 



dais of white domination while 
nurturing and enlisting as junior 
partner an urban black middle 
class. 

ft has left white officials with a 
stark choice: revert to the tough 
tactics of the past or seek a differ- 
ent and posably more equitable 
political arrangement with the 
black majority. 

The four-week 
cy clearly is an ai 
Police officials say 
identify and isolate those - they be- 
lieve are instigating township un- 
rest. They believe they are succeed- 
ing. 

“Maybe 1 percent or less are the 
real radicals." said a senior police 
official in Pretoria. “They have the 
support of follow-on hooligans 
who are taking advantage of the 
situation and kids who are bored 
and looking for excitement. 

He added: “Our estimate is at 
most 10 percent of the population 
is actively involved —a small, vio- 
lent group that has been holding 
the entire community for ransom. 



747 Tape Tells of Desperate Fight 
By Pilot to Steer by Engine Power 


reporting that the hydraulic system 
was gone, Mr. Iwao said, the alti- 
tude changes plotted by radar indi- 
cate loss of elevator control. 

Radio and radar transcripts 


The Associated Pros 

TOKYO — With pieces of the 
vertical tail section torn away and 
the hydraulically powered controls 

going’ u se less , the pilot of the Japan Radio and radar transcripts 
Air Lines Boeing 747 jet that made public by the Transport \tin- 
crasbed Aug. 12 evidently varied is try show that at 6:25 P.M., the 
the power of his four engines in a 
desperate effort to guide the plane 
to a landing. 

Conversation from the voice rc- 


The Wtzhnpon Pan 

Two bodyguards stand with Tom Boya, the mayor of Daveyton, and his family. 


But many residents see it differ- 
ently. Ultimately they hold the gov- 
ernment responsible* for their des- 
perate poverty and for the wires l 
they say it has triggered. 

When it was started in the mid 
1950s. Daveyton was supposed to 
be a model township, and a sign 
near its entrance still promises a 
“Pot of Gold at the End of the 
Rainbow.” 

But the years have betrayed that 


promise. Unemployment is so hi°h 


The other 90 percenL are law-abid- 
ing people who realize the need for . . . 

stability. Once the situation is nor- chat Mr. Boya say s he has no 
malize d, they will not allow this to able way to count it. Nearly 
happen again ” 100.000 people are crammed into 

Daveyton's energetic black may- 12.000 small houses, many of 
or. Tom Boya, 34. accepts much of whose tiny front yards have been 
that analysis and blames his town's taken over by tin or plywood 
troubles in large part on outside shacks. 

agitators. In the darkened living room of a 


house last week sat three young 
men. all of them local leaders of the 
Congress of South African Stu- 
dents. and all of them in hiding 
from police since the emergency 
began. 

The congress, founded in 1979. is 
one of the many national organiza- 
tions that sprang up to replace 
those banned by the state after the 
Soweto uprising, and police con- 
tend it has been one of the main 
elements behind the unrest 

The three young men, aged 18. 
19 and 21. do not deny their role in 
the violence. 

“There are many young ones 
running in the streets who look up 
to us for leadership." said the 21- 
vsar-old, who identified himself by 
the nickname Sello. 



He justified the burning of the 
four policemen's houses earlier this 
year as retaliation for the deaths of 
students. 

“The blacks oppress us more 
■han the whites,” he said. “They 
shoot even before the whites when 
they see us.” 

The students say they look up to 
the outlawed African National 
Congress, or ANC, the exiled resis- 
tance movement, but they say they 
have no comjci with its agents in- 
side South Africa. 

They say they admire Nelson 
Mandela, the imprisoned black na- 
tionalist. Bui the man outside jail 
who they say they most respect, 
even though they disagree with his 
advocacy of nonviolence, is the .An- 
glican bishop of Johannesburg. 
Desmond M. Tutu. 

The three say they are not eager 
xo die. When police opened fine or. 
a crowd returning from a funeral a 
few days after the emergency took 
effect, they ran away. 

“How could we fight?" said Si- 
pho. 19. "We don’t have guns. We 
know we can’t win on the streets." 


corder. made public Monday, 
shows that the pilot, Masami Tafca- 
bama. 49. and the copilot. Yu taka 
Sasaki. 39, kept righting to control 
the plane until it crashed into a 
mo untain killing ail but four of the 
524 people aboard. 

Press reports said that prelimi- 
nary analysis of the tape revealed 
that about 6:35 P.M- 10 minutes 
after Mr. Takahama declared an 
emergency, a crew member said: 
“Hydraulic are all oul" 

Subsequently a voice, probably 
the pilot's, issues a series of orders, 
including “Turn right." “Increase 
power" and other instructions. 

News reports said the tape con- 
tained “numerous sounds of auto- 
matic alarms and war ning s in the 
cockpit" during the last 32 minutes, 
ending with a “loud noise." 

Mr. Takahama had logged a to- 
tal of 12,404 flight hours, including 
4,588 in 747s. according to the se- 
nior jumbo jet pilot at Japan Air 
Lines. Yoshio Iwao. 

Mr. Iwao said that Mr. Taka- 
hama was expen in the "very diffi- 
cult" techniques of maneuvering 
the 747 solely by varying engine 
power. 

There have been instances, espe- 
ciallv with battle-damaged bomb- 
ers. where pilots have used engine 
power only to steer back to base 
and land safely. 

Experts say the 747 s vertical tail 
and rudder had disintegrated, ap- 
parently breaking all foW hydrau- 
lic systems available to move aile- 
rons. flaps, elevators and rudder. 

In addition to the cockpit voice 


istry 

stan of the crisis and 39 minutes 
before the crash, Mr. T aka h ama 
told Tokyo air controllers that he 
was declaring an “emergency" and 

descending from 24,000 feet (7,272 
meters) to 22X100 feet 
However, radar indicated that 
the plane instead climbed in the 
next two minutes to 24.900 feet. 
“That shows be had difficulty 


with the elevators, which aren’t 
known to have blown away,” Mir. 
Iwao said “I: only cnuhl point to 
an extensive damage to the hydrau- 
lic system." In such a case, he add- 
ed. die pilot would throttle bade all 
engines to descend. 

With bis ailerons disabled and 
his rudder gone, the pilot probably 
reduced power of the two right en- 
gines to turn to the right, or toward 
Tokyo, Mr. Iwao said. Tins would 
account tor the wide curve near 
Mount Fuji, west of Tokyo. 

Excess power, with no stabilizing 
tail fin. could explain a complete 
circle that occurred minutes later. 


In Russia, Bread Is Life 
(And It’s Delicious , Too) 


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(Continued from Page 1) 
than 20 cents, it is one of the cheap- 
est foods in the Sarin Union and is 
a symbol of the government’s care 
in meeting basic needs. 

No matter what steps Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, may 
plan to readjust the economy and 
its artificial prices, it is difficult to 
imagine his raising the price of 
bread. 

Last year, the grain harvest was 
only 170 mill i nn tons — far shon of 
the government’s target of 240 mil- 
lion tons. As a result. 55 million 
tons of gram were imported. 

About 27 million tons of the im- 
ported grain, including about six 
million tons from the United 
States, consisted of wheat and most 
of that was bread-quality wheat, 
making up dose to three -fourths of 
the 37 million tons consumed an- 
nually in the Soviet Union. 

Tire enormous government sub- 
sidy for bread, including the cost of 
importing grain, is not made public 
but it is certainly one reason for 
concern over waste — such as feed- 
ing bread to pigs or other animals. 

In a sign of the seriousness with 
which the government views the 


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problem, the Politburo adopted a 
resolution in May calling for stria 
measures to stop waste and misuse 
of bread. 

But the problem is not an easy 
one to solve. 

"Drop in to any rural store in the 
Novgorod. Pskov or Leningrad re- 
gions.” the newspaper Zzvtstia said 
three years ago. “Peasant women, 
who have Jos fall respect for bread, 
are buying five or six leaves a day 
to feed ifcar livestock." 

Last week. Izvestia published a 
report on the case of tire director of 
the Progress Collective Farm in 
Moldavia. P. Profca. the n™ who is 
facing trial for feeding toss of 
bread to pigs. The writer was al- 
most bestoe himself. 

“Honestly, I find it embarrassing 
even to write about this, as if l awe 
committing some sort of sacrilege," 
he wrote. “But it would be an even 
greater sacrilege to reman s2cnt-" 
Hospitals and schools hi Molda- 
vian district had begun consum- 
ing about a bread shortage -■ 
Historical records show that in 
I63S there were 263 bakeries in 
Moscow, each specuftzing in a dif- 
ferent type of broad, in biscuits, 
bimv (pancakes! or cutmousiofl 
wafers. Until this centuty, white 
bread was for aristocrats or, is a 
rare treat, special feasts. 

Now. bread remains the basic 
food in the Russian din. obhgatiay 
with borscht and popular as a chas- 
er to vodka. 

Perhaps the staple of the Honan 
table is orlwsky. a soar. Kg Id- 
brown. smooth-grained bread that 
costs 18 kopecks, or 20 cents, a Jo£ 
Noreznoy. at 13 kopecks, is a 
good, cheap white bread. Another 
inexpensive baric bread, known as 
gray bread, is sold in large, round 
loaves cut in half. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY. AUGUST 20, 1985 




Page 7 


ARTS /LEISURE 


OldArtinNew Guises: Painted Furniture Makes Cornel>ack 


By Joseph Giovannini 

New M Trims Swire 

F OR most of the 20th century, 
mass-produced furniture was a 
matter or industrial production 
done in the fewest steps possible. 
Seldom did the brush of an artist 
touch the surfaces. Beautiful. form 
may have been a design objective, 
but the form was left unadorned. 

evavthcrc has been a strragrevival 
of interest in painted furniture, 
done by artists, craftsmen, archi- 
tects arid designers, in motifs rang- 


urative drawing and trompe I’oefl. 
Marry of the pieces are one-of-a- 
kind art objects or are custom-de- 
signed on commission. 

There are also new furniture 
lines being introduced, such as the 
14-piece Nuova Alchimia collec- 
tion by the Italian manufacturer 
Zabro, and chairs in the Robert 
Venturi collection presented last 
year by KnolL Techniques include 
brush painting, stenciling, air 
brushing and silk screening. Some 
pieces have designs in their lami- 
nate surfaces that originated as 
drawings. The spirit of the Mila- 
nese group Memphis is evident in 
many of the Italian designs. 

The resulting furniture is engag- 
ing rather than cool, charged by 
unusual colors, striking designs 
and intriguing subject matter. A 



Painted-glass table or desk by Carmen Spent. 


tilt-top table, for example, de- 
signed by the architectural firm 
Hammond Beeby & Babka or Chi- 
cago for a branch library that will 

open there this autumn, will also be 
the storyteller's chair in the chil- 
dren's reading room. 

On the back of the chair-table is 
a radiant sun; two griffins are 
painted on its si dearms. Depicting 
a type of visual legend, the chair, 
like a book, tells a story. “People 
are looking for ornament, some- 
thing with content that will make a 
more stimulating environment," 
says Tannys Langdon, project ar- 
chitect for the library. 

“I think the new furniture is a 
reaction to cool industrial design,” 


says Carolyn Watson of a Zabro 
distributor, Watson Hague Ein- 
stein Inc. in Los Angeles: “The 
designs give a human aspect to the 
furniture; the legs of the Atropo 
game table recall architectural col- 
umns and its gold leaf takes you 
back to antique furniture. You in- 
teract with the designs through 
your memory." Introduced in April 
in the United States, the collection 
features hand-silk -screened designs 
applied to sturdy, factory-built fur- 
niture. The pieces combine craft 
and industrial production. Made in 
numbered editions, the pieces 
range from $700 to $5,700 in the 
United States. The designs that 
cover the tilt-top Zabro chair- table 


and the Cantaride bar-chest are ab- 
stract, colorful compositions done 
in lacquer. 

Along with furniture from Italy, 
pieces done by American artists 
and sold through such galleries as 
An et Industrie in New York are 
among the freshest furniture de- 
signs available, coming in a great 
variety of shapes, sizes, and pat- 
terns. Carmen Spera’s glass tables, 
for example, are decorated with 
colorfully painted shards that re- 
call broken glass; the softly colored 
lacquered sidebar could contain a 
service for 12 and sells for $8 .500. 

“Modernist furniture was about 
overall line and form." said Rick 
Kaufmann. director of An et In- 


dustrie, "not so much about sur- 
face. iconography and decoration. 
You're going to see more and more 
decoration on objects." He also be- 
lieves that these radical designs will 
not be accepted by the mass market 
until the end of the decade even 
though some pieces, such as the 
stenciled tables by Spera, could be 
mass-produced. 

Many painted pieces are done on 
commission by an artist or a crafts- 
man for a particular person and a 
particular place. Lvnn Goodpas- 
ture, a New York ‘artist, recently 
stenciled two geese on a Shaker- 
style blanket chest for Ian Inger- 
son, a craftsman from West Corn- 
wall Connecticut, who built the 
chest. The geese were inspired by a 
flock that inhabits Scovifle’s Pond, 
near the town. Such stenciled and 
painted pine chests cost $1,000 to 
$ 2 , 000 . 

“When you do a custom piece, 
the diem can influence the design.” 
Goodpasture said. "You know 
where it’ll go and who it’s for. It's 
not like making a piece for a gal- 
lery." 

A 10-year-old butcher-block cut- 
ting table with a plastic laminate 
cabinet beneath was the surface on 
which Leslie Horan, a Brooklyn 
artist, painted a trompe l'oeil still 
life in an apartment renovation de- 
signed by Marilyn Glass. The own- 
ers of the apartment wanted to in- 


clude a picture of a toy Pekingese 
dog, some favorite cookbooks and 
peppers that look like several in an 
Edward Weston photograph. 

While some of the visions paint- 
ed are contemporary, painted fur- 
niture itself belongs to centuries- 
old European and Oriental 
traditions. Kaufman said most art- 
ists were "at least aware of the 
dassic traditions of applied decora- 
tion.” 

New York has one of the few 
schools of the an of the painted 
f inish, the Isabel O'Neil Studio 
Workshop. Kakia Livanos. head of 
the design department, said enroll- 
ment, now 350 students, had more 
than doubled in the last several 
years. 


Spanish Town's Tourists 
Feted With 6-Ton Paella 

United Press International 

VELEZ MALAGA, Spain — 
More than 20.000 people jammed a 
Mediterranean beach to eat 11,700 
pounds (5,330 kilograms) of padla. 
donated by this town to celebrate 
“Tourist Day." 

“It was more people and more 
rice than I've ever seen in my life,” 
said a local policeman. The mixture 
of rice, shellfish and spices was 
intended to feed 15,000 people. 


Lacquered Zabro tilt-top chair-table. 


■J f. VU U UU IU|I U J W II -MWlfci 

d h lip 

y 'Belly of Beast 9 Onstage: 
Compulsiveness Missing 


By Mel Gussow 

New York Times Service 

, XT EW YORK — The prison let- 
.* -iNters of Jack Henry Abbott, 
published under the title “In the 
Belly of the Beast,” gave a terrify- 
ing picture of a life lived almost 
entirely behind bars and in solitary 
confinement in maximum-security . 
prisons. Abbott was a “state-raised 
convict” who from the age of 12 
until he was released at 37 had 
spent only nine months out of insti- 
tutions. Though his nightmare was 
not unique, it was demonic in its 
relentlessness — no light of charity 
was allowed to pierce the blackness 
of his incarceration. The book re- 
vealed a fervid self-taught mind, a 
literary sensibility and a deqp para- 
noia; andhadmade-Abbotta mi- 
nor literary celebrity, championed 
by people such as Norman Mailer. 

A great deal of the torment of 
Abbott’s book is transferred intact 

to the theater in the stage version at 

the Joyce Theater. The play is co- 
adapted by Adrian Hall and Rob- 
ert Woodruff, who is also the eve- 
ning’s director. This Mark Taper 
^ Forum production is based not 
' only on the book but also draws 
from interviews and the transcript 
of Abbott’s trial for killing Richard 
Adan. 

The additional material includ- 
ing a letter from Abbott explaining 
the misconception on his part that 
led to the killing, gives the story a 
context and a bdaled cautionary 
message. Releasing Abbott without 
an adequate support system into a 
society he was unable to compre- 
hend was like placing a time bomb 
in the street. The innocent victim 
was Adan. . 

To its credit, the adaptation is 
judicious about apportioning re- 
sponsibility — to the prisons thru 
molded Abbott, to a literary world 
ihat could turn him into a celebrity 
and not look behind the art to see 
the psychopathology, ana 10 Ab- 
bott. who does not “shift responsi- 
bility for my own corrupted sell. 
-> The evening is free of moral 
> preachment or polonies, but it 

leads to an inescapable question. 

How many more Jack Henry Ab- 
botts are being fostered and then 
precipitously returned to aviliza- 

t * < The version at the Joyoe, one of 
three versions presCTtedm 
United States, lacks the fierce com- 
pulsiveness of the boot Readmg 
thT book, one felt c onfined with 

nOONESBURY 

.Sfesssu 

IKES* <**r' 


Abbott Seeing him personified in 
an adaptation that moves uneasily 
between documentation and dra- 
matization, one is distanced from 
the first-hand Kafkaesque trauma. 

After introducing Abbott the 
adapters reveal the outcome of his 
case, evoking the tragic killing that 
led to his re-imprisonment To do 
otherwise might be to provoke mis- 
placed sympathy for the guilty. We 
h ea r what Abbott did — mi the eve 
of the day he received critical ac- 
daim for his book —and then nitn 
bade to Ms mordant reflections on 
his past 

Those reflections, however, are 
awkwardly interlarded with ex- 
cerpts from the trial. Woodruff has 
aimed - Tor a stylized approach — 
bright. Lights, loud buzzers, stop- 
action motion and a perfunctory 
use of -television' monitors. Andy 
Wood and William Allen Young 
play “readers” delivering some of 
Abbott’s prose while also, uncon- 
vincingly, representing various 
voices (attorneys, witnesses, Adan, 
a woman who accompanied Abbott 
on the fatal night). Unlike Emily 
Mann's “Execution of Justice,” 
which is scrupulous about differen- 
tiating characters and perspectives, 
the Abbott play settles for a less- 
focused collagr treatment 

Andrew Robinson plays Abbott 
with a nervous intensity. The char- 
acter seems bewildered by his di- 
lemma, taking his glasses on and 
off, carefully adjusting his voice to 
avoid stuttering and looking quizzi- 
cal when asked the simplest ques- 
tion. What is not suggested is a 
feeling of menace, of imminent ex- 
plosiveness. 

Because of the incendiary source 
materiaL there are scenes that are 
harrowing, as Abbott describes m 
vivid detail the menial 8od physical 
deprivations — the filthy _ cells 
without light the guards without 
humanity and the instinctive perfi- 
dy of the prisoners. At one point, 
Abbott evokes Dante. Asking him- 
self why he failed on the outside, he 
answers that he was not exactly 
“delivered to Paradiso.” 

“In the Bdly of Beast” is a devas- 
tating indictment of a d ehumaniz - 
ing penal system. When Abbott is 
freed — on stage as, one assumes, 
in life — he is like a wild child, 
incapable of surviving in a totally 
alien world. As he said in his book, 
“Solitary confinement In prison 
can alter the ontological makeup of 
a stone." 


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Room to stretch out and relax. 

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Pan Am.You Can't Beat The Experience: 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 


NYSE Most Actives 


VM- HU Low Lott dm. 







3IM0 9* 
16144 45% 
12671 Sin 

7990 XVi 
7673 26% 

74» an* 

7131 411* 
6697 46V* 
« n irn 

5766 27% 

ms » 

£529 53% 
5476 45% 
5960 126% 1 


714 + Vi 
45% + % 
51 +14 

7% — % 
49 + K 

26* + n 
20 + ft 

41* + % 
46 

1X4 + to 
27% + % 
20 * + % 
52% 

45% + % 

125% + % 


Dow Jones Averages 


OMfl HW LOW Lot CORO 

Indus 12)205 131922 V3S7J7 1X150 — 022 
umT” ?S12 SH! “ 5 - 50 671J0+ 4JJ 
K!1L IK'S l 58 -* 0 15650 15732+ 062 
Como 542. U 54602 MM9 54237+ 121 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bona 

utimiu 

Industrials 



NYSE Diaries 



Omo 

Prav. 


796 

422 


xs 

1073 


47a 

595 

a 

1981 

2000 


28 

26 

• 9 * 

X 

20 


NYSE Index 


Pmfoei Today 

HU* low OOM 3 PM. 

ComoosHe 10839 107.91 10731 108.11 

InOUMrtOtS 13433 13149 IZU9 12179 

Tmnso. 10037 10035 10035 10847 

UflHffo* 5679 5652 5652 5676 

Finance 11431 11333 11333 11X79 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y 


Bay Sales *»Tl 

aw. i6 ’SS SMS HSS 

ouo « — 147389 351287 I.U6 

SulTii 1CUK KU1« BB3 

££*3 I." ISW* SSsT 30 

AML 12 165,970 451290 B73 

-Inctudod la it* solos fleurai 


Moiid^^ 

M SE 

Qosfrg 


AMEX Diaries 


masdaQ index 


Adwarad 
Declined 
Undwnood 
Total Issues 
New Hisht 
New lows 


Close Pm. 

220 100 

504 315 

257 356 

781 799 

9 7 

12 15 


commit* 

industrials 

Flresx* 

Insurance 

unu: m 

B«As 

Trams. 


BSBE - — 
r 3B83S5 

39776 — 295-» WfJ 

27X43 — 278.12 27557 


Vaf.ai.lBXl 

5L17UH 

PTtV.3PJA.yoL 

6M1MH 

PrwamiBciaMdesfl 

10U7U80 


Tables Include the nat io nwide prices 
up to the dating on wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Standard & Poor's Index 


Industrials 20803 20630 30UD 2038 

Tronsp. 17239 17135 17T3S T7L»* 

UHlIlta ti.10 8243 8144 0234 

Finance 22.14 3130 2138 21.99 

Composite 18736 10670 10610 11664 



AMEX Sates 


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25 

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25 

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143*114 

32 

1.9 

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.12 

15 

244 

55 

559*10.1 

150 

34 

150 

25 

40 

25 


2714 

24% 

49% 

25% 

36% 

1* 

5614 
96% 67% 
71% 43 
36% 25% 
13% 71* 
66% 46% 
46% 26% 
9 TV*. 7D% 
90% 62 
150 112% 

28% IHWt 


Prices Are Firmer on NYSE 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices oa the New York 
Stock Exchange were modestly higher late 
Monday in very light trading. 

The Dow Jones industrial average was up 
0.89 to 1,313.61 an hour before the close. 
Advances led declines by a 7-6 ratio. Volume 

Although prices in tables on these pages are from 
the 4 P.M. close in New York, for time reasons, 
this article is based on the market at 3 P.M. 

at 3 P.M. was 54.05 million shares, down from 
66.41 million in the same period Friday. 

Analysts said the market was likely to contin- 
ue moving in a narrow range in light trading. 

william LeFevre of Purcell, Graham & Co. 
noted that the Dow has given up about 46 
points since its record dose of 1,359.54 on July 
19. He said an apparent “bottoming” in the 
Dow Jones utility mdex, frequently a leading 
indicator of the broader market’s trend, could 
be a sign that the pullback in the overall market 
is neanng an end. 

“Signs are mixed and inconclusive,” said Jo- 
seph Feshbach of Prudential-Bache Securities. 
“Technical problems have arisen in the past 


weeks and. until they are resolved, the market 
has a minimal upside and a definite downside.” 

Investors should “maintain a defensive pos- 
ture toward equities for at least the balance of 
the summer, after which a reassessment will be 
in order,” Mr. Feshbach said. 

Before the market opened, the Commerce 
Department said U.S. personal income rose 0.4 
percent in July, which was in line with econo- 
mists' estimates. 

Middle South Utilities, the most active 
NYSE-listed issue, was off slightly. 

Pan American World Airways was off a frac- 
tion. The airline has expressed an interest in 
buying some TWA assets. TWA was un- 
changed. 

Revlon Inc. was up a fraction in active trad- 
ing. 

Arkl a (ex-dividend} was ahead. Helmerich & 
Payne was gaining. 

Phillips Petroleum and Exxon were up mod- 
estly. Chevron was off a fraction. 

Technology issues were mostly higher. IBM, 
Digital Equipment, Sperry and Control Data 
Core, were ahead. Hewlett Packard was off 
slightly after reporting lower earnings for its 
third quarter. 


trr 


97 7314 BdlAII 6Mt 74 

33 24 BCE fl 238 

27% 19% Belllnd J2 1.4 


323 89% 88% 89 +14 

248 31% 31% 31%— % 
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44% 30% BMISou WO 73 9 3234 4% 39% 40% + % 
57 41% BetoAH JO 1.6 23 70 50% 50% 50% _ % 


3W B ooth tM XI II 69 31% 31% JT £ + * 

45% 27% BenfCp 2M 54 9 114 41% 39% 40 — % 

201 124% Benef pf 650 3.1 10x178 171 171 —3% 

22% 18 BonofPt 2 M 114 310z2214 21% 22 

198k 17% BonMtn L20 AJI 59 17% 1714 17% + 14 

6% 3* BOIIOtB 471 1615 5% 5% 5* + % 

8% 3% Bortov 63 m 7% 7% + U 

15 10% BostPO 34 17 3) 1123 13% 12% 12%— >4, 

71% 14% BeftlStl AO 22 619 18 17% 17% + 14 

49% 37% BelllSIpfSJIO ITJ 124 45% 45% «S% + % 

2414 18% BoftlSIPflSO 106 63 23% 2314 23% + % 

40% 27% Beverly J2 .9 19 1IM 36% 36 36% 

26% 19% BtoThr JO 32 16 414 24% 34% 24% 

24% 13% Bfocrt It 27 131 19% 19 19 

26% 18% BtocLD 64 34 16 466 18% 18 .18% + % 

34% 31% BlcfcHP 1-92 52 8 124 32% 32% 32% + % 

»■* 14% BtalrJn .281 203 18 17% 17% + % 

58% 39% BlckHR 24043 15 685 57* 57 57% + % 

50% 33% Booings 148 13 IS 3975 47% 46% 46%— % 

51 36% BolieC 1.S» 42 20 362 45% 44% 45% 

61 48 BotoCpf&m 86 23 58% 56% £8 +1% 

29% 18% Boltoor .10 A 28 149 20* 28% 28% + % 

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31% 26 BrfoSf T60 56 T2 40x 28% 28% 28% 


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' EUROPEAN COAL AND - 
STEEL COMMUNITY;' 
International Issse 
with graduated rate 
S US 100 millions 
due December, 1986 

We inform the bondbokten Hat m 
accordance with the .terms sod . 
conditions of the notes, the Earapoa 
Coal and Seed Cwnmunay has deend 
to redeem all of its outstanding nadu 
on Se ptemb er 20, 1985 «.a redenqxiori ; 
price of 100.25 S. 

Interest on the said notes will cease m 
accrue on September 20, 1985 and wife < 
be paid for S US 821,28 instead of 
S US 1075. 

The notes will be reimbursed coupon 
number 6 and followings att a ch ed 
according to the terms and cwndMoi 
of the notes. 

THE PRINCIPAL PAYING 
AGENT 

SOCIETE GENERALE 
ALSACIENNE DE BANQUE 
IS, Avenue Emile Reuter 
Luxembourg 


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BUSINESS /FINANCE 



U.S. Stocks 

Report, Page 8 


TOESPAY.MjGUsfMPmSg 



Hedging Long-Term Bisks 
With Short-Term Insurance 

By HJ* MAIDENBEKG 

kwiB-tlWi? Although Treasure bond and other 
I futures and options were designed 
1 N| “&JP portfolio managers hedge fixed-income and 
hedpft fhc J2SJSL were designed to help portfolio managers 

against adverse interest rate moves, 
S^nate 1 ^^? ^ ***** foi ?“' ** msurance^ often provide 

- ^ *^ at P** outlays for futures margins and the cost 

- Tii? “P “so ss wen as reduce portfolio yields. 

Also, hedging bonds on a day-to-day basis can be difficult. 
Decause of the quarterly expiration dates of the contracts, which 
affect their values as much as „ - 


broad-based stock 
index options. 


rate moves. 

For example, a manager of A radical strategy: 
a portfolio of long-term fixed- nr*. _ ,. nA 
income bonds would normally ine 01 
sell short an equivalent 
amount of Treasury bond fu- 
tures. If interest rates rise, it 
would reduce the value of the 
portfolio, but the loss, in the- 
ory, would be offset by the gains on the futures. 

“In reality, this traditional form of hed ging rarely aff 

portfolio coverage,” said R. Sean Lapp, options coordii 

Dean Witter Reynolds Inc. in Washington, “because the portfo- 
lio. manager using bond futures or options is, in effect, buying 
short-term insurance against long-term risks. * 1 

Bui even minor moves in short-term rates tend to be magnified 
at the far end of the maturity range. For example, in the past six 
months, 90-day bill rates have fluctuated 2 percentage points, 
while Treasury bond yields have swung over a range of 9 
percentage points. 

Mr. Lapp noted that during the past six months the New York 
Stock Exchange's composite index, known by its ticker symbol 
NDX, also fluctuated over a 9-point range, while some narrower 
equities indexes correlated slightly less to the moves in Treasury 
bond yields. 

“Clearly, the broad-based NDX index options, while basically 
a short-term instrument, appear also to move in tan d e m with 
long-term yields,” Mr. Lapp continued. “This led us to suggest a 
radical hfldgrng strategy — the use of broad-based stock mdex 
options as a surrogate for short-term interest rate moves, as a 
mms to hedge portfolios of long-term securities.” 

H E NOTED further that a 1 -point move in the NDX is 
equal to a 7-potni move in die Dow Janes industrial 
average. Die relationship between Standard and Poors 
100, or OEX, is somewhat less, about 6 points to each of the 
Dow’s. 

Cautioning that no two fixed-income portfolios are the same, 
and thus require custom-made hedging strategies, Mr. Lapp 

nevertheless offered some guidelines. 

He said the fixed-income portfolio hedger must first determine 
whether the stock market is headed higher or lower over thenext 
seven weeks, which is not as difficult as it would seem. "Every 
major brokerage house keeps track of the market’s AVM, or asset 

valuation model,” he said. - .. . .. 

“Basically, the AVM tells us the distribution pattern of the 
shares in the Dow and other popular averages, Lapp > smd. 

aI Tlw n ^^ , s^«tStoIoniis institution^ 

portfolio yields are competitive with those on fixed-mcome and 

"^SSSSi Mr. Lapp said, that tto AVMalsomdmato 
thatthest^ market, expressed in terms of the Dow average, will 

. (Continued on Page 13, CoL 6) 


Income 
Up 0.4% 
InU.S. 

Gain Last Month 
Matched June's 

The Associated Press 
WASHINGTON — Americans* 
personal income rose 0.4 percent 
last month, despite only a modest 
gain in wages and salaries, the gov- 
ernment reported Monday. 

. The Commerce Department said 
that the July income gain m a t c h ed 
a 0.4-percent June increase with 
both months showing a rebound 
from a 0.7-perceni May decline, 

which had been, the first setback in 
more than two years. 

With more income, Americans 
also increased their spending last 
month by 0.4 percent, which 
matched the June increase. Both 
months woe down from a 0.7-per- 
cent May gain. 

The income figures have been 
buffeted this year by delays in get- 
ting tax-refund dusks delivered by 
the Internal Revenue Service. 

Disposable, or after-tax, income 
rose 0.4 percent in July after plung- 
ing 2.5 percent in June. However, 
the June drop reflected the absence 
of a big surge in refund payments 
made m May. Analysts said the 
July figure more accurately reflect- 
ed the undertying trend for after- 
tax income gams. 

The personal income report for 
July, which showed steady if un- 
spectacular gains, follows a string 
ofeconomic barometers that have 
pointed to weaker U.S. economic 
activity last month. 

Unemployment remained stuck 
at 7 3 percent for the sixth straight 
month and retail sales, industrial 
production and housing construc- 
tion all showed weakness. 

These figures represented a set- 
back to Reagan administration 
hopes for a sharp rebound in eco- 
nomic activity in the second half of 

the year. While the administration 
is forecasting that the economy mil 

grow at a robust 5-percent annual 
rate, many analysts are predicting 
only a slight pickup from the ane- 
mic 1-percent rate during the first 
six months of die year. 

For July, wages and salaries rose 
just $1.7 Union, down tom the 
$ 10 . 8 -bEHion gain recorded m June 
as most industries had smaller 
wage gains than they had the 
month before. 


Decision Time Approaches at GATT 


David Tinnin 
Inimunional Herald Tribune 

GENEVA — Officials of the - 

General Agreement on Tariffs 

and Trade are working with rep- 
resentatives of the United Stales 
and other member nations to 
break a' stalemate in negotia- 
tions. These talks could have a 
lasting effect on the course of 
worid trade. . « 

On one side are the United 
Slates and most of the world’s 
pi ajar trading nations, which are 
l yrffing a special GATT meeting 

to lay the groundwork for a new 

■round of trade talks. On the oth- 
er side are many Third World 
nations who fear thatthe United 
States and its allies are trying to 
force them to accept concessions 
that would seriously hamper 
their development. 

The deadline for resolving the 
current stalemate is Aug. 31, the 
date by which member nations 
must approve or rgect a new 

meeting. 

According to trade experts in 
Geneva, fauuie to achieve a con- 
sensus on opening a new round 
of negotiations would almost 
certainly damage U.S. trade po- 
licy. Furthermore, an absence oi 
progress would cast serious 
doubts on the effectiveness of 
GATT, the Geneva-based orga- 
nization that oversees trade in 
the non-Communist world. 

Trade experts in Geneva say 
that Washington urgently needs 
movement toward an improved 
U.S. position in world trade to 
deflect increasing clamor for 
protectionist measures by many 
American industries, Congress 
and various other pressure 
groims. 

Unless the White House can 
point to favorable developments 
for negotiations that would low- 
er foreign barriers to American 
goods and services, the mood of 
Congress' when it reconvenes 
next month, is likely to be more 
protectionist than ever, experts 
say. 

In that event, several pending 
protectionist bills are almost cer- 
tain to be passed by the House 
and Senate, forcing President 
Ronald Reagan either to retreat 
from his relativdy free-trade 
stand or risk having his veto 
overridden by Congress if he re- 
fuses to sign the legislation. 

Among experts here, the 
worst-case scenario is that U.S. 
reprisals against imports would 
set off retaliatory moves against 
U.S. products in Europe and 

Asia that would lead to the same 

sort of decline in worid trade 



Brazil Seeks 
To Delay New 
Pact With IMF 


Photo by Domi Tim 

Arthur DunkeL director of GATT, in his Geneva office. 


that preceded, in the 1920s, the 
Depression of the 1930s. 

The current crisis atmosphere 
surrounding world trade puts 
unusual pressures on GATT, as 
its director general, Arthur Dun- 
kel, acknowledged in an inter- 
view. 

“The time has definitely come 
for a new major trade negotia- 
tion,* 1 said Mr. Dunkd, a former 
Swiss diplomat who until now 
had been sflent on the subject of 
a new trade round. “We need to 
reaffirm the credibility of GATT 
rules and reimpose them in areas 
that have slipped outside the 
realm of liberal trade. 

- otherwise, we wifi wake up 
one fine morning only to find 
that GATT has passed into the 
history bodes." 

GATT, founded in 1948, has 
been a successful forum for set- 
ting fair-trade practices and arbi- 
tration procedures that helped 
bring about huge increases in 
global trade. 

Its member states, which now 
number 90 and indude all major 
non-Communist trading nations, 
subscribe to the so-called Gener- 
al Agreement, which implies ad- 
herence to liberal and nondis- 
• criminatory trade practices. 
Since the recent worldwide reces- 
sions, however, many countries 


have ignored GATT rules in fa- 
vor of short-term trading advan- 


“The tragedy is that govern- 
ments are deviating from the 
agreement to cope with what 
they consider exceptional rir- 
cums lances,” Mr. Dunk el said. 
“In a growing number of sectors, 

such as steel automobiles, do- 
mestic electronics and the like, 
governments have simply acted 
outside the GAIT. The question 
now is, are exceptions to the rule 
typing to become the rule, or are 
we gang to return to the rule?" 

Over the years, there have 
been seven major trade negotia- 
tions, called rounds, under 
GATT. The most recent was the 
Tokyo round, which lasted from 
1 973 to 1979. The rounds are not 
regularly scheduled, but are held 
when a consensus is reached by 
GATT members that trade burn- 
ers need to be lowered. 

Currently, however, there is so 
much disagreement among trad- 
ing nations that a consensus^ ap- 
peared remote. The United 
States provoked a showdown by 
invoking a rarely used rule to 
convene a special meeting for a 
new round of trade talks. 

Unlike the World Bank or the 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 4) 


Reiners 

SAO PAULO — Brazil prefers 
to postpone the signing d a new 
credit agreement with the Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund until next 
year. Finance Minister Francisco 
Dandles was quoted as saying 
Monday. 

Mr. Dandles said m an inter- 
view with Estado de Sfio Paulo 
newspaper that the signing of an 
agreement covering economic tar- 
gets that were later not met would 
not hdp Brazil's negotiations with 
creditor banks. 

Mr. Doradies, who is m Pans for 
t plica with the IMFs m an ag i ng di- 
rector, Jacques de Laroaire, said in 
the interview that the delay would 
allow Brazil and the IMF to moni- 
tor the evolution of the country’s 
economic program until the end of 
the year. He said that, by that time, 
the impact of the government’s 
July package of spending cuts and 
tax increases would be fdL 
The results in the next three 
months will provide a solid basis 
for the signing of a letter of intent 
for 1986 with less possibility of 
error, he said 

Brazil's total foreign debt is $ 1 03 
billion. __ 

Brazil and the IMF have been 
wiring an accord on economic tar- 
gets since the fund suspended its 
loan program last February after 
Brazil's farmer government failed 
to meet its goals. 

In Paris, Mr. Doradies said he 
and Mr. de Larosifcre had reviewed 
developments in the Br azilian 
economy between March and July. 

He said after the meeting that ms 

government would send expats to 
Washington next month to discuss 
a new agreement with the IMF. 
The talks would decide whether a 
new agreement should cover the 
last frinnthg of 1985 and 1986, or 
should be restricted to 1986 only, 
he said. 

The central bank governor, An- 
tonio Carlos Lemgruber, is current- 
ly negotiating on the delay with 
bank creditors in New York. 

■ Pern Stresses Priority 1 
Peru will give priority to interna- 
tional organizations over foreign 
governments and commercial 
Hant< in paying its foreign debt, 
Economy Minister Lois Alva Cas- 
tro was quoted Monday as saying 
in Caretas magazine. 

Mr. Castro told the ma gazin e 


that reduced debt-service payments 
of 10 percent of export earnings 
would continue to go to interna- 
tional organizations, which provide 
funds allow interest rates. 

“We can’t stop paying the inter- 
national organizations because 
they lead to us on cheaper terms for 
development projects," he said. “In 
contrast, if one pays the commer- 
cial banks, (me does not receive 
anything in exchange." 

Peru's new debt-service limit, set 
by President Alan Garcia in his 
July 28 inaugural speech, will free 
about $310 million in debt service 
fa the next 12 months. Thai com- 
pares with $3.7 billion in unpaid 
principal and interest to the end of 
1985 and $14 billion in theoretical 
debt service projected for 1986, Mr. 
Alva said 


Sale by Britain 
Of C&W Shares 
Called Likely 

Reuters 

LONDON — The delay in 
the privatization of British Air- 
ways has increased the likeli- 
hood that the government wfil 
soon sell its shares in Cable & 
Wireless PLC. government 
sources said Monday. 

The Treasury was counting 
on the BA sale to meet its target 
fa sales of government-owned 
assets of £7-5 billion ($3.5 bil- 
lion) in the year ending March 
31. Sale of the government's 23- 
percent interest in Cable & 
Wireless would raise about 
£500 million, about the amount 
the Treasury needs to reach its 
target, the sources said. 

The government may sell 
more Cable & Wireless shares 
beginning next month, when its 
cunent offering expires. 

The BA privatization has 
been delayed by legal difficul- 
ties arising from the collapse of 
i jiifpr Airways. Although BA 
appears near solving the prob- 
lems, the chances of a public 
offering this fiscal year are fad- 
ing, the sources said 



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Senator Robert J. Dole 

Dole Warns 
Japan of U.S. 
Trade Anger 

By Stuart Auerbach 

Washington Poet Service 

TOKYO— The UA Senate mar 
iority leader, Robert J. Dole, 

. warned Japan in bhmt, lough terms 
Monday that it faces stiff protec- 
tionist action from an angry Con- 
gress this year unless it moves 
quickly to ease its burgeoning trade 
surplus with the United States. _ 

Mr. Dole, here on a tour of Asian 

nations with six other senators, said 
tails aime d at punishing Japan fa 

what is seal as its unfair trade prac- 
tices have gathered so mum sup- 
port that Coigress is tikdy to over- 
ride a presidential veto. 

“The plain fact is that 1 have 
never seen stronger congressional 
sentiment for action on the trate 
front," Mr. Dole, a major candi- 
date for the presiden- 

tial nomination in 1988, tad Ja- 
pan’s National Press Club m a 
luncheon speech. . 

The Kansas senator panted to 
“hundreds” of protectionist-orient- 
ed bills up for consideration m 
Washington, and warned that mv- 
oal were Kkdy to pass and with- 
stand a presidential veto. 

“My colleagues, even the most 
responsible ones, arc tired of what 
they perceive as basic unfairness, 
he said. “They m convincw of^ the 
oeed to addnss the situation one 

way or another, and fpnddy." 

rin dispatches earned by Umted 
press International and Reuters, 
Mr. Dole was quoted as saying: 
“We can no longer avoid a trade 
confrontation. We have i one. Tbe 
time is past for gestures. Immediate 
action is needed.”] 

Mr. Dole’s group rs one of a 
series of visiting congressional del- 
egations that has carried the same 
basic warning to Japan, whose S36- 
(Contmned on Page 11, CoL 1) 


By Peter Millership 

Ream 

JAKARTA — Indonesia, which 
is dependent on ofl exports fa 
about 70 percent of its foreign ex- 
change, can withstand the latest 

round of moderate oQ price cuts fa 

the near future, Western bankers 
and economic analysts say. 

However, sharper oil price cuts 
would force the government to cut 
h^if further on devdemment plans. 
And an oD price collapse would 
plunge the economy into crisis, 
they said. . . . 

President Suharto said in a 
speech following the latest cuts that 
Indonesia would not devalue the 
rupiah, although the economy re- 
mained sensitive to oil prices. 

Arifin Siregar. governor of the 
central bank, said the cuts would 
not weaken ihe rupiah because it is 
supported by a low inflation rate 
and currency reserves of over $10 
billion. , . . 

Dun crude, which makes up 4.4 

percent of Indonesia's oG output, 
fefl by $1.95, and other oils, ac- 
counting fa 36 percent of the out- 
put, had prices shaved by 20 cents. 

The Minas benchmark crude, 
which accounts fa 35.6 percent of 
total output, was not affected try 
the cuts and remains at S28.53 a 
band. 

“A little revenue will be lost, but 

it’s better than buyers turning away 
and having no Dun revenue at all," 
erne banker said. . 

Economists said the complexity 
of Indonesian oil marketing makes 
it hard to accurately calculate reve- 
nue losses. A Worid Bank report in 

May said that if oil prices weak- 
ened further, Indonesia’s debt 
would still be manageable as long 
as cautious borrowing co n ti n ued. 

However, it said Indonesia’s in- 
ward-looking trade policies could 
stunt projected average annual 5- 
percent growth in the gross domes- 
tic product fa the next four years. 

President Suharto said his jong- 
-tenn oWective was to industrialize 
Indonesia’s largely agrarian econo- 
my and rdy less on oil earnings. 


He identified financing, technol- 
ogy transfers and marketing as ob- 
stacles to industrialization. 

The government has already tak- 
en a number of steps to promote 
modernization of the economy. Li 
has adopted extensive anti-corrup- 
tion measures at ports and airports 
and simplified investment proce- 
dures. 

The government is studying al- 
lowing limited foreign participa- 
tion on the Jakarta stock exchange. 
However, foreign economic ana- 
lysts said the stock market is mon- 
bund and were skeptical about the 
plans. 

The central bank recently cut the 
discount rale for short- tom paper 
to 17 percent from 18 percent to 
hdp promote investment 

Tjark Woydt, managing director 
of the Hamburg-based European 
Asian Bank, recently told the An- 
lara news agency that the rate s had 
been too high and had deterred 
foreign and domestic investors. 

In his speech. President Suharto 
welcomed the trend towards fi- 
nancing prqjects from domestic 
rather man overseas funds. He said 
finding work fa the 1.8 mDhon 
people who join the work force 
year was one of his toughest 


many Indonesian commodities re- 
main unstable. 

Jakarta recently opened direct 
trade with China in an effort to 
boost exports. Relations were fro- 
zen 18 years ago after an abortive 
Communist-backed coup encour- 
aged by China. 

However, the overall investment 
r-Kmata must be further improved, 
several bankers and businessmen 
said. They said a recent seminar on 
agribusiness highlighted the prob- 
lems of investing in agriculture. 

“Incentives are needed in tins 
high-risk, slow-yield area. All they 
get are regulations," one banker 
said. . , 

NMwrrhdesjL Indonesia s cur- 


rent economic policies are making 
a difference, analysts said. 

inflation slowed to4.7 percent in 
the year ending July 1 from 9.6 
percent a year earlier, and Bank 
Indonesia will soon revise its cur- 
rent-account deficit fa the year 
ended March 1. 1985, to $2 billion 
from an earlier es timate of $2-9 
billion. A U.S. Embassy report put 
the 1983-84 deficit at $4.1 billion. 
The current account is a broad 
trade measure that includes mer- 
chandise as well as nonmerchan- 
dise items such as services. 

■ Revising Projection 
Government officials said that 
Venezuela is revising it projection 
on cal income to reflect its recent 


reduction in the price of its heavy 
crude and will probably reduce its 
1986 budget as a result, Reuters 
reported Monday from Caracas. 

The energy and mines minister. 
Arturo HeraAndez Grisanti. said 
over the weekend that he expected 
thebudest, set at a prdiminaiy 1 10 
billion Bolivars (7.8 billion), would 
be affected to a small degree if oil 
income trends stay relatively un- 


changed. 
Indus lx 


.industry sauces said that ofl ex- 
ports have picked up since Venezu- 
ela cut its heavy crude prices by 
$1.95 per bared on Aug. 1. No 
figures were available. 

Oil exports averaged 1.27 million 
bands per day in the first six 
months. 


The president called on Indone- 
sians to be more responsible in pay- 
ing taxes and reaffirmed his com- 
mitment to boost nonoil exports, 
although analysis said prices tor 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 20 , 1985 




■ A.i\ 


.w 



STOCK 


Page 11 


1®S US® 




vong Refuses 

to New Airline 


By Dinah Lee CAn ■ _ 

Tribune ^ mtroduad the new rcgola- 
HONG KONG — The u nfta ^ effective July 26. 
f^ggovmunentliasreftaed^ tJr’ -Miller said the CAD gave 
«s*on ^ Hoag Kom DnS *£» reasons for its decJoo; 

Co; the ne^ Hd KL£j 0 “£ to ' °P cratt scheduled 

Hn P ctrt °r to Caihav vl*%rE? “SM* Begins and Shanri.*. w 


* ■'■■^5 

‘•i* iy f « 


*3g$ -TaKsS^&lte- 

V* 


ra«?oa to Hoag Kong 

Airiroes Co, the newR ft ai,ca «e to operate scheduled 

com P ctit °r to Caihay^jfi?^ 

ways, -to operate charter fligh t; m granted to Cathay Pa- 

Bjmg. and Shanghai begmnins aa agreement toDra- 

SepLf.. ■ ■ «smmng ganairt amEcafion before British- 

..... --- • Ultnese bilateral «ir_cwr *A~, ..n._ 


^ -'aSS 5 « 3 a^ 

^ Stephen Miller, chief cxmvtw,* £ 3 °*** sdwduled services to 
ryL, of DiMonair, Mai'S BfWk- ■ ■ In an obvious attempt 


ght 

Her 


of Dr 

merits 


stifle the growth of iw!,:," difficult to understand why 


F?,tSrT£ £“* Msasajs: 

Youde. . * ™ “ ward shay’s charter flights, initiated so 

was the W kvhr. 


would confuse the situation for (he Sinth 


V -Cv. 


He added that the sririine was 
seebng legal advice on a depart- 
ro«it. regulation, in trod need in 


Further ckwding the issue is the 
July of another contendov 
»™ish Caledonia’s subsidiary Cal- 


juW ^S: jSvZTS m C^edoma'ssubsidiary, Cal^ 
XVie^3 "T- Mw aulme to edonian Far East Aizwxvs.lt has 

^np^onWthegovem- proposed Dnk^HCK^S 


Former Continental Pilots Ijnmch 
Airline in Florida and Western U.S. 

la Angela Timer Serrice 

NEW ORLEANS — Agroup of former Continental Airlines pilots 
has launched an airiine offering low-cost sendee in the Sun Belt of the 
United Slates. 

The new carrier, called Pride Air. is based in New Orleans. ItS$l5.5 
million in stan-up rapi tal came mainly from the pilots, more than 1 00 
of whom invested 590,000 each. In ad. Pride has 322 investors, 
including 440 persons' who used to work for Continental- About $4.2 
mulion came from two venture capitalists. 

Pride’s chajrman. Panl R. Eckel, formerly Con tLoemaTs chief pilot, 
said Pride had a plan' for success: providing nonstop or one-stop 
service to a number of under-served markets in the West and Florida. 

He said the new company’s employee stock-ownership plan would 
motivate Pride’s workers, even though they would not be making high 
wages. A flight attendant nankins SI, 100 a month now could realize 
thousands of dollars in a decade if the company did weU, he said. 

Pride, which has leased nine Boeing 727s, is now flying from eight 
of us cities — Miami. Fort Lauderdale and West Pahn Beach, Florida, 
Nov Orleans, Los Angdes, San Diego, Las Vegas, and San Jose, 
Cah/omia. The second phase of its service is to begin Wednesday with 
flights from Sarasota, Tampa, Jacksonville, Orlando, all in Florida; 
Salt Lake City; Denver; San Francisco and Sacramento, California. 

The relatively smooth take-off was jarred Iasi week when Pride sued 
Raymond M. Gray, one of the two venture capitalists and a director, 
alleging that Mr. Gray violated az> agreement that he and Brian 
Manar, the other venture capitalist, made with Pride gjvingthem a 
limited right to market travel vouchers for standby seals. The suit 
asserts that Mr. Gray started to market the seats without Pride’s 
Permission. Pride is seeking an injunction, 5500,000 in compensatory 
da m a g es and punitive damage of 520 milli on 


Is Lift 

*’ Tooj 


*£****?- Kong-based a£r services. bS 
tmmicy, which began five months strongly resisted the entry of both 

^^^o«xi its moqption _Jast April, Mr. Chao, asked whether he had 

10 discussed *e decision with Brij- 
operate tmartered flights between mg’s aviation director, Hu Yizhou, 

?£fS.£? 8 ‘ Sicc lim ' S!dd ' haven't got the authority to 
the ffldme has hired a staff and go to Beging, and it appears mat 
leased a Boeing 737-200. In July, it the Hong Kong gove rnmen t looks 

G®""*’* *3? “4 wotft support its own 

Mr. Miller said that as recently 
as July 4, the CAD told Dragonair P«~*+ 4 , » 

that any negotiations with Beijing TO iVCUUITe 

would be the sole responability of Kor> n o 
the airiine. He said that even as Oo Liable OVSteiDS 
Dragonairis chairman JJJ> Chao, T, ^ J 

SSSSSi From Cap Cities 

The Associmed Press 


After Reports of Default by Subsidiary 

new services 

Mr Chan »ApA k„ Cem P Ued ^ S'*ff Frnm Dopoieka At Community's Rockville, 

BETHESDA. Maryland - Ntaytad, branch, which was open 
inR’s aviation director HuYn*nn Lines fonned at several branches of until 6 PM. Saturday, lines of up to 

Community Savings & Loan Inc. 60 people continued for much of 
StlSEBftSSn £ during the\eS as customers the^y. By midaftemo«L the 


default an payments to invesiOTs. 

A spokesman for Governor Har- 
ry Hughes said Monday that there 
was no indication of lines spread- 
ing to other state-insured institu- 
tions. 

EPIC of Falls Church. Virginia, 
had sold limited partnership inter- 




France Increases 
Renault Capital 

Reiners 

PARIS — The French gov- 
ernment has approved an in- 
crease of 4,94 billion francs 
(SI 17 suBion) in rite share capi- 
tal of government-owned Re- 
nault, the official Bulletin said 
Monday. 

The Economy and Finance 
Ministry approved, a derision of 
the Renault board to make the 
increase, to 8.044 bfflian francs, - 
by consolidating and integrat- 
ing previous government erect 
its .and 1 advances. A Renault j 
spokesman jaid the capital in-~ 
crease was a technical step r in- 
tegrating previously allocated 
funds from the government into 
the group’s capital base. - 

The automaker, which had a 
consolidated net loss of 12.55 
billion francs in 1984, has been 
negotiating with _ the govern- 
ment on further aid both in the 
form of capital grants for 1986 
and low-cost loans. 


The Associmed Press ^ “* single-family homes to iflves- 

WASHINGTON - Washing- ^, acr ?^. t ! lc U*®* States - 11 
a Post Co. said Monday Aatit ^°*>d, F nday that payments to 
ri to Kith ft «,Kf. holders of securities were overdue. 


ion rosi i^o. said Monday that it 
had agreed to buy S3 cable televi- 
sion systems from Capital Qties 
Communications flic, for $350 mil- 
lion. 

Capital Qties is selling its cable 
operations in connection with its 
merger with American Broadcast- 
ing Cos. Capital Cities must com- 
ply with restrictions cm the com- 
mon ownership of cable television 
systems, televirion networks and 
televirion stations. 

The Fori win sot boy Capital 
Odes' cable outlets in Plymouth 
and Saline, Michigan, because of a 
regulation that prohibits it from 


COMPANY NOTES 


I facilities totaling 5100 mil- 
lion for Adelaide-based SA working capital of Sybron Corp.'s 
Brewing Holdings. Denricon Division together with 

BL PL C said its Austin -Rover the share capital of Dental Labora- 
Group is discussing with unions tones Inc., for $15 million, 
plans for a 10-percent cat in out- Control Dam Cotp. said it will 
puL A company spokesman said not proceed with a plan to acquire 
that a net reduction of about 300 in Applied Information Memories, a 
the company’s 28,000 work force is maker of computer disk-storage 


owning a cable system in the same foreseen, effective by September. 


area as Its Detroit television sta- 
tion, WDIV. : 

. The sale is contingent on the 
.completion of the $3.5-billion 
ABC-Capital Cities merger. A 
statement from The Post Co. said 
that the acquisition would be fi- 
nanced through borrowings. 

I The Post said the acquired cable 
| operations would function as a sep- 
, arate division. The 53 systems have 
1 approximately 350,000 subscribers 
in 15 aridwerieno, western and 
I southern stales. 


BOX International 


units. It said the derision was made 
after a review of the potential costs 


Ltd. said that syndication of Korea and benefits of the acquisition. 
Exchange Bank's 30-billion-yen Hewlett-Packard Co. said earo- 
($126.6-mfllion) yen has been com- ings for its third quarter ended July 
pleted. The eight-year loan is the 31 fell to SI 17 million on revenue 
largest medium-term Euroyen loan of $1.61 billion, from $134 million 
since the relaxation of guidelines on revenue of $1.56 billion a year 
by the Japanese government in earlier. It said new orders for the 
April. quarter were down 12 percent from 

Barton Groap PLC said bid ac- a year earlier, 
ceptances to its open lender offer blAatrapma-Harima Heavy In- 


have raised its stake in Debenhams dusfries Co. said it has won an 
PLC to 147.7 miliion ordinary order for five bulk carriers from a 


■shares, or 87.5 percent 


group of Norwegian shipowners 


Dole Tells Japan It Must Move Quickly on Trade 


(Caatinaed from page 9) - 
, baHjon trade surplus with the Unit- 
ed Stales in 1984 is expected to 
grow to $50 billion this year. 

New York Senator Daniel Pat- 
rick Moynihan, the only Democrat 
in the delegation, saidrCongrcss is 


. ■< 

. -• 


al of the Reagan administration to 
ra c k ’ll the record U.S. trade defi- 
cits. which soared to $ 1 23 billion in 
1984 and could go $27 billion higjt 
ex this year. , „ , 

Mr. Moynihan described any 
trade action as being aimed as 
orach “at getting the administra- 
tion’s attention" as Japan's. 

'“L Mr. Dole, in his speech, said Jast 
* month’s “action program" by 
Prime Minister Yasulnro Naka- 
sone to open Japan’s mar kets to 
foreign goods “ignored the urgency 
of the problem” by spacing its im- 
port liberalizations steps over tiiree 

’ years and fading to respond to 
many LLS. prion ties. 

Japanese officials appeared to be 
dazed by the series of attacks by 
visiting congressmen and Clayton 
Yen tier, the Reagan admimstra- 

doc* new US mute reprj^ntf- 
tiva. In interviews here Monday 
and in questions to Mr. Dole, ti^y 
unsure of what they could 
do to forestall cougnsssiontiacttM. 

They pointed out flat there is no 
action Japan could take todar^t 
would have an immediate jmpjct 
on its trade surplus with the United 

^Ntoreover, according 10 
. administration estimates, the 


that your market is not sufficiently 
open to oar products and services. 
Its opening is an essential first step 
toward solving onr trade problem.’’ 

He said Japan's markets are 
dosed to American products, such 
as telecommunications equipment 
and other high- technology goods , 
“when they are the best in the 
world." The senator also listed 
lumber, plywood and paper as 
products kept out of Japan by high 
tariffs and farm goods whose sales 
are restricted by quotas. 

He cited Japanese restrictions on 
imports ranging from tobacco to 
satellites, and said this country’s 
system for testing and certification 
“is notorious among foreign busi- 
nessmen. It has accomplished in 
many areas what tariffs and quotas 
could not do.” 

Mr. Dole, as well as Mr. Yeutter, 
urged Japanese businesses to in- 
oeaseiheir purchases of U.S.-man- 
ufactured goods, a move many of 
them seem prepared to make. 

But the bulk of his message was 
that trade has become a major po- 
litical issue, and . congressmen look- 
ing toward their own re-election 
wfll press legislation hitting out at 
japan and other nations who are 
sets as »ging unfair trade practices 
against the United States. 

‘fin this highly charged atmo- 
sphere.” he said,' u admmistraticn 
opposition would not be enough to 
forestall action for long and even a 
nfggd ftptial veto might.be swept 


lateral concessions seems totally 
unrealistic.’' said Mr. Dole. 

■ Textile BiS Assailed 

William Branigan, of the Wash- 
ington Past, reported from Bangkok: 

. A US. congressional delegation 
ran into a barrage of complaints 
Monday from Thai government, 
business and labor leaders about a 
controversial bill that would sharp- 
ly lower Asian textile and garment 
exports to the United States. 

The bffl, a source of outrage from 
Beijing to Bangkok and beyond, 
has made its leading sponsor. Rep- 
resentative Ed Jenkins, probably 
the best known Amer i ca n congress- 
men in Aria and more famous in 
many Asian capitals than in parts 
of his home state of Georgia. 


Known officially as the Textile 
and Apparel Trade and Enforce- 
ment Art, the “Jenkins bill" as it is 
called here would slash Thailand’s 
textile export revenue by more than 
64 percent, throw 100,000 Thais 
out of work and ultimately affect 
the lives of nearly 2 million people, 
according to industry estimates. 

According to these same esti- 
mates, the ML if passed, would cut 
Indonesian textile income by 85 
percent, China’s by nearly 60 per- 
cent and Taiwan's, South Korea's 
and Pakistan’s by about a third. 

Asian critics say the bill not only 
is protectionist, but discrimmatoiy 
as well since it exempts textile ana 
garment imports from Canada, 
Mexico, the Caribbean Basin and 
the European Community. 


NOTICE OF REDEMPTION OF 
CERTAIN DEBENTURES OF NIC08 OVERSEAS FINANCE N.V. 

DESIGNATED "14% SUBORDINATED DEBENTURES 
DUE MAY 1, 1995” 

Notice ia hereby given that NICGR Overseas Finance JV.V^ a 
Netherlands Antilles corporation, (the "Company”) and a wholh 
owned subsidiary of NICOR Inc., an ffimoig corporation, has elected 
to redeem and will redeem all of the outstanding 14% Subordinated 
Debentures doe May L 1995 (the "14% Subordinated Debentures”) 
of the Company as fottows: 


aside." . 

As a result Of the growing, trade 
deficits, he said. Congress is be- 
coming increasingly skeptical 
about bunching a new round of 
global trade talfcs,.a prune gt«l of 


Nakasooe government. . 

“There Uvoy tittle we could give 

up in-new negotiatiems mid to ex- 
pect others to make significant um- 


. _ . m « an infp 


xemboui? SA-. W ‘ iostruenaas- 

85 together with appwpnat Q { Board 

ted August 9th, 1985. 


3. AH of the 14% Subordinated Debentures will be redeemed. 

4. On the Redemption Date the Redemption Price of SL050 
plus accrued interest from May L 1985 to September 30. 1985 
of $57.94 will become due and payable for each $1,000 face 
amount of the 14% Subordinated Debenture* and interest 
ibereon shall cease to accrue on and after the Redemption 
Date. 

5. The 14% Subordinated Debentures may be surrendered with 
oil coupons znataring aAer tbe Redemption Date attached for 
payment an 

a) Continental Bank / Tntprnatinnal, One Liberty Plaza, New 
York, New York 10006. 

b) Continental Bank, 30 North LaSalle Street, Chicago, BB- 
. juho 60697, Attention: Corporate Trust Operations, 16th 

floor. 

e) Continental Bank 5J_ 227 Roe de k Lot, 1040 Brussels. 

Rj-lgiuim. 

id) Continental Bank/Brandt, 162 Queen Victoria Street, 
London EC4V4BS, England. 

e) Continental Bank/Branch, 10 Avenue Montaigne, 75008 
Paris. 

f) Continental Bank/Brandi, Bodtenbdmer Landatraase 24, 
6000 Frankfurt/Main, West Germany, Federal Republic 
of Germany. 

g) State. Street Bank (Switzerland), Bahno&trafie 18, P.O. 
Box 5053. CB8022 Zorich, Swi tzeriamL 

h) Bantme Internationale ft Luxembourg 5 JL, 2 Boulevard 
Royale, Luxembourg; Lnaemhoaty 

Doted August 20, 1985 in London, Englood. 

NICOR OVERSEAS FINANCE N.Y. 
By Sdmyier K, Henderson 
Attorney-in-fact 


Resorts Sees Potential BidforContwi 

t n A < -a ^ Of News Group 

In ran Am, Analysts Say u Robed 2S% 


By Jonathan P. Hicks quarter widened to S72 million 
<Vew York Times Service from S49 million in the s a m e period 

NEW YORK — Resorts Inter- las 1 year. Its operating revenue fell 
national Inc., which disclosed on 13-7 percent for the first half of 
Friday that it bad accumulated a 1985 and its long-term debt re- 
stake in Pan American World Air- mains a huge S970 mflli nn. 
ways, may beatcracted totheafling opt^ ^ ^ Pbcavage 

, oth * indtistry analysts^ 


.. The Assaciaied Press 

2 S 2 LOS ANGELES - Nonna, 

from S49miIuonm the same period lMr * T prTrl ]j p-renrhio 

n 7 ^^ T^rh^rlTb^F^ raised their bid on Monday for the 
13.7_ percent for the first half of c„ M ,- no bv 


^v^vcrsoonfromitsprolv 

ten^, according to secunties ana- notably the prospect of Pan Am 


J ■ , receiving $750 million in cash for 

I Kesorts reported Fnday that it the sale of its Pacific routes to UAL 
had an 8.8-percent stake in Pan Int, parent of United Airlines. 
Am. On Monday, however, in a .. 

filing with the Securities and Ex- U lhe J a § rc, P enl ^ Umled » 

change Commission, Resorts cor- K 

reced the figure to 11 percent of SSS, a 


BradtetaS Z Ev,ajin g New Association fay 25 
^ percem to 5565 million. J 
ams a hup S970 million. The offer by LP. Media was 

The optimism of Mr. Pincavage made a day before a federal appeals 
d other industry analysts is court was to hear a challenge to a 
sed on a number of factors, most lower court decision upholding the 
itably the prospect of Pan Am legality of a Michigan anti-take- 
xhrug $750 million in cash for over statute, 
isale of its Pacific routes to UAL LP. Media boosted its bid for 

t, parent of United Airlines. the parent of the Detroit Evening 
If the agreement with United is a share from the 

proved by the government as ex- hhi* 3 ! SI, 000 per share it offered 
cted. it would result in a reduc- weeks ago. Analysts suggest- 


ion til 6 PM. Saturday, lines of up to 
60 people continued for much of 
the day. By midafternoon, the 
branch ran short of cash and began 
limiting cash withdrawals to S500, 
giving depositors checks for 
amounts over $500. 

Under orders from Governor 
Hughes, withdrawals from Com- 
munity and other state-insured 
thrifts are limited to 51,000 a 
month from funds deposited before 
May, when the private Maryland 
Savings Share Insurance Corp- col- 
lapsed and was taken over by the 
state. There is no limit on with- 
drawal of money deposited since 
then. (AP, Reuters } 


Pincavage, the airline analyst for 
Paine Webber Inc. ‘They’ve done 
some financial restructuring. And, 
assuming some of their recent 
transactions are approved, you'll 
have a company that will be worth 
a lot more than it's currently selling 


SffaMSS ESSSSSrSTX 
ffSMKSMI 

^ a gtecd to assume someof km gare and that MnLor and Mr. 
Refill Am’s Tease obligations at various Perenduo made a low rniual offer 

KtaSfiMsyt MMttrsas 

poses, and that it was cons denag the Evening News Asrociation’s 

ssraawtiss sssziisssx 

gambling concern, which already own stock. “After all of this is com nan'/s stock, 
owns a small helicopter service ami done,” Mr. Pincavage said, “Pan 3 

a Miami-based airline and has long Am will have about SI billion to (“ 

set its sights on a major carrier, S 1 .2 billion in cash and, at the same 

could not be reached for commenL time, their debt will be about $ 600 
Resorts purchased an interest in million.” 

Pan Am more than a decade ago. Even after the Pacific routes are SAVE & I 

but us effort to lake over the airline sold, analysts said. Pan Am would wr,B " ** ■ 

failed, and it reported a loss when it still have a large international pres- CAP C flCTFR 

sold its slock in 1974. Two months ence, including its lucrative franc- ■ I ErH 

ago, Raorts made a bid to acquire Atlantic operations. Those routes, sharp wot hfrs arphfwki 

Trans World Airlmes few $22 a wWch reported operating profits of bHAKtHOLuLKS ARh HEKkl 

share, or a total of S759 million, about SI 19 minim last year, rep re- L The Directors are pleased to a 

The bid was ngected by TWA’s sent twice the income of the routes S?f nd te>P*stoi 

board in favor of a higher offer being sold to United 30thjune 1985 In order tone 

from Texas Air Tnm e bearer sha res. holders of sucli 

“Pan Am hnc com.. Although Resorts said that it did Coupon No. 3 io the office of t) 

received some tee- increase its stake in Prosper Jersey l Limited. 1*0 

mendous concessions from their la- ^ Hetie?. Jersey. Channel Island* 

bor groups lately, said John V. were stepti^and aeems of the Fund listed beiuu 

speculated about a bid for control 
by James M. Crosby, the compa- 
ny’s chairman. 

“Jim Crosby has always had a 
fascination with the airline indus- 
try,” said William Kabbash, an is- 


DeVwHolbrin 

Internal] mud m (s l ts. V/i 

Qiv-Cock 

Jnlemational nv 2 % 3>fe 

Quotes » of: At^usl 19, 1985 


1 investors seeking above jvr: apt 
: capiul guns in global smek 
markets can simple vwur us a 
note ami (he neekh 
INVESTORS ALERT newri-.ltcr 
will be sent IrtT and w ithoui 
oHigatiun. 

First Commerce Securities bv 
Herengracht -t8t 
1017 BT Amsterdam 
TheNetherlands 
Telephone: (01 ' 1 20 ZbCMQl 
Telex; 14507 firconl 


FOREIGN & COLONIAL ! 
RESERVE ASSET FUND \ 

P81CE5 AT 14.&BS ) 

A-. ui douak cash Sioae 

Be AiLtTiajWB'ICY CASH $1072 

Ci DOUAR BONDS SI 13 I 

D: MATtCURESVCV BOMJS $1145 

E; STBUNG ASSET ElO^ 

FOfiBGN 3. COtONtAL 
managem&jt yasFO umthj 
u wACAsra snsrsr i-ajKjaspi.ci ! 
TB. QSUZ’SSt 7REX. J1920S? | 

FOR OTHER F&C FUNDS, S£F 
flVTEBNAnONAt FUNDS UST { 


for. Next year they'll have a shot at dependent analyst formerly with 
making some money.” Tripp & Co. “Pve followed this 


Australia & New Zealand Bank- W. Canmng PLC said a wholly 
ing Groap said it has arranged fi- owned subrimaiy, DTC Inc., has 
nandnfi facthties totaling 5100 mil- agreed to acauire certain assets and 


agreed to acquire certain assets and 
working capiLal of Sybron Corp.'s 
Denricon Division together with 


Still, Pan Am is not without ma- SfSSKi?-* 1 * 
jor problems. Its loss for the second ** anted an airline. 

In 1 978, Resorts opened the first 
_ casino in Atlantic Qty after gam- 

bling was approved. Propelled by 
- - its head start, Resorts reaped huge 

represented by Bulls Tankrederi S 
A /S and Aaby’ » Rederi A/S. Value ^ ^ ’ 51 9 

of the accord was not disclosed. ftllt ■ j,, 

fl^oTincreaid and Resorts Ve- 
a loss of $4.7 million on 

banks that reflects recent _tmprowe- ^ million 

men is in ns financial position. The 

company was adversely affected I 

last year by the near-collapse of its — 

Johnson Matthey Bankers subsid- f 
iary- which was taken over by the 
Bank of England. 

Monsanto Ca said it had extend- y 

ed until midnight Friday its cash |f« VeST J 

tender offer for G.D. Scarte * Co. 

Monsanto said it had been ten- 
dered about 38.9 million Searie 
shares, or more than 92 percent of 
the total outstanding, under its 

$65-a~share takeover offer. P rOQ f0S 

Otin Corp. said it completed the , , , 

purchase of FMC Corp.'s pool- Hflu DrOK6r3( 

chemical division and related oper- ’ 

ations. Tenns were not disclosed. GXcC 

Philipp Hotzntaim AG, Frank- 
fim-based construction concern, 
told shareholders that group turn- 
over will likely fall to 7 billion 
Deutsche marks (S2_5 billion) this 
year from 8.13 billion in 1984. The 

company cited continued slack do- Plea® 

mestic demand, tougher oompeti- I 

lion abroad and a fall in bunding 
orders from OPEC states. 

Union Carbide India said it DfMBSRlfVcS 

would omit its declared dividend irWimiUB 

for calendar 1984 because of costs 42 Aven 

related to the tragedy at its Bhopal 
plant The Union Carbide unit paid V. 
a 15-percent dividend in 19S3. ■ ■ 


SAVE & PROSPER 
FAR EASTERN FUND S.A. 

SHAREHOLDERS ARE HEREBY INFORMED THAT: 

1. The Directors are pleased to announce that Lhe Fund will pay a 
dividend of USSfl. 105 per share in respect «»i the year ended 
30th June 1985. In order to receive the dividend payable nn 
bearer shares, holders of such shares must submit Dividend 
Coupon No, 3 lo the office of the Administrator. Save & 
Prosper Jersey 1 Limited. IK) Box 73. -15 La Motto Street. St 
Hefier. Jersey. Channel Islands or to either ot the desipnmed 
agents of the Fund listed below: 

a) The Bank of N.T. Butterfield & Son Limited, Hamilton. 
Bermuda 

bl TTieHongkonR and Shanghai Kanfcinu Corporation. 99 
. Bishops gate. London 

Payment of dividends against presentation or lender of 
dividend cuupons will constitute absolute proof of the 
discharge of the Fund from its liability therefor. 

2. The fifteenth Annual Ordinary Meeting of Shareholders will 
be held at Thirty Cedar Avenue. Hamilton n-L'J. Bermuda on 
Tuesday, HUh September I9S5 at 11!. i Hi nrmn for the Allowing 
purposes: 

a) lb receive the Report of (he Directors and the Financial 
Statements for the year ended 3(tth June 19tS 

b) To appoint auditors at a rate of remuneration to be decided 
by the Directors 

c) To fix the number of and to elect Directors 

d) To determine the remuneration of the t lirect' irs 

el Tb transact any other business of an Annual Ordinary 
Meeting of Shareholders. 

By Order of the Board 
J.U CAMPBELL 
Secretary 


INVESTMENT MANMQI 


Progressive, investment management 
and brokerage firm seeks experienced account 
executive to handle expanding 
international business. 


Please send resume and salary history to 

FRANCOIS MOUTE or J.J. CHEVET 

Donaldson, Lulkin & lensetie 

42 Avenue Montaigne, 75008 Pans, France ■ 331-723-3478 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) August 19, 1985 

Md asset value quotations art niPMIM by the Points listed wttti Me exception ot seme quotes based on issue price. 

The morolacri symbols Indicate frequency ot qootoltoos supplied: Id) -daihrJ (wl-wmkly; (b)-bMnoaftilr; (r) • repulorly; ID-Irreoulcrty. 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 

-tv* ) APMal Trust, 

BANK JULIUS BAER A CO. Ltd. 

-{ d 1 BoorbarW . 

-Id I Ccmbor__ — _ — . — _ — — ! 
-f dl Enwlbaer America — — 

-Id I Egutboer Europe — — ! 

-I d } Equttxwr pacHlc.. . : 

-I d I Grofcaf , 

*(d 1 Stockbar — . — ! 

BANQUE fNDOSUEZ 

■4d> Aslan Growrth Fund 

-IwJ Plverbond ! 

-(w) P IF- America ... — - 


. l'lra) Amor Values CunuPret„ 
S IM4S(-<d> Fidelity Amer. Assets — . 
1-1 a Fidelity Australia Fund. 


SF S9i5Sl-t cl iFIdelHY Discovery 
SF 1TB3J» | -(dl Fidelity Dlr.Svos.' 


i IW.mI-1 ** ) Gpss C- Japoi 

S WJ7 OSLIFLEX LIMITED 

s lajr rw) MuHicurrencv 

S loji |*< w{ Dollar Medium Term. 
i i2Sja|-iwl Dollar Lena Term 


S m&OOi-f a > Fidelity For East Fund. S ZUal-fw) Japanese Yen. 


-Id) Aslan Growth Fund * i« 

-lw) Dlverbond ,. SF 8L35 

(w) F IF- America — S tag 

-<wl FiF-Eurwe — — - J IMS 

-(wl FlF-Pocttlc. S 17.1? 

■td> IndasuezMuttibondsA S 99.92 

-idj Indosuez Mull (bonds B— * , 

-l d I Indosuez USD (JWUA.Fl — S10ZU3 

BRITANNItU>OB 371. St. Hellar.JKrMV 
-<wl Brii-DPltar Income ... _ - S OBW 

-jwl Bri-LS Atanoa.Curr. — S 9J4- 

-Tdl BrK. ifitU Manaopartf. S Ml 

— ( d | Bril, inti J Monao-Portf £ 1114 

-jwl BrH. Am. Inc. & Fd Ltd S IJg 

-jw) BrH.Gold Fund l Un 

-Iwl Br JMamo.Currency_- — - C IL30 

■(dl BrH.JWWiOIrPtrt'. Fd % OS ’ 74 

-( w I Brit Jersey Gilt Fund £ 0J2H* 

-(d) BrK. World Lets. Fund S 1.M2 

-(d) Brtt. World Techa Fund — S 0JM 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

-(w) Capital Ini' I Fund * 3U4 

-(wl Capital Italia SA — .. * 15A3 

CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES! 

-( d J Actions Suites — SF 4llg 

-f d) Band Valor Swi — — SF ICMB 

-Id) Bond Valor D-mark DM JTjl^ 
•f d) Bond Valor UStoOLLAR— _ * l»» 


SF 1334.ca -( a \ Fidelity Hitt Fund * tASO -jw) Pound Sterling 

SF 114X00 -td) Fidelity Orient Fund S 3753 -I w ) Deutsche Mark _____ 

SF97tua -(d) FUellty Frontier Fund S 1*47 -(w I Dutch Florin 

SF 1S2HK -( d ) Futslltv PocHtc Fund-— S US56 -<w) Swfea Franc 

-(d) Fidelity sacL Growth Fi — s U» orange Nassau group 
S HUBS -Id) Fidelity World Fund 33JB PB 65578. The Hooue (070) 41 


S 1153 

— s iaw 

S 10.90 

— s ips 

1 10.96 

-DM 10 66 
— FL 1051 
.SF 1OJ00 


1&SS -(d) Fidelity World Fund S 

805 FORBES PO BM7GRAHD CAYMAN 
1857 London Agent 01-8390013 


13j 03 -(wl Dollar Income — . — — * 759* 

17.19 -(Wl Forbes Hiatt Inc. GW Fd — c um 
99.92 -(wl Gold Income , ■ — S 023* 


IMS) -lw) Gold Ap*xr»ckrt)oO_ 
01 JO -(m) StrateatcTradlno — 
r oefinor funds. 

0090 -{wl East investment Put 
9J4- -(w)Sootmti World Fund 
1.111 -<w) Stale st American- 


33JB PBB5578. The Hooue (070)449570 

-id) Bcver Beieool naerH-F. 

PARISBAS-GROUP 
7 59* -(d) Cwtexa International 

awt -(wjobu-om 

&T3- -iwl OBLICeSTIQU . 

454 -(W) OBLI-DOLLAR 

1.15 -jw) OBLI-YEN — 

-(wl OBLI-GULDEN 


S 33755 i-(d ) PAROIL-FUNO 

S 11377 - d) PAR' MTER FUND 
S 14S3D 1 4 0) PAR US Treasury £ 


-(d) Cortexa International S 8858 

-(Wi OBLI-DAL ■_ — _ DM I2XLS7 

l-IW) OBLIGESTION — ■ ... ■ SF 94AS 

1-1 W) OBLI-POLLAR 3 1)99.96 

-jw) OBLI-YEN-. Y lffBWJB 

!-(wi OBLI-GULDEN FL 110566 

-(d) PAROIL-FUNO 1 94.17 

- . -j a > PARI NTER FUND _____ S 114.11 

1.17! -iwl Stale 5t American— S 74 5JB 40) PAR US Treasury Bond S IOLS5 

1135 CaptLTnMJjrtLLotvAaeiit5V49U2W ROYAL B. CANADA5N7S 34&GUERNSEY 

1J095 GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP- -H w I RBC Canadian Fund Ltd. _ $ 1154 

0373 PB 119, St peter Port. Guernsey, 0481-28715 -Hw) RBC Far Eoot&PocHIc F&. s 11.13 

U30 - m) FuturGAM SJL S 1JS58 -H*l RBC IntT Codfal Fd. i 22.79* 

OSH -(mi GAM Arbitrage Inc I 137.54 4(w) RBC mi l income Fd S T1J21 

1222* ■ wIGANierlcnlnc -H d 1RBC LUecCurrencv Rl $ UP! 

1.192 -tw> GAM Australia Inc S.P9J3 -+jw) RBC North Amer. Fd.___5 ■>47'. 

0734 -lw) GAM Boston Inc- S 110J3 SKANDIFOND INTL FUND (44-4-234270) 

-<w) GAM Ertnlfooe — _ S .75.17 -(w)lnc.: Bid S SSI Ofler _s 5J7 

30X4 - wl GAM Ffonc-wl SF 1045S -IwlAce.: Bid % JL59 Offer S S.99 

1553 -1 wl GAM Hono Kona inc.__— . *.99^ svenska interhationalltd. 

■ d) GAM international inc. — — S H7JB 17 DmnMtitilrw Sa.LondOii i?-377-Ba» 

HIL35 - w) GAM Joean Inc. S .99.19 -< r 1 SHB Bond Fund .1 2451 

0050 -fw) GAM North America me.— S 10450 -lw) SHB Inti Growtb Fund S 2154 

1135 - w) GAM N. America Unit Tried— TOjOOd SWISS BANK CORP. (ISSUE PRICES) 

3087 - w) GAM Poctflc InC- S 1103 •( d ) Amerlco-Votor .. SF 5Q0JS 


( d ) Drovfos Fund Infl 5 9 

! wl Drevhra Inierconllneni— _ S 34.15 
wl Tha EstcbDshment Trusl— S J.le 

( d 1 E urope OoHootlons ol 73 

(w) First Eagle Fund—— S14.1M.35 

(r)FWvS)orsuau___ s sstus 

(wl Fixed Income Trans _____ s 1051 
(wl Fonsele* issue Pr.___-_ sf 197.10 

(wl Foc^jctund £ 753 

(w) Formula selection Fu. sf ax 

td) POnrfllfillfT . s 2 VJ 4 

l d ) Govern m. Sec. Fund* S 91 JO 

Id) Frtmkt-Tnist InterzJns DM *OD 

(w) Houssnumn Hides. N.V 5 1245B 

(wl HMIlff Funds S 183JS I 

(wl Horlmn F.nut s I330J9 

Im) IBEX Holdings Ltd SF 111.36 

( r > 1 la mm Gold Sand- S 9.W 

( r 1 ILA-IGB s 10J)1 

< r I ILA-IGS s 1043 

Id Interfund SA s is 77 

(w Inter morfcBt Fund S 306J3 

(d imerminina Mot. Fd ct. B - S 736.58 

Ir Inn Securities Fund S 1D3B 

Id InvestoDWS — Dim 5153 

jr Invert Atlonthaoet. - £ a.48 

( r ItaHortune Inl’l Fund SA S 15^1 

(w Joaon Selection Fund s 11558 

(w Joean Pacific Fund S 10554 

I IT) -letter PfM. Inti 1 M S 71211 J7 

Id Ktelnwon Benson Inn Fd— S 2259 


-Tdl Band valor Yen 


Yen i»65J» j-tml GAMrint corp. 


-i d ) Convert Valor 5wf — SF H7JOMw)GAMSlnoaaora/Motov Inc — S 9958 -Id) Dollar Band Selection 

-Id i Convert Valor US- DOLLAR. S 1 19J4 {-( w) GAM S/erl A Inti Unit Trust _ 134319 * a -< d I Florin Band Selection 
-(d) cSSec-__-_ SF 741 IO I -im) GAM Systems! nc S 1Q4J4 -(d) Irdwvojor — 


•Id) CS Fantb-Bandi SF 74JB -|w) GAM WorldiyWe )nc» — 

(diCS FwiS-InT L. SF 10935 -(m) OAM Tycite SJL dots A 

4 d > Hs Market Fund— Ijwa G.T MANAGEM|NT (U K) Ltd 

»|dl CS Money Market Fund-. DM 104950 ■{*) f*:" 

-jd)C5 Money Market Fund -J’flZjH *t ^ { S-I- — 

t rl 1 Frwtuln-VnliiT SF I43J3 -(d) G.T.Aaean KJC. GwttLFa__ 


-(d) D-Mark Band Selection „ DM 13157 

-Id Dollar Band SeleeKan s 132.91 

-<d Florin Bond Selection FL I25fi5i 

-id intervaior - SF 8375 

4d Jemon Portfolio.—, ... . sf boits. 

-id Sterling Bond Selection c 18507 

-(d Swl« Forrton Bond Set — SF ibsji 


(wl Klelnnori Bern. Jap. I 
(w| Korea Grawtti Trusl- 

(d) uMcom Futk! 

(w) Lover 000 Cap Hold 

i d ) UnvUwr, 

(w) Luntund. 

(m) Moanafund N V - 

(d) Mediolanum Sol. Fd._ 

1 r 1 Mel core— 

(w| NAAT 


— 

K.W8540JI 

— 1 W 

— S 1291,117 

— S 1B3J9 

— 5133500 , 

— £ 7372 

— S 18644 

— S 17J7 1 
Y 10450450 

— S 1IL7I j 


-jd > C5 Money Market Fund 

-(dl Enerale-Vnlor 

-Id) Um. — — 

-(ill EurePQ-VBto r - ■ — 

-I d ) PacHlc ■Valor———-- 


9J6 1-( d ) Syrinvolor New Series sf 


DREXCL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC 


SF 85350 -(w)G-T. ANa Fund. 

SF 757.59 -( d ) G.T. Australia Fund- 
SF 1S12S ■( d ) G.T. Europe Fund— 


1479 -( d 1 Universal Bond Select, 
1259 -fd) Universal Fund—— 
451 -( d ) Yen Bond Selection — 
25 99 UNION BANK OF SWI7ZEI 


iw) O.T . Eon. Small Cos, Fund — S 


SF 6350 
SF llS5<i 
,Y 1(09450 


( d I Nlkka Grawtti Package Fd S 791434 

tw» U)PM) FuTKi _ S 2 PJ 7 - 

(m) NOSTEC Portfolio S 513352 

Iwl Navolec investment Fund S 9135 

|W> NJLM.F - £ 14459 

fmlNSPF.l.T S 149J0 

(d) Pacific Horlson invf. Fd S UT7Q53 


5nS S^£ J’a^5^7Ti Mirian wall -j d ) G.T. Daiior Fund — . S 1554 -Id) Fotim SmbaSL... .. »■ SF 

LONDON EC2 (01 9319797) -Idl G>T.Band Fund S 1L13 -jd j Jongn-lnvest. ... SF 

4 wl FlrSburv GrwS^LttL S 12553 -(d) G.T. GWbal Tertmtuv Fd s 71® -(dfSaflt south aOC |F 

Jmi ^S^wDlwTSlftedM— % SS >(d)G.T.Hor«tMPrtliflnaer I Ztf5 -(dl Sima — —SF 

-(ml winS^w F nandolLteir * 1237 -4 d I G.T. Ittveitmenf Fund S 1545 UNION INVESTMENT FnMkMit 

iSlwiSSSSKldSlS — ^ ^ 1 S ! “ 5 Sa-MMMM® B« 


..II IH| TraOUNdCI«UUI-WMVa, IVIWM 

2599 UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

1157 -(d) Amoa UJ.Sh, SF 0L75 

1254 -Id) Bond-lnvest — SF .44-75 

14 -Id) FtMlM SwIsiSh. SF 15050 

13 -I d j J opart- Invest, SF 84550 

7 -(d)Saflt south Afr.sh. SF 3S10Q 

5 -(d) Sima Ulock price)... SF 207 JD 


(dl Pacific Korean tnvl. Fd S 107053 

Iwt PAMCURBI Inr - £ 197B 

(r) Portal Sw. R Esf Geneve _ SF 1397X0 

( r | Permal Value N.V- $ 1300.72 

(r)PtelodM s 106 S .12 


(wl PSCOFundN.V., _ 

(wl PSC 0 lull. N.V S 10554 

(d) Putnam inl'l Fund ______ S 4730 

( r ) PH-TwA S 803.75 

(wlGuontum Fund N.V. S4379JJ9 

Id) Ren to Fund— - LF 572350 

(d) RenllnwBf—— LFI0555B 

Idl Reserve insured Peposits — S1D99J1 

I d ) Rudolf Wolff Fyt Fd Lid S 124550 

(w) So mural Portfolio.. SF llH.eo 

Id ) SCI/Tech. SA Liutmbourv- S 1052 
I wl Seven Arrows Fund N.V ... .. .. S 747.8a 

1 w) Stott S». Bonk Faulty HdBSNV S 9J7 

(w) Strattov Im/ejlmenl Fund«_ 4 22.19 

Id) Synlax Lld-’lCiass A ) 1 S uj 

(w) Techno Growth Fund___ SF 8117 

I (w) Tokva Pec. Hold. (Seal 5 8951 

(Wl Tokyo Pot Hold. N.V S 12359 

Iwt Transpacific Fund S 7U6 

(d) TurmuXM Fund_ S 10451 

1 wl Tweedy, Browne n.v.Ckj$ 5 A_ s 22D459 
(w) TweedyAwwten.v.CljBsH_ s 1542.13 
Im) Tweedv. Browne (U.K.l n.v._ s 10C8J4 

Id) UNICOFund, — ...... DM 800 

(d I UNi Bond Fund— s 109555 

I r ) UNI certlal Fund $'1153.99 

(w) Vanderbilt Assets — % 11.97 

(dl World Fund SJL- s IIJ) 


_ 5 1234 »(d I G.T, TecfinOieay Fuml S 5J ( d J Unltant 

.(wiuierldwUtoSecurHlMS/S3Vb^ S 4552 -<d)O.T. South China Fund - S 15J2|-(d) Unlrok 

32 WtawSS?l£^d5s/SM_r S 143144 HILtSAJiWELimiSST t MS5riNTLWL -IdJUNIZII 


S 1300.72 ! 
5104S.12 . 
S 132.90 I 
5 10546 
S 6720 
S 803-75 
5437959 
LF 572350 
LF 105555 


S2SSaSS= SS H 957 (w) Ad bonds 

SSffiSfisns- « Maifc==L ¥ & ams 

-id) Int. currency U&. 


Other Funds 

ris Investments Fund. 


-(ml D&H Commodltv P 00 J 
-(m) Currency & Gold Pool. 


S 31255**' 
_S 147.90 


2553 1 (w) Aqullo iRtentolhmol Fund— s 150.17 


(mi wifSuUfe S57753*-* -(dl rrF Fd (Tedwtoloey) _ — - S 1351 (rl Arab Finance I.F. — - — — 

S! Tw^WrvMriFirt PonTT 190753— -(d) 0‘Seas Fd IN- AMERICA) S 2855 (r)Arlane 

Jbc TR tWTCOI JERSEY) LTD.* JARPINE FLEMING, POB 78 GPO Ho K 9 (w) Trudttr IrdT Fi (AE(F) 

usnlrSUI Htlliir.'WJUIl -( r) J.F Currency ABond, — — — . S jw) BNP Inteibotvd Fund ._ 

TRADED CURRENCYFUNdT . -( r ) J.F Hons KOW Trust J 3T.T7 iwl BOMteMx- Issue Pr. 

e(d)K: BldZlJr WflOHer SJWffl -f r) J^JaaiPac Conv Y (m) CatMa GttFMortaaae Fd 

»(SlcS.:BhCZ5 1152 Offer «’-»S -ir ) j.F jonan Trust-— Y (dlCepfto PrMerv.Fd.lntt 

inTERWiTraNALlNCOME FUND A r j j.P JeMA TertmoloBV Y 17517 tw) Citadel Fund _ 

-( d TemiW‘(A^«fl| - * 15919 -frjjj= Pacific Sec^lAcc) — S 5.94 Id) CJ.R. Austral lo Fund 

-Idl Start Tern 'A' (DhSlZ— * 05947 LLOYDS BAMKINTL, POB 438. Geneva ill (d)CJJLJopan F-n ri 

-id Swf T?m 'B- MttiflTiTIIL. 5 UI» -+f w) Lloyds Infl Dollar J llilO (m) Cleveland CWshorp Fd 

1 d ) Term 'B' DWr)-Z^l- S 19076 -+(wj Lloyds Inn Europe SF 11490 (w) ColumUa S^urttlet 

4 w) Lono T^ n Z7 S 2175 -+(wi (Jovd* InTI (Srowtti SF 17J30 ( r ) COMETE 

FftC MMTfLTDTlNvl ADVISERS -Hw) Uavde nh liwpnw- SF 31U0 tw Convert. Fd. Inti A Com 

LLoureneBPountY Hill* EC4. oi-SKMOT _ -Hw) Uoyd» Inn N. America S lteJO (w Convert. Fd. Inti BCorte_ 

lv?I F^CAtlOfrtlr 1 tlAS -fiwl Ucyid INI PbcIBt — SF (2250 (a Dnlwo Japan Fund—— 

w Fl^ Cu^r— ~ ^ s 1298 -H w) Lterds Inrt Smaller Co&— . S 14JB2 Iw D.G.C 

-I w) f£c girlwSaU. - SVJS N (MAR BEN id a WWerWkl wide fvt Tst._ 

FIDELITY POB 678, Hnmiltoa lormude -(d) gw* -- ... ..«■■■ S 8952 (r Drokkar Irtves-’.Fund N,V._— 

-(ml American val ves ContnwtL- t W50 -tw ) Ckm B - UA — ■ - 8 7812! Id Dreyful Amends Fund.. 

DM - Deutsche Mark; QF- Betghm Frma: FL - Dutch Fhr tnjL F-Utx mntouni Frcra/SF- SwteFranai 0 - osked; + -Oft 
Available; N.C- NoICotwmunlcatKl to.; N ew; S-yagn^d^S/S-STott Spat; •- EiLOlyUnd; "^Ex-Rts; *** -Gross Perfor 
Fonrwfv Wartdiyide Fond LUk © - O Her Prla Inti. 3% sranffl. chart, • ++- dolly Stock price os on Amsfertom Slock E*cftor 


-jd ) Short Term ‘B 1 (Dlstr) 
4 w) Lons Term-. .. 


S B9U7I 
. S 174154 1 
5 I0.1B 
. S 11129 

S 1151 

*s 

S 211157 
FL 10458 
S 747.18 

s ma 
S 29.11 
Y 10831 

S ffi 

S1I41JS 
S 1058 


|(um Francs; FL - Dvlch Flert fl.-LF - Lineemdourv Frcrrcs; SF - Swfaa Franca; 0 - asked; + - Offer Prices* - 0W e/wnoe p/v STO losioerumt; na - Nat 
artfdjp - New; 5 - susponded; S/S • Stock Scat; * - Ex-Dtvtdand; ••-Ex-Rts; •** - Gross Perfomwice Index July: e . Rrdetnpt- Price- EvCoupan; «•' 
& - Offer Prl» lr»ct. 3*» prelim, chorat; ++ - dolly sta* price a* on Amsterdam Sloe* E*efwrm? 




?* 1 ' r - 


\TS8 VJt , 


Page 12 


Hoatin^fiaie Notes 


EVTERIVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 1985 


LS. Futures 


Dollar 


Season Season 

High Low 


■tup 19 

Opm Hhrti Lew On On. 


Grains 


uE° flaoHW.^ »■ a* 

POTK MUIEHCMI1 

wgom.-eTOiJWto^ 405 -t» 

?£S as SS &3 22 - £ 

7540 5 492 MOT SMS MU# £g Sfi -;•£ 

73LM SUB W« 50-K g» S3| Zfg 

74J30 5*65 Jilt ».M »-*> g® 5*£ ~jg 

7115 SUB. Am 57 JO 5470 SOO -W 

ej#.Sate» UR Pr*w. Sole* *4*5 
Prev. Dav Own mi. U81 off*47 


|M 

i ft (Whirl 

Iff 

10* 

IM 

kW 

BKPtTD 

101*3 

naif 

lid 9! 

Inf 91 
intff 
i107lC0B> 


WHY PAY FIXED 

CD 

WHEN TOD DONT 
HAVE TO? 


Now you can trade through Eastern 
Capital in securities, options, bonds and 
commodities. At extraordinarily low rates. 

On US Stock transactions we offer a 
50% commission discount to retail rates 
prevailing in 1975 when fixed rates were 
abolished. 

Our commodity rates are discounted to 
extremely competitive levels. 

In addition we offermanaged portfolios 
in commodities, stocks, and bonds for the 
private investor 

So call us on (01) 250 0798 or send the 
coupon below. Or pay the consequences. 

|”~ To: Eastern Capital, 9 Leonard Street, London, EC2A 4HP. | 

I • Please send me a commission schedule and brochure. | 


EASTERN CAPITAL 

THE STOCK & COMMODITY 
DISCOUNT BROKER 



Metals 


u 

1 








1.79 

1.141ft 

S«o 1704, 

1704 

1198 

1.1W4 —42 

1471ft 

174 

Dec 179V: 

179% 

178 

i7B*4> —m 

167%. 

1J6V3 

Altar 172 

172 

I7FK 

179% — JEFK 

163 

ITF.ft 

MOV 170 

170 

17914 

itfui —srrti 

IJ0V2 

17B*ft 

Jill 



17M — 42VS 

ESI. Solas 



556 



Prev. Day ODoaim. 1740 nN30 




Livestock 


Non Dollar 


CATTLE (GMEJ 
■ii.J'M lbs.- cents per to. 

6747 5072 AuO 54J5S 5SJH 

tSn 5345 OCT S&MJ 5455 

67.35 55.15 D«C 59.10 5970 

67.4S 54B0 F«0 5955 5970 

6757 57 JO Aar S»40 5940 

6625 59.10 Jun. 6060 6075 

65 40 5970 Aua 5995 50.95 

ESI. Sales 11543 Pm. 5am 11723 
Prev. Day Odea Inf. 42440 aN142 
FEEDER CATTLE (QME) 

44 jmo ita.- cam per Rl 

7370 5930 Aua 6550 6150 

7100 5749 Sip 6X95 6195 

7132 57.15 Ocl 62.40 6150 

7120 £920 Nov 6600 *4.10 

7960 6060 Jan 6560 6960 

7055 61.10 Mar 6560 <560 

7065 61.15 Aar 6570 6570 

6625 6170 Wav 0460 M40 

Est Sates 1783 Prev. Soles 1490 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 7743 up 77 
HOGS (CME1 
31X000 lbs.- cents per 18. 

5637 41.92 Aua 4465 44 45 

51.75 3645 Ocr 3740 3765 

5045 39.15 Oec 3970 3975 

Xil 4035 Feb 4140 4160 

4775 3740 Aor 3865 3845 

4905 4040 Jim 4160 4160 

4945 4170 Jul 4175. 41. ■JO 

51,90 4075 Alia 4170 4100 

41.10 3870 Oct 3940 3940 

Es>. Sales 5441 Prev. Sales 5465 
Prev. Oav Open Ini i«767 api22 


5445 5472 — .18 

5570 5622 —68 

5767 5747 —35 

57.90 5927 —45 

59.10 5975 —45 

6000 6060 —35 

5895 5945 


6460 4540 —65 

6245 6105 — -95 

6165 41.95 —47 

6115 6335 —.92 

6445 64.90 —75 

4445 8540 —79 

6465 65.05 — 7S 

6470 6470 —45 


43L3S 4387 —43 

3865 3847 —168 
3840 3892 —138 
4060 4062 — 168 


Currency Options 


aCSribunr 


Financial 


OpeauglorTuDui 
j Is Seen in Mweow 



Commointir indexes 




2 iori 


Take advantage of our special rales for new subscribers and 
we’ll give you an extra month of Tribs fee with a one-year 
subscription. Total savings: nearly 50% off the newsstand price 
in most European countries! 


London 

Commodities 


Close 

Hhrti Low BU Aik 

SUGAR 

SfeMng per metric ton 
DO 12370 11760 11760 11740 
Dec 12570 11960 11970 11960 
Mo- 13530 12870 12970 12970 
May 13940 13X80 13X00 13X40 
AIM N.T. N.T. 137.00 13760 
OU 14748 14740 14100 14240 
Volume: 1404 lots of 50 tons. 
COCOA 

SterDna per metric hm 
Sap 1701 1492 1499 MOO 

Dec 1712 1700 13D6 17M 

Mar 1325 1,777 1722 1723 

May 1740 1733 1735 1736 

JIT 1753 USB 1750 1752 

Sep N.T. N.T. 1763 1745 

Dec 1770 1769 1765 1770 

Volume: 1407 lots oMO tons. 
COFFEE 

SMrEna per metric ton 
Sep 1470 1455 1759 146S 

Nov 1708 1490 17D0 1702 

Mm 1739 1724 1730 1735 

MOT 1740 1747 1752 ITS 

Mg 1765 lTttj 1770 
Jly 1790 1790 JTSffl 1795 

S*V N.T. N.T. 1790 1430 

Volume: 4434 lets of 5 tons. 


Omuroclhies 


CommSlhies 


Cash Prices 


12040 12SJ0 
12440 12500 
1347013440 
1374013800 
14240 14340 
14800 14800 


1497 1499 
170* 1707 
1721 1723 
1739 1741 

'll 


1451 1458 
I4S7 1489 
171* 1719 
1740 1743 
1785 1780 
1785 1700 
1410 USD 


US. donors P*r metric tat 


T 


j TaSubsanptiOTMarragffJnternaliard 
rt^marriiNreducodS^saT^ittj^^riFarnowwfcKrtoTonh 92S21 Nei%Cedex, Frafice.Telj7^(F29.Tdex:61283Z 


SUOAB HW. x*a Bin ASK ame 

rrsicfi fra ncs per metric toa 
Oct 1770 1715 17SS USB + 18 

Dec in ITS us l^g +M 

Mor UK US UK 1769 +0 

N;T. NT- U9S 1608 -t-», 

Ass 1641 lAm 1640 1641 + S 

Oct NX, N.T. 1610 U05 + K* 

Es»- YJH . : XWV Ws of 50 lens. Prev. octuca 
coles: 2711 tots, open Interest: 20403 

COCOA 

French francs par m ta 

Sep 2405 2405 2005 2011 —4 

DOC 2MJ7 UWB ub 2001 -JO 

EFT S-?- 2^ MH -10 

May N.T. N.T. 2420 — 5 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2430 — _ 5 

Sea N.T. NX 2440 — —5 

Dec N.T. N.T. 22BC _ 

O f. 10 tp ra._Prav. actuctf 
solas. II tots, open failmst: 797 

COFFEE 

French francs per 10S kg ~ 

S#P N.T. NX 1470 1418 —4 nt 

Nov N.T. NX — 1470 +20 34 

Jan N.T. N.T. 1470 — +5 £ 

Mor NX N.T. 2412 2440 +£ £ 

Mar NX N.T. 2725 _ +15 37 

Jly N.T. NX 2644 — -MS £ 

Sen N.T. H.T. 2440 — Uach. 5 

Ea tvoL: B tots U S ton s. Prev. ocfuol safes: 1 
tma. on«n imansi: 395 Isf 

Sourer: Boonedo Commorca. £* 


London Metals 


D.\I liitiires 
Options 

». Germ* Msn -J2UM aorta. cv*s NT * 


t Ug Me Mar She ok 

735 294 in ’gig |B 

UO 230 275 M7 857 

M 14 U U6 Kf 

U UR 3 U U) 

804 074 172 U* 204 

- M US - - 

toW vet 291 1 

: rn. vaL 27*7 mm let. M44r 
:FrLMiUOBraraSLmm 




t S&P 10p 
Index Options 


pam«ddtnx^ifftnh3I. W&J 



Please erter my subsaipiion fen 

a■ □ 12 months □ 6morths □ 3 months 

(+ 1 mar* free) l+2vweksfi«] (+1 week free) 

jf □ Mychedcbendased 

Please charge my: □ Access □ American Eqpress □ DtnenOub 

1 3 □ Gurecord □ Mcaterard □ Viso 

FinIwpryHffr ggryenm 

r^l L„:ci„l Qjrdaaxmrtf 

number i — i — i — i — i — i — i — i — i — i — i — i — i — i — i — i — , 


4341 

m °y- 


20-8-85 


jw[ 

dm 

sbI 


K VACATION INSTRUCTIONS 

Iwflbetrovefingfrom — 

130 ^PleoMl^u^lerld^1ysubKripHondurir5m)rabs8r»adexlB^d^cfafeof«ph2Sonoc^xdngly , . 
□I'MXid^lBhcj^fhepopersenftomyvaaTfmnoddreapeQseendcaeinslnjdbrB). 


EXTRA 

i _ 71 10-1 9^13 

INCREASED 

Q M M3 97 
INITIAL 

Q 4214 10-T MS 
Q .n ID-1 9-6 

STOCK SPLIT 

Hors* of South — MoM 

USUAL 

g 43 10-1 9-17 
fl .10 9-13 870 
S 70 9-16 800 
Q 44 MO 94 

8 75 9-S 9-6 

77 9-14 MS 

8 76 10-1 9-U 

§ $$ W 

g .is n-i mo 

5 48 947 9-12 

8 JB 974 94 
.14 10-1 M 
Q .18 10-10 9-» 
O 46 10-10 NO 
Q .15 14-25 HM 
Q 63 10-1 M 
fi 7 9-15 8-38 
S 33 10-1 M 
□ 73 10-31 9-23 


Treasury 


ILK. MjmnffiM’iimiig Pay 

Reisers 

LONDON — British manufac- 
turing-pay raises have remained 
fairly steady, the Confederation of 
British Industry said Monday. 
Through the first seven months of : 
the year, settlements averaged 
raises of 6J percent, unchanged 
from the average for the first and 
second quarters. But the spread of 
settlements has been wide, from 
raises of under 15 percent to more 
than 10,5 percent. 


Xerox Is introdbemg 

New Coinptiter Stations 

Hewers 

LOS ANGELES — Xerox Carp, 
said Monday that Xerox Artificial 
Intelligence Systems has intro- 
duced two computer woctstatioor 
that win hdp expand artificial In- 
telligence applications in the com- 
merdal sector. 

Artificial intelligence tedmotegy 
enables a computer to display bo* 
man-like reasoning powers, allow* 
ing the machines to hdp people 
perform complex task? jgd) ss tax 
and investment p lanning ml n y a fi 
cal diagnosis, xexox said. 


French Production FaBs 

tram 

PARIS — French industrial pro* 
dnetkm fell a provisksial L5 
cent in June alter a confifmed .L5 
percent rise in Max. the National 
Statistics Institute said. Tte i 
fell DR percent between June 
and June 1985. . . 


















































Page 13 • 


- > 






Se 




; fg »CY MAR KETS 

* Dollar Mixed 




: .. 






-~x. . 

Vi 




' ^ dollar was 

Monday on European 

iS* P^^quar- 

tng Iwforc Tuesday’s revSeT^. 

Smu 1^S? d ' q!wrter SKWhSi 
thelLS.gross rnmcmal product 

dealers desaibed trad- 
mg as quiet and trendless. 

^D^krs iii. London said the dol- 
hff:traded,i5tody in a ladcW 

ch ^S 1 2.^D«iSte 

marks, up from Friday’s 2.7519. 
.Tie pound finished at $1.40 in 
*f“Jan, up from Friday’s close of 

SlJ993 k 


® Quiet Trading in Europe 


fames, down from TJ.S. economic growth, the dealers 


qac* -- — ‘“buw, uuwu ihhii u.s. 

53^ at 25608 Swiss francs, said. 

<town from 12635. The market needs worse than 

Hie pound was firmer against 

the Deutsche mait in iS down to 170-mark level, a 
^ang at 3.867^annpared1riS hank dcate saii lie said fect- 

Fnday’g 3.8508. UwSaeady “® wa fi d ? ^ 

aganm the Swiss franc, ending at but a technical correction could be 

3.1633 from Friday’s 3.1625. C du £.,. , . 

tv . “With more people squaring up 

sealers saw nothing ^jectaoilar short positions we might get a reac- 
was expected from rither the GNP tion theother way,” he said. 

theFbderal ^?^/ s , m ^ tillg Dealers su'd U.S. economic data 


rcfcaod Monday, showing a 0.4- 
tet ^^emaricetexpans a dechnc ra r^ai increase in JuhTra both 

toome tradTspendra* 

cent to IS percent from 1.7 per- CL. k,„ 


^ Ime. trading in other markets 
m Eurt^e, the dollar was at 17647 
p M. uprightly from 1763 Friday- 


cent ^T 11 ^ —-Ef' were uninspiring but could have 

SS? d tK^^^ th D eCOnmi . t ' given thedollar slight support. 

^y t^ Sral ReSOT,eS to Tokyo, toe doDor dosod 
uiouemiy poucy. . 236^0 Japanese yen, almost un- 

The dollar probably will fall if rtwraEpH from 237 yen Friday, 
the figures indicate a slowing in (Ratios. AP) 


Taman Boosts 
US. Investment 


Reuters 

TAIPEI — Taiwan's Eco- 
nomics Ministry announced on 
Monday that it has adopted 
new measures to encourage di- 
rect investment in the United 
States. 

lerTwu^el^sun. said that the 
measures, including simplified 
procedures and easier access to 
foreign exchange, are part of 
the government's efforts to re- 
duce Taiwan's balance-of-pay- 
menis surplus with the United 
States. 

Taiwan's direct investment in 
the United States totaled $20 
million in the first seven 
months of this year, compared 
with SIS millio n in the same 
period last year, be said. 


'Sugar Group’ Seeks More Access to U.S. Market 

Latin , Caribbean Nations Have One Crop to Sell and Only One Place to Sell It 


By Joanne Omang 

Washington Post Senna 

Washington —Ten Central 


and the only export of several small 

-■ * • ■ " -w-. — * They are trying, with U.S. hdp, 
to start other crops and industries, 
but island soils are thin and new 


nations. 


Texas. The State Department is 
backing the idea. 

Th c mechanism would bring in 


THE EUROMARKETS 


_ GATTNears 



lie Again Grabs Attention A Deadline 


(Continued from Page 9) 


World suear prices hit bottom in cause of lack of vision at this ume, 
"swnuiuiv/n — ibimhuu iiuim wgw _ . • « 

American and Caribbean nations May at 15 cents a pou nd , ma kin g it he saw. 
have formed a “Sugar Group" to cheaper to bum sugar cane than in addition to °pposmg further 
try to crack the USsugar market harvest iu The price reflects a glut quota reductions, the CB1 nations 
in what they say is a desperate of sugar subsidized by the Europe- have proposed a new way into the 
effort to save their economic and an Community in a market sudden- U.S. market that would require no 
social structures from crombUng. ly smaller because of U 5. impart legislative action, avoiding cot- 
In a letter July 10 to Secretary of fees and quotas designed to protect frontation with congressional den 
State George P. Shultz, ambasss- U.S. com and sugar growers. fenders of the sugar growers in 
dors of the countries proposed a The CBI Sugar Group is plead- Louisiana, Florida^ Hawaii and 
solution to the “severe crisis" they mg for broader access to US. con- 
said has followed a crash in world sumers, now paying 21.75 cents a 
sugar prices and the steady dosing pound for raw sugar. So far, the 
of the U.S. sugar market to im- CBI nations have had no luck, 
ports. In fact, the United States is mov- 

The situation, they wrote, has ing steadily toward self-sufficiency 
had “a devastating impact" and “is in sweeteners, and quota levels are 
beginning to affect the political and expected to be reduced this year, 
social stability of the region and U.S. imports from the CBI Sugar 
will become untenable unless it is Group have declined from an aver- 
remedied promptly." age of 1.6 million tons a year be- 

The request will force the Rea- tween 1977 and 1981 to an es rim at- 
gan a dminis tration to choose be- ed 594,000 ions this year. They 
tween its desire to help Central were valued at $686 million in 
America and its need to please 1981, at S501.7 million in 1983 and 
powerful domestic com and sugar at $250 million this year, 
interests, which strongly oppose Gilberto Goldstein, presideni of 


factories require the expenditure of 
money the governments do not 
have. 

“In the Caribbean, you need hur- 
ricane-proof crops, and there are 
only two: sugar cane and arrow* 
root," a starchy plant used Hke po- 
tatoes, said Richard Holwill, depu- 
ty secretary of state for 

the Caribbean. 

One other option, is marijuana. 


an extra 1J million tons of Carib- ^ said, noting that "the argument 
bean sugar, but only to be made ^ made that you can expect a 
into syrup — thus co mpe ring not c htf r from sugar to marijuana on 

■ i ,1n_ w niifl, nunptmert - i i.:il ,1 . m.u 


with U.S sugar, but with sweeteners idamk if you kill the cane 

made from U.S. com, called high pn ai - k(»t " 

fructose corn syrup. U.S. growers are unmoved. 

Corn syrup at 12 cents to 15 “We recognize the political and 
cents a pound is cheaper than U.S. economic reality of their situa- 
sngar, but well above the world tion," said Alan Tank, speaking fra 
price. It has gradually replaced sug- the National Comgrowers Assoda- 
ar in many manufacturing uses, no- tion. “We just say their problem 
tably in soft drinks, to the chagrin should not be laid on the back of 
of U.S. sugar producers. domestic com growers and refin- 

Bnt the market for it appears to ers, especially at a time when agri- 


r 1UIIUU LUUU^aiUUO. JT UbU M UU w UlC nUUUUKU JUgOi HVUUWiaiw ^ ; J ~ L t 

Monetary Fund, expected before SepL 15^11* dead- sodauou. told a Georgetown Uni- ing to Agriculture also opposed 


By Peter Conradi Ford had launch ed a qmilar 25- JOOVi, was the only other new-issue 

t mnvttr Reuun billion-yen issue, also paying 8 per- activity out of London. It was led 

LONDON — Attention in the cent a year over 10 years, July 25, by Deutsche Bank ~ ’ ” 

mark ets centered Monday an a fur- bat bond market sources said kets. 

thoryen doal-curraicy issue, a 25- Monday’s issue was not a refinano- Rises of 0.4 percent in U.S. July .7- . , , . . . .. tA 

WBon-yen, 10-ycar i^Kfor Ford mg of the first. personal income and spending an- aware of his limits, said he codd ample of the increasing dashes be- the CBI countries were pot aMe to 

- - - nounced Monday wereinUne with only act as “the honest and unbi- tween U.S. domestic industries and meet payments on foreign obhga- 


theH^^PtSSs ^ be^ra> samrai^accord- is gpbg thrmigh a tremen. 



Motor Credit Cxx, the frnmriTip 
unit of Ford Motor Co. of the Unit- 


Well after the market dosed, an nounced Monday 

.. . . expected second dual-currency is- expectations 

ec states. In most yen doal-cuiren- sue emerged in the form of a 20- on markets, 
cy issues, the subscription price billion-yen, 10-year bond for the : 


proposaL 

^ come in with a cheaper 

Instead, they said, imported cane product than com syrup, there are 
svnm would challenge about 20 stffl a number of people using sugar 
3 * - - ’ • who would switch to sugar syrup. 


espectarions ana had little effect ased broker who his govern- foreign-policy goals, particularly in tioos. ip import goods and services percent of ^ rf Sd ^al 

SSf ^n^oattodrd&ccs^ ndc. - «art.«r Icvd, or » *• T 



_je Dealers said they were awaiting tries to keep them from becoming As impoverished foreign nations rise of imemployment. total U.S. com proauctio^om^ Cane Leaeue, which represents 

■fBR£5E55M^rt 


yen, but the p ri ncipal is repaid in priced at par and with an 8-per- 


U.S. dollars. 


m." debts by selling in the U.S. market, that the area, wiucii is 01 Daac otner opiums, diuuk 

_ cent-a.year coupon. era expecura uuu me *«««, n* u 5. move has been support- American businesses fed threat- interest to the national securit y of nations have nothing to sell but m Louisiana. 

The usual August holiday lull Tiw wi rnanatwr naiwa Fn- be revised down to a 1J to 1.6 ed by Japan, Canada and all mem- ened by less expensive foreign 

od lack of major US. data were rope LtSdSe&Sa total P**? 1 bers of 


gross national product data, 
ere expected that the figure would 


mea- 


to H point higher, in line with the current yen/ dollar rate is about 
US. debt market Floating-rate 238. 


vices. 

Dealers said the GNP data 
would have to be way out of line 


A Strategy for Hedging Long-Term Risks 

NDX point Mods w» .Dow te UMOpuB udM 


notes ended unchanged to ud 3 . . would have to be way out 01 une that services, and not just me trauc lraI Amenca and the Caribbean, been the pattern in recent months, close, the NUX moex stooa ai puis, oaacw uu 

nores^enoeu unenangeo 10 up a mimh sm^ra 30-mlhOT-Am- ^ expectations to have an effect m gpods, should now be placed created the Caribbean Basin Ini tia- step would be to ere- 2l7.l8.Thus.thebedgeisrelativdy ues. The premuims can be mva ted 

j ualian-dollar bond iot UtB rir A . t Ua vnartni iha /^att nmhnrfla. tiv^ in iojf) flnH rKp iirkcnn Plan ^nncAnrathw nnlv 30 noinis TOOTC in moncy-DiEAcl funds lo cam a 




does not move sig- 
r the next seven 
the rails or the puts 

Aatmntni Tamm F aB In lima* V* .**.• ,u ‘ r 14 short of the maiomy requires umcc nave pomeu miumcui ui um- struct the upper range ana sen a po^oiio hedged against a violent exercised bv the buyers and 

Uulpatm Japan kewm June activity m the nuonung, that maybe .. hons of dollars m economic aid, 210 NDX out to set our ower leveL ^ now but v ^ lU oe exerpseaoy me uu^cisauu 

LZe the market will react" H °wever, Colombian ^ arrangements and other con- Sch SlOdon bond ZSnSiSm fi? 

after a week that saw the issue of a TOKYO - Industrial prodne- Tuesday’s delegate to cessioils mX ° ^ rcgiorL portMo would require the sale of ^.,SJ^S^^te^ioves," he 

S3 of .90 biffioo yen of «« * ™ ^000 NDX c^.and U»f«- ^ ^ wiU he exercised, but to. prcrcuuu 


changed 
The non callable, 8-percent Ford 
issue, priced at 100 11/16, came 
after a week that saw the issue of a 


V let Committee; although ljj“tyto K&MSddbe vin^llTnega.ed by rcdpieutf ’ iu effrc, he has s« a 7-poim 

aaaswwfi — 


said. 


and other losses would be covered 


Dahra Europe Ltd. mute'iasued Monday. pone trcdmg Monday. 


month. 


main cash crop, a major employer 


floor for the NDX, which is eqrnva- Moreover, the portfolio man^or by the gains on the puts that were 
lent to 105 points on the Dow (one would earn a premium of $1 1 5,®0 sold, and vice ver sa, Mr. Lapp said. 



Monday^ 



Prices 


NASDAQ Prices ds of 

S wn. Now York tlmo. . 

Via The , Associated Press 


i 


55 


hjl 

HUm Low Shu* 


ptem 




HM 


Nit 

L am SPJ*.CWVt 


IM » CcMwnk 
lAUi M Cartert 
71% 71* CotBIfil 

lift » Cencor* 

35Vi 71% CittrBc 1J0 

WVk B Cwleor 

57 32V2 C ’lBcp ZDSb M 

TP*. OiBJhS 132 A2 
31 Vh 15=V. CFdBfc» J4 M 
**% 74 Centron JO 2 3 
gVi m Cmtitk 
T5tV M Catw 
SMi 3Vx anPEn 

21Vi wa ChrmS* 

21 Kt TIM. ChkPnt 
11 - 54k CtikTcti 
3141 21 CHIMB 
TH ntCiwim 
15V. BBS'-a MVE 
tv, m cnraii 
Wi cnipaci 


— v. 


im ii it 

UM 12% 13 

B it. iaw tow 
vx nw nvs 
M 32W 32W 

17V. 17W- W 
- 56W + W 


ZUm live Equal 
U* 5W EqtOII 
45% 26 va ErtcTi 
24W 11 EvnSut 
16W 3W Exovlr 


11W 11W nw + H 

7 7 7 — W 

27W 2Mfc 27 — W 
10W 17W 17*% 

Pt M Hk 


30 1.1 


30 17 


.12 1J 


r 

11W 6W 

im w% 



*VS 




44 
U 
... 1.9 
M 35 
JD 42 


40 2-1 

Si 


>. 


10 11 AOCTi 

18V. UW AELs 
TOV. 14W AFO 
25 irn ASK 

23 14 AnmRt 

1» 4 A COdln 

11Vt aw Aoa*rhi 

i* 7 S£« 

si rss 

SW 3 Anqutm 
17W UW Anwh 
14W VWAIrMd 
1B% 706 AJrWbe 

39W 27W AlyxB 

24 13W Afftr 

ITU «% AlBOTMt 
24W 1«6 AJWVOT 
22W 15V. Allafl Bv 


20 


M 


2 
14 
«7 
1371 
112 
62 24M 
146 
1J 266 
128 
MV 
111 
210 

JO 45 12 

.lto j a 
140 35 346 

Jl 

StiS “ 

JK 35 1^ 

S 

347 

40 27 55 

109 

t 2 

* U £ 

■*,” 4? 

JO 2J « 
J8 U 306 
J U 41 
■* 301 

2 

1JS an 160 


714 

4W 

34M 

15 

6 

216 


1J2 M 




11W 5V. AgMic 

14V6 6W Alt oa 

am i3w 

17V, 4W AWAIrl 

» ACon*. 

30W 16 AFltK* 

uv. aw AminLf 
1ZW 5W AMoont 
sfW I5W AMS 
W* 25 ANH« 

3Vi APItrG 
W AQuoan 
ia» asoccp 
7W AmSfti 
1W Mow 

2)u V? ASti .U , aj, i A 

44W 23W Arm ITT a 140 46 
SS 1314 Amrwsf 
Ift -3J6 AjnQW u 

2914 16W AmSKB *S 

S2 14V. Anwod* 40 22 
I ai. 9 AftlOBlC 
15W 7% Arwrw • 

30V1 T7 A nwry 
WW 6W AP0066 
30V, 1614 ApoloC 
31W MW AOfS5. 

27W 11W ApIBIal 
19W 10V. ApWCm 
34 20 ApHW* 

in B ApMSIr 
7W 3W Archil* 

2ZW 15V, AWST 
32W I7W ArttB 
o aw ArW 

o 54% Astrosy 
22V. 12*4 Altar 
27 12W AJlAlJl 

25 AtlnlBC 
7W AHnFd 
BV, AM Fin 
194% AWRes* 

3W AIS»Ar s 
15 AtwdOc 

6 AiMTrT 
5W Autmftc 
414 AnxMO 
W AiManj 
6 AwntGr 
25W I7W 

20 MW a w 22L, 

2M 13W AWOJGP 
044 4 A*1CM 


.M 


5 
203 

31 
116 
41 
107 
60 
2 
247 
26 

6 

121 
1 

462 

1930 


JOb 2 S 


37S 

101 

544 

11 

38 

24 

482. 

Jl 


.12 1J g 


43W 

MW 

14 
29 
21W 
20 . 

15 
14 

9W 

1314 

2SW 


M XI 

40b 1A 
.90 23 


1 


BB 

96 

11 

5 

19 

11 

37 

41 

74 

2 

121 

182 

12 

15 

% 

54 

3 


1716 1744 174% + 14 

fclftkfrg 

2TO 2114 IT*- W 
4W 2J% JV.— W 

24W wt 

iSw « 

, S liw & 

14V% 14 14 

36 36 + 14 

MW MW 2BW- W 
5V, 4» 4*— 14 
1BV. 17V, T7W— W 
184* UM 18W — W 

iS£ iSt iSi + w 
13i im w* 

10 10 IB + w 

12* 1144 11W - v% 

cf-hs 

» MW MW- V. 
33 31* 31ft— ft 

IMk 12ft 1^ 

TUi 7 7Ui + Jfc 
2M 23Wi 23V»— ^4 

’St 

*5 

M W » - ft 

“ft ! u T t* V ‘ 

34W 34W 34ft + W 

sgg"; 

B“ 3S 

T !S! K=.* 

6ft » sft— ft 
Sv. 30* 31ft + ^ 

SiB V 2 

55 »*r55 

MW MW_ft 

sr si» 

Sft 20ft 21ft 


I 


iro**» 

12ft M ' 

444* 23ft 
34ft 14ft 

12ft 6 „ 

714 4 -Clrcon 
23ft 15ft CtxSOo 

3514 22 enna 

4BW 27V. CtlUtA 
38ft 24 CJzUtB i^j, J- 
141% 9 CItvFeil JO 2J 
29 22ft CtvMO, JBb 3.1 
28ft 22ft ClorlcJ JB 36 

S5S3SS»iiu 

18ft 4ft CltWjns 

17ft 12W CowtF 

20ft 9 Cot»Lb 
4a 24W CocaBtl — 


m ’j*- » 


,,ft i^cow. 


5ft 1% COOMilc 
25ft 14ft cammta 
6ft Zft CoMR 
15ft Oft Cofcwcn 
6ft 4 CollllU 


55 ^5 Sr™ 


LI Ac IjQO 


15ft 

30 

131% 

Sft 

lift 


JB 


8ft 

BV> 

1014 

19W 

lift 

a 

im% 

946 

27 


.12 


21ft 15 CotoNt 

12ft 4ft Comori 

30 ft n comest a .12 

15ft 10W Comdln .14 
Sft lft Conritol 
43ft 29 Comwe 2.10 
43 22ft CrnoaU 1J4 
T3V» 9ft CmlSJir JOf 
7W 11% ConiAm 

30ft 16W Com I«1 M 
U 7ft Com57I 
24 12- CmpCOa 

lift 3V. Compaq 
2SW ISft CmpCra J2 
4ft MBCgmPUl 
BftCCTC 
15W CrnoAs 
9V4 CdlPjM 
3ft CrtEnt 
4W CmptH 
4 CmMcm 
5ft CRlffLR 

Zft CinptM 
Sft CmpMa 
9ft CmT ski 

414 CmPUtn 

lft Cbtcft 
6 Camstir 
4 Cancptl 

_ lift enCap BJOl 
18ft 14ft CCapR 168, 
2*ft 21ft CCopS MJ 
54ft 32V. OlP»* 1^ 
Sft 3ft ConsPd JB 
9ft 3 Consul 
18ft BW CtlHn a 
8 .4 CtUW 

16ft 4ft Convot 
23 IM Corrvrso 
7 IS CoprBta 
21ft 13W CoorsB 60 
41ft UM CcmfW 
lift 6ft Cortl* 

mm ssft const ana 

5 11% CorvuS 

7ft 3W Cgmo 

23ft lift CaUBrl 

161% 10ft CraHH 

^awer-Tr 


.14 1J 


JO IS 


71W 2U« . y. 14ft 9 CwnBk 

I5W If 4 VP* * ft 33ft 1BW CulInPr 
6 * ft aft IS., Cuihirn 


a +y*\ 


6W Sft 
7W 4W 
6«, 

.jft ft 

2ZW Si ?«£ 


17ft Cvcars 


... ... -J + W 

40W 40ft 40ft— V% 

’ss ’a*-* 

A sSw ^-w 

311% 31ft 31ft 
39 MM IBM „ 

35ft 3S 35 —ft 

14ft Uft 14ft— ft 
2BW MW 28W + ft 
2414 23ft 24ft + W 
UM IBft 18ft— W 
18 18 18 — W 

17ft W* 17 — W 
16ft 1H% 151%— W 
19ft 19W 19W— ft 
48 47V% 47ft— ft 

IM 14W 171% 

Ann 

isr i=s 

'lft 'sw 'lft— w 

ssssigs 

191* 19 IM + 1% 
12W 11W lift 
18 17W 17ft — W 

um wife iov%— 1% 

391% W% 391%— Vb 
421% 42 421% + ft 

ifc ^ “ft-t 
V-Jl 

2«% am + ft 

'85S T ’SJSJJt 

no* nw nw— i% 

9ft 9 9ft 

aft ti% a +w 
% 

’m% iBft ^ + w 

n% n% m + ^ 

7* «% S%- w 

ifr; 

¥ ^ 'a-j 

9 Bft E%— ft 

% ny; 

& £ g-Q 

27ft 27ft 27ft— ft 

jrasagft ^ 
S* »»“* 


1.12 IB 
.72 as 
US 14 


UB 46 
I.12B14.7 


60b 16 
JO X0 


5 FM1 

... lft Font Rest 
BW 13ft FormF 
681% 44W FrmG 1J6 
73V, 121% 

8ft 4ft Faroflu 
I7ft 7 Flbran a 
34ft 1M% Fldters 1.32 
56 33V. FlfttlTS 160 

37ft 21ft FlBBlo 68 
IBft 1ZM Flftrtk 
6ft 3W Ftnoioo 
9ft Sft Finsnw 
14ft 4V, Rnloan 

33 M FAloBk 
aw 23 FtAFIn 
MW 22 FIATn 
19 lift FtCOlF 
29ft 20ft FComr 

91% 7ft FlCmU 
aft ISft FDaMR 
15ft 9W FEuc, 

28ft 10 FFtfCal 
26V. 141% FFFIM 
29ft >4 FIFUCP 
IBft 10ft FIFflMa , 4 
SOW 19ft FIFIBk 60 14 
34ft Z7ft FJorm 1J0 SJ 
66 251% FMdB 160 2J 

42ft 20ft FMTCIna 160 4J 

34 UM FKtSup 

40ft 25ft FRBGo 
30 18ft FISvRa 
26 17W FlSecC 

421% 261% FTmiNI 
44ft 291% FltUnC 

Bft 31% FlafcBV 
16W 12 FleicJ 
21ft 13ft FIOFdl 

411% 25ft FlaNFI 

19ft 7ft Flaws a 
16ft 10W Flunocb 
6ft 2ft FtHWh 
1BW 101% FUonA 
19V. 10ft FUon B 

341% 22W For Am 
24ft ISft FotbsKJ 1J0 
aw 12W FortnF 
4 iS Forms 
10ft 51% Forom 
Bft 41% Faster 
29ft 14ft Fremnl 
151% 6 Fud «* 

16ft lift FulrHB 


115 
110 
950 
209 
287 
55 
732 

to 
2 

31 . 

418 
3 

1*6 
266 
7 
9 
721 

53 
1 

54 
57 

MO 
50 
2 
11 
913 
9 

106 
II 
98 
86 

19 8 

25 116 

4J mix 
4J) 25 

» 

88 

S tt 4 

JO 2.1 137 

J4 1J 310 
159 

JO S 59 
.07 A 39 
.96 10 1 

“ 69 

105 

J6b 6 787 

.10 2.1 7 

48 1J l S 

32 U U 


1J8 

JO 

1.10 

160 

1.12 


91% 9W 9W + » 
29% 2V. 2W — ft 

MW 13ft 14W 
61ft 41 4IW ^ 
18 17W 17W— ft 

Sft Sft 5ft— W 
17ft 171% 17W 
29ft 29ft 29ft + ft 
MW 52ft 52W + W 
35 35 35 — W 

15ft 15W 15W 
4ft 4ft 4ft— ft 
4ft 6ft 4W 
13ft 13 13 — 

29ft WW 29V. — ft 
» 29 29 

371% 37W 37ft 
IBft T7ft 18 
7J 27 73 

7ft 7ft 7ft 
31W. 30ft 31 
13ft 13ft 13ft + ft 
» 26ft 71 + W 

24ft 24ft 241% + ft 
26ft 26 26W + ft 

17ft 17ft 17ft — W 
281% 271% 271* 

ITS | +ig 

35 34W 35 +ft 

MW 23ft 235% + W 
38 37ft 37ft 
27W 27 27ft — ft 

a 22ft a + ft 

40ft 40W 40 W— W 
38ft 38W 38W 

4W 4 4 

13 12W 13 + W 

MW 191% 19W— 1 
MW 38 M — W 
181% 181% IBft + W 
161% 16W I4W 
4V% 4W 4W— W 
17W 17 17W 

1719 17ft 171% 
aw aw 32ft— w 
18ft 181% IBM + ft 


21W 21W 2] ft ^ 


2 lft lft _ 

91% 9ft 9W— 1% 

41% 4ft 4ft 

25 25 25 + ft 

EM 8 £% + ft 

16 * 151* 151* 


121% 31% GTS 
16ft 9ft Galileo 
111% 61* OamaB 
56 V. Mft Genetch 
Bft 5 Goners 
12 ZW Genox 
744% 7ft GaFBfc 
Msw dft GerMda 
341% 121% GlbsG* 
2tw 14 GtaaTr 
16W 12W C-otOOS 
17W 9ft GOTT 
18W 14W GouWP 

15W 10W Groeo 

9ft 5ft Gitaitre 
7V. Gropni 
4 GrphSc 
Bft GW5ov 
8 Gtedl 
13W Gwllfrd 


181% 

9W 

72 

15ft 

19 

15ft 


.10 

I A 

M 

10 

33 

> JM 

IJ 

119 

2733 

56 

542 

24 

J4 

IJ 

411 

3 

1041 

15 

346 

JA 

4J 

M 

3J 

17 

Mr 

2J 

17 

44 

1506 

12 

1200 c 


1105 

9 

19 


41% 4W 4V% — W 
12 lift lift 
7ft 7W 7W 
49V, *9 49V, + W 

7N> 7ft 7ft + 1% 
21% 2ft 24% 

23ft aw 23V. 

7ft 71% 7ft + ft 
30ft 19ft a + w 
16M 16U 16W 
13ft 131% I3W 
161% 16ft 16ft— W 
17V. 17 17 

141* 1419 14ft 
7W 7W 7W— V, 
17ft 171% 171% 

71% 7 71% — W 

iiv% i3ft + v. 

15W 141* l«* 

15ft 151* ISft 


H 


30 1J 


.10 6 
160 56 
.101 U 
.141 


.11 



.90 SJ 


1J4I 93 
J0O 2-5 


1X2 ** 


51W 39ft BBDO 230 
20 7V% BRCom 

22W Ml? 

nii, tto g®»» s 2J0 23 
T » eKy “ »’ 

IJtt 9W Bonlnrl 
1BW liw ■“ 

tow tfW Borpnu 
13W 6 BlTnA 

15W 7 Boawn 

H, * 2S1 2 W « 

* aS ■* “ 

hh% ,5w 

5 im* 

iw 

ssasf 

4W Bk»0i 
1W Bl oarc 
61% BkifcR 
5 Birdinc 
hu J4W BOOtBH 

B lift 

--- 6ft BoNTC 
11 BOStBC 
4% BJtgJ? 

9ft MfrSS 
Sft B rOOCP 
31* Bronco 
lft ftrwTWn 
B Brunoi 
31ft 16 BuWJrt' 

20ft 16W gnUW» 

22W 15 BurfSc 
91% 3 BusinW 


U 

BW 

15W 

TO 

iew 

BW 

KM 

11 


taw 

n 

nw 

23V, 

16 

7ft 

5W 

161% 


,59 4 3 
JOB 1-S 
M 15 

n v 


JOeU 


11 
7 
1 

26 

201 

163 

6 

2 

31 i 

IS 

10 

13 

20 

41 

10 

JSS 

’ll 

63 

% 

"A 

IS 

68 

109 

10 

453 

12 


.12 U 


1W 


* * 

fCCis 
b i it: 

UM » 

1“2 122 16ft- 4% 

H ,ss 

Haags-* 

^ ai-» 

™ S* 

1 1 tel 

** J£Z a+v. 

f*£Ti 

27 “P 5 + W 
S J* 2 §W + * 
^5 rtV* % 

» ?£ ” + h 


171% 7 DBA 

3DW 13 DSC 
37V, 20ft gotarSy 
29ft 16ft DotasF 
7W 4M nmnDki 
106 B3 D nrtGP 
229% n Dctcrd ■ 
14W W. 

9U 3M DTSwtcti 

am ii 

5W 3 Dtasm 
BW 44% Datum 

mS M* iSShi 


3D 


Si %%%? 

5ft 2W Dtaaenc 
19 io Dlceaii 
lift 6 0\cmae 
30W 1JV, DWCm 
ink ft Ovtooo 
7W 31% DOOfCH 
29ft 149% mvCg 1 
361* 2T1* Dmnu. 
ST mw DoyIDB 
MW 9W Oran** 
i5 9ft Drexlr 

19*6 nw rnwGr 
i«w rajgjSo*. 

MW 9W Dixinxi 
15ft 91* DWFlIs 
6W 3WDVJ»» 
358* i6W Dynienc 


J2 


53 

3878 

4578 

11 

24 

.1 15 

U P 

533 

52 

13 

2 

12 

^ 3W 

m a 

253 

60 


J4 W 


lS w 
SelJ 


248 

5 

40 

2T9 

o 

212 

5 

39 

UB 

235 

82 

152 

396 

225 

325 


Sft 51% 3W 
'?V ’l9W + 

T « ’St-S 

^vl ^w ^w + w 

JE jsgt# 

if 'ST a 

13W 13W lg% 

aSt a aw 

231* 22ft a — J* 
aw 32ft ■!?»-£ 
Sft 22ft 23 “ W- 

FftKS 

Ik-. 

«ft % 1 St + * 

28 271 % « + «■ 


24W 15V% HBO 

2046 12 Hobor 
KM 3W HOdca 
jw 2 Hobson 
lft W HnleSyn 
19 124% HomOII 

34ft 23W HrHKl 
low 5W HOtlTwe 
14W 61* KawKB 

121% 11* HltBln 
5ft 11% HltMvn 
231% 14 HcMAS 
341% 141% HcJWBl 
9 3W HetefiT 
37ft 21 W He«x 
38ft aft HemdF 
244* 191% HlberCP 1 JOB 62 
13ft 9 HK*om 
14 31% HOBOn 

29ft 9V. HmFAJ 
13 4ft Hmecft 
as 15ft Honlnd 
30ft 224% Hoovor 
6ft 3W Honlnd 
28V, I2U. HwBNJ 

2Bft 18W HufliJB 

MW 7ft Hnmin 
211% 14W HntBB * 

291% 12W Hvbrltc 
111% 4ft Hyponx 
11W 5ft HviekM 


796 
13 
5 

24 
20 
60 
90 
12DX 
31 
7 
89 
3V 
36 
54 
211 
5 
13 
3 
42 
541 
119 
48 
571 
29 
317 
1 

* ” J 

17 

V 


.92 2 3 


M 

120 


J5e 3 


20 *% 201 % 201 % 

19ft 19W 194* 

4W 4Vk 4W 
31% 24% 2W 

ft ft ft 
16W 161% 16ft 
29ft 29W 29ft + W 
84% BW Sft + ft 

Bft a b — ]% 

2W 2W 2W— w 

A 1% + S 

T* 'k ‘5ft + w 

224* aft 22ft 
33ft 33ft 33ft f W 
24W 231* 24 + to 

9ft 9W 9ft — W 
4ft 44% 4ft 
29ft 2B«% 29W + W 

M S4W 25 +ft 
2B*% MW MW — ft 

am M-i 

23W 23W 23V%— W 
13 12W 13 + ft 

23ft 23 a 
39 ft 27W 28ft — J* 
10W 10W 10W + W 
7W 7W 7W 


,12 1J 


.16 W 


lift If* Jf*— W 

30ft 30.. Rv 


3 as*" 1 


,| 2 e 1J 



9W 

WU 

Uft 

21 

TOW 

12ft 

«W 


6 CCOB 

44% CPB"*’ 
CMl- 
14 CPI 
5ft CPT 
A CSP 

^ 2ft cai siyo 

s 2V» CnlftfiP 

ijw sft C#*v -. 

uw n c arum* 

5ft sft coreerc 


651 M 


.16 W 


o Sr -5 
W XI 


11 

44 

7 

51 

55 

74 

305 

704 

5 

M 

148 

48 

40 


7V* 79* 5% 

i phT*l 

3 S3.-* 

w *1” 41% 

3 1 SJis 


ir’KIS™ 

'sft l EMrijr, 

am 'fa. 11 

E »«8T ,3< 

6 11« I™ 

jS 7W Elan 
12ft 81% EM** 

'§* ’Sft 


WB IM 


.16 U 


m ,^-wi 

»v* ^ w 
ig » + ^ 


jm 12ft Elcftnt 

S 

i, 2ft Endto 
Ufa 5W EndvfB 

JSX 4 En«?U 
36^ ’Sft E"gW 
==-■ ■ 7ft EnFaa 
BW EnOpB* 


JO u 


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374 

190 

91 

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139 

75 

4 
109 
569 
143 
730 

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413 

107 

46 

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10 10 18 —ft 

ft ft &zl 

^ 33* »% + ft 

9W 9W 9W 

t « sns 

7% 7ft 7ft- W 

t ir P=b 

12 11 W lift— ft 
iow 9ft low +1 
SS 7ft m + ft 

74* 7W 7Vt 
4 4 4 +«. 

Hi 6ft Sft + W 
12 lift Uft- ft 
2M* 30ft Mft + ft 
15W «ft JSft „ 
15ft 15 15W— ft 

in* nw lift— w 


101* TV* ILC 

304% 16W IMS* .16 J 

141% 7W ISC 

7 3ft leaf 
10W 4ft linunex 

71* 3W inaanp 

461* 29ft incHN 1A0 4J 
a 20 InfORsc 
341* 14W Inftm 
118% 31% I mean 
15 Bft InfrPv 
4ft 3 IntvGen 
231% 14W 1SSCO 
371% 22W Inlal 
U 4ft IntlSy. 

JW lft imrTel 
15ft 3ft Wtmd 
1» 5V. InMvnh 

16*% 4W InmFir .16 1.1 
35W 22W inlophs 
18ft 4V% Intrawn 
22V. 131% intmec 
1SW Sft infrmtr 

23 W low imam 

191% Bft I Game 
251% isu intKina > 
Uft 7ft InlLM* 

4ft InMOBU 
ft IRIS 
9ft ITCPJ 
5 lameoa 

9ft iKxndx 
2ft (M 


12 

lft 

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I4W 

13W 

Sft 


364 

757 

126 

10 

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390 

140 

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arm 

155 

311 

8 

64 

46 

1355 

20 

31 

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187 

193 

6 
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242 


W 


M 


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892 

653 

5 

147 


10 9ft 91%— W 

288% 28W 2BW + *% 

13ft 13W 13W 
6W «fc 6W 
Sft Sft 5ft „ 
4ft «% «?-ft 

«W 40W «W. 

to 26 V. 77 + W 

7SW 22 22 

6 Sft 5ft — 
lift lift 11W , 

3% 3ft 3ft + 
15V* 15U 15U 
36W 25ft 26 — 

% ns ns~ 

% m 

UV* 13ft 14W + 

29 2BW MW + 
f 7ft 7ft 
17V. 17 I7W + 

B 7ft 7ft — 
13ft 12ft 12ft- 
101% 94* 10 
19U 19 19W + 

1344 13W IJW — 

r* ^ \ v 

2SW 23ft 25ft +lw 
II 10ft 1W% ^ 

11 U 11 + 

8 8 8 


151* 9 JBR»tB 
BW 3ft JacfcFot 
41ft 2* JddOJa 
27ft 14ft JamWfr 
SW 5 JelMort 
72 14ft JifteO 
7ft 3ft Janlcbi 
IBft 61% Jamwi 
19 9ft June* 
sow ISft Justin 


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12 1227 
6 
5 

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13 
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72 

12 131 


13W T3 13W + 
Sft 51% SW— ■ 
34ft 34W 34ft — 
Sft 18ft 19ft- 
5 41% 4ft — 

204* 20 20W + 

6ft 6ft 6ft- 
81% 81% 84%- 
1714 17ft 171* + 
IBft »«■ IBft 


24W 13W KLAS 
4ft KVPtir 
„ 20'4 Komon 

29ft 131% Korehr 
ir4 iow Rosier 
104% 6*4 Kovdon 
61 W 3514 Kemp 
411% a KvCnLI 
BW 4W Keuvx 
13ft 7ft KeyTm 
nw 3 Klnftfk 
211% 13 Kinders 
Uft 444 Krov 
164% 91% Kiyoer 
291% 13 Kukfce 


St 11 


240 

14 
103 
158 

JOr 4J 185 
160 

15 

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a 
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13 US 
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12 

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3 

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19W 19 19ft 
tft 6W 6ft 
77 26ft 2614 
16 I5W 15ft + ft 
12 1114 12 

9W 9ft 9W— ft 
57. 56ft 57 +1% 
371% 21 37ft +1ft 
H4 6ft 614 
8ft Bft BW + ft 

3 3 3 — *% 

2BKt 28W 20ft 
6ft 61* 6ft + ft 
14W 13ft 13ft— W 
14W 14ft lift 


111% 

15ft 

9ft 

4 

5 

24 V, 
7ft 


M 

32 

ja 


lift 6ft LDBmfc 

16 54% L4M. 

TO 914 LSI Loo 
231% 10 LTX 
16ft 84% La Poles 
ATft 2944 LOZBv IJ0 
20ft 12ft LOdFm .16 
IBft 11 LakUw ^ 

17 lift LomaT JO 

17 14 Lancasl 

21W 12W LndBF 
59ft 35 LaneCo 
ft 2114 Lowsni 

44% LeeDW 
BW LOtner 
7ft LewtsP 
2ft Lexicon 
1% LexMta 
I7W Utbrl 
44% LleCom 
2014 UM UIvTuI 
32% 1BW UnBrt 
36W 27W UncTri 120 64 
6Vk 4ft U noire -16 17 
49ft 214* UzOos ^ 

254, 20ft LonpF 1J8 
XM 1*44 Lotus 
2*44 19 Lmden 
29 Tft LvPbOt 


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213 

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IJ 29 
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12 231 
IJ 3 

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516 

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164 

JI7 A 100 
37 

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13 
19 

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54 M 
1420 
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714 7ft 
MW M 14 
1614 16 161% _ 

14W MV, 14ft + ft 

161% 161% 164% + ft 

4614 46ft 4614 + W 
1IM 1BW 10*4 
17ft 17 17*4 — W 

15W 15ft ISft , 
1514 15ft 15W — W 
19 IBft IBft— W 
53ft 53W 53ft 
29 28ft 2ffft 

9* 8W 8W 

M 5*% JW + * 

JS/ , C=5 

SW 51% Mi 
19% 194% 1914 + ft 
aft 311% 31ft + W 
844* 34W 34W 
6 59k 51%— *% 

4314 421% 43ft 
231* MW 23ft— ft 
24W MW MW + W 
24ft 24ft 24ft 1; 
22ft MW 22ft — ft 


M 


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JO 

2JM 

JO 


.10 


141* Oft MSI 
UW 6ft MCI 
31 15 MTS ■ 

38ft 13 MTV 
1714 91% MocKTr 

274% 19ft ModGE 2J0 
II 7ft MoIRt 
14ft 71% Molrlts 
lift Sft MpHcl 

24ft 17ft Manltw 

7214 36 VS. MlfSN 

19ft 13% Marcus 

9 4W Mareux 
UK 6W Manet 
37ft 17ft MrWN S 1 JO 
691* 191* MsCDln 

Sft lft Maaslar 
102 24 Matr«5 

24ft 13 Muxcri 
Mft 8ft Maxwel 
7ft 3% May Pi 
44% 31% MavnOI 

38ft 294% McCrm 

Uft 101% McFarl 
lift 6 Medex 
I2W 4 MedCre 
2DW 10 Mentor 
30ft 15W MentrG 
391% 26ft MercBc 1 J2 
15 3514 MercBk 148 

22 9W MrOjCa 
36V* 211% MPdBCO 1J0 
22ft Uft MerlBs J6 
171% Bft MetrFn 
41ft 14W Ml com 
61* 2W Micrp 
SW MIcrMk 
4W Mlcrdv 
59% MkrTc 
4 Mlcrop 
Sft MlcSmi 
2ft MUPCA 
17 MdSTFd 
MlalBk 
MdtMAIr 


34 1J 10 


84 


189 
35 
31 
12 
309 
27 
46 
10 

13 

14 
83 

1D6 
521 
J 20 
1644 

15 


61 


JB 2 S 


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61 

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40b 34 


13W 
BW 
40ft 
9 

69% 

7ft 
24 
4114 24 
3 


M .9 


419% Z7W MIIIHr 
44 SOU MIHIpr 
7W lft Mlnlscr 
27ft 16 Minstar 
161% 7ft MGOdC 
12W 6 MOWC B 
209% 13 Modifies 48 
Mft 6 Moledr 
39ft 26W Mo lex 
12 7ft MonAnt 
23W 9ft MonoM 
33ft 72 MOnuC 
2DW 13ft MorFto 
14 9 MOTKe 

22 Vk uft Morrsn 
7W 3 Maselev 
1714 12ft Mor Ob 
64ft 30 Midland 
26W 10W Mylans 


65 
21 
141 
14 
20 
141 
71 
768 
25 
138 
40 
16 
110 
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JO 2J 4 

46 1.1 3 

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40 1J 
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40 


Uft 111% I1W— .. 

9ta 8ft 9 +1% 

19 19 19+J% 

28ft UW 28ft- ft 
119% lift lift 
25ft 25ft 251% 

Bft BW aw— ft 
I3W 13W 13W + 14 
14W 14 14 — W 

22ft aw 22W 
*6ft 66W 66ft— V* 
171% 17ft 17W- ft 
4ft 49% 4W 
109* 10W 10ft— W 
32W 32ft 32ft— ft 
69W 681* 69W 
2W 2W 2ft + V% 
31 HP* 31 +1 

JO I9W 1914 + ft 
12W 121% 121% — ft 
51% 5 5 

4ft 4W 4W + ft 
32ft 301* SOW— 1W 
lift nw lift + w 
10ft 10ft 10ft— w 
4 Sft 5ft— 1% 
Mft V4W 14ft + ft 
17W 171% 17W— W 
» 369% 36ft— ft 

5014 571* SB 
18 171* 171*— W 

35ft 35ft 15ft— W 

20 199% 19ft 
17W 16ft 16ft— W 
19M 19ft 1914 

Zft 3W £4 

8 7M 7W 
61% 6W 6ft V ft 
Bft 8W 8W-V4 
7 6ft 69k— ft 
61% 614 614— ft 

4 314 4 

2114 UW 21W 
36ft 36W 361% + W 
6ft 6ft 6ft 
39 38W 38ft + ft 

40ft 39ft 39ft — 1% 
2 lft 2 

21 20V, 21 
9W 91% 914 
12ft 12 12ft + ft 
17ft 174% 179% + V. 
6M Oft 49* + W 

344% 34W 34W — W 
10 9ft 9ft + W 
121% 11W 12 
33ft 33ft 33W 
18W 18W 1BW + W 
13W U 13 — W 
19W 19ft 191% + ft 

,SSi3 £-w 

R & 552-ift 


36 

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9ft 

10ft 

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12W 

9W 


M 14 
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30 1.1 
M 3-5 

M 3 


52 1J 
JO M 
1.12b « 


ft 


ft 


13 4ft MCA CP 
6W 2W NMS 
14ft SW Nopcos 
2414 1BW NBnTex 
so* 30ft WtlpY 
nw Uft NtCptrs 
IfiW 4W NDafa 
16ft NHItCs 
4W NtLumB 
2W NMIcm 
Oft NflUOft 

Oft NeSnT 
*W N oison 
5W HwfeSec 

27W Uft MtwKSs 

36ft 1914 NeutlUS 

12ft Tft NBnmS 
34 23ft HE Bus 
38ft 16ft NHmPB 
29ft 16 NJNaU 
61% 3ft MYAIrt 
16 BW NwkIBk 
SOW 18 Herat 
T2W lW NmpPI* 

7ft 2ft NICalo 
1114 69k Nike B 
21ft Uft NO fXbn 
jZft 38W Hordstr 
43ft 28ft HrakBs 
BW Sft Nontan 
10ft 5 NAtlln 
16W 6W NestSv 
20W 13W HartJG 
33ft 17W NwtFn s 
36ft 1814 HwNLt 
249% 18ft HirttPS 118 
55ft 39ft Hwudl -72 
7 5 NudPti 

9W 5W Numrax 
31 W 1BW Numeric J8 
Uft 6W NutrtF 
13W 6W NuMedi 


JO 2J 


40 35 
46 35 
M 1J 
JS J 


141 

48 

JO 


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310 

23 

313 

295 

2*0 

526 

77 

102 

45 

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5 
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1 

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70 

61 

336 

80 

178 

11 

237 

135 

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12 

589 

133 

62 

50 

72 

331 

59 

6 
2 

132 

142 


5 5 5 

n% 414 4W- w 
T2W lift lift 
23V, 23ft Ztft 
48 47ft 47ft— ft 
18ft 18W 18% „ 

13W I2W 1214— ft 
17W 17 17 - W 


7 

SW 

5V, 

7W 

7ft 

6W 


6W 

3W 

5 

7 

7 

Oft 


3ft— ft 
5U + ft 
7 -ft 
7 -W 


JM % 73 2SW + 1% 
32ft 31 W 31W— tft 
10 9W 10 
28ft Wg »%+' 

27ft 2Jf SW 

28 2TW 27W 
64% 6W 6W + 
ISft ISft ISft + 
22ft 22W 22W — 
UW UW 11W- 
3 29% Sft — 

lift lift lift 
17W 17 17 

461* 46 46W — 

S 3JW 3riJ— 
Tft 7 (ft + 
71* 71% 7W 

16W Igl J4ft + 
17W im 17ft + 

JJ 28ft 28ft— 

23 2214 22ft 

lift 21ft 21W + 
Uft SOW SOW 
6ft 6W 6ft + 

7 7 7 — 

a 27 W 28 + 
Oft 9W » 

iow io io — 


SW lftOceoner 
I7» 12 Oclltaa 
46W 30ft CM l« 1 JB 
67W 39ft OM£a 180 
32W 16W OWKrtS 1J8 
411% 23 OldRPS -74 , , 
aw 18W OW5P1C 24® 1 3-1 
24 9W One Bed 39e 1.7 


19 

12 

24 17 

44 144 

3J » 
2J 1749 
- 26 
27 


3W 3ft 3ft 
15W ISW 15V. 

4414 Uft 44ft + 

61 *04% *04%- 

29 28ft 2Bft — 

3* 31ft 12 -31% 
21ft 21ft 2IVS — 
914 234% 23W 


9ft 3W OnUne 
19W 13ft OpItcC 
48W 23W OpttcR 
19M lift Ortwnc 
Bft 5ft OrMt 
7 4 OrfaCp 

aw u oarnnn 
344% 2514 OttrTP 
24ft 12 OwonM 
61k ft Oxoeo 


JO 

2J« 

JO 


21 

51 

852 

261 

a 

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1 

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50 

789 


aw 7% a + ft 
14ft 14 14 — ft 

2714 27ft 271* 

14ft 14 lift — W 
6W Oft Oft 
414 4V. 4W + ft 

161% 16W 16W + ft 


30 ft 30ft 30W—W 


2iw 11 21V, 

4% ft ft- ft 


171 


1J0O2J 


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aw 391* Paccar 

154% 7 PocFst 
15 IOW PacTel 

law ioft PocoPti 
Bft 6 PancMx 
249k 1#W Pareph 
20V. 12W ParttO h 
• 4 PatntM 

12W 54% PoulHr 

1314 5ft PoulPt 
Uft 714 Povchx 
25 9ft PoakHC 
3214 Mft FearJH 

low 5W PnaGM 

35 2014 PenaEn 220 

lift 20W Pontars JB 
UW 7W PeapE* . . 
32 Vi 24ft Petrlle 1.12 
Uft 4 Ptirmct 
12W 7W PSFS 
17W Uft PtlllGI 
BW 3W PtinxAm 
aft 171* PIcSov 

24ft 16ft PicCafe 

J7ft 27W PlonHl 

liw 7 piofisr 
16ft BW Pa Folk 

3414 16W PIcvMo 

79 20V% Purwt 

39% 11* Powell 
17W Tft Powrtcs 
lift Sft PwContr 
37W I8W ProcCsl 
9 4ft PrpdLO 
Bft 3 Prkmi 
16ft Oft PricCme 
66 SOW PrlceCo 
22W 9 Prtronx 

4 41% ProdOP .16 

15%% 121* PnoptTr 1J0 
19ft 134% Previn 
79% 3W Pulimn 
2614 13W PurtBn M 


218 

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JO SJ 


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40 47 


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225 
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66 

33 

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15 

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70 

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13 

390 

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» 2914 2914— W 

45 4414 4414 

MW UW UW + ft 
MW 13*4 U 
14W Uft 14ft— W 
7W 7ft 7ft 
23ft 329% 2M%— W 
1214 12V. 1214 
7Vl 71% 7W 
114% lift 11W i( _ 

121% UW 11W— ft 
lift 16W 16W + W 
Mft 14 14W— ft 

321* 324% 324% 

10W 91* 9ft- W 
34ft 34 341% +.ft 

n 26W MW— ift 

141% 14ft Mft— ft 
2716 27W 27V. 

7 6W 64% — ft 
104* 9V% 9V%— 1W 

14W 14ft 14ft— ft 
lft 2W 2W 
TA 259% 2SW 

221% aft 22ft 

36 35V. 34 + ft 

gv, BV. 816 
134% 131% 134% + W 
IB* I8W 18ft— W 
25ft 24*4 2414— W 
24% 24% 21* + ft 

in* uw nw — ft 

TOW W® 10W — W 

m n sow + w 

Bft B Bft— ft 
4 31* 4 

10 9W «*— W 
57ft 57 57W + W 

I2W 12 12 — ft 

4W 4W 4W— ft 
13ft 13 1»% 

IB 171* 17W— W 
7 6M 6W — ft 
2314 23W 384k + W 


Q 


Uft Bft QMS 5 
Tft 3ft Quodrx 
131* 9 QuokCs 

32W law Quentin 
5W Zft QuesIM 
12V, BW Quixote 
13U 714 Quotm 


JB 35 


125 

104 

5 

329 

56 

3 

3B5 


109% 104% 10W- ft 
BW Bft Bft— ft 

11 II 11 + W 

73 22fc 22W 

4ft 4W 4W 

12 12 12 

11 109% 109% 


Jle .1 
M 35 


IJ0 

M 


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30 

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Uft 64* RAX 
1BW 1014 RPHl 
lew BW RodSvs 
1414 6W RadmT 
11 5ft Radon 
79% 2ft Ragan 
MW 199* Rainrs 
MW 12ft RayEn 
7ft 2ft ReSJCr 
23W ISft RroOna 
10W Sft Recotn 
35W 2SW RedUL 
I2W 3W Reeves 
714 5W RBCVEI 
MW 11 RegbS 
Mft 4ft Rellab 
10 7W RPAVU 
aw 9ft RpHHh 
161* 11W RestrSv 
164% Bft Reulerl 
29W 17ft ReutrH 
431* 29 Rev Rev 1J4 11 
10 3W RIbllm S 
17ft 18ft Rival 
331* 241k RoadStf 
Uft I1W RMNUO 
UW 8ft RcBVsn 

24ft 169% Rouses 

13 6ft RovPlm 
12ft 4W RwlR* 

18W 11 RustPel 

1VW T1W RyonF 9 


96 
343 
90 
38 
16 
25 
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14 
674 

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310 

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129 

JO 54 6 

1-00 16 240 

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64 M 7 

tiL 
31 


7W 6W 7V% + ft 

15W ISW 1594 + ft 

nv uft uft 

UW 11V* lift 
Bft B 8 — W 
5 49% 49% + ft 

28W 2Bft 30W 
19 IBfV. UW— W 
3 2W 2ft— W 
211% 211* 211* 

9W 9W 9W 
24 24 

Uft 109% 10ft— ft 
Oft 4W 6W 
141* 14 14 — ft 

Sft 5W 5W— W 
9W 9W 9W— ft 
lift UW lift + 9% 
1414 141* 149* — W 
89* Bft Bft— W 
26 26 26 
40ft 40 48 — ft 

69% 64% 4W— ft 
14ft Mft 14ft— ft 
MW M 2Bft + ft 
Uft UW UW— ft 
12W 12 12 — W 

23 2ZW 22W— W 
UW 10ft 10ft 


15 ft 15 ft 15 ft 
17 17 17 + ft 


.Wr 1 3 
AO 3J 
JO 1-0 
1J0 4J 


100 4J 


J5r 3 
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M 23 


37 26 
40 1-7 


JO SJ 


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JO 


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19W 10W SCI Sv 
19W 10ft 5 El 
UW 7 5FE 
23 16 SRI ^ 

20 * 5 ft S gtocd S 
44 ft 29 Safeco 
23 lift SotHim 
16 7W stJuda 

759 k 39 W StPoul 
6 ft 2 W SalCpt 
UW 4 W Son Bar 

9ft 5ft Sotagy 

20 10W SBkPSs 

low 4 W 5 COnOP 
16 ft 10ft SconTr 
1394 89 % Setwref 

24 ft 15 W ScWmA 

8 ft 3 ft JClMJc 
uw 7 scisn 

21 13 Sdtex 
Oft 5ft 5eaGol 

10W 4 Seooote 
12W 1W SEEQ 
SOW 16 Selbel 
UW 5ft Semkai 
101% 6 Sensor 

16 W lOWSwMor 

25ft 17Vi Svmsts 
81 % 4 ft SvcFrct 
18 12W SevDak 

mS&KZAlM 48 
Mft 12 snrtbys .14 J 
lift 7 W SHeldl * 

35 W 2414 Shonev* 

16W IP ShonSos 
12ft 6 SOrcon 
221% 9ft Silicons 
23W UW Sllleval 
Mft uw suiau 
12ft 4W SRlec 
17W UW Simp in 
15W 109% SlpPins 
24W 13W Sbalers 
12W 9 Sklopor 
4W 2ft SnUttlL 
54 31 Sodely 

H9% Oft SaetySv 
10ft 5ft Softool 
21ft 111% SoftwA 
2Bft ISW *»*£* •*! 

27V% 14W SonrFd 
Oft 4 50HWP 
38W UW SttxJFn 
28W i*ft Sautrsi 
0ft Sft Sovnm 
47W 329% Sovran 
low BW Saecdy 
38 vi 8ft Spctran 
BW 59% SMCCN 
16W 13 Sol re 
I9W 3ft SlwSrs 
Oft 5 SlatBKS 
30 191* Stand vi ijo 36 

MW 1IW SWJWC 
27 19 Storttw & IJO 53 

34W 17W SloSiBs 


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41 

25 

11 

395 

86 

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501 

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66 

261 

103 

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369 

130 

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163 

54 

51 

11 

29 

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373 


ISft 149% 14ft— ft 
171* 17ft 17ft— W 
BW BW BW— W 
21 W 21 W 21V* - W 
nw 19W 1»W— .W 
40ft 40W 40W 
20W 19 19 — W 

15W 141* 15ft -H 
704% 7®W 78% 

5W 5%% Sft 
'61* 6W 6W 
tft 6 6 + W 

1TW 19ft 19ft— W 
7ft 7ft 7ft 
154* MW 15ft + W 
I2W 121% 12W 
23ft 23ft 23ft- W 
rn 4W 4W 
8ft Bft Bft — W 
13V. 13W 13W 

y Sw iw-ft 

3 2W 21k — ft 

161* 16 16 — ft 

8ft 8 89% + ft 

IW 8ft M + }% 

15ft 14W 15 +ft 
21 Mft 21 
5 5 5 — ft 

T6W 1*4% 16W 
31ft 31ft 3JW ^ 
359% 35ft J5W— ft 

19 1BW in*— ft 

H 99% 9W + 

28 27V. 27W — 

12 UW UW— 
Oft 59% 6 - 
Uft 12 U 
16ft 14W UW + 
20ft 20ft Mft— 

4 54m 5ft— 
15ft ISft 15ft 

13 12W 13 

Uft 16 16 

Oft 9 9 

29% 2W 2ft 
46ft 46 46ft + 
ZlW 20ft 21W + 
81* Bft Sft 
141% 14W Mft— 

28 27ft 27W t 
19W lift 19W + 
4W 4ft 4W 
23W 23W 23* — 
T7W 17V. 17W— 
d* ow 6 r 
43U 43 43 

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36ft 24ft 2*4* — 
6W Oft 6W + 
Uft 14ft 14ft + 
5W 59% 5ft — 
6W 6W 6W + 
Mft 27ft 28ft + 
ISft 159% 15W 
22ft Mft 22ft— 
KW 31ft 371% + 


69 


4 StotcG 
. ._ 4ft Steiger 
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38ft 26W StrwCI s 
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2ft Summa 
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3 Suartex 
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UW SyAMC 

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169% ISW 16W + W 
23 23 23 

4W Oft Oft— ft 
16W 16 16 — W 

35 34 Vk 35 + ft 

aft a 32 — ft 
166ft 165ft 165ft— ft 
61W 61W 61ft— ft 
2W 2ft 2W— ft 
12 lift UW— W 
14% 19% IW 
9 BW BW— W 
4ft 4. 4 

ft K, IV— H, 
101* 10W IOW + ft 
124% 12W 124% + W 
3W 3W 3W— ft 
28ft M 20 —W 
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99% 91% Oft— W 
11 11 11 
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MW 15ft UTL 
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529% 20W UnTBCB 1J0 3J 
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UW 7ft UBAbk .15r IJ 
28ft IBft UBCol 
11 6 UFnGfP 

MW II W UFstFd 
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24% US Ant 
204% US BCP 
19% US Cop 
2ft USDson 
11 W USHCe 
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22ft 10W USSur 
37ft 25W U5TTS 
284* 17W USMftl 
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28 

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a 73 72 

Bft BW 89% + ft 
15W 14W 144%— 4% 
lift 11 11 —ft 

M 27V, 2714— W 
511* 5014 SOW— ft 
21M 21ft 211% — ft 
IOW 10ft 10ft— ft 
Z6W 26W 26W 
7ft 7W 7W— W 
17ft 17W 17ft + ft 
14ft 139% lift 
12. 119% 119% 

41% 4ft 4W + fc 
271% 271% 27ft— W 

r a a-* 

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IBft 18ft 18ft 
351* 35ft Mft 
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22ft 22ft 22ft— W 
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lift 18 18. —ft 

Uft Uft 16 W — 9% 

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16 

124b 

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4W VMX 
7 VSE 
61% VoildLg 

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4ZW 25W VolHtl 
38W 20 VaILn 
10ft 11 W VanDus 
15W 6W Vanzell 
61% 21b Ventrax 

281* 13W VLcorp 
15W 8ft VledeFr JM 23 
Mft Tft Vlklno 
20W 139* V Irate* 

12ft 61* vodavl 
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low 10 woibC 1 

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MW IOW WB«> 
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171* 5W WStFSL 
14W 4W WtTlAs 
21W 15ft wmorC 
17ft 5 WBtwCs 
31ft 21ft Wtottra 
61% Tft Wkxrt 
13ft 4W Wldcoei 
46W 2Bft Winmt 
15W TftWUUJ. 
1714 BW WlTtsSn 
low 4W WianF 
Bft 4W Wtotknr 
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29ft 21ft Worths 
n% 4W Writer 
3BW 211* Wyman 


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34 

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77 

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9 

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w 

1.76 

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38 

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73 

22ft 


60 

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148 

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239b 

23ft — 

9* 

569 

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550 

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182 

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171* 10W XTdex 


543 

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21* 2ft 2W— ft 
BW Sft BW 
1ZW 121% Uft 


439% 28ft YloefFt 1J» 2J 249 


Mft 39ft— W 


30ft 5W ZenUs 
1314 IOW Ziegler 
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12% 31* Ztyad 
158% Aft Zondvn 


3217 
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70 

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tW Oft 41* + ft 
119% 119k 1114— ft 


The Global 
Newspaper. 


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international herald tribune, Tuesday, august 20, 1985 



UJHATPlP'lOUPOlUrrH 
THE PICTURE OF ME 
THAT I SAVE YOU ? 


ACROSS 


- 1 Wanders about 
S Piece of 
jewelry 
9 Trim with 
loops 

14 An organ stop 

15 Attic coin 

16 Place to spend 
15 Across 

17 Kind of crier 

18 Wowed 

20 Count 
Vronsky's love 

21 Bleaching 
agent 

22 Imprisonment 

23 Mettle 
revealers 

25 Shinbone 

27 Spree 

29 "Do 

disturb” 

30 Footnote abbr. 

34 Scoundrel 

36 Slugger Staub 

38 Diacritical 
mark 

39 Children’s folk 
song 

42 Students takw 
these 

43 Lofty pad 

44 Parched 

45 Mild 

46 Mil. group 

47 Lang 

49 Single-celled 
organism 

51 Hide behind 
words 


54 Robin’s Lass 
58 Zodiacal sign 
60 "An apple 


61 Repaired 
completely 

63 Amour 

64 Closet lining 

65 Deep 

(oceanic 

depression) 

66 Wide-mouthed 
pitcher 

67 Danish coin 

68 The vat man 

69 Hereditary 
factors 


DOWN 


1 Bribed 

2 "To fetch her 

poor dog ” 

3 With the 
current 

4 Where 
Mondale once 
ruled 

5 Tasks 

6 Circa 

7 Traditional 
folksong 

8 Wright wing 

9 "Taming of the 
Shrew” locale 

10 Conductor 
Buketoff 

11 Place for a 
marina 

12 Malachite and 
manganese 

13 Salts 


8/70/85 

19 Blue-pencil 
24 Rani's 
wardrobe 
26Cleteor 
C hades 
28 Hosiery 

rrp^frap 

30 Savings plan: 
Abbr. 

31 Ready for the 
night 

32 Welsh actor 
Noveilo 

33 Like a petal in 
the morning 

34 Charge 

35 Optic layer 

37 Spot 

38 Nut-bearing 
tree 

40 Map abbr. 

41 Actress 
Farrow 

46 Lady from 
Lisbon 

48 Made well 

49 U.S. Olympic 
skier 

56 A plow 

inventor 

52 leg up 

(lent a hand) 

53 Witnesses 

54 Ersatz 

55 Say 

56 Workover 

57 Abadan is here 
59 Repute . 

62 Humperdinck's 

"Hinse! 

Grete]” 


€> New York Tones, edited by Eagene Maleska. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



'DO TttHHINK THERESA BENEEN ML 

THE BREAD WE'VE BEEN MIS8M6 AN0ALLTH6 PI0GONS 
1HW KEEP HAHQH6AMBMD HERE?' 



1945: The World We Fongbt For 
By Robert Kee. 371 pages. IBusmaed. 
$19.95. 

Little, Brown, 34 Beacon Street, Boston, 
Mass. 02106 . 

Reviewed by John Gross 

T HE an of narrative history is in large 
measure the art oT selection — deciding 
what should be emphasized and what can be 
sacrificed, fastening onto the detail that a 
representative as well as intrinsically interest- 
ing. To reduce an epoch to the conqjass of a 
few hunched pages, without lapsing mto life- 
less generalizations, is a harder task than it 
looks — and it isn’t even so easy when the time 
span is restricted to a single y»r. 

Up to a point, Robert Kee. in his portrait of 
the year 1 945, has solved the problem of choice 
by limiting hims elf to material from about two 
dozen American, British and French newspa- 
pers and periodicals of the period. There are no 
large retrospective reflections here — inis is 
history caught on the wing, events as they 



has retrieved some cxl 

iarfy from the last «pu_ 

men urging suicidal restfUBce^i>? 
tks raremreugh the cK>i FWdManhal A»- 
goH von Mackenwn expounding hit 


nationalistic creed at the MB « », 
with his “frightening niafity «* »msfc »■ 

i. . J hit 


rter who has tracked him dowa, i« 
Luftwaffe still in action on the day Hrd» va. 

The problems of tbepogtreyo rid had be en 
cooing steadily wtire fore. At the begaum$' « . 
the year, if Kee’s sampling of the jam a any 
guide, there was more friction between the 
major Western allies than between the West 
and the Soviet Union. In particular, amah 
support of the Greek BPvetxuuem 
ft as. the leftist, largely Coranmmsi nxnb of 

the raasanct incurred heavy criticism m 

U.S. press and liberal British prc». dwogh 


U-» "‘"7” r — 

there was a gradual change of tune as the tnnh 
about ELAS atrocities began w i 


or at least as they were presented, to 
h them. 


lwa u who lived through 

Kee has still had to exercise his judgment, to 
assess the value of his sources (if only by 
implication) and to weave toothy a s ta i nl e s s 
narrative — all of which he does with a marked 

degree of As the author of “1939: In 
the Shadow of War,” he has had some experi- 
ence with this particular genre, but bis new 
book seems an i m pr o vement cm the earlier one; 
be has mastered his techmqae. 

There have been plenty of anniversaries late- 
ly ^ remind us of the final dramas of World 
War II, but much gets forgotten even so. Kee 


was sometimes prepared to lake in its stride. 
He rounds off ha cfaapte 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


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a/ 2 oa» 


John Gross a an the staff of The Sere York 
Times. 


CHESS 


By Robert Byme 


GARFIELD 


| THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
u by Howl Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscr am ble these totr JumtHea. 
one tatter to oecb square, to form 
tour onJnary words. 


THAB1 


~nr 



SUAPE 








r / VOD'RE LATE \ 

FOR PINNER, 1 
_ V^GARFIELP J 

/ IASSOME \ 

| VOO HAVE A ] 

^ \GOOQt. XCDSeJ 

i MV MORNING NAP 

(rage p oot of control, 

Hn 




T HE 1985 Milan Vidmar 
Memorial Tournament 
held in Portoraz and Ljul^ana, 
Yugoslavia, ended in a tie for 
first place among three promi- 
nent grandmasters, Lajos Poc- 
dsch andZohan Ribli of Hun- 
gary and Anthony Mies of 
Britain. Their winning score 
was 7-4. 

Fourth place was taken by 
the Los Angeles grandmaster 
Larry Christiansen, who taffied 
6W-414. 

Miles outfought the Yugo- 
slav grandmaster Svetozar GH- 
goric in a prolonged tactical 

straggle emerging from a 
Quern's Indian Defense. 

The pin-preventing 4 P-QR3, 
originated by the late Tigran 
Petrosian, continues to pm 
problems before the defender. 
Thus, following 7 Q-R4cfa, the 
interpositions 1 ... B-Q2 and 
7...Q-Q2 would prove awk- 
ward after the fadle reposition- 
ing with 8 Q-B2. Moreover, 
1 ... QN-Q2 would allow 8 N- 
K5 foDowed by 9 N-B6. 

Blocking wfih 7...P-B3 is 
normal, but after 8 N-K5, one 
would have expected 8 . . . B- 
N2 even though White's initia- 
tive is difficult to control. Gfi- 
goric chose instead a tactical 
solution with 8...P-QN41; 9 
Q-B2, Q-N3 which left him 
.with a backward QBP. 


On 10 B-N2, Gligoric could 
have dissolved the weakness 
with 10...QxP; 11 NxQBP. 
Q-B4; 12 QxQ, BxQ; 13 N-K5, 
but his isolaied QP could then 
give Black trouble. 

One would have 
16...QR-B1 with the __ 
of a breakout with 17... P- 
QB4. 

After 22 P-R3. the sound re- 
ntal would have been 22... B- 
K3 rather than Gligoric's auda- 
cious 22...B-R4?! which gw 
the black queen bishop into 
trouble after 23 P-B4! 





Gligoric must have rebed 
upon 53. . . Q-N4; 24 Q-Q2, P- 
B4 with its threat of 


25 . . . RxBI, but Miles sacri- 
ficed hs KP with 25 K-R2f, 
PxP; 26 QBxP, BxB: 27 QxB, 
BxP. the point being that after 
28 R-B2, the Made Bishop was 
threatened by 29 Q-Q2. 

Ghgoric could have saved his 
piece with 28...Q-R3, bat 
then 29 RxP, N-B3; 30 Rxfi, 
RxR, 31 NxR. QxN; 32 QxRP 


gives White an extra pawn that 
should prove decisive. Accord- 


Id prove decisive. Accord- 
ly, he tried a trick with 

B-B57, but MBe's 29 Q- 

Q2! trapped the black bishop 
without reprieve. 

The Yugoslav hoped to 
achieve smashing with his two 
connected passed pawns after 
29 ...Q-B 4 ; 3 QPxB,PxP — 31 
RxP? loses a rook to 31... N- 
B 3 . 


j men ran 


1 M« HI 

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DRENGE 


~nrc 



WHAT THOSE 
| SNOBBISH MEMBERS 
OF THE HORSEY SET 
THOUGHT THEY WERE. I 


Now arrange ttw dnded letters to 
farm the surprise answer, as sup- 
pasted by the above cartoon. 


Answer hem: A [ X X X 11 1111X3 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 
Jumbles: GLOVE CLEFT CACTUS FEDORA 
Answer What the runner's diet consisted of. 
naturally— FAST FOOD 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 
28 82 21 70 


32 90 21 to 
» « If M 


26 79 13 S5 
21 70 12 54 


20 <8 15 59 
» at W 41 


23 73 10 50 
16 61 13 55 


l DM Sol 30 85 19 66 


18 66 15 S9 
30 86 20 63 

22 72 11 52 
27 81 11 a 

23 73 14 81 

26 79 30 <8 
25 77 21 70 

27 11 II M 

20 M 15 59 ah 

36 93 15 99 ' 

27 fl 18 64 
25 77 18 64 
36 75 10 SD 

fa 79 ao a 

18 56 13 55 

21 70 17 63 

21 78 9 68 
15 59 10 50 

28 82 19 66 

22 72 13 55 

25 77 16 S7 

26 TV 16 6! 

22 72 n SB 

15 59 13 53 
26 75 11 52 



ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 




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90 

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86 

22 

72 

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HOMKtma 

32 

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29 

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86 

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AFRICA 






o 

Algiers 

32 

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17 

63 

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Cairo 

— 

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— 

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CawMaoca 

35 

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34 

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LATIN AMERICA 




BSMHAIrat 

16 

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Careens 

36 

79 

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Lima 


— 

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Mexico City 

24 

75 

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0 

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— 

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NORTH AMERICA 


Zurtc* 

MIDDLE EAST 

32 90 15 59 


Ankara 
Mint 
Damaicoi 
jcruMttn 
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OCEANIA 


30 86 U 75 
38 100 20 68 
» 79 20 68 
30 86 26 75 


Auckland 

SWttV 


16 61 13 55 
16 61 9 68 


ABekaran 

15 

59 

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31 

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68 

fr 

Estfoa 

21 

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25 

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34 

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Miami 

32 

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II: na-rwt ayoilabto; oovercast: 


TUESDAY'S PORE CAST — CHANNEL: Madarol*. FRANKPURTrgcwtfr. 
Tenw. 22— 13J72— 551. LONDON: Koto. Tw»HL 2T— M CT—CT. jWPRIO- 
Folr. Temp, 32—15 (90—59). NSW YORK: Partly etaudv. Tamp. 21—20 

183-MI. PARIS: Rata. Tam* 23-14 1“ 

JM — 68). TEL AVIV: no. ZURICH: 

B AW gTOKsJnypnifTitnrrii i Tefnp. 33- «« in — rm Veniii - - 

Temp. 33 --27 (91 — «1|. MANILAS ShOWM. Tew. 79— U W--7S). SEOUL- 


, 23-14 C73-57). ROME: Mr. Temt2»-a 
UIRICH: gaudy. Temp. M — !?. j g — 56j. 
emp, 33- 26 t W-T V). HONC KOWB- SvmWi 
SlNMMfS. Temp. 29 — 24 (M—WJ-SBOUL. 
25 (93— 771. SINGAPORE: TBundarsttrna. TamP- 31— » 
IM— 777. TOKYO: FonY- Tamp, 31-27 (88— 81 J. 


W>rid Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse Aug. 19 

■ doting prices in local currencies unless othamse indicated. 



| Mamin 1 


Close 

Fvw. 


512 

510 

ACF Molding 

249JD 

250 

AEGON 

97M 

96J0 

AKZO 

122.1D 

122 

Ahold 

239 JO 

239 JO 

. AMEV 

274 

275 

AT : m Rubber 

850 

850 


84J0 

8670 

BVG 

20550 

206 




Cakmd Hldg 

37.90 

37 JO 

Elserier-NDU 

131 

131 

Eokkar 

S3 

B3J0 


214 

21350 


14850 

143 


42 

win 

KLM 

59 JO 

62 


49 JO 

49.18 

NatNedder 

77 J* 


Neditoyd 

17550 

17&J0 


335 

337 

PaklxMd 

67 JO 

67 JO 

Philips 

4540 

4520 


7A70 

74J0 


13280 


RoHnoo 

68J0 

4840 

Rarente 

4620 

185J0 

M 


aw an 

32530 


2BJ0 

Z8.90 

VMF5toric 

253 


VNU 

21550 


I ANP.CBS GenT index : 2VL58 

Provtaus: 2HJ0 



|| UniBfrli | \i 


*7^ 

1630 



5400 ' 


■fr 

211 ' 

Cobraa 

EBES 


3495 

2B80 

GB-liTflOBM 


3650 



1885 



3945 

Hqbakm 


5490 

8900 

KracMbank 






HlEu' 

1785 



7400 


wr:- 

4530 . 



3820 J 

UCB 


5110 ! 


Bll? 

1«W ? 

VleHle Mantasno 

BE 

TIM •* 

1 Cuarst Stock lodex : 331BJI IS 

prtvloo* : 232M4 


5 

S 

T 

II Vrmakhmt tl« 


AEG-Teiefunkoi 
Allianz Von 
Altana 
BASF 
Bayer 

Bay Hvna Bank, 
Bay Varaimbank 
BBC 

BHF-Bank 

BMW 

CwiMWifateHik 

ContGonmil 

Dalmiv-Btm 

Daussa 

Deutsche Babcock 
Deutsche Bank 
Dmdnar Bank 
GHH 


13030 131 
1360 1375 
tl 357 


2aSo 


361 363 

382 398 
TMW 236 
31A50 314 
42550 43650 
3SS307J0 
149 147 

875.20 OO 
36580 36250 
Iffl 157 
550 55650 
266 » 
MMO lg 

300 Mil HI 


CtoM Pra v. 


Hochtief 

690 

670 


2U90 

TU 

HoMdl 

11810 

111 

Horten 

IK 

185 


ft '1 

XM 

IWKA 

fere.il 

274 

Kao + Sab 

R'+vI 

3D6 


245 

241 

Kauttnf 

273 271 to 

Ktoecknor H-O 

27450 

277 

Kloeckner Werke 

4250 

4050 

Kn»P Stahl 

107 

«W 


495 49550 

Luttriarao 

22150 

222 

MAH 

14050 

144 



Muonen Rwadt 

1740 

1750 

NlMdarf 

53880 

534 

PKI 



Porsche 

1273 

1282 


274 27750 

PWA 

134 13540 

rwe 

18550 

185 

Rhein melon 

31050 

312 

Scriorina 

46346450 

SEL 

33350 

334 

Siemens 

53870 53650 


119JD T2050 

vena 


VUkswooramft 

31050 

317 

WMfa 

6» 

408 


Commanbaak Umax : i«D4.ia 


H— gKtfnt 


■ Slt oiB) Bon > 

■ Ttiortloni 


Wiraar 
World inn 


23.10 

1940 

14Jfi 

BBS 

47 

n 

&4S 
12J0 
3&25 
655 
7JS 
9A5 
US 
7M 
29 JO 
046 
(W9 
1050 
1520 
920 
47 
785 
2 

ION 

2.773 

26J0 

2.175 

0J4 

•w 

515 

240 


2280 

1880 

U 

US 

4680 

2375 

HUB 

845 

12J0 


660 

7J3 

935 

2J5 

7JS 

2880 

064 

1 

1240 
itrn 
9.10 
45 
7 JO 

2 

1170 

170 

to 

115 

1 


«5 

5.15 

2J75 


Haaa Saav ladax : PrLSf 
PlWlOM : 17S0J7 


Job 


AECI 

Anglo American 
Angie Am GoM 

BortenH 

Bhryggr 

BirfMs 

Be B ear s 

DrMbnleta 

Elands 


785 

2970 

17700 

1065 

1340 

7275 

1195 

4700 

1700 


809 

2875 

17000 

1070 

129 

7100 

1150 


169S 


GFSA 
Harmony 
HlvtW Stool 
Kloof 
NeAank 
Pres Stem 
Ruspkd 
SA Brows 
St Helena 
Smol 

Wat Hold] no 


3200 


515 

7650 

1350 

5200 

1785 

730 

3300 

683 

6300 


3100 

2550 

500 

74S0 

139 

5051 

1725 

725 

3000 

5S5 

6000 


Composite stock uutax : I 
Pravtom : issue 


AACarp S11W Slims 

Ained-Lvans 231 ZJQ 

Amjkj Am GoW S72W S7I>A 

A» Blit Foods 226 224 


Ass Dairies 
Barclays 


144 164 


BJLT. 


579 

298 

333 

23® 

34 

506 

278 

196 

315 

336 

280 

IW 

363 

205 

343 

290 

54J 

142 

176 


579 


IW 


419 

127 

416 

490 

293 


BICC 
BL 

Blue drda 
BOC Group 
Boots 

Bawatar Indus 
BP 

Brlf Homs SI 
BrilTatocom 
Brif Aeraspooe 
Brfteil 
BTB 
Burmah 
Cable wireless 
CodDury 5chw 
Owner Cons 
Commercial U 
Cans Gold 
Caurlaulds 
Da kwly 
De Beers < 

ObtttJers 
DrWanteln S19W IIH 

Pisans 353 353 

Frye St Ged S184h SIBta 

GEC ISO 188 

GenAcxtoent 625 as 

GKN 327 230 

Glaxo C 1229/331361/64 
Grand MM 
GRE 
Guinnass 
GUS 
Hanson 
Hawker 
ICi 

Imperial Graua 

itanr 

Land Secu rules 
Legal General 
UaydsBanfc 
Lonrha 
Lucca 

Marks and Sp 
Metal Box 
Midland Bank 
not west Bank 
Pent a 
PHktagtan 
P lesser 
Prudential 
RaccH Elect 
R a ndtanta ta 


315 

756 

272 
865 
206 
383 

651 
182 

273 
303 
717 
419 
154 
326 
153 
483 
392 

652 
390 
273 
148 
709 

jm 


315 

760 

271 

165 

207 


654 

182 

274 

305 

719 

419 

154 
331 

155 


394 

651 

313 

278 

148 

712 

156 


“ifi 

3)3 312 


Rank 

I ah 

Reuters 

Royal Dutch c 42 53/64 
RTZ 559 557 

Saatchl 650 690 

SahuburV 330 toO 

5earsHoMtaas 98 99 


Clete Free. 


sben 

STC 

5ld Chartered 
Sun AHIaoce 
Tata and Lyle 


Timm EMI 
tj. Grain 

Tr afalgar Hse 
THP 

Ultramar 
UnBeeerc 10 
unBed Biscuits 
Vickers 


82 

449 

513 

445 

263 

357 

387 

370 

136 

203 


176 

273 


FJ.3S index : 92830 

: 12HN 

Pw a ta es : l2ft.M 


Banco Comm 
Cwdrule 
CMnMs 
Cmd IM 
Eridanfa 
ffarmBaUa 
Rat „ 
Generali 
IFI 


(Intent 

IfabnobUfarl 

MuHoboncxi 

Montedison 

OHwwttl 

Pfcnfll 

RA5 

Rlnascenfa 

SIP 

SME 

sola 

siaxta 

Stef 


840 


MIB Current Index : 1541 
Prrrh»:w 


AkrUtaddr 
AHtnamAh. 
Av Dassault 

Bencalre 
B IC . 

Bangrotn 


Cirrataar 
atatseyrt 
dab Med 
Darty 


oSStBotae 



588 581 

2B690 284.10 
1140 1110 
626 627 

487 492 

1740 I7D0 
77S 778 

3156 2175 
S99 2270 
632 632 

516 518 

MTV U22 
108 810 
191 rw 
767 760 

621 421 

1440 - 

514 _ 

207D 2120 
419 615 

2231 2240 

1540 1556 


1675 1730 

‘ 2M0 


Total 


«» .... 

1138 1144 
UtV UU 
8150 7850 
719 721 

<94 695 

47450 472 

'361 36110 
277 281 

295 293 

1461 1469 
UDI 1510 
6» 678 

I3» UTS 
2590 3*00 
536 516 

28 226 


: 3MJ7 

agg» ilS» 

P i e riousiaim 


’I. • • 

Close 

Pt^V. 

fill Slegepera. . | 




S Cald Storage 

Z30 

270 

3 DBS 

4JN 

4.96 


555 

555 


2.13 

214 

inchamo 

233 

235 


5J4 

530 

OCBC 

80S 

885 

OUB 

NA 

261 

OUE 

KJL 

231 

Sriangrl-Ia 

MJQ. 

188 


LB2 

UK 


124 

223 

Start Press 

555 

550 

S Steamship 

888 

NA 

St Trading 

3.16 

3JB 


154 

151 

HOB 

X70 

332 

i Straits Times lad latex : 

75879 

|| Pravioas : 75829 



911 TtnilrWIm | 

AGA 

TO 

114 


187 

189 


295 

293 



mjo. 

Allas Copco 

107 

108 



— 


275 

274 


22B 

223 


340 

340 

HamMsbonkea 

171 

173 


183 

185 


NA 




— 


•950 

•9 

SKF 

220 

225 

5w*KflshMaldi 

IK 

188 

Votvu 

239 

235 

AfteomwMea 

edex : xtuo 

Prarioas ; 37838 



1! II 

AO 

2J0 

271 

ANZ 

5.10 

£12 


7.14 

7.12 

Baral 

151 

253 

Bougainville 

1.95 


Carttmokw 

750 

7JD 

Colei 

4J6 

4.11 

CotnOas 

1.92 

IM 

CRA 

£80 


CSR 

2.12 



154 

3 -« 

ECderaljd 

115 

315 

ICI Australia 

220 

215 

MooeOan 

230 

230 

MIM 

2.7B 

290 

Myar 

MS 

331 

ml AusMknk 

455 


Mews Carp 

680 

686 

N Broken Hill 

zc 

242 

Pnetean 

440 

ua 

Old Coal Yrast 

130 

130 

Sont>3s 

£84 

£88 

THom» Nation 

234 

224 

Wesfn Mfafaig 

437 


wosteac Bansssig 

452 

A73 

WPOBlhfi 

130 

132 

j All Ordinaries Index: 93631 

Prarioas: 95638 



1 II 

Altai 

373 

380 

AsohlQioitt 

897 

W 

AiaM Glass 

inn 

807 

Bank of Tokyo 

791 

793 1 

BridWteM 

531 

SB 

Canon 

944 


caste 

1540 

S80 

CJteh 


420 

Dal Nteaon Print 

1070 

m 

DohwHous* 

863 

m 

Dafwa Securffle 

930 

MB 

FOnuc 

<470 MO 

Full Book 

vm vm \ 


Ctase 

Pun Photo 1980 

FulRsu 906 

HflariU 7Q3 

Hitachi Cable SOT 

Hondo 1430 

Japan Ah- Lines 5100 

Kalhna 471 

Kansal Power 1900 

Kanasakl Steel 155 

Kirin Brewery 4B7 

Komatsu 534 

Kubota 355 

Kyocera 3740 

Matsu Elec I rids 1300 

Mafcsu Elec Works 482 

Mitsubishi Bank 1400 

Mitsubishi atom 480 

Mitsubishi Elec 354 

Mitsubishi Heavy SSI 

Mitsubishi Carp 633 

Mitsui and Co 431 

Mitsubishi 646 

Mitsumi 725 

NEC 95* 

HGK Insulators 74S 

NikJmSec ng 

Nippon Kooafcu 922 

MeuonOH 840 

Nippon Steel 176 

tOnoon Yusen 334 

Ninon 430 

Nomura Sec 1250 

Olympus 990 

Pioneer 1820 

£«h m 

Sharp S25 

Pil nMmf 492 

Sh[netz& Chemical 491 

soar 3770 

Sumitomo Bank 1 810 

SumUnma Cham 259 

Sumitomo Marine so 

Sumitomo Metal U7 

TaMCarp 350 

Taleho Maine 585 

T^rtoChem “* 

TDK 4278 

Trilla 470 

Takla Marine 900 

Tokyo Elec. Power 21» 

Toppon Print i ng 860 

Taravind 88 

Toshiba 346 

Toyota 1190 

Ytamalctt Sac 026 


20201 

■ 907. 


Tto 

572 


1430 

6270 

474 

1870 

154 

700 

535 

340 

3770 

1320 

865 

1410 


3» 

344 


421 

434 


6B 

741 


943 

735 

795 

02S 

840 

IW 

299 

644 

1230 

HMD 

BID 


IW 

651 

495 

3700 


247 
464 
153 
347 
5 (4 

«n 

4340 

490 

866 

2100 


5091 

347 

1140 


MMnl/DLj. Index: 13MMS 
previous : T35CUI 
New Index : THAI* 
Prevtoas : W1U8 


Atfo 
AhBOiSSi 
Autaohan 
Bonk Lou 
Brown Dev o n . 

Ssdffdsj®* 

Etadrowau 

Houcraank 


2930 3500 
808 8U 
S9IS 5925 


1480 UBS 
33N 3300 
2995 3000 


Jacobi 
JelanO 
UnxflsGVr 
Moovonpldi 
Nestle 


Roche BOtar 


660 JM 
2560 VS 
6600 6400 
2700 3600 
two 1950 
5S5 fflj 
6875 6B0 
. 1440 1440 
*975 9488 
13* 13*5 


Swtxar 


175 




SBC 


1448 M35 
474 474 


■union Bank 


1758 TWO 


SU0 SUB 
2320 ZKtD 


PlWlDH 1 


^qg. J6 


Gmat&an stocks ria AP 


Safas Stock 


2276 AMI Prct 
300Acklands 
22400 Aon loo E 
tosoo Aora Ind A 
24026 Art Energy 
12130 AltO Nat 
172D Albania SI 
SMArpcon 
3D00Ah»if 
4286 BP Canada 
21220 Bank BC 
91305 Bor* NS 

294300 Harriett o 
43900 Baton A I 
13400 Bonanza R 
XIOBrofartM 
MOD Bramalea 
1400 Brando M 
7S6364BCPP 
36745 BC Res 
14927 BCNKM 
3800 Bru n s wfc 
2000 Budd Can 
12U0CAE 
15BCCLA 
23100 CM Frv 


Utah Lmr Close Cha 

SH 20Vi 2B*+ W 
S17V3 T7ta 171b 
sm* T9V% mi+to 
m svj s»+ so 
SWIV 1BVJ UM 
Sinu UVi I49k 
S20VH low. 20b— *b 
S23W. 23W 23ta 
vm 9tk Ota— V. 
534 331% IM 

SSta 516 5H— lb 

SOta Ota Bh 
198 190 198 +8 

Sim tata T8ta+ ta 
370 3*0 365 
450 440 430 

S17ta 1716 17U 

no 9« n + « 

two to w 

rn_ 24? 232 +4 

CTh 22ta XBfc— ta 
S15ta 15ta WKt— Vi 
S33 mb 3216— 16 
sim im iota— ta 
SJ7Vi 17ta I7ta— « 


4405CNorWest 
25C Pockr* 
59742 can Trust 
8200 C Tana 
400 CGE 
3602 Cl Bk Com 
3H442 CTtre A f 
400 C UtB B 
5000 Cara 
3721 Catanese 
17250 CeatrlTr 


M9ta gi* ijta 


1 21145 C Dislb A 
178977 CD ta B f 
■ 4100CTL Benfc 
HrtOConvmfn 
1 aSS ConwegA 
p2030Cosefcn R 
Irtoo Conran A 
33acnmnx 
22300 Crar Res 
10218 Doan Dev 
bXODaonAra 


.5300 Denison A p 


15600 Denison B | 

UDODevefcon 
53300 DkfatmAi 

HNDtaknoa 

|T70S4D3mco 

isaiODomanA 

HO Donahue 
P 950 Du Pant A 
12500 Dries A 
1 1750 Elcthom X 
P112S Etna 
1 16556 EaUBv Sur 
2SSD0FCA InH 
2650 C Falcon C 
29950 Fknbrdao 
■ 3R5 Fed Ind A 
1 300 Fid PfonH 




■ho Ml 

VxDOGeeeCmw 
30100 Geocrude ■ 

b jssbJ 


MO Graft G" 
iGL Forest 


4475 GC 1 

200 Gf Pod He 

aOBGreyhnd 

900 H Group A 

Moo Hawker 
2800 Haves D 
3800 Hees intt 
_nc H Bay C o 
toBiintarao 
STBQlpdal 
208 lt>g| fat 
ton intend Got 
75750 tim Thant 
5589 Inter Pipe 
1150 IOSCO 

300! woo B 
ZHOJamock 
408 Kelsey H 


1 UXXHT 


5BV41 

400 1. Dm Cent 


28 + '* 

S24 23 26 +1 

S3* 34 34 — ta 

SOM 42% 421b— ta 
SUta Uta llta-u. 
S64 64 64 +1 

UM M 3^- M> 

SW 9ta 9ta 
snta 17ta 17ta+ Vfe 
Stata Mta Uta 
m. rw ru— v> 
«S Uta is + vs 

S11I6 Uta 1116+1 

§ta 7ta m + w 
*jta ^1, 

9P6 816 8ta— ta 

325 295 323 +25 

S15 Uta Uta— Vb 
S71U 2116 71 ta 
1» 175 100 + 5 

425 4» 425 +5 
415 415 415 -» 

SUM. w Uta 

snta i3ta ista— ta 

M Sta 57*- ta 
SM Sta Ota + is 

m* b 8ta+ ta 
SZ7ta 271b 771+— U 
270 260 260 —9 
SI Tta 17V. I7ta + ta 
«2ta 22H 22ta 
SW* TOb im-ta 

Vta 8 n*+ ta 

S3146 IW, Zita- 16 
» , m 7ta+ 1% 
nni iTta i7ta-u 
S17 16% 17 +ta 

2?* wta-v. 

njw »« tota+ta 

nm -mb 13V, + i% 
30ta 30ta 

Si JP 4 " +ta 

» ”k^ +j 

SB 7% 7t*+ ta 

S* Uta w. 

S 5 3S 
’Sta « 

POta 20ta 3BV-ta 
S12ta T3ta 12>6— H 
S2Zta 2714 271k 
S3V» 2316 274. 

H6 ta tota avs_ta 
sigk i«ta wit 

STSta Uta ISta 
»ta 2ita Jita-v. 

S42K 42 <2 — ta 

SU 14 14 - ta 

B2ta 22ta 22ta+>6 

suta uta 16*. 

W 41ta 6UV— 

B9 28ta+ ta 

«4t« U U - ta 


5«90B Lacuna 
10400 Utotow Co 

21828 Lumanks 

IMMDSHA 
3400 Mice 
■742 Melon HX 
3700 Marinme I 

52D0Meriond E 

18143 MotsanAf 

7800 Murray 
4300 NtfaiscO L 
45E2Naranda 
417*8 Noran 
■9780 Nva Aft At 
1700 Nawsca W 
55M1 NaWst so A 
JOOO QoltwOPd 

TSBZttls 


>* 


SlOOPonConP 
BH0 Pembina 
Sip Pine Polnf 
941731 Plaar 
17US Prov loo 
IS37S Qua Stung o 
1240a Rav rack 1 


1*00 Rd Slealts A 
«0 Ropers A 
3106 Roman 


■lb Sceptre 

1000 Scott* I 


23170 Shelt Can 
24490 Sherr it! 


SBsP' 

«KS?SS7 A 

iKO Tex Can 
,SHJnc , ri M A 
JJWTar Dm B> 
28425 Tontar Bl 
1173 Traders At 
14*25 T ras MI 
1780 Trinity Res 
MESTaiAlto Ua 
30190 TrCan PL 
10774 Trlmac 
6W5 Triton A 
_ lOOT.-Inc Al 
«*2fi Turbo 
1*60 Unicorn A f 
2*12 UnCar Bid 
Mto U Eid prise 
4S0OU Keno 
72D0VetSliAl 
TWO Vesterai 
WSWarosir 
'WWOKMM 

H2S Weibxi 

300 Yk Bear 
•ulai voiesl 


SI3 m. 124b 
ratal 204k 2B4S 

SZI ar.v an 
Sl* 1 « ir« T7> 

415 415 415 

S13ta 13V* UVS_ .. 
S15ta 15- 15 V* + ta 
J60 2H S3 

r<- in i 4 

S22 21*. 71 *• 

SZ7ta 2 T<m 3 Tj— ta 
8* Tta I7V» 17H+ ta 
HSta TS'e ISta 
J*4* tta 4- + t* 
3=0 20 » 

40 Ji’T 39 
tota 74* Tta+ 4* 
IB* SI- 3146- >. 
3154* 15 1SV. + ta 

w» ,r*+'» 

017 3< toT+ta 
3T7 16* IT + ta 

04'^ on ar.T+ <t 
stota 2S'6 tota+ ta 
323 244, 25 

4*5 475 4C5 *JJ 

SlOH *4. 134*9- ta 
SW Uta Uta- 3 

sai 21 3: + ta 

51 IV* uu lltatta 

sir- u is — e 

Stota 3He 344, * fa 
*P* B» 51 - ta 
SSI 27H 27ta 

W: *•- — u. 

Ho*, a-* a - 

S8ta S'- •> 

*'.213 ITe IF 
S17-* ‘.*X. 

IP* _ . . 

5S. 2, ac — v* 

Sjg-.e .21*1 Jl">- ta 
.99 m !99 + 4 

218 217 217—8 

rar.j ay* »»*- ■% 

Slg-l } 5« 75’.;+ to 

S-* 1 2?* Si! - * 1 

S37-s 22 - 224*+ 4 
34 n-.S - 
25^ TJta v, + n 
a- 3T-2- ta 

*i> Kn* •: + — 

7*0 SS UC *30 
H6 Sta » + i% 

SKta 2SH- ta 

410 490 soo —18 

glta 2Ita Site- % 

sot* rta m*- % 

S5 H ^ “ T 

nl 1 ;?r* ,li * - 

**»1 9 

4» 410 480 

ȣ* .9ta ' 


i+ ta 
■ rt 


r* ' T J+b— ■* 


«• \ 


Sir* :tu i* 

S3 It u 

lUta in* 


9J1LI37 lham 

CkM 




[Stays stock 
62547 Bank Mad 
W7iBamte3ff 

7tnBomh:dre 

isun CofcaOH 

«0MMTr>l 


<5938 Norm OJo 
Cora 


-«g. Cfw owl 

HI.* 29«* 29*»+ is 

^ ^ 2 

:! * * 

*2|a? •• j :s 3— « 


75a Powered 
. toDRoUtadA 
tins Roytu Bonk 

40BM«nBraA 

„ Z ei tors 

Tww Sflinutajr. 


Sir* '!** iSta* « 

521 — 31 to 31 ta— to 

«r> jgtaw +2 


130- 30 

HI? « 
an* rta m 
a*e M * to 
, W O 88 
starts. 


to 


.»“ ta 


Indosmof* Utoex: 


ii*87 


* 


tool fcLAS airocmta ovu w 
Reports <rf the ruthless methods used the 
Communists in Bulgaria brought home a few 
hard realities as wefl: bui for mosi people 
events in lhai country mere loo obscure, too 
peripheral, to be allotted to disturb i he need 
for the Sovid Union and the Wea w »wk «i 
a harmonious relationship. Even Praand had to 
rake second place. The selling up or the »«*- 

cow-backed Lublin government; ihe dasp- 

pearance of the members the Potash go^nh 

beat in London who had been united w 
confer wiih Soviet military autbmiues (and 
offered safe amduct); ihe aennouarema rt that 
the missing men had been arrested and chargol 
with subversive activities; Hwr trial and sen- 
tencing daring the Potsdam conference —Kee 
showsm painful detail jost bow modi ur West 


He rounds on ^chapter on the bbcruuoo 
of the Nazi concentration camps with an unbe- 
coming but mino r incident that look piare 
shortly afterward m a small neutral country: 
Eamon De^ Valera’s visit to the German embas- 
sy in Dublin to convey hisofncMraidotaM* 
as prime minister of Eire on the death of Hiller. 

“De Valera," hewriics, “was not concerned 
with respect or otherwise foe Mdf Hilkr. Ha 
visit was simply one mote carefully aa cnated 
move in his long campaign id establish tire 
unassailable political reality of separatist Irish 
nationalism’ And he adds thai^ “it was to inch 
a world of everyday practical political consid- 
erations. their co mpro mises, their devices* 
pAcyAc_ and their routine shrinking of drih 
that the international community as a whole 
was now to return.'' 


His blunder, 33... QON4?, 
made everything easy far Miles 
after 34 R*P!TQxN; 33 QxW. 
but also 33... QxQ; m0. 
R-Ni; 35 N-S3. F-B7; J6 R- 
R2, RhQBI: 37 N-B1 will wn 
for White. 

After 39 QxBP. Ghgonc hod 
no compensation for the lost 
piece, so he gave np. 


1 

< 


* r 


n 


. ^ 


i: 
i . 

iv 

i. 

i 

t 

■A. 


f 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 198S 




Page 15 


SPORTS 


Baseball’s Struggle With Cocaine: 
4 Widespread but Hidden Battle 


By Murray Chass 
Miehael Goocfwin 

NEW YORK S®* *"* r ' 

“£* «e of cocaine by 

SfiJW'SS J*5» ^ been 2 


traveled to other National League aties to 
supply players with cocaine. 

Adam Renfroe Jr, Strong's lawyer, said his 
dient would not have any comment, bnt 
added : “The reason a lot of guys are pointing 


P?^Se , beS C SlLi ?ea ^^ al 500165 of tohim,^ was imy guy is thekast likely one who 
“ oiminal m- item? ■ 


SKSSSLftsSjSSfi 

SrSftsFfcE : •SSSS 

*SSSS! -SB 

Tm “ ‘ b0 

• Players representing nenrhr nil ia 


United State^SSSSiKS 
al players implicated. & 

dties ’ *ng dealers or 
r® r COUr -f IS had access to baseball chib- 
hous» and conducted sales there. 

• The practice of shielding players from 
- Prosecuuoo and idendficSlSSiSrS 

a®90g t some defense lawyers, who 
feel that their clients have become scape- 
goats. 

• In Kansas City, as many as 20 players, 
representing nine teams, and one batboy 
were implicated in a 1983 cocaine case, al- 
though it culminated in only four Royals 


Dale Shiftman, an unemployed photogra- 
pher indicted on 1 1 1 counts, was to go on 
trial Monday, but sources dose to his case 
said he was expected to plead guilty barring a 
last-minute breakdown in plea bargain nego- 
tiations. The case against Shiftman was built 
in part with the aid of a cooperating witness, 
who, the FBI said, made a government-moni- 
tored purchase of cocaine from (he defen- 
dant. Sources close to the case identified the 
witness as Kevin Koch, who was in his sev- 
enth season as the Pittsburgh Parrot, the team 
mascot, when he resigned in June. The 
sources said Koch acted as a go-between who 
purchased cocaine from Shiftman and deliv- 


purchased cocaine from Shiftman and deliv- 
ered it to players in the clubhouse. to-viewed Moti- — — — — — 

Contacted by telephone, Koch declined to tor in April 1983. 
discuss the case. “I don' t have any comment," Asked whether Molitor had acknowledged 
he said. Tve talked to the people I’ve bad to knowing Peters, Miller answered yes, and 
talk to. There's really nothing 1 can say.” added: “Basically, it was a business rdation- 
Tben he added, “Tm p lanning on writing a ship that Molitor maintained with Mr. Peters 


"He did use 3® 

drugs at one •' 

E oiot in time. VfS 

le's not now.” '. d™ 

According to a * W - ' 

transcript of •• 

Miller's tesdmo- ^ 

ny obtained by /Wm****'*' ■ / 

The Tunes, Da- 't / HI:. • ; l 
vis named eight n , D 
players from 1/316 DCrra, 
various teams as . _ 

customers of Pe- SOI1TC68 831(1, WAS 
ters and said that 

be and Molitor involved With 
had “drug prob- 
lems because of { oar defendants 
an identity cn- 

in Pittsburgh 

grand jury train- 
script, said he in- case ' 


• iwo players, Dale Berra of the New 
York Yankees and Dave Parker of the Crn- 
cumati Reds, were among the players named 
as cocaine purchasers in a statement riven to 
federal prosecutors by a defendant in an 
ongoing case in Pittsburgh. Both players dis- 
puted the assertions. 

• At least eight players are expected to 
testify in the trial next month of one the seven 
defendants in the Pittsburgh case. 

Until now, public knowledge about the 
extent of cocaine use in baseball has been 
confined to the cases of the dozen or so 

caine use, and several others who havebeen 
charged individually with possession of the 
drug. Most of those who have acknowledged 
using cocaine have been those who have re- 
ceived treatment for addiction. Baseball offi- 
cials say that an unspecified number of addi- 
tional players have undergone such 
rehabilitation treatment, and they say others 
may have done so without idling anyone in 
baseball ' 

With the exception of the case in Kansas 
Gty twfr yean ago, in which four players 
were sentenced to prison terms, no players 
have been prosecuted as a result of large-scale 
investigations.. 

Estimates of the' extent of cocaine use 
among players vary widely, with some people 
connected with the game saying they believe . 
the problem peaked a fewyears ago and now; 
has declined to where only a few players used 
it. On the other hand, a source familiar with 
the Pittsburgh case said that some of the 
players interviewed by the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation said that “40 to 50percentof all 
players use drugs." 

The commissioner of baseball, Peter Ue- 
berroth, while declining to estimate how 
many players use cocaine, said he considered 
drug use the No. 1 problem facing the sport 
and has warned that it could lead to corrup- 


boofc myself." 

Bara, who mice played for the Pirates, and 
Scurry, a relief pitcher for the ream, had been 
expected to testify at Shiftman’s trial, people 
on both sides of the case said. A prosecution 
source said their names still may surface as 
part of a guilty plea by Shiftman. The two 
players, sources on both rides said, also have 
been mentioned as possible witnesses if an- 
other defendant, Jeffery Mosco, goes to uiaL 

When Scurry was asked about his involve- 
ment in the Pittsburgh investigation, he said, 
“I have nothing to say." 

In addition, the sources said, Berra was 
involved with three other defendants, includ- 
ing Shelby Greer, a sales representative for a 
telecommunications company in Philadel- 
phia. Sources familiar with Greer's statement 
to authorities said it named Berra as a cocaine 
customer and reported that one night Berra 
ransacked Greer's apartment looking for 
drugs. 

Berra acknowledged renting his lownhouse 
to Mosco and a friend of Mosco one winter, 
but be took issue with Greer's statement 

“Shelby Greer's statements are not fact," 
Berra said. “I don't fed I have to comment on 
anything as ridiculous as that 1 never ran- 
sacked Greer's apartment It’s ridiculous and 
if s not true." 

A Yankees source said Berra, after being 
traded to New York, had agreed to undergo 
testing for drug use and has passed two tests 
this season, at times selected by the club. 

Parker, Who other players said was a friend 
of Greer, was another player who had sub- 
stantial involvement in the Greer case, ac- 
cording to sources on both rides of the case. 
Two of (hose sources said that in his state- 


in order to purchase cocaine for personal 
consumption ... He said he purchased at 
various times, which numbered 30 or 40 
times, he purchased up to an eighth of an 
ounce of cocaine from Mr. Peters." 

Molitor recently was quoted as saying that 
be had used cocaine in 1981. But he declined, 
through a team official to be interviewed for 
this article. 

Despite a lengthy trial for Peters and sever- 
al other suspects, none of the players was 
mentioned in open court as a cocaine user, 
lawyers for several of the defendants said 
they had agreed to a prosecution request that 
the players be kept out of the case. They 
agreed, they said, because they felt that the 
public would be more inclined to view the 
defendants as corrupters of sports heroes. 

The case involving at least two members of 
the Orioles similarly resulted in jail terms for 
those who were selling cocaine and immunity 
from prosecution in- exchange for testimony 
for the players who were buying it, according 
to Gary Krmmel, a former high school teach- 
er and businessman in Owings Mills, Mary- 
land. He was recently released after spending 
13 months in federal correctional facilities for 
selling cocaine to various people, including, 
he said in an interview, Rich Dauer, a second 
baseman for the Orioles, and Sammy Stew- 
art, a relief pitcher. Kimmel said he sold the 
drug to each of the players seven or eight 
times between the 1982 and 1983 seasons. 

Kimmel now in the real estate business, 
said he could not remember how he met 
Dauer. but that he had met Stewart through a 
mutual friend. Dauer, he said, attended a 
poker game on several occasions built around 
television broadcasts of Monday night foot- 
ball games and that he bad sold cocaine to 


ment on drag trafficking in baseball Greer, ball games and that he had sold 
who was charged with lu counts, said Parker him there. Stewart, Kimmel said, purchased 
once gave him $2,000 to buy an ounce of cocaine from him as well as from tne mutual 
cocaine andtold him to deliver it to him in friend. He said that he never saw 
San Diego. use the drag together. 

Parker, in a telephone interview, said he “I can totally understand what 
had “nothing to say” about the Pittsburgh do,” Kimmel said, referring to t 
case. Asked specifically about his inclusion testifying against him to a federal 
cm the list of witnesses for Strong's trial be “They’re making $400,000 or $500 
said, “Tm not acknowledging anything.” When you’re making $500,000, ii 

Milner, whose last season was 1982, has hard to tdl what you have to." 
been identified by sources as a possible wit- Stewart has refusal to discuss 
ness in the Mosco trial and as a friend of publicly. Dauer, who first denie 


friend: He said that he never saw the players 
use the drag together. 

“I can totally understand what they had to 
do,” Kimmel said, referring to the players’ 
testifying against him to a federal grand jmy. 
“They’re making $400,000 or $500,000 a year. 
When you’re making $500,000, it’s not that 
hard to tdl wbat you have to." 

Stewart has refused to discuss the subject 
publicly. Dauer, who first denied knowing 


and has warned that it could lead to oorrup- Robert McCue, another defendant Repeated anyone involved, later said through his agent, 
lion of the game by gamblers and drug deal- efforts to reach Milner, who played for the Ron Shapiro, that be had testified against 


era. Asked whether he believed the cocaine 
problem was less or greater than it was sever- 
al years ago, he replied simply: “Greater." 

Cocaine use has not been limited to cities 
where criminal investiga- . . . . 
tions have taken place. 

Baseball officials across the 
country said they were 
aware mat their teams had 
serious drug problems at 
one time or another. 

In Montreal for example, 

John McHale, president of 
the Expos, said that eight or 
nine of his players ware us- 
ing cocaine in 1982. Told of 
McHale’s comments, Whit- 
er Herzog, the manager of 
the Sl Louis Cardinals, said 
his team bad an even bigger 
drug problem when'be took 
over m 1980. Ballard Smith, 
president of the San Diego 
padres, said that, in 1982, ... . > 

“we probably tod tolf-a- ^ e y 

do? «i guys we felt strongly J 

were involved" with drugs. a l rpa( l 

All three officials said they aireau 

“cleaned bouse," meaning 
they released or traded most COCA1E 

of the players involved. 

A former member of the Blue S 
San Francisco Giants cited 
the names of four players on playei 

the 1985 team as frequent 
c oc aine users- One of the tO A d< 

four, Chffi Davis, conceded 

that he had experimented 



Pirates and the Expos, were unsuccessful 
One of his lawyers. Chuck Berry of Pitts- 
burgh. said he had been unable to locate him 
recently. _ . . 

_ . - ■ — Some lawyers m the case 

expressed the belief that 
their clients had been treat- 
ed unfairiy because the wit- 
nesses received immunity 
from prosecution. Michael 
Mullen, the lawyer for 
Thomas Balzer, said neither 
Balzer nor Kevin Connolly, 
both of whom pleaded 
guilty to intent to distribute 
cocaine, would have been in 
court if it bad not been for 
the cocaine buyers, whom 
be did not identify. 

“Neither of these boys 
had the wherewithal to pur- 
chase such a huge quantity 
of cocaine,” Mullen said. 
“Kevin operates a beating 
and air conditioning plant. 
They were He didn't generate enough 

_ . income. If someone hadn’t 

already doing laid a large amount of mon- 

J D ev on Kevin, he wouldn’t 

cocaine’ Vida have been there and neither 
would Tom. The guys who 
R] nP Bald of supply the money get umnu- 

Biue 8 am Oi id walk away. It really 

players he took AiroLber lawyer involved 
j I in one of the cases, who 

to a neater. bAhI not, to be identified, 

- 1 " — — ■ — “ said he believed at least 
some of the defendants were 


— “ — ‘ , . . t?oi SUUISUI - 

with the tong * and that™ 1 1 ^ w frirads ^ payers, soriaM with Jem 

agents had warned him m l and, eventually, began getting drugs for them 


under surveillance. Uae playerf requests. “Ttey. became 

“That was enough for me, uavts sam. ^ ^ -These guys didn’t corrupt 

“You know: a ?ord to the week5 the players." 

Baseball may Icara in the nma rew 


the players." 

In the Milwaukee case; which resulted last 


^ilThaWirof some players In the Milwaukee case, wrncu rewuiw 
about the cocame hM«te ofsome^pj ^ y^ut Anthony J. Peters, a former ice cream 

the ^ co- Mtesman, being sentenced to 22 years m 

Pittsburgh with a tool of ( prison for rannmg a cocame operation that 

caine possession and <hslri ^V. d Authorities said grossed $17 million a year, 
Whiles* of awS- the names of at least 1C 1 playere from the 

with sanity pleas, the one Brewers, Chicago White Sox and Cleveland 


who had access to the house and an Internal Revenue Serviceagenu 

The officials said those ; likely to hf faH Miller, testified that bank records showed 

testify in his trial scheduled fcffnextm^ finaizcxal transactions involving Peters and 

25S3sBiS?ssg 

rSria, Jeff Leonard of San Francisco Washington, formerly of the 

“fr Cflftc Cabdl of Los Angles. White Sox and Mels and now with the Atlan- 


Kim m e l Asked if that meant Dauer also was 
acknowledging buying cocaine from Kimmel 
Shapiro said: “If Kimmel wants to say be 
sola cocaine to Dauer, then you can put the 
pieces together.” 

Perhaps the largest case involving players 
took place in Kansas City during 1982 and 
1983. Only four Royals — Vida Blue, Willie 
Wilson, Jeny Martin and Willie Aikens — 
were charged, but Mark Uebl a Kansas Gty 
man who pleaded guilty in the case, said 
players from around the American League 
were his customers. Liebl, who was sentenced 
to six years in federal prison in Texas, said he 
sometimes delivered drugs to players at 
Royals Stadium. 

Wilson, Martin and Aikens pleaded guilty 
to misdemeanor charges of attempting to 
possess cocaine after calls they made to Uebl 
were picked up by a government wiretap. 
Blue was charged with possession, a misde- 
meanor. He agreed to testify against Liebl 
and others in the case, including Liebl's 
brother, and received the same sentence as 
the other players: a year in prison, with nine 
months suspended, and a tine. 

In an interview and in a sworn statement to 
baseball officials, Uebl said he had used 
cocaine with nine members of the Royals’ 
organization, including some from the minor 
leagues, either at his House or those of Blue 
and Aikens. He said he also used cocaine with 
debt other players from the Oakland A's, 
Chicago White Sox, Boston Red Sox and 
Minnesota Twins, as well as a Brewers bat- 
boy. 

Liebl said that Blue was the first player be 
met and that, after initially purchasing co- 
caine for others. Blue started bringing players 
to Liebl’s house and having cocaine parties at 
his house. Uebl said that Blue tod purchased 
the drug from him for at least one other 
player on the Detroit Tigers, that Aikens had 
attempted to buy it for a member of the 
Baltimore Orioles and that Wilson had trial 
to buy it for a member of the Seattle Mari- 
ners. 

Aikens, then the Royals’ starting first base- 
man but now in Toronto's minor league sys- 
tem, declined to common except to say that 
the experience was “history." 

Wilson, too. declined to comment directly 
ontlmcase.Butmhiscoiifessioiiheadmowl- 
edged placing a phone call to liebl's house in 
an effort to buy cocaine. Later, he said he had 
made the call on behalf of a friend. Uebl said 
the friend played for the Mariners. 

What struck Uebl about the players who 
used cocaine, be said, was that they all had 
experience with the drag before they met him. 

“I can't think of one ballplayer where it 
was his fust time with me/ he said in an 
interview. “There was no such thing. They all 


*** who testified before _ the taftra b ■ g ^ from, knew bow to roll up dollar bills to snort it 

eiS&sssss 

Sfss-jrsrssTe issrr: 
jskk SSsrssft‘-s."' , i .sagas 

ttea l— toveac^^^^ ^ bo L " writing a book on the 

SSia former ptayer wtih Srsha, an agent representing wring the _ issue of 1 

h^.^rSoapp^red before the grand w 2Zn, said his diem would not com- players to Liebl, he sai 

several teams. al» appear™ case. However. Kederaha sank domg cocaine. 


S^^^^ bCf0retIieBran 

iu ^ people dose to the case said Stro ng 


ment on 


with. I remember talking to these guys about 
where they had their first experience and 
their first experience was always with another 
ballplayer” 

Blue, now pitching for the Giants, declined 
to comment, saying that be. Hire UebL was 
writing a bode on the subject However, re- 
garding the issue of his introducing other 
players to Uebl, he said, "They were already 
doing cocaine.” 


Expos Joining die Race in NL East 

Mattingly Is Hot, Yanks on Hot Spot Cardinals Defeated Again, in 10th 


w JrJZ'n ruw L Senicc and give the Yankees a 4-2 victory 
NEW YORK — The Yankees’ over the Boston Red Sox. It was 
°J VQer ; , George Steiubrenner, ihrir fourth straight triumph, 
showed his young hitting star, Don The double stretched Matting- 
Maitingly. who was boss last ty's hitting streak to 16 and 
March. But it may turn out to cost increased his major league-leading 


Sieinbrenner a bundle. 

Mattingly, 24, who had won the 
American League batting tide with 


runs-batied-in total to 98. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dapateha 

ST. LOUIS —The Montreal Ex- 
pos are serious about crashing the 
party at the top of the National 
League East Division. 

They beat the Cardinals for the 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


l the top of the National “Sure, it was in the back of my 
East Division. mind," he said. “We're in a pen* 

beat the Cardinals for ihe nam chase and I can't do that I 
straight time Sunday, and was getting nervous about throw- 


During his hot spell he has gone that 6-5, 10-inning triumph, cou- “Jg strikes. 1 had to bear down. 
3l-for-64. has raised his average pled with the Pittsburgh Pirates' Andujar walked six, but settled 
from .306 to .333. has scored 20 victory aver the Mels, closed Mon- down after the third inning and did 


» - - a- — ■ -nn. uis a.biagv DICU WIUI UtC I ILLS ULUE.M luoiw y— 

iiT i ^ ? J“ rirst faU season fr0fll -306 to .333, has scored 20 victory over the Mels, closed Mon- down after the third inning and dtd 
as tne Yankees first baseman, was runs, hit eight home runs and driv- ireal to within four of co- not allow another hit until the 

nint> Hniie U.. ■ . a _ .1. _ . . - .» -- — t , ■ 


nine days away from being eligible en in 19 runs 
for arbitration u„ .v. t 

When Sieinbrenner and Mai- 
ttogly could not agree on the worth 
of the talented lefi-handed hitter. * 
the owner, as was his Dreroeative. w 
renewed Mattingly's contract with hrermef^J!? 
a raise from S130.000 to 5325,000. 

The Yankees could have signed nexl 
him to a four-year contract calling vieoige auto 


en m 19 runs. leaders Sl Louis and New York. 

He leads the league in total bases Teny Francona won the game 
(253), doubles (36), extra-base hits with a two-run single in the 10th 
(59) and in game-winning RBI (15). inning off Joaquin Andujar, who 
“! won't forget what happened.” was bidding to become the majors' 
Mattingly said Iasi spring Stein- first 20-game winner this season, 
brenner “got his this year. TU get Tim Rames bad doubled, then a 


leaders Sl Louis and New York, eighth, when Tommy Herr’s homer 

Terry Francona won the game *»■ <■*«»** 
wiih a two-run single in the 10th “We got some help from the Pi- 
icning off Joaquin Andujar, who rates, but that ain't the idea.” said 
was bidding to become the majors' the Cardinals' manager, Whitejj 
first 20-gamc winner this season. Herzog. “The idea is for us to win. 
Tim Raines bad doubled, then a p^tes 5, Mels 0: In Pittsburgh, 
walk, a ground out and. an mien- Bill Padlock hit two home runs. 
tionaJ walk brought up Francona. for 3 ^ j Q f uj tbe Iasi three 


him 10 a four-year contract calling “George didn’t want to take care tionaJ walk brought up Francona. for . 

for about $1 million per season. ^ me - 80 ru take care of myself In the bottom 0] the inning re- games, and Don Robinson and Pat 

They will never get a chance 10 sign from now on.” lief ace Jeff Reardon walked two Clements held New York to five 

him that cheap again Sieinbrenner will have to dig batters to force in a run before ^ 

After undergoing ‘ arthroscopic dee P- striking out Andy Van Slyke to get p, 

knee surgery in late February, Mat- Among those who are aware of his 31st save. Mil 

tingjy was off to a slow start. He is Mattingly's importance to the Yan- “I’d only walked 10 batters all hom 


striking out Andy Van Slyke to get mases 9, Cubs 5: Tom Foley, 
his 31st save. Mike Schmidt and Juan Samuel 

“I'd only walked 10 batters all homered for Philadelphia; Chica-. 


in high gear now and spearheading kees is Boston’s manager, John Me- season before this series.” Reardon go, playing ai home, lost for the 
the Yankees' drive to overtake To- Namara. “We pitched him away said. “It’s just a matter of concert- 1 2th time in its last 14 games. 


ronto in the American League East and played him away," McNamara trauon. I need 10 concentrate h&rd- 
Mattingly bounced a double said. “He hits the pitch the other er out there.” 
over first base with two on and one way anyway. That’s why the Yan- Saturday, he allowed the Outb- 


id. “It s just a matter of concert- 12th time in its last 14 games, 
uion. I need to concentrate hard- Giants 2, Dodgers 1: Dan Glad- 
out there." den's two-out single in the 10th 

Saturday, he allowed the Cardi- beat Los Angeles in San Francisco. 

■ _ . . -r • . v. ..... , _ -m. . r>. j > n in l:. . 


out in the seventh inning Sunday to kees are a hoi hall club. He's some- nals to tie to the ei ghth t but the The Dodgers' Orel Hershiser had a 
drive in two runs, break a 2-2 tie thing." Expos pulled out a 5-4 victory. three- hitter and was working on his- 


"'V-l. :-.. -I - H . r - 



BmwvUPI 

GETTING THE LOWDOWN — Charles Romes got a good peek at the runner Buffalo 
teammate Don Wilson (added, but final score did not look so good: Miami won, 27-17. 


SCOREBOARD 


Baseball 


Sunday’s Major League line Scores 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
New von W MO MM s D 

PtmiMrati in sia on— s 9 0 

Aguilera Leach (ft), Gannon (8) and Hur- 
dle; Robinson. Clements (7) and Pena W— 
Robinson, 3-& L — Aguilera, ft-4. Sv— Clements 
HI. HRs— Pittsburgh, Modloch 5 (101. 
MlkHiaMiia Ml 113 Mo—* tft > 

Chicago 180 000 W- 5 ft 1 

Hudson, Shlponofl (9), Tekulve (91 and Vir- 
gil: Bal ler. Gum Perl (ft), Frazier [ft I, Mar iQlth 
19) and Davis. W—Hudsoa ft-1 1. L— Bailer. 0-1. 
Sv— Tekulve (13). HRs— Philadelphia. Foley 
<21. Schmidt (22). Samuel (13). Chicago, Sand- 
berg (17). 

Montreal 822 808 800 3—0 7 8 

SI. Loots 280 001 no 1—5 12 2 

(10 innings) 

Heskettt, Roberge (7). Lucas (9), Reardon 
(9) and Butera Fitzgerald (7), Nicosia HI; 
Andulor. Daylev (10). Lahll UD) and Nieto. 
Porter (0). W— Lucas, 4-2. L — Andulor, 19-7. 
HI M -Man tree). Butera (2). 5t. Louis, Herr 
(4). 

Las Aesetes 000 801 088 0—1 I 0 

San Ftm c ts cB 800 DM 010 1—2 5 3 

Henuiber. Niedenfuer (ft) and Sdosda; 
Krakow. M. Daub (9) and Broil v. w— M. Da- 

Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East DhrfslM 


vis. 4-7. L — Niedeniuer,5-ft. HR— San Francis- 
ca, Brenlv (14). 

Ffc-sJ Game 

AHwrta 000 100 080—1 8 8 

Son Diem 208 800 MX— J 3 1 

Bedraskn. Garber (7) and Benedict; Thur- 
mond. Jackson IS), Me Cullers (7) and Kenne- 
dy. W— Jackson, 1-2. L— Bed fusion, 5-11. Sv— 
McCullcrs (31. HRs — Atlanta, Murpttv (39). 
Son Dleoo. Nettles (13). 

Second Game 

Altanta 020 M4 080-4 13 1 

San Dleoo 188 010 100—3 f 1 

McMurtrv, Forsler (5), Garber 17), Sutter 
(«) and Cerone; Hoyt. Stoddard (ft). Letfem 
(81 ana Kermdey. W— Forster, J-l L — Hovl, 
13-0. Sv — Sutler (20). HRs— Atlanta, Murphy 
(33). Obertdell (3). San Dleaa Royster (2). 
Cincinnati BOS 0M 040-8 9 1 

Houston 080 828 180-3 7 4 

Tlbbs.Prle® (ft). Franco (7) and Dk»; Rmn. 
Smith (8). Calhoun (9) and BaHev. W— Tibbs. 
ft-13. L— Rvaa B-)i. Sv— Franco U). 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Kansas City BOB 213 080— ft 7 2 

Toronto 283 281 11 k— 10 II I 

Gubkan. Jones (3). Farr (ft), Beckwith (8) 
and Wathan; Filer, Lamp (61. Henke (9) and 
Whitt. W— Filer, ML L-Gubiaa, 9-7. HRs— 
Kansas aty.McRM nil.BaUMnl (257. Taran- 
la Bell (29). Upshaw (19). 



W 1 

. 

Pci. 

GB 

Toronto 

73 

44 

424 

— 

New York 

47 

48 

-583 

5 

Detroit 

43 

S3 

543 

9lh 

BaitHnore 

M 

54 

526 

lUb 

Boston 

57 

58 

JM 

15 

Milwaukee 

52 

42 

J56 

!9Kr 

Cleveland 

38 

7B 

J2S 

34va 


West Dtvtsloe 




California 

a 

SO 

573 

— 

Kansas city 

63 

51 

553 

21b 

Da Mona 

42 

ss 

530 

5 

Chicago 

57 

57 

500 

life 

Seattle 

55 

a 

Mi 

12VS 

Minnesota 

S3 

a 

J5J 

13W 

Texas 

42 

73 

MS 

24 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

LeMond, Longo Wins Coors Classic 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East DlvitiOP 

W L PCI. 


Now York 

70 

45 

409 

— 

SI. LMls 

70 

45 

M 

— 

Montreol 

47 

50 

573 

A 

cnicooo 

56 

59 

.487 

14 

Phltadaiohla 

54 

a 

M 

16U> 

Pittsburgh 

3S 

70 

301 

34 lb 

West 

Division 




Lbs Angeles 

49 

44 

500 

— 

Cincinnati 

*1 

54 

530 

0 

San Diego 

43 

SS 

530 

I 

Houston 

54 

62 

M 

1S*» 

Atlanta 

50 

45 

A3S 

19 

San Francisco 

45 

71 

Ml 

Wi 


Tennis 


MEN 

(Al Montreal) 

• ; Floats 

; joboj McEnroe. U^. &t- Ivw 
'C>«i>ft*loynW«L 7*S. 4^. 

' ) r . WOMEN 

' ' ‘ .(At MattumL New Jersey) 

:• i Finals 

Kotny RmoHtl 16). US. «*. Sleftl Grot «). 

West Germany, wKH 


leader's jersey since the fifth day, won the 16-stage Loors mternatiooaJ 
Bicycle Classic on Simday while Jeannie Longo of France, who dominat- 
ed the women's field with five stage victories, woo the women’s title. 

LeMond came in sixth in the final stage, a 61-milfc, 37-lap race won by 
Steve 'Bauer while their Red Zinger teammate, the Tour de France 
champion Bernard Hinault, controlled the field and allowed LeMond to 
concentrate of Andrew Hampslen. his closest overall challenger. 

Green Triumphs in U.S. Golf Tourney 

GRAND BLANC, Michigan (AP) — Ken Green, winning his first 
PGA event, birdied four of the last nine holes of the Buick Open for a 
tournament-record 20-imder-par 268 on Sunday. Pour shots bade was 
Wayne Grady, who had a two-shot lead on Green at the rum. 

Mac O'Grad^an Australian playing his first year on the PGA Tour 
after 11 years oil tournaments in Asia and Europe, finished third at 274. 

For the Record 

Eric Dickerson, beginning the fourth week of his holdout from the 
National Football League's Los Angeles Rams, said that if he does not- 
get a new contract Tlisit here the whole season. I win.” (LAT) 

Challenger Guadalupe Pint or won the World Boxing Council super- 
baniam weight crown in a bloody but unanimous decision against fellow 
Mexican Juan Meza in Mexico Gty. (AP ) 

The UJS. national voUeyball team beat the touring Soviet Union team, 
15-4, 16-14. 15-S. in Seattle. (AP) 


fifth shutout this year until Bob 
Brenly homered to tie the score in 
the eighth. 

Reds 8, Astros 3: Player-manag- 
er Pete Rose singled in a run and' 
scored the go-ahead run during a- 
four-run sixth against Nolan Ryan.. 
Ryan, who lost his eighth straight, 
tod not given up a hit until the 
Reds got five singles in the sixth. 
Rose went 2-for-4 and needs 1 5 hits 
to break Ty Cobb's record of 4.191 . - 

Padres 2-3, Braves 1-6: In San 
Diego. Graig Nettles' two-run shot' 
trumped Dole Murphy's bases- 
empty homer in the first game. But 
in the second, Atlanta ended a six- 
game losing streak when Murphy 
and Ken Oberkfell each homered 
in the sixth inning and Paul Zuvella 
tripled in a run. 

A's 4, Angels 3: In the American 
League. California catcher Bob 
Boone forgot to cover third base on 
a sacrifice bunt in the eighth inning 
in Anaheim, the runner advancing 
all the way from first, then Dave 
Collins' two-strike suicide sqeeze 
bunt gave Oakland its victory. 

That ended the Angels’ nine- 
game winning streak at home and 
closed the A's to within five games 
of the West Division lead. 

Blue Jays 10, Royals 6: George 
Bell drove in four runs with a two- 
run bomer and two sacrifice Dies in 
Toronto and Jesse Barfield got 
three hits, one a bases-loaded tri- 
ple. against Kansas Gty. 

Manners 7, Twins In Mari Lang- 
ston and two relievers held Minne- 
sota to seven hits in Minneapolis 
while Gorman Thomas doubled in 
two runs and Spike Owen singled 
in two for Seattle. 

Tigers 4, Indians 0: Nelson Sim- 
mons. Chet Lemon and Marty Cas- 
tillo homered against Geveland to 
bade the three-hit pitching of Dan 
Petry and Willie Hernandez in De- 
troit! 

White Sox &, Brewers 4: Rudy 
Law got three hits, one a two-run 
triple, and pmch-hitter Jerry Hair- 
ston broke a 3-3 lie with a two-run 
single as Chicago won in Milwau- 
kee. (AP. VPI ) 


Golf 


Bottoa •» 008 MO-2 7 1 

New York BIB IN Ma— 4 S 1 

Lollor. Stanley (7) and Gedmon; Nlekro, 
Bonn <7>. Shlrlev (7). Rlghettl (8). Fisher (9) 
and Wy nosijr. W— Rtotwlti, 9-7. L— Lollor, S-7. 
Sv—Flshwr C7). HR— Easton. Rice (30). 
Seattle 820 801 480-7 13 1 

Minnesota 908 M Ml— 2 7 t 

Lanastan, Nunei (8). Vanda Bora (9) ana 
Kenmev; Viola Hawn (71. EufeatUi (7) and 
Loudner. W— Langston, 7-9. L- Viola 12-10. 
HR— Minnesota Utudner (7). 

CMcaao 000 003 230-8 14 8 

Milwaukee 883 800 100-4 7 « 

Bunts. MfetM-nwfetar <71. James (7) ana 
Fisk; Vuckovleh, Soarage (7). Walts (9) ana 
Schroeder. W— Burns, 13-7. L— Vuckavich. 4-9. 
Sw-^tames (2D.HR*— Milwaukee. Ponce (1), 
Cooner (10). 

Owe land DM MO 800-0 3 0 

Detroit 821 MB lBx— 4 ft I 

ftamera Ruble (4), Easterly (7) and WII. 
lard; Petry, Hernandez (8) and Costilla W— 
Petry. 13-11. L- Romero. 1-1 Sv — Hernandez 
<2*1. HRs— Detroit. Simmons (7), Leman (71, 
Castillo (2). 

OeUand Bn 000 210-4 I 0 

CaUfornla 101 828 810-3 7 I 

John. Rllo (SI. Ontiveros (9) and Healti; 

Romanic*, Holland (7). Moore (7) and Boone. 
W— Rllo, 2-1. L — Moore. 7-4. Sv— Ontiveros 
(ft). HRs— Oakland. Bocftle (lOt. California, 

Bentauez (ft). 


Final scores and money wtanlnos In foe 
S4SMM0 Bukfc Dam at Warwick Hills go» & 
Country Club course. Grand Blanc, MfcUmni 
(7414-vanl Par-72): 


Ken Green. MIAOU 
wavne Grady. S4&A00 
Mac OGrodv, tawOO 
George Burn* Sl&ftOO 
Gary HoUbero. Slttft00 
Gene Sauers. S1BAM 
Bret# Upper. D4JJ3 
Roger MalfMe. SV4-513 
Andy Boon. *11250 
Jack Renner, J11JS0 
David Graham. S11JS0 
Calvin Peete, *11250 
DonnJe Hommna (UJ50 
Dov* Barr, MP2S 
Scott Hoch. MJ2S 


49-4547-47—7*8 
49-44-69-70-272. 
704947-48-274. 
48-704849— 275. 
68-7247-48 — 275 
724*44-73—275 
7)4044-70—274 
194848-71—274 
70-70-7144-277 

48- 724948-277 

49- 724749-277' 
48-7049-70-277 
494747-74—277 
7144-71-70-278 
47-7*45-73-278 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
American nmn 

DETROIT— Signed Randy Nuek. DHctier. 

MILWAUKEE— Placed Paul Moliler, in- 
fletdar.on the 1 5-day disabled list retroactive 
to Aua. IX 

TORONTO— Stoned Winston Brown, oui- 
ffeider, and assigned him to Medicine Hot ot- 
itic Pioneer Leaoue. 

National League 

PITTSBURGH— Pieced Lorry mcWH- 
Ikuns. pitcher, on Km lS-dav disabled list. Re- . 
called Jose DeLeon. Ditcher, from Hawaii of . 
the Pacific Coast League. 

FOOTBALL 

National Football League 

L. A. RAAtS — Pieced Doug Barnett, Duke 
Sctia met ana Mike McDonald, Hnebaekers. ! 
and Ken Potter, kicker, an waivers. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Waived Eric Price. 
carnarbodL 

ST. LOUIS A nn ou nced the retirement of 

Willard Harrell, running back. 

TAMPA BAT— Waived Mike Heaven, de- 
fensive back end Jim Metka Hnetoocker. Re- 
leased Robert Brannon, defensive end. Joe 
H&Ma.IlMbocfcer.Ricb Schulte and John Har- 
rell. offensive linemen, ana Vince Abbott, 
olocoktcker, 


Football 

CFL Standings 


Eastern Dlvisloa 



W 

L 

r 

PF 

PA 

PIS 

Montreal 

5 

2 

0 

160 

131 

10 < 

Toronto 

3 

4 

0 

185 

1B2 

4 1 

Ottawa 

3 

3 

0 

123 

>87 

4 - 

Hamilton 

1 

S 

0 

117 

165 

2 


Western Division 


’ 

Brit amb 

5 

I 

0 

209 

100 

10 

Winnipeg 

4 

2 

0 

171 

122 

B-l 

Edmonton 

3 

3 

0 

151 

169 

6 

Saskotcbwn 

3 

3 

0 

ISO 

135 

6 

Colgarv 

1 

5 

e 

101 

143 

J - 


SUNDAYS RESULT 
Winnipeg 28. Hamilton IB 

NFL Exhibition 


SUNDAY'S RESULT 
Washington 14 . Lot AnoeiM Haiders 9 


■ r--~ 






] Page 16 


international herald tribute, Tuesday, August 20 , 1985 


RIO POSTCARD 


Brazil’s Miranda Revival 


By Gloria Helena Rey 

The Associated Press 


R IO DE JANEIRO — Thirty 
years after her death, the Bra- 


XV years after her death, the Bra- 
zilian movie star Carmen Miranda 
is still revered by legions of fans 
here and abroad. 

In August, to mark the anniver- 
sary of her death, the government 
and private fan dubs have paid 
homage to the actress whose fruit- 
covered turbans and exuberant 
style made her a symbol of Brazil 
around the world. 

Tbe National Foundation for the 
Arts began a campaign called “30 
Years Without Carmen Miranda." 
It features musicals, a film festival, 
a new biography and two previous- 
ly unr el eased Carmen Miranda re- 
cords. In SSo Paolo, Brazil's largest 
city, a public school was named 
after her. 

Her memory is kept alive by ad- 
mirers in 18 fan dubs in Brazil and 
others in the United States, En- 
gland, France, Italy, Smith Africa, 
India, Cuba and Australia. 

Letters and telegrams marking 
the anniversary have poured in to 
the Carmen Miranda Museum, 
where costumes, records, photo- 
graphs, cartoons and other memo- 
rabilia are on display, said a muse- 
um employee, Cristina Meades. 


rin g in g and danrinp in yp^ ^ipalc 

and five Brazilian feature film* 
The original copies of those films 
have been lost or badly damaged. 

In 1940 she made ber first Holly- 
wood film, “Down Argentine 
Way" with Don Ameche and Betty 
Grable. It didn’t matter mudi that 
Carmen was not Argentine; her ex- 
otic clothing and accent 

marked her as Smith American and 
became her trademark. 


Shinoda’s Children 

Japanese Film Traces Houj Youngsters • - ■ 

Viewed American Occupation .;.*>• 


By Leslie Bennetts 

New Viwk Tima Service 

EW YORK — He had 


N EW YORK — He had 
learned in school that when 
Japan was attacked in the 13th 
century, a fcamiltaw wind de- 
stroyed the enemy fleet. And so, 
when World War II began to turn 
against the Japanese, Masahiro 


oda said through an interpreter. 
“It was really a tragedy for ok- 
Before the end of the war, we 
were in a panic, and the school- 
teacher taught us how to do hara- 
kiri and lou ourselves instead of 



PEOPLE 

Sprhusteen: Back 

n . _ Triumph sport* 


urn employee, Cristina Mendes. 
- Ricardo Cravo Alvin, director of 
museums of Rio de Janeiro, said 
the campaign was intended to re- 
mind B razilians about their most 
famous actress. Most of the 135 
milli on people now living in Brazil 
were born after Miranda died of a 
heart attack on Aug. 3, 1955, at her 
home in Beverly Hills, California. 

“Today she is better remembered 
in New York, Paris and London 
than in her own country,” Alvin 
said. 

Born Maria do Canno Cunha 
Miranda in Marco de Canavezes, 
Portugal in 1909, Carmen Mir- 
anda as a young girl moved with 
her family to BrazuTShe considered 
herself thoroughly Brazilian, 
though she never necame a citizen. 

By the 1930s she was a local star, 


Glyndeboame Gift Pledged 

Reuters 

LONDON — A French busi- 
nessman, Vincent Meyer, has 
pledged a gift of £100,000 (about 
3140.000) to £150.000 to the GJyn- 
debourne Festival Opera. 


During her 15 years in Holly- 
wood she marie 14 film* intending 
“That Night in Rio," with Ameche 
and Alice Faye (1941); “Spring- 
time in The Rockies,” with unable 
and Cesar Romero (1942); ‘The 
Gang's All Here," featuring Busby 
Berkeley’s masterpiece “The Lady 
in the Tutti-Frutti Hat" (1943); 
“Copacabana,” with Groucbo 
Marx (1947); and “Scared Stiff," 
with Dean Martin and Jerzy Lewis 
(1953). 

In 1947, Miranda married David 
Sebastian, who now lives in San 
Francisco. They had no children. 

Perhaps the most remarkable 
thing about Miranda's career, the 
biographer Cassio Baisante said, is 
that she became a perfomcr ax alL 

“She bad everything going 
against her,” Barsante said. “Her 
voice wasn’t good, and die was 
only 5 feet 1 inch [1 .55 meters] 
talL" But she overcame her short- 
comings with a unique style, he 
said. 

“She compensated, for the defi- 
ciencies in ner voice with move- 
ments of her hands and hips, at a 
time when other singers clung to 
the microphone like a life preserv- 
er. She increased her height by cre- 
ating exotic turbans and wearing 
unusual platform shoes, sometimes 
more than seven inches high." Bar- 
sante said. 

Carmen Miranda was buried in 
Rio’s SAo Jofio Batista Cemetery. 
Admirers still come to lay flowers 
on her grave or pay their respects. 

Tve been coming to see her for 
30 years, every Sunday and on each 
anniversary' of her death,” said 
Ma tilde Mafia, 60. Dusting off the 
red granite mausoleum marked 
with the performer’s signature, Ma- 
fia said: T crane to thank her for 
what she did for BraziL Many mu- 
sicians bend! Led from her work. 
She gave her life to spread our 
music." 


said: “I realty believed 
isie. wind could save Ja- 


the kamikaze wind could save Ja- 
pan and destroy all tbe American 
fleet, the airplanes and every- 
thing. But whm we lost the war. 
there was no wind at all" 

What arrived instead was Her- 
shey bars, strange new music and 
unfamiliar ideas that would 
change Japan forever. The nation 
that had considered itself invinci- 
ble was occupied by foreign 
troops. Sudd eaily the emperor 
was no longer to be worshiped as 
a god but seen as an ordinary 
man. The military leaders who 
had been lionized were trans- 
formed into war criminals, and 
some were executed. “It was a big 
shock to me," said Shinoda, who 
was 14 years old at the time. 

Although Japan would adjusi, 
sprinting into the modem era 
with dazzling success, Shinoda, 


who is one of Japan's leading film 
directors, brooded over what had 


Art Budavald is an vocation. 


directors, brooded over what had 
happened. “For the last 40 years 
Tve been linking about why we 
got into the war and bow I could 
capture that history,” be said. 

The result is “MacArthur’s 
Children," an award- winning 
movie about how Japan's surren- 
der affected the children of a 
s mall fishing village. Through the 
children's experiences, amusing 
as well as roughing , Shinoda takes 
on the larger task of communicat- 
ing the irrevocable sense of loss 
he feels about the modernization 
and Americanization of Japan. 
As the old gives way to the irre- 
sistible onslaught of the new, the 
culture and traditions of the an- 
cient society be grew up in begin 
to erode, some to be lost forever. 

The film, Japan’s biggest box 
office success last year, was based 
on a novel whose author, Yu Aku, 
is six years younger than Shin- 
oda. This difference in age, Shin- 
oda found, was significant. 

“The first feeling I had about 
the Americans was hatred,” Sun- 


cans. And then all of a sadden the 
war ended, the Hersheys choco- 
late appeared and it was voy dif- 
ferent circumstances. For chil- 
dren younger than I was, facing 
the Americans was very interest- 
ing, a very gay occasion." 

Shinoda decided to focus the 
picture on snch children, al- 
though he communicates clearly 
the ambivalence of the most sym- 
pathetic youngster. This boy, a 
talented artist, is told by bis et 
deis to bum all the paintings and 
drawings be has made of battle- 
ships, warplanes and military en- 
gagements, for fear they might 
anger the occupying American 
forces. Shinoda, as a child, was 
forced to destroy such drawings. 

In “MacArthur’s Children,” 
Shinoda created rate character 
not in tbe novel a handsome ad- 
miral whose daughter becomes 
the boy’s best friend. The admi- 
ral who is tried and executed as a 
war criminal is a figure who reso- 
nates on several symbolic levels. 
For Shinoda. be represents the 
parallels between the end of em- 
peror worship and the decline of 
patriarchy. 

“The admiral is the general im- 
age of ray father " he said. “The 
reason I added that character is 
because all of a sudden the em- 
peror, who had been a god, be- 
came an ordinary person. And 
my father used to be an extreme 
godlike figure in the family situa- 
tion, but after the war he became 
just 'Daddy.' For years and years 
rd been taught to respect my fa- 
ther, but all of a sudden the whole 
concept of dimity was gone, be- 
cause of the shame of having lost 
the war; it was my father’s genff- 
ation that was responsible. 9 

The character of the admiral 
mirrors a familiar theme in Shin- 
oda’s work, which has been noted 
for its preoccupation with vio- 
lence and destruction. “MacAr- 
Lhurs Children" is more grade 
than some of Shinoda's previous 


steen opened a hofne-statejpS D 
day mght before mwe tout • . temporarily 

fans inEast Rutherford. NcwJct dimb Mount 

sey. Tbe audience included Gdver ^^ned plans » Ark 

ST^H-KanofNw.^ ^ ^ 

and Mayor Edward L Koch of N because tbe gowjniwn 

YorTL- »ck nar and ^ E ded Her- 


and Mayor lunram *- —t, : p because ^ moun- 

York. The rock star and his & ded ape dmons Hur _ 

Street Band are expected wplay 10 according « Turkey ^ 

S of 3 W .000 Ss m Nw ££ „ev»s m&JE&IS- 

j cnnriav mchL for the nf Przunun. 


Director Shinoda: “The beauty of destruction." 


Ski* ( 

End t<] 


films, its images benign and its 
atmosphere sunny — literally so. 
In other films, he has often made 
it a prant to shoot only on cloudy 
or rainy days to capture a sense of 
atmospheric bleakness, but 
“MacArthur’s Children" was 
filmed only when tbe weather was 
fair. Still, however, darker dimen- 
sions lurk beneath the surface, as 
with the admiral. He reflects 
Shinoda’s perception of what be 


calls “the beauty of destruction.' 
And ultimately the admiral 
comes to represent Japan itself. 

*• A tirliA'e Lrton rwvnwtiAf? 


“A man who's been punished 
and destroyed has a certain kind 
of beauty and excitement," Shin- 
oda said. “I think that’s all based 
on a fundamental feeling of Japa- 
nese history and tradition. And 
what I wanted to show, using that 
character who is being destroyed, 
is that the admiral is typical of 


Japanese tradition. He was carry- 
ing the whole of Japanese history 
on his bade, and now he’s disap- 
pearing. After he's executed, Jap- 
anese tradition is gone. We all 
became Americanized." 

In the film, old-fashioned mo- 
res give way to a passion for base- 
ball and insistently upbeat new 
music whose surface cheer belies 
reality. The movie’s theme song is 
Glenn Miller’s “In the Mood," 
and lor Shinoda the choice was 
significant. “It’s swinging and 
light, it’s a wonderful tune, but a 
lot of Japanese war cr iminals 


next. . • - About turningtoAm^-"- 

Emaed out Sunday mght for the of Ercurum. 

fiSerf the 1985 Newport Jazz D 


lUIiSIC VI . - lf kJ 

Festival where fusion groups out- 

numbered jazz veterans and rising ^ prime minister of Tmkey, 

SSksrss wfassssss 


ZSESEL Sfi- EPS mSScs™ 

who brought the two-day evemtoa at^ ^ Haas 

dose, helped draw^ the JKL? Lsuigoy for «Jnch hcwasa 


dose, Helped oi»w u** — eve cureery «o* 

younger crowd the producer, ^JS^accordmgto aTmfaA 

Geon^Wdn, was hoping ;for man in Houston. The 5frmmutt 

event that strayed fromthe classic was to rem<we acatarart 

jazz emphasis it has held since its g^his right eye and u^ntaa 
return to the birthplace of jazz fes- leuSi doctors 

rivals in 1981. The program also Emeiy, an ophthalmologic 

featured the yoimg .aaophoonj would regain fid wskhj 

David Murray and his octet; the w ami recover m abOTttwo 


were executed right behind this 
music," he said. ^Japanese his to- 


tarid Mmnv andnis octet the 

trumpeter Wynton Marsalis, the wflj return to Turkey at 

fusion pairing of the guitarist Lee h mc jofthe month and should .be 
— resume his regular dimes. 


music, he said. “Japanese histo- 
ry, tradition' and philosophy are 
very stoic, but all of a sodden it's 
so gay, there’s all this swing mu- 
sic, and it seemed to me so deca- 
dent Forme the violence is built 
into the music." 


uiaiuu iMiiiue o __ ihaend ul ini 

RHenour and the piamstcranposer 
Dave Grusin; an/ the pianist Me- 
Coy Tyners quartet. 0 


The industrialist and art collec- 
tor Baron Hans Heinrich Thyssen- 
Bornemisza de Kaszoo, 64, has 


The British novelist WdwrdA^; 
ams will boycott the 
market because ^ gOMOTWal 


fihn TJas Heart and Hmoor 9 


Lloyd Grove of The Washington Past writes of “MacArthur's Chil* 
dretT: 


Bornemisza de Kaszoo, 04, nas mareet kw* jT ,i^ v;nina of 
married a former Spanish beanty has not £ 

queen, Camea Cravera, 42, widow whales near the Faeroeiaano^ 

of the actor Lex Barker, in More- Copenhagen ^ 

ik/on-v, PnoianH Thvssen s Hmde reoorts. Adams, auuior or 


Though it wanders, and occasionally dawdles, over too much 
ground, it has enough heart and humor to make the traipse worth- 
while. “Japan is under occupation — bat oar souls are not under 
occupation," (he young teacher, Komako, Hrimnnisht* her class as 
GIs steam into the harbor. Bui the soul of all Jaoan is shorn to 


GIs steam into the harbor. But the soul of all Japan is about to 
undergo a cultural occupation from which it will never recover. 

After introductory newsreel footage of Hiroshima in rains and 
MacArthnr at the surrender aboard the battleship Missouri the 
story begins with schoolboys bent over their textbooks, inking out all 
refer e nces to imperial glories, blotting them from the mem coy of 
postwar Japan. It ends with the class learning En glish, -rep ealing in 


ton-in-Marsh, England. Tbyssen’s 
fourth wife, Denise, divorced him 
last year after 17 years of marriage. 
. . . Madonna and the actor Sean 
Penn are honeymooning after their 
marriage in Malibu, California. 
The rock anger turned 27 Friday, 
and her husband's 25th birthday 
was Saturday. 

□ 


A 1929 Duesenberg roadster 
used in the 1976 film “Gable and 
Lombard" drew the high bid of 
$362,000 during an auction of cars, 
props and o titer movie and TV 
memorabilia in Los Angeles. Mark 
Smith of Ft. Washington, Pennsyl- 
vania, owner of the Old Philadel- 
phia Motor Co„ bought tbe road- 
ster for his company. A 1920 Ford 
truck used in the movie “The 
Grapes of Wrath" sold for S4J00 
to an unidentified collector. The 


A prickly young man named Yoshiyoki Omori, playing a would- 
be champion against the invaders, has the commanding presence of a 


— r- - p.--— iuwuumii, MM J UH. piQOlkC ia a 

10-year-old Toshiro Mifune. But much of this movie coukl probably 
fit into separate films abont the birth of mndmi Japanese 
might, the difficult marital readjustment of a returning soldier, the 
depravity of drag addiction, the awakening of pre-teen sexuality and 
tiie adventures of a spunky kids’ baseball dnb. With such Hollywood 
influences, “MacArtmir’s Ghfldren" is itself a result of the American 
occupation. 


of 

“WaiereSp Down," will not alkw 
his latest novel “Mala," to be pub- 
lished in Denmark as long as 
whales are being hunted, the news- 
paper said. One Damsh publisher 
had declined to produce the book; 
another had expressed willingness 
to publish the novel but Adams 
declined to sign a cnntract- 
□ 


Oslo city officials have canceled 
a December concert by the British 
singer Shirley Bassey because she 

a United Nations ban on . _a 
cultural and sporting events in Tv* 
South Africa, officials said Mon- 
day. Oslo authorities had asked 
Bassey to apologize for having ap- 
peared in South Africa, but her 
manager replied that she refused to 
be used for political purposes. 


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REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


MOVING 


MALLORCA 

AMBAS5ADOR PARK 


ALLIED 


PARAOtSE FOB THE HAPPY FEW 


VAN LNE5 INTL 

OVER 1300 OFFICES 


USA AIM Voi Utum bifl Carp 
(01011 312-681-8100 
Office: 25th Avm & Roc mwH U 


An mchsM Medfiorraneon viage a 
being built right b» Ihe sea on the mast 
beamful rite an Makrtn. kfed loca- 
tion, 20 minute Fran Fakna. Spooous 
apartments, 1 to 3 bedroom, el with 
large terraces. Very high gudity eon- 


sis 60 153 USA 


Or cd ear Agency oBics t. 
PARIS Dasbordes Interne 
(01) 343 23 64 


«ankwrt sJSJftZ 


VISIT AMBASSADOR PARK AND 
BE CONVINCH} 
for in/ouiiafton: 

GLOBE PLAN SJL 

Av. Mon-Bepas 24, 

CH-1005 lAUSAl^CSwtzBriand Imll „ 

Teh (21)2235 l2HxSl85MGLIS01 | PARIS AREA 



Arizona, UiA 

Wei estdbh l ied general red eflrte 
company desira to have a fapromto 
trae Manager. Top cor m ii mu ti ded. 
We are not subciwders or keid fromat- 
ets. We hand* everytteng in gomal 
red estate. Write S/.C. 80*4142, 
Soottsdde, Arizona 85261 USA 



PORSCH& far mmdoto drfrvery HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 
FROM STOCK 


Catttg all EXCAUBOR owners 


Bed ^eenrite shiptyg . 

bona, n siwnl nn in USA 


M 1,'17'el 


8 you era fee owner of a Series IV 
BiaAwv with Atnarian ximjiicaticni 
vmaan upgraek you to a 300 HP Euro- 
peai sp e ufcja ji n n Power Train ad 
provide al service md ware parti you 
require For normal in ui ntei mu e 


MAHGNAN SBMCE MTBHM 
hoi BiBitssfiate operings 
for Engbih mother tanow 
BBJNaiAL SEOffTAlfe 
G* Para 233 17 54 


We haw aba fanned a European 
Owners Qub and wil be arganxing 
special weds from lime to fan. 


ROTE INC. 

TAUNUSSTR 52, 6000 FBANKRJKT 

W Gate, td Wtosi, fa 411559 , ^ YAQfnM& ^ 

BOATS & Acodomas 2 8. Athens 10671, Greece. 

RECREATIONAL 
VEHICLES 




special weds from lime to fee. 

8 you would Bo more infarmafei 


i faddy ovoitebte 
215^257547 USA 


Lw A utoin s bil e s ExSroordlnol r w 
Monte Cario 


LEGAL SERVICES 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


Tdspham (H 257479 or hiss 479560 
AUTO MC or 469870 MG MC 




yywl suV 1 . itJ';! 1 , 


643960a 1x441469. 


LOW COST FUGHTS 


COOP® ST JAMB 

OHKIAL AG84T 
OF BMW (GO) UD 


S2E 


INTHtNATIONAL 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


TRANSCAR 

IHE CM SWPMG 
SPH3AUST5 


(069) 250066 

DUSS&DORF/RAT1NGEN 

(02102) 45023 1RLS. 

MUNICH LNLS. 

(089] 142244 

LONDON JK 


Broker Bwp w fes Welcome 


ETANG-LA-VULE 

MCXHN HOUSE, reception. 6 bed- 
rooms, 3 baths, in 2400 sam pert + 
heale d swi mminfi pool 
EMBASSY SStVta 540 68 38 



RANDSTAD 

BWNGUAt ACB4CY fflCd 
^758 12 40™^ 


SPAMSH/ BOGUSH/ FSB4CH speak- 



ms 

m 


92521 Neuflv 


PARS m 225 64 44 

CAbWB/NKE J93) 39 43 44 

FSANKRRT . (061 07) 80 51 

BOW / COLOGNE flZ|H 212921 
STUTTGART (OTOI) BM 

MUNICH (flW)93 10 

B8EMBWAVB4 (0471)43(1 

t«W YORK ora fife 70 

Houston ng 931 74 

LOS ANGBES 213 568 93 

MONTREAL 5141866 66 

AQtNTS WOHb WDE 
Lean it to us to bring it to you 


LHD. Mercedes Tax Free 
l imousm m 36" & 4 4" 
Armored cars and imouHiies 
Coach hrilt con 
Other mdees & exatks 


While you are in Europe, we cat offer 
as mi dei u ble savings on brand new 
BMW con to mad speofkxrtw. F 16 
factory warranty. 


We can abo : 
drive tax free 


iflfe or left hand 
at tourist prices. 



B ) 10 45 
43063 
>5 7061 
II 7605 
16 9288 
16 6681 


Over 100 units in dock 
World wide defivery 
Direct from source 
D.Q.T. & EJ*A 


Teh LondonU4l 0| 629 7779 
Telex (51) 8556022 TEAS a 


rtowe tax free DMws at tauntt pnoes. 
We also suaJy factory txdt balet- 
pW BMWs and the Alpiw BMW 
range tax free. 

Cal LeadM (OI) 629 6699. 


PAGE 6 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


Trasco London Lid. 

6567 Park bxie, London W.t. 


10 YEARS 

We Deffwer Cars to the World 


5wrt ie riand - UK - W. Germany 


TRANSCO 


w*^Daily Sotto® far 
mt ft mat kmal Iuvestoas, 


International Business Message Center 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 



Keeping a aretart stod of more than 
300 brand new a**, 

’^S l i&s££ , sa5"- 

TrmsoD 5A, 95 NoonUacn, 


2030 Anfwurp, Bolgnm 
Tel 3237542 62 40. Th 35207 TZANS I 


OFFSHORE & UK 
LTD COMPANIES 


incorporator! vd 
Isle of Mcwv, Tt 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 










Fr ance £ tntmmationat Mo v ing 
Futty profewand • Reasonably priced 


PARIS {!) 867 42 46 


BY THE LAKESIDE MONTRHJX. A 61 1 
luxurious 100 sam. cxxrtotd avad- nn J 
able for s<4fl to foreigners. Tel: Lon- aria 
dan 01-2627191. rrvr 




CORPORATION will consid- 
er hoding stack to reliable 
and financially stable 
corporation. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 



Enhy into mufti-billion dollar 
duty-free U5. market - dr 
ports and off-site locations in 
major cities of the United 
States. 




GREAT BRITAIN 




Jfrii'llilvTrJiii 












Present management 
(marketing & warehousing], 
well qualified and available 

Approved under US Federal 
Regulations. Possible expan- 
sion throughout the US. exit 
points. 

Please meal your inquiry to: 

P.O. Bbx 45*36 _ 


Embassy Service 

8 Am d* Mam 
75008 P«»te 

YOUR REAL STATE 



AGENT IN PARIS 
PH0MS62 78 99