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WEAT>«tpAjA APPEAR, ON PAGE 14 


No. 31,881 


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INTERNATIONAL 



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ESTABLISHED 1887 



- By Sanjoy Hazarika 

_N ew York Times Sendee 
NEW DELHI — Sikh gunmen 
in the Punjab assassinated Tuesday 
the moderate Sikh leader who re- 
cently signed a controversial peace 
accord with Prime Minister Rajiv 
Gandhi. The shooting was a major 
setback to efforts to normalize the 
troubled state. 

The assassination of Harchand 
Singh Longowal, president of the 
Akali Dal party, clouds the future 
both of the agreement, signed last 
month, and of state elections 
scheduled for Sept 22. 
a Mr. 


It also upset 
* a-swi 
jab, just 


Gandhi’s hopes 
for a swift political solution in Pun- 
after h& bad won acclaim 

- {nVot his handling of the crisis in 
v^-Tf "Punjab and Assam. The Press Trust 

of India NewsAgency, quoting ah- 
- : / tboritative Indian sources, said the 
"■ ^ government was considering post- 
• ^ poning the elections as a result of 
«,_ the assassination. 

A witness said thaMwo younj* 

■'/ after be completed a speech and 
"J bowed to greet the congregational 

pur, neartlae town trfSangrar. The 
witness, a reporter for the Press 
V. Trust of India, said that Mr. 
■- Longowal collapsed after 
' wounded critically in his chest 

- that an aide was killed and three 
others wounded in the shooting. 


headed the Congress unit in Jullim- 
dur District 

The Indian government placed 
troops on alert to prevent possible 
counterviolence m Punjab and 
neighboring states, especially by 
Longowal supporters on militant 
Sikhs who oppose them. 

Mr.Ganatu railed for calm and 
convened an emergency cabinet 
meeting that mourned Mr. Longo- 
waTs death. 

The incident drew nationwide 
condemnation and angry reactions 
from opposition politicians who 
blamed the killing on the central 
government, saying it should not 
have scheduled elections in Punjab 
next month. The announcement of 
the elections was. made last week 
and has given extremists a fresh 
chance to disrupt the state, -the 
leaders said. 

bflity for ike Longowal slaying, al- 
though the two 
were identified as 
and Gian Singh . 
district. It was not immediately 
known if they were waited mem- 
bers of any of the groups that have 
opposed the accord. Toe settlement 
ended three years of confrontation 
between Sikhs and the Indian gov- 
ernment. . 

Officials in Punjab said last 
month that they had increased se- 
curity for Mr. Lonacwal after it 




-4- 



U.S. Will Test a Weapon 

Against Satellite in Space, 
Reagan Informs Congress 


By David Hoffman 

Washington Past Service 

SANTA BARBARA, California 
— The United Suites plans to con- 
duct its first test soon of an anti- 
satellite weapon against an object 
in space. President Ronald Reagan 
informed Congress on Tuesday. 
The test, to be aimed at an obso- 


fense budget, said that the pagan 
administration could undertake 
three tests in space this year if the 
president provided the necessary 
certification at least 15 days before- 
hand. , , . . 

A statement issued by Mr. 
Speakes said that Mr. Reagan had 
certified to Coneress that: 




e to disrupt UK state, - me I T 

Car Bomb K£Bs4B in North Lebanon^ 
iSSS Beirut Area Caught in Artillery Duels 


• The is in accordance 

with the Anti-Ballistic Missile 
Treaty of 1972. 

• Such testing “would not con- 
stitute an irreversible step that 
would gravely impair prospects for 
negotiation on antisaiellite weap- 
ons." It “constitutes an incentive 

for the Soviet Union to reach an 

n satellite in EuS IS •The United States is endeavor- agreement on these and other is- 

JS 15days?said ■mg“mgoodfrithtonegouarewth sues; in Geneva, he said. 

"Larry Shakes, the chief Wbhe the Soviets a mutual and verifiable ^ announcement came at a 
BepS agreement withthe strictest p J,T wh ra the United States and 
P ble lirmtanons on anti-satellite |r“- et Union apparently have 
the Soviet weapons “ransistent wi**emj- „ impasle in the Geneva 

_ ___ negotiations that 

ed States." . - - - -• 

• Pending agreement on sura 
strict limitations, the testing is nec- 
essary "to avert clear and irrevoca- 
ble harm to the national security. 


Reuters 

BEIRUT — A car bomb killed 
40 persons in the northern Leba- 
nese city of Tripoli on Tuesday as 
Moslem and Christian forces 
fought fierce artillery duels that en- 
fed Beirut and mountain vil- 
i north and east of the capital. 


' rV 


tMTs wotmoeamuicsnooim^. fepotted that hehad become a 

' Bofh assailantswere captured J“ 5 g^areet because of the 

-• agreement, which is said to be win- 

•- when juards fired back at them * the Punjab. The 

•: Ear^mthe^y g^maimtte at least four 

• :>Puiyab shot ami JnHeda ffindu boAy J slds anne ^ with sam-auto- 
polittoan of Mr. Gandhi s Con- revolvers and rifles, 

gress (I) Party and wounded two ”• 

7 - persons. 

i - a police nffiriial said four kudi 
men fired at DD. KhnBar, a Con- 
gress leader, in a house inTwhmdur 
city, killing him on tbospotThey 
■*i e^ped by car. • • - ■ 

The official said another Con- 


housing a police station and started 
a major fire. . _ . 

Sheikh Kanaan Nan, the Tnpdi 
chief of the Sunni Moslem funda- 
mentalist Jundollah. or Soldiers erf 
God, militia- was critically injured 
in the blast, the sources said. 

Two car bombs killed 28 persons 
in Moslem West Beirut on Mon- 


Security sources said that un- . apparently in reprisal for earii- 
identified planes had attacked gun * Christian areas. Mon- 
positkms near Tarshish, on Syrian- - - • • — — — 1 

-controlled slopes of the central 


. The goveroment’s failure to pro- 
tect Mr. Longowal is already being 
strongly criticized. 

Mr. Longowal was a native of 
the district and took his surname 
from the village of the same name. 

He was respected in thereupon and 

In many parts of the Puigab as a 


Mount Lebanon range, but police 
in the nearby town erf Dhour 
Shweir later denied the report. 

The car bomb, the fifth in less 
that a week, eroloded among 
crowds in Tripoli that had gathered 
after a man threw 
note from a car 
security sources said. 

Security sources said that the 
440-pound (200-kilogram) bomb 


day’s explosions started shelling 
duels that raged across the city for 
16 hours before easing in early af- 
ternoon. Fifty-five persons were 
killed in a car bomb explosion out- 
side a supermarket near Christian 


Nabih Beni, chief of the Shiite 
Moslem militia Amal 
The rightist Christian Voice of 
Lebanon Radio said that much of 
the shelling of Christian mountain 
villages came from gun positions in 
Syrian-held heights. 

Education Minis ter Selim al- 
Hoss, a Sunni Moslem, left sudden- 
ly for Damascus at the urgent re- 
quest of Syrian leaders, 
government sources said. They did 
not say what Mr. Hoss, a widely 
respected former prime minister, 
would be discussing. 

President Amin Gemayel and 
Prime Minis ter Rashid K a ra m i 
both said Monday that the car 


East Beirut on Saturday. i^mb^ were trvmiz to foil Syrian motors, would be released ana 

As fighting raged around Beirut, Mb ^oe to ynan_ ^ * «, the low-orbit satdlite. 


Union and US. allies had been 
notified of the announcement 
through diplomatic channels. 

He said the derision to proceed 
with the test was made after taking 
into account possible Soviet reac- 
tion. There was no reason why the 
test should affect the November 
summit between Mr. Reagan and 
the Soviet leader. Mikhail S. Gor- 
bachev, Mr. Speakes said. 

However, official sources in 
Washington said that they expect- 
ed Tuesday’s announcement to re- 
duce the chances for progress at 
aims negotiations in Geneva. 

The Soviet Union previously of- 
fend a moratorium on testing of 
anti-satdhie weapons and recently 
has refrained from testing ihem. 
But the United States has rqected a 
moratorium, saying it would pre- 
serve a Soviet monopoly on ann- 
saidliie weapons. 

The U.S. weapon to be tested 
includes a two-stage m a i n rocket 
that is to be carried high into the 
atmosphere by an F-15 fighter, 

’ then launched into space. The war- 
head, equipped with tiny rocket 
would be rdeased and 


arms con. _ . . 

would include possible limits on 
anti-satellite weapons. 

Some officials in Washington 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


McFarlane Considers 
Arms Control Unlikely 


By David Hoffman 

Washington Pan Service 

SANTA BARBARA, California 
_ President Ronald Reagan's na- 
tional security affaire adviser, Rob- 
ert C. McFariane, has offered a 
deeply pessimistic view of the pros- 
pects for a US--Soviet agreement 
to slow the arms race. 

McFariane offered his as- 


in fact in the thinking that under- 
lies it, 1 fear that even incremental 
improvements will be extremely 
hard to reach. And they will be 
much less likely to gather momen- 
tum, to build on each other.” 

Mr. McFariane also noted the 
Soviet Union's support for Cuba 
and Libya and the Soviet interven- 
tion in Afghanistan. Although the 
United States can "deal with these 


Mr. - 

sessmmt in a speech Mra^y as whc n they are placed in 

ft! our way," Mr. McFariane said, it 


as* siKsHi aa-— 

the Mount Lebanon range, about Mr.haram accused teaelofre- 


ex- 


plosives. 

The U.S. Air Force has conduct- 


. gress leader, Gurdid Satin, and a nious ^nwho began asareHgious killed 40 and wounded 100 persons. 

- visitor at Mr. Saiqi were_. ^ . ^ it d emolish ed a four-story building 

seriously wounded: Mr. Khullar (Cootmoed on Page i, um. oj 


rr-.- it -C“ 


Revised Figure* Show l .S. Economy 

Growing at Weak 2% Annual Rate 

‘ Wif . .a a. iUa ratufluCt Dflf 


iutfur sum grow* path quarter, the anaDat pm m two 
^ for die W S Commerce Department also 


Syrian troops and a variety 
pro-Syrian and leftist militias have 
gun positions on the hillsides. 

The Voice of Lebanon radio 
identified the attacking planes as 
Israeli,- but this was denied 
Israeli mifitaiy spokesman m Tel 
Aviv. The Lebanese police denial 
of the incident came later. 

There was no comment from the 
Lebanese Air Force, which has a 
few Hawker Hunter fighter- 
-bombers based in Christian tern- 


Gunmen in Cairo Kill 
Israeli Embassy Official 


By Jeffrey Baitholer 

Washington Pan Service 


dam and dignity, launched an at : 
tack against members of the Israeli 

■ in r ain't " 


way, 

certainly sends us loud messages 

that can’t be ignored about the mo- 
tivations of Soviet policy." _ 
Although political and rmLuaiy 
issues have dominated the agenda 
of UJS.-Soviet relations, he said the 
“most momentous changes" could 
tut* place in human rights. 

“The most durable and far- 
reaching kind of improvement in 
Soviet-American relations, and 
probably in the Soviet Union's re- 
lations with almost every country 
of the world, would be created by 
events inside the Soviet Union, ’ he 
said. 

■ Soviet Cites Progress 
The chief Soviet delegate to the 
40-nation Conference on Disarma- 
ment in Geneva riled progress 
U.Sk-Soviet charges and counter- j ues day toward negotiating a 
charges over ballistic missile de- chemical weapons ban but said ob- 


Mr. Reagan's meeting with Fi 
Minister Eduard A- Shevardnadze 

of the Soviet Union has been set for 
Sept 27. The meeting is expected to 
prepare for Mr. Reagan's Novem- 
ber meeting with Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev, the Soviet leader. 

In a speech to the Santa Barbara 

Channel Dob, Mr. McFariane 
died several examples of what he 
described as Soviet decisions in re- 
cent years to accelerate superpower 
competition in chemical weapons, 
ballistic missile defenses and inter- 
mediate-range missiles. 

•In each case, Mr. McFariane 

said, the Soviet Union tried to “re- 
sume or initiate competition in an 

area where there hadn’t been any at • 

all" . . 

Mr. McFariane pointed to the 


was 

were 


The statement 


u\> 


ann ual iou> -r — -o 

gnjxnent reported Tuesday 

The rise in gross national proa- 


— uct was 


revised slightly upward aSy “StemL profits have declined lor five 

nvmtVs. estimate cf 1.7- raw* A £**. oraicht Quarters. 


wut wwuuv%- . ” . .i « n 

Seef- sprayf ^yTSay C ^ ^ ^ “ avC8thccoa J tiy ^ 

f. Vl"rSv"th«mBh March. After-tax fett at midday. The rival forces had ca ^ lie ^pkmiav an adminUtrative wflh lOTael r and' said 

. January througn ,. A , — r-.» ignored numerous earher efforts by attac ^ Albert Atraghju 34, was group earlier had asked 



sasisssss SSsSs 

&»asss5s 

percent at an annual rate, in the 
second quarter. 


a 




f-C* 




all-party security committee to to the Israeli Embassy from p^ denl ^S Mubarak to cancel 

t the fitting. his home in the Cairo suburb ot 1079 accord. 

Maadi w*ra the shooting occurred “Regrettably. President Mu- 
st 8:30 AM. . bank fid not listen to the wishes of 

The Egyptian authonues ught- - ^ le ^ su bnutted to the 

Securitv sources said that at least eued security at Cairo s airport ana enemy and bis Am eri ca n 

jSwons were killed in the shril- other points of departure, anj were tiw statement said, "and 

ing Md 100 were wounded. conducting “a feverish search .w ^ fouo d the Israeli flag desecrat- 

carried out the shooting. 


an 

halt _ 

“We can do nothing unless there 
is a political agreement," a commit- 
tee source sai< 

Security s 
24 persons 


after falling 0 J i^s residents huddled in basements 


The Soviet Union, he said, has yggrs of negotiations on chemical 
proposed “something we believe is weapons now everyone can very 
nonnegotiable and nonverifiable; a p^v y see results," Viktor Israelyan 
ban on research even as they pur- a news conference. A multi- 

sue the largest research program on rH rimial ban on production and 
Earth.” Mr. McFariane ctescribed stockpiling erf chemical weapons 
President Mu- as a “masterpiece of chutzpah" the has been under discussion at the 
Soviet claim that the U.S. program Qeneval talks for 16 years, 
is designed to acquire a first-strike member of the U.S. delegation 
capability. also noted some “modest progress 

-In short, we’re having a lot of but said it was _ “not as i rapid or 

trouble establishing a real dia- extensive as we had hoped. 

_ . loeue," Mr. McFariane said. Mr. Israelyan said the confer- 

An Bryptian Foreign Ministry ^ p^pan k willing to meet the cnee's chemical weapons comnnt- 

spokesman said: "We stronglvcon- UniOT "halfway in develop- we had found broad areas of con- 



3BSs«^ 

said Allen Sin^ drief econo^ 


shefls continual to Mr. Atraghji's wife, n an* ami 
rain 

rian 


—^^so far tins ttE^cSSKf* 

year of just Upcrran}. avc ^ ^ m year> which made imparts xti,m ic no indication that con- />incwi as fiehtina sureery to treat bullet wounds io murdered diplomat ^tived to 


Moslem and Chris- an embassy secretary, Mazal Men- measure to apprehend the 
am down on M^rai anoijui^ -jh- both 24 , who were aocompa- tmujre and bane them to justice. 

the drolomaL were said to be Aocor din^Sie Ismcfa femba^y 

.aid. All roads linking East and in a sa 

West Beirut wore closed as fighting surgery 


demn this criminal act The Egyp- Sg'^spomrible solutions to out- sensus, as opproed to 
turn authorities will take every legal st ^ 1 < ii n gprobleins," he added. _ years. He declined to be more spe- 


1 


dividing the city. 


A hitherto unknown group call; 


i. sSSSSg 

continue, 

• sa- ea g ^rsssss 


sMdTFliabts continued to operate, ered to tbe barters ne ** 

Cairo said:. “Our valumt armrf 

■e near the WestBeinit home of mra today, m defense of our free- 


age near 


Britain Faces Rail Worker Strikes 

JnlSew Test for Thatcher Government 


By Bob South Wales, Scotland and the into a showdown. A 

international Herald *. London area. . i plter passengers handed out by 

LONDON - Six months after 113 p0 guards are ^ I t ^S«rassem that “re- 

defeatingacoalminere’s^^ scheduled to vote Frida? of tl« guards wiU be a cbm- 


hv a Mowing mousuw* — r yow was seneumou .»>r At%- 49, out recently asked: “Who helps 

Almas the 12-moath coal stnke. ^ Tuesday^stalks. railroad management is deter- 

already is disrupmg- that some of my anoorts. British Rail re- 

lh lf^SnUffand fnright ser- taken pnsoner. £ loss of £408 million ($57 1 

iirisss msmm 


to negotiate under 



C3fid*»Se-*-i- 

meat on ~ , . . ... the oast several decades. The gov- 

; bus bad link P®* ^mates ihat only 5 per- 


effects of the ranters’ strike on 
^"^^f^Snonrists at British 

stockbrokerages sad the di^uieis 

unlikely to canse severe nardsmp 

« uj. n M.U as a « ir. 



in 1983. 

Tf s certainly an inconveni ence , 

to cause some dismp- 


.r 


™ _ivyn Davies, an econ- 



According to — w L ^ 

Cai- 
ro three to four months ago, and 
“didn’t really know any Egyptians 
yet." He added: "We have no idea 
of who they are and why they did 
it." 

■ Israeli Reaction 

William Claiborne ofThe Wash - 
ingfon Post reported from Jerusa- 
lem : 


standing problems, , 

“But without some c han ge m the 
Soviet approach to security issues. 


rific and cautioned that some posi- 
trons remained “very far apart. 


Safety Lapses Widespread 
In U,S, Chemical Industry 

sidered email, because many hu- 
man and equipment failures would 


By Stuart Diamond 

LJTrtAT YORK— ^ The Irak of tox- have to occur in sequence for haz- 
kraeliofGd^s said they did not , «*-■—« l» be 

believe the attack in Cairo would - m Virginia last week has fo- 
affect attempts by both Israel and ^ attention on saferir de- 
Eevpt to normalize relations, ^ problems at thousands of 
. u.. lORT invasion l’! :_-l „l. n i nmivuinp units 


chemical plant processing units 
where hazardous materials are han- 
dled, industry consultants say. 

The consultants said that as 


that only certain weather condi- 
tions would carry it to populated 
areas. 

Moreover, only about 1 percent 
of the nation's five million chemi- 
ca) processing units handle hazard- 
ous materials that could result in 

issued many as 50,000 processing traits iat JffiST’are concemS 

Peres expressed “deep rimek at d^cai plants around the United “ ^ pioW6nL 

criminal tarronst attack, rorapi States were not designed io prevrai R-nresentatives of the Union 
Ministry of&aals. said leading 0 f hazardous sub- Corp . refused to go into 

ed that the Egyptian stances in the event that chemical delan OT ^ leak Aug. 11 at the 

reaction to the lnadent vrouldcffl processes get out of controL ^ - m institute. A spokesman 

set any tension suiroundmg me m- ^ ^ ^ these defects could ^id Sunday it would be “specula- 
ddent 


strained by Israel's 1982 invasion 
of Lebanon and by a dispute over 
land in Sinai. 

Although an official statement 
issued by Prime Minister Shimon 


Crowds at 
during an 


sjai^assaa® 


The Foreign Ministry said: “We 
are in close contact with the Egyp- 
tian authorities, including the 
Egyptian minister of foreign af- 
fairs, from whom we heard they are 

acting to the best of thdr aMity ra 

everything connected to tins das- 
tardly attack.” . . 

The Egyptian chargfe ffaffans in 
Td Aviv, Mohammed Basaoum, 
told Israel Radio that he beheyed 
the gunmen came from outsde 
Egypt, He said it was unlikely that 
the Egyptian opposition was in- 
volved, because, he said, it had ac- 
cepted the peace treaty with Israel. 

The attack came at a time when 
the Peres government is seeking to 
improve relations with Egypt 

Aides have said that Mr. Pena 
believes that that once Israeh- 
Egyptian ties are normalized, Mr. 
Mubarak can actively involve him- 
sdf in the peace initiative he began 
Iasi February when he urged the 
creation of ajcrfnt Jordanian-Pales- 
tinian delegation that would nego- 
tiate directly with IsraeL 


INSIDE 

■ The tinting of the Rainbow 

Warrior is creating strains for 
France’s Socialists. Page L 

■ BranTs new government has 

espoused a campaign against 
. official corruption. Page 3. 

■ Shimon Peres has 

Israel's dominant politic 
ure. P*E® 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Dresdner Bank AG and Com- 
merzbank cut two of their inter' 
est rates. 


as 

ft 


TOMORROW 

Chinese sentiment about Japan 
on the 40th anniversary of the 
end of Worid War II is ambigu- 
ous. 


tive" to discuss matters being cov- 
ered by the company’s own investi- 
gation, which, he said, would be 
finishwl within a week. 

But chemical engineers, consul- 
tants and other experts who are 
f amiliar with the circumstances of 
that leak, including present and 
former employees of the company, 
said that it appeared to be related 
to safety problems common in the 
industry. Their assessments woe 
based on new details on how the 
leak occurred, derived from infor- 
mation provided by the company, 
federal officials and industry ex- 
perts. 

Representatives of leading 
chemical companies and engineer- 
ing societies who have studied the 
situation are recommending 
Ranges in emergency systems for 
ihe processing of hazardous chemi- 
cals The recommendations, which 
took 10 years to develop, will be 
incorporated in a new manual of 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


. !• 







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Page 2 


Ship Attack Jars Paris Politics 

Suspicion of IncompeimtSuperwsion Hangs Over Socialists 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21, 1985 

Uganda Official Hopeful 
On United Government 



>h Fitchctt 

International Herald Tribune 
PARIS — For France’s Socialist 
government, tarred in the sabotage 
of the Rainbow Warrior, the 
Greenpeace ship, accusations of in- 
competence in controlling the secu- 
rity services seem likely to be the 
main political price. 

An investigation into the sinking 
of the Rainbow Warrior in New 
Zealand by limpet mines is expect- 
ed to report this week that the oper- Service, whose origins 
ation was carried out by the DGSE, World War n Gaiuhst 
the General Directorate for Exter- 


starting to attack the government 
for ineffective intelligence went 
Conservative commentators, 
saying that a Socialist hid in 1982 
to purge the DGSE was a crippling 
episode, are saying that poor man- 
agement by the Socialists explains 
why the operatives bungled the 
Rainbow Warrior mission. 

The Socialists have always had 
strained relations with the DGSE, 
its so-called Action 
date to the 
reastance. 


nal Security. 

Known as the "piscine,” or 
“swimming pool’’ because its 
headquarters are near a public pool 
in an industrial area of Paris, it is 
France's foreign espionage agency, 
similar in function to tbe CIA. 

Each day, the Paris press pro- 
vides more colorful details about 
moves of well- bankrolled French 
agents in the Rainbow Warrior op- 
eration, which resulted in tbe death 
of a photographer. 

Reaction in France has been 
markedly free of debate about pos- 
sible moral overtones or of any 
likelihood of the incident becoming 
a “French Watergate " 

Discussing the operation in a ra- 
dio interview Monday, a centrist 
opposition leader, Jean Lecanuet, 
of the Union for French Democra- 
cy, said; “That is what secret ser- 
vices exist for.” 

■ A national consensus apparently 
supports the government s readi- 
ness to use violence — overt and 
covert — to protect the nuclear- 
testing program in the Pacific. 

But opposition politicians are 


Its agents, many of whom hold 
rightist views, are specialized in op- 
erations in former French colonies, 
especially in Africa. 

A few Socialist politicians — for 
example. Max Gallo, a former gov- 
ernment spokesman and now edi- 
tor of the pro-Sodalist Lc Matin — 
complain that the government has 
undermined its own efforts to occu- 
py tbe moral high ground on, for 
example, human rights. 

Certainly, the publicity about 
French actions will intensify an 
anti-nuclear mood in Australia, 
New Ze al and and other South Pa- 
cific nations. It could affect the 
diplomatic context of tbe troubled 
French territory. New C»ti»d«nia 

But opposition politicians, ap- 
parently reluctant to criticize the 
intelligence c ommuni ty, which they 
might end up controlling after leg- 
islative elections in March, hare 
focused their attack carefully, 
charging that tbe government is 
trying to evade paying the political 

The Socialists have uneasy rela- 
tions with the service, known until 
recently as tbe SDECE. 

The service has periodically been 


rocked by scandal, notably in 1965, 
when it helped Moroccan agents is 
Paris abduct and murder Mehdi 
Ben Baika, a Moroccan Socialist 
leader. That episode, and the 
SDECE's Gaullist roots, hardened 
the Socialists’ antipathies to the 
agency. 

Despite its checkered past, 
SDECE was spared the repeated 
treason cases afflicting Britain’s 
services or the sustained bad pub- 
licity surrounding tbe CIA. 

But in recent years, operating 
under die Ministry of Defense, it 
has placed increased em phasis on 
undercover operations, using mili- 
tary men or mercenaries. It neglect- 
ed analysis, especially of the Soviet 
bloc, according to Pascal Krop and 
Faligot, authors of a recent 
“Lansane.*’ 

According to them, the agency, 
with roughly 2^00 full-time agents 
and at least as many voluntary 
“honorary correspondents,” has 
concentrated its efforts in Africa, 
where it frequently operated in 
conjunction with French armed 
forces in supporting pro-Western 
blade African governments. 

Throughout the 1970s, the 
SDECE was headed by Alexandre 
de Marenches, a stout; energetic 
aristocrat known in Western intelli- 
gence aides as “Porthos.” 

He was trusted by President 
Georges Pompidou, who suspected 
that GauQists in the agency hnd 
tried to smear him in a sexual scan- 

daL 

Under Mr. de Marenches, 
SDECE had problems. It repeated- 
ly failed, sometimes publicly, in ef- 
forts to fo ment insurrection in Lib- 



WORLD BRIEFS 


Chari** 

After-Meeting 

f °“Evea 

“ the statement smd._o?^ iShe^bkr It added: “The 


and Kenya — cultural, trade and 

ethnic." . 

With the exception of Cnspian 
Rwakasiri. who was chief of Mr. . 
Obote's secret police. Mr. Otunnu 
said no other officials of the former 


Jean Lecanuet 


He said that Uganda’s military 
rulers are preparing for a return to 
parliamentary democracy and will 
turn the government over to civil- 
ians as soon as possible. 


Compiled by Our Staff Trvtn Dispateka 

NAIROBI — Uganda’s foreign 
minister, Clara Otunnu, said Tues- 
day that he had met within tbe last 
three days with Yoweri Museveni 
leader of the main Ugandan guer- 
rilla grog), and was optimistic that 
efforts to form a unity government 
would be successful 
The meeting here was the highest 
level of contact between tbe two 
sides since Milton Obote, a civilian, 
was toppled as president on July 
27. 

In the Ugandan capital of Kam- 
pala, the radio reported that the 
new military rulers have agreed to 

make sweeping changes within the _ 

_ _ army to restore discipline and im- concluded by saying the rebels 

Africa, especially after Congress prove the poor human rights situa- were willing to discuss a political 
curbed U.S. undercover activities, lion in the cmmtrv. arrangement 

The statement said the coup was 
merely a “changing of die guards." 
noting that the ruling Military 
Council had made Paulo 
Muwanga, Mr. Obote’s vice presi- 


ya against Colonel Moamer 
Qadhafi. 

However, intelligence sources 
say that during the 1970s the 
SDECE gained the respect of West- 
ern governments for its work in 


vak experiences of the l%us. 

Later Tuesday, the political wing in Slt-Ill •: 

of the National Resistance Army F/VlCt 5 LEWIIlHlkCrS III 

released a contradictory statement laniCUo ^ .*rpn — ■ In a pre-dawn 

purportedly from Mr. Museveni HEBRON, Israeli-Occupied J^SLiiSIlfive mem bers of the KnesStt, 
Toe state 




statement urged the over- 
throw of the present regime, but 
; the n 


Policeman Kills Man in South Africa 


The Associated Press 

.JOHANNESBURG — A black 
policeman accused by a Mack mob 
of collaboration with the govern- 
ment shot his way oat of the crowd 
Tuesday, killing one man. police 
said. 

! Police said a crowd surrounded 
the officer as be was going to work 
in a black neighborhood near tbe 
white fanning community of 
Bethal 68 miles (111 kilometers} 
east of Johannesburg. Black police 
and munitipaJ officials have been 
frequent targets during the current 
unrest 

• Meanwhile, in the black town- 
ship of Soweto outside Johannes- 
burg, soldiers aided by attack dogs 
launched house-to-house searches, 
witnesses said. 

It was the first time in a year of 
rioting in South Africa mat the 
ny has been sent house-to-house 
the nation’s largest black com- 
munity. although similar opera- 
tions have been conducted in the 
eastern Cape province. 

There were no immediate reports 


arm 1 

in 


of casualties or arrests during the 
search operation. 

It was not dear how large an area 
was sealed off. In other derations 
of this sort, the soldiers have said 
that they were helping police look 
for fugitives and ordering students 
to end their boycotts of classes. 

The searches came a day after a 
delegation of dergy, inducting both 
Macks and whites, met with Presi- 
dent Pieter W. Botha. They said tbe 
leader of the white minority gov- 
ernment did not appear to recog- 
nize the seriousness of the unrest by 
the black majority. 

Bishop Desmond M. Tutu, who 
refused to join the delegation that 
met with Mr. Botha, said the presi- 
dent was not inclined to negotiate 
with the black majority because of 
the military power at his disposaL 

Mr. Botha had earlier rqected 
Bishop Tutu’s request feu a private 

m eeting 

A spokesman far the U.S. Stale 
Department in Washington criti- 
cized Bishop Tutu for not meeting 
with Mr. Botha on Monday. “A 
refusal by any party to meet and 
negotiate only womens the pros- 


pects for understanding in South 
Africa,” said the spokesman, 

Charles E. Radrnan. 

Meanwhile, Winnie Mandela, 
the wife of the jailed black ami- 
apartheid leader, Nelson Mandela, 
failed to attend a news conference 
she had called. Tuesday at her law- 
yer’s office in Johannesburg, spark- ^txnntnr 

mg speculation that she had been OefUUOr 

arrested. 


activities. 

When the Socialists came to 
power in 1981, President Francois 
Mitterrand resisted party pressure 
to disband SDECE It was left un- 
der tbe control of the defense min- 
ister, Charles Hernu, an old friend 
of Mr. Mitterrand and, tl yn as 
now, the Socialist most esteemed 
by the French aimed forces. 

But mutual suspicions remained. 
According to the authors of “La 
Piscine," tbe service adopted a 
“scorched earth" policy, destroying 
files in an effort to conceal its net- 
works from the Socialists. 

As a result, the Socialist govern- 
ment mistakenly badeed a losing 
home in Chad, a sensitive former 
French colony in North Africa. 

It supported Gonkouni Oueddei 
because the Socialists had not been 
told that bis rival Hisstae Habit, 
had just been resupplied in an op- 
eration involving the SDECE, the 
CIA and Egyptian intelligence. 

Despite a new head. Vice Admi- 
ral Pierre Laocste, and anew name, 
DGSE, its troubles continued. Last 
year, for example, on tbe basis of 
French intelligence, Mr. Mitter- 
rand announced that Libyan 
troops bad withdrawn from Ch a d , 
only to. be contradicted by U.S. 
satellite photographs. 


lion in the country. 

The broadcasts said that tbe 
number oF soldiers- stationed 
around the capital would be re- 
duced, proportionate representa- 
tion for ethnic groups within the 
army would be assured and the dent, the executive prime minister, 
ci vilian im<»iiigt»nr* units would be “We do not recognize the Mili- 


intriligmrtt 


recognize 
tary Council, Tito [OlceQo] as head 
of state, Muwanga as prime minis- 
ter and the other appointments and 
decisions tbe usurper junta has 
been making,” the statement said. 
“We are, however, wffling to dis- 
cuss all these issues and arrive at a 
secure and progressive political ar- 
rangement.*’ (AP, UPI) 


Diplomats said tbe moves were 
the first concrete steps promised to 
restore discipline within the army, 
which has run amok in the three 
weeks since the coup. 

After meeting with the guerrillas, 

Mr. Otunnu said, “We had an ex- 
tremely useful discussion and our 
talks were held in a brotherly spir- 
it." But he added, “It would not be __ _ • __ 

in tbe interests of the peace which 

we seek for me to disraqx here the M. Cut' 

contents and dements of our dis- 
cussion.” 

Mr. Otunnu declined to say 
when or where he met Mr. Muse- 
veni commander of the National 
Resistance Army. 


IsSetbyU.S. 


(Contained from Page 1) 

predicted that tbe movewauld dull ^ tat ^ ^awea to con- 

Talks between the rebels and the in Geneva, partkylarly on doctdwrch business daring tbe 

vemment smeared tmminmt cm the prospects of an anti-satdhte 

Jeff Garbow, a spokesman for 
the Danbtuty prison, said Mr. 
Moan was given time off for good 
behavior. 




SsracTs parliament! who had ocojpiedan l0 settle there, 

four daw in an effort, to enawrage other yitzhak Rabin said 

In a^tatemeat after ^^J^^^Siw^toe^decision. — 
that settlement would be w obey orders to leave tbe ; 

Bsssssaff*— * 


Reverend Moon Leaves U.S. Prison 


. NEW YORK (AP) — The Rev- 
erend Sun Myung Moon, the Kore- 
an evangelist who beads the Unifi- 
cation Church, was released 
Tuesday from a Brooklyn halfway 
house after serving 13 months of an 
18-month sentence for tax evasion. 

Mr. Moon, 65. was convicted in 
Mav 1982 of failing lo report 
SI 62.000 in income on his U.S. tax 
returns. He appealed to the Su- 
preme Conn but it refused to hear 
his case and he began serving his 
sentence on July 20. 1 984. 

He span 1114 months in the me- 
dium-security federal correctional 
facility is Danbury. Connecticut, 
then was moved to the halfway 
house. He had to report there every 
but was allowed to con- 


However, the lawyer reported Says New Zealand 

later that she had telephoned to say T . . j-r 7 Mr. Museveni’s insurgents 

she had forgotten the 2:30 PAL MS AmtOU* MUXtUtKS fought the Obote government four 
gathering. It was rescheduled for years before the civilian president 


government appeared hnminimt on 
Aug. 13 in Dar es SaImnn L Tanza- 
nia. Lieutenant General Tito 
OkeDo, Uganda’s new head of 
state, showed up, but Mr. Muse- 
veni did not 

Mr. Otnruui said two other ma- 
jor anti-Obote rebel groups, the 
Uganda Freedom Movement and 
the Uganda Federal Democratic 
Movement have sent representa- 
tives to Kampala for 

Mr. Mnseveni’s 


prospects 
agreement 

One official noted that the Unit- 
ed States and the Soviet Union 
“have agreed that the objectives of 
the talks in Geneva are to work out 
effective agreements aimed at pre- 
venting an 
terminating 



Sun Myung Moon 


Wednesday. 

■ Stay of Execution Granted 

A blade poet and upholsterer, 
due to hang at Pretoria prison 
Wednesday for the murder of a 
black poKceman, was granted a 21- 
day stay, Reuters reported from 
Pretoria. 

A Supreme Court judge Tuesday 
night granted tbe stay to Benjamin 
Moloisl 30, to allow new evidence 
to be brought. The outlawed Afri- 
can National Congress guerrilla 
group has claimed responsibility 
for the killing. 


Another Bonn Secretary Disappears 


Untied Pros International 

BONN — West German coun- 
terintelligence is investigating the 
disappearance of a second woman 
who may be connected with spying 
for East Germany, officials said. 

A spokesman for the Karlsruhe- 
based Federal Prosecutor's Office 
said Monday that a secretary em- 
ployed by the privately run Nation- 
al Federation of Exiles, dealing 
with exiles from eastern Europe, 
bad vanished 10 days before, and 
that authorities are treating it as a 
spy case. 

He identified the woman as Ur- 
sula Richter, 52, and said she had 
access to important information 
about prominent politicians who 
are active in the exile group. 

Like the West German cabinet 
minister’s aide who disappeared at 


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the beginning of August, Miss 
Richter originally came from East 
Germany. She apparently came to 
West Germany from Canada 20 
years ago, informed sources said. 

The newspaper Die Well repent- 
ed Monday that French counterin- 
telligence had been asked to join 
the search for Souja Lfinebmg, 60,. 
the missing secretary of Economics 
Minister Martin Bangemann. 

Miss Luneburg, who had been 
Mr. Bangemann’s secretary for 12 
years, disappeared the first week- 
end in August after telling neigh- 
bors that sbe was going to Brussels. 

Die Welt said federal prosecu- 
tors have learned that a beautician 
named Souja L&neburg lived in 
West Berlin until 1966, when she 
moved for unknown reasons to tbe 
Alsatian city of Colmar. 

Intelligence officials have 
learned that soon afterward a wom- 
an using this name entered West 
Germany from France and lived in 
Offenbach. Hamburg and then 
Bonn, Die Writ sakL This was the 
person who became Mr. Bange- 
mann ’s secretary. 

■ Rotscb Is Indicted 

Manfred Rotsch, the former 
chief engineer of West Germany’s 
leading aerospace company, has 
been indicted on charges of provid- 
ing the Soviet Union with details of 
a multipurpose European jet fight- 
er, The Associated Press reported 
from Karlsruhe. 

Mr. Rotsch, 61, was arrested in 
September 1984 and has been in 


Reuters 

PARIS — A Gaullist monber of 
tbe French Senate has accused New 
Zealand of supplying weapons to 
Melanesian Kanaks seeking New 
Caledonia’s independence from 
France. Prime Minister David 
Lange of New Zealand denied (he 
assertion Tuesday. 

Charles Pasqua, the Gaullist 
leader in the Senate, said Monday 
that New Zealand had shipped 
aims and supplies to “saboteurs" in 
New Caledonia. 

Mr. Lange told his country’s par- 
liament that there was “absolutely 
no truth" to tbe accusation. “It is a 
ludicrous and preposterous sugges- 
tion by a rather despe rat e seeker 
after publicity in an opposition 
party in France." 

Mr. Pasqua made the assertion 
during a debate an New Caledonia 
that was dominated by discussion 
of the sinking of the Greenpeace 
protest ship Rainbow Warrior in 


years 

was removed. The guerrillas wel- 
comed Mr. Obote's removal but 
Mr. Museveni has demanded that 
his faction have a major role in 
structuring a new gov ernme nt 
Mr. Otuium said there have been 
“long and ongoing" contacts by 
telephone and telex between Kam- 
pala and tbe National Resistance 
Army. Mr. Museveni has agreed to 
a peace meeting, he said. 

*Tbe government’s spirit of rec- 
onciliation remains intact. The 
door remains open for negotia- 
tions," the foreign minister said. 

Mr. Otunnu, 34, who was Ugan- 
da's permanent representative to 
the United Nations daring the 
Obote regime, also said that Gener- 
al OkeDo traveled to Kenya on 
Monday to meet with President 
Daniel ArapMoi and “deepen the 
sn Ugai 


^racemspacc and T unisia Kxpftls 253 Libyans as Threat ^ 

[ It on Earth.” TUNIS (Reuters) — Tunisia has expelled 253 Libyans, including 

diplomats, on chmy t of espionage and subversion, the Tunisian news 
agency TAP reported Tuesday. 

Tbe Libyans, some of whom worked at the country^ diplomatic 
mission or in the cultural center in Tunis, were attempting to set up 
networks to incite acts of terrorism and sabotage, the agency said. T 

The activities of the Libyans, it added, were a threat to Tunisia's 
internal and external security. Tbe move by Tunis followed the expulsion 
by Libya of more than 20,000 Tunisian workers in recent weeks. 


ed a qmcK and angry response from 
the Soviet Union to tbe U.S. an- 
nouncement 

In his message, Mr. Reagan dab- 
orated on the reasons for the new 
testing. “The Soviet Union has for 
many years had tbe world’s only 
operational anti-satellite system,” 


he said “There is also a growing . 

th^raS&S] Manila Alert for Aquino Anniversary 

• MANILA (UPI) — President Ferdinand E. Mateos put the militaiyon 
maximum red alert Tuesday and appealed for calm on the eve of planned 
protests marking the second anniversary of the murder of the chief 
opposition leader, Benigno S. Aquino Jr. 

Tbe Presidential Palace, was placed under heavy guard. Barbed-wire 
bar ri c a des, 400 police officers and 500 marines (docked the approaches. 
Naval vessdspatroDed tbe adjoining Pasig River. 

About 1,000 students tried to march on the palace in what a protester 
called “muscle flexing for tomorrow,'’ but hundreds of riot police and 
marines blocked tfadr path. No violence was reported. 

Melanesians Given Assembly Majority 

PARIS (AP) — The French parliament passed a law Tuesday regulat- 

O rKniMMl efrrtinmc in ifco C_.l n J 


J 


very 


ties between Uganda Speakes said. 


jafl since then. His indictment, on 
charges of espionage and revealing 
classified secrets, was issued Aug. 1 
but made public Monday. 

Moderate Sikh Leader Slain 

struction department of Messer- |Q ^ New Caledonia to inde- 
pendence. 


five Soviet satellites Which are de- 
signed to support directly the 
U-S-SJL's terrestrial forces." 

Mr. Speakes, saying that “we 
have to test, and test now, to re- 
store tbe military balance,” assert- 
ed that tbe Soviet Union has “pros- 
pects for future development that 
we believe could pul us farther be- 
hind.” 

In addition to “an effective capa- 
bility to seek and destroy critical 
U.S. space systems in near-Earth 
orbit," tbe Soviet Union now has a 

ground-based laser tystem that . . .. . . — - 1Wfiuwr , . 

could be operational m grace by “8 regional elections m the troubled French Pacific territory of New 
the late 1980s or early 1990, Mr. Catedmia, giving native Melanesians a majority in the new territorial ' T 


assemt 


ably. 

The Sodalist-dominated lower house, the National Assembly over- 
rode the Senate to give the Melanesians the mxinritv TX» 



schmitt-Bdlkow-BIohm GmbH, 
outside Munich, gave Moscow de- 
tails of the Tornado fighter plane 
built by Italy, West Germany and 
Bri tain 

The chief federal prosecutor. For Mecca Pilgrimage 
Kurt Rebmann, said that Mr. b 


(Continued from Page 1) 


Egypt Releases Sheikh 


teacher and developed into a formi- 
[uiet politid 


Rotsch, who was bom in Czecho- 
slovakia, began spying for the Rus- 
sians in 1954 when he lived in East 
Berlin. 

Mr. Rotsch got a job with an 
aircraft maker in Stuttgart in 1955 
on instructions from tbe Soviet 
KGB and continued spying when 
he went to work for another com- 
pany in 1964, Mr. Re bmann said. 
He began working on the Tornado 
project in 1970. 


Reuters 

CAIRO — A Moslem cleric 
campaigning for Islamic law in 
Egypt, Sheikh Fahez Salama, was 
freed from nearly a month's deten- 
tion and flown to Saudi Arabia on 
Tuesday to make the annual pil- 
grimage to Mecca, his lawyer said. 

The lawyer said that the sheikh 
had been detained by Egyptian se- 
curity officials for alleged anti- 
state activity. 


influence on Sikh politics 
were radicalized three years 
dable but quiet politician. ago by a f undamenlaliH preacher. 

Apart from critics outside his Jarnafl Singh Bhindranwale. 
party, Mr. Longowal had had to Mr. Longowal lived in the shad- 
contend with opposition within the aw of the younger militan t who was 
party from two mflueutiai leaders, killed along with hundreds of ndli- 
They were Parkash Singh Badal, a taut sympathizers in the raid last 
former state chief minister, and year by Indian troops an the Gdd- 
Gurcharan Singh Dohra, the pres- en Temple, tbe Sikhs holiest shrine; 
dent of a powerful committee that in Amntsar. 


ma|°my of New Caledonia's p!£!S™ ^ 
Tie South ftci& territory now will have a 46-seal2scmblv Twenty- 
one scats will be reserved for the settler-dominated capital ofNonmil 
leaving the mflonty of the seats in MelanesiandoSated araT^ 

For die Record 

siprtme commander for Europe for the 
North Atlantic Treaty Orgnahation, arrived unexpectedlyTuLdav in 
Athms ifor talks with Greece's Socialist government y lu ^ y m 


The British Fi 


(Reuters) 


administers Sikh shrines. 

The killing leaves a vacuum that 
may be difficult to fill especially 
since Mr. Longowal bad over tire 
past mouth acquired a popular im- 
age and influence that Ms rivals 
could not match. 

Mr. Langow&l 57, was a moder- 


Mr. Longowal was arrested dur- 
ing that military operation and re- 
leased only last March. After 
adopting initial militant postures 
to win support, be b egan gaining 
the backing that enabled him to 
negotiate with the central govern- 
ment last month. 


n Brin® is being 

(AP) 

Correction 

A Briton kidnapped and stifl detained in Lebanon j- 
identified in an article Monday. He is Alec Collett, a ioamfli« C °!3S! y 
for the United Nations Relief and Works Agency J raaIlsl working 


$ 


Chemical Industry Is Lagging Years Behind in Safety , Experts Say 

* n ■ 1 AOA ■ . - — 1 ^ mpm « t/ 


(C ontinued from Page 1) 
standards for such systems, to be 
published early next year. 

Tbe changes all concern emer- 
gency systems to relieve potentially 
dangerous increases in temperature 
and pressure in chemical processes 
using hazardous material. Ways to 
deal with these increases have been 


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available since 1980, but few com- 
panies have installed the needed 
equipment, industry experts said. 
The reasons include ignorance, 
lack of technical know-how and 
high cost, the experts said. No gov- 
ernment regulatory agency or in- 
dustry association has required 
such changes. 

"Chemical companies don’t de- 


uwr- 

effects," said lan Swift, 
director of Fike Technical 


.Mr. Swift, who helped inifi*n» 


~ “ HIM 

relief systems in 
ears ana tl 


the 

that all were 


cures and pressures that can result 
from a runaway reaction. 

He estimated that (he cost of 
adequately redesigning the systems 
could be as much as $2 billion over- 
all. 

Mr.. Swift and other industry 
sources said that Union Carbide 
grant about S5 million earlier this 
year to upgrade safety equipment 
used in the production of methyl 
isocyanate, a pesticide component 
known as MJC. at its Institute 
plant The new equipment was in- 
stalled after MIC leaked from tbe 
company’s plant in Bhopal India, 
on Dec. 3. killing at least 2,000 
people. 

But the improvements were not 
made in apart of the Institute plant 
where the leak of another pesticide 
ingredient, aldicarb oxime, injured 
at least 135 persons on Aug. 1 1, 
industry sources said. Such im- 
piovements probably would have 
prevented that toxic release, they 
added. 



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They also said that both the Bho- 
pal and Institute plants had safety 
systems too small to handle the 
high temperatures and pressures of 
a runaway reaction. 

One reason emergency and safe- 
ty systems are not given higher pri- 
ority in the industry, some expats 
say, is that undergraduate students 
in chemical engineering are not re- 
quired to study the subject. None 
of the 145 accredited undergradu- 
ate chemical engineering programs 
in U.S. colleges requires a safety 
course as part of the curriculum, 
they said. 

In a paper presented in March to 
tbe American Society of Chemical 
Engineers. Harold G. Fisher, a spe- 
cialist in emergency systems who 
works at Union Carbide’s facility 
in South Charleston. West Virgin- 
ia, said that designing emergency 
relief systems is generally not rec- 
ognized as a specialty in the chemi- 
cal industry. 

“Much of this work is therefore 
performed by journeymen and-or 
recess design engi- 
’ in a 


mg tbe temperature of the solution 
to tbe point where it began to boil 
The high pressure material, they 
said, blew open two safety rdief 
devices, including one that opened 
to the outdoors. In systems with 
toxic chemicals, both devices 
sbould have been vented lo pipes 
that lead to a chemical neutralizer 

and flare tower that destroys gas by 

burning it off, they added. 

These problems are correctable, 
but technical experts from various 


! by 

inexperienced proce 
neera using methods _ 
piecemeal fashion,” he sai 
Tbe accident at Institute in- 
volved a tank storing a solution of 
aldicarb oxime, or ADO. and meth- 
ylene chloride, also called dichloro- 
methane. Tbe tank is surrounded 
by a jacket into which steam is 
sometimes piped to prevent the 
mixture inside from freezing in 
cold weather. The industry sources 
said that the leak probably began 
after a motor-operated valve emit- 
ted steam into the jacket, increas- 


that tbe solutions could be costly 
time-consuming and difficult to 
carry out 

J -,T rb f se du Fg cs m complex and 
difficult, and n will take quite a 
wbfle before we examine every- 
thing thoroughly in Iiriit of whai 
we know now” said Richard F. 
Schwab, manager of process safety 
and loss prevention for the Allied 
Corp, a major chemical producer 
~nns is a team project thai could 
take months on a single system and 

we probably onty have half a dozen 

people who really comprehend it 
TJat is probably tbe rase with most 
cnenncal companies." 

Forman, executive di- 
rector of the American Institute of 
Ojenuca^ [Engineers, said: “These 

Mr. Swift added that design 



puteized and automated systems. 
Joath to retrofit, became tK 

SHapaTS 

away reaction occurs.” 

esmuySS 

wsaffi-ws. 

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and speefficatiom^^d 0 ^* 5 ^^' 
&88cr, than theiaW 

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Bhopal and In S 5? eot ' But the 

Ul -i urie s that 

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AMERICAN TOPICS 


U.S. Agencies Battle 

Unwanted Intruders 


Imported Pests , From 'Killer’ Bees 
To Catfish, Pose a Growing Threat 


Rv Peter Kerr announced a quarantine, restrict- 

Nt J Y vk Times Service ingimerstate transport of all honey 

In Oswego, New York, mean- 
ra^Slar rags from while, entomologists from Cornell , 

from Brazil arnring AfSanizcd 


___ __ - Ths Aaooaiid Pna 

I oe hme-green mansion of Sheikh Mohammed al-Fassi, jotted by fire five yearn ago 
and m disrepair since, feD to boDdoxera Monday as les&deuts of Beverly Hills cheered. 


Beveriy Hflls Cries Not 
Over Eyesore’s Demise 


H3Hs 


red to bid 


As bulldozers roared into ac- 
tion, hundreds of Bevedy Hills, 
California, residents raised pins- ■ 
tic cups of wine this week in a 
toast to another razing: The de- 
molition of the once-elegam 
mansion made infamcai^ in 1978 
when, purchased by the family of 
Sheikh Mohammed al-FassC it 
became known as the Dune-green 
eyesore. 


t to the city's “Grand Old 

Dame . 7 

“Gentlemen, start your en- 
s," Mr. Lopez called to the 


that. The attendants . . . well . . . 
attend." 


A T^oterpiilaK escaped and 
Trouvelot introduced to North 

America the gypsy moth, whidi has 

tormented foresters and gardeners 
ever since. _ . 

While the UJ3. Department of 
Agriculture has moved swiftly to 
contain yet another new amyal, 
Africanized “killer” bees in Cali- 
fornia, the bees are only one exam- 
ple of the hundreds of pests that 
have arrived under se emin gly inno- 
cent drcuxnstances. . 

The dangers posed by such in- 
truders are more serious than ever. 


of opulence came crashing 


Colonel Sanders Joins 
NASA’s Space Team 


according to the Agriculture De- 
‘ imal an 


Short Takes 


Built in 1917 on some of 
Southern California’s most ex- 
pensive real estate, the Italian 

Rmawctnw tnatwin n hud long 

symbolized Bevedy Hips chic. 
But something of a scandal de- 


Thf. Brn ronmendd Protection 
Agency has put an end to LUST 
—at least on paper. Agency bu- 
reaucrats had used the whimsical 


Two dozen chicken eggs and 
baker's yeast will be taken into 
space on two shuttle flights 
scheduled for 1986, The Wash- 
ington Post reports. Both unlike- 
ly cargo items will be used in 
experiments planned by two stu- 
dents — John Vellinger, 20, a 
sophomore at Purdue University 


partment’s Animal and Plant 
Health Inspection Service. Grow- 
ing numbers are arriving by plane, 
in containerized cargo vessels and 
in the belongings of illegal aliens. 

“The threat is always expand- 
ing” said Harvey L Ford, an in- 

- - j ..i.. -J— iw i.tra. 


carrying Africanized 

bees had docked at that lake On- 
tario port in June 1984. The scien- 
tists feared that some of them may 
have flown off and joined nearby 
colonies of native bees. 

While the scientists doubt that 
Africanized bees could have sur- 
vived the winter co Id i 

New York, they feared 

carried the deadly varroa mite, 
which is unknown m North Ameri- 
ca. The mite is harmless to humans 
but could wipe out bee colonies 
across the country if it established a 
beachhead. 

While the Africanized bees in 
California will probably be assum- 
laied by native bees and lose their 
dangerous attributes, things have 
not always ended so satisfactorilr 



Laxalt’s Departure 
Raises Democrats’ 


Hopes for Senate 


Bv Sara Fritz The case recently miered the dis- 

Los A'ngfiia Tima Service covery phase, in which to® defease 
WASHINGTON — The an- hopestointaviewpeopfetotired to 
nouncement by Senator Paul Lax- organized enme about their ties to 
all, a Republican of Nevada, that Mr- Laxalt. • 

he will not seek re-deciion in 1986 Some observers, however, said 

has raised the Democrats’ hopes of they believe that Laxaltalrea^has 
capturing control of the Senate. managed a major victory that coma 

Nfr. Lax alt, a two-term senator, leave its imprint on libel litigation. 


|VU . I-OAtUh a fcnw-n..-* 

said Monday he was bowing oui for 
family reasons. but would continue 
to serve as general chairman of the 


Meir Kahane 


Republican Party thiougfa_the end 
of his 


is term in January 1987. 


□OUDi max ,, 

SS RMitoxigns 

mu mini y v i t /• Reagan _ 

Leadership oj 
Jewish Group 


rnary 

The Senate seat of Mr. Laxalt. 
63, has been considered a solid Re- 
seat. The senator’s close 
with President Ronald 
Reagan has made him one of the 
most influential Republicans in 
Congress. 

With 22 Republican seats up for 
election in 1986, Mr. Laxalt’s deci- 
sion was seen as a serious blow to 


the efforts of Republican leaders to 
maintain their 33- 


Two months before last year’s 
pr esidential election, the CBS and 
ABC television networks canceled 
reports about Mr. Laxalt after me 
senator warned them he was filing 
the lawsuit. Since then, McQ atch y 
has filed a $ 6 -million counterswt 
alleging that the senator contrived 
the siut to scare the press away 
from reporting on him. 

If successful, some press repre- 
sentatives say, McQatchy s coun- 
terclaim tactic may be adopted by 
other press organizations seeking 
to discourage nbel suits. 


New York Tima Service maintain thdr 53-47 majority in 

NEW YORK — Rabbi Mdr Ka- the Senate, 
hane, the founder of the militant The Democrauc Party will invest 

-ry»v-£- Jewish Defense League, has re- its full resources in Nevada as a 
t 1M r ended so sau^ctogr. ggned the leaderehip of the organi- potential key state for victory in 
In 1971 a shipment of pel bods Son mpanbecaiisehecouldnoi 1986. said Senator George J. 
ms. saiu rauwej i*. *«***, — earned Newcastle disease, a virus »;««, tn it ch«mvm nf ih<« 

that lolled! 2million birds before it dCV Hen SaTl^“ binas hi, sue- 
tw. “W± the sp«d otmjgior; was contained at aeon of S5 5 mil- cessor ^ Mr. Rubin live in Los An- 


F 


tation today it is impossible to 
watch everything coming in." The 
service, with 1,000 inspectors and a 


lion. Inspectors still keep a dose 
eye on parrots and cockatoos arriv- 
ing from countries to the south 


veloped when the- billionaire 
Saudi sfc 


sheikh’s father, Moham- 
med StamgiHriin al-Fassi, paid 
$2.4 minion for the; estate arid 
the mansihn was painted lime 
green, plastic flowers were {dalli- 
ed in toe garden arid bright od- 
ors were used to higkHgni geni- 
tals on the garden’s white plaster 
nude statues. 


underground storage tanks” 

its program to protect ground- 
water from (heir contamination. 
But Winston Porter, the new as- 
sistant administrator of EPA for 
solid waste, instructed his staff 

last week not to use the acronym, 

» instead for UST, became 
PA was monitoring all un- 



High L 

who won competitions spon- 


gers and has been the West Coast 
coordinator of the organization. 

soyi^Mm i.uwms^^- mg irom countries to me soum Mr. Kahane. who is a member of 
budget that has doubled m 10 years where the disease is prevalent ^ Isradi parliament, the Knesset 
to $532 mnhpn, attempts to into- Somewhat less thr ea te n i n g was ^ Monday in a radio interview 
cant evervtmnz from nam sannr .u p “njoitinv catfish." imnoried to .u_. k. r»t< h« 


17DU, JOJU Ukuu.w' O- " 

Mitchell of Maine, chairman of ihe 
Democratic Senatorial Campaign 
Committee. 

“Senator Laxalt’s retirement an- 
nouncement today must add to the 
Republicans' continuing fears of 
losing control of the Senate,” Mr. 
Mitchell said. "If the general chair- 


sored by the National Aeronau- 

onn 


ac not “Now," he said, 
LUST only in our hearts. 


Earlier this year, Caesar Lopez. 
Jr., a developer, acquired, the 
building and 3.5-acre (L4-hect- 
are) grounds far an undisclosed 


sTim He gained approval from 
rty Hills Qty Council to 


the Beverly Hills — w 

build two new estates — each for 
about $10 xniDian — mid was on 
hand Monday as the residents of 


In a newsletter to his constitu- 
ents. Representative Thomas E 
. Petri, a Republican of Wiscon- 
sin, complained abom the formi- 
dable task of containing congrcs- 
sional mending. "There’s SI. 4 
mmiftn for garage at t end ants , 
he said. “No, they don’t park 
cars. Nrv they don’t gnaid the 

garage doors— we have a Capi- 

'tei police farce eqnal to that at 
the city of to do 


tics »nd Space Administration 
and the Marshall Space Flight 
Center in Huntsville, Alabama. 

The eggs trio be«flown into 
orbit to determine whether 
chicken embryos can survive 
weightlessness, while the yeast 
will help measure the effects of 
weightlessness on cell division. 

Kentucky Fried Chicken is 
sponsoring Mr. Vellinger’ s ex- 
periment to determine the feasi- 
bility of raismg chickens for food 
in space. Mr. Ddory, whose ex- 
periment is sponsored by the 
Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 
at the University of California, 
Berkeley, hopes to test the pro- 
duction of spores in mold. 


cent everything from 

wiehes to parcels. Florida as a two-inch (5-centime- f OT l0 return lo re-election, the Republicans must 

Containerization has made it im- lerJ a q uar i um curiosity in the the United States occasionally if he know their slim majority is qmckly 
possible to inspect all goods mnv- 1960s. But the Asian fish found its u reauired to qv« up his U.S. dti- slipping away." 
mg on ships, officials say, ai J^^ e way into the canals and, by drag- jemhip Similarly, Paul G. Kirk, ebair- 

* ging itself overland between lakes, Hesaid of his resignation: “No. man of the Democratic National 

ponds, and canals on spiky pecto- j it * s i just don’t have the Committee, described it as a 

ral fins, has meandered its way up ’ - -- - 


ma- 


SkllMC IUI 

fly infestation that spread across 
California in recent years and cost 
$100 minio n to control 
Bert W. Hawkins, the inspection 
service director, says the gpvera- 
‘ — ‘-t X-ray machines and 


AMY H' 


(WELL 


ti 



Fahrenkopf, 

Florida was also the landing Kahane, who was born in the Republican National Commit- 

point of the giant snail. In 1966, a B^idyn, New York, and founded tee, said that he and Richard 

10-year-old tourist pocketed a few the organization there in 1968 with Winhlin, a Republican popster, 

small snails in Hawaii and threw ^ 0 [ forcefully opposing ene- spent two days last week with Mr. 

auvivw uilWVfcWM t O' , them out when he got home. In a ^ moved to Israel in Laxalt,' trying to persuade him to 

menl is using X-ray machines ana few weeks, the Agriculture Depart- ] 971 . He was elected to the Knesset seek re-election, 

dogs to sniff out food products at ment was summoned to a Miami ^ ^ 9^4 on a platform of expelling According to the party chair- 

airports. Inspectors are given pro- neighborhood to dispose of thou- ^ ^^s from IsraeL man, Mr. Wirthlin showed Mr. 

riles of the types of person believed of ^ foot-long (30- ^ ^ 0 ^ to change the em- Laxalt polling data indicating that 

likely to be carrying potentially centimeter) creatures slithering phasis of the JDL to be more of an any other Rqjublican would have 
dangerous creatures. j __ through grass and eating plants. - American-based organization,” trouble bolding on to that Nevada 

"T said Mr. Rubin, 40, a private inves- Semite real. 

wtuusu ubauuw wm. — v- tipn inr and printer. Friends insisted that Mr. Lax- 

strated in recent weeks by the two YnfiOfllaviaJails71for'nieft Although Mr. Rubin does not alt’s decision had nothing to do 
spottings of Africanized bees, an „ nlan to^vc to New York City, he with a $250-million Ebel lawsuit 

hybrid descended from BEL ^^^ ntyK)n e - »- ^ 

m V„_ .:h> l 


aggressive hybrid docendeo uom nciofCkDE^—Seventy-one Slid that “asYar as the Jewish 60 m- flied by" the senator against ihe 
bees that were brouriit from Africa ^ munitv is concerned. New York is McQatchy Newspapers chain. The 

to Brazil in 1957 in an effort to He^d°U^ MpaWDAMl 


(hmpaign on Official Corruption 


improve honey prody ^ S no office in New YoA. ‘The 


% ... -By, Alan Ridiiig. 

. New York Tima SaVtce 
RIO DE JANEIRO —Long be- 
fore it left office five mesuhs ago, 
Brazil’s mffitaiy reginre had been 
found guilty of corruption by toe. 
of public opinion. Now the 
ing ewdemce is beginning to 

.-r«;KKMv* "“Almost daily, Brazilian newsp*- 
. pers and officials of the new avft- 
: - jffii government have been levcal- 
ing details of kickbacks, padded 


jury 


'Mario Gatrioo, who has ; been 
charged with embezzling toe huge 
private BrasQmvest group that ne 
headed. Five months ago, Ihe new.. 
finance minister, Francisco Dor- 
ncBes, dedared that Mir. Gamero 
should be jaikid, but this has not 

occurred and toe case is proc e e din g 
slowly. 

As a result, “trial by media*’ has 
became a popular method of deal- 
ing with toe past 


rnmraat inm published in the press. 
One has even been nicknamed 
“Mr. 10 Percent," referring to toe 
commission he purpor tedly re- 
ceived on major government con- 
tracts. But none have been formally 
charged. 

A dampdown on rackets within 
the social security system, however, 
rfiH lead to the arrest of several 


hospital administrators. The new 
minist er erf sodal security, Waldyr 


Pins, recently said that the sys- 
tem’s financial deficit had been 


other illegalities that 
flourished under past 


the Africans’ traits predominated. 

In an arid oilfield near Lost 
Hills, California, officials discov- 
ered a colony of the hybrid, which 
is now native to South and Central 
America. The Agriculture Depart- 
ment believes the bees came north 
aboard a ship carrying ofl-driUing 
equipment 

Africanized bees are known as 
“tillers" not because of their sting, 
which is ? rw ^ ar to that of a native 
honey bee, but because they are 
easily aroused, massing in great 
numbers to attack humans or ani- 
mals. Last week, in an effort to 
isolate them in Kern County, Cali- 
fornia, the Agriculture Department 


ver from a mine, the Tanjug news 
agency reported. 


rhnin published an article alleging 
ties between Mr. Laxalt and orga- 
probiiunis a lack of financial sup- nized crime figures ^connection 
Dort And tremendous apathy," he with a casino he owned rrom lyfi 
Sd. to 1976. 


LEROY 


tv 


JSL 

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MONTE-CARLO /l 


tsa. 


lions. " ; . j 

This month, the new monster at 
industry and commerce, Roberto 
Gusmfio, announced that thro 
government agencies, dealing with 
coffee, sugar and tourism, would be 
dismantled because they wot nd- 
<fled “with a high de^ee of corrup- 
tion.” ’ 

president Josi Sarncy also has 
pledged an “implacaWe" ^b^tie 
against corruption an d has 

cbmped down on toe high »Jan^ 

3 free homes, 

other government-financed P^V 

leges that senior officials now are 
found to have had in much of the 
21 years of military nue. 

The revelations apprartohayc 


INTERNATIONAL BPSEIKSS OPPORTOIflES 



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n V Brazilians remain skepti- 

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quandary of how to dad 
a abuses of pow« 

5 other Latin Anrcnam 
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co danocracy. In Argentina 

military rulers are 

ribeffrokmthcdisapj^ 

if thousands of P ur P®?^ 
— a thP TTrnauayan Con- 


tbousanob 

ud toe Uruguayan^C^ 
mflariy investigating past 
ohts abuses. 


imilan v ravea 
ights abuses. 

Brazil where a. 197 ^" 
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Page 4 


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21, 1985 


j ftmlbS^rUnm* 


u 

p 


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L 


With Hi* >*w York Time* mid Tbe Washington Post 

Not at White Convenience 


In South Africa st Is tbe black man who 
bears the burden — not Just tbe burden of 
repression at tbe hands of the white govern- 
ment, but also the burden of proving his open- 
mindedness and unending patience where that 
government’s obdurate resistance to lessening 
the repression is concerned. “No hard feelings, 
fellows,” he is expected to say. ‘Take your 
time. Do it your way. No big deal.” 

Increasingly a number of people on the 
outside have taken to discussing current rela- 
tions between whites and blacks in South Afri- 
ca as if they were dealing with two equally 
intractable parties to a tiresome labor dispute 
or a fight over automobile accident insurance. 
It is forgotten that one of the parties to this 
dispute — the government — is committing a 
terrible, continuing crime against the other. 
The blacks are merely calling on it to stop 
perpetrating that crime now. The white gov- 
ernment says it may consider leaving off doing 
some of the things it is doing in good time, but 
only if its victims behave a certain way first. 

These victims must, for instance, vow not 
to resist the injustices inflicted upon them; 
they must forswear not only violence, but also 
nonviolent dvil disobedience (of the kind that 
peacefully desegregated lunch counters and 
other institutions in the American South). 
Then they must come along to meetings at the 
behest of tbe government, respecting the gov- 
ernment's timetable and represented by those 
whom the government sees fit to include as 
their spokesman and bargainers. They are, in 
other wards, to enter on these chancy negotia- 
tions stripped of as much dignity as the gov- 


ernment can manage Itis all to be done at the 
white govcmmait’s convenience. 

Apparently there are those in the US. gov- 
ernment who believe that Bishop Desmond 
Tutu, having been rebuffed in his quest for a 
one-on-one meeting with President P.W. Bo- 
tha, was wrong to refuse the request that he 
simply turn up with a scheduled group erf other 
clerics whom Mr. Botha was seeing three 
weeks later (to no avail, as it turned out). The 
word out of the White House and the State 
Department both, although strangled as in- 
creasingly these pronouncements are coming 
to be, earned a strong hint of reproach: Gosh, 
there were those white folks good enough at 
last to let him in the door and Desmond Tutu 


how be win talk. The nerve 

Within tbe US. government and elsewhere 
over the past few days a gigan tic effort has 
been made to find benign ™*aning in the 
grating, uncharitable text of President Botha's 
address to his Durban constituents last week. 
Some of tbe consolation they have drawn from 
that speech required a search for ambiguities 
and allusions that probably are not there. But 
the point is that even if they are, what the 
search has yielded up is pitifuL More precisely, 
it is insulting. Maybe, the government is sard 
to be hinting, if you are extremely good girls 
and boys and do it our way, we will in time talk 
with you or those erf you we fed like talking 
with about loosening a shackle or two. 

Forgive us, we don't think Desmond Tutu is 
the one who needs the public reprimand. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Three Economic Hostages 


The likely contenders for the Republican 
Party's presidential nomination in 1988 have 
all made themselves, in different ways, hos- 
tages to the course of (he economy over the 
next three year?. Each has identified himself — 
or put hims elf in a position where he is bound 
to be identified — with an economic program. 
Plausible cases can be made for each set of 
prescriptions and predictions today. But these 
cases are tmlikdy to seem equally plausible 
two and half years from now. 

Senator Robert Dole thinks that America 
faces dire economic consequences if the deficit 
continues at the 5200- billion level Underlying 
this stand is an assump tion that, absent tire 
deficit problem, things will go tolerably wdL 
You may need to adjust farm programs and be 
more generous with food stamps (both causes 
championed by Mr. Dole) but you do not need 
major changes to get America moving at a 
decent pace again. These views will be tested 
by events. If taxes are not raised and spending 
is not cut much, and if deficits continue with 
dire consequences, Mr. Dole will be vindicat- 
ed. It wiD also help if he can lead Congress in 
the direction he attempted this year, and 
things get better. But if deficits continue and 
the negative payoff does not come in time for 
him politically, his stock will falL 
’ Similarly, events will test the quite different 
economic theories of Representative Jack 
Kemp. He is brimming with confidence that 
the economy will grow exuberantly if only it is 
freed from the shackles of high taxation and 
tight money. Mr. Kemp wants something like 


the present administration’s fiscal policies, 
coupled with something like pre-Volcker mon- 
etary policies. Some of his policies — the 
Kemp-Roth tax cut, most of which President 
Reagan go! through Congress in 1981 — have 
already been tested, and have so far conspicu- 
ously failed to produce the sharp rises in in- 
vestment and the high levels of sustained 
growth that Mr. Kemp predicted. He does not 
have much more time for them to work out. 

As for Vice President George Bush, he is in 
the odd position of being held accountable for 
tire success of Mr. Reagan’s policies although 
almost everyone supposes that he would have 
done things at least somewhat differently him- 
self. He did, after all coin tire phrase “voodoo 
economics” in 1 980. Politically, though, be will 
probably be seen, and seen accurately, as tire 
closest thing to a Reagan replica in the 1988 
race. If growth is Hi g h , inflation low and un- 
employment not rising, Mr. Bush's candidacy 
will be helped, as Richard Nixon’s candidacy 
was by similar conditions through much of 
1960. If the economy stumbles, he wiD be hurt, 
as Mr. Nixon was in tire fall of that year. 

Of course, other things will affect the out- 
come: the strengths and gaffes of the candi- 
dates, their stands cm other issues, the nature 
of the particular Republican electorates, tire 
skills of their campaig n operations. But to an 
unusual extent these three Republicans, who 
are currently leading in polls for 1988, have 
made themselves hostage to the economy and 
the turn k takes in tire next two yean. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Trade Competition Accelerates 

We should not assume that a fall in the 
dollar will remove tbe trade deficit or restore 
America's competitiveness in world markets. 
Haring penetrated the U.S. market, developed 
marketing networks and gained product recog- 
nition, foreign producers will struggle — and 
accept smaller profit margins, if necessary — 
to preserve their market position when the 
currency advantage diminish es. 

Tbe strong dollar accelerates the flood of 
imports at present, and it may well camouflage 
another harsh reality — namely, that the im- 
port challenge would have come anyway. 

Significant structural forces are at work, 
which over tire long term are working to inte- 
grate and internationalize tbe world economy. 
The result is to intensify competition in previ- 
ously sheltered national markets for standard 
consumer and capital goods. One such unif y- 
ing factor has beat the gradual decline of tariff 
barriers since World War IL Another has been 
the general reduction in shipping costs, result- 
ing from supertankers, large bulk carriers, con- 
tainers and wide-bodied aircraft 

In tire competitive world economy of the 
1990s, it may be more difficult than ever to 
boost U.S. exports, as South Korea, Taiwan 
and Brazil increasingly move up on the prod- 
uct ladder to be replaced by India, China and 
others in the production of standard consumer 
goods like shoes and textiles. I ask; Are Japan 


or the European Community ready to open 
their markets and run substantial import sur- 
pluses so the United Stales can pay its debts? 

— Alfred £ Eckes, of die U.S. International 

Trade Commission, in The Washington Past 

Paris, Greenpeace, Washington 

There are certain international proposals, 
however modest, which can be seen from the 
outset to be ill-starred. France’s proposal to 
conduct nuclear tests in Polynesia is taking 
such a look. The episode, still burning briskly, 
of the Rainbow Warrior, flagship of Green- 
peace, sunk in a messy performance by the 
French counterespionage service, is only part 
of it. A replacement is reported to be on its 
way to the Pacific with undisclosed intentions. 
President Mitterrand, brushing this aside, has 
declared that France will carry on. 

If tiie French go ahead and even if they can 
dreumveni Greenpeace, nuclear testing tins 
time round is going sharply to concentrate 
certain political attitudes in Australia. One 
consequence could be to put another question 
mark over ANZUS. Were the determination of 
tire French to carry out Pacific tests to result in 
anti-nuclear forces gaining ground in the Pa- 
cific, the Americans would have cause to wor- 
ry. The crux over these tests lies not simply 
between President Mitterrand and Green- 
peace, but between Paris and Washington. 

— The Daily Telegraph (London). 


FROM OUR AUG. 21 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Egyptian Gets German Degree 
BERLIN — An Arab sheikh. HamedWaly, of 
tbe Aghar Mosque and the Dar-ul-Ulom (the 
House of Science) in Egypt who acts as lectur : 
er for the Arabic lan g ua g e in the Berlin Orien- 
tal seminary, has just been given the degree of 
a doctor of medicine “summa cum laude." 
This is the first lime that an Egyptian savant 
has been given a German university degree. 
Sheikh Hamed Waly is tire first student of tire 
Aghar Mosque (the great Mohammedan uni- 
versity attended by 20,000 students) to devote 
himself to the study of medicine. His Ureas 
was “Three Chapters from the Medical Career 
of Ibn- Abi-Osai bfla, ” the famous Arabian 
medical man and wriier of the 13th century. 


1935: Jews’ Harp Boom in Britain 
LONDON — Skilled tongue-setters for Jews’ 
Harps are at a premium in England, which is 
now exporting hundreds of thousands of Jews' 
harps to the United States. Birmingham, 
which is tire only city in the world where Jews’ 
harps are made, has been enjoying a boom in 

ofJew^harp bands in AmeriaLT^etimgue- 
setters, who are responsible for the adjustment 
of the metal strip which vibrates to produce 
the sound, have to be trained for several years, 
for if the strip is the merest fraction of an inch 
out of adjustment the. tone is ruined. One 
Birmingham firm is producing 100,000 harps a 
week for export to the United States. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY. Chairma n 1958-19, S2 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOIStE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
■CARLGEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. PMaher 

Executive Editor RENfi BONDY Deputy Publisher 

Eft >or ALAIN LECOUR Associate Publisher 

Deputy Editor RICHARD H. MORGAN Associate Pvbhsber 

Deptay Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Operations 
Aaaaau Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Dataorof timdalm 
ROLF D. KI 


KRANEPUHL Djremr of Adrrrtwog Saks 

International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Cbarles-de-Ganlle. 92200 NeuiDwsur-Seme. 

France. Tel: (I) 747-1265- Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN; 0294-8052. 

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Asia Headquarters. 24-34 Hennessy Rd., Hang Kong. Tel. 5-285618. Telex 61170. 

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U.S. subscription: $322 yearly. Second-das postage paid at Long Island City. N.Y. 1 1101. 

0 1985, International Herald Tribute. AH rights reserved 



it-- ■'L 
_~\£3c; 


Against 

Chemical 

Weapons 


By Karsten D. Voigt 

The writer is the Social Democratic 
•iffi policy yiokesfftan in the 
id chairman af dig party’s 
group on chemical eEsarmamatt. 

B ONN — The U S. Congre® has 
renounced America’s moratori- 
um on production of chemical weap- 
ons. This could have grave and last- 
ing effects on West Europeans’ 
attitude toward the Atlantic affiance. 

The authorization measure before 
tbe House does not require the allies' 
consent for production of chemical 
weapons. Yet' what the Reagan ad- 
ministration euphemistically calls the 
“modernization” of chemical arms — 
a new generation of weapons — and 
the discussion of their deployment in 
West Germany may trigger a pro- 
tracted dispute much like the one 
ova- tbe installation of new inter- 
mediate-range nuclear missiles. 

Central Europeans have only re- 
cently grasped what it would mean to 
have advanced chemical weapons on 
their territory, and reactions have not 
been favorable. Consider the skeleton 
agreement concluded in June be- 
tween the Social Democratic Party in 



Confusion 

On the Way f 
To Market L 

By Anthony Lewi* u 

B^ IN S.*turtriSo® 1 * StTw v v' 

O differeotprico for ; 

has t0 P, ay rS5?S2Z5 to S700 a «»■> 
his *^«2d products. Now yfu. : : . 

for the same steci^ strains ;. 

have an. is undefgfe*.-. 


oc 


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tbai^^Tmirkets: 
as it moves t in luusl ■ ■ 

and so the na orra * enterprise 

fssss 
-4S£tt=gs 


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v:' 1 


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aged to 
can sell 


'And so ym see, Senators, icith good old American qualify 
control f and . . . GOOD GRIEF, Major ! What was that ? 5 


the- Netherlands as welL Other na- 
tions could join as they wished. 

The countries that did participate 
would not produce or acquire chemi- 
cal weapons. After a certain grace 
period, they would also be required 
to ask other nations to remove all 
chemical weaponry deployed on their 


ties to the treaty would be responsible ■ cal weapons used on the Continent, 
for coming up with measures for ua- We do very much want to maintam 

the security we have achieved in tne 
it 20 years, but chemical weapons 
not add to that security. Nor do 
add to deterrence. 


West Germany and the ruling Social- territory or jri a^acerd countries, 
ist Unity Party in East Germany. Neither 


After a year of talks they produced a 
framework for a future treaty that 
would set up a chemical-weapon-frcc 
zone in Central Europe. 

It is only a party agreement; it may 
wefl not be realized until tbe Social 
Democrats return to power. But it 
may stimulate government action in 
the meantime. Even as an unrealized 
model treaty, it is an important first 
step toward European disarmament 
and Ge rman cooperation. 

Tbe chemical-weapon-free zone 
would include at least the countries 
on the border between the two blocs 
— East and West Germany and 
Czechoslovakia — and, perhaps later, 
Poland, Belgium, Luxembourg and 


West no- East Germany 
disposes of its own chemical weap- 
ons. The existing stores were pro- 
duced in the United States ana tbe 
Soviet Union and are controlled by 
them in accordance with the defense 
of NATO and tbe Warsaw 
. An effective treaty would, there- 
fore have to limit tbe capabilities of 
the United States and the Soviet 
Union to maneuver their **wmjrai 
' in Central Europe, 
to effective restrictions 
would be' effective verification. In 
formulating the skeleton agreement, 
we concluded that a mixture of na- 
tional and international controls de- 
signed to allay mutual suspicions 
would have the best results. All par- 


dons! verification, bat international 
verification would be administered 
by a per manent international com- 
mission that would hear complaints 
and perform on-site inspection of 
stockpiles and production facilities. 

We believe that such a regional 
approach — and the trust that it 
would build through cooperation and 
of data — amid hdp the 
set Unit 


United States and the Soviet union 
break their deadlock in the multi- 
lateral negotiations about chemical 
weapons taking place in Geneva. 

Tne ultimate purpose is and re- 
mains the worldwide abolition of all 
chemical weapons. In the interim, 
however, regional measures are osier 
to realize, smee fewer countries axe 
involved, the proMeflis addressed are 
more specific and regional treaties 
can concentrate on withdrawal rather 
than abolition of the weapons. 

Die civilian population of Central 
Europe would be the first to witness 
the devastating effects of any ebrati- 


effort by the West German Social 
Democrats and the ruling party of 
East Germany is meant to demon- 
strate to the superpowers that smaller 
countries in the center of a possible 
future armed conflict will take the 
initia tive fra 1 disarmament talks into 
their own hands. 

Other people interpret the agree- 
ment as an effort to test the limits of 
the room fra maneuver that the su- 
perpowers leave their respective Eu- 
ropean alKes. There could be some 
truth to both interpretations. 

But there was another reason why 
representatives of the two Germanys 
miw. together to think about com- 
mon action: the deep conviction that 
peace, and never again war, should 
emerge from German soil. 

The New York Times. 


?Bk 2 sk 2S ? 

sSs isgrcsi 

-K-JSSSSSS- 



¥00 


to 

re 




* 


American Conservatives Want Troops in Europe 


Alvin Bernstein, chairman of the Strategy De- 
partment at die U.S. Naval War College: 

Probably my number one fear is that we are 
going to do something like that We shouldn’t 
NATO keeps our basic geopolitical stance viable, 
which is why the destruction of NATO is the 
prime strategic objective erf the Soviet Union. 
stncfi Napoleon, the name of the strategic game 
has been to prevent the umf catioaotEorasa 
under a single hegemonial power. 

G 

Malcolm Wallop, senator from Wyoming: 

Unless our forces, together with European 
forces, are given the weapons and manpower to 
defeat a Soviet conventional assault preceded by 
a missile attack, it just does not seem proper to 
expose American troops to certain catastrophe. 
We are presently exposing them to such a catas- 
trophe and, in effect, treating them as hostages. 
We should make them a force able to win — and 
therefore to deter — or they should come home. 
□ 

Richard V. Alien, former national security advis- 
er to President Reagan: 

Only if we are convinced that Europe no 
longer wants than. Having our troops in Europe 
is crucial to our national security interests, and to 
Europe’s. If it woe possible to reach a verifiable 
and balanced agreement an mutual force reduc- 
tions with the Soviet Union, then we could con- 
ceivably withdraw troops at Europe’s invitation. 
□ 

Zbigniew Brzezinski, former national security 
adviser to President Carter: 

We should not withdraw all troops, but I agree 
with Senator Sam Nunn and Hairy Kissinger 
that some reductions are justified, both for mili- 
tary reasons, since it would give os other options, 
and because I think it is in our interest to sain 
motion a process in Europe whereby there is a 


This comment is adapted 
from “The Defense Budget: 
A Conservative Debate,” in 
the summer issue of Policy 
Review, the quarterly of The 
Heritage Foundation. The 
responses cited were to the 
question, “Under what cir- 
cumstances should we with- 
draw troops from Europe?” 


gradual reduction eventually in both American 
and Soviet armed forces. A more autonomous 
Europe is in ocr geopolitical interest 
□ 

James Woolsey, former undersecretary of die 
navy and adviser to the U.S. delegation at the 
SALT-1 negotiations: 

Given the size of the Soviet conventional 

idi 

ty, I don’t 

Europe. I can see significant ’reductions of US. 
manpower only if the West Germans effectively 
arm their territorial reserve. 

□ 

Robert L Pfaltcgraff. president and director of 
the Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis : 

We should deploy troops in Europe as long as 
ground forces, maritime capabilities and air pow- 
er are supplied principally by NATO-Euzopean 
stales. Tne United Stales has a vital interest in 
deterring, or preventing, the outbreak erf war in 


Europe because it would be next to impossible 
fra our armed forces to liberate Western Europe 
if it was seized by the Soviet Umon. 

□ 

Admiral Thomas Moorer, former chairman of 
die Joint Chiefs af Staff: 

The number of American troops over there is 
not significant except in the image context: As 


know they cannot attack western Europe with- 
out getting the United States involved m a war. 
Bat I think the Europeans should do their share. 

Seymour Weiss, former director of the State 
Department's Bureau af Poimco-Milttary Affairs : 

I see no cucumstance in this foreseeable future 
in which it would be in the UJS. interest to 
withdraw our forces. We aren’t keeping troops in 
Europe simply out of the goodness of our hearts. 
□ . 

Jack Kemp, representative from New York: 

I do not believe that withdrawing from Europe 
is a rational rcsponse to cancans dial the allies 
should do more in thor own defense. 

□ 

Helmut Samenfddt, a senior member of die 
National Security Council from 1969 to 1974: 

The security of Europe is a commitment that 
requires the mflitaiy presence of the United 
States in Europe. Therejnay be rimuustances in 
which I could envisage some rearrangement of 
forces in Europe, but! can’t foresee any rircum- 
stances in which the United States could wisely 
withdraw the totality of its forces. 

□ 

James T. Hackett, editor af National Security 
Record, a Heritage Foundation publication: 

Following the collapse of the Soviet empire. It 
would be imprudent to do so prior to that event 
International Herald Tribune. 


The Developing World Is No More a Remote Place 

By John Maxwell Hamilton 


W ASHINGTON — Last year, 
when Dr Pepper cans showed 
up in Hattiesburg Mississippi, with 
“mysterious Middle Eastern^ writing 
on the lids, it was front-page news. 
Customers returned the cans unused. 
Before the nearby canning plant re- 
vealed that the cans were left ova 
from a foreign export contract com- 
pleted several years ago, rumors 
spread of a foreign plot 
Hattiesburg’s reaction is not sur- 
prising. Americans think little about 
economic interdependence with the 
Third World. National statistics 
a boot in independence can seem ab- 
stract; It is one thing for the Treasury 
Department to estimate that for ev- 
ery SI billion lost in exports, 25,000 
Americans are put out of work. It is 
another to find and shake hands with 
the 425,000. Americans who are job- 
less because debt- ridden Latin Amer- 
ican nations had to cut imports from 
the United States by dose to 50 per- 
cent between 1981 and 1983. 

Longstanding cultural and eco- 
nomic ties with Europe also blinker 
A m er i can recognition of the growing 
economic importance of developing 
countries. The fledgling indepen- 
dence and often chaotic governments 
of those countries seem to make them 
relatively insignificant. 

Few Americans would thmk to ask 
— let alone correctly answer in the 
affirmative — the question. “Do the 
developing nations purchase 


Korean guitars, drams and pianos. 

Nearly all erf the wheal and soy- 
beans raised locally are sold to devel- 
oping countries via nearby ports. 

The Miller-Picking Hattiesburg 
plant exports, on average, 50 percent 
of its custom-made heating, ventilat- 
ing and air-conditioning units to dc- 
vdoping countries. 

Tbe newly built Leaf River Forest 
Products plant, which expects to ex- 
port £0 percent of its pulp, has target- 
ed Indonesia as one of its best poten- 
tial customers. The reason? Indo- 
nesia has just passed a compulsory 
education law, and that means the 
market for books is gong to mow. 

The University of Southern Missis- 
sippi, like all the state’s universities, 
has higher fldmwa on standards for 
foreigners than for Americans. Yet 
despite tbe drop last fall in overall 
enrollment, the number of foreign 
students increased. In fact, it has 
doubled in the last three years. Al- 
most all of tbe universigrs foreign, 
students come from the Third Wond. 

Some 2300 Vietnamese make up 
the most recent group of immigrants 
to escape poverty and panned up- 
heaval Tor the security of southern 
Mississippi- A Nigerian doctor came 
to Hattiesburg in^ 1977, filling a large 
void in the Sack community. Ou- 
sted resiau- 
with diems 


red beans a month to a mission they 
sponsor in Saltillo, Mexico. 


sold 30 firefighting units to ' 
through a contract with the Agency 
fra International Development 
A company specializing in anti- 
corrosion technology offered to pay 
for the training of two Chinese in its 
planL Anti-corrosion technology is 
important in dl drilling, which is one 
of the biggest economic activities 
these days m China. “Like my Daddy 
used to tdl me,” said one of the 
company’s owners, *T never made a 
nickd off my enemies, but Tve 
le a fortune an my friends.” 

This interdependence with the 
Third World is not static, but an 
in MississiDDi's constantly 


ting relations with the world. 


century ago, economic troubles drove 
Mississippi legislators to pass a con- 
stitutional amendment defaulting on 
the state’s European debts. Last year 
Mississippi - ^ largest bank. Deposit 
Guaranty, repotted $32 million in 
foreign loans, most to financially 
troubled countries in Latin America. 
No erne can say what the next 100 
j will bring. But a quick look at 
tiesburg shows that, contrary to 
popular impressions, events in devel- 
oping countries are shaping events in 
industrialized America today. 

The writer, who is North America 
adviser at the World Bank, recently 
Vetu a month working far The Hat- 
tiesburg American. This fall he will 
head a Sigma Delta Chi Foundation 
project to improve local reporting on 
the Third World He contribute? 
comment to The New York Tunes. 


Ss bit by bU year by year." *«■ 
“and enlarge reliance on the market- 
One reason for phasing out the 
svsiem of fixed prices for basic neces- 
sities is that it relies on state^- 
sidies. which are extremely cospy- 
Everv kilogram of cooking oil sold at 
the fixed price costs the government 
about 60 cents. Subsidies for staple 
roods add up to $5.5 billion a jWir. 

Non-staple food prices were freed 
in May. Mr. Song said the intention 
was to free staples such as grain, too, 
in time. He emphasized the need for 
caution. “We have to let people get 
used to the idea of prices changing^ 
he said. “We cannot run fast at first- 
Moving industrial prices toward a 

market basis, which is just beginning, 

is especially tricky because of the 
local interests involved. Industrial 

enterprises may be set up not only by { 

the national government but also by 
provinces and counties, with each fix- 
ing its production targets and prices. - 
The city of Yingkou, for example, set 
up a factory that makes 200.000 
washing machines a year with know- 
how from a Japanese company. 

Abandoning all rigidity and going 
to a market system would be trau- 
matic, in the short run at least, be- 
cause materials are in such short sup- 
ply that prices would leap. China has 
seller’s markets in just about every- 
thing. Steel is so short, and hence so 
costly on the free market, that the 
local producers mocked as “backyard 
steel mills” in the Great Leap For- 
ward 30 years ago have reappeared. 

Apart from prices, another funda- 
mental dilemma of the economic re- 
form process is the notion of failure. 

In a competitive system the ineffi- 
cient are supposed to fail Is that 
notion acceptable in China? “Failure 
is the core of the problem,” the eco- 
nomic adviser I met said. “If we don’t 
allow failure, the nation or locality 
has to subsidize the enterprise." 

Bicycles indicate the problem. Chi- 
na has three bicyde companies whose 
brands are valued and are in short 
supply everywhere, while others are 
iu surplus. Shouldn’t the latter manu- 
facturers be allowed to fail? 

But in the People’s Republic the 
enterprise is the basic social provider. 

It provides health care to its employ- 
ees, and pensions. If it is allowed to 
fail, where will the safety net come 
from? The economic reformers are 
talking about a national scheme of 
social insurance, perhaps handled by 
an independent financial institution. 

Listening to the reformers, one has 
to foraet all past notions of what a 
socialist system may do. Mr. Song 
remark®! that individual bank sav- 
ings had reached nearly $50 billion 
and that there were plans to put that 

2SE? S 0 *-? to housing 
problem. Families would be able to 
put their savings down for private 
commercial hoiking. p 

The changes to make the economy 
responsive to martet prinS 

2"^^ whole 

t 5J5v 5 ^fissr- 

opponents of reform to fighnhemn- 

going ahead. bS th* u : 
cesses so far — Se ■ S0 F“~ 

HSFsSSS. 


tv-- 


* 


> ' 




ec °o°my begins. 


LETTER TO THE EDITOR 


The New York Tunes. 



developing nations purchase more rants that are now miea wiui menu 
American goods than Europe and the who once thought of dining <»t only 
Soviet Union combined?” on country-fried steak and potatoes. 

The motho of the 1979 Mss Harnes- 


trade 

some. 


Soviet Union combined?” 

A web of ties bind American com- 
munities to the Third World. Most 
large businesses and many small ones 
In the Hattiesburg area report 
with developing countries. For 
such trade is dramatic. 

Tbe Hercules Incorporated chemi- 
cal plant, the city’s largest employer, 
cm its work force by about one-fifth 
two years ago when it decided to 
import rosin from China rather than 
make it locally at twice the cast The 
Johnson Music Company built a re- 
gional wholesale business on South 


; is a Nicaraguan, 
ae of the major environmental 
problems in the developing world, 
deforestation, has cauW water 
is in the Panama Canal wa- 
These shortages restrict the 


Nairobi Has Survived 

Putting up 15,000 guests at tbe 
United Nations women’s conference 
and tbe Nongovernment Forum *85 
was rough on Kenyan hospitality. 

Three weeks of “equality, develop- 
ment and peace" rattled Kenyan 

males, exposed Kenyan women’s lot 

to worid scrutiny and caused a city- Standard” dish un“n*ri,JS a 
wide face lift Ira Nairobi. Official ^ a social ^ P°hUcs 

antics and local gossip spread waves 

was dearly not ready fra us. A severe 8° rc car- 


"V"* *wtob£tiS" by ’* ich " 
"ursc-mother '^, yo ^ :o *- cl «no- 
to^uartenKrfVtfriSS ^ with -• 


c'LZZZr r . "oncstiops. 
Comfort came from the minister of 
culture with an explanation of Ken- 
3® * frec P 1 ^ a f opening press 
free to wriiciboS 

Quote the ngbt sources.” And “do 
not force me to defend myself ” 

Nation” and “The 






the 


bed shortage was met with traditional 
stress-reducing techniques, (nod. 


conference cleani 


& 


products and commodities. 

Unions, businesses, owe groups 
and especially jchb^tos aic mvwyw 
in a wMearrayof foragn i md activi- 


ties. As just one example, Mississippi rates who were later displaced by the 
Roman Catbdics provide 30 tons of ON 


sisted. The organizing committee 
been nan-prepared for months. Last 
winter’s reservations floated on 

of paper around Kenyatta to start “askmclii# "wmen~ 
erence Center’s phalhc tower, around Junior! nappies 
Tourists absent an safari were evicted * • or and ODeo tiv- 

to make room for Forum ’85 dele- 


oos or wife-bralingT ,™. , 

frntennto eagerly foU school Qfwonv^* 31 dcwn s, 

lowed the conference in theffLan hosting? Yes. fjJX?” 1 s conference: ' . i £ Vi- 

by 15.060 skirts” was 2? SS to ‘ r ' - ' 

until titeir own wives west 
by the militant women” 

" nappies 


- interests of S^3 ,ras ® OIl - i n 
^housing and for 

spoke » Wtorats ?°i forihe otit- 
and J? Kenyan^.- 


• * , 5.-. a 

vlX 


sisters. “Imperialism!'’ we cried. 





ya. — jArrasg* 






% 










- ■ 



rarr^a-MONAL HERALD TBTBUN E. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21, 1985 IC — 

Mozambique Looks Increasingly to West 

. . ■ u..:m a nf hnrfc- stan ce. have supplied advi 


Page 5 


Rv Alan Cowdl do S s of war wfll really be un- fryijS 10 Kw hdf^)tCT P ^mships for toe 

Swn-** ' l^^by^SouAAfn- 

cans - LEI* h^'nr nrirfibonne helicopters ai idle al the Maputo 


New York “ - Thus, increasingly, Mozamwquc wun r-Br-i 

MAPUTO. Mozambique — The gloomy riew of the Wesi is “.*?*«« *? ddLdfcS’S SShMltaiiftid. ^ 

When Mozambique celebraiedi by sq^ western envoys, Zimbabwe to defend *5 , f msurKDcy has paralyzed 

lOtfa anniversary of independence wh j instance, that with- hne, highway thc nauon, but Mozambican offi- 

tom Portugal in Jane, it out We^ food aid during a enp- fromthep^ofB^toiheborto the y nut Mozam ... . 


10th annivemwy of mdepenocu« wh b argue for instance, that with- 

.tom Portugal in June, out WtSern food aid during a crip- SWSIllSe-- r . 

surprising that pling drought, many more Mozam- town of n^S£SScuard the settlement with the rebels. Rather, 

scveralRussiflns, fl J 10 “?«?! bicans would have died of hunger, bwe semi ,000 souhersto^a solution is seen in military 

Marxist country, and others from Moreover, one diplomat said, the route. Now the number *§ terms. There, other problems arise, 

countries professing socialism. people of Mozambique know that 4,000 and, a . i _^ es |^ n . & i rartmmdenee. said a Mozam- 


can be no political 


.unifies professing social people of Mozambique know tnat ^ - 7 . * ^SJZL 

Z m the viewing stands was rhei? food comes fr3m the United «ud by later this year it could be 
RriricVi financier Slates and elsewhere and so are 8,01X1. . , 


Bul in ^ viewing stands was their food comes from tne urmeu > 

ssj»«ss?cSi £5 

Lmrrbo. was once de- the nee and butter, as against the wre. to Zmobabwe tortr^m 0 oy the Portuguese into a 

’ vZLm H*»h. the for- Soviet arms suonlies. British instructors based there ana naa tougm Crimed coa- 


lerms. iuas,vu<w piv»— 

At independence, said a Mozam- 
bican scholar with close ties to the 
authorities, the government sought 

. r fnnv innl 


by Edward’ Heath, the for- Soviet arms supplies, 
mer British prime minister, as the yet, to a visitor who has been 
“unacceptable face of capitahsm. ^ f OT last eight years, 

Mr. Rowland was in the reality seems less comforting 

bique to buy a hotel sndsraae ^ jj, e evidence seems to point to 
farms. And be. too, was an honored decline that will compel 

guest . . President Samora M. Machel to 

At the time of “dependence rdv on a variety of outsiders for 


Ssjsssrsiss! 

Yet, to a visitor who has been M ^ p orUJ gal. The in- venuonal army facing Souto*^; 


that the country’s problems 00 not Mmnmgpu^ _ WntinB 


arise from rivalries between nasi ‘r'l S 



Samora Machel 


Lv won power, me presenw: -.y 

/representative of Western acquis- for economic recovery and, > 
,v,^ c m iohi have seemed un- creasingly, of acquiring new tmu- 
tikdyto action that saw itself as lary skills, lies with the West To 

^ > • .. JiAari tuin >Ktc ciinrwrf D8S 


Tamils fleeing the racial violence in Mijmlta soa^ reftee T 1 “ es * , y ■* temporary cmnps. M>J;» 

_ In the las 

Tamils, Sri Lanka Will Reopen Talks =|S 
In Bhutan. Indian Of/iciflfe B&port ss?*** 

7 . . . . kered non 

Bv Saniov Hazarika group, the liberation Tigers of state consisting of the : northern and ^ South 

D 7. „ J. 0 !™™ 1 ® Q PaIvt., said in Madras: eastern provinces of Sn Lanka. w have brought few resets. 

. - tvim an» i»1niu> control over inter- on* ovme. the ( 


mteiy uu o , .7 , j 

Communism’ s new bndgehcad. wm ^ ^ 

In ihe last decade, however, the bowed to Western pressures to jom 
nJ«iires of war and famine and the International Monetary Fund, 

P - _ j u,.i> rnnwl Mn- ha<: sinned a trade asreement of- 


tary skills, lies with the West To 
win this support, Mozambique has 

i j « _ m inin 


economic decline have forced Mo- 
zambique to embark on a turn to- 
ward the West But a senior Mo- 


has signed a trade agreement of- 
fered by the European Community 
to developing coun tries and has be- 

...... ...ami /ukor RlADaiTK de- 


Ward the West. But a senior w- iuucv C R V u. 6 v« U iu.w 
Mmbican official said that the gun several other measures de- 
ffSderaSd by a U.S.-bro- signed to show Western countries 

- _ _ lK*i fnr all ilC CiinallCI (InpRIlS. thc 


Malaysia Fears Increasing Influence 
Of Islamic Extremism in Public Ufa 

■ - - ^«.h bo nn B .pdo n esi». .he 


Mass* 

f JuuS^mmn 3 KSS 5 Sk.-Tj*f “‘^“ thoseUM A '? I 

renew peace Swith the gorem- fighvmdie B Second Massacre Afleged 

menr nf Sri i Tndian aSwbU out fi ghting." He spoke after the Tam n seoaraUst guerrillas sail 


ion agreement 

ca last year, seemed country is no stooge of Moscow. — w un nauonai eiecuous cajjo. l«j ■ omotes a humanistic national 
tfewiSts. That much seems to be accepted «riyncxt year, pohncal ^ Pancasilai ^ a socially um- 

some," the official by t h e Reagan administration, expressing fear of vihat fyine force. Many Indonesians 

: beginning, to say Xch earlier ibis year sought $1 ? e / r ^fi i ^!Siklie^e Malaysians mayone day re- 

to thT&st has million in nonlethal military^d for gret their choice, but the system has 

, little in return.” Mozambioue. Congress blocked gov^ment h^_sery^ nonce that ^der the tolerant form of 


renew peace talks with the govern-- " ^ 

meat of Sri l -antra , Tndian officials o 11 * fi g h l m g. He sp<Ae after 
gay. reports of massacres. 

An Indian spokesman said that Thepeace talks 

m ^ • ai TnrWc imanc. The Tamils, an 


“There are some, 

nai secuniy in umsc»uua s^d, “who are begumiue *w »*j wmen earner ims year sougu; . «« Jr'-, l a ien ,«„ n „hriclife The idded. is a campaign to demon- 

■ Second Massacre Afleged that tunimg *2^?" ™LS as ™ Uion innonleftal mhtaryaidfOT ^ notice ' that ^^d^erAetolenmaonn of sirate to fundamentalist, many of 

Tamn separalist gumilba said brmgM -'£^™a „ Mommb.qua. Congress blocked ^ ^ ^btoteoTu^^es then, young peonle. to Un> 

W-k'5£ld , S SdU. ^ offer he^ned so» ’ h ' ^ ^ ttmA*>***+ 

?ssr=a J-BSMSTE ^*SW--SS"£-!S“ 


that, for all its Socialist slogans, the 
country is no stooge of Moscow. 

That much seems to be accepted 
by the Reagan a dmini stration. 


By Barabaca Crossette 

New York Tima Service 


Neighboring Indonesia, the 
worid’s most populous Moslem na- 

■ i mihm isMiet i mt 


rial society like ours, we just say: 
‘No nonsense allowed!' ” 


SSI 


ot tne lamii aeicgauon, wno — w": 7 TZL ‘ v™. 

walked out of the n^otiations and ^ 16 " 

flew to Madras on Monday, com- ; n Ov 

n ■ t i ■ rr*" n 1 . i % lomlm > sS^m<hw 5 that 37 Sinha- 


sytf-StoSS®- ’^ssSa&'isz 

nsSSSwBf SSSQS SSS ^SSSSSB SSsl 

becoming “less and less defensible and Afghani- recently told foreign journal^ a naclion that hdra^ urnte to sho w the popu- 

beanie the conflict has not Ajjoh. Nicaragua ana /vignam 9Bt ^ tm tf aa j a havmg and idada^is, of Ulamic 

stoooed. despite South African slan - profound effects, notably m Iran ^ people of Borneo. They “J ■ ^J ntries ^ ^ Egypt 

SffiTttat U no longer supplies _ In acknowledging the failure of other _ Middle Eastern com- ^ ^ }S!cm-led government to wSw 


2 ” Vtoik; But, the omctai saia, me ihwi «■ 

^ ^ ..u Ua. nneA the conflict has no 


EeSe^^ Ves^ told tawue 

^Tbt is-^, ton m ^ ^ “During rhe to 2 £^«f *= -Soblm," the official said, 

ecnnrteri to mabf* new nmoOSals W8S 92. . situation UQ the COUntiy has been «Vm» aimwnent. 


ill Kuiunioigiug w. 

-i i-t , Soviet support to counter the insur- 

TTie Sri Lankan government is .d^h toD in three days of ctasnes “During the last 24 Ae Ul t^^ oblem ," the official said, gem Mozambique National Resis- ^ _ ennsuan ^ . ... . 

""^wtheviolenceandensuing country has been ^g^^up the agreement, tance, Mr. Madiei also seems tobe and 10 **“ After earlier attempts to mollify ^^sitiwUthesutgectinKua- 

aMsgjBa SwsfflMK — — — c w r 

a ““ Russians Said to Wreck ss^-*--i£ 

SS^^^gasr-a 4 Beijing Hostel in Anger gs-fegat 

gssfe is=ss -assor ear*; SBcBBS 35S3&E 

Earlier, Tamfl radkals called for **“• BEIJING— After an academic THe Chinese, in racoon to *e of die Third World s success sto- of ^ous S^csL 

a renewal of fighting against gov- to S down. Survivors year here, the first Soviet students angiy manner of d^artme by die n es. versc s." “It is an irony in the political 

ernment troops, whick would nave Sn Lanka has suggested that the S^rhv iuneles. to come to China in more than two Soviet students, roped off the dor- About 50 percent of the 14.8 mfl- Mr Mim. the home affairs min- world,” he said, “that the ann-dem- 

dS^cda&lt trace that was. Tanrib evmtoafly be giymconttd rq K^^ffla Erou^S^al- decades left for home last mon Jin mitory corndor. posted secung H°n people ist^'mressed tOTcan that Mos- ocratic forces would always tty to 

S^StSwnthsagd. ovrit^^^dprovnori an violent mood, smashmg be« guards and photogaphed the felam is the official idg>. bm JSSfS oqiloited by dor- appeal to democratic princiries to 

Anton. RBi^bigbani, So is a cotmcflsi which would be antmo- JJL wceL bottles and dormitory windows be- wreckage, as if gathering evidence freedom of worship is guarantMd i Vevolutionaries. “The aiSd. They would be the first to 

leader <rf toelSgest insurgent mous.TTK TamDsw ant aseparate mTnncomal forc leaving, according to foreign of a crime. A first wttjjfor toe —toBuddh^Taoinnjando^ cammuitisis just learn to say saar be critical of such so-called sup- 

••• . — * — students al Beijing University. SovietEijMssy wasaimmoned to faiths of JcChmesetatout 35^ ^“^Moslem greeting, “and pressive laws. But whenever they 

^ T Foreigners at the university who see what had occurred. cent of the popdauon). to tadum ^ ^ vour hoiwe," he said, have the chance to be m power ,my 

• • . T|, A . {n I' I W I UW talked with the 15 Soviet students -jbe Chinese screamed at him ffindus nd lakh* and to » urn 7< . 1ami c ooremists have God, they go much further than 

Pl«ATIAfiPn A filftHCllFlfilllS ID. U • ^ from time to rime over the school „ nA ^ he’d look into the nrat- P*™WpL br ^i, b L?J^ Ix^driained under the Internal that.” 

A A UUUoCU vear said they had complained of ““ a foreim student remarked. ies in British colonial days. u — 

On Exlradilion to U.K. Are Assafled WHY TIIE OWNER 

SsSS of a patek phuippe has more 

THAN JUST MONEY’S WORTH. 


and asking na- 
show the popu-' 
ides of Islamic 


profound effects, notaoty m iran ^ people of Borneo. They ^ ^ Egypt- 

and other fondle Easton coun- n ^ el ^je Moslem-led government Tunisia. “I want them to know' 
tries. Here in Southeast Sere and formed Malaysia s first happiness, love .... 

Malaysians said it poses immediate Q^tian state administration. 25" he said. 

So sensitive is the subject in Kua- 


Malaysians said it poses immediate Qj^stian state administration, 
and immense ^ ‘° “*ir ^ &a]ia attcmpts to mollify 
delicately balanced *»«y- . nil rictc oressina for Islam- 


Beijing Hostel in Anger 

. , . fmin llw lal. 


v knfa nred soaerv After earlier attempts to motiuy sensitive is the subject m Mia- 

dehcaiely balanced soaeQr. Moslem purists pressing for Islam- la Lumpur that when reports of 

nv^Chi^SllvKfor^ ic lwMa practice, the government Musa’s rmaSs to the 

T.nv^^dcriSn 1%9 has been taking a tougher hne. fore ign correspondents appeared m 
r?w£crW Prime Minister Mahathir bm Mo- local^ewspapers, his comments on 
hrin Malav hamad now loses no opportunity to uiam were omitted, 
nan on designed to help Malay -rtr-micte For examole. u. xi„co «rHn hut a graduate 


By Daniel Southerland 

1 Washington Past Service 

BELTING — After an academic 


and poiiaw or poa hamad now loses no opportunity to i a i am were omitted. 

L^l A -w* /vaw natioa designed tonqp excoriate extremists. For example, Mr. Musa, who has a graduate 

*1 in Anger ggns«. w . 

asaaBS.-— - 5«S3a ssts'.Stt s.ir.'iKK 


20s to the mid-40s. 

The Chinese, in reaction 


he late Tr enrietv markmg the end oi Kamaoau, ^ aware that steps rmuaysm 

!i?SS^riS^3rin«» Malaysia one Moslem month of fasting. People ^ to control religious ex- 
tnthe swSL sending them, he said, “have twist- Ssm could seem undemocratic 

to toe of toe Third World s success sto- ^interpretation of religious m ^ WesL 
nv the n« . ..... ■ ■_ 


d^a^trucc^..^ 

"KS^^ELSSS'aS-i. » l^d«S™><ato<rasac re 

JlAWp'.SS*iS wtaL^atmlk.amea^m inTrmcomalectowA 


rses." “It is an irony in toe political 

Mr Musa, toe home affairs min- world,” he said, “that the anti-dem- 
’ .J ft K fit Mac. Mrdttn fnnvc alWflVS trV tO 


Proposed Amendments in l i.S. law 
On Extradition to U.K. Are Assailed 


can of toe populationj. to inaiam ^ ^ - m your house," he said. have the chance to be in power, my 
him Jfindus “] d h “i.^ onar . Several Islamic extremists have God, they go much further than 
.T- b«a detained under the Internal ta.' 


tn tne i j aoviet -The Chinese screameo at mm ruuuw Several Islamic extremists nave goo, 

e to rime over toe schod d ^ ^ he’d look into toe nat- Chnstiamtybrou^lby^Dnar- delained under the Internal that. 

they had complained of ta\”. a foreign student remarked, ies in British colonia l days. ^ u 

s frustrations. The stu- * — — - . — — — "* " 


S States and Brit- people wno uea tyrauuy m 
twea 1 the Umtod^taiK moon Series had when they came and 

Stois land.” He added: “You 
people accused of OTtear (town the Statuecf liberty 

have become an issue to ^e cases aawm 


UU. XW*J un*“ 

in the dorahtory corridor to 

« ..AwillanAA 


WHY THE OWNER 
IE A PATEK PHILIPPE HAS 
THAN JUST MONEY’S WO 


5ssssr*a»« ss-t-sssss 

ISkM. *-*>-» SsUSSVSSft ssr,s. «.«.»..« tsSj* 

tsiwm.g sSHfSawtt ftiffiSfis 

trying, thro^ Justi^Departmenfs C rimin al Di- ^ ^ found piled a foot and a half high 

jettison unp<jamd^^^ virian,^that toe charges that ^ ^ in toe Srand-floor dormitory ott- 

have been proven agamst Do- was boro and ridor, said one rodent, who asked 

caBy motivated acts heity and those pen ding agaiittt -bc^r. ^ranriem hasbeenin not to be identified, 

that have been carved out by D to- Quiim are “common terronst raised m “They left everyone with the im- 

til’£3tB£v - TSflT presSon STaSdutdy demised 

The extradition troty ’wun^^ Morton EL Halperin, driecua erf 30,1981. the Chinese," the student said. I 

ain, which has been mjemvax W ashmgton office of the Amer- The charges amunst hm mwe Takcn ^ die sweep of recent 

1972, forbids , ext ^^ jean Civfl Liberties Umm, whtob from hisstay m Ii^nd mtoe 197te die dormitory incident 

charges are of a pohtu»*^ ^ ^cd to testify at the before he retoraed to toe Umtw have to be considered a nn- 


that nave ocxu mu«« -j 

am.-*jchtel^tofar<*»ce 


cnarges me « tr . — 

ter " This concept is undefin^ 

— tvt— n InwilPr 


__ lOQK. Upv/Jl U ud a — — - 

ride who is exempted case ay wdves who “blew up ade- here of the IRA to. cany out a Q^-f^ade and other contacts 

se. _ for partment store or threw bombs at bomtog campaign m London. ^ with the Soviet Union are expand- 

Mary Bwesz Klre, a wwyer on the street” should be ^ ^ February 1975, an off- jug, many tensions stifl plague rda- 

Er. Doherty, raid:“^ s ^J_°^ turned over as terrorists, extradi- ^ constable in plain cdotoes was dons between toe two countries, 
■nous from toe Federal > timn shraid continue to be denied ohm to death on a London street by Forden students said toe ina- 


jug, many tensions still plague rela- 
tions between toe two countries. 


jyiHSjr - - t - people an . UK sutw aov— Ana m repnuuy *»- mg, mauy icuaiuuj • — 

Mr. Doherty, "SKS* to mrned over as terrorists, extradi- ^ constable in plain cdotoes was dons between toe two countries, 
riaons from the Federal oonmw don should continue to be denied ^ to deatoon a London street by Foreign students said toe rna- 
the effect that offcasts ______ j OT “some violent acts that are part a man fleeing toe questioning of d ent seemed more significant than 

in Northern Ireland m^uncra^ ^ a traditional rebellion against a poUce officer. Britam [heusuri student pranks that occur 

vrito toe ongoing tesurrecjm tiiore 0}Ve[nment » charaes that toe killer was Mr. evoywhere. The Sowet students 


in Northern lrdana of a traditional rebdlion against a ^ notice officer. Bntein ^ usual student pranks tim occur 

wito toe ongoing insunectim tnore 0}Ve[nmenL » charaes that toe killer was Mr. everywhere. The Soviet students 

are political offenses, and ^Mj. Doherty, an IRA. member, ^ were specialists from leading msu- 

acislrfcommoncnmu^w^^ was found gudw bya Bntidi irourt ^ Qntan's re- — 

S-ssssF* OTbam ^ s^tHLlSSiffi 


The Golden Ellipse. 


-SMSaSW A British Officer 

rested m New YoAm 1983. ^ magistrate .in San Franasco With Gail 


jaKSBS ^dinNewYoAtoim CMOahtWAGon 

ate Forogn ^ December, J 01 ™ agreedtoottradite him. CangHt WIUIWIII 

ButtoMflinajth.aU.s.du- iWoor Bnval Caslle 


would sprfzK) of F< 


acts as mi 
arm with 


i Sr#*SS2E JttBBflaSSfi NearRoyalCastle 

> her^r to^ram, d ^^ that the magistrate had eared. He united Pros international 

i- on the political offenses doctnne. «« ihe . * 


tST- 


rved the 
with oo- 
political 


^^“SSSiSi * STSd because Mr. Doherty uprising 
cisco attorney represent 



^oldest'nmiinBrito^mslWfpiiBtonday. 

Tbe former wclsa 


United Press International 

LONDON — An army warrant 
officer carrying a loaded pistol was 
arrested in Scotland near Balmoral 
Castle, where Queen Elizabeth H 
and other members of toe Bnush 
royal family were vacationing, toe 
Defense Ministry said Tuesday. 

But officials denied reports that 

senior army officers feared that the 

man. who was absent without 
leave, had planned to assassinate 
the queen. 

A Defense Ministry spokesman 
said Tuesday that toe warrant offi- 

cer, Paul Rowan, went AWOL 
Aug. 12 from near tbe central En- 
glish town of Leicester with “a pis- 
tol ami some ammunition." He said 
that Mr. Rowan was arrested Fri- 
day within several mDes of Balmor- 
al Castle. . , 

The Leicester police said that 
Mr. Rowan belonged to the Pay 
Corps and was attached at the Glen 
Parva barracks in Wigstown, about 
90 mDes (145 kilometers) northwest 
of London. 

The Daily Star newspaper 
quoted an officer as saying that Mr- 
■Rowan had “severe personal prob- 
lems.” The Star said that Mr. Row- 
an reached the northwest Scottish 
port of Aberdeen by train during 

thc weekend and then hgacked an 

army vehicle. Military patrols had 
been set up around the castle, toe 
newspaper said. 


It takes nine months 
•f* shown here. Some- 
complicated Patek Philippe jj 
Every element is micro- Q 
ance which represents ag 
hair. Every wheel, S ear, Jj3 
until it is virtually friction- 
Just as most Patek 
from one generation to g|S 
Patek Philippe watch- 
heirlooms that have<d|||g 
dispensable. 

After 600 hours#.: ^ j 
as near absolute per- 
can achieve, each Bgm f 
it takes less than a 


R complete the Golden Ellipse 
es even several years for a 

cally hand- finished to a toler- 
m of the thickness of a human 
and cog is polished by hand 

are handed down 
so are the tools that 
B to perfect them - 

i irecious as they are in- 


^After 600 hours!: of testing, regulating Mid refining to 

^solute oer- iKE&Jr fection as human hands and minds 
^ achieve each MV watch is lubricated so delicately that 
f “ . t ’ han , iV cupful of oil for an entire year’s production. 

ll Everything about agold Patek Philippe that can be gold, is gold - 18ct.gold- 
■ u.rz^thedial the winding crown, the strap buckle, and the spring bars 

Ji“e strap to ie watch. In automatic fttek Philippes, even the winding 

rotors are rf^oUd gold, since the additional weight increases the winding 

efficiency^ ^ ^ ^ ^ the time.patience, tradition and absolute dedi- 
cation to flawlessness that makes it a Patek Philippe 

like any other work of art by an acknowledged mas ten a Patek 
Philippe appreciates in value because the scarcity of such quality .s grow- 

ine at a disheartening rate. _ 

^ Thus if you are aiming for perfection you need patience. Persev- 

enrnce too. And perhaps a streak of the stubbornness required to / 
achieve the best things in life. But isn’t it this that relates Patek Philippe | 

watches to their owners? H| 

Which makes one think ... why not invest in a Patek Philippe? r I 



PATEK 

PHILIPPE 


GENEVE 


sa wSM '» * ^ ch -' 211 Ganevo 3 - 


.■ i " " 

FOR MASTERS OF THEIR TIME; 








Page 6 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21, 1985 


INSIGHTS 


New Cities, Old Problems in Pretoria’s Homelands 


BOISWW** 


By Alan Cowell 


New York Tima Service 


E KANDUSTRIA, Sooth Africa — The 
brochure brims with bustle and hope. 
Here, at an industrial site straddling the 
nominal ami invisible bonier between a so- 
called blade homeland and white South - Africa, 
29 industries have been set up and 22 Factories 
are being built. Nearby, a new town called 
Picangala is rising; its population is projected to 
be 300,000 by the year 2000. 

Build here, the officials say, and there trill be 
subsidies for wages and construction costs and 
the importing of raw materials. 

To the north, at SSyabuswa, where a govern- 
ment dependent on Pretoria sits in offices con- 
verted firom a school, the capital already is 
overstretched. And so, in the manner of Tanza- 
nia ot Nigeria, a uew capital is to be built farther 
south, closer to the heart of the homeland called 
KwaNdebde, 50 miles (81 kilometers) from 
Pretoria. 


debele is declared independent, possibly late 
next year. 

Amid the worst racial crisis in years to be 
prompted by the policies of apartheid, a central 
strand of those policies continues with the con- 
struction of the homelands. The process reveals 
some thing about the Machs with whom Mr. 
Botha wishes to negotiate Sooth Africa’s future. - 


an independence that no one outside Sooth 
Africa recognizes. In all, the homelands cover 13 
percent of the country, and according to o ffic ial 


census figures they are home to more than half 
of South Africa’s 23 million blades. 


ics and a fleet of silver Mercedes-Benz sedans 
for the eight ministers who rule over 400,000 
people is equhrakni to $34.5 nriflko, of 
which $27 J million cranes directly from Sooth 
Africa. 

Explaining the growing population, which 
was offidaDy pm at only 160.000 five yeais agp> 
Mr. Kotzenberg spoke of a great return of 
Ndebeles. Yet according to unofficial figures, 
Jess than half the population is Ndebde. 

To cynics, this place of barren ground and 
poor homes seems less a homeland than a labor 
pool for the distant markets of South Africa’s 
fnHiigtrial heartland. In this view, it has filled 
quickly not because erf tribal yearnings bat be- 


On a tour of KwaNdebde earlier this month. 
President Pieter W. Botha called it “this won- 
derful young country.” 

A visitor might find it difficult to understand 
ibe euphoria over what seems a stretch of scrub, 
carved from South Africa to produce a home- 
land for people of Ndebele descent. Its budget is 
made up mostly of South African subsidies, and 
most of its workers commute at least 80 miles 
each day in buses to jobs in Pretoria. AH of 
them, under existing laws, would lose their 
claim to South African citizenship when KwaN- 


of South Africa’s 23 million blades. 

The smallest of the six that have not bees 
declared independent is called Qwaqwa, with 
roughly 120,000 acres (48.480 hectares), sand- 
wiched between white farmland and the Dra- 
kensberg Mountains. The biggest is KwaZoIn, 
home to the nation’s six Zulu descen- 

dants. South Africa has spent millions to buy 
white farmland for blade homeland settlement, 
and the implication of Mr. Botha’s visit was that 
the spending will goon. 

Construction of the new KwaNdebde capital, 

efofthe 8 kwNdSbde N^^'o^gmaot 
Crap., will cost the equivalent of $12 mflfion to 
$15 million. The homeland itself, winch covers 

250.000 acres, is to be expanded to more than 

650.000 acres with the acquisition of more farm- 
land from whites. 

The annual budget of KwaNdebde — which 
has provided, among other things, schools, ctin- 


many blacks have been left by law with 
nowhere else to go and are wanted in white 
South Africa rally for their labor. 

The buses here begin running at 4 All, 
carrying workers to distant places and ramming 
late in the evening; the faxes are subsidized to 
the daily migration. Some men rise before 
their children awake and return after they go to 


mond M. Tutu, winner of the 1984Nobd Peace 
Prize and the firri black AngHeah bishop of. 
Johannesbure, said, “It is quite-riniple how to 
solve oor crisis." ... 

Appealing to Mr. Botha, Bishop Tutu said: 
“Please release our leaders who are m jail. Allow 
our leaders who are in exile to return home and 
then sit and talk with our leaders, for our people 
do not want to fight.” 

The reference was clearly to the African Na- 
tional Congress, the most prominent of the 
outlawed groups fighting white minority rule. 
Its leaders are the imprisoned Nelson Mandela 
and the exiled Oliver Tambo. 

Earlier tins year, Mr. Botha offered to free 
Mr. Mandela if he renounced violence. The - 
offer was refused, and Mr. Mandela presented 
his Own ri^rnanHs inrJnding the JegaTirarinq of 
his group. Sm?* then there has no jmMir 
indication of progress toward a meeting erf the 
two men. 


rm 




/ . a 


/ irSr 


ZIMBABWE 



JPtHcm 

'joharnBibwV 


SOUTH/AWCA 




CAPf 

noma 


fS [gANS&M 

MomMi* ( 


sranHl-.-ZAraK^y- 
f r ounce ./ .. 


J <&&5 



By craning to KwaNdebde. shortly after re- 
fusing to meet with Bishop Tutu, Ml Botha 
seemed to be saying that whatever else hap-, 
pened, he wished to consolidate support among 
the leaders of the homdaods rather than con- 
front more demanding figures. 

Among its other consequences, apartheid has 
splintered Hade leadership, reinforced tribal 
distinctions nurtured p olitical divisions.' 
Chief Galsha Bothdezi, leader cf the 7n\ n 
homeland, KwaZulu, boasts the best-organized 
and biggest political organization, Tnlrantg and 
many white businessmen say they believe that 
no settlement of the nation’s problems can be 
brokered without Hm. 

Yet Chief Bothdezi has refused to talk with 


when he came to Ekandustria on Aug. 9 in a 
military helicopter, Mr. Botha was greeted by 
Chief Minister Simon S. Skosana. Tire twomen, 
along with ministers and aides, conferred for an 
hour and a half. 

“We ag ain showed,” Mr. Botha said, “that we 
could at around a table and discuss our prob- 
lems.” 

Yet Mr. Skosana has little in the way of a 
constituency, and other Hack leaders, iriio re- 
ject people lute him as puppets, see the country’s 
problems differently. 

Speaking at a recent funeral. Bishop Des- 


»^icww«Bae 


B^rotWWATS**** 
c=oskb . , 

X =a tkanskh 

V = VfiNQA r 


The Wahr&an PB* ■ 




Mr. Botha unless the president offers a “decla- 
ration of intent” to embark on more sweeping 
chawys that he has made so fax. 

The rfrigf, in tarn, is spumed by radicals in 
blade townships, who accuse Mm erf working 
within the apartheid system. The ZoJu leader 
himself reserves only harsh and bitter words for 
the African National Congress and its leaders. 

' The tangle of conflicting personalities and the 
increasing radicalism of the black townships 


■“5 S“°S fw Kunutu. the minister of edu-. - v 

<***£: v 

P, ^fmnst congratulate you on d* firm V- 

you have taken to restore law and trio, JJJjr 
Kmrutu said, referring to South Africa s cmec- . 
gency decree. “You can count on our support 


Peres Emerges as Israel’s Preferred Leader 


Expense of Likud 


By Thomas L. Friedman 




New York Tima Service 


ERUSALEM — After almost a year as the 
head of Israel's national unity government. 
Prime Minister Shimon Peres has estab- 


lished himself as the dominant figure in Israeli 
politics today, according to Israeli political ex- 


Mr. Peres, they note, has been far more suc- 
cessful in dealing with Israel's economic prob- 
lems and ending the country’s involvement in 
Lebanon than many people had predicted when 
be took office last SepL 13. It is his success in 
these areas that appears to have led to Us new 
popularity. 

However, the pollsters, consultants and other 
political experts say that Mr. Peres has been less 
successful m extending his personal popularity 


the new faces and new approaches that would 
attract mote of Israel’s growing numbers of 
Sephardic Jews. 

Moreover, while Mr. Peres has put together 
cabinet majorities for healing the economy and 
withdrawing from Lebanon, critics within his 
party mid analysts on the left say he has fallen 
short in defining a direction fra Israel and in 
educating the public in the values in which, he 
believes. 


For the most part, he has taken a soft-spoken 
approach so as not to imset the delicate balance 
in ms cabinet The result, the pollsters and other 
experts say, has been that the only strong voices 
in Israeli politics now seem to come from the far 
right 

‘’Considering that he took over with a divided 



for an issue on which to force a showdown with percent of the deetoraie, and ^ . 


rantssue on which to force a snowaown w»n — Crater major group’. the Ashk* : s 


iWttuvu OLILUUU1U ill UXV i/ooi mo -- -A. _ _ - j,, , IIUlwl 

depicted him as a man who did not keep prom- m Israel during the early years 


ises, and he cannot afford to appear to go back 
on a deal. 

It seems dear, however, that Mr. Peres’s strat- 
egy is to press ahead with the peace process with 


S EPHARDIM still view' Likud as the party 

of upward mobility, and as the groups , p 
most sensitive to their needs, pollsters say. " ' 


«yts to press ahead with the peace process with TnhAr they add, has failed to change its image - V 
Egypt and Jordan m the hope of creating a to accommodate the new Israeli constituent. . .. ... 
breakthrough that would force Mr. Shamir to if new elections were held tomorrow, said one 

walk out of the government on an issue of jaadipoBste. Hanoch Strath, many traditional 
principle that both men could then take to the Votere might not be able to bring them- ..... 

electorate. selves to cast a ballot for Labor even with Mr. auf . 

Two achievements appear to have propelled p npw TVm , 1 | flrirv Wi.. 

Mr P eres in the public we Hnrinp his fnstll P®P“ 9- „ • 

monSwra^dosdywiSMf Rabin, the 7^ biffitst problem remains ibepfflty.^ 
defense mhtistaThe was able to put together a said one leading yhtical consultapt who works . . • 


Americc 


N." 


uuoue UlUUMa, UC HUIC UJ UUV wgcuia a - T“ . , ur- .m,, . 

majority for withdrawing most of the Isradi ^ the Labor ahgnment. TJe gorai, 

mwpsfrom Lebanon, frfwinning over several news for Petes is that he's comeup m popidan- 
members of the Likud faction in the 25-member ty. The bad news is that it doesnt make a ; 
national unity government and solidly lhring up difference.” ' 

the Labor momier s. A second criticism of the Peres-led govexn- 

ci . qtvmt r,? n n Rut tocnt has focused on its decision in May to 

it 1,150 Palestinian prisoners for three . 
ttgiiow dear that Mr. Peres rod the mood g Is ^l^ dkrs . MaPeresiSberited the baric 


L* f > ' ‘ *> *** ' : 

E.f •; • •; 

" v 

* 1 v * *' ’ 


•<>. -V 


•> ■ 


troops from Lebanon, by winning over several 
mem b ers of the F-flnid faction in the 25-member 
national unity g ov ernm ent and solidly tilling up 
the Labor members. 


5 


it is now dear that Mr. Peres read the mood of 


the Israeli electorate correctly, while Mr. Shamir ^ rem, mnenieu inc ^ 

nriscalcullted. With all but a few bundled lsra&- outlms of the nchang; from Mr. Shamir, tot 


lv"- • 
-r: 

r_:;.r 


li troops out of Lebanon, the war has become a 

disfamMDcniory for roost Israels which is 

now mey axe u. wewst decisions made by any Israeli govern- 


his government attracted much criticism fra 
gomg ahead with the arrangement. Many Israeli ~ 



T HE wnwii achievement, the economic 
austerity package; belongs -to ML Peres 
and the finance nunista. Yitzhak Modai 


meat, one that ooold encourage terrorism and 
underffrihe the rule of law.. ... - . 


and the finance minister, Yhzhak Modai a third criticism, usually from within Mr. 


of Likud. The jiiogtam included the di snh galof Peres’s party and from leftist political analysts, • 
about 14,900 workers from Israef s btoated gov- is that Mr. Peres has not used his position to ' 
emmait bureancracy and cut deeply mto the educate and lead the public, sha ping values ou t 
spending power of the electorate. key political issues. 

“Fezes is the first prime minister in Israeli Mr. Peres's critics note that he was almost j 


cabinet and a demoralized country, Peres has 
made some real achievements,” said Ze’ev Cha- 
lets, a political consultant who is a former 
political activistfor (be conservative Likud bloc. 
“Before he took office, I was ratling Peres a 
lifetime 235 hitter, to put it in baseball terms. 
But this year he was definitely die Most Valu- 
able Player. This year he lived up to his poten- 
tial.” 


history to assume 


said Professor 


respcnability for the econo- l* 51 month when a group of Jewish tenor-, 

or Yoram Ben-Porat, a Hey *sts were convicted of murder and other crimes.^ 


brew University economist. “Peres took charge rightist leaders were calling them “good ' jjft 
of it from the start, getting involved in every boys” who deserved to be pardoned. Some of his ” 


Since becoming prime minister, the Israeli 
political experts say, Mr. Peres has essentially 
transformed his image: the widely disliked poli- 
tician, associated with backroom deals, appears 
today as a dignified, seif -confident statesman. 
His party now views him not as a liability, but as 
an asset 




detail Having said that, he kidded himself for say Mr. Peres also has been less than " '• 
nine months blinking that things could be ao- straightforward on the question of a territorial - v 


compiisbed without hard deaskms, but once he 
became convinced that there was no escape, be 
took them.” 

Mr. Peres, said Professor Ben-Porat, “is get- 
ting the political rewards for the overall results 


compromise on the West Bank. He boasts pri- ' . • 
vately of having stopped settlements, but does * . 
not pubhdy argue against the settlement pro- 
gram. • .- . . 

The only dear position bong heard anymore v . 



2S*=ret = 


Prime Minister Shimon Petes addressing the Knesset; Israel’s pufisment, in Jerusalem. 


A poll conducted by the Modiin Ezrachi Ap- 
plied Research Center and published a week ago 
by the newspaper Ma’ariv found that 472 per- 
cent of the public preferred Mr. Peres as prime 
minister, while 6.6 percent chose Yitzhak Sha- 
mir, the Likud leader. 


Sharon, David Levy and Mosbe Arens maneu- 
vering to succeed Mr. Shamir or even, perhaps. 


vering to succeed Mr. Shamir or even, perhaps, 
to overtake him. And Mr. Peres is the undisput- 
ed leader of his party. 


Whereas for years Likud under Mr. Begin was 
associated with the “national interest” and the 


Education Minister Yitzhak Navon, while Li- 
kud was solidly united behind Menachem Be- 
gin- Now Likud seems to be fra ying, with Arid 


political center, that mantle now belongs to Mr. 
Peres, the political experts said. 

“The primary victim erf Peres’s success has 
been the Likud,” Mr. Gtafels said. “The Likud 
is finding itself caught between a competent 
centrist leader, Peres, and the extreme right 
wing of Kahane. They are having trouble main- 


taining an identity. What we are seeing now, in 
fact, is the real baddasb from the kiss of Begin." 
IBs reference was to Rabbi Meir Kahane, whose 
view that all Arabs should be expelled from 
Israel has been gaining popularity. 

A recent opinion poll m the newspaper Hada- 
sfaot found mat if elections were held now for 
Israel’s parliament, the 120-member Knesset, 
Labor would win 51 seals, compared to 44 in the 
election hdd last year, and the Ukud 33, com- 
pared to 41. Most of the Likud losses would be 


to the far right. 
Likud leaden 


Likud leaders say such polls fail to reflect the 
real public mood. They dte others taken months 


before previous elections that showed them far 
behind and were proved wrong. 

“It is just a beauty contest now,” said Mr. 
Arens, a minister without portfolio. “If elections 
come, our traditional support will be there.” 

According to the 50-month agreement to 
form a national unity coalition that was signed 
by Ukud and Labor last September, Mr. fees 
and Mr. Shamir are scheduled to switch jobs on 
Oct- 14, 1986. Thus far, neither party has been' 

a^nw4»sed coatitirausrcafl new^ections. 

However, with Mr. Poes riding high, mare 
and more Labor supporters seem to be looking 


haw to wait and sre how they react to Poes It is givmg people a dear message of where you 1 :v' 
when they realize just how much their buying are beading.” ^ . - y 

pow tobmirrdumt" Aides to Mr. Peres counter Oat he would - i 

W fth the CTMptiOtt of Mr. Moda, most at rather wrak quietly on ihc inside— sayim that j 
M r. IWt ataa coOeegees have kft the he has iedeej stopped all new scttleS?..^ ^ ' ' 


pt^mmisteto seiltheKonomcpadageby rag— than loudly on the ontside. They savhe is " ' 

lmBdf d °Ph°“ «P® if « falls wining sometimes to stifle his realtelSLte 

apart. Pollsters have foond, however, that this example by supporting a ban oTpmtXdS : ■ 
wnr Out pnme mmuaer points wtth dm to be able to'SKth Ihe re& pSSS 
P “OUC whose SUDDOrt he n«vJ 0 - 


Vj. . 


whose support he needs. 


ous parties 


Tt^ to what are sam as Mr. Peres’s fail- ^wewSttoachievethinas.wehaveinhe, 

ures u Hnce, somepohtical experts point to his minority” said one ass^te pi* l - 




gowed Labor ^ unpopular still with from the reli^fpaztie^We wSdraSS^J 

Sephardim, Israelis whose ethnic origins are in up with thraTSiir^. i ■ W 

Spain or the Middle EasL They now niem than be a ihetoncal minority ■-»; 


The YDT: Typhoid Mary or a Vision of the Future? 


Legidatice battles erupt 
over regulation of the 
video display terminals 
that are changing 
millions of U.S.jobs 


adbes, debilitating wrist injuries and psychologi- 
cal stress. 

So far, lobbyists for both the VDT manufac- 
turers and the conmanies with large numbers of 
employees using the terminals have convinced 
the legislatures that no laws are needed. They 


argue that VDTs are-safe and that any stress 
problems can be solved through the voluntary 


including AT&T, Hewlett-Packard and IBM — 
and trade associations — including the Elec- 
tronics Association, the American Insurance 
Association, the Air Transport Association and 
the American Newspaper Publishers Associa- 
tion — formed The Coalition for Office Tech- 
nology this year to combat VDT regulation. 


directed employers to ensure that all work sta- 
tion equipment, including VDT components 
and light sources, be adjustable. 

• A measure introduced in Connecticut 


would have required employers to inspect and 
maintain VDTs twice a year and to provide 
annual ophthalmologic exams for workers. 

• An Iowa bill would have required adjust- 
able furniture, ways to reduce glare, mandatory 
rest breaks and alternative work daring preg- 
nancy. 

• A proposed law in Maryland would have 
combined equipment design standards, radia- 
tion testing and right- to-know provisions re- 
quiring employers to provide detailed informa- 
tion to employees about the known and 
suspected dangers of working on terminals. 


Workers also will be given access to comput- 
er-generated information on their individual 
productivity, which is monitored by the compa- 
ny. VDT operators complain that monitoring— 
which can mea su re the employee’s arrival and 
departure time, keyboard speed, number of er- 
rors and frequency of breaks —is Hkdy to be a 
subject of future legislation and labor negotia- 


efforts of employers. The vast majority of the 
bills died in legislative committees. 


By Henry Weinstein 

Lot Angela Tuna Service 


bills died in legislative committees. 

' In mid- June, however, the National Associa- 
tion of Working Women and the Sendee Em- 
ployees International Union announced a 


Many of the group’s 27-man ber organizations 
contributed $20,000 each to get the coalition 
started. 


ALEM, Oregon — Over the past four 
years, a legislative battle has developed 


years, a legislative battle has developed 
k/ across the united States over efforts by 
women’s groups and labor unions to regulate 
the video display terminal, an electronic tool 
that is dramatically changing millions of jobs. 

The video display terminal, or VDT, is a 
computerized hybrid of the typewriter and the 
television set, and it is rapidly making the type- 
writer obsolete. About 13 million Americans 
now use VDTs, and the electronics industry 
estimates that 60 million terminals will be in use 
in the United Slates by the turn of the century. 

The person who takes airline reservations on 
the telephone, dispatches service for a leaking 
gas tine, transcribes doctors’ reports in a hospi- 
tal answers Questions about the cost of an auto 
Insurance policy or writes or edits a newspaper 
article now is or soon will be tiring a VDT. It is 
the foundation stone of the automated office. 

Legislation has been introduced in 20 states 
seeking some type of regulation of VDTs. Pro- 
ponents have cited scientific studies showing 
that many workers who use the seemingly in- 
nocuous electronic appliances are suffering 
from eyestrain gnd fatigue, backaches and bead- 


houses of the Oregon Legislature Had approved 
a bin regulating the operation of VDTs. 


rri HE victory was temporary. Oregon’s Re- 
■ publican governor. Victor G. Atiydt, ve- 
toed the bill which had been opposed by 
representatives of the electronics ana newspa- 

ivr rn^ncfrlM omamm ti - S» 


r ~ m — “«• viwcuwiinj diiU UCWbUd” 

per industries, among others. The governor indt- 
caled that he thought such a law would be 
harmful to the state s business climate. 

Oregon has been cultivating high- tech indus- 
tries and the state’s largest private employer is 
Tektronix Inc., which manufactures VDTs 


The supporters of regulation said they are 
disappointed, but the clash over safety is only 


v)ne of ibe reasons we’re so cheered is the 
issue didn t exist in the public mind five yean 
ago —in terms of the impact of automation on 
peopfe in offices,” said Deborah Meyer, director 
of pubhc information for the National Associa- 
tion of Working Women. “We fed we’ve 
people re a l ize there are some drawbacks to 
usmg technology and it’s time now to start 
addressing those things.” 

Some of the nation’s largest corp or ations — 


The coalition's chairman. Larry Zippin. said 
that concern over VDTs is similar to the re- 
sponse that other new products encountered 
when they came on the market. 

“I remember when we got a television, my 
mother said to keep the light on and stay six feet 
away,” Mr. Zippin said. “I remember concern 
over microwave ovens. It takes a little while for 
new technology to be accepted.” 

An Oregon stale senator, Margie Hendriksen, 
a Democrat who introduced the bill that Mr. 
Aliy eh vetoed, is troubled by the contention 
that enacting legislation would send a “bad 
signal” to the brafriesa community. “Germany 
has regulations and no one can say they’re ann- 
economic development,” she said. 

West German/s law includes detailed VDT 
regulations covering a wide range of factors. 
These indude the design of the terminal, and the 
s ize, luminance and fbeker rate of the characters 
cm the terminal screen. In addition, the regula- 
tions require that the desks on which the ternri- 
oais are placed be erf a certain height and width, 
and chat die keyboard be detachable, with a 
certain tilt and a nonreflective finish. 


Still, most office workers— about 85 percent 

of the people currently using VDTs on the job 
fit m that classifi c ation — have no union repre- 
sentation, noted Pam Haynes, the health and 
safety director for the Air Transport Employees 
Union. 

The body <rf medical literature is growing. 
The National Institute for Occupational Safety 
and Health and other scientists in the United 


cumulative trauma inf uries such as carpal tun- " 
20 inflammation of wrist hga- “ 
intimately can cause a person to fee V 

strength in his or her grip. : 

■ 

stiess problem among VDT ~~ — * 

lne major find mo me A** 


*.» = - - 
£ i. 

Trl "T" 1 -r 




U,l- 

j?.;, *? 


flra major finding ^ 


£> if" 1 :/-~V 


h r: ^ :* 

&3cl;.v« ••„. . 
SL tr " ; -r- :■ 


- “-um — — — — — uujsa 9WBDUHS in me united 
Stat« and abroad have documented the physi- 
cal discomfort and stress experienced by VDT 
users. J 

Some of those problems are attributable to 
the fact that using a VDT is different from urine ' 
* ^ - Dia ? a Rocse, director ofrS 


gress or ine xeaerai uccupanonai oainy 
Health AdministraticHi win enact regulations 
governing ^ VDTs. As long as there are no federal 
standards, unions will continue to advocate the 
need of state laws,' said David Bsen, research 
director for the Newspaper Guild. 

In some stales, the VDT Safety Coalition has 
received positive action without the need for 
Legislation- In New Mexico for example. Gover- 
nor Toney Anaya issued an executive order 

.. «- - nJiL 1^. f— 


issues that are the subject rf the' ^ 
owst mteise debate are whether ^ • 

dangerous levds erf nuiiatioa^2w,S v - - 
J^na 1 can have harmful effeS^ : 

1 AST year Donald Millar, director of -dte ^ 


I- t. 


eaHig this year with rules for the future pur- 
chase of VuTs far state offices. 


Several of the bills introduced this year were 
considerably more sweeping than the one in 
Oregon. For example; 

• A California measure would have set health 
and safety guidelines and ergonomical stan- 
dards for terminal operators. It would have 


V/ prune response, m several instances m 
recent years, unions have gained contractual 
protections fax employees using terminals 
Last November, workers at Equitable Life 
Assurance Society’s office in Syracuse, New 
York, secured, among other things, the require- 
ment that the company provide glare-reducing 
screens, detachable keyboards, adjustable chairs 

and periodic maintenance. 


m and out of the machine, often uses a camaas 

BEftSS 4 "* stops 10 me * 

eliminates all 

those steps. One study showed that a person 
who cmda type 1 5 pages an hour could gmerate 
tee equivalent of 25 pages on a computertenxj^ 

“A high rate” of muscular-skeletal com- 
plarnts among workers also has brearereafein 
Ms- Roost noted. Forexamnfe 


-M hSuT 

emi^SKms from raaiatxou r 

not see any phvsiolo^ * 

VDTs cS ? 


i Bi. !'w ■;! 

' ^ - r.' ■ . 

,1* ^ - v r 1 

'*r-. t> i-:' ■ . -* 

-1 T. . -7* 

: ;, = ?■« 
u;- 

S' 5 t ’-Ss-. *■'. •. 




fins^ttsgsas'. 


*cre, 

Association ofWorkmu^rm^ -nf 


In JmT , 10 ^survey. 

National AssodS ^ 1 *** ■ 


National Association ** ' 

uounced plans for a lull* Worn® an- ; 




2u ir ~ w 
5 1 * ^ ‘ 3 . 

s&r'&i r 

- 

*> v;iv ■ iti 

14:^.;: : -! 






"N 


** 


Tn-mm, ™ BUWE - Wednesday, august 21. 


1985 


arts /leisure 




Page 7 


Redgrave and Pryce Revitalize 'Seagull’ 

^ ^ . . 1 .1. .. . mini mllinV Tf that C 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — The right to rc- 
/ think, and often drastically to 
recast, a classical production some 


confidence to a quite remarkable 


productions deserve to live on after 
the original cast has departed. — _ . . 

r — . Wg therefore have a radically re - orient. Tots is a ^ 

weeks after it has first been shown . , “SeaeulL" with Pryce in tber of the subsidized companies 

to the press is one taken for granted JgjjjgJ in mother- would be more than bcfcyjnd 


or tan** deal, . ..w} *&£+*£ 

have 

5am! "ajscTgrowii in stat ure Bid 



turned up 

safest 

s - wisely emphasizes that point w 

■ tly »m g tunes from well-** 


by Royal Shakespeare Company 
directors moving shows in from 
Stratford to the Barbican but it 


playing to 
nown TV 


vrise larerify tmdbanged cast. Be- greieful to have in their repertmr^. nown tv 

W that just goes to prove Red- change. 


soaps during the scene 


cause bom are quinuisentiaUy and and that pjovei xeo- 19 50s TV 

totally theatric creatures, the Arka- tinSSS Crisp seems to have 

dina and Trigorin return to center tages rf haying new actors move the change that has 


THE LONDON STAGE stage and to full strength- Having into old sets. 


remains almost totally unknown to 
directors working in' the commer- 
cial theater in Britain, so what is 


given us the most haunting Nina of 

the years since World War II (a 
performance very nearly matched 
here by her daughter), Redgrave 


The best Trigorin 1 ever saw was uu* have 

much- underrated English comic “Whose Life Is It Anyway r 'ra ve 
lor and dramatist called Hugh surdy taken us 
Suns, at the Saville for Jam lips and d^dpan bedpM joktt, y« 


UVWIWAwu t — - — ^ . .v. 

come over medical drama m tM 
last 30 years. “Duet for One" and 


a 

actor 


Tbe Rova Quartet: “Totally committed to keeping this group together. 


Rova Quartet: Unaccompcaned Saxes in Vanguard 


By Michael Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 

P i ARIS — Somebody once said 
that all new ideas go through 


three stages — thejoke, tbe threat 
The 


ud 


and the obvious. The Rova Saxo- 
phone Quartet may be just about 
reaching the obvious. 

Eight years ago when they 
formed their cooperative, the idea 


There, as nowhere else along 
Shaftesbury Avenue, the house-full 
notices are out six nights a week for 
a production of “The SeagnH” Star- 
ring Vanessa Redgrave and Jona- 
than Pryce. 

This is the Charles Siurridge pro- 
duction lhat opened earlier this 
year at the Oxford Playhouse then 
moved 10 the Lyric Hammersmith 

■ ' . _ . , _ - . ™„ ir1 factory Tan-v Musicians traveled 1,000 kfiome- w a rather mixed critical reception. 

“Our pect ‘Flamingo Honzcms working in factory^ Umy hear us. We talked with the At the time it starred Samantha 

wasinspMbyan&nJItoafipiu> Moscow Saxophone Quartet ^ John Hunt. neither of 

to of an enormous flock of flamm- ra“*d company g which plays contemporary classical w hom had spent much or their re- 

acts flying oyer a lake. It gaveus an ar ^V - . acroaYm for their music. There was a receBtion at tM ^ careers 0Q stage; and as the 
idea of how to deal with Aythm. Rraraxs an acronym iot embassy for os. And what we left director had also come to it from 
We each play a different pattern ^J^^riJvJhnvc iust comoleted the country, none of our fears ma- y^s m studios (most memorably 

in 8, 9 and II, for orample and SSwe just walked out." L the director of television’s “Bri- 

they change relationships. The to** 1 0* m a ^rtwSStsof tovTwas recently mduded. deshead Revisited"), the whole af- 
becomes mcr^singlyimpro- Pj°“*2 QHa ^ Hfljp Glass, m “West- fair had ^ oddly detached and 
vised with differing juxtaposittons. a 1984 10111 Sts," a system «- filmtc quahtv m which the prind- 

. . , - , It always changes, depatdmg on °f^e Saviet Umon. _ rpwfll taWishedMDy universities m the pals seemed to be standing around 

saxoj>bones payi ng, ab- ^ material demands.” That tour s , ava nt- western United Stales to book waiting for close-ups that never 

street music without a rhythm ao- Brine avam-earde at night usual- the joys and hazards of the avant- western now 

companiment was a joke indeed. lv involves ehtostervaS or day- garde Hfe. Raskin recounted the toure g ™ P “H?; 

But today’s avant-garde is the rear 
guard of tomorrow, and ufiaccom- 

lamed saxopta m ensembles l aw ^foracmistnidcnbiisfoessih sober wam ™ ^ a^'ot ^HtafciSiirT Nbiasbi Rkfr 

smee appeared all over the world. Sd^Sce a I™” Sto ™T Nba a rale Red- 

Experimental complex, inlefleo- all the Rova members are from. hewaa desatbrnt .. ._ “\v e ’rejust totally committed to — — 

tual ther music festal well ahead S<otc of the partners m the compa- t hinking , Xool it. ugh treeoinR this group together,” Ras- 

of established forms. Itis“free" in ny are former artists, so are ready- arranged by SrepUed, “though we’re vaydtf- 

Friendship Ambassadors, n org* teat from. 
oSSmXit arranges for amateur trained musician, Larry came out 
U S. artistic organizations to tour of rode, Brocewa* ^ 
the Soviet Union. Rova traveled drew studied at Karl Berg^s Cre- 
West Virginia State Jazz rim Muac Stiod “ w “^h t 

Band. But the Leningrad atycoun- Improvising for 

%x 


going on at the Queen's Theatre is now gives us an unexpectc^Aika- ^ revivaL His son hSe there is no sign 

more than a little fascinating. dina, a languid, cigarette-smoking Clements m a l»o . interest in the m 

TK^. « alona Bloomsbury figurerather closer to Simon is now to be iquna a tew tar 


any parttcu- 
the moral issues of a 


□W lO UC 1UVU1U B SMT. MU . 

ayhcApoSohffl(tog 


Virginia Woolf to ^STd^L.!^ we grt a 

have °cL»*by N.j- Crisp, vaguel^dramauzed arnica.- 


one might nave anuapauw. ^r* '“rTTK-™ wn nvntarv about techniques ot recov- 

Sturridge’s much-rethougit pr^ give Elizabeth «y, and our admiration for tbe :way 

duction (which now resembles a St Quinn has taught herself 10 


about techniques of recov- 


duction (wmen now rewmo - w—r ~~~ . f r 0m “Chn- that Ouinn has taught nerseu w 
Renoir country-house movie of the Quinn (the from ChU- a d eep 

1 enough, dren of a Lesser God ) anotner mg speax ougm uu * ^ ^ a „ nn n. 


ough, 

edgy 


lyin' 

time rear- „ — . 

kin makes Ms living as a purchasing 
itforaconstructkmbusmessm 


When tbe Hammersmith run 


WactoL IKK came u> an end, however, Redgrave 

s his hvmg as a purchasing and a maximum 01 om amg. ™ with such sooradic engago- 


sober verbal caution was ^direct tween. With such sporadic decided that she wished to joint the 


1930s). this works well 
while Pryce achieves a fine, 
intensity as Trigorin. 

Here too, however, the perfor- 
mance is unexpected, closer to 
John Lynch’s callow Konstantin 
ihan to a hugely successful middle: 
a g?H novelist, so that the two be- 
come rivals not only for the fledg- 
ling Nina but also for the affections 
of the increasingly eccentric Arka- 
<tina_ Stunidge throws his third act 
into unashamed farce as the actress 
c hases lover and son around the 
dining-room table, but his produc- 
tion has gained such confidence 
and flamboyance that it can cope 
with aD this. He has also, merciful- 
ly, rethought the final curtain so 
that we no longer have Masha (Ju- 
lia Swift replacing Phoebe Ni- 
ctaolls) throwing up all over the set 


^ dren of . . 

gy at our heartstrings.. She is cast as 
one of six patients in a residential 
rehabilitation center for neurologi- 
cal victims. . 

We also gel Williams as a cynical 
journalist, Brian Marshall as the 
ward’s cheery wheelchair joto, 
Victor Maddera as an injured 
crane driver, Lewis Jones as a Qty 
executive and Robin MacDonald 


sense of indignation at the appall- 
ing Quality of the dialogue she has 
been to deliver. Because of 
her “Fighting Chance" may sur- 
vive at the box office for a month or 
two, but it remains a despoaMsy 
underwritten and stereotyped play 
that has no right to benefit from 
such remarkable physical and the- 
atrical talents. 


DOONESBURY 


PR.GORP, WBTV8& 

moim^DeeFf^ 
A$SOaA!EPfflTH'BfI&&rr 
m SHOUU? BB 


am.yBSt’MBefrrssMSTO 

l)BlEfiSftNWE95AnRIBUlB? 
TO ITS CHEMICAL COUSINS - 


that the four construct their own generous with time off for tours, he 
boundaries. According to "one said. Bruce Addey works in a re- 
member, John Raskin, one Rova cord store, with a similar ammge- 
“ territory” goes like this; . meat Andrew Voigt has been 


Edinburgh Fringe Growing 


American EUe Makes Debut 


The Associated Press 

E dinburgh — The Edin- 
burgh Festival Fringe is bigger 


She smd the magazine .would SKftS 


than ever this year, with more than 
6,000 entertainers in 1,080 eompa- 


actress with Festival Theater USA 
of Los Angeles, is at the Fringe for 
the second time with 37 others in 
her company. 

“We are not getting paid for 




roes — up from 800 last year — coming. We do it for our own en- 
ovina 8 000 performances in three joyment and because we have noth- 
wce j cs ing like it back home, she said. 

“The Fringe exists because there Cole, a Chicago native 

is an intense demand for % said us ^ ha /| ivef j pans since 1963, is 


U. S. markets for $2^0. 


The Associated Press ■ 

N EW YORK EHe.anAmeri- seek to attract female readers in vear bv tbe we maintain separate lives. 

suss~“r; 

sSMsKSas *.tsssk«ssb 

^ asgffjgs SSJgfc 

*£"£2 street with the video crew that was moremd mn ^ “P ^ pan ]es and perfonners, “Anybody m the world wfaocre- 

^ 5131 trawding with us. . flSSw- -Am. pSSuari and amatiff, preseni ales something ^ 

— jbere confus- Rova Saxophone Quartet. & P mnsicals, cabarets, operas, get reviews, meet people, mows, 

■tfsssa j SS&Bfi - "** 


..UKZMJSeA, 

-mmurnoF 

-mm.srn 

OZZINESS.. 


bad mis, 

Atm.-macf 
PKXGOTUB 
60R NOMI- 
NATION' 


The new piibiicatkm is intenm- 
tional in scope, said its publisher, 
- Marybeth RnsseU. “People’s satsH 


a copy but a cousm’ 1 
EBe, whidt she said was 


CIU5 dliu ouuiuuvmk 

Jessica Susnar, 22, a professional 


tuv4w m 

inspiration, and incentive to create 
new work," Cole said. 



..Am or 

COURSE, 

FLASHBACKS. 

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flSSeL a: 





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do not reflect late trades elsewbere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Clow Prev. 


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N ew HIs>h 
N ew Lows 

Vofcjme up 
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40 


(Continued on Page 8) 


jglSSSUl-B* 


414% 





Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21, 1985 


'Kiesdays 


wsi; 


ijo bu m aw 


Use M 35 

108 10 11 IS 

ao ij u ns 

100 U V M 

230 30 12 3752 

2_5o is n ns 


Tables \ndude ttic nationwide prices 
up to ttw dating on Wall Strut 
and do not reflect tote trades dttwbera. 


JO 1J 3 IV 
J4 10 X 
X 15 1069 

124 4S 305 

soar 7 j5 « 4M6 



13 Month 
HffltiLmr Stack 


IJMilHlBti Low BuotOroe 


(Continued from Page 7) 


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4816 3026 ComGi 140 34 10 1002 46 45 45% + 26 


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7726 45 CoocOn .34 J 21 675 75 75 — V6 

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50 23 O-oy R I 23 2216 47% 45(6 4716 +116 

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24 1826 CnwK 140 52 12 33 2316 2326 23% 

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8016 5816 CuniEn £20 34 4 121 04% 03% 04—16 
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140e 04 37 

344 124 77 

370 124 21 

250 114 15 

253 114 30 

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516 4 Datptn 1352 5 4*6 4*6—% 

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20% 13% DavtPL 240 11 J 7 716 17* 17*6 17%—% 

05 48 DPL p< 748 124 10DX 00 00 00 + % 

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8% 416 Deltona 887 8 7*0 7* + % 


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. 99% 74% DetE pf 540 07 

80 00 DetE Pi 972 127 

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140 47 TO T7 33*4 33% 33*6 + % 
148 1A4 7 1099 1016 15% 10% + % 
54064 0 891689 89+% 

9J2 123 250z 70 74 76 +1% 

745 114 1002 02% 02% 02% 

7 JO 114 300z 02% 02% 03% 

275 M 10 IS K S 

124 111 44 27 30(6 20* + 46 

213 1X7 19 25*4 25% 25*— *6 

112 124 2 25% 25% 25% + % 

ars 114 2 25 25 25 

340 1X1 10 28 27* 28 

342 1X1 9 28% X 28% 

440 124 20 31*0 31 31%— % 

4.12 124 10 32* 33 22% 

240 1X2 1 MS 105 105 +1(6 

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40 17 II 83 21* 21*6 21*— * 
M 42 03 15% 15% 15* 

225 74 5 29 28* 29 

I M 104 5929 17% 17 17 — % 

WSS HU 29 37% 37 37% 

JO 32 3 17 9% 9% 9% + (6 



.16 4 81 

13 

4 1403 
42 £6 77 1090 

£60 63 11 1157 

6 

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■20 A 7 907 
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1-52 3J 13 203 
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7 131 

1J2 44 10 1397 
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JO 24 10 45 

m S 14 61 

!JU0 11 9 1400 

240 104 4 

.16 34 48 54 

48 £7 10 72 

20 2J 12 1985 


58% 35(4 DleMds 140 £8 11 659 36% 35% 30 — *6 


125* 85% Dlortol 
95 S3* Disney 

■X% 15 DEIS 

0(6 6 Dtvrsln 

11* 6* Domes 


14 2726 101* >00* 101* +1% 
1J 48 410 89* 88* 89* + * 
56 8 188 25 24% M% + * 
3 21 5 5 5 

3403 9* 9* «6— |6 


34% 23* Damns £72 84 9 2802 31 30% 31 + (6 

21% 10% Donald 46 34 9 25 18*6 18 18% + * 

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33% 2316 DorSey 1 JO 64 12 Z7 30(6 29*6 29*4— * 


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32% 21* HcdlFB 140 13 2143 30% X 3016— % 

34*6 26% Hdlbfn 140 04 12 3074 28* 28 28% + % 

1* *4 Hal Iwd 48 5J 19 374 1% 1* 1% + % 

H* 5*6 Hafmtpf M SS 30 TO* 10 10% + * 

39% 30* Damp 3 1 JO XS 10 tOO 3B* 38% 38* + % 

15% 12 HonJS 1.470104 29 1416 14% 14* 

71% 16* Hanil 144a 9.1 43 20* 20% 2D(6 + % 

30 16% Bondi > J6 £7 12 2882 30* 19* 20* + H 

20* 16 KondH JO 13 22 130 20 19* 19*— (6 

21% 16* Hanna JO Xi 23 21 18% 1» 18*— % 

08* 33 HarBrJ lj» IJ M 147 00* 40% 60% + * 

30* 21* Horfnds 36 14 25 52 31* 31 31* +1 

12* 7* Hamtab 2$ 1449 11* 11 11* 

28* 24* Barn pfi3340 115 8 25% 25* 25% 

29* 24* Ham Pic £13 73 70S 29% 28% 9 — % 

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46% 32(6 POCLIP 132 74 M 544 42* 42% 42% 

29* 2Mb PeLum U» 42 It 50 X* 2816 28* 

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43(6 26% Painwtf JO £0 18 2963 29* 38% 29% +1 
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31% 19* LonpD a 32 23 14 its 


37% 23% Loral 52 IJ 19 1297* 
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29% 24% PaP Ldp<£42 114 16 29 XX — % 

27% 21* PoPL dprX90 114 X 26* X 26* 

X% X% PaPLdm£25 llj 4 28(6 X 21% + % 

31* 25* PaPLdp<X75 122 15 30% 30* 3D* 

100 fll* PaPL prl 140 11.1 100x 97% 99 97% +1% 

70% 55 PoPLpt 800 111 300X 67 66 66 — 1% 

74% 59* PaPL pr 8JD 1X0 140x 73 77% 73% — % 

41% 34 Panwn X20 SL7 12 41 X 38% 38%— % 

25% 23 Pemrpf 1J0 0J 3 24 33% 24 

X 28% Pennxel 220 44 19 1737 46* 45% 45%— * 

18% 10% PeopEn 1J0 7J 7 70 id% id* it* 

2« 14* PePBy* 18 398 21* 21% 21% + % 

60% 39% PepsiCo 128 £1 11 7384 58% 57% 5B% + % 

30% 21% PertiEI J6 £1 14 1079 X* X* 26* + * 

9% 7% Prmlcsi 1.17el4J 6 315 8% 8 ■% — 16 

23* 15* PeryDr X IJ 18 190 23* 23* 23% + % 

44 31 Puttie T M 34 14 43 37* 37 37* + * 

28% 24% PelRS 3J2eT4J 37 X% 25* 25* -r * 

17 14 PetRs Pf 1 J7 93 15 16% 16* 16* 

6% 2* Ptrlnv -95*28.1 IX 3M 3* 3% 


A M 35 2949 61% 

1^>S 6J 7 186 22% 

33 15 11 IX 12* 

272 74 V 41 34% 

X L3 15 1129 40% 

J4 £6 X 239 17 

1*44 13 2 13* 

JO9 J 5109 X 


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L52 llj um 

US 123 56 

U0 114 27 

JO 34 It 78 
32(6 21% HkUIFB MB 33 


11% 2% MGMuerl 604 11% 

8* 7% MLCOrtvn 72 7* 

11% 71% ML Inc n 131 11% 

22* 15 MBUt J*t 55 IS* 

38% 16% MOCml 1 55 17 II 712 32 

35* 38% MOCV 1.16 2J 11 346 47 

44 X MOCVPf 4J5 lai lOOz 42 
18 11(6 Mad Res 63 11% 

46% 29% MOOtCI 1J0 £3 8 192 44 

29% 1% MOtASt 18J»c 293 2% 

21% 12% Mantiin jnu X 12* 

21% 12% ManflNt 32 15 73 12% 

29% 14U. Monrc B .16 3 21 329 23% 

42* 25% Mir Han 3J0 85 5 12X 37% 

56% 44% MfrH pf «JSD*12I> 57 54* 

52* 41 Mint pf 572011 J 333 SO 49% X + % 

8* 5% vIManvl 3 675 6% 5% 5* — * 

25* 17* vIMnvl pf 402 17% 17* 17% + % 

38% 23(6 MAPCO MB £7 9 346 X% X* 36* + % 

5 3 Manrtz X 3% 3% 3* + * 

2* % Morale 271 % % % + * 

38% 23% MarMM I JO 57 7 76 31% 30* 31% + M 

53* 42 MOTMpf 5J6a 9-9 622 53% 52* 53* + % 

39* 18 Mortal S J8 J X 699 34% 34 34* 

12% 8* MorkC 32 11 8 10* 10* 10* 

18% 13* Marfcsf 1J0 7J 4 15* 15* 15*— * 

100 70 Man-tot 34 J 17 197 95 94% 94* + * 

79% 46% MrstlM 2J8 3J 18 81 72 71% 71* 

44% 23% Alarms 1.00 £6 1343 39% 38% 39% + % 

14 8* Mamc jOdl TO 3062 12% 12 12% + % 

X 24 Masco Jd U 16 1147 33% 32% X 

15% 10(6 MassMr JO 1 J 18 103 13% 13% 13% + 16 

3% 1% MosoyP 32m 2% 2* 2% + * 

30% 22 MOSCP £96 108 31 29% 28* 29% + % 

12% 10 Mtttlnc 1 J2 IM 51 12* 12* 12*— * 

65* 51* MatsuE J4r J 10 167 55(6 
17% 9% Mattel 18 597 15% 

13* 6% Motel wt 132 11% 

15* 10* Maxart! 4 89 13* 

58% 38* MayDl IjBB 3J 10 479 SG% 

58% 42* Mayto £80 4J 12 66 58% 

25* 20* Me Dr of £60 105 1 24% 

31 21% McPerl 1J0 82 467 22% 

11% 4% AAcDrl wt X 4* 

10% Mb McDtd JO 12 14 62 9% 

70 48% McDnlS J® 1.4 14 2947 64% 

87 63* McOrtD 1J4 £3 9 1161 80% 


MHz 42 
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192 44 
298 2% 

X 12% 
73 12% 


228* 38* 30% 38% — * 
16 29 29 X — % 

30 X* X 26* 

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15 30% 30* 3D* 

1001 99% 99 97% +1% 

300X 67 66 66 — 1% 

140* 73 72% 72%—% 

41 39 38% 38%— % 

3 34 23% X 1 


mm 


23* 15* PeryDr X IJ 
44 31 Petrie Mo xo 

28* 24% PetRs 3J2el4J 
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6% 2* Ptrlnv .95e2S.i 


For our IW Annual ^^."^•srruur 
Grow Chemical humpc wuo 
„ .. ... 1 ' .3 U.»luii>nv IJCPC. '* 


57 54* 54* S4M— * 
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675 6% 5* 5%—* 
402 17% 17* 17% + % 
346 36% X* 36% + (6 


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76 31% 30* 31% + % 
622 53% 52* 53* + % 


10 28* 28* 28*— * 


42% 32* Dower JS ZA 13 142 37% 37 37(6— * 

37(6 26* DowOl 1J0 £1 14 4847 35* 35% 35* + % 

50 X* DowJn JS IJ 21 174 43% 43* 43% + % 

15* 11 Draws 60 U 32 13 12% 12%—* 

X* 17* Drf» 


39* Vft, Hnrtnvn 1JB £9 10 935 33V. 32% 33% + % 


12 % 12 % — * 


JO 3J 18 701 21* 20* 21% + * 


21% 15% DrexB 2.00 105 2 1916 19% 19(6 + * 

65* 31 Dreyfus JO IJ 14 5X 58* 57% 58* +1% 

61Tb 46% duPOnt £00 U 15 1799 58 57% 57* + % 

48 31* duPDtpf 150 9-5 9 37% 37 37— % 

” J9% duPrttPf 450 9J 


35Tb 25% DUMP 240 8J 8 1334 32 31% 31% + % 


B5% 67 DuftOPf 8.70 19.9 
M% 63* Duke pi 8J0 11-0 
77 60* Duke Pf 7 JO 11-0 

27 22% DukdPf £69 1(U 

35% X* DufcePf 345 MJ 
80% 63 DufcePf 8J8 llj 


2S90i SBto 79% 79% — % 
450B 74* 74* 74* + % 
31001 72% 71 71 — * 

6 X 25* 25*— * 
X 33% 33% 33* + % 
!OCk 75 75 75 — % 


83* 57* Dun 3rd £20 28 21 453 77% 75* 77% +2* 


17% 12% DuqLI £06 1X3 
18% 15* Din pfA £10 120 


17% 12% Duq pf £00 1X5 
18 13% DuaprK £10 1Z0 


X* 14% Ouqpr £31 120 
25% 22 Duq pr £73 II J 
62% 43% Due of 7 JO 111 
16% 8% DvcaPt JO 40 12 

X% 20% DynAm JO J II 


606 17 16* 16* — % 

5001 17% 17% 17% — % 
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IS 17* 17% 17% — U 

2220c 19* 18% IV* + * 

lOOz 24* 24* 24*— % 
210x41 59% 99% 

268 15 14% 14% + % 

17 23% 23% 23* 


17* 14 HofKe 100 104 11 35 17 16% 17 + % in 

2» 16% HowEI 1J4 7J 9 314 21 20* 21 + % “ 

-3®* *8 a 10 10 9Tb 9*- (6 4+ 

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13* 9% HazLMj 32 XS 19 7 13% 13 13 — % gx 

30* 13% HlrtiAm 38 935 23* 19* 22* + % ici 

a% 21 HHCrPfl .189 J 82 21% 21% n%- * 

SS ’£? „ 58 15* 15% IS* + % 3i 

15* 9ft Hecks X 10 212 14* 14% 14%—* ™ 

IB* 13% HeclaM 30 U 638 17% 17% 17*— % S 

23% 14% Hellran Jf XS 12 180 19% 19 19(6 + M 

3ns. 16% Helllo j® IJ 14 144 X 25* X 

£ Hefnr 140 £9 14 1349 55% 55% 55% + % 

125% m Heinz Pf IJD IJ 2 123 IX 121 

12* HetnoC 17 IX 17* 15* 17* + * 

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«* OT6 Herarts MO 4J 12 2069 30* 37 38% +1% 

19% 10% HerttCs M JS 356 IB* 17* 18 + U 

X 2ffl Horde Pf I JO 40 • 31 38% 31 +1 


16% Hormnn 


30* Hersbv IJD 12 12 
31% HevtfPk 32 4 17 


16 73 18* 18* 18* 

L2 12 SS 44* 44 44% + * 
J 17 7439 35* 35% 35% + % 


S3* 33* Pflzar 1J8 30 

34 12* Pint IpD 

55 34 Phdppr $00 9J 

46* X PhlbrS J4 IJ 
16* 11% PbltaCl £20 14J 
31 23% PhllE pf 3J0 113 

X ' 25* PhllE pf 4J0 13J 
XK 23% PMIEpf 4J0 119 
37% 26* PMIEpf 440 134 
X 40* PhllE pf 700 1X7 
67% 52 PhllE Pi £75 134 
11% 9% PMIEpf Ml 1X1 
10* 7* PhllE pf 1J3 111 
60* 45 PMIEpf 70S 1X4 
10% 7* PhllE pf 1J8 111 


17*— % IX 100% Phil of 17.12 140 

2%— * 74 54% PMIEpf 950 134 

37*—% 60% 46 PhllE pf 700 13J 

54%— % 60 46% PMIEpf 775 134 

50 + % 23% 15% Ptins* 172 6.1 13 

,X6— % 95% 72% Phi IMr 400 4.9 10 

17% + 16 25* 13* PTllrpln 40 2J 14 

amji + % 62 33% PMlInpf 100 17 

3* + % 18* 11% PMlPts 100 80 8 

46 + fc 24% 22* PWP1 pf 104r 4J 
31% + % 20% 20* PflllVH JO 14 11 123 

53% + % 35* 23* PMdAl 78 3 9 728 

34% 34 24* PlaNG £31 74 9 9 

25% 14% pw i it 

1X6— (6 56* 36* PltflSrv IX 30 12 

94* + * X 22* Ptoooer 174 5.1 5 


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t J8 30 15 9441 48% 40 48* + * 

587 21* 21% 21* 

500 95 61 52% 52* 53* + % 

34 IJ 22 3650 41* <S0>A 41%. +1(4 , 
2.20 14-4 6 X67 15% 14* 15% + Vk 

300 113 330z 31 3D-.V 31 

£30 137 10z32% 32% 32%— % 

4J0 1X9 IX 34 34 34 

440 13.4 20x 35 35 X — M 

700 1X7 3101 X 54 X +1 

875 134 10Z 64% 64% 64% — % 

Ml T&1 142 10% 10* 10* 

M3 1X1 133 10* 9* 10% — % 

70S 13J WOz SB* 57* 50* +1* 

IX 13.1 171 10 9% 9*— U 

7.12 140 50zl22% 122% 122%— 1 

9X 134 10%. 70% 70 70—2 

700 133 260z 58% X 58% 

775 134 200z 57 37 57 +1 

M2 6.1 >3 48 21% 21* 21* + M 

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M 23 14 72 74% 24% 24* 

100 17 2 60 60 60 — % 

100 80 8 7914 12% 12% 12% + * 

I04r 4J 289 23* 23% 33% + (6 

JO 10 11 123 24* 24% 2*16 + % 

X S 9 728 33 32* 32* + % 

10 76 1 9 31 30* 30*— % 

16 141 24* 23* 24* + * 

IX 30 12 1416 51* 51 51* + * 

IX 5L1 5 1X1 24* 24% 24% 

.I7r 1.1 3 15b. 15% 15% — % 


B-26JW) AartseUwr. Belgium. l^P c - 

Grow Group 

Awlgrip, Devoe, Ameritone. three of our well-known brand 


names. 


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39% 29* sears 176 50 9 2930 35* 35% 35* + % 30 25* UDCf 

107* 97 5tarapf 908e 85 29 107% 107% 107% - % X% 17* UG 

31* 23 SacPaei IX 50 6 2045 27% 26% 27 + % 25% 19% UGlPf 

18% 11* SetoLt 8 18 17Tb 18 11* 8* UNCRl 

48 26* SvcCps X TJ 18 110 40 39 39* + * 14 10* URS 

16% 11* Shakle* 72 40 X 312 15* 14* U X* 21* USFG 

26* is Shaw In JO 27 7 122 23 21* 22*— % 44% 2t* USG» 

39* 19% ShatIT X37 b U 7 1179 37% 37* 37% + * 19* 12* UnIFrj 

X* 17* ShelGla JD 30 6 LM 34* 25% X* + % 110* B0* UnlNV 

40 25% Shrwtn 72 £4 13 1043 X* 37* 38 + * 41* 31* UCami 

Wt 5* shoefnn 9 171 6% 6* 6* 56* 32* UnCarl 

1Mb 12 Showt* M 45 12 13 13% 12* 12* — % 7% 4* UnlanC 

19% M SlerPoc IX 9J 9 229 18% 17% 17% — * 19* 13% UnEtaC 

44% 28% 5 tonal IX £4 16 2891 41* 40% 41* + % X 26 UnEl P 

X 52* ShHd Pf 472 60 9 61 60% 61 40 JO UnElP 

47 26% SAW JO 1.1 9 2069 35% 34% 35* + N 34* 25* UnEl Pi 

XFft 27% Shtorpf 350 100 8 32% 32% 33% 72 51 UEI pfl 

18 12* Skvnoe J8 15 19 146 13* 13% 13* + % X 20 UnEIPI 

15% 7% SrtlHflln 72 30 W 18 » M4K 68 48 UnElP 

71ft 5D* 5(T*B 200 47 ID 1566 66* 65% 66%— % 23* 22 UnExp 

79% 42* snwckr IX IJ 17 12 71* 71* 71*— * 52* 37* UnPoc 


S% 19% UGlPf 275 10.9 


1 24% 
467 22% 
X 4* 
62 9% 


«% + * 

U% + % 
2% + * 
29% + % 
ink— % 
ss%— % 

15* + % 
11* + * 
13* + * 
SB* +% 
58% 

24%— % 

9% + * 
64*— % 
80* + * 


45% 29% PHnyB IX 30 11 577 40% 39% 40% 


13% 9* PIttstn 523 lift U* IT* + % 

16* 8* PlanRs X 17 17 275 15* 15% 15* + * 

1M4 7 PUntrn .16b IJ 16 21 10% 10% 10% + % 

JS ,5S E 1 ?®? „ 13 28*8*5% + % 

»6 14% PaMPd SO 47 33 209 14* 14 14%— % 
JRk 34* Pufafla (00 M m 587 n 31% 31% + * 

21 ID* Pondrs AO A X 83 11* 11* 11* 

21% 15* PopTal 30 43 137 17% 17% 17ft— % 

22* 14% Portae JO 10 a 27 22% 22% 22% 

2«% 4% PortGE 1.90 97 8 516 19% 19* If* + % 

1W» POTG p) Xffl IftJ 8 34 23* 24 +1 

35% 30 PorGof 4J0 1X9 22 34* 33ft 34 

«* » PMGpf 432 12J 8 33* 33* 33* + % 

38% 5 PoflkA IX 40 13 lag 32* 32* 32* + * 

34 22 PotmEI £16 60 10 3287 31* 31% 31* + * 


17 

1* 

£04 97 11 


42 15% 14* 15% + ft 

91 27 36* 26*.— ft 

49 22* 22 22* .. 

8S0z 25* 2S 1 » 25* 

516 10* W 10* + ft 

38 12* W 12* + & 


71* 50* smkB 


79% 42* SrtHKfcr IX IJ 17 
41* 31* snanOn 1.16 £9 13 


56* 32* UrtCflrb M 

7% 4* UnlanC 
19* 13% UnElec J74 9.7 
30 26 UnEl Pf 400 IM 

M 30 UnEl Pf 450 120 

34* 25* UnEl pfflM0O I2J 

72 51 UEIPfL 800 117 

28 20 UnElPf £98 117 

M 48 UnElPf 7.44 I IJ 

23* 22 UnExpn 

52* 37* UnPoc IX 17 


15* 12% Snyder 200 112 15 77 15(4 15ft 15% — % 

43* 31% Sonet 200 &1 0 2400 33* 32* 32* 

19* 13% SdnvCp .IX J 13 1922 16* 15* 16 + % 

30* 22* StnUn IX 4.1 33 106 29* 29 29% + ft 


ffS? eri 70 £0 16 62 29* 29* 29ft— % 

23% 13ft HlShoar 30 14 9 5 21 21 21 

U* ** HIVoH .17 M 8 74 12* 12% 12* + * 

2Mfa 18% Hllnbnd X £1 14 61 26* 25ft 26% + * 

JSft £?* HHton IX 10 13 1396 59* X 59ft + % 

37* 27V, Hitachi J3B 1.1 10 210 29ft 29% 29ft— % 


37ft IWcGrH IX II 16 913 4Sft 45ft 45* + * 


73% 49ft Hilton 
37* 27% Hitachi 


43 29 EGG M IJ 19 213 37 36* 37 +1 

17* 16 EQKn IX 70 22 16* 16* 16* + * 

32* 23ft E SvjI 31 10 (4 325 20 27ft 27ft + % 

28* 20 EODieP MM 4J 8 131 23% 23 23 — % 

20% 12 Easco J4 2L2 94 19* 19ft 19* + % 

12% 3% East Air 13 5163 10% 10% 10ft + % 

, 5 IftEALwtO 110 4ft 4* 4ft + * 

2ft % EALwtA 454 2ft 1% 2* + % 

22% 6% ESAJrPf 1.18k 41 21% 21 21% 

^ I^EAlrpIBIJOh 43 23% 23% 23% + % 

33* 9ft EAlrpfC 40 30% 30 30% + % 

20ft 21% EasIGF MO 50125 IM 22* 22% 22% — * 

23* 13% EostUtl £06 97 8 IM 22 21* 21% + % 

52 41* EsKadS £20 50 13 3J40 44* 43* 44* + * 

60* 47* Eaton IX XS 7 1428 56* 55% 56 

15% 10* EchlblS 12 199 13 12ft 12%—% 

32% X Eckert! IX 40 12 1359 26 25ft 25* — % 

32* 26* EdtlBr IX 49 13 37 32* 32% 32* 

I8W 14ft EDO -28 IJ 14 29 16% 16% 16% 


a y?* ^t°S?5 v IS I 5 n 815 52* 51* 51% + ft 

65 HolfyS IX 17 30 76 73% 73 73* — % 

Wl 10% HWW8D 24 2849 11% 11% 1f% + % 


39ft 24ft Me Into 
SO 3S% MCK0BB £40 30 13 
77* 58 McKpf 100 £3 
15% 9ft McLean IB 

6% 2% McLsawf 
44* 32% Mead 120 30 10 
24ft 15* MuriM M T.1 n 


«® 30ft 29% 30ft + * 
£40 30 13 9248*48 48 — * 

IX £3 2 77ft 77ft 77ft 

18 12 lift 11* 11*— ft 

I 75 3% 3* 3ft— * 

MO 30 10 274 40% 39ft 40 + * 
M 1.1 12 656 21ft 20* 21ft + * 


TP* 14% HmFSO 6 1190 21 20% 20% 

9% 1 HmeGpf 1.10 110 20 9ft 9% 9% 

28 20% Hmstka X J 56 3699 27* 37* 27ft + % 


X 24% Medtrn X £3 U 736 34% 34% 34* 

56% 37% Mellon Ul U 7 in 52% 51% 52 + % 

x* 24 Mellim pfXBO 95 » 3Bft 28% 28* 

«% 35* Melvlll 141 U I] 465 45% 44% 44ft— % 

70 50% MarcSt U0 £1 la 33 61% 61% 61% +1% 


46% 36% Patel Pf 4J0 10J 3KB 45 44 44 — 1 

41* 32* PatElpf 40« 10.1 6S0z 40 39 40 +1 

5% T8% Pram r I JJ U M im wc 24 24ft + ft 

« 28* Prlrnrk £20 JJ 8 45 38ft 38* 38ft- % 

2®% 14* PrlmeC 14 1646 18 17ft 18 + ft 

3S% 16% PrlmMs M J 30 497 33ft 32* 33ft + % 

S9ft SOW ProefG £60 4J 15 1677 59% 58 58% + % 

18ft IS PitfHsb 25 XI 21 54 17 16* 16*— * 

47* 35 Prefer 140 II 1] 63 41% 41 41 — % 

24* 17% PSvCol 200 90 9 453 22% 21ft 22% 

21* 16* PSCOlpf £10 106 8 20ft 19* 19*— % 

10% 6% PSInd IX IM 10 496 8ft 8W 8* + % 

26 20 PS in pf 150 143 70z 24% 24% 24% + * 

Jft 6* PSIHPf UW 117 261Hz 8ft 7ft 7ft— % 


l»’A 13% SanyCp _ .. _ . 

30* 22* SODLlit IX 4.1 22 IM 29% X 29% + ft 

40* 31% Source 3J0 86 30 38% 38* 38* 

23* 18% STCCp pf 2JQ 10 J 4 22ft 22% 221ft 

30% 27ft SoJ erln 141 M 12 23 27% 27* 27% + % 

49% 38% Somtan IX 2J 18 79 41ft 40% 40*— 1% 

35 26 SoefBk IX 30 10 82 30ft 30% 30* — % 

10 6ft SaetPS £131310 40 729 7- 6% 6ft— % 

27ft X seal Ed £16 87 8 3118 25 24* 24ft + ft 

23% 15 Saumca 102 93 6 3086 20% X 20* + % 

26* 17ft SalnGbs 10 M I 51 23ft 33% 23ft + % 


90 39% 38* 39% + W 115% B7* UnPcpf 7JS 60 

77 15* 15% 15% — % 21ft 12% UMrorl ■» J 

M 33% 32* 32* 70 50 Unrvtpf 800 1£9 

£3 16% 15* 16 + % 5* 3* UnlfOr 

06 29% W 29% + ft X* 10* UnBmd 

30 38% 38* 38* 16ft 9ft UBrdPt 

4 22ft 22% 22ft 33ft U% UCbTV 6 


127 6% 6 6 

104 9 7 6 342 19 18ft 19 

SlU *» M 35 

,20 SO* 37% 37% 37% ' 

iflO 120 36 31* 31ft 3T* + ft 

800 HJ 5WP 68% 67* 68% + ft 

}M 110 14 25ft 25* 25* + ft 

7J4 1IJ M0X 64* 63% *4* +1* 

681 23ft 23% 23ft + %■ 
IX 17 12 1291 48ft 47* 4Mh + ft 


L# 93 110% 107% >10 . +T%_ 

0 13 713 21ft 21* 21ft. 

9 360 18% 18* 18ft— U 

535 14% 14 14ft— : ft , 

51 7 31* 31% 31* + ft 


40* 27* UnEnra ZM 67 30 2423 40% M% 40ft 


30ft SNET1 £72 60 11 136 41ft 41 


51 73ft 22% ZJft + % 


18 10 HnmPn jo £7 5 7V is* is « _ 2 S? 1 f^occSi uo xi la 3a 61ft 61* 61ft +1% 

63* 46%HoSa JO. J TO Wa WP. S ’IT 4 Men* la 11 17 2097 116*115 116* +1* 

u, IS JZ iSt « 47* Aieram ix u u jb 63* dm 63* +1* 


gft S’? fftnvff 11 2JJ0 £1 13 3089 63ft 63% 63* + ft 

34 20% HrznBn 1.12 13 K) 3 30ft X* 30* — U 

27ft 11 HnBnpf 204*100 X 27* 27* 27*—% 


6ft 3ft Horizon 


147 5* 5% 5* +%| 


5* 36% HnpCP X IJ 13 1576 47% 46ft 46ft— ft | 

~ a*—* 


30% 23ft Hotel In 260 9 J 13 
42ft 25ft HouOflM M £4 IS 
19* 13* HouFOb X 30 ID 
39% 28ft Houslnt IX 40 9 
63ft HOlitfPf 63S 80 


25ft HoupflM 06 2J 15 24 40* 40% 40%— ft 
13* HoSpOb X 32 10 116 15 14* If + % 


Housinf IX 40 9 944 37% 36ft 36ft— % 

HOlitfPf 60S 80 3 77ft 77% 77% + * 

Moclnd £64 90 7 3031 27* 27% zm 


80 47* Merdth IX IJ 14 

22 12* Mesa Ft < 

33* 28* AltoxaR I36e SJ 

a ssa.*" 8 

x»3*nstttt 

3* 2 AMxFd J2V14J 


HouOR 109O180 


» 16% 16% 16% 


X* 14% HourtCo X £3 32 
21% Kubbrd ZX 80 11 


34% 22* Edward X £8 14 497 28* 27% 28ft + « 


24* 20% EPCdpt £33 90 482 24 23* 23ft + % 

SJ? I PG,rf 175 111 2 28ft 28ft 28% + % 

TO* 10ft Err ora A4e J 16 so 16% 16* lift— % 

12 8% Ekar J6 42 33 9ft Ift Bft— % 

5% 3* ElacAs 26 27 4* 4ft 4* 

»* 19% Elctsp* X OX 57 29ft 28% 28ft— ft 

11* EWn X SJ 14 29 14ft 14% 14ft 

«ft 3* EHdnf 393 3ft 3% 3ft + * 

78* 65ft EmrsEJ 200 30 13 1081 72ft 21ft 72* + ft 

14ft 8* Em Rod 041 93 11 408 10ft 9ft 10ft + ft 

I5J? S n, T vA M IS 6<3 18% 17ft 18 + % 

SS ]-4Ob40 9 £15 29* 28ft 28ft— * 

«% 15* EmpDs 1J6 U 7 II 21% 21* 21% 

5, 3ft Emppf A7 90 2«& 4ft 4ft 4ft 


482 24 23* 23ft + ft 

2 28ft 28ft 38ft + ft 
X 16ft 16ft 16*— ft 
33 9ft Bft Bft— ft 
27 4* 4ft 4* 

57 29% 28% 28ft— ft 
29 14ft 14ft 14ft I 


13ft 9* Huffy JO 30 12 

17* 12ft HwghTl X 33 
« 17* HugfiSp X 1 J 12 

36* 21ft Human 


Oft HuntMf X 13 17 


£25?? 

ss ,J ,sis r 

X IJ 12 38 23% 23% 

08 ZJ IS 1225 31ft 31ft 


X M 14 38 63* &m 63* +T* 

X 23 13 33W 32 31ft 31ft + ft 

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21 Tone 


IttralbSSribunc, 

MTSTNF.SS/FINANCE 



U.S. Slocks 

Report, Page T 


Page 9 


** 


IKTEBWATIOWAL MANAGER 


JVJV 


0 ie Resume 
To Sell You Anywhere 


3 German 

Banks Cut 


Call for DeriationaUzation 
1 ompts Heated Debate 


Icahn Gets Boost 


By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

International Herald THbtme 

I ~T Summer is a good lime 10 update your rfcsumfe. 
lomaxumze your c han ces of getting a job with different 
west European companies, yon may need different ver- 
sions of your rfcsumfc to smi the nationality of the 
company. 

Rfcsumfe throughout Europe, according to recruiters, are be- 
coming increasingly standardized on thelXs. and British models: 
a clear, concise statement that nms no more than one or two 
pages listing degrees and jobs r* v 1 ~~~ 

■ tivmt the aditrMc nf 


Key Rates 



Consumer Costs 
Shaved 0.75% 


. AUU UU13 liU UIUIC lUflll UU6 Ul inv 

p^es listing degrees and jobs in reverse chronological order and 
givi ng th e address of the university and company, the nature of 
the company and a short description of dunes and responsabil 


hies. 


iw. 

Often larking in European 
rfcsumfes are ~i — * 


iwwiuMi cue specifics about 
the job itself that can be help- 
ful to both the candidate and 


« iwvu uiai um Uv itcip- 

■ mi both the candidate and 
the employer a short descrip- 
tion of the company; the nnm- 


In France, 
many resumes 
are f no better 

non ot the company; the nnm- 

ber of people managed; for a than dishrflfiS.’ 

marketing or sales job, the ; ^ 

amount of sales generated in a 

year; for a senior post, the amount of the budget under your 
control. 

• “In France, people don’t know how to do their rtsumfis; 
they’re no better than dishrags. Because executives aren’t used to 
moving much, they never give the size of the company or what the 
company does, for example,” says Marie- Annick Flambard-Guy, 
an associate director with Russell Reynolds & Assodfes, the 
French subsidiary of the UR. executive-search firm. * 


( - 

'■ 


Jj* - 

I ' 


B UT, depending on the job and the company, a UR-type 
rfcsum6 may not be entirely appropriate. The more tram- 
rifynnl the company, the more that the rfeume - should 
follow the national style either by including some_deta3s not 
usually available in U.S.-type x6sum£s or by omitting some 
information, that a future employer may find culturally offensive. 

• Personal data: Most European countries do not haw non- 
diacrinrina toiy laws similar to those that exist in the Umtea 
States. As a result, the employer is entitled to know certain details 
about you. The standard practice is to give age, sex, nationality, 
marital status and the number of children. . 

“In the United States, it is a big no-no to ask someone his age. 
In France, it would surprise candidates if yem didn't ^then^ 
says Marc Lamy ,a vice president with Korn Ferry SA m Pans, 
the French subsidiary of the U.S. execuhye-scar^ ^ X?e 
employer is entitled to get certain information on the ramjaate. 
It is a pyrrhic victory if six months later the candl< } a ^ r d 5^% 
work out .because of certain personal data the employer didn 

Paris-based UR. search firm. • j™!,-*** civfl 

In Switzerland, acoontry that has a hig^devdopede^ 
defense system, it helps to indudeyoor rank and function m the 

“^WestGermany and Belghnn,itis stfflcammra. for 
executives to include the nimie of their parents and thar parents’ 

professi on.^ ^ ^^whole breeding,” says AndersU Borg. 


Reuters 

FRANKFURT — West Germa- 
ny’s three biggest commercial 
banks Tuesday announced cats in 
ihe interest rales they charge on 
overdrafts and installment credit to 
private customers: 

The actions followed half-point 
cuts by the Bundesbank last Tnuis- 
day in its key discount and Lom- 
bard rales, its charges on short- and 
medium-term loans to commercial 
banks. 

The move by the central bank 
was aimed at stimulating sluggish 
West Gorman consumer demand. 

Diesdner Bank AG said its an- 
nual interest rate on overdrafts, ef- 
fective immediately, falls to 930 
percent from 10.25 percent, wtere 
n had held since March 1983. 
Dresdner said it would also cut. its 
rates on installment credit, but did 
not elaborate. 

Commerzbank later announced 
that it was cutting by as much as 
0.75 percentage point its credit 

charges on consumer loans of up to 

50.000 Deutsche marks (about 
118,000). 

It said that a loan for more than 

10.000 DM stretched over 60 
months would now carry an annual 

r n n/ .t mriMit nf thff 


By Paul Lewis 

New York Times Scr*ct 
PARIS — Pressures are build- 
ing in France to sell back to pri- 
vate investors industry and 
banking concerns nationabzed 
by President Frampns Mitter- 
rand’s Socialist government after 
it came into office four years ago- 
The move comes just as many of 

these companies are beginning to 

tU Tbe Socialists’ nanonahzation 

spree has given France the larg- 
est stale sector among industnal- 
ized countries outside the Com- 
munist world, with 
government-owned com panies 
accounting for about 30 percent 
of industrial output 
The 12 big industrial grows 
that the Socialists swrai into the 
public net at a cost of 50 bflhon 
bancs ($5.92 billion) in compen- 
sation, include Ge. de Saint- Go- 
bain, the insolation maker, "e- 
chiney Ugine KubJmann SA, the 
metals giant; Rh5ne- Poulenc 
SA the chemicals group; Com- 
pagnie Gtafcrale d'Ele ctiKatfe. 
T&oqtCSF and ITTs French 
subsidiaries in the electrical sec- 
tor, two steel companies, Usinor 
and Sacflon two leading arma- 
ments c o mpanies, Dassault and 
Matra; Roussel Udaf SA, a 
pharmaceuticals concern, and 
Gi Honeywell Bull, a computer 



As TWA Rejects 

Texas Proposals 


Employees of Usinor at a plant in Isbergues, France. 


rate of 9.96 percent instead of the 
3.63 percent. A si mil ar 

* nnA TMi Til 


previous lO.u. t — - — — 

loan for less than 10,000 DM will 


U/OU iw — _ 

be reduced to 10.41 percent from 
11.08 percent, it said. 

Commerzbank also said that it is 
cutting the rate on overdrafts to an 
annua! 9.75 percentfrom 1030 per- 
cent 


The Socialists also national- 
ized 39 banks — the three largest 
were already stale-owned — 
most insurance companies; Re- 
nault, the kuto company, the avi- 
ation, nudear, shipbuilding and 
coal mining industries; _ Air 
France and me internal aidines; 
the railways, telephone, post of- 
fice and gas and electricity sup- 


mpmex 

]e the state sector grew, so 


did its aggregate losses as the 
Socialists sought to use these 
companies to spur growth and 
employment From a total of 1.9 
billion francs in 1 980 before the 
Socialists came to power, the na- 
tionalized sector’s deficit wid- 
ened to 39.1 billion francs in 
1982, slipping back to 36 billion 
francs last year, although many 
individual companies moved 
into the black. 

This huge state sector today 
occupies a key position in tin: 
economic strategies of Frances 
major political parties as they 
prepare for next spring's parlia- 
mentary elections. 


The Socialists have become 
much more moderate under 
prime Minister Laurent Fahins. 


nunc MuuhLGi uuuuii i 

emphasizing the fight against in- 
flation and modernization of in- 
dustry. Since the government can 
no longer afford to pay for the 
losses of state-owned companies 
or proride new capital, it is urg- 
ing management to make profit- 
ability an overriding goal and 
raise investment finance from 
the private sector by selling sub- 
sidiaries or floating nonvoting 
share issues on the Pans stock 
exchange. 

As a result, private investors 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 5) 


NEW YORK — Carl G Icahn, 
the New York financier, took a 
commanding lead Tuesday m his 
battle to acquire Trans world Air- 
lines following its board’s defeat of 
proposals that would have cement- 
ed a merger agreement between 
TWA and Texas Air Corp. 

The TWA board rejected pro- 
posals by Texas Air that wouM 
have tnade the airline undesirable 
to Mr. Icahn or would have diluted 
his 453-percent stake in TWA to 
the point where he could not block 
Texas Air’s $26-a-share offer. 

Mr. Icahn, in a letter to the TWA 

board delivered last Friday, had 
threatened to reduce his $24-a- 
share offer for the airline's stock if 
it gave Texas Air asset options. 

The TWA board agrred to Mr. 
Icahn’s proposal that the Texas Air 
bid be submitted to TWA stock- 
holders for a vote. TWA wfl) hold 
open Mr. Icahn's offer for board 
action until two weeks after share- 
holders have voted on the Texas 
Air package. 

TWA said its board had rejected 
all steps suggested by Texas Air to 
lock up its merger proposal by 
agreeing to sell off parts of the 
airline and issue a preferred stock. 

Mr. irahri later said the TWA 
board action was in the best inter- 
est of TWA’s shareholders, em- 
ployees, the traveling pubhc and 
communities served by the airline. 

While WaD Street sources said 
that Texas Air has no immediate 
contingency plan, analysts specu- 
lated that ihe situation may not 
have been entirely resolved because 
of the complicated history of the 
struggle. 


But Mr. Icahn issued what some 

Wall Street sources saw as a victory 

speech. He said he eamects bis own 
merger proposal to be completed 
by Nov. 30, contingent on financ- 

m ^Theoreticafly, this should ret 
the tone for winding this thing 
down to a decision audit looks Eke, 
at this point, the cards are all m Mr. 
Icahn’s and his backers [the unions] 

hands,” said Louis Marckesano, an 

analyst at Janney Montgomery 

Scott of New York. 

Analysts, however, are not ready 
to predict the fate of TWA. “Obvi- 
ously there can be many moreslor- 

nusbes before the final battle, said 

Robert Joedicke, an analyst with 
Shearsoo Lehman Brothers of New 

York. , 

TWA said after the board mat- 
ing that it views Mr. Icahn's offer 
as an excellent price for sharehold- 
ers, and did not threaten to dis- 
member the airline. 

TWA added that Mr. Icahn also 
delivered a letter from a miyor 
commercial bank, which it did not 
name, stating that the bank was 
highly confident it could arrange 
the necessary financing for his 
merger proposal 
r Earlier, Pan American World 

Aiways told the TWA board 

that it would be interested in buy- 
ing TWA’s reservation Systran, its 
Ke tour program, i^t^mnai at 
Kennedy International Airportm 
New York and certain planes. The 
New York Tunes reported.] 

TWA shares dosed Tuesday on 
the New York Stock Exchange up 
25 cents, at $2230. 

(Reuters, UPI) 


Late in the day, Deutsche Bank 
‘ ‘ ' Id follow suit, cul- 


fo general in Europe it is considered 

a i^f -ne 

.. (Continued on P*g* 13, ^ 


AG said it woula iouuw a iu>, an- 
ting its rates on overdrafts and con- 
sumer loans to 9.75 percent from 
103 percent, effective immediately. 

Rales on consumer loans of up 
to 10,000 DM and maturities of 36 
months will drop to an effamve 
10.74 percent from a pnor 1L85 
percent, it said in a . 

j yvnng of more than 10,000 DM 
will be charged at 10.19 percent, 
down from 11-29 percent, while 
similar loans over 60 .months wD 
be charged an effective 9.62 per- 
cent, down from 10.71, it said. 

A number of small savings banks 
have already cut their consumer 
credit charges over the past tew 
days and mortgage rates have been 
cat back steadily this summer. 


Ailing Philippine Economy Seen on Slow Road to Recovery 

^ „ n0frmt lo companies “could not afford to pay in My against a record low $483 “ 

thar employees and this resulted m 


Reams 

MANILA — The Philippine 
economy, which virtually collapsed 
following the murder of opposition 
leader Bcnigno Aquino in Manila 
two years ago, appears to be recov- 
ering, but businessmen and econo- 
mists say it could be years before it 
returns to full health. 

Acconfing to analysts, the coun- 
try’s economy is saddled with re- 
duced trade, labor problems and 
political uncertainty that may take 

years to work oat 

In the first five months of 1985, 
according to government statistics. 


exports dropped 17 percent, to 
SI. 91 billion, although imports also 

fell It percent, to $2.1 billion. 

Strikes increased by 76 percent 
in the first half of the year, to 240, 
and lost man-hours more than dou- 
bled, to 123 million, from 5.66 mil- 
lion in the same period last year. 

In 1984, the annualized inflation 
rate averaged 50 percent and nmre 
than 90,000 people tost their jobs. 

According to Felix Maramba, 
president of the Philippine Cham- 
ber of Commerce ana Industries, 
the country’s economic situation 
was so bad last year that many 


strikes. 

Despite signs of improvement to 
recent statistics, says Bernardo Vil- 
legas, a Harvard-educated econo- 
mist, the Philipptoe economy is still 
“sticking out nke a sore thumb in 
die fast-growing Pacific region. 

Recent reports show that the rate 
of inflation fell to 18.8 p ercent m 

July and that interest rates drappea 

to 23.6 percent from a peak of 373 
percent in November. The^ central 
bank also reported that interna- 
tional reserves rose to $1.1 bflhon 


in July against a record low $483 
million in October 1983. 

Mr. Villegas, senior rice presi- 
dent of the independent Center for 
Research and Communications, 


said tbe economic policies of Presi- 
~ " ' Marcos v 


^«»nt Ferdinand Marcos were gen- 
erally in the right direction but that 
there continues to be political un- 
certainty and a lack of investor 

confidence. 

Ramon Gonzalez, a broker with 
Anscor Hegedorn Securities, 

agreed. “Tbere is a crisis of confi- 
dence.” he said. “The economy 
needs more investments and not 


more loans. We have loans coming 
out of our ears.” 

The government has successfully 

concluded a standby credit agree- 
ment with the International Mone- 
tary Fund has drawn the first 
two installments from a special 
credit line. 

It has also agreed with its 483 
creditor banks to a $10-billioa res- 
cue package, including a S5.8-M- 
lion rescheduling of the country s 
$25 -billion foreign debt- A morato- 
rium on repayment of debts, im- 
posed in October 1983, is still in 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 8) 



Jt*g.20 

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,U7* .JJg ^ IBS 

London (b) 


Brazil Seeks 
Deferral on 
Bank Debt 


tUtickms Still Awaiting Benefits 


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iwion **** "S” -mwa* »w »» 

3 month* 7 Abia inw* s 


ImontM «*** 


By Juan de Onis 

Ua Anodes Times Service 

RIO DE JANEIRO — Brazfl, 
the Third World’s largest. debtor 
country, asked its international 
bank creditors Tuesday for a new 
180-day deferral of principal pay- 
ments on about $70 billion m debt 
while it negotiated a new standby 
agreement with the International 
Monetary Fund. • 

Finance Minister Francisco 
DomeDes said after meeting m 
France with Jacques de Larosif^ 
managing director of the IMF, that. 
Brazil hoped to reach a standby 
agreement with the IMF m Octo- 
ber fh gt would cover the rest of this 
year and 1986. , 

The request for an extension or 
deferred payments of principal to 
the private international banks was 
presented to New York by. Antonio 

Cartes Lemgruber, presidait ot 
Brazil’s central bank. An earner yu- 
day deferral is tt> 

Brazil is rrwmtainmg its mterest 
payments and othear service charges 
ot d» debt, which is just over $100 
bilBon. Among the debtors are pn- 

SSftCSKS 

BnTiic and Inter-American Devei- 

0f ^ lt I^eriiber said last week 

■ men Brazil 


By William McBride 

International Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — Six months af- 
ter the dollar began to fall from its 
peak, U.S. corporations and [politi- 
cians are looking in vain for the 
expected benefits. 


Few economists are betting i 
UR. growth in the second half will 


warn many 
say * 

dollar u 

currencies since February 
short of improving UR- .c 01 ?®®" 
dons' competitive edge to world 

markets. They also worry thatm- 


from six months to a year to show when prices are c ^P res ^“ , kets. An informal survey of the 
to m oSl trade figures, the of otha cunwo«. Simdarty, a members indicatol 

SnSnX ray. Thus, Ihe UR. strong SSS' -appropriate” value for the 

merchandise trade deficit will acm- foreign £{^k“L ition fjo^iSs dollar would be about 200 yen a 

SSlSiSSui doIlir “ dabontl - 10to ^' 

*-■— $150 billion for the full 


Sourcns: Maroon 


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nmbia to tatorban* 


that servicing the dd)t costs Brazd 
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about$13biffimia^hj^Sl 

billion KK>re than Brazfl hopes to 
earn this year in foreign tram. But 
Brazil does not plan to seek new 

bank loans this year, it has a cush- 
ion of $8 billiou in reserves. 

Mr. Dornelles said after tos 

oeetingMo^y^bfr-fe^- 

atre that there woe still oufer 

^ between Brazfl mdthe^ff 

mirr “how fast we should reduce 
'ZJiml Mats.” H=aidte 
redurtow 

der tbe new gpveaunent of Presr- 


year, "lne worst is yet to come, 
said Allan Sinai, an economist with 
Shearson i <4iman r the UR. invest- 
ment firm. 

The delay increases the likeli- 
hood that Congress will enact some 
form of protectionist lcgidation 
when it reconvenes in IbefalL “Tte 
lag is just too long,” Mr. Snaisaid. 
“Legislation is inevitable." There 
are about 300 congressional pro- 
posals with protectionist features, 
Wit of which are aimed at Japan. 

The impatience of UR corpora- 
tions isalso growing. Officials of 
tbe National Association of Manu- 
facturers and a handful of top exeo- 
. i M,.. Aim mrnft- 


utives from such Uue-ehrp corpo- 
rations as Du Pont Co. and 


as Du Pont 

pactman Kodak Co. told 

Secretary James A. Baker in a J— ^ 
16 meetrng that tbe recent declines 

m the dollar, though wdcomfcwtw 

«nvhvN> eivmfi- 


Standard Chartered Profit Jumps 

Reuters . 

LONDON - 

first half pretax profit The hank died results 


The bank dted.i^ults 

C'b&n'^'^ Africa in ac profit gain, wtach 

- to. Sbgapo™ and 

provisions for exposure to countries debts. 


But one of the 
is economic 

United States «*«»* - 

UR. manufacturers hide- good to 
achieve a more competitive stance 
if demand for their products is 

weak- . 

Gerald Gleason, a vice president 
of Foxboro Co„ a Massachusetts 
maker of industrial controls that 
does about 50 percent of its bua- 
ncss abroad, says a decline in the 
dollar is not enough to insure a 
bright outlook. “It’s a move m the 
right direction," he said. “But we 
need more buoyancy in the econo- 
my." 


mar ctuuwuut-a, - — — — 

“It’s hard to look for more than 
sluggish growth from the rest of the 
world.” Estimates for Western Eu- 
(Contmned on Page 13, CoL 4) 


When m 
VjjlunK^in. I1C 
inert me it 




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Limv 1 


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, OUR 59th YEAR- 


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percent. 

The political context in wycg 
Brazil is negotiating with the IMF 
and its major bank creditors is 
heavily influenced by decnons tor 
mayor in all the state capitals. The 
. . ■ H and 


eiecuum ; . 

will involve about' 30 million vot- 
ers. 



p 

1 


« 



The. _ 

(arlyle 

Hotel 



i — 

U»di*ofi Avenue 
*t 76lh Street 
HcwWBfhlOaSl 

Carlyle HwWJ 
S20W 

Wepho«»*^ ! ' 7M ' 1800 

A member el the Sbwp Group 
• jjncctS^ 

c 



LOEWS MONTE CARLO HOTEL 

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u are pleased to announce 
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ctf//euferA 


-If 4 


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present 

their latest creations as well as 
a selection of their rarest stones 

HOTEL DU CAP 
Cap d 5 Antibes 

Thursday 22, Friday 23, August 1985. 


1! 1 




New York Genfeve Paris Monte-Carlo 




art iik 

514 

4% !» 

19% 13% 
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8 'J* 4 Vi 

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28 k 101 % 

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10k 7M> 
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3 k 1 % 
aok iiu 
23k 18% 
3S% 25% 


Cal RE 158 
Colmar M 
Cal ton n 
Caipfw jm 
Cameo J2 
Camcnl 
CMarco 50 
CdnOcc M 
CWIne 


54 1-9 13 
IB 
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M 14 70 
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501105 14 
22 10 10 


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30H 22k 
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FWvmB M 60 12 
Fstcran 60 24 7 
FtachP iH U 19 
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Fluke lJ8t 53 11 
Footfrm 5 


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13k 14 
2 2 
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5k 5k + k 
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i2k 13k + k 
20k 20k— k 
12k 13 — U 
9k 9k 
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4014 4016 — lb 
26 26tt 4 k 
12k 1 2k— k 


17k 12k 
7k 5k 
5k 214 
2 k 
9k 4 la 
6k 3 
11k TV, 
im 5k 
7V. 3V, 

36 24k 

4k lk 
16k 10 
13 10k 

24 15k 

23k Uk 
9k Sk 
17k ■ 

8 3k 
2k lk 
9k 5k 

4k 2ia 

4k 3k 
5 3k 
5k 2k 
5k 3k 
3k 2 
17k 10k 
16k 10k 
30k 22k 


Joclyn JOb 35 9 
Jacobs 

JetAm 7 

JrtAwf 

Jetron -Tit 95 16 

John Pd 

JatmAin 50 14 12 
JohnJnd 4 

JmpJkn 9 

J under 14 

KaaofcC „ S 
KayCp 50 15 8 
KavJn 50a u 18 
Kama hi 50o 4.1 10 
Kctchm 581 35 18 
KeyCs -30o 36 
KoyPtl 50 15 19 
KavCa 8 

Kaycawt 
KavCa im 
KItfeteWl 

Kllem ■ 31 

Klnork 

Kirby 

KilMio 15 

KtearV JJ2r 5 
Knoaa 18 

Knoll 16 

KaaarC 252 8.1 82 


1 14k 
25 6k 

' X 5 

TO Th 
21 3k 
43J 9k 
TO 8 Vi 
15 3k 
1 36 
97 3k 
3 1314 
19 Ilk 
1 19% 
44 10% 
6 Bk 
782 11 
6 3k 
33 1 

5 5k 
61 «k 

io m 

18 4 

200 2k 
> 1 4k 
74 3k 
107 17k 
544 15k 
73 29k 


9k 5k FllllllG 19 

112 77 FordCn 3450a 

34k 15k FaralCA .15 6 96 

32k 12k Fa resit. 31 

7 . % Fnnwnt 


865 6k 6 6k + V. 
lUbiaSk 105k 105k — lk 
2 23k 23k 23k— 14 
315 25 24k 24k— k 

713 ik ?k ik 


2 lk L5B 
3k 2% La Barg 
7k 3k La Put 
1514 Uk LndSnrt 60 45 


17 2 2 2 

18 2k 2k 2k + k 
16 4k 4 4k 

ID 15 14k 14k + M 


10k PGEpfA 1 JO 11J 
12k 9 PGEPfO 155 116 
12W 9 PGEptE 155 11.1 
12k 8k PGEotG 150 115 
36 29k PGEptF 454 125 

3314 2814 PGEpfZ 466 1 7JB 
29k 23k PGEpfY 350 114 
24% IBk PGEpfW 257 116 
22k 16k PGEP1V 252 115 
24k 1814 PGEpfT 254 115 
24k 18k PGEpfS 2 68 115 
11 7k PGEnfH 1.12 108 
16k PQEPfR 257 118 
19k Uk PGEpfP 205 115 
20k 1414 PGEPfO Z«1 115 
19% 1414 PGEpfMT.ft 115 
21 16 PGEofL 255 118 

30k 14k PGEpfK 254 115 
21k 16k PGepfJ 252 118 
Uk 7k PGEPfl 159 115 
2414 15k PGTm 154 58 7 
41k 31k PDCLrpf 456 115 
4Zk 33 PbCLlpf 450 115 
5014 57„ PocHpt 550 11.1 
Ik k Paaaa 
40k 32k PaflCp 48 15 91 
Bk 5V1 Pantasf 43 

25k 17k Parkdi 150 45 10 
14k 7k PatTctl 49 

5k 214 PayFon 30 

Ilk 5k PUMG .12a 15 4 
13 7k PEC lor 521 7J 12 
11k 814 Peer T u 40b 45 IS 
45% 36k Pen EM 150a 35 12 
24k 15k PenTr 150 5.1 13 
2k % PECe jsr4aa 
2514 18 PomREs 150 74 9 
14k 7% Pawn 58 25 7 
30 24k PerlnlC 50 35 


12 13% 12k 
38 Uk 10k 
33 1114 11 

5 10% 10% 

6 34k 34 
18 31k 31k 
40 28% 2714 

4 22k 22k 

10 20k 20% 
9 22% 22% 
9 zna 22k 

11 10% 1014 
7B 2114 20k 

3 1814 18k 
58 17% 17% 
42 17k 1714 
10 19k IBk 
32 18k -18 
3 20k 20k 
18 9k 9k 
32 21k 21k 
700z 39 39 

IKOz 41V, 38k 
SOB 45 45. 

20 k & 
67 38k 38k 

21 6k 6k 
2 25k 25% 

8 7k 7k 

30 4% 4k 

ID 11k Ilk 

20Qz 10% 10k 
a so w 

5 36k 36k 

9 23k 23% 

37 % k 

67 24k 2414 

8 8k Bk 

6 27 26k 


13 — % 
11 k + k 
1114 

io%— k 
34 + k 

31 k + k 
28 

22 k— k 
s»sa 

22% + k 
22 k— k 
Wk + V. 
20 k— % 
iBk — k 
17 k— U 
17 k 
19 k 

18 — k 
20 k + IV 
9 % 

2 ik + k 
39—14 
38 k— k 
45 +114 

k 

38 k + k 
6 k | 
25 k + 14 ! 
7 % + 14 
4 k 

Uk + k 
10 % + k 
io — k 

36 k— k 
23 k + k 
% 

2414 — k 

8 % 

26 % 


16 k 
10 k 
Uk 
Uk 
12k 
Uk 
43 k 
21 k 
23 k 
75 k 
85 % 

3% 

TV, 

■Uk 
Uk 4 k 
3 ' k 
8% 4% 

23 k 17 k 
10 % 7 % 

2114 Uk 
Uk 6 k 
21 15 k 

5 k 414 
3 k 1 % 
23 11 k 

Uk 5 % 
7 4 k 
21 Uk 
3514 20 k 
lk Mr 
13 k 6 
IBk 1114 
6 k 4 k 
28 19 % 


AMEX Highs-Lcms 


MEW HIGHS 


COvGwFla 

Mart rook; 

S orvoiron 


Com poind 
NRM Eng of 


E sa Rod El 
NordRscs 


Uk MTBor 


T 

531 66 18 


Allan Tire 
GTICorp 
STermdn . 


AHHticrMo DomsEnoy b Devon Real nn 
KorsfCom wt MorthnOff Pneu Scale 

SorgPrlntn TumerBrdn Vintage Ent 


fe.V li 

* 

Iris 


DYNAMIC NEW CONCEPT 


ELIMINATE U.S. INCOME TAX 
CAPITAL GAIN TAX 
AND ESTATE TAX 


All these bonds having been sold, this announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


BMH 


Bank Mees & Hope nv 


EARN GUARANTEED 

10 % 

TAX-FREE INCOME 
WHILE YOUR PRINCIPAL 
GROWS 100% TO 500% 
AT MATURITY 


ECU 50,000,000 
9 per cent Bonds due 1992 


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Compare these features with your current investments: 


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Generate Bank 

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J. Henry Schroder Wagg & Co. Limited 
Swiss Banfc Corporation International Limited 
S-G. Warburg & Co. Ltd. 


Banque Internationale a Luxembourg S.A. 
Banque Paribas Capital Markets 
Berliner Handels- und Frankfurter Bank 
Deutsche Bank Aktiengesellschaft 

Istitato Bancario San Paolo di Torino 

Morgan Guaranty Ltd 

ii - D f . Society Generate 

Union Bank of Switzerland (Securities) Limited 
Westdeutsche Landesbank Girozentraie 


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Sank International! Cnirale 

Sssa&aw 





AVAILABLE IN UNITS OF 

$100,000 TO $2,000,000 


BARRY KAYE ASSOCIATES 

Established 1963 

9300 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 510 
Beverly Hills, California 90212 


Algemene Bank Nederland N.V. Amro International Limited R„ n _ rv. 

Banca di Credito Commerriale e Mobiiiare S.A. Banca del Gottardo ,ca ^ommerciaie Ifaliana 

Bank der Bondsspaarbanken N.V. Bank Gutzwiller, Kurz, Bungener (Overseas) Limited D.?! ni ? l ^anu wrdi & r 

Bank Leu International Ltd. Bank J. Vontobel & Co. AG if! 1 * 01 Helsinki Limited 

Banque Franfaise du Commerce Exierieur Banque Generale du Luxembourg S A. Mn£ jue de Benelux S A 

Banque Paribas Belgique S. AVParibas Bank Belgie N.V. ' Ba ... “nque Indosuev 

Bayerische Hypotheken- und Wechsel-Bank Ainiengesellschafi Bayerische i fnJ L L n,on Euro Peenne 

Bayerische Vereinsbank Aktiengesellschaft Caisse des Depots el Consignations Chemicnl Rs^fJi . sbank Girozenirai* 
Citicorp Investment Bank Limited Commerzbank Aktiengesellschaft p "? k international Limii «»4 

County Bank Limited Creditanstalt-Bankverein rS?i?^ en Handel ^ank A/e 

Credit Industrie! d’ Alsace et de Lorraine Succursale de Luxembourg Credit InriuctK«i ''^P lni ercial de Fr-^J 3 

Credit Lyonnais Dai-lchi Kangyo Bank Nederland N.V. ne e 2 ^ or tmierciai de 

Den Dahske Bank Den norske Credit bank Luxembouig S.A. Dr+«Hn« r o , Wa Europe i 

Enskilda Securities-Skandinaviska Enskifda Limited Euromobiliare S.p.A ^"er Bank Aktiengeseik.i! • 

Hambros Bank Limited Hessische Landesbonk-Girozentrale- j.-,, ? cot *oor Gihssen 

IBJ International Limited Kansallis-Osafce-Pankki A?. 11 ! Samuel & Co r i ■ ■ 

Kuwait Investment Company (S.A.K.) F. van Lanschot Bankiers N.V. M-.n.Ir nw ° n - Benson i' m ! ,od 

Merrill Lynch Capital Markets Mitsubishi Finance International Limited 5 am. U T?! ir * R Hanover i ! m f led 

Morgan Stanley Intemaiional Nederiandse Credietbank N.V. “ c ' Monuj gu & c J-jmiied 

Nippon European Bank S.A. LTCB Group Nomura International Limited an usehe Middenstanri k ’ l£l1 

Osterreichische Liinderbank Aktiengesellschaft Pierson. Heldring & Pierson N.V pl- ri. .°. r,an Royal R- in t ■ “ nli nv 
Post i pan kki (U.K.) Limited Privatbanken A/S ^ l - nr,,5l ‘ania Bank ti it’ . . ni,! cd 

Salomon Brothers International Limited Sansin ^bobant w V m ‘ted 

Sod6i5 Generale Alsociennc de Banque. Luxembourg n International Secuni' Ne . dcr ^nd 

Svenska Handeisbanken Group Verband Schweizerischer Kantonalbanken Vercins- ifnHiLV 3 ” 10 finance il', es ^‘^iied 
H. Wesselius & Co. B.V. Wood Gundy Inc. • ySf We stbank Abt' lern;il ion 3 | 


! ■'it;/. r ^7 — - ^ 
i s ■».■ ‘L ~ CiS'a* 

i tiv-cVr ' 


Dresdner LmSS 


KJfiiriU'nrt n l-lmil.M 


I 5?^. 


lot Bankiers N.V. Man,^« on ' Be nso n ! C 

emational Limited Hanover I ;2‘ led 

bank N.V. ^ L Monu >eu & Cr. 

International Limited ds £ he Mid densiand'jh ,ni . Ued 

Id ring & Pierson N.V. pi- rhr -®- no 9 Roy a | Bant i nv 
anken A/S Chr,st, ania Li m ,icd 

Sarasin imcmation^i&f 

into nalban ken Vercins- undW^g^anee l'meri! t ? i,ed 

V»mai q hilniem^" k . A taieniseJS. ,, ? ns >J 




•s.: 1 '*? s-.^ . 


’■r.fc..'. • ' :- a*. 51 

s-ir I. 


July. 1985 


1 — -i^assstssg 


r, elT ••' 



























































■v: 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21, 1985 



Page 11 


BUSINESS PEOPLE 


'i *mm' 


*' ‘ ft 



Creditor Plan 


Tteyteo doty r^ss 

ssfraafg 

'iUSSSSt^S^ 

«3, promised i 
—an in cash to 

passas* 

the new company 

533 iriBkm, plus udiqui- 
a 8*“*st the two companies. 


Laker Given Reprieve 



ent 


Reuters 

JERSEY, England — Sir Fred- 
^ker Tuesday won atwo-wedt 
jqmewe in his hid to block an ou- 
t-of-court settlement of aSl-bOHoa 
muxnxst smt hefiicd when his Lak- 
a Airways was forced ouLofbusi- 


The Royal Court of 
Channel island where die 
can * e r.was registered and which 
must give final consent to the set- 
tlement, granted Sir Freddie's re- 
quest for a delay in signing the 
Proposed settlement - 1 
Tuesday had been the 
for Sir Freddie to accept an $8- 
minicrQ personal payment and a 


Court Puts Freeze on Assets 
Of Sanko, Suspends Creditor Gaims 


ud 


Reuters 

st2£JS£? 7? T 5i asscts of Saako 

Stramsbp Co have been frozen 
and CTemtor claims against it sus- 
pended, a court official said Toes- 

ofly, 

nr S ^ lasl week for court 
protection because of huge losses. 

It owes $12 Whoa 

^ A lawyer win watch over the 
company to make sure all assets 
remam mtaa. until the court de- 
cides whether to appoint a receiver 
or force the business into liquida- 
tion. 

Sanko operated 244 ships, about 
4 percent of the world’s shipping 
tonnage, industry sources raid. 

■ US. Detains 6 Ships 

The New York Tunes reported 
earlier from New York: 

Six ships owned or operated by 
Sanko have been detained in Amra- 


i cac p orts because of fears that the 
company will not pay its debts. 

Michael A. Rza, anef deputy at 
the federal marshal’s office in 
Brooklyn, New York, said a Sanko 
vessel had been detained in Brook- 
lyn on the basis of complaints by 
two creditors who said they woe 
owed a total of about $200,000. Mr. 
Pizzi said the company’s debts were 
primarily for stevedoring sendees. 

He said that a company can have 
a ship detained only u the shipping 
company has not paid for work 
performed cm the vessel involved. 

Five other Sanko sldps have been 
detained m . the United States, two 
in South Africa and one in Canada, 
according to Japanese reports, 
which added that the vessels would 
beheld until die debts were paid. 

Woodrow Gaskin, manager of 
Sanko operations in the United 
States, declined to c omment on the 
matter. 


Vltramar Halts Negotiations to Buy 
Gulf Canada Assets in last Provinces 


New York Times Service 

rtj NEW YORK — Ultramar Cana-. 
«a Inc. has ended negotiations with 
Gulf Canada Ltd, to buy Gtilf Can- 
ada's refining and marketing assets 
in Quebec and the Atlantic prov- 
inces, an Ult ramar official sad, 
Wiffiam 'Betty,' Ultramar’s man- 
ager of government affairs, said on 
Monday that the talk* were ralfad 
off Sunday after Gulf CanedB. ro- 
jected Ultramai’s bid for the prop- 
erties. They indude 675 service sta- 
tions in Quebec and the Atlantic 


* 


D^t^mTVaBe 

. Ratters 

PARIS — France had a sea- 
sonally adjusted trade deficit in 
July of 3.84 billion francs 
(about 5455 million) compared 
with a surplus of 424 naOion 
francs a year earlier, the Trade 
Ministry said Tuesday. 

It said imports rose to 78.14 
bAHon francs from 69.64 bfllion 
a year earlier. Exports rose to 
7430 bHUoa francs from 70.06 
billion francs a year earlier. ■ 

The July figures bring the cu- 
mulative adjusted trade deficit 
for the first seven months of the 
year to 183.4 billion francs. 


provinces and a refinery in Mbrnre- 
at 

Mr. Berry declined to state the 
amount of die bid or whether Ul- 
tramar would make another offer. 

fjingdinn ofl indus try anal ysts nut 

the value at between $300 rcullion 
and $350 mfllinn- 

*' Ultramar Canada, a subsidiary 
of Ultramar PLC, the British ener- 
gy company, owns a refinery in 
Samt-Roxnuald, Quebec, and 861 
service stations in Quebec, the At- 
lantic provinces, and Ontario. 

- The company was thought to be 
a leading contender for Gulf Cana- 
da’s H»gfBrn r efining and marketing 
assets, which were put on the block 
tins month after Olympia A: York 
nDevaopmeoisTJdU the Toronto- 
based real estate company, ac- 
quired a 603-percent stake in Gulf 
Canada from Chevron Carp, for 
$2.8 bffiion 

Robert VaUuKCt a Gulf Canada 
spokesman, said the company 
would not comment about its dis- 
cussions with Ultramar, or with 
other ladders, which he declined to 
identify. 

Hamer this month Gulf Canada 
sold its refining and marketing as- 
sets in western Canada to Petro- 
Canada, the government-owned 
company, ataprice thought to ex- 
ceed $446 mflfion. In addition, 6 
percent of Gulfs resources hold- 
ings were sold to Norc en Energy 
Resources Ltd. for $222 million. 


$48-mDlion ouwif-court settlement 
offered last month by British Air- 
ways and I I co-defendants accused 
by the cut-price air travel pioneer 
of conspiring to put him out of 
business in 1982. 

Taming the offer “pitifully in- 
adequate,* Sir Freddie last week 
failed to persuade a High Com 
judge in London to withhold ap- 
proval of the settlement, Much 
would end an antitrust case pend- 
ing in the United States. 

However, he has applied to the 
Court of Appeal in England and 
the Jersey court granted a delay 
pending its derision. It has sched- 
uled a Hearing for Sept. 4. 

Intel tend Philips Agree 
To Technology Exchange 

Reuters 

SANTA CLARA, California — 
Intel Corp. said Tuesday that it has 
entered into a multiyear a grewn^nt 
on technology and product ex- 
change with NV Philips and its 
Signed cs Corp. subsidiary. 

The agreement covers 16-bit sin- 
gle chip microcontrollers, Intel 
said. The company said Philips and 
Stgnetics will alternately manufac- 
ture. market and support four ver- 
sions of the Intel MCS-96 group of 
microcontrollers. 

Sara Lee Posts Profit Gain 

United press International 

CHICAGO — Sara Lee Corp. 
reported Tuesday record sales and 
earnings for the year ending June 
29. Formerly known as Consolidat- 
ed Foods Coro., the company said 
net sales for me year increased 16 
percent to $8.12 billion, bom S7 
billion in fiscal 1984. 


Pepsi, in Cola War Attack, 
Introduces New Coke Early 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — Pepsi-Coia opened a new front Tuesday in the cola 
war, attempting to pre-empt its main rival by "introducing" new 
formula Coca-Cola to the world wdl ahead of Coke’s official overseas 

launch 

Peosi's 16-city media launch was aimed at capitalizing on adverse 
reactions to Coke’s new formula- But Coke reacted with 
saying its product was still No. 1 in the world. 

“The new Coke is about to roll out worldwide, and we at Pepsi 
could not be happier," Peter Kendall, Pepsi's regional idee president 
for northern Europe, said in London at one of 16 test-tasting news 
conferences in cities across the globe. 

The world’s No. 2 soft-drink maker says that its sales in the United 
States jumped an unprecedented 14 percent in May and June after 
Coca-Cola introduced its new, sweeter product to Americans. 

By early July, after complaints from customers, Coca-Cola decided 
to hnng baric its 99-year-old formula 7-X that has made Coke the No. 
1 soft drink worldwide. But it is keeping the new concoction on the 
VS. and overseas market 

Coca-Cola officials appeared puzzled by Pepsi-Cola’s initiative. 
Olivier Bennon, a Coca-Cola spokesman in Paris, said it was kind of 
Pepsi to take care of Coca-Cola's publicity. “Coca-Cola takes care of 
its customers while Pepsi is busy with its competitors," he remarked. 

The new formula is already on sale in Canada and Puerto Rico and 
a Coke spokeswoman in London said its popularity was un dimin- 
ished. Coca-Cola expects to complete its official launch throughout its 
148-nation market m 16 months, she said. 

In Paris, asked how any Frenchman could prefer Pepsi to Beauio- 
iais wine, Eric Saare, president of Pcpsi-Cola France, recommended 
wine with meals and Pepsi for thirst. Mr. Saare declared a “a new 
phase of the war was lakmg place.” 

“For us, Pepsi is a small competitor" countered Coke's Mr. 
Bennon. In France alone. 210 million liters (54.6 million gallons) of 
Coke were sold last year compared to only 30 million liters of Pepsi, 
he riaimed. 


Kissinger Joins Italian Bank Advisory Board 


By Brenda Erdmann 

Intermnomi Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Banca Nazfcraale 
del Lavoro. the state-controlled in- 
stitution that is Italy's biggest 
bank, has appointed Henry A. Kis- 
singer to its international advisory 
board. 

Formed in 1984. the board ad- 
vises the bank on economic and 
social conditions in countries 
where it operates. 

Mr. Kissinger, a former U.S. sec- 
retary of stare, is chairman of the 
board of Kissinger Associates Inc., 
which gives political advice to gov- 
ernments. 

ASEA AB» the Swedish electri- 
cal-engineering and electronics 
group, has named Lais H. Tbnnell 
to the new post of executive vice 
president, responsible for finance. 
Since 1983, he has been finance 
director at ASEA and general man- 
ager of the finance department In 
his new post Mr. Thunell becomes 
a member of ASEA’s corporate 
management 

Republic National Bank of New 
York has set up a subsidiary in 
Luxembourg, offering banking ser- 
vices for wealthy individuals. Re- 
public National Bank of New York 
(Luxembourg) SA is beaded by 
Leon Weyer, who left Gulf Bank 
KSC of Kuwait last year. The new 
unit's board has four members — 
Richard Spikerman, executive rice 
president of the parent in New 


York: Jeon Hoss, a Luxembourg 
lawyer: Jacques TawiL an executive 
in the bank's London branch, and 
Mr. Weyer. 

Amsterdam-Roaenbta Bank NV 
said Yoji Oka has joined the bank 
in Japan as representative institu- 
tional banking division, a new posi- 
tion. He will be based in the bank's 
Tokyo representative office, where 
he will be active mainly in servicing 
Japanese institutional investors. 
Formerly, he was president of 
Daiwa Europe NV in Amsterdam. 
He was succeeded as head of 
Daiwa's operations in the Nether- 
lands by Shusri Saito. 

Wells Fargo Bank NA said Elson 
Ng. its Singapore representative, 
has been promoted to vice presi- 
dent. senior representative and 
manager of its Singapore regional 
representative office. Mr. Ng will 
coordinate the San Francisco- 
based bank's trade-related and cor- 
respondent-banking services in 
Singapore, Brunei, Indonesia, Ma- 
laysia and Thailand. 

Standard Chartered Bank of 
London has appointed Alan Plumb 
manager , merchant banking divi- 
sion, South Korea and director and 
representative in South Korea for 
S tandar d Chartered Asia Ltd He 
will be responsible for the estab- 
lishment oi the group merchant- 
banking presence in South Korea 
and the development of corporate 
business. Mr. Plumb is on second- 


ment from Standard Chartered 
Merchant Bank Ltd. 

Saab-Scania AB, the Swedish ve- 
hicle maker, said its aircraft divi- 
sion has formed a collaborative- 
programs sector to strengthen the 
company’s ability to handle further 
subcontracted business. 

American Express Co. has 
named G. Richard Thoman presi- 
dent of the international division of 
its American Express Travel Relat- 
ed Sendees Co. unit, responsible 
for all the unit's activities outside 
the United States. 

National Westminster Bank PLC 
of Britain has appointed Don 
Goodman senior executive, subsid- 
iaries and affiliates!, in its interna- 
tional banking division. Succeed- 
ing Mr. Goodman as financial 
controller ctf that division is Keith 
ShackeU. 

British Caledonian Airways has 
named Arnold Sheead director of 
engineering, succeeding Norman 
Jackson, who left the carrier. Mr. 
Sheead turns over his duties as 
chief engineer to Martyn Hurst 


South African Prime Is Cut 

Reuters 

JOHANNESBURG — Major 
South African banks said Tuesday 
that they trill cut their prime rate to 
19.5 percent from 21 percent effec- 
tive Sept 2. 


Deere Reports Fall in Net 

The Associated Press 

MOLINE Illinois — Deere & 
Co. said Tuesday its third-quarter 
ea rning s fdl to $4.5 million. Deere 
said the earnings in the quarter 
ended July 31 meant income of 6 
cents a share for stockholders and 
came on sales of about 51 biffioa 
In the same period of 1984, Deere 
earned $29.4 minion, or 43 cents a 
share, on sales of $1 billion. 


COMPANY NOTES 


Boognmffle Copper Ltd. said a 

48- percenr drop in first half profit 
stemmed from lower gold assays 
and prices, lower concentrate ship- 

■ menfn «nd reduced sales. Bougain- 
ville reported profit of 8.05 million 
Puma New Guinea kina ($7.92 
million), down from 16.6 million 
kina for the 1984 period. 

Broken 239 1%. said it had 
agreed to buy Getty Oil Co.'s 50- 
percent stake in the Escondida cop- 
per project in Chile. Getty is a 
subsidiary of Texaco Inc. 

Caa^rffi Tefefdnica Nackmal 
de Espafia, the telephone company 

49- percent owned by the Spanish 
government, has placed 10 million 
shares cm the Frankfurt Stock Ex- 
change, and plans to apply for a 
Tokyo^ listing next month, a com- 
pany spokesman said. 

Dofasco Inc. of Canada has 
bought a license for a steelmaking 
process from Kl&eckner CRA 
Technotogie GmbH, a joint ven- 
ture of KlOckner-Wexke AG and 
CRA Ltd. of Australia, KlOckner 
said. 

Du Pont Co. has received per- 
mission from the Taiwan govern- 
ment to set up a $160-mniioa tita- 
nium dioxide plant in central 
Taiwan, a government s p o ke s m a n 
said. 

Entoprise 03 PLC has bought 
3 J3 million ordinary shares in Sax- 
on CHI PLC at 540 peace ($7.57) 
each, or 1491 percent, a statement 
from Enterprise said. 

Hciwa Sogo Bank Ltd of Japan 


is undergoing a regular inspection 
by the Finance Ministry, ministry 
officials said They denied press 
reports that the inspection was 
moved up from October, after 
charges in the Diet in May that the 
hank had maria questionable loans. 

Nissan Diesel Motor Ca, Toyo 

Mwita Kaidia Tiri. and fi han d- 

hare Nissan Ltd will sign a joint- 
venture agreement next month to 
assemble rffcyt trucks in Pakistan, 
a Nissan Diesel spokesman said 

NV PhSps Gtoeaa mp e nfa b rik cn 
is to arrange a domestic braid issue 
through a bank syndicate that is 
bong put together, Dutch bond 
market sources said 

RacaT Electronics PLC expects 
record profit and sales in the region 
of £13 billion ($11 billion) in the 
current financial year after record 
performance in the year en de d 
March 31, when it boosted net 
profit by 11 percent and sales by 
35.7 percent, according to its chair- 
man, Ernest Harrison. 

Harhette and Rupert Murdoch 
are jointly publishing American 
Elk, a monthly fashion and styk 
magazine that went on sale Tues- 
day in the United States. 

Volkswagen AG and its subsid- 
iary Audi AG are recalling one mil- 
lion cars worldwide for decks on 
possible damage to brake hoses, a 
VW spokesman said The cars are 
VWs Golf, Jetta, Sdrocco and Pas- 
sat models and Audi's 80 and 100 
models, buDt between March 1983 
and May 1984. 


ADVERTISEMENT 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) August 20,1985 

Net auet value quo tot too* are supplied by me Funds listed with me exception at mine quotes based oa Issue price. 

The marginal symbols Indicate frequency of quotations supplied :(d) - daily; (w) -weekly; (b) td-montWy; tr) - regularly; (I) - Irreooiorty. 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 

■!«> Al-Mol Trust. XA S 164.45 

BANK JULIUS BAER C CO. LM. 

-Id I Boer-bond SF 89055 

-I d ) Conbar — SF 118150 

-< d I Eoui&aef America SflCMM 

SF 1217.00 
SF 1 14V.00 
SF 975 CO 
SF 152850 

. S 1055 
SF 8435 
. S 1157 

. S 12.02 
. S 17.19 
. S 99.92 
. S 1*451 
S 1031 Zt 


-( d ) Equlboer Europe . 
-Id) Eauiboer Pociiic- 

-Id i &robor_ 

-Id I Stackbor . 


BANQUE INDDSUEZ 
■{ d I Aslan Growth Fund. 

-Iwl Di-eraond— 

-tw) FiF-Amgrlro . _ 


-Iwl FIF-Euro. _ 

-|wt FIF-Pocllic 

•I d » indosue, Mulftbonds A . 

-I d I indocuez MulliDortOs B 

-id) indosuei USD (A4M.FI 

Bf?f taNni a.pos 271. St. Heller, Jersey 


-Iw) Brii Dailor Income, 
-i wi Brlt.SMtonaB.Curr. 


S 0590 
S 976 
S 1.114 
1 11X7 

5 1594 

S 0508 

-<w) Bm avwiqq-Cu rrenev t 1431 

-I e ) Bril. Jo Port Dir Perl. Fd s 0.978 

-fwj Brlljersev Gilt Fund i <L22- 

-( d i Brit. World Lois. Fund S 1.181 

■let Bril. World Team. Fvna s 0739 


•Id 1 Bril. Ini 15 ManoOJtortf 

-C d i Bril, inllx Manna. Portl 

-(* 1 Bril. Am. Inc- A Fd Ltd 

-<w) Brll.GoW Fund. 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

-lw| Capital Inll Fund S 

■<u»| Cosltal Halid SA S 


39.12 

1554 


CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) 

-Id) Actions Sulsses SF 41450 

-Id) Bond Valor Swf SF 10655 

-Id) Bond Valor D-mark DM113.16 

-Id) Bond VOtor US-DOLLAB S 13L46 

-t d i Bond Valor Ven_ Yen 1095650 

•I d ) Convert Valor Swf SF 11770 

-t d > Convert Valor U5-DOLLAR. S 1)959 

- SF 741 -0Q 

If ,B 3 

S 1081. 


!aj CS Fonas-tnrt 

■Id] cl Maw Market Fund ~DM 104950 

•l d ) CS Money Market Fund 

-Id ) Enerple-Volor 

-101 ywee 


-Id) Europc-Vator. 


c 101750 

IPiSS 

SF 15775 
SF 151.00 


DREXEiTbURNHAM LAMBERT INC 

CSSSSSTe W3WS5T" 811 

I €S 

•lm) Winchester Financial LldL — S 1X27 

_-<*J Winchester Holdlnaa FF T0446 

. s 1134 

•4v>) Worldwide Securities s/s 3Vj_ s 4552 
-twl Worldwide Special s/s 2VS — 5 163554 
DIT INVESTMENT FFM 

-+!d) Caocentro DM 78.76 

-+(d 1 Inn Rentenfooa DM 9X07 

Dunn A Horpitt t Lloyd Gooroe. Brussels 

-lm) DAH Commodity pool 5311*5 — 

-lm) Currency & Gold Pool 5 167.90 — 

-Inn WindL Ufe Ful. Pool 5S7753 — 

-lm) Trans World Fut. Pool 590753 — 

BBC TRUST CO. MERSEY) LTD. 

1-3 Scale S15I. Heller; 0534-36231 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 

6(d line.: Bid S 1044Offer $10763 

@l dICop.: BM_ — S 11 S3 Offer 511586 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 

-Id) Short Term ’A’ (ACCum) S 14920 

-l d ) Sbort Term ’A' (DlstrV S 0.9968 

-Id) Shwi Term 'B' (Acann) S 17191 

•I d ) Short Term 'B' (Distr) S 07077 

-Iw) Long Ter m- — = 5 2275 

FAC MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
1. Laurence Pountv HllL EC*. 01-62X4680 . 

-tw) FACAriontlC s 1142 

-|w) F8.C European- — S 1278 

-Jm») R 8«C Orlenlal S 27m 

FIDELITY FOB 671 NamUftm Bermuda 
■lm) American Values Common.. 2 95 DO 


•KnlAmer Values Cum.Pret S 10196 

-( d 1 Fidelity Amer. Assets s 6*14 

-< a I Fidelity Australia Fund $ ia.47 

-<d 1 Fidelity Discovery Fund__ S 1077 

-( d I Fidelity Dir. Svps.Tr S 12577 

-Id) Fldellly Far East Fund 5 2063 

-Id I Fidelllv infl. Fund 5 6A84 

-I d 1 Fidelity Orient Fund S 2755 

-Id ) Fidelity Frontier Fund 5 1X4S 

-I d ) Fidelity Pacific Fund S 13UM 

-Id) Fidelity Sod. Growth Fd S 1455 

-Id) Fidelity World Fund 5 3X84 

FORBES PO B887 GRAND CAYMAN 
London Apen) 01-B39-3073 
-I wi Dollar Income _______ 

-|W) Forbes Won inc. Gilt Fd 

■IwICoU Income _ 


I vr I Gold Appreciation 

-tml strorealc Trading 

GEF1NOR FUNDS. 

-Iw) East Investment Fund. 

-Cwi Scottish World Fima 

Iw) Store St. American . 


769- 
0.971 
87T 
S 4.64 
S 1.15 

S 337.95 
t 11377 
S 16550 


CoPILTrust J-flLLondon : 01 -4914230, 
Genevo:41-223555B0 
GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. 
PB 119. St Pater Port, Guernsey, 0401-28715 

-tmt FlitwGAM SA S 12558 

-lm) GAM Ami trope me - s 12764 

-Iw) GAMerica Inc S 13973 

-twt GAM Australia Inc S 9973 

-4w) GAM Boston Inc S 11073 

|w) GAM Ermitooe S 1X17 


-(w) GAM Franc- vo I SF 10465 

-Iw) GAM Hong Kona Inc. 5 9952 

-id 1 GAM international Inc S >17.78 

-Iw) GAM Jtmon Inc. S 99.19 


Iw) GAM Norm Amer ico Inc — S 1D668 
I w ) GAM M. America Unit TruSt_ 1D7JU P 
-<w) GAM Pacific Inc | 11653 


-lm) GAMrlnt. 


11055 



iwi GAMSinaaPore/MoloY Inc 5 9958 

C w ) GAM Sterl & Inll Unit Trust 134O0- p 

Hmi GAM Systems Inc - S 10454 

-f w) GAM Worldwide Inc 5 15869 

■int) GAM Tvefie XA. Class A S 12254 

G-T. MANAGEMENT (UK) LKL 

-Id) Berry PooFaUi S 960 

-i r 1 G.T. Applied Science S 14.16 

-(d) G.T. Asean H.K. GwtfLFd S 1268 

(d) G.T. Aski Fimd S 4XQ 

-(d) G.T. Australia Fund t 2X27 

-t a ) G.T. Europe Fund. 5 1)57 

-|w)G.T. Euro. Small Cos. Fund. S 1X97 

-( r) G.T. Dollar Fund. 

-tatG.T. Bond Fund 

-(d I G.T. Glooal Tcdinlgy Fl 
-( d ) G.T. Honshu Pathfinder. 

-( d I G.T. Inve stmen t Fund 

■i w ) G.T. Japan Small Co. Fund _ 

-I r ) G.T. Tectmotoov Fund 

-la) G.T. South Chino Fund 

KILL SAMUEL INVEST. MGMT. INTL. ! 
Jersey. PC Box 61 TH 0534 76029 

Berne, P.O. Bax 3622. Tel 4131 224051 

Id) Crossbow (Far East] SF 979 

-(d) C5F (Bolonced) SF 25 64 

-fd) Ininl. Bond Fund 5 ia.ll- 

-t d i int. Currency U5. S 2X31 

-1 2 1 o^Fd^T^lpicAn: l ^ 
JARDINE FLEMING. FOB 70 GPO H« Kg 

( r I J.F Currency* Bond . I 

-( r ) J.F Hona Kona Trust 5 37.17 

-i r ) J.F Jaa&Poc Canv Y 

■trl J-FJaiwn Trust Y 4377 

I r ) J.F Jaoan Technology Y 17517 

-( r I J.F Padlic SecS-(Aee) S 554 

LLOYDS BANK INTL. POB 08. Geneva 11 

+lw) Lloyds Inti Dollar S 11X60 

-4-lwi Llovds I mi Europe SF 11660 

-+-[») Lloyds Inll Growth SF 17050 

-+(wl Llovds Infl Income SF 31550 

-H w ) UWB Infl N. Amerlco S 10450 

-H«l Lloyds mri Pacific — — SF 12160 
-+(w)Liovas mix Smaller Cos__ s 1452 
NtMARBEN 

Id) Class A 5 8967 


(w) Class B - 115. 

(w ) Class C ■ Japan. 


OBLIFLEX LIMITED 

-twi Multicurrency 

Iw) Dollar Medium Term. 

-Iw) c-oilor Lang Term 

I w) Japanese Yen 

(w> Pound Sterling 

(wl Deutsche Mark -■ 

|w> Dutcn Florin 

-tw) Swiss Fronts 


.5 10022 
.5 B459 


S 1153 

5 1054 

S 1X90 

— S 1128 
__t 1056 
DM 1066 


— FL 1051 

.sf iaoo 


ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
PB 85578. The Hague (070) 469670 

Id l Sever BrleoDlnaerrM- 3 3250 

PARI5BAS-GROUP 

-Idl Cortexa International 8 0867 

-fprfOBLI-OM DM 123257 

-<w) OBLIGESTION SF 94X5 

•iw) OBLI-DOLLAR 5119956 

-(wl OBLI-YEN Y 10389650 

-(w) OBLI-GULDEN — FL 110566 

Id) PAROIL-PUND S 901 

-Id) PARINTER FUND S 11X19 

•Id) PAR US Treasury Bend S 10X56 

ROYAL B. CANADAJKJB 24XGUERN5EY 

-4-1 w) RBc Canadian Fund Ltd S 11X6 

-+(») RBC For EastXPodnc Fd. 5 11.13 

-H w> RBC Infl Capital Fd 8 22.79* 

-+Cw) RBC infl incemoFd. S 1151 

-H d ) RBC Mon.Currenev Fd-__ 5 2459 

-+(w) RBC North Amer. Fd._ 5 9X7- 

SKANDIFOND INTL FUND (MA-XtCCT) 

-(w)lnc.: Bid S 557 Otter 5 X97 

(wlAcC.: Bid S 539 Offer S 5.99 

SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

17 Devonshire Sa6london-01 -377-8IM0 

-( r > SHB Bong Fund ... .5 2451 

-IwlSHB Inll Growth Fund S 2X56 

SWISS BANK CORF- (ISSUE PRICE5) 

-Id 1 Amen co- Vo lor SF 50075 

-(d) D-Mark Bond Selection _ DM 121X7 
-(d) Dollar Said Select ton ___ S 13191 

-Idl Florin Bond Selection FL 12555 

■Id) Inlrrvolor. . ... .. ... SF 8275 

fri I Inrmn PnrHaDr, SF 90)55 

-i d ) Sieriina Bond Seiectton t 10X07 

-(d) Swiss Foreign Bond Sol SF 10861 

-(d) Swfcsvo for New Series SF 33X25 

•(d) Universal Bond Select SF 8350 

-I d ) Universal Fund SF 11554 

-(d) Yen Band Selection Y 1829450 

UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

-Id) Amco U3. Sh. SF 3550 

-Id) Bond-Invest 
( a ) Fansa Swiss Sh. 

-(d) Joaqt)- I nvest 


IV i JUNWrillTCJ* 

(d)5om South Afr.Sh,. 


SF 6X75 
SF 15030 
SF 84930 

_ _____ SF 36250 

(d)SiRia (stack M-'lCi) SF 20730 

UNION INVBSTMENT Frankfurt 

-Id) Unirento I ... . 

•( d ) urttfands DM 2570 

rid) Untrak DM 7860 


-Id) UNI2 


Other Funds 


JM 11570 


(w)Actlbands Investments Fund. S 2269 

|w) Act (vest Inti S 1131 

(ml Allied Ltd. — S X80 

Ivn Auuiio international Fund, — s 150.17 

I r ) Arab Finance !JF S 88)37 

I r 1 Artone — _ — — S 1741X6 

(w) Trustccr Infl Fd. (AE1F) S 1IL18 

(w) BNP Uttar band Fund 5 11X29 

iwi Bendseleii- Issue Pr.____ 5F 13420 

(ml Canodo Gtd-Mortoage Fd S 963 

(djCaWtalPreserv.Ftf.inft 5 M3) 

CW) Citadel Fund S 152 

I d 1 CJ.R. Austral lo Fund S 1036 

< d ) CJ.R. Jooon Fund S 10X3 

lm) Cleveland Offshore Fd._ *211237 

(w) Columbia Securities FL ID4J8 

IriCOMETE S 767.18 

(w| Convert. Fd inn A Crrts S 1058 

lw> Convert. F<L IntTS Certs s 2955 

f wl Dalwo Japan Fund Y 10514 

IW) D.G.C. — S B756 

(d) a Wilier Wld Wide MTsl . — S 7)55 

( r ) Drgkkar Invest.Fund N.V *114138 


( a ) Dreytus America Fund. 
(d> Dreyfus Fund inti.. 


S 1059 

, _ 5 39.19 

«wi Dreyfus (nferoonWntnr. S 34.15 

iw) The Establishment Trust S 1.1 a 

id) Europe Obitoottons— Ecu 6161 

(w) First Eoale Fund S IX16I35 

tr) Fifty Stars Ltd * 880.45 

(wl Fixed income Trent . S 1031 

(w) Fonseles issue Pr. SF 17330 

Iw) Forextund — ■ 5 733 

Iw) Forme lo Seiectton Fd._ SF 6768 

(d I Foodlttilto 5 2950 

< d ) Govern m. lee. Pirns* s 9120 

tdi FmnkFTrusI Inlerzlrts DM **32 

(w) Houssmonn Hides. N.V S 12468 

(w)Hestto Funds s links 

(w) Horizon Fund J 123069 

(ml IBEX Hotting* Lid SF 11136 

I r i ILA inll Gold Bond 

Crl ILA-IGS 


( r ) ILA-IGS- 


S 

* 

(d) Interfund SA S 

(w) intarmorfcet Fund * 

( d ) Interminkia MuL Fd. CL"B‘_ S 
(r> infl Securities Fund _ — __ 8 

d) Investa DWS DM 

r ) invest AttanUgues. S 

r ) ) to) fortune InH Fux) 56 S 

iw) Japan Selection Fund S 

(w) Japan Padlic Fund * 

(mijeftarPtns.lnfi.LXil 5 1121 _ 

Id) Klefnworl Benson Inn FH__ * 22X9 

Iw) Klelnworl Bens. job. Fd. t 72.11 

(wl Korea Growth Trust KW 830036 

( d ) Leicom Fund 

(w) Leverage Cop Hold 
(d) Uaulbanr 
Iw) Luxfund 

(ml Mngnofund N.V. 

id I M e di o l a nu m SeL Fd. 

IriMoieoro 

(wl NAAT 

(d ) Nlkko Growth Package Fd_ 

Iw) Nippon Fund 

(m) NOSTEC Portfolio 

iw) Nnvetac Inve s t m ent Fund 

(w) NJLM.F— 

(mj MSP F.l.T 

(d) Pacific Horizon Invt. Fd. 

(w) PANCURRI Inc 



r 1 Partan Sw. R Est Geneva^ 
i r)pemm Value N.V- 

i r I Pletade 

iwi PSCO Fund N.V. 

tw) P5CO InttutV. 

(d) Putnam mn Fund 
i r ) Prt-Tech,. ^ 

(w> Quantum Fund N.V. 

(d) Renta Fund 

( d ) R»i1UivesJ . 

(d> Reserve Insured Deposits-— S II 
( d I Rudolf Wolff Fut Fd Ltd— — *124 

(wl Samurai Portfolio SF IB 

(d) SCl/Tech.SA Luxembourg. S 


Iw) Seven Arrows Fund N.V S 763 

(wl State St- Bank Equity HdgsNV — Sf 
w) Strategy Investment Fund — S 

d) Syntax UdL'ICIcns A) 1 — 5 

w) Techno Growth Fund — — . SF 
w > Tokyo Poc. Hold. ISea). 
w) Tokyo Poc. Hoid. N-V — 
w) Transoocfflc Fax) 


d ) Turquoise Fund, 
w) Tweedy .Browne 


w) Twemfy3rowne mv.aassB— 
ml Tweedy Browne (UJC.1 n,v — . _ 

d) UNICO Fund DM 

d) UN) Bond Fund *10. 

r) UNI capital Fund *114 

w) Vanderbilt Assets — * 

d ) World Fund SA. — S 


DM- Deutsche Mark; BF - Belgium Francs; FL - Dutch Florin; LF - Luxembourg Francs; ECU - European i Currency Unit; SF - Swiss Frona: o-nstasd; + -Otter Prtaes;b; bkt change 
PAtSID tall per unit; NA -nw AvoitoWe; NX. - NoiComruunicutedro • New; S- suspended; S/S • Stock Split; * - Ex-Dlvk)end; — ■ Ex-Rf*;*’*- Gross PrrtamK* 

Redempl- Price- Ex -Coupon; •• - Formerly Worldwide Fund Ltd; 0 - OHor Price tad. 3% prelim, choree; ++ - dally stack price nan AmstenJom Stack Exchange 


■iu-macnan 
i Inde* July: « 


New issue 
August 21, 1985 


This advertisement appears 
as a matter of record only. 


! EUROPEAN INVESTMENT BANK 

^ Luxembourg 

I divj 200,000,000 

I 6%% Deutsche Mark Bearer Bonds of 1985/1997 


Interest: PriCe ffH% p.a.. payable annually on August 22 

FrankfurtaieMai n, Beriin. DQsseldorf, Hemburs on ti MQnchen 



Deutsche Bank 

AkttonQeselbchaft 

Commerzbank 

AktiengeseUscheft 


Dresdner Bank 

AlettongeMteehaft 

Westdeutsche Landes bank 
Girozentrafe 


Arab Banking Corporation - 

• QausftCo. GmbH 

• Bankfarfiomainwlrtsdiaft 

• AWengesdtedieft 

• 

• Bayoriscbe Weroinsbank 

j -n-— 

• tJelbiuckACo. 

5 Hamburg is che Landosbank 

l -Giraxontrale- 

• Bankhaus Heonann Lamp* 

• Kommanditges^lschatt 

‘ Merck. RnckaCa 

• sal- Oppenhelm jr. &Cie- 
! Trinkaus S> Burkhardt 


Baden-WQrttainbefgtecTie Bank 
AktiengeseiEschaft 
Bayerische Hypotheken- und 
Wtechsel-Bank 
Aktiengeseilschaft 

joh. Berenberg, GosslerACo. 

Bankhaus Gebriidor Bethmann 
Deutsche Girowntrale 

_ Deutsche Kommunalbftnk - 
Georg HauckiSohn Baitidera 
Kommanditgeseffschaft but Akben 
Landeabank Phafnland4*fBlZ 
-Giro»ntrale- 
B, Metzlor seeL SohnftCo. 

Simonbank 

AJctjengBsellscbart 

Vfe reins- und Vifeatbank 

Akfiengesdlschaft 

Wtestfalenbank 

Aktrengesailacbaft 


Bsdtechs Kommunale Landesbank 
- Girowntrala - 
. Bayerische Landes bank 
Girozentrale 

Berliner Bank 
Aktiengeseflschaft 
CSFB-Eftectenbank AG 
DG Bank 

Deutsche Genossenschaftsbank 
Hessischa Landes bank 
-Gtroxentrale- 
Landesbank Saar Girozentrale 

Norddetrtsche Landesbank 

Girozentrale 

J.R Stein 

M.M. Warburg-Brinckmarm. Wirt* & Co. 
















This announcement is neither an offer to sell nor a solicitation of an offer to buy these securities. 
The Offer is made only by the Prospectus. 


August 14, 1985 


1,000,000 Shares 

Nutul 

International Mobile Machines Corporation 


Common Stock 


Price $7,125 Per Share 


Copies of the Prospectus may be obtained in any State in which this announcement is circulated 
only from such of the undersigned as may legally offer these securities in such State. 


Bear, Stearns & Co. 
Prndential-Bache 

Sccwftin 


Butcher & Singer Inc. 

Drexel Burnham Lambert 

lucorponled 

Shearson Lehman Brothers inc. 


Blunt Cilis & Loewi 

iMwporaicd 


E. F. Hutton & Company Inc. 
Hoare Govett Limited 

W. H. Newbold’s Son & Co., Inc. 


Ticker, Anthony & R. L Day, Inc. 

Raymond, James & Associates, Inc. Reinheimer Nordberg Inc. Schneider, Bernet & Hickman, Inc. 

Wheat, First Securities, Inc. 

Broadchild Securities Corp. freimaxk Blair & Company, Inc. 


Sutro & Co. 

iMorpmied 


Anderson & Strudwick 

tnoorporatarf 

Lepercq, deNeaflize Secnrities Inc. Scott & StringfeHow, Inc. Swergold, Chefitz & Smsabangh, Inc. 


4 






Floating-Rate. \otes 


“BPOuHw Bid ASM 


Aug. 30 I nurnnm. 


CMMlkal Bid Asm 


V 


& 3pc 



Now affirm# 

CBOT 

BOND 

FUTURES 

MK3M & BBSS 

FUTURES 

OPTIONS 

Also Futures and 
Futures Options on 
COMEX-GOLD & SILVER 
IMM -CURRENCIES 


rfrr 






Rt K'Nl* TURN 
llAY AND 
iJVKRNUJHT 


7 *- R*K.'J 

ift f ^ HAY A 

JjoJ i WEB 


'Apptta intfr ttt tntdrx 
CKmfmp - ,so rroiwaiU per 
ca/mAnr n ninth First JO 1 
vtmtntm J.'i n<itm! turn. 


<i!l ime >■! nurpmfcvJonah 

2 1 2-22 1 -7 1 38 

Teiex: 




ciFMtaKKiNrna 

Bepattc fettead Bank of fcw Mi 

A S I - Bilb.ni ( Mimimnl ILmk 


b*- 


CEE 




L.S. Futures 


Season 

Season 

**20 

Utah 

UW 

Open Hloti La«, Close Cha. 


Grains 


WHEAT ICBT) . 

54W bu mUrtmum- collars per buihef 
3X6** 180V] S«P US Z46SS 

X*3Vj inva dk zam 1M& 

3X*ta IW6 Mar 104 IMft 

4 JB 154 /Mov If? twv» 

172*1 145 Jui 2JSi 1« 

145 ZJTti Sep Zlt* W*i 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 842* 

Prev.Dav Open Inf. 394B» up 12* 

corn tears 

tODObu minimum- dollars per btssrief 
1211* 123 Sea 13 HU 132 


19S 121 

118 130 

3X1*6 Z3**i 

156 243V. 

156 V*} 125 

22» 22014 

Esl. Sales. 


Dee 122Vj ZZ1V, 
Mar 2XIU. 132 
MOV 13584 236U 
Jul 13681 1371* 
Sep 126 VS 136V. 
Dec 123 213 

Prev. Soles 18450 


Non Dollar 


Prev. Day Open int.12B.044 up 362 
soybeans (can 

5400 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
7J6 5.16 Aue 5.17 S3 0 

4.71 i0584 Sep 505 50446 

648 £09 Nov 5M MOW 

6.7V 5.18 Jan 5.14V* il?4 

743 SOS Mot 5 33 5X9 

7-79 SJ5V, MOV SJSVi 5X7 

45S SJfte Jul 5L3BVS Ml 

6.74 S4fl* Aug 5J4V* 5X7 

6XS 5X5 S*P 

602 525 Nav 5JH4 S3 A 

ESI. Sales Prev. Sales 15.04 

Prev. Dov Open Int. 64480 eH 140 
SOYBEAN MEAL ICBT} 

100 tons- dol lari per ton 
180X0 117.70 Aug 121X0 13130 

179JC 12060 Sep 12180 123X0 

180X0 12130 Oct 124X0 124X0 

184X0 126X0 Dec 124X0 127X0 

143X0 127X0 Jon 128X0 129X0 

206X0 130X0 MOT 130X0 131.90 

162X0 13150 May 132X0 134X0 

147X0 134X0 Jul 134X0 13450 

141X0 135X0 AU9 

167X0 139X0 Sep 138X0 13800 

Est. Sales Prev. Soles 5. 751 

Prev. Day Open inL 41,213 up2Bf 
SOYBEAN OIL tesn 
60X00 lbs- dollars per MB lbs. 

31X5 22X2 Aug 2225 2240 

31. H) 2121 Sep 2125 22X0 

30X7 2118 Od 2115 2148 

29X5 2120 Dec 2112 2150 

29X7 2131 J«l 22X0 2160 

2840 2151 MOT 2155 2180 

2745 2175 Mav 227S 1186 

25X5 2190 Jul 23X0 23X5 

25.15 2193 Aug 23.10 23.10 

34X5 22X4 Sep 2190 2190 

Est. Sales Prev. Soles 8X51 

Prev. Dov Open Int. SL2B2 aft 259 
OATS (Cm 

5X00 bu minimum- dal tars per Oustiel 
179 1.141* Sep 1.19W 1.1944 

1X2*, 1X4 Dec 1X7VS 1.28 'A 

1X744 1X6*2 Mar 1X9 V, 1X9 Vi 

1X3 IX7V* MOV 1X914 1X9 Vi 

1.30V, 1X8V, Jul 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 444 

Prev. Day Open InL 3X52 up 12 


2X0 -2X016 -JIT Vi 

sju im> ’—in 

1941* Hi 

ZTIVk 172 

2X4 174 —2WV, 


X30M — JKH* 
122 — jnv 
23BPA — JrtV. 
2X5W — XI 
134** -JB** 
2241*-— JB2V. 
2304* —021* 


5.11V, — JUI* 
544 — JR 
SM .—01 
5.17*6 —40V. 
5XBV* 

136 —001* 

539 —01*4 

5X4 —01** 

5X4 

5X3 +41 


130X0 120X8 
170X0 121X0 
12150 123.10 
125X0 126.10 
127X0 127X0 
130X0 13070 
132X0 132-58 
135X0 135X0 
137X0 
138X0 138X0 


enen •nut 
2116 2148 
2112 2142 
2112 2137 

9i« n cn 
22X5 2177 

2175 2175 
2195 23X0 
2192 2292 
2190 2190 


1.19 1.19 —00*4 

1X7 1X7V. —01 

1X9 1X9 —110*4 

1X9 1X9 —00*4 

1X616 — XOVS 


*8-25 


1SSXS 136XO 13*30 »HS Xjf* 


Metals 


COPPERtCOMHX) 

25X00 lbs.- cents per lb. 

6115 S5.65 Aug 

8110 57X0 Sep 99X0 59X0 

Oct 

84X5 5BX0 Dee 40X5 61.10 

MXB .. 99X0 Jan 

aaoa 59X0 Alar 6txs 4105 

74X0 el. 10 May *2X5 62X0 

-74X0 61X0 Jul 6190 63X0 

70.9C - 62X0 5e» 6335 4140 

70X0 6170 Dec 64X5 64X5 

70X8 - 44X0 Jan 

67.90 65.10 MOT 

_«7 X0;' 6190 M0v 

Sates Prev. Sales 13X34 

Prev. Day Onen Int 79 am off 73 


59X5 
59X5 *j-™ 

S3 

61X5 61X5 
42X0 6145 

6185 41«0 

63X5 6140 
44X5 64.15 

44X5 
.. . 64.75 
65.15 


AUTO SHIPPING 


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Tat (0)421/14264 The 246584 Tram D 
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Smousino 36“ A 44" 
arnvxred oars and Irmouines 
Gooch buJf can 
Other mates & exotics 

Over 100 unit in stack 
World wide dafiwy 
Direct from source 
D.O.T. & EPA 

Tet tondpnfMfl) 629 7779 
Telex pi) a&atm HAS G. 

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Transas SA. 95 Noordeloan, 

Tel Z23JM ^^HANS B 


CATTLE (CME1 
40000 lbs.- cents per lb. 

67X7 50.72 Aug 54X2 5480 

45X0 5145 Oct 55.95 56X5 

6785 55.15 Dee 57X5 5H.15 

67^5 56X0 F«b 58X0 54X0 

67.57 57X0 APT 59.70 59X0 

£6X5 5110 Jun 6030 6030 

4540 5170 Aue 59.10 99.10 

Esl. Sales 11,954 Prev. Sates 76X43 
Prev. Day Openin'. 42X70 up 230 
FEEDER CATTLE <CMEJ 
44800 itat- cents per lb. 

7170 5BX0 Allfl 4580 4580 

7100 57.45 Sap 6100 4160 

7132 57.15 Oct 6185 6115 

7120 56X0 Nov 6115 6150 

7980 6060 JOO 4470 6480 

7055 61.18 Mar 6580 6580 

7085 61.15 APT 4485 6585 

46X5 61X0 May 64.10 64.10 

Est. sales 1878 Prev. Salas 1810 
Prev. Day Open InL 7817 oft 124 
HOGS (CME) 

30800 fbs.- cants per lb. 

54X7 41X2 Aug 4140 4385 

5175 3145 Od 3630 3685 

5085 3880. Dec 38J0 79X0 

50X7 40.35 Feb 40X0 4065 

47X5 37X0 Apr 37X7 37X2 

4985 4040 Jun 4072 4080 

4985 4080 Jul 41X5 41X5 

57X0 40X5 Aug 40X0 4080 

41.10 3090 Od 39.15 39.15 

Est. Solo 3X51 Prev. Soles 7X88 
Prev. Day Open Int. 19X51 off 214 



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To the Greek Wands & Turkey. Saitng 
every Monday & Friday from Praeus 

PfcOS * <W * y AflBrt 01 

j far- Sennas Sl. Ath ens 1056 2 
Tete x: 215621, Phone 3228883. 

Pans ml 265 90 3o 
Murveh tel 399 811 
Geneva tefc 327 110 
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r» ’ vn i rngg gpyr 71? 


KgjyA. SAFAW I week eamdnj 
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PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 

Option & strftoe 

uadsrtytog Price Co D b— L ast 

1MN BrOlsb pauads^nts permriL* 0 * 
BPaund 11a r r r 

13989 115 2380 2480 X 

13989 120 1985 r 1980 

139JN 125 1X80 14.10 1480 

13989 130 880 1040 11.15 

13989 135 00 7X5 180 

13989 140 1.55 480 640 

13989 US r 180 r 

13989 150 r 1X5 r 

SB800 r npp riton DoUcn-centeper ualL 
CDaJlr 72 r r r 

Tun n r r r 

7181 74 r r r 

62JM west German Maricxents per eeit. 
DMark 30 C US X 

35.99 31 583 r r 

3SJ*. 32 199 480 r 

35X9 J3 U5 38 r 

35.99 34 2J8 2X2 r 

35.99 35 1X3 281 X 

35X9 36 084 1,50 282 

35X9 37 0.18 1J90 r 

35.99 38 r r 1JB 

6XSBXM Japanese Ygn-TSaths of a cent pei 
JYen 48 r 244 r 

42.15 41 1X2 r r 

4Z15 42 044 183 X 

42.15 43 0.12 081 r 

OJS .44 r 0X4 044 

tvLSOi Seriss FYaH^cents per aML 
S Franc 38 5.94 4X2 X 

4X92 39 4X5 r r 

43X2 40 480 440 r 

4192 41 286 r r 

4192 42 284 r r 

4192 43 1X5 2J0 r 

4193 44 084 1J6 283 

4192 45 0X7 138 r 

3 franc 46 s DJI s 

SFranc 46 e s 186 

Total call veL 5806 Callt 

Total eat voL Mil Pott 

r — Not rrocfrtt s— Na option offered. 

Last Is premtam Ipurchaee price). 
Source.- AP. 


London 

Commodities 


Puts— Last 
Sep Dec Mar 

r 0.10 r 

r 025 r 

r 080 r 

085 180 r 

uo 2JS r 

0X0 440 r 

3.15 6X0 BJO 

r r r 

r r r 

r US r 

au ui r 

081 r r 

’ r r 0.11 

x r 

r r 

r 0X3 

r 043 

0.15 871 

0J2 s 

1X2 s 

r r i 


Financial 


(LQ3 r r 

089 046 DM 

025 190 I 

073 140 r 


apeafaL 216851 
open Id. NUB 


UST. BILLS (IMM) 

SI million- cf* of 100 acL 

9133 B6X4 Sep 92.90 9102 9286 9381 

9387 85.77 Dec 9153 9289 9253 9289 

9259 B6JO MOT 92X8 92X7 9222 9136 

9228 87X1 Jun 91 JO 9202 91X3 92X2 

9281 MAO Sep 9185 9171 9183 9172 

9178 09X5 Dec 91X6 9140 91X2 9145 

91X9 8958 Altar 91.10 91.10 91.10 9L1I 

90.93 9050 Jun 90X4 

Etf-Striee 6X82 Prev.Sotae SX92 
Prev. Day Open InL 37X69 off 325 
18 TR. TREASURY CCBTJ 
Sl HUSO prffLpts&32nds of 100 pd 
M-21 W-lfl Sep 86-19 86-29 867 86-25 

!?‘I 3 5-]* Dec «*- M KtJa *** “S' 25 

SH 5-Ii Mor “■» 84-13 8628 

85-7 7630 Jun 83-25 863 83-75 84-2 

‘ B M3-10 83 8J-9 

83-11 80-2 Dec 82-19 

Est. Sales Prev.Sates 11.996 
Prev. Day Open UN. 63.924 ofllAM 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBTI 
(Bpd-Sl(XUWFnts & 32nds oflOOPttl 
79-12 37-10 SfP 76-27 77-11 76-17 77-10 

78-13 57-1 Doc 75-25 76-9 75-13 76-7 

77-29 57-2 Mar 762S 758 74-15 758 

764 56-29 Jun 74 74-8 73-18 74-7 

75- 31 56-29 Sep 7X4 7X12 77-22 72-11 

74-24 56-25 Dec 72 72-18 71-29 72-17 

74-15 56-27 Mar 71-6 71-26 71-4 71-25 

76- 26 63-12 Jgn 71-3 


9286 93X1 
9233 9169 
9222 92-36 
91X1 92X2 

9143 9122 
91X2 9145 
91.10 9L1I 
90X4 


867 8625 

8W 85-25 
8613 8628 
83-25 862 
83 (D-9 

82-19 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
points o nd cents 

198X0 14000 Sep <88X0 18950 

200X5 175-70 Dec 19050 19210 

203X5 1*0.10 Mar 19340 19340 

20650 194-70 Jun 196X0 196X0 

Est. Sales 47X72 Prev. Sales 37590 
Prev.Dav Open Int. 61.765 ohwi 
VALUE LINE MCCBT) 
points and cents 

213X0 185X5 Sep 199X5 200X0 

217X5 . 200X0 Dec 30290 2WJ0 

30940 20495 Mar 20740 20740 

EsLSafu Prev. Sales 3500 

Prev.Dav Open Int. 1M71 up 180 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
paten and cents 

11885 91X5 Sap 108X0 109X0 

117X0. 101X0 Dec 11050 111.40 

118X5 10950 Mar 11110 11110 

BBX0 11175 Jun 113X0 11180 

E it- Soles 9.937 Prev. Sales 6,912 
Prev.Dav Open Int. 9.917 up 213 


187X0 189X5 
190X0 191.95 
193X5 194X5 
196X0 197.75 


199X0 20050 
30245 204.15 
20750 20740 


108X0 10945 
110.45 111.30 
112X0 11290 
113X0 11450 


+1X5 / 

+1.10 v- 

+1.10 

+1.10 


Commodity Indexes 


Close 

Moody’S — B93 i 

Reuters } f 

D_J. Futures 

Com. Research Bureau. 218J0 

MoadyX : base loo : Dec 31 , 1931 
p- preliminary; »- final 

Reutere : Base 100 : Sep. is. 1931 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31 . 974 . 


Previous 
899 JO f 
1/68820 
114.95 
219^0 


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1 17411740 

119X0 11*40 
129X0 129X0 
133A0U340 
137X0 13740 
141X014240 


SU «* HI ’* " ,S “ 1 * 
Stetltog per metric ton 
Od 11840 115X0 11640 11640 
Pec 12040 11940 niso 11940 
Mor 130X0 128X0 12840 12840 
May 133X0 132X0 T32X0 13240 
Aog N.T. N.T. 13740 136X0 
OO N.T. N.T. 141X0 14240 
Volume: 1X95 tats of 50 tans. 


COCOA 

Sterling pgr metric ten 
Sep 1X19 1X0* 1.710 1X12 1499 1X00 

Dec 1X25 1X10 1.717 1X1B 1X06 1X08 

Mar 1X3S 1X26 1X29 1X30 1X3 1X23 

May 1X40 1X« 1X<2 1X43 1X35 1X34 

Jlv 1X59 1^ 1X53 1X5* 1X50 1X32 

top 1X75 1X7S 1X65 1X70 1X63 1X65 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1X45 1X75 1X45 1X70 

Volume: 1X54 lots of 10 Ions. 

COFFEE 

Starting per metric ten 

Sep 1400 1440 1475 1478 lX5f 1465 

Nov 1,719 1499 1X17 _L71| 1X00 1X02 

top N.Ti N.t; 1X81 1415 1X90 1430 

Vafcmrie: 1X38 tots at 5 tens. 


0*A011- . 

U5. doners per metric tan 

vug «mwn wi, « wn y>< IKl 23L2S 

o5 mooOTJDBj^maimgmso 

MOV 231X5 22940 231X5 231-50 23240 232X5 
Dk 231 JO 23040 231X5 23140 232-00 23225 
iS mS 23048 23140 23DJ0 

Feb 2Z740 22740 22740 22850 22640 g040 
Mot NX. N.T. 2T840 22340 22340 


CommSfiies 


SUGAR HW ^ Bk. Ato OTto 

Frencb frana per metric tea 

Od 1J« 1430 1438 1440 —17 

Dec 12*5 1425 1422 1425 —33 

Ator 1^5 1^ 1431 14*0 -27 

Mar 1490 1480 1470 1480 —27 

Aup M30 1430 1415 14* —17 . 

°e» N.T N.T. 1465 1490 — IS 1 

-§**■ tats Of 50 tartj. Prev. actual 

eatei: 2X16 lots. Open tatenesl: Z1496 
COCOA 

Freadi francs per Ml kg 
top 2409 2409 2410 2418 -1-6 

Dec 2411 3400 3405 2415 +12 

2430 2430 2420 2433 +16 

May N.T. N.T. 24*0 — +20 

Jlv N.T. N.T. 2450 — +23 

Sep N.T. N.T. 2460 — +20 

Dec N.T. N.T. 2470 — +20 

EsL vol: 10 jots of IB tans. Prev. actual 
soles: TO lots. Open Interest: 794 
COFFEE 

Fnmdi francs per IN Kg 
top 1400 1.900 — 1,930 +61 

Nov N.T. N.T. — X000 +30 

Jan N.T. N.T. — 2400 + 70 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2420 2450 +10 

Mar N.T. N.T. 34*0 2475 +13 

top fix NX Ira “5? Unctu 

Source- Bourse Ou Cammurca. 


V-Si-HT 

Commodities 


f^sh Prices 




Iron 2 Fdry. Phita, 


Dividends 



Dptions 


M '•« 240 3a 8X7 ajg 

1 M? & S {| » g 

s * as § B a « 

tatd *bl 4jj, 

SSI5' ,Ss «ap 

Tandy Reports 
33% Fall in Net 

T ^r:z‘rrr 

fiscal year 19R? 

1 984. whfle sales ** 

raues increaS d ° peraUn 8 re 

jK n 30 f °derf e JP 031 
n V J J*ou,or$2Jia^ cd to 

with $2819 * share, compart 

*«. to p 4S*L- jS" 

S. ,n 8 revenu^-^a. 


volume: Blots of 25 tens. 
Source: Rvutmn. 



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Soane: COOK. 





















































































er in Europe, ILS. on GNP Data Still to Be Felt 


into 6133 TRIBUNE, W EDNESDAY, AUGUST 21. 1985 

Dollar’s Fall Hong Kong 9 s Tax Bill Is Criticized 


Page 13 


NEW YORK —-He doIlflr 

higher Tnesdsv bnt c!S f«® JU020 


the GNP repon. recovered 10 flurry of activity after the U.S. 
«ose at $13915, still down a cent GNP report* the markets remained 


JS. Commerce Department re- Y/vrtTwr Wil *“ ,QU ? “ for fresh factors to ward oil a re- 
“^Prcd- raus ■* to**"*"* tor Ok 


« inched „f to fl* Other Ure J* i. No, fibi' OoealOT woe now looking 


(Continued from Page 9) 

. .... ■ njupftn growth in full 1985 1 _ 

JfJl HE BfySTl2 5 percent to just 


By Dinah Lee 

International Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — Hong Kong’s 




Recovery' Seen 
In Philippines 

(Continued from Page 9) 


fftTfmnVn “reties on overtoil and creates total force but is expected w be lifted 
- tii iqo< proposed legislation to curb tax uxauocu aa atiracti gn fVTTain t ^ for businessmen.” He when rescheduling agreements with 

ropean growth in full 1985 ; rang ETbeen subjected to m«»tors. uw * 1 - J - J 


factors to ward off a re- 


read criticism since it was 


recovery 


^SBSSSrfs fSS'.TfifJ? =s~~ 


^•c >■ 




Markfitt ha 1 been expecting a 
downward revision in ^ GNPfip- 
ore to -between 1.0-percent and a 

ore was revised downward to a 1 7- 

perOeatgam. 


8.4825 French francs, up 7 ceo- “One good figure doesn’t change import demand, 

times from 8.4125, -and 1X5730 the overall picture," and the under- Fox, vice president or the -Nam. 
lire, up from 1,847.00. The doHar lying sentiment for the dollar re- and the effects from bffl include 


-TP *»wui I.O-T/.W. lUb UUiUU. V“0 "" “ - - - , , l mm |n t_ (Nil UiV 

rose to 237.15 Japanese yen tom mains bearish, one dealer with a effort to open its markets are un H K 

1M« “ » i j:__ II V JumnKinketiil r\t-nr — • 


added that under the bill as now individual banks are 

... _ . . However, in what appears to be Inland Revenue De- Mr. Villegas said 

over 3 percent. • published last month. legislation drawn piecemeal from nartment can catch virtually every- would be slow and a return to the 6- 

While the outlook is more tayor- fbe Hong Kong Society of Ac- regulations elsewhere, the British ^ingand then pick up on the cases pe^rat growth rate of the 1970s 

able in Japan, “there s no mm - joined the critics on colony’s government has proposed jjj-. want.” may not be reached in this decade, 

tion that the Japanese have pent-up bv calline the plan a a general anti-avoidance provision, 

■famamT’ S&ld LaWlCIlCC u , , u. ._ „_i .w ..J >h»i nHriirinngl anil mnn> me* 


1 of Ita NAM. ^ bodiB 


‘sledgehammer to crack a nut.” and then additional and more spe- 


236.76. 

In earlier 
U.S. currency 


leading UJC dealing bank said. 

; in Europe, the Markets are now waiting for 
in London (j3. inflation and durable goods 



. Mr. Marcos has predicted eco- 
KX Yu, vice president of tne nom j c growth of 1 percent this year 

. -■ f u “* Vma * - the 

mem 

it and the Hongkong money-losing companies, equip- enunem come up wiin a new ujo*i A^nty has revised its iva5 fig- 
«i. ... , , . Equipment Leasing Association, ment and plant leasing, and pen- of the bill, which must be passed Dy ure to zero growth. 

Given the still bighleyd or me ^ ‘bill has been described as si on funds and other employee ^ Legislative Council to become in the first quarter of 1985. the 
ji«w “it*e a hit unrealistic to unnK — — j — a... benefits. law. gross national product, the widest 

Most of the criticism has been objections of oth- ®«sure of a nation’s ^tpui of 

directed at the general provision He ecnowine^^^ goods and services, fell 3.7 percent 

that would allow the government to out after a 53-percent decline for aU of 


It* UVU1 UvwUI iX/wu w 

? . ^ fA poorly written, redundant, rushed 

American companies are about ^ JJJJj ^ ^ broad for its intended 


" * %- ‘N 


dollar, “it's a bit unrealistic 

at 2.7782 DKi, down ltt pfennigs rumibtisfor July, and money-sup- m^Sro^mauketA' nc — 

“It was not necessaifly a strom* riom its session high of 17900 but pW data far the week ending Aug. , p purpose of curtailing tax avoid- 

mrfjcx; but many had exDectfid f IS 3 from 2.7620 at Monday’s dose. 14. aU due Thursday, they said. tv^T rw*weries in both Europe ance - -- — ncuvcreu 

dS™«lrevSonand,Sa^if “Act m Frankfurt, (he dollar was . . _ an^Ja^haw been largSya Faced with a deficit estimated at withbold tax benefits from in the financial year 1985-1986 — 

they bid the doflar higher” aNew P* 4 “ 17652 » aeariy undbaMed risTin thSf to 2.1 billion Hong Kong dollars action «f [he ux wj and to the uncertaiiity it is said to 

Yoric dealer said. from Monday’s fixing oTl7MX on Tuesday, compaiwl with^hte fMtiua «a than (S269.3 million) for the fiscal year least one factor m the tran^efcoa. fflr investors. He said he had 

™ - h^cSntinn in triline his clients at 


Y!«k dealer said. He said trading 
was qmet, however. 

the dollar closed more than 2 
pfennigs Ib^kt against the Deut- 
sche marie, rising to 17770 from 
2-7545 at Monday’s dose, but was 
down more than a pf ennig from ^ 
sesaon high of 2.7900. The British 
pound, which fell nearly 2 cents 


from Monday's fixing of 
The British pound, meanwhile, 
eased on the dollar’s rise to end at 


TWSday- compMcoi win aw moau«« - ^ ($269.3 million) for the fiscal year least one famor m the tn 

tes Monday, rnduded. Z2825 tht United Sta^ unsworn ending March 1986. the financial Elsewhere, for example r 
wss francs, up from 2.2608, homegrown buying ny ihe eoverament must 


prove 


no hesitation in idling his clients 

« • ■ t, u_. au cjlr tn tmln 


1984. 

Mr. VDlegas has predicted that 
the narrower gross domestic prod- 
uct, a measure of GNP iliac ex- 
cludes income from foreign invesi- 



against the' made from 3X670 on In London, the Japanese yen g qgS | CT i [ director of the Institute 
Monday and to 11.7705 Fraadt ended at 23725 to the dollar, down f or Lntemauona] Economics, a 
francs frem 11,8208. from its eartier dose in Tokyo of y M binw nn think tank. “Some an- 

Dealers said that apart from a 236.85. (.Reuters, IHT) have attributed as much as 

■ ' half of West German and Japanese 


French Debate Dentttionahzation 


THE EUROMARKETS 


Secondary Market Shakes Off GNP News 

4 


growth to their exports to the Unit 
ed Slates. If the locomotive be- 
comes the caboose, you’ve got 
problems.” M .. . 
Groups such as NAM insist 


(Continued from Page 9) 
are acquiring a growing claim on 
many nationalized companies, 
that Tne rightist opposition parties. 


sdoation has cast itself as one of fc changes i 
the most vocal advocates of U.S. in a bid to 


By Peter Conradi ... 

Reuters issue is secured by a surety bond expecting a down 

LONDON — Just over $400 issued by Aetna.Casualty & Surety 13 to 1.6 percent. 

- million of new straight Eurobonds Co. The IADB bond was quoted lett _ bv Mr. 

- were laundicd Tuesday, but deal- within its total 2 percent fees, at a a daird Aug. 6, to the Sen- 

j “SJ? e ^? 1 | issues *?* a | aill 1 c l u j: tiisDOunt <rf about 1%. ale Banking Committee saying that J^ch' that runs counter to the 

- cl The. secondary market shook off Credit Suisse First Boston also ^ would restrain money ?refrmarket tHink-mg of the Reagan 

. the unexpected upward revision of led a two-tranche usue for Phoenix u ^ economy grew faster Ministration 

U3. econonnc growth figures and Mutual Mortga^ Funding Coip. 1985. ThSftave been some modest 

bearish comments by Paul A. consstmg of a $1003-£^lion, sev- ^ im ^ t m ^ [T(m decline so 


further steps to bring down the confident lhai they will be returned 
doOai’s vtdue should remain a key to power, plan a major sale of gov- 
nart of any effort to keep the recov- enunent assets to finance the tax 


within total 1% percent fees. The irony, thecas- au^andoihet sugpty-side econom- 



that they are promising 
raise France's sluggish 
unemployment, 
percent of the 


‘ • Volcker, the Federal Reserve en-year bond with a KW-percent- fhw 

- ■ Board chairman dealers said. a-vear coupon apri a $5d8-m3h<m, J 

; n / ._A_ inv. ... . .. n 


The Communists strongly op- 
pose any denationalization. Bui 
they are out of the government now 

and with hardy 10 percent of the 

Sr acknowledged Mr. Fox. Some vote are ignored by the Socialists. 

. . U3. companies that had been en- Denationalization has prompted 

Inter-American Development 11 -year issue paying 11H* percent. Although U.S. credit markets ^ ura T I ^ 1 ^ slroa g dollar to as heated a debate in France as 

* ^ Bank came up with the week’s first Both were par-priced. wens lower, dollar-straight Euro- mov g \beir production overseas nationalization did. 

3 ‘a dollar straight, a 10-year, $1 50-mil- The issues are collateralized by bonds ended steady to n point a- w£re Q0W those plans. Earlier this year the industry 

• tion issue paying 10ft percent a first mortgages and were trading ther side of Monday's night’s close, . A j SOt u.S. companies that minis ter. Edith Cresson, created a 

- year and is^ied at par. ka by Cred- within thar total fees.^ ( while floating-rate notes were have seen their profit figui 



thing the Socialists took over. Since 
all polls show these two parties re- 
gaining control til the French Na- 
tional Assembly in next spring’s 
elections, their economic promises 
are being taken seriously. 

“The first thing we have to do is 
make a collective confession of 


Tailoring 
The Resume 

(Continued from Page 9) 

hunters think that a statement of 
career objectives is useful informa- 
tion that should be included in a 
resumfe. , . 

Q • University degrees and refer; 

guilt for what we didn’t do in the races. In West Germany, a resume 
lasC said Alain Juppe, the RPR can be a 20-page document. They 
economic spokesman, are very formal end read tike legal 

, , documents, says Julian McKitnck 
Although often vaguely worded, of Korn GmbH in Frankfurt, 
the opposition’s economic plat- a subsidiary of the U.S. executive- 
form implies a far more radical fjjm. West German execu- 

rhnnpr g in French economic UTe m q vcs include photocopies of their 
Laurent Fabius relation to past practice than any- ^ooi certificates and university 

, u i. thing proposed by Prime Minister degrees. Often the photocopies 
to “ natio nalize losses while pn- Mar g aret Thatcher of Britain or j^ve been stamped by a lawyer. 

President Ronald Reagan in the « Hobbies and sports. In most 
United States. European countries, executives do 

Its macroeconomic aim is an an- not include their hobbies and 


not to 

va tiring profits.' 

The debate moved into hi; 
this summer. In a new joint 

al nlatform that commits them to a 
. r , i-i .!■ «r ih« 


gear 

T- 


_ ister. Edith Cresson, created a breaching hberalization of the nual growth rate of 3 percent, com- sports. 

profit figures de- stir when she hinred that the got- p^^SomTFSice’s conser- pared with this year’s 1 percent, to But there 

K amsse rust oosum t-iu. wcwn one*, m u* largely unuuuigpu. oressed by unfavorable currency emment might sell a minority in- oonosiiion Dairies —former be brought about by extensive de- admit that once 1 seieaea a woimn 

■: Co. of the United Slates followed dealers said most pnas seemed hi- . _„ r v^r n^ktion will have less pressure terest in profitable state compa- Giscard d’Es- regulation and yearly cuts in tax- for a certain position because she 

with a SlOQ-mfilion bond, paying tie affected by Tu “da£ s 1 “jj vc 5^^ n ^' n ?nf -rii. 0 n the bottom tine as the dollar nics. This forced Mr. Mitterrand to . Union ^r la Democratic aSn of 40 billion francs, or rough- had staled on her rfisume (hat she 

10% percent a vear over fivevean uomri revision of US. seoond- is really showing a lot of “,™ c DO defend his narionalizaiion program poinja Ia t, neromt of gross nntional was a marathon nmnCTsnd I want- 

— the value of goods and ed someone who would be up to a 
including income from for- grueling task,” says Mr. Borg of 
Bemdtson in Brussels. 



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139b Aft Morasi 
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50ft 30ft NIICtY 
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79% 41* HiLumb 
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2098 12ft ParbOlt 
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179* U 1 * PBIIGI 

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17'ft fVs Powrtcs 
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Mft 13J% J3ft- kb 
144% Mft 14VS 
TV* 786 7ft 

23 23ft Wi- ft 
lift 129b 13ft 
79% 7V6 79% 

11V* lift 11V4— ft 
121% 11% H% ^ „ 
16ft 16ft Mft + 94 
1496 1496 149% + ft 
328i 32ft 3»% 

9ft 9ft fft + ft 
34 34 34 

33 36ft 27 + 94 

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69% Aft 6% + ft 

fft 9 996 + ft 

141% Mft 149% + ft 
29% 2ft 2Ui — ft I 
26 35ft 26 + ft I 

22ft 21% 21%— W 
35ft 359b SSft + ft 1 
139% 139* 139* 

19ft 18 19ft + V* 
24% 2«b 2gb 
2ft 29% 296 

12 lift 12 — ft 
IBS* 109* IDft + ft 
31ft 30ft 31ft + ft 
Bft 7% 7%- ft 
4 3ft 3ft — I* 

10 fft ia + ft 

58 56ft 58 + ft 

12ft 12 12ft + }% 
41* 486 4*6 — 9* 

3? 39 39 

131* 121% 13ft . _ 
179% 178i« 178% + ft 
7ft 7 71b + ft 

23ft aft aft — ft 


lift 119% SoftwA 
aft 1896 SonocPs M 
27ft 149b SonrFd <4S 
61% 4 SoHoso 

38ft aft SthdFn J2 
Mft 161* Soutrrt JO 
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47ft 329% Sovran 1J8 
19ft Oft Speedy 
3896 Bft Spctron 
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1686 13 SPtre 
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30 19ft StomtYS MW 
34ft lift SMJIMC 

27 19 SlonhnS 1J0 

34ft 179% StuSlBi 
i'* 39% ShrtrC 
7% 41% Steiner 
17ft 10ft SiwaShf 
25 179* ShMlnf 

181* 7ft Sirahtt 
Mft 269% StrwCIs 
359b 19ft Stryker 


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21* 5vntrnx 

24'6 Mft SyAlOC 
7ft 3ft Systln 
lift Aft Swainto 
lift Aft Sy«Gn 
25V* 12ft Syslml 


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10ft 

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149% Mft Mft— ft 
288% 27ft 288% + 8% 
19 lBft 19 — 9b 
4ft 4ft 48% 

24ft 23ft 24ft + ft 
17ft 17ft 1786— ft 
6ft Aft 6ft— ’* 
43ft 43 43 . 

17ft 17ft 17ft— ft 
Mft 26 24ft 
68% ffft 68%— ft 
15 Mft 14% 

51% 58% 5ft + ft 
4ft Aft 68% + 9% 
M 279* 28 — ft 
15% 158% 15ft + V* 
22V, 22ft 22ft 
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17 15U 15ft — 2V* 

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lift 11 lift + ft 
25ft 248b Mft + ft 


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79* <8* ToeVIvl 

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25ft 13ft Taiecrd 
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158% BV* TherPr 
17ft 78. Thrmfli 
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17ft 10 TrokAu 
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15ft 15 159* 9* 

48* 4ft 4ft + ft 
ISft Mft 15 + ft 

328% Mft Mft 
98% 98% 9ft— ft 
19ft 19ft 1984 + ft 
34 238b Mft— ft 

2ft 29% 2ft . 

15ft 159* 158b + Vi 
17ft left 17 
99* 9ft 9Vi + Vo 
lift 14% 145%— I* 
55 52ft 52ft— 2 
8 7ft 7% + J% 
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7% 7 7 — ft 

118* lift lift— ft 
ft 1% V*— % 

158% 15ft 15ft— ft 

Sft Sft Bft?* 

78% 7ft 7VS — ft 
26 259i 25ft 


U 


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fft 3Y* Quo**. 
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128ii Bft Quixote 
13ft 7ft Quotrn 


138 

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152 

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108m 108% 1086 + 9% 
Bft BV, »% + V% | 
T3 72ft 22ft 
41* 4ft 4ft + ft 
12ft 129b 12ft + 9b 
11 I0M 109*— ft 


238% 15% US LICS 
24ft 15ft UTL 
208% 5 uifrsy 


169* 6ft RAX 
188% ItHi RPMS 
lift Bft RodSv* 

14ft 6ft RodttlT 

11 Sft Rodion 
7ft 2ft Rrxwn 
339b 198b RoInfS 
Mft 121* RovEn 
74* 28% RedICr 
23ft IS * R rod no 
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358) 25ft RedHlL 
128b 3ft ReeuM 
7ft Sft RncvEI 
20ft 11 Rents s 
Mft 49* ReUoB 
10 7ft RpAuIo 
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16ft 118b RestrSy 
16'/b BV* Reuteri 
298a 17ft ReutrH 


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15ft 9ft Rhodes 
10 38% Rioilms 

21 128% RlcnEia 

179% 10ft RIVOI 
3Jft 24ft RoadSv 

16ft lift RdDNva 
Mft B9% RobVsn 
241* 16% Rouses 
13 69* ROVPIm 

124* 4ft RoviRs 
188% 11 Rust Pal 
19ft lift RvonFS 


JO 

MH 

JA 


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IA 158% IA + Vb 
111% 118% 11% + Vb 
111* 11 11 — Jft 

■ft Bft Sft + ft 
5 488 5 + 98 

28%. 289* 2B8b + ft 
19 18%. 1«8b— ft 

2ft 28% 284 + 1% 
218% 218% 218% 

10 9W fft + ft 

24 Vi 24 369* + % 

11 108* 10H— ft 
ift 68% 68% + ft 

14ft 1484 Mft + ft 
Sft 58% 58% 

98% 98% 98% + 9% 
119% 118% 119% + 8% 

15 148b 148b 

Bft Bft B8%— 8% 
269% 26V* 26% + % 
40V* 40 . 409* + i* 
138% 13V* 13V*— ft 
7 64% 69% — 9% 

21ft 21 aft + ft 

141% 14% 14% 

28% a Mft + ft 

lift lift 118b 
12ft 12 1894 + ft 

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Page 14 


extern ational herald tribune, Wednesday, august 21,1935 



PEANUTS 

f I KEEP REAPING ^ 
THAT CWERPOPULATION 
V 15 A PROBLEM., a 


EVEN THE DESERT IS 
GETTING CROWDED 


BUT I DON'T 
^ MINCL ^ 








actually; 

I LIRE 
STAMP1N6 
IN LINES J 


A BRIDGE THROUGH TIME: 
A Memoir 




S! 

artist should w u . 



BLONDHE 

IS HE STILL. —‘Ml*' 

playins casts? L— 


ZSESFIL , r l LL JS°l 1 1 JLlST-LOSrJ so VAW?/ -i WHO SAVS THATJ'*' 

TH«0UU-S-1 INNCJwl ■rHEWEU.'S’T LOOK AT jf TWAINS ISN'T V 
EYES// — 1 *. I X V 110 < i * mawiuii^WQ X. 


ACCXJLNT. 


| EVERYTHING? 


■By Leila Said 282 pages. 517.95. ^dan-Lbe ^JjSdSUi i*^“2 

Summit Books, 1230 Avenue of the Amen- {l almost defiaody i«^ e rejjgion 

■ sss£ffi5g3isri?ii?s£. 

Reviewed by David Ottawa)' ^uadTmSif^*' jS' tfBb 

T AILA SAID has written a sad. and often JT al l he end of J^rietv. aoing back 
JL beautiful story about alienation in A Ljj to apt 10 lt f b familvs old Milage 

Bridge Through Tune." It is not at all clear ggj j^iues of her WJ^ ^ r ^|u- 

wbe&r she meant to do this, but tbs is the u Egypt, whj«- sh J nobody seemed 
overpowering sensation for anyone who nas . not reached - • 
ever spent tune in her homeland. t0 aKm ' m 

On the face of it. her book tells in often " uVitAiiia- 

intimate terms of one Arab woman’s struggle _ _ . is on (he staff of 

to free herself from a family-arranged marriage David Otto* 

and become the first female director in the ion Post. 


ACROSS 

1 Ointment 
5 Cry of a 
flushed snipe 
10 Enos's 
grandmother 
13 Pelvic bone 

15 Galsworthy 
novel 

16 Res followers 

17 Uncas's friend 
19 Gamp or 

Gummidge 
at Lasso’s sound 

21 Letter addenda 

22 Lear 

23 Unsophisticated 
25 Forerunner of 

the freezer 
27 More than 
several 

30 Morse signal 

31 Treaty gp. 

32 Ovidian 
declaration 

33 MOMA piece 

34 Live it up 
37 Sidekick 
39 Hymn 

41 Gin 

42 Bakery tool 


52 Motherwell 
medium 

53 N.Z. parrot 

55 Morbid 

condition: 

Suffix 

53 Popular street 
name 

59 Cheerful 
fictional clerk 

62 Where 
Wadkins starts 

63 Comhuskers’ 
city 

64 Polished 

65 Land south of 
Turk. . 

66 Regions 

67 Cheese-store 
purchase 

DOWN 

1 Storage area 

2 “There ought 

to be !” 

3 AnS.S.R. 

4 Bligh's 
problem 

5 Erwin of old 
films 

6 Run in a race 

7 Tyrol's locale 


WHATS A FJVE- 
L6TTER WORP 
MHAW/W© 
■\"T O LEAVE 
-> 1 HASTILY? 



43 Brazilian's coffee g Important 

44 Lou Ferrigno enzyme 

role 9 Ike's doma 

46" longa in 1942 


47 Tatum’s father 

48 Thaumatur- 
gist 'sword 

50 Dame 


9 Ike's domain 
in 1942 

10 Subject of a 
Flaubert 
masterpiece 
11 A September 
sign 


Elizabeth 1 jtSm J*£5 

14 Breckinridge Stl& 

18 Restrain BEETLE BAILEY 

22 Ustinov or 
O'Toole 
24 Contender 

26 Burnett or 
Charming 

27 Charts 

28" for AH 

Seasons” 

29 Ibsen's “doU" 

33 Genuflected 

35 "Roast Pig" 
dissertator 

36 Urisor 
Goossens 

38 Tie up 

39 Zilch, to 
Zapata 

46 Vesta, to Greeks t\nv TAPP 
42 Flamboyance AINU* UAH* 

SKf*' IJJdQj — 

48 Wilbur and M_Li 

Merrill 

49 William \=8l 

Bend lx role Sjgfflr-' 

51 Charlie Brown 

expletive AJW 

54 Israeli A jS"F 

statesman Ǥ. I 

Hammer" C.CTvf_^ y~ 5T 

57 Hindu god 

59 Dickens ’5 nom — "* 

50 tuttJSii prince W IZARD of ID 

61 Pro fi 




scraaa.' 


HE MUST 
HAVE SEE^ 

you COMINE > 


;« 

m 


■LJH 



cm DaMy Dim NmaMpMB, I. 
But By H— i Mmta tisiMS 




® New York Tima, edited by Eugene Maleska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


A&TW 


tow(£ 

sewwH 

I 



/ THflT 
J51? STUPlP, 
«| iJANITOR! 


MllVUgC I1UUUKU lUUfa . - m 

whether she meant to do this, but this is the 
overpowering sensation for anyone who has 
ever spent time in her homeland. 

On the face of it, her book tells in often 
intimate terms of one Arab woman's struggle 
to tree herself from a family-arranged marriage 
and become the first female director in the 
politically stifled world of the Egyptian the- 
ater. No westerner can hdp but be moved by 
■her uphill and often lonely struggle to break 
through the taboos of Egypt's male-dominated 
society. 

“Dr. i-aiia " as her countrymen her, is at 
, her very best as a writer when she describes her 
emotions as tragedy and adversity repeatedly 
1 befall her. Her story of dealing with her family 
and friends after the accidental death of her 
younger sister Asms is extraordinarily power- 
ful, as is that of watching the ceremonial dr- 
cuBxarion of a young Egyptian girL 

What is missing , ttistur hingiy. throughout 
her moving account is any appreciation of her 
privileged position in Egypt* upper class. 

Lada Said came from the Hipwian Coptic 
■■ upper class, a minority within a minority m a 
Moslem-dominated country where the vast 
mass of the population is dut poor. Her par- 
ents sari her to the United States for her 
master -of arts degree at the University of 
Chicago and later for a doctorate in theater 
from the University of Illinois. They allowed 
her lio return there alone after die was married, 
against her husband's wishes. They approved 
of her getting an abortion so she could devote 
.all her time to the theater. 

Jin. terms of Egyptian society and its mores, 
Dr.- Lada was extremely unusual in being al- 
lowed .to.. do -any of these dung* She seems 
thrice alienated — as a Copt In a Moslem 
worfd,' as an upper-class Egyptian in a poverty- 
ridden country, and as a woman in a male- 
dominated society. She never comes to terms - 
with ha alienation or seriously analyzes it 

She is constantly shocked by the heavy hand 
of politics and. official censorship that stifled 
the Egyptian^theata after the revolution. Im- 

. Safaition to Previous Pazzte ' 


eeee nnaa anson 

EE30GJ 0OHH EI00nn 
BEcn nannoBHasa 
□□□□ 0013 1333303 
DD3D3 □□□□□ 

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Bern araann 33333 
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QESOGJ 0 aa 3333 

□0303 (33303 
□oanan S3B oaoa 
BE333O3B30 B0DB 
BB0D3 3330 3333 
30033 3033 3303 


BEST S ELLERS 


The ;.iHiHb.vk..hMtt 

Thi'Ir'I r ^ im i,, jri - in- ***** 


J££m*VmKd**> 

LiHW.n.Uli'0 


FICTION 


|jsl 

Hcri anIM 


’ ; ; 
' 3 ?Sg' HUNT t OR R»i CXTOKER. h> . „ 

4 S cffifiK" HOUife RiLS !■> J'*" 4 

; , " 

! ; 7 

: n fp^TONtORRoWcoMES. h> SW«« s £ 

i. h> _ f 

,2 SoSSSTw ax b> , 

13 INSIDE.' ^oufsira: ^ “ 

]4 CHAPTERHOUSE. RUNE h J3 , h 

15 THUWER. b>" Wchiril Bachman ,J ^ 

nonfiction 

1 VEACiER: An Aulohu’graphv. h> Chuck ( ^ 

2 r^^OCCA: An Auk^'^raphj. h> Lee fa- ^ ^ 

- 3 r^roN ,H roTt N E^LENCi b> : ' 

Tom PBicn and Njrw.^U4>'n — - 
. 4 SMART WOMEN. FOOLISH CHOICES. 

bv Connell Cow an and Mdvcn kinder 4 

5 THEMICK.be MicU> Mamie wiih Hcrh 

A MARTINA, bv Mamna Na*ranknj G 5 

7 NUTCRACKER. hv Shana.AIcwndk.-r 7 7 

S CONFESSIONS Of A HOOKER. b> Boh 

Hope with D*»nc Nelland " Ji 

9 THE AMATEURS, bv Daud Halbcrilam — J 

10 HAMMER OF THE^iODS: The Led Zcp- 

11 ?^GiCL^ V HO^ERnLAP. 'hy PamOc 

F. McManus — - ~ ‘ 

12 FUNNY MONEY. b% Mark Singer 10 3 

13 LOVING EAC H OTHER. h> Lev* Buscag.- 

lin . ** 51 

14 THE DANGEROUS SUMMER. b> Er- 

near Hcminewac - - - - 13 

.15 THE BRIDGE ACROSS FOREVER, by 

Richard Bach I- W 

ADVICE. HOW-TO AND MISCHAANFOUS 

.1 DR. BERGER S IMMUNE POWER 

. - DIET, by Siuan M. Berger ... I 10 

2 WOMEN WHO LOVE TOO MUCH, by 

. Robin Norwood - ". — I 

- X' THE FRUGAL GOURMET, bv Jeff 

'-Smith 3 20' 

4 NOTHING DOWN, by Robert G. Allen 4 37 

5 .SMART COOKIES DONT CRUMBLE, 

by Sonya Friedman 2 ‘6. 


BRIDGE 


ding suggested to South that 
the diamond ace was on his 
□ghL 

Now the made king was 
cashed and a diamond was led 
to the king and ace. The con- 
tract would have been defeated 
if West had cashed the heart 
ace and led a diamond, since 
the spade tea would score. But 
he tea a low heart, playing his 
partner for the oueen, and 
South actually mane an over- 
trick. This meant a gain of 11 
international match points, for 
in the replay North-South 
played three spades and made 
just nine tricks. 


WEST (D) 

♦ 1033 
?a j»se 
o A53 

♦ 53 


NORTH 

♦ K 
OK4 

£Q»S4 / 

♦ Q J u> 8 7 3 r: 

’■ >E 

♦ A K 941 4 

SOUTH 

♦ AQSB842 
^053 

$ K 7J 

♦ - 


T1 |^^w erewiaenafc 


ffl- IRT. Pm 
Pa® 3 N.T. Paw 
**» P»» 

West tod the dob Ow. 






































■s£ 


HpL 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 21, 1985 


SPORTS 






<2riTa s ? nds to 

251 S 5 J 5 M w the ninth 


tn fott-PkceTorop- 1 hand and readied two rows into the bon* ran. “I’ve had the best dcfcn- 

^“Jtoe American Leagues East- BASEBALL ROUNDUP stands to make the catch. As he ave year of ray career,” he saia. 

(uw Bhe Jays lost to : ' came down Griffey stumbled and “One good thing is chat both of 

Monday night). New moth, Boston’s Marty Barrett sent turned a somersault, but he hdd those catches saved games. The one 
£3 2*®® over .500 — its a high fly to left Gnffey, who en- onto the bafl. thing I thought about after [Mon* 

st ^sno wing sm ee 1983. The Red terea the game as apinefa hitter in "I didn't do any planning or day’s] catch was that the fans didn’t 
« a«v* dropped nine of their last the seventh, planted his right foot thinking ■— ljust reacted,” said interfere with me. That was a 
and seven straight lb die Tan- in the padding of the 8-fool-high Griffey, who made a similar catch break." 

, (2.43-meier) wall, balanced himself on April 16 to rob Chicago’s Ron The winners’ Dave Winfield 

out in the top of the on lop of the fence with his left Kittle of a potential game-winning drove in four runs, rwo of them on 

a seventh-inning single that tied the 
game. 5-5 fWStfjew came home 
with the deciding run on Don Bay- 
lor’s double). Rickey Henderson 
. scored three times and Don Mat- 
tingly extended his hilling streak to 
17 games. 


ox cm Griffey’s Game-Saving Catch 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


towithr 


■msi, 





West German Soccer Prospects Soar 
Under National Coach Beckenbauer 


It r — J*™* mu A. 1ft j w* ucvu MM iuuv 

Winners of 12 of then ]»« io l ^ scw *o straight to the Tan- in the paddingof the 8-foot-high 

mot tlvVimk^. . *J HWt - '«■« ‘ , Tf 1 1 i i > .■*«» 


International Herald Tribune 
LONDON — The brain speeds up. the body 
slows down and the famous player takes up coach- 









_ Winner Many Bystrom allowed 
six hits and five runs in his seven 
innings. Bob' Shirley worked 1% 
in n in g s and Rich Bordj got the last 
out for his second save of the year. 

With New York trailing by 5-3 in 
the seventh, Henderson reached on 
a Beider’s choice and moved to 
third on Mattingly’s double, which 
knocked out starter Bruce Hurst 
Reliever Mar i Clear came on and 
gave up the angle to Winfield, who 
had hit a two-run home run in the 
first 

Indians 5, Bfae Jays 3: In Cleve- 
land. Tom WaddeD pitched a sev- 
en-hitter for the first complete 
game of his career and Tony Bema- 
zard hit a home run to lead the 
Indians over Toronto. Wadddl was 
starting for only the third time after 
98 career relief appearances; in his 
other two starts, he had beaten 
New York’s Ron Guidry and Dave 
Stieb of the Blue Jays. 

Royals 2, Tigers']: In Kansas 
City, Missouri, pinch-runner Onix 
Concepcion raced home from third 
on pinch-hitter Dave Leeper’s 
grounder with one out in the 10th 
to give the Royals their squeaker 
over Detroit. Shortstop Alan 
Trammell's throw to the plate ap- 
peared to beat Conoepaon, but 
plate umpire Ted Hendry ruled 
him safe. 

Brewers 4, Twins 1: In Milwau- 
kee, Danny Darwin, who had lost 
10 straight decisions, pitched a one- 

D gaBtefvtwsd ftm kaonefcond hitter to beat Minne sota for the 

ilf!* &]V. Boston numager John McNamara had plenty to kick about Monday in New York: He was ejected by umpire Mike Redly Brewers. The Twins’ only hit was 
1 **• -fjpr protesting a second-inning balk call, above, on pitcher Bruce Hrirst, and the Red Sox lost for toe ninth time in 10 games. Roy Smalley's fifth-inning leadoff 
-‘:;7 heme run, which bounced off the 

>• ~ right-field foul pole. DaiWin al- 

At . Jowod only one other basenmner 

(be hit Mark Sains with a pitch in 

' the fourth) and retired the last 15 

“ T* “ JZ TZ Minnesota batters. 

• Baseball Iransittoil Orioles 9, Ranges 2: In Balti- 

J -■ ■ , ■■■ ' - — ■— —1 L— — — - ... - - - - - — ■ — — more, Eddie Murray drove in the 

' ■ ■'•’•^^iorLeaOTeLfiadeK - JSSuLm and^P^ tie-breaking run as the Orioles 

iwajor League Leaoers » c caufornTSS^^ nooch*. XU scored SB timesm the fifth with the 

NATIONAL LEAGUE r| " lr, * : ”? * "■ er, on ft* ISObv disabled list Readied Ur- returner; Billy Alien, runrina back; Trag help Of three WaDtS and tWO Texas 

i Innivar..- ... ® *» " H ^ ilfSE r^. Edmonton ^ma *«" 5* P"?!. ««■: ***», bode; errors. Baltimore has won six 




SCOREBOARD 

Baseball 


Transition 


' Major League Leaders 


ajrta, us Angeles. 155; Darling, New York, 
130; Krukow, San Francisco, 13a 


* Annnr^jweGee Si-L. 

Herr St-L. • 
•'.Guerrero LA. 

Beckman N.Y. 

Gwvnn SIX 
• Parker dn- 
Raines Mart, - 
.. ; .Crux Htn 
• —Moreland CM- 
rrDorar Hln. 
Hemandee N.Y 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 

G AB. R H Pel. 
.L. 105 418 01 151 J61 

113 40 ' 40138 .326 

LA. W 3M 72 122 JU 

N.Y. 101 348 56 106 JOS 

x ii 2 457 a iso : not 

H. 114 451 w 136 JOT 

to. ■ m 431 .85 130 JIB 

703 402 « 129. -J99 

114 400 49 122 399 

1W 43S 61 128 2*4 

114 419 58 IS 394 


BASEBALL 
Americas League 

CALIFORNIA — PSocad Geoff z atm. pitch- 


and Ran Peterson, offensive lineman, on In- 
I tired reserve. 

NEW ORLEANS— Cvf Carl RoocbeA kick 


CWeaaa, 24; Gauge, San Dteoa 21; Suftgr, 
Atlanta, 23; o. SniUfu Noasian, TV; Power, an- 
cbmattr W. 


bano Logo, Pitcher, from Edmonton of the Songy and David Gtesca detonslvg back; errors Baltimore has WOO SIX 
Pacific Cowl League. Sent Darryl Sconler^ James Boyd and Scott McLaughlin, ouonh: . . , . . - . . 

first baseman, to Edmonton for rehabOHo- Sam Stater. offensive tackle, and Steve Hoff- Straight games and, by taking eight 


JQ5 ■ AMERICAN LEAGUE 

au ■ G AS R K 

art BoowBol IM Mi 47 145 J» 

jm Brtlt ICC - . -109 392 74 08 JJ52 

jo. R.>Nn«NrWp»N.Y. - N 30* 101 735 
■m ■ MaMingty sly. 1J4' 460 72 132 


/len. man, punter. Signed Peter Pent guard. 

NEW YORK— Purchased the contract of N.Y. giants— C ut Af Youna, aim Harris, 
Cwsnn CorruW. o u t fi e ld er, from Miami of tho and keChails McOanleL defensive bocks; Al 
Florida Stale League and assigned him to Morvtn, Dave Bond and Ptdi Mock, defensive 


Hemandee N.Y. 114 419 58 123 394 

Runs: Murphy, Atlanta. Ml RobnAMonfre- 
ot 85; Culetnan, St. Louts, 83;. McGee,. 
■ SI. Louis. 01; Guerrero, Las Angeles. 78. 
RBI>: Murphy, Atlaota, 88; Parker.CIncIn- 
nalL8S; J. Clarlt. SL LoufL«3; Herr.SL Loufe 
81; G.tNQson, Philadelphia, tl 
HM>: McGee, St. Louts, 151; Gwytn. San 


Boride Oak. 
Lac v Bel ' 
Whitaker Dot 
Gedman Boo. 
PBradley Sea. 
Cooper MU. 


99 293 a 94 321 

M 361 54 114 J2I 
111 *55 81 142 312 

105 349 SB 10 307 
115 463 70 142 307 

110 448 60 137 306 


Re nac ft Henderson, New York, 101; Rip- 
ken. Baltimore. 0; Whitaker, Detroit, 01; 
M. Davis. OafctaML 79; E. Murray. Baltimore. 


Albany af mo Eastern League. 

MdHoaai League 

PHILADELPHIA— Recalled Jeff Stone. 
euffieMer.fnm Portland of the Paclflc Coat 
League. Placed John WBcfconfua, Brit bow- 
man. on waivers. 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Association 
PHOENIX— Traded Maurice Luca, for- 


um. punter. Signed Peter Pent, guard. of its last rime, has nuuriinri its bcs? 
N.Y. GIANTS— Cut Al Young, Olnf Harris, of Qjj. season 

sd LeChorts McOanW. defensive bocks; Al 

orvbvDave Bond and Phil Mack, defensive Angds 5, A s 4! U1 Atiahtam, 

lOmim; Jock Oliver and Mark Salter. California. RfigmC T acktfm hit a 
rnrds; Knox Culpepper and Maurice -BaU.- IrZ*- / 

wbar kerm; Potw woodward, qu ar torbo c k; IWD-run DOIlKa^ m LaC IlTSt flEQ S1H- 
ronk Captious. nmnlnB boric: Tom Mullodv, glcd tO Spaik a thrCC-nm fourth to 


Unoman; Jack OHver and Mark Salter. 
guard*; Knox C ulpep p er and Maurice BelL 
linebackers; Dauu Woodward, qu ar terb ac k; 
FnmkCaahauLrunMna baric: Tom Mullodv, 
tWif end. ad Eric Rafftoed and Victor 
James, wkle receivers. Ptaced Groea Du- 
Broc. linebacker, an tofund reserve. 

N.Y. JETS— Waived Brad White, defensive 
end; Pete McCartney, euvd; Rodney Vest- 
ing. rtaooMdter; Bobby Sell, Greg Battle. 


ward, fa the LA. Lolcors for 9eamd-niund jehnwoadrine and Jimmy Himtor.ltnefcock- 


! ; tf tiw: McGee, w. Louts, oi; «wynn. 

* ? ! V ^iiVWega. 13*; Herr, SL Louie. 138; Pdrtcer. On- 7* 


TUDiv 


."riimatl, 136; Raines, Montreal, 130. 

- DoaMes; WaHarii. MontreoL 29;. GWHson. 


RBH: Mattingly. New York, 98i E. Murray. 
Baltimore, 90; Wtotieia New York, 84; ft k>- 

'riHtadclPtila.28; Hernandez, New York. 2Ss Mem 

Parker, CtocJmwtL 28; Herr, SL Laois. 27. 

■ Triples; McGee, SL Loots, 14; Coleman. WWtafcw. 

St. Louis. 10; Rtrines. MortraaL 9j 5omget 

Guerre- Milwaukee, 30; GTWdlker. Chicago. 38. 

TrWts: wosoo, Kant® aty. 14; Butler, 
n. Las Anoates, *; Parker. Onclnncti. n. r _. 


draft Picks In 19M and 1989. 

FOOTBALL 

Mntlfinl FwribnB Loaaue 

BUFFALO— Stoned Chris Keating, tine- 


en; Branf Burks and Sid Dodd, offensive 
tackles; Bob Grupp, Bret Wright and Luke 
Pr es tri do e. punters; Wayne Schurirts. quor- 
torttoric; Bruc e H a r per and Mika wafers, run- 


boricer to a series of one-yew contracts, nlnoboda; Ken Gantair.tt«hf end, anC I Bill 


jra. los Anoom. at; i-cow. unamra. 
Schmidt, PhUmlelphla.22; X Clark. St. Louis. 

.-2L 

Stolen Bases: Catoman, St.Loori. 82; 
• ' Raima. Montreal, 48; Lanes, Odcosa 4fc 
* McGee. St. Louis, 42! Rodus, Cincinnati, 4L 
PITCHING 


Cleveland, 12i Puckett, Minnesota 10; Coo- 
per. Milwaukee, 1 ; P. Bradley, Seattle, 8. 

♦tome Bugs: Fhk. CMcoaa32; Da. Evans, 
Detroit. 27; Bcdbent. Kansas dlY. 25; G. Tho- 
mas, Seattle. 25; K/ngmcev Oakland, 24; Pres- 
ley. Seattle, 2*. . 

- stoteo Bates: R. Henderson, New York, 55; 


CoWorn, °- Cleveland, 34; 
rinnafLI 0 !. Wlbon. Kansas CHV.34: MasebV.TonxrtaUO. 

.NHL 1-67; Gooden, New York, 18^ X57, Xtt PITCHING 

ttorshlser, Los ARMtelH, MO, 238; How- Wo^LosfAVtoetao pcfyERA: Guidry, New 
“•^SfflTDleaalW, JW. 3.U. YorLI6^ J0CL23S,air»sas^WaancLM,^O. 

Strfkoauts: Goodea New York.192, Ryan. ^ SoBBrtMBWV KansosCllv.t«,350.2a0; 
Houston, 172; Safa Ondnnali, 168. Veden- j. Howell, Oakland, 9-4 M2, 133; Roamlck, 

CalHonito, UW, A84, X67. 

_ . . ft c s trtitooafe: Xyleven, Minnesota. IB? Mar- 

Mondays line Scores rtAD^n>W,l4L' Burns, Chlcaaa -os; F.BWV- 

W j idster, CUriMM. 130; wm, COffiomla, T2L 

AMERICAN LEAGUE Saves; Quttenberry, Kansas City. 28; Her- 

JOM 081 802 280— fi 6 1 nandez. Detrett, 2$; J. HowNl Oakland, 23;- 

<towY0ri( 208 no 3tx— 6 9 t O. Moore, OdHomia. 22; Rlgtwtti, New York; 

Hurst. Clear (71, Stanley (7) ond Gedman: 22. 


> M' 


• . Monday’s Line Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Boston 081 802 280— fi 6 1 

<Hw York 208 M0 30X-4 9 t 

Hurst. Ctoor (71,«tontey (7) ond Gedman; 
-■Jvstrwn, SWrier (81 , Ba«fl IflondWvrwiw'- 
iw — Systran. 2-1 . L-Clear. T-X Sv-Boafl (2). 
-iRs— Gaston, Rice 121), Evans (14), Mew 
rark. WnfleW 09). Henderson H81^ ■ 

Has ®*l #W • * 

Ode 0C&QSX—9 fJ I 
- wtowryitoiTts (5), H enry 15). Schmi dt (71 
'- ml PetraUU Oban and 

OtT m Xlx—S 10 0 

^SS^SStiZSi 

-aranto, Whitt (15), Bell (231. Ctowrland. Ber- 

t JSShO« M ' M8 8108IM 1 1 

’ JSSra Ml 861 «*-•, J* L! 

-.SSatr mi obo obo 1—2 4 o 

Morris and Parrish; 

Vathan. W-Seberhngen, 154 L— Morris. »■ 


Waived Chris SulUvon, oentor; Brian Carpen- 
ter and Ray Griffin, defensive backs; Larry 
Alexander, defensive end; Jos Azeiby, line- 
backer; Alex Carter ond Brian Howard, nose 
tackles: Alan Bolttnoer. punter; Chuck Net- 
san. Paul wnodSMe end Todd Sriilopy, Placo- 
klckers; Jaame R oM i o o n ond Jimmy wat- 
dra. running backs; Joe Janes, Knht end, and 
Julius Oowkias, wide rgcetvw. Placed Rada 
Riddick, runidng back; Ron PHts. defensive 
back; Mike Hamby, offensive lineman, and 
Eddie McGill and Ulysses Norris. tight ends, 
en the tolurad reserve ItaL 
. CHICAGO— Cuf Matt Lang, center; John 
HUIand Kevin Potter, defensive backs; Curtis 
Garrett, defensive end; Bill Heamcadc. de- 
tersive tockte: Rod Anderson, linebacker; 
Euasne Rowell, offensive linemen; Steve 
Buxton, attentive tackle; Mike Vbscota and 
Rick Ward, punters; Bruce Kali merer. Pi oca-, 
kicker; Ken Crut a u arferfagck; Ed Phnites. 
Rnaefl Clayton aid Tony LambardL nmntna 
bocks, and Ken stortvand Sian Johnson, wide 
receiver*. Placed Mike Singletary, Itnebock- 
tr. on the resorvwdld naf report list. Placed 
Jett Fisher, defensive bock; Don Rains. One- 
backer; Brian Sascftnaget wide receiver, 
end Mitch Krenk, tigfrt end, on Inltaed rt- 


Goff 

PGA Leaders 

Leodersoatbe Priit o at tos ol OetisrsAssocl. 
ottratour fbrnagh tbe BdtokOPoa.wblcbend- 

od Aug. 18: 

EARNINGS - 

1. Curtis Straws _ tSVJtl 

Z Roy Floyd 

X Lonny Wadklns S3S3213 

4 . Carer Pavto SS’IS 

4 Catvtn Poefe «U3» 

i. Mark O’Meara .. SWJJ5 

7 . crate Stud ter «»** 

8. Bsrnhard Longer 

g. Hal Sutton SScvS 

10. Roger Mattbte 

11. Flaw 2aeHer 

IX Hubert Green S2JS383 

U. Larrv Mite 
u John Mcfwffay 

is. save Ballesteros SBISAJS 

SCORING 

1 . Corey Pavtn. 71S8. i RDV F10VtL7WL a 

SSESKiKSSKKS 


CINCINNATI — Wolved Steve Bird and MJ- 

□ rimet Wad*, wide raceivets; Tom Kilkenny 
and Dave Strotwt EsgbadtonE and Rfcfc Rog- 
ers. running bock. 

DALLAS— Cut Mei Lattany. wide receiver; 
Jimmie Turner, cornerbodc; John Warren, 
punter: Jim Herrmanrv defensive tackle; 
. Tommy Hamm defensive bock; Robert Be- 
y Assort- tot and Rasteo Oce. eornerbacla; Larry 
hicbead- Roocft,Ptao*Weker,ond KenPotko. defensive 
fadeto. 

DETROIT— Cut Ernes! Anderson, runrdna 
SS27JS81 bock; Mika Weaver.guord; Ray Stochowlcz, 
33SUB9 punter; Mika Bas*,Ploeaiaeker; Mike White, 
wgm offensive tackle; Ken Graefaer and Jee mo- 
■ 8345.148 aanlat defe ns ive tackle, and Mike Northcwtt 
$31X539 ond Ricky Stounon, wide reetfvers. • 

$308,315 GREEN BAY— Cut Jim Mryer.puntor:Do- 

■H yyoA vtdToxlora.Macoklckori Perry Hartnettof- 
$2714)44 ten siv e guard; George W. Harris. Itoebortcer. 
$20560 and Mare Hoaon, defensive bock. 

$223734 HOUSTON— Waived Robert Brazlle, llne- 

vn ejun Docker; Adorn Bethea, defensive end; Scott 
$215383 Gordon, guard; Tfm Harris and Brian WJtey. 
<215346 rwmtng bocks: Ooug Kettorroover. offensive 
5213286 tockte, and Wbddall Smith,' wide rertevor. 
$ 9 ^ 19 Placed MM* Johnson, defensive end. on Ihe 
tWured reserve tlsT. 

L 7062-1 (HOtAMAPOUS— Waived 71m Gotten. 
,3.Lmy - Bnrtocker; David Burnettejjffenslvclockle; 
89 7/Cnf- Ian SInrtoir, center; Robert Patefc defensive 


AW 983 008-4 9 1 »• ■ 32)3286 tockfe, and Wbddall MIK wide rec lever. 

SJiSL . 280 398 8Bx— 5 5 0 if" $206638 Ptoced Mike Johnson, defensive end. on Ihe 

<B) and Heath; MCCsAM, Smn BallesiwM tolurad reserve Itet. 

•mifrrntiimdBaone. W— MeCasUlLFr. L“ e^ATom xiSy F1ovd.7B«.l iNOfANAPOUS-WWved 77m Golden. 

■SS£S 53 S 5 rSE®^ 

S5Sy* j**g!» aia sss ’^zss-xzsxsz 

■-*"™^sse 3 !! ^ B r^rs^»sssr~ 

■SfiffSSSti X*" SS&3S 

- „ ,, fenshm end; ondJeffWlHIoBiK whig redovw, 

slajor league Stoidmgs -jj-r-— 55 .KK 5 sKS 5 S£raaS 


wolloce, Darren Graen. Tony Smith and Tran 
Armstrong, wide recelvors. Placed Gfenn 
Oannloon. tight end. en In lured reserve; 
pkxtdMarvIn PeweU,affensivtlackle,an the 
raserve-dto net report list; Maced Bob Cra- 
bttoBnsbockar.on iTJ erife phy i lc otl yunoSAe 
to perform; placed Darrel Ray, defensive 
bock, on the Inlurod w aived list 

PITTSBURGH— Cut Andre Harris, defen- 
sive back; Terry Echols and Todd Seo hn uuh. 
Onebockers; Akm Huff and Stove Utile, nose 
tackles; Craig Colquitt, punter; Roderick 
Moore, running back; John Rodgers, tight 
end. and Daavne McMullen ond Ntarc Quin II- 
vaa wide receivers. 

ST. LOUI S W aived Dennis Williams and 
Richard Svmaik, running bodes; Scott Wil- 
liams, tight end; Louis Wong, offensive tack- 
le; Bob Minor, center; Cart Aiken*, wkfe re- 
ceiver. and Paul Calhoun, defensive back, 
ptoced Bab Harris, linebacker; Vince Bean, 
wide receiver, and Robert Curry and Dtm 
Ralph, defensive tackles, an inlured reserve. 

SAN di EGO— Waived Paul Berner, ouar- 
terbock; zoeh Barnes and Terry Jackson, 
defensive ends; Bobby Crotehoad and Doug 
J ef fe rson, running backs; Joe Kelly ond joe 
Nobles, wide rectevers; Stave Knight, offen- 
sive todeto; Mike Katoliit, guard, and Joev 
Evans, tight end. 

SEATTLE— Placed Jeff Korn to, quartor- 
baOLonlnlur s d reserve. Cut Mark Na po Ht an. 
center; Rav Wllmer. defensive back; Mike 
RusJnek, d e fe n si ve end; Bob Hodotz, I toe- 
backer; Beau Babko, note tockte; Mar* 
Srtilcctit, punter; John Conner, quarterback; 
Johnnie Jones. Nathan Poole and Steve Mar- 
eon, runn tog bodes, ond Judlous Lewis, wide 
receiver. 

HOCKEY 

Notional Hockey Leaooo 

DETROIT— Stoned Harold Sneusts, de- 
fensonai, to o ane-vear contracL 
COLLEGE 

EAST STROUDSBURG— Named Pole Hoe- 
son women's cratscountrv and track and (fold 
coach. 

KANSAS— Named Alvin Gentry assistant 
basketball coach. 

LEHMAN— Announced the resignation of 
Tom Hahao. baosbati coach, who will take the 
same paeltion at Wooner. Named Nick Nlkou 
Interim baseball coach. 

MONTANASTATE — Named Mark Me Neal 
an am i st art football coach. 

WAKE FOREST— Named Jerrv Waliv 
wrtflht asslshati baseketbail cOQCh. 


help California beat Oakland. 
Jacisoii’s home run, his 20th of the 
season and 523d lifetime, came off 
loser Don Sutton. 

Mets 1, Expos 0: In the National 
League's only game, in Montreal. * 
Wafiy Backman drove in the 
game’s only nrn and Ron Darling 
combined on a four-hitter with 
Roger McDowell as New Yoric 
edged the Expos and took a half- 
game l^ad over SL Louis in the 
Eastern Division. (UPl AP) 


Logical, but as often as not a pain in the ego. 
Murphy’s Law seems to measure those brushed by 
performing genius for dunce caps in management. 
Franz Beckenbauer just might be an exception. 

His transition seems as smooth as his stride was 
in action. 

Without pause or apprenticeship he leapfrogged 
every experienced coach in the Bundesliga a year 
ago to acquire the mantle of West Germany’s 
national team manager. 

That team had been the bore of the 1984 Euro- 
pean championship; Beckenbauer, its biggest crit- 
ic, was invited to improve things. So far, he has; In 

Rob Hughes 

World Cup qualifying, Beckenbauer’s team has 
played five games, won five and racked up 18 goals 
against four. 

Sfill fresh-faced and (just) under 40, Becken- 
bauer rid the team of argumentative old pros, 
injected new blood and, with some th in g approach- 
ing the imperiousness of Ids youth, Beckenbauer' s 
boys swept aside Sweden. Portugal and Czechoslo- 
vakia. 

Now. in the summer of his content, Beckenbauer 
accepts another invitation. He shares, with Italy’s 
victorious World Cup coach, fam Beared, a 
FIFA magazine platform. 

Bearzot, as ever, weighs confidence with pessi- 
mism. He will reveal his hand in Mexico at the 
World Cup. 

Beckenbauer, from his text, might be undergo- 
ing a personality transplant. 

For a player who so exuded arrogance, who 
revolutionized the game through spontaneous runs 
from behind the defense, Franz Beckenbauer ex- 
pounds some hardy notions. 

“I panted out,” he writes of the first team 
gathering under his wing, “that 1 placed greatest 
importance on punctuality, exactness and disci- 
pline — things which actually should be obvious in 
a community that is to function perfectly.” 

It was Beckenbauer’s opinion that West Germa- 
ny had deceived itself since (with him as captain) it 
won the 1974 World Cup. and that a really concert- 
ed effort was essential; players, coaches, dubs, 
fans, offi cials and the media must pull together, he 
urged. 

He was presumably not looking for the kind of 
personal public damnation he bad heaped on his 
predecessor, Jupp Dervall. 

Nearly everyone, Beckenbauer reports, did as he 
asked. The mily rare to register a hasty refusal f*l 
couldn’t even exchange a personal word with 
trim **) was Bond Schuster. 

Schuster, the enfant terrible with the Becken- 
bauer touch of technique; Schuster, whose flair has 
piloted Barcelona to the title in Spain yet whose 
dressing room rapport with West Germans, nota- 
bly Karl-Hetnz Rummenigge, is hopeless. 

Beckenbauer detests Schuster’s reaction. “Play- 
ers of my generation.” he writes, “had always 
considered it an honor and a distinction lo belong 
to the national team, and I saw no plausible reason 
why this should be changed. Therefore I issued my 
motto; Who Does-Nol Want to Can Stay at Home. 

“Begging lettere or even pleading are not on my 
program to form a team. In other words, if Schus- 
ter is to return, even now, he and not Beckenbauer 
will have to bend at the knee.” 

Turning to West Germany’s wretched perfor- 
mances in France last summer. Beckenbauer re- 
marks, U I had been displeased to see that some of 
the players made verbally great appearances be- 
tween the matches but once in possession of the 
ball they very quickly lest the courage and turned 
the responsibility away with superfluous cross and 
short passes.” 

And although Beckenbauer has no coaching 
license — a prerequisite for managing in the Bun- 
deshga — he identifies decline with poor coaching 


at many dubs. Give the guys a ball to practice 
with, he implores. Any idiot can be taught condi- 
tion. that's no art. 

He is optimistic that he and bis partner. Horn 
Koppel are instilling the joy of playing, high 
morale and the mil to win. especially in junior 
talents like Uwe Rahn. Olaf Thou. Ralf Faulken- 
mayer, Thomas Bertold and Michael FrontzecL 

This despite punctuating his essay with quotes 
such as “success in football is 20 percent talent and 
80 percent hard woric." from Billy Wright. En- 
gland's former captain. And despite the difficulty 
of negotiating sufficient time to work with players 
—somewhat unusual negotiations, he admits, with 
former teammates Uli Hoeness and Gunther 
Netzer, “whom I used to push to attack with 
running passes and who now defend tire interests 
of their dubs,” Bayern Munich and Hamburg, 
respectively. 

With qualification for Mexico on the horizon, 
his message is to avoid a sense of arrogance and 
carelessness, somehow to dampen the euphoria 
after the excellently played 5-1 victory over 
Czechoslovakia in Prague. 

Quite. But there may be readers who thought, as 
players have thought, (hat Beckenbauer exceeded 
his duties in 1974, that he was dictating the tactics 
and selecting the team. 

That is not correct, Helmut Schoen, the 1974 
manager, has told me. Beckenbauer could not 
change the style. He played his own game others 
adapted to his great individualism. 

Indeed, Schoen had written, in his 1970 book, 
limner am Ball: “One must prepare scrupulously 
and convince players the right selection has been 
made. . . . The team must be convinced the boss is 
right to such an extent that each player should feel 
he himself would have made the same plans and 
decisions.” 

A wise old bird, Schoen, one who led players on 
a long leash and who became wearied in the end by 
sniping media campaigns and money-crazed play- 
ers. 

1 see him now watching Beckenbauer's real turn 
at the helm. Watching and perhaps smilin g as. in 
the honeymoon period, his former pupil boasts: 

“I've heard worried voices say ‘Beckenbauer 
under stress . . . ’ But there isn’t a more stimulating 
job around. 1 cannot imagine a more beautiful 
stress.” 



The new national coach: ‘Sdustev and not 
Beckenbauer, wffl have to bend at the knee.* 


Pro Tennis Computer Does a Number on McEnroe 


Hew York Tima Service 158.54, the top figure in the rank- ATP ranking, as are the orga- would fly in the face of common 

NEW YORK — The computer ing. ^ olhcT S rand slam , 

administered by the Association of The ATP formula has long been events. “They re great believers in going 

— , t, * ^ i r .1. ..-An. ia/.V D.<< Tnhn Cmi*h Mtw-tnr rtf hv lhf> imnH nrn nilM ” Smith <a!n 


“They’re great believers in 


Tennis Professionals for the pur- under attack for its lack of weight- But John Smith, director of by the grand prix roles," Smith 


And this time it has done so with a would seem to be grounds for yet player Tanked first by the computer this seems like such a clear-cut case 
vengeance, causing a magnificent further reconsideration. The who had not been top-seeded by that you have a real conflict The 
for theUJS. Tennis Asso- USTA, which is due to announce the association’s U.S. Open Com- computer says one thing, and the 
dance on ly one week before the its seedings for the open on Thurs- mil tee. On the other band, adher- results seem to say something dse." 
US. Open. day, is permitted to deviate from ing to the computer in this case □ 


US. Open. day, is permitted to deviate from ing to tne comparer in mis casi 

A week ago Sunday, John McEn- 
roe met Ivan Lendl in the final of a - 1 “ — 1 - - 

tournament in Stratton, Vermont, Cn/VD lr r'CJ PPTP U C 

arUK i> mtib*5 

International in Montreal, and Pirate Pitcher Named in Drug Probe 

once more he came away a straight- urr-rom tdfixj /ai»\ „r kha—l 


□ 

The Los Angeles Rams seem 
content to start the National Foot- 
ball League season without star 
running back Eric Dickerson, 
whose attorney said on Monday 
that none of Dickerson's represen- 
tatives has had any recent conver- 
sation with the dub regarding a 


Yet when tbe weekly AT? rank- on Monday becamethe first player drrecuy talked to the investigation of been made between the Miami 
ing was issued on Monday, McEn- drug use m basebaD when he was named as a customer of a man who Dolphins and their star holdout, 
roe had fallen from the top position pl«^ gudty to seUmg corame. , J quarterback Dan Marino. His al- 
to second place, and Lendl had The plea iwas entered _by _Dale Shiftman. ^an anemployed photographer toroey, Marvin Demoff. said Mari- 

«me from No. 2 to No. 1. If you and one of seven men indicted by a grand jury invesugatmg drug sales no ~is prepared for the worst” 
believe that defies logic, you are a ^ oad ^ree Ri^s Stadium. He pleaded gmhy to 20 drug- trafficking # More bad news for the Dol- 
it ic charges; another 91 counts against him were dropped m a plea bargain. a* ;r 


Yet when tbe weekly ATP rank- jP 


PITTSBURGH (AP) — Pitcher Rod Scimy of the Pittsburgh Pirates new contract. Nor has an; 


gone from No. 2 to No. 1. If you and one of seven men indicted by a grand jury investigating drug sales no “is prepared for the worst” 
believe that defies logic, you are a ^ aad ^reeRi^s Stadium. He pleaded gmhy to 20 drug- trafficking # More bad news for the Dol- 

correct But if you bdieve it is phins: As if Ihdr defense weren’t 

downright impossible, then you weak enough with linebacker Bob 

need a refresher course in tbe way Bnidzinski and safety Glenn 

the computer is programmed. £ “ ^ 3S““ dunnS im Md 1983 seasons ' 1 — 

The ATP ranking formula is un- ^ CUI P\ 


“SJSSKSJSaE weak enough with linebacker Bob 
rifiSS5 f SSt^£ T Bnidzinski ^nd safety Glenn 
the^IffZ and [983 smsots. Blackwood holding out for new 


rSnSiiSSSSSMmr So™ who has twk* undergone drug rtMrajton, could not be ^SSTthTa S 

weighted —that is, results that are, itacbed to c»m^L A team spokesn^n said the Pirates would hwe no Do n McNeal. its best cornerback, 
” - • comment on the case. 


KANSAS CITY’ — Ptaced Km Thomas, rav 
nto8Mdc,anlM Physical lyunrtitetoftertorm 
narad list. Placed Ken McAHstcrondMnt- 


Tennis 

Pro Tour Leaders 


say, nine months old have roughly ° ° S r?ir ‘ l Im . . . „ , 1C . . ... , , would be lost for at least two 

the same statistical importanoas Shiffmm faca seottnaof 15 yrarsmjpnsoo, although monihi McNeal rdnjurai the richt 

dsoscfmsnsio^msSrS™ a pojon of tto m*. pins p^a to of SM.0W ^ lial tq)1 b J om rfZs 


Shiftman faces a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison, although he ninths. McNeal ran; 


“^^t^alL f ^^o^52- *7^^ up 16 racks 

rJEXSZSSX Cram lo Try for Record in 2 -Mile Run 


™». — — - , j im ptneod Km McAlklef and MBl- MEN , I. I. 7 «»■« — W — - ■ “ lul ju UAIU vaiuiuau inn y IA. uu 

V John xwms LendL are pmidied into the computer, the LONDON (UFQ —Steve Cram will bid for his fonrth world record ai 

n FMteXi 2 ZOovwed«rt^»- Tioi Mayotte, swum. ?. Mien Jarryit before axe sutomatically djmmat- Cram will have las sights on the two-mile marie of 8 minutes, 13.51 ^ inTcontrart SLme to 

ITS: f^, U T^ea , ^ V 7^ nS?SSS’S2Son ana Mik. Araiortrart. ST ^ stwmds, hdd by fdlow Briton Steve Ovett, al Monday’s Crystal Palace ^ Memphis ShotSts for 

&%SS2S&S ^ It is the workings of these ele- meet among Ebglmid, Poland, Hungary and Ovett has 

post, 737. l i van Lendt. la* poiiitsA JotinMcEnroe. mmts. taken together, that explain yet to decide whether to run m the two-mile race or in the 1,500 meters. i_ lj. ^ 

■— SfiSt’STSS*! S2SS how^ie cornet did its munber worid 4cl500^e 2.000 and the ^ - 

IrtoffeY and jorryd, 4 X 2 i?. vanrtcfcNoa^5977.aAnd^ on McEnroe. His trimuph Sunday mile, narrowly failed to lower the mark in the 1,000. Carlos Scott, a converted center; 

Mie, joi. «r oan -^7; iw*; Qutoioo saiiart. ifefensiv* im*- Gomez. 5X92.9, Borts Becker, suo. ix Miioi- ^ Montreal earned him 192 grand Art Plunkett, a five-year veteran, 

^ M * ar ' ^ui- prfe points prix points, the same rotalhehad [g SdcCfed PrPSlHftnf pf ATP and Scott Bergold, a rookie. But the 

srage putts ^^^f^towuingbadcgrLPtacKiDuQn i.j<^ Meg iu w ife i poi^x ivnn Lews, garnered exactly one year bdore in j offensive line gave up five sacks in 

yS&“VS2-oSE the Toronto tourney J*atww (^ClNNATlfUPn-BeAssodationofTamisProfesaQ^ one game and 11 in the next 

Morris Hafoi5kY.2L& Noe4vij5a 7 , Mikstov Medr, 1^54 LAixfer* purged Monday from the consul- j^on^y selected Matt Doj^e president of the players union. Doyle, 27 • Tbe Minnesota Vikings, trying 

zootior ond Pw 1 ? ren ” * g* 1 - ^ reaervo. pio£*i aj. o<ne. ttnebock- Jorrfd xml 9 , Tim MoyaHe, l.wi la K^vfn ^ consideration- Lendl mean- a professional since 1980, siKxeeds Ray Moore, who was elected in to arouse an otherwise sleepy team, 
^Art8»Fngdd^n«bactoonihe cufiwv whiles earoedl39 pomts m Men- |983 / ^ are dose to adding aitoihffqualS 

LwnY “°2?f ^ w«. re- Eoratifes treal, winch was 138 more than be xh c ATP board also named Mats Wilander vice president; Mike Estep player, Anthony Carter, the wide 


Having given up 16 sacks in 
exhibition games, both losses, 
3t Louis Cardinals may be on 


'orente 

few York 

Jcfrott 

KUtimora 

KBton 

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AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East DlvtsUA 
W L 
73 45 

. a 44 

43 54 
61 Si 


uKiviNM > i mta HnMmri’ Willie GfBflnOflriMflfft I flPQb Connors S39f «541f % Boris 8ickir«S79i4A ^ 

1, Calvin Peefe. XlZZOovlc! uraixxkm; Davo Hattomon, ofterahro line- Tlai Mayotte. 4MS3C4. ?. 

jodc Brandon ana Mika Armantruu), 8259SH L Toma iSmld. MIOB. 9, MMff 


- L Pet C8 
73 45 - 

68 45 JOS * 
« 54 JM » 
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57 59 *471 35 
S3 42 Ml IW 


l.jodc Rentufe. J5L4. Lorry Brandon ana Mlk« Ar^wTrurt. S2S9S11 L Tomas 5mld. SmSS. 9, MllOSto 1 

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^^rrtiiterrtsandTortlClttomiO, RumNL AYP ^feutor Rortftnw ^ 

F SeeS IN REGULATION SSSSid Byron Brawaruonlngbodt. 


Sharoe had been a starter^f^ 
tackle for three years before leaving 
the team in a contract dispute to 


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X John Mafwffev 


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mi in. Pavo Barr. am. (MUun^temfevhocLondRobertHlgglrB Grana prtt poott 

AVERAGE PUTTS PER ROUND M .n n nvTriBMtilin(l)iidntt.PlatidDuQfl l,johnMe6nrag.l961P0lnlL2,l«inUaiKfl 1 
1 . cKtett. 2L57. 2. FJW* totoW. 2*4. X Mots Wltofefer. USL4. jimmy Can. 

a*5. 3, Crtfa Sfodfef# 3*3114 nnernon; DonMcNoaLdeferahteBOtt; Daryl nor*. Utt. 5. Berts Bgdtor, MSI L Yg nnlrt 

EKKSSKSBS 


PCRCENTAOE OF SUfrPAKn™ ^ ^ phySlcai Ifart. 

i,CraWSWter.7l3.iLomrWodWi»ai. MINN esota— C ut Juan JoftraoP. w«* r*. 

rhuno Own. liams. clofeft*tY* ftaclt. 


Chuoo aim. q -G rady. .199. 9, 

m VS 5 . «H *«. .m. 

warn* Gra*r. 


Jorr/d. 1,140. 9. Tim Ntoyattb 1.M8. 11 Kavfn 
CurTWV 1,045. 

WOMEN 

Eoratogs 

h Martina Novratttoua, 51,007779. Z Cttrfe 
Ewt Lloyd, 54915*9. X Hatt MonUUkavO, 


MEW ENGLAND — Hfehfed Krt»> Lee, de~ mtsa. 4. Motena Sukaw. &m. X Pam 
igndvgbadc; Troy Badhw,Prt Brennan and Shrlvor. 067453. L Claudia Kohde-Ktbrt. 
Smshin. auartertacto; RWey Askew. 2253,420. 7. Ztoa Garrison. 
tfahtgnd; Cttuelt Calwn. dofenilvg Rngman; Jordan, *157511 9, KcdftyRtooftjLnSL215. W. 
Randy Soafer, llnobocker; Wfllle MuCKte, Eitznftoffi Smvita, S14X10I . . 

inr&fa; Frank Sutton, offensive line- Graod Pj» Perns 

hv* Dmwttv, punter; JwAfWnsoa I.OtrlsEugrtlJmul.'LJUAMartlnoNauro- 


SAGLES , ngua Stem, auartertacfcs.’ RWey Askew, 

l Cwer*Wto.l2.a.P*' r,,p ®“^“C'^r: tteftf md; Cttuek Calwn. detenshig Raoem: 
Lo^stolwr. R»utv SooUw. Hrafaocker; Vffllte Mu CKte, 

r°_ , n a, Mac O G rodv. CurtlsSH«iwe,LroiB taddo; Frank Sutton, offensive Une- 

5 ^^C0upteandflvddV Gardrter.l J«, Afth»a 

btodfer SIRDIBB -toertlefcor; MkUoot Fwbuwii and Mtta 

1 joov Stodetar. 320. ™?cnilg LcBtone. running bcWta, and Jgrrv Wiiah!.- 

wovnc 

Stodlcr. 290. X Roge f - . n^nfl 9 Bratt ■*» roeotvgr*. Piarad aaytsi WfefstAton, 
I»yi2». X Buddy Wte ftm »• Bran UnetJOCtetr; ^arart PMoo. wtdo receiver. 

uSor. 20. IA Core* 2Bt 


It is the workings ot these eie- meet among cngimia. roiaua, nungary ana uveu nas ^ igg5 Foolba n 

menis, taken together, that explain yd ito deadh whether lo nmm^w^ei^ormthe l^OOmetera. seas®, in his ahsense, the 

how the computer did its number Cram this summer has set worid rccon^thcISOOthe 2,000 and the JgfeW used threedSS - 
on McEnroe. His triumph Sunday mile, and narrowly fafled to tower the mark in the 1,000. Carios Scott, a converted center; 

in Montreal earned him 1 92 grand . . An Plunkttt, a five-year veteran, 

Doyle Is Selected President of ATP “g&tS 

the Toronto tourney that was CINCINNATI (UPI) — The Association of Tennis Professionals on one game and 1 1 in the next 
purged Monday from the comput- Monday selected Matt Doyle president of the players union. Doyle, 27 • The Minnesota Vikings, trying 

er’s consideration. Lendl, mean- ^ a professional since 1980, succeeds Ray Moore, who was elected in to arouse an otherwise sleepy team, 
while, earned 139 points in Mem- |9g3 are dose to adding another quality 

treal, winch was 138 more than ne The ATP board also named Mats Wilander vice president; Mike Estep player, Anthony carter, the wide 

had achieved in Toronto, where^ ^ re-dcct^j treasurer and Jim McManus remains treasurer. Other receiver of the USFL Oakland In- 
having drawn a bye m the nrsi boa^ members indude Colin DowdesweH, Carlos Nirmayr, Harold vaders. The Dolphins had held the 

round, he was beaten in me second, gnomon, Brian Gottfried, John McEnroe and Paul McNamee. rights to Carter until last week. 


Again, that 1 -point performance - - 

was purged Monday, and as a re- l/|10t3JolG 

Uwm. lina nult >Kk ai»Y 


ttmA . suit UK bottom fine reads this way: ^ 

McEnroe’s am^e per tomaanMl y tahia Eagle qmntetock Rn 

ana Gan fa«i, 915.5, Pom swiv#r, 9 fl(L<» Go- ^ n ow 15036 points, uncnangea that Cleveland Brown rookie Benue j 
brteia sabotini. bio. 7 , Mom** Maifevu. 8«. j the orevious week, but stiff in Saturday’s exhibition gfmw 
~ Lendl’s has sbouiD from 147.92 to ‘ Jaworski Calls Kosar a Stiff ” 


ia Eagle quarterback Ron Jaworski, after tdliog a reporter 
d Brown rookie Beraie Kosar lotted a fittie hesitant and 
rda/s exhibition game: ”1 can see tbe headlines now: 


rights to Carter until last week, 
when they traded them lo the Vi- 
kings for linebacker Robin Send- 
lein and Minnesota’s second-round 
draft choice in 1986. The Vikings 
and Carter have agreed on a con- 
tract; all that remains is buying out 
his current USFL contract 









Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TR IB LOVE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21, 1985 


OBSERVER 


King John in the Buff 


By Russell Baker 

N SW YORK — Before the 
camera's invention it was 
harder for famous people to be seen 
naked by their fans than it is today. 
Consider King John. “Bad King 
John," we call him today, because 
he was portrayed in the movie by- 
Claude Rains and was mean to Er- 
rol Flynn playing Robin Hood. 

The truth about “Bad King 
John" is more interesting than 
Warner Brothers dared hint. The 
Production Code of Hollywood's 
heyday forbade movies to deal with 
such subjects as King John's desire 
to be seen in the nude by all En- 
gland. 

Under tbe code, the natural, 
healthy, human urges of the stars, 
even of royal stars like King John, 
could not be shown on the screen. 
The truth is that King John was a 
sensitive man who wanted to be 
adored by his people and was sad- 
dened about being called “Bad 
King John." Having read about 
Camelot. he knew about the magi- 
cian Merlin, and wondered why no 
king had hired one since. 

So he traded two dukes, four 
earls and 12 barons for a foreign 
magician named Fritz, which an- 
gered dukes, earls and barons all 
over England, thus leading to the 
Magna Cana, but that is another 
story. "Fritz," he told his magician, 
"I want my people to see the real 
King John, the decent, sensitive but 
magnificently well-built fellow 
who's their liege lord." 

"I ll give it to you straight from 
the shoulder. Flex," said Fritz. 
“Buttoned up in that armor, with 
those sequined whatever* down the 
legs and that goatee on the chin 
makes you look like Cbude Rains, 
a reai no-no for the decent-sensi- 
tive market. You’ve got to be a hide 
more Stallone." 


King John was mystified. Not 
being a magician, he could not 
know the future would produce 
Sylvester Stallone, better known as 
“Rocky." also better known as 
“Rarabo.'’ 

“Stallone?" 

Fritz said. "Imagine a sweet guy 
everybody calls ‘Rocky’ who be- 
comes famous by punching out 
sides of raw beef. Imagine a really 
swell fellow everybody calls 
‘Rarabo* who can single-handedly 
wipe out one oi the world’s better 
armies." 


King John liked what he was 
hearing. “1 want to be 'Sweet John' 
and ‘Really Swell King John.” he 
said. “What do I do, Fritz?" 

"Get out of the armor. Majesty. 
Then take off your chain-mail un- 
derwear, and let your subjects see 
what you look like in the altogeth- 
er.” 

“Naked?" said the king. “Naked 
as a jaybird?" 

“Tbe jaybird hasn't been invent- 
ed yet," said Fritz. 

“Of course it has.” said the 
who hated being contradicted, 
have the robin, the sparrow, tbe 
hummingbird, the turkey buzzard 

“Sorry," said Fritz. "A slip or the 
tongue. I meant to say the camera 
hasn't been invented yet." 


If the camera bad been invented, 
it would have been easy for the king 
to go to a studio and prance around 
in his pelt, and afterward there 
would be pictures which, if only- 
magazines had been invented, 
could be seen by everybody in En- 
gland, thus showing exactly what 
kind of king they bad. 

“After that 1 would be adored?" 

“You would be a star, Highness. 
True royally, like Stallone. Mon- 
roe. Miss America, Madonna — " 

“You're talking future again, 
and we’re sLQl in the Stone Age. 
Let's get down to stone tacks." 

Fritz had an idea. Without cam- 
eras. tbe king would have to do 
nude personal appearances. But the 
shock might bother the people, so 
they would put out some hokum 
about the king having a new suit of 
clothes made, and everybody 
would be told to stand at the curb 
when the king first wore iu and of 
course everybody would pretend 
the king was wearing a new suit, 
but in the meanwhile getting an 
eyeful of what he looked like in the 
buff — to wit, gentle, sensitive, but 
well-built, real star quality. 

The king agreed. but fearing the 
people would not believe their eyes, 
he paid an urchin to shout, “The 
king has no clothes on!" After this 
cry, everybody gazed on the king 
with prurient curiosity and con- 
cluded that he either licked sound 
judgment or was centuries ahead of 
his ume. The latter, as we now 
know, was the sad truth of the mat- 
ter. 

New York Tima Service 


Keeping Track of the Widening Gyre 


Bv Michael Norman 

Xnr York Times Service 

L INDEN, New Jersey — Things seem to 
• run in cycles. The days revolve dawn to 
dusk around the wheel of seasons. History 
has its ends and its beginnings, too. “Turning 
and turning in the widening gyre.” wrote 
Yeats. Scientists track the loop of life and 
death. And poets like Wallace Stevens spend 
their time spinning: “Yet that things go 
round and again go round has a rather classi- 
cal sound." 

Why. then, should anyone doubt Michael 
Zahcnrhak? “Either we’ve been conned and 
the greatest think ers in the world are fools," 
he said, “or there is something to the idea erf 
cycles and we. in our arrogance, choose to 
ignore it " 

Zahorchak. a writer and a former executive 
at the American Stadc Exchange, is a member 
of the Society for the Investigation of Recur- 
ring Events, a group with a keen interest in 
things cyclical, from trends in the stock mar- 
ket lo sleep cycles. 

There is nothing mystical or astrological 
about cycle theorists. Many of them are hard- 
headed businessmen looking for an edge in 
the market or, at least, a way to moke on 
informed guess about its direction. 

For Zahorchak. however, tbe study of cy- 
cles has become a way of life. Several years 
ago he discovered the work of Raymond H. 
Wheeler, a psychology professor who be- 
lieved that all social behavior was related to 
climate. Lhat climate was cyclical and could 
be predicted and that one could thus make 
reasonable assumptions about the future. 

Wheeler died before he could publish his 
findings. Zahorchak obtained his research, 
thousands of pages of charts and Tacts and 
theory- papers. 

Zahorchak contends that temperature and 
rainfall affect the body and mind. On hot, 
humid days, he said, people are lethargic, 
while on a cool day in April they are full of 
vigor. In short, “vitality and aggressiveness" 
decrease in midwinter and midsummer, when 
temperatures are at their extremes, and revive 
in the fall and the spring, he said. 

Next, he asserts, from a study of tree rings 
and sun spots and weather reports it is possi- 
ble to chan cycles in the world's weather back 
to 600 B. C„ discovering when it has been 
hotter or colder, weuer or drier than normal. 
These fluctuations have occurred regularly at 
measurable intervals, the most important of 
which is the hundred-year cycle, he said. 

It is best to think of this cycle, Zahorchak 
said, in terms of seasons: Ii begins with a 
springlike period of weather that is warmer 
and wetter than usual and ends with a winter- 
like period, colder and drier than usual 
He argues that it is during the temperate, 
springlike wann-wet phase of the hundred- 
year cycle lhat humans are at their best and 
that civilization has flourished, with prosperi- 


: =vfe>, • ■ 



Dati Fron/lKa N*w York Tom 

Michael Zahorchak with dimate charts at his home in linden. New Jersey. 


ty. enlightened leadership and a proliferation 
of the arts and sciences. 

During the cold-dry, winterliie phase, be 
believes, the psyche often turns on itself, 
economies stagnate, dictators emerge, chaos 
and anarchy reign. 

U. S. society, in Zahorchak’s view, has just 
emerged from the “winter" of one of these 
cycles. 

“It began in the 1960s," he said, ^when all 
of a sudden you had extremes in irrational 
behavior, students marching in the streets, 
Johnson with his insistence on guns and but- 
ter, business trying to make irrational acqui- 
sitions. 

“There were situations that tested the very 
foundations of society: protests by blacks 


and women. This forced society to look at 
itself. Institutions that were weak either 
t-hang ad or went under. This prepared us for 
the start of a new cycle, new freedoms and 
new ways of looking at one another.” 

Now for the spring of the cycle and the 
advent of another golden age: Interest rates, 
Zahorchak predicts, will go down. Strong 
leadership will emerge. More emphasis will 
be placed on the arts and humanities. 

All this is a simplified version of a detailed 
plan for life that has at its root the notion that 
if one knows the cycles and can make adjust- 
ments in behavior, one will not get wirt. 

In other words, sell when the market is up 
and don't write poetry when everyone else 
wants to read prose. 


PEOPLE 


Stowaways Miss Goal 


Two Irish boys are in tbe dog- 
house, and some Air-In dia employ- 
ees soon will be. after the young- 
sters stowed away on a flight to 
New York because they wanted to 
see their favorite television star. 
Mr. T of the “A-Team.” The airline 
said it was conducting a security 
investigation because Nod Murray. 
13. and Keith Byrne. 10, told New 
York authorities that they slipped 
aboard an Air-India flight at Lon- 
don’s Heathrow Airport without 
tickets or passports. Back home in 
Dublin, facing the prospect of no 
pocket money for several weeks as 
p unishm ent. Byrne said: “I really 
did hope to see BA,” the adven- 
turer played by Mr. T in the series 
about four Robin Hood-like Viet- 
nam veterans. The beys were first 
caught on an Irish Sea ferry head- 
ing for Wales; they were put on the 
return ferry and Irish police were 
informed. But the two managed to 
elude the police and remain aboard 
for the next sailing to Wales. They 
took a train to London and a bus to 
Heathrow, where they followed 
passengers through passport and 
ticket controls to the New York- 
bound Air-India flight. “We saw a 
plane and we asked a man where it 
was going. He told us New York. 
When going on board, we were 
iked for 


Questions," a collection of about 
3,000 pronouncements by the fun- 
damentalist Shiite Moslem leader. 
The 432-page book from Westview 
Press of Boulder, Colorado, a pub- 
lisher of scholarly books, is be- 
lieved to be the First complete En- 
glish translation of the religious 
code that guides Iranian Shiites. 

□ 

Ella Fitzgerald. 67, has been re- 
leased from a Washington hospital 
after a week of treatment for a 
respiratory problem. Tbejazz sing- 
er's road manager. Pete Caveflo, 
said she would return to her Cali- 
fornia borne for a five-week vac ra- 
tion before resuming her perfoi- 
mance schedule at the Hollywood 
Bowl in late September. 

□ 

Erik Estrada and Peggy Rowe, 
who share billing in a soon- to-be- 
released movie called “Light 
Blast.” were married Monday in 
Rome and are on their honeymoon 
there. 


Penthouse 
Cheryl Rixon 


has to give 
— the value 


of a car and other gifts promised to 
vinner of the 19*9-80 Pet i 


her as w inner of the 1979-80 Pet of 
the Year pageant — Justice Alvin 
Klein of the New York State Su- 
preme Court has ruled. The judge 
said Penthouse breached its c otf: 
tract with Rixon by failing to deli - 
S75.000 handmade Diamante 


er a 


asked for our tickets, but we said 
our mother was following behind 
with them and we were allowed to 
go ahead,” Byrne said. 

^ car, a whirlpool, a cruise for two. 

About 15,000 people attended a lingerie, chocolates, and other 
four-hour outdoor performance by items. Rixon, 31. an Australian 
opera stars in Verona, Italy, to aid who bills herself as a rock singer 
African famine victims. The and actress, sued Penthouse for $5 
amount of money raised was not min in n saying she received “a frac- 
immediately anno unced. The event tion" of the $1 95,000 in prizes she 
will be shown on television in sev- was promised. Klein noted that 
end European countries and the Penthouse's president. Bob Guc- 
United States, a spokesman for the 


organizers said The Spanish tenor 
Jost Carreras, who served as mas- 
ter of ceremonies along with the 
actor Christopher Lee, was one of 
the most applauded singers. Other 
performers included Montserrat 
Caballe, Giuseppe Di Stefaoo, 
SberriD MBnes, Rosalind Plow- 
right, James King, Renato Bntson 
and Juan Poos. 


Drinking wine is illegal and sin- 


prea_ . 

done, gave Rixon keys to a Dia- 
mante that was on the stage during 
the pageant but that the car be- 
longed to someone else; the car’s 
maker has gone out of business. 

□ 

Prince Wfflan Alexander, 18, ef- 
dest son of Queen Beatrix and ben- 
to the Dutch throne, has been 
drafted into the Royal Dutch Navy 
for an 18- month stmLaspokestt^ 
confirmed Tuesday. As there has 
been something of a shortage -of 

I- L ■ ! TT e 


vr wv iq a ii*i, aui uuui oAiiUbUiuig \jl a auvitogv vi 

ful, and on Judgment Day those male heirs in the House of Orange, 
who did not abstain will regret it, Willem Alexander is the First heir 
Ayatoftah Ruhoflah Khomeini of to the Dutch throne to serve in the 
Iran says in "A Clarification of military since 1870. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS m 
EngSsh. Pan [drily] 634 59 65. Rome 
678 03 20. 


HAVE A MCE 0AYI BOKEL Hob a 
nice day! Bofad. 


MOVING 


INTERDEAN 


WHO BSE FOR YOUR 
NEXT INTBMATIONAL MOVE 

FOR A FES ESTIMATE CAU 


AMSTERDAM: 

ATHENS: 

BARCELONA: 


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BRUSSELS: 

CADIZ: 

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GENEVA: 

LONDON: 

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ZURICH: 


[0711 89.93.24 
01 1961.12.12 
03)6523111 


■■11)66062 
04211170591 I 
02)720.95.63 


956)8631441 
[ 06190)2001 
022)43.85.30 
01)961.41.41 
[01)671 .24.50 
■■7072016 
1415036 
7801622 
■■49000 _ 
06)526^^ 

01 pH 


11955520 

163.20.00 


FOUR WINDS 
INTERNATIONAL 

Officai Worldwide 


LONDON 


m 


578 66 11 


fKSr CLASS SBMCE 
ASSURED EVSEY MOVE 

CONTINEX. Sntal moves, cars, bog 
e. wwridwkfe. CaB Crafe Parts 


%r>8 


18 81 (near Opera). 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


NICE 

MONT BORON 

Eweptiandl view and access sea 
Superb 8-bedroom estate + many 
outbidding^ in /JXBxjjTu^xirt. 


Justified hiSi price, j 
w Copemtc, 


32 rut 


Paris 16. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


MOUGR4S 

EXCEPTIONAL 

New PrawHjde House of 378 sqjn. 

Comoro***: 

- Main Houe vim 3 bedrooms, eodt 
with its own bathroom En Suite Mas- 
ter has Fireplace; Kitchen with dl Mod- 
em Conveniences.- Diring Roam: Study; 
Large Salon with Fireplace; Powder 
Sooth; Office; Workshop. 

- Separate Guest Apartment of 2 Bed- 
rooms, Kitchen, Living Room with fire- 
place & Bathroom. Syarate Staff Sta- 
do. Covered Healed Swimnvng Pod, 3 
m. Hecith SPAJacuzri Style, completely 
enclosed. 

• Over 400 iqjn. of terraces for enter- 
trinjng. 4Car Groge + Cm Pari - fully 
equipped For Chauffeur to mriridn 


- latest 'User Beam' 5ecunfy System 6 
dosed Circuit Television. 1 5 m. Cdmmu- 
rtiarfiocs Antenna. Telex, 300 sam. put- 


tain & remote control garden hgthng 
system. 

- Situated m 5,000 sqm. Park, backing 
on to the Natianol Forest at entrance « 
Goff Qub of Cares-Mougins. 

Residence for Embassy, or Consular Of- 
fiaal. or fcnt'l Excufives searching com- 
fortable 4 5Mm* residence m 5owft of 
France. 15 mins, from Nice Airport. & 
spo® for privrte N eEc uptei tending. 

Total inve s t m e nt of F^^OO.OOO. how- 
ever. owner needs to sell for personal 
reason. Therefore will consider reason- 
able offer. 

CaB Monte-Carta 
33 (93) . 25 74 79 


COTE D'AZUR, 

, 600 VILLAS FOR SA1E 

from $1 50,000 to $3,000,000! Whatev- 
er yaw tastes, whatever your budget 
S^ierthodt Inti, Cannes has the vffla 
you desire In fad, now a a pwtiataty 
□dmttogious tune to invest pi a Cote 
d'Azw property. Find out why by ecfl- 
usg Ke* or Mark on J?31 38 19 19. 

SSI. 47 la Croeette. 06400 Carnes. 


CHARMING SMALL V1UA. artroc- 
hvehr furrahed, garden overtook™ 
Metfaerrcrean m the old vitoge erf 
Roquebrune, Cap Month, 2 double 
bedrooms. 2 angle bedrooms. 314 
baths. FFlJOOjm Tel (93) 35 42 26. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR S ALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


COTE D'AZUR: Eze sur Met: Lovely 
and# Proven^de Vila patotamic 
view, perfect condition. LivingJI bed- 
rooms. 3 baths. 1=2.100,000. AGENCE 
BOVIS, BP 63, 06310 BeauKeu-sur- 
Mer. TeL [9^ 01 00 36. 


jtubiia l ruA|.ii 

sam. garden. Caen, 

Fl .200,000. Promotion 
MoartWaWNce. Tel: 93-87 08 20L 
Th.- 461 235 


SAINT JEAN CAP FERRAT, panoram- 
ic 500 view, Provengale 7 roans. 90 

tana. ro^HM,uuu. rromown Mozart, 
Ptace Mazal. 06000 Nke. Tefc 93E7 
08 20. 71* 461 235 


CANNES: Near Carlton, 90 sqJti. du- 
. F7W.Q00. Equipped kitchen. Tet 
99 09 65 


Eg* 


GREECE 


SWATHOS: 58,000 sqjn. with private 

beach, teed by law for a 
km from 


hotel 2 bn From town, S 
Architect -hr otos, tel: 04 27-2 


HOLLAND 


AMSTERDAM, NEAR CONCStT - 

Gcbauw. Luxurious house. 3 stares. 7 

rooms, 2 btchens. 2 bathrooms, 225 
sqjn. Writer lomansttoat I OB. 1075 
RA Amsterdam. Tel: 020-715701 


IRELAND 


ATTRACTIVE HCXJ5E FOR SA1£ lo- 
cated in DukAn Mountains, 13 miles 
from city oerter. house includes 5 
bedrooms. 3 receptions, bar. fitted 
tocher & playroom. 3,000 sd-ft. situat- 
ed on aver 1 acre with grazing & 
pleasure rights over 590 acres. Mag- 
nificent panor am ic views, fnshm 
£160,000. Tel London 01-580 1077 
during office hotrfS. 


PARIS St SUBURBS 


ST NOM LA BRETKHE 
SUPERB ESTATE 

217 sqjn. living space. 

Private indoor swimminqpool, Rnresh 
sauna, smrdse roam. 1700 sgjn. park. 
VERY HIGH CLASS 
Justified price 

13) 462 SO 71 after 6 pm 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MONACO 


CENTER OF 
MONTE CARLO 

PARK PALACE 

MAGNIFICENT 3-roam ointment (175 
s<i.m| far sale in detaxe residential build- 
ing with pool & sauna, dose to the 
famous Como, fviy equipped modern 
kitchen, breathtak in g view of the Meck- 
lerranean with cefiar & parking space. 

Far further dettds please contact: 

A.GJLD.I. 

26 Bis 3d Pniwesse Charlotte 
Monte Carlo, MC 98000 Monaco 
Tel: (93) 50 66 00. Totanc 479417 


SPAIN 


MALLORCA - ttiETAS. New 1 bed- 
room flat, facing the sea, fumbftJ 
£36.000. Tel Span 34 jT3) 40 19. 


SWITZERLAND 


LAKE GENEVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Lovely apartments with magnificent 
views of Lake Geneva and mauntans. 
Mrnitreu*. VBors, Verbier, Les Dtabler- 
ets. Chateau aOex near Gstood, 
Leysin. Excellent OpporhmrtHes 
Far Foreigners 
Prices from Sri 23.000. 

Liberal mon a c o m at 6V-i% interest. 
GLOBEPIAN SA. 

Real Etoate Specicfeft 
Av Mon Sepal 24. 

CH-1005 Lausanne. SwnseriandL 
Tel: (21) 22 35 1Z H*: 251 85 MEJS 
fiefttefisfsed Sface 19710 


LAKE G84EVA + LUGANO. Moo 
treux, VBars, Gstood Region, loctmo 
l Aicona & many famous mountain 
resorts, mqmficenr NEW APAET- 
MENT5 / CHAL5TS / VJUAS avnd- 
aWe far foreigners. From U5SSLOOO. 
B*S «hwca Mortgages at 6WJEv Swiss 
residency paraHe H. SEBOID 5A 
Tour Gnse 6. CH-1C07 LAUSANNE. 
21/2526 11. LUGANO 91/ 68 7648. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


USA GENERAL 


LAKE TRAVIS 
AUSTIN, TEXAS 

700 Aces 

4 Mies Lake Frontage 
Unique Cove With 
Strong Development Potential 
Mtnteder/Kiafl Co. 

3703 Speed way 
Austin. Terra 78705 
(512) 477-5827 


USA 

COMMERCIAL 
& INDUSTRIAL 


REAL ESTATE IN COLORADO 
TO BE SOLO BY OWNER 
90 unit ocartrnerts & one office build- 
ing, excellent condition, good cash flow 
& high capitalization rate. 

Box 2612 Herald Tffcune, 

92521 NeuBy Codex. France 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Embassy Service 

8 Avaae Mum 
75008 Paris 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 

PHONE 562 78 99 


EIysees~Concorde 

A otrlmmH s / Houses 
Short tern 


uw i h kh from T we fc on wres t s 


ABP. 9 Rue Rqytee, 75000 Paris 
TeL (I) 265 11 99. Telex 64Q793F. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/ SHARE 


CANADA 


Short term rentals. The Market Suites, 
80 Front St. East. Ste. 222, Toronto, 
MSE IT4, Canada (4161 862-1096. 

GREAT BRITAIN 


LONDON. For the best Funushed flab 
and houses. Consult Ihe Speriafcts: 
PMSj*. Kav and Lewis. Tel: South of 
Park 352 fall. North of Park 722 
5135 l Telex 278*6 RESIDE G. 


HOLLAND 


BY THE LAKESIDE MQNTRHJX. A 
kncuncws 100 sqjn. apartment avaS- 
aWe for sde to foreiflnexs. TeL Lon- 
don 01-262 7191. 


Renfhouse International 
020448751 (4 lines) 

Nederhoven 19-21. Amsterdam 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


SHORT TBM STAY. Advantages of a 
hotel without iPcaneriences. fed a 
home in noe studtas, one bedroom 
and more m Ports. SORHJM: 80 rue 
do ITJnivenrtfi, Paris 7th: 544 39 40 


81 AVEFOCH 

ivxwiaui Stadias 
Phone, aster TV, krtdien. short term 
lease. No agency fees. F4 500/ month. 
Veit today, 11 am to 6 pm 
Te£ 574 8257. 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSBH 8 th 

Srucfio, 2 or 3-room op a li n er*. 
One month or more. 

LE CLAR1DGE 359 67 97. 


6!h: ST GERMAM MS PISS. Oxrm- 
hg duplex, in hdtaricol setting. Ion 
fcrng, eaf-m-te«cheiijbe*oom. bam, 
in perfect concEtioa r7000; 720 37 99. 


6IH LUXEMBOURG. I 
UucSo on garden, full bash, 
bean*. Wfilf furred 
720 37 99 


APAKTMBtT TO SHARE near Opera 
dl amforb. R2,5CO/ircmti:. Aualabie 
Aug. 23 . Nov, 1 ; 233 29 17. 


PENTHOUSE A VS MONTAIGNE 
near Champs Bysees, 120 stun. + 
targe tenoca, high doss. 359 B8 44. 


PORTE MAJLLOT Luxurious 2 -room 
apartment. F2500 vweldy, mnttwn 4 
weeks. Tel today: 572 66 13. 


SHORT TERM in Latin Quote. 
No agents. Teh 327 38 83, 


ODEON ROOMATEfor high doss flat. 
Your share: F3400/month. 634 1X1. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


7 TH UNIVERS 1 TE 

Excepliond, 300 sqjn. newly redone, 4 
receptions', 7 bedrooms. 4 baths. Pork- 

inarafcooa 

EMBASSY SERVICE 563 68 38 


WECT SUBURBS. (IteugMd). Lovely 56 
»m. Ik*. «qw«a kitchen, tege 
Inina medium bedroom, bath, celar, 
garage. CaB GAB. 574 4216 


USA 


Braid New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 

A Unique 

Hotel Suite Residence 

offering 

pre-opening savings on 
6 mo., 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 

featuring 

Studio, 1-Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and all with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 

Executive Services Available 

Model Suites 

(212) 371-8866 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


Arizona, U.SA 

WeS retaUdicd general red estate 
company desires to havu a Represento- 
trvn Manger. Top commeson deoL 
Wearenoftsubdvidenar late promot- 
ers. We Itande everything in generd 
red estate. Write SlF.C, Bob 4142, 
Scottsdale, Arizona 8526) USA. 


B4GU5H SPEAKWG sdeMirf wanted. 
Tel: 770 80 69, or preforaay visit is in 
person' at bnchtuno, PAKJMERIE; 3 
nte du HsUer, Pans 9, Metro Opera. 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


AUTOMOBILES 


UNKXffiCADBl ACFIDORADOootv 
verttate. \m.tam maes,FlBOjOOa 
Tet Pans 348 71 51. 


MEKBS 450 S& 1978. 80,000 
Ateencanaeet. perfocf cdk£- 
twrv ALL OPTO®, ussiojoua 
(SwiB aatomjtaiefl. Tte: Geneva 22 / 
47 48 00 anytime. 


BEAUmUY RESTORB} *59 Sendcy 
S-2. white, ton feather, origind su» 
roof. DM55000. Td UK 01 -Sm 9626. 


AUTO RENTALS 


CHARC. RBff A CAR. Prerfifle an 
with phonei Rots Spun, Mercedes. 
Jaguar, BMW, bnousnes, smol can. 
iSrfierre Oreron, 75008 Pons. Teh 
Telex 630797 


7203040. Tetex 


FCHAROC 


PAGE 12 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIHEDS 


DUTCH BOY 17, wishes to learn 
French & Eve with fine French frenfy 
[hfa or vidnity) in exchange for gen- 
eral hoosoworic/gardediw. Cal Pbd 
Vdk, Hdtaadb m 8S5531BT am. 


GOMAN FASHION MODBL WeB- 
educated, muUSngud, tada forirter- 
estteg poatioA Lowon 2450080 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


Don't rein ‘ 
INTKNATKJNAL 
SEOSTAHAL POSITIONS 

TUESDAYS 

in Rn XT OatefU Section. 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


FRBKH/ENGUSH SECRETARY. OP 
Programmer badtground (ret S 
years in LLS. Relumig to Tcdaute 
region. Seek remand* positioa Be- 
ta Box Mi Hwcfa Tribune, 
NeuRy Odex. France 


W21° 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


NANNE/GOVERNESS, very experi- 
•nced with children, kind meet no- 
lured person free now. Fry Staff Con- 
wbarts. 7 ffigh St, Aldenhot ) kilts 
UK=CB23ia69. Ck ficeered. 


ENGLISH NANMB A mothers' Mps 
No* Agency, 53 Church fid, Hove, 
Sussex. Teh Brighton (273) 290U 


Place Your Classified Ad Qidckfy and Easily 

in the 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

By Phone: Cafl your local IHT representative with yow text. You 
wifl be in formed of the east wuneefiotefy, and onoe prepayment is 
made your ad wifl appear within 48 hours. 

Cost: The bade rete a S9J0por Ene per day + toed tares. There are 
25 letters, signs arte spaces in tfn first fite and 36 in (he followiig ties. 
Minimum spare it 26m. No abhrevtostoni accepted 
CndB Credte Amerioon Express, Diner's Qub, Eurocard, Mastor 
Card, Access and Visa 


Hupoma 

Paris: (For ckasifiod only): 
747-464)0. 

omopE 


IAT1N AMERICA 

Aim: 41 40 31 




26-36-15. 
Aflienm 361-8397/360-2421 . 
: 343-1899. 

(01)329440. 
h (069) 72-67-55. 

: 29-5894. 

Lisbon: 67-27-93/66-25-44. 
London: (01)836-4802. 
Mmhrisb4S-2B91/4553306. 
MBore (02) 7531445. 
Norway: (03) 845545. 
Rama: 679-3437. 

Swwtec (08) 7569229. 

Tel Aviv: 03-455 559. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt 

UNinP STATES 

Now York (212) 752389a 
WootCoash (415) 362-8339. 

SOUTH AFRICA 

421599. 


>331454 
1:514505 
UrnoB 417852 
FkmreB«69Q511 
San Joore 221055 
SredtaBte 6961 355 
Soo-Poolo; 852 1893 

MIDDLE EAST 


: 246303. 

Kwnoifr 5614485. 

Lobcnon: 341 457/879. 

Oaten 416535. 

Saudi Arabia: 

J eddah . 667-1500. 

UAX: Dubai 224161. 

FAR EAST 

Ban g kok: 3900667. 

Hong Konre 5-213671. 
Mreda: 8l7 07 49. 

Sooafe 735 87 73. 

Skwort 222-2725. 4 

Tarwm.- 752 44 25/9. f 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 

Mel b ou rne: 690 8233. 

p 929 56 39, 957 43 20. 
19833. 

P addfogto a . Quso n terei d. 

369 34 53. 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 
in ffw InSemaHonal HerSdfit 

bone, where mere than a Hurd 
of a mffl bn rea de rs world- 
wide. mote of wham are fit 
business and industry, wtt 
read U. Just teles us f Parts 
61 3595) before Warn., en- 
suring that we eon telex you 
bade, and your mes sa ge wi 
appear within 48 hours. The 
rah, h US.S9.BO er heal 
equivtden I per Ene. You mast 
indude complete and veriB- 
atio biding address. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


JOIN 

PRUDENTIAL 
IN EUROPE 

We offer a kwath* meeket in Europe 
among U5. nv Story & ovikon person- 
nel, with high earninre potemtiaL The 
first SeO.COua year o IJfi. Income Tax 
anduded One year of successful kfe 
murance sales experience, a current 
vtekJe U5. life insurance EcenM & 
NASD Reparation is an absolute re- 
quirement for contracting. 

tatenwm held mrtmxt By n 
Warmheim, West Germany. 

For infarmotion contact 
Les G41espey & Jan Hudson 
General Agents for Europe 
Prudential Insurance Co. of America 
Foreign Operations OAAD-4DN 

P.O. Bax 38S flHT] 

Fort Washmjjtan. Pa 19034, U.SA. 

In Eurooe Call W. Germany: 

TXcoai} 471077. 

WraWKV^WWBEffflDW 
SOUTHEAST ASIA IN NOVEMIH 


* SAFETY FIRST * 

Mien i nterested m a second travel 

ALTEA i Aficonfe > Span. 



International Business Message Center 


CAPITAL WANTTU 


OFFSHORE & UK 
LTD COMPANIES 

(ncorporarion arte management m UK. 
He of Man, Turks. Angulte, Channd 
Hands. P an a ma Liberia, Gferohar ond 
most other offshore areas, 

• Confidential advice 
■ lirnnediuM avalabkty 


services 

• Bearer shares 

• Boat ragssira&ons 

• Accounting 6 adninstrotion 

• Mail, telephone & tele* 
booklet from: 
IPORATB 

SERVICES LTD 
Head Office 

Ml Pleasant, Douteas, We of Man 
Tet Douglas (0624)23718 
Telex 628554 SBECT G 
London Itopreientanve 
2-5 Old Bond 3 ^ London Wl 
Td 01-493 4244. Tlx 28247 SCSLDN G 


JOJOBA - LIQUID GOLD 

MVESTORS B BROKBtS 

The mirade Jojoba cfl. produced From 
a plant grown in the USA wtach kves 
for Over 1 00 years, has unique, out- 
standing quofities end con fovorebly re- 
place mineral & artmai breed Uxi- 
conto Other es ta bl i shed uses, 
coutwia. _ pharraoceutknls. food, 
manufacturing. 

“ ‘ “ Plantations Already Pro- 
dntent h 


on Investment fa Ffart 
Year. By End Of Hi Year. Returns 
Equal Initial Amount Inverted. 
Thereafter, projections show average 
annual income of 33%. For cantatoe 
derails contac t - ALJOBA BESARQL 
Box 2502, Herald Trbune. 

92521 Netrily Cedax. France 


Minin 


- US $5000 


5WTTZB0AND, LAME GENEVA oreo. 
foreigner! con buy. 

BUtLDiNG with 6 q M tmgtts dl rent- 
ed out. Pncfc SF1 .920.000. Lomcnne 
21/25 26 II, H.SE80LDS A 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


NORADEANNEWSLETTBI 

Send far your FREE 

LONDON 
METALS REPORT 


Rogotered London Cm ■■ nudity Broken 
we offer a complete service in ol 
COMMCXHTY WTIJSS MARKETS. 
Also, for details ol ear 
COMMODITY INVESTMENT 
PSOGRAM 

Tefc London 621 1864 or write lo 
NORADEAN ltd [IHT). 48 Ptansabon 
Hse, ( fe ndhureh St. London EC3M 3DX 
Telex 894560 COME» G. 


U.5. REAL ESTATE 
LARGE PROJECTS 
FOR YOU TO BUY 
OR BUILD 

EXPBtnSE PROVIDED M 

• Resecrch 
re Pkameifl 

* Services en be provided 
in real estate - law. 
mc m oB em ent, lean xifomxrfion 

Whet are your needs? 
Contort: US Real Erfate 
lav 8 Dev Swvfees Inc 
500 Chreban Haase 
ISO Regent Street 
Leaders W1R 5 FA 
Tel: 01-734 5354 


FIDUCIARY BANKING cn tog. ccl 
taterufaed foam. The oily asmner- 
riol bank with a reneswative office 
in London spcaafissw m this service. 
Arab Owrtcm Bonk & Trust (W.IJ 
Ltd. 28 B)«k Prtnee toed, London 
SE1. tef- 01-7353171 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 
BANKS 

INSURANCE COMPANIES 

Moiing - T el e p hone - Telex 
Put warelate stntzi 
We of Mon, Jersey. Guermsy, 
Gibrahor, Pcnama. Liberia 
Luxanboura. Andies, UC 
Ready made or speaol 
Free eufJanatory booklet 
Boat reparations 
London representative 


Telex 627691 SPtVA G 


MONEY TREES ? 

YES ktvest in one of America's mast 
•rating technologic^ breakthroughs at 
a bSondoflo industry. We hove plant- 
ed mare nut tree S in 1984 than arty 
other developer in our State. 

High cmaual e anwiR ti pr ojec te d far 
mreiy, many votes out, wo guaran- 
tee to tmeiraitaa favi utoi eii t . 
BROrag^ PfQUIBB INVTTHJ. 
Material avcdlebto EngSjh. French, 
German Box 2358, Hereto Tribune. 
92521 NeuJIy Cede*. France 

Minimum inve s tment - 11387,950 


COMPUTER PORTRAIT SYSTEMS 
($10,000 2? 000 K£\ and supp&es: 
T-shrts, nbbom. pesters, colctearj, 
pureefi etc. Moor crertt cadi oe- 
cepred Kemo 16. Paafoch 170340 
Frankfurt. TeL- 747BC8 T* 412713 


OTWOffi BANKING - FWucisry ser- 
vices, cn lateral, l/G, bonk notes & 
commeracf toon services. Write: 
Praetonqn, 243 M Huron St, Smte 
800. Tofedo. Oho 43604 USA. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


SWnZERlAND 

Safety first far you end your fantbr: We 
help set up business and leoirrdd 
property, obtain permanent residency 
(permit B. wort perrml, pemvt C & nato- 
rafaahon). Confidential information 
only by a porsond interview m Europe. 
Sond us your telephone number & we 
m you prompHy. Necessary crtveil- 
i around USS50.000 - U5Si5,(X». 

Pleate write 

Bo« 2176. LH.T, Fnedrichslr. IS, 
D-6000 Froftrfurtif Mam. 


RBBB4CY IMMIGRATION 
NATURALIZATION 
Government authorized investment 
ptogro™ ipepfiedly designed 
tar persons saetung feU era 
status or o new homeland m 

MID WTaN^riONAL 

P.O_ Bco. 263 P.O. Ben 261 

MorbeBa (Malaga] London Nl 
Spam Unted 




WYTOSATIONAL OffSHORS 
COMPANYWCORPOHATlOre 
FROM £110 

ContpreriMive Adnumaration, 
Noiiwiee sennas. Powers of Attorney. 
lfee<w«to offices Tete*. tetephone. 
mo* tarwafirtng. 

Wood Resources 
Batearene House. 
SuetmerhiB, 
hie of Man. 

Tel. (0624) 28020-20240-28933 
Tete* 628352 (stand G. 


PA NAMA COMPANIES with npnsnee 

preetors and ean F ti fa it id Swiss or 
Uaetrtwfl bank canuni farmed in 
4B howj Swiss bench office opened 
tor to* free trading. Anonymous term 
oepoah. forergn esshaige 5 bufccn 

l* 0 ** 1 ?- "on**- JO Par* Place. ». 
tamest. London JWl. Td; 629 2326. 

Imprimis par Offprint. 73 rue de i’Evarmle. 7501 8 Paris. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 

Newly to be created offshore trust 


of erisfimo dents arid bre* proof of 
fendf awtocrfrfe. Operational widar 90 
banking day. Pnapob only. 

Write to Bax 41503. LH.T, 

63 Long Acre, London. WC2E 9JK 


YOM OWN COMPANY IN 

SWITZERLAND 

ZURICH - ZUG - LU2IRN 


A Present for Your Son 


SWATCH WATCHB 

Mi n imum q ure tSBee 500 rfeens 
No tautefions 
Seiriauti offers ten 
SdH*fa Hrewteb A Horen AG- 


Tel: 07S/2 13 9tt The 77869 


S BUOU5 PAKTPBt WANTED. Bm- 

years o» cwmo uiwif »* 

rextife/rQshGn branch, web partner 
to establish firm to open exdusve 
fasban bsutigims in .targer cities of 
Switaertand. For further information 
please contact. P.O. Bn 41, 1820 
Montiww/VeytouK. Switieriand. 


MSSAGETOIMXA. Estobfahad hut- 
an fiem offer* anything m ready mode 
garmenti, canvas and terehar goods, 
fishing tetodfl, homes wires, meded 
syringes, 
nj gt , 

Montana, P.O., Va- 
lois" 


bondages. Londoufb, 
Ids, urrtonjts. Contort: R. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTtlNITIES 


LONDON. HAMPSTEAD NW3, I7th 
century tedorie fated Wxrfd house, 
now portly used by owner as My 
Bcensed restainau. £225.000. Tel 
•mornings 01-794 46(57. 


tfW UME OF COSMETICS avtdable 
for block women. Territorial ovedobte 
worldwide. Interested prindpab en- 
quire: President BBC Inc, 310 Braad- 
woy Lawrence. New Yort 11559 USA 


HERBAL MEWONB. Largest retoB 
herbolisa in UJC offer unque bmoed 
range Notable worldwide tales. Mr. 
Met on, Cathay of Bournemouth Ltd 
derelond Bd. Boxnesnouth. BH1.UA. 


PANAMALOBOA. CORPORATIONS 
from US$400 avertable now. Tel 
|Q^gB40. Tetefc 628352 BLAND 


flNANQAL ENTREPHBBUl famSor 

oD phases. Would fibs to mrk tSrectiy 
k»W P.O. Box 262. Ever dote, 
NY 10471 USA. 


S&UNGOEMICA15. Solvents & tab- 
oratory emmert. Uwveml Chen*. 

Fw * P ) m »■ 

71x220064. 


250 HECTARE IDEAL FOR develop, 
ment Costa Del Sal £150000. Box 


tow cost nsimnuu. STATUS m 


fried po ro J se. No physical prese 
' . Apply Box 85, Douglas, 


pres - *. 


BORDEAUX WINES — DMNORD^ 
10 rue Maria, 92110 CSchy. France. 
TeL PI 730 30 56. Ifo 6411K BJTA 


WE BUY MORTGAGES or (focount. 
wans any purpose. Bax 63421, The 
ftaflun. hfelfaid. 31-7&654Q49, 


2ND PASSPORT 35 countries. GMC, 
ttXleemenou, 106 76 Athens Greece 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


WTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNUMITH) INC 

USJl .8 wouswas 

A camplrte personal & business service 
prpvidng a ornie cofledkxi of 
talented, vrerafife & muttiTinguai 
mdividuah far al sociol & 
pramotionol occasions. 

21 2-765-7793 

212-765-7794 

3» W. 56th St, N.YjC 10019 
Seneca ~ 


PANA MANIA N rarporotions provide 

Mtaodvonfoges of fflmpfcfccrxrfbrtt- 
fe*y. mra tax iobity & US dob 

oxtenCT enviro nm e nt . We offer coiti- 

pmy formation services on a fast, 
route and asmpe l itive basis. We 
are partoforty interested in faking 
up wim onshore business consultants 
m other countries. Contort H. L Oat- 

POB 1 377, Panama 9* Pano- 

JS^Sin Kfr«A PG. fet 23- 
0834 or 23^819 faves 236779). 


OVSMMSBWWYMBff htewstet- 


T w r 

in<OfiiiuM)n wntea 
tons Ud, B ' 
of MorOI X 


■— — Consuh 
t. Douglas. Isle 


private DErecmn- Scandinavia 

14r >1* 18949 agent, Mantxy 
er G. Rektov, former poGoe/arnv offi- 
cer. worldwide. EstosjJuhad Iftg. Post 
ta tamotCTTgterpet A. N-Q1 Sd nA. 1 


1»W TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT, 
report -12 taurines andyied De- 


WE HAVE BANK COUATFRAL instru. 
marts. Need fundna Any amount 
Euro Dolre bans sou^hL Met 
fwtd 305-944-4 1 07 or write P.a Bax 
598. N. Man! Beo*. HA 331 60 USA. 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


GAS WH1S/USA 

Strong e e p fa ration group with 100% 
waste record) 106 wrSTlOd compte- 
tirmfl Guaranteed produUmii on muiti- 
we* asrtrodL Broslere ngtim an bv 
vednwnt for tana term income in (US) 
Dqlgrejja QDpOO per w«LCortCKt 


GAS' 

76634. Tel, «17)^ 
WBil USA. 


GAS 


Loguna Put Texas 
78044 / 71X361982 


R EQUIRE GBBWBLPIpH B or fewd- 
managen to service prime saxtoes 
with prime baric guarante es in farm 
of prime bank promiteOQr note U5. 
Dolors or S» TS f ra n c s W - 20 yeers. 
no brokers duase. Prmcipafa oruy op- 
ply to Boot 4)5H LftlCSliong Lera 
tmd^WOEWH or telex IRCB3M7 


22% APMUAL REIUIINL on average, 

has been generated by flie Caribbeai 
Basin ImetfliMrf Trust's IWt Trust 
Pool Detaite firit Wemo- 


^taPlrost Co. lid. Dept. 850, PO 
foe 3KL 1005 San ioie, Carta Ken. 
rrieteSei. 


Bqk . 
Tefae 


EARN 30% - 35%. MVBT In short 
term ouran er ri al paper neees. ABed 
Ud, PO Ba y 422, Naniianbug. Vie- 
gfoia 22801, USA. 


DIAMONDS 


Shopping in Europe? Visit 

Dl AMQNDLAND 

The largest showroom bt- 

Antwerp, Diamond Gty 

Apprimanrt- 33*. Tet 3237234361Z 


OFFICE SERVICES 


NDWQIAMK aYSEB 
Rertd with afl office foaSlies, Uingud 
socrctoiws. mafbax, phone, teta» Ss- 

rage t ernoe. m cetagropms. projertao 

30 Av. Geo toe V, 7S0ahfa " 
Tell 723 701 Telex 61222S 


GENEVA KA,B ^ggNBs 

^J^tartion 4 secretand services. .- 


"J^^lfiA suburb. l*» offia 

sfeStSsaSB.' 


tSO #e Tine. 


53/11-251 57 3 3, Tkfm?| 3^ ^ 

OFFICES FOR RENrf ; 


'nmus ■ecrataiini ra. 

rra.^ R, i ln ^ 




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