Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats





.'JS 


f-K 


% 

• a** T 


=Hst 


. >& : ‘ 

' .^vV 


Tke Global Newspaper 
Edited inParis 
•• Printed ShnuliMepigly 

in Pkii», Undoi Zurict 



WgATHSt ^ APPEAR on PAGE M 

No. 31 


INTERNATIONAL 





d»On 
& 

-(USD On 

Coeoda C-S 1-20 

CypM Cl 070 

DneA-UDIUi, 

Ebtjx- I»R 

Mm) 7JMFM 

^ France ■— ■ .AflOF. 


listed With Hie New York limes and Hie Washington Post 


Gmaw^UDM 

Grta Brood SOP. 

Cmet A3 Or. 

.mu 


kraal l&l.’OOOO 

Ur IJOOb™ 

Jordan 450 % 

teya %lZL0Q 

Xm* DA 

lkmoa_ Q5CQ 

Ubya UJnOTS 

fa wn feo mg -45 Lfr 

Madura WEk. 

MflBn JOea 


Mmaa tso Dh. 

Nil>tM-27SR 
r*gtno 17D K. 


Norway JOONXr. 

Orwjn 0700 Ui 

.«&£ 

ft** uoui 

B*<*Ubnd.70P. 

SntAraba.AOOP 

Sun MO Pto 

5wadm — faiA. 
Swmtiand- UClFi 

ToObd 0550 Dm 

Tatay — Ti. 40000 
UAfc .. ASIDrh 
US M finJ-XU 
hgodow — IOD. 


ZORICH, THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


; n*$s 

P-K^' 

r^._ •«- 




c:i 

rd 


*tedrC J : 


«a 


The Associated Proa 

***£$&. . ^KANAPaBstan-Bena- 

; t*se fU. 4 tfei y ** Bhutto, a central figure m Paid- 
sua s opposition movement, 
brought her brother's body home 
for banal Wednesday and vowed 
to stay and fight the military re- 
gtme that overthrew and executed 
her father, Prime Minister Zolfikar 
Ali Bhutto. 

Tens of thousands of supporters 
greeted Miss Bhutto, who was w- 
coxnpanied by four, other leading 
politicians, when she arrived from 
self-mi posed exile in Europe with 
the body of her brother, 
Snahnawaz Bhutto. He was found 
dead last month at his home in 
France under circumstances yet to 
be explained. .. 

He had been wantedin Pakistan 
on terrorism chains, . 

Tyrf , Bhutl ? snpporters lined die road 
*v i for nearly 20 miles (32 kilometers) 

as the body was escorted into Lar- 
kana, an agricultural center 200 
miles north of Karachi that is the 
Bhutto family’s hometown. 

Miss Bhutto, 32, is political fa«r 
of her father, who founded the Pa- 
kistan People’s Party that she now 
leads. General Mohammed Zia ut- 
il aq, . now Pakistan’s president, 
overthrew Mr. Bhutto in a 1977 
coup and Mr. Bhutto was hanged 
in 1979 after conviction on charges 
of conspiring to m order a political 
opponent 

Miss Bhutto, who went to Lon- 
don 18 months ago when General 
Za’s government released her from 
house arcest, said that she intends 
to remain in Pakistan and continue 
her political opposition. 

She said that she would spend at 


iys 60,000 
Fight Zia Protest 

In Manila 



Anti-Marcos 
Hatties Mark 
Aquino Kitting 


■v c -u 


Benazir Bhutto 


■-iSj 

if 

w X: .V 


store Democracy, who returned 
from Europe with Miss Bhutto, as- 


The Associated Press 

MANILA. — More than 60,000 
people marched through Manila mi 
Wednesday, in the biggest anti- 
government protests in 8 year, to 
mark the anniversary of the assassi- 
nation two years ago of the opposi- 
tion leader Beni goo S. Aquino Jr. 

Soldiers used water hoses to 
break up another demonstration by 
5, 000 people in the central Philip- 
pine city of Cebu. Sixteen protest- 
ers and four soldiers were injured 
as demonstrators retaliated by 
throwing stones, witnesses said. 

Clouds of confetti poured from 
office windows in Manila as 30,000 
people, facing heavy rains, clogged 


=* to 




serted that the appointed cabinet ^ iaaD S “?vy .ram* .aoggeo 
Khan Junejo was merrily a iron! for d “ tna of Mr ' 




‘U ys, - 

: -o ; 7,^’ ~"'>' 




. least 40 days of mourning m Lar- 
' I,"*"- kana before deriding im a precise 

■ muiV nT nrtinn hnt tliar clw 


course of action, but added that she 
was “more committed than ever 
before'* to the political struggle: 


the military. 

One of those who returned from 
exile, Ghulam Mustafa Jatoi, said 
he alro would remain in Pakistan to 
hdp lead the opposition. “Zia ul- 
Haqhasno intention whatsoever of 
lifting martial law,** he arid 

Shaimawaz Bhutto's body was 
taken to the family graveyard after 
arahgious ceremony for burial next 
to his father's grave. About 50,000 
people crowded into the sports sta- 
dium for funeral prayers and to pay 
thdr last respects. 

Mir. Bhutto, 27, was found dead 
July 18 in his apartment in Cannes. 
There woe signs of suffocation, 
but an autopsy was inconclusive. A 


“There have, been far too many second autopsy was performed, but 



sacrifices.’' she said. 

Miss Bhutto dismissed the an- 
nouncement earlier this month that 
General 25a would end martini law 
by the end of the year and remove 
the ban on political activity. 

Udder the plan.to end martial 
law. General Zia wouldTum over 
the running of thegovetflinent to a 
civilian cabinet Be already has ap- 
pointed and remain in Office ks a 
civilian pread^ 


sitioQ coalition Movement to 


the results have not been revealed. 

At a. news conference Wednes- 
day night. Miss Bhutto said she 
could not accept that her brother 
had died a natural death. 

He was wanted in Pakistan on 
several charges. He was accused of 
planning die 1981 hijacking of a 
Pakistan International Airlines 
plane, with more than 100 passen- 
gers aboard, first to Kabul, Af- 
ghanistan^ and -later to' Damascus. 
GneT^Jdsrtaniffiplomat aboanftbe 
aircraft/ was killed by the tsjacken. 


jiiinos 

widow, Corazon, wrapped in a 
raincoat, urged the chanting, cheer- 
ing protesters to say “goodbye" to 
President Ferdinand E. Marcos. 

More than 20,000 people in a 
more mfliiant, leftist protest con- 
fronted barbed wire barricades and 
anti-riot troops around the presi- 
dential palace. They chanted 
“NPA is growing,” in support of 
the New People’s Army, a Commu- 
nist guerrilla group fighting the 
government. 

Protests also took place in sever- 
al other dries, including General 
Santos. Naga, Legaspi, Dagupan 
and Laoang. The government news 
agency reported a pro- government 
rally by 20,000 people in Laoang 
capital of Mr. Marcos’s home prov- 
ince. 

Mr. Aquino, who many people 
bad believed might succeed Mr. 
Marcos, was shot to death on Aug. 
21, 1983, as be arrived back in the 
Philippines from self-imposed exile 
in the United States. Three gener- 
als, 22 other soldiers and one civil- 
ian are an trial lor the trilling, 
which the military blames on Com- 
munists. 



U.S. Says KGB 
Uses Chemicals 


On Diplomats 




Corazon Aquino, widow of the assassinated opposition leader, placed a wreath on the 
statue of Benigno S. Aqtrino Jr. during a rain-drenched rally attended by 30,000 in Manila. 


y 

US. Anti- Satellite Weapon Is Ready, 
But Wisdont of Testing Is Questioned 


Tags Says Test to 'Militarize’ Space 


By William J. Broad ? 

Nev York Timrt. Service < 

NEW YORK — Scientists say • 
that the U.S. anti-satellite weapon, J 
if fully devdoped, would be vastly ^ 
more advanced than the Soviet one. - 
They say it would be a marvel of ; 

high-technology miniaturization. ; weapon would cause a superpower arms race in space. 


Return 


MOSCOW — The Soviet news, agency, Tass. said Wednesday that 
Washington’s decision to press ahead with testing an ami -satellite 


‘If it works, ours is going to be a 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


ass said in a commentary that Moscow would keep to the 
••• unilateral freeze on anti-satellite weapons announced by late Presi- 
J ;; dent Yuri V. Andropov only if other countries held off too. 
f ’ “Washington has made another step along the line of preparing for 
Pike, bead op. -r large-scale militarization of space,” Tass said. It said responsibility 


‘‘Wehaye been asking Marcos to .day.~“h's going to be.- 10 times' 
resign bnf he doesn’t hear us,” Mrs. faster, and potentially there will be 


lot better,” John w t _ r ^ 

q»ce policy at the Washington-; for starting an arms race in space would lie with “those who are 
based Federation of American Sd- • ^“prepared to start dangerous experiments in near-earth orbit." 
enlists, said in an interview Tues» J Jj denounced what it called the cynicism of Washington's assertion 




Jti ALLS VI 


-v 

. -y .■J.‘K| 

■ ■>! - 


.1 


■* ’.-a . 




M 




W ; 


■ M- 




Sikhs bear Hardnnd Singh Longowal to ftmeral pyre. [ 


Aquino told the protesters in the 
financial district “Perhaps we 
should just say ‘goodbye.’ ” The 
crowd included businessmen, so- 
cialites, office workers and peas- 
ants. 

One opposition leader. Salvador 
H. Laurd, waved a sheaf of papers 
that he said contained evidence of 
property the Marcoses and their 
“cronies” have accumulated 
abroad. 

Yellow banners bearing Mr. 
Aquino’s likeness appeared promi- 
nently at the financial district rally. 
Red banners denouncing the 
“UiL-Marcos dictatorship” pre- 
vailed at the central Manila protest 
Mr. Aquino’s brother, Agapito, 
said at the financial district rally, “I 
don’t want the Communists to take 
over from Marcos.” But, he added, 
if Mr. Marcos does not allow fair 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 1) 


10 tunes as many of them. U’S go- 
ing to &e able to place a lot/more 
satellites at risk.” 

Scientists are generally confi- 
dent, too, that the U.S. weapon is 
so close to technical realization that 
all it needs is final testing. 

But there is heated debate over 
whether the United States should 
go ahead with that testing. 

Some experts say that, although 
the U.S. devfee is highly advanced, 
it remains militarily useless unless 
it is finally tested against a target 
orbiting in space. They say the So- 
viet Union already has a working 
weapon, though a more primitive 
one, and the United States must 
catch up. 

Daniel O. Graham, a retired lieu- 
tenant general who used to behead 
of U.S. Air Force intelligence, said 
Tuesday, “The Soviets can destroy 
a lot of important satellites and we 


thafthe new anti-satellite test would promote progress at the Geneva 
talks on nuclear and space weapons. ^Washington believes that the 
rest of the world consists of simpletons who can swallow any propa- 
ganda dish," it said. 


have to counter that. For that rea- 
son alone it is necessary to test this 
weapon.” 

However, other scientific and 
technical experts argue that the na- 
tion and the world would be far 
better off if the United States did 
not go ahead with the final stage of 
its anti-satellite weapon program in 
the hope of negotiating a ban on 
such weapons. They argue that the 
Soviet advantage in this particular 
area is minimal and that the United 
States has a distinct advantage in 
the overall field of space-arms de- 
velop menu 

According to a study by the 
Union of Concerned Scientists, 
based in Cambridge, Massachu- 
setts, the Soviet anti-satellite weap- 


on is something of a blunderbuss 
estimated to weigh more than two 
tons. The weapon and liquid-fueled 
booster rocket stand 150 feet (45.4 
meters) tall, they say. Launching it 
is anything bat speedy. Soviet strat- 
egists must wait up to 24 hours, 
until the turning of the Earth 
brings a particular target over the 
Asian launching site. 

Another factor that would slow 
an attack is the fact that the war- 
head. nuber than making a direct 
ascent, goes into orbit and only 
doses in on its target after one or 
two revolutions around the Earth, 
according to the scientists’ study. 
Interception can take up to three 
hours, they say. The Soviet war- 

(Conti nn ed on Page 2, CoL 5) 


By Don Oberdorfcr 

tV^rkingtoH Pott Service 

WASHINGTON — The Soviet 
KGB security police has been mon- 
itoring the movements of U.S. dip- 
lomats in Moscow with “potential- 
ly harmful (racking chemicals,” the 
State Department charged 
Wednesday. 

It said that powdery substances 
had been “applied indirectly” — on 
automobile steering wheels, seats 
and other places where U.S. diplo- 
mats would come in contact with 
them. 

It said that the substances could 
present a health hazard. 

. Hie United States protested 
Monday to Soviet officials in 
Washington and Moscow “in the 
strongest terms.” They demanded 
that the practice “be terminated 
inunediatdy." the Stale Depart- 
ment said. 

The chemical, according to the 
statement, could “leave deposits on 
the person or possessions" of Sovi- 
et citizens or others with whom the 
Americans came into contact. 

Recent “biological screening 
tests” determined that the most ex- 
tensively used of the tracking 
agents, a substance known as Nitro 
Phenyl Praia dein, or NPPD. is a 
mutagen, the Slate Department 
statement said. 

This was a potential health haz- 
ard, it continued, because muta- 
gens can cause cancers in human 
beings. 

“Mutagens can be. but are not 
always, carcinogens in human be- 
ings.” the statement said. 

A State Department official said 
that such t rackin g agents had been 
in “very sporadic, infrequent” use 
by the KGB since the 1970s but 
that U.S. officials had believed that 
their use was halted in 19S2. 

This spring and summer, howev- 
er. a “more widespread” use of the 
substances was uncovered through 
routine U.S. tests in Moscow. 

The discovery, together with new 
information about the possible 
health hazards, caused an alarm “in 
the last few weeks only,” officials 
said. 

U.S. Embassy personnel in Mos- 
cow, numbering about 200, were 
informed of toe findings early 
Wednesday. 

A medical team from toe Na- 
tional Institutes of Health and toe 


Environmental Protection Agency 
was being sent to Moscow to inves- 
tigate and interview Americans 
about the health aspects. 

“Pnetimmary indications suggest 
that the levels of NPPD and other 
substances to which individuals 
may have been exposed is very low. 
There is no evidence to date that 
any embassy personnel have suf- 
fered ill effects due to exposure to 
tracking agents.” the State Depart- 
ment said. 

Officials gave very few details of 
how or where toe powder was be- 
lieved to have been applied to 
Americans <?r how toe KGB could 
use it to trace their movements. 

Guarded comments to reporters 
suggested that toe KGB may have 
used chemical testing equipment 
on the persons, possessions or 
dwellings of Soviet citizens to de- 
termine if they had contact with 
U.S. diplomats bring traced by toe 
powder. 

There was no explanation for 
why the R ussians are believed to 
have stopped sporadic use of chem- 
ical tracking agents in 1982 and to 
have rearmed them on a heavier 
basis this spring. 


■ Earlier UB. Charges 

The allegation was toe latest in a 
series of charges dating back at 
least to I960, when a microphone 
was discovered in toe beak of a 
wooden eagle on the official seal in 
a UJ>. Embassy office in Moscow, 
Reuters reported. 

Four years later, about 40 eaves- 
dropping microphones were uncov- 
ered at the embassy and U.S. offi- 
cials said many more were 
probably undiscovered. 

In. 1978, U.S. security officials 
found an antenna near the embassy 
roof that was connected to an elec- 
tronic snooping booth beneath toe 
building maimed by a Soviet agent, 
according to U.S. officials. 

The United States also com- 
plained to the Kremlin in the 1970s 
that its embassy was being bom- 
barded with microwaves in an ef- 
fort to intercept US. communica- 
tions. 

Both toe U.S. Embassy in Mos- 
cow and toe Soviet Embassy in 
Washington are equipped with so- 
phisticated electronic surveillance 
gear to gath er information about 
the host countries. Western diplo- 
mats say. 


Falwell Seeks to Block 
South African Sanctions 


Rise of Drug Addiction Jolts British, 
Who Thought It Was a U.S. Problem 




- n 


Slain Sikh Is Cremated; 
Gandhi Assails Terror 


7 V Associated Prets 

LONGOWAL, India — The 
bodv of Harchand 


Siagh 




“We will fight terrorism with all 
our strength,” the prime minister 
said before Parliament adjourned 
to mourn Mr. LongowaTs death. 

Most shops, businesses, markets 
and schools throughout Punjab 
OflUYC ” , fia-Kl term were sbu! Wednesday in a strike 

Rajiv Gandhi vowed to ngm «*’ caDed py ^ Akali Dal to protest 

rorism “with aU the murder. • 

Mr. Longowal was the Indian Army has been 


^er wScremauxi Wednesday at to 
- ' nanve village, and W® 6 ““““ 




dav by gunmen, late idea **r^V. placed on alert in Punjab and 
Sikhs, while speaking at a rriigtous- states, and security 


By Karen DeYoung 

Washington Port Service 

LONDON — Three weeks ago a 
Liverpool boy of 14 died of an 
overdose of heroin. He had bought 
it from drug pushers only a five- 
minute walk from his home. 

At an inquest, the coroner said 
toe boy. Jason Fitzsimmons, was 
the youngest heroin victim be had 
come across in nearly two decades. 

The coroner warned that Jason’s 
death was part of a drug problem 
that could endanger “the whole fu- 
ture of the nation.” 

Barely 10 years ago, illegal sale 
and use of drugs in Britain was 
virtually unheard of outside a few 
London districts. Britain felt hsrif 
largely immune to the U-S. wave of 
drug smuggling and abuse. 

Yet in five years, with a speed 
that has shocked parents and ap- 
parently taken the government un- 
awares, Britain has found itself 
with a severe drug problem. A re- 
cent Parliament inquiry called it 
“the most serious peacetime threat 
to our national wril-bring.” 

ju England and in 'much of Scot- 
land. drug use has doubled, tripled 


leading his group on a 10-day tour 
of toe drug dens of New York 
City’s Lower East Side and the 
smuggling centers on Florida’s east 
coast “Because it is in toe U.SA. 
that toe real battle is being waged.” 

The most serious concern in Brit- 
ain centers on toe spread of heroin, 
now toe country’s “drug of choice." 

The government estimates that 


A swift rise in the 
use of drags is f the 
most serious 
peacetime threat to 
our national well- 
being^ an inquiry 
by Parliament 
warned. 


Customs officials estimate that 
toey find no more than 10 percent 
to 20 percent of toe total. 

There is disagreement over toe 
reason for toe drug use. Some 
blame unemployment, social ills 
and changing mores. Others say if a 
result of an expanded smuggling 
network from Pakistan, Iran and 
South America, rerouted to Britain 
after U.S. crackdowns. 

This month. Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher paid a visit, ac- 
companied by television cameras, 
' to customs inspectors at Heathrow 
Airport. E xaminin g confiscated 
smuggling devices, she promised 
that traffickers would be “pursued 
relentlessly” and that “we shall 
make your life not worth living” 
“The taxpayer will find toe mon- 
ey." Mrs. Thatcher said. “We have 


INSIDE 


■ Beirutis artillery battles con- 
tinue, with 10 reported dead, 
plane hit at airport. Page 2. 


■ Nicaraguan rebels adopt a 
“code of conduct” in an at- 
tempt to improve their human 
rights image. Page 3. 


SCIENCE 


■ What colors do birds see? Re- 
search on animal vision pro- 
vides some answers. Page 7. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


■ American Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co. said it will eliminat- 
ing 24,000 jobs in its Informa- 
tion Systems group. Page 9. 


By Robot Pear 

New York Tuner Service 

WASHINGTON — The Rever- 
end Jerry Falwell has begun a cam- 
paign to block imposition of eco- 
nomic sanctions against South 
Africa. The step occurred amid 
growing evidence that American 
conservatives were deeply divided 
over the issue. 

Mr. Fahvdl, just back from a 
visit to South Africa, also de- 
nounced Desmond M. Tutu, toe 
Anglican bishop who is South Afri- 
ca’s most prominent clergyman. “If 
Bishop Tutu maintains that be 
speaks for the blade people of 
South Africa, he’s a phony,” he 
said. 

The bishop, a leading critic of 
toe Pretoria government's racial 
policies who won the 1984 Nobel 
Peace Prize, has offered theological 
as well as social arguments against 
apartheid. 

Mr. Falwdl, the head of toe 
American evangelical Christian 
group known as the Moral Major- 
ity, gave bis impressions of his trip 
to South Africa at a news confer- 
ence Tbesday in Washington. He 
urged Americans to support the 


Pretoria government by buying its 
one-ounce gold coins, called Kru- 
gerrands, and by investing in com- 
panies that do business there. 

South Africans, Mr. Falwell said, 
do not want the United States to 
reduce investment in their country 
or to impose economic sanctions. 
This view, he said, was toe consen- 
sus of throe to whom he talked “in 
every segment of every communi- 
ty” in South Africa. 

[On Wednesday, Mr. Falwell en- 
gaged in a heated debate with toe 
Reverend Jesse L. Jackson on the 
subject of South Africa when toe 
two appeared on a television pro- 
gram, The Associated Press report- 
ed from New York. 

[Mr. Jackson told Mr. Falwell, 
“You supported apartheid in 
southern America until it was over. 
Now you’re supporting apartheid 
in southern Africa while it's still 
alive.” He called the evangelist's 
views “an insult to Christians.” 

[Mr. Falwell responded by deny- 
ing be supported “that polity of toe 
Botha government. He said that 
film shot during his five-day trip 
which will be broadcast Sunday 
(Continu e d on Page 3, CoL 3) 


New York Agog Over Record Lottery 




As JVM—- — , , r M nnlMl ll» —O „ . ‘ J OOCOIUC av 

main Sikh party, Mr- Lr®|0^ days after Mr. Gandhi announced , ^ ^ effect last week 

Sapeaceaccoid^™ m Punjab, despite warn- j^^eofsni 

Mr! Gandhi aimed atjauMg^ 


^ security 

^astigfttened in New Delhi. 

The shooting took place three 





three- year conflict beween the 




jf 


.if 


become so widespread here that a heat the dreg and inhale its vapors 

— known as “chasing the dragon" 

elections is wnjao. urspiw **«!*- bana i n g ^ 0 i surname solvents — in the mistakes belief that this is 
jugs by Mr. Longowal and others ^ under the age of* 18. less addictive than injection. 

mree-ysau w-~ T that toe state was not ready for Ma pj„ ntl3 use is on t&e upswing Heroin often is cheaper than 

Sikh community and the to elections and that premature voting but it is considered a minor prob- marijuana in Britain, unlike the sit- . 

government over Punjab- might spark violence. Iem compared with a flood of co- uation in toe United States, in Brit- 

Xbe body of Mr. Lohgowai, ;”, Moderate Figure came— previously rare in Britain am, a bag of 4&percent-pure her- 

ivai humed on a pyre after thou- ■ Ztoat £ expected to hit these oin, which win last a day or two, 

. r cikbs. weeping shout- Earlier, WdfgONg Saxcni / . i_ ,h eB exi few years as over- can cost less than $15. 

Seasons, marched 13 miles (20 New York Times reported from New the u!s. market. That figure has not changed for 

York: re- British officials have begun dose several yeais. which officials auri- 

T ^ fa ^jifWfiSSatiinc consultation with toe US. Drug burn to increased smuggling, 
moved a modentongtora a Enforcement Administration. Heroin seizures by customs offi- 

when it appeared, thank. aig M apology for revert- rials reached . nearly 500 pounds 

part to his efforts, that a ics e> reDeale d(y to the American «- (almost 230 kilograms) in the first 

conflict was neanng a soluuo^- penenre” said Edward Gardner, seven months of 1984. more than 


Tic kete Sell at 18,900 a Minute for $41-MiUion Prize 

and corrupt everything.” 

At a news conference last week, Confuted by Our Sa$ From Dupacha must match those in toe weekly drawing. The odds 

NEWYORK— They walked, they rode toe subway against that are 1 in 6.1 miffion. 
and some even flew in. They stood in Hne for hours. Since July 27 there have been seven drawings with 
Some toed: the day off from work, dreaming they no top-money winner, allowing toe prize to reach its 
might never have to work again. rc ^ rd lev 4 

There were so many custom® for New York's The prevrou. North American record, W0 million. 
Lotto 48 game on Tuesday that officials dosed the 

miilionTthfi largest such prize ever offered^ North 
der way among drag treatment pro- America, 
fessionals as to whether Britain’s 


unions representing customs offi- 
cers asserted that Mrs. Thatcher 
bad turned Britain into “open 
house for smugglers” — with a de- 
’ crease of nearly 1,000 customs jobs 


was collected last year in Chicago by a single winner. 

New York state’s lottery director, John Quinn, said 
Tuesday that 20 million tickets had been purchased 
for the current drawing. 

Mayor Edward I. Koch sent his press aide stand in 


me slogans, 

% kilometers) from Sangrur. 

* Wreathed in roses and man- 


His death created 
(Continued on Page - Cok 5) 


head of the Parliament study, after six limes toe total for all of 1980. 


tolerant attitude toward narcotics 
helped created the difficulties. 

Until quite recently, addiction 
was considered a problem to be 
dealt with by physicians rather 
than law officers. Under a program 
known by UJS. officials as “toe 
British system,” treatment for de- 
cades has included the mainte- 
nance of registered heroin addicts 
with government-supplied drugs. 

Although the program now is se- 
verely limited and is being phased 
out officials visiting the United 
Steles in search of a solution to the 
(Continued on Page £ CoL 4) 


Lotto players bought tickets at the rate of 13900a ^ tobuyhima ticket, but New York City residents 


minute Tuesday afternoon, and lousy officials derid- 
ed to shutdown at 9:30 P.M. — half an hour early — 
so that the computers could catch char breath. 

A regional lottery director, James Nolan, said eady 
Wednesday of the ticket nidi, “It's already building 
again this morning.” 

People in New York City were standing in line, in 
spite of the rain, when lottery offices opened at 5:45 
AM. 

The drawing is scheduled for 10:25 P.M. 
Wednesday. 

In New York's Lotto 48 game, players purchase a 
card for Si that allows them to choose six numbers 
from 1 to 48. 

To win or share in toe top prize, all six numbers 


were not toe only ones infected 

Lottery officials in Buffalo said there were calls 
from Ohio, Pennsylvania and Tennessee. 

“People want to know the closest lottery office or 
where they can buy a lottery ticket at the airport,” said 
Howard FrankeL a regional lottery director. 

There was a strong streak of altruism among the 
players interviewed Tuesday in New York City. 

Wflfredo Garda, a police officer, said he would give 
a large chunk of his money to the starving in Africa. 
Eve Benani said she would found an orphanage. Er- 
nest DeNigris of East Quogue. New York, said that if 
he ascended to “toe power of money." he would pay 
off the mortgage on his son’s home. (NIT, UP/ l 


i . 










TZZZZZZ: 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 1985 


Artillery War in Beirut 
Continues; Airport Is 
Closed After Jet Is Hit 


Reuter, t 

BEIRUT — Hundreds of artil- 
lery rounds slammed into Beirut, 
its airport and the nearby hills 
Wednesday as shelling continued 
for the third straight day despite 
political efforts to end the violence. 

Six persons were killed in Chris- 
tian areas and four in Moslem-con- 
trolled West Beirut, radio stations 
reported. 

At Beirut International Airport, 
a Middle East Airlines Boeing 720 
was hit minutes before passengers 
for Jordan were to board, radio 
stations said. Flights in and out of 
the airport was halted 

Shells also hit villages as far as 15 
miles [,25 kilometers) from Beirut. 

A high-ranking government 
source said it was unlikely that cab- 
inet ministers would be able to at- 
tend a meeting Thursday if the 
shelling continued. 

Prime Minister Rashid Karami 
had called the meeting, the fust 
scheduled since April 10, in an at- 
tempt to revive Chris tian-MosJem 


talks and break the latest cycle of 
violence in Lebanon. 

Education Minister Selim al- 
Hoss, a Sunni Moslem former 
prime minister, and sou or Mod ern 
army officers telephoned Christian 
colleagues, to no avail, to arrange a 

cease-fire, official sources said. 

At the Vatican, Pope John Paul 
II condemned the massacre of Leb- 
anese civilians and prayed for an 
end to the killing s and reprisals. 

In one of his firmest statements 
to date cm Lebanon, the pope said 
during his weekly audie n ce in St 
Peter’s Square that such violence, 
“coldly calculated, aimed at massa- 



Rise of Drug Addiction Jolts British, WORLD 

Who Thought It Was a U.S. Problem New Caledonia 2s 

O O&RK matters) - Eta»ons ‘^amcntary and consam- 


(“■ 

. 10 * 

(it’ 1 " 


(Continued from Page I) softer drugs, a friend with a legal a clinic, were given psychiatric and 
new drug epidemic say the stigma heroic prescription offered to share physical e xamin ations and issued 
of the maintenance treatment so® 6 - “scrip,” reissued at six-week inter- 
method is difficult to shake. Like Anne, who was turned on - vals and sent to thar pharmacist. 

“Everywhere we went, even in ty a boyfriend, he says: “I don’t Neither they nor Brian has hdd a 
Co ng ress, people were totally con- remember the first time being so job for most of the last two de- 
vinced that we fed addicts,” said wonderful. I got sick. I vomited.” cades. They live in public housing 
Robin Corbett. Neither Michael or Anne, with and receive welfare. Yet they say 


So sensitive is the government to rare exceptions, has ever bought or they are satisfied with their lives. " ^ date first was set its allocation ix 

such belief that it has pnblidied a used illegal heroin. When they be- They live quietly, say they do not rev ^ se d the Constitutional Councn rg they also wm try 

four-page explanatory pamphlet came addicted, any physician could associate with other longtime ad- w conservative members of nSt ituticjnal- 

entitled “The Medical Usfcof write a herom : prescription. diets or what they call the “rub- w j^ve the amended version declared vow 

Opioids in the United Kingdom.” Heroin maintenance had been bish" among the new addict gener- nm X3 ILm* CpflC r^*^ 

“For many years,” it Wans, accepted treatment here since 1926, ation. Porn IlismiSSCS lOUCC ^ ' 

“there has been considerable inter- when a government report recora- They insist that they do not “get * _ Prudent Alan Garcia rerez 

est in the UX approach to the mended it foe hard-core addicts stoned" by uring their day’s ration LIMA (AP) — The government ot ^ a plan to reorganize 

treatment of drug addicts. LWor- deemed incapable of withdrawaL at once or saving it for a binge- dismissed 37 police commanders mtnei 

lunatdy this interest has all too The reasoning was that if procure- They look upon it the way a diabet- Peru's police forces to rid them otjMtfrup completely revanip 

often been based on nrisunder- ®«t was easy, no illegal heroin ic regards insulin. The president also has anflo*®«»j t °°\. ^ inian dens who bold the 

standing." t market would develop. Anne, with badly scarred thin the judicial system. The dismissal of toepo p - s ^ce forces, went into 

It goes on: “The popular view of With the social acceptability of arms, says she would be in the ^nk of general in the militaiy structureoi r *pfp c ia| newspaper, B 
what has become known as 1 ‘the drug abase limited to what was street ot “throwing bricks" through effect when their names were P ubLls - rTijg civil Guard and 16 were 
British system’ is oerfiaiw best «tn- considered a small London core, pharmacy windows to eel the drug, rfenumn Twencv-one commanders were in me 


PARIS (Reuters) - Batons in ana 

a clinic, were gven psychi^ric and ^ end of September despiff « P . the tninisto - 

physical examinations and issued battle over the distnwiuc Wed _ eSi j a y. ^ 1 ,™ 

“scrip,” reissued at six-week inter- teTT ^ lU> ^ in the South Padf^ *fw,ions. set up under a --j* 

and sent to thdr pharmacist. Edgard Pisani said that the e Jecuon& ■ ^ hdd on tfjJjjjSepL 

Neither they nor Brian has hdd a passe d Tuesday by the National AssC® ^dependence of the . 

job for most of the last two de- g^OcL 6. lie bffl paves the way fJj^tioos for four regwaal 
cades. They live in public housing asS0C j a ti O n with France and P™™L dence by late 1987- ^ . 

and receive welfare. Yet they say and a referendum on tndepen o^j t (he. original bill bad tote 

they are satisfied with their lives. noli date first was set for jSep L Jj- . its allocation of seato. 


w-ai 




of write a heroin prescription. 


Opioids in the United Kingdom.” Heroin maintenance had been 

u CfM* momf umh w i* _ anvnfwl hvotmont rinrv* 1 


“For many years,” it Wgtns, accepted treatment here since 1926, 
“there has been considerable mter- when a government report recom- 


Rashid 


kly audience m SL state-owned Beirut Radio 

that such violence, that an unidentified plane had 
ed, aimed at massa- trjei to attack Shiite Amal militia 


cring unarmed populations, what- p^bon* Wednesday in Syrian- 
ever its wurce, must be condemned near Tarshish, 18 


est in the UX approach to the mended it for hard-core addicts 
treatment of drug addicts. Uhfor- deemed incapable of withdrawaL 


forcefully by anyone wbo respects ^es east of BeiroL bm was driven 


h uman rights.” 

In the northern city of Tripoli, 


off by ground fire. 

There was no independent con- 


standing." v market would develop. Anne, with badly scarred thin the judicial system. The dismissal oi p - s oolice forces, went into 

It goes on: “The popular view of With the social acceptability of arms, says she worild be in the nmk of general in the militaiy structureoi r *^ c ial newspaper, El 

what has become known as.'the drug abase limited to what was street ot “throwing bricks" through effect when their names were publisi nea in Guan j and 16 were 

British system’ is perhaps bestcon- considered a small London core, pharmacy windows to get the drug, peruana Twenty-one commandos were in me 

veyed by its alternative title, ;*the “to some extent the system worked But while the maintenance sys- bi the Peruvian Investigative Police. Monday, said that any of 

British Heroin Maintenance Pro- right ® t0 the ’60s," said David tern worked for people like than, . Mr. Garda, who visited a mflitaiy Wnaws relieved of duty for 

’ . Tn- CtanA. a: -c I I I „ . i (mhn> forces COUIU . „-A 


the toll from Tuesday’s car bomb- finnation of the report A similar 
ing rose to 50 dead and 160 wound- report on Tuesday was denied by 


ed after nine more persons died the 
from wounds, security sources said, 1 


ly. to a regular supply of heroin on there wasn't a black market 


Swiss head of the Interna- 


Among the dead was Sheikh Za- tiooal Red Cross mission in the 
kariya al-Rashid, an official of the southern city of Sidon was freed 


Sunni fundamentalist militia called after being held by a gunman for 
Jund iillnh or Soldiers of God. The about 36 hours. 


a doctor’s prescription. The reality 
is very different. ** 

For more than a decade — npar- 


At most, he said, there were 400 
to 500 people under treatment 
By 1965, however, a slight rise in 


ly 20 years in one case — Michael, the number of new addicts was not- 
Azme and Brian have begun each and a new government report 


Saudi Minister's Son Killed 

Reuters 

CANNES — The son of a Saudi 
minister was killed when the car in 
which he was traveling hit a tree, 
the police said Tuesday. He was 
identified as Mohammed A1 Sa- 
lum, 20, the son of Nasir A1 Salum, 
deputy minister for telecommuni- 
cations. 


local head of JunduDah, Sheikh 
Kanaan Naji, was wounded. 


Stophane Jacquemet 29, was de- 
livered to Red Cross officials at the 


The explosion in Tripoli was the home of Daoud Datrad. Amal’s se- 
latest in a six-day wave of car nior official in the south, according 


morning with a trip to their local acknowledged that some physi- 
pharmacies for a prescribed, daily caans were over-prescribing, with 
fix of government-supplied heroin, the excess being sold by patients. 


bombings that has killed more than 
1 10 persons and wounded 400. 

After the bombing in Tripoli, (he 
Shiite leader Nabih Bern said that 
only a militaiy showdown with “Is- 


to the agency's delegate in Tyre, 
Mario Fetz. 

Mr. Daoud identified Mr. Jac- 
quemet’s abductor as the brother of 
Naameh Hashem, who was seized 


Back home, (hey inject it with gov- Rather than a change in the 


erament-supplied needles and pre- treatment method, the solution was 


pare to face tin day. 


to regulate the n umb er of physi- 


It has been seven or eight years da ns who could prescribe heroin, 
since the last new patient was In 1968, they were reduced from 


system could not eliminate. also for incompetence or met uoaugr ■ 

Sri Lankan Soldiers Killed by Mine 

drugs,” said Mr. Turner, the British r-ni rwnn < 5 ri Tjmka (Reu- 

aaSdiug offidaL “It is true to , COLOMBO. Sn L«Ua 

some degree that the eiiurination of Tamil 

illicit drugs led to illicit supply." Wednesday when sq^USl Tanul 
Shortly after the dime system ©wri^srtoff almd mjMimdOT 
was established, treatment agencies (hear vehicle in the northCTStOT 
were required to report addicts to province of Sn Lanka, secuntyoffi- 
authorities. As the rules tightened . ;ii 

in the early 1970s, a small black Thcoffiaals said that ‘ 

market began to thrive, catering to taiy vdnde was blown tm by four 
those who had been introduced to guerrillas as it accompanied 


rael's internal agents," a reference by the Israeli Army when it raided 


to Christian militias , could end 
Lebanon's crisis. 


the Shiite village of Zrariyeh on 
March 11. 


Thousands Demonstrate in Philippines 


(Confirmed from Page 1) 


canceled classes and some busi- 


elections, then “I will be with those nesses declared a half-day holiday, 
who have arms because that _ It was the biggest day of protest 


among (he fewer than 200 hold- 
■» CMholic archbishop of Ma- SSi. 6 ™. “ JS*” . to « 3? 


placed on an indefinite program of nm^lri thnmjnric m a few h'liyln^, l^al heroin but then had" theii 

addiction maintenance with inject- almost entirely in London. 0682 restricted. 

able heroin. As in many other Michael and Anne checked into NEXT: The And- Drug Off en 

Western countries, thousands of ; 

British addicts now participate in 

programs consisting of oral doses QfW m A»| | f f 

^Z^ i ^ tb ' h0p ' 0 ' Sam Sikh Is Cremated ; 

Michael Anne and Brian are — ^ __ . _ _ 


TFtav uau UTOI UIUUUULCU UJ ^ , _ . • . _ . C A 

legal heroin but then had their ac- eroment bus canying about 50 bin- 
cm restricted. halese refugees at Serunuwara. 

NEXT: The Anti-Drug Offensive. The «tack gum 

Junius R. Jayewardene ordered an 
: 7 inquiry into assertions, denied by 

the government, that security 
rn YVIVtl /f f/ 1 /f • forces killed more than 100 Tamils 

UlllCCwCyHa in Vavuniya district in the north 
7 . last week, A spokesman for the 
•I ri I • _ Fj»Jam Na tiooal Liberation Front, 

Islermnsm 


nBa said in the homily at the Mass 
that the country has been thrown 


Britain considered the develop- 
ment of a black market in narcotics 


Gandhi Assads Terrorism 


(Continued from Page 1} 



wno nave anus oecause mat means wmuuj t u an — — - -a- -/ — i 2U0 were wounded in an army 

Marcos would have to be removed sauc . r “« a®nvenwiy of the into violence because “no guilt has aAiSnSf wilh n0 successor in sight and im- ^“8 “ d successful people, ^ 40 ^ the town and near- 
by armed means.” assasamation, when hundreds of been confessed, no role has been hSSwtt** 011 * porianl elections coming up to con- v f ho contributed more than then- w^JsFridav 

Die military had been placed on tiiousands of FBioinos imned im- acknowledeed. no resnonsibilitv a icw rm^iuded iiKUvitiuais. mlidate the a«wd hi^ r«irL«i with share to India s economy. The Pan- 3 y ' 


FQipinos joined un- 


alert for Wednesday's protests, but soccessful efforts to force Mr. Mar- 
soldiers and policemen generally ^ 10 step down. 


stayed away from the demonstra- 
tors except when (hey neared the 
presidential palace. About 200 
Philippine soldiers guarded the 
U.S. Embassy as demonstrators 
passed, raising clenched fists. 

Many universities and schools 


acknowledged, no responsibility 
has been accepted” in Mr. 
Aquino’s assassination. 


They have asked that their 
names be changed so relatives and 


Representatives of both the 
moderate and militant groups at- 
tended a morning Mass for Mr. 


He said that many Philippine friends will not learn of their addk>- 
provinces were becoming “killing tion. According to a social worker. 


solidate the accord he readied with 
Mr. G andhi 

Sikhism, founded in northern In- 
dia about 500 years ago, claims 


share to India’s economy. 


Junius R. Jayawardene 


Union Carbide Damage Suits Growing * 


dia about 500 years ago, n»hm But 1947 left the seeds far smol- NEW YORK (NYT) — ■ Lawyers who have sued the Union Carbide 
about 15 million believers. About dering resentments. Sikhs felt Corp. over the gas leak in Bhopal India, have filed new multimilhoo- 
13 million are in India, where they cheated out of a homeland. There do llar dmnay spin agains t th* tvanpany, this time on behalf of victims of 
make up 2 percent of the popular was a fcc&ig that the Hindu-led the Aug. 1 1 gas leak at the company’s facility in Institute. Wesi Virginia. 


Aquino's followers and family 


the their cases are “pathetic.' 


insurrection Michael 40, is tali and thin, a 


members. 


and other violence. People with neat dresser. He became addicted tion but exert a far greater tula- government in New Delhi was The suits, brought Tuesday in state court in West Virginia and in U.S. 


Cardinal Jaime L. Sin, the Un- 


concern for the poor, he added, 
were being called subversives. 


during the flower-power days of ence over the economy and politics treating Punjab and the Sikhs with District Court in New York, will have a major effect on the Bhopal case, 

1 .. in/n.n ■ _e» j • _ iL : i. *1 _ „ iW - !)., .... i i: nf .... 


the 1960s," when, after dabbling in 


INTERNATIONAL POSITION 


than numbers alone might su gg est fess titan fairness. 

Their conflict with the Hindu Among their 
majority centers largely on the Sikhs accused N« 
northern state of Punjab, the prai- stipulating wheat 
rie homeland of the Sflrh« steering new industry away from 

Most of the unrest, killing and Punjab toward poorer sections of 
terrorism involving STirh extremists tiie country. Sikhs were affronted 


less than fairness. the lawyers said. They said that the new leak — which sent 135 persons to 

Among their grievances, the hospitals — disclosed defects in design, operation and emergency re- 
Sikhs accused New Delhi .of ma- spouse similar to the Dec. 3, 1984, accident in India, in which 2,000 
nrpulating wheat prices and of people died. 


IRM 

(Institute for Rosaardi and In formation on M ul tinationals) 
Geneva — -is looking for a British 

ASSISTANT (m. or f.) 

fertile 

DIRECTOR OF INFORMATION 
AND COMMUNICATION 

* The Job: 

— Relations with the press (particularly in Great Britain): 

— Material organization of conferences, meetings, etc. 
throughout Europe; 

— Coordination of the editing of publications in English and 
relations with the publish era; 

— The candidate will m- attached to IRM Geneva Office with 
frequent journeys to Great Britain. 

* Profile: 

— Age 2S40. 

— At least three years' experience in communication matters; 
— Good contacts with the British press: 

— Interest in economical social and political problems; 

— Fluent French; 

— Knowledge of German would be appreciated. 

Please write with full curriculum vitae to IRM. 
45-4-7, Rue de Lausanne, GH-1201 Geneva. 


ENTOMOLOGIST: 
FOOD LEGUME CROPS 


in the last few years, as well as the when, in 1966, the government sev- 
raore peaceful drive for Sikh rights, ered some Hindi-speaking portions 
was focused on autonomy for Pun- tiie Punjab, made them into a 


Tunisia Expels 30 Libyan Diplomats 

966, the government sev- TUNIS (AFP) — The Tunisian authorities ordered the expulsion 
Hindi-speaking portions Wednesday of 30 Libyan diplomats for carrying out activities “contrary 

.a«L — - sL - - iL J- I . J r - . M am - V <-r< . n * 


Hen 


The International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas 
(1 CARD A) with headquarters in Aleppo, Syria, invites applications 
for the position of Entomologist in die Food Legume Improvement 
Program in Aleppo, Syria. 


jab, an important grain region. 

Sikh separatism had begun to 
stir with the partition of 1947, 
: when the Sikhs found themselves 
straddling the new border between 
Moslem Pakistan and Hindu India. 
The bulk of those in Pakistan 
moved to join their co-religionists 
on the Indian side. 


Over the years, Sikhs as a whole spiritual focus, as a holy city. 
- Mr. Longowal followed the 


ered some Hindi-speaking portions Wednesday of 30 Libyan diplomats for carrying out activities “contrary 
of the Punjab, made than into a to their diplomatic status and functions." the official TAP news agency 
new state of Haryana and then reported- 

made both of them share one cap- The agency said the Foreign Ministry had summoned the Libyan 
tal Chandiga rh . ambassador, Abdallah Ahmed al-Harraii to inform him that the 30 

By 1982, the main Sikh party, the diplomats had been declared personae non gratae. Tunisia anm^mr^ 
Akali Dal broke into the open with Tuesday, that it had expelled 253 Libyan nationals in recent days for 
a movement of civil disobedience, spying. 

Its principal objectives were con- The Tunisia government has ordered the closure of the Libyan cultural 
stderable autonomy for Punjab and center here and reuuposed visa requirements for Libyan nm.nnaic foflow- 
recognition of Amritsar, the Sikhs’ ing the expulsion by Libya of more than 2 1.000 Tunisian immigrants this 
spiritual focus, as a holy city, month. 


Fre 


C , Z' . 

»l. 1 


RESPONSIBILITIES: 


The Eniomolofjst wifl be pari of a multidisciplinary team whose 
objective is to improve legume production in the region. He would be 
expected to develop integrated strategies for control of imeds on faba 
beans, lentils, and chickpeas with emphasis on screening and/or 
breeding far host plant resistance. The use of chemical, cultural and 
biological control methods h also to be investigated. Responsibilities 
indude training of Entomologists from national research program s . 


Angers India Parliament 

The Associated Pros 


mt. Longowal followed the non- 
violent course charted by Mohan- 
das K. Gandhi before Indian inde- 
pendence, concentrating on strikes 
and marches. But his movement 
soon attracted radical dements. 
Occasional killing of police offl- 


Iran Denies Attack on Bf-l g lan Ship 

BRUSSELS (Reuters)-— Iran denied on Wednesday involvement in 


the missile attack on the Belgian-registered oil tanker Naess Leopard off 
the coast of Qatar on Sunday, and suggested that Iraq was responsible. 

RlMTtlflO In 0 fnrmol Antimlamt «L. n.)^ ** 


to f ^ 


QUALIFICATIONS: 


PhJX in Entomology with at feast 5 yews of research experience. 
Previous experience in developing countries, involvement in framing, 
and ability to speak Arabic or French would be advantageous. Proven 
competence in spoken and written English is regarded as a prerequisite 
to appointment. 


NEW DELHI — Angry law- cers and others culminated in the a statement categorically denying any role, and sayina that “Iran nnnra-< 
makers, shouting “vulgar” and “de- major bloodshed of 1983-1984. The aD violations of international law, such as the dnirinp 0 f nemraUhim" 
spicable." on Tuesday condemned mQi tarns, thought to number fewer government of Iraq," the statement added, “has announewtwirii 

a video beer commercia] produced than 1,000, went on a rampage pride attacks on over 100 neutral ships with the purpose of extend’ otht 
by a U.S. men's magazine that against police officers, politicians war imposed on Iran, of creating an area of insecnnrvan^ 
showed Mohandas K. Gandhi the and even moderate Sikhs. tensions in the area.” 3 01 mcreasm g 


TERMS Of APPOINTMENT: 


If you are unskilled, 
hut ambitious 

and want to earn up to £75 per day 9 
become an 


International tax-free salary based on background and experience; use 
of car; dlowance towards housing; annual home leave; non-contribu- 
tory medico! insurance scheme and pension fund. 


a video beer commercial produced 
by a U.S. men's magazine that 
showed Mohandas K. Gandhi the 
ascetic father of India’s indepen- 
dence movement, breaking a fast 
by drinking beer and hugging half- 
naked girls. 

Balram Jhakhar, speaker of the 
lower house of Parliament, said the 
use of Gandhi's name for the Play- 
boy Magazine advertisement was 
“downright despicable” and direct- 
ed the government to send a strong 
protest to the United States. 


Of US;: r 


and even moderate Sikhs. 

The word Sikh means disciple in 
Hindi It refers to the followers of 


Si- 


the first Sikh mystic, the Guru Na- 

nak. and nine succeeding gurus, or WA A c '' uuu 


trachere, who preached the Sikh Because of an editing error, an article in Wednesday's r, 

Dharraa, or path. It was Nanak incorrectly said that France's current Socialist 
who tried to bridge Ifae gap bo- tioodized most ufflmnce 

tween Islam and Hinduism Ire shipbuilding and coal -mining industries- Air Franr^S*??' ? ndear ; 
teaching a monotheistic creed, with airlines; the railroads, and the telephone, ix*t nffw” a mleraa f 
the emphasis on religious exercises electrid tv-supply comnanies. These ^.. ao “.8 as “d 




teaching a monotheistic creed, with airlines; the railroads, and the telephone. ixKt nffW a mlem ~ 

the emphasis on religious exercises dectridty-nipply companies. These operatioiTwere 

and meditation. before the Socialists came to power in 1981 . nationalized long 


c:h;- ' 


AUTO MARK AGENT 


Candidates should submit two copies of their Curriculum Vitae and 
samples, of work, plus names of two referees quoting Ref. No. FUP/J/85 
ta 


Security marking car windscreens, 
full or part time 

in your own area of Great Britain. 


Tel.: U.K. 061 832 4508, 
AUTO MARK, MANCHESTER, U.K 


Personnel Office 

ICARDA 

P.O. Box 5466 

Aleppo 

SYRIA 


U.S. Anti-Satellite Arm Is Described as Advanced 




^ P , et y r ? 1< ^ e , Divis to° opes der expansivsten imd mil einem Umsatz von fiber 15 Milliarden S grOBten US-Konzerne 1st sehr 
enolgrncn un Bereicn High Technology totig; Entwiddung, Fertigung und Vertrieb vou komplexen Da ten verarbei tungs- und Komiminikationssystemen 
ii r> ■ ne y eslcr 1 Mikroprozessor- und Netzwerktechnologie einschliefllich einer hochentwickelten Software ffir daen speziellen 

An wenaungs Darien- Aufgrtind jhrer mnovaoven Sthrke nimmt die Division lechnologiscb die international fnhrcnde Position ihres Indus triezwdges 

halben Milliarde DM. Die Division hat ihr Headquarter in Deutschland und operien von hier aus wdtweit mit 
eigen en sowie emem Netz unabhangiger und fohrender VertriebsgeseUschaften. FQr das imenuLtxonale Marketing wird der kreative Kopf gcsucht. 


(Contimied from Page 1) to military officials, the fighter eight tiny telescopes in its nose Ihal 
mnir« i.. lrtii hv in 50315 t0 811 altitu de of abouliJ8 gather infrared radiation from a 

8 mfles(29kilometen!), then fires its satellite and focus it on a super- 

In SnS they say, the VS. ^fJ? 005 ^ C0 l ed , at me hean of the 
Z.. 11/18 faS* .Za rocket, the nussde speeds warhead. 

wjold be bumched ^ , a line toward the A amputer sorts out the stream 

^^-15jSk?Acc«dinE _ of mfonnation. induding inertial 

J The attack is performed by a guidance readings from a laser gy- 

high-technology jewel on the tip of roscope. Fifty-six small steering 

the missile, a cylindrical warhead rockets keep Lbe warhead on a coHi- 

12 by 13 inches (30.6 by 33.2 ceali- sion course with its target. The ene- 

raeters) that bristles with silicon toy satellite is destroyed when the 
US-Konzeme 1st sehr chips and other electronic gear. Af- warhead simply smashes into it at 

nununlkauonssystemen ter separating from the missile, .the blindi ng speed. 

ien spezidlen warhead locks onto the tug/et with ■ “The ILS. anti-satellite weapon 




jc: A-. ‘ 






*The USL anti-satellite weapon 
has the potential of havin g greater 


t0 P ro P°nems of the 

fan' speed and sophistiS- 
tion are not everythaw^dS 

asaSSS-M 


High Technology 

Vice President International Marketing 

US-Konzem - Microcomputer Division - Headquarter in Germany 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


speed, flexibdity reliability and ef- Z ^P 005 in hola to 

fectwwess,” said Paul B. Stares, a 2u RSi ’ ** » *5 S 

research associate ai the Brookings to still be there. 


BAOfiOirS • MASIBfS ■ DOCTORATE 
far WoHc, Aca d ink Uh 


Sand detailed recume 

for free evaluation. 


berichten und ffir die weltweite Inituenmg. Steuenmg und Koordimerung simthefaer 
folgende Aufgabenschwerpunkte: Mitgestaltong und Koordinienmg der stxategia*ai Plammg 
und der operauven Jahresplane, Auf^Qrenimd Eyahaeren neuer Ge^SSogUchkdten einschheBlich Akquisitionen, Joint Ventures, OEM-Geschaft, 
Lizenzen usw.; Corporate Identity; Preispolitik; Maiktforschung, Planung imd Finfflhmng neuer Produkte; Untersifitzung der nationalen 

Vcrtn ebsgesdlschaf ten bei der Implementierung der Unternefamensride. 

S 1 * 0 " . en 5 I Scber) National tat mit starker europ&scber Ausrichtung und berats in Enropa ansUssig, 
EIec ? nc ^Engineeiing Degree bzw. europflisefaes Aquivalent, etwa 38 bis 46 Jahre alt; mngpkehrt 
™ aucb ein_ Deu^bCT nut starker Venvuradung in amenkaniseber Memalitat und Spracbe sowie langjahrigen Erfahrungen m amerikanischen 

m den ^ e ? lcre Yoranssetzungen; Untemehmerische Veranlag un g und diplomatisches Geschick. 

muunauonale Marketing enfahnmgpn in ernw aimhchen Ftihningsporitton odOT als General Manager eines kletoeren/mittieren Untemehmens der 
EDP- Oder verwandten elektromscheu Industrie - wie z.B. Office Automation, Mini- oder Fersonalcomputer, CAD/CAM etc. 


PAOFIC WBTBN UMVERSUY 

600 M. Sepulveda BhnL. 

Los Anaetes. California 
90049, Dept. 23, UaLAi 


Institution, a policy study center in 
Washington. Mr. Stares is the au- 
thor of “The Militarization of 
Space: U.S. Policy From 1945 to 
1984,” published by the Cornell 
University Press. 

While the Soviet weapon is slow 

m getting to its target, the U.S 
missile will be able to speed from 

hangar to target in an hour, accord- 
ing to the Union of Concerned Sd- 
ennsts. Once m space, the U.S. mis- 


bSSsbE 

Critics of the ^ 

^ saying sovfei 

with a treaty W (Sd hi 

to verify than «3 eaa «' 


’sSon Named 


STEVEN RUBINSTEIN 


Werm Sie sich auf der GnmcDage der genannten Voraussetzungen ffir diese hochkaittige und entspreefaead dotierle Position toxeressieren, bitte k* ffir 
weitere Inforxmtionm und anm eretCT Gedankmaustaust* urn Ihrcn Anmf. Sie torddaen muh tdefonisefa: Frankfurt 069-632036. Schrifthch 
erreichen Sie tnich fiber Postfach 701225. 6000 Frankfurt/ M. 70, W.-Gennany. Dabei dflrfea Sie absolute Vertraulichkeit voraussetzen. 


Heinrich c. SchOn 

Dr. Rochus Mummert, Heinrich C. SchOn und Dr. Dieter Kopsch ■ Untemehmei^sberater 


Age 18 S» lO-’ 130 lb. 

Loa Angeles resident 
Argentine passport. 

MISSING since July 17 . 
Last news front Chamonix^ Franc*. 


Reuters 

% succeeded by h 


S° r ^ official said 


Pteaae relay any knowledge of hie whereabouts to 


radio^L.^ said to a ® 


local police, Interpol or call collect bis narenta 
Lm Angeles @13) 208*1331. 


radio totoviewlhaTS: “«* “ a 
working toward hi f® p ^' was ■ 
S'n-Wfier 

fo««, uli e aroed . 




nUed Pa rapw^r 0 Sf Krhair 






> 








f- -J.'BIS 

*U!L- ij*.v 


^•S. Midwest 
In Economic 
Recovery, 

Leaders Say 

% James Barron 
w.» wr,rt7I «»W 

^chnacisiand,^. 
SeWaS^T 1 ^ of t ™ 01 Mid- 

s-Ai&ffsn 

Jetne did not that the region's resi. 
Ante and wealth wereiovK 
toeSouth or the West. S 0 

ru^T'-J Sba P Caia ^ toe gover- 
nSLS 41 ^ 15 ^ “novative te<*. 
Mltges are being developed here. 

2fi?y 0 ^to toe most pat- 

ar? m the Middle Wml 
JM. toe regwn has four of the a* 
^on s top 10 universities ranked in 

35252?“ °" — * 

Governor James J. Blanchard of 
Mtaugan said that fewer residents 
of the Middle West were migrating 
to places that promised more jobs 
and lower taxes. 

To officials who have staked 
‘ > weir political careers and their 
■ states futures on bringing in com- 
panies and jobs, that was welcome 
news. And they are apparently not 
alone in seeing an upturn. Louis 
Hams said that his polling organi- 
zation had found that only the 

South was more optinristic than the 
Middle West. 

“This is a recent trend, belie ve 
me,” he said. “For most of the past 
four years, the Midwest has led the 
nation in gloom and despair. Some- 
thing obvious is taking place.” 

But by some measures, the re- 
gion has a long way to go in its 
quest for economic weB-bcmg. Un- 
employment was down from. 8.2 
percent in June 1984 to 7.9 percent 
this June, according to the Federal 
Bureau of Labor Statistics, yet the 
rate of joblessness in five states in 
the region — Illinois, North Dako- 
ta. South Dakota, Iowa and Ne- 
braska — rose at least six-tenths of 
a percent in that period: 

The gathering was sponsored by 
the Midwestern Governors Confer- 
ence. which, some officials said had 
come close to disbanding last year 
amid a rift between states with 



I 


ConmAMi 

James J; Blanchard 

economies tied to manufacturing 
and those tied to agriculture. 

Some of the manufacturing 
states also belong to the smaller 
Great Lakes Governors Confer- 
ence, which earlier this year signed 
a charter with two Canadian prov- 
inces to prevent water from being 
piped to states in the South and the 
West that need it to continue their 
growth. Mr. Blanchard said the 
Great Lakes group met more often 
than the Midwestern Conference, 
'Much, he said, had a reputation of 
being a “more social” group. 

But the dispute was patched up, 
and this conference opened with 
Mr. Blanchard borrowing a line 
from Mark Twain by saying that 
reports of the region’s demise had 
been greatly exaggerated. 

Attending with him were Gover- 
nors Robert D. Orr of Indiana, the 
chairman of the conference, John 
Ashcroft of Missouri, Terry E. 
Branstad of Iowa, John W. Carlin 
of Kansas, Richard F. Celeste of 
Ohio and Robert Kerrey of Ne- 
braska, and Lieutenant Governors 
James T. Flynn of Wisconsin and 
Marlene Johnson of Minnesota. 

Governors James R. Thompson 
of Illinois, George Sinner of North 
Dakota and Martha Layne Coffins 
of Kentucky did not attend or send 
representatives. 

Mr. Orr said that three years ago, 
the last time the group convened on 
Mackinac Island, a resort island 
between Lake Huron and Lake 
Michigan, “things were not so good 
in the Midwest" But he noted a 
turnaround, and added: “Each of 
us is seeing investments by manu- 
facturers. Employment is at an all- 
time high and we’re benefiting in 
all ways except agriculture.” 


m Henri Flanunarion, 75, 
French Publisher, Dies 


'V 




r 


uW$ 


Agence France- Press? 

PARIS — Henri Flammarioa, 
75, a leading French publisher, has 
died after a lengthy illness. 

Mr. Flamman6nwas23 when he 
joined the company founded by his 
grandfather, Ernest, in 1876. He 
ran the business with his father 
from 1933 and then took over the 
direction himself in 1945 and built 
the firm op to publish 1,000 titles 
annually, with a yearly turnover of. 
700 million francs (about $83 mil- 
lion). The firm became the fifth 
largest publishing house inFrance. 

He is succeeded by his eldest son, 
Chari es-Henri, 39. 

Alfred Hayes, 74, Author 
Of Labor Hymn, “Joe MIT 

LOS ANGELES (UPI) — Al- 
fred Hayes, 74, a screenwriter and 
novelist whose poem “Joe HiD” 
was set to music and. became a 
rallying song for labor in the 1940s, 
died here Aug. 14 of meningitis. 

He wrote the script for “Teresa,” 
which drew an Academy Award 
nomination in 1951. Among his 
other movies were “Island in the 
Sun," “A Hatful of Rain,” and 
“The Left Hand of God." 

The poem “Joe Hfll" about the 
execution in 1915 of anotganizer 
for the International workers ot 
the World, was put to muse by 
Eari Robinson, recorded by a suc- 
cession of folk singers and sung on 


picket lines and at union meetings 
across the country. 

■ Other deaths: 

■ Frank. Raymond KeBy, 76, a jour- 
nalist who began his career on the 
copy desk of the New York Herald 
in Paris in 1933, Monday in New 
Rochelle, New York Mr. Kelly re- 
tired in 1976 from NBC News 
where he had been correspondent, 
writer and producer since 1962. 

Sbeikfc Sufuim bin Hamad 
al-Tham, 52, foreign minister of 
Qatar, of a heart attack Wednes- 
day. He was a brother of Qatar’s 
ruler. Sheikh Khalifa bin Hamad 
al-Tham. 

Nicholas Eden, 54, the Eari of 
Avon and a former undersecretary 
in the Department of Environment 
in the present British cabinet, Sat- 
urday after a long Alness. He was 
the son of Anthony Eden, a former 
prime minister. 

George Weiss, 90, a former 
chairman of Bache & Co-, the in- 
vestment brokerage house now 
known as Pmdential-Bache Securi- 
ties Ino, of heart failure last Thurs- 
day in New York. 

Edw a rd B. Rust, 66, president 
and chief executive officer of State 
Farm Mutual Automobile Insur- 
ance Co. and president of the U.S. 
Cham ber of Commerce is 1973-74, 
Sunday in Bloomington, minds. 


v 



CONCORD 

CE8THRKK 







. jskL gold, quartz, water-resistanL 

io person in Swiss watches. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TREBtlNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 1985 



FahveU Urges Oppositions 
To Apartheid Sanctions 


(Continued from Page 1) 
shows blacks “who weep and say, 
‘Please; don’t sanction. Don’t cut 
us off, our children die.’ 

Representative Robert S. Walk- 
er, a Republican of Pennsylvania, 
said American conservatives were 
divided cm the advisability of such 
sanctions. 

Younger Republican conserva- 
tives like Mr. Walker and Repre- 
sentative Vin Weber of Minnesota 
and Newt Gingrich of Georgia 
have supported sanctions os a way 
to prod the Pretoria government 
into the type of change they have 
said is needed to prevent anti- 
American, pro-Sonet forces from 
taking power there. 

"There is a split in the conserva- 
tive community,” Mr. Walker said 
Tuesday. “You have a long-stand- 
ing position among American con- 
servatives in support of South Afri- 
ca, nearly a carte blanche attitude 
that says, “Whatever they do is ac- 
ceptable because it is a nation that 
is friendly to the West and has 
great strategic value to us.’ ” 
“However,” he said, “there is 
now a substantial, growing number 
of conservatives who say, “Yes, 
South Africa is important to us 
strategically, but the danger of los- 
ing her strategically is greater if we 
support a government that is in- 
transigent to change, which is al- 
most inevitable in that society.' ” 
Richard A Viguerie, a fund-rais- 
er for conservative causes, said he 
agreed with Mr. FalweO on South 
Africa. Mr. Viguerie said he was 
“moving heaven and earth to get 
the Senate shored up to sustai n a 
presidential veto” of the sanctions 
legislation that is now in Congress. 

Both houses have approved 
sanctions. The House of Represen- 


tatives has approved the compro- 
mise version that came out of a 
conference committee, and the 
Senate is scheduled to vote soon 
after it reconvenes Sept. 9. 

“None of us conservatives sup- 
port apartheid," Mr. Viguerie said. 
“The question is not whether ihey : 
will have a while ruler or a black 
ruler in South Africa. Theyll have 
white rule for the foreseeable fu- 
ture. 

“The question is whether that 
white ruler win be South African or 
Soviet. The alternative to the cur- 
rent government is a Communist 
regime. If South Africa falls, free- 
dom is not likely to prevail in the 
rest of the world for much longer.” 

Herbert B. Berkowitz, a spokes- 
man for the Heritage Foundation, 
a conservative research and policy 
institute, said Mr. FahveU “repre- 
sents mainstream conservative sen- 
timent” on South Africa. 

■ New Jersey Legislation 

Earlier, Joseph F. Sullivan of The 
New York Times reported from 
Trenton, New Jersey : 

Governor Thomas R Kean of 
New Jersey said Tuesday that he 
would sign legislation to withdraw 
$2 billion io state investments from 
companies doing business in South 
Africa, as a protest against the Pre- 
toria government's policies of ra- 
cial separation. 

Governor Kean said he had de- 
rided to sign the bQl despite oppo- 
sition from the Reagan administra- 
tion and estimates by slate 
investment officials that the dives- 
titure could cost the state's pension 
system more than 5100 million in 
Joss of interest and transaction 
costs. It would take place over the 
next three years. 

“We can no longer stand by and 



Reverend Jerry FalweU 


watch while a system predicated on 
racism attempts io su b ju gate an 
entire people," he said. “The time 
has come for action to change — 
and to end, mice and for all — the 
oppressive system of apartheid.” 

The governor said the “moral 
imperative” that prompted him to 
act should move other governors to 
consider seriously similar actions. 

Several states have enacted some 
divestiture legislation . But slate of- 
ficials said New Jersey’s would be 
20 times as large as that of Massa- 
chusetts. which has the largest so 
far and whose law took effect in 
January 1983. 

The National Conference ot 
Slate Legislatures in Denver said 
some form of disinvestment or di- 
vestiture legislation has been en- 
acted in Connecticut. Iowa, Mary- 
land. Michigan, Nebraska, Rhode 
Island and Wisconsin. In addition 
laws are being or have been consid- 
ered in 29 other states. 

New Jersey's pension system, 
with investments of more than S10 
billion, covers 360.000 workers and 
retirees. 


Nicaraguan Rebel Group Drafts Code 
In Effort to Improve Image on Rights 


By Anne-Marie O’Connor 
Reuters 

TEGUCIGALPA. Honduras — 
The rebel Nicaraguan Democratic 
Force says it has established a code 
of conduct for its 15,000-sirong 
army, which has been accused of 
human rights abuses in its war 
aga inst the leftist Saa difltM govern- 
ment in Managua. 

The 70-article code, a draft of 
which was made available Tuesday, 
provides for sentences of up to 16 
years for rape, murder and robbery 
and establishes norms for treat- 
ment of prisoners ■ and civilians. 

Carlos Icaza, an exiled Nicara- 
guan lawyer who a month ago was 
named attorney general for the 
U .S. -backed rebel group, said the 
code would be presented to the 
group's leaders for final approval. 

7be code, which calls for adher- 
ence to the Geneva Convention, 
was viewed by diplomats here as an 
attempt to improve the image of 
the Nicaraguan Democratic Force, 
known bv its Spanish acronym 
FDN. 

International human rights 
groups have critiri 2 ed the FDN, 
the largest of the groups fighting 
the Sandinist government, for 
widespread human rights abuses 
against Nicaraguan civilians and 
prisoners of war. • 

The rebels’ human rights record 
also has influenced some US. con- 
gressmen to vote against aid for 
them. 

Mr. Icaza said be was unaware of 
any systematic human rights viola- 
tions but acknowledged that fight- 
ers could have committed abuses 
“in the heat of war.” 

Referring to the code, he said: 
“We are establishing this in part to 
make sure troops will know bow to 


treat the civilian population when 
we throw out the Sandinist&T 

The code’s harshest sentence is 
for homicide under conditions vio- 
lating the Geneva Convention, 
which will be punishable by 16 
years of rehabilitation work and a 
dishonorable discharge from the 
guerrilla group. 

Mr. Icaza said he had opened 
proceedings against 30 rebels and 
that another had been convicted of 
homicide under an earlier code. 

■ Nicaraguan Reports on Panel 

According to U.S. government 
documents, a senior member of 
Nicaragua's human rights commis- 
sion who secretly defected to the 
United States four months ago says 
the Sandinisis tried to turn the pan- 
el into a propaganda agency. The 
Associated Press reported from 
Washington. 

Mateo Guerrero, former execu- 
tive director of Nicaragua's Na- 
tional Commission for the Promo- 
tion and Protection of Human 
Rights, told U.S. interrogators af- 
ter his defection that the Sandinists 
had prevented the agency from in- 
vestigating most abuses. 

The panel was established five 
years ago as an autonomous agen- 
cy. 

Reached by telephone Tuesday. 
Mr. Guerrero refused to discuss his 
case publicly. But a four-page U.S. 
government summary of his disclo- 
sures to US. interrogators said: 

• The commission, established 
in 1980 to investigate rights abuses, 
has increasingly come under the 
control of the Nicaraguan Foreign 
Ministry, which has attempted to 
use the office to enhance Nicara- 
gua's international image. 

• Since late 1983, the ministry's 


secretary-general. Alejandro Ben- 
dam, has monitored the commis- 
sion’s activities. Early this year, be 
told the commission leadership not 
to investigate allegations of abuses 
concerning the forced relocation of 
communities in northern Nicara- 
gua. 

• Mr. Bendana told two com- 
mission officials in January that the 

panel would help the Nicaraguan 
government establish ties with for- 
eign human rights groups to draw 
international attention to abuses 
committed by anti-government re- 
bels. “The commission leaders were 
told to stop investigating any abuse 
committed by the government of 
Nicaragua and to concentrate their 
efforts on the anti-Sandmists,” the 
summary said. 

• Since 1982, commission mem- 
bers have not been permitted to 
investigate abuses in Nicaragua’s 
prison system, the summary said. 

The Nicaraguan Embassy de- 
clined comment on Mr. Guerrero's 
allegations. In April, the Lawyers 
Committee for International Hu- 
man Rights, a private U.S. group, 
offered a generally favorable ac- 
count of the agency’s activities, es- 
pecially on prison reform, in a re- 
port on Nicaragua's justice system. 


50 Chileans Held in Protest 

Reuters 

SANTIAGO, Chile — Chilean 
police arrested about 50 protesters 
Tuesday after breaking up an anli- 
-goverament demonstration with 
tear gas and water cannon, police 
said. Trade unions canceled a dem- 
onstration planned Tuesday after 
the military government declared it 
illegal. 


This is the start 
of something 
verybig. 



You’ve got a big future ahead of you with Hewlett-Fhckard’s new 
HP 150 II personal computer. Because the HP 150 II makes it easy to be 

more productive in your office. In many ways. 

• Ifs your own powerful yet simple-to-use personal computer, with 

built-in Personal Applications Manager so you don’t need to remember 
system commands/Ergonomic design for tne office, with a new, easy- 
viewing 12-inch screen. And a wide choice of user interfaces, such as 
optional touchscreen and mouse. Plus hundreds of the most popular 
business software packages. t . , 

• It’s your link to Hewlett-Packard’s peripherals. The standard-setters 

for the inaustzy. Such as the advanced Thinkjet and LaserJet printers 
and professional-quality plotters. _ 

• The HP 150 II is your own highly flexible terminal, too. At the 


touch of a key, it links you to the power of minicomputers and main- 
frames. So you have access to your department’s data bases and financial 
reports. 

• Your HP 150 II can be your link to Hewlett-Packard’s Personal 
Productivity Center, the advanced office automation system. So you can 
communicate instantly with other users. Exchange information. And 
tap a wide range of computing resources. 

The HP 150 II. With it comes the forward thinking you expect from 
Hewlett-Packard. 

See it at your nearest Hewlett-Packard dealer today. Or write to: 
Michael Zanawyken, Hewlett-Packard B.V, DeptR0301» 

P.O- Box 529, NL-1180 AM Amstelveea 

And then there’ll be no stopping you. 


The Hewlett-Packard 150 II Personal Computet 



HEWLETT 

PACKARD 









u 

p 


c 

r 


L 


Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 1985 


Own land in the great 


American West 


w 




★ ★ ★ ★ 



W hat more perfect way to stake your 
claim than by purchasing five glori- 
ous acres in die Colorado Rockies 
for yourself and those you love. At Sangre 
de Cristo Ranches you can still own a siz- 
able piece of America at a very modest cost 
and on easy credit terms. This is scenic land 
in one of the fastest-growing states in the 
USA, a piece of the unspoiled, romantic old 
Southwest. 

Sangre de Cristo Ranches is a subsidiary 
of Forbes Inc., publishers of the highly re- 
spected American business and financial 
publication, Forbes Magazine. The land be- 
ing offered for sale to you is a part of the 
huge 258,000-acre Forbes Trinchera Ranch, 
one of the oldest of the remaining big 
ranches in America. A sportsmen's paradise 
in all seasons for hunting, fishing, riding, 
hiking and boating. With fine skiing less than 
50 miles away, the ranch ranks among the 
world's best-known preserves for deer, elk, 
game birds and other wildlife. 

You can own majestic mountain views of 
Trinchera Peak and Mount Blanca (higher 
than Pikes Peak) which stand as silent sen- 
tinels protecting the ro lling foothills and 


valley that make up our Sangre de Cristo 
Ranches. 

The land lies about 200 miles southwest 
of Denver, just east of US Route 160 — the 
Navajo Trail. Its town is historic Fort Gar- 
land, the last co mman d of Kit Carson. 

For as little as $4,500 total cash price you 
can purchase your own 5-acre Sangre de 
Cristo Ranch, with payments as low as $45 
monthly. 

Important money-back and exchange 
privileges backed by Forbes Magazine's dis- 
tinguished reputation have contributed 
much to the great success of this unusual 
land offering. 



For complete de- 
tails on this won- 
derful opportunity, 
without obligation, 
please fill in and 
mail coupon today. 


Obtain the Property Report required by Federal tew and 
read ft Mora awning anything. No Federal agency has 
Judged the merits or value, if any, of fft« property. 
Equal Credrt and Housing Opportunity 





1 Opening for Talk* 
* Ib Seen in Moscow 



2 FORI 


Take advantage of our special rales for new subscribers and 
we II give you an extra month ofTribs fee with a one-year 
subscription. Total savings: nearly 50% off the newsstand price 
in most European countries! 


1 Speorf**xi4*iofyaiB. 

| ^Aa<rtddRMrt>Madi3).)Sau 

h I Cotrtry Currency 

1 ?y«r 

6maL 

BKJ 

1 Aurina 



IK] 

mm 

I . 

BJt. 




_ Denrmk 

DJCr. 


mezz 

57D 

1 finfcmd 

IK! 

wmm 



1 ftonoe 

1 F7. 

1J200 

644 




482 

261 

■mi 

1 Grodftitan 

t 

Hni 

55 

30 

1 Grseee 

Or. 


WES 

■C^il 

■ Nrthertads 

H. 




1 (rahnd 

Cfct 

115 

62 

341 

S arfy 

Ups 

mu . l 


Lft. 

9^777. 

Mg? 


1 hi 22*52 





j ftartood 

Be. 




[ Span 

Pits. 




_ Swmden 

SXr. 



3l^dJ 







Ifctfrt Alrica,Cano!fci IxUnAmBriaa OultStosa 

1 $1 «2[ 23B| 


TaSiiKciip^Mcrager.lnterTOfbnd Herald Trfcwie, 787,QvenueOicriesd&Gaulle, 
92521 NeuSyCedex, France. Tel: 747 C7 29. Tdex: 61 2832 

Please enter my subscription for: 

□ T 2 months □ 6 (norths 03 months 

{+1 month free} {+ 2 w«fafree} (+1 week free) 

□ My check is enclosed 



Phase dvige my: □ Access □ ArarianEtpres □ Driers Oub 
□ Euroard □ Afatenxvri □ Via 


Card expry date 

Gxdoceburt 
nunfaer i — i 


. Signature. 


□ 


n 


Name. 


Address. 


ay. 
Tel — 


.Country. 


.Teles*. 


22-8-85 


VACATION MSTRUCnONS 
I wS be trowing from . 


□ PfaBB suspend mywbscfrAandwmg my t*gero«idgriend 9 rodctetfe«prafenacOTfrgy. 

□ I worid fte to haw the paper sent to my vaoAon address. (Pieces endow mdrudigr^ 


(dales l 




MS, THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, , f • • • ; 

White* Urged to 


By Alan Cowell 
New York Times Server 

PRETORIA — The tones are 
sonorous and seem reasoned and 
the message is this: The revolution 
is coming, and the blacks will try to 
lake all, and die whites will fight ' 
back for the land that is theirs. And 
the whites will win. 

Over coffee, the words of Eugene 
Terre Blanche, the leader of South 
Africa's most extreme rightist 
white organization, somehow do 
not seem particularly perplexing in 
this land of divided people and raw 
racial passions cloaked m complex 
rationales. Elsewhere, they aright 
chill. 

South Africa, Mr. Terre Blanche 
said in an interview Tuesday, was 
at “the be ginning of the bloodiest 
revolution between black and 
white.” 

“If the blacks start a revolution, 
if our government capitulates and 
hands over our land, if the blacks 
start a revolution to destroy oar 


property, rape our women, even 
our childreiv' he said, “there w31 


be a white force under the leader- 
ship of the Afrikaner Resistance 
Movement that will Tight back in a 
kind of coonterrevolutioa. And we 
will take back our lands which are 
rightfully ours. We will implement 
a white people’s state.” 

In the uncharted reaches to the 
political right of President Pieter 
W. Botha, Mr. Terre Blanche sug- 
gests there are passions to be 
stirred by soch talk. He speaks to a 
segment of Afrikanerdom still far 
from the centers of power, but his 
words touch atavistic fears of slave 
rebellion. 

A speech by Mi. Botha in Dur- 
ban last Thursday, in which be re- 
stated a commitment to unHefimH 
racial reforms, has given Mr. Terre 
Blanche's «»(-«»- ammunition. 'Hie 
same speech has been depicted by 
others, across the racial divide, as 
the final rebuff to black aspira- 
tions. 

Mr. Terre Blanche is bead of the 
Afrikaner Resistance Movement, a 
movement whose emblem resem- 
bles a swastika. He says the com- 
parison of the emblem and his 
ideas to those of the Nazis are inac- 
curate. 



Afrifouns 
toe CtW ^p^na on Tu«d*£ ■ 




^ PartvM. 

rtf 1 * Jr, has ruled in South 
Dr- Treurmdu. 


^f.hSTwho’broke from it in : 
leads Botha's limited- 


Opposition to Mr. 

^S^jrtraumaiic moment 

inai " . ... inn *7 unify 





as a 


^ninitsstn.ggejos^ 
. ^niineot that offered, m 




sometimes 




dogma, 

raC ial distinction and pro- . , 
At the Conservative . 

qSed Tuesday 

2Sre “childlike people "J***J*g ' 

-ra-ESSSiSSSiiV: 


• ■ r f 

vf-rir; 

i.i # 




I'S’-- ***, 

dunking for them. 

But the perceived eballengp^,,. 
Mr. Botha from the nghi is one that 
haunts his cabinet It 

Western diplomats. 

Kic Hprtcion last week to. ... 


»' • r K-m- 


Mdtal 


Eugene Terre Blanche, head of a rightist Afrikaner gronqp. 


Terre Blanche, 41, a cattle farmer 
and former policeman, persists in 
holding public meetings in the con- 
servative heartlands of the nation. 
He cites the history of the 2.8 mil- 
lion Afrikaners, who are descen- 
dants of South Africa’s Dutch set- 
tlers, as justification for a renewal 
of Afrikaner resistance. 

The language is apocalyptic and 
revives memories of the Cheat Trek 
inland. That was when Afrikaners 
from the Cape rejected what they 
saw as the integrationist dictates of 
British masters and poshed north, 
fighting Zulus and Matabeles and 


Terre Blanche said, “I am not a 
Nazi I am an Afrikaner national- 
ist” That is a mantle many would 
c laim, for survival is seen as a no- 
tion indivisible from control. 

Mr. Botha, for instance, has told 
his followers that they must “adapt 
or die” offering limited reforms 
and the notion of “co-responsibil- 
ity” with blacks as a means of per- 
petuating Af rikan er survival In 
this context, survival is seen as con- 
tinued control over everything that 
affects the lives of Afrikaners and 
the rest of South Africa’s 4.5 mil- 
lion whites. 

Mr. Botha has so far not enacted 


the British themselves to establish 

His movement does not rep re- sud dtrfend republics in the Orange any of the promises, but the 
sent the mainstream of rightist Af- l ?iec Stale and the TransvaaL pledges themselves have become 
rikaner dissent, a position held by Mr. Terre Blanche’s movement the grist of controversy, 
the Conservative Party of Andries has also troubled some because of To Mr. Botha's right, for in- 
P. Treumicht, which controls only its references to “international 25- stance, Dr. Treumicht custo- 

18 of the 178 seats in South Africa's on ism” and “international Juda- ” 

Parliament ism” as the powers that he says 

But the existence of the Afrika- have taken control of South Af li- 
ner Resistance Movement has ca's mineral wealth and other re- 
proved troubling in recent yean to sources. In the early part of this 
mainstream Afrikaner politicians, century such references were com- 
who have sought to disown it The mon in the political speeches of 
movement is thought to have about Afrikaners seeking power, but have 
5.000 adherents. since largely faded. 

Despite their disapproval, Mr. “I am not an extremist,” Mr. 


dy of the Afrikaner souL He argues 

that 


Mr. Botha has strayed from 
traditional apartheid, opening a 
way to black majority rule. Dr. 
Treumicht’s argument is that 
South Africa must abandon the 
limited reforms offered by Mr. Bo- 
tha and seek to implant the racial 
and ethnic compartmentahzation 
envisaged by the o riginal theolo- 


factor in his decision last 

withhold a dear-cut announce™* ; ;, 
of political reforms that mighl stem . 
the violence of black low, ' nA ^^ ^ 
where more than 620 people bovef, 
died since last Septembe r. \ ? 

Mr. Terre Blanche's convert 
doo seems to suggest that, when he * ; -■ 
speaks of re-establishing Afrikaner ... 
dominance in the manner of**:. 
Af rikaner farmer’s republics of u» ■: 
Orange Free Stale and the Trans- - 
vaal there are people of like mind . 
waiting to take up arms to fight ; 
black domination. . 

“I do noi think,” be said Tuesday, ■_ 
of South Africa’s whites, “that oar • 
people realize what dire straits we 
are in. But the Afrikaner is accns- -• 
tomed to fight.” 

in speaking of the Afrikaners, .. • 
Mr. Terre Blanche drew a distinc-, " 
don between those who made the ■ 
Great Trek and those, like Mr. 
Botha's forebears, who remained in 
the Cape. ^ 

“I know the black man.” he said. 

“I played with him while I was a 
child I speak his language. I under- 
stand him. I do not hate him, but I 
knew him and 1 realize that the 
blade man is not interested in pow- 
er-sharing.” 

“If you give him just a little bit, 
he uses that power to demand more 
power and if you try to share the 
power in the same country and he’s 
a majority” Mr. Terre Blanche 
said “he’ll certainly destroy you.” 


P- 


Ml 


r- .1 


1 


Winnie Mandela Refuses US. Aid to Rebuild Home 


Hu Associated Press 

JOHANNESBURG — Winnie 
Mandela, the wife of the jailed 
black nationalist leader Nelson 
Mandela, refused a SI 0,000 offer 
Wednesday from the UA govern- 
ment to help rebuild ho- fire- 
bombed home, and said she be- 
lieves that the Reagan 
administration does not oppose 
apartheid 

Mrs. Mandela said she could not 
accept money from the U.S- State 
Department because it “maintains 
its support of the South African 
government by its policy of ‘con- 
structive engagement’ ” 

Her husband a leader of the out- 
lawed African National Congress, 
was jailed for life in 1964 after 
being convicted on charges of plot- 
ting sabotage. He is widely regard- 
ed as the most influential black 
leader in South Africa. 

Constructive engagement is 
President Ronald Ragan’s policy 
of attempting to persuade Sooth 
Africa to end apartheid the forced 
system of racial separation, rather 
than to threaten the nation, which 


is ruled by its white minority, with 
economic sanctions. 

In a letter drafted by her lawyer. 
Mis. Mandela said that some of 
Mr. Reagan's comments on Smith 
Africa “disturbed her greatly.” 

She cited Mr. Reagan’s state- 
ment at a news conference after 
South African security forces fired 
into a crowd of blacks in Uitenhage 
in March, killing 17 persons and 
wounding 19. 

Mr. Reagan placed a share of the 
blame on the black demonstrators, 
saying: “There has been increasing 
violence and there is an element in 
South Africa that does not want a 
peaceful settlement, that wants vio- 
lence in the streets.” 

The letter read by Mrs. Mandela 
said that accepting U.S. govern- 
ment funds might create what it 
called the incorrect impression that 
the U.S. government “genuinely 
opposes apartheid” 

Mrs. Mandela said, however, 
that she would accept contribu- 
tions toward the rebuilding of her 
home from individual U.S. sena- 
tors, and that she was grateful for 



Winnie Mandela 


messages of support from many 
Americans. 

The 510,000 would have come 
from a 51 -million allocation from 
Congress last vear for comrmmitv 


programs and other efforts in 
South Africa. 

■ Poet Admits Role in Murder 

A black South African poet who 
won a reprieve from the gallows has 
admitted taking part in the murder 
of a policeman but says he was 
under pressure from anti-govern- 
ment guerrillas, his lawyer said 
Wednesday, Reuters reported from 
Johannesburg. 

Benjamin MoJois, 30, was due to 
be hanged Wednesday at the Pre- 
toria prison. His execution was de- 
iayed Tuesday for three weeks to 
allow his defense team to prepare 
new evidence concerning the mur- 
der rf a black policeman in 1983. 

. Jana, his lawyer, said 

that Mr. Moloisi signed an affida- 
vit Tuesday saying he had partici- 
pated m the murder under pressure 
tram the guerrillas of the African 
National Congress. 

tJ^^ 0loisi ’ s ^Pending execu- ' 
ton had prompted international 
and local appeals for clemency, in- 
°ne from the British gov- 


I- :: . 
M_'. . 


Bonn 

InEas 







■-VJ 

,*.• _ . 


INTERNATIONAL 




ESCORT 

sema 

USA R WORLDWIDE 

Head afBcn in Now Yari 

330 W. 566, SL, N.Y.C 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

NUUOt OBNT CARDS AMD 
CKOS ACCEWH) 

ESCORTS & GUIDES 

ESCORTS & GUIDES 

LONDON 

KBHSIN6TON 

ESCORT SGRVKX 

10 KENSINGTON CHURCH 5T VTR 
TO; 937 9136 OR 937 91^3 
AI major credR cartfa aonptod 

ARISTOCATS 

Undro Sort Service 

128 Wigmors St. London W.l. 

Afl mrtor Oedt Cords Aocapted 
Tot 437 <7 41 / 4742* 

12 noon - rndnighi 

HEATHROW 

* AIO LONDON * 

- ESCORT SERVICE 01-834 AAOt e 

LONDON 

B&GRAV1A 

E»oor» Service. 

Tel: 736 5877. 

bMB (Mhnd ai Hw top a ant 
■xdmiv Burt SarAa by _ 

brtwifag iu6e rod TV. 

MAYFAIR CUffi 

GUDE SatVICE firem 5em 
ROTT3DAM j0) 10-254155 
THE KACUE (o) 70-60 79 96 

* USA & TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 

ESCORT SERVICE. 
EVERYWreKE YOU ARE OR GOL. 

1-813-921-7946 

Cal foe from US: 1-800-237-092 
Cod Free from Rorida T-80CW82-0B9Z 
Lowdl Eotfern otkowwi yoo bodd 

UJNDON 

Portman Escort Agency 

67 CMtorn Slmrt, 

. . tendon WT 

AJ mJJ? ^2a 

MADRID INTL 

TO; 245634*. ^SPcARDS 


* LONDON * 

jssununii 

ZURICH 

Caroline Enert Service 

Tel; 01/252 61 74 

CAPRICE 

ESCORT SBtVICE 

IN NEW YORK 

TBj 212-737 3291. 

* LONDON * 
ZARA ESCORT SERVICE 
HEATHROW / GA1WKK 

Monwig HI Midnight 834 7945 

** GB4EVA-HRST ** 

DULY ESCORT SERVICE 

+ 1WBO + TRAVR 

RAMKHIRT AREA. ISABaiFS h. 

nnle and wole Mngurt Ejaxl md 



MADIdD SasenGNS ESCORT Ser- 

^blW 40115U7 C«»Cw6w 

■PWBS- AWWSRP NATASCHA 

Emt Semes. Tek 02/721 7 

■ »>»/**/« 1 - 1 

,->iVVr,\ar 


i-*-!9 '"V.' A* •.mtfiiib&EiiA 

r—r-.W 


i* 1 t wa j 



: - s,: • --* • * <* 


ww YORK KATHBBNE EscorTS - 
«*. P1Z 496-lflm* s*' 





eMS 






airport 

“conTsanncE. 020-999244 




* JASMINE * 


KIM SUE 
Bcotr swig. 020^53392 


CarO, {7 


AMSTBiDA £ SSVKI 

366655 


51 


Z URICH -GENEVA 


arars ESCORT S8tVK£ 
TCL 01/343 08 64 - 022/ 3441B6 


* MADRID LOLA * 


BCORT SERVICE 1 EL 
233 03 19 






, aoacauBHJBore escort i 

* Gl **5, S «* v,CB - T *J< 06/589260^589 
1146 from 4 pn to 10 prtjT 589 


VKNNA 

ra, 37 52 39 





_gg*VA * beauty* 

WVItt 022/29 51 3Q 


******G£McyA seer 

BCOmsBMaS/MifL 


AMS7RDAM BARBARA 


ESCORT 

S ® Via T* 46 09 2* 


“OSBOOW - COIjOGNE , mZ 

CtrtL 021,^^- 

v »s?>S^ FS ®s^Bis: 






®COW Soviet 


T‘\- - :VH 


U SsSs»a BiCO W AOS4CV. 

Strata: 















?r . 



















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 1985 



PageS 


Chinese Sentiment on Japan Is Mix of Bitterness and Hope 


Dr. Edward TeDer at the nuclear war seminar in Erice. 


. By John F. Bums 

Mw York Tuna Service 

BEIJING — An elderly Chinese 
official who bicycles past the Japa- 
nese Embassy every day on his way 
to work found himself flinching 
last week as he glimpsed the white 
banner with the red circle at its 
center fluttering from the embassy 
flagstaff. 

" Asia has been transformed in the 
40 years sin« be took to the streets 
of Shanghai to celebrate the Japa- 
nese surrender that ended World 
War II. Japan and China have es- 
tablished a new and thriving rela- 
tionship. But for the official, as for 
many Chinese, emotions still are 
stirred by memories of the Japa- 
nese occupation. 

Amid the welter of official activi- 
ties marking the anniversary of the 
Japanese surrender in 1945, Chi- 
nese have been working over their 
aniiudes toward Japan. What has 
emerged is a patchwork of feelings, 
some magnanimous, some bitter, 
that seem likely to condition rela- 
tionships for a long time to come. 

From the seizure of Manchuria 
m 1931 to the deployment of 1.3 
million Japanese soldiers across 
China by war's end, China suffered 
more than any other under Japa- 
nese occupation. Official estimates 
pur Chinese losses at 3.8 million 
soldiers killed and 18 million civil- 


ians dead or wounded, and proper-. 

) billion. 


ty losses ar more than S120 
At one level, the Chinese govern- 
ment's posture on the anniversaiy 
has been to odebrate the ties with 
Japan that have developed since 
the establishment of diplomatic re- 
lations in 1972, and particularly 


Review said in an article, “but it 
should not be forgotten, written off 
or distorted.” 

In case anyone should think this 
is a philosophical matter, seven] 
officials have gone out of their way 
to say, in effect, that good as rela- 
tions are, full trust is a long way off. 


'You must understand what Japan has done 
here,’ a Japanese businessman said. r It is not 
for ns to make a noise/ 


Although Japan is easily China's 
largest trading partner, with SI 3.2 
billion last year, the trade is becom- 
ing lopsided. In the first six, months 
of this year, Japan had surplus of 
SIS billion, aggravating China's 
decline of bard currency reserves. 
Still more irksome from the Chi- 
nese standpoint, the Japanese have 
responded limply so far to requests 
that they loosen up on the flow of 
capital and technology. 

“The Japanese are our neighbors 
in Asia, and they have profound 
historical responsibilities here," a 
trade official remarked. “We ex- 
pected more.” 


since a peace treaty was signed in 
1978. 

Gu Mu, a national Communist 
Pony secretary who led an econom- 
ic delegation to Tokyo two weeks 
ago, told Prime Minister Yasuhiro 
Nakasone that relations were 
“marvelously good in all aspects.” 

However, other pronouncements 
have offered a more modulated 
view similar to the one that the 
Russians have adopted in their ties 
with West Germany — that the 
broad development of trade and 
cultural contacts should not set 
aside the historical legacy of the 
war. 

“Japan’s ruthless invasion of 
China is now pan of history," the 
English-language weekly Beijing 


Qian Qichen, a deputy foreign 
minister, noted in an interview with 
the Australian Broadcasting Cor- 
poration that there were “those in 
Japan who want to revive milita- 
rism. but the Japanese will not 
countenance it." 

“While it is necessary to be vigi- 
lant. there is no cause for fear." Mr. 
Qian said. 

The wariness implicit in such re- 
marks is compounded by a sense of 
frustration at the failure of Japan 
to offer more help in China’s drive 
to modernize its economy. Al- 
though the thought is never public- 
ly expressed, there is a feeling 
among educated Chinese that Ja- 
pan has a historical obligation to 
help China out of its poverty. 


On a personal level Japanese 
visiting and living here have gained 
a reputation for being, among for- 
eigners. outstandingly polite and 
self-effacing One Japanese busi- 
nessman, asked why he did not 
press his case harder with a Chinese 
government ministry that was 
dragging its feel on a potentially 
lucrative deal, replied: ”You must 
understand what Japan has done 
here. It is not for us to make a 


noise. 


However, there is concern 
among Chinese that attitudes like 
these are becoming rarer as the 
wartime generation dies out and is 
replaced by younger Japanese who 
feel no personal guilt. There was an 
echo of this in a Chinese protest in 


advance of Mr. Nakasone’s visit 
last week to the Yasukuni shrine 
for Japan's war dead. 

A Chinese spokesman said that 
the ■visit would “hurt the feelings" 
of Chinese since the shrine com- 
memorated such wartime figures as 
Hideki Tojo. who beaded Japan’s 
government through much of the 
war. When the visit went ahead, 
Chinese newspapers published re- 
ports of protests at the shrine. 

For its part, China is using the 
anniversary to ensure that wartime 
memories remain alive. The gov- 
ernment has organized mass rallies, 
the preparation of spatial books 
and films, commemorative stamps, 
academic seminars and wreath-lay- 
ing ceremonies. The climactic event 
is to occur Sept. 2. the day of the 
signing of Japan's surrender, when 
100,000 people are expected to lay 
wreaths at the Beijing monument 
to the People's Heroes. 

The anniversary also is being 
used for other political ends. Arti- 
cles. books and films are giving 
prominence to the role played in 
World War 11 by Chiang Kai- 
shek's Nationalist soldiers, later 
defeated by the Communists in a 
civil war. 


Although General Chiang' s per- 
sonal role is virtually ignored, the 
new spate of publications empha- 
sizes the part played by Nationalist 
soldiers alongside the Communist 
forces, whose efforts are described 
as decisive. 


Russians Don’t Show Up 
At Talks on Nuclear War 


- Reuters 

ERICE, Sicily — Soviet scien- 
tists stayed away from an interna- 
tional seminar here on nucledr war 
as delegates met to discuss Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan’s project to 
develop a space shield against nu- 
clear missiles. 

Participants said the absence of 
12 Soviet scientists and academic 
experts dampened the mood. 

The seminar, which has been 
held annually for the last four 
years, is one of the few internation- 
al forums where colleagues from 
East and West can dismiss issues erf 
nuclear war. 


Several U.S. scientists, inclu ding 
jyadstof • 


fid Hot 


K02s:‘ ; 


Dr. Robert Budwine, a physicist 
the Lawrence Livermore National 
Laboratory in California, who is 
working on the space shield, voiced 
disappointment. , 

“The atmosphere certainly 
would have been different and the 
give and take would have been in- 
teresting if they had come,” he said. 

Organizers said they had not re- 
ceived any explanation for the So- 
viet delegation’s absence. The sem- 
inar began Tuesday. 

Foreign . Minister Giulio An- 
dreotti of Italy, safd the absence, 
might be liiikbd to the disappear:- 
ance in Rome three weeks ago of a 
Soviet diplomat, VitaH Yurchenko. 
He also mentioned possibie fear of 
Mafia violence in $KtiIy. 

Others said the Sovwt absence 
might be connected to the < 
pearance in Spain last April 


fflaihflmattr-fofi, Vladimir Alexan- 
drov, who attended the Erice semi- 
nar Iasi year. 

An Italian, Professor Antonino 
Ziduchi, said he had received a 
telegram from Professor Yevgeni 
Velikhov, vice president of the So- 
viet Academy of Scienoes, inviting 
him to visit Moscow to discuss 
“problems concerning oar scientif- 
ic tinks.*’- 

iDr. Budwine described Wash- 
ington’s space defense program, 
known formally as the Strategic 
Defense Initiative, as “a rational 
approach to what is basically an 
irrational situation." 

Dr. Gregory Cana van, a physi- 
cist at the Los Alamos -Laboratory 
in New Mexico, said there were 
technical, financial and moral 
problems facing the rnissOe shield 
but he believed none were insur- 
mountable. 

Dr. Edward Teller, the Hungar-, 
ian-born U.S. nuclear scientist, 
said predictions that unclear war 
would mean the end of mankind 
were wrong. 

“Those people who talk about 
nuclear war as the end of mankind 
contradict themselves because nu- 
clear war can be reduced to a pro- 
portion," he said. “It would not be 
the end of mankind." 

He said the goal of US. nuclear 
military policy was to deter Soviet 
attack. “If we show our opponents 
that aggression against us will not 
succeed, then aggression will not 
come," he said. 



Radioactive Material for Medical Use 
Was Carried on Japanese Jumbo Jet 


In the past. Communist histories 
generally depicted the Nationalists 
as cowardly and ineffective, and as 
having conserved their weapons 
and energies for use against the 
Communists after the defeat of Ja- 
pan. 



30 bis, Rue de Paradis 
75010 PARIS 


(thru the archway) 

Tel.: 770 64 30 


When in Paris... 
visif our Museum 
and showrooms 


Open Monday - Friday 
9 j.m. io b p m. 

Saturday 10- 12 a.m_ - 2 ■ 5 p.ro. 
Also in selected stores 
near your home. 
Catalogue on request 


Martin McGuinness 


BBC Subject 
In Film Jailed 
Over Fines 


Bonn Seeks Third Suspect 
In East German Spy Ring 


Reuters 


BONN — West Gennan investi- 
gators announced Wednesday that 
they were hunting a third suspected 


two secretaries believed to have 
been East German agents- : 

The Federal Prosecutor’s Office 
said it had begun inquiring into the 
disappearance at the weekend of a 
messenger in an army administra- 
tive center in Bonn.. The office re- 
fused to give further derails but 
security sources said the man, 
whom they identified as Lorenz B., 
53. had been a close fnend of Ursu- 
la Richter, one of the two nnssmg 

S ^eseoMty sources said that the 
simultaneous disappearance of me 
> - 


messenger had reinforced suspi- 
cions that Miss Richter had been a 
controlling officer in charge of a 
string of agents in Bonn. 

A spokesman for an elevator 
company that previously employed 
the messenger said that the man 
was involved in the installation of 
air-conditioning equipment in a 
top-secret government bunker near 
Bonn in the 1960s. 

Earlier photographic records, the 
prosecutor’s office said, indicated 
that the other missing secretary, 
Sanja Lflneburg, 61, had lived in 
Beam under a false identity for 20 
years before vanishing more than 
two weeks ago. She was a long-time 
personal aide of Economics Minis- 
ter Martin Bangemann. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatcher 

BELFAST — - Martin McGuin- 
ness, one of the men featured in a 
controversial British Broadcasting 
Corp. film about extremism in 
Northern Ireland, has been jailed 
for 28 days after refusing to pay 
fines, police said. 

They said Mr. McGuinness, a 
senior member of Sinn Fein, the 
political wing of the outlawed Irish 
Republican Army, had been fined 
£155 ($215) in March for obstruct- 
ing and assaulting police. He was 
jailed Tuesday. 

The BBC at the request of Home 
Secretary Leon Brittan, derided 
last month to cancel showing the 
interview with Mr. McGuinness. 
That set off charges of government 
censorship and a dispute over 
BBC's editorial independence, with 
broadcast journalists staging a 24- 
hour strike. 

Meanwhile, the LRA claimed re- 
sponsibility for killing a wealthy 
building contractor in the Irish Re- 
public “because of his collabora- 
tion." The contractor helped secu- 
rity forces build barracks and 
police posts. 

A statement issued in Dublin 
said Seamus McEvoy, 46, original- 
ly from Northern Ireland, had been 
warned repeatedly about his bnild- 


By Matthew L Wald 

flew York Times Service 

BOSTON — The Japan Air- 
lines plane that crashed on Aug. 
12 was carrying 61 small packages 
of radioactive materials manufac- 
tured in the United States for medi- 
cal research and diagnosis in Ja- 
pan, according to the New England 
Nuclear Corp. 

A spokesman for New England 
"Nuclear, which is a subsidiary of 
Du Pont Co., said he that thought it 
unlikely that radiation levels would 
be high enough to affect the four 
survivors or rescue workers. 

He said the Japanese authorities ' 
were informed about the materials; 
before rescuers reached the site. 

In a telephone interview Tues- 
day. the director of the U.S. Nucle- 
ar Regulatory Commission’s office 
of international programs, James 
P. Shea, said the Japanese had 
found some of the packages intacL 

“They had not found any prob- 
lem so far," he said. “They haven't 
reported finding any radiation lev- 
els as if any were broken open." 

The material involved included 
iodine- 125. which is a hazard if 


taken internally, and phospborous- 
32. which can be an external haz- 
ard. 

According to the company 
spokesman, (he material is shipped 
in very small amounts and if the 
largest via) of phosphorous had 
come to rest near the exposed skin 
of a survivor or rescue worker, the 
dose would have been 300 miQi- 
roemgen per hour, which he called 
“a nuisance amount" Clothing 
would have cut the dose, he added. 

For comparison, the Environ- 
mental Protection Agency sets a 
guideline of 1.000 to 5,000 milli- 
roentgen where the authorities 
should tell members of the public 
to take shelter. The average Ameri- 
can receives a radiation dose of 
about 200 railli roentgen a year, half 
from natural sources and half from 
man-made sources. 

The radiation in the phospho- 
rous will return to background lev- 
els within the environment in about 
five months, according to the com- 
pany spokesman, and the iodine in 
abcrni two years. 

The material on the Japanese 
flight was bound for Dietchi, a Jap- 


anese pharmaceutical distributor, 
according to the company. 

The materials are used in ani- 
mals in cancer research and re- 
search into DNA and in human 
tissue samples, but generally are 
not used directly on humans. They 
are shipped by air because they are 
have short life spans and because 
scientists often have an urgent need 
for them. 

In Washington, a memorandum 
sent to the five members of the 
Nuclear Regulatoty Commission 
by the commission staff last week 
said that the packages could pose a 
potential health hazard if they were 
damaged during the crash. 


A Record 99 Nominated 
For Nobel Peace Prize 


Reuters 


Knesset Panel Opposes 
Mormon School Center 


OSLO — A record number of 99 
nominations for the 1985 Nobd 
Peace Prize has been submitted to 
the Norwegian Nobel Committee, 
committee sources said Wednes- 
day. 

There were 81 nominations last 
year, and the winner was Bishop 
Desmond M. Tutu of South Africa. 
The winner will be announced in 
October. The other nominees will 
not be revealed. 


f' Every piece of jewelry has a story to teli\ 



ilias LALAoUNIS 


PARIS - 364, RUE ST-HONORE (PLACE VENDOME) 
GENEVA - -BON GENIE’, ZURICH - "GRIEDER" 
ATHENS - 6, PANEPISTlMtOU AVENUE 
HOTEL GRANDE BRETAGNE & ATHENS HILTON 
MYCONOS, CORFU. RHODES 
NEW YORK - 4 WEST 57 TH STREET & FIFTH AVENUE 


United Press International 


JERUSALEM — The Knesset 
Interior Affairs Committee has rec- 
ommended hailing construction or 
a Mormon academic center on the 
Mount of Olives, the committee 
chairman said Wednesday. 

“I believe the aim of the Mor- 
mons in their ideology is to prosely- 
tize people," Div Shilansky, the 
chairman, said. 


The committee said in a majority 
opinion that it was skeptical of 
promises of Brigham Young Uni- 
versity, an institution of the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter- 
Day Saints, not to use the extension 
to proselytize. The opinion wD] be 
submitted io the Knesset, or parlia- 
ment. 


The president of Brigham 
Young, Jeffrey Holland, visited Is- 
rael two weeks ago to inspect the 
site and promised in a letter to the 
commiuee that the university ex- 
tension would not become a center 
for proselytizing Jews. 

During Mr. Holland's visit, 
groups of orthodox Jews stood out- 
side his hotel with signs and slo- 
gans saying: “Utah is big enough" 
and “Mormons, stop your mission 
now." 


Earlier, hundreds of ultraortbo- 
dox Jews massed at the Wailing 
Wall in Jerusalem's Old City in a 
prayer meeting to protest the ex- 
tension. 


“Mormons without proselytizing 
1 Mr. 


ing contracts for security forces but 
dIv 


is not Morraonism." Mr. Shilansky 
said. 




Car Owner Held in Cairo Killing 


i-Yi 


Reuters 

CAIRO — Police detained 
Wednesday an Egyptian whose tar 
is believed to have been used in the 
killing of an Israeli diplomat, po- 
lice sources said. .. 

He was identified as Osama Au- 
The car was abandoned after me 
assassination. 


A hitherto unknown group 
called Egypt’s Revolution claimed 
responsibility for the killing Tues- 


day of Albert Atraghji, administra- 
tive attache at the Isra 


Israeli Embassy. 

Meanwhile, the Egyptian tour- 
ism minister. Wagjh Shindi, arrived 
in Israel Wednesday for an official 
visit. 


had continued to supply materials 
and temporary huis for barracks 
and military border posts. 

"Without such bases the British 
military power in the north would 
be severely hampered," the state- 
ment said. “There will be no more 
warnings." 

Police sources said Mr. McEvoy 
had extensive building interests on 
both sides of the border and had 
completed several maintenance 
contracts for security forces. One 
of his companies in Northern Ire- 
land had been bombed repeatedly. 

(Reuters, If PI) 


Construction of the center has 
run into stiff opposition from Isra- 
el's chief rabbis as well as Christian 


groups who say it will become a 
center for proselytizing. 

A dissenting member of the com- 
mittee, Mordechai Virshubski, said 
that the panel voted 7-4 to recom- 
mend to the Knesset that construc- 
tion of the extension be stopped. 

The mountainside center, which 
is only a third complete, has been 
under construction for four years at 
a site next to Hebrew University 
and not far from the Garden of 
Gethsemane. 


Mr. Virshubski denied charges 
by opponents of the extension that 
land for its construction was ob- 
tained fraudulently. He said all 
necessary building permits had 
been obtained legally. 

He said the committee’s recom- 
mendation could be used as a 
weapon by opponents of the exten- 


sion. 


U.S. to Study Tampon Rating 


Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Tampon 
packages should be labeled with an 
absorbency rating and a listing of 
ingredients to help protect women 
against toxic shock syndrome, a 
rare but potentially fatal disease, a 
government advisory panel con- 
cluded Tuesday. 


Turks Reported to Slay 
3 Kurdish Guerrillas 


DOONESBURY 


: ‘2 

. .. r 


Reuters 

'i. aRA — Turkish troops 
Kurdish separatist 
bu and wounded another ^ 
on Mount Ararat, a mflitary 

- IA 


pfiGo&'Hffiwmx&ovr 
, wmfaLmmcMmcr 

J mmmAv&GN&vMs 

|j /&UMBSTEPAS t M9&Tr? 


Nb.BUTMMm 

emmaurn 
has. mm 










er with Iran, was 
owft, inctadtog ttnswn 
-nudists looking for Nch 
fiwo weeks 
rebels 

■jed foreign cumbers. 




TVS DONE A LOT OF RESEARCH 
ON THE MATTER, ANDI CAN 
ASSURE YOU. MORAtS-6U(5e, 
U0RBON TERRA FfAMA. 


HIREIHESm 
EFFECT, m 

oumm. upthbact. 




lifouH always be recognised by your taste in Scotch. 

w 



Johnnie Walker Red Label 
Recognised for good taste throughout the world. 

JOHN \V.\l KT.R 4 SONS LTD . SCOTCH WHISKY PISTII 1.T.KS. KlLMARNOt K Si i tTl.ANH 



' l 


. -I 



*'■ 


x r ' 


Marriott Hotels in Europe 


AMSTERDAM • ATHENS • LONDON ■ PARIS ■ VIENNA 


Marriott 


HOTELS + R E SO RTS 


reserve Amsterdam® ™ 43 51 12 


. Frankfurt® (069)287492 ■ London (OH 439 0281 • Milan® 12) 345 2009 . Munich® '89)182093 - Paris <?«06i 079 11 37- Zurich ** ' 01 *302 0979 • Utell International or your Travel Agent. 


* - F 







THURSDAY. AUGUST 22, 1985 


licralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


PfaUnfacd Wkh TV New Y«k Hors and Tbe Vabpia F«t 


SribltnC. America and Japan Should Make Peace and 


Trade, Jobs, Currencies 


Most members of the US. Congress want to 
help ailing manufacturers by shutting out for- 
eign competitors. In refreshing contrast. Sena- 
tor Bill Bradley aims to treat the disease, not 
just its symptoms. He may not have all the 
answers, but it is good to find someone in 
Washington looking to save open trade, on 
which the world’s prosperity depends. 

With the dollar costing a third more than in 
1981 in international exchange, even the most 
efficient American producers have trouble 
competing with foreigners. But protectionism, 
although tempting, is no fix at all. Tariffs or 
quotas protect inefficient as weQ as effidait 
companies, raise prices and invite retaliation 
against American products. Just such a cycle 
of protection and retaliation smashed the 
world's trading system in the 1930s. 

Senator Bradley wants to reduce the politi- 
cal appeal o[ protectionism by giving workers 
displaced by unports some hope of other em- 
ployment He would use a modest tariff of 
1 percent on all imports to give titem a choice 
between higher unemployment benefits or sti- 
pends for retraining and moving to new jobs. 

This proposed “Job Security Bank” is still a 
vague idea. One obvious source of concern is 
the precedent of using a tariff to raise revenue. 
If the program is worth doing it is worth 
financing with general tax revenues. But the 
underlying concept is laudable: It is immoral 
and impolitic to expect individual workers to 
bear the brum of great economic change. 

Senator Bradley has another idea, perhaps 
even more controversial, for managing foreign 


able for government and private purchases 
and investments. That would leave the Federal 


and investments. That would leave the Federal 
Reserve with a tough choice: force up interest 
rates to crowd out private borrowers who com- 
pete with tbe Treasury, or expand the money 
supply, in effect inviting inflation to ration 
credit among public and private investors. 

No conceivable trade or exchange policy 
can have ranch value unless the United States 
also puts its fiscal house in order. The Ameri- 
can economy needs open world markets to 
thrive. Managing exchange rates is not the 
only way to keep them open, and may not be 
tbe best way. But Mr. Bradley invites a debate 
that should have started long ago. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Appearances in Power 


' The Pentagon has now done just what it had 
to do in the case of Mary Ann Gilleece. Hut is 
good news and bad. In a «»*Tiiryt sense the 
case has been neatly disposed of. Miss Gilleece 
has been pilloried in a report by the depart- 
ment's inspector general and has resigned. But 
the almost surgical nature of tbe process by 
which she was removed is itself a part of the 
problem. Words are cheap in cases suhh as 
this, but we would have welcomed a few from 
on high, some sease of indignation, on the part 


culpability is significantly reduced by good 
faith reliance an the advice of counsel.” 


of the secretary or deputy secretary. Plainly 
they care, It would help if they said so. Miss 
Gilleece has been caught and is gone. What is 
the lesson? Thai is what they should tell us. 

The inspector general took us as far as a 
person of his rank can. On several occasions 
the present inspector general, Joseph Sherick, 
has shown himself to be an important farce for 
good in the department. The department’s 
senior officials had turned to him on July 3, 
about a week after stories saying Miss Gilleece 
was considering setting up a consulting firm 
appeared in the press. The stories suggested 
that she was soliciting future business from 
defense contractors over whose affairs and 
profits she still exercised official sway. 

Before writing to tbe contractors. Miss Gil- 
leece had gone to the attorney in tbe general 
counsel's office who has charge of conflict-of- 
interest questions. There is some dispute as to 
bow much she told him and what he replied. 
Mr. Sherick said be should have been sharper 
in the advice he gave. He suggested that, in 
future, ethics advice to senior officials be more 
formal and in writing and that the standards 
of conduct be clarified. But ultimately, he said, 
“responsibility . . . rested with Ms. Gilleece, 
herself an attorney. [We] do not believe her 


Mr. Sherick said there was no evidence that 
Miss Gilleece had broken the law, or had 
specifically helped any contractor whose cus- 
tom she was seeking. Her problem instead was 
with the departmental roles, he said, which 
forbid not just conflict of interest but the 
appearance of it Appearances — and the 
public confidence that they can so powerfully 
afTect — are partly what is at stake here We 
are compelled to turn to Mr. Sherick. 'The 
actions taken by Ms. GiQeece, and tbe ensuing 
publicity, have so compromised her ability to 
perform her role making and policy setting 
role that she can no longer effectively serve tbe 
department in such a position,” he wrote. Her 
violations of the rules “created a lack of public 
confidence in her official conduct” 

Defense contractors both are and are not 
litr« other private companies in the e con omy 
Their relationship with their prime customer is 
not the same as tbe arm’s-length relationships 
ihar prevail in private transactions. On many 
issues the interests of department and contrac- 
tors are the same. Almost every administration 
lodes to the contractors for some of its senior 
defense officials; as is weH known, the contrac- 
tors recruit from the department in turn. The 
revolving door is itself a source of public 
distrust, yet difficult to deal with. Congress 
just tried, again, to legislate against it, and not 
with much success. The Gilleece case is easy; 
others are hard. The secretary needs to speak 
out on them, more than be has. They are 
ethical issues, and tbe inspector general’s of- 
fice should not be die only place to which one 
looks for guidance on than. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Karami: At a Loss for Words 


What can I say to the citizen when we have 
lost all sense of values, morality, heritage and 
civilization? Say or do? Is it any good resign- 
ing? Or staying on without the least ability to 
help people bear tbe burden? I don’t know. 

— Prime Minisw Rashid Karami of 
Lebanon, quoted in The Guardian (London). 


Marcos: Overrating His Hand? 


Cut off from most sources of new credit, 
faced with a contracting economy, a Commu- 
nist insurgency, waning popular and inter- 
national support and growing pressure to im- 
plement unpalatable political, economic and 
military reforms. President Marcos is consid- 
ering calling an surly presidential election. The 
prospect is a worrying one. A dean presiden- 
tial election, following last year's open and fair 
legislative poll in winch the opposition won a 
third of the seats, would also strengthen the 
country's democratic institutions, u this is 
what President Marcos intends to be the out- 
crane of an early election — one is not official- 
ly due until 1987 — then he should go ahead. 
But there are good grounds for suspicion. 

It is true that, under considerable pressure, 
Mr. Marcos has made some change But there 
has been as yet no fundamental reform such as 


doing away with the Philippines’ particular 
brand of “crony capitalism* or the opening of 
a g enuin e dialogue with die opposition. 

A big reason why Mr. Marcos has been able 
to get away with haff measures is the belief that 
U.S. political and economic support would go 
on indefinitely because of Washington's desire 
to keep its military bases. [He] needs to ask 
himself how far the United States would be 
willing to go in defending these important 
bases. If, as a result of his failure to implement 
the necessary policies, widespread upheaval 
were to combine with Communist insurgency 
to plunge the country into chaos, would an 
American president sacrifice a single U.S. sol- 
dier to defend the bases? Almost certainly noL 
— The Financial Times (London). 


Botha: An Electorate to Fear 


Anyone naive enough to believe that Presi- 
dent P.W. Botha, with a single bold stroke, 
would open the door to black power must be 
blind to the fact that there is more to South 
African politics than the unrest in the town- 
ships and the police action to contain it. Elec- 
tions are an the way. [Concessions could] un- 
dermine Mr. Botha’s position in the eyes of 
most while voters and lead to the election of 
leaders with far more extreme views. 

— Neue ZQrcher Zeitung (Zurich). 


FROM OUR AUG. 22 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Paris Dog Captures 'Apaches 9 
PARIS — Fresh laurels were won by the Paris 
police dog, Capi table, the companion of two 
policemen attached to the 8th arrondissement, 
being instrumental in the capture of two 
“apaches.” Something like a pitched battle was 
going on between two bands of these individ- 
uals when Capitaine and his uniformed com- 
rades came on the scene. At once the “apach- 
es” united forces and opened fire on the police. 
The dog was let loose and a moment later be 
was in pursuit of the bandits who at the sight 
of him had taken to their heels. Capitaine, 
however, succeeded in keeping two of them 
fast prisoners until policemen arrived. 


1935: Boeing Bomber Sets Records 
DAYTON, Ohio — A new chapter in the 
possibilities of aerial warfare was written when 
the giant new Boeing “flying fortress,” 15 tons 
of potential death, landed here after a 

non-stop test flight of 2300 miles [3,700 kilo- 
meters] from Seattle in exactly nine hours at 
tbe speed of 255 miles an hour. The huge 
armored bomber hurtled through the air at an 
altitude of 10,000 feet, smashing all world 
records for military planes. This is the most 
formidable death machine ever given a public 
demonstration. One ton of bombs can be car- 
ried, and five gun turrets enable the bomber to 
protect itself from attack on every side. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARL GEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Publisher 

gxeaane Editor RENE BONDY Deputy Publisher 

Editor ALAIN LEC0UR Associate Pubtisktr 

Deputy Edittr RICHA RD H- MORGAN Associate Publisher 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Operations 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMA1SONS Dtrector of Gradation 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director of Adtenhar Sales 


ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director of Adtertisag Sales 
International Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Charies-de-GauDe. 92200 NcmDY-sa^Sdfle. 

France. TdL: (1)747-1265. Telex; 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN:' 0294-8052! c 


Direaeur de la publication: Walter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters. 24-14 Hennessy RtL Hong Kong TeL 5-285618. Telex 61170. 
MaanmDtr U.K: RdmMaeKidm. 61 Long Aar. London WCl TeL 8364802. Telex 262009. 
GBLMp tV. Germany: W. laaerbatk Fhetticfatr, IX 6000 frorkfmi M 71 (069)726755. Tbe. 416721. 
SA- tot capital de 1.20A000 F. RCS Nantenv B 732021 126. Commission Panudre Ho. 61337. 
U.S. subscription: SS22 yearly. Second-dais postage pad a Long Island City. N.Y. 1 1101. 
® 1985. International Herald Tribute. All rights resened 



W ashington — in the recent 40th 
anniversary celebration of tbe aid of 


exchange rates. To reduce the dollar’s value 
and make American goods more competitive, 
he would require the Federal Reserve to sdl 
Hnflare and stand ready to intervene in curren- 
cy markets to prevent any rapid rate chan ge s . 

The Reagan adminis tration has opposed 
such intervention, arguing that it interferes 
with free market forces. Bat markets are not an 
end in themselves. The real questions are 
whether the Fed has the muscle to counter 
market forces and whether Americans would 
accept the consequences. At this stage, a deter- 
mined effort by tbe Fed would probably be 
effective, if only became owners of dollars 
must be ready to believe that these will soon 
lose more value. But as the trade deficit dimin- 
ishes the budget deficit crisis would accelerate. 

A cheaper dollar would almost certainly 
reduce imports, reducing the total goods avail- 


World War It two facts were obscured that 
need to be made dear. 

First. America is still at war with Japan. 
Second, it is losing. 

I vis ted Japan pot long ago, congratulated 
everyone from. Prime Minister Yasuhiro Na- 


kasone on down for Japan’s incredible post- 
war trade success, told them h was cansme 


war trade success, told them h was cand™ 
Americans quite a lot of trouble and suggrat- 
ed that it would cause them trouble next. 

I don’t think anyone was listening, The 
largely cosmetic “action package” of trade 
reforms announced by the Japanese govern- 
ment in July rally reinforced that feelmv 


By Howard H. Baker Jr. 

The writs', a lawyer, was Senate majority leader from December 1980 to btst January. 

adapt their products to Japanese preferences. America around the world, 

Bat in tbe fidds of finance, tdecoammnica- that the United Stale and 

dons, government contracts and other large- economic diversity and a teennrat® 
scale enterprises, I believe both countries icy that no nation or group or nations 
would profit by greater American paitidpa- match. If current trends continue, inis 


meat in July oily reinforced mat f eeahjg . 

Having returned from Japan to hear a ris- 
ing chorus of protectionist sentiment from my 
framer colleagues in Congress, I believe it 
may be worthwhile to offer a few ideas on 
what can be done to end the war, secure the 
peace and increase the prosperity of the two 
countries and the world at large. 

The one-sided nature of trade between 
America and Japan in recent years is familiar 
to everyone. What is less well known is that 
these persistent trade imbalances have hw»n 
so large for so long that America is rapidly 
accumulating a foreign debt surpassed only 
by its federal deficit By 1990, that re nte 
deficit could well total a trillion dollars. . 

It should be noted here that Japan is.nol 
the only trade problem the United Stales has. 
But it is the biggest one, and if this problem 
can be solved, they &D can. 

I think it can be solved, in three stages. 

In tbe short term, Americans must get the 
attention of the Japanese and let them know 
they are serious about this issue. The Senate’s 
recent resolution condemning Japan’s trade 
practices — a resolution that passed cm a 92-0 
vote — is one way of getting Japan’s atten- 
tion. The flurry of increasingly protectionist 
bills in Congress is one way of keeping it 

Bat Americans must remember that they 
are dealing with live ammunition here, and 
take care not to shoot themselves in the foot 
The disastrous Smoot- Hawley Tariff Act of 
1930 was rushed through Congress in a ami , 
lar mood, and it took 14 years and a world 
war to straighten out the mess. 

Still, it is not too much to ask — even to 
demand — that the Japanese give America 
better access to their domestic market, in 
return for keeping the vast and lucrative 
American market open to them. 

I frankly doubt that many American con- 
sumer goods will interest many Japanese con- 
sumers, particularly until American manufac- 
turers make a mote conscientious effort to 


scale enterprises, I believe both countries 
would profit by greater American participa- 
tion in the Japanese economy. 

The second stage of the solution is to do 
everything that America can unilaterally to 
improve its trade position. This involves, 
among other things, reducing the federal defi- ' 
cat, rechedting tbe stock of exportable goods 
and preparing more diligently and deliberate- 
ly to compete in a global market. 

As for the deficit. Congress labored might- 
ily and courageously this year to reach what 
the wider wood saw as a largely cosmetic 
deficit reduction package — much as it saw 
Mr. Nakasone’s *‘actian package” of trade 
reforms. The hard truth is that Congress must 
do more next year, and the next, and tire next, 
before the deficit problem nears solution. 

As for exports, it may well be time to 
reconsider the prohibition on sales of Alaskan 
North Slope ml to Japan. Thai prohibition 
was imposed in a time of energy crises mid 
embargoes, and while it may have made sense 
at the tune, it does not make much yaisft now 
that we are awash in a sea of ofl. Several 
billion dollars could flow America’s way al- ' 
most immediately with the flow of Alaskan 
oil to Japan. Washington should at least pat it 
an the table and see what it can get in trade. 

As for preparing to compete with the 
world, I agree with the governor of Tennessee, 
Lamar Alexander, that tins is “the greatest 
challenge lor America’s future,'’ and 1 am 
happy to pant to my own state of Tennessee 
as a model for such preparation. 

I told the president of Nissan not long ago 
that, with a combination of Japanese industri- 
al technique and American pride, we are 
building better Datsons in Smyrna, T enney 


icy that no nation or group of nations can 
™rrh If current trends continue,Jhis itor 
unction will only be more pronounced mitt 
future. Both tides must be prepared. to deal 
effectively and wisely with this emerging eco- 
nomic and political reality. _ . 

One step in that preparation might be to 
«staMi«h a new form of trading currency 
between the two countries that reduces or 
riimin the disparity between the yen and 
the dollar. We might indude Canada -— the 
largest U.S. trading partner, with which the 
United Stales has its second largest deficit — 
in this new currency arrangement, ^rearin g 
oar own version of the European Currency 
Unit that serves the Common Market 

Another step, solely up to the Japanese, 
whose grcrcrcs )ias made than the “OPEC of 
trade,” may be to recycle a su b sta nti a l por- 
tion' of thar trade profits in a comprehensive 


reign of greed, Jap™ - standing m the 
cJlkbuuan. to the 

i^TTjSworid’sdistress and 

productive economy- requ ^ d 

SsMMjgSjSr 

■BBESKS.— -* ;■ 


and constructive program of foreign mvest- 
menL Tennessee has benefited handsomely 


menu Tennessee has benefited handsomely 
from investment, and Japan could win a 


American T^otas St- 

toS^wctiOTS^ihe most virulent straw. 

™ P ro r~r^rzL no nniiucal or economic 

J&t£££S£ S5S3* »<**■ 

Sd SSSSyfi* UK tin* b«' come for 
^ Sgfnmds. and. ta proff®*™* 1 
gsy^which all muons can share. 

The New York Times. 



halt RIGHT 

THERE OR 

I SHOOT! 









people of General Motors, are looking for- 
ward to selling a truly competitive American 
automobile, the Saturn, to the whole worid. 

The third and final stage of the solution is 
for the United States and Japan to under- 


ward to selling a truly con 
automobile, the Saturn, to 


Bkf/tw 

Bri/urf 


stand and agree that they have a special role 
of mutnal leadership to play in the world, that 
this role trill expand ana intensify in the new 
century just ahead, and that (hey cannot play 
this critical role successfully if they cannot 


i. -i 


work well together at every level of cnimptise. 
With apologies to other friends and allies of 


rmrtBAPouSftM ******* 


Criticizing South Africa: Israel Should Clean Up Its Own Act 


I FIRST encountered the charge 
(Hal Zionist racism makes Ijtrnel 


By Mark A. Brnzonsky 


comparable to South Africa in the 
early 1970s, while I was chief repre- 
sentative of tbe International Student 
Movement for the United Nations. I 
protested vehemently in a personal 
letter to an assistant of Secretary- 
General Kurt Waldheim. Officials of 
the American Zionist Youth Founda- 
tion sent copies of that letter to Jew- 
ish university students in the United 
States and Israel, and then commis- 
sioned me to write moodily articles 
on Zionism fra their newsletter. 

I next confronted the Israel-South 
Africa comparison at Princeton Uni- 
versity white ob taining a master’s de- 
gree in international affairs. Profes- 
sor Richard Falk, himself Jewish, 
repeatedly linked the situations of the 
two countries in his course on inter- 
national law. I remember s haring the 
outrage of my Israeli student col- 
leagues. Once again I protested. 


atytical tools. Historically and cultur- 
ally, conditions in Israel and South 
Africa are replete with differences. 
1 leave those to be catalogued by 
others, who will no doubt be eager to 
challenge my conclusion. 

Here are what I view as tbe impor- 
tant points of similarity: 

• Both states are escalating mili- 
tarism, intimidation and brutality. 

• Iul both cases, sdf-detenmna- 
tion is being sought by a mistreated, 
oppressed, abused ethnic group — 
the blacks of South Africa, the Pales- 
tinians in the territories occupied by 
Israel since the 1967 war. 


• Both oppressed groups have re- 
sorted to defiance and violence. 

• In both cases the potential for 
escalating conflict is growing. 

Riots and strikes are spreading in 
South Africa, and there is a state of 
emergency. The results of Israel’s 
policies are being reaped in a degen- 
erating economy a descent to- 
ward anti-democratic attitudes ger- . 
minating amid anti-Arab sentiments, 

Responding to these conditions 
and to the continued P alestinian 
struggle for an independent state, the 
government has further stepped up a 
campaign against its Palestinian sub- 


jects that over the years has included 
deportation, imprisonment, collec- 


tive punishment amL occasionally. 


ani occasion: 
documented torture. Emergency reg- 
ulations left over from British man- 
date days in what used to be called 
Palestine, similar to those imposed in 
South Africa, are enforced by Israel 
in the occupied territories. ' 

Looked at historically rather than 


day headlines, the white minority of 
South Africa and the Jewish minority in conflict today. Jewish ethmtity 
in the Middle East are both coming and chauvinism in combination witn 


nation and secularism they are ideo- 
logically wedded to principles that, 
many in the world term racist. 

For South Africa there is no solo- 
don in sight The white minority, 
seems destined to raise the level of 
oppression until die society boils over 
in rage, as it has begun to da The 
lime for compromise may be past 

The situation is mare confused in 
the case of historic Palestine, a land 
that the worid community voted to 
partition in 1947 between the same 
two nationalist movements that are 




op against their own inescapable con- 
tradictions. In an era of nondisaimi- 


peateaiy irnkea tne situations ottne i i« w -ry -m m* 1 Ti TT Q 

Ltiooal law. I remember s haring the -A-lli mt t rom the 1 lger and Be Eaten: 

itrage of my Israeli student col- ^ ^ 

igues. Once again I protested. TT WASHINGTON — Just (yes, By George F. Will society. Changes in laws touch 
In my subsequent work for the YY “just”) 125 years ago the Unit- J e matters as varied and vital as tr 

mencan Jewish Congress and the ed States began solving a racial prob- unions, interracial sex and marri 


American Jewish Congress and the 
Worid Jewish Congress, and on un- 
related journalistic assignments, 
I traveled widely in the Middle EasL 
My perspective broadened. 


ed States began solving a racial prob- 
lem significantly less difficult than 
the one afflicting South Africa. The 
process began with four years of civil 
war and was followed by-a centuty of 


I provide my own history to make intermittent litigation and legisla- 
ckar that fra years I aggressively tion. All this was needed to open 


challenged comparisons of Sooth Af- 
rica ana Israel. Now I have come to 
conclude that the similari ties be- 
tween them outweigh the differences. 

Tragically, Israel today has be- 
come precisely what many of its lib- 
eral founders feared — a besieged. 


American society to a racial minority 
that was regionally concentrated. 


Now, what of tbe prospects for 

an&e in Snnth Africa? 


autobit 

publish) 


in South Africa? 

Buchan, in his magnificent 


“Pilgrim’s Way,” 
I, recalled serving as 


divided, polarizing country whose an aide to Lard Milner in South Afri- 
methods of repression a g ai n st the ca in the first decade of the century. 

TT..1 .1 _r nn i . «... , . 


Palestinians parallel those of white When read today, tins passage leaps 
South Africa against the blacks. off the pane: “The hope of breaking 


South Africa against the blacks. 
Analogies are always imperfect ao- 


off the page: “The hope of breaking 
down the racial barrier between town 


and country was always very near to 
Milner’s heart He wanted to see the 
Dutch share in tbe urban industries 
and men of British stock fanning 
beside the Boers in tbe veldt” South 
Africa's blacks woe invisible then. 

Today they are omnipresent in the 
global drcuitiy of journalism. A cru- 
cial fact about South Africa’s tunnoP 
is its presence in U.S. fivmg rooms. 

South Africa is far from bang an 
open society bat so, too, is it far from 
bong as closed as any Communist 
society, or many African despotisms. 
Bishop Tutn holcis press conferences; 
he regales white students with witty 


society. Changes in laws touching 
mattm as vaned and vital as trade 
unions, interracial sex and marriage 
cannot be dismissed as cosmetic. 

There are two certainties about 
South African change: (hath is com- 
ing, and that it wm occur behind a 
fusillade of bluster designed to deny 
foreign aides the satisfaction of 


On a planet where narrow creeks 
can create canyons and where even 
the continents drift, nothing lasts, 
least of all social arrangements. But it 
is said that there are three lost tribes 
in today’s worid — Protestants in 
Ulster, Israelis in tbe Middle East 
and white (especially Dutch) South 
Africans. These three groups are not 


and withering ridicule of government going to go borne. They are home, 
policy. South Africa is an opening Chief Gatsha Butbdczi, leader of 


the Zulus, says South Africa may 


When Ronald Reigns , Who Governs? 


once) because blacks and whites are relationships that 

<•« mmrnnmh, nT Tt. UCTWCOl the tO/rt mimlria* 


Zionist natio nalis m have created. ; 8 
mix that is discriminatory in spirit 
if not in actual laws. 

The greatest distinction between 
Israel and South Africa is that while 
Zionism is legally aoadiscriminatOFy, 
apartheid is legally racist And yet, u 
we are to be honest, in practice the 
results are comparable. 

The most hopeful difference bo-, 
tween the two may be that an accept- 
able solution is still conceivable for 
Israel and the Palestinians — peace- 
ful coexistence and mutual recogni- 
tion of both peoples' national rights. 
However, increasing attacks afJew- 
ish settlers on the West Bank and 
nsrag Israeli support for extremists 
are signs that time may also be run- 
nmg out in the Middle East 

In. the past few months a number 
of major American Jewish o raamza- 
tions have spoken out against South 
African repression. Jewish leadexs 
hav* been arrested picketing the 
South African Embassy 

JiFfSHFr.** govern- 
ment said that it “unconditionally 

Soutii Africa/ although it took no 


Kefor Dinosaur 1 






Q ueenstown, Maryland — 

Thirty or so liberal arts profes- 
ftorc from small colleges spent the 
better part of a recent week ponder- 
ing American values in a wooded 
grove on tbe Wye River not far 
from here Tbe “readings'’ ran from 
Aristotle and Plato to Machiavdli, 
the Declaration of Independence, 
Lincoln and Franklin Delano Roo- 
sevelt. A few nonacademic gadflies 
were invited along to lend contem- 
porary context and/or comic relief. 

In that spirit, I offered what 
struck me at the time as a Construc- 
tive Thought. We were raflrin^ 
about “citizenship in the American 
polity” (about how weH we govern 
ourselves); the consensus seemed 
to be that the system doesn't work. 
By way of strflong a positive note, 

I ventured the proposition that 
what America needs is a monarchy. 


By Philip Geyelin 


stuffed into his jacket cuff, “One is 
for show and one is for blow.” 

But Americans have only one 
handkerchief; they ask their presi- 
dents to personify (he integrity and 
continuity of tbe state while manag- 
ing a government whose power 
flows from a legislature that his 
own political party mayor may not 
contra. You do not have to search 
far back in the record to demon- 


strate that American presidents 
have rarefy been Rood at Doth. 


You might have thought I had 
ggested a Fourth Reich. A mon- 


suggested a Fourth Reich. A mon- 
archy, the assembled academics im- 
patiently explained, is what the 
American Revolution was against. 
A constitutional monarchy, I ex- 
plained, is what I had in mind. 

I would like to take tins opportu- 
nity to pursue tbe point 

The United States is alone 
among the Western democracies in 
combining in one office, the presi- 
dency, two jobs: head of govern- 
ment and head of state. The Euro- 
pean democracies have kings or 


have rarefy been good at Doth. 

Jimmy Carter had too tight a 
grasp on tbe controls of tbe execu- 
tive branch. Congress was in friend- 
ly Democratic bands, but he rot in 
a fight with a rabbit and said things 
like “Trust me,” which is more than 
a politician can expect Then came 
Iran, and he lost the prerequisite of 
a iw-ad of state: a meaningful rela- 
tionship with the people. 

With Ronald Reagan it is just the 
other way around. lake Mr. Carter, 
he ran for the presidency as a head 
of state, with a proper, royal dis- 


the» convey tbe right blend of be- 
nevolence and innocence. 

A president who is good at the 
role of head of state is only expect- 
ed to propose: a Middle East peace 
plan, a foolproof bubble to end the 
threat of nuclear war, tbe consign- 
ment of an “evil empire” to histo- 
ry's ash heap, a balanced budget. 
“You guys work it out.” he says.. 

Hie trouble is that even if it 
works with the people, the relation- 
ship is personal. The chemistry ma y 
get some good thine done and in- 
sulate the president from the conse- 
quences of bad thing* done, or un- 
done, but it is a sometime thing 
For a coherent, stable way of gov- 
erning, you need both a brad of 
state and a head Of gove rnment A 
president who is good at one of 
those functions is almost doomed 
to be bad at the other. 

“The modern president's author- 
ity, essentially, derives from his sta- 
tus as a popular hero,” political 
scientist William Schneider wrote 


recently in tbe Los Angeles Times. 
“If a [European] prime minister 
... proves to be an ineffective lead- 
er, power can be transferred to an- 
other party leader without creating 
a political crisis. It is much harder 
to transfer legitimacy in the Ameri- 
can system. A president’s power is 
personal. It must be established di- 
rectly with the American people 
and cannot be transferred.” 

Mr. Schneider knows no sure 
cure for the political system. It may 
simply be something that we have 
to live with. That is why I brought it 
up at a learning experience on 
Maryland's tranquil eastern shore. 
It was a perfect occasion for think- 
ing thoughts that lead you nowhere 
in particular, in no hurry. 

Washington Past Writers Group. 


of state, with a proper, royai dis- 
dain for the grubby side of govern- 
ment. He would be the people’s 


a ueens or presidents to symbolize 
le stale as father fizures and 


the stale as father figures and 
friends in court for all the people. 
To run the government, they have 


menu He would be the people’s 
champion against tbe craven spe- 
cial interests of Congress and (he 
bureaucracies. Unlike Mr. Carter 
or any other recent president (ex- 
cept Eisenhower), King Ronald has 
retained the trust of his subjects by 
ctenn to it that they do not look 
uponlum as a head of government 
r^ ^ yted by courtiers, be lets his 
ministers lake tbe falls. When the 


prime ministers whose power re- parliament rebels, the head of state 
sides in political parties and their cannot be hdd accountable. Tbe 
command of parliaments. As Bob correct eestures help: the reassur- 


command of parliaments. As Bob correct gestures help: the reassur- 
Hope said, when he was asked why ing, ratal wave, the easy grin, the 
he had a handkerchief neatly folded questioning cocked eyebrow, tbe 
in his breast pocket and another outstretched arms, palms up — all 


“a community of Africans.’’ The 
whites “have become indigenous." 

Foreign Minister File Botha says, 
tendenbously, that “there is no dear- 
cut majority” in South Africa be- 
cause there is no “itomogeneoas” 
black majority. There are, he says, 
“differences of opinion” among 
blacks. Weil, do tdL Ima gine : Blacks 
do not all think atike. Next tiring you 
know, they won’t all look alike. There 
certainly is a dear-cut minority. It is 
white and it is not homogeneou& 

Chief Bmheteri says the minimal 
demand is for the government to ac- 
knowledge “that we are one people in 

one country.” The government is 
closer to doing that than even it may 
realize. Its ambassador in Washing- 
ton says that his government is com- 
mitted to a process of change that 
should end in a federal structure with 
whites not in a privileged position in 
the central goveramaiL 

The crucial paint in President 
Botha’s otherwise barren speech last 
wed: was tbe offer to negotiate with 
blades. Negotiation presupposes hu- 
man beings on both sides of the table. 

It is too late for a South African 
“Died Scott decision.” In America, 


ES? Me oaSbffitr-S 






SS-f the tXnian 

people into submission is hypocrisy. 


t.-r-v 




Security m the Middle East” mhU 

«3M-5S-fe*WSS 




ars at the WrA, z.'*7 r f or «w 


it 

Y-- 

Yr.. 


letters 


** « v - ti.. - . 






that lKTdedsfouht the ^Hifaseto w&^be^fc' 

war by drclanng a constitutional PW in their car raSa- 

princrole that blacks could not be 1015 ““ coming winter, 
complete atizens, and hence, tnferen- LAU RANGE D ja craw 

uaBy, were not completely human 

To pass from authoritarianism to London. 


popular government without falling Blushes Ar*> lUn 
into anarchy and moreautfatmtaiS *** Unlikely 

ism_is difficult. King Juan Carlos of J n response to thereout -out 


for his role in ma lting relatively ho- It is highly uniikeh, »hL k . 
mogeneous Spam tbe mfyEnopean ninth 

nauon to move from fascism to de- prompting from ShaW^S? n ? ed ^ 
mtxmy without bdrm conquoed. aid * “rit 


a tiger. Clitics should consider this: sponsibl^S^E^?* k* those re- 

Tdhng ancteofatigwthathede. ^ig excesses 

serves jo be devoured is no way to Ayatollah Khnm^n; ^ ^vices to 

persuade him to dismount. y *^°meuu and the like. 

Washington Post Writers Group. MARJORJE A. STEELE. 

Autibe^ France. 


fey* 

"I: -7 

*s.Y a Y. "'Y 

IKy 







I 







* 




* 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 1985 1 

Gf 

u 

Page 7 

- — SCIENCE 


l 

CrT^V A P a * iit« • t n • 

n i 



?r ~£S%i 




ea of Animal Vision Is Proving a Colorful Field 



aon based on recording three parts 
im There have wen 


fy and push the pand whose color tanopia, occurs in pecmle lacking copy of human trichromacy,” vi- 
Bduxerent, a banana-flavored food cones that are sensitive to 559 * ’ " " 

polet or a small serving of grape nanometers. Deuteranopic or im- 
-> > . n u ' ; »iinmg to come aliw “ ,ul f? i “ delivered. . paired perception of green, occurs 

"ii jg . While research in , . Jacobs* a professor of psy- in those without cones receptive to 

fc ' ® ~ e — - Ule ™ w “ ecology, said that, apart from man 53! nanometers. In tritanopia, af- 

and primates, most mammals fecting less than one person in 
m min™ Jvr' H robabl Y only two types of 15,000, a failure to distinguish blue 
—i Z-_ T msibIc to bu- hghi receptors and therefore have arises from a lack of cones sensitive 




its infancy. 




- • -?r- ; 

•••• 


man eves. wn^T*L*£ T “‘ lwclOBu - h 8ht i 
coiorsornonc^an^ 1 ^ ** *** *«jivdy poor color vision. 

vSMfifflSSSSS 

^ * ■ nLwUfc - — pf Caosasiah males lack rauctioo- 

ing sensms in one <tf the three cate- 
gories needed Jor full color virion. 
The human retina contains two ba- 
ric kinds of receptors: cones, winch 
provide the basis for color vision, 
and rods, which record faint light 
Each cone contains a photopig- 
ment particularly sensitive to one 
of three parts of the light in the 
electromagnetic spectrum. The 
peak response of one dass of cones 
is to a wavelength of ^nanome- 
ters (billionths of a meter) in the 


Soli 


sgta-wiSf. “iSSS 

ffiW-n the origin of suchde- 
fe«s in human b rings ? 

For centuries there ‘was no wav 

many of these questinK 

sassspaF® 

1z EifZS+jStZS “«-—v £“«. 

many par allds between eol or vv - ■■■ *_ Henmn/lvnnifl- an autnnnfv nn m- 

®on in animals and humans, par- 
EmL m connection with color 

Dr. Gerald H. Jacobs, a special- 
mon animal vision at theUnivera- 
jy of California at Santa Barbara, 
uas i been studying color blindness 
m Peruvian sqtrirrd monkeys. 

Tim animals are. exposed to three 


to 419 nanometers. 

Like the color-thscriminaung ap- 
paratus of the human eye, that of 
insects depends on recording and 
comparing light intensities in these 
three regions of the spectrum. But 
what a person sees and what an 
insect sees can be vastly different. 

Being sensitive to ultraviolet 

light, a bee zeroing in on a black- 
eyed Susan sees a bull's-eye pattern 
in what to human eyes are uniform- 
ly yellow petals. Because the bee’s 
eye cannot see red, a white phlox 
blossom looks blue-green. 

Dr. Kenneth McCrea of 


er dass is most sensitive to 531 
nanometers, or green. The third 
dass of cones responds chiefly to 
559 n a n om e ters, a shade of green, 
but its range of sensitivity extends 


to yellow and red. 
The an 


-JW 


*n Act! 






,"a 


r ; : •• 


each test, two of the panels arc 
™ identical color and the third is 
different If the monkey can identi- 


cones receiving an electro- 
magnetic impulse corresponding to 
the wavelength of a color pass 
along that impulse to the nerves 
and a cdor message is sent to the 
brain. By comparing these light 
messages, the mmd identifies cdor. 

Blindness to red, known as pro- 


Pennsylvania. an authority on in- 
sect vision, says the flowers look 
white to human eyes because hu- 
man retinas are sensitive to red, 
green and blue, which produce 
white when mixed. The bee, howev- 
er. cannot see red. 

The new research in animals is 
changing some old notions about 
what they see. Dr. Jacobs says cats 
are not totally color-blind, as once 
thought. Neverihdess, he believes 
feline color vision “is at best a pale 


Bid for ' Green Revolution 9 in Africa 
Bringing a Few Glimmers of Success 

By Philip M. Boffey 

New Yon Times Service 


don't think there's any question conditions is a contributing factor 

j ... .--1 .1 - ■_ .l. * f ■ r_ : a «■_: ..n 


\Vf ASHINGTON — After de- 
TV cades of frustrating failure, 
scientists are reporting glimmers of 
success in efforts to design “miracle 
crops” far Africa. 

In recent months, farmers In 
Zimbabwe have achieved record 
harvests of nwtiae using a high- 
yielding hybrid developed by agri- 
cultural researchers, a high-yidd, 
drought-resistant strain of sor- 
ghum has been distributed to some 
miners in Sudan and progress has 
been rial mad toward developing 
new varieties of other staple food 
oops in Africa. ! 

Nobody expects an overnight 
technological revolution in African 
agriculture. But some scientists be- 
lieve science may ultimately .do for 
Africa what it has helped accom- 
plish in modi -of Asia — Elimina- 
tion of chronic food shortages and., 
periodic famines. \ 

“The job is going to take some 
tune,” saidNyle C. Brady, assistant 
administrator for science and tech- 
nology in the U. S. Agency for In- 
ternational Development. fi Bul you 
just know it’s going to unfold. I 


that the potential is there. 

Mr. Brady may be in a good 
position to know. He once haded 
the International Rice Research In- 
stitute in the Philippines, a labora- 
tory that is profited with a major 

ricties of ricelhll helped bring a 
“Green Revolution” to previously 
food-short regions of Asia. 

But similar promises about im- 
proving African agriculture have 
been made for decades with little to 
. show for it so far, said Carl K. 
Eicher, professor of agricultural 
economics at Michigan State Uni- 
versity, who has performed per- 
haps the most extensive recent re- 
views of agricultural technologies 
in sub-Saharan Africa. 

“Some scientists have consistent- 
ly promised tooglowing a pros- 
pect," he said. “There has been a 
gap between expectations and per- 
formance, and there’s a credibility 
problem now. Africa has brought 
many scientists to their knees on 
this question.” . 


in the African famine. Africa is stiD 
in dire straits despite international 
food aid and the return of rain to 
some areas. A report in July by the 
United Nations Office for Emer- 
gency Operations in Africa said 
that “the situation in the conti- 
nent’s most severely affected na- 
tions is continuing to deteriorate.” 

Prospects for improved agricid- 
tural productivity in Africa are un- 
certain. Many scientists draw hope 
from the fad that agricultural re- 
search has increased crop yields in 
Asia and Latin America in recent 
decades. The achievements in some 
countries once viewed as hopeless 
have been prodigious. India, which 
relied heavily on imported food in 
the 1960s, is largely self-sufficient 
in cereal production. Bangladesh, 
widely described as a basket-case 
two decades ago, is approaching 
self-sufficiency. China, which suf- 
fered a devastating famine between 
1958 and 1961, is exporting food, 
an achievement that Chinese offi- 
cials attribute partly to improved 
crop varieties and partly to goveni- 
. . J ‘ encour- 


IN BRIEF 


The lack of crop varieties capa- mental policies designed to en 
>le of producing high yields in Af- age better fanning, 
lea's harsh and variable climatic Rm Africa ha $ a harsher climate, 
^ — — — its land is more depleted and its 

countries are generally poorer. It 
has far fewer trained scientists and 
research institutions and its inexpe- 
rienced governments have been un- 
willing or unable to adopt policies 
that favor agricultural devdop- 


Dinosaur Bones Found in Alaska 

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — More than 150 dinosaur bones have been 

discovered on Alaska's North Slope, a find that casts doubt on the theory 

that two months of darkness from a huge dust cloud after an asteroid 
collision with Earth caused d in osaurs* extinction. 

The find confirms that dinosaurs roamed the north when it was a 
subtropical swamp, said Professor William Clemens of the Umverary of tod* ora* ran up against 

aiifondaaBeAdq.lt MwMiWSSf iSftSESWSE 


ment over urban development. 

TwENTY years ago. Professor 
Eicher said, int ern ational experts 
believed they could quickly trans- 
ferGreen Revolution technology to 


them, were adapted to an mviraunent where they had to contend with six 
weeks to two months of darkness” a year, he said; they thus would have 
been relatively unaffected by the asteroid dust cloud. 

In another recall paleontological find, name than 20 pounds (9 
kflocrams) of fossil wood and banes have been repaired at a construc- 
tion ate near the La Brea Tar Pits. Scientists said the find should provide 
the first dear idea of what Southern CaKfomia was like shortly after the 

most recent Ice Age, 15,000 to 25,000 years ago. 

And near Frick Switzerland, scientists reported finding what appears 
to be a complete skeleton of a platcoeaur, 210 mfflum years old and 
^e^irii^^meters (19 feet) from head to tafl. (AP, LAT) 

Rockefeller Gift to Sloan-Kettering 

vfw YORK (NYT) — The Manorial Sloan-Ketteting Canca Center success u> a high-yielding, drraigbi- 
relived a S 36 . 2 -million gift from Laurence S. Rockefeller. The resistant strain of soghom devel- 
hSnSToSis to build a S78-nriIlian research and confraoe ceut», oped in Sudan, one of flie countna 
r,nW«i bv the donation and named in honor of Rockefellers most severely affected by the 
K tiLSSr: officials said. drought. “It’s so new that they're 

tS ^wteh offidals called one of the largest evwbv anmdhadual right now tsymg 
. hSSn* inStutitm. came in response to a $305-mflhon fund- hands of fanna* said Mr/Brady 

just over to its goaL Dr. Woodx TWs, director^ 


new 
conditions. 

“Coming up with a Green Revo- 
lution in Africa is going to be a 
much tougher job man it was in 
India or Mexico ” said Glen VoU- 
mar, associate dean for interna- 
tional programs at the University 
of Nebraska and director of an in- 
ternational program, financed by 
AID. to develop new varieties of 
two staple grain crops in Africa, 
mm and millet. 

the most recent research 


international programs at Purdue 

Supersensitive X-Ray Camera Made 

a fmffl the Los Alamos Natic"" 1 * ■ ‘ — *-= 


nuclear woipons sources ~«tars and galaxies — to test tl 

^•"^SShS?^ D rlldMmore. a ulA^DOsphysiast. 
imaging capabflm ^ , mus “ pIflteSi && with more tha 


Laboratory i 
camera to be 

atmosphere. yean its reed is bemgmultip 

^K^iSS/x-rav«>ui^~- stars and galaxies — to test the Station to burners. 

Aysiast. Similar gains may be on the more 

i more than (Rstant horizon with millet. “Very 

. hftie acts » » , ! P® little woik faas been done with nfi- 

26.000 to® Orn 5,000 deetton volts; L« let the jars," ssidWmkmD. 

pick up X-rays wim would be sensitive to X-rays of 2,000 stegmaer, a research agronomist ai 

Alamos scaentists said K State University, one of the 

to 60,000 electron volts. ^ ^ , leading U. S. centers of millet re- 

search. “I suspect part of the reason 
is that it*s a crop consumed by the 
poorest people in the poorest areas 
of the world. But in the last few 
years it’s been receiving a lot more 

3 *-"••- Af ^a." 

millet 

were being grown on a small scale 
in several communities in Sudan, 
induding one that matures more 
quickly, making it potentially use- 
ful when (he rainy season is short 
The most dramatic practical suc- 
cess so far. Mr. Brady said, is the 
recent widespread adoption is 
Zimbab we of high-yielding strains 


Rats Fine After In-Utero Space Trip 

MfKCOW (AP) -■ Tass to mwwd the bW. of tealthy baby «. 

W dWfcL-' r results 

The ofiiCir 

launched Jui; 

’W-SSsss«a-‘SS * C3 

P i , n . h Sv™pDsedAgai ,, * tIl >««0% 

n , In -A MHO wiSSKBS: 


of maize tlai wsie devdeoed yean 

cut of n0 ?' pr ^2! in whom cervical mucus stops sperm ago by international and govern- 

orofessor of obstdWcs xud ©necolo® roem research Halims. Tbis yea’s 

of cough syrup *Jv“rhedft research because he did 

BsgSgstfsssai*-' 1 — 


p«ii7i» crop in Smbabwe far ex- 
ceeded expectations, Mr. Brady 
said. largely because the strains 
were usol on small farms more 
widely than anyone predicted. 
“The notion that poor people won't 
accept new technology is hog- 
wash " he said. 


of the spectrum. T 
□o definitive studies of dogs' color 
vision, he added, but it is probably 
no belter than that of cats. 

pi geo ns have an extraordinary 
ability to discriminate between al- 
most identical shades, wavelength 
differences of only a few billionths 
of a meter. Pigeons use a combina- 
tion of photosensors and light fil- 
ters that may record as many as five 
different spectral bands. 

Some g nimals that are daytime 
feeders, such as hummingbirds, can 
see into the ultraviolet part of the 
s pe c m >m that h umans cannot see 
at alL which may help than find 
flowers or ripe fruit 

Frogs, in tests with Qluminated 
panels, show a preference for blue, 
and it appears that color vision is 
common m amphibians. However, 
Dr. David J. Ingle of the Eye Re- 
search Institute in Boston, who has 
been working with frogs, notes that 
the timils of their color perception 
have not been established. Reptile 
retinas are rich in* the receptors 
normally used for color vision, but 
their ability also remains untested. 

Goldfish, like humans, have 
three classes of color receptor and 
their performance has been tested 
in various laboratories, including 
that of the Rowland Institute for 
Science in Cambridge. Massachu- 
setts. Eariy this year. Dr. Ingle, 
then at Rowland, reported that 
goldfish determine the color of a 
surface not tty merely measuring its 
radiating wavelength but by con- 
trasting it with the light from other 
dements of the scene. Such “re- 
tinex” vision in h uman beings was 
postulated by Edwin H. Land, 
founder of Polaroid Corp- and the 
Rowland Institute, as early as 1959. 

In Dr. Ingle’s new tests, the 
wavelengths of light reaching the 
fish from a Mondrian-type patch- 
work of colors were radically al- 



SEEING IN COLOR 

Light receptors called cones in 
the retina of me eye are sensi- 
tive to electromagnetic im- 
pulses in various wavelengths 
of color. The cones then relay 
messages of those impulses 
through nerves to the brain, 
which compares and analyzes 
them to identify the color or 
colors. 


Vitreous Body 


Lens 


fish, if trained to obtain a bit of 
liver by pushing a green p atc h, 
could identify it amoog repeatedly 
juggled panels of other colors, even 
when the pattern was illuminated 
so that the green panel radiated 
wavelengths of yellow or gray. 

Few, if any. mammaU totally 
lack color vision. Dr. Jacobs be- 
lieves, although he said this might 
prove true of some nocturnal spe- 
cies for which seeing color would 


Human eye. here, has 
three types of cones 
that react in ways ena- 
bling the brain to 

recognize shades and 
blends of blue, green 
and yellow. 


The chief function of 
rods, sandwiched in 
among the cones, is to 
absorb impulses of 
faint light and pass 
them along to the 
brain. 


tered by changing the color and have little value, 
intensity of ill umin a ti on. Yet the The ym*; responsible for th ey 


characteristics are assumed to be 
on the X. or “female,” chromo- 
some, and to be recessive; that is, 
the defect does not manifest ilsdf if 
the genes contain a second, normal 
X chromosome. Since all women 
cany two X chromosomes, only a 
woman who inherited a color- 
blindness gene from both parents 
would have limited color vision, 
and all of her sons would inherit 
the trait If only one of her chromo- 
somes were affected, she would not 
be color-blind but her sons would 


>percent 
5. In men 


blindness. In men, who cany only 
one X chromosome mated with the 
Y or “ male ” chromosome, a defec- 
tive X chromosome invariably 
causes color blindness; this there- 
fore occurs roughly 20 times more 
often in men than in women. A 
color-blind father cannot pass the 
trait to his sons, since they inherit 
only his Y chromosome. 

Dr. Jacobs, along with J. D. Mol- 
lon of Cambridge University and 
J.K. Bowmaker of Queen Mary 


College at the University of Lon- 
don, reported on ibeir research in 
the Proceedings of the Royal Soci- 
ety of London. Speculating on pos- 
sible evolutionary origins of vari- 
able color vision, they suggested it 
might provide a survival advan- 
tage. As color-blind soldiers, they 
noted, are said to be less easily 
deceived by camouflage, members 
of a group of animals with im- 
paired color vision might root cam- 
ouflaged predators or foods invisi- 
ble to their companions. 


The outside of a plane tells you 
a lot about the inside. 






. ” '■ ■ 
w-5>- 


. •. ■ . . i- ■ - 

« ’ /. . • «•.' ■■ % ’ M •• • . * 

: i . s • V s c ' • / ■ , 

• * : •••• . ■ 

mM§T'$r •: ■ ■ 


vW 



Lufthansa 






•t 


Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY,; AUGUST 22, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE index 


WbIi Lew Last c*g. 


Wfechiesdajs 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index, 


-^pv^st Actives, 


Htah LOW uxst Cb* 


Church* 

PanAm 

Ramod 

TWA 

Revlon 

Mktsut 

Trwiwv 

AT8.T 

UntTef 

MaoirrF 

Morons 


15 * 

14 * 

,5 

—1 

•* 

7 * 

0* 

+ ft 

9 * 

0* 

9 

+ * 

22ft 

22% 

22* 

— * 

47 * 

46 * 

46 * 

+ * 

10* 

9 * 

10* 

+ * 

43 * 

39 

43 * 

+ 9 * 

21* 

20* 

21* 

+ * 

22* 

2% 

22* 

Z* 

22ft 

2ft 

+ » 

49 * 

48 * 

C* 

- * 

46 ft 

44 * 

45 * 

— 1* 

40 ft 

40 % 

40 ft 

+ * 

30 * 

30 

30 * 

+ M 

12* 

31 * 

32 

+ * 


IIKIW 120.93 133307 1319.11 132903 + SJB 

Wont 407.97 MU 7 AS 3-75 6*604 + 1£50 

Util T 58 LM 15990 15 UD 159 x 3 + 072 

Comp 55100 5 * 4.17 948 X 3 55409 + 5 X 8 


Previous 

HU LOW aoM 

bmolltt 18092 MHL 33 100.92 

UnMBU IK iix6 

Tronsp. W 9 X* '&» 

ytnme» s7Ji saw “Ji 

Flnonca 114.13 HITS 114.13 


HS2 2S *» *■> 


Advanced 
Dedlned 
Undnmoed 
Total Issues 
New Hlsha 
New Lows 


308 343 

337 341 

255 347 

780 790 

IS IB 

13 12 


Composite 

Industrials 

Finance 
nuoronco 
Ultimas 
! Bonks 
; Trans 


2 WJ 4 297 JO 297.02 30 AB. 
30378 3 BL 34 MM? 3 » ’ 

1*E if 

giB r SISKS 


NYSE Diaries 


Wiche* 

EcflOBB 

BOtafPi 

BAT in 

wonoB 

HBsfirs 

CtfCdO 

fSU 

Ktawf 


iSS £ 

* s 
ss § 

« 1 

,?* iS. 

e & 
2 * 

dSS ™ 


£ t& 

» +S 

, 4 * 

2ft +W 
JRta + *»i 
10* — * 
4 % —I 




2* + to 
7 % + * 

45 % + * 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


I Dow Jones Bond Averages 1 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
New H 10*11 
New Lows 


UtttMas 

Industrials 


’included in Itw solos floures 


Bov Salas *S0rt 

:ssjs.f 

H 5 SSB 8 IS 

155319 341819 » 


VoLatl PJ4 T&SjOjea 

Pm. 3 PJM.val 7 U 7 UH 

PmcoHaMataddae 115 . 735,130 


Standard & Poor's index 


AMEX Soles 


ameX Stack index. 


v * 


Tables include the nation wide prices 
up to the doslns on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


industrials 2 B 9 J 1 207 JM 30910 2094 * 

Transp. 17478 17 L 9 S 174.13 175 X 7 

umniea ra m as ffls 

Ptawnca 2207 21.92 32 JB 2101 

Campostta 18037 184 JB 18008 18844 


3 P-M- volume 
prev. 3 P JWL volume 
Prov. cons, volume 


T 32 °“ Close 3 rK 
231 a* mu 


UMeaai 
HU Low Stock 


Dlv. Yld. PE a n HU Low Quo! 01*00 


NYSE Moves Up in Light Trade 


23 * 10 AAR 441714 145 21 U am 31 — fa 

16 * m amca 15 *i 11* 11* if* + * Compiled by Our Su$ From Dapauhes 

* ’iSS&SR-Mh NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
55 ^ £p, R b< 247 "J ^ ^ S Stock Exchange were mostly higher in bght 

«* 3916 asa zoo 5.1 1987 4 o* 38 * ww— i^ trading late Wednesday, although most of the 

SM. 1 ?* azp miu* m m! w* 24 *— vs market’s key measures showed only moderate 

»* a* SSfc&s 1 *} fa if a* 22* m* + * gains. 

104 12 V 4 aotwc xo 27 is 14 * i 4 * i+% + * The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials, 




10 !A 7 * AcmaE J 2 b 4.1 II 

19 15 * Adas* i jaaioj 

20 13 * AdmMI J 2 IS 7 

19 8 * AdvSvs 031 44 19 133 13 11 * 12 + % 

41 * 22 * AMD 17 2479 29 28 * 28 * — * 

12 * 4 * Advert .12 U 20 111 9 * 9 9 — * 

15 * 9 * AerftoX 12 42 14 IM 13 *— fa 

49 * 32 * AelnU 24407 14 3430 44 45 * 44 +* 

57 ’- 52 * AetL Pt £790102 4 57 54 * 57 

37 * 10 * Attains 120 18 8 709 32 31 * 32 +* 

3 * 2 * Alleen 28 3 * 3 * 3 * + * 

57 42 AlrPrd 120 22 12 473 55 * 54 * 54 *— * 

24 * 15 AlrbFrt m 28 13 29 21 * 21 * 21 * 

2 * 1 AIMOQS , 10 a 4 J 438 2 * 2 2 * 


2 7 * 7 * 7 * W 

si 17* i 7 u> i 7 *— * which rase 
31 17 14 * 14 *— * 

133 13 11 * 13 + V. 

1479 29 28 * 28 *— * 

111 9 * 9 9 — * 

*££ ^ 2*7 S A [though p 

4 57 54 * 57 the 4 P M < 

709 32 311 * 32 + * . 

28 2 * 3 * 3 h + * this article I 


r Jones average oi m moust nai s, 
11 JO points Tuesday for its best 


2 Va 1 AIMOdS .IBa « 
33 * 27 V, AloP PfA 3.93 124 
8 * 4 * AloP ctof JO 10.9 

82 43 * AloP Pi 980 114 

74 58 VJ AloP Pt 8-14 114 

75 S 7 AloP Pt 828 UJ 


14 * 11 * Alooscs 1 JM 72 10 1 B 2 14 * 14 V. 1414 +* 

24 * 11 * AlskAIr .14 A 10 422 34 25 * 25 *— * 

24 * II* AJbrioa 28 14 19 44 2 <* 24 * 24 * + * 


24 * II* AJUriOS 28 14 19 44 24 * 24 * 24 * + * 

33 L, 24 * AUsm Ja 17 It 179 WA 28 28 — * 

31 * 2314 Alcon 120 AA 28 1764 27 * 27 27 V. 

38 * 37 * AlcoStd 120 14 12 284 3 S* 35 * »*- * 

32 2014 AlMAlX U 00 17 1487 Z 7 * 24 * Z 7 * + * 

25 * 20 M A I exdr 22 34 24 * 24 24 * + * 

89 * 7214 AltaCp 1241 10 8 74 * 7414 76 * + * 

28 * 7014 Ataim 1 X 0 4,7 91 20 * 20 * 20 *— * 

20 * 1414 A loin Pi Z.I 9 121 3 18>4 18 * IB*— * 

n 85 Al 0 lPtC 112 S 122 3 92 91 * 91 * + * 

34 * 24 * AlloPW 220 87 9 BM 31 30 * 31 

23 * 15 * AJIsnG 40 b U 15 23 22 * 22 * 22 * 

44 * 32 * AltdCP 180 O B 1738 42 * 41 * 42 * + * 

44 57 * AldCppi 174 104 47 45 44 * 45 

115 * 10114 AVJCppfl 2 JI 0 102 14 112*112 112 — * 

10414 100 * AMC pi 1 l« 57 el 1.1 311 VH* 104 * 104 * 

23 * 15 * AlkIPd 12 8 18 * 18 * 18 * 

40 * 45 * AlfelStr 2.12 30 8 1 U 54 * 5414 54 *— 'A 

12 * 4 * AlllsOl 44 4 * 4 * 4 * + 14 

34 * 24 AlfeCPf 25 3014 29 * 3014 + V. 

29 * 21 * ALLTL 104 42 9 44 28 27 * 27 *— * 

39 * 29 * Alcoa 120 14 31 1339 35 * 34 * 34 *— * 

23 * 13 * A max .101 280 1 SW, 15 * 15 * 


22 * AmHes 1.10 40 22 2291 27 * 27 * 27 * 


12 Morili 
HU Low stock 


S*. Ckxri 1 nMoriti 

1005 HU Low ttxrt.Oi'PH HU Low Stock 


2 * 1 * AmAgr 

21 * 14 ABokr 
70 58 * A Brand J.W 40 

30 * 2 SV, ABrdpf 225 9 3 
70 * 59 * ABrdpf 247 4.4 


33 1 * 1 * I*—* 

45 20 * 20 * 20 *- * 
509 40 * 59 * 40 * + * 
890 29 * 29 * 29 »— * 
4 40 * 40 * 40 * + * 


Sfe. ClOSB 

HBUfULow aastQrtw 


115 * 54 * ABdcd 140 M 17 730 115 114 * 114 * + * 
30 * 19 * ABIdM 04 LI 15 24 28 V. 27 * 27 *— <4 


28 * 20 * ABusPr 44 24 14 2 24 * 24 * 24 * + U> 


£ 0 * 45 * AmCan 2.90 50 11 301 SB* SB 


25 * 22 ACanpf 200 11.1 
52 * 40 * ACanpf 300 50 
114*103 ACanpf 1375 111 
20 * 17 * ACopBd 2 J 0 107 
30 * 25 * ACopCv 201 a 97 
11 4 * ACentC 172 

57 44 * ACVOTl 1.90 14 15 

27 V, IB* ADT SI 30 23 


200 11.1 I 25 * 25 * 25 * 

300 50 8 51 * 51 * 51 * + * 

175 111 I 114 114 114 + * 

220 102 40 20 * 20 * 20 * + * 

201 a 97 24 2714 27 27 — 14 

172 9 7 * 4 * 4 *— * 

1.90 14 15 3 982 57 * 55 * 54 —1 
SI 30 23 ITT 2414 24 * 24 *— * 


BelHwpf 07 20 3 34 * 

Ball At I 400 7 j 9 553 90 * 

BCE o 228 114 31 * 

Beilina 72 IX 18 53 22 * 

BellSau 200 AS 9 8119 40 * 

BelnAH 00 10 22 410 SO* 

Bom Is 100 11 11 32 32 * 


BenfCp 200 40 10 322 41 


24 * 17 * AElPw 2760107 9 1375 22 21 * 21 * + V. 

49 * 31 * Am Exp 178 10 15 3800 42 * 42 * 42 * + * 

25 * 12 * AFamlS X 8 11 U 640 23 * 22 * 22 * + W 

34 V) 22 ACnCP 100 11 9 2453 32 * 31 * 31 *—* 

14 4 * AGnl wt 101 13 * 13 * 13 * + Vh 

54 W 51 * AGnlpfA 507 alOX 403 54 * 54 * 54 * + * 

94 * 63 * AGnl p(B 50 Oe 47 S 3 87 * 84 * 86 * + * 

71 * 45 AGnpfD 204 4.1 447 45 * 64 * 64 *—* 

36 * 25 * A HerU 170 17 10 7 32 * 32*4 32 * + * 

13 * 7 * A Hotel 55 12 * 12 * 12 * + * 

44 * 44 * A Home 2.90 40 12 1579 59 * 59 59 * + * 

44 * 26 U. AH OTP 1.12 2 X 15 3844 46 * 44 * 44 *— * 

97 * TO* Amrtcn 140 77 9 852 90 * 90 * 98 * 

90 * 42 AlnGrp X 4 0 22 421 84 * 84 * 84 * + * 

28 * 18 * AMI .72 20 12 2947 24 * 24 * 24 * 

5 7 * AmMOt 3413 3 * 3 3 * 

2 * 16 * ap reads 751 17 5 138 19 * 19 * 19 * + * 


323 45 * 
582 23 * 


72 .9 19 807 34 * 
00 12 18 911 25 * 


90 * 42 AlnGrp X 4 0 22 421 84 * 

28 * 18 * AMI .72 20 12 2947 24 * 

5 7 * AmMOt 3413 3 * 

29 16 * APraads 79 17 5 138 19 * 

13 * 5 ASLFla 10 80 4 * 

18 * 12 V, ASLF 1 pf Z 19 156 29 14 

16 It* AStllp 00 AS 9 144 12 * 

35 * 26 * Amfitd 160 SX 10 285 29 * 

67 * 35 * AmStar 64 1,1 11 116 59 * 

78 46 * ASIrpfA 478 67 4 69 * 

57 * 51 ASIr pfS 400 122 12 55 * 

24 * 17 * AT&T 170 SJ 1612003 21 * 
41 * 32 * AT&T pf 364 9 X 543 39 

42 33 * AT&T pf 304 9 X 16 39 * 

27 * 16 * AWOtrs 100 30 8 115 25 * 

13 M 10 AWaSpf ITS 107 200 z 12 * 

28 * 10 * AmMotl 2 X 0 110 7 367 18 * 

72 * 59 * ATrPr 564 87 Z 7 48 * 

18 6 * ATrSC 28 13 * 1 

89 V 6 46 * ATrUn 564 60 14 82 * 8 

40 * 26 * Amenm 160 47 8 24 38 * 


138 19 * 19 * 19 * + * 
ID 6 * 6 * 6 *—* 
29 14 14 14 

164 12 * 12 * 12 * + M 
285 29 * 29 * 29 * + * 
116 59 * 59 * 59 * + * 
4 69 * 69 * 69 * 

12 55 * 55 * 53 * + * 

115 25 * 25 * 25 * + * 

^ssj m ifS“i 


Benefpf 4J0 11.1 3 38 * 

Brnrtpl 4 j 3 T 1 J ita 

Benelpf 500 30 auisi 
BanetPt Z 5 D 110 mtz 21 
Bcneatn 170 60 2 17 * 

BenptB 071 1020 5 * 

Barkov 309 > 

Boat Pd 74 10 34 659 13 * 

BetfiSM XO 27 1105 II* 

BeltlStpfSiU 110 323 45 * 

BettlSI of 200 107 5 B 2 23 * 

Beverly 72 .9 19 807 36 * 

BloTUr 00 12 18 911 25 * 

Blocftn 26 27 18 * 

BIOCkD 64 13 16 974 19 * 
BICkHP 102 60 8 15 32 * 

BhilrJn 781 156 17 * 

BIckHR 2 X 0 41 15 849 59 * 

Borings 100 27 16 4255 48 * 

BotaoC 1.90 4.1 20 313 46 * 

BolsaCPlS^ 06 28 58 

Bonder .10 X 28 41 28 * 

Bardens 102 19 11 790 39 * 

Borg Wo 02 40 12 863 22 * 

Bormns 16 199 9 * 

28 * BoaEd 124 87 8 132 39 * 

65 BosEPf 808 110 550 ZB 1 

9 * BasEpr 1.17 106 15 11 * 

10 * BasEpr 1 X 6 180 30 13 * 

19 * Bowralr 73 11 9 205 23 * 

26 BrloSI 160 16 12 29 28 * 

43 * BristM 108 12 16 2902 59 * 

3 * BrifLnd 14 2 4 * 

21 * BrltPt 100 s 50 B IM 30 * 

22 BriT 2 pa 6 le 27 133 27 * 


34 * + 1 * 
90 *— * 
3 ®*— * 
22 * — * 
40 * + * 
50 — * 
31 *— * 
40 % 

38 *—* 

39 

1 B 1 +3 

21 —1 

1 SS + * 
8 + * 
13 U, 

17 * — * 
45 *— * 
23 *— * 
36 * 

25 * + * 
18 * 

W* + * 
32 U. — * 
16 *— * 
59 + 1 * 
48 * +1 
44 'A + * 
58 + * 


ColgPwd 595 

ColAIkl 64 28 8 114 

ColFdss .16 7 17 86 

ColPen 1 X 0 *0 9 2514 

Coltind 200 47 9 120 
Col Gas 118 10.1 561 

CSOPf 2 X 2 127 8 

CamOln 116 40 7 369 

CmtoEn 104 67 11 850 
Comdli 70 10 10 753 


CoaiMII 76 11 16 


74 * CmwE 300 90 7 1735 


24 * CwE pf 1 X 2 46 
13 * CwE Pf 100 117 
14 * CwE pt 200 117 
IB* CwE Pt 277 97 
21 * CwE Pi 207 110 
CwE pf 774 11.9 
ComES 152 97 




27 48 * 67 * 6 B* + * 

28 13 * 13 * 13 * + * 


29 * 22 * Amririt 
28 * lBttAmfac 


28 * 18 * Amfac 
16 6 * Amtesc 

69 50 * Amoco 

38 * 28 * AMP 
23 * 11 * Amoco 


47 8 24 30 * 

S 21 5913 44 * 
13 13 431 24 * 
06 26 * 
5 31 7 


130 b 50 8 2051 66 * 64 * 
72 27 23 928 33 32 * 


23 * II* Amreps 
34 21 * Amsrtl 1 X 0 43 


22 23 928 33 32 * 

14 17 450 12 * 12 
13 32 22 21 * 

47 9 7 ® 33 * 33 * 


13 * + * 
82 * +1 
37 *— * 
4216 — 2 * 
34 + * 

26 * 

7 — * 

fc*> 


Brmpp 0 te 12 
Brock 

Brckwy 172 &> 21 
BKYLK 5 112 70 8 
BkUGpf 2 X 7 90 


87 8 132 39 % 

10 550 x 81 

06 15 11 * 

80 30 13 * 

11 9 205 23 * 

14 12 29 28 * 

12 16 2902 59 * 

50 'S 856 30 * 
5.1 21 26 V. 


22* 

9 * + 1 * 
39 * + * 
81 
11 

13 * + * 


m* + * 

59 * + 16 
4 M 


30 * + * 
27 *— * I 


SSjgSSS 

BwnSJi 70 


Comsol 170 15 10 837 

CPsvc 78 0 21 677 

Compgr 60 U 8 49 

CompSc 11 3407 

Cptvsn 480 

ConAgi 07 27 15 194 

ConnE 160 9.1 10 31 

CnnNG 260 80 9 32 

Conroe X 0 19 6 26 

ConsEd 2X0 70 8 2084 

ConEpt 600 17 1 

CanEpf 500 lax 7 

CraFrt 1.10 11 12 699 

CnSNG 272 16 9 339 

ConsPw 1597 

CnPpfB 400 111 830 x 

CnPpfD 7 X 5 147 36 ta 

CnPpfE 702 147 340 , 

CnPprV 4 X 0 146 00 

CnPprtl 14(2 140 38 

CnPprT 308 110 39 

CnPprR 400 140 39 

CnPprP 308 140 5 

CnPprN 305 145 - -i- 

CnPprMl 50 145 3 

CnPpri. 123 140 29 


45 * 30 Amsted 160 16 14 161 44 * 44 


22 + * 
33 *— * 


BurinCt 

Burilnd 164 50 


305 11 X 
70 S 
106 4 X 

8 

28 

6 

794 

34 * 

SS 

100 11 

17 

506 

51 * 

100 17 

a 

558 

37 

02 10 

is 

120 

33 

00 4 X 

9 

10 

18 % 

116 110 


28 

18 * 


,1 

24 

16 


34 * 

22* + * 
31 + * 


51 *—* 
36 *— * 
32 *— * 


18 * + * 
T1 IS 


4 * I* Anocmo 

24 * 16 * Anlog 19 

27 * 19 * Anchor 1X8 10 

46 * 29 * AnCtay 172 37 30 

12* 9 * AndrGr 70 10 14 


44 vV 

1158 3 2 * 3 + * 

19 237 22 * 21 21 — 1 * 

479 S* 24 * 25 * + * 
30 29 40 * 40 * 40 *— * 

14 53 12 11 * 12 + * 
14 77 26 * 25 * 25 *- * 


BriNth 1 X 0 12 9 1375 


21* Antwuss 00 14 13 3425 33 * 33 * 33 * + * 

48 * Anheupf 360 17 22 69 * 68* 69 * + U 

19 % 13 * An bar 78 10 18 112 16 * 16 * IS* + * 

16 % 9 Anthem 04 7 21 47 14 * 14 * 14 * 

15 * 10 * Anthny X 4 b 19 9 127 15 * IS 15 — * 

13 9 * Apache 78 16 10 77 1 ! 10 * 10*— * 

2 * ApchPwt 54 Vk * * 

19 * 15 * APChP UflCLIO 117 233 IS* IM 18 * + * 

34 * 28 * ApPwpf 4.18 137 14 32 * 31 * 31 *— * i 

31 * 26 * ApPwpf irn 120 5 30 30 as — * . 

39 * 22 * ApIDta 1.761 75 23 148 24 * 23 * 23 * — % 

1 B 6 S APPIM 0 64 61 14 * 13 % 14 * + * 

24 * 16 * ArchDn , 14 b 0 13 2450 21 * 21 21 * + * 


BrlNpf 112 80 5 23 % 

BriNpf 573 ellL 6 343 50 * 

Bumay X 4 18 19 60 12 

Burrgh 260 40 12 3426 45 * 

Bulb-in 52 10108 2! 17 * 

Buttes 187 2 * 

Botes pf 1051 8 4 


28 * + * 
63 * + * 
23 * + * 
SO*- * 
11 *— * 
64 * + * 
17 * 

2* + * 

4 


30 * 24 * ArIP pt 358 111 51 2 

102 79 * AriPpf 1000 11.1 58 X 9 

24 % 14 ArkBst XO 10 9 48 2 

24 * 16 Ark la 108 56 25 1322 1 

* * ArtnRt 12 

15 * 11* Armada 4 1: 

12 % 6* Armco 837 1 

22% 15 * Armc Pf 110 100 30 2 

24 * 14 * ArmsRb X8 32 0 84 1: 

39 * 26 % ArmWIfl 170 30 9 135 3 

34 * 19 * AnoCo 170 47 7 0 2 

24 * 12* ArnwE 00 1J 17 22 1 

30 * 14 Arfra 72 0157 62 2 

27 15 Ary Ini 00 14 9 347 2 

27 * 17 * Asorco 572 2 

37 . 23 * Aswan 160 49 1457 3 


21* + * 
58 29 * 29 * 29 * 

5 tx 94 96 96 — * 

48 23 * 23 23 — * 

1322 19 £ 19 * * 

4 12 * 12 * 12 * + * 

837 10 * 10 * 10 * + * 

38 21 20* 21 +1 

84 15 * 14 * 15 * + * 

135 34 * 33 % 34 - * 

0 29 38 % 28 % 

22 14 13 * 13 % 

62 26 % 26 * 26 * + * 

347 23 * 23 23 * + * 

573 22 * 21 * 22 * + * 

1457 32 * 32 32 * + * 


C8J In IXOa 6X 10 184 21 % 21* 21 % 

CBS 300 17 19 1672112 * 111 * 111 %+*. 
CCX 8 29 5 % 5 * 5 * 

CCXpt ITS 11.1 488 * 11 * 11 * 11 * + % 

CIGNA 260 40 36 1612 55 * 54 % 55 *- * 
CIG Pf 205 80 58 30 * 3 ff* + * 

CIGpf 4.10 80 21 51 * 51 51 

CLC 27 2 * M 2 *— M 

CNA Fn H 251 55 * 55 * 5 S* + * 

CNAI 174 117 28 11 TO* 11 

CNW 253 21 * 21 * 21 * + * 

CPC lilt 120 S.I II 272 43 * 43 43 * + * 

CP Nil 1 X 0 67 9 32 22 * 22 * 22 * + * 

CRIIMI 207 a 160 79 21 20 * 20 %—* 


CRIIMI 20701(30 


1.16 47 9 3015 26 * 26 * 26 * + * 


45 * 34 * AlMOpf 470 HU) 432 45 * 45 * 45 *— * 40 * 

44 * 32 % AshlOPf 306 97 ' 14 42 * <2* 42 * + * 15 * 

69 * 49 AsdDG 200 4 X 10 1 Z 7 T 64 * 43 * 63 *—* 22 % 

110* 79 AsdD pf 405 40 6 102* 102 102 — * 228 * 

24 % IB* A Hi lone 160 &1 It 3 19 % 19 % 19 % + 16 27 * 

29 * 21 * AtCvEI 258 96 9 160 27 * 27 27 — * 14 * 

64 * 42 All Rich 400 60 3974 99 * 58 * 59 % + * 40 * 

101 32 * AtfRcpf 305 30 374 QXMI 100*101 26 % 

153 100 % All Rep* 200 10 3 142 142 142 + 1 * 30 * 


110* 79 AsdDpf 405 40 

34 % IB* Athtone 160 8.1 It 

29 * 21 * AtCvEI 258 96 9 

64 * 42 AtIRICh 400 60 

101 32 * AtfRCPf 305 10 

153 100 * ADRcpt 200 10 

18 * 10* AffasCp 

31 * 18 * About X 0 16 25 

54 * 34 * AutaDI 68 17 22 

5 4 * Avalon n 9 

31 * 17 * AVEMC 60 10 14 

39 * 28 * A very 60 17 13 

20 io Avlall n 10 

39 * 27 Avnet 50 15 II 

25 * 17 * Avon 200 9.1 11 

28 * 16 * Avdfn IS 


CdlFed X8 27 
CalFdpf 405 97 
Callhn 75 b 17 
Cdmml .12 0 

CRLkg xs 
CmpRo .161 
CpRpfg 150 
CamSpa 
CdPucs X8 
ConPEg 00 
CapClt* 70 


00 10 73 34 * 33 * 33 *— * 

444 372 8* M 8* + * 

02 15 J« 158 26 * 36 * 26 * 

17 2539 15 * 15 * 15 * + * 

X8 27 5 1720 22 * 21 * 21 *— * 

05 97 91 52 51 51 — * 

75 b 17 176 28 19 Vi 19 % + * 

.12 0 129 397 15 * IS* 15 * — * 

X 0 1670 35 * 24 * 25 * + * 

.161 45 3 * 3 * 3 * 

-50 13 iw 11 * II*— * 

12 575 37 % 37 * 37 * + * 

XS 164 13 * 13 * 13 *— % 

00 13 19 * 19 * 19*6 + * 

70 20 295 212*210 212 * +1 


g PprS 402 140 
PprlC 143 146 


CnttCp 260 67 1? 313 


Con MU 16 122 

Conflict 595 

orrniipf 107 

OllHdn 2®' 

Cntlnto ■ 124 

ConfTri 100 70 8 1755 

CtOata 02 II 3575 

CnDtpf 4 J 0 110 100 * 

Canwd 1.10 11 13 432 

vlCaokU I 

COOPT 162 40 16 2422 

Coaalpf 200 77 72 

CoprTr X0 15 7 52 


.43 10 15 475 


Copwld 721 
CpwfdPf 2X0 127 


«fc:: 


Cardura 04 IX 16 172 


Corns* 178 20 1* 3798 . 


CorBlk 1 JJ 0 20 191 

Co it Cm 74 0 21 5 

Craig 24 

Crone i 40 b 4 X 10 154 
CrovR* 24 2038 

CrckNpfllB 11J 7 

CrckN pf 163 e 5.1 1200 

CrmpK 170 57 13 34 

CrwnCk 14 71 


CrwZri 100 26 W 120 


CrZolpf 463 90 18 

CrZel pfC 4 J 0 70 35 

cumro 00 20 16 4 

Oi Uriel g 22 1186 

CumEn 270 IX 4 1004 


Currlnc l.lOalOX 
CUriW 170 37 1 * 
Cvriaps 1.10 25 8 


9 * 9 *— * 
20 * 20 V. — * 
23 * 24 * + * 
12 * 12 * 

45 % 46 % +1 
49 * 49 * + * 

3 * % 

36 * 36 % + * 
< 7 * 48 % + 1 * 
IB* IB*— * 
51 * 51 % + * 
22 * 22 % — * 
67 * 67 *— 1 * 
38 * 38 *— * 
47 % 47 % — * 
50 * 58 % + * 
29 * 29 * + * 
17 * 17 * 

63 % 64 * + * 
10* 10% 

37 37 * + * 

44 44 *— * 


CapHds 07 15 9 1903 22* 21 % 22* + * 


28 13 * 13 13 — * 

X 0 16 25 370 24 % 24 * 24 *— * 
68 17 22 87850 * 50 * 50 % + % 
9 47 5 4 * 4 * 

60 10 14 4030 29 * 30 +* 

60 10 13 KB 33 % 33 * 33 *— * 
10 129 19 * 19 * 19 *—* 
60 13 18 3 V 3 33 32*33 +* 

200 9.1 11 1546 22 * 21 * 22 

IS IDS 20 % 20 * 20 % + * 


Coring p X8 15 11 * 10 * 10 ft— * 

Carlisle 108 33 9 10 31 * 30 * 30 ft 

CaraFt X 0 10 11 169 23 * 22 % 23 * 

Corf*w 160 90 7 1923 27 * 26 * 27 — * 

CorToc 110 5 X 14 305 39 * 38 * 38 % — % 

Carrol 07 10 10 117 7 * 7 * 7 * 

CarPIrs 60 20 8 27 21% 21* 21* 

CoriHw 172 4 X 10 547 28 Z 7 % 28 

CortWI 62 13 11 140 331 k 33 * 33 * + * 

CascHG 170 70 7 31 15 * 15 % 15 % + * 

CCJUIOt 406 11 * 11 * 11 * 

CstfCpf 108 k 3 25 ft 25 % 25 % — * 

CrilCPf 00 6X 147 14 * W 14 

CatipT 3 B IX 1662 36 % 36 36 % + % 

Coco J6 30 11 44 25 % 24 % 25 * + * 


17 * 7 * 

35 * 22 * 
19 * 15 
24 % 18 * 
2 * * 
9 

61 * : 
21 * 

119 k 


.121 77 

60 11 10 488 
02 5 J 14 2632 
J6 10 14 5 

2730 
136 


70 1.1 2251 

13 51 

3 X 0 70 8 459 

1 33 


8* + * 
24 * + * 
17 *— * 
21 *— * 
2* + * 
9 + 1 % 
61 *— * 
17 * +% 
11 + * 


1.10 37 11 66 

1 3 

64 e 56 2 

133 

170 12 11 68 

1 X 0 4.9 5 45 

«X 3 elOJ> 10 

104 40 7 1169 
1.12 4.1 9 45 

00 57 6293 


43 *— * 

22 — * II* 
32 ft— * 12 * 

22* 23 * 

9 * 28 * 

3 34 * 

54 * — * 25 % 

49 *— * 27 * 

54 *— * 54 * 

43 V,— M 9 ft 
27 * 4 * 

15 *—* 1 * 

43 — * 4 * 

66*—* 63 * 39 

15 *— ft 48 * 3 V 
28 % — * 56 * 50 

66ft— * 56 * 51 

25 *— * 22 * 15 

II*— * 34 * 24 

35 + * 44 * 27 

24 44 * 27 

35 * + * 56 % 51 

21 *— * 39 * 32 

9 38 * 31 i 

31 % + ft 39 29 

14 * + * 200 IX 


4 . 91 e 110 254 

703 ell 0 152 

208 III 

2 X 0 8X 13 177 

100 40 7 1503 
ISO 90 2 

03 a J 15 37 


66 16 14 600 


.00 37 IS 10 
104 20 10 1441 
60 18 16 241 
. 12 b 17 1 ! 96 

08 15 18 275 
77 26 71 2743 
X 0146 X 
260 8.1 9 4 

100 19 13 11 

1 JH 56 7 4439 
378 56 ZZ 
X 4 19 60 145 

170 11 15 224 
691 398 

170 400 34 

XO 20 11 56 

66 16 11 207 


X* 

32 * 

34 ft— * 
33 — % 
61 —1 
15 , -ft 
54 *— * 
2% 

4 Vi— * 
13 % — ft 
34 % + ft 


CascHG 170 70 7 SI 15 * 15 * 15 * + ft 

CastlOc 406 11 % 11 * 11 * 

CstfCpf 108 k 3 25 ft 25 % 25 % — % 

CrilCPf 00 6 X 147 14 ft 14 14 

CortrpT 6 B IX 1662 36 % 36 36 % + % 

Ceco 06 30 11 44 25 * 24 % 25 * + * 

Criaroo 4 X 0 30 II 418 120 * 118 * 119 % + 1 * 
Crirm at 460 106 5 43 42 % 43 + * 

Canary n 03 e J 25 1442 9 * 9 ft 9 * 

Cental 278 50 9 76 41 % 41 * 41 % + ft 

Centakn 75 10 1 1 193 24 ZJ% 24 + % 

ConSOW ZJD 2 u 7 2409 25 % 25 25 * + * 

CenHud 196 107 6 62 38 ft 28 % 28 %— ft 

CnllPS 164 86 10 135 19 ft 10 % 19 + * 

CnLoEl LB 84 1 52 24 ft 24 % 54 % — * 

CLaElpf +18 110 8 35 * TSft 35 * 

CoMPw 1 X 0 100109 315 13 * 17 13 ft + ft 

CVIP 5 T .90 97 6 IS 20 % 20 ft 20 * + ft 

CentriJt 102 4 ft 4 4 ft + ft 

CntryTI 00 6 X 9 82 12 * 12 * 12 * + * 

Cenvlll 2 X 0 120 9 35 20 19 * 20 +ft 

Crt-teed 00 20 12 72 24 ft 25 % 26 

C«SAIr 60 1.9 19 235 30 % 20 % 30 * 

Chmpln 62 27 4 X 1 23 % 22 % 23 % + % 

Chmlpf 170 40 5 25 % 25 % 25 %—* 

Ownl pf 460 £7 125 52 % 52 V, 52 % + * 

ChomSp X 0 46 16 307 B% 0 % 8 % 

vlChriC IX 2 * 2 * 2 * 

a CMwt a ft ft % 

Ctirt p* 45 2 % 2 ft 2 % — * 

23 37 * ansa 380 60 6 898 56 % 56 * 56 % — ft 

48 * 39 Chase pf 575 117 1 47 47 47 + % 

56 * SO Chase Pf AX 9 ell 6 7 B 0 55 ft 55 % 55 % + ft 

56 * 51 Chase pflO 44 el 90 202 54 53 % 53 %—* 

n* is* Owteea ,02 168 uamx 20* + ft 
34 % 24 % ChanxBtf 102 57 12 57 29 ft 39 * 29 ft + * 

44 * 27 ChmNY 2 X 3 47 5 762 39 % »* »*— ft 

44 * Z 7 CUNY of 107 40 3 39 ft 39 39 ft— ft 

56 ft 51 ChNYpf 408 a 77 359 56 ft 56 * 56 *— * 

39 * 32 Cheap* 174 3 J 11 25 37 * 37 ft 37 * + * 

38 % 31 * CtMSPn 100 50 10 954 34 * 34 % 34 % + ft 

39 29 * Chevm 140 66 9 2133 37 ft 36 % 37 ft— * 

«. IX ChIMIw 113 2 137 * 137 * 137 * — ft 

29 * 16 % QlIPnT 70 s 1.1 9 SO 26 % 25 * 25 % +lft 


66 30 II 29 18 * 

70 10 32 lift 

178 50 8 584 25 % 

12 30 8 * 

- 18 b 10 42 9 % 

106 4 X 11 1556 35 % 

17 1334 Xft 

in 4 * 

74 20 10 78 9 % 

74 1 J 11 406 30 * 

.74 10 IS 655 40 ft 

200 11.1 8 877 18 * 

7 X 8 123 10701 61 

06 T 0 18 40 Xft 

100 36 X 1470 38 % 

102 80 9 289 24 * 

100 10 8 1034 48 * 

553 8 * 
104 26 18 4 M 39 * 

170 40 13 65 X* 

1 X 0 41 10 45 31 % 

168 103 7 908 16 ft 


65 X* 
45 31 % 
906 16 ft 

1 91 * 
150 z 75 

lOz 65 % 

2 2S 
18 26 % 

113 25 % 
a 25 % 
I 25 * 
8 X 
32 28 * 
25 31 * 
27 32 ft 
4 115 

is a* 

84 21 % 
87 IS* 
1375 17 ft 
13 37 % 
11 9 * 


2 137 * 137 * 137 * — * 
SO 26 % 25 % 26 % +lft 


11 % 7 * CNcFull 74 t 30197 113 8 * 7 * 7 % — * 


54 28 * ChrfsCr 

13 ft 5 thrlsbi 
13 % 9 * Chroma 


110 SO* 50 * 50 % + * 
14 11 * 10 % 11 * + * 
73 12 * 12 12 — ft 


108 20 II 636 35 % 

14 2151 102 % 

170 17 48 625 89 % 

1 X 0 56 8 147 25 * 

3 21 5 * 

.12 2569 9 * 

203 80 9 13 « 31 * 

66 30 9 33 18 % 

1.16 11 15 879 54 % 

170 41 12 55 29 % 

08 13 13 106 37 * 

100 50 14 2845 36 ft 

78 10 21 109 43 % 

00 LB 65 11 

00 LB 18 517 21 * 

200 10 X 18 19 ft 

60 10 14 347 60 * 

300 57 15 2794 58 ft 


160 &2 8 1189 32 ft 
800 100 40 OZ 80 * 


900 * 73 ft 
5 26 


38 * 25 % Oiryslr 100 20 3 5131 36 * 36 36 V, + * 

77 44 % Chubb 270 11 12 2 S 7 70 % 70 * 70 ft + ft 

63 * 50 % Chubb pf 405 7.1 3 60 * 60 ft 60 ft— ft 

X* 12 % Church a X 4 29 1337207 15 % W* 15 —1 

27 * 20 CIKoro 222 9.1 9 93 24 ft 34 % 24 V!i— ft 

51 Xft CJnBril L 12 6 X 8 55 48 * 48 % 48 % + fa 

If* 13 ft CblGE 116 110 7 14 X 18 ft 17 * 18 ft + ft 


5000 ( 105 % 
37 th 74 ft 


The Global 
N 


34 ft 25 ClnGPf 400 110 
74 * an ClnGPf 970 120 
59 ft 43 % ClnGPf 7 X 4 115 
» 53 ClnGPf 978 126 

26 % 18 * C In Mil 02 L 6 
5 Xft CfrdK 04 24 


100 110 1 QZ 33 % 33 % 33 % 

>70 127 30 c 72 % 72 % 72 % 

>64 120 22 Bx 59 * SB Sfft +1 

>78 126 SOQz 73 ft 72 * 73 * +2 

02 L 6 36 792 20 * 30 20 — % 

04 24 13 134 31 30 ft 31 + % 


270 19 21 951 77 % 

206 111 B 863 17 


107 110 
100 115 
105 12 X 
107 125 
110 I 2 X 
110 110 
131 127 
60 40 13 
20 0 II 


7 D 0 X 16 * 
71 Ox If* 
IMx 16* 
4 S 0 z 16 * 


1 17 % 
352 QZ 19 
32 15 
25 23 % 


17 % — * 
11 %— ft 
25 % + * 
8 ft— ft 
9 % 

35 *— % 
38 ft + ft 
4 %— U 
9 - ft 
a* + % 

40 — ft 
18 + * 
61 +1 
38 * + ft 
2 M— * 
24 ft + ft 
48 % 

B% + * 
39 * 

25 — ft 
33 % 

16 * + *. 
91 * + 3 * 
74 ft— lft ' 
65 * 

2S 

26 % — ft 
25 % + ft 
25 * + * 
25 * + * 
27 ft— ft 
28 * + ft 
31 * + ft 
32 V, + ft 
115 

X* + ft 
21ft— ft 
15 * + ft 
17 

37 ft— * 
9 * 

35 *- * 
102 % + 1 * 
89 % — ft 
25 + ft 

5 % + * 
9 * + * 
31 * + ft 
18 * + ft 
54 ft 

29 % — ft 
37 * + * 
X + * 

43 % + % 
13 + ft 

21% + ft 
IV* + ft 
59 * + % 
57 * + ft 
37 * + ft 
46 * + ft 
31 ft 

80 % + % 

as- 1 * 

33 *— * 
105 % + ft 
73 —2 
76 % — * 

17 + * 

16 * 

16 

16 * 

16 * 

17 —1 
17 * + ft 
19 — 16 

IS + ft 
23 %— % 


HULpw Mock Dto.Ytd.PE §M»HULow SctQi’ge 1 HlSC Stuck 


CHv.Yld.PE lSsHUUMr QuoLCBbe] 


'V.. > s . .. ■ 


move wQI have to include the participation of 


indicates that much of Wall Street continues to 
view the outlook for stocks with camion. 

Robert Stovall of Dean Witts Reynolds said 
it was too soon to say whether the climb, com- 
bined with Tuesday’s advance; constituted a 


,9 eSJS JE . Mr. Stovall said that the market has drawn 

13 « *2* ^ 2 2* some support from a softer interest rate tread, 

i» 3 i% 31 si* gain in six weeks, was up 2.02 to 1,325.72 an the result of flat economic activity. 

5010 x 79 tb% 7 ? +i hoar before the close. “The tone of the market is pretty good,” said 

S n* 7i* 71*— i* Advances held an 8 -lo -5 lead over declines on Robert Colby of Smith, Barney Hams Upturn. 

Jo «2 x* 25* 2s*- * ^ New York Stock Exchange, whose compos- since the market has been down for about a 

J? lit m% If* x*— % hidex rose 0 J 2 to 109 . 24 . Volume totaled month, people are reluctant to bdieve the trend 

is i 76 « 27 % 27 27 % 78 J 6 milli on shares, up from 7327 million at is changing , he said. 

1487 27* 26% z 7 % + * that hour Tuesday. Still, the decline appears to be over tor the 

22 ^ 74u + % Brokers said that Lhe market's ament up- short term, Mr . Colby said. “We think there is a 

^ ibS is* is*- % turn, which followed several sessions of ladtlus- minor raBy under way." 

3 vs 9i* vi* + ft ter activity, could trigger additional buying in- Churchs Fried Chicken was the most active 

is "a 22* a* 22* terest in the next few days. issue and was lower. A 137 -million share block 

* x7 a S* M% S* + * But they said many of the gains have reflected of the stock cross at 1414 . 

in J«% Jm* io** - * technical factors ana have been limited pmnari- Strength was found among technol ogy and 
’2 iJ S 2 1 SS- * Hie market’s blue chips and other large- blue-chip stocks. IBM, Burroughs, Digital 

■IS 4 % 4 % 4 % + % capitalization issues. Any sustained upward Equipment and Cray Research all were up. 

25 30 * 29 * 30 % + % 1 ‘ J 

9 66 X 27 % 27 *— ft — * — — 


30 * 19 ft 

16 IT* 

12* 3* 
78 * 65 * 
14 * 0 * 

20 * IS* 
33 ft X* 
22 * 15 % 

5 8 * 
* 

32 % 24 * 
20 10* 
27 * 17 * 
56 * 52 * 
21 * 17 % 
2 * 1 * 
13 * 9 ft 
19 * 15 * 
21 * 17 * 
X 19 ft 
6* 2* 
22% 11* 
X* 25 * 
50 * 31 V, 

17 9 * 
14 % 10 % 
X* 12* 
29 * 18 % 
31 * 15 * 
X* 12 * 

6 1% 
9 * 2 ft 
12 * 3 * 
43 * 32 * 
17 % 14 
54 % 41 


08 0 X 182 28 % 28 % X*— ft 

00 SX 14 X 14 * 14 % 14 % — * 
384 3 % 3 * 3 *— * 

260 36 13 2461 72 ft 71 % 72 — * 

.949 90 11 233 10 9 * 9 *— fa 

00 20 14 155 10 fa 18 ISfa + M 

IXOb 40 9 ITS 29 28 * 28 * + fa 

106 87 7 112 21 * 21 * 21 * 

X 7 9 X 200 x 5 S S+ft 

646 ft 

02 2 J 11 330 27 % 26 * 26 *—* 

36 10 13 X 18 * IM 18 * + * 

160 67199 1021 2* 23 % 23 * 

6 . 15 e 11 J 6000 x 54 * 54 * 54 *— ft 

60 e 20 334 20 % 20 % 20 %— fa 

21 229 2 U 2 ft 2 ft 

99 12 * 12 * 12 % + ft 
20 OBI 40 53 17 % 17 * 17 * 

is mi at » a 20% + vv 

1.14 34 17 43 33 * 33 % 33 % — ft 

168 4 * 4 * 4 * 

271 106 3 22 71 * 21 *— fa 

m 36 * 26 Xft + fa 
102 30 9 818 44 * 43 % 44 % + 1 * 

.12 0 9 183 13 % 13 % 13 *— fa 

00 25 13 19 12 ft 12 12 —ft 

X 4 20 14 12 22 * 22 * 22 *—* 

KTo 20 16 54 28 * 28 * 28 % + ft 

02 19 11 10 IB* 1 BU IB* + ft 

06 23 15 897 24 23 * 24 + fa 

B 1 * 1 % 1 * 

[ 50 2* 2% 2fa 

I I 3 % 3 % 3 % 

102 4.1 II 67 41 * 40 * 41 * + * 

106 VIO 0 4 17 17 17 1 


102 4.1 II 
106*100 


3 X 0 66 8 4581 51 * 51 * 51 fa + ft 


X* 26 * + fa 
22 * 23 % — ft 
Xft Z 3 ft— fa 
2 Bfa 28 % + fa 
59 59 —ft 

31 11 * 

19 * 19 * + ft 
44 44 *+ ft 

29 * 29 *— * 
19 ft 19 * + * 
17 * 17 * 

10% 10ft + ft 
30 * 30 % + fa 
30 % + * 

17 17 

17 * 17 *— ft 
24 % 24 * + ft 

X X + fa 
61 61 + 1 . 
27 % 27 * 

33 % 34 % + fa 
29 * 29 * + ft 
X* Xft—* 
22 % 23 * + % 
14 * 14 *— ft 
X 18 * + ft 
17 * 17 *— ft 
29 * 29 * 

13 * 13 * 

33 % 34 * + * 
220 228 +9 

47 ft 47 ft . 
34 % 35 — * 
41 * 41 % + ft 
7 U 7 * + ft 
31 ft 32 ft — 1 
52 * 52 *— ft 

29 * Xft— * 

26 % 27 ft— f- * - 
26 * X* + ft 
26 * 26 *— fa. 
17 % 17 % — ft 
15 ft 15 ft -F ft 
27 * 27 *— ft 
16 * 16 ft— ft 
41 41 * + * 

7 7 * 

lft 1 * + ft 
50 * 50 *— ft 

22* 22* + * 
a* as* 

35 * 35 * 

1 % 1 % 

37 * 37 ft- * 
39 % 39 *— fa 
15 % 16 +* 


270 36 X 46 

US U 1 

1.94 70 8 2503 

20 27 23 31 

7 11 

70 16 767 

360 116 411 

.18 10 9 56 

30 IM 22 1150 
60 4.1 12 61 

7 5 

08 57 7 73 

70 27 16 139 

04 e 0 B 315 
104 40 9 X 
30 3219 
102 47 11 91 x 

.16 0 7123 

08 L 5 10 77 

271 70 61 

1 X 4 60 13 23 

00 42 16 67 

204 44 t fn 
170 45 15 93 

IX 3 X 14 7 

XS) 823 

60 127 I 

661(202 52 

m 

00 47 9 1048 
06 20 9 M 

168 47 8 487 
100 3 J 13 4 

13 450 
172 50 160 23 * 

I 576 ell 7 54 48 

00 5.1 II 153 
554*1 JX 7 

9 163 


65 * 

Blfa + fa 
25 — * 
10 * + ft 
11 

12*— fa 
31 + * 

11* 

21 + * 
14 *— fa 
37 + fa 

17 + fa 

9 *— ft 
4 % . 

39 % + ft 1 
48 U + * 
X* + ft 
30 ft + fa 
20fa +* 
29 % + fa 
22% + ft 
18 * + fa 
57 % + % 
36 *— * 
29 * 

6 * + ft 


17 X 
76 10 27 1115 
100 41 12 853 
041 X 148 
1100 49 4 

16 395 
1 X 0 37 H IX 
34 



22 6 17 7029 

60 20 U 39 
00 2 X f 18 
.17 IX 8 X 
04 11 14 65 

109 30 13 442 
73 a 1.1 10 717 

100 1.9 12 270 

WO \A 30 57 


17 * — » 
19 * + fa 
3 E% +* 
17 % — fa 
30 *— * 
18 * + ft 
43 *— * 
7 fa + fa 
lift— * 



ST& S--..;. 5 , :f ;.^ N eVE.. . ..y': 


1.10 117 20 

70 7 57 1510 

X 0 27 5 1 

XOe 7 10 1047 
200 LT 13 1660 
1.12 37 10 21 

2 T 4 e 1 O 0 350 

105 

60 17 II 8138 
260 90 14 111 
H 24 IS 32 
.48 U 10 60 

101 50 9 356 
675 8.1 13 

204 96 7 767 

1090187 15 

XO 27 32 33 

278 87 11 111 


XB 27 95 

71 IX 11 20 

60 27 15 1518 

30 17 17 11 


00 27 9 3245 



21 

12* + ft 
26 ft 

60 fa + ft 
29 ft 

51 * — fa 
73 — fa 

11 *— ft' 
21U + *; 
9 %— ftl 

as* + * 
is 

60 — ft 
64 * + % 
X* + fa 
27 * + ft 
5 Vk— ft 
45 *— I* 
28 % +1 
40 ft 
15 

36 *— ft 
77 % — ft 
27 ft — ft 
10 

18 + ft 

25 *— ft 
10 — fa 
13 ft 

23 —fa 
31 * + ft 
29 + ft 

34 % + 1 * 
29 * 


68 b 20 a 1503 


262 9 X 145 
106 7.1 IS 51 
08 30 10 IX 
1.30 41 9 04 

675 117 20Cx 
100 20 292 

050 0 21 

172 30 * IM 
X 4 27 9 889 


100 27 13 485 


32 % 

6 % 

19 — % 
24 * l 
38 % — fa 
30 % + fa 
41 * + * 
23 * + fa 
48 — % 
11 % 

41 * + ft 
9 fa + * 
23 % + 2 % 
56 * + ft 

» +m 

30 * + ft 
8 % + ft 
29 ft + ft 
6 ft + ft 
27 *— ft 
27 * + fa 
24 * + fa 
32 + 1 * 

S 3 *— I* 
34 * + 1 * 
11 —ft 
37 *+ fa 
l?ft 


35 % ZM 
19 % 15 % 
lift 7 ft 
» 22 * 
18 % 14 ft 
27 % 23 
23 17 * 

36 % 25 % 
63 % 47 * 
61 * 47 % 
65 49 * 

19 % 11 * 
X* 16 * 
T 9 ft 10 % 
Z 7 * 19 * 
X 14 % 
20 % 15 
38 * 28 ft 
35 * 27 
53 50 % 

55 48 * 

45 37 

36 fa X 
4016 31 M 
12 6 
15 * 9 % 
62 * 45 * 
19 * 14 * 
20 * 15 % 
30 % 24 % 
28 * 19 * 
10 * 4 % 

53 * 39 
37 * 28 
IS* 11 
X 19 % 
48 % 38 % 
21 % 16 ft 
7 % 3 * 
Xft 11 * 

a 19 
35 * 25 % 
9 * 7 * 
Ufa 8 
19 % 16 * 
70 * 55 % 


1 X 4 44 12 1935 
05 b 10 X 
63 579 


100 LI 9 3348 


72 .27 U m 
271 e 60 7 Mil 
12 228 
20 14 2042 


"T* '■ • !■ ' ’ ,”j 

T ft A . V/j 


200 50 17 704 


A 20 236 26 
18 233 33 


37 * + * | 152 121 * 
12 % — fa 13 ft 9 % 


.160 X 13 240 41 * 
2.16 70 9 12 X 27 % 
XO 27 15 22 17 * 


25 %— ft 
32 % — * 
41 ft + ft 


27 15 22 17 * 

46 M 
— 25 16 238 17 * 

X» 2.4 418 16 * 

220 40 11 X 


176 100 16 

104 27 17 IX 
64 L 3 13 212 
08 5.9 13 82 

104 60 76 34 


60 LI 14 XI 


-W 17 31 
70 7 6 

2 J 30 7 JJ 
X 0 17 8 


ar* 

17 * + ft 
| 5 *— ft 

54 * + * 
44 ft + fa | 
12* + ft 
78 * + ftl 
13 * + ft 
lift + ft 

34 *—* 
19 *— ft 
13 ft + ft 

i a-*, 

2 «%— ft 
30 * 


53 % 41 
13 % 8 ft 
X* 15 * 
lXfallf 
29 fa 16 * 
33 34 

Ufa fft 
7 * 3 % 
60 X* 
42 23 

34 % 19 
44 X 
35 23 % 


IX 47 12 X 
12 859 
100 IX ID 211 
178 
13 

L 16 70 8 SIX 
200 77 4 

2 X 8 100 23 

18 

1 X 8 20 9 234 

08 16 25 312 
70 | 18 147 

06 27 15 X 


XOe 25 99 

100 b 37 49 127 
16 X 9 X 53 
100 17 11 85 

; XO 17 IT 267 
14 300 
100 17 9 687 
270 36 12 2959 
250 13 12 980 
60 o 80 66 

9 11 

20 10 3 220 

74 2 X 55 

75 IX 434 

2 X 40 775 

lOQr 7 X 6 4040 

051 .1 407 

375 97 I 

£00 97 3 

.16 37 17 262 
7 109 V 
106 10128 522 

6 27 

100 47 11 233 
170 I 0 X 280 z 

271 

.18 7 75 M 

170 £1 205 

1.18 30 13 605 
00 30 X 1414 


274 6.1 1 

374 6 X 12 

3M 110 X 

164 b 6.1 8 

304 123 45 

376 127 26 

208 117 5 

252 110 10 

275 100 8 

772 121 90 z 

172 19 13 670 

.12 7 12 X 7 

.16 6 109 


02 20 79 631 
260 47 11 248 


70 6 7 576 

108 47 1174 

70 S 97 ISDz 
160 56 8 2220 

J 37 19 X 
27 664 

66 13 309 
68 22 13 89 

XS 2.7 0 2052 
6 58 

100 10 11 11 
1658107 8 11 


1650107 8 11 

102 36 13 1787 
100 37 9 1581 
172 88 9 « 

172 47 10 1138 
9 211 
JO 27 14 ITS 
08 .9 IS 397 

100 LI 9 743 
280 106 8 
.16 LI 47 34 

68 27 M 16 
00 27 12 6476 
£75 90 1 

20 913 

164 110 6 844 

4 X 80127 25 

165 137 49 

MO 1 X 3 23 

100 HL 7 AOx 
60 LS 11 l SB 



32 % + fa 40 W 
28 % - ft _ 
14 I 

72 + 1 K 

a — ft wv 
+ ft 

39 % — fa 2 SW 
25 * + * m 
23 *— ft 47 Vt 
JM 77 

59 *— ft 86 
31 * + 1 U *5 

9 * + * JM 
ZD*— * 101 
10 ft ww 
ii* ra* 

44 %— * 49 * 

17 % — ft 44 fa 
57 * — * 27 % 

33 ft— fa X* 
13 + fa 27 * 

80 +lfa 

61 * + ft | 
76 ft + * "TT 
6 % — fa 9 * 
«k 

18 % + * 

9 % + ft 41 ft 
17 fa + * « 

56 % + ft 
86 +1 »% 
43 % — * 18 % 

40 ft— * 1 » 

54 * + ft I?* 
5 — ft 
13 * + ft 39 * 
B 4 %— fa 20 % 
9 + fa 21 * 

43 ft + ft * 

12 * 15 * 

4 ft + fa Jl* 
14 % 2 % 

23 *— ft = 

31 ft « 
23 ft + H 1 U 
38 % 30 

35 18 ft 

as*— ft as 
22 *— * 
a + * 38 % 

29 * + fa 2 ft 

2 ’*— ft Sw. 

21 ft ** 

25 ft + ft 14 % 
88 + ft J 8 ft 

34 % — fa ■«* 

17 * + ft ?l* 
28 * J 3 * 

Ufa + ft 
8 * + ft J”* 
20 * +* 

86= S Z 

ss 

7 + ft 

10 ft — ft 10 } 

2 ft — fa 
35 fa + ft 88 
“* + * 2 * 

85 — 1 * * 5 } 

28 ft + fa 67 V, 
18 ft + fa 23 fa 

X — ft m 

43 * + ft I 

31 * + ft 

18 + ft 

15 * — fa 
52 % + fa 
18 + * 

39 % + ft 
23 + fa 

19 * 

27 ft + * 

28 ft + ft 

lift + ft 
9 ft + * 

32 + * 

Xft + * 

5 ft— * 

25 — * 

40 % +1 
64 +1 

15 + fa 


23 2 SS 

22 17 * 

13 ft 10 ft 
21% 15* 
35 24V2 

23 fa 17 
37 ft 28 * 
40 29 * 

13 % 9 % 
40 * 26 ft 


275 80 1 

04 47 25 9 

00 10 218 
4 35 KL 1 X 

100 b 50 10 187 
181 
V 15 
103 111 11 

475 130 X 


2100105 
in 44 13 
775 £1 
60 £1 6 
260 57 0 


72 Li 9 25 

4 X 0 36 13 7090 
XO 16 ia 41 
1.12 12 17 1524 
1754 


■ &: 

32 % + * ■ 

15ft 

9* + * 

X*— fa '•!. 
17% + * 

24ft + fa 

aow + * ,-:3 

32 * + ft 

26 t 6 £ 

82 — * ■ .“U 

12ft + * 

20% + fa 
10%— * • • 

25 + ft \.-- 

18 *— * • T-t 
19* + % 

35 ft + * 1 v 

34 * + ft j£SS 
53 + % O.-. 

54ft— * Dp 
4»— % ||L« 

31 * + * |p&. 

34 * + ft 19 ^ 
9 * + ft isjr. 
14 * + ft Vfry- 
40 *— 1 * I*-: 

18ft + ft fyC-: 

19% + ft •*““ 
29 

ft Cho 
51ft + ft 

36 

12%+ fa 
24ft— ft !2M0t 
47* HMlL 

Ufa + ft 

iS?-* » 

2 S -ft 
32 % + fa » 

ii- 1 a 1 

BS-* ss 

151-1 18 

11% 

TO% + * 



Arofleble et I— cflog iewritoro wmfci uride 
Choprid ft Cle &JL. S, nn da Verrot - Gaatoro 022 82 17 17 


12 Month 
HMiLov Stock 


Ste. Case' 

TOfti HtofI Low QuoLC 


25 * 17 % LoPLpf L 18 157 

32 % 23 * LouvGs 2 X 4 80 

58 37 % Lows! 200 36 

31 * 19 % Lown 26 10 

25 ft 19 ft Lutorzl 1.16 5 X 

37 * 26 * Lubys 60 10 


L 16 157 347 21 20 * 20 % + * 

2 X 4 80 fl 48 27 ft 27 * 27 ft + ft 

£00 36 9 » 56 * 55 * 56 + ft 

26 10 14 763 24 * 23 * X + % 

1.16 5 X 13 380 21 * 21 U 21 * 

60 10 22 301 34 * X* Xft + * 


23 ft 16 * LUCftvS 1.16 57 11 IBS 21 % 21 * 21 % + * 


21 14 ft 13 ft 14 — ft 


X* 15 % MACOM 24 17 20 1399 » 


> 128 * + * 

!B=S 


Mfa XV. MCA 


34 *' 19 ft MCorp 1 X 0 67 


08 14 X 2485 43 % 52 * 83 ft + ft 


260 87 10 
176 54 11 
2 X 0 40 57 


248 60 9 
108 26 14 
12 

100 90 9 
228 107 

11 


100 94 10 IX 


74 20 13 143 


f 

M** 

12 + ft 

SJfa-* 

3**6 

21* + ft 

11 *— * 

33 * + * 

tar* 

38 * — * 


14 *. 8 % MDC 72 25 11 IW 13 ft 

38 26 % MDU 272 70 9 49 X* 

42 * 34 MEI 00 17 15 21 Xft 

. . I 18 9 ft MGMGr X 4 26 X 

+ 1 % I - 13 ft . 9 % MGMGr Pt 44 37 
Xft! Xft 10 MGMUO 709 0 
11 * 2 * MG Mu Wt 
Oft 7 * MLConvn 
1 * 11 *' ML. inen 
2 ft 15 MBUO Ttt 


3 * 3 * i«ft Mocmlt 05 17 l 


46 22 % 22 23 ft + fa 

.IBS®** 

31 Xft 40 40 % + ft 

i5*, , gSJSS + * 

1452 X 25 * X + ft 
137 11 10 * 10 % 

121 8 7 % 7 ft + * 

29 lift 11 * 11 * + * 
8 15 * 15 * IS* + Vk 
347 31 ft 31 * 31 *—* 


5 Sfa 38 * MOCV l.U 15 12 8511 47 % 46 * 47 


18 llftMadRM 50 11 * Ufa Ufa 

46 ft 29 ft Moeia 100 23 8 . 219 44 43 * 44 + * 

29 * Jfa MtrtAkf 1800 c 7 ® 3 * 2 * 2 * + * 

21 * 12 * Manhln 33*27 153 1 3 % 13 13 % + * 

21 * IXh-ManhNt 72 20 46 13 * 1 Z% 12 %—* 

27 * 14 ft ManrCs .18 J 21 . 344 X 23 * 23 ft + fa 

42 ft 2M MfrMan 370 86 5 493 37 % 37 * 37 *— * 


115 ** 


54 * 44 * Mfrifpf & 5091 L 9 
fi 2 * 41 MfrHpf £ 7 X 110 
T* 5 * viManvl 
25 % 77 ft vIMnwl pf 


' 4 X* X* 54 * + * 
14 49 * 49 * 49 *—* 
2 1303 5 % 5 * 5 *— * 

_ . 3T 17 % 17 * 17 * 


38 * 23 * MAFCO 100 27 9 13 X 36 * 36 * 36 %+* 


35 % Xft JWT s 1.12 L 5 

37 23 % J River 08 16 

28 * 15 JKHTWwy .12 6 

13 % 10 % JopiiF 1 X 3 elL 7 


5 3 Momte 

2ft *. Manats 
38 * 23 * MorMkf 100 £7 


08 16 11 590 3414 33 % Ufa +* ] 20 


33 19 * 19 * ' 19 *— * 
334 lift lift 12 ft + fa 


47 * 31 % JeffPIJ 160 LX 7 1582 44 % 42 * 44 ft + 1 * 100 


12 * Bfa MoricC 72 LI 
18 * 13 % Marie pf 170 76 


77 57 JorCpf 908 125 

88 49 JcrCpf 112 125 

65 40 JorCpf 708 125 

06 91 % JSTC Pf 1300 ELI 

01 80 * JcrC pf 1100 116 

10 % 13 % jerCpf 21 B 127 
12 * 4 * Jewfor 


1000 Z 74 * 74 % 74 % + 1 * 
inn 84 ft 84 ft 66 ft +tfa 
535 x 43 63 63 +* 

70 X 103 101 * 103 

10 X 94 * 94 * 94 * 

208 17 ft 17 * 17 * + ft I 
4 11 * 11 * II* + * 


98 ^ * ^=iC 

<2 7 22 31 * llfa 31 * 

0 36 MO 34 % 33 % Xft 

LI 34 10 * TQU Iff* + ft 

’*■ 40 16 15 % 15 * 

6 17 253 97 95 97 + 9 fa 


72H 5 S 2 S? ^ 36 w xa 71* 70* 70*— 1* 


(unvi! 


44 * 23 * MortMi 100 25 
14 0 ft MnrvK 061 

36 74 Masco 06 17 


15 * 10 * MokMt 70 IX 19 486 14 


20 914 39 ft 39 % 39 ft + % 

, , 12 % + ft 

17 16 223 33 % Ufa 33 * + * 


49 * JOfa JrimJn 1 JO 20 15 1484 47 46 * 47 + * 


46 % 37 * JoftnCn 108 a 45 9 
27 % 21 ft Joroen in 40 19 


SX 42 % * 1 * 41 % — ft 
3 25 25 25 + * 


X* 17 % Jpstwi s 00 37 14 210 25 % 24 % 25 * + * 
27 * 22 % JOVMfa 1 X 0 5015 63 23 % 23 * 23 % + % 


KDI 24 20 10 485 n 

KLMS 01 e 26 8 902 19 V 

KMipf 4 . 3 ! 106 2 41 M 

Kmart 1 X 0 47 10 4512 33 
KN Ena 1 X 8 30 19 37 39*1 

KOlsrAJ .151 480 16 * 

KOteCo SB 1.1 13 17 ft 

KOfCBf 177 70 1 17 ft 

Kaneb xo 4.9 106 8 % 

Kanri) eff 2 Xtiel 2 S 200 XHM 
KCIVPL 206 10.1 5 384 23 M 

KCPL pf 475 123 IBffx 35 * 

KCPLpt 270 11.7 3 If 

KCPl-Pf 233 110 2 XU 

KC 30 U 108 10 9 227 X 57 % 
KanGE 2 J 6 112 6 463 18 
Kan PL t 208 80 8 40 37 

KdPLPf 232 100 B mu 

KcPLpf 223 100 2 21 % 

Kotyln 323 17 * 

KalVPf 1 X 8 36 3 42 * 

KoufBr XB 20 5 89 18 * 

KoufPf 100 90 2 10 % 

Kaufpf £75 105 8 83 % 

Kejtoga 104 13 15 881 58 * 
KrihwJ 170 SJ 7 92 36 % 


8 * + * 
19 * + * 
41 *— fa 
33 + * i 

39 fa 

15 ft— fa 
17 * + * 
17 * + fa 

m,— * 

100 —I 
23 * 

■IS* + * 
18 % + fa 
30 ft + fa 
57 %— fa 
17 ft— * 


3 * lft *oswF 9551 2% 2 * 2 * + * 

30 * ZZ Ma*Cp 208 100 23 29 V, 39 * 29 * 

10 Maslnc 102 1 B 0 6 12 * 12 * W* 

«% 5 Uh MateuE J 4 T 6 10 431 55 * 55 SSh 

Sfa 2 S 2 T«» 11 *5 1 SJ 15Wi + * 

ww mawm 24 life nu iiu, __ u 

IM IM Maxom 4 12 IM 134 b i3ȣ vw 

SS X2ZZ* 2-55 H ™ « 6 ? sSS wJ soS + 2 

3 M Mayfy 2 LJK) 4 j| 12 1093 5 M 58 go* x ix 

u* 

lift 4 * MCOTI wt TV 4 * 4 * 4 * + fa 

10 * 4 * MeOld 70 22 14 4 9 9 o _ * 

70 48 * McDnls 00 IX U 2058 65 64 * 65 + fa 

52 37 %MCG?H te if,! 81 * emv 81 * + 1 * 

,J<0 11 14 . 45 * 45 % + * 

S'* to? ... J 30 % 30 % 30 %—* 


39 * 24 * Mcfntg 


^ 2 X 0 50 13 1121 47 ft 47 % 47 ft- * 


15 * 9 * McLean IB 

6 * 2 ft McLea wl 
29 % 22 ft McNeil 1-00 10 ft 

44 % 32 * Mead 170 30 10 

24 * 15 % Mcsrux 74 1.1 12 

X 34 * Mwttrn 00 27 l! 

X* 37 * Mellon 268 £1 8 

5 % i*. OjtoltonpflOB 90 


U ’S 11 * + % 

' ,, . « 3 * 3 ft 3 * + fa 

1-00 U I O 36 * 2 fcV» 36 * * 

1-20 30 10 I 860 40 % 39 ft 40 fa + fa 

00 i'i « wra n 31 * 21 * + fa 

£ H ■ * 

“5 ?•* 1 28 % 2 S% 25 * + * 


flW JJeMII 104 37 13 1184 4 +fa S% Wk 

13 H 12 » £» «S £5 + * 


ISM— lft 


Kenal 
Kenmt 00 17 14 
KyUtll 2 X 4 9.1 9 
KerrGl X4 4.1 
KorGpf 1 J 0 97 


41 — 1 % 

15 ft + * 
15 % — ft 
83 % 

58 * +* 
36 * + * 


'Jrft M er ck 370 27 17 16 X 117 * IM 1 T 7 U. Xlfa 
36 * SS SSSS, ^ li , 1 “ 42 * 43 ^- % 

»h ^ft M u SS T 9 ^ * 


KerrMc LID 30 20 2 B 43 29 * 


KOYBK U 0 U I 55 28 * 
Ker Inf s X 8 12 19 402 is* 
KWde 170 15 9 170 34 ft 

Klddepf 164 30 5 51 * 

KJmba 232 17 11 1028 62 % 
KlWITt Rd ,74 20 17 783 37 * 
Kaoer 260 90 49 45 27 % 


KWde . 170 25 
Klddepf 164 30 


Kopero 00 4 X 
Koprpf 400 10.9 

Kopur pnoj» 100 
Karoo 03 o 30 


xl ia si in it* 


583 18 % 
5001 36 % 
2 M 0 
39 15 


Krooor 200 46 11 200 43 % 


KuBOla X 9 e 16 33 
Kudlmc X 0 10 16 
Kyocer Tie 10 16 
KV»or 08 40 7 


03 e 10 16 118 32 
08 40 7 44 19 * 


21* + M 
36 ft— % 
10% + fa 
18 * + * 
28 ft— * 
28 * 

IS + M 
34 *— * 
54 * + ft 
42 % + % 
37 * + ft 
27 * + * 
18 % 1 
18 + * i 

36 % + 1 % 1 
100 + fa 

15 + ft 

43 * + * 
30 + 1 * 

20* + ft 
32 + 1 % 

If* + ft 


22 12 % mSSp. 6 gl J* ,^ + Vk 

** 2 M 6 motor !- 73 e 57 3 ^ BI 4 TO 

SSK'SHil 1 f'ftC + * 

20 % i 5 %S a’S 5 i« 

ss »* jjwf 5 i5S5xn 

EPK SRIPi: 

*“ M 

BOSSES -■ 


•^tg. 


32 fa 23 * MWE 276 9 X 11 
if* IS? «!!»» xJ 30 15 
88 73 * MMM 150 ic ii 

3 W. 24 MlnPL 276 70 8 


>^- . 
n -. ' 


Ts., jj )i &«*«*+* 

SB iSS ass: 20S 3 E !£3 as Ufa C +1 

19 ft IS* MonSf 100 a 55 SS ?SfL 

raw. 7 % MONY Si 18 * 18 * 


1 ft 1 % lft 


13 ft + ft 

53 — * 
29 * + ft 
33 + % 

82 * + % 
17 + ft 


X 12 266 22 % 22 * 33 ft + ft 


21 * HallFB 100 L 3 2662 30 * 30 30 ft + fa 

Xfa Holbta 100 67 12 1816 9 M Xfa 28 ft + % 

ft HallWfl 08 50 17 334 1ft I* lft— ft 

5 % HalWCfPf 0653 MlOfaTOftlOfa + h. 

Xft HafflPk IX IX 14 1437 39 ft 38 * 39 ft +lfa 


170 39 ft 29 V. 39 ft— ft 


51 ft 33 ft Ottat, 276 40 7 2463 47 ft 46 ft 47 * + fa 






■J* 70 atlcppf 77 X 90 300 81 fa llfa 81 % 

108 % CltaPPfA 9 J 5 e 90 229 98 90 98 +1 

41 % 26 ft Cttyfnv 700 c 4 492 27 % 27 27 ft + ft 

A.. «* Ctawr. 72 107 6 87 7 * 7 7 — * 

29 * B CkrirSI .10 X 32 714 22 ft 20 ft 22 ft + 1 * 

»* ClarkE 1.10 IX 33 371 32 ft 31 1 % 32 ft — ft 

i* ^ 9 CtoVHm 14 116 14 ft 14 * 14 % + ft 

SS? !09 50 10 17 20 19 ft IW, + ft 

H* a*a« 200 97 ia] 21ft 21* 21ft 

2 * IS 2 HySP' , MB 110 4 1034 23 22 % 23 

49 ft OvEI Pf 7 X 0 122 100 x 60 * 60 * 40 * 

, 5 ^ ?«!* . 0 W no 12* 12 12 

J ? 4 12 g»»* *K 1.111 11 14 % 14 V. Ufa 

19 . 10 Chrakaf .921 ~~ 

JW 6 24 * Clorax 176 20 
26 * 14 % CJubMn 70 e 0 


.921 41 13 % 11 11 % + % 

106 30 12 975 40 * 39 % 39 *— * 
2 k 4 If 229 s 23 ft 23 23 ft + ft 


auettP 100 27 19 642 30 37 * 37 ft— % 


74 % Ufa Chief pf 1X0 *3 

n% 12 * Caochm xo 3.1 17 


5 23 ft 23 * 23 *— * 
87 12 * 12 * 12 * + fa ! 


** COMM XO 17 11 743 32 31 * Jl* + * 


SS S 0 ® 00 136 4.1 15 1853 72 % 71 % 72 % + fa 


Wh IMCoieca 

SS S 3 4 Solemn 170 47 X 


476 16 * 16 * 16 H— * 
87 28 * Xfa 28 % 


28 * 22 ft CdoPri 17 Bb 40 SB 627 26% 36 % 26 % + * 


43 29 

17 ft 16 
32 ft 23 ft 
2SU 20 
20* 12 
12 ft 3 * 
5 lft 
2 * * 
22ft 6ft 
25 % 7 * 

33 % 9 ft 
28 ft 21 * 
23 % 13 * 
SS 41 fa 
40 % 47 % 
15 * 10 % 
32 ft 20 
32 % Xft 
18 ft 14 ft 
X* 22 % 
24 * 20 * 
29 ft 26 % 
29 % 26 
19 % 10 * 
12 8 * 
5 * 2 * 


XB 17 19 536 3B 36 % 36 % — % 

IX 70 ■ II 16 % 16 U 16 % 

00 10 14 680 28 * 27 % 28 ft + % 

104 45 8 2 D 23 % 23 23 

X 4 17 63 19 * 19 ft 19 % 


12 HanJS 1 X 70107 

16 * HanJt 104 a &9 

16 fa HanUi s 06 20 12 

16 HandH M 32 77 

16 % Hanna xo 21 24 

33 HarBrJ 100 10 16 


IXTtfmr X 14 ft 14 % 14 ft + * 

1040 &9 22 20 ft 20 fa 20 ft + ft 

06 20 12 997 20 ft TO 20 *— fa 
06 13 22 487 19 ft 19 * 19 * + Vb 

X 0 11 24 18 18 * 18 * II* + fa 

00 10 16 80 40 * 60 * 60 ft + * ! 


|4 4012 llfa 10 ft 11 * + ft 
158 4 ft 4 ft 4 V, — * 


21 ft Hortnds 06 10 19 164 33 31 * 31 *— ft 


431 2 * 2 fa 2 V, + fa 

1 . 18 k X 21 % 21 21 % + fa 

IXOk 57 74 23 ft 24 + * 

IX 31 30 ft 31 4 - ft 

I 7 D £7131 « 22 * 22 * Bft ♦ * 

206 90 I 67 32 21 * 21 ft— fa 

270 50 13 3516 44 ft 44 44 % 

1 X 3 25 7 1158 St* 55 * S 6 * + * 

12 463 13 * 12 * 12 *— % 
T 04 4M 12 2773 26 ft 76 Ufa + ft 

100 £0 13 16 32 ft 32 % 32 % — ft . 

25 17 14 143 16 ft 16 * 16 * 

00 27 14 257 29 * 28 * 29 * + % 

US 97 72 S 24 % 23 % 24 % + * 

375 130 5029 28 * 28 * + % 

285 38 * Xft 28 ft 
04 e 7 16 283 17 * 16 % 17 % + ft 
36 L 9 JB 9 % 8 % 9 % + % : 
27 56 4 * 4 * 4 * + ft 


7 ft Horn ten ... 35 
Xft Horn pm 3 X 0 130 
X* Horn PfC 213 77 
10 ft HrpRw 00 27 11 
Xft Harris 08 30 IS 

10 * HorCr n ■ 

21 * Horace 175 fX 10 


25 711 11 * llfa II* + fa 

1 X 0 130 10 25 % X 25 * 

L 13 77 319 29 * 28 ft 3 Vft + ft 

00 27 11 5 29 ft 29 * 29 % + % 

00 34 13 879 26 % X X*— ft I 

I 54 15 ft 15 ft 15 % — * 

0 M 10 25 29 * 28 % 29 * + ft 


26 22 % 
31 24 * 

17 * 12 * 
4 * 1 * 

12 8 
13 % 7 

25 % 15 * 
68 * 41 

ia* low 
16 * 10 * 
2 m it* 
MW 6 % 
27 * 23 
14 * 8 ft 
4 ft 1 % 
14 * 10 % 
25 % 11 % 
Xfa 21* 
57 % 41 
IS 
25 * 
23 ft 
9 * 
16 * 
2 * 
13 * 
11 
12 
24 
42 % 
68* 
22* 
54 * 
II 

30 % 
18 * 
61 % 
39 * 
27 
20* 


207 , 90,0 ■s 5 S St SB * 8 

2240160 373 13 % U im! + fa 

J $ $ ississ 

;a ssi ss ISjajss* 

mf 22 ff IM T 3 va m 

09 li 7 " *J5 im 

| if as r Tis* 

MiHPaPIS 

^ .2 § iS ^ 

IT 4 , 2 ? IS? 18 * 18 *- % 
1" is ” "JSr S 5 _ u 

^ a ,4 vg^iftlPjS 
370 L 6 13 2043 B 7 *B 7 *| 7 %t* 

, ]£ A ?? St t £ 






54 % Morons 270 40 7 BjAS S 3 S! SS~ 3 

Sfa ™ ® iS 


45 % 28 * MorKnd 1 X 8 U 11 Hft 86 % + 1 % 

23 * IB* MorSSs 3 16 IS ££ Vi* + * 

21 «£«». 179 . 90 io a W* Sft Sft 

522 JSI* -Ml.?! 13 V 34 % nx ^ _ % 




SS j'SS&S 5 3 ft 7 '& 


W 36 * 35 ft 36 ft + * 
18 21 * 21 * 71 ft + fa 
» 12 lift 12 + * 


• 4 ,.. - - ... 


33 % 23 * MurvO 108 3 4 » ^ 12 11* 12 + 1 

ssi^KKil M ” ”!?*??*?!a+; 


8 * I* MVWL 


’5 1 S 5 7 3 S ’ 4 ft 

Z 2* 2* 2* 


M* am NBO? IS A1 ” S X* ^ Wto .+ Vl 

2* 5SKS. S2^i >1 

4 *ft X NCNB K ’2 1989 19 * 19 *— * 

36 22 * NCR m M ™ ?„ 38 * 38 * + ft 

I 4 fa 9 * NL Ind 3 rS 11 ? 5 * 34 34 % 

^ a7 *S% “ « ■ 2-B8 3S'3BS$8 

18* TO* NIOwL v 2«* 34 ■ »% +fa 


21 12 % NBI 

22 * 17 * NCH 

If 6 

36 22 * NCR 

14 % 9 * NL Ind 
36 % 27 NU| 
lft * NVF 
SWh 35 * NWA 


1S-S" “!fi%g5^ 

78 ft 


+ % Igft.NICmM 26 M 1! *S* 36 . »% + * 

IS » seaf » ” » fl a iss ?ss+s 

+ ** 2 fih 20 * NFCH M 1 « Xft 26 ft Xft— fa 


13 "S gK 5 E + * 

10 raft TO § s »6 
1X0 4A S S3 S'” 2fl*T ft 


iS X EPS* MO 90 
33 ft 24 Nil sc „ 


Xft Hormu 178 .18 10 MS 33 * 33 * 33 * + fa 
14 HattS* 10a I 0 X 12 3 17 % 17 % 17% + fa 


16 * HowEl 104 7.9 9 81 21 70 ft Wft— * 
V HOVMA 70 e 10 I 33 10 V* 9 ft 

22 * Haxfefn XO IX 14 74 28 * 27 * Xft + fa 

9 * Manx* 02 15 19 X Ufa 17 * 13 — fa 

12 % HlttiAm . 36 1139 Xfa 22 22 — * 

21 HltaPn .180 J 137 2 Tft 31 * 21 * + ft 

10 ft H 1 IUSA 234 16 * 15 % 16 + fa 

9 ft H«kS SO 10 87 16 * 14 * 14 % 

13 % KOClOM 70 1.1 11 M 17 % 17 * 17 % + % 

VO* Hrilmn XB 20 12 397 19 % 19 19 — fa 

16 * Hrilto XO 10 13 120 X 25 % 25 *— fa 

37 Heinz 100 19 14 1107 55 * 55 % 55 * + * 


5 LIL 
28 LIL 
fft LIL 

muL 

9 * LIL 
J 2 * LIL 
II LIL 
8 * UL 
8 * LIL 
19 ft 
23 * 

10 * 


MSS!? 

iSiSi 


0 34 24 M . . 

139 m. 47 * 48 * + ft 

2 M 38 M * 

W7 26 25fa 2Sfa— ft 


137 2 « « 
100 Z S 3 a SB 

fi J, ft awfc— ft 

tn if a te ^ xJS JS** + .& 

■S II K 3ft T Sfa“ ,w , 


* saa s 

-«8 s sas? «. ^ + » 

N* 9 f*S S 110 2 **M» ]£H 

•tavapi! so i c „ » 30 rao% 20 

s»> Bj; 1 ,ji a & ss + a 


16* Hrillo 
37 Heinz 


a ^ as 


31* Newtau 


mrilPI=: 

Irll llli:: 

xiftHlunS 7 «* S* am-Sft + ft 

■»% 14 % NYSpf Oja lft! 30 38 28 28 

s* sasM 03 !™ 4 sp-ajp ■ 

“ “twSi ■* 11 A H* im MW + * 

26 M TO TO.TO + * 

(Continued on Page 10) 










AMEX prices p.ij 
htaftt/lowiPW 
NYSE prices P , 
Jntafttnww, p.i a 
Canadian stock, p il4 
Qrr «wv rates p. g 
Comma® rw* PU 
wvm*m* P ;S 


Earnings rations p,|j 
Fltna rata n« to p « 
Gom morinit p. 9 

lotaraM rotes p^ j 

^“iKfBHnmary P, a 
p in 

ore stack p.n 
Gftiar mints p.m 


HcralbSSribunc 




BUSINESS/ FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 


Page 9 


WAU. STREET WATCH 


Butcher-Singer Analyst 
lakes Contrarian Signs 


By EDWARD ROHRBACH 

International Herald Tribune 


— m 1 ci M om 1 

P i ?^iTZy? S ?^ tt ^ da ^^ tiwbull s andthc t> cars 

bunal°e<ii An^ysts and investors arc groping around tbe 
nature COnm * to differenl cautoriu* about tie 


**“«“*- OI UlO UC4M. 

*■??"*: have control of the market — there’s a 
definite downward bias,” said Richard Yashewski, technical 
anaWst for Butcher & Singer in PhiladdphhL^ 

„ ^eariy is not the time to run for Noah’s Ark," he 
asserted. He describes Wall Street as only being in the midst of a 
summer thunderstorm” - 

needed to wash away “some . , , 

temporary excesses and pie- Analysts see little 

pare the technical foundation >i ■ < » 

for a productive and poteu- OOWIlSICie nSK, H1I1CB 

^ upside potential. 

What Mn Yashewski likes in current market. 

best about Wall Street are the . 

so-called sentiment indica- 
tors. He said these now show dampened enthusiasm toward 
stocks, which is usually taken as a contrarian sign that the market 
has room to move up. 

Therefore, “Sentiment is the most powerfully bullish it’s been 
since July 1984,” he said, noting that even optimism among 
professional market advisers, which hart been high, currently 
shows some 30 percent of them outright bears, the highest figure 
since shortly before last January’s upward surge on Wall Street. 

“Sentiment figures are saying there's minima] downside risk in 
this market, probably just above 1,300 ” he said. 

With the bond market in a “rally mode and stocks oversold,” 
he sees Wall Street “building a foundation that will propel the 
Dow well over 1,400 in the final months of 1985.” 

Meanwhile, Robert Farrell, Merrill Lynch’s chief market ana- 
lyst, also sees a “good case” for stocks to begin advancing soon. 
However, he warns that the rally will have to show “breadt h and 
rekindle buying interest” or risk aborting and sending Wall Street 
into a “10 to 15-percent shakeout” before the end of 1985. 

H E THINKS most investors are too complacent long term. 
Investors, he says, are either overly confident now on the 
fundamental ride because they are looking ahead to a 
resurgence of the U.S. economy, or fed comfortable from a 
technical point of view because they expect that even if Wall 
Street is topping out, as cyclical factors indicate, the process will 
be slow and allow time to get out. 

The market’s current doldrums, he said, are probably the result 
of it being in a transition stage, moving from being “interest-rate 
driven to earnings driven.” „ 

He added: “Some groups likely to respond to the next rally 
attempt are chemicals, construction machineary, metal and min- 
ing and selected emdging growth stocks." 

Alan- Shaw, technical analyst at Smith Barney, also sees the 
“short-term picture brightening somewhat.” But he warned 
about the “growing probability in the months ahead of a cyclical 
correction — an event that seems to unfold every four years or 


so 


Philip Roth. EJ 7 . Hutton’s technical analyst, sees the stock 
market fenced in, with downside risk less now because sentiment 
indicators have improved, but he argues that aipply-demand 
indicators alsoshow that rally potential is limited. . . . 

“It will be several months err jnore before the conditions jot 
another broad, sustained advance evolve.” he said, 

Christoph Gruebler, who manages more than S200 nuinanat 
his own investment firm in Zurich, sees the U.S. economy, 
saddled with heavy federal and consumer d^Lstrug^ugm the 
final stages of a business expansion that began m November 

of low inflation plus increased liquidity as interest rates decline 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 4) 


H.K. Bank 
To Open 
In China 

Beijing Allows 
Foreign Branch 

By Jim Mann 

Lot Angela Tima Service 

BEUING — For the first time 
since the Communist takeover in 
1949, China on Wednesday gave 
permission for a foreign bank to 
open a branch inside its borders. 

Chinese authorities approved a 
request by Hong Kong & Shanghai 
Banking Corp^ Hong Kong's lead- 
ing financial institution, to estab- 
lish a branch bank in Shenzhen, the 
special economic zone China has 
set op alongside the British colony. 

Representatives of foreign bank- 
ing companies, many of which have 
been waiting since 1 979 for permis- 
son to open branches in China, 
were generally pleased. “It's the 
first step towards liberalization, to- 
wards allowing foreign banks to do 
more business here," said the repre- 
sentative of one U.S. bank. 

But they cautioned that the re- 
strictions on foreign banking in 
fhina remain severe. So far, China 
has agreed to consider applications 
for foreign bank branches only in 
the four special economic zones in 
southern China; Shenzhen, Zhuhai, 
Xiamen and Shan tou. 

In addition, foreign bankers 
pointed out that the powers of the 
new branch will be carefully limit- 
ed. “Tbey can’t get involved in for- 
eign currency banking,” said one 
banking official in Beijing. “It's 
still a long way from bong a real 
bank branch.” 

The new branch will, however, 
be permitted to make loans, to ac- 
cept foreign-currency deposits, to 
issue guarantees and to handle ex- 
port and import transactions. 

Until now, four other banks have 
had functioning branches in China, 
all in Shanghai: Hong Kong & 
Shanghai Chartered Bank. Bank of 
East Asia Ltd. and Overseas-Chi- 

nese Banking Cqrp. The four banks 

have been in China since the estab- 
lishment of the People’s Republic 
in 1949, but they have had no pow- 
er to accept deposits or make loans. 



AT&T Is to Cut 
24,000 Jobs 
At Major Unit 


Canptkd by Our Swfl From Dispatches 
NEW YORK — American Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Co. said 



Dm Nn York Tm 

W illiam J. Brodsky, presi- 
dent of tbe Chicago Merc, 
stands near the trading floor. 


Chicago Merc Faces New ChaUeng 

Board of Trade Shows That It Can Be Innovative, Too 


By Steven Greenhouse 

He*- York Tuna Service 

CHICAGO — For years, the Chicago Mercan- 
tile Exchange was known for haying the hottest 
flgag around. It pioneered trading in currency 
futures and livestock futures. 

But now its creative juices, some traders say, 
seem to be slowing just as they are starting to flow, 
albeit belatedly, at the Chicago Board of Trade. 
And that may be turning the tables not just on 
image, but also on growth. 

“The real question for the Merc, the challenge 
they face, is what do they do next,'' said John M. 
min, director of options at Lasser Marshall Inc., a 
leading New York-based currency broker. Mr. 
Blin, who developed the Eurodollar futures con- 
tract for the Merc added, “The Merc led the way 
in exchanges developing new products and diversi- 
fying their offerings. But now it appears that tbe 
major innovations in futures and options are prob- 
ably behind us." 

Two of the Merc's most recent ventures have 
started slowly. Trading in several of its currency 
options, introduced earlier this year, has stumbled, 
hampered by competition at other ex chang e s . And 
despite much fanfare, its recent link-up with the 
Singapore International Monetary Exchange has 
bad unimp ressive volume. 

“The competition has definitely intensified,” 
said William J. Brodsky, who assumed the ex- 
change's presidency June 1. But Mr. Brodsky. 41, is 
confident that the Merc will continue to prosper. 

Developing new products that will draw interest 
and trading volume is a critical role for any ex- 
change. The Merc, like other exchanges, is a non- 
profit enterprise, whose 2,725 members include 


brokerage firms and individuals who trade on the 
exchange's floor. Like most businesses, however, 
its growth — and the growth of its members — 
depends on diversification and a continuing flow 
of new products, should trading in other areas flag. 

The Merc understands this wdL The exchange 
has long teen dwarfed by the much bigger Board 
of Trade, founded in 1848, whose com and soy- 
bean trading far outstripped the Merc’s trading m 
butter, eggs and cattle. In fact, the Merc, which 
was founded in 1898 as the Chicago Butter and 
Egg Board, has always seemed to be running to 
keep up. 

But while the Merc remains No. 2 in volume, its 
rate of growth from the early 1970s to 1983 far 
outstripped the Board of Trade's. The big break- 
through, both for the Merc and for the commod- 
ities industry, came with the exchange’s introduc- 
tion of financial-futures contracts, which enabled 
customers to protect themselves against currency 
and interest-rate fluctuations. 

And tbe Merc has more new twists forthcoming, 
according to Leo Melamed, a former Merc chair- 
man and tbe wizard behind the financial-futures 
revolution. He rejects any suggestion that the Merc 
has slowed down or that the Board of Trade has 
surpassed it as an innovator. Mr. Melamed said tbe 
Mere's plans to trade futures on European curren- 
cy units and zero-coupon bonds attest to its con- 
tinued innovativeness. 

Some of the Merc’s biggest successes, Mr. Me- 
lamed pointed out, include the Standard & Poors 
500 futures contract to help investors who want to 
hedge against stock market swings, Swiss franc and 
German marie futures to hedge against currency 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 5) 


Systems unit. 

Robert E Allen, chairman of the 

unit, said the cuts were necessary to 

reduce costs and improve profit 
pm qrins- He warned that market 
conditions could require additional 
job reductions. 

Following the 24,000 reduction 
in jobs. Information Systems will 
have about 93,000 employees. 

Although cuts were expected, the 
figure was higher than the 20,000 
jobs hinted at last week by the 
company, and the announcement 
brought angry reaction from the 
Communications Workers of 
America, which represents AT&T 
employees. The union said the cost- 
cutting step was outrageous and 
would create major obstacles to 
next year’s contract talks. 

The company said the majority 
of cuts wm take place this year, 
unth tbe balance being completed 
in 1986. It said about 30 percent of 
the jobs lost will .be in mati a ge - 
ment 

Mr. Allen said the changes are 
possible because all resources nec- 
essary to manag e Information Sys- 
tems business have been brought 
together in a single organization 
under common management. 

Last April, he pointed out, the 
Federal Communications Commis- 
sion approved a proposal that per- 
mitted Information Systems to 
streamline its operations. 

He added that AT&T said it ex- 
pects to begin achieving some of 
the benefits of the cost savings next 
year, and that the announcement 
Wednesday represents only one de- 
cision among many being made to 
malm; improved profits. 

Employees may be offered either 
a t ransf er to another job in ATT or 
financial incentives to leave, Mr. 
Allen said. Those incentives in- 
clude newly enhanced pension 
plans for both management and 
nnn managem ent employees. Attri- 
tion will take care of some of the 


jobs as positions are eliminated . 
when people retire or resign. 

After other efforts have been ex- 
hausted, tbe remaining surplus po- 
sitions will be eliminated through 
layoffs, Mr. Allen said. 

re tailing the layoffs, he said the 
cuts would primarily affect staff 
and support positions totaling 
about 15,000 nationwide. Other 
cuts include 4,000 installation, 
maintenance and other technical 
support jobs, 3, 000 jobs that handle 
product distribution, and 2,000 
hourly factory jobs that have al- 
ready been announced. 

Information Systems, formerly 
American Bell, markets computer 

systems to business customers with 

80 or more lines. 

The unit, which employed about 
118,000 people, has trimmed back 
about 4,800 jobs since the Gist of 
tbe year. AT&T, the parent compa- 
ny, has some 360,000 employees on 
its payroll. 

(AP, Reuters. UPJ) 


BrnsiTs Bankers 
Agree to Deferral 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — An interna- 
tional banking committee 
agreed Wednesday to recom- 
mend that Brazil’s 700 creditor 
hankers extend a moratorium 
on the nation's debt repayment 
for another 140 days. 

Brazil requested the delay be- 
cause it sull has noL reached 
agreement with the Internation- 
al Monetary Fund on an eco- 
nomic austerity program it will 
follow in return for new loans. 
The moratorium covers only 
principal of the debt of more 
than $100 million. An earlier 
deferral expires at the end of 
the month. 

William Rhodes, the Citi- 
bank official who chairs the 
committee, said that banks also 
will be asked to keep open $16- 
billion line of credit for Brazfl. 


HoechstNetUp 11.5%; 
BASF Posts 37% Gain 



ssss s «■ Si £?• S- !§■ U 

Frankfurt UBU *** JJSJJ0 *XB 7M« U« 


Fnrouun ~ ,um tuna ZKO-W 

London (b) 1JW8 " - 595.lt TUS 

iStaT 1*SM 1MUB W* 5US IS DUJ 

HewYork(c) — J? UMx 17131 tiBB- *7® 

P-ta WW5 _ 'JJJg 2MS 1177 * 75 B . 


ToWO 
Znricn 
1 ECU 
1 SDR 


££ S S- 

ss ^ ’jss US’* 


(=) TO bur one pound: tUSSMU 

OlherDolUrVataes cwtwkt pur □ 3S automat vor UAS 

__ u AS CWTW— per “fj Mnta* rtoo. 24635 S. Kor.won 8B5J0 

KS 5 ! S K.SUS ££ 


Reuters 

FRANKFURT — Two major 
West German chemicals compa- 
nies, Hoechst AG and BASF AG, 
reported Wednesday increases m 
first-half profits ana sales. 

Hoechst said world group pretax 
earnings rose 11.5 percent to 1.65 
trillion Deutsche marks ($611 mil- 
lion) in the first half of 1985, from 
1.48 billion DM a year earlier. 

Sales in the period totaled 72J2 

bflBon DM, up 7 percent from 
20.71 billion in the earlier penrtt. 

Parent pretax profit totaled 813 
million DM, op 2 6 percent from 
644 nriffion DM a year earlier. 
Sales for the parent company r ose 9 
percent to 7.91 bflBon DM from 
7.24 bflBon DM earlier. 

Tbe figures were disclosed m an 
interim report to shareholders. 
Hoechst said dial it expects bust- 


It said both sales and earnings 
during the second quarter re- 
mained at the high levels of the first 
three months. Domestic sales was 
stronger than a year ago, though 
this partly reflected strikes in the 
early s ummer of 1984. 

Hoechst said foreign sales in tbe 
first half of 1985 developed most 
favorably in Western Europe and 
Australia. But the high dollar made 
imports into the united Stares 
cheaper. As a result, sales of its 
American Hoechst Corp. were ad- 
versely affected, the company said. 

The major contribution to first- 
half profit gain came from West 
German operations, but ea rnin g s 


also developed positively abroad 
apart from the United States, 
South Africa and Argentina. 


BASF reported that group prc- 


|j AS CBTWn 

**«•*>» 

AortroLS rare® 

Amtr. icbfl. 1M1 
Buta.fio-fr- ** 

«/»* 


ssss^st 1436 

Egypt. pound °7*37 KW—no™- 


the second half of 1985. The com- 
pany added that even if worldwide 
economic activity slackens and the 
dollar continues to decline, it 
should show a satisfactory perfor- 
mance for the year. 



lion DM a year earlier. 

Sales increased II percent to 
22.45 billion DM from 20 JO bil- 
lion DM in the earlier period. 


CStertM: l M Irtsh c 





Years After Rescue, 
r .K. Dollar Flies High 


AugZl 


mnmeyB ** m * V 2£: SWUM ?5S 

OoUar D-Mar* n*w-liw. 1MB* BWraw. 7W 

7 *,7* *WVs "Jim. 1MM1* 7% 

7 YrB fc .^21 II lb’ll fc l*M» z; 

ES* 2ES "n* r 

Sfc-Sfc 


leuey Bates 


a 

*■171 HOT* 
tf-rvMU 

. . nXHr 


Aug- 21 


CH» W*. 
7ta » 
TVt 79/16 
91b T/l 

7 jfl 770 

MB 

7* » 

MO 7 -£ 
750 156 


WertGun JgW 
unbardRBK 

own**** 

OaeMooflj lutaffa— « 
^ootftn utariH— 
MumHi Wtrtw* 


550 
UB 
4 J& 

u& 

<70 


550 

AJfi 

470 

470 

475 


^1 


BriMn 

Jon* bom Rota 
Cofl M«ntY 

W^ayTr—I WVjy 

JBPBB 

DtlCHdl fttrit 

CoUUBMV 
iM—lPtarbarii 

f^SJSS^raM. 


IS « 

11 ” 

lllb lllriS 


5 

IN 

4* 


5 

6ft 

4ft 


Aslam Dollar DepMltt 

7ft ■ 8 
7*.-»fc 
8-BVIi 
Bfc-Bfc 


By Dinah Lee 

International Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — Next month. 
Hone Kong will celebrate the sec- 
ond anniversary of “Black Satur- 
day” Thai was Sept. 24, 1983, 

when uncertainty about the colo- 

BMJ* 4 oLul mi Ltovd* Book (ECU); Routers fumm ^ once China takes 

larvon Guaranty tdodor. mkdaum (oroautvotont). j^er jn 1 997 — Sent the Htmg Kong 

^oppiiasbte to interim dollar plummeting 10 percent, to a 

recoid low of 9J5 to the U.S. dol- 
lar. It was the largest single-day 

loss in the currencjrs histwy. 

The political anxiety that bad 
been barely contained, for many 
months burst into panicked baying 
of gold, U5. dollars and all manner 
of consumer goods, from stereo 
systems to groceries. 

Hong Kong’s political future 
now seems settled by a agreement, 
reached last December and ratified 
- _ 1 1 ... lmiumi TMtinb and Lon- 


thc Hong Kong dollar to the US. 
dollar may require sane readjust- 
ment That question has itself ag- 
gravated the situation, with specu- 
lators buying Hong Kong dollars in 
anticipation of a new exchange 
rate. 

The rescue package that arrested 

tbe Hong Kong’s dollar’s plunge 


- i month 

j month* 

snsontbs 
4 month* 
i tear 


source; Reuters. 


Soura . Morrill LY** 1 



how>22S 


AM. 

335.15 

SIS!* *;? m 

W» Y “* ^lan official flx- 

I £rt^qpenhn> »tg 

lng? ,~ riona coma current 

Source: Routes 


in May, between Bejjing and Lon- 
don, and the Hong Kong dollar is 
strong. Huge amounts of canal 
are flowing into, not out of, the 
British colony. 

These inflows have produced an 

excess in liquidity in the Hong 
Kong-rioilar market since the sign- 
ing of the Sino-British agreemmL 
Call rates in the money manat 
have dropped to just under 4 per- 
cent from a high of about 16 per- 
cent a year ago- 

Not surprisingly, the economic 
recovery has led to widespread dis- 
cussions during the last few weeks 
about whether the two-year-old 
government rescue package linking 


brainchild of John Greenwood, 
little-known British economist at 
die time and an admirer of Milton 
Friedman, the U.S. economist who 

won a Nobd prize for his monetar- 
ist weak and is known as a devout 
free-maiket supporter. Mr. Green- 
wood had been working in the 
Hong Kong offices of GT 
meat Ltd, a British investment 
finn. 

His idea required the colony’s 
two note-issuing banks — the 
Hongkong & Shanghai Banking 
Corp. and Standard Chartered 
Bank— to the government 100 
U5. dollars for every 780 Hong 
Kong dollars they printed, and to 

(Contmncd oo Page 1L CoL 6) 


Rate Yw Brdtar AwjdaV Wt’UWi*- 

MnfatWMrti ponHBt 10 rhntw wu m** 

mmwiUuiIcwfani aw US *at r« 

wtrmr WHAH£f«rBROKEIS W^*«lta 
m niOi fanr aod» «nJ 
mibriv 

M RdOlTlhBllHWS»llA«001«3ur*»**»!5 

MiMcm M A 01345 USA * cJ141 l-MMUIO 

Markc& WaU-h 


This announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


iKTiSAT 

BAIXKASI 



US$9,016,000 

Short Term Oil Financing 


Arranged by 

Kuwait Foreign Trading Contracting & Investment Co. (KFTCIC) 

Provided by 

Kuwait Foreign Trading Contracting & Investment Co. (KFTCIC) 

Asian Oceanic Limited 
A1 Bahrain Arab African Bank (E.C.) 

“ALBAAB” 

Al-Saudi Banque (ASB ) 

Arlabank International E.C. 

National Bank of Oman Ltd (SAO) 

United Overseas Bank, Geneva 

Agent 

Kuwait Foreign Trading Contracting & Investment Co. (S.A.K.) 



May 1985 




0 


Wednesday?; 


Gosng 

Tobies include Hie nationwide prices 
up to ttie dosing on wall Street 
and do not reflect tats trades elsewhere. 


Kttanth 
HLMLow Stock 


Dio 1 . YM. PE 100 b Utah Low dual. Orte 


IIS. Futures 


12 Morrill 

W.ofiLow Stock 


□Iv. YU. PE Mb High Law Omtf.Ortw 


M 




17* 13ft Tyl mt* A U 11 El WUHWn 







03 

ito 

1U 

IK— to 




Min OoklleP IJ2 

4* 

12 

2 

3W 

33to 

3m 

|KT 



23to OcdPrl X50 

7.9 

10 

3092 

32 

31V 





411a OccIPdI 216 

46 


2 

Slfc 

51 

Slto— Ito 

Kt 



i7-a OcdP Pf X12 

IIU 


« 







ISto OcdP Bt 2J0 

10* 



21V 

2ito 

21to + to 

■ , 



4riV> OcdP 665 117 


225 

ssto 

55VS 

ssto 

Ktt 


115 


14.1 


1992 HIM llOto 11016 + to 

1 





9 10946 I0m 109% 




ioo occippti4.no 1X3 


100z114 

114 

114 




» ODECO 160 

44 

2 

282 

23IA 

22to 

22to 

Wr 



24la Oydm 160 

57 

IS 

336 

3ito 


31H + to 




ira OhioEa 1*8 11* 

6 

1B&3 

16 

15to 

15to— to 

1, 

( 


72to OllEdPf X90 

1X2 


lOOz 32 

32 

32 — to 

f- 

V 


<2 OhEdpt 764 

1XS 


20QZ SB 

58 

SB + to 






220z <0 

5V 


r 



47 OtiEdBf B60 

1X7 


17201 64W 

tan 

64W +2U. 


L 


25to Ob Ed at 106a 9* 


500 

32%h 

xm 

32to + to 




2Dto Oh Ed Pf ISO 

127 


1 

27V> 

27to 

27to + to 

Vf 



3 jU OhEd pr 362 

1X0 


11 

30 V. 

30 

JOto — to 




1: OhEd PI 1*0 11* 


44 

15to 

15to 

ISto 




53 OhEd cf 912 

12* 


300z 72V. 

72 Vi 

72V. — to 













Oh Mai r .40 

36 

17 

311 

i3to 

13to 

ISto 



. 70 

57 . ohppia T *o 

11.9 


I500z 6Mt 

63to 

6391. — 411. 

21 











Mr 

111 

OC OtlFPlF1460 13.1 


10:107 

07 

m — to 

lr 











Q 


n, OklcG pf *0 

94 


27Di 

an 

Blu 

Sto— to 




23ii 0«n 160 

4* 

12 

95 

31V. 

30to 

31 + to 



17*4 

5U Omncre- 



41 

7 

<9h 

6to 



IWa 

12 Duel da *0 

6 * 

10 

13 

i4to 

14to 

Mto 

nr 



36*4 ONEOK XS6 

R* 

11 

64 

79’% 

27V> 

+ to 




211. OranRk 214 

B2 

10 

64 

?6to 

26 

26W, + to 


(£ 


7». Orange *3t 

5.7 

17 

41 

9 V. 

9to 

9to— to 



28't 

20 OrlonC 76 

XI 


56 

24to 

24 V. 

2416 — to 




21* i OrlonCpn.il 

0.7 


5 

Mto 

74V. 

Mto — to 




J!-1 OrlonP 


33 

619 

iffto 

10W 

Mto + to 



r--. 

i'-s Orton p( 60 

<6 


9 

7to 

7V, 

716— to 



'3Mt 

24 Orion pi X7S 

96 


445 

79to 

79 

2»to + M> 


11 

31 «-i 

19^2 CruttOM 64 

27 

R 

1662 

23to 

73 V. 

2Jto 




J2"j OvrnTr .72 

21 

13 

98 

35 

.14 to 

35 + to 




13 pvShip *0 

12 

12 

343 

I.VU 

i5to 

1516 + to 


P 

r 

2313 OwenC 1.40 

40 

9 

384 

3<to 

3eto 

3486 + to 



Sl^ 

38*. Owenlll 1*0 

37 

10 

127 

48to 

48 

4886 + 86 



15’ • 

I0W O.hwd -44 

36 

21 

50 

M 

Uto 

1386 — to 



160 

2 * 

1 - 

1*0 

16 

u 

*0 

26 

X 

1.90 

96 


1.54 

11 1 


1*4 

9.9 

3 

137 

7* 

13 

160 

42 

It 

65e 

* 

13 

X00 10* 


*0 

2* 

11 

572 

77 


*0 

17 

9 

262 

aa 

e 

407 

11* 


All 

7.0 

11 

X25 

IU> 


160 

3* 

33 

70 

1 * 

12 




I* 


29 29 — to 

34to 3«to — to 
2m 30 + <H 

TP* HU + Ml 
34* 34* 

MW. 38* + to 
m a* + * 

3* 3V + to 
T6U 16to + Vb 
35*4 as*— Vk 
7U r* + * 

nsx-* 

^ia 

33* + to 
^ + * 


1 


L5 

-40 1-0 38 


m 



13* 
25* 
12 
Tl* 
51* 
49* 
73* 
79* 
91* 

* 73 

* 68 
Vs 70* 

* 27* 
Vb 45Va 

* 8S 


• * 3lto 

■ to 49 

• to 38* 

■ * 23 V. 

. * ID* 

56* 
to 30* 
to 25* 

* 39* 
to 39V. 

* £ 
26* 
32* 
46to 


22* VF Com 
5* Valaro 
14 Volar pi 
2* Vaiayin 
19 VonDm 
2to Voreo 
<to Vorco of 
26* vorwn 

9* Vara 
17* Vecco 
3* Vendo 
914 VestSe 
su Viacom 
36» VcrEPPf 
55 VaEPpt 
67* VaEPpf 
71to VaEPpf 
57 VaE PIJ 
S3 VaEPpf 
S3 VaEP pf 

13Kl vkbays 

as* Vomuo 
66to ViricnM 


76 J 20 
-40 3-4 32 
-40 2.1 15 
18 

ITOolOJ 
-48 UO 22 
100 106 
772 107 
860 116 
97S 116 
7.72 10-9 
760 116 
765 109 

15 

12 

260 36 13 


580 39* 
90* llto 
32 24 
4 2* 

14 23* 
128 3* 

4 10* 
323 31 
56 II* 
40 19* 
99 9* 

23 llto 
704 50to 
me 47 
90x72 
78 

lOOz 88* 
2S0z 70* 
280x 65* 
lOOz 68* 
29 2Sto 
12 <1* 
268 83* 


39*—* 

i 11* + * 

i 24 + * 

2 *— to 
23* + * 
3 * + * 
10 * + * 
30*+ to 
11*— to 
19* 

11* + * 
59* + to 
47 —1 
72 —to 
78 — Ito 
■B* 

70* + * 
45* +1* 
68 *— * 
25 — * 
42* + * 
83to 


COFFEE C UfYCSCE! 

37-500 lbs.- c ant s par Hx 
15U8 12760 Sap JK90 13JL35 

15060 12965 Dec J3«B “060 

14979 12E5D Mar l«*9 142*5 

14860 13160 MOV MMS 14175 

14860 IWL5B Jul M260 UXW) 

14760 13275 SaP M160 14160 

13860 13860 Dec ; 

Est. Sate* Prav. Sate 287S 

Prev. Day Open Int 10-741 off 234 
5UCARWORLD 11 (JNTC5CE) 

11X800 tbs.- cents per lb. 

975 244 Sop 469 4,15 

965 274 Od 429 *M 

775 360 Jon 463 463 

933 334 MPT 4J0 *83 

7.15 158 MOV 466 4» 

669 379 Jul 5.15 5.15 

6.15 462 Oct 563 543 

Jon 

Eat. Sales Prav-Soi“ IIJM 

Prav. Dav Open Int 90601 atfl606 
COCOA (NYC3CE) . 

10 metric tons- 5 P9T tan __ , 

2415 1963 SeP SSI 050 

2337 ms Dec 2172 2240 

2220 19S Mar 220 22A5 

2241 1960 MOV 2226 2Z7S 

2255 I960 Jill , 

y rv. Km sea 2369 2260 

2235 sw D«c 2260 2260 

Eat. Sales Prav. 5a to 2^*7 

Prav.Oav Open Inf. 18700 aff348 
ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 

15600 n>s.-cants per lb. 

18260 13055 Sap 13*85 135.15 

18160 12760 NOV 13160 13160 

11060 12150 J<mi 12895 129-00 

17760 12260 MOT W7J» 127*5 

15250 T24J0 MOV 12760 12760 

15760 13660 Jul _ 

Eat Sol as _ Prev.Saies 175 

Prav.Oav Open I nt. 4699 up 32 


15160 13462 
13749 13778 
13979 13961 
14070 140,75 
14160 140188 
14160 14160 
14160 


367 368 

465 4.Q 

<19 *25 

452 468 

470 475 

490 464 

5.17. 527 

<62 


2081 2148 

2168 23T 

2205 2364 

2236 2273 

2110 
2280 rm 
7360 2345 


134*5 13560 
13160 13160 
12150 12960 
12870,12760 
12860 12679 
12675 




■ 



CATTLE (CME) 

40000 lbs.- cents per lb. 

65.90 5145 Oct 5367 5567 

6765 55.15 Dec 57-58 5865 

67-45 56JW Fob 5760 5845 

8767 57 JO APT 59.10 5960 

66.25 58.10 Jun 5940 60l20 

6540 58JO Aug 9840 5840 

Est. Sales 14658 Prev.Saies 13,116 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 41,993 off 777 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 
uSMS lbs.- cents per lb. 

7360 57-45 Sep 6250 64.10 

7272 57.15 Od 6140 6245 

7370 5070 Nov 63.15 6475 

79*0 6040 Jan 64.90 8545 

7065 61.10 Mar 6475 6560 

7045 81.15 Apr 64.90 6555 

6625 6170 May 64.10 64.10 

Est. Sales 1606 Prev. Sales 1669 
prev. Dav Open Int. 7672 up 55 
HOGS (CME) 

30600 lbs-- cents per lb. 

51-75 3610 Od 3880 37.10 

5065 38J0 -Dec 3860 39.15 

5047 3975 Feb 4040 fl.CS 

« 37.10 'Apr 3760 3870 

49.05 40.15 Jun 4060 4070 

4965 4040 Jul 4175 4167 

51.90 -«25 Auo 4160 4160 

41.10 3870 Od 3870 38*0 

Est. Sales 3,180 Prev.Saies 5434 
Prev. Dav Open int 18438 off 413 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

38600 lbs.- cents per lb. 

8045. 4445 Auo 4360 4375 


55.10 55*2 
57.15 5777 
5770 5872 

5865 5970 

5940 <070 
5840 5875 


62.90 0*5 
6160 6177 
0.15 <3*0 
<445 <530 
6475 65J® 

6475 65-40 

6375 6430 


3640 3760 

3860 3862 
4040 40*7 

3745 37.92 

4040 4075 
4170 4167 
4070 4170 

3865 39.15 



Currency Options 


ill 


55to 35* Xerox 360 57 14 4128 52to 52to 52to + * 

551-3 46to Xerox pf 545 9.9 2 55to 55to SSto 

29 19* XTRA *4 27 12 37 34* 23*24 +* 


30* 24* ZaleCp 162 46 10 79 27* 27 Z7* + * 

23to 19to ZalrpfA 60 36 1 21* 21* 71* + * 

211* 8* Zapata .12 1* 62 686 8* 8to B* + to 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Option A StHke 

Underlying Price Calls— Last 

Sep Dec Mar 

H6M Brtttsb Poends-cents par wit. 

B Pound mo r r r 

13969 115 2360 2460 r 

13969 120 1965 r 1960 

13969 125 1460 1410 1480 I 

13969 130 660 10,® 11.15 I 

1»*9 135 430 775 850 ■ I 

13969 Mil 165 489 840 

13969 145 f IE! r 

13969 150 r 16S r 

58.MQ Qmoeflpn DoUort-centi per anil. 
CDnllr 72 r r r 

7361 73 r r r 

7X01 .74 r r r ' 

cum west German Mam-cents per unit. 
DMoric 3» r 8-45 r 

35-99 31 563 r r 

3579 32 199 440 r 

3579 .33 275 142 r 

3579 34 X3B 272 t 

3579 35 1-23 Ml t I 

35.9? 36 SH iJ® W I 

3579 37 0.1B 160 T 

3579 38 r r 178 

4250606 Japanese Yes-lOOttis of a cent per 
JYen <B r 244 r 

<2.15 4i 172 r r 

42.15 42 044 163 T I 

4X15 43 - 0.12 041 r 

4X15 44 r 033 044 

<£5M Ssrtss Francs-cants par entt. 

SFrwc 38 574 672 r 

4172 39 475 r r 

4X92 40 4*o 4*0 r 

4372 41 266 r r t 

4372 42 7JM r T ( 

4372 43 16 i® r ( 

4372 44 0-64 176 2*3 t 

4X92 45 077 178 t 

S franc 46 s 071 s 

S prone 46 s s 166 

Total call veL 5608 Call a 

Total pat voL 5601 Polo 

r—Nof traded. 5— No oot Inn offered. 

Last Is premium (purchase price). 

Soares: ap. 


Pats — Last 
Sap Dec Mar 


005 UO 
MS XSS 
070 4*0 

X15 670 


r 025 
0.14 061 

061 r 


r 073 
r 8*3 

xis an 


Est. Sales 6*10 Prev.Saies 6*26 

Prev. Day Open Int. 16616 up 440 

PALLADIUM (NYME) 





TSffl tray az- dollars per az 





14173 

90*0 

SOP 10450 

10775 

10410 

10*5 

+175 

141.56 

91*0 

Dec 70575 

10*0 

10475 

WAS 

+175 

127*0 

9170 

Mar 106*0 

10*0 

105*11 

18375 

+175 

11400 

91*0 

Jun 107*0 

107*8 

107*0 

100*0 

+175 

10500 

105*0 

Sep 



10865 

+175 

B94. Sales 

Prev. Sales 

<01 




Prev. Dav Open Int 7764 





GOLD (COM EX) 






WO trny «*- ckrilon pot troy o*. 





485iSO 

291*0 

Aue 335*0 

339.10 

335*0 

338*0 

-KUO 

3«5» 

315*0 

Sep 



339*0 

+070 

493J7C 

297*0 

Oct 330*0 

34360 

337*0 

341*0 

+370 

40*0 

301*0 

Dec 341*0 

347*0 

34170 

34620 

+370 

485*0 

306*0 

Feb 34460 

35170 

34460 

35040 

+120 

496*0 

31470 

APT 351*0 

355*0 

351*0 

35560 

+170 

43570 

370*0 

Jun 257-50 

357*0 

354*0 

359*0 

+370 

428.40 

33160 

Aug 363*0 

3<4*0 

363*0 

344*0 

+3.10 ' 

39570 

335*0 

Oct 36970 

36970 

36960 

37X18 

+31 10 

39X00 

342*0 

Dec 376*0 

37460 

37460 

37X40- 

+XJO , 

388*0 

355*0 

Apr 



38640 

+360 



Jun 



39240 

+360 

Est. Sales 32-000 Prev.Saies 25,133 




Prav. Oav Open Intl3450 aft 422 







Financial 


063 r r 

U 06 U6 

075 a*B r 

HR 16 r 


open lot. 216831 
open ht. 14X07 



US T. BILLS (IMM) 







SI million- pt* of IH Pet. 







9X33 

86.94 


9199 

9110 

92*9 

93*7 

+66 


9X0 

8577 


92J4 

9261 

9272 

9X79 

+0 


9X59 

8640 


92*1 

9X46 

9X37 

92*5 

+0 


9278 

061 


9X10 

9110 

92*5 

9X18 

+68 


92*1 

88*0 

Sep 

9177 

91*0 

9175 

91*0 

+68 


9178 

0*5 

Ooc 

91*0 

91*0 

91*8 

91*2 

+67 


91 79 

0*8 

Mar 




9175 

+67 


90.93 

90*0 





900 

+*5 


Est. Safes 1X160 Prev.Saies 10*93 





Prav. Dav Open Int. 37*32 off 237 





18 YR. TREASURY (CBT) 






*H»*00 prin- pts A 3bitSs at 1 00 pd 





88-21 

75-16 


0-3 

0-7 

86-25 

0-5 

+12 


0-13 

75-13 

Dec 

B5J0 

86+ • 

85-25 

86-5 

+12 


BA-2 

75-14 

ftSor 

8431 

85-8 

84-29 

85+ 

-H2 


85-7 

7+30 


B4-y 

84-15 

84-3 

84-13 

+11 


84-4 

BO-7 

Sep 

83-15 

83-21 

83-10 

83-20 

+11 

1 

03-11 

BO-2 

Dec 




8370 

+IV 


Est. Sales 


Prev. Sotos 8692 





Prev. Day Open Int 6070 off 1.165 





• t indexes camelled shortly, batons market data} 
5P COMP. INDEX (CME) 
pobrta and rads ■ 

19860 M8» - Sep 1060 190J0 1060 1060 4 

20065 77570 Sac 19X20 19270 191*3 192*0 - 4 

20375 mio. 'Mar 19450 IKA5 19460 19545 4 

20850 man JUn 19060 19860 19860 19860 4 

EstSdao . Prev.Saies 5X835 
Prev. Day Open Int 50744 off 1819 
VALUE LIMB (KCBT) 
potnte and coats . . , . 

21X20 18523 . ■ Sap '20070 20160 20L10 20175 + 

21765 -20000 Dec mSO 205*5 20400 205.10 + 

Est. sales ' Prev.Saies 6*25 
Prev. Day Open lot 18*02 off 849 
HTSE COMP. INDEXINYFE) 
points and emta 

11UB 9173 Sep 1070 11060 1060 1070 + 

JJJJ0 WJTD Dec H1*S 11260 11160 711*5 +. 

JjMS 709 JO Mar >1X38 11X50 UXW 11260 +. 

E«L SaieS ^ Prev.Saies 9737 
Prev. Day.Open ltd. 10*28 up 711 


CommoditY Indexes 


Zlto 8* Zapata 
57* 31 to Zayres 
28* 17to ZenIHiE 
21* 15* Zeros 


.12 1* 62 806 8* 8«!i B* + to 

*8 7 12 148 52* 51 to 51*— to 

II 569 19 IB* 18* + * 
62 16 17 9 19* 19* 19* 


Comnmlities 


\cian 

Conimodhies 


0to 22* Zurnln 162 27 12 1131 33* 34* 35* + * 


MSE H^hs-Lmvs 


N.T. N.T. 34260 14460 
N.T. N.T. 34760 34968 


53 

31 « QuakOs 

174 

u 

13 

40 

49to 

49to 

49to + to 

23V 

IAV. QuakSQ 

*0 

3* 

19 

160 

20* 

20to 

20to + V 

1 low 

6*s Guano* 



20 

0 

8 

7to 

7to 

; . Kto 

CJ 1 ) Qucsiar 

140 

57 

11 

223 

30*. 

30 V. 

am + to 


14’-; B* Rell 

740 1.1 

15 

73 

22V 

22 

22V + V 



4’1 RBIna 

*4 

* 


4 

7V 

7V 

7V 

49*S 

34 RCA 

1*4 

2* 

12 

3271 

444* 

43*8 

44V. + to 

II.' 

79»? RCA Pi 

4*0 

40 


S 10 

101 

10 +1to 










S'» 


3+5 

9.7 


5 

S7V5 

37V» 

37Vl 

We 


70 

2-S 

14 

242 

8to 

8 

8 

4 V 





122 

4to 

4to 

4to— to 

If.'k. 



19 

10 

50 

19 

llto 

T9 

(to 1 ? 

BVl Hcdlra 



11 

10 

14 

1JV 

13to 


28'.. RnllPur 

1*0 

24 

13 

669 

4lto 

4ito 

41 to 

*> 

S • Pumafl 



44 2208 

?to 

8V 

9 + to 

;i'i 

It': Fanca 

*4 

4.7 

10 

23 


17W 

17V 


: Rfincrv 




364 

ito 


3V— to 




-A 

27 




77to 4i3to 

i 1 

SoeriV 




12 

12to 

12 

12'. + to 

„ ;* 1 . • 


'.60 

12 

12 

1975 

50 V, 

49to 


, 1 1 1 

*• r Pr^dei 

40 

57 


164 

TV 

7to 

7to 


lito FdE-IPl 

XI2 

1X1 


44 

17to 

17V, 


,e ; 

l > RdBCI pi 3794107 


229 

19to 

18 

IB —ito 

tl *4 

J! RIIRel 

U3el0.4 

10 

10 

urii 

12V 

in.- in 


95. PedlEq 



11 

179 

?to 

9to 

9V + to 


?' : SKlmn 






Hto 



n*. Recce 



34 

28 

llto 

11 

11 






7 




4 Jto 

ITto RelchC 

£0 

12 

13 

26 

0 

36to 

37 + %* 


4*: RopAIr 



5 

1093 

low. 

lOto 



Ito HepAwt 




116 

2V 

2to 

2V + to 


5to RpGvps 

JO 

3* 

B 

104 

s 

m 



33to Reafiv 

IN 

3* 

8 

25 

46V 

46to 

46V + 1* 




Am Cyan 
ClnG928p( 
Deltana Cp 
MammPans 
KlmbClarK 
Mont Pew 
Parker Pen 
Revlon 

Sealed Air 

Talley OIB 
VorcaJpt 


vIBUUn pf 

Comdisco 

EqumkpfC 

Homastahe 

LACMInrln 

Marpon ad pf 

PerrvOrug 

Ravin cv pt 

SvceCps 

Trarawv ini 

WOalwttipf 


Blade HR 
Campgt 5d 
Fax5ta Phot 
Interco Inc 
LeasMasan 
Newhall 
Pier tine 
Rockwlntpl 
Starrott 
UnEI272pl 


ASA AmerHatel Falrchld 

PopoPrad RdaBatadlp RlverOak n 

Rubermaldwl WstCoNA 


Bril Pet 
Crock N( ad [ 
GopIik 
I ntercept 
March Co 
Pac Tin 
Ramada Inn 
S CM Cora 
Talley ind 
UnlonExpl n 


Falrchld nt 
vjRobtnsAH 




Report Sees Slowdown 
In Britain^ Economy 

Return 

LONDON — One of the longest periods of 
British economic growth in recent history may 
be coming to an end, according to an economic 
report published Wednesday. 

The National Institute of Economic and So- 
cial Research, an independent economic fore- 
casting group, said in its summer review that the 
next year would see a further slow rise in unem- 
ployment to 3J1 million from about 3.18 mil- 
lion, or 13.1 percent of the work force, last 
month. 

“The long period of steady, if moderate, ex- 
pansion may soon be coming to an end," the 
institute said. It based its forecast on an expect- 
ed decline in manufacturing exports as a result 
of the new strength of the pound against the 
dollar. 

The institute expected total output to contin- 
ue growing slowly until the end of this year 
before tailing off. It also forecast that inflation 
would be cut in half from its current annual rate 
of 7 parent, provided the pound remained, 
steady against the dollar. 

This would produce a fall in interest rates and 
contribute to a sharp improvement in living 
standards for those with jobs, it said. 


WHAT WOULD LIFE BE LIKE 
WTTHOUT IT? 


CteM [ HONG-KONG GOLD FUTURES 

Hlob Low Bid Aik CTTse ) U66 per ounce 

SUGAR 

FriiKh franc* per metric ton 
Od U65 1604 1610 1615 --27 

■ r£c 1J50 1J00 179S 1J0S -23 

• IJffl IJ04 1J10 1612 —28 

MOV 1695 1.330 1635 UJS -35 

Aim 1*40 1675 1685 16W —36 

Od N.T. N.T. 1*20 1*45 -44 

E*t voL: 2A23 lots of 50 toot. Prav. actual 
soles: 2798 Ms. Open interest : 21,948 

French trow* per lee kg 
Sep NT. N.T. 2615 U06 +6 

& w. ^v 5 u t! 

T S: K S = =j 

cIm NT NT. 10S5 — “5 

C Ed. vol.-.V'lot/ ^; IQ^p rw_Prew achM 
sales: 10 la tv Open Intend: 797 

COFFEE 

French traacs per IN ka 
Sap 1690 1685 1685 1695 —30 

N.T. N.T. 1.960 1.980 -» 

jen N.T. N.T. 1.978 — — W 

fS, N.T. N.T. 2610 2640 —10 

SSL NT. N.T, X02S — —23 

N.T. N.T. — 2680 Undi . 

SOP N.T. N.T. 2640 — UndL 

E*». vol.: 10 lots at 5 tons. Prev. actual sales: 

B hits. Open Interest: 398 
Source: Bourse do Commerce. 


DIM futures 
Options 

W. Gcnnea Mort CMUtnrtS. opes mow* 


Aug. 21 

Stren CBMaWe . iwSeHI* 

srfs 55T SR Sf " 
s & 3 3 SS B Si 

£ U in in 177 UI 16 

S 064 US 129 168 1.91 — 

S — 0*9 l» - — — 

CM lWBlid loM Wjj.7,942 
Cow: TIN. veLsmepsaM. 34745 
Pad : TUe. raL 2783 raan M. 28*49 
Source: CME. 


London 

Commodities 


Aug. 21 

. _Ck«« Preview 

sucar HWi Low Bid Aik Bid Aik 

SterlteB per metric kn 
Ocl moa 11260 11360 11460 116*0 116*0 
Dec m» 11760 11760 117*0 11860 119*8 
Mar 131*0 12400 135*0 125*0 128*0 128*0 
May 1M*0 12260 12960 130*0 13260 mS 

AIM N.T. N.T. 13300 135*0 136*0 13760 

Od 14460 1060 1060 140*0 MUD 14X40 

Volume: 2747 Ms of 50 tons. 

COCOA 

SferiUM per metric fen 
SSI VT9 U09 1714 171* 1710 1712 

KS 162J 1717 1718 

160 730 1736- 1JM T70 1730 

May 1750 1745 1749 1750 1742 1743 

Jly 1740 1754 1J58 17 M 1753 1754 

5ep 1773 1770 1765 1770 1765 1770 

EMC N.T. N.T. 1765 1775 1765 1775 

Volume: 2677 lots of 10 tons. 

COFFEE 

Sterling per metric tan 
j» 1-680 1*60 1*40 1*62 1*75 1*78 

"W 1615 1*ra 1*2 1*95 1717 1718 

4«« 1743 1727 1729 1J32 1744 1745 

JJS: H5S i® I'?® '6S 1659 1740 

May 1772 1778 1770 1780 170 1772 

Jly 1790 1799 1785 1790 1774 1790 

BOP N.T. 6LT. 1795 U10 1781 1*15 

Volume: 1*21 tots of Stans. 

GASOIL 

UJL dollars per metric ten 
Sep 23760 23565 23675 237 JO 23375 23465 
OO S465 2327$ 23460 23465 ZT175 KM 
Nov 23375 23X50 23375 23460 23165 23US 
Dec 22375 23X50 23360 23373 231^21^ 
is mas 23275 H275 moo nasumjn 
N.T. N.T. 21160 231 JO mlt 
N.T. N.T. 2M.no 1?1W 71m 22360 
APf 22260 719-50 22175 2221 Ml 21875 21960 
May N.T. N.T. 21760 22560 21000 22560 
volume: 2*78 tots oflOO (cm. 


Dividends 


Cash Prices 


Coa u naUHy and Uolr 
Coffee 4 Smites. Hi_ 
Prbrtdoni 64130 38 to. yu „ 
fkdw «s fpmj. tanli: 
lmn. 2 Rjry .PMia. tan 

ag fig w - 

g^U BodMb^. 
Silver N.V.. nr 
Source: AP, 


■US 1*4 

8*0 674 

47360 0260 

SUM 21X00 

72-71 nut 

If 20-31 

4+71 <4*7 

66113 66197 

0*1 8*0 

103-m 139-MI 
<69 7*1 


Treasury Bids 


Oneveor 7-41 

Source: Satomori Brothers 


votumv: 0 tots of 2S font. 
Source: Routers. 


London Metals 





EACH FRIDAY IN THE IHT 


Barcelona Bourse 
Seeks New Rules 

Reuters 

BARCELONA — The manage- 
ment of the Barcelona Stock fit, 
change has asked that foreign in- 
vestment restrictions be lifted, 
gvmg’it the same legal facilities as 
tne Madrid exchange, a Barcelona 
bourse spokesman said Wednes- 
day. 

The Trade Ministry has allowed 
management of the Madrid ex- 
change to hold deposited stocks ac- 
quired by foreign investors, lifting 
an exchange controls requirement 
thattbey be deposited with banks. 

The Barcelona sp okesman said 
man f8emem there asked the rninis- 
ny for the same penzdssioa -mri 
thatstock exchanges in Bilbao and 
Valencia planned to file a «mii«r 
request 

C®^Has2i^} n a l te Profit 


JO' Hale Stores Inc, a large U.S. 
E?»9 Wednesday ft^eaS 
^were S 7 .? million in the seoad 

“2 5ZI *® mffion in the Hke 

pwodlastycaif; 


Sc, 


,v 

: > l. -u 











































































I 


' 


* 


l 


f 



Page 11 


- ■ 


<: V 

.'a*. " 


United Wing U.K. Clearance 

lo Attempt Fleet Takeo 


H.K. Dollar Is Thriving With Linkage 










Sswji 




By Bob Hagcrty 

ShsksAb; 

S5»»SS 

pert and magn-rtr^ ^ 

Based on Fleet’s current share 
pno, the company is valued at 
£279 mtffion (about S389 nriffion). 
United, which owns Pouch and 

*StSSE 

to announce terms. The company 
said its board would announce ii$ 
intentions shortly. United already 
owns 20 percent of Fleet 3 

la considering terms. United 
said, it would be influenced by a 
dropm the market value of Flat’s 
gurehokhng m Reuters Holdings 
“j? t° about £78 minion from £92 
muhon last March 25, when United 
announced its intention to acquire 
Fleet. 1 

Canadian Group 
Lowers Estimate 
For Hibernia Oil 

Reuters 

CALGARY, ALBERTA — The 
Canadian Petroleum Association 
said Wednesday it revised down- 
ward the size of the Hibernia oil 
field off Newfoundland to estimat- 
ed oil reserves of 648 milli on bar- 
rel s, from 1 .10 billion. 

The association attributed the 
decrease to a better understanding 
of Hibernia’s geology after six 
years of drilling. 

What was mice thought to be a 
large, connected, oil-bearing for- 
mation has turned out to be a frac- 
tured structure of smaller dl de- 
posits, the association said. 


ver 


. Fleet retorted Wednesday that 
its board believes the company's 
value is “greatly in excess of the 
current market price." Ian Irvine, 
Fleet’s managing director, added: 
“We can see no reason why we 
should pul two companies together 
such as Fleet and United." 

In its report, tbe Monopolies and 
Mergers Commissi 0 Q said the pro- 
posed takeover would have no sig- 
nificant effect on newspaper com- 
petition. 

Derek Terrington, a newspaper 
analyst at Grieveson, Grant &. Co- 
said he believed United was likely 
to seek a partner to bdp it buy and 
operate FleeL 

He noted the acquisition 
would about double the size of 
United and that the company has 
had no experience in running na- 
tional newspapers since 1930. 

Finding such a partner would 
not be difficult, Mr. Terrington 
suggested. "There’s always some- 
body willing to have a bash at run- 
ning national newspapers,’’ he said. 

In 1984, United derived about 
half of its operating profit from the 
United Slates, where it owns PR 
Newswire, which dectromcafly dis- 
tributes public relations n u«*r«l, 
as well as trade and technical jour- 
nals. 

In Bri tain, the company owns 
the Yorkshire Post and about 60 
other provincial papers, including 
advertising sheets. Along with 
Punch, it publishes such magazines 
as Glass Age and Pig Farming. 

Flat also has interests in trade 
magazines, provincial newspapers 
and television. 

Mr. Terrington said he expected 
that Fleet would report pretax 
profit of about £25 mQHon for the 
year ended last June 30, up from 
£22.1 milli on a year earlier. He 
forecast that United would show 
pretax profit of £33.5 million in 
1985, up from £26.7 million in 
1984. 


vvnAr^ To Reveal Secret Formula 


U.S. Judge Orders CocarCola 




Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

ATLANTA — Coca-Cola Co. 
has vowed to keep secret its 99- 
year-old formula for Coke, despite 
a federal judge’s ruling orderingthe 
soft-drink maker to disclose the 
recipe. 

The order came Tuesday in a 
1983 lawsuit filed by 40 Coca-Cola 
bottlers over the company’s pricing 
policies. The bottlers are seeking 
formulas for aB of Coca-Cola’s 

-!_■ » . UTJ Mmn lint lh« 


dosed the secret formulas for its 
products and that policy will not 
change," said a Coca-Cola spokes- 
man, Randy Donaldson. The At- 
lanta-based company is studying 
its options in the case, be said. 

The fo rmula Merchandise 7X is 
perhaps one of the best-lcept secrets 
in UJS. industry. It is kept locked in 
an Atlanta bank vault and is 
known to only a few company exec- 
utives. 


tbe riame “Coke” on a product oth- 
er than its standard-bearing soft 
drink. 

The company said then that be- 


“Nothing is sacred in civil litiga- 
tion,” tte judge said. 

“The company has never dis- 


JVW. 

aZaTZ. afihl The quarrel between Coca-Cola 

the company’s first product to use 
same pricing structure. >l. nn <> mwim-t nth. 

U.S. District Judge Murray 
Schwartz of Wilmington, Dela- 
ware, agreed that Coca-Cola _ « 

should divulge cam* DittSe ^as a different 

«S2 “ d product than Coca-Cola, it was not 

smiting the bottlers. bound by its existing contract with 

“Nothing is sacred in civil Utiga- tIie 5 ott i ersaM } thus could raise the 

price bottlers pay for the diet drink, 
said Bill Schmidt, bead of the Bot- 
tlers of Coca-Cola U.SA, which 
has taken Coca-Cola to court 
Bottlers pay between $2.73 and 
$326 a gallon for old Coke and 
$3.80 ana $4-60 for Diet Coke, de- 
pending at whether they have 
signed supply contracts with the 
company, Mr. Schmidt said. 

The issue became murkier still 
when Coca-Cola replaced old Coke 
with tbe new version last April, and 
three months later, bowed to con- 
sumer pressure . and revived the 
Real Thmg, renaming it Coca-Cola 
Classic. 

Coca-Cola said that the products 
involved are Coca-Cola, Coca-Cola 
Classic, Diet Coke, Caffeine-Free 
Coke, Caffeine-Free Diet Coke and 
Cherry Coke. 

The formula for Coca-Cola was 
developed on May 6 , 1886, by an 
Atlanta pharmacist. John Pember- 
ton, who stirred up the first batch 
in a three-legged brass pot in his 
backyard. (AP, WP, Reuters) 


Olivetti, Toshiba 
FonnVentare 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Olivetti SpA of 
Italy has set up a joint company 
in Japan with Toshiba Corp„ a 

spokesman for the new concern 

said Wednesday. . 

The company, Olivetti Coip. 
of Japan, is capitalized at 2.44 
WboSTyea ($1033 ngbon), 
with Olivetti holding an St-per- 
cent stake and Toshiba having 

20 percent, the spokesman Mid. 

It has taken the name. Dust- 
ness and service actmtua of 
Olivetti’s wholly owned subsd- 

iary, which is now renamed Oli- 
vetti Properties of Japan lnc. 
The changes took effect on 
Aug. 1. 


ized workers at the company’s Sud- 
bury, Ontario, operations went on 
strike over a new contract. The 
me u-5. icuta <u T iwnn anv maintained that a tenta- 

1 ts subsidiary, Bell ^ accord was agreed on four 

Association, was ^nover by ten before the roSt 

eral regulators last month, leaving The & RrfAer Co. has 

Bdl hffiual with % sold a 51-percent stake m its East 
negative net worth of $25 so ^/bridjaiy to a Kenyan m- 

British Parole®. Co- X>r hoop. Sanxsr 

soW Us 3^per^? 


Sir dive Given 
Confidence Vote 
From Creditors 

Reuters 

LONDON — Sir Clive Sin- 
clair. the British inventor and 

entrepreneur who is fighting to 
keep his computer company 
afloat, appeared Wednesday 10 

have won a breathing space 
from his creditors. 

Six Clive’s creditors, who are 
owed an estimated £15 million 
($20.7 million), said they were 
“broadly supportive’’ of his 
company, Sinclair Research, 
and hoped to reach an agree- 
ment on rescheduling the debt 
within the next few days. 

The statement by the credi- 
tors, which include Barclays 
Baltic, Citibank and the compa- 
ny’s main suppliers Thorn-EMI 
and Timex, followed a meeting 
with Sir Clive earlier this week. 

Sources among tbe creditors 
said Sr Clive had outlined his 
plans for the vital pre-Christ- 
mas shopping season when 
most micro-computer sales are 
made. 

They said the creditors were 
likely to allow Sinclair to con- 
tinue operations in the hope of 
a successful winter that would 
restore the company to finan- 
cial health after a collapse in 
home-computer sales. 


Atlas Copco Says Earnings 
Increased 47% in First Hall 


By Juris Kaza 

International Herald Tribune 

STOCKHOLM — Atlas Copco 
AB, a Swedish air compression, 
mining equipment and tool group, 
reported Wednesday that pretax 

turning s rose 47 percent to 422 Bul- 
lion kronor (S50.S million) in the 
first half of 1985 . 

In the second quarter, earnings 
rose 45 percent to 220 million kro- 
nor from 152 million kronor in the 

w^^^Bioa^kroaor in (he 1985 
first quarter. 

Invoiced sales were up 18 per- 
cent in the first half to 5.003 billion 
kronor, while order bookings rose 
13 percent to 5222 billion kronor. 
Atlas Copco said in an interim re- 
port. 

The group’s president, Tom 
Wacbtmeister, said that the sharp 
improvement in earnings was the 
result of better market conditions 
as well as rationalization measures 
taken by Atlas Copco in recent 
years. 

He reaffirmed Allas Copco s ear- 
lier forecast that earnings would 
“significantly exceed" the 1984 fig- 
ure of 573 imSioa kronor. Tbe fore- 
cast said sales would rise to more 
itinn 10 billion kronor from 9.1 
billion kronor in 1984. 

Mr. Wachtmeister said that in 
volume terms, orders increased 8 
percent- Orders rose 10 percent in 


Western Europe, Atlas Copco's 
largest market. 20 percent in South 
America and 30 percent in Austra- 
lia. he said. 

Orders from the United States 
were stagnant, Allas Copco said. 

Mr. wachimdsier said that the 
Swedish group, with 92 percent of 
sales on export markets, had taken 
market shares away from its most 
important competitors during the 
slump for mining and air compres- 
sion companies. 

Analysts said Atlas Copco's in- 
terim results were in line with ex- 
pectations. 

Michael Willis Fleming, a spe- 
cialist in Scandinavian equity with 
E.B. Savory Milln in London, 
called Atlas Copco “a very cheap 
stock" that was “bound to run if 
the Swedish market becomes popu- 
lar again." 

Mr. Fl eming said it was likely 
that Atlas Copco would raise its 
dividend to 6 kronor per share for 
1985 from 450 kronor in 1984. 

Mr. Wadumoster said that the 
dividend was a matter for Atlas 
Copco's board and shareholders’ 
meeting to deride, but he himed 
that a payout increase ought be 
recommended. 

Sales for Allas Copco Airpower, 
the company's largest division, rose 
17 percent Lo 2.339 billion kronor, 
while order bookings were up 16 
percent to 2.542 billion kronor. 


(Continued from Page 9) 
redeem notes from other hanks at 
the same rate. 

The broad theory behind the 
package was that the forces of arbi- 
trage between the rest of the colo- 
ny's banks and the note-issuing 
banks would keep the value of the 
Hong Kong dollar trading in a 
band of one U.S. dollar to 7.78-7.82 
Hong Kong dollars. 

A key pan of the theory was the 
role of interest rates. Rates were to 
be adjusted by the Association of 
Banks in Hong Kong, depending 
on the demand for Hong Kong 
dollars and fluctuating in response 
to the market Meanwhile, the 
Hong Kong dollar’s assigned value 
of one US. dollar to 7.80 Hong 
Kong dollars would remain rela- 
tively stable. 

The idea was completely untried 
at tbe time. Bat the colony’s finan- 
cial secretary, John Bremridge, in 
bis urgency to arrest the plunging 
Hong Kong dollar, boldly adopted 
tbe rescue package and in doing so. 


ernment’s traditionally laissez-faire 
policies. 

Some months after the package 
was implemented. Mr. Bremridge 
confessed that he still awoke each 
morning to learn with relief that 
“the link," as it came to be known, 
was bolding firm. 

Two years later, it is clear that 
the link has not only worked, but 
worked extraordinarily well 

By mid-July of this year, tbe 
Hong Kong dollar soared to its 
highest level against the greenback 
since the introduction of the link. 


trading at 7.71 Hong Kong dollars, 
or 1.15 percent higher than the 
linked rate, as the U:S. dollar fell in 
an international bout of selling 
triggered by doubts about the U.S. 
economy. 

To encourage a capital outflow 
to the US. dollar, the Association 
of Banks of Hong Kong adjusted 
Hong Kong dollar interest rates 
downwards twice in one week in 
July to rest at the present level of an 
■ annual 6 percent for prime lenders. 
Hus was a dramatic contrast to the 
high of 17 percent readied in July 
1984. 

Commercially available bank de- 
posit rates for three months fell 
below the Hong Kong annual rate 
of inflation of about 3.6 percent, 
pviVing them negative interest rates 
in inflation-adjusted terms. 

Market rumors that tbe link 
would be adjusted to accommodate 
the strong Hong Kong dollar 
gained momentum, and tbe Bridsh- 
-based Henley Ceuta for Forecast- 
ing reported that a continuing 
weaker U.S. dollar and capital in- 
flows to Hong Kong would result 
in a “relaxation" of the link in the 
last quarter of this year. 

However, in the weds since the 
last readjustment of tbe local inter- 
est rates, the U.S. dollar has gradu- 
ally finned in Hong Kong, with the 
help of large Hong Kong banks, 
particularly Hongkong & Shang- 
hai. They are reportedly selling 
Hong Kong dollars in London, and 
buying U .S. 

The tl 

ferential 

Hong Kong-dollar interest rates at- 



tracted general trading out or the 
local currency. With the filming of 
the U.S unit, the exchange link be- 
tween the two currencies now holds 
at around 7.79. The Hong Kong 
dollar closed at 7.8055 to the U.S. 
dollar Wednesday in Hong Kong. 

Continuing low Hong Kong-dol- 
lar interest rates have speeded up a 
property-market recovery, which 
was already well underway. The 
low interest rales have also fueled 
the local stock market, which 
leaped 29 points Aug. 6 . to pierce 
the 1.700 mark on the Hang Seng 

index, its highest level in four years. 
On Wednesday, however, the Hang 
Seng feO 41.96. to 1,650.78. 

However, speculation about the 
posable future readjustment of the 
link in the future lingers, not enure- 
ly erased by repeated public gov- 
ernment endorsements of the link. 
In July, the colony's secretary for 
monetary affairs, Douglas Blye, 

said that tbe government might 
even approve of negative deposit 
interest rates, whereby bank cus- 
tomers would be charged for mak- 
ing deposits. Peter Wrangham, gen- 
eral manager of Hong Kong & 
shang hai Bank, said the imposition 
of negative interest rates was possi- 
ble, “but practically speaking, terri- 
bly difficult to implement." 

At the same time, Mr. 
Wrangham said it was premature 
to assume that a readjustment of 
the link was needed 

On the question of rebuking the 
local dollar to a basket of curren- 
cies. Mr. Wrangham warned: "It 
might throw more mud into the 
water than there is now. " 


Mat 

> 22? To reUfis Ma PJE venture, will have the 


mature, WiU have the 

SspiiSS 

■uttinE plan that began ^ it ^ agreed 


P‘ 

investors 
cutting plan 

Terms were pot 


(ffinrance Co. 


'"S ““““Renting ater* £££». Indents Saw 
^^^h^owned by Hong Le coal in West Sumaon 



— ■ 

=SSfe*lSrifer» lcyw , KNEwmATMPU ^c H «B, a .Cm E D-POS S ,, l YTB ES .FE CT WN,,»™EUNnaD ! n-.T B ,"Y<X,.D«PH 0 N,NC™ H ,T<X,. 


eong w wr Of Britain company, PT Allied Indo 

Entefpnse -^ir^rake in Saxon venwre company, 
saidithasrasediisrt^u c^l & Cd of the 

Oil PLCto - seemed ma- States said that more than 

this the Sax® parted merchants in Georgia haw 

jonty support®*® / 57 . 4 O) cash 3,0W 3^1 its new finanoal- 

^ board for a 540-p^ l propos- JSand applications for 

bid for the com. PlC, f^S'bcgin to be processed 

jje of &ptT9. Sears plans to 

- newly formed Q^gfbouse pe- launch its Discover cs 

uon On tundras, t?. .mi wear. Georgia wfll bf 


Canadian JfJ y keL 

n ™^ y I ^d 2.000 unton- l- 


card 
wflJ be a 


Republic National Bank of New York. Traditional banking in an age of change. 

no -J. siOtrtt) iCTJUO'Jl'M- .hHvNJfc PAR | ' J , <I |,JW m* lU-lMtuXBlGiJWi-Ca 7H MIIMJIP* JiM^I-H A jAfPA BAMfc WITH CAPITAL Of GVH» M W0 000 000 







INTERNATIONAL 


Wednesdays 


Tobies Include the nationwide prices 
w to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late Trades elsewhere. 
Via The Associated Press 


2W AndJcb 

sv Annies as 

v Angel wt 

ft vjAngl v 

M Anx>Pt 

SVi Artayn a 

7K Armed 12 

m AmwA jo 13 n 

AW Asm'S .IS lj 
BN Asrru 11 

1 Astrote 

7Vj Aeh*tpf 180 114 
Hi AtlsCM 
2*J Altos wt 

2 Audhrtr 


it n n 
33 ow ay. 
« ns i« 
12 I Vi IV* 
]7 m w 
40 A A 
M 7ft 7ft 

11 sv HA 
aa> <pa m 
101 12 Ilk 
274 1H 1U 
2 13V 1JU 
170 mi n 

2 nt 3 V, 
17 3 ZN 


ZV 

W* + H 

IV + K 
lift— V* 
3V 
A 

m— h 

sv 

9H + VS 
19 
IK 

UK * K 
v 

3K-K 


JZ 14 47 
82 3J 43 


IB 

3J0 56 M 


19V 

7V GDIs 



13 

9 

19W 

183* 

19V* 

134* 

5V CMICp 



21 

41 

tlft* 

11 

11 - N 

4N 

1H CMXCP 




113 

3 

IN 

IN 

19V 

13ft* CRS 

J4 

18 

12 

5 

IB 

1 7ft* 

17ft* — V 

IAN 

9N CoesNJ 



18 

13 

12 

llh 

12 + V 

BV 

4W CooteA 



5 

2 

srt 

5** 

SN 

14ft* 

10W Cal RE 

1JS 10.1 

9 

22 

12V 

12W 

12H + N 

29H 

18ft* ca knot 

80 

24 

20 

94 

25ft* 

2SW 

2SW + V* 

AW 

3** Colton n 



24 

103 

5ft* 

5V 

5*» + ft* 

1H 

W Colin wt 




68 

V 

H 

H + K 

1BN 

11 Cornea 

J2 

28 

10 

A 

1AW 

IAN 

IAN 4- N 

3V 

IN CBnipn) 




40 

2ft* 

2ft* 

2ft* 

20V 

I3V aware a 

J8 



76 

14V 

15V 

1SV— N 

23V 

18ft* Cdnocc 

M 



9 

21 W 

209* 

20ft*— ft* 

35V 

25ft* cwine 



10 

8 

33V 

33 

33 — V 

13 

4ft* Cardiff 



18 

23 

10 

9V 

9N + V 

3H 

IV Cardll 




3 

2H 

2ft* 

2ft* + W 

15N 

79* Carve 



17 

7 

14V* 

14 

14 — V 

154* 

7W CaroA 

.10 

3 

17 

8 

14V 

14 

14 - H 


13 

40 U U 


m 

in 

Aft* AV 
Aft* AH 
Aft IAN 

3ft* in* 

1H 21V* 
8W 
4W 
M 
BV 

n 


Mb AV* 
1AH 12V 
7H 4W 
AH 2V* 
3Vr ZV* 
40 31 V 
15V. TV, 
2H IK 
2SV* 15H 
SV TV 
BV 51* 
1JW 10V 

10H 4ft* 
2H V* 
171* IMA 
I2H 7 
9 A 
31ft* 181* 
Aft* 11* 
3AV 221* 
9H A 
9H AH 


3 1H 
271* 21AA . 

a w si* i 

15V 12V* I 
ISV I2K | 
TV* 3ft* I 
29H I7H I 
24ft* 19V* I 
Bit l«ft* I 
7 3ft* I 
8ft* 3ft* | 
Aft* 3H I 
37ft* 25ft* I 
15H 12U I 
5U 2 I 


■13t AS A 
32 1J 10 


.52 1.4 11 
168 11J> 9 


70 2 

54 24K 
3 7ft* 
94 12H 
9A I2H 
20 3H 

1 19H 
9 201* 

237 129. 
39 5ft* 

2 3ft* 

19 4V* 

2 3A 
9 15V* 
80 2ft* 


lft* 1H— V* 
22ft* Z4K +114 

1 

1VH 19H 

aom. an* 

1Mb 1Mb ' 

& 55- * 

Mb 3ft* 4- V* 
4 4H + K 
34 3A + K 
151* 15K + 1* 
2K 2K 


i Foblnd 60 11 7 

i FnlrFJn 2* 

Forty pf 
Fldota 

FWvmB JO 52 It 
i FlsehP 681 £2 19 
FIlcGE 4 

FlonEn 

FtaRck JO 12 8 
i Fluke 1281 52 11 
Foodrni A 

FttUIIG 20 

FordCn 0480a 
FOTStCA .15 J> 95 
FsmtL 32 

ftotoinl 

FrdHty 242 

FmEI 18 

FrfesEn 

Frtsdis 22 S 20 
FmlHd 48 

FrtA wt .171 2 6 
FurVH 19 


15 19 19 

II U 13H 
51 17ft* 17H 
47 SH 5 

18 13K 13 

19 UK 13 
43 9V M* 

3 B 7ft* 
9 40*. 40ft* 
20B 261* 25ft* 
A 12** 12ft* 
377 AH AH 
300x105 104 
1 23V 23V 
381 25V 24V 
165 1ft* 1H 
13 714 7 

17 23V. 23 
195 10V* 1PW 
40 23ft* 23V 
401 lAW 15V 
70 7 AV 

3 1DV* 101* 


19 + V* 

13ft* — 'V* 
T7V 
5K 

13 — K 
13 

***— V* 
7ft* — W 
40ft* + V* 
2A — H 
1ZN + K 
AV + K 
104 —IV* 
23V- V* 
25V +1 
IV + W 
7V. + H 
23V + K 
101 * 

23K— 1* 
1A + K 
7 + K 

10W 


Hoating-Rate Notes 


Dollar 


I t 1 1 ,1 1| '.' |> 


ADVERTISEMEIVT 


MTsusun Eucms 

MUKIM BL, LT8. 

(Q)Ra) 

The indeniBwd announces that as from 27 th 
'August, 1985, id Ka»- Associate N,V« 
Spomtrsal 172, Amsteukiu. dh. a. no. 29 
.(accompanied by an "Affidavit") of die 
CDE’s Matsanita Electric Industrial 
.Ca, Ltd_jwill be poyahle with Dfls. 5,71 
wt per CDR, rqr. 100 aha. and with 
-Dfb. 57,10 net per CDR, nw. L0O0 
■faa.(div. per record-dale 05J20.19B5: gross 


260 

186 


179 

14V* 

UV 

14 




192 

19ft* 

19V 

19V 


V 



17 

46 

9V 

BN 

9V 

+ 

j , M 

1 14 

10 

9 

I1N 

11V 

11V 

— 

H 

JO 

6 

260 

30 

1AK 

H 

** 

IAN 

H 


N 

.791 

46 

14 

11 

18ft* 

II 

18 ' 

— 

N 

185 

62 

17 

154 

17 

1A« 

17 

+ 

N 

■JOe 

S3 

11 

41 

21 

20ft* 


— 

N 

s -60 

1J 

U 

1137 

45V 

45 

45 1 * 

+ 

W 

35e 

48 

8 

51 

5K 

5H 

5K 

+ 

N 

32 

28 136 

25 

14 

13V 

13V 


H 




Hi 

12V 

12W 

12H 

— ■ 

N 

180 

96 

11 

5 

15N 

15V 

1^ 

+■ 

H 


20 

5W 

5V 

5V 





7 

AA 

10ft* 

UP* 

10V 

— 

N 



19 

13 

3 

29* 

3 





10 

1099 

1AH 

15H 

1A 

4- 

H 



5 

MW 

1AW 

IAN- 

— ■ 

N 

4J5 

111 


iooz 

35 

35 

35 

— 

N 


B 

15 

2H 

2V 

2ft* 





7 

14 

AN 

AN 

AN 


K 




55 

9ft* 

9 

9N- 



I 


24V 14V 
22H 151* 
13 4 

IAN 4ft* 
181* 131* 
,27ft* 10ft* 
71* 31* 

TV* 3V 

a «ft* 

7ft* 4H 
2ft* 1 
2SV 1A 
14V M* 

nw av 


OEA 12 

Ookwtf Mb 3 11 
OdetAn 
OdttBa 

OhArt J4 14 
□Wans 3A .9 21 
OOfcteo 

Oppanti JSt S S9 
OnolHA .15 3.1 
OrtolHB JO 4.1 
Ormond 

OSuIvns 42 28 14 
OxfrdF JGt 5.1 II 
OzarUH JO 18 11 


A 20V 
142 17ft* 
5 5ft* 
IQ 71* 
A 17 
BO 25V 
11 4ft* 
1 5ft* 
7 4ft* 
11 4fth 
7 1H 
29 JON 
21 13V* 
B17 11V 


20V 20V + K 
17V* 17H 

“ SS-w 

25ft* 25V + ft* 
4ft* 4ft* 

5ftk 5ft* 

4ft* 4ft* 

4ft* 4ft*— V* 
1H IV 
20V 20ft* + H 
I3W 13V— V 
101* UW + W 


10W HMG - JO 49 
9V HUBC Mta 30 
4 Halifax Me 3 
7W Hamptl .931 128 
23 HnOvmn -Q5o J 
1BW Honfrd % 68 IS 
v Harvey 

19 l-teters .15 A 
22W H astir pf 200 54 
20V Hasttna 40a 1J 
MH HHtiCre 2860 03 
5W HittiCh 

BH HlttiEx 

'll HetttlM M AS 
9ft* Hetnlck .10 3 

2V HrWar 
TV Heltanl 
w HeimR 
4 HarshO 
1H Hlndrt 
9V Hlplrur 
AW HotlyCp M 13 

20 HmInspf2J5 145 
2BW Honml 1.08 28 
14V Hormlwt 

7ft* HmHar .711 7.9 ■ 
IV HmHwt .277166 
12V HotlPty 180 98 
IV HoftPwt 
3W HmiOT 89*1BJ , 
9ft* HovnE 

Hi* Howl In JOe 15 
14ft* HubeVAs 
15V HuMBi 
AH Husky a Jo 58 


12K 12V 
19V 19H 
5ft* 5V, 
7V 7V 
23V 22V 
35H 35H 
IN. 1ft* 
3ZW 31V 
3AV 3A 
33 33 

25 24V 

9K 9W 
9W 8ft* 
13 12V 

14W 14V 
3ft* 2H 

% 

4 4 

IN IV 
UV* 14H 
I4W 14V* 
20H 20V 
38V* 371* 
19 19 

9W BH 
IV 1W 
1BH 18V* 
5H 5ft* 
4H 4V 
14V 14ft* 
10V 104* 
3ZW 2TN 
33W 22H 
7ft* 7H 


12V— W 

19V 

5W 

7V + W 
22ft* — W 
35ft* 

IV— W 

32V* 4- V 

3AV— W 
33 

24V ft- W 
9H— W 
9 — V 
13 ft- W 
ftftftk 
2ft* 

4Vi + V* 

H 

4 -V* 
IV 

14H— W 
14V*— V* 
20ft* + V* 
3SM +1 V 
19 — W 
9 ft- H 
74* — V* 
18V*— V* 
SH— V* 
4ft* ft- H 
14V— H 
10H— K 
22ft* ft- Vs 
23ft* ft- V 
7V ft- H 


4ft* 
7W 
4H 
AH 
13V 
AK 
2V 
IN 
14ft* 
39 . 
3V 
20V 10V 
2ft* 1H 
EI4V 96 
34ft* 24K 
11H SK 
16V AW 
5H TU 
AN 4 Ml 
31W 2ZH 
39 AH 
10W 4W 
22V WH 
BK 1ft* 
3H Mb 
34W 25 
9V 4V* 

27V 22W 
19V UN 
17V UK 
UV 7N 
AH 3V 
14V 3V 


Non Dollar 


Yea 5, — pjh.) after dedoctioa of 15% Japa - 
neseux “ Yen 75, — ™ Dtk. 1, — pcrCUR, 
ar. I00ahs~ Yen 75a— - Dtk fa— per 
■CDR, repr. L000 sbs. Whhout sn Affidavit 
20% Jap. lax - Yen J00,— - D6s. 1,34 per 
CDRrW. 100 ahs. Yen 1XXXI— - 
ECk. 13.-10 per CDR. nepr, l.OOQaha^ will br 
d w d o ciod. After 12^0.1985 the (fiv. will only 
he paid under dedoctioa d 20% Jap. tax «du 
reap DOa. 557; DOs. 53,70 net per CDR, 
npr. rap 100 and 1.000 aha. each, in »<xnr- 
■dance with the Japan ese tax regulations. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 
Ansterdam, L3th August, 1965. 


r i 


Weekly net asset value 

Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 

on Aug. 19 , 1985 : U.S. $ 122 . 44 . 

Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 

Information: Piereon, Heldring & Pierson N.V., 

Merefi gr actit 214. 1016 BS Amsterdam. 


B 

A ICEEn 



12 

5 

AW 

AN 

AH— V 

55W 

I9H ICHB 



7 

94 

46 

44H 

45 —1 

7N 

2H ICO 



250 

2B 

2W 

2W 

ZW 

3N 

2N 1PM 




59 

2 ft* 

2N 

29* 

17ft* 

AH IRTCp 



37 

24 

17V 

17 

17 — K 

A 

2ft* 

4N 185 

IN ImpG* 

.12 28 
.lie 4J 


1 

73 

% 

4V 

2W 

&+K 

ZV 

IV Implnd 




12 

TV 

IV 

IV 

40V 

29ft* imnOlig 160 



151 

37V 

37W 

37W 

13V 

AW Inflaht 



U 

15 

11N 

119* 

UN + W 

BW 

11 Instrns 

38 

18 » 

A 

19V 

19H 

19H— K 

2V 

IN InstSy 



8 

209 

IV 

1H 

IV 

3W 

2N InsSyat 

J5t 108 


13 

2W 

2N 

2W + V 

12V 

AN IntCtvg 

60 



293 

13 

12V 

12N + W 

IAN 

11V infmk 

-12b 

8 


3 

15H 

15V 

15V + H 

4V 

2V intBknt 
N IntBkwt 




304 

3ft* 

* 

3N • 

IN 




114 

IN 

1 

17V 

AV IntHyd 



21 

5 

7W 

7W 

7W— N 

UN 

9 IIP 

.96 

f.T 

42 

5 

ION 

10W 

lew + w 

7N 

3W IntPwr 



40 

1 

5N 

5N 

SH 

4V. 

IN IntPrat 




1 

3W 

3W 

3W 

9 

A InfScaw 




1 

AH 

AN 

AN 

10V 

A lntThrn 



2B 

322 

AN 

AV 

AV— N 

10V 

A inThrpf 




27 

AN 

AV 

AV 

4N 

W intota 




233 

V 

V 

V + N 

22V 

12V Ionics s 



12 

72 

28N 

19V 

19V— V 

41 

19H inwBrd 



M 

IS 

48 

40 

40 

4W 

ZV Ifldty 

JOB 

28 

26 

11 

2ft* 

2N 

ZH 


*2 

4 » » 
74 AH AV 
SI M W 
2B Sft* 5W 
2 714* 71ft* 
35 7ft* 7V 
016 IBM 1SW 
104 1AV 15V 

s in m 

1 3M 3V* 

a isw 

TO 3N 

US 10V 

m* 

AW. 


V 

S . low 
10V 

u. 7m 

* l# 1 . 

„ 23ft* 

s * 

w» 14ft* 
,, AV 

5 'F 

„ 4N 
™ UN 
A4N 
9V 

nw 

19N 


9H VSTn 
12V VoOyRs 
in* Vafewra 
2ft* Vwff 
UW VtAmC 
3ft* VtRstl 
H Verna 

OU-vumlt 
ZV.VdrtMA 
5 vkitacn 
5W Vfcan 
m vbiltM 
IS VTrco 
53W VoJntf 
AN VJswjtQ 
8 Wpln 
14ft* VuIcCp 


1^0 7J U 
M 1 3 15 

^ObU W 

jt m ia 


84<r J 1J 

JO 38 9 
A 41 H 
80 44 13 


10* 4 Quabos 


A8 9N 9H 9N + V 


7V 5V* Jacobs 
5W 2V Jet Am 
2 W Jet Awl 
9ft* 4V Jetran 


UN TV JohnAm 80 38 11 290 8V fl 


23 AW A A — M 

342 3V 3H 3V + W 

42 V « V + » 
13 7W 7W 7W 

31 3ft* 34* 3* + V 


lift* 5V Johnlnd 
7V 3W JmpJk n 
36 34V Jupiter 


290 ffU a I — V 

1 A3 9ft* a 9ft* +1H 

15 3ft* 3 W 34* 

1 M 36 34 


— — ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) August 21, 1985 

. Wei fl”* y”lj* qu otations nra anWPgwl Mr ftp Funds Hated wtthtbe axcnpHon of some gums band on Uw mien. 

The marginal symbols ladtcate frequency of quotations supplied: (A -daffy; tw I -weekly; (b> -bUnanttilv; (rj - regularly; (I) - meoafarlv. 


SF 89180 
5F 119080 
S 115080 
SF 
5F 
SI 
SF 


T 4377 
Y 17817 


39W 30W 
4ft* IN 
13 Wftfc 
W 9V 
34 15H 

23ft* 13V 
9W Sft* 
17W B 
B 3N 
9W SH 
4N 2K 
4ft* 3Vh 
5 3ft* 
5H M 
5V 3N 
3H 2 
17N 10V 
|AV 10K 
SOW 22ft* 


KnGxpf 480 1 
KOPOkC 
RavJn JOe 
KearNf M : 
Ken win 80a . 
Keklnri JBt : 
Korea JO* : 

Key PH jo 1 

KevCo 

KevCaun 

Klddowt 

Kllem 

Kkxrk 

Kiiby 

Kit Mfa 

Kteerv 83r 

Kneao 

Knoll 

KagerC 2-32 I 


7 IN 
3H 2H 
15V UN 
14V 9W 

27V 21W 
9H 31* 
31N 17N 
AN 3ft* 

M 3& ^ 
4 2W 
3N IV 
3tH 27V 
14V 10V 
14W B 
15V 9W 
UN IP 


LSB 

LaBam 

LndBnn M 3.9 9 
Laser 34 

Lauren 33 

LearPP 380 138 
Lo*PH It 

LrtUaiis .DM J 10 
LeteurT 6 

LblFPIt A0 18 10 
UfalW 
LHtkf 
Lndaa 

Lorlmr 18 

Lumex JOB 8 31 
Lundy E 17 

Lurta » 

Lvdal 4 


9 13 
5 14V 
4 I9N 
36 18 
11 BW 
693 UN 


1554 2W 

2 4N 

3 2W 
190 174* 

56 15H 
99 2th 


26 IN 
A 3H 
72 15W 
41 ION 
1 9W 
A3 23W 
81 AN 
1 2BW 
77 5K 
UB 27V* 
16 1H 
55 3W 
B IV 
144 35W 
57 1AW 
123 13V 
44 10U 
13 13V 


37W + W 
3ft* — N 
1TO+ W 
14 V— W 
19W + V 
18 + V 

BW + N 

nw + w 

3N 

SN— V 
4 — H 
3H— N 
3W 

3N + N 

4N 

2W 

17ft* + H 
1SV + V 


IN— N 
2H— W 
ISW + H 
10N— V* 
9W + ft* 
22N 
A 

28ft* 4- V 
SN — V 
27 — V 
1H— N 
3ft* 

IV 

3&* 

1AW + H 
13V— ft* 
KV 
13V 


133 10N 10 
1 18V 1W 
12 25ft* 25W 
37 IN SH 
A 17V 17 

ai ¥ 

si ion in* 

5 4H 4H 
9 8V II* 
M AN AW 
A 2K 2V 
1 I4H I4H 
3 AAW A4N 
IS ft tv. 
20 99* 94* 

12 1BH I7V 


59 54* 

1 15W 
879 17V* 
30 % 

1 BH 
64 U7W 
80 19 
A 10 
1H 
3ft* 
9W 
1H 
AN 


10 

18V— N 
25H + W 
9ft* + V 
17V* + N 

’Sh + n 

•W— N 
AN— N 
SK 
14N 

44W + W 
BH 
9W 

1IH + H 


Sates (Inures are 


AMEX Highs-Lows 


AmCantind 

IntrCtvGsB 

Sarvctron 


NEW HKSHS U 

Am Israel Dynaer 

NontR^ 


rrontterHoW 

SJW» 


New Issue 
August, 1985 




This advertisement appears 
as a matter of record only. 


DM - DauTKjie Hark.- Bf- Belgium Figia: FL-Dvlefl Florin; LF - Luxembourg Pi 
PAf *10Jo Sl.oerunltj NA ■ Not Available: NX. - NotComnnnUcafBdjo - New; S-susaended 
Redompt- Prlee- Ex-Cowan; “ - Formerlv Viter IdwWe Fund LM; 6 ■ Offer Price IncL 3% or* 




GUROFIMR 

Europaische Gesellschaft fur die Finanztemng won Ei sen bah n mate rial 
Soclele europeenne pour le Mnancomenl de material ferroviaire 
Society europea per il flnanzlamento di material® ferroviarto 

DM 70,000,000 

Private Placement 

6% Deutsche Mark Notes of 1985/1989 


Deutsche Bank 

Aktiengesellschaft 






























































































CUWm ^MARKi!S 

Dollar Declines in Most European Trading 

widespread predictions of more in- •** at Swiss francs, down 

S3F»“ 

Foreiga^xchanae dealers *»;a The dollar finished in London at ^ ^ doDar closed at 237. 
tlwU-S-govenun^siinwaitlSlL 2.7690 Deuisdie marks after Men- yen. On Tuesday in London, l 
sion of its estimate for^Sl ' m S at 2.7772. Earlier in Frankfort, J oQ ^ ^ al 237 JO yen. 

tor second- ,i„iw •> 7sn DM. ““rr.Tr* u— 


hf.b AI.P TRIBUNE. THURSDAY. AUGUST 22, 1985 




Page 13 


Tuesday. §36-85 cm Tuesday. Laier, m Lon- 

The dollar finished in London at ^ dcrilar closed at 237.15 
7690 Deutsche marks after open- ve _ qq Tuesday in London, the 

- ..<1 TW ^ n IL_ Cnmlrfflrt J. _ i i wV) oft 


sion of its estimate Sr^ecrmlt “8 « 2 . 7772 . Earlier in Frankfort , mAei al 237 JO yen. 
quarter growth in its erossaaSmai ^ dollar was fixed at 2.7813 DM, one U5. bank dealer said dollar 
product to 2 percem^Sdav^! “P ^ 2:1652 DM previously. • - m New York sent the cur- 

"rankrurt said tne y down. 


product to 2 percent Tuesday was 
02 m earfy trading in 


Dealers in Fi 


rcacy down. 
“This has 


aed a lot recem- 
is so quiet it is 


luggea ou m eariv trwtina Tr rcncy aown. 

Europe. y iraaing m i^fing was mostly between banks « TMc has happened a lot reccct- 

In July, GNP which » and ** activity picked up. in W j y and the market is so quiet it is 
the total output afternoon. . . difficult to judge whether it is a 

vices induding income from for- Bank traders were squaring their - genuine movement or not, he aaa- 
“8n investments, had been emeet- positions following uncertainty by cd. 

I to rise 1.7 percent, aaTmost U.S. traders as a result of the oNP - AntHWlar feeing? j 2SS 
vestors had been ejmectine a revision, analystssaid. •• ed to piw»3 ^ 

Jwnward revision. CTpeCUn * “We’re waiting for new UJ5. data a revival by the U.S. economy ap- 

<»r\_ i , .... ... .i /ImW 


downward revision. *^Ve re waiting for new ua aaia 

“On balance, there isn’t' much 10 sh0OW w ***?■ 0DC 
evidence that the US. economic assertcd - 
powth ts picking np speed,” one But the dollar gained in Paris, 
1-ranitlurt dealer commented. ending at 8.4995 French francs, np 
In London, the dollar lost from 8.441 francs previously. 

around tn fht* Riiiich nn-.j J ... m.. , T r» — ■ m—AmA it, 7n, 


me aouar lost from 8.441 wanes pn 
ground to the British pound despite The U.S. currency 

THE EUROMARKETS ” 


me dealer pruned. 

The U.S. government is to re- 
I in Paris, lease Thursday data on July dura- 

fpwiwt , np Me goods, the consumer price in- 

441 francs oreviously. dex and money supply figures for 
U.S. currency ended in Zu- the latest week. (AP, Reuters) 


Taiwan to Drop 
More Tariffs 

Reuters 

TAIPEI — Taiwan, under 
growing U.S. pressure, agreed 
to lower tariffs and import 
more American products to re- 
duce its hefty trade surplus, its 
foreign trade chief said 
Wednesday. , 

Vincent Siew, director of the 
Board of Foreign Trade, said I 
that Taiwan would send a “buy 
American** mission next month 
to purchase S380 million worth 

of products. . 

He said that its shopping list 
would include machinery and 
1.27 million tons of grains, in- 
cluding 630.000 tons of maize, 
351,000 tons of wheat, 240,000 
tons of soybeans and 52,000 
tons of bariey. 


* - 

Chicago Merc Is Facing j 
Challenge From Board I ■ — 

(Continued from Page 9) Trade, and the Merc responded by _ . 

fluctuations, and three-month Eu- applying to the Commodifies \Jte- 
rodollar futiires to hedge against £*««*- J35 

interest-rate swings.^ aco^^f^^^based ■£«£- 

Futures contracts are agree- an The SAP. OTC mast. * ” 

ments to deliver or receive com- The Merc “d^ard^_Tr^e Can °l t5 

modities or currencies at a sped- are expected to 

Tied time and price. Options give OTC mdex contract ^ 

investors the right, but not theobh- year, and oddsmakm opect the 

gation, to buy or sell something at a wo exchange to dad tong and 
specified time and price. hard to get the bulk of the OTC «3£ 

“For a longtime the Board erf m^ business. K?3Un ,a,T ^ 

Trade couldn't do a thing right, Itwiilbearealannpefifive^ t wo** *$32 
said Mr. Melamed, who now serves tie, sad Mr. Brodsky. “Everyone ^^=2 EhS 
as special counsel to the Merc’s feels that one^exebange wil sm> p*s*™_ - 

board. “They got the reputation of viye. The other B expected jj*rfkerla»* 

S’Sjsgjtaii-. - 

■wsrst- Mr. sss rSSSi 8 
ississ-isssai sssas 


Earnings 

——a 


r , , nn u.,rf.nn Mormon OrouP 

Britain DO¥ltB,H ^ >n , ti . 3 MQUBT. ins vm 

aodQMT. M« 5w5nw— sy 

Stawiord Chartered Bk ^ ^ ^ SJ 

WH iws 1«4 SrSffiwZ: nf ™ 2J2S.__ wS SB 

PnfaxtM— ins JM2 wmt i 19*5 ISM BS?”* ni % 3U» 

Per Shore— B» rSJ^S*— 

^ MOV Dept. Stores 

rnnnn l?*i t*1 lneUfUes um/SVOl — j guar. IMS ISM 

. ZmofSHLtamW**. SSISS’— ta 


Canon 

ms ism 

27UKL 22ZMD 

ZZ 2MM. 17^ 
1970 I9SS 


Deere 

toss 


K70 Mav Dept Stores 

*»' xadQuar. Ml W 

£» 0J6 

ISM IjtrMf. J5 tW 


?aas- m % ^ ’is 

pSs&SZ: oS 043 w Share— 


Mt! S^iz SS Ss 

ssskl- ( 4 K ^ tas 

wfe 1 ' - ^ P«r — «. ■- 

ess^dlHBt 

ProHi (oHaB. ^ quorter ond O morrfM.ro- 

Per Shore — — 42S0 st»ctt*ly, vsS5JiriWJonca*t 


Neiherlaais 

Nedcrtond.MUden.Bk 


Per Shore — t-M 

Norway 

EDcem 

iBt Hxof ms 


XZlS mllUon tow «M™ V- S£-VJ 5 vi 

w ”"- 


per aaoro roe 

3-for-2 stock spot otfookm 
Oct.xmk 

Penney ti-CJ 

adOMr. rs(B ism 

R e venue «n4 “ft 

Met Inc. — — 3M 
PwrShara — M 0 M* 
lOMf 1*» «« 

Revenue S«. 5SJ®: 

NMinc. tog 

Per Shore — W7 1-5* 


How Par Brothers lnt*l 
lit Mad ISM ,J2*S 

sr- ,! ss 


By Peter Conradi lOW-pexcent issue, due 1993 and 

Rouen priced at par, with Union Bank of 

LONDON — Borrowers tapped Switzerland (Securities) Ltd. as the 
virtually all sectors of the Euro- maMger. 

- V bond market Wednesday with a ^ m the Notnuralntor- 
' crop of new issues that included national Ltd. officially launched a 
two more dollar-stmi ght iwnes and S2Q0- millkm, 13-4«ar flo^mg" 
a couple of dual-currency yen/dd- rate-note issue for National Bank 
lar bonds, dealers said. of Hnngary to a mxal receptwn. 

But trading on the secondary Some dealers said 
market continued quiet, with dot coupmi of W porat above tte ax- 
lar-straight-bond prices up H to W month London intebank offCTal 

point from TuesSa/s dose and r ate r® snot « c r°S!^S™v 
floating-rale notes imdumged u> ^^memn^tetkiswew- 
slightiy higher. mg % poml over Libor was o^rng 

On the heels of Tuesday’s $400 mterest in 
million of doflar-straight Euro- ^ 

bonds, the Dutch insurance com- St the^ssne was 

pagy, Aegon NV, laimdud aS75- 


" (Ccatinued from Page 9 ) 

Borrowers Tap Virtually AU Market Sectors 

- msss gfflga ws 3H£S3 k 

sStoland (Stcuritics) Ltd as Ibe -J“Jr “ ‘“fg,,* U yaar cut hadt forte. 


bte goods, the consumer price in- , T af Trade has put it together and done ooen a ED "ms m* 

faSmofley supply figures for 4 nalvfit T IkPJSl a good job. It’s not taking away arrangement^ mve stors can opoa^ SJS2. — ® “ft 

AnaiysiMKeb ^m*™***- recSSSSM “ 

- Market Signs ^JME» h £ iSrrSrS 

° tures contract, the Board of Trade’s step imrard rotmd-l 1 ^ 

(Continued from Page 9 ) financial futures volume rose mg and ^ SmaS Atria* 

r 1 and the Federal Reserve moves to sharply to 39 million contracts last changes to seek their own overseas 

[(OUTKiSt SGCtOT& stimulate the economy, but be year, from 7 million in 1980 . In- bnks. rip will he the de- ' 'm* 

Stbe negative elanents will L-ed, the Mere's 1984 volume of The next decade wiB «^g! g gg 

, d IBJ SiTraSly on Wall SlreeL ^million conliacis was wdl ta- ode Asia, jasl as te last •« 

1^? i°^SLnh]r fnr^Jmil “As the economy continues to low the 74.4 million contracts trad- ins GFSA ^ 

SSSS SS5SP £=i" 


9^ SSrtrffiWnigjltonfron*®}* 


non from 
lon/su/r- 


Smlltrfleld Foods 
U» Qoor. IMS 1IM 

Paw— III - llU llM 

gSTST— gtoMw 


Fed. DoM. Stores 

m Ouor. t*u Tondv 

RcvBnu * a wn 4HIOW. IMS 19M 

Not IOC. — — 2e! ^ RmiMHM — *56.1 a7J 

UtHcrtf Iff l?Sf Par Short — M* 


Senth Atria* 

De Boers Comwlld. 


likely lead manager. u v£ ^hSvear at an Stiially ruling out the chances for h^ve traditionally dominated. ■»* « J hope m the nart oe^ 

Late in the day, Nomura Inter- cribble mje ‘ “W. w D aWabullmSkeu” he said. “I m “You’re seeing a lot of creative well get that land of result from Anted stores 

national Ltd. officially launched a cffc ? 1 ^ wM ^mmSiately cautious about Wall Street, al- thinking coming out of the Board teun . ■ “tS5T-_ aJ?S mm 

5200- nriUkm, 15-year floating- maAel ™ ^olS «237 though tbe downside risk is limited, 0 f Trade,” said Jack Zaner, manag- To Nrt,nc - — ^ 

rate-note issue for National Bank avaMe. Tta yra ^ at^ turnip ing partner of the Chicago-based futures, the Mtwobtamedtitengt 

of Hungary to a mixed reception. His buy list, headed by Eastman Futures Discount Group. “Tbe hut month to trade^futureson me 

Some dealers said the issue’s K^^nphasizes mtSlinational Merc seems to be catching its Nihon 

coupe® of 14 point above the ax- and SSpaiiSihat stand to benefit breath.” 

month London interbank offered taSIwfparibas forna declining dollar. Other There is intense rivalry between Japanese stocks- Mereomcials 

rate was not |CBffcms mo^i, not- Lees are IBM. G^eral Oecirk the Board of Trade and the Merc to 


GFSA 

Year 19*5 

Pretax NW— 22S3 

United Stale* 


SJSS.- 3S. ^ 

;£* .£» P^aSrSII «* w* ilKS 

Flrerton* Tire wicl 

Manor. W*5 IJM 

’SS ^ SSTTffiz; 

Not Inc. “™ Ss Over share— 

Per Share— Ml 7 V\J 1 !r 

19*5 I9M g*U2_ 

Mft SSSmS”” 


060 06* 
19*5 19M 

s a 

ill 175 


Revenue 

Net Inc. 

Per Shore — 


HM KJ722* *500 

w * KJsfeJz: Si 

tm net taekjdn tsKtruenS- 


WlckesCos 

■■u ]■< soar. IMS I**J 

J® SH2SSS — *fts 

Oner Net — »■** Jg 

U* Oner Share— MS M2 
1fM MHaU 19M IBM 

iaS Revenue 1^ 

**£ OPerMet— « 


etan ._ 

198* rYtorword*. 


:«■ 

jnff- 

a/ SZ5 mUtion. 


Net Inc. — - 
Per Share — 
lit Half 
Revenue — 


31A 1671 

178 076 

19BS 1984 
\jna ijT 4 j» 


extraordinary Stains aiSSmll- jjj million. 

Per aft aro /gwri ft ottfie tfed >° 

3S'S5SSf‘ rfpn ’^ 


meat 

o t *77 million to Quarter r ond 


L.r,.U" dex. a Tokyo newspaper S index JOT imnetbotoportodstnck*** nwrtMMttnflo **£**%" Revenue — 

breath. uww,a«u*jv aatnotsi.u o short from salt goto of Sit million tram sale. ^ lnc _ 

There is intense rivalry between Japanese stocks. Merc otncuus ^ „ omt-Hme cmtov of ® per share — 

sbStSKfS'Kt m s*s 


Winn Enterprise* 
tatouar. IMS jg* 

Revenue 1 ft] 

Net Inc. Mj Ki 

P mr Share— M* 


pany, Aep Nv, launched a i/> , h . 

SoTsevun-year issue paying 

l(m pacent and priced at pS: ^^.JL^SSrfSoriina- 

The U mm Mo™ ' 

Guaranty Lt^^d A^s bond ^ md Ocstentachischc 

was callable in the fifth y^aLj®Jr jCnntroDbank added to the recent 
deduupg by Vi point a year there-, dual-currency bonds that 


ESB ^Tf« 

ssrlTil felj 

l aunche d new Eurobond issues. Swiss f - handemuract has steered £ 3 x ta. 1982 ,is to make the Mm ^TSSSZn 


fill ilUu ev m 

ugapore Exchange to help m- Anne, an Rj* 
ease that exchange’s whirne. BISS'— 

Another challenge facing Mr. Njt^r bj* o5u 

mdskv. who ran the options de- i«s m 


3rd Qoor. 
Ravcnue — 
Net Inc. — - 
PcrShora— 
9 Months 

Ravonua 

Nat Inc. 

par Sltara— 


19*5 19M 

3609 356jt 

9J6 5J1 

099 054 

ms in* 

1400 i4aL 
217! tijn 
157 12B 


19M »MJ "*7 WtaMwfi? grd»; 

3 sJ 3 oarv chaan of SXteoOfiram 

sSl debt raWromaglantfPQ*Mg< 
054 JSW 08 vs » 5 a«W from tax 
JgHmrvftnMnlgata. 


West 


around its total 1%-percent fees at 
a discount of about 1% 

Bond market sources said RJ- 
Reynolds Industries Inc. was tm 
the verge of issuing a $1 00-million, 


quoted at 98.125 on the market, launched np' E^bood ^u^ ' 

just inside its 2-percent fees. Canadian Pacrfic Lid. issued_ 75 — - 

In the other sectors of the prima- million Canadian dollars of five- . 

„ _ . . . luuul ry market, issues from Anheuser year bonds, paymg Wf* W. German Car Reastranoc 

ftiXak and Oesloidcliische Ld priced al I® 1 - with Wood 

.hEmsF®""^ sassssassas: 

a ‘S n ^riMSai^saidRJ. AnbaeaffBu^^J-bfflim- jS 4?S?uJdS^ S. yea r-fr ^ed - 

SSK BSBllBSll^ 5 eral Motor Office said Wednesday. 


the Board of Trade's Treasray Boiange tafore jomng ine SSSStf maM.!* “‘“’“S? <n< «“■ 
bond contract lias steered so much .n IMluioinakeaeMn ctoow n ^ M *« -««» gawj^ « n— 

volume — and so_ many comnus- al ian op W Intauuy « « 

q 0QS — u> the senior institution. 1984, it began trai umg 1 up i9is i9M hdh ms mf 

' The lwo exchanges came into gSMn ™ ^ 

fh«r mn« rtirttt OMmetitioD last since added options on Bntidi tun - Ktsiwto— .om_ » Ptntox 

arcsssTsa j 

«®st aca-M -<W 

awarded the index to the Board of June. . 


BMf 

Locfcy Stare* MHdl ms ifM 

tori Boor. 1985 198* bJJSSo 2M3 mm 

MNWMja — Uia SSSNrt- 1 - asB - 

P^Staro— MB Hoechxt 

gas— uS ® ■■ JSt aSK 


VCXJR GUDETO DB^ING WBL 
PATRICIA WB1S 
IN FRONTS Wffl®® SECTION 
OF THE BIT 



Prices 


UMoiih 
HMiLwq Sto* 

% 

5** 
71% 

B 

32M 

am 

15%6 
34 


Ida* la 
Wv.YM._m_t 


Nil 

*i Low 1 Pi* OiVe 

im 17W TMfc— Vti 
ia 17W rm 
1W 1W Jin t 


HlffSir S Mcfc PI*. VI4 . 

15% 7W EnFot* 

I7V, Bvs Enw>hs U 

21W 10 E1120BI 

21 %i 11 W Equal , n 

ffM m Eaton 30 2 S 

i&M 25«i ErlcTl J5e 12 

34Vt II Evn5ul 
16VS We Exavlr 


Satala 
I00S High 


NN 

oe 1 PAt ChVe 

15Vb 15V. + % 
15 IS 
lOTh lWh— W 

im in*— vh 
7 7 


IlMnntn. 

Hlsdi low 6toO_ 


Sales hi Ntl I 

Dlv. YM. iS HMl W IPMOiW 


24W IJV* 
9 4U. 

S3 2014 
2 *% 13*6 
17V. 104a 

'9> 

6l'- SSV. 
41Mi 23 
BVi 4 Vj 
1314 7Vs 
111* 3 
2m 13 
14W «4 

1AW 9Hi 
29Vs 13 


KVA n 

KV Phr „ 
Kaman M 
Karchr 
Knsler JOr 
Ktwtal 
Kemp 1 JO 
KvCnLf 
Kevex 
KevTm 
Klmbrk 
Kinders A6 
Krov 0* 
Kruger J2, 
Kulche .131 


19W 19W 
m kVa 
2714 2444 
IM 15* 
12V. iavk 
m> 9v* 

5744 56*4 
yiYs 38VY 
644 644 

844 044 

5 A 

20'A SI 
7V4 644 
14W 14 
1414 1444 


19W + >4 
644 + Vs 
2744 +1 
1614 + M 
12V4— V4 
9V» 

57V4 + V> 
394m + 44 
644 — *4 
144 + '4 

20* + «• 


12 Month 
Hlah LDP SMcfc 

4844 22VS OptlcR 
19W 1144 OftWW 
8 M. 5*. Ortrit 

7 4 OrfoCo 

m 14 oshrnn 
3444 25V. OftrTP 
15 9*4 OvtExp 

24V4 13 OwenM 
tn IA Oxoco 


ukM KB 

Dlv. YM. iS Ha* Ubv 3 PM. OrV 

n p*W 

™ ss aj*i» 

^ SSS£«=5 

M 73 V 44 w 


12 Month 

mdiLop Star* t 

3444 1116 SMMIC , 
37 19 Stl*ilWS-l 

34 Vb 1744 StaSIBs 
694 344 StotoG 
744 416 Stehier 
1714 10W StewStv 

mill sw SHW 
1BW 744 Stratus 
38 VS 2644 StneOs 
3516 i9va Stryker 
171% 97 Sudani 
69 35VS SubrB 
544 ZM Summa 
144* 7 SumtHI 

3\4 14 SunC*t 

KJVi fiV> SunMcd 
614 3 Suartes 
3 14 vISVkas 

14 614 SvmhT 

1414 614 Synteat 
54 4 2*6 Synirex 

1*44 11V» Svsam 
2614 1414 5VA>0C 
716 3WSY4MI1 
1144 644 SVSJTTtB 

1116 6VS SvsTQn 
25VS 1244 systml 


Scries hi 

mm hm Law 1 1 

M 1614 1594 
I 3 2244 2244 

2W 3214 3144 

: §4 416 4 

78 444 4*4 

440 1844 17 

7 614 6V1 

2216 1616 1514 

1 11 3444 3444 

12 32V. 3214 

g 91 167Vh USVi 

a 202 43A 62 

24 244 Wi 

9 ,30 1144 ll» 

315 144 IS 

539 914 844 

263 <14 4*4 

415 14 « 


Net 
PM. CMm 

16W+W 

2244 

32—46 
416 + 14 

1^-14 

W4 + JJ 
3444- *4 
32*4 + VS 
16714 +1 

6316+1W 

244 + Vh 
1114 

144 + 16 

1 9 +16 

. 4J6+* 


10V> Wfc 
1344 13 


1014 

13 — *4 
1W + W 

9*4 

11*4 

25—16 





































u 

p 


c 

r 


L 


* 


Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 1985 



PEANUTS 



r 

THEN I SOT IN THE RI6HT 


I WAS IN THE BANP 



ROOM.ANP SATIN THE 


FOR THREE RW5 BEFORE 


5 

WRONG DESK ..I HPNT 6ET 


P15C0VERS? 0UR5CH0O1 


“ r 

MY LOCKER OPEN 


POKNTWve A BANP. 1 



THE WHOLE YEAK-y 


zr^w- 

"A 


1 




|?\ 


s 

■p 



L Ji 

1 


I THINK I'LL 5I6N UP 
FOR STAVING HOME.. 



BOOKS 


I Nanny's 
vehicle 

5 Actor Duncan 
9 Shoot from 
cover 

14 Director 
Wertmiiller 

15 At all 

16 Kind of society 

17 Hebrew lyre 

18 Casa part 

19 Neural 
networks 

20 Give a report 
that's cm the up 
and up 

23 "As You Like 
It” place 

24 Some parka 
wearers 

26 "A Boy 

Sue” 

30 Intersecting 
line in 
geometry 

31 Developer's 
concern 

34 Disintegrates 

36 Sunglo. e.g. 

37 Date to beware 

38 Curtaining 
materia] 

39 Middle name 
of Chan's 
creator 

40 An uncle of Saul 

41 Where Church 
met Bible 


42 Actual being 

43 OPEC is one 
45 A contempo- 
rary of Edison 

47 Glyceryl ester 
49 God, loan 
Iranian 
53 Talk openly 

57 Singer John of 
musicals 

58 Raced 

59 Direction in 
Dijon 


8/22/85 

12 Some Borgias 

13 Failed Const, 
addition 

21 Wycherley’s 

“Love 

Wood” 

22 Ancient Jewish 
ascetics 

25 Rubberneck 

27 Ethiopian 
ruler: 1889- 
1913 

28 Where Mayo is 


60 Bilkoor Kovacs 29 "The Citadel 


61 Sicilian city 

62 Kind of iron 

63 Sycophantic 
words 

64 Condemn 

65 Actress 
Thompson 

DOWN 



OUR THREE SELYES: 

The life of Radclyffe Hall 

By Michael Baker. 386 pages. Illustrated. 
$17.95. 

William Morrow, 105 Madison Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. 10016. 

Reviewed by John Gross 

Ayf ARGUERITE Radclyffc-HaU — she 
JVL dropped the Marguerite and the hyphen, 
and to her friends she was always “John — 
publishing poetry, at her expense, in 
1906, wien she was in ha 1 20s: unremaikaWe 
lyrics, winch lent themselves to being setto 
music as drawmgHroom ballads. After World 
War I she turned to fiction. Her first novas 
enjoyed a moderate dazree of u^-mddk- 
brow success. Then in 1928 came "The Well of 


Loneliness." which promptly got banned m 
the UrntedS tales for its open 


Britain and — -7--- — 
presentation of lesbianism. 

This was enough to confer mtemaaonal 
fame. When the American ban was lifted ion 
appeal, the book became a runaway best seller, 
and though British readers had to wait imm 
1949 to buy copies over the counter, they could 
get hold of an edition printed in Paris. “The 
Well of Loneliness” has been reprinted many 
Hitim, ip many lnrc 113 ^”. and most readers of 
fiction are probably still aware of it, if only by 
hearsay. 

Raddyffe Hall's mother's family came from 
Philadelphia. On the Fjiglish side, her grandfa- 
ther was a prominent physician; her father, 
who rejoiced in the njWne Radclyffe Radclyffo- 
HalJ (and in the nickname “Rat"), decamped 
soon after she was bom and devoted the rest of 
his ratify short life to gentlemanly idleness, 
leaving her to the mercies of a mother who 
bullied awl neglected her. At 2 1, she inherited 
her -grandfather's fortune — he had had no 
illiiqnfw about his son, and had willed it direct- 
ly to her — and made her escape. 

At first that meant travel, country life (she 

sericsof'^^^usive relatiotulhips with other 
women. Then, when she was 27, she fell in love 
with Mabel Batten, familiarly known as “La- 
dye," who was 23 years her senior — a famous 
beauty (though she bad begun to put on 
weight) and a renowned amateur lieder anger. 

T a4i mV Uiiptian/1 u/vnrimv'ivl in fhA 


Trowbridge, a married woman inher ^Al- 
though Ladye tried to take a tMtamUOThc^- 
inz attitude, there was an inevitable buflmro of 
tension, and: one quarrelsome evening she had 
a stroke, from which she died a few days lattt 

The following year Una went to hve with 
Radclyffe HalL and not long afterward she and 
ho- husband, an admiral who bad found him- 
self in deeper waters than be was accustomed 
to, signed a legal deed of separation. Both 

women had been left with a huge sense of gpflt 

about Ladye, which they were able to alleviate 
only by nuking a cult of her memory, arrang- 
ing for Masses to be said far her and burning 
votive candles (they were both devout Catho- 
lics), and communing with her through a medi- 
um. (they were also spiritualists, inconsistent 
though *na> might seem with their Catboh- 

ri»m j 

The wyncps remained a feature of their life 
together over the.next 25 years. As JMjcbad 
Baker says in his new biography of Radclyffe 
Hall, “Ladye, alive, had proved a source of 
friction and guilt between John and Una. 
Dead, she was transformed for both into a 
combination of idol, confidante and ultimate 
arbiter.” While rally a few dose friends were let 
in on the secret of their enduring connection 
with her, h was hinted alin the decncatioaHall 
used in several or her books, which has provid- 
ed B gjny with his title — “To Our Three 
Selves.” 

At first sight this may not seem a particular- 
ly appealing story, but in Baker’s hands it 
makes riveting reading. You begin by wonder- 
ing whether Hall can sustain a full-scale biog- 
raphy (by now “The Well of LoaeSness” has 
tittle more than limited historical interest; you 
end up by being avid for yet more detail The 
book is saturated in the atmosphere, idiom, 



fashions (Including emotional . fashions) ■ of its 

Lufioar 


Ladye’s elderly husband acquiesced in the 
friendship, and after his death they 


women's friendship, and after his death they 
set up house together. The idyll douded over 
when Hall also became involved with Una 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 

IeMeTvTeI 



EDDIE 


eIei 


IS; 

I0 1 

Id- 
as 
a 

a 

a 

sn 
00 
□□0 

HQ 
D 
ni 

snann 


□□a 



LMlBOBCR 


rlRMzIcHNIElsI 


□ 

0 

a 

0 


□ 

0 

0 

a 

□ 

0 

0 

□ 

□ 

a i 


0 

0 

□ 

□ 


period; it throws fascinating lighten s literary 
world that no longer exists and on a lesbian 
world that was stfllhalf-hldden in thesbadows. 

In the end, however, the chief fascination 
lies in Raddyffe Hall's personality, and in the 
interplay (sometimes . poignant, sometimes 
comic) between her general outlook — which 
in most respects was highly conventional and 
conservative and the rebellious role into 
which she was cast by her determination to be 
honest about her sexual preferences. 

She could be very seignearial, ranariung of 
one bibulous aristocratic guest, for instance; 
that “if you want to have a property run house, 
you can't have people like him around. The 
servants won’t stand fear it" Some of her views 
do her little credit — she was a fervent admirer 
of Mussolini -—and there were times when her 
courage in personal matters was indistinjpiish- 
able from rulhlessness. But she suffered, par- 
ticularly in later life, when she became horribly 
obsessed witha White Russian called Jivguenia 
Soutine who preyed on her for money — a 
painful and rather sinister episode that 
d on for years. 

also did the undeniably brave thing in 
ahead with The Well of Loneliness.” 

: may be dated it iray draw a mislead- 
ing equation between lesbianism and pseudo- 
masculinity, bat to read Baker's account of its 
publication and the witch hunt stirred up 
against it is to acquire fresh respect for its 
author. Her full stray was well worth telling, 
and Baker tells it with a nice sense for of its 
dramatic possibilities. 





8/22/85 


John Grow is on the staff of The New York 
Times. . 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


Unscramble these four Jwnbtes, 
one letter to each square, to [orm 
four ordinary words. 


ENVOM 



zn 

JJ 

e 3v5JZ25 Bp “ "" 


HOOT r 




JJ 


BONGEY 


_LX_ 



MINOOT 


~n~c 



HOW THOSE FOLK© 
WHO ENJQYEP 
EATIN6 GRITS SAN©. 


N ORTH-South gained 
heavily on the diagramed 
deal when South brought 
home an apparently hopeless 
three-no-trump contract 
The opening lead of the dia- 
mond deuce was favorable, al- 
lowing South to win in the 
dosed hand with the eight but 
it might seem that the bad lie 
of the opposing cards doomed 
the contract 

He began by taking a heart 
finesse and losing to the queen. 
East shifted to a dub, which 
was ducked to the queen. East 
ducked the dub return, allow- 
ing dummy’s jack to win, and 


South was now headed for de- 
feat if he made either of the 
obvious plays: taking a second 
heart finesse or attempting to 
take five spade tricks. 


to lead from the spade jack at 
the-fimsb. 


Instead, South cashed the 
diamond king and the heart 
ace, came to bis hand with a 
to the queen and cashed 
diamond ace. He threw a 
spade from dummy, and East 
was helpless. He threw the 
heart king in the hope that his 
partner odd the jade, giving 
South nine tricks. But throw- 
ing a dub would have been no 
better He would have been 
forced into the lead in either 
dubs or hearts and compelled 


NORTH 

♦ A K106 3 
O A 1014 
OKI 
*J3 

EAST 
4JIIS 

^ KQ 5 
O 74 
6A872 
SOUTH CD) 

* Q 7 

OJ72 

0 A 10 98 3 

*KHI4 

North and South wan votamHo. 
Tbn bkkSng; 


WEST 
«43 
O S 63 
O Q J52 
*Q9«S 


Seath 

Wtmt 

Mnrth 

Eas 

FM 

Peaa 

1 * 

Pan 

1 N.T. 

Pans 

2 9 

Pass 

2 N.T. 
PUB 

pm 

Pub 

mr. 

Pan 


Wot fed tte diamond two. 


Now arrange the circled tetters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Print answer here: IN X X X X ^£">1 


Yesterday’s 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: SOOTY OAKEN RATHER MUSTER 

Answer What you might get from astronomers— 
"NO MORE STARS" 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Amsterdam 

Athens 


Beta rode 

Berlin 

Brassed 


Bona past 
Copenhagen 
Costa Del Sol 
Detain 
Edinburgh 
Florence 
FranKfurt 
Geneva 
Helsinki 
Ittantml 
Las Palmas 


Madrid 

Ml km 

Mos c ow 

Munich 

Mae 

Oslo 

Parts 

Frame 

Rerkiavflc 

Rome 

Stack Holm 

Strasbourg 

Van ico 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 

MIDDLE 


HIGH 

C F 

29 84 
20 68 
32 91 

30 86 
29 84 

22 72 

23 73 
27 81 

25 77 
20 68 
29 84 
IB 64 
18 6 1 
36 97 
23 73 
36 79 
20 68 
32 90 
27 81 

29 84 
21 70 
35 95 

30 86 

23 73 

24 75 
27 81 

19 66 
27 81 

24 75 
15 99 
29 84 
18 64 
27 Bt 

20 02 

26 79 
21 70 

25 77 

EAST 


LOW 
C F 
60 
99 


ASIA 


20 

15 
21 70 
19 66 
17 63 
14 57 
17 63 

16 61 


16 61 
15 59 


BeHlM 
Hong Kong 
Manila 
Hew Delhi 
Seoul 
Shanghai 


Toinci 

Tokyo 


11 52 
18 64 


17 63 


It 64 
21 70 


15 59 
48 


21 70 
13 55 


20 68 

14 57 


AFRICA 


Calm 


Com Town 


Nairobi 

Thus 


HIGH 

C 

F 

33 

91 

28 

82 

29 

84 

32 

90 

as 

95 

32 

90 

31 

88 

31 

88 

31 

81 

31 

88 

33 

91 

34 

99 

19 

66 

U 

79 

22 

72 

22 

72 

34 

99 


LOW 


C F 

25 77 r 

20 68 O 

24 75 st 

34 75 Cl 

25 77 s 

23 73 fr 

36 79 o 

25 77 d 

26 79 d 

24 75 fr 


kATIW AMERICA 

Bueno* Aires 


68 <r 
73 fr 

45 d 
68 fr 

46 cl 
— no 
45 d 
70 fr 


Una 20 

Morten 25 

Rio do Janeiro — 


19 66 6 
82 20 
68 II 
77 9 


WORTH AMERICA 


43 fr 
68 r 
52 a 
48 el 
— no 


11 52 


19 66 
14 57 


Anchorage 

Atlanta 

Boston 

Chicago 


Detroit 


Ankara 

Beirut 


30 86 12 54 d 


Tel Avtv 

OCEANIA 


30 IN 
30 86 
32 90 


15 99 fr 

19 66 fr 

23 73 fr 


Miami 
Mimmopofia 
Montreal 


15 99 10 50 ill 
Sydney 18 64 . 6 43 el 

CJ-ctaudy; fotoeov; fr-»olr; tvhail; 
Vwtwwors; nwnw; st-storrny. 


Snaffle 

Toronto 

MtasMngten 


o-overenst; pc-parity 


57 

9 

a 

r 

88 

22 

72 

PC 

73 

17 

63 

PC 

75 

11 

53 

fr 

84 

16 

61 

PC 

70 

10 

so 

d 

90 

24 

73 

fr 

97 

25 

77 

PC 

79 

19 

66 

PC 

91 

2S 

77 

PC 

73 

14 

57 

PC 

75 

15 

59 

Cl 

91 

26 

79 

fr 

79 

18 

64 

PC 

72 

IS 

59 

fr 

73 

12 

54 

PC 

70 

15 

59 

a 

>1 

17 

63 

PC 

cloudy; 

r-rg|n; 


THURSDAY^ FDRIBCA5T — CHANNEL: SI torn. FRANKFURT: Pair Term, 


tel' * H0 *if : Pair. Ten*. 30— a «-«{' 
tel AVIV: No. ZURICH: Fair. Temp. 25 — 12 (77 — 54) RiHainw.' 

KONG KONG: Rain. Temsf^ai 
SEOUL: Shower* Term 

?OtCTO: Pe^.’i^'So^a lit Temp. 31-27 (»-«lT, 


W)Hd Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse Aug. 21 

Citing prices in local currencies unless Otherwise indicated. 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

AEGON 

AKZO 

Ahold 

AMEV 

Attain Rubber 
Amro Rank 
BVG 

BuefurnarmT 
CokmdHldB 
Elsevler-NDU 
Fofckar 
Gist I 


l taogovens 
KLM 


Mat Nedder 
NedUovd 
Oo Vender G 
Pakhoed 
Philips 


Rodamca 
Ro-Staoe 
Roraito 
Royal Dutch 
Unilever 
vonOmmeren 
VMF Stark 
VNU 


511 

411 

101 9910 

13410 123.10 
242 241.50 
277 JO Z7i30 
8J5 15D 

88 87,411 

208 an 

M0 10650 
3750 3750 
13230 13150 
7930 81 

21 9 JO 21550 
M9J31 1SHW 
62 GL10 
SO 59 JO 
5050 4950 
7830 7710 
176 177 

337 337 

6730 BM 
4650 4650 
7550 7450 
132J0 13250 
4&90 6830 


18850 18750 


29.10 29 

269 361 

21450 2UL5D 


ANRXBS Gem index : 21758 
Pravtau* : 216J0 


Aitwd 

Befcoert 

CoduHtll 


EBE5 
GB-Inno-BM 
GDL 
Gevacrt 
Hoboken 
Intercom 
Kredletbenfc 
Petroftna 
Soc Generate 
Soft no 


I860 1645 
5410 S44D 
211 212 
3470 3470 


Solway 
net Ion 


Tract k 
UCB 
Unerg 

vietlle Montaene 


im xun 
1935 1925 
3900 3900 
5370 5280 
2200 2195 
8BS0 0900 
5850 5870 
1775 1795 
7420 7500 
4660 4530 
3790 3760 
5020 5000 
1700 1700 
MOD 7710 


current Stack lades : 233052 


AEG-Telefimkan 

Allianz vet* 
Altana 
BASF 
Borer 

Bov Hypo Bank 
Bov Verelnsbonk 
BBC 

BHF-Bonk 

BMW 

Commerzbank 
Cant Gumml 
Datmier-Eera 
Desuna 

Deutsche Bidicock 
DeutsdwBank 
Dresdner Bank 
GHH 
Hammer 


131.10 131 JD 
1373 1361 
361 364 

22 oj 22250 
223 mi 
367 367 

394 


31750 316 

439 428 

20540 as 
14740 145 

090 an 

365 367 

15915750 
55950 551 

270 au 


172 17LgB 


90150 


HoChttat 


Close Pre*. 
700 700 


Hoesch 
Harlan 
HUSMl 
TWKA 
Kail + Sab 
Karstadt 
Kouthof 

KloectaierH-D 
Ktoecknar Werke 
Krapp Stahl 
Linde 
Lufthansa 
MAN 

Mannesman! 
Muendi Ruecfc 
Nlxdarf 
PKI 

Porsche 

Preussoa 

PWA 

RWE 

Rtwlnmetall 

Schwinn 

SEL 

Siemens 

Thvseen 

veba 

Votkawagenwerk 


216J0 2I8J0 

11250 

111 

18750 

186 

36180 

341 

369 

271 


Wella 


30450 30AJD 
258 251 

277 JO 275 

Z775D 27450 
66 62.5B 
110 104 

507JO 49750 
■m cn tw ■ji 

163 16050 
1925019050 
1740 1730 
53750 537 

648 M 
1268 1265 
272 275 

13440 132.10 
188 18750 

315 312 

462 442 

33B 334JO 
542 532 

122 121 X 
235 235 

31480 TO,® 
600 590 


Frew km : HIM 


: : 141658 


Bk East Asia 
Owuna Kona 


China Ugh! 
■■ Island 


Green i 

Hang Seng Bank 
Henderson 
China Gas 

HK Electric 
HK Realty A 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HK Shorn Bank 
HK T e l ephone 
HKYoumatel 
HK wharf 
Hutch Whampoa 

Hvean 

mnettv 
JanHne 
JanHne Sec 

■fniede ■ m m m — M - - 

ivowmon man 

Miramar Hotel 


22 23 

1850 19.10 
1580 16.10 
SJ0 9 
4525 46 

240 250 
10140 1080 


Orient Overseas 


72.10 1240 
38 mss 
520 650 
755 745 

9 925 

1725 175 

7 7 J0 

2840 29.10 
044 045 

0.95 087 

12J0 1120 
1440 15.10 
9 9.15 
45 4650 
7J5 75B 

2 2 


SHK Props 

13.20 

Stehix 

230 


2SM 

Tat aiming 

2 

WohKwana 

WheatockA 

090 

Sun. 


m 

rnmor 

505 

world Inti 

230 

Haas Sena ledex 

M58JS 


Ut 


1125 

090 


186 

2^ 


AECI 

Anplo A m erican 
Anata Am Gold 

Barlows 

Bivyear 

Buffets 

D* Beers 

Drtetontebi 

Elands 


3000 2925 
18300 17700 
1110 1075 
1370 1340 
7400 7250 
1180 1115 
4935 4750 
U66 UM 


Dm Pre* 


GF&A 

Harmony 

Hhietd Steel 

Kloof 

Nedbank 

Pras5tevn 

Ruspktt 

SA Brews 

SI Helena 

Sosa! 

West HoWfno 


3400 2700 
2750 2700 
515 515 

7700 7650 
1365 1375 
5175 5100 
1790 1775 
755 745 

3200 32KI 
683 685 

6100 6200 


Composite Stack Index : 11Z740 
Previous : ha. 


AA Cara 

*121% 

$121% 

AllbN+Lvons 

230 

2X 

Angla Am Gold 

*74 

*73 V; 

As* Brit Foods 

224 

22i 

An Dairies 

148 

1+ 

Barclays 

399 

39i 

Bass 

5B1 

503 

BAT. 

300 


Beedtam 

348 

345 

BICC 

208 

20t 

BL 

34 


Bhiearde 

491 

496 

BOC Group 

293 

284 

Boats 

196 

T94 

Bamter Indus 

316 

320 

BP 

54 

541 

Brit Home Si 

283 

281 

Brit Telecom 

197 

197 

Brit Aerospace 

375 

373 

BrlMI 

210 


BTR 

358 

353 

Bumiafl 

292 

290 

Cable Wireless 

555 

550 

Cadbury Sctmv 

145 

141 

Charter Cons 

IBS 

IB] 

Cemmerctol U 

230 

230 

Cans Gold 

439 

434 

Court ay Ids 

128 


Datoetv 

420 

418 

De Boers « 

480 

485 

Distillers 

308 

297 

Drietonteln 

*20 U. 

*191% 

Flsons 

373 

365 

Freest Gad 


*191% 

aec 



Gen Acddent 

630 

631 

GKN 

231 


Glaxo C 12 29/B 

171k 

Grata AIM 

321 

321 

ORE 

770 

763 

Gutaaen 



GU5 

,940 

065 

Hanson 

209 

207 

Hawker 






imperial Group 

182 

133 

Jaoun 

277 

275 

Land Securities 

303 

306 

Legal General 

719 

719 

Lloyds Bank 



Lanrho 

1M 


Lucas 



Marks and So 

154 

154 







Not West Bank 

669 


PcrndO 

390 

393 


276 

276 




PrwfemJW 

712 

712 

it acal Elect 

160 

158 

BonOtDnleln 

S82W 


Rank 

410 


Reed InH 

TUI 


«evl<« 

316 

313 

Rovol Dutch t 

43k. 

43k. 

RTZ 

579 

S7V 

SaoteM 

6M 

685 

Salnsburv 



Sean HetaHns 

9BVs 

9ftV» 



Close *e» 

6SS 671 

84 82 

474 472 

520 521 

445 445 

260 263 

367 362 

376 3B3 

375 373 

138 137 

216 213 

1029/6410 13/32 

182 177 

288 283 

461 


Close pre*. 


F.T.30 lades : 98620 

PievMOS : 902JB 

F.TJJE.180 lades : 131190 
Previous : 1307.» 




181 
123 
_ 555 

085 OJB 
112 114 
153 159 

164 164 


Japan Air Lines 
Katlma 
Kansal Power 
Kowasau steel 
I Kirk, Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
, Kvocera 
Matsu Elec inch 


1980 1*70 
906 905 

700 701 

566 545 

Ml® Wl® 
5680 B00 
468 465 

1880 1870 

158 159 

<95 695 

540 52» 

159 360 
3680 1550 
is® ijgo 


Strutts Times lad Index: 73587 
pravkm : 7548* 


Banco Comm 
Centrata 

gas- 

SSSSk, 

Flat 

Generali 

,F ‘ 

llaicemenll 

llalnwblllarl 

MedtaWnca 

Manledlsan 

Olivetti 

ptrau 
has 

Rinoscenle 

SIP, 

SME 

Snta 

Standa 

S*ef 


24000 23890 

3325 3340 

9815 10020 

2899 2950 

10*00 10910 

13200 1322S 

4090 4110 
55490 56200 
9720 9770 
45400 46500 
1629 1629 
102000103175 

HS600 morn 

2180 2156 
6491 6395 
2970 300V 
103600101900 
B40 853 

2685 2720 
MOO 1400 
3334 3290 
15310 15800 
3330 3)40 


AGA 

Alta Laval 

Asea 

Astra 

Allas Copes 

Balldan 

Electrolux 

Ericsson 

Essette 

Handdstoanfcan 

Pharmacia 

Soafa- Scania 

Sondvlk 

Skaska 

SKF 

r — -- 4 |ehni nl, Ji 
jwvuisnjnuiui 

Volvo 


116 114 

187 MS 

300 297 

405 405 

111 107 

190 NO. 
271 274 

213 217 

NA 357 
171 171 

188 184 

N.Q. - 
420 425 

90 90 

216 214 

106 186 
230 230 


483 
360 

& 

427 — 

682 <70 

325 NX 
949 948 

751 745 

796 111 

920 922 

838 XI 
179 179 

316 319 

640 630 

1220 1 


AltaarsvaerMan 
Previous 


index : 36980 


nub cprreatindnx : 1593 

— : ISM 


| Sydney 


Air Uqulde 570 

Alsttaxn Ah. 29fcM 

AvDCBUKXjIt 1177 

BVKoIre 

aiSorom 

JBSgr 

C orrefaur 
Charaewrs 
Club Med 

Dortv 
Oomai 

EH-Aaultalne 
Europe! 

Gat Emm 

Igte 

Learand 
Epsieur 
roneal 
Mortoll 
Motra 
Merlin, 

MidMln 

Mae* Hennessv 
Moulinex 

SPSS’S? 


Pernod 
Perrier 
Pauaeol 
Prtntempe 
RodJotechr 
mdoUg 
pousselUdar 

Sanaa , 

5Us Rasdanol 
Telemeewi 
Thomson C5F 
Total 


629 

495 

1740 

779 

2150 

2290 

645 

516 

1426 

019 

199 

771 

615 

1450 

533 

2067 

601 

2240 

1569 

ias 

2118 

1120 

IIBB 

81 

719 

698 


■ 573 
28880 

■ 1160 


485.18 

1740 

790 

2156 


r«4 

1 512 1 
[1430 
■ 8101 
19X50 
■ 769 
1611 
[1448 
521 
2048 


ACI 
ANZ 
BHP 
Bora I 

Bouaoiiwilie 
I Castiemalne 
Coles 

Comal cd 
CRA 
CSR 
Dunlap 
Elders Ixl 
ICI Australia 
. Magellan 
MIM 
Mver 

Nat Aust Bank 
News Carp 
h Broken Hill 
PasakSon 
Ota Coat Trust 
Santas 

Thomas Nation 
Western Mining 
Westaac Banking 
Wdadsfda 


3 280 

5JJ4 5A4 
720 730 

151 151 

186 UM 
750 750 


Matsu Elec worlo 875 __ 

Mit-suhJsW Bank 1650 W00 
Mitsubishi Chom 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
Mitsubishi Carp 
Mitsui and Co 
Mltsuknehl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Ineulatars 
NlkkoSec 
Nippon Kagafui 

Nippon Oil 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
Olympus 
Pionee r 
Ricoh 
Sharp 

Shlmoiu «. n 

SWnetsu Chemical 692 692 

Sony — ' 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sum i t om o Marine 
Sum Homo Metal 
TolselCara 
Tataho Marine 
Tofcada Chem 
TDK 
Tetlki 

Tofclo Marine ... 

Tokyo Elec. Po we r 212Q 

Toppan Printing 799 gw 

Tor ay Hid 381 m 

Toshiba 345 346 

Toyota 1168 1180 

Yamaktil sec 825 804 


1790 1788 
HO >12 
815 830 

690 685 


1800 1 — 
245 2M 


U0 

345 


873 1 

4208 41.. 
483 471 

B9S 


lJO 1.92 

5-78 U4 
110 110 
2J0 Z53 

113 115 

£& Dk 

249 168 
3J7 136 

4J0 445 

6.90 490 

245 UO 
450 440 

172 1J2 

184 550 

120 123 

4.14 4^3 

470 4J0 
1J0 1J0 


Watkei/PJ. Iidox : 1270481 
Prevtaus.-iaiMJS 
New Index : 1S1941 
Pi eel u w : M13J8 


Adta 
AhisuIssB 
Autaohon 
Bonk Leu 


CfeoCdsyR 
I Credit Suisse 


Ele c traw u ltl 
Holderbat* ■ 
■nterdbeount 


Mil 

ilia 

8150 

719 

691 


AH Ordlaartet 
Previous : 95480 


Index: SS640 


Jetmoll 
Landis Gyr 


Oantkon-B 
~ ‘ 1 Baby 


379 

275 

299.90 

1SD2 

1450 

695 

1376 

2605 

578 

226 


36850 

27650 

291 

1465. 

1494 

6B5 

1370 

2595 

537 

225 


Toby* 


lnd ex_.3M.44 
Piw w iu : WjP 
CAC IntKX : 21M0 


Akol 

Asahl Chem 

AMOlIGtaSC 

Bank at Tokyo 

BrtaBMtona 

Canon 

Casio 

ci ton 

Do! Nippon Print 
Dahn House 
Oahm Securities 


a a 


Schtndier 

Sutter 

SurvMI 


BI5 >18 

795 771 

^ m 

'22 ’S 

1080 1070 


iw^s Retaaurance 


SwlM 
Union 
Wtatermur 
Zurich Ins 


. — n : 51459 
Prartoos : 50438 


PreWees : *1*79 


Fanue 
Full Bonk 


J30 930 

~ 7368 
1590 


ss *» 


**•*>;: "Q 1 nuotad; NA: net 

Rwdkdile: xd: e»d(vtdond. 


Au* 20 


Sotos Stock 
16377 AMI Prce 

E 


CamSm stacks via AP 

High Low Close Cho. 


Aonkaj L 

8140 Alt Energy 


12MO0 Alta L™. 
niAkmra St 
40OArgcen 
15300 Atca if 
40UBPConada 
43764 Bank BC 
I573B8 Bank N 5 
134884 Barrlcke 
97100 Baton A I 
2603 B onon so R 
&M®Htnmol«a 
1000 Brando M 
24415 BCFP 
14430 BC Res 
3S2B1 BC Phone 
8900 Brunswk 
MBuaiCan 
28200 CAE 
2420 Cad Fr« 
aogcampeau f 
2900 C Nor W«st 
114104 Can Trust 
2900CTung 
M0CGE 

101033 Cl Bk Com 
59170 CTlraAl 
700 C l/tll B 
200 Cm 
HOI Catanese 
10000 Caafrl Tr 
90 CHUM 
29665 Chwplex 
23B75C Dlstb A 
467550 COtott) B f 
1240 CTL BO* 
3500 Conventrs 
..OO G a mut a 
11050 CosefcgR 
9975 Con ran A 

3254 Crawnx 
47000 Cror Res 
5801 DaanDev 
12431 DenlsaoAp 
13156 Denison Bt 
2250 Deve icon 
14000 Dlckmn A I 
15M CHcXnso B 
11800 Ootasco 
2106 Daman A 
900 Donahue 
925 Du Pont A 

5»Dvb)iA 
roafidbamx 
:Sj a Emco 
23ms Eauttv Svr 
200 FCA InH 
.llWC FcdamC 
44500 Flcnbrdee 
24445 Fed indA 


DM 2 m 20% 

SI 9% 1959 1943— Vk 
5105k IBft 18VH— V, 
SI 45k 145k 1— ‘ 


OVA 20U 2IU+4* 


23 — Vi 
94h+ <A 


K, 

1456— Vk 

+ 2 




3000 1 

WGeacCemp 

WOO Hawker 
2260 Haves D 
“Hwlntl 
l og H Bay Co 


523 23 

195 k 95k 

*3356 3396 33%+ 16 
*516 5* 556— lk 

*l*k 135k 135k 
195 IBS 185 — 10 
*19 19 19+46 

360 350 355 — •TO 

*1756 1716 17%+ Vk 
SI 146 1146 1146+ 4k 
*10 946 946- 16 

MB 342 242 — 5 
*23 225k 2256+ 16 

*155k 1516 1556— lb 
*3256 32Vt 32Yi — Vt 
5169 3 1656 1 54k 
*1246 I2V. 1346 
*2744 2716 27 Vk— 16 
524V. 24 2456+ 16 

S444fc 4444 4456+2 
*U4k TIN, 115k— Vk 
163 63 53 —1 

5365k 3S5k 3614+ % 
*10 946 99k 

*17®k 174k 171k 
SIMk 1616 — - 
*916 9 

*15 14V6 

*4016 W6 

*1114 W6 1046- 14 

SE ^ 

*11 11 11 
*7 «k 7 
Wto « . 0*6+ V6 
350 340 340 — S 

SUIk 1446 1 446 
*22 2156 22 

4§ 4M 420 411 
1134 4 13W 134k 
nw. % igj-ik 

SBk 75k 1—16 

STfc 746 746— 4k 

gst SS B£_, k 

Sim 1346 1346- 56 
t»k B Btk—Tk 
SO 2M6 22 + V6 

J£!t .I? 

*1746 1746 1746 

B1 1956 20 
*3656 264k 3696+ 5k 

3S Sw s*-* 

*m 846 856 

*74fc 75k 746 


5282Meiiand E 
88427 MaHon A I 
900 Motion B 
100 Nabisco L 
42534 Nonmda 
, 3246 5 Norcen 
1293326 Nva AHA ( 
KS3 Nowscd W 
WENu Wrtsp A 
1100 Oakvwod 
WOOshawa Af 

S 2SS& P 

itoPlne Point 
48692 PlQCT 
21000 Prov loo 
5600 Ouo Slum 0 


+ S 


1510 Royrad|~f~ 


5200 _ _ 

?HSt StoS » A 

tsoo Scon, i 
3475 Sears Can 
9187 shell Can 
Sherri tt 
mUOSoutham 
*3W1 Spar A«ral 
14344 StetaaA 
lOOSulptro 
1300 Steep R 
4 Tara 

MOOTeekCOrA 

mgTeckBf 

3508 Tex Can 
*450 Thom N A 
37594 Tor D m Bk 
7B35Tonrtar B f 
9+a Traders A f 
HOOTrnsMt 

|i 

^SS5c PL 

2'SMTrttanA 

:,h^SSJTB5f Al 

1058B0 Turbo 

’MOJIntairpA I 

» Un CBrWd 
4225 u Entprtse 
1400 u 

TOT Venn At 
6950Vestoron 
, 13*0 WOT Hair 
18450 Westmln 
,210 Weston 
'“gwo^wdA 
300 Yk Bear 
Total salesi 


Hlofi 

340 355 340 . _ 

SU46 1616 1646+ 46 
fjjjfc l» 1616+ Vk 
279fc 27*%+ 16 
Sink ink 174k— 16 
*1516 151k 15M 
*«k 6V6 64k 

a % 

3* » sts ■ 

Si 3346 34 
£17 1646 17 + 16 

*245% 245k 24*6+ lk 
*255k 25 2556 — 46 

Sam 2446 20k— 5h 
*5 490 490 —35 

SlOlk 18 10—16 

*14 1346 14 + lk 

S?» 39V4 2016-46 
*111 6 1116 lllk + Ik 
£J3J% 124k 13 —4* 
*3646 3646 3646 
JgVt «k 5Hk+ Vk 
*28 2746 28 + lk 

*?4k 9V6 9Vk— 5k 

S26Vk 265k 2656— 5b 
MW 74k 0 — Ik 

*17* 17 17Vk+ Vk 

*30 2946 2946 

*2T5k 2046 215k- Vk 
195 I9S IPS 

a % % . 

& 


* 

+ 1 . 
5k 
V6 
16 
Vk 
Vk 


znk— ie 

4k 


_irv6 + w 

345 —15 
' 1% 


ESS 1 «»k 

S3 ii’? 

S3* 51* 

SIS S'* 

» 29V6 

g?» r* 

345 345 

»546 jpk Sk+ 56 

1* i* 

*8 9 9 

*1316 m uu 

*12 1 W lUfc 

x* 6 JO* VVr ~ * 

480 470 470 15 

**9k 55k 546- tk 

334 2356 83sS— S 

JUVfc 

*93 93 93 

™k ** MKr-Vk 

3,126,995 shares 


+ 1 
+ lfc 




6Vr— lk 


TSE 300 Index: 


Ctose Prwlatn 
1283A0 7JKJ0 


iMOindat 
, 30* InoMs 
12980 Inland Gas 
igtaOjntlTTioS* 
"tar Pipe 

’SZ!" 900 « 

TOHlvacoB 
la^Jonnock 
aoKMeevH 
.-90* Kerr Add 
urn Lctxrtt 
OOLOntCem 

54«7 Loamo 

aaOLeb ta wCo 
uno Lumonlcs 
2MMDSHA 
MDO MICC 

3 n255 c *S , . H * 

1 HO Maritime f 


*2llk 

*34 

S34Vk 

52016 

512 

SBH 

SOI* 

*2656 

SUh 

*1516 

*2146 

*95% 

*415% 

5135k 

*22Vk 

*1656 

Milk 

516 

S 2 nk 

5135k 
SI 


3125% 

S2flVk 

5201k 

ST* 

51356 

SU5k 


34* W rt+ ‘ ,, 
241k 241k— 56 

h 

2316 2356— 16 
264k 26Vk+ 16 
16V. 1656+ 16 
1556 1556 
215k 2146 
91ft 95k 
415k 4146—16 
TOk 134k 
22Vk 22Vt— >6 
161k 1616— 16 

J74k 174+1 2 

154% isift 




Hlob Low Close Cha. 

s »s- 

«£^eak* SB 


2700 Con Both 
MSDontTxtA 
WUGm Metro 

S773B NotBk Cdn 

^?E2!yCa™ 


+ 5k 

+ 56 


iBlfe-Vk 

LBC +Ib 




intafrtats index: 


Don 

12049 


Preview 

119J0 


sit.': 


awt WriH 


.•CV^ i. 


nnrni ■ w iTT" c VVIIH 

BusayesspEonjE 

WffiN 8sc9« 

ANO R3D4Y IN THE MT 




■Al'S 

•‘Vvt 







I 


*s -m. 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBI NE. THI RSDW. Al GI ST 22. 1985 



Page 15 


SPORTS 

Blanking Giants, Gooden Fans 16 


' *•« 




^o^Trr?" 

!5 ra “ ^ 

fJ.nd rT£ cl '‘ “>• “*™<l 
P™ly<.n M iSS. tUmed OUt 10 h* 

Gooden struck . 

'“Sue Sean'S ™j°r- 

tCglSlCTed » «e&4S»£ ll Slg 

_j ASEBALL ROU Nniip" 

1 3th 


his sixth shutout of the season, ty- 
ing him with John Tudor of St. 
Louis for the major- league lead. 

Gooden struck out ihcsde twice 
and walked three in raisin& his sea- 
son mark to 19-3,. tying utin with 
the Cardinals' Joaquin Andujar for 
Me major-league lead in victories. 
Six of Gooden's. last right starts 
have resulted in complete-game tri- 
umphs. 

“He gets that determined look 
on his face," said the Mel manager. 
,V lr iumph here Johttson * “!*«* sorry for San 

y ^ ^ New Ywk Fraadsro. He's got a history of 


consecutive 


Urt-'ffT “W wew York “""-wco. ncs got a msiory cm 
puffed the San Francisco Q- hack aga£st the club that 

routed him up or c ’ * 

asSSSSs* 

,!?j prcv,ous Gooden 

up five nms arwTmoih. v:.. 


roughed Mm up or coming bade 
Strong in his next start afterhe gats 
roughed up." 

lac Mets scored twioe in 



r 



1 said to myseFrm a betterS 
erthan " he said. *This Silds 

my confidence back up. The bad 
performance is behind me now I 
hope there are no more ahead." ' 

Barring catastrophe, that prop- 
sect seems remote. On Tuesday the 
20-year-old right-hander 

• Lowered baseball's best 
earned-run average to 1.74; 

jt • Raised his season strikeout to- 
■ tal to 208, tops in the majors; 

• Became the second player in 
“Story to strike out 200-plus in 
each of his first two seasons (the 
otter was Herb Score, who did it 
with the Cleveland Indians in 1955 
and 19561; 

• Pitched his 1 3th complete 
game, a National-League hi g h , and 


the 

second inning, on run-scoring sin- 
gles by Rafael Santana and Lenny. 
Dykstra. A double by Wally Back- 
man and a two-out single by Gaiy 
Carter produced the game’s final 
run in the fifth. 

Amid all but universal praise for 
Gooden's performance (even home 


a ran. tripled with two outs in the 
J )th to score Steve Sax with the 
decisive run for Los Angeles. 

Padres 1, Expos <fc In Montreal, 
winner Dave Dravecky worked sev- 
en strong innings and fifth- inning 
doubles by Terry Kenedy and Ke- 
vin McReynokis made the Expos 1- 
0 losers for the second straight 
game. 

Pirates 3, Reds 2s In Pittsburgh, 
Jason Thompson hit a lie-breaking 
home run in the fourth and Rick 
Reuschel won his first game in 
more than a month as the Pirates 
edged Cincinnati. Mario Soto lest 
Tor the first time in nine career 
decisions at Three Rivers Stadium. 
Pete Rose, the Reds’ player-manag- 
er, went hitless and still needs 15 
bits to break Ty Cobb's all-time 
record. 

Cribs 5, Braves 2: In Atlanta, 
Ryne Sandberg’s two- run homer 
highlighted a three-run eighth that 
rallied Chicago past the Braves. 

Marinos 4, Orioles 3: In the 
American League, in Seattle, Gor- 


Califomia. Mattingly, the league's 
reigning batting champion, has hit 
safely in his last 18 games. 

RangersA Red Sox 1; In Boston, 
Toby Harrah horoered to lead off 
the eighth and Texas added two 
more runs (on an RBI double by 
Gary Ward and a single by Bobby 
Jones) to end a six-game losing 
streak. Knuckleballer Charlie 
Hough earned his seventh victory 
in nine starts since July 5. Hough 
struck out seven, didn’t walk a bai- 
ter and allowed only one runner 
past second base. 

Bine Jays 3, Indians 2: In Cleve- 
land, Tony Fernandez’s second 
RBI single of the night scored Jesse 
Barfield for the seventh-inning ran 
that tallied Toronto past the Indi- 
ans. 

Brewers 3, Twins 2 : In Milwau- 
kee, Rick Manning angled home 
the winning ran to cap a three-run 
Brewer ninth. Minnesota starter 
John Butcher took a four-hit shut- 
out into the inning, but Robin 
Yount led off with a single and that 
brought on reliever Steve Howe, 


plate umpire Bob Engel allowed man Thomas walked with the bases W1UUBHI wu 
that he was outstanding, obvious- loaded in the ninth to push across ^ immediately gave up a angle 
ly X Chili Davis was a minority of Jack Pttrconte and end Baltimore’s » 0 rvdi Cbooer. Ben Oalivie then 
one. Said Davis, who had three ~ n •- - 


singles and was the only Giant 
starter Gooden didn’t strike out: 
“He ain’t God, man." 

Astros 17, Cardinals 2s In Hous- 
ton, Mark- Bailey hit his second 
grand-slam home ran of the season 
and Dickie Thou drove in four runs 
with a triple and homer in hi ghligh t 
a 19-hit attack tn which every Astro 
starter scored at least once. 

Dodgers 5, PfasBies 4: In Phila- 
delphia, rookie Mariano Duncan, 
who earlier had doubled and scored 


six-game winning streak. Perconte 
singled to center with one out off 
reliever Nate Snell; Phil Bradley 
angled him to third and A1 Co wens 
walked on four pitches to load the 
bases before Snell walked Thomas 
— also on four pitches. 

Yankees 8, Angels 5: In Ana- 
heim, California, Don Mattingly's 
two bases-empty homers (which 
raised his RBI total to a major 
league-leading 100 for the year) 
highlighted a five-home run bar- 
rage that powered New York past 


grounded to shortstop Alvero 
Espinoza, who threw wildly to sec- 
ond, allowing Yount to score. Kent 
Hrbek retrieved the ball and threw 
home; but catcher Tun Laudner 
dr oped the ball as Cooper scored 
and Oglivie went to third. Ted Sim- 
mons was intentionally walked be- 
fore reliever Ron Davis got Bill 
Schroeder to ground into a double 
play — Oglivie staying at third. Bnt 
Manning singled off Davis’s glove 
to score Oglivie 



Wgge Wgsoq ooflapsed (and Chicago second baseman Jufio Qnz covered op) after a throw by pntrter Pazfa m Ffefc mnb*t rt*> 

White Sox 2, Royals 1 : In Cfe Uty basoumer m the neck as he tried to steal second Tuesday night Knocked unconscious, Wilson washwaitafii^forobservati^ 
■ second baseman Frank White * 


* K 


Athletes Taking Out Insurance 
Against Career-Ending Injuries 




iiiiHpk 


By Gary Libman . 

n'V ^ as An P* a 7 " na Soviet 

' LOS ANGELES — When Dave 
> Williams was catching 101 passes 
and was being chosen all-American 

- - at the University of Ifimms last 
season, he didn’t wqny about a 
career-ending injury. 

But his father worried enough 
for both of them. 

“One time my father made the 
comment that he wouldn’t let me 
go back to school unless I got insur- 
ance.” said the wide receiver. “I 
don't know how serious he was, but 
he said XL” . . . 

National Football League scoots 
had said that Williams could be a 
first-round choice in their player 
draft this winter, and Williams re- 
alized fie woald get hit hard five or 
six tunes a game during his senior 
year this fall So the 6-foot-A 197- 
pound (153-meter, 893-kilogram) 
player began to consider a SI mil- 
lion Lloyd’s of London policy to 
protect against a career-ending in- 

JUI Wilh'ams — whose brother Oli- 
ver and whose cousin, Phil Smith, 
are wide receivers for the In di an ap- 
Kt • \ 'S'-'Z K i oil's Colts — mentioned his situa- 
’**'** u _ non to his coach, Mike White; who 
said “he wuuld find out the details'' 
- of the poBcy. ... “He knows the 
things HI be doing.” 

White recommended the insur- 

- ance to Williams, who played a 
•_ year at Harbor Junior College in 

• - Los Angeles before transferring to 
• Illinois, and to Hbnois quarterback 
Jack Trudeau, another potential 
first- round draft pick. 

— Last April each player borrowed 

more than $1 1,000 to buy a policy, 
which pays for a career-ending in- 


bounds or make 10 more yards, Tm 
going to make the 10 more yards. 

“The only time I'm going to ran 
out of bounds is if a gain is impossi- 
ble. My coach would probably be 
shocked if he saw me ran out of 
bounds." 


80. 

booted T-iijs Salazar s grounder 
with two out and the bases loaded 
in the ninth, allowing pinch-runner 
Scott Fletcher to score the game- 
winner for the While Sox. Kansas 
City center fielder Willie Wilson, 
attempting to steal second base in 
the third inning, was knocked un- 
conscious when Fisk’s throw struck 
the back of his neck. He was hospi- 


A Saratoga Notebook: Winners and Losers 


hits, but home runs by Larry Hern- 
don and Tom Brookens were 
enough to defeat the A’s. (UPI, AP) 


so the policies can be particularly 
helpful to NFL players. 

In baseball and basketball the 
policies are typically used by young 
players who have not yet signed 
long-term, guaranteed contracts. 

“It’s a good vehide to guarantee 

sitional period," said RarTfhapiro, 
the Baltimore agent for Calif ornia 
Angd third baseman Doug De- 

Gnces and others. 

ited Japan last winter, Shapiro took Decker Sets 4:16.17 World Mile Mark 

out a three-month policy on pitcher 

ZURICH (Combined Dispatches) ■ — Mary Dccker-Slaney of the 
United States lowered the world record for the women’s mDe by more 
than half a second here Wednesday night, docking 4 urinates, 16.71 
seconds at an international track meet at Letzjgnmd Stadium. 

Decker brpkethe mark of 4: 17.44 set by Romanian Maridca Puica. the 
Olympic 3,000- meter champion, in September 1982. (UPI. Reuters) 


By Scevcn Crist 

New York Tima Service 

SARATOGA SPRINGS. New York — A 

r _ messenger arrived at the front door of a rented 

talheei for X-rays and observation, borne here the other morning, bringing a pack- 
Tigersd, A’s 1: In Oakland, Cali- ^ of mail forwarded from New York City. He 
foraia, Detroit manaped only five wa ^ feeling talkative. 

“You folks op from the city?" 

Yup. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


Mike Boddiker, 27, who won 20 
games and lost only 1 1 in 19 84, for 
S500.000, the anticipated worth of 
Boddiker's contract the following 
season. .- 

Without such a policy, an athlete 
be in jeopardy. Quarterback 




can 

Bert Jones of the Los Angeles 
Rams retired in 1983 after an injury' 
that required the surgical removal 
of a ruptured cervical disk and the 
fusion of two broken vertebrae in 
the neck area. 

Jones was covered for a career- 
ending injury and collected, ac- 
cording to John Jenrison, owner of 
Sports Insurance International Ser- 
vices in Houston. The policy paid 
SI srilfion, a source said. 

A. 1981 car accident paralyzed 
center Landon Turner and aided 
his career a few months after his 
University of Indiana team won the 
NCAA basketball championship. 
Turner received minimal help from 
his own auto insurance policy and 
his father's hospital-medical cover- 
age. 

In 1978, a collision with Oakland 
defensive back Jack Tatum para- 
lyzed New England Patriots wide 


each attends his first professional hw «‘ r “ r 


\,i' ji" 


training camp next summer. 

Williams and. Trudeau bought 
the same protection as athletes in- 
cluding University of Iowa quarter- 
back Chuck Long and former Uni- 
versity of Miami quarterback 
w Beraie Kosar, who signed this sum- 
noer with Geveland of the NFL 

Former Uni vers ty of Georgia 
r unnin g back Herschd Walker 
bought coverage in 1981 before 
joining the New Jersey Generals of 
the United States Football League. 

The insurance is purchased by 
only the “top echelon of profes- 
sional prospects who have proven 
value" as far as professional sports 
are concerned, said John Leavens, 
director of the legislative servioes 
committee of the National Colle- 
giate Athletic Association. 

The NCAA spurred the sale of 
the policies last January when it 
passed a rule that an athlete could 
buy than by borrowing money 
from a lending institution. 

The NCAA honed the rule 


his career. 

The league agreed to pay. the 
remainder of Stingley’s medical 
and living expenses after work- 
men's compensation and the NFL 
Flayers Association disability plan 
proved inadequate. 

Although >he new policies guard 
against such occurrences, some 
people think they contain a weak- 
ness. 

“You only get paid off if you’re 
permanently disabled and can't 
play the sport again," said Peter 
Johnson, vice president of the In- 
ternational Marketing Group in 
Cleveland, who represents tennis 
player Martina Navratilova and 
football player Walker. 

“Let’s say you get injured in a 
post-season all-star game. You can 
play afterwards (but not as well} 
and your value goes down. You still 
can’t cash in." 

“What's probably needed is 
some type of program through the 
NCAA where all students get some 
type of disability {insurance!,’’ said 
George Andrews, a Chicago attor- 



‘Here for the raring?" 

Uh-huh. 

“Seems a lot of folks are up here for the 
month,- renting these houses. 1 delivered a pack- 
age fast week to some folks just up the road The 
woman, she was wearing the biggest diamond 
ring I've ever seen and some kind of a green 
stone around her neck, must have been an 
emerald or something. Funny thing, those peo- 
ple went to the races just the other day and 
somebody came and stole all their jewels. Funny 
how someone always knows which people gpt 
the jewels." 

. It seemed like the time to explain, quickly and 
firmly, that there were no jewels worth strafing 
at this residence. “Oh, I'm sure you’re right- 

What's that? Oh, listen, no tip is necessary, 

but that’s very generous of you, every little bit is 
appreciated. Thank you, thank you so much. 
You folks be careful now. bear?" 

□ 

One afternoon early in this year's annual race 
meeting, a steeplechaser in the sixth race at 
Saratoga Racetrack lost his jockey after the first 
jump, and continued on riderless. With no one 
to guide him, be nonetheless jumped the next 
hedge like a champion. Approaching the third 
fence, though, he shied, pulled himself up and 
ran around the side of iL 

There was no difference in the bright or shape 


of the two jumps, so the horse presumably was 
just being fickle. But maybe not: The next horse 
to jump the hedge that the riderless horse had 
avoided tripped and fell. 

□ 

A tout working the grandstand was pontifi- 
cating to a potential sucker on the virtues of the 
No. 5 hone. 

“I'm telling you, bet your house, the horse is a 
cinch. If he comes in. all 1 ask is the proceeds of 
a $20 win bet.” 

The toutce. as loutees do, thought this sound- 
ed like a swell arrangement. He was not so sure 
after No. 5 finished a distant second to No. I, 
and was further discouraged when he saw the 
(out standing on line to collect. 

“I thought you liked the 5 " he said to the 
tOUL 

“I liked him second-best,'* said the touL “I 
bet the 1 and got some free insurance this way." 

The Lou tee looked puzzled as to whether this 
was all proper, but after all the tout had bet on 
the winner. 

“O.FL,” he said, “who do you like in the next 

racer 

□ 

A minister whose parish is within driving 
distance of the track tikes to spend Wednesdays 
on the Turf Terrace hoe. It is a day off. but be is 
sometimes called on for counseling anyway. A 
somewhat distraught bettor, having faded to 
pick a winner all day and looking like he was in 
trouble, shuffled over to the minister and asked 
for some advice. 

“I'm going bad," he said. “What should 1 do? 
Should 1 just go home instead of losing any 
more money?” 

“Do you haw enough money to get along and 
feed your family?" the minister asked. 


The bettor nodded and explained that it was 
only his betting kitty he had almost depleted, 
not his eating money. 

“In that case," the minister said, “my advice 
to you is to key the 4 over the 3, 6 and 7 in the 
triple and try to get it all back." 

O 

One New York City horseplayer who is 
spending his first August here is also spending 
ins first mouth ever in a country bouse instead 
of a dty apartment. 

“1 think there's some kind of animal out in the 
yard at night," he said after his first two nights 
here. “It’s gpt me spooked. It keeps going beep- 
a-beep, all night long.” 

He was told it was probably a cicada. 

“A chickadee? No, it don’t sound like : a chick- 
adee.” No a cicada. C-i-c-a-d-a. 

“Oh. you mean like the horse, Gcada. Why 
didn’t you say so?" 

□ 

On the first Saturday (right of the 1985 meet- 
ing,- many race-track regulars make a tradition 
of congregating at The Wishing Well, a local 
steakhouse where lies are swapped along with 
congratulations about haring made it through 
another year. 

“This my 30tir Saratoga," bragged one jock- 
ey’s agent. 

"My 38th." said a trainer. 

“Pikers,” said Paul Healy, an owner. “This is 
my 80th year here. The first time I came up 1 was 
3 years old, and I’m 83 now." 

Thai ended the bragging contest, but a nit- 
picker told him Later that if he was 3 his first 
year and hadn’t missed a season, this would 
actually be his 81st Saratoga. 

“Well," be said, “80 sounds better. Eighty- 
one would make me sound like a fossil." 


SCOREBOARD 


Transition 



PeutatMete Attib Mnser, after ^ Wednesday’s cross-couttry 4^)0a 


FOOTBALL 

Notional FaotbaD LtNH 
ATLANTA— TrodeO Don SmfttT, dotenslvs 
and. to Buffalo tor on undiadoMd sroft diolco. 
Waived Mike Moroskl. quarttrfiack. Ploced 
Bronf Mart fn. center, and Erie Boiler. Motif 
•ml on injured reserve. 

BUFFALO— Traded Preston Dennoni. 
wW* receiver, to Green Bov tar on undlo- 
closeddrnft tfwice- Waived Soeedv NeoL hiiw 
t»cfc.and Brian Plllmon. linebacker. Placed 
Mark Brommor.tfgBtenaond Rodney Lvle*. 
linebacker, on the Inlured reserve list. 

DENVER BRONCOS — Waived Jesse 
Mvles.rvnnln0 bock; Scott Stankavoae-ouar- 
lerbock; wode Manning and Dorvi Smith. 

camerttacks ; Bob Svxmke and Dalle* Carr>er- 


an, nose tackles; Sieve Baadwov. Crain 
Schaffer and Erie Scoggins, linebackers: 
Cory nolle, wide receiver; Ikts t era . 
tight end. and Jock Sims, offensive gourd. 
Ploced John Sawyer, tight end: Dan James, 
nose tackle; Mike Freemoa oitord; Randy 
Robbins, carnerhock; Larry Wilis, wide re- 
ceiver; Brfson Manor, defensive end, and 
Eric Riley, eomertooefc. on Inlured reserve. 

DETROIT— Signed Willie Curran, wide re- 
ceiver. Waived Jason Grimes, wide receiver. 
Moved Billy Sims, running bock, end Rob 
Ruble*, matt end. from Iheoctlve-phvsiconv- 
unable-tomenarm ust to the reserve-ohvsl- 
col/r-unabie Ip perf or m list. Placed Kir* 
Dodge. Ilnebocker; Mike Mochurek. nuarter- 
bock; Jtm Browne, fullback. and Don Laster. 
offensive tackle, on Inlured reserve ond 


Baseball 


•Hungarian Modem Pentathlon Tidist 

MELB OURNE (AP) — Attiia Mizser of Hungary won ibe individual Tuesday’s Major League Line Scores 
modem pentathlon world championship here Wednesday. The 24-year- 
old student clinched the title by finishing SO meters (54.5 yards) ahead of 
defending champion Anatoly Starastin of the Soviet Union to win the 
4,000-meter cross-country ran, the four-day competition's final eveoL 

Mizser totaled 5.525 prints for the five events (equestrian, fencing, 
swimming, shooting and running), followed by Starostm with 5,505 and 
Russian Igor Shvartz with 5,362. The Soviet Union won the team title; 

Hungary was second and Italy third. 


UEFA Tightens Soccer-Match Security 

PARIS (AP) — The Union of European Football Associations on 
Wednesday adopted measures to be takes by European soccer teams to 
prevent spectator violence at some international matches. 

UEFA approved a document prepared by a study group foD owing the 

. .A - 1 n 1_ "" - - 1-m-J J Itn 1 


ncYwho represents Earvin Johnson - May 29 riot m Brussels, when 39 people were killed and 450 were injured 
of the NBA’s Los Angeles Lakers, during the European championship game. Europe’s national soccer 
ofU,c . federations, as well as public authorities, must subscribe to the document 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

ON 020 tOt— S It 6 
Clerahma on no r l 

Kev. Henke (t) and Whitt; Smith. Ward* 
(71. Ruble »7>, EcBtartv (I). Read (•> and 
Banda. Wlllara CBI.W— Kev. KM. L— Smith, l- 
l. Sv— Henke (fl. 

Texas on an 00—3 10 O 

Boston OH 000 Dtl— 1 5 1 

Hough <md 8 rummer. Pefraffi (II; OleOa 
Craw f ord (81 and Gedmon. W— Hough. 12-11 
L — Oieda. M. hr— T exas. Hamm <«. 
Minnesota 000 810 100-7 1* 2 

Milwaukee ooo oeo «»-3 7 • 

But (Tier, Howe (91. Davts (91 and Loudner; 
Higuera ond Schroeder . w— *f ieuera, t M. L— 
Howe, 1-1 

Kansas City 010 an 000-1 S 1 

Chicago 008 DOS 811—1 8 8 

Block, Qulsonberrv <■> and wattwn; 


hoped t 

would keep star atMetes m 

aritaSSE’JStfWS* of tbs nba’s los Angora Major League Standings 

. SS iSciball Association Andrews aoKs that NC^ ^^^^ raUon p rftoteamfromEurofrancom q, titiOT . 

■ nuon of college schools are reqoued to kaq>>qmd OT {£f Airbed fiva -high risk" malcheTSLf. U hdgh.«ed 

S’if.fS^quirenlcnls in student athletes emschoteskp measSes. They are; ^ 

ffhaTMmd baseball are more only for the year m wbkh they are ,uj=FA Cup finds and semifinals, and the finals of the Cup Winners’ 
looroau injured. Cup and Champions’ Cup tournaments. 

^n M VAA orohibited coaches -I'm not saying take care of him • A match deiemuned by UEFA to be potentially volatile because of 

ine nwy* i« f p. ^ ^fd, “but there should ^ p^yjous behavior of the fans of either team. 

be some kind of therapy and job «a match in which visiting-team fans exceed 10 percent of stadium 

capacity, or when there are more than 3,000 visiting fans. 

• Matches drawing capacity crowds or more than 50,000 spectators. 

• Matches attracting large numbers of “immigrant” fans — those with 
national ties to the country of the visiting team but living in the host 
country or a neighboring one: . 

Heightened security measures are to include stria control of ticket 


Soaver. James (9) and Fisk. W— James. 5-5. 
L ' Qu l s on berry. 4-7. 

New York 380 Me H0-€ 9 I 

Contorted BOB Ml 000— S 10 0 

Whitson. SNrlev <51. Bordl (4>. Rtghetti (91 
and Wynesar; Slaton, Sanchez (4), Holland 
(B> and Boone. W— Bordl. 44. L— Staton. S-10. 
Sv— Rlghettl (23I.HR9— NewYork.MOtftlngfv 
2 (221, Winfield (281. Pogllarulo (13). Hender- 
son (19). Colffemlo. Grieft (61. 

Detroit 683 80S 180— « 5 0 

Oakland 000 600 100—1 7 8 

Terne/L ll omond oz (8) and Parrish; 8M- 
sas. Atherton CB> and Heath. W— ■ Terre*. 124. 
L— Bkrtsas.94. Sv— Hernandez (Ml. HRs— 
Detroit. Herndon (101. Brookens (SI. 
Baltimore HO 830 880-8 ■ 3 

Seattle Ml 200 001—4 ? i 

Ftanomn, Snell (8) ond Dempsey; Moore 
and Keamev. W M oore. 11-7. L— Snell, 3-2. 
hr> — B altimore, Sheets (Ml. Demosev 181. 
Seattle. Bradley (17). 


The NLAA . 

and agents from buying ^ 

Mt*--coacbes so they wotdd not 

S to keep athletes in schod and retraining. 

control over an alhktekrfore 

gTiime in his career when it be- 
came legaL 


Toronto 

New York 

Detroit 

Baltimore 

Boston 

Milwaukee 

Cleveland 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Division 

W L Pet. OB 
74 *5 iZ2 — 
» 48 J90 4 

44 54 SO 9VS 
81 55 SM 111* 
57 68 .487 M 

14 62 Ad IK 
39 79 J31 Mh 


Williams, whose brother. Steven 
will go to fflinris tins fall as a 
fre shman wide receiver, WOTked 
-.L l; s friend Trudeau, the fflim 

“ uc “S'- . . uy coj. AoSTexamimna the poE- Heightened security measures are to mauae stria control or aatet 

The buying pf ?riira- quarterback, £ saies (match-day sales will be limited to two tuiets per person); a ban on 

lege players coinrid« *““ ■ aes. sales or consumption of alcohol in (he stadiums; increased surveillance in 

Jar move among profession's. They checked out ainoent pos- ^ ^ s t stadium entrances, and the searching of spectators. 

Mets Sign Bowa for Rest of ’85 Season 

m din£ injury as early as the 1W ^rwmie said you got to take it ^ * cT* 

Atanv more athletes buy m d there during the NEWYORKfAP) — Shortstop Lany Bowa, 39, who was cni last week 

"Sw as athletic salaries and the ^ avoid gating hurt, Wil- by the Chicago Cabs, on Tuesday signed a contract with the New York 

states of alMelK areas sate, gf “Wen, I wouldn 1 do Mets for the reminder ollhesmiem. 

and insurance rep- T7T Bowa, whose .980 career fiddmg percentage is the highest for a 

Player agenc an coo _ ina touchdowns and I shortstop in major-league history, earlier this season set the National 

baseball and 1 tel If there’s a League shortstop record for games played (he has played 2^12 in his 16- 
basketbaU are S uarantfie< ^J > ^Lf^. cSs where you go out of year career). 

most footban contracts are not 


California 
Kofdos aty 
Oakland 
CM cage 
saottla 

8UfHW50ta 

Texas 


West Ofvtalen 

48 SI 
M 52 
62 57 
SB S3 
58 43 
S3 45 
43 74 


J71 - 
S52 Vh 
J21 6 

-504 8 

xn 12 

MR UV» 
J48 34 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
SON Division 

W L PCI. 


GB 


New Yorfc 

St. LOutt 

Montreal 

Chicago 

Ptiiiaoelahlo 

Pittsburgh 

too Anton 
son Otago 
Cincinnati 

Houston 
Atlanta 
San Francisco 


72 45 
70 44 

47 52 
57 S9 

54 43 
34 79 

west Division 

TV 44 
63 55 
41 55 

55 a 
SO 44 
4S 72 


ilS - 

m m 

-543 4 

xn mi* 
18 

Jt3 35 

M - 
J34 8 

J26 9 

m i&t 
A3i a 
785 25' : 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
CtadanoN Bit 8M MI—2 6 8 

Pittsburgh tee lie oe*-a a 4 

Soto, Hume (71 and Diaz; Reuscnel ond 
Pena w— Reuscnel. 94. L— Sgta, io-m. hr— 
PHtsburgh. 1710010100 (111. 

Chicago 810 808 831-5 8 1 

Atlanta OM woe 7tr 7 4 8 

Fontenot, Smith CB> ami Davis; Mahtor. Sut- 
ler m and Cerone. W— Fontenot, 5-7, L— Sut- 
ler, 7-4. Sv— Smith (25). HRa— Chicago. Sand- 
berg (18). Durham (131. 

San Otago WtltHM 8 I 

MeatreW HO 8M WM B 8 

Dravecky, Mcculiera (8). Walter (9) and 
Kennedy; GuWefcson. Lucas (SI. 51. Qo Ere (fj 
aid FHwrald. W-Dravecky, 11-7. L— GuF 
llcksm. 11-*. Sv-Watter (2). 

Soa Francises 088 888 888-8 7 8 

New York 828 818 B8*-3 I I 

Gaft, JeNeoat [71, Minton (8) and Brenly; 
Gooden and Carter. w—Goaden. 19a L-Gott> 
*9. 

Lai Angeles 817 882 080 81-5 71 » 

Philadelphia 388 8TB 880 88— ( 12 2 

welch, Haweii (6). Nledenhier (B). Honev- 
cuff CIl) ana Scfecda; K-Graaa, Anderaea fit 1. 
Carman (8), Tekulve (10) and Doulton. W— 
Niedmhmr, 6-4. L— ' Tefcukrb 4-9. Sv— Honey, 
cun (1). HR— Philadelphia Samuel (14). 

St. Louis 888 882 808- 2 S 1 

Houston 124 215 Ofer-17 19 ■ 

KePUilre. Horton 131. Beaver (41. Forxti 
(6). Campbell III and Porter. Nteio (8) : Scott, 
Hesthcgck IB) and B alley, Mizeroek 161. W— 
Scott. IJ-4. L— Kepshlre, 9-7. HRs— Houston. 
Bouev HOi. Tuan ui. 


placed Clovton Beoutara. wide receiver, on 
the nontootboll Iniurv list. 

GREEN BAY — Released Brad Tubbs, wide 
receiver, and Don JaHerson. defensive baCk. 
Ploced John Jefferson, wide receiver, on the 
dktaat-fSPOrt Ust Plead Tony DeLucn, de- 
fensive end. on the n on to otboll Iniurv list. 

HOUSTON— Reached agreement with 
Richard Jettnson. defensive bock, on o four- 
year contract. 

KANSAS CITY- Ploc ed BUIv Jackson. nm- 
nliv hoc *. on Inlured raaorve. 

LA. RAMS— Placed Eric Dickerson, run- 
ning bock, and Jock Young Wood, linebacker, 
on fhedJd-not -report Usf ; Wared Mike Shiner. 
tackle, on Inlured reserve. Waived Tony Sla- 
ton. center; Scott Tinsley, ouortorbock; 
Ricky Martin, wide receiver,- Gory Swanson, 
Ilnebocker. and Bill Slone, running bock. 

MINNESOTA — Waived Jett Caller, defen- 
sive bodi: Byron Jones defensive lineman; 
Rick HecMnger, offensive iinefikei; George 
Reynolds. Punier; Jaime Covington, running 
bock, and Mark Rush, tight end. Placed Stove 
RUry, offensive tackle, on the reserve-retired 
list. Ploced Allanao Smith and Walker Lee 
Ashley, linebackers; Melvin Brawn, corner- 
back. and Jim Gustafson and Tom McCon- 
nouotwy. wide receivers on Inlured reserve. 
andOwlgMCoilina.w!dereceiver,onreserve- 
dfd not report IW. Announced that Tim Lono. 
offensive tackle, has left camp. 

NEW ORLEANS— Placed Earl Johnson, 
coraertack. Mike Deuocono ond Sam Balloy. 
wide receivers, and Rob D e n nett and Dennis 
KuWte, light ends on Inlured reserve. 

N.Y. GIANTS— -Signed Eric SchuberL 
pkjcefclcker. 

PHILADELPHIA— Placed Wilbert Mont- 
gomery. running back; Dennis Harrison, de- 
fensive end; Jerry Robinson, linebacker, ond 
Mike Quick, wide receiver, on the reserved- 
did not report list, waived Dean Miraldl and 
Rusty Russell, offensive tackles; Harvey 
Armstrong, nose tackle; Doan Mcy.«u«rter- 
bOCk; Mkime] Williams, running back; Tim 
Chambers. defensjve bock: Dexter Edmonds, 
tight end; Tommy F lemons, nose todde; 
Mike Harris and Todd Russell. cameiDodu; 
Cim Wallers and Dove Paslev, linebackers; 
Brad Smith, defensive end. ana Al Yuknus. 
Kicker. Placed Rodney Geosby and Kevin 
Guthrie, wide receivers,and Jody Schulz,ilne- 
bocker. an Inlured reserve. 

SAN DIEGO— Traded Maury Buford, punt- 
er. to Chicago For an undisclosed 1(86 draft 
melee. 

SEATTLE— Signed Dave Bream, wner- 
back.WnivgdFraakSeurar,4wiiiertxick; SM 
Ahramowtte offensive tackle; Mark Hides 
ana Julto Cartes, linebackers; Adam Haw 
aen. wide receiver; Paul Mergenhaeen, neat 
tackle, and Oarrefl Hoooer, mrnerbock. 
Placed Xacharv Dixon, running bock, on the 
reserve-physical hr unehle to perform list] 
ptoced Chris Gashr.wldo receiver.on Inlured 
reserve, and Paul Johns, wide receiver.on the 
reserve-dld red report list. 

COLLEGE 

SETON HALL— Named Larry Hooting ath- 
letic director. 


CFL Leaders 



SCORING 

TO C FG 5 PH 

Kennsrd, Wpa. 

0 15 17 7 

73 

Rldgwav, Sask. 

0 12 14 10 

64 

Panagilo. B.C. 

0 25 1 10 

59 

Kurtz.MIL 

0 14 11 2 

51 

Jenkins. B.C 

8 0 0 0 

48 

Hay, Cat 

0 9 9 10 

46 

Dorsey. Otl. 

0 13 B 3 

42 

□bum. Edm. 

0 19 4 6 

37 

Ruott. Ham. 

0 ID 5 12 

37 

Fernandez. BXL 

4 0 0 0 

34 

Greer, Tor. 

6 D D 0 

36 


RUSHING 

NO Yd* AVP 

TD 

Reaves, Wpa 

1(0 STB L6 

5 

Jenkins. B X. 

81 558 iS 

5 

Wilson, Mil 

44 274 4 2 

1 

GUI, MH 

44 2*7 £4 

3 

Hobart, Horn 

24 233 9J 

3 

Cowan, Edm 

37 231 43 

e 

Dunfoan. Edm 

14 228 43 

4 

Watts. Ott 

31 224 72 

0 

Ellis, So* 

6* 224 35 

3 

James. Ham 

58 214 43 

2 


PASSING 

Alt Com Yds im TD 

Barnes. Caf 

241 147 1997 W 

p 

Paopaa, Sask 

211 133 1789 7 

6 

Dewatt, BX. 

188 118 1441 5 

11 

Dunfoan, Edm 

176 107 1456 12 

7 

dements- Wpo 

174 99 1377 9 

5 

GHL Mil 

280 120 1315 8 

6 

wotts, on 

173 48 12*4 7 

S 

Hollawav. Tor 

133 94 1144 3 

4 

Hobart, Ham 

104 48 580 4 

3 

Casale. Tor 

89 54 5725 

5 


European Soccer 


ENGLISH FIRST DIVISION 
Arsenal 3, Southampton 2 
Chelsea I. Coventry 0 
Evgrton 2, West Brem 0 
laswlch D, Atanawtw united 1 
Watford 3. Birmingham 0 
west Ham 1 Queen's Pm* Rangers 1 
WEST GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 
wgidhoi Mannelm 4. Bocnum 1 
Ducsietdori 0. Emirocm Frankfort l 


PASS RECEIVING 




No Yds 

An 

TD 

Fernandez, BX- 

39 491 

177 

6 

EtoaorCL Sask 

42 634 

1S.1 

3 

PopicwBfci, Wpo 

33 59S 

188 

1 

Greer, Tor 

34 576 

148 

6 

Toibort, Cal 

35 S53 

1LB 

2 

woods. Edm 

18 522 

290 

4 

EHIl Sask. 

44 454 

184 

2 

Taylor, Tor 

40 454 

114 

2 

Sandusky. B.C. 

25 452 

18.1 

3 

Kelly. Edm 

34. 448 

T72 

3 

PUNTING 




No Yd* AW 

L 

Clark. OM 

53 2*89 47JI 

78 

RuoH. Ham 

52 2436 46.9 

77 

Dixon. Edm 

45 2DM 4L6 

70 

Postoglla, BX. 

52 3318 Mi 

44 

Cameron. Wpa 

39 1737 44S 

74 

He**, Tor 

AS 2833 4U 

68 

Hay. Cal 

64 2768 43J 

77 

McTooubMH 

59 2527 428 

65* 

Leschuk. Sask 

44 1753 J?Jf 

71 

PUNT RETURNS 




No Yds 

Avg 

TD 

Clash, B.C 

41 454 

1U 

II 

Zeno. On 

25 348 

MJ 

2 

Carl net. Tor 

25 211 

84 

0 

Fraser. Sask 

38 198 

Aj6 

0 

Steele. WPS 

30 191 

98 

1 

Sandusky, ELC. 

IS 144 

10.9 

0 

McDermott. Sask 

17 US 

IS 

D 

Woods. Edm 

17 M0 

82 

0 

Tiwffffn. Edm 

13 134 

105 

0 

Skinner. M»l 

7 139 

184 

0 

KICKOFF RETURNS 




No Yds 

a™ 

TD 

Zeno, Otl 

14 381 

277 

0 

Phoson. mu 

11 288 

247 

0 

Jenkins. BX. 

18 249 

24.9 

0 


Fields. Ham 
Elarms. Sesk 
Edwards. Cal 
Caurbona, on 
Woods, Earn 
Clash, B.C. 


237 

220 

2DQ 

190 

140 

143 


213 

2U 

183 

27.1 

310 

532 


i l 


1 j 


1 1 











TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 1985 


BANGKOK POSTCARD 


Japanese Who Stayed 


Antillean Prime Minister With Spirit 


By Sunn Maisrikrod 

The Associated Pros 


B ANGKOK — Japanese sol- 
diers, young, energetic and 
fired by nationalism, were sent to 
attack Thailand in World War IL 
For some of them, what was once a 
vassal land has become a happy 
home, probably forever. 

About SO Japanese veterans nev- 
er returned home after their coun- 
try surrendered 40 years ago. At 
first, some hid their identities. By 
now. however, according to Japa- 
nese officials in Bangkok, virtually 
all of the veterans have been quietly 
absorbed into Thai society. 

“This is definitely my home. If 
Japan ever invades Thailand a gain, 

I will fight for the Thais," said 
Motoji Otani, 64, who owns a re- 
frigerator repair shop called Thaio- 
tani Electric. 

“I don’t consider myself a Japa- 
nese now. I even forgot half the 
language," said Zunao Sasabe, a 
gardener, who fought as a Japanese 
Imperial Army infantryman in 
China, Cambodia and Vie tnam. 

On Dec. S, 1941, after a brief 
resistance. Thailand relented to 
Japanese demands for use of its 
territory to as a launching pad for 
invasions of Burma and the Malay 
peninsula. The Bangkok govern- 
ment was later pressured into de- 
claring war on the Allies, though 
many T hais joined an anti-Japa- 
nese resistance movement and 
Thailand was not treated by the 
Allies as an enemy nation after the 
war ended. 

When Japan surrendered, some 
Japanese soldiers stationed in 
Asian countries that had been con- 
quered by the imperial army chose 
not to return to Japan. 

About 20 settled in Burma. Last 
month one of these, Sakunojo Kita- 
mura. made his first visit back to 
Japan. For the occasion, be dressed 
in a traditional Burmese sarong. 

Those who stayed behind in 
Thailand did not have to face die 
kind of hatred against the Japanese 
that was so strong in countries such 
as China and the Philippines, 
where Japanese soldiers haa com- 
mitted atrocities. In recent, years, 
only economic problems have 
marred Thai -Japanese relations. 

"After losing the war, ] heard 
rumors that there was no thing left 
in Japan — no food, no farm fields, 
nothing. So I thought it was no use 


going back," said YoshihLsa Mat- 
suda, 68, one of several Japanese 
veterans interviewed. 

Matsu da said be escaped after 
his surrender and lived in disguise 
at a Buddhist monastery south of 
Bangkok, where he fell in love with 
a Thai woman -whom he later mar- 
ried. Thai friends helped hide him 
from the Thai authorities, he said. 

Maisuda has become a wealthy 
man, and plays an active role in the 
management of his four businesses: 
a travel agency, a coffee plantation, 
a night club and a company servic- 
ing sugar plants. He is a prominent 
member of tie local Japanese busi- 
ness community — the largest for- 
eign group in the country. * 

By contrast, Sasabe, the garden- 
er, said: "1 still live hand-to-mouth. 
1 earn about 100 baht [about J3.70J 
a day from my carpentry," in addi- 
tion to his job at an orchid nursery 
on the outskirts of Bangkok. He 
recently moved to Bangkok from 
the provinces, where over the years 
he had done rice farming and 
small-time contract work. Two of 
his daughters are abroad, in Italy 
and the Uni led States. 

He praised the hospitality he has 
received from Thai friends and ac- 
quaintances. who helped him flee 
the army and then obtained immi- 
gration documents for him under a 
false Chinese identity. 

Otani, echoing statements by 
other veterans, said: “I did not 
really know what was going on at 
that time. I was so young and ev- 
eryone was a soldier. It was fun 
somehow to join the army. When I 
think bade to those days it was all 


By Joseph B. Treascer 

New York Tima Semce 


W ILLEMSTAD, Curasao — 
in the annual carnival pa- 


VV la the annual carnival pa- 
rade this year — the biggest, most 
rambunctious celebration on this 
island off Venezuela — - a tall, 
imposing woman in a pink and 
green lam& costume got a little 
more attention than the other 
dancers. 

To the delight of some and the 
dismay of others, the focus of the 
cheers and flying confetti was 
Maria Liberia- Peters, who last 
September became the first wom- 
an to serve as prime minister of 
the Netherlands Antilles, six Ca- 
ribbean islands colonized by the 
Dutch and now largely self-gov- 
erning. 

The 43-year-old former kinder- 
garten teacher says she straggled 
with whether to participate in the 
carnival, as she had for the previ- 
ous seven years, instead of taking 
the prime minister 's traditional 
place in the reviewing stand. 

She knew she wouldn't be hap- 
py as a spectator, she said. “Some 
people just feel it’s not appropri- 
ate for a prime minister. I said 
no, in the first place Tm Maria 
and in the second place Tm prime 
minister. So Tm going." 

That kind of spirit and deter- 
mination have made her one of 
the Netherlands Amides' most 
popular leaders. Liberia-Peters, 
leader of the National People's 
Party, admires former U. S. Kep- 



To critics who ask what a for- 
mer kindergarten teacher is doing 
as prime minis ter, LiberiarPeters 
coolly suggests that “it would be 
incorrect to think that nothing 
has happened” since 1962, when 
she first entered a classroom as a 


people 

Ramho Real Blood 


teacher. She has a group of advis- 
ers that she calls her “think tank," 


resentative Shirley Chisholm and 
the late Indira tfandhi of India, 


and she is being favorably com- 
pared to Prime Minister Marga- 
ret Thatcher of Britain. 


wrong. The Japanese army was so 
arrogant. But tne war proved Japan 


arrogant. But the war proved Japan 
was just a frog in a small pond" 

Otani also made bis escape when 
the war ended went into business 
and started a family. He has five 
children and six grandchildren 
from two marriages. He said he 
now rarely eats Japanese food and 
he takas part in traditional Thai 
ceremonies. 

Otani said he had visited Japan 
twice since the end of the war. 

“I felt so different and empty," 
he recalled. “I could not even travel 
alone in Japan. I was really a for- 
eigner. The moment I arrived back 
at Don Muang” — Bangkok’s air- 
port — “1 felt so relieved I thought 
to myself: ‘Ah. I am home.’ " 


She has come to power in one 
of the most turbulent periods in 
Antillean history. After decades 
of prosperity, the economies of 


the two biggest islands, Curasao 
and Aruba, are in trouble. Fur- 


Art Buchwald is on vacation. 


and Aruba, are in trouble. Fur- 
ther, Aruba, which with Curasao 
had shared the burden of sup- 
porting the four other islands, 
plans to separate from the federa- 
tion early next year. 

The Exxon oil refinery that 
provided about SO percent of 
Aruba's income closed last 
spring, and the Shell refinery in 
Curasao, a major employer, says 
it may have to close unless the 
government can buy two- thirds 
of the failing business. 

Liberia-Peters's government is 
trying to find a way to keep Shell 


open. Site said she was also work- 
ing on ways to balance the econo- 
my as revenues falL 

“What 1 really hope," she said 
"is that I will be successful in at 
least setting out the lines for the 
future, for a new future, so that 
the people of the Netherlands 
Antilles can say, *O.K.. we’re go- 
ing through a difficult situation, 
but nevertheless this is where it’s 
going to lead to, 1 and that there is 
light It’s a situation you have to 
handle very carefully, so that my 
people don't panic. As the Span- 
ish people say, I have to keep 
away la desesperaaon, the desper- 
ation." 

Liberia-Peters laughs easily 
and has the politician's knack of 
turning aside or seeming not to 
hear difficult questions. Like 
many An till cans, she speaks four 
languages: Dutch. English, Span- 
ish and Papiamento, a local com- 
bination of the first three with 


some Portuguese added. She pep- 
pers her English with Spanish ex- 


pos her English with Spanish ex- 
clamations such as “Corrector 
and “Si. si!” 

More than previous prime min , 
isters, residents say, she is using 
newspapers, radio and television 
to reach the 240.000 people of the 
Netherlands Antilles. She has 


also met more often with business 
and community leaders. 

“People appreciate that she 
keeps the various groups in- 
formed and that she is as bal- 
anced as possible and doesn't 
take sides,” said Lionel Cap riles, 
the head of Madura & CurieTs 
Bank, the largest in the Antilles. 

Liberia-Peters has also traveled 
more than is customary for prime 
ministers of the Netherlands An- 
tilles, whose defense and many 
foreign affairs matters are still 
handled by the Netherlands. 

“I fed it's important that we let 
the region, especially, know who 
we are, where we are, what we are 
and what we want," she said. 

In the fall of 1976, Liberia- 
Peters won a seat in the island 
government in Curasao, which is 
similar to the Antilles govern- 
ment and has a larger budget. 
Since then she has been in charge 
of economic affairs, public 
health, labor and several other 
matters in the Curasao govern- 
ment When the Natioaal Peo- 
ple's Party took a leading role in 
forming a new Antilles govern- 
ment it turned to Liberia-Peters, 
its top vote-getter, to be prime 
minister. 


but supporters say she has a mind 
of her own. “She asks and she 
listens," Capriles said, “but she 
tgimc the decision.” 

Among her strengths, admirers 
say. is an ability to gain a consen- 
sus from the governing council of 
ministers and other groups with 
which she works. “She speaks 
with authority and die can con- 
vince people.” a banker said. 

Economists say that one of the 
Netherlands Antilles’ problems is 
high wages that prevent the is- 
lands' goods and services from 
being competitive international- 
ly. But the prime minister has 
resisted pressure to impose an 
across-the-board pay cut of 15 to 
20 percent 

Instead, she said, she plans to 
put the economists’ reports be- 
fore the workers and their unions 
and give them “a reasonable time 
to get the feeling that ‘O.K., we 


have been granted the possibility 
to also make 3 move.’ Then, if 


to also make a move.' Then, if 
they “don’t come across,” she 
said, *T think you have the way 
open for imposing” a pay cut 

Liberia-Peters is married to a 
civil servant Niels Peters, 46. She 
met him on a high school basket- 
ball court; she was playing center 
on a girls’ team and Peters, who 
had gained a reputation through- 
out the Antilles as a center, was 
assisting the coach. 

It was not a blazing romance. 
She went off to the Netherlands 
for four years of college. Back in 
Cura 9 ao. she joined a women's 
basketball team affiliated with a 
Roman Catholic school Peters 
was on the men’s team. About 
four years later they went on their 
first date. 

Six years later — 14 years afta 
they met — they were married. 
They have a 6-year-old daughter 
and a 4-year-old son, both born 
in the United States and adopted 
through the Roman Catholic 
archdiocese of New York. 

She is asked what impressed 
her about Peters the first time 
they met. “His hook shot," rite 
replied instantly. 


When a well-muscled imperson- 
ator of Sylvester Staflooe, sporting 
combat fatigues, cartridge belt and 
fake automatic rifle, lost his way 
delivering a “Rarabo-gram" to a 
lawyer in Buffalo, New York, he 
dropped by the county courthouse 
for directions. In the ensuing panic, 
scores of police officers and sher- 
iffs deputies scrambled through 
the courthouse with revolvers 
drawn, and one shot himself in the 
foot, before “Rambo" his mission 
completed, was jumped by an army 
of law enforcers. “I'm flunking 
about jnst hanging the whole 
‘Ram bo-gram’ thing up," said Jofes 
Gowea, whose Show Productions 
company, specializing in jocular 
telegrams, sent the messenger. 
Ms*. Sfancapiano. 28, who does 
the Rambo-grams at $64.95 e a c h , 
recalled: “I see all these cops and 
what looked like 60 cop cats in 
front of the courthouse, and about 
300 people outside watching. It was 
like ‘Dog Day Afternoon.’ I got a 
feeling that it could be me they re 
looking for. And Tm parked right 
in front of the damn place. So I 
thought, well maybe I can get to my 
car, maybe I can’t I was gonna 
stash the gun in the bushes. But I 
decided simply to kind of walk to 
the car, with my gun all covered up 
in my shirt But all of a sadden 
these cots cross the street, and then 
one of them says, ‘Freeze!’ ” After 
per suading the authooties not to ■ 
do anything rash, Stancapiano was 
mt»»n to jail, charged with disorder-, 
ly conduct and released. “He was 
just seconds away from being a 
statistic," said Lieutenant Francis 
Lee. Pa t ro l man Gerald BaetzfcoH, 
45, said of his wounded foot: “It' 
still hurts like hefl.” 


Canadian and U. S. treasure 
hunters have announced a 
to retrieve treasure from the wrew 
of the ocean liner American Re- 
public. Martin Boyerie, president 
of the U. S. company Marine Ana- 
lysts, said he located the ship four 

4us ago; it was reportedly cany- 

lac FiSch-owned u. S. gold coins 
Hot New York when it sank in a 
collision with the Italian ship Flori- 
da off the northeastern U. S. on 
Jan. 23, 1909. Marine Analysts and 
its Canadian, partner, Wtflf . Sub- 
Ocean, believo there is S500 million 
worth of gold coins (S3 million in 
face value) in the bold of the drip, / 
about 250 feet{75 meters) down, 50 1 . 

miles from Nantucket, 
Massachusetts. 

□ 


J * 1 

*r' 


Makaznve Ftamh Mandeb, 31, 


daughter of the jailed black South 
African leader Nebco Mandela, 
held a news conference at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts in Am- 
herst and said she bad come to the 
United States to study and write 
about women’s issues, not ta dis- 
cuss ter country’s problems. Man- 


dela. a social worker, who is stiidjN 
ine for a master’s degree, said she- 


ing for a master’s degree, said she- 
sometimes felts like saying. “To : 
hell with being Mandela’s daugh- 
ter." - 


The Australian rock group Mes v 
Wotfc will tour China in Novem- 


Ou the eve of Md Fisher’s birth- 
day, the salvage operator's crew de- 
livered from (Be wreck of a Spanish , 
galleon the largest single haul of 
gold ever recovered from an an- 
cient ship, an official of his Trea- 
sure SaNare Inc. said in Key West, 
Florida. “Happy birthday, Md — 
that’s what we told him,*' * crew-, 
man, Darwin Washington, said 
Tuesday, the day before Fisher 's 
64th birthday. Divers excavating 
the wreck of Nuestra Sefiora do 
Atocba found about 150 pounds 
(68 kilograms) of gold, including 76 . 
gold bars gold eh gins and 

discs, said Bfeth M£Haky, vice 
president of Treasure Salvoift. 


at Wotfc will tour China in Novem- 
ber . following intervention with 
Be^izig by Prime Minister Bob 
Hawfce, a government spokesman 
said . Wednesday in -Sydney. The 
group hopes to play Beijing, Shang- 
hai and N anking , a spokesman 
said. Hawke had promoted the tour 
as an Australian contribution to 
the United Nations International 
Youth Year. Official sources said 
the tour was thrown into doubt 
after a controversial Beijing con- 
cert by the British group Wham! 

□ 


The son of China’s tap leader, 
lew fiming, is in France to 


Deag Xiaoping, is in France to 
study care for the handicapped. 


Deng Pufang, 41, deputy director 
of the China Welfare Fund for the 


of the China Welfare Fund for the 
Handicapped, will visit rchabDiia- A 
tion centers for the disabled in Par^ 
is and other cites and meet with 
senior offi cials He has been con- 
fined to a wheelchair since break- 
ing his spine when when he was 
forced from a fourth-story window 
by Red Guards in 1967. 


few// 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


Mac* YourOasatM Ad Quickly and Earfy 


Aides 


HAVE A MG DAY! BOKEL Have 0 
™co day! BokeL 


PERSONALS 


FORCALQUER. Alpes da Hauls Pro- 
vence*. 3 -storey lWi century stone 
village house, with lett u ce. 2 targe 
bedroo m, 2 large bathrooms, dree- 
ing, fang, cinm (ergo fcsdien. heat- 
ing, large atbc/txtafc studb vrtfh 
shower, dl modem con venie nces, de- 
al liar artist & foraTy. E 350 J 000 L Teh 
(9217523 76 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


EMPLOYMENT 


EMPLOYMENT 


EMPLOYMENT 


1NTIRNAT10NAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED I 


EXECUTIVE 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


MOVING 


ALLIED 


SAMT PAUL DC VOICE mndentid. 
splendid viBa, 6 rooms, qwrfty fittings, 
swwb ZOO *}Jil pari, pod. 
F&XXMML Promotion Mazed. Ptaa 
Mozart, 06000 hiat. Teh 93-87 06 20 . 
The IMMQZAR 461235 


DUTCH HOUSING CENTO RV. 
Deluxe mdok. Vdhriusstr. 174 , 
A m sterdam 020621234 ar 623221 


MONCEAU 


VAN LINES INTI 

OVH 1 1300 OFTKE 5 


When in fames 
PALAZZO AL V&ABRO 

,, . . „ Uoaxy apartment house with furnished 

F 0 RCA 1 GUE 9 . AJpw (hi Houh Pro- flat*, avtdable for 1 week end mare 
mao, 15 th century Hone visage 

home. 6 Bedrooms, 4 bathrooms. 3 Hums 6794325 , 6793450 . 
livings. 2 terraces, 2 Ml* eqwpped Write; Via del Vektaro 16 
bdhens. Poane division into 2 nan. 00186 Rome. 




Gy Urone: CaByaur toed HT representative with your text. You 
wil be informed af the. cost immecSctay, end once prepayment b 
mode your od wB. appear within 48 horn. 

Gocb Ttwrbaec.no* is $ 9 R 0 per Sns per day 4 - load haoee. Thera are 
25 lette*, signs and giaoei in the firrf ine and 36 in the Wowing fines. 
Minimum spaas is 2 Srtes. No abbravimiam accepted. 

Credit Carat: ‘American Express, Diner's Gob, Eurocard, Master 
Card, Access -aid Visa . 


LATIN AMERICA 


tail: fftor classified onlyfe 
. 747 - 4600 ; 


USA Atttad Vrai Lines Infl Caqt 

S 10 I 1 312 - 681-8100 
Jb Ave A Reeseveb Rd 
Broadview, Anais 60 T 53 USA 


S I 011 312 - 681-8100 
RtAveB Roosevelt 


F 650 D 00 . Tet ( 92 ) 75 23 76 


MONACO 


<IH MAR IE ST. LOUS, 125 sqm. 
luxurious Furniture, 3 bedrooms. ] 


both, 1 shower, Sving. pertonn From 
Sept. 1 / 85 , for 1 war. Id 2553000 . 


Sept. 1 / 85 , for ! year. 


' Beenae Abacs 41 40 31 
(Dept. 312 ) 

Game: 33 14 54 
Gu oyoaufl: 51 45 05 ' 
Una: 4)7 852 

6905 11 
Ssoi Joses 22-1055 
Sanfhwec 6961 555 
Saa Paula: 852 1893 


es ev el t Rd 
60153 USA 


& cal our Agency offices; 

PARIS Desfaeidee totem 
( 01 ) 343 23 64 

FRANKFURT J2L 1 


MONTE CARLO 

SHOOK) 3 ROOM APARTMENT 

for sale, CEfltrdfy located, *■*" 

decorated. 146 sqm, Fully «... 
Utchen. Exdussve stfe 


MBT tall Moving 
Sendees, MAS. 
( 069 ) 250066 


IMhv : I u* si ;/_i i : ; 


A.GJLD.L 

26 Ba Bd IVincesse OwWte 
Moale Carta. MC 98000 Menace 
Tefc ( 93 ) 50 66 OD Telex: 479417 


Brand New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 


Bahrain: 246303 . 
KuwaH: 5614485 . 
leb on o u. 341 457 / 8 / 9 . 
Qatar. 416535 . 

Saudi Arabia: 

Jeddah: 667 - 1500 : 
UAJL: Dubai 234161 . 


( 02102)45023 IMS. 

MUNICH ijas. 

( 089 ) 142244 

LONDON » m 


iwwtv tan Moving 

( 01 ) 953 3636 
Cal For AAetfs free estimate 


FAR EAST 

Bras#**: 3900657 . 

Hong Kern 5 - 213671 . 
Mailae 817 07 49 . 

Soot* 73567 73 . 

Stagapor* 222 - 2725 . 
Tehran; 752 44 25 / 9 . 

Tokyo: 504 - 1925 . 

AUSTRALIA 

M el bour ne. 6908233 . 

SSSSi— ■” 



ton 


PAGE 4 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS