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Soviet Denies Chemi 
ct May Arise , 




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aixsr 

jpwSSE 

tossy and oUkt U.S. agencfe 6 ”" 

riafsls ^ Aa ?eH a presiden- 
tial spokesman said the issue was a 

senous one that was likely to come 

: 

tite U.S. Embassy in Moscowoffor 
some other form of reprisal. 

“* *he first Soviet acknow- 
ledgement of tbe accusations waH. 
Wednesday by tbe State Depart- 
pwtt; called the charges “absurd 
. inventions.** It said they were in- 
tended “id .poison tbe atmosphere 
■^m^ons between our two couq- 

■ The Stale Department had said 
the KGB dusted common articles 
sudh as doorknobs with nitro- 
phenyl pentadiene aldehyde, or 
NPPD, to aDow the tracing of 
Americans who came into contact 
with the items. It stud the substance 
was mutagenic, m«mfng it can 
cause edd mutations, and might 
lead to cancer. 

American officials said Wednes- 
day they had known about tbe 
practice for years, but that h had 
become widespread only recently.' 

A Stale Department spokesman, 

!.<« n„j j » i >n a 



Richard E. Combs Jr., the 
U5. charg& d’affaires, took 
part in a series of tmnsoal 
briefings of Americans Bring 
in Moscow. Page 2. 

on housing and culture, were con- 
tinuing, he said. 

In Moscow, tbe LL$L charge d'af- 
faires, Richard E. Combs Jr., 
briefed about 30 foreign diploma ts 
cm the charges Thursday. 

A senior British diplomat in 
Moscow said later that his country 
would protest only if h became 
clear the British Embassy had been 


The diplomat dismissed sugges- 
tions that the allegations woe part 

__ 7— -t — - r~- of a propaganda campaign to dis- 

Chartes Redman, dented Thursday credit tbe Soviet Union ahead of 
that the timing of the charges was the November summit 
intended to hurt U.S.-Soviet rela- 
tions. He noted that Secretary of 
Agriculture John R. Block would 
leave for Moscow cm schedule Fri- 


. 

;■ ' day to discuss grain sales. Other 
technical contacts, fnr-trvting fgflrc 


Those who attended the U.S. I 

mg Thursday, be said, “certainly 
did not fee 1 the Americans were 
playing to the gallery.” 

In Bonn, West German officials 
said they would check whether 


their embassy staff in Moscow may 
have been tracked with NPPD. 

Larry Sheakes, the chief White 
House qxKC&man, said in Los An- 
geles that Mr. Reagan had been 
given a detailed document on the 
chemical dust Monday and gave 
the State Department the go-ahead 
to make public a protest to the 
Russians on Wednesday. 

Asked if the subject would be 
raised at the Nov. 19-20 summit 
meeting, Mr. Speakes said it was 
“entirety fikdy” that it would be 
raised either there or when Mr. 
Reagan meets Foreign Minister 
Eduard A. Shevardnadze on Sept 
27 in Washington. 

But Mr. Speakes said the chemi- 
cal dust episode should not affect 

the summit. 

( UPI, AP, Reuters) 
■ NPPD Is Little-Known 

Earlier, Malcolm W. Browne of 
The New York Times reported from 
New York: 

NP PD is so little known that it 
does not appear in any of the stan- 
dard chemical reference books. 

Peter Andrews, a spokesman for 
tbe American nianiwil Society in 
Washington, said his organization 
had been able to up only eight 
references to NPPD in the scientif- 
ic literature. Of the eight, he said, 
seven were Soviet and one, which 
merely described the synthesis of 
NPPD. was Australian. 

“It’s reasonable to guess that this 
material may be mutagenic,” he 
said, “but there’s no reference to its 
mutagenicity" in the literature. 

Interviews with various authori- 
ties in chemicals of this dis- 
closed that nearly everything 
known in the United States about 
NPPD is the province of govern- 
ment scientists who are keeping the 
information secret 


Rescue workers search wreckage of plane that caught fire Thursday during takeoff in Manchester, England. 

Reagan Expected to Veto Pretoria Sanctions 




- U,S. 



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David Hoffman 

Vosha^m Ptxo-Senice 

LOS ANGELES — Whik Presf- 


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Rehearsal for Summit: New Zealand 

Ties Suspect 
To Military 

Reuters 

WELLINGTON — New Zea- 
land police for the .first time offi- 
cially linked tbe French military 
establishment Thursday to the 
sinking of the Gre enpe ace protest 
ship, Rainbow Warrior. 

The police said that French au- 
thorities had identified & woman 
held here as Dominique Prirnr, 36, 
a French Army captain. 

Prime Minister David Lange 
said that Captain Prion's identifi- 
cation did not mean the French 
government was involved. A 
French government inquiry beaded 
by Bernard Tricot, a former aide to 
De Gaulle, is expected to report 
late next week to President Fran- 
cois Mitterrand on any government 
role in the attack. 

Mr. Lange said Captain Prieor 
could be “an enthusiastic political 
activist” acting without official 
sanction. But be added: “If you’re 
saying does the plot thicken — def- 
initely.” 

The police made no comment on 
suggestions that Captain Prieur 
was attached to French intelligence 
and said that they were still check- 
ing on the identity of the man ar- 
rested with her. 

Tbe couple are charged with 
murdering a crewman who died in 
the July 10 blast, planting the two 
explosive devices that sank the ves- 
sel and entering New Zealand on 
false Swiss passports. 

Both appeared briefly in court 
Thursday, sriD charged as Alain 
and Sophie Tureoge, and were re- 
(Cootinaed oo Page 2, Cot 7) 


approach to the summit meeting 
with Mikhail SL Gorbachev. 

Each of the|messages suggested 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

that high White House officials 
were preparing for an autumn of 
confrontation ^ihMoscaw,aihm.- 
. Dating at the Geneva meeting in. 
November, and that they were 
growing pessxjniso’c about pros- 
pects for an accord in the aims 
race. ] 

One reason for the pessimism is 
that the adznhtistration is still rent 
over an arms 


A split exists between 
officials and officials in the Stale. 
Department add White House over 
a tradeoff that would limit Mr. 
Reagan’s plan) for a space shield 
against missiles in exchange for 
deep cuts in Soviet missDes. 

If the disputes are not recon- 
ciled, officials! said, it may be im- 
possible to reach any agreement 
with Mr. Gorbachev on reducing 
nuclear arsenals. 

But, the officials added, an effort 
will be made to forge a consensus 
by a summit planning group to be 
presided over by the national secu- 
rity affairs adviser, Robert C. 
McFariane, and the White House 
.chief of staff, Donald T. Regan. 


White Houtje officials said the 
signals to Moscow this week were 
prompted by 1 differing demands 
and events wijbm the administra- 
tion. -Each was accompanied by a 
dicloacaf-chafrengc, including tbe 
disclosure iha* : the Soviet Union 
had used pbsdibly harmful chemi- 
cal substances? to help them follow 
U.S. diplomat^ in Moscow. 

The most deliberate and detailed 

message was delivered Monday by 
Mr McFariane. He spoke to a San- 
ta Barbara dub on the subject, 
“U.S.-Soviei relations in the late 
20th centuty.” 

In addition to Mr. McFariane’s 
speech, the ? White House chal- 
lenged Moscow this -week fay an- 
nouncing plans for the first test of 
an anti-satepite weapon against a 
space -target, a project the Soviet 
Union has pied to stop. 

The presidential spokesman. 
Larry Speakes, said tire test was 
necessary i to counter a “clear 
threat” frotn Soviet programs. 

On Wednesday, the White 
House responded to Soviet use of 
chemical Substances against Amer- 
icans in Moscow by accusing the 
Kremlin of letting its mahtary and 
security Services “act as if they are 
under no control.” 

A White House official said the 
tinting of this development was co- 
incidental with the others. But offi- 
cials said h was to alert Moscow erf 
US. displeasure. 

Mr. McFarland's speech was 
written as if he were speaking di- 
rectly to Soviet leaders, white 
House officials said tbe remarks 
were p ur posely aimed at the Krero- 
lin, not at the U.S. listeners. 


LOS ANGELES — President 
Ronald Reagan intends to veto leg- 
islation imposing U.S. sanctions on 
South Africa but may take execu- 
tive action that would penalize the 
Pretoria government, administra- 
tion officials say. 

These officials said Wednesday 
that Mr. Reagan is likely to prohib- 
it the sale of U.S. computers to 
departments of the South African 
government that administer apart- 
heid and to forbid U.S. government 
loans to companies that refuse to 
accept equal opportunity guide- 
lines. 

But they said that he is deter- 
mined to veto any bill limiting U.S. 
investment in South Africa cm 
grounds that this would harm 
blacks and unfairly penalize a 
white minority government he be- 
lieves is making progress away 
from apartheid. 

The president has not an- 
nounced his intentions although he 
has been critical of tbe sanctions 
measure that has passed both 
houses of Congress and will be up 
for final approval when the Senate 
reconvenes Sept. 9. Mr. Reagan's 


U.S. Indicts 
A British 
Financier 

By Bob Hagcrty 

International Herald Tribute 

LONDON — A federal grand 
jury in Orlando, Florida, has in- 
dicted Alex William Herbage, a 
British financier, for allegedly de- 
frauding about 3,000 American in- 
vestors of more than $46 million. 

Edwin Meese 3d, the UB. attor- 
ney general, who announced the 
indictment Wednesday in Wash- 
ington, said the Justice Depart- 
ment would seek to extradite Mr. 
Herbage to face trial in the United 
States. 

Mr. Herbage, 55, headed Capri- 
mex, a firm registered in the Cay- 
man Islands that offered to invest 
funds in gold, commodities and 
currencies. 

An Australian, Graham R. Ayrc, 
who has pursued legal action to 
recover investors’ funds estimated 
recently that investors who sent 
money to Caprimex will receive as 
much as 40 percent of their money 


national security adviser. Robert C. 
McFariane, has said that the presi- 
dent's decision will be guided in 
part by the political situation in 
South Africa at the time. 

Despite the president's view that 
South Africa has made progress. 
White House officials are growing 
increasingly restive over what they 
see as the failure of all parties in 
South Africa to develop a dialogue 
that could lead to further reforms. 

■ U.S. Expected More Change 

Gerald M. Bayd of The New York 
Times reported from Los Angeles: 

South African officials told high- 
ranking White House representa- 
tives at a meeting in Vienna that 
the government was prepared to 
make political changes that were 
more significant than the steps ulti- 
mately announced by Pretoria, a 
senior administration official says. 

The U.S- official said this week 
that the administration was led to 
believe rhar tbe South African gov- 
ernment was prepared to make in- 
ternal changes involving “power 
sharing” with the country’s black 
majority. 


The sharing was to come both 
through some form of political par- 
ticipation for blacks and in bow the 
Pretoria government would relate 
to other internal government enti- 
ties, said the officiaL who was in- 
volved in tbe meeting. 

Although be was a participant in 
tbe Vienna meeting, the senior ad- 
ministration official who discussed 
the session refused to be identified, 
a condition set because of the sensi- 
tive foreign policy position he 
bolds in the administration. 

Among the six U.S. officials at 
tbe Vienna meeting were Mr. 
McFariane and Chester A Crock-; 


Vienna that were not in his 
speech,” the official said. 

Specifically, tbe official said the 
meeting had discussed changes in 
the areas of citizenship, Pretoria’s 
homeland policy, political partici- 
pation and federalism, which is (he 
relationship between the govern- 
ment and other political entities. 

“On the whole," he said, “I 
would say that two out of four 
issues treated b Vienna were treat- 
ed in the speech: the issue of citi- 
zenship and going into homelands 
policy” 

“But the separate matter of bow 
individual South Africans could 


er, the assistant secretary of state participate in the political process 


for African affairs. 

The Vienna session, two weeks 
ago, came before a speech Aug. 15 
by President Pieter W. Botha of 
South Africa that failed to include 
ijor concessions to blacks, 
le administration official said 
the South African officials had dis- 
cussed changes in four major areas. 
In two cases. Mr. Botha's treatment 
of them b the speech was .“more 
diffuse,” be said. 

“They did say a lot of things b 


was more diffuse b the speech and 
che ultimate outcome, that is the 
relationship between the central 
government and whether the sub- 
ordinate entities are agreed upon, is 
also more diffuse in the speech,” he 
added. 

The official said he believed it 
was a mistake for Mr. Botha to 
restate as a condition that tbe black 
nationalist leader. Nelson Man- 

(Cooiuued on Page 2, Col 5) 



I8S&S .. 

St!; '- 

ESCAPE IN BEIRUT — A Moslem girl flees the 
Lebanese capital after 12 days of violence. Page 2. 


INSIDE 

■ BritaiiL shocked by a sudden 

rise in drug use, warns youths m 

their own language- Page 2. 

■ President Reagan was report- 

edly advised by the Jcnnt Chiefs 
against deploying troops in 
Lebanon. Page 2. 

■ Mexican foreign minister 

says overthrow of the Sandin- 
ists would destabilize Latin 
America. Page 3. 

WEEKEND 

■ Eve Arnold talks to Mary 
Blume about her long career of 
capturing the daily life of peo- 
ple m photographs. Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Orders to US. factories for 

durable goods fell a sharper- 
than-expccted 18 percent to 
July. Page 11. 

TOMORROW 

Tbe Soviet Union is debati 
the rote of semilegal, 
workers to its economy. 


54 Killed 

In Fire on 
British Jet 

EngmeExplodes 
During Takeoff 
In Manchester 


By R. W. Apple Jr. 

New Tisrfc Times Senior 

LONDON — Fifty-four people 
were killed Thursday when a Brit- 
ish chart erj el burst bto flames as it 
roared down a runway at Manches- 
ter airport to northern England, 
then broke to two. 

A total of 137 people — 131 
passengers and six crew members 
— were on board flight KT 328, a 
Boeing 737 bound for the Greek 
island of Corfu. 

As smoke and (lames poured 
bto the cabin, some passengers 
scrambled to safety and others 
were thrown dear by crew mem- 
bers through doors and emergency 
chutes. Of the 83 survivors. 15 were 
hospitalized with bums. 

Witnesses described scenes of 
what they called “mass panic.” 

“Many didn't stand a chance.” 
said Mike Mather. 21. from North- 
wich to Cheshire, who was still 
trembling and draped b a hospital 
blanket “The aisles of those planes 
are so small. People were falling on 
top of each other trying to get out 
of there.” 

Another survivor, Keith Middle- 
ton, 21. of Liverpool, added: “Ev- 
eryone was screaming and shout- 
ing. Everyone was pushing. People 
were falling to the floor and getting 
trampled on by other people.” 

It appeared' that almost ail of 
those killed had been sitting b the 
rear section of the airliner. 

The plane belonged to British 
Amours, a subsidiary of British 
Airways, the state-owned national 
carrier. Officials of the company 
said that a fire bad broken out in 
tbe port engbe just as the plane 
was about to lift off and that an 
explosion had followed. 

[Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher flew to Manchester after 
ending an Austrian vacation, and 
spent 30 minutes at the crash site, 
talking to firemen and rescue work- 
ers, Reuters reported from Man- 
chester. 

[After a briefing, she said thar 
two date recorders had been recov- 
ered and firemen expected to re- 
trieve a voice recorder still buried 
under the broken tail section. She 
later visited some of the survivors.} 

The 737 was powered by Prait & 
Whitney JT8D-17 turbofan en- 
gines. Pratt & Whitney is a unit of 
United Technologies Corp. of tbe 
United Stales. 

Gilbert Thompson, chief execu- 
tive of the airport, said that the 
captain of the plane had aborted 
his takeoff at a speed of about 1 15 
miles per hour (185 kpb) slewing 
the plane off the runway and aim- 
ing it toward the airport fire sta- 
tion. He added: “That action prob- 
ably saved many lives, because fire 
units got to the plane within sec- 
onds.” 

Following four other major 
crashes this year, the Manchester 
accident b as made 1985 the worst 
year ever for civil aviation, authori- 
ties said. 

■ Emergency LmHfing in Japan 

Officials at Tokyo's Naiita air- 
port said Thursday that an Iran Air 
Boring 747 airliner made an emer- 
gency landing there Thursday 
shortly after its takeoff for Tehran 
because of a suspected fire b the 
plane’s rear cargo room. Agence 
France- Presse reported. 

The plane carried 23 crew mem- 
bers and 328 passengers. 


Gandhi to Hold Elections in Punjab 
Despite Assassination of Sikh Leader 


bade when Mr. Herbage’s complex -w~w -w -*-* « rr rr T1 • . T? Rjf ? J 

Death Rows m U.S. Becoming tver More Crowded 


Reuters 

NEW DELHI — Prime Minister 

the Sikh leader, Harchadd Singh 

chief election comndsaono^ 
Ram Krishna Trivedi, said the 

India’s envoy 
tbe is 

£h» could *?»*»*£% 



hUH 


Sinjit Singh Barnala 

Longowal’s memory can be held, 
tr. Gandhi deoarca -— v Trive disaid. 

r his government would not bow He said the last date for nomma- 

‘,S» Mr. Javedi/ud «■ ^ % ^ teopjeteda 

irsdav that voting ;£ ~ — to he m olace m 

^ oaly tirss dav*. 

ted6eUon'»^ bebd i OM SS! 

onth after official noofieaom 


TO be issued rnunj v™-— 
postponed until MomtoySf 

SteSus ceremonies m Mr. 


oons **» “** , — . — 

new government to be m place m 

the state by Sept. 30. 

Pariasb Singh Badri, a leader of 
the Akrii Dal, the main Sikh party, 

and a former Punjabcirief minister, 
Sd the party would have to recon- 
Sier a derision made three days 
ago u> participate in tbe polls. 


“If elections are imposed on us 
we wiU have lo think df whether to 
contest them,” he said m Punjab’s 
capital Chandigarh. “You can’t 
campaign when assassins’ bullets 
await you. In the present violent 
atmosphere you can’t expect a fair 
election.” 

Mr. Longowal and a supporter 
of Mr. Gandhi’s Congress (I) Party, 
D. D. Similar, were killed by Sikh 
oorearists on Tuesday b a new 
outburst of violence in the northern 
state. 

Meanwhile, one group of Sikh 
moderates announced Thursday 
that the party leader ship had ap- 
pointed the former Indian agricul- 
ture minister, Surjit Singh Barnala, 
as acting president of the Akah 
Dal 

Hours later, a rival _ 

Mr. Bamala’s selection, 
tended that the party c 
appointed Aju Singh, a self-styled 
“sant,” or saint, like Mr. Longowal 
as the interim chief. 

Tbe rival claims reflected the 
power struggle in the party between 
the supporters and opponents of 
Mr. Longowal’s July 24 peace ac- 
cord. The 11 -point package deal 
was aimed at resolving tbe ihrco- 
year Punjab crisis. 



denied 
con- 
had 


Mr. Ayre, a Rotterdam-based 
in interconsult & Partners 
said that process probably 
would require at least two more 
years. 

Mr. Herbage's assets include art, 
estates to Hampshire and Scotland, 
and other property to France and 
the Caribbean, Mr. Ayre said. 

The indictment charged that Mr. 
Herbage and his company to 1979 
“entered bto a scheme to portray 
him as a successful international 
financial adviser, an expert on 
commodities and currencies and an 
investment analyst.” 

Rather than investing funds sent 
to Caprimex, the indictment said, 
Mr. Herbage spent the money on 
“a lavish lifestyle.” 

The investors received monthly 
account statements falsely report- 
ing that their money was invested 
and earning substantial profits, of- 
ten exceeding 35 percent, accord- 
ing to the indictment. It said that 
investors occasionally received 
“tolling payments” but that the 
money was mostly diverted by Mr. 
Herbage for his personal use. 


By Robert Reinhold 

New York Times Service 

HOUSTON — So many convicted murderers 
were scheduled to die last week to Texas that the 
state prison director asked the courts to avoid 
wJwrinling more than one execution a day. 

Although all those to be put to death received 
stays of execution, the move was a sign of tbe 
accelerating pace of executions in Texas and 
across the United States since two years ago 
when the Supreme Court upheld speedier han- 
dling of appeals from people awaiting execu- 
tion. 

So far this year 15 murderers have been exe- 
cuted, five of them to Texas, more than to any 
other state. Attorney General Jim Mattox of 
Texas h»g said that he expected tbe state to be 
executing one convict a month by the end of this 
year. 

Texas has 21 1 convicts on death row, more 
than any other state except Florida, which has 
221. Florida has exeented 3 persons so far this 
year. . . 

Executions have become so routine tn Texas 
that they draw little public attention. When 
Texas executed Charlie Brooks in December 
1982, the first execution in the state after the 
Supreme Court reauthorized the death penalty. 


capital punishment, but death sentences are 
usually commuted bto prison terms automati- 
cally. Italy, Switzerland. Britain and Spain haw 
retained capital punishment only for war-relat- 
ed crimes. 

[Among Asian nations, Japan, Malaysia, In- 
donesia, Thailand and Singapore all have capi- 
tal punishment and carry out sentences. Hong 
Kong law provides for capital punishment, but 
sentences are automatically commuted.] 

Lane McCotter, director of the Texas Depart- 
ment of Correction, asked the courts to coordi- 


Opponents of the death 
penalty, acknowledging the 
overwhelming pnblic, 
political and legal support 
for capital punishment, are 
altering their tactics. 


scores of reporters and demonstrators were . . 

drawn to die prison system’s headquarters to naie executions more after he learned that four cal leadership. 
Mr. Herbage failed to disclose Hm^-av where all of Texas’s executions take convicts had been scheduled to die on two days TSp ArT 1 1 
that between 1963 and 1971 a num- p) ^ last week. All but rate of them received slays 


alty project for the American Civil Liberties 
Union b New York. He said opponents would 
nonetheless try to keep the issue alive and pre- 
dicted that, like slavery, the death penalty would 
ultimately be abolished. 

As of Aug. 1, there were 1.540 men and 
women on death rows b the United States, 
according to an ACLU tally. 

Only 6 convicts were executed from 1 976, the 
year the Supreme Court permitted the states to 
resume executions, to the end of 1982. The pace 
quickened to 1983, with 5 executions, and then 
quadrupled to 21 last year. Mr. Schwatzchild 
estimates there trill be as many as 50 this year. 

Even with the acceleration, the number of 
executions has come nowhere near the 250 or so 
people a year who are sentenced to death. This 
raises the question of how the slates are going to 
cope with tbe increasing load. 

The logjam began lo break with the Supreme 
Court ruling on July 6, 1983, that held that a 
Texas inmate could be executed even though a 
constitutional challenge to his murder convic- 
tion was still technically pending. That inmate, 
Thomas Andy Barefoot, was executed Oct 30, 
1984, for killing a police officer. 

Since then judges in Texas and other states 
have been trying to clear up the backlog and 
there has been little opposition from the poll li- 


ber of separate companies he had 
organized failed and were declared 
bankrupt, the indictment said. 

It charged Mr. Herbage with 23 
counts of mail fraud and two 
counts of interstate transportation 
of fraudulently obtained property. 


This year’s flrm’ti™ 1 * have drawn only minor after Mr. McCotter’s request 


nouoe. . 

[According to Amnesty International many 
Western European countries have abolished 


and two ■’apitail p unishme nt or if they have retamed it on altering t 
portation the books, do not carry it oul Belgium, Greece, “Well 
Ireland and Liechtenstein still officially have Henry Sc 



their tactics. 

have it with us for a generation,” said 
Henry Scbwaizchild, director of the death pen- 


The ACLU and other opponents no longer 
seek publicity for each case, feeling that this 
tactic often evokes public sympathy for the 
victim of tbe crime. Rather, they seek to pursue 
the debate on moral grounds. 

“The individual execution no longer com- 
mands public attention,” Mr. SchwarzchUd 
said. “But the issue of the penalty is a high- 
profile issue.” 



** 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 19tf5 


Drug War: British Seek Right Language 


Second of two articles 

By Karen DeYoung 

Washington Past Service 

LONDON — On screen, a 
health-looking boy of 17 stands 
cockily, one band on bis hip. “Her- 
oin,’* he says. “I dunno why there’s 

all this fuss about it- It might be a 
problem for some people, but I 
could handle it.” 

The scene dissolves into others, 
with the boy looking scruffier and 
sicker. As his speech deteriorates, 
he claims. “There’s no way I'm go- 
ing to become an addict” 

Finally, he is silting on the floor 
of an empty room, his body 
hunched and sweating. “Look. I've 
got this thing under control. I’ve, 
just got a touch of the flu today. 
That’s all." His voice is barely audi- 
ble. “I could give it up tomorrow. 
Couldn’t IT* 

This and another similar com- 
mercial. featuring a girl, are being 
shown on television programs fa- 
vored by teen-agers. Along with a 
series of advertisements in teen 
magazines, it is pan of a costly, 
controversial campaign warning 
young Britons against heroin. 

The government has allocated 
nearly S20 million to combat a fast- 
spreading drug problem that has 
seen nearly a tripling of heroin us- 
ers since 1979. 

Once limited to several hundred 
addicts centered in London, heroin 
use now has become so common in 
■ schoolyards and neighborhoods 
throughout the country' that Prime 
Minister Margaret Thatcher has 
warned it threatens to “undermine 
a whole generation.” 

The publicity campaign has been 
tailored for teen-agers. But the 
overall ami-drug offensive is com- 
prehensive, targeted at the sources 
of the drug and its domestic traf- 
fickers as well as its users. 

British officials, who see the 
United Stales as the pacesetter 
both in illegal drug use and the 
fight against it, have consulted 
closely with their U.S. counterparts 
in planning strategy. 

The government has begun sta- 
tioning customs officers in coun- 
tries that are primary sources of 
heroin, like Pakistan, and it is con- 
tributing money abroad to encour- 
age substitution of poppy crops by 


others. The maximum penalty for 
trafficking has been changed from 
14 years to life imprisonment. 

This fall, new laws, modeled on 
UJSL legislation, will be introduced 
to loosen banking and privacy reg- 
ulations to allow Invesugation and 
seizure of drug-earned assets. 

Britain even has a celebrity an ti- 
ding crusader. After Diana, the 
Princess of Wales, appeared on a 
British Broadcasting Coip. televi- 
sion special last month urging ado- 
lescents to swear off drugs, phone 
calls by anxious parents to a hot- 
line jammed national circuits. 

Drug treatment clinics agree that 
publicity and education programs 
have raised public concern and en- 
couraged willingness among some 
addicts to seek help. But they add 


you within two weeks to a 

month.* " 

Most of those turned away, he 
said, do not come back. 

Officials are prepared to ac- 
knowledge that Britain's 13.5 per- 
cent unemployment rate has been a 
factor in the spread of drug abuse. 
But while heroin addiction has 
grown by quantum leaps in poor 
areas such as Hackney and the city 
of Liverpool, it is by no means 
limited to lower economic strata. 

“There are a lot of other vari- 
ables,” including Britain's histori- 
cally relaxed attitude toward drugs, 
said on official from the Home Of- 
fice. which has responsibility for 
law enforcement and drug prob- 
lems. “There is evidence that avail- 
ability is important, too." 


r If yon say, Take heroin and you’ll become 
a junkie and die,’ they won’t believe it’ 


Sammy Harari 
director of British ad agency 


that Mrs. Thatcher's overall clamp- 
downs on public spending has 
meant that there is little real help to 
offer. So far, the government has 
offered about S16 million for 
pump-priming of local treatment 
units over a three-year period. 

“I have to be fair to this govern- 
ment and say that it is the first that 
has handed out so much money," 
said Jeff Boyd, a social worker at 
the Hackney Hospital Drug De- 
pendency Unit in London. “But on 
the other band, it's not much mon- 
ey, and we have a drug problem of 
immense size." 

The Hackney unit is designed to 
serve five of London’s poorest bor- 
oughs, with a combined population 
of one million. Located in three 
basement rooms next to the laun- 
dry, it is staffed by one psychiatrist, 
one social worker and a reception- 
ist More help is planned. 

Ideally, Mr. Boyd said, anyone 
requesting treatment should be 
seen and placed within eight days. 
“This morning,” he said in an inter- 
view, “I bad to say to somebody, 
‘Well we have a hell of a wailing 
list 1 can't give you an appoint- 
ment The rweptiarust will write to 


The government dates the begin- 
ning of the heroin epidemic to the 
end of the 1970s. when the shah’s 
regime was deposed in Iran. Many 
upper-class Iranians put their sav- 
ings into easily salable heroin and 
fled to Britain. 

With the I ranians came the prac- 
tice of “chasing the dragon,” street 
jargon here for smoking, rather 
than injecting, heroin in the mis- 
taken belief that inhaling the va- 
pors is nonaddictive. 

The wave of Iranian heroin was 
followed by a bigger flood from 
Pakistan after the Soviet interven- 
tion in Afghanistan in December 
1979 and domestic political up- 
heaval contributed to changes in 
supply routes. Until the late 1970s, 
the demand for heroin was small in 
Britain. Its pons served primarily 
as transit points. 

A vicious curie began, as the 
growing number of users encour- 
aged an increased supply, which in 
turn promoted the market to more 
and ever younger users. 

Despite evident that the habit 
was growing among youngsters, a 
government advisory committee 
argued against an anti-drug public- 


■ ity campaign, saying it would 
“stimulate and encourage interest" 
in drugs in general Research by the 
Home Office among parents, pro- 
fessionals and youths, however, led 

to the conclusion that teen-agers 
“already were very aware of drugs, 
but often not very weD-infonned,” 
the official said. 

In overruling the advisory group, 
the Home Office went to Yellow- 
hammer, London's trendiest 
youth-market ad agency, to com- 
mission anti-heroin messages. 

Yellowhammer decided that 
what Britain did not need was a 
campaign patterned on U.S. adver- 
tisements, using “scare tactics” like 
the threat of imprisonment. Teen- 
agers, said the Yellowhammer di- 
rector, Sammy Harari, “see people 
around them smoking heroin, ex- 
hibiting all the positive aspects of it 
and none of the negative ones. If 
you say. Take heroin and you’ll 
become a junkie and die,* they 
won’t believe it." 

“Among the other theories we 
developed,” he continued, ‘Is that 
there is no such thing as a pusher” 
to warn against. The person who 
introduces most youths to heroin 
usually “is a friend.” “And it is 
free,” he added. 

Mr. Harari traveled to Liverpool 
to interview inner-city youths and 
found that “kids are very sophisti- 
cated, but they are illiterate . . . and 
completely iaarttculate. Long 
words like, ‘Heroin win make you 
impotent,’ didn't work. They didn’t 
know the word.” 

So the warnings focus on the 
“sliding slope” of usage, from ini- 
tial apparent hannlessness to even- 
tual problems not easily avoided 
even by the most careful user, from 
skin problems to addiction. 

In searching for the correct mes- 
senger, Mr. Harari rejected rock 
stars, because “kids simply don't 
believe that a pop star tells them 
not to take drugs, and then doesn’t 
walk around the corner and do two 
lines of coke.” 




WORLD BRIEFS 


Libya Said to Move Army Near Tunisia* 

/.tv, t l-. ii.nl/TUM* a laree face of troops on the 



Tunis CAP) —Libya has deployed a laige force of fryofg 
TiSSnbordorm Sst 24 hows, ago'^™^ sonreesard Thursday 


ks tension rose over Libya’s expulsion of worker 


ideate ** *e 

20 000 to 25.000 sdhtiers had occurred in the Zouara (13 

Mometera) from the Tunisian border along M^terranean. 


Tunisian troops in the area have beat put on alert, he said. 


RdSoSSween Libya and Tunisia have been deteriorating rapidly 

f since the beginning of August after die Ljtyf 115 
; Z 2.000 of tte SStted lOSjOOO Tunisian wafers m the fflWBVjte 
p. « Libyans also have expelled large numbers of makers from Niger, 
fc M^^an^TEgypt and other countries in what Libya sard was a move 
■ affecting all foreign workers. 


2 Koreas to Start Family Reunions 


PANMUNJOM, Korea (Reuters) —The two Korasagreed Thursday 

S allow 100 members of families separated smee the 195&53 war to meet 
Pyongyang and Seoul nett month, it was reported here by partiapanttfi 

in Rcduross talks. . ' i."v 

The 100 are among about 10 million relatives separated by the creation 

of two Koreas after World War II and then the Korean War. Delegates to 
f anre at this bonier village agreed that 50 family members from each side 
should make the visits over four days sttfrting'Sept. 20. 

The delegates also agreed that a 50-member performance troupe, 30 
journalists and 20 assistants from each side would go along. 


The AHOoated fad 


Pakistanis harvesting a crop of opium poppies. 


Similarly, he discarded the Prin- 
cess Diana approach. “Having 
Princess Di saying. ‘Don’t take 
drugs,’ is about as realistic,” be 
said, “as having Nancy Reagan 
saying ‘Don't lake drugs.' ” 

The completed print and video 


messages were submined to the 
government with some trepidation. 
Mr. Harari said. 

“Originally, we suspected that 
the whole campaign was designed 
for vote geLting,” he added, allud- 
ing to Mrs. Thatcher’s white, con- 
servative constituency. 

Mr. Harari said the message cre- 
ators told the government it had to 
agree to a couple of conditions — 
that the messages would be placed 
“underground," meaning on teen 
programs and in magazines where 
they would be invisible to the aver- 
age parent or voter. 

And, Mr. Harari acknowledged, 
in the process of focusing on the 
dangers of heroin, the advertise- 


ments “imply that soft drugs" like 
marijuana “are not that bad.” 

Even the principal slogan was 
bound to raise conservative hack- 
les. “Time and time again kids said 
to us, ‘If you really want to tell Itids 
about it, you should say “Heroin 
[expletive deleted] you up!' ” 

“We knew- the government 
wouldn't even like ‘screw,’" Mr. 
Harari said. “We tried out things 
like ‘Heroin is a pain' and ‘Say no 
to heroin.' ‘Heroin screws you up’ 
w as head and shoulders above.” 


CAIRO (Reuters) — Laboratory tests on spent bullets suggest lhara 
7 mm Soviet-made autom a tic rifle mis used izt the assassination: Tuesday 
of an Israeli diplomat here, poHce sources srid Thursday. 

Police tightened security on homes of bothTJS. and Israeli di plomats 
in Maadi, the suburb where the. Israebmtachi, Albert Atragfa'i, 30, was 
killed by three unidentified . gunmen. They continued interrogating 
Osama All, an Egyptian whose car is befieyed to have been used in the 
attack. ;V : - f 7 : 

Mustapha Khalil, deputy c&axtinaa of the ruling National Democratic. 
Party and an architect of:the,l979 Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty, was£ 
quoted in Thursday’s edition of Ai-Gotnlunm newspaper as saying thar 
the incident should not undermine relations between the two countries. 
Top Israeli offi cials had' made similar c omment* . 


Vietnam Sets 1990 to Quit Cambodia 


Bureaucrats balked, so Mr. Har- 
ari took it to government ministers. 
The campaign was approved, and 
the messages began inis spring.' 


Reagan Reportedly Got 
A Warning on Lebanon 


By Bill Keller 

Ntne York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The chair- 
man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff 
told a House commit Lee investigat- 
ing the 1983 track-bombing of the 
marine garrison at the Beirut air- 
port that the military chiefs had 
unanimously advised President 
Ronald Reagan against deploying 
marines in Lebanon in the first 
place, according to a committee 
member. 

A transcript of the classified 
hearings by the House Armed Ser- 
vices Committee was made public 
Wednesday, with most references 
to the Joint Chiefs' advice censored 
at the Pentagon’s insistence. 

But one member of the panel 
Representative Larry J. Hopkins, a 
Republican of Kentucky, filled in 
details of a censored exchange with 
General John W. Vessey Jr., chair- 
man of the Joint Chiefs, in which, 
according to Mr. Hopkins, the gen- 
eral said the Joint Chiefs had op- 
posed the use of the marines. 

In a telephone interview from 
Kentucky. Mr. Hopkins said: 
“That is very definitely my recol- 
lection. The conclusion was unani- 
mous at that time among the Joint 
Chiefs that we should not be there 
under these circumstances.” 

■ Base Commander Testifies 

Earlier, Don Shannon of the Los 
Angeles Times reported : 

The commander of the U.S. Ma- 
rine unit in Beirut that had 241 
deaths in a 1983 suicide bombing 
told congressmen in a closed ses- 
sion that the base was “virtually 
impossible” to defend against a ter- 
rorist attack, newly declassified tes- 
timony disclose. 

Colonel Timothy J. Geraghty, 
who commanded the 1,800 marines 


in the Lebanese capital, told the 
House Armed Services Committee 
that adequate defenses could not 
be built around the marine bar- 
racks at the Beirut airport because 
his troops’ peacekeeping mission 
was more political and diplomatic 
than military. 

Colonel Geraghty said the ma- 
rine compound was so vulnerable 
that it was nearly impossible to 
block the roads that approached it. 
One of those roads was used by a 
terrorist who drove a track laden 
with 12,000 pounds (5.450 kilo- 
grams) of explosive into the Ameri- 
cans' barracks on OcL 23. 1983. 

“I could take you by that airport 
and stand there for an hour, and we 
could count 300 refuelers or airline 
catering trucks or dump trades — 
any of which could be loaded with 
the same or bigger bomb — that 
would be moving 10 feeL (three me- 
ters) from the fence and drive 
through it and blow it and kill 800 
people," Colonel Geraghty said. 

If the truck "didn't go through 
the location that it did, 1 could give 
you 10 other locations it could get 
in the compound,” he added. 

He was unable to explain, how- 
ever, why the gate through which 
the truck sped was open at the time 
of the attack or why it was custom- 
arily left open. 

Colonel Geraghty was one of 
two marine officers to receive mild 
reprimands as a result of the bomb- 
ing. The two officers received let- 
ters of instruction that were not to 
be retained in their Hies. 

The marine commander testified 
in late 1983 before the committee 
when it probed the bombing in 
eight days of hearings. Later, the 
panel issued a report highly critical 



Syria Agrees to Monitor Beirut Truce 


Timothy J. Geraghty 


By Nora Boustany 

Washington Past Service 

BEIRUT — A wobbly truce 
went into effect Thursday after 
Syria stepped in to haltthe heaviest 
fighting between Moslem and 
Christian forces in more than a 
year. A special security comimnee 
agreed on the deployment of Syrian 
observers to monitor confrontation 
tines. 

Brigadier Gfaazi Kanaan of Syr- 
ia. chief of military' intelligence in 
Lebanon, conducted a meeting that 
included representatives of the 
Lebanese Army, Christian, Draze 
and Shiite Moslem militias in the 
central Lebanese village of Anjar. 

The committee issued a state- 
ment dedaring a 1 P.M. cease-fire 
and prohibiting the use of heavy 


arms and artillery against civ ilian 
areas. 

The sounds of guns pounding 
Christian East Beirut and Moslem 
West Beirut finally fell sflem about 
seven hours after the trace was to 
have taken effect 

The committee agreed on the de- 
ployment of more Syrian military 
observers to supervise the Leba- 
nese moun tains and Beirut. 

Nabih Beni, chief of the Shiite 
Moslem militia, Amal, said that 
more guarantees were needed be- 
fore his group committed itself to 
the plan. He demanded that the 
sources of shelling in Christian 
East Beirut should also be kept 
under surveillance. 

Prime Minister Rashid Karami 
charged that a “cursed demon’ 


behind ihe escalation and a bloody 
series of car-bombings in various 
Lebanese areas and demanded that 
Syrian observers cover all of Beirut, 
not only confrontation lines. 

About 287 people died and at 
least 924 were injured in the vio- 


JAKARTA (UPI) The Viet- 
namese foreign minister, Nguyen 
Co Thach, on Thursday pledged 
the unconditional withdrawal.. of 
his nation's forces from Cambodia 
by 1990. 

Elaborating on a statement be 
issued last week afangwfth the for- 
eign ministers of Lads and Cambo- 
dia, Mr. Thach saidlbe withdrawal - 
could.be carried out earlier if sever- 
al Cambodian factions fighting the 
Vietnamese occupation reached a 
political settlement. 

Mr. Thach, on a fivfrday official 
visit to Indonesia, said he. wished to 
eliminate cnrtfinrinri aroring .from 
statements attributed loihe Cam- 
bodian foreign minister, Hun 
that the troop withdrawal was con- 
ditional on the elimination of gner- 
rilla bases of the Khmer Rouge, lead 
by Pol Pot “If there is Pd Pot or 
not, it win not change our decision 
to withdraw by I99Q/’ Mr. Thach 
said. 'Tf.there.is a political settle- 
ment we can withdraw earlier.” 



i 

I 


Nguyen Co Thach 


U.S. Engineer Is Said to Flee Trial 


position from radical Moslem lead- 
ers and deteriorating security con- 
ditions in Lebanon, finally met 
with President Amin Gemayd on 
Thursday for the first rime in five 
months. 

Mr. Beni and Walid Jmnhlat, 
leader of the leftist Draze Mos- 


was 


declassified testimony was con- 
tained in a separate committee re- 
port. 

Colonel Geraghty, now com- 
mander of the Marine Corps bar- 
racks at the Norfolk, Virginia, Na- 
val Station, has never discussed the 
bombing publicly. 

He said he had decided to bar 
most of the marine sentries from 
carrying ammunition in their rifles 
because of the danger of an acci- 
dental shooting amid the heavy ci- 
vilian traffic at the airport. 

For Lbe same reason, he said, 
anti-tank rockets, which might 
have prevented the terrorist’s track 
from reaching the barracks, were 
not kept ready at the gales to the 
compound. 

During the testimony. Represen- 
tative Beverly B. Byron, a Demo- 
crat of Maryland, observed that 
committee members who had visit- 
ed Beirut were so worried about 
“the vulnerability of your posi lion" 
that only three days before the 
bombing they met with Secretary 


U.S. Citizens in Moscow Are Briefed 
On Alleged Chemical Surveillance 


LOS ANGELES (AP) — An engineer facing trial on charges that he 
illegally shipped nuetar triggering devices to Israel has left the country 
with his wife and does not plan to return, a relative said. 

The whereabouts' of Klchard'K. Smyth and hisj wife,- EmOie, -are 
unknown, but Randy Risvold, his son-in-law, said that they are hot In die 
United States. — 

Mr. Smyth, 55, failed to appear Tor trialTuesday in U.S. District Court 
m,n Hc *** “dKtai on charges or illegally exporting about $60,000 worth of 
Jems, boycotted [tecouDCUof mm- _ triggering devices -tolsraeT 

isters session, which was held in the 

summer presidential palace of . ' 

Bickfaya. in the Christian sector. jfaMll. Shamir Warn King HlUMpiq 

TEL AVIV (AP) — Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Foreign 
Minister Yitzhak Shamir warned Thursday that Israel faces a growing 
danger from Jordan. 

. Addressing an audience at a military academy, Mr. Rabin -warned 
Jordan’s King Hussein that he should Emit the buildup of Palestinian 
guerrilla bases in his country or face Israeli military action. 

Mr. Shamir was also critical of Egypt’s efforts at explaining to its 
people the Importance of the peace treaty with Israel." 


F 

fe&vdu 


ji 


By Serge Schraernann 

Ne it- York Times Service 

MOSCOW — American resi- 
dents in Moscow were informed of 
assertions about the use of a poten- 
tially harmful chemical by the 
KGB in an extraordinary series of 
briefings. 

In three separate one-hour ses- 
sions, about 500 diplomats, techni- 
cians, journalists, businessmen, 
teachers and other residents gath- 


tra eking agents had been known 
for years, and tests were conducted 
in 1984. Mr. Combs and Dr. Bro- 
dine said that a yellowish powder 
called nitrophenyl pentadiene alde- 
hyde was being used increasingly 
by the Russians to keep track of 
foreigners' movements. 

Laboratory analyses in Washing- 
ton, they said, determined that the 
chemical was a substance known to 
cause genetic change. They said the 


For the Record 


erratic and infrequent” not to be 
considered a danger. 

There is new evidence, he added, 
that usage was “more widespread A team of ISO North Korean ratEtary advisers invited to Uamda four 
than we thought and had m- years ago by deposed President Milton Obote to aid in the fight against 
creased significantly over the past rebels will leave in a few days, Radio Uganda said Thursday. (UPI) 
spring and summer. — — - 3 , / 


Mr. Combs seemed to be speak- States ^ lt w® conduct Friday the first 

IP IlflrlpT llirftlmt CArniwK/ from an underground sOo of an MX nuclear missile at 


of military officials for failing to of Defense Caspar W. Weinberger 
protect the U.S. troops. The newly to register their concern. 


ered Wednesday in the ballroom of substance was being used in minute 
Spaso House, the ambassador's quantities and its use was therefore 
residence, for information that few probably not a cause for alarm, 
found assuring and fewer found Dr. Brodine said little was 
sufficient known about the properties or the 

The information was that the compound and extensive tests were 
KGB, the Soviet internal security required to determine its actual ef- 
agency, had intensified its use of fects. Scientists are on their way to 
the chemical as an aid in conduct- the Soviet Union to begin testing. 


(Xaaa) 

communications satellite. ^ (AP) 

Mark W. Cannon, an aide to Chief Justice Warren E. Buraer was 
^ S^WO-a-year job as head of a craSston 

planning the 1989 bicentennial celebration of the US. Constitution. (AP) 


Kohl Warns East Berlin On Spy Issue 


Reuters 

BONN — Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl of West Germany said Thurs- 
day that a spy scandal in Bonn had 
strained relations with East Ger- 
many and he accused the East of 
creating mistrust. 

West German investigators an- 
nounced that they were looking 
now for a fourth espionage suspect, 
a man who worked for the counter- 
intelligence service. In another de- 
velop mem. the government said 
Thursday that it would tighten se- 
curity checks on people whose jobs 
involved sensitive materials. 

Mr. Kohl, in a television inter- 
view, said new indications that 
there were long-term agents in sen- 
sitive posts in Bonn showed that 
East Germany's calls for better re- 
lations were often propaganda. 

“When spying and eavesdrop- 
ping is going on in our ministries, 
in our parties, in business organiza- 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


dons and trade unions, indeed ev- 
erywhere where relatively impor- 
tant decisions are made — this 
inevitably creates mistrust," Mr. 
Kohl said. 

“The assurances of good, neigh- 
borly relations and the reality are 
often far apart. We really have to 
look at the difference between the 
propaganda and the real situa- 
tion." 

Mr. Kohl’s remarks were his first 
direct comment on the affair, 
which some say is the worst since 
1974, when Gu enter Guillaume, an 
aide to Chancellor Willy Brandt, 
was exposed as an East German 
agent- Mr. Brandt resigned 

The present scandal began with 
the disappearance of Sonja Line- 
burg, an aide to Economics Minis- 
ter Martin Bangemann. Later, Ur- 
sula Richter, who authorities 
believe may have controlled an es- 
pionage .network in Bonn, disap- 
peared. 

A third suspect, a man identified 
as Lorenz B„ worked in a top-se- 
cret bunker outside Bonn in the 


1960s. He was employed as a mes- 
senger by an army administration 
center in Bonn before be disap- 
peared last weekend. 

In addition, the Federal Prosecu- 
tor’s Office said Thursday that an 
employee of the government’s in- 
ternal security organization had 
been missing since Monday. 

Security sources identified him 
as Hans Hedge. He was a senior 
agent responsible for directing op- 
erations against East German 
agents in West Germany. 

Mr. Kohl said he firmly support- 
ed such moves but cautioned that it 
would be ah illusion to expect, 
counterintelligence to unmask all 
East German agents in Bonn. 

"If someone plans 30 years 
ahead, provides agents with a com- 
pletely new identity, infiltrates 
them into West Germany via for- 
eign countries and builds 19 his 
network, be has naturally got good 
chances of putting his people into 
place,” Mr. Kohl said 


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ing surveillance of foreigners. 

[The U.S. Embassy briefed 30 
representatives of other Western 
embassies Thursday about the 
chemical threat. Rollers reported 
from Moscow. One European dip- 
lomat present described the meet- 
ing as “very businesslike, technical 
and serious.” A U.S. spokesman 
said representatives from "NATO 
countries. Pacific allies and Euro- 
pean neutrals” had been invited.] 

In the absence of Ambassador 
Arthur A. Hartman, the briefings 
for U.S. citizens were held by the 
charge d’affaires, Richard E. 
Combs Jr, who said available in- 
formation did not give any cause 
for alarm. 

But the information presented 
by Mr. Combs and by Dr. Charles 
E Brodine, a State Department 
medical officer who flew to Mos- 
cow for the briefings, was too 
scanty to allay concern. 

A young mother asked whether 
her child could be tested for expo- 
sure to the substance. A journalist 
asked what specific places or things 
should be avoided. A woman re- 
cently arrived wondered whether 
the chemical could be included in 
preparations used by Soviet exter- 
minators against cockroaches. 

Others asked why the alarm was 
being raised now, if the use of the 


he said. 

He advised the American resi- 
dents to wash with soap and water 
and then with an alcohol- based 
compound. 

Mr. Combs said no diplomats 
were known to have suffered from 
the chemical. 

Both he and Dr. Brodine said 
they had learned of the hazard last 
weekend, but they declined to say 
what specifically had prompted 
their concern. In the past, Mr. 
Combs said, Russian use of track- 
ing agents had been “sufficiently 


sians used the chemical how the 
embassy had determined an in- 
crease in use, where it was most 
frequently employed, or how many 
people had bora targets. 

“I was a bit scared to learn about 
that powder, but I was not sur- 
prised.” a journalist’s wife said. 
Most foreign residents here assume 
that their activities and conversa- 
tions ore being constantly moni- 
tored. 

The revelation that the Russians 
used tracking powders implied that 
internal security agents could de- 
termine not only where a foreigner 
was going, but where he had been, 
with whom he had met and what 
items he had handed over or 
touched. 

But for those at the briefings in 
Spaso House, there was little titiUa- 
tion at the discovery of another 
James Bond technique or concern 
over possible breaches of security. 

“I have an infant child," a moth- 
er said. “What should I do?” 


.r-: - 

t .. 


New Zealand Says Suspect 
Is a Fiench Army Captain 


s -'We ] 


(Continued from Page 1) 
manded in prison for another eight 

A preliminary hearing of evi- 
dence against them is due to open 
Nov. 4 and last for six weeks. 

{The French magazine L'Express 
said Thursday that a woman who 
infiltrated Greenpeace in New Zea- 
land was a French secret agent, 
Reuters reported. 

[It identified her as Frtd&ique 


Reagan Expected to Veto Sanctions 


Booiieu, 34, a lieutenant working 
for intelligence. Greenpeace said 
she posed as a sympathizer to find 
out its plans for a protest off Mur- 
moa against French nuclear test- 
ing. She disappeared and is being 
sought by New Zealand potice.] 

New Zealand police said the 
rrench system was causing frustra- 
tions for the three Auckland detec- 
tives sent to Paris to conduct an 
investigation. They said detectives 
vrae receiving good cooperation 
from French police but wem nnt 


r 


11 , police but were not 

allowed to question suspects them- 
selves. 


Panama Politician Beaten Up 

Reuters 

PANAMA CITY — A Panama- 
nian opposition leader, Mauro 
Zuniga, was abducted and beaten 
Wednesday before being dumped 
semiconscious in a l own near the 
Costa Rican border. 


(Continued from Rage I) 
del a, renounce violence before 
gaining his release from prison. The 
United States has supported Mr. 
Mandela's release, and the possibil- 
ity that he might be freed was one 
reported under consideration be- 
fore the speech. 

“The effect of that is to require a 
concession before negotiations, 
which inhibits negotiations." he 
said. “Without calling for that, sit- 
ting down at a table would not 
mean neca»sarily that Mr. Mandela 
would encourage violence. He 
might or he might not" 

Mr. Mandela was sentenced to a 
life term in 1964 on treason 
charges. 


ing con Times, The Associated Press 
reported from Washington. 

Mr. Mandela, interviewed in 
prison by Tunes reporters, was 
quoted as saying that there is “no 
room for peaceful struggle in South 
Africa." 

The while minority government 
in Pretoria is “crawling on crutches 
out of the Middle Ages,” Mr. Man- 
dela said. 

[Police kilted two black men 
Thursday, wounded nine and jailed 
103 people as anti-apartheid vio- 
lence continued in black ghettos 
across South Africa. United Press 
Internationa] reported from Johan- 
nesburg. 


[Police said Thursday that 103 
people were jailed under a state of 
emergency declared July 21 by 
President Botha to curb the vio- 
lence.] 


Miners CaD Off Strike 


■ Mandeta Predicts Revolution 
Mr. Mandela has said that he 
sees “no alternative” to violent rev- 
olution in South Africa, according 
to a report Thursday in The Wash- 


[Thc government also an- 
nounced a ban on meetings to mark 
the first anniversary of Sept. 3 riots 
in Sharpeville. Those riots marked 
the beginning of the worst wave of 
race violence in South African his- 
tory. 


South Africa's most powerful 
black union called off a strike 
Thursday that was due to begin in 
gold and coal mines on Sunday 
after mining companies made a 
new offer, Reuters reported from 
Johannesburg. 

The National Union of 
Mineworkers, which had said 
230,000 of South Africa’s 550.000 
black miners would strike unless its 
demands were met, wilt reportedly 
deliver us members’ verdict on the 
new offer by next Wednesday. 
JDwunion has been demanding a 
22-percent pay rise while nrinmE 
companies paid 14.1- to 1 ' 9 . 6 -pa? 
cent wage increases from Juiv I 


Police have issued warrants 
agamst three unidentified French- 
raen who disappeared with *e 
charter yacht, Ouvfa, and have in- 
terviewed a fourth crew member, 
Mai % uet i several times. 
w ®ye never been entirely satis- 
fied with his activities or explana- 
ikhi why he was in New Zealand.” 
Detective Inspector Allan Gal- 
braith said. H was possible he could 
stfll be charged, he added. 

The Rainbow Warrior itself. 

raised Trom the seabed on Tuesday, 

was moved to dry dock. The police 
saia they wanted tomakea detailed 
investigation of the interior. 

The French government has 
maintained a strict silence on the 
gempeace affair, and Defense „ 
Wastry spokesmen said there wOJ * ■ 
he no comment until after Mr. Tri- 
«H s report is submitted.' 

..- Mr Lange has said that he wotdd 
me France & ? link were proved 
between the Turenge couple and 
rrench intelligence ‘ 






V. -;r , 


<* 


•'e,< 



I 


■** 


•a. . 





** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 1985 



Page 3 


U.S. Prisons Uncertain 

ith AIDS 



Si'*. ■ 


IS, 


K-crs 


1 - 




•Soil 



•'Vfe'; 


r 'i 


F™« Sfl&foJT fro^a^SiS 

Sffisr “* 

Centers for Disease 

MSes DUt SOW to manan, the qhh 

that arc diagnosetT^ “cones 
• Homosexuals account for nearly 
'“ re ^ out of four males with AIDS, 
bin they are not particularly associ- 
ated with the types of crimes that 

'3S£ priKm 

Another highriisk group, intra- 
venous drug users, represents the 
.majority of prisoners with AIDS, 
according to a telephone canvass of 
prison medical directors in 10' 
states. 

Almt Koenigsfest, health service 
coordinator for New Jersey’s Do- 
partment of Corrections, reported 
that about three-fourths of those 
with AIDS in New Jersey prisons 
a said they had taken drugs intrave- 
nously. . 

. don’t think our major problem 
is with prisoners engaging in homo- 
sexual activity either before incar- 
ceration or while in prison,” he 
£aid. “The issue is what do you do 
with the I-V drug users.” 

Many AIDS patients are able to 
recover sporadically from fliwsg** 
associated with the disease. Dr. 

’ Jalfe noted. 

- “Most prisons hospitalize the 
sick ones and then send them bade 
Into the general population when 
‘ they recover,” he said. “No one 


U.S. Arrests 
21 Alleged 
SSS^^CwS Members of 

C egregatcs inmates with AIDS. ■■ r « ip • 

Mob barmy 


and 

dim JChdmy. medical director for 
the Odifornia Department oT Cor- 
rections. “The AIDS rate is dou- 
bling in the outside work! bat not 
reside the prisons, although we ex- 
pect we will be seeing atot more 
cases in the next few years." - 
. Prisons in the Northeast have the 
highest rates of confirmed UJ5. 
cases, while the disease has barely 
appeared in prisons in other re- 
gions. Colorado, for example, has 
not reported a angle case. Illinois 
has only one case, and its system 
holds more than 17,000 men. 

James Plateau, a spokesman for 
the New York State Department of 
Correctional Services, said 196 
. cases of AIDS had been confirmed 
since 1981, when the disease was 
discovered. Of those, 128 are now 
dead. 

Prison officials in New York, 
New Jersey and Connecticut said 
all AIDS patients in their prisons 
contracted the disease before im- 
prisonment, based on the suspected 
incubation period of three to five 
years. 

Despite the high incidence of ho- 


Uruud Press International 

NEWARK, New Jmey — Fed- 
eral authorities arrested 21 alleged 
members of the powerful Lucbesc 
crime family in northern New Jer- 
sey on racketeering charges, au- 
thorities said Thursday. 

U-S. Attorney Thomas Greelish 
said (he indictment “charges virtu- 
ally the entire New Jersey member- 
ship of the Luchese organized 
crime family" with racketeering. 

Mr. Greelish said the gang was 
involved in gambling, loan-shark- 
ing, credit card fraud and traffick- 
ing in cocaine and marijuana. 

He said five of the 26 persons 
named in the indictment remain at 
large, including one who escaped 
arrest. 

An assistant U.S. attorney, 
Grady O'Malley, the head of the 
organized crime strike force, said 
the Luchese family is the strongest 
crime organization in northern 
New Jersey and the most violent 

The Luchese operations in New 
Jersey are headed by Anthony (Tu- 
mac) Accetturo, 47, of Hollywood. 


SKsexual activity in prisons, the Florida, Mr. Greelish said, and sir- 
physicians stud, inmates generally pervised by Michael (The Fat Kid) 

Taccetta. 38, 


do not have frequent sexual contact 
with a wide number of partners, a 
factor in the spread of AJDS 
among promiscuous homosexuals. 

Dr. Annond Start, medical di- 
rector for the Texas Department of 
Corrections, pointed out another 
problem. “Trying to get additional 
money ont of legislatures to prop- 
erly treat inmates with AIDS is 
going to be tough sledding,” he 
said. 

' He added that the long incuba- 
tion period of AIDS also meant 


■•V* 


_ _ that the extent of the problem in 

seems enthusiastic about placing prisons might not become manifest 
them permanently in a nod i ca l fa- for some tune. 

;dlity.” . . . “Trying to manage a serious dis- 

Flotida, for example, does tittle ease among an incarcerated popu- 
to segregate inmates with AIDS. latipn when we don’t know the in- 


of Ftorbam Park, 

New Jersey. 

FBI agents arrested Mr. Accet- 
turo and five other men in Florida 
during raids Wednesday. Mr. Tac- 
cetta and 14 others were arrested at 
their homes in New Jersey on 
Wednesday. 

“The indictment and arrests 
bring to an end in New Jersey the 
operation of the Luchese organized 
crime family, known as the Accet- 
turo group or Taccetta group," Mr. 
Greelish said. 

“The family was extremely ag- 
gressive," Mr. Greelish said. “It 
controlled gambling in New Jersey, 
particularly here in North Jersey." 


Lotto 48 Money: Where It Goes 

Oiiinbutirtn o' minoy 1mm hc.H*t *aK>- 


15 % 

Administrative costs 
V 



11 % 

Second prizo 

28 % 

Third pnzo 

11 % 

Fourth pnze 


F*u;Ci' Hva 


The York TnM 


3 Winning Tickets Share 
In N. Y. $41 Million Lottery 

The Assocuued Press 

NEW YORK — A Brooklyn man and 21 factory workers who 
shared one ticket claimed iwtwhirds of New York state’s record 541 
million lottery jackpot on Thursday. 

-Officials said a third winner, who bought the ticket in Albany, New 
York, had not yet come forward. 

Each of the Lhree winning tickets was worth $13,666,667, which 
would be distributed in 21 annual payments of 56S0.793. 

That meant each member of “The Lucky 21" — the name the 
factory workers signed on papers ai lottery offices — wQ] receive 21 
annual payments of about 524.000 after taxes, according to their 
lawyer. 

John Quinn, the director of New York’s Lotto 48 game, declined to 
identify the other known winner except to say he was a Brooklyn man. 

The lucky 21, who work at the Hanucho Co, an offset press 
manufacturer in Mount Vernon. New York, said they had agreed to 
pool 521 to play and split any winnings. 

“1 just thought it was a good idea" to play together, said Peter Lee. 
38, of Yonkers. “We’re like a family here. Wc have a good relationship 
with our bosses. We decided to lake a chance.” 

A record 536. 1 million was bet in the last four days on the jackpot 
which grew to 541 million because seven previous drawings since July 
27 bad failed to produce a winner. The winning nurabers"were 14. 17. 
22, 23. 30. and 47, with the supplementary number 33. 

Las t Saturday, Fred McCullough won SI5 million in the Illinois 
state lottery. The drawing made Mr. McCullough, president of the 
Bank of Gibson City. Illinois, wealthier than his bank, which has 
assets of 5115 million. 


Mexican Says Sandinist Overthrow 
Would Destabilize Latin America 


By Richard J. Meislin 

Sew York Times Service 

MEXICO cm’ — Mexico’s 
foreign minister has criticized sen- 
timent that favors the overthrow of 
the Sandinist government of Nica- 
ragua. Such action, be said, would 
have “very unfortunate conse- 
quences" for Latin America. 

The foreign minister, Bernardo 
Sepulveda Amor, was responding 
to a report that some Reagan ad- 
ministration officials had said VS. 
differences with Nicaragua could 
not be resolved as long as the San- 
dinists were in power. 

“We do not believe that the solu- 
tion is by way of the removal or a 
legitimately constituted govern- 
ment,” Mr. Sepulveda said. 

He added that forceful over- 
throw could bring s “possible rup- 
ture of the institutional order and 
legitimate systems of security," not 
only in Central America but also in 
other regions of Latin America. 

The foreign minister made his 
remarks two days before be was to 
leave for a meeting in Cartagena. 
Colombia, of Latin American for- 
eign ministers. 

The meeting is to be the first 
between the so-called Contadora 
nations — Mexico. Colombia. Pan- 
ama and Venezuela — and a sup- 
port group that has been created to 
show wider support for the Conta- 
dora group. The support group 
consists of Argentina, Brazil. Peru 
and Uruguay. 

The Contadora group has been 
working Tor more than two and a 
half years to negotiate a peaceful 
resolution or the conflicts in Cen- 
tral America. It is named for the 
island off Panama where the for- 
eign ministers of the four nations 
met to begin the attempt. 

The group’s efforts have been 
faltering recently. Mr. Sepulveda 
attributed this to a “hardening of 
the positions by the parties in- 
volved" since the beginning of the 
year and to a resulting “tndtsposi- 



Bernardo Sepulveda Amor 

tion to consider terms that would 
be conducive to a compromise." 

He said that secondary issues 
had been magnified into obstacles 
that were “distracting attention 
from what really constitutes the es- 
sence" of Centra] America’s prob- 
lems. 

Asked later to what he attributed 
the hardening of positions, Mr. Se- 
pulveda referred his questioner to a 
dispatch from Washington that 
was printed in The New York 
Times on Sunday. (The article ran 
in the International Herald Tri- 
bune on Monday). 

The dispatch reported that Rea- 
gan administration officials in- 
volved in Centra) American policy 
were saying that the United States 
could not resolve its differences 
with the Sandinisis. It added that 
some officials indicated they fa- 
vored overthrowing the Sandinists. 

This is contradictory to the pub- 
lic support voiced by the Reagan 
administration for the Contadora 
peace efforts, the Mexicans say. 


Mexican officials have also ex- 
pressed concern in private that the 
United Stales is using its influence 
with its three major allies in Cen- 
tral America — Honduras, Costa 
Rica and E) Salvador — to create 
obstacles to a regional treaty th3i 
would leave the Sandinist govern- 
ment in power in its present form. 

Foreign Minister Sepulveda said 
that, while Nicaragua was an “es- 
sential actor in the solution to be 
proposed in Central America," the 
problem was of a regional nature 
that involved more than conflicts 
between Nicaragua and its neigh- 
bors and would require “reciprocal 
concessions.” 

■ Rebel Funds Tax-Exempt 

A leading group raising funds for 
Nicaraguan rebels obtained federal 
tax-exempt status three years ago 
after pledging never to provide 
“materiel or funds" to insurgents, 
according to Internal Revenue Ser- 
vice documents. The Associated 
Press reported from Washington. 

Now, however, the group, the 
U.S. Council /or World Freedom, 
claims credit for funneting tens of 
thousands of dollars in aid to the 
rebels fighting to overthrow’ Nica- 
ragua's leftist government. 

Retired Major General John K- 
Singlaub, council chairman, said 
this week that he was not familiar 
with the commitment made to the 
IRS by the group’s treasurer. “1 
suppose I should be," he said. 

General Singlaub and other 
council officials say funds collected 
in the United States were used only 
to buy the rebels noolethal supplies 
to avoid violating U.S. neutrality 
and arms export laws. Money to 
buy weapons for the rebels was 
raised elsewhere, they said. 

Wilson Fadely. an IRS spokes- 
man. said the council’s tax-exempt 
status was granted “based upon the 
information provided to us" and 
could be revoked if a group is “not 
carrying out the tax-exempt pur- 
pose." 









The state reports more cases among 
t . prisoners .than . does California, 
which moves all inmates with 
' AIDS to a single medical fadtity, in 
Vacaville. .. 

Officials are puzzled by .the ttn- 
‘ explained variance in the number 
of cases reported in different states. 

New York, for instance, now re- 
ports about 33 peroentof all AIDS 
cases among the general popular 
tion in the United States, and its 
prisons have about 50 cases. 

But California, which reports 
nearly as many cases as New York 
among the general population, has 
only 10 cases among prisoners even 


cuba ti cm period or how to treat 
those who come down with it is not 
an easy problem.” he said. 

■ 208 Die of AIDS in Brazil 
- The B razilian health minister, 
Carlos Santana, says 200 have died 
in Brazil of AIDS and another 415 
were known to have the disease, 
Reuters reported from Brasilia on 
Wednesday. 

He told a meeting of regional 
health, chiefs called to discuss the 
disease that most victims were in 
SfioPanto and Rio de Janeiro, and 
were mainly homosexuals in the 
20-49 age group. 


Miskito Indians Still Await Their Return Home in Nicaragua 




By Stephen Kinzer 

New York Times Service 

SUMUBILA, Nicaragua — 
Adolfo Herman and about 100 oth- 
er Miskito Indians were ready to 
begin a long-awaited return to iheir 
homeland along the Coco River re- 
cently. 

The Miskitos had been told that 
a government truck would arrive 
on the appointed day to cany them 
bade to the spot on the rivetbank. 
about 18- miles (30 kilometers) east 

— ~ ; ' . " <rf Waspam, where their village, 

. . • - •' IT f ' Saldin, once stood. The village was 

American Priest m Honduras . 55 * 

1982. 

Mr. Herman and his neighbors 
removed the corrugated zinc roofs 
from their houses and carefully 
pried their walls apart so they 
would have some lumber to start 
rebuilding once they arrived at the 
riverbank. Surrounded by their 
possessions, they sat and wailed aD 
day. 

But the truck never came; not on 
the scheduled riay of departure or 
on the days that followed. Finally, 
Mr. Hainan decided last week to 
set out for the regional center of 
Puerto Cabezas, 30 miles east of 
here, to find oat what bad gone 
wrong. 

Meanwhile, his family and 
friends were living by a roadside in 
this resettlement camp. Their buts 
bad been dismantled. Only a few 
scraps of plastic shielded them 
from almost constant rain. 

The return of the Miskitos has 
been hampered by severe shortages 
of vehicles, fuel and other necessi- 


Gtes Psychological Torture 

The Associated Press 

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras — 

An American Roman Catholic 
priest said Honduran military in- 
telligence officers subjected Turn to 
. psychological- torture during a two- 
day detention and accused him of 
training guerrillas. 

The Reverend John Donald, 46, 
told reporters Wednesday that 
. Honduran soldiers arrested him 
Sunday and accused him of malting 
bombs, transporting aims, hiding 
arms in caves and training guerril- 
las. 

Before be was released, he said, 
the soldiers subjected him to psy- 
chological torture by blindfolding 
ynd handcuffing him and threaten- 
ing him with physical torture. 

He said bis Honduran interroga- 
tors slammed doors to sound tike a 
. shot from a gun and dropped ob- 


jects on the- floor to see whether he 
was nervous. 

At one pant during the journey 
from northern Honduras to Tegu- 
cigalpa, two U5. soldiers drove 
him and bis four Honduran captors 
from a U.S. military camp to a 
Honduran military camp, he said. 

“They didn’t realize I was being 
detained, bat I told one of the 
Americans 2 bad a problem and I 
wanted him to let somebody know 
where I was and where I was being 
taken," Father Donald said. “He 
said be would do it but I don’t 
-know if.be ever did or not” 

The VS. Embassy issued a state- 
ment raying: “We have no reason 
to believe that there was any U.S. 
involvement in the detention of Fa- 
ther Donald. However, in light of 
his statements today, we are look- 
ing into the matter urgently.’’ 



A Miskito Indian girl walks by the ruins of a lumber mill burned by guerrillas in 1983. 


ties, according to local officials and 
relief workers. 

Haze] Lau. a Sandinist member 
of the National Assembly whose 
district includes most of the tradi- 
tional Miskito homeland, estimat- 
ed that only about 2,700 of the 
more than 30,000 Miskitos who 
once lived along the Coco have 
been able to make ibeir way home. 

“Even if there are no military or 


other obstacles, the return of our 
people could still lake two years," 
Mr. Lau said. 

Saklin, the village to which Mr. 
Herman was seeking to return, was 
one of more than 50 towns and 
villages along the river that were 
forcibly evacuated by Sandinist 
troops in Lhe first months erf 1982. 
The army was attempting to crush 
an uprising by Indians dissatisfied 


by policies of the revolutionaiy 
government that look power in 
1979. 

For three years, nearly 10.000 
Miskitos from Saklin and d ozen s of 
other Miskito villages eked out a 
living in Sumubila and at four oth- 
er nearby settlements to which the 
government gave the collective 
name Tasba Pri, which translates as 


“free land” from the Miskito lan- 
guage. 

“Everyone is waiting to leave 
and happy to get out of this place," 
said Sandoval Herrera, a lay minis- 
ter who runs the makeshift Moravi- 
an Church in Sumubila. “But we 
know there are so many problems." 

When President Daniel Ortega 
Saavedra announced on May 29 
that the government would allow 
the Indians to return bone, he said 
the derision was part of an effort to 
bring a peaceful end to the Sandra- 
ists’ conflict with Miskito insur- 
gents. 

The Miskito rebels said they are 
not fighting to overthrow the San- 
dinists. but rather to win recogni- 
tion of what they consider to be 
their rights as indigenous people. 

The Miskitos arrived safdy at 
rustic camps like Sumubila, but 
they have not lived nearly so well as 
they did along the Coco. The land 

fertile and Csh are plentiful there. 
Before war disrupted life in the 
region, most families kepi farm an- 
imals and. by their own accounts, 
lived well. 

Commerce and travel among vil- 
lages on the Coco River was tradi- 
tionally by boat, and many of the 
villages are not accessible any other 
way. But the government said it has 
no motorized vessels to support the 
resettlement. Many of those who 
live upstream must wait until mo- 
torboats become available. 


PiageT 





The Jeweler 
you should not miss.. 

EDWARD 

JEWELS 

Via V. Veneto 187 
Tel. 49 38 09 
Roma 


U.S. Love for Auto Is All Heartbreak in New York 


By Margot Homblower 

Washington Past Service 

NEW YORK — In New York, 
the American romance with the 
automobile is more tike an unhap- 
py marriage. 

Take Kevin Lessra, 27. an actor 
— he got seven seconds in the mov- 
: ie “Prizzi’s Honor." He never gave 
much thought to the reason behind 
. shattered glass on the sidewalk, a 
common sight on New Yo 
streets, or to the crudely lettered 


reported, “You’ve watched too 
much ‘Kojak.’ " 

Mr. Lessin sued the discount 
store that sold him the “primary 
asset alarm system" (hat failed to 
protect the radio. Emerging from 
gnatl claims court in M a n ha t ta n , 
be found that a truck had plowed 
into his Porsche. 

Mr. Lesan’s insurance adjuster, 
Morris Lundy, was unimpressed 

*Tve personally spent 5800 just 
to have my windshield replaced," 


'New York is the only city where having a 
car subtracts from your mobility.’ 


Warren D. Leigbt 
anther of *1 Hate New York Guidebook'’ 


signs taped to car windows: “No 

^That was before his 118,000 
Porsche was broken into la? Apnl 
md his S500 Blaupunkt radio dus- 
ked out with a crowbar. 

Mr Lessm went to ihepobce and 

b£ 5; nCi now? Do you take 

told bta. he 

Joyecs’ Union 

' ^708 



Reuters 

3T0N — United 
janaJ. altemptiag tc 
.«■ 1 1 nf the 


: union refused to 

Is for further w^ge 

cessions. The guild 
i 10 discuss a gfnjy 
is by reducing the 
guild employees. 


said Mr. Lundy, whose 1983 Maz- 
da has been looted seven times in 
his middle-class Brooklyn neigh- 
borhood. . , , 

-The first time they npped up 
the dashboard but couldn’t get the 
radio out,” he said. “They came 
back in two weeks and got the ra- 
dio. i put *n another radio with an 
equalizer sound boosting system. 
They got that, too. I put m an 

alarm. The car was broken into 
again in midday on a busy street. 
The alarm went oft- Peopk saw 
them, but nothing happened. 

This story, however, has some- 
thing of a happy P “““g- , ,, 
In a city where an average of 62 

^ are plundered daily or radios 

and slew oquipmen^Mr. Ussm 
found a way to supplement his tn- 

“por 56 he sells brigbi-ydlow 
laminated Signs that fit in car wtn- 

Zs and advise would-be intnid- 

^Warren^ LeighL the humorist 
who wrote the lyncs to the perouter 
musical. “Mayor, devoted a chap- 


ter of his “I Hate New York Guide- 
book" to the perils of automobile 
ownership. 

“New York is the only city in the 
world where having a car subtracts 
from your mobility,” he wrote. 

“In the time it takes to find a 
parking place, you could locate the 
Aric of the Covenant. Once parked, 
you need only worry about your car 
getting ticketed, towed away, van- 
dalized, burglarized or sodo- 
mized." 

In an article in The New York 
Tunes, a resident of the neighbor- 
hood now known as the “Yupper 
West Side" warned against parking 
on Riverside Drive along the Hud- 
son River, where three-bedroom 
apartments seO for close to SI mil- 
lion. 

“Only the border between Iran 
and Iraq is more hazardous.” ad- 
vised the author of the article , Jay 

LeonharL 

New York car owners must pay 
parking fees averaging 5200 
monthly or fathom the intricacies 
of the city’s alternate-side-of-the- 
street parking system. 

Shortly before 8 each morning 
on nearly half of the city’s 6,400 
miles ( 10,200 kilometers) of streets, 
men and women with coats draped 


over pajamas pour out of apart- 
ment buildings to move their cars. 
They double-park illegally on the 
opposite side of the street, leaving 
pbone cumbers scribbled in lhe 
windshield, and then, about three 
hours later, move back. 

The system began in 1951 to al- 
low mechanized street brooms to 
sweep along the curb. 

Because mere are more cars than 
spaces, the result is a mad game of 
musical autos seeking empty 
spaces. The normally vigilant traf- 
fic police turn a blind eye to the 
scramble. 

Like Kevin Lessin’s stolen radio, 
the system has given rise to addi- 
tional examples of free enterprise. 

Moonlighting doormen, known 
as “car shepherds," charge as much 
ss 560 a month to move a car from 
one side of the street to the other. 

Glen Boiofsky, an accountant 
who has paid hundreds of dollars in 
parking tickets, invented lhe suc- 
cessful “New York City alternate 
side 0 / the street parking calendar” 
listing 30 holidays when regula- 
tions are suspended. 

The suspensions began when 
Jewish leaders complained that re- 
ligious custom forbade driving on 
certain da vs. 


*** While 
in Madrid 
Remember. 


jends-Wbiks of Art-Wddies 

Main distributor 

PIAGET- BAim&MEROER-BDIBX 
Gran Via, 1. Tel 232 IOC". 

SSSSSSm mis MADRID mSSSSm 


ESCADA 

in Paris 

at European 
export prices 

Marie-Martine 

8, Rik de Sfevres, Paris 6th. 
Tel: (1)2221844. 
Credit cards 


fe 

CARAVEL 

HOTEL 


If you come to Athens (Greece) 
and you like a Hotel 

100% fireproof and 100% earthquake proof 

alt 420 rooms and 72 suites with facilities, such as 

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also a beautiful Mosque on the 
roof garden, then come to 

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If you like enjoying your life 

there is also CARAVEL No. 2 

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s v zss *Apf*-*+ ■■ \ ■ 





[V* V •'*>•# !£*?£* o’: r-;> 

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. ijiiatfiiiMSKaif „ 


Please send me information material on the 23rd Overseas Import Fair 

Name 

C ompan y 

Adress - 

AMKBerfan AusatalhinB a .M c 3SB-KonflrBss-GwbH : 

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' ' 










Page 4 


** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 1985 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SPAIN 


WZA VILIA 4 min. walk boodvS nin. 
drive boat harbor. Vito 3bedtoon* 2 


brahx. fir6i-Aif.fi, fufty himahed, tpt» 
dam bedroom & bath 


i otcl cow™ 
jol, rtfirtflrfin ri 

Towrfww 2 

_ . *, 2 we, general dmcrtp- 
fian mJ a r to wBa TJS5J0/XB. + 

remote afaoavratobfe far vBaft town- 

home, Cog Ibizo 0471) 330269. 


MALLORCA - B1ETAS. New 1 bed- 
. _ _ rhe sea, furnished 

tel Span 3AJlS) 40 19. 


MOROCCO 


KASBAH OF TANQtBt, Palatal fed- 
deuce, fa flowered private (treat. wry 
protected polio floor, 43S sq. ft/ 144 
receptions with firepiocs. Mtr- 
with fountain. 16 flJ 6 


bed 


(Continued From Back Page) 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

USA RESIDENTIAL 

ITALY 

NYC 43-Story CONDO 

Dag Hammoralqold Tower 

240 EAST 47th ST. 

I Eted; To United Natans 
-SPECTACULAR 

1, 2, 3, ft 4 Bedroom Apartments 
[irvneftrae Occupancy 

New Hfl Service Bunding WHh 
Swimming PbaL Hecflh Cteb and 
HoweLMingsentos Avmbbte 
RBrffAL APARTMENTS 

ARE ALSO AVARABLE 

Fra Info Gal 2127598844 

Sat, Sun 1H Mon to Fri 95 

COSTA SMBUUDA SEAFRONT. Do- 
Eghtful 4-bedroaai viMa awfldbh 
tapt, sea water pool, rtnaefag, bar- 
beam aaa TelTH 22/31 50, 

office haws. 

MRAN RBM5HED APABTMBir to 

tel S900 monthly. Monaco 30 52 39. 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

74 CHAMPS-aYSSS 8th 

StucfiOjJ or irpom opcrtmeiit. 

One month or more. 

IE CLARDGE 359 67 97. 


AUTOMOBILES 


CONFUSED 9 
HE MOST UP-TO-DATE 



Cars of . 
Copenhagen 

TAX FREE 


Harbin 

Chinese City Stands to Gain From End of Border Dispute 


2390 Hamburg. 
West Germany 


MERCEDES 450 5& 7978, 80.000 

u e tes , Am er ican specs,, parto concS- 
tipn. Aa OFTlofS. USSICMKHl 
“ hb custaim pm^. Tet Geneva 22/ 
48 OP gnytone. 


* he emotienol Saiet 

* Worldwide Defivery 

* Empean Price Leoden 

* Tetrt 45 I 37 78 00 

* Tefan 19932 DK 


55 Vbdrofftvei DK-1900 
CPU V.-OENMABC 


AMERICAN IN EUROPE OHBES best 

buy fa new and used Mercedes and 
Pandto. Tel UK 01-586 9626, 


Hwrtlfe starwqy. 1 guest {WATER BLAND i HR£ i ISIAID. Da- 
Mi bean. . pantry, 


agner home on 1 J8 share acre with 
' nwdte-BUmel deck ta bay and 
vaulted eaten. areal room / 
re. 3 becfaxirra. 4 baths. Mas- 
ter suite opwi lo private grade ns. 
Separate guest 


. sittiig widi , 

riareraoms, seraaM'i quar- 
... . bdh. tervratf's bedroom with 
bath 2nd floon Matte floor mezza- 
rine over potto. 3 bedrooms with 
boh ensule, vast dosets Master 
suite has finepfac* & small pool an 
private terras. Roof gaden, T bed- 
room wflh bcftiemurfe. 1 mdrabtah- 
en ft bra for lage parties on &50 sqJt 
/ 215 *v> of fragrant gaden, pcie- 
bo & sundeek. 360 drones urobsruct- 
ed views an town, Br mountaira. Bay 
of TangNT, the Strafe^ Gibraltar, 

Medilnmrarai & Spain. Entire itroc- 

IrfeT 8 JgPST 1 ? fig bahs. gourmet rook's ktehm, fire- 


105 


| BOIAOGNE: Luxury 4 ... 

K)jn. + 20 scuil terrace. 3 , 

pa li ng. Unary furniture. I tnfa, Met- 
ro. 3 mins Boo. 8th Boor + Eft. 


AUTO RENTALS 


MERCEDES SPECIALISTS 
FOR USA + MflXHf EAST 


Unique view. H^IO^nBL Tek 8Dd 12 1 


78 


152 56 


CHAJRCRMT A CAR. Prestige cars 

with pkxwi Bob Spirit, Maudes, 

Jogura, BMW, Imousmevsmd era*. 

46 r mm Oiar 
72030.401 Tefax I 




LARGE 

■ mrSbcab 


' Rem Charon, 750 

Toiex 630797 FOWLOC 


Pail. Tel: 


280^ no SL. 2B0 SH, 500 SB. 


Ptimrumic water views. FumWiirup 
faduded. $595,000. Appointment 
through Arione Haitzmrav Morril 
lyncnfedty / Cal Burr fad 100 
War Main SLEost Ufa. LL, N.Y. 
11730 516-581^855. 


AUTO SHIPPING 


SHORT TERM STAY. Asfaattoges of a 
hdd without facamnenOH, fed d 

RAfttFURT/MAW-W. GerrcawJjL 
ato mae w PariL SOHAiM BO rye hemonn GmbH. Tel: 06944*171. 

Picfc-up cfl over Europe *ro/no-ihips. 


SEC with both, vefagg 8. 
leather idenar. * 
Shipment & defivery worldwide. 

NASSAR EXPORT GMBH, 


LABCHM ONT. M EW YORK 
■ WESTCHESTER COUNTY ■ 


de rUwvenrW. Paris 7th 544 39 40 
PENTHOUSE AVE MONTAIGNE, | 
near Ohaeps Bytea, 12B 
large terrace high dose .* ~~ 


MAINZER LAND51R. 191, 
■ D-6000 FRANKFURT/ M | 




anew ml 984. The residence ha s been 
shown on cow & artide fa 'Demra- 
tan b*omotiontie , > June asue ft pho- 
to j aphed to appev fa muse ft 
Gaden' ft athar mogazinee No fuss, 
pure faSena design lends itself ta_aL 
lands of now personefa n boa The 

can do aoquveo nwy appuawKL wnn 
O refined Atoracmn staff of 5 Mr- 
vants, fluent fa Engiidi ft Spanish. 
Deify Hfijfa; of oamediora to afl Eu- 
rope ft 0SA from Tangier Airport, 15 
nxm. away. Fa oppointmenTr Cbd: 

Pbyoia, in Tangfar: (9) 333-15. No 
agents, please. 


plaas, pool ft pool Howe, 
setting on premium rwer. 


MONTPARNASSE. 

beautiful afnCcr deeps 3- 
Cdk 325 78 33/ 4l2 49 84 9a«hl Ian. | 


TRANSCAR 17 ov de Frfadknd 75008 
Pais. Tet 225 6444. Nee: S 95 33. 

Antwenx 233 99 85. Cannes 39 43 44 


™mSr X " 


414018 


AUTO CONVERSION 


BURBAMC ASSOOATES 
3097 Boston Pan 

I 9V 


SHORT TERM in Latin Quorfar.f 
No gpents. TeL 329 38 83- 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED ! 


SAlIAfRfc HUE ISLAND. 

nt n this 


pofati 



f unfly community 
. pano ra m ic wa ter views. 
™s bird suNjuny ossur- 


I WEST SUBURBS. Urge house fa lorn 
fan, 5 bedooms. 3 
(3 969 31 25. 


MON1SOURS. Lotto 2 rooms, newly 
. F4800 net. id: 720 94 95 


DOT iff A 
CONVBK510NS 

Dane fa Tfae USA. 
The Ul Way! 

! PBCMtE BONDING. 
XKTOM5 CLEARANCE , 


ENGLISH EXPERTS 

We speak the fanauaae of Tax-free 


By Daniel Southerland 

Washington Past Serfacr 

HARBIN, China — Once con- 
sidered part of a front line bracing 
fora possible attack from the Sovi- 
et Union, the city of Harbin now 
appears to face potential benefits 
from increased Chinese-Soviet 
trade. 

No <me talks much any more 
about the deep air-raid shelters 
built under Harbin following bor- 
der clashes with the Russians 16 
years ago. Some sections of the 
underground labyrinth of tunnels 
and shelters seem to be falling into 
disrepair. 

According to a recent issue of the 
China Daily newspaper, the port of 
Aihui located on the Soviet border 
north of Harbin is to be “drastical- 
ly expanded" to accommodate in- 
creased trade with the Soviet 
Union and Eastern Europe. 

About six weeks ago, a Chinese 
provincial delegation met in Blago- 


-vesbeheosk on the Soviet side of the as Soviet technology is considered 
Heflcrag River opposite Aihui and primitive. Although few American 
aamwi to terms for opening trade firms have done much business in 
between the two river ports for the Harbin, the U.S. WesUDgbouse 
first time in two decades. Corp., which helped to build a large 

Harbin is the capital of Heflong- electrical power generator^ here, 
jiang. the northeast em province seems to have impressed Cftmese 
bordering the Soviet Union. By officials wilh its technological ea- 
rnest logical standards the city pabQities. 

would gam gready from the n- lbc 'i9 5 <K the Soviet Union 
panded Ounese-Sowet trade called ^ ^jy entrenched in this 



forin a five-year, JI4-biIlkm agree- p art of what was once 

Moscow last month. ^ u Manchuria. But now if 


ment signed in I .. _ 

But while the old hostility to- to nwdemizesomcofthe 

ird the Soviet Upon appears to faa o rics which they helped to de- 


ry Russia, it grew from a, fishing 
village to a city of mores than 
100,000 European residents. ^ 




ward 


have subsided, in Harbin at least it s jg n an( j hufld here in those years. 


does not seem to haw been re- officials say they must 

placed by any great eothiKiasm for for contracts against the 

domg business ; with the Russians. West Europeans and 

Officials m Harbin sometimes mdi- 
cated they would now prefer to see _ 

Western nations rather than the An industrial center of nearly 
Soviet Union bring in new technol- three million people, Harbin is the 
ogy, trade, and investment- major Chinese city situated closest 

UJ3 technology, in particular, to the Soviet border. Developed as 
appears to be highly prized, where- a railroad center by late 19th cento- 


redone. I 


SSJS!?52^Sf2; s ^ ope 5 

tioor pion oonouave to 


frapfaeo z . 


Funrannas h 
$425,000 


l mHorr d nina. 2 
fadudftd, l£d 
appaintananli 


SWITZERLAND 


WEI 

US. CUSTOM5 i 

PKXLF SBMCE FROM PORT 

EUROPEAN FRC CAR 


passat bmw, a sous ioyce , 
I LHTRKdriva. Nwr & Pr*Ovmd 
8 years expononce fa fafnrt/Giporr. 
Doamrantohon, d-tpang «ic 
USAaorweSSy! 1 
Tokr atfae in toQB of our expufam. 


HUOHES MOTOR COMPANY 


Imports ft Gonwnfam 
36-51 31s 


VAUD. EXCEPTIONAL FARMHOUSE I „ n 3 2S S' 

Snftx Rnwmi f A, r»nrifa i I 718^29-2407 Tbt 51 OT 009922 


Tb 


(01 202: 

i 412S4 KUGHB G. 


SWITZERLAND 


through Arlene HcSsbwbi, I 
Lyndi/Ctxl Butt bit 100 W«f 


35 rag G an avg, fuky l e n uvuto d. 4| 
bcdroaim, 4 bdhs, 2 vo 


St, Ena Ufa, U, MY. 11730 (516) 
581-8855. 


SWITZERLAND 

FAMOUS RESORT AREA 


| PARK AVMUE ft 5S1H STRST. 0* 

keen corner apartme n t 2 tMdrocxn, 2 

berti y*] A 

baits, new teehexi. >Ubin SBuMXXL 
Prindpdh oNy. Bos 2600. Herald Tri- 
buw79K21 Ncukty Ofaex, Frcra! 


.! vat receptions, 

stably bans. Un^jo* vflage near 
wood*. Suit senior exeaArve/cSpb- 
mot with entertainraent reqwBmemi 
kfad far fi mm iJin. cross-country, 
da. Write Bos 2623.Tfandd Tribm, 
92521 NeuByCedax. Franca 


■tiaOQRP EUROPE / HOUAND 
[has lane eiMtory of tax free asn.- 

Ksttllf JAOUArJmW^ 

We ako can tafcs cos cf 
CONVHBiON: DOT ft ERA, 


COSTA IB.SM- A1MUNECAR.HR- 1 

top wBo, private poof, 
iS R35 23 Geneva, 


EPA / DOT 

CONVERSIONS 

• Custom brokerage/bonding service _ __ 

* Rd-yp ftttekvwv anywhere fa the Ishfapfag/importfao al over the mid 
Lootnm US. & Tbxos 


,poo ' , es2a^r-i 


• Froferaonal work usfag only the 


highest qugfay^cat^Mnewfa 


DO YOU WISH - 

• TO BUY AN APAOTMB4T 
OK A HOUSE? 

• TO RETIRE IN SWTTZSlAND? 

• TO WVEST IN swnzanANW 


CONTACT US; 25 YEARS OF EXPERT 
ENCE IN BLADING AND SHiJNG 
RN£ SWISS BEAL ESTATE 


BEAUTffUL B. AURAGE, California, -40 

acres with M nfle fr o ntage on paved 
road Located East of fUmdfafa ft 
ML of fad vowing VkJorwfle, 
579900. (jxtoa G. Krvidion, Jl/ 
Eucfd St. No. 6 Soda Monfaa, CA 
90401 Phone |213) 451-0466 


USA 


CALL MRS HAMMOND 01-352 21 25 
SOOMSA. 

P.O. B« 62, 

1884 Vafars, Switzartcnd 
Tbe 456213 GESE OH 


DAREN ft NEW CANAAN Gomdi- 

ait. Beecutrve type homes for rent ft 
side. Pleasant MY. Gty suburb. 
Fr en ch roafcen. NatomwttJe connec- 

lions. GoITUbKiILL 2034557724. 


LOS ANG8CS Bevorfy H3d 3-bsd- 

roora condo, 5660,000 arvKfl trade 
equity far Pais q p artm ent. Write D. 
Greenwood, 1B4 Six Sepulveda 
Svd. Los Angela, CA 90021 


frond New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 


I* Gucroiteed EPA / DCTT opcrovol 
| CHAMPAGNE IMPORTS NC, 

1 2294 North Pm Rd, hSSSL I 
PA. 1944Q, USA ToL-21& 822 6852 
M TeUoc 4971917-CHAMP 


PteoM CALL OR WBIE TO: 

MIBtCORP EUROPE BV 

56. Baatendaoni 

5615 KT BNDHOV04, HOLM® 

51 

Telex 59231 


Tet 00^*0^55^ 


EPA/ DOT 

* Superior En gine # ri n g 
* faroort fnnmHnnli, 

P.O. Box if Run 


10 YEARS 

We Deliver On to file World 


BOIS DU BOUCHET 
1 KM FROM CHAMONDC 


USA 

COMMERCIAL 
& INDUSTRIAL 


For sofa: 

BEAUTIFUL 2-JtOCM APARTMENT 
faefag south, fuBy i 
■’ separate ’ 


□3ny^(9s^m.^wA_yiew Mr the’ fanv 


ski fadeer. 


* garage, obAx' A 


- NKZ STUDIO (26 (qm.L fully far- 
rated and equipped, balcony (13 
■qjivjgaage and cellar with slander. 


REAL STATE M COLORADO 
TO RE SOU1 BY OWNS 
90 unit qpvfmenls & one office bu4d- 
ing, exaelent eondtawgaad codi flow 
ft high copitnfacfton rate. 

B« 2612. Herald Triune, 

92521 Mmy Gedex, Ffcm 


For further detail please contact; 
L CARAVEL 


. Mr. L CARAVEL 
8, Rue ftfac e w e Rorestfae 
MC - 98000 MONACO 
Tet (93} 30 10 57 


ounce PRomms 

Camnwrrid, Investment and Distinctive 
Hom es fa Vferth Etsf USA. Consult 
ROBERT NAME i 

1 67 Washington St, 


1(617) 878-2310 
.NorwalMA 02061 


GBCVA COUNTY 
(FRB4CH FRH ZONE 


SAN OffiGO. 9J5 acres 562^)00, 
5200^00 below typroi su L P.U D 15 
ma new office rafapfax S525L000 be- 
low 7 JxaraB.wa nmaga. Mr. Alex- 
ander 619423-6464. Po7 Bax 352, 
Bonita, CA 92003, 


A Unique 

Hotel Suite Residence 

offarfa g 

pre-opening savings on 
6 mo. ( 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 

featuring 

Studio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and all with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 


DOT/EPA CONVERSIONS 

to US wees. Shfapfag, bonding, fawr- 
«xm Euopean aHomcsive oompb- 
OPOKL 'Euraae to USA gu a i ufato d 
Se inp u st stroot 117, 2586 HC The 
Hague, Holand Phone (0)70-559245 


TRANSCO 

Keepfag a constant Hock of more than 
300 brand new oars, 

m SsS 0 f Kfe'sar- 

Troram SA, 95 MxxddaraT 
2030 Antwerp, Brigiuii 

Tel 3237542 6Z 40. TfaSwTIANSB 



A war memorial to Soviet troqps 
who fought the Japanese here tonto 
warf the aid of Wodd Whr II afeo r 
f waTls a second wave of Rus^n 
influence. After, ihe war, the Sav&a ; 
Unian belped to desi^i and buDd -: 
*22 factories. m HarbuL The new.; 
agreement signed in Moscow cafi^ 
for Soviet cooperation ia modern-v.- 
king TJ factories buBt m Quna. - 
with 5ovret‘ aid . in the nrid-195(h: \ 
Only three., of those factories are^.: 
reported to be ideated in Harbm. 




a - 
:*■ 


■ .-^UMAfatorPM 

Hie nortbem Chinese city of Harbin faces the prospect of more trafte with the Russians. 


- Zhu Yaosheng, director of Har- 
bia’s dty axHiomic committee, said 
that the Oiinese want to compare 
tens offered by various compa- 
nies before deciding who should . 

cariy out certain parts of the mod- 

ermzation. Hc said that Japanese 
arul West Germanfinns had shown 
r fm uiteresL. _ 

. .Moreover, the province transit,' 
pdrtadon net work is limited in 
. abflirjr td ape with greatly expand^ 
ed Chhiese-Soviet trade. The Sower'* 
Arm y dismantled the railroad liijgjf/ 
J when it withdrew from ManchunjSr’> 
foDowing the vmtory over Japan 
"Wdrid War n. 

. .. . 

What is certain is that the atmo^ 
spherics of the relariooshipw ththe^ 
Ricans has greatly nnprovejL ln^.- 
oue smali agn of a thaw T .Chines& 
trained by the Russians ho longer' 
have anything to fear from demoa-l- 
slra ting their Russian language* 
abilities. ’T: 








doSvo™. Nfarast 

tern 40^00 sq. ft. facSty dodicni- 


B’A/DOT Brobvoqe. 

tin doivet 

modem 40J . 

ed to quaCty oaavoroonsL 1 week 
turnaround, lab lacEty avaUfa. 

BJRO/SPEC Inc 215-82S7547 USA. 


LMISA 

OFFICIAL ROUS BOYCE 
DEALS KX BaGJUM 

TAX FRS CARS 


WORLDWIDE ■ 

ENTERTAINMENT 


ROUS ROYCE BENTLEY 
RANGE and LAMXOVR 


12, av, ^eorgs V tc! 723.22. 32 

PARIS - FRANCE 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


LB 

AUTOMOBILES 
EXTRAORDINARY 

ol EXCAUBUR. CLENET, 


roe MTOOEIKXSG 74^2 
1170 Bnateb 
TH: 2-673 33 92 
TlXi 20377 


BM1EV 


AND ASTON 
owners 


NEW MERCEDES] 

PORSCHE, far faimedfate defivery 

FROM STOCK 


BEVBO.Y : HUS JCoHJ Gokkn Trim- 
- ft nwfifri 


NEAR LAKE GENEVA^ i 


Vlai, mxB li t iei ft ft bufldng land 
ode. No r a friafani far farefanen. 
HB.VE SUNBBJ SJL 
PO Bax 40 
17 Ufa (fHanmtae 
04-1245 


. — _ bedding + 
aifMi sq. ft auto nuvicB station + 
pextang far 50 oars. Groat upside 


potentnd.AefangSl2nflioncnA.Gcfl 
tea Grey 213-551.1800. 

WEST INDIES 


Executive Services Available I 
Model Suites 

(212) 371-8866 


LmJ 

HWHHJi 1 


in USA 


We now have aur own fufly equfaped 
lerviro faefty jri we k ame the 
Iwity to look aflH 
automofaila. 


>wr 


me the oppar- 
extraoroniary 


RUIEINC. 

I TAUNUS5IS. 5 

W Gent, tel |0| 


6000FBANKRJKT 

*-232351. 11x411559 



If you vwxdd ike moro fafarttcriuo on | 
our sdtei or xervne faeflte, contact 


PALM. BEACH FtORDA. 150m to 


H Cblonge-Belerive 

G0CVA - SWTTZHOAM} 


faki 
Tefax: < 


r 52 35 95 
r 603 FMS 04 


I TAX USE GRAND TURK B.WJ. 1 hr. 
worn Mkxn. Fiduro develoanent, ha- 
rondos, coro etc 160 acres. 

ft. beach. P.O. Bax 1417B4, 

I Gables, HA 33114 USA. 



Im Aufamabflee Exlraordnaras 
Monte Carlo 

Telephone: pg 25 74 79 or 
Telex 479550 AUTO MC 


OCEANWOX 
MOTORS GmbH 


DAVOS 

FAMOUS MOUNTAIN RESORT 
m top qurfly buttng next to Gatf 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


TRASCO 

INTHNATIONAL 


5face 1972, experienced cor trader far 
Meraxfas, Pmdw. BMW. Jaguar, fav 
madcrte debvery. bnport/expart, US. 
DOT ft ffA, shipping far tourot and 
detder. Oceanwkfe Motors GmbH, 
Twsteegerstr. 8, 4 Duesseklorf, W. 
Gernxxry (0) 211-434646, Sx 858^74 


mu HORSE 


far and away 
the best nude revue 
in the world 

scy; t 


CANADA 


AMBHCAN AMHTECIUBE ft drag- : 
■ner/wnter leekina furmhed flat h 



LHD. Mercedes Tax Free 
Imoufaee 36" ft 44" 
amoured cm and hno u efaei 
Coach built an 
Other nudge* ft exotics 


EUROPE ft USA SPECS. 

Al mafcei far worldwide detvery from 
stock. Send far a TAX-RBE catalog 
BMW - MOCffiB - PORSCHE 
VW - SAAB - VOLVO - PEUGEOT 


at the bar only 250 frs 
+ 15 c .: service charge 


avaldble. 

Contact: ADftoA Aft 
_ PXL BOX 577. 8039 Zurich 
Tet 01/202 66 29 - The 815639 


BOfrpnt ». East, Ste. 222, Tararto, 
■ 6)822-1096. 


M5E 1T4. Canada (416| I 

FRENCH PROVINCES 


Neuifly Cedi, France 


AMBICAN STUDENT seefa camfart- 


LAKE Q8CVA + IUGANO, Mon- 
trowc Vatoa Gstcnd Be^ort, Locarno 
7 Arana ft many Femora mountain 
resortL magnifiaenf NEW APART- 
MENTS / CHALETS / VILAS awfl- 
edde far faraignea From USpOidO. 

Tour Grae A CH ! 007 LAUSANNE 
21/25 26 1M.UGANO 91/68 76 4& 


I UJBGRON - PROVENCE luxury 
howe, autstondng barton. 4 bod- 
roomi. poof, FIDJXK) per week. 
Hrorataeper ft/or co ok ovbMbfe. 
Owner, Fro nc e PI 288,8802 e ves 


erfde torb^c ^rfagn f^far academic | 


vMr. Wrte Jenxter totha*. 131 E 
6? SL, NYC 10021 or teL Pern 553 89 


Over TOO unite in slack 
World wide cWnry 
Direct from source 

D.ar. & epa 


, EUROPE AUTO BROKBB he. 

FOB 214, 3430 AH Meuwwefa Holand 
I Tak (IQ340Z-41 346. Tbu 76068 EABNL i 


63 after Sept. 1, 


APARTMENT WANIHM>AR& US. 
Profaaqr with ktfL Orgmiration 


Tet London 
Tefax (51) 


629 7779 
TEAS G. 


I CANNES MAMA. Smdl audio fa 


seefa 3 bedroom, 130 * s.itC flat far 1 
to2yecnUpto $1200/m 


Trasoo London Ltd. 

6567 Park lane; London W.l. 


EUROPORT TAX 
FREE CARS 


to l year*. Up to 51200/mon 
ing Aug- TfTek 524 9511. 


month. Arriv. 


CaB or write far free cuhdog , 
- 12011 


SwitzerVmd A K-'W. Gentxxiy 


SL 


GREAT BRITAIN 


_ ZURICH 
New 2K) «m. lake view houe, 30 
nwxitai from Zurich far sde to fareigo- 
ox 2180, IKT V 
Frankfurt/Mate 


orv Pleara 

Friedrietetr. 




lU JQ^ DtECUjTVEAPAgTMBdTS. 
Kregfasbridge/Chelseii. Over 100 
fuly serviced dudos, 1 ft 2 bedroom 


| NEW YORK / PARS EXCHANGE 
Sept, 1 bedroom, ronoonn. cH atm- 
nines, 56th/LmanBton. 212832-71 46 

EMPLOYMENT 


Ti 

Telex 


AiroorLHcdtand 

| 1^623077 
BCARM. 


Discover 
the charms 
of the city 


ctoorlments. AO modem 
™mww si 


Stay 22 doys. Price from 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


USA GENERAL 


£145 par mefc.J’lean contact Lair. 
i You 


'owig. N&f Apartments, Nefl 
TetOlSp 1105. IR^MITG 


1,922 +/- ACRE 
POTATO FARM 

Fart Wrfifad, Matew 

Looted on 7 ropjote pg-ceb, the pro- 


| CENTRAL LONDON - Executive ser- 
**». apratmerta fa new buUngt, 
canmirSably fumishad and fogy 
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4*. 


Talks on Tamil Insiarocdon Collapse^ 


The Associated Press 

COLOMBO. Sri Lanl-n — Talks 
between the Sri Lanlra government 
and T amil separatist groups have 
collapsed because of a resurgence 
of violence and irreconcilable ne- 
gotiating positions, the Indian high 
commissioner here said Thursday. 

The breakdown, in the Indian- 
sponsored talks held in the Bhutan 
capital Thimpn threaten to lead to 
a new round of violence in Sri Lan- 
ka, where the Tamils are 


that there was no indkadon on 
when ta Tk« might resume: - ■ 

Hector Jayawardene, .the presi- 
dent’s brother and ; special envoy, 
mil meet the Indian prime minis- 
ter, Rajiv Gandhi, at Mr Gandhi's 
request either Thursday or Friday 
to discuss the Tamil problem, he 
said. . ’ 


- t.v' 

era India also have cl^inwyt that * 


200 Tamil civilians were kflled itr 
two villages in TrmcomaIee r lasC 
Saturday. 

■ Partition Called Solution ■'.l 



■^yvrt 


The Tamils, most of whom are 
followers of the Hinda lrdigion, 


A prominent Indian Tamil lead- ' 
er said Thursday that a partition oF 
Sri Lanka was the only solution to' 
the island’s ethnic problem, Ren-* 
tens rqtorted from New D <dfri- y 
Tamil guerrillas at the same time ^ 

II _ J f . . t ' . a ' 



i t 


land-. 


mg greater political autonomy. 

a The talks bad been suspended jority, which is mostly Buddhist. ... 
since last weekend when the Tamils The violence has claimed the lives.-, - The news agency Press Trust of < 
claimed a massacre of about 400 <rf more than 1,000 people since quoted M. Karunanidhi, 

civilians by Sri L a nkan security mid- 1983. - . . president of the opposition Dra- 

forces in two separate incidents! In the Thimpu talks, the Tamils vida Munnetra Ka2hagam party in • 

India’s high commissioner, Joth- had rgected government proposals southern Tamil Nadu state, as say- ' 
indra Nath Dixit, said that India for the establishment or district ing the ethnic division of the island 
regretted the Thimpu talks had to councils which would -give them 
end Wednesday night “before mak- more control over such issues .as 
ing a definite and positive oontri- tend settlement, language, educa- 
buLton.” tkm, and employment policy. 

After meeting with Sri Lanka's _ The Sri Lankan government has 
president, Junius R. Jayawardene, sinceoffered a new concession that 


W "*'■ wsauu 

could be on the lines of the parti-' . 
tion of the Indian sub-continent in’ 
1947 into ffindu-m^orire India •: 1 
and Moslem- majority Pakistan. 


The news agency quoted AJL\- 

Mr. Dixit said that “it is India’s allows the councils to mage into “te^S^m. spokesman fa- the«- 
to be larger provincial councils. But it „^ 0n 1 .- 8ei;s °. fT f urul 


assessment that the talks had 
adjourned because of a resurgence 
of violence in Sri Lanka and be- 
cause there was some gap between 
the expectations of the Tamil dele- 
gates about the solution and what 
was offered by the Sri T-ankau gpv- 
emmenL'’ 

Mr. Dixit said that he told Mr. 
Jayawardene that India hoped the 
cease-fire declared on June 18 
would be restored “so that the talks 
will be resumed at a later date.” But 
he said the Tamil leaders had re- 


has rgected Tamil demands fa a 
homeland in; Ihe north and the 
merger of the northern with the 
eastern province where most Tam- 
ils live. 

Tamil militant leaders in 
Thimpn had su$pen<tai the talks, 
claiming a massacre Friday of more 
than 200 dviliaas in the northern 
town of Yavuniya. Sri l-anV^r offi- 
cials say that 21 civilians were 
killed in a clash between soldiers 
and attacking Tamil guerrillas but 


assay 

to arm Sri Lanka’s Tamil dviliaiis" 
to prepare fa a total war for ft: 
separate Tamil state. The group is^" 
the largest of about six major guer~*' 
rilla groups fighting for a separate*? 
Tamil state in the island’s northC 
and east. Eel am is the name For the*-** 
proposed autonomous state. ' : 


turned to their headquarters in the denies any massacre look place, 
southern Indian city of Madras and Tamils guerrillas based in south- 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 1985 


Page 5 


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_____ — Rm e Sod Cm Henri O^-B^sson, EHo. Erwitt, Ernst Hass, Erich 

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Page 6 


FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 1985 


Iteralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



niMeihed VIA The Nr** York Thaw and The Washugioa Poet 


SribltnC. JaP 311 Must Take Steps to End Free Ride 0 « D jff! s ® 


Falwell’s Amoral Minority 


AS South Africa crackles with violence, 
American debate over the impending tragedy 
win* somehow lost in last year’s he adl i n es. 
The Reverend Jerry Falwell of the Moral Ma- 
jority rushes to speak on behalf of an amoral 
minority, proffering indecencies to comfort 
the oppressors in the name of anri-Commu- 
nism- People offended by apartheid are locked 
in stale argument about economic sanctions. 

The U.S. government, peeking through the 
tatters of its policy of “constructive engage- 
ment,” cannot decide which side it is on. One 
day it warns white Afrikaners they are heading 
for the abyss. The next, it reproaches Bishop 
Desmond Tutu, the soul of black moderation. 

All three responses are obsolete; none serve 
either America's interest or Americans’ altru- 
ism. Surely it is time to weigh another ap- 
proach. Call it affirmative involvement 

Of the voices in this debate, Mr. FalweU’s is 
the most embarrassing. How elegant and in- 
formed his description of the bishop; “a pho- 
ny.” He c laims President P.W. Botha told him 
that apartheid is “wrong” — just days after 
Mr. Botha reaffirmed its principles in a defiant 
speech. And Mr. Falwell extols the Pretoria 
regime as an anti-Co mm unist friend of the 
West — as if that excused a racial tyranny 
whose offenses are a windfall for Moscow. 

If Mr. Falwell’s ideas fail on grounds of 
decency, a different problem is posed by sanc- 
tions and disinvestment. They are surely well 
motivated, meant to coerce South Africa's rul- 
ers to relax their racial oppression. But while 
Americans have been arguing about whether 
to apply sanctions and which ones, Pretoria 
has been tightening its grip. Mr. Botha has 
calculated the pain, and finds it bearable. 


Vet the reflexive expressions of virtue. con- 
tinue. People contend that disin vesting from 
companies doing business in South Africa will 
bdp bring Pretoria to its knees, and senses. 
Gestures like that have symbolic value, and 
make Americans feel better. But band-washing 
is as inadequate as the administration’s evi- 
dent policy of hand-wringing. 

“Constructive engagement" was sold as the 
way to produce concessions through quiet 
pressure. The idea was that Washington could 
coax Pretoria into multiracial bargaining. The 
depressing reality is that Pretoria will not bar- 
gain. not even with Bishop Tutu until he dis- 
avows civil disobedience, the only nonviolent 
recourse available to blacks. But instead of 
assailing this demeaning condition, the admin- 
istration faults the bishop for declining to join 
a delegation that met with Mr. Botha. “Con- 
structive engagement'' has wrested nothing 
from Pretoria — while costing the United 
States dearly. Washington is now perceived by 
blacks as Mr. Botha's apologist and partner. 

South Africa’s six million whites are scarce- 
ly monolithic. They care deeply what America 
and other Western societies think. So do the 23 
million blacks. It ought to be Washington’s 
minimum purpose to build credibility with 
every side. Instead of correcting a pillar like 
the bishop, let it reproach an interloper named 
Mr. FaiwelL Instead of sparring about sim- 
plisms like disin vestment let it promote a web 
of contacts with South Africans of all colors by 
students, lawyers, unionists and others. Trage- 


W ASHINGTON — At the 1983 
Williamsburg economic sum- 
mit the industrial democracies issued 
a joint statement that included the 
following assertion: “The security of 
our countries is indivisible and must 
be approached on a global basis.” 
Ibis was a historic milestone. 

For the first rime it was recognized 
that the security of Western Europe, 
Japan and the North Pacific are inex- 
tricably intertwined Prime Minister 
Yasuhiro Nakasone deserves praise 
for recognizing this fact, as do the 
Japanese" people for showing the po- 


By Zbigniew Braerineki 

The writer served m President Jtmmv Carter’s national security adviser. 
cent one asserting that Japan needs to part of Japan’s defense contribution, states in which 




be “strongly encouraged” to com- 
plete efforts toward acquiring “thou- 
sand-mile sdf-drfeosc capabilities by 
the end of the decade." are inappro- 
priate and counterproductive 
Japan will move in this direction 
on its own, as a natural outgrowth of 


But, given the vital health of Ja- 
pan's economy, it is appropriate for 
the United States and Europe to ex- 


pect that the total proportion of the 
Japa ‘ * 


its global status jmd growing interna- 
Jananese 


Japanese GNP devoted to its own 
direct defense and strategic economic 
aid designed to enhance our coUco- 


litical maturin^thal behooves a truly 


great power, in the context of these 
relationships it is only appropriate 
that Japan should play a more impor- 
tant role in international security. 

Japanese efforts have been steadily 
growing. Tbe current Five-year de- 
fense program increases defense 
spending significantly, and will im- 


prove Japan's security position. But 
Japai 


apan still spends a disproportionate- 
ly low amount compared with other 
Western powers, both per capita and 
in terms of the portion of gross na- 


tional product spent on defense. 
While Ai ‘ 


* Americans spend S percent 
of GNP, and Western Europe's major 
powers spend 2.8 percent to 53 per- 
cent, Japan keeps its defense budget 
at just under 1 percent South Korea, 
from whose security Japan benefits, 
spends 75 percent on defense, The 
average American spends about 
S 1,050 per year, and the average Brit- 
on, Frenchman and West 


tional stature- The Japanese realize 
that regional stability cannot be sus- 
tained only on the basis of U.S. com- 
mitments, awl that Japan must play a 
larger role in making the region’s 
multilateral security arrangements. 

Id the interim, when Japan's de- 
fense effort remains markedly lower 
than the rest of the West, it can make 
an indirect but vital contribution to 
common security by increasing its 
strategic economic aid to developing 
countries whose defense is vital to the 
interests of the Western democracies. 
Egypt, the Sudan, Thailand, the Phil- 
ippines and Pakistan are among 
those key countries, and in 1983 Ja- 
pan gave them a total of $803 million 
m economic aid. Another $208,5 mil- 
lion went to South Korea, and in 
1984 Japan allocated more than $1 
billion of aid to the Philippines. 
These sums should be considered as 


The current expenditure 
by the Japanese on 
'defense is 20 times less 
than in the United States . 


strategic interest: Central America, 
S of the Panama Canal, 
through which much of Japan s trade 

SwTunder US. protection- This 

wSuld help us cope with a senous 
security problem in a region vital to 

us. just £ we help to assure Japan s 

secii ty in the Far East and mas 

critical to Japan, such as the Gulf. 

A Japanese contribution of such an 

amount to our common defense 


dve to many Japanese, US. friends 
consider that ihe : comm 
: is S2S4 bC- 


should 
American defense 


bon, evtfi thou^GNP is only twice 


JU t/V OU 11 * 0 “ □ - - 1 

nese to reach such a 4 -percenttevd 


UC&C LU — r- . W ,, J 

within the next three years. Spread 


tive security should be approximately 
4 percent — which would still be 
much less than the percentage of 
GNP expended purely on defense by 
the United States, and approximately 
equivalent to the level for the major 
countries of Western Europe. 

This means that, over a three-year 
period, Japan should increase its 
combined defense and strategic-aid 
programs by about $12 billion a year, 
and these resources should be chan- 
neled not only to the present recipi- 
ents of Japanese aid but also to other 



y^ra'die approximate total of 
billion a year allocated for Japans 




Moreover, such aid should be i 
cried deliberately for strategic pur- 
poses, and not merely as a means to 
enhance Japan’s trade. And it should 
be disposed through close geopoliti- 
cal and security consultations among 
japan, the United States and Other 
Williamsburg participants — though. 


ihm of Japan. The current Japan©* 
expenditure on defense is about 20 
times less: the prop^ cdicctiw- 
security budget would atfll be about 
six times Jess, even though Japan’s 
GNP ishalf that of the Unilea States. 

Furthermore, the U.S-general-per. 
pose forces dedicated nr the. prolee- 
Hon of the Far East (not ebuming the 
strategic forces that also protect Ja- 
pan) account directly for.more (hap 
S40 billion a year. Tne prqposed fig- 
ure for the d'verall:Japangse; defease 
and strategic-aid budget wouldn 
about equal in GNP tartis io- 
burden now carried' ty. -Britt 
France or West Germany oQ defense 
akme — but absofittdy and jdativdy 
much less ihm by the United Staler 

Thus, with the hkehhobd titat arai- 
Japanese. hysdaia awM; Vbeconie^ a 
do minan t theme la Ameri&gj .poe- 
tics, and the danger ;tbat tin?, carries 
far our- wider political re fa ti tigs, g is 
' imperative, that oiir sb^rcdmlercgs 
in global security-be more^eatj&faf 



i 



be taken toward those aids. 
■ j’ .. LosAngdesTbues. 


spends $375, $270 and $260 each. Yet 
dy in South' Africa may be inevitable and ^ Japanese spend only about $100 ENEVA — By a strange coincidence Prune 
At Uc, w ;• Vw*_ “pita on defense. VJ Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone of Japan visted 


America's leverage limited. At least let it be- 
come honestly constructive. 

THE SEW YORK TIMES. 


Tokyo Seeks New Technologies From Arms Research 

By Curl Gasteyger 


This imbalance is the result of the Europe just as representatives of 17 


biggest, most important companies in 
(from Mitsubishi Heavy Industries to Ka 


the 


Kawasaki 


Hazards of Defense Buildup 


The Pentagon has reached a point in the 
defease buildup that administration officials 
used to deny would occur. It is increasingly 
clear that the buildup has been underpriced. 
The defense budgets now projected, large as 
they are. wOl not buy all the weapons the 
planners earlier said they would. Tbe services 
are having to choose; there is growing pressure 
on the weaker weapons that they want. A 
classic example is DIVAD, the Army’s new 
radar-controlled divisional air defease gun. 

To accompany its tanks in battle, the Army 
wants 614 of these guns (the current cost 
estimate for which is $4.2 bOiion), and has 
already ordered 146. ol which 50 have been 
delivered. The orders were placed before the 
weapon was fully tested, under a procedure 
intended to save time. The procedure would 
have been fine had DIVAD then passed the 
tests. Unfortunately it has not The radar has 
been misled, the gun has not been quick 
enough and it also has jammed. 

Last year tbe administration requested and 
Congress approved purchase of the next 1 17 
DIVADs, hit Defense Secretary Caspar Wein- 
berger took the unusual step of holding up the 
expenditure, pending further testing. That has 
now been done, and Mr. Weinberger is sched- 
uled to announce a bny-or-noi-buy decision 
before SepL 30, the endof the fiscal year. 

The Army and DIVAD's manufacturer, 
Ford Aerospace, a division of Ford Motor Co., 
both say the gun did well in its further tests this 
year. The most dramatic though not necessar- 
ily most important of these was a live-fire 
exercise in June. Ford has pot about a paper 
saying that in this exercise the weapon “de- 
stroyed six of seven high-performance aircraft 
and three of three helicopters presented.” But 
a cochairman of Congress’s self-styled Mili- 
tary Reform Caucus mid a critic of DIVAD, 
Representative Denny Smith (Republican of 
Oregon), says this is misleading. It sounds as if 
DIVAD was offered 10 targets in realistic 


circumstances and shot down nine. In fact 
weapons experts say such tests tend to be less 
realistic than they sound, because of the cum- 
bersomeness of the drone aircraft involved. 
There were also many more than 10 flybys in 
the test — 32 “presentations," the Army says, 
and not all the claimed kills are dear. The test 
used proximity rounds, which are meant to 
disable planes' by bursting near them. Hie 
three helicopters were felled by these bursts, 
the Army says, and two of tbe fixed-wing 
aircraft The other four fixed-wing targets that 
Ford said were destroyed were actually “com- 
mand destructed” by the range safety officer; 
be blew them up when the proximity rounds 
did not bring them down right away. No one 
knows whether the bursts from the rounds 
themselves would have brought them down. 

The Army already has several other weap- 
ons to protect forward units against air attack 
(and the Air Force has still more; that is one of 
its main jobs). But the Army says the weapons 
it has are not good enough to meet the envi- 
sioned threat, and that it will need either 
DIVAD. on which it has already spent about 
$1.5 billion, or a comparable weapon. Spokes- 
men also warn against holding DIVAD or any 
complex modem weapon to too high a stan- 
dard loo early in its life cycle. The spokesman 
also say teething problems must be expected. 

The trouble with these kinds of arguments is 
that they are open-ended; they leave no way to 
say no. DIVAD is a cosily weapon, the need 
for which is not completely clear and in whose 
performance no one can have great confidence 
on the record so far. The Army may need more 
protection for its tanks, but Mr. Weinberger 
needs even more to impart a sense of discipline 
and credibility to the procurement process. A 
decision to buy DIVAD would take him in the 
opposite direction. DIVAD has become a sym- 
bol. If it can pass muster in its present state, 
the message is that any weapon can. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


interesting to note that, tor many 
years before the budget ceiling was 
declared, Japanese defense expendi- 
tures stood well above this arbitrarily 
set figure, reaching as hi gh as 2.9 
percent in 1952. Inis is inequitable, 
and does not do justice to the global 
role that Japan should be ass uming 
At tbe same time, it would be a 
mistake for the United States to pres- 
sure Japan to increase Jts. defense 
spending dramatically. A concern 
both for internal political stability 
and the sensitivities of Japan's neigh- 
bors counsel Americans to urge only 
a gradual but steady increase in the 
Japanese defense budget. The feel- 
ings of the Japanese people against 
militarism deserve our respect; they 
are the product of painful historical 
experience. Unilateral American 
statements pressing Japan to double 
or triple its defense budget in order to 
bring it closer to the spending levels 
sustained by the United States or our 
West European allies will only inten- 
sify existing antagonisms. And con- 
gressional resolutions, such as the re- 


repn 

governments assembled for the first time in Paris 
to discuss Eureka, a French-sponsored project for 
European technological cooperation. 

Not surprisingly, Japan had not been invited to 
this gathering: not oruy because it is not part of 
Europe but because Eureka is conceived to become 
a way to counter Japanese technological competi- 
tion m addition to answer President Ronald Rea- 
gan's Strategic Defense Initiative. 

Japan is a world leader in many fields of ad- 
vanced technology. So far, most of it is in the 
civilian sector. But the dividing line between civil- 
ian and military application is getting thinner ail 
the time: The electronic revolution is bringing 
Japan ever closer to anns-related production. A 
recent study by Dr. Reinhard Dnfte, assistant 
director of the International Institute for Strategic 
Studies in London and a specialist on Japan and 
the Far East, shows the delicate relationship be- 
tween the two, with the arms industry gaming 
gradually but steadily in importance. 


of those Western industrialized countries which 
the U.S. administration invited to participate in 
tbe SDI research programs: Japan’s industry and. 
technological performance are of considerable in- 
terest, particularly in those fields expected to be- 
come relevant in connection with space-based 
. weapon systems. The Japanese, in turn , see a 
co nsider able advantage in such cooperation with 
the United States: It promotes tbeir efforts toward 
buil ding up a more autonomous arms industry and 
broadens me technological basis of industry. Arms 
procurement is bring considered from the perspec- . 
tive as to how it might benefit the civilian sector. 


larms 

good access to the political leadership. 
Anns industries are conceived as 



With Europeans still debating the strategic and 
impucatior 


The study, “Japan's Growing Arms Industry” 

‘ ' thill r ‘ 


concludes that “the 
try to launch into 
prospect of gaining 
arms- related 


nest lure for Japan’s indus- 
production of arms is the 
new technologies through 
and Development (partly 
state-funded), and of finding a wider application 
for their most advanced civilian technology ...” 


The driving force in this process is the United 
States. Thus, Japan figures prominently on the list 


political impucations of SDL Japan has shown an 
interest in joining tbe SDI research program, al- 
though Mr. Nakasone has stopped short of its ML 
endorse matt Japan's arms industry proper is still 
relatively small, its annual sales in. 1980 amounting 
to a mere $3 biffion. The reasons for this are 
obvious. There is still a widespread iductance to 
become a major arms producer; there is th e small 
size of tbe Japanese “Self-Defense Forces” and 
there Ls the prohibition of arms exports. 

Such limitations have, however, not prevented 
the formation of what Dr. Drifte calls “at least s 
potential military-industrial complex.” It is, at 
present, not so much the size of animal sales or tbe 
share of anns-related production out of total pro- 
duction which matters. Rather, it is the fact that 


ing civilian industries. This is important 
as negotiations on the 1983 agreement on i 
Japanese xaShary technology to the Unht 
have show^ Japan suspects that America is merely 
interested in acquiring more easily high technology 
from Japan yia the channel of “mflitaiy exports." 
Japan a£» feats that by- sharing technology with a 
•US. anm producer. the technology could be made 
.dass35ad,'preyentnig its application in otherfidds. 

-Whereas in the civilian sector Japan has readied 
a high degree bf technolog ical maturity, if is still 
• badetvard m key arms technologies. The attraction 
of major technological advances here will no doubt 
a in such projects as SDL It 
is-from this" kind nf venture in the armament fidd 
that Japa ne se companies draw, the 
for them advances m other seetbrs-o 
. The message from all tins is that Japan^-mafe 
interest in arms technology isprampted less bytu 
concern for defense and grand strategy than by the 
country's determination to further promote-its 
competitiveness in high technology in general. Bur 
it would appear that this message has. not yet 
arrived on the other side of the Pacific. - 



lessor atthe Graduate Institute - 


Thewriterisai 
of International Studies in Geneva He contributed 
this to < 


' die International Herald Tribune. 


New Right 
Wages War 
On Shultz 




By Arnold Sawislak 


WASHINGTON — Richard Vi- 


Other Opinion 

Peace Effort Going Nowhere 


At the urging of King Hussein of Jordan, the 
United States agreed to involve itself in talks 
aimed at trying to revive the Middle East peace 
process. But Assistant Secretary 1 of Slate Rich- 
ard Murphy — after conferring in Jordan, 
Israel and Egypt — has little if anything to 
show for his trouble. The central problem is 
that the United Slates and Jordan do not agree 
cm what the talks should lead to. 

Jordan wants the United States to meet with 
a joint Jordanian-Palestinian delegation. The 
Palestine Liberation Organization and Jordan 
say they would regard such a meeting as con- 
stituting UJS. recognition of the PLO. But U.S. 
policy is stiH not to deal with the PLO until it 
at least implicitly accepts Israel’s legitimacy by 


endowing a couple of key U.N. Security Coun- 
cil resolutions. The recent Arab summit con- 
ference showed how divided the Arab world is 
when it comes even, to a political settlement 
with IsraeL Though they boycotted the event, 
radical states led by Syria still were able to 
exercise a coercive veto and prevent any en- 
dorsement of King Hussein’s initiative. 

All this is welcome news to many in Israel, 
since it again postpones the day of reckoning 
that would come if (he deeply split Israeli 
government was ever confronted with a plausi- 
ble opportunity to negotiate a territorial com- 
promise on the* West Bank. Because the Arabs 
are not ready to get serious about peace based 
on territorial compromise, the Israelis have 
been spared the need to get serious, too. 

— Las Angeles Times. 


FROM OUR AUG. 23 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Nicaraguan President Resigns 
NEW ORLEANS — Advices from Managua 
declare President Madriz has resigned tbe 
Presidency of Nicaragua and named Sen or 
Jose Estrada, brother of tbe insurgent leader, 
as his successor. Mr. Estrada has issued a 
proclamation turning over the government to 
the insurgents. It is stated that the rioting at 
Managua is most serious and that two persons 
have been killed and many are leaving, while 
the American residents are apprehensive. The 
revolutionists are reported to be 12 miles out- 
side tiie capitaL Tbe State Department in 
Washington confirms the news erf the victory 
of General Estrada's troops in Nicaragua. 
Crowds parade the streets crying "Death to the 
Yankees!" The American Legation and Con- 
sulate are crowded. The United States cruisers 
Vicksburg and York town are at Corinto. 


1935: Japanese Cotton Disturbs U.S. 
WASHINGTON — Continuance of cotton 
processing taxes despite their questionable 
constitutionality, and a “friendly agreement” 
with Japan to limit dumping of cheap Japa- 
nese cotton textiles in the United States are 
recommended in a report of the Cotton Textile 
Committee which President Roosevelt submit- 
ted to Congress [on Aug. 22J. The committee 
urged continuance of the processing taxes dur- 
ing “the economic emergency,” but rejected a 
proposal for a subsidy for American cotton 
textile exporters. The committee found that 
“the domestic market has been disturbed by 
recent exports of cotton textiles from Japan," 
and added: “Although Japanese exports to the 
United States have been in small proportion to 
American production, there has been a sudden 
and unusual increase in certain cloths.” 


guene, a New Right fun- 
draiser, and his conservative cohorts 
are out to get George Shultz fired. 
Most put this latest crusade in the fat 
chance category, but dismissing the 
secretary of state may be a guise for 
the real purpose of the campaign. 

Mr. Viguerie has just sent out a 
letter “for this nationwide grassroots 
effort to change the direction of 
American foreign policy." 

Included in the mailing is a list of 
25 reasons Mr. Shultz should be dis- 
missed, including six examples of 
“terrorism or other acts of warfare" 
against the United States, including 
the recent TWA hijacking, which 
have been answered by threats of 
U.S. retaliation but no action. 

“People are sick and tired of (his 
country being pushed around by two- 
bit hijackers and communist pup- 
pets,” Mr. Viguerie wrote. 

Some of the charges against Mr. 
Shultz arc general: He has “sought to 
impose a mindless orthodoxy on 
State Department officials by purg- 
ing those who disagree with the For- 
eign Service establishment” and has 
“systematically excluded people with 
a common-sense view of internation- 
al affairs from importantjobs in the 
foreign policy apparatus/ 

Others are more specific: He lob- 
bied in favor of continued obser- 
vance of the SALT-2 treaty, support- 
ed more than $250 million in aid to 
the Marxist government of Zimba- 
bwe, opposed establishment of Radio 
Marti broadcasting anti-Castro pro- 
paganda to Ctiba, backed the Conta- 
dora nations' proposals for Central 
America “which would have legiti- 
mized the Soviet colony in Nicara- 
gua.” supported the so-called Geno- 
cide Treaty and refused to 
acknowledge Soviet treaty violations 
so as not to damage the prospects for 
more treaties with the Soviets. 

The list of sins suggests that even 
those who believe Mr. Shultz is a 



The US.S. Retaliation launches mwther hot-air strike. 


f-. ■- 


The World Does Not View the U.S. as a Weakling 

By Harlan K. ti ll man 


r ASHINGTON — America’s 


W New Right has indulged in 


rotten secretary of state would have 
cede he nas been a busy one. 


INTERNATIONAL HER A ID TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 19581982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARL GEWTRTZ 


Deputy Puflisker 
Associate Publisher 
Associate PtAhshtr 
Director 


LEEW. HUEBNER. PMuher 
Execmne Editor RENE BONDY 

_ alatn lecour 

Deputy Editor RICHARD H. MORGAN 

Dqmy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Director of Circtdrmon 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director cf Adeeming Sales 
International Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Charies-de-Gaiille. 922 00 NemBv-sur-Seinc 
France. TeL: (1)7-17-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Pins. ISSN: 0294-8052.' 

Directcur de hi pttbtkauoa: Walter ,V. Thayer. 

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Managing Dir. U.K: Rutin MacKkhm. 63 Long Acre. London WC1 TeL 836-002. Telex 262009. 


S.A. au 
U.S. subscription 


C 1985, International Herald Tribune. All rigfit i resented. 



to concede he ! 

Such a list of transgressions, which 
literally includes errors of judgment 
or policy in five continents, might 
also raise the question: How could 
President Ronald Reagan have failed 
to notice t^t his secretary of slate 
was committing so many outrages 
against American interests? 

One possible answer is that he did 
not and that Mr. Shultz is doing what 
Mr. Reagan wants. That assumes that 
Mr. Reagan knows what is going on 
in his own administration and if so, 
then the arrows Mr. Viguerie el al 
have launched at Mr. Shultz really 
are aimed at the president and his 


conduct of foreign policy. 
As to the outcome, Mr. 


Viguerie 

raiii: the campaign against Mr. Shultz 
the most urgent issue “since our fight 
against the Panama Canal treaties.” 
Those who receive the letters asking 
for $100 contributions may recall 
who won that fight. 

United Tress International 


some heavy Reagan-bashing recently 
over the administration’s response to 
international terrorism. 

It asserts that failure to take repri- 
sals for, and pohaps pre-empt, spe- 
cific acts of anti-American terrorism, 
such as the hijacking of the TWA 
flight and the killing of U.S. military 
personnel in El Salvador and West 
Germany, signals a great national 
weakness. That in turn is said to un- 
dermine the imagp of America’s re- 
solve and destroy tbe credibility of its 
capacity to use force. 

By extension, pernicious American 
inaction allegedly contaminates other 
national interests — principally rela- 
tions with the Soviet Union, which 
are at the bean of the New Right's 
current discontent with the Reagan 
administration. The New Right ar- 
gues that refusal to react Forcefully to 
terrorist acts will be interpreted in 
Moscow as a sign of incre a si n g soft- 
ness in American policies. 

This line of reasoning contains ba- 
ric errors abou t international politics, 
errors concerning the way the United 
States is perceived by (hose meant to 
be influenced by force, and with the 
utility of force to achieve policy ends. 

Americans who believe that the in- 
ternational community (including 
the Soviet Union) views the United 
States as a bashful, reluctant protago- 
nist, unwilling to use military force to 
protect its interests, are taking little 
note of events over tbe past 40 years. 

Tbe United States remains the only 
nation to have used nuclear weapons 
against an enemy. Since 1945 it has 


fought in major conflicts in Korea 
and Vietnam in which millions of 
Chinese, North Koreans and North 
Vietnamese were killed or wounded. 
It has employed force to advance its 
interests about 250 times since 1945, 
in various lesser crises. 

In the fall of 1983 the United 
Stales successfully intervened in Gre- 
nada to protect U.S. citizens and ulti- 
mately to re-establish a democratic 
government. The Economist, tbe 
British news magazine, displayed on 
its cover a drawing of Mr. fteagan 
poring as James Bond with the cap- 
tion “Licensed to kill " 

This year tbe United States will 
appropriate $300 billion for defense, 
representing an increase of more than 
50 percent in annual military spend- 
ing since 1980. Few observers, in- 
cluding Mikhail Gorbachev and bis 
colleagues in the Kremlin, arc likely 
to be entirely unimpressed. 

It is true that Secretary of Defense 
Caspar Weinberger has oiled for 
strong restrictions on the use erf mili- 
tary force, including the need for 
strong public support, the use of suf- 
ficient force to accomplish the task 
and a political commitment by the 
administration that will assure the 
first two. But every administration 
must act responsibly in milii 


bystanders is unacceptable. The New 
Right’s line of reasoning takes no 
account of tbe fact that military ac- 
tion against terrorists could risk the 
lives erf hostages meant to be freed, 
and ignores the possibility that retali- 
ation against villains, known or un- 
known, could fan the very terrorism, 
that it was meant to curb. 

Tbe course that the Reagan admin. 


istration has chosen in the face of j 
terrorism is responsible but difficult, j 
Woiie codes say it shows weakness, a 
survey of adversaries and allies finds j 
great concern about the power of j 
America and its capacity to use tL j 




The 


wnter is a senior fellow at 
Georgetown University's Cauer for : 
Strategic and International Studies. » iS i\ 
He contributed this point of view to the j 
Los Angeles Times.. ' 


V.'-tf w 
• - 


INTERS TO THE EDITOR 
More Dian Sabotage 

\ Spy Case 
(Aug, 9): 


*.I -5 *-• " 


Catied a 


'Documents in 
•Bibb’ 

Contrary to what U.S. Naval offi- 
cials are caning h. tlrc latest infeorna- 

tion revealed in the Walker case is 
hanfijr a “Bible for Sabotage;” Rath- 
er, it is information crndal to a Soviet 

Contrary to cxvifcma^mSi 
belief, with 


momic aid, but also moral and 'pofiti/' ^ V : - 
cal support from die international j : 
community for its immediate and ■■ 

tong term stability. Uganda's human; . 
twits record is truly bad but this 
ooesn t mean that all its are! s . * - • 

or violent as most people dal- \ v " 

sidp own «n VT F. 


die ability to tap _ 
communication satellites and decrypt 
codes, tbey have a formidable anti- 
submarine warfare capability. 

DOUGLAS COE. 

Drraeich, West Germany. 


in \JgflUUH UuCUJr . • i" 

“cause some people are exploiting! •• 

fori 

LAZARUS JAWIYAMBE. 

Brussels.' 


tan' mat- 
ters. Force cannot be used tightly. 


Uganda Needs Support 


and when it is used it must be used 
effectively. It must work. 

Preventing and punishing terror- 
ism are among the most difficult pur- 
poses for military force to achieve, 
particularly when harm to innocent 


store Civil Rights m (Aug. 17) : 


Many people with annrfe knowl- 
ed^ of cyans in Africa certainly 
apee withMichacl Posner that 
Uganda badly needs not only cco- 


c intended for pubhcarich 

be addressed “Letters to the, 
Gndmust contain the writ- 
«tj signature, name and full ad- 

dress. letters should be brief and 

?? **iect to editing We cam* 
tewpomible for the return of 
unsoheued manuscripts. 


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INTERNATIONAL 




^OV ^“gust 23 , 


WEEKEND 


Page 7 


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Ezra Pound in his Venice home, 1971. 



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Eve Arnold’s Eye for Facts 


< Ezra Pound: living by the Word 


by Alan Levy . 

E ZRA Loomis Pound, author of “The 
Cantos" as well as “Jefferson 
and/or Mussolini," was bom a 

century ago Get 30 in Hailey, Ida- 

no, a few miles from Ketchum, where his 
' Ernest Hemingway ended bis fife in, 
1961. It was Hemingway who wrote early on: 

• Any poet bom m this century or in the 
. last ten years of the preceding century who 
ran honestly say he has not been influen ced 
. gy OT learned greatly from the work of Ezra 
Pound deserves to be pitied' rather than ns- . 
baked It is as if a prose writer bant m that 
time should not have learned- from or been 
. influenced by James Jayocor that a traveler 
should pass through a great b lizzar d and not 
have felt its cold or a sandstorm and not 
have felt the sand and the wind. The best of 
;• Pound's writing — and it is inthe “Cantos’ — 

1 will last as long as there is airy literature." 
Hemingway did not overstate his case. 
Ezra Pound Bvedby the word (and almost 
died on the gallows) to become a classic (and 
pariah) in ms lifetime. Since bis death in 
Venice, on Nov. 1, 1972, two days after his 
87th birthday. Pound’s, stock has stayed 
steadily high on the literary exchange with 
few of the fluctuations that affect the post- 
humous value of contemporaries he champi- 
oned, such as T. S. Eliot, Robert Frost, and 
William Carlos Williams. 

Pound began his eastward odyssey as a: 
boy by moving to Philadelphia when his 
father, Hamer, was named, assistant assayer 
of the United States. Jmt as die very name 
Pound had monetary significance, his boy- 
hood background had some bearing on tfie 


hood background had some bearing on the 
economic uteories^ that led him to be tried on . 
19 counts of treason fra: his World War H 
broadcasts over the radio in Rome. ■ 

At the U S. Mint, the hoy saw — and 
remembered — people, bringing in “gold- 
bricks” peddled % swindlers, that proved to 
be gilded lead . . . .workmen idling visitors 
who inquired about free samples that 
“you’re welcome to keep this bag of gold if 
you can cany it away" which proved impos- 
sible, and, after the 1892 Presidential elec- 
tion, “silver I saw, as no Aladdin, for when, 
[Grover] Cleveland was elected, there was 
the recount of four-million in the Mint 
vaults, the bags had rotted, and the men half- 
naked with open gas flares, shoveled it into' 
the counting machines, with. a gleam on 
tarnished discs." By the time he was seven, 
he also knew — from his parents’ struggles to 


keep up wtth their genteel neighbors on a 
dvn servant's salary — that his playmates 
were richer than he was. 

“I knew at IS pretty much what 1 wanted 
to do. I resolved that at 30 I would know 
more about poetry than any man living, that 
I would know what was accounted poetry 
everywhere, what part cf poetry was ‘inde- 
structible,’ what part could not be lost by 
translation and — scarcely less important — 
what effects were obtainable in one language 
only and were utterly incapable of being 
translated. 

“In this search I learned more or less of 
nine foreign languages. I read Oriental 
stuff ... 1 found every University regula- 
tion and every professor who tried to make 
me learn anything except this, or who both- 
ered me with ‘requirements for degrees.' ” 
With a bachelor’s degree from Hamilton 
College In upstate New York in 1905 and a 
masters in 1906 from the University of 
itamsylvania. Pound already knew the fate 
that avridted him: 

Go little verse, 

Goforth and be damned 
Throughout your limited sphere 
But prithee tell 
The bards in hell 
Who live on nothing a year 
That a Master of Arts 
And a man of parts 
Is doing the same thing here. 


4 k/ T HEN his first teaching post, as an 
11/ instructor of Romance languages at 

Ff Wabash College, ended in dismissal 
after a chorus girl was found asleep in his 
bed. Pound sailed in 1908 for Venice, “an 
excellent place to come to from Crawfords- 
vflle, Indiana." This stay lasted only a few 
months — long enough for him to publish, at 
his own expense, his first collection of po- 
ems, “A Lume Sfcento,” and to develop a 
regard for the Venetian sun as a fixed point 
of return and repose in his life. 

For a rookie American poet, however, the 
jousting ground was London and it was there 
that Pound appeared later that year. He sold 
his second book of poems, Ttersonae,” to 
the publisher EDdn Mathews, discoverer of 
WJB. Yeats, and went on to become the 
innovator to whom other innovators paid 
homage- He championed Frost as the bard 
for “serious people in America," prompted 
Yeats to change style in mid-career, was the 
translator T. S. ELtot called “the inventor of 
Chinese poetry for our time.” Pound ar- 


Shards From the Musical Digs 


by Ponal H e n ahan 


N EW YORK — Ardmeokwists do 
not need to unearth complete cit- 
ies or nations to know what a lost 
culture was all about Sometimes 
talented diggers can see a universe, so to 
speak, in a grain of sand. Looking at a few 
shards, bones and fragmented tools*, they 
extrapolate and reconstruct with great tree- 
dom, their creative imaginations probably 
fired by the scarcity of hard evidence, 
much tangible data, m fact, might only strife 
Se creative urge to build whole avibzatioas 
out of hints and hypotheses. . 

With that in mind, I offer some tmscellar 
neous shards, bits of mfonnation drawn 
from a musical culture that 
- vet but certainly seems m danger of bang 

be fitted 

painti ngs -g, cd from * distiir- 

to iSSfis hardly 

off Dior own cm 

ingor Khoshbin of liar- 

s' 

P** 0 **? ?7m 2L- T have this right) temporal 


temporal lobes throughout Western culture 
healed mysteriously and musical production 
began to fall off precipitously. Except for a 
stray Shostakovich or two, composers no 
longer fdt driven to turn out piles of manu- 
scripts- The framer plague of masterpieces 
abated Today it is the rare composer who is 
afflicted. Where a Rossini or a Donizetti 
mig ht fed the need to fling off an opera a 
month to appease audience hunger, their 
modem counterparts are in no such grip. 
Good health is now endemic in the musical 
community. 

If sanity may have crane thus to musical 
composition, it sometimes still can be found 
raging in the opera. The director Andrei 
Serban, for instance; recently announced 
font in his new production of “Norma” for 
the New York Guy Opera he would allow the 
weak to end the way the composer and 
librettist: wanted it to, with the tenor Pollione 
joining his priestess wile Nonna cm the pyre. 
Hie had previously directed a version in 
Wales that replaced Pollione on the pyre 
with Nonna’s confidante, A rial g isa , a femi- 
nis t twist nowhere to be found in Beffini’s 
score. In the present operatic climate, Ser- 
ban’s decision in favor of the composer's 
version, mlrgn after much soul-searching 
strode an interviewer as startling enough to 
be worth reporting in detail. 


Americans and one Japanese, will collabo- 
rate on a new piece with the support of the 
National Endowment for the Arts. The com- 
posers — John Cage, Torn Takemitsu, Ed- 
win Harkins and Philip Larson — will ex- 
change ideas via mail and telephone during 
the next few months. “Thereupon they will 
hold a one-week conference to finalize the 
piece before its premiere in San Diego next 
spring.” Such jean! ventures are hardly new 
— Beethoven and 50 others wrote variations 
on a Diabeffi waltz, for instance — but 
group think by telephone adds a wrinkle. 
What will technology do for us next? 

The press release, I believe, is one of the 
unappreciated art forms of our time, often 
rising to a kind of visionary Dada. I study 
this form of literature as closely and with as 
much amazement as any Grok ever read 
entrails. If you knew nothing else about 
American musical culture in the last decades 
of the 20th centmy, a idease from the Cleve- 
land Opera about a Ludano Pavarotti redtal 
wafHgr this season might be ^tightening 


O PERA, however, is still the best place 
to look for mad scenes. From the 
SaZzbtiig Festival comes a report of a 
‘‘Macbeth” rehearsal in winch the director 
rtintf to blows with the festivals secretary- 


? wEbbiRW and camp^- 

dency to prodm* ^ t . 

f8VOrite 

supermarket *“*1 along with Khoshbin 
1 am inclined to fra* given 

the questionajo j ottiwg^ scans \o&- 

cal to assumethntbyW^gg ^ but has 
among conJ P oscr ^ nere d recently, 13® polio 

- i 5 SSS?i-sss. i S 


£fby SertTs request that the density of dw- 
ice fog be lessened in onesceae to benefit the 


fromthe 

ihdr ,£,cft of it, “<>■ 

'*%* - *• CB, “ y 


singers, siappcu uk oluuzu. «!■»»» **"• 

A contributing factor in the dispute which 
apparently had been simmering for days, 
32s the offidaTs refusal to approve Fag- 
aonTs plan to use topless witches m the 
Vmfi opera, I admit I am not sure about tl»! 
larger meaning, if any, of this mod al t, but it 
maybe a straw in the wind. Opposition to 
directorial and excess ooulu be 

growing, even among impresarios. 

The a nemic avant-garde, ever faithful to 
its stock of revolutionary old ideas, also 
continues on its mad, mad, grant^gafliermg 
wav A mess release from the mnsic depart- 
meat oftbe University of California at San 
Diego reports that four composers, three 


enough. The Ohio program, which followed 
Pavarotti’s chcuslike appearances at Madi- 
son Square Garden, was held in the Rich- 
field Coliseum, which seats 16,000. Besides 
installing a special sound system for the 
occasion, the Cleveland impresarios took 
further mercy on Pavarotti’s long-distance 
admirers: “One pair of cooqplimastaiy opera 
glasses will be given to every couple in order 
to further enhance their enjoyment of this 
spectacular event.” That is music by hearsay, 
and possibly the only music erf the future. 

What other cultural insights has the mail 
brought recently? Well, a notice that a new 
rock 'n' roll magazine win not be offered on 
newsstands but is to be sold exclusively at 
McDonald’s restaurants. (How neat: Rock 
music as fast food.) Also, an amKMmrement 
by a New York choral group of a forthcom- 
ing performance of “Giuseppe VendPs emo- 
tionally charged ‘Messadi Requiem,’ ” evi- 
dently aversion of the “Manzom Requiem.” 

As I say, 1 am not able to stand back far 
enough fran these cultural fragments to dis- 
cern what they may ****** "Perhaps nothing 
at all, perhaps everything. If miy historical 
society or archaeological archive wants to 
preserve these data, 1^ wffl be glad to contrib- 
ute my research free — contingent, of course, 
on a favorable ruling by the Internal Reve- 
nue Service. , . ■ 

e>1985 The New York Tima 


I ON DON — - In a discreet and distin- 
guished career, Eve Arnold has 
. photographed Everyone with a 
capital “e,” and also everyone. 
Robert Capa once said that, metaphorically 
speaking, her work falls between Marlene 
Dieuich's legs and the bitter lives of migrant 
potato workers. 

“If the photographer cares about the peo- 
ple before the lens and is compassionate, 
much is given." Eve Arnold once wrote. “It is 
the photographer, not the camera, that is the 

Mary Blume 

instrument.” She rather misses the days 
when photography was about people and not 
about DhoiozraDhv. 


ranged publication of Eliot’s “Prufrock” and 
edited a chaotic Eliot manuscript called “He 
Do the Police in Different Voices” into ‘The 
Waste Land.” 

From London (1908-21) and Paris (1921- 
24), and as “foreign correspondent” of the 
Chicago-based Poetry Magazine, Pound’s 
influence extended to the spheres of music 
and fine arts. He had the compositions of 
Vivaldi in a Dresden library copied for him- 
self, which is how they outlasted their de- 
struction by Allied bombing. Pound sculpt- 
ed and composed music, too. And crusaded 
for what he liked, writing books advocating 
the avant-garde music of George Antheil 
and the vortirist sculpture of Henri Gaudier- 
Brzeska. Gertrude Stein called him “a village 
explainer, excellent if you were a village, but 
if you were not, not” 

In Paris, Pound took boxing lessons from 
Hemingway and edited his first full volume 
of short stories, “In Our Time." He arranged 
publication of James Joyce’s “Portrait of the 
Artist as a Young Man” as a serial in The 
Egoist, interested Harriet Weaver in becom- 
ing Joyce's benefactor, and even (with Yeats) 
applied successfully an Joyce’s behalf, for a 
grant from the Royal Literary Fund. 

But in London, another of Pound’s “dis- 
coveries” had been Major C H. Douglas and 
his Social Credit movement Soon after the 
poet settled in Italy in the mid- 1 920s, false 
credit (“the beast with a hundred legs, 
L/SURA”) became his root of ad evil. 

Pound's economics found fertile soil in' 
Fascist Italy, where the “corporative state” 
and shortcut solutions of Benito Mussolini 
not only made trains run on time, but gave 
men more manhood, women more feminini- 
ty, and many the flliiaon of renaissance, to 
all of which Pound was susceptible. He was 
broadcasting his economic theories from 
Rome as early as 1935. After the United 
States entered war, the broadcasts continued 
with diatribes such as that of May 5, 2942: 

“Europe callin’ — Pound speakin' . . . 
The kike, and the unmitigated evil that has 
been centered in London since the British 
government set on the Red Indians to mur- 
der the American frontier settlers, has herd- 
ed the Slavs, the Mongols, the Tartar openly 
against Germany and Poland. And secretly 
against all that is decent in America, against 
the total American heritage. This is my war 
all right. I’ve been in it for twenty years — 
my granddad was in it before me. Ezra 
Pound speakin'." 

Continued on page 9 




People and the quotidian are her subjects 
and they have taken her from a wedding in 
the Hindu Kush to a bar in Cuba, from a 
harem in Abu Dhabi (“It's a boring life: 
They just sit around and grow fat and make 
bad jokes about their mutual husband ”) to a 
Moscow divorce court: from photographing 
a monarch, Elizabeth H, to following a Hol- 
lywood queen bee. Joan Crawford, through 
rite fierce beauty regime that helped her cling 
lo the top for three decades. 

In I960, she tripped over Richard Nixon's 
dog Checkers, mistaking the animal for a 
rug. She calls photojournalism a mixture of 
high adventure and low comedy. Philadel- 
phia-born, a London resident for 23 years, 
she is equally at home in “a marvelous yurt” 
in Mongolia and in her small flat in Mayfair. 

“Figuratively, I've lived my life off the 
back of a camel, which is kina of fun.” she 
says. “In the beginning when I would go off 
on a trip I would get on the plane covered in 
tears, hating lo leave whatever security there 
was. Then, over the years, that became secu- 
rity.*’ 

She is small with precise movements and 
gray hair pulled back from a serenely obser- 
vant face that she cl aims is unphotogenic. 
“She has elegance and dignity, an extraordi- 
nary vitality, endless curiosity." a journalist 
friend says. “Shell go anywhere, no matter 
how humiliating or vexing, if she thinks 
there’s a picture to be taken. She’s utterly 
without the snobbishness that afflicts a 
younger generation of photographers — 
they’re like hemophiliacs, they go all limp.” 

Her lack of pretension and her readiness 
for a good giggle, “which gives me the stom- 
ach to go to the next heavy course.” come 
perhaps from having been a factory worker 
when she was very young and from coming 
to professional photography relatively late. 
Her first job was in a Hoboken photo finish- 
ing plant during World War IL It employed 
1,300 people and by the end of the first year 
she was not ony managing the plant but had 
opened another one m Chicago. She quit 
work to take care of her baby son, who is 
now a doctor in England, and then was 
encouraged by her husband to join a photog- 
raphy class given at New York’s New School 
by the great Russian-born art director of 
Harper's Bazaar. Alexei Brodovitch. 

The other sutdents, vying for the master's 
attention and hoping for glossy jobs, 
laughed at her happy amateurish snapshots. 
But when the class was told to take fashion 
pictures, evoyone came bade with the ex- 
pected except Eve, who had photographed a 
fashion show in Harlem. “Is most interesting 
documentary fashion," said Brodovitch. 
“Do not do the other class assignments. 
Learn from doing.” Her photography stud- 
ies had lasted six weeks. 

The respected English magazine Picture 
Post published the Harlem fashion show 
pictures. Mrs. Arnold is also a veteran of 
Life and Look, has worked for the color 
supplement of the Sunday Times of London 
since it began in the ’60s and is a member of 
die Magnum agency. She has published four 
books of pictures with excellent and modest 
texts. She is doughty but has never succeed- 
ed in being tough. 

“Many people think I should be," she 
says. “When I came back from South Africa, 

I thought I had a heart attack. I didn’t. I was 
heartsick." 

Later, her book, “The Unretouched Wom- 
an" (197 6), was banned in South Africa 
because it included a view of Vanessa Red- 
grave’s bare bottom, taken while she was 
getting into costume on a film set, 

“Thai’s not obscene,” Eve Arnold says. 
“There is one picture in the book that is — a 
sta r v ing child in Znluland. That is obscene." 

She tries not to judge but does not attempt 
to conceal what she feels. “It’s not people I 
hate, it’s the situation — poverty, disaster, 
children dying of starvation. If T hate it, I 
think I manage to say it. I was always inter- 
ested in the basic thing , what makes people 
tick and what the facts are, although it’s not 
always easy to say." 

As a photojournalism she relies in part on 
speed. “I think the difference between a fine 
photograph and an average one is being 
quick enough on the reflex to take advantage 
of the accident," she says. “And there are all 







'ft 


Cuban family , 1954. 





-'t. mft*- yV’ 



Joan Crawford gets a beauty treatment. 


kinds of accidents, you know, from a frown 
to the raising of an eyebrow or the move- 
ment of a hand.” 

Her reflexes are so quick that sometimes 
the camera catches what her eye hasn’t quite 
registered. But what makes her work unique 
is not its newsworthiness but its durability as 
a document of what we were at a certain 
point in history. 

“Many people j ust shoot Use one definitive 
picture. For me, it’s like taking notes. I begin 
before the action, if that’s possible, then go 
through the action and come out the other 
side. It isn’t that I don’t know what I’m 
doing, it’s because I want to know the whole 
of iL It’s because f want to write about it, 
because I want to see iL And I want to have it 
intact” 


ca," by 


when be told her to set ui 


O prepare for her most successful 
book, “In China" ( 1980), she spent 15 
years readingabout the country: Fa- 
miliar with eternal China, she was then able 


her lights where she pleased, “Reverend Fal- 
well, I use oo additional light 1 use God's 
light” Laughing, she says, T was shocked at 
myself. I didn't say it deliberately, I promise 
you. He was instantly my slave.” 

Tn America” (1983), an all-color attempt 
to re-view her native land after so many 
years abroad, was her hardest book. “And 1 
could speak the language, that’s the worst of 
iL" she says. In 36 states, over two years, she 
photographed and interviewed Navahos, 
Hasidic Jews, construction workers, lady 
mud wrestlers, socialites, a group of male 
homosexual nuns called The Sisters of Per- 
petual Indulgence, Laotian immigrants, 
KJansmen, cattle breeders, drug addicts. 
Shakers, Buddhists, Sufis and a m a n outside 
the While House holding a sign, “Hypocrisy 
Stinks.” A lot of the time she was very 


depressed- 

five years earlier. Eve Arnold published a 
bode of black and white pictures of the 
1950s called “Flashback! The 50’s." The 
pictures are perfect period pieces and are 
also premonitory in their hints of today's 
mindless violence and plastic tattiness. “The 
sailor reading a newspaper ” a critic says of 
one picture, “his wife in that bouffant skin 
and the children looking like cutouts — it’s 
all like a new form of cornflake. ” The 1980s 
are there in embryo. 

Today, few Americans talk about life or 
living. Eve Arnold wrote in her text. “They 
talked about lifestyle,' seeming to suggest 
infinite choice, as though the blue-collar 
worker on minimum hourly wage that I was 
talking to in New Mexico, or the min er in 
Virginia had deliberately chosen his way of 
life or arranged his own circumstances.'’ 

“In America" is more static than Eve 
Arnold’s other books because much of it 
shows lifestyles being consciously pursued 
rather than life being lived. There is little of 
the subject she does so well: people simply 
enjoying each oiher, like the reunited Cuban 
family on the Gulf of Mexico in 1934. 

“I can only follow my mind's illogic," Eve 
Arnold says, “which throws up moods feU, 
images experienced and — I hope — a sense 
of the tune's true atmosphere." ■ 


ia, she was then able 


to capture fleeting but enduring instants of 
daily life. 

“The daily life of people is very hard to 
do,” she says. “It's much more difficult than 
the set-up kind of photograph, which has a 
lot going for it because you light it and tan it 
up and add to it and show what you think 
was there. The other tiling is to try to figure 
out what people were really like, and (hat is 
tough." 

Her China pictures traveled through the 
United Stales for three years and the curator 
of the exhibition said of Ihe pictures, “What 
is left, after the factual material, is in the 
realm of an." 

Although flattered. Eve Arnold cannot 
resist adding, “I don't look at it that way, it’s 
not important whether photography is an art 
or not What is important is if it shows 
people something they wouldn't have seen if 
they hadn't seen the photograph." 

So as to have as easy a rapport as possible 
with her subjects, she uses neither lights nor 
fancy lenses nor an assistant She got a 
splendidly unctuous picture of the Reverend 
Jerry Falwell for her last book, “In Axneri- 




Sailor's family in 1956. 


•Wogropl*, Eve Arnold, MogAvm 






Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 1985 



TRAVEL 


Following literary Footprints Through the Streets of Bath 






by Benedict Nightingale 


B 


ATH, England — You can hardly 
walk a yard in Bath without dupli- 
cating the footsteps of some liter- 
ary ghost. Start at the stately Royal 
Crescent, continue through the Circus and 
south to Queen Square, then cut east to the 
High Street; you are tracing the precise route 
that Charles Dickens’s Sam Weller took to 
the greengrocer’s shop in whose upper rooms 
he found a party of carousing footmen and 
watched the host dance the “frog hornpipe” 
on a table. 

Or go north from the Pump Room across 


Cheap Street to MUsom Street: withyou is 
Thorpe, 


Jane Austen's coquettish Isabella 
followed by two mildly lustful young men, 
whose notice she “was so far from seeking to 
attract that she looked bade at them only 
three times.” 

Press on higher and higher, to Lansdown 
Crescent, then up Sion H3L That's where 
Austen heisrif went one fine day with a Mrs. 
Chamberlayne, who walked so fast that “I 
could with difficulty keep pace with her, yet 
would not flinch for the world.” That’s die 
way William Beckford, author of the Gothic 
novel “Vathek. an Arabian Tale,” would 
regularly ride on his gray Arab, accompa- 
nied by four grooms, six aogs and a misha- 
pen dwarf named Pare. 

Addison, Pope, Small ett, Fanny Burney, 
Goldsmith, Sheridan — but the list of writ- 
ers who knew Bath well is longer than that, 
and the site's literary associations are about 
as old as they could be. The city is, after all, 
supposed to have been founded by the great- 
grandson of VupTs Aeneas, the fatter of 
Shakespeare’s King Lear. Prince Bladud, as 
be was caRed, contracted leprosy, was ex- 
pelled from the British court, and became a 
swineherd. Unluckily, he pasred the disease 
on to his pigs and, fearful of bis master’s 
anger, drove the infected animals over the 
River Avon into a swampy valley. There they 
wallowed, as did be when he followed them 
into the mud. He had discovered the hot and 
healing springs of Bath, with all the predict- 
able results. He was welcomed back to court, 
erected a fine spa on the site of his cure, 
ascended the throne, and eventually handed 
over his kingdom to a son silly enough to 
want to divide it among his daughters, there- 
by giving us Shakespeare’s greatest tragedy. 

If you stand in the Pump Room and low 
through the window at the steaming King's 
Bath, you can see a 17th-century plaque 
confidently plating Bladud’s discovery in 
863 B.C. More orthodox historians would 
say the city dates from the time of the Ro- 
mans, who established a settlement called 
Aquae Sulis and constructed an elaborate 
system of baths around a temple to Minerva, 
the remains of which have teen thoroughly 
excavated and are well worth visiting. 

In the Middle Ages the city was prosper- 
ous again, a well-known wool-marketing 
center peopled by such assertive citizens as 
Chaucer’s Wife of Bath, who surpassed 
“them of Ypres and of Gaunt” at cloth- 
making and cheerfully boasted of the five 
husbands (“Welcome to the sixth when that 
ever he shall”) she’d already buried. 

It was Charles ITs stay in 1663 that made 
BSffiMashionable spa. Samuel Pepys visited 

sjrceis” andwent to t^eHilb-ceattuy Aljbey 
Cjhurch, where “a vain pra gmati cal fellow 
preached a ridiculous affected sermon, that 
mate me angry.” He returned for evening 
service the same day, only to find the same 
man in the pulpit: “I slept.” Nor does he 
seem to have been much mollified by the 
architectural excellences that have particu- 
larly impressed later visitors, such as the 
graceful fan-vaulting above the choir or the 
great west facade, with its angels clambering 
to and from heaven. 



rather longer, where SmoOen wrote 

sleep,- famous Circus that 


in* 

*r . fi 

r 






r 


needed a colonnade, becausem rai^y wea^r 


boS of S* leather, for ****&£?*£ *. 
gouty and rheumatic. Monaajgw. * ... 
SSL are likely to be less critical ^ - 

of columns, Corinthian and Ionic and Patty. 

Its chiseled friezes, and * -* 

acorns weirdly packed on .* ' - - 

arcs. Moreover. it uonly^^rt^to^ - 

mar pgfie carve of the Rqy« Crescent, sonsy /j. . ■ 
the most i mpre ssive sight in all Bam. "■■■?. 


P RESS north, braving a dope that, 
Ditircns himself thought rcsemwei- 


The Royal Crescent in Bath. 


Sir Walter Scott, who spent a year in a 
house neaiby when he was 5. remembered all 
his life being terrified by the facade: “No 
aarieat iconoclast or modem Calvinist could 
have locked on the outside of the Church 
with more horror than the image of Jacob’s 
Ladder present to my infant eye.” 

The baths themselves, though, woe the 
main destinations of both diarist and novti- 
ist- to-be. The child Scott spent much time 
immersed, but without the least benefit to 
the lameness that always afflicted him. 
Pepys went to be “parbofled” for two hours, 
then “carried away wrapped in a sheet, and 
in. a fhair home.” In his account of the 
experience, be also questioned whether it 
was “dean to get so many bodies together in 
the same water” a doubt often echoed latex. 
Tobias Smollett, a doctor as well as a novel- 
ist, published a pamphlet attacking the pro- 
miscuous bathing of “diseased persons or all 
ages, sexes and conditions,” and in his “Ex- 
pedition of Humphrey Clinker” left a memo- 
rable picture of ladies in brown jackets sub- 
merged to their necks and looking “so 
flushed and so frightful that I always turn 
my eyes the other way.” 


time Ra t h was the handsome place that, 
subtract the odd 19th-cezitury mutilation 
and 20th-century excrescence, we know to- 
day. Pepys may have liked the old city, but 
his fellow diarist John Evelyn probably 
fa more when he called its streets 


angles a ma^pr planner might wish, but the 
buddings are oftt 


spoke foi 

'marrow, uneven and unpleasant.” Increas- 


ingly, it seemed inadequate for what it had 
increasingly become, the summer retreat of 
fashionable Londoners who, as Oliva Gold- 
smith explained, “wanted some place where 
they might have each others’ company, m yi 
others’ money, as theyhad done 


win i 

during the winter in town.” 


C 


ATEHNG is prohibited now, thanks 


B to the discovery of an amoeba al the 
hot spring’s surface. The intrepid visi- 
tor, in search of a dip or a nostalgic aquatic 
jostle; will have to wait untfl the opening of 
new, uncontarmnaied pods, expected in 
1987. But already he can safely drink the 
water they’ll contain and decide whether be 
agrees with Sam Weller, who thought it tast- 
ed “partkklery unpleasant,” with “a way 
strong flavor o'-warm flatirons.” i nd ee d , he 
can walk around the Pump Room with his 
glass' and imagine- the many who camp, to 
imbibe, gossip, talk scandal and make trysts 
both before and after its rebuilding in the 
1790s. 

' The C orinthian columns m en tipp ed in 
Dickens’s “Pickwick Papers” are still there, 
and the music gallery, and even the great 
Tompion dock near which the Dowager 
Lady Snnphanuph, Lord Mutanhed and oth- 
er Bath notables grandly perambulated. In 
Jane Austen’s “N onhanger Abbey” Mrs. 
Thorpe sat beneath the same dock for 10 
mrnntes before realizing that the lady beside 
ha was Mrs. Allen: “Thrirjoy on this meet- 
ing was very great, as well it might, since they 
had been contented to know nothing of each 
other for the last 15 years.”' 

That was in 1797 a thereabouts, by which 


HANGE was dearly needed, and 
change was provided by three of the 
18th century’s more remarkable men. 
One was Beau Nash, the city's Masta of 
Ceremonies, arbiter of elegance and un- 
crowned king: He made Bath a safe haven 
for the gen tod and the due. Another was 
Ralph Allen, who provided it with its dis- 
tinctive pale limestone from his quarries 
nearby. The third was John Wood, toe city’s 
chief architect and master badder and fatha 
of its next great architect. John Wood the 
younger. 


ften superb in themselves, 
with their poised pediments and bala nc ed 
pilasters, their perfectly placed windows and 
doors — and, of course, their mellow color. 

How best to explore Bath’s literary past? 
Well, there are writers whose trail, if you 
follow it, will you all ova town. Sheri- 
dan, for instance. Start at Noth Parade 
Bridge, look down onto the west bank of the 
Avon, and there’s a tiny, unprep o sses sing 
stone alcove. That’s Sheridan’s Grotto, a 
hiding-place fa lovers and a post-box fa 
billets-doux, perhaps tuHnding those of the 
dramatist-to-be. Walk slowly back into the 
city center, and reminders erf his great “Ri- 
vals” are everywhere. North Parade and its 
parallel terrace. South Parade, are wbere 
Jack Absolute and Sir Lucius OTrigger plot- 
ted their next moves in the game oflove. The 
stark Masonic hall in Ola Orchard Street 
was once Bath’s famous Theatre Royal, the 
place where the play itself triumphed after 
its failure in London. 


told ha it was more 


“the perpendicular street a man secs^ 

inadream, which he cannot get upfiorthe,- 
life of him,” and there’s more Dickens to; 
discover In a simple bet elegant yellow-gray 
house, 35 SL James’s Square, lived the pocl> 


family visit She left in 1806 without either 
personal regrets or cause fa professional 
satisfaction, since the manuscript of “North- 
anger Abbey” was amply gathering dust in 
the office of the local publisher who had 
bought if fa £10; but there’s hardly a street 
square a crescent that she and her charac- 
ters have not made permanently their own. 

Seek, out No. 13 in Wood the elder’s mag- 


House.” Longfellow was there awe, and . 
Dickens was a regular vision Accordingly 
hif biographers, that’s where he heard thy 

» - - - • — J iL a /lUnvuMat' aF T iftla ■ ' J 




that inspired the character of Little^ Ap 1 


mficent Queen Square. Make your way to 

dowdy place. 


Press farther west, to the theater that re- 
placed it in 1804, and you’re in what used to 
be King’s Mead Fields, where Sr Anthony 


High to the south of the town, and stiS 
worth a 


Absolute stopped a dud between his son 
OTngger.i 


a visit, is the magnificent Palladian 
mansion. Wood the elder built for Alien, 
Prior Park. Alexander Pope planned the last 
book of his great “Dunaacr in its library. 
Indeed he often stayed with Allen, the recon- 
struction of Bath gradually reconciling him 
to a city that earlier had reminded imn of 
“rocks and dirt, brimstones and fogs.” Sam- 
uel Richardson came, and so did Henry 
Fielding, who briefly lived nearby, in a plain 
gray house that you still pass if you extend 
your walk to Prior Park to go past Wid- 
combe Church. In there he wrote part of 
“Tom Jones,” immor talizing Allen hims elf 
as- the munificent Squire All worthy.. 


Jack and OTrigger, and Mrs. Malaprop per- 
petrated the last of many malapropisms 
(“thou barbarous Vandyke”), and all the 
expected romantic resolutions were readied. 

But let’s not forget Sheridan’s own mnum- 
tic resolution, because its fame spread far 
beyond the Bath of the early 1770k The 
beautiful Elizabeth Linley was first affi- 
anced by ha greedy father to an eldcriy 
landowner, then harassed by a married rote 
with “secret and objectionable a ft wi ring 
followed by disgraceful proposals.” She 
needed rescue, and got it from Sheridan. 
From his bouse at 7 Terrace Walk (now. 


No. 1 Paragon, nowadays a 
part of it a step selling ex-military clothing. 
That’s where the family was visted by a Mr. 
Maitland, at whom “I am prevented from 
setting my cap toy his having a wife and tea 
children. 75 Bat -the Austens finally settled 
farther from the dty center. Cross the Avon 
by Robert Adam’s Pultensy Bridge, the only 
one in Britain lined entirely by mops. Con- 
tinue through octagonal Laura Place, where 
Lady Dalrymple lived in “Persuasion,” and 
past the long, grand terraces of Pulleney 
Street, wbere Catherine Moriand lodged in 
“Northanga Abbey.” 

At the end, opposite the park in which 
Jane herself saw fireworks that were “realty 
beautiful and surpassing my expectations, 
is 4 Sydney Place, where she spent, several 
years: a demure, unpretentious house, re- 
markable only fa the jumble of tiny holes in 
the stones around the door, like' an arch of 
Gniyfere cheese. 


B 


antidirnacticafly, a shorts shop) he sent a 


sedan chair to fetch ter clandestinely from 


UT it’s a better use of time to combine 
Jane Austen’s trail with the pursuit of 
other literary memories. Start, per- 
haps, at MUsom Street, still the magnet fa 
brow ser s it was in ha day, though the print 
shop into whicb Anne Elliot saw A dmir al 
Croft staring in “Persuasion” is probably 
now Culpeper the Herbalists, or Jolly’s De- 
partment 


Meanwhile, the Palladian mecca that was " ter family home at T1 Rriyai Crescent 1 and' 

ir i i •_ .i • — ji ..r i r. ■ 


Bath itself began to spread in the valley 
below, from there up the steep meadows to 
old ' 


the north of the old city, then to both east 
and west Not everyone was delighted with 
tiie work of Wood and his successors. “Like 


the wreck of streets and squares disjointed 
Ma 


Bramble in “Humphrey Clinker.’ 


fatthew 


Certainly, one of the city’s charms is its 
' of the formal and the unpredictable, 


blend 

the symmetrical and the rambling. The 
streets may not always be at the mutual 


.with '-a chapaon- they- doped- to Franci, 
where they were secretly married. 

The matter didn’t end there. Sheridan was 
seriously wounded in the second erf two duds 
with the resentful rote; on Kingsdown HOI, 
just out of Bath. But be survived to write, not 
only “The Rivals,” but the “Pump Room 
Sketch” that eventually evolved into “The 
School Cor Scandal.” 

The Jane Austen trail is more daunting 
stflL She moved reluctantly to Bath in 1801, 
actually fainting dead away when ha fatter 


ly -romantid ' Street," this.’ 

Tandy? Catherine Modand’s beloved. Here 
Anne Elliot herself first caught a glimpse 'of 
Captain Wentworth, whom she had unwisely 
rqected years before, and “fa a few minutes 
saw nothing before her, it was all confu- 
sion.” And near here, in Union Street, she 
and be were reconciled, and strolled up to 
Milsom Street “seeing natter sauntering 
politicians, bustling housekeepers, {Siting 
girls nor nursery maids and children.” 

Turn left to Gay Street, where Jane Aus- 
ten herself stayed briefly and Fanny Burney 


By that time Bath bad indeed become a' 
quiet and sedate city, a natural resting nlacej- 
for the invalid, the aged and the dead. Jr yoiir 
want, to be reminded of merrier times, you - 
yHfHild tan amend and go southeast to the, . 
pleasant qhw building that could oucce 
claim tip be the very heart of Bath. The^ 
present Assembly Rooms are neither the 
only ones — there were others, now no mere- 
ilywi a plaque on the sidewalk, near, the; 
Abbey — nor precisely the same ones Italy 
Sheridan, Goldsmith and Jane.Austen knew.-. 
Mostly, they’re a lovingly exact cepKea of; 
those damaged by the Luftwaffe in 1942. .- 
Actually , sane thought Bath was m de- 
efine by. the time those New Assembly 
' Roams opened, in 1771. The raffish aristo- 
crats who had come to gamble and whore, 
away their fortunes, provoking John Wesley 
to tab the dty “Satan's headquarters,” were-, 
las and less to be seen, the rising middle; 
dass more and more. 

Yet the writers did not stay away. Shelley .* 
and Wordsworth came like Crabbe and: 
Sterne before them. William Beckford came,: , 
to rechristen his house in Lansdown Cres- 
cent “Baghdad,” to scandalize the neighbors 
with the exotic rites supposedty occ urrin g 
made, then to bmkl a faintly Moorish (and ■ 
still via table) tower on the hul behind. Swin- 
burne came to celebrate Bath as England’s 
Florence, “the lovely dty whose grace no 
grief deflowers”; Hardy io look down on its 1' 
“tan concave, towers and spires” from - 
Beecten Chff to the south, and Kipling to 
compose the imsoliticed tribute to Aquae - 

«_«_ • ----- ifo mouth of a centurion in 

“Eyctyoqp goes there. 

. ..Rritenv.as good as- 

Rone.” Edith. StwdL came to write a 280- - 
page book about the place that doesn’t even 
get as far as Jane Ansten. But then, there’s 
hardly another dty in Britain with so much • 
literary history embedded in its walls. ■' 


&- 


BenetKct NtgfOmgak, yrfio reports regularly 
from London - for Ihttfew York Times on the 
theater, is the author of “A Reader's Guide to' 


Fifty Modem British Flays* (Barnes A No- 


,7bts is excerptedfhm an article written 
for The Tones. 






VIENNA, Bdsendorfer Hall (tel: 
65.66.51). 


SALZBURG. Festival (Lei: 42541 ). 
BALLET — Aug. 26: “Matthaus Pss- 
siofl”(Neumdcr. Bach). 


CONCERTS — Aug. 30aud 31: Pitts- Z. 
burgh Symphony Orchestra. Lorin 
Maazel conductor (Berlioz, Stravin- 
sky). 

OPERA — Aug. 25 and 30: “Capric- 
do”(R. Strauss). 

Aug. 26: “Cod fan latte" (Mozart). 

Aug. 27 and 3 1 : “The Return of Ulysss 
to his Country" (Monteverdi). 

Aug. 28: “Die ZauberflOlc" (Mozart). 


•International Theater(td: 3 1.62.72). 
THEATER — Through August “Kill 
Hamlet” (Sokdovic). 

•Kurmkrhans (tel: 57.96.63). 
EXHIBITIONS— ToSept 30: “1984 
Looking Ahead to 2000.” 

To Oct 6:^Yienna 1870-1930 Dream 
and Reality: The greatest names of the 
Viennese un-de-sride." 

•Musikvexein (id: 65.81.90). 
CONCERT — Aug. 24: Dresdner 
Staatkapelle, Hans Vonk conductor, 
Alexander Jenna piano (Beethoven, 
Reger). 

•Staatsopcr(td: 53240). 


OPERA— Aug. 31: “DieCsardasfur- 
srin” (Kalman). 

•Theater an derWidi(td:57.71-5J). 
THEATRE — To Aug. 31: “Cate” 
(Webber, T.S. Eliot). 


INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 

Aug. 28: Royal Liverpool Philharmoo- CONCERT — Ang. 31: 
ic, Marek Janowski conductor (Schn- Orchestra of Budapest, 
maim, Wagner). conductor (Bach, Mendel 


ITALY 


(Gordon, 


Franz Liszt 
Janos Rofla 
lasohn). 


2: “Rome- 


COPENHAGEN. Helligandshnset 

fid: 143452). 

EXHIBITION —To Sept. 2: “Char- 
Jottenborg Painters." 

•Museum of Decorative An (id: 
14.94v52). 


mann, Wagner). 

PAWS * C®** Geoiges Pompidou 
Sir Charles Groves conductor. Jessye 277 12331 

^rn S iahmi ’y ?? P ?j- EXHIBITION —To Sept. 30: “Jean 
Au& 30: BBC Philharmonic Grebes' Dubuffet.” 

dcLarTocha piano (T^cza^Stnrv^ Gennain-des-Prts (trf: 


EXHIBITION— To! 

Archeology and Urban! 

•Muste dn Grand Palais (tel: 
26134.10). 

EXHIBITION — 


To Sept 2: “Re- 


FLORE2VCE, Museo Archeokttico 
(teL- 2132.70). 

EXHmmON — To Oct 20: *The 
Etruscan CSvilizatii».” 


“Boohovm and Booth” 
BectbovenX 
QMf CERTS — Ang. 25: Polish 
Chamber Orchestra, Jerzy Maksy- 
miukoonductor, Dontry Sitovetsky vi- 
oiin (Mozart, Schuman). 

Ai^. 28 and 29: Phflh a nno n iaOrobes- 
tea, Giuseppe Sinopoli conductor 


•National Library, (teL 28.70.4S). (Mahler). 

•Muste da Louvre fieL- 2603926). EXHi mTI ON— ToSmt^K): ^Rabe- Ang. ,30 and 31: Orchestre de Paris, 

5 — ToSepL 9:“XVHI lats: nhctratronsfroin the I6th Cento- DanidBa — L -‘ - * - — 


Ang. 31: BBC Philharmonic Orches- 
tra, Edward Downes conductor. John 
LQ1 piano (Brahms). 

•Taie Gallery (id: 821.13.13). 


organ (Bach). 


Aug. 28: Jean Gnillon 


EXHIBITIONS— ToSepL 9: 
Century French Pastels,* “Drawings 
in Genoa: XVI -XVU Century.” 

Tn -VI- «Tmmw " 


ty to the Present- 1 " 

•Palazzo Piti (teL 2134 AO). 
EXHIBITION —ToSepL 29: 


Temperaments” 


24-17: “The Foot 
iandiinc, Hmde- 


To Sept. 30: ‘Ingres Portraits.' 
•Mustedu Petit Palais (teL 265.12.73). 
EXHIBITION —To Sept 29: “Gto- 
taveDorfc" 



EXHIBITION —To Ang. 25: “Nor- 
dic Decorative An.” 


Musfc Rodin (td: 705.0134). 

“ “ 15: “Alain 


•Tiv oli Co ncert Hall, (td: IS.I0.1Z). 
CONCERT — August 26: Tivoli Sym- 
phony Orchestra, John Frandsen con- 
ductor (RactunaninoO. 



BATEAUX-MO UCHES* 

PARIS RIVER BOA TS 


RIGHT BANK 3593030 


LONDON, Barbican Centre (id: 


1 638.41.41). 

-1CEKTS — 


-TS — Royal PhilhanDonic 
— Ang. 27: 1 


BOOKS 


3 |[ 


HOTELS 



Hemingway lives... 


..ill' this ctching-style.^jen 


& ink {Mrcrait; as does 
Twain, Eugene O'Neill, 
William Riulkner, Carl Sand- 
berg, Oscar Wilde, John 
Steinbeck, Sinclair Lewis, 
Tennessee Williams, Thomas 
Wfolfe, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and 
Truman Capote. 

Faithful renderings by Flor- 
ida arrist, Terry Carroll, are 
superbly reproduced on tex- 
tured stock U'xl4*. Any one 
for $6, three for $15, set of!2 
for only $40, plus P&.H $1. 50, 
outside U.S. $5. Orders sent 
air mail within 24 hours- Flor- 
ida Residents add 5% sales 
tax. Money bock guarantiee. 

Send your selection, with 
check & return address, to: 
Famous Faces, P.O. Box 
490473, Key Biscay ne, FL 
33149, U-S.A. 


Q < .r:ili(l I |:,?d ik- H 

UndCii'ivir. irri^fisN: 

T HE EPIC L RE 
”G()L RMET” DIET 


CON( 

Orchestra — Aug 27: Uri Segal con- 
ductor, Vladimir Ashkenazy piano 
(Beethoven, RosanD. 

Aug. 3L Nichdas Qcobury coodne- 
tor, Jos6 Feghali piano (Handel. Men- 
delssohn). 

l 30: Engtwh Chamber Orchestra, 
up Simm conductor, JosdLuis 
I Garcia violin, Emma Johnson clarinet 


Hr. ri!> -I. A ->iv!ji, l-.n^-k 


OF SPECIAL INTEREST 


STRESA INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL 


“Ertfoy getting sfim” 

The diet based on the 


ence 

tzine. 


latest medical 
(see “Spiegel 1 
no. 15/85). 

Monotony and frustration 
are things of the past The 
Epicure Diet is not only 
restorative and vitalising 
but combined with the 
tanous Gastefn spa the- 
rapy. Price complete with 


EXHIBITIONS — To Stax. 1: “Pat- 
rick Heron,” “Fainting m Newiyn, 

1880-1930“ 

Through December: “Matthew 
Smith. _ 

THEATER — Aug. 26: “Hamid” 

(Shakespeare). 

Aug. 27 and 28: “Lavers Labor Lost” •Victoria and Albert Museum (td: 
(Shakespeare). 

Aug. 31: “Rad Noses” (Pfeier Barnes). 

Aug. 29 and 30: “Richard UT (Shake- 


STRESA — The 24th international muse festival extends until Sept. 
18 and includes the following events: 

CONCERTS — Aug. 25: Zurich Chamb er Orchestra, Frimond de 
Stoutz conductor, Nathan MOstein violin (Bach, Handel). 

Aug. 27: Cologne Chamber Orchestra, Helmut MOlkr-Brfihl cooduo- 
tor (Bach). 

Aug. 28: Cantilena Chamber Players (Brahms, Mahla). 

Aug. 31: Stuttgart Bach Collegium (Bach). 

Sept. 2: Washington National Symphony Orchestra, Mstislav Rostro- 
~"nch conductor (Beethoven). 
iL 4: Alban Berg Quartet (T 
HIBmON— ToSept. 18 : __ 

RECITALS — Aug. 26: Narriso Y. 

Ang. 30: Shlomo Mzntz violin. Pad 
ven). 

SepL 3: Jon Kimura Parka piano (Liszt, Mozart). 

Fa further information tel: 31095. 


Gafner . 

(Bach, Scarlatti). 

vsky piano (Badt, Beetho- 


EXHIBITION —To Scot 
Kiriffi." 


era Masters from the 
misza collection: Corot, 
so.” 

VERONA, Arena di Verona 


29: “Mod- 
i-Borne- 
Pkas- 


DanidBarenboiin conductor (Baxho- 
yrauDebusty, Stravinsky). 

EXMBmONS — To fcjt. 21 : “Cdk;-: 
our Since Matisse: An Exhibition of ■ 



(td: 


SCEAUX Festival del’Orangaie (id: 
660.07.79). 

CONCERT — Aug. 31: Bartboty 
Quartet (Ravd, Schubert). 
RECITALS— Aug. 24: OUvierChar- 
lier vxrfin, Gety Moutier i»aso (Bee- 
thoven, Mozart). 

Aug. 25: Mikhail Rudy piano (Chopin, 
Schubert). 


CONCERTS — Aug. 30: Orchestra 
Arena di Verona. 

OPERA — Ang. 24, 27, 29: “Aida” 
(Verdi). 

Aug: 25: “AniU" (Verdi). 
Aug.28and3 1 :“IITrovatore"(Verdi). 


ToFdj.4: “French Connectkjus: Scot- 
land and the Arts of France." 

OPERA —Aug. 24, 26, 28: Connecti- 
cut Grand Opera, “The Consul" 


Ang. 26, 29, 30: “Miss Julie 
berg). 


(Strind-;- 


JAPAN 


SWITZERUNO 


■ — __ 


EXHIBITION —To Sept. 8: “Bruce 
McLean.” 


589.63.711 
3ITIC 


speaie). 

•British 


Musonn jjteL 636.153% 


EXHTBITION —To Jan. 1986: “Bud- 
dhisni: Art and Faith.” 

•Lond on Coliseiini (td: 836.01.1 i> 
OPERA — Angnst 28 and 31 : “Rko- 
I«to”.(Vc«di)T^ 

-National Portrait Gallery (td: 


entertainment (in- 
to the 


1930.1532). 

BrnoNs— 


To Sept 8: “How- 


duefing free entry 
Casino; 
Introductory price 
September85> DM1 


§0^ 


EXHIBI 

aid Coster.” 

TSJR?- ,3 = “Charlie Chaplin 1889- 
1977.” 


EXHIBITIONS — To September 1 : 
“Endish Caricature 1620 to 0 k Pre- 
sent?* 

To September 15: “Louis Vuilloo: A 
Journey through Time.” 

To October 6: “Julia Margaret Camer- 
on 1815-1979.” 

To October 22: “Textiles from the 
Wdkome Collection: ancient and 
modem textiles from the Near East 

and Peru. ” 

STRATFORD-apou-AVON, Royal 


actor 


nrith), “Les Umnnuncms" (MaiDot), 
“Ragtime” (Cate). 

•Galeae Pertain (tel: 508.43.67). 
EXHIBmON —To Sqpt 2£h J Fran- 
dsJaUam.” 

•H6td deVTQe(td: 276.40 j 6 6). 
EXHIBITION — To Oct 5: “Vr 
Hum and Paris. 1 
•Hotel 

JAZ2— ToAng. 
bis orchestra. 

•Maine da ler arroodissaaem (teL 
26038.01). 

EXHTBITION —To Sept. 29: 
Centuries d Ballet in Pans.” 


BERLIN, Nationiigalerie (teL 26661 
EXHIBITION —To Aug 25: “New 
acquisitions from 1975-1985” 
FRANKFURT, AiteOper(td: 13400L 
CONCERT — Aug S: Stockholm 
Chamber Choir. Eric Ericson canduo- 
tor (Han del). 

RECITAL — Aug 30: .Christian 
Zacharias piano (Mozart, Ravdfy. 
MUNICH, Artcuriol GaQezy (td: 
29A131). 

EXHIBrlTON — To SepL 8: “Ecok 
de Paris ‘Les Naif s’.” 

►Kunsthalle der Hypo-Stiftnng 


TOKYO, Idemitsu Art Museum (td: 
21331.111 

EXHIBITION— ToSepL l.“Master- 
pieocs fromldenritsu Art Gallery: Ori- 
ental Ceramics. Craftsand PaintiDgs.” 
•National Museum of Modem Art 
fid: 21425*1). 

EXHIBITION— To SepL 29: “Modi- 
gliani Exhibition.” 

•Suntory Museum of Art (tel: 
470.10.m 

EXHIBITION — To Sort. 1: "Bril- 
liant Cut Glass.” * 


C®flEV£ Music de PAtWnie (let 
EXHWTION —To Sept 29: “Cha- 

nades.” 


^Prome- 


^|^tFtate(tet 46.1433). 

“Moat- • 


•Zcit Photo Sakm Ttel: 246. 1 3.70k 
—ToSept 16: ‘Ts 


EXHEBITON 

kubaCity.” 


^V^ANNE, The Hermitage Foun- 

sromsts in the Fr 
Cdkctions.” 




(teL233L74). 
EXHTBITION — 


IITION — To SepL 1: “The 
Gercnan Romantics.” 

•S t aatega i etic modem er Kuust (td: 
2937.1(5. 

EXHlBriJON — ' 


Mfaidien(td: 758.1230). 

31 : Maxim Saury and 


■To SepL 15: “Ger- 
man Art since i960.” 


“Four 


r i r week, minimum stay: 
wt 


1 

The press: “At last a diet 
that does more than it 
promises”. 

Reservations: 

Grand Hotel de 1 ’Europe, 
A-5640 BadgastBin 
Tel. 0043/6434/37010 
Tlx 67552 


TM 5 &J 2 ) ACade ™ y of ArU (Ml: 

EXHTbSoN— T o Ang 25: “217th 
Su mm e r Exhflation.” 

assssHSKRaSi- 


DUBLIN, 

(td:74.45D5). 

_ TlffiATER— 

iJLe Petit Opportunftd: 236.0136). King of Friday’s Men 1 

AZZ — To Ang 27: Oaude Tissen- *0008 


Abbey Theatre 


AMSTERDAM, Cbncengdxsiwftd: 
71.8345). 

CONCERTS —Aug. 24 smd3 1 ; Radio 
Philharmonic Orchestra, Setgin Com- 
missioiia conductor (Beethoven, Berli- 
oz). 

Aug 28: Hacquart Ensemble (Bach, 
Handd). 

Aug 29: Oncertgebouw Oidtestra, 
Bernard Haitink conductor, Vladunir 


don Symphony Orchestra, Oaudio • 
Abbata condnctor (Menddssofan;^ 
Dvorak, Stravinsky). 

^^armonic Orches-l ; 

von Kanyan coadncwc 


5?i74ty°’ VilU Favor * ta (tcI: I 
BOffiBftlON - To Ocl 15: '”4T 


SVJ' . . 

L. v*- 




•The 


stakovich 

King of Friday’s Men” (McJkjy). •M aiso n Descartes (td: 22.6U4) — — 1 

•Douglas Hyde Gallery (tel: EXHIBITION — To Sept. 27: “Des- NEW YORK. . ■' 

5JMU- cartes and The Netherl^Kis.” NamrJl^L^S^ ‘ 


UfUTkia STATES 


1: 


Ang 24, 28, 29: “The Meny Wives of 
Windsor.” 

Aug 29 and 30: “As You Like It" 


■Aug 24: Pittsburgh 
ay Orchestra, Lorin Maazel 
. ^(uvoralt Srraua). 

Aug 26: London Sn/onietia, Simon 
Rattle conductor. Ronald Branligam 
piano (Gershwin, Ives). 

Aug 27: BBC Symphony Orchestra. 
David Atherton conductor (Banrik, 
Stravinsky). 


DUON, Muste Nattonal Maurice 
Magninfid: 67.1 1.10). 
EXHIBITION — To Nov. 18: “XIX 
Century French Portraits 
MENTON, 36th Chamber Music Fes- 
tival (td: 5757.00). 


dkr. 

•Memphis Mdody((el: 329.60.73). ' 
JAZZ — Aug 28: Ilane Perce. 

Ang 31: Gerard Lamkm, Manu de 
Carvalho. 

•Minute Bou r delle fiel: 5485737). 
EXHIBITION— To &pL 15: *^Bror 

•^4^eCamavaIet(td:27Z2L13). 
EXHIBITION— ToOct. 27: “The Big 
Boulevards of Paris.” - 

•Mus£e d’Art Moderne (tel: 


723^1371 

BITION— 1 


EXHIBITION —To SepL 8: “Robert 
and Sonia Delaunay." - 
•Musee de dully (teh 2743232). 


77.29.411 

EXHTBITION — Through August: 
"FrankStdla.” . 

•Gallery of Photography (tel: 

7I.4634). 

EXHIBITION — Throudr August: 
“Body Electric." 

•Gate Theater (td: 74.4 0.45). 
THEATER — Through August: 
“Blithe Spirit” (Coward). 

•National Library fid; 7635JI1 
EXHIBfFON — Through Au g ust: 
“Irish Heritage” 


Garesana i oe jv«nrtands." Natural HmdryTieLXTl ,,n 



Art 




SCOTLAND 


Sdiwii^"- - To ° ct ' 1 -“K«rt> 

S^W^D-CNationalGal-^ 


EDINBURGH, Festival 

225 ccT 


(tel: 


fid: 

, tomONS—To 

fa^kyfaal^g: Old 



LTi'Ctilr,' 

oSLlJS embrM| H. Byct.: , 


In**.' 








I 








Zh; 






% 

X\r-, 


- OR FUii * NP PROFIT 

Concorde’s Turnaround: 

ed to Pay Off 


. v - : 


. . Sr 


ITS 



Paris to cJnmgeS£f d ^ ret “ rni *8 to 



■c I . - r,- 


'^ho were aide to trade the eclipse of the son 
for two hours with Concorde (it actually has 
to slow down to Mach 13). The cost of 
chartering Concorde vanes from 540,000 for 
a joy-ride across Europe to 5250,000 and 
[or a trans-Atlantic flight. Concorde, wh.„„ 
had been written off as a magnificent failure, 
has never bad it so Rood. 

Therein is the problem, and the irony, for 
Concorde is a fiidte resource. The produc- 
tion line was closed down after 16 aircraft 
(two arc currently with the manufacturers) 
and three prototypes had been built. By all 
accounts, the plane is aging gracefully and 
should last for at least another 20 years, but 
spare parts will become more costly once the 
* airframes have been cannibalized 


ritisb Airways has recently taken its sev- 




owe from ordinary fosESSS 
become more phtemhiSiS'J^^ you 
rived fmetaplJbS^P^S? yoa ve 

rv. ^ fi w 

sAaSSfSSSa Charterfh # lts 

SSSZg&BSi V“fr*** 

tor 2 airlines 


. Prowess of this extraordinary aircraft) Ac 

: Air France, 

V:7^ SS£S?ttS W TC 15 <* 

' ^ is due m part to having a 

'if Copowde— out of theffeet of four — 
both Paris and New 
: *- -1 “<* bat ite scheduled arrival time in 

* ■ - -c: £. > New Yodc (8:45 A.M.) and its dqXire 
'* • r*^S 7 toM for Pans (1 P.M) allow it to escape the 
— .‘5 J OT at JFK. At twice the speed 

« sound and a cruising altitude of 10 miles 
- . Mi-' > (nearly mice that of a 747) the slender 100- 
r , - ' sew craft is virtually unaffected by winds 

~.j"-ss and turbulence. 

■y : “ -I i; ^ •bis adds up to a unique travel experi- 
tt • -W* - f 0 * which a steadily growing number of 

.. ." V 3 ® 5 People are prepared to pay. Air France has 
.. ■; ’■< seen its load /actor increase from around 51 

- 1 : - '= Re * 11 :*® 1 in 1982 to nearly 62 percent for the 

- first six months of this year. And British 
; Airwaw (the only other carrier with the 

7 ■< ‘oi ; Concorde) has had a similar experience. 

, .. j ~«7 ,^Next January, both airlines celebrate the 

; ! ~* :r ; 10 th anniversary of commercial supersonic 
• l -~ ■ travel with Concorde making a surprisingly 

^ healthy contribution to income. In 1984, Air 

i:c: France reported an “operating profir of 

63.4 million francs on sales of 592 million, 

. and British Airways £1 1 million on sales of 
.. -4 ^95 million. (This does not include the cost 

.y m ;s_ of development nor depreciation on t he- sev- 
7'7 en planes each acquired by two airlines, this 
V ”7;7. being absorbed by the French and British 
’’I.".." ~ governments.) This is a dramatic improve- 
: ment on four or five years ago when it might 
‘ .T .7 have made commercial sense to ground the 
. r ~ Concorde fleet 

’■.'7 The reasons for this almost magical Him. 

' ' .7 around are that Concorde, as an Inveterate 
7.; gas-guzzler, has benefited more from lower 
. “ oil prices than subsonic aircraft; the strength 
7 . ; ’ 7 of the dollar has brought more revenue rda- 

Jrive to costs; the elimination of unprofitable 
• ^ routes (British^ Airways . ax$d Bahrain and 

-■ ~ -fracas; ^k>4nd' ; 9ifesiMnijt^^^^tifeaitan7 
” " • • ; ; ishing growth of tfiechai^ market v ' ■ '* 

7 7" 7 British Airways will operate -at least 200 
7.7 Concorde charters this year, day trips to 
■_ - J ; Reykjavik (for a VDringfrast), Bordeaux (for 

’■ wine tasting and a lunch in Saint-Enrilion), 
— Bermuda (for ei^it hours on the beach), 
7_ Cairo (to see the pyramids), and incentive 
• tours for prized employees or customers' and 
“7 ' promotions for new products. Package tte - 
- *• ins with the Vemce^Sixnplon-Qrient-Ejqjress 
' v - and the QE 2 are also big business. 

Air France does an average of one charter 
i a week. A recent example was a trip from 
Atlantic Gty to Nice with a planeload of 
gamblers to sample the tables at Monte Car- 
lo. Another was a group of astronomy buffs 


enth and last Concorde out of mothballs; Air 
France is refurbishmg its fifth. 

But what counts most is getting there. And 

this is down to schedules as much as speed. 

BA which operates two round-trip Con- 
corde (lights a day between London and 
New Yonr (plus a thrice- weekly service from 
London to Washington and cm to Miami) 
gives you the choice of a 10 JO AJri. depar- 
ture from London, which gets you to New 
York at 9:20 AJvL in time for a day’s work; 
or a 7 PAL departure, which arrives at 5:50 
PJri. in time for dinner. Flying east (the 
worst for jet lag), you can avoid the agony of 
a sleepless night in the sky by catching either 
the 9:30 AM. or the 1:45 P.M. departures 
which get in to London at 6:10 PJtL and 
10:25 RM. respectively. Air France has one 
round trip aday from Paris, which arrives in 
New York at 8:45 P3L The return flight 
leaves at 1 PJVL, arriving in Paris at 10:45 
P.M. You can have breakfast in Paris, a 
three-hour meeting in Manhattan, and be 
home the same night. And you can be in your 
office the next morning fit and rested. 

The value of Concorde depends on how 
much you value your time. For example, a 
round-trip Paris-New York by Concorde 
costs around $3,300 compared with $1,500 
business class. The time saving on a round- 
trip is approximately 7 hours 30 minutes, 
which works out at a measly 5240 an hour. 
Surely oar time is worth as much as that 

It's hardly surprising that many Concorde 
passengers are people who either sell their 
own time directly, like psychiatrists and 
Wall Street lawyers, or owner-presidents of 
medium-size companies who have little cor- 
porate backup. Says Jean-Qaude Martin, 
inspector-general of Air France: “It's not so 
much the jet set, they prefer the caviar of 
first class, nor the president of Chase Man- 
hattan; they’ve already seat over their vice 
presidents, they have more time. It’s people 
w^nmrsmalfaicoiiipiiiiies.of up to 2,000 
employees, who have no one else, to send7 j : ■ 
• Two-thirds of Concorde passengers have ; 
flown Concorde before and, according to 
Francois Lafaye, Air France general manag- 
er in the United Stales, 10 percent are regu- 
lars who travel at least twice a month. This 
explains why there is a distinct chiblike am- 
bience aboard. Everybody seems to know 
everyone else and the cabin crew know many 
passengers by name: It’s Hke being in a 
corporate jet or a commuter aircraft. Its 
definitely the way to fly. If you can afford it 
If you have to fly subsonic, shop around 
for the deepest discount ticket you can get. 
You’ll get there just as quickly as everyone 
else, ana you can make seven tops for the 
price of one on the Concorde. ■ 


Ezra Pound 


Continued from page 7 


: 7 Crackerbarrel nonsense, but the U. S. au- 
. iborities called it treason— and Pound was 
•- indicted in 1943. For once in American 1ns- 
-ipry, a poet was held accountable for his 
words. To dale, however, the last word is 
; POTmd’s (in Canto L XXIV% .“that bee 
speech without free radio speech is as zero. 

' tatbespringof 1 ^ 5 , •wo It^ partisans 
knocked on Pound’s door vn lb jifle : butts 
; 7 and led him into American custody. Hand- 
' cuffed to a black accused of mpe 

' der, he was driven m an open snmyjeep 
.. through the streets ofRapdlo, his rammer 
hometown, to the Daaptausy 
Cento- near Pisa, where the U. £ Anny pu 

him in a floodlit outdooi -cttetor^ 
weeks. The excuse for tins was 

might try to rescue PounithmW^J| 

SSh birthday. But there, in his cage, ne 
wrote: 

Jus, as Cervantes ■* 
found their The fruit 

reaffirmed his in pantos,” was 

of Pound’s ordeal, Sl 

published while be Insane 

Elizabeth Hospital f « treason 

as mentally imfit lc r s ^° - were awarded 
After "The »«2321 hS. the Bol- 
America’s most Award, for “the 

bedlam for an- 

other decade- 


Upon his discharge in 1958, be was 
into custody of his wife, Dorothy S 
spear, and returned to Italy, where she resid- 
ed. (She died in 1973; their son, Oamr Shakc- 
spear Pound, was bom 1926 in Paris.) But 
Pound spent his later years living in Venice 
with the American violinist Olga Rudge 
(mother of his illegitimate daughter, now 
Princess Maiy de Rachewillz, bom 1925 in 
Italy). He completed and polished his “Can- 
tos" — 120 in all (Pisa’s were numbers 74- 
84), modeled after Dante and comprising 
Pound’s own history of the world. After bis 
health began to deteriorate in 1 959, however. 
Pound wrote relatively little and spoke most- 
ly in monosyllables when he spoke at all 

Today, more than a decade after bis death, 

only his antics are arguable. In the last year, 
as fcos centenary neared, he has been honored 
with congresses in Venice, Milan and Zu- 
rich; Cambridge, England, and Qrono, 
Maine, as well as concerts in Rome and 
Naples. At 90, Olga Rndge still tends the 
narrow three-room triplex house in Venice 
where she and Pound spent his dec l in ing 
years. Obsessed with expunging his anti- 
Semitic notoriety, she is documenting 
Pound’s dossier with testimony from some 
of his best friends who are Jewish. On or 
about Pound’s 1 00th birthday, she hopes to 
hold a simple observance ai the Clm Foun- 
dation nearby, where Gaudier-Brzeska’s 
famous bust of the poet rests on its base by 
Isamu Noguchi If all §oes weD, a priest, a 
minister, and a rabbi officiate. ■ 

Aim Levy is the author of “Ezra Pound: 
The Voice of Silence ** ( Permanent Press, 
1983). 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 1985 


TRAVEL 



Bouzigues 

B 


and Its Mussels 


OUZIGUES, France — This is the 
kind of place that could be called a 
brand-name town, as in Camem- 
beit or Cognac; places with gastro- 
nomic reputations mat surpass their touris- 
tic worth. 

Bouzigues — as in ntoules de Bouzigues — 
might well bill itself as the mussel capital of 
France. This Languedoc village at the north- 
ern tip of the Bassin de Thau, cultivates one- 
third of France’s mussel crop, a crop that 
totals more than 80,000 tons each year. 

In contrast to the nearby Mediterranean 
port of S&e. with its overcrowded streets. 


Patricia Wells 


bleak quayside restaurants, and oil refiner- 
ies, Bouzigues — population 904 — is calm, 
dean and beautiful. A romantic, moody sort 
of beautiful, with a gray-blue saltwater la- 
goon that fades gently into the sandy blue 
haze of the sky and vineyards that crowd 
right up to the water’s cage. Like a stark, 
exotic Japanese painting that says it aD in a 
few strokes, Bouzigues says it all with a few 
sticks sprouting from the water. 

As yon drive along Nl 13 just east of town, 
row after orderly row of sult-like frames jut 
out from the water. If you did not know they 
were raising mussels and oysters out there, 
you would be confused, for the brownish- 
gray frames resemble strange, stationary 
rafts. They appear at once inaccessible ana 
abandoned. 

But it is from these frames, clinging to 
hundreds of nets and slicks attached to cords 
han g in g down into the shallow lagoon, that 
France’s biggest, darkest fleshiest mussels 
are brought to maturity. 

Unlike the smaller Atlantic coast monies 
de bouchot, which grow dinging to fat oak 


poles driven into the sediment of shallow 
coastal beds, Bouzigues mussels grow in sus- 
pension. 

Hanging on tight with the bundle of 
lough, hamike fibers we call the beard, the 
mussel grows clinging to wooden sticks or 
metal rods dangling into the' water. Some 
mussels also grow encased in nets several 
meters long, nets that expand, month after 
month, as the blue-bearded bivalves grow, 
producing bright orange, succulent meat en- 
cased in violet-tinged, blackish shells. 

As mussels hang in suspension, they profit 
from the lagoon’s slow-moving current, en- 
hanced by the wood, assuring a steady supply 
of food m the form ofplankton. As they 
capture their food, they filter water at a rapid 
pace, some mussels filtering at the rale of 15 
gallons a day. Every few months, the nets 
and poles are thinned, and the growing mus- 
sels are put back into the water. 

They grow slowly, very slowly. By the time 
the mussel is ready for the table, it’s about to 
celebrate its first birthday. 

1 HERE is no better place to consume 
the mussels of Bouzigues than on the 
spot, and the prettiest spot in town is 
La Cote Bleue, a modest modem mold and 
restaurant with a marvelous terrace over- 
looking the glistening mussel and oyster 
beds. 

This is a lovely restaurant for family din- 
ing. As you enter, you can watch workers 
shucking platters of shellfish in a little glass- 
enclosed room, while smiling waiters are 
carrying platters onto the shaded veranda. It 
is a big place, but not impersonal; service is 
warm, efficient and friendly, even if you 
have to wait an hour for a table on a warm 
and sunny Sunday. 

On summer afternoons the terrace and 


indoor dining room fill up with French fam- 
ilies sharing the fresh and generous plateau 
de fruits de mer (here they call it the super 
corbeiUe), downing glasses of the local Listd 
pis de pis, & pale and delicious rost that 
cranes from grapes grown on the nearby 
sand dunes of the Golfe du Lion. Its light- 
ness and ]dw alcohol content (about 10 per- 
cent) make it perfect for summer sipping. 

La C&e Blcue’s shellfish platter is one of 
the freshest I've ever tasted, including the 
rare local hutires plates of Bouzigues (iodine- 
rich and delirious), tiny dams, sweet crab, 
meaty langoustines. chewy bulots and buc- 
dns, and of course, the local mussels. Be- 
cause Bouzigues mussels are meatier and 
larger, they’re the preferred mussel for eating 
raw on the half -shell. Even those who aren't 
fans of raw mussels (I wasn't until 1 tasted 
them here) should try them. 

The plateau also includes the unusual vio- 
let, a sh ellfish a Frenchman once described 
to me as a soft- shelled oyster. It's not the 
prettiest thing you ever saw, resembling an 
old potato from a corner of the cupboard. Its 
taste, as well, is unusual, rather Iodine-strong 
with a soft texture not unlike that of an 
oyster. The French also call them ftgue de 
mer — sea fig. 

The local mussel is also available in a 
wonderful sniffed version: The raw mussels 
are opened by hand, filled with a fine- fla- 
vored sausage meat, tied shut with a string, 
then quickly sauteed in raL They are cooked 
again, in tomato sauce, opened and served 
over a platter of while rice. 

If you hit a lucky day, La Cdte Bleue 
might also be serving agates de mer, tiny 
“sea crickets,” lovely -looking creatures with 
mottled black-on-red shells. In form and 
flavor, they resemble crayfish, but meatier 
and more tender. Served much like langpus- 



HUITRES! 

MQULES 


A sign in Bouzigues. 


Ptmioa Web 


tines, they are best split in two and grilled. 

Another wonhwile offering is chef Olivier 
Lombard's rillettes de Thau, a compact, full- 
flavored fish teniae that combines rouget . 
rascasse, smoked salmon and herbs, served 
with toast and a dash of lemon. 

Before or after lunch, visitors may want to 
take in the little Music de la Conchyli cul- 
ture, where you can leant a bit about raising 
fish and shellfish, and watch a fascinating 
video (in French), including interviews with 
local Fishermen. Also, up and down the 
coastline along this scenic portion of Nl 13, 
there are roadside oyster and mussel stands 
and a pleasant beach in the lively nearby 
town of M&ze. 

La Cdte Bleue, 34140 Bouzigues (15 kilo- 
meters northwest of Site), teb (67) 78.30.87. 
Closed Sunday evening and Monday from July 
J to Sept J, and Tuesday evening and 
Wednesday from Sept. 1 to July 1. Closed 
February and the third week of October. No 
credit cards. A la cane, about 200 francs a 
person, including wine and service. ■ 


The Restoration of the Grand Vefour 


by Susan Heller Anderson 


P 


ARIS — Like an heirloom jewel in 
an ever-changing setting, the 18th- 
century Palais Royal glows softly in 
the heart of Paris. Stepping through 
its arches is a leap into another time. 

Two monuments anchor the P alais Royal: 
on one comer, the Costedie Fran^aise, the 
national repository of the French theater. 
On the other, the Grand Vfefour, a monu- 
ment of French gastronomy. 

The restaurant reached its pinnacle short- 
ly after World War 13 when it was taken over 
y Raymond Oliver, who did much in 
ranee to popularize French cooking on 
television. It began to wane about seven 
years ago, and in 1983 the restaurant, which 
for 30 years had held three stars in the 
Michdin Guide, lost one due to Oliver's 


have been young rabbit on a bed of cabbage, 
lobster with caviar and sweetbreads and kid- 
neys in puff pastry. 

To attract a younger public, the 33-year- 
old chef, Andte Signorct, is uying slightly 
trendi er cooking without succumbing fully 
to nouvefle cuisine. 

The Taittrngers, who own a hotel chain 
crowned by the deluxe Crillon in Paris, re- 
tain a sense of the restaurant's history. “We 
were entranced by the project because we’re 
interested in everything that’s part of the 
French heritage,” Taittinger said. 

Several endearing quirks will remain. Un- 
like most Paris restaurants, the Grand Vfr- 
four serves copious portions. “It’s better to 
leave food,” Courault said, “than to leave 
hungry.” Champagne is saved in carafes, 
with halves available. It is a special bottling 
for the restaurant, but it is not Taittingpr. 


increasing absence because of failing health. ^ Grand Vifour, 17 Rue de Beaujolais 

Now, like generations of chameuses and (296.56.27). Reserve at least two weeks ahead 


danseuses, the Grand Vfcfour is making a 
comeback. Complete with face-lift and new 
repertoire, it reopened last fall under new 
ownership. (Now closed for the summer va- 
cation, it opens its doors-again on Monday.) 

Its new owner, the Tmteigpr family 'of 
Champagne fame, has. spent six million 
francs (about $700,000 at current rates) to 
restore the decor to former glory, which is 
pretty glorious. Its two dining rooms are 
ilings included, with elaborate 
pa in tings on s& depicting the harvest, the 
hunt and other food themes. With carved 
, elaborate gflding, mirrors, chande- 
liers, tea velvet and lace curtains, the setting 
strikes one as delicious, refined excess. 

Tbe restoration, painstakingly done by 45 
workers under the eye OF an architect from 
the Department of Historical Monuments, 
removed decades of smoke and grease. Win- 
dows were made bomb resistant (the restau- 
rant was damaged and several diners injured 
in a bombing in December 1983). Everything 
was scrubbed in the first cleaning since 1940. 
As a classified historical monument, not an 
inch of its interior can be changed. 

The painted-silk decor, a transition be- 
tween the styles of Louis XVI and the Direc- 
tcare, perplexes historians, who do not know 
who aid iL It was not installed until the 
restaurant, which began as the Cate de Char- 
tres in about 1782 (or possibly 20 years 
earlier), was several decades old. The restau- 
rant got its present name in 1814 from Jean 
Vifour, an owner and former chef to a mem- 
ber of the royal family. 

As restaurants go, there is nothing quite 
like the Grand Vifour for sheer glamour. In 
the 1985 Ganlt-Millau Guide, it gets no 
rating because of the new chef, but nearly 
half a page is devoted to iL “Very rapidly, 
the Parudan public has found the way once 
more to this inspired place,” the editors say. 

“More and more, we are getting a younger 
clientele,” said Yvon Courault, (he manager. 
“People who had left are now coming back, 
with businessmen and babitites at lunch.” At 
lunch, the smaller room is pretty; in the 
evening, the larger room more glamorous. 

But the Taittrngers want to charm palates 
as well as eyes. “The grand design is to regain 
the third star,” said Thierry Taitting er. the 
esmaa Normally, when a res- 
taurant changes hands, at least one star in 
the Micbelin Guide is withdrawn. But Le 
Grand Vefour stayed at two. 

The menu, which changes four times a 
year, has such delectable items as consomnte 
with tiny ravioli staffed with chicken, fillet 
of sea bass green with herbs and small arti- 
chokes. filet of lamb wrapped in a spinach 
leaf and a paper-thin crisp of pastry and, in 
homage to Oliver, oeufs au plat Louis Oliver, 
his creation of fried eggs with foie gras. The 
lunch menu changes twice a month. 

“Our ambition was to conserve a tradi- 
tional style of cooking,” said Taittinger, 
“while trying to evolve toward a more con- 
temporary codring.” Some other offerings 


of time for dinner. Closed Saturday and Sun- 
day. Total seating for 65. Ties and jackets 
required. © 1985 The New York Tima * 



Inside the Grand Vifour. 



DOONESBURY 






****!££» 
PFE& tmffl, 
60RP, FIRST' 
RATE! 


thankM 

PRESiTJQTT 

PUNE- 

\ 



tmiouwu&r )gs,r 

MfW- 


GREAT, am w 
msfffneoo 
imnoueBEACH 
awwktbm? 




OIL (3 MONEY 
IN THE EIGHTIES. 


ANINIERNm*^ 
OILD^CONFERENCE 

DCT0BER24-25J965, 

■ in a competitive environment * will be the theme of the sixth International Herald Tribune/ Oil 
terence on fr Oil and Money in the Eighties 7 The program, designed for senior executives in er — 


and related fields, will address the )tey issues affecting the current energy situation and assess future 



speakers from Europe, the Middle East, Latin America and the United States. 


OCTOBER 24 


OCTOBER 25 


KEYNOTE ADDRESS: 

— Professor Dr. Subroto, Minister of Mines and Energy, 
Indonesia. 

COMPETITION FOR MARKET SHAR E 
— Moderator: Herman F ranssen, Chief Econotrisf, International 
Energy Agency, Paris. 

— HP. Kepfinger, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, 

The Kepfinger Companies, Houston. 

— Airio Parra, Mtmaging Director, Petroleos de Venezuela 
(U-K.) SA., London. 

— Doughs Wade, Senior Energy Analyst, She! International 
Petroleum Compcny Ltd, London 
THE IMPLICATIONS OF OPEC PRODUCT IMPORTS AND 
DOWNSTREAM STRATEGIES ON THE Ofl. MARKETS. 

— Nader H. Sullen, President, Kuwait Petroleum International 
DdL, London. 

HOW TWO MAJOR OIL COMPANIES ARE SURVJVNG 
IN A COMPETITIVE B4VRONMENT. 

— Alen E. Murray, President, Mobil Corporation, New York. 
— A rve Johnsen, President, Statofl, Savanger. 

PRODUCERS AND REFINERS STRATEGIES IN AN ERA 
OF GROWING COMPETITION. 

— John R. Hafl, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Ashland 
08 Incorporated, Ashland, Kentucky. 

— 6ja MdfriMrta, General Manager, Neste Oy, HdankL 
— Nfchola MangeS, Assistant to the Executive Vice President, 
Ente Narioncte Idrocarburi, Rome. 

— Saud O. Ounafch, Mamgsr, Supply Coordination, Petromin 

Participation, Dhahran. 


NEW OUTLOOKS FOR UNITED STATES’ ENERGY POUCY. 

— The Honorable John S. H errington, United States' Energy 
Secretay. 

NORTH SEA OIL SEED-CORN OF TOMORROW'S 

PROSPERITY. 

— Join Moore, MP., Financial Secretory to the Treasury, 

United Kingdom. 

THE EFFECT OF FLUCTUATNG Ofl. PRICES ON THE 

BANMNG SYSTEMS, SHARE VALUES, INSTITUTIONAL 

NVE5TORS AND WORLD BANK LOANS. 

— Robert B. Weaver, Senior Vice President and Global 

Petroleum Executive, The Chase M un i xi t in Bank, NA, N.Y. 

— Peter Gigroux, Senior Vice Presdort, Sheareon Lehman 
Brothers Ltd, London. 

— Robert L Frankfin, Founder and President, Lawrence Energy 
Associates Incorporatfed, Boston. 

— Ian M. Hume, Assistant Director, Energy Department , The 
World Bank, Washington, D.C 

MEGAMERGER TRENDS AND THE FUTURE OF THE OIL 

INDUSTRY. 

— Robert F. GreenhS, Manajjng Director, Morgan Stanley & 

Ca Incorporated, New York. 

NONCONVB'mONAL OR. SALES. 

— Nicholas G. VSute, Ol Gonsufert, London, The Hague: 

— Charles L Daly, Managing Director, LM. Fischel&Co, Ud, London. 

— Dieter Kempermarm, Managing Director, Unton Rheiresche 
Braunlcohle n Krafts taff A.G. 

— Rosemary McFadden, President, N.Y. Mercantile Exchcnge. 

CLOSING PANS. DISCUSSION OF GJfflENT ENERGY ISSUES. 

— Paul H franks!, Preadent, Petroleum Economics Ud. 



|?.GpfaC 

:$2S2ft' 

i 





7\- v V •i-S**.' 

rwteliir'MHB 




— '“H 


CONFERENCE LOCATION: 

Royd Garden Hotel, Kensington high Street, LONDON W84P T. Telep hone; (441)937 8000. Telex; 
263151. A blade of rooms has been reserved tor conference part kip er d s. Please contact held dnedy. 
CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FORM. 

Please enn^ the fetowi^pextidpar* tor the a3 conference. D Check endosed. D Please invoke. 


SURNAME . 


FRSTNAME. 


posrrm. 


GMMff;. 


ADOBE St. 


OTY/COUNTW:. 


THBHDNi. 


.THjBt. 


I 

I 

I 

23*85 | 








Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


VoL 

High Law 

LOIt 

Chg. 

Ecbard 


30* 

28* 



PanAm 

1 1 • r 

8V 

Sft 

8% 


DEI# 

j-lf'"- 

25ft 

» 

24% 


Revlon 

TWA 


47 

22* 

46% 

22* 

46% 

22* 

— ft 

AT&T 


22 

21% 

21* 

— u 

SCM 

'1^. 

6 Sft 

63 

64* 

+1* 

OcdPef 


IT* 

31% 

31* 


Interco 


71* 

69* 

71% 

+1* 

Uncurb ; 

54* 

52ft 

53* 

+1* 

AddSUI 





— n 

Church s 

*609 

15* 

15 

15% 

+ % 

Tranwy 

*488 


42ft 

42* 

— * 

HuftEF 

ZZl 

36% 

34% 

35% 

+m 

Ramad 

m 

9 

Bft 

8% 



awn HU Low Lot Chg. 


imhn iaQ issue nrasi 'Ilf-12 - '1-S 

Trons «sji (Mr 68887 abajj— «7J 

Ulli l»J7 16009 15X19 159.11— 0J1 

Comp 55443 556J8 547J1 549.33- 106 


HNH Uw Close Oi'go 
10908 10BJ3 10347 — 042 
12113 12445 12445 — 1.17 
11143 10942 10942 -149 
57 J3 5743 5743-0.18 
11481 113.90 11340 -041 


Composite 

Industrial# 

Tronm 

Utilities 

Finance 


Thursday ^ 

N 1 S E 

Closing 


AMEX Diaries 


wasdaQ Index 


AMEX Most Active^ 


Htsh Law 


Close P«v. 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unchanged 

Total issues 
New HWn 
New Laws 
Volume in 
volume down 


i* » 

292 237 

262 255 

742 780 

U II 

U 12 

1485450 
2444,970 


Composite 

industrlat* 

Finance 

Insurance 

UNlKttS 

Banks 

Tramp. 


Week Tear I 
CUM CJl’W ABO ABO 
2MJU —040 29741 3044* 1 

34448 — 042 347.51 35444 
ffl&KI — 049 28941 KU 
2 oWB 4-0.12 29778 »7.1i 
275^3 — 0.77 275. IB 27540 


NYSE Diaries 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


Oo^a Prov. 


Dow Jones Bond Averages I 


Bonds 

UilllHes 

industrials 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanaed 
Total Issues 
New H lefts 
New Lows 
Volume up 
Volume down 


572 989 

1005 544 

441 447 

2018 2002 

50 42 

13 10 

24083020 
58063070 


■Included m the sales Heines 


Boy Sales -Skti 

210842 384439 MU 

14X944 377415 1375 

141484 394,909 577 

148528 380043 2786 

14X289 SuK 1,154 




PreY.4 PJA vd 

Httum 

Prw consol Mated dost 

I1V460M 


OxarkM 

Hosbrs 

wickes 

AMBId 
! BatarPi 
EchoB o 
TIE 

AM Inti 

WanaB 

SFNpfA 

ToxAlr 

intThrn 

AtnOll 

Colton n 

GWCdB 


1 2% 11 
32 fa 321% 
4ft 4% 

m 

13Sk 121% 
lg% »** 
5*% 5* 

3* » 

me im 

8 7ft 

’SS 
A «fc 


» + » 
J2% + ft 

IS + * 

14ft =* 
Mb -ft 
3* —ft 
16% — ft 


17% —I 
7% + ft 
9ft 

5ft —ft 

14ft 


Standard & Poor’s Index 


AMEX Sales 




Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to Hie closing an Wall Street and 
da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Industrials 

Transo. 

Utilities 

Finance 

Composite 


mod low ao*e are* 
21074 207-86 20007—115 
177.00 17339 17373 —191 
BOl 8X68 8334—0.14 
22.13 2133 2133 —82 
18933 187 JO 1B7J4 — 1 JO 


4PM. volume 
Frav. 4 PM volume 
Prev.cnns. volume 


AMEX Stock Index 


i 

P ■ 


Hiati Low Close CkVo 

221 JM 231 79 — 0.92 


12 Month 
HMtLow Stock 


5k. Close 

Dlv. VM. PE IWsHMh Low Quol.OiBe 


23% 14 AAR Si 27 

17ft 914 AGS 

21ft 13 AMF .251 

50ft 24ft AMR 

23 W, 18ft AMR Pt Z18 94 

22 19 ANRpI 2.12 1X5 

14ft 7ft APL 

61ft 38ft ASA 2J0 5.1 

37 lift AVX 72 Z3 

28ft 17ft AZP 272 IIP 


54 27 14 903 21 

13 47 14 

JSI 94 483 II 


20ft 30ft— ft 


Dow Average Skids 11.4 Points 

The Assotiated Press ~ _ _ ~ _ _ _ _ 

NEW YORK — The stock market’s bid lo M-l tllSeS $900 MullOH 


(7 Month 
Utah Low Slock 


CHv ylxPE 140s High Low OuBtOrU* HUiLow Stack _ 
~ , a m is in. in, + ft 13ft f » Hlvpit 


13 47 14ft 15ft 15ft— ft The Associated Press 

** 324« ijv! «ft Jfft- ft NEW YORK — The stock market’s bid lo 

i IS §1';. »% + ft extend a brief upswing fell apart Thursday as 

is 57 4o5 sS* aSS + v% prices tumbled in moderate trading. Retail, 

'$ mi 24 * m* aSS- ft aul °- computer, drug and financial issues were 

16 ion 57ft 541% 54ft— ft among, the major casualties 

17 !o? ?4ft Mft m% — ft The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials 


, s. bs essrd i|,B ™ Jg^s 

,S* if- ISSS,fS!!i 


Sis. fa— 

ah/, via. PE IBh High LOW awr.Wos 
.17 14 8 74 12ft 12ft 12ft— y% 


njukMBi 
Utah LOW Stock 


Sis Ctoe 

EMv. YHLPE W8gHlBHLow ttwLQrtN 


14% 7ft APL 5 9ft 9ft 7ft 

a] fa 38ft ASA X00 5,1 1557 40ft 39 39% + ft 

77 13ft AVX 02 13 1* 67 13ft 13ft 13ft- ft 

aft 17ft AZP UI 1LS 7 W 14* Mb Mft- ft 

40 34ft AW Lab 1.40 XS 16 1039 57* 56ft 56ft— 1% 

*B] 20 ACCOVW s JO 21 7 150 22ft 22-* 23ft 

“ft 121% AcrnoC * A0 28 101 14ft 14% 14ft- ft 

10ft 7ft AcmeE J2b 42 I« ,2* 7ft 7ft 7% 

19 151% Ado Ex 1.920109 34 17ft 17ft 17ft 

20 13ft AdmMI J2 1.9 7 5 14ft 14ft 16ft - % 

19 6 ft AdvSvs 53t *J 19 58 12* 12., Hft + % 

41ft 22ft AMD 
12 ft 4ft Advesr 
15ft 9ft Aerttex 


218% 1706 EnsExn 00* £9 
2ft 1ft Ensrce 21 

prices tumbled m moderatelrading. Retail, , The Associated Press mi j» |£Fn Lw* , ia ;i 32 K5 1S2 + £ 

auto, computer, drug and financial issues were NEW YORK — The basic measure of the * 1 % T 2 »S iSuimk 20 -22 42 + % 

among the major casualties. U.S. money supply, M-l, rose $900 million in g% JJJ5 gM U1 ,w ^ »* ^ -wS 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials *** “dw Aug. 12, the Federal Reserve ^ «»| | tU - 5 

skidded 11.43 to 1,318.10. erasing most of its B 0 "* 1 reported Thursday. The nse was within iow |SK5 jo w n ^ gw »*- » 
17-point gain over the two previous sessions. eapectapOTS. 29 % io% m> 2 J w “ “ft »•— ^ 

The Dow Jones transportation average, which The Fed said M-l, representing funds readily jgJS ]§JJ fSp* 54 3j is 3*7 «ft awr w 
had soared 16J0 paints Wednesday, gave back available for spending, rose to a seasonally » ethw- no w ^ “fft 24 ?* 34 ?* 

9.71 to686.33. adjusted 5603.1 bnhon from a revised $6012 m 21 % vb-. *.pi * 2 % + 

Declines overall led advances by about 2-to- 1 ^ 0 ° the previous week. The previous week’s ah eSSo^ijb <.111 ^ <n% 415 

on the New York Stock Exchange, where the &gure originally was estimated at $601.9 bOUon. ££ Jf a 4723 s?% sw- » 

composite index lost 0.92 to 10857. M-l includes cash in drculalion, deposits in r IT — I 


183 201% 20ft 2M* + ft 
79 2ft 2ft 2ft 
2472 72ft 12 % 12ft „ 
38 17ft 17 17 — ft 

4M 20ft 19ft Mft— )% 
II 37% 33ft 33ft + ft 
222 4ft 

5 22ft 22ft 2Zft+ft 
294 Z» 24 29 +2% 

447 44ft 43% 44 — ft 


17 23 M 28% 27% 28 — ft 

.12 IJ 20 240 9ft 9 9ft + ft 

12 55 14 13% 13% 


49ft 37ft ABtnU 264 55 16 7125 46 


57% 57ft ActLpf 559piai 
37ft 18% Ahmns 1 JO JJ 
3ft 7V] AllEWl 


191 57W 541% 571% + ft 
222 3Zft 31ft 32ft + ft 
U 3% 3ft 3ft— ft 


AirPrd i jo 2 j is ™ 5 fi? “ft m — 1 % on the New York Stock 


24% 15 AlrbFrf 60 28 13 
33ft 27’A AloPpM in' 126 25 31% 31% 31% 

«!**&£ mi^bSJ tS% t?% + « 

104 94 AlaP pi 11.00 105 25ttrl05% 105% 1IB% +1% 

84 67ft AlaPpf 964 11.1 426«te 85ft 85 8p& + % 

75 57 AlaPpf BJ9 UJ 100Z71 71 7T 

I6V» Tift A logic I 154 7 A 10 19 Mft 14 14 — % 

26ft lift AlskAJr .14 6 10 I3W Bft 25ft 25ft— % 

24ft 11V, AIDrtos 58 15 19 B0 25 34% 2flh + ft 

33% 24% AlbtWS .74 25 H 597 23 2Tfl gft— ft 

31% 23% A lean 1J0 AA 28 5745 27ft V 27% + ft 

38ft 27ft Alco&ld 150 14 12 289 35ft Kft ISVj + ft 

32 AlexAlx 1XH 36 1259 2B 27% 27% + ft 

251% 30ft Aftxrfr 23 24 24% 24ft 24ft + ft 

S9’% 72% AllaCa 1541 25 14 76ft 74% 76ft + ft 

24% 24ft AlgCpof 184 105 19*261% 24% 24ft + % 

28% 20% Alaint 160 6.7 118 20ft 20ft 20ft + ft 

20% lift A loin Pi 2.19 116 17 18ft 18ft lfft + ft 

98 85 AlBl PfCllJS III 19 93% 93 +lft 

34% 26% AlloPw 170 88 9 951 31 30% »%— % 

23ft 15% AllsnG 60b 26 14 85 22ft 21% 21% — ft 


2£ft lift HUnbra 54 2.1 14 10 26ft If 38 " 36% MDU . 272 

3% Sft h!m '£e%12 ™ ^ SHJnGT 3 

Ki.ia ,>u tdSS B-hB&r 

27Vk 14% HfaF$D 6 122? 21Ml 2JJ* *■** . M Bl ML Conv O 


32 15 11 219 12ft 12% 12» 

in U I * WJ soft - (S 

U 15 712 40% 39ft 39ft — ft 
26 38 49 17 16ft 14ft 


37% 27ft Hitachi 'Me 12 

57ft 35% Holkkiv 160 26 

83% 45 HolIVS 160 16 

30ft 10ft HonwD 

27ft 14ft KmPSO 

9ft 7 HmcGpf 1.10 116 
38ft 20ft HnralM JO J 

63% 46ft Hondo 60s J 

47ft 53ft Honwall 260 XI 

34 20ft H ran Bn 1.12 17 

27ft 21 HrxSnPf 3J4O106 

Oft 3ft Horizon _ _ 


9% MOMOr M 26 38 « 17 .bjj -™ 
9ft MGMOrptM 32 J2. HSS i ? 4 


8 ft 7ft ML Conv 0 
Tfi + lift lift ML Incn 


7 57 3833 28% »ft gj*— ft l 22% 15 MBUv J» 


“ .?* & 

M 15 14% 1«— ft 


REST Mb J 9 60ft 59% 59% — % ^ [fa 3SK 55 LB .17 .419 *ft »% 3«- * 

ass? BS 3 "8 & & 1 ^ 


«6 WiHStaT g 5ft 5ft 5ft 

52% 34ft HOSpCP 60 16 12 4709 45% *4Th 45ft — % 
30ft Mft Holelln 268 86 14 in »4 » 2* + 5 


30 37% 27% 27% — ft ^ MotriCf 160 26 1 


29ft 1ft MstAst 1860C 
21ft 12ft Mcnhin 60b 22 
21ft 12ft MonhNl Ja 25 


2M *2% Jft ^2% — ft 

S'SEJ&SiS 


mSSm M3 . 4 IS « -» »ft lift Monrei xU J » 340 23» Mft CTJ- ft 

HouFOb 68 12 10 490 15ft lift 15 42% 25 ft MfrHay 330 - at 5 976 37ft 37ft 37ft 

Hmnlnf 161 56 9 407 36M 36 36 — ft £ 7 * 41 MfrHpf 5L72MI6 30 49ft l« WJ + ft 

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i§ S 2 ft ’a* 2 2 U — ft composite index lost 0.92 to 10857! 


where the 


Exmbr 164el05 


20 Ift 1 % 1 ft 
4 2ft 2ft 2ft 

2 3ft 3ft 3ft + ft 
93 47ft 41ft 41ft 

21 17 14% 17 


42* 25ft HOUtfiM .94 24 15 

19% 13ft HouFob 68 12 10 490 IS 

39ft 38% Hmnlnf 161 *6 * «? M 

81% 63ft Holnfpf 4J5 8.1 ,,1121 

29ft 19% Hculnd 164 JJ 7 1064 28 

15ft 8 HOJJOR _ ® IS 

23% 14ft HowfCP 60 12 32 4 18 


27% lift Hubbnf aa fj JJ 
13% 9% Hu«y 60 46 11 


360 *5 8 4723 51% 50ft 50% — Hi 


. 46% 32% AltdQp 160 45 8 32T0 42ft 41% 41% — % 


44 57ft AMCn pf 4.74 106 
115% 101% AldCp Pfl260 70.7 
104% 100% AhfC pt 1157*11.1 
23ft 15% AIM Pd 
40ft 45% AlldSIr 213 17 
- 12% 4% AllteCh 

. 34ft 74 AllBCpf 
29% 21ft ALLTL 164 4J 


38ft 28% ALLTpf 204 SJ 


74 ’J* "* 3 l* Volume totaled 90.60 million shares, against checking accounts and nonbank travelers * _ 

Sg,S5i 94.88 million on Wednesday. checks, L « 

sgte 85 ss% + % Prices opened with a small gain but drifted 14 % to 

19 14% 14 14 — % into n^alive tern lory at midsession, with the hard bull has to be disappointed that on only aS* 30 * 

m W* m 2 5* + % slide gaining momentum in the final hour. day three of an upward bounce, the nfarket 

S 5 »% + % The moderate gains earlier this week bad totally gave up the ship." w* 

™ »» wft + % sparked debate on Wail Street as to whether the In terms of business fundamentals, investors 15 % 

% »% Mft 24% + % upturn, which was led by the blue chips and remain frustrated that the economy has not "yet ’ 2 ft 4 % 

i 9 x 2 &ft 36% 24«i + % other market favorites, had staying power. shown signs of a substantial recovery from its 52 % §?% 

’! ®iSm + » Some observers said it appeared the so-called sluggish performance in the first half of 198S, S'* SS 
si a ? 14 Si Sn-S “secondary” stocks were joining with the large- brokers said, ’ aft mS 

bs 2 m 21 % 21 % - ft capitalization issues in moving higher, which They said there was additional concern after Sft »% 

u Sft m% 64% — % they considered a bullish sign. the Commerce Department reported that new 19 % 13 % 

as im% iMu iw% + ft But many analysts contended that the ad- factory orders for durable goods fell 18 percent tf* ££ 

41 5 Mv 56 % iS5 + ft vance was little more than a technical rebound in July, the biggest drop since March, 3s 25 % 

” son 30 % 30 ft + % from riie market’s lackluster showing earlier this In a separate report, the Labor Department 37% im 

38 27 % Sft 27 ft — % month, and that the rally would be short-lived said consumer prices in July edged up 0.2 per- 22 % iSS 

di wo. 34 % m%- ft because the broader market continued to ap- cent for the third consecutive month. 2 ™ 


22D 3J 34 172 46% 65* 46 + ft 

164 76 8 7060 25 24ft JW — % 

’IS aj a n m% io% - ft 

7 11 II 11 11 „ 

JO 17 1029 12% 12 12 —“Jo 

XM 11J 302 31% 30ft 30ft— ft 

.18 15 9 52 12ft lift !?_ + ft 


13% 9% Hu«9_ 60 46 

17% 17ft HuBhTl M 36 

24 17% HuohSP 52 T6 

34% 21* Humor* 68 2J 

31* 20ft HuntMl SO IJ 

41* 24ft HuTTEF 60 2J 


L44 9J 7 1966 28 »ft % 

np|I« 8 10 9* SB 

MI 32 32 6 18' 17* 17*— ft 

Sun 21 25% 25ft 25ft 
60 46 11 SI 10% 10 10 

68 34 1350 13ft 13ft 13ft + % 

£ 1A 12 M 23% 22% 22% — % 

M 2J 14 2844 31ft TO* TOk-lft m 
50 IJ 17 34 29% ‘30* 28*— ft Tn0 

M 2J 10 9440 34% »% 3g4 +lft ^ 


ITU vIMmrtpl 


sm MAPCO 160 2J 
3 Mumfx 

ft Mamie 


23ft MarMM 161 56 
18 Marlons 58 5 


Marlons 58 6 
MarkC 52 35 
Markpf 150 74 
Martlet 54 4 


14 17% 17ft- 17% + % 
J 9 42 35* 34ft 34ft— % 

-.a ■*»•;.* ir * 

16 7 597 . 31ft 31% 31% — U 
6 34 484 34* 33% 34 — % 

15 ' 22 10% 10ft 10ft— % 

'4 1 15% 15% 15% 

4 17 374 97% . 94% 97% -f U 


31% 18ft Hvorni Z00 46 10 103 29ft 29ft 29ft— % I 


44ft MnhM V60 36 18 ^4 71 TO* 70ft— ft 

44ft 23ft Mcn-tM* 160 25 " jm 39ft 39% »%— ft 

0* MorvK 641 21 7344 -13ft 12% 12* + Ml 

_ 24 MUM 54 14 17. 444 34U33%34%4-% 

Wft 10ft MamMr ; 50 16 19 ^ 14 - . Uft Wfc— W 

3ft 1* MasvF 2241 2% 5ft 2% + ft 

3OT* 2Z MUCP 258 185 59 29* 28* 26*—* 

TZft w Maine 153 ms- *1 im 12 % 12 % + ft 

32 nnSI Sr 4 w m S*k 5* 54ft— ft 

17ft 9* Moftsf 17 2S? ■ K* J? ^ 

13ft £ftMaftmrt - - ■ 35 XSh. U U “S 

15* 10* Mown — 4 413 13% U 13 — * 

58* 36% MarDs 168 17 10 .448 51 50ft JM 

58% 42ft MavfB 200 40 12 IM 59ft JB 38% + ft 

31* im iSSSfpl 250 E9 IWJft 24* — ft 
24ft 20* McDTPf 260 185 1 24* 24ft- 24* 

31 21ft McDorl 160 U IMS 22ft 21ft 21*— ft 

lift 4ft McDrl wt 280 4ft 4% *4%— ft 

10ft 4* McOM 50 25 14 0 Oft 9ft Vft + ft 

70 48ft McDnl 3 .90 16 14 1008 45 44 64% — % 

87 63% McDnD 164 20 9 814 81ft 01ft 81ft— ft 

52 37ft McGrH 760 XT 15 587 - 44 45ft 45ft— * 

50 35* MCKC33 240 50 13 235 48 47ft 47ft — % 

15ft 9ft McLean 17 50 lift lift lift— % 

6ft B* McLsawt' .S 3ft 3ft 3ft- * 

29ft 22* McfWI 160 30 8 3 25* 25* 25*—% 

44% 32ft Mood 1JC Xfl 9 Ml 40 - 39ft 39ft— ft 

24* -15ft M4STUX 54 1.1 li 440 22ft 71ft 52ft * ft 

38 24ft Aftdtm 60 22 14 266 34ft 35ft 35*— ft 

56ft 37ft MM km 268 5.1 8 110 52ft 52* 52ft— ft 

30V. 34 MsUonpf20O 9.9 6 28U 28V* 28V.— ft 

48ft 05% MoMIl 164- 30 13 898 44* 44% 44ft— ft 

70 50ft McrcSt UO 21 10 118 42ft Mft 40ft— 1% 

17ft 79% More* 3L2D 27 17 1284 117% 115*117%— 14 

80 - 47% Merdlh 160 16 14 148 43 42% 43 

34* 25ft MBrt-yn 00 U 13 2951 32ft 31* 31ft—* 

3ft 1* MosaOf 497 2ft 2% 2* 


JO 16 22 340 21ft 20% 20»— ft 


85 22* 21% 21% — * 


28% 15* 
13 9 

6ft 4% 
41% 29* 
92% 31% 
48ft 31* 
39 30% 

22ft 12ft 
27 14* 

30ft 25% 


114 64* 64% 44% — 1* 
12 112 112 112 
2S5 104* 104% 104% + ft 
4 IB* 18* 18* 4- % 
141 54* 54% 56* + ft 
in 5 4% 4* 

7 30ft 30% 30ft + % 
38 27% 27ft 27ft— ft 


23 17* 

19* 13* 


45* 48ft 
32 23% 

35 25% 

11% 4% 

37* 18ft 


39 * 29 % Alcoa ijo xj 31 2501 34* 34 * 34*— ft Decause me Dreader market continued to ap- 

22% 13* Amos .101 565 15* 14* 14*—* near wi»ilr 

40 32ft Aliuw pf XC0 96 2 33% 32ft 3314 — * . , 

34 22 % Am his i.io 4.0 22 2i5z 27 % 27 * 27 % + * “What we had over the nnor two davs was 

140ft 98% AJfespf 360 2.9 21 119*118% 119ft— ft ... ~r “ Vj , ■ ,r „ 

2 % i* AmAsr 145 1 % i* 1 % nothing more than an oversold, knee-jerk rally. 


. 2% 1* AmAsr 

21ft 16 A Baler 8 

70 50* ABrond 370 65 f 

30ft 2SV. ABrupf 2JS 90 

115* 54ft ABdest 160 16 17 

30% 19ft ABUM 64 11 15 

28ft 20ft ABusPr 64 26 14 


JackEckerd jumped 414 to 3014 and topped “ 

« a ,Sft 1 * “What we had over the prior two days was the NYSE's active list. » mS 

145 7% ?% i%_ _ nothing more than an oversold, knee-jerk rally” SCM rosel% to 64^6 in heavy trading one day to 1 * 

si S Bo “% “ft ft asserted Alfred E Goldman, vice president of after receiving a 560-a-share takeover bid from 
i 6 it im nT* 11 S iw*“ w Edwards & Sons in St. Louis. fc Even a die- the British company Hanson Trust PLC. 


77 28 27% 27*+ ft 
17 24% 24 24 — * 


40ft 45ft AmCan 2J0 5.1 11 1482 58% 54* 54*— 1* 


25% 22 ACanpf 260 110 
52* 40% ACoipf 360 56 
23H5. 17ft A Capas 2J0 10 J 
25 ft ACooCv 151a 90 
11 6ft ACentC 172 


8 25% 25 25 — ft 12Montti 

19 51 50ft 50ft— 1% HMi Low Slack 

149 20ft 20% Mft ■*,*"*; 

8 27* 27 27%+% “ 

34 7 4* 6* ”22 


57* 44ft ACron 1.90 15 14 1977 54% 54% 55 —1 


27% 18% ADT 62 38 23 413 24* 23* 24 — ft 

24* 17* AElPw 2040106 8 3359 22 21ft 21*— % 

49* 31ft AmEx* 1J8 36 15 7848 43* 41* 42 — % 

25* 12ft A Faml a 68 Z1 14 310 23ft 22% 23 + % 

34% 22 AGnCp 160 30 9 2205 31* 31ft 31*— ft 

14 6* AGnI art 181 lift 13ft U%— % 

Mft 51* AGrri pfAS87al06 23 54* 54% 54%—% 

Mft 42* AGnI pfB 56Da 45 12 85% 85 05 -1% 

71* 43 AGnpfD 264 40 182 44 43ft 43ft— 1 

34* 25% AHertl 100 17 10 3 32ft 32ft 32ft 

13* 7ft AHohrt 27 12% 12* 12*— ft 

44* 48% A Horne 260 SO 12 3394 59* Mft 58ft — * . 

Mft 26% A Hasp 1.12 26 15 3757 44* — ‘ ‘ 

77ft 70* Amrtch 460 70 9 849 90* 


90% 42 AlnGro 64 J 
150 112ft AIGppf 565 4.1 

28* 18ft AMI J2 30 
. 5 2* AmMot 

29 Mft APresds JSI 10 
13* 5 ASLFlo 
VVft 12% A8LF1 pf 2.19 156 
14 lift A Ship 00 46 


90* 90*- ft 


64 J 22 340 84% 84ft 84ft— % 
>65 41 2 141 141 141 + ft 

J2 30 11 1338 24* 23* 24 — ft 

712 3ft 3 3 — ft 

JSI 10 5 205 19* 19* 19*- % 

10 1337 6ft 6 0 — ft 

L19 156 84 14 13* 14 

00 46 9 30 12* 12% 12%— ft 


35* 26% Am5M 160 56 10 747 29* 29ft 29%— ft 

67ft 35% Am Star 64 1.1 1 1 242 59* 59 59 — % 

78 44ft AStr pf A 408 60 25 49% 49 49% 

57ft 51 AStrpfB 6;XI 120 3 55% 55% 55% 

24* 17% AT&T 100 56 1612548 22 21% 31*- % 


31ft 26 
44ft 43* 
4* 3* 

30* 21* 
27* 22 
5ft 1* 
28 14% 

41 29ft 
25ft 19ft 
37% 30 
24% 13 
31* 23* 
56 32% 

40% 28% 
40* 29 
19ft 15ft 
20 IS* 
71ft 14% 
30% 24 
48ft 43% 
7* 4* 
23% 19 
52 Mft 
18% 11 
Mft 50ft 
30* 14 
4* 1* 
14% 3* 


Div. YHLPE M0g HMi Low SSSoite 

160 56 12 136 28* 3* 28* + ft 

108 30 16 1911 59ft 58* 58*— ft 

15 1 4* 4* 4* + ft 

1000 5.9 I 141 3S«) 3MS 3S% + ft 
01C 22 15 27% 27% 27% + ft 

258 7ft 2 2ft + ft 
102 5.1 22 29 24 25%34 +% 

3.12 70 8 32 39% 39ft 39ft— % 

267 90 1 25ft 25ft 25ft 

3.95 116 4 34* 34* 34* + ft 

JB 3 8 4 22% 22 22ft— ft 

104 46 20 ISM 31% 31 31 

10B 11 17 244 51* 50* 51 — % 

100 20 8 470 36% 35* 35*—* 


12 Manta 
Hbft Low Stock 


5ft. _ Ckae 
HBa HW» Low Quof-OToe 


62 10 15 128 32* 32% 32ft— % 


3D 46 9 818 18 18 — ft 

2.16 116 50 18* 18* 18* 

II 14 16% Mft Mft + ft 

164 59 101 28 27% 27% — * 

IJ 21 I 947 43ft SfMij sm—m 
65 7.9 2 7 7 7 + ft 

2.12 9.1 II 23ft 23% 23% — ft 

5J3«106 1533 50* 58ft 50* + ft 

64 3.9 18 227 11* 11% 11%— % 

260 A) 12 2417 44* 63* 64 — * 

62 11105 53 17% 14* 16*—* 

25 2 2 2 — ft 

1051 8 4 3* 3*— ft 


41* 32% AT0.T pf 364 90 
42 33% AT&T pf 3J4 96 


27% 16% AVYotrs 100 39 
13% 10 AWo Spf 105 100 
28ft 17% Am Holt 260 136 
72ft 59* ATrPr 564 80 
18 4ft ATrSc 
40% 26ft Anwnm 160 40 
90 24ft AmeaC 00 j 
39ft 22ft Ametofc 00 34 
28* 18ft Am toe 
16 6ft Amtasc 


164 90 1439 38% 39 + % 

174 96 337 39* 39* 39* + ft 

00 39 8 42 25% 25% 25* + % 

05 100 IBBz 12ft 12 12ft + * 

160 136 7 407 18ft 17* 17* + ft 

16480 3 49% 49 49+* 

31 14 13* 13% 

60 40 8 10 38 37% 38 +% 

00 36 13 279 23% 5* 23% — % 

5 2^“*“* + * 


31% 21* CBI in 1600 66 
125 48* CBS 300 2J 

8ft 4% CCX 
12 8ft CCX pf 10S 11.9 


1600 66 705 21% 20ft 21ft—* 

300 2J 19 4042X1 lift 110% 110*— % 
■ 35 5% 5 5ft— ft 

105 11.9 52Hz 10ft 10ft 10ft— % 


60* 34ft CIGNA 260 48 35 832 55 


32% 24% CIG pt 2J5 8.9 
Oft 49* CIGPI 4.10 80 
7* 2% CLC 
59ft 25% CNA Ffl 
lift 9% CNAI 1J4 110 
30% 16ft CNW 


50% Amoco 3J0b 5.1 8 1512 65* 65% 65% - * 


46% 35% CPC Int 200 5.1 II B37 43% 43 


7B 30% 30* 38% — ft 
283 51ft 50 50 —1 

260 2ft 2% 2*— % 
20 55% 55% 55%—* 
28 lift 11 11 

87 21ft 21ft 21ft— * 


38ft 28* AMP J2 20 23 

23* lift AmpCO 00 25 16 

23* 12* Am ran a 12 

36 21ft AmSth 160 40 9 

45% 30 Amstatf 160 36 16 
4% 1* Anacmp 

24ft 16% Anton 19 

27* 19% Anchor 168 19 

46% 29ft An Clay 102 30 30 

12ft 9ft AndrGr Jft IJ 14 


J2 20 23 ®J9 33 32ft 32*— % 

JO 20 14 134 12* 12 12 — * 

12 18 22 22 22 
60 40 9 309 33 32% 32*— % 

60 36 M 93 44% 44 44 

404 3ft 3 3ft + ft 
19 5BS 22 21% 21* + * 

68 19 319 25ft 24* 24*- * 

02 30 30 34 41* 40ft 41ft +1 

Jit IJ 14 41 12 11* 11*— ft 


27% 17 Anaallc 69 26 14 117 24 25ft 25%—* 

34* 21ft Animus a 00 25 12 3411 33ft 31* 32ft— 1% 

71% 48% Antleupf 300 14 1142 49% 46* 44*— 2* 

19% 13ft Anlxtr JB IJ 18 819 14* 14% 14%— ft 

14% 9 Anthem jm j 21 103 14% 14* 14* 


15% 10* Antony Mb 29 
13 9* Apocha JB 2J 

2 ft APChPwt 
19* 15ft ApchP wtXlO nj 
47 53 ApPwpt 760 116 

34* 28* ApPwpf LIB 121 
31ft 24% ApPwpf 100 125 


29 9 2 15 15 15 

27 10 120 10* 10^ 10^— % 

10 294 18% 18* 18% 

16 TffijOz 64% 64% 44% — ft 

11 35 32* 32 32 +% 

L5 _ 130* 30* 30* + * 


24 14* CP NM IJ U 1 49 22* 22* 22*— % 

27* 19ft CRIIMI 207e 9.9 83 21 20% 21 + % 

a* 21* CSX 1.16 44 9 3294 26* 26% 24*— * 

40% 28% CTS 100 10 » 34 33ft 33ft— * 

12ft 7*C3lnc 444 199 8* 8* 8* 

33% 24* Cabot .92 17 9 1018 26ft 25ft 25ft— 1* 

14* 8* Caosor 17 120C 15* 15% IS* 

25* lift Cal Fed 68 23 5 1954 21% 20% 21ft—* 

54% 35% CalFdof 4J5 90 21 51 50 51 

20ft 13ft CaUhn 05b T0 213 M 19ft 19* + ft 

15* 12 Qrnirnl .12 0128 58 15ft 15 

24 15% CRLkB 60 781 25ft 24 

6* 3 CmpR a -16t 118 3% 3 

l«ft 8% CpR pf p 258 3 11% 11 

40% 30ft Cams*.# 12 304 37% 37 

15* 11* CdPaci 68 537 13ft 13 

a% 16* CnnPE o JSJ 69 19 18 

22V4 150% CapCHs 00 30 448 213 211 

27* 17 CapHd* JJ 35 9 2254 22% 21 

Mft 10 Carina p 68 7 10* 10 

40% 29% Carlisle 108 05 9 259 21ft 30 

26* 18 COTDFt 60 17 11 27 23% 23 


58 15ft 15% 15*— ft 

781 25ft WW 24% — * 

118 3% 3% 3% 

3 11% 11% 11% + ft 

304 37% 37* 37ft— ft 

537 13ft 13 13ft— % 

60 19 18% 18%— ft 

448213 211 711%— ft 
854 22% 21* 22 — ft 
7 10* 10% 10% — ft 
2 SJ 21ft 30% 31ft + % 
27 23% 23ft 23ft — % 


39V> 22ft ApIDta T.76I 70 27 273 23* 23 23ft— * 

15ft 8 ApoINVa 64 32 14* M 14 — ft 

24% 16% ArcfiDn ,14b .7 12 1493 21% 21 21ft— ft 

XE 158 ”•* *1 30ft 3®ft + * 

24% 14 ArfcBlt -*! IJ 9 54 23% 23 23 

M fc 'VEStl '»***'% 


30* 21* CarPw 260 90 7 2403 27ft 26* 27 


* % ArlnRt 

15ft lift Armada 
12% 6% Armco 
22% 15ft Armcpf Z10 100 
24ft 14* ArmsRb 68 3J 


54 23% 23 23 

IBM 1ȣ l.ft l^h-H 

4 12ft 12ft 12* 

656 10* left 10% — % 
7 21 21 21 

95 15% 15 15ft 


M 21% 20* 21ft — * 


39% 26% ArmWIn 100 00 9 1246 34ft 33% 33% — % 


34ft 19* AroCp 1J0 40 7 10 28i 

24* 12* ArowE JO 10 17 11 14 

30% 16 Artro J2 0158 19 27 

27 15 Arvlns M 36 9 121 23 

gft 36 Arvtnpf 200 16 1 55 

27% 17* Asanco 7B» 22 

37 23* AtfilOII 160 4,9 262 32 

44% 32* A4ilO pf X96 90 1 47 

69ft 49 AsdDG 200 40 10 1129 64 

34% 24* AsDG wl 2 32 

HO* 79 AsdDpf 4J5 47 241 101' 

24% 18* Atokam 160 01 II 13 19: 

29% 21% AtCvEl 208 90 9 70 27' 

64% 42 AFIRIdl 400 fij J2W W 
101 32ft AtIRCPf 3JS 17 39101101 

153 100* AlIRcpf 200 20 5 142: 

18* 10ft AttasCp 220 131 


31% 18% AUBOt 60 10 25 
54% 34* AutaOt 68 16 21 
5 4% Avalon n 9 

31% 17ft AVEMC 60 20 15 

39* 28% Avery 60 10 13 

20 m Avtalln |j 

39* 27 Avnet 00 10 is 

25% 17* Avon 200 90 11 

28* Mft Avdln 1 ) 


1 J0 40 7 10 28* 28 28%— * 

JO 10 17 11 14 13% 13% 

J2 0158 19 27 26* 26* + ft 

00 36 9 121 23* 23% 23% 

200 36 1 55ft M* 55* — ft 

TOT 22ft 22 22ft + ft 
160 *9 262 32% 32 32* + ft 

3-96 90 1 42ft 42ft «2ft 

200 40 10 1129 64 62% 62* — 1 

2 32 32 32 — ft 

4J5 47 241 101ft 101* 101* — * 

160 8.1 II 13 19% 19ft 19% 

L-jjj 90 9 70 27% 24* 27ft + ft 

400 67 «M 59% 59* 59*— * 
ITS 17 39102101 100* 100* -ft 

200 20 5 142*142*142* + * 

220 13ft 12% 12% — % 
60 10 25 171 24% 24ft 24ft 

48 U 11 138 SO* SQ 50— % 

„ . 9 27 5 4% 4* 

6020 15 4038*30 30% + % 

60 10 13 780 33ft 32ft 32*- ft 

_ 13 487 23% 19ft 23 +3* 

JO 10 10 357 33 32* 32*— * 

200 90 11 514 22 21% 21% — U 

18 54 21% 20% 21* + * 


2S* 20ft Carp pt 267 106 14 25ft 25ft 25* — % 

48 35* CorTec 110 56 14 130 39 38ft 38*— ft 

lift 7 Carrol 07 10 10 48 7% 7ft 7ft 

24% 17% OarPIrs 60 20 9 M 21% 20* 21ft—* 

31 21* CarlHw 1J2 46 m 183 28% 28 28 

«* 22 CartWl 02 10 12 224 36 33* 35% +1* 

18* 18 COKNG 100 80 7 32 15* 15 15 — % 

16* 9ft CastICk SHI 11* 11* 11*— ft 

29 15% CstICpf 108k 52 24 25* 25ft + ft 

15 12 CstIC Pf MM 248 Mft 14 14 

40 28* CatrpT 00 16 736 34% 36ft Mft — * 

27% 19* Cmco J6 30 11 4425*25*25* + % 


24* 18* 
26* 21* 
76* 9 
65% 48* 
3D* 19% 
3m 22% 
35% 23% 
35% 25 
lift 12* 
46% lift 
39% 24ft 
20 14% 

31 21ft 
15ft 12* 
38 26* 

55 39 

36 23 

47* 35 
8* 4ft 
31 17% 

33* 19 
54* 31% 

56 32ft 

56 32% 

31ft 15* 
25% 13% 
28* 14% 
31* 

14% 
M% 
14% 
9ft 
B* 
IS 
V* 

45 

19* 

21 

26% 

1 

27% 

31 
14U 
15 
9% 
19% 
17ft 

30% 
Mft 

32 
23 
17ft 
49ft 
18* 
40% 
Z7* 
43% 
22 % 
17 
58% 

B* 
30% 
33* 


TJ0 30 Tl 576 

JS 1JJ 21 714 

60 2J 8 22 

12 2305 
1157 

07 20 14 337 
160 9.1 10 6 

260 89 9 18 

60 30 6 70 

260 40 8 1325 



500 IIL5 4 

1.10 30 12 497 
202 56 9 384 


AM 140 148z 

400 127 200z 

765 14.1 3 m 

7J2 146 S5fe 

7 J6 140 400Z 

460 14J 30 

360 140 38 

3J8 14.1 8 

768 14.1 BSOz 

4^3 14J 33 

398 149 17 

X8S 140 2 

200 140 21 

203 146 12 

402 T4J 10 

263 146 9 

260 80 19 571 

16 63 

25E 
424 
8 30 11% 

100 70 8 736 23% 

.72 11 4434 23ft 

1.10 IT 13 79 35* 

30 1% 

102 4.1 16 1139 37* 

290 70 361 39* 

60 20 7 157 16 



60 10 10 373 22ft 
021 8 9* 

148 I2J 3 20ft 

04 36 16 236 24* 
06 46 11 56 17ft 

108 20 18 1100 46% 

100 20 77 em 

04 j 21 42 75 

160b 40 11 121 37% 

23 1110 48% 
118 110 6 18* 
263a 50 1959 52* 

100 SJ 12 35 22ft 

14 39 67* 

100 26 18 Z74 38* 
463 9J 29 47% 
00 27 16 7 29ft 

22 1634 17* 
120 36 4 119 64* 
T.IOQ1O0 7 10ft 

IJO 12 17 5 37* 

1.10 15 8 156 44% 


34% 

25% — % 
72% +1% 
62ft +1* 
27* 

34* + ft 
29ft— % 
26% — U 
23* + % 
Mft 
37ft— 1 
17ft 

29% — ft 
13*— % 
35 + % 

47ft + * 
34ft— ft 
41 %— ft 
7ft 

» ”1 
32% + 16 
53 + * 

sm— % 
54% — ft 
29* — % 
24% + ft 
26% +1ft 
54ft- ft 
27% + ft 
26*— % 
26ft 

17ft + K 
15% + ft 
27% 

14* + % 
41%— fa 
7ft 
1ft 
* 

II —ft 
23 — % 
23* + ft 
am 
1 % 

37ft— ft 
39% 

15% — % 
22* + % 


TBft 11 

53 35 

20% 8 
24% 10* 
40 W 
55* 36 
34% 23ft 
11* 7ft 
30 16 

7* 5ft 
30% 23% 
31* 25* 
28ft 17ft 
33* 19ft 
85 29 

lift Bft 

43 23 

50* 42ft 
28% 18* 
39% 24% 
13* 11% 
19% 18ft 
34* 14% 
45ft 31 
29 Ml 20ft 
18* 11% 
6 * 3 % 

21 13% 

20* Mft 
59 47% 

51* 40ft 
13% 10ft 
79* 56ft 
15ft 10% 
lift 7W 
33ft 24* 
27 22 

22* 18* 
13ft Oft 
10% 7* 
22ft 14ft 
34% 23% 
38% 71% 
32ft 25% 
36* 26% 


60 40 12 33 14% 14% 14%- % 

7 2 37% 37% 37% + % 

08 50 7 252 17* 16% 16*— ft 

00 20 16 195 9% 9 * — * 

4Me 0 8 43 4% 4% 4V 

104 46 9 4840 39* 39* 

30 1181 49 47% 47% — ft 

f 1640 O 19 33* 33% 33* 

IJJ 40 II 349 36* 35* 36 — ft 

.16 0 1470 20% 20ft 20* + * 

JD 10 10 7320*20 20 — % 

201 70 3 29% 29ft 2 9ft— % 

164 46 14 29 22ft 22 22ft + * 

00 40 M 70 18* 18% 18* 

204 40 8 537 58% 56* 56W— 1% 
100 40 15 76 24% 26* 26% + % 

100 36 M 17 29% 29ft 29ft 

J3S1 925 6* 6* 6*— ft 

I 441O20J 51 33 32% 32% 

22 6% 6ft 6% 

00 40 9 1193 19ft 18* 18*— * 
_6fl 2.7 9 29? 24% Mft 24% + ft 

160 4J 8 131 38* 37* 38% 

100 30 13 10 30% 30% 30% 

13 758 42% 41% 42ft + * 

1 02 56 1381 24% 23ft 23ft- * 

r 5040116 10 47 47 47 — I 

: 76OS1O0 2 73ft 73ft 73ft—* 


35% 23ft 1C ind 164 40 
17% 15% ICMn -SSe 05 
11* 7ft I CM 
30 22ft ICNpf 2J0 100 
18% 14* INAln 1-92 10.9 
27% 23 IPTtain J7o 30 
22 17ft 1RTPT 107 90 


164 40 12 2088 32* 32 32ft—* 

054 30 ' 45 15* 15* 15h— ft 

65 1Z70 10 9* 9% + % 

270 100 23 27 26% 27 + ft 

1 J2 10.9 4x 17* 17* 17* + ft 

J7a 30 39 24* 24% 24% — ft 

107 90 7 16 28% 30* ®* — ft 


36% 25% ITT Cp 1.80 XI 9 5304 32% 32* 32ft 


n —ft 

13 — * 


63 49 ITTpfJ 400 60 

65% 47ft ITTpfK 4 jB 3 46 
61ft 47% ITT pfO 500 8J 
65 49ft ITT pfl «J5S 70 
19* II* JU Inf 60 40 
24ft 16ft IdaboP s 172 80 
19ft 10% IdaolB 
27ft 19ft IIIPoW 264 100 
20 14% llPowpf 204 10J 

30% 15 llPowpf 2.13 116 
21% 17ft llPowpf 205 UU 
3Sft 27 llPowpf 378 110 
43 37 llPowpf 4.14 b *6 

37% 20ft llPowpf 400 110 


4 61ft 61ft 61ft +lft 
7 62ft 62* 62* + K 

5 40* 40* 4®Sfc 

3 62ft 62 42 

1305 12ft 12% 1Z%— ft 
296 20% 28ft 20*— ft 
92 11 10* 10*— ft 

575 25ft 24ft Mft— ft 
200x 19 19 19 + ft 

lOOr 18% 18% 11% — % 
211308 21* 20% 21* +1H 
300z 33% 33 33 —1ft 

J 64 44 44 +% 

16 35% 34 34 -2 


36% 26 ITW 72 20 12 119 31ft 31* 31*— ft 
40% 31ft ImiChm 201a 6.1 7 1837 36* 36ft. Mft— ft 


60 50 II 806 12ft 11* 12 + % 


504*1X3 6 41% 41% 41% + * 

9 83 9% 9ft 9ft 

68b 20 8 2019 24* 23% 23* 

X12 50' 8 62 57% 56ft 57 + ft 

250 5.1 8 405 50 48% 49% — % 

237 7 S 62 30ft 30 30— * 

04 20 9 331 8% B* B%— ft 

19. 176 29% 29* 29* 

283 6* 6ft 6ft— ft 

262 90 33 2Bft 28 20ft + % 

1.96 7.0 15 90 38% 27* 28 + ft 

08 36 10 149 25 24* 24% — ft 

100 40 4 135 32% 32ft 32ft + ft 

IM 23 64 34% 34 34% — Vi 

050 0 19 11% 11 11 

102 30 9 142 38% 37* 38% + * 

401a 85 271 3®ft 50ft 50ft 

64 20 9 707 19* 19ft 19ft— ft 

100 26 U 76 37% 37* 17% + * 

161 120 25 12* 12ft 12ft 

.16 6 19 90 26 25% 25*— ft 

18 127 32* 32 32 — % 

.16a 0 13 10 41* 41* 41ft + * 

2.16 70 9 3379 27* 27* 27* 

60 20 15 35 17% 17ft 17ft + ft 

179 5* 5% 5% — % 

64 26 17 314 18ft 18 11% + ft 

M IS 389 16% 16 16 — * 

2J0 4.1 11 M 54% 54 54 — ft 


12 6 ImpfCp II 574 9* 

15* 9* IK CO 00 10 2077 14% 

62M 45ft IlXflMpf 70S 11-9 200Z 59ft 

68 49% IndlMpf 7J6 11 J 50302 67* 

19* 14ft IndlMpf 2.15 II J 22 18* 

20* 15% IndlMpf 2J5 110 26 19* 

25* 20ft IndlMpf 275 11.1 10 34* 

28* 19* IndlGs* IM IS 7 28 23% 

10ft 4% Inoxoo 071 56 5% 

53ft 39 IfWR 260 50 17 383 51ft 

37ft 28 liTORpf 205 66 2 36 

15ft 11 InarTec 04 46 24 13 12* 

26 19* InhfStl 00 20 219 M* 

48% 38* InidStpf 4J5 100 33 47ft 


II 574 F* 0* 8*— * 

2077 14* 14ft 14%— ft 
200Z 59ft 59ft 59ft — 1 
50302 67* 66ft 66ft— 1 
22 18ft 18* 18* 


26 19% 19ft 19ft— % ] i£ft 79% Merck 
10 24* 24ft 24%— % 

28 23% 22% 27%— ft 36* 2S? MerLy 
56 5% 5* J*— ft » ,1* 

383 51ft 50% 50% — 1% 32 ISA Me»P 

2 36 35% 35% — % 7% 5ft Mnob 

13 12ft 12* 12*—* 4* 2ft MuteV 

219 24* 24* 24ft— ft 5L S'* JSIf 3 

33 47ft 47ft 47ft + * gft 49. WEpf 


160 XT 15 587 46 45ft 45ft— * 

240 50 13 235 48 47* 47*—% 

17 50 11* lift lift— * 

f . .5 3* 3* 3*— ft 

100 30 8 3 25ft 25ft 25ft— % 

IJO Xfl 9 mm 39* 39*— * 
04 1.1 u 440 22ft 21% 22ft .+ ft 

-flO 23 14 366 34* 35* 35ft— ft 

268 5.1 I 110 52* 52* 52ft— ft 

200 9.9 6 2SU 28* 28%— ft 


71% 16* inaiku 100b 56 10 163 18ft 18* 18* + Mil 


Um 23 
05a 0 
102 30 9 
401a 85 
64 20 9 
100 26 13 
161 120 
.16 6 19 


7% 3* InspRs 84 SU 5 5 — ft 

26* lift lntuRac -9 61 20 19* 19% 

28 19 InfoRpf X03 120 125 24% 24* 24*— * 

35ft 25% IntflRpf 4J5 1X2 5 37ft 32% 32%— ft 

9* 7* Inf toon IBS? 9* 9 9* + % 

14% 8 IntRFn 7 S3 17 11* 11*— * 

19* 16* IfcpSa 2.100109 42 19* 19% 19% — ft 

72% 55% Interco X0B 40 1410261 71* *» 71% +1* 

154 121ft Inter pf 70S 00 7 153ft 150 153ft -Mft 

13* 9% Intrfst 60 50 6 1651 11* 11* 11*— ft 

51* 41 Intrik 260 50 8 14 49 48% 48% 

13ft B* I (Timed 76 10% 10ft 10%— ft 

24ft 15* IMAki 02 30 9 17 19 10% 18*— * 

138% I Id IBM 460 30 13 7B57 12BH 126* 126% — 1* 

29% Mft IntCtrl 60 16 10 92 25% 25ft 25% 


3* 1* MosaOf ... 

22 12% MeaaPt 6 3650 16 15ft 15*— ft 

7* JftMfH»S»- JSbIIJ 8 32 6* 6* 6*— ft 

4* 2ft Mustek 2 3* 3* 3* 

33 23» MtF pfC 190 1X2 100z 29ft 29ft 29ft— 1 

67ft 4? TIME pfj 802 120 ’ 230z 66ft 45 65 — ft 

66 69* MtEpfH 837 12.9 ‘ BOB 64ft Mft Mft— 1 

3* 3 MexFd 02eMJ 39 2* 2% 2% 

18ft 13* MchER 160 80 11 20 17% 16* 17ft + ft 

7* 4* MkJtlby 06 LI 38 5 5% 5ft 5% 

55ft 37 Mktcon 206 SJ 8 B66 45ft 44ft 45ft + ft 

15% 0* MldSUt 1-73 170 4 W7! 10 10 — * 

20% 15% MldRos TJ» 50 83 17* T7 17 — % 

32% 23ft MWE 276 90 11 99 29* 29ft 29* + * 

15% 10% Ml I In R 64 40 15 11 11 11 11 — % ^ 

88 73* MMM 300 46 13 1615 77 76* 76*— * 

39% 26 MfclPL 274 7J 8 79 35* 35ft 35* + % 

Mft _■ 5% Mtoaln# a W 6ft «ft— ft 

8 - -4% MJM 167 7* 7% 7% 


13* 9* Intrfst 
51* 41 Intrik 
13* Bft mimed 
24ft 15* InfAtu 
138% 116 IBM 
29% Mft IntCtrl 


M 20 
2J0 41 11 


11% 6* IntHqrv 

7ft 3 * Irrthtrwt 
60 28* kifHpfC 

42 23 IntHpfA 

34% 19 IntH PfD 


IrtfFIov LT2 30 17 1241 30* 29* 29% — *1 


1679 9 Bft 8* 

129 5ft 5*i' 5*— ft 
16 52* 52ft 52% + % 
2 35% 35 -.31. 

74 28 27% 27% 


32%' 23ft MWE 2J6 90 
15% 10% Mil In R 64 40 
88 73* MMM 30D 46 

39% 26 MfclPL 276 7J 
Mft 5* Mtoaln# 

< - -4ft MtoU 
34* 25* Mobil 200 70 
2* ft vIMoblH 
9 5* MudCpf 

33* 17ft Meftaec 68 10 
15 1% MofikDt 

53ft 28ft MonCa 1051 


200 70 9 3321 29ft 29ft 29% — ft 

2* ftWMObfH 5 * * *— ft 

9 5* ModCpt 11 68 7 6ft 6ft 

33* 17ft Maltose 68 10 II 1512 27 24% 

15 1% MofikDt 193 2 1% 2 + ft 

53ft 28ft MonCo 1051 10 34 48% 48* 4B%— ft 

19* 14* Monrdi 00 5.1 24 12 15% 15% 15% 

55* 40* MDftaon 200 40 12 1814 52% 51ft 51%— % 

29* 16* MonPw 200 60 12 610 29* 29* 29% — % 

19* 15* MonSt 100a 96 53 18% IB* 18% + % 

10% 7U MONY 08 90 10 84 9* 9* 9% 


260 50 3 3400 44% 43* 43% — ft 


106 MLB 29 12* 12* 12* + ' 
104 23 17 302 79* 78% 79ft +1 


44 34 lMMin 260 62 10 346 42 41 % 41ft / im l»k MMW 100a 90 S2 M IM 1B% + % 

35 23% Inf Mutt 1J6 50 tl 168 33 32* 33ft—* -£• g*?NY _ ^ 90 10 84 m 9ft 9% 

57% 47ft InfPopr 260 50 56 909 49 48* 45ft— 1 «ft SgSI?.* .'S H H + 


5ft* *— ft 
68 7 6ft 6ft 

>12 27 26% 26% 

n 2 1 % 2 + Vll 

34 48% 48* 48% — ft 

12 15% 15% 15% 


64 34 13 191 13ft 13* 13*— % 

68 63 11 29 lift 11% n%— * 

104 40 76 104 26 25% 25ft— * 

16 408 24% 24ft 24ft 


17* 9% Int Rea 
54* 35ft IMNritl 240 6.1 
M0 90 InfNf pfHO0O 100 


100 90 InfNf pfH 000 109 IM 96* 96ft 96ft + ft 
43% 30* InhftGp 100 27 M 292 41* 40% 40%—* 


43 12* 11* U 
846 41 40ft 40% — % 
IM 96* 96ft 96ft + ft 


28 20 . MoOrM 104 40 M 41 25 24* 34*—* 

71 : 24* M M pf 250 80 63 30 29ft 30 +* 

54% 33% Morgns 2J0 40 7 2450 49% 48* 48ft— * 


84 19% 19% 19*— % 
535 13 12 12% — ft 
757 9* 9* 9* + % 


40 11 14 350 19ft 19* 19% 


19% 12 IntBakr 12 

22% 16 InWPw 100 90 9 

22 17* inPwpf 220 1BJ 

13ft ]«* InfSecn 12 


60 2J21 181 26% 26% 26% + ft 

JD J 6 4Z7 24% »* 24%—* 


427 24* 34* 24% — * 
61 28ft 28* 28% 

99 30ft 30* 30*—* 


B % 15* lowaEI 100 96 10 
24ft lowlIG 274 80 7 


37* 26ft lawaR# 308 9J 
40 29* Ipaieo - 304 80 

13% 9% ipooCp 04 20 13 
40* 26* IrvBnk 106 £.1 7 


12 68 19 10% 19 +* 

9 136 20* 20 20 

7001 21% 21% 21* 

12 166 12 11% IT* +.ft 

10 04 20 19* mb 

7 48 39% 30ft 30% + % 

9 50 33% 33* 33*— % 

9 172 35* 35* 35ft + % 

n ? 


86% 7Sft Moron pf 760a 88 8 8<ft 86 86 — % 

45% 2m MorKnd 108 3J 11 m 44 % 44ft 44* + * 

23ft. 18ft MorseS 0830 15 153 22* 22 22U+* 

21 M* MtnRty 1.79c 90 10 110 19* 18* 18% 

38 25% Mortons 04 10 8 279 34* 33* 33*—* 


44% 29ft- Malaria 04 10 15 2726 36* 35% 
26* .19% Munfrd 04 20. II 46 21* 21* 


14% 8* Morass 
33% 23* MurpO 100 30 12 
22* Mft MurryO 00 30 11 
14%. U* MutOtn 104 JKL4 
B* 1* MverL 


19 12 12 

86 28ft 28* 
A IS 18 


33*— * 
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21ft- % 


A IS 18 18 — ft 

41- 14* 03* 13*— % 
113 2ft 2ft 2ft 


20ft— ft 
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12ft— % 
45% —1 
49 — ft 
75 

37 + % 

47% — I 
18* + * 
52% + ft 
22% 

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29ft 

17% — % 
64 — % 
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37* + ft 
44 - ft 


29 15% CstICpf 

15 12 CstIC pf 

40 28* CatrpT 

27% 19 * Coco 


32 15* 15 15 — % 

550 II* 11* 11*— ft 
52 26 25* 25* + ft 

243 Mft 14 14 

736 36* 36ft 36M — * 
66 25* 25% 25ft + % 


l»ft 68ft Celanse 400 17 11 805 120% 119% 119ft— * 


44* 35 Cetanpf 4-50 10 J 5 43* 43 43 

IS Cenpyn 03a J 26 1652 9% 9* 9ft + % 
« Cental 208 57 9 296 <1* 41ft 41* 

26* 17 Centex n JS 10 10 693 24 23ft 33*— ft 

27 18ft ten Sow 202 80 7 2010 25* 25ft 25% 

3lta 19% CenHud 206 100 6 97 28* 2flft 28*— ft 

If.. CnlLtPt 400 10J 1001 42 42 42 —1ft 


23ft 33*— ft 


I7ft 7* BMC 


35ft 22* Batmca 00 11 10 473 24* Mfa 24* 


I9fa 15 Hkrlntl .92 50 M 
34% 18* Baldor 06 IJ 14 

2ft * vIBatdu 
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61ft 33* BallCo 1A4 20 M 

2Tft lift BallvMf JO 1.1 

11* 7* BallvPk 12 

46* 33% BaltGE JM 70 1 

23% 16* BltGE wl 

35% 22% BncOne 1.10 30 11 

5* 2* BaiTex 


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06 IJ 14 104 21* 21* 21* 

2ft 1ft — ft 
102 10 9 9* + ft 

44 24 14 sa 61% 60* 61% + ft 

JO 1.1 I6tf 18 17* 17* 

12 48 11 10* 10% — % 

140 70 8 603 43* 43% 43*— ft 

19 22 31% 21% — % 

.10 30 II 91 33 12* 33 + ft 

S* 3 2* 2*— % 


J* “ CnlLtPt 400 10J 1001 42 42 42 —1ft 

21ft TS* CnllPS 104 80 10 200 19 18* 18*— * 

»ft 19ft CnLaEl ZD8 84 7 43 24* 24* 34* + * 

37 j S ft CLaElpfAlS 110 24 35* 35 35* 

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’3^ CVIPS T0O 90 4 920*20 20 — * 

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5? 2r? NY 3M 6J 5 1835 39ft 

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54% 44* BkBplA 4.91c 89 5 54* 54% 54* + * 

47ft 2m BkNY 2044J 7 298 43ft 43* 43% 

M% 18* BankVa 1.12 4.1 9 29 27* 27ft 27* + * 

K% 15 BnkAm 00 53 53S 15% 15 Mft- * 

47 m BkArnpt 401ell0 6 43% 42% 43W fa 

Mft 12ft BkAm 0(308 109 15* IS* 15ft ft 

32ft 25% BkARty 240 85 12 44 28* Mft 2Bft_ ft 

75* 45% BankTr 370 4.1 6 1559 6A* 65% S*- (ft 

Z7 21% BkTrpf X5Q W 12 25ft 25* + * 

73 ,|ft Bonner Ale 0 15 40 lift Tl* lift + 

39ft 19 Bard 06 14 14 83 35 34% 35 

25 19% BomGo 00 30 15 345 Mft 24 24ft + * 

41* 25* Barnet i TJH U 10 300 37% 36% 36% +1% 

33* 17 Barywr 00 20 16 73 21% 21 21ft— * 

13* Bft BA3IX .IS 14 II 56 9 0* 8%— ft 

35* 22VB Bausd! .78 20 18 303 32 31ft 31ft— fa 

17ft 11% BaxtTr 07 30 71 1934 14* 14 14*— ft 

37* 20* BavFto JO 8 144 41 %U 26 26 — % 

34% 23% BavSlG 200 81 9 10 32% 32 32% 

33% 31% Bearing 100 zb 13 9 3«% 34ft 34% + fa 


12 Mft 25* 25* + * 

40 lift 11* lift + % 

83 35 34% 35 


.S' 4 240 60 8 4852 37% 

OriMh. 113 6 137 

S3ft OilMl pf 7 fij* 

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SJ? SJ" 0 " AU .9 58 50* 

'P* Ft 100 90 11 lift 

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airomo 40 182 12 

44% Oirmpl 1 54ft 

25% Oirvatr 100 20 3 3487 36* 

Onibb XI 13 197 70% 

Z I M 60% 

12% Omrchs 44 19 13 9609 15* 

20 C ICOTT 322 90 9 103 M% 

wU SSS ?! 1 J-ra 64 8 57 48* 

ra* CtoGE 816 12.1 7 543 18* 


77* 20* QavFto JO 0144 
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38% 31% Bearing 100 19 13 


if* ClnGE 116 111 

“ S"S p* 4 >«® 1“ 

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«% ClnGpf 744 130 
18ft CtnMIl J2 30 
2£ft ClrclK 74 23 
30% aratv .10 4 
IS 


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L16 12.1 7 543 18* 
100 133 lOQx 33 

L75 130 2001 37 

100 1X9 2S0z 72% 

'44 136 1002 59% 

J2 30 27 571 31 


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.10 4 12 342 28* 


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48* Beat pt 308 54 


9 62* Alft 62* +1* , 


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Wt 35ft BecfnD 1J0 XI IS 236 56% 56% 56ft 


8* 2ft Beker 09| 

II 4 Beker pf LTD 41J 

17* 12ft BeWnH M 23 Tl 

35* 22W BelHWI 06 10 II 

35ft 22 BelHwPf 07 X0 


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120 4% 4 4ft— * 

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72 34* 34* 34*— * 

1 34.. 34 34 — ft 


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60 IS 17* 17ft 17ft— * 

605 5* 5* 5*—* 

777 8* 0 Bft + ft 

10 34 290 13% 13* 13% 

20 3S4 17* 17* 17% 

110 7 45ft 45* 45ft + ft 

187 20 23ft 23* 23* 


24 BCE g X28 86 30* 30* 3G* % 

27% 19* Bell Ind J2 10 17 761 22% 22 22 — % 

44* 30ft BeilSau 300 60 9 5017 41% 40* 40% — * 

57 41ft BaloAH 00 10 22 62 49% 49* 49*— * 

32% 22% Bern I# 100 11 10 6 32 31% 31*— ft 

45ft 27% BenfCp 200 50 9 178 41* 40* 40*— * 

40 30% Banefpf 400 11 J 1 38ft 38ft 30ft— * 

22ft 18 Belief pt XU 110 60Bz 22% 21ft 21ft + ft 

19ft 17% BeneolnlJO 60 IS 17* 17ft 17ft— ft 

6* 3% BengtB 071 60S 5ft 5* 5*— ft 

Bft 3ft Berkey 727 8* 8 Bft + ft 

15 10* Best Pd 04 10 34 290 13% 13Mi 13% 

21ft 14% BethStt 40 13 3S4 17* 17* 17% 

49* 37% BethStpf 500 110 7 45ft 45* 45ft + ft 

24% 18* BethStpf 200 187 20 23* 23* 23* 

40* 27* Beverly J2 .9 19 215 36ft 36* 36*— ft 

26* 19ft B to The 00 U 18 709 25% Mft 24% — * 

Mft 13ft Blocfin 26 91 18* 18ft 18ft 

Mft 18* BtoCkD 04 34 16 372 19* 18% 18%—* 

34* 21ft 01c* HP 103 50 8 13 32ft 32% 33ft + % 

29% 14% Blair Jn JBl 210 lift 17 17fa + % 

59ft 39* BICkHR 240 4.1 15 18 58% 50% 58ft — ft 

50ft 33% Boeing# 108 X3 15 5346 40 47 47*— ft 

36% BolseC 1.90 4.1 20 391 469# 46* 46* + ft 

48 BatoeC pfXOa 87 31 58 57% 57% — fa 

29ft 18* BolfBer .18 4 28 73 20ft 20% »% — fa 


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06 30 11 24 17% 17ft 17ft— fa 

JO 10 56 lift 11% 11%— ft 

1 JB 81 7 1617k 25* 25% 25% — U 

12 66 8ft 8* 8ft 

■18b 10 66 9% 9% 9*> 

106 40 11 1469 35* 34* 34*— * 
16 1092 38ft 36* 36*— I ft 
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200 110 8 330 11% 18 18ft + ft 

06 10 18 168 38ft 37% 38 — * 

100 30 42 1447 2B* 28 28ft — ft 

1.92 70 9 130 24* 24ft Mfa + ft 

100 XI 7 1907 49 47* 47% —1ft 

550 8* Bft 8ft + ft 

104 X7 17 498 39% 38* 38*— * 

1J0 40 13 63 25ft 25 25% + % 

L40 41 10 42 34ft 33ft Mft + ft 

108 100 7 718 

708 110 20l 

705 11J 3001 

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140 1X3 11 

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1J4 100 2057 

400 110 24 37 36% 36ft—* 

00 12 3 23 9ft 9ft 9ft 

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M 1422 102* 100ft 100% —I 
1 00 10 48 ASS 89 88ft 98ft — % 
100 SJ B 20106 25ft 24 24*—* 

3 51 S* 5 5ft 

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X72 BJ 9 1306 31* 31ft 31ft 

06 30 9 22 18ft 1 Bft IE*— % 

1.16 XI 15 379 55 54* 54% + % 

120 43 12 152 28ft 28 Mft— t* 

08 20 13 306x37* 37ft 37ft— ft 
’ - ’ 1 35* 35*— * | 

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12* 13 
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19* 19* + * , 

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37ft 37ft 
46ft 46ft + fa 
31* 31* 

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71 71 —1ft 

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33% 33* 

72ft 72ft— ft 

75 75 —1% 

16* 17 
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17% 17% + ft | 
19ft Itft + ft 
14% 14% — * 
23% 23% — * 


Bft 8ft + ft 
38* 38*— H 
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33* 33* + ft 
16% 16* 

45% 65% 

63* 43* +lft 
62ft 62% + * 
25 25 

24% 27 + % 

25% 25* + ft 
25% 25% — * 
27% 27% — ft 

28 28% — ft 
31ft Ufa 
32ft 32% 

115 115 

20* 20*— ft 
21% 21* + * 
IS* 15% — % 

29 29 

16% 16*— ft 
36% 36ft— * 


100 XI 14 2S7B 
78 10 21 229 

00 30 255 


.SO XB 18 577 


200 1X2 9 

00 10 14 211 
300 50 15 2125 


36* 201 
37ft 26 
36* 15V 
78* 54 
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12* 5V 
44ft 384 
26* 199 
8% 3V 
A4ft 419 
31* 189 
17* 9 
22ft T3Y 
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12* 10 
51ft 319 
18* 1491 
58ft 319 
39ft 229 
21 109 

M 57 
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16% Bft 
27% 14M 
44 47% 

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46ft 16ft 
43% 35 
58% 46 
8* 3* 
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14% A 
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13% 10 
7ft 3ft 
28% 13ft 
26% 17* 
Mft 18ft 

36 28* 
27* 20 

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Mft 24% 
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30% M% 
31* 25* 
23* 18 
23% 77ft 
26% 21% 
Mft 54 
67ft 53 
37* 20ft 
23ft 12* 
28* 13ft 
12ft 8ft 
12ft 7 
27 17% 

64ft 48* 
Mft lift 
14% 7 

7* 1ft 
23% 5* 

13ft Bft 
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39 13ft 
3S M* 
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18% 14% 
32% 19 
45 18ft 
34ft 26* 
21ft 8* 
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29* 22% 

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16ft 10 
Mft 40 
72% 24 
35ft 27ft 
19* 14 


1J0 40 13 90 

II 463 

100 10 10 281 
15 

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208 105 11 

109 

108 X5 20 643 
JU 10 25 975 
JOI 17 245 
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32% 32%— ft 
28* 28ft + ft 
15ft 15*— ft 
71 71ft—* 

3% 396— ft 


71 71ft—* 

3% 396— ft 
5* 594 

39% 39ft— % 
23* 23* 

3ft 3% 

58* 59ft— 94 


31% 32* +1 
9ft 9*— % 
19* 19*— ft 
16% 18ft 
11% 11* 

44* 45 +ft 
17% 17% 

56ft 57% — ft 
33 33 — * 

12 * 12 *— * 
79 79%—% 

60* 60ft— 1 
76* 76*— % 
A* 6ft— ft 
6ft 6% + ft 
16* 16*— ft 
9* 9* 

16* 16*—* 
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S3* 53*— ft 
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84ft 84* 

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12* 12ft + ft 
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23* 23* 

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31 31ft 
22 * 22 % — * 
35 35 

2494 2494— ft 
27* 27* + ft 
27% 28 
29% 29V, — ft 
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25% 25* 

15% 65% —196 
63 —1 


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103*90 55 

100 IJ 11 122 

i 00 IJ 10 223 

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100 10 9 489 
2JD X6 12 3440 
250 00 12 1816 


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1.18 30 13 321 

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102 X9 13 135 34fa 

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02 20 85 1930 23 

200 40 11 245 60* 

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3596 20* JWT* 1.12 15 18 66 31% 31* 31*— ft 

37 2396 JRIvar 06 10 11 920 34% 33% 34 — ft 

28* 15 Januwy .12 0 ■ 1319 19% 18ft 18ft— * 

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£ft 3196 JetfPII 10 U 7 4786 45 Mft 44* + ft 

33ft 24ft JerCpf 400 1X5 4tXta 32 82 32 +1% 

,66ft 49 JerCpf 000 1X6 lOz 63ft 63ft 63ft + 96 

IDT 80ft JerCpf 1L0O 115 5360Z 95% 9496 95% + ft 

18% 13% JerCpf Z18 1X5 11 1796 17ft 17ft— ft 

12ft 6ft Jgortor 19 16 Tift n* lift + ft 

49* 30% JohnJn 100 20 15 1537 47 46% 46ft— ft 

46% 37ft JaftnCfl 1060 *4 9 1263 42ft 41ft 41ft + ft 

27* 21* Jargen 100 4.1 18 M 25* 24ft 24ft— ft 
Mft 17% JasfBPS 00 3J 14 473 3* 24* 2496— ft 

27ft 22% JovMfe 100 XB 15 582 2496 23ft 24% + ft 


.66ft 49 JerCpf 000 1X6 
101 80ft JerCpf 1100 110 
1896 13% JerCpf Z18 1X5 
12* 6ft Jowlcr 


21ft 16ft NAFC0 108 50 17 11 10ft 18* 18*— % 

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21 . 1296 NBt . 11418 16 15 15*— * 

22ft T7ft NCH J2 X/ 12 20 19ft 19ft 19ft 

44* 28 MCKB 102-34.7 1554 39 38% 38ft— ft 

36 22* NCR 08 -16 10 1918 34% 33% 33%— 1 

14% 9ft NL Imf JO 10 496 lift 10* 10*— fa 

36ft 27. NUT 202 7J B 11 30% 30% 30% 

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53* 35ft NWA JO IJ 23 375 S3* 52ft 52ft— 1ft 
84ft 46 Itab*c8 .1061. 16 1539 83* 03% 8396 

2£ 25£ N £i2 1 - z0 ** >1 mi »y> *ft— ft 

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S* m.WDW 2J86029 432 32* 32% 32ft + % 

SJ MM NDtster 105 94 50 19% 19% 19% + ft 

19*T 11% NatHdu 18 295 18ft 18% 18ft + ft 

»ft 23* NafFG* 208 70 8 45 26* 26% Mft- ft 

49* 34 MtdO VP 200 40 - 7 186 Mft 48 48ft 


9ft 7% KDI 04 20 10 171 8ft Bft Bft— ft. 
20* 10ft KLMs Jle 24 8 1134 19* 19* 19ft— ft’ 

43ft 33ft KMIpf +50 105 2 41% 41% 41%— % 

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«* 28 KN Eng 108 3J 19 1063 3996 39* 39* + 96 


16* 12* Kotor Al .151 

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20% 15ft KalsCv 00 U 

1394 796 Kaneta 00 40 


4% 2«1 MI Horn 

33* 34 Nil JS 3 244 28% 27 

65 52ft Nil Pf SJ® BJ 6 57ft 57 

32* 19* NMedE 02 XI 13 2020 25ft 25 

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29 22% NfPreef 106 33 12 15 27* TT 


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39ft 29 KCPLpf 405 120 
40 29* KCPLPf 450 114 

3096 15 KCPLpf 200 114 
71ft 16 KCPLpf 233 114 
58 3994 KCSou T08 U 

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1001 35ft 35ft 35ft— * 
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74 57* 57 57 — % 

13001 12ft 12ft 12ft— * 


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33ft 24* NevPw U4 U t 

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41* 29* KanPLI 2J6 80 
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115 36* Kafypf 106 30 

28 13* KaufBr 00 24 

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60 32 Keltogg 104 30 

38* 23ft Kellwd 100 13 
2ft ft Kenal 
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29* 2196 KvUfll 204 9J 
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100 30 7 199 36* 36J£ 3«^6jf ft 

00 17 14 101 22 21ft 21ft— ft 

104 90 9 101 26* 26* 26*— ft 

04 4.1 18 10* 10ft M*— ft 


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32% 24* NYS PfD 3J5 1X1 
19 13% Newall 40 XI 

54% 31* Hewhat 
Si 12 Newfili 140*107 


19 13% Newell 40 XI 9 70 16% 16 14 u. 

54% 31* Hewhat Tl 63 56ft 54% Sfltllll 

’LVMSiWBi 


96 14% 14ft Mft + ft 
13 12* 12* 12*— % 
88 30ft 2996 30* + * 
200k 16% 16% 16% — ft 
IHta 28% 20 20% + % 

1 18 18 18 + ft 

23 lift 10* ID*— fa 
77 44ft 44 44% — % 

6 » 2«4 27 + ft 

2f 27%fc 2Ab Z7Vb— « V% 

'} par* 

70 16% 16 16 — ft 

63 56ft 56% 56* +1* 
’ 1Mb 16* 16* + % 
if ** m a* + ft 


33* MU KerrMc 1.10 30 28 1142 29ft 28% 29% + % 


■ chesv b 7i £r aSi,8 

17* is NkaSh iJSeixi a Sb SSff m 
18* 11% NKoiet .12 .9 IS ft 14ft 13* u. 

s^s-ass ^47 3bSSC = 2 

52% S'* NarsfrpfAOeaj 9 ’*1 5?ft sift Sift + % 

19 12% Norlak 08 4 6 SIS 17 MW llS - W 

60 ' u an NACOot 1.10 ij 7 « I5 ' 6 

45% 33ft NAPhH 100 XJ 9 JOB 33% 34ft Su. ». 

20ft 13* NEUrO 1.720 93 10 ami* 5 

ft 12 Worst Ut 1 JB 90 6 10K {?* ,'SS IS t i? 

15ft 10% NlndPS 1 5* li, in iSS if? Ur? 17* + % 


a=^s 


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68 7 

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106 

7 178 35* 
657 32% 

8 666 20 * 

19 45 la* 

1404 25* 


42 30 19 45 fa* 

08 27 1404 25* 

280 64 13 466 43* 

08 20 13 112 31ft 

08 28 8 172 IB 

7 271 16ft 

100 14 11 10 52% 

1050100 3 17% 

142 30 13 842 40 
100 30 9 976 26* 

1-72 9.1 9 52 19ft 

7 136 27ft 
102 40 10 1475 28* 
9 135 6 

JO 27 M 238 11% 

08 M IS lift 9% 
100 XI 9 2831 33 

ISO 106 8 Mft 

.16 30 48 23 5% 

08 27 10 142 25 

.90 22 12 2542 40* 

175 9.1 1 63 

24 177 15 

04 114 6 4*0 14ft 
u4Sel2J 18 53ft 

09 1X2 30 29% 

.40 1X3 2S 33ft 

00 30 11 41 17ft 


16% —1* 
24* 

11 — % 
8* 

22 +1W 

6094 + ft 
12% 

12 % — % 
2%— ft 
A*— ft 
10% — ft 
2% 

34% — ft 

32% — * 
28*—* 
16 — * 
24*— ft 
43% — % 
31ft— * 
17% — % 
16 + *1 
51ft— % 
1794— % 
39% 

Mft— ft 
19 — ft 
27 — ft 
28* + ft 
5*— ft 
11 - ft 
99V + fa 
32% + fa 
Mft 

5% + ft 
24% — % 
40*— ft 
63 —1 
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13% — ft 
53 

29% + ft 
33 

1694— % 


31* 17* KevBk UO 44 ■ 
4ft 2ft KevCon 
15% 12 Key Int# 08 12 19 
37ft 26ft KktdO 100 34 9 
62* 43 KimbCI X32 37 II 
«% 26 KraTltRd M XI 17 
29 23* Koaer 250 90 49 

»* 14* Kotmor 02 94 58 
22* 17 Kopert 00 <5 
37 30ft Kopr pf 400 109 
104 97% KajWpflOOO 94 

Mft 12* Korea 4* 30 
46 35ft Kroger 200 47 11 
32 25 Kubota 09> 17 32 

M% Bft K ultima 00 20 16 
47ft. 29% Kvocer J3e 10 15 
23% 15* Kvaor 00 44 7 


KevBk UO 44 8 5228*20*28% + * 

KevCon 2 2% 2% 2%— ft 

Key Int# 08X2 19 49 15ft 15 15ft + ft 

KktdO 100 24 9 86034*34 34— * 

KimbCI X32 37 11 342 62% 61* 62ft— ft 

KraTltRd 78 XI 17 545 37% M* 36*— * 

Koaer 250 90 49 54 27% 27% 27* 

Kotmor 02 34 50 81 18% 17* 17*—* 

Koper* 00 ,45 209 18 IT* 17*— ft 

Kopr pf 400 109 5Qi 36% 36% 36% 
KapprpfHU» 94 5 Wlft 100% 101ft +lft 

Korea jao 30 « 15 Ufa 14%— fa 


35ft Kroger 200 47 11 1468 43% 42* 42ft— ft 
25 Kubota 090 17 32 2 29ft 29ft 29ft — ft I 


91 20* 20ft 20ft— ft 

75 32 31* 31ft— ft 

9 19* 19* 19*— ft 


L^ m . . .. 


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220 33% 34ft 34% * 

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17% 12* LLE Rv X2M164 

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1? 11% LTVA 0S 12 

55 41 LTV pf 

25% 15ft LTV pf 106 160 

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18% 10ft LTV pt 1 JS 90 

16 * 10ft LQufnf 22 

ink 16ft LactGa 170 77 7 

vm 6% Lafaroe JO 24 

77ft 23 LafTgpf 204 9.9 


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197 13ft 13% 13ft + % 

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5 48ft 48ft 48ft— ft 
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57% 41 LeorSg 200 37 10 


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77 54% 54 54ft + ft 


16* 8 NwSIW 1 75 

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1 J6 74 18 1AM 16ft 16ft — ft 

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104 AS 8 344 23ft 23% 23% + fa 

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18* 14* EDO M 17 14 89 Mft MU 16U — U 

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21ft 16* HonJI 1040 19 30 2M »U 2Mb 

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68* 33 HorBrJ 100 10 17 J4 Alfa 60* Alfa + * 

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12% 7* HaznIPi a 310 11* lift 11* 

28 * 24% Horn pfB 300 1X5 I 25ft 29ft 

»* 24* HampICXIS 70 HM TOb 29 29ft— % 

33 V, im HrpRw 00 27 11 9 29% 29ft 29ft— % 

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cm 9ft HOkLPb 02 20 1? IS 12* 12% 121b— ft 


29ft M ERGOT 
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Bft Elor 

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MU lift Hen* 00 14 13 20 25* M E— * 

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Mft IJ HatmP 36 15 27 363 19* 19ft 19ft 

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21 16* Herman M 603 19 II* 18% — fa 

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9ft 4U Barmn# 

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89 65 BosEpt 808 110 

lift 7% BosEpr 1.17 100 
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A6 Vft 9ft 9U— U TOb _8U Comoro 
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S! ,2£ SSJ?*? am .4 S ** 9%— % 20ft 15ft EmryA .00 20 14 17U 18% 18 


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22ft IB* 
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li,! siilrf 


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U 26ft OhEdpf 400 1X6 
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62% 43ft CtlEdpt 706 120 
66* 47 Ot) Ed Pt 800 120 

31* 29% Oh Ed pr X92 1XO 
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70 50ft OhEdpf 804 1X9 


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9* 5 LILCo 

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23* .9* LILpfV 
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2T% 11 LIL pfT 
19* 8ft LILpfO 


LaneSpf 507 M0 
LILCo 


“ ra 30* aSS-SJ 


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299 6* Afa Uh 

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a Me, La Land 100 XI 9 1259 32M 31% 31%— U 

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23* » LOPLpf 400 160 76 29 ft 29% g o£ + % 

Mb 1W, UlPL.pt 114 146 _ 13S nS SS ± S 


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19 .13 OvShto 


163 19* 19ft 19* 

122 39* 38% 39% + * 
41 IT* 17* 17% 

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is g't 3 * 

^ ?5S *2 g J? “ i 


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ISV SPBre* 

Ja it n — 5 •** * + fa 


Ufa 13fa IMh 


J 3 Ms '1 pk 

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4ltt IS PSA U JJ M Tlz 271 Wlft 44 — fa 

S? I2£ Z**** IJO “ 80 ^ ft 


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20% 13% PscOE 104 e'a -j 
« 70 13 


mi 9 Hntnpf 4 > 1 * 11 * 11 * 

a* 31% HewtPk J2 8 17 5600 36* 3S* 36 

33% 34 He* cal 00 20 M 23 Mb 30* 30* + fa 

23* n*HI5MOf 00 24 9 M 20* 20% 30%— fa 


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m* ^ E£!r!f n ,J0 <3 is s? sa 

(Caaifoued on Page 12 ) 


5 » it ST-,* 
,JS W% 6* 1 

,3 2 ifuS 

1 i§b iS2 












■ - V'V. ■ 


^latistie& Index 


:AWCXnicefr pi< rnr ... 
'AMStfhWiBftfcsPM P.12 

'VYSEmta'pZ u 

■'HrsE rmvHMtlS P " 

'Coootai (tacks p» All 

v Cun-fncy rote* P n J®*®*®™*** p » 
■\Omrnomat -. p» 2™? „ P.» 

tW**, pg P.>$ 

r r ,z 0fh « raoA«s P.i6 


™P^^JGgsT23TT^- 

technology 


en t New Products 
>n Help PC Users 


By THOMAS C HAYES 
os angeles _ v ;r„lr Sm,a 

rersonal comnuipr 


* • ■ * computers. “*" c 5 °PWSUcaied and powerful 

era, are tobl? ^^^V r ° gr ^ for E ersonil1 con3 P ij,t " 

^ provide 

* nm be to help define a j-wobUmt * ^ contnbutiOT 

JaDe T - Mafia, cognitive 

... ed^gineSiT^^f C ° Uea * ueuse Knowl 

; . “«nt to trouble-shoot for air- 7ZT~. 

; ^SrsPS?? 5 “ simu ' we are 

mted sleeping quarters for , , 

. astronauts on the space sta- w the edge of 

- If the air lemperaturc is too something very big. 

* pkyrf «** ver > important 

: S,mm f Su2S iHt P licatio,,s - • ' 

v items in the air-quality svsiem When the rmv 

- tr0able ’ il auiornaiic3 ^y «St?a variety of 

maS tfiSSSS thal does the dk S nosis ’ Aen keq* moving to 
■ ? SSC ^ect even tf it is not sure It knows the 

Mss Malm was attending the biennial International Joint 
Conference on Artificial Intelligence. The historically sleepy, 
; ' JW* i gathering attracted 1,400 participants in 1981. This year 
. the conference was expected to attract more than 10,000 people 
before its close Friday on the campus of the University of 
Calaorma at Los Angeles, with its attendance swelled by venture 
.. capitalists, investment bankers such as Goldman, Sachs & Co. 
I Morgan Stanley & Co. and legions of corporate executives 
and marketing personnel. 

“Most of what we’re seeing are tools that win enable us to build 
applications that people can use” on personal computers, said 
Esther Dyson, publisher of Computer Industry Daily. “For now, 
you can't run or create them on a personal computer. But they are 
clearly becoming commercial, and it’s about tone.” 

J OHN A. Young, president and chief executive of Hewlett- 
Packard Co., said, “We believe we are on the edge of 
something very big, with very impor tant imp li c ati on s for our 
business and for oar many customers.” He that with artificial 

intelligence development tools, “we think we have the beginnings 
of a solution to the software-productivity problem.” 

Hewlett-Packard, Digital Equipment, International Business 
Machines and General Electric were among, the computer indus- 
try leaders that brought new products to the conference. 

Small start-up companies that beat the bigger companies to the 
marketplace with eariy products three andfour years ago, also 
were hoe. They included InteDicorp, Teknowlcdge and the Car- 
negie Group. Intellicoip, which has been listed on the over-the- 
counter market smee 1983, made its first profit during the last 
fiscal quarter, on sales of 53.4 ariffio n. 

Many of the products axe known as expert systems. They 
devise ways of collecting and a rpmmng highly m nrializnri infor- 
mation so that users can make quicker, more intelligent decisions. 

Scientists at Hewlett-Packard, who began work on artificial 
-intelligence in 1981; have usedexpertsysteim designs todeydop 
.. a training system Tor workers in the wafer-fabrication units of 
their semiconductor manufacturing division. The program runs 
on the company’s personal computers. 

The system can recommend 120 steps for solving problems, 
and the number is expected to double soon. It include s 65 movies 
of bow to conduct various tests; the films are stored on video 
cassettes and displayed on a computer screen by a research 

(Continued on Page 14, CoL 8) 

j Currency Rates | 

Cross Bat** **** 


s 

1 

DM. 

FJF. 

ltJ_ 

OUT. 

UP. .■ 

6F. 

10985 

435 

1TZ59 • 

3684* 

8,1679* 

— • 

6558* 

H78B* 

55XT 

7123 

20349 

65313 

10196* 

16002 

— 

24765 

27513 

1661 


J2T3* 

M9* 

8883* 

. *934* 

12227* 

1405 


10623 

1 17915 

159080 

AMI 

1615 

3.1515 

UMTS 

UflA) 

67I.M 

219.63 

— — 

MM 

33147 

82646 


0710 * 

2764 

044 

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acralggeribimc 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 




U.S. Stocks 
Report, M-l , Page 10 

Page 11 


Ericsson 
Profit 
Off 31% 

Film dies Losses 
bi EIS, U.S. Unit 

By Juris Kara 

International Herald Tribune 

STOCKHOLM — L M. Erics- 
son. the Swedish tdccommimica- 
tions and electronics group, said 
Thursday that pretax earnings in 
the first half of 1985 dropped 31 
percent from a year earlier, to 643.8 
nullioa kronor (S77.8 million) from 
927.8 million. 

The company predicted, howev- 
er, that second-half earnings would 
‘improve somewhat” because of 
measures taken to improve the per- 
formance of unprofitable areas of 
operations. 

It said that group sales in the half 
rose 12 percent from a year earlier, 
to 14.9 billion kronor from 13328 
billion, while order bookings were 
up 14 percent, to 163 billion kro- 
nor. 

Ericsson said the lower profits 
were the result of losses by its 
Ericsson Information Systems unit 
and its U-S. operations. U.S sub- 
sidiaries, including Ericsson In&, 
suffered losses chargeable to the 
group of 17] million kronor, it said. 

Brian Knox, a senior partner at 
London-based Grievson Grant & 
Co., said Ericsson’s earnings for all 
of 1985 could be around 13 billion 
kronor, down from 1.569 billion in 
1984. 

Ericsson's interim report drew 
criticism from Swedish and inter- 
national analysts, who said the 
company had chosen a reporting 
method that hid a much sharper 
drop in profitability. 

“The pretax figure actually in- 
cludes 170 million kronor for the 
sale of a subsidiary, and that brings 
the earnings down to a more de- 
pressing level,” said a London- 
based analyst. 

Adjusted for that figure, said an- 
other analyst at a major Swedish 
bank in Stockholm, “earnings 
dropped 49 percent, to 474 million 
kronor.” 

Ericsson’s six-month report 
mentioned that the capital gain had 
been included in earnings, bat clas- 
sified it under “other operating in- 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 1) 


London Comes to Wafl Street 


ll8. kwfa« wtHPk 
ggSSjStagT 
L F RemscttiW, 

UotetMty.TawOfri ‘ 

RoSacbStoeT 1 


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5, G, Warburg, Rowe & 
pftren.AKrpydinc. 
K)ekn»ort(B«33on kyfc " 


BrtMWip* art company 

Morcw^a House HolangsPrc" 

S 0 % owned by J. RomachiKi 
HaUngaPLC. 

EquoByowwO by the French m 
Brttah branches ol u* RoOiacnid 
Banking Group. 

Robert Retwrig Holdings Ltd, 
Robert FwabiQ Hokimgs ug 

S. Q Wartxeg. Rowo a Pitman. 
Aknyd hdermbonal 
Kle inwon, Benson Ua 


U.5.imnliMRt 

firmeapltiL 

ianl.-BS, 

mmoaaMdt 

S1S3.474 
‘ 126.623 


U.S. Durable Orders Fell 
2.8% in July; Prices Rose 


•Tot* ipogaa and I— P«d Cn wy wim runn ing he 





The Nm Tori Ta*& 


Members of British financial firms in New York, from 
left, Robert S. Pine, chief executive, Rothschild Inc.; lain 
Saunders, president, Robert Fleming Inc, and Ian Pea- 
cock, executive vice president, Kleinwort. Benson Ltd. 

British Firms Invade 
U.S. Capital Market 

By James Sterngold 

Sew York Times Service 

MEW YORK — The British are coming to Wall Street. Aiming to 
emulate American brokerages and commercial banks that are firmly 
entrenched in the London financial market, merchant banks from 
Britain are scrambling to expand into the New York capital market, 
i Robert Fleming Holdings Ltd, one of the largest merchant banks 
in Loudon, announced 2ft weeks ago that it had agreed to buy F. 

I Eberstadt & Co., a small, specialized Wall Street research firm. Last 
month, S.G. Warburg, the venerable London firm, reorganized and 
widened its U3. securities business. 

And dnring the last few years other large British financial institu- 
tions — such as KJeinwon, Benson Ltd.; Mercantile House Holdings 
PLC, and J. Rothschild Holdings PLC — have begun building bases 
of operation in the United States. 

“This is the largest capital market, and we felt it was essential to be 
here,” said Ian Peacock, executive vice president of Kleinwort. Ben- 
son, which last year acquired ACL1 Government Securities. 

“Not to have a presence in New York is increasingly a disadvan- 
tage,” added lain Saunders, head of Fleming’s New York subsidiary. 
“That will only become more true.” 

Nonetheless, the forays by the British have thus far been less than a 
resounding success. These latest attempts to penetrate VS. under- 
writing and brokerage businesses are not the first 
Robert Fleming’s acquisition of F. Eberstadt for instance, was an 
acknowledgment of the troubles that Renting had faced in trying to 
(Continued on Page 15, Col. 4) 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Orders to 
U 3. factories for durable goods fell 
a sharper-than-cxpecied 18 per- 
cent in July after an Increase of 3.6 
percent in June, the Commerce De- 
partment reported Thursday. 

The decline; to 5103.6 bzllioa. 
was the largest since a 29-percent 
drop in March anrf indicated that 
the U.S. economy is showing no 
signs of the administration’s 
hoped-for rebound in the second 
half. 

The report on durable goods is a 
closely watched indicator of w hat 
manufacturing employment and 
production are likelv to do in com- 
ing months. 

Analyst « noted, however, that 
the decline was skewed by a big 
drop in the volatile mffitary-goods 
sector, and that too much signifi- 
cance should not be attached to 
any one month’s number. 

In a separate report, meanwhile, 
the Labor Department said that 
inflation as measured by chan ges in 
consumer prices rose a modest 02 
percent in July, identical to June 
and in line with expectations. 

As measured by the Consumer 
Price Index, the department said, 
prices during the first seven months 
of the year have risen at an annual 
rate of 3-5 percent. 

Analysts said the July number all 
but confirms predictions that U.S. 
inflation for 1985 could be the low- 
est in more a decade. 

The Commerce Department said 
that orders for military equipment 
plunged 17.6 percent in July after 
gains of 263 percent in June and 
43.1 percent in May. proriding 
much of the strength in orders ex- 
hibited in those two months. 

Excluding defense goods, new 
orders have increased on average 
only a slight 0.1 percent since the 
be ginning of this year. 

Orders for nondefense capital 
goods dropped 63 percent in July 
after a 9.4-percent June gam, the 
department said. This category is 
closely watched for indications of 
business plans to expand and mod- 
ernize production facilities. 

Declines were widespread in 
most industries in July, Commerce 
reported. Orders were down 83 
percent for transportation equip- 
ment, following a 6.6-percent June 
increase, while orders for machin- 


ery declined 42 percent, with virtu- 
ally ail of the decline coming in the 
electrical category. 

Orders for primary metals 
dropped 1.1 percent as an increase 
in steel production was offset by a 
drop in orders for nonferrous met- 
als. >t said. 

Shipments of durable goods rose 
only 0.1 percent in July following a 
decline of 0.) percent in June, 
Commerce said. Shipments 
reached a high last December of 
S 103.9 billion but have shown little 
change since then. 

The July increase in the inflatio n 
rate, meanwhile, came on the beds 
of back-to-back increases of 02 
percent in May and June. 

Food prices, which declined at 
an annual rate of 0.8 percent dnr- 
ing the previous three months. 


inched un bv 0.1 percent last 
month, the Labor Department 
said. 

Shelter costs, which include both 
renter and homeowner expenses, 
accounted for nearly three-fourths 
of the increase in July. Those costs 
have been rising at an annual rate 
of about 6 percent so far this year, 
and went up an additional 0.6 per- 
cent in July. 

That rise was offset somewhat by 
a slowdown in the index for fuel 
and utilities, which are a compo- 
nent of the broader hooting index, 
which was np 03 percent. 

Energy costs — finally beginning 
to follow a general decline in world 
crude oil prices — were down. Gas- 
oline prices fell 0.4 percent while 
fud-od prices declined 13 percent, 
the department said. 


Laker Decision on Suit 
Clears Way for BA Sale 


Return 

LONDON — Sir Freddie Lak- 
er’s decision Wednesday to end a 
S 1-billion antitrust, suit against 10 
of the world's major air carriers has 
cleared the way for a government 
sale of British Airways. 

The state-owned airline an- 
nounced Wednesday night that Sir 
Freddie had accepted SS million 
and dropped all rfaims that BA and 
nine other major carriers plotted to 
bankrupt itis cut-price trans-Atlan- 
tic airline that collapsed in 1982 

The settlement removes the last 
obstacle to a S48-m31ton out-of- 
court settlement offered by the air- 
lines in response to an antitrust suit 
brought by Laker Airways’ liquida- 
tor three years ago seeking more 
than SI billion in damages. 

It also will enable Britain's Con- 
servative government to fulfill its 
long-standing desire to transfer BA 
to private hands, a move consid- 
ered a key part of Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher s privatization 
program but repeatedly held up by 
the litigation. 

BA which handles more than 80 
percent of die British international 
air-travel market, is expected to sell 
for more than S1.4 billion. 


Sir Freddie, who originally 
termed the airlines* offer “pitifully 
inadequate,” declined to comment 
on why be agreed to the settlement 
just a day after winning a two-week 
delay in a Jersey court. 

But he told rqxaters he was 
“very pleased” with the settlement, 
adding: T wish British Airways all 
the luck in the world.” 

BA which Mrs. Thatcher wants 
to sell as pan of her drive to reduce 
direct state involvement has recov- 
ered from near bankruptcy in 1982 
to pretax profits of more than £200 
million (52S0 million) last year. 

Sr Freddie, a colorful business- 
man kni ghted after brin g in g trans- 
Atlantic flights within the reach of 
budget travelers, had charged that 
the 10 airlines conspired to drive 
Laker Airways out of business by 
cutting their fares. 

But BA, the main defendant in 
the lawsuit, said (he settlement 
"bears no admission of guilt on 
behalf of British Airways or die 
other defendants to drive Laker out 
of business.” 

Other defendants includ ed Pan 
American, Lufthansa, Swissair, 
SAS, British Caledonia and KLM. 


To Fight Hyperinflation 

By Lydia Chavez confidence. If prices were to ria 
New York Tunes Service quickly it could be devastating. OE 


- __ WHT'l iww 

1 rear * ** * mi Uards Bonk (ECU): Reuters 


BUENOS AIRES —More than 
two months after President Rati] 
Alfonsin introduced a bold and un- 
expected program to hall inflation, 
the majority of Argentines — worse 
off economically than they were the 
month before the plan was an- 
nounced — remain behind the gov- 
ernment’s effort 

This support, which has always 
been viewed as the key to the pro- 
gram’s success, has beat strong de- 
spite increased layoffs, tight credit 
some food shortages ana a contin- 
ued fail in real wages. 

To be sure, Peronist-led labor 
unions have attacked the plan and 
called for a general strike on Aim. 
29. However, the number of work 
stoppages has actually decreased 
since the plan was announced, and 
many pontical leaders doubt there 
will be^ widereread compliance with 
the strike call The government felt 
confident enough of its support last 
week to immediately reject labor’s 
request for a cosl-ol-Kving adjust- 
ment 

The anti-inflation package an- 
nounced on June 14^ includes wage 
and price controls; a new currency, 
the austral and. a pronuse by the 
government to stop printing money 
to cover its own expenses. 

The biggest concern among busi- 
ness executives and economists is 
how the government -will lift the 
wage and price controls without 
prompting an immediate jump in 
inflati on and a loss in consumer 


GDP of France 
Increased 0.6 % 
bi2dQuarter 

The Associated Press 

PARIS — France’s gross do- 
mestic product rose a seasonal- 
ly adjusted 0.6 percent in the 
second quarter of 1985 from the 
previous quarter, according to 
preliminary data released 
Thursday by the the National 
Statistics Institute. 

GDP measures the total val- 
ue of a nation’s goods and ser- 
vices grinding income from 
foreign investments. 

The government agency said 
the advance followed a decline 
of 03 percent in GDP far the 
first three months of 1985. 

For all of 1984, France’s 
GDP expanded by 13 percent, 
and the government's goal for 
1985 is a 1.6-percent growth 
rate. 

The latest figures indicate 
that the government will have 
difficulty readring its goal un- 
less the economy achieves a 
strong second halt 


confidence. If prices were to rise 
quickly it could be devastating, one 
economist said, since the price con- 
trols are the only real benefit felt by 
the consumer. 

“The popular momentum is still 
behind the program, but the big 
problem they have is how to get out 
of these controls,” said one foreign 
banker. “The important thing is 
that they are building a base that 
could be very positive.” 

In addition, business executives ( 
said, the government must con tin- ! 
tie to nine structural c h a n ges in , 
the large public sector, reducing its 1 
are and transferring more of the 
country's economy to the private 
sector. 

“The government has to make 
fiscal adjustments on a permanent 
basis,” said the owner of an Argen- 
tine bank, “You can’t cut down on 
security and defense eternally and 
they' won’t always have the benefit 
of the wage freeze to reduce its 
expenditures.” 

The government also has been 
helped on (be revenue side by re- 
ceiving an installment from the 
$I.4-biDion standby loan from the 
International Monetary Fund, in 
addition it is near to closing on the 
$42-billion loan from Us creditor 
banks. 

The banker and other Argentine 
business executives said, however, 
that there were signs the govern- 
ment was well aware of the steps it 
needed to take and was not de- 
pending chi foreign loans or short- 
term remedies. 

Rather than strongly criticizing 
the government, as business execu- 
tives had done in the past, they 

.-aJ the r 






















The man with aflcejrtHMial goals 
needs an exceptional bank- 


Our service in Switzerland, for example. 


print money , and had challenged 
the paternal relationship between 
the government and private enter- 
prise. 

“The government was financing 
and saving everyone to prevent 
bankruptcies and layoffs/’ said 
Alganoro Acbaval, a senior execu- 
tive of Garovaglio & Zoiraquin, an 
Argentine conglomerate. “It has 
taken a lot of courage for the gov- 
ernment to say that no more subsi- 
dies are pang to be given away.” 

Another positive qgn, business 
executives said, was the govern- 
ment’s decision to permit the state- 
owned company to sdl erode oil 
rather than refined products. This 
alone could give the country a sub- 
stantial surplus in its trade balance 
for petroleum sales, they added. 

In addition, private enterprise 
was given a potential boost when 
Juan SourrouiUe, the minister of 
the economy, announced this 
month that export duties would be 
eliminated or reduced significantly. 
The government has traditionally 
depended on these duties for a 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 3) 


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An American Express company 



* 







Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL 


ik i a 1 1 


lIS.ftriures 


Grains 


1 Baoaan 
HEgti 

Season 

Lgw 


Open 

High 

Law 

Close 

dig. 

PORK BELLIES (CME) 





3X000 Ibx- rants per lb. 





+1.IS 


4245 

Aug 

4330 

4X25 

4330 

4X45 

7X20 

5540 

Feb 

5730 

53-37 

5X10 

5X20 

—147 

7540 

5545 

Mar 

5B4Q 

5845 

56JH 

5XJ» 

—147 

75-40 

5730 

May 

58.70 

59.10 

SMS 

57*40 

— 130 

7640 

5735 

Jul 

5905 

5930 

5735 

S7SS 

—135 

7X15 

5XU 

Aua 

5640 

5640 

5X25 

sens 

—130 

Est. Sofas 4344 Prev.Sales 3361 
Prav. Day Open Hit. A343 up 80 





Season Season 
High Low 


Ooen High Low Close 



Livestock 


CATTLE (CM£) 







40000 lbs.- cents per lb. 






65.90 

5345 

Oct 

5547 

5520 

5530 

5525 

— 37 

6735 

55.15 

Dec 

5745 

57.90 

57.15 

5730 

—47 

6745 

5X00 

Feb 

58X5 

5825 

5745 

5747 

—25 

67 37 

5730 

Aar 

5930 

5932 

5040 

5845 

-25 

.6X25 

5X10 

Jun 

6020 

6X20 

5*25 

9940 

—30 

6540 

5840 

Aua 

5840 

5840 

5840 

5840 

— J5 

Esi. Satan 11433 Prav. Sales 13477 
Prev. OavOcen Int. 42,178 up 185 




FEEDER CATTLE ICME) 





4X000 lbs.- cents per lb- 






7X00 

5745 

Sep 

6345 

6180 

xins 

6127 

—38 

7232 

57.15 

Oct 

62JH 

4140 

6125 

6135 

—42 

7330 

5820 

Nov 

6340 

6X25 

6115 

6120 

—40 

7940 

4060 

Jan 

6530 

6530 

6X70 

6420 

—40. 

70.55 

61.10 

Mar 

6550 

<5.95 

6X70 

6X99 

— 45 

7065 

61.15 

Apr 

6530 

6530 

6X95 

6X95 

— 45 

6X25 

6130 

May 

6X40 

6X75 

6X00 

6430 

— JO 

Eat Salas 

1414 Prav. Sates 1477 




Prev. Day Open Int. 7444 off 28 





HOGS(CME) 







30000 Ib3.-centft0er m. 






5175 

3X10 

Oct 

37.10 

3730 

3625 

3X27 

—23 

50lBS 

38 35 

Dec 

3945 

3740 

3X10 

3X12 

-20 

5X47 

3935 

Feb 

4X85 

41.17 

37.75 

3997 

—90 

4735 

37.10 

Apr 

3X00 

3825 

37.10 

3722 

—20 

49.05 

4X15 

Jun 

4043 

4140 

4X05 

4X05 

—20 

4935 

4040 

Jul 

41J5 

4130 

4040 

4132 

—45 

51.90 

4X23 

Aua 

4145 

4145 

4035 

4037 

— -33 

41.10 

3835 

Od 

3X95 

3X97 

3825 

3X95 

— 20 

8* JO 

4550 

Dec 




4X00 


Eat. Sates 

X722 Prev. Sales X923 



Prev. Day Open Int. I83Q5 up 167 





Currency Options 



COPPER (COMCX) 

25-000 lbs.- earns per lb- 

62. 15 SB-65 Aug 9? JO 

82.10 57 JO Sec 59 JO 59-80 7.10 59 JO 

Oct 57 JS 

8425 5050 Dec 6135 6135 6040 6040 

8420 59 JO Jan _ 6095 

9000 59 JO Mar 6230 42-00 61J0 6140 

7400 61.70 May 6225 4230 6200 6210 

74.40 61J0 Jul 6200 6100 6265 6260 

70.90 6220 Sec 6125 6125 625V 6110 

7030 6170 Dec 6400 6400 6400 6185 

7030 6480 Jan 6400 

6790 65.10 Mar 6530 6530 6538 64 M 

6730 6590 Mov 6480 

Est. Soles Prav. Sales 7.994 

Prrv. Day Often inL 77-900 off 1.114 
ALUMINUM (COMEX1 
40300 lbs.- cents per lb. 

Aug 4SJB 

7430 4190 Sec 45.15 4535 45.10 45,15 

Oct 45-50 

TOJO 4490 Dec 4630 4635 4620 4635 

7450 46J5 Jan 4460 

7160 44 -K Mar 4730 4735 4730 4735 

6675 5195 MOV 4flJK 

4X45 4735 Jul 4835 

5210 5130 Sec 4935 

Dec 50-50 

Jan 50.85 

Mar 5135 

5135 5335 May 5225 

Est Sales P rev. Sales 272 

Prav.Day Open Int. 1383 oH 67 
SILVER (COMEX) 

5-000 trey az.- cents per trovaz. 

6403 6010 Aug 6225 

11810 5710 Sep 6343 6340 61X0 *9XK 

646JJ 6110 Od 6260 6260 6260 6Z73 

I2XO 5900 Dec 647.0 6470 6300 636.1 

1715.0 5950 Jan 6402 

>1910 6070 Mar 6600 6600 6450 649.T 

10480 8210 May 6670 6670 6600 65&0 

9450 6310 Jul 6710 6750 667.5 667-7 

9400 6410 Sep 6815 6870 6710 6770 

7990 6600 Dec 7050 7050 6900 6933 

7890 6780 Jan 6990 

7700 6770 M or 72X0 7230 7080 7100 

7520 6930 MOV 721.9 

Est. Sales P rev. Sales 17.763 

Prav. Day Ooen InL 74077 off 1393 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 troy oz.- dollars per tray a z. 

306JX 27500 Auo 32060- 

39100 25000 Oct 31500 337 JO 31800 32260 - 

37150 257 JO Jan 339 JO 34000 32000 325.10 - 

35700 264 JO APT 34400 34400 32X50 323.50 - 

36100 27300 Jul 34200 34100 33100 33240 - 

36000 3050 Od 35400 35400 34600 33660 - 

Est. Sales prav. Sales 6698 

Prev. Day Ocen Int. 16071 off 45 
PALLADIUM (NYME) 

1 08 troy ae- dot tars par ai 

141.75 90J0 Sec I05J0 107 JO 10X50 10400 

141 JO 9100 Dec 106.95 10325 10250 10460 

177 JO 9I_70 Mar 10800 10900 10150 10550 

11400 VI JO jun 10X00 10X00 10460 10575 

10500 10500 Sep 10600 

Est. Sales Prev. Sates 526 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 7,789 up 25 
COLD (COMEX) 

1 00 trav az. - do< lore per Iray az. 

48500 29100 Aug 33X00 33800 33250 33X80 

340J0 J15J0 Sep 33440 

49100 27700 Ocl 34IJ0 34210 33X00 33660 

489 JO 307.50 Dec 34600 34660 337-50 340.90 • 

485J0 30X00 Feb 35100 35100 34200 34520 

496-80 31470 APT 35500 35500 34620 349 JO - 

435.70 32050 Jun 35770 357 JO 35200 35430 

42140 33100 Awe 36X00 36X00 36300 35720 

395.70 33500 Od 36430 - 

39100 34200 Dec 37X00 37X00 36900 369-50 - 

38X40 35500 Apr 380 JO - 

jun 38X00 38800 38X00 38X40 - 
ESI. Sales 55000 Prev. Sales 32264 
Prav. Day Often Int. 13X941 up 2X33 


72-18 63-24 Dec 7W1 

69-16 67-5 M«r M 

EsL Soles Pray-8alesi4XM0 

Prav. Day Open InLXJXTll up 5308 
GNMA(CBT) 

5100000 prlrr-otsfi 3Znds oflOO pd 
77-24 59-13 See 76-29 77-13 7M9 77 

76-28 59-4 Dec 76-6 76*21 7M 76-7 

768 58-20 MPT 75-17 

7CT7 58-25 Jun 74-31 74-31 74-21 74-28 

JM 63 Sec 74-16 74-16 74-10 74-10 

Est. Sales Prey.Jales 134 

Prev. Day Open InL 4^26 up 20 
CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

SI million- pfsol 100 PCt __ 

9278 8500 SeP 9231 9241 9235 9236 

72J7 6X34 Dec 9213 9X13 9202 9202 

91.75 8656 MOT 91-tS 

9140 8643 Jun *1.19 

91.15 8706 Sep jag 

9033 8X34 Dec 

89.91 0X30 MOT 9X19 

EsL Soles Prav-SaJes 307 

Prav. Day Open int Z-663 up 18 
EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

*1 mllUcn-ptXfri 100 ad- _ „ 

9245 US SeP 9206 9200 9201 9200 

9X00 0400 Dec 9100 9100 9108 9109 

9106 8X10 Mar 9107 9108 9127 9127 

91 JS 8X73 Jun 9X9S 9QJB 9CJS 9006 

•eji 8708 SOP 9X60 9060 9048 9050 

«CJ3 8708 OeC 9X35 9X25 9X17 90)7 

9X24 8704 Mar 89.95 8905 8906 8906 

89.95 8X84 Jun W46 8746 8940 S9J7 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales 44489 

Prav. Day Often Int. 130406 uu23 
BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

S per pound- 1 po Int eatta li SHOW 1 
14450 13293 left 14040 14090 10930 10940 

141*0 10200 DSC 10950 10990 10335 10840 

14160 10480 Mar 10860 10890 10750 1 0770 

10990 1.1905 Jun 10725. 

Est. Sales 12645 Prev.Sales 11JM 
Prev. Day Open Int. 41.971 iip774 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

Sperdlr-looMleguntesaUOOl 

JS8S JB25 sett 0378 0389 0374 0376 

0566 0006 Dec 3366 2351 Og 

0504 4981 Mar 0350 039) 0345 -7342 

0360 00711 Jun -7328 

Est. Saha 1039 Prev.Sales SHI 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 2276 on 38 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

S per franc- 1 point equals 4X00001 

.11835 4)9680 Sep .11808 .11108 .11800 .11830 

.11640 49470 DeC -11730 

.11650 .11425 Mar .11700 .11700 .11680 .11630 

EST. Sales 4 Prev.Sales 10 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 394 
GERMAN MARK UMM) 

S per morfc.1 point enuatoSOJDOl 

D651 0930 SeP 3653 -3667 3631 3628 

-3684 xm Oic 360 3696 -MS5 OM1 

-3714 0040 MOT .3728 3731 36 87 3SH 

-37D0 2335 jun 3715 3715 3715 3728 

Est. Soles 2X707 Prev.Sales 2X03 
Prev. Day Open InL 60487 up 2540 
JAPANESE YEN (IMM) < ijlj uuii 
‘<£ 5^ iSSS ^$304256 304223 -004232 

004307 rnurru; Mar JD42S3 JJ04290 304272 .004372 

Eit. Sales 14J71 Prev.Sales 94*4 
Prav. Dav Open int. 37,952 up 4363 
SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

$per franc- 1 pa mt envois noooi 

4830 3480 S«P 44 55 .4477 4405 4420 

4494 3531 Dec 4490 4512 .4442 4458 

4545 3835 Mar 4530 MSS 4490 4495 

Est. Sales 26355 Prew. Sales 20468 
Prev. Oav Open Int. 37.944 UP 92 



Financial 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

SI million- pis of 100 pet. 

9X33 86.94 Sep 9X05 9X13 

9337 BS.77 Dec 92JB 9286 

92J9 8X60 Mar 9249 92J0 

9228 8731 Jun 9X15 92.17 

9231 8830 SCP 91-76 *1.76 

9128 8935 DOC 9IJS 91.55 

9139 89 JB Mar 91-20 9130 

90.93 90 JO Jun 9X94 90j>4 

Est Sales Prev. Sales 1 1426 

Prev. Day Open InL 37329 off 403 
18 YR. TREASURY (CBT) 

SIOCUMO prfn- ats X3MS0t 100 pd 
88-71 75-18 Sep *7-13 87-24 

17-13 75-13 Dec 86-12 86-23 

Bb-2 75-14 Mar 8S-24 85-25 

(5-7 74-30 Jun 

84-4 BO-7 Sen 

83-11 80-3 Dee 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales 1X893 

Prev. Dav Osen Int. 63344 up 285 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBT1 
IB pct-suxuxDats * 32nds of 1 00 nd) 
79-12 57-10 SeP 77-2* 78-10 

78-13 57-8 D«C 7646 77-7 

77-29 57-2 Mar 7M6 765 

76-6 56-29 jun 74-27 756 

75-31 56-29 Sep 74 743 

74-24 56-25 Dec 73-10 73-13 

74-15 56-27 Mar 72-21 72-21 

74-26 63-12 Jim 71*20 71-25 

72-27 63-1 SeP 


9335 «338 
7277 9279 
9243 9243 
*237 9237 
91.76 9126 
9147 9147 

9130 9120 
9X94 9034 


15-10 &S-10 
84-15 
83-22 
83 


77-23 77-75 
76-20 76-2 7 
75-19 75-21 
74-22 74-22 
7X26 73-26 
73 73 

733 72-8 

71-10 71-18 
70-29 


Stock Indexes 


5P COMP. INDEX (CME) 
points and cents 

178JX 16030 Sep 19030 19X10 1B7J5 18730 

3)035 175.70 Dec 19X50 19240 19X25 19X55 

20175 1*0.10 Mar 19X50 195J0 1*330 19X20 

204-50 19x70 Jun 19535 195.95 19X95 1*630 

Ell. Sales 58477 Prev.Sales 49.164 
Prev. Day Open Ini. 58,961 up 215 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
command cents 

713-20 18575 Sep 20130 20135 19X25 19X50 

21735 20X00 Dec 20X95 251530 20170 28205 

20*40 20X95 Mar 20730 20730 20730 205 a 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales 5425 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. 1X696 un94 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
oolnts and eenfs 

11835 9136 Sep 11X05 11X15 10X60 10X15 

11730 10130 Dec 111.70 11135 11073 1IQ35 

11X75 109 JO Mar 11X45 11X45 11X15 11230 

12030 11X75 Jun 11035 

Esl.5oltt 10356 Prev.Sales 9365 
Prev. Day Open Int. 1QJ85 off 43 


I 


Commodity indexes 


Close 

Moody's—. 90040 f 

Reuters 1 373.90 

D_). Futures 114.06 

Com. Research Bureau- 217.90 

Moody^ ; base 100 : Dec 37. 1931. 
p- preliminary; f -final 
Reuters ; base 100 : Sep. 18. 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31. 1974. 


Previous 
097X0 f 
7 <683.40 
114.31 
21160 


Oommociities 


Aug. 22 

Close 

SUGAR n** ^ BW ** <** 

Frsech francs per metric ton 
Oct 1310 1385 1300 1302 -II 

Dee 1JDQ 1775 1790 ljoo -s 

Mnr 1310 1785 1300 1302 — 10 

May 1340 1320 1320 1330 —15 

Aw 1390 1365 1360 1375 -» 

Oct 1450 1430 1445 1488 + 15 

Esi- ypk: MM ipt* ot S) tens. Prev. actual 
sales: lOfli lots. Own Interest: 22.133 

COCOA 

French fraaes per 108 kg 
Sep 2350 2JU0 2340 2347 +24 

Dec 2345 2332 2333 2335 + 17 

Mar 2360 2350 2350 2355 + 26 

May N.T. N.T. 2365 — +20 

Jlv N.T. N.T. 2365 — +20 

5ep N.T. N.T. 2375 — +20 

Dee N.T. N.T. 2385 — +20 

Est. vol,: 52 lots of 10 tons. Prev. ocfuc* 

sales: 11 Ids. Open Interest; 804 

COFFEE 

French francs per 108 kg 

SS- K: K:T: i® =§ 

^ K:J: !lt: iS8 z]l 

MOV N.T. N.T. 2320 — —5 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2325 — —25 

Sep. 2300 2380 2365 2390 — 77 

Pn,v - ortUG ' sahH: 

Source: Bourse eu Commerce. 


London 

Commodities 


Cion 

SUGAR Hh,,, ^ “ ASX 
Sterttog per metric tea 
Oct 11530 11130 11530 11570 

Dec 116-60 11340 11730 11LQ0 

Mar 12X00 12230 12630 12X40 

Mar 12830 12670 12930 1 3030 

APB 13240 13X60 13440 135.00 

Od N.T. N.T. 13930 14130 




Cadi Prices 


113J0 11X00 
11730 11740 
12560 12530 
12930 13040 
13330 13540 
1393014X40 


Volume: 2370 lots of 50 tons. 

COCOA 

Sterling per metric ton 

1*35 135 339 u» ltm wie 

25= 3 'IS 1^53 1754 1724 1725 

Mar 1765 1750 1764 1765 1736 1738 

Mo» W73 1760 1770 1774 174 9 1750 

Jt 1784 1771 1781 1784 1,758 1760 

3* HZ! HK ’765 1770 

Dec 1788 1784 1790 1795 1,765 1775 
Volume: 4342 (pfsol 10 tons. ■ 

COFFEE 

Slerflne per aaetrlc ton 

Sep 1450 1440 1445 1450 1460 1462 

j™ HS 339 1l715 1 - 71 > 1729 1732 

Mar 1730 1737 1742 1745 1755 1758 

MOY .765 17» 1756 1760 1770 1780 

Jhr 1J81 1780 17w 1777 1785 1790 

Sep N.T. N.T. 1770 1300 1795 1310 

Volume: 2338 hits at 5 tans. 


Commodity cmd Uoft 

Coffee 4 Scnlas. lb 

Printdelfi upn 38 ta, yd _ 
Steel billets IPItt.l. ton — 
Iren 2 Fdry. Phi la, ion — 
Steel scrap no l irvy Pitt. . 
Leod Soot, lb — . — . — — 

Coopar e+ed.ft 

Tin istrelis), to 

Zinc. E. St. I- Bails, lb — 

Parkxflum, oz 

Sliver n.y- oz 

Source: AP. 


Aug. 22 
Year 
TtMi Age 
133 1 M 

0J8 07* 

47X18 473J0 

21X08 71X80 

72-33 88-89 

19 JF32 
66-70 68-67 

63613 62324 

041 1M 
183-186 136-158 
629. 7.61 


Dividends 


Aug. 22 

Company Per Amt Pay Roc 

DECREASED 

Amer Pefrotlno Q JO 9-16 9-4 

INCREASED 

Deposit Guaranty Q 37 10-1 9-18 

FU Northern SAL Q .12 9-15 we 

Hotel Investors Q jo tl-1 10-15 

Lawson PrortodS Q JX 10-18 9-27 

Soadhnork Corp Q 36 9-16 W 

Uld Jersey Banks a n n-1 10-10 

Van Dorn Co Q 75 11-1 jg-il 



¥ S&P 100 
Index Optic 


Options 


Shite cubxaft PstsXaa 

Prto 5m Oct Nor Dk Sep Od No* Dec 

>3 n IF* - 1F» 1/16 b 5716 ft 

T75 7W It* 9b Wft 3/16 9/U 1 15716 

W 3 4h 5b Vi 1U, Uk 2b » 

1S5 Ik 21/MZL Hk 4t 4% M S 

190 6* 11/1* 1 37U 1 96 Ik I1/U9 7b 

WS 1716 1716 ft - lfk 3M« _ _ 

SB — 1/14 lk — - - - _ 

Total cos vofarar 124JB3 
TeMalmiU.4H3ii 
TsMpet nbm 1J4J15 
tbH eat seta M 34*676 
Man 

HM 1BX4S Law 11151 Odw I8UI —289 
Source: CBOE. 


DM Fulures 
Options 


GASOIL 

U3. dollars per metric Ion 
Sep 24X00 23730 23875 23930 23X75 23730 

Od 23625 23X75 23X00 23X25 23X00 23X2S 

NOV 23525 23X00 OXW 22US mj5 

Dec 2352S 33X25 23540 mjO SS 

Jaa 23525 23X25 23275 rtrnq 

Feb N.T. N.T. Wig 231 JR) 231 JO 

Mar N.T. N.T. Mini 230JW w m ron?i 

Apf 22440 22X25 22XSD CTJ5 mS 

Mar N.T. N.T. 22X00 22&0B 217JXI 22530 

Volume: 132S lots oflOO tons. 

Source s: Reu ters and London Petroleum Ex- 
mma {mow. 


London Metals 




Vahmw: 0 left of 2S Ion*. 
Source: Rovftrx 


JAL Halts Ads 
After 747 Crash 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Japan Air Lines Ltd. 
has stopped advertising in Japan 
and overseas following the crash 
Aug. 12 of one of its Boeing 747s in 
which 520 people were lulled, an 


STOCK 

Conti Bancorp .5* 

National fiat Oil - 79 

Sodtunor* Corn _1B% ' 

STOCK SPLITS 
pgyco Americ a n— 2-ter-l 
Utd Jersey Banks — 34or-2 
USUAL 

Affiliated Bkdirs Q 31 

Artrona Bancwast Q Jt 

Beatrice Cos O 4! 

BekJtoB HMiimray O .11 

Beneficial Carp . Q JJ 

Brtt. CDlumWo Tel Q X. 

Orcfe K Corn O .18 ft 

Continental Bncp O J1 

Essex County Gas Q JE 

Ex-Cel 1-0 Q 41 

Fit Bank System Q -2C 

First Tier Inc O 35 

GefcoCarp Q 75 

General Re Cora Q J9 

HunHneton Bncstns Q 31 

Intertake Inc Q J£ 

Local Ferfl SAL O 47 Vs 

Marine MJdkeXtBfcs Q 45 

MM-Amedco ln«»- Q .11 

Mitchell Enrav 6 0* Q 46 

More Shoo Q -20 

National Gw A Oil O .10 

Nike Inc O -IB 

RTE Caro Q .U 

Showboat me Q .15 

Unltrode Cara Q 45 

Utah PonW A Debt O 38 

Valiev National Co O JO 

valamr Carp O .11 

Wvman-Gonlan Q 3» 


11- 15 104 

12- 23 12.2 

-16 9-3 


i 9-13 8-30 

9- 20 *-S 

10- 1 9-13 

9-17 9-3 

1W6 9^0 
9-20 W0 

9- 13 9-3 

10- 1 9-13 

10-1 9-6 

9-16 94 

9-13 B-30 

9-30 9-3 

9- 27 9-23 

10- 1 9-9 

9-30 9-14 

9- 23 94 

10- 1 94 

10-1 9*13 
10-2 9-11 

10-10 94 

9-23 9-9 

9- 28 9-3 

10-12 9-13 
10-10 9-13 
10-12 9-13 

10- 1 9-5 

9-13 9-3 

1G1S 10-1 




Wvman-Gonlan Q 40 9-12 9-3 

a B wa on l : ■o-mentMr; anoartsrtr; frceml- 


Trcasurj’ Bills 


Aug. 22 
Prev 

Offer BM YM6 TWd 

Xmonth 746 742 726 7X6 

6-montti 7,16 7.14 734 734 

One year 7J4 734 748 746 

Soiree: Saknun Brothers 


The Associated Press 

DETROIT — Ford Motor Co. plans to re- 
duce its white-collar work force by 9,540 jobs — 
a 20- percent cut — by 1990 in an effort to cut 
costs and improve efficiency, company officials 
say. 

The company hopes to achieve the reduction 
through voluntary termination and early-retire- 
ment plans, Peter Peslfllo, vice president of 
employee relations, said Wednesday. ‘There 
could still be some layoffs," Mr. PestiHo said. 
The No. 2 U.S. automaker has 47,700 salaried 
employees in its U.S. automotive and divemi- 
fied-product operations. 

White-collar employment at Ford peaked at 
85.300 in the boom year of 1978 and was 68,400 
last year, company officials said. The new pro- 
gram is not likely to affect the 20,200 white- 
collar workers in Ford's financial, aerospace 
and dec ironies operations, said David Scott 
executive director of corporate relations. 


i r ~- 1 1 * ’ ^-» ' 6jii4*- 

1 1 (li 1 1 h 1 1 r#i i 


*8 SB- *s 

XTRA 44 24 12 


3W6 Mb ZoltCp 132 jo • 
3SHr 2» Zumln 1A U 13 


Si S»' : nnr^nb 


218 T9* TMfc %tt>— Jt 

tSSS: 


IMVSE tfighHUms 


























































I 


V.. 



A \\ .* ; .. 

* iV- 

3 Si- 
ll 5, VP 

5 $$*! 
" *■ 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 1985 



Page 13 


*™^ps to Cut Exports 

a From North Sea 


Ratten 


1987 does not 


t. '..i 


OSLO rt Phillips Petroleum to begin & 

Co^sohsfcy mNoiSSS ^fesinldn^ 

™"^ay that u has agraritL?£ fadustiy sources have stud that 
cwm exports to Western h*™ 3 * could lose about SI A M- 
*" — TpHera few ^ * revenue from the 

^oilandgasfirid J?f loss could be 

to rnrot further sinkinl^ a? 

seabed under the fidd. ' T° e , Ekofisk field, the oldest on 

A J%3fips spokesman said th» E.® N°rwegian continental shdf. 
West. German distribution rrtn.v ■ ^ )een produdbg (Hi and gas 
- v'V MuBW-'AG, has agreed to S& ^ currently produces 

two-year xeductioEL at S“ '•**&* banris of £ude per 

" *• *&•*» the gas to FrcndUDwS 03 Tm * h ' rtin " 


- . - , “PpKerSw 
Toe spokesman said it had not 


03 
affected 
bed. 

jjJ^Kps owns 37 percent of Efco- 


iction has not been 
the sinking of the sea- 


tonccessaiy to impose force ma- 
jenr^a l^gal tom used to nullify 
contracts because of an “act of 

Veb ® Says Profit 

^^aSSa^tfto^emtnjeci. ^ DCr ® a 8Cd 11% 

ed mto the Ekofisk field, wW T x . ,,, __ 

rammual exbacttoofaaandeas ™ 106 1 ITSt Half 

fifciSSt^LJSss! 

and platforms on the Held to sink 

* ^ (105 meteis) 

since 1974. ' 

Inmrctfce the agreement means 
that the daily sales volume of abom 
one biffion cubic feet (283 million 
fibre meters) wffl be reduced by 
2» miBion cubic feet, the s ' 
man sakL The accord could 


Reuters 

DUSSJELDORF - Veba AG, 
West Germany’s largest industrial 
group, said Thursday that consoli- 
dated group profit rose II percent 
m the first half, to 245 tmKnn 
Deutsche marks ($88.1 million) 
from 221 mfition DM a year earlier. 

World gronp revenue rose far 


less, up 4 percent in the Gist half to 
billion DJ 


- ** - :-v 


r?.?i 


• <■ , 


i i it 

*’ '.l- «•* 


■’i .• . 


* '•■ 


■U T*% 

r. » 


SIA Plans Issue 
To liaise Capital 

Reuters 

SINGAPORE — Singapore 
Airlines said Thursday that it 
make a public issue of 50 
million one-Singapore-dollar 
shares in November after mak- 
ing a one-for-one bonus issue to 
doable its share capital to 
521.21 million dollars ($233.6 
tmffipu). 

The airline's deputy chair - 
man, Lim Chin B eng, said that 
Jhe public offering's issue price 
%as not been decided. ^Ihe 
plan at the moment is to list 
SIA shares only in the stock 
exchange of Singapore but we 
plan to make private placement 
offers in New York, London 
and Tokyo simultaneously," he 
said. 

SIA employees now hold 65 
million shares and governmen- 
t-owned Temasek Holdings 
PTE owns the remaining 1 9538 
million one-doDar shares. SIA 
last week posted group net 
profit of 37x9 million dollars 
on revenue of 3.16 biffion dot 
Lars for the:year ended March 
3KJtafiLii 198M4 was 1363 
million dollars an sales.of 25G _ 
bflBcra dollars. ... 


25.72 billion DM bom 2AS1 bil- 
lion DM a year earlier. 

Rudolf von Bennigsen-FOrder, 
Veba s managing board Ai rman 
attributed the boost in earning s at 
the diversified energy conglomer- 
ate to improved results in the 
chemical and electricity divisions. 

Mr. Benningsen-Frcer said he 
expects 1985 group net profit to 
exceed last year’s record mil- 
lion DM, which was np from 471.1 
million DM in 1983. 

He added that this year's divi- 
dend will be at least as high as last 
year's 9-DM payout. 

The 1984 dividend was raised 
from 730 DM in 1983. 

Mr. BetmingseorFCrder empha- 
sized that other divisions sum as 
transport and oil also contributed 
to the profit rise and noted that 
sales rose for all divisions. 

The oil sector; which returned to 
profit last year, saw tire largest rate 
of revenue growth, op 10.7 percent, 
to 73 billion DM. It also improved 
hs half-year earnings from the like 
1984 period and has made a profit 
on refining since the second ouar- 
ter, Veba ’s chairman said without 
giving figures. 

Mr. Bezungsen-FOrdersaid cost- 
cutting in Vela’s activities had now 
largely been achieved, and this 
would increasingly be reflected in 
group earnings. . 

He said cutbacks in tire 'group's 
workforce were mainly conqrfeted 
last yeardnzt msd&no forecast for 
workforce numbers for the full year 
1985. 


Nixdorf Reports 
Sales (limbed 
24% in Half 

Roam 

PADERBORN, West Ger- 
many — Nixdorf Computer 
AG, the West German data- 

B ing company, said 
y that fust half group 
sales rose' 24 percent, to 136 
billion Deutsche marks ($561 
nriffion) from L26 billion DM a 
year earfier. Sales have risen an 
average 20 percent annually for 


157 


thepast 10 years. 

The company earned 
million DM for "1984. 

Without making a profit or 
sales projection for tire full 
year, Nixdorf said in an interim 
report that its high level erf or- 
ders on hand should ensure that 
business remains successful in 
the second half of 1985. 

Nixdorf said the company 
beceStted from buoyant de- 
mand at home and abroad, not- 


erate at tuff capacity. 

■ Sales in the domestic market 
rose 20 percent in fust half, 
while sales abroad rose 27 per- 
cent, spurred particularly by or- 
ders from banks, large retailers 
and small to medium -sized 
companies. Nixdorf said first 
half orders rose 29 percent, but 
gave no figures. Orders on hand 
rose 24 percent to 33 billion 
marks. 

The company said its one- 
for-three rights issue in July, 
which raised 720 million DM, 
had provided a sound capital 
base for expansion. 

Capital expenditure rose 27 

r ent, to 184 minim i DM, in 
first 


first half, mainly for ex- 



Revlon Profit Potential 
Draws Unwanted Suitor 


By Steven E. Prokesch 

Nm York Times Service 

NEW YORK — After several 
years of lackluster earnings. Revlon 
Inc,, a company famous for making 
women look more glamorous, is 
*- — ■ -- i to look more alluring ifr- 


So much so that it is having to 

fight off a hostile suitor that has 
recognized s omething other inves- 
tors had not: The cosmetics and 
health-care giant is worth far more 
than the stock market was reflect- 
ing. 

As recently as a month ago. Rev- 
loo's shares were trading at 54230. 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

giving them a total market value of 
SI. 6 billion. The price of Revlon 
common shares rose 87.5 cents 
Wednesday to 546.875 on the New 
York Stock Exchange. 

Now, in offering $47.50 a share, 
or $1.8 billion. Pantry Pride Inc. 
appears to be hoping that it can 
make a quick killing. Sources dose 
to Pantry Pride say it believes that 
Revlon's disparate healtb-care op- 
erations — which last year generat- 
ed 66 percent of Revlon’s operating 
profits of $298.3 million and 54 
percent of its sales of $2.4 billion — 
could be sold piecemeal for SI.5 
billion. That would leave Pantry 
Pride with Revlon's cosmetics and 
toiletries operations, believed by 
some analysts to be worth at least 
$700 million. 

Revlon's cosmetics business had 
been suffering from poor profit- 
ability, a dearth of new products 
and a loss of market share in sever- 
al segments. But Pantry Pride's bid 
comes at a time when the unit, 
which still sefls more makeup, fra- 
grances and beauty aids through 


retailers than anyone else, is show- 
ing signs of new life. 

“The company has been effect- 
ing a turnaround," said Jack L 
Salzman. an analyst at Goldman, 
Sachs & Co. and a former bear on 
Revlon stock. He b eg a n “aggres- 
sively” recommending the stock in 
February. 

No one is more bullish, however, 
than Michel C. Bergerac, Revlon’s 
chairman and chief executive. He 
insists that his company is worth 
S65 a share, or 52.49 billion, which 
suggests that he believes the beauty 
business is worth SI billion- 

Wall Street analysts, investment 
bankers and industry consultants 
agree that Revlon is worth far more 
than Pan try Pride is offering, but 
they Put its value at doser to S23 
billion, or 560 a share. 

These estimates seem extremely 
high, for a company with Revlon's 
profit performance in the past five 
years. The company's earnings 
reached a peak of SI92 million in 
1980, slid to Sill min i on in J982, 
and essentially remained at that 
level through' 1984. This year, 
though, analysts expect Revlon's 
earnmgs to rise 9 to 1 1 percent, to 
$325 to 53.30 a share. 

Revlon would have fared much 
worse if it had not diversified into 
health care. Mr. Beigerac, a former 
ITT executive recruited in 1974 by 
Revlon's founder, the late Charles 
Revson. engineered the diversifica- 
tion. 

In the last decade, he has made 
11 acquisitions, increasing Rev- 
lon's health -care revenues tenfold 
in the past decade. Now, ironically, 
his very success in that area has 
made Revlon such an attractive 
takeover candidate. 

One of Revlon’s most alluring 
health-care operations is its vision- 



COMPANY NOTES 


Commodore International Ltd. 
said it is cutting its worldwide work 
force by IS percent, about 700 jobs, 
as part of a continuing effort to 
streamline its operations. The U3. 
computer maker has said that it 
expects to report an S80-nriIHon 
loss for its fiscal fourth quarter. 

Enterprise Ofl PLC said it has 
bought a further 274,500 shares in 
Saxon M PLC at 540 pence ($7.50) 
each , raising its stake to 3.81 uni- 
lion shares, or 17.07 percent. Enter- 
prise has secured majority support 
from the Saxon Oil board for a 540- 
pence-per-share cash bid. 

EPIC Holdings Ltd. has notified 
most of its investors that it mil 
cease making payments on all of its 
$1.4 billion m mortgages and mon- 
gage-backed secunfies, USL offi- 
cials said. EPIC is the parent of 
Cammunky Savings & Loan Asso- 


ciation of Maryland, which tempo- 
rarily baited operations this week 
after a run by depositors. 

Iran Power Generation & Trans- 
mtssioti Corp. has awarded a joint 
order for four power generators to 
Mitsubishi Heavy Industries LuL 
Mitsubishi Electric Corp.. and Mit- 
subishi Corp^ a MHI spokesman 
said. The order, worth 45 billion 
yen ($189 million}, calls far deliv- 
ery to the Gharb power station. 

International Business Machines 
Cup and Microsoft Corp., a key 
software supplier, said they have 
agreed to develop fundamental 
software for personal computers 
Microsoft will be able to sell the 
jointly developed operating sys- 
tems to other computer manufac- 
turers. 

Levi Strauss & Co. the San 
Francisco-based apparel maker. 


said a bank group led by Weils 
Fargo Bank NA entered into a 
credit agreement for $ 1.45 billion 
of financing for HHF Corp. to buy 
Levi Strauss stock at 550 per share. 
HHF s tender offer began Aug. 1 
Newtek lntx a U.S. holding com- 
pany. said it has offered to buy 
Transway International Corp. for 
$265 million, a move that would 
double Nortek's size. But Trans- 
way officials said that the company 
was not for sale and that there was 
no reason for the two companies to 
enter into negotiations. 

Sehrust Hoktings Ltd. said its 
shareholders have approved a third 
proposal aimed at reconstructing 
the Perth-based mining group 
placed in voluntary liquidation Last 
February. Sd trust said the vote will 
enable the liquidators to seek court 
of tnepr 


approval . 


proposal 


Michel C. Bergerac 

o-re businesses. With a strong posi- 
tion in the extended-wear segment 
of the contact-lens market, analysts 
estimate vision care could fetch as 
much as 5380 million to 5400 mil- 
lion. 

Another crown jewel is Revlon's 
Norctiff Thayer division. Its Oxy 
line of acne medications and its 
antacid. Turns, have both been 
gaining share in recent years and 
are No. 1 and No. 2, respectively, in 
their markets. Alice Beebe Longley, 
an analyst at Donaldson. Lufkin & 
Janette Inc., believes that the divi- 
sion could command a price of 
$180 million. 

Revlon's medical-diagnostic di- 
vision might sell for as much as 
5421 million, according to Deepak 
Raj, an analyst at Merrill Lynch. 

In one segment of critical impor- 
tance to Revlon — lipstick, nail 
polish and eye products sold 
through drugstores, supermarkets, 
and mass merchandisers — its share 
has rumbled to about 20 percent, 
down from more than 30 percent 
five years ago, according to Allan 
G. Moltus. a consultant to the 
health-care and beauty industry. 

And the company has yet to 
come out with a product that rivals 
the smash success of Charlie or 
Jontue, two Revlon fragrances that 
were introduced in the mid- 1970’s. 

Recently, though, Mr. Bergerac 
has been trying to revive Revlon's 
beauty business. To cut losses 
abroad, Revlon has turned over its 
operations in seven European 
countries to distributors. 

In the last three years, Mr. Ber- 
gerac has also cut the company’s 
payroll by 5.000 to 30,000. 

If a split-up Revlon is worth so 
much, then why is its stock trading 
below Pantry Pride's offer? 

One big reason is that invest- 
ment bankers are assuming that 
Revlon parts can be individually 
retailed for top dollar, which has 
yet to be seen. Purchased in its 
entirety by a “wholesale" buyer, 
the company is worth no more than 
$49 a share, according to Daniel J. 
Meade, an analyst at First Boston 
Corp. 


Profit Falls Ethiopian Airlines: A Capitalistic Success Story 


At Ericsson 

(Continued from Page 11) 
come" rather than extraordinary 
income. 

“I have a notion that if you were 
I to chop np the report and look at 
the second' quarter, you would 
probably find an even lower re- 
. suit," stud the Stockholm analyst 

Ericsson did not publish quarter- 

^Th^company stud that sales of 
its largest business area, EIS, rose 
18 percent in-the half, to 4.92 bfl- 
•• lion kronor. Losses of the unit had 
* been reduced from levels of the 
second half of 1984, according to 
Ericsson. 

It also said the loss-making unit 
had been reorganized into separate 
co mmuni cations and data-process- 
ing divisions. It said the personal- 
computer division had beat inte- 
grated with the production of 
tCricsson's Alfaskop terminals and 
aKta new, independent unit had 
been created for office equipment, 
such as electronic typewriters, cal- 
culators and printers. 

The company said that sales of 

public tdecommumcations eaujp- 
ment increased 1 1 percent, to 4.822 
biffion kronor, but that heavy in- 
vestments m marketing m 
and the United States, conk* 
with slower sales m the United 

rest of Europe rose 14 percent to 
5.324 billion kronor,. it said. 

US. and Canadian salesfeu 
slightly, to 1319 billion kronor 
froZiL566 billion kronor ■ 
ago, while Asian sales doubled, to 
L275 billion kronor, Encsson re- 
ported. _ 

bPECSaidtoSet 
Oct. 3 Session 

The Associated Press 

_ VIENNA 


_. By Clifford D. May 

New York Tima Service 

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — 
Imagine a corporation wholly 
owned by committed Communists 
but run on the baas of unabashedly 
capitalist principles- Or conceptu- 
alize a state-owned company in Af- 
rica that is lean, efficient and 
praised by its customers for its dt~ 
cdlent service. 

Sound improbable? Then picture 
a generally profitable company, 
with relatively well-paid workers, 
a0 of whom are citizens of the 
poorest nation in the world. 

All three descriptions can be ap- 
plied to Ethiopian Airlines, which 
many African officials hope will 
save as a model, not only for a 
more flexible economic profile for 
Addis Ababa’s rigid nuKtary re- 
gime, but also for other state- 
owned companies in neighboring 
countries. 

Frequent travelers point to Ethi- 
opian Airlines as the exception in 
Africa, whore complaints abound 
about airline services. Confirmed 
reservations sometimes are not 
honored, at least not without a sub- 
stantial gratuity just prior to depar- 
ture; flights may be delayed for 
hours or days; check-in counters 
often resemble a locked exit in a 
burning movie theater; passengers 
might have to make mad rushes 
across steaming runways in pursuit 
of too few seats; luggage may arrive 
at its destination lighter than it was 
when it was checked through; and 
safety records can make your spine 

^A recent letter from a Mr. AG. 


That relationship continued un- 
til a year after the 1974 revolution 
that brought a Soviet-allied regime 
to power in Addis Ababa. 

Mr. Mohammed said, “At that 
time we told TWA they should 
<f. But they said you are grown 
ou can stand on your 
own two feet.’ ” 

The first few years did not go 
wdL The staff swelled, with hiring 
based an who one knew rather than 
what one knew. Wasteful business 
practices became entrenched as the 
bottom hne was eschewed in favor 
of the party Hne. Profits turned to 
losses and service suffered. 

In short, Ethiopian Airlines be- 
gan to succumb to the same chronic 
ailments that now afflict so many 
Third World state-owned compa- 
nies. 

But in this rare case, the authori- 
ties both recognized the disease 
and elected to take the cure. 

In 1980, Mr. Mohammed, an en- 
gineer and forma: air force officer 
who then had spent 17 years with 
the company, was promoted to 
chief operating officer and given a 
mandate to reclaim the airline's 
lost roots. 

Among other things, he dis- 
missed 400 of the company’s 3375 
employees. 

One executive said, “It was a 
very diffimli, critical and frighten- 
ing time here.” 

From that point on, however, the 
airline has been reasonably suc- 
cessful. Ethiopian flies to 31 inter- 
national destinations, including 
Dakar, London and . . 

Mr. Mohammed said he is 



NYT 

Workers in Ethiopian Air- 
line's maintenance shop. 

to open service to Japan and Sou Lh 
America. There are no flights to 
Moscow. 

The development of new routes, 
states an amine publication, “is 
based purely ou commercial, rather 
than ideological, considerations." 

Mr. Mohammed said, “We have 
kept the style, the corporate cul- 
ture, we inherited from TWA. We 
are now very much independent 
The government wants it to be that 
way." 

Illustrations of that indepen- 
dence include the purchase last 
year of two Boemg 767s and an 
agreement with Schweizer Aircraft 
of Elmira, New York, to build that 


corporation’s Model B turbine AG- 
CAT in Addis Ababa. 

A Western diplomat said, “There 
are those who have argued strenu- 
ously that dealing with Soviet or 
East European manufacturers 
would be more appropriate at this 
time. It has to be regarded as en- 
couraging that that view has not 
prevailed." 

Mr. Mohammed says he has no 
doubts that such decisions will in- 
sure profitability in the future But 
be also frankly acknowledges (hat 
tins year — for the first time since 
he became general manager — the 
company showed a loss in net in- 
come. 

“Our cash flow is very good, our 
operating profits are reasonably 
high, productivity is way up," he 
said. "Bui because we’ve got inter- 
est to pay on the 767s, and because 
the doDarisso strong, and because 
the drought has affected business, 
the result is that we’re S3 million in 
the red for 1984-85." 

Mr. Mohammed said, “This year 
is already looking better. The im- 
portant thing is that while other 
African airlines are cutting back, 
we’re still expanding." 

Metropolitan Moves Into UJL 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Metropolitan 
Life Insurance Co. said Thursday it 
is expanding into the United King- 
dom through the acquisition of Al- 
bany Life Assurance Co. Ltd. and 
associated companies from Ameri- 
can General Corp. of Houston. 


Montreal to link 
Options Trading 
Wilh Amsterdam 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The Amsterdam- 
based European Options Exchange 
said Thursday that it and the Mon- 
treal Stock Exchange plan to set up 
a link to trade currency options. 

The system would allow dollar/ 
pound currency options bought on 
one exchange to be sold on the 
other, giving users the opportunity 
to trade in two time zones. Trans- 
actions would be cleared through a 
common organization. 

Currency options give buyers the 
right, but not the obligation, to buy 
or sell currencies at a predeter- 
mined price during a set period. In 
recent years, they have grown rap- 
idly in popularity as a means for 
companies to hedge currency risks. 

The contracts vnll be completely 
interchangeable, said Luobetus 
Scholten, managing director of the 


Since the plan involves introduc- 
ing a new doUar/pound contract on 
the Amsterdam exchange, it re- 
quins Dutch government approv- 
al But, Mr. Scholteu said, the ex- 
changes hope it will go into effect 
in late September. 

The Montreal and Amsterdam 
exchanges, along with exchanges in 
Sydney and Vancouver, already 
trade gold and silver options under 
a similar system. 

The London and Philadelphia 
stock exchanges also have an- 
nounced plans for Unking their 
trading in currency options. 


Argentines Bark Austerity 



in Vienna to «s«cw 
production 
Its in Vienna and m 
ca said Thursday- 
O said the aitdi® 


w 



that tneu - A 

sasss* 

potss. 

conference in G^of- 
, the oil nnnisux? 

’aspedaH®^ 



Ringera to me editor oi ne wn 
Review of Kenya recounted an 

too- typical tale of woe. On aLz^w 
to Nairobi flight aboard Nigerian 
Airways, Mr. Ringera was saved 
crackers and soda for both lunch 
and dinner because, the flight at- 
tendant explained, the meals on 
board were “insufficient for every- 
one on the plane, _ 

Mr Ringera said: “Believe it or 
not, a few minutes later the hostess 
and stewards were havmg complete 
meals right beade me. 

On Ethiopian Airlines, m con- 
tt«* nightmare d this sort are 

Ahmed, 53 gweral 
■JJSSroF Ethiopian Airlines, 

^ mast rdmHe urfms in 

^f'terms of salty ^ s* 1 ™? 

Sot no nm- 
probaMy be 

sS?aS5SE«i~ 

fi !? aeo this Decero- 


(Contiuned from Page 11) 
large source of revenue, and in ef- 
fect taxed rather than encouraged 

^^Se^gpverament also followed 
through on its demand that public 
enterprises pay their share of the 
interest on the foreign debt, ac- 
cording to business executives. 

“It was in doubt whether some 
would do it, but it looks now tike 
they all win,” said one executive. 
“AH of these things should be nor- 
mal operating procedures but they 
have never been done before." 

While all these 
the executives said, 
the government 
have to announce 
hasnotiakenand 



eventually 
s, a step it 
probably pul 


off until after the November con- 


With i»n. 
seating, OPEC also 
to St heavy cru® 


aSasssM 

sgsszsz* 


Even without announcing lay- 
offs, it is undear how long the gen- 
a*] public will remain supportive 
of Mr. AUoosfat'f plan. Other than 
escaping the dizzying effects of hy- 
perinflation, the consumer has yet 


io fed any real benefits from the 
plan, according to economists. 

Inflation in July fell io 62 per- 
cent a month compared with 30 
percent in Junc'and it is expected 
to drop below ^ 4 percent this month. 
Although the July increase was the 
smallest in three years, it still re- 
mains high. Moreover, with wages 
frozen, workers are continuing to 
see the value of their pay checks 
deteriorate. 

In addition to a fall in real wages, 
some producers, presumably wait- 
ing for the price controls to be 
lifted, are withholding their prod- 
ucts- and causing shortages. The 
number of cattle sail to the coun- 
try's meal market this month, for 
example, declined to a weekly aver- 
age of 43,000 head compared with 
57,000 in August 1984 and 51000 
last month. The quality of meat 
sold in the market at the affinal 
price has defined, according io 
consumers, and there have been 
shortages of oLher products, such as 
chickens. 


CAISSE NATIONALE DES AUTOROUTES 

U.S. 850*000,000.- 
9W& 1976/ 1991 

its dclenleura d’obligalions sort informs qw U quatrieme Lranriw 
(Tamottissement au 9 septembne 1985 portant sur Oil mo Ji l tnl nominal dfi 
U3. $5,000,000.- atte dfectuee par tinge au sort au siage social de 1* Agent 
Financier. 

Lea obligations liras au sort, portant lea numenw 39391 a 44390 indus 
80 IW 1 I imbouraables au pair i parlir du 9 wplembr* 1985 ei cesaeront de 
porter inlereti, a ertte meme date. 

Le manual rtttanJ on circulation au 9 septeffibre 1981 sera de 

U3.mooo.ooo,. 

Lea obligations tirees au sort anlfricuiwioit et non encore presentees au 
rembouKemenl ponem les num&ros suivants: 

4m4795; 49564959; 49704971; 49834989; 5143-5144. 
en 1984' 

779-780; 783; 788-796: 827; 891-894; 900; 931-933; 963-964; 982; J042- 
1043; 10831131; 1206-1264; 1274-127& 1278-1284; 1309-1311; 1313- 
1316; 1331-1338; 1346-1349; 1447; 1469-1471; 1475-1479: 1566-I58S; 
1663-1667; 168S1700: 1717-1726; 1755-1756: 1768-1769: 1K2-1855; 
1937-1943: 1976-2050: 2055; 2078-2079; 2122-2128; 2154-2161; 2175- 
2195; 2234-225% 2289-2296; 2299-2302; 2430-2433; 2435-2436; 2452- 
2453; 2785-2789; 2921; 2968-2971; 3560-35844 3588; 36183619; 9439- 
9463. 

BANQUE INTERNATIONALE A LUXEMBOURG 
Sodeti Anonyme 

Agent Financier 

Luxembourg, le 22 <*out 198k 


SCM Corp . Rejects Bid 
From Hanson Trust PLC 


Compiled 6y Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — SCM Corp. re- 
jected on Thursday an unsolicited 
5720-milh’an takeover bid from 
Hanson Trust PLC, raying its 
shareholders would best be served 
if the company remained indepen- 
dent. 

u We think we can provide share- 
holder value by continuing the 
kinds of things we've been oping, 

and by con tinuing au independent 
role," said SOM’s chairman. Paul 
H. Bicker. “I think the sharehold- 
ers deserve that We’ve done well 
for them" 

Mr. Bicker also said that the 
company did not plan to seek a 
“white knight," or friendly suitor. 

Hans on, a British company with 
interests ranging from hoi dogs to 
lighting fixtures, said Wednesday 
that h intends to offer $60 a share 
for any and all of the equivalent of 
about 12 milli on shares of SCM. 

In response to the offer, SCM 
stock shot up S6 at the opening of 
the New York Stock Exchange on 
Thursday, to $64 a share, suggest- 
ing a feeling on Wall Street that a 
bidding war could break out for the 
company. SOM’s shares dosed up 
51.375 at $64375. 

Analysis and market sources 
said there was speculation that an- 


other bidder may appear since the 
Hanson price is lower than the $70 
to 575 per share that analysts have 
placed as the value of SCVTs com- 
mon shares. 

SCM, based in New York, man- 
ufactures products that include 
Smith-Corona typewriters, Gtid- 
den paints and Durkee foods and 
spices. 

Earlier Thursday. Mr. Elicker 
had said that the company was re- 
viewing the offer with its financial 
adviser, Goldman, Sachs & Co., 
and its legal adviser, WachteU Lip- 
ton Rosen & Katz. 

Chris Gnawer, manager of ac- 
quisitions Tor Hanson Industries 
Inc., the U.S. subsidiary of the 
London-based company, said Han- 
son believes it has adequate re- 
sources to finance the takeover 
with its own funds. 

Last month. Transworld Corp. 
agreed to buy a food-service man- 
agement concern. Interstate Unit- 
ed Corp M from Hanson for S91i 
million. 

Hanson has annual sales of more 
than SI 3 billion in the United 
States. 

SCM earned 541.8 million on 
sales of $2.18 billion in the fiscal 
year that ended June 30. 

(AP, Reuters) 


REGLJEMENT DE GESTION DU FONDS 
PARINTER FUNDS 


Modification de ['Article 16 
Article 16t G oi o n tie 

Paribas Aaaei Manage mem Inc^ New York, 

” — Banqne Paribas Belgique S_A^ Bruxelles. 

"en qnali le d'aeuonnairrs dr la Sociel£ de Geation. el 
" — Banque Paribas (Luxembourg) S Jk, Luxembourg; 

"en qnalile lant d’actionnaire de la Society de Gesuon que de 
"Banque Dfrpositaire, ganmtiseem ronjoinirmeni. et solidaire- 
"ment Tobservalion par la Soririe de Gestion de loulee les 
"clauses el conditions du present Rrglement. 

"La banque Deposilaire pramil I'aceomptusemem de sea de- 
"voire el obligations conformenjeni an present Reglemem de 
"Gestion." 

Fait 4 Luxembourg 

Pkrinler Management Company SA. 


i . 
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GOLF-INVESTMENT 



Germany's largest championship golf-course (36-holes) to go under 
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appears every 

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contact our office in your country 
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.92521 NenxDj’ Cedes, France. 
Telephone: 747.12.65. 
Tdec 613595. 




I 


13 Month „ , 
HMlLOW Stpt* 


ru.. vm PP tflHHMlUMr omcgtg 


Ifmrsdajs 

MEX 


Closing 


ToUes include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Well Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


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25% 2S%- 
17% 13 ' 

4% 4% 

102 102 - 
23% 23% - 
23% 23% - 
25% 25% 
1 % 1 % - 
7% 7ft- 
23* 23% ■ 
10% 10% 
15% 15%- 
7 7 

10 10 % 


4VS 
77% 
21(4 
8% 
20% 
13% 13% 
19% UW 
5% 5% 
9% 9% 
28* 

13% 

11* 

38% 

14% 

14% 


3 — 

ft 

1* 


8% — 

% 

1ft 


Bft + ft 

2% — 

ft 

2ft — 

ft 

4% 


1ft + % 

7ft 


3ft — 

* 

3% 


4ft + ft 

9ft 


9ft — 

* 

5% — 

ft 

7* + ft 

1ft — 

ft 

7ft — 

ft 

1* — 

ft 

2% — 

ft 

S% — 

ft 

4W — 

ft 

4ft — 

ft 

7M — 


Ift — 

ft 

8% 


Bft — 

* 

3% — 

ft 

9ft — 

ft 

5ft + ft 

9ft + ft 

— 

% 

3ft — 

ft 

1* — 

ft 

Ift 


tft — 

ft 

Sft — 

ft 

Oft + ft 



Bft 


»* — 

ft 

1* — 

ft 

9% 


+ ft 


u 


mm 9 % unvCm 

s iSSSSSS » 

1514 10% UnvPol 


20 12% 17% 12% — *S 
70 7% 7 7. — % 

-4 17% 14% !<*— % 
32 12*- 12% 32* +> 


TOM 9% 
27% 17% 
10 2 % 
23% 14% 
4% 3% 
14% 9% 

4% 2% 

* 5% 

4* 2% 

18% iz 

44* 53% 
19* 14% 


VSTn -30* 10 
Volsprs M 1-7 « 


• Mo 23 10 
JO IS 14- 


12 

84r 3 15 


9% 9ft— % 
25* 2584 + * 
8% WA — % 
17 HVr + ft 
4* 4% 

18% 18% 

4% 4ft— .ft 
A* 4% 

2 % 2 % 

14* 14% 

64ft 44* 

18* 18% 


3% -2 USRInd 
24* 8* Ultmte 11 

13% ais umcarp 
U* lift llnlcPPf .-75 50 
11% 8* unlmrn 1-44*137 

23 ft 15* UAIrPd JOB TO 
a 14% uncosF* a u * 
2% 1% UFhoOA .10 42 

2* |% UFoOdB 

TOW 11% UtMed IS 

I* 5% Uniurtv a 


40 2% 

142 13% 
153 12% 
9 15 
101 10 % 
ID 21% 
I lWa 
20 I* 
3 1 % 

75 15 
3 7* 


2% — £ 
13% — % 
12 — % 

10% — * 
21 «•— % 
19%—' % 
1 % 

1 % 

is + * 

TVS— % 


m 


S3 29% 
33% 18% 


42% 33% 
23% 10* 
4% 3W 
10* 4* 

8 * 2 * 
22 I* 
TO* BV> 
12% 4* 
4% 
5% 
4* 



14ft 

13ft 

14 

19% 

19* 

19* 

9ft 

9ft 

9ft 

11% 

11* 

IT* + ft 

T6ft 

ft 


15*— ft 
ft 

17ft 

17ft 

17*— ft 
17ft + ft 

17ft 

17ft 

21 

20% 

20% 

45% 

43* 

44ft— ft 

5ft 

5 

Sft— ft 

13ft 

13 

11 - ft 

17% 

12* 

12* + ft 

15% 

15% 

15* 

5% 

5% 

5% 

IDft 

10ft 

10ft— ft 

3 

2* 

3 

14% 

15ft 

15ft— ft 

14ft 

I4M 

14%-*- ft 

IS 

36 

33 

2% 

2ft 

2ft— ft 

Oft 

Oft 

Oft 

9% 

9ft 

9ft 


30! 

b 48ft 
13* 

48 

13% 

40ft 

13% 

1 

39% 

39ft 

39ft 

1 

93 

92 

92 

4 

22% 

21% 

21% 

1 

21ft 

71M 

21% 


82 

B3 

82 


S3 

83 

83 


5% 

5ft 

Sft 


7ft 

7ft 

7ft 

4 

4% 

4* 

4% 






7ft 

7ft 

7W 

Iff 

22% 

22% 

22% 

1. 

7S 

74ft 

75 


9ft 

9 



18% 

18ft 

18ft 


20* 

20* 

30* 


7% 

2% 

2% 

2 

9% 

9ft 

9* 


4* 




Bft 

8ft 

Bft* 


5% 

5 

5 

Z 

21% 

70ft 


1: 

31* 

31ft 

31%- 

31 

1% 

1ft 

1% 


10% 

10* 

TD* 


17ft 

17ft 

17ft* 


Sft 

5ft 

Sft 

11 

1% 

1% 

1% 

St 

22 

21ft 

21ft- 

26 

4 

3* 

4 


sales flour** or* imaffldaL Yearly Mohs and lows r*ned 
previous S3 week»ph*«h* current week- taut oat Ttt* knesr 
trading day- Wiser* a taW or stock dividend amounting 
oeicent or more lias been paid, the year's h loft-tow reno* and 
dividend are shown lor the new slot* only. Unless otherwise 
noted, rotas of dividends or* annual dtaburwments based on 
the latest dectorotlon. 
a— dividend oho extra (s)./l 
b— annual rate of dividend plus stock dhridenst/l 
c— Itairidailna dividend/) 

CM — cbUmL/I 

d — new yearly law.71 _ 

e— dividend declared or pold to preceding 12 manths/T 

g —dividend In Canadian funds, sutslccr to 15* non-rusktence 

tax, 

t— dividend declared after spIK-up or stack dividend. 

1— dividend paid this year, omitted, deferred, or no action 
taken at latest dividend ineeHno. 

k— dividend declared or poM this year, an occumvfortve 
Issue with dividends In arrears. 

n —new issue In the post 52 weeks. The Mgb-lew range begins 
wffh The start of trading, 
nd — next dav delivery. 

P/E — price-earrtngs ratio. 




■w 


14 8 5% 5% 

U 14 3 24% 24% 

13)348 1487 17* 14% 
13 % % 

6 - 5 8% 8% 

j is a H6%iu i 

6A 17 82 IS* 18% 

za -5 8 9% 9% 

IS » » 
427 9% 9%. 
20 7W 1% 


3 


49 3% 

49- 14* 
12. 4 

24 TOM 

M 11U 
32 3% 

15- a- 

. 74 evk 
•19 18% 
245 13W 
•.TO. 17 
. 10 . 20 % 
145 J2M 
74 23* 

TO 2* 
2072 '4% 
90 - 2% 
281-39% 
M3 13* 
- 14 Tft 

25 71%- 
40944% 
12 .8% 
no* 

4. 17% 
-233 3% 

12 14% 
252 10* 


. 3ft J%— * 
14% TOft_ U, 


4 4 . 

TO TOM ,+fJ 
10% 11M +fS 

2 * a*- % 

27% a + % 
4% 4ft 
10M TOM 
13 - 13% 

14* 1«* 

30 2D + ft 
TO 12% — ft 
23% 23ft— % 
2% 2ft— M 
- 4* 4VS-- 
2M ZU ‘ 

79 a - % 
12*13* + ft 

21 -21% — ft 

43% 44ft +1 
3M 3M — U 
1 ‘ 9- 
17M 17ft- ft 
.» 3 % 

MV, 14ft 
10% 10* + ft 


r— dividend declared or paid fn preceding 12 months. Plus 
sack dividend. 


lift 4* 
13ft 4* 
M% 4* 
21U 13* 
18% 6M ' 
15% 9ft 
4% TV. ' 
4M tft 
22% 14% 

77% a 

4% 3* 
20% 10% ' 
4M 2 
34* 24% 1 
lift «M ‘ 
14% 4% ’ 


.33t 6A IB 52 5% 

1619 5% 

32 7 Bft 

JO 1.1 13 17 18% 


5 

M 25 12 


15 

14 

12 

JO U I 


M U 15 
Ma 34 13 
21 


S% + ft 
5%— ft 
S* 

18% — % 
4* 

14%— ft 
4 

2 % 

14 

46%— ft 
4ft 

13ft— M 
2%— ft 
33*— % 
10ft 

7 + W 


sock cflvktencL 

s — stack spilt. Dividend Begins with data ol split, 
sis— sates. 

1— dividend poM tn stock In preceding 12 months estimated 
cash value on ax-dividend or ex-dlstrlbutlon data. . 
u— new yearly high, 
v — tradlna halted. 

vt— to Bankr u ptcy or receivership or Hekla reotponltadun- 
der the Bankruptcy Act. or securities assumed By such «mv- 


AMEX I%hs4j«»s 


NEW HIGH-' 


wd— when dMrlButad. 
rrt— when issued, 
ww — wllti awrants. 
x — ex-dividend or ea-rights. 
xdli — bx - distribution, 
n — without warrants, 
y — ex-dtvktand and sales In htlL 
y» — Y tokL 
z — sales lirfulL 


AmContlnd Aitilsraei 
Gorman Rue s H annafr ds 
ntartrgnlc' OzarkHlde 
weucoEnt wmcaxGbs 


AmMecEHd Dvneer 
LandmkBacn Lumet 
PorkChem S h op w e H In , 


AHHhcrMg Am Petraf Casablan Cojttotnd 

Devon Resin a DlracfAchin Graph Td, Implndust 

XantnCam LHestyRst Sfaiudn Scndthfl wt 

TennevEna vlTldweli WhbbDelun 


24% 14% 
22ft 15ft 
18% 13ft 
24% Iffe 
27% 10% 
7ft 3ft 
7ft 3* 
8 4% 

7ft 4% 
2% 1 
25* 16 
7% 5ft 
14* Aft 
lift ■% 


OEA 12 

Ookwd Mb 5 11 
OhArl 24 \A 
Dtialnd 40 1J 73 
Olsten S 24 .9 21 

OOklep 

Opponh JSe JO A0 
OrtofHA .15 il 
OrkilH B JO 4.1 
Ormond 

OSutvns A2 21 13 
OverSc 

OxtrdF J2t 42 10 
OzarkH 30 1J 12 


TOft 20ft + M 
17% 17% + % 
17ft 17* + * 
22 32 — ft 

25ft 20 + V4 

4% 4% 

4 4 + ft 

4ft 4ft 
4% 4ft 
1% 1% + ft 

2D 20 — ft 
5ft 5ft— ft 
13% 13% — % 
11 12 + ft 


Floating-Rate Notes 


Dollar 



8 4 

S5ft 19% 
7ft 2% 
3ft 2ft 
17% Aft 
4 4ft 
2ft 1% 
2 * 1 % 
40% 29% 
32ft II 
2* 1% 
3ft 7ft 
13 6% 

16ft 11% 


4% 2% 

Ift ft 
17% 4* 

lift 9 
4% 1ft 
10* A 
18* 6 
4ft ft 
22* 12* 
41 19% 

4ft 2* 


ICEEn 

ICHs 

ICO 

I PM 

IRTCP 

IS5 

imeGP 

Implnd 

impotla 

instms 

I rats y 

rnsSypf 

lately a 

Intmfc 

intBknl 

IMBkwt 

IntHyd 

IIP 

IntPrvt 

IntThrn 

InThrPf 

Into to 

Ionics * 

IroqBrd 

Isoly 


12 10 

7 558 

250 35 

50 

37 3 

.12 25 12 

.lie 4 A 41 

7* 

140 102 

jo u a 17 

a im 

251105 4 

A0 134 

-Mb * 32 

214 
37 

20 1 

M 9.1 42 4 


31 1104 
129 
36 

12 217 

24 48 

a 28 24 18 


f ^ 

7% 7% 
10% 10ft 
3ft 3ft 
7ft 4* 

30 19* 

40 39% 

2ft Tft 


17* 


50b 35 

9 

9 

14% 

14ft 

14ft — % 

7* 

5ft Jacobs 



7 

5% 

5% 

Sft— Vi 

5% 

2ft Jet Am 


a 

l» 

3* 

3ft 

3* 

2 




1 

* 

* 


9% 


Jit 95 

14 

8 

7% 

7ft 

7ft 

Oft 

3 JohnPd 



41 

3* 

3ft 

3ft — ft 

11% 

TV JahnAm 

JO 14 

11 

254 

0% 

■ 

8% + M 

11% 



4 

274 

V% 

Bft 

Bft— Vi 

7ft 

3ft jmojkn 


9 

14 

3* 

3% 

3% 


10% 4 Ouches 


59 10ft 9% 10ft + % 


3 1% 

77ft 21* 
Bft 5ft 
15% 12ft 
15% 12% 
7ft 3% 
29% 17% 
24* 19ft 
23% 10% 
7 3% 

8% 3% 
15% 12% 
5W 2 
7 4 


DWG .131 45 4 
DoleEn 32 1J 10 
DomnC 

Dome A 2J0 148 
DomEB 2J0 l&B 
Damson 5 

Damsel 250 128 
Domspf 175 18.4 
Dote Pd .14 1J 
Datarm 4 

Dr Rose 22 

DotVal IPS 11.1 9 

Delmed 

Dwntm J3t &4 12 


44 2 

M 24 
5 7% 

45 12% 

77 12* 
47 3% 

3 19ft 

4 70% 
123 12* 

41 5ft 
16 3% 
TO 15% 
324 2% 

2A 4% 


I* 2 + ft 

34 24 — % 

7* 7% — ft 

T2ft 12ft— ft 
12% 12% — ft 
3% 3% 

19ft 19ft — ft 
20% 20% - ft 
12ft 12% + ft 
5% S%— % 

3* 2*— ft 
15V, 15ft— ft 
2ft 2% 

4% 4% 


aft 


450 115 


SOOz39 

37* 

37* + V 

«% 

1% KodgKC 


5 

23 

3% 

3* 

Jft + (S 

13 

10% KoyJ n 

JOe IJ 

10 

10 

11* 

II* 

11*— K 

16 

9* KtorW 

AO 28 

19 

7 

14ft 

14ft 

14ft 

24 


80a 4.1 

W 

1 

IV% 

19% 

19%— ft 

23% 


581 33 

18 

4 

17ft 

17% 

17% — W 

9ft 

S* KevCo 

JOa 3 A 


4 

8* 

8% 

B* + V! 

17% 

8 KevPh 

30 18 

19 

375 

lift 

10% 

10% — n 

8 

2ft KevCo 


B 

14 

3% 

3* 

3*— V. 

4% 

2ft KMdewi 



8 

4 

3% 

J%— ft 

4ft 



31 

2 

3* 

3* 

3* + ft 

5 

3% Ktoorfc 



40 

4 

3* 

3% 

5% 

2* Kirby 



104 

2% 

2* 

7*— ft 

5* 



15 

4 

4ft 

4* 

4% 

3% 

2 KtoerV 

SS2T 8 


24 

2ft 

2ft 

2ft 

17ft 

10ft Know? 


18 

174 

17% 

17% 


14* 



14 

718 

14 

lift 

16 + ft 

30ft 

22% KogerC 

2J2 88 

83 

93 

29 

aft 

29 + ft 



JSt 58 13 
.12 3 45 

J2 4J 43 
•42 13 8 


80b 5.1 10 
30 
15 

30 1.9 18 


540 22 f 
56 23 

7 

30 15 13 
50 28 14 


9 7 

5 14ft 
84 17% 
1 12% 
5 18ft 
93 4 

3 11% 
43 40ft 
43 7% 

26 10% 
24 ft 
83 34% 
13 18% 
22 21* 
7 1% 

342 4% 
2 25% 
2 25ft 
26 7 

10 17ft 
237 25% 


7 7 

16ft 14ft— ft 
14% 17 — % 
17% 12% + ft 
lift 18Vk + ft 
3ft Ft- % 
11% 11% + ft 
39* 39* 

7ft 7* 

10ft 10W— 'A 
ft ft— fc 
aft »*- % 
18% 18ft— ft 
21% 21% — M 
1% 1* + * 
Oft Oft— ft 
ZSW 25ft + ft 
a* 35ft— ft 
4* Oft— ft 
14* 16*— ft 
25ft 2S% + ft 




r-(rrr 




Ite 





mm 




m 


m. 






.vri-’-H 

* \{ M . \t 4 


llntfMi 


m 


tn 




or 


Non Dollar 


ADVERTISEMENT 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 23. 19g5 



Page 15 


currency markets 



erinU.S. 




■ ^ . 


_NRV.yORK — 1116 dollar re- 


orders was skewed by a b&drop in there are still plenty of people will- 
the volatile nulitar™o*se<5Sr. wg to sell at the higher levels, said 


a dealer at a major foreign bank. 

Mr. Johnson said he sees the dol- 
lar holding in its current trading 
range in the weeks ahead. “We 
don't have any big economic re- 
pons until the third-quarter 'flash' 
- .. ~ • — and it 


Rei 


v,>* 


^^dfrom 14-monthlowssetin The dollar later cSosed in Lon- 

dou at 2.7440 DM," down 2S& pfen- 

J5J?, oprades in nigs from 2.7690 on Wednesday. 

^ dollar M jnuy gpod 

techniSuhortSSng le ch^cal sumort at marks.” 

^dollar failed to fall through^ key Earl j Johnson, vkc presidmtai GKP report in September, 

.support level ^ ” Chicago s Hams Bank-' jaere ^ tH y P g^)d numbers to 

' In London, the dollar Tdl more 101 ? sbort sdlers^t were ^ ^ ^yar higher ” he said, 

than 3 pfennigs from its Wednes- J? ^ < ? )vcr SSLPIS 111 eariier “ Europe, 

-day close, to 2.7325 Deutschp , Uon f 1 J^ Mn « didn t go bdow that meanwhile, the dollar was fixed m 
marks,- immediately after the US. Frankfurt at 2.7512 DM, down 3 

Commerce Department am^ In New York, the dollar rose* pfennigs from 17813 at Wedncs- 

that new orders received bv U5. nearly 2 pfennigs from Wednesday day’s fixing. 

; durable goods manufacturers, a 10 close at 2J640 DM, up from Other late European rates for the 
^ dosely watched indicator of the 2.7470; It also rose to 22640 Swiss dollar Thursday, compared with 
' i'&conoxny’ / health, fell a shorn 18 francs from 2.2505; to .8.4400 late rate Wednesday, included: 
percent last month. French francs from 83950 and to 23455 Swiss [rants, down from 




Dealers said, however, that the 
currency recovered from its lows 
once markets digested the fact that 
the size of the decline in durables 


1353.00 lire from. 133930. The 12765; 8.406 French francs .down 
British pound fdl to S 13980 from from 8.4995 and 1,846.75 lire. 
51.4030. down from 1,865.00. 

“It was a good bounce back, but fl/PZ, Reuters, IHT) 


THE EUROMARKETS 


Attention Focuses Again on Primary Market 


Experts From Private Sector 
To Meet on Eureka Funds 


Reusers 

BONN — financial experts 
from private industry m 1 • 
West European countries were 

SEWS* 5? 

"*?!£?***& 
government had proposed the 
conference as a means of gaug- 
ing the extent of financial sup- 
port from private industry for 
^ pr^, ini^ted by Fi^ 
with strong West German back- 

foreign Minister Hans- Die- 
trich Genscher of West Genna- 
ny and the French external af- 
fairs minister, Roland Dumas, 
discussed the proposal at a 
meeting in Bonn on Wednesday 
night and agreed to support it, 

the sources added. 

Eureka, a civilian program, is 
intended to help Western Eu- 
rope keep pace with technology 
cal advances in Japan and the 
United States. The govern- 
ments of the 17 countries gave it 
the political clearance at a rain- 



Hans-Dietrieh Genscher 

isterial conference in Paris in 
July. . . . , 

The sources said Britain had 
yet to issue formal invitations 
to the conference or name a 
date. But they said that it was 
expected to take place in Lon- 
don in mid-September and that 
it signaled growing British in- 
terest in the Eureka program. 


BUSINESS PEOPLE 


BP Announces High-Level Changes 

By Brenda Erdmann r“hSS- K^He JS^emasiuy and 

LONDON — British Petroleum g-J SmlrdSu bank. Baring 

Co. has announced a senes of high- Brothers & Co. 

Wei management change. c-_. „ e ^ ass j sw m vice presi* Westync Banking Cap. of Syd- 

oil <md gas. at Bank ofltar n=y ™ ^ 

York. manager, treasuiy, of us losyo 

prcSdenl rtlPAlaska Eqttora- S^S^nS^Londoa to 

uon Iuc.. a post in which he was Taguchi, forme riy m the Teg) -j^^Manliattan Bank, where he 
succeeded by Chris Gibson-Smith. headtpianers, su^dsJu^uKa- & the treasury de- 

in his new post, Mr. Gibson- mala, who has b^ inu^rred to 

Smith, who formerly was a chief Tokyo as general Short Brothers FLC, the Bdfast- 

geologist for BP and most recently bank’s investment-management aerospace company, has 

a Sloan Fellow at the Stanford department. elected Sir John Sparrow to the 

Graduate School of Business, will gaa^Scaato AB, the Swedish ye- rnn „ eml \ vt . 0 f deputy chaii- 
be responsible for oil exploration maker, said its aircraft dm- CTitia a Wig-standing vacan- 

and production in the United s j on formed a collaborative- ■ J 

States. prograxns sector to strengthearts 

Mr. Grundon took over his new ability to handle hffthersuDcon- 


icvel management changes. 

In London, it has named Jooniv. 
Grundon regional coordinator for flenl ’ 
the Near East, Middle East and 
Indian subcon Lin ent. He had been 
in San Francisco, where he was 


duties in London from John Or- traded biuine^ The new sector 
ange, who has moved w (Topenha- «B _be tetod 


Since 1977. Saab-Scamas 
division has participated as a sub- 


cy. Sir John was appointed a non- 
executive director of Shorts m 
1984 and is a director of the 
t bankers, Morgan Gren- 
Co. 



New Products 
For PC Users 


PS British Firms Are Invading V.S. Capital Market 

Matafocuadontonn™™™^ S^Sn'be'fcSd^Ll Ctato ^tato secondary msAa . dealers 





..again focused on the primary mar- 
p- ^ei, with several new issues m a 
Variety of currenctes emerging, 
dealers said. 

• . Activity in the secondary market 
sicked up during the day and 


(Continued from Page 11) 
build an American business on its 


2 S£JSi£S£!I?.S£ 

.. . J L .. .U. n^.:,w about the monthly swings in L.b- of L.r ^ Jod s _ Birabaum. director of the 

Rothschild s earnings- Lj> develoned without great company’s research 

than-exuecied 2.8 percent during opcrauuu ^ .^. — -- _ . f ^i .‘ Bul eventually tney wiu Even for those Bnush compames ^ capital” said that the system probamyrep- 

. ^ “^ ble w bmld a mean,ngful pteSr find Au they will hare to be every- Oral have worked at the ..Amman amounts 01 resents a greater knowledge base 

mg KBipenxnta year ovd JU ^ , h where, in all markets, or they will market the longest, settling that held byany single person 

these ^ S We than enough to ^ fw ^ve to caive out very comfortable slead v business has proven diffi- _ _ in our company.” 

while seasoned floating-rate inrnes S^teraci the upward revisit m “triSTaowing in- ™ che& " ra,L . Katy Ends Effort to Sell Th ^ course, is a central 

rf rSl? ^ ^ ^ U.S. GNP," one^trato at .U A 1 ^^gS i 1 SSSJS £e One problem is that some of the S .G. Warburg & Co, panel ^ _ n __. j nromise that has sustained the 

dealers added. -was^ttarfiim^dely. It was bank said. The Umted Staus re- S^kets gearing up for 24- British institutions have been ware London’s large Mcrcurj'Secun ik 

quoted ai atom of about 1ft. ported earber ibis week trading, firrancial-services of exposing themselves to the U3. group,CMietoNew York b> team- . 

WdmanaEer was the Bank of gross national product, a measure nonr irauras. necessary to secumies industry's sharp earnings ^g with Kuhn Loeb & Co. in 1 952. United Press ntemumai 

The 1 cm manager was tneuanit oi ^ „ lwnS aosl6ot ? & total fluctuations. That allowed it to gain access to ELGIN. Dlinous- Katy Indus- 

operate m every Key nnanc Rolhschild Hoidbgs PL C. for many U.S. corporate diems and ^ lnc . has endedjts aiienmt to 

j. Kotnscnna no ^ ^ Kuhn Loeb an entree to us se n lls Mi 5 soun-Kaf«as-Texas 


gen as managing director of B.P. 

As head of BP’S Danishunit, Mr. oodwijt 
O range succeeds Denis Dunstont rS w D ^ 0 ^ the British 

who has become chief executive of Corpus 
BP Detergents International in nf ^ 

SSSlSLSSS“ J^in^DennisGepptoto 

(Continued from Page J I) 

engineer after a production prob- 
larTis spotted. Researchers at the 
company said that the system had 
reduced quality problems, and 

according to some of its officials, it padiy," said Fran^ois J-P. May^. sharply improved the performance 


of workers. 


ai'5S!S5- = S! r ji| , !ri , l! LtSSt'S ab0 P l to monUtly swings 
aJJwSto^tSndSS CSSd U^SSt SSSZS.'HSmS-' toaily. “Bn. evenly theyjatD 


the doUar-strmght sector generally mg UM paeav a you 
closed with rises of « to % pram 3*n i^d pno^ 




f -. 


*h 


Trading was quite active during 
the afternoon, with some signs that 
retail operators were beginning to 
re-enter the market, a trader said. 

' The expected SlOO-rmllion con- 
vertible issue for Fugi Bank Ltd. 
emerged early in the morning as a 
two-tranebe issue targeted sepa- 


gross naaonai piuuuu, - 

of the total value of a nation's total 
WEttn***** goods and *rvic«,.rose ata 2- 
launched a 75-minion-European percent annual rate in the second 


Tokyo International Ltd. 


currency-unit bond paying 8% per- quarter, 
cent a year over three years and 


Reuters 


' l\ r-' 


Sood, Africa UMon Slows 

■SfsSrfiSiSStSagS 

tf-ad-Tnanased bv Fmi mside the 1-percent seUmg conas 
sion. Lead manager was Chase 
Manhattan Lid. 



tranche was lead-managed by Fmi 
International Finance Ltd, while 
inohe S2B-mIIlion part, targeted at the 
"' Asian investors, was led by Fuji 
International Finance (HK) Ltd. 


was 


Steachtods in «ch others cently received a takeover e 

PRETORIA-Tlie^Mr-i<>y^ toto J. RotWSfd — which 

consumer-price inflation rate m spending vtsniy a small leveraged-buyoui 

South Afnra slowed to 15.93 per- op ^ ’X in , banks have not need- operation in New York — was 

The Danish-krone sector saw_a cent in July from 16.44 percent in ^ York that badly up tempted to sell its stake because. 

30O^nilhon-kroner brad for the Fi- June. 


v, v . j i nn _ moVncTowns 50 percent of L.F. gave Kuhn Loeb an entree to us se n Hs Missoun-iSJiisas-icxw 

That means New York and Loch n^iS^Towbin. a wviable roster of European clients. Railroad Co. unit to the Misssoun- 

don and now Tokyo. U S Bnudi 5^“J’ r ^ l ^7p ec i a ii 2 es in The two parted ways in i 1964 . and Pacific Railroad, offiaals said 
and Japanese banking and secun- Warburg^perated in New York n^y. 

ties firms have been rushing to«- f^ver offer, through a small office that was an 


Katy Ends Effort to Sell 
Its Railroad Subsidiary 

years or more, as many said at the 
conference. 

Some university researchers were 
cautious about the commercial ef- 
forts on display at the conference. 

“There is as much marketing 
hype" in artificial intelligence “as 
there is in all other areas of com- 
outixuL* 1 said Dr- Alan K- Mack- 

* ■ _ r MMtforMtrV* 


^aaaass -3.3*1“ 


“Traditionally, me onuau mu- *«■» j - 1 — n wnn v, chairman of the conference 

chant banks didn’t make markets road, known!* *eKaty. to the University of 

Securities in a big way, and they siSiffiom British Columbia, 

didn’t have great distribution ca- Pacific Coip. for 5108 million. 



ut l !« 


Thursday^ 



Brices 


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Via The Associated Press 




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25V* 17ft Svmsts 
M 139* Service 
88* av, SweFrd 
18 I2to SevQrt 
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401* 40«t 40ft + ft 
19 19 19 -ft 

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7BW 69ft 70*6 + ft 
5ft Sto Sto 
Ato 616 6*6 

44W 43V* 43ft— 9k 
20V. 199* 19ft + ft 
79* 7ft 79* + ft 

16 ISto 15*6 
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Bto Bft Bft— to 
Uft 13 13*6- to 

6 5ft 6 + » 

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36 3516 M + Jj* 

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27ft 27ft 27ft 
12 1194 lift- ft 

AV* 6*6 61* 

12 119* lift- V- 

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9%* 496 VU 

16 716 VLSI 

12%6 fto VWC 
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29ft 21ft Worths 
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1 


























INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 1985 


Is 6 7 


[ r W i5 T r FT r I PEANUTS 


WHERE'S MV CAPP1E? 


128 1 29 130 ^■311 1 32 1 33 



OH, HERE 1 
i VOU ARE j 




IF IT GET5 TOO HEAVY, 
WE CAN ALWAVS 
TA<E OUT THE TEE5.. 





BLOND IE 


| AND SHE SA1R 
I WHEN HE SAID. 


k AND HE SAID m 
WHEN SHE SAID.. 


Also THEN SHE Tin* 
-I SAID... ' 


ACROSS 


1 Guinness, the 
knight 

5 Buys pies or 
ties 

10 Hitchcock title 

14 El .Tex. 

15 Social restraint 

16 Eternally 

17 Famous 
penultimate 
words 

18 Skull part 

19 Stag party, 
sometimes 

20 Erstwhile 
N.Y.C. 
newspaper 

23 Pinball "wrist 
slap” 

24 Serval. e.g. 

25 Fleet 

28 East, in Essen 

31 Flower part 

35 Author Eliav 

36 Chevron 
stripe, in 
heraldry 

38 Palindromic 
dir. 

39 Erstwhile 
N.Y.C. 
newspaper 

42 Kiangor quagga 

43 Diner offering 

44 Zola book 

45 Half a dozen is 
one 

47 Ten: Comb, 
form 

48 Lab heaters 


49 Lament to Bo- 
peep 

51 Utile Sheba's 
creator 

53 Erstwhile N.Y. 
newspaper 

59 Arp’s cult 

60 Kind of lace 

61 Black, to Blake 

63 Zealous 

64 Fix in the mind 

65 Wild plum 

66 New Year’s 
Eve word 

67 Maudlin 

68 Ornamented 
wig 


1 Act as if you’re 
Rich 

2 Trellis 
component 

3 Varese's 

Palazzo d’ 

4 Flatterer of a 
sort 

5 "Mountain 
dew” producer 

6 Wrought by an 
artisan 

7 Newspaper 
item, for short 

8Likea 
student's D 

9 Super follower 

19 Disprove 

11 Where many a 
host roasts 

12 Fountain of 
jazz 


a/23/as 

13 ". .. 1 saw 

Elba- 

21 Foreign 

22 More shameful 
C. 25 Rani’s mate 

26 Originated 

27 Pope 
proclaimed a 
saint in 1954 

29 Like an old 
bialy 

30 Diversion 

32 Hard nut to 
crack 

33 Yoga posture 

34 Chanteuse 
Horne etal. 

36 Traffic-light 
part 

37 Hollywood 

construction 

40 Knobby 

41 Bank offering 
46 Grate 

48 “Joe 

Orton play 
50 Speak off the 
cuff 

52 Penurious 

53 Penn term 

54 One-eyed god 

55 This is served 
in the clink 

56 The Labe, to a 
German 

57 Willing pursuer 

58 Kind of point 

59" KapitaJ" 

62 Ellen Louise 

Wilson, 

Axson 


BEETLE BAILEY 


THE GENERAL HAP L- — J* 
SON\£ NEW TRAFFIC / X l 

e\eu s put up ./know ! 


X HAVE THE FEELING 

he poegn't want us 

TO 60 ANYWHERE 




ANDY CAPP 


. CHW50H yHh.ui X— ratals. I 
OWL by Mam 1/iMi Sfndoata 


THANKS. 



MIND 
DHOPPlhO 
TH^INAT 


MAH3aH> ALL THIS TW^jAND 

E STIU. MAKETVCMlSXAKEOF . 


/'ZTTN TONKINS I CAN 

[TQ4 ) WITH J12STSAV»<?TWMg 


LAUNDERETTE 
FORME? 


WIZARD of ID 


® New York Tunes, edited by Eugene Maleska. 




vmta& y&u vcm, em? N n 

J TSrafe 


WHAli i ; 
#. 1 
^m&? » > 


'Fimm&w , 1 
mve-wr-im- d & 


rMm 




mffi 


REX MORGAN 


IS THIS WHAT I 

think rr is, ~ 

MISS GALE ? J 


IT COULD BE — 


PERHAPS WE'D BETTER SHOW 
THESE TO DR. MORGAN IT MAY 
PARTIALLY EXPLAIN WHAT 
HAPPENED TO youR WIFE, BRADY 


XT CAN ALSO 
EXPLAIN A LOT 
OF OTHER 
THINGS ! 





* THAMKS a LOT. A 6UYSURE ’PREOATES A 
RESlTOOVt WHEN HE'S RUNN1N' AWAY FKM HOME [ ' 


GARFIELD 



THERE MUST BE /MILLIONS 
, OF ANTS DOWN THERE 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
• by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


I WONPER HOW VOU TELL 
THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN 
„ BOV ANTS ANP GIRL ANT5, 


I GUESS THEV PIPNT 
HAVE ANV TROUBLE 
RGURING IT OUT 


Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one loner to each square, to form 

four ordinary words. 


WHAT DO YOU THINK 
OF THAT POET? 


ORPEN 


KYSHU 


srs KHZ* 








KROMES 


VEELEN 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Wirid Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse Aug. 22 

Oating prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow} 

JixnUes: VENOM TOOTH BYGONE MOTION 

Answer How those folks who enjoyed eating gilts 
sang — -in “HOMINY" (harmony} 


WEATHER 


Algarve 
Amsterdam 
. Alberts 
Barcelona 
Bel g r ade 
Banin 


CoMalmrm 
.Costa Del Sal 
DtMn 


S n lr 

16 61 O 

25 77 fr 

20 68 fr 

14 57 fr 

12 54 fr 

22 72 r 

II 52 tr 

14 57 tr 

13 55 lr 

19 64 tr 

10 50 O 


Belling 
Kona Kona 
Manila 


Scoot 

ShanetMl 


Ed la Du rata 

16 

61 




1 Ftormca 






■ Frankfort 

28 

82 

12 


fr 

.Gce-sw 

S 

84 

13 


ri 

. HtriikOd 

19 

66 

13 



Istanbul 

79 

m 




Laa Palmas 

29 

84 




' UalSssi 

29 

84 

18 


tr 

■ Leawlajs 

20 

<8 




.IW!«kTUI 

- 36 

97 




Milan 

31 

88 

21 



Moscow 

20 

68 




Mualcb 

» 

84 

11 


fr 

Nice 

a 

82 

22 



OHO 

i* 





Paris 

25 

77 

19 



Pranas 

27 

81 

11 



RaYKicnrik 

13 

55 

10 

50 

d 

Rome 

29 

84 

19 



Stackbcim 

18 

64 

13 

a 


Slmtoara 

29 

84 

13 

53 

fr 

vealca 

30 

86 

19 

66 

fr 

Vtenaa 

27 

11 

16 

61 

tr 

wtaraow 

21 

70 

11 

52 

d 

Zorich aa 82 

MIDDLE EAST 

» 

54 

lr 


25 

77 

12 

54 

fr 

Beirut 

33 

90 

23 

73 

fr 


40 104 

16 

61 

fr 


31 

88 

19 

66 

fr 

TM AWlV 

33 

VI 

22 

72 

lr 

OCEANIA 


15 

59 

11 

52 

d 

SVIfMV 

15 

59 

13 

55 

r 


AFRICA 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

31 V 25 77 lr 

28 82 21 70 a 

28 82 24 7S a 

31 88 34 75 sh 

35 95 25 77 o 

32 93 24 75 lr 

31 SB 26 79 Cf 

31 88 26 79 a 

30 86 26 79 r 

31 M 24 73 d 


Hivetd Steel 
►Poor 
Nadbanfc 
Pnet Stem 
Rusotat 
SA Brows 
St H e len a 

West Mowing 


3400 3«M 
ZJM 2750 
520 515 

7675 »Ea 
1370 1365 
5200 5175 
T740 1790 
740 7S5 

3200 3200 

m m 

4050 6108 


SMI 

STC 

Sid Chartered 
Sun AUtana 
Tata and Lyle 
Team 
ttmtoemi 

T.I.Crw 
T rafalgar Hse 
THF 
Ultramar 
Unilever ( 
United Biscuits 
Vickers 
Waotworih 


<8$ 613 

% A 

511 520 

4£0 445 

25B 260 

364 367 

373 376 

375 375 

138 138 

218 216 

10 29/6410 29/64 
185 182 


F.T.JO IWn : 98720 
Prwieus : MUD 
FX&e-HO (nan : 130970 
pim u flns ; nun 


Cold Storage 
DBS 

Fraser Neave 

Haw Par 

indKaaa 

Mai Banking 

OCBC 

OUB 

DUE 

SnarorHa 
Slme Darby 
3 ’pare Land 
Stare Press 
S Steamship 
SI Trading 
United Overseas 
UOB 


268 268 
424 4S2 

565 530 
2.13 2.14 
223 126 

1C UD 
7.95 8 

560 26? 
220 230 


W tit 
221 122 
560 565 

OBS 085 
1H) 3.12 

163 1-53 

362 364 


PrWfMM : TT2760 


Com merzbank lode* : H3660 
Previous : 141660 


Alaien 
Cairo 
Cape Tows 


31 88 21 70 
35 95 23 73 
18 44 11 52 
26 .79 20 68 


AWr.C BS Genl index : 21130 
Pravleas : 217 JO 


Teats 31 88 ! 

LATIN AMERICA 

Bee n es Aires 19 66 


29 84 23 73 a 

21 70 10 SO a 

31 88 24 75 fr 


Be en es Aires 19 64 5 

Caracas 26 79 28 

LAna 21 70 13 

Mexico CUT 25 77 11 

RIb do Jaoetru 24 75 18 


NORTH AMERICA 


AMboraoe 13 55 7 

Attata 31 88 W 

gfUo n 20 68 15 

CWcogo 25 77 13 

32 90 M 
DMrdt 24 7S 11 

HMOtata 32 90 24 

HooHoa 35 95 23 

Las A n gel ss 30 86 18 

Miami 33 91 24 

fl bm e u ii u lts 25 77 15 

Mjatroal 25 77 n 

*WW 25 77 13 

ItawYofX 24 75 16 

San Francisco 20 68 14 

jjea"M 25 77 10 

Toronto 33 91 28 

W HU u U l MI 26 79 15 

o-avercast; oc-pority daudv; 


truuuar. irnwFi in— 

sh- Stowers; jw-snow; sFstarmv- 


Bk East Asia 
Cheung Kang 


China Unfit 
Green Island 
Horn Seng Bank 
Henderson 
China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK Realty A 
HK Hotels 

HK Land 

HK Shane Bonk 
HK Telephone 
HK Yaumatel 
HK Wharf 
Hutch Whampoa 

S un 
i ary 
Jartflnc 
JardbieSec 
Kowloon Molar 

Miramar Haw 
New World 
Orient Overs e a s 
SHK Proas 
Shriux 

Swire PadflcA 
Tal Cheung 
vwi Kwena 
WtneleckA 
Wins On Ca 
Winter 
World Inn 


2260 22 
1830 1SLS0 
16 1560 
860 08 
4735 4535 
2625 260 

1060 1060 
*25 835 

1218 1210 
38 38 

745 SS 
9 9 

365 3325 
7.15 7 


0.95 035 

1290 1270 


1460 1460 
9.15 9 

4460 45 

^ «| 
1360 1330 
360 270 

2560 2560 
2075 2 

090 090 

163 


2375 S 


Hang Seen index ; 1*7167 
P i - e v ie w s 5 165098 


Straits Times led Index : 75238 
Provtou* : 75117 


StoefcMn 


BOOKS 


WOMEN LIKE US 


By JJz Roman Gallese. 252 pages. $15.95. 
William Morrow, , 105 Madison Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. 10016. 


y* isn't rr silly? we * 

POraSOTTD PLAY CARDS 


Reviewed by Anne Chamberlin 

S OME of us can remember covering events 
at the National Press Club in Washington 
from a sort of balcony purdah, high above the 
baiimnm , watching as the male reporters ate 
lunch. The day a cheeky friend and I brought 
snacks, we were banished to the back stairs. 
We wouldn't have dared to ask for equal pay m 
those days. If we were caught domg men s 
work, we might be busted back to the typing 
pool where we belonged. . 

For women like us, the idea of an masters m 
business adminis tration from Harvard Busi- 
ness School was too farfetched even to contem- 
plate. We watch in wonder as young women 
doctors, lawyers and reporters emu more in 
their first jobs than we ever made in our lives, 
complaining all the while that they're still not 
getting their due. r „ 

For women like us, “Women Like Us, a 
study of 82 of the 88 women who enrolled at 
Harvard Business School in the aut umn of 
1973 , brings discouraging news: The problem, 
it seems, is men. 

We'd bad inrimatiaDS as we fallowed the tale 
of Maty C unningham- class of T9, and Wil- 
liam Agee, daw of '63, the H&dfse and Abe- 
lard of the Bendix boardroom. Bui one as- 
sumed that their case was unique. 

The profiles that unfold in these pages show 
tha t, while the words may differ, the music is 
the same: A woman may have an MBA from 
the most prestigious business school in the 


right.” For six years. Suzanne-had been a 
pediatric muy.; she had signed on at Harvard 
after being rejected for ajob bya Boston bank 
because she couldn't type. 

Despite its absorbing material, this book is 
tiresome to read. The author, a former Wall 
Street Journal reporter, tends to turn her tape 
. recorder on and forget to turn iLoff, even wbein 
she’s talking to herself. (She has hatlpiDl^ans, 
too.) The dialogues tend to sound like a Tup^ 
perware party or an all-giri luncheon g? 
Scfaraffr’s. She interviews , ax key graduates 
twice — briefly at the beguiling of the book, in 
deeper detail later — 'which makes Ji hard (o 
keep people straight She also skips back and 
forth within the interviews .to interview others 
about the person she’s internewing, mid inter- 
jecting her reactions to what is being said. The 
whale wprks could have. used. some sharp 
■ shears and another trip thrtHigh the typewriter. 


Harvard. 

Far "Mary Pat” (all have imaginary names, 
we're assured), disaster struck before she even 
got her degree: A dashing fellow student spent 
the ni g ht , then told her to get lost She was so 
devastated she could hardly finish the crucial 
assignment due the next day, and she seems to 
■have been drawn ever after into mistake after 
mixialce in her business and personal lives. 
“Phoebe,” attractive and vivacious, is persuad- 
ed to enroll at Harvard by her South American 
boyfriend, who later marries ho*, and beats her 
so badly that she shows op late for work. 

“Tess” had been jilted by a lover and turned 
down for a stewardess job by five airlines 
before she read “Sex ana the Single Girl" by 
Helen Gurley Brown — five times — and got a 
grip on herself. By the time she enrolled at 
Harvard, she had found a husband and a good 


Anne Chamberlin, a Washington writer, wrote 
this review for The Washington Past. - 


Xerox Copier Becomes: 
■A'U. S. Museum Piece ; 


Untied Press International 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


EEnn aaaol anaaQ 
anon gqsg qqqqei 
deed oaao manna 
DDaaaaaaaaaaaa 
DE3EEH] ciEannHo 
□anna Eicasnna 

□DOE □□□□□□ Q0n 
DGBO EDHEH □□□□ 
cioa QEcianE hsse 
EDQDI 3B asaaa 
□DQQEQC3 atrania 
EaGaaaasEnnaHa 

□DODD QEI3G EIEHI0 

BBEina aaaa sana 

DGSBS aEEE aOEQ 


. 8/23/8S 


tne machine mat revolutionized office opentf 1 
‘ tibns; to die Smithsonian Institotion’s Natiotr- 
al Museum of Amoican Hist ary to cddjraip 
the 25th anniversary of the mood’s introduc- 
tion. 

The 914 was the first entry in wharbas 
-become a S27-b21ion-a-year industry. It was 
the first copier to use the dry copying process 
called xen»raphy (from die Greek for^dry^L 

The maennie made an tmlimitivi number of 
copies automatically at seven copies a nrinul£ 

" Production of the 914 stopped in 1976 after 
: 200,000 had been installed woridwkte. A oxxss- 
pany official said about l,60Dwere still in us£ 

'• "The 914 completely redefined the flow, the 
speed and the exchange of information,” said 
Xerox’s chairman, David T. Kearns. “For the 
first time in the history- of printing, it was 
economically feasible to make a single copy of 
anytiung anybody wanted to put on paper." ” 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


O N the diagramed dea l, 
North-South used a re- 
verse sequence in which the 
threc-club preference bid was 
forcing. The connect can al- 
ways succeed. If, for example, 
West leads a diamond and 
East returns a trump, South 
can maneuver to rim aQ his 
hearts in the dummy with no 
great difficulty. 


Sooth would eventaalfy : have 
to rdy on finding the two re- ‘ ■ 
main mg trumps evenly split - 
This would have paid off, but 
he selected a reasonable alter- • 
native by finessing in hearts, west 
W hen this foiled, and with it akhii 
the slam, East-West had nearly J}/® 75 
all the match points on the *42 
deal, and, eventually, the tide. 

HaUUMP 


NORTH 
♦ QJS4 
VS 

<► >.7«a 
4KH97 


EAST CD) 
* A 9 7 6 2 
9 J 194 
0 A 194 
*11 


However, West led a trump 
and the attempt to ruff all 
three hearts became risky. 


1* 

Pern 2 * 
PM8 3.9 

Pom |* 


SOOTH 

* — 

9 A Q 6 2 

* KQ J S 

* A Q 3 8.3 


Wanted nwc&b two. 


Eut iad W«Bt were tatnenttc. 


A<£A 

Alta Laval 
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Astra 

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Balldan 
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Ericsson 
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Handefstonlcm 

Ptormacta 

Soee-Scanta 

Sandvlk 

Skstmlw 

SKF 

5w«flsJiMafcti 

Volvo 


IIS 116 
186 187. 

296 300 

n!cl ita! 3 ™ 1 


& ® 

IS IS 

VA Vd 


Pravlau: 3f*6i 


MB Currant Imm : 1691 
PiwMI : I5T9 


ACI 

ANZ 

BHP 

Bonn 

Bougainville 

CasttamaHM 

Coles 

ComalcD 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunlop 

EUers ixl 

■Cl Australia 

Maaelion 

MIM 


260 . 3 
<66 JJW 
7.16 730 

251 261 

m « 


Nat Auxf Bank 
News Corn ... 

N Broken HIH 
PosvWan 
QWCaalTrud 
Sonias 

TMnias Nation 
Western Mlnloo 
Wsstaac Bonftlna 
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730 760 

465 ASA 
168 1.98" 

574 538 

262 xn< 

263 250 

210 113 

ZI5 215 

260 240 

261 Z49 

336 337 
468 4.78 

A90 SM 
268 245 

460 460 

131 132 

564 &S4 

216 220 
4.10 4.14 
465 430 
161 160 


12 £ 


All Ordinaries Index : 
Prevtoae : 95660 


373 374 

BBS 895 


ewstothcWcxkfs 




Aik 


M6asfiawssf«s?' 

confides to the author that Aar sec hfe B 
mess. Next “Tess” was fired from her job. cut 
soon found another, paring 560,000 a _year. She 
has decided to go into therapy and is fee l in g a 

strong physiou attraction for the corporate 
recruiter who found her her job. Cl ea^ |J , 
gods wifi have more sport with ^ess and 
“Martha” and “Holly” and aD the rest down 
the road. ... 

Sex is not the only weapon in w ? r - 
“Stoanne,” the one woman among the 82 who 
personifies for the author what it takes toreach^ 
the top — no personal involvements, a single-^ 
wrimiwt obsession with, work — faces the age- 
old diff erences that won’t go away. Discussing 
a man she h«* recently hired, she reflects: “I 
began tarealize that he expects to have contin- 
ued promotions. . ; . He is so self-confident 
and so unhnriible that U surprises me. ... I 
don't dare- ask for something more until 1 fed 
sure they can't say no. And that in a way 
worries me about getting into senior manage- 
ment. Because I don't believe it’s my birth- 


inf* 






























INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBl/NE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 1985 

SPORTS 



Page 17 


oronto ’s Lead to 3 Games 


• " S V 


V»*i. ' . ~ ; — ■'“"w rnsi 

been since July 21 

-*rftss.te 

Oft aw OT(»s, pine unearned 

™f an ^ 8-bioop single that be- 
came, effect ivrfv •> < 


Re %, 

"o witt, the help QftwoSS^ 

•" i an i Eu f s W* C0 “W call this a 
.’.' •■ ^fe,.f ai l. Y ank ^ Manager 

V ■ - V* Ma f tUL fiat’s not thetest 

" j;. we can play." ucsl 

- 17 * : - Vanfcees won their seventh 

; T -> 3 BSBS 8 S& 




Guerrero’s 


toby only three games in ibcArner* 
“an League East after being bo 
tuna by seven games a wedcago. - 
nicher Dave Righetti, the eveo- 
t*uJ winner, was on -..the mound' 
Jf® **o unearned runs erased a 
10~8 New York lead in the ninth 
mniy ^ 

Juan fccniqutt blooped a single 
to nght field. Qne.-'MUA 
tojrow to third base hit basenmner 
Rod Carewand rdfed awaylOrew 
beat the throw home and ca tc her 
Butch Wynegar, trying to get Beni- 
guez. threw to an uncovered third 
base- Beniquez scored easily. 

But in the lOih^AngeJ third base- 
Jack HoweJTs throwing error 
lei Don Baylor scorc from third 
base and i^bby Meadiam fol- 
lowed with a two-run single. 

Meacham and teamma te' BiHy 
Sample drove in three tubs- each. 


Don Mattingly had one of New 
York's »x doubles,, stretching his 
hitting streak to 19 games. 

The. Yankees scored four times 
is the first, but the next tune they 
came up they were down, 5-4. Brian 

BASEBALL ROUNDUP 

Downing’s I5th homer of the year, 
two walks and Reggie Jackson’s 
ran-scoring angle chased starter 
Joe Cowley; Bob Shirley came in 
and Bobby Grich hit a three-r\m 
home run. 

In the second, Rickey Hender- 
son hit a two-run homer and Win- 
field and Billy Sample doubled, but 
Howell answered with an RBI sin- 
gle to make it 7-6 after two innings. 

- Indians 5, Blue Jays 2: In Cleve- 
land, Neal Heaton’s six-hitter and 
a home run and two runs batted in 


from Joe Carter allowed the Indi- 
ans to survive back-to-back fifth- 
inning homers by Jesse Barfield 
and Cedi Fielder. 

Rangers S, Red Sox 3: In Boston. 
Gary Ward hit a three-run homer 
in the first and Texas went on to 
hand the Red Sox their sixth 
straight loss and tbdr 1 1th in 12 
games. 

Orioles 11, Mariners 8; In Seat- 
tle, a 10-run third enabled Balti- 
more to outlast the Mariners. Tun 
Beattie walked the first three bat- 
ters he faced and was relieved by 
Frank Wills, Eddie Murray dou- 
bled in Alan Wiggins and Lee 
Lacy, and WQls walked Fred Lynn 
to reload the bases. First baseman 
Alvin Davis’s throwing error on 

Mike Young's grounder allowed 
two mor6 runs and Lanv Sheets 
and Floyd Rayford singled in a run 


By Thomas Boswell 



— Even in a compkx age 
’ KWBfcmes meet a man as siiimte and 

hard as the poverty that made him. 

' ' Guen ^j^ and that’s dose 

• When you are bom poof in San Pedro 
m the Dominican Rer " " 

■ upward or you sink down. You 
you cut cane for a life time 



funds 11 youth teams. “I will do anything for 
that little town." 

“Pfedro never forgets his friends," says Mota. 
Or Iris parents, for whom he has bought a home, 
or his toother, who lives in his Los An ‘ 
condnmimiriimi, or even rookie teammate ] 


to Infinity 


demerits against a man who plays hart, hard 
and smart. 

One story says enough about Guerrero as a 
player. Save it for The Natural H. Last month 
nis back, which is subject to dislocating spasms. 


back, which 
had a spell so severe 


to dislocating spasms. 
Manager Tom Lasorda 


■uaCa* 



* nJi?| WayS 1 10 make h in the 

ft “Jp 01 ! leagues someday ,*says Pedro Guerrero, 
who signed a pro contract atl6 and thisyea^ 
ir r?» may oc lbe most vahmhfc nimn- ,n <h« 


***■ 






•jev 


N«S lLSL”® vahsbfc ^ 

■ smooth! inmhKaSe ' fOS ixxiffzs ana gets 11. Alter me smite, uuerrcro 

missed the fint game back and Ae Dodgers 
: Twenty vrem: S, w * jL T weren’t even going to fine him until the league 

i il 1 >*» fOT AW 

| Dominican Republic. To the children who 
j swarmed around Mm he threw mma 

Now the children of San Pedro de Macons 
.have grown up. A dcLcn are in the 

■ among them Joaquin Andujar, George BeD, 

V Tony Fernandez, JoKo Franco, Alfredo Griffin 

and Juan Samuel. 


iano Duncan (yes, also from San Pedro), who told him to leave the game. “Let me give it one 
lived with Guerrero and his wife for three swing,” said Guerrero, 
months. .. . One swing was more like a half-swing, as 

n Guerrero retry ared his back. Bui it resulted in 

one 430-foot game-winning homer over the cen- 
ter-field fence. Guerrero needed 40 seconds to 
walk the bases, then was out of the lineup for 
more than a week. 


Bullet's be honest Guerrero is no saint Just 
a proud, driven and ample man, remember. He 
is as vain as be is handsome, poring in front of 
minors for minutes at a time, seemingly trans- 
fixed. He expects special treatment from the 
Dodgers and gets it After the strike, Guerrero 


each. Reliever Roy Thomas came 
on and got an out but Wiggins 
singled and Lacy singled for two 
more runs. Cal Ripken followed 
with a RBI double; Murray's run- 
producing groundoui closed out 
the scoring. 

The outburst equaled the 
league’s single-inning high for the 
year {Minnesota scored 10 runs 
against Detroit on April 30). 

A"s4, Tigers 3: Tn Oakland, Cali- 
fornia, the A's rallied for four runs 
in the ninth against reliever Willie 
Hernandez. Donnie Hill's double 
and singles by Dave Collins and 
Mike Heath made it 3-1. A bases- 
loadcd grounder by Alfredo Grif- 
fin brought Oakland to within a 
run. Steve Henderson, batting Tor 
Dwayne Murphy, hit a shot past 
center fielder Chet Lemon, who 
chased the ball down and got it 
back in to first baseman Dave 
Bergman as Heath scored the tying 
run. Bergman threw to second but 
the ball hit Henderson in the back; 
shortstop Alan Trammell finally 
threw home — too late to get Grif- 
fin. 

Royals 2, White Sox 2: In Chica- 
go. George Brett’s I7th home run 
of the year broke a 1-1 tie in the 
fourth and Charlie Leibrandt and 
Dan Quisenberry combined on a 
six-hitter as Kansas City nipped 
the White Sox. 

Brewers 3, Twins 2: In Milwau- 
kee, Robin Yount’s bases-loaded 
single in the ninth gave the Brewers 
a sweep of their thre 
with Minnesota. 



iree-game series 



_ .. We camot know how many children, like 
Guerrero, looked at Mota, Rico Carty, Juan 
■ -Manchal and the three Alou brothers and' said, 
•Aiafr the way oul” Weonly meet die few, like 
Guerrero, who are so exceptional that hminwigr 
the game with a guava- tree fimb for a bat is no 

^ hindrance. 

i. Today Mota is the Dodger fritting coach, 
leaning cm the cage: Guerrero is the hitter, 
'launching practice pitches into tbe upper deck 
‘ at Veterans Stadium with a savage, compact 
*"*ing. ' - 

Looking at Guexrero’a 326 batting average, 

' 1 : -his 29 home runs, his 73 runs batted m and Ms 

five-year,- $7 milfion contract; many call his a 
! i i Fw T'- succcss st °iy. Guenxro knows better: He goes 
■ • * 1 r - - -bade to SanPedro de Macoris every winter. The 
- . ^poor crane to him, a steady stream it sometimes 
seems. To beg: . 

“I can’rfind a way tosay no^”iie says.^ ^^Ihey . 
know I am ride And I fcncrw how pow they are. 

. They come to my house, stop me rax the street. 
Tm a real soft touch. I don’t thmlcthafs badL 
“They all tdl a story. About their mother or 
child who is ack. I know some are lying, just to 
get the money. Just like anywhere else ■ — good 
people, bad people. Some are die ones who boo 
meat the balipack. 

(7 ^ “It bothers me,” s^s Guerrero, “that I can- 

jottdl who is tdhng rite troth, who really needs 

*ac mraiey and how much.” 

• So what does he do? “I guess,” he shrugs. 

“Some ask for $50 and I give them 525. Some 
- ask for $25 and. I give them 5100. Guerrero who 


players. 

True, Guerrero loves food too much; he bal- 
looned to 218 pounds once last year and, some- 
day, the massive chest and bullocks that are 
now his power source could become his enemy. 
True, be spends money as generously on himself 
as he gives it to others; he loves jewelry and lives 
-in Hancock Park near Dodger Owner Peter 
O’Malley. 

No teammate would emphasize such nagging 


Kinj I: 



Ptdn> Guemra Evoy day's a day in Jime. 


Such heroics —everything in fact that Guer- 
rero has done this year — have been a joyous 
vindication after marly a season and a naif of 
frustration. 

In 1984 he was weighed down by excess 
poundage, by the expectations attendant on a 
S 1 35-nuHic»-a-year deal and by the pressure of 
being shifted from the comfort of the outfield to 
the embarrassment of third bare 

Many a star, coming off consecutive 30- 
homer, 100-RBI years, would have nixed the 
switch. But Guerrero gritted his teeth through 
22 errors and six months of home-crowd boos. 

“3 try not to listen,” he said. “Every day, I 
read the letters from fans — 25 to 50 of them — 
all teQing me, *We are with you. Those who boo 
are not toe true Dodger fans.’ " 

On the first of Jane, Guerrero was headed 
toward another season of humble 16-homer, 72- 
RBI stats. Finally, the Dodgers admitted they'd 
been dumb. Lasorda gave Guerrero a reprieve to 
play left field, saying, “We know you're willing 
to play third, but we’d rather haveyour bat than 
your glove.” 

His dignity and performing grace restored, 
Guerrero homered in his first game and hit 15 
home runs far tbe month. Then he batted .460 in 
July. 

“You know that thyme, Thirty days hath 
September, April Jane and Novembers " says 
Lasorda. “Wdl, I changed it. I knew June was 
Pedro’s favorite month, so I told him that, in the 
UA, Jnne had 60 days. Td see him in Jiriy and 
say, *Wdl Pedro, if s June S2d and I see you’re 
.stflLhoU." . . — . 

To Guerrero, it doesn’t mean a great deal that 
he leads tbe league in slugging (-609) and on- 
base percentage (.424). His play cones from 
deeper sources. As he says of one Dominican 
team owner who once gave him a few needed 
dollars daring his bush-league days, “He 
showed be cared about me before l was famous. 
He buy my heart ” 

The things Guerrero wants most, money no 
longer buys. “I remember my rookie season 
11981] whm we won the World Scries,” he says. 
‘That was the best I play for the ring, and the 
sweet chan^ttgne.” 


D 

Giants 3, Mets 2; In the National 
League, in New York. Bob Brenly 
hit a two-run homer with one out in 
the ninth, rallying San Francisco 
past the Mets. 

Cardinals 7, Astros 4: In Hous- 
ton, pinch hitter Darrell Porter’s 
three-run homer in the ninth boost- 
ed St. Louis past the Astros. 

Reds R Pirates 5: In Pittsburgh. 
Nick Esasky hit a two-run homer to 
help Cincinnati down tbe Pirates, 
who failed for the ninth time this 
season to extend a two-game win- 
ning streak. Pete Rose, the Reds' 
placer- manager, had a single in six 
at- bats, leaving him 14 hits short of 
Ty Cobb's all-time career record of 
4,191. 

Dodgers 15, PbOEes 6c In Phila- 
delphia. Los Angeles, which has 
rolled to on eight-game Western 
Division lead primarily with strong 
pitching, bombed the Phillies with 
22 hits, including five by Candy 
Maldonado and four each by Mike 
Marshall and Bob Bailor. 

Cobs 9, Braves 5: In Atlanta, 
Chris Speier’s two-run homer 
broke a 5-5 eighth-inning tie and 
Ryne Sandberg established a Chi- 
cago Cub standard for combined 
speed and power with two home 
runs., and six RBJs. Sandberg’s 
three-run homer gave the Cubs a 3- 
1 lead in the third, be singled to tie 
the game in the seventh and added 
a home run in the ninth, giving him 
20 on the year and providing Chi- 
cago with a four-run cushion. 
Sandbag is the first Cub ever to 
have at least 20 homers and 30 
stolen bases (he has 38) in a season. 

Padres 6, Expos 2: fa Montreal 
Graig Nettles had three hits and 
drove in two runs to pace a 14-hit 
San Diego attack. 


The Aneoadd PrcjB 

Billy Costello managed to duck this right hand, but Loon/e Smith floored the champion five 
times Wednesday night to win the WBC super- lightweight title on a knockout in the eighth. 

Smith Knocks Costello Out of Boxing 


Compile*! hr Our Sitiff From Dispotehci 

NEW YORK — Lonnie Smith 
knocked down Billy Costello fire 
limes, look away his World Boxing 
Council super-lightweight champi- 



Tbe new champion 

‘ You see what I told you ? 


onship with an eighth-round 
knockout and *ent him into retire- 
ment here Wednesday night. 

The fight at Madison Square 
Garden ended with Costello. 29. 
face-down and the referee not even 
bothering to count Shortly after- 
ward. a tearful beaten champion 
said. “I had no excuses. Lonnie was 
the better fighter tonight. 1 tried 
hard. This was my last fight 

“I was nine years a pro. I reached 
my goal I made some money, now 
I’m going to get the hell oul I 
retire." 

Costello had won the title from 
Donald Curry in January’ 1 984 and 
defended it successfully three 
times. 

An announced crowd of 3,847. 
believed to be the smallest title* 
fight crowd ever in the main Gar- 
den, saw the little-known challeng- 
er from Denver blend fool speed 
with punching power in befuddling 
Costello, who lost for the first time 
in his 31-bout career. 

Late in the eighth round. Smith 
dropped Costello with a right up- 
percut. The champion got up, bad- 
ly hurt at five and took a manda- 
tory eight count. Costello had 
escaped after three previous knock- 
downs, but Smith didn't let him off 
die hook this time. He moved in 
with a flurry of punches to the head" 
and dropped Costello with a right 
hand. At 2:31 of the round, referee 
Luis Rivera signaled tbe fight was 
over. 

Despite being decked three 
times, Costello was ahead on two of 
the three official cards after the 
seventh round; judge Carol Castel- 
lano had Smith ahead, 67-63, but 
judges Tony Perez (by 65-64) and 
Billy Graham (66-64) favored Cos- 
tello. 


“You see what I told you?" said 
Smith, who raised his record to 22- 
0-1. “1 had to knock him oul All 
the odds were against me. They 
said ‘Who is Lonnie Smith?* " 

For a moment it looked as if the 
23-year-old Smith's challenge 
might he a short one. Midway 
through the opening round. Costel- 
lo knocked Smith down with a right 
hand, the fint solid punch of the 
fight. But Smith got up immediate- 
ly. took an eight count and escaped 
further trouble. 

With 2:10 left in the second 
round. Smith connected with a 
right cross that stunned Costello; 
about a minute later he pul Costel- 
lo down with a left hook. Costello 
got up and took an eight count. 
With 22 seconds left, Costello 
threw a right, but Smith hooked 
over it and again floored the cham- 
pion. Costello went down again in 
the fifth, when Smith caught him 
with another solid hook to the jaw 
at 1:44. Costello hung on to finish 
the round despite taking some stiff 
jabs. 

It was a strange fight in that, 
despite the knockdowns, there were 
several periods of inaction as Smith 
■ chose to move away from CosteQo. 
sometimes showboating and draw- 
ing the displeasure of the fams. 

Before the fight Smith had said. 
“I'm going to beat Billy Costello by 
ouuhmking him. He doesn’t think 
in the ring.” But Smith beat the 
New Yorker by simply overpower- 
ing him. 

Donning the championship bdl. 
Smith climbed the tumbuckle and 
shouted to WBC lightweight cham- 
pion Hector Camacho, who was 
silting at ringside, "I want you. 
You’re nexL” (AP. UP1) 


College Football’s Parodies of Parity 


SCOREBOARD 




iil- 


By Herschel Nissenson 

The Associated Press 
NEW YORK — If it is true that 
something approaching parity has. 
arrived in U.S. college football, it’s 
' somehow managed to avoid places 
- like Texas-H Paso. Northwestern, 
Oregon Slate and Rice. 

The word at those schools is par- 
ody rather than parity. Last season, 
they were a combined 7-37. Among 

them, they have not won more than 

seven games a year since 1974, and 
the intervening years included de- 
Vades such as 5-39 (1977 and 
" '1979), 6-37-1 (1978), 6-38-1 (1982), 
6-38 (1981) and 6-39 (1980). 

None of them has had a winning 
season since Northwestern went 7- 
4 in 1971. And Rice's ongoing 
string of 21 consecutive nonwn- 
nipp seasons — — the Owls were 6-4 
way back in 1963 —is a National 
Collegiate Athletic Association re- 
cord. . „ 

Going strictly by consecutive 
■losing seasons, a -500 year is merely 
a nonwinning one; Oregon State is 
the current leader at Wlt “ 
Northwestern and Texas-El Paso at 
13 and Rice at 12. . . 

Among other ignominies suf- 
fered during the lean yen* North- 
western set a major-college 
by losing 34 straight games. It also 


went from Nov. 23. 1974, through 
Ocl 30, 1982— a total of 54 games 
— without winning on an oppo- 
nent’s field. Northwestern failed to 
win a game in 1978, 1980 and 1981 
and settled for single victories in 
1976. 1977 and 1979. 

Tbe last three years have been 
virtual wonders by comparison — 
3-8 in 1982 (when Dennis Green 
was named Big Ten coach of the 
year Tor that achievement) and 2-9 
in both 1983 and 1984. 

During its 21-year non winning 
streak. Rice has broken even twice: 
5-5 in 1970 and 5-5-1 in 1972.- And 
despite records of 0-9-1 in 1968 and 
0-11 in 1982, the Owls went posi- 
tively bonkers in 1964 (4-5-1); 1967 
(4-6), 1973 (5-6). 1980 (5-6) and 
1981 (4-7). 

How bad has it been? 

If Ray Alborn. the coach, had 
said that the turning point of the 
]9S2 season was the opening kick- 
off, he was right. Southwestern 
Louisiana, the opening-game op- 
ponent, was supposed to be a 
breather. Before Alborn had taken 
a deep breath, USL’s Clarence Ver- 
din had returned the opening kick- 
off for a touchdown. 

But for sheer futility, it s hard to 
match Texas-El Paso. Over tbe lasL 
10 years, the Miners are 14-101 fra 


Hungary Seeks Grand Prix Racing 

■ .1 n..Jnngfl ,1 a initllw 


The Associated Pros 

BUDAPEST - Hungry 
next year will become the rust 
Sowrt-bloc wunt^ »*** ■ 
Formula 1 Grand Pn.i auto 
race, the state news agency re- 
ported late Wednesday. 

The MTI report said thata* 

economc association -mdnd- 

ine the Hungarian Automobile 
the organization or Formula 

car races in Hungary- 
The report said the associa- 
tion anticipates signing a 

agreement with the Formula 
Constructors Association on 

Schjl 8 and expects the coun- 
nys first grand prix to be nm 
«t August. The event will be 


held near Budapest at a multi- 
purpose course that will also be 

.used for go^art bicycle and 
other car races, the report said. 

■ Rosbergto Join McLaren 

Finland’s Keke Rosbetg will 
switch from the Williams team 
to drive for McLaren next year 
as a replacement for the retiring 
Austrian Niki Lauda. United 
Press international reported 

Thursday from Woking. Eng- 
J^d- 

R os berg, winner of £^982 
Formula I championship, has 
Sven in 91 grand pnx ra«& 
Stoning tour. He is currently 
fifth in the driver standings, 
with 1 » points after winning the 

Detrit Grand Pnx and piling 

second in France and fourth in 
Canada. 


a victoiy percentage of .122, Obvi- 
ously, they were flushed by the suc- 
cess of that giddy 4-7 mark in 1974, 
which came on the heels of the 0-1 1 
disaster of 1973. 

So why Is the 1985 media guide 
entitled “Miner MagjcT One rea- 
son is UTEFs first redshiil pro- 
gram a year ago, under which an 
injured player is allowed to sit out a 
season without losing eligibility. 

For the fifth year in a row, 
Northwestern’s games will be 
broadcast by radio station WAIT 
in Chicago. Is the real wait nearing 
an end? WH1 the 10-year mark of 
13-96-1 (at .123, a dose second to 
UTEFs .122) go up or down? 

Oregon State's 10-year record is 
15-93-3, a percentage of .149. Over 
. the past six years, it's even worse: 
7-57-2, and .121. Strangely, the 
string of failures began after 11 
consecutive non losing seasons 
from 1960-70. 

The Beavers have a new coach, 
Dave Kragthorpe, who led Idaho 
Stale to the NCAA Division I-AA 
title two years ago. Kragthorpe was 
offensive coordinator at pass- re- 
cord-setting Brigham Young from 
1970-79, so it is a foregone conclu- 
sion that Oregon State wifi throw 
thefootbalL 

But will it win? 

“Trying to be realistic, we are a 
ways away from having an out- 
standing football team.” said 
Kragthorpe. 

Rice's string of losing seasons 
actually began under the legendary 
Jess Neely, whose overall record in 
27 seasons there was 144-324-10, 
with four Southwest Conference ti- 
tles and two Cotton Bowl victories. 
But he was only 8-21-1 in his last 
three years and the decline contin- 
ued under Bo Hagen (12-27-1). Al 
Conover (14-28-1), Homer Rice (4- 
18V Alborn (13-53) and, last year, 
Walson Brown (M0). 

Brown got bis start in coaching 
after an injury temporarily stopped 
him from playing at Vanderbilt. He 
worked as a student assistant with 
the Commodores and met Neelyi 
who was the university’s athletic 
director and golf coach in 1967. 

“Before I was injured, I was 
thinking about becoming a sports- 
writer,” Brown said. “I guess the 
rime I spent with Coach Nedy 
changed my mind.” He may have 
had second thoughts when he gal a 
look at the Rice team he inherited. 


European Soccer 


Baseball 


Golf 


ENGLISH FIRST DIVISION 

Aslan Vida Z Uvenool 2 
Manchestsr City 1, LetoMtw I 
Nmrcasfl* l Lufoo 7 
Nott. Forest 0, steffNId Wednesday 1 
Oxford 1. Tottenham 1 


Wednesday’s Major League Line Scores 


rants: Monctastw Unltod 6; TonwtMm, 
LdcMcr, LOmvoQl, CMsea, Swfflsfcf 
vwtfcuwsday 4; West Ham. Evorton. Ameoat, 
Watford. Quasn's Park Raman. Blrmirw- 
Iwm 3: Latov Newcastle. Manchester Cl tv. 
Oxford 2: Southampton, Coventry. N«tlna> 
ham Forest. West Bromwich, Aston Villa 1; 
lesMrtch 0 . 


WEST GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 
SaartHiMdcen 1, Bremen 1 
Nirantors 3, Kaiserslautern 1 
Uerdlnaen 1. Stuitvart 4 
Hanover z Borawla Moneneneladboch 3 
Sdhalke 0. Bayern Munich 1 
Colons 2. Dortmund 0 


AMB RICAN LEAGUE 
Minnesota Mi m« io»-a 7 I 

MUwaehee W *14 0*1—3 11 1 

Blvleven, Howe W>, Davis (») and Sates; 
Burris and Schrader. W— Burris, H L— 
Homo, 7-3. HR— Minnesota. Teufel tit. 

Detroit **1 BN »»-5 * I 

OaMaod ON 000 004—4 » • 

Bersnauer. O'Neal C7>. Hernandos IBI and 
Parrish j CUdlrolL Ontiveros (7),MarD IW and 
I leottvW— M uwlI-Ol L — H * mandei.7-<.HR— 
Detroit, wniiaker (is). 

Toronto esc U eeo-a < o 

Cleveland lot IN nx— i 13 • 

Alexander. Acker (81 and Whitt: Heaton 
and Banda. W — Heaton. Hi l— A lexander, 
TtS. H Rs — Toronto, Barfield (V). Fielder Cl>. 
Cleveland. Carter Ml- 
Texas 301 000 •«— S W 2 

Boston IN ON 0M-4 I 1 

Russell Harris Ml and Brummer; Boyd 
and Gedman. W — Russell, 1-3. L— Boyd. 11-U- 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
American fjraoe 

BOSTON— Placed Roeer Clemefts. pHctwr, 
on the 1 May dtatotod Hot. 

BASKETBALL 

Nathmoi BasKefimH Aamctefto* 

DALLAS- Announced that Bm Weantna- 
ton, center, has agreed an a tour-year con- 
tract 

DETROIT— Signed Joe Daman, Board, to a 
multiyear contract. 

NEW JERSEY— Arautned Mkdtev John- 
son, forward, from Golden State far future 
considerations. 


FOOTBALL 

Nefloaaf FeafMfl Leasee 
CLEVE LAND-Cut Steve Col Uer. offensive 
taddn 

DETROIT— Traded Garry Cobb, lineback- 
er, to Ptinodelctila lor WUberl Montsemerv, 
running back. 

PHILADELPHIA— Waived Gene Giles ond 
Ralph PodfTca wide receivers, and Daryl 
Good km, linebacker. Acnuirad Tim Golden, 

linebacker, and Jutflaus Lewis and Tran Arm- 

strand, wide receivers, via watwesB. 

PITTSBURGH— mooed Russ Grtteam. ol- 
Icnsive tackle, an me fnfured reserve Hat. 
TAMPA BAY— Waived Cedrte Brown, de- 


5v— Harris (8). HRs— Texas, ward (10). Bos- 
ton, Bangs <7J. 

Kansas City Ml IDO 800—3 s 8 

Chicago 001 COO S »— I A 8 

Leibrandt, Oul Berberry W1 and Wathan; 
Bannlsier, James (8) and Ffe*. W— Lel- 
brandL tSM. L-Samdster, Ml. Sv-Qulsen- 
aerry 091. HR— Kansas City. Bret: (171. 
Baltimore fOdW OR Ota— II II 0 

Seattle ON M4 230— i 18 1 

DMortlnez, TMartinoi tt). At ere (7) and 
Pardo, Dempsey 191; Beattie, wins (31. 
R.Thomas (3). Lazorko «). Long (91 and 
Kearney. Scott (71. w— CLMartlmi. IO-7. L— 
Beattie, S*. Sv— Aou (81. HRv-Seotlle. 
G. Thomas last. Conans fW. Scott 13}. 

Hew York «n HD ua s— w is 5 

Californio 510 181 002 0-10 7 3 

Cowley. SMrtey (U, Allen (2). Fisher (4). 
Rtohettl 19) and Wvnegar; Candelaria, al- 
burn (2), Lugo (81, Sancnez (4), Holland (81. 
Moare( 101 and Boone. Narron 110). W— Rlgh- 
*fil,10-7.L— Moore.7-7.HRs— New York. Hen- 
dersan (20). Paaltonilo (141. California. 
Downing 115), Crien (7). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
San Francisco 0M OH 103-3 ID 0 

New York m no 010-3 7 • 

LaPoint. Gar rails (»» and Brenly: Lynch. 
McDowell (9) and Carter. W— LaMnl. 6-11. 
L — McDawHL L-S. Sv— Gmrelte (10). HRs— 
San Frond sen, Drtessen (0), Brenly (17). New 
York. Strawberry (18). Jennson (01- 
Sae Diego 003 301 DID— 4 14 3 

Montreal Ml OH 006— S t 3 

Stew and Kennedy; Laskev. Roberge (4), 
Lucas (4), St. Claire (81 and ROtoerald. W— 
Stew. 9-7. L— Laskey, S-ii HR— Montreal, 
Raines (7). 

LOS Aimes 530 236 no— U 32 0 

ptiBodatPhte 80S BN 030- ( 9 2 

Valenzuela, Dta (8) and Yeager: Koos- 
man, Rucker (I), Andersen (5). sntoonoft (4). 
Tefcuhw (9) and Virgil, Thomas (8). W— Va- 


geies. Mormon osi. Maldonaldo IS), Duerre- 
n 1291. Philadelphia Hayes (12), Thomca 14), 
Ctednnatl on 182 DU— 4 13 t 

Pittsburgh 108 200 200-5 18 t 

Browning, Hume lb), Franca (7) and Diaz, 
Van Gorder (7) ; walk. DeLeon (5). Clements 
181. Guanto W, Scurry (0) and Pena. IV— 
Browning. 12-9. L— Walk. 0-1. Sv— Franco (4). 
HRs— Cincinnati, Esasky (14). Pittsburgh. 
Gonzalez (2). 

Chicago 003 ON 233-9 M 2 

Aflonto 103 Ml 000— S f ] 

Engel, Sorensen UI.Brusstar [7). Smith (9) 
ana Doufe; Johnson, Corner 17), Forster 18), 
Dedmon (9) and CerantL W— Brusstar.3-2. L— 
Garoer, 3-f. Sv— Smite (34). HRs— Chicago, 
Sandberg 2 (20), Soeter <41. Alien to. cerone 
(3). 

St. Leals 480 080 M3— 7 II 0 

Houston 260 MS 1)0-4 9 2 

Cox, Daytev [7), Lahti 18) ate Nletn, Porter 
(9); Knepaer, Calhoun (8), Smite (9),0IPlno 
(9) and Bailey. W— Lahti, 2-1. L — Smith. 4-5. 
HR— St. Louis. Porter (7). 


Walker Cup Results 

BRITAIN-1 RE LAND «, UN ITED STATES < 
(At pin* Valley, New Jersey: Par 78) 
PAIRS 

Jav Steel and Sant VerotonK ua. Art. Colin 
Montgomerie. Scotland, and Georoe Mocore- 
oor, Scotland, 1-w; John Hawksworth, En- 
gland, and Garni McGlmpsey, Nortfmm Ire- 
land, def. Duffv Waldorf and Sam Randolph. 
U A, •Land-3; Peter Baker. England, and Pe- 
ter McEvov. England, def. Randv Sonnier and 
Jerry Haas. UA» frond-5; Cecti Stolen. En- 
gland, and Sandy Stouten, Scotland, halved 
wlthMlchaei Podolak and Davis Love llt.UA. 

SINGLES 

Vcrplank def. McGtmuscv 2-and-l; Ran- 
dolph def. Paul Mavo. WaMs. 5^i nd-4: Hawks- 
worth halved with Sonnier .'Steel def. Man too- 
merle Sand-4; McEvoy del Bob Lewis, UA- 
2-and-l; Macgregor del. Clark Burroughs. 
UA*2-up; Stephen def. Haas 2-anO-l; Waldorf 
def. Oavfd Gritord, England, 4-and-l 


Track and Field 


Women’s Mile 

tin evote&M of . tee worM reco r d in tee 
womee‘1 mile since 190 : 

4:39.2— Ann* Smith, Brltohv London, May 
QW7 

4:37:0— Ann 5fnHti Britain, London, June 3. 
1947 

4:34. 8 — M aria Gammers, tee Nathertondi 
Leicester. England, June T4. WW 
4:K3— Ellw TUtet west Germany, Stttard, 
west Gernunv, Aug, 20, 1971 
4 ^9 J— Paolo WgnKteccftL Italy, Vtoreo- 
gla, Italy. Aug. 5, W73 
A’jaa — Natalia Morasetcu, Romania Bu- 
dhonst, MfV.wn 
4^2.1— Natalia Marottccu, Romania 
AuddamL New Zeehmt Jan. 27, 1979 


ftnsfwtdock; Steve Coloona auarterbart: jeaweeinwa fr 4 . H R^-LusAn. 

Punkfat William, running back: Sim Netoon. W"*"* 

Item end.- Den SwaffORLofferalve tackle; Joe 

Major league Standings 

l*a«« 

fWtr man John Janata, offensive tackle; 

Paul Vooet Knebacker, and Freddie Miles, 
running back, on Intend reserve. 

United Slaws Football League 
ARIZONA WRANGLERS— Stored Al Wll- 
Uams.wWe receiver, too three-yeoraoniracL 


East Oivleiea 


Tennis 


i 


U.S. Open Seeding^ 


Hedlngi for Hw 190 UA Open isampleg- 
jMpi, which begin Tuesday in New Torn: 
MEN 

1, John McEnroe: 2. Ivon Lcmfl; X Mot* 
4:21.18— Mary Decker, U&, Auckland, New WHander; 4 JlnwiY Connore: S .Kevin Cue- 
boIoml Jen. 24. 1980 ran: 6. Anders Jarrrd; 7, Vaimlek Noah, a 

Bart* Beck err 9, Mlkwav MvHr: 10. 

Urd nm: 11, Stolon Edbenr; Tfc J0««m RrfeliJ 


ZeateM Jen. 24. 1980 
4ffllW nmmllg Veaelkowa. Soviet Unioa 
Batogna Italy# Seat iz 1980 
4:1M B Ma ry Decker, US. Parts. July 9, 
1982 

4:174* MwtdcpPuica Romania RlefL IF 
ON, SepL 14, 1982 

4.-7L77— Mery Deeker-Sknyy, UA, Zurkta 
Aug. 21, 1905 


Scon Davis,- 14* Tomas SmWL 
WOMEN 

1, Chris Evert LJovd; Z Martina NovraH- 


Helena Suhova; L Monueia MoieevaJ 


there was no drug testing at the meet) Bassett; la Andrea TemeevarL 



W | 

_ 

Pci. 

GB 

Toronto 

74 

4* 

417 

— 

New York 

70 

48 

Jto 

J 

Deireit 

64 

55 

■S3? 

91* 

Ball 

67 

55 

S36 

1016 

Boston 

57 

41 

M 

14 

Milwaukee 

SS 

43 

jtn 

17% 

Cleveland 

40 

79 

J34 

3314 


West Division 



Callfamla 

48 

52 

.547 

— 

Kansas City 

43 

52 

JS4 

Ilk 

Oakland 

41 

57 

JOS 

J 

Chicago 

58 

58 

500 

8 

Seattle 

&t 

64 

ja 

U 

Minnesota 

S3 

44 

MS 

1414 

Texas 

44 

74 

xn 

23 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 




Best Divtnen 





W L 

Pet. 

GB 

New Yore 

72 

44 

AID 

— 

St. Louts 

71 

44 

.407 

Vi 

Montreal 

47 

a 


4 

Chicago 

38 

59 

A96 


Philadelphia 

54 

44 

A SB 

IB 

piHshureh 

3d 

BO 

am 

35 


West Division 




Loo Angeles 

71 

44 

ota 

— 

San Olego 

44 

35 

J38 

8 

Cincinnati 

42 

55 

-530 

V 

Houston 

55 

43 

-464 

1612 

Atlanta 

3D 

<7 

427 

21 

Son Frond sen 44 

72 

-300 

25W> 


B 

cpaiN 





ymORQWG 1ST5 

Hi Now Bwd SC3H Hayfair loodDD Wl 
01-4335915 








Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 1985 


OBSERVER 


people 


'Hi, Sucker, Let's Deal 9 


Murder in a Small Town: 


Is His Gain 


By Russell Baber 


N EW YORK — There is one of 
those commercials that car 


IN those commercials that car 
dealexs pay to these stations to run 
after midnight. It shows 20 acres of 
cars surrounding a hypothyroid 
man who looks as if his name is 
Phii. 

You can tell he was voted most 
likely to succeed in high school 17 
years ago, and he has obviously 
fulfilled the prophecy because he 
owns 20 car-covered acres and stars 
in his own TV commercial. 

Phil strides from car to car, wav- 
ing his hands and talking a mile a 
minute, never looking at where he’s 
going, but staring straight into the 
camera and, amazingly, never col- 
liding with any of his cars. 

I nave seen other dynamic men, 
especially Lee lacocca, walk 
through densely cluttered areas on 
TV commercials, talking endlessly 
right into the camera without ever 
hitting anything, and I am envious 
of their skill at getting through 
commercials unbruised. I have 
trouble getting through open door- 
ways without hanging an elbow. 

The sureness with which PM. 
glides among those cars without 
once bumping a thigh does nothing 
to pul me at ease about him. Has he 
made a bargain with Satan: bis soul 
in trade for this astonishing TV 
cunning? 

□ 


Is that a wink Phil is giving the 
rest of the TV audience? Of course. 
Sly devil Having discovered my 
weakness — having exposed me as 
a pedantic lint-picker about points 
of grammar — he will know how to 
handle me when I come in. 

“Ain’t it a nice day?” he'll ay, so 
that I will get too prissy about 
grammar, saying, “ * Ain't* is incor- 
rect, sir,” to notice Phil adding vin- 
yiized mink seat covers to the op- 
tional equipment bong loaded on 
the car he intends to sell me. 


A Father-Daughter Tragedy 


By £ R. Shipp . 

Sew York Tima Service 


U NDERWOOD, Minnesota 
— When 13-year-old Sarah 

Ann Rairdon disappeared in 
May, the people of Underwood 
rallied together to search for her 
and comfort her family. When 
her body was found seven weeks 
later, they mourned together. 

Afterward, with her father. 
John Albert Rairdon, they orga- 
nized to help missing children. 
Rairdon was chosen to lead the 


Sitting there before the TV, 
watching Phil move so dynamical- 
ly, F am engulfed by self-pity. 

Crane in and make a deal? In the 
awful post-midnight light of the TV 
tube, it is all too clear how pathetic 
my amateur efforts to make a deal 
will look when Phil raises the hoods 
from his eyes LO see whether I'm the 
sort of sap who will take the cus- 
tom-made hubcaps and the horn 
that plays the first 13 notes of 
“Wunderbar.” 


MINNESOTA 


lltnneapoJise^/ 

St. PauT 


Me make a deal with Phil? Lyn- 
don Johnson might have been an 
equal match at dealing, but I'll bet 
Phil would have come out of it with 
a federal judgeship for his brother- 
in-law. 


group. 

But earlier this month the un- 
fathomable happened: Rairdon, 
a 38-year-old mechanic, con- 
fessed, according to the police, 
that he had killed Sarah as she 
fought off his sexual advances. 
He told the authorities that he 
had been sexually abusing her for 
five years. 

Rairdon was arrested Aug. 13 
and charged with first-degree 
murder and intra famflinl sexual 
abuse. 


TJ» New Yad ta 


know the side of John that’s com- 
ing out now.” 

In the days since his arrest, she 
said, Rairdon has begun telling 
her that “he doesn’t know for 
sure if he did it, and be wants to 
find out” 


Normally, I wouldn't care. For 
years I have been watching Phil's 
late-night car-sale commercials, as 
well as Real's, Sam’s, Hairy’s and 
Bill’s. 

“My poor fellow man” — that is 
what these commercials have made 
me say in the past — “with his 
witless insistence on buying cars, 
he will soon be again in the clutches 
of Ken, Sam, Harry or BQL" 

Now, however, life has presented 
me with a miserable circumstance. 
After all these years of having a 
subway at my beck and call, I am 
finally compelled to buy a car of 
my own. Hence my morbid concen- 
tration on Phil's dashing around on 
his 20 acres of cars without once 
denting a fender. 

Ah, he'll find me an easy mark, 
young PhD will Can you believe 
what he is now saying? “Ready to 
deal!” he is shouting. “We are 
ready to deal! Ready to deal like no 
dealer has ever dealed before.” 

“Dealt before,” 1 say to the TV 
set “The past tense of ‘deal’ is 
‘dealt.’ ” 


I know people, mostly men, who 
boast they have made deals with 
Phil that made Phil weep and beg 
them not to take the bread from his 
children’s months. These are men 
with no sense of reality. Phil did 
not acquire 20 acres of cars and 
power to disturb the peace of 
100.000 parlors after midni ght by 
granting boons to gullible human- 
ity. 

I sit here watching Phfl. “Come 
in and let me make you happy,” he 
pleads. “Very, very happy. It is 
bloodcurdling for I mil have to 


Underwood, a western Minne- 
sota town of about 330 people 
where serious crime is almost un- 
known, is full of bewilderment 
and bitterness. 


“When he confessed,” she said, 
“I don’t even know if he believed 
it himself that he did it, or if it 
was just guilt from the sexual 
thing that made him confess to 
the other.” 


The tragedy, many people say, 
is that despite all the attention 
that has been paid to sexual abuse 
of children in recent years, Sarah 
apparently had not confided in 
anyone 

John Klinnext, the high school 
principal, said that after her dis- 
appearance three days before the 
school term ended, he found a 
note in a book in her locker that 
said: “Please, please don’t kill 
me. Don’t hurt me. I want to 
live.'' 


In town, people do not refuse 
to discuss the Rairdon case, but 

their unfinish ed sentences, the 
shrugs and the deep sighs say a 
great deaL 

Why, they ask, can’t a smalt 
town be free of the crimes that 
curse the big dries? Could a fa- 
ther do this to his daughter? 
Could they have been misled by 
the man they chose to lead their 
group. Search and Fmd Missing 
Persons? 


with dntnmc of .lakes, with names 
like Bass and Fish and Turtle and 
Otter . Tail, it is also a popular 
vacation area. 

When there is a crisis, everyone 
bands together, giving not only 
rime but money, even though, as 
auction posters at the Western 
Barbershop indicate, many of the 
local Farinas are in deep financial 
' trouble. 

According to Michael L. Kirk, 
the Otter Tail County attorney, 
the last homicide in the county 
was in 1978. 

When Sarah, a popular seventh 
grader, honor roll student and 
member of the track team, disap- 
peared, the town swung into ac- 
tum. 

She had stayed after school to 
work on a home-economics pro- 
ject Then, as she commonly did, 
she began walking home, about 4 
miles (63 kilomstere) away. 

The Randoms’ yard, covered 
with toys and old cars, bird feed- 
ers, a picnic table and a barbecue 
grill and with puppies and chick- 
ens running about gives evidence 
of the laige, active family that 
lives there. 

When John and Linda Rairdon 
were divorced yean ago, he kept 
their five child nan. Sarah was 



Rolej rMcMyre 

33. a cfrfl servant fom’ 

Womffl ignored gpingon a diet of ss&d. fsm and-- 

easy: His height is 5 foetlG wus gj^ ^ bcer-Inacere-' f 

SgSSssssk-ms. 


i 


Ife Nn fork tna 

Sarah Ann Rairdon 


ordered him to do somethingabout ^3*3* 

his health. arms round him much more easily' 


their only daughter. In 1975, be 
married Marilyn, who had four 
dnklren, from a previous mar- 
riage. Together, they had two 
more children. 

By all accounts, he was a hard- 
working man who took pride in 
being able to care for his big fam- 
ily without public assistance. 

He was not a suspect until re- 
cently, when the police began 
questioning him, hoping to find 
anything that mi ght bdp in the 
investigation. 

He told county deputies and 
state agents that he had sexually 
abused his daughter at least 60 
times but that he did not remem- 
ber whether he bad killed her. 
After more questioning, the offi- 
cial report said, be told them that 
be had killed her, and described 
bow. 

A report filed in court gave this 
account: 

John Rairdon mid the police 
that last March Sarah had begun 
to resist his advances. On May 19, 
he said, she fought him off. Then, 


face him any day now, and it will 
not help to level with hin^ to say, 
“Phil it would be useless for a dolt 
like me to try to deal with — ” 

Because he will say: “Deal old 
buddy? You've come to the right 
place. Have you seen the new viny- 
lized mink seat covers and — T 


According to Sandy Kolstad, a 
ader of the search efforts, leach- 


leader of the search efforts, teach- 
ers and school officials are “look- 
ing back and saying, "What did I 
miss?’ ” 


Safe,', I think, to phone up and 
y, “Just send over the car of your 


say. “Just send over the car of your 
choice, Phil and leave it at the 
curb, and HI put the check in the 
mail” That way you don’t have to 
see him sneering at you. 


New York Tima Service 


In the past Klinnert said, par- 
ents have thought: “ This is rural 
America. It doesn't happen in ru- 
ral America.' 1 think it's happen- 
ing out in rural America just as 
much, and sometimes more be- 
cause of the open spaces." 

Marilyn Rairdon, Sarah’s step- 
mother and John’s wife of nearly 
10 years, says simply, “I don't 


Some, like Kolstad, s&y the an- 
swer lies in the mental state of 
Rairdon. “The only way J can 
explain it is, he psychologically 
blocked it out right after he got 
rid of the body, said Kolstad, 
the wife of a dairy fanner. 

No one can forget the appeals 
for Sarah’s return that Reardon 
nude on television after her dis- 


appearance May 20, nor the fact 
that just a week before his arrest 
he had appeared on a panel with 
the Minnesota attorney general 
Hubert H. Humphrey 3d, to dis- 
cuss missing children and sexual 
abuse. 


This part of Minnesota is dairy 
country, but because it is dotted 


be uid, on May 20, as he was 
driving home, hue saw Sarah walk- 
ing picked her up, drove to a 
secluded area ana once ag ain 
tried to have sexual relations with 
her. She fought. 

According to the report, John 
Rairdon said he took an awl from 
his truck and stabbed her in the 
abdomen. Then, he said, he 
strode her and watched as she 
bled profusely. The report said he 
hid the body in a barn and went 
back later that evening to dispose 
of it in a fidd several miles away. 

Tire word sooa spread that Sa- 
rah was missing, and, that night, 
neighbors began searching for 
ha. 

Kolstad and other Sunday 
school teachers in the Rairdons’ 
congregation at Sverdrup Luther- 
an Church organized volunteers 
who prepared meals fra the Rair- 
dons for the next two weeks. 

The church people had 2^00 
fliers printed, and about 100 to 
200 people, including vacationers 
in the area, helped stuff and ad- 
dress envelopes at the American 
Legion Hall and the school. 

Later, the volunteers raised 
$6,000 fra a reward. 

Then c»mg the arrest Si nce 
then, despite their mixed feelings, 
people have not abandoned 
Marilyn Rairdon and her chil- 
dren. They bring meals, run er- 
rands, do the laundry. \ 

“The real danger,” the Rever- 




end Rolf P. Wangberg, pastor of 
the Lutheran church, said of 
Rairdon, “is that we will cast him 
off and say, This guy is differ- 
ent, ’ and not realize than maybe 
any one of us, in tberight dreum- 
stances, has the potential to have 
that same flaw.” 






If; ill iT-V n ■ i i » i > : 1 • i H i i ■ , / 1 ; - i ■ i if - 1 


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No! MOVER 

FOURMNDSINn 


ISLAND GFJACOPM 
sduated in the viaijty of Rmcaff faring 
Ihe "Wand of Be&“ inducing a 7-room 
manor house with kitchen, bmoaras. 


A e o n u b le by cor via the beach. 
For all i nfa rm utio fi. 


apply to the above odaess. 


CAli US FOR YOUR NEXT MOVE 
PAMS (31 036 63 11 
tOMXM (01) 578 66 II 



. Awl Uarm d k wet Mori* 
M y profeaiono/ - Bemonoby proid 


PARIS (!) 867 42 46 



YOUR ESTATE AGENT N MUNCH. 
Enquire n wrieng to: John SdsaittK, 
Orion GmbH Bnmr Str. 3, MOOd 
Munich 2. 


SIIRNNO GABDBN HAT in Homp- 

*ad (best restoenfkJ Loodo^, 2 
"ognfoeft wtaod ponefied reception 
rooms witti viury onginti fecAjra^ 2 
bedroom, 2 bathroonq, 1 emurte 
win j ncuni , pin separate guest 
doakroom, Udi blade 4 S5e 
Ukhen. 100 foot private gsden with 
bub in baboo®. Off-street parting. 

Ma 16851 " 


International Bnsiness Message Center 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


PUBUC l PRIVATE 
U.S. SYNDICATIONS 

S300roojOT+ In Various Amount 


on. a gas 

Guxarteed feaame funds, banded to 
vraged dr^^produdion podmgeL 


Resort property, hotels, office buMm, 
opartnieiS amipleaes. Is stu i ud buito 


notaieS campleaes, ffetaried be 
inm, raw 1cs«L 

OOMMUMCAHONS 
Coble IV, movies, TV syn di c uti ons 


BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


[Afaiuiwm InviMjmarrf cf 
V/e « a pubic USdl & a 


rf^50o53 T 





Raaoae Amees 41 40 31 
Pep*. 312) 

Canaan: 33 14 54 


Ok*ayaquBr51 4505 
lima: 417852 


Araetenloab 2636-15. - 

3S1«97/36M421. 
BnreMisi' 343-J899. 
rnp e rf i q g av pi) 32 944ft 
r r m d rf er l (069)72-67-55. 
LauMMBm29«89A 
IMram 67-^7^3/66-2544. 
London: (01) 8364802. 
Aludrid: 45S.2B91/455330i 
MBaru (02) 7531445. 
Norway; (03) 845545. 
Room: £79-3437. 

S w e de n. 08)7569229. 

Tel Avhr: 03-455 559. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt. 


lima: 417 852 
Panama; 6905 11 
San Jm 22-1055 
Smitiagoe®6l 555 
SaoRralo: 852 1893 


MIDDLE EAST 


Batovdn: 246303- 
Kuwtsfc 5614405. - 

tebanan: 341 457/8/9. 
Oaken 416535. 




.. -toddah: 667-1500. 
UAi: Dubai 224161. 


EAR EAST 

■f*ntfWe39lKto57. 


Hen* Karw 5-213671. 
Nanim 81 / 07 49. 


UNITD STATES 


New York: {21 2) 752-3890. 
Wee* Coaefc (415] 362-8339. 


Manim 817 07 49. 
Sawd: 735 87 73. 

2223721 
Tcdwies: 752 44 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 


SOUTH AFIUCA 


AUSTRAUA 

JWbounta: 690 8233. ' 
Sydnaw929 56 39, 9^ 4320: 
Perth: Sfl 98 33. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


Isy.i: ; 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 

Pnvota axnsxm, near Monaco Prinoe 
Wooe, pon oroc u c seo view. 

Teb (93) 30 46 54. 






CORPORATION wiH consid- 
er trading stock to reliable 
and financidly stable 
corporation. 


We on a pubic US o4 & gas coronary 
that has expanded te base of product, 


fire! international Ofl 1 Go* lac 

Jade Warner or Irrfea CarbJe 
Denver, CO USA 3C&534-1714 
London, England 01-828505 


__ USA 

BUHNBOS i DEAL ESTATE 
Bcsinen k*Sj commerad, feduttod & 
rosidenfa d red eda tewles 4 leeses. 
Property mangereenl & buns de- 
vdoprasrTt Wnte with yow require- 
ert* Snonad no to Hraon RaaSy 


30 MMS. East of Paris at Owvry- 

DIAMONDS I SS^lSSiS 


JOJOBA - UQUID GOLD 

NVBTORS 4 B80KB5 


#210. fevfee, CA 92714 USA 
7T4651 3m 71* 590194. 


Your bed buy. 

fine demands in any price range 
at Icmui] wholesale prices 
drud from Antwerp 
renter of the damond world. 

M guqmtoe. 

For Free price Est unite 

AW8IH vBNMnmn 

Wta owtrant £L 6201 B Antwerp 
^ Mdun - Tet (32 3 234 07 51 
Tit 7177V syf b. At toeDioraond dub. 
Heart of Adwreip Dianand industry 



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