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INTERNATIONAL 



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Published With The New York Tunes and The Washington Post 


.115 Bob 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


PARIS, SATURDAY -SUNDAY, AUGUST 24-25, 1985 


v .if'- - - - By Phil Gsuky 

: ‘}fti«7«fc Timet 'Service 


... V LOS .ANGELES- — President 
~ RbaakJ Reagan. ip aspeedh that 
reinforced . the administration's 
t^ii gtiKnmg posture toward the So- 
ujirt Union, has strongly defended 


. The, anti-satellite test is not di- 
rectly' associated with the Strategic 
Defense Initiative. But because the 
. two weapons programs involve 
similar concepts and hardware^ the 
anti- satellite program has become 
ah element in the debate over the 


uiei Union, has strongly defended an element m me oeoaie ^ 
v SlS to^evrfop a defensive wrap- Sinieg.cMenKto.MHvt 
oD^sy^anm^OTter space. • ' These *■“*“' 

. were . a mmtshavenusri questions about 

strong reaffiemationof his commit- "*«her the administmtion re 
Sent to the weapons project, and jtqjmmnM -V** posture to- 
• Jtoxanre-aEFT^S sharp the Soviet UmMnk 
Snaps and other developments . P la ^ meeting betweai Mr. R » 
thatteveappearedto haveWher 8““? £ Goihaihev, the 
^SSaSSbdtweCn^heJUmt- ; Soyietlead*,m Geneva in Novem- 

* ***** Monday, Robert C. 
&*!* fim .enaad? Ihh jteFKtartTtoe white House ua- 

m! 1 ■Tiihml security adviser, said there 

5* 'coold be rio fundamental changes 

R^3^.theprop«e4S^c ^ betweeQ Washinglon 

and Moscow until the Soviet Union 
as - star ware, offered durnged its ways and attitude, 

out of the nudear dflemma ftat has on Wednesday, the admin- 

confpmided mankind for four do- accused the Soviet securi- 

^ScSr^ "s; 

JAmmons in Moscow to track 
money- the president said^^d^ . movements and contacts, 
if that s true, why are the Soviets so . r 1 ™ . 



Counterspy Flees East; 
Bonn Concedes Harm 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Post Service 

BONN — East Germany an- 
nounced Friday that a leading 
West German counterespionage 
official had defected, confirming 
what diplomats here described as a 
spy scandal that could seriously un- 
dermine Western intelligence agen- 
cies- 


X A UW) w«y raw uiv mv>«w-w — 

upaci about it? As a matter of fact, 
why are they investing so many 
rubles of their own in ‘the same 
technologies?' 1 • •-.. .. 

Speaking to. a fund-raising din- 
ner for the California Republican 
I!.*, u* Vmhii hiH Mlriiinistra- 


p»«gan in High Spirits 

-^Tlre president appeared in good 
health and high spirit s as he gave a 
17-xmnut e kpeech, interspersed 
with typical one-liners, at the 


A Soodi African soWBrhoIfcb^dtfan^ynia^mtodto^w^J*”^®™^^^^ 

for not attemfing school. About 500 were arresteo rnoay ui ^ 


ner for the California Republican wirn typicm 

Party Mr Reagan said administra- 51,000-a-plate R^ubht^n ftmd- 

^^^SralAmerica had 

‘burned wound a desperate sitna- Post reported from Los Angeies. 
don in these last four and a half ' Mr. Reagan joked about the ap- 
pears.” V "■ erationinwhidi a cancerous tumor 

'#He added: “One of the proudest was removed from his colon. He 
'Iccomplishments of this adm inis- aid lie had received many cants 

v Afld -- --- - 


South African Authorities Detain 
Hundreds of Black Schoolchildren 

. hU of their missing children. By Friday 


accompHshracnts of tins atimmis- said he had receiyea many uuta 
. . tratkm has happened slowly and and letters, including one that said,- 
A iT i quietly, with little recognition. -“I was very disappdnted to hear 
-^r- when we first got to Washington, that tiie doctors took two feet out 

. m ■ — UaW /fill 


When we first got to Washington, duti tiie doctors took two feet out 
the question on everyone’s Hps was. ^ your inner workings. How did 

•Will E Salvador fad to the Com- those two feet get in there?" 


fc-a-ie 




munistsT . , „ . 

Now, the preadent said, “the 
question is, “Will democracy win in 
NicaraugaT . And tomorrow the 
question will be. 'How soon?* - 

Mr. Reagan’s remarks came two 
days after the administration an- 

•* a l: 'a. nkfOA. 


The president has been out of 
public view most of the time since 
he returned to the White-House on 
jfuly 2Q, aftra: a week in the hospital. 
He held a state dinner in the 

White House for President Li 


ssssattsars £=s.~^.~ 

SSSSSSSk ssssr-fflttg 
ggSP 5 ® S5SdHaa£ 

Uxg® blade com- thr ^f^,!'^ ce tac/ ihar to claimed mor, to 

“llSdreds of pirents galtocd thM at least seven more people 62 i) ivcs . m . =- 

outside the Moro^fc: station 

here Friday morning sedong word including ax wno wac 


By Glenn Frankel 

Washington Past Service 

SOWETO, South Africa — Sol- 
diers and police rounded up on 
Friday hundreds of black school- 
children, some of them under 10 
years old, in a new government 
crackdown that inP fltnt ^ residents 


st of an anti-saiemre wxat^i- - - . ^ 

The Soviet Umon hatf objectwi .. invisible 

the militarization of outer space. 


Soweto Nigbts Reflect 
Realities of Apartheid 

■ m - a fi tf CWIA ratft citicS. ihOT 


rv^ 





In 



By Alan Cowell 

New York Tones Service 
JOHANNESBURG - The 
man who sells Picassos and 

are not gcmg too badly m South 

Africa these days. 

He says his clients, from me 
white suburb of Sandton, won 
mainly affluent people who 


two very separate dtie*. 
economies mterimked in the 
manner of master and slave. 
flip™ manners and expectations 
divided sharply by the laws 
called apartheid. 

The weekend shows it most. 
That is when Soweto provides 
the sharpest contrast to the 
Chagalls and Picassos, the par- 
ties around private pools and 

.1 r~m» the. WAV 


*•« 

«S»* 








MOSCOW — The SovieL news 

J^Sctedaslmrpcou^ 

■act Fri day 

that Americans here D0B “ 

tracked using a chemical dust 
"R^tsiS two Soviet newj£ 
pers^dthe accusations seemed to 
Kmcd at blocking 
meat in U-S.-Soviet retenaos. 

^ut a State Department 

»”T iW £S , S3 

tinue doing business 
• •^SgS^er^-forma!^ 

< Kington, OwteE 

■ _ w* 1 ® rotate Department 

Redman, 4 President Rea- 
>*. spokesman, sm ■ B ^ 

'■/ has made ihat 

, problems and P" f^joting- We in- 

Sr^» Wcncv - 

;;i a stood 

’J 


touched objects that had been dust- 
ed with the substance. 

Very little is known al»ut the 
powder, nitrophenyl pentadiene al- 
Sryde, 0 rNPPD-ButsOTiesa«- 

tists said Friday it een 

likely that anyone had been 

ha ]fo?brtefing Fri^y.in 
a U3. Embassy official said that 
NPFD had apparently beea^ 
since 1976, but it was still unclear 
exactly bow it was used. 

The official, who masted he not 
be-named, said U S. nenlufe 

detect the chemical only nnd^l^- 

oratoiy conditions with an wqp^ 
save instnnneni called a mass speo- 

how it could then be of 
value in tradng people in a crowd- 
ed dry, he said the United States 
believed the 

cheaper way of detecting NPPD 


5 S-Bfl 6 S SCS==»= 5 ; 

SSSJta Sf^thier^ 

js-tfstfidsrs 

interest in fixed cha^ but whose fortunes have 

The VBhre of their money, he d him t hc nickname 

says, seemed to wither by the car -• — 


says, sbousw <*r -m 

day. And so, »ys the ait dealer, 

Dennis Hot*, interest was 
growing in fine art as an invest- 
ment. In his office, s« back 

wall 

Across town, in Soweto, 
Lucky Michaels drove a plum- 
colored BMW sedan, worth 


Lucky — picks up his guests 

outside a center-city hoteL He 

comes in the car that is a land of 

trademark for him. It also is a 
statement to whites that blacks, 
too, can make it, and an em- 
blem, in Soweto, of arrival 
where it counts. 

The destination is Soweto, 
under a curfew from 10 P.M. to 

. . « I _ #■ n«s> eifthlc 


Lucky Mtcnacis mwe « under a curlew from rjq. ™ 

colored BMW sedan, worth 4A j^ but first there are sights 
550,000, around the township s to be seen. Lucky points out 
aiidt speakeasies, caDed she- Western, a suburb for people of 
beens. And be says things were - «-- — » «n~» 

n Ur MirtinpJs 


P^Sd the U-Sjmba^ does 


not have a mass MMMioiK 
would be “logical to condude the 
dScal was first found outside 

SSasasKS 


beens- nuu "“j- “r*jr; , 
not going so wdL Mr. 
is probably one of the black 
township’s few mflhonmres, a 
nightclub baron with a 38 pis- 
tol strapped to his ankle and toe 
money to buy a car Hke his 
BMW, and, possibly toe entire 

contents of Mr. Hotf s gallery. 
~ th» rwreanoii 


WCMElUi « . 

mixed race, who are called col- 
oreds in South Africa s racial 
lexicon, a place that used to be 
for blacks. 

And here is Sophiatown, an- 
other area once set aside for 
blacks but where whites now 
live under toe laws that some- 


But his unde is toe recreation determi!1 e where toe races 

of Soweto’s ;two white, at that. 

And anoe the govenunai F* ^ pc yy slowing the BMW, 

curfew on toe sprawl of hon» Sam-colled leatoer 

upM=wj and its tmiltipurposc 
passion^ busmess, he says, ^^jputo-. 
fallen off. . The houses are neat, undut- 

Wito the comparison, ana soadous by toe standards 

asrJsa^™ 


a*- r j ”... - 

The roundup of children m 
Soweto started Thursday with 
about 300 arrests of students 
caught outside school grounds by 
soldiers. Witnesses said some of the 
children were beaten with whips 
that are issued to soldiers and po- 
lice. Most of them, induding’ the 
voungest group, spent toe night m 
nolice jails, according to parents 
interviewed Friday. . 

The troops were enforcing anti- 
bovcoit regulations issued last 
week that make it a crime for stu- 
dents to be off school grounds dur- 
ing school hours. The rules, pro- 
mulgated under toe governments 
sweeping emergency decree, art ^an 
attempt to crush what has been one 
of toe main weapons of young 
black activists seeking to demon- 
strate opposition to white mmonty 
rule and the government’s apart- 
heid system. . 

The white police commander «or 
Soweto, Brigadier Jan Coetzee, was 
quoted in The Sowetan newspaper 
as saying “We are cracking down. 
We will not allow 5,000 stupid stu- 
dents to disregard law and order in 
Soweto and in South Africa. 

The newspaper also quoted Brig- 
adier Coetzee as saying it was quite 
possible that as many as 50 pupto 
between toe ages of 7 and 10 had 
been arrested. 

Hundreds more students were 
picked up Friday, many of them at 
Fidetitas High School in the town- 
ship of Diepldoof. 

“They came and took us ngb 
out of class." Viviens Dav^ 
16 who was one of those held for 
about five hours at toe station. 
“They didn’t tell us anything, they 
just made us move into trucks. 

The police spokesman said stu- 
dents under 13 were released with- 
out charge while others were 
rharged under toe emergency regu- 
lations and released to their par- 
ents’ custody. They are to appear in 
court early next week. 

Aliwal North, located in South 

Africa’s politically conservative m- 
lerior, was another community toat 
had managed to skirt the unrest 
until recently. But Thursday nigh 
police opened fire on a crowd toat 

(Continued on Page X CoLQ 


ES- 

The East German news agency 
ADN said that Hans Joachim 
Tiedge, 48, who disappeared last 
weekend amid mounting evidence 
of a major spy ring in Bonn, had 
asked for political asylum. It said, 
his request was under review. 

The news agency said that the 
defection proved East Germany s 
superiority over West Germany in 
intelligence work. East Berlin 
newspapers said Thursday that 168 
West German agents had been cap- 
tured in the last 18 months. 

West Germany conceded Friday 
that Mr. Hedge's defection woidd 
cause enormous damage to toe 
countiys security^ He had worked 
in counterintelligence for nearly 20 
years, and had risen to become 
third in command of cotmteniiielli- 
eence service known as the Office 
for Protection of toe Constitution. 

Diplomats said toat Mr. Tiedge s 
high rank and broad access to sen- 
sitive information could compro- 
mise toe work of toe intelligence 
services of other Western allies, in- 
cluding the United States, wd 
could even impair certain amed 
functions. . 

[The United Stales will consult 
Bonn to assess the damage caused 
by Mr. Hedge's defection, the State 
Department said Friday, Reuters 
reported from Washington.] 

For toe past four years Mr. 
Tiedge was in charge of trademg 
East German spies. Security offi- 
cials said be was entrusted with toe 

identities of many Western agents 
and their contacts. His detailed 
knowledge of West German meth- 



Hans Joachim Tiedge 


ods in delecting Communist spies 
would enable East Germany w al- 
ler espionage tactics and protect 
any agents deemed at risk, toe 
sources added. 

Hans Neusel a state secretary in 
toe Interior Ministry, said that the 
government had undertaken emer- 
gency measures to protect pa>ple 
whose work and lives could be 
jeopardized by Mr. Tiedge s defec- 
tion. He said that toe Bonn govern- 
ment also would carry out an ur- 
gent review of its counter- 
intdligence operations a g a i nst East 
Germany. 


The defection of Mr. Tiedge 
swelled speculation that he might 
have tipped off three other espio- 
nage suspects, including toe per- 
sonal secretary of Economics Min- 
ister Martin Bangemann, who have 
disappeared this month. The three 
also are believed to have sought 
sanctuary in East Germany. 


Mr. Tiedge was ostensibly in 
charge of toe hunt for Ursula Rich- 
ter. an official for an East Europe- 
an exile organization in Bonn who 
was suspected by security forces of 
acting as a control agent for several 
Eas t German spies. 

She vanished last weekend along 
with a friend, Lorenz Betzing. an 
army messenger who had worked 
earlier inside a top-secret govern- 
ment bunker near Bonn toat was 
intended to serve as an under- 
ground command post in time oi 
nuclear war. 

Sonja Luneburg. Mr. Bange- 
mann’s secretary, disappeared 
three weeks ago after saying toat 
she was going to Brussels for the 
weekend. When her story proved 
false, the police searched her apart- 
ment and found devices toat could 
be used for espionage. 

Mr. Neusel said that bean uri- 
nated a continuing exodus of Com- 
munist spies in toe coming ; weete 
once Mr. Tiedge informs toe East 
German authorities about agents 
who could be threatened with ex- 
posure in West Germany. 

There were reports that Ins supe- 
rior knew he had serious dunking 
and debt problems but allowed him 
to remain in Ins sensitive position. 

Mr Neusel confirmed the re- 
ports about Mr. Hedge’s personal 
problems but contendedtoat toe 
man would have presented a more 
severe risk if dismissed suddenly. 

Mr. Tiedge called “ ° n 
Monday. A nationwide search be- 
gan on Wednesday when his three 
daughters filed a “missing person 
report 

“This case will have serious re^ 
suits for West Germany's security, 
Mr Neusel said. “If Tiedge passes 
on all bis knowledge to toe oppo- 
nent secret services tins will mean 
massive damage for West Germa- 
ny’s intelligence work." 


UX Orders 


Testing of 
Jet Engines 


Compiled by Oer Staff From Dispatches 

MANCHESTER, England -- 
Following toe fire tool killed ^54 


following me mi. . 

people on a British Airtours Boeing 
737 British Airways said Friday 
toat it was ordering precautionary 
checks on all engines of the type 
that exploded and set the plane on 
fire. 

And in Washington, U.S. safety 
officials confirmed that they had 
recommended on July 22 that U.S. 
airlines inspect the same type oi 
engine used on the Airtours plane. 

The National Transportation 
Safety Board said it made the rec- 
ommendation to toe Federal Avia- 
tion Administration after an inves- 
tigation implicated the Pratt & 
Whitney engines in seven acaaents 
since 1981. 

But a safety board spokesman 
said toat there was no evidence 
tying Thursday’s accident to toe 
earlier ones. 

Results of a survey being 
out for toe FAA by Pratt & Whit- 
ney are expected next week. 

British Airways, which owns 
British Airtours, said it had not 
been told of any aiggesbon to 
check its UiL-made Pratt & Whit- 
ney JT8D engines. 

But Britain’s Civil Aviation Au- 
thority said that all British opoa- 
tors of planes with the engines naa 
been informed of the U3. recom- 
mendation. 

The aviation authority said that 
the U.S. directive called fo r checks 
on certain blades in the compres- 
sors of JT8D-15 engines with more 
than 17,000 hours of service. 

The plane that ca ugh t fire Tnurs- 

(Contimied on Page 2, CoL 1) 




" - Ktuon 

Policemen in Auckland, New Zealand, examining the 
has posed a dilemma for the French opposition- Page 


INSIPfi 


■ A case-fire is in effect in Beirut as Christian and Moslem leaders 
discuss options for deploying Synan observers. 


ARTS/LEISURE 


■ Afo^- factory in Cologne provides generous space for progres- 
sive art 


SS™ — 1 ° f ^ 

& Sons. 


White House: 




At* 


here for the most striking P. Clark, were seldom seen and even less 
, favorable atnKKpb^ ^ vacation. frequently heard. . ' toat toe staff was meeting to make 

BV Gerald M.Bofd ^^iltof^S^topromir it has been left to. Mi ^idationson Mr. Reagan’s agenda fortoe 

u* -£3,36 JS ffi£gr«S£iS 5SSSS55S SSSBBfflgae 
SSSESS BaSsrZZ &gssses= 

andhowtoemteoi^P rffidakh ^ — — 

One evident ^ less prone to 



Earthquake Hits 
Chinese-Soviet 
Border Region 

Agenee France-Prase 

PARIS — A major earthquake, 
measuring 7.7 on the opai-ended 
RicbtCTlcale, struck Friday nor 
the Chinese-Soviet border. sasmoi- 
ogists at the World Physics Insti- 
tute said in Strasbourg 
Earlier, toe UA Seismology In- 
stitute in Goto Cototo £ 
ooned a magnitude of 73 on the 

Soul 300 miles (500 Mome^ 
east of Tashkent, the capital of So- 
viet Uzbekistan. . 

The Strasbourg seismologists 
placed the tremor in about toe 
»me area. An earthquake of that 
magnitude is Body \o cmsc serums 
damage, they said, although there 
were no immediate reports of casu- 
alties or damage. 

Although toe region where it oc- 
curred was sparsely poptuaMd. toe 
quake may have affected the city of 
Kashgar, in toe Xinjiang Uygur re- 
gion of western Chin a, toe seismol- 
ogists said. 


U.S. Churches Divided 


Lctuary f 


By Ari L Goldman 

Sew York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Although pro- 
viding sanctuary u> those m danger 
is a tradition as did as tire Bible, 
U3- religious leaders are debating 
whether American churches and 
synagogues are justified in harbor- 
ing aliens from Central America- 
More than 200 churches and syn- 
agogues — from Grace Baptist 
Quitch in San Jose, California, to 
Riverside Church in Manhattan to 
Temple Beth El in Madison, Wis- 
consm — have declared tiremsdves 
sanctuaries for such illegal aliens. 

Supporters argue that these 
churches have reclaimed an ancient 
tradition in order to shelter those 
El Salvador and Guatema- 
la. Many sanctuary workers ac- 
knowledge thaf they are breaking 
U.S. laws, but argue that they are 
following a higjrer religious law. 

“The glory of toe American im- 
migration tradition is that we 


opened the Golden Door to people 
of many different persuasion* 
said toe Reverend Donald W. Srn- 
ver Jr., president of Union Theo- 
logical Seminary in Manhattan, if 
the Golden Door is being unjustly 
dosed, then we feel obliged to open 
the church door to them." 

Critics say tire ideal of sanctuary 
is bring subverted for political pnr- 

T iL —Vn nnnnv R KtOlfl 


noses Dy LDuac mriiu 

administration policy on immigra- 
tion and Central America. 

The U.S. government contends 
that the alien* are fleeing poverty, 
not persecution, and many have 
been deported. 

The critics of sanctuary also ray 
• that religious people should work 
to change laws rather than break 
them. 

“You should not pull, out all tire 
sacred stops on toe churchly organ 
for every little partisan’ cause you 

(Contitmed on Page X CoL I j 





Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATUKDAY-SUTTOAY, AUGUST 2^25, 1985 


mu 


a 


Greenpeace Sinking Poses Di] 

For the Rightist Opposition in France 



-** 


By Michael Dobbs 

Wttihutgtof! Post Strike 

PARIS — The staking of a ship 
• belonging to environmental pro- 
testers campaigning against French 
nuclear policies has posed a deli- 
cate political dilemma for rightist 
' French opposition parties that usu- 
. ally seem eager to seize on any issue 
to embarrass the ruling Socialists. ' 

The caution with which opposi- 
tion politicians have reacted to 
charges that French secret service 
agents blew up a Greenpeace ship 
in the New Zealand port of Auck- 
land on July 10, killing a man 
aboard, has reflected one of the 
unwritten rules of political debate 
here: Tbou shalt not bring into 
question the force de frappe, 
France's independent nuclear de- 
terrent 

Earlier this week, President 
Franqois Mitterrand's rightist op- 
ponents broke a self-imposed si- 
lence on the affair, which has been 
makin g headlines here since early 
August. But rather than attack the 
government for authorizing a crim- 
inal act in a friendly country, they 
instead charged incompetence. 

While two French secret service 
agents prepare to go on trial in New 
Zealand on charges of arson and 
murder, the political debate in Par- 
is has centered on who was respon- 
sible for allowing them to get 
caught. 

The French press Thursday 
named a suspected informer 
aboard the sabotaged ship, the 
Rainbow Warrior, as Lieutenant 


Chris tine-Huguette Cabon, an em- 
ployee of the DGSE, the General 
Directorate for External Security, 
the French intelligence service. 

Along with several other alleged 
French agents, Lieutenant Cabon 
has disappeared since the sinking 
of the siup. She reportedly infiltrat- 
ed Greenpeace under the name 


FrAd erique Bonlieu last spring and 
"XJSE. 


gave information to the DG 

In the National Assembly, Jean- 
daude Gaudin, floor leader of the 
center-right Union for French De- 
mocracy, called for the resignations 
of Prime Minister Laurent Fabius 
and Defense Minister Charles 
Hernu. 

"Because of your clumsiness, a 
boat of environmentalists has been 
given the chance to launch an un- 
precedented propaganda cam- 
paign. This is a typically Socialist 
action,” Mr. Gnu dm said. 

The continued silence of other 
opposition figures has officially 
been explained as a wish not to 
prejudge the investigation headed 
by a prominent civil servant, Ber- 
nard Tricot, who is expected to 
present his report next week. 

Most French commentators, 
however, say they are convinced 
that the opposition leaders do not 
want to lay themselves open to ac- 
cusations of exploiting a sensitive 
issue of national security for parti- 
san political reasons. 

' A dissenting voice in the opposi- 
tion ranks was provided by a cen- 
trist deputy, Bernard Stasi, who de- 
scribed as "totally cynical” the idea 


that France was right to sabotage 
the Rainbow Warrior but wrong to 
get caught. Mr. Stasi said that, 
while serving as minister for 
France's overseas territories in 
1973, he had opposed an earlier 
plan by “certain authorities” to 
rink a Greenpeace ship 
When Mr. Mitterrand ordered 
the armed forces last weekend to 
prevent “by force if necessary" any 
future attempt by Greenpeace to 
disrupt French nuclear testing in 
the Pacific, the opposition could 
only sit back and applaud as he 
publicly pledged to continue the 
tests in defiance of the wishes of 
most of the countries in the region. 
■ Raft Provided Oue 

A rubber raft bought from a 
London marine shop owned by a 
former British secret agent hripud 
New Zealand police trace French 
officers charged with sinking the 
Rainb ow Warrior, the French 
newspaper Liberation said Friday, 
United Press Internationa] report- 
ed from Paris. 

The newspaper said David 
Chapman, the owner of the shop, 
telephoned his former secret ser- 
vice colleagues after a “quite 
strange" man with a French accent 
purchased a specialized 



WORLD 


A 


( l 




Council Approves New Caledonia Flan 

PARIS (Reuters) —The French government^ plan on New Caledonia 

. j - n .j /uinnririnn n htecbOOS WGTC reKCtetiJnh 




was finally improved ttioay wnen oppoauuu 
the Constitutional Council here. Local electrons are now expected to 
held in the South Pacific territory by the end of next month. ■ 

The nine-member council rilled that an amended bill on-New Caledo- 
na was constitutional, ending weeks of pariiamentary wran^mg. The 


ma was constitutional, ending weexs « y** 

MIL approved Tuesday by a special season of the National Assembly, 
provides for elections for fournew regional councils and a referendum on 

in ^ebflI^TOXlrree more seats than originally planned to the capital of 
Noumea, which is dominated by French settlers, but leaders of the 
rightist opposition said the. temtoiy’s indigenous ^people would stiD 
benefit unfairly. The opposition fenced revision of an earner but by 
referring it to the Constitutional Co un c i l. . 


party played Mnrift Uhii- 


Tamils Accused of Plannin g Offensivif ' 

COLOMBO, Sri T-ankfl (Combined Dispatches) — Sri Lanka accused 
Tamil mili tant groups Friday of planning a major offensive and c harg ed 
the guerrillas were responsible Kir more than 600 cease-fire violations 
over right weeks. The statement occurred a day after a Tamil guerrilla 
spokesman , warned of . “all-out war" in the Indian Ocean i slan d n atio n. 

Meanwhile in Geneva, a Sri 1 ^mkari official said Friday that it was up 


raeanwnue m ueneva, a on mnnan wuum smu uuoj 
to. India to pressure Tamil separatists to modify their demands to 
facilitate a political solution to the country’s ethnic crisis. Sri Lanka’s 

.r ^ t "... r AtMathmnHQK cairf hie pn wmmwi l 


a specialized raft in 

May. 

British agents followed the CUS- United Pros International 
tenter, believed to be the man idea- BEIRUT — Christian and Mos- 

tified by New Zealand as Alain lem forces honored a Syrian- 
Turrage, the paper said. He is one backed cease-fire Friday and ro- 
of the two alleged French agents pcrtecDy were considering three 
facing charges in New Zealand plans for the deployment of Syrian 
over the altar* observers along the Green Line be- 


jong mg no me ua am party played checkers with bidlets near facilitate a political solution to the counnys ethmc aisis. bn J-anj tars 
a cease-fire was imposed TTi-^alay, avfinp t? days <rf Yin l*nn<»_ minister of national security, LalithA thula t hm udali, said his govemmeat 

commuted to seeking a_political solution” with separatist 
Tamils , d^spitet th« np Hap iff of talks Thursday fallowing renewed violence 

Beirut Factions Considering 3 Flam 
For Deployment of Syrian Observers 


Cuba to Increase Its Forces in Angola 


and 
iy be- 


Orders Testing of Jet Engines 


tween East and West Beirut and in 
outlying areas of the Lebanese cap- 
ital 


1) 


day had about 12,000 boms flying 
time. 

The Boeing 737 that caught fire 
on takeoff from Manchester was 
beading for Greece with 131 pas- 
sengers and six crew members on 
board. Fifteen of the 83 survivors 
were hospitalized for bums. 

Forensic experts worked Friday 
to identify the badly burned re- 
mains of the 54 victims laid out in a 


makeshift morgue in a 


for the checks. He said that the 
airline had not been told of any 
specific problems related to the en- 
gine. 

Investigators from Pratt & Whit- 
ney and a separate team of Boeing 
specialists flew to Manchester an 
Friday to join the British investiga- 
tors. 

The Pratt & Whitney investiga- 
tors were later quoted by a Federal 
Aviation Administration spokes- 
man as saying that the disk that 


the engine would have spewed 


Roads linking Chris tian 
Beirut and Moslem West Beirut 
were opened to traffic Friday, and 


burning fuel under immense pres- the authorities prepared to reopen 
sure — “Kke a torch,” the source Beirut International Airport after 


hnnozr mat me disx that 

“Only two of the bodies are reebg- eariierprob- 

nnnkla fmm ** . 


nizable from their faces, 
port spokesman ■m id , 

Investigators also were checking 
reports from some passengers that 
they were told by crew members to 
stay in their seals even after the 
plane was on fire. 

A British Airways spok esman 
said that the airlin e had begun 
making computerized checks on 
the engines of the 30 Boeing 737s it 


an air- J 0 ™ Wlt * 1 .* e JT8D engine was not 
involved in the Manchester acci- 


dent. 

“The disk was still intact after 
the accident,” the spokesman said. 
“What apparently aid happen was 
that one of the combustion cham- 
bers blew op or blew off.” 

One source said that attention 
was^ focused on the “combustor 
cun" — metal-alloy bands that sur- 
round the combustion chamber 


operates. «™u usuuu uuunoer 

The airline spokesman said that S™} ^t be tough enough to 

none of its 737s had been grounded W1 S s £ nd hl ^ beat “ d pressure. 

If the combustor can cracked. 


said. 

Although the engines are ar- 
mored to stop debris from explo- 
sive failures flying about danger- 
ously, some engine part pierced 
fuel tanks in the wing of the British 
plane, starting the fire. 

Boeing, based in Seattle, has sold 
more than 1,200 of the 737s, a 
short-range plane that generally is 
considered one of the world's saf- 
est. 

Meanwhile, the Manchester air- 
port was put on emergency alert 
again Friday when a Yugoslavian 
DC-9 had landing problems. Unit- 
ed Press International reported. 

The pilot of a In ex Adria Air- 
lines DC-9 with 93 people aboard, 
arriving from Dubrovnik, Yugosla- 
via, radioed the control tower that 
his “wheels had not locked proper- 
ly," an airport spokesman said. 

The wheels finally moved into 
place and the plane landed safely. 

(AP, UPJ, Reuters) 


guarantees from the rival factions 
to spare the facility from artiDby 
and rocket poundings. 

Militia sources reported minor 
skirmishes in (he Beirut area and in 
the mountains east of the city, but 
said that the cease-fire, agreed on 


killed at least 11 

wounded 32 others 

fore the cease-fire took effect in the 
early ev ening 

About 287 people died and at 
least 924 were injured in 12 days of 
violence before the cease-fire was 
imposed. 

Moslem and Christian mili tia 
sources said that while there stiQ 
were stumbling blocks threaten in g 
the cease-fire, agreement was unan- 
imous among the rival factions to 
give the Syrians a greater peace- 
keeping rale. 

They said that three plans were 
under consideration, each involv- 
ing the deployment of Syrian Army 
observers to monitor the cease-fire. 

The first plan, the sources said, 
called for the deployment of three 


their barracks for reorganization 
under direct Syrian supervision. 

The second p lan, the sources 
said, calls for the deployment of 
only 50 Syrian observers in East 
Beirut to complement a similar 
measure already in force in West 
Beirut. A ranking Syrian officer 
would supervise security commit- 
tees in both sectors of the capital 

The third plan calls for allbcavy 
weapons to be withdrawn from the 
rival factions in Beirut and htmded 
over to Lebanese Army units, (he 
sources said. 

A final decision on which of the 
three plans will be applied is to be 
made in the next few days after 
more talks led by Syria between the 
rival factions, militia leaders said. 



Isidore Mahnierca Peoli 


HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — 
Sooth Africa's military incursions 
into Marxist Angola have forced 
Cuba to increase its troop preserffr 
in the .former Portuguese colony, 
the Cuban foreign, rotations minis- 
ter said Friday. 

Hie minister, Isidore Mahnierca 
Peoli, in Harare on a three-day vis- 
it. said that Cuba wanted to reduce 
its military presence in Angola but 
was resolved to keep soldiers there 
until Sooth African-sponsored “in- 
stability” in the region ceased. 
Cuba has sent op to 20,000 troops 
into Angola to back the govern- 
ment of the Soviet-supported An- 
golan Popular liberation Move- 
ment which took power Nov. 11, 
1975. 



Peres Warns of Threat to Government 

University Employees Seized JERUSALEM (AP) — Prime Minis ter Shimon Peres said Friday that 
T “f cease -? re - *8™* on i^T n Two Lebanese employees of the attacks on his administration by rightist cabinet misistera could end the 

Thursday at a meeting conducted 10 ^ ast American University of Beirut partnership and bring down the coalition government ^ 

by Syna, was being honored other- overln ^^ l t ^ d - ** mountains were abducted early this week, a FoirignMinister Yitzhak Shamir, ala meeting with Mr. Peres derignJE 
WISP - wou£befilM»52£ spokesman said Friday, to repair a growing rift in the cabinet, said his party did not want to break 

Rocket, tank and artillery fire Sm ^ “ ’ “ ^ 


Pretoria Holds Black Schoolchildren 


(Continued from Page 1) 

they said had refused to disperse. 
Six were reported killed and 26 
wounded. 

Another black man, age 20, died 
when police shot at a group that 
had set fire to a teacher’s house and 
stoned police vehicles in Shalo vil- 


lage. outside the Ciskei town 
Whitt] esea, police reported 
Police also announced that they 
had arrested 94 more people using 
their emergency powers, brin ging 
to 2^29 the number detained since 
the decree took effect July 21 . Huy 
reported 1,183 of the detainees 
, have been released 

: March to Mahdefa Prison 
Reverend Allan Boesak, presi- 
dent of the World Allian ce of Re- 
formed 


up the 1 1-month-old partnership, Israel Radio said The radio report was 
confirmed by a Peres aide. 

Mr. Peres called the meeting following criticism by Arid Sharon, the 
industry and trade minister, of a government decision to evict legislators 
from an apartment they occupied in Hebron, a West Bank city. The 
legislators were trying to expand the Jewish presence in the predominant- 
ly Arab city. 


of enoe in Cape Town that Mr. Man- 


dela’s release was “a^Sffltiaj^. MX Successfnfly launched From Silo 

ogful solution VAKmcwnrnn im .... 


requisite to a m eaning ful solu tion 
in South Africa." 


Radio South Africa appeared to 
suggest that Mr. Mandela would 
not be released anytime soon. 

■ FahveB Apologizes to Tutu 
Reverend Jerry Falwell, the po- 
litically conservative U.S. evange- 
list who recently returned from a 


WDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, California (AP) — An un- 
armed MX intercontinental missile was successfully launched Friday for 
thefirat time from an underground sflo. the Pentagon annntmr^ 

The four-stage missile, whose development has been a matter of 
JESFSE* F* a dummy warhead in the target area in the Kwajaleu 
wusMle Test Range m the Pacific, according to an airforce spokesman. 

^ 7“ 00n *?**P^'* “Heston* because of the successful Tmtnrt. 
trom an underground sflo. 


3* U-S. Spy Plane Crashes in El Salvador 

^ohonv- Rraitftrc PrAm o a vm wa** m 1 


— * 


Heral 




•Srikunelilp f 

— i. >i, a , m sr-.sEsJBirj.-5 rf, 


Opening for Talks 
la Seen In Moscow 




Leaders Vow to Pnsh p 
an Economic Recovery ft' 


Churches, urged people 

Friday to jean a march to Cape “phony,” Reuters reported from SAN SALVADOR a ' 

Towns top-security Pollsmoor Washington. re P u ™° Fridav^ unmanned US., spy plane crashed 
prison on Wednesday to demand InTidevision interview Mr fo? to 011 ^ movements 

to release of to imprisoned Afri- Falwell said: “It was an unfortu-' mflitary,_a U5. emba»y spokesman said. 

*** C f I n ® ress lcader > Nd- nate choice of words, to word possibilitv that 5,11 ^ ^ not role out to/) 

son Mandda, Umted Press Inter- ‘phony,' which I should not haw J™te-controIled drone that V 

national reported Friday from used.” Mr. Falwell had said T ,7 ? — 0>Cia0 * a,,B ^ ol ^«“ 

Mr. Boesak, an outspoken critics “mamraS-he^speate 5 for noS t S- Say *w M1C *** totik but Hondu- 

of apartheid, said at a press roofer- whiEs. - 1 , pg ^ ^ 


Sjw? SI: 


j 

mmwm\ 
PRL 

nSSSjcS 

SMs 


& 



tLSt San 7 f 

bW i 


Soweto Nightlife Reflects Realities of Apartheid 


*. .. , 



1 '^“'"■I'dnflnU'aSSS 

| faw !^£Ujg? 




2R»1 


Ta ke advantage of our speaal rates for new subscribers and 
we II give you an extra month of Tribs fieewith a one-year 
subsen pfion. Total savings: nearly 50% off the newsstand price 
in most European countries] 


(Continued (ram Page 1) 
of a black township, cramped by 
those of a wealthy white area. 
Nearby, however, are homes being 
built for colored people, much 
smaller places. Homes, Lucky says, 
where you cannot fit a decent-sized 
double bed into the bedroom. 
“That," be says, “is apartheid.” 
The car puns forward. It is night, 
past to curfew hour, which should 
mean streets empty of cars and of 
people. The conversation, above 
to country and western music that 
fills to soft interior of the car, 
turns to to nation's violence in to 
black townships. That violence has 
claimed more than 620 lives, virtu- 
ally ah of them black; 120 of those 
since a state of emergency took 
effect in 36 magisterial districts, 
including this one, July 21. 

A question: Why, in the unrest, 
do blacks not shoot bade at the 
police? Are there no guns? Lucky 
smiles, reaches to his ankle, then 
dangles his snub-nosed pistol by 


to trigger guard. Yes, he says, 
there are guns in Soweto. 

White Johannesburg and black 
Soweto are about 10 nuks (16 kilo- 
meters) apart, but it is a gulf made 
unbridgeable by economics and by 
to Group Areas Act, which re- 
mains intact under to limi ted 
changes in racial policy offered by 
President Pieter W. Botha. The law 
says blade people must live in one 
area, colored people in another, In- 
dians in another, and whites in yet 
one more. 

The divide is evident, even with- 
out seeing the race of to residents. 
White South Africa abounds with 
vegetation. Soweto is mostly bar- 
ren, a place of dark ydlow dirt 


discos, but, by a conservative esti- 
mate, 4,000 shebeens, the un- 
adorned, backroom parlors devot- 
ed to drinking and loud muse and 
conversation. 

At Sophie's, the first shebeen on 
to itinerary, there is an immediate 


policeman, says things have been 
quiet since to curfew. Hesayspeo- 
ple are not coming to to shebeens 
in to usual numbere. And he has a 
'grievance, too. 

He has been on to force 10 
years, he says, riding his 


_J J-. . T . — J — 1MUI1K ms SUZUKI 

22J2&, 7 te women courting motonpde around town, his ser- 
venture, wee. pistol on hu hip, ticketing 


dwt through, still, with a sense of 
to illicit, despite to repeal of leg- 
islation forbidding mterradal sex! 

Sophie’s is on a street of dirt and 
small homes, unmarked and unad- 


bhteks and whites juATS 
traffic cop would. His take-home 
pay, he says with some pride, is 
abotu the equivalent of $450 a 
mouth. ^ 


wtosck oxqn by to cars parked “But to whites, they are gettrac 
outside, a place to be enterofby the more ” he says, “whites who jSS 

nn> U 1 P l A r r w wtUam V *»•« J 


back door. Its clients are mostly 
middle dass, and to black com- 
puter analysts and personnel offi- 


crammed vjth homes that rat^ rers gathered offer tStoSiy to 
from small, for to many to grand, black advancement and to con- 

f °wv, r T Weallhy bi f c * cs - c ««“«* <® R and to to economic 

While there are strata in Soweto, envies induced by apartheid. 

0* dBtacucB of ebss aodTOlfl. A man caliad JoTfoTiLnco, 

says he has a good job with a multi- 


do not detract from black hostility 


to force when I did. *5^ 
anve a patrol car. I am not allowed 
to. 

Outride again, the sedan sneaks 

forward fike some phantom haunt- 
ing the night between small.homes 
Lhal seem all the smaller in compar- 
ison to the places over to hllL the 
places with pools and courts and 


-r- 


v- 


to apartheid, and offer insights into S pools and cour 

ton 


t 


CHURCH SERVICES 


thp cMion «• r * 1 “F une is a white *~w«o nas rrve municirxal swim- 

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To: Subscription Manager, Intemaliond Herald Tribune, 181 . avenue Chrotesde^SajlIp 

92521 Neu^Gedex,Franoe.Tdj:7^ 0729.Telex:6T283Z 

Plecse enter my subscription Ibn 

□ l2marths □6morths OSmorths 
(+7 mortthfree) |+2wBefcsfrw4 f+lweekfre^ M 

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G rngt-V, 75008 Paris. The Very Rev. 
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Almq Mores u u. Sunday, 9 an, fl ajn. 
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CENTRAL BAPTIST CHURCH. 13 Bn du 
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PAMS SUBURBS 
EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH, 56 Rue des 
Bons-Raisln*. Ruail-Malrnobon. English 
speaking, avonge tk al, afl denom in ations. 
&5. 9v45; Wonshfo, 1(MS. Oteer otfvHes. 
Cal Dr. B.C. Thomas, Pastor. 749.1 5.29. 


young people don’t want to 
into that acceptance. So you nave 
kids throwing rocks to protest the 
~ystem. But how long can you go on 
irowing rocks? For 10 years?” 
The conversation lapses. 

Across town, in to white areas, 
people are going to to movies, fill- 
ing up the discotheques, or bring 
seated at restaurants. In Soweto, 
there is one movie house and few 


w lorce Mxyoe 1 percent of die blade 

raoal change on to white amhori- P^Pfc, th<Be Idee him, could afford 

ae t , J to move into white areas. But the 

Dowoto road, at Spoons’s she- w «tid stay put in Soweto, he 
ws^tltey are sittiim on chairs ar- J 3 )®. and so their children wonld go 
ranged around to bare walls, the to “* 00 ! in Soweto, as thev ^ 

ties, while a professional disco to in. white areas. There 


. f *M^wvnqi uihLU — “■'•vwi in wffllC allMU 

dancer on Ms night off from to be no apocalvMt^ 

stage gyrates in salitarv mm . — The «ir _ 


Nana. 


Address . 


Gfy. 


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UMTAMAN-UNIVHtSAUST, wonhip and 
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Sj-- 1 * K<oi ^ n ' 7he 


~ COmIIH, - rato'a night made 

S ^ UnsofN ^^W^bytoSngofa 

ened lighL Benny, a black traffic ^^fgen mmibiis, steaSiing 



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MONTE CARLO 
WT FWkWvp. 9 rue L Notari. Sunday 
B3de h-. (afl ages) 9rfS ajm. WcnNp 11 +6 
turn. Tel. 255151/2531 15. 


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ton* m the 

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Mexican 

Kesfcaoxant-Cantji 



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- ** 


.NTERISATlOIVALHEB^ n TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 24-25, 1985 






Page 3 


US. 
After M 




ies Mideast Peace Talks 
i Unsuccessful Mission 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


'"^AV 


■V . v 


s i 


By John M. Goshko 

-■ Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON - The ream 
. tnp of Richard W. Murphy assis- 
tout secretary, of stale for Near 
Eastern and South Asian affairs, W 
the Middle East made so Kttle pro- 
gress that the 'Reagan admimsira- 
uon has begun to reassess its hope 
of reviving the Middle East peace 
. process, diplomatic sources said. 

The sources said that Mr. Mur- 
phy. in a six-day trip that ended 
: 4 last Sunday, was unable to win as- 
f su ran ccs that if the United States 
agreed to meet with a joint Jordani- 
. an-Palestinian delegation, direct 
talks between Jordan and Israel 
would follow. 

The administration is not ready 
to abandon the goal of launching 
new, expanded peace talks between 
Israel and Jordan by the end of the 
year, the sources stressed. The 
United States has devoted consid- 
erable effort to this end since King 
Hussein of Jordan met with Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan at the White 
House in May. 

But, the sources said, the admin- 
istration wiD not be able to put off 
. much longer a decision about 
whether to risk serious strains in 
i* U.S. relations with Israel by acced- 
ing to Hussein's wishes and meet- 
ing with the joint Jordanian-Pales- 
tinian delegation. 



Richard W. Murphy 


Israel has strongly opposed Uik 
acquiesence to Hussein’s proposal 
because it fears that such a meeting 
would be regarded as U.S. recogni- 
tion of the Palestine Liberation Or- 
ganization. 


The United States has pledged 
that it would not deal with any 
delegation containing PLO mem- 
bers and would participate in a 
meeting 'cmly if it appears to further 


the goal of eventual Jordanian-Is- 
raeli talks. 

Hussein reportedly has said that 
while he hopes his plan would lead 
to eventual direct talks, the uncer- 
tainties of continued cooperation 
from the PLO chairman, Yasser 
Arafat, and the reluctance of mod- 
erate Arab states to openly support 
his peace initiative prevent him 
fr om giving assurances about what - 
Jordan would do. 

Hussein also is said to be un- 
yielding on two demands that the 
United States regards as serious 
obstacles: Jordan's insistence that 
the United States deal with the 
PLO and that the peace talks be 
held under the umbrella or an inter- 
national conference, including the 
Soviet Union. 

Israel has said that it would not 
mv. part in any process that in- 
cludes the PLO, and the United 
States has opposed Soviet involve- 
ment in current Middle East nego- 
tiations. 

Before Mr. Murphy’s trip, U.S. 
officials had expressed cautious op- 
timism that he might find sufficient 
flexibility in the Jordanian and Is- 
raeli positions to get around the 
procedural problems. That did not 
happen, and the question facing 
U.S. policymakers is whether the 
process has reached a point where 
no further movement is possible. 






Alleged U.S. Mobsters 
Named in Indictment 
Are Called New Breed 







iMMIVUn 


U.S. Bills on Cars May Hurt Expatriates 

_ _ . W iriHitifica- This “erav market” can save 


IjflY*- 


require makers to place identifica- Thu “gray market < am wg-j 
Jon marks on as many as 14 car U.S. buyer from S4.000 toSlO .000 

parts that are frequently stolen, a car, according to DcMrnnratof 

foreign cars without these marks Transportation figures. The market 

oooMnot be imported. has grown to about 50,000 vehides 

The Reagan administration op- in 1984, ab°ut90 percent from 
_ „ nosesT ihemeasuresas restrictions rope, from 5.000 vehicles in MW. 

under legislation now beforeCon- {J| s f* e?niarkel competition. according to an aide ma subcom- 

gress and rules being considered by . ^ ^ regulations mittee of the House Energy and 

the Department of Transportation. fiy. so-called Commerce Committee. 

Bills in both the House of Repre- -gray market” in foreign autos, 
sentatives and the Senate would tkj c marker k made in> of cars that 
bar the 
are not 

manufacturers as meeting 
safety and emission, standards. 


By Robert C. Siner 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — Many 
Americans who buy automobiles 
overseas may be barred from bring- 
ing them back to the United States 
under legislation now before Con- 


•d Ft:: 


Although many Americans in 
the United States order European 
cars buflt to American specifica- 
tions for phi op in Europe, about 
50000 cars a year currently come 
into the United States without 
m eeting these standards. It is these 
cars tha t would be banned. Foreign 

-*■ i If O rtan. 


Uira uiai ujyrwo 

distribution networks. 

But the measures could also af- 
fect Ameri cans who buy cars while 
working abroad and want to bring 
them back to the United States 

Under current law, uncertified 
vehicles can be imported if their 
owners have them upgraded to 
meet U J5; standards. 


from Europe. 

The House bill would permit ex- 
emptions for members of the 
armed forces stationed overseas, 
while the Senate measure would 
allow exemptions “only to cases of 
extreme hardship or unforeseen ex- 
traordinary circumstances." 

Gray-market imports have 


era that would be banned. Foreign Because prices overseas can be 

^ certified to meet UA stay- Omusandsofd^aral **tath«e ^^SSSSStS^S SSk 
dards generally are not sold outside at fnn*sed d^M ^the from foreigI1 mak- 

of the United Stattu Umted ere that improper modifications 

In addition, the Depaipnent of mm might le.veSc.pen to product. 


strong said that new housing 
would have to be built at twice 
the current rate to keep up. 


for the second straight year, from 
33 cents to 3178 cents per mile, 
due mainly to a decline in inter- 
est rates and to motorists driving 
more. 


..ny WFT _ ^8 Town Casino in Las Vegas will open 

rmsJraday. At the moment, it is planning only to accept football wagers. 

New York 2000: 

A Growth Odyssey 

The shine will stay on the Big 
Apple for the rest of this century, 
according to a newly published 
economic analysis. It says the 
economy of New York City and 
its suburbs, buoyed by a five- 
year recovery, has entered a peri- 
od oT sustained growth that is 
threatened only by a bousing 
shortage. . 

The study, reported m The 
New York Times, concludes that 
the nation’s largest urban area 
has fully recovered from the eco- 
nomic crunch of the 1970s, when 
New York City came close to 
bankruptcy and hundreds of 
businesses closed. 

“We are no longer looking at 
an aging economy, but one that 
is vital and growing." said Regi- 
na B. Armstrong, an economist 
who conducted the analysis for 
the Regional Plan Association, 
an economic research group. ^ 

Her study predicts the area s 

population.’ employment and in- 
dustrial output will grow at a rate 
slightly below the VS. average 
but still wiH increase rapidly for 
the next 15 years. 

The study projects that the 
city, which lost more than 
450.000 jobs in the 1970s, viU 
regain a similar number by the 
century's end. The metropolitan 
area lost 564,000 residents from 
1972 to 1982, the study said, but 
it will ga in more than two million 
in the next 15 years. Ms. Ann- 


Short Takes 

The Smithsonian Institution is 
preparing for a surge of calls on 
its DiaJ-a-Phenomenon number 
as Halley's comet nears. Recent 
ralU to the number — (202) 357- 
2000 — have been spurred by ihe 
Pleiades meteor shower. To ob- 
serve it, a recorded message sug- 
gests, a person should simply lie 
on the ground on a clear night 
and look up at the sky. For Hal- 
ley’s, it counsels patience. The 
comet will not be visible through 
small telescopes for another 
month or two, even later to the 
naked eye. 

The number of Americans who 
died in home fires dropped 14 
percent in 1984. largely because 
of a decline in arson. A survey by 
the National Fire Prevention As- 
sociation reported 4,075 home 
deaths in 1984. down from 4.670 
in 1983. The association cited a 
more coordinated effort by au- 
thorities to identify and arrest 
arsonists, and the continued in- 
crease in the use of automatic 
smoke detectors, which are now 
in three-fourths of U.S. homes. 

Shorter Takes: Forty-eight 
percent of all state and local gov- 
ernment workers were employed 
in education last year-.. The 
i cost of driving a car fell m 1984 


Three Mile Island: 

I fggal Hiam Reaction 

More than six years after the 
nuclear accident at Three Mile 
tdanri in Pennsylvania, area resi- 
dents are going to court in 
droves, blaming the mishap for 
problems from cancer to .AIDS. 

More than 1,300 such suits 
have been filed; more than 100 
were registered last week alone. 
“1 counted to 1,000,” said Dau- 
phin County Judge William Lip- 
sitt. “and then I gave up.” 

The deluge followed recent re- 
ports that injury claims filed af- 
ter the March 1979 accident led 
to at least $3.9 million in settle- 
ments, though the plant did not 
admit liability. 

Some people say they' are su- 
ing simply as a way to get infor- 
mation. “I would .tike to know,” 
said Naomi Livingston, who 
.timifs the accident may have 
ran<a»ri her breast cancer, “wbal 
was released down there." 

But Fred Speaker, an attorney 
for American Nuclear Insurers, 
was skeptical Some of the plain- 
tiffs, he said, “view the accident 
as opening up some veiy deep 
pockets." 

— Comp iled by 

BRIAN KNOWLTON 


Bv Joseph F. Sullivan 

■ VV- York Times Service 

NEWARK, New Jersey — The 
members of the Luchese crime or- 
ganization who were indicted this 
Seek cm charges of racketeering cue 
a new breed of criminal who broke 
with the “old code" and low-key 
way of life of their elders, accord- 
ing to U.S. law enforcement offi- 
cials. , . 

This week, a federal grand jury 
indicted 26 persons accused of be- 
ing New Jersey members of the 
New York-based Luchese crime 
group, which the authorities satdis 
beaded bv Anthony Corallo. On 
Wednesday. 21 of the accused were 
arrested in New Jersey and Florida 
while the other five remain at large. 

In interviews Thursday, law en- 
forcement officials described the 
defendants as “voting. aggressive, 
intelligent and sophisticated" peo- 
ple in their 30s who bought 
S 500.000 homes and flashy sports 
cars. 

“They are all related by blood or 
marriage and for this reason, were 
verv tough to penetrate, one fed- 
eral official said. “They dress casu- 
al but upscale, and when ibev 
wauled 10 gel in touch wiih each 
other, they used beepers.” 

According to the indictment, the 
Luchese organization is involved 
principally in gambling and loan- 
sharking operations in northern 
New Jersey, and through these op- 
erations the members have been 
able to lake control of at least one 

business. , 

They also cooperate in a network 
that brings drugs from South 
America and the Caribbean 
through Florida to New Jersey and 
New York, according to a report on 
Organized Crime in New Jersey 
written by Lieutenant Colonel Jus- 
tin J. Dintino. deputy state police 
superintendent. 

Members of the Luchese group 
maintain close working relations 
with members of the Genovese and 


DeCavalcante organizations who 
operate in some of the same territo- 
ries. the report said. 

The Luchese group moved 
quickly tofiU a vacuum in the gam- 
bling operations in the Ironbound 
section of Newark a few years ago. 
the report said, when Angelo Bru- 
no, the reputed crime boss of Phila- 
delphia, and his Newark represen- 
tative, Anthony Caponegro, were 
killed within a short time of each 
other. 

The killings were the result of a 
dispute within the Biuno group, 
according to police sources, but the 
Luchese organization took the op- 
portunity to move into the area. 

The report described the Lu- 
chese members in New Jersey as a 
small but powerful group of indi- 
viduals" who were able not only to 
lake over the territory held by the 
Bruno faction but to move into 
some gambling operations run bv 
Tino Ftumara. who was identified 
as a Genovese group figure, after 
Mr. Fiumara was sent to prison. 

According to Thomas W. Gree* 
lish, the acting U.S. attorney for 
New Jersey, the leader of the New 
Jersev faction of the Luchese 
group, one of those indicted Mon- 
day. is Anthony Accet luro. 47 or 
Hollywood, Florida. He fled New 
Jersey 10 years ago when he was 
subpoenaed to testify before the 
State Commission of lnvesugation. 

The stale police said that Mr. 
Accet luro was groomed for leader- 
ship in Lhe New Jersey faction by- 
Joseph Abate of Atlantic City, who 
is identified by law enforcement 
officials as a caporegime, or under- 
boss. in the Luchese group and who 
is described as in semiretirement. 

Mr. Green lish said the activities 
of Mr. Accetturo and the other *5 
defendants “range from an extort- 
ed 25 percent takeover of a gem- 
distribution business” in Florida to 
“loan-sharking at interest rates or 
156 percent annually.” 


Lsvestia Sees a Threat to Ties 
In U.S. Chemical-Spy Charge 

o mFiimIc thrpe limes in til 


Prepare far 


V:i» 

! I- -- 


By William J. Broad 

Hew York Times Service 

NEW YORK — In a ritual re- 
peated before evety liftoff, rescue 
teams from the National Aeronan- 
tjes and Space Administration are 
busy tins week preparing for some- 
thing they hope will never happen. 
thTcrash of an American space 

shuttle. . . 

Such contingency plans nave 
come into focus because of the unr 

expected shutdown of one of the 

Sssxas-” 

la Tbk week the rescue i crews have 

fanned out from Flond M 3 < 5 r t “ 
the event that they are neededafiex 
Saturday’s Discovery launching 
They go to such places as Spainan 
Si where, at various for^ 
SpSte they practice with fire- 

wtdtTln 19 starts 

thou has been no need for tnor 
^At times iUs quite buiry,” said 

=3£s»-*= 


Plans for 
Shuttle in 
Ascent 
Emergency 

Shuttle Destruction 

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uv c aew 01 

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Return to Launch Site 

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tuck loitw Kennedy Space 
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Trans-Attantic Abort 

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■tie space cemei netweengaw 
Mure Ha.etnep*«lw'Wl 
HiKftng sue a m SonevaJ o* 
Soam. where rescue crews aie 

ready and waling. 


Abort Once Around 

The plan, nlrawdiline slwOe 
has sumcienl nerf* and speed, 
sends me wait once around me 
globe onto ruiwyeyai Edwaide 
Air Force Base. WWf Sonde or 
Bie Kennedy Space Center 


Abort to Orbit 

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comeiue. ame« ai e lower Mftan- 

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RETURN 
TO LAUNCH 


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In an emergency the sMitde coiddexera^nu; 
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Ae ratnation. The primary 
ing sites for an emergency are shown at left. 


ties has 
bon miles 


oTdown in Europe or the eastern 

Mediterranean. 

No astronaut would be asked to 
destruction to keep the shuttle 


jjiore lhan 50 nut- 
nultioa ldlomettfs) 

UOU uiuw ' 

SsP’&fflTctt 

jon FuUrrtuu of the ®r ton*' 

ship’s commander, 


from crashing into populated areas. 

Responsibility for blowing up 
the craft rests with the range safety 
officer at the Cape Canaveral Air 
Force Station, just down the coast 
from the Kennedy Space Center. 

j catastrophic ways to end a 
shuttle mission, are routinely prac- 
ticed by rescue teams and astro- 
naut crews. 


The first of the space agency’s 
fwMtt^ency plans to abort a mission 
is known as “return to launch site. 
This occurs if a main shuttle engine 
shots down immediately after lif- 
toff. 

A 100 - member recovery crew 
stands by at eveiy launch for this 
type of emergency, waipng at tie 
shuttle's three-mile landing strip at 


ihe Kennedy Space Center^ The- 
second type of emergency, known 
as “trans-Atlantic abort_ startsif 
the shuttle climbs ^ 
gine failure. Here tie landing site iS 
in Senegal or Spain. 

If the shuttle gets even higberit 

might “abort once around” me 
globe onto a runway at Edwaids 

Air Force Base m California, White 


Sands Space Harbor in New Mexi- 
co or the Kennedy Space Center. 

According to space agency offi- 
cials, the best and last of tie 
planned aborts is the one that oc- 
curred in July- 

Known as “abort to orbit.” it 
puts the shuttle high enough to al- 
low a mission to continue, although 
at a lower orbit. The July mission 
was able to continue for eight days, 
one longer than scheduled. 

Once in orbit, the shuttle could 
face a crisis calling for immediate 
return to Earth. 

Rather than waiting hours for 
the shuttle to come within range of 
a main landing site, the space a 6 £ n_ 
cy could choose one of more than 
two dozen emergency runways 
around the world. 

Space agency officials say that in 
dire emergencies any 10 , 000 -fooi 
( 2 ^ 00 -meter) runway would do. al- 
though they prefer a landing site m 
the United States if possible. For 
remote landing sites, the agency 
ntninta^s a 70 -member rapid re- 
sponse team that could be on us 
way to a downed orbiter within five 
hours. 

Only the primary abort sites in 
Spain and Senegal are manned by 
special rescue teams, which have up 
to 16 members. 

There are two main types of 
emergency in space that would call 
for a rapid return: 

• A failure of tie craft s loops 
that cool the crew, electronics and 
fuel cells. 

• A loss of cabin pressure as n 
result of a collision with meteorites 
or space debris. 

The shuttle also could be forced 
to land on water, a last-ditch op- 
tion the spare agency would rather 
avoid since the craft lands at a 
speed of 218 miles per hour (351 
kpb). 


(Continued from Page 1) 

check to assure that use of tie pow- 
der has been discontinued- The of- 
ficial said it was unclear whether 
tie substance had been used m 
Leningrad as well as Moscow. 

The State Department has been 
asked by tie American Foreign 
Service Association, which repre- 
sents career Foreign Service em- 
iloyees, to increase hardship pay 
,‘or those serving in M«ww and 
Leningrad because of NPPD. 

In a comment on U.S, -Soviet re- 
lations. Pravda denounced .Wash- 
ington for barring three Soviet dip- 
lomats in San Francisco rrom 
traveling to a US.-Soviet volleyball 
game just outside the city. 

The Stale Department said tie 
arena was in an area closed to Sovi- 
et diplomats and added that tie 
aftirm was narllv in response io 


t 


Soviet refusals three times m tie 
past six weeks to approve travel by 
officials from tie U.S. consul in 
Leningrad to closed areas. 

"This creates tie impression 
that, instead of encouraging dia- 
logue between our countries and 
creating a favorable atmosphere 
for tie [summit] meeting, attempts 
are being made in tie ELSA, to 
place obstacles in the way or the 
dialogue," Pravda said. 

But in an indication that busi- 
ness was continuing as usual. Agri- 
culture Secretary John R. Block 
was to proceed on schedule Fnday 
to Moscow on a mission to pro- 
mote Soviet purchases of U.S. farm 
commodities. 

An aide said it would ‘ probably 
not be appropriate” for the agricul- 
ture secretary to bring up tie ques- 
tion of NPPD. 

(AP. Reuters. NYT) 


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10 VIA DEI CONDOTTI ROM A 
HOTEL TIERRE NEW 'tORK 
30. RUE DU RHONE 1 104 GENEVE 
AVENUE DE5 BEAUX-ARTS MONTE CARLO 
HOTEL PLAZA-ATHENEE PARIS 


Page 4 


Hcratfc 


INTERNATIONAL 


(tribune. 


Patched VU He Hew Y«fc Tmw nd TV lU^FM 


Spy Dust on Summit Road 


There is a new, unwelcome eatnr In the 
glossary of diplomacy: nitrophenyl penta- 
dienai aldehyde. It is the chemical die Siam 
Department says the Soviet Union uses to 
track diplomats in Moscow. That is a crude 
breach of the respect that civilized countries 
accord to diplomats, especially if the chemical 
is harmful But the spy dust, Hke the White 
House's announcement of a new anti-satellite 
missile test, is a stage prop in a larger drama: 
President Ronald Reagan's November meet- 
ing with the Soviet leader, MikhaQ Gorbachev. 

The last few weeks have seen a torrent of 
tough talk from the White House, antiphony 
to the propaganda blasts from Moscow. The 
Kremlin's promise of a five-month moratori- 
um on nuclear tests got the rapid brush-off it 
deserved. But then the White House an- 
nounced it was not interested either in a com- 
prehensive ban on anti-satellite nrissQes. At 
this rate of attrition, there will be little left to 
talv about at the Geneva summit meeting. 

White House tacticians may see several ad- 
vantages in striking a harsh pre-summit atti- 
tude. It softens up the Russians, lowers public 
expectations and guards against criticism of 
concessions. But there axe dangers of excess. 

The anti-satellite tests in particular are peril- 
ous brinkmanship. Surveillance and early- 
warning satellites proride a stabilizing force 


will soon be no return. Why risk stimulating a 
race in which there are only losers? 


that both sides benefit in keeping inviolate, 
particularly the United States. To avoid drift- 
ing in to an arms race no one needed, the 
American anti-satellite missil e system was ter- 
minated in 1975. But the Soviet Union rashly 


race in which there are only losers? 

Mr. Reagan has spent SI trillion on rebuild- 
ing defense. He has hung tough in arms talks, 
letting the Soviet Union stalk out in dudgeon 
and walk bade empty-handed. He left every- 
one guessing if he would continue to abide by 
the unratified SALT-2 treaty, accepting its 
limitations only at the last *»«"«** Presumably 
be intends, al Geneva also, to present a tough 
image while preparing to take the last exit to a 
pragmatic compromise. That is not a bad ne- 
gotiating strategy, if it works. The problem is 
the leguy he will leave if it does not: unbridled 
competition in evoy form of strategic weapon- 
ry. Spy dost stories may be useful adjuncts of 
the performer's art; anti-satellite tests are 
playing with unquenchable fire. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 


Eclipse of Mr. Moon Is Over 


The Reverend Sun Myung Moon was re- 
leased this week from a halfway boose in 
Brooklyn after serving 13 months — most of it 
in the federal prison m Danbury, Connecticut 
— for tax fraud. For weeks before this event, 
full-page ads appeared in newspapers, includ- 
ing this one, questioning the justice of Mr. 
Moon’s conviction. And at a news conference 
in Washington following his release, Mr. 
Moon’s supporters, some of whom are clergy- 
men, charged that his case was a serious in- 
fringement of First Amendmen t rights. 

These arguments have been heard before. 
They were made before a series of federal 
courts to no avail They were put forward by 
lawyers and public relations firms when the 
Supreme Corn was considering a petition to 
bear Mr. Moon's appeal; but that petition was 
denied. It is reasonable to maaimw that these 
arguments failed to persuade a single court 
because they have no merit 

Mr. Moot was not prosecuted for crirnmal 
violation of the tax laws over a ample misun- 


derstanding or an innnrent omission on his 
return. He was convicted not only of faffing to 
report personal income but also of concocting 
with ms associates, fraudulent evidence to 
show that the funds in question were actually 
the property of his church. Freedom of religion 
is not threatened by this conviction, nor are 
other c h u r ch leaders in jeopardy so long as 
they do not participate in conspiracies to con- 
oeal personal assets, forge documents or de- 
fraud the federal government 
The same law applies to every religious 
group. Church funds used for church purposes 
remain tax-exempt; funds that belong to indi- 
viduals or that arc generated by commercial or 
business activities of the church are 
taxable^ Jones om malra fi^tnal fmriingc 
about the source and ownership of assets. 

It is fine that Mir. Moon has completed his 
sentence and was a model prisoner. But he is 
not a martyr and is not entitled to be treated as 
if he had been a prisoner of conscience. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Tanzania: Victim of Fallacies 

Compared with many of his peers. President 


an African national leader. His sincere com- 
mitment to socialism and his much-trumpeted 
personal integrity have made him the hero of 
many Western liberals. Yet, as Mr. Nyerere 
prepares to stand down from office after 24 
years, he seems a pathetic figure — a man 
whose vain attachment to doctrinal purity has 
inflicted economic misery and destitution on a 
once relatively prosperous country. 

Tanzania has beat a spectacular victim of 
ihe fallacies of so-called "development eco- 
nomics," the main teachings of winch are that 
the price mechanism and the free market have 
no relevance for the Third World and must be 
supplanted by an disastrous dirigisme. 

— The Daily Telegraph ( London ij. 


Another Hurdle for ANZUS 


French-speaking couple arrested and charged 
with murder and sabotage were French agents. 

France has not acknowledged any involve- 
ment, bat an investigation ordered by Presi- 
dent Francois Mitterrand is under way. The 
prevailing view in Paris is that high-level offi- 
cials must have known of the operation. 

As things stand, Greenpeace plans to scad 
another sinp to the Pacific to replace the Rain- 
bow "Warrior, and toe French navy is sad to be 
under orders to use whatever force is necessary 
to prevent interference with die tests. 

From the U.S. viewpoint the worst thing 
about the incident is that it feeds the already 
virulent anti-nod ear sentiment in toe South 
Pacific — sentiment that is reflected in the 
squabble between the United States and New 
Z ealand over the visit of nuclear-capable war- 
ships to New Zealand ports. 

— Los Angeles Tones. 


Agents of the French intelligence service 
seem to have been caught red-handed in a 
murderous sortie into New Zealand. New Zea- 
landers are furious, and all that France has to 
show for its caper are a dead photographer, a 
sunken ship and another big problem for the 
ANZUS defense alliance in toe South Pacific. 

France is geared up for nudear-weapons 
tests on Moraroa atoll in French Polynesia. 
Such tests are opposed by New Zealand, Aus- 
tralia a nd various island nations in the South 
Pacific that are working to establish a nuclear- 
free zone in the region. The Rainbow Warrior, 
flagship of the Greenpeace environmental 
movement, was in the area to lead demonstra- 
tions against the tests whoa it was blown up 
and sunk by saboteurs in Auckland on July 10. 
One crewman was killed. 

It developed that the General Directorate of 
External Security, Fiance’s equivalent of toe 
CIA, was almost certainly involved. Main- 
stream French newspapers report that a 


No Cause for Complacency 


Signs that toe Soviet Union is coming to 
terms with toe profit motive, while the Chinese 
are embracing market forces with the enthusi- 
asm of the ooovert, should be no cause for 
complacen c y in toe West 
The imitator may progress farther than his 
model; toe new mood in toe East is a reminder 
of the con tinuing need to dredge the channel 
of our industrial market economies. In toe 
Soviet Union, moonlighting (having a second 
job in addition to om?s main job) on such a 
scale that it is said to account for up to 80 
percent of domestic repair jobs has forced the 
bureaucrats into a few tentative experiments 
with small profit-sharing cooperatives. The 
Chinese are moving towards private share 
ownership by the employees of an internation- 
ally-financed industrial plant Old ideas in the 
West, maybe; but ideas which have faUea well 
short of desred condnsians. 

— The Tones (London). 


FROM OUR AUG. 24 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Dirigible Delights Rockefeller 
CLEVELAND — Mr. John D. Rockefeller 
threw dignity to the winds late this afternoon 
and, tossing his cap in the air, ran about his 
lawn just like a schoolboy. He was jubilant 
because Mr. Frank Goodale, the young aoo- 
naut, alighted at Forest MD to pay his respects 
to him. Mr. Goodale is giving exhibition 
flights at Luna Park and before he set sail this 
afternoon he announced that he would visit 
Mr. Rockefeller. The head of the Standard Oil 
Company was eating his supper when toe 
lodge keeper announced that an airship was 
alighting cm toe grounds. Mr. Rockefeller and 
his family rushed out as Goodale, in his dirigi- 
ble ballon, was landing. “Welcome, welcome, 
my boy," cried Mr. Rockefeller. Mr. Goodale 
said he “just dropped down" to pay his re- 
spects. He was invited to dinner but declined. 


1935: House Passes Neutrality Bffl 
WASHINGTON — The House passed the 
compromise neutrality Ml by acclamation on 
[Aug. 23.] Sparred by fears that the Adminis- 
tration might be contemplating support of a 
European attempt to apply pressure on Italy, 
Confess succeeded today with plans to tie the 
President’s hands with neutrality legislation 
for the next six months. The suggestion that 
toe President should receive permissive rather 
than mandatory powers in dealing with belli- 
gerents was rqected by toe House. House 
leaders assured that these change were ac- 
ceptable to tte Senate. Protests from Adminis- 
tration officials, notably those of the State 
Department, that provisions of the act would 
force toe country to “run for cover" whenever 
war starts and would destroy toe country’s 
influence for peace, were disregarded. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS 5ULZBEROER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOtSiE 
WALTER WELLS 
Samuel abt 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARL GEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Publisher 

Extame Editor RENE BQNDY Deputy FMaher 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Aaadate PMidter 

Deputy Editor RICHA RD H. MORGAN Associate Pabitsker 

Dam Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Operaaaa 

Associate Eduor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Director of Chctdahaa 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Daecsor of Ad v er tis ing Saks 


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SATURDAY -SUNDAY, AUGUST 24^25, 1985 




L ONDON — Last week, Julius 
/ Nyerere, toe Shakespeare-trans- 


By Jonathan Power 


continued development and the Defease De- 
partment started in 1977 to develop the new 
weapon that is now ready to be tested. . 

Unlike toe cumbersome Soviet anti-satellite 
rocket the Air Force's new missile is a highly 
advanced "homing vehicle” fired from an F-15 
fighter. Once it is operational, the Soviet 
Union may fed unable to accept a treaty until 
it has caught up- Since homing vehicles can 
shoot down missies as wdl as satellites, the 
advancing technology threatens to erode the 
anti-ballistic missile treaty. 

The three tests that Congress has allowed 
toe Air Force to conduct may not be enough to 
the anti-satellite missile operational But 
they are strides along a path from which there 


taring , Christian and socialist presi- 
dent of Tanzania formally an- 
nounced that he was stepping down 
after 30 years in office. 

No one will accuse him of having 
amassed a fortune. Unless he has 
been especially thrifty on his $8,000- 
a-year salary, he has little saved for 
retirement. He has no splendid man- 
sion and will probably spend much of 
his time from now on in his house 
situated in bis home village in the 
north of toe country. 

Nevertheless, in political and eco- 
nomic terms this man walks off the 
stage having failed to achieve what Ik 
set out to do. He has not made Tanza- 
nia a good place in which to live. 

My first encounter with Julius 
Nyerere was watching him on a Brit- 
ish Broadcasting Corp. television 
-program years ago. I was a student, 
and he was a teacher. During the 
school holidays he organized Tan- 
ganyika's (as it was then) struggle fra: 
independence from the BritisfiT 

He was not, and never became, a 
flywisk-canying orator. Lucid, intel- 
ligent and thoughtful his interviews 
and speeches were a joy to watch, 
delivered without bombast but with 
humor. They were wdl reasoned. 

No wonder that many students in 


Later 1 worked in toe villages of 
Tanzania’s southern highlands, orga- 
nizing farmers' cooperatives and 
t^hinp in toe evening. One of my 
students became toe minister of agri- 
culture. Later stiU, as a journalist I 
came back frequently to film, report 
on and interview the president- 
My admiration of him lived on. 
Mr. Nyerere’s modesty, perceptive- 
ness and self criticism were beguiling. 
How is it that that I now consider 
Mr. Nyerere's Tanzania flawed? 

1. < -i.. « ■ ik A fiAnuwAf 


adequate the soils are poor. Only the 
volcanic seals near Mount Kilimanja- 
ro are truly fertile. 

But there is potential The north 
east of BrzriL the poorest area of that 
country, is on the same latitude and 
has tnudi the same ecology as Tanza- 
nia. But it is much more developed 
than its African counterpart 

Tanzania, too, has had more than 
its fair share of troubles from toe 
vicissitudes of the world economy. 
TTie prices of its major exports — 
sisal tobacco, sugar and cotton — 


. Over the-years freedom fighters 
from Mozambique. Zimbabwe, Na- 
mibia and South Africa have come to 
owe Mr. Nyerere a lot for the hospi- 
tality andiupport he extended. Nev- 
ertheless. there are those within those 
movements, m particular SWAPO r or 
toe South-West Africa People’s Orga- 
nization; who remember only the in- 
side of Mr. Nyerere's jails. 

Dissentersto these movements’ es- 
tablished leadership were given short.-: 
shrift. By contrast, qp the big issues - 


r! 


Syndrome ? 


M ?|] 


It is partly because, in the nature of sisal tobacco, sugar and cotton 
an, I expected a performance I do have “S^ejindtew been 


No wonder that many students in 
toe West came to revere Mr. Nyerere. 


falling for toe last few years. 

■ But despite external economic in- 

External influences apart, 

Mr.NyereremadepoUdes vised policies that eventually de- 
J r , stroyed the values he stood for. 

that eventually destroyed His economic policies, rather than 

the values he stood for. riculture, as has happenerfbiMalawi 

and Zimbabwe, have undermined iL 

lot demand in my own country. Also, The attempt to communalize agricul- 
t is because Mr. Nyerere is only one lure ended up overwhelming Tanza- 
[anzanian and, however popular and nia's limited m anag em ent resources, 
espccted he has remained, he is not a Peasants used to living in simple tam- 
lemigod and has relied heavily on fly compounds woe corralled mio 
>ther people to implement his poli- villages, often far from good land and 
ies. Those peopledid not live up to a decent water supply. . , 

us ideals or honor his trust Despite Mr. Nyerere s owerwndm- 

Also resnonsibie for mv view of ina public commitment to the coun- 


oot demand in my own country. Also, 
it is because Mr. Nyerere is only one 
Tanzanian and, however popular and 
respected he has remained, he is not a 
demigod and has relied heavily on 
other people to implement his poli- 
cies. Those people aid not live up to 
his ideals or honor his trust 


He inspired us with a moral justifica- 
tion for helping fight toe anti-colon- 
ial fight at home. Students always like 
their battles to be right versus wrong 
and Mr. Nyerere made it easy for us. 

We believed there would be a new 
Africa once the colonial powers with- 
drew, in which black men would find 
their proper dignity. The best of old 
Africa — family life, communal en- 
deavor. gentleness and good humor 
— would be combined with the task 
of storting nation-state building from 

S e one. How wonderful to have a 
sheet and avoid the mistakes of 
Europe and North America! 


Mr. Nyerere’s legacy is the inevitable tryside, state controlled prices tor ag- 
failout from the clash of cultures. The ricul rural produce were kept low to 
British left behind a middle and ur- placate toe relatively small out polil- 
ban class who were at odds with peas- icaDy volatile, urban population. The 
ant-dominated society in Tanzania, peasants therefore had httle incentive 
But Tanzanians pushed «Vir own self to produce and diversify, 
interest with a aqgleminded purpose: On toe political front Mr. Nyer- 
to live like the British bwana mkubwa era's attempt to break away from the 



By Lester Bernstein 

L UX) BEACH, New York — If 
, Congress lets it go through, toe 
Chinese will soon be able , to act on 
President Repaid Reagan'S agree- 
ment alio wingthan to buy Am encan 
nuclear reactors for electric power.. 
Some may ask whether we should be 
making nudeiar reactore available to 
Chino. But the moreinterestinggiies- 
tion is why on earth the Chinese 
would want to buy them from acoun-^ 
ay that has. made such a singular?* 


to produce and diversify. 

On toe political front Mr. Nyer- 


(big man) who had set a certain style formalized struct u r e s of British gov- 
ana standard of living. eminent to create a society more tm- 

Another side of the problem lies in ly reflecting African tribal consensus 
tnzania’s poverty. It is one of the politics, ended up creating a near 
wrest countries and even with toe dictatorship. While by no means as 
si will and the best management it crude as other African dictatorships, 


Tanzania’s poverty. It is one of tl 
poorest countries and even with tl 
best will and the best management 


. It is one of the politics, ended up creati 
ind even with toe dictatorship. While by nc 
si management it crude as other African die 


will always remain so. Much of it is too many people in Tanzania have 
arid and in parts where the rainfall is been imprisoned without trial 


Mr. Nyerere's political counsel has 
usually been in the direction of com- 
promise and tolerance. He made the 
end of the war in Rhodesia possible. 

Mr. Nyerere st«s down voluntari- 
ly — a c o n sid erable achievement in. 

itself. Most post colonial African 
leaders have left office ratty on death 
or after a coop d’6taL But, as he goes, 
I wonder bow be feds, tins most sdf- 
critical of Why did it all have to 
go so very badly wrong? ■ 
International Herald Tribune. 


U.S. Drug Rides May Be Hindering AIDS Research 


By Harry Schwartz 

Q CARSDALE. New York — Pub- 
13 lie awareness of toe AIDS epi- 
demic is now greater than ever be- 
fore. The numbers explain why. 

More than 12,000 cases have been 
diagnosed to date and more than 
6,000 Americans have died of the 
disease. The great majority of AIDS 
victims are young men in the prime of 
life, not elderly citizens. 

In this situation toe clamor for a 
medicine to cure AIDS, or Acquired 
Immune Deficiency Syndrome, is 
naturally mounting. And so is toe 
number of Americans who — like 
Rock Hudson — are going abroad to 
try medicines that are unavailable in 
the United States because of Food 
and Drag Administration rales. The 
FDA insists that its rales are intend- 
ed to protea sick people; the AIDS 
victims in America who are r unning 
to Mexico, France and other coun- 
tries for treatment obviously believe 
the FDA rules are too stria. 

What this means, dearly, is that 


despite toe great public uproar over 
AIDS, the United States has not yet 
focused attention on toe key ques- 
tions; How do we discover new medi- 
cines to help sick people and what 
can we do to encourage and speed up 
such discoveries against AIDS and 
other killing and crippling ailments? 

Recently, an influential member of 
the House of Representatives sneered 
publicly when told that the average 
cost of research and development for 
a new drag now approaches 5100 
million. The figure, be said, must 
surely be grossly inflated to justify 
toe profits of toe pharmaceutical in- 
dustry. Oddly, tins same Congress- 
man has a relatively high number of 
AIDS victims among his constitu- 
ents. Would he cavil one wonders, at 
appropriating hundreds of millions 
of dollars to find a cure for AIDS? 

The great majority of new and ef- 
fective medicines are discovered by 
the private pharmaceutical industry, 
which is under constant attack. An 
endless stream of critics complain 
that drag prices are loo high, that 



WWU.AMJ0OT 

AIDS : 


s i MMkS in The AuBrifcr, Sydny. Ccrtoanitfi ft Wrtfen Syndarfe 


medicines have too many side effects, 
that many drugs permitted on toe 
market are really unsafe, and so on. 


Tfae fact that therapeutic drags con- 
tribute enormously to improved 
health and longevity usually goes un- 
mentioned. So does the fact that 
these medicines are often toe most 
cost-effective therapies known. 

This climate of discussion hardly 
encourages pharmaceutical firms to 
invest tens of millions of dollars look- 
ing for a remedy for a disease tike 
AIDS, where mud) of toe basic sri- 
ence required is still unknown. 

Neither Congress nor the general 
public has any idea of what an army 
of chemists, pharmacologists, toxi- 
cologists and other specialists is re- 


ly because the desired medicine can- 
not be found. The harsh realities are 
suggested by toe fact that corpora- 
tions that spend 5300 million or $400 
million a year on pharmaceutical re- 
search do well if they average even 
one marketable, newly discovered 
drug every two years. 


research is always 
a gamble, even when there is a far 
better background of scientific 
knowledge thin we now have about 
AIDS. The huge financial risks of this 
research make wildcat oil exploration 
seem tame by comparison. 

This background suggests that the 
tragic AIDS epidemic could have a 
positive byproduct if it produces a 
new look at the conventional wisdom 
in the drug field. 

AIDS victims, understandably 
want a cure, not a compound toot is 
guaranteed never to have a harmful 
side effect on anybody under any 


q uired in the typical modem hunt for 
a new drag. Nor is there any under- 


a new drag. Nor is there any under- 
standing of bow many years and how 
many teas of milli ons of dollars can 
be — and often are — spent fruitless- 


circumstances. Should Americans 
not take a new look to see whether 
FDA rules arc loaded loo heavily in 
favor of unattainable perfect safety 
white underemphasmng the needs tif 
the sick and the dying? , 

And should not Congressmen who 
specialize in attacking the pharma- 
ceutical industry worry about their 
impact upon discouraging invest- 
ments in research to tty to find new 
cures for kiDer diseases? 

AIDS vic tims and their f amilies 
should bring these heretical ideas 
more forcefully to the FDA’s atten- 
tion. Such pressure might hdp in- 
crease industrial research on AIDS 
and thus increase the chance of find- 
ing deperatefy needed remedies. 


The writer, a former member of the 
editorial board of The New York 
Tones, writes frequently on health is- 
sues. He contributed tm to the Times. 


Reaganomics: Tax Cuts Alone Are Not Enough 


W r ASHINGTON —By political 
standards Reaganomics would 


YY standards Reaganomics would 
seem to be successful 
Running on much the same plat- 
form in 1984 as he did in 1980, 
Ronald Reagan was re-elected with 
a substantial plurality. The inter- 


By Arthur B. Laffer 


vening four years apparently did 
not dissuade voters of Mr. Reagan’s 
competence to manage the econo- 
my. So-called supply-side econom- 
ics comprised much of Reagano- 
mics then as it does today. 

On nonpolitical grounds toe sup- 
ply-side record is wide open to all 
who wish to lake a lode 

While a tax bill was passed in 
1981, the actual tax cuts made pos- 
sible by the legislation did not occur 
until months, sometimes years later. 

In fact, because toe tax cuts were 
delayed, in reality there was only a 
1.25 -percent cut in calendar year 
1981. a cumulative 10-percent cut in 
1982 and a cumulative 20-percent 
cut during the whole of 1983. 

The bulk of US. tax cuts began 
on Jan. 1. 1983, and the economic 
recovery began at the same time. 
Isn’t it amazing bow tax reductions 
do not work until they take effect? 

More to the point, the downturn 
of 1981 and 1982 as foreseen by 
many a supply-ride economist was 
actually toe consequence of the de- 
layed reductions in tax. 

In the year before a tax cut, most 
people do everything that they can 
to postpone realizing income from 
the higher-taxed year in order to 
defer its recognition until the lower- 
taxed year commences. 


foreign investments, grew in those 
two years at an average annual rate 
of some € percent 
Notwithstanding the masses of 
data and commentary emanating 
from the White House and toe Re- 
publican Rirty during 1984 and be- 
yond, some people still have not 
comprehended the magnitude of the 
effects of tax cuts. 


Perhaps most surprising to tradi- 
tionalists is toe fact that inflation 


money supply that includes curren- 
cy in drcolation, travelers checks 
and checking deposits at financial 
institutions, was exceptionally high 
during the 1983-84 period, averag- 
ing a 7.8-percent rate. 

In 1979, the last time inflation 
accelerated to double digits, the 
same measure of toe money supply 
grew by sane 12 percent. 


Commerce Department measure) 
peaked in the fourth quarter of 


peaked in the fourth quarter of 
1982, just before the actual tax cuts, 
and was $43.1 billion lower in toe 
first quarter of 1985 than the fourth 
quarter of 1981 

State and local surpluses have ris- 
en a substantial $20.8 bi ll i o n during 
the first quarter of the year. 

After adjusting for inflation, tax 
revenues lor fiscal 1985 exceeded 
the Reagan administration's opti- 


botch of its nuclear-power program. 

", - Even more intriguing is the pros-- 
peet that the Ounce may be able to 
• teach us how to use the reactors. 

-Mr. Reagan’-s agreement does a. 
considerable - .favor for. American 
trannffle-ru rra rTijna is free to make, 
-deals with French- and West German- 
manufacturers, who are just as eager 
as Axnezicans are to supply toe 10 
plants China; dans to band m a mar- 
ket estimated by the Chinese torn-' 
volve $10 biHion to $20 billion. - 
- ' For their part. U& manufa c tu re rs 
have not attracted a siagije. domestic 
order for a nuclear reactor rince 1979. 
That was the year of the accident at’ 
Three Mile Iswnd and, cqi]uadental- , 
ty, its cinematic premonition. The 
rhina Syndrome.* The movie raised >. 
the specter of the ultimate catastrolY 
phe m a nuclear power jplant' a- . 
meltdown so devastating m its inten- 
sity that it mi ght burn through the 
earth all the way to Chino. 

For reasons deeper than Three 
Mile Island and the shock waves it 
created among environmentalists, 
unclear-power development in the' 
United States is at a dead end. There 
are 82 plants in commercial opera- 
tion but at least J 10 more have wen ' 
abandoned with a loss of $15 billion. - 
It sow takes 12 years to build a 
plant. Those that have opened since 
1983 or still await completion love 
run six to eight times over budget; 
they cost three to four times more 
than their predecessors. After such - 
overruns, some new plants wffl" Be 
unable to compete witn oil, let alone 
coal and half a dozen mudear-isvest- • 
ed utilities are near bankruptcy. w 
Yet the experts and global operi-#r 
ence insist that Americana-pioneered ' 
technology can realty work safety and 
efficiently. The world has 344 func- 
tioning plants, many of them with 
reactors made in the United Stales. . 
The French use nudear power to pro- 
duce 60 percent of their 'electricity, 
four times toe U.S. percentage. 

Ironically, the Chinese may be able 
to do a better job with ILS. equip- 
ment than die United States. The 
U.S. program has been plagued by 
chaotic regulations, failure to stan- 
dardize plant Hadg n, iirnmy rtence 
in such low-tech- crafts as pooling 
concrete and welding metal, misman- 
aged,contcactras and subcontractors, 
inadeooate . oaestaght by state and 
federal officials, and an ingrained 
pass-the-buck psychology. This 
means blaming the re gulato r who 
concocts nd«needless of cost, the 
supplier who piles add-ons to his ■ 
cost-plus contract, the utility execu- 
tive who tries to pass it all into toe . 
rate base inflicted on consumers. ' ' 

Oddhr enough, the. Chinese may /) 
succeed precisely because they do not 
- do things in what Americans are usu- 
ally pleased to call the American way. 
Regulation is second nature to than, 
and denial has bred a certain patri- 
mony. China is not eddnated for its 
protest marches, and the cause of 
environmental safety may lack some 
urgency in a country so overpopulat- 
ed that it tries to ration the number of 
children in a family. 

True, corruption is no stranger to 
the Chinese, Imt ideology gives them 
a passion for standardization and en- 
forcement. They need. no guff 
from ratepayers or shareholders, and 
their managers wiD see to it that he 
who fails to pour concrete as he 
should may wind up in it. 

finally, the Chinese have’ a fine 1 
example of what not to do: toe U.S. 
example. Americans ought to be aHe 
to learn from their own mistakes, and 
must do so if they are to answer toe 
call.for a whole new round of node- 
ar-euergy development before the 
end of the century. 

Can it be done in a democratic' 
society? The success of France sug- 
gests it can, but not without some 
wrenching adiustments. For exam-' 
pte, the French government itself de- 
signs, builds and regulates all the nu- 
clear plants in two standardized 
modds. By contrast; almost no two 
U.S. plants are alik e. 

It would be the final twist of irony - 
if it took a Chinese success to shame 
America into using its own toAnrii - 
ogy in a rigorous way. 




I lie of 




23 

' :■ -1 


:<r ■- 








Rapid money growth is seen by mistic forecast of January 1983 by 
traditionalists as leading toa higher $30.5 billion. Not bad. eh? 


As President Ronald Reagan has stated) Congress 
has spent like drunken sdHors, the only difference 
being that drunken sailors usually spend their aim 
money. Congress always spends other people’s. 


By all accounts, the recovery of 
1983 and 1984 was spectacular. 


1983 and 1984 was spectacular. 
Real gross national product, which 
measures toe total value of goods 
and services, including income from 


has fallen during this period of na- 
scent and actual tax cuts. 

To supply-skiers and (he elector- 
ate, this result seems quite rational. 
Just as a bumper crop of apples 
leads to lower apple prices, so an 
n ggreffitg supply increase leads to a 
lower inflation rale. 

In the period from 1981 to 1983. 
consumer price inflation fell to 3.2 
percent from 10.4 percent 

If the Reagan supply-side recov- 
ery had in reality been good old 
demand stimulation of the pump- 
p riming variety, inflation should 
have risen. But this, as we have seen, 
was not what happened. 

It is difficult to attribute all of the 
reduction in toe level of inflation 
and interest rates to toe traditional 
view of monetary policy. 

Growth in M-l, a measure of the 


inflation rate and interest rates, in 
addition to a weaker economy. 

The Federal Reserve does deserve 
much of the credit for lower infla- 
tion, interest rates and a stronger 
dollar. The Fed’s success, however, 
was not based on austerity. 

The Fed changed its policy to 
targeting prices. This fundamental 
policy change allows rapid money 
growth to coexist with lower infla- 
tion, lower rates of intoest and an 
expanding economy. 

All this means there should be no 
more stagflation. 

Federal budget deficits are a lot 
larger than I ever thought they 
would be, especially given toe eco- 
nomic growth experienced in the 

past two and a half years. 

But 1 should point out that toe 
NIPA deficit (a s easo nally adjusted 


Defense spending is also $25.6 
bfflioa less man had been projected 
back in January 1983. 

Both tax revenues and defense 
spending reduced toe deficit by 
556.1 bub on. What could possibly 
have gone wrong? 

" Congress has literally gone on a 
spending spree in non-defense 
items. It exceeded the generous pro- 
jections of January 1983by a stag- . 
going $77.8 biDion. 

As Mr. Reagan said. Congress 
has spent like drunken sailors, the 
difference being that drunken sail- 
ors usually spend toeir own money. 
By contrast. Congress always 
spends other people’s. 

Quite frankty, my miscalculation 
on the federal budget deficit was 
due to my overly generous percep- 
tion that Congress would live op to 


The writer is a former editor of 
Newsweek. He contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Tones. 


LETTER 

Nodear Energy Growth 

Raant&tg the editorial “Keen the 
Otl Noose Loose " (Aug. IS): 

It m astute to pamtont that in toe 
last decade America has reduced its 
raiance on imported cal Iw about 
four million barrels a day and that 
the economy has indeed prospered 


If Vo, 

®loo 


its appointed rote 
The solution to the federal bud- 
get problem must also include 
spending restraints. Tax cuts alone 
are not enough to cut the deficit. 


The writer is the chairman cfA.B. 
Laffer Associates, an economic fore- 
casting concern in the United States 
Ht contributed this comment to die 
Washington Post. 


The observation that conservation is 
the cause of this new situation is, 
only part of the story. An- 
°, t * >er .' rc*y unportant factor is the new 
“ttnficaboa of toe nation. 

The United States now uses over 

second only to coal -as the nation’s 
«"we of aectric energy ahead of oil' 

fv w proved its safe- 

2*™? 11 » essentiaHF we 

8“*to continue to move beyond out 

“paMtence on mported <»t 

■ OILBESTi. BROWN. 

•• Lonsnltant, International - 


Lc r ; 

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With D 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* SATUKDAY-SUNDAY. AUGUST 24-25, 1985 



Page 5 



en Africans 


% Clifford D. May 


ssesfcSS 5 


h^SS of donated 


piled. 


are 


ffluddy water boles.' 


and 
about in 


fcvi, A £ Cw , xnon *s ago, this looked 

u» sbsotate aid^SS. 


taWfiiMSw 


““ ever grown here.” 

la western Sudan; as in many 
22 °L Afr ! ca ? tot main pan ah£e 

renei effort js connng to an end and 

i5°“ rf recovery 

apd rehabilitation is about to be- 

gin 


Throughout vast areas of the 
"“toneat, the drought has broken, 
though there is no guarantee tto 
rams will continue to fall 
bottlenecks 


be of much value. “Webasc to do 
cw =O r thmgwccantomc4ffizethose 
' resources ?har we caztnse now, in 
Jc next . few wedci; n said Mfc 
'Strong, 

“After that,” he added, “we need 
K> start vroridng far .'ibe longer 
term.” ' '• 

Wittin days, UJL helicopters are 
to begin operating in southern Osr- 

fajjnd ^afong the' Chad ^onfer, 

floods. be ^ ^ 1 * by ram and 

Peasants in those and other areas 
will need all the strength they can 
tnoater to tend their crops and reap 
this year's main hsvest, hoped far 
around November. . - • 

“In places that aid hasn't 
reached,” smdGcoigeCaldobanlt, 
head of agricultural services for the 
auemattoafilly financed Western 
Sahara Development Cotp, 'Yann- 
ets are so weak they’re actnaDy 
crifiaDsme in the Adds, just falB 
le ofweedmg.' 




eportedly Had Role 
In Large-Scale Profiteering Scandal 


anall p4rt of the scandal, since been involved not only in illegally 
hundreds of millions of dollars in transporting goods but also in sefl- 
iQicii loans were involved, accord- ing than for total revenue amount- 
ing to reports carried by the official ing to more than 2.4 million yuan 
Xinhua news agency earlier this (5827,58 6). 


Gsprau 


ilD 


the relief and rehabilitation efforts 
is inevitable. 

. Experts Say such conflict can be 
minimized, although not eliminat- 
ed, through planning and coordina- 
tion among the many organizations 
working in Sudan. Ethiopia and 
other African countries. Such coor- 
dination has been limited so Jar, 
but at least a few aid officials are 
working ar it 

After the harvest, Mr. Strong 
undistributed foreign grain 


_ j. , , ...... should be immediately warehoused 

"Io distribuletbe food where it is and reserved for future emergen- 
most needled mu require that rural CTe s. 


■;; r - -- k 


Aversion of food, aid . has 
feached millions in need. A surpris- 
ing number of peasants, parti cular - 
V m the western Sudan, where 
many had predicted a catastrophe; 
have m an aged to get by with little 
or no aid by subsisting on such 
nourishment as roots and wild ber- 
ries. 

Hundreds of thousands of others 
ena not m an age to survive what will 
certainly be known as the great 
famine of the mid-1980s. Tens rtf 
millions of Africans continue . to 
softer from hunger, malnutrition 
and chmni^ dimac* _ 

A few weds ago the United Nsk 
tions issued an emergency appeal 
for aid for Sudan. But after a tour 
of Darfur, the hardest-hit western 
region, the executive coordinator 
for emergency op crafiopvManpcc 
F. Strong. ooDcmded-that what was 
needed was to use the food and 
trucks already -in Sudan. 

Supplies ordered from abroad" 


areas of severe deprivation be ideh- 
. tified and monitored. 

A recent study by Umcef, the 
UN Children’s Fund, concluded 
that "blanket distribution** of aid, 
coupled with “misappropriation” 
of resources, had too often meant 
that “the truly needy received titlle 
or nothing.” 

But development specialists say 
that after the harvest, most areas 
should be quickly weaned from re- 
lief aid. “The farmers are obviously 
very poor, and many of them are 
deqriy in debt,” said James Og- 
bom, the senior a gro n om ist for 
'Western Sahara Devdopment. 

“They need a good harvest this 
year and a good price for their 
crop,” Mr. Ogbom said. “A distri- 
bution of ‘Reagan’ after the harvest 
wifi only hold prices down and en- 
sure that they remain destitute." 

In Sudan alone as' many as a 
nriffion peasants are still in camps 
or urban squatter settlements, or 
will return to rural areas too late to 


now are unlikely to arrive in time to plant this year, so conflict between 


Displaced people might be put to 
work on such aid projects as plant- 
ing trees to hold back the desert or 
improving sanitation in disease- 
ridden inner cities and pud in cash 
that they could use to buy food 
from farmers. 

Donated fertilizers could be sold 
to those farmers, and the proceeds 
used to continue the environmental 
rehabilitation programs. 

Western development specialists 
contend that profound changes wifi 
be needed in governmental policies 
that provide food for soldiers and 
bureaucrats at the expense of the 
peasants who produce it Such poli- 
cies have long been the rule in most 
of the famine-afflicted countries of 
Africa. 

Finally, for rehabilitation to suc- 
ceed, progress must be made to- 
ward settling the civil wan that 
have caused widespread destruc- 
tion, hastened economic deteriora- 
tion and interfered with relief ef- 
forts in Sudan, Ethiopia, Chad and 
virtually every other African nation 
where hunger has been sevens. 


used illegally to transport imported 
consumer goods for resale at a high 
markup earlier this year despite re- 
peated injunctions from central 
government authorities against 
such activities, according to the 
People's Liberation Army Daily. ■ 

In an Aug. 17 report, the military 
daily said that from January to 
March of this year, a certain un- 
identified air force unit of the Chi- 
nese Navy used military aircraft on 
six occasions, to transport from 
Hainan island to Sichuan province 
imported consumer products that 
were not supposed to be brought 
out of Hainan. 

Hainan has been designated an 
“open port" with import privileges 
denied to other areas with special 
development zones that have a de- 
gree of economic autonomy. 

The products from Hainan in- 
cluded more than 6,000 video cas- 
settes, 1,038 video cassette record- 
ers, 386 television sets, and one 
Japanese-made minibus. The total 
value of the products was more 
than 6 mini on yuan ($2.07 million), 
the military newspaper said. 

The People's Liberation Army 
Daily thus confirmed earlier suspi- 
cions of militaiy involvement in 
China's recently disclosed Hainan 
affair, viewed by some observers as 
the biggest profiteering scandal to 
occur smee the country began its 
open-door policy toward trade and 
investment more than six years ago. 

Earlier unconfirmed reports in- 
dicated that the Chinese Navy had 
played a role in illegally transport- 
ing by sea thousands of imported 
motor vehicles from Hainan to the 
Chinese mainland. 

It was not clear whether the mili- 
tary newspaper had addressed the 
question of sea transport in other 
editions, since the publication is 
not easily obtained by foreigners. 
Foreigners are not allowed to sub- 
scribe to it. 

The reported involvement of na- 
val aircraft in the Hainan affair 
would have constituted only one 


By Dan Southerland 

Washington Fast Service 

BEIJING —Gunn'S official mH- 
itary newspaper has provided die 

first confirmation of military in- _ „ — — 

volvement in a profiteering scandal ® onlh - BuUhe full story has yetto It said the division's illegal activ- 
on the southern island of Hainan. Xmhua said earlier ities occurred after central govem- 

Chincse Navy airplanes were *43 cas« of creminal practice meat authorities had fonnafly stip- 
• were sull under investigation. u i at ed that government 
Foreigners here said it is logical organizations not engage in busi- 

to assume that the navy used not 

only airplanes but also sea-going 
vessels to carry some of the import- 
ed consumer goods to the main- 
land, given the navy's heavy in- 
volvement in strategic Hainan. It 
would be difficult to move thou- 
sands of vehicles in a relatively 


ness activities. 

Even after a discipline inspection 
team was sent to H ainan in early 
March to investigate the case, lead- 
ers of the navy division were re- 
ported to have ignored the investi- 
gation and continued to transport 
imported products off the island 


short period of time by means other for resale elsewhere. 


By Gelestine Bohlen 

Washington Past Service r 

MOSCOW —To a police colo- 
nel in the north Caucasus, they are 
nothing more than “money grub- 
bers, who wmk from dawn to dnsk, 
don’t drink, bye in sromsh comfi- 
tions and suffer rmtold hardships: , 

£*5 “ «* «**.'**« i 


rate at savings banks and register- 
ing the purchase of expensive items 
an income declarations. 

. Another idea, promptly and 
“sharply rejected” m one newspa- 
per, would require, fellow workers 
to approve purchases costing more 
than 1,000-roMes (about $1,1 70^ at 


That makes shabaskntfd, as mi- 
grant seasonal workers in flie Sovi- 
et Union are known, alien to “the 
principles of our economy and of 
our morals” and "socially harm- 
ful,” as A Didyenko concluded m 
a letter to the newspaper Izvestia: 

This is one view of a group of 
workers whore precarious existence 
on the fringes of private enterprise 
has prompted a hot debate in the 
Soviet press. 

Another view comes from a sha- 
bariurik himself. “Yes, we earn 
good wages,” said one who d ared 
not give his name to the newspaper. 
“And this automatically pats the 
law enforcement bodies on the 
alert” 

In recent months, as public dia- 
logue about Soviet econ om ic op- 
tions has opened up, the shabasn- 
nflr has emerged as the focus of 
several key questions: To what ex- 
tent can people accumulate private 
wealth in the Soviet Umou, and 
how should the state control iff 

The debate so far has been rather 
positive toward the shabarimflo, 
whose initiative is compared favor- 
ably to sluggish performances m 
the official economy. 1** trend 
seems to be toward a more flexible 

definition of legal work outside the 

public sector. 

The issue also has led to discus- 
sions about the need for tax reform, 
perhaps involving a single progres- 
sive income tax that would treat 


abdirt suffer 
taxes tin inheritance, a sensitive 
subject that has elicited wide com- 
ment going to the heart of the Sovi- 
et economic dflemma; (he search 


is needed, often in agriculture or 
rural construction. An estimate by 
the Academy of Sciences is that 
half of rural construction is done 
by shabashnik brigades. 

He works in groups similar to the 
brigades favored in the Soviet 
Union now, and his earnings de- 
pend cm bis product. 

The difference is that the sha- 
bashnik works outside the system, 
without links to government minis- 
tries, under private arrangements 
with enterprises or collective farms 


'Walk through some Tillages in the summer 
and yon will see that every other house is 
shnt up — whole families have gone off on 
seasonal work,’ a student wrote to Pravda. 


fora balance between social equali- 
ty and individual motivation. 

.“What stimulus fra weak would 
we have;,” wondered A Nikonov, 
of Krivoi Rog. “if we knew that our 
children' would have to start all 
over again?” L Chagrin of Archan- 
gdsk f eh just as strongly that “all 
young people should start oat un- 
der more or less equal conditions.” 
Modi of the current debate over 


looking for ways of finishing work 
long overdue. 

As a rule, be works harder, fin- 
ishes the job faster and is paid 
more, in each or in kind, than bis 
salaried counterparts. 

According to one article in Izves- 
tia, the origins of the present-day 
sbabasiuuk date back to the early 
1960s, when itinerant workers, 
mainly Koreans, joined groups 


personal wealth has to do with so- looking for temporary work, most- 
called “unearned income,” or file- ly in southern regions. 


gal profits made in the Soviet 
Union’s pervasive black market 
Hlegal “unearned income” is “an 
economic, social and moral evfl.” 
On that, all agree. Speaking in Len- 
ingrad, the Soviet leader, MfithaO 
S. Gorbachev, observed that “peo- 
ple are so indignant about the fact 
of unearned incomes” that there 
had been demands for legislation. 
But there also is a grayer area 


There are few statistics on the 
phenomenon. One report said that 
about 100,000 migrate from Lhe 
Transcaucasian republics a year, 
the same number from the north- 
Caucasus and about 50.000 


real calamity in our region,” wrote 
a student from the Checben-Ingush 
region. “Walk through some vil- 
lages in the summer and you will 
see that eveiy other house is shut 
up — whole families have gone oft 
on seasonal work.” 

“Like nomads, we wander back 
and forth with our suitcases.” an- 
other said. Seasonal workers, she 
added, can be recognized by their 
clothes — leather coats, jeans, im- 
ported boots and jewelry . 

Izvesda quoted one shabashnik 
as saying that his group always pre- 
pared the fields themselves in lhe 
fall for sjjring sowing and repaired 
the machinery because they could 
not trust the collective farm work- 
ers to do the job. 

“Work is so intensive that in one 
season an average shabashnik lost 
10 kilos of weight,” be wrote of his 
brigade. 

The shabashntiri's free-wheeling 
ways iik the authorities. Mr. Di- 
dyenko, the police lieutenant colo- 
nel from Stavropol, noted that sha- 
basbniki have no residence permits 
and may live in “an unauthorized 
place” for only 1.5 months before 
be ejects them. He also noted lhai 
they tend to swell their ranks with 
tramps and drunks, paying them 
out of their own profits. 

Come harvest time, in cases 
where they are paid in kind, they 
often bribe local officials, drivers 
and market authorities to unload 
their produce. 

“How else can we treat these 
le?” be asked. “They are 
ig the law in every way.” 


era 


each from Moldavia, the Baltic re- 
publics and eastern Beloiussia and 
the Ukraine. 


Sikh Moderates 
WfflTakePart 


In one region, a letter-writer to 

ihcome tax that woum ira» ®ui u«k » » b«u« «“ Communist Party newspaper „ - v ir . 

SriS^idTonsalaried income involving HEegal “earned” income, Pravdasaid that of the 28 pup ikm In Punjab VOte 
SkT Ottoproposa^ fra control- the dfiemma of the shabashnik, her class, ail but one were involved . c a 


Ung incomes aired recently mthe 
press include reduction on interest 


who is neither a blade marketeer 
nor a speculator. He does work that 


in seasonal work. 

“Seasonal work has become a 


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NEW DELHI — The moderate 
Sikh political party, the Akali Dal, 
said Friday that it would partici- 
pate in next month’s elections to 
choose a new assembly in Punjab. 

Smjii Singh Bamala, who was 
elected to replace Harchand Singh 
Loogowal as the Akali Dal leader, 
said that the party would take part 
in the Sept 25 elections even 
though “time is short,” the Press 
Trust of India reported from Chan- 
digarh, the Punjab capital. 

Mr. Longowal, the most promi- 
nent Sikh moderate, was lolled 
Tuesday by extremists in Punjab. 
He had urged a delay in the elec- 
tions to resolve dispute between 
moderates and extremists. 

In another development, Punjab 
state officials dismissed the state 
director-general of police, Knpai 
Singh Dhfllon, following assertions 
that security lapses had resulted in 
Mr. LongowaTs death. 

Earlier Friday, Mr. Dh31on said 
that restraints on security forces 
entering Sikh temples meant that 
the safety of candidates for the vote 
could not be guaranteed. 


MEMORIAL NOTICE 


STANLEY RUDBARG 
August 16th, 1984. 

Universal mafl. my beloved friend and 
partner, devoted father. His worldwide 
jouraks with Josiah Mary, Jr. Founda- 
tion, The Institute for World Order and 
The Rockefeller Foundation have fcfi 
many friendships and memories. His 
belief In humanity and dreams of one 
world will Kvc on. 


than military sea transport. 

When the Hainan scandal was 
first disclosed three weeks ago, (he 
Chinese press cited investigative re- 
ports showing ihai 89.000 motor 
vehicles were moved from Hainan 
to the mainland for resale, along 
with other imported consumer 
goods, which were then resold at 
double or triple their original price. 

In its Aug. 17 report, the People’s 
Liberation Army Daily said that 
the navy division which it cited had 


Beijing, Singapore Set Talks 

/teuton 

SINGAPORE — Prime Minister 
Lee Kuan Yew of Singapore plans 
to visit Beijing in mid-September 
for talks on improving trade and 
economic relations, official sources 
said Thursday. The visit follows an 
invitation from Prime Minister 
Zhao Ziyang of China in January. 


A military commission of ibe 
Communist Party Central Com- 
mittee accused leading cadres of 
the navy division of forgetting 
Communist Party ideals and disci- 
pline. A parly warning was deliv- 
ered to die commander and politi- 
cal commissar of the division and 
serious demerits were recorded in 
their records, the People’s libera- 
tion Army Daily said. The divi- 
sion’s chid 1 of staff also got a warn- 
ing and demerit. 

Corruption in the Chinese mili- 
tary is a sensitive issue, given the 
traditional image of the armed 


forces as a highly disciplined force. 

official press has from 


But the official press has from 
time to time touched on the subject 
in recent years. In December 1983, 
for example, the English-language 
China Daily reported that two navy 
officers at the Canton naval base 
who sold airplane fuel to a traffick- 
er in exchange for gifts were sent to 
jail for two years. 



Deng Xiaoping, the Chinese leader. 


For Deng’s 81st Birthday, the Press 
In Beijing Publishes a Gift of Song 


Return 

BEUING — The official press published on Friday the lyrics of a 
song strongly praising the Chinese leader, Deng Xiaoping, in prepara- 
tion for his 8 1st birthday Saturday. 

Mr. Deng has avoided the personality cult that surrounded his 
predecessors, Mao and Hua Guofeng, but analysts said that the new 
song, “Hello, Xiaoping,” recalled such tunes as “Our Leader Chair- 
man Map.” 

The song’s lyrics were translated as follows: 


The smiles which had been lost today grace the eyebrows. 

The bound feet now prance over the golden bridge. 

The singing which had been swallowed bursts from the breast. 
Hello Xiaoping, hello Xiaoping. 

Mr. Deng has engineered China’s economic opening to the West 
since he returned to power in 1978, following a period of disgrace 
under Mao. He has gained popularity among Chinese for his 
relatively pragmatic approach to government. 

Biographies of Chinese leaders are generally sketchy, and in the 
absence of official guidance, Mr. Deng’s 80th birthday was widely 
marked last year on Aug. 22. But according to a Foreign Ministry 
spokeswoman, his birth date was Aug. 24, 1904. 


Liberia Tries Dissident Banker on Sedition Charges 


By Edward A. Gargan 

Sew York Times Service 

NEW YORK — An internation- 
al banking executive for Citibank, 
who is a leader of an opposition 
party in Liberia, has gone on trial 
on sedition charges in Monrovia, 
the Liberian capital, according to 
officials at the United Nations and 
the State Department 

The trial by militaiy tribunal of 
the banker. Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, 
began on Thursday. It came two 
months before scheduled elections 
that are to mark a return to civilian 
rule in Liberia. 


time of the 1980 military coop. She 
later worked at the World Bank 
before becoming Citibank's Afri- 
can representative. 

She was placed under house ar- 
rest on July 31 after arriving in 
Liberia and was taken to a militaiy 
stockade on Aug. 9. 

LT.S. Embassy officials in Mon- 
rovia have “expressed concern” to 
the Liberian government over the 
case, according to Robert L Bruce, 
a spokesman for the State Depart- 


ment. “We’re urging prompt due 
process,” be said. 

In addition, Edward J. Derwin- 
ski, a State Department counselor, 
went to Monrovia last month to 
review election procedures and to 
voice concern about the impending 
trials, Mr. Bruce said. 

Despite the proliferation of po- 
litical parties that sprang np when 
elections were called, only one par- 
ty besides General Doe’s ruling 
National Democratic Party of Li- 


General Samuel K. Doe, Libe- 
ria's leader, has asserted that a 
speech given last month by Mrs. 
Johnson-Sirleaf in Philadelphia 
was “detrimental to the peace and 
stability of the country.” 

Mrs. Johnson-Sirleaf. 46, a Har- 
vard-educated economist, was min- 
ister of finance in Liberia at the 


Nigeria Finds Novel Form of Pay TV 


Reuters 

LAGOS — A Nigerian television 
station is making the organizers of 
events pay for news coverage, the 
Daily Tunes reprated. 

Hie newspaper quoted Yomi 
Ozmbulu, general manager of Ogun 
slate television, as saying he be- 
lieved the practice would improve 


standards of news presentation. 

Nigerian television stations, 
short of cash because of govern- 
ment austerity measures, have been 
asked to find' ways of raising funds 
themselves. Mr. Onabulu did not 
say how much his station charged 
but said that others were doing the 
same. 


beria, the Unity Party, has success- 
fully registered for the election. 

The other parties, including Mrs. 
Johnson-SuieaTs Liberal Action 
Party, which she helped found, 
have been blocked by the courts or 
special election panels, or the par- 
ties' leaders have been jailed or 
banned from political activity. 

In her speech in Philadelphia to- 
the Union of Liberian Associations 
in the Americas, Mrs. Johnson- Sir- , 
leaf criticized Liberia’s program of 
constructing large pubhc buildings 
to the detriment of the rest of the 
economy. 

“While agricultural and rural de- 
velopment programs are on the 
verge of closure for lack of funding, 
a wide range of buildings — Minis- 
try of Defense, Ministry of Health 
and saxes of buildings — are bang 
constructed,” she said, adding that 
this activity “represents a nonpro- 
ductive investment” 


WHY THE OWNER 
OF A PATEK PHILIPPE 
HAS MORE 

THAN JUST MONEY’S WORTH. 



Nautilus. 


A Patek Philippe is 
for its owner, the real 

money. 

The Nautilus model illus- 
nine months to manufacture, 
outstanding addition to the 
hundred pieces only, each 
Patient hands of mas- 
the movement to near 
and minute screw is in- 
millimetre. 

In the men’s Nauti- 
mum winding effiden- 
In the ladies’ Nau- 



e costliest watch to make. But 
ue goes beyond the question of 


trated here requires, on average. 
It is therefore not surprising that this 
Patek Philippe range is limited to a few 
year. 

ter- watchmakers finish each part of 
perfection. Every wheel, pinion, pivot 
dividually crafted to a hundredth of a 


lus a solid 18 ct. gold rotor ensures maxi- 



tilus, slimness and practicability are ensured 
by a quartz movement. Designed and crafted in Patek Philippe’s own ateliers, 
this electronic marvel matches the quality criteria as stipulated for our 
mechanical timepieces. 

The two-piece case incorporates a water-resistant sealing system 
which completely protects the men’s Nautilus to a depth of 120 m (396 
ft) and the ladies' models to a depth of 60 m (198 ft). 

Eachlinkofthe Nautilus bracelets hand-crafted;polished orsatin- 
fmished, and then individually assembled. In reality, it is only by being 
hand-finished that a timepiece can be turned into a masterpiece. 

If you are aiming for perfection you need patience. Perseverance 
also - and perhaps a streak of stubbornness - are often needed to 
achieve the best things in life. 

Queen Victoria, Charles Lindbergh, Richard Wagner, Franklin D. 
Roosevelt - . .and many other famous people have worn a Patek Philippe. Many 
more are wearing one right now. 

All of them for more than just money’s worth. 


PATEK 

PHILIPPE 


GENEVE 


Write tra catalogue to. 

Patek Philippe S. A , 41 rue du Rhone, CH-1211 Geneva 3. 


FOR MASTERS OF THEIR TIME. 


, I 


'-.w-rrFi 




Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. SATURDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 24r25, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


Auctioneers Should Turn Back Clock on Estimates 


International Herald Tribune 


J HE two leading auction 


houses, Sotheby's and Chris- 
tie's, had Hifffeuft moments in the 
season that ended My 31. The 
heart of the matter was that the 
auction houses departed from their 
role as arbiters is the art market to 


SOUREN MEUKIAN 


become actors. They were sot con- 
tent to keep a record of paces paid 
at their sates, but tried to influence 
them. 

Sotheby’s case is not very seri- 
ous. What is significant is the pub- 
lic perception of it After the Flor- 
ence Gould sale of Impressionist 
works, professional circles buzzed 
with the rumor that A. Alfred 
Taubman, Sotheby’s owner, had 
acquired the S9.9-million Van 
Gogh and, it was later said, the 
S5.2-imIlion Toulouse-Lautrec. It 
is now known, a reliable source 
says, that be did not buy the Van 
Gogh but did acquire the Tou- 
louse-Lautrec. And why not? 
Taubman has been collecting for a 
long tim e and the painting was the 
sale’s most plausible candidate for 
the status of a museum picture. 

The snag is that an unwritten 
rule forbids auctioneers and de- 


own sales. Should aot'faubman, as 
the commander-in-chief, abstain 
from doing what his subordinates 
are not allowed to do? By stepping 
in, Em was influencing paces. 

Christie's infinitely more serious 
case also stems from its having 
gene beyond its role as arbiter of 
the market David Bathurst, then 
its New York president, lied in 
May 1981, saying that three out of 
eight Impressionist paintings had 
been sola when only one had found 
a buyer. He did so “to protea the 
market and the vendor's interests," 
be declared in court papers. Far 
more seriously, Christie's kept fid- 
dling with estimates and reserves. 
The vendor, Dimitry Jodidio, 
chairman Of the Cristailma dealer- 
ship. which took Christie’s to court, 
was exasperated by reserves bring 
raised at the 11th hour, allegedly 


without his knowledge, and by di- 
opinions within Christie's 


verging opinions 
regarding estimates, of which he 
was not informed. 

Had the sale been successful, no 
complaints would have been node 
against the “floating reserves," as 
they were referred to, nor the diver- 
gent estimates. The outrage was 
caused by Bathurst’s utterly unim- 
portant lie — those in a position to 
buy millioo-dollar paintings knew 


the truth within days — but the real 
problem was the estimates and the 
way in winch they are used by auc- 
tion houses to steer the market 

A quarter of a century ago an 
estimate was a broad price bracket 
The hi gher end of the estimate 
could be twice the lower, or more. 
It was determined weeks in ad- 
vance to give the vendor some idea 
of what be might go, and not much 
fuss was made about it The vendor 
agreed to a reserve set, as a purely 
protective measure, below the low- 
er estim at e. 

Now auction house experts fine- 
tune their estimates for weeks, test- 
ing the reactions of dealers and 
collectors who come to see the 
piece, saying “in confidence" to po- 
tential buyers that the work might 
fetch a lot more than the original 
estimate. Sometimes, the wader, 
who is kepi informed, accordingly 
raises his reserve. He, as much as 
the auction bouse, bears the blame 
for this constant readjustment. If 
this happens so often these days, it 
is because the vendor is often a 
dealer. 

Whatever the cause, however, 
the estimate- ami-reserve game is 
ultimately harmful to the system. It 
works as long as the trend in prices 
is upward; when the economy 
slows, it goes haywire and is reflect- 


ed in high failure rates. At Soth- 
eby’s main Impressionist sale in 
London last March. 46 percent of 
the pictures, in terms of the total 
value given for the sale, were 
bought in. At a sale in mid-May, 
the proportion was 41 percent Old 
Masters fared no better At Chris- 
tie’s New York sale May 9. two- 
thirds of the collection. In value 
terms, failed to sriL 
True, the market for paintings, 
regardless of schools and periods, 
has become intensely speculative. 
Beginners, including investors, find 
paint in g the easiest form of ait to 
buy. It is prominently displayed in 
museums and is more extensively 
documented than most fields. The 
intrusion of inexperienced specula- 


tors in the past five years or so has 
dycor 


significantly contributed to the de- 
stabilization of the mate. 

But this does noL apply to the 
market in Chinese art, where con- 
noisscurship runs on a high IeveL 
And here, too, failures have 
reached an unusually high propor- 
tion, suggesting that something is 
wrong with the estimate-reserve 
system. 

On May 1, Sotheby’s New York 
press office announced the sale of 
“the most important group of Chi- 
nese sculpture to be offered since 
World War EL" The buy-in rate at 


the June 3 sale was 63 percent of 
total value. The next day Sotheby's 
could comfort itself with a $3.9- 
mfllion sale of Chinese ceramics, 
leaving 3 percent unsold, but on 
June 5 the buy-in rate in the sale of 
Chinese works of an from the Alan 
Hartman dealership reached S3 
percent. 

Qeariy, auction houses have a 
problem with their appraisal proce- 
dure as far as both estimates and 
reserves are concerned. The experts 
who have been involved in most 
auctions with hi gh buy-in rates are 
too experienced to have been un- 
aware that the estimates they were 
giving were far too optimistic. Mi- 
dori Strauss, the leading Impres- 
sionist expert in Sotheby’s London 
operation, and James Lally, for 


years Sotheby’s top Chinese expert 
ew York, who is leaving the 


INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


mmi 


The TAS1S Schools 


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International 
Herald Tribune's 


NEXT SPECIAL 
EDUCATION 
DIRECTORY 


wOl appear on September 7 
A December 7 


Far information 
please contact 
Frangoae Clement, 
httemational Herald Tribune. 
181 Ave. Ouaies-de-GauIIe, 
92521 NooBy Cedex, France. 

or your nearest 
Urt’ representative. 


in New 

bouse at the end of the year; are 
among the best people in their 
field. Both have an acute percep- 
tion of quality and financial value. 
Tbeir failures are nnlflcdy to reflect 
errors of judgment My guess is 
that they gave into pressure from 
the vendor or perhaps that they 
went out of their way to entice the 
vendor for fear of loosing him to 
the competition. 

While the consequences were less 
ominous, fhgw June sales, in the 
aspect of inflated estimates, were 
like minor replays of Christie's cat- 
astrophic auction of the paintings 
owned by Cristaflina. 

Here is where reform is most 
urgently needed. Estimates most 
once again become real estimates. 
Reserves must be protective barri- 
ers set below the lower end of the 
estimate. This could be enforced 



Thomas Krings-Smst and the former factory he has turned into a gaOeiy. 


A Venturesome Gallery in Cologne 




legally, since the reserve is specified 
of agree- 


By David Galloway While preparing fa- a job onthe That success f urther encooraged 

1 - 7 — " ~ * - *- * him to begin converting his factory. . 


by contract (The practice of agree- ^ OLOGNE — Since itsooen- New York Stock .Exchange, he bun to begin converting nauaan. 
mg orally to alter reserves should V^ine four a*> t£ made the ronndsof Manhattan stu- If further impetus was required, he 

be disondcd.) There should be a dty’swwest, biggest andiost adr dios. Tbeycarwas'1969, and wfaai had to took no farthCT thanjte 


Straus 


time limit beyond which ne ither the 
lor nor the auction bouse 
would be allowed to modify the 
reserve, say seven days before the 
action. 


Auction houses should be dis- 
couraged from advertising esti- 
mates before sales; now dene sys- 
tematically, this was the exeqtaon 
two decades ago. Estimates should 


les ago. Estimates 
be aimed at infor ming would-be 
buyers, not at yanking up prices. A 
code of conduct should be worked 
out by the auction houses. 


The news media might do some 
>. N o 


soul-searching too. No self-re- 
specting writer of so-called straight 
news would dream of reporting 
that a wonderful painting by the 
famous X, offered by Z, the well- 
known dealer, is expected to fetch 
so many millions of dollar s, but 
this is exactly what happens every 
month in the auction odd, as wit- 
ness in recent months the Gouki 
sale, the Mantegna “Adoration of 
the Magi" and the Portland gold 
font splashed all over the London 
dailies 


T 


Selling by auction, like dealing , 
is a commercial activity. Relaying 
auction-house news releases before 
sales and carrying stany-cyed in- 
terviews with auction-house ex- 
perts about their own wares is pro- 
viding free advertising, with 
harmful effects; pan of the public 
gains the impression that these are 
objective statements. 


Last of three articles. 


venturesome private gallery has 
mounted three major exhibitions. 
Such a tempo would wean most 
museum curators, but luomas 
Krings-Emst, 38, learned to pace 
himself on the fast-track of interna- 
tional finance. 

At 26, Krings-Emst engineered a 
French-German venture for pro- 
ducing pet foods. Then he estab- 
lished a West German affiliate foe 
J. C Decam, the company that re- 
placed Paris's decaying pissairs 
with high-tech comfort stations 
and introduced elegantly stream- 
lined bus shelters in glass and steeL 

WhDe French publications were 
deoying the razing of Paris’s redo- 
lent monuments, Krings-Emst saw 
the evolution of an historic tradi- 
tion that started with the Roman 
Emperor Vespasian, who had urn- 
shaped nrinals erected in Rome. 
The fledgling gallerist has ainre 
parted company with his French 
partner but still speaks enthusiasti- 
cally about the aesthetics of “street 
furniture" 

Krings- Ernst’s financial adven- 
turing and his passion for painting 
and sculpture nave too$ enjoyed a 
peaceful coexistence: His initiation 
into the fine arts came two decades 
ago. at “Documeata 3,” one of 
Kassel'S mammoth internati onal 
exhibitions. Between degrees in 
business administration at Cologne 
and Fontainebleau, Krings-Emst 
chalked up two semesters of art 
histofyat 
in Nice. 


sycarwas' 1969,i 
be calls “The Coca-Cola culture" 
was bubbling. constant high” 
he recaDed,in hisbrisfc, telegraphic 
style. “A rash, the first galleries 
moving dow ntown: Cage and Cun- 
ningham. Concerts by Phil Glass. 


nearby Kunstvereine. These local 
art ass ociatio ns are committed - to 
presenting young artists from the., 
region, and often provide wring-- 
boards for new talent In 1984 the' 
Kunstvereine arranged a nation- 


tr... 


Parties at Warhol’s Factory. For wide exchange of shows. “When I jjt J» I - 

i . mu nitwi me wn wi nB thrrvughrwTt fT--: "' 


the first time, I fbend contact to my 
own generation.” 

Meanwhile, despite his student 
budget, he had begun to collect 
prints and drawings by Jasper 
Johns, Donald Judd, David Hock- 
ney, diriidn Rpy T iriilwwlrin awH 
JamesRosenquisL But when he ap- 
plied for an apprenticeship at me 
Maedtt Foundation, he was ad- 
vised that being a gaflerist was not 
a job but a life commitment It was 
too early lor that, be derided, so he 
became assistant to a director of 
the French hank Credit Industrie! 
et CommerciaL 

His conviction that beatify and 
ftmnti raialkm need not be antithet- 
ical helped sdd his bus-shelter pro- 
ject to the Germans. He offered 
free installation an d maint enance 
as well as a cadi pre m i um m ex- 
changefOTtherighttouseaportUHi 
of each shdto for advertising. Co- 
logne, Hamburg, Saarbrficken, 
Bremen and Ludwigshafeo Mgnwi 
an, but in Dfissddorf he ran into 
long-standing monopolies and- die 
project soared. 


pick 


AUCTION SALES 


CHRISTIES 

GENEVA 


Important 
Autumn Sales 


At the Hotel Richemond, Geneva 
9-14 November, 1985 



Highly Important Jewellery, Porcelain, Art 
Nouveau, Art Deco and Bookbindings, Silver, 
Watches and Objects of Vertu, GolaBcxes, 
Faberg£ and Russian Works of Art, Wine 


Closing date for those wishing 
to indude their pr op ert y in these rales is 
16 September, 1985 



For information and valuations, 
please contact: 

Christie’s 

8 Place de la Taconnerie, 1204 Geneva 
Tel (022) 282544 Telex: 423634 

8 King Street, St. James’s, London swiy 6QT 
Tel: (0441) 839 9060 Telex: 916429 

17 rue de Lille, 75007 Paris 
Tel: (01) 261 1247 Telex: 213468 


He and his wifev Dana, a Russian 
up two semesters ol mi a^heaologist, had bought a dis- 
ubeEcoledes Beaux Aru 

mired earty industrial architecture 
Krings-Emst was also intrigued by 
the multiple uses to wfaidi such 
structures woe bring put in the 
United Stales — “from ateliers to 
discos to tow-cost housing." In 
1982 he made 800 photographs of 
arch projects, in hopes of produc- 
ing a book. 

Instead be found himself in tire 
more active role of conservationist 
Dozens of Cologne’s artists had 
been producing and exhibiting 
tbrir work in an old chocolate fac- 
tory. When their refnge was threat- 
ened with the wrecker’s ball, 
Krings-Emst drammed up support 
to save part of the historic struc- 
ture 


la nearby Engelskirchea, a 19th- 
century wool warehouse in a spa- 
cious park was to be darwiisbed to 
make room for a new city hall. 
Krings-Emst orpnawl sit-ins anH 
mobilized teams of journalists and 
architects lo attend meetings of the 
afy councfl. He warehouse is be- 
ing recycled as municipal offices, 
as industrial museum and loft-style 
apartments. 


saw what was emerging throughout 
Germany" Krings-Emst recalls, “I 
knew I had to be pan erf this pro- 
gressive spirit," 

Within, six months he had visited • 
150 studios, drawn up plans for ' 
renovating Us factory and de- 
signed most of its furnishings- The 
result is a spacious, fierifcte exhibi- 
tion area that man y museum direc- 
tors might envy. With 1,500 square 
feet, excluding courtyards and of- 
fices, Kiinstiftume, at GbMstean- 
strasse 106, may be Europe’s larg- 
est private gallery. A. show 
regularly features four artists, each 
of whom receives an entire .floor. ' 
For tibose.wbojtian, more complex, 
tTTTvw ^xmTHng msta]Iatinii. s, thmi 
are dri-rite'lhmig q uarters 

Krings-Emst staged the first 
three shows with a single assistant 
AIL were accompanied by hand- - 
so m^^hoxM catalogs. Heyrians 

Ms permanent stable prai 
ly. *Tm open to every medium and 
mpvemeat,’’ he. said. Where he feds 
a strong rapport with an artist and 
his work, he may offer a three-year 
contract “as a land of self-motiva- 
tion." 

The terms are generous, and 
word is ouL He and his assistant, 
Oiaf Zunmen nann, regularly re- - 
view a half-dozen portfolios a day. 
Most of the successful candidates 
have come from DQssddorf, whose 
art acadony main tain s a brillian t . 
reputation- Bolin also ranks hi gh 
on Krings-Emst’s aesthetic map: 
“There it’s the political schizophre- 
nia that counts." 

He has no doubt that Cologne is 
rapidly becoming Europe's leading' 
art metropok. When the Musenm 
Ludwig opens in 1986, that poa- | 
non win be consolidated. And ’ 
than is, Krings-Emst believes, a 
new generation of potential critec- ' 

tors, “ Wi rtschaftsvnmdeTkind£T n 
luce himself, who will be caught up 
by the innovative spirit of his entia - - 
prise. 

Exchange exhibitions are 
planned with Hamburg, Frankfurt! 
and Mu nich, and the scope is 
broadening. “T want -to create an 
international forum for progressive 
art," he said. 


v -i 


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l-L*:.: 



Vecte 

W* Ppcr 


David Galloway ij a tvriler and 
professor based in Wuppertal, West 
Germany. 


est 

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doonesbury 


, 1 £ 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNPAY, AUGUST 24-25, 1985 




Page 7 



ARTS /LEISURE 


Ne »y°*r tmaSmn 

New 


Hgure in the dewdcpmcai of Ab- The award ceremony was the j n his 
siract Expressionism, ihe first 26th since the colony began giving erweilat 


septazice speech. Mod- 
ified that theme, begin- 


. . r , _ ,'v — u-" ouiuuiiwu uw iuuiai 

^“cncan style erf paniizft io com- the medal annually to American nine by describing himself, 
mmxd major international success artist* Past recipients include the “i’ m actually very shy ar 



An . * ceremony ~ a major mtematkmi -Success artists. Past recipients include the “i’ m actually very shy and diffi- 
laughter P^oked ?“£, recognition. J& -canvases — .artists Alexander Calder. Edward deni socially, though not at all in 

ert Moih*™ Jn 1 V® a^ist Rob- ““ft. bn *hy statements of color Hopper and Georgia O'Keeffe, the mv studio." Moiherwdl said “I am 
Dowell lhc ^ac- “f 1 m which Wade and white voters Wm UpdSe. Eudora Wei- „oi a performer. J make symbolic 

for hSlifSS Medal Sunday ■ oft ? 1 appear in vas^splashyfidds ty and Thornton Wilder, and the expressions of the human experi- 
aiti contribution to the —have been caUed “ra«HnKnur composers EUiou Carter. Aaron e** m flat surfaces, made with 

■ aa<f “sensuous” by critics. Copland and Edgard Var&se. burnt sticks, or slicks with chunks 

MotherwdTs acceptance sneer* "Tbe MacDowcIl Colony, found- . P 1 * speeches began typi- of animal hair tied on one end and 
and die speech inwfuch iKu£ «* in 1908 by the widow of the ‘.ffe ”} t {‘. Bc ^ hosi “ raiding from dipped in colored liquids, 
tor Varujan Boghosian inirodoced American composer Edward Mac- a 1151 °f Motherwell s .degrees and “This experience is as primal and 



Bibliotheque National# 
Puts Ronsard in Context 


Ha 


By Michael Gibson 

Ituemaamal Herald Tnbtme 

P i ARIS — The Biblioihique Na- 
tion ale and the Archives Na- 
tional are the memory of France, 


a courtier or diplomat— in 1540 he 
was part of a mission to an interna- 
tional conference in Alsace — 
when a persistent high Fever forced 
turn to go home. It turned out to be 


a to* iSSf acc^plishnieDis, which jndwfea 

i some sadness the difficulty of mair retteai for artists, writers and com- Philosophy degree fnmi Stanford 

reg statements about the J»s«s. l» scholarships offer: the L?nn ysty ® 1937 and awards in 

^dition through the visuid arts— 5* aacc to work for six-week stints from die Pennsylvania 

es P®aaHy abstract art m sednded cabins scattered over ^“5: Ar “v lb f Nation- 

MbthemelLnnw in , 400 wooded acres (160 hectares) in “ A^CJubm New York and ihe 

«*«weu, now 70. was a key southern New Hampshire Umveraty of Salamanca m Spam. 

■ Then Boghosian began to de- 

scribe the difficulty he had bad in 
preparing the speech. The prob- 
lem, he suggested, lay mainly in 
describing toe medium of pig- 
ments-on-canvas in the medium of 
words. 

It was especially difficult, Bogh- 
osian said, to describe the feeling of 
“shock” he recently received while 
poring over a book of Motherwell's 
paintings. He said that while look- 
ing at the works — especially the 
violent clashing* of white and black 
— he bad felt an overwhelming 
sense that their creator was a bong 
far different from the quintessen- 
tifllly civilized person who sat be- 
hind him on the stage. 

‘1 warn you, do not buy this 
book,” Boghosian said, bolding the 
volume alofL “It is terrifying, fwas 
jolted because this kind, wonderful, 

MotberwelFs “At Fire m the Afternoon’' (1949). to be, is not that at all." 



■4 ** 


ias °*a£1 


>logii 


Vr . j 

IfsstiF 




“This experience is as primal and 

natural as moving one s body, or yflEjt'&L- \. 1 is -*» - ^ f 
uttering sounds of anger or glee. It 

is so natural that I am sufl sur- i ‘ * ' 

prised that children, at the age of 5 
or 6 years, give it up." 

In an interview before the award 
ceremony. Motherwell said that 
Modernist painring, as he under- 
stood and attempted to practice it, 
was a means of representing truth 
in the medium of paint — as Ein- 
stein had done in the medium of 
mathematics, as Beethoven had 
done with music, as Freud had 

done with words. - - 

■The Freudian part is Lfae diffi- ^c^-rh., 

Robert Moftenre " Va ™J“ B«i 

well said. “And how to paint that 

which is not what it seems to be is a P 115 en ton°n. he apologized for be- for the ears of men 
colossal problem.” P? al ? 1( e 10 cogendy define Rob- The flesh, the Non ? 

He also said: “The chemistry of e * Motherwell s importance or to 
the pigments is interesting. Ivory adequately describe what he felt Musi 1 show outright 
black like bone black, is made w hile looking at more than 50 years The bruise in the side, 
from charred bones or horns. °* “ e artist’s paintings. The holt in the night. 


a memory so vast ih.-u one is con- a serious illness, which left Roa- 
siantly surprised by what is said partly deaf and looking a lot 
brought out of its inscrutable older than his 16 years. The youth 
depths. A current show at the Bib- decided to give up life at court and 
liotheque Nationale is devoted to resume his studies, and eventually 
the poet Pierre de Ronsard (1524- took minor orders in the Roman 
1585). Catholic church. 

It is Th rift up of books, maim- The times were precarious. The 
scripts, works of art of every son monarchy was not yet very strong 


the poet Pierre de Ronsard (1524- took minor orders in the Roman 
1585). Catholic church. 

It is mfrrie up of books, manu- The times were precarious. The 
scripts, works erf art of every son monarchy was not yet very strong 
and portraits of famous men and hi Fiance and the country was di- 
women, as wdl as such unexpected vided by the religious issues of the 
items as the first lease Ronsard Reformation. Ronsard took a po~ 
signed when he took up lodgings in lemical stance on the Catholic side 
Paris and the retiip. ne for a coach and, bong a confirmed supporter 
he wanted built — trivia, in a sense; of the monarchy, also wrote a long ■ 


but at a distance of 400 years such epic work aimed at glorifying the 


Cnjrepmn/Tl* Ntw York r«« 

Robert Motherwell (seated) with Varujan Boghosian. 


s in sha ping our French kings. The platonic ideals 
>le oncefived. of the Renaissance, fostered by 
i son of Loys de philosophers fleeing the Arab con- 
ur de la Posson- querois of Constantinople, had by 
elle-Gaugaineidu then reached France, where they 
entleman of the exercised a strong influence on 
was originally in- Ronsard’s conception of poeuy 
n a military am) and on the courtly arts. The my- 
r. At age 12 be was thology of antiquity became artisii- 


invia is precious in shaping our 
idea of how people oncefived. 

Ronsard. sixth son of Loys de 
Ronsan, Seigneur de la Posson- 
nifcre, de la ChapeUe-Gaugain et du 
Saxceau and Gentleman of the 
PHvy Chamber, was originally in- 
tended to follow a military and 
diplomatic career. At age 12 be was 


^ i ^ „ w . worth of the artist’s paintings] ... 

Sometimes 1 wonder, laying in a . ^ as l an S ua S e of 3 And how death cried? 
great black stripe on a canvas, what Motherwell painting. Boghosian 
animal's bones or horns are making suss^ted. and so be ended by read- Must 1 speak to the lot 
. the furrows of my picture." J I**? b y Lcy ^ e Bog* 11 - Wo little bore? 

pq gh flctnn had kept the audience ^ aenio n: It said H7t y not ? 

laughing during his inuoductoiy Must I tell again ^ sa ^ Once more 

speech, bat finally, and with obvi- In the words I kno m- o-rv-c»««,fw,i 9 n B , 


The halt in the night. 


MotberwelFs “At Fire in the Afternoon*' (1949). 


made a page in the service of the cally fashionable. 

Dau phin Francois, son of Francois All this is handsomely illustrated 
1. Shortly thereafter the 18-year-old in the exhibition by means of ta- 
prince died, spitting blood, at the pestries. paintings and a large 
end of a g«nv» of tennis. Since it quantity of drawings and prints, 
was suspected that the dauphin had These help one understand the age 
been poisoned by Francois Vs ene- from a point of view akin to that of 
my. Emperor Charles V, young an anthropologist, and show it as 
Ronsard and the rest of the prince’s frailer and more vulnerable than 
entourage had to sit through the o&e usually i m agines, 
autopsy. Ronsard later recalled, “1 Ronsard wrote some memorable 
had to feast my eyes on the heart poetry, especially love poems that 
and lungs and blood of my mas- every French school boy must learn, 
ter.” but he was insufferably prolific. 


and with obvi- In the words / know 


Who little bore? 

It said H7iy not ? 

It said Once more 

o -ft. Ebow, rw> 190 B ISO- Nomfav ft*o 


Strauss’ 'Capriccio’ Stands Out Amid the Standard Spectacles at Salzburg 


By Andrew Clark 
O ALZBURG — The 1985 Salz- 
burg festival is onlikdy to gp 
down as a vintage year. The open- 
ing was clouded by a widely report- 
ed incident in vmich the Italian 
stage director Kero Faggioni 
slapped cme of the festival adminis- 
trators during rehearsals for Ver- 
di’s “Macbeth.” The other main, 
event at the Grosses Festspidhaus 
— a breath takingly dnll and tradi- 
tional “Carmen” staged and con- 


ducted by Herbert vrib Karajan - v™™****^™^ 
featured a first-rank cast, most of that the widowed Countess 

whom had already sungiid acted SgSS**' *** 

the same roles better dsewbere. • £«»»«( 1930s fashions. 


reoent yearn, partly as a result of an exquisite moonlight setting, —is not being shelved for 
prodnictiems that have updated the does the production approach an is one of the best things ! 
action to this ©satiny. ideal artistic unity.- Much of the has done in recent years, i 

That is the approach adopted at impetus here stems from the way the credit for its success m 1 
Salzburg by the West German fUm the Vienna Philharmonic handles Michael Hampe and his c 
and stage director Johannes Schaaf Strauss’ sumptuous orchestral tex- Mauro Pagano, who also 
and the designer Andreas Rein- Hires — this really is vintage play- seal on a new staging of M 
hardt. The palatial, clear-cut ing — and from Anna Tomowa- di’s “fl Ritorno <fi Ulixse ii 
framework of neodasacal glass- Sintow’s portrait of the lonely at the Fdsenreitschule. 
and-marble decor makes discreet Countess, her beautiful singing A . urn ^^ M- mr w»’c > 
reference to fashionable trends in only occasionally maned by lapses r *f ™ *}r“**I. 

the visual ans from the first three into shriD tremolo. f UlSw 

d«ad« of the cental^ The co, EUewbere, to poefaj of !he m U - ^ 

tones are an equally effective re- sic by the conductor, Horst Stein, is r2LJ 


the score. The project shows that he 
is as fascinated as ever by tradition- 
al operatic forms, bv Italian culture 


Ronsard was next attached to 
Princess Madeleine, who married 
King James V of Scotland in 1537. 
The royal couple and their follow- 


Thereareunexpectedwoodwind 

obbfigau*’ muted^pets^and 5S3^T5 Sa?£ 


The prestigious PICiade edition of 
Ins works has more than 2.000 
pages, which no one today can 
hope to read for pleasure’s sake. 


ideal artistic unity. Much of the has done in recent years. Much o? aJ operatic forms, bv Italian culture tromWl a small S band Tub ff cuk)s i s *“ ve ^ ™ «pe^ mm m toe m^cgmai 

impetus hae stems from the way the credit for its success must go to and by the music of other compos- with enlarced double-bass section. Wedd V 1& ' ^rem* escort subjects so abundantly dealt with 

ihe Vinma Phiiham.onic lundte Mfchad Hampe and his deader, cm. He has no, changed the nS> S aSSd a hm^ rftSs Edutbajh for a year, m ■*- *e show does hdo one on- 

Strauss' sumptuous orchestral tex- Mauro Pagano, who also set the dies, composed any new sections or orean. oiano accordion, tambou- l ^ c returaed from France 
tores — this really is vintage play- seal on a new staging of Mon terer- significantly altered the rhythms, nne and timpani. The sonorities. ^ 2 new queen (Mane de Guise, 
mg — and from Anna Tomowa- di’s “fl Ritorno mUlisse in Patna” The simplicity and vigor of the mu- especially those of bassoon, contra- ^J 10 wou ^ ““ther of 


set sail for Bui by setting Rcmard's writing in 
en died of the artistic context of the day. and 
after the especially that of the mythological 


lug — auu iroxu ahus iomowa- m s U Kitorno <n uusse m ratna me sunpiicny and vigor ol toe mu- esoeciallv these of bassoon, contra- 7. wmu U ^ LUW u ‘ 

Sintow’s portrait of the lonely at the Fdsenreitschule. sic is preserved. bSscxm and bass darine? suggest queen rf S»ls).Ro^ 

But his broadening of the insttu- f -ive rapproche- 


only occasional] y maned by lapses 

Sto SSo y ^ a?. “j 


mentation and near-total exclusion ment of two artistic epochs. 


dramatically effective. He makes of choral music make this very 


ed in the account book of Cardinal 


Both operas were presented with acter changes bach into 
tire kind of extravagant visual spec- tomes of the 18th cenm 
tade that has become something of ' intended by Strauss, uni 
a clicW in Salzburg’s largest audi- Italian duet halfway thi 
torium, and that goes, down well opera, eveo the servants 


and her entourage are at the fore- 
front of 1930s fashions. 

- One by one, however; .each char- 
acter changes back into the cos- 
tumes erf the 18th cennny setting 
intended by Strauss, untfl try the 
Italian duet halfway through the 
opera, even the servants appear to 


Elsewhere, the narine of the mu- **: « c , ho ™ music make this very The large cast was led by Thom- Beaton (on loan from the Scottish 

S is his cast act as wi^ as they smg. The much Monteverdi heard through as AUen as Ulysses and Kathleen Record Office), in which the future 

wSjSlfte act,OQ 15 «»- raU ? cr ^ “ Kuhlmann as Pendope, both of poet is referred to as “the page 

and Tomowa-Sintow aoD^? 1 ^ representing the ribs rf the 16th- authentic reconstnicuon of the whom conveyed nobility and emo- callit Wandomoy” because he came 

bkmd md^StiSSfv loTTviS ^ h* 1 ? a ? pe 2 s0 sounds that might have been heard Uon ^ ^eir singing. In the pit, from the Vendbmois region, 

oiano ano Dpaixomy to dc a viva- mat-c ; nf pii pair ikp of the audito- hv *hn. oioHr’c in the t-rr -r„. c.zZZi u:, 


with tbefestrVaTsndi, coosemtive have been lifted straight out of the 
aodjences. fin smte of ^he beefless" Andea Regime. The effect<rf- these 


contribution of the Vienna Philhar- 
monic Orchestra in the pit, neither 
“Macbeth,” a holdover from last 
year’s festival, nor “Carmen," arig~ 


skffifully plotted t ransf o rmatio ns is 
disconcerting. They add one far- 
ther anachronism to a work over- 
flowing with anachronistic music 


inaliy staged for Karajan’s Easter and conversation, yet Schaaf never 
festival added .up to a cohesive really succeeds in making them 


KIdnes Festspielhaus, will not be 


musical-dramatic whole. seem anything more than a clever year. 

Events next door at the KIdnes theatrical ploy . “Coa fan ante," also at the 

Festpidhaus, as so often in the Only during the Countess’ poi- Kieincs Festspielhaus, will not be 
past, produced the most satisfying guant final soliloquy, where the back at the 2986 festival, but the 
artistic results. The new production stage picture returns to the 1930sin production — now four years (rid 

was “Capricdo," Richard Strauss’ ; : 

Last stage work. In spite of the 

strong historical connections be- • # ( vm- n ■» -m . 

afirtr’l'Sfaiita University to Buy Byrd m 

mounted for the festival at the ^ . J* . zL w 

Schloss Areaberg — “Capricdo” By Martic Bamcs died m Boston m 1957. Many-^- 

has been seen at only one previous h* Associated Pr** tennis from five antarctic expetfa- 


oiana ana naaironiy ip dc a viva- infrili am t use of the audit©- 

oousywmg bostss. Tht rCT of the I ^^ces. and of a futt 

jmlg " range cl rSlOTTOgc aDd Ughting 
«nfli as La Roche cuts a strong w ffllJsm Bth e divide be- 

profiie in rta toter doeclor s [wocn ^ Md mcrU h 
monologue; Trudebese Schmidts * 

rich- toned Clairon is slinky, sexy The starting point of the produc- 
and uninhibited in just the right tion is the new musical arra n gg- 
actressy way; Wolfgang SchOne’s ment by Hans Werner Henze, 
Count may use art as a doorway to whose opera “Tbe Bassarids" was 
pretty girls but is much more than premiered ai Salzburg nearly 2D 
the usual aristocratic ass. With the years ago. A problem with “UHsse" 
individual performances at its cen- is that the surviving manuscripts 
ter, the production has a chance to •tot in Monteverdi’s handwrit- 
grow in stature when it returns next ing: They contain only lhc vocal 


by the work’s first audiences in the Jeffrey Tate confirmed his growing 
Venice of 1641. Henze’s expansion reputation as a conductor. 


of the bass line in particular draws 

cm a colorful selection of instiu- *“ e 

men is, which create a more exciting Se P L 

sound-picture than Raymond Lep- 

partT s version for Glvndebourne in Andrt 

the 1970s. music a 


Ffrey Tate confirmed his growing Back in Paris, Ronsard was 
putation as a conductor. named to the royal stables as a 

The festival continues through cadeL ^ Henri II 

_ L | enjoyed his company and always 

v wanted to have him on his team 

i r-iHT"- • , when they kicked the ball around 

Andre*’ CM is a journalist and lhc p r d-aux-CIercs. Ronsard 
music critic based m Switzerland. seemed headed for a good career as 


in art, the show does help one un- 
derstand what made even his more 
garrulous works seem relevant in 
his day. 

'‘Ronsard,’’ Bibliotheque Nation- 
ale, 58 rue de Richelieu, through 
Sept. 15. 


Cdtic Treasures on Display 

Roam 

STUTTGART — The treasures 
of a Celtic prince, buried with him 
2^500 years ago and undisturbed 
until their discovery near here in 
1978, are on display for the first 
tune, through OcL 13. The collec- 
tion is thought to be the only one of 
its period m Europe not to have 
been plundered by grave robbers. 


ar parts and the bass, and the music 

“0*d fan ante,” also at the for several scenes has been losL 


Henze is the latest in a line of 
20tb-cennuy composers and musi- 
cologists to attempt to complete 


University to Buy Byrd Memorabilia 




By Martic Bamcs 

Tht Associated Press 


died in Boston in 1957. Many ma- 
terials from five antarctic expedi- 




We offer this 
opportunity 
26 times 
1 MILLION 
I DM! 


The work articulates Strauss’ 
thoughts on the role in opera of 
word, muse and production, which 
he threads into the dut-chax and 
amorous g ames of a Parisian salon 
in the 1770s. The conversational 
nature of the work, and its length 
— two and a half hours without a 
break — have given it the reputa- 
tion of a connoisseur’s piece, but it 
has achieved greater popularity m 


historians in recent years in Boston 
basements, tranks and trash bags. 


were found in nearby 
e, and last year papers 


1155,000 to Ohio State University. 


The material will be available for 
research at the university's Insti- 
tute of Polar Studies, according to 
the institute’s assistant director, 
Pieter Anderson. 


This last cadre, of goods that had 
been stored in plastic trash bags, 
yielded items such as a log from 
Byrd’s flight to the North Pole and 
notes Byrd wrote during the first 




Resurrected 'Maometto IT 
Opens Pesaro Rossini Fest 


StSTaStedasthefimmanto flight over the South Pole, 
fly ova- the North and South Poles, “The stuff in the trash bags was 

3 really gold," said Kenneth Ren deli 

■■ - — ■■ — a manuscript expert who was hired 

to appraise the material for the 

TT’ State Street Bank, executor of the 
lilOmClXO JU. estate of Byrd’s wife, Mane. 

Though there has been some 
Fofit doubt cast on the claim, Byrd, as 
LVU851L11 J. G31 navigator, and his pilot, Floyd Ben- 

nett, are generally credited with 


w ANNIVERSARY 
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O^omRnMiniFwit doSTK AtaWs 

TTP Tlfl x CSoTU liUSSllU J. navigator, and his pilot Floyd Ben- Anderson, who is writing a biog- 

F nett, are generally credited with raphy of Byid, described the coHec- 

_ -Bfn- w/mvpt part of her voice lacked body, but it making the First flight over the tion as Byrd’s primary papers, con- 

^ Williani wra a was warm and full for the towering North Pole on May 9, 1926. Byrd’s raining all of his private 


15 ESARO, Italy — The final scene. As Maometto, the en- diary for the trip, an expedition expeditionary materials, including 

XOpcra Festival has openedits pmo r ^ infidel Samuel Ramey that earned him the Medal of Hon- information on how he financed, 
axth year with a highly confirmed his insight into Rossinis w from Congress, contains the no- organized and conducted the trips. 

and highly enjoyable production id voca j demands and his ability to 

“Maometto U, » &noas opera, t fi ePL He also confinned his r — - - - - - - ■ i 

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fc S? H ? P 2S Jf&val has ***2 awardfid ta a '°° g ART EXHIBITIONS 

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now.^a nd a^dMCT iption of a poten- 

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into the unknown beyond the jh® NORTH-WEST-GERMAN-STATE-LOTTHRY SUPER-JACKPOT OF1 MILLION - determined 
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Anderson and ReodeQ said it national group ofdever participants. Ail prizes Million DM plus 2 guaranteed prizes of 1 Million 
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ranged fey through the 

its attention to this area of 


canon, its attention to w Valeatini Tenrani in the 

the work has b®® trouser tote of Calbo. Valeo tim 

valuable, for until fattly j cr ^j ma dramatic affinity with 

these operas were these Rossini warriors, as she 

“Maometto H was fanw a /cw scasonsagowith her 

known, but not m rts ; ongnuu stining TancredL Again she was m 

0 sioa of IDOL It Jodtam. negotia^the fiendish 

-* and recorded, in gSoratura wiS style and panache, 

thal Rossini Chris Merritt broughi nmacah^ 

various suppressiJiK **a «« mA taste to.his mterjmtetion of 
tions, then enatied Le biege uc ^ ^ ^ Ensso, Aurra’sfathcr. In 

u, “Mao^tto” tiiere is amp^ ^tical edition of the score 
mlen^r^tipageantiy.^^S obvious affection and Imowl- 
SLitv of edge, though a httle more bite 


' P a ,ca"p^ii£s 

^^Maometto’ 4 wasTOttm^ femed courtyar^. whose Teaden 
t^Ha Colbran (later f? tone was an ideal background for 

wife). Sufl, ins no star costumes. His staging was 

c0 R OSCt \r rather, it ^ *** hmeccabfe, supportmg the music, 

=S£5Sss» 


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ft HT KuhlmannstraBe 1 A 

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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDA Y-SUNDAY, AUGUST 24-25, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


VaL 


Hfab LOW Last OB. 


USFG 

Scot* 

Trarrwy 

OomRs 

NOHtUi 

FPLGp 

OcdPet 

PhlbrS 

TWA 

Ericordi 

CmwE 

SCM 

PonAm 

Revlon 

WnAIrL 


TOSS 

18720 

15708 

14782 

U7S2 


34 

3 5V 
45U 
31* 
17* 


14437 75V. 
1293S 32% 
11530 39* 
10738 3m 
*562 30*. 
8114 » 
8926 46V 
7935 8* 

74*4 464* 
7454 7V 


33% 

35 

44% 

30% 

17% 

a* 

31% 

38% 

22% 

30% 

30% 

45 

8% 

44 

7% 


»% -% 
35% + ft 

44% +1% 

30% — % 
17% - % 
Mft + % 
32% -4% 
39(4 —1% 
22 % 

30% -4- % 
30% 

45% +1* 
8% + % 
44% — % 
7* + % 


Dow Jones Averages 


OWi H%b Low Lost Q» 


Indus 131442 132252 1310ft 131832 + 

Trans 465.98 4*1,71 68144 48440 + 

Util 15HJ5 15973 158.14 13971 + 

Comp 54847 55201 54584 549* + 


NYSE Index 


Im Close Cite 


Composite 

Industrials 

TTansp. 

utiHttee 

Finance 


Mali 

10852 10833 10849— MB 
124X0 12164 12379 —086 

109.1* io&» *£.10-022 

5740 5775 5740— OM 
11181 118,45 11150 — ** 


NYSE Diaries 


I Dow Jones Bond Averages I 


Bands 

utilities 

industrials 


7971 

7744 

8237 


arao 

+ 032 
+ 043 

+un 


Advanced 
Declined 
undwnaed 
Total Issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 
! Volume up 
Volume dawn 


Close 

Pro*. 

706 

575 

762 

1004 

509 

439 

1977 

2018 

27 

SO 

11 

2382570 

31 J44570 

U 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Aufl-22 . 
Alls. 21 . 
Aue.20, 
Aug. 19 , 
.14. 


Bay 

151.1 T7 02344 
210342 384439 
142,944 3973U 
161384 394.909 
14&52B 380843 


-Included m the sales figures 


•ww 

499 

1 

ZJ86 


Fridays 


MSE 


Closing 


W.014P3L 


Prav.4PJA.veL 

Prey cnatidatod dose 1U,1102S 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
op to Hie dosing on Wall Street and 
do not rafted late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


12Montti 
HMhLflw Slot* 


5% 

IQQs HWi Low 


Bunt cage 


36 


351 


218 94 
247 113 
212 103 


11 , 
1.920113 42 

32 20 7 27 

331 43 2D 37 

17 1752 
.12 13 28 182 

12 59 

244 29 16 
579*102 
130 37 8 


23% 16 AAR 
17% 9% AGS 
14% 9% AMCA 

21% 13 AMF 
50% 24 fk AMR 
2114 18% AMR pf 
25% 23 AMR pf 
22 19 ANRpt 

14* 7% API- 

61% 38% ASA 
27 12% AVX 

38% 17% A2P 
60 34% AWLorb 

25% 20 AccoWd i 30 23 17 
24% 12% AcmeC 40 29 
10% 7% Aenwe 32b 4.1 

19 15% AdoEx 

20 13% AdmMl 

19 B% AdvSn 
41% 22% AMO 
12% 4% Advesl 
15% 9% Aerflox 

49% 32% AcfnLt 
57% 52% AotLpf 
37% 16* Atainns 

3% 2% Alteon 

57 42 A If Prd 

2»% 15 AkrtoFrt 
2% 1 AIMoas 

33% 27* AktPpfAin 124 
8% 4V. AlaPdpf 37 11.1 

82 43% AlaP pf 9X0 114 

106 96 AlaP of 1130 104 

75 57 AtaPpf 838 1T7 

16% 11% Atoascs 134 74 10 
28% n% AlskAIr .16 
25 11% Albrtos 

33(4 24% Albtsns 
31(4 2314 AJ can 
389k 27% AlcaSId 
32 20(4 AlesAlx 1X0 

25% 20% Alexdr 

89% 72% AlhiCp 1341 U 

28% 20(4 Ahjinl 140 67 

20% 14(4 Alain pf £19 l£1 

98 85 AMI pfC 1135 12.1 

34% 24% AllgPw 270 83 9 

23% 15% AllenG Mb 29 14 
44% 32(4 AlldCp 1X0 43 8 

44 57% AldCopf 474 104 

115% 101% AldCopflZBO 107 
104(4 >00% AldCpf 1137*11.1 


23% 15% AIM Pd 
40% 45% AlMStr 112 33 8 
12% 4% AJJfaCh 

34% 14 AllsCPl 
29% 21% ALLTL 134 47 9 
39% 29% Alcoa 130 33 31 
22(4 13% Amax .1 « 

40 32% Amax Of 3X0 V4 


15 BS 22 20% 22 +1% 

13 21 16 15% 15% 

2 11% 11% 11*4— % 

94 387 13% 13% 13% 

6 4315 48(4 47% 47*4— *6 

IB 23% 23 23% — % 

42 23% 23% 23%—% 

3 20(4 20U 20V* 

14 9% 9% 9% 

100 5L0 752 40 39% 39% + % 

J2 14 19 99 13% 13% 13% - % 

272 113 7 719 34% 24% 24% + % 

140 25 16 1409 57% 54% 57% + % 

294 22% 22(4 22% + % 

107 14% 13% 13% — % 

7 7% 7% 7% + (4 

17% 17% 17% — % 

16% 16% 16%— % 

12% 12(4 12% + (4 

28 27% 2714— % 

9% 8% 9% 

_ 13% 13% 13*4— % 

693 45(4 45 45 — % 

29 57 57 57 — % 

383 32% 32% 32% 

97 3(4 3(4 3(4 + % 

310 54 53% 53*4— (4 

198 22 21% 22 + (A 

32 2% 2 2% + (4 

A 31% 31% 3114 

41 8(4 7% 7% — % 

Sta 79(4 79% 79(4 
7740006(4 106*4 106% +1 
20z 70% 70% 70% — % 
39 14% 13% 14% + (4 
344$ 2*74 23 23% — 1% 

133 25 24% 24% — % 

56* 27% U 77%—% 
850 27% 27(4 27% + % 
129 35% 35(4 35% 

453 27% 27% 27% + % 
17 24% 24% 24% — % 
10 74*4 74*4 74% + *4 
309 21 2ffWi 20% 

22 18% 18% 18% — % 

1 93 93 93 

450 30% 30% 30%—% 

71 21% 21 21 — *4 

1384 42 41% 42 + % 

33 44% 44*4 64% 

2 112(4 112(4 112(4 + (4 
4982 10414 104% 104*4 


1X0 22 12 
40 17 11 
,10e AJ 


J6 

1JD 

1X0 


J 9 
15 19 
28 11 
4X 28 
14 12 
34 

22 


Prices Mixed in Quiet Trading 


United Press international Pantry Pride said it intended to sell “snbstan- 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York a 13 " <* assas ewept the beauty 

Stock Exchange closed mixed Friday in light products division. 


trading as investors focused their attention on 
takeover situations. 

Late buying helped the Dow Jones industrial 
average finish the day with a slight gain of 0.22 
to 1,318.32. For the week, the Dow added 5.60. 

Declines outnumbered advances by an 8-7 


SCM Corp.. the target of a hostile takeover 
bid by Hanson Trust, advanced IH to 66. After 
the dose, SCM said its board would am Sun- 
day to consider the offer. 

in auto stocks. General Motors lost M to 6654, 
Ford ft to 43ft. Chrysler inched up ft to 36ft. 


ratio. Volume sh runk to 1521 milli on from 90.6 ^ three companies reported lower mid- August 
million Thursday. car sales. 

Analysts said the market drifted in a general Phibro-Salomon fell 1 ft to 39ft after a major 
downtrend with takeover situations g en e rating brokerage house lowered its opinion of the firm 
much of the day’s activity. They saia advances to “neutral" from “attractive." 
earlier this week had amounted to a normal, Tektronix was the session's biggest loser, fall- 

reflex reaction to an “oversold" market. ing 4ft to 57ft after it said its first-quarter 

Some participants contended that , in face of earnings probably would not match those of 
negative economic news, the market had been ,ast year- 
doing well by h iding fairly steady. MCA was the day’s biggest winner, advanc- 

USF&G Corp. was the most active NYSE- 3ft to 67ft amid rumors that it had resumed 
listed issue, easing ft to 33ft. talks with RCA Corp. RCA has expressed inter- 

Sears followed, up ft to 35ft. “‘j 0 MCA- 

Tramway InteraaOoaal Corp. wax thud, add- “* ““ 3? » *» 




■'Vjl 


29 25% Earn* of 

50% 31% Eat Rea 17! U I 

17 9% Eouttoe .12 J 9 

1414 10(4 Ertmnt JO 25 13 

24% 1244 EssBsn M IS U 

29% 18% EfOBXC JOb 25 14 
31% 15% Eatrlne 71 19 II 

25% 12% EttlVls 34 14 W 

6 1*4 vtEvnnP 

9% 2V4 vIEvmpf 

12% 3% vIEvnpfB 

43% 32% B*CeV> 1J2 4.1 11 

1714 14 Exertsr 1X6el0J 


28 30 29 30 +1 

354 44(4 *3% 44 

35 13*4 13% 1314 + % 
149 12 1194 12 +% 

9 23 23 -B 

32 38*4 38(4 28% 

144 18*4 18 18*4 + % 

217 34 23*6 2316— .K 

30 1% 1*4 1*4— % 

16 2% 2% 2(4 

3 314 3*4 3*4 — (4 

185 41% 4114 41%—% 

13 17 17 17 


5414 41 Exxon 3X0 4 J 8 3546 50% 50% 50ft + % 


2794 21 HrzBopr2J4el05 «7 28 27% 

sr£ 14% HujS S io u 12 scan «4 45 
30% 23% Hofei in 2X0 BE 14 
42% 25% HouehM Ji 24 IS 
19*4 13(6 HOUR* 44 U 10 
39% 28*4 HnalPt 1XT SX 9 

86 48' Holntpf Z37 3X 

2?% 19% Hewind U* M 7 

■" 1X9*19.1 

40 23 31 

228 as 11 

40 U D 

XS 16 
J2 1 A 12 


70 52 PMC U0 

84% 45% FMCpf 2X3 
28 18*4 FPLGp 1X4 

T3*4 994 FoDCtr J» 

1414 10 Focet 

' 12 FoirctM JO 


39% 30 Faircpt 140 11X 

14*4 11% Folrtd .18 IX 9 

27 15% FortlCH 8 JB X 22 

38 23 FrWstF 8 

28(4 15*4 Fart* JO U 7 


33 34 90 44(4 45% 46 

27 1 82 82 82 + *6 

7 X 8 14437 25% 24*4 24% + % 

27 23 n IM IW HHi 

7 18 11 11 11 

17 1318 12% 1144 11*6— % 


15% 8- HauOR 
28% 14*4 HoeriCP 
27% 21% HiXjbrd 

RiSSOfn 

31% 20% HuntMT 
41% 26* 4 HirtTEP 
31* -T844 Hydro) 


5% 

45% 

39 29% 29*4 29% + 

12 40 3944 »* — 

78 15 14% 14* — 

229 34 35*4 35* — 

5 80 80 80 —t 

931 Z7% 27(4 27% + % 

21 10 934 9% — 

6 17*4 17% 17* — 

84 25*4 25% . 

317 10(4 «4 10% + 

123 13% 13*6 1M4— 

M „ „ 12 22% a% m— 

jn 23 14 3402 30V4 29*4 W — 

SO tJ 17 48 28*4 28*4 2W4 — 

J0 u JO 3090 35% 34*4 M*4 — 

2X0 S 10 41 29*4 29% 29% + 


'44 


1 


1.10 


34 22% AmHes 

2*a 1*4 ArtiAtH" 

21% 16 ABokr 
70 58% A Brand 3X0 

30% 2PA ABrdpI 275 
70% 59(6 ABnfPt 2X7 
115*4 56% ABdcst I JO 
30% 19% ABMM J4 
28% 20% ABuaPr M 
40% 45% AmCon 2X0 


4J 22 1090 
175 


42 18% 18% 18% — % 
205 56% 54*6 56% — % 
91 4% 4% 4% 

3 31% 31 31% +1 

24 27*4 27% 27% + % 
943 3414 34% 3444 + (4 
468 14% 14% 14%— % 
32% 32 32 —1(6 


iiL.awxiiu vi -j.. • r— .7 !26% * lAgital Equipment lost 1 to 99ft and 

mg 1% to 44ft. Nortek Inc sweeicned its hostile Cray Research advanced 1% to 49ft. 

SSrfif 545 a *■" from ^ other blue chips, AT&T lost ft to 

Nortek eased ft to 16ft. 21ft, U.S. Sted eased ft to 30ft. General Hec- 

Reiio^ the target of a hostile takeover bid by trie dropped ft to 6a and American Express 
Panuy Pride Inc^ fell ft to 46ft. Pantiy Pnde declined ft to 41ft. Eastman Kodak addedft to 
was unchanged at 7 ft. After the market closed, 44ft. 


12 Month 
High Low Slock 


0%. YKL PE 


Sts. 

1083 Httl LOW 


85 8 

9A 

AS 

IX 17 
as 14 
IS 14 
5.1 IT 


25*1 22 AConpf 2X0 II J 
52% 40*. A Con Pf 3X0 5.9 
114*4 103 ACon pf 13.75 1Z1 
20*4 17% ACOpBd 220 IdX 
30% 25% AConCv 251e 9J 
11 6% ACwitC 172 


27% 27% 27% — % 
1*4 1% 1*4 

.. 20*6 1944 1«*6— (4 
407 59*4 59*4 59% + % 
2 39% 39*4 79% — Vt 
I 60 60 60 — ' 

83115 114*4114% 

13 28 27*6 Z7% — % 

7 26 24 26 

715 57*4 56*4 57*4 + W 
5 24*4 24*4 24*4— (6 
IS 50% 50 50% 

I IU% 113% 113%— % 
54 20% 20(6 20(6— (6 
9 2716 27(4 27% — % 
92 7 6% 4% 


57*4 46% AC van 1X0 3A 15 2519 55% 54(6 55% + % 

27% 18% ADT .92 JJ 23 672 24(6 23% 24(6 + % 

24% 17% AElPw 2J6alO_5 8 895 21*4 21% 21*4— % 
49% 31% Am Exp 1JB 11 14 3036 42% 41(6 41% — % 

25% 12% AFamJ s A8 2.1 15 IBS 23% 23 23(6 + (6 

34(6 22 AGnCo 1X0 12 9 3200 3144 31 31%— % 

16 6% AGnl wt 49 1314 13 13V4— U 

54*4 51% AQnlflfA5J7allL4 200 56% 54% 56% + (6 

96% 42*4 AGnl PfB 530a 6X 143 84 83% 83%— 1% 

71*4 45 AGnpfO 2X4 AS 181 63(6 <2% 62(6—1(6 

17 10 29 32% 32(4 32% 

16 12% 12% 12*4— *4 
SO 12 3332 58*6 58% 58(6— % 
2 A 15 2347 4444 44% 44% — U 
71 9 553 90% 90% 90(6— % 
J H 442 84*4 84 84M + % 

U 11 1291 23% 23% 23% — (6 
7*1 3% 3 3(4 + % 

10 


1J0 


190 

1.12 


34% 2S*h AHerlt 
13% 7% AHaM 

44% 44*4 AHacne 
44% 34*6 AHOSP 
97% 70% Amrtch 
90U 42 AinGrp 
28% 18% AM) 
s Z% Am Mol 
29 18% AP reads JSt 1J 

13% 5 ASLFIa 


18% 12>6 ASLFI pi 119 111 
14 11(4 AShlp JO U f 

35% 24% AmStd 1X0 5 A 10 
47% 35% AmSfar M 1.1 10 
7B 44(4 ASIrafA 4J8 S4 
57% 51 AStr PfB 4X0 127 
24% 17*6 AT&T IJ0 U 
41% 32*6 AT&T Pi 3X4 9 A 
.42 33*4 AT&T Pf 174 94 

27% 14% AWalrt 1X0 88 B 
13(6 10 AWoSpf 1J5 114 
28% 1716 AmHoN 140 113 7 
72% 99% ATrPr 5X4 BJ 
18 6% ATrSe 

89% 46% ATrUn 
40% 26% Ameran 
50 24% AmasD 

29% 22% Amatek 
28% 18% Anttoc 
16 6% Amfesc 

49 50V6 Amoco 

38% 28% AMP 
23% 11% Am pea 
23% 12% Amreps 
34 21% AmSfh 

4516 30 Airnted 
4(6 1% Anaan 

24% 16(6 Anlog 


75 19% 18% 19 — % 
501 4% 4% 6% + % 

201 14% 14% 14% + % 
142 12*6 12% 12% + % 
161 »*4 29% 29*4 


155 50% 57% 57*4—1(6 


1 »» 4 B%- 


6 55% 55% 
54 16 7228 2144 71(6 
21 39 38% 


« 34% 25% 
■mi 12 12 



^ 4(6 + % 

5407 12 12 12 — % 

324 18% 17% IB +% 
2 48*6 48% 48*4— (6 

smmu* 


5X4 6J 4 82% 82% 82% 

1X0 42 8 25 jm 37*6 37*4 — 

70 X 20 2122 33% 41 41—1 


dose 
Quotaree 


12 Month 
High Law stock 


DH.lTd.PE Wh^iLflw 


aon 
QuctOide , 


Alt 


6% 3(4 BengtB 

8% 3% Berkev 

15 10% Best Pd SA IX 34 

21% 14(6 Be ms 11 .40 2J 

49% 37(6 BathS (pf 5X0 T1X 

24(6 (•% SethSt pf2XB 10X 

40% 27*4 Beverly 32 .9 19 

24% 19% BtaThr JO 3J 18 

24% 13% Btocfln 24 

25% 18% BlackD X4 

34% 21% BfcfcHP 1X2 

29(6 14% Blair Jn J8I 


5% — % 
8% 


228 5*6 5% 

443 8*4 8% 

805 13*4 13 13% — % 

301 17*4 17% 17% — (6 

A 45% 45% 45% 

88 23% 23% 23% — (6 

262 34% 34 36(6—'% 

345 24% 24(6 24(6 — % 

. 107 18% 17% 18 — % 

3A 16 1069 1B*6 18% 18% — % 
5.9 8 25 32*4 27(6 32*6 + (6 

161 18% 17(6 18% +1(6 


3X0 


59% 39% BIckHR Z40 A1 IS 108 58(6 57*6 5B — » 
50% 33% BoHnas 1X8 2J 15 3546 47% 46*6 44*8—116 


32% 24% OtoE _ 

18% 13% CwEpf 1X8 II J 
18% 14% CwEpf 2X0 11 J 
83% 45 CwC pfB 8X0 110 
76% 57 CMEpf 8JB 11 J 
24% 18% CwE Pf 237 9X 
24% 21% CwEpt 2J7 1U 
65*4 48*8 CwE pf 7J4 11X 
30% 19*6 ComES 252 9.1 4 

38*6 22% Comsat ISO IS 10 
35*6 2316 CPsvc SB IX 21 

is** 25 Cerapar JO U I 
24% 12% ComoSc 11 

44(6 11% Cphrai 


51 36(4 BoJseC 1X0 A1 20 

41 48 BotseCpf5X0 SX 

29% 18% BollBer .10 J 29 

42% 28% Bordens 1X2 AO 11 

24% 19% Borg Wo .92 4.1 12 

9% 4(6 Bomuia 16 

44% 28% BasEd 324 1.1 I 

85 45 BosEpf 8X8 11.1 

11% 9(6 BoiE pr 1.17 18L4 

14% 10% BosEpr 1X4 10X 

25% 19*6 Bowotr JI II » 

31% 24 BrtgSf 1X0 5-5 13 


TJ8 3S 16 2064 59V, 5B(4 5B%— *6 


JO ax 13 


5 

230b 5.1 8 

Ji 21 23 
JO 24 17 
12 

1X0 4J 9 
1X0 36 16 


71 23% 23% ^4 + 


90 24*6 24% 

12 7 7 7 

1221 55% 65% 65(6 

484 32% 3216 32% 

50 12*6 12 12*4 + *6 

136 22 21V 21V— V 


62 32% 32% 32% — 


27% 19(6 Anchor 
AllCIay 


£ 


it 

5X 

as so 

IX 14 

ax 14 


46V 29% 

12% 9% AndrGr JO 

27V 17 Anselfc xo 
34% 71% Anhowss JO 
71% 48*6 Anheupf 3X0 
19*6 13% Anljrtr SB 
15V 9 Anthem M J 21 
1516 10% Anthny .44b 2X 9 
13 9% Apache J8 26 10 

2 % ApctiP wt 

19% 15% ApctiP urtfLIO ITJ 
74V 55% ApPwpf 8.12 TJX 
34% 28% ApPwpf &18 129 
31% 26V ApPwpf 3X0 127 
39% 22% Apt Din 1.761 7 X 21 

15% 8 ApplMg 64 

24V 16V ArdhDn 

30V 24V AriPpf 

24% 14 ArkBrf 


24(6 14 Arkla 
ft V ArhiRt 


.14b 3 13 
3X8 11X 
X0 IJ 9 
1X8 57 25 


15% 11% Armada 
12V 4*6 Armco 

22*4 15% Armcpf 210 10J 

24% 14% AntnHo X8 22 8 

3*V 26V Arm Win 1 JO 12 9 

34% 19ft AraCp 1 JO 4J 7 

24% 12% ArawE JO IX 17 

30’m 14 Artre -22 J 157 
27 IS Arvlns JO U f 

27*6 1T% Asarcn 

37 23ft AtfllCHl 1X0 50 

45% 34% AlhlO Pf 4X0 10-1 

69% 49 AkIDG 2X0 4X 10 

110% 79 AucfQ pf 475 

24V 18% AtMane 1X0 

29V 21V AlCvEI 2X8 

44V 42 AtfRIch 4X0 

101 32% AfIRcpf 375 

m 100ft AURcpf 2X0 
18% 10% AttasCo 
31V 18V Auuat XO 
54V 34% AufaD! 

5 4*6 Awalann 

3TV 17% AVEMC 
39% 28V A very 
33 v 10 Awfoll n 
39% 27 Avnet 
OS'm 17ft Avan 
2Sft 16% Avdln 


X8 


XO 

2X0 


305 44% 43ft 
201 3% 3 3% 

153 22 31V 21V- % 

74 2S 24ft 25 + % 

44 41% 40% 40ft— V 

31 12% 12 12 +% 

- - 123 25*6 25% 25V 

7A 12 1901 32ft 32 12ft + ft 
S3 101 47% 44 47% +1% 
17 10 544 16*6 16% |«V 

40 14% 14% 14% + % 

14 15 15 15 

118 "St 

4157 10ft W*6 18*4 
BOz 70 70 JO —IV 

33 32ft 32% 37% + ft 

50 30 30 30 —ft 

489 23V 22 22V— ft 

47 14% 13V 14ft + % 
' 21V 21 21V + % 

30 30 30 — % 

aft 22 % 22 ft— ft 
19^ 18V 18ft + V 

12ft 12V 12V + V 
10V 10 19% — % 

20% 30% 20% — % 
15% 14ft 15% 

34 33V 34 + % 

34 28% 28% 28ft— % 
19 13ft 13V 13V 

5 2«i 24*6 24V— % 
120 23V 23% 23V 
387 22V 22ft 22V + V 
142 32V 32 32V — ft 

5 44V 44% 44%— % 
449 62ft 42V 42ft 

2 101V 100% 100%— ft 
7 Iffl* 19% 19% — V 

7* 27% 24% 27 — % 
2463 « 59V 99ft + % 

1758*100% 100ft 100ft 

3 M2% 142% 142% + % 

16 12V 12% 12V 
47 25 24% 24V + V 

876 50V 50 50% + *6 

108 4ft 4*6 4ft 
21 30ft 30V 30% 4- ft 
105 32% 32V 32ft 
954 24% 23ft 24 +1 

2*3 32% 32% 32ft— % 
508 21ft 21V lift + % 
118 21% 21 71% + ft 


1 

48 

747 

205 

4 

363 

2 

81 

163 


47 
BJ 10 
9X 9 
47 
37 
20 


IX 26 
IJ 21 
9 

1.9 15 
IJ 13 
13 
IX 17 
9.1 11 
IB 


.121 

XO 2X 10 
.a 5S 14 
J6 17 14 


17% 7ft BMC 
35% 22ft Bolrncn 

19V is BkrlnH 

24V 18% BoMOT 

2% *6 vIBoJdU 

10 2 vtBldUpf 

61% 33 % BoIICd 1X4 2X 14 

21% 11% Baity Mf JO 1.1 

lift 7ft BaltyPk 12 

46*6 33(6 BaltGE 3X0 79 8 

23V 16<ft BltGE wi 

43 38 Balt PfB 4X0 9X 

35(6 27*4 BacOne 1.18 3X 11 

5*6 2*6 BonTex 

« 64V Bandog 130 23 11 


55% 34 BkSos 2X0 U 

5 4ft 44V BfcBpfA 4Xle 9J 

53% 49ft BkBpfB .99a IX 
54 49 BkNE dpSXJelO.1 

47% 28*6 BkNY 2X4 47 7 

33V 18% Bank VO 1.12 43 8 

av 15 BnkAm X0 5J 

47 40 BkAmpf A91ellX 

16% 12% BkAmaf 2JB 
ffl% 25*6 BkARtv 2X0 BJ 13 

75* 45V BankTr 270 4.1 6 

13 8% Banner X3e J 15 

39% 19 Bard X6 IX 14 

19V BamGn X0 13 15 

41ft 23% Harriets UH 2X 10 

33% 17 BaryWr XO 29 15 

13*6 8*6 BASIX ,12b IX II 

35% 22ft Bausrfl 78 25 17 

17% 11 V BaxfTr J7 

27% 20*6 BavFIn SO 

3<V 23V BavSTG 2X0 

38V 31(6 Bearing 1X0 

34% 26*6 BoatCo 1X0 

64 48ft Beat pf 3J8 

15% 12% Becar X4 

5B% 35% BeetnD 1 JO 

.8% 2% Baker X9I 


51 8% 8 8 

416 25ft 34V 25*6 +1% 
582 17V 17ft 17V + V 
291 21V 21*6 21% + % 
827 2% 2 2 — % 

14 BV B% Bft- % 

101 61ft 41 61V 

706 17ft 17V 17ft 

15 ion 10*6 10ft— % 
586 43% 43% 43V— % 

28 91ft 21ft 21ft + ft 
44 45 44 +1 

61 33 32% 32V— V 

178 2ft TV 2ft + ft 
54 53ft 53 53*6 — % 


5 3482 48 47V 47ft— % 

4*53% 53ft 53% — ft 
38x 52V 51V 51V— to 
2 54 S3 54 — % 

282 43*6 43 43 — V 

159 27% 26ft 26ft — V 
4006 15V 15 15 — to 

48 <2*6 42V 42*4 + % 

lit 15*6 15 15 — % 

29 » , 28% 2Bft + V 

340 65*4 65ft 65% + ft 

2 lift 11% 11% 

65 34ft 34V 34ft— ft 

46 24V 24% 24% 

212 37 36 36V 

52 21V 20*6 20ft— V 
12 8*6 8 ft 8 ft 

. - .. 151 31% 30% 30V— V 

U 71 1672 14V 13ft 14V + ft 

X 144 4 24 36 26 

SO 9 28 32% 32 32V + ft 

23 13 8 34*6 34% 34V 

5J 7 >371 34 33% 33V 

5X_ 2 63 63 63 + V 

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187 29 28% 29 + V 

630 38ft 37ft 38% — % 
403 22% 22V 22%— % 
114 9% 9 9V + ft 

17 40% 39V 40 —ft 
170* BOV 80 80 —1 

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309 23% 23ft 23*6 + % 
54 29V 28% 29(6 + V 


39V 34% ConAas JO 
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15% 12% Conroe -40 
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9 24V 2<V 24V 
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100*61% 61ft 61ft— V 
25 27V 27% 27V + ft 
430 34ft 33% 3416— V 
989 29 28% 28V— % 

28 26V 25V 25ft— ft 
580 23V 23% 23V— ft 
1442 14% 14ft 14ft 


161 30% 30% 30% + V 
13 27% 27% 27V 
201 2ft 2 2 — ft 

82 26V 26 24 

39 39V 39% 39V + V 
1 2Sft 25% 25ft 
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154 33% 22 22 —ft 

30V 30V— ft 
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719 61ft 41 41ft + ft 
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601 50% 50V 58V 

97 11*6 11V lift + U 

624 64V 63% 63V— V 

104 17ft 16% 17ft + V 

80 2ft 2 2% + ft 

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38V 14V CnPprR 4X0 149 
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32V 24V CIGpf 
53ft 49% CIGpt 
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59% 25V CNA Fn 
lift 9V CNAI 
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25% 11% Co l Fed XI 
54V 35V CalPdPl 4J5 
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228% 150V GapCItS 30 
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24V 17V CorPIrs X0 3X I 

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207 50% 50 SO 
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48 21V 21 Z1V + ft 

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33 22ft 22% 22% + ft 

141 21% 20% 21V + V 

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S *» ^ *»: " 

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308 15V 15% 15%—% 
1195 31ft 71 aft + % 

2 51 51 51 

41 19ft 19ft 19ft 

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614 25 24% 24*6— ft 

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208 13V 13 13% 

20 1246 213 211 212 + V 


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360* 53 52V 52*6— V 

200* 54V 54 54 + V 

48 X 29% 29V— ft 
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26% 25V 25%— IV 
27V X% 24ft— % 
27% 24ft 26ft + V 
26*6 34% 26*6 + % 
17ft 17% 17ft 
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1Mb 16V 14V— ft 
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110 7Vi 7 7 — ft 

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27 35*6 35*a 35% 

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52 39V XV 39V 

9 15V 15V 15V 

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10 20V XV 20V + ft 

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24 12V 12% 12V +■ ft 

260 45V 45V 45% — % 

117 49ft 49 49ft + ft 
1 75 75 75 

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33 37ft 36ft J7ft + % 

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58% 58% 58ft— V 
29% XV 29% 

17% 14% 16V— ft 
44V 63% 64 
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124 12ft lift 12ft + ft 
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23 17% Fad Rtf 1X4 6J IX 14 22V 22% 22V + V 

19% 13% FriSonl JO 43 14 77 18% 18V 18ft 

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33 25V Fldcst 1X8 3X U X 29% 29 29V— V 

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6% 2% PnSBOT 106 6% 6% 4ft— % 

22% 16% Flresm JO 43 14 1998 18% 18% 1B%— ft 

27% 14 RAM 8 XS 28 9 100 25 24% 2456— ft 

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73 19% FstCMc IX SX 3591 23% 23V 23*6— ft 

18% 11 FtSTex X0 49 11 237 T2V 12 12V + V 

XV 8 FfCJty 9 75 9% W 9% + V 

24ft 10ft FPedA* X8b 28 8 345 24% 23V 24% + % 

40 X FFB 112 55 J X 57% 57ft 57ft + ft 

55% 38 PlnJTte 2J0 S3 7 2a 49V 48 <8 —IV 

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11*6 7% Ft Miss 34 28 9 651 Bft 8% 8% 

30 14 FINOfnn 19 26 29V 29** 29% 

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XV av PstPOPf 2X2 9X 79 28 27% X — % 

31ft 25% FrUnfib 1.96 69 IS 136 29 28% 2846 + % 

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5% 19% FfWbc 130 41 9 73 32% 31% 32 — % 

45 It Fbcbb IJQ If 87 34% 34V 34*6 + *6 

11% 8% PtahFd xse X a 11 11 IT 

43 23 RfFnGs IJ2 3X 9 27738%38%3M6 + ft 

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39% 38% F talma 1X0 28 13 87 37ft J7V 37V 

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45% 31 FIoEC .14a X 13 5 41% 41% 41*6 + ft 

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230 4.1 11 4 54 54 54 

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79% 56% FmcMd 1J4 
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28V av FruoMs 30 J 6 
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36*6 24V Fuqua X0 IJ ■ 


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49 1VV 19ft 19% + ft 
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689 9V 9ft 9V + ft 
4 96 19*6 18ft 18V— to 
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MB 24V 24 24ft— 1b 

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IS 30V 30% 30% — V 


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2% 19ft IlfPowr £64 10X 
20 Ml* tlPawpf £04 ia? 
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40% 30% ilPDWpf 4X7 I1J 
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8jL~ 4TV indIMpf 734 113 
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»6 19*6 TncflGSB £M 89 7 
l«b 4V Inexco X71 
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49% 42 IntgRaf &Jtal3J 
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lift 6ft IntHarv 
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42 a IntH pfA 
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35 av IntMott 136 
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71 27% 37ft 27ft— ft 

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41 32ft a 32 — ft 

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31V 19V CenHud £96 703 
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29% 19% CnLaEI £08 8X 7 
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56V 50 Chase pf 6X9allX 
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44% 27 QimNY TAB 6J 
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56* 51 OlNYpf AJBe 7J 
55% 49 aiNYpf 4J77e 7X 


692 22% Z1 ft 22% + * 
7B 10ft 10V 10ft + % 
132 31 30ft 31 — % 

47 23V 22* 73 — V 
365 27% 20* 26ft— % 
1 25% 25% 25% + * 
33 38% 38 V 38V 
92 7% 7 7 — % 

109 21 20 20 —1% 

95 28% » 28% + % 

83 3SV 34% 35% + % 

a 15% 15V 15V + V 

451 11% 11% 11% + % 

13 21 25ft 28 + % 

759 14 14 14 

7702 36% 35* 36% 

88 25ft 25% 25* + V 

741 119V 118% 119V— V 
10 43 42* 42ft— V 

709 9% 9% 9% 

5a 41* 41% 41* 

25 23ft 23% 23% — * 


23% 17 Dalles X6 
15% 9* Domonc 30 
30% 72 DanaCp 138 
9% 5% Dcnohr 

IS 9% Daniel .!■ 

. 25 DarfKrs 156 
76 31 DafdGn 

5% 4 Datjrtn 

12ft 8% DtaDsg 34 
72 14V Doyen 34 

45V 29% DoyfHd 34 ... 
20% 13% DayfPL 2J» 11X 8 
40% 24% DeanFd 56 15 18 


7 1340 25V 25 25% 

6 143 28V 28% 28% + % 

205 18ft 18% 78* + % 
105 24ft 24V 24V— % 
10 35 34* a — % 

272 13% 13% 73V + % 
47 20% 20 20% + * 

12 4 3ft 3%— % 

83 12% 12ft I TV— % 
59 IV* If* 19ft— V 
M 25ft 25V 25% + % 
186 20% 20% 28*— % 
931 23% 23% 23ft— % 

t 26V a* 26 

22 53 V 52V 53% + % 

« Kb w . . 

78 2% 2V. 2V— V 

3C % ft % 

V M ft M 
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4 47ft 47V 47V— * 
211 55ft 55» 55ft— % 
8 53ft 53% 53ft— % 
3 20% 20% 20% + % 
403 29ft V »% + % 
5 2990 39% *% 19% 

1 39 39 39 — % 

250 56V. 56ft 56ft— % 
340 54ft 54% 54ft— to 


33% 26 Deere 1X0 
26% 19% DelmP 173 
52ft 31* DeltoAr 1X0 
8* 4ft Deltona 
44% 23% DlxChs 1X4 _ 
28% 21% DenMfs 130 4J 13 
37% 29% Desoto 1X0 4.1 10 
17* 13% Del Ed 1JB 103 7 
80 60 Drte Pf 9J2 114 

64ft 48ft DelE P< 7J4 11J 
25% 20% DEpfF £75 107 
28% 21V DEprR 334 11.9 
27ft 20% DEpKJ 113 117 
37% 20% DE pfP 3.12 120 
25% 20% DE pfB £75 11X 
29V 22% DEpfO 3X0 1£1 
29% 22% OEptM 1X2 111 
»% 36 DEprL 4X0 127 
34% 27% DEPfK 412 717 
20% 15 DelE PT £28 UJ 
34 18% Oextor XO 07 II 

16% 10% DfGkW X4 43 
29ft 22ft DiGlOPf 235 7X 
21 15V orams 176 105 


t 17* 17* 17* + % 
51 11% UV 11* + % 
815 25% 24V 24V— % 
75 8% 8(6 Bft — ft 
125 9ft 9ft 9ft 
AS II 1016 35% 34* 35 + % 

16 209 37% 36ft 37% + % 
2179 5V 5 5ft + ft 
£7 10 50 9 SV Bft— % 

13 10 59 20ft 19* 2D A . 

17 16 1924 39% 38% 38ft— % 
‘ 246 18ft II (8% + % 
12 38% 37* 371b — % 


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sa% 35V Dleblds 1X0 2X 11 


3X 42 437 28% 28% 28% 

79 9 119 24% 34 24ft 
£1 7 1159 47* 47% 47% — % 
1152 8* 8% 8% + % 

27 II 624 39ft 38% 39% + % 
155 25ft 24* 25ft 
3 33* 33* 33V— % 
S72 16% 16V 16V— % 
15Qx 76 75 75 + to 

25ta 62% 62% 62V— % 
1 25% 25% 25% + % 
43 27% 26% 27% + % 
514 26V 26 26ft + % 
24 26 24% 26 + ft 

3 75 25 25 — V 

59 289o 27ft » + V 

23 28ft 27* 38V 

4 31% 31V 31% + % 
6 32% 32ft 32% + V 

13 20% 20ft 30ft — % 
18 21* 21% M*— ft 
54 15ft 15% 15% — % 
3 29 29 39 

2676 17 16% 16ft— % 


46% 14% GMES OS1 
43* a GMotpf £75 
51V 46 GMotpf 5XO 
... GNC .16 
15% 9 GPU 

9Z% 57 Gen Re IJ* 

14(6 6 GdRefr 
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13ft 10 GTFlpf 135 I0X 
13V 10ft GTFlpf (JO 10A 
7* 3% Gensca 
28ft 13% GnRod .10 7 74 

2 tv 17* Gensto 130 5.1 
26% 18% Gel pf 1X8 7 S 
28* GonuPt 1.18 3X 13 
27% TO GOPOC X0 £5 29 
37% 33ft GoPCPf £34 4X 
26% 24ft GoPwPf 3X0 113 
30 2SV GaPwpf lJ6e 6X 
30ft 24V GdPwOf 3X4 112 
37* 25* GaPnrpf £76 727 
23% II GaPwpf £54 117 
MV 17% GaPwpf 153 T1X 
26V 21ft GaPwpf 275 10.9 
66% 54 GaPwpf 7X0 12B 
47% 53 GaPwpf 772 111 
37% 20% GerbPd ' “ " 

21% 72% GertJS s 
28* 13% Getty 3 
12% 1% GIANT 

12% 7 GfbrFn 
27 17ft GMHIII 
64% 48% Gillette 
14% 11% G leasC 
14V 7 GfenFd 
1% GtoMM 


““S' 

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6 * 6 *— % 

368 16* 16% 16%—* 
5D 55% 55V 55%— * 


9% 7% KDJ 34 29 ID 246 8% Bft 8%— to 

IWb KLMs JllU I 619 19* 19% 19* + to 

43% 33% KM I pf 4X0 HJ I 41ft 41V 4 IV 

fl% 32% Kmart 7X0 43 10 1730 3J» n 33V + to 

40% 28 KN Eng 1X8 37 19 1H 39* 39% 3*6 

16% 12% KabrAl -1S( 


6 TWO 47 66% 


412 41% 48* 4Mb- *> 


54V + %i 

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13% 

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39% 32 Chex* 734 3J 11 57 37% 37% 37% 

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39 29ft Chevm 2X0 65 9 2080 36* 36% 36* + ft 


125% 85ft D tonal 
95 53% Disnev 

28% 15 DEIS 
6ft 4 Dtvrsln 
11% 6% Domes 
34(6 23* Dorn Re 

21% 16% Donato 

61* <3% Dan lev 
5% aft Dorsey 
42% 32ft Dover 
37% 26* OawCh 
50 36ft DawJn 
15V 11 Drava 
24ft 17% Dresr 
27% 75% OrexB 
65ft 37 Dreyfus 
61* 46% duPartf 
3S* 25% DukeP _. 

85% 67 Duke Of 870 707 
»% 63V Duke Pf 830 10J 


8 36ft 36% 36% 

6 9% 9% 9% 

126 35% 35% 35V— V 


8% GMNug 
IV GMNwf 
13% GWWF 
24% Gdrich 
aft 34ft Goatfyr 
lift 14ft GOTdnJ 
79 Could 
38% Grace 




112 


JOe 1.1 9 
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3.1 12 

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80ft 53% ChlMIpf 
29% 16% ChIPnT 
lift 7ft ChkFull 
54 2J% chriecr 

13% 5 Christo 

13V 9% Chroma 

56 44ft cnrmpf 
30% 25ft ChfYSlr 

77 44ft Chubb 

63% so* Chubb pf 435 
20V 12ft Church S X4 
^V 20 aicorp 232 

57 36% CtoSell ‘ 

19% 12% emoe 
34% 25 anGpf 
39% 27 ClnGpf 
59% 42ft ClnGpf 
75 55 CtnG of 

26% 18% CtoMlI 
37 26% aralK 

37 MV OrCJty 
30 15 Circus 

57ft 33% Cittern _ 

100ft 83V ClKPPtA9J5e 9J 
102 97V OtCPPfB&47e &4 

41ft 26* atyinv 7JDe 4 
9 6% Clahfr .73 103 6 

29% 8 CkdrSt .10 S 28 
33* D% Clark E 1.10 £5 33 
16 9 CTcyHm 14 

22H 17 CIvCM 1X0 SX 10 

a* 2i%avCiPf 2x0 pj . 

33* 15% OevEI £52 11X 6 

64 49% CtvBIpf 7X0 123 

44 V 51 CJvEIPf 7X6 12X 

16% 8ft Clevok JM 
17ft 10 CIVPkPf 1.111 
19 10 Chrpkpf ia 

mk 34* CJarox * " 

24% 14ft OvOMn 

saft 25 auetip 

av i6V Chief pf 

21V 12% Coacton 

36ft 16% Coast) I 

74* 39% Cocoa 

19ft 10ft Coleco 

22* 25ft C olu mn 

28* 22% CoipPal 

26% 25* Catpfwd 

34* 14* CotAIkS J4 U I 

25 13% CalPdgs .16 7 16 

29% 2Sft Col Pen 1X0 47 9 

65* 46 CMflnd £50 AS 9 

35 26ft CofGas 118 10X 

T09% 99% CSO Pf nl53S 140 

» . 22* Comb In £16 49 7 

37% Sft CmOEn 1X4 6J 10 

TP* 8 Comtfll 30 IX 10 
19% 15% ComMH J6 £1 16 


3 136 135ft 135ft— % 

15 63% 63 63 — % 

62 26% 26V 26V— V 
38 8% 7* 8% + V 

38 51ft 50* 51ft + * 

16 11* 11% 11U 

17 11* lift 11*— % 

2 55 53 55 + % 

1326 36% 35ft 36% + V 
53 70ft 70 70 + % 

2 60ft 60ft 60ft 


77 22* Dulcgpf 2X9 10J 

35* 29ft Du kept 3X5 11X 
87% 66 Duk pfM &84 10J 
toft 57% DunBrd £20 £9 21 
17% 12% DuqU £04 120 8 

18% 15* DM PfA £10 117 
IB 13% dmptk no 111 
20ft 14% DMPT £37 1£0 
25% 72 Duqpr 275 10X 
16% B% DYCOPt X0 4X 13 
»% 20% DynAm 30 9 11 


13 1431 100% 99V 99ft— I 
130 IX 40 539 88% 88 88% 

1X0 SX* 57 24* 24% 24* + ft 

3 59 5% 4* 5% 

1077 9% 9% 9%— % 

SX 9 14712 31ft 30* 30*— V 

£6 9 93 18% 18% 10* 

£7 15 407 55 54 54 — ft 

43 12 13 28% 28 20% + % 

2X 13 238 37% 36* 37% 

SX 14 1567 36 35% 35V + % 

IX 21 329 43V 43ft 43% — V 

19 598 13 12% 12V — V 

... 37 18 2689 21% 21ft 21* + % 

2X0 107 5 19% 19% 19%—% 

XO IX 13 169 58W 57% 58 — % 

3X0 S3 15 1297 57V 57 57V + % 

2X0 £1 8 693 33 31* 32 + % 

TOOQz 80 79 80 +1 

30001 75V 74* 75V +1% 


1J2 £9 

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709 76 75% 75* + * 

SO 17* 17 17% + * 

20fe 18 18 18 + % 

21 17* (7* 17*— * 
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5Sh 23V. 25 25% + » 

58 75 14% 15 + V 

100 23V 22V 23V 


21% 8* GtAFit 

18% 14* GtAfPc 
56ft 28% GtLkln 
21% 15 GNIm 
41ft 31* GtffNk 
29ft 19% GIWFln 
70 13 GMP 

29% 22V Green T 
30% 20% Greyfl 
49 37% Grevfi pf 4.75 18X 

6* 2% Grafler 9 

13* 9 GruwGs JO £8 16 
12* 6% Grub El JX J 15 

33* 24* Groom 1X0 £1 9 

27% 24* Grvmpf 2X0 7QJ 
7* 4% Gruntol .14 10 ’ 

27* V Gultfrd 
42 26V GffWsf 

19% 11% GU»Rs 
16% 10 GlfSfUt 
39 38% GKSU pf 4X0 113 

... 24 GlfSUpr £85 111 

35% £7% GtfSU pr 4X0 13X 


M 

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699 13* 13* .... 

398 84* 84V 84V 
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176 42* 42% 42% — % 
lllte 12% 12 12 — % 

95QzW 12% 12% 

94 4 3* 4 — % 

732 14* 14 14 — V 

107 23% 23V 33% + % 
2 22 % 22 % 22 %— % 
851 31* a 31 — % 

2279 23% 22 22V 

4 37V 37V 37V + % 

17 25% 25V 25ft + % 

200 27V 27V 27% + % 

W 28* 27V 2fl% + % 

9 29* 29% 29* + * 

7 22% 21* 21* 

67 21V 21*6 21ft + ft 

13 25% 25ft 25ft— % 
12SQz 65V 64 65* 

3009:64 63% 64 +1 

- 33* 33* 33*— % 
942 16% 15% 16(6 

24* 24% 34%— % 
II* 11% 11% + % 
B* 8* 8* 

22 21% a*— % 

119 60V 60% 60% — V 
15 12* 12V 12* + % 
~ 12V 12* 13V 
2V 2ft 7ft 
6* 6V 6V— to 

10ft 9* 9*— * 
2(6 2 2 — ft 

35 34 34ft— % 

32% 32 32ft 

28% ® a — % 
16% 16% 16% + % 
. . 26V 24V 26% +1% 
519 43% 42V 43 — ft 
114 31V 30% 30% — % 
17% 17 17 — V 

76% 15* 16% + % 
51V 51V 51V — V 
17* 17* 11*— % 
39% 38* 3Mb— 1% 

a* 86% at* + % 

19 18% 18*— % 

27 a% 26% — % 
_ 29% 28* » + % 

3*47% 47% 47% — % 
134 5* 5V 5* 

40 11 10% 10*—% 

iio n m nt 

1371 32V 32ft 32* + % 

I at* 34* 34* + % 
TO 5ft SV SV 

58 24* 24V 24* + % 


20V 15% KolsCe 30 13 
18V 15V KalCpf TJ7 7J 
13ft 7V Kaneb XO 4X 
103% 87 Kaneb pfl2X4el2J 
34% 16* KCfyPL £36 105 
39% 29 KCPLpf 435 I2J 
20ft 15 KCPLpf 230 I1X 
58 39ft KCSau 1J8 19 
19% IS KanGE £36 1£1 
41* 29* KanPLf £96 73 
ZJV 78% KoPLpf £32 99 
23 18 KaPLpf 233 93 

45 13% Kafyln 

20 13* KoufBr 

88 73 Kauf pf 

60 32 Kef km 

38% 33% Kellwd 


2% Kinol 
26 19V Kenml 

29* 21% Kvuni 

T6V 9% KorrGI 

26% 17% KorGpf 130 89 

33% UV KerrMc 1.10 33 


JO 

2X4 


296 IS* 15% 19%—* 
53 17 16V 16*— V 

1 17% 17% 17% 

100 Bft 0%-OU - 

5030*107 700 101 +1 

5 570x22ft 22ft 22% — % 

100* 35% 31% 35% + V 

2 19V 19V 19V + V 

• 90 58ft 57 58V +1V 

6 3481 18* 18 W 

8 284 37V 37 J7V + % 

2 23% 23% 23% + ft 

1 22 % 22 % 22 % 

179 IS* 75% 15*— % 

5 133 15V 15% 15%— % 

1 83 to 83 — V 

345 55* 55% 55ft + ft 

T70 37V 36* S7% + V 

3X 14 50 21% 21 21 — % 

9.1 9 197 27 »% aV + % 

4.1 33 10% 10% io* 

4 19 19 19 + % 

665 29V 29ft 29V + % 


X0 £6 
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1X4 3J 15 
1X0 33 7 


IX 46 I 


31* 17* KerBk 
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15V 12 Key Infs X8 £1 70 

£% a% Kttde 130 £5 9 

8SV 64% KldprB 4X0 5.1 

62% 43 KJmbCI £32 £7 II 

40V a KnoWRd 36 £.1 17 

29 23* Koffor ZjO 9.1 49 

29ft 74* Ktomor J2 IJ 49 

22% 17 Kopers £0 AS 

IM 97V KoporpflOXO 99 

76% 12% Korao J3e 3X 

46 35% Krooor £00 43 11 2434 43 43* <Xb— V 

24% 8% KiMms X0 £0 16 98 20% 20 20%—% 

a* 29ft Kyocer ,^e IX is a 31% 31* 31%^ 

23V 15* Kyeor J 45 7 35 19% 19ft 79% + to 


a 28* 28% 2S%— V 
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171 15% 15 15% + * 

303 34V 33% 34 

1 79 79 79 —2 , 

407 63* 62 63* + Vk 

715 3gb 36* 36V— V 
29 27* 27 27% — % 

ttt 17* 17V 17*— ft 

304 17* 17* 17V— % 
1 Wl 101 101 — % 

131 U* 14% IX*— to 


3X6 159 
535 103 
135 »X 


130 

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23 12 1938 40ft 40% 40* + ft 


13» 15% 14* 15 +%l 

6 1010 13* 13* T3tt 

IBM 39ft 3pft 39V + ft 
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19 33% 12ft 32*— % 


19* 14 Gulton X0 £5 11 18 17 UV 17 + ft I 


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16 48% 48V 48* 

994 18 (7% 17ft— V l 

100i32% 32% 33% 

I08E 38% 38% 38% +1% 
TOM 59% 59 59% + V 

1350Z 74 73% 74 — ft 

2*3 av av av + % 
436 32ft 31% 32ft + V 
258 23V 23* 23% + ft 
100 20* 20% 28%— % 
1503 46* 46* 46* + % 
191 90 98 98 

10 707 701 101 — % 

441 27% 27ft 27% 

34 7 6* 7 

131 av 21% 21* 

187 32* a* a*— % 
110 15 14% 15 + ft 

a Mft 2D 20 

3 21% 31% 21%— % 

751 73 22% 73 

2000X60% 60% 60% +1% 

IM 63 63 63 

94 12 11* Tl*— % 

4 14% 14% 14% — % 
19 13% 13% 13*— % 

251 39* 39 39*— U 

17 24 aft »V— % 
390 37* 37% 37ft 

7 23% 23% 23% — % 
90 13 13ft 12*— % 
288 32% 32 32ft + V 
7S9 71% 71% 71ft 
675 16% 16ft 16% + * 
178 28 27% 27%— % 

189 36V 26% 26*— to 
34 26% 36% 26*— * 
134 23* 23% aft— % 
57 22% 72 S% + % 
172 28% aft 28% + ft 
46 59% 51ft Bft— ft 
205 33 31% 31ft + V 

50*109 109 109 + to 

203 44V 43* 44ft 
*07 28% a 28V— to 
» 19* 19% 19% + to 
25 17ft 17% 17*— % 
1294 10% 9* 10 + V | 


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1X6 7X It 16V 16% 16V + to 

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1X4 4J 8 19 a% 23% 23*— to 

AA 22 60 7 7ft 19ft 1 9ft 

14 2144 11 10ft 11 
51 4to 4* 4% 

257 2% 2 V 2% 

18 21% aito Zlto— to 

71 54% Zlto 24 + Vb 

43 30% 30% 30% 

a* 21% EastGF 1J0 £7144 85 ZZ* 22% 27* + V 

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52 41ft EsKodS 230 5X 13 2460 46* 43% 44ft + V 

60V 47ft eofon 1X0 £5 7 Ml 55V, 55% 55% — ft 

15% 10 V Echllns 12 166 13 12ft 13 + ft 

37% 30 Eckerd 1X4 3X 14 9582 30V 30V 30% + % 

32V av EdtsBr 1X0 5X 13 1532to32ftSV + V 
18% 14% EDO XB IJ 14 51 16V Uft 16V 

34% 22ft Edward XO £8 14 327 29 23% 28ft 

34* 20% EPGdpf 2JS 93 S 2418 2AV. SAVt + V> 

»% 36* EPGpf £75 ISA 13 a* 38% »%— * 

ZJV a EPGpr 14 28% S% 28% — V 

i9v 10% errora M J n a it 17* ia + % 

12 BW Elcor M 39 5 9ft 9(u 9ft + ft 

5% 2V ElecAs « 14 4ft 4% 4ft + Mi 


32% »* HoltFB 
34ft 26V HaBjfO 

1% ft Hollwd _ — .. .„ 

17% 5ft Hofwdpf S6 5L5 20 

AS* 25* HamPs 1X6 3J 18 1584 

V5» 12 HmUS 1X701 OX 40 

21% 16* Hanjl U4a 90 48 

30 16V Handls J6 2X 12 920 

20% 16 HondH M OS 72 75 

21 U 16ft Hanna XO £1 a 17 

68* 33 HorBrJ IXO IX 17 

■ 21* Ha rinds X8 1.7 to 

7* HamWl » 

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37ft 24% Ham PfC 2.13 72 
33% IBft HrpRw X0 17 13 
35 24* Harris X8 £4 13 

18ft 10% KorGrn 8 

30V 71* Horace 1X8 4X 10 
39* 24* Hortmx 13B 3J W 
17V 14 HonSe 1X0 106 II 
25V 16% HowEi 1X4 7J 9 




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30* 19* El dm a X0 
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78V 65* EmrsEl £60 £6 13 
u* 8% Em Rod .941 93 11 

29% is* EmryA J 11 n 

S to W EmhorJ IXOb 4J 9 
to 15V EmnOS 134 8.1 7 

5% 4 Emppf SO 10S 

9V 7* Emppf SI 10J 
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32ft 24* EnsICp 33 £7 II 
20 10V EntoBuS 26 7.9 73 

29* 17* Enaarcfl IXO 6X 195 1564 23% S3 

M* 52% Enoch pf 6-15e7I3 36000x 55 54* 54* 

31* 17V Era Ex n X06 29 1*6 a* 20% 20% 

2% 1* Cnsrca 21 107 2% 2 2% 

73% »to Entera' 46 12* 13V 12% 

19* 15% Enlne 2JM153 140 16ft H 1S%— * 

a* 17* Entoxln TJ4 6J 11 267 20* 19* a - to 

a 19% Eoufxs 1.14 £4 17 2 33% S3to . 

6% 2% Eoutmk • 145 4% 4 V 4% 

22V 11% Eqtnkpf 2J1 11J f? 22 21 21 — 1% 


85 14* 14* 14*— % 
79 3ft 3% 3* 

423 71* 71V 71* + V 
224 10% 10* 10V 
387 (8 17V lift— * 

169 29 2SV, 2t + * 
32 31* »% 2IV + * 
1IBC 4ft 4ft 4ft — % 
400Z 9 0ft oft — V 
632 % % 

5<i 27 av av — * 
25 19 18* ia* + to 


.18 


XD 


1X0 


1X0 43 


n» 9 HovesA 
34% 22* Haztetn 
13* 9to HazLab 
30V 13ft HlthAm 
23% 21 HttCi-Pn 
22% 10* HltUSA 
15* 9* Hecks 

Uft 13V HectaM 
23* 14* Heflmn 
56ft V Heinz 
30 12ft HBJnaC 
34* 18 HefmP 
40ft K* HSrculS 
me 10% HeriiCe 
21 16% l lei inn n 

49% 20ft Herdnr 
Mto SV Hessfan 
12% 9 Heeftiuf 

41% 31V HewlPk 

33ft 74 Hex cel 
23* 13% HIShear 
13% 9V HTVolt 
24* 18% Hlinbrd 
73% 49% HIHen 
37ft 27% Hitachi 
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Hcralbvi^eribunc, 



ECONOMIC SCFIW 

Japan, the United States 
Need Their Interdependence 

b T kiyohiko FUKUSfllMA 

A v_i. 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 



U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 


** 


Page 9 



.t »s 


«. “:=i. 


i * SS 




ImIIa^TVnT*^ remains hisl 

cyclical econo my ^ TW^ 011 in the event of a 

high interest !5ea vSEF* J h 2**„ ,he now "“nffiar Pattern of 
SiVaSU 4°“? and bloated US. trade 
ovcr this atna^^jJ^-S^Lri ** ahead- Frustration 

JME** — 

“V*™* ?nd the kragan ad- IT : 

“miration are motivated by Reducing the degree 
efficntia% the same economic t • . j jT^ 

ph^^phxes. of mferdependence 

has won ^ hurt Japan and 

IX d vS t b aVTc?SI United States 

During the last five Severely, 

y^ars the Reagan adminlstra- . Z, 

ktu^-pk c ■ ^ jcej ^ to do the same. Ironically, Japan’s 

SKS?, controlling its budget deficit has explicated US. 
efforts to restore fiscal balance p 

. ^^^ trast to its position at home, the Reagan administration 
-Das oeen urging Japan to stimulate domestic demand. But since 
toe movement toward reducing the budget deficit and reforming 
toe government is deeply rooted in Japan, chances of such «*«ng* 
m Japan s macroeconomic policy are slim. 

iot^PttL 5 ^ tcrent < ? rivc for snudlcr government started around 
,y7i - The burgeoning budget deficit after the first ofl crisis set 
sorra thinkers in Japan to publish an article, “Stridde of Japan,” 
which inveighed against the growing tendencies of dependence 
on government among the younger Japanese. The article called 
for self-reliance, discipline and hard work to build a better future. 

\\T ITHIN the Japanese leadership the uncontrollable bud- 
get deficit soon became public enemy No. L Successive 
Japanese prime ministers tried different methods to com- 
kfSl 4 ’ Fuloida, who took office in 1976, tried to grow out 
of the deficit by s timulating the economy through more spending 
based on the locomotive theory popular in the Carter years, and 
failed. Masayoshi Ohira’s proposarfor a tax increase led to an 
electoral setback for his party m l 979, a year after he took office.* 
Logically, there was no choice left for Mr. Ohira’s successor 
but to cut sp ending . Since Zeuko Suzuki pl«*!yd to pursue this 
path when he took over in 1980, the movement for smaller 
government became official government policy. An authoritative 
council on government reform was set op with wide public 
support. 

After Mr. Suzuki resigned in 1982, his successor, Yasuhiro 
Nakasane, at one time the state minister for government reform, 
became the advocate of this political and economic thmlcwig . a 
factor that helped him to succeed Mr. Suzuki. With this back- 
ground, Mr. Nakasone was able to freeze or reduce all govern- 
ment spending in nominal terms for three consecutive years 
except lor miHtajy expenditures and a few other items. 

This has gradually reduced the govenimenf s borrowing as a 

' ^Jhparfs di5vti?OfsiBaIIer govemmerithasinore than 10 years of 
consensus bmkHngbehind icFor Mr. Nakasooeto reverse course 
in response.to foreign political pressures might well be a formula 

for political suicide. 

As the Japanese government's borrowing decreased, surplus 
private funds became available for overseas investment. At the 
same time, Japanese corporations sought to increase their exports 
to compensate for reduced government spending. 

In the United States, in contrast, a dramatic jump in interest 
(Coattaoed on Page 13, CoL 5) 


| Currency Rates 


Aug. 23 


BnKstitln) 

Frankfurt 

UfUMiCU 

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Now Yoric(e) 
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Tokyo 

Zvrfc* 

1 ECU 
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Currency Wsr USS 

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11W-12W 


Aug. 23 


Icahn Hag 
50 . 3 % 

Of TWA 

Move Apparently 
Assures Takeover 

CarpHed by Oar Staff From Dtipatcha 

NEW YORK — Carl C. Icahn, 
the New York financier, raised his 
interest in Trans World Airlines to 
50.3 percent of its outstanding 
shares on Friday, a move that ap- 
peared to give turn a victory in ms 
struggle for control of TWA. 

Mr. Icahn raised his stake from 

abouTv7.49 million sharefoPibe 
approximately 34 J million shares 
outstanding, a spokesman said af- 
ter financial markets had dosed for 
the week. 

The spokesman, Peter Rosen- 
thal, refused to discuss Mr. Icahn's 
plans, and Mr. Icahn was unavail- 
able for comment. 

Earlier in the week, after the 
TWA board refused to adopt pro- 
posals that would have been favor- 
able to a rival bidder, Texas Air 
Corp^ Mr. Icahn said be would 
seek to seal control of TWA by 
increasing Ms hniHfngc to more 
than 50 percent. 

It is bdieved that he purchased a 
930.000-share block of TWA stock 
that traded Friday at $22-50 a 
share. 

TWA ended the week at S22J75 
a share, unchanged hum Thurs- 
day’s dose. 

Mr. Icahn previously offered to 
buy the TWA shares he did not 
already own for $24 a dure in cash, 
but he also said he would enter the 
market to buy shares at tnore favor- 
able terms. 

Texas Air offered $26 a share for 
TWA, but was opposed by the 
company’s unions, winch negotiat- 
ed wage concessions with Mr. 
Icahn. 

Mr. Icahn reached the agreement 
oo Aug. 5 with leaders of TWa’s 
two largest unions, the Internation- 
al Association of Machinists and 
Aerospace Workers and the Airline 
Pilots Association. 

The agreement, calling for em- 
ployee concessions in return for 20 
percent of the company’s stock, re- 
quired Mr. I cahn to take connuol 
of TWA and keep its assets largely 
intact during the three-year pact 
Directors of TWA decided on 
Tuesday not to Mock Mr. Icahn's ■ 
offer and refused to grant Texas 
Air options to boy the airline’s 
valuable assets. 

Some WaS Street sources bad 
said that Texas Air Corp. and 
Icahn representatives had been ne- 
gotiating an agreement under 
which Texas Air would drop its 
offer for TWA 

Mr. Icahn confirmed in an inter- 
view TMirsday that the talks with 
Texas Air were going cat 

(AP, UPI, Reuters) 



Motorola’s Changing 
Business Mix 

Corapartaonol IftTBond t(S« 
Qparafcng toconw by boMms 
aeflnmn 

1979 


Sam&ondiictora CMmwnfcatkmi 
47% 39% 



brtotnafloD Systems 10% 
1984 


Semiconductor* 

64% 



<a*pmwtkw>SY*a«k T% 

■ Otw proaiets Adu6» wnMfta m 

Th* Now Vert Tims 


Gopal TalatL, a systems tester for Motorola, checking a cellular mobile phone. 

Motorola in the High-Tech Market 

Analysts Optimistic After Decade of Ups and Downs 


By Steven Greenhouse 

New York Tunes Service 

CHICAGO — For many middle-aged Ameri- 
cans, the name Motorola evokes memories of their 
fust television set or car radio. These days, howev- 
er, Motorola is making its mark in the high-tech 
world of semiconductors, computers and mobile 
phones. 

But Motorola's technological expansion in the 
past decade has not always gone smoothly. And 
today, the company is plagued with problems in 
the very businesses that it is counting on for fast 
growth in the future. 

Low-priced cellular mobile phones from Japan 
havejproduced losses for Motorola’s mobile-phone 
division, notwithstanding its 40-percent market 
share. Four-Phase Systems Inc, Motorola's com- 
puter unit, which is also in the red. laid off 500 
employees last week. And a worldwide slump has 
hurt Motorola's semiconductor division even 
though that unit is weathering the downturn far 
better than many of its competitors. 


As a result of these problems. Motorola’s earn- 
ings dropped to $26 million in the second quarter, 
from $98 million in the second quarter of 1984. 

Despite the turbulence in the marketplace, Rob- 
ert W. Galvin. Motorola's chairman, boasts that 
the company, which had revenues of S5.5 billion 
last year, will remain on a fast-growth track. In 
1980, Motorola had net sales of $33 billion. 

“I suppose that by the turn of this decade the 
corporation should be doing something on the 
order of $10 billion worth of business and some- 
time in the cuddle '90s potentially double that,” 
said Mr. Galvin, 62, the son of Motorola’s founder. 

Mr. Galvin scoffs at suggestions that any of his 
company’s ailin g divirions face long-term prob- 
lems. “The businesses that we're engaged in stiB 
have a tremendous life ahead of them," he said 
from Motorola's headquarters in Schaumburg, Illi- 
nois, 30 miles (48 kilometers) northwest of down- 
town Chicagp. 

On Wall Street many analysts share his opti- 
(Cootinned on Page 1L, CoL 1) 


Guinness Wins 
Stru ggl e for 
Control of Bell 


By Bob Hageny 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Guinness PLC an- 
nounced Friday that its £360-mU- 
lion ($5 04- million) takeover bid 
had succeeded in gaining control of 
Arthur Bell & Sous PLC, a distiller 
of whisky based in Perth, Scotland. 

Guinness, a brewing and retail- 
ing company based in London, said 
acceptances counted so far had 
raised its stake in Bell to about 65 
percent. 

The victory by Guinness ended a 
two month straggle that was more 
bitter than the company’s famous 
black stout. The two companies at- 
tacked each other through press 
releases and full-page newspaper 
advertisements with a ferocity un- 
usual even by the aggressive stan- 
dards of recent British takeover 
battles. 

Guinness made a slogan of the 
phrase, “Bells has lost its way.” 

Bell retorted that “Guinness's 
publicity masks its basic weakness- 
es in burin ess and management 
methods.” 

But Guinness was able to score 
points by stressing the sluggish 
growth of Bell's earnings per share 
in the past three years, its failure to 
make rapid gains in the U.S. mar- 
ket. and a decline in its share of the 
British market, although Bell re- 
mains the biggest- selhng whisky in 
Bri tain. 

In recent years, Guinness has 
been trying to reduce dependence 
on the slow-growing beer business, 
which provided 85 percent of the 
company's operating profit in the 
six months ended in March. Thus, 
many observers initially were sur- 
prised that Guinness chose to pur- 
sue a company in an even more 
sluggish business, Scotch whisky. 


Big 3 U.S. Automakers Start Interest-Rate War 


By Warren Brown 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The Big 
Three automakers in the United 
States, in an effort to reduce bulg- 
ing inventories of 1985 cars, have 
begun an interest-rale war that 
could give buyer, some of the best 
financing terms since the recession 
of 1983. 

Chiysler Corp. is offering 15- 
percent financing on a wide range 
of cars and trucks, and General 
Motors Corp. and Ford Motor Co. 
have put a 7.7-percent yearly fi- 
nancing rate on many vehicles 

The cut-rate financing is being 
offered only on 1985 models in 
dealer stocks. Dealer lots are swol- 
len now by 600,000 cars that were 


manufactured during the auto- 
transport drivers strike that ended 
Monday. 

The strike by Teamsters who de- 
liver cars to dialers worsened what 
was already turning into a trouble- 
some oversupply of cars for the 
three companies. Their sales are off 
largely because of increasing diffi- 
culty in selling mid-size and luxury 
cars. 

‘Their sales were down about 10 
percent from a year ago some 40 
days before the truckers' strike,” 
said Arvid Jouppi, president of Ar- 
vid Jouppi Associates Inc., a De- 
troit concern that analyzes devel- 
opments in baric industries. “The 
truckers’ strike, was just an inci- 
dent-” 


Mr. Jouppi said there was evi- 
dence that buyers with family in- 
comes of $22,000 or more — the 
people who led the US. auto indus- 
try out of its recent recession — are 
beginning to spend money on 
things other than cars. 

Aube same time, there is heated 
competition between domestic and 
foreign makers for buyers .at the 
lower end of the market, he said. 

GM, the biggest U3. car compa- 
ny, has seen its overall UiL market 
share fall to 563 percent during the 
first six months of this year from 
593 percent during the same peri- 
od a year ago. 

Ford increased its market share 
from 23.8 percent to 25.1 percent 
during the period, and Chrysler 


franc <« Amounts needed to bur one pouna 

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c Sterttw: 1 (BntssebH: Sanaa Common** itatkmo IMOml: Sam No- 

(Tokyo); IMF (SDR); BAt, (tenor, rtyat rfraanu. 

other data from Reuters andAP. 


Soviet Price 
For Grade 
Said .to Rise 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The Soviet 
Union, the world’s largest oil pro- 
ducer, has notified European cus- 
tomers that it is raising the price ol 
its main export crude oil by 25 
cents a band to $2635, effective 
Sept. 1, industry sources said Fri- 
day. 

The mow by the Russians, who 
keep prices dosely in fine with mar- 
ket conditions, followed an in- 
crease of 50 cents a barrel for Urals 
crude in mid-August. 

The Soviet Union does not pub- 


U.S. Banks Tighten Controls After Hutton Case 


ECU SDR 
IWh 7th 
ntra 7 th 
IMt. 79. 
IM«- 79b 
8*-9 . B 
Uonts Bank (ECU); Reuters 
(orooutvoimn. 


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France 

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Source: Rooters. 


’ZSIZSZS '**' » 

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Source: Morritt Lynch. Tolerate. 



for oiL cos of its main sources of 
hard currency. The sources said 
their companies had been informed 
of the latest price change by telex 
messages. 

John Lichthlau, executive direc- 
tor of the Petroleum Industry Re- 
search Foundation in New York, 
said the move “shows the market is 
quite strong at the moment." Oil 
prices on world markets have been 
amring higher in the past month. 

Urals oil for Angust delivery was 
quoted Friday in the spot or non- 
contract market at $26.45 a barrel, 
according to Tderatc Energy Ser- 
vice, a private market information 
company. 

Mr. UchtUan said the higher 
prices are not a sign that demand 

rather reflect the low level of sap- 
plies available as the fall heating 
season nears. 

The Organization of Petroleum 
Exporting Countries has been 
holding its production down in an 
attempt to defend official prices. 

Arabian light oil, the OPEC 
benchmark, was quoted at $27.45 a 
barrel on the spot market Friday. A 
month ago, Arabian light crude 
was hovering around S27 a band. 
The official price is S28 a band. 


By Steven E. Prokesch 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Until EP. Hut- 
ton & Co. pleaded guilty in May to 
overdrafting many of its bank 
checking accounts, a son of laissez- 
faire attitude existed in the casb- 
mananeme nt relationships rtf many 
U.S. hanks and corporations. 

The bankers blew that corporate 
clients were testing the limits of 
dectronic funds transfers and other 
sophisticated systems to maximize 
interest income on their cash. But 
they trusted that the new breed of 
corporate cash managers would not 
deliberately deceive them. 

Now, however, that trust is fast 
disappearing. Fearful rtf being ex- 
ploited, small banks are beefing up 
their techniques for keeping tabs 
on corporate accounts. Many big 
banks are finally putting to use the 
monitoring systems that already 
have. And both bankers and corpo- 
rate officials are taking no chances 
about what is, and is not, permissi- 
ble under cash-management ar- 
rangements. 

As a result, they are detailing the 
exact nature of their relationships. 

“Bankers are bring more vigi- 
lant** and “wffl be more circum- 
spect and less trusting of large in- 
stitutional accounts in the future,” 
predicted George Lula, a vice presi- 
dent in the financial institutions 
department of Mellon Bank NA, a 
major provider of credit and oper- 


ating services to the financial ser- 
vices industry. 

He said that managements at 
both large and small banks had 
been guilty of “management over- 
right” in not using the systems they 
already had in place to monitor 
their corporate customers. 

At the same time, “a number of 
corporations are taking a hard look 
at all their cash- management prac- 
tices, to make sure they’re not do- 
ing some of the practices that were 
listed in the E.F. Hutton case,” said 
Elliott C. Me En tec, the Federal Re- 
serve's associate director of opera- 
tions. 

“We have not changed any- 
thing,” but “we took a step back to 
look at what we were doing,” said a 
cash manager at Southland Corp„ 
who asked not to be named. 

Paul A Volckcr, chairman of the 
Federal Reserve Board, was the 
first to suggest that the Hutton case 
hari caused other companies to act 
more conservatively in the way 
they deposit and transfer funds. He 
suggested, on July 16, that this 
might explain why the money sup- 
ply rose sharply in May and June. 

But some bankers say the rise in 
corporate balances has much more 
to do with declining interest rates 
than Hutton. Instead of paying fees 
for a bank’s services, many compa- 
nies agree lO maintain a wiiniiwiitn 
balance anil in effect, compensate 
the bank for its services with the 
interest income that the bank can 


earn on the money. But because of 
the fall in rates in recent months, 
banks have been steadily raising 
“compensating balance” require- 
ments. 

But since the Hutton case, some 
hankers say corporations are keep- 
ing more money in their bank ac- 
counts and appear to be more con- 
servative in thai use of the “float” 
— the tune lag between when a 
check is written and when the 
funds are actually drawn from an 
account 

Hutton's principal offense was a 
scheme to create mure floats — said 
to be as much as $270 million a day 
— without its banks' knowledge or 
consent, thereby providing Hutton 
interest-free use of bank funds. Ex- 
cessive use of float without a bank’s 
permission is illegal. Hmton creat- 
ed the float by overdrafting its 
bank accounts and also by transfer- 
ring funds through a series of small 
banks before depositing them in a 
major money center bank. Many of 
the smalt banks hurt by Hutton’s 
scheme knew what was going on, 
but looked the other way because 


Hutton was such a big customer. 

“We have seen a lessening of 
companies drawing on uncollected 
funds since the Hutton deal,” said 
John Shivers, chairman of South- 
west Bank in Fort Worth, which 
has assets of $104 nriHion. 

“Definitely, corporations are not 
being as aggressive in their draw- 
down practices as they used to be, 
because of EF. Hutton,” said 
Zadrie Wisdom, a senior rice presi- 
dent at Interfirst Bank Dallas NA. 
The bank’s commercial demand 
deposits increased 5 to 6 percent in 
the months following Hutton’s 
guilty plea. 

And NCNB National Batik, 
which operates in Noth Carolina 
and Florida, has a similar explana- 
tion for why its corporate ana com- 
mercial deposits rose 10 percent in 
the second quarter. 

“I 

ing it a little more 
until everything settles with the 
Hutton situation,” said Buddy Lc- 
Toumeau, a senior rice presidenL 
“This lias served as an attention- 
getter, to say the least” 


OJA. 


Aug. xt 

pm- area 

bus —aw 

- - 4 * 

, mu -*» 

3)4.15 3J47S — OSff 

33140 SUBS —645 

Hta-v** - m* .+* 

York come* currant 

source: Reuters- 


tusteh 
LBHfMI 

urn* Ywr* 


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* men me j* * 


<Waddt% 

Housec/Bea 7 : 

AdparfH «■ rtw WiihinRHjn Wirw'ft I 
. OUK »efa.YE6it wS 


LOEWS MONTE-CARLO HOTEL 
IN MONACO, and 

Loews La Napoule 

ON THE BEACH NEAR CANNES 

are pleased to announce 
the installation of a fully operative 
satellite communication system available 
for any worldwide communication link '• 
including video conference world news ! 
now available dally in all bedrooms. I 
For further enquiries , please cad | 

S3 (93 ) 50. 65. 00 extension S7032 j 

director of sales 



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went up from 12.1 percent to 14 
percent. Analysts believe that Ford 
and Chrysler gained at GM*s ex- 
pense. 

GM began attempting to recap- 
ture pan of the lost business in 
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Gourmet Stores 
ToBe Acquired 

liumutthmoi Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Ernest 
Saunders, chief executive of 
Guinness PLC, said Late Friday 
that the company expected to 
acquire Hediard SA, a Paris- 
based maker of gourmet foods, 
for about £10 million ($14 mil- 
lion). 

He said the company was be- 
ing acquired from the family of 
Philip Bronon. who would con- 
tinue to manage the business. 
The sale is subject to French 
it approval, but Mr. 
iders said he expected to 
complete the transaction 
Wednesday. 

He said Guinness aimed to 
expand sales of H&diard prod- 
ucts in the United States. 

But London investment analysts 
say the acquisition will give Guin- 
ness another steady source of profit 
and provide the financial strength 
needed to pursue more aggressively 
its expansion in higher-growth ar- 
eas, such as retailing and health 
products. 

“It’s easier to do things if you’re 
starting from a larger base.” said 
Colin Humphreys, an analyst at the 
stockbrokerage of Scnmgeour 
Vickers & Co. 

The combined company will 
have annual sales of about £1.5 
billion, and John Spicer of Grieve- 
son. Grant & Co. forecast that it 
would produce pretax profit of 
£140 million in the year ended in 
September 1986, up from the £85 
million Guinness is expected to re- 
port for the current fiscal year. 

The acquisition of Bell marks the 
peak of a diversification drive lhai 
has extended Guinness into opera- 
tion of cigarette, candy and news- 
paper shops and health spas and 
manufacture of vitamins and di- 
etary products. Guinness officials 
insist that this drive is belter found- 
ed than a pell-mell diversification 
pursued bv the company in the 
1960s and 'I970su 
Ernest Saunders, a former top 
marketing executive for Nestle SA 
who took over as chief executive of 
Guinness in 1981, spent much of 
bis first three years undoing the 
earlier spree. He oversaw the clo- 
sure or sale of about 150 operating 
companies, extracting the company 
from such fields as film finance, 
baby clothing, vacation camps, 
confectionery and plastics. The 
company continues to publish its 
Book of Records, however. 


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sv-*7 r-,*" 









Page 10 


DVTERWATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 24-25, 1985 




Fridays 

MSE 

Closing 

Tobies include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


It Month 
Wgi Law Slock 


□hr. YU. PE 


Sis. 

iibshWi lw 


am 

Qumaiw 


13 7m Rowan 
67% 40 RovID 
17 OK, RoylnlB 
5% 37ft Rubrmd .90 
27V. 24V, Bubmdwl 
« 1*% RUMBr 

2M4 15% RusTOfl 26 
3lta 17 Rvanh 140 
30ft 22 RvdWB 40 
2 17 R viand 46 

20ft 8ft Rymor 
13ft lift Rvmerofi.17 


.12 14 51 437 Sft 8ft 8ft 
1070 50 7 1047 OIK. 41ft 41ft 4- ft 

16 103 13ft 13ft 13ft— ft 
1 4 IS 382 52ft 52 52ft — ft 
0 26ft 96ft 26ft— ft 
13 111 20ft 20ft 30ft— ft 

IB 10 110 17ft 10ft TOft + ft 

U 11 16 2716 27ft 27ft — ft 

2.1 13 607 20 28ft 28ft— ft 

U IS 233 24ft 34 24 

S 77 TOM 17ft 17ft 

90 14 12 lift lift 


12 Month 

WMiUm Stock 


CHv. YM. PE 


Sb. 

HUE HMD Law 


Close 

QuoLCftHel 


(Coa tin ued from Page 8) 


10 

.16 3J 
1.13 U II 
42t 24 50 
3 

-64 4.9 13 
.16 1j0 14 

20 u a 


2 36 
246 


13 


2lm lift ParkEI 
0ft 4ft ParkDrl 
39ft 2B'i ParkH 
20ft 14ft ParkPn 
2ft lft PotPtrl 
16% lift PavNP 
23ft 14 PovCsh 
lift 6> PeaMv 
lft ft Penuo 
58ft 43ft PenCen 
S5b 44ft Penney 
27ft 22ft PoPL 
40ft 30ft PoPLpf 440 11.7 
40ft 31 PoPL pt <50 11 J 
20ft 24ft PaPLdDi043 115 
27ft 21ft PaPLdprAOO 115 
72ft 58 Pa PL or 040 11J 
28ft 23ft PaPLdprtJS 115 
31ft 25ft PoPL dpr&TS 12L2 
.91% 70 PaPLPf »2t 105 
1« sift PaPLprll.OO 115 
JJH 55 PoPL pr RH0 111 
74ft 50ft PoPL nr 070 11.0 
41ft M Pem.ll 250 55 12 
aft 20 Panwof 140 45 
SO 28ft Pemzol 250 44 30 
21 72 Pcm pfB 500 95 

18% 18ft PeonEn 150 75 7 
Mft 14ft PepBvs 10 

60ft 30ft PensKo 15S 
30ft gift Perkgl 54 


9ft 7ft Prmion 53a 105 6 

24W 15ft PervDr 58 15 16 

*L. 2* Petrie 1 40 3.9 14 

Wfc 24ft PetRs 172*144 

17 14 PetRs pf 157 95 

2ft Ptrlnv 5Se201 

S3ft 33% Pllier 140 3.1 

24 177. PhelpD 

55 34 P help nr 5X0 9.7 


30 13ft 131% 13'*— ft 

230 5 4ft 4ft 

94 34 33ft 33ft + ft 

323 21 20ft 30ft— ft 

43 2ft 2ft 2ft— ft 

47 13ft 13 13ft 
268 16ft 16 16ft + ft 

’S "ft ,o s 

184 53ft 51ft 53ft + ft 
366 48ft 48ft 48ft 
336 36 25% 25ft— ft 

JltJz 37V, 37ft 37ft 
SOz 38ft 38ft 28ft 
36 30 29 30 

7 26ft 36ft 26ft — ft 
160z 72 71 72 +3ft 

2 28ft 38ft 26ft 

3 30ft 30ft 30ft 

6002 90ft 89ft 90ft + ft 
190z 09ft 98 98 —11% 

130z 67 66 66 + ft 

1002 73ft 73ft 73ft +lft 
71 38ft 38ft 38ft 
10 23ft 231% 23ft 
600 48 47ft 47ft 
lOOOz 87ft 87 87 — ft 

81 16ft 16ft 16ft— ft 
.. 300 23 22ft 23 + ft 

AO 11 1175 59 Tl SSft 58ft 
25 13 60* 26% 25ft 25ft — ft 


6SV% 37ft SCM 200 
32ft 10ft SPSTec 50 _ 

T9 ft 15 Sabine JM 5 44 

21ft 16 SobnRv 156o145 

20ft I2Vi Slades JO 14 17 

lift 5ft SfsdSc 23 

7ft lft SfodSwt 
38ft 23ft Sol Kins 40 1.1 24 

34ft 24ft Safewv 1X0 5.1 10 

24ft saga SI 1 9 13 

— 16ft StJ»LP 152 85 7 

’15 2% SPoul ’■» WJ 
Oft 3ft v| Solent 


AO 16 8025 66ft 65 66 +1% 

25 14 97 ZOft 29 29ft + ft 

258 19 16ft 10 +] 

123 18 17ft 18 + ft 

59 18ft 18ft 181% + ft 

142 lift lift lift + ft 

361 3ft 2ft 2ft + ft 

288 351% 34ft 35ft + ft 

340 311% 31ft 31U— ft 

08 27ft 27ft 27ft — ft 

II 21 20ft 21 

51 lift lift lift— ft 

28 Oft 6 6 


35ft 24ft SallleM .16 S IS 1453 34 33ft 33ft + ft 

54 51 - SallM pf 340e 65 50 57ft S2ft 52ft + ft 

28ft 19ft SDIeGs 224 85 9 400 »ft 26ft 26ft + ft 

Oft 6ft SJuwiB 52e 94 11 107 9V> 9ft Oft 

T2ft 8ft SJuanR 22 9 lift lift lift + ft 

49ft 31 Sandr 56 14 IB 1207 36ft SSft 35ft— 1% 

25ft 20 SAnHRf 154 75 13 71 25 24M 25 

35ft 23ft SFeSaP 150 11 14 1146 321% 31ft 31ft— ft 

<6 20ft SaraLoe 144 35 11 666 40ft 37ft 40ft +1 

22ft 16 SavElP 140 8.1 7 “ — 

211% 171% SavEA 154 64 
12V% Oft SavE nf 158 115 
01% 5 Savin 

281% 19ft SCAN A 2.16 85 0 
571% 33 SchrPIo 148 34 13 
49ft 341% S chimb 150 35 0 

.12 3 19 

56 24 14 


12 Month 
won low stock 

102 87 TrOPl 1052 104 

06 77ft Ti*GP pi 844 95 
251% 22 TrGPpf 250 0.0 
13ft 6ft TmsOti 
43ft 201% Tnonwv 150 _ 

41ft ZB Tmwtd 48 15 13 
23ft 12 Twld WfA 
34ft 26ft Twld Of ADO 
40ft 32ft Trovier 254 

58ft 50ft Travpf 4.16 ... 

27ft 22 Tricon A528111 
30 21ft TitCnnf 250 85 
25ft 7ft Trfalns 50 4 
31ft 22ft TrtcPc 
401% 27Vj Tribune 
Oft 5ft Trhso 
18ft 171% TrlntV 
2Sft 14ft TrllEng .... _ 

14ft Oft TrifE of 1.10 84 
43ft 3DV% TUCSEP 350 74 0 

1M% Oft Till tax 44 35 16 

101% 16 TwirtDs 50 45 10 
41 30 Tree Lb 50 25 10 

17ft 13ft Tylers 40 25 11 


40x100 100 100 

I40i 941% 93ft 94ft + ft 
1 25ft 29ft 25ft 
11 148 Oft 9 tb — ft 
45 1315708 45b 441% 44ft +7% 
■ ' 313 30. 38ft 38ft- ft 
4 21ft 21ft 21ft— u 

65 3 31ft 31ft 31ft- ft 

45 TO 1444 42ft 41ft 42ft + ft 

7.0 09 52f% S2ft 5Zft 

163 27 26ft 26ft— ft 

1 a a a 

7 610 26ft 25ft 26 +1 

34 9 38 29ft 28ft 29 — ft 
1.9 16 4750 45ft 44 44% — 4% 

9 6ft 6ft 6ft— ft 

78 14ft 14ft |4ft + ft 

36 SSft 20ft 20ft + ft 
.10 12 ft 12 ft 12 ft _ ft 
3M 38% 38ft 28ft 
78 15 146% 14ft 

11 186% 183% 18ft 
66 30ft 30ft 39ft— ft 
449 141% 14 14ft— ft 



7650 

7540 

7540 

7640 

7A15 


SS.90 

5545 

5750 

57JH 

5659 


Feb 

Mar 

Mot 

Jul 

AiM 


5650 

5630 

5850 

5055 


5750 

5740 

5850 

58S0 


5645 

5650 

5750 

5800 


Eat Sales 3479 Prev. Saks 3JW 
Prev. Dav Open InL 4517 aft 126 


5755 

56.97 

58.15 

3800 

5656 


+155 

+.92 

+55 

+45 


Season Scam 
Hum- low 


Open Hleh Low Close am. 


Food 


Grains 


150 

54 ... ._ 

30 U 73 
40 34 

■10b J 19 


150 

240 


22 


42 35 II 
4 U I 


8 


.0 . 
74 9 

14 
35 12 
5.1 5 

35 II 
V 


JO IJ 17 
-16b 15 13 
13 

-We 4J 14 
40 44 32 
150 35 121 
40 4 25 

50 44 
40 14 38 
1.00 9J B 


36ft 28 PtlibrS 
16ft lift pniioEl — . u 
Wl% 26ft PhllE pf 448 112 
lift Oft PMIE nf 141 135 
TOa, 7ft PhllE pf 153 125 
«ft 46 PhllE of 745 T13 
10ft 7ft PhllE »f 158 110 
126 100ft Phil nf 17.12 144 

6«% 46 PhllE p< 740 135 

IS 4 PbllSub 152 65 13 
MW 72ft PhllMr 450 

aft ljft Phllpln 40 

J8% lift Phil PI s 150 82 8 
1540 45 

28ft 20ft PtlllVH .40 14 11 
35ft 23ft PledA s 58 
34 24% FloNG 252 

2Sft 14ft pier 1 
56ft 34ft PJIsfarv 156 
34 22ft Pioneer 154 
45-% 30ft PltnvB 150 
90 611% PltnB pf A12 

18ft Oft Plttstn 
16ft 8ft PlonRs 
13}% 7 Planlm 
13ft 8ft Playboy 
28ft 191% Piesey 
Oft 13ft PoaoPd 
33ft 24b Polar id 
21 10ft Pondrs 

?1V% 15ft PopToi 

»ft 14ft Pori pc 

21ft 14ft PortSE ..„ „ 

Mft 18ft Ports Pf 240 104 

25?? 22 PorG pf 440 124 

Mft 29 PorG pf 452 125 

38ft 28 Pal Itch 146 45 13 

34 22 POlmEI 116 74 0 

66ft 36ft PotElpf 4M 0.0 

STS 18ft Prom I s 56 14 18 

« 28ft Prlmrk 250 87 8 

2Bft 14ft PrlmeC 14 

MW 16ft PrlmMs 50 5 30 

9W% 50ft ProdG 240 44 15 

'Bft 10 PrdRsh 55 A1 21 

47ft M Prefer- 140 3 A 13 

2ft 2ft PruRCn 
PruR un 

24ft I7V% PSvCol 250 05 0 
21ft 16ft PSCofpf 110 104 
101% 6ft PSInd 150 11.1 11 
0 6 PSInpf 

Bit 6ft PSInpf 
53 38ft PSInpf 
71 51 PSInpf 

63 46 PSInpf 

63 45 PSin Pf 

8ft 31% PSvNH 
lift 7ft PSNHpf 
17 7ft PNH pfB 
24ft 11 PNHnfC 
22ft 0ft PNH pfE 
20ft O PNHpfG 
20ft 20ft PSvNM 258 104 I 
32ft 23 PSvEG 244 95 6 
15 10ft PSEG nr 1.40 95 
39 28ft PSEG pf 458 115 
48 36ft PSEG pf S5S 114 
20ft 16 PSEG pf 2.17 114 
«ft 48ft PSEG pf 650 114 
23ft 17ft PSEGpf 243 T14 
1081% 96ft PSEG pfl 255 115 
71, « PSEGpf 750 115 

Hft 57ft PSEGpf 750 Tl.l 
73 56 PSEGPf 851! 114 

88 70 PSEGpf 042 114 

4ft 2ft Publlck 

1W. 0W. Pueblo .16 1.1 ia 

9ft 6 PR C«m S 

IS' 1 * S lfl,erP , - 76 11-7 8 
21ft 13 PulteHm .13 4 18 

Sl- ^ Pur “»°* -*4| 11 
10ft 6ft Pvro 8 


210 Bft 8 Bft + ft 

60 241% 33ft 23ft— ft 

67 36ft 36 36 — ft 

22 Tfl 25ft 25V. — ft 

15 lift 16ft lift 4 ft 

17 3H 3ft 3ft 
14 3981 48ft 47U| 47ft— ft 

407 20ft 20ft 20ft— ft 

231 S3 51ft 51ft— ft 


-M M 21 11530 39ft 38ft 30ft— lft 
250 144 6 2005 15ft 15ft 15ft — ft 
lOOzASft SSft 35ft— 1 
88 11 10ft 10ft 

538 IfflCb 10ft 10ft -I- ft 

301b 59 58 59 + ft 

82 10 Oft Oft— ft 
40zl20ft 130 Vi 120ft —lft 
50Z 58ft 58ft SSft 
— .. JO 21ft 21 31ft— ft 

45 10 1538 81ft 81ft 81ft + ft 

25 13 236 241% 24 24 

1B5T 12ft 12ft 12ft 

1027 24ft 34ft 24ft + ft 

233 25 24ft 25 + ft 

Id® 33 In 37ft 32ft— ft 
26 31ft 30ft 31 — ft 

48 24ft 24V, 24ft — 1% 
345 53ft 51ft 517% — ft 
524 241% 74 24ft— ft 

507 40ft 3«ft 309%— ft 
3 70ft 70ft 79ft -I- ft 
779 lift lift lift 
284 16 15ft 16 +7% 

Hi 101% SOft I Oft + ft 

42 Oft 0 0 

18 217% 217% 211% + ft 
157 13ft 13ft 13ft 
288 31ft 3IW 31ft— ft 
34 lift 11 lift 
11 17ft 17ft 17ft + ft 

93 23ft 3292 22ft + V% 

208 19ft 10ft 10ft 

2 24 24 24 + ft 

26 34ft 34 34ft + ft 

8 33ft 33ft 33ft 
415 33ft 321% 331% — U. 
379x 31ft 31 31 — ft 

050: 451% 44 451% 4 1% 

38 24 W 241% 24ft— ft 
6 38ft 381% 38ft— ft 
867 17ft 17ft 17ft— ft 
10$ 3312 32ft 33ft + ft 
565 57ft 571% 57ft— ft 
41 16ft 161% 16ft— ft 
24 41ft 41 41ft + ft 
1 2ft 2ft 2ft 

718 10ft 10 Iflft 

240 221% 71ft 31ft— ft 
6 201% 20U 20U — V% 
846 Oft 9 

1600z Bft 8 8—1% 

32002 7ft 7ft 7ft 

61002 40ft 49ft 401%+ 1% 
102 661% 66ft 66ft— 1 
2SSJ2 58ft 57ft 57ft + ft 
MSU 58ft 58 58 — ft 

2682 8ft 79li 81% + ft 

S70z 16 151% 15ft — ft 

33 17 lift 17 +1 

08 334% 231% 231% 

01 21ft 71ft J| ft — 4% 

27 19ft 19ft 19ft 
213 27ft 27 27ft + ft 
708 30ft 30ft 30ft + V% 

3 14ft 14ft 141% 9- ft 
17802 37 37 37 — ft 

302 46 46 46 4-lft 


101% 10ft 10ft + ft 

1 21 31 21 

5 117k 114% lift— ft 

85 8 71% 7ft 

3100 26ft 26 26ft 

660 47ft 46 461%— 1 

1784 36ft 361% 361% — ft 

742 14 !3ft 13ft— ft 

*. .. 303 31ft 311% 31ft— ft 

-90o 14 10 5988 56ft Bft 56ft — ft 

1-24 10 10 480 41ft 40ft 41 — ft 

105 13ft 13 ITU + ft 

262 33U 311% 311%— 2ft 

3 17ft 13ft 12ft + 1% 

14 16ft 15ft 15U— V% 

23 16 15ft 16 +1% 

108 'JfP~ 20 201% — 1% 

53 4ft 41% 4ft 
A1 11 mo 30 38ft 381% — 1% 

— 10 3 171% 171% 171% 

31ft 22ft SealAJr 44 14 17 30 Sm 301% 300% + ft 

321% 221% 5aalPw 150 17 8 80 27 261% 26ft— 1% 

651% 45ft SoorleG 150 15 18 41 64ft 64M 64ft 

1J6 ** YlBraO 35ft 35 35ft + 1% 
107ft 97 Sears pf Pine 85 65 107ft 107ft 107ft — ft 

31U 23 5ecPacs 154 4.0 7 — — - 

187% HU SatflU 

48 IJ 18 

.72 44 23 

40 24 B 

137« 6J 7 

50 II 6 

52 24 13 

0 

40 45 12 


14ft "8" ScfAti 

33 22V% Scoolnd 

611% 491% ScolPef 

441% 281% ScottP 

1616 121% ScottVS 

45 24ft SeaOlt ~ — 

13 10 Sea Cl pf 146 114 

16ft 129% SeaCpfBZIO 13J 
167% 13 SeoCPfCAlO IAI 
271% 171% SeaLnd 48 24 
51% 31% ScaCo 
4M% 359%SMgrm 50 
211% 13 Saaaul 


52 35 
250 42 II 
158 15 17 
1.16 3.1 13 
250 111 15 
250 6.1 B 


3J0 84 


154 135 
158 117 
7.15 144 
044 I4J 
842 145 
848 144 


42 19ft 191% 10U 
150x 59 59 SO —1 

3 221% 22V% 221% 

60x1 OB Vi IO8V1 1081% + Va 
lib 69 60 69 —1% 

«Xb 71 60 70ft + ft 

life 70 78 70 

30z 87K. B7U B71& +lft 
128 2U 21% 21% 

5 14ft 14ft 14ft— 1% 

2 6ft 6ft 6ft 

246 15 14ft 15 + ft 

182 14ft 14 I4ft + 1% 
211 20ft 201% 20ft— ft 
285 6ft 61% 6ft + ft 


S3 311% QuokOs 144 
105 00ft QuaOpf 046 
23ft 161% OuakSO 50 
10ft 6ft Quanrx 
3414 24ft Quest or 140 
261% 14ft Ok Roll J4a 


AS 13 1082 50ft 40U 50 + ft 
9J 350x304 104 104 + ft 

45 IB 130 20ft 20 20ft— 1% 

28 09 7ft 7U 7ft— ft 

57 11 331 301% 30ft 301% 

LI IS 34 22U 22ft 22ft— ft 


Oft 

112* 

S3 

3 


67% RBInd 
34 RCA 
79Vx RCA pf 
27ft RCA pf 
31ft RCA Pf 
6ft RLC 
-- 3ft RPC 

19U 12»% rte 

*q5 3 Sifc □ als £u r 1-00 14 3 1683 411% 40U 41ft + ft 


541 4 14 7U 71m 7ft 

154 24 12 2086 <31% 42ft 42ft- ft 
45 2 100 303 100 —1 

74 316 30ft 33ft 30 'm — 1% 

H 21 371% 371% 37V% 

iS 14 90 8 77% 7ft 

136 4ft 4ft 41% + 1% 
35 ID 167 16ft 181% 18ft— ft 
10 105 13ft 13ft 13ft — ft 


450 

112 

345 

JO 

46 


5J 


9ft 5ft Ramad 
21ft 16ft Ranco 
7ft Jft RongrO 
TB'% 51ft Ravcm 
17ft Oft Raymk 
53ft 3AU Rayttin 
P'A 7ft ReadBf 
315 IS 1 * BdBal pf A12 ill 
24ft 18 RdBalpf A20al75 
5 nRe * lJ3elOH 
17ft Bft ReaiEa 
]2* 7ft Redmn 
127% Bft Reece 
11% ft Reoal 
43ft 27ft RelchC 
Iflft 4ft RepAIr 
3 lft RepAwt 
12* RpGyps JO 10 
US* 2?? R8S NV T44 34 
S5 51? 5"Yp«:ii2 114 

2 Vj 5?* 144 SJ 

Rw>BkPfll2 7J 
247% 15ft RshCal J2 14 
32ft avi Revca 
15 Oft vIRevar 
f7ft 321% Revlon 
24ft 17ft Rexhm 
17 lift Rexnrd 


54 


140 

40 


JO 


50 


63 3226 8ft 8ft Bft 
45 0 12 17ft 17 17ft — ft 

M2Jft 3ft 3ft 
4 27 320 76ft 75ft 76ft— ft 
__ „ 3 lift lift lift— ft 

JJ 12 2579 40ft 499% 49ft + ft 


10 


17 15 
35 


1! 13 
5 


45 

12 

10 

6 

272 

73 

10 

30 

171 


50 II 24 

2 


7ft 71% 7ft 
17ft 17U 17ft — ft 
18ft 18U I Bft 
131% 13 I3ft + ft 
Oft Oft Oft 
8U, Bft 8ft 

in-* 

852 & % "oft^U 
IBB 2ft 2ft 2ft 
322 71 m 71% 7U 
18 47 46ft 46ft — U. 

4 27ft 27ft 27ft— ft 
90 31*6 31ft 31ft 
80 28 27ft 28 + ft 

187 21*. 21ft 21 U + ft 
B07 25ft 25 


. . 25U + U 

154 45 15 7606 46ft 46* 46ft — 1% 

.70 10 15 78 23ft 23 23ft + ft 

f* a * tx* 

r ” 1* ,81 Sfi Sft 

Sft xT 41 5 iS£!J -S' M , 1 3SVI 22 ft 22 ft 

V* Rvrilkn ^ 25 24ft 247% + ft 

“ RvrOK fl 9 <fr) ts*, m til u, 

36ft 281% Robxhw 1.12 3J B - - ^ ^ + » 

«ft 26 Roblxn 140 55 
2«% 5ft v I Roto Ini 
24ft 144% RachG 2J0 OJ 6 
Cft 29ft RochTl A44 64 7 
41U Z7U Rocfcwl 1.12 2.7 10 
405 287 Rklntpf 475 1J 
73 55U RotlmH 2J0 34 11 


62ft 39 Rota-in 

I3JS RoInCm 

3«% 18V, Roimei 

^ goJnEwwl 
'S? 5 Roillra 
3ft 7 Room 

*”% 24 Rarer 


II 
14 30 
4 23 


■46 45 17 


84 

48 15 43 

10 18 4857 


14 3«ft M*6 34ft + ft 
^3 33ft 77 27ft +4% 
804 81% 8ft 816— ft 

1S4 an 221% 22*. + ft 
.21 37ft 37ft 37ft — 1% 
659 401% 40ft 4UU— ft 
I 403 403 -MB —2 
70 66 45 65 —lft 

45V 6316 62U 63ft + ft 
,1S 25 24 *% 24U— ft 

® a 


40U 261% SvcCps 
lift lift Shaklee 
26ft 15 Shawln 
39ft 291% SIwllT 
30 ft 1 714 SMGla 
« 251% Shrwln 

81% SU Shoefwn 
16ft 12 Stoowbt „ _ 
19ft 14 SlerPac 146 9J 0 
■MV, 281% Signal 150 
65 SZU Sign! at 412 _ 

41 2M% Singer m 1.1 9 

Bft 27ft singr pf 150 107 
IB 12U Skyline 48 13 71 
151% 7ft Smith In 
71ft 501% SmkB 
791% 421% Smuckr 
411% 31ft SaapOn 
15ft 12ft Snyder 
43ft 31ft Scoot 
17ft 137% Son vCo 
soft 22U SooLIn 
40ft 311% Source , 

aft 181% SreCppf 240 105 
30ft 22ft SoJerln 248 9.1 13 
■49ft 38 VI Soudwn IMS A5 9 
35 24 SootBk JJD 19 TO 

10 tit Seal PS 1131 314 40 
27ft 20 SCotEd A16 84 8 
231% 15 SouttiCa 152 94 6 

26*. 171% SalnGss 150 74 8 
44 SOft SNETr A72 64 IT 
39ft n* SoNE pf 352 94 
77ft 22ft SoRypf 240 105 
31 24ft SaUnCo 172 41 
39ft 24U Sou find 150 A9 O 
loft lift SoPuy .12 .0 14 

8U Oft Soumrk J4b 27 6 
511% 47 Sank pf 678ctl6 
31 16ft SwAIrl .13 5 19 

1BU 11*6 SwtFer 
181% 101% SwtGas 
88ft 62ft 5 w Bel I 
29 19ft SwEnr 
269% 18V, SwIPS 
17ft lift spartan 
271% 151% SpeefP 
59 34ft Sperry 
38 30V, Springs 

43ft 35ft SquarD 
77ft 45 Squibb 
24 17ft S la lav 
23ft 1716 SIBPnf 
301% II StMatr 

50ft 394%SldOOh 

76ft 72ft SOOftpf 375 
231% 91% StPacC 5 40 

16ft 1216 Standee 
311% 23ft SlanWk 
35U 25ft Storrrft 
lift 9 StaMSe 
3ft 2ft Sfeaoo 
20ft IS Slerctil 
34ft 24ft 5 fori Do 
23ft 15ft StwvnJ 

34 26 StwWrn 

12 9 StkVCPfUW 

451% 36U SioneW 140 
39 24 StoneC 40 

51ft 360% StopShp 1.10 
2116 16ft StarEa 152 
121% 2 vIStarT 
881% 381% Store 
21ft 17ft ShrtMtn 
l»ft 141% ShidRt 
7ft 3ft 5uavSh 
39 26 SunCh 

121% 61% Sun El 
52ft 43ft SunCo 
HBU 90U SunCpt 
49ft 40 Sundsfr 
lift 6ft SunMn 

JSi ,s ^ 

Bft 37U SunTmf 
j. 1414 SwrVafu 5 
48ft 26ft SupMkt 48 
1716 14ft Swank 
21ft 16ft Sybron 
16ft lift SyrnsCp 
65ft 41ft Syntax 
40ft 30U Sysco 


1654 28 27ft 27ft— ft 
44 18 1 79% IB +16 

25B 3Bft 38ft 38ft — 14 
379 15U 1514 15ft + V. 
35 2314 231% 23ft— ft 
650 381% 3814 38ft + 16 
64 26ft 26 26 — ft 

156 37ft 37ft 371%— ft 
132 714 7ft 7ft — 1% 

14 12U 12ft 12V6 + ft 
... 32 18 17ft 18 + ft 

24 16 1577 411% 41ft 411% — ft 

2 60ft 60ft 60ft— ft 

507 36 35ft 35ft — ft 

3 32 31*. 32 + 16 

668 I4U 13U l«U + ft 
146 8W 8ft Bft 
865 66ft 661% 66ft— ft 
JJ 721% 72ft + W 

23B 37ft 3716 37ft— 16 

76 15ft 1516 15ft— ft 

... 4381 33 32ft 33 

.150 14 12 2174 15ft 151% 15ft 

I JO 61 23 14 291% 29V6 2916— ft 

17 301% 38 38ft 

3 m 04 2216 — 16 

4 271% 27ft 27ft 

28 m-z 39ft 39ft— 1 

105 SOU 30ft 30ft— ft 
25 7 6ft 6ft 

1222 25 24ft 25 + ft 

1143 20ft 30ft 20ft + 1% 
37 23% 23ft 23ft— 16 
660 41ft 401% 41 
25 39ft 30ft 39ft + 1% 

6 26 25ft 26 
44 28ft 28V. 2816 
509 34V, 34ft 3416 
261 13ft 131% 1316 
839 Bft 8ft 0U 
2 49ft 40ft 49ft 
341 20 28ft 28ft- ft 
79 1216 12 121% + ft 

131 IB 17ft T7ft 
583 B2V% 81ft 82 — ft 
S3 27ft 271% 27V, + 1% 
636 24 23ft 23ft + ft 
84 Mft 13ft 141% + 1% 

79 70ft 20ft 20ft— ft 

2345 49ft 49 4914— t% 

„ 2 331% 33ft 33ft— 16 

255 3716 371% 3716 + 16 

597 60 6816 68ft— 16 

124 21 2» 20ft + ft 

256 22ft 22ft 22ft— 1 m 

84 12ft 13 12—16 

752 41ft 45ft 45*4 + ft 
20z 7246 7216 7216 
332 171% lift 17 — 46 
288 13ft 13 13ft— ft 

100 30 29ft 20ft 
14 3516 35 35 

26 lift 11 lift 
ISO 316 3 3V. + 1 m 

6 19ft 191% 19ft 
705 3056 30 30U + ft 

161 21U 21ft 211% 

C 26ft 2646 26ft + b 
JOz lift lift lift + ft 
120 42ft 42 42ft + ft 
126 30ft 30ft 30b- ft 
126 38ft 38ft 38ft— ft 
311 19ft 19ft 19ft + ft 
411 2b 2ft 2V% 

141 86ft 86ft 86ft 

18ft 18 1BV. + ft 


15128 300 56ft 55b Sift- ft 
74 203 3416 34 34b — ft 

17 65 T5ft 15ft 15H + ft 

18 TO 26ft 26 26ft— ft 

AM 8.9 II 120 22ft 22ft 22ft + 3 

109 9ft 9U 9ft- ft 


501% 35ft UAL 
381% 26 UALpt 
171% 916 UCCEL 

» 2546 UDCll 

24ft 17b UOI .. „„ „„ _ _ 

11b Oft UNCRM 100 9ft ^U £ 

14 10b URS 40 14 15 106 lift lift lift— ft 

“ "* ! “ 5 230 64 4720855 34 33ft 33ft— ft 

148 43 7 364 39U 391% 30ft— b 

150 24 1 69ft 691% 69ft + ft 

2.12e AS 6 2 56ft Sift 56ft— 1 

5J6e 55 10 43 106b 106 1Mb 

" 4.1 14 615 391% 391% 30ft 

6J 14 3402 54ft 53b 54ft + 1% 


WHEAT tCBTJ 

5500 bu mini mum- dot I ora per bushel 
3.76ft 2J9U Sep 246ft 240 243ft 243ft —42b 

163ft 252ft Dec AOOb 350 1951% 255U —43b 

374ft 253ft Mar 354ft 354ft AOBft 3501% —JM 

40 254 May ASSb ASBft A9S MS*. — 53K. 

3721% 345 Jut 274ft 2.75ft A72U 2J2U —52ft 

345 272ft See 277 277 276 ft 276ft — _Q2 

Est. Sales Prev. Sale* 1QJ64 

Prev. Day Oaenint. 30403 up 209 
corn <cirn 

5400 bu minlmum-dallan per bushel 

veau. Sep ZJ4ft 374ft 232ft A33 —5116 

Dec A24U A25U 2J4 274 -51 

Mar 2J3ft 2J4 2J2b Z32b —51b 

MOT 27716 2JI 2J6ft AJ6ft — 51b 

Jut 278ft 2J9ft 277% 2J7U —51b 


371 ft 

AOS 

310 

321b 

256 

2461% 


27Sft 

A21 

2J0 

2J4b 

2J3b 

274b 

2JDb 


38ft 211% USFG 
44ft 261% USGs 
771% 48ft USGpl 
63 46 Unllvr 

110b 80b UnINV — , 
4iu 311% UCamp 144 
SM% 32ft UnCart, 340 


7ft 41% UnlonC 
1916 13ft UnElec 144 94 6 
40 30 UnEtpf 450 114 
34ft Mft UnEl pi MUM 117 
28 20 UnElpt 298 115 

201% 14ft UnElRf A13 11.1 
26ft 21 UnEl pf A72 104 
68 48 UnElpf 744 114 

24 22 UnExpn 

,S2% 37b UnPoc I4D 34 11 
115ft S7ft UnPcpf 775 67 
2IH 121% Unlrayl .18 4 13 

70 50 UnrylPf 850 111 

5ft 3b UnltDr • 

20b 10b UnBmd ID 

16% 91% UBrd pf 

OT% 16ft UCbTVs 51 

«b 22ft UnEnrg 248 
g1% lib U Ilium 250 
301% 22ft Ulllu Pf 397 112 
IBM 12 Ulllupr 120 111 
3W% 22b Ulllu Pf 450 111 

14ft 10ft Ulllu pf 

25 ISft Unltlnd 

43ft 35% Unttlnn 

47 28ft UJerBk 

16ft lift UMMM 

3 2 UPkMn 

38ft 26ft UsalrG 
Bft 5b USHam 
42ft 321% USLMS 

40b 24 USShae 

31b 22b ussteel ,^u » 

56ft 49*. USStlPf 601elQ4 

142ft 115b USSM pr 1275 93 


95 6ft 6ft fh + ft 
1008 19 18ft 181% — ft 
10QX 30 39 39 +1ft 

39 3116 31ft 31ft- b 
42 26 2516 26 + ft 

14 101% 19 19ft + ft 

2 261% 26b Sib 
10MZ 64b 63% 64b— *, 

371 23U 23% 23ft + b 
411 48b 47U 47% — b 
36 109ft 108ft 108% + b 
54»2T% 21ft 21ft 
18Qx 61 61 61 

11 3U 3ft 316 + ft 
61 lift 18ft 18ft— ft 
10 14M 14ft 14ft + ft 
-. 21 31b SB 5s 30ft— b 

62 30 2714 40b 4lh4M 
94 4 134 21ft 201% 21 + 1% 

16 30 30 38 —ft 

6O0x 18b 18b 18b + ft 

3 30ft 30ft 301% + ft 

4 14ft 14M 14ft— ft 
60 24b 23% 24b + b 

2 42% 42% 42% 

44 461% 46ft 46M + ft 
315 14 17b 13ft 

5 2ft 2ft 2ft 

723 33% 33 33b— ft 

263 61% 6b 6ft + ft 

117 34ft 34ft 34ft + ft. 

_ r — „ 111 3Sb 35 35 — b 
H? ” 2379 3<p, * , 3M%— £ 

* log 55% 55H Kft 

337 138b 136ft 1 37b — ft 


Sep 127 277b 275 275b — . 

— Dee 273 223b 271b 271b —51% 

EstSajea Prev. Sales 20591 

Prev. Day Oaen lnt.129796 up 873 
SOY SCANS (CUT) 

5400 bu rntnlmuncdaiian per bushel 

Sep 5L13 5.15ft 5.10ft 5.10% —52% 

NOV &I2 5.15 559 550ft —55 

Jan 573ft 574ft 5.18ft 5.18% —54% 

Mar SJlft SJ3U 578 578ft -54% 

May SJ0V, 5411% 5J6 5J6 —55ft 

Jul 542 545% 540 540 — M4 

Aug 543 543 5JBft 5J8ft —54ft 

SOP SJ7 —53 

Nov 5J8 SJOft 5751% 5J5U -53% 

_ Prev. Soles A 978 

Prev. Day Open int. Z1550 off 30.968 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBTJ 

100 tans- dallcrsnw tan 

179 JO 12040 


071 

540ft 

068 

£05 

679 

£14ft 

743 

524ft 

779 

023ft 

058 

5JBU 

674 

035ft 

028 

5J5 

032 

£28 


Sep 12440 T2L50 12130 12340 —178 

Oct 12S40 12750 12129 125^J — JO 

Dec 12050 13070 T2EL50 12870 —JO 

Jan 13150 13250 13070 13850 —40 

Mar I33J0 13470 13370 13450 —70 

MOV 13650 13750 USJffl 13550 — 1J0 

Jul 120-5® 33970 13750 13850 -150 

Aug 139 JO 14050 13850 139JO —JO 

Sep 14050 ™ 

Pray. Sales 12462 


37 


l.po in 
40 15 
72 J .. 
1J6 34 10 
11 
I 

.12 A 7 

50 13 10 
2S U 


31% 24ft USStlPf ATS 7J iS7 5w> 55ft '56%— b 

393% 32% USTOb 171 45 12 1731 35ft 35b 35b 

B4ft 60 US West 5J2 77 8 BS4 78b 7U%— u. 

13 6ft UnStck 18 10 7b 7b 7b- b 

45 34 UnTech 140 A5 10 3913 40ft 48ft 40ft— ft 

39b 31b UTdlpf US 72 157 ^ 3S 5 

» J«% UnlTel 1.92 84 8 TO 22b ^ft + b 

S» if* SXTSd. '3 *1 ii a » » iw8 

28 21ft UnjvFd 1,12 4J 9 

23ft 17 UnLeof 150 4J 8 

S3 26ft Unocal 15 U I 

122ft 52 Uplohn 156 24 20 

43 25ft USLIFE 154 24 10 

10b Bft UelfeFd 1580107 
26ft 20ft Ufa PL 132 97 13 
27ft 22% UfPL pf 180 185 


-Bft 22ft UIPLpf 190 185 
20 I6b UfPL pf 254 10J 
27 16% UtiltCo 140b 57 

24% 18% UfltCapr 241 11.1 
35ft 29ft UhlCa pf 4.17 127 


78 23ft Sb 23b 

6 25V), 25ft 25ft 
55 22ft 22ft 221% 

3563 29b 26% 28ft + ft 
683 108ft 10516 188ft +2 
619 37 36% 37 — ft 

51 10V. 10ft 10ft 
34V 25V. 25 25ft + % 
1 26% 26% 24*.— ft 

7 37ft 27V, 27V, — b 
17 19% 19% 19% + b 
31 24ft 24% 24% — ft 
20 23ft 23ft 23ft— ft 

1 33% 33% 33% — b 


180J0 12A30 

18450 12340 

16100 127 JO 

20650 130JH 

16250 13250 

16750 13450 

14150 13550 

16750 13850 

Ext. Soles 

Prev. Day Open ML 41785 up 876 
soybeanoilicbtj 
6QJ0gito-dDiion par IK lbs. 

31.10 22.16 Sep 214) 2245 2140 2257 

3057 a.12 Oct 22JQ 2246 22^0 2225 

2-S 5-H ““C 3230 22JS 2258 2A11 

22 HS J “ 1 3231 2242 2118 2A19 

78.60 2250 Mar 2240 Wid 2240 2240 

2745 2275 May 2250 tom wq 

|fJS M Jd 22.90 2100 ZLTO 22.73 

S-S S5 5 **» 3230 2350 2A75 2178 

=5*^. 2184 .J?’ 3230 22.00 2250 2158 -mu 

EaLSale* Prev. soles 11560 

Prev. Day Open Int. 54jsi up 1741 
OATS(CBT) 

5500 bu minimum- doiian parbwhel 
,» ’ "'*• Sep 171 171 I TOM 170% +50M 

Dec UOft 1J0V, 1J9V, lJOb +50% 

Mar UIM 1J3M 171b 03 +5216 

May 1J1 UIM 1J1 |J2M +5IV, 

jul ITEM +51 

Prev. Sales 175 
3477 offlO 


COFFEE C [HYC3CEJ 

374Q0 Itar cvntt per ih. ..... >3440 135.10 

15070 12750 SCP lJ+« 1KA WjU 

15040 10-25 2^ {^0 

14075 12850 Mar 140J0 MOJO >5" ,TTnS 

14850 1^50 May 140J5 14155 1«J3 M1« 

14850 13550 Jul 

14750 13255 SOP lijn 

13850 13050 Dee.^, „ " 

Eat. Sales Pre/.SaiM 947 

Prev. Dot Open int. 10429 uni' 

SUGARWORLD mNYCSCEl 

112500 ibv- cents acr lb. 

0J5 7M Sep 450 +» 

955 174 Oct 470 440 

775 350 Jan 4J0 440 

953 3J4 Mar 440 488 

7.15 359 May 476 4.08 

649 379 Juf 4.J* 

6.15 452 Oct 573 

Est. Sales Prey-Satae 1&40 

prev. Dav Open Int. 87J18 off US 
COCOA (NYCSCE1 
W metric tans> Sper ten 
2415 1063 SOP 

2337 1945 DOC 

2285 1955 MOT 

2299 I 960 MOT 

2300 1968 JUl 

2330 2023 S*P 

2325 2055 Dec 

Est. Sales Prev. 5a»s 4786 

Prev. Day Open InL 19530 up 94 
ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 

lSTJMJtr^- camper lb. 13UO I3S45 

^2 B il s ss 

Mr 26J0 1»75 12645 

SS; m iSw 

431 


2155 

2237 

3261 


5.15 

545 


2155 

2220 

TOW 

2Z70 


450 

A17 

4J0 

456 

ATI 

454 

553 


2125 

2104 

2232 

2250 


453 

459 

440 

456 

458 

£15 

545 

645 


212S 

2197 

2233 

2251 


3300 2300 2295 2283 


18200 

18150 

18050 123J0 

17750 12358 

16150 12450 

15750 12650 Jul 

Est. Sales 600 Prev.SalM 
Prev. Day Open Int. <732 eH44 


+.14 

+44 
+JS 
+J2 
+.18 
—51 
— 1 J7 


+58 

+44 

+J8 

+J0 

+76 

■K23 

+23 

+.15 


—27 
-21 
— 24 
—30 
-39 
—23 


+53 


Metals 


+.18 
—50 
—57 
—46 
— .17 
— 70 
— 72 
—72 


25400 lbs.- cents per lb 
6A15 5065 Aug 

SATO 5740 Sep 

5* JO 

5940 

5090 

5095 

S9JM 

5945 

— JS 
—JO 
—JO 



Dec 

6065 

6070 

5940 

6030 

—JO 

8420 

BOlBO 

9*40 

Jan 

6145 

6170 

61.15 

61 JO 

-OD 




61.90 

A2J0 

6140 


—JO 




6240 

6240 







6AI0 

63.10 



.^80 

7030 

7020 

6740 

67 JO 

6370 

6440 

6010 

6570 

Dec 

Jan 

Mar 

May 

6340 

6345 


6370 

6010 

6440 

—JO 
—JO 
— JO 
—JO 

Est. Salas 

Prev. Softs 9473 





1.79 

152ft 

147% 

143 

1J0M 


1.16ft 

174 

156M 

I77M 

1771% 


Est. Sales 
Pm. Day Open int. 


ALUMINUM (COMeXI 

40500 tbs.- cents per lb. 

Aug 
4190 Sep 
Oct 


700 


45.10 4 £15 4550 

4675 4675 46.15 


Livestock 


CATTLE ICME1 
405K K*r cents Per lb. 
6570 5345 Oct 

6755 35.15 Dec 

6745 ' 5650 Feb 

6757 57 J8 Apr 

6675 58.10 Jun 

6540 5840 Aug 


5550 
5755 
57 JO 
5875 
5978 
5855 


56J7 

5855 

5050 

5970 

6050 

5085 


174 

650 

52 

158 

52 


£9 8 
7J 8 
15 II 
7J 0 
37353 


19 9 
45 13 
47 ID 
24 18 
35 22 
15 12 

17 12 
£1 8 
52 

.. U I 
52 45 10 
76 37 11 
158 II 10 
ITOalOJ 
.12 37 
76 37 10 
170 45 12 
54 13 
6J IB 
07 

37 0 
A0 14 

18 8 
04 14 

40 5 

JO® 45 
50 47 43 

48 14 11 

UO 40 10 
A25 A3 
150 37 12 


172 

152 

154 

1J6 

50 

56 

72 

280 


170 

148 


41 22ft VFCorp 1.12 10 10 
14% 5ft Valera 
25ft 14 Verier pf 344 146 
4ft 2b V-.Jerln 
28b 19 VCHDm 150 43 7 

4 2b Vara 

11 6b Varcopf 

46ft 26% Vartan 76 5 21 

n% 9% Vara A» 34 33 
25ft 17% Veeco 40 11 15 

12 3ft Vends 18 

lift Ob VestSe 1700105 

Sift 29b Viacom 48 15 22 

73ft 55 VaEPpf 7.72 104 

83 63% VaEPpf 854 105 

73 57 VaEpfJ 772 115 

68 S3 VaEPpf 770 110 

53 VaEPpf 745 10.9 

27ft 13ft Vlshavs 15 

45ft 30% varaad 12 

85 66ft VutcnM 250 34 13 


516 30% 38M 38ft + M 

345 lift lib lib— ft 

40 23% 23ft 23ft- ft 

12 2% 2% 2% 

13 23ft 23% 23ft— ft 

207 3% 3% TO 

9 11 11 11 

570 31% 30% 31% + M 
31 11% 11% 11% 

116 10 18% 18% — % 
47 Oft 8% Oft + % 

12 11b lift lift 
807 50% 50 5Dft + ft 
BSOx 72Vi 70ft 72ft + ft 
50z Sift 8IM 811% +1b 
B50z 70% 70 7Bb + b 
200z65b 65b 65b— % 

1000X 68ft 68ft 68ft + b 

38 24% 24b 24ft— ft 
5 43ft 43 43ft + b 
17 BJft B3ft 83%— ft 


w 


64 18ft 18% It.. 

54 33ft 3?ft 33ft + ft 

216 47ft T ^±5 
2 08 07% 08 -lb 

77 471% 461% 46% — U 
7 6% 6%— b 

7% 7ft 7% 

% 


.90 

158 


152 

76 


1.1 13 
53 23 
£9 12 
16 
37 14 
5 16 


627 
278 34% 
284 19 


.62 15% 15% 15b— ft 

! K ” 


115 
12 

373 .... 
115 38b 




50b 30ft TDK 77e 5 
36% 25ft TECO 2J6 74 
12% 7ft TGIF 
21% 12 TNP 175 
26% lBft TRE 150 
81ft 66ft TRW ADO 
7% lft TacBoaf 
»b 52ft TafIBrd 1.10 
211? 12ft Talley .15e 
22% 15 Talley pf 150 44 
51 5S 4 T »rebr0 370 43 14 

36 23% Tandy 

15% 12% Tndvcft 
6fb 5<ft Tektmx 150 
Sb 2ft Tel com 
302% 228% Teldyn 
24 14% Tefrota 

«b 29M Telex 
«Re 20% Temp In 
45b 33M Terma 
Wft 20 Terdvn 
IS 0% Tesoro ™ 

Pft W> Tasorpf 116 


31ft 25ft WICOR 242 
38% 25ft Wachav 150 
23b lift Wadchf 40 
10% 6b Watnoc 
56% 37b woiMrf J8 
30b 18% Walams 44 
2Sb 17% Wk HRs a 140 
30ft a Wales V 45 
39b 25ft WollJm 140 
2«k 17% WOnia 58 
32% 18% WrnCm 
46ft MMWWnrL 148 
aft 15% WashGS 146 ... . 
28b 18% WshNot 158 44 7 
24ft 16b WshWf 248 113 8 
66% 38ft Waste ~~ 

28% Kb WafkJn 
12% 8% wnyGas 
12ft 4b WaanU 
23% 15ft WebtoD 
20 19ft WalnRn 
46% a WelsMk 73 17 16 
3S& aa wctsMwl 
62b 37% WellsF 240 JJ 7 
50b 41 WMFpf 4JDe 05 
20b 23% WefFM 250 105 11 
19ft 12 Wendy 3 71 1J 17 
27b 17 WestCo 48 1.0 14 
45% 34ft WPanPpAJO 107 
45 35 WstPtP 270 £5 14 

4 


72 


44 

192 


0 
14 
7.1 0 
£1 16 
3.9 11 

L5 16 
J 15 


19 a 

SO 

IJ 0 
74 14 
13 
47 
0J 


Japan Reports Drop 
In Dependence on Oil 

Reuters 

TOKYO Japan s dependence on oil as a 
proportion or all energy sources Tell below 60 
Percent for the fiisi time in 19 years in the year 
ended March 31. to 59.6 percent from 61.9 
percent a year earlier, the Ministry- of Interna- 
tional Trade and Industry said Friday. 

The agency said in its fiscai-1985 rtswrt on 
energy supply and demand that overall primary 
energy supplies, rose 5 J percent, to the equiva- 
lent of 436 miliion kiJoliters of crude oil (11 3.4 
billion gallons or 2.7 billion barTdsL from 414 
million in 1984. 

Oil supplies rose to 259.6 million kiJoliters in 
1 985 from 256 million a year earlier, but fell as a 
proportion of total energy supplies, it said. 

Supplies of natural gas soared 28 percent, to 
the equivalent of 40 million kiloliteis of crude 
oil in 1985, from 31.2 million a year earlier, 
accounting for 92 percent of total’ energy sup^ 
plies against 7.5 percent, the report said. 

Atomic power supplies rose 17.5 percent, to 
the equivalent of 35 million kiloliters in 1985 
from 29.8 million a year earlier and accounted 
for S percent of the total against 7 2 percenL 

Industry sources said Japan's oil dependence 
hit a peak of 77.6 percent in the first oil-crisis 
year of fiscal 1974, but has steadily declined 
since then as a result of efforts to diversify 
energy sources and become more energy-effi- 
denL 

The report said Japan has no need to change 
its 1983 long-term energy estimates and will 
continue effons to secure reliable ofl supplies, 
develop and introduce alternative energy re- 
sources and funher promote efficiency. 


40b 32% Texaco 180 84 32 

JW 31b TXABC 142 45 9 

46ft 30% TsxCm 15 44 7 

39 26% Tex Ext 120 64 8 

38b 52 TxETpf 654el04 

25,. I**! 1 * 1 -Boms w 

'47% 86b Texlrat 250 11 13 

3% 1 Tex Int 

J3% 15 TexOGs .18 

Si! £?“ TxPac -40 

31ft 24ft TmUHl 242 

4ft 2 Taxfl In 
50% 30b Textron 150 

65 32% Texfrpf 258 

lift 5ft Thaek 
34% 15ft Therm E 
43% 30ft Trim Bet 1J6 _ 

’7b 13% Thom in 48b 34 10 

24 13b ThmMed .40 16 10 

3L, 22 1 5 r M K 

24% 13% Tldwtr 

10ft 5% Tloerln 
61% 40 Time 

23b 14% Tlmplx 

Mft 36ft TlmeM 

58ft 46 Timken 

9b 6% Titan 
11% 8ft Titan of 
39ft 26% ToCS hp 
Mb 15% Tokhmx _ 

21b 15 TolEdls 242 113 
2^ 24% TolEdpf 3J3 134 
30b TolEdpf ITS 112 
28 21 TefEdpf X47 135 

M% 26ft TolEdpf 478 115 
20% 14ft TolEdpf A36 120 
l?ft 14ft TolEdpf 271 124 

30 8% Tonka X g 

3% 26 TootRoJ 48b 15 13 
I r 2?!!. fc , - Do 33 12 
’ISJ? K r 7chpf n.iseiai 
17ft ID ToroCa 40 24 W 
5 I Taxed 
17b Bb Towle 

jfb a. xz&n 

rsir J2, ■ s,3 


150 

1J3 


16 1MB TWA pf 275 14.9 
34ft 10ft TWA p#B 2-25 6J 
32% 24% Tranxm 144 £0 13 
lift T ranine A32 107 
“ 10ft TARity li» 01 62 
STA 44 Transco A16b 45 10 
66ft M Trnscpt 187 65 
2» 19V, Tran Ex 2J6 117 
13ft 8 Tnanscn 6 

85ft 63 TrGPpf 645 00 


8 34M 34ft 34ft— ft 
6g 31% 31% 31ft 
20 10 Oft 10 + ft 

S RS28J#-* 

m 76% 76% 76ft + % 

50 BOb 70% BO 
684 21b 20ft 20ft— 1 
» 23 22b 22ft— b 

- 61 77b 77 77 

16 1493 33% 33% 33ft— ft 
,, 12 10 13b 13 13ft 

1.7 13 6990 57% S4b 57b— 4% 
8 3 3b 3ft 3ft 

10 WVil 3*6A 247ft + ft 

250 17b 16b 17 + b 

230 41 40ft + ft 
« 37ft 37 37 — ft 

633 30% 30% 30% 

60 23ft 23 23ft + ft 
107 0% 9% 9%— ft 

9 22% 22ft 22b— ft 

3463 36 SSft 3S%— b 
. 55 31ft 31% 31ft 
1633 3Mti 37% 32% - ft 
911 33% 33% 33% + ft 
52 57b 56% 56% — ft 
49 2Bft 28 28b 

MB 95ft 93% 04 —lb 
2838 3ft 3b 3ft + ft 
17 10 2716 15ft 14% ISft 
17 17 M 31 30% 31 — b 

1441 29% 29ft 29% + ft 
148 3% 3% 39b + b 
534 S5 M% 55 + b 

3 99ft SOft 99ft 
5 Oft Oft 9M + ft 
303 34b 33% 34 - ft 
73 35% 35ft 35% + ft 
20 18% 18% 18% + b 
22 15% 15% 15% 

135 19U 10 19ft 
,406 15 14% 14% — ft 

1424 7% 7% 7% — b 

596 56% 55% S5%_ % 

143 10% 10 10% + b 

780 SO 40ft 49% + ft 
14 40% 40ft 49% — ft 
8? 7ft 7 7 

5 10% 10% 10% — ft 
31 32% 3Zft 32ft— % 

66 18% 18b 18% + ft 
552 20% 20ft 30ft— b 
51 28ft 27% 27% + ft 
17 28% 27% 28% + ft 
II 26% Mb 26% + ft 
3 33 31% 31% — ft 

22 18% 18ft 18ft— ft 
W 17% 17% 17% 

103 26ft 26ft 26ft — % 

„ 2 45% 45ft 45% + ft 
31* 44% 44ft 44% + ft 

io iioft no noft 

243 16ft 16 16 — ft 

407 3ft 3b 3b— b 
50 0b 9 0b + ft 
14 6b 6b 6b — ft 
706 35 34% 34%— ft 

170 20% 20% 20% 

10738 32% 22b 22% 


05 7 

3J 12 

34 

05 

27 

35 16 


50 01 

150 14 16 
17 

176 17 14 
150a 34 23 


8 2% WnAJrL 

2% % WtAIrwt 

23% 8% WAIr pl 250 07 
24ft 8*. WAIr nf 114 10.1 
8ft 3% WCNA 
2Tft 5% WUnlon 
,B% 2b WnUpfS 
!«■ 4% WnUpfE 
4B 20 WUTIpt 

lfft 5ft WUTlpfA 

36% 24 WstaE 1J0 

41% 34% WUtvc 1J2 _ _ 

34 25% Weverti 1 JO 44 23 

44% 35% Wevrpf 250 74 

2S Weyrpr 4J0 92 

lift 6% vlWhPII 

K% 10ft vlWhPitpf 
50% 30% WhJrlpI ZOO 
32ft 25ft White 1J0 
34% 10b Wbltahl 
26ft 17% Whmak 40 
12b 6% Wlebldt 
15% 8 Wllfrdn 
33 26b William 140 

SM 2 WllmEI 
8% 6ft WllxhrO .10 
38% 38ft WlnDIx 1J4 
»% m WInntoo jo 
11% 5% Winner 
48ft 28% WIscEP 248 _ 

W 71 WISE Pf 090 10J 

70 61 WISE pf 7J5 mo 

24 Oft WteGpf 7SS 103 

40% 26% WHCPL 2J6 74 0 

2* S,. JHfCPS Z56 74 0 

40ft 30ft Wltco 148 47 9 

15% fftWMvrW 74 11 
«b 33% Wotwttl 250 47 18 

67ft 49 Wolwpf 270 3J 

4% 2% WrMAr 
81% 54% VWtgly 1500 13 13 
4% 2% WhHltxr 
Igk l»h WyteLIl J2 17 13 
»% ISM Wvmx 40 37 8 


09 9 27 27b 77ft 27% — b 

3.1 9 233 32ft 32 32b— ft 

18 6 21b 21ft 21b + ft 

J™ 7M + % 

S 25 831 Sift 50% 51ft + % 

U 17 1802 25% S 25b + b 

68 24ft 24 24% 

17 16 83 35ft 34ft 15b 

45 7 398 35ft 35H, 35% + % 

34 13 1W 25 24% 24% — ft 

2*15 30 28% 29% + % 

33 13 1430 38b 37b 37%—% 
7.9 9 288 21ft 20ft 21ft + % 
45 24% 24 24% + b 

. 113 zm 22 22b 

32 IJ 19 403 60% 59% 60 +b 

76 14 10 1138 23% 23 23 — ft 

70 II 9 3 0% 0% 0% 

19 6b 6M 6b 

70e 15 10 139 19ft 19b 19ft— U 
220 19% 10% 10% 

20 <Sb 44% 45 

2 30V, 30b 30ft + ft 

134 56ft 56 56 

700 50 40ft 49% — ft 

-- ■■ 47 25ft 25% 25ft + ft 

17 17 1440 16% 16% 16% 

24 25% 25% 25% — ft 
50Z 44 44 44 +1 

12* 40% 40 40ft + % 
7456 7b 7ft 7% + ft 
1“ 2ft 2% 2ft 
» 23 22% 23 +% 

1TO 21ft 21% 21b— % 
395 3% 3M 3ft— b 
502 14 13% 14 + ft 

» 7 6% 6%— % 

76 12 11% 11% — ft 

1 34b 34U 34b 
34 14ft 13% 14 
J5 11 1380 33% 33ft 33% + % 
35 8 8038 37% 37% + ft 

676 28% 28 28b + M 

39 3*% 30ft 30% + % 

10 40 48% 40 + b 

28 0% 8% B%— % 

Mb 17ft 17 17 — % 

200 46% 46ft 46% + ft 
300 31% 30% 31ft + % 
182 30% 30% 30% + % 
236 24% 24% 24% — ft 
182 12% 11% 11% + % 

, , -- 54 12ft 12% 12ft + % 
44 16 2314 32 30ft 31% +1 
, , 26 4% 4 4% 

14 27 6b 6b 6b 

4.9 13 74 35% 35% 35% 

25 0 955 10% 10% 10b + b 

196 6 5% 5% 5% 

63 8 160 35% 35ft 35% + ft 

400r86% 86% 86% 

3100x 77ft 76% 77ft 

2 24% 24% 34% + b 
40 37% 37% 37% 

Bg 30 38% 38% + % 

193 35ft 35% 35ft— ft 
226 11% lift 11%— b 
796 48ft 47% 47% — b 

3 67ft 67M 67ft 

1*2 4% 4ft 4% + ft 

2 77ft 77b 77ft + ft 
7 3 3 3 

117 12 11% 11% + b 

22 18% 18ft 18% 


Esf. Sales 11226 Prav.Sata 10554 
Prev. Day Open int. 41444 upl64 

FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

44500 IhL cents per lb. 

?3J® 5745 Sep 6110 6175 

72J2 57.15 Oct 6140 6225 

712D 58J8 Nov 6115 6405 

nM 4040 Jan 6475 65J0 

70-55 61.10 Mar 4455 65J0 

7045 61.15 Apr 65.10 mw 

.f+AS, «J0 MOV 6100 6440 

Eri. Sales 1J52 Prev. Soles 1550 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 7482 up 38 
HOGS (CME1 
*»0 B»r cents per lb. 

5175 3010 Oct 3640 3060 

5085 38.10 Dec 3832 3080 

5047 3975 Feb 3977 4030 

47J5 37.10 APT 37J5 37J0 

4*45 4055 Jun 40.10 4035 

4955 4840 Jul 4140 4140 

5150 4025 Aug 41.10 41JQ 

41.10 3875 Od 3870 3070 

49-50 4550 Dec 30.00 30.00 

,E5t. Sales 1153 Prev. Sales 0215 
Prev. Dot Open Int. 10382 off 423 
] PORK BELLIES tCME) 

I 38500 lbs.- cents per U>. 

8045 4245 Aug 4447 4045 


5540 

5740 

5740 

5065 

5045 

5875 


6155 

61J7 

<115 

6075 

6455 

6540 

6100 


3025 

3020 

3040 

37-07 

4005 

4090 

4050 

3070 

30.00 


5027 
S8S2 
5840 
5* JO 
6025 
5040 


6150 

6117 

6100 

6530 

6045 

6545 


+142 

+1-22 

+03 

+75 

+55 

+40 


+73 

+52 

+70 

+40 

+J0 

+.50 

+40 


7040 4400 Dec 

7050 4065 Jan 

7340 46JS Mar 

6075 5305 MOV 

6145 4755 Jul 

5110 5150 SOP 

Dec 
Jan 
Mar 

5135 5335 May 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 165 

Prev. DOT open Inf. 1440 off 33 
SILVER (COMEX) 


4405 

45.05 

4540 

4015 

4050 

4775 

4709 

4065 


-30 

—.TO 

—,10 
—,10 
—70 
— ,18 
—.10 


6405 

11834 

6034 

5734 

Aug 

Sep 

62*4 

6274 

6214 

6334 

6244 

6464 

12304 

6100 

5904 

Od 

Dec 

6374 

6394 

6344 

6204 
637 J 

12100 

11934 

S9S4 

6074 

Jan 

Mar 

6500 

6524 

6474 

6414 

6502 

10400 

6214 

May 

ILKB K 

6604 

«at 

669.1 

*450 

6X14 

Jul 

6684 

6734 

6684 

6684 

•mi s 

6414 

Sep 

6700 

ana 

67B® 

<70* 

7994 

6604 

DSC 

6944 

6944 

6944 

6MJ 

7894 
770 Jt 

6700 

6774 

Jan 

Mar 

7164 

7164 

7114 

7001 

711.1 

7524 

6934 

MOV 




7234 

Esf. Sales 

Prev.Sales 





Prev. Day Open InL 74.164 up 87 


3030 
3875 
3007 
3775 
40 JO 
4140 
4040 
3080 
4150 


+53 

+.13 

+70 

+53 

+75 

+J8 

—37 

—.15 

+150 


32808 

32450 33250 32458 33800 
327 JO 33450 32L50 33300 


44.15 4645 +250 


j^^MTenqOpdon§ 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Option 0 Strike 
Under lying Price Calls— Last 

Sep Dec s 

120 20,10 r 

12S isjsi r 

130 1045 r 

135 3-2» r 

140 2.15 555 

145 0J5 37S 

150 0.10 1O0 145 

! “^5°***” Doftore-cens per UBjl . 

CDallr 73 r r r 

7« 017 053 r 

1 -- 75 r r 046 

: ASM West German Marlu-centx per unit. 
□Mark m r 050 t 

32 428 440 r 


Aug. 23 


Mar 


975 

095 


Pats— Last 
Sep Dec Mar 


010 

045 

1UI 


428 

145 

138 

144 

075 

073 

007 


274 

145 


182 

125 


r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

002 

010 

032 

r 


da y_/3 f f 

■'•‘“"g* y«»-iwh» of a cent per unit. 


A34 

175 

050 

011 


049 

039 


43 10 
45 

12 

15 12 
17 

13 


<L5W Swiss Fraucs-cenft per unit. 
SFrnmc 36 r r 

38 031 

40 r 

41 r 

42 

43 

44 

45 

Sfrtmc 46 

Total call voL <729 

Total pet vat. 1558 

r— Not traded. 

Source: AP. 


1-52 

086 

036 


640 

r 

4JS 

r 

r 

t 

201 

146 

159 


243 

276 


r 

r 

074 


001 

054 

013 


r 

r 

r 

r 

350 


040 

095 

r 

r 

r 

r 

tun 

059 

091 


190 

£00 


024 


071 


053 

r 

r 

r 

r 

040 

078 

1.17 


-No option offered. 


Call open Inf. 
Pei open Int. 


148 

r 116 

' 225418 
>44233 


PLATINUM CNYME) 

50 tray abr dollars per tray ax. 

Mim 27556 Aug 

39350 25050 Oct 

37350 25740 Jan — ^ 

35750 26450 Apr 33150 33750 33150 33740 

36350 27350 Jul 33450 33450 33450 34170 

36050 30150 Oct 33050 34050 33850 34540 

Ext. Sales Prev. Sales 0030 

Prev. Day Open Int. 10774 up 503 
PALLADIUM (NYME7 
100 fray ax- dollars per az . 

M1J5 9050 Sep 10450 IO08S 10458 10060 

Oct 53 

14150 9150 Dec 10550 10750 10450 1B02B 

,, - 7D Mar 10650 10000 HU50 107.10 

ll-f-S ,21-3 Jv" " . w7js 

10550 10550 Sep 10740 

jdtSrtes Prev. Sales 735 

Prev. Day Open rnL 7570 up 09 
GOLD (COMEX) 

, 2JS lr per "w "*■ 

80000 29150 Aug 334J8 33750 33420 33070 

Sep 336JU 

Oct 33640 33950 33080 33040 

Dec 34150 34420 33950 34270 

Fed 34370 34770 34420 347.10 

Apr 36000 339 JO 349J0 3S15D 

Jun 3S550 35550 33550 35040 

Aug 36140 

Oct 3ALSO 

Dec 37150 37150 -37140-37178 
APT 38270 

Jim TV xn 

Pnev.Sdes SUN 


49J3 — .10 

5040 —.10 

9075 —.10 

5175 —.10 

52J5 -vlO 


+15 . 
+15 
+15 
+1.1 
+1.1 
+1.1 
+L1 
+1.1 
+M 
+1.1 
+ 1.1 
+1.1 
+17 


4870 

+030 

4080 

+090 

+090 

40.90 


Dec, 7M0 

MOT 725 

Jon 71-Jd 

Sep 

Mta 6M7 


73 

720. 

71-17 

70-29 

6 M7 


7+24 §6-25 

7+15 

7+26 63-12 
73-27 . 63-4 

72-18 

EsLsaies nSEjgHW 

Pre^DOTOnen mtJ<0JW op2528 

5100500 prlrt-Pts03andson««t_ 
77-26 59-13. Sm 71 77-5 

7+28 W-4 Dec 7+8 7+17 

7M . 58-20 MW »>7 7W7 

7+17 58*25 . JWl 75 75 

754 63 _8CP • 

Est. Soles Prev. Sales l<8 

Prev. Day Open hit. 4452 UP26 
CERT. -DEPOSIT (I MM) 

SI million- ptsoflOOPct 
92J8 8£B0 Sep «33 9236 

«J? S5L34 Dec 9256 9256 

9IJ5 8056 Mar 

9140 8043 Jun 

91.15 8756 Sep 

9033 BSJ4 Dec 

8951 8020 Mar 

Ext. Sales Prev.Sales _ 235 

prev. Day Open Int. 2444 otfW 
EURODOLLARS lUNNU 

S7 miinoo-pfsof lOOoct. 

9245 .8403 Sep 91.99 97SS 

9250. 8450 Dec. 9148 *1J4 

91 56 - 8010 Mar 9 kg 91^ 

91.15 S6J3 Jun WAS «N 

9084 8756 Sep - 9050 9051 

0B DJ EM 90.17 90.W. 

9024 8744 Mar W55 8955 

89.95 8084 Jun 89-34 8954 

Est Sales Prev.Sales.XjMO 


7248 7M0 
72-5 724 

71-14 71-M 

70-26 ‘ 78-27- 

70-8 70-8 

69-23 69-33 


.-4 

-2 

—2 

-2 


S-T 


7+25 

78 

75-17 75-17 
7+23 7+28 
7+W 



9251 92J3 — 53 

91.9? 9251 -51 

. 9MB — 52 

’ 91.17 . —52 
9080 —52 

*04* — JB 

9013 —56 


<1.98 9159 —54 

9146 9147 — 52. 

9L23 8153 — B2 

<083 <084 —52 

■9846 9047 — 53 

9059. 90.12 -55 

8950 0950 —56 

0950 8950 —57 


13845 

13808 


J342 

J328 


.11830 

,11730 

31630 


+75 
+73 ' 
+75 
+75 


EatsawE Krw-aarva -w+jw 

Prev. Day Open Hit. I2&857 offistt 

BRITISH POUND «MM1 

s per pound- » paint equate mow . 

14450 15200 Sep IJ980 1 4CE 1J«0 14013 

14190 15200 Dec L387S T JW0 1J840 L39IS 

14160 15680 MOT 

1J990 1.1905 JIM.., „ ~ 

Est Soles 10717 prev.SalH 0686 
Prev. Day Open Int. 41460 off 511 

CANADIAN DOLLAR <IMM) 

SperdlM paint etwolxsamwi 
J585 .7025 Sep J380 J3B3 J3M J372 

J36* .7004 Dec J364 J364 J3S0 

J304 • 4981 Mar 

J360 jm Jun ' 

Ext. Sales 555 Prev.Sales 575 
Prev. Dav Open int 8JEW up 48 
FRENCH FRANC flMMl 
Sper franc- 1 paint eauahi 9080801 
.11835 Mi 80 Sep 

.11660 59470 Dec 

.1T708 - J1425 Mar 

Est.Safes . Prev.Sales 5 
Prev. Day Open Int. 397 up3 
GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

Sper mark- 1 paint eauali50inpl , . 

J667 J930 Sop 5637 5653 

JffS - -J971 D»C J671 5686 

5731 5040 Mar J702 5712 

J715 - J33S Jon J7» J7S9 

Est. Sates 21591 Prev. Softs 36563 
Prev.DOvOpen Int 58,157 off 2530 

JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

Soar yen-i point eauataKUHoaoi 

MMSfe 503870 Sep 504235 J04240 MOO JOCT . +1 

1)04330 mms Dec 504255 504259 50 « 5Q 50 052 . - 

804307 504033 Mar JJ04277 504279 504277 504278 - +6 

Est- Sales £157 Prev. Softs 19J17 
Prev. Dav Ooen InL 39516 up 1564. 

SWtSSFRANC(IMM) 

I per .mane- 1 point equals *05001 
4B30.--.J4N Sap 4435 -4439 

4512. r J531 Dec 4473 4495 

4555- JB35 MOT 4530 4533 
Est Sales 19402 Prev. Softs 20874 
Prev. Day Open Int. 37462 off 482 




-J629 J644 +16 

J663 J677 +M 

5699 5710 +16 

5759 J747 +19 




4426 4447 

4461 4484 

4515 4525 


+37 

+26 

+M 


^ t0> 

r V'&SBZ 

f« n rd 

r rCi ,, v 


Industrials 


LUMBER (CME) 

130000 bd. ft-S per 1500 tad. ft 

Iran yam sap i3i» ;mi uom mao 

18750 
19S80 
17640 
18350 
17650 

Est SUns 


sop • ijiju IUW UIUU Midi —MV 

12750 Nov 12840 12940 12070 1ZSU® —1.10 

13440 Jan 13490 13£50 13340 134.40 —.90 

14140 Mar 14140 14150 I40W 140)0 —MO 

14030 May 14080 14080 14£» 14640 —40 

19050 Jul 1J0L00 15000 149-50 15000 

15450 Sep 15X90 —30 

2523 Prev. Salsa A7Q5 


I Prev. DOT Open Inti " 0639 oil 36 
GOtTON 2 (NYCE) 

50000 lbs,- cents per It-, 

77 SO ■ 3745 Oct . 5850 5850 

-7350 5000 Dec 5030 5053 

7035 . 5013 Mar 59.71 3955 

7000 " 59.25 MOV 6000 6090 

.7005 59.10 Jul 5940 5940 

-6S5D S43H Od 5440 5440 

. j&3S . 5115 DOC 5480 5425 

Ext. Soft* Prov. Sales 2J3T 

[Prev. Day Open int 20719 upltf 
I HEATING OIL(NYME) 


5740 

5745 

39.25 

5055 

594S 

5460 

53-90 


57J3 

'918W 

5335 
59 JS 
5949 
5580 
5410 


—JO 

—30 


— M 


+.19 

+.19 


34050 
49180 
48950 
48550 
49080 
43170 
42040 
39&70 
39380 
38840 
31000 
ESI. Sales 


31050 
29788 
30158 
30000 
31470 
32050 
33 MM 
33580 
34A00 
35540 

TMnn 


+140. 

+140 

+140 

+140 

+140 


+1.<0 

+140 

+1A0 

+140 

+140' 

+2JW 

+010 

4020 

+250 

4020 

+220 

+230 


7045 

6090 

Sen 

7080 

7060 

7445 

70U- +J4 . W 

-- 


6745 

Od 

7095 

7620 

7030 

7011 +37 

— ' — ■ " “ 

7490 • 

0050 

Nov 

7058 

7640 

7000 

7649 +J4 

L * ». 

7025 

69.15 

Dec 

77.15 

77 JO 

7640 

77 JO +J0 

r -re - - 

-77-70 

6940 

Jan 

77 JO 

7745 

7040 

7740 +J5 . 


■77.10 

7000 

Feb 

7645 

7083 

7345 

7*45 +20 

' ' ' ” ' 

7*40 

6080 

Men- 

7340 

7340 

7A25 

7175 — 45 


■7080 
- 7050 

6080 

6840 

Apr 

Mot 

7145 

7140 

7145 

7140 +20 

7090 +20 

-- 

Est Sales 

’rev. Sales 

SB 




CRUDE OIL(NYME) 

5 JSStotoL- dollars per MM. 

2950 2445 Od 27.96 2883 

2950 2440 Nov 2751 Z759 

2MB 23.TO Dec 2746 27J2 

.2950 2438 Jan 2743 2787 

2946 2425 Feb 2075 2648 

294S 2413 Mar 2655 2070 

2945 23.93 Apr 2035 2645 

27.96 2365 May 26JS9 2050 

7070 23J8 Jun 2£90 2£9B 

2570 2070 Jul 

5M> 

, Est Sales Prev.Sales 11497 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 51416 UP1492 


2746 2745 —82 

2743 2755 

2027 27.27 +41 

3642 -. 2742 +jn 

2070 2642 +43 

2650 2641 +44 

2033 2640 +45 

2009 2019 +46 

25-90 25.98 +.17 

2543 +J4 

2533 +J8 


Stock Indexes 


Prev. Day Open lntl36jn off 653 


Financial 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

Si minion- ptiof iM pet 


9133 

809* 

S«P 

9346 

9110 




0077 

Dec 

9280 

9281 

9275 




Mar 

9A46 

9246 




B741 

Jun 

9246 

9246 




8000 

S«> 

9122 

9122 

9122 



8945 

Dec 

9142 

9142 




8948 

Ator 

91.16 

91.16 

91.16 


rare VO40 Jun 9090 9090 

EstSalM Prev.Sales 7J87 

Prev. Day Open int. 37J17 up 88 

9090 

9092- 


—42 
— m 

— 42 
— 43 
— 83 
— 43 
—82- 
—m 


llYR-TREASURY ICBT) 

pr,n - Pl* 32ndi of lOOpd 
08-2,1 75-10 Sep 87-7 87-12 

75-13 Doc 86-8 86-12 

5£? SJ! ««■ >« w 

85-7 74-30 Jun 

84-4 80-7 Sep 

_W-n «M Dec 

. Prev.Sales 9462 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 62456 off IN 

H S J^ R Jr* 5 ii. RY BONDS (CBTI 

DMOO+ds * 32odx of 100 Bd) 

S'l 8 S"* 71 -' n 77 ^° 

Si °« 76-22 7630 

57-2 MO r 75-22 75-24 

7J-6 56-» Jun 7+23 7+26 

75-31 56-29 Sen 72-27 73-29 


87-2 

(6-2 

85-5 


77-20 

7+17 

75-16 

7+18 

7523 


87-4 

86-3 

855 

8+10 

83-17 

82-27 


77-23 

76-20 

75-19 

7+20 

73.34 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) . 
points and cunts 

19880 16040 Sap 18740 187.90 48085 18740 

2535 JS2S D * c IfiJO 1*050 .189 JS 189.90 

2DA7S 19010 Mar 193J0 I93JB 19105 19245 

JO6S0 1900 Jun 19545 19545 MS45 19055 

Est.Sates 4430 Prev.Sales 60305 --V 
Prev. Day Open Int 60652 up 1490 . 

VALUE. LINE (KCBT) 
pofnlsand cents ■. 

232 3532 2*-* 2J* i»ss 

252 ooc.mum mas 201.10 20140 

28940 20095 • Mar . * xt 

Eetsale* - Prev. Softs -5439 
Prev. Day OPenjnf. 11,106 «p4W . 

NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFEI 
potortsondeenta 

KfS ' 2155 & ,10075 10085 WBJ5 10845 

M 'S| JiSS M ?RS 

132“ 1,w ” ,vuo 

Prey. Day Open int. 5427off £158 


—40 
—45 
—55 
— JS 


+45 

-JS 

—45 


—.20 
-45 
— JS 
—45 


Commodity indexes 


Moody’s 

Reuters. 

DJ. Futures. 


—2 

—2 


-a 

—a 


Qo» Previous 

90040 f 

1^7f30 U73JO 

— 114.25 114,06 

Com. Research Bureau- 21S.70 217.90 

Moody’s : base 100 : Dbc.31,1931. 

P - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18, 19311 
Daw Janes : base 100 : Dec. 31,1974, 




Coiimwifities 


Kft 35b Xerox 300 

S’* ms 

29 19% XTRA 44 


£9 14 1839 n% 5D% SOft- % 
93 24 55 54% 55 

24 12 39 24ft 24 24b 


94 

01 8 
24 II 
5 


138 15% 14% 15ft + % 
1B4 33V, 33b 33%— % 
914 28% 28 28 — % 

1 20% 20% 20% 

10 12% 12% 12% 

IN 47% 47 47% + % 

.33 57ft 57 57 + ft 

195 Zlb 20% 21 
26 8% 8% 8%— b 

2001 83% 82% 83ft + % 


30b 24% ZaftCp 
2% 8b ZaPOfo 
57% 31% Zavres 
!«% 17ft Zen HUE 
21% 1M6 Zerai 
35% 22% Zurnln 


1J2 48 10 37 27% 27% 27b + ft 

ii **§ 8JSAA;t 

- a ^ 

1J2 34 12 72 25 34% 34% 


Aug. 23 

jfONG+CONG GOLD FUTURES 
UJW per ounce 

Hfth Law BM*** UR BlS Vl Adc 
}9B — N.T. N.T. 33280 334.00 337 JM 37900 
S-P- N.T. N.T. m00 
Oct _ N.T. N.T. 335.00 337JI0 3+3.00 342SB 
DSC, N.T. N.T. 339M 3*l m 34000 34000 
F«> „ 34J8D 34000 343JB 34£M 34980 SlAO 

Apt — N.T, N.T. 348JH 350E» 35100 M5.SS 
Jlta _ 35000 35480 3S700 35000 mao moo 

Volume: 34 lafs of 100 az. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
USA I 


j MSEHghs-Lows 


HM 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

340N 


Prev. 

Lew 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

34080 


Settle 

N-O. 


Volume: 139 lota of lOOoz. 

I L UMPU R RUBBER 

Malaysian cents per Ule 


NEW HIGHS 27 


AlaPw 11 pf 
Dafoantn 

HortzBncpf 

KCSouind 
Parker Pen 
RorerGp 
Talley pfB 


Avlall n 
EwmkpfC 
Intanco inc 
KhnbCiartE 
PtUIPtrpt 
SCM Com 
Transwy Inf 


Berhey Pho 

FtHawPap 

Intarcopt 

LeeoMasan 

Puto&vc NH 

Sotaemsd 

Trangllnds 


HEW LOWS 11 


Amax3pf 
Culllnet s 
Me Di-mlnt wf 


AppfdDofa 

DfttxMl rwnuiN 
Rubermaidwl TexasOGas 


CLC Am 
FdlrdlM 


CwE IMOpfB 
GlfSU440pf 
IntrxtBakr 
NYSadlpf 
Rohr Ind 
SOU NET pfA 


CambEng 

FaysDrwa 


Sep. 

Od. 


I Nov. 
Dec 


BM 

i83jn 

18275 

uaai 

183J0 


18000 

18150 

18450 

18580 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 

“IGGER 
El'iEH. 

The Trib s business section is now 
bigger and better than ever. 

And once a month look for the 
review o f the world of investment: 

PERSONAL 

INVESTING 


Volume: 1 lots. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cents per Ufa 
Close 

Bid Ask 
RSS 1 Sep— 16425 16450 

RSSlOct- 16340 16440 

RSS 2 Sao_ 15140 15230 

RSS 3 Sen— 1495D 15031 

RSS 4 Sen- 14530 14730 

RSS5 Sep— 14050 14230 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 

Moftnloe rinmlls per 25 tens 

Close 

BM ASK 
760 ®Mt 


34080 


Bid 

185.25 

18000 

18480 

18050 


Settle 1 
337 JO 
337801 
340.10 
34450 


■ Ask I 
HB&S8 
I85JH) 
18000 
185301 


Prevftus 
Bid Ask 
165-00 16530 

16480 16430 

153JB IS480 

15180 15280 

14050 14830 

14130 14X50 


Od, 


J«»- 


Feto 

Mar 

MOT 

Jlv 


760 

760 

750 

740 

740 

740 

730 

730 


volume: 0 lots of 25 lorn. 
Source: ftoutom 


800 

33 

790 

780 

780 

770 

770 


BM 

770 

770 

770 

760 

«c 

7SD 

758 

740 

740 


Ask 
810 
. 818 
810 
800 
BOO 
290 
790 
780 
780 


London 
Commodities 


Aug. 23 

Mtah low PtWteN 

SUGAR 

Starting pot metric too 

OCf 12440 11480 12ZB0 I23JB 11000 11020 

J2M2 IS-fS ES-® ™ M H7JM 71000 

imu 1K60 131 JO 131.40 126J10 12630 
13000 129.60 134JU 13040 13930 130-00 
, N-Ji N-T. 13000 14 MM 134A0 iSX 
14130 14140 14000 14040 13930 14100 


Commodities 

Cftce^' 9 
Low B4d Ask OriW 


Cash Prices 


MOV 

Aeg 

Od 


Volume: A762 lots of 50 tons. 


SUOAR 

French francs par name tan 

Oct U29 IJ03 1J22 

g J5 IS hS 

N.T. IS? 1^ 
cw N.T. N.T. 1450 


1J2S 

U25 

1330 

1J40 

'■«5 

147» 


+ 22 
+23 
+ 27 
+30 
+20 
+ U 


COCOA 

Starting per metric taa 
' > 1.732 1718 1J32 1J34 U30 1J32 

1J44 U2S 1.735 1J74Q 1J53 IJ54 

r 1J54 1740 1J54 1J55 176* 1765 

May 1769 1755 1767 1768 1778 1774 

Jhr 17» 1766 1773 1775 1781 VS* 

Sag 17W 1775 1780 1783 1789 1791 

Dee 1782 1775 1775 1790 1790 1795 

Volume: 3734 lots of 10 torn. 

COFFEE 

Staffing per metric Ian 
Sep 1463 1439 1444 1445 >445 1450 

«•* 1488 1475 1484 1485 T4M 1484 

1722 1710 1718 1720 1315 17U 
1744 1737 1738 1740 VC 1745 
—7 J7M 1754 17«5 1755 1756 1760 

JW 17W 1787 ITS 1,770 Vw 1777 

e» N.T. N.T. 1790 1420 1710 1400 

volume: 1489 lots of S tans. 

GASOIL 

U4. dollars per metric too 
Sim 23940 23000 239J5 23940 2307S 23940 
Od 23640 234J0 23025 23050 23640 236JS 
■715 5ft 23350 235-50 23575 5475 — ~ 

WS.7S M*S mS tot? TOCIW 

JOB 23025 23050 23025 23640 Z30» 

N.T. N.T. 23U5S 23000 22A50 «u, 
N.T. N-T. 227 JO 22940 TOson 23000 

22050 223J5 22050 22075 22340 22375 

MOT N.T. N.T. 20000 22940 22000 22540 
volume: *33 lota of 100 tans. 

Sources: Reuters and London Petntimum Ex- 
Bhang* fpasoflj. 


softs: 2432 


te8J LEW tats of at tons . Prev. oefuat 
N Ml Open interest: 224N 


CmwnodBy and Unit 

earner eteef. to . ‘ 

P««E5= 

Silver N.Y„ ox 
Sauroo: AP. 


Aug. 23 

^ Y * or 
Fri Ann 

US 
(ja 
*7340 
21340 

71-73 

, 79 28-32 

4^3 J »« 

6 JOK 03219 
Ml 048 
™-l» 13+13* 
<J8 743 


Jdvsts 

t 




eii'i,;.: 


l - . 


Sr - - ' S1 

’■I. V .. 


y-fSz^~ •: 




146 

076 

*73.90 

213J0 


- COCOA 

French francs pot IN kg 
Sep 2445 2440 sms 

Dec 2430 2425 2430 

Mar N.T. N-T. 2460 

May N.T. N.T. 2450 

Jlv NX N.T. 2460 

N.T. N.T. 2478 


2413 

2432 

2445 




^AvoUT^iof iita«.^v. actual sales: 
S3 lots. Open Interest: 877 


COFFEE 

French francs per »• ko 
Sep 1440 1440 1435 

® ® W. i% 5 

5S5 K:?: g£ ”2 

SW EtT; StX 2450 

tern. Prev. 

1 lots. Open Interest: 389 

Source: Bourse du Commerce. 


i 


DMRitiJHnes 

Options 

19. Canm Mart- OSMP marts, Ms per mart 


Strike 



Aug 23 

n&MBe 
Hf Ator 

820 052 

tlC 052 088 

JW 1.1S 

874 U1 159 
151 150 - 





Smxb: CME. 


j Dividends 1 1 Eamii^s 


Company 


J London Medals 


Aug 23 

bm ask ar 40 ^ 

_ — IMINUM 
Staritag ner metric ton 
Spot _ 72058 72740 72740 72840 

Krwnrd _ _ 74940 74940 75040 75140 
COPPER cathodes (High Grade) 
Sterling eer metric tan 
Sp ot . ,»«40 996S0 ,90540 98740 

F u rword 102040 102140 101340 101340 

copper CATHODES (Standard) 

SlarlMe per mahlc tee 
Spat *7250 *7340 VgAOD M0OD 


99040 


99000 


Forward 99740 

LEAD 

Starflog per metric ten 
soul „ «02 was moo 29*40 

NICKEL 

HarHng per metric ton 


29840 29025 30040 30140 


SILVER 


342000 343040 341040 342040 
348540 149000 3*7340 348040 


( Spot . 44250 44340 4*540 44000 

Forward „ 45840 45000 45050 45*40 
TTNIMWMertl 
Sterling per metric ton 

*08000 *09000 908540 908640 

. 905140 905000 905040 905UW 

ZINC 

slerBna per metric ton 
SPOt 50940 51000 31240 31340 

Forward 51449 51009 51840 51940 

Source: AP. 


i m S&P 100 

| index Options 


Aug. 23 

Per Aatt Pay Reel 
INCREASED 

Savannah Pda &f nd q ja idi' blijI 


"•asis ssesasaag*- 


CantrwBCore 
Sunlrest Banks 


INITIAL 


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. 


BUSINESS ROUMnTijr 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAY. AUGUST 24-25, 1985 



Page 11 


udge Suspend Suits 



By Michad Isikoff 



isjsgsawste 

*M Mon s3 
K^^ldeyicc protested the 


In 


.■»s r«S Waa 

^. ^Icraptey filing an 
pounds of fraud because Robins, 
py its awn adm ission, is not an 
nisolvent comnanv. 


* 


j .. 




lorn 


!f 


v WHipoUJP, 

. ^though it is otherwise finan- 

Sgfc kttr JS ff 

protection because it is unable to 

poodriditoShut 
FhmtMakbig Tires 
For Heavy Vehicles 

United Press InUmatumal 

MIAMI, Oklahoma — B.F. 
Goodrich said Friday that it would 
dose a plant here that manufac- 
tures tires for f arm equipment, 
large trucks and heavy machinery. 
, V' About 1 300 employees will be af- 
_ ' Vv. fected by the February shutdown. 
*- X* Foster Smith, a company spokes- 

-X ; man, blamed foreign competition 
V and depressed sales of sp ecialt y 
:C; tires for Goodrich’s decision to 
• slop making radial truck tires, farm 

:* ... lira and large off-highway ma- 
• ^ : j chinery tires. 

i Mr. Smith said Goodrich triad to 
\ : : sell the Miami plant but no buyer 
Awas found. He mid there stiD are 
-~I some potential buyers that have 
r-V’I notyet been contacted. 

The plant, which has been oper- 
ating fw 45 years, is the only one of 
‘ l~ Goodrich’s four plants flat xnanu- 
facture those tires. The others make 
mainly automobile replacement 
tires. Mr. Smith said that debate 
only “fair” sales for Goodrich's 
other products, thccompany’snth- 
er three plants would not be affect- 
ed. 


.V 


on Maker 


53“ with an onslaught of lawsuits 

3®E*"S ^“tions, «eri% in- 
■ sbortians and other iqu*. 

'“^fawBASSSff 

t K«° bins, , a 1 ^yBar-oM company 
that markets such well-known 
SfrL* Q*«P Stick Kp balm 

fe&isus&s&s 

ton women between 1970 and 
yy 4 ' when the device was with- 
‘town from the 

. Since then, the conmany and its 
“surer have paid out 53783 mil- 
tom to settle 9330 of the lawsuits, 
pot another 5,100 suits are peod- 
ing, and “the company anticipates 
a substantial number of new 
and claims in the future,** Robins 
said in a statement. 

Some legal experts said Thurs- 
day that the bankruptcy filing 
cock! end up backfiring against the 

company. These experts said that, 
because of recent changes in the 
law, the company ultimatdyvriD be 
anabie to adrieve the relief from 
huge punitive dama ge awards that 
it is seeking. 

Manville Cora., which has been 
cited as a precedent far the Robins 
action, tiled for Ghapter-1 1 protec- 
tion three years ago to aet out from 
under more than $10 billion m legal 
claims for asbestos-related health 
problems. But the company earlier 
this month agreed to a settlement 
that will provide an open-ended 
fund of $25 bSfion to pay off 
claimants. . . 

The filing did have the initial 
effect of gmng Robins the breath- 
ing time « wanted, however. 

“My understanding of the law is 
that everything is stayed in every 
court,” the judge said in a previous- 
ly scheduled hearing. 

“It was obvious this was com- 
ing,*’ Judge Meririge told about 24 
Jankers at the hearing. “You knew 
it, you knew it, you knew it I think 
it will bun oat all ri ght: It was 
inevitable.’’ 

Layoffs at Computer Plant 

The Associated Press 

CARROLLTON, Texas — Mos- 
tekCoip^ citing a continued reces- 
sion in the sennoondnetor industry, 
said it was laying off 500 more 
workers at its CarroHUHi plant ef- 
fective Friday, bringing total to 
about 2,600.. . 


Toyota Says Net 
Increased 22.5% 
bi Fiscal 1985 

Reuters 

- TOKYO — Toyota Motor 
Crap. said - Friday that net in- 
come for the parent company 
rose 225 percent in the fiscal 
year ending June 30. 

Net income was 308.31 bil- 
lion yen ($130 billion) in 1985 
compared with 25157 billion 
yenm fiscal 1984. Sales rose 10 
percent to 656 trillion from 
5.47 bUKoa, Toyota said. 

Toyota blamed slu ggish de- 
mand, particularly in the first 
ax months, for a 1.7 -percent 
year-to-year decline in domes- 
tic sales. Exports increased 113 
percent to 1.90 million partly as 
a result of increased sales to the 
United States and China, 
Toyota said. 

The company predicted only 
a 3.9-percent year-to-year sales 
increase in the current fiscal 
year, partly because of expected 
slowdowns to the Japanese and 
U5. economies. 

“The export picture will re- 
main uncertain due to the slug- 
gish market situation in the de- 
veloping and oil producing 
countries,’* Toyota said. 


Murdoch Petition Causes Speculation Casdema * ri eDe f ers 

A Consideration of 

New Bond Bid 


Las Angeles Tima Service 

NEW YORK — A recent peti- 
tion filed with the Federal Commu- 
nications Commission oo behalf of 
Rupert Murdoch has ignited specu- 
lation that the publisher intends to 
close bis newspapers in New York 
and Chicago. 

The petition was filed Tuesday 
concerning Mr. Murdoch’s pro- 
posed takeover of six television sta- 
tions from Metromedia Inc. Star 
tions in New York and Chicago are 
included in the proposal and Mr. 
Murdoch has asked the FCC to 
temporarily waive regulations pro- 
hibiting ownership of a broadcast 
outlet and newspaper in tbe same 

In what appeared to be a refer- 
ence to Mr. Murdoch, the petition 
read in pan: “If sufficient pressure 
•to sell is exerted, either tbe buyer or 
seller might very well cease opera- 
tions of the papers and liquidate its 
physical assets.” 

The petition caused speculation 
that Mr. Murdoch would sell the 
Chicago Sun-Times and the New 
York Post rather than be forced to 
sell them for less than what be 
believes they are worth. 

On Thursday, Mr. Murdoch’s at- 
torney, Howard Squadron, said 
that the piihitghw had not made “a 
statement of intent, a threat or a 


promise” to sd] the newspapers. 
“We never told the FCC that we 
would liquidate,” Mr. Squadron 
said. 

The misunderstanding arose, he 
said, because c£ vague wording 
used in his 10-page written re- 
sponse to petitioners opposing Mr. 
Murdoch's intended SI55-biIIion 
acquisition of the Metromedia sta- 
tions. 

■ ENA May Be for Sale 

NEW YORK — Evening News 
Association, which owns The De- 
troit News, said that it had told 
shareholders that it might be neces- 


sary to sell all or part of the compa- 
ny, The New York Times reported. 

The Thursday statement was a 
reversal of the company’s previous 
public position ana it appeared to 
acknowledge that ENA was for sale 
and probably would try to reach a 
friendly agreement 

Norman Lear and A. Jerroki 
Perenchio, two Hollywood produc- 
ers, last month offered SI, 000 a 
share, or £453 million, for the close- 
ly held company. On Monday, they 
increased the offer to S1250 a 
share for a minimum of 51 percent 
in a bid that expires Aug. 30. 


Warner Ends Talks on Sale of MTV 


The Associated Press 
NEW YORK — Warner Com- 
munications said Friday that it had 
ended negotiations on a proposal 
by Forstmann Little & Co. to buy 
the two-thirds share of MTV Net- 
works Inc. that Warner controls. 

Jeffrey Holmes, a Warner 
spokesman, said the company was 
involved in other negotiations to 
sell its MTV stake, which is owned 
by Warner- Arncx Cable Communi- 
cations. a 50-50 joint venture with 
American Express Co. He declined 
to identify other potential buyers. 


COMPANY NOTES 


Warner said recently that it 
would exercise its option to buy out 
its partner for $450 million. 

MTV Networks provides music 
videos and children’s programming 
for cable-TV. The rest of MTV*s 
stock is publicly held. 

Warner Amex is the sixth largest 
U.S. operator of cable-television 
systems. It owns 19 percent of an- 
other cable-TV programming com- 
pany, Showtime-The Movie Chan- 
nel Inc. 

Fors tmann Little, a privately 
held investment firm that special- 
izes in taking companies private, 
said it would neither extend the 
offer nor continue negotiating with 
Warner “in any respect” 


Ratters 

BRISBANE, Australia — The 
board of Castlanaine Tooheys Ltd. 
brewers said Friday that it would 
consider an enhanced takeover of- 
fer from Bond Corp. Holdings Ltd 
after discussions on a posable 
counterbid 

Rond pnnnnnceri earlier that it 
had increased its offer to 835 dol- 
lars ($5.80) a share from 750 dol- 
lars and said CTL’s largest share- 
holder, Allicd-Lyons PLC, had 
accepted the offer for its 24.87- 
percent interest in the company. 
The Allied-Lyons* sale lifted 
Bond's stake in CTL to 4187 per- 
cent Its target is 1465 million is- 
sued shares of CTL. 

CTL said Thursday that it was 
holding discussions with a major, 
unnamed com pany that could lead 
to a bid for CTL that would be 
significantly higher than Bond's 
previous offer. 

Westinghonse Acquisition 

United Press International 

PITTSBURGH — Westing- 
house Electric Corp. has purchased 
the assets of Gladwin Corp., a com- 
pany that services and repairs 
molds for continuous casters for 
the steel industry, it was an- 
nounced Friday. Terms were not 
disclosed. 


ADVERTISEMENT 


HITACHI LTD. 

(CDRs) 


Tbe undersigned announces that the An- 
nual Report 1985 of Hitachi Ltd. nil] 
be available in Amsterdam at 
Algernon Bank Nederland N.V., 
Amsterdam Rotterdam Bank N.V„ 
Bank Mees & Hope NV., 

Pierson, Hatching & Ptenon N.V.. 
Kau-Assodatie nTV. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

Amsterdam, 16th August, 1985. 


ADVERTISEMENT 


NEC CORPORATION. 

(CDRs) 


The undersigned announces that the An- 
nual Report 1985 of Nec Corporation 
will be available in Amsterdam a) 
Amsterdam Rotterdam Bank N.V„ 
AWmtiK Bank Nederland N-V_ 

Bank Mees & Hope NV„ 

Pierson, Heldrine & Piereon N.V.. 
Kaa-Associade N.V. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

Amsterdam, 16th August, 1985. 


Asahi Class Co. will invest 200 
million Singapore dollars ($90 mil- 
lion) in a factory to manufacture 
glass bulbs used for color television 
picture tubes. The plant will have 
initial capacity of 7 million bulbs a 
year, of which two thirds wall be 
exported, mainly to Japan. 

CPT Corp. of Minneapolis has 
expanded its distribution agree- 
ment with Oc6-Van Der Gnnteh 
NV of the Netherlands. Oc6 has 
agreed to purchase $23 milli on in 
office-automation equipment in an 
18-month period and had received 
rights to distribute in Norway and 
Sweden. 

CRA Ltd. will sell its 50-percent 
share of tbe Misima Island gold 
project in Papua New Guinea to a 
Placer Development Ltd. subsid- 
iary for an unaisdased price. Plac- 
er will become sole owner. 

Digital Eqrapment Corp. has re- 
ceived a mnltimilliQZHldlar, five- 
year contract from Electronic Data 
Systems Corp. for computer equip- 
ment to be used in General Motors 
Corpi’s truck and bus divisions. 


Green Island Cement Co. will 
end its shipping operations and 
write off losses of about 150 million 
Hong Kong dollars ($192 million). 
Green Island earlier reported a net 
loss of 25 2 million dollars in the 
first half of 1985. compared with a 
1249-million net loss in the first 
half of 1984. 

Hindustan Copper Ltd. of India 
said it planned to boost output 
through intensive development of 
copper mines to reduce imports. 
India’s copper output is expected 
to rise to 65,000 metric tons in the 
year ending in March 1986, com- 
pared with an estimated 44,000 
tons last year. 

Nortek Inc. of Rhode Island has 
withdrawn its offer, made Tuesday, 
for a $40-a-share cash merger with 
Transway International Corp. The 
company said it would soon begin a 
cash tender offer for all Transway 
shares outstanding at $45 a share. 

Pancontmentai Mining Lid. will 
acquire Kfim Holdings Ltd.’s 50- 
percent interest in the Lady Loretta 


zinc, lead and silver project in 
Queensland for 105 million Aus- 
tralian dollars (57.4 million). The 
other partner. Elf Aquitaine Triako 
Mines Lid. granted Pancon an op- 
tion for its 50-percent stake. 

Ryder System Inc, a transporta- 
tion-services company, has ac- 
quired Aviall Inc., an aircraf t main- 
tenance company. for S 125 million. 

Standard Oil Co. has estimated 
that crude-oil production in the 
Prudboe Bay fidd will not begin io 
decline until 1988. A spokesman 
said tbe company’s previous public 
statement was dial the decline was 
expected to begin in 1987. 

Toa Domestic Airlines of Japan 
has signed a contract to buy its 10th 
Airbus, an A300-B4. to be deliv- 
ered in February. The company 
now operates nine A300-B2s. 

Wefla AG reported that first-half 
group pretax profit rose 10.2 per- 
cent to 73.2 million Deutsche 
marks ($26.6 million), on a 102- 
percent sales increase to 834.8 mil- 
lion DM. 


:i Analysis Consider Motorola’s Problems to Be Temporary 


- (Continued ^ 
ntism. It looks to me as if well 

- have a reversal in the searicondno 
tor slump in three to six months on 

. the outside,'* said Jay W, Cooper, 
^ an analyst with F. Ebastadt &Co. 
■„/. “The industry is down probafcdy 15 
percent plus, and next year we 

- think it will be up 15 percent in 
- it revenues. We think Motorola wiB 
ir do at least as wdL” 

Several analysts predicted that 
Motorola’s lucrative business of 
. f. selling electronic products to auto- 
motive and government customers 
— which represented 14 percent of 
■ last year's revenue — would also 

grow at more than 15 percent armor 
i - ally. 

Many analysts say Motorola 

- ' most be doing something right be- 

cause its semiconductor division 
* has navigated the slump without 

• -• * the imgelayaffs marry of its eont- 

• i.- petitors have had. 

Helping Motorola weather the 
storm was the fact that it intro- 
... dneed its highly acclaimed 32-rat 
microprocessor, the 68020. at 


about - the Ttime'the shxrop -began. 
The 68020 is part of anew genera- 
tion of microprocessors that wzS 
give desk-top computers a great 
deal more speed and processing 
power. A microprocessor is a so- 
phisticated logic chip that serves as 
a key thinking component of mi- 
crocomputers. 

.“I think the 68020 is the best 
srdritectmeout therefor full 32-bit 
microprocessors,” said Eberstadt’s 
ML Cooper, who noted that Apollo 
Computer Inc. and Hewlett-Pack- 
ard Co. were using it in ibrir worfc- 
station. computers, often for com- 
puter- aided design “But I think it 
will get some very strong competi- 
tion from Intel when its 386 comes 
out fins ML” 

Making life tougher for Motor- 
ola is International Business Ma> 
cbine Corp.'s pan ownership of In- 
tel Corp., whose 16-bit 
microprocessor was chosen for 
IBM’s personal computer. Speak- 
ing about the IBM-Intd link, Mr. 
Gabon said: “That affects the vol- 


ume of our business, but we still do 
a lot of business with IBM." 

As one of the most diversified 
semiconductor companies. Motor- 
ola also makes memory drips, but it 
has limited its role in mat cutthroat 
business, which the Japanese domi- 
nate. After having been late to mar- 
ket with its 256-K.dnp, the highest- 
capacity chip now available. 
Motorola is racing to introduce the 
next generation, a one-megabit dy- 
namic random-access memory 
chip, early next year. But the Japa- 
nese are expected to beat Motorola 
to market by a few months. 

“The Japanese are ahead of 
them," said Daniel L. Kkslrin, an 
analyst with Montgomery Securi- 
ties. “But at least the Japanese 
won’t have the one-, onc-and-a- 
half-year lead they had with the 
256-K chip.” 

In semiconductors. Motorola 
has come very far very fast inas- 
much as 10 yean ago it was a con- 
sumer electronics company that 
was just starting to tinker with sili- 
con. chips. It migrated its money- 


losing Quasar television operation 
in 1974, and in 1980 it got out of 
the car radio business — the busi- 
ness where it got its start and its 
Dame, a combination of “mo tod’ 
and “Victrola.” 

Eves though it left car radios 
behind, communications remains a 
$2-bflIion-tyear business for Mo- 
torola. Although cellular mobile 
phones make up just 10 percent of 
Motorola's conmumicaUcns sales, 
they are the product to watch in 
that sector, analysts say. Some ana- 
lysts estimate it will be a S5-biHiaQ- 
a-year business worldwide in a few 
years. The bulk of communications 
revenues comes from two-way ra- 
dio systems, used by police depart- 
ments, construction companies and 
utilities. 

Despite the glamour in mobile 
phones. Motorola has lost money 
m it, mainly because of what the 
company calls “predatory pricing" 
by some Japanese manufacturers. 
Motorola has asked the govern- 
ment to Bod the Japanese guilty of 
dumping the phones, and the Com- 


merce Department has made a pre- 
liminary determination that the 
Japanese were selling cellular car 
phones for as little as 50 percent of 
their fair value. 

It looks as if the p resident wfil 
give them some relief on the .pres- 
sures of Japanese cellular pricing.” 
said Michael Krasko, an analyst 
with UF. Rothschild, Unterberg, 
Towbin. “That fact along with their 
cost cutting should enable cellular 
to come pretty dose to breaking 
even." 

Motorola has about 40 percent 
of the domestic market for both the 
cellular phones and tbe base sta- 
tions that process the signals. It is 
also providing cellular equipment 
to England, Austria, Hong Kong 
and IsraeL 


ADVERTISEMENT 


* 9 j ... 

* - % 


Of 
-,*■ ■ y 




■> I 


-.if 


rv- 


s 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) August 23/ 1985 

, Iinn ^*t£«32£ 255SSKW <■» iSSSE 

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«» 1 1. 1 im In' I T liirrmnmny — - Ex-Rts; — • Orw P ortormoneo index July; •- 





A leading testing and inspection company has an 
opening for a 

DIVISION MANAGER/ 
CONSUMER PRODUCTS 

in the Far East. 


This challenging assignment includes responsibility for 
execution and development of all inspection and testing 
activities in the field on consumer goods. 

This important key-position calls for a first-rate academic 
background in chemistry and at least five years of experience 
in a managerial position involving laboratory activities. 


Candidates between 30 and 40 years of age, having the 
necessary qualifications , are requested to send their 
application to: 

Box D-118, International Herald Tribune, 

181 Are. Charles-de-Gaulle, 

92521 Neuilly Cedex, France. 


FOOD LEGUME CROP MICROBIOLOGIST 

17ie International Center (or Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas 
(ICARDA) with headquarters in Aleppo, Syria. Invites applications 
for the position of a Microbiulogisl in the Food Legume Improve- 
ment Program (FLIP). The Microbiolorist will conduct research 
within a multi disciplinary team in the FLIP on riuzobiology with tbe 
ultimate aim of improving the (symbiotic niuo^eu fixation io the dry 
land agriculture cropping systems through lentils, chickpeas and (aba 
beans. 

RESPONSIBILITIES 

1. To stodv naturalized populations of Rhh obhnn np, unertake 
Rhizobium Strain selection and testing for suitability as inocu- 
lants, establish Rhizobium strain coliertion and us$ it in collabo- 
ration with legume breeders, in Rhizobium strain x boat geno- 
type studies for improved biological nitrogen fixation, and study 
long term persistence of the Rhizobium strains in field environ- 
ments To develop suitable inorulanls and inoculation techniques 
for field use in dry areas. 

2. To work closely with the agronomists and crop-physiologists in tbe 
n TP and Fanning Svstems Program in studying the biological 
nitrogen fixation in field experiments evaluating novel produc- 
tion techniques and genotypes and long term rotational effects. 

3. To strengthen contacts with national programs and help to en- 
hance their efforts on symbiotic nitrogen fixation studies. To- 
wards this end. to conduct special training programs in rhizobio- 
logy and in participate in the general food legume residential 
training course*. 

4» To establish effective collaboration with other Centers of ExceK 
io augment the local rhizobiological research effort at 

ICARDA 


qualifications 


ience of research 
ecology 


A Ph.D. ia microbiology with at least 5 

in riuaobiology. Specialization in the field of - » 

would be desirable. Experience of working ia developing ronntritt 
with lentil, faba bean or chickpea would be considered desirable, and 
previous involvement in training activities would be useful As 
essential prerequisite is competence in spoken and written English, 
and a knowledge of Arabic and/or French would be valuable. 

CONDITIONS OF APPOINTMENT 

■The candidates would be based in Aleppo. North Syria and would be 
responsible to tbe leader of the Food Legume Improvement Program. 
The candidate is entitled io an international tax-free salary based on 
background and experience; use of ear; allowance towards boosing 
annual home leave: non-contributory medical insurance scheme; 
pension fund. 

application 

Candidates should send 2 copies of their curriculum vitoe and names 
of 3 referees by airmail quoting reference FLIP/2/85 toe 

Personnel Officer 
ICARDA 
P.O. Box 5466 
Aleppo, Syria. 

Applications should be received by September 30. 1985. 


SWITZERLAND 

Our client, ft major consultancy Institute, 
has an immediate opening for a 

PROJECT LEADER 
NEW MATERIALS 

Age 28-35; degree in chemistry; 3 to 5 years experience 
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MANAGEMENT 

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TO PLACE AN ADVERTISEMENT contact ysur naorert 
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181 An. Chorlwdtf-OauBs, 92521 NeuiHy Cede*. Franco. 

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Fridays 

iWEX 


Closing 


Tables Include me nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


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THE MODERN LUXURY SHFS 



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TT1 SATURDAY-SUNDAY. AUGUST 24-25,^985 

Alberta’s Energy Industry Revives 



Page 13 


business people 


'Wer in New York, Up in Europe 


- W dollar 
drifted lower m New YoA on Fri- 
day, ending the week with a bearish 
sentrmenL 
The dollar was 


early for a long weekend. British in *c near term to push it higher/* 


rnptcy proceedings in late 1982. to Mr. Price, are the move to world 
, Dome’s troubles with long-term oil prices — the NEP had a two* 

fmemationalHerttUTntme ^ debt snowballed after the company tiered pricing system that paid 
RED DEER, Alberta — A new ^ ^ March 19Sl Hud- world prices for newly discovered 

federal government energy poncy ^ qq & ^ 54.1 oil but lower prices for oil already 

and a rush to take advantage ot ^ borrowing $4.5 billion to in the ground— along with a one- 
expiring incentive grants and tax - e ^ puT -rh-ia- year holiday on Province of AJber- 

laws has Alberta’s sluggish econo- KaMj fn ta royalties on new- discovers 


Investment Banker Uses 
Tough Tactics for Unions 

Sew York Times Service 

NEW YORK — When Brian M. 


5 


A. V-...?' : 


New York, although the dollar held 
above key support levels 
The pound dosed in New York 
at SljgS, up from $1398 Thurs- 
day. Other closing dollar rates in 
Yoric: 2.75 Deutsche th ^^ Vc 
■ Jgwi from 2.764; 83975 French 
i^acs, down from 8.44, and 225 
. Swiss francs, down from 2264. - 
“It was a typical August Friday," 
V saw Elaine Lloyd, an analyst at 
Irving Trust. “The market didn’t 
i get anything in the way of new 
; direction.*' 

* She also suggested that New 
York’s trading may have been af- 
: • fected by London’s activity, whidt 
■■ slowed as many dealers went home 


policy have meant no 


us a 1 airly thin Friday," 5 *hx 

£S 2 §j£K 

at 

S3Uli- a ub IU04MCL UKU yim uu iwu - — -- — - T' » , , ■ 

this work to push the dollar below in JEarope. on Friday came about 
2.74 marks without success. Next when ' 

week is devoid of economic stalls- that a-n. 6-percent c 
tics to trade on, and I suspect tech- fan 

nkaans will dominaie the market able for t^tofttaovOTDdahM 
trying again to push the dollar in the report on U.S. factory orders. 
dow£" • the dealers said. 

So-called technical traders base In London, the pounddosed at 
their buy 
torical chart 


Calcarv-based Dome appears to toWmesonnwmxnay's. Freeman, an investment banker, is 

■tews-} — a s&vssSs atsaarsa 

and gas province, bul_Wte^wrld imlaSd- Si toll, to Soy *° **■ 


The clients he so tenaciously rep- 
analyst at the resents, however, are neither deep- 
Firsi Marathon p<^« nor mnln- 


ly came about y™ w u* roes 3 rmlW Canndian doto >ta £ ^SS^STiZ^Sil Sliion-doll.r ongndgi 

ipants reahzed flJKinoA problems largely fast quarter Jt was the first profit JgJJgSj Alberta's turnaround. Instead, they are labor' muons 
drop m orders « * &,erav PoUcy, or since the third quarter of 1983. %* . . --jj-. of drill- whose members may be willmg to 


to the National Energy PoUcy, or since the third quarter 

announced in the Dome had a record loss of 1.1 


“Sure, there’s a stocking of drill- whose metn ^* in 

but .haf, because make 



NEP, a program announced in me Dome had a record loss of 1.1 ing activity, but that s because mase v nwner- 

fall of 1980 by the liberal govaii- jjjjUou Canadian dollars in 1983, companies want to gel PIP grams for profit-sharing and 

ment of former Prime Minister (rijQnnng that deficit to 197 million before they run out in March of ship- . 

r n ./iMii _ « jj e ggjd. atim ;« tmnhled company suu- 


Brian M. Freeman 


Pierrc-Elliott Trudeau. . 

The NEP was designed to bring a 


Often in troubled company situ- Fibres could split a $23-million 


resistance 
for the dollar. 



“If tedmidans do push the dd- and *t £4245 French francs, up 
lar below key support levels it from 8.406. Jn Zurich, the doDar 
could weD drop sharply after that,” closed at 
be said. “For sure, there’s nothing from aJAjj. 


dosed at 22505 Swiss francs, up 
(AP, UPI) 


foreign, especially American, 

aSSTtSSB «« »• according 


THE EUROMARKETS 


Market Ends Active Week on Subdued Note 


com 

oa companies sharply reduced 
their drilling activity. Alberta s oU 
industry, already faced with declin- 
ing oil prices, went from boom to 
bust. 

It is is easy to see that is .chang- 
ing. Oil rigs are going up inside Red 

. .. . f.. ilin firct (imp. 


tores, and has lifted restrictions on Under the new system there wfll as that of getting 


jp tutu m fa * *** “ 'p — " ^ anu - - . 

SSTEJSStoS: be no grants: “If it’s a dry hole, it’s acres, u, diem to *e ^ con- FMrprt 


all yours,” said Mr. Hallisey. 


Cutting Japan, U.S. Deficits 


By Christopher Pizzey 

A Reuters 

.LONDON — The Eurobond 
market ended what had been a 


_ . (CoutiMKd from Page 9) 

Deer’s city limits for die Erst time. paymenLs ^ ^ government has 
while west of the city, drflhngartiv- PJ3™ ^ y s b ^ dgpl situation 


cessions of unions are “no different international Association of Ma- 
than making a capital investment dunists and Aerospace Workers, 
in a company." “But when we play around m the 

For riant corporations those financial world, we netd someone 
concessions can amount to SIOG like Brian Freeman. He fills a lot of 

million and more a year. Using voids." • 

. them as a bargaining chip is what Known as a workaholic, the 5* 

ey bisneces^remammn^ as “Ibe exer- fo ^Mi udL 39-yeer-old Mr. 

and continuing contacts and con- . - r : — ..^,^ 1 ^ iuooiino sev- 


Ixmdon interbank bid and offered 
rates semiannually, but refixed 
monthly. This note rose around 6 


sultations. 


luing 

ana 


to wtaiw! not rise of economic power." Freeman is routinely juggling sev- 

. made me us uuusei hubuuu « n ti«ics but iliobmader Mr. Freeman is one of only a few eral union negotiations at once. 

p*d d,e ree*. of.U, dx-reend; bon^_ ^^^ud^detoh. 


’^cnotos of diilUng for ^-effeodngreobcoun- 


quite active week on a subdued basis points-to end al about 99.90 
: note Friday. Secondary -market Friday. 

generally showed sugjit falls A trader said "the new note’s got totaling; 


pnees generally showed slight falls A trader sain tne new note s gw , “T72T J ^ private company. Trans World Airlines. and keep coming back for more. 

:■’* From Thursday’s dosing levels, to fall a bU before it rmresents launched, dealers noted. stocks- mabe driUin£ - 11 “ T — The three uSo^ machinists, pi- To^sur^- Freeman has his 

S: ^ k f nKOfthe<idll0 “ 0 ” HMU.MM.AB? &£££.+##* wSdracyw wke chu^e of negpua- 

:;assraa£ 3 fe -sstLStajs: ^-saa-assss: saasaw- - ; «su*» 

vestor pul option after 15 years. It noted. , ^ , m ^ and it was not . Dome Petroleum Ltd. is one ot 


macr oeconomic policies are not 


luulll, Uiv uivnuu wuv - — p ICUUC! 

an apparently successful takeover . boos. 

bid for the airline. Robert Callahan, president or 

Fnr four vears. Mr Freeman also Eastern Airlines Local 553 of me 
Reserve Board's pouqy-setung For^yrar^rrewiiML TranS p 0 rt Workers Umon. de- 

Federal Open Market Committee has beolJeW®** scribed Mr. 

Led w25«* July 9 meeting -"ISfiSSHgft SLn_„« 


Reuters 

NEW YORK — The Federal 
Board's policy-setring 


ort Workers 

Freeman as “tough 
street punk with a PhD.’' 


Guaranty Lid. ~ "yean. Priced al 101%, the issw was 

T V oWy quirt that thu waoie, which lead by Y amai c h i Inter- 


aS£is SSSsFstf SS 55 SS BSSsSaBS 


SS^nthemS^atf^ant S^conqarcd with the total fees lapse. A debt-refinancmg package, 

‘-"“js ^73basis points. ofl% percent. - ■ ‘ ^ored by the Canadian govern- 

Earlier this year Malaysia Ddk strains totahng more ^ ^ meQt and se vera i commeraal 


Dome’s comeback from near col- but not necessarily me —r—- growth, but w receive a giani pay^ « ««■ 

“ sss-djy-ip. ^ SgTsa. i 


la^cireda jdOft-iillioa note'to to 1500 «*»■«« .. LSLsM^MioOlC 
used the “mismatch” formula. It during the wedt, though corporate years ano was pneeu ai 


h anks, rescued Dome from bank- 


To bring economic policies in the J*gS=» 
two counmes into greater haimo- ly higher money growth. 


York law firm and holding 
search appointment al Harvard s 
Graduate School of Business. 



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11% 10% StowStv 
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14% 4*6 RadtnT 

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3316 19*6 Ralnrs 
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16% Bft Reotert 
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43*6 » Rev Hey 'JJ 

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13% 8Vb RnbVwi 

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11% 10% 10%— % 
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4* «6 4*6— % 

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18*6 18*6 18*4 

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15 15 15 + % 

5% 516 VA — Vb 

13V, 13% 13ft + % 
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24% 24% 24% + % 
40% 39% »%— 

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12ft 12% 12ft 
23 22% 23 + V6 

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10% 10ft 10% 

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73% 23 23% 

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29 29 29 

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21% 21ft + JJ 

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41% 61% 61% + % 

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25ft 13 TCACD 
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28% I3*fc Tandem 

10% 4 Tendon 
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12% 1% TelPlua 

25ft 13ft Telecrd 
28*6 13 Teteplet 

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1416 13*6 M . — ft 
32ft 32J6 32% 

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1916 19 79 — ft 

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21*6 21Vk 21ft— ft 
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11% 71% »V9 
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51ft 5016 51 Vj + ft 
23% 22% 23% + % 
10 9% 10 

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17% 17ft 17*6 

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416 4 4% 

18% 18ft 18ft— 6 
35*6 35ft 35ft— % 
21 % 20*6 20*6 

22% 22% 22ft + % 

4216 42 42% + % 

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11% 11 11% + % 
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34ft Oft S JB « “ 

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14% 10 StunSos 
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72ft 4ft Sfl tec 
17% 11% Sbnpin 
15% 10ft SlPPins 

24% 13% Stzztora 

15ft 8% SK1MW 
4% 2ft SmlttlL 
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10ft SftSotteCh 

21% lift SoftwA 
29ft IBftSonoCPs J8 
27ft 14% SonrFd 
Mb 4 5oHoaa 
38ft 2T6 SthdFh 
28ft Mft Soutral 
9% Sft Sovran 
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a 16 aft Sfkdran 
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14 15% 15*6— % 

12% 72*6 17ft— % 
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% a 

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20*6 a 20ft + ft 

B’4 a* ^ + «* 
34ft 35% ^ . „ 
19ft 18ft 18% + ft 
10% 10% 1«b + % 
77ft 27ft 27ft- % 
12 11% 11% 

4% 4% 416— ft 
11% 11% lift- ft 
14% 14% M% - % 
21 20ft 21 + ft 

5% 5% 5% 

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13 13 13, “ ft 

14% 14ft 14% 

9% 8% 1% 

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46% 44 46% 

81% 21 21 
9 8% 8%— ft 

15% 15% t» 

29 28ft Mft- ft 
19ft 19 19ft +1 
4ft 4ft 4ft— ft 
Mft 23% W - % 
17% 17W 17ft— }J 
4% ift 4ft— ft 
43 42ft 42%- % 
17% 17% 17% — % 

24% 24% 24% — % 
6ft Mb 6ft 
14% Mft M% + % 
4% ift 6% + ft 
4ft 4% «% + ft 


239 
17 
305 

•m 

311 

1X0 Al 1077 
JO AO 9S 
JO 2J U7 
3234 

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8ft VledeFr -22e 2J IB 


4*6 VLI 
7% VLSI 
4% VMX 
Aft VolWLs 
7*6 VolFSL 
42*6 25*6 VOlNH 
3BU TO VOlLn 

IBft 17% VanDws 
6Vb 2ft Ventre* 

20% 13*6 Vlcnrp 

75% 


lift 9ft VlUng 
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12ft 6% Vedml 
22 14% Vail in! 


6ft 6% 4Vk — ft 
12 12 12 
5% Sft 5ft 
7ft 7ft 7ft 
IBft IB IBJb + J6 
39 38% 38*6— % 

a% a 2ou> 

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4% 4ft 4ft + ft 
24ft 24 24 — ft 

9ft 9ft 9% + ft 
14 13% 13ft— % 

Mft 1« M - ft 
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18% 18ft 18*6 + Vk 


w 


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14% 

18ft 

17ft 

12 

14% 


25% 19% IND 40 

13*6 5V6 wikrTel 
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lift 9% VtfMSB 
5% Wovetk 
10% Webb 
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5% WafFSL 
516 WMIeTc 
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21*6 15ft WAnorC 
17ft S WshwCa 
31ft 21V1 wettro 
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44% 38ft Wlllmt 
15ft 7% WIIIM. 
17% 8*6 WmsSn 

10% 4% WTIanF 
Bft 4% Wlndtof 
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24% 14ft WlaerO 
21% lift woocmd 
»ft 21ft Worths 
30% 21% wyman 


24 
73 
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79 
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41 
30 
53 
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165 
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99 
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19% 19ft 19ft — % 

9 8% 9 

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24 «ft 23ft— ft 
15ft 15ft l|ft — % 
7% 4% 7% + ft 

IJVs 12% 12% 

17 14% 17 + *6 

15% 15ft 15*6 
8 7ft 7%— *6 
12% 12ft 12% 

17% 17% 17*6 . 
13% 11% 12% -1 
32% 31ft 32% +1ft 
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9% Tft 7%-l% 
4311 43V6 43ft + ft 
12% 12% 12ft- % 
17 14*6 17 + % 

6% 6 6% — % 
4% ift Jft- 2 
7ft 7ft Tft + ft 
17 14% 14% 

11% 11*6 11% ^ 
281b 28% Mft-* 
24% Mft 24% 


10% 1ft Xebec 
Mft 5% Xl«r 
17% 10% XWo* 


702 

78 

1003 


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Bft Bft 8ft— V6 
13 12ft 13 


43ft MVS YlnwFI 1X0 !X ® 


40ft 40ft 40ft 


30ft 5% Zen Lbs 

13% 10% ZtoOler 

40% 30 ZtonUl 
8 2ft ZHel 
12% 3% avod 
15ft ift Zondvn 


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1X4 14 


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237 

17 

2 

312 

74 

107 


22 21ft 21ft + % 
12V4 12 12 — ft 

a a 38 + ft 
2ft 2ft 2ft- ft 
6ft ift «b— ft 
lift lift lift 


IF YOU GET 

A KICK OUT OF SOCCffi, READ 

rob hughes 

WEDNESDAYS IN THE IHT 



































I 




i!Li£ 


ACROSS 


ACROSS 


ACROSS 


1 What teasels 
raise 

5 Sell tickets 
illegally 
10 X is one 
15 At a distance 
18 Pan of 
HOMES 


48 Quarterback's 
quest 

49 Food Osh 

50 Like cerium 

51 Portico 

52 Antediluvian 

53 Object 


82 Conductor 
Solti’s title 


False Starts by harold b. counts 


PEANUTS 


20 Hebrew 
prophet 

21 Rajah’s wife 

22 Rational 

23 !!!t!!!l 
20 Locale 


57 Something to 
be counted 


27 Treatment at a 
hospital 

28 Patriot Silas 
- 29 Made bland 

and smooth 

30 Snake eyes 

31 House of 

32 C.S.A. men 

34 off (got rid 

of) 


be counted 
58 Bargain events 

68 Girl-watched 

61 Pyxes 

62 Inscribe 

63 Pon on Huon 
Gulf 

64 Actor Walker 
fromlll. 


66 Strains 
68 Major cocoa- 
producing 
country 
70 Lab animal 


83N.L. player 

87 El Greco's 
homeland 

88 Shreds 

90 South African 
plant 

91 Lowell's "The 

• Present " 

92 LL.B. holder 

93 Lazy Susans 

94 Clog or pump 

95 Blackjack 
phrase 

98 Gaucho’s rope 

99 Certain 
ringers 

103 Greek music 
halls 

104 New York 


73 Flask far Plato J®*!£S 1 l L°!5? late 


37 Farmer 
mining town in 
Venezuela 

38 Removes to 
avoid legal 
seizure 

42 Sharp 

43 Be a paragon 

47 Dweller in Moo 


74 Highball s 
77 Nantu’s look- 
alike 


78 Retired 

79 Vibrissa 

80 Former 
lightweight 
champ 

81 Galsworthy's 

•* of 

Devon" 


lOOMilland’s 
birthplace in 
Wales 

110 Pang 

111 Cartoonist or 
river 

112 Call 

113 Pointed 

114 Thurber’s 

“The with 

Ross" 

115 Ollie’spal 


DOWN 

1 Beside 

2 Waggish 

3 Dock support 

4 Gurnard 

5 Molded 

6 Thracian 
goddess 

7Thus, inTaxco 
8 Composer 
Delibes 


9 Wife of 
Eplmetheus 

10 Timber tool 

11 Actor in 
"Notorious": 
1946 

12 The Bard’s 
mate 

13 Istle product 


DOWN 

14 Plaines, 

III. 

15 Giotto painted 
here 

16 La y an egg 

17 Poker terra 

18 Device on a 
loom 

24 Like Leo 

25 Juan or Evita 

29 Piffero 

31 Resinous 
liquid 

32 Copy .for short 

33 Actress 
Burstyn 

34 Bundle of 
sticks 

35 Fruit-shipping 
Fla. city 


DOWN 

36 Goren. e.g. 

39 Overdo 

49 Trap of a sort 

41 Short gaiters 

43 Old World 
falcon 

44 Supplements, 
with “out” 

45 Pro 

Chamber 

Orchestra 

46 Abigail 

49 Revolutionary 
hero 

51 Tea cake 

53 Makes lace 

54 Fountain 
drinks 

55 Former First 
Family of Alaska 



HELLO, 

SCHOOL- 




ONLY TEN MOKE CAV5 
ANPALLTHE KIPS 
WILL BE -BACK'. 


cbc 


' 50RRY, I > 
DIDN'T mean': 
TO STARTLE j 
V YOU- / 


,.v\. r 


BLQNDXE 


b~HE33ES A 
WO BBLE IN 
THE SOBA 


. I'LL MA/E 
A LOOK I 



I DID YOU Flh® THE 
k WC 30 BLE ? h — 


VB&AND rd& 
r ROCWN& 

L,TOStB» r 




■* i" • 


' y>* ; Jr - 


BEETLE BAILEY 


hot/ce! , 

FRESHRVHTf 
THERE W/LL8E 
HO GRAFFrm 
OH TH/s Wall! 

SEN- HALFTRACK 


© New York 7*rnes, edited by Eugene Malaka. 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


56 Fold 
59 Ed of the 
P.G.A. 

61 Snippets 

64 Twilled fabric 

65 What a tourist 
drops 

66 Idol of a sort 

67 City in Iowa 

68 Pluck 

69 Bonn title 


70 Distort 

71 Violinmaker 


72 Adjusts 

74 Urge 

75 Heartsease 

76 Short-haired 
rabbits 


85 Wing-shaped 

86 Kind of da lb 

87 Hybrid 

89 This is hot stuff 


81 Short songs 

83 Allot 

84 Otalgia 


91 Errands 

93 Scripture pas- 
sages 

94 Track of a cat 

95 Saddle feature 

96 Concept 


97 Yoke 

98 Erect 
196 Emporium 
191 Sicilian sizzler 
102 Lamp filler 
104 Explosive 

195'* Haw," 

TV show 




9 

3 

S-Zf | 


^ 1° HOT/CE!-^ ^ 
fresh RHNrf a . 
Sgjg? 7 HEREW/UBE ' . 

HO GRAFF/m t TZxF 
oH th/s Wall! 

L 

ioo s pe/tecL 
' Gr+Ff>+i Rongl 
cm oMnarne .. >• S/pl 

Hare WHERE ot*x / 

kHocrnon.6 oftu. Nonce* scad-* 








ANDY CAPP 


106 Haggard novel 

107 Author Levin 


THE ILLUSTRATED ZULEIKA DOB- 
SON: Or an Oxford Love Story 

By Max Beerbohm. With 80 illustrations by the 
author. Introduction by N. John HaJL 350 pages. 
SI 9.95. 

Yale University Press, 302 Temple Street, New 
Haven, Conn. 06520. 

Reviewed by Michiko Kakutam 

“p XCUSE all this to-do,” said Max Beerbohm, 
L/ e xplaining why be was so upset with typo- 
graphical mistakes in the first printing of his novel 
“Zulelkfl. Dobson.” “If one is writing a history of 
dvflisation or propounding some great new gospel 
printers’ errors do not matter — they even brighten 
a thing up. But a trifle must be perfect" 

A savvy literary critic, as weQ as a confirmed 
aesthete, Beerbohm was never one to overestimate 


BOOKS 


As this elegant volume from Yale University 
Press attests, however, Beerbobm’s drawings amph- 


— who takes Oxford by storm. The Duke of Dorset 
a committed dandy who has vowed never to com- 
promise his pristine self-adoration by falling in love 
with someone else, tumbles for her chnmm , as do all 


Press attests, however, Beerbohm s drawings ampli- 
fy, rather than diminish, his accomplishment, like 
TetraieTs illustrations to “Alice in Wonderland,” 


his glittering bat minor talents, and in the case of 
“ZuJcika Dobson" his self-assessment was remark- 
ably astute: His only novel, ori ginall y issued in 
1911, is indeed a trifle, but a perfectly delightful one 
— all style and wit, a pretty fantasy served up in 
exquisite, ornamented prose. 

A satire on university life, aristocratic manners 
and the literature of Tragedy and Romantic Love, 
“Zuletka Dobson" recounts the whimsical and auite 

Li. , 1 m i *. . i 1 . • 


the other undergraduates at Oxford. When they 
discover that their love is to remain forever unre- 
quited, they eagerly race to the river to drown 
themselves m its shallow waters. “From the towing- 
path — no more din there now, but great single cries 
of ‘ZulerkaT — leapt figures innumerable through 
rain to river ” “Abomraable, yes, to them who 
discerned there death only but sacramental and 
sweet enough to the men who were dying there for 
love. Any face that rose was snriUng." 

Besides being one of fin de stedeEngland’s most 
charming satirists, Beerbohm was a well-known 

— j l. . i* __ ■ • _ . 


—“the toast of two hemispheres" and “a nymph to 
whom men’s admiration was the greater part oflife" 


now, those drawings have been unavailable to most 
of his readers; convinced that illustrations were 
superfluous in a good novel, Beerbohm refrained 
from publishing them during his lifetime. “If I 
cannot seelhc characters in a novd." he once wrote, 
“then they are not worth seeing. If I can see (hem, 
then any other man ’s definite presentment of them 
seems to me an act of impertinence to myself and of 
impiety to the author.” 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Solution to Last Week’s Puzzle 


Tennid’s illustrations to “Alice in Wonderland,” 
like Cruikshank’s to “Oliver Twist,” these sketches 
contribute to the story a new and plearing dimen- 
sion, so gracefully do they complement the qualities 
of the text Beeroohm’s drawings possess the same 
qualities as his prose: Both are fanciful in concep- 
tion and stylized in execution, the swift edge of their 
hyperbole moderated by the author's evident affec- 
tion for the objects of his satire. 

Although Beerbobm’s meticulous attention to so- 
rial and sartorial detail grounds both the drawings 
and the text in a recognizable reality, it remains a 
reality brilliantly heightened by hk impish inuigina . 
tion. In the Oxford of “Zuleika Dobson,” students 
spend a lot of time worrying about love and their 
soda! standing, and they hold plenty of earnest 
discussions about the virtues of Beamy and Truth. 
Bat in this fictional Oxford, statues hterally weep 
with fear, the gods shake their fists and grimace at 
the follies of men, and people generally behave like 
Freudian case studies in ex tr e mi s. 

A good number of the drawings chronicle central 
events in the novel (Zuleika’s arrival in Oxford, (he 
duke's plunge to a watery death), but marry others 
are devoted to minor personages and to fantasies 
entertained by various characters — the duke's 
imagining, for inctancg that ByTOU would have 
grown to be “a florid old gentleman with iron-grey 
whiskers, writing very long, very able letters to The 
Times.' ” Eight of the drawings depict Beerbohm as 
the dapper narrator of “Zdeika, mixing up real 
people and phony ones at will and leading Melpom- 
ene, a most befuddled muse of Tragedy, on a merry 
chase through history. 

Introduced with a succinct, inf amative essay fy 
N. John Hall, this edition of “Zulrika Dobson” is 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATORDAY-SUNPAY, AUGUST 24-25, 1985 


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U.S. Captur 

■ By S 01 ^ 00 S. White Tr 

CLEMENTOK ^"7^ 

Pknk. the mg? — Scott Ver- 

'^w5Siaff tt ‘Ssygs 

Bloke of England, aSarin* K a V B “ mw 
“««hf half poiSShe^S 8 ^ 6 ho 5 t * * 
™ bs ma^4^ 3 , to 

<fe£ s iS35b^ ^ SwSSiJSn? *?* 

gfes on Wednesday ^^™ saxid e*gbt sm- 

against an unexpected stSn^ 

squad wfcea they won thm-. _ (H1 &. B nfab-Insh 

“atcb« and f <***™& 

ttsSSSISSS^ 

•tok, ^ shot a one-under-par 69 on Thurs-" 
Montgomene’s 70. “Maybe thafsbe^ 

aadooratjy!" DOt Just for m®* hrtfor the team 

first amateur to win a 
m 29 years by taking the recent 


SPORTS 



Page 15 



Following Wednesday's heavy rains said sog- 
gy play, Thursdays matches woe played in 
doody hat comforttMe weather. 

La the moating fotersome matches, Britain- 
Ireland earned only half a point, when the teazo 
of Pan! Mayo and Montgomerie battled Ver- 
planfc and Jay Sjgd on even toms. The 22-year- 
old Mayo dropped a s lm pcty, 20-foot downhill 
putt on the 18th for a budie 3 that enabled that 
duo to gain a soKl 2t was the best foursome 

lnnt«4t /vf nnrtfmtiifinii me m tuK iA T WNtl tl Ni vwir 


ever led by mom than a hole and each team 1 
e 1-up advantage an three occasions. 

lie result of the awnring play was that the 
Americans west to the lunch break with a 9 V4- 
6 % lead. That put diem in a comfortable posi- 
tion, needing only 3 points out of dm eight 
afternoon singles matches to win the cup. 

The victory was the Z7th for the United States 
in the iustoty of tlw-te Twfrnnrel rarHprtTfhnTy; , 
which were first held at the National Golf Links 
on Long Island in 1922. 

Sigd, a two-time winner of the U.S. amateur 
title, and Verplank, the 1984 VS amateur 
champion, went to the 17th tee even with Mayo 
and Montgomerie. Verplank: hit his drive into 
the middle of the landing area about 120 yards 
from the 17th pin. 

Sigd then hit the approach over the scrub 
pine and sand between the fairway and the 
small, elevated green; the ball stopped, below 
the hole, 12 feet from the pin. After the Mayo- 
MoniRomerie team camoktcd its par, Verplank 



Riggs, at 67, Parlays the Same Old Hustle 



Montgomene, the Scotsman who is a student at 
Houston Baptist Umvershy in Texas, where he 
plays on the golf team. Tlusy halved the final 
three holes, all par-4s. 


s putt for birdie 3 and a I -up ad vast 
The Americans needed only to halve the l£th 
for a sweep of the morning foursomes. 

Bat after Sigd drove down the middle, Ver- 
p&Hed his approach iron to the back 
at the 428-yand par-4. Sigd chipped dose 
enough for the 
but then Mayo 
halved the match. 

The 41 -year-old 
golf for life instead 
years ago, set a Watt 
he and Verplank gamed the half-point In five 
cop appearances, Sigd has earned a lota] of 1214 
points. 


to concede the 
the birdie putt ' 


who chose amateur 
turning professional 20 


\ / * > ' i ' : <* ". J ■ \ 1 ■ ' ’ . 


UP1 

Jay Sigd: New standard for cap points. 

William Campbell, also a former U.S. ama- 
teur champion, played cm seven Walker Cup 
teams and earned 12 points. Bobby Jones and 
Francis Ouimet each scored nine points in their 
lifetime for US. teams. 

No member of a Brihsh-lrish team has ever 
earned more than eight points. 


The Associated Press 

ATLANTIC CITY, New Jersey 
— * Long before there was a 
called the hustle, there was Bobby 
Riggs, one of the greatest hustlers 
of all time. 

Riggs was to do bis thing here 
Friday night by com bining with 
Vitas Gerulailis in a five-set, 
5500,000 challenge match against 
Martina Navratilova and Pam 
Shriver. the world’s No. 1 women’s 
doubles team. The winners wfl] 

S2OT000 00 ' 000 an< ^ ^ oscrs 

Riggs, 67, said it was to be a test 
of ability. *T only deal with thing * 
that involve skill, a bustle im pl k* 
that the result is known in advance, 
that you set it up. I don’t do that” 

But be added: “Imagine an over- 
the-hill codger getting somebody to 
pay half a million dollars to watch 
me in a doubles match with a cou- 
ple or gals. This is going to be my 
annuity. Every year HI get a part- 
ner to help me challenge the best 
women's team. It’ll be like a TV 
series." 

Navratilova and Shriver, favored 
9-5 by Las Vegas oddsmakers. had 
wan 109 straight doubles matches 
and eight grand slam titles before 
losing to Elizabeth SmyUe and 
Kathy Jordan in the final at Wim- 
bledon this year. 

As of week ago, Shriver and 
Navratilova had not played togeth- 
er in a tournament since Wimble- 
don. “But I don’t ima ging it’s going 
to take us long to get used to each 
other," said Shriver, 23 and the 
world’s third-ranked women play- 
er. 

Riggs said he is not worried 
about meeting Shriver and partner 
Navratilova, the 29-year-old who 
has dominated women's tennis 


over the past few years. “People are 

underes tima ting uS," Riggs said 

about his team. Tie watched Vitas 
owr the years and 1 believe he's just 
as good now as when he did so wdl 
in some big tournaments.” 

Earlier this year, Genilaitis, 32, 
said Navratilova would not be able 
to defeat the man who was ranked 
No. 100 on the men’s tour. He soft- 
ened his statement by saying she 
was one of the best female athletes 
in the world. 

Friday's match marked the third 
time Riggs has lured a leading 
woman player into a nationally 
publicized match. 

In 1973, be defeated Margaret 
Court in a baHyhooed Mother’s 
Day march and won, 6-2, 6-1. 

That paved the way for' a con- 
frontation later that year against 
Billie Jean King; 39,472 were on 
hand at the Astrodome in Houston, 
and a national television andi<-nr»» 
was estimated at 50 million. It 
wasn't mudi of a match as King 
routed Rims, 64, 6-3, 6-3. 

“When Host to Billie Jean, I had 
hoped she would give me a return 
match, but she refused,” said 


Riggs. “So this was concoied as an 
alternative. 

“I made a couple of trial runs. I 
teamed with Rancho Segura” [who 
is 64] “and we beat one of the best 
women’s teams on the West Coast. 
Then l played with Mai Ander- 
son,” a 49-year-old Australian, 
“and we easily beat the 1982 _U-S. 
women’s doubles champions, 
Rosemary Casals and Wendy 
Turnbull. 

“] knew then I could take a 
younger man like Gerulaitis, who 
can still hold his own on the tour, 
and destroy the legend of the Nav- 
ratilova-Shriver invincibility." 

RiggS first caught the world's at- 
tention in 1939 as a 21-year-old at 
Wimbledon. Unranked and unno- 
ticed, he was intrigued by the 25-1 
odds posted by London's legal 
bookmakers. So he scraped togeth- 
er all the money he could and made 
a swing around the parlors, betting 
cm inxnseff. 

“I parlayed the bet to both the 
men’s doubles and mixed doubles,” 
he said. 

He stunned the tennis establish- 


ment by beating Hwood Cooke for 
the singles crown, and then teamed 
with Cooke for the men's doubles 
title and with Alice Marble in 
mixed doubles for a triple sweep. 
He returned home noth $100,000. 

He won the V. S. championship 
in 1939 and 1941, and then turned 
professional, beating Don Budge in 
a cross-country tour and spoiling 
Jade Kramer’s professional debut 
at Madison Square Garden in New 
York in December 1947. 

But these days, at 5-foot-7V4 and 
135 pounds (1.70 meters, 61 kilo- 
grams), Riggs is bow-legged and 
knobby-kneed and bean scam re- 
semblance to an athlete. He hides 
the gray in his hair with a mustaidy 
tint He wears hearing aids in both 
cars and his glasses are so thick be 
cannot see the net without them. 
He swings a king-sized racket that 
looks like a rug-beater. 

*T11 play dose to the net and 
they’ll shoot everything at me,” be 
said of Navratilova and Shriver. 
“That’s the way 1 want iL 1 can get 
everything bad:, and Vitas win be 
there to cover the rest of the court.” 


'Ovena* 


Hawley Cools Off Dodger Bats With a 4-Hit Shutout 


■i Fro 


K! 'ite 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dhpmdha 

PHILADELPHIA — TTie Los 
t Angeles Dodgers have demonstrat- 
Jpd that baseball is truly an Ameri- 
can pastime: Yon can- be rich one 
day and dead broke the next. . 

After scoring 15 runs: and col- 
lecting 22 hits against Philadelphia 
pitchers cm Wednesday, the Dodg- 
ers got only four Mis off Slum* 
Rawley Thursday might in 1<ytntg to 
the PhzDies, 2-0. Lamented the Los . 
Angeles manager; Tom Lasorda, 
“You can’t save the hits.” 

“We wore them down last 
night," joked PMadetohia Manag- 
er John Felske. “The difference to- 
night was Rawley. He was out- 
standing, he had good stuff, a great 
fasthaB.”'- • - 

Rawley also contributed two 
hite,--one of diem hi&'firat- career 
double, and drove in a run. The 
Phillies turned; three double, plays. 

Rawley (10-6) struck out three 
and walked three posting, his first 
shutout since July 17, 1983, when 
he was with the New York Yan- 
kees. ‘Tt means a lot to a pitcher to 
gp -nin e strong innings,” said Raw- 
JT ley, after pitching has fourth com- 
r plete game of the season and win- 
ning his fifth straight decision. “A 
pitcher has to show people that he 
can go eight or nine innings, show 
rhpt lie is in control and strong.” 


‘ “In his last six starts, the 30-year- 
old left-hander has pitched 49 of a 
posable 54 innings. In his six 
American League seasons, he oom- 
pleted only 16 of 65 starts. 

Meta 7, Giants 0: In New York, 
Terry Leach, pressed into a rare 
start when scheduled pitcher Sid 
Temandez suffered dizzy spells just 
25 minutes before game time, re- 
sponded with a. three-hitter to shut 
out San Francisco for the Mets. 
Darryl Strawbeay had a two-run 
home run and a two-run single, and 
Wally Backman weat 3-for-4 with 
two runs scored and an RBI off 
loser Vida Blue. The start was only 
the fourth of Leach’s career, which 
has been spent mainly as a reliever. 
He also bad a HMsnmg one-hitter 
in "1982 and fc 3-0 as a starter. 

CardtaMb 2, Astros I: In Hons- - 
ton, Sl Louis scored twice in die 
tiititb to remain abaUhgamebdrind 
New York in the National League 
East Joe Niekro had a four-hitler 
and had retired 13 straight batters 
going into the ninth, but when 
Tommy Heir opened the inning by 
reaching on an error by first base- 
man Glenn Davis, he was replaced 
by Dave Smith. Smith strode out 
Jade Gaik but balked Herr to seo- 
ond, bringing on reliever Jeff Cal- 
houn. Calhoun gave up a walk to 
pinch hitler Tito Landnim and sin- - 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


Parrish added an RBI single that go, rebounding from an 
carried Detroit past the A’s. Evans forced him to miss Wi 
connected off Keith Atherton, the game, Willie Wilson triple 
fourth Oakland pitcher; Parrish, scored in the first and tripled 



SCOREBOARD 


Boss! Boa. 


glcs to Brian Harper (tying the 

game) and Terry Pendleton (load- who had bomered earlier, singled runs to cap a four-run" sixth that 
tng the bases) before Bill Dawley home Lou Whitaker, who had put Kansas City out of reach for 
walked Mike Jorgensen. walked. Reliever Bill Scherrer the White Sox. Trailing by 3-2 in 

Pirates 5, Reds 1: In Pittsburgh, pitched two shutout innings for the the sixth, Frank White drew a walk 
pitcher Rick Rhoden went 2-for-3, victory and Chuck Cary, in his ma- from Joel Davis. Steve Balbcmi fol- 
drove in a run and scattered six hits jor-league debut, strode out the lowed with his 26 ih home run of 
in his eight innings-phis to spark side in the 1 3th for the save. the year, giving the Royals the lead, 
the Pirates past CmoanatL Rho- Red Sox 8, Rangers 4: In Boston, John Wathan then walked and 
den departed when he gave up a rookie Mike Trujillo, making his Kiddy Biancalana was awarded 
single and two walks to start the fourth major-league start, pitched first base on interference by catch- Major Leaffoe Leaders 
ninth; Reliever Rod Scurry yielded eight strong innings as the Red Sox er Carlton Fisk before Wilson hit + 
a sacrifice fly to Tony Perez, bm broke a six-game losing streak, his ma/or league-leading 18th triple 

got the last three outs for his sec- Trujillo, who walked none, shut out of the year to make it 6-3. Wilson 

ond save One of the hits off Rho- Texas for seven innings before giv- left Tuesday night’s game after be- anew kx. 
den was a single by Pete Rose, ing up two runs in the eighth. The ing hit in ttie nock by a throw while 
leaving him 13 hits short of break- 
ing Ty Cobb’s career record of 

4,191 --.v ... 

Cubs 3, Braves 2: In Atlanta, 
pinch hitter Thad Bosley led off the 
ninth- with a hone run that gave 
Chicago a three-game sweep of the 
Braves. Batting for rdiever Jlon 

Meridith. Bosley drilled Rick " ‘ 

Aouita Breaks World Record in 1,500 

league in pinch hits with 16, two of . enon 

them homers. Atlanta has lost 9 of BERLIN (AFP) — Olympic 5,000-meter 
its last 10 gaiTwy Morocco broke the men’s 1,500-meter world 

^ ‘ . track and field competition here Friday night. 

Aouita, who ran the second-fastest 1,500 ever behind Briton Steve 
Cram's 3 minutes, 29.67 seconds in Nice on July 16. was timed in 3:29.45 



m Iba Now Yad Thu 

SpeSbmder Bobby Riggs, left, and partner Vilas Gendmtis: *1 only deal with tiangp that involve skflL’ 


Baseball 


Transition 


»»nd # r ww H.'f. 

Rno^rs got to reliever Bob Stanley trying to steal a base. He had been UKr'aH* 1 *' 
for two more runs in the ninth. hospitalized overnight and roent Bociuaoak. 
Royals 7, White Sox 3: In Chica- Wednesday in bed. ( AP.uPJ ) 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


Brorftov Sea. 
WMtoker Det. 
Baines OU. 
Butler Cle. 


M 
70 170 
7$ 141 
J0» m 
76 1SS 
St 117 
37 M 
72 MI 
>4 144 
61 141 
78 143 


Pel. 

ass 

452 

447 

JB6 

SU 

-312 

Jtl 

JOB 

407 

406 



NFL Player Union Seeks 
Increase in Roster Limit 


i,-:* 






By Michael Janofsky 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Gene Upshaw, 
the executive director of the Na- 
tional Football League Players As- 
sociation, said. Thursday that he 
has intensified his effort to per- 
suade league owners to expand ros- 
ter sizes to 49 players. When the 
season opens Sept- 8, each team 
will carry 45 players. 

H Upshaw said that in recent days 
he has telephoned owners and dub 
executives known to favor the 
smaller squad size, urging them to 
reconsider. He has also discussed 
the issue this week with Pete Ro- 
adie, the league commissioner. 

“I haven’t given up ycC Up- 
shaw said from his office m .Wash- 
ington. “Until they play the first 
jt»s not to late to do some- 
{tang about it I have reason to 
believe we’re malting headway get- 
ting some teams to reconsider ttieir 
vote.” The main reason for ms 
campaign, Upshaw arid, «ai (that 
the “quality of the game suffers 

with the smaller squads. 

He said that with smaller testers, 
players face a greaterpossibityof 
injury. “When the fi»t 
Stbis wed£ ^ 

to Tuesday’s 60-player Jant for 
w each team, "tbe.iWP^Jd 
H pkyere on the injured 
owners say they want to sa 
ey with smaller squad^bntthey 

Sve to pay these guys 

The owners have taken xp 
issue of squad size twice smee me 
end of last season, ax nKse J D ^ 1J . 
March and May. Vie 

mom provides tna ^ A 
have a mbrimum of 45 P ¥ „ 

voteis required to mc^^m 

it, but because 

March, the size reverted to »■ i 

May, a vote to lflCreaS ®J^ needed 
49 was taken: 21 votes were nerteu 

to make the change h* 11 ° n ^ 

chibs voted y«- told 

Upshaw said that ww 

4 him tofcusve any dub intend » 
* changing its vote to norfy the 

“aoouple at dobs have cafie^W” 

SSMSSISS 


end who had been holding out for & 
new contract, and Joe Pisanak, the 
33-year-old quarterback who was 
released last month by the Phila- 
delphia Eagles. Johnson’s return 
leaves four Ddplun veterans out rtf 
camp in contract disputes — quar- 
terback Dan Marino, linebacker 

NFL TRAINING NOTES 

Bob Brudzinski, safety Glenn 
Blackwood and quarterback-re- 
ceiver Jim Jensen, nsarrik is now 
the fourth quarterback in camp, 
along with veteran Don Strode and 
two free agents, Bryan Clark and 
Lou Paglcy. 

□ 

Joe Montana, the San Francisco 
49er quarterback, will probably 
tniss the exhibition game Saturday 
against San Diego because of a sore 
back that has been bothering him 
throughout training camp. BiD 
Walsh, the 49a- coach, said the in- 
jury might be seme enough to 
keep him out of a regular-season 


With Jobs Hannah and Brian 
Holloway inured, the New En- 
gland Patriots plan to shuffle their 
offensive fine for Friday night's ex- 
hibition game against Washington. 
Hannah, an all-pro, js out at left 
guard with a strained caff misdc. 
Holloway has a bad back. Coach 
Raymond Berry will move center 
mw Hannah’s spot at 
mig to 
ay lor 

[ray. Steve mow wm fill ip 
n for Darryl Haley, a tackle 
who was figured earner. 

• fa their 23-1710® to flieAtlan- 

ja Falcons Saturd^r 

Bav Buccaneers aid some- 

•giffijpsasE 

ferswsgs 

S3 upby Mark Witte, J^o re- 
SSdftynd* for a touchdown. 

•Ron Meyer, who was dismissed 
.cdreNew En&Ian d P&ttwtfeoscfa 
season, m now 


ion Said Aouita of. 
at an international 

Padres 3, Expos 0: In Montreal, 

Steve Garvey doubled home two 

runs in the third and Andy Haw- .. . . _ .. , 

ldns pitched a complete game four- at Fnday*s ISTAF meet m Berlin s western sector, 
hitter chat handed the Expos their Aouita, 24, ran a 3:29.71 in the Nice 1,500, and on Wednesday in 
fourth straight loss (three of them ju* missed Cram’s mile world record by docking 3:49.62, the 

shutouts). Hawkins (16-4) retired second-fastest time ever. He also broke the 5,000 mark in Oslo od July 27, 
14 straight batters between the lowering Briton Dave Moorcroft’s 13:00.41 by a hundredth of a second 
fourth and sixth innings to hdp cut , , T ( , ~ - 

Los Angeles’s lead in the West to Mflncmi Jjg KeOIlM JcTOHI AIM at IA 
seven games. ° ° 

D NEW YORK (AP) — 

Angeb 3i, Yankees 2: In the Ray (Boom Boom) Maocini, 

American Leagpe, in A n ahei m , the former World Boxing 
California, pinch hitter Bob Association lightweight 
Boone’s two-out single in the ninth champion, announced his 
scored Bobby Grich from second retirement Thursday, 
base with the run that ended New “This decision is mine 
York’s winning streak at seven and mine alone,” said Man- 
games. Mike Witt, who threw 176 rim. 24, who lost the title to 
pitches, struck out 10 in registering Livingstone Bramble when 
ins sixth complete game of the year, he was stopped in the 14th 
He also held Don Mattingly to an round on June !, 1984. He 
D-for-5 night, potting a stop to the tried to regain the crown 
Yankee first baseman’s 19-game last Feb. 16, but Bramble 
hitting streak. Boone, who did not won a unanimous 15-round 
start because of a putted groin tnus- decision, 
de, trotted gingerly to first base, Mancini, who turned pro 
and then turned to accept congrat- in 1979, has a record of 29-3 
Illarions from his teammates on ins with 23 knockouts. Man- 
game- winner. dni, then 20-0, challenged 

Mariners 4, Orioles (fcln Seattle, Alexis Argue II o for the 
Matt Young broke a six-game k»- World Boxing Council 
ing streak with a five-hit shutout tigbtwrigbt title on Oct 3, 
and PhQ Bradley drove in three 1981. He was knocked out 
runs with a homer and a double as in the 14th round. Two vic- 
ihe Mariners dumped Baltimore, tones .later, he challenged 
Young had not won since June 25, Art Frias for the WBA title 
and the shutout was his first since and woo on a first-round 
his rookie season in 1983. knockout 

Tigers 5, A’s 3: In Oakland, Cali- He defended the title four 
forma, Darrell Evans hit the first times before loang to Bram- 
pitchof the 13th inning for his 28 tb Me. In one of those de- 
home run of the season and Lance f raises, on Nov. 13, 1982, 

Duk Koo Kim of Korea was injured fatally when Mancini knocked him 
out in the 14th round. 



Ray Mhikhb, laming a right to Liv- 
ingstone Bramble's brow on Feb. 16. 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
G AS R 
117 47S 
112 401 

101 398 
117 47S 

M 373 

102 301 
110 47# 

114 4M 
114 450 
119 4*7 

Rum: HnNcnv Now York. 104; Ripken. 
BottlmorpjM; WMtofcer. Detroit. 84; Winfield. 
Maw York. 82; Murray. BolHmore. 30; Oevis, 
Oakland. <L 

RBts: Matttngtv. New York, loo; Murray, 
Baltimore, 93; Winfield, New York, 8*; Rip- 
ken. Baltimore. 04; Fhk. Chlcaoa. 82. 

HUt: Bobos, notion. ITS; MottlnelY. New 
York, 155; Bradley. BcaN to, MB; WIHon. Kan- 
•as City. 145; WWfoker, DotwH. 144. 

Thursday’s line Scores 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Sob Mom 002 OH 0111—3 4 1 

Montreal 000 000 008-0 4 2 

Hawkins and Kennedy; Youmans. Burke 
10) and Bvtora. W — How* Im. 144. L— Yew 
mono, 1-1. 

Los An p et es 000 008 008—0 4 8 

PMbHteMla 100 100 OOa— 1 12 1 

Reus&Hewen (0)anO$dascJa; Rawley and 
Virgil. W — Rnwtcy, 184. L— Reusv IM 
San FnmcNoo 0M ON 008-0 s i 

New York 080 112 »*— 7 12 B 

Blue, Jettawt 171. William (SI, Minton (91 
and Brenlvj Leadiand Carter. W— Leoch.3-1. 
L— Blue, SO. H R— OLYrf Strawberry (IV). 
CtacUmaH 080 ON 001-4 < 1 

Plit um refi Ml on ten— 5 f * 

Tlbbi, Price (7). Power U) and Van Ganter, 
Din (4); Rhoden. Scurry (9) and Pena W- 
Rlwdea Ml L— Tibbs, A-U Sv— Scurry t». 
CMCbbo 0M ON 001—3 12 1 

Atlanta M 009 900-2 7 8 

Bated®. Brusetor (7), NwrWIlh 10). Smith 
f9; and Oavbu BedmAn. Camp W and Car- 

one. w— Me rtd lWw M. I Came. **. &»— 

Smith <271. HRs— CM, Cey <141, Bosley tSJ. 
SL Loots NO ON 002—2 4 1 

Houston tOO ((• 000—1 0 I 

Tudor, Horton (S), Daytev 19) and Porter; 
Niekro, smith (9). Calhoun (9). Dawley (9) 
and Mlserock, Bailey (9). W— Horton. 2^. L — 
Calhoun, 1-2. Sr — Day ley (101. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Tems OH BM 022—4 11 3 

Boston 004 012 01W-B 9 1 

Notes, Welsh 151, Mason (71. Schmidt (0) 
and Petrelll; TruliMe, Stanley (9) and Ged- 
mon. W— TrolUlo, VS. L— Notes. 4-7. 

Kansas atr toi M eej— 7 » 7 

ChlcaM 030 ON 000-3 5 3 

Jackson, Ocrtsonberry <01 and Woman.- Da- 
vis. SaUlnar (Ol. Wo hrm eto tsr <87- Aowsto (9), 
Gfeofon <91 and Fisk. W— Jockswv 12-7. L— 
Davis. 1-L 3v— Qutsenberrv (30). HR— Kan- 
sas City, Button! <261. 

BalHmoro ON BM 004-0 5 0 

SeWffe 002 018 80s— 4 V 0 

McGrenor. Stewart (5) and De mo se y; 

Young md Kearney. W — Youno, DU L — 
MCGrogor, 10-11. HR— Seattle. Bradley (10). 
New York IN 1B0 000—9 I • 

California (NO dm on—* 9 i 

Guidry, Banfl (9). Rlahettt (91 and Wvne- 
gor; Witt and Narron. w— Wl»!,ll-7.L— floral, 
4-S. HR — Cantortlla. Down! no 1147. 

Cetrotf 001 NO TOO DM 2—5 14 3 

128 BN ON ON 0—3 0 I 


Doubles: Mattingly. New York. 38; Buck- 
ner, Boston, 3$; Boose. Boston, 32; Cooper, 
Milwaukee. 30; Walker. Chicago, 30. 

Trtatas; Wilson. Kansas City. W Butler, 
Cleveland. 12; Puckett, Minnesota, 70; Coo- 
per, Milwaukee. 0; Bradley. Seattle, 6. 

Heme Runs: Fisk, Chicago, 32; Evans, De- 
troit, 28; Balkan!, Kansas City, 2&i Thomas, 
Seattle, 24; Kingman, Oakland, 24; Presley, 
Seattle, 24. 

Stolen Boms: Henderson, New York, 56; 
Pettis. California. 39; Butler, Cleveland. 35; 
Wilson, Kansas aty, 34; smith, Kamos aty, 
30; Mascbv. Toronto, 30. 

PITCHING 

Won-Loat/WUMoe PcL/EBA; Guidry. New 
York.l«-LS08.292jSat«erlwgen, Kansas aty, 
15-5,-750, 280.- Birtsaa. Oakland. ^ < A9ZXS3; 
Howell. Oakland, VA. M2. 1J»; Romanlck. 
California, km. ms. 147. 

Mrikeaats: Blytowerv Mlnneiido, 157; Mor- 
ris. Defrolf, 148; Banntsfcr, Chicago, 139; Witt, 
Calllarnla, 134; Burns, Chicago, 135, 

Savw: Quteenhorry, Kansas Citv, 30; Her- 
nandos. Detroit, 34; Howell, Oakland. 23; 
Rlghetn, New York. 23; Moore. CaiHornl 0,22. 


BASEBALL 
American League 

CALIFORNIA— Placed Urbane Lugo, 
Wtriier.on the 15-dov disabled list. Pur ch ased 
the c on i m e t of Alan Fowlkes. Mlcher. from 
Edmonton of the PocMc Coast League: 

DETROIT— Waived Doug Balr.nHdwr.fcr 
the Purpose of bMhb Mm Ms uneondIWanoJ 
release. 

OAKLAND— Acnvafed Tom' Pftllllae. M- 
fMder. Oct toned Bill Krueger, ottcher, to To- 
co ma of Pacfflc Coast League. 

Hattanori longue 

MONTREAL — Recalled Andres Galar- 
raga. InfleWer. Waived Sieve Nknela, catch- 
er. for the purpose ol shrlng him Ms uncondi- 
tional release. Picked up the option for Ike 
19*6 season OH the contract of Andre Dawson, 
outfielder. 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Association 

ATLANTA— Stoned Tracy Jackson, guard, 
to a multiyear contract. 

INDIANA— Announced that Winfred King: 
confer, and Kenton Edefin. forward, wfif not 
report fa training camp 

FOOTBALL 
National Football 


NATIONAL LRAGUE 
G AB R 

H 

Pci. 

DETROIT— signed Clarence Chapman, 
CDmefbacfc.taalrea-aeeni contract. Waived 

McGee SU_ 

109 

429 

82 

US 

461 

Al Latimer, comtrtjack. and Burl Muenllng- 

Herr WJL. 

776 

434 

70 

740 

-323 

tight end. 

Guerrero LA. 

no 

388 

83 

135 

-322 

HOUSTON— Stoned Richard Johnson, cor- 

Bockmon N.Y. 

IM 

360 

59 

178 

-306 

nerBoek. 

Gwvnn Lb. 

115 

478 

M 

144 

JM 

INDIANAPOLIS — WaNod Jim Merrils, 

Rabies Mon. 

IM 

441 

05 

134 

-KM 

nose tackle. Ctalmed Danas Cameron, nose 

Moreland QiL 

117 

420 

Sl 

134 

JOO 

tackle, tram waivers. 

Porker Cln. 

117 

40 

50 

«8 

JM 

MIAMI— SfancaJoePlsardk. quarterback. 

Cna Hou. 

104 

414 

49 

123 

xn 

N.Y. JETS— Signed Sid Abramowttx and 

Oester an. 

108 

377 

42 

112 

391 

Steve August, offensive tackles, waived John 


Rons: Murphy, Atlanta. 94 : Rallies. Montre- 
al, 84; Coleman, St Louis, 8$; Guerrero. Los 
Angela* 83; McGee, St. Lou tv 82. 

RBIk Murphy, AHanta, B9; Parker, Cincin- 
nati, 84; Clark, st Louis, 84; Hrrr. St. Loafs. 
83; Wilson. Philadelphia. 71 
Nits: McGee, SL Loots, 155; Gwvnn, San 
Diego. 144; Herr. SL Louis. 140; Parker. On- 
cfnncrtL U8; names, Montreal. 734. 

Doubles: Herr. St. Louis.®; Parker, Clndrv- 
notL 29; Woltoch. MontreaL »; Hernandez. 
New York, 28; Wilson, PnllodalpMa. 27. 

Triples; McGee. SL Louis. W; Samuet, Phll- 
odelpblo. 11; Cetemon. BL Louis, 10; Raines. 
Mon freoL 9; Gamer. Houston, 4; Gladdsn, Scot 
Fronc l s c a. 4; Law, Montreal. L 
Home Robb: Merpbv, Atlanta, 33; Guerre- 
ta Las Angeles, ®; Parker, Cincinnati, 23; 
Schmidt, Philadelphia, 22; Clark, SLLouls,21. 

584m Bases: Coleman, SL Louis, B3; 
Raines, MontreaL 48; Loots. Chlcaoo. 42; 
McGee: Sf. Louts, 43; Rodus. Cincinnati. 41. 

PITCHING 

Wop-Losl/Wtoalop PcL/BRA; Franco, Chv 
c/nnaft 70-1, JOT, Ijl.-WWch, Los Angelas, 9-t. 
-900. 1.94; Gooden, New York. 1M, JA4. L74; 
Hawkins, San Dieoo, US-4, jm 2 99; Henfilser. 
Los Anaeles. 1M, JW, 228. 

Sfrfkoeatt: Gaodsn, New York, 308; Rvan, 
Houston, 172; Sola OncUmaft, 172; Volen- 
zuela, Las Angeles. M3; Darling, New York, 
130; Krakow, Son Frwvdscn, 13a 
Sams; Reardon. MontreaL 31; Smith, CM- 
cago. 27; Gassago. San Dieoo. 31,- Sutter, At- 
lanta, 20; D. Smith, Houston, 19; Power, Cln- 
dnnoil, 19. 


Golf 



S b^tonts' 5 cum* amtwt 
Sewnl ■«>« fia* 5 . 10 

^^-Ican'twiMonegoB- 
ate a oew one. 



Tonona Lapse fn.Scherrar fill, Carr (K» 
and ParrtNu John, Ontive ro s (4). HoweHTS). 
Altaian nei.MoGdffy CUl and o- Brian. W— 

Scherrer. 2-1. 1 Atherttxi. ♦«. 3 v— Cory (17. 

HRs — Detroit Parrish (T97. Gibson (22). Ev- 
ens US). 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Bait PfvUJao 


Seattle's Matt Young 

. , . first shutout since 'S3. 


Maocani's manager, Dave Wolf, said on. Wednesday that he bad been 
offered $3 imffion for a fight matching Mancini and Aaron Pryor, the 
International Boring Federation junior welterweight champion. Said , _ g. L . i» 

Mancini: “If I b^l Aaron Piyor, what does it prove? February 1 6th was W^or JLeagmb Standings 
the last day you’ll see Ray Mancini in the ring. There are other things I 
want to do.” 

McGnigan to Defend Against Taylor 

BELFAST (AP) — Barry McGoigan’s_ first drfense of his World 
Boxing Association featherweight boxing title will be against unbeaten 
American Benue Taylor at the King’s Hall here on Sept 28, promoter 
Stephen Eastwood announced Friday. 

McGnigan, 27-1, won the title June 8th in London on a I5-rouna 
decision over Panamanian Eusebio Pedroza. Taylor, 32-0-1, held Pedroza 
to a disputed draw in a title fight three years ago. 

Maltbie, Dennis Watson Golf leaders 

AKRON, Ohio (AP) — Roger Maltbie ono-puued nine times to route 
to a 5- under-par 65 that lifted him into a tie with defending champion 
Denis Watson after Thursday’s first round of the Worid Senes of Golf. 

Calvin Peete was alone at 66, and the group at 67 included Tom Kite, 

George Archer, Gordon Brand Jr., Bob Eastwood and Woody Blackburn. 

Quotable 

• Coach Bum Phillips of the New Orleans Saints, on whether Imehaclc- 
er Dennis Winston’s recent holdout was over money: “We don t supply 
women, so it most be money.” 



^1 

9 

Pd. 

GB 

Toronto 

n st 

.617 

— 

New York 

70 49 

588 

W» 

Detroit 

45 55 

-542 

9 

Baltimore 

42 54 

-525 

11 

Boston 

58 61 

jaa 

15Vi 

AUfHOuU* 

55 63 

MO 

17W 

Ctovatand 

40 79 

west DMSioa 

536 

33W 

California 

49 53 

JS 70 

— 

Kansas Oty 

64 52 

■SS9 

m 

Oakland 

43 SB 

JSI 

6 

CHIOtaO 

58 58 

.496 

9 

Seattle 

57 64 

.471 

72 

Mkewsata 

a 46 

MS 

15 

Texas 44 75 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
EM Division 

JM 

24 


W L , 

Pet. 

GB 

New York 

73 46 

sn 

— 

St. Louis 

72 46 

410 

14 

Montreal 

a 54 

454 

7 

Qileaaa 

59 59 

400 

13W 

Phltadeleiila 

55 64 

462 

IS 

Pttttbunm 

37 80 

West DtrtsJea 

JM 

35 

U» Angeles 

71 47 

M2 

— 

Son Ohgu 

65 55 

se 

7 

Ondnnatt 

62 56 

SOS 

9 

Houston 

53 64 

462 

16W 

Atfrevta 

50 61 

404 

27 

San Frandsao 44 73 

J87 

2M 


Walker Cup Results 

FINAL: UA IX BRITAIN-) RE LAND 11 
(At Pina Volley, now joreevi Par 18) 
FOURSOMES 

Paul Mavo, wdin, and Colin Montgamorie, 
Scotland, hafvwf wfiti scoff Verotonk and Jay 
SlaoL ILSj Bam Randotch and JWty Hoot, 
UJL dot John Hawkawortti England, CM 
Garth McGlmeaey, Northern inland. 3-and- 
l: Bob Ltwlsona Clark Burroughi, UA,dof. 
Peter Baker, England, ond Peter Mc£woy, 
England, 2-anO-Li Mike Poaoiak and Dcvts 
LOW III, ILSwdM. Cadi BMca, EngfmLend 
5ondy SMhn ScoHond, sond-i 


KospersW. tackle. Ploced Troy Banian, Ikw 
bockar. on the bilured reserve list. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Waived Donald Chunv 
tov. defensive tackle. Selected Roosevelt 

Sn|pe& running bock. In o special NFL supple- 
mental draft. 

HOCKEY 

National Hockey League 

QUEBEC— Traded Brad AtexiMILdetonsa- 
tnan, to Toronto lor Jottn Andenon, torvmrd. 
Named Ron Harris, aasi stam coacfv 

NEW JERSEY— Stoned Craig Wotanln, Oe- 
fenaeman. and Petor McNab, center, 

PHILADELPHIA— Announced me refire- 
menf of Bill Barber, left wins. 

WINNIPEG— Stonod Robert Picard, de- 
fenseman. 

WEIGHT LIFTING 

CANADIAN WEIGHTLIFTING ASSOCIA- 
TION— Suspended Michel Vkm, GutUmame 
Salvos ond Michel Pletracupa Indefinitely far 
having tested potiltvs In anaboUc-etorold an- 
alyses. 

OLYMPICS 

USOC— Named Gloria Chadwick director 
far Uj. Olympic Training Oentor at Narrhern 
Mtohlgan Unlveretty. 

COLLEGE 

CENTRAL MISSOURI- N amed Jonathan 
Pve women's basketball coach, 

DARTMOUTH— Nairwd Donna Lelmer as- 
sistant athletic director, 

GEORGETOWN— Announced Ralph Dal- 
ton, center, will be return (or me 1985-86 bas- 
ketball season, 

PACIFIC-18 CONFERENCE— Announced 
It will stage a post-season basketball tourna- 
ment beginning in 19S7. 

TEMPLE— Named Greo Klretein director 
M atMelk: fund raising and Mike Koine and 
Bernle G reenbe r g assistant sports Informa- 
tion director*. 

WAYNE STATE— Named Scoff Hubbard 
men's cress-country and track coach. 


Football 


Ottawa 

Toronto 

Hamilton 


SINGLES 

Huwksworfn deC Stoef. 4-ond-3; Baker d»f. 
Randv Sorailer, ua, Stand-41 Low deL McE- 
vov, S-and-3; Verptank deL Montgomerie, 1- 
up; McGInttsey Halved wtni wand ote h,- 
GeargeMacsnWM-, Scotland, det. Burroughs, 
Vond-St Lewis def. Cedi Blotab Enetond, > 
ano-2; Stanhenaef.Ouffy Waldorf, u&scrnd- 


CFL Standings 

Eastern Dlvtsian 

W L T PF PA P« 

5 2 0 740 731 10 

4 3 O 141 195 8 

3 S D 193 200 6 

15 0 117 145 2 

Western DMifeo 

Brltamb 5 1 0 209 K» 10 

wkaitoa 4 2 8 171 M2 • 

Edmonton 3 3 o isi 149 6 

Sosknfcftwn 3 3 8 150 135 6 

Cabarv 1 S 0 101 143 3 

THURSDAYS RESULT 
Ottawa 18, Toronto 0 


GRAND OPENING 

Saturday August 31 

5De S^cizera SNOOKER club 

presents cAiex ”^iurrican&' Siiqqind 
VOID CHAMPION SNO&KB? 1982-1983 

TfdOBtaDH 100,-for 1 4.00 -ra.00 or 20.00- 01 -0Q. 
Free play dh tables that day, refreshments provided. 
Special offer Dfl. 2O0 P - inci a one year's membership 
onfer at KoizBfssrecfit 25$, AmstBidam Hotend. 

TeL 31. 20. 231 566 









t 


i ; . 
! f . 




Page 16 


LOURDES POSTCARD 



No Room for a Tavern? 


By Richard Bernstein 

New York Times Service 
T OURDES, France — The sou- 
venir shops in this sainted dty 
of pilgrims — shops that have 
names like Our Lady of Perpetual 
Aid — offer for safe an array of 
flickering plastic objects that fall 
shot of nigh art. The shops reflect 
the dominant tone of Lourdes, 
where about 45,000 of the faithful 
come every day to visit the holiest 
Roman Catholic site in France. 

Every afternoon a colorful pro- 
cession of visitors, many disabled 
or sick and wheeled on stretcher 
beds, or pulled along by volunteers 
in blue canopied carriages, makes 
its way past the grotto where the 
Virgin Mary is believed to have 
appeared to Sl Bernadette in 1858. 
The procession then goes on to the 
great esplanade in front of the Ba- 
silica of the Immaculate Concep- 
tion for the celebration of a multi- 
lingual Mass. All the visitors are 
drawn by their faith in the miracu- 
lous cures attributed to the waters 
of the shrine. 

August, the month of vacations 


in Europe, is a seasonal high point 
st Fr 


for Lourdes, in southwest trance; 
after Paris, Lourdes has the largest 
number of hotels of any city in 
France. 

This month, an uncharacteristic 
note of contention has interrupted 
the solemn routines of Landes. 
The note was struck by Francois 
Abadie; mayor of Lourdes, who ap- 


peared on television one recent day 
sarf- 


lo declare, “Lourdes is not a 
ora port of call like Toulon.” 

What Abadie was talking about 
is a kind of clash of values and 
moods between the city’s character 
as a holy place, and a small njgfat- 
H in a soundproof basement of 
,a 


spot w a soundproof basement of 
the Burgundy and Brittany Hotel, a 
place with a bar and a jukebox and 


a tiny dance floor. 

The bar was opened a couple of 
months ago by Jean- Pierre Garnet, 
who owns the Burgundy and Brit- 
tany and a man whom the local 
press calls “the pillar" of the 
French national rugby team. 

Garnet's bar has become (me of 
those little things that grow imper- 
ceptibly larger. 

It happened this way; On Aug. 1, 
with the summer season about to 

Donze, wrote^a letter, which was 
reprinted in a local newspaper. The 
letter called on all people to respect 
the sanctity of Lourdes’s holy sites. 


The bishop’s main concern was for 
proper dress, since everybody in 
Lourdes had noticed skimpily clad 
young people, often on carrying 
trips in the surrounding Pyrenees, 
visiting the dty. 

The bishop also wrote that “in 
certain hotels, the bolding of par- 
ries and even nighttime dances, 
drinking and noisy revelry, raise a 
lively condemnation.” 

His letter did not specifically 
mention Garnet's little bar or any 
other of the handful of simil ar 
places in Lourdes. But word soon 
went out that the place at the Bur- 
gundy and Brittany was what the 
bishop had in mind. 

A journalist from the French 
sports dally L’ Equips was appar- 
ently the First to mention Garnet by 
name in connection with the bish- 
op’s letter. The story was picked up 
by the national leftist daily Libera- 
tion and, on the right, by Le Quoti- 
dien de Paris. Crews from two of 
France's three television stations 
appeared at Garnet’s hotel to film 
and interview the rugby star. 

Explanations vary over how the 
“piano bar affair,” as it is being 
called (even (hough there is no pi- 
ano in Garnet's bar), became a big 
deal. “The nights are long, people 
are far from their homes, ,r said the 
Reverend Fernand Barraqu6, the 
deputy rector of Lourdes's sanctu- 
ary. “Lourdes is one of the most 
anonymous cities in France, be- 
cause you can be completely alone 
here. It’s a place where most of the 
population at any given rime 
changes completely every four or 
five days.” 

The clear concern of some local 
clergy was the prospect that ban. 
like Garnet’s would become open- 
ing wedges toward public drunken- 
ness, noisy nightspots in a quiet 
dty. 

Although they say a nightclub is 
not appropriate for a city of reli- 
gious vbitors, some religious lead- 
ers are surprised that so much has 
been made of so little, and dis- 
turbed that one result may be to 
make the church authorities appear 
rigid, opposed to fun. 

The French press has quoted 
some religious authorities as saying 
that Lourdes may be a sainted dty, 
but it is not a dty of saints. It is a 
truism that seems to provoke some 
delight in Lourdes. 


Art Buchwald is an vacation. 


The Dean of China Studies: 


Frisbees and a Fake Beard 


By Jay Mathews 

Washington Post Service 

I WAS a sophomore at Har- 
vard, newly transferred from 
a smalt California college because 
1 had discovered I was in love 
with China. John King Fairbank 
was the dean of China studies, 
talk lean, bald, usually expres- 
sionless, save for a slight smirk 
when listening to something be 
considered unusually funny or ri- 
diculous. 

He had come out of South Da- 
kota in the 1920s like an intellec- 
tual tornado, taking a in 
history, winning a Rhodes schol- 
arship, marrying the brilliant 
daughter of a famous Harvard 
Medical School professor, spend- 
ing years of adventure in friina, 
defying the McCarthyite®, then 
polishing off the legend by creat- 
ing the postwar China studies in- 
dustry. 

It was intimidating to see him 
standing before the 100 or so of us 
crammed into Soc. Sri. HI (East 
Asian History, usually called 
“Rice Paddies"), celebrating the 
sweep of the Chinese cultural 
sphere (in which he thoughtfully 
included Japan) and demanding 
thought ana synthesis and mean- 
ing from a confusing montage of 
Asian faces and strange trisyllab- 
ic names. 

In many cases a name and leg- 
end seem to leave tittle room for 
the shy and the uncertain, but 
John Fairbank knew that, and 
spent much of his time throwing 
down lines to us small fry. 

There was, for example, his 
house, a shaky little yellow-frame 
three-story model amid a jungle 
of tall dams and university of- 
fices. There was barely enough 
room inside to move around dur- 
ing his regular Thursday after- 
noon teas. 

The impression that Professor 
Fairbank was not a man to put on 
airs was fortified by his habit of 
appearing at darkened theaters 
with a flashlig ht in his pocket, to 
make sure his large and ungainl y 
feet did not tread on any toes. He 
also liked to throw Frisbees in his 
front yard, a practice I coaid not 
square with my ima ge of the man 
writing those pieces in the New 
York Review of Books. 


Then there was Wilma Mrs. 
Fairbank. She was the eldest of 
four sisters of the celebrated Can- 
non family, a magwn graduate in 
fine arts whose husband envied 
her “creative capacity foe sponta- 
neous play, thought and action.” 
This was fortunate, since her hus- 
band was the sort who rhapso- 
dized about Sundays locked in the 
sladcs of Widener library; “Free 
for the day — no people, no 
phones, a sandwich, and the quiet 
of a Trappist monastery.” 

The Fairbank genius, I gradu- 
ally learned, was to mix rigor and 
sweat with a great deal of fun. It 
was not something I expected, 
with a Westerner’s view of Har- 
vard as a very serious place, but it 
bad an enormous appeal. In his 
autobiography, “Chmaboand: A 
Fifty-Year Memoir, ” Fairbank 
notes that his conquest of Exeter, 
Harvard and Oxford came 
through a similar formula: Spend 
the firat year with the books, then 
get to know the people. 

His forbidding appearance and 
bis ultra-dry acndmiir sp ecial ly, 
Qmg dynasty diplomatic papers, 
gave his jokes that much more 
punch. You did not expect to see 
him don a long Coofnaous-style 
beard at the faculty-student par- 
ty. nor did you expect the well- 
drawn quips in nearly everything 
he wrote. 

On bow to survive academic 
skirmishes: “I was already learn- 
ing how to be a sinologist when 
among historians and, with a 
slight shift of gears, a historian 
when among sinologists — nmirh 
like a Chinese bandit who is never 
ca u gh t because he stays on the 
border between provinces and 
when pursued from one side qui- 
etly fades across into the outer 
jurisdiction.” 

On Shirley MacLarne, seated to 
his right at a White House dinn er- 
“She had acquired China by lead- 
ing a menagerie of American 
women, one of every known IrinH, 
on a culture-shock trip to the 
PRC that simply beat the pants 
off any other culture shock she 
had ever had.” 

On his 1979 coronary: “A non- 
fatal heart attack is, I am sure, 
much more interesting than the 
other kind.” 


Fairbank has been celebrated 
for his popular works, foremost 
among them the much-reissued 
“United States and China.” Even 
at personal moments he loves to 
speculate on the broad sweep of 
history. One of his letters to mem 
Vietnam wondered if Western 
civilization could survive “with 
this much firepower.” 

His memoir speaks most glow- 
ingly oi one of his most narrow 
projects, however — “Modem 
China; A Bibliographical Guide 
to Chinese WoXs 1898-1937” 
Few hardy souls have read 
through fins 608-page tome, co- 
authored with K. C Uu. “I still 
get excited reading this volume,” 
Fahbank said. “ As long as I had it 
at hand I could give any student 
the knowledge ofi Chinese sources 
that he ought to have and show 
him how to proceed” 

To galvanize an entire area of 
academic study, and take it 
through the difficult McCarthy 
days, required enormous energy 
and persistence. Even in Fair- 
bank: s underplayed manner, his 
outrage at the blow to rivU liber- 
ties and intellectual freedom from 
the McCarthy and McCarraa 
bearings was palpable. But I sense 
be was at least as distressed be- 
cause McCarthy and company 
were vesting his time, and the time 
of a lot of other people. 

Plotting bis conquest of Exeter 
at age 16, he decided that “we all 
started equal in having 24 hours a 
day." The game wait to whomev- 
er used this thrift best Fairbank 
watchers ever since have noticed 
the greaf man dipping his nnfle 
during tutorials, shaving while on 
the telephone. A seminar (hat de- 
generated into a bull se s si o n grat- 
ed on him tike fingernails on a 
blackboard. At each session a stu- 
dent paper had to be read and 
criticized; no straying from the 
point. 



Gwendolyn 5tiwc*t 


Scholar Fairbank: “Much like a Chinese bandit.* 


His heart attack occurred whik 
he was in his office on aThanks- 


it”; be was trying to get 
in some work on his several book 
projects before dinner. 

As East Asian area studies de- 
veloped in the 1950s and 1960s, 


and his students began to fan out 
around the com try, Fairbank 
made sure they were not wasting 
their tune, either. He waged war 
against something he called 
“manuscript retention," a post- 
graduate’s insecure resistance to 
offering work for publication. 
When David Roy, now professor 
of Chinese literature at the Uni- 
versity of Chicago, was a “tena- 
cious young instructor” at Prince- 
ton University, Fail- hank asked to 
see his manuscript, then “picked 
it up and got out the door with it 
It made a good book and helped 
his career.” 

When promising historians oc- 
casionally veered away from aca- 
demia, Fairbank could be heard 
to complain. He was still ragging 
Fox Butterfield for not finishing 
his doctoral thesis years after But- 
terfield had become a foreign cor- 
respondent for The New York 
Tunes. But those who strayed 
knew this was mostly a joke. We 
extended his empire to the mass 
audience. 

The point, he made dear, was 
to communicate. Stay in touch 
with your Students, your profes- 
sors, yoor readers, your mends; 
just as he does at age 78. The troth 
will never emerge unless we afi 
take a whack at it. 

In one mwhmn, th*> rii r-nlar ) ffl- 

ter.no one could outdo him. One 


of his best came after the heart 
attack. On his arrival at Ml Aif 
burn Hospital in an am b ul a n ce, 
he said, “the entire staff were out 
on the steps smiting and dapping 
under a banner that read ‘Huan- 
ying Mei-kuo p’eng-yu Fei 
Cheng-db’mg’ (Welcome to our 
American friend, John King Fair- 
bank) — although it is possible 
that I confuse this occasion with a 
visit to the May 7th School of the 
Western District of Peking in 
1972. 


“The skill of the Ml Auburn 
Hospital doctors has not only 
kept me from moving on to the 
adjacent and beautiful but rather 
less active Ml Auburn Cemetery 
(Cambridge has everything you 
need); their advice has also great- 
ly simplified the future and made 
it more attractive. I am now com- 
mitted to no articles, no reviews, 
no lectures, no letters, no consul t- 
manships, no conferences, no 
meetings, and only six bodes to 
write or ediL What epoki be more 
pleasant?” 


PEOPLE 


for 7fcYeor-6ld’$ Wife 
A 70-year-old non and his 38- 
y ear-old wife are expected to be- 
come the parents of tea-gbe qua- 
druplets next m onth , Hammer- 
smith Hospital in London,, raw of 
Britain’s leading centers of inferffl- 

• Annfnmnl Frirfav A 



tie m& U S jum Him 

oei *and the babies are yorjr 

well" but that she was staying in 
the hospital as a precautionary 
measure. The statement followed a 
front-page story, in.. The Tanes of- 
London and an interview in which . 
Tom del Renzio, a 'retired art&eor 
tor for Italian magazines, films and 

television, said; “I must admit I 

would have been happier if we had? 
been able to have just one baby.^ 
Del Renao and ins German-bom 
wife erf 14 years live in KcqL 



Concertgoers waiting to hear 
Woody Herman and George Bes- 
son at an International JazzHaffof 
Fame induction awards ceremony 
in Kansas City. Missouri, had to 
wait about an hour and a half be- 
cause paychecks for musicians and 
t^bpjral crews were misplaced. 
About 500 people waited while the 
checks were sought. Finally induct-, 
ed into the HaD of Fame war Jo 
Jones, Max Roach, Roy "“ ** 


„ Gfflesfae, Ow* Terry, 

Fitzgerald, Hon 


. _ Jamah andMs piraies* 
tra, and some 
Count Basie Orchestra. . - r ' 


Fan-hank is filling this 
He is general editor, with 
Twitches, of the Cambridge His- 
tory of China and principal editor 
of vohunes 10 through 15, the last 


two of which are in preparation; 
and he has just sent his ^Revolu- 


tion in China" to Harper & Row. 


Beijing residents, have been 
flocking to bear and buy Weston 
music from Beethoven to Boy 
George at the first exhibition 
c tagftd in China by Western record 
companies. Most of tte rectffdings 
on exhibit are budget classical 
rap-a, but popular sounds from the 
West and from Hong Kong attract-! 
ed more attention from the pre- 
dominantly young visitors: 
“There’s a lot cif interest wbmwe 
show music videos,”. saidDafid 
Tang, representative of Virgin Re- 
cords, whose artists include Boy 
George and Jcfian Lemon. “Pay 
pie are interested by Boy George^ 
androgynous look- Hc looks similar 
to one of the standard chaiacternfafr 


Yan Roosted, 


1 7-year-old art student checking 
out Virgin tapes, said: “Young peo- 
ple in Qtma today aren’t much 
interested in light music. We want 
something with a beat to it, music 
with a bit of feeling.” . . 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


A touch of 


PARIS 

GUIDE 


ON SAlf NOW! 

»«y 


$»r, rmangjaaty 


rtaoafat Samp*. A perfect grid. 
On sola ■mVbo&m «d 
rmstondi. Sand diack or money 
order to Tiokn a TnmUn 


36, roe du Cofiat* Park 750O3 
far $10 mdwKng oirmtd 


AMERICAN HOSPITAL OF PARK, 

Accredited U5. HcuptaL 24-bour 
Emergency Service. English spoken . 


anemoney . 

BtoOpn. 63 Bid. VkJor Hugo, 92202 
imrtes rnxn 


NEULLY SUR SEINE (10 mnites 
Erode). Phone 7475300 


ACADEMY ORGANIZING INTT cen- 
tal in hortfura seeks Foreign people 
from c i over the world to write book 
m French. For wform*c«i write Efee 
Gamier. BJ*. 144, 13675 Aubogne 
Cedex. France. 


MOVING 


INTERDEAN 


WHO BSE FOR YOUR 
NEXT MTBNATKMAL MOVE 


FOR A RS ESTIMATE CALL 


AMSTERDAM: 

ATHENS) 

BARCELONA: 


I071189.9&24 

(01)961.12.12 


wwsass 

CADIZ: 


(03(652311 tl 
(02241166062 
Hill 1170591 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


AUTOMOBILES 


AUTO CONVERSION 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


GREECE 


15TH MONTPARNASSE 


GSCVA: I 
LOFDON: 


-30 


MANCHESTER: 

MUNCH: 

NARES: 

PAHS: 

ROME: 

VtfNNA: 

ZURICH: 


1 §0421)17059 R 
|02 1720.95. 63 
§956)863 1441 

njSi 
Toipuma 

01 671. 24 JO 
(0611 7072016 
■ani4i5036] 
Toggaoirai 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS 
Bnfah. Paris (dcriy) 634 59 65l fame 
£78 03 201 


SUN. N.Y. TIMES - 
Wise fayser, POB 2. B1 


HAVE A NKE DAYI BOKB. Hove 
nice day! Bofcri. 


PERSONALS 


CATHERINE YOU ARE EVBtYTHSW 
and everything, is, you. Musk wharev- 
er you go. Je t'ar me. Imy. 


MOVING 


ALLIED 


VAN LBMES (NTL 

OVB 1300 OFFICES 
WORLDWIDE 

USA AMied Vcm Linos Infl Corp 
(0101) 312-681-8100 
Office Addram 25th Av & Roaseweh ltd 
Broadview, liras £0153 USA 


Or as# our Agency offices 

PARIS D e d bow fae I n tarnotionri 
(01) 343 23 64 

FRANKFURT J&ttS 

(0A9) 250066 

DUSSHDORF/RAT1NGEN 

(021021 45023 LM4. 

MUNICH IMS. 

(089) 142244 

LONDON 

(01) 953 3636 

BRUSSELS: zfegfesA 


^(M, 425 *6 14 


Afiacfs free estimate 



DAKS CORNER 
WELCOMES 
MEMBERS OF THE 
AMERICAN BAR 
ASSOCIATION 
TO LONDON 


GLOBAL 


YOUR BBT CHOKE 
FOR WOWDWlOe MOVING 


AMSTERDAM 

BOGOTA 

BONN 

BRUS5HS 

CAIRO 

CARACAS 

RtAMCFUKT 

HONGKONG 

JAKARTA 

LOfTON 

MANILA 
MEXICO dY 
RAMS 
QUITO 
STOOCHOIM 

SMGAPORE 

TOKYO 

USA 


6105 


1 1261 1651 
1277 0401 
■ 664 011 
6876082 ■ 
406064 
358 009 


ESI 21011 

422151 


. 582 376 
997 4321 
854837 
51511 79 74 
834 87 20 
525 898 
755 8794 


film 4 4,51 


■0471H 

223 2460 


A WOOD OF DIFFERENCE 


CONTINBC Smdl moves, can, bag- 
Crf Chafe Pots 


worldwide, i 

81 [necr Opera). 


MHAN/1UHN RBOCATMG T Cal 

W4BH & SGOTTO 02/2155025. ■ 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


FORCAUgaAl|w des Maud Fhs- 


8th century done 
-race. 2 large 


venae, 

vfltage bowse, weh tern _ 
bedrooms, 2 lags bathrooms, dress- 
ing. living. (Ring, krge ktkhen, heat- 
ing, large amc/artists stuefio with 
shower, a* modem conveniences, ide- 
jd far qrtBf & family. FSSOjOOOL Tefc 
(W) 75 23 76 


CHARMING 5MA1L V1UA, attrac- 


Inaly handled, garden overlooking 
Meanon cnaan m the old village of 
faKfjebnmo. Cap htorfe 2 eiiubfa 


bafefFl 


Tet(W135< 


FO RC AIOMBt Alpes eta Hoots Pro- 
venoss, 15th century stone vflage 
house. 6 Bedrooms. 4 bathrooms. 3 


Eyim, 2 terraces, 2 hjfly eqiapded 

%3jfete cSvbksw into 7 flat. 


kidhens. I 

F650JQ0. Tet (92) 75 23 76 


COTE D'AZUR. EZE/MEX. Mogriv- 

cent w ae rlront estate, lumaioui rib 

aid numerous ourtxakfngi. PrivcM 

“«sSSVS8* , iS‘i 


EXCEPTIONAL CANNES, CoHbnfe 

The but Afedroam apartrwrt in Co- 
“wnie^jold by the owner. Plica 
USSl 


634Q1 1 efter 7 pm 


CHEAT BRITAIN 


LONDON HAJffSIEAD NW3L 17lh 

(hold raiee. 


oantury hetanc faed freehold 

I** «tal by owner as fuBy 
I censed restaurant. £225X00. Td 
rcxen imp 01-794 4667. 


LARGE ELEGANT KNtGHTSMDGE 

house near Harrwh, long bare with 
« awn imws house + 3 

tfeque offer. 01-589 301 


GREECE 


46 KM. BtQM ATHENS an unpcButed 
ir Sorted 


tea, on the sea ip a rather 

4 to 5 bereogna. Eriig room, ertai- 
ariyfurnisbed. Price (£5180,000. Tot 
32 45845 (9a n to T30tai4, Jtenxwm 
teli723W>38 (5pm la Tpny local time 


hotel . 

to dfecMrobn. teU 0427-7145?. 


HOLLAND 


AM5TBLVHN-NEAR SORFHOL or- 


perl. We offer you on apartment of 


sjiiu roort,_4 bed 


rooms. 
Quiet , 
center of 
20433129. 


and bathroom. 
10 minutes from 
Col hoiked (Q) 


"S ve ry luxurious flats 2 fo 5 reams. 

Knees sioni 


iF750^00»oF1750.000. Vis- 


it from 2 pm to 6 oil 21 Rue Castag- 
1X08.19,20.23,24,25^26^ 


ray.oni 


[UPDOS GRBCE FULLY equipped 
XVlth century axVnini bouse, 3 oou- 
He bedrooms, 3 baths, kitdian^nna. 
big “wfa", terrace, polio & garden. 
Sept 15 - OtsTlS. S3^00rPhane 
Greece 244 31362. 


UE VESINET. UgHy reskhmlid dstiict. 


HOLLAND 


very aoRvenient.M de Frcnaa house. | 


I sqjn. 6 betfrooms, 5 baifa, am - 1 


end end hooted pool, garden, 3<or | 


TeL |W| Sftfa y4or* gilfril' 


Renfhouse International 
020-448751 {4 lines) 


SPAIN 


Nederhovon 19-3T, Amsterdam 


MALLORCA - IUETAS. New 1 bed-j 
100 m flat, foong Ihe sea, famhhe 
£36m Tel Span 34^1 4Q40 19. 


DUTCH HOUSING CENTRE B.V. 
Dekne rentals. Vderiusstr. 174. 
Amsterdam. 028621234 or 623Zfe. 


SWITZERLAND 


hi the dimning mountain resort of 

LEYSIN: 

RBIDB4CE LB FRB4ES 


PETER BRUN MAKBAAROU 


bin^te^n^fervtaMUntals 


Ameterdmit Tel: 020-768022. 


Overtaokmg a RfancEd Alpine panora- 
ma 30 min. from Montraux end Lake l 
Geneva by ocr. 

- you mi own qudhy residences 


IBOENL VBIMra TYPE 17th Centwy 
cand nouse. Fu#y Furmhed, 4 bed- 






ITALY 


with indoor iwuMiMg^joal and 


fitness faedties in an i 

environment far leisure and sports 
J*j, golf, eft), 
nnononga* low SF. rotes 
up to SOX mortgages. 


When in Rome: 

PALAZZO AL VHABRO 
Uuniry oportment house with furnished 
flah, ovdkAie for 1 week and more 


Rewdence le e Frene s. 1854 toMei I 
SWITZKLAND 

Teh (025) 34 1 1 55 Tlx: 456 120 ttAI CH 


Rhone: 094325, 6793450. 
f<o del tafara 16, 


Wife Via __ 

00186 Rome. 


LAKE GBCVA 
AND 

MOUNTAIN RBORT5 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


74 OiAMPS-ELYSEES 8th 


Foreigners con buy tovriy ap a tmere s 
- - vs of Lake Geneva 


Shidio, 2 or 3-roam cportmeitt. 
On# month or more. 

IE CLAHDGE 359 67 97. 


reth mognificenf views* 

6 mo u nta in s- Mornreim. Vilcr^ Varbier. ! 
Us Dnbterels, Choteou cfOm 
Gstaod, Laysm. 


PWoes from. SR 22000. 

*614% irterest. 


to 65% at _ 

. 1 WAN S JL 
_ Av Mon Repos 24, 

TeL (2l!z2 I ffil2 ,1 ftc: S »KAOIS 


SHORT TBM STAY. Advmitoges of a 
hotel wrihout moanvenenefe feel at 
home «t race studos, one bedroom 
msd more in Paris. SOtiHiM: 80 rue 
de lUwvenitt, Pam 7th; 544 39 40 


1 NEAR MONTPARNASSE. Urge 
9?pen ' 


CaH: 325 78 33/5 


f84 9am-llam. 


REAL ESTATE 
TOREOT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


let, 1 month. BaxllSoA HerddTri- 
bunn, 92521 NwJy Ccdtn, Fwwce. 

SHORT TBUM in Item Quwter. 
No oflerfy TeL 3293883 


LUXEMBOURG GARDENS, 1 - 

months, comforts. TuL 633 7A 70. 


USA 


Brand New 


THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 


A Unique 

Hotel Suite Residence 


offering 


pre-opening savings on 
1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 


6 mo, 


fettwinu 


Studio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnifiaentiy 
furnished and all with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 


Executive Services Available 


Model Suites 


(212) 371-8866 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


IL&A. 


MIAMI REAOi. GcriHon Hotel an lha 


beach. Lease by weekly, monthly, 
' p un dxBfc (305) 38F-170B. 


yeadyorj 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVE 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


EMPLOYMENT 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


TEOMCAL WRflBt 4- HXTOttl 


DOMESTIC 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 


^crrite% .brnnan. computer, jMdt-| AD FAaUHqtUUOlIlJL MatAivo, 
caf and sdeiilific i r 


adj and scwiftfe emenencc. EngUi ipvA Engfirfv For working couple in 
momer tonguer Auofebla October far Wcntangtan, DjC ova wfe diScfran , 
anjgnmMto, rfwrt or fang term. 13 & Ih Wnto, 645 Pattwvx RWer 


MBKSJB Iram EUROPE 

WEFH301ALIZE CARS TO MEET US. 1 
SAFETY STAN3A8DS 

D.O.T. A EJ*JV. 

5 YEARS EXPB8S4CE 
X FRANK MC. 
bxSanqpoEi, fadfana 317-2914108 


POT - EPA 

ucmsED csmncATioNS 


We arrange ch ip ping , endans bondng 
L 5 yen repair warrartties far 


and US.: 


European autat. 
ATLANTIC 


Write: Boc 2629, HerJd^ribim, 
92521 Neufly Cadsx, Franca 


Rood MdecmVA 22102 or cdloX - 

fact 703448&KL Aik far Chra CHAHC RENT A CAR. Prerfp am 


ATJTOTBENTALSE 


IMPORTH5 MOTORS 

F4EWJKSEY, USA 
Teh 201-322-7811) “ffe 226Q7H 

Oanfity Coavarnom Shea 1978. 


Stoma l . 


FOR MORE EXECUTIVE POSmONS 
UOOKUKSt 
"IVTHNA7TONAL POSmONS" 
PAGE IT 


AU NUR 6 H0KH TUTOR vwaited 

to Kite with cheerful hmdy in Icrge 

noma in nburb mar Naur York Cte. 
BfinguoL Privran rami both & T.V. 
nor. Bor 2607, Horrid Trv 


with phone. Rob Spud, Menmdu, 
Jpguv, BMW,EmouHWvjmal on 
46 r Pierre Ow mon, 7M 0B Pork. Tet»| 

72aaU0LWt<3P97FQ(AHjQC 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


GEOTECHNICAL 
ENGINEERS 


Mar. Be* 3SW. Horrid Tri 
bene. V2S2T NewBy O-iex. Frcnce 


AUTO SHIPPING 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


G eatadhriml & pn ee n with 
MSCEc 


8SCE 


and very 


good spofam and writteh 
Frond, fanau 


language abCty 
needed far asvgrvnenf on 
rrikood project in Wta Afri- 
ca. LLS. cfcans ar raadents 
preferred. 


PERSONAL ASSISTANT far emrgriic 
Chaeman of U5. co mpel ly. Requres 
high mteBgence, co mmu ti fence, op- 
predabon er Seals & subtleties; dear 
written & verbal 
rilw 


jAUPAHLG 
baby, 

hen* Huicii arg, FA 

wceSenf salary. NorMmaksr. Send 


. Engfah tp eofc in g to care for 
■afigfa housekeeping bwfy 
■risfaurg, 9A. Room/booid / 


HOW TO IMPORT A EUROPEAN 
^ CAR INTO DC U£A. 

Iw doenmart axpiain fuBy. what am i 


TRASCO 

irrfrSBMATIONAL 




phone & resun* to Bax 2632,tleiridl 
TribuiM “ 


mutf dole bring a or into the US. , 
ad *gaAy. If mdudn new & I 


rribune, 92521 NeuBy Cedex, fiance 
AU PAS. Near NYC 2 yaar aid & 


DOT 6 EPA conw uor 


attopritta buying ijpi, 
tan addrenes, cus- 


UUX.Mareedn Tax fras 

feouj.no 36 & 44" - < 

renwirad oar* and fcnauuna "L." • 
Goadi boat con f* r .. 

Other makes & malics ' 




Good irimy & benefits • 
fanriy data. Send detailed 
resume with srivy histonr 
and references to: Writer T. 
OBrlemonj, F m o i nI Men- 
oger, rehrenoe #8516. 


iZriZk M f T m - Jteor old « tom demxrnce & shipping procedures 

r”' newborn. Prefer non-ainUr, Enririh as waB m toad poiitYoa mn som up 
****** <**"*>***- Sand r*x- toUSS12U«rXibuyumoM«!idS 

&Docicl plus sdary. French speaking 7W > ». West Garmsiy 


mg drmgjjirTOnce, ettrodhte, unat- 


World witfa dafiwry 
«red from source 
DX3.T. & EPA. 


. j desire to share joys 

ri victory aid agonies of defeat es- 
senriri. Salayto matdi perfarmaxB- 
tfort m S30.W0 range pkn movng 
rifaweree. Send resume, reoed photo 
& explanation of raasare why you 
beieve ymi could bande this potman 
to: Qicmrman, P.O. Box 26CH, Savon- 
nrii, GA 31402 ' 


Tot London 
Telex (51| 


629 7779 
TRASa 


. pka sriary. French speaking 
ahoy. Contact Bax 2630, Herald Tit- j 
bane, 92521 NauBy Cedex, Trance 


Trana London Ltd. 

6367 Park Lane, London W.L 


view ra September. 


USA for Paris mter- 


tams, 

Architects & Planners 

655 Herd Avenue 
hteWYbrk. NY 10017 
EQUAL OPPCKTuN/TY EMPLOYBl 


|RKHWTHL Ex ori ent opportunity far 
incfviduri or orainizatian la recnet 
far mericri ana veterinary schools. 
Exdume representation in your oauv 


AU PAM GKL NY area Car* of nt 
yeex ri d ^EngfatMpgokyg. noth 
smoker. Mid Seri. Sena refaranaw, 
2631, Hwoki Trf- 


MATMA SHWnNO 
Sbfapfas Wfrora ILSJL 


SwteariondUltW. Germany 


bune, 9821 NeuJf/ Cedex, Franoe 


igk Send nejume kx Ross CriVenr 


10001 


West 34th SL New York 


% 


AU PAHL To cure far newborn ion. 
Boom & board / S5QD0 per week 
sriary. Send resume to Konm Wil- 


MAttNA: Antwerp (3) 234 36 68 
234 35 72 
Spedal GamfiHane at the Imfing 
A s M h w erp SwMfnrateL 


5W YOJUI OJl TO « HMM USA 
Sanq, 20 Jcepar Ave., Patdugue, NY [ Free ho- 

USA 11772/ I teL Regular sainas. Airoart ddwv 


DYNAMIC AD SALES RH 1 for Ameri- 
cas leaE&ig fine arts magaane. Must 
hove sales meperience & contacts in 
Ihe European art wvid. Territory: 
» 2619, Herrid Tribute, 
Neuily Cedex. France 


GSENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


ttSfo/JC e $ CMB> MA1E, 


US. resident, leaks ini 
enee at any Jevel anywhere. 

'es & atxounfr 


31. 


AU FAIR/ IMMEDIATELY. Bays 4&1 
oil, write, photo S. Hsdier, 380 
e_ Dr* New Oty, NY )0956 




ground indudes tries. 


1 lei Bog# Dr, h 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 




senow position as exeaifiva Haeftry GOMAN 
tr PA in Europe, preferably Pbra or ' — ~ 
Gurmm. 3 yews e*peri*nai in Gor- 
morty. ScAxy: FISOJOOO/vckx. Paris 
589 1 0 65 or writo &x 2SV, Herrid 
Trifautw, 92521 NeuAy Cedes, gratae 


FAMILY SSS AU PAHL » hour 
NYC Send expviancB, phone & pho- 
to Dr. Jed, 16 N. Broodway, White 
Pldm, NY 10501 USA. 


AU PABt/NANNY. Contact Sunt 


Bdgomrtek23\ 0*39. 

ndHto « am Europe "ro/rcufrf K. 
WORTOWHIE Cor shipping & remov- 

Antwerp: 233 99 85. Gmws 39 <3 44 


MERCEDES SPECIALISTS 
FOR USA + MIDDLE EAST 

.wreher - efenor 

Shipment & defivny woridwide- 

NASSAR EXPORT GMBH, 

^JOOHWMFURT/M 


c?- ^ _ 


280 


ss« 


EshMstwd Sfaca 1970 


SWfTZSLAND 

Fwjapen an buy STUDX3S/APAET- 
AgNTS / C HALETS. LAKE G8CVA - 
MONTRHJK or in Biese world famous 
r^-OAWMONTANA. IB 
MABLBtETS, VHJKBL VELARS, 
01 wAADL From 

SFHOJOO wrgoges 60% or 6HX 


Froi£furt/mn 


To* oonsuttant 
to Bee. 
D6000 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


AUTO CONVERSION 


International Business Message Center I I 


EPA / DOT 

CONVOSIONS 


FRBlCH GKL 22, seeks 4 months in 

New York area, ? panibto ou pair, 

I November 1st, nor motor, driving . r _- , . ... _ , — __ « r 

srasstai 


REVAC SA 
52 Mon t fariluitL CH-1282 GORV A. 
TeL 022/341540. Tetot 22030 


USA GENERAL 


LAM) FOR SALE— TEXAS 

AinUn/Sta Antonio Corridor 
+ oerw with frontage on Inteniata 
ihwov 35. jup sooth of New flrajn- 
coreider taking payment in 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 

ftrbfa/i roarbuBnmsmaaanm 

MtfMfatamMlnnaPffetotfT^ 
bone, wWe more than a Mnf 
o mXon mo dors tvoHd- 
wridfe mod of wham mo fa 
fariwi end Mushy, wB 
mad it Jta# Mm ut {Park 
613595) bafarv 10 tun, an- 
"nd am tan Max you 
Data, mat jour mamq g a wB 
m wstofa 4ffam The 
a U.S. $9.80 or load 


*W*hrtJmd par Ena. You must 

ss&sssir' -*■ 


A4e j ncon 
renw.wel _ 
stock Priat . 
(51 


ar other c o n W ifale cur- 
tradad 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


SOUTHERN CAUTORMA. 2000 sqA 

of beoutiU la Jdb Sving m fab 3 
beriom oondo. PprWfe ntling. 
wmded leturify. S305J00. Owita 
on to seB (619) 452-5690. 


HIGH RETURNS 

U. S . A. 

Pftai eyptaiitdiun jrf revolutionary 


USA 

COMMERCIAL 
4k INDUSTRIAL 



in ogneri- 
. - T _. — dPtrLifa. 
Materal avrilable fa 
German. Ful detaBs 

J . HeroU Trtom, 

92521 NeuBy Cedex, France 


SEAL ESTATE M COLORADO 
TO BE SOLD BY OWNS! 

90 oral u purt me n te & one office buid- 1 
ing,t 


EaqpMet Cram Braken Weleana 


k* c&xu linanlx L _ 

An^nartl m KiMt ftiniul -■ , n- 1 -; 

BWMPIT WHJlRAL (fAAJ tun ■ 

u^jiiukm&on rots. 


•st 


Box 

92S21 


M12.H 

NeuRy 


Herrid Tifaune, 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


AUSTRIA 


USA 

_ BUS ffl E SSB 8 REAL ESTATE 
Boriness i srife commerrid, mdwtrid & 
rahdentml red es tate tries & lames. 
Property monagemert & busmen de- 
i«l cn aii Lu 4 . Write with your n 
mens & finanod ipea to Hnon ._ 

& Busmen Broken, 14795 Jeffrey 
#210, hyfae, CA 92714 USA. 
714^51 8TO0j Tbc 590194. 


VBIWA-S HOUSING AGENCY. 
- : L Hpd 09 k Groben 31. | 
eentancl 


CANADA 


MIBNAnONAL PUBUSHBL tpe- 
cnAring in syophicshashodiTeraen- 
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TOK3NTO, CANADA - LUXURY. 


nan opportutefy to smol nWestan fa 
the tUcW# on 


My fan whad and ecyiipped T & 2 1 
bedroom suttes * “ 


suites. Superior Services. 
Short term rentak The Mvtot Srite% 


i are now ready ta op- 

poke national ristributon ei other 
countries 1a do Ihe Sana. €25.000 


88 Front Sl East, Sts. 222, Taranto. I 
- (4R3 80-1096. I 


M5E 1T4, Canada j 


724 08 4& Tbt, 925441. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


SWraiWO, LAKE GENEVA 


SBUNG CHaUCAlS. Solvents 4 U>- 
oratoyeowpawt. Uiweivi Cbarti- 

^AWtatoFrcncen^dOSa 


^ PASSPORT a munfries. GMC, 
M Kfaomenou, 106 76 Athens Greece 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


wn. 

BEAimnJL PEOPLE 

UKUMITTOMC 

U.5-A- A WORLDWDE 


A cornptoe personal & bums „ 

M&srisSfr 1 

ftamctianol occasiam. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 

330 W. 56fa ^hL^C. 10019 
Serwce Representatives 
NeededWorldwidB. 


MAUFORWARDWG Offered Pur 


HOW TO. GET A 2nd PASSPORT, 
report , 12 countries ceioly red De- 
Wtai 45 Lvndfent Twroce, 

Sute 510. untrri. Hang Kong. 


COMMERCIAL 

PREMISES 


CHMTH( MONTE^CARLO 


Commerari premises - 150 sam. 

(pasubtfiy of MtWTSoo) 
far further detafe, pteree contact: 


26 bis Bd ftincesi e Qxidotse 


Monte Gaia, MC 98000 Monaco 

(93] 506600 fnt.lSt}, Ik 479417 MC 


FINANCIAL 

DVVESriMENTS 


■rri . _ 
Vctt. Hofland: 


1ST am. 


iNTHlIGSfr, CAPABLE SCOTS 


22% AtMUAL KIUffLan memgej 


, 2 2. saris situation in North 
WrTte Box 41567, IJH.T, 63 


Africa 

tong Age, London, WC2fe 9JH. 


RBM» GOL22, teris Aw^or port 4 

months in MY. ona if paa&ke . Nov 
Ite-. Non-smoker, divers Baance, rof- 
erences. Aiiefc Schadw. 2 rue L 
Anmanj 740TO Annecy. France. 


LADY. 45, SINGl^ WITH QAS5 re- 


hos been generoted_by fee Caribbion GOMAN, FASH ON MODEL WriL 
P ” 11 faregme nt. Trust s_ ttat Trap eduoded, multiEngud, faoks far faier- 
Mortpjge Pori. Detofe Fnttetemo- rating position, london 245am 
tonri Trust Ca Ltd. Dept. 850. PO 11 . ■ 

EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


^OTmsKkfejqb ta compqmgri )Um 1 


___ _ to A 18-11535B, 

Pubtidlm, CH-1211. Geneva 3. 


Tatox 4971917-QUMP 


Don’t 

gwBwrtyfcf Pbrrftae a MBCBies. 

rope. Wle, provide a frit TURKEY" 
fafemafeoririn 
* trend;, oroer- 
, . tionsfer^ nppfaa 

jl.3900 Aegdegg, 

T * 154758 

Tito 533433 (MONO 




Bax 

Tetoc 


Son 


Coda I 


B4GUSH NANNES 1 iwtfesrs' helps 

Noth Aosngr, S3 Church Rd Hove, 
SusseA Tri: Bririiton (273| 290 m 


DIAMONDS 




c- r bay - 

m aamonai ei any pnee rane 

at fawml wbofasde prices 
cEroct from AfVwerp 
cemer of fae dfenand world. 
Frit guarantee. 

For free price fat write 


111* OPB4 CHJTHE reqnres a qua5- 
fied S experienced teacher or the 
Fridenlata Method 5M to teach doss- 
es & give fadviduri lessons. Safa 
coratewur u te with quakfiaxiora 

Wrie John Joyro. The 
Open Centre, 188 OWSLUfadwiBCI 
| RJUL41ME ACADEMIC Admeestratar 
■w v«d rMpora&itiw Kiughr by 

sWKWL 


AMBKAN OR. wants to Ke with 


BOY 20, anerienad, seeks house- 

M fimB - Tet ! 


HAVE YOUR BMW. MHCfiw 

00,w1 * d to 
"»el U&Safriy & erntnan dendods 
fatogortto fee U5.Cta r wort is fafly 

“Otaerarf&guararieedtabeSp- 

prgta LJiar con 5 years & ofcfar. o3y 
^nty chony B ore raqwed. K 

a&£MEsta 


,.Oo Slock -: 

awatsa?.^' 


AUTOMOB ILES 


700344, anoa STUrjtAZTTOTd 


PeB tata tract 62, 201 8 Antwerp 

Betaitw i ■ Tefc (fa 31 234 07 51 
The 7T779 syl fe At the tfaxnond Oub. 1 
Heart of Antwerp Diamond industry 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


DOLLAR UP I 
DOUAR DOWN 

uSedME*CH3B, 
Bta. Direct is dwaj 
i you current new ! 


EPA/ DOT 

*.%E£ r J§*2" s "R 


rotta«wuT Ilf bes»Sr r 

*«- BMW.- Poach. 

Tto522M, 10 am.- 10 pin. 

Ovwmd tad Operated 


V-. 


t: 


Shopping in Europe? Visit 

DIAMONDLAND 

Hie largest shmeoam fa 

Antwerp, Diamond Oty 

Appekmatr 33A. Tel: 323/2343612. 


— ^AU BAB far fa. Ip* 

fry. Own roam, own on, met be 
fluent - - 


l$3£&t£ 

x & oaerts. 9uwi. < 


P.O.Bral! 

Telex 705514 Tat i 
Pfeoaa Cofl For Free ' 



Buying a new or un 
PORKHRBMWetc 
asuperdeaLIgteayoi 
used car pnew 

ywfafe fey y _ . 

pnvota, derien Aments. Stippfag, 

3SSffiS,raswsSiS OOT/B-A conversions 

to tom your cm reedy cm your arrival ta US 


BWOWMT TAX «g CARS 




Hc&nd ^ ^ ' 

CAR M_ .< cl- ; - - *_• 


«■ 


SkGcrm Diamonds, Jewelry 


dmg da, if .fensted in taking 


Hofland. Phone (0PD-S9245 


PAGE 12 
POR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


:v 

S': 


-c l,. 

•.-« . ■ • 


Export prices dred from factory. 
Centre Interna ti on a l Keeper, Hermar 
Entrance, PO Boat 266, teete 15D9, I 
1210 Brunet Tefc 322? 218 28 S3, 
open weekdays Vam-dptn, Sat 24pm. 


r_ J ..fr* ri.ff°rida d Ho!ata3 

fa'ro^faSpKlirt.and resume. ^5rt 


GS HOKSTMANN, 2390 Herabun, 
Katawinamtr. 12, West Gam, 


JMarcad** and Ponchft Can < 




Hondo 32B03 1BA. 


OFFICE SERVICES 


AD P**t To cam far 2cNUren 
* A Houcriueping & some 


pHUULBRBE 

export. Nobody offen penonofaad 
tawce Ote we da, Perron end Ion- 


-aSBBKBKE.. 

-ttfexa? 


ZUMCH-ZURKH-ZURICH 

BAHNHOfSTSASSE 52 
YOUR OfflCE AWAY ROM HOME 

• Office/M o nreiemBnt S erwros 
a Gorifuny fawtioies 

• How to do Btfsteoss in tat! 

ROM SWITZERLAND 
Berieaw Senric t Cantl> Cwp. 


reepprai Cor pnMded, mud few 
Large pnv 


B riw l mfuraa e 52, 0*8022 Zutidi. 
' 9207. Tfe- 813 062 


Tefc 01/211 


drivers fcenre- Large private room 8 
bath m new home just outside DcAil 

Tews. Send resume, rejwmtas S 

room / boerd. Experienced & family 
* Wre Hmoon 516-482- 


' bajfea oha avaiorie. 


MAHN 8 H. HOman 

tuebenadier Str. 75 
5400 I f e M e nc . Weet Gecmray 

w , t*iii / asoso* 
Tahoe 17 26 18 38 MHAE D 


5SSp ? ' S 

o^.ornai,P930T«bo,p 

16 jratves, 300 T 



3SOSL/C. 


Imprimi par Offprint, 73 rue de I’Evanpte, 7501 S Paris. 


ROU5-H0YCX CDRMKHE aotMt- 


sssiaSS^^aAar.BS' 

* ra ?* on " a *hi» fa Aiearicnn nonat*^" apwd «o*»dWon* for 


St. 


AfaewtdO 




^-34.66- 27 





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