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Edited in Pans 

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WEATHa DATA APPEAR 


Jsijipfr • No- 3 1,886 


ON PAGE u 


With Hie New York Times and The Washington Post 


ZURICH, TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 1985 


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v 2 Top Aides 

Resi 

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In Brazil 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BONN — West German offi- 
cials East G er man y on Moot 
day for permission to contact Hans 
Joachim Hedge, die top counteres- 
pionage nffirial who defected last 
week, to determine if he left be- 
cause of personal problems or po- 
litical reasons. 

A government spokesman, 
Friedhdm Ost/said the authorities 
hoped to convince Mr. Hedge to 
return to the West. 

Mr. Ost refused further com- 
ment on the talks, and said he knew 
nothing about reports that Mr- 
Hedge had refused to meet with 
West German diplomats. 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl, mean- 
while, met with cabinet minis ters 
and party leaders cm the growing 
»»y pi<wiafl e g pindal, as pressure grew 
for the resignations of those with 
most direct responsibility. 

Mr. Kohl met for four hours with 
leaders of his Christian Democratic 
.Party, then with Interior Minister 
Friedri ch Tirnmer mann for a brief- 
ing cm the affair. 

Mr. Zunmermann is one of those 
facing pressure to resign. 

. Hans Jochen Vogel, the leader of 
■■ the opposition Social Democratic 
Party, said Monday that Mr. Zhn- 
' mermann beat! “political responfl- 
bilityfar the greatest endangering 
.'of security in the Federal Repub- 
- lid’s history." 


France Gears Agency 
Of Role in Ship Sinking 

Opposition 
Sees Cover-Up 


-'IN! 


In the Soviet Union, a Modern Society 

h Beset by a Host of Modern Problems 


By Joseph Ficchetc 

International HeraU Tribune 
PARIS — A special French in- 
vestigator exonerated the govern- 
ment and its main intelligence 
agency Monday in the sinking of a 
ship belonging to the Greenpeace 
environmental movement last 
month in New Zealand. 

The government-appointed in- 
vestigator, Bernard Tricot, con- 
firmed that two teams of French 
secret agents were in the Auckland 
area at the time of the attack, but 
he said he believed that neither had 
carried it out. He was unable to say 
who might have done it. 

The findings seemed to lessen 
the threat of a major political scan- 
dal for France's Socialist govern- 
ment. But the opposition attacked 
the Tricot report as a cover-up, and 
a Greenpeace official called it “a 
whitewash." 

The New Zealand government 
indicated earlier that it had evi- 
dence linking French agents to the 
explosion that caused the sinking, 
in which a photographer in the 
crew was killed. 

In his report, Mr. Tricot said: 
“On the basis of the information 
available to me at this time, 1 do 
not believe there was any official 
French responsibility.” 

French newspapers and New 
Zealand officials have charged that 








'«*!■ 


■ ■ 

:■ "**:■; 




By Seth My dans 

New York Tunes Service 

MOSCOW — The Soviet Union 
is in the grip of a demographic and 
social revolution that is breaking 
up f amilies, lowering the birthrate 
and contributing to alcoholism, ju- 




w:.?. 

1 <*■ •" v; » 

« S3" 


■ s lusuujr- 

Mr. Ost, the chancellor’s spokes- 
Th ' man mid that after a cabinet meet- 

•l^OStS . -in* Ttiesday Mr. Kohl would have 
Q ‘ a second briefing on the affair, then 

' would draw the appropriate “per- 
* sonnd consequences.” That, ap- 
peared to be a reference to an antic- anu tuuuiuuuug %%, 

The Associated press •> ipated shake-up in the intelligence venile delinquency and crane, a 

The Assoaaua eras ictRWisbment. leading Soviet researcher says. 

BRASILIA -ncBamtofi: officMs aid Mr. 

Kohl had also conferred Sunday 
with Franz Josef Strauss, the Ba- 
varian pre mier and leader of the 
Christian Social Union. They met 
in Fiance, when Mr. Kohl had met 
the French president, Francois 

dent of the.centnd bank, did came the same day or these tanmtes urea* up. u* ^ 

same a short timejater. • \ _ the soveniment announced the dries of European Russia, the *- 

The resignations came at a time ,, spying charges of Margar- voice rate has risen to 50 percent, 

when Brazil is attempting to rraftr /^retatvin the West The problems stem from an ex- 

* 1 ^"“rindto ■^*SSi tt «hol a d lemdveurban-ra 


nance minister and . the central 
bank, president resigned Monday, 
Francisco DomeDes, the finance 
minister, offered bis reagnahon 
without explanation Monday 
m orning to President Jorfi Samey. 
Antdmo Carios Lemgruber, presh 

- . * ... W 1 L ~JtlA *||A 


aamg joyicl locaiLu^t smjv - 

“Today's young family is fuD of 
conflict, unstable, and with few 
children,” said Viktor L Perevts- 
dentsev, a senior demographer with 
the Soviet Academy of Sciences. 

Under the pressures of a nation- 
wide shift in soda! values and ways 


In a country where a rural, tradi- 
tional way of life had endured 
much longer than in most Western 
nations, the shift from the extended 
patriarchal family to the nuclear 
urban f amil y is yielding painful re- 
sults. Husbands, unable to accept a 
busy, working wife and unwilling 
to share her household burdens, are 
turning to the traditional Russian 
solace of vodka. 

Wives, whose income is needed 
to support the family and who are 
often better educated than their 
husbands, are holding their fam- 


zxoianu ouiLiais uu*« kibu&bw 

. . French intelligence agents sank the 

relationships have not ebangea, vesse ] the Rainbow Warrior, to 
and the domestic responsibiliues sabol j, &e a Greenpeace protest 
remain on the woman’s shoulders, demonstration against French nu- 

Most women do not remarry, he • **--*:- 


JV 1 M 31 nvuivu uv uvv — 

said, and the Soviet Union is seeing 
new phenomena: one-parent fam- 
ilies and youngsters who grow up 
without a male influence either at 
hpme or at school, where virtually 
all teachers are women. 

. Mr. Perevedentsev said that 
youngsters growing up in fatherless 
families appear to be subject to 
what he called “abnormal behav- 
ior ' — drinking, hooliganism and 
theft. 


clear tests in the South Pacific. 

The Tricot report said that five 
French intelligence agents were in 
New Zealand at the time of the 
sinking, but added that they had 
orders to obtain information about 
Greenpeace and possibly infiltrate 
the movement, not act against it 

Saying that he believed the 
agents had not exceeded their in- 
structions, Mr. Tricot, nonetheless, 

. r..«k„ innniriK 


Bernard Tricot leaving television stwfios in Paris after 
giving the results of his report on the rote of the French 
intelligence agency in the sinking of the Rainbow Warrior. 

U.S. Anti-Satellite Test 



By Bill Keller 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Hie effort 
by the U.S. Air Force to perfect a 
weapon that can destroy satellites 
has t aken on new scientific and 


Tests of anti-missile weapons are 
severely limited by the 1972 Anti- 
Ballistic Missile Treaty, but anti- 
satellite weapons are not covered 
by any agreement 
Critics such as Representative 


eotiate debts due this year 

gain the retose of stalled Itt ^^^^materials. 
Brazil holds the largest foreign debt C oT mtCT j nt dHgetice agents 
in the developing world, put at mTOtrWflB khoni a dozen other 
S103 bzDion. 

A presidential spokesman, !* er- 
nando C£sar Mesquita, said that 
the resignations did not mean a 
change in the government’s eco- 
nomic policy. . . 

' “Just the opposite. Mr. Mes- 
quita said. “The government has 
been following an anti-recession 
line. President Saraey has said and 
repeated, Brazil cannot stop 
growth. You can’t haw recession in 
a country where there is a p^ma- 

uent crisis of unemployment ana 

"where there is a senous social 

P ^5cgpvemment has to control 
inflation,” he added, _ but it also 
must “stimulate growth. Inflation 

has been running at an annual rate 
of 1 17 percent. Mr. Santey also has 
XrM would honor its 

d, tfa. DomeDes, select«l fwti* 

□ost bv his uncle. Tan credo Neves, 

the late P resident ^ !e ?’,, I ^^KS 
resigned because he had not ^ 

>' . £Sed about th jjJjJjtS" 

Vday of his deputy, 

' Mr. Saraey reportedly dismissed 
■ Mr. Vital for criticizing g° v ^£ 
ment economic 

during a meeting with haititereJ^; 

■ ■■ DomeDes waste Pam wthJ^iK 

-r: Z'SSSSSS™* 

Paulo Branco, said that Mr- P® 

Ses cited “personal reasons for 

^tr^gruber reportedly » 

outS lo^^Mr. DomeDes, his 
superior 


:*Mu 


D ^ , 

watching about a dozen other sec- 
retaries in Bono, according to the 
BOdZetemg. 

The newspaper said one ol tne 
subjects is a secretary in Mr. KohTs 
(Continued on Page 2, Col 6) 


WJW# auu» mam srww — — — - 

of life, he said.- more than one- third 

of these families break up. In the though, — - : 

- — - - - ™ — -- ■' — -** who file for divorce m most cases. 

Women cite alcoholism in more 

SSS&ssi iSsa SESg 


maiogete as longisth^^n, '“ C . , r ci0|0 ^ !ls ^ delenninai 
Mr. Perevedentsev said. In the raid, . ■ f r0 m lack of the 

te said. i. IS & women SSr npbring- 

ing," he said. 

Shauered homes also are cut 


st ructions, Mr. Tricot, nonetheless, ^ taken on new scientific and Critics such “ 
recommended further inquiries political importance because of the George E. Brown iJr, Denmcrata 
into their conduct in the Pacific. program’s identificauon with the California, say 


are 


million people a year that some he thought that complaint, along 
sodtMogisls say is ttansformteg the with complaints of ^atedute^ 
counnys social structure as none and mcom^tibflity^were sjOTp- 
of the ware or internal conflicts of toms of the larger social problem. 

‘■"■s'srSSS 


■JI WI iui VM 

adrift from the older generation, in 
which the grandmother, or babush- 
ka. traditionally played a role in 
raising children. . 

"Anyway, the babushka is be- 
coming younger,” Mr. Perevedent- 
sev said.' “She may be 40 years old 
and have another 15 years in the 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


rsS-' 


■ . j 5 * 


■Stf 

■ «T 

Vr 






South Africa 


By Alan Cowell 

flew York Tunes Service 

JOHANNESBURG - The 
signs are there: a line of ants, long 
dormant, penetrating, suddenly 
and mysteriously, from garden to* 
sunlit kitchen; the smudge of 
pink cherry blossom on branches 
that had seemed barren; the 
swimming pools turning quickly 
green in the incipient heau 

In Johannesburg’s wealthy 
white suburbs, the omens say that 
spring is stirring — an intimation 
of the coming hot days and ram 
and a time, this year, of nervous 
talk and quandaries for whit« 
haunted by the specter of black 
township violence and political 
uncertainty. . . 

The old ways of the whites m 
South Africa, government mmis- 
ters keep saying, are gomg. Yet, 
they are far from gone, and, m 
anv event, wealth and poverty in 
aracialiy divided land wffl pro- 
vide their own separations Tor de- 
cades. 


the United States, while those 
without that option ponder in 
moods that range from harsh ra- 
cial defiance to puzzlement where 
their government will lead them. 

There is also talk of change, of 
“co-responsibility” with blacks, 
but no visible change is evident: 


in a time of the nation's worst 
racial unrest, have brought their 
own doubts and fears, questions 
posed in the hiatus between gov- 
ernment statement and official 
inaction. 

The man is an Afrikaner, rela- 
tively liberal, who likes to shock 


'Somewhere, out there, beyond the light, 
we know they are there, the blacks. Then 
we will see them, the eyes, outside the 

firelight, the eyes.’ ^Afrikaner 


ihe buses that ply the leafy ave- 
nues from white northern sub- 
urbs to city center are stiD segre- 
gated by law. a black face in a 
diy center rcstsuniDt still sltnicts 
furtive curiosity from white din- 
ers. 

The future, thus, still seems 


^ - I fte mime, Uiua. BUU 

have the passport andthe wo « ^ of m of many is here 

and now. But the portents, read 


foreigners by calling blacks “nig- 
gcre,” smiling at this affront to 
iheir liberalism. The pejorative 
terminology, moreover, seems de- 
signed to defy his own anguish 
over the future. 

“It’s nothing new," he said in a 
conversation, when talk turned to 
the white reaction to black dis- 
sent. “We’ve been sending our 
money abroad for years. Of 
course, it’s illegal and if we’re 


caught we've had iti" Hiat, he 
is why he does not wish to be 
identified. 

“Everybody wants a bolt hole, 
if they can afford it,” he said. Bui 
ihe notion of departure is hedged 
with constraints and memories. 

"Think of the Afrikaners, in 
the old davs, sitting around the 
fire,” he said. “Somewhere, oui 
there, beyond the light, we know 
they are there the blacks. Then 
we will see them, the eyes, outside 
the firelight, the eyes. Then we U 
all have our code names, to com- 
municate, to defend ourselves. 
We'll be inside the laager." 

A laager is a camp surrounded 
by a barricade of wagons. 

So why send money abroad, if 
the defense lies at home, in the 
laagert “Because they’ll be back 
the next night," he said. "There U 
always be the eyes just out of the 
firelight” . 

On the street, he meets a black 
man he knows, and spends a min- 
ute or two in cas ua l jest and ca- 
maraderie, handshakes and 
friendship. Was the black man, 
than, not one of those beyond the 
firelight? Oh, sure he was. the 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL 1) 


.He said that if the attack on the 
ship was an official French mis- 
sion, it was carried out in an aston- 
ishingly slipshod manner. 

All five agents —four men and a 
woman — belong to France’s for- 
eign intelligence agency, the Gen- 
eral Directorate for External Secu- 
rity, which is known by its French 
initials, DGSE The four men are 
current or former members of a 
special underwater demolition unit 
that is linked to the DGSE 
Alain Madeira, an opposition 
parliamentarian, accused the re- 
port of “taking the French people 
for imbeciles.” He said that agents 
with this specialized training would 
not have been sent to New Ze alan d 
“just to take pictures." 

France, he said, had “carried ont 
a terrorist acL" . 

The report by Mr. Tncoti a 
Gaullisti was certain to be wel- 
comed by the Socialist government 
Press criticism has led to pecula- 
tion that Defense Minister Charles 
Herau would resign. Mr. Hernu 
has responsibility for the DGSE 
The newspaper JLe Monde, how- 
ever. said that public opinion prob- 
ably would believe that Mr. Tricot 
agreed to accept the DOSE'S ver- 
sion of events to protect what he 
considered to be France's national 
interest 

Before the report’s release, gov- 
ernment sources in New Zealand 


>rograin s 

strategic Defense Imtifctv^*- ac- 
cording to government officials 
and outride experts. 

Technically, the anti-satellite 
program, which is schedu le d for its 
first test against a target in space 
next month, is only one step in 
nearly 30 years of American re- 
search into anti-satellite weaponry. 

But both supporters and critics 
said the program had become 
closely identified, both in technol- 
ogy and arms control implications, 
with President Ronald Reagan’s 
plan for research into an anti-mis- 
sile system, formally known as the 
Strategic Defense Initiative, or 
SDI, and frequently called “star 
wars.” 

One Pentagon official involved 
in space policy said in an interview 
Friday that the overlap between 
anti-satellite technology and SDI 
was so great that if the United 
States was forced to slop testing 
anti-satellite weapons, “it would 
slow down certain parts of SDI 
today and probably prevent the 
completion of the research pro- 
gram.” , 

Such a ban has been proposed 
both by the Soviet Union and by 
some American arms control advo- 
cates. 

The Pentagon official, who 
spoke on condition that be not be 
identified, said thai the anti-saiel- 


SSSS aafserase 


vreuigt — • 

California, say anti-satellite weap- 
ons are dangerous in themselves 
because, if developed unchecked, 
they would endanger the satellites 
that provide early warning and 
communications in a crisis. 

They also fault the timing of the 
test next month, saying it may poi- 
son the atmosphere ter talks be- 
tween President Reagan and Mik- 
hail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet 
leader, in November. 

The critics also see anti-satellite 
weapons as the precursor of some- 
thing much bigger. Testing of such 
weapons, they argue, will build up 
pressure to scrap the anti-ballistic 
missile treaty and proreed with a 
leapfrogging anus rare in space. 

Both in Congress and at arms 
negotiations in Geneva, the effort 
to limit spare weapons has cen- 
tered on the anti-satellite, or 
ASAT, program, because SDI still 
is a nebulous assortment of compo- 
nents that exist only on drawing 
boards and in laboratories. 

The House of Representatives 
voted in June to ban anti-satellite 
tests as long as the Soviet Union 
continued its two-year moratorium 
on such tests. But the ban was 
dropped in a House-Senate confer- 
ence on the military authorization 
bill That measure" is awaiting a 
f inal House vote in September. 

Mr. Brown, who led the fighi for 
an ami-satellite ban. said that his 


Mr. Tricot, that linked French in- 
telligence agents to the operation. 

David Lange, the New Zealand 
prime minister, said Sunday that 
i hi* information would test the 
credibility of the Tricot report, and 
.i . ■ it hnnt in helieve 


effort was not an indirect attack on 

mini aturization of sensors and gjjj j, ul ^ attempt to make the 
computers, which would be central Reagan a dminis tration take arms 
io constructing orbiting batde^ta- control more seriously. Bui he ac- 


IV — W , 

Lions to shoot down enemy mis- 
siles. 

In the future, the Pentagon offi- 


credibility of the Tricot report, and in the future, me rentagon ou.- 
Lhai he would find it hard to believe dal said, the air force also expects 
any report clearing French inielli- lo conduct tests of energy-beam 




£S»|b£§ Without Rain, Cambodia Sees Mg 

civilian military- 



minisier 

^ ^.^enteipnses- Ml 

goverarnent-ntn w Saruey 
Sayad subimuedand ^ 
approved cuts of 9** 


genre. . 

While not disclosing the infor- 
mation from New Z ea l and . Mr. 
Tricot said that "evaything I have 
seen and heard convinces me. that 
the government made no decision 
that might have led to damage to 
the Rainbow Warrior." 

He added that "there is no rea- 
^ WrZSVf*f/Y so Q 10 Micve (and in fact many 

CG tJl |i/f tx reasons to doubt) that France s m- 

u idli genre agency gave its agents m 

ssKsCtss 

ssKhSS emts-w 

Cambodia. F™»<* otficiaJ f ..Tf™ 

According to international aid ^^ l 31 Lb^l^have been a 

organizations working m -ov-mio most of the or- 

(fia,teel^ofwawmanagemai ^ ^ ^ were given orally, 

major contnburor _ te .food acknowledged that the 

s. This is vivify dieted myiAoimA when a hearing 

*&****£,* LtJS opens in November in New Zea- 

T n * landon charges against two Frmch 

Food Program contributed about ground water only a fw hundred ^ offter5 arrested there 
$400 milli on in food aid to Cambo- yards from noe plan yi & after the sinking, 

dia, almost S100 miDion of it from parched earth. 


weapons, including lasers, for use 
against satellites. Such weapons 
also are considered a leadingcandi- 
date for a role in the Strategic De- 
fense Initiative. 


umuui * 

knowledged that the two programs 
were inseparable. 

The test next month will be the 
third firing of the anti-satellite 
rocket. 

The experiment is a major ad- 
vance because the two previous 
tests have been aimed only at emp- 
ty points in space. 



msroE 


, July. ,7&ted economic ioi vrev- * exportog.com and Nations agency, 16,000 metric tons 

r — K 30(1 beans to Vietnam, the Soviet Union were donated to Cambodia, more a menace th 

. c^ortPOWs S appfi^ t0 , hav f ^^?als and other Comimmist nations, he with 54,000 additional metnc tons The Cambodi 

\* A China, Vietnam Swap ™3Sfood and pointed out, but rinuns do not ^ Cambodian refugees along the knowledges that C 

V. * nciaxedP"* 1 , rubber and.umbcr.. and food becomes scarce, Thai border. • :tion systems, whe 


gSSsSC S^-”* wsaSsas bsstss 

Z -.a~na£ •it’mZtideS *sarea--ir 


ls "SSS aS&ssTbTSZ** ^SSJSSiS."^ whKjSfkta- 

Monday for 19 «« ^ faminc fl “ l swspt Cmbod,an food w0 “ ld 

r centrf its * h *"’°**‘ 80 

Television news reporieti- 


"we 


stiU depend on the sky. 


Gerald Andries. 

The Tricot report reconstructs 
(Continued on Page 2, Col 6) 


Baulin 

Samantha Smith, 13, 
who dated Moscow af- 
ter writing to .Yuri V. 
Andropov, was killed in a 
plane crash- Page 2. 


■ Edwin Meese 3d, as UJ3. at- 

torney general, has adopted the 
conservative “social agenda” as 
his own. P*g® 3- 

■ The US. govenunent has 

agreed to pay millions of dollars 
to relatives of victims of a 1982 
air crash. Page 3. 

■ The Uganda government 
opened peace talks with the Na- 
tional Resistance Army. Page 6. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

Japanese makers of setmeon- 
ductors denied that their trade 
practices are unfair against the 
U.S. industry. Page 9. 

■ Mesa Petroleum Co. said its 

board has approved reoiganiz- 
ing the company into a limited 
partnership. Psg® 9- 

SPORTS 

■ Zola Budd set a world record 
of 14:48.07 in the women’s 


5,000 meiers. 


Page 15. 


r— — r- # V*.H¥ ! / ;. 




Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 1985 


West Bank Palestinian 
Who Appealed Expulsion 
Agrees to 3-Year Exile 


By William Claiborne 

Washington Post Senior 

JERUSALEM — A Palestinian 
whose court appeal of an expulsion 
order threw into doubt Israel's re- 
newed policy of deporting suspect- 
ed Arab subversives has agreed to a 
three-year voluntary exile in ex- 
change for the cancellation of his 
deportation order, officials said 
Monday. 

Hain Abu Had signed an agree- 
ment stipulating that he can return 
to the West Bank in three years if 
be has not engaged in hostile acts 
against Israel 

In return, the deportation order 
of Aug. 7 issued by the army com- 
mand was provisionally canceled 

Mr. Abu Ziad was identified by 
Israeli security officials as com- 
mander of a West Bank unit of d- 
Fatah. the mainstream faction of 
the Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion. 

His case was scheduled to be 
heard Wednesday by the Israeli Su- 
preme Court. 

Palestinian lawyers had hoped 
Mr. Abu Ziad’s appeal could estab- 
lish a precedent that would hinder 
a government policy of deporting 
suspected Arab subversives. 

A military review board on Aug. 
II urged that the army’s central 
co mman d reconsider its decision to 
deport him, saying that while he 
could be linked to Fatah, there was 
no evidence that he engaged in spe- 
cific terrorist actions. 

Although the review board’s rec- 
ommendation was rqected by the 
central command and Mr. Abo 
Ziad was held under ’’administra- 
tive detention” without charges, se- 
nior army officers said they were 
dismayed because the review 
board's findings could be presented 


as evidence in a Supreme Court 
hearing. 

In rqecting the board’s recom- 
mendation, the army command 
said that Mr. Abu Had ‘'may not 
have been engaged in specific ter- 
rorist acts,” but could have provid- 
ed the inspiration and guidance for 
such acts. 

Mr. Abu Ziad’s lawyer. Amnon 
Zichroni, said Monday that his cli- 
ent had agreed to voluntary exile 
for three years because he was fear- 
ful that even if he won bis appeal in 
the Supreme Court, the army could 
keep him in prison under adminis- 
trative detention without formal 
charges. 

“He spent 10 years in prison, and 
his wife is pregnant,” Mr. Zichroni 
said. Mr. Abu Ziad was convicted 
in 1970 of engaging in terrorist ac- 
tivities. 

■ More Palestinians Arrested 

Israeli forces have arrested doz- 
ens of Palestinians on the West 
Bank and questioned several thou- 
sand others following the shooting 
of two Israelis, one fatally on Sat- 
urday, Agenee France-Presse re- 
ported from Tel Aviv. 


MoanrOwned N.Y. Paper 
Suspends Publication 

United Press International 

NEW YORK — The New York 
City Tribune, a daily newspaper 
founded by Sun Myung Moon, the 
leader of the Unification Church, 
has announced it is suspending 
publication as of Monday but 
plans to launch an expanded ver- 
sion of the paper next year. 

The newspaper was founded by 
News World Communications Inc. 
in 1983. 


U.S. Girl Who Wrote to Andropov Dies in Crash 


Compiled by Oar Staff Fnm Dispatches 

AUBURN, Maine — Samantha Smith, the 
American schoolgirl who wrote to Yuri V. 
Andropov two years ago about her fear of 
nuclear war and then visited the Soviet Union 
as his guest, died in a plane crash Sunday 
nigh t. 

Jeff Congo U, the Auburn airport manager, 
said that the twin -engine Beecbcrafl plane 
carrying six passengers and two crew mem- 
bers crashed in a wooded area just short of 
the runway, killing all those aboard. The Bar 
Harbor Airlines plane was on a flight from 
Boston and the pilot had reported no prob- 
lems, Mr. GongoIJ said. 

There was no immediate indication of what 
caused the crash. 

The state medical examiner. Dr. Henry 
Ryan, said that S amantha 13, and her father, 
Arthur Smith, were among the passengers. 


The other bodies were still unidentified. 

Jane Smith said her husband and daughter 
were flying in from Boston after a two- week 
stay in England, where Samantha had been 

filming a part in a television comedy that was 
to start on U.S. television next month. 

After Samantha -wrote to Andropov, then 
the Soviet leader, about her fear of nuclear 
war, he invited her to visit the Soviet Union in 
July 1983. 

The Maine gtrl, then 11, became a celebrity 
and after the trip made many appearances on 
television talk shows. ' 

The Soviet Union paid for the trip for 
Samantha and her parents, but she newer met 
Andropov, who died seven mo nths later. 

Andropov’s letter inviting her to the Soviet 
Union assured her that the Soviet Union, was 
doing everything possible to avoid a nuclear 
war, Samantha said. 


She said of the Soviet leader, “Fran his 
letter, to me he’s just like a grandfather or an 
unde.” 

Upon arrival in Moscow, she told a group 
of Soviet children: “The Americans are not 
going to start a war, either. So why are we still 
maWng all these bombs and -pointing them at 
each other?" 

During her visit, she participated in many 
activities with Russian children. She went to 
carnivals, (he circus, the Bolshoi Ballet, 
beaches and classes. 

In Moscow, tbeTass news agency reported 
her death Monday, saying that “the name of 
Samantha Smith is well known in the 
U.S.SJL and around the world.” 

It adrifd that dining her visit to the Soviet 
Union, “rite saw for herself the sincere desire 
of the Soviet people to live in peace and to 
prevent nuclear war.” (UP I, Reuters, AP) 


WORLD BRIEFS 




Shuttle Ready for 3d Launching Try 

oumiicnww; ,Am_The space shuttle Discovery 
CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida (AP) .. attempt in four days. 

was declared ready Monday for ^5 ^ a^nright frustrate them 

but officials worried that poor weather in the area uu*n 


once again. 

“We’re watching a new area 


of disturbed -either off ^ 




thunderstorms in the vicinity 
) table range. 


was 


Polish Debts to Austria Rescheduled Bonn Asks 

Mr. Bujak, 30, also said in the Vgvwn /f TflTI? 
terview, with Newsweek maga- ■*. nJt l X (ini' 

With Spy 


Reuters 

WARSAW — Austria has signed 
an agreement rescheduling Po- 
land's debts and promising it new 
loans, the Polish news agency PAP 
said Monday. 

It is the first Western country to 
do so since martial law was im- 
posed in Poland in December 1981. 

Western diplomats are uncertain 
whether the West will lend Poland 
the S800 milli on it wants this year. 

Austria, in the accord signed last 
week in Vienna, rescheduled pay- 
ments due from 1982 to 1984 and 
pledged $40 million in state-guar- 
anteed credits to fund Polish im- 
ports from Austria. 

Poland has a debt of about $27 
billion, the legacy of heavy borrow- 
ing in the 1970s. 

The Paris Cub of non-Commun- 
ist creditor nations signed an agree- 
ment fast month rescheduling $12 
billion. This paved the way for bi- 
lateral talks on repayment terms 
and new loans. 

Western diplomats expect other 
countries to deride whether to em- 


ulate Austria after the end of this 
month, when Poland is due to re- 
pay 5400 million owed from 1981. 

West Germany, Poland’s largest 
Western trading partner, has indi- 
cated that it may extend credits of 
about 100 million Deutsche marks 
($36 million), diplomatic sources 
said. 

Billions of dollars due to be paid 
this year need rescheduling, and 
the Paris Club will tackle this next 
month, according to the sources. 

Polish exports to the West in the 
first six months of last year were a 
mere 0.5 percent higher than in the 
first half of last year, and last 
month’s trade surplus was only 
$500,000. 

■ Underground Strength 

A fugitive leader of Poland’s out- 
lawed Solidarity trade onion move- 
ment estimated that the under- 
ground still has 50.000 to 70,000 
full-time activists. The man . Zbig- 
niew Bujak, spoke in an interview 
published Monday, The Associated 
Press reported from New York. 


interview, with Newsweek maga- 
zine: “Those who work with us 
from time to time number about 
200,000 to 250,000.” 

He said he expected the fight for 
union and individual rights would 
be a long one. and that be might 
end up in prison. “I am ready for a 
long struggle,” be said. “I expect it 
to last 10 to 15 years. Something 
will certainly move. I am convinced 
I am 'going to see iL” 

Newsweek said that Mr. Bujak 1 

has managed to dude the police 
since 1981. 


barely in the acceptable rang* . saaxs d were bettered, howev- 

al 6:55 ^ 

are thunderstorms, officials can wait until 7.49. 

Soviet Operation in Angola Is Alleged * 

PARIS f API —-Soviet soldiers have joined with Angolan gpveramept 1 
foi^x^Q against insurgents, the rrijelNational iWorthe 

Soviet infantry battalion was actively mvrivedm^tbe c^erationaimed^ 
dSEug Luanda from rebd action in annapahon of a meeting of the 
Non aligned Movement there in September. . . 

MrjGato said that the Angolan government wasanxmus toprorcms 
in control of the situation and to thus realne a 
He said that the offensive bad resulted m fierce combat in ctt-txntral 
Angola about 525 mOes (850 kilometers) from Luanda, notably at 
Locusse, south of Laena. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
headquarters and three others work 
for the Social Democratic Party. 

But Mr. Ost raid he knew of no 
such suspect in Mr. Kohl’s office, 
and a Social Democratic spokes- 
man said only that the party was 
routine security 


Record Dutch Heroin Seizure 

The Associated Press 

AMSTERDAM — Police seized 
Dearly 100 pounds (45 kilograms) 
of heroin in coordinated raids here, 
the largest drug haul in Dutch his- 
tory. a police spokesman disclosed 
Monday. Nine Chinese nationals 
were arrested. 



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Politicians and press commenta- 
tors have stepped up demands tor 

resignations in the affair. 

There have been indications that 
the first resignation might come 
from the country’s intelligence' 
chief, Heribert Hellenbroicb. 
Those indications were strength- 
ened Monday Mien Mr. Kohl’s co- 
alition partners, the liberal Free 
Democrats, accused him of making 
“unpardonable errors.” 

Mr. HeDenbroich, 48, took over 
the secret sendee last month. Be- 
fore that, he was chief of countain- 
telHgencc, and thus was responsble 
for Mr. Tiedge. He has confirmed 
that be knew Mr. Hedge suffered 
from alcoholism and bouts of de- 
pression and was heavily in debt 

Mr. Zimmermann did not de- 
fend Mr. Hellenbrrich in television 
interviews Sunday and complained 
that Mr. HeQeobroich had never 
informed his minis try about Mr. 
Hedge’s problems. 

West German investigators said 
Monday that they woe continuing 
the interrogation of Miss Hake, 
who security sources said worked 
in the foreign affairs and defense 
section of President Richard von 
Wrizsicker’s office. 

Miss Hake was the third woman 
secretaty exposed as a suspected 
spy this month. The two others 
disappeared, as did an army mes- 
senger under suspicion as a spy. 
(Reuters, UPI, NTT) 

Paris Report 
Gears Agency 

(Continued from P^*e I) 
an elaborate French intelligence 
operation against Greenpeace, in 
which France dispatched at least 
two teams of agents to New Zea- 
land to spy on the group. 

One team — two agents, pre- 
tending to be a married couple — 
went to Auckland to investigate 
Greenpeace plans to send a flotilla 
to French Polynesia in an effort to 
stir up local separatist emotions 
and attract unfavorable publicity 
about French nuclear tests. The 
agents, who were arrested in New 
Zealand, have been named as Ma- 
jor Alain Mafart, 35, and Captain 
Dominique Prieur, 36. They had 
gone under the assumed names of 
Alain Turenge and Sophie Tur- 
enge. 

A second team — three men, 
those who surrendered Monday — 
sailed from New Caledonia to New 
Zealand in a chartered yacht, the 
Ouvfca, on a double mission. 

They were to scout the Pacific 
areas where Greenpeace ships op-' 
erate and lay the groundwork for 
joining the Greenpeace flotilla on 
any future anti-French expedition 
or, if possible, to be asked to skip- 
per a Greenpeace ship. 

The Ouvfea left New Zealand on 
July 9, two days after the arrival of 
the Rainbow Warrior and the day 
before it was sunk. When the yacht 
called at Norfolk Island, on Aus- 
tralian territory, the crew were 
questioned by Australian and New 
Zealand potire on July 16, then 
allowed to proceed. 

But DGSE headquarters then or- 
dered the team to abandon then 
yacht and escape, the report said. 

The authorities in New Zealand 
are seeking another Frenchwoman 
who was working as an informer 
inside Greenpeace and was ordered 
out of New Zeala n d by her French 



Hn. Aauiiu Wfti 

A Shfite Moslem militiaman wearing a ’“Peace 1 " T-shirt 
sights Ins Soviet-made grenade launcher across die Green 
Line that divides Beirut during a lull in fighting oh Monday. 

Lebanon Militia Chiefs Meet Syrians 

BEIRUT (UPI) — Lebanese Moslem militia chiefs and Syrian officials 
met Monday in Damascus to discuss a Christian refusal to accept Syrian 
observers as part of a cease-fire in Lebanon. Reports circulated about a 
French proposal for a new Western observer force in Beirut, but there 
were no details. 

The Damascus talks involved Nabifa Beni, leader of the Suite Amal 
militia; Walid Jumblat, the Druze leader, and Vice President Abdel 
Halim Khaddam, militia sources said. Beirut radio said that a Lebanese 
Christian envoy might bead for Syria on Tuesday. 

Last weekend. Mr. Bern threatened open war if Syrian observers were 
not allowed deep in Christian territory to watch heavy guns Christian 
leaders said that Syrian observers should stay on the front lines. Mr. 
Beni’s militia was reported by the Christian radio Monday to be moving 
reinforcements and heavy guns to positions overlooking Christian areas. 
But the front lines were reported quiet Monday at the start of a two-day 
Moslem feast 

Vietnam Approves Cambodia Talks 

JAKARTA (AP) — Vietnam’s foreign minister, Nguyen Co Thacfa, 
said Monday be had agreed to meet with officials from six southeast 
Asian nations to discuss the occupation of Cambodia and the .guerrilla 
war against the Hanoi-backed government in Phnom Penh. 

The statement by Mr. Thach, who departed for Moscow after a five- 
day visa to Indonesia, appeared to soften slightly Vietnam’s policy 
against Internationa] meetings on the 160,000 Vietnamese troops in 
Cambodia. 

“We have a compromise in mind,” said Mr. Tbach’s Indonesian 
counterpart, Mochtar Kusumaalmadja. Mr. Thadi agreed that Vietnam’s 

tied, but said that 

New Problems in Soviet 

cm loose from the ties of family 
and village and seeking personal 
satisfaction and advancement in a 
new atmosphere. Fully one-fifth of 





superiors in May. 

The woman, Chris tin e-H; 
CAbon, 34, is said by die 
press to work for the DGSE 
The report said that the “most 
troubling aspect” of the case is that 
there are no other plausible cul- 
prits. The operation might have 


(Continued from Page 1) 

work force. She has her own life to 
lead." 

The country's crippling bousing 
shortage adds to the pressures on 
mban families, where young mar- 
ried couples may have to wait 
months or years for an apartment 
where they can live together apart 
from their parents. 

Their cramped quarters, once 
they get them, contribute to the 
small families they choose to raise 
and to the pressures of borne life 
that drive them apart. And they can 
make divorce doubly painful when 
an estranged couple is forced to 
remain together, in some cases for 
months or years, until they can find 
separate apartments. 

All these pressures contribute to 
a birthrate that lags well below the 
needs of the work force. 

An optimum birth rate would be 
1*200 or more children for each 
1,000 people, Mr. Perevedentsev 
said. The rural birth rate approach- 




year, statistics show; 

The number of people migrating 
to cities each year, Mr. Perevcdent- 
sev said, is 3 million to 4 million, 
with 1.5 million to 2 million mov- 
ing in the other direction. That 
means a net shift oflj million to 2 
million people to the dries each 
year. 

A major problem, he said, is that 
upshift from rural areas is not 
*f™6 Pwce where it is needed. In 
curopean Russia, where a stable 
™ work force is needed and 
where a ties are filling their own 
manpower needs by normal 
^wthjiboui 25 people per 1,000 
leave for the a ties each year. 

In Soviet Central Asia, however, 
tne population growth rate is much 
lu Sher. producing workers that are 

TUr/IArt in link j- i ■ •« m 



i.'Sv 


i saattSfassc 3“jfcj£sss& 

=r.t txstss 

lie Soviet population was rural. 

Tne proportion has shi fte d and 
now more than two-thirds live in 
dries. The result is a new and un- 
usual freedom in life, with people 


Greenpeace and discredit France, 
Mr. Tricot said. 



Head Office Dusseldorf 


UNIVERSITY 
DEGREE 

RACHSOfS • MASTER'S • DOCTORATE 

f* Work, Aeadnm K Ub 

Send detailed resume 
ier free evaluation. 

[PACIFIC WESTERN UNZVBSfTY 
M0 N. Sepulveda Blvdw 
Angeles, California 
Dept. 23. U AA. 


DEATH notice 


"The death has been anwmnrrd of 

Mr. Moipta* Demure De I 
Chairman and Chief Exec 
at Feaofiu 
Tne funeral mass wifi take piw m 

Coudenbm, Raoe Royak, Bmssek. 

No flowers by request. 


mj!s a ? y 2 l . Ferevedentsev’s 
initiative, Soviet high schools hare 
* «>urse called “The Ethics 
and Psychology of Family Life,” 
wuch be said would take over some 
of the educational role of parents, a 
parental function that has suffered. 



said, is for the sociological _ 
carued by the nation’s rura£urbaa 
shift to play itself outandforpeo- 

pk: to devdop new social riiles tbat 

lit the small, pressurized family m 
which each person shares the bur- 
F® of both work and 
ing. 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRJOBDVE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 1985 


Page 3 



«*-• a 

■ i .*»•». *n . .• y 

Mivt ?jri 





Studies Cutbacks in Amtrak Rail System , Eldership Is Reaching New Peaks 


ME ^lDlAN , ^ , - SerWfr 


rr' wTfu. 

oo its daily >~!f- th t e Dee P South 
tra * ns 


system, ridership and. revenues 
"w* risen at the same time Coo- 
&cs& has been studying possible 
pHbacJcs of as much as IS percent 
w the rail passenger system’sanmj- 

^ operating subsidy. 

U -S. rail passenger services have 
tong been in decline because of 
difficulty in comp aring -with air- 
lines. . * 

“We have more people wasting 

1 nde the train tins summer than 


-j UGM^nc waniiUft 

___ to nde the t rain th<«E tfitmypff than 

‘^fr^stance trains w sometimes have seats,” said La- 
ity with at °r nearcapac- “pole Code, the ticket agent here, 

flies oners and thejrfam- *^0 says be is now handling as 

I ' - . “y » 100 passengers a day out 

‘act. throughout the of “e tiny rail station in M endian, 

— one of four towns in Mississippi 


that still have daily passenger ser- 
vice, 

Ridership on Amtrak's overnight 
trains generally peaks hu the sum- 
mer months, but in July it was up 
an estimated 7 percent over a year 
ago, and advance bookings since 
June have been running 15 percent 
to 20 percent ahead of a year ago. 

- Amtrak officials say the increase 
in ridership is probably a result, 
among other things, of discount 
fares and the debate in Congress 
over the future of the nation's pas- 
senger rail system, formally known 
as the National Railroad Passenger 
Coip. 

Business has been so good this 


summer that, according to prelimi- 
nary estimates, Amtrak's passen- 
ger-related revenues topped out at 
$61.8 million in July, toe highest 
total for any July since the compa- 
ny was created in 197 1, said Susan 
Martin, an Amtrak spokesman. _ - 

Amtrak is projecting that it wtH 
cany about 20.7 million passengers 
this year, on increase of 4.5 percent 
over last year. The short-haul trains 
in the densely populated Northeast 
Corridor account for slightly more 
than half of the railroad’s annual 
ridership, and about half the pas- 
senger-related revenues, which last 
year were about $758 million. 

Richard Pop well, a conductor on 


the Crescent, says the trains are as 
full this summer as he has ever seen 
them. 

‘Tm not sure why it's so crowd- 
ed," he said, “but 1 think a lot of 
people are maybe coming oui be- 
cause they've heard Amtrak is go- 
ing wu of business, and this will be 
their last chance to ride a train." 

The increase in riders on the sys- 
tem's long-distance trains comes as 
Congress prepares to resume de- 
bate neat month over how much to 
cut the government's annual subsi- 
dy to ihe passenger rail system, 
which nationwide runs about 240 
trains a day over 24,000 route miles 
(38.780 kilometers). 


The Reagan administration bad 
proposed elimination of Amtrak’s 
operating subsidy, which is cur- 
rently 5684 million. 

The subsidy makes up about 42 
percent or the railroad's annual op- 
erating budget of about 51J bil- 
lion. with the remainder coming 
from passenger fares. 

Congress balked ax the adminis- 
tration's proposal. Instead, in the 
budget resolution adopted earlier 
this year. Congress recommended a 
15-percent cm in the subsidy. More 
recently, the House of Representa- 
tives has been discussing a 10-per- 
ceni cul 

Passengers riding the trains this 


summer say that tow fares were a 
big factor in attracting them to the 
train. 

Amtrak's All Aboard America 
fare, for example, allows round-trip 
travel anywhere within the eastern 
United States for $150 for adults 
and 575 Tor children. 

That fare, which carries some re- 
strictions, is 525 less than it was last 
year. Identical fares, which are a 
substantial discount from regular 
Amtrak prices, apply in other re- 
gions of the country. 

Thai meant that Ron S try on and 


his wife, LuAnn, of New Orleans, 
had to pay just $450 to take their 
two children to New York and 
back, to visit relatives, recently. 
“It’s a lot faster than a car. and 
cheaper by far than the airplane.” 
said Mr. Stiyon. 

Othere aboard the train said they 
tod: tile train simply because they 
preferred it. “We've decided to deal 
with the problems of the 20th cen- 
tury by retreating to the 19th centu- 
ry.” said Derek Van Loan. who. 
along with his wife, Mae Margaret, 
was traveling the country by rail 
this summer. 


In New Role, Meese Makes Right’s 'Social Agenda’ His Own 


By Howard Kurtz 
and Mary Thornton 

Past Service 

. WASHINGTON — J n hu rirst 

II us - mom * 

ataost as much controversy as dur- 

BATS 3 S* b “ — » 

finot^n of 686 ; 15 ^ more out " 

gKffi£ 52 K 35 : 

Pears more determined to press the 
*® M *y atlve "social agenda” on is- 
sues tike prayer in public schools 
' and abortion. 

nSirsraM 

most outspoken attorney general in 
Mr- Mepse's detractors 
cau nun one of the most political 
and ideological men to head the 
Justice Department. 

“We have had poli deal attorneys 
general before,” said Ralph G. 
Neas, executive director of the 
leadership Conference on Civil 
Rights. “I am not sure we’ve had an 
attorney general like this one, who 
seems to display so little respect for 
the law. He is much more aggres- 
sive, much more confrontational, 
in pursuit of the radical right's 


Mr. Meese disputed the notion 
that he has politicized the job. - 
“My first six months in office 
v. would tend to mark me as a more 
'legally oriented attorney general” 
he said in an interview. He said he. 
has been “devoted to legal issues 
rather than political issues, and I've 
specifically avoided doing anything 



Urrtwd Pren (nttractonrf 

Attorney General Edwin Meese 3d has brought a two-fisted style to the Justice Department 


after the investigation be fought 
successfully for Senate confirma- 
tion, 

A former prosecutor in Alameda 


that would give the impression of . County, California, Mr. Meese has 
political involvement" v. - * 

Many Americans' recall Mr. 

Meese as a nominee under fire, the 
subject of an independent counsel's 
probe of such issues as Ms failure to 
disclose a $15,000 interest-free loan 
from a friend who later received a 
government job.. The inquiry last' 


given top priority to combating 
narcotics, terrorism, organized 
crime and white-collar crime. On 
criminal justice issues, where he 
feels most at home, Mr. Meese has 
stirred considerable debate. 

On Sunday, he described as “in- 
famous” and “wrong” the 1 966 Su- 


year found no evidence that Mr: prone Court decision creating the 
Meese had violated any laws, and Miranda rale, which .greatly ex- 


panded the rights of criminal sus- 
pects in police custody. 

He has been criticized widely for 
allowing EP. Hutton & Co. to 
plead guilty to 2,000 felony counts 
m a huge check-kiting scheme with- 
out seeking charges against any of 
its officials. 

Mr. Meese's influence extends 
well beyond the Justice Depart- 
ment He reviews most domestic 
issues as bead of the cabinet's Do- 
mestic Policy Council and attends 
meetings of the National Security 
Councfl. 


He was Ronald Reagan's chief at 
staff in the early 1970s when Mr, 
Reagan was governor of California, . 
and came to the White House with 
Mr. Reagan in 198 1 with the title of 
counselor to the president. 

As attorney general be remains 
dose to Mr. Reagan. When Mr. 
Meese speaks out on abortion, reli- 
gion or affirmative action against 
discrimination, few doubt that he is 
expressing Mr. Reagan's views. 

Conservative activists say that 
they have found a more receptive 


U.S. Agrees to Pay Crush Victims 9 Families 


By Philip M. Boffcy 

New York Times Service 
WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
jvernmenl has agreed to pay mil- - 
ons of dollars ter relatives of the 
(5 passengers killed in the crash of 
Pan American Worid Airways - 
itiiner outside New Orleans m 
)82, according to' officials of (he 
ederal Aviation A dminis tration. 
The crash was attributed to vio- 
nt wind shifts that caused the 
lane to dive suddenly. Relatives of 
te victims said the FAA failed to 
ert the Pan American ppot suffi- 
ently about possible wind shear 
id was partly at fault. 

Frederick H. Farrar, an FAA 
jokesman, said Sunday that the 
jvemment had agreed with Pan 
men can's insurance carriers to 
>lit the payments to the survivors, 
ith the government and the airline 
ich paying half. 

“It was cheaper for the FAA to 
ay halT the damages than to con- 
st it,” Mr. Farrar said. “We did 
Di believe then and do not believe 


now that we were at fault. Our 
traffic controller gave sufficient 
warning that wind shear could be 
expected.” 

Experts investigating the crash 
of a Delta Air Lines jet in Dallas on 
Aug. 2 have also focused on wind 
shear as a possible cause. 

Officials of the FAA and Mi- 
chael J. Pangia. a lawyer whose 
firm represented two plaintiffs in 
tbe 1982 said the FAA had 
paid damages in other cases where 
the agency seemed likely to be 
judged partly culpable for an acci- 
dent, so the latest settlement would 
have no special impact as a prece- 
dent on claims arising from the 
Delta crash. 

James S. Dill man, an FAA attor- 
ney, called international law “a 
very important element in our 
thinking.” He noted that the War- 
saw Convention limi ted the liabil- 
ity of airlines to 575,000 per pas- 
senger on international flights. 

Thus there was “a substantial 
chance.” he said, that relatives of 


the approximately 40 travelers on 
the flight who held tickets for desti- 
nations abroad would win large 
judgments in the courts and that 
tbe government, however small its 
culpability, might be left to pay the 
bulk of the damages. 

Mr. Dfflman said most of the 
New Orleans claims had been set- 
tled. although in some cases rela- 
tives were still seeking higher 
amounts in the courts. He estimat- 
ed the government’s total payout as 
in the milli ons of dollars but not 
the tens of millions. 

■ Problems Delay 5 Flights 

Five airiine flights, four in the 
United Stales, were disrupted Sun- 
day by apparent engine problems. 
The Associated Press reported 
from New York. 


United Air Lines said a Boeing 
737 flight was delayed after taxiing 
on the runway in Cleveland be- 
cause a valve stuck in one of the 
jet’s two engines. 

A Boeing 737 crashed on takeoff 
Thursday in Manchester, killing 54 
people, when an engine exploded. 

In London, A British Airways 
Boeing 737 made an emergency 
landing after a cockpit light indi- 
cated one of its two engines was 
overheating. 

Three other commercial flights 
in the United States, involving a 
People Express Boeing 737 in New 
Jersey, an Eastern Airlines A -300 
Airbus in Texas, and a Northwest 
Airlines 747 in Washington, also 
were disrupted Sunday due to ap- 
parent engine problems. 


ions of Latin America Assert 
omy Is Key to Regional Peace 

. - __ . . .laiMMi tlior f A 


ed Press International 
\GENA, Colombia — 
linis ters from eight Latin 
countries warned that 
come to Central America 
r the region's economic 
are solved. 

lement issued at the aid 
days of talks involving 
panama, Venezuela. Co- 

reentina, Peru, Brazil and 

the foreign ministers said 


Ponld liberalise 
egidency Roles 


in a statement that Central Ameri- 
can problems cannot be solved by 
force. It. will be necessary, they 
said, to simultaneously seek peace 
on one hand and economic reacti- 
vation on the other. 

Argentina, -Peru, Brazil and Uru- 
guay are members of the Lima 
Group, an alliance aimed at finding 
a solution to the civil wars in Cen- 
tral America. 

Mexico, Panama Venezuela and 
Colombia joined as the Contadora 
group, have worked unsuccessfully 
for two years to obtain support for 
their regional peace plan. 


as drafted a 
ace rights to 
in China or 
ientific and 


Nepal King’s Foreign Torn- 


)U, 

d Monday, 
visas for 
to travel 
the 


' KATMANDU- Nepal — King 
Birendra is to leave Friday on a 22- 
day tour that will include official 
visits to Australia and India, as well 
as stops in Brunei Malaysia, Hong 
Kong and Japan, the Foreign Min- 
istry said Monday. 



BOUTIQUES 


62, Fg Saint Honorfi 

Palais des Congrds 
' Porte Maillot 


Louis Feraud 


MONSIEUR 


audience at the Justice Department 
since Mr. Meese took over Feb. 25. 

“We think of Meese as more 
lake-charge on our issues,” said Jon 
Pascals of the Free Congress Foun- 
dation, “We worked hard for his 
nomination. He’s done a real good 
job so far.” 

Despite his combative image, in 
person Mr. Meese seems genial and 
easygoing. He appears more com- 
fortable in the job than did Mr. 
Smith, a reserved corporate lawyer. 

At the same lime, Mr. Meese 
appears wilting to take on a politi- 
cal flghi. He continued to push the 
nomination of William Bradford 
Reynolds to be associate attorney 
general long after it appeared 
doomed, and opened old wounds 
by calling the nation's civil rights 
groups, who opposed Mr. Reyn- 
olds, a “very pernicious lobby." 
The Senate Judiciary Committee 
rejected the nomination in June. 

Perhaps no single action better 
typifies Mr. Meese's two-fisted 
style lhan the Justice Department's 
recent friend-of-the-coun brief 
urging the Supreme Court to over- 
turn its 1973 decision legalizing 
abortion. 

Mr. Smith had stopped short of 
asking the justices to reverse their 
7-10-2 ruling in Roe vs. Wade, ask- 
ing instead that the stales be given 
greater leeway to regulate abortion. 
But the new brief calls the 1973 
decision “inherently unworkable” 
and “so far flawed that this court 
should overrule it" 


Mr. Meese ruffled more legal 
feathers last raomb when be ripped 
into a series of Supreme Court rul- 
ings on voluntary school prayer, 
aid to parochial schools and states’ 
rights. 

Accusing the justices of “a bewil- 
dering Catch-22 logic" and "a mis- 
taken understanding of constitu- 
tional theory," he said that the 
Founding Fathers would have 
found the court’s views on religion 
“bizarre." 

Mr. Meese also has challenged 
the “doctrine of incorporation." 
under which the courts have hdd 
Sot the last 60 years that most pro- 
visions of the Bill of Rights apply 
to the states. Mr. Meese said the 
doctrine, which has provided the 
basis for much modern litigation 
involving civil liberties, privacy 
and religion, rests on “an intellec- 
tually shaky foundation.” 

Such rhetorical assaults under- 
score the importance that Mr. 
Meese places on the courts as a 
vehicle for conservative reform. By 
1988, Mr. Reagan will have select- 
ed more than half the nation's fed- 
eral judges, and Mr. Meese is serv- 
ing as chief architect of Mr. 
Reagan's effort to reshape the judi- 
ciary. 

But Mr. Meese maintained that 
“we don't have any issue-by-issue 
ideological test” for judicial candi- 
dates. He said he is looking for 
people with a philosophy of judi- 
cial restraint. 



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'Page 4 


TUESDAY, AUGUST 27. 1985 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


tribune. 


fublt4ipd WUh TV >ew Y«fc Tinea and He WtahiagtoH Post 


The South Africa Debate 


. Something ritual reflexive and off the point 
has seized the debate La America about South 
'Africa. People seem more Interested in demol- 
ishing each other's arguments and in justifying 
their own prior political biases than in trying 
to understand what is going on in South Africa 
and what the U.S. position should be. Every 
ctich& in the book has been trotted out Empty 
theorizing runs rioL It is lots of fun. But it is 
reckless. America needs a dear, strong, broad- 
ly agreed upon, bipartisan policy toward 
South Africa, its government and its tunno fl- 
it is a measure of the self-absorption and 
.confusion reigning at the moment that even 
this self-evident proposition is held in doubt 

There is nothing America can da so it 

• should do nothing — this is an only slightly 
| exaggerated form of an argument one increas- 
ingly reads and hears. It is made most often by 
conservatives, mid it rests almost entirely on 

■ reasoning that conservatives themselves deride 
: when it is hurled at them from the other side in 

arguments over bow America should react to 
various Soviet outrages. Left and right are still 
at it, only they have had a kind erf cultural 
exchange of their own: Each side has stolen the 
other's arguments. Nobody seems ashamed. 

These arguments — overstated, extreme — 

* do not stand up much better in the South 
1 African context than when applied to East- 

■ West matters. They have the same unmistak- 
able aspect of debating points that may or may 
not have anything to do with reality. Thus we 
find conservatism arguing about President Bo- 
tha (as liberalism is wont to do about whoever 
is Soviet party secretary that year) that, thug- 
gish as his acts may look, he is a considerable 
breakthrough toward decency and reform, and 
that to push him in any respect is to endanger 
him with the “hard-liners 9 ' in his own camp 
and to show, as said hard-liners have always 
argued, that reasonableness doesn’t pay. 

A variation, which conservatives have hoot- 
ed down when it was made by their liberal 
opponents in relation to taking tough action 
against places from North Vietnam to Nicara- 
gua, is that tough action will only unify the 
country around its presiding villain and thus 
work in the opposite way from that intended. 
Besides, say a few of these folks whose instinct 
for interventionism is generally strong (and 
sound), it is surely none of our business how 
they organize their affairs in South Africa. 
Finally there comes what the right, in another 
context, denounces as “moral equivalence,” 
that insistence on seeing both sides at fault no 
matter how towering the crime of one may be 
in relation to that of the other. 

Hold the mirror up Lo this and you will see 
how those who can provide you with any 
number of impassioned arguments as to why 
the United States should follow a policy erf 
'‘constructive engagement” toward the Soviet 
Union, no matter what it does, and who are 
often indifferent to or doubtful about its bru- 
talities, have reversed polemic course just as 
thoroughly as their antagonists have. 


model There is a little of the wfaen-you’ve- 
seen-one-you’ve-seen- them- all mentality to 
this. But it is also true that no one can look 
at the political and economic condition of 
most of the newly liberated countries of blade 
Africa and hope that South Africa minus 
apartheid will aid up like them. 

The pant is, however, that, just as it is 
possible (and necessary) to press the Soviets on 
questions of human rights and political sub- 
version and aggression without inviting nucle- 
ar war, so it is posable (and necessary) to press 
the white apartheid government of South Afri- 
ca to abandon its institutionalized cruelties 
without inviting a nightmare of anarchy. 

Mr. Botha would like you to think other- 
wise. He and his government keep putting 
forward these two false alternatives: Leave us 
alone or risk the disintegration and impover- 
ishment of the land . But the real alternative to 
what he is doing is to end a system of gratu- 
itous cruelty and oppression visited on people 
for no other reason than their race. It is the 
continuation of that system, more than any- 
thing else, that is likely to bring on precisely 
the violent debacle be purports to be wanting 
off. Conservatives who understand that abject 
appeasement is likelier to lead to nuclear war 
than to avert it should have tittle trouble un- 
derstanding that the same is true erf the Sooth 
African version of the holocaust. 

The white South African gover n ment, fam- 
ous for its habit of pinning down peaceful 
protestm for over a quarter of a century now, 
has resisted every inch of the way taking those 
steps that could ameliorate the system, always 

S too little and too late. It is sometimes 

in distinguishing Snnfh Africa from vwr- 
ious to talitarian and authoritarian states that 
certain dements of democratic openness are 
present there as compared with other tyran- 
nies. This is true, but it hardly extenuates the 
gun-enforced mass racial repression. 

Rather, it suggests that pressure may have 
some response. On both moral and political 
grounds, it seems to us, there is an obligation 
for the United States, on which Pretoria so 
greatly depends, to press it to take advantage 
of what r emains of the opp o r tuni ty to reach a 
just and stable solution. America does have 
power; it does have influence; it does have 
responsibility; it does have urgent cause to act 
while there are stiD parties around with whom 
the Botha government can de al Is otaty^n ab- 
dication, the big shrug would be criminal. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Less Liberty in Liberia 


Unhappy Liberia has its own version of one 
man, one vote. There, only one man’s vote 
matters. He is Samuel K. Doe, a forma ser- 
geant who at age 28 ensconced hims elf as 
president in 1 980 af la his soldiers bayoneted a 
civilian predecessor. He is now a five-star 
general whose most conspicuous victory is 
ova the calendar. He has added two years to 
his agp so that, officially, be will be 35, as 
required by the constitution, when the people 
choose him for president in November. 

To assure that election result, all serious 
opposition parties have been Tided ineligible, 
their leaders jailed, their newspapers silenced. 
The most formidable challenger is Ellen John- 
son-Sirieaf, candidate of the liberal Action 
Party. Harvard-educated and a forma minis- 
ter of finance. Mrs. Johnson-Sirieaf has been 
Citibank's representative in Nairobi In a re- 
cent speech in Philadelphia, she faulted Libe- 
ria's lavish public spending. For this she was 
arrested on ha return to Monrovia, accused of 
endangering stability. Last week, incredibly, 
she was put on trial for sedition. 

All this cries out for more than a routine 
response. Americans have special historic ties 
to Liberia, which was established in 1822 with 


American help as a haven for freed black 
slaves. Its use of English, its constitution and 
even its flag reflect this history. But the prom- 
ise of liberty has neva been realized. Liberians 
have endured poverty ami corrupt nrisgovem- 
ment, and General Doe’s erratic despotism 
now outdoes that of his predecessors. 

Nonetheless, since his coup, U5. foreign aid 
to Liberia has quadrupled to $83 million this 
year, the highest pa capita figure in Africa. To 
induce him to hold the elections that he prom- 
ised, $25(1000 of this aid was earmarked to 
help pay the costs. General Doe denounced 
Washington fra interfering and vowed to re- 
turn the money. Wholly in character, he hasn’t 

The general seemingly assumes that the 
Reagan administration will put tip with any- 
thing so long as he makes anti-Conmnmist 
noises and causes no trouble about a vital 
Voice of America transmitter. Bat jailing a 
Gtibank representative for preaching fiscal 
canservatisn shows neither scruple nor sense. 
If Mis. Johnson-Sirieaf and other challengers 
are barred from the election, a healthy cot in 
Liberian aid — especially $13 million in mili- 
taiy aid — is one vote that America can cast. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Other Opinion 


Botha Rounds Up the Talkers 


As the hollow echoes of President Botha's 
empty ‘‘reform" speech die away, his police are 
busier than ever. The latest roundup of yet 
more leaders of the anti-apartheid United 
Democratic Front has serious implications. 
These are the kind of people with whom the 
authorities ought to be talking if the unspeci- 
fied reform promises are ever to be taken 
seriously. What matters is that the white mi- 
nority should hold unconditional negotiations 


with freely chosen African representatives. If 
the whites enter these oft promised talks with 
no intention of making any sacrifices of privi- 
lege, violence wiD gain even more appeal. 
White South Africans regard themselves as an 
unfairly unacknowledged adjunct of the West 
It is the duty of the West and its opportunity, 
to remind them of the lowest common denomi- 
nator for membership of our dub, which im- 
plies repeal of the most savage statutes to be 
found almost anywhere in the world. 

— The Guardian ( London j. 


FROM OUR AUG. 27 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Japan Is Set to Annex Corea 
PEKING — The last act of the tragedy of 
Corea's passing from the ranks of the Powers is 
scheduled, according to the Chinese Govern- 
ment's advices, for next Monday [Aug. 29}. 


or of Corea to enact the farce of requesting the 
Emperor of Japan to take ova the country, 
this request having been carefully formulated 
by the Tokio authorities. Japan will pension 


the Corean Emperor and will liberally reward 
the members of the notorious 0 -Chin-hoi Do- 


th e members of the notorious D -Chin-hoi po- 
litical society for aiding Japanese intrigues 
against their country's nationality. 


1935: War Games Show Army Flaws 
PINE CAMP, N.Y. — The biggest peace-time 
maneuvers held in the United States, staged 
here during the past week, revealed startling 
defects in the training and equipment of the 
regular army and the National Guard, officers 
admitted following a “battle” between invad- 
ing and defending armies. One side was found 
to have only five effective tanks. There was a 
deplorable tedt of transport, resulting in 155- 
miUimeter guns bang moved at only right 
miles an hour. Officers said the refusal of 
Congress to abolish antiquated army posts has 
ha m p ere d efficient military reorganization. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chaim, t» 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-diatrmm 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K_ McCABE 
CARL GEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Publisher 

Executive Editor RENfi BONDY Deputy PubBsker 

Etfftr ALAIN LECOUR Associate Publisher 

Otpmy Edo* RICHA RD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Operabaas 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Director of Circulation 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director of AJtaxfsux Saks 


ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director of Adxenki/tg Saks 
International Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Charics-de-GauDe, 92200 Ncnflly-sur-Seine, 

France. TeL: 1 1 } 747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8052. ^ 


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£ 1985, international Herald Tribune. AB rights resected. 



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m U t* *- TW(4p ■ tdat 

Sag asBjg_ ^aaa psr. 


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At about this point you will hear the nuclear 
holocaust ar gumen t nvidp Those who are for- 
ever arguing that to get tongh in any respect or 
any degree with the Soviets ova anything is to 
invite almost certain obliteration of the planet 
will protest that the Soviet case is a special one. 
But the apartheid p acifis ts have their own 
variation on this ultimate threat- Again and 
one wfll hear that the risk in pushing Mr. 
Rntha is that the worid will end up with a 
brutish black African anarchy on the Ugandan 











A Record otr allure 

To Inflect Pretoria 


•iff 1 


By Joseph Kraft 


W ASHINGTON — The Reagan 
administration has overplayed 
the U-S. hand in South Africa at all 
times. As a result, American impo- 
tence there has been advertised. 

Civil strife; far from bring averted, 
has been promoted. Brutal confron- 
tation is now apt to intensify. 

Appeasement with an anti-Soviet 
spin was the form first taken by the 
policy puffed up into the lenn “con- 
structive engagement-*’ The theory 
was that P.w. Botha, having sprung 
from the security forces, was particu- 
larly keen to dose South Africa s 
northern borders against forays from 
Angola and Mozambique by guerril- 
las of the African National Congress. 

From 1981 through 1984, U.S. pol- 
icy centered on making peace along 
those borders. In return for Amencan 

support. Mr. Botha was to cease sab- 


otage operations by South African 
forces and their local “contras 
against the two Marxist reguaes, 
which were to shot down the ANC 
and end ties with Moscow. Havana 
and the rest of the international 
Communist gang. Progress along 
those lines was billed as tire ban- 
ning of the end of Communist influ- 
ence in southern Africa. 

The polity failed either because . 
Mr Botha lost control over his secu- 
rity forces or. more likely, because he 
was did dlin g Washington au along. ^ 
The failure became absolutely certain W. 
when a South African raiding party 
was discovered trying, to btowTipi in- 
s tallati ons of an American oil compa- 
ny in northern Angola. In protest, the 
United States withdrew its ambassa- 
dor in Pretoria last June ... 

The facial situation inside Smith ■' 
Africa had taken a violent turn 18 . 
months before In. place of the 
banned ANC there sprung up a Unit- 
ed Democratic From finking black' 
clergy and trade union leaders. To ’ ; 
protest against miserable economic ' 
conditions and a denial erf political . 
rights, the UDF launched strikes, - 
boycotts and demonstrations. Last 
fan- 16 UDF leaders .were arretted 


The Posthumous Reward for Moderation 


B OMBAY — When it all started 
in the late 1970s, it was a case 


By Dhiren Bhagat 


of Sikhs killing Sikhs — Jarnafl 

Sing h Rhind ran wale’s mil i Lin t fac- 


tion locked in conflict with a group 
it regarded as haeticaL Then Sikhs 


it regarded as hereticaL Then Sikhs 
killed Hindus. Then Hindus killed 


the last Sflfh gum legitimized the 
use of the sword if another means 
had failed. He smiled He would not 
resort to violence, be said He would 
rather the Sikhs sacrificed them- 


The Sikhs are a ■ 


their struggle has always been 
apafnst the authority in Delhi. Who- 


Sikhs. With last Tuesday’s assassi- selves to tire enemy’s violence, 
nation of Sant Harchand Singh Events dwarfed him. When in 


nation of Sant Harchand Singh Events dwa 
Longowai, the moderate Sikh lead- 1982 be shoul 
er, by two Sikh extremists, it is Sikhs resisted Mr. B 
killing Sikhs once again. braced the n 

But it is not back to square one. stand t hoping 
Mr. Longowai was the third lead- him Mr. Bun 
a to die in the triangular conflict, 
and the least charismatic Each of ~ 

the three died a violent death. Mr. the ext 1 

Bhindranwale was killed when the 
Indian army stormed the Golden lAfngOu 
Temple in June last year. Indira 9n hh R/i 
Gandhi was assassinated by Sflcb . 

guards last October. 

AU three leaders died when thty created by tire 
thought they had achieved a post- rificaDy by Sar 
don of strength. Mr. Longowal’s Singh, the pre 
death came less than a month after dia, who woe 
he negotiated a peace accord with thai and on tfa 
Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi religious figun 

Mr. Longowal's publicity people electoral advz 
introduced him to the press as the Lon ao waL The 
“dictator” of Sikh agitation. Since ducting a peac 
be spoke no English, it is reasonable — agitation in 
to suppose he was unaware of the waters dispute 
associations of the word. He was the dranwale calle 
unlikehest of dictators. sponsible agita 

The guardian of a Sikh shrine cn Temple, Mr 
in his Home village of Longowai to an aide, “Wf 
(hence his name), be emerged in they have puli 
regional politics for the Akali Dal That was the 

party in the' latter 1960s. A soft- snake to ehall 
spoken, unimposing man, be made wale when be v 
no impact But in 1975, during the leader, to cem 
emergency, the party leadership was that Mr. Bhinc 
in prison and someone had to step mining with his 
ul Mr. Loogawal did just that da. instead M 
He was neva a fighting man At his own agitalii 
the beginning of the Amritsar agita- ingTorces with 
don in 1982, 1 asked him what he To be fair to 
thought of the Farsi verse in which difficult job be 


Events dwarfed torn. When in 
1982 he should have isolated and 
resisted Mr. Bhindranwale, he em- 
braced the militan t preadur in- 
stead, hoping thereby to rnntain 
him. Mr. Bhmdranwale had been 


against the authority in Delhi. Who- 
ever is seen as betraying the cause is 
palled down. Banda Singh Bahadur, 
the courageous guerrilla leader, has 
neva been forgiven his surrender to 
the Maghals in 1715. In 1962 the 
Akali leader, Master Tara Singh 
was dropped for breaking a fast 
i death foi 


rime when no other leadi ng Sikh, 
politician was prepared to sign a , . ... 

deal with the government, be did. and charged withtreason. . 

What convinced him was his belief The arrests endeddiances form 

that most Sikhs in the country were ous dialogue. Bhdks-.maeastoriy; 

fedpfagiaiimai.doftta^low 


for- 1 


onto death for a Punjabi-speaking 
state the year before. 


The extremists haze struck but it teas not Mr. 
Longowai they wanted It teas the peace accord 
with Rajir Gandhi that they wished to JdlL 


rificaDy by Sanjay Gandhi and Zlafl 
Singh, the present president of In- 
dia, who woe born in oppostion 
then and on the lookout for a Sikh 
religious figure they could use to 
electoral advantage against Mr. 
Longow&L The Akali Dal was con- 
ducting a peaceful — if ineffective 
— agitation in Patiala over the river 
waters dispute. When Mr. Bhin- 
dranwale called up his own irre- 
sponsible agitation from the Gold- 
en Temple, Mr. Longowai muttered 
to an aide; “What is this dead *n»k* 
they have pal around our nedcT* 

That was the time to shove off tire 
make; to ehaHgnge Mr. Bhindran- 
wak when be was not yet a popular 
leader, to cement Hindn -Sikh ties 
that Mr. Bhindranwale was under- 
mining with his sectarian propagan- 
da. Instead, Mr. Longowai moved 
his own agitation to Amritsar, join- 
ingTorces with Mr. Bhindranwale. 

To be fair to Mr. Longjowalit is a 
difficult job being a Sikh moderate. 


wal lost face when he 
to the army in the 


to the army in the 
Golden Temple battle. Ana his re- 
lease last February he traveled in 


Punjab trying to make ex tr e mi st 
noises ana win acceptability. It was 
a ploy that the government covertly 
endorsed. Occasionally he went too 


of being regarded as subversive citi- 
zens He calculated that they would 
welcome the pact, and he was right. 

With a few obvious exceptions, 
ffkhg all ova India heaved a sigh of 
relief, and the press made him a 
hero. “The dramatic accord,” wrote 
a s»kh columnist, “is one of those 
historic moments which help a na- 
tion recover something of its natu- 
ral. moral rhythm after a .radical 
breach in its tone and tenor.” • 
The extremists have struck but it 
was not Mr. Longowai they wanted. 
It was the peace accord with Rajiv 
Gandhi that they wished to Itifl. - 
The central government has de- 
layed tire elections in Punjab by 
three days, to Sept 25. Those dec-, 
tions may have to be delayed much 
longer. Bulwhethaornot the peace 
accord survives, it was hot a futile 
exercise. Something has been woo. 
No Hindu mourned tire death 


far, notably when he' honored the of Mr. Bhindranwale.- Few Sikhs 


family of one of Mrs. Gandhi's as- 
sassins. That earned him the wrath 
of the Indian press, which was 
fooled by his pretended extremism. 

The real extremists were not 
fooled. Piqued by his posing, they 
pulled out Mr. Krindranwale's oc- 
togenarian father and set him up as 
a rival iwyter to Mr. Longowai. In 
May, asked to settle a dispute in the 
Akali party, the old man hijacked 
tire 65-year-okl party from under 
Mr. Longowal’s nose. Dismayed, 
Mr. Longowai appeared to want to 
opt out of politics. At tins point 
most people gave up on hhn 

But he was persuaded to return 
and he rose to the situation. At a 


mourned Mrs. Gandhfs death -r-r 
and even if they did, they did not 
dare attend berfunoal for fear of 
losing their lives. Mr. Longowal 
may haw been the IfW riiarignatie 

of the three but his death has been 
m onrnwl by HinHiKimri Sikhs. His 
funeral last Wednesday was attend- 
ed by both commnmtres. . 

Hindus sod Sikhs arc comings to- 
gether. That is the achievement and 
the reward of moderation. 


Ilie writer, a coiumnisi for severed 

dent opTI^^Ktaior in Londdn, 
contributed this comment to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune. 


Yes, Reagan Has a Philosophy, but It Won’t Work 


W ASHINGTON — Does Ron- 
ald Reagan have a political 


▼V aid Reagan have a political 
philosophy? Of coarse he does, you 
say; he is a conservative, urging self- 
refiance and all the old virtues. But 
wait — one of the central tenets of 
conservatism has been “fiscal respon- 
sibility ” and the Reagan men nave 
already doubled the national debL 

How about populist, embracing 
the anti-establishment resentments 
of the legions erf little guys? No. The 
easy-money American populism of 
the past has become more of a politi- 
cal posture than a philosophy; it is 
now poptilari&m, better suited to 

rampaigniflg than gov ernin g. 

If neither strict conservative nor 
inflationary popularist, then what is 
he? One word he has used is federal- 
ist, which now means “not national- 
ist” He talks of shifting a share of 


By William S afire 


federal power to state and local au- 
thority. Let’s examine that 

This year the president and Con- 
gress put an end to general revenue 
sharing In a budget that needed cut- 
ting, it was the fust cut made, $4 
billion saved and none so poor as to 
do it reverence. 

I remember revenue sharing; it was 
part of “the new federalism." Con- 
caved by Walter Heller, the Kennedy 
economist, and carried out a decade 
lata by Richard Nixon, revenue 
sharing was seen as a way to shift 
power from Washington to the states 
and localities. The idea was to return 
a portion of the anticipated growth of 
revenues to political levels closa to 


tax ooDection was most efficient at 
the federal level and derisions on 
spending would be most responsive if 
made on the local scene. 

This is not Mr. Reagan’s philoso- 
phy. Although he has spoken in the 
past about returning power to the 
states (through the transfer to them 
of federal revenue sources like excise 
taxes), his actions in office have been 
in the opposite direction. 

For example, at the core of his tax 
simplification is the end of deduct- 
ibility of state and local taxes from 
federal taxes. Deductibility has been 
a bulwark of federalism, making tax- 
ation less painful for localities; The 


revenues to political levels closa to more you pay in local taxes, the more 
the people, without federal strings you take off your federal income tax. 
attached — cm the assumption that Thus, in both big actions in the 


Why Doesn’t the Buck Pass Upward? 


arena of federalism — ending reve- 
nue sharing and proposing to aid 
deductibility — Mr. Reagan has cho- 
sen to make it tougher for those levels 
of government “closer to the people.” 

Can it be that the Reagan ap- 
proach is to centralize power, weaken 
state governments and impoverish lo- 
calities — making him the biggest 
anti-federalist since FDR? 

It may seem that way, but I suggest 
that the direction of the flow of inta- 
gcrvanmental power is of Dak con- 
cern to Mr. Reagan. “Big govern- 
ment,” to him. is not the federal 
government but the sum of all gov- 
ernmenL His philosophy is to reduce 
total government, and his technique 
can be summed up in three words: 
Make taxation painfuL 

That explains tire demise of reve- 
nue sharing, which provided funds to 
localities painlessly. That also ex- 
plains his eagerness to end deduct- 
ibility, because this would make local 
taxation hurt much more. Moreover, 


mg for tire reginre. Police crackdowns ' 
accelerated the cycle of ItiUia& The 
stage was set for a declaration erf . 
dnagency on July 20. 

In America, the arrest of the UDF 
leaders triggered a protest movement 
led by blades and white liberal! 
Demonstrations were staged outride 
the South African. Enmassy, and 
moves to apply economic sanctions 
> were laun ched in Congress; TheRea- 
e gan administration viewed the pro- 

- tests as a pipy to hold blacks and , 
liberals with the Democrats against 

-President Reagan despite his land- 
_ slide rictory. As a counterploy, con- 
servative Republicans woe urged to. . 
join the protests, and Mr. Reagan . 
himself received a black South Ani- -- • 
can. Bishop Desmond Tutu. 

So there was no middle ground in 
the United States when President i _ 
Botha's declaration of emergency : 
stirred a furor in the Congress. Huge 
majorities in the House and the Sen- 
ate whooped through separate bills . 
applying punitive sanctions against 
South Africa. A conference compro- 
mise was arranged and passed by the 
House. Only the threat of a filibuster 
by Jesse Helms of North Carolina 
blocked Senate passage Just before 
the August recess. . 

The adtnfn ic tra rfaiwwd t n wel- 
come the threat of sanctions as a 
whip to force concessions from the 
Botha government In that spirit tire 
presidraf s national security ad visa, 
Robert C. McFarland, and five other 
U.S. officials conferred with the 
South African foreign minister, Pik 
Botha. They emerged from the ses- 
sion voicing hope for concessions to 
be offered by President Botha in a 
speech set fra Aug. 15. 

- The speech offered nothing new. 

Mr. Mcrarlane acknowledged disap- 
pointment But he counsdol Macks 
to explore possibilities with President 
Botha, and he sharpfy criticized Bish- 
op Tutu for not joining a group of ■ 
aeries who visited Mr. Botha. 

The Reagan administration has 
tried all approaches on all parties and 
failed every time. It has tried to ap- 
pease Mr, Botha and failed. It has 
tried to threaten Mr. Botha and 
faded. It has tried to support the 
blacks and failed. It is now blaming 
the b l acks — and f aifing once a gain 
President Botha now knows that 
A meric an policy in soutirem Africa is 
largely anti-Cranminust bluster. The 
blacks know it, too. Nrithra side has 
any reason to pay heed to Washing- 
ton, and the catastrophe that has 
been so long and noisily announced 
seems closa than ever. 

At no time did the United States 
have a strong hand to play. It is not 
prepared to fight for justice in South 
Africa, nor to make economic sacri- 
fice. But why pretend otherwise? ' 

The answer lies deep in the nation- 
al psyche. Fed up with years of trou- a, . 
ble, America seeks reassurance. The P 


W ASHINGTON — At a time 
when the United States is in- 


TV when the United Slates is in- 
creasingly preoccupied with the 
economic challenge from Japan. 
I have been thinkin g hard about 
one aspect of the tragedy that killed 
520 people in the crash earlier this 
month of a Japan Air Lines plane. 


By David S. Broder 


going back to the Vietnam War 
period, I have written about the loss 
of the healthy tradition of “resigna- 
tion on principle.” People simply 
have forgotten bow lo quit their 


I noted these lines in a story after jobs when they find themselves in 
the crash: “Japan Air Lines Pres- strong disagreement with the policy 


dent Yasumoto Takagi announced 
tonight that he intended to resign 
'as soon as the situation has settled 
down.’ He told reporters, T want to 
take responsibility/ Such resigna- 
tions are common in the Japanese 
business and political worid, where 
leaders are held to have ultimate 


they are bong asked to cany ouL 
Cyrus Vance provided a rare ex- 
ception when he quit as Timmy Car- 
ta's secretary of state, rather than 
attempt to justify the aborted Irani- 
an hostage rescue effort that he had 
opposed in the private councils of 


often by senior officials in both the 
private sector and government in 
America. The operative principle 
here often seems to be mat it is 
always somebody rise’s fault 

The pattern is not confuted to 
one business, party or administra- 
tion. But present goverment has 
been as flagrant in denying any 
sense of personal accountability as 
any I can remember. 

This is the Tost administration 
that tolerated having an indicted 
person — forma Secretary of La- 
bor Raymond J. Donovan —retain 
a position in the cabinet The list of 
those who fought to stay in their 

tnbe nftsn niilh tha « 


Mr. Jtoagan is on record as opposing Reagan administration provides it in 
pay-as-ywr-go methods of collection; a buoyant president wfth a genume 
be would rather the taxpayer get talent for retreating from fatiedodi- 


slugged once a year, causing J ohn Q. 
to rise up against the tormentors. 

His timoiy is that if taxation hurts, 
the taxpayer will bring enormous 
pressure to bear on l egislato rs & ey_ 


ay level to spend less, which in turn 
wfll lead to a reversal of the lom> rise 


ries as if nothing had gone wrong. 
But later the storms gather — in the 
economy, in the Middle East and 
even in distant South Africa. 

Los Angeles Tones Syndicate. 


wfll lead to a reversal of the long rise 
of the invasion of the private sector 
by public officials. If. the additions] 


tax money is not thoe, goes the Rea- 
gan theory, it won’t be spent. D Jr 

Makes sense, if you figure that peo- Bad txamples in Africa 

pie still act the way sensible people 

used to acL Tie onty trouble wriT the of 05 would eiy'oy living 

Reagan pofitica] theory is the end run Africa? Every 

around the bottom line — borrowing person knows those cram- 

— which defeats his central purpose. -Tv to r ,e somontarian one-party 
His entire philosophy is based on tyrannical hellholes. 


LETTERS 


a M, w uavG mumaic me acummstranon. lne more typi- joos, onen wun me president s tn- 

respousibfljty for all acts erf their cal pattern is to disagree in private, du lg en cc, long after their nperhical 
aoborennates. Mr. Takagi called on support the policy or action m pub- behavior, incompetence or chica- 
Prune Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone Ik, and then resign for what you nay had been exposed is long 


Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone 
today to inform him of his decision. 
Mr. Nakasone reportedly admon- 
ished Mr. Takagi for the accident, 
saying that discipline at the air- 
line had become lax.” 

I wonder if there is not a lesson 
for Americans in the way the Japa- 
nese airline executive responded 

This is not an exercise of finger- 
praming. 1 am not thinking of (he 
specific contrast to the Delta Air- 
bus crash at Dallas-Fon Wrath 
Airport a few days earlier, or to the 
accidents that have befallen Union 
Carbide at its plant in Institute, 
West Virginia, since the disaster 
last year with the samp, company's 
subsidiary in Bhopal, India. 

The top executives of those com- 
panies are still in place, but my 
point is a broader one. I wonder u 
America has not lost the whole con- 

and with it a sense ol^setf-discmjine 
and organizational discipline mar is 
essential in a competitive world. 

On several occasions in the past. 


describe as other reasons —as Da- 
vid Stockman recently did. 

But today I am talking about a 
different land of resignation, the 
kind offered voluntarily by the 
bead of an. organization when there 
has been a costly, damaging failure 
of performance by his organization. 

The examples that come to mind, 
unfortunately, all involved people 
from countries other than the Unit- 
ed States. Mr. Takagi is one Anoth- 
er notable example was Lord Car- 
rington, the British foreign 
secretary; Ik was a favorite of 
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher 
and a man of great ability, yet he 


resigned the day after the Argen- 
tines occupied the Falklands. His 
ministry was responsible for the se- 
curity of the islands and fra the 
diplomacy that had failed to save 
them from invasion, so he stepped 
down. It was as sinmle as thaL 
Contrast that with (he pattern of 
evasion,! procrastination and repu- 
diation of responsibility we see so 


nay had been exposed is long 
enough to fill this page. 

President Reagan damaged the 
principle of accountability in the 
uniformed services by claiming per- 
sonal responsibility fra the deaths 
of the marines in the Beirut bar- 
rages bombing. Thai premature 
grandstanding prevented the ma- 
rines from dealing with the incident 
within their own chain of com- 
mand, as they would otherwise 
have done. It damaged the system 
of accountability which all the 
armed services believe is 
to their discipline an h performance. 

The relevance of all this to the 
controversy about the U^.-Japa- 
nese trade imbalance is evident 
Americans cannot compete 
they get tough, and the place to get 
tough is first with themselves. 

Leaders must set an example. 
And the example now bong set by 
leaders in the United States/both in 
government and in busness, is just 
not good enough. 

The Washington Post. 


the discipline expected to be enforced 

by the fear of federal deficits, as well 
as the fear of excessive local bond 
issues. But that healthy ennee ra is 
d i minis hed. Deficits are shnwwd off 
and spending grows apace. T^eRea- 
gan philosophy is foundering on the 
rock of the confidence he has created. 

Mr. Reagan is neither conserva- 
tive. populist nor federalist He is a 
governmental minimalist, reliant on a 
weapon that does not worit 

*TTie only thing we have to fear " 
goes the necessary call to action, “is 
fearlessness — nameless, unreason- 
ing. unjustified overconfidence that 
paralyzes needed efforts to convert 
retreat into advance ...” 

The New York Times. 


tries to be authoritarian one-party 
states, when not tyrannical hellholes, 
wuh ra m s h ackl e economies that only 
toragn aid saves from collapse. 

X®i flic South African whites, by 
jrastteating. hu miliating and exploit- 
mg the blacks, have brought them lo 
the point where they are not taking ft 
**ty™rae. One need only put oneself 
“ P}ace of the blacks to undra- 
tt™. But rare man, one vote? One 
JJ^domy put oneself hi the place of 

tne whites to seeit is unflnnkabfc.. 
IRVING PASKUDNYAKl " 
Paris. - ' 


Letters intended for publication 
be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor" and must contain the writ- 
ers Signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are subject to editing. We cannot 
be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


/kgont&ig the editorial “Not at 
White Cofrwnienee" (Aug. 21): 

a loss to understand the 
media bhtt against the South African 
regime. The editorial states, “It is 
forgotten that [the government] is 
COTnmttma a terrible, ccntinuiiig 
mme . But no, it is not forgot- 
ten. We are told about it every day. •; 
ranters forgeuhcimllioiis'? 
kjacks killed by black governments 
ttooughtmt Africa for 25 years in 
Sa <&n, Zimbabwe, 
Uganda, Zaire, etc.? Is any African, 
country ruled by one m»n j one vote? 

. . J. CAUWENBERGK-- ' 

Brussels. 


r. 








v: 

... v. a 


.: h 

— u 

•• -• •- fc- 




x-4 

-- ■* 

va 


^“Pporters «f Skin Sikh 
^ to Honor Accords 

°y Loren wu— 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 198S 




Page 5 




tj _ %MKT 

Awtetaf United AJcali Dal, meei- 

. DELHI ^ n,. I ,, “8 u the Sikh holy dty of Aram- 

SoX»,r on ““ p ^ d 


tvpfc ■ 


m 


Eanak Separatists likely to Boycott 
Assembly Elections in New Caledonia 


.ewweninieni. «nuai nas received to counter the assassi- 

The party etwr,M ■. nation of Mr. LongowoL whose 

leader Surgit Singh BanJS aC ^ n * has been negotiating with 

mer national aErici^i^ a, - a -^° r ' t k e 8 ove raroem. Mr. LoagowsJ was 
Md an aid, ?“gKt? ™rd<TOi by adkil StSfoppoied 

Longowai the Sikh 4 Singh to his accommodaiion with Mr, 

assaMbateHT^, “*** «*<> wa s Gandhi. 

« Would pSriSaS'iS? *** ‘D* Sept 25 wffl fill the 

i elections that PriLe * 17 seats in the Punjab Slate As- 
! Gandhi has set for ?^ 1V ““Mar and 13 seats in the federal 

Mr. Bamab i Z^\S^ ttb ’ legislature in New Delhi It wffl be 

through the elec^rmf 1 !^ to S ^ vi: a key test of Sikh sentiment about 
permanent leader is^lStL™* 1 * thc , accords "ff 1 ®* *V Mr. Gandhi 
The AkaU t£ 5* m £ Mr. Longowai on July 24. 
Sunday durine a If 6 actJMls The agreements are widely 

six-hour meetL in ,h jJ"®? 85 on f of * he j^ P°*f ble 

ways to resolve the violent three- 

Year cnnfrrmtntinn k>twM tKp in- 


six-hour meetma in JESS?**- S E nny V3ewed as one of the few possible 
itaj of Chandieart Ul ir U i! abcap ' **** lo reso,ve *>= violent three- 
time the rival ■ lhe 531116 confrontation between the in- 

ume. tae rival radical wmg of the fluenrial Sikh minority and the 


n* AaoooMri ft«n 

Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi of India, right, shares a laugh Monday with President Julios 
K. Nyerere of Tanzania, who was on an official visit to New Delhi. Mr. Nyenere is stepping 
down voluntarily in October after leading Tanzania since its Independence in 1961. 


Hindu-dominated central govern- 
ment. 

The accords, under which the 
government would grant the Skits 
greater autonomy in Punjab and 
would recognize Sikh cultural, reli- 
gious and linguistic traditions, have 
been denounced by Sikh radicals, 


who have demanded nothing less 
than an independent Sikh nation. 

These radicals, some of whom 
are thought to have direct links id 
the All-Indian Sikh Students Fed- 
eration. are widely believed to have 
been responsible for Mr. 
Longowal’s assassination. 


Two of the party's leading fac- 
tions were split over the selection of 
a party leader. One favored Mr. 
Barn ala. another favored Sant Ajit 
Singh, also a Longowai protege. 

The dispute had more i o do with 
personal rivalries than with politi- 
cal differences. 


‘Vpk York Times Srmce 

NEW YORK — A spokeswom- 
an for the main pro-independence 
group in New Caledonia says the 
group probably will call for a boy- 
cott of elections in the French Pa- 
cific territory. The group will meet 
early next month to decide whether 
to take part in the vote, she said. 

The statement by Susanna Ounei 
follows the approval last week by 
the French parliament of a new 
structure for ihe territorial assem- 
bly. 

The restructuring is designed to 
give native Melanesians, although a 
minority of the population, a slight 
majority of seats over European 
settlers and is part of a French 
government plan lo eventually 
grant New Caledonia limited inde- 
pendence. 

Edgard Pisani. the French spe- 
cial envoy to New Caledonia, said 
last week that the elections are like- 


ly to be held the last week in Sep- 
tember or the first week in October. 

Most of the European settlers 
oppose the plan, while pro-inde- 
pendence groups say ii does not go 
far enough. 

In an interview Friday in IJfew 
York. Miss Ounei. who is in (he 
United States on a fund-raising 
tour for her group, the K arm ic So- 
cialist National Liberation From. 
-tUp said there was a growing sense 
of desperation that was hardening 
her group's position. 

In June, both the Liberation 
Front and a more militant group, 
the Melanese Progressive Union, 
agreed to take part in elections. The 
government agreed to reduce the 
□umber or troops in troubled areas. 
But Miss Ounei said the govern- 
ment had not done so. 

“If they don't keep (heir prom- 
ises," she said, “we just have to 
fight. We have no other way." 


For Many 


Jjme man says: “He's the future, 
we re outnumbered." So the show 
o friendship was fagped? Not at 
all, the man says. “I like the guy." 

*' A passing friendship may thus be 
possible. In collective racial terms, 
“ungs are more complex. The con- 
tradictions linger, unresolved. 

South Africa’s white population 
numbers about 4.5 million, 18 mil- 
u°n or them drawn from the Afri- 
kaner descendants of Dutch set- 
tlers whose story began when Jan 
van Riebeeck landed in the Cape in 
April 1652. The rest are generally 
classified as English-speakers, but 
they are more of a motley collec- 
tion of old families and recent im- 
migrants, Portuguese and Britons 
and Greeks among them. 

Talk of change — and news of 
the unrest that has elairm-d at least 
63S lives m almost 3 year — takes 
them differently, but some feats, 
predominantly of a swamping by . 
blacks, seem universal- The irony, 
however, is that it is a fear that 
thrives on ignorance, the apprehen- 
sion of captives in a' luxurious pris- 
on. 

The scene, for example, is repeat- 
ed a thousandfold each weekend — 
the Sunday barbecue that sends 
smoke curling over steaks and sau- 
sage and marinated chicken in gar- 
dens still pale from winter. 

At one home recently, six. cou- 
ples in their 30s, people of no great 
wealth, but not poor either, gath- 
ered and talked. The women, all six 
of them, vouchsafed that they had 
never visited Soweto, Johannes- 
burg’s huge sprawl of blackness 
just a few miles distant, and neither _ 


Whites in South Africa, Spring Portends a Time of Reckoning 

did they wish to, so their premises ’ “ “ ’ ' * ~ whites here as an experiment gone ahead of fellow whites and 

seemed secondhand. Black vio- # _ __ _ ~ ] i a r f • ~w~k f wrong, a model of what would hap- by them as a fifth column 

lence has not spilled into white ar- Wv eft/tn f vifir "o SkrflT? rig} iff f/M* iTtHtjJJfflJOf P«> if majority role came here and version, vet too far behind 

eas so far, and white perceptions of -DfSflUIJ 1 Uill S OUll XMXStMA JUt IfWlWWffg A UUMJV Macks loo k power to lead the na- radicalism that challenges 
it come largely from an officially - Reuters J * * 1 - 

teKSSLSE JOHANNES^RG Th. 

rism by blacks ralhcr than protest Monday 

aeainst nffiri.l vinlJo. ■ Hat they had detained tie son of 


Reuters 

JOHANNESBURG — The 


against white, official violence. 


“Well, we’ve thought of going,” b^'**^**}*™*™™’ 
one of the women sam. “Why not? w Peace Prize recipient- under 

What’s going to happen? We don't ^jcrgency laws . 

^ ow - Trevor Tutu, 29, was detained at 

She gestured at a small child. I ^ ^ bkck t ^ vnshi ? ° f 
“He'll Eve to go into the army if Johannesburg, where 

we stay, and who’s he going to he had been aUaKhng a tearmg for 
Fight?" 6 blat * pupds who had faded lo 

But, she continued, it was not so “ ttnd t class ?- P “P k >" “urt.said 
simple. “Lookatns.-shcsaid. “We 1631 w ,^“_ lhe ***** “ 
can't afford to go. just lo leave >«ar-old i»y was called lout by the 

everything and smt over. My hus- H™*" 110 ”- T «™ r Tot “ Siud: 


band couldn't get a job in England. 
And wherever we went, we still 


What a shame.” 

He was warned by the police but 


wouldn’t have the same standard of be challenged them to attest him 


living.” and was then led away, the Witness- 

Others, younger whites, seem essaid - 
readier to seek other lives. 

Australia is one place they talk 

about. Canada is another. In ccn- a first-time visitor seeing only the 
tral Johannesburg, suddenly, busi- white areas, persist 
nesses have sprung up, dealing in “If you just lived here in the 
emigra tion One of them, according northern suburbs,” said Helen Suz- 
to The Weekly Mail newspaper, man, a longtime anti-apartheid 
had its telephones installed this campaigner and white opposition 
month and, within six days, record- legislator, “you would not learn of 


Lawyers acting for Trevor Tutu 
said Lhey had been told he would be 
held in a Soweto prison for 14 days 
under emergency powers, but the 
police could not confirm this. The 
lawyers said the police told them 
they would charge Mr. Tutu with 
insulting the police by calling them 
“clowns." 

The police, enforcing emergency 
rules, last week arrested hundreds 
of children for breaking emergency 
rules on school attendance. The 92 
pupils who appeared in court Mon- 
day were all released on bail or an 
warnings. Their cases were post- 
poned for six weeks while the pro- 
vincial attomey-general decided 
whether to press charges, the law- 
yers said. 



whites here as an experiment gone ahead of fellow whiles and decried 
wrong, a model or what would hap- by them as a fifth column of sub- 
pen if majority role came here and version, yet too far behind a black 
blacks took power to lead the na- radicalism that challenges the tol- 
tion toward one-pany role, as erance on which liberalism is 
Prime Minister Robert Mugabe is based. 


doing in Zimbabwe. 


In South Africa, there are im- 


“Their fear is being swamped by too, of prosperity attached to 
the black people, Mrs. Coleman white liberalism — dissent from the 
said. “And the usual question is. comfort of a poolside terrace, or 
Whai s going to happen to us. from the gentrificauon of a fash- 
The comparison with other pans ioctably “liberal" suburb. It is a 
or Africa often seems spurious. In comfort, people like Mrs. Coleman 
the country then called Rhodesia, gay that is physical in nature only, 
and now Zimbabwe, for instance, reflecting none of the spiritual an- 
to be a third-generation settler was gm<h of ostracism and resentment 
to belong to a kind of aristocracy. Mrs< Coleman powered the atti- 
Many more were immigrants who mdes of ^ who ^ w 

arrived to escape *e postwar ^ her lo seek legal and other advice 
of Bmam in the 1940s. In South m ^ - You 

Africa, the roots of some go back she ^ o ]e ^ have real . 


more than 300 years, and there is j v 
no bolt hole to ihe south, such as , 


and have good 


Trevor Tutu 


no mine io ucwuid. sues .as w ^ bittert & ey ^ DQt 

SouLh Africa proitded for white bj|t perhaps ^ ^ 

Rhodeians unwilling to counte- known ^ litShope.” 
nance black majority rule. - - r - - - - 


“We whiles,” she said, “if we had 


a first-time visitor seeing only the 
white areas, persist 
“If you just lived here in the 


Audrey Coleman is a white activ- black townships, and so shelter he- 
ist from the liberal end of South hind the state of emergency, but 
Africa's spectrum who has cause to their fears were tangible. “They're 
be resentful of the white authorities scared.” she said, so at the meeting 
because her son. Neil, is one of the there had been questions. 


“There is too mud i at stake." £ at TeJ 

Mrs. Suzman said. This is not have had, we wStid have reacted m 


-They said things like, ‘Do you 
warn South Africa to become like 
the rest of Africa?* ” she said. 


Rhodesia-Zimbabwe. H is ,rol Ke- a far mort violent way. 

nya. It is a place where there are 4.5 

million settled whites. 

“I do not believe,'' she said, “that 
it is too late for peaceful negotia- 
tion." 

That negotiation, however, still 
seems distant, and so polarization 


The new territorial assembly will 
give the Kanafcs a slight edge over 
the settlers. Twenty-five of the as- 
sembly's 46 seats will be split be- 
tween two regions dominated by 
Kannks. and 2! mil be elected 
from the European-dominated re- 
gion around Noumea. 

Miss Ounei also said that ber 
group wanted to restrict voting eli- 
gibility in a referendum on inde- 
pendence, now required lo lake 
place by 1988, to people with at 
least one parent bom in the territo- 
ry. The French plan would allow 
anyone who had lived in the territo- 
ry at least three years to take part. 


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“They said, ‘Look at Zitnba- of a divided land continues. And 


had its telephones installed this campaigner and white opposition four whites detained under the “They said things like, ‘Do you tion ." 

month and, within six days, record- legislator, “you would not learn of state of emergency. After four warn South Africa to become like That negotiation, however, still 

ed 171 Inquiries by anxious whites what's happening in the town- weeks, she says, he is still detained, the rest of Africa?* ” she said. seems distant, and so polarization 

wiring a new life in P a miri n , Im~ ships.” for reasons that elude her. “They said, ‘Look at Zitnba- of a divided land continues. And 

migration into South Africa eased in South Africa, she said in an The other night, at Sl George's bwe/ ” she said. the whites are caught in that. too. 

in the first four months of this year, interview, the milk and the newspa- Church, in the wealthy suburb of What then was the white image Across the continent, in recent 

down from 10,775 the year before pen are stiQ delivered, and whites Farktown. she said, she was present of the rest of Africa? “Poor, dan- history, there has been a species 

to 7,595, but that was before a state are cocooned, by the official televi- at a public meeting and 100 whites gerous," Mrs. Coleman said, and that sometimes seemed as endan- 

of emergency was proclaimed an sion, from the realities of their showed up to talk about their fu- that notwithstanding the fact that gered as some of Africa's wildlife 

Julv 21. before many whites had land. Television audiences in the ture. one man at the meeting said be had — the white liberal. 


We’ve captured the flair 
of Rodeo Drive. 


bwe/ ” she said. 

What then was the white image 


the whites are caught in that. too. 
Across the continent, in recent 


July 21, before many whites had land Television audiences in the ture. one man at me meeting saja w 

realized that the violence, unlike United States and Britain, she said. “The majority of whiles,” Mrs. been to Zimbabwe recently an 

earlier spasms, was not easing. have a more realistic picture of Coleman said* “actually don’t want a white, did not feel scared at 
Tbe perception of calm would, lo' things than South Africans do. to know” whal is happening in the^ Zimbabwe is seen by n 


gerous,” Mrs. Coleman said, and that sometimes seemed as endan- 
that notwithstanding the fact that gered as some of Africa's wildlife 


one man at the meeting said be had — the white liberal. 


“The majority of whiles,” Mrs. been io Zimbabwe recently and, as 


Invariably, said a man wbo once , 
wore that title in Rhodesia, the 
white liberal is caught, loo far 


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In Tel Aviv 9 a Memorial to Secret Agents 

360 Who Lived and Died in Anonymity Are Honored on Labyrinth’s Walls 


By Thomas L Friedman 

New York Times Service 

TEL AVIV — Some of them 
were killed by double agents; oth- 
ers were hanged in the central 
squares of Damascus or Baghdad, 
and still others died yearn ago in 
■circumstances so shrouded in mys- 
;tery that even today no one will 
■speak about them. 

What they all had in common 
was that they were Israeli spies, 
secret agents or intelligence ana- 
lysts who lived and died in ano- 
: nymity. No longer. 

All 360 of their names have been 
carved into the walls of a memorial 
center in north Tel Aviv that hon- 
ors the fallen members of Israel's 
intelligence agencies, the one 
branch of the Israeli security forces 
that has never had a monument 

The site was opened recently to 
Lhe public, and for anyone interest- 
ed in espionage the list of names is 
fascinating reading. The names of 
some people never before exposed 
as intelligence officers are on the 
wall. The curators of the memorial, 
former intelligence officers them- 
selves, are tight-lipped about the 
personal histories of many of the 
names. 

But with a little research in the 
dozens of books about the Israeli 
secret services, it is possible to put 
.together the names with some of 
• the more captivating spy stories of 
thepostwar era. 

The story behind the Center for 


Special Studies in the Memory of 
the Fallen of Israel’s Intelligence 
Community, as the memorial is 
called. began several years ago 
when the relatives of the dead intel- 
ligence agents got together and de- 
cided to build a monument to their 
loved ones. 

"We gave in to their demands,” 
said Metr Amit, who was the head 
of the Mossad. Israel's ullrasecre- 
tive foreign intelligence arm, from 
1963 to 1968. He is chairman of the 
center. “But we took over the pro- 
ject We didn’t want a pile of ce- 
ment. We wanted a living memori- 
al.” 

Mr. Amit and his intelligence 
colleagues gathered $700,000 from 
Israelis and $13 million from Jews 
abroad, who, for a $30,000 dona- 
tion, could become “honorary 
members of (he intelligence com- 
munity.” 

The memorial honors fallen 
members of all three intelligence 
services in Israel: the Mossad; the 
Shin Bet the domestic investigative 
agency, and Military Intelligence. 

Although the name of Brigadier 
General Ehud Barak, the chief of 
Military Intelligence, is public, the 
tmmes of the current heads of Shin 
Bet and Mossad are secret. 

The center’s complex, already is 
being hailed as one of the most 
tastefully appointed and innovati- 
veJy designed memorials in Israel. 
Built of huge, angular sandstone 
blocks, the core of the memorial 


consists of a maze broken into five 
alcoves, each representing a period 
in the history of Israel’s intelligence 
operations. The names of the 
agents who died during each period 
are engraved on the stone walls. 


“The idea of the labyrinthine 
maze,” said Yeshayahu Daliot, a 
veteran of the Israeli security estab- 
lishment and the director of (he 
center, “was to create an impres- 
sion of interminable search, of 
changing direction, of complexity 
and infinity, which is what intelli- 
gence-gathering is all about” 

Showing a viator through the 
maze, Mr. Amit pointed out names 
of friends and colleagues. 

In the second alcove, covering 
1949 to 1937, is the name of Jacob 
Bokai, the first agent to die after 
the nation of Israel was established. 

A Syrian-born Jew, Mr. Bokai 
was assigned by Israeli intelligence 
to enter Jordan with a stream of 
Palestinian refugees on May 4. 
1949. He carried the forged identity 
card of Najib Ibrahim Hamuda 
and was prepared for his mission 
by being put into a prison with 
Arab captives, where be was occa- 
sionally beaten by his Jewish 
guards. 

But the Jordanians suspected 
him and arrested him as soon as he 
crossed into their territory. Despite 
hours of Interrogation, the Jordani- 
ans never discovered that he was an 
Israeli, said Mr. Amit. Mr. ‘bokai 
was executed on Aug. 3, 1949, for 


spying and was given a Moslem 
burial as Hamuda. * ; 

The next alcove, 1957 to 1968, 
contains the name of probably the 
most famous of Israel's secret 
agents, Eli Cohen, known as “Our 
Man in Damascus.” Mr. Amit was 
his boss. Mr. Cohen was infiltrated 
into Syria under the identity of Ka- 
mi] Amin Taabes, supposedly a 
Syrian femigrfc returning home from 
Argentina after having ama^yj a 
fortune. 

He penetrated the top echelons 
of the Syrian government and the 
army, throwing lavish parties and 
dispensing expensive gifts. He was 
so effective at ingratiating him»»if 
with the Syrian elite that he was 
considered as a possible candidate 
for defense minister. 

Bat he was caught after the Sovi- 
et Union shipped Syria sophisticat- 
ed homing equipment, which led 
the Syrian secret service to Mr. Co- 
hen's apartment as he was making 
his daily transmission to Mossad 
headquarters. He was hanged in a 
Damascus square on May IS, 1965, 
for spying. 

Also in the second alcove is Sha- 
lom Dani, who died of natural 
causes on May 21, 1963. A painter, 
Mr. Dani was the unrivaled master 
forger for Israeli intelligence, ac- 
cording to a former Mossad chief, 
Isser Hard- 

Working in Buenos Aires in 
I960, he forged all of the docu- 
ments used by the Mossad team 



feo 

& 


The NmYoVUnwi 


Meir Amit, a fonner head of Mossad, Israel's foreign intelligence agency, at the monument to Israefi mteffigence agarts. 


that captured the Nazi criminal 
Adolf Fi chmann. . 

Mr. Amit said there were a few 
names so secret that they could not 
be listed. 

Still, there are a few surprises on 
the walL One is Yacov Bar Siman- 
Tov. who was gunned down as he 
walked out of his Paris home on 


April 3, 1982. He had beat sta- 
tioned as a diplomat at Israel's Par- 
is Embassy and had never before 
been confirmed as an intelligence 


agent. 

One of the most colorful people 
on the list, according to Mr. Daliot, 
was Ze'ev Biber Bar Levi, who died 
of cancer in February. Known tc 


everyone as “The Jordanian,” Mr. 
Biber was the chief military intelli- 
gence expert on King Hussein. 

“They used to say erf Colonel 
Biber that be knew what King Hus- 
sein was thinking before King Hus- 
sein did,” Mr. Sailot said. 

There is one alcove with a blank 
walL 


“We have -a spare court," -Mr. 
Amit said. 

. “You mean,” a visitor began, “in 
case someone else . . 

“No," the former Mossad chief 
said, “not in case.” . •„ 

“We know we are going to. need "* 
it, unfortunaidy." 




Uganda, Guerrillas Open Peace Talks 
As New Prime Minister Takes Office 


The Associated Press 


NAIROBI — The military gov- 
ernment of Uganda opened peace 
talks here Monday with the main 
Ugandan guerrilla group in an ef- 
fort to end an insurgency that be- 
gan in 1981. 

In Kampala, Uganda, mean- 
while, Abraham Waligo was sworn 
in as Uganda's prime minister. He 
had been serving as finance minis- 
ter in the government that took 
power on July 27 in a coup. He 
replaces Paulo Muwanga, who was 
dismissed Sunday. 

Mr. Waligo, in a speech broad- 
cast by Radio Uganda after his 
swearing-in. said that be had re- 
ceived a congratulatory telephone 
call from Mr. Muwanga. Mr. Wa- 
ligo said his predecessor was “safe, 
secure in his home in Entebbe.” 


The guerrilla commander, 
Yoweri K. Museveni, and 11 other 
leaders of his National Resistance 


Army met at the Kenyan presi- 
dent's office with a seven-member 
Ugandan delegation that included 
Defense Minister G. Wilson Toko. 

President Daniel Arap Moi of 
Kenya, who called Sunday for rec- 
onciliation in Uganda, was at the 
meeting. 

At the start of the talks, the guer- 
rillas distributed a statement 
signed by Mr. Museveni and ad- 
dressed to the Ugandan public. It 
said: 

“1 am aware of the widespread 
popular disagreement with the idea 
of holding peace talks with the mil- 
itary clique in Kampala. I know of 
your revulsion to some of the per- 
sonalities involved in this new re- 
gime because of (heir past record. 

“Whatever we do, includin g talk- 
ing to some of the people wbo were 
involved in the past in crimes, will 
not be allowed to damag* the vital 
interests of our people. Moreover, 


your army, the National Resistance 
Army, has got the capacity to de- 
fend those vital interests.” 




Western diplomats said the dis- 
missal of Mr. Muwanga improves 
the chances of the talks succeeding. 
Mr. Muwanga had been vice presi- 
dent and defense minister under 
Milton Obote, the civilian presi- 
dent who was overthrown and is in 
exile in Zambia. 


Mr. Waligo was also a member 
of the Obote cabinet, serving as 
housing minister. 

The National Resistance Army 
had criticized Mr.' Muwanga's ap- 
pointment as prime minister, but 
has not objected to Mr. Waligo’s 
role in the new government. 

The National Resistance Army 
has demanded half the seats in a 
new ruling military council and 
control of the armed forces as con- 
ditions for cooperating with the 
new government. 





In Sudan , New Leaden 
Battle an Old Civil War 


G. Wilson Toko, Uganda’s defense minister, left, conferring with Elijah W. M 1 
Kenya's foreign minister, in Nairobi on Monday before peace tallr« with the gi 


tile A w odqted rnu 


Soviet Honors Stakhanov, 
Labor Hero of Stalin Era 



The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — Soviet television 
has broadcast a tribute to Alexei 
Stakhanov, a Stalin-era labor hero 
whose example started a nation- 
wide push for productivity in the 
1930s. 

Television news led its Sunday 
night broadcast with a 10-minute 
tribute to Mr. Stakhanov, the coal 
miner who, according to Soviet ac- 
counts, set a world 


production record with the pneu- 
matic drill during the night of Aug. 
30-31, 1935. 

The film showed miners in Mr. 
Stakhanov’s home area, the Do- 
netsk Basin, marching in honor of 


MGAE r«WS Nl£55 TIME 

IKE WORLD IN 16 MUSES 

MAY IN THEM! 


the 50th anniversary of the move- 
ment. Rare footage showed Mr. 
Stakhanov, who died in 1977, 
teaching women to take men's 
places in the mines during World 
WarIL 

The TV commentator praised 
Mr. Stakhanov’s methods as a way 
of boosting output He said miners 
in the Donetsk area would produce 
50 extra weeks' labor for the anni- 
versary. 

At the mine where the Soviet 
Union says Mr. Stakhanov set his 
record, “a mass movement has 
been initialed for new Stakhanov- 
ite records,” the commentator said. 
He said many miners had exceeded 
.shift norms by 10 times or 20 times. 

On that night in 1935, Mr. Stak- 
hanov is said to have cut 102 tons 
of coal in six hours, or 14 times the 
norm. 


By Clifford D. May - 

New York Times Service 
KHARTOUM, Sudan — Imme- 
diately after the overthrow of Presi- 
dent Gaafar Nimeiri in April, the 
new Sudanese leaders declared rihat 
settling the civil war in the south 
was their “top priority” 

They proclaimed a one-sided 
cease-fire, promised amnesty to 
any rebels willing to lay down their 
arms and offered the- religiously 
and ethnically distinct southern re- 
gions increased autonomy. 

The new prime minia te-, Gazouli 
Dafaa Allah, even sent a personal 
message to Colonel John Garang, 
the American-educated head of the 
rebel group known as the Sudan 
People’s liberation Army. The 
prime minister wrote, “Your place 
is with us here, and it is an honor 
that must not be missed.” . 

But that and other approaches 
have faded. After a brief pause, the 
conflict has widened and worsened. 
“There is more fi ghting now than 
there has been in at leasts, year,” a 
Western diplomat said: • 

Rebel forces have Bern 'moving 
steadily naitfE. A week ago they 
attacked a town less than 300 miles 
(485 kilometers) south of Khar- 
toum. Earlier this month, there 
were attacks farther west, in the 
Nuba Mountains near Kadugli. 
Several hundred people have ban 
killed. Several thousand have been 
left homeless. 

“The situation is very tense," 
said the defense minister, Brigadier 
Osman Abdullah Mohammed. 

He said that “huge numbers” of 
rebel troops had been deployed in 
spots along the Ethiopian border, 
and listed some southern towns stfll 
held by government forces that 
now are “completely encircled” by 
the rebels. Reinforcements are to 
be sent. Brigadier Mohammed add- 
ed, in order to enable Sudanese 
garrisons to “withstand seizure by 
Garang’s troops for a longer time.” 

Weston diplomats in Khartoum 
said that the rebels^ radio station, 
which broadcasts from inside Ethi- 
opia, was using the same harsh ad- 
jectives to describe Sudan's new 


leader. General Abdul Rahman - 
Swareddahab, that it once reserved 
for General Nimeiri. 

The rebel radio also has begun 
talking not about the “southern." 
problem but about the “Sudanese” 
problem. “That seems to suggest 
that Cokmel Garang now sees him- 
self as the leader not only of the 
south but of the whole country," an 
embassy official said. * 

Western diplomats said there If 1 
was a mayor rebel training camp 
and base in southwestern Ethiopia, 
near the city of Gambda. Rebel 
leaders live as guests of the Ethiopi- 
an government in and around Ad- 
dis Ababa. 

Some Sudanese officials and 
Western diplomats say they believe 
that the price the Ethiopian gov- 
ernment exacts for its hospitality is 
substantial influence over Colonel 
Garang and his forces. 

As part of the Sudan ese-Libyan 
reconciliation. Colonel Moamer 
Qadhafi, the Libyan leader, 
pledged to stop financing Colonel 
Garan^s rebds. 

' But the expansion of die conflict 
in recent days is evidenre that Col- 
onel Garang is not short of equip- 
ment and supplies, according to 
military experts. They say die rebel 
group can cause extensive damage 
and disruption. 


10 Cabinet Ministers 
Dismissed in Cameroon ? r 


Reuters 

YAOUNDE, Cameroon — Pres- 
ident Paul Biya. of Cameroon has 
dismissed 10 ministers in a major 
cabinet reorganization, a presiden- 
tial spokesman said. 

Sources said the change an- 
nounced Saturday, were designed 
to strenghen Mr. Biya's hold on the 
country and move it further away 
from the era of his predecessor, 
A hm adou Ahidjo. The dismissed 
officials included Defense Minister 
Gilbert Andz£ Tsoungui. Finance 
Minister Etienne Ntsama and 
Planning Minister Youssoufa 
Daouda. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TR1RL-NE. TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 1985 


■X 


ARTS /LEISURE 



Page 7 


People Who Shape the World 

father 


I 


•' f 


- [ 


S&pisajwS 

Thai a i hcr s«te. 

IkmhotS zLFSL"* 300 m3- 

'» 33 $«BS? 

sSasp - A* 

^5““- .» round man with a 

aU 9 n i includes a landscane nww 
a Buddhist Adi TTZSgt 

n 7^ OWm i pkstic hummfatn 
mounted on fou. 

. J* e ^ ornes about Japanese chii . 
J*7* wbo “ dis cwnimS^^ with 
Jbar parents. He says things like, 
Lack of matrjial goods *umgi£ 
and after,” and “Now only 
bdieve m material things." and 

’ < JjT want . *® equal the soul 
and material world,” and "The air- 
planehas two wings. . . . Mater- 





jal world without spiritual wortd is 

nke one- wing airplane.** 

Pressed, be comes down io earth 
°n the problems of design. 

He says the great Japanese suc- 
cess m world trade stems from the 
great number of Japanese research- 
es sent abroad by the government 
end private c o rpor at ions. 

“If people want to sell to other 
cultures, they should learn about 
their customers. If America wants 
to sell to Japan, they <hnniH send 
people not for a week but five or 
ten years, to live not downtown, 
but in the neighborhoods, so they 
could understand Japanese houses, 
kitchens. 

Niels Diffrient, of a 

chair that was a major hit of the 
Wori design exhibit, said: “Lots of 
evidence shows people do a great 
deal of work when they are not 
officially at work." The chair, with 
as many aims as Siva, allows one to 
use a computer, write, read or con- 
template in a pose similar to that of 
a Roman at a banquet. 

Diffrient calls it his “Jefferson 
Lounge Chair-Table” -after one 
Thomas Jefferson designed for bis 
study. Jefferson’s had candle 
stands on each side, as well as a 


doonesbury 

W&MXZ TH&tsm'm&OF 
WIDONTMJANTWUIO 
5AY ANYTHING ATRR5T. JUSTGO 
l{ INTO 7HB STUCK) AND SUX&y TAKE 

If 



table with a reading rack and an 
ottoman. In Diffrient’s, eaeh criti- 
cal part reclines, swings backward 
and forward, and goes up and 
down. 

“The chair aims to break down 
the Jndeo-Christian attitude that 
you must suffer to work." 

Out of Emilio Ambasz's pocket 
comes a pea with a flexible middle 
and a top you can’t lose because it 
won’t come off. Its dip is designed 
not to tear shirts. "I had it put 
together by a toolmaker. IH test it 
for two years. I have to be sure that 
it won’t break in the middle and it 
does what I think it will. Then, Til 
take it to a manufacturer, show it 
works, say it costs 6 cents to make 
and license it to them." 

Ambasz, an Argentine-bora ar- 
chitect, is a universal designer: a 
diesel engine for Cummins Engine 
Co.; the Logotec spotlight. a Ger- 
man trade-lighting system; the Ver- 
tebra chair, which adjusts automat- 
ically without levers or buttons; the 
San Antonio Botanical Conserva- 
tory, with earth-insulated plant 
containers ("Texas has enclaves of 
people with the highest fortune and 
taste"); an underground tree grove 
for the Plaza Mayor in Salamanca, 
Spain; buildings including labora- 
tories in Austin, Texas, and a house 
in Cordoba, Spain, with a medita- 
tion tower enclosing a waterfall; 
and the Museum of American Folk 
Art in New York. 

He is a former curator of design 
at the Museum of Modem An in 
New York, where he introduced 
Italian design of 1972 in “Italy: 
The Domestic Landscape." 

“Italian design then influenced 
everyone to be freer, more open, 
colorful,” he said. “Now Italian de- 
sign is slightly tired, but they make 
objects with a tremendous quality 
of detail, well built, refined, su- 
premely exquisite in workman- 
ship." 

Massimo and Leila VjgncUi de- 
sign Xerox packaging, books about 
Philip Johnson and South African 
women artists, a chair for stacking 
auditorium seating. Italian marble 
tables and Japanese Sasaki china, 
among other things. Massimo Vig- 
nefli said: “Thank god Post-Mod- 
ern is gone. Acceleration is so fast 
today that if you bank mi a design, 
you’re out. We're still tied to fash- 
ion. The impact made by Post- 
Modern is deep, pari of the plural- 
ism which began in the mid 70s 
and stiD is rampant. It’s given us a 
much wider vocabulaiy of orna- 
ment. Now we need to learn how to 
use it, not by duplicating reality but 
interpreting iL” 


Costly Fanstasies to Fan the Flames of a Collector’s Fancy 


By Ann Barry 

New York Tima Senate 


way," said Charles Fiance, an 
Oklahoma City collector. “Some- 
time in my 20s. I decided to keep 
things, instead of giving them 
away as gifts." 

France sat in a state of mild 
bewilderment in his apartment, 
which resembles an antique shop 
minus price tags and reveals a 
most eclectic taste. Surrounded 
by items such as stacks of English 
and French candy boxes, a me- 
nagerie of stuffed bears, minia- 
ture picture frames, French paste 
jewelry, an 18th-century Austrian 
chest, a framed Chinese kimono, 
an American patented crib-sled 
and a French poster of Mistin- 
guett, France said, “I may have to 
move." 

One of the cornerstones of his 
holdings is an assembly of about 
25 folded fans from the 18th and 
19th centuries. “1 was initially 
drawn to fans for their paintings," 
be said, showing what he regards 
as the crime de la crime of his 
collection: a late 18th-centuiy 
French fan, which he picked up in 
London at a shop in Portobalo 
Road, and estimates to be worth 
$1,300. It unfolds a charming pas- 
toral scene in oil on paper, with 




A French fan from the collection of Charles France. 

mother-of-pearl and gold overlay inscribed “La Naissance et le 
slicks replete with birds and flow- 
ers. Another fan of the same peri- 
od and about the same worth, for 
which France paid 5750 about 10 
years ago, displays a Watteau-like 
scene chat, with its crisp, vivid 
colors, might bare been painted 
yesterday. 

An even more delicate fan has 
bouquets of lilacs painted on 
gauze, trimmed with handmade 
lace that is echoed by a handmade 
lace basket at the center of the 
leaf. France bought this fan at a 
Miami antiques fair about five 
years ago for S350 and guesses 
that it is worth twice that today. 

On a foray in 1975 to the 
Marche aux' Puces in Paris, 

France happened on an unusual 
fan complete with its original box. 


tercolors on the theme of Cupid's 
initiation into the use of the bow 
and arrow. France estimates its 
value at S 2.000. 

"There are all kinds of fans I 
don't have," be said; “telescope 
fans, commemorative fans, feath- 
er fans." He does possess an un- 
usual three- sided fan, for which 
be paid S 30 in Chicago, to a shop- 
keeper who did not know its se- 
cret. 

“The use of the fan was more 
than just functional," France 
said. “A whole fan language de- 
veloped ’My husband is here, go 
away,' that son. of thing." 

Lucy Commoner, tactile con- 


servator at the Cooper-Hewitt 
Museum in New York and orga- 
nizer of a show based on the mu- 
seum's collection of 300 Europe- 
an and Oriental folding fans, 
planned for February 1987, dis- 
agreed. 

“Actually, there would not 
have been a fan language," she 
maintained. “People like the ro- 
mance of it, but a codified lan- 
guage would hare defeated the 
purpose of what would have been 
designed as a veiled communica- 
tion. The whole idea came from a 
satirical piece done in a 1 7 1 1 issue 
of The Spectator by Joseph Addi- 
son, in which he capitalized on the 
contemporary enthusiasm for 
fans and proposed a fan academy 
that would teach a fan language.” 

In the 19th century. Commoner 
related, a Parisian fanmaker 
named DuveDeroy popularized a 
fan language, but for commercial 
advertising purposes. Twirling 
the Fan in the left hand meant 
“We are being watched," covering 
the left ear with an open fan sig- 
naled "Do not betray our secret,'* 
and so on. 

The origin of the fan can be 
traced lo Japan and China in the 
eighth century. Its earliest use was 
ceremonial or as an indication of 
rank. When trade routes opened, 
the fan wended its way to Europe, 
where it first appeared in Portugal 


in the 15th century. The 16th cen- 
tury saw the beginning of the fan 
as a personal costume accessory, 
primarily in Spain. Italy arid 
France at first 

By (he 18th century, the fan 
was bang employed by the bour- 
geoisie as well as the aristocracy, 
and by the 19th century it had 
become common to all classes. 
The fan had established itself as a 
son of ‘Ice-breaker" or conversa- 
tion piece. 

There are two types of folding 
fans, one with a paper leaf and the 
other, called brise. which consists 
solely of sticks riveted together at 
the base, held together at the top 
with a ribbon or chord, and open- 
ing out to form a flat fan. 

All these components — sticks, 
leaf, river, ribbon, sometimes jew- 
els, plus painting, carving and 
gilding — required rniutiple 
sources and various craftsmen. By 
1673, a fanmakers’ guild had been 
founded in Paris and by 1709 
there was a Worshipful Company 
of Fan Makers in London. 

Commoner said it was fre- 
quently difficult to date and give 
provenance to fans. Since a fan 
was something of a luxury item, 
and a fragile piece of equipment, 
it would often have been repaired 
rather than replaced, or a leaf 
might have been changed to ac- 
cord with a new fashion. 


Jazz Goes to School: 'Lab Bands 9 Come Out of the Studio 


By Michael Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 

W HEN the school year begins in the 
United States, “virtually every high 
school in the country will have a jazz pro- 
gram,” according to Richard Dunscomb, in- 
ternational chairman of the National Associ- 
ation of Jazz Educators, or NAJE, At last 
count the number was somewhere around 
1 5,000 high schools, and there are about 300 
college programs. 

Dunscomb, director of bands for Purdue 
University, goes to Monlreaux, Switzerland, 
each summer to direct the jazz festival's 
student band concerts and workshops. The 
NAJE with 6,000 members and six full-time 
employees, is headquartered in the heartland 
of the United Stales — Manhattan, Kansas. 
Jazz education is an all-American subject, 
rapidly becoming an industry. 

Increasing quantities of improvising and 
leaching methods, combo and big band ar- 
rangements, magazines and audio-visual ma- 
terial are being published. Dunscomb is writ- 
ing a directory listing, describing and 
grading them. There are more workshops, 
seminars and summer band camp s all the 
tune, and Down Beat Magazine inaugurated 

a student jazz poll this year. 

Although many of today's stars* such as 
Pat Metheny and Michael Brecker. are prod- 


ucts of jazz schools, Dunscomb pointed to a 
big band from an Iowa high school, shiny- 
faced teen-agers struggling with Count Basie 
and Chick Corea arrangements with infec- 
tious joy: “Most of these kids are not going 
to be professional musicians. We are devel- 
oping consumers. These will be the lawyers, 
doctors and executives of the future. They 
may continue to play jazz for pleasure, they 
will be able to appreciate it, and they will be 
in a high enough income bracket to contrib- 
ute to its viability." 

The first university to offer jazz for credit 
was North Texas Slate in Demon, in the late 
1950s. Other universities organized bands, 
but the word “jazz" was still unacceptable. 
They were called “stage” or “lab'* bands. 
(Students were often ejected from campus 
practice studios for playing jazz in titan.) 
Bandleader Stan Kenton was one of the first 
professionals to become interested in jazz 
education, conducting clinics and organizing 
“stage band" summer camps. 

Most of the teachers, despite their enthusi- 
asm and love for jazz, were classically trained 
and had never played jazz professionally. 
The NAJE was formed 16 years ago to edu- 
cate jazz educators. Thrown out of work by 
rock in the 1960s, musicians began to join 
faculties. People like Jackie McLean, Archie 
Stepp and Richard Davis became full- 
fledged teachers. 


An alto saxophonist named Jamie Aeber- 
sold has released a collection of 45 record- 
ings with professional rhythm sections, com- 
plemented by method books with sample 
solo transcriptions, chords and instructions 
helping the student improviser to play along. 

Aebersold recently donated $600 worth of 
material to the Polish Jazz Society, and 
Dunscomb has been working on publishers 
and record companies to follow that exam- 
ple. With the help of funding from the U. S. 
Information Agency, he conducted a series 
of clinics in Poland* and Hungary this year. 

International jazz education is embryonic, 
not yet integrated into curricula. “I've gone 
to many countries and worked with educa- 
tors, professional musicians and students," 
Dunscomb said. “It's difficult but we're pro- 
gressing. I would say that the highest level of 
student proficiency, and certainly enthusi- 
asm, is in Poland, they are just like sponges. 
Fmjust wasted after dimes there They have 
such an urgent desire to learn" 

The basic dement of jazz called swine is a 
combination of the African and North 
American experience; transplanting it is a 
delicate matter. Dunscomb said other cul- 
tures’ lack of exposure to manifestations of 
swing such as Afro-American body move-' 
ment and speech patterns could cause prob- 
lems. but be added: 


“In a funny kind of way it’s not all nega- 
tive. First, of all they do a lot of listening, they 
have access to many recordings. And also, by 
not being structured on the American pat- 
tern t hay are developing their own national 
trends, avoiding certain cliches. We encour- 
age this." 

Meanwhile, he said, in the United Slates 
“the market is now being flooded by pop 
tunes arranged for jazz bands. There’s a good 
hook there. A kid coming into high school, 
this is his music. If he can play a Michael 
Jackson tune in a jazz band then we can take 
him to the next step. It’s healthy if we nur- 
ture it properly. The danger is not taking the 
students past where they already are. 

“Another danger is the increasing number 
of contests and prizes. There’s always this 
controversy — is competition necessary in 
the field of culture? Yes. if used properly. It 
should not be the ultimate goal We don’t 
want a band to work on three pieces all year 
and then take them to a contest Students 
should get a look at the entire spectrum. 
Most of all, it should be fun for them.” 

The drummer Elvin Jones once conducted 
a clinic for more than 300 students in Japan. 
A journalist asked Mm where all these fledg- 
ling- dnmnners could find work. Jones re- 
plied: "You don’t have to win the Tour de 
France to enjoy riding a bicycle.” 


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NYSE index 


Previous __ Today 
Him LOW ant JP* 
Composite 10852 10823 10849 10851 

Industrial* 124.00 JZLM 133.99 134.11 

Tranap. 109.19 138.94 lS.10 MW* 

Utilities S7M 572 S SIM 57.17 

Finance 11881 11845 1U58 11845 


I Dow Jones Bond Averages | 

’Today 


Bonds 
UttUtka , 
Industrials 


Closo 

79J91 

77M 

8227 


7U7 

77.45 

8220 


NYSE Diaries 


AdvancKl 
Declined . 
Unchanged 
Total twos 
Now Highs 
Now Lows 


799 

73* 

459 

1984 

3S 

7 


708 

758 

512 

1978 

27 

11 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Aug. 23 . 
Ain. 22. 
Aua- 21 . 
Aug. 20 . 
If , 


"Included In It* solos Mures 


Bov solos •sun 

139435 34SUJ 931 

151,117 422446 ,«9 

210442 3BM39 14M 

142944 397415 1495 

141.086 394409 577 


Monday s 

MSE 

Closing 



5tABUm 
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Pitv consotWoted dose 

9019550 


Tables include Its* nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Kb The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


Advanced 
Declined 
uirdianaed 
Total issues 
New Htaha 
Now Lows 


234 

* 

231 

745 

18 

10 


244 

250 

249 

743 

12 

13 


NASDAQ Index 


Composite 

Industrial* 

Finance 

Insurance 

Utilities 

B onus 

T romp. 


WmK Year 

Close Noon Ago Ago 
29868 296.12 29846 38442 
3KUU 30228 303.17 31444 
30146 — 38047 38445 

34541 — 


2B8J1 - 
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27488 - 


34441 35492 
28743 29525 
297J6 29429 
27X43 276.03 


Standard & Poor's Index 


Previous Today 

HJpil Low Oom 3 PM. 
Industrials 20807 20723 20749 20009 

TronSpL 17348 17244 17X25 17249 

Utilities 8107 8X52 B341 8X47 

Finance 2143 21 JO 21.75 2176 

Composite 1 87.36 18639 187.17 18721 


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Trading Is light on the NYSE 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices were slightly lower 
late' Monday in light trading on the New York 
Stock Exchange- 

The Dow Jones industrial average was down 
1.00 to 131732 an hour before the close. 

Declines were edging out advances among 
the 1,917 issues traded. Five-hour volume 
amounted to about 57.4 million shares, com- 
pared with 63.11 nnDion in the same period 
Friday. 


Although prices in tables on these pages are from 
the 4 PM close in New York , for time reasons, 
j this article is based on the market at 3 


PM. 


“The market’s on a holiday," said Alan Ack- 
erman of Herzfdd & Stem. “There's an absence 
erf interest by portfolio managers with the La- 
bor Day weekend coming." 

Mr. Ackerman said that, besides the season- 
ally light activity, the market was contending 
with “recession jitters and more and more talk 

about the economy slowing more than had been 

CX ^njc^mrket was listless and could go lower, 
he said, ad ding that investors could be surprised 


by a move up if interest rates start to decline. 

“The safe and sane thing now is to be on the 
sidelines and be very selective;" he said. “Cau- 
tion is the word of the moment” 

Texas Utilities was near the top of the active 
list and up slightly. 

Southern Co. was lower in active trading 

Mesa Petroleum Co. was advancing. Its 
board approved a plan to reorganize the compa- 
ny into a new limited partnership to be called 
Mesa Limited Partnership. 

Sperry was gaining and Texas International 
Co. was up slightly, both in active trading. 

Among airline stocks. Pan American world 
Airways was lower while Western Airlines and 
Eastern Airlines were ahead 

Several bine-chips were higher. IBM, Exxon, 
Chevron, General Electric and Eastman Kodak 
were up modestly. 

Some pharmaceuticals were weaker. Upjohn 
was down sharply. Merck and Pfizer were also 
lower. 

The resignation erf Brazil's finance minister 
made little impact on stocks of money center 
banks. Manufacturers Hanover was up slightly. 
Citibank was oil a fraction, and Chase Manhat- 
tan Bank was unchanged. 


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2W 98 vIBohJU 

10 2 vlBWUot 

61W MU BdllCe 1A4 2 A 14 

IW UW BaUyMI 50 1.1 

11W 7U BollvPk , 12 

4698 33V, BallGE M0 M I 

2318 149* BltGE wl 

35K 2298 BncOnv 1.10 14 II 

23W 1SV* BncOnwl 

59* m BanT«x 

42 4488 Bandog 1 M 13 II 

559% MS* BkBOS 140 50 5 

53W 4*8* BkB pfB 59* 15 

4716 288% BkNV 104 45 7 

3314 an* Bank Vo 1.12 45 8 

2296 15 BnkAm JB 53 

74W 459* BkAmpf 753*115 
16W 17*. BkAm of 188 
32W 24 BkARty 140 85 12 

758* 4498 BanhTr 250 4.1 6 

27 21<a BkTrsA ISO 95 

449* 35V2 BkTrpf 422 9 A 

U BW Bonner JJ3* 4 IS 

39W 19 Bart 56 14 14 

25 I91A BomOp £0 3J IS 

4188 25% Barnet s 154 18 II 

328* 17 BaTVWr 40 U S 

138* BW BAS IX ,12b M II 

3598 221* Bmisch 58 25 17 

1714 119* BaxtTr 57 14 72 

278* 208* BayFIn 20 5144 

3«i 24 BOYSKS 240 50 9 

3896 31 u. Bearing 150 19 13 

34W 248* BeatCa 150 54 7 

15(8 12W Bacor M 17 45 

588* 35W BechiD 150 11 15 

898 2W Baker Ml 

11 4 Baker pi 1J0 «5 .. 

1798 12W BetdnH M 15 11 

358* 22»* BHHwt 26 14 11 

3SW 22 BelHwpt J7 1.9 _ 

97 7416 BeflAII 450 75 9 

33 24 BCEB ZM „ .. 

Z71A 1948 Beilina 52 14 18 

448* SOW BellSou 1BQ 45 9 

37 41W BCWAH 50 15 21 

3296 2296 Boro Is UW XI 11 

45W 2794 BerrfCp 100 SO 9 

40 30V. Benoipf 4J0 115 

201 134W BHWfpf XI 

22W la Benefit 250 11.1 

19(8 171% Beneotn I JO 60 

616 316 BenolB 071 

896 38* Bcrtev . . 

15 109* Brat Pd 54 14 34 

21W UW BethSH M M 

W8 19(8 BteSr 50 35 IB 

2(18 13W Btocttn , . 35 

2488 1098 BtoCXD 44 34 16 

3418 2)98 WrtHP 1 J2_ 5.9 8 

29V. 1416 Blair Jn 5BI .. 

59*8 399* BIckHR 1« f-1 15 

SOW 3396 Boeings ISO U 15 

51 3616 BotwC 1.90 40 20 

29(8 189* BoltBer .10 J 29 

42W 28W Barden s 152 40 M 

24(8 19W Borg Wo .92 41 12 

998 416 Bormra 14 

4118 SOW Based 354 XI B 

BS 45 BOOE Pt 8« 115 

11 W 916 BOSE or 1.17 W+ 

1418 11 BosEor 1-4* 108 

. 25(8 1998 BoMOtr J2 11 9 

3118 26 BrioSt 

' 44W 4398 BrlStM 

4(8 348 BrlH.nd 

3098 219* BrffPI 

Z7V8 32 BrtT2pg Ale 13 

5*8 1(8 Brock _ „ 

28 1696 Birkwy 1^ M » 

41 2998 BkYUG 112 7.9 8 

25W I9W BWJGpt 2A7 9J 

3714 30V8 BkUGpt IK 115 

' 2694 14V. BwnSh 50 .0 8 

3198 3398 BTwnGn 156 44 20 

. 56 3294 BrvmF 2.1 1J 

; 409* 2816 Brngvk 1 50 18 8 

, 409* 29 BrsfiWt 52 15 IS 

. 20 15W BunhrH Xl4 Hi 

21W 1416 BwrinCi 11 

3016 24 Burtlnd 15f 40 

68W 4316 BrlNttl 1X0 13 8 

7(8 698 BrtNopt Si IS 


116 816 7(8 7(8— *8 

130 2U8 2596 24W + W 
353 I79S rm 1791 
215 22 219* 22 + W 

915 2 V. 1(8 2 
38 8*6 7W 716—116 

70 41 W 41 41W 

1147 17*8 1796 1798 
IB IMS IM* + V* 
488 A3W 4316 A3W + 16 
28 211* 21 (* 2198 
34 32(6 32W 32W— U 
2 2216 2216 2216— 1* 
394 2(8 29* 294—16 

138 53W 53 5316 

441 48 47W 48 +18 

37 SZ94 52 5294+1 

119 «3Vb 4298 4298 — 9* 
292 27 24(8 24*8 

2006 1» 15 15 

80 6418 d4W 6698— I* 

83 159* 1518 1516 + 16 

19X2816 28 2816 

3442 *51* 4596 4596 + 16 

5 25W 259* 254* 

10 45 44(8 45 + (8 

21 MW 11W IK*— }8 

134 34K 3416 3496— 18 

40x 3416 » 2416 +9* 

281 379k 37 37W + 94 

11 2116 209* 21 + M 

37 BW 894 896— 16 

i47 jow 3 tm sm. 

1456 14W 1418 149* 

84 24 25(8 35W— W 

3 32W 32V8 32W + V* 

11 35 3496 IM 

1593 3398 339* 3316- J6 

729 I6U 15W 16V. + W 

90 5491 549* 56W— M 

154 3*8 296 3(8 

197 4 4 4 


5 

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32 

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90 

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101 

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4096 

409* 

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48 — V* 

2 

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33 

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92 

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200= 22V. 22W 22W + 16 

13 1798 17W 179* + 16 

189 59* 5W 5*8 + W 

261 896 89* 896 + 16 

258X 1316 13V8 13W + W 
244 1796 17W 1798— W 

• 45W 4518 4516- 98 

132 2316 23 231* „ 

99 349* 3596 36 - 16 

170 24(8 3416 249* + W 

BS 17(8 T7W 1796- U. 

523 189* 18W 189* 

IS 32(8 3396 3296 

446 9H6 I8W T9W +1 

360 SBW 5796 SOW + 98 

4259 47 459* 47 + W 

240 47 459* 47 + 98 

310 29W 29 29W + 18 

1433 3816 38 38W 

443 22*8 229* 2298 + W 

38 99* 9 9V8-16 

49 40*6 399* 40W + W 
150x7916 7916 79VJ — W 
17 UW 11 II 

2S 13W U I3W 

661 2398 23W 23 W- 16 

37 3916 289* 2BW- W 

9B2 589* 5816 589* + 16 

8 4V. 488 498 — 16 

12 30W 301* J0W— W 

11 27W 2798 27W + V. 

112 2W 1(8 2 

20 2418 259* 26 

14 39(8 39W 3998- W 

2 35W 2516 25W + 98 

12 34(8 34W 34W— •A 

19 2216 219* 22 

481 31 » »W + 9 

194 §016 609* 504* + W 

1367 34 KW 3598— W 

JO 32(8 3296 3K8 + V. 

9 1196 18W 1096 

44 1698 UW lit* 

284 28 271* 2798 

1121 61W 409* 611* — W 

4 7 618 7 + W 


f 12 Month 




StL 



l HtetiLow Stock 

Dt«. YKL PE 

IBteHtehUm 

Owk.CBtp 



XI2 

9.1 


2 

3% 

Z3b 

23b 

52 

4416 BrlNPt 

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3X» 

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1BS6 

11 BurnOv 

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20 

123 

1214 

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12b + 94 

4418 


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411 

12 

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4SV6 +194 

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14 Butlrln 

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44 

1716 

17 

17b + 18 

frb 





» 

2 

m 

1(8— b 

1496 

396 Bales pf 

IJHJ 


3 

4 

4 

4 

r 




C 




1 


20WCBI in 

1A0O 43 


143 

2298 

219* 

22b 

125 

4818 CBS 

300 

23 

20 

2043 1 1396 110(811394 +296 

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0 

74 

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12 

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US 11.9 


200z ion 

ion 

101* 

409* 

341* CIGNA 

230 

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845 

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3296 

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38 

3878 

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20 

50 

50 

50 

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SO 

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2b 

5916 

25b CNAFn 



11 

54 

54b 

5396 

54 


9b CN AI 

134 11J 


21 

111* 

11 

11 — 16 

2996 

1416 CNW 




544 

21b 

21 

21 — b 


359* CPC Ini 

IM 

5.1 

11 

40B 

43b 

43 

4316 + W 


15 CP Nit 

l.«0 

4.1 

V 

VO 

saw 

22b 

2298 + 98 

229* 

1916 CRIIMI 

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■7k 219* 

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219* CSX 

1.16 

43 

9 

1008 

2418 

25(6 

2596— 98 

40b 

28 V. CTS 

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105 

349* 

3391 

3496 +198 

12VS 

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40 

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a* 

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3396 

249* Cabal 

.92 

33 

9 

154 

25 

249* 

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149* 




17 

3576 

1S9* 

15b 

16b + 94 

25(8 

1116 CalFcd 

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22 

5 

1219 

2116 

21 

SJZ-9* 

54b 

35b ColPd Pf <75 



27 

5094 

50b 

201* 

1316 caltan 

35b 13 


250 

2ova 

19W 

sun + w 

IP6 

12 Comml 


3129 


15V* 

15b 

15V. 


15b CRLJtB 

M 



389 

24«b 

3416 

«94 + b 


3 CmpRO 

.161 




3b 

316 

3b + b 


89* CpR Pf 0 250 




IVM 


lib— b 


3016 Com Sc 5 


12 

168 

37V* 

379* 

3798 



At 



271 

13(6 

13W 

13b + b 


30 


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59 212 

212 

212b + V* 


17 CassrWa 

37 

IS 

9 

501x226. 

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15 

9 

214 

30(6 30b 

SOW— Vk 

2496 

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M 

1.7 

n 

928 

22(8 

2296 

22 b— b 

3096 

21(6 CarPw 

2IO 

93 

7 

2019 

2718 

24W 

27b + b 

251* 

2016 Car Pet 

237 103 


3 

2518 

25b 

asb- w 

39U + 4* 


35W CorTec 

X10 

53 

14 


39b 

3BW 

11W 


37 

14 

10 

71 

7V* 

7 

7 

24b 

17*8 CnrPlrs 

30 

XI 

B 

39 

20 

199* 

1t«b— 98 


219* CartHw 

132 

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45 

28 

28 

38 — V8 


22 CortWI 

32 

13 

12 

171 

34b 

35W 

34b + W 



130 

73 

7 

43 

15(8 

liva 

159* + 9* 


9V8 CasfICfc 




325 

1194 

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tin + n 



138k 


14x 259* 

saw 

2598 + b 


12 CslICPt 

50 

43 


245x14 

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1398 + b 



30 

13 


1713 

3498 

36 

34b + 16 



34 

U 


6 

259* 

25(* 

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A40 

13 

11 

raw 2o 

m. 120 +iw 


35 Ceteipf 

430 1U 


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4116 

4116 — b 



JB. 

2 

25 

454 

9*8 

9b 

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3496 Camel 

238 

5 3 

9 

54 

419* 

419* 

4196 



35 

1.1 

10 

31 

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23 

23 — b 




04 

7 

2578 

7918 

25 

2518 + 16 



L» 103 


94 

28(8 

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2118 

14 CnilPS 

134 

07 

10 

131 

Bit 

1816 

law 


1916 CnUEl 

248 

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7 

174 



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3094 CLoEl pf <18 1LS 


4 

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351* 


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130 1X7109 

598 

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1316- 16 

2196 

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93 

8 

55 

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20 

a —w 


296 Control 




145 

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40 

43 

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12 

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10b Cenvin 

230 123 

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133x1918 

law 

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27 

12 

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269* 

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30 

24 

19 

723 

20 

20b 

2596 

1B98 CtKflffliil 

32 

23 


872 

239* 22(8 2316— W 


an* enrol Pi 

1.70 

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24 

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53V8 

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53 — 16 

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si axMpna44*i9a 


31 

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99(8 

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217 

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53W 

539ft— 16 

2296 

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209* + 96 

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24(8 CntmM 

132 

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4416 

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17*7 

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3998 

399* + (fa 

SOW 

51 ChNYOf UH 72 


5 

.9496 

5496 

5494 + 16 

5516 

49 CUNY pf 407*7 S 


20 

.9494 

.Mb 

5416—96 

3916 

13 Chesuk 

124 

13 

11 

41 


37b 


389* 

3IJ6 OwsPn 

SM 


» 

712 

3498 34b 34b— 961 

39 

29b Ch*v«i 

230 

43 

9 

2440 

37b 

3416 

37 + b| 

200 130 OlIMJw 


112 

1 13516 135V* 13316— bl 

■Ob 

5316 CWMlpf 




1 

43 

43 

43 

29(8 

14(8 CMPrtT 

JO* 1.1 

9 

35 

MW 

25b 

24(8 + 48 

11(* 

7b chkFufl 

Jll 34200 

17 

816 

B 

a — w 

54 

2M6 aimer 

38t 

S 


173 

S7 

5116 

52 + (ft 

UW 

518 curtate 




32 

lib 

11 

li — b 

U98 

99* aimn 



39 

170 

12 

1148 

11(6—14 

54 

44b OiraiM 




12 

5418 

Mb 

5416 — 16 

3816 25W Oirvalr 

1.00 

17 

3 3794 

3698 

36*8 

3616 + 96 

77 

44W OKiSJj 

2SD 

27 

12 

130 

78W 

70 

70W + 94 

4316 

5DW Chubb of <25 

7.1 


18 

<m 

Mb 

40b 

20b 


34 

19 

13 

1099 

15Va 

15b 

15b— b 

27b 


2.22 

94 

9 

55 

74(8 

24Kt 

2 m + * 

51 

351* ClnBail 

X12 

43 

8 

130 

4(6 

4816 

4Bb — 16 

m* 

12*8 ClnGE 

5. 16 111 

7 

458 

1718 

17b 

17(8 + 16 


12 Month 
HWiLw Stock 


Dh». Ykl. PE 


Sis. 

XXb Hlafc Ltm 


dose 

OmiOrtie 


34W 25 CJnGpt <00 11 J 
59W 4» CteGpt 7A4 123 
7316 53 OnCPf Oja 127 
75 55 ClnG pi 952 127 

26(8 18(8 ClnMIl J2 15 V 

37 24W Cl relit 74 23 12 

31 2016 ClrCItY .10 A 12 

30 15 Circus 14 

5196 33V. atterp 234 43 7 

41(6 24(6 Citvlnv 7J0C 4 

9 416 ClaWr 72 103 4 

299* 8 CJairSr .10 J 28 

32V. 2398 Clark E 1.10 X4 34 
14 9 CtavHm 14 

2216 77 OvCH 170 47 10 
2196 lit* CIvCJ Pt 2JW 95 
ZH8 15W ClevCI 252 11 j 0 4 
44 49W CIVElBt TM 115 

101 01 CIvEJpf 11.24*1 1 J 

14(8 8 V. Clevpk JtH 

mi W avpkpt Lit I 
19 10 Clvokpt 521 

403* M* Oorax 154 X5 12 
26(6 149* ChJfaM n 209 A 19 
3896 25 CHwttP 1J)0 25 19 
211* 12)6 Coactim .40 3.1 17 
3&V. MW CoastJs M 12 II 
7498 59W Cocoa ~ 

19V8 1018 Coleco 
3296 251* Coienin 1 70 45 20 
28% 229* Colo Pol USD 45 38 
26W 259* CalePwd 
2fV» I4W CoMlh a 44 32 B 
25 139* ColFdss .14 7 14 

29W 2594 Cal Pen U 4J 1 
*59. 44W Cottlnd 750 47 9 
35 2494 CafGos X18 97 

53 «5M> CotGspf 579*107 

1W 9BW CSOptolS.35 MB 
SO 33V4 Contain X14 SO 7 
3798 28 CntaEn 1JM tS 10 


7001 339* 33W 33W +1 
5(0i 61 £0 61 +1W 

700x 73 72 73 — W 

SSOx 7496 7496 749* + 9* 
133 2118 2DW 209*— W 
142x 32 311* 3196— W 

116 23V. 23V* 23V. — W 
34 2BW 2BW 2BW + 96 
2313 449* 4498 4«8— V* 
537 28 Z7U 27(8 + W 

248 7 4*8 498— W 

187 219* 21 W 2198 
247 32V. 319* 3216 + 9* 
32 14(8 1498 14(8— W 
426 20K 20 201* + U 

500 21W 2116 21W— 9* 
407 23 229* 22(8— M 

80= 5914 59V, 591*— 116 
102 101(8 10018 101(8 +1(6 
4 11(8 11W 11W 
3 1478 74W 149*— W 
1316 + 18 


19W 8 Comdis 
Wk 151* CatniiMI 
3396 8W Comoro 
339* 245* CfflvE 
32(6 249* CwEPt 
18(8 1398 CurE pf 
1BW 1416 CwE pt 
2498 189* CwE Pt 
659* 49W CwE Pi 


3D(* 20 ComES 133 XP 6 

3H6 2294 Comsat 171! 35 II 

359* 23V. CPsve 78 lJ 20 

35(6 25 Compor jSO 24 • 

24W 12W CampSC 11 

45(8 1118 CPtvsn 

3096 241* CanAOS JB 27 14 

SO 1496 CoiME ljfiO U ID 

31 2116 CnnNG US M t 

15W m* Conroe M 19 6 

38 2648 ConsEd 140 6.9 8 

Ml 164 CwE Pt <00 27 

SO 39 ConE pt SJXJ l&S 

34 23 CnaFrt 1.10 12 12 

tm 35W CnsNG 132 5 J, 9 

8(8 4W ConsPw 

ai 1716 cnPotA 4.U im 

54 32W CnPpfE 773 143 

31W 1598 CnP prV <40 1<B 

259* 1316 CnP orU 140 14.1 

28W 1416 CnPprT 178 t<8 

284. 1416 CnPprR <00 14J 

MU. 14V8 CnPprP 3.9B 14J 

BU MW CnPprU 3J5 145 

18W VW CnPorMZJO 1<1 

17 8(8 CnPprL 2J3 14J 

» IS CnPprS <02 TAJ 

18 9W CnPprK 243 141 

6796 3076 CntlCc 160 4J 19 


9 1398 13V* 

241 39 389* 389*— 4* 

II fflk 2W 2398— V. 

293 3796 37(8 379* 

S53 139* 12(8 13 + 16 

40M3216 7118 32 — W 
X94 42 14 2047 7116 7096 71 — 16 

1315 1496 16V. I4W— 18 

32x 279* 2716 2716 + V* 

498 2696 26W 249* 

287 24W 2496 24W 

713 23V, 2216 2216— I* 
144 2298 2296 2296 

427 29 289* 28 W + 9* 

124 iOVfe 5W. 40 +96 

411 32U, 319* 32 +16 

30 SOW 4996 SOW + 94 

hm» m m + w 

534 43W 439* 4398 — 98 
371 2076 2898 289* + Vh 
20 W 10 412 109* 19 1916— 16 

26 XI 14 10 179* 1798 17*8 

7 493 10 996 10 

100 97 41 7159 31 3M6 304 

142 <4 1 30V 30(6 309*— V* 

l.m I'Ll 14 17W 14(8 1718 + 98 

2X0 11X 9 1898 18 181* + (* 

2J7 »J 51 249* 2416 2416— 18 

7-24 1U 980z 421* 41W 429* + 9* 


43 2816 274* 2816 + W 
103 3498 34 34(6 

1505 289* 28 2816— W 

45 2598 2518 25W— 9* 
311 23W 2396 m— 16 
331 149* 141* 14W 
79 279* J7W 379*_ 1* 
5 1816 UI6 1B16 + (6 
19 2Ah 299* 299* + 16 
94 13*8 139* 139* + 16 
701 34(8 34W 349* 

1 220 220 220 
4 4794 479* 479i + *4 
127 3496 34W 3416 
143 41(8 41 41(6 + 16 

49M 7W 71 — 


10W 4W Con! Ill U 

416 (k Canlil rl 
51(6 24W Cntin pt 
4W (8 CniHdn 
13 4W Cot Into 
24(6 19(6 ContTal 1J0 77 

38(4 21 CtDatO 72 3J 

40W 33W CnDtpf <50 115 

359* 2496 Crowd 1.10 XI 13 

246 I vlCookU 

39 279* Coon- )J2 <0 14 

4116 31 COOPI pt M0 7J _ 

2096 I4W CoprTr M IS 7 

27 15 Coopvb JO, IJ 15 

19V6 916 CopwM J2I 
2496 1916 Cnwtd pf IM 124 

2796 17(6 Corturo J4 3A 74 

1516 11 Coreln St <7 11 

4B96 3096 CornGs 1JB 2J IB 

49(8 2ftW Cor&IK 1 JO XI 

77(* 45 Cox Cm M S 21 

IB 446 Crate 
39V* 32 Crane lJ0b<4 10 

50 23 CravR 1 » 

1946 17W CrcMI pfXlB IU 


«W + 16 
19* + W 

"in 


_ 7V. 7W + 16 

502 30 30 30 +1 

1202 54 54 54 

43 2994 29(8 294* 

36 25V* 24 251* +1 

7 25(6 25W 25W 
29 27V, 37 27 + W 

10 2718 27 27 + W 

2 2446 2496 2496 
5 17(4 1716 1796 + 14 
24 W8 15W 1S98 + (6 
IS zn* 27W 37W 
14 17(6 17 1716 + W 

274 «W 41 - 

45 7V, 7 

244 19* 1(6 

114 SOW 49(8 

199 \ W 

a is n tow n + w 

8 1309 23W 23 2JW + 16 

9» 34 2346 23(6— 16 

400* 39 39 39 

274 359. 1546 35(6 + 18 

27 V6 IVfa 1W 

743 3798 37W 3796 + 18 

19 399* 3916 39(6 

40 T5W I5W 15(8 + W 

3M 22W- 1% 

21 94* 9W 9W 

18 2016 50 20 — 16 

.72 2518 2446 24(8 
101X 12>6 12 12 

229 W* 45 44 + VS 

l <@1 Wi 98 

9 744* 749* 74(6— 16 

97 10 99* 10 + L* 

.101 34(8 34W 34W- 96 

1749 51 49 51 +1(6 

4 19 18(. 18(6— 16 


(Continued on Page 8) 


~n r: 










*■4 I. 

'.'i/ ' a'jj 


Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 1983 


Mondsofe 


l2Moniti 
High Low Stock 


SIS. CUM 

Dls.rld.PE TflfaHtah Low QuaLQi'flc 


numi 
Hlcta Unr Slock 


Us. Chao . 

Dlv-YIIPE MfcMWiLOW Quet-Orte 


RWertn 
HMiLow Stock 


12 Month 
High Low Stack 


MSE 


3S GMofpf 175 U 8 40% «t «M— U 

46 G/Vtarf pf SjOO 93 1 54 54 S4 — U 

3ft GNC .16 U 17 19k S 4ft 4ft— ft 

9 GPU 7 344 1M 13% 13ft + ft 

57 Gen Re 1.56 1.8129 SB2 B5 84ft B4ft + ft 

& GnHetr 6 33 9 9 9 

40% GnStgnt 110 U 11 7D 4» 42ft 43% 

3ft Gortsca 89 4 3ft 4 

GnRod .10 3 73 364 14ft 13ft 13ft— ft 

Gemtg MO S2 4S 23ft 23ft 23ft— ft 


1 3ft GnRod .10 7 
17ft Gemtg IJO S3 


38ft GcnuPt 1.18 U 13 402 31ft 31. 31ft + ft 
20 Game JO 35 29 794 22ft 22ft 22ft + ft 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up la the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect lale trades else where. 


12 Month 
High Low Slock 


Sb- cJobo 

tCQj Utah Lon Quirt. Ottoe 


(Continued from Page 7) 


32ft GoPpfB 2J4 6J 
30** GaPcPfC224 6J 
24ft GaPwpf in 11.9 
35ft GaPwpf ljae 40 
24ft GaPwpf 144 12J 
25ft GaPwpf 174 114 
18 GaPwpf 154 115 
17ft GaPwpf 3S2 115 
21ft GaPwpf 23S ms 
54 GaPwpf 700 117 
53 GaPwpf 777 113 
20ft GertPd 1J2 19 12 


Oft 49ft CrckN pf 2J3e 50 BW 3X6 57U 5ZU 

24 10ft CrmpK 15D 57 12 47 23 22ft 23 + ft 

4Wk 40ft CrwnCk _ 14 119 47ft 47ft 67*6— ft 

44ft raft CrwZel 100 14' IB SO 38ft 38ft 3X6 — ft 


12ft GerhSi 
13ft Getty i 
8ft GIANT 
7ft GtorFn 
17ft GlffHIII 


1 35 X 35 
9 34 34 34 — ft 

18 2Sft 2Sft 25ft 
75 37ft 2746 27ft 

11 2B 37ft 28 — ft 

54 X 29ft 29ft + ft 

12 22 21ft 21ft— ft 
4 21ft 21ft 21ft— ft 

5ft 2SH 25ft 25ft + ft 
370z £6ft 66ft 44ft +1U 
2S0z 43 43 63 —1 

78 33ft 33ft 33ft— ft 


18ft 10ft LTV of 1.25 97 1! 13 12ft 12ft— ft 

16ft Mft LQoJnf 23 IS 13ft 13 13ft— 2 

29ft 16ft LoCJGs 1 JO 75 7 X 22ft S 2ft + ft 

]Wi 6ft La tors* 2D 21 13 7ft 7ft 7V 

27ft 73 La fro pi 144 9,9 3 24ft 24ft 24ft + ft 

14ft 8ft Lnmurs .24 14 13 14 9ft 9ft 9ft + ft 

4ft 1ft LomSes 175 S 3ft 3ft 3ft 

14ft 10ft Lowflrvt J56 SJO 16 68 lift nu lift— ft 

25ft lift LeorPt JO \7 477 12 lift 72 

28ft 21ft LmrPpfZJ7 m 84 22 21ft 21ft + ft 

57ft 41 Learsa 2 j 00 17 10 55 54ft 53ft 54ft + % 

21 is Lea Riws JO 2.1 is 3 left is* ie* + u 

34ft 25* LswvTr 150 11 12 147 29ft 29 29ft 

46ft 23ft LhEiH X 72 19 21 41ft 41ft 41ft 

19 9ft LeoMas TOb IJ 19 162 19ft 18ft 1 9ft 4- ft 


55 54ft 53ft 54ft -fcj% 
3 left 18ft 10ft + ft 


17ft 5ft Ontm 
19ft 12 Oneida PUD 

33ft 26ft ONEOK 156 15 11 
39 21ft OranRk 114 11 10 
12ft 7ft Orange 531 17 17 

28ft 20 OrkmC M 11 

35 23ft OrfcaCpfl.U 14 
12ft Bft Orton P 36 

9ft 6ft Orion pf 50 5J 

33ft 24 Orion of 3J3 19 


SiHftsLpw Sgora. KM. tok nhrmPE 

40 7 6ft 6ft > ft 55 IS 15 18 M T ££ SS^ft 

33 1416 M 14 £2? S*®™ 6 ™ in O 3854* 34» 34ft 34ft + ft 

16 X X 30 . S* 5”P? nf ?mr Hi MWOSW '04% 1B5%~ % 

60 26ft 26ft 26ft— ft '2”* 77 £"£*15*2. 7 27ft 27ft Sft „ 

44 9ft9ft9ft + ft3JftHft SeCPcci 1J4 45 7 n 17ft 17ft 17ft- * 


40 7 6ft 6ft + ft 

33 1416 M 14 

16 X X X 


19 24% 24ft 34% ^,7 ivr . « •« ig a 3»* ae« 45™ 

s 22ft" 


18ft lift SeteU 


43 38* 38% 3g%- ft 


COLLECTORS 

ITEM 


L-V-lp* 1 


31% W% OutfadM 54 25 
36ft 73 OvrnTr 52 10 
19 13 OvShla JO 12 

37 3Hfe OwenC 1.40 4.1 


X 31U 3m 3Cft— ft I 39Ji Z9% ShrtIT 


3 S am? sSSSa =ft ■£ H 


Sij,j &%^S+g 


52 20 14 395* 39ft 35ft 35ft + ft 
JO 12 12 124 I5U 15ft 15ft— ft 


13SK34H 33ft 34ft + ft I Uft 12 


40 25ft Snrwin 
Bft 5ft Srtoatwn 


7 11 570 1 6ft 16ft 16ft— ft 


13 24ft 24ft 24ft— ft 
S lift 10ft 10ft— ft 
475 Oft 8ft 8ft— ft 
73 21ft 21ft 21ft— ft 


25ft 16ft LeoPtot 53 2.1 10 
4U 2ft L etiVal 
15ft 13ft Letvrai 1JBH05 

15ft 11 Lamar 20 15 12 

24ft 12 LeucMfs 4 

SO 24 Levi St 155 17 27 

SBft 4214 LOF 1J2 25 8 
79ft 68ft LOF Pf 475 63 
SVfa 22ft UMrCp J2 2J 14 
9Qft 547k Lilly 3JD 37 12 
27ft lift LimfldB .16 A 27 


53 II 10 45 24ft 24ft 24ft— ft 

88 2ft 2ft 2ft 

1-58*107 245 15 14ft 14ft — ft 

JO 15 12 31 lift lift lift— ft 

4 23 19ft 19 19ft + ft 

1 JS 17 27 367 X 49ft SO + ft 

1-32 25 8 43 47ft 47 47— ft 

455 6J 10 76 76 76 

77 24 14 2 30 30 X + ft 

3J0 37 12 434 84ft 85ft BSU— ft 


£lft 38ft OwMIH 150 17 10 196 49 48ft 49 + ft I 


1514 10ft Oxford M 


1 13ft 13ft 13ft 


37ft 22ft PHH 150 -25 14 32 36ft 36ft 36ft— ft J8 Wft S kyttnp 

47ft 31ft PPG 1JO 14 ID 4» 44ft 43ft 44- + ft 26ft 2». Skrttenr 

31ft IS PSA 40 2J 19 131 24ft 24ft 26ft— ft ISft 7ft SmJ»In 

23ft 13ft PSAOM in 95 3 20 20 70 Tift gk SwifcB 

14ft lift POCAS 1J4 11J 12 13ft 13ft 13ft 79ft 42ft S madtr 

Xft 1314 PocGE IJ4 M 7 1224 18ft 18ft 18ft + ft 41ft 311A SnopOn 

46ft 32ft POCUO 132 7 3 II 276 42ft 42ft 42ft— ft 15ft 12ft Snyder 

2914 Xft PeUun JJ0 4J 18 40 Xft Xft 2814 + ft 43ft 31ft Soned 

10 5ft PacRea Me A \7 S 8ft 8ft Bft 19ft 13ft SonvCP 

19ft 13ft PocRspf 24H 107 X 18ft 18ft 181k _ Xft aft SwUn 

17ft 12ft PDCSci JO 35 10 45 13ft 13ft 13ft— ft 4gft 3I1J Source , 

82ft 61ft PdCTele 572 77 9 816 74ft 73'4 74ft + ft Xft Uft SrcCspf 

IS 9ft Poe Tin JO 25 8 5 14ft Mft 14ft— ft Xft 22ft Salerln 

31ft 23ft PocHcp 2J2 79 8 375 29ft 29ft 29ft 49ft 38ft SmKfwn 

36 29ft PocHpf 457 12.1 10 Xft 33ft 33ft— ft 35 34 SoelBk 


19ft T4ft SierPac 
44ft 28ft Signal. 
65 52ft Slgnlaf 
41 26ft Singer . 
33ft 27ft Slngrpf 
18 12ft SKvIine 
26ft 20ft Slattery 
15ft 7ft Smllhln 
71ft SBft SmkB 
791k 42ft Smudir 


2$ Sf g r ^ lwt 9.7 M 47ft 47ft 47ft I 

3514 2214 Cortiro 50 27 17 5 X 29ft X + ft 

Xft SBft CumEn 220 3J 4 69x 63ft 63 63ft 

Iff? CUrrlnc l.lOalOJ 23* 10ft 1014 10ft + ft I 

S? £“2* J-K 3 - 2 14 4 37 34ft 37 — ft 

32ft 33ft CydOPS 1.10 25 8 X 44ft 44ft 44ft + ft 


48ft Glllrtfe 250 4J 11 375 40ft 40ft 40ft 


22ft 17 Dallas 54 35 11 59 17ft 1714 17Y4 — ft 

JSt J 14 SSSBS p - 20 I- 7 372 12ft lift 12 + ft 

^ P 000 *^ » 5.1 7 4« 25V1 24ft 25 

9ft 5ft Danaftr 12 30 Bft Bft 8ft + ft 

15^ Jft Da Mel .18b 15 55 10 10 4- ft 

Xft DorlKr s 156 4J II 1283 35ft 34ft 3516 + 14 

74 31 DataGn 17 450 38ft 37ft Xft +lft 

.5J? 1 5?!?" 396 5ft 5ft 5ft— ft 

12ft 8ft DtaDae J4 27 10 X Bft Bft Bft 

X 14ft Doyen J4 IJ 10 IX Xft X 20ft + ft 

«ft mk DavtHd .74 1.9 16 978 39ft 38ft 38ft— ft 

Xft 13ft DarlPL 250 115 8 194 18ft 17ft IBM + ft 

M 48 DPLpf 7J8 I2J 702- ta 60 W. — 1 
40ft 24ft DeanFd Si U IB X 37ft 37ft 37ft— ft 

33ft 26 Deere in 33 42 llio 28ft Xft 38ft + ft 

26ft 19ft DelmP 1.92 75 9 77 24ft 24ft 2414 

raft 31ft DellaAr 150 21 7 1404 47ft 47ft 47ft— ft 


lift G leasC 97 12ft 12ft 12ft— ft 

7 GlenFd 5 347 13ft 12ft 13 +16 

lft GtoblM .121 257 2ft 214 2ft 

5ft GtobMPf 1751 X 6ft 4ft 4ft 

8ft GUNiiD IS 584 10 9ft 10 + ft 

lft GMNwt 132 2ft 2 2ft + ft 

13ft GWWF JO 5 7 159 34ft 34ft 34ft + ft 

35 24ft Gdrlch 136 45 1397 32ft 32 3216 

Xft Xft Gaeayr 140 M I 1298 28ft 27ft 27ft— ft 

1816 14ft GorfflU SI 37 19 19 16 16 16 — ft 

31ft 19 Gatrid 58 25 878 Xft X Xft + ft 


1816 Mft GorfflU 53 33 >9 19 16 16 T6 — ft 

31ft 19 Gauid 50 25 878 Xft X Xft + ft 

45 Xft Grace 2X 45 12 222 43U 42*6 42* — 16 

Mft Xft Bransrs 58 27 13 182 30ft 30ft 30ft + 16 

21ft 8ft GtAFgf J8 25 8 3S 17V6 17 17ft + ft 
TSft 14ft GIAtPe 7 IX 1416 16 16 — ft 


27ft lift Limflds .16 A 31 612 25ft 24ft 24ft 
Xft 30ft LlncNFt 154 4J 1! 197 42ft 41ft 41ft— ft 

23ft 18ft UncPI 2J4a 95 2 23ft 22ft 22ft— ft 

X 41ft utlan 250e 25 12 202 79ft 79ft 79ft + ft 

SI 39ft Lockhd TDe 1 J 9 884 53ft 52ft £E + ft 

4316 27 Locflle X 24 14 71 30ft 29ft Xft +1 

34ft Xft Loews s I50a 20 10 732 50 49* Xft— ft 

38ft 23ft Logical JO A 18 132 33ft S3 2ft— 2 

Xft 26ft Lorn Fin 15 41 11 m 14 Xft 34 + u 

28ft 1016 LomMt s 244 95 IT 228 27ft Mft 27 —ft 

4ft 2 LanMwt 117 3ft 3ft 3ft— ft 

27ft 2116 LnStar 150 7J 5 43 Xft Xft 26 Vt ft 

CTk 44 LoneSof 5J7 1(M 12 lift lift “ft- ft 

9ft 5ft LILCo 2 8SS 8ft 8ft 8ft + ft 

2? 1 7ft LILpfE 700z 28ft 27 77 1 ifi 


Xft 241% PcLum IJ0 43 18 
10 5ft PacRea 5Se A 12 
19ft Uft PocRspf 250 107 
17ft 12ft PdcScI JO 35 10 
82ft 6116 PncTeie 572 77 9 
IS 9ft Poe Tin JO 25 8 

31 H Xft PocHcp 232 75 B 
36 29ft PocHpf 457 121 


43ft Xft PohiWb 50 17 19 960 31ft Xft 21ft +Uk 


181% 14ft GIAtPe 7 

56ft 29ft GtLkln 150 IS 11 

21ft IS GNInt 155elOJ 

41ft 31ft GINNk 1J3 45 12 

29ft 191% GIWRln in 35 8 

X 13 GMP 173 9.1 9 

29ft 22ft Groan T 7 

30ft SBa Greyti 1J2 45 10 

6ft 2ft Groiler 9 

Uft 9 GrowQs JO 28 16 


12ft 6ft GrutiEI 


J8 28 8 3S 1716 17 171% + 1% 

7 IX Uft 16 14—1% 

in 15 11 2 51ft 5IV% 51ft + ft 

IJBelOJ 3 17ft 17ft 17ft 

1J3 45 12 837 38ft 37ft X — ft 

150 35 0 22X 2ift 25ft 26 — ft 

173 9.1 9 16 19 18ft 19 + ft 

7 17 36Vj Xft 26ft — 1% 

1-33 45 10 SgJbc29ft Xft 29 +ft 
9 490 5ft 5ft 5ft— Vk 

JO 28 16 X 11 10ft 10ft 


51 281% LILpfJ 

52 39 LILptK 
29ft lift LILpfX 
32ft lift LILpfW 
231% lift LILpfV 
Xft 141% LfLpfU 
21ft 1116 LIL PIT 
14ft 9ft LILPfP 
19ft 916 LIL pfO 


5 43 Xft Xft Xft— ft 

2 ASS 8 P+8 

700z 28n 27 27 —1ft 

200Z 491% 491% 49ft— ft 
4001 * 50 X —fl 

11 Z1 20ft 20ft 

8 21ft 21ft 21ft— 16 

9 21ft 21 21ft 
X 25ft 251% 2» 
si 20w aa aoft 

7 ISft Uft 15ft 
, 4 12S Eft 17ft + ft 


Mft 24ft PdnWpflS 73 
39 33ft PcrimBc 1J0 3J X 
40ft 2016 PonABk JO 15 11 
Bft 4 PonAm 
4 1ft PonAwt 
21 13ft Pondckn JO IJ 33 


627 28ft a 28ft + ft 
14 34ft Mft 34ft 
60* 38*4 38ft 38ft 
9550 Oft 7ft 7ft— ft 
472 3ft 3Vk 31% — ft 
47 14*4 14ft 14ft + ft 


49ft 381% Soudwn 
35 24 ScelBk 

10 6ft SoetPS 
raft 20 SCalEd 

23 ft 14 SouftiCo 

26ft 18ft SoInGsa 


21 12*6 I2ft IJ* 
71 18 17ft 18 


Bft 7ft 7ft— ft I 44 30ft SNETI 
3ft 31% 31%— ft 2716 22Vb ScRyPt 


411% 32ft PonhEC 2X 65 11 640 M 34ft 35 + 16 I 391% «ft Soutlnd 


8 3ft PontPr 
19ft 13ft Pgprcfl J0I 
IBM 9VB Pordyn 
2TJ% lift PorkEI 
Bft 4ft PorkDrl .16 32 
39V% a 16 PortcH 1.12 3J 


32 960 7*6 71% 7Jk— 16 16ft 1116 SoRoy 

Jtn 15 114 1916 191% 19ft— Vk 8*4 616 Soumrk 
343 10 9ft 9ft +16 511% 47 Somkpf 
10 6 13M 13 13 — 1% 31 14ft SwAIrl 

.16 32 344 51% 4ft 3 + ft 18ft lift SwtFor 

1.12 33 11 424 34ft 33ft 34 +1% 18ft 10*6 SwtGoa 124 75 


31M lft Lonoos 72 28 13 235 25ft 23ft 25ft + M 


141% PorkPn J2I 25 49 268 20ft 2016 2016— Hi 88ft 62ft 5wBeil 650 7J 


37U. Xft Loral 52 U 19 694 35ft 34ft 35ft + ft 

» 10ft LoGail 57 « 10 14 121% 12 12—2 

X 26ft La Land in 31 10 262 3216 311% Xft + ft 

»ft ink LoPac 50b 42 42 667 19ft 191% 19ft 
Xft 2» La PL pf 450 175 IX 2Bft 24ft 27 —lft 

25ft 17ft La PL of 316 145 203 20ft 19 19ft— lft 

Xft Uft LouvGa 2J4 05 8 464 »k Xft 28ft + ft I 

58. 37*6 Lows) 250 3J 9 24 Xft 56ft 5616 t £ 


Bft 4ft Deltona 


IS 8ft 8ft n% 


<»4ft 23ft DUCKS ISM 37 IB IX 3916 38ft 391% 

28ft 21ft DeilMfS 120 45 13 273 25ft 25M 25ft— ft 

raft 29ft DeSoto 1J0 43 10 11 33*6 Mft 33ft— 16 

17ft 131k Del Ed 15B 102 7 518 Uft 161% 16ft + ft 

50 40 DetEpt 952 12J 1002 741% 74ft 74ft— ft 


Mft 48*6 DetEPf 736 117 
Xft 2116 DEpfF 275 105 
2nk 21ft DEprR 324 131 
27*6 BUft DEpfQ 313 125 
27ft 20ft DE DfP 312 115 
25ft 21 OEpfB 275 IDS 
Xft 22ft DEpfO 340 122 
Xft 22ft DE pfM 3J2 122 
33ft X DE PTL 450 127 
tt*k 27ft DEpfK 4.12 125 
116ft 1021% DEpfJ 1558 135 
20ft 15 Dale pr 228 11.1 
X 18ft Dexter 50 37 11 
Uft 10ft DIGtor 54 43 
21 15ft DlamS 176 I0J 
38ft 34ft Dtash pf 450 109 
II 6ft DhmaCp X 31 3 


11 33*6 Mft 33ft— 16 

518 Uft 161% 161% + ft 
1002 74ft 741% 74ft— ft 
300Z 63 6216 63 + ft 

37 25ft 25*6 2Sft + *6 
2 26ft 36*6 JAM — 16 

12 X X X — *6 

103 Xft 2516 MM + 1% 

81 251% 25 251% + ft 

10 77ft 27*6 27ft— 16 

U Xft 27ft 2796— *6 
17 31ft 31*6 31*6 

22 32ft 32ft 32ft + M 

2 114 114 114 —1 

30 20ft 2016 20*6 + ft 
35 21ft 2116 21ft— M 
85 1516 151% ISM 

1933 17 16*6 17 + M 

3 34*6 Mft 36*6 + ft 

2 9ft 9*6 9*6 + ft | 


33M Mft Grumn 150 31 9 

27ft 24ft Grom pf 250 107 
7ft 4ft Gruntnl .16 30 48 
27*6 30 Gut If rd 58 27 11 

42 26*6 GHWet .90 33 13 


515 245 9ft 91% 9* + M 


19*6 lift GulfRj 25 

24ft 161% Gulf R pf LX 6J 


in 31 9 596 37ft X 32ft — 16 

LSS 107 14 26*% Xft Xft— M 

.14 35 48 41 516 Slk 5ft 

58 27 II 140 2516 25 25ft + 16 

.90 22 13 1209 40ft 40ft 40ft + 16 


2V% lft PatPtrf 
16*6 lift PayNP 


102 2*6 2M 2ft 

73 13ft 13 13 — ft 


746 15ft 14M 15 
1 21ft 21ft 71ft — 1% 


GltStUt 154 131 6 2890 13ft 13U. 13ft— 16 


Xft 381% GltSU Pf 4J0 115 
Mft 41 GHSlf pf 6J8elU 
32*6 M GltSU pr 355 132 
35ft 27*6 GHSU Pr 440 115 


1001 40 40 40 + *6 

292 Mft 9ZW 54ft +lft 

17 291% Xft 2916— 16 

51 33 329k 32M— 16 

91 171% T6*k 17*6 + *6 


MM 25ft La PL pf 450 175 IX 28*6 24*6 27 —19k 

25*k 17*6 La PL of 316 145 203 20ft 19 ink— lft 

raw Mft LouvGa 344 05 8 464 »6 »M 2 ft + 5 

58 37*6 LowEt 250 3J V 24 56ft 56*6 54*6 + ft 

31ft 1916 Lowes 54 75 IS 129 MM Mft 2ft- {? 

HJk 1996 Lubrrd 1.14 14 13 124 21*6 21*6 lift " 

Mft 24*6 Lubys 50 17 23 40 34 J5W Mft- ft 

23<A 16ft LuckvS 1.16 33 11 410 2216 21*6 22 ” 

16 10*6 Lukeria JB 33 15 M 14ft 14*6 14*% + ft 


16*6 lift PayNP 54 4.9 13 73 1316 13 13 — M 

23*6 14 PgyOdi M 15 14 1292k 141% ISM 16 — 16 

"m ‘sssr - 14,38 "S T0 £ ,D & 


39 1996 SwEnr 32 1.9 II » Z7M raw 4«a 

26*6 18*6 SwtPS 158 85 9 197 M 23ft OT%— M 

17*6 111% Soarlon J2 35359 17S 14** 1» 1« + « 

27*6 15ft SaaetP 75 21*6 2S4k 211A + *% 

» 34*6 Sperry 1.92 37 911494 51M 49 MM +M6 

X Xft Springs 152 4J 13 9 33*6 33*6 M96 

4346 351% SqinO 154 45 10 284 OT6 37*6 raft + *6 

72ft 45 Saulbb 176 25 18 CTW 68 - ft 

23ft 17*6 Staley 50 38 22 444 2DM 20W 20ft 

23ft 17*6 SiePRt J6 35 12 143 22*6 32Vl ^ft— ft 


„ ,374 41ft 

30 77 141% 14 14*6 — 1% 

W 2 25*6 2516 25J6 

53 8ft 8*6 8ft 

10 703 64*% 45ft 44ft— *6 

17 18 72ft 71ft. » 

13 91 37ft 3M6 Tgk + *6 

is 76 i5i% ig* ig* * ?? 

8 919x32ft 32«6 Mft— ft 

12 238 15*6 15*% -15*6 

23 J S£ 2* * 

42 32ft *. 5 

J 22ft 22ft 22ft + M 

12 4 27ft raft raw + *6 

9 60 39*6 39ft 391% 

10 78 31W 31ft + ft 

40 7 6*6 4ft 6ft 

8 1077 35 M*6 34ft— *% 

6 19542 20*6 X 28ft— ft 

fra 23ft 23ft 23fk + ft 

11 M «ft 40*6 40*4 — ft 

11 Xft X 26ft + » 

39x soft a a + ft 

9 14^ Mft Mft Mft + M 
U 400 T3W 13ft 13ft— ft 

6 917 8*6 .Bft BW + *% 

2 49ft 49ft 49ft 

19 333 28ft 27*% 28*6— *% 

12ft 12 12ft 

8 74 18 17*6 17*.— ft 

0 704 02ft 81*6 82 

II a raft raft raft • 

9 197 M 231% 231%— *6 


f 0 U'< 


IMPORTED 

5-.# “ 


* N 


25? i£? SMS 0 * M 13 30 335 nn 19H 19*6 — 14 


3SV4 35ft DiebMl 150 25 11 315 35*6 34ft 34ft— ft 


’S* 55?* Dw,a, — 14 2879 101*6 99*6 1011% +1* 

.95 5346 Disney 1 JO IJ 40 444 09 80 8816 — 14 

»ft 15 DEIS 1 JO 57 3 47 24*k 34ft 24*6- 14 

f£ S'y 7 * 1 ' 1 3 69 5*6 51% 5(6 + M 

1!?* S""!? 12 6U 9ft 9ft 9*6 

172 M 9 3398*30*6. 29ft 30M 
21M 16ft Donald 56 35 9 IX 181% 1814 10V% + ft 

-61ft 42ft Dontey 1.16 2J 15 1166 53ft 53 53ft— ft 

•K? S^ 1 Dorsey >■» 4.1 12 31 29 20ft X + ft 

IS? P9W .58 24 u 114 37ft 36W 37 — ft 

JTft 26ft DowOi 150 55 14 XOB 35*4 35*6 35*6 

S,, ^ SSf Jn ■ 7B ,£ 21 118 43ft 43ft 43ft + ft 

1 5% 11 Drava JO 19 48 12ft 12*6 12*6 

?? SIPC _n 35 19 1522 22*6 21*4 22 + *6 

211% 1 5ft DrnB - — * 


Mft 21*6 HallFB 150 3J 68 30ft 30*% 30*4 — M 

3316 Xft Holhtn 150 63 12 5168 29ft 20ft 39 — ft 

lft *6 Halhnd 5B 58 17 513 lft lft lft 

Uft 5*4 Halwdpr J6 5J 23 10ft 10U. 10*% + ft 

42ft 26ft HamPs IX 14 14 023 41 39ft 39*4—1*4 

15ft 12 HanJS IJTblOLl 64 141% 14*4 14ft + M 

21ft 16*6 HanJI 154a 95 90 20ft Xft 28*6— ft 

X 161% Handle J6 Z0 12 540 28 19*6 20 — ft 

20ft 16 HandH 56 JJ 22 62 30 19W 30 + ft 

21*6 16*6 Hama JO 2.1 M 12 18ft I Bft 18ft + 1% 


6914 Xft MCA 58 IJ 

24ft 19*4 MCorp | JO 6J 

3W% M MCor pf J50 95 

14*6 8*6 MDC J3 2J 

X 26*4 MDU 272 7.9 

42ft 34 MEI JO IJ 


IJ X 1051 67 64*6 65*6— lft 

H 7 14 22 21ft 21ft— ft 

95 13 38*6 38*4 38*4— ft 

M 11 197 13ft U 13ft + ft 

?! .! « J 4 * M*% Mft 

1 J 15 17 39ft 39*6 39*6— ft 


H 39 453 17ft 16ft 17ft + ft 


13ft 9*6 MGMGr pf44 3J 


XU 18 MGMUa J0e 
lift 2ft MGMu wl 
Bft 7ft ML Caw n 
lift lift ML Inc n 
MW 14W MB LI O 7Bt 


3 Uft 13ft 13ft 

2456 2Sft 35 35 — U 

193 10U 9ft 10 — S 

37 7ft 7*6 7ft— *% 

203 Uft 11*6 11*6 

4 15ft 15 15*% + *% 


lft ft Penao W W % ft 59 34ft Sperry 

SBft 43*6 PenCen 12 260 52 51*6 51*6— ft X 30ft SprEnoi 

5516 44ft Penney 236 45 9 783 4St% 47ft 48W — *4 4346 35ft SquarC 

27ft 2214 PoPL 2J6 95 9 452 XM 2Sft X +U 72ft 45 Sq ui bb 

40*% 31 Pa PL pf 4J0 115 UOz X X X — ft 23ft 17*6 Staley 

Xft 24M PaPLdpr3J2 117 0 29 MX 29ft + 16 23ft 17*6 SIGPnt 

271% Z1U PaPLdpr25» 11J 2 X 76 26 — U X 11 SIMotr 32 2 A 

77*4 x PaPLpr 5MI 115 10* 71 71 71 —1 50*6 39ft SWOOft 250 6.1 

28ft 23ft PaPLdpr375 115 10 25 28 20 — U 23ft 9ft SfPOcCs JO 25 

3114 2S*4 PaPLd»r37S 1Z1 12 30*6 304 30ft + 14 16*4 12*4 Skmde! 

91ft 71 PaPLpf 9J4 102 10z 90ft 90ft 90ft + U 31ft 23ft StanWli 

IX 81*4 PaPLprUJO IU UOz 98 98 98 35U Xft Starred 

411% M Ptmwft 2J0 55 12 SO 38ft 37*6 X — ft lift 9 StdMSe 

2516 30 Penwpf 150 67 13 23ft 23W 2314 — 14 3ft 2ft StOODO 

50 28ft Permeel 220 45 20 274x47ft 47*u 471% + M " 

18ft 101% PeapEn 1J0 7J 7 99 161% 16*4 16ft 

24ft 1416 Pepfive » 77 23ft 23 23ft + 1% 

«H% 39ft PepelCa 178 11 11 1246 SBft 58 50V6— W 

30ft 21ft Perk El J6 2.1 13 5« Xft X Xft + *4 

9*6 7ft Prmlan 53elOS 6 331* 8 7ft 7ft — M 
24W 16M PervDr J8 IJ 16 193 23*6 23ft 23*6— U 
151% 10*6 PeryDwl 11 15*6 15*6 15*6 


J2 35 359 179 14*6 13*6 1*16 + U 

75 21*4 20ft 21 U + ft 


ENGLISH OASSiC; 

PRESTIGIOUS; EACH A SIGNATURE PIECE 


16*4 12*6 Stondex J2 45 10 


74 12*4 12 13U + U 

789 46*6 45*6 46U + M 

331 17 U 16*6— ft 

47 13*6 13M 1?M .. 


12 Marti) 

High Law Slock 


Sis. - .date 
la&Hifl&Low PocLanw 


31ft 23ft StanWk .W 37 IT 160 TVft 2W6 — M 


ss WiSr in » stoats 

sssrmssss^. 

30ft 22*4 UllluPf 450 1U 9 SOW XM 30ft— W 

Ulllu pf 190 1M . 14 143% MH 141% • 

_ K» Unlllnd 51 5 9 X M_ M — ft 

431% 35*4 unitlm 72 J 27 12 «ft 42ft 42*6—16 

47 X*% UJerBk 1J6JJ10 + 

Uft 11V% UMMM 11 • x ir 14 ;T+ ft ’ 

3 2 UPkMn 1 3 2ft 2*6 -3ft 

381% 26ft UsalrG .M * ? X4 »H .33*4 33fe + *6 

816 5*6 USHom 570 . 4ft 646 6*6— *4 

421% 32ft USLeoa 50 ZJ 10 2 Mft 34ft 34ft— ft 

40*4 24*4 US5hoe 56 25 13 1489 35 34 , 3414 — *6 

31*4 22 W USSfmf 170 3.9 19 T047 Xft. 30ft 3016 
54*6 49*6 USStlpf AJOIeKU XT 5S*b 55W 55*4 + 16. 

142*6 115ft USSHpr 1275 95 110 137 13356 13614 —1 

31*6 Xft USStlpf 275 7J 143 TOW 30M 30ft 

39ft 32*6 USToto 172 49 12 .168 35*k 35M 35*4 


» 77 23V. 33 231% + *% 

11 11 1246 SBft 5S 58ft— W 

2.1 13 540 MW X XW + U 
0J 6 331* 8 7ft 7ft — W 

IJ 16 193 23ft 23ft 23*6— *4 

11 15ft 15*6 15*4 


35*4 Xft StorreH 158 11 10 
lift 9 StdMSe lJOoiu 
3ft 2ft steeoo .12 35 
XU 15 S Urdu 76 19 10 
12*4 9ft Slrl Ben 76 63 9 


26 35ft 95 35U + U 

so* saa I0ft 10*. 

10 3U 3ft 3ft— ft 
1 19*6 19*6 19*6 

5 lift lift lift + ft 


3414 24ft SterlDo 170 45 12 B6 30*6 Xft Xft + ft 


23ft 15*4 StevnJ IX 55 13 
M X StwWm 150 6J 17 

12 9 StkVC pf 150 B7 

45ft 37*6 Stonew 1 JO 17 9 


M 2116 J1U 21*4 — *4 

30 26ft 26*6 Xft— *6 

Xz 11*% 11 11*% 

3 43 42*6 43 +*% 


30ft 221% UIHUPf 37? 1M 

18*% 12 Ulllupr JJD 12.1 . 

30ft 22*4 Ulllu pf 450 1U 

1416 10ft Ulllu pf 190 1M 

35 15ft Urdflnd JO- U 9 

43*6 35*4 Unillnn 33 J 37 

47 Xft UJerBk 1J6 03 ID 


68ft 33*4 HarBrJ in IJ 17 498 61ft 611% 61*% + ft 


21W ISW DraxB 250 IDS 7 19U 19 19 — ft I 

“S 32. 2'E*? ,c 13 ia sme 57*6 5w* + *6 ; 

61ft 46*6 duPant 150 SJ 14 1380 57U 56ft 56ft— ft I 

40 31U duPntPf 150 9J 1 37*% 37ft 37ft 


40 31U duPntPf ISO 93 

.50 39ft duPntpf 450 97 
.3 5ft 25W DukeP 2J0 BJ 
,85ft 60 Dukepf 870 115 
77 60*4 Dukepf 750 115 


.ra raw Dukepf 269 105 
,35ft 29U Dukepf 355 11J 
in 951% Dukepf 1150 10J 
00ft 65 Dukepf 878 117 


1 37ft 37ft 37ft 

1 46U 44U 46U — U 

331 32 31ft 31ft— Vk 

250* 79W 79ft 79*6— ft 

4400Z72U 71 71 

4 25*6 25ft 251% — ft 
16 MW 33ft 34ft + ft 
18002105ft 1 0G*fe 105*6 
1001 74 74 74 +lft 


Xft 21ft HvtndS J6 1.7 X 77 32W 32ft 3ZV% + ft 

1X6 7ft Ham I3I1 24 1M 11*6 Uft lift— ft 

2Mji 24*6 KampfBSJO I3J 4x 25ft 24*6 X +U 

w* Xft HampfC213 7 J « 28ft 2B*4 28*6 — ft 

331% 19ft HrpRw 50 27 13 13 29*6 29<A 39*6 

M Xft Harrl e 58 3J 13 690 Xft 25*4 25*4 

18*6 10*6 HarGrn . B 9 15 14ft 14ft— ft 

30*4 21*6 Hanco 1JB 45 10 125 29 28*6 28ft— *4 

39*6 24ft Mortrmt 17B 35 10 331 33ft 33ft 33ft + U 

Uft 14 HalfSe 150 107 II 4 16ft Uft lift- ft 

2S*h 16*% HuwEI 1J4 79 9 IX 21ft 20fk 20*6— *4 

13ft 9*4 HaveiA 70e 35 8 63 10 9H 9ft— ft 

144k 22ft HazJetn JO 1 j 16 11 27ft 27*4 27ft + ft 

13ft 9ft HazLafa 72 25 19 31 13ft 12ft 12ft- ft 

& 13*4 HlfhAni X 409 22ft 21ft 22*4 - ft 

222 ?L.H! C £ Pn ■■ 31 21W «« 21ft— ft 

22*% 10ft HlfUSA 90 16 15V6 Uft— 1% 

15ft 10U Hacks 78 11 37 lift Uft Uft- U 

70 1.1 712 17ft 17ft 17ft 

-48 26 12 372 18ft 1B*4 10*4- ft 
JO IJ 13 21 35ft 25 25*4 + *4 

1J0 29 14 701 55 54ft 54ft— ft 

17 X 17ft 17U 17*4 + ft 


3W4 Uft Mocmls .55 1.9 17 387 30ft 2»ft 29ft— ft 
5514 381% MOCV 1.16 25 M 663 46ft 46 46 


15ft 10W Kecks 78 11 

18*4 13*6 HecklM 70 1.1 

23ft 14*6 Heltmn JB 26 

30*6 16ft Hellig jo u 

56*6 37ft Heinz 160 29 

X 12*4 HebiflC 

24ft 18 HelmP 36 19 


10 lift Mad Res 
46ft 29ft MaolCf in 2J 
29*4 1*6 MgtAet IS50C 

19ft 12ft Manhln 50b 23 
21ft 12ft ManhNt 32 13 
29ft 14ft ManrCs .16 A 
42*6 25V% MlrHan 370 8J 
S6W 44WMfrHpf 6J0B125 
52ft 41 MfrHpf 57X11 J 
Bft 5ft vIManvl 
25ft 17U vIMnvIpf 
38ft 23*6 MARCO in 27 
5 3 Mamiz 

2ft Vi Morale 
381% 23ft MarMW in 57 
53*4 42 MarM pf 5J4e 95 


82 11*4 lift 11*6— ft 

8 9B 43ft 43*4 43ft— ft 

273 2W 2ft 3ft 

X 13*6 Uft 13*6 + ft 

« T9 TMi 13*% 13ft + *4 

a 207 2SW X 2Sft -H*k 

5 272 371% 37*4 37ft + ft 

519 541% 5414 54*4— *6 , 
5 49*4 49*6 49*6 + ft ■ 
3 874 6*6 5*6 5ft— *6 

47 18*6 IBM 10ft— ft 

9 137 36W 36*6 36*6— U 

36 3*6 3ft 3*6 + 1% 

IX ft % ft + ft 

7 63 31ft 31*6 Xft + ft 

3 53*4 S3W 53*4 + ft 


44 31 Petrie in 39 14 277 Xft 35*4 35ft — ft | 51ft 36ft StonSbp 1.10 25 

2B*k 24*k FatRs 37X147 X XU 25ft Xft + *6 

17 14 PetRapf 1J7 9J 24 16*6 16*% 16ft— *6 

6 2*4 -frfnv 9Se»7 27 3U 3U 3U — ft 

S3*4 33ft Pfizer 1 J8 3.1 14 2879 471% 46*6 47ft— 46 

24 12ft Pheloo 347 20*4 20*6 20ft + ft 

25 Phelopr sn 95 40 S1U 50*4 51U— W 

44*6 M Pit tors J4 IJ 21 X15 39W 38*6 39*6 + ft 

16ft Tift PKIklEI UO 14J 6 1450 15*6 15ft 15U 


JO 2J) 14 265 30ft 301% Mft— *6 


74x38*6 MU 38*4 + ft 


X XU 25ft Xft + *6 I 71*6 16ft StorEn 192 9.9 U IX I£% 19*4 19ft— ft 


Mft 25*4 PftllE pf 4J0 125 

37ft 26*6 Phi IE Pf 4AB 137 

6716 52*4 PhllEpf &75 116 

lift 9U PhllEpf 1J1 135 

10ft 7*6 PWIE pf 173 135 

60*6 46 Phi IE Of 7J5 13J 
1DU 7*6 Phi IE Pi TJ8 135 
IX 100ft Phllpf 17.12 145 
79 61 PhilE pf 9 J2 126 

74 54ft PhllEpf 9J0 136 

601% 47 PhllEpf 750 112 

Ml 46ft PhllEpf 775 117 

23*4 15W PlUISub 1-32 67 13 


1001 34ft 34 34ft + 1% 

Mr 35ft 35ft 351% 

120(65 641% 64I%—1 

62 11 10ft 10*k 

121 10*6 I0U 10*4 — ft 


12ft 2 vlStorT 
08ft 30*6 Storar JO J 

21*6 17*% StrtMln 5X 46 

19ft Uft StrFdRf 50 4J 41 

7ft 3*6 SuavSh 
39 XU SunOl JO IJ 11 
12ft 6*6 Sun El 
52ft 43ft SunCo 2J0 4.9 10 

106W 90ft SunCPf US 23 

49*% 40 SundBtr in 19 12 

Uft 6U SunMn 
7*6 7 SunMpf 1.19 I5J 


20z 59ft 59ft 59ft + ft 38*6 32*6 SunTrst 


54 1DU 9*6 9*6 
158x122 122 122 +lft 

110176*% 751% 75ft— ft 
150z 7014 7D 70 , 

21 Oz 59 SBft 59 + ft 

2Q( Mft Sift 561%— 1 I 
49 21U 204k 21U + ft 


1493 2W 2ft 2U + ft 

JO J 90 86* B6*k 86*4 + W 

5X 4J 33 18U 18 18 — U 

50 4J 41 61x1016 18 1 Bft — ft 

88 54* 5*k 5*k 

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64 TOU 10ft 10ft 

2J0 4.9 10 244 47ft 47ft 47*6 + ft 

235 23 2 981% 96ft 98ft + ft 

in 3.9 12 44 46W 46 46 — 4* 

421 7 6*6 6*% + ft 

1.19 I5J 133 7*6 7*k 7*6 

- XI 344b 33*6 34ft +1 

& 547X 19*4 19 19*4 + 66 

J8 1.1 13 269 43*6 43ft 43*4 + U 

50 65 23 22 15ft 15ft 15ft— ft 

in S3 72 160 1* 1BU 19 +46 

2J0 75 S 34*4 34*4 XU + U 


Uft lift UMMM 11 

3 2 UPkMn 1 

38ft X*fc UsalrG .12 J 7 
B*k 5*6 USHom 
42ft 32*6 USLeoa 50 ZJ 10 
40*6 XU USShoe 56 25 13 


84*6 60 USWest 5J2 7J 8.1023 78ft 77*4 3H4 + ft 
13 6*6 UnStck 18 2. 7U 714 7W . 


SW 18 Marions JB 5 ra 356 35ft 34*6 34*6— ft 


125 ,2? 1 Mar1tC 32 U 13 10ft TO 101% 

.J2 V!l ^ ,JB 7J 14 14 '* 

160 X Marrlot J4 J 17 202 96ft Mft 96ft— ft 

««% MrshM M U II 16 7TW 70ft 71» + ft 


15 27 530 19ft 18ft 19ft + ft 


83 W 57*6 DunBrd 270 25 21 390 77*4 75W 77U +1(4 
'TW 13ft DoqLI 256 121 » 3412 17U U 17 - * 
18ft 15*6 DlMpfA 2.10 UJ 600z I8W 1RW im» + W 


44ft 23ft MarfMs 150 25 1163 39U 39*6 39ft 

14 8*6 MarvK 561 X 1112 12ft 12*6 12*6— U 

K*** 0 56 77 16 601 raw raw 33 — ft 


S. hl Mr 4J 10 2766 B2ft 8U% 81ft 

*5*6 13*6 Phi to In JO 2J 13 143 24*6 23*6 23*6— U 

'8*6 UU PhllPta 150 8.1 8 3940 12*6 12ft 12*6 + U 

225 55!? , . pf UMe 43 3713 24ft 24*4 24*6 + ft 

22? jo u 12 29s 2*w x xu +iu 

5 .9 9 243 33ft 331% 32*4 

Su ^*6 SS?P 232 7J 9 30 31 31 


22 14*4 SuprVofuS 547X1916 19 19ft + *% 

48*6 Xft SupMkt J8 1.1 13 269 43*4 43ft 43*4 + U 

17W 14% Swank 50 65 23 ra 15ft lift 15ft— ft 

21ft Uft Sybron 158 5L7 12 160 1* 18U 19 +46 

35*4 3Qft Svbmpf 240 75 S 34U 34*4 XU + U 

Uft llft-SymsCp 17 225 12ft 12*6 12ft + U 

45*k 41ft Syntex 152 33 14 264 59*6 59Vk 59*% + 1% 

40ft 30*6 Sysco 36 9 16 188 38*6 38 38 — Vk 


45 M UnTocti I JO 3J 10 4H7 4014 3Vft-39ft — U 

39U 31*4 UTchpf 2 55 73 200 Mk 34*6 J5*k + ft 

25 10*6 Uni Tel 152 55- 9 577 raft 22ft 22ft + U 

31 23 UMTasf 150 55 8 27ft 27*6 27*6 + U 

21 15*4 UWR 138 69 12 36 18*6 T8U * 1SMT 

33ft 21 Unftrde JO 5 18 13 : 23*4 23U 23*6 + ft 

20ft I5U Unlvor 50 43 7 14 Wft 19*6 19U— *4 

20 2146 UnhfFd 1.12 +5 9 13 25ft 25Vk 25U 

23ft 17ft UnLeof 150 4J * 555 23 22ft 23 + 4% 

53 26*% UnoEnf 1J0 +1 ■ 2291 29Vk 28*4 29 + Vk. 

122ft 52 Upfahn 2J6 24 20 990 1071% 103ft TM '. —3*6 
43 26*6 USD FE 154 25 10 190 371% 36*4 37W + ft 


101% 84% IttHeFd 150aKL7 . 95 TOU TOW Mft 
2Mk 20ft UtaPt. 2J2 - 93 *3- *18 25*6 -» 25ft 


154e 43 3713 36(6 2fU 24*6 + ft 

JO IJ 12 295 26ft 35 XU +1U 

■2B .9 9 243 32ft 321% 22*4 

232 73 , S® 31 3046 31 


16 IX 24*6 X 


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5616 36ft Plbtary 1J6 35 12 174 51ft 51*% 51ft— *6 


19ft 10ft HerttC S 541 


10W 15*6 DlMpfA 2.10 1TJ 

171% 12ft Duapf 250 125 

•18 13ft DuqprK 210 115 

20*4 14*% Duapr 2J1 11.9 

25ft ra Duapr 2 75 UJ 

uw BW DvcoPt jo 41 12 
Xft 20*6 DynAm jo .9 II 


600z IBft 1B*% 18ft + ft 
2«z 16ft 16 16ft- V6 

30 17(6 17W 17ft + U 
2650z 19ft 19 17ft + ft 
200z 24(6 24(6 Xft— ft 
21* Uft Uft Mft— ft 
5 23 23 23 — *6 


HertlCpf 1JD 49 


35 278 17ft 17*6 17ft 


161% Hermnn 


41 39ft SOU 30*6 + ft 
77 10ft 1 Bft 18ft + Vk 


4Wfc 30*4 Hartfly 1J0 3J 12 306 43ft 42ft 431% + *% 


41 29 EGG J8 IJ 

17*4 16 EQKn 136 75 
TOi raw E Svst JO 15 
au 20 E OO top 154 45 
20ft 12 Bcaca J4 22 
.12*% 3V% East Air 
. 5 lft EALwtO 


Zft 1% EALwtA 318 246 2ft 2W + ft 

SSj ? 1.10k 14 211% 21*4 2U% + *4 

SJ? 5%. lj<0k 49 Xft 23ft 24 

3314 9*4 EAirpfC 399 32 30*4 32 +1W 

■Mft raw Easter ijo sjiso 439 raw ra + v% 

Mft I3W EaslUn 256 9J B 05 21(6 TIM 21ft— 16 
SOW 41 W EcKadS 2JD 49 13 6336 44(6 44ft 44W + U 

60*4 47k. Eaton IJO 25 7 334 M £5% « I £ 

15*6 I0U Echllns 12 175 13 iw 171X £ 

raft 20 Eckerd 154 3J 14 3612 31 30ft 30W + ft 

™ mp IS5. Br 1 ~ 11 27x32U 31*6 32*4 + W 

iS? IS®. -M IJ U 311 16ft 16U 16ft + 46 


JB IJ 19 141 3646 35*6 36 

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n 15 14 476 27% 27 27*4 — U 

154 450 4423*623 23— W 

J4 22 US 19ft 19ft 19ft + ft 
14 7171 UK) 10ft UU + 16 
227 4% 4M 44b + ft 


10W 5U Hessian 
131% 9 Hestn pf 
4H6 31U HewIPk 5 4 17 
33*6 74 Hexed JO 25 16 

23ft 14W HIShear SO 24 9 
13*% 9U HIVoll .17 IJ 8 
24ft IBM Hltobrd J4 21 14 
73*% 49*6 Hilton 150 20 13 
37*6 27*% Hitachi J»b IJ 10 


53 7 6ft 6ft— W 
1 UM lift 11*% 

A 17 3152 36(6 25*% 36(6 + 4k 


JO 25 16 32 30ft 30(6 30% + ft 

-50 24 9 42 21 SUM 21 +ft 

.17 IJ B 67 12U 12 12U + W 

X 21 14 3S 2546 25% 25% 

150 10 13 178 60*6 59*6 60W + ft I 

J3B 1 J 10 142 28*6 XU 23*4 — ft I 


3*% lft ManvF 
30ft 22 MaaCp 1W 113 
12ft 10 Maslne 1J2 10.9 
65W 51% MatsuE J4r J 
17*6 9*4 Mattel 

13U 646 Mai el wt 

15(6 10*6 Maxam 


642 2*4 2% 2*6 

15 20ft 28*6 28*6 + W 

24xl2U 12 12V% + V% 

9 599 STS 52 Vk 52*6 — 1*6 

17 817 15 14*6 14ft— ft 

ix 11 10ft 10ft 

4 11® 13*6 13 13*6 + 1% 


34 22*6 Pioneer 1J4 5.1 

26*6 13W PI one El .» r “l 


45W 29ft PirnrB 1J0 35 11 610 40 


1M 34(6 X 34ft + U I 
17 15 14*6 IS + *6 I 


MW 36*6 MayDs 158 35 10 330x49ft 49*6 49*6— V6 


13*% 9ft PHtstn 
1646 8(6 PlanRs 
12W 7 Plantm 

13(6 8(6 Playboy 
aft 19*% Pleaev 


686 IT 
JO. TJ 16 IX 16 


39*6 3946— U 
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15*6 1546— ft 


-16b IJ 14 311 lift 10% 11(6 + ft 


£2! E! 0Yfil ® y 13 a 9j% 9 9% + w isu iz% Tndvcff 

S5 ISfi E 1 * 8 ®* -946 4J 14 11 aw 22*% 22*% + % MU 54% Tektnu 

22*6 1X6 POSoPd JO 4J 33 161 14 13(6 14 + (6 SU 2% Tofcom 

mo XU Potarto 150 12120 157 31*6 31 31*4 — ta 302%22BU Tetoyn 

21 1W6 Pondrs JO J 2S 89 1116 lilt 111% X 14% Telrafe 

2U? 32? W™ n 45 7 17ft 17ft 17ft MU 29M Telex 

rau 14(6 Portae JO 15 » 2*5 22% 221% 22W— ft 40ft 294% Tempi n 

21S !££ E?!P e ' W 9J 0 75 19*6 I9(% 19*6 + W 45U 331% TefVKO 

IS* 1 240 ™ 2 24 23ft 23ft— ft 84*6 68 Tencpr 

22 ~° r £ Pl . ,2fl 17 34ft 34 34ft 33*% 20 Tortfyn 

S ESSf' 432 1M 20 33ft 33% 33ft + U IS 9*6 Tewro 

3B% a Poritch 1J4 45 13 16 32*6 32% 32*6 + U 271% 20(6 Tesorp! 

24 M PotmEt 116 75 9 344 31% 30% 30*6— U 40U 32ft Texaco 

Jfi? UJ? Ml +» 'ft2 2001 44 44 44 — 1W 38% 31U TxABc 

JIS SS E 0te ', pf 4JM ta0 100Z40M40M4BW 46ft 30% TexCm 

5^ J© 5™*"' 1 34 15 IB 11 24U 34% XU 3? Xft TexEel 

2L ^ f r mr * 230 51 B X 391% XM 38% + U 34% 35 Texlnd 


£5 J? 4 1-22 25 12 314 51 W 50ft SI + U 

44 HollyS 150 1 J 30 8 73*% 721% 77% — W 

» H«*trD 36 176 11% HW 11% + U 

raw 15% HmFSD 4 183 21% 21 W 2Tft— % 


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63% McSflO 1J4 2J 9 403 79% 79U 7946— W 


33*4 9% EAirpfC 


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18 IB ffmgIFn Ji U 5 4 14% 14% 14% — 


HmeGpfl.lO UJ 


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63*6 46% Honda 


67ft 53% Honwelf U0 U D 662x 62ft 62 


356x99ft SBft » — Vk 


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27 32 

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31W 3Tft + ft 
28 28 
5 5% — W 


»U 42U Moyfg 250 49 11 
31*% Mk McDrpf Z30 9.1 
26ft 20ft McDrpf 2J0 105 
31 21*% McDerl in BJ 

lift 41% McDrl w, 

70 48% McOnl S JO 1 J 14 

87 63% McSflO 154 25 9 

O 37ft McGrH IJO 3J IS 
394% 24% Mclntg 
50 36*4 McKess 2J0 +9 13 

15 9% McLean 18 

4f% 2ft McLeawt 
29ft 22ft McNeil 150 35 8 
44% 32*% Mead IJO XI 9 
24ft ISU Mesrux 34 1.1 13 
30 Xl% Madtm 50 22 14 


75x58 56*k 57*6 — vt 

50 Xft Mft 24% — % 

4 34(6 34% 34(6 

476 22 21U 21% — % 

45 4W 4U 41% + |% 1 


X 14% Telrafe 52 15 

4SU 29% Telex 

40(6 994% Tempi n J4 IJ 


488 43ft 43% 434% 

7 » 29% 291%— *4 


UU McKess 2J0 +9 13 158 48ft 48 48*% + % 
9ft McLean 18 43 11% lift UU— 1% 

2ft McLeawt 22 3 U 3U 356 14 


18ft 1446 EDO 


JDS Si KDSSi n 17 14 299 29ft 28% 29*6 +1 


Xft MftEPGdpfUS 97 34 XU 

2? 2* fES 1- 122 I 3 - 4 20 2BK 

29U 36 EPGpr 3 2B*f 

IS* ’22 i! Tora ,JM * J 17 67x 170 

12 •% Ekw J4 U 10 W, 

5% 2% ElecAS 36 41 <u 

30U 19% Elcbpi n J 30 36 38ft 

11% Etoto 50 SJ 14 95 Uft 

12*6 3*6 Etoclnt 222 3% 

78U 65ft EmrsEl 2J0 X7 13 831 71% 

Mft 8ft Em Rod .947 9J 11 212 1BU 

30% 15% EmryA JO 18 13 197 I7ft 

33% XU Emhart 1 JOb 48 9 271 29 

»% 15% EmpOs 1.74 82 7 19*71% 

S 4 Emppf J7 9J 40fe S 
5ft 4 Emppf SO 9-5 fiOQr 5U 

»» 7ft Eim Pf 97 104 raote 9% 

% EnExc 116 

ra% 2446 EnsICp J2 2J 11 80 26ft 

» ' EntsBus 56 15 13 41 IM 

»ft 17ft Enserch 1J0 65196 2169 23ft 

.Xft 52% Ensch pt 4.15ell2 6000z 50 

*«£ $L. EnsdipflUPelOJ 10 103% 

17 2» Me 29 238 20ft 

2% lft Enures 20 25a 2 

1.3ft 9% Enlera M 12*6 

Mft 'gh EnfexE 2J0elSJ 77 16ft 

gft 17ft Entetln 156 69 U 92 19ft 

® |«f , » I-* 4 24 17 55 33% 

6% 2% Equlmk 540 4% 

gu 12% Eqmk pf 251 118 10 21% 

,m 25% Earn* pf 2 30 

50% 31U Eat Res 1J2 U I n 

I 7 fy? Ewitoc .12 .» 9 in U% 


34 XU 24% 24% — % 
20 20% TO 20 — % 

s.s 2 sr* 

X 28ft 28% 20ft + % 
X Mft 14(6 14% + ft 
222 3% 3% 3ft 


52*6 X% HosnCp JO 15 12 B33 45% 44ft 45ft + U 

*2 2fii tS??!! 1 !. 244 H- 7 M 141 30ft 29ft X + % 

42ft 2Bft HouOhM 56 14 *5 69 39ft 39% 39% 

19% 13*6 HouFab JB 35 10 30 I4ft Mft U% + ft 

39% 28ft Hauslnf 151 S.0 9 314 XU 35% X% + U 

58% 45 Ho In, pf 2JD 47 30 52(6 52% ^6—3% 

Biu 65 Helnlpf 4J5 8.1 18 77U 76% 76% -U 


1 25*6 *jcu 

44% 32% Mea d 1J0 XI 9 1227 38% 38*6 38%— U 

24ft ISU Mesrux 34 1.1 13 235 2ZU 22U 22*4 + ft 

30 X% Madtm n 22 14 IU 36*6 36ft 36ft % 

56% 37% Mellon 268 5.1 8 139 52*6 SZ Sft— ft 

4B% 35U Melvlll 1J4 35 13 179 44% 44 uu 4. ft 1 

sTSi- 51J? 12 10 80x 60% 59% 59ft + *6 

79*6 Merck 3J0 28 U 1203 116% 115U U5U — 1% 

80 47W Menffti in TJ 14 IS 63% 63ft 63% + W 


21 10*4 Pondrs JO J 3S 

21% 15ft PopTal 80 45 

72*6 Mft Portae JO 18 38 

21ft 14*6 PartGE 1.90 9J 0 

Xft 18% PorGpf 260 108 

3Sft 30 PorGpf 440 125 

3446 29 PorGpf 452 125 

X% 28 Potltch 1J4 48 13 

34 22 PohnEI 116 75 9 

46% X% Pot El pf 450 102 

41% 32ft PotElpf 454 105 

25% 10ft Premia 36 IS IB 

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15 2*6 2U 2U 


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^ ^ range end '"« H ™*»8 

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7 10 13 lift lift lift— % 

L7 14 BO 30U 29ft 29ft + % 

J 42 540 ISft 17% 17*6—1% 

12 202 10 17* 18 

J 16 49 18*6 UVb IBU — U 

M 293 1X6 12 12(6 + ft 

353 2% 2% 3ft + % 


"•"»*** onty. Unless otadrirtse 
are rnmuri dtoburiamenft based on 

a — dividend also extra talJl 

b— annual rato of dividend plus stock divldeMyi 

e — Ikwldatfmi dMdend/l 

CM— calledLTl 

d — new yearly low 71 

* — ?, v !?" nd d ° ciar *l *" Pb** 1 to orecedWTO 12 monftii/i 

O— dividend In Canadtanfundkcubiectta 15% aatwMidence 


"GW LOWS 7 

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- 


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9% 3% vlSatant 
35ft Xft SdlltoM 
54 51 SaiIMpf 

21ft 20 SDIeGs 


SaiIMpf 3JX 67 
SDIeGs 124 BJ 


L3 7 3 20ft 20ft 20ft— U 

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. a 6U 6% 4U + u 
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U.S., Swiss OffidalsPlan 

Talks on Better Legal Ties 

iuMtdS^L'iL^'u" 4 S»fs.ofBda|j. kin 








hdd talks m Bern this week 

I— dividend paid bile year, omitted. deferred, or m action COODeralion »ft«- rv>lZ? W6C1C ° h»al 

tekon at tatast dividend meetine. «• "r no aewon wopCTUion After idatlOOS were Stmncd dtmM 

k— dividen d dedcra d or paid mis year, an ■Kmwwift ° va ’ Rh*, a commodiii«; S? 


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25*6 20 SAnttRt T.9* 10 13 74 2S 
35*6 23*6 SPeSoP 100 U |4 2129 33 


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with The start of trading. 

1*8 — naxt day delivery. 
P/E— price ea m lnw ratio. 


39ft SaroLea IJ4 37 II 414 41% 40(6 40*6— ft 


XU XU OcdPpf 270 10J I 33% 23% 23(6 + U 

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57 40*6 OcdPpf 425 11J 13 55% 55% 55% 

113 105*6 OcdPeflSJO 141 70 110% 110 110ft 

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13% 9ft SavEnl 1J8 107 

9ft S Savin 
1316 9ft Savin Of 150 11J 
Xft 19ft 5CANA 2.16 07 9 


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7 10% 18% 18% 

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170 7ft 7% 7ft 
1 13ft 12ft 12% + % 
405 XU X XU 


dock dividend. 

9 — daA spffl. Ohrtdend begins with date o, spIil 

si* — sales. 

t-dMdend pom tad^inpraeedlng TOmonffte.astunoft,, 
cash vat ua on ex-dtvkiend or etpdtotrtautian date. 

newyeortv high, 
v—tradbm halted. 


« — * 




*" iiesobjcaof. 
=1 States' “r-WBion cases m the Unil- 


XM 22ft LAC n 

31 HU LN Ho 2J7e 95 10 

17ft 1 2ft LLE Ry 374(14.9 

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874 8% 8*6 0% 

57 19U 19 TOU 


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31ft OU OhEd pr 192 130 
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73 S3 Often pt 9.12 12J 
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i xft xft Xft 

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5 30(6 X XU +.U. 

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lOOz 72U 73U 72U . 

440B 67 67 67 . 

100ZB6U UU Ufa — 46- 


52ft 33 SchrPle 1J8 17 13 1315 44R6 45U 45ft— 1 v— trading halted. 


11U OftMdtr JO 30 17 m Uft 12*6 13ft + ft, I 
55 DftPpf 801 120 5Qz 67 67 67 +-% \ 


Wt 2016 OfclaGE 200 8J 10 351 23ft 22% 22% 


1 19% 19% 19% +•% f S% 3% Sea Co 


33 raft Scaalnd 76 2J 14 10(9 32 31% 31% + *6 

61% 49(6 SCBtFet .Me IJ 10 729x 58% 55 56U +1 

44% 26(6 ScatfP 1J4 11 18 4» 41 40ft 40*6- U 

16*6 12% Scothri 53 U II 471 14 13% 13% — % 

S HU SeaCM J2 IJ 8 683 33(6 Xft 33% +1U 

10 SaaCtpf 1J6 1I.9 2x 12U «U HU— ft 
Ifflb 12% SeaCptBUO 13J a 1516 15% ISft— ft 

16(6 13ft SeaCPfCITO 111 12 16 15% 16 

27% 17*6 SaaLltd 0 14 I 172 30(6 20% 20*6 + U 


dwthe Bankruptcy Aet.ar gwwHtosomumed by well awH 


40% 40*6— U fad— when dhtributad. 

«a%ssas+,a 

48 15% lift 1S6— ft «— ‘“dhrtdendormwMWs. 


ed States! mtijeUmt- 


comply. 


353 4% 44b 4W 


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36* 28(6 0,01 


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44% 35% Seagnm 00 11 II 1024 38% 38ft 3m 


150 .49 12 123 30ft X 


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19 18 17ft 17 17 — ft 

44 IJ 17 397 30% 30ft 30ft— U 


mw— without warranto. 

V' - “Mhvtctond and galas In IWL 
vW— ytoid. 

*— eatoslniulL 


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AmenraD5 said was tooslw. 







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* M £X orfess p.ia FnrK . 

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Whor rnont^f. 


Hcralb3^ (tribune. 




BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 7 


* 


Page 9 


options 

^“•go Mere, CBOE Move 
loLockUpS&PInde: 


jxes 


% Hj. MAIDENBERG 

N EW Yno/™ yftrfr ^iner Slower 

change annnii^J^? 1 ^ ****, CWcago Mercantile Ex- 
ducc ft““ Wee fc that it planned to intro- 
this fan. S-P° Ji®. of over-the-counter stocks 
showed that it had not irK»^^ n<i " lai ^ esl futurcs again 

Merc plan to trade mr ^ ) ' mive: touch. Not only does the 

industrial stocks, it ak^fi OT Sta ? d f xd * Poor’s index of 250 
Options Exchan 10 hnk with the Chicago Board 

If firiSFR? £*£} Elions market on ihesaSe index, 
ex chang es solid 11 give the two Chicago 

markets on the S&p->sn ^ at P™ 11113 * t0 he extremely successful 
exchSK^d^^?: 2 ? “ de * Stines and options. As it is, both 

’sasfi32“ ^ 

«cond mos< a cS^JS5' S * **'** ^ “ ** 

fut ^ es - Its volume in July „ . : 

1. 1 mdUon contracts, was ex- Melamed sees OTC 
eeetied only by the Chicago ^ , , 

Board of trade’s Treasury- 8tOCks becoming 

contracts. *** at 3.3 million the biggest of 

all equity markets. 

niost active of afl options mar- 

r 5lf’ an average of 400.000 contracts traded each day. In 
22*®® 100 "OP&on5 market has grown so powerful that Wall 
street analysts who once considered it the tail on the Big Board's 
dog now qmp that it frequently moves the entire equities market 
But Leo Melamed, the former chairman of the Chicago Merc 
who pioneered the first foreign-currency, interest-rate and index 
futures on that exchange; believes the over-the-counter equities 
market will continue to be the fastest growing stock market. 

Since 1980, OTC trading has increased 127 percent and now 
averages 75 percent of the Big Board’s daily volume,” he observed 
Jastweek during a visit to New Yoric. He added: “The number of 
OTC stocks has climbed to over 4,000. from 2,900, in this period, 
while the Big Board still has about 1,500 listed issues. Clearly, the 
investors see more potential in OTC stocks than in the more 
mature companies whose shares are traded on the Big Board.” 

M EANWHILE, William J. Brodsky, the Chicago Merc's 
president who also came to New York to brief broker- 
age-house officials on the proposed index futures, said 
he was impressed during a recent tnp through Asia by the strong 
interest shown by financial institutions therein U.S. futures and 
options markets. 

“Many people in and out of our industry complain that the 
proliferation of new futures and options is diluting all but a few 
active markets,” Mr. Brodsky said. “This is not true, because a 
growing percentage of our volume, some 30 percent, now comes 
from abroad. When, the Tokyo financial-futures market opens its 
doors in October, the international hedging and trading will 
increase even more.” 

What also bodes well for the UjS. financial futures and options 
markets, Mr. Brodsky said, was the emergence of China as an 
increasingly important global economic power. 

“Whether China's financial authorities use our markets to 
hedge foreign exchange or dollar instruments or let the Japanese 
act as their brokers, they too will need liquid hedging markets.” 
he said. *Tt is interesting that the first head of a foreign state to 
visit an American futures exchange waa President li pfianman] 
of China, who toured the Chicago Merc on- July 26.” 

For his part, Mr. Melamed says flatly that in five years, Tokyo 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 7) 


U.S. Trade 

Complaint 

Rebutted 

Semiconductor 
Makers Assailed 

By Michael Schrage 
and Sarah Oates 

Washington Pen Service 

WASHINGTON — Japanese 
semiconductor manufacturers, re- 
sponding to a formal US. industry 
complaint that they are engaging in 
unfair trade practices, denied Mon- 
day that Japan’s markets are dosed 
and called complaints by U.S. chip 
makers a “red herring” to mask 
their own deficiencies. 

“The Semiconductor Industry 
Association’s allegation that U.S. 
semiconductor producers are de- 
nied fair access to the Japanese 
market is a red herring and has no 
baas m law or reality, said Tomi- 
hiro Matsumura, a senior vice pres- 
ident of Japan's NEC Corp., ref er- 
ring to a trade complain i filed by 
tire U.S. trade group. 

Mr. Matsumura. speaking at a 
press briefing called to elaborate on 
the Japanese industry's response to 
the complaint, said, “The Japanese 
V»nr»ranriiieinf mar ker has been 
completely liberalized for trade 
and investment for over a decade.” 

Mr. Matsumura also maintain ed 
that the complaint failed to show 
that the Japanese government had 
established any unreasonable trade 
barriers to U.S. semiconductor ex- 
ports. Similarly, he argued that 
Japanese semiconductor compa- 
nies did not rifmimmflte against 
UB. companies. 

“No evidence of actual market 
barriers has been presented for the 
simple reason that the market is 
completely open," be said. 

The UJS. Electronics Industry 
Association, which supported the 
SLA filing, said it wiD examine the 
Japanese statistics. 

According to the Electronics In- 
dustries Association of Japan, the 

tuesTare biaseiFbecanse "they ex- 
clude the so-called “captive" man- 
ufacturers of semiconductors. 

For example, they said. Interna- 
tional Business Machines Corp. has 
a substantial in-house manufactur- 
ing capability for silicon chips as 
does General Motors Corp. 

In contrast, the Japanese group 
said, Japan’s large captive semi con- 
ductor market was included in the 
SLA estimates. 


Broken Hitt Broadens Its Horizons 


Australia Giant 
Moves Into U.S. 
In Oil, Steel 

By Hugh D. Menzies 

Net v York Times Service 

NEW YORK — They call 
Broken HilJ Ply. Co. the Big Aus- 
tralian — with good reason. This 
steel, mining, and oil monolith 
accounts for 3 percent of Austra- 
lia’s gross domestic product, 5 
percent of exports and 10 per- 
cent of the value of all shares 
listed on the nation's stock ex- 
changes. On Australia’s scale, 
that's rather like being U.S. Steel 
Corp., Asarco Inc. and Exxon 
Corp. rolled into one. 

Even more impressive, BHP 
boasts remarkable profitability 
for a company in such distressed 
industries. It reported record net 
income of 5546 million on sales 
of S3 billion for the fiscal year 
that ended May 31. Those earn- 
ings, two-thirds of which stem 
from Australian oil operations, 
received an added lift because 
almost half its sales were made in 
strong U.S. dollars, while most 
costs are paid in the much weak- 
er Australian dollar. 

But the Big Australian has 
grown too big for Australia. Not 
only does it monopolize the steel 
industry there; but it also pro- 
duces, in a joint venture with 
Exxon, most of the oil pumped in 
Australia and it is a major miner 
of iron ore, coal and manganese. 
To grow faster than the nation’s 
economy, the century-old com- 
pany has decided that it must go 
multinational. 

Thus Broken Hill is drilling 
for oil off the coast of China, 
buying control of a huge copper 
deposit in Chile, and preparing 
to mine coal and gold in South 
Africa. But the United States is 
by far the major target of its 
thrust abroad. 

BHP has been infiltrating the 
U.S. steel and oil markets for 
some time, but last year it moved 
boldly beyond the beachheads. 
Fust it bought Utah Internation- 
al Inc„ the San Francisco mining 
concern, from General Electric 
Co. for $2.6 billion. Then it ac- 
quired Energy Reserves Group, a 
Kansas-based oil and gas pro- 
ducer, for $500 million. More re- 
cently, management spent 513 
million to expand the company’s 
sled-processing facilities m the 
United States, mostly in the 
West. 

The Utah division, in the first 
full year, contributed almost 20 


HJIJP/s American Presence 


Tao*n,,° OSpjk.VW 




„ . BCttcer 

Calif Aimuy 

O^V'-imcnio _ 

B.H.a. (Ammlcssl 
Hoadqu*rt«n 

WcfM Kanu-> 


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-^Fr.-mon. C0L( - 

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F.irminqtor 

MM 

ALASKA 

DAnd«ras» 

S' KW 

B *" OKLA 

■OMatao'n.iCny 

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BHcosion A Coalmm. 

A Tungsten mh* 

O Steel ptoceulng 
plant 



percent of Broken Hill's profits 
— most notably from coal mines 
in New Mexico and Australia. 
But the new division brought' 
with it some risks: Utah Interna- 
tional owns gold and coal depos- 
its in South Africa, as weu as 
large copper boldnm in Chile; 
where fordgD-ownedaiines were 
nationalized for a while just over 
a decade ago. The current Chil- 
ean government has the welcome 
mat out, however. 

One of the acquisitions is like- 
ly to be a U.S. ou property. Phil- 
lips Petroleum Co., for one, 
needs cash to help finance the 
huge debt it ran up to fight tbe 
takeover raid started by T. 
.Boone Pickens, and there is talk 
that Phillips is looking for buyers 
for some of its oil reserves. In- 
deed. despite denials from BHP. 


The Nh Voik Turn 

speculation is rife in the compa- 
ny’s hometown of Melbourne 
that a major oil acquisition, cost- 
ing up to $500 million, is in the 
works. 

Tbe chief executive of Broken 
Hill Brian Loton, says he would 
like to add to tbe company's oil 
and gas reserves in die United 
States. He said in a telephone 
interview: “We can get a far bet- 
ter net return on petroleum as- 
sets there than in many other 
countries. The profit motive is 
still well regarded in the U.S." 

Mr. Loton’s ability to pull off 
transactions catapulted tbe com- 
pany’s asset base in the United 
Slates from virtually nothing 16 
months ago to 15 percent of total 
holdings of S8.5 billion. “It 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 2) 


Mesa Petroleum 
Plans to Become 
A Partnership 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Mesa Petro- 
leum Co. said Monday that its 
board had approved reorganizing 
the company into a limited partner- 
ship. 

T. Boone Pickens Jr, tbe founder 
and chairman of Mesa, would head 
the partnership. 

Under a limited partnership,, 
cash produced by the company s 
oil and natural gas business would 
not have to be subjected to a corpo- 
rate income tax before being avail- 
able for distribution to sharehold- 


ers. 


Substantially all of tbe compa- 
wouldbe 
partnership, the 


ny's oil and gas properties 
rred to the 


transferred 
group said. 

Mesa proposed that sharehold- 
ers receive one unit representing a a 
interest in the partnership for each 
share of Mesa stock. The units will 
be publicly traded. 

instead of quarterly stock divi- 
dends, there would be quarterly 
distributions of nearly all of the 
available net casb flow. 

Mesa said that it planned to 
make the first of two distributions 
of units of the partnership in De- 
cember and that it planned for Me- 
sa's existence as a corporation to 
end in 1987, after the second distri- 
bution. 

After the first distribution of 
partnership units, the company’s 
stock and the partnership's units 
would trade independently in secu- 
rity markets. 

The plan is subject to approval 
by Mesa's stockholders at a meet- 
ing planned for December. 

The company also must clear tbe 
proposal with its lenders and feder- 
al regulators. 

“Transfer of assets to the limited 
partnership will provide Mesa 
shareholders a more direct eco- 
nomic interest in the company’s 
primary asset — its oil and gas 
reserves,” Mr. Pickens said. 

“Net available cash flow from 
tbe properties, unburdened by in- 
come taxes at the corporate level 
will be available for distribution to 
unit holders and will provide sub- 
stantially higher cash flow than 
Mesa’s current common stock divi- 
dend.” he added. 

Mesa slock shot up $1 to $16.50 
a share in the opening hour of New 
York Stock Exchange trading to- 
day following the announcement. 


Mesa said the 14.6 million shares 
of Unocal Corp. it acquired in an 
unsuccessful takeover bid earlier 
this year and certain other assets 
would be retained by the company 
after the first distribution of part- 
nership units and sold within a 
year. 

Proceeds of those sales would be 
used to finance newly issued part- 
nership units that would be distrib- 
uted to holders of Mesa common 
stock in the fust half of 1987, end- 
ing Mesa's corporate existence. 

In recent years. Mesa has taken 
on other large companies in hostile 
takeovers, gaining huge profits 
when the target companies either 
sought higher bids or bought back 
their own stock. 

Mr. Pickens, with S4J2 million in 
salary and SIS. 6 million in deferred 
bonuses stemming from takeover 
fights, was believed to be the high- 
est-paid executive in the United 
States last year. 

Last month. Mesa reported sec- 
ond-quarter earnings of $95.33 mil- 
lion, or SI. 39 a share, down from 
$230.91 million, or $3.31 a share in 
the same quarter a year earlier. 
Revenue slipped 13.6 percent to 
$87.64 million, from S101.47 mil- 
lion. 


EC Jobless Rate 
Crete in July 

Reuters 

LUXEMBOURG — Unem- 
ployment in the European 
Community rose to 11 percent 
of the wont force in July, the 
community's statistics organi- 
zation, Eurostat, reported Mon- 
day. The jobless figure had been 
10.8 percent in June and 10.6 
percent in July 1984. 

In its monthly bulletin, tbe 
agency said 124 million people 
were jobless in July, almost 
400,000 more than in June. Sea- 
sonally adjusted data showed a 
mainly downward trend in un- 
employment among men, but in 
most member states unemploy- 
ment among women rose slight- 
ly. the agency said. Young peo- 
ple were also affected % the 
increase in unemployment. 

The statistics excluded 
Greece for technical reasons. 


Currency Kates 


ms Bales 
% 

teeOam 1MB 
HUbl) 5SJ9 
Mfarf 2 JS 8 t 
loo tW 

a 1852.10 

YoHt(c) 

t JUZS 

ro mH 

Ck 22SB 

:u oj »74 


A* 26 


Black Africa’s Debt Crisis Deepens 

Investment, Earnings, Aid Fall as Interest Payments Mount 


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By Edward A. Gargan 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Sub-Saharan 
African countries, faced with 
mounting foreign debts and debt 
service, are finding it increasingly 
difficult to repay their loans, rais- 
ing concerns at the World Bank 
and tbe International Monetary 

Fund as well as among commercial 
bankers. 

According to IMF estimates, by 
the end of last year total debt to 
foreign creditors owed by all Afri- 
can countries, excluding Libya and 
South Africa, was $104.3 billion. 
Some private economists, however, 
place the debl of the sub-Saharan 
African countries alone at between 
$130 billion and $135 billion, a 
figure these economists say is more 
realistic than the IMF numbers. 

The sab-Saharan region excludes 
Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco 
and Tunisia. In addition. South Af- 
rica is not treated as part of Africa 
in economic discussions. 

The World Bank estimates that 
this year 38 of tbe sub-Saharan 
countries wiD be required to shoul- 
der $11.1 billion in debt-service 
payments, nearly double the 
amount they were required to pay 
only two years ago. 

Indeed, the Organization of Afri- 
can Unity declared in July that 
most of the continent's countries 
were approaching “economic col- 
lapse:” And while the organization 
attributed much blame to “an un- 
just and inequitable economic sys- 
tem.'' as weU as natural catastro- 
phes such as drought, the 
51 -member OAU also pointed to 
“some domestic policy shortcom- 
ings" as factors in the economic 
fragility of many nations. 

Although Africa’s debt is dwarf- 
ed by that of Latin America — 
Brazil's debt to foreign creditors 
alone approaches that of all of sub- 

Saharan Africa — many econo- 


a condition rare among African na- 
tions. 

“One of the things that alarms 
us," said John M. Underwood, a 
specialist on external debt at tbe 
World Bank, “is that if you look at 
the total debt service Africa has 
been paying, it’s been running $4 
billion, $5 bQhon. In 1983, it was 
$5.7 billion. What we’re projecting 
for 1984 is $9.7 billion and for 
1985, $11.1 billion.” 

With this steep jump in debt ser- 
vice, he said, “we just don’t think 
they can manage it without some 
kind of debt rescheduling.” 

The economies of most of the 
sub-Saharan countries have been 
staggered in the last decade or so by 
a combination of factors, including 
dorp increases in oil prices; falling 
prices for cocoa, groundnuts, cof- 
fee and copper, some of the re- 
gion's key export commodities, and 
widespread economic mismanage- 
ment. 

Officials at the IMF, which has 
about $8 billion in loans outstand- 
ing to Africa, declined to discuss 
the agency’s lending policies or its 
appraisal of Africa’s economic 
state, but one source familiar with 
the views of the fund said tbe IMF 
saw considerable difficulties ahead 
for African countries. 

“A lot of adjustment needs to be 
made,” said the source. “A lot of 
financing is needed beyond what is 
available at commercial rates or 
from the fund. There needs to be a 
lot of other money coining to help 
them. They are in the worst shape 
of any region." 

This need for dramatically en- 
hanced attention to Africa was em- 


phasized by Edward V JL Jay cox, a 
vice president of the World Bank, 
in a speech earlier this month. 

“Access to new credit and pri- 
vate equity investment has all but 
dried up and concessional aid has 
declined,” Mr. Jaycox said. “By 
and large, African governments 
have faded to adjust their econo- 
mies, and have therefore been over- 
whelmed by difficulties." 

At the same time, Mr. Jaycox 
observed, “we now estimate that on 
a net basis the capital flows to Afri- 
ca in the period 1985-89 will be less 
than one-half the net Cows during 
the period 1 980-84. We do not fore- 
see any dramatic improvement in 
terms of trade or export possibili- 
ties that can offset this reduction in 
net capital flows." 

In response to this gloomy pic- 
ture, tbe World Bank, according to 
Mr. Jaycox, “has put sub-Saharan 
Africa at the top of its priority list" 

While tbe debt picture for Africa 
appears increasingly bleak, some 
bankers and African experts be- 
lieve that if given enough time, 
most African countries can 
strengthen their economies and ac- 
commodate foreign lenders. 

“It’s not a question of whether 
they will meet their obligations or 
not, with the exception perhaps of 


Mozambique,” said Jeffrey L. 
Schmidt, a vice president at Shear- 
son l-ehman Brothers Inc. 

He added: “It’s mostly a matter 
of sub-Saharan countries being 
granted rescheduling of their debt 
service. Our feeling here is that un- 
less they gel some breathing space, 
they will never grow and trill never 
get out from under their debt bur- 
den." 



Aog.26 

AM. PM. Ctfflt 
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„ U57S — 

«JS £5 

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_ BMC 


mis . - , - 

of African economies makes it far 
more difficult for those countries to 
manage their international obliga- 
tions titan countries such as Mexi- 
co, Brazil or Peru. 

Twelve African nations, includ- 
ing Mali, Nig«, Ghana and Ivory 
J austerit^mea- 


+xe 
+t.n 
+ 140 



sures arranged by the IMF. None- 
theless, there is widespread pessi- 
mism about African economies and 
many UJS. commercial banks are 
quietly beginning to withdraw from 
involvement in the continent. 

At least three countries —Zam- 
bia. Sudan and Liberia — are be- 
hind on their repayments of loans 
from the IMF. Nigeria, the largest 
African debtor with a debt of near- 
ly $21 billion, has avoided incur- 
ring debt from the IMF and conse- 
tov in Britain. Hong qU ently has also avoided the 
- strictures attached to IMF lending. 


_ +w® 

Paris and London OtMa i fl*- 
ontf Zurich open!/* and 
; ‘TldwVorft Can»* current 


Foreign Investors Selling Securities 
bt South Africa, Central Barik Says 

Reuters 

PRETORIA —Sales of securities by foreign investors caused an 
outflow of private-sector capital from South Africa in the second 
quarter and the sefiing trend appeared to gain momentum last month 
amid nnregt amongbLcks, the^ Reserve Bank reported Monday. 

In its antuuti economic report, the central bank said nonresidents 
became net setiere of securities on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange 
from May on. It said this was the main reason for a net outflow of 317 
milli on rands ($128-1 milli on) of long-term capital from the private 
sector in the quarter. ... . 

Tbe bank added that net securities sale appeared to accelerate w 
July because of the violent protests against the white-minority govern- 
ment’s apartheid policies, & state of emergency declared frdy 2 1 and 
an intensified campaign abroad seeking the reduction erf investments 
in South Africa. 

There was a net inflow of long-term funds to thepubhe sector in the 
second quarto, leaving a net long-term capital inflow of 104 snHton 
rands, down from 355 milli on in the first quarter, the bank said. 

Of South Africa's general economic picture, the Reserve Bank said 
its business cycle indicator suggested that the current downswing had 
not yet reached its lowest point JtsaidJhat a short upswing had ended 
abruptly in mid-1984, but an etyxflem export performance that 
cushioned the impact on domestic output of a fall in real domestic 
demand. 


Orders Fall 
For Machine 
Tools in U.S. 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK —Orders for U.S.- 
made machine tools declined to 
slightly more than $200 million in 
July, a drop of 14.6 percent from 
the previous month and 35.9 per- 
cent from July 1984. according to a 
report rcJeasaj Monday by the in- 
dustry’s trade association. 

Cumulative orders for the first 
seven months erf 1985 also eased, 
slipping 6.4 percent from the same 
period last year, to SI .57 billion, 
according to tbe National Machine 
Tool Builders’ Association. 

.Machine tools are power-driven 
devices that cut or form racial. 

Shipments followed a similar 
pattern, dropping to S189.6 mil- 
lion, down 20.7 percent from June 
and 2.1 percent from a year agp. 
However, cumulative shipments 
through July totaled S 1.31 billion, 
up 7.6 percent. 

“While we hope that the second 
half of 1985 will show some pickup 
in industry activity, it looks like 
buying plans have bras put on hold 
for now,” said James A. Gray, pres- 
ident of the association. 

“I’m not too concerned about 
tbe decline in shipments because 
most builders traditionally shut 
down for vacations in July and Au- 
gust,” he added. 

Christine Chien, an analyst with 
Prudential-Bachc Securities Inc^ 
agreed that “seasonally. July and 
August are not strong months." 

“But, on the other hand," she 
said, “when you're looking ai num- 
bers that are pretty low, the de- 
clines should not be pronounced. 
Domestically, things just aren’t 
very good." 

Tool makers and industry ana- 
lysts said foreign competition re- 
mains the major factor in the 
slump. About half of the machine 
mol imports in the United States 
come from Japan, with the remain- 
der supplied by West Germany, 
Taiwan and South Korea. 

“We’ve had zero growth in ex- 
ports for the past three years, while 
imports are surging ahead —mak- 
ing up more than 40 percent of 
domestic consumption,” said Jo- 
seph Franklin, statistical director 
for the association. 

“The domestic industry is crip- 
pled, and I don’t foresee any dras- 
tic recovery in the months ahead." 
he added. 

Miss Chien of FrodentiaJ-Bache 
said: “Imports continue strong and 
pricing is pretty weak. Only two 
sectors — aerospace and automo- 
tive — are buying. The economy 
will continue to grow, but manu- 
facturing will certainly not be the 
catalyst.* 


Problems at Carbide 
Continue to Increase 


By Thomas J. Lueck 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — By Naming its 
own employees and equipment for 
tite toxic gas leak at its plant in 
Institute, West Virginia, Union 
Carbide Corp. has fallen deeper 
into a corporate quagmire of litigar 
non, overburdened management 
and public cynicism about its con- 
cern for safety. 

Seven months after tbe devastat- 
ing accident at its plant in Bhopal, 
India — the worst industrial acd- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

dent in history — the company's 
problems appear to be growing 
worse. 

Union Carbide, which disclosed 
tbe results of an internal investiga- 
tion in Institute last Friday, sad 
that for 10 days before the Aug. 1 1 
leak, 32 employees had been m a 
position to know that gas might 
escape from a chemical tank. Safe- ' 
ty alarms were out of service, a 
broken gauge had not been fixed 
and basic safety procedures were 
ignored, tbe company said. 

The company contritely said it 
had dispatched managers around 
the world to re-examine safety pro- 
cedures. 

“Union Carbide has a problem; 
Union Carbide will dean it up," 
said Robert D. Kennedy, president 
of the company’s chemicals and 
plastics division. 

But the company has problems 
on several fronts. 

Lawsuits filed ou behalf of the 
victims in India and West Virginia 
seek damages amounting to bil- 
lions of dollars. Tbe company's ne- 
gotiations with the Indian govern- 
ment, aimed at reaching an 
out-of-court settlement with the 
Bhopal victims, have broken off. 
Lawyers say Union Carbide's dis- 
closures about the Institute acci- 
dent have weakened its legal de- 
fense in aS the cases, in West 
Virginia and in India. 

“As a plaintiffs attorney. I'm 
amazed by their admissions," said 
Aaron J. Broder, a partner in the 
New York law firm c« F. Lee Bailey 
ft Aaron J. Broder. “I see no de- 
fense on tbe question of negli- 
gence." 

In Congress, proposals for in- 
creased regulation of chemical 
plants are gaming support On 
Wall Street. Union Carbide is in- 
creasingly viewed as vulnerable to 
other a takeover attempt or a 
proxy fight that would force it to 
sell off some its best lines of busi- 
ness. 

And while the company is bur- 
dared by all these external threats, 
one of its biggest problems is inter- 
nal Even before die Bhopal acci- 


dent last December, several poorly 
performing business segments were 
puttmg a ebag on Union Carbide's 

t-nmmgc 

Analysts say that now, just at (he 
rime when the attention of its man- 
agement is bang diverted. Union 
Carbide needs to sell assets, lay off 
workers and cut costs sharply to 
become more profitable. Among 
the assets that should be sold, the 
analysts say, are several petro- 
chemical plants that are facing in- 
creased competition from foreign 
producers, and several other lines 
of chemicals and plastics. 

“Carbide’s problem isn’t Insti- 
tute," said Leonard Bpgner of First 
Manhattan Co. “If s how to fix the 
rest of Carbide.” 

For major U.S. corporations, 
particularly those that seD most of 
tbtir products to other large com- 
panies, the impact of a tarnished 
public image is impossible to mea- 
sure; it is often exaggerated by the 
press. But Union Carbide has 
dearly suffered. 

Not only have its accidents re- 
ceived worldwide attention but 
they have come at a time erf grow- 
ing public debate ova* corporate 
accountability. Just last week, be- 
sides the Union Carbide disclo- 
sures, AJL Robins Co. filed for 
protection from its creditors under 
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code to deal 
with numerous claims related to 
tbe Daikon Shield, and Eli Lilly ft 

had *f ailed toteA tbcfgovenuiiem 
about deaths and illnesses related 
to its drug Orafiex. 

“These three companies are 
known for the quality erf their sci- 
ence. Accidents result from a fail- 
ure to act on knowledge they al- 
ready have;" said Elks Sflbergeld, 
a toxicologist and senior scientist 
with the Environmental Defense 
Fuad. She said mounting public 
criticism would lead to larger 
claims for damages and 
santMrtforgovamoentj _ 

Far Union Carbide, few 
the accidents in India and West 
Virginia to lead to bankruptcy. 

“People thought the problem of 
Bhopal would peak atm go away. 
They haven’t,” said Anantha Ra- 
man, a chemical-industry analyst 
*T still don’t think bankruptcy is 
something to wony abont, but tbe 
odds have increased." 


WVII Karr Yota B.<*n Anjdtvl We’ll Win. 

MjrirtWjcd? pjMtdldu-i la uUimvv. 

motnUnl'-laiin’I.'i lulihanarat- 
•rtpiw WE ARE NOT BROKERS Wrjouks- 
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nofluti MiLr rranr* Acttm* cm ii*W ««■ 
tflv fcttn dtu hnucandicrunwuidaVmc 
•> one h mwui uiO,W- FREE mluhraimn 

lh« 0*1 rJtmc tharpn) Wny MariutWHcfc- 

MAOI24S USA i» &D41 1-S2l<rt|il 

MarkciWiUch 





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At 50, UAW Faces Difficult Future 

New York rums Smia inditttiy and, by reducing themrai- granted concessions to General 

DFTRnrr wr.-j bo - of jobs, cut the union’s mem- Motors Cora, and Ford Motor Co. 

' about ^ bersWofrom a peak of more than Even though prosperity has appar- 
-23E 1-5 ixifilioa in 1979 to about \2 ently returned to the industry, the 

minion. 1 984 con tracts that the union n^o- 


trmt\ Fnrt Shilliu Hfltal <;n »-> minion m i yiy uj aooui i-i euujr iguuihm iu uit muusu j. u». 

:o« ^ a .K?T&.3 0 r. 50y S s minion. 1 984 contracts that the union otuy 

WorSw^f™Sd2. AutomoWc ' More than 125,000 Canadian dated at the two largest companies 
- WiSbTfe^S'of Betrins a DKfflben will formally withdraw to fid not n^ttaaimiid 3 percent 


rt Hrtw th. »- r— - T-. j r . Iona mar own umon m a icw ums™ 

■ -SoIrffiSlSfifffiKtft weeks. With imports still rising and Recently, theXjAW agreed to a 
; UAW tad %2? 3 ?’hf the American auto companies fori- highly unusual contract that was 

■SSSJdiSfSV mitomation. in an the price of getting GM to con- 
• ^ j . i 1 1 ^ flttempttn rmm a competitive struct its plant for building a new 

Dowerful intions the chances that the UAW small-car K the Saturn, in this 

powerful muons m the United i!s fonncr size are countiy. The Saturn, to be built at a 

b^T „ llu , . mi „ Tr ~ nam i considered small. new plant in Spring HD, Tomes- 

.--“a- 31 compedBg *“ 

■ides Imd 31110 “dnstry is in competing," The labor agreement for the 

rteriv «J5S «S2it «ys Richard Block, dwifirectarof plant includes outlines for a high 


-hattW nf IQVk anH lOanT f.1. mc acoooi Oi l^aoor anu luuusmai ucgicc 01 rewccu 

Siteo to ST • Rdationsal Midrigm Sum Uni- nvupamoiudlfb*. tat also 


■JS-MUSSST £S5££S££ 

"jssaa-sffttt sae 


first time, the union is feeling the as the wave of the future. 



US. Futures 


FOREIGN & COLONIAL 
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effects of o 
In those 


letitKMV- 

(jen Hgnariw; before 


Although the/ agreed to the Sat- 
urn experiment, many of the top 


1980, the union was often the pace- leaders of die union, steeped in the 


setter for industrial America, with lore of : 
other unions striving to match the manage 
contracts won by the UAW. agreemet 

Lately, though, the trend has "We 1 
been the other way. The union out, that 
granted wage and benefit conces- will fall 
sions to Chrysler Carp, in 1979 to Bieber, t! 
help keqp die auto concern from may not 


lore of adversarial relations with 
management, are treating the 
agreement warily. 

"We hope this thing will work 
out, that all the pieces of the jigsaw 
will fall together,'' said Owen F. 
Bieber, tbe UAW president, "but it 
may not- The worst thing in the 


bankruptcy, and in 1982, under the world we could do is to try to make 
pressure of a severe recession, it Tit in traditional operations.” 

But other influential union 

voices said that Saturn-hkc agree- 


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Oil Exploration 
Is Set for Negev 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — Isramco Inc. 
said it has agreed on the first phase 
of oil exploration and development 
in Israel's Negev desert. It plans to 
spend between $5 and $6 milli on 
tnrougb March 31, 1986. 

Aiming the group is Eastern 
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Gnyana Sees Potential 
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Return 

GEORGETOWN, Guyana — 
Guyana will hold talks with several 
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month to discuss its production po- 
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Mr. Hoyte said Sunday at a con- SftSfMfi 


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Own Hioti Low Cine Os. 


Groin* 


Owen Bieber 

meats and other responses to the 
changing nature of the anto indus- 
try were needed to insure the 
union's future. "We have to find 
new ways to compete, that’s an 
absolute,*' said Douglas A Fraser, 
Mr. Biebeaf’s predecessor as union 
president "Whether it is the Saturn 
way or other ways, we have to do 
iL” 

In addition to bong tied to an 


sure, union leaders said that they 
were concerned about what they 
see as a hostile national administra- 
tion and a public disregard for the 
role of unions. Tbe union recently 
opened a 52- mil li nn television-ad- 
vertising campaign, some of It 
filmed at CM'S plant in Tarrytown, 
New York, to convey the mawap 
that union workers are like other 
middle-class families. "We thought 
it was time we spoke on behalf of 
our members to the public at 
large.” Mr. Bieber said. "This is not 
a angle-issue union.” 


Used-Home Sales Rise 
In U.S. to 5-Year High 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Sales of ex- 
isting homes in the United States 
posted Lheir largest increase in four 
months in July and rose to the 
highest level in almost five years, 
an industry group said Monday. 

The National Association of 
Realtors said that sales of existing 
homes lastmonth rase ! 1 j percent 
from a year earlier, to an annual 
rate of 3.11 million units. The June 
increase had been 0.7-percenL The 
increase left the annual sales pace 



COFFEE CfKTCSCEl 

raw* «we ig£ «*■« 

15040 72? as Dec BUD 139.60 18835 IW/g +Jj 

iSSS 77*50 Mar 14UOO 141.23 740.40 14055 +JS 

14880 mS Mar 14150 14150 MUD 141.40 «S 

148.00 13SJ8 Jul tw 

1SS- SS ££ 

^LSatas 451 Prw.SsfM lJKl 
Ph^OwOpcniRLWWBfle 
SUCARWORLD 11 CNYCSCE} 

«, 455 433 *2 ^ 

£§ S| S 3^ IS ifl SS 

?J3 M4 Mw 4.94 4M 4J3 4J4 

715 158 MOV 5.10 5.12 4JS 4JU —.12 

UB w? Jtri saa 5J1 Ml 501 — .M 

*7S 4£2 Oct 557 557 S3Z 522 -iU 

S US US US w +.« 

EsLSalW Pr®v. Seles H3i 

^DwOWlW. M14OHB2S04 

COCOA CHYCSCEJ 

lOmrfrtctonarlwrton 

2415 7M3 Seo 2138 21to jm 2134 . -HI 

ZD7 1945 Dec £97 OT1 T}97 DM +8 

w s Mg r 2235 2249 2237 . 2244 +13 

^ OT 2240 2251 Dfl +77 

2300 I960 Jul +” 

win 2023 S«p 2393 +12 

2325 2055 Dec 2290 2295 2290 2299 -7 

EM. Sates Prew. Safes 7to0 

P rev. Dav Open Int. 19J540 W»W 
ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 

‘ 13540 13580 U5« 1S4| ~ ^ 

18LOO 127/40 Nov 137.10 WOSS — 

7BOM mso Jen 12730 noao vaje — .u 

177 JO 123X10 Mar 12540 }27M 1 3LBS 125JS —JO 

76150 134JD Mav 725J5 12575 12575 

157.30 12650 JlH «SJ0 +55 

EM. Sal os 300 Prev.Sales 428 

Prav. Dav Open int 4JM ofto 







I'T^wiv 


2293 
2290 2299 


CATTLE (CME1 
j Q jifl fl fb&.- cents put Ih. 

6550 5165 Oct S7JS 5725 34X0 5507 — JD 

6755 55-15 DK 59J0 59J2 5150 5BJ5 +JU 

67/45 56X10 Feb 59.75 S9J5 58.10 58.13 —.25 

47 J7 57 ja Apr 59J5 60J3 39X» 59JH —.15 

64.25 58.10 Jun 61JX) 61 JO 6000 60.10 — -15 

65A0 58X0 Aue 9>3B 59 JO 59 JO 5M0 +J0 

Est. Solos 77J43 Prov. Sates 11X157 
Prev. Dav Own Int. <1277 up 833 

FEEDER CATTLE ICME1 
44X100 1 Ob- cants per tt-.. 

7M3 57/45 Sop 4AM 6430 6120 6140 —.10 

7132 57.15 Oct 6177 6125 6155 62JtO +A3 

7320 5820 Nov 6490 6520 6425 6427 +J7 

79 JO «aas Jon 6435 64« 65/40 65J0 +30 

7tL55 67.70 Sfeir 66J0 6450 6552 6550 +.15 

. MAS 47J5 Apr 6650 6450 6555 6555 +.10 

663S 6130 May 6470 +.10 

EsI- Sales 2301 Prev.Sales 7.151 
Prev. Dav Open inL 7590 aH 92 

HOOS(CMG) 

30000 lbs.- cents per lb. 

51-75 3410 OO 3645 3645 3175 3587 —43 

SMS 38.10 Dec 3055 MM 3732 3827 +XD 

5047 3940 Feb <0.75 4057 39J5 <0X17 +.70 

4725 37X17 Apr 37/47 375® 3480 37.70 —.15 

49X15 «UJ5 Jun 4050 4LBS SUB 4020 

4955 m M Jul 4125 4175 40L9C 4120 —.10 

51.M 4025 AOB 4720 4720 4040 4040 —JO 

4UB 3020 Oct 3845 3845 3845 3880 

4950 3950 DOC 4025 4025 4025 4025 — JS 

Est. Soles 4252 Prev.Sales 3439 
Prev. DovOpm Inf. 715X7 dp 165 


Currency Options 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Option A Strike 

uadertvtaa Price Calls— last F 

Sea Dec Mar Sep 
12580 Brtnsh Poerett-ceafs per adK. 

BPound no 3025 r r r 
T2J aio r r r 

125 1528 r r r 

138 ISMS r r 0.10 

135 530 r 925 045 

140 Z15 5A5 495 Z10 

145 055 3.25 r r 

750 0.10 150 345 r 

SUM Caearfkm Dallarvccnts per uott. 

CDollr 73 r r r r 

74 0.17 053 r r 

75 r r 046 r 

42500 West German Marlcs-csnSs per unit 
DMarfc 3 r 658 r r 

32 428 469 r r 

33 345 r r r 

34 228 r r 0X12 

35 144 124 282 0.10 

M 025 145 225 022 

37 022 r r r 

38 0X77 025 r r 

4 35 4801 Japae n e Tm-TOOUis at a cent per unit. 


CUD0 Serfn Fraocs-conti per oatt 
SFranc 36 r r i 

38 621 640 r 

39 S25 r r 

40 r 475 r 

41 r r i 

42 r r r 

43 152 r r 

44 8J86 2XTI 243 

45 036 746 221 

Sfronc 46 S 1X» s 

Total call voL 4329 C 

TettapvtvDL 1558 I 

r-Nof traded, s— No option offered. 
Source: AP. 


CommcNfities 


Pats— Lost 
Sep Dec Mar 




Industrials 


130000 bd. ft- SperliJB6lbii.fi - 

72780 Sep 130X10 73230 130100 U2JO +50 

12628 Mav 12650 12040 12650 72020 +30 

13340 Jan 13400 -735XH 13340 73440 +20 

T40S0 Mor 74tu» T47XB 13920 74040 —.10 

14550 May 14650 I46JO 14520 1X620 +20 

14950 JUT - 15070 75070 14950 150.10 +.10 

1S400- -SeP 154 »> 15400 75358 15280 —.70 

Est. Sates 1.224 Prev.Sales 2491 
Prev. Day Ooen infc 8500. off 131 
COTTON 2 1NYCE) 

SaXIOOIbA- cents owltx ■ 

7750 “S Oct 5733 5733 5740 5745 —XU 
73DO 5735 Dee -58.78 5S33 5735 5837 +.19 

7675 59.13- JUter - 5948 5940 59.U 5923 +X» 

AUXT ' ». 3935 MOV 59J» 5980 5V42 59.91 +.16 

m05 59.10 Jul 5949 5950 5940 5952 +53 

6550 : 5420 Oct 5495 5495 §£33 5485 —.15 

5935 5325 . Dec 5336 5425 5336 5407 —XU 

EsLSalef 1500 Prev.Sales 1338 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 21X104 up 285 
HEATING Q7L CNTMJU 

/wXr^TSi^sSn 7535 7583 7&W 7534 +56 

7728. ‘ 6745 Oct . 7655 . 7690 7590 7677 +46 

' 7690 - -6850 ' Nov 7645 7747 7610 7758 +49 

7135 69.15 Dee 77.75 7880 7785 7782 +42 

773B ' 6980 Jon 7740 78.10 7740 7BJ® 4-Mi 

77.10 '.moo Feb 7685 7750 7685 7745 +40 

7480 IflJO- Mar 7405 74JH 74X15 7435 +40 

7480 6880 Apr . 7140 7140 7140 72.10 +40 

7X30 0U» MOV 7150 +50 

EsLSates - = -Prev.Sales 4187 
Prey. Day Open InL 26118 aff313 
CRUDE OlLtNYMEI 
i o M4.- dollars oer btoL 

29J0 2465. Oct 2737 28.72 2730 20.10 +.15 

2958: 24X0 Nov Z757 7725 2758 2773 +.18 

2950 . 3X90 Dec 2738 3752 27.11 2748 +31 

WM • 2438. Jan 2780 2735 2635 Z735 +33 

2946 2425 Feb 2682 2780 2680 2784 +32 

2945' 2413 Mar 2635 2486 2675 3483 +32 

• 2945 2333 : Apt 2645 2659 2644 2642 +32 

27.96 2345 May 2659 2648 2630 2641 +32 

347 . .2X70 : jun 2598 2685 2530 2630 +32 

2530 2570 Jul 2480 2580 2580 268S +32 

.-. Sep 2530 +.17 

EsLSate* . . Prev. Sates 8876 

Prev. Day Oneatnt 57359 utf2S7 


Stock Indexes 


(Indexes compiled shortly be fo re market does) 

SP COMP. LNDEXXCMI}, 
po tail aod cents . -i 

W8J» W»M Sep 18688' 188.15 18630 18780 +40 

200JS. 17570 - Dae- 189J0 19070 18835 19CU5 +55 

20X75 19ai6 Mar 19280 19380 19185 19200 +35 

EsL Sales . Piwr.5alas 41896 . 

Prev.DoyOtusi int. 6M70,Mpt!7 - 
VALUE L7MH CtCCBT} • 

ppbrts and cents 

21330 . 18175 Sep 19088 19940 19740 19940 +85 

217« 20000 _Oec rniM iBitg mm 20200 +100 

Est. Soles Prev.Sales 3812 

Prev. Dav Open Int 101966 off 140 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE> 
mints and cents 

SE 1SHS 152-55 1°“° ,OBJO +->s 

1172 10130 OOC .10950 11540 10940 11045 +.75 

11835 10950 JSSr_ 11235 J l 23S 11135 11125 +30 

Eat. Scries _ - Prev.Sales 5427 

Prev. Day Open int. 10,153 up 4326 


Commodity Indexes 


Ckae 

Moodyli 891 D 0 f 

Reuters. —— -. Clsd 

DJ. Futures ... .... na 

Cam. Research Bureau - NA 

Moady^ : base 100 : Dec. 31 , 1937 . 

P - preliminary; f - Anal 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18 , 7937 . 
Dow Janes : base 700 : Dec. 31 , 1974 . 


Previous 
894.70 f 
7.67530 
11425 
21830 


Cash Prices 


Treasurj' 


Dividends 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) August 26, 1985 

Wet eMetyeftt o g auhi ll w u urn oueptled bv the Fends IlstedwWti the ettcepHoaefewieaeoles based en Issue price. 

The morainal symbols Indicate freaaencr of ■ m otal lum supplied: (d) -daffy; (wj - weekty; (b) -bHnoafblv; (rj -rveularty; (IJ -Irregularly. 


36 CommodlhrandUett 

Coflee 4 Santo, lb 

Prfnrctolh 64t30 3B ta. yd _ 
API CWBO Steel bUtotUPtnj. Ian 



SUSAA 

Frepcb francs per metric ton 
Od 1365 1343 1352 1355 +30 

Dec T565 1347 134S 1350 +30 

Mar 1370 1344 1355 139 +29 

MO V 13W U75 1375 13W +30 

Aug N.T. N.T. 1470 142B +20 

Od N.T. N.T. 1480 1490 +25 

Est. veL: 1300 lots of 50 tons: Prev. actual 
sales: 1858 tats, Open Interop: 24837 


Load Spot, lb 

+30 Cnooer elect, tb 

+30 Tin (Slraltsl. lb 

+ 29 ZbK. E. St. L Basis, lb . 
+30 PaUadlum,ai _ — __ 

+ 30 Silver N.Y. or 

+ 25 Source; AP. 


841 848 

102-107 136-13* 
631 757 



Otter 

BM 

Ahg. 

YWd 

23 

Pit* 

YMd 

Xnonffi 

787 

7XB 

739 

736 

6-fnonlti 

7JD 

7.18 

756 

754 

One war 

740 

731 

753 

756 

1 Sauna: Satamon Brothers 





DM Futures 
Options 

W. GemaaMort-aSJUtoori&caalseermBt 


mm 






Aug. 26 

Sbtte 

CUB+MUe 


Pat*5»®s 

mm ta 

OK 

Mar 

SK 

ff 

Mar 

34 213 

271 

333 


040 

35 I.U 

281 

251 

olid 

0 J» 


36 U? 

140 

280 

627 

ass 

133 

37 6M 

OR 

MB 

054 

\fa 

270 

31 081 

OjSD 

i.n 

187 

231 

39 — 

831 

0179 




BdimatadlaM voL 3538 




CM*: FTl. *04 3306 
Pets tFrLvaL 2977 

5 


% 

m 


Source: CASE. 







Brtte CattaUet 
Price Se* Od Nw Dee 

2! SP P* M n. 

77S <* * . 5? J* 

I hk 

NS in* » , » - , 

200 1/M 1716 tb 

TSSSSSw-SS. 

Iita! 

mnw leoiEE a 


Sa W Mr DK 
VH« VU fc 
M tk 11/UPt 
1S/161W 7S 2W 
A » A 
? no m - 
- 14 — — 


Ericsson Wins Order 

From Chinese Province 

Return 

STOCKHOLM — LM. Erics- 
son, the Swedish telecommunica- 
tions and electronics group, said 
Monday that it had won a S28- 
mifiion order from China 's Liao- 
ning province for 10 digital tele- 
phone exchanges. 

The contract also covers trans- 
mission equipment for the ex- 1 
changes, which are to be installed 
during the next three years, the 
company said. 


Japan’s Vehicle Output 
Climbed 8.8% in July 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Vehicle production 
in Japan rose 8 £ percent in July to 
a record 1.11 mill i nn units from 
1-02 million a year earlier, the Ja- 
pan Automobile Manufacturers 
Association said Monday. It said 
the increase was helped by a 12- 
percent rise in exports. 

The previous record production 
figure was .1,09 millio n units in 
April. Output in June was 1.04 mil- 
lion. Tbe output increase for July 
was the 10th consecutive year-to- 
year rise. 


united Press International 

SANTA BARBARA, California 
— President Ronald Reagan will 
begin his fall campaign for tax re- 
form with a speech Sept. 2 at a 
festival commemorating U.S. pio- 
oeers. in Independence, Missouri, 
home of former President Harry S. 
Truman, the White House an- 
norinced Monday. 


DM- Deutsche Mark; BF - Batotam Francs; FL- Dutch Flortn; LF- L uxe mbourg Fr pna; EC U_- JuropecnCurreDcy U Qjt; SF - Swta Fraga; b-ibM, 
p/vsYTtoSlMrunlf.' njlTnuI Available; NX. : NotCanwiuntamd.-o - New.- g- «g to»fl;..y s -toes* Mil; -- ertNyldend; - - ^5*222 ™ Ju,v; *’ 

Rtdtmiil- priw- Ex-Caupan; - Formerly tbortdwkla Fund Ltd; O - Offer Price Incl. 3* arellni. dwrw; ++ ■ daily stock price as an AMSMtUum stock Exchange 


vifeaswcowenaeffiFaf the 


% SSSS^N^^ x ' RaDC& 


M 













































BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


INTERNATIONAL H ERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 1985 

THE EUROMARKETS 



Page 11 


* Henkel to Offer Shares 



12%in 9 85 


To Public for First Time 



V 


ny>. 





Our Staff From Dispatches 
- PETROIT — . Volkswagen AG 

WtamBKag 

pushmg^ne* profits abovelS 

($82.9 mfflion), the company’s 

board J3! 

the chairman, said Last 

^'Si s te led,,ion:ih “ 

ftus year improving from last 
yearns results, continuing a trend 
shewn m the first half^ 

_He noted that VW, the world’s 
fifth largest automaker, has 
achieved car sales leadership in its 

first tune in the first halfof 1985. 

< ‘Tt looks good in the second halt 
too, but what is even better, we 
expect to be No. 1 in dollar volume 
m Europe, and our profit picture 
lodes better than last year” Mr 
Hahn said. 

He said the sales outlook in Eu- 
4^ rope hi coining months is brighter 
as a result of the settlement of a 
controversy over auto-exhaust 
standards. 

Asked about the outlook for the 
U.S. market, Mr. Hahn said he ex- 
pected next year's auto market to 
be level with this year’s, bm he said 
the outlook was better for Europe- 
an luxury cars, such as VW's Audi 
products and its exports in the 
$10,000 category, such as the Jetta. 

Speaking m Detroit at the open- 
ing of the Tenth Annual Automo- 
tive News World Congress, Mr. 
Hahn urged the U.S. industry to 
take the initiative to develop Third 
World nations, which represent a 
vast, untapped market. . .. 

Latin America's combined pop- 
ulation of more than 400 million is 
a huge potential market but only if 
something is done to stimulate that 
continent’s economy and help in its 
debt situation, he added. 

Mr. Hahn also said that China is 
ripe for some large-scale invest- 
ment venture arrangements 
and called Mexico a “Canada- type 
of manufacturing bas^ thatwiti be 
utilized by domestic U.S. and Japa- 
nese companies to benefit Ameri- 
can consumers. 

He added that global investment 
by the auto industry will escalate 
but that Africa may be left out 
“with the possible exception of Ni- 
geria and South Africa.” (Reuters, 
DPI) 


Reuters 

BONN — Henkel KGAA, the 
family-owned West German chem- 
1C “ 5 §TO“P. said Monday that it 
will offer shares to the public for 
the first time in its 109-year history. 

The company, best known for its 
rersil washing, powder, «irt it will 
sell l.S million shares on Goman 
gock exchanges in early October. 
Banking sources estimate that the 
issue could raise almost 400 million 
Deutsche marks (S14S million ) in 

new capital. 

Henkel is the fourth-biggest 
West German chemical producer. 

The flotation, approved at a so-, 
cret weekend meeting, of family 
shareholders, makes Henkel the 
latest in a series of family-owned 
West German companies to allow 
in outside investors recently. 
Porsche AG, the sports-car maker. 
Axel Springer AG, the publishing 
company, NIxdorf Computer AG 
have all gone public in the past two 
years. 

under 


continue to bold all voting shares. 

Henkel, which operates in 45 
countries and employs about 
31,000 people worldwide, said an 
increase in us capital linked to the 
share issue opened up new possibil- 
ities for expansion. 

A spokesman said the company 
had specific projects in mind, but 
* declined to give details. Henkel ex- 
- ccutives have said in the past they 
are eager to strengthen U.S. opera- 
tions. 



they nui nuu a iiiyn.1 miiim mh . 

than ordinary shares, the prefer- 
ence shares offered will not cany 
voting rights and will initially 
amount to only 13 percent of Hen- 
kel’s capital Family members will 


Banking sources said they ex- 
pected the shares to be priced at 
around 260 DM, which would 
bring in 390 milli on DM. 

The issue comes in a year when 
Henkel expects a marked improve- 
ment in profits following a reorga- 
nization in 1984 that included the 
sale of money-losing subsidiaries. 

Last year it increased after-tax 
profit by 26 percent to 130 million 
DM on worldwide sales of 9.34 
billion DM. 

The company was set up in 1876 
by Fritz Henkel It achieved a ma- 
jor breakthrough in 1907 when 
Hugo Henkel, the founder’s son, 
developed Penal said by the com- 


Japanese Weigh 


ILS. Chip Output 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Matsushita Elec- 
tric Industrial Co. of Japan said 
Monday (hat it was considering 
production of semiconductor 
in the United States as part of 
its long-term business strategy. 

“The time has co me for us to 
study US. production [of mi- 
crochips],'' a spokesman said. 
But he denied reports in the 
financial daily Nihon Keizai 


Viacom Set Fall in DM Bond Yields Roils Market 


To Acquire 
2 TV Firms 


Shimbun that said the group 


would build a plant in the U. 
Midwest in early 1987. Monthly 
output of the reported plant 
was pul at 10 miUicm chips, 
mainly for use in Matsushita 
color TV sets and video-tape 
recorders. 

“We have not decided any- 
thing on the timing, scale, in- 
vestment and operation formu- 
las,’* the spokesman said. 


By Nell Henderson 

Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — Warner 
Communications Ind and Viacom 
International Inc. said Monday 


By Allan Saunderson 

Reuters 

FRANKFURT— The accelera- 
tion of the Deuische-mark bond- 
yield decline last week has thrown 
the market into uncertainty, and 
syndication manag ers. were sharply 
divided on the effect of the slide on 


the September Eurobond calendar 
Wes 


that they had reached an agreement 
will allow Viacom to acquire 


that 


pany to be the first powder that 
clean wit 


could wash clothes dean without 
housewives having to scrub out the 
dirt. 


Named after two of its constitu- 
ents, perborate and silicate, PersQ 
became Henkel’s best-known prod- 
uct and remains the market leader 
in West Germany today. 

Since World War 1L Henkel has 
diversified away from its tradition- 
al cleaning agents business. Its 
product tine now includes adhe- 
sives. cosmetics and personal hy- 
giene products. 


COMPANY NOTES 


AJPL limited Partnership, an in- 
vestor group associated with Miller 
Tabak Hirsch & Co. of the United 
States, has started its tender offer 
for 950,000 common shares of Van 
Dusen Air Inn at $19.50 each. Van 
Dusen is based in Minneapolis. 

Adda Inc. of the United States 
has reached an agreement to sell its 
Arkansas Cement Corp. unit to 
Ash Grove Cement Co. for $38 
million. The sale is expected to be 
completed on Friday. 

Adas Coosofidated Mining & De- 
velopment Corp. said a second- 
quarter loss was a result of continu- 
ing dep ressed copper prices with 


shares traded by foreign investors 
y- July period. 


in the January- July period. 

Estestioe Corp. of the United 
States said it expected continued 
softness in electronics orders to 
make results fQ£ the fourth quarter 
ending SepL 30 “substantially low- 
er*' iVinn results in the fourthperiod 
last year. It reported a third-quar- 
ter loss of $2.1 milli on, compared 
with profit of $4.9 million a year 
earlier. 


line herbicides into some of its lines 
of com seed. 

Phillips Petrol eion Co. of the 

United Stales has sold its subsid- 
iary, Gao North Sea LuL, to Dei 


little improvement in the price of 
gold. The '' ~ 


0 Manila-based company 

reported a second-quarter loss a 
31 cents a share on sales of $40.1 
miTiinn, compared with a loss of 12 
cents on sales of $445 milli on a 
year earlier. 

rnmpania Telefonica National 
de Espofia SA, the partly govern- 
ment-owned telephone company, 
took almost half of all foreign in- 
vestment on the Madrid Stock Ex- 
change in the first seven months of 
this year. Its shares accounted for 
8.4-jmflion of the 17.7 mfltion 


General Motors Corp- will lay off 
about 1.100 hourly workers at its 
Pontiac, Michigan, assembly facili- 
ties next month because of de- 
pressed demand for buses and 
heavy-duty trucks. Layoffs are 
scheduled to begin Sept. 16. 


McDouuB Douglas Corp. said 
that its McDonnell Douglas Fi- 
nance Corp. subsidiary nas ac- 
quired substantially all the assets of 
Sun Electric Corp.’s unit, SECC 
Financial Services lnc n for about 
$40 million. 


for 400 milli on kroner ($49 
lion). The sale includes GAO’s 
ownership of shares in four explo- 
ration blocks on the Dutch conti- 
nental shelf. 

Shoreline Savings Bank and 
Washington Federal Savings & 
Loan Association announced a 
proposal Monday to merge the 
bank into Washington Federal. 
Under terms of the agreement, 
Shoreline Savings* shareholders 
would receive Washington Federal 
stock for $15.50 per share, cash, or 
both. 

Stamfaml Chartered Bank signed 
an agreement in Beijing with Japa- 
nese and Chinese interests to setup 
a joint venture leasing company in 



Molecular Genetics Inc. said 
American Cyan amid Co. has 
signed an agreement licensing Pio- 
neer Hi-Bred International me. to 
incorporate tolerance to imidazo- 


Liaoning International 

vestment Corp., Dalian Local 
Trust & Investment Corp., ati of 
Oniia, and Nichimen Coip- of Ja- 
pan. The venture is capitalized at 
$3 million. 


Warner’s interests in two major 
U.S. cable- television programmers 
— MTV Networks Inc. and Show- 
time-The Movie Channel. 

Under the agreement. Viacom is 
to pay $500 million in cash and give 
Warner warrants to acquire Via- 
com stock, in exchange for 
Warner's interests in the two pro- 
grammers. 

Viacom is currently the iOth 
largest cable-system operator in the 
United States. 

Under the agreement Viacom 
would gain complete ownership of 
the two programming services and 
would more than double its annual 
revenues to about $770 milli on, a 
spokesman said. Viacom reported 
profit of $30.6 million on sales of 
$320 million in 1984. 

Warner owns half erf Warner 
Amex Cable Communications Inc., 
which owns part of MTV Networks 
and Showtime. Warner said Aug. 9 
that it had exercised its option to 
buy the other half of Warner Amex 
from American Express Co. tor 
$450 million. 

Under terms of the agreement, 
Viacom would acquire Warner’s 
31 -percent stake and Warner 
Amex’s 19-percent stake in Show- 
time, which primarily provides 
movies. Viacom owns the remain- 
ing SO percent 

Viacom would buy Warner 
Amex's 66-percent share of MTV 
Networks, which operates two 24- 
hour music- video services, MTV 
and VH-1, and a children’s chan- 
nel, Nickelodeon. 

Viacom said it would purchase 
the remaining 33 percent of MTV 
Networks' stock, which is publicly 
owned. Tor $33 JO per share. 

MTV Networks reported a 1984 
profit of SI 1.9 million on revenue 
of $109.5 million. 

Warner would get warrants to 
buy 1 .625 millio n shares of Viacom 
common stock at $70 per share. 
Warner also plans to buy addition- 
al warrants, at $9.75 per warrant, 
allowing it to acquire another 
625,000 shares of Viacom common 
stock at $75 a share. Viacom closed 
Friday at 550.50 a share on the 
New York Slock Exchange. 

If all the warrants were exer 


for West Germany. The cal e n dar 
was expected to be announced as 
early as Wednesday. 

Amiri] 


ion now centers on an 
issue volume of probably about 2 
billion DM or slightly higher, well 
above August’s 1.51 trillion DM. 
The potential of the DM to rise 
further a gains t the dollar was the 
key to derisions by corporate trea- 
surers about whether to raise funds 
in West Germany at present, the 
managers said. 

Syndication managers were di- 
vided on the effect of currency- 
market developments on the size of 
the new calendar. 

About a half dozen leading syn- 
dication managers canvassed by 
Reuters reflected this division, but 
more than half said that they ex- 
pected the September calendar 
would be fairly busy after ihe mod- 
est issue volume seen in the sum- 
mer. Borrowers had registered is- 
sues for 1.83 billion DM in July. 

Sources Monday were expecting 
the World Bank to finish up this 
month’s <*al«nrtar with an offi 


for 250 million DM. The 
World Bank issue was widely ex- 
pected to appear with DG Bank 
Deutsche Genossenschaftsbank as 
] fad manager and 10 be part Of & 

multicurrency financing by an in- 
ternational cooperative banking 
group. 

In April, DG Bank lead-man- 
aged a 200-miDion-DM and 60- 
miHion Emopean-cunency-unit is- 
sue for the World Bank, which 
simultaneously launched issues in 
Swiss francs, guilders and Austrian 
schillings. 

One U.S. bank branch syndica- 
tion h eart sai d that a surge of sew 
issues should be registered for Sep- 
tember, in view of the DM being up 
strongly from lows against the dol- 


lar atthe end of Febntaiy. 

that it ps 


ffenng 


“1 would guess that it [issue vol- 
ume] would more likely be above 
2JS [billion] ihan below, ” the UJS. 
syndication head said. The danger 
of the dollar collapsing by as much 
as a 1 DM is weti past now that the 
U.S. currency hasfairly moderately 
did from its highs above 3.47 DM 
earlier this year, he said. 

A nvmflgpr for a major West 
German bank printed to a survey 
in Friday’s Boeisen-Zrinmg busi- 
ness newspaper that showed an av- 
erage expectation that public- au- 
thority bond yields, as calculated 
daily by the Bundesbank, would 
end the year at about 6.35 percent. 


The calculation stood at 6.28 per- 
cent Friday, its lowest since De- 
cember 1978, and down from 6.42 
percent a week earlier. 

Although the 12 bond-market 
specialists canvassed by the news- 
paper expected further yield de- 
clines before year end, general 
opinion was that the room for fur- 
ther dramatic slides was now con- 
siderably limited. 

Syndication managers said that 
unless borrowers have, like multi- 
national companies, a constant 
need for DM funds, they would 
balance initial costs against risks of 
higher repayment costs. 

“I don’t know bow much longer 
corporate treasurers are going _ to 
want to wait, whether that W print 
in the final analysis makes that 
much difference,*' the West Ger- 
man batik syndication manager 
said. 

The managers said some unfore- 
seen factors could also emerge in 
currency markets, suddenly revers- 
ing the DM"s rise against the dollar 
and putting renewal upward pres- 
sure on yields in West Germany. 

A second manag er for 3 U.S.- 
based hanlc in Frankfurt said, how- 
ever, that feeling was running 
strongly that the DM would rise to 
at least 160 against the dollar. 
Most borrowers would therefore 
wait until cost of funds has 
dropped further. 


CURRENCY MARKETS 


Quiet European Trading 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — The dollar was 
mixed against most currencies 
Monday in trading that was very 
quiet because banks in Britain, Sin- 
gapore and Hong Kong were 
dreed Tor holidays. 

“The market is dead here," said a 
currency dealer in Frankfurt 

Other dealers said they expected 
little activity even after markets re- 
open on Tuesday because no major 
U.S. economic statistics are to be 
released until late in the week. 


cised, Warner would j|ain 10 per- 


cent of Viacom, said David R- 
Fluhrer, a Viacom spokesman. 


The dollar was fixed in Frank- 
furt at 17586 Deutsche marks 
Monday, unchang ed from 17586 
DM on Friday. Dealers said the 
imi< dosed in the middle of the 
day's narrow range in a market 
thinned by the absence of London 
traders and underpinned by its re- 
sistance to a drop below the sup- 
port level of 174 DM last week. 

Dealers said the dollar seemed 
trapped within a range of 17350 to 
178 DM, with the entry of U.S. 
markets on Monday afternoon also 
failing to liven up trading. 


Corporate orders out of West 
Germany were at a very low ebb, 
traders said. 

The dollar turned in a mixed 
performance in other European 
markets. 

In Paris, the dollar was quoted at 

8.4225 French francs, down from 
8.4245 francs on Friday. The dollar 
closed in Zurich at 21538 Swiss 
francs, up from an earlier 21505 
francs. 

Earlier in the day, the dollar end- 
ed against the yen in Tokyo at 
236.55, up from 236.45. 


The European markets continue 
to focus on the st 


; strength of the UJ5. 
economy, waiting on data due at 
the end of the week. These include 
July leading indicators, in addition 
to trade balance figures and factory 
orders. 

Some operators in Frankfurt 
said foreign cheats had voiced con- 
cern over West Germany’s growing 
espionage scandaL 
There were a series of meetings 
in Bonn as Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl of West Germany and key 


minis ters tried to limit the damage 
fanral by the defection last week 
of a top West German spy hunter 
to East Germany. 

However, West German dealers 
said the Deutsche mark had shown 
resistance to pressure over such af- 
fairs in the past and few anticipated 
any major impact on currency trad- 
ing. 

Interest rate factors also played 
little role Monday. 

Eurodollar deposit rates re- 
mained at last week’s softer levels, 
with six months remaining un- 
changed at 8 3/16 percent. Like- 
dated Emomarks were unchanged 
around 4 1 1/16 percent, while do- 
mestic money market rates were 
steady. 

The Bundesbank, the West Ger- 
man central bank, last Friday in- 
jected 4.6 billion DM liquidity aid 
into the money market- While no 
further relaxation of credit policy is 
expected at Thursday’s routine 
council meeting, dealers see its 
open market move as a dear sign it 
wants rates to stay soft. 

(Reuters, A P) 





THE AIRLINE 

THAT STARTED FLYING IN 1947 

IS NOW TWO YEARS OLD. 







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SINGAPORE AJ RUNES i 


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we have tne most moaem 




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Tobies include Hie mtionwfde prices 
up to tbe closing on Well street 
owl do not reflect kite trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 




15 



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64% 

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3to 

3 

3 + to 



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19ft 

I9to + V* 

L96C20J 

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5 

344% 

34 

34ft + ft 

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627 

14ft 

1446 

14ft + w 



20 

lft 

lto 

ito— to 

140 6i 

11 

1 

23 

27 

22 



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449 

Aft 

546 

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JQt j 


1 

lift 

lift 

lift 


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646 





56 

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ft 

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15 

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9 — to 



77 

lto 

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40c an 

9 

4 

13ft 

I3to 

13% — to 

48ol54 


21 

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21% 

3M + to 


9 

8 

in 

9ft 

TO +16 

JKJ 154 


15 

Aft 

Ato 

Ato— V6 

40 20 

7 

7 

19ft 

19ft 

1946— to 



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14% 

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J2e 1j9 

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4 

371% 

37 

37 

.10 1J 

29 

5 

Bto 

si% 

Bto 

40b 5.1 

11 

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7ft 

TV, 

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am iCHa 
34 * ico 
m iPM 
Ut IRTCP 
4>% ISS 
1 % ImpGp 
IV* Implnd 
30 I modi s 
AVS inf Wit 
11 Instrns 
1* I rats* 
21% litsSypf 
Aft Inter* s 
lift mimk 
TV. intBKnt 
'ti* IntBkwt 
an. infHvd 
91% IIP 
3Vi IntPwr 
A IntSaow 
A iniThrn 
a InThrnf 
vs intDto 
i3i% ionics ■ 
194* IroaBrd 
2* Esalv 


140 

12 

20 1J> 23 


20 

.96 9JB 63 
40 


18 U% 
23 38V* 
X UK* 

12 19% 
2122 1% 

S 2% 
73 121% 
10x15 
64 3J* 
26 *to 

13 7to 

1 104% 
5 5»% 
3 6% 

1428 7ft 


12 

25 

M 28 26 


44 4416— to 

2% 7ft- 1% 
2% 244 
16% 1644 — to 
44% 4ft — to 
2VS 2% 

Ito lto 
381% 381% — 1% 
11 to 1 lto — V, 
19to 1944 + 1% 
lto lto— '% 
7ft 2to — M 
124% 12V* 

14Vl 141% — W 

% 

7to 7to 

urn lOto + to 

54% 5to— 1% 
Aft 646 — to 
7to 7to— to 

^ ts-s 

19to 19to 
394% 394%— to 
74% 2to 


1346 
5to 
94% 
131% 
1146 
1546 16to 
151% 1546 
161% 16to 
24% 24% 

IBM. 184% 
946 944 

146 146 

48% 

7to 
21 % 
to 
urn 
[4to 15 
■946 30 
9to 9K 
134% 

"K 

17ft 

17 

20ft 
424% 
4ft 
I3U 


104* 416 Quota a s 


JSt SB 
A9 3 

13 

45 

X 

8 

71% 

1616 

7 

161% 

7 — to 
lAto + to 

J2 

4.1 

43 

48 

17V* 

17% 

174% + to 

A2 

3J 

8 

9 

12ft 

12ft 

12ft— to 



B 

2 

Bft 

8ft 

Bft— to 




2 

184% 

184% 

184% 




27 

3ft 

3V3 

3to 



X 

X 

40to 

39ft 

40 



14 

53 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft to 




1 

5ft 

54% 

5ft + to 

.Tfla 24 

13 

10 

44% 

416 

416 

JO 

1.9 

18 

15 

181% 

101% 

lOto— to 

M 

32 


9 

1716 

171% 

171% — ft 




43 

ft 

ft 

ft + to 

J6 

1J 

26 

84 

3A4% 

361% 

36VS 




9 

18to 

18% 

18% — to 

.12 

A 

12 

7 

21 

3046 

SJ*%— to 




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Aft 

AW + to 

J6i 22 

9 

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25% 

2S% 

25%— % 



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6 

7 

646 

7 + to 

JO 

1J 

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2A 

17 

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1546 

JO 

ZO 

14 

76 

25% 

2<ft 

25 — ft 


1746 1246 Jodvn JOb 3J 9 5 1416 14to 14to— ft 

746 5ft Jacobs 1 5ft 5ft 5ft 

4ft 216 JtffAm 8 174 4 3ft 4 + to 

2 to JetAwt 6 % 'Hi 4% — to 

94% 5ft Jetron .711 A J 14 2 TVs 7V, 71% 

6VS 3 John Pd 14 34% 3ft 3ft + to 

lift 7to JohnAm 30 U II 122 8ft 7ft 7ft— to 

lift 6 John Ind 4 106 9to 9 9—1% 

7to 3VS JmpJkn 9 14 3to 3ft 3ft— to 


4ft iv% 
16to 10 
13 I Oft 
ZK% 1346 
9to 5ft 
16ft 8 
8 31% 

91% 446 

4ft 2to 
S 3ft 
9ft 2ft 
546 3ft 
3ft 2 
17ft 10U 
16ft lOto 
30to 22ft 


KanakC 5 

KavCp JO 14 7 

Kayjn J0r 12 10 

Kelchm J8t 3J 18 

KevCo J0n 34 

KBVPh JO 14 X 

KevCo 7 

KavCaun 

Klddewt 

Klnark 

KIrtoy 

KIIMIe 15 

KtoerV STtr -B 

Know 18 

Knoll 1« 

KnserC 232 8.1 81 


1016 lift 
X 3 ft 
2 ito 
1 3ft 
1 34k 

113 24% 
6 4ft 
27 7W 
19 17ft 
21 15ft 
135 28ft 


346 346— to 

12*% 12ft — to 
lift lift— ft 
17ft 17ft— to 
8ft Bft + to 
lift lift— to 
3U 3ft + to 
4to 4Vi — to 
3ft 3ft— to 
3ft 3%, 

2ft 246 
446 4ft 
2 to 2V% + to 
1716 17to — to 
15ft 15ft— 16 
28ft 28 V%— ft 




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34ft + to 


.12* 1.1 4 

■40& 4J 14 


4 to 1ft 
3ft 2 
24ft Bft 
13to Bft 
1546 llto 
llto Bft 
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2ft lto 
1616 lift 
Bft 5V6 
141% 9to 
10ft Aft 
22 15ft 
15ft 101% 


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U5R Ind 

Ultmto 11 

Unlcorp 

UnScppf 25 SO 

unlmrn ’-f** 1 ?-? 

UAirPd J4ta 25 12 
UFoadA .16 62 
UlMAd 1% 

UnltefV » 

UnvCm IS 

UnlwRs - » 

UnlvRu JOa 47 13 
UnvPort 


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2 24% 

53 13 to 

54 12ft 
13 15 

629 lOto 
15 21to 
98* 1ft 
129 15to 
13 7ft 
1 12ft 
95 7to 
27 17 
4 12ft 


lft— to 
2ft- to 
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14ft— to 
M4%— to 
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1ft + to 
i5i% — to 
7ft— to 
1246— to. 
716 + to 
17 . + to 
12ft— to 


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27ft 17ft 
10 24% 

234% 161% 
61* 34% 

ft ft 
14ft 916 
10ft 5 
9 Sto 
644% 53V, 
9ft Aft 
121% 8 
19ft 1*4% 


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Voisor s M 1-7 15 

(/•elf 

VlAmC 40b 14 10 
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VsrnJt JO 1.9 1A 

VlatOCh 

Vlcan 12 

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VbuaKr JO 16 9 

Voptox 40 4.1 12 
VuIcCP JO 44 12 


946 9ft— to 
25ft 25ft — to 
I - 8 — ft 
17 17 - to 

4ft Aft ' 
to to— ft 
10ft 10ft— to 
7ft 516 + to 
6to Aft + to 
641% 64ft + ft 
84% 84% + to 

9ft 9ft 
TBto 18ft 






14 

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516 

51% 



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ft 

ft 

ft 

18to 

54% WstBrC 



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64% + to 

lift 

Sto wstbrfl 

J0 


12 

12 

104% 

104% 

104% 

ISto 

Aft WDtoin 



30 

302 

1346 

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159* 

17to + to 

2116 

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12ft 

13 

1246 + ft 

3046 

134% WhEnt a 



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83 

239% 

23to 

23ft 

5*6 

2Vi Wichita 




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7ft 

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5ft 

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44% 


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TV. 

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79 to 

294% + to 

13ft 

71% WlllcxG 



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a 

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m 

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23ft 

19ft WlnNn 

224 109 


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20ft 

204% 

20ft 

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LSD 10.1 


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441% 

441% + U 

10ft 

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40 

44 

10 

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9 

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114% WKWHr 

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20 

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11 

171% 

1746 

171% + ft 

Sto 

2ft WwricE 



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78 

346 

3ft 

3ft 

174% 

124% WWdcpf 1J0 12J 


11 

144% 

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I4V6 

lift 

94% Worttui 

J51 



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10 

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746 

44% Wrftvirt 




560 

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21ft 

13% wrothr 

joa 

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15 

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9to 

94% 

9to 

5ft YankCo 



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0-50 k nil’ll very quickly 


We hope you’ll never see a long queue 
at an Avis rental desk. Not that we don’t like 
being popular. We do. 

. Which is why weVe introduced ways 
of getting you into your car fester than 
anyone else. 


Our Avis Express Card for instance. 
All those tedious questions you’re usually 
asked are encoded on a magnetic strip. . , ; 

When we run it through one of our! 
computer terminals your rental agreement 
is printed automatically. 


But it’s not just our speed that’s made 
us the largest rental company throughout 
Europe, Africa and the Middle East. (Around 
the world we’re represented in 126 countries 
and more than 1100 airports.) 

We may have the only direct world- 


wide computer link in car 

rental. 

But we also owe a lot 
to those three old-fashioned 
words. fj=g 

We tty harder. 


AVIS 


qS/SST 8 


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Hanso] 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, At'CUST 27, 1985 




Page 13 


«™l r »*7W, Ss , te 


ocuses Expansionist Policies on Hostile SCM 


1 i?£P° N “ For dshT wert, “ 8 *> ®»ke them more success* uL dustrie^ Carislwoolc (lonUes), En- “Ii does not mailer what you arc 

TV^f I m^ n ’ chainn a^ofH^^ Although ii is Britain’s tenih-lare- dicott Johnson (shoes). Ames making, Lord Hansen racetold ^on»47 

one of Britaiii’smS? ^ company, witha market capital (shovels) and Hygrade (fast food at an interviewer . Wlw matters is njOhon Imi yrar. Tms 

and feared corooraic^S!" nahQa «.44 billion, it is aeon- baseball stadiums). The American how you go about what yon are Hanson has gc«e °n record as 

has countered m *ai is nm by about 50 people businesses account for two-thirds making. SSS^pt ^SSii^SrSSr 1 !? 

2* proceeds of “7*“® are only 25 cxecutirccm- of total sales of just over 54 billion. Martin Taylor, a director of ^ or tf s ^^|j?^ n h SL’ y S S’ 

share issue would either be usedm pkiyces « the company’s head- It is a conglomerate, and if there Hanson Trust, explained: We art ° J ^ 

purchase another British nSm If ^ Uartcr s in central London and the is a common thread among the an industrial management compa- ITlonlhs “™ m Ma Y- 

left earning a useful return on tS Sitac - num ber at its U.S. headquar- companies it is that they are almost ny which believes in devolution of 

money markets. 011 1005 in I selin. New Jersey/Hmson all matura concems in basic indus- responsibility to the operating 

It has, after all, become fadiim ?" duslrie ^ its American subsid* tries or retailing whose previous companies, and involving the man- 

abw in Britain for comnanipc i " ***¥' ^ by Sir Gordon White, has performance had been languid agement of those companies in um 

raise money cheantv fmmri, ■ 3 similar number of executives. rather than uns u ccessful. Hanson success of their performance^ 

shareholders and use it if. l 7 u ^ has steered clear of glamour stocks Managers are cm Hanson-devisa 

unn- to- benefit from KUkSSPl Trust runs many compa- and high-technology industries, incentive plans that are based or 

rates. mes wefl^coown to Bntons — Ev- «y/ e are in basic human nods the return on capital employed 

Lord Hanson was m.ii. -i.r London Brick companies," is how one Hanson and the bead office operates, as om 

about Ids intention* « IL,;™ Sr *5" AUdere department stores executive put it. analyst put it, as a •‘mini-merchani 


S 


Chicago Merc, CBOEtoLink 

(Continued from Page 9) tax-exempt state and municipal « 




r— » BL UK omipauys ucau- U ta « am u u«.ni nansou | lUk, Mpuuw. mnnlli* arulwt in Mm 

quarters in central London and the is a common thread among the an industrial management compa- ra ™ ms “““ m M v- 
same number ai its U.S. headquar- companies it is that they are almost ny which believes in devolution of Hanson Trust reject 
ters in Iselin. New Josev7Hmst» all mature concerns in basic indus- resoonsibifitv to the operating media suggestions is 


EffisaSEH 

from high hielS 


ny which believes in devolution of Hanson Trust reject some British 
responsibility to the operating media suggestions is that it is an 
companies, and involving the man- asset stripper, and, occasionally, a 
agement of those companies in the greentnailer. u We are very rare sell- 
of their performances." *n.“ says Mr. Taylor. “We just 
Managers are cm Hanson-devised have a commitment to perform." 
incentive plans that are based on . “He does sell off pans of a com- 
the return on capital employed, pany that he does not require." says 
and the bead office operates, as one Mr. Morton of De Zoeie & Bevan. 
analyst put it, as a “mini-merchant “Thai is because he knows what he 

wants and there is no point in keep- 

tw. : K i: lt i e doubt of the sue- in 6 bi “ he does not wanL Bu . 1 1 do 

There IS little aouot ihinlr thai ic ,cc«i ctrinmna 31 


(Continued from Page 9) tax-exempt state and municipal is- 

sues* 

wiD surpass London as the biggest g^mse the Chicago Merc began 
foreign capital market. “For one, M a jjutter-and-egg market, it has 
he said, “the Japanese success in lendgd w favor ^ perishable 
foreign trade and investments has commo di l j es 35 live cattle, live 
given the country a huge amount or . ^ ^ Thus, when 

capital to recycle as well as hedge. t0 financial markets, the 

Ibis should not only benefit us but w„_ chose such short-term insim- 

.1.. n ..r fnonrlc at thr* fTlOPO ah j m hills ,nd 


also our friends at the Chicago 
Beard of Trade." 

Although the Chicago Board of 


muu — 

ments as 90-day Treasury bills ana 
Eurodollar futures and options. 
“In any case, all markets today 


^atsSrina S “Wttion is airports, as well as some lesser- before be became a life peer, and “ SSSmSte comoarol n01 lhiak *« assei stripping at 

industries. Imown industries such as Barbour Sir Gordon argue that their cardi- c^s of the Ha^n «yle comparM ^ 

™wSaUX^ Sel ’- hC n Said ’ Campbell (textiles). Northern »«[ ^ ** ^JSSSTSSISHw it Mr-MorlonalsonotesthatHan- 

Se to 1x1 ^gamated Industries (rubber), business management of the cor»- stock son is not known for ruthless clo- 

SLD (diesel-driven pumps) and pan«s in which they have revested. on the ^ sures and large-scale byoffs, pre- 

UDS (textiles). ^SSrSd^nbrokTDrofits ferring usu^to replati odydie 


2k 

Lord Hanson 




/UUIUU^U UK wuivt»Bu ““J 7 -* — . |” 

Trade, the largest futures market, are actually short-term anans, oe 
and the Chicago Merc have long they stocks or 30-year Treasury' 
been viewed as rivals, the fact is bonds." Mr. Melamed said, be- 
that their backgrounds have led cause interest rales are a major fae- 


and those lower in the company “rr 77 u ac f awW( i innu- 

move up and benefit from the in- able P^ ucl ^‘i, , 1 S f [f'^X n f s 
centives he offers." he said. Lord Fmanoal fuurns a^has 

Hanson’s secret is motivating peo- Ox * 6 m Treasury A*wx*ia 
pic ."d very stric. Enrrnci^ con- 


th fm into two different kinds of tor in aD markets. 

futures and options markets, Mr. 

Melamed noted. 

Perhaps because the Chicago Belgian Prices l 
Board of Trade has long been the The Asotin 

dominant market in wheat, corn, BRUSSELS — ’ 
and soybeans, all of which are stor- said Monday that 1 


, . wuuumgE ana indus- 

tn^products group for which 
Hanson Trust paid alrn^ jjnn 
million a year ago. 

7? to a^ibcr Unit- 
erf States Industnes, that would be 

Hanson said at the 
hme. WeHke to be general rather 
than specific. 

Loud Hanson, 63, ended the 
speculation L-^t week. The astute 
businessman, whose company’s 

ftltl hncinac, . ■ 


puuipaj ™u i — ; — ■ . — . . c V ohon ao in 1964 Hanson Trust sores ana laree-scaie tawns, pre- 

UDS (textiles). £Sn Sf SSrded unbroken profits f«ring usually to replace only the 

£ ™” S 0,1 “ ^ S°^ h^n P^cgy c-npa-y. d led <*. 


Belgian Prices Unchanged 

The Associated Press 

BRUSSELS — The government 
said Monday that consumer prices 
in August were unchanged from 
July and that the inflation rate for 
the past 12 months dropped 0.41 
point from last month, to 4.65 per- 
cent. 


Lora Hanson, 63, ended the (Continued from Page 9) cent Australian company to seek its ence operating with tdragnaHnoa- 

fpeculauon L-^t week. The astute wouldn’t «imri« me if RHP had 30 fortunes in the United Slates. Ru- niesmjomt ventures at home. Ev- 

. businessman, whose company^ oSTfts^with ^Murdoch’s S 2 -billion acquisi- ery major, ifternaureial source 

first business venture was renting in rhr I I S tion of six Metromedia television company interested in venturing 

stations w the latest move in the J-A-JSftSPSdS iwCSTS'S Ite taSe'E SiKfltal5ftaiW»iS». 

v --Sjg -* ?”? 1 lu!ib »«?a Crony, president or the Now Yo* derotolOM npaonon of Ite US. ” Am „ rivi^ f rom the weakness of the million gainer last year. That torn- 

a^shSefil^M 11 ?^ 560 office of Potter Papers, a Md- Incl SeU5- mining company that Australian dollar rather than from around was made possible by an 

^iS&n includes ^er ptiros for minerais and oiL 

it S? CS SS:: SR. 2 % AUS,raUm 

SCM^S board, meeting on Sunday, ^jmes of to Australia’s most proOtable bank,^ The egoience has been mvalua 

unanimously reiected Lhe offer and FmH rtf expanding its network of U.S. toBH ” . .. .L.d nun 


The Bis Australian, ’ Seeks New Horizons in U.S. in Oil, Steel and Mining 

it Australian company In seek its ^ ^ B^enHiS^ie^W^lS 


equity. Thai leaves plenty of bor- Mr. Loton's strong position at 
rowing capacity. Broken Hill stems partly from his 

Most Australian brokerage triumph in retooling of the rec«- 
houses project a jump in Broken siou-plagued steel division. He 
Hill's earnings for the fiscal year transformed the division from a 
IQ 9 JL ..:ak w.«> than man,» ftm. CllWmillinn tlWT in 19g^ to aS90- 


DIU&CU ill II dICUU pdiUT IIWU1 Oil tjt UU UiU , 

triumph in retooling of the reces - he joined the BHP sted division as 
sion-plagued steel division. He a trainee. 


By 1970, Mr. Loton was running 


1 986, with most of the increase de- SlOO-miltion loser in 19Jbto a 590- a ' or slee iworks; three years lat- 
riving from the weakness of the million gainer last year. That turn- a ^ ^ ^ division. In 

Australian dollar rather than from around was made posable by an n , mw i manag in g di- 

higher prices for minerals and oiL agreement struck with the Ausua- ^ Qr operating officer, of 
lian government. ^ which decided ^ company; he won the 

A._ „ =_ _B. S£ B ^ u ?. e ,rai :. s _ 


xni or the Australian chief gj^tjve title last year. 

Car Built in Yugoslavia onliT^stk mmpaniS 0 ^ 1 in Though arguably the most im- 

w _ __ .. . r n> MiMnia Affirm - in All*. 


ex ways of nuurimiring values to 
holders. 

“It is in the mold of Hanson 
acquisitions: SCM is exactly the 
kind of company that he goes for," 
said Robert Morton, an analyst for 
De Zoete & Bevan, a London 
stockbrokerage. “Like his other re- 
cent U.S. acquisition. United 
Slates Industries, it is a company 
which has already undergone a 
great deal of rationalization and 
sorting-out, which perhaps was not 
fully realize d by the shareholders." 
a SCM is a paints and chemicals 
~ company. Hanson Trust is in die 
business of industrial management, 
of buying businesses and attempt- 


utive wooed US. money managers time when the S^,erev oStions rank among Inc. Monday placedtts Yugoslavia- steelworkers, one-third of a com- 

dnring a five^ty swing last May. spectacularly weak, trading ^ rSS^mpetitive in the world, built minicar on sale at several East plemeni of 42,000, have been laid 
“This is a startling departure for a «wmd 1 70i iUS ■ .. . - th deposits that are Coast dealers. Ward’s Automotive ofi. With imports hamstrung and 

=»sS jgMJEiSS 

CS^totoftheNewS 


There is little question that BHP Maltp s U.S. Sales Debut 

is well structured to punts multma- UmHj Prm 


OI UIC UU1I1C3UL UJlUpdUlW ua - c»“ O” * . 

effect, BHP. Also, the Big Austra- portam corporate officer m aus- 

lian was permitted by the govern- tralia, Mr. Loton is not particularly nail's^ steel industry. Shortly afiet- 
ment to slice the fat from its opera- well known. He rarely grants inter- £ , m . tnn p fCT e n t gamblai on a 
rii-inc Plant* were shut and 14.000 views and adopts a formal manner belief that oil lav be- 


the newly founded Melbourne 
company began working a large 
silver deposit at Broken Hill, in the 
New South Wales cutback. The 
company eventually moved into 
iron ore and coal mining and 
thence into steelmaJdng. By the 
outbreak of World War II, it was a 
potent industrial force. 

During the 1960s, BHP was 
quick to stake a claim in the huge 
iron ore deposits discovered in 
western Australia. That ore 
brought handsome prices from 3 a- 


Ututed Press international mem to slice the fat from its opera- well known. He rarely grants rnier- 
DETROIT — Yugo of America tions: Plants were shut and 14,000 views and adoptsa '^rmal maimer 
w__j i i i — „ o mm. in rmhhc. Mr. Reef, the consultant. 


of a pain in the neck," said James Abo ? t4 ? p ^S Tblficopper and gold mine in Pa- uy ever sold in the United States, black. Lower cosLs also helped 

Rotmt. president ofthe New York “[SteSSSmofittcwfsaSiB p^SGuinea — but BHP re- will be prical at 53^90, substan- them to increase sted exporis. lwli iV11 . r - 0ul ^ 5lrai[ ^ proaU cuon is 

JAWe«& Son, another ^®^J^^^Every 1- £nlly wrote off its investment tially less than any subcompaa t S ^ title. The board gave rtlo one of its ^ And although it is a 

Australian broker. m Austranan rarreu ^- e y ,HerZ\ currently on the market. lately groomed, Mr. Loton looks QWa James Balderstone, a 8 -hillion nnmral eas 

Mr. Loton says of Biff’s move cent swing in the Austnrim 1 B f|p ^ deep pock- The car, based on an old Fiat every inch a chief exeoitivt The wor ( ( ^]y executive with ties to Aus- n f f northwestern Australia, 

to bufld operatioiis abroad: “We dofiw rtjatiorahip company is generating design, will be offered as a two- West Aus t ralia n joined BHP m tr a1iatt1 Mutual Provident Society, Sup ha* failed to make another We 

don’t underestimate the diffioil ties. BHFs I nion’s nearly $1 billion \ yewin cash door hatchback only, although a 1954 after graduating with hemors ^ largest institutional holder of - ^ ^ ■ h country Mr 

of going multinational. But we 006 “ S^hai of wWch be spent four-door sedan is planned for sale in metallurgical engineering from ggp'^ires. iS^fiStSSSdfcSlifi 

SiSS “SS*£ jssaaseu IESSBP— 


ouui mrnicar on saie ai sevenu caai pionau ui ua»». . ..uu^u 

Coast dealers. Ward’s Automotive off. With imports hamstrung and of presmee ana easy coarm mat B HP struck oil on the first try, a 

News reported. The Yugo. the first costs slashed. Broken HflTs steel marked Ms predecessors. decade later, the Organization of 

car from a Communist bloc coun- operation moved back into the \vh en Sir James McNeill Petroleum Exporting Countries 
uy ever sold in the United States, black. Lower cos is also helped pepped down as chair man in mid- sent oil prices snooting up. 
will be priced at $3,990, substan- them to increase sted exports. i9p?Mr. Loton did not get the B ~ s ^. Droductioi] jg 

tially less than any subcompaa ^ tide. The board gave h to one of its SSalLAndJLu^ it is a 

currently on the market. lately groomed, Mr. Loton looks owa ^ Jamcs Balderstone, a DarlD CT ina^ 8 -billion namral gas 

The car, based on an old Fiat every inch a chief exeoitivt The executive wth ties to Aus- off ^hwestem AustrS 

design, will be offered as a two- West Australian joined l BHP m Mutua i Provident Society. failed to make another We 


viewsandadoptsa onnaJ maimer bdief that oU lay be- 

in public. Mr. Reef, the cousultanti 5 o3bms Strait, which separates 
described him as lacking the blaid Tacmania from mmnJand Austra- 
onH Mcu rtwrm that ... . #• 


aren't (tainted by them. We have ea^rness to boosi me oimpanys «D«5^hr»- on 1988, the weekly publicatic 

been involved in the international U A asset ^ acquisition* long-term debt said. Yugo plans to have about 2‘ 

■SMBS5’*-- “Vco. ot dealeis nationwide. Ward's said. 


Moodanph 

cm: 


UNtontfi 

iQabLoo Stodc 


Sata-W, Net IlMonm 

Ply. YW. lB MMI Uim j PM. atl* HMLW SteCfc. 


DM. Ykt 100c 


Met 1 1J Month 

Lam l PJKOm HWiLow 5MCE 


NH I 12 Month 

Qty. YIQ. ^TflS Htati Law 3 PA Chw> I WWiLow Slo<* _ 


Prices 


NASDAQ prices ns of 
- a Pam. Nbw York Hme. 

Via The Associated Press 


12 Month 
M Mi Low Stecfc 


1>V* V* A6L 
72* 14U. AFG 
2S 1QV» ASK „ 
23 m AomfU 
BS m 
11W 8=M 

28 17V. 

7V, 2Vh 

im Mk 
lift 5 
SW 3 
17* 13 Vi 
23» lg* 

UVx 

IBM 7 « 

r ss 

17 «h 
iM IBM 
22» 15Vi 
2MC M 

5 IJS 
ltWa 5W 
MV. «h 
12 M « 

I7V. BVS 
M* IB* 

14* 10* 

Mh 5* 

17* 13 

8 * ** 

30* IM* 

37* 30 
14* » 

12* 5* 

24* m* 

7V» 3* 

4* W 
34* 14* 

IS 7V. 

6 1 * 


DM. VM. 10 * y 
A ~~~ 

Si 

74 

* * % 

5 

224- 

7 

jBO SO 11 Ox 

I I* 

■10« J » 

140 17 04 
24 

.100 S 3M 

40 2J TiO 

s 

43 

335 

455 

t 48 

JO IS 45 
M 
141 

JO U 15 

I 78 

« y w 

J* LB 512 
A 12 
•^125 
13 

7J8 3J) » 

li» 3A i w 

222 

5W 

; 1J» 42 2M» 


Nit 

3 PJWLCWw 


O* Carwnk \ » 

16* 6V. Cartel » 447 

21* B* Cassvcs 
12 5* Ccncors 104 

35* 21* CntrBc 1A0 *5 « 

57^ BhbnM UAU 86 
37 22* CnBshS 1^2. 43 M 

31* 15* CFdakS M 14 405 
0* 1* Cormtfc « 

15* ** Coh* 749 

5* -3* ChopEn 40 

71* 13* ChrmS* JO 1.1 « 

21* 11* CUKPirt 47 

11 6* OlkTdl U 

31* 20* Ort-win J8 1 J Ml 
■ 7* 3*-CHin«K 95 

S 

31 24* ChlPOC* H 

im 4* a»ranr g 

19* 7* cnrOwi a u n 
12* s* amwi -i? 5 *** 


26 13* Amrwsi 

B* 3* A tltPi n -j 22 

29* 16VI Am*B 1Q5 

»* I-* Aiwae» JO Z3 1® 

15* 9 Antooic 

15* 7* AHBTitl 47 

37* 17 AWNW .. , , A 


^30* 14* 

ms 


t Ts "t '*■ 


31* If* 

27* 11* 

19* 10* 

34 19* 

13* 8 

7* » 

22* 15* 

48 18* 

9 4* 

17* 10* 

9 5* 

22 * ]» 

27 12* 

43* 25 
14* 8* 

14 8* 

30 I** 

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® IS 

14* 4 

13* 5* 

9* 4* 

13* 3* AvOQTt 

25* 6 AwiiJGr 

25* 17* AvrniK 
20 15* AvoW 

20* 13* AwtoKJP 


M ^ 2941 
1443 
51 
39 
140 
3 
7 
7 

Mb 11 1272 
.12 U 274 
44 20 339 

.90 U Ag 

114 

78 

49SX 

24 

» 344 

3 S 

20 

49 

3 

124 


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1 Si 5 

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29* 

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4*— * 
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22 *— * 
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tno .!» 1J 2M 

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34* 14* CJPhpr . 

12* 4 ciprtco t 1 

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2^^SSSS , M01«U J 

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^ rsr s 

3MC S3* CSUAC 1X0 30 220 

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s . 1 * Comdlol ™ 

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43 22* CirtseU 104 25 IM 

13* 9* CrntShr -»a 5B n 

31* 21 CnwvTI 100 S7 4 
7* 1* ComAnj * 

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3* 12. CrnpCdS , A3 


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25* IsSSSSS^O J2 W ^ 

1 SSiff S’ 

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13* 9* CmpDt OB O 1 

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11* 4* CnVrtH 218 

ww 4* Cmpldn 
0* 5* CnwLR .12 L5 
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13 CCOPS 2.16 13J 756 

54* 32* SpSjs 1 M Z9 » 
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^ 3 ^^ 204.15.1 % 

T r « 

1644 644 Corwot 2«1 

23 13* ConwriB 4M 

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22 * 13* Coora B 08 U B 

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40* 39* 
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18* 18* 

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8 * 8 * 

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2 * 2 * 

7* 7* 
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9* 9* 
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18* 17* 
14* 14* 
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3* 344 

3* 3 
39* 38* 
12* 1144 
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12 *— * 

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17* + * 
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10 
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lft 144 
31* 21* 
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17* 4* EndoLa 77 

34 15* EnnCnv 4 

14* 7* EnFod 124 

17* 8* Enochs 30 13 13 

21* lO EnxsBi 70 

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B* 5* EqtOII JO 30 44 

43 25* ErteTI 05a 32 BW 

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4 

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3* GTS 
9* Galileo 
6* GamoB .W 1-4 
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5 Genets 
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7* GoFBk _ , . 
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14* GoukIP J4 45 
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14* 14* 
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30H 30ft 
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21 2D* 

33* 33* 
23* 22ft 
4* 4* 

28* 28ft 
24* 24* 
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17* 10* I 
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13 7* 

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16 5ft 

19* 9* 

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17 14 

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32 21* 

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44ft 38* 
7* 4ft 
20* 10ft 
32* 18ft 
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49ft 21* 
25* 20* 
33* 16* 
24* 19 
29 7ft 


14* Bft 
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7ft 4ft 
10* 3® 
31 15 

38ft 13 
17* Oft 
27ft 19* 
11 7ft 
14ft 7ft 
14* Bft 
34ft 17ft 
72* 37* 
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17 14* 

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39 38* 

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7ft 7 
14ft 13* 
14 13* 


19 — * 
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Saks In Net 12 Month 

Phi. VOtL 18fc HMi Low 3 POL OiW HMi Low Stnch 

r 2*r+s s* kss 

l2o 120 s« 2]* 21* 21* .S' SS 5“ 

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951 26ft 25ft 26ft + ft M* 

146 i*ac V2Vfa 13Vk 14 Z7 Mo 

IS S 6ft 6ft-* 34* 18ft 5ln 

S 5* 5 5ft + ft 6JJ 22 

JS 90 si ST KK ^ 


OldKnts 100 35 

OMRPS .74 14 

OWSofClOO 120 

OneBcn J* 1J 

OnLlne 

OctlcC 

OetlcR 

Ortxwc 

Orbit 

OrfaCn 

Ostnnn JO 1J 
OttrTP 276 90 
OwhiM -40 IJ 
Oxaco 


7* 7* 
14ft 14ft 
ltft 14* 
14 13* 

14ft 14* 
47 47 

18* IS* 
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It 14 
15ft 15ft 
18* 18ft 
52ft 53ft 
29* 29 
6ft 6 
8ft 8ft 

st a 

21 20V!i 

44 44 

5* 5* 

19* 19* 
32 31* 

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45 44ft 

23* 23* 
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24ft 24ft 
22ft 22* 


7* 

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16* 

14 

16* 

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18*— * 
16*— * 
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15ft + * 
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52ft- * 
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& 

51 ±ft 

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19* 

31ft + ft . 
5ft— * 1 
44*- * 
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23ft— * 
24ft + * 
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21* PNC* 
39* 

7 

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4 

10ft 
12* 

4 

5* 

5* 

7* 

9ft 
20ft 
S* 

21 

20* 

7* 

24ft 
4 

7* 

14* 

2* 

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27* 

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4* 

3 


405 

1J0O 27 a 
J« 59 M 
.13 17 126 




144 

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03 89 

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200 42 

20 1.1 150 

-64 14 85 

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7* 7 

4* 4* 
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31* 31 
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24 25* 

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13ft 13ft 
15ft 14* 
21ft 21* 
44* 45* 
18ft 18 
4ft 4ft 
II* 10ft 
32ft 32 
48* 48* 
2ft 2ft 
32 30* 

20ft 20* 
12 12 
5ft 5 
4ft 4ft 
33* 32* 
lift 11* 
10ft 10ft 
6* 6ft 
14 13ft 
17* 17, 
37ft 37* 
62 60 ft 

16* 14* 
34* 34 
20 20 
15* 15* 
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19ft 19 
2ft 2* 
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6M 6* 
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36ft 36* 
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10 * 10 . 
12 11* 
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33ft 33ft 
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13* 9 QuakCs J8 15 

32* 14* Quantm 
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13 8* QuUote 

II* 7* QixJtra 


ltft 4* 
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16* Bft 
14* 6* 

II 5ft 
7ft 2ft 
33* 19* 
20* 12* 
7ft 3ft 
23ft 15* 
10* 5ft 
35* 25* 
12* 3* 
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20 * 11 
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10 7ft 
20* 9ft 
16* 11* 
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29* 17ft 
43* 29 
15* 9* 

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22* 12ft 
17ft 10ft 
33* 26* 
16ft 11* 
13* 8ft 
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13 6ft 
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19* 11* 


30 

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13ft— ft 
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54*— 1* 
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13 

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Uft 10ft 10ft 
B* Bft Bft— ft 
II II 11 +ft 
33 22* 22* 

4ft 4ft 4ft + ft 
12ft 12* 12*— ft 
IDft 9ft 10 + * 


7 7* + ft 

16 16* — * 
lift lift 
10* 10ft— ft 
B* Bft + ft 
4ft 4ft— ft 
30ft 30* + ft 
19 19ft + ft 
2* 2* 

21* 21* 

9ft 9ft— * 
24 26ft + ft 

12 12 — ft 
4ft 4ft + ft 
14ft 14ft 

5ft 5ft + ft 
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13 11*— ft 

14* 14*—* 

1 8* Bft 
24ft 24ft— ft 
39ft 39*— * 
13ft 14 + * 

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. 14* 14ft 
27ft 28 — * 

1 lift lift 
i 12ft 12ft + ft 
22ft 22ft— ft 

I 10* 10*— * 

3ft 3ft— * 
, ISft ISft— ft 
, 16* 16* + ft 


8* Speedy 
Bft Spctnxi 
5ft SaecCil 
3ft SfarSrs 
5 StatBId 
19* Sfandvs 
11* SMMIc 
19 Stanhos 
18ft SiaSISs 
3ft SlateG 
4ft Steiger 
18ft StewSlv 
17ft Stwlrrf 
5* SIHei 
7 * Slrabn 
25* SlrwCl & 
19ft Stryker 

97 Subaru 
35* SubrB 
2ft Sum mo 

7 SumtHl 
ft SunCst 

6ft Sun»ed 

8 SuPSfcv 

3„ Suprte* 

ft v I Sykes 
4ft SvmbT 
6* Syntedi 
2ft Svntrex 
lift Svsatn 
M* SyASDC 
3ft Svslln 
4 * Srslnlv 
4ft SWtGn 
12* Svumt 


Sales In Ne> 

piv. YU MBs High Lew 3 POL QiVe 

70 17Vl 17 17 — * 

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19 31* 31 31 -ft 

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3 17ft 16ft 16ft- * 

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lift 10 129x IWft’fS?™ +S 

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129 ft ft ft 

B9 10* 9* 10ft . 

112 13* 12* 12* + * 

41 3ft 3* J* 

JB 1A 15 10 IB 18 + ft 

570 15ft 15 IS — * 
rsa s 4ft 4* + ft 

355 . 9ft 9ft 9ft + ft 

113 lift 11* 11*— * 

JB J 1J7X 25 24» 24ft- * 


25ft 13 
Tft 4ft 
28ft 14 
9ft 4 
22 11 
33ft 18* 
1298 8* 
25ft 13ft 
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20 13 

17ft tft 
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57* 29* 
14ft 6* 
29ft 9ft 
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17ft 8 
33 lift 
17* ID 
12ft 6* 
30* 23ft 


TCACb .12 
TocVIvs 
Tandem 
Tondon 

Telco 

TIcmA t 

TeiPlus 

Teiecrd J2 

Tetenict 

TelvJd 

Tetatn 

Telxans 

TermDt I 

TherPr 

Th rinds 

ThrdMt 1 JB 

TNortec 

TbouTr 

TlmeEn 

TmeFBi 

Tlprary 

Tofu s 

TotlSys 

TrakAu 

TrkxSSv 
TrusJo 40 


23ft 23ft 
4* 4ft 
ISft 14ft 
6ft 4* 
14* 14 
32ft 32* 
10 9* 

19* 18* 
25* 25 
2ft 2* 
ltft 16* 
14ft 15* 
5 4* 

9ft 9ft 
15* 14* 
52ft 52* 
7* 7ft 
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15 13* 

30ft 30 
11* 10ft 
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23ft— ft 
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lift + ft 
Tft + ft 
25 


14ft USLICs 
15ft UTL 
Ullrsy 
10* Unomn 
7* Unlfl 
14* unPbitr 
11* UACms 
Tft UBAIsk 
19 UBCol 
6 UFnGrp 
lift UPstFd 
7* UGrdn 
7* UPrad 
2*8 US An! 
21* USBCP 
1 * US Can 

2ft USDeon 

11* USHCl 
3* US SMI 
10ft USSur 
i 25* USTrs 
17* UStatn 
14* UnTetev 
29ft UVaBs 
12* UnvFm 
9* UnvHI! 
5* UFSBk 
. 3ft useafe 


U 

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04e J 547 
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16 7* 

19* 10ft 
19* 10ft 
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23 14 

20 * 6 
44* 29 
23 lift 
16 7* 

75* 39* 
438 2* 
11* 6* 
9ft 5 ft 
45ft 32* 
20 * 10 * 
ID* 4* 
16ft 10ft 
13* 8* 
25 15* 

Bft 3* 
16* 7 

30* 13 
9ft 5* 
8* 4 
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II* 5ft 
10 * 6 
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lift 


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£ 

90 

as 

10 130 

u «2 
220 
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164 
338 
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JO 3J 71 
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14 13* 

15* 15ft 
17* 17ft 
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3D* 20* : 
20ft 19ft 
40* 40* 
19* 19 
IS* ISft 
70ft 70 
5* Sft 
7 4* 

4* S* 
44ft 45* 
20* 20, 
Tft 7ft 
1548 15* 
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2ft 2ft 
218 2* 
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14ft 14* 
21 20* 
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5 5 

17 ltft 
32* 32 
34ft 3518 
19 1818 

11 ID* 
27ft 27ft 
lift lift 
4ft 6* 
11* lift 
16* 16* 
20ft 20ft 
5* 5* 
16 1518 

13* 13 
16ft 14* 
9 8* 

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21* 30ft 
9* Bft 
1518 15ft 
28* 28* 
4ft tft 
24ft 24, 
17ft 17ft 
4ft 6ft 
28ft 28ft 


13ft— ft 
15* + ft 1 
17ft 

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20ft- ft 
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19 — ft 
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78 

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6* 

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15*— * 
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24*— * 

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Sft 

7* + * 
218— * 
2*— ft 
ltft + * 
7 

Bft 

Wtt— ft 

21 + * 
1958— ft 


9ft 4* 
16 7* 

12ft 4* 
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20* tft 
20ft 7* 
41* 24 
ISft 11* 
15* 4* 
tft 2ft 
28* 13* 
ISft lft 
Mft 9ft 
20* 13* 
13ft 4* 
22 14* 


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VLSI 

VMX 

VSE .146 

ValldLo 

ValFSL 

ValNtl I JD : 
Von Dus OO : 
Varewtl 
Ventrex 
vlcorp 09e 
VledoFr Jle 1 

Viking 

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vodovl 

veliinf 


24* 23ft 
21ft 21ft 
9ft Bft 
14ft 14 
11* lift 
Sft 28 
23ft 22* 
10 9ft 
24ft 24* 
7ft 7* 
17ft 17V, 
13* 13* 

"A VA 

28* 27ft 
3* 

2ft 298 
28* 27% 
4* 4 

18ft 18ft 
35% 35ft 
21* 20% 
22ft 22* 
42* 42ft 
ID* 18* 
16ft 15* 
lift lift 
Sft Sft 


4* 4* 

12 11 * 
5* Sft 
9* 9* 

Tft 7ft 
18ft IB 
38ft 38ft 
1848 17ft 
7 7 

4ft 4ft 
24* 34 
9* 9ft 
13ft 13 
14 13* 

Tft 7ft 
19* 18ft 


23ft- ft 
21ft 
9 

|4ft— * 
lift + ft 
28ft— ft 
23 — ft 
9ft— ft 
26ft + ft 
7*— ft 
17ft 

13% — * 
lift 

4ft + !W 

28* + ft 

298 + 
77*— * 
4 — * 
13ft— ft 
35ft 
20% 

22* 

42ft + ft 

18* 

15*— * 
lift + ft 
5* — fi 


tft— * 
lift— ft 
5* 

9* — ft 
Tft— ft 
18 

38ft— ft 
18 +1 
7 — ft 
4ft— ft 
24ft + ft 
9ft— * 

13 —1 

14 — ft 
7ft + ft 
18ft — ft 


25* 19* 
16% 10 
13* 5* 

25* Mft 
26ft lift 
16* 9* 

9* S* 
14* 10* 
18ft Bft 
17% 5* 
12 5* 

14* 4ft 
21* 15ft 
17ft 5 
32ft 21ft 
tft 2ft 
13ft 4ft 
46* 28ft 
15ft 7ft 
17* 8* 
10* & 
8ft 4ft 

Bft 2ft 

24* Uft 
21 * 11 * 
29ft 21ft 
9ft 4* 
30* 21* 


WD40 

waibCs 

WikrTH 

WtilE 

WFSL3 

WMSB 

Waveflc 

Webb 

weslRi 

WstFSL 

WNUCTC 

W1T1AS 

WmorC 

WstwCs 

Wettra 

What 

widow 

Wlllmt 

WIDAL 

WrrwSn 

WllsnF 

Wlndmr 

WlimEn 

WlaerO 

woodhd 

1 Worthy 

Writer 

Wy ma n 


19* 19W 
14 ISft 
9 Sft 
21ft 21ft 

23% a* 

ISft ISft 
7* 6* 

12* 12* 

17 16* 

ISft 15ft 
7% 7ft 
12 * 12 * 
17ft 17* 
12* 11* 
32* 32ft 
4ft 4ft 
8M 7ft 
43ft 43* 
12ft 12* 
17 14ft 
6* Sft 
4ft 4ft 
7ft 7ft 
Uft 14ft 
11 * 11 * 
as* a* 

7* 7% 

a a* 


19% 

13% + * 
Bft — ft 
21*— ft 
23ft 
IS* 

7* + * 

12* 

17 

15ft— ft 
7* 

12% 

17ft 

12* + * 
32ft + * 
4ft + to 

8 - ft 
43ft + * 
12* — * 
14*— * 
5ft- ft 

4ft 

Tft— ft 
Uft — ft 
11* 

28ft + ft 
7* + ft 
Mft 





















Page 14 




BOOKS 


ACROSS 

1 Locksmith's 
products 
5 Fundamental 

10 Pond occupant 

14 Sector 

15 Sports pa lace 

16 Notion 

17 Herb with bell- 
shaped flowers 

20 Lamprey 

21 Blazing 

22 Bankers' 
protections 

23 Broadway 
play: 1985 

24 Arab's garb 

25 Spring- (lower- 
ing herb 

33 Bradley and 
Sharif 

34 Profs 
concoction 

35 "Sail Union 

36 Actress Foch 

37 Rot-resistant 
tree 

39 Defeat utterly 

40 Peer’s mother 

41 Iris 

42 Bolivian city 

43 Herb also 
called sleepy 
Dick 

47 Out of, in Bonn 

48 Highway 

49 Anew 

52 Maxi or midi 


54 Plant seeds 
57 Spring-flower- 
ing plant 

60 Not fooled by 

61 Vapid 

62 Formerly 
owned 

63 Presently 

64 Red Sox 
southpaw 


65 Garden growth 31 Habituate 
32 pole 


0/27/85 

23 Group in 
Ghana 

24 On with 

25 Dr. Salk — 

26 Love-in BEETLE BAILEY 

(garden plant) 

27 City in Crete 

28 Privet's use 

29 Devon river 

30 Snarleyyow 


HORSE'S NECK 

By Pete Townshend 134 pages. S12;95. 
Houghton Mifflin, 2 Park Sum, Boston, 
Mass. CHIOS. 

Reviewed by Michiko Kakutam 

F t ETE TOWNSHEND is best known as the 
songwriter and lead guitarist for now dis- 
The Who, primary author 
■ ■* a man who 
I get old” 


„„ a memoir. 

bickering that was part of the bonos 0 ®“* 
existence surfaces in ■®P?*_ t 25?a5 


existence surfaces in angry, 

The Who's onstage theatrics —us 1 9MB stow 

ended with the pfem. 

meats to bits — arc mirrored “ s 

pinsiraan, 



i \ vn uviiv 11 >|M ■ “**'* r i» , 

of the rock opera f Tommy” and the man who 
wrote the Rne “Hope I die before 


(which appeared cb The Who ^bom “My 
Generation” two decades ago). He has tafl 
something of a literary career as weu: Besittes 
owning a bookshop called the Magic Bus, he 
ran a small press called Ed Pie and be is an 
aegnoafp editor at Faber & Faber. In this, his 
first published volume of prose, he writes, each 
rhap wy “deals with one aspect of my struggle 
to discover what beauty really is.” 

That vague, pretentious statement probably 
gum up tee experience of reading Horses 
Neck” as well as anything dse: Like The Who 
albums “Tommy” and ^Quadraphenia,” the 
book is an anomalous, idiosyncratic volume, 
held together more by the authors sensibility, 
and certain recurrent preoccupations and ull- 
ages, than conventional narrative strategies. 
It's nwthw a novel nor a collection of snort 
stories, neither a fully imagined work of fiction 


DOWN 


1 Colewort 

2 Huron's 
neighbor 

3 Shout 

4 Utter 

5 Canada's 

Island 

6 Helen 

. F ranken thaler 
is one 

7 Very, in 
Verden 

8 Arrow poison 

9 Mascagni 
opera, tor 
short 

10 Kind of 
devotion 

11 Useless 

12 "Mine eyes 

have the 

glory . . 

13 Uses a tedder „ 

18 Haven of a sort 56 Marries 

19 Collection of 
stanipsor 
photos 


(carved pillar) 

37 Landonetai. 

38 R.P.I. room 

39 Was contrite 

41 Garden 
feature, to a 
poet 

42 Shade of blue 

44 “Don't My 

Parade" 

45 Court events 

46 Garden visitor 

49 Gosden role 

50 "Yet we’ll 

more 

a- roving' 

Byron 

51 Flivver 

52 In 

(naturally 

positioned) 

53 Burl on wood 

54 Middling 

55 Singles 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


58 Rowan 

59 Fall flower, for 
short 



□a 
00 
30 

□000 09(3 □03303 

Baa □□aaaa 

□ 

33 

□3330 

39 □□□ 

□a 


8/27/89 


counts- the craning of age of a young mntirian, 
his problems with drugs and alcohol aim fas 
efforts, to escape, but it undermines the docu- 
mentary interest of such a story and the read-, 
er’s sympathy for its characters by continuous- 
ly shifting narrative gears, splitting ; up 
individual characters into a handful o f mear- 
nafkms, confusing the reader with baane, 
dreamlike digressions. . . j 

Despite the repeated references to horses 
we’re never given a hint of , what the title mean w 
or how it connects to TowsshakTs other con- . 
cents. » . . 

Townshend possesses an instinctive fed fra 
mythicmngthestnff ofreallife— anabflitytp; 
t'-it**- personal emotions and shattcr anti reas- 
semble them in more abstract configurations. 

But while this impulse can result.— ia'sudr 
chapters as “Champagne on AeTdiace^and 
“Fish Siop” — in some dramatioset •* 

is too often direct^ toward; such 
subjects as getting high er I 
stand. . 

There is a great deal of such complainmgin * 
“Horse’s Month.” Townsberaf s tiharactas, ap- 
parently do not have much-tolerance fbryobng ; 
people (“they scramble -the innate rhythmic 
response granted man by a godsons God,wilh ■_ 

. getting high in stnoke-fiucd Idiscos, or throwing 
CdK cans and finxxadcera at istedium' con- 
certs”), for women (“she had been Hce a chal- ■ 
lenging whipped-rarcam and.fcmg45ag job in a Uv v 
confectioners wtndcnO.ra their Own spoiled ' 
lives (“Sometimes I imagine vhai it mast be . 
like to sleep where rats ran, where insects crawi 
over yon and -into your coat; where tbe-night- 
marish visions are real add : not ddim Tm 
brought on by srff-indu^eiice”). TSesfrienli- 
ments are nra dissimilar to ones expressed by 
some at Townshentfs lyrics, bat, at least, rat 
the better records, they werecountexpainted .. 
by die music’s aggressive and energetic drive 

- Afidtiko Kakutani is on the sort of The flew 
YorkTmes. . . .V 


c^- 


■ ft.' 

ic/. 

: w?.? 

r -!■» <r 

S;:‘ .7 

r- . 



CHESS 


WIZARD of ID 


© yVetc York Tones, edited by Eugene Molesko. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 




REX MORGAN 


Tbu mO\M FIRST THINS SHESS 60KNABO WHEN I 
WALKINTHETOOR IS AWE ME TAKE A BAIR i" 


THE TRUTH IS THAT 

I STILL DOWT KNOW WHY CLAUDIA LOST 
. COMSClOUSNeSS, &RADV.' I'M CERTAIM IT 
WAS CAUSED BY THE COCAIWE WHICH RESULTED 
IN A SERIOUS HEART IRgE&ULARfTY-- OR A 


GARFIELD 


meanwhile; at the hospital 

*^"rrs RIDICULOUS for me to be in theAI 
hospital/ I think the tub was a little 



I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
|« by Henri Arnold and Bob Lae 


Unscramble those four Jumbtes, //"T\ N 
one letter to each square, to form • J \v 

four ordinary words. ' j. _ * 


THE JfiNE RANGER HAS TONTa 
1RE4MEN HDRNCT HAS KATO, 
ANp BATMAN HAS ROBIN. 
THE CAPEP AVENGER NEEDS A 
SIDEKICK TOO 


NAUHM 






ARBSS 





DECLUD 


TOOT 




By Robert Byme 

I T shouldn’t happen, yet 
there are players who let 
themselves get caught in defen- 
sive thinking when they are 
called upon to defend. Precious 
opportunities for counterattack 
are then sadly overlooked. 

The ideal reward fra success- 
ful defense is not to goon doing 
it forever but eventually to 
wrest the attack for oneself. 
For this objective, which at first 
may seem too optimistic, it is 
wdl to remember that once an 
attack is stopped — in this case 
your opponent’s — it can be 
exceedingly difficult fra the at- 
tacker to pull back. This is the 
moment to search for the weap- 
on to catch him flatfooted. 

It arose in the game between 
Zoltan Ribli, a 33-year-old 
Hungarian grandmaster, and 
Predrag Nikolic, a 24-year-old 
Yugoslav grandmaster, in the 
Milan Vidmar Memorial Tour- 
nament in Portoroz and Lju- 
bljana, Yugoslavia. Rfbh was 
ready with an incisive exchange 
sacrifice. 

The recapture with 5-NxP is 
what tb'stingirishftfi the Semi- 
Taxrasch from the Tarrasch 
Defease (5...KPxP). Thus, 
Black avoids getting an isolated 


IS QR-QL.16 B-R2 sod 17 B- 
NI. • 

Instead, 14. N/3-NS, which 
threatened IS Bxtf, Id NxBch 
and 17 QxPtnale, is known to 
let Black' simplify by 
14 . . . BxN; 15 BxB, especially 
since the surprising 15 ... P- 
B31 is unoigectionable here. 
The idea, first played in a TaJ- 
Petrosian encounter in the So- 
viet Union in 1966, is that 
Black will not have any more 
trouble defending his KP than 
White with Ms QP and that the 
while QB is limited by the 
black knights' scope in the cen- 
ter as weQ as by the isolated 
QP. 

Tai had 
N3; 20 Q- 


V-. 



imuc/miu a/ia/u 
Position after 34 B-N2 

The same idea in a slightly 
altered form occurred after 29 
Q-K2, N-B5; 30 Q-Q2, P-K4! 

itidhav 


QP, although he concedes 
White control of more space in 
the center. 

After I3...R-B1. Nikolic 
arrived at a classical isolated 
QP position in which White’s 
chances lay in producing a mat- 
ing attack. Perhaps the best 
way to work for this would 
have been 14 B-Q2 followed by 


19 B-NI, N- 

^ 13 and the gamr. 

was soon dram, but now Ni- 
koBc. tried to improve vrith 19 
P-KR4. 

On 20 . . . P-N3. Nikolic 
could have tried 21 P-R5, but 
what is the ftrilow-up after 

21 . . . R-KN1. with which 
Blade concedes a half-open KR 
file to obtain a half-open KN 
file? 

Confronted by a more solid 
defense than he had expected, 
Nikolic went wrong with the 
unnecessary and dnmsy retreat 
with 23 N-N3?! 

In playing 25 B-Nl?, Nikolic 
had overlooked (he wonderful 
attacking possibilities that 
Ribli would derive from the ex- 
change sacrifice with 

25 . . . RxB!; 26 RxR, N-B5. 

An alternative defense with 

29 Q-R3, N-B5; 30 Q-Bl, B- 
N7; 31 Q-Kl could have en- 
countered 31 . . . P-K4!; 32 
PxP. Q-R6, with a terrible 
threat of 33 . . . N-N5. 


Here, 3 1 . PxP? would have been 
destroyed at once by 31 ... Q- 
R6! 

■ On 33 . . . QxKRF, it was im- 
possible for White to get air by 
34 P-B3 because of 34. ..N- 
B7!; 35 R-Kl (35 QxN?, N- 
R6cbl B-R3; 36 P-Q6, N/7- 
Rfich; 37 K-Rl, BxN; 38 RxB, 
N-B7ch; 39 K-Nl, Q-N6matc. 

Ribli’s 34...B-R3! threat- 
ened 35 . . . N-K7di, thus fon> 
mg 35 R-Kl. After 35 . . .BxN, 
there was no defense, since 36 
KxB, N-R7; 37 K-Nl, Q-N5; 
38 P-B3, NxPch is annihilating. 
Nikolic gave up. 

•TARXASOI DEFENSE 


Ml 

MO 




St 'SS 

I IHH UNO. 

S M4 Ml H M 
1 Ml F^-1 a <HB 

t 2 E2 

. ! rwjp rtxT a n-ni 

! E? 

7 MM - B »M 

i nr m* - 
» M H 
N HI ML 
U N-M MW 
U TQM MJ 
B 

M 

n ns mi » N« 

U Ml <MB M HO 
D QM1 NAB2 » B4D 
H MB KMl X Mi 



POATTE 


WHAT HE WAG 
WHEN! HE SAW 
THAT TREE TRUNK 
, RIGHT IN THE 
MIDDLE OF THE RQAP. 


— -y~s Now arrange the circled lottas to 

I I form the surprtae answer, as sug- 

^ lih-d gested by the etxm cartoon. 


Timm 

(Answers tomorrow) 

Yesterday's I ^ niU8£ VAPOR FRAME NUMBER STYLUS 

| Answer Why they called lor the chimney sweep— 

IT WAS THE ■FLUE" SEASON 

WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Ahorve 

Amsterdam 


Barcelona 


Brussels 


Budapest 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

24 79 16 41 
19 66 U 54 
32 90 71 7D 

25 77 14 57 
34 97 19 M 
2S 48 14 57 
19 46 10 55 
31 S8 15 59 
SB #4 It 64 

52 


Costa Del Sol 

31 

100 


tHrtjUn 

16 



Edtobargfc 

16 

61 

6 





Frankfurt 

20 

68 


Geneva 

14 

41 


HefskiU 

21 




30 

B4 

19 

Las Palmax 

27 

81 


Lisbon 

26 

7? 


London 

19 

44 

10 





Mifca 

26 

79 

16 

MOES»W 

26 

79 

11 

JMantdi 

M 

57 

10 

Nice 

20 

B6 

10 

Oslo 

14 

57 


Parts 

20 

68 

11 

Prague 

17 

63 

n 

RerWavtk 

12 

54 

4 

Kssne 

29 

84 

24 

Stackfwlai 

19 

46 

10 

Hrasboura 

18 

64 

10 

Vessica 

26 

79 

20 

Vlrana 

19 

64 

16 

thnsw 

24 

75 

17 

Zorich 

15 

59 

11 


44 


tr 

tr 

h 

0 

fr 

cl 

fr 

r 

fr 

sh 


ASIA 





HIGH 

LOW 


C 

F 

C 

F 

Bangkok 

32 

90 

25 

77 

Ballim 

27 

81 

21 

a 

Hatsg Kosss 

29 

84 

25 

77 

Manila 

32 

90 

24 

75 

New DOM 

34 

97 



Sewn 

31 

80 

22 

72 

ShasglMl 

30 

86 

V 

77 


32 

90 



Toteai 

32 

90 

26 

79 

Tokyo 

33 

90 

22 

72 

AFRICA 





Algiers 

30 

86 



Cairo 

35 

95 

23 

73 

Caw Town 

-19 




CmaWraica 

24 

75 



Harare 

23 




Lagos 





Nairobi 

22 

72 

10 


Toms 

32 

90 

25 

77 

LATIN AMERICA 


Buenos Aim 





Caracas 

28 

82 

21 



W 




Meideo City 

24 




Rio de Janeiro 

26 

79 

19 

64 


12 § 4 » fr NORTH AMERICA 


ABctwraae 
Altanta 


Detroit 


MIDDLE EAST 


Ankara 
Bdm 
DamcMcm 
Jara salmi 
Tel Aviv 

OCEANIA 

Amfclaad 


14 41 7 45 fr 

28 U 30 48 m 

M 2 19 44 r 

23 73 15 59 d 

M 93 14 57 fr 

24 75 15 59 d 

31 88 33 73 PC 

£ 21 70 pc 

£ 2 2* 75 * 

® # 27 n sc 

24 79 12 54 fr 

W 44 IS .59 r 

31 88 23 73 tr’ HrwYorll 24 79 M 70 *r 

Son Francisco 20 6B 14 57 pc 

24 79 12 54 lr 

d 
d 


31 88 15 59 

31 88 24 79 

41 104 12 54 

30 84 18 44 


IB 44 11 52 

22 72 13 55 


Haaitaa 
Los Angela 
Miami 
MlmwapoHi 
Maatreal 


Toraato 

WaslUneioa 


24 75 17 43 
30 B4 21 70 


Svdnmr s 72 is ss tr wasamama su ae 21 70 d 

d-doudy: fo-foaoy; fr4alr; iHiall; paveraut; uc-oartlv doudv; rmun: 
sh-sliowers; sw-snaw; at-etor mv. 

Ch OPOY. FRANKFURT: 


- imp. 29— 20(84— 681. TEL AVIV: NolovallatM. ZURICH: Fair. Temp.19— 9 
(44—43), BANOKOK: Shew8rs.TamB.31— 25(88— 77). MONO KGMNC: Rainy. 
Temo. 28 — 25 IB2— 77). MANILA: Stormy. Tairm. 31-24 (88 — 75). SEOUL: 
fw*y. Tamp. 31—24 (88 - 75). 51 NQAPORS: Showers, Tamo. 31-24 
(88 — 75). TOKYO: Foaov. T8I11A B — 34 (90 — 75). 


Wbrkl Stock Markets 


Via Agence France- Presse Aug. 26 

Qosing prices in load currencies unless oAevdse indicated. 


[ Mcnhn 


Oese 

Wav. 

ABN 

5BSJ0 

505J0 

ACF Hold hie 

247 

246 

AEGON 

99 JO 

10a 

AKZO 

124.10 

12390 

Ahold 

239 

240 

AMEV 

280 

279 JO 

AT>am Rubber 

845 

845 

Anwq Bank 

8728 

87 

BVG 

220 

215 

Buehmwsrtn T 

107 

104 

Co land Hktg 

27 JO 

37 JO 

Elsevlcr-NDU 

12180 

131 JD 

Fafckhr 

77 

76.70 

Gist Brocades 

215.70 

2 17 JO 

Hebieken 

151 

15069 

Hooeovarra 

41.10 

6ILB0 

KLM 

4150 

61 


49 JO 

51 JO 

NatNeddor 

78 

78.20 

Nedltavd 

T77JD 

126J0 

OceVandarG 

33SJ0 

f-L‘1 

Pakhood 

46 

46J0 

Phil Ido 

4649 

4640 


75-30 

75.10 


133.10 

133 

Rollnca 


r.-.vj 

Ror on to 

46.10 

46J0 


191 

»/l J 

Unlteuer 


p.Y l i| 


29 JO 


VMF Stark 

a 

|*Vj 

VNU 

■TiTJ 


ANPdCBS Goal Index 7I7AS 

Previous : 2T7 J0 



Bniwtib 1 


Arbed 
BOfcCMTt 
Cocker ill 


EBES 
GB-tanckSM 
GBL 
Gevoert 
Hoboken 


KrwBe t ttCTlk 
Petraflna 
5oc Ge n e r ol e 

Saivav 

Traction Elec 
U CB 
Unera 

Vlellla Montaane 

Carnot Stock Index : 
Praylaas : 23MJ7 



AEG-Talofyrtkan 

Allianz wars 
Altaic 
BASF 
Saver 

Bav Hypo Bank 
Bcv Vendnbonk 

BHF-Baik 

BMW 

CemmeRbpnk 

CantGumml 

Dalmler-Banz 

Doming 

Peutedi a Babcodc 
Dautseha Bank 
DjjgdnarBani: 

Ha miner 


131 Jn 131.18 
1375 1367 
357 342 

221.18 219JB 
23UH218J0 
367343 
387 38450 
23920 237 

318 316 

445 436 

20SL80 20450 
15750 155 

929 901 
345 344 
154J0 15850 
552 555 

269 24750 
174 17A10 
300.90 301 


Close Free. 
Hochtket 725 725 

Hoadnt 214J0 2?s A n 

Howdi 11550 11550 

Horten 19350 190 

HossH 352 344 

IWKA 282 2S2 

Kail + Sail 308 306 

Karalodf 248.90 240 

Koulhol 29100 — 

Kloockner H-O 274 : 

Ktoedmer Werke 4458 
Kruea Stotil 111 

Linde 500 

Luflhansa 230 ' 

MAN 16350 

Monnesmonn 190 

Muendi Rueck 1795 

Nlxdarf 53150 

PKI 64950 

Porsche 1305 

Preumoa 272 

PWA 13950 

RWE IB8J0 

Rhelnmetall 310 

Schertno 458. 

5EL 335 

Siemens 540 

Thyssan 12580 

Veba 224)—, 

Valkswaoeiwiam 322.90 3173® 


Wei la 


60S 402 


Cammanbank Index : 142SJM 
Prevtoas : 14I5J8 




AECI 

Anglo Amer. 
Anuta Am Gold 


Buffets 
De Bears 
DrlefanWn 
Elands 
GFSA 

Haraumv 
HIveM Steel 
Kloof 

RXKlk 

PresStevn 


SA Brens 
s tr - 


WestHokBna 


BOO 

NA 

NA 

1110 

1380 

7475 

1195 

NA 

NA 

3400 

2790 

515 

7750 

1330 

5300 

ISIS 

745 

3150 

NA 

6125 


820 

3040 

18550 

1110 

1310 

7358 

1100 

4900 

1640 

3400 

2710 

515 

7400 

1395 

5150 

1740 

745 

3079 

700 

4050 


Previo u s: TOM 


Banco Comm 

SSS&. 

Cred I to! 

Eridanio 

Farmltalla 

Flat 

GeneraH 

IFI 

Itateemanti 


ltd mob) liar I 


Mantodfsan 

Olivetti 

mrain 

RAS 

Rlnascente 

SIP 


24200 24410 


2949 9910 

10800 10900 

13400 13540 


9640 W4D 

45200 45500 
1444 1650 
107100104000 

118900119750 

2X8 2215 

4520 4994 
2994 3003 
101600)02880 
848 845 

2669 2661 


Close prts 


SME 

SnJa 

Standa 

Slot 


1440 

3310 

15100 


1434 

3300 

15050 


MIBCimnnadex : IMS 


ill "of 1 

Air UaukJe 

562 


1 Aisthom Atf. 

307 


1 Aw Dassault 

1160 

1170 

l Bmoalre 

629 

434 

1 B1C 

493 


1 Banana In 

1760 

1780 

! Bwvnu 

767 


1 BSN-CO 

2060 

2070 

1 Carrafaur 

2280 


1 Chargeurs 



l Chib Med 

513 

516 

1 Darty 

1421 

1424 

1 Damn 

854 


1 EtfAaultatne 

204J0 199 JO 

i Europe 1 

772 


1 Gan Eaux 

600 


< Hachette 

1435 

1450 

LafaraaCap 

539 


1 Logrand 

2179 


! LOS'r 

630 


rOngal 

2375 


Martell 

1560 

1564 

Motto 

1715 


Marlin 



Mlcheiln 

1115 


Moot Hennesay 

1841 

1820 

Moulinex 



OcddentolB 

718 

712 

Pernod Rlc 

687 


Perrier 

5D1 


Peugeot 

390 


Prlntempi 



Ramatochn 

38SJQ 


Redoute 

1565 


Roussel Uchrf 



Sanofl 



Skis Rasslgnal 

1410 

1420 

Telemecan 

2430 

2630 

Thomson CSF 

557 


Total 

234 Z32JO 1 

Aoafl Index : 9062* 
Prevtoas : 286J7 
CAC Index : 2I8J0 
Pi -ev toes : 21848 



II Stnridmha | | 

AGA 




186 








AHao COPCO 

115 





Electro lux 

268 


Ericsson 






Handel sbankan 






Soab-Scnaki 



Sandvtk 








SvndtahMatch 

191 



K.U. 





1 


ACl 

ANZ 

182 

4-75 



tJB* 

M4 . 


Close 

Nrev. 

Boroi 

342 

340 

Bougainville 

1JJ1 

IJ5 

COstlofnalno 

BJ5 

825 

Cotas 

4 

4Jb 


1J4 

Ut 

CRA 

SJ0 

1M 

CSA 

101 

3 


T42 

244 

Elders ixl 

111 

110 

ICI Australia 

115 

112 

Maori tan 

240 

24(1 

MIM 

157 

2J5 

Myer 

3J3 

130 

Plat Arat Bank 

4J2 

*62 

News Carp 

&76 

684 


266 

JJ5 

Poseidon 

4J0 

4-30 

Old Coal Trust 

146 

1JI 


5.74 

540 


112 

110 

Wfcsfsrn MtobMj 

180 

195 

W^aocBnoklpR 

449 

1.28 

4J5 

128 


AH OrrHnarte* Index 
Previous : M5JB 


: 941 AS 


Tthyg 


AboM Cheai 

AeaMGiasa 

Bank of Tokyo 

BrMuestane 

Canon 

Casio 

Utah 

an Nippon Print 
Dahra House 
Dts’-ai Securities 


FUll Bank 
- il Photo 
. Jltsu 

Hltochl 

hfltachi CaMa 


370 378 

840 875 

011 809 

795 775 

541 55V 

931 TO 
1510 1550 
436 442 

1Q50 1050 
843 825 

911 910 

raiHS 72M 
1410 1400 
1930 I960 
871 886 

474 478 

554 554 


370 376 
3400 3730 
1238 1290 


Honda 

Japan Air Lines 
Kalima 
Konsal Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kbin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 

Matsu Elec Inds ■«, •*>» 

Matsu Elec Mtorks 851 860 

Mitsubishi Bank 1568 1570 

Mitsubishi Chem — 

Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
Mitsubishi Carp 
Mitsui and Ca 
Mftaukoshl 
Mitsumi 
NIC 

NGK Insulators 
NlkkoSec 
Nippon Koeaku 

Nippon CHI 

Niuean Steel 
Nippon Yusan 
Nissan 
Nomura Sac 
Otvmpus 
Pioneer 

Ricoh 

Sharp 
Shi 


482 484 
350 350 
396 375 
430 428 
417 429 
474 443 
724 N.Q. 
904 920 
771 748 
798 790 
BSD 915 
845 837 
177 ITS 
313 311 
631 638 
1220 1228 
96S 965 
1770 1780 
820 829 
BIO 892 
782 490 


SMnptsu Chwnteoi 475 475 


3720 3750 
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250 247 

675 668 

158 160 


Sony 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sumitomo Own 
Sumitomo Marine 
S u mitomo Metal 
Tolsel Cotp 
T aisho Marino 
Takeda Cham 
TDK 
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Toido Marine w 

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540 

513 


339 

346 

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1190 

1130 

Yamatctil Sec 

811 

806 

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13*51-77 

Previous : 120141 

New Index : H13J3 


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11 W* 11 

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3800 

3775 

Atoau(s» 

B7S 

535 

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6300 

6700 

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JNTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 1985 

SPORTS 




Page 15 


^uddSets Mnrh m 5.000 I ,jate Sur g e RaUies Past Error-Prone Tigers 

■**'^ / * ** Cotmiledh- Our Staff Fnm Dupottka idl , the Angels loaded the bases “ ^ waukee. In the opener. Jerry bined on a seven-hitter as fii 


LON no V ' --"wrnmvtspart* 

M-minute N Md % & !!^ aw “2 d racwd ° f 

5 i000- meter run here 

now a British citizen S ^i Afnc ^°' boni runner, 

KristianS\^^ t 7h/ J^> N ;° ru ' e8ian 

dun ng an inSnationS^t *5* ?*■ 

“ COnd “ ‘*57.43, 








Zola Budd, naming her record-setting 5,00ft anOlympic went for women. " ~ (UP/. AP) ratehCTMJwasSlo also helped. mon f i 30 ^ 11 , "P*. 2 ?. years ' 9 

^ ' S fhe Sl^rWaltTSl months and 9 days old as he sloshed his way to 

the National League record, winning his 20th at 

M n/f 21 years, 1 month and 9 days back in 1901. 

w API 1 JlkCjC POINT/ George Vecsey Gooden also won his 14th straight decision. 

9 the longest winning streak in the major leagues 

~a~fe 1 11' T'v A 1 ffP A • this year, and four better than the previous Met 

Baseball Drug Abuse: 1 une for Action of records — Tom Beaver’s 300th victoiy. Rod 

C/ Carew's 3,000th base hit and Pete Rose chasing 

New York Tima Savia add Raines that eight or nine mem- tional figures, and should submit to significantly, mandatory testing T > Cobb s record for total hits T9°°den* 

NEW YORK — The image is a bers of the Expos were on drags a testing. Fehr believes the current may soon be ihe only protection for ff^mpkshinent on ^ ^^uviies that borebaU 

frightening one. A pitcher, zonked few years back, to know there has drag agreement with the owners is athletes endangered by their own contmucs 10 come up with Heroes to maicn tne 

out from something be inhaled be*- been an epidemic. working. But if the recent epidemic success, by their own fortunes and greatest names mi^hismry- M«hw«on,0 abb. 

tween innings, decides he can blow Donald Fehr, the acting ex ecu- has not already begun to subside by their own lack of awareness. «n f', Y**™^**- A 


Budd agreed last Friday to compete in the race, 
but word of her entry was suppressed for fear of an 
anti-apartheid demonstration; her homeland is 
barred from international sport because of its 

policy of racial separation, known as apartheid. 
The announcement that she would compete was 
not made until just before Monday's meet began. 

A crowd of 12,000 at the Crystal Palace Stadium 
saw the barefoot Sudd's performance, but an esti- 
mated 3,000 more arrived after it was all over. 

Doug Goodman, bead of the British Athletics 
Promotion Unit said: “Zola has been the target for 
anti-apartheid demonstrators this season and we 
were worried it would happen again. 

“We had to take a calculated risk — either to 
make an announcement well in advance and ran 
the risk of trouble, or aOow her to compete know- 
ing that there would be no pressure. It was regret- 
table that some spectators missed her race, but we 
don’t fed that we cheated them. We had to weigh 
the pros and cons of the saltation.** 

Budd and Kristiansen had decided before the 
race to share the pace-making and. after quickly 
puQing away from the rest of the field, they played 
cat-and-mouse for eight of the 12 laps. But then 
Budd moved dear and won by about 70 meters. 

Although criticism and controversy have dogged 
her career since she became a Briton last year (in 
time to compete in the 1984 Summer Olympic 
Games), Budd received a standing ovation on her 
lap of honor. - 

Some of Bndd’s track appearances have been 
marred by anti-apartheid demonstrations, but her 
Olympic final dash with U.S. favorite Maty Deck- 
er attracted even more attention. 

In the 3,000- meter race the two tangled legs; the 
American crashed out of the race and was left 
sobbing and injured on the infield while Budd, 
amid a storm of booing, continued to finish sev- 
enth. 

Sudd's international career almost ended when 
she returned to her homeland, but she was per- 
suaded to return to Britain and this year has woo 
her first-ever indoor race, her first national title 
and also the world cross-country crown. 

Nine days ago she won the Europa Cup 3,000 
meters in Moscow, and in Zurich last Wednesday 
she was narrowly beaten in the mile by Decker, 
who set a world record, and Olympic 3,000-meier 
champion Maririca Puica. 

Monday’s performance will not earn Budd the 
£50,000 pounds (about 570,000) being offered by a 
champagne company for a world record set in 
Britain by a British athlete because the 5.000 is not 
an Olympic event for women. (UP/. AP) 


Compiled hy Our Staff Fnm DupoKtet 
ANAHEIM, California — Sel- 
dom is one gome in a 162-game 
schedule a true reflection of two 
teams’ seasons. But such a game 
was played here Sunday as the Cal- 
ifornia Angels overcame the De- 
troit Tigers 7-1. 

The division-leading Angels, af- 
ter staying close on the combined 
pitching of Jim Slaton and Stewart 
Clibum, scored seven runs in the 


reli, the Angels loaded the bases “ inrin Tr w waukee. In the opener. Jerry 

with one out on a walk to Dick BASEBALL ROUNDUP Willard and Mike Hargrove each 

Schofield. Ruppert Jones’s double " u- , • , “ " T” 7 T _„ singled home two runs to make a 

and an intentional walk w Canw; wiSwofTom Waddell, who is «> 

Juan Beniquez promptly singled rjtvMisM tiri Pere O'BrimdroS since joining the starting rotation 
home two runs, and Lemon's wild ‘ July 31 and who has won five 

Ihrow home enabled C» to S* slight decisions overall. The two 

score on the play. Beniquez. who : . oISETh!**? . l p , victories gave Cleveland a season- 

toot third onLenWs duow. tal- 2* * ™ T rK.. high TourW winning slreak. 

Bed the final run on Reggie Jaclt- T““ Hmes " O, Astr^. 3-9-. In the 
son's firs sacrifice fly of the year. ^ he ta hit attoJOta a National League in_Kmbur^. rhe 


victories gave Cleveland a seas 
high four-game winning streak. 


bined on a seven-hitter as first- 
place St. Louis stayed a game 
ahead of New York in the Eastern 
Division. It was the Braves' sixth 
straight loss. 

Expos & Dodgers 1: in Montre- 
al, Hubie Brooks drove in three 
runs to back BUI Gullickson’s five- 
hiuer as the Expos ended Bob 


Pirates 9-10, Astros 3-9: In the- Welch's personal eight-game win- 
National League, in Pittsburgh, the nin g streak. Brooks is Montreal's 


Yankees 8, Mariners 5: In Seat- 


last three innings for their 34ih ile_ Han Pasqua drove in Tour tuns 
comeback victoiy oT the season, with Lhree hits, including a three- 
And the Tigers, the defending run homer, to pace the victory thai 
World Series champions, added gave New York a three-game series 


season. 

A's 10, Orioles 4: In Oakland, 
California. Dave Kingman and 
Sieve Henderson hit two-run 
homers and rookie Tim Birtsas 


" , i | CT ’ b au»M IWMt k Kill DUIM3 

five more errors to their league- sweep of the Mariners and moved pitched a five-hitter as the A’s beat 


lost-place Pirates rallied twice in 
the second game to sweep a double- 
header with Houston. Pittsburgh 
scored five runs in the seventh of 
the nightcap to lake a 94 lead, but 
the Astros came back with four in 


leading total. the Yankees, winners of 10 or their 

“We haven’t done anydnng right ^ u lo ±rec of 

all year, said Deuoit Manager Eastern Division-leading Toronto. 

Sparky Anderson. “This wasn l a New York's Don Mattingly hit a . 

one-day affair not after 12 1 er- two-run home run and increased Coliseum, 
rors. I don't know what we re going jus major league-leading RBI total run of the 
to do about it to 104. secutive-ga 

Tiger center fielder Chet Lemon While Sox 5. Blue Jays 3: In career-lug* 
had gone more than a year without Chicago. Harold Baines's three-run Indians 
an error — until making three Sun- homer keyed a four-run first that Cleveland, 

% helped the White Sox end a five- run fifth-in 

e have received some cooper- game losing streak. Floyd Bannis- dians a dot 
ation lately, but we'll accept any- 
thing that comes our way," said 
Manager Gene Mauch, whose An- 

gels, despite a batting and pitching vrOOfl PH X OHIlffC 
slump, have won three of their last 

four to move .214 games ahead of New Yofk Tma Smice 

Kansas City m the Western Divi- wc .., vr , Dl/ --i. 4 - j j , , 

son race. NEW YORK — Dwight Gooden doesnt take 

run Slaton, with effectiveness Phching in a tropical rainf orest He had 

that belied his 1-7 record since mid- ^le fT P °^ 

May. limited Detroit to Alan Jngms tlw baUwildly mthegeneral direcuon 
Trammell's sixth-inning borne ran °* h o™Plale and even third base at one parttc- 


pitched a five-hmer as the As beat , Ka A .j., 

Ul, beal Mike Hnnngan. Flana- % “ d SS£ 


gan entered the game with a 154 
career mark against the A's, includ- 
ing a 10-0 record at the Oakland 
Coliseum. Kingman's 26th home 
run of the year extended his con- 
secutive-gome hitting streak to a 
career-high 1 1. 

Intfians 6 - 2 , Brewers 2-0: In 
Oeveland, George Vukovicb's two- 
run fifth-i nnin g, homer gave the In- 
dians a doubleheader sweep of Mil- 


before Sammy Khalifa singled in winningest rookie this year. Cinrin- 
Mike Brown with one out in the oaii's player- roan agex. Pete Rose, 
home ninth. In the opener, winning did not play; he remains 12 hits 
pitcher Rick Reuse hd drove in short ofTy Cobb's all-time mark of 
three runs with a home run and a 4 , 191 . 

double. The Pirates have won six of ,j Gbmts S: ln PhiiadeJ. 

their last nine gam< 5 , dunng which w Juan Samuel and Von Hayes 
they have totaled 47 runs. back- 10 -back fourth-inning 

Canhnals 5, Braves 2i In Atlanta, homers to highlight an attack that 

Tom Herr tripled home two runs in 

the seventh and four pitchers corn- 


leader in RBIs with 74, one more 
than his previous career high. 

Reds 5, Cubs 3: In Cincinnati, Bo 
Diaz's sixth-inning double off the 
left-field wall broke a 3-3 tie and 
the Reds went on to make Tom 
Browning (.13-9) the major leagues' 
winningest rookie this year. Cmrin- 
nati’s player- manager. Pete Rose, 
did not play; he remains 12 hits 
short of Ty Cobb's all-time mark of 
4,191. 

PbflEes 1 A Giants 5: In Philadel- 


included 10 extra-base hits and 
buried San Francisco, f AP..UPI ) 


Gooden Youngest Pitcher Ever to Win 20 Games 


Trammell's sixth-inning borne run “ home Plate and even third base at one partic- 
until giving way to Cuburn with ukrty slippery moment. 
two Sits ia the sixth. Rdiever 1 1 r “ d myrhythm, Gooden 

Stewart Clibum held the Tigershit- ^ d - TJeWlwp t rubbri up enough. He 
less, the rest of the way to pare his ^ 50 Unownoffhisgaine by the showers and 
team-leading earaed-run average the wet grounds lhat he ksted only six mnmgs. 
to 1 80 ° struck out only four San Diego Padres and gave 

“Good pitching picks up our “P five tits - A thoroughly un-Gooden perfor- 

bench," said Clibum, a 28-vear-old , , . . _ . 

who spent a decade in the’ minors B “ t r af 1 “T he d he was the benefiaa- 

and who is a rookie-of-the-vear nf of five msunmee runsjmd became the win- 
contender. “If we hold the other “P&P^er for the 20th ume in 23 decisions 
t«m down, those guys will start ^ ^ ^ ^ 

a RRI youngest major-league pitcher ever to win 20 

S^SWS2?S5 B S“o°^To 



i-t i : 

li'ri 


VANTAGE POINT/ George Vecsey 

Baseball Drug Abuse: Time for Action 


New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — The image is a 


tween inrangs, decides he can blow 
the batter away with an inside 
pitch. The batter, zonked out from 
something he inhaled between ro- 
nings, decides he ts.inxtriorttd and 
leans into the pitch. 


Donald Fehr, the acting execu- 
tive of tho Major League Baseball 
Players .Association, said Tuesday: 
“As far as I can tefl, the epidemic 
peaked several years ago. It became 
known that cocaine is more danger- 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


have been taking infield practice, but Gooden 
did not seem nervous about going for the earli- 
est 20th-victory season in hikory. He strolled 
around the clubhouse with teammates and re- 
porters leaving him pretty much alone. “You 
don't want to be priming him too much," said 
catcher-psychologist Gary Carter, a few lockers 
away. “You don't want him to be thinking about 
the weather too much. But it had to be tough on 
him, thinking we might not get it in." 

Gooden said later: “I just prepared myself as 
if we woe going to start on time." 

The rain let up by game time. 

The Padres were slip-sliding away in the first 
inning, giving up three watermarked runs, and 
the day seemed made for a pitcher who could 
strike out batters and not put the ball in play too 
many times. In his last start, Gooden had struck 
out 16 San Francisco Giants, but Sunday he 
threw two wild pitches in the third inning , after 
making only three all season. He also made a 
throwing error after fielding a bunt and trying 
to throw out a runner at third base when there 
was no force play. 

“Gary yelled ‘third' and I just rushed my 
throw," he said later. “It was a good call. I had 
ume." 

Carter went out to the mound to talk to 
Gooden: “I was trying to pnmp him up a little. I 
was afraid it might affect his concentration 
when he threw the ball away. He was upset. He 
takes pride in his fielding." 

Gooden's wild third inning helped the Padres 
score twice, and the Mels were still leading, 4-3, 
when Manager Dave Johnson used a pinch- 
hitter for Gooden in the sixth. 

“He didn't have his good control," Johnson 
said. “1 didn't want to push him. Tm sure he 
could have given me another inning or two, but 
he had thrown 90-some pilches already, on top 


Never happen? Let’s just hope it ous than people had thought." Lee 
on> th* turn MacPhail- of the owners players 


doesn’t, but the chances are the two MacPhaif. of the owners players 
forces have already been in place, relations ammultee also said Tues- 
according to a series on cocaine day thM he believed the problem 

abase in baseball in The New Yorit was dedjmng. 

Times last week. In the articles, two The fmlure of the Expos to 

admitted drag abusers, Tun Raines achieve thar World Senes poten- 
and Lonnie Smith, with admirable tial in the early 80s is too recent to 
a candor and detail, described the forget. I remember being m the 
- depths they had reached before re- Montreal dressing room before a 
habitation. game m 1980, and recemng an un- 

jrjsriswa EE£S“18 

s V s .TT & ms . Tz V -i f-., 7 ? better shape than his motor skills. I 
who told how he slid headfirst to ewTconadered he might be 

on an induced high, but I reroera- 


caine in his hip pocket. 

His slide might take him directly 


jxniiaTas 


bered that interview on the day he 
dropped out of the league a few 


into the waiting tag by the second ^ toua . 

baseman, and a few knowledgeable ^ m ^ wouldn - t 


fans and reporters and baseball 
people might wonder why he did 
not perform a standard hook slide 
to the side of the base. 

The reason he dove headfirst is 
that he did not want to leave his 


know cocaine from celery salt, 
awareness comes slowly and sur- 

urm^^out a relief pitcher who 
loafed through the early innings 
but became a fire- breathing mon- 


s t a sh of cocaine in his locker or his g^gf-fa the late innings, according to 
jacket while he was in the game, so ^ admiring teammates. In last 
he carried it with him in a vial while wce k’ s articles I learned that relief 


he was running the bases. 


pit cbm can time their cocaine us- 


in 


Some playm have carried the ^ j ate ^ ^ gg^g to soaring 
effect of the drug with them on the they are called upon to save a 

field: the heightened sense of self- lea<jL 
.awareness, the grandiosity, into _ Peter Ue betrotii. the commis- 
•Vhich drug abusers retreat. Lost tn ^ baseball, has ordered 

■ themselves, they can think only of „, an f farnry drug tests for baseball 
protecting their slash. Or perhaps who are surely not ini- 

while they are thinking about f roD0 abuse, but his prindpal 

whether they can manage a snort in (ai ^ ( jj a p pens to be out of his 
the bathroom before the next in- reac j 1| ^ players. There is current- 
ning, they are picked off first base . ^ agreement between labor and 
flat-footed. Thar brains are fnea; manag ement in which dubs can 
their competitive edge is gone, per- voluntary testing for sus- 

haps never to return. pect players, and a neutral panel of 

There are hardheads who believe £ j u ^ e doctors who wfl] judge wbetb- 


mune from abase, but his principal 
target happens to be out of his 
reach: the players. There is current- 



Fcller; Carew, Seaver. Rose. Gooden. "He didn't have his good control," Johnson 

- Gooden was up against two opponents: the said. “1 didn't want to push him. Fm sure he 
defending league champions and a steady rain, could have given me another inning or two, but 
If the, Mets didn’t have Gooden going (and a he had thrown 90-some pitches already, on top 
huge advance sale for another giveaway day — - of the 149 against the Giants, so I just said. 
Idbsdeaf folders for all resident scholars), the “That's enough.' ” 

game might easily have been called off before And how did Gooden react to being lifted 
fans ever left for Shea Stadium. But the money after six innings? Just how any exnexgingyoung 
was in the till, and management listened lo hero, in the mold of Mathewson and Feuer and 
forecasts of diminishing showers. Seaver, would. Said Johnson: “Hejust nodded." 

It was still pouring when the Mets should — GEORGE VECSEY 



'"Si'-. 

-4 '* v • **"••• Xw 

[ _ r 


Dwight Gooden, tip against the defend- 
ing league champions and a steady rain. 


SCOREBOARD 


Baseball 


Golf 


Major League Leaders Sunday’s line Scores Major League Standings 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 



G 

AB 

R 

H 

McGee St. L 

172 

447 

85 

Iff 

Herr St.L. 

119 

447 

73 

146 

Guerrero LA. 

113 

398 

85 

126 

Ralnos Man. 

117 

454 

91 

141 

Gwynn S.D. 

118 

482 

66 

148 

Cruz Htn. 

109 

423 

50 

127 

Moreland Chi. 

120 

432 

52 

129 

Parker Cla 

120 

473 

60 

140 

Hernandaz N.v. 

121 

448 

41 

133 

Oeaief On. 

111 

383 

43 

113 


Bme m MMl Pros* b m r n eti u m J 

Tdeprompter, edging Greanton to win the Arlington Million. 


iub*. — , 11 uunruoLwis --.j— . us- 

SSLSSaftSiSSi Teleprompter Wins Arlington Million 

habili cation is a fraud, that refonn nfc||I cbanuel for supervising a tew CHICAGO (AP) — - Teleprompter, a 14-1 shot from England, led all dnmrn, i*. 

is suspecL At the voy least, the proWem players, and scaring a lot Sunday to win the fifth running of the Arlington Million, edging * 

witness of Raines and Smith is evi- mora hard-charging favorite G rein ton by three-quarters of a length. Boaaa ^ 

deuce that some players ran maxe Tbere is already mandatory test- Trained by John Watts and ridden by Tony Ives, the 5-year-old erett tuc. 
it back, day by day, but thar tesn- for drugs at the Olympic Teleprompter negotiated the mile-and-a-quarter turf courae in two min- 
mony Should scare the daylights Q amcs At World Cup soccer u tes, three and two-fifths seconds to take down the top pnze of $600,000. u^aoi, 
out of their colleagues, and the rest [T1Htche ^ two players from each cjreinton, under Laffit Pincay Jr, made a great charge down the stretch soc w» m 
of us. . . t eam are selected at random at a but was unable to overtake the leader. Flying Pkigcon was third and King 

One need only read about me station in the runway from the of Cubs finished fourth in the 13-horse field. Baines on 

investigations and arrests m several The idea of occasional man- Called “the English John Henry" because he is a gelding, Tdeprcxnpter coopttmji 

dries, of players being called m to ^ting has always seemed had won 9 of 21 previous races, finishing out of the money four times. 

>tratifv, of the list of playera anathema to any notion of personal i-i-iewr no • r A Bc * ,lf ^' 1 

■have 'sought to Ubcrty, but what do you do rten jVIaltbie Takes Golf World Senes by 4 

agreement by John McHale, me profession is plagued by a . Bornmore. 

Drcsidenl of the Montreal Expos, d5sease? AKRON, Ohio (AP) — Roger Maltbie cruised to a 4-stroke victory Toronto, u 

V Baseball playens are oof exactly here Sunday in the World Series of Golf. ySEhEI 

like airline pilots or school teachers Maltbie, 34, who broke a 9-year victory drought earlier this season. cttY , l4 

nr anv other anonymous body of ^01 a front-nmmng. 4-undcr-par 66 and acquired the the most presb- 
toS Tte! viable gious ullc ofte 1 l-y«r w«h a 269 tooi 1 1 Strok® irncfer [ar on 

and tuehlv rich; they attract leeches ^ 7 , 173 -yard Firestone Country Qnb course. er.cwaw 

Swfnt to siphon off some of the Denis Watson, who entered the final round Mdteile lead witii 

moneyed the fame. The fact that Mahbie. dropptri long budie putts oa th and 13th hdes ^ SUSSn 

Slavers have been indicted in within a shot of the lead, but a double bogey at No. 14 wt him three w< ^ 
? p j?vS!t Pittsbureh investiza- behind with four holes to play. Watson finished m pan-70 for second »«***> 

phffic. Tom Kile (a cloring M) and ftlvinPeete (67) tbiid at 273. 

Tetrad tow afwr the supply Curtis Strange, with a 286 total that tied him for 32d place m the 41- «,***.» 
officers ten a to w ™rrj wm SK.750 tn set a ancle-season money- wmmflE s»bi« « 


Rttoi: MurptiY.AUanto.Mi RabiM. Montre- 
al. 91; Caiernon. St. Louis. Bfl; Gucrroro, Los 
Anoetea. 85: McGee. St- LoulL IS 
RBIs: MurotiY. At to m a. 90; Hotr. St. Louis. 
Er; Parfcw,anclnnoM,to; ClartuSL Louis. M; 
WUson. PtmodrlPtita, 81. 

Hits: McGoa. si. Louis. 1 S»; Gwynn. San 
Olevo. 148; Herr. St. Louis, M8; R nines. Mon- 
treal. Ml; Partwr. ClnclnnotL MO. 

Doubles: Harr. St. Louls.31; Porker, Cl rtchv 
noil, 29; WoMoctv Montreal. 29; Hernandez, 
New York. 28; Wlhan. PtiHoWHoWa. ». 

Triples: McGee. SL Louis. 15; Samuel. Phil- 
ockupwa. 11; CoMtrran, St. Louis. 10; RaNiss. 
Montreal. 9; Hadden, San Francisco. 7. 

Home Runs: Mutmiy, Atlanta. 31; Guerre- 
ro. Los Anaeks. 30; Parker, andmotL 23; 
Setimiai.PhlladeMila.22j Clark, St. Louls.21. 

Staten Bases: Ccrieman, SL Louis. 86; 
iwlnes. Montreal, SO; Lonex CWeaaa, 42; 
McGee, St. Louis. 42; Redus. Cincinnati, 4t. 
PITCHING 

Wa^Lott/Wtoalns PcL/ERA:Franeo,Cl»v 

CMMItl, II-I..917.IJ4; Gooden. New York. 2&J. 
370. 1.7B; Welch. Los Anaetes. 9-1 .818. 2.10; 
Herstilser, Loi Angeles. 13-X JI3.2J7; Burke, 
Montreal. 8-2, AOft 1 J9: Hawkhu. Sen Diego. 
16-L MO. 2J9. 

Stiikeam: Gooden. New York. 212; ftvan. 
Houston. 178; Solo. Cindiwoil. 171; VoJen- 
zueto. Los Armeies. 163; Darling. New York. 
135. 

Saves: Reardon. Montreal 32; smith, OW- 
eago.28; Gassage.San Dlego.21; Sutter. At- 
lanta, 20; D. Smith, Houston 19; Power, dn- 


NATIONAL LEAGUE AMERICAN LEAGUE 

First Gome bhi Division 

HHlM 80S 900 180—3 4 2 W L PcL GB 

Pittsburgh 010 511 8t»— 9 11 1 Toronto 77 47 .621 — 

Scott, Calhoun |4>, Madden (7) and BaJley; Mew York 73 49 _WS a 

ReusdMri and Pena w-ReusctwL 10^. L— o^pi, 66 57 J37 I0V« 

Scott. 13-7. HRs— PlttsburgfL Ganzahu «>. Bommoro 6* 57 J29 IIYj 

Reuschel Cl}. Boston 58 63 .479 I7V« 

Second Game MllwaiAee S5 65 A58 20 

Houston 888 10* 0*1— 9 13 * OvekXtd 43 79 .352 33 

Pittsburgh 818 DM Ml— 10 15 1 West Division - 

I mnhco c k . Dawtev (51. DiPIno (6), Smith California 71 S3 :S73 — 

17). Cailwm IB) and Mtzerock; DeLeon, Cie- Kamos city 67 5* 554 2V» 

moots (6), Whin 16), Scurry (81, Robinson (8) Oakland 64 M -516 7 

and Ortiz, Penn (7). W— Robinson, 4-0. L— chtoxw 59 62 .488 IDVi 

Calhoun. 1-4. HRs— Houston, Reynolds (41. Siwit ,|, 57 67 MO 14 

Pittsburgh. Khalifa (2). Minnesota 55 66 AS5 MVft 

LOS Angeles 000 ON m-l S 1 Ttawl 46 76 J77 2* 

Montreal 181 IN 3 QK-* IT 0 NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Welch, Diaz 161. Costilla 17) and Sctosda; East Division 

Gulllcfcsonand Fitzgerald. W—^ Gufllcksoii, n- w L Pet. GB 

9. L— welch, 9-2. SI. Louis 75 46 6M — 

Oleaa M2 Ml 898-3 6 1 New York 75 48 .6111 1 

New York 3M ON «l*— 9 16 1 Montreal » 55 J56 7Va 

Show. Stoddard 171 and Kennedy; Gooden. Qiltaoa 10 61 ,496 15 

McDowell 17) and Carter. W-Goadea 20-3. Philadelphia 57 65 Ml \8Vi 

L— Show, 9-0. Su— McDowell 112). HR— Hew Pitts&uroh » 81 325 35 Vj 

York. Strawberry <20). West Division 

San Francisco 823 DM ooo— 5 11 0 ^ 72 49 595 — 

PblladelpMa M0 403 21x— M M 0 ^ Dtefl0 67 57 J40 tVi 

Gotl, MXmvls (4), Wllllami 16). Mlnloa (81 Cincinnati 64 57 329 I 

and Trevfno ; fCGross. Rucker (SJ.SMpcnaff Houslon 56 66 .459 16ft 

(8) , Carmen (9) and Dauttcn. W — Rucker, 2-1. Attcmta 50 71 All 22 

L— Galt. 4-ia HRs— Son Franctsco, Trevino ^ Franclro 47 75 385 25Vi 

IS). PhUadriotUa. K. Grass (1). Samuel <151. 

Haves (in. Wilson (121. ■ ■ - — 

St. Louis Oil Ml 205—5 ID 0 m *,» 

Attama uoo om iti —2 7 o 1 ransition 

Keaehlre. Lahti ti). Davtev 191. Campbell 

19) and Porter; Mahler. Forster m. Dedmon . 

(9) and Benedict. W— Konshin. 1G7. L— Mah- 

Ci^SeTSSe loro, out- 
von sty ke til). At1ontp.J*ora^ 2 < 6 ) nehtor, on the ISdav disabled list. Rocalled 

SSai from ° m *° 01 lfH> 


top fUdsbers and eanitaigs In ihe the weru 
Series of Colt wtrldi ended Sunday at the 7 , 173 
rord, pgr-70 Fi rcsiDocCoeo try Club course la 
Akron, OMo : 



East Division 




Roger Maltbie. S126JM0 

65-69-68-66— 2*8 


W 4 


Pet 

GB 

Denis Watson. *73400 

65-71-66-70-272 

Taranto 

77 

47 

421 

— 

Calvin Peete. 540600 

66-69-71-67 — 273 

New York 

73 

49 

ffS 

3 

Tam Kite, 54Q400 

67 -68-70-68 — 273 

Detroit 

66 

57 

S3J 

low 

Hal Sutton. 528X00 

6668-70-68 — 274 

Baltimore 

64 

57 

JB9 

mo 

Ray Floyd. S2&2M 

70-71-7044—275' 

Boston 

58 

63 

479 

I7Vj 

Andy North. 520400 

6969 -73-65 — 276 

Milwaukee 

55 

65 

458 

20 

Greg Norman, 520400 

7163-7067—276 

Cleveland 

43 

79 

J52 

33 

Lorry Nelson. 520400 

6968-7049—276 


West Division 




Woody Bfockbrn, 500400 

67-7) 67-77 —276 

California 

71 

53 

.573 

— 

Gordon Brad Jr. 520400 

6767-70-72-276 

Kansas City 

67 

54 

554 

2VS 

Tom Watson, 814400 

6967-7269-277 

Oakland 

64 

60 

J16 

7 

Hubert Green, 514400 

68-70-7069—277 

ChJcooo 

59 

62 

488 

10W 

Mark McCumber, 514400 

696868-72— Z77 

Seattle 

57 

47 

460 

14 

Fuzzy Zoetier. 512,700 

6867.7766— 278 

Minnesota 

55 

66 

455 

I4W 

Dan Foreman. 511400 

68-70-7269—279 

Texas 

46 

76 

J77 

24 

Bill Glassoa. 51IJ00 

6966-73-71—279 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



George Archer, S11J00 

67-7365-74-279 


East Division 




Soon Simpson. 59400 

68-72-7268—280 


W L 

PCT. 

GB 

ion Baker-Finch, S9JD0 

73-7067-70—380 

St. Louis 

75 

4* 

420 

— 

Wayne Levi. S9JDQ 

72 -*8-70- 70—380 


New York 

Montreal 

Chicago 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 

V 

Los Angeles 

Son Diego 

Cincinnati 

Houslon 

Atlanta 

San Francisco 


Transition 


Top flalsners to H» rato-shortened Wfesf 
w w " 7W Germon Open, wtilcb ended Sunday to Bre- 

60 61 -496 15 nwn: 

S S 'iSI Bw’ifwrt Lanaer. West Gar. 61-6H62— 183 

» 01 325 35VI Vork McNulty, South Africa 59-6M6— 190 

lto " L« Mike McLean. England, 654*62-190 

72 ™ ■“ Malcolm Mockenz. Engtnd, 64-63-64—191 

^ m . John Btefl " s ' So * rtn Afrieo ' 66-63^3 — 192 

t. V Philip WO lion. Ireland. 63-66-63-192 

54 « « « Voughon Somers. Australia 66-6365— 194 

- H V'wnto Fernandez. Aroentina 626765— 194 

47 75 385 25W Gonzalez, BrailL 476662— 195 

Hugh Bo local I, South Africa 466762— 195 

Mats Lanner. Sweden. 626964—193 

Rem Ratter ly. N. Ireland. 656565—195 

LiUU Art Russell. U3. 616965—195 


» 81 325 35Vi 

West Division 

72 49 595 — 

67 57 540 6M 

64 57 529 0 

56 66 A59 1617 

50 71 .413 22 


BASEBALL 
American League 

KANSAS CITY— Ploced Dane loro, out- 
fielder. on the iSdav disabled list- Recalled 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 



G 

AB 

R 

H 

Pet. 

Boggs Bos. 

119 

400 

71 

173 

360 

Brett K-C 

IT S 

411 

51 

147 

J5B 

R. Henderson N.Y. 

104 

409 

106 

141 

J45 

Mattingly N.Y. 

120 

486 

70 

159 

327 

Lacy Bal. 

90 

381 

51 

120 

315 

Bocftto Oak. 

105 

310 

38 

95 

J06 

Butler Cte. 

119 

467 

78 

143 

306 

Whitaker DaL 

117 

479 

86 

146 

305 

Baines ChL 

118 

474 

64 

144 

304 

Cooper Mil. 

115 

467 

62 

143 

304 

p, Bradley Sea 

121 

490 

73 

149 

304 

Runs: Henderson, New York. W6; Rloken, 
8attlmore.ua.- whltaker,Detralt.«6; Wlnfleld. 


New Y ark. M. Murray, BalMmor*. tt. 5v-*Jar* ui.nn- 

RBH: Mattingly. New York, 104; Murray. Toronto 
Baltimore, 93; WlnfWd. New York. 88; Bdl. ™omo 
T oronto, u; R token. Baltimore, 85. 

Hits: Boggs, Boston. r73; Mattlnolv. New hm"*"- 
York. I»; Bractov. Seattle. 149; Wilson, non- «^H>iLw_Bon 
sas City. 149; Brett, K«s« CHy. W. 

ooabkn: Mattingly. New York. 39; Buck- I*** rBK 

ner. Boston. 36; Boms, Boston. 32t Cooper. 

Milwaukee, 32; Brott. Kansas City. 30; VWk- W 

er, Chtoaga 30; Davis. Oakland. 30. 

Triples: Wilson, Kansas CHv- 1»: Butter. JSSuSttHtt 
Cwvekmd. 12; Puckett. MtoneSoW. 11; Bar- HRs 

Held, Toronto. 8; Caoaer,MllMNifcee,8; Brad- Strim (Ji. 

toy. Seattle) 1 „ r^Lia 

Homo Rub; PWl OdcoBa, 32; Da evens- 


Fontenot, Brucstor (51. Sorensen C7) and 
Lake; Browning, Franco (7) and Diaz. W— 
Browning. 136. L— Brusstar.33. SV— Franco 
(71. HRs— Cincinnati, Eiaskv (157. Chlcagw 
Cev (171. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
First Gama 

MUwaiAee *10 on BOO— I 1 t 

aevetaad on 0 M l 0>-6 n 1 

Haas. Wafts IS). Fingers (8) ana Scnroeder; 
Waddell, Reed (I) and Willard, w— Wooded 
7-5. L— Haas. 76. HR— Milwaukee. Gantner 
(4). 

Second Game 

MllwauKM BOB DM 008-0 6 0 

Cleveland 0M 020 08*— 2 5 0 

oarwfai end Moore; Romero. Clark (4) and 
Willard. W— Remora. 2-2. L— Darwin. 7-15. 
Sv— Clark lll.HR— Oevelona Vukowfch IS>. 
Taranto 000 0a 000-3 7 1 

CWcaao 400 001 00 k— 4 a • 

Key. Davis (4), Lamp (4). Caudill (8) and 
Heerran; Bannister, Gtoaton (o). James <7t 
and HIIL w— Bannister, 6-11. L— Key. 104. 
Sv— James (22>.H Rs— Toronto, Bell (24>.CM* 


American Association. 

OAKLAND— Activated Mickey Tettlatan, 
catcher. Optioned Chartie O’Brien, catcher, to 
Tacoma at the Pacific Coast League. 

TO RONTO— Called uo stave Davis, pitcher, 
and Jett Hearten, catcher, (ram Knoxville of 
the Southern League. Optioned Ron Mussel- 
ntaft Pilcher, to Syracuse o# lt» internal Iona) 
Leoaue. Released outright Gary Alfensoru 
catcher. 

FOOTBALL 

CantOkm PaeTOall League 
CALGARY— Added Doug Leon, defensive 
back, to Ihe raster. Activated Richie Hall, 
defensive bock. Placed Fred Worthy, defen- 
sive linemen on the reserve list. 

WINNIPEG— Added Joe Jackson, line- 
backer, lo the roster, Activated John Sturdi- 
vant. defendve lineman, and Pat Lanadon. 
offensive Uneman. Placed Gory Moton, line- 
backer, aM David Black, defensive lineman, 
on the reserve lift 

National Football League 
PITTSBURGH — Placed Ellon veals ana 
Scoop Glllesale. running bocks, an waivers. 
Placed Cam Jacobs, llnabackrr, Frank Po- 
kamy, wide receiver, and Russ Graham, of- 
fensive lineman, on Ihe Mfured reserve Ihtf. 

COLLEGE 


Football 
CFL Standings 


Eastern Division 



W L 

T PF 

PA 

Ft* 

Montreal 

5 2 

0 160 

131 

10 

Ottawa 

4 3 

0 141 

195 

8 

Toronto 

3 S 

O 193 

200 

6 

Hamilton 

1 6 

O 128 

106 

2 


Western Division 



Brn amb 

6 1 

0 230 

111 

12 

Winnipeg 

5 2 

0 214 

128 

10 

Saskatchwn 

4 3 

0 192 

169 

8 

Edmonton 

3 4 

0 116 

211 

6 

Calgary 

1 6 

0 187 

206 

S 


Sunday's Resell 



Wlmtoefl 43, Calgary 6 




Soccer 

WORLD CUP QUALIFYING 



CONCACAF Stoop 




Kauai CHV 5SS 5 '* 

Hough and Brvmmer; Black. Farr (4). 

Beckwith IB) and Woman. W— HovOh, 13-13. TENNESSEE STATE— Named Gale Soy- 
L— Black.*-?! Hite— Kansas City. Brett (201, InJerim attileHc director. 

Smith 13). 

Detroit 008 D01 MO— I 7 5 

California 000 083 04*— J 11 o i 


Honduras 0. Canada i 
Points: Canada 3. Costa Rica 2. Honduras 1 
Next match; Canada ot Costa Rica Sopt. I 

ENGLISH FIRST DIVISION 
Liverpool S. Ipswich 0 
M an ch e ster united 2, west Horn 0 
Sheffield Wednesday X Wolford l 
Tottenham & Evsrton 1 



tirrn is not necessarily unfair, law place. Tom wie ia closing oo) anu ui™ ^ umu «. x. . ThnmMi M . Kingman, 

Tr^ tMd t^TafKT the supply H Curtis Strange, with a 286 total that tied him for 32d place m the 41- 
^UwMhan the cmS- man international field, won $6,750 to set a angle-scas^i mofl^wnnmg 
pr* in major drug cases. Athletes record for the PGA Imr. HU wmnmgs i ^or year co^to S534J31, f Moseby, Toronto, si. 

breaking ibe record of SS30,808 sel by Tom Wabon in 1980. 

aagftfgig For the Record • 

* sis 2"“_^_ ■.•niscBaaaassaBaaaas 


nmrT Thoitani SvT»7 BetU Terrell. Cory (81 end CarflUo; Slaton, Oh 

S' Klwman, bunt 14) and Boone. w-ainum.B-1 L-Ter- 

« Vmm • S * 0 ™' roll, W-7. HR— Detroit. Trammell («>. 

SLimh kkNmrYaribW; SStti ! 

Butter, CUwetond, K. MMahT. Toronto, (g) ^ BlrnM ^ TeW ,toh. w- 

otoa^LnriremmtaaMJlJRA- album. (W- M HRs— Bolt i- 

* oo4 ^ ,t/ y >l,U>Tq , more, Lacy 2 (9), Rayford (81. ocftiand. Hen- 


TimRames 


"JSJ; dStml the former pitcher 4 , 6-2, to win the final of the Association of Tennis Professionals Sunday 

and a “pJ^SSiPWlipiie Stretff will drive for the Iigier Formula 1 auto 

valuable drag ^ tp?m for the rest of the season, starting with the Sept. 8 Italian Grand 
Sj payers 1 profi^f^ Wng ^ die team announced Sunday in Zsndvoort. the Netherlands. (UP1) 


Woo^/WtonftN Pet /ERA: CUbum.^ v***^*-™™ 

, fornta, L2, J00. LM; Guidry, New York, 1M. 

M. UK; Sabethaoen. Kansas City. 1M, ^62. denonm. Ktogmon t26L 

ffoBSSSSKS™ *, 

ris. Detroit. 152; Bdiwtowr. ammo, M7i 
Buntt.~aucagoi 138; Witt. California 134. JW ■ 
ch^. oui—nberry, Kansas Qtv, 30; Her- tl-«.SY-Fl»h*r(9i.HRs— «*w York.PasaiM 
^^SS^T HawetLOoktond.as: IS». Mattingly ffl). Seattle. Davis m>. Pres- 
Righem. Kt* Vork. 23; Jamcfc Chkago, 73: 

Moorto CoMtontlo, 22. (Minnesota at Battm, bhL, ratal 


GRAND OPENING 

Saturday August 31 

S)e 3£eizer*6 SNOOKER CUB 

presents cAlex "Surriaane’’ cLtiggb to 
WORLD CHAMPION SNC&KER 1982-1 983 

Tickets DfL 1 00,- for 14.00 - T9.CX) or 20.00 -01.00. 
Free play on tables that day. refreshments provided. 
Special offer ML 200,- ind. a one year's membership 
order at Ketzersgracht 256, Amsterdam Holland. 

TeL 31. 20. 231586 










.v.- 


r * 


• - l* 1 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUTE, TUESDAY, AUGUST 27. 1985 



POLAND POSTCARD 


f A Generation of Poets 9 


By Jackson Diehl 

Washington Past Service 

J AROCDM, Poland — A scream 
swept across a Geld packed with 
teen-agers bristling with black 
leather, chains and tortured hair. 
“Prohibit work; prohibit pay," was 
the cry. “People are dying 
Thus began the final concert of 
the Jarodn rock music festival, a 
celebration of loud guitars, exotic 
styles and aggressive alienation 
that has become a remarkable fo- 
rum of independent expression for 
Poland’s young generation. 

Thousands of youth came to par- 
ty, camp, and cheer bands who 
sang of hopelessness, aimlessness 
and fear of nuclear war. “No goal 
no future, no hope, no joy: that’s 
the picture of our generation," 
went one lyric. 

Such themes blared out from Jar- 
odn, a small town in Poland's 
farmlands, for five long nights this 
month, to the bemusement of Com- 
munist authorities and emissaries 
of the Roman Catholic Church. 
Bands performed under such 
names as Jail Trial and Dead Scab 
Formation. 

The audience dressed according 
to dan: There were skinheads in 
leather and chains, punks in black 
lipstick and dyed, teased hair, and 
even a few hippies in T-shirts and 
pony tails. 

The Jarodn festival has become 
both a rare Polish outlet for social 
and economic frustration and a ba- 
rometer of youth coming of age 
after the Solidarity era. 

“We are creating national cul- 
ture, like it or not," said Waller 
CbelstawsJri, a festival organizer. 
“A generation of poets is being 
born here with strong lies to reali- 
ty." The youth attracted to this 
movement are mostly from work- 
ing-class families. They say in polls 
that they are frustrated with life, 
alienated by schools and jobs, fear- 
ful about the future. 

“For them, rock seems to be the 
only alternative," said an organizer 
of the festival which began in 1980. 
“After martial law was introduced 
[in 1981), rock became special be- 
cause it was the only youth activity 
that was not prohibited." 

Hie young are a special concern 
for the government of General 
Wqjciech Jaruzdski and for the op- 
position. The party’s Central Com- 
mittee has held two meetings in the 
last four years to discuss programs 


for youth. Communists and oppo- 
sition activists have urged special 
efforts to win over young Poms. 

Neither side seems to have had 
much success. To judge from polls 
carried out at the festival many 
Polish youth simply feel adrift. 

For many participants, the at- 
traction of Jarodn seemed to be its 
removal from the restrictions and 
institutions of everyday life. 

“Here, I can forget about every- 
thing," said Wqjciech Raubo, 19, a 
student and heavy- metal fan. “7 
can express myself completely.’’ 

Critics say the authorities (der- 
ate the festival as a way of distract- 
ing and mani pulating youth. In re- 
cent years, however, official 
disquiet with Jarodn has surfaced 
in a series of measures to control 
the event, including censorship of 
some lyrics, a ban on alcohol and a 
requirement that all concert-goers 
wear photo identification cards. 

The church has also bad uncer- 
tain results trying to reach the rock 
fans. Andrzej Madej', a monk, spat 
a week with 100 volunteers seeking 
to aitice youth to a local church for 
films, Masses and free food. 

His most conspicuous reward 
was a request by the leader of a 
group of 500 punk fans that a 
“punks only" Mass be celebrated at 
midnight. TIk punk leader de- 
manded that Madej deliver a homi- 
ly saying that “punks have to be 
united at all times," Madej said. 
“His problem was that when his 
punks got into fights, some of them 
were running away." 

Made] said he complied with the 
request, only to be faced with a 
tough flock who stamped the floor, 
waved their arms and shouted at 
him throughout the service. “If it 
were up to me, 1 would be against 
(he festival," he said. “But there are 
very authentic tilings in what they 
do, and we have to try and support 
them. Here these youth are able to 
fully realize themselves." 

■ Bines Festival in Oteztyn 
Polish blues, eclipsed by rock in 
the 1970s, is enjoying a revival The 
Associated Press reports from 
Olsztyn, a 14th-century city 215 
kilometers (135 miles) north of 
Warsaw. The second annual Olsz- 
tyn Blues Nights, a four-day, gov- 
ernment-financed festival orga- 
nized by the official Polish 
Students' Association, drew thou- 
sands of youths. 


Going 'Straight for the Small Potatoes 


Art Buchwald is on vacation. 


By Mervyn Rothstdn 

New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — Sitting on a 
sofa in his suite at the Algon- 
quin Hotel, Garrison Keillor 
leans forward and looks at a mi- 
crocassette recorder on the table. 
“This is a little tiny one," he says. 
He picks it up and begins talking 
to it. “How are you doing. Bud- 
dy?" 

Microphones have been nice to 
Keillor. Perhaps that explains 
why be is nice to them. For more 
than a decade he has been host of 
“A Prairie Home Companion," 
■ regaling U.S. radio listeners ev- 
ery Saturday with his tales of 
Lake Wobegon. Minnesota, “the 
town that time forgot and that the 
decades cannot improve," and of 
its inhabitants and places — 
Ralph of Ralph’s Pretty Good 
Grocery Store (“Remember, if 
you can't find it at Ralph’s, you 
can probably get along without 
it”), Our Lady of Perpetual Re- 
sponsibility Church (where Fa- 
ther Emil has been known to 
stand up in the middle of a con- 
fession and say, “Oh, you 
didn't!"), the Sidetrack Tap 
(“where the old guys sit and lose 
some memory capacity with a 
glass of peppermint schnapps, 
which Wally knows how to keep 
adding to so that they can tell the 
old lady they only had one”) and, 
of course, tne Statue of the Un- 
known Norwegian. 

At the same time, Keillor has 
been pursuing a career as a writer. 
His work has appeared in The 
New Yorker, The Atlantic and 
other publications, mid his first 
book, “Happy to Be Here," a col- 
lection of his pieces, was a big 
seller. 


* VJr * 



Ffelfeto 


Keillor In earlier “Prairie Home Companion” days. 


Now he has combined (he two 
careers with the publication by 
Viking of “Lake Wobegon 
Days," a chronicle of the little 
Midwestern prairie town that he 
admits bears more than a dose- 
resemblance to Anoka, Minneso- 
ta, where be was bora 43 years 
ago. 

“The book was my project to 
get myself back to bong a writer, 
a writer as I dreamed I might be 
when I was a child," he said. “I 
have been writing since I was a 
little boy and always knew that 
that was what I wanted to do. But 
when I got out of college I found 
radio to be a more possible way 


of earning a living. And even 
when I began publishing with 
The New Yorker in 1970 I was 
still tom between radio, which is 
imp ro visa tional and colloquial 
and more intimate and more sen- 
timental to me, and my other 
writing, which tended to be a lit- 
tle drier, a piece of crafL 
“And in the conflict between 
radio and writing, radio bong 
kind of like a warm bath and 
writing being like aoold shower, I 
arrived at doing this monologue 
on Saturday nights, about Is to 
20 minutes in length. For me, the 
monologue was the favorite thing 
I had done in radio. It was based 
on writing, but in the end it was 
radio, it was standing up and 
leaning forward into the dark and 
talking, letting words come out of 
you. And I wanted to take this 
radio serial that I had made up 
and bring it around back to the 
writing that I had always wanted 

i. J* w 


Keillor’s two-hoor radio show, 
consisting of live music as wdl as 
die monologue, is broadcast live 
by Minnesota Public Radio and 
American Public Radio to more 
than 260 stations across the coun- 
try Saturday nights from SL Paul 
where be lives. 


limits television. It makes every- 
thing that happen* exactly that 
size. 

“Radio, d e p endin g on what’s- 
there, how yon listen to it, how 
you fed about it —radio can fill 
up the entire room- It can be 
hnniwisp. Radio, as you sit and 
focus in on something that comes 
from it, isn’t the size of the receiv- 
er. Your innage is not limited to 

that. It can be as big as the 
world." 

Keillor draws most of his mate- 
rial from his own experience. The 
residents of Lake Wobegon, he 
yard , “include almost all the peo- 
ple I've known in my life. The 
town incorporates most of 
what has ever happened to me.” 

He considers himself very 
much a person with a small-town 
sensib ility, very much in tune 
with the virtues of small-town 

America and very much a part of 
I jilre Wobegon (population 942), 
“where much of the day you 
could stand in the middle of Main 
Street and not be in anyone’s 
way" 

As Keillor wrote in bis new 
book: “Left to our own devices, 
we Wobegonians go straight for 
the s mall potatoes. Majestic 
doesn’t appeal to us; we like the 
Grand Canyon better with Clar- 
ence and Arlene parked in front ■ 
of it, smiling . We fed uneasy at 
momentous events.” 


to do." 


For Keillor, live radio is some- 
thing special. “I do fed strongly 
that live radio is (he baas of our 
show, and not my talent, not our 
coming from the Midwest,” he 
said. “Someday, reporters will be 
asking television performers if 
they nave any ideas of going into 
radio. Now, we smile as we say 
that because everyone would re- 
gard going from television to ra- 
dio as a demotion, as a come- 
down — but it is noL I think that 
I have something going on with 
the audience that people in televi- 
sion don't know about TV is 
tiny. TV is a little box. It's a little 
piece of furniture. The picture 


“It's a town becomes more 
real to me as time goes by.” he 
said. “It becomes real to me as a 
place I have left. I have lived 
in Sl Paul for about 12 years, and 
I believe I'll probably live in St 
P aul for a long time, as least as 
long as I keep on doing this show. 
But I can imagine a time in the 
future when I might go back to 
Lake Wobegon to live. 


“One of the themes of the sto- 
ries is the theme of small plea- 
sures, and one thing I've tried to 
give myself over to in the course 
of telling these stories is to stand 
in praise of common and modest 
things. And that really is at the 
heart of Lake Wobegon — the 
pleasure of porches, and small 
conversation, and fresh vegeta- 
bles, the pleasure of winter, the 
pleasure of the familiar, every 
year, coming around and around. 
And a person could make a life 
on that." 


people 


Artie Shaw Jams Again 


Artie Shaw has just completed a 
weeklong engagement with his new 
16 -member band at (he Blue Note, 
one of New York’s top jazz dubs, 
and says it was the emotional peak 
of his musical career. It was the 
first time he had played a New 
York dub since his quintet left the 
Embers on 52d Street in 1954. The 
Blue Note had a full house every 
night. Shaw, 75, said the crowd 
“took everything we could give 
them" and asked the band to 
stretch out more in improvisations. 
Shaw won fame as a clarinetist in 
the 1930s and ’40s and Ins band 
recorded many hits, including “Be- 
nin the Beguine." “Summertime 
and “Indian Love Call At the 

height of his popularity, he discard- 
ed the clarinet and said be would 
never play it again. He’s kept that 
vow, in the new group, Dick Jota- 
son handles clarin et and leads the 
band in Shaw’s absence. Shaw said 
he organized the group in Decem- 
ber 1983 to keep a vital kind of 
American music alive. But he said, 
“If the audiences keep going to 
Cyndi Laoper, Madonna, Brace 
Sreinsteen, Prince and company, 
ihereis a very dim future for us.* 


tMim of relief workers.- Tim re? 
maining money is coitecunguiter- 
est in bank acconnts. . . ; The 
rock gfogftr Boh Gefclof, who is one - 
of Live Aid’s organizffs. and Sa- 
moa Le Bon of the rodt araip 
Dtuan Duran went, to Bennudato; 
rack ud the island's contribution ti> r 
Lb* Aid: a check for 5210,413. 

• d 



A 3-year-old boy walked into 
Disneyland in A n ah ei m . Califor- 
nia, to become the park’ s 25ft ntBr 
lionth via tor and win a bonanza of 
rifts as part of .a yeaxloag, oc&fcra^ 
tkm of Disneyland's 30* anniver-j 
sary. Brooks Baer seemed a hit her; 
wildered by all the fuss; stifling 
only when radkeyMwsegirinfiim' - 
a kiss. His father. Brace, seemed 
more excited — nor surprising, 
considering gifts such as a. new 
raftillae, * trip in Japan, th ousands 
of free miles: of air travel and » 
lifetime' pass to all 'Disney, thane 
parks. - ■ • . v- ~ 

a- ’ 






>' *£ :•* ' 


James Irwin, leading a six-man 
expedition, has embarked on his 
four* effort to find Noah's Aik on 
Mount Ararat. Turkish mou ntain 
troops are escorting, the forms' 
U. S. astronaut Irwin and five other : 
Christian fundamentalists ..oiT a 
four-day climb. Hie team has been 
advised not to spend nights at 
camps on Ararat’s southwest face, 
where foreign dimbers have been 
harassed by what the government 
said woe Kurdish separatists. - 

' r- ; T 


Daefhi Kim, 23, of Seoul is the. 
winner of the sixth Robert Casadfr- . 
sos, international piano competi- . 
non. at the Cleveland Institute of'. 
Murid. He won $5,000. an appear- 
ance with the Cleveland Orchestra 
and recitals at the Cleveland Mnse^ 
urn of Art and the Mrison Fran^, 
false in New York Be w*D also* 
appear as a soloist with the Or- . 
chestre Pasdrioup in Paris and *0 
Orchestra PhUharmomquc in IiBe^ 
France. 

' :• •: a. ' 



Only a tiny fraction of themoncy 
raised in the Live Aid 'concerts fra 
African famine relief has been used 
and no food or medicine has been 
shipped. Live Aid officials :say. 
Philip Rusted, an accountant who 
recently returned from a f act-find- 
ing trip to Africa, said Ik could not 
say when live Aid would ship the 
first food. “We woe hoping to 
move sooner but you can’t .start, 
zooming up without bang properly 
geared,” he said: Officials said that 
of the nrifliou of pounds raised -by 
the twin concerts m Philadelphia 
and London, 52 million (about J2.8 
million) had been spent on. buying 
a fleet of trades and setting up 


Senator. Edward M. Kennedy is 
irate over a forthcoming book. 
about his framer wife that says he 
had an active extra-marital love' 
life, .the Boston Herald. reports.', 
“living With the Kennedy? by ; 
Marcia Cheffis says affairs eventn- 
aQy drove Kennedy’s wife. Joan, to -' 
drink and divorce, the Herald re- 
ported. Some Kemtedy-watites 
believe the book will hart Kenne- 
dy’s chances for the White House:' . 
“The whis p erin g camp aign on the 
senator’s women problem, as it’s 
been called, now wfl] grow into 
load murmur,” said Peter CoJBe&l 
author of “The Kennedy's: An?] 
American Drama.” He predicted ^ :• 
would be “a major issue." A Ken- . 
nedy spokesman, Brian Delaney, 
pooh-poohed that notion, though- •> . 
“It’s probably the 300* bode an*, 
the Kennedys,” he said. 


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wrwi prune bank prerontees m farm 
game bar* promnsory note US. 
Pc faxor Svriss Frann 10- 20 years, 
no (xolcers 



OFFICE SERVICES 


YOUR RIRMSHED OFFICE 
M LONDON 

• 7 day 24 hour access & onswerphone 

• FuB support services including: 
recratand, telex, copying, efc_ 

• Corporate Repres en tat i on Sen** - ] 

• Short or lorn term avadabSw 

1 

Tab 01 834-0918 Tbu 24973 


OFFICE SERVICES 


BUSINESS BAS 
IN ZURICH 


FUU.Y INTEGRATED 
BUSD'CSS SBW1CE5 
aOSE TO RNANOAL 


Telephone / Tetex / Mat Serwces 


Ward Proonsinq / Translation 
Company Formation 

tNlESNATfONAl. OfRCE 


32 Remwa Q+8001 Zorich 
TeL-01 / 21461 il. 



AUTOS TAX FREE . 


TRASCO 

INTHINATiONAL 

LRD. Mercedes Tar Free 

6 mou» rwi 36” & 44" 
armoured cars and bwuaita 
Gooch buih cars 

Other maims & exotics 

Over 100 writs in Ho* 

World We defamry 

Dried from soarce 

D.aT. & EPA 

Tefc London (44) PI OS 7779 
Tefcw (51) B5%«Z2 TMS G. 

Trosca London Ltd. 

6567 Park Lane, London W.l. 

SwrtrerlcxxMX-W. Geruimy 

oi HttWCH QTIZtN of Mauririan angin, 
!6 bBngud retang podBon handymai. 
1 - wA consider dl propasiiians, prsfero- 
bty Middle Erotem empfayen. WS 
7” travel WBh driving kenoe. Tefc Paris 

j* 37B2242 

rh HARVARD MA1E GRADUATE 1985, 
AS reels work abroad. Speeds Rendt 
Boot 2633L Hearid Tnbune, 92521 
— NeuBy Cedex. France. 



» EDUCATIONAL 

ly POSmONS AVAILABLE 


COOPH ST JAMES 

ORKIALAGB4T 

OF BMW (GB) UD 

Whfc you are fa Europe, we are offer ! 
<smiderobk> savings on brand new 
BMW con to not specifications. Ful 
factory wants*/. 

We con dso supply vighT or left herd j 
ckfae tax free WCr/i at tounst paces. 
We aba swipiy factory built buBet- 
proof BMmond the Alpina BMW 
range ton free. 

Gal Leaden (OT) 629 6699. 

h DOMESTIC 

n- POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

pfta 

DOMESTIC 

- POSITIONS WANTED 

MBtCBXS SPECIALISTS 
FOR USA + MHXXE EAST 

far 20 wen. 

LAME STOCK OF MEW 
MBtaSES CARS 

280 S, 280 SL 280 5EL 500 SB, * 
500 SEC with both, vefaun 4 
leather mtsnar. 

Shipment & delivery worldwide. p 

NASSAR EXPORT GMBH, - 

MAJNZES 1ANDSTS. T91, 
D-6000 RAhKHIRT/M 



TEL: 10)69-73 30 61 U 

jU: 414018 

AlfTOS TAX FREE 

10 YEARS 

We Deliver On to fta Worid 

TRANSCO 

Keeping a constant stock af more than 
300 braid new cot, 
making 5XW happy efiet* every year. 
Send far free muhicalor aoldog. 
Tronsoo SA, 95 Noardefaan. 

2030 Antwtm Belgium 

Tel 323/542 62 4a ^^TRANS B 

390 SE Chranpevre / Brawn j 

Septanrijor deliveries 

50C SB. Sivar/ Gray 

500 SL Noutiori Hoe / Gray 
KJtSOft 944 Turbo Sfcw _ 

^ BMW, Porsche T1 

Tbu 5228ST. 10 am. - 10 pm 

Areertaw Owned an) Operated 


MEMBBI WOBUMNIDE 

■ BU9NES5 cames 


YOUR OFTKE IN PAMS: TELEX, 

ANSWERING SERVICE, secretary, 
amwd^ .52*% 24H/day. 


: 609*5 93. 


IMPETUS • ZURICH * 252 76 21. 

Phone / telex / molbagc. 


OFFICES FOR RENT 


Udfag Far Yam" 

GBCVA OFFICES 

i 

exuhjil 


rSSoiSnauy^^^® 


Herman MBer Adon Offices 

Midy t GentraBy Located 
Comnwrod & Bcnken Rue du Rhone 
Monthly Renti US33300 
Sarious Re l erences and bank guanm- 

Far farther infor motion, write Pa 
RB-1 15355, PlfflUOTAS. 
0+1211 Geneva 3 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 


Your best buy. 

Fine dmonds m any price range 
at lowest wholesale pices 
drect from Antwerp 
center of die dem and world. 
fvt guarantee. 

For free pnoe fat write 


Ertdbfahed 1928 

Peftaoratroat 62. 8-2018 Antwerp 
H eSSS? iyn?A! Oufe 

Heart of A n twerp Dkenand industry 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


POIBOft. fer- mit ne<fata delivery 

ROM STOCK 


in USA 

RUTTING 


aeboan, B324T Zoereri. Antwerp. Teh 
03384.1054 Hx.3230rf Truism I l In 
slotte Mercedes. BMW. ASO. 


AUTOMOBILES 


Otr npoft nMe AJSSS9M toe G. 
Hantman^Z390Henslxrg l Katharin- 


AUTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCAR 


THE CAR SUPPING 
5KOAUST5 




311 88081 
93 TD'45 
171/43063 
095 7D61 
931 7605 
568 9288 
866 6681 

AGENTS I " 

Leave it to u to bring bio you 


AUTO CONVERSION 


ERA / DOT 

coNvaaoNS 


— _ -PA / DOT approved 
CHAMPAGNE IMPORTS IwC., 


Tehx 6971917-CHAMP 


LEGAL SERVICES 




. > FL 
441469. 


HOTELS 


SWITZERLAND 


CRAW HOia EUROPE 

tree Parking. 


U&A. 


r ] ^2 bkxi from UN. 

.- — . - i. dttehtaii from W5. 
1 ftewing ma gd- 20X r&count. 


onawwiiB mu ad- 20 % (far 
i 422951. Tefc 212-9863800. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


FRENCH FABM VACATION. B%sy 

horses, organic garden, vegetation 
ansina m gradOus 17th century atom- . 
try merer. Sonoundnd by 15^X)0 
acre forat ne^ Fontainebloou/PajB. 
Cofl M 069 47 4& 



HBUA5 YACHTING: YacN Charters. 
Academira 28: Athene'! 0671, Greece. 


KENYA SAFARI 1 week aurora 

$350. ScJaiiceere lxrefatt 437 TQS 


LOW COST FUGHTS 


ACCESS USA 


fiwnPtrii 
New York 
Los Angeles 
Oucago 
Wan 

Daflas 

Montreal 


One Way 

US$149 
US 239 
US 239 
US 275 
US 329 
USSI89 


RoundTrip 
U5S229 y 
US 479.-. 
US 30 
US 419 - 
US 449 
US$339 


and more destitutions ~— 
15% (ftcount an Id dan 
MBS fair IT) 221 46 94 
(Cor. lie. 1502) 




NT ,«« WAYSl SO. Evewfau N.Y.- 

West Coast $145. Paris 2259290. 


T |lgnorei 


;sS:-r-.V.l 


PAGE 6 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


. 

-5 r ,■ — 

• *^1 : ; r 

- 

. -•s. ■** ■- 
r-~ . ^ : 





>au. 


* : -f - * 






!>l, 


.fe, * *•- 


Small space: : 
advertising m 
the International . 

Herald Tribune 
is less expensive 
than you might 
imagine. J. ' 

For price ; v V?: ft? ?: j - - • : 

details call these 
numbers of ' 
your nearest 
IHT advertising . 
rqpresentative. . 






Paris: 747.46 jX) : 
London: 836.4802 
New York: 7523890 
Frankfurt: 72^7^5 
Hong Kongr 5.420906 


«■.. ■ 






International Secretarial Positions 


- y*. 




SECRET AWES AVAILABLE 


SECRETARIES 

OVERSEAS 


Througlwii t{* umrU we introduce efr 
enfc to finf- riras re creta r i p whose Bn- 
auate: and recretariot tab how been 
thoraugnty tested. If you era an env- 
atojrer, cot dad ib for the bat advice. 
Secretaries . col ut to cerange cut inter- 
view m London. 

. jntem o t iaud S eg eta ria 
174 New Band Street London W1 
Tefc 01-491 ft00 
Reauiliuanl Consultants. 


BiraKH «tatJAN. FuBy expwi. 
wired m Office Admetamation amt 
Mcmagemwit and Pubic Relations 
PorfHP.ra PA. and pnvata 
tecretary. Effidency Joydty and In*, 
worthmtes aaured. Prepared to trow- 
d cmd r doeede (either to Miari or 

MssaaSaam 


RANDSTAD 


Sr a ri afa e d in 
BBMGUAL AGB4CY hX Birred 
Ptata7MT2 4O T - ,,pW0 K f ^ 


A 2 l W n )2 wai TEAVBlEDBfft- 

o h k^y, a y eprt y ets potation os 


SECRETARIAL 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 


UROMILY IDUU for tap hvd 
working American executive in Peris, 


SECRETARY 


Eng** ntajher tongue. Ruent Frarrt, 
te 

cope wrtti lots of wort mrody irtenal 

SKEfe afjBSSJg 

aoporntmonc 

GK MTBMAT1GNAL 
PARK (1) 225 59 25 


CHAUBiffiNG JOB for mrl saaetary 

ib The- candidate must have 

a 


preferably 


Knowtedge 
* PC on reset. 
/ 180000 / 


NautBy Oidex, fronoe 


unovf seas far ambbcan 

rfi f r 2S oaa 


tekiJiinr . write or phene: 138 Avenue 
Vtaer^go, 75T16 Paris, FraSTrS 


PAP-TTME WGUH1 mother Iwgue 

1761 at 563 y 30. 


SECRETARIAL 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAH-ABT.E 


™eadvwwng oma of f*- 

Pr Afcahom based fa tens ■ 
b ? fchl B fa^? perfectly bifagud seo 
Wtesy, Preodi mcStier tongun. g Hn- 


AND AnMMBPtATioN 

**far. infl company Paris 16ft, 

ss&ssriSffiLrf**' 

praretang, work wth ^ures repor- 
tant. .prewore rapmnx unth 





JUrMSSBrANTibr advfaft- 

fnwdw cfepartmertf of Franah Itn- 

“ ^1wUftgr..BHga4RMi. 

wtjstjtse 




FREETIMERSJ 


Secretaire jenae, com p£ tome « «atliOB«a«c’ _< 

devema •' • •* 


^assistants: 

w^mwsiimiae ct uaieire oKtawate pan- perearae d'aneBeate 


r ‘-5C.^ 




40/4 


Bid. JomJmsta. BJ*. 277 



Printed by gd z in Zurich (Switzerland)