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INTERNATIONAL 


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Publi^hed ^it^ Jhe ||pw York Times and The Washing ton Post 

*R it. nPABJg,jjnED!VESDAY, AUGUST 28, 1985 


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ESTABLISHED 1887 


^ - N *; - 


Threatens Presngem Kohl 

W^n^ExpeaeiuSuffer : I — 




By James M. Markham 

l :Jie " York Timex Service 
BONN All CSfU^nocra r/wtn. 


fl y about Bonn of 
cast German moles” in ministries 


*i'l -lil; 


PAD:! 

?02M^ 

£US5 :? ~ 




«**?* coalition at home andlow 

SS? r ong West Gennan/s 
NATO allies, according to pollti- 
aans. and Western -diplomats in 
Yet ties between the two 
gwnan states have so far been 
.little affected. 

Hk defection to EastGeraumy 
or a ‘ top-ranking counterinteffi- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

gBoco officer, and the uncovering 
tfwhalappears-io be a networic of 
Communist operatives in high 
places in Bonn, has jolted the chan- 
m Slid -the governing Christian 


Moreover, the trial of Otto 
1 atnb sdorff, the Former economics 
minister, opens in Bonn on Thurs- 
day. A senior figure in the small 
Free Democratic party. Count 



bribes from the Flick holding com- 
pany. 

The weekly Der Spiegel has add- 
ed fuel tothe fires crackling around 
the coalition with disclosures of po- 
litical payoffs by the insurance and 
Pbannacentical industries in Bonn. 

The accumulation of scandals 
®ay have accentuated what Bodo 
Hombach, a Social Democratic 
strategist, believes is a new volatili- 
ty in the West German electorate, 




Friedrich Zumnennann 


RwiMra 

Count Otto Lambsdorff 


Kohl May Dismiss Intelligence Chief 


mapping sttate^S forgtsSal dec! bCCQ ^ I BONN —Chancellor Hdmm Kohl fieredyiairidzed West Germany's 

tions.set for February 1987. “The belief in institutions has SSJE?*®! 8 * sem “ Tuesday ovcr ^ defection of one of us lop 

: The disclosure that Heribert been extremely shaken,” said Mr. ^ moSt (hsaass lhe 

Hellenbroich, the Christian Demo- Hombacb, who crafted his party’s u,teUl Ben« chief, Henbert Hellenbroich. 

oral head of the West Germany’s May election victory in North Mr. Kohl's spokesman, Friedhdm Ost, said the chancellor had said at 
counterintelligence agency, had Rhme*Wes(phajia. “So people are 1X0 emergency cabinet meeting that he failed to understand why a 

E rotectcd the defector, despite a ^siting which man will help, not counterintelligence official, HanvJoadrim Tiedge, had been left in a 
. mg history of alcoholism and in- which organization or institution sensitive post despite problems with alcohol and debt, 
detaedness, gave the opposition should they dect” The chancellor’s remarks, his first on Mr. Tfedge since he sought 

Social Democrats a handy stick- to Johannes Rau, the Social Demo- political asylum in East Germany last week, appeared to be =wrn<»rf at the 
wat the Kohl government The op- P 3 * victor in the state, is Ukefy to former chief of counterespionage, Mr. Hellenbroich, who is now head of 
position has often charged that the be designated his party's standard- the West German secret service. 

chancellors team is “amateurish” bearer for 1987 and to apply some w , ... ... . , T 

rniA u An«tonti a n • - • ^ 3 Mr. HeUenbroich was bead of counterespionage until last month. He 

^ . .. (Continued on Page 2, CoL 2) has admitted that he was aware of Mr. Hedge's personal problems. 


tions.set for Febniaiy 1987. 

: The disclosure that Heribert 
HeUenbroich, the Christian Demo- 
crat head of the West Germany’s 
counterintelligence agency, had 

E rotected the defector, despite a 
. mg history of alcohoHsm and in- 
debtedness, gave the opposition 
Serial Democrats a handy stick- to 


chancellor's team is “amateniitii’* 
and •“dflettantidL 1 * ••• ' 



Military Chief 

Ousts Buliari 
In Lagos Coup 





. - v| 

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Compiled by Our Staff From Dapmchea 

ABIDJAN. Ivory Coast — The 
Nigerian government of General 
Mohammed Buhari was toppled 
Tuesday in a coup 20 mouths after 
it came to power, Lagos Radio an- 
nounced. 

There were no reports of blood- 
died, and the radio said cities had 
remained c?lm. Sources said that 
tanks were seen outride the Su- 
preme Military Headquarters, but 
there was no' other indication of 
military movements. 

Telephone and telex links were 
severed and a dawn-lo-dusk curfew 
was imposed in Lagos and all state 
capitals. Air and sea ports were 
closed; land borders had already 
been closed. 

Diplomatic sources said the chief 
of army staff, Major General Ibra- ap 

him Babangida, was named on tele- Mohammed Buhari 
virion as the new government head. ... 

The general, described by knowl- misuse power to .the detriment of 
edgeable sources as a radical who oujr nanonal aspirations and iner- 
tias a wide following in the army. General Dongonyaro said. 



was a planner of the 1983 coup that 
brought General Buhari to power. 


“The government had started to 
drift. The economy does not seem 


Ths AoooaiBCf Preu 


General Buhari's fate was not to be getting any better." 


Heribert HeUenbroich leaving parliament Tuesday. 


known. 


General Dogonyaro, who was 



Rrngan Analysis of f Reform 9 in South Africa Draws Criticism 


In a radio address Tuesday eve- identified as the chief staff officer 
ning, General Bahangida promised for armaments at army headquar- 
to strengthen the economy and re- ters in La g os, claimed to speak on 
view the of people behalf of all Nigerian forces, 

by the previous regime. He said he General Babangida became a 
would overhaul the secret police major power in the Buhari govern- 


ARRESTED — The 
Reverend ABan Boesak, 
was detained Tuesday in 
South Africa^ one day 
before he.vrastolead J a 
protek march. Ps^geS. 


Compiled by Our Staff Firm Dispatches 

‘ SANTA BARBARA, .California 
— President Ronald Reagans re- 
marks that the South African gov- 
ernment of President Pieter- W. Bo- 
tha is a ^reformist adnanistrsdon" 
and has made “substantial 
changes” toward ending segrega- 
tion Save drawn sharp criticism 
from anti-apartheid activists. 

"It’s bard to believe the presi- 
dent of the United States believes 


removed from their black fam- In a radio interview taped Satur- 
ities.” day and aired Monday, Mr. Rea- 

The Reverend Jesse L Jackson, 8“ dlcd Ulhe very faa that now 


the former Democratic presidential the blacks have ability — being in 
candidate, said: “Either he is mis- bibor unions or even having their 


In a radio interview taped Satur- marriages, and likened the opening end to South Africa’s political cri- 
day and aired Monday, Mr. Rea- of some public places to blacks in sis. We think many of those who 
gan died “the very fact that now South Africa to the United Slates' have been detained are leaders of 
the blacks have ability — being in desegregation of public accommo- organizations which the South Af- 
labor unions or even having their dations in the 1960s. rican government should be negoti- 


and release jailed journalists. 


meat after helping plan the Dec. 


“It’s bard to believe the preri- might have gone too far. 
dent of the United States believes “If be continues to talk about 
that segregation has been untied in what nice progress the present gov- 
Souih Africa,” said Senator Alan eminent is taking regarding cfaang- 


infonned or be is trying to misin- “ ; ™ T. 

fonn the American pubffc to justify CMms about cfaaige u. South 
making ^jartheid tolerable and Africa are reviewed. Page 2. 
justify vetoing the sanctions bOL” South Attica qHywMleii trading 
Richard Vigueric, editor- of Con- in its stock and currency mar- 
savative Digest, said the president kets until Sept 2. Page 9. 


rican government should be negoti- Nigeria until I960. 


Larry Speakes. ibe White House aling wilh lo restore law and order 
spokesniacLsajd later The president «he «■« of mogenq; and 
STreferring to racial pSlides in barganung for a new pdincal 
South Africa's -major cities." <bspensanon m the country, 
where he said there has been “a Mr. Reapun also said: -Our rela- 


A Foreign Office spokesman in 31, 1983, coup that removed the 
London said he had no reports of civilian government of President 
any danger lo the more than 1 1,000 Shehn Shagari. But he was known 
Britons in Nigeria. Britain reded to be involved in a struggle for 
Nigeria until I960 influence with his immediate supe- 


In Washington, the State De- nor. General Tunde ldiagbon. 
panment said it did not expect any General Buhari has been ill, the 
change in its close ties to Nigeria, sources said, and an increasing 
About 7,000 Americans live in Ni- share of the work of government 


. Cranston, a California DemocraL 
“ComitJess blacks are segregated in 
hamdaDds, not only forcefully re- 
moved from whiles but forcefully 


fng the apartheid system, I think he 
will lose in Congress and in the 
support of the American people,” 
he said. 


own labor unions: the fact they can 
buy property in the heretofore 
white areas; that they can own 
businesses in some 40 white-domi- 
nated business districts.** 

He said the South African gov- 
ernment recognized interracial 

INSIDE 


step in that direction to remove uonship with South Africa, which 
barriers of apartheid.'' has always over the years been a 

Act at n lumra hnVflnc for Mr ^codiy one - we have made it 


,, . ce na had been handled by General 

^The first announcement of the ldiagbon. General ldiagbon _ was 


Asked atanewsbriefingfor Mr. monitored here, chafed' that the 

Reagan sinews on the most reont xSr eSuimSt V S Buhari regime bad abused hs pow- 

^ ^ ^ thatt^^ouSIdSw^ti p^h S .andmo^ too slowly to bolster 
Speakes said. ^ ^ bringing abdUt a Nigeria sailing economy. 

“Wc do nor "believe that rep res- more perfect democracy in their “We could not stay passive and 
sioo.iand detentions will bring an coumiy.” (AP, S fT. LAT) watch a small group of individuals 


coup, read on radio by Brigadier believed to be in Saudi Arabia at 
General Joshua Dongonyaro and *h® time of the coup. 


Is Ignored by France 


By Joseph Krdsert 

International Herald Tribune 

PARES — The French govern- 
ment accepted Tuesday an official 
report clearing France of sinking a 


tion spokesman said it was “an 
alibi” and “an empty gesture.” 

Mr. Fabius, who declined to an- 
swer reporters’ questions, ignored 
Mr. Lange’s fmy over the Tricot 
report and the jibes of many 


Greenpeace dup last month in «P«* 

^tS&einWdling- 


protest from WdUngton and open 
skepticism in the Freadt press. 

' Faced »ith_n diplomatic con- 
frontation with New Zeal an d. 
Prime Minister Launait Fabras 
nxarif. a statement that in effect 
challenged critics to disprove the 
version of events given Monday m 
the report by-Bernard Tncot, a for- 
mer Gaullist civil servant Mr. Tn- 
cot exonerated the government 

Prime Munster David Lange of 
New Zealand has demanded that 
France at least apologize for its 
admitted espionage in New Zea- 
land, but Mr. Fabtus implicitly re- 
Stffed him, saying that France was 
determined to defend its interests 
in the Pacific. 

[However, Reuters reported 
from Wellington that Mr. Lange 


ton on Tuesday, Mr. Lange said the 
French findings were “unbeliev- 
abfc r ' and “too transparent to be 
called a whitewash." He terming 
the report “a calculated insult” to 
New Zealand. 

“The French have a remarkable 
flair fra: getting out of New-Zealand 
in a hurry," he said, referring to the 
five French agents who were in the 
country, reportedly on surveillance 
missions, when the Greenpeace 
ship was bombed. Three managed 
to leave, but two were arrested and 
charged with murder because a 
crew member died in the blast. 

Mr. Lange complained that the 
three men, who are sought by New 
Zealand, had been ordered to talk 
to the official French investigator, 
but kept hidden from theNew Zea- 



said in a radio intCTWCTv May ^ p^e officers pursuing their 

Wednesday that Mr. Fabius s 1^*. , 

statement was ^iot an apoicOT m have an acceptable 

any specific sense wit waycooana- ^^h another country 

lory” . „ .i . that sets its spies on you and ig- 

[He added: ‘ I thmk “P* nores your warrants for arrest for 
come the closest to a nnmter ” Mr. Lange said. 

apology that we are gomg to g^i Echoing Mr. Lange’ s com- 

New Zealand has been a leaorng plaints> ^ Greenpeace chairman, 
critic of French aud<^ testsrn McTaggart , said in London 

French Polynesia, wbteh are mom jjjg Tricot report is “an. insult 


Th» Aaaootmd Hat 

DTVAD’S DEMISE — The Pentagon has scrapped the Divad anti-aircraft gun. Page 3. 


By Bernard Gwextzman 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The United 
States has affirmed its support for 
Tunisia's security, amid a sharp rise 
in tension between that country 
and neighboring Libya. 

Tunisia, which has longstanding 
ties to the United States, asserted 
Sunday that Libyan fighter planes 
had violated its airspace and that 
Libya had massed forces along the 
Tunisian-Libyan frontier, after 
days of charges and counter- 
charges. 

The State Department said Mon- 
day that the United States stood by 
a pledge of American backing for 
Tunisia’s security and territorial in- 
tegrity. That pledge was made June 
18 at the White House by President 
Ronald Reagan to President Habib 
Bourguiba of Tunisia. 

The latest tensions between Lib- 
ya and Tunisia arose two weeks ago 
when Libya ordered the expulsion 
of Tunisian workers, many of 
whom had been there for years. 


iLl thaitnan- monitored here, charged that the Speculation that a coup was im- 
p_, nI „7anrf Buhari regime had abused hs pow- pending had become intense m re- 
todowri the oath CT moved “0 slowly to bolster cent weeks, the source said. 
Snpuicr a bout a Nigeria's ailing economy. In hw statanem. General Do- 

SS3 tt* "We could not stay pa*dv,and £ -g 

tAF.H/T.Lfn watch a small group of individuals ST^uS^,r*h n™ 

— exceeds 40 percent annually. 

Nigeria's heavily oil-based econ- 

U A A Opt rffl • • omy has been undercut in recent 

,h. Affirms limisia 1 le ^ ^ ^ * 

* *-*-*-^ pnees. Nigeria depends on oil for 

. • w T m • more than 90 peitxnt of its hard 

Amid Libyan Tensions is. “■ 10 

* The revenue decline has coinrid- 

Gweitzm an ■■ — r-i ed with the bunching up or repay- 

mes Service -wSA menls 00 debt - The 

fsj jj,g Uxuied Buhari government faced the debt 

d its support for / * W '5 msis by refusing conditions se: b>- 

axnid a sharp rise 4 the International Monetaiy Fund 

eu that country a ^ *»« 

ibva. allowed a rescheduling of debt obh- 

bas longstanding IK? . * gatious to Western creditors, 

i States, asserted j Byimposmgahc«iofsteinmea- 

u fighter planes f / % .% w «««» “cludins the dismissal of 

irepace and that \ **** s •’Sjjt ' j thousands of civil servants, the con- 
ferees along the r f ' l *i,4 fl celing or postponement of bun- 

frontier. after ' «• ■' dreds of mdustrial projects, and the 

and counter- # . * fM B use of the death penalty to discour- 

*■ age “economic crimes,” the Buhari 

tment said Mon- % JKKL gP v enunent halved the deficiu 

i States stood by . Bui support for it waned with the 

Lean backing for ■ lmposmon of measures restricting 

ind territorial in- flf ' . freedom of qjeech. 

e was made June MW In recent months there have been 

aise by Preadcnt BV reports of growing dissatisfaction 

President Habib ■ flHHI among Nigeria's southern, pre- 

idn ” u,, dominantly Christian peoples over 

ms between Lib- Habib Bourgiuba * e dominance of northern Mos- 

se two w eeks ago 6 lems m Buhan goveramenL 

government 


in the Sudan. 


he has received training in India, 


My, u.-. Charles E. Redman, a State De- the United States and Britain. 

‘•saSrat 

Tonisia. mauy of .*■ %St£S**2i£?JS. 

lhw propoty and documents. ^ ^ ^ dKlr ^ 


COI11C Ult ww-»- . rn 

aoology that we are going to get. i 
New has been a leading 

critic of French nud«r teas* 
French Polynesia, which aremom" 
tored by the Greenpeace environ- 

■Tswns-. 

stTr^aSS 

KsawgSF* 

ZSSlSSGEStE***- 


tion is ehatleng in g films as the top mass entertain- 
ment in India. Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ West Germany's current-account and merchan- 

dise-trade surpluses swelled last month to the big- 
gest ever for July. P*ge 9 

■ Noofann business productivity rose in the Unit- 

ed States at a revised annual rate of 1 percent in the 
second quarter. Page 9. 


By Christopher Dickey 

Washington Pest Sendee 


■ Moslem and Christian gaEtfatnai traded artillery sion is diahc n ging films as the top mass th Sma!w^m^ d< o^CT l ptian<; 

fire in Lebanon. Page 2. ment in India. trage . ^ ^ other foreign nationals have 

■ dale's sovenunem is shaken by police links to BUSINESS /FINANCE also been expelled from Libya. The 

the murder af three Communists. PSge3. ■ West Germany's cnrrent-account and merchan- 

™ U , . , |. „ - dise-trade surpluses swelled last month to the big- that this was done fw economic 

■ The Sonet Union sharply raised liquor pnees to . -T , Pace 9 reasons because of the drop in ub- 

discourage heavy drinkmg. Page 5. ever tor juiy. ya’s oil revenues. 

, _ ■ Noofann business productivity rose in the Unit- In retaliation, Tunisia has ex- 

ARTS/UasURE ^ g^tesat a revised annual rate of 1 percent in the peDed more than 250 Libyans, ac- 

■ With a phenoaaMMdly pomdar soap opera, tdevi- second quarter. Page 9. curing them of subversion. 

r But Tunisian officials have said 

_ _ they regarded the Libyan moves as 

, Feasting'Halt the Moslem World er , to subvert Tunisia, whose presi- 

' C7 dent is 82 years old and in poor 

tffer His Son Is Remembered in Islamic Holiday On several occasions. Colonel 

Qadhafi has talked of uniting Tuni- 

pflgrimage to Mecca, that every Moslem is ex- afraid some people who aren't used to it think ^ Libya. Because of previous 
pected to undertake once in his life. Wealthier ifs a little barbaric.” ^ ^ tensions between ibe two countries. 


“Thai position was made dear tion that had been taken over in a 
publicly during the visit of Presi- coup attempt and persuaded rebel 
dent Bourguiba to the United nffirera tn mrmuler. 


mt Bourguiba to the Unite 
( Confirmed on Page 2, CoL 5) 


officers to surrender. 

f(JP l, Reuters, AP, HP) 


Animal Sacrifice , FeastingHalt the Moslem World 

Decision by Abraham to Offer His Son Is Remembered in Islamic Holiday 


Crocker Bank Fined 
La U.S. Currency Case 


tensions between the two countries. 


The Associated Pros Hons of dollars in one shipment, 

WASHINGTON — Crocker Cr “ ik ® r, „ . . ,, _ . 

National Bank of San Francisco Harold P. Racbwald, Crocked 
wifi be required to pay a $235- general counsel said that the settie- 
million penalty for failing to report “ ent that the bank had agreed to 
almost Wbaiion in currency irons- ^wipes the slate clean concerning 
actions, the government said Tues- “y kn °wn or unknown failures to 
day file currency transaction reports 


“My country, right’or wrong- ^ white Kuwaiti robes and watched as 
France, Mr- F®^ ramwasslau^teredanthfiatfewalkrf 


Arab famiKes sacrifice shec^, bullocks or ram- In Saudi Arabia in years past, pilgrims ^ United States has in recent Treasury Derailment officials fro® mid-1980 until the present." 

*5 las kss-s -SZ a. h.m^. -Thus. it PU u ^ m ^ . 


. - ~ vT,aK<« cfrwt in lannues saennee soccp, uuuuiAa \n mum- id DilUDJ wow* ui 

CAIRO — N™ , Wane ds. In Saadi Arabia, the ritual is performed en slaughtered such unonnous quantities of sin 

ids white Kuwaiti robes and wraicnea masse by hundreds of thousands of pilgrims that much of the meat had to be burned 

on the sidewalk of a main -s o... swKc = 


When Mr. Bourguiba was in 


UJS. bank, had committed more and enables us to concentrate our 
than 7,800 reporting violations resources on our future progress.” 


over a four-year peril 


he said. “We are confident our de- 


irose ^ utc ,he at- a Mercedes. - „,w af v.» n ’'Mr Abraham was about to sacrifice his son in obe* kDkd by proxy aod the meat distributed to States has pledged repeatedly since 

implicated “Any man ^°] ia5 . nK J.^ diace to God’s command, only to have God Moslem countries where there are more poor ^ Keagan took office that it 

vipw Khalidi explained. A tmra « me intercede at the last moment and substitute a people in greater need. would hdp any nation threatened 

w d eariierdt^^ ^imalis given to c [££*** ram lo be slaughtered instead. TS Efeypi. as Mr. Khalidi said, .“there are ^ ^ 

evidence of r w ^jeads and a third is kept for ranow. ^ ^ here, hundreds, even plenty of poor people." Even before it could all American officials said that they 

.....answered But itawodda ^ W »# T. MB be divided imo lwoiymd piece; mJ l»t g did not believe Libya was actually 


Ss&ssas 

Sjs-awsa 

involvement. » unanswered 

questioD5.ana^“ Mr. 

-"A«*5sS 


atSpS^^eatedly since John M. Walker Jr., an assistant aarm is ngbt ev-en thourij v^uade 

“easury ^ae^y, said that the W counsel strongly advised us 

Li Tan MtiM SttSSJj penalty was the W ever im- we would wm a rase against 
auwwpanynauontnreaieneo ^ J md „^ hai ^ x ^ AeL the govanmem m court. 

Amffican officials said that they He said the fine wodd be a mes- The Bank Secrecy Act was en- 


will submit annu^T^o^-J^ camewastrafOTacd^M^^ ‘They’ve been doing this in fremt of me since 

onager the chan®® theg^g, 0 ^^" 1111 ^ 685 ^ I could walk, so Tm used to it,” said a Weriem- 

H,' SJSSXnitf- of the baa, U* yemg Egyptian woman. “But Tm. 

^o^asaid.aodaooppom- — 


fasrimttion ' quantities of the faithful, not only m mosques his one-year-old treaty of union tions with six banks in Hong Kong. , al" 6 , ■“Tj ,-t° , 810 

<; in front of me since hut on mats laid out in the streets, with Morocco, despite Morocco’s He stud that couriers from the for- j 13 *™ ban ^ lls f“ deuberatdy en 

There was a special sense of celebration Mon- ties to die United' States, and by the dan banks would deposit large in money laundering. Crock 

• a.- a, - I . , . . . - .. IT. ■ ..5 m A C ..- tT A 


his one-year-old treaty of union 
with Morocco, despite Morocco’s 


(Caatimed on Page 5, CoL 1) 


friendly relations he has struck sums of cash, in some cases urn- (Continued on Page 13, CoL 6) 





I , 

I , 


Cease-Fire Deteriorates 
As Abductions, Fi ghting 
Resume in Lebanon 


The Associated Prev 

BEIRUT — Moslem and Chris- 
tian forces traded artillery and 
rocket fire Tuesday as police re- 
ported renewed kidnappings at the 
only open crossing between East 
and West Beirut. 

Meanwhile, Christian and Mos- 
lem radio stations reported that 
France may send observers to rein- 
force the crumbling cease-fire that 
was negotiated by Syria last week. 

Iq southern Lebanon, Israeli 
gunners and units of the South 
Lebanon Army, a mainly Christian 
mili tia financed by Israel, were re- 
ported to have joined in firing on a 
duster of Shiite Moslem villages. 

United Nations sources said 
about 500 Israeli troops were sta- 
tioned with the South Lebanon 
Army in the border security zone 
established by Israel. Those troops, 
the sources said, regularly partici- 
pate in operations against Shiite 
Moslems in the zone. 

Shiite gunmen hijacked a bus be- 
longing to Middle East Airlines, 
Lebanon's national carrier, and 
held six of its Christian occupants 
hostage, police said, in retaliation 
for the earlier abduction of a Shiite 
driver on the Christian side of the 
Mretjeh-Kafaat crossing. 

Two other Christians who had 
driven from southern Lebanon 
were kidnapped by Shiites at the 
same gateway, police said. 

A spokesman for Middle East 
Airlines said the airline was negoti- 
ating with various militia com- 
mands to arrange a trade of hos- 
tages. 

Reports from southern Lebanon 
said that Israeli artillery positions 
and allied gunners of the South 
Lebanon Army bombarded the vil- 
lages of Habboush, Kfar Rumman, 
Kfar Tibnit, Jbaa, Arab Salim and 
Jaijou be ginning in the early morn- 
ing. 

All six villages are stroagbolds of 
Amal, the Shiite Moslem militia 
headed by Justice Minister Nabth 
Beni 

Amal has vowed to force Israel 
to abandon the security belt it has 


maintained in southern Lebanon 
since withdrawing the bulk of its 
forces from the country in June. 

The artillery duds followed a 
Moslem barrage of the Christian 
heartland north of Beirut on Mon- 
day in which one civilian W3S killed 
and two were wounded. 

The Syrian-brokered truce an- 
nounced Thursday had succeeded 
in halting 12 days of car bombings 
and fierce artillery warfare in 
which more than 300 people were 
killed and nearly 1.100 wounded. 

A security committee represent- 
ing the Lebanese Army and the 
principal warring militias has failed 
in three meetings to break a dead- 
lock over Syrian participation. 

The Christian-controlled Voice 
of Lebanon radio station and the 
Voice of the Nation, controlled by 
Moslems, said that France would 
send an envoy who would try to 
arrange a compromise. 

Hie radio reports said the envoy 
also would meet Syrian officials in 
Damascus to discuss ways of coor- 
dinating the roles of French and 
Syrian observers in Lebanon. 

France has had 56 observers sta- 
tioned along the Green Line that 
divides Beirut's Christian and Mos- 
lem sectors and in the Souk H- 
Gbarb area since April 1984. 

The broadcasts said France may 
propose a compromise in which 
French observers would be posted 
in Christian areas and Syrians on 
the Moslem side. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, A UGUST 28, I9S5 

Reagan Errs 
About Some 





The UJS. shuttle Discovery was launched Tuesday during a break In stormy weather. 


Shuttle Reaches Orbit, Launches a Satellite 


The Associated Press 

CAPE CANAVERAL, Flori- 
da — The space shuttle Discov- 
ery was launched Tuesday in 
the worst weather of tbe U.S. 
shuttle program, then bad to 
rush die release of an Austra- 
lian satellite to keep it from 
broiling in the sun. 

Forty-five minutes later, a 
rocket motor fired to send the 
S60-miilion satellite toward a 
duty station 22,300 miles 
(36,152 kilometers) high. From 
there it will handle television 


and telephone service for Aus- 
tralia. Tracking data showed 
the rocket firing went perfectly. 

Tbe National Aeronautics 
and Space Administration also 
derided to go ahead with the 
scheduled release later in the 
day of another satellite, for the 
American Satellite Co. 

The Discovery's mission will 
also include repairing an 585- 
million Syncom satellite strand- 
ed uselessly in space. 

Hie Australian payload, one 
of three satellites carried aloft 


in Discovery’s cargo bay, had 
been scheduled for launch 
Wednesday but a damaged sim- 
shiekl forced the early release. 

The frame-and-fabric device 
was supposed to dose like a 
clamshell over the satellite in 
the cargo bay until deployment 
time, but it hong op in tbe half- 
way position as it was opened to 
check the satellite. Tbe astro- 
nauts then gind«*d the ship’s 50- 
foot (15.2-meter) robot arm to 
push it out of the way, leaving 
the satellite exposed. 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Changes in 
South Africa 


. ■ •'••• 

Number of Poor Americans Declines 

WASHINGTON (WP) -i Hie prop ortion o f 
the government's official poverty liw *£££“ Sj ^ 
compared to 153 percent tbe year the 

Sbstantial economy recovery and Sharp dnp.m.mnBifapata, the 
Census Bureau reported Tuesday. • - 


•m*! 




. v 


By Glenn Frankd. 

IVcahiagion Past Service 
JOHANNESBURG — Ronald 
Reagan dted four “very sub s tanti a l 
changes" in South African society 
flint L he said, had resulted from 
“our present relationship" with tbe 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


Sooth African government. He was 
wrong on some points, right on 
others. 



• On black membership in labor 
unions: 

It is c o r re c t that Made South Af- 
ricans pin belong to labor unions. 
But it was legislation passed in 
1979, when Jimmy Carter was pres- 
ident, that gave there that right. 


• On blacks buying property in 
white areas and owning; businesses: 


JUUU1CI u LCUttiiUU 

^tTsouth Espionage Scandals Threaten Prestige of Kohl 


(Continued from Page 1) 
of Mr. Hombacb’s insights in run- 


ning an American-styIe.pereonaI 
lied campaign. The Soria 


ity-drienled campaign. The Social 
Democrats face an uphill fight, but 
it is widely agreed that Mr. Kohl's 
weaknesses give them a long shot at 
victory that would have been un- 
thinkable a year ago. 



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Mr. Kohl has so far allowed his 
interior minister. Friedrich Zim- 
mermann, who is responsible for 
the counterintelligence agency, to 
cany the brunt of the scandal Mr. 
Zimmennaim, who represents Mr. 
Kohl's coalition partners, the Ba- 
varian Christian Social Union, 
made some scathing public re- 
marks about the chancellor's deri- 
sion-making capacities in May. 

Franz-Josef Strauss, leader of 
the Christian. Social Union, and 
Mr. Kohl are intermittent foes, so 
the chancellor may to a certain 
point savor the interior minister’s 
discomfiture. 

According to sources close to the 
chancellor, Mr. Kohl has no inten- 
tion of sacrificing Mr. Zimmer- 
mann, a move that might oblige 
him to reshuffle his cabinet By 
protecting the minister, Mr. Kohl 
will make him indebted to him 

Both East and West Germany 
have shown si gn* of wanting to 


prevent the spy scandal from en- 
venoming relations between them. 
The East German press has avoid- 
ed exulting over the defection of 
Hans Joachim Hedge, the counter- 
intelligence officer, and he has not 
appeared on East German televi- 
sion. 

The East Germans have no in- 
terest in playing this up," said 

Hflrtmni Timm w mann, a West 

Berlin academic and authority on 
East Germany . “There are still peo- 
ple over there who have an interest 
in a visit by Honecker to Bonn." 

Erich Honecker, the East Ger- 
man leader, is to open the Leipzig 
fair in a few days, and Mr. Strauss, 
the Bavarian slate premier, is 
scheduled to meet with him there. 
Friedhdm Ost, the Bonn govern- 
ment spokesman, said Tuesday 
that Mr. Kohl had no objections 10 
Mr. Strauss' planned encounter. 

Willy Brandt, chairman of the 
Social Democrats, is also expected 


to meet later with Mr. Honecker in 
his first visit to East Germany since 
1974. when the discover,' of an East 
German spy in his office forced 
him to resign as chancellor. 

Some Western diplomats believe 
that the espionage scandal will 
cause more damage to Bonn's ties 
with other members of tbe North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization, par- 
ticularly the United States, at a 
time when tbe Reagan administra- 
tion's space weapons initiative has 
brought into focus the question of 
the transfer of high technology to 
West Germany and other allies. 


Horst Teltschik, the chancellor's 
security adviser, will lead a high- 
ranking delegation to Washington 
next week to discuss space weap- 
ons. An American who is knowl- 
edgeable about the trip noted that 
the Pentagon has resisted the trans- 
fer of sensitive technology to West 
Germany. 


He erred cm both counts. South 
Africa ’s Group Areas Act dearly 
defines by race the residential and 
business districts in the country 
and restricts eadt race group to its 
own areas. They cannot own or 
rent property outside their desig- 
nated “group area." The Influx 
Control Act r equ i res blades to have 
written government penmssaon to 
enter “white areas.” 

A government policy implement- 
ed about four years ago allows 
some blacks to own houses and 
acquire 99-year leasehold rights for 
the land under diem in blade town- 
ships that are located in the 87 
percent of South Africa considered 
white territory. Bat so far h is only 
in Soweto to wnship that htarirc . 
have been able to acquire lease- 
holds in significant numbers. 

As for businesses, a government 
policy yet to be enacted into law 
would aOow blacks to open busi- 
nesses in white central cities where 
urban blacks shop. But tbe proper- 
ties would be owned by whites. 

• On segregation; 

The president is incorrect. Ho- 
tels and restaurants most have spe- 
cial government permits to. serve 
blacks. Perhaps two dozen holds 
and three dozen restaurants in Jo- 
hannesburg have such permits, 
while many holds and restanramts 
remain off Kurils to blacks. 


TEL AVIV (Renters)—! T; ^~ . v . L ..jr~ 

Tuesday that the Palestine Liberation Oiganizatido kadtf ..TtfSec- At* 
fat, was personally directing guerrilla actroticS agrioSt Israel.- * 

Mr. Peres spoke to reporters during ^ a priaon <yisfa : ;IVottsterajir Td 
Aviv have blamed his government- for ^ a“iwse*a- increase in guernBa 
iriiKnpt of Israelis, “There is no;dotibt.th^;^.HXX'^'FU3'head 
Yasser Arafat personally, are conducting terrorist attacks until tins very 
day,” Mr. Peres said. - ^ .. “• ; • — 

In tbe Israeli-occupied West Bank, The towns ofTnHcann and Jeds 
were under curfew for tbefottoh suooea^ d^yriiite soldiers searched 
for the gntim en who title d anTcnfaJ: <*nA cwr^-mcW another bwt 

Saturday. 



7 ThrAwlaMiTteii' 

CRASH REPORT -- H5sag Fujitomi of the government 
investigating panel held a copy of a pretimmaiy report 
issued Tuesdayontbe Japan Air Lines cmh mtJiifejL 
520. Experts said the report tended to support speatotiau. 
that cracks in the cabin bulkhead damaged the jet's, fail 


ILK. Grounds Jets for Engine Check 


• On interracial marriages: 

He is correct The law banning 
mixed marriages was repealed this 
year and many commentators here 
credit quiet lobbying from the Rea- 
gan administration. A black mar- 
ried to a white cannot legally live in 
a white area. 1 


- ^ r -**~ 


V .*».c***»~r*- 


i! 1 


1 Opening for Talk* 
J la Seen in Moeeow 



UJS. Affirms Tie With Tunisia 
As Tension Rises With Libya 


LONDON (AP) —Britain’s Civil Aviation Authority ordered urgent 
checks Ibesday on jet engines similar to the one involved in last wok’s 
Manchester airport crash. It said some planes would have to be grounded 
until they were, examined. 

Ihe order JoHowod tbe discovery of various combustion chambers with 
extensive cracking- Tbe problem was found during checks of Boeing 737 
engines of the type that caught fire on takeoff Thursday, causing 54 
deaths. 

Planes will be-banwt from flying until the check is completed, wink 
those in question thaLare abroad wifi return to Britain empty, a statement 
issued by the agency says. The order related to Pratt and Whitney JT8-D 
engines that have had amanufoctqxers' modification arid- have flown a 
certain number of hours. 


Austria Will Get Strict New Wine Law 


2 FORI 


(Continued from Page I) 
States,” he said. "It remains un- 
changed. President Reagan said at 
that time that the United States 
remains firmly committed to the 
sanctity of Tunisia's territorial in- 
tegrity and to the principle of non- 
interference in its internal affairs." 

Die United States has no formal 
security pact with Tunisia, but, as 
with other nations believed to be 
threatened by Libya, tbe adminis- 
tration has offered assistance. Two 
years ago, the United States and 
France provided backing to Chad, 
which had come under attack by 
Libyan forces and rebels backed by 
Libya. 

In recent days, France has coa- 
its support for Tunisia, and 
rocco and Kuwait have offered 
to mediate. 


Algeria, whid has a friendship 
treaty with Tunisia, has conferred 
with tbe Tunisians, but has said 
little pubficly. State Department 
officials said. 


Die case for aiding Tunisia was 
stated by Richard B. Parker, an 
expert on North Africa, who is a 
former American ambassador to 
Algeria. Writing in the summer is- 
sue of Foreign Affairs magazine. 
Mr. Parker sad that “alone of the 
North African states, Tunisia has 
never done anything to endanger 
its friendship with the United 
States.” 


- VIENNA (Renters) -—The Austrian cabinet Tuesday agreed on a strict 
wine production law to submit to parliament despite a protest by 
thousands of winegrowers,-- 

The law followed the discovery that more than 1,000 Austrian wines 
contained a toxk chemical used in anti-freeze. Chancellor Fred SmowaUf? 
described the law as the toughest in Europe, adding: “We need this strict 
wine law to have absolute control and to guarantee the quality of our 
wines." .... 

His coalition’s majority in parliament assures passage of the law, whidi - 
requires a detailed system of checking and labeling wine amflur to the 
French appellation contrite. Mr. Sinowatz met a fanners’ delegation that 
made a last-minute appeal for tax concessions to accompany the law. 
About 4,000 winegrowers, who waited in the rain outside his office daring 
the talks, said the law would be catastrophic for their business. 


err. 

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Moroc 


“For it to go under or decay into 
radicalism would have serious con- 
sequences for Western prestige, 
much as the Iranian revolution 
did,” be said. 


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India Seals Border Against Extremists 

NEW DELHI (Reuters) — India’s border with Pakistan was sealed 
Tuesday and security forces were put on high alert in the stale erf Punjab. 
The government said it feared terrorism by Sikh extremists before next 
month’s stale elections. 

The Press Trust of India quoted B.S. Bedi, deputy police inspector 

KSt “ fT 8 ^ ^iSO-mile (550-kQometer) frontier h^ween 
fttiostm and the states or districts of Punjab, Rqasthan, Jammu and 

be® ,to prevent extremists from crossing: Indiahss 

SSSSSS au. to 

decided to go ahead with the elections 
ctespite the Ang. 20 assassination of the Akali Dal leader “ 1 *” * 
Singh LoogowaL by Skb e xtr emists. * . 


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Peace talks fa Ndrobi between Uganda’s new military 
^TOcntawes of the srauxx guenilla group, the National Resistance 
tndeltmldy Tuesday, the office of the Ka^nll 

OT ' rtta r °f htonbipK-s 

Tuesday they had kfllod more than lOOAteSbicaril rixms md37 
^^ibwean soldien this month fa attacks fa the eon^:SiD 



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■ >. - 

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Ignores Neu> Zealand Anger * 


f|| : : 


(Coatinoed from Page I) 

to public intelligence "and world 
opinion." 

The leading French newspaper, 
Le Monde, commented that tbe 
Tricot report was unconvincing for 
French people and for internation- 
al opinion. 

In an editorial, the paper. 
that the episode had nndermmed 
French influence because “looking 
ridiculous is a costly diplomatic 
mistake.” 


..m, 

thi n g.” The Communist LHuman- 
ltfc called file report “a state Be." 

Soci alists were rdQeyed that, the 
report ruled out sot government 
tuvohFement, thus pfenmatfag a ny 

pressure far . President Frenfas 

Mitterrand to diatrriajg Defense 
Mmister Charles Heron or admit 

roat the government had ordered 


k cr- , - . 


. . j Cl-- 


. French newspapers, vdiich have 
vigorously investigated the Green^ 
peare bombing, reacted generally 
to the report with skepticism or 
scorn. 

“Tricot Wadies Whiter," several 
papers headlined. The pKvSodallst 
Le Matin de Paris sad: "Govern- 
ment Not Guilty In the opoosi- 
tian, the conservative Le Figaro led 
with “Tncot; 1 Don’t KnowAnv- 


The Socialist Party, ndiich alone 

supports the governmott 1 fa the 
parliamen L demanded last week 
urat any guilty minister 'be puh- 
iri wd — a call which tbepress not- 
ea emerged only after rumors that 

the Tncot report would dear. thh 
government.- . .. 

Conservatives have been ":cmr 
hoos in discussing the affair, ap- 

Psreutiy because ffiey want to 
avoid offending the. intelligence . 
co mmunity or gr vmg any iitqms- 
sum of weakness m supporting. 








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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 1985 



Page 3 


% Pentagon 

a y George C Wikon O 

1 WitHS^^Snta Alt^ M-4a tank diasris. iw 
■ W ASHINGTON —The Peaia Bofoo 40mm cameo and 

Jfi Cance fed its sSSi' J^^lheUJ&AirFoicdW 

to bo3d tw 4 ?® ri Shto. 

'*5S?SSS 

"W ? ccr «axy Caspar oj?* ^ * ■*“» known *s the 

' Tuesday**^ 5?l eant Vori£ “ baser of Alvin 

toA «TSS^ "fi^iorfd Y< & J w °dd War I hero. 

• 'ronei U J2? pons available in En Aero^ace and Camrtamt- 

^^^asvwihhTSebvSi^ «^CorpTrfNewpQrtBeadw 
series in seek* Cahfornia, a subsidiary of Bond 

togarenlswvw^— . pX_ViT^? n :***■“ * j-.iL.rt. ***■_* 


bu 3 tI 4 $pf 

aboutiStb 


««od on going on with the pro- 
SSL m h °P“ °f improving 
•JJJjg 1 w development pro- 

^ Vad ia composed of a US. 

U.S. Turns 



.\nses radar to the guns and ucu*«eu amount w 

stands for divW^i? the army, which had planned to 
feose system. ^ ** ^ buy 618. ProductkawalSdlasi 
-Critics of the weapon i,.... y^forfurtherlest* of the weapon. 
d a rni ed that it frequoatfffaiied to *? ordcr to P*®^ their negoti- 
fat targets consisSofn™m2 ated price, the Pentagon andCm- 
4rone* and that it &*** bad to decade by Oct. I 

,k«. - 11 *» no better whether to bny the next &taflment 

of 1 17 far S525 nriffian. 

Mr. Wdnbager said: "What 
weatwrongwas that the system did 
not develop the capabilities that we 
require. those capabilities de- 
pend upon the growing nature of 
the Soviet threat; specifically, the 
■ ability of the helicopter to sit off 
and s tand off and deliver very ef- 

He said tbatSl.8 

ready been spent on Divad and it 
would take another S3 hQfion to 
complete the progra m . He said that 
this investment still would not pro- 
vide the army with a weapon that 
would adequately protect its 
ground troops against advanced 
Soviet helicopters and fixed-wing 
bombers. 

- “The most. difficult part of this 
derision is that the problems with 
die system in no wary reduced the 
army’s argent need for better air 
defense than we now have,’' Mr. 
Weinberger said. 

Extensive tests by the army last 
spring “demonstrated that thesys- 
tan’s performance does not effec- 
tively meet the growing milit ary 
' threat,” he said. 

“Urn. tests demonstrated also 
■that while there are marginal im- 
provements that can be made to' the 
Divad, these are not significant 
compared to the capability of cur- 
rent air drfensewemoos and there- 
fore, not worth the additional 
cost,” Mr~ Weinberger said. “So we 
will not invest any more funds in 
this system.” 

Mr. Weinberger said that no ad- 
ditional cancellation costs would 
have to be paid to Ford Aerospace 
since these costs were already cov- 
ered in the $U8 bflHon already 
spent for the project 
He said he had forwarded to 
Congress copies of the latest test 
reports on the system which, he 
said. Indicated that “as tested, the 
•' Sergeant Ycnfc was not operational- 
ly affective in adequately protect- 
ing friendly fences during simulat- 
ed- combat” “ 


fortress in 
San Salvador 

By Marjorie Miller 

lie Angela Times Service ' 

• -.San Salvador — surround- 
. ed by trenches and a small anny of 
.construction workers, the U.S. Em- 




w 


•jbassy in El Salvador’s capital looks 
.''less like a diplomatic ntiaann than 
■ ^ giant fortress in thin country at 
jwai. 

V lu recent months, workmen have 
added layer upon layer of security 
to the compound that covers & fid! 
city block, prompting some em- 
ployees to call it Fort Apache. Sal- 
«’■ fadorans refer to it as the “embassy 
-‘garrison.” 

The pounding of jackhammers 
echoes throughout .the embassy, 
which is expanding into the streets 
with waist-high concrete planters 
and a wall 12 feet (3.7 meters) high 
and throe feet thick. The wall, an 
- official said, is “stxaqg enough to 
stop a truck full of optatives.’* 

TTm three-story chancery is <x>v- 
‘ered by a gold-colored meial net to 
deflect rwkrt-propeflcdgrenades, 
such as one that destroyed a con- 
ference room in 19SLand another .. 
flmthh the compter's inner walls in . 

J»3. ' 

Between dKJoe^aiidflwejffeaj^. 
windows, wlnrii are coverod wMx a 
shatterproof plasticrfilm, there are 
metal plates high, enouglr to stop a 
bullet from hitring anyone inside. 

“The embassy has been attacked 
a dozen or so rimes over the years,” 
an embassy official said, “and there 
are active puWic threats against 
personnel by people who have 
v shown a willingness and abffity to 
' • carry them oat” 

The complex has been attacked 
by both leftist guerrillas mid rights 
1st extremists, but US. officials say 
they are worrying most about tw 
left. Washington backs the govern- 
ment of President Jos4 Napole6n 
Duarte and has spent about $1.7 
billion in the last four years on 
militar y and economic aid tO H 
Salvador. 

The need for increased protre- 
tioa of UA pereremel was brought 
home in June when guerrillas shot 
and killed four US, marines and 

nine civiHan* sitting at outdoor ca- 

i&. 

After that attack. State Depart- 
ment officials considere d ord ering 
the families of embassy employees 
io move out of the country but later 
decided the step was unnecessary. 

H Salvador is one of six coun- 
iitries, along with Lebanon, Kuwait, 

/ Afghanistan, Uganda and Cowm- 
bia. where Stale Department 
ployees get “danger pay” of 25 pa- 
cent above their base salary. 
Members of *e nriKtaiy do not 
receive the extra pay. 

Beach* the four marines, the 
only other American mffitaiy man 
to die in H Salvador’s fiveanda 

half years of riv3 war was L^ten- 

ant Commander Albert A Schan- 
rdberga 3d, deputy commander or 
the US. military traumg gr«9- Jh 
May 1983 guerrillas shot bun to 
Si as he wahedinlns^top^ 
up a friend at the WanunuOrof 
Central America in San Salvador. 

mander Schaufelbager and the 
marines became bx M 
ifety measures that U5. P®^" 
d are instructed to follow. The 
tSm toriode varying routes 
id schedules arid avoiding 
teadaosat restaurants, theaters 

id other public plac®- . 

11 q personnel also are advised 

the streets and 


AMERICAN TOPICS 



Tht Aaodoiad Prwd 

WINNING ENTRY — Dan Verey, left, and Beth Moore, two of the five members of 
the Shore Sharks sand scripting team, put finishing touches on their creation on AQri 
Beach in Seattle on Sunday. The Shore Sharks took first place with this dragon in the 
sea creature category of Sand Blast *85, Puget Sound’s first sand-castle contest. 


Shipyards Taking on Water Fast 

America's once mighty shipbuilding industry 
has fallen on hard times, the Los Angeles Tunes 
reports. Orders are down, labor disputes are wide- 
spread, prospects are dim. Twenty-five of the Da- 
tum’s 110 shipyards have dosed since 1981, and 
dozens more are in trouble; said Jed Babbin of the 
Shipbuilders Council of America, a trade group. 
“The U.S. Navy is the only customer in town,” he 
said. “Commercial shipbuilding has disappeared. 
There were only five orders in the last five years.” 

About 25,000 shipyard jobs have disappeared 
since 1981, and nearly 10,000 more will be lost in 
the next year. 

Analysts rite foreign competition as a key prob- 
lem; U& shipbuilders charge about twice as much 
as shipyards in South Korea and Japan. And 
President Ronald Reagan canceled a key subsidy 
program in 1981. 

Competition among shipyards has been fierce to 
win contracts from the navy, which is required to 
boy American. As profit margins have fallen, some 
shipbuilders have sought wage concessions, and 
labor disputes have ensued. Milt Dudley, a me- 
chanic at the Bath Iron Works in Maine, has been 
on strike now for seven weeks. “You have succes- 
sive generations of the same families working 
here,” be said. “They’re asking us to sell oot our 
own children. That’s not palatable.” 


Short Takes 

The Cbnsmner Product Safety Commission has 
been holding hearings on the risks of ATVs, or ail- 
terrain vehicles — the motorized, three-wheel vehi- 
cles designed for offroad use At least 233 people 
died in accidents involving ATVs from 1982 
through June 20 of tins year, half of all ATV 
accidents involved riders under age 16. 

□ 

With Wyoming's adoption of a child-restraint 
law this year, all 50 states now have laws requiring 
Installation and use of special car seats for chil- 
dren. In Tennessee, such a law has halved die 
automobile-associated deaths of children under 4. 


A Minnesota publisher plans to print an English- 
language version of Pravda as soon as he finds 
enough subscribers willing io pay the capitalistic 
sum of $630 yearly. Charles Cox, 64, said he has 
found plenty of translators, some of them Soviet 
immigrants, in the Minneapolis area. Subscribers 
may include libraries and government agencies. 

A Table for 3 Would Do Nicely 

It is still months away, but the forthcoming 
exhibition of art from private British houses is 
j amming phone lines at the National Gallery of 
An in Washington- Many callers hope to wangle 
invitations to dine with the exhibition’s patrons, 
Prince Charles and Diana, princess of Wales, per- 
haps to sip sherry with them. 

Many will be disappointed. The two dinners that 
the couple plans to attend will be intimate and 
select; one is being given by President Ronald 
Reagan. More than a million people are expected 
to view the art — holdings from 200 houses in 
England, Scotland and Wales. The show runs Nov. 
3 to March 16. 

Dec. 25: A Day like Any Other 

At City Hall in West Hollywood. California, 
employees call the council's new holiday ordinance 
“the Grinch law” The council voted earlier this 
month to cancel Christmas. 

After bring advised that an earlier ordinance to 
mnlre the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur a dty 
holiday might be unconstitutional, the council de- 
rided to riiminaie all religious holidays. So the city 
government now will operate on Yom Kippur and 
on Christmas. 

But dty workers will still be able to spend a 
holiday morning at home with the family; they will 
be given four and a half holiday days a year to use 
as they wish. “It's a floating holiday system,” 
explained Mayor John Heilman. Employees “can 
take Yom Kippur, Christinas Day. Hare Krishna 
Day, whatever day they want.” 

— Compiled by 

BRIAN KNOWLTON 


Pinochet Goyerament Shaken 
By Police Link to 3 Murders 


By Lydia Chavez 

Ntv York Tuna Service 

SANTIAGO — As President 
August* Pinochet approaches fats 
12th anniversary in power, his mili- 
tary government has been ghalrwi 
by accusations of involvement in 
the killing of three Chflwm Cbm* ' 
mirnms. 

Unlike 1983, when widespread 
civilian demonstrations put mni on 
the defensive, the current crisis has 
been caused primarily by what ap- 
pear io be divisions within the 
armed forces, according to 
sources and diplomats here. 

It is unclear how deep or how 
widespread the problems are, but 
the sources say that for the first 
time since General Pinochet over- 
threw the elected Marxist govern- 
ment of Salvador All cade in 1973, 
there are rumors that a coup is in 
the making 

Last week the speculation was so 
strong that General Pinochet and 
other government officials felt the 
need to deny the rumors. 

“Here, the rally one who could 
rebel would be me,” the general 
said. 

Fourteen police officers were 
suspended in August after the gov- 
ernment's investigation into the 
March killing of the three Commu- 
nists. In addition, an original mem- 
ber of the four-member Chilean 
junta resigned and there is evidence 
of continued unhappiness among 
the police: 

Until now, Chileans had as- 
sumed that General Pinochet en- 
joyed total control of his military, 
but the three deaths have been fol- 
lowed by a wave of kidnapping and 
torture cases, some directed against 
members of the Roman Catholic 
Church. 

The incidents have raised the 
possibility of infighting in a once 
unifi ed military marhini* 

“I am sure Pinochet did not or- 
der the three murders,” said Jorge 
Schaulsohn, a member of the cen- 
trist Radical Party. “But when you 
have a totalitarian system, you 
have all these little groups that can 
potentially act on their own and 
cause embarrassment.” 

In recent weeks. General Pino- 
chet has met with about 10,000 
military officials. Sergjo Bittar, a 
member of the Socialist Party, said 
he interpreted the meetings as a 
effort to touch base with the troops. 

Diplomats and political sources 
agree that there seems to be little 
likelihood that General Pinochet 
will be overthrown by his military 
supporters. However, the divisions 
within the military, depending on 
their depths, could give some impe- 
tus to those officers who favor a 
return to democracy, the sources 
said. 

Moreover, the crisis could give 
momentum to the political opposi- 



Angusto Pinochet 

'Here, the only one 
who could rebel 
would be me. 1 

Angusto Pinochet 
president of Chile 


don, which has been calling for a 
return to civilian government. 

General Pinochet's new crisis 
comes at a time when the govern- 
ment appeared to have its foes at 
bay. The economic slide leveled off 
in March, curbing middle-class 
support for anti-government pro- 
tests. The opposition, debilitated 
by the state of siege and infighting, 
was under control. 

Then, cm March 28 and 29, 
armed men kidnapped three mem- 
bers of (he Communist Party. Their 
daylight seizure came after two 
days of insignificant anti-govern- 
ment protests. 

Two days later, a fanner found 
the three men: Manuel Guerrero, 
the regional secretary of a teachers 
union; Jose Manuel Parada, a hu- 
man rights worker for the Roman 
Catholic Church, and Santiago 
Nattino, an illustrator. Their 
throats had been slashed. 

Mr. Guerrero, 35, was a member 
of the central committee. Mr. Par- 
ada. also 35, held a financial post, 
and Mr. Nattino, 65, was an impor- 
tant member of the underground 
faction of the party, possibly the 
secretary-general 

Hundreds of other murders with 
apparent political overtones had 
gone unmvestigated, but this time 
the government stepped in quickly. 

General Pinochet denounced the 
killing s as a brutal crime and the 


government asked the supreme 
court co names special prosecutor. 

Some political sources said the 
government intervened in order to 
dismantle Dicomcar, a 400-man se- 
curity group that is part of the 
Carabineros, the national police 
force. They said the Dicomcar was 
competing too directly with the 
National Center for Information, 
known by its Spanish acronym. 
CNI. The CNI is an inteHigehce 
agency under General Pinochet's 
direct control. 

The Carabineros are a formida- 
ble military force of 35,000 highly 
trained and disciplined men. It is 
half ihe size of the army, and the 
only force trained to deal with civil 
disturbances. 

Church officials have attributed 
countless human rights abuses to 
both the CNI and Dicomcar. 

Josb Canovas Robles, an appeals 
judge named as the special prose- 
cutor. asked both the Carabineros 
and the CNI to provide reports on 
the murders. Only the CNI has 
complied. 

The CNI report specifically 
named Carabineros who it alleged 
were involved in the kidnappings 
and in Dicomcar. 

Soon after receiving this report. 
Judge Canovas indicted iwo Cara- 
bineros and ordered 12, including 
two colonels, to remain in the coun- 
try. The judge is still investigating 
and has not issued his final report. 

His initial report, however, was 
the first time m 12 years that a 
judge had pointed a finger at the 
military for political minders. 

Twenty-four hours after it was 
released. General Cbsar Mendoza 
resigned from the junta. Within 
days, his replacement as head of 
the Carabineros, General Rodolfo 
Stange, disbanded Dicomcar and 
retired 29 top officers, including 
five generals, from the national po- 
lice. 

■ 2 Pofice Officers Arrested 

Judge Canovas ordered the ar- 
rest Monday of two Dicomcar po- 
lice captains in connection with the 
abduction and murder of three 
Communist leaders, United Press 
International reported in Santiago. 
He did not disclose the charges. 

Hector Diaz Anderson and Pa- 
tricio Zamora were bring held at 
two police stations, lawyers said. 

“There are well-founded suspi- 
cions that they were directly in- 
volved in the kidnappings,” said 
Luis HermosiEa, a lawyer fra the 
Roman Catholic Church’s human 
rights organization. The two police 
ca ptains allegedly were identified 
by witnesses on Saturday. 

Captain Diaz Anderson also was 
charged two weeks ago with the 
murder of a student, Carlos Godoy, 
23, who was tortured to death in 
February. 


Delays, Violations Beset TVA’s Nuclear Prograi 


By Stephen Labaton 

Washington Part Service 

KNOXVILLE; Tennessee — 
Four years ago, Joseph M. Hen- 
drie, chairman of the Nuclear Reg- 
nlatory Commission, describetHhe 
nuclear power program of the Ten- 
nessee Valley Authority as the 
pacesetter in the United Stales. 

At the time, the TVA envisioned 
the nation's most ambitions nucle- 
ar system: 17 reactors in three 
states capable of supplying 40 per- 
cent of its power. Today the TVA 
operates only two such plants. 

. Eight were abandoned wh3e un- 
der construction. Three were shut 
by the TVA earlier this year follow- 
ing pressure from the regulatory 
commission over serious safety 
concerns. Four others, partly built, 
have experienced substantial con- 
struction delays or have been ques- 
tioned for safety reasons. 

Before beginning its nuclear 
power program, the TVA see m ed 
to have an exemplary record. It was 
conceived 50 years ago as a federal 
agency to develop energy and agri- 
cultural resources for what was 
tfie p the nation's poorest region- 

In the nuclear field during the 
last four years, however, the TVA 
has been cited for more than IjOOO. 
rules violations, three times the na- 
tional average, according to a re- 
cent regulatory commission report, 

Toxic Gas CUmd Leaks 
AtUidcnCarbide-FUnU 

Return 

DANBURY, Connecticut — A 
dood of toxic hydrogen chloride 
eas leaked Monday night from a 
Union Carbide plant in Charles- 
ton, West Virginia, bnt fte leak 
“did not pose a danger to me a*m- 
nnjnity and no one was ugurod, a 
company spokesman said Tuesday. 

It was the third leak at a Union 
Carbide plant in 15 day& Witnesses 
said a cloud rose near where 60,000 
people had gathered foran outdoor 
concert. 



The utility also appears to have 
serious internal problems and has 
been criticized by the regulatory 
commission for mismanagement. 

Nuclear engineers and safety of- 
ficials at the TVA say they have so 
little confidence in management 
and the regional office of the Nu- 
clear Regulatory Commission that 
they have taken their complaints 
directly to congressmen. 

Their complaints prompted four 
federal investigations, which have 
been examining charges ranging 
from inytegmn* safety standards 


TteWarfstfonnw 


to harassment of workers who pro- 
vide evidence of internal problems. 

Sources within the TVA, the reg- 
ulatory commissi on and on Capitol 
Hill suggested at bast three expla- 
nations for the troubles. 

• The enormous changes in nu- 
clear regulation and safety stan- 
dards cursed by the accident six 
years ago at Three Mile Island. 

•As tire only federally owned 
utility, often cited as an example of 
mod management at tire federal 
level, the TVA had reached a point 
where there was tittle supervision 


from Washington. The utility has 
never had an inspector general's 
office. 

■ The utility is in the midst of a 
management crisis resulting from 
failure to retain plant managers 
and operators. 

Quality assurance was described 
by one engineer as a joke. He men- 
tioned the construction, inspection 
and design problems at two reac- 
tors bring built at Watts Bar, a 
plant south of Knoxville that was 
scheduled fra completion in 1977. 

“We’ve had to essentially tear 
that one down and build it three 
times,” he said. 

Dozens of safety concerns wore' 
raised about Watts Bar in a June 
report for tire TVA by the Institute 
of Nuclear Power Operations, an 
Atlanta consulting firm. According 
to the report, maintenance manuals 
at the plant were outdated, gaskets 
had rotted, electrical connections 
were loose and bolts were missing. 

The report said that of 23 pipe 
supports inspected, 10 had not met 
the TVA’s guidelines because of 
such problems as improper welds, 
loose screws or bent atrial parts. 
The report also found that low- 
quality material had been used 
where safety-grade equipment was 
needed. 

Construction officials at the 
TVA said the report may have un- 
derstated the problems. 

The Browns Ferry plant in Ala- 


bama has valves that were not de- 
picted on any plant drawings. 

Richard M. Freeman, one of the 
TVA's three directors, said he 
thought the problems lie with man- 
agement. 

Harold R. Denton, the regula- 
tory commission’s director of nu- 
clear reactor regulations, said the 
Washington office became con- 
cerned about the TVA’s nuclear 
program last fall, when he heard 
from a new regional administrator 
in Atlanta and received anonymous 
calls from the TVA employees. 

M I asked »he pi if they had talked 
to their supervisors, ami they said 
they were afraid to raise it for fear 
of retribution,” he said. 

Investigators also have been ra- 
amhring hrtw effectively the ncgula- 
tory commission's regional office 
in Atlanta policed the TVA. 

An engineer said that many of 
the important people at the TVA 
bad alro worked at the regional 
office, “and so they are able to 
negotiate away violations. If s cra- 
zy. It's tike the driver of a speetting 
car being stopped a second time 
down the road by the same cop and 
saying, ‘Yeah, I sped once, so let’s 
make a deal on tins one,’ And they 
get away with it.” 

The utility has said that, partly 
as a result of the costs of its nuclear 
program, its electrical rates will in- 
crease by as much as 9 percent in 
October. 


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Page 4 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribttnc. 


Pobfobnl Wtth Thr New York Horn wad Hie Wwhjngtnc Port 


Trade Winds Turn Slowly 


America's huge trade deficit now menaces 
the world, providing seductive ar gum e n ts to 
protectionists. How «»n it be reduced — and 
how fast? It takes two to tango, but in this 
case the choreography calls for a corps de 
ballet. And the aance may be slow. 

A smooth fall in the dollar — a first 
necessity — requires thai American interest 
rates fall against those elsewhere. Preferably 
this would be achieved by cutting the monu- 
mental federal budget deficit. Alternatively, 
it could follow a spontaneous weakening of 
demand in the private economy. 

But necessary conditions are not always 
sufficient. Weaker demand growth in Amer- 
ica — whether contrived through the budget 
or achieved more spontaneously — needs to 
be accompanied by rising demand elsewhere 
if the US. trade deficit is to fall. Otherwise 
the probability is world recession, with ac- 
tivity and employment shrinking but the 
trade imbalan ces little changed. 

UJS. interest rates and the exchange rate 
have fallm recently because demand for 
US. output has sagged. Will other countries 
permit America to cash in on such improved 
competitiveness as this confers? Several Eu- 
ropean countries have reduced interest rates 
a little, particularly West Germany. That 
may help to revive iheir flagging demand. 

But America's partners may be taking the 
wrong type of action. The major object of 
reducing US. interest rates is to make the 
dollar less tempting to international inves- 
tors. Insofar as other countries reduce theirs 
in tandem, the desired fall of the dollar 
could be impeded. That is why we have been 
arguing for some departure, in the stronger 
countries, from current budgetary austerity, 
suggesting moderate tax cuts or public 


spending increases to raise domestic de- 
mand without discouraging the gradual re- 
alignment of exchange rates. (Japan seems a 
prime case where the mixture of budgetary 
and monetary policies is wrong.) The need is 
for nTiHramanY: cooperative steps to c h a n ge 
the policy mix. Relatively minor shifts in 
policy, internationally coordinated, can 
have major beneficial effects on market sen- 
timent — which is wh»» is needed for the 
smooth adjustment of international parities. 

At best, progress to better trade balance 
may be slow. On Aug. 21, Alfred E Eckes, of 
the US. International Trade Coramissioa, 
wondered on this page whether dollar deval- 
uation would have much effect at all; and 
William McBride, in a report on Page 9 that 
same day, died similar doubts from bruised 
businessmen and experienced economists. 
The dollar has fallen about 13 percent this 
year, but estimates by the OECD staff sug- 
gest that without appropriate changes of 
policy — inducting trade policy — by other 
governments, the effect on the UJL trade 
deficit could be small even after four years. 

Trade deficits, like supertankers, are slow 
to-turn around. The reasons most be under- 
stood if hope deferred is not to make the 
heart of the markets sick. Devaluation wors- 
ens the hade balance before improving it, 
because import prices rise fast and it takes 
time for traders to step up exports. After the 
1967 sterling devaluation, Britain needed 
□early two years to get back into balance, 
starting from a much smaller defidt Ameri- 
ca’s trade gap — a global problem — can be 
bridged if governments match words with 
action. Even then they will probably have to 
live with it for several years to come. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


Reagan’s Idea of Apartheid 


Finally President President Reagan has pro- 
vided a basis for understanding ms relatively 
relaxed and indulgent view of South Africa. To 
an Atlanta radio station, he has given a snap- 
shot of his picture of reality in that quarter. He 
finds it a place where important progress is 
being made through the happy incidence of a 
reformist local government and a persuasive 
American administration — where blacks real- 
ly have very Hide to complain about- Anyway, 
the Soviet Union is stirring the poL 
No wonder he resists any policy change. Yet 
that is all — or most of it — quite untrue. 

From his comments it is evident that Mr. 
Reagan lacks the foggiest notion of what 
apartheid is about. Even in the limited areas 
where he pants to progress, there is not all that 
much to boast about. One could hoot at him 
for his ignorance if it were not so painful 
Mr. Reagan altogether omits from his pic- 
ture, furthermore, any hint of the larger and 
grosser aspects of apartheid; the humiliation 
and harassment by the pass courts; the forced 
removals; the brutalization of family life. He 
shows no awareness of the fundamental ques- 
tion of political power — disenfranchisement 
of blacks under the current system — nor of 
the quality of repression organized by whites 
to deny political power to blacks. Has anyone 


told him that a state of emergency is currently 
in effect and that blacks are being arrested and 
killed practically every day? 

The president did make his ritual use of the 
adjective “repugnant” to describe apartheid. 
By what else he said, however, he erased any 
impression that the system truly troubles him. 
It was not simply that he was at pains to excuse 
Jerry Falwefl from the burden of his unfair and 
unfeeling criticism — since only partially re- 
tracted —of the Nobd peace laureate, Bishop 
Desmond Tutu. It was the particular explana- 
tion that Mr. Reagan offered in so doing. 
South Africa, be said, is “a combination of 
minorities. There are at least 10 tribal divisions 
there.” This is a painful echo of the official 
South African rationale for the large structure 
of apartheid: that blades are not the rightful 
citizens of a unitary South African state, but 
members of distinct tribes that are to be con- 
signed, unconsul ted, to separate “homelands.” 

What Mr. Reagan said goes far to explain 
the most objectionable aspect of his approach 
to South Africa: his stunning lack of moral 
energy and commitment to the cause of justice: 
The South Africa he depicts exists only in his 
mind. But the South Africa that the United 
States must deal with exists on the ground. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Rules for Supercomputers 


Supercomputers are machines that do a bil- 
lion or more calculations a second They also 
threaten to create a head-on. coUisicm between 
national security and academic freedom. Deft 
rule-making is needed from a federal inter- 
agency study committee before both suffer. 

The National Science Foundation plans to 
help fund supercomputer centers at four um- 
veraties. Security officials are concerned that 
the supercomputers might be used to run pro- 
grams of military significance to foreigners, 
like designing nuclear weapons or cracking 
codes. They note that even with regular inspec- 
tion, it is stfll possible to disguise programs; 
often only a program's author can easily divine 
its purpose. Another concern is that diagnostic 
tests might reveal critical information about 
the supercomputers' system architecture. 

The Defense Department wants universities 
to deny foreign scientists and students access 
to supercomputers, arguing that it is inconsis- 
tent to give Russians access to machines that 
they are not allowed to buy. Universities reply 
that it is not their business to discriminate on 
the baas of nationality or to act as the game 
wardens of advanced technology. 

Nor should the government, in their view, 
specify whom the universities may accept as 


students, or whom should be denied access to 
university facilities. It is just that kind of 
security restrictions that hobble the Soviet 
Union’s progress, despite its excellent math- 
ematicians, and prompt it to steal American 
technology, suggests Robert Parks, executive 
director of the American Physical Society. 

Despite the stark dash of principles, there is 
a practical bridge between the two positions. 
Because of the expense of supercomputer time, 
universities wiD in fact monitor use closely. 
Although program sampling is not an absolute 
protection against disguise, the researcher who 
has invited a foreign colleague to his campus 
will presumably know enough about any pro- 
gram to vouch for its purpose. 

As for the chance of computer design secrets 
being filched by diagnostic tests, mum of that 
information, is already published; the rest, be- 
ing proprietary, is presumably protected by 
manufacturers. Still, many East bloc research- 
ers apparently have instructions to spy. The 
solution ties with the Slate Department, not 
the universities, in policing visas. Clear and 
simple rules to ensure that universities’ super- 
computers are efficiently used for their intend- 
ed purposes should suffice to bar misuse. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


FROM OUR AUG. 28 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Spiritists Await Dead Letter 
NEW YORK — Professor William James, the 
Harvard University psychologist who died [cm 
Aug. 27], had promised the members of the 
Society of Physical Research to help solve the 
great question: Can the dead communicate 
with the living, through mediums or other- 
wise? The late Dr. Richard Hodgson, of Bos- 
ton, and Professor James had made many tests 
of this. Each had given the other a message 
which the first to die was to communicate to 
the survivor. After Dr. Hodgson died. Profes- 
sor James waited for the message, but, so far as 
was known, it was never received. Before he 
died. Professor James confided messages to 
members of the Physical Society. They are 
confident that they will soon receive confirma- 
tion from the spirit world that communication 
between the dead and the living is possible. 


1935: Ethiopians Prepare for War 
ADDIS ABABA — As the war menace looms 
closer, hundreds of natives from outlying 
country districts are flocking out of the capital 
and returning to their villages on mule and on 
foot, following the Emperor’s preliminary 
evacuation notice. Portly Ethiopian wives are 
accompanying their men folk. Some of the 
more prosperous are accompanied by one or 
two retainers cm fool — the number of these 
being an indication of their wealth. Another 
exodus from the capital is being carried out 
under the supervision of police chieftains as 
hundreds of beggars, loafers and jobless are 
rounded up and drafted into the southern 
army which will confront the Italians on the 
Ogaden front. The troops give the impression 
of being full of enthusiasm despite the scarcity 
of weapons, ammunition and uniforms. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 
KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

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CARL GEWIRTZ Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISQNS Director % Gradation 

ROLFD.KRANEPUHL Director of Athotisiug Sales 
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© 7983, International Herald Tribune. A0 rights reserved. 



WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 28,1985 



May End 


B 


By Joyce R. Starr 

AfiHDAD — A British tourist; 

breakdandat od- 

hisheadattheen^^ 
tn Rashid hotel- No one 1 — — - 

.rJSleasi oi all tbc three seaway;. 

guards stationed kit 

S hS to believe? No^ w ta' 
the passion in Iraq scajrital ' 

ing.wSi slick new alleys gvail^ite^.- 


j»iTTTBFROMBA(aa>AD ^ 

almost every . 

American ' 

the midday sun “because othtfwtae- , 


you can never get ac ^,. - . 

Then there are the weddings 
take place every Thursday otgfaVa 
veritable dance of fashion 



each 


and- 


The Contadora Process Needs Washington’s Help 


r ASHINGTON — The Conta- 


W dora process, launched 
fully in 1983 to try t 


By Wayne S. Smith 


• try to find a peaceful 
solution for Central America, is now 
virtually dead in the water. It will 
have little hope of making any head- 
way unless the United States be- 
comes actively involved 
To be sure, Contadora’ s wheels 
continue to turn. Last week the four 
founding nations — Mexico, Pana- 
ma, Venezuela and Colombia — met 
in Cartagena, Colombia, with the for- 
eign ministers of Argentina, Brazil 
Peru and Uruguay. The founders 
hoped to breathe new life into the 


process by enlisting the support of 
the four emerging South 


American 

democracies. Even with it, however, 
Conta dora’ s chances are almost niL 
The Contadora nations originally 
hoped to avoid involvement by the 
colossus to the north. That was per- 
haps unrealistic. The United States 
has legitimate security concerns in 
Central America. It has military ad- 
visers and assistance programs there; 
several thousand UJS. troops are de- 
ployed more or less permanently in 
Honduras on military maneuvers. 
The Reagan administration has not 
seemed very interested in a negotiat- 
ed solution. That is why the Conta- 
dora countries started their effort. 

Once undertaken, Contadora was 
quickly recognized as “the cmly game 


m town,” and it became de tigueur to 

express support In Congress, per- 
plexed legislators cat both sides or the 
aisle could party questions by saying, 
“I support the Contadora process/ 
Even the Reagan administration said 
it backed the process. So did Nicara- 
gua, the other Central American 
states and, indeed, virtually every 
government expressing an opinion. 

Why, then, has Contadora not ac- 
complished its objectives? Without 
question, the major obstacle is the 
attitude of the Reagan administra- 
tion, which, despite occasional lip 
service, has no interest at all in a 
diplomatic accommodation with the 
Sandinists. That was made perfectly 
dear this month by Assistant Secre- 
tary of State EIKott Abrams, who said 
it was “preposterous to think we 
could sign a deal with the Sandinists 
and expect it to be kept.” In other 
words, no agreement is possible, ever. 

Not that the Sandinists have co- 


tbe draft treaties presented by the 
Contadora countries last September. 

Nicaragua is prepared to negotiate 
revisions to the draft treaties; the 

Reagan adminictrafiq in is nn f Ijjf 

month Washington rejected an ap- 
peal from the Contadora foreign 
ministers to resume aquations with 
the Sanrlinioc The Reagan adminis- 
tration also marie certain that Costa 
Rica rejected an appeal for talks 
aimeri at earing fpr icyy w along its 
border with Nicaragua. This is not 
surprising. Incidents along the bor- 
der serve the administration’s pur- 
poses: At some point they may pro- 
vide a convenient pretext for direct 
military action against Nicaragua. 

Why has the administration so 
consistently undermined the Conta- 
dora process? Because so far the ad- 
ministration’s objectives have been 
basically incompatible with those of 
the Contadora countries. The four 


operated fully. Recently, for exam- 
ple, they walked out of a meeth 


meeting 

sponsored by Contadora in protest 
over its failure to discuss US. sup- 
port for the “contras.” Nevertheless, 
the Sandinists’ record of cooperation 
is incomparably better than the Rea- 
gan administration’s. Unlike Wash- 
ington, Managua did at least accept 


Latin peacemakers hope to produce i 
regional accommodation that is ac 


:a 
ac- 

■ the sover- 
eignty of each. The administration 
seeks primarily to get rid of the San- 
dinists, by fence if necessary, and 
Nicaraguan sovereignty be riarnm-ri 
So long as Washington holds to 
that positron, the Contadora process 
will be stymied — which is just the 


way the administration wants it, for it 
is thus free to pursue its confronta- 
tional approach unencumbered by a 
regional agreement or the compro- 
mises impheri by negotiations. Mean- 
while, since Washington is not a di- 
rect party to the Contadora process, 
it avoids responsibility for its failure. 

The problem with this approach, 
for the United States, is that it leaves 
no workable options. The adminis- 
tration has blocked the diplomatic 
track, but the military defeat of the 
Sandinists — the solution it would 
prefer — still seems prohibitively dif- 
ficult and unpopular. It would, after 
all, probably require direct involve- 
ment of U.S. armed faces — with aD 
' the cost, risk and damage to broader 
relations that tins would imply. 

The oily way out of the impasse 
would be direct and active US. in- 
volvement in the ne gotiating process- 
That would dearly require a change 
of attitryfo to the administration, if 
the United States cares enough about 
Central America to consider the use 
of force, surely it cares enough to 
make a serious diplomatic effort be- 
fore face becomes necessary. 


vcriuiuib , - . . ■ . 

have put Beirut to shame m better 
days. On the first Thursday ffigfe of- 
July, for example, 65 new 
pies checked m to the 
turning the rather austere 
■ into a festival of music, fa 
irrepressible children. . ' ■ 

What about the war, you ask? The . 
five-year-old conflict has depleted an 
estimated $37 biflkm from the rag- 
men exchange reserves and created 
ITJS detl started « m 
billion, where none prewously eW,^ 
ed. The toll so far is befleye a toh ey 

75.000 Iraqi soldiers k£Bed m battle. 

Ah, yes, the war. Hal you nar 
flown in from outer space, or awoken: 
from a five-year sleen. ww would 
find few dues in I 
of a struggle. Soldiers are not i 



to wear uniforms in the dtv- There. 

'Ltierej 


The writer is adjunct professor of 
Latin American studies at me Johns 
Hopkins School of Advanced Inter- 
national Studies. He contributed das 
comment to The New York Times. 


The Nonproliferation Treaty Has Worked So Far 


W ASHINGTON —The parties to the Non- 
proliferation Treaty are meeting to take 
stock of how wefl this treaty has worked since its 
entry into force in 1970. A great deal of attention 
will be paid at this review conference in Geneva 
to one of the treaty’s goals — encouraging nego- 
tiations to end the nudear arms race. 

Let there be no doubt about the Reagan ad- 
ministration’s pursuit of that goaL We are com- 
mitted to redoubled efforts to reach concrete and 
verifiable agreements that radically reduce both 
rides’ nudear arsenals. We remain convinced 
that with persistent dialogue the resumed talks in 
Geneva can achieve such reductions. This would 
be the best first step to the goal of eventual 
elimination of nudear weapons. 

An honest review of the NPT, however, must 
lode at all of its goals. Without that, we cannot 
reach a fair and balanced overall evaluation of 
the NPTs health and vitality. 


By Lewis Dunn 


The writer is an assistant director of the 
U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. 


The treaty has been a cornerstone of inter- 
ionai effo 


national efforts to help prevent the further 
spread of nuclear weapons, thereby contributing 
to all countries* security. Since it was opened fa 
signature in 1 968, only one additional country — 
not a party to the NPT — has detonated a 
nuclear explosive device. By contrast, more than 
125 countries have renounced the right to do so 


by joining the NPT, 16 of them since the last 
review conference in 1980. The NPT is the most 
widely observed arms control treaty in his toy. 

The NPT also established the first export 
requirements among nuclear supplier countries 
by requiring international safeguards on nuclear 
exports to deter any misuse of such peaceful 
nuclear equipment and material These controls 
have made it harder for non-NPT parties seeking 
the bomb to achieve that objective. 

The NPT demonstrates broad international 
acceptance of nonproliferation. World opinion 
has come to regard the acquisition of nudear 
weapons as illegitimate. References to (he pres- 
tige of these weapons are no longer common- 
place. Few expect that a world of many nudear 
powers is (he inevitable wave of the future. This 
growing norm of nonproliferation makes it 
tougher to set out on the road to a nuclear 
arsenal and lessens the motivations to do sa 

A fair and balanced review of the NPT makes 
dear it has been and is essential to realizing 
the full benefit erf (he peaceful uses of the atom. 


Its nonproli feration under taking s, including in- 
ternational safeguards, provide the necessary po- 
litical confidence that peaceful nudear trade will 
not be misused. Since 1970 that trade has steadily 
expanded, with parties to the treaty setting up . 
nuclear research centers, making use of radio- 
isotopes in medicine, agriculture, and industry, 

Thecuninl NPT review Snference wfll cod- 
front aD countries with difficult questions and 
bard issues. There wfll be tough language used, 
and the United States cannot be complacent. AS 
parties to the NPT need to lake stock: to ask 
honestly where we are and vrfuu remains to be 
dais. £ach party will have to examine the role of 
the NPT in contributing to its security and in 
fostering its economic well-being. . . 

In that process of taking stock, the NonpraH- 
eration Treaty can and wfll stand on its own 
merits. It is an unquestioned arms control suc- 
cess. Even more than when, it was signed 15 years, 
ago, the treaty makes a vital contribution to the 
security and safety of the world. What is needed 
today is a recognition of that contribution and a 
redoubled commitment to realize fully all of the 
treaty’s goals. United Stales policy is based on 
that recognition and makes that commitment. 

International Herald Tribune. 


are deep gashes in the earth, here and 
there; some houses have been de- 
stroyed during attacks. Yet much, of - 
the destruction could be mista ken for 
urban renewal given the haphazard 
nature erf Iranian shelling. The Iraqi 
soccer stadium took a recent hzt, at . 
three o’clock in the morning. 

Construction is still going at aD. 
over town. High-rise bufldingS.de-T 
signed by Western architects go up 
along wide, newly paved boulevards: : 

A typical apartment offers three bed- 
rooms, at a cost between $75,000 and 
5100,000 — not altogether out of . 
reach fa a white collar worker who jj 
earns $1,000 a month, pays no taxes' 
and is a likely recipient of a low- 
mterest government mortgage. 

Th 1 * Iraq i re gime has man-- 

aged to provide cradkMo-grave bene- 
fits that Marx never dreamed of, arid 
to maintain them throughout the war. 

Arab grants and loans totaling same 
$50 billion have helped to defray ex- 
penses, along with rescheduling of 
foreign contract payments. 

However, senior Iraqi officials say 
that the good life is about to undergo 
serious revision. If the economic plan 
fa 1986-1990 is carried out, govern- 
ment control over the economy wfll 
be reduced,' the private sector greatly 
expanded arid rands previously lav- 
ished ad. social benefits redirected 
into capital investment The goal is to 
adseve economic independence by 
untyinjg the economy from the price 
ofal which in turn means reinvest- 
: ing ofl revenues in industrial and ag- 
ricultural technologies. 

Plans underway fa the construc- 
tion of pipelines through Saudi Ara- jc, 1 z.-'r- 
bia and Turkey could double Iraq’s 1 , p 1 i-- -I .’ 
annual oil revenues by 1987 to about 
520 bflh’on. But even with a near-tom 
end to the Iran-Iraq conflict, such 
additional funds would stfll fall far 
short of projected investment needs. 

The next several years wfll thero 
fore likely bring an end to many priv- 
ileges, which now include new can 
fa the mflitazy and free homes fa ; 
persons who make “distinguished- 
cxmtributicos’’ in their work. 

Iraqis may find themselves saddled 
fa die first time with Western-style 
income tax laws. An initial attcmpLat 
tax collection was Regulated” by the - 
gov ernment three years ago, but is so 
limited that few people know it exists. 

“It was an easy one,'’ a senior official 
conceded. “But nothing is stable,' 
nothing will stay as it is.* 

The_Ba’athist regime seems to be: 
preparing fa the risk of chan ge. 

International Herald Tribune. 


t _ - 




I ,' <L . 

I ^ ■' 


A Case lor Skipping Much of August letters to the editor 


I -/ - 


W ASHINGTON — On the wall 
just above my typewriter han gs 
a calendar, courtesy of the quarterly 
Foreign Policy, which tells you the 
anniversaries of interesting things 
that happened in international affairs 
day by day and month by month. I 
spend a lot of time staring at the 
calendar when the Muse is oul to 
lnnch. This being commonly consid- 
ered a slow and* somnolent time of 
year, I have been giving particular 
attention to August 
What I have learned, first of aD, is 
that August has been getting a bum 
rap; this is not at all a slow and 
somnolent time erf year. Just because 
a la of folks are sitting around some 
lakeside a building sand castles or 
otherwise goofing off does not mean 
that nothing is going on. 

Second, I have discovered that you 
lose a lot of the texture and context of 


By Philip Geyelin 


American bombers were striking 
back against North Vietnam, Presi- 
dent Johnson said: “We still seek no 
wider war.” Three days after that. 
Congress passed the Tonkin. Gulf res- 
olution giving Mr. Johnson a license 
to do pretty much anything he want- 
ed in pursuit of whatever policy 
caught his fancy in Vietnam. 

You could argue that we are in 
safer hands when Congress, as is the 


K 


case this year, recesses fa August. 

at Nixi 


important happenings if you wait 
ibered 


an- 


around fa tug, round- numf 
mversaries to come along. 

It cannot have escaped your notice 
by now that the 6th, 9th and 14th of 
August this year were the 40th anni- 
versaries Of Hi roshim a, Na gasaki and 
V-J Day — which, some would say, is 
proof enough that August is no slow 
month. But how many recall that on 
Aug. 2, 1939, Albert mnstein was not 
goofing off? He was writing a letter 
to Franklin D. Roosevelt saying that 
“it may become possible to set up a 
nuclear chain reaction in a large mass 
of uranium.” That is where (he Man- 
hattan project and the Alamagordo 
first test shot — and. indeed, the 
first use of nudear weapons in war 
—had their staru 

On that same day in August 1964, 
North Vietnamese torpedo boats 
were said to have attacked the de- 
stroyer U-SJi. Maddox in the Gulf of 
Tonkin. Two days later, even as 


On Aug 9, 1974, President Nixon 
ended his presidency by resigning, 
and brought an end to a threatening 
constitutional crisis called Water- 
gate. Mir. Nixon pleaded not guflty, 
an exercise in semantics that was 
matched by the next day (Aug. 10) in 
1949 when the War Department be- 
came the Defense Department. 

American imperialism has had its 
Clings in August. On the 12th, in 1898, 
the United States formally annexed 
Hawaii. On the 15th, in 1914, the 
Panama Canal opened fa business. 
And on the 27th, the president of the 
United Stales made the following 
statement: “We are not making war 
on Nicaragua any more than a police- 
man on the street is making war on 
passers-by." In case you have won- 
dered why Calvin Coolidge is said to 
be one or Ronald Ragan's favorite 
Presidents, that was Coolidge com- 
menting, in 1926, on the landing of 
U.S. marines in Nicaragua. 

Speaking of imperialism, the *hnh 
of Iran was restored to his throne on 
Aug. 19, 1953, with a helping hand 
from the CIA. Historians ww be a 
long time contemplating whether the 
regime be replaced would not have 
been a better way fa Iran to go than 
the way it has been going since Aya- 


tollah Khomeini replaced (he shah. 

August has been particularly big 
on good intentions. On the first erf 
this month 10 years ago we got the 
final act of the Conference ai Securi- 
and Cooperation in Europe, at 
feJsmki. On Aug. 27, 1928, we got 
the KeUogg-Briand Pact, which was 
supposed to be an agreement ban- 
ning war. Chi Aug. 30, 1963, a “bot- 
hne was established between Wash- 
ington and Moscow fa the purpose 
of providing a quick way to cool off a 
superpower confrontation and re- 
duce the risk of accidental war. On 
Aug. 21, 1944, US., British, Chinese 
and Soviet representatives met at 
Dumbarton Oaks to tty to devise an 
international organization fa the 
purpose of promoting according to 
my calendar, “peaceful and legal so- 
lutions to world problems.” 


For a Test Moratorium 


One could not say it better than the 
headline over Anthony Lewis’s Aug. 
9 column: "Realistically: The Way to 
Stop Is to Stop." This is precisely 
what Moscow has been catling on 
Washington to do. To prove that it 
was ready to go its part of the way, it 
announced a unilateral moratorium 
on all nudear explosions fa the du- 
ration of the year. Moreover, to pro- 
vide the U.S. side with an added 
incentive to do the same, the Sovier 
government stressed that this mea- 
sure would stay in force indefinitely 
if tiie Reagan administration also ter- 
minates its explosions. 

Unfortunately, the White Howe’s 
response has been arctic, to say (he 
least It would seem that Washii ' 
would rather starve to " 


Pre s ident Reagan forewa rn ing him nf 
fhe Soviet move and inviting hmi to 
join in. It is stfll not too latf. fa the 
White House to put its militaris tic 
ambitions aside and join the Soviet 
Union in a moratorium an aD nudear . 
weapons testing. There is stiD time 
until the end of the year. 

VLADIMIR ALEXEEV. 

Novosti Press Agency. 

Moscow.- 


Flight Attendant 


In response to TWA Employee 
Honored” ( People, June 24): - .* 


In August of " 1812, on the 16th, 
liwillii 


General "W illiam Hull surrendered 
Detroit to the British. Two years lat- 
er, in 1814, the British outdid them- 
selves in Washington, where the tem- 
perature must have already been 
reasonably dose to unbearable: Brit- 
ish troops burned the Capitol and the 

White House as wefl. 

I could go on, but it gets grimmer. 
On the Iasi day of August m 1983, 
South Korea's KAL 007 was toot 
down by a Soviet fighter. On V-J Day 
in 1969, North Koreans shot down an 
American reconnaissance plane over 
international waters off the North 
Korean coast, killing 31 Americans. 

It was also in August that William 
Clark, then Ronald Reagan's nation- 
al security adviser, gave me a good 
reason to bring this recital to a dose 
and take what is left of the month off. 
“I have never felt inhibited by a lack 
of background," Mr. Clark said, add- 
ing, “We haw too many facts." . 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


»v w uioi 

accept a Soviet invitation to dinner. 

Mr. Lewis rightly stresses that the 
totals of existing - nuclear weapons 
stockpiles are “abstractions, beyond 
our imagination ... ” but not “be- 
yond our control” People can pm a 
Stop to this madness , 

. une of the most effective ways to 
proceed would be to set a moratori- 
um oi afl nudear test explosions, as 


— by the Soviet^Umon, for 

'that would oe ' - 


■ the best hindrance' to 

the development of new nudear 
vreapons systems and tire perfection 
of existing ones. The fact that the 
Soviet Union was the fust with the 
mutual moratorium suggestion 
not detract from its attractiveness. 
I am sure that if the United States 
was the first to come up with the 
proposal, the Soviet Union would 
have had no qualms in accepting it. 
In attacking the moratorium u fcp 

■! it. a propaganda ploy, 

ashmgton intentionally avoids 

menuon that prior to the pubHc an- 
nouncement Moscow sent a tetter to 


Asa flight attendant of 13 years’- 
standing on a French immytrinnat 
a?™. I welcome the official appro- 

of Ufi Derickson, thcl&bt AS. 
attendant on the TWA plane Ju-.' 
jacked on June 14. Female ni ght ap- . 
J^dants, have often acteTrourar: 
8COU»y m dramatic 
and not only during hgackmgs. Qa* 
toe danger was past, passengers have, 
told journalists much the as. 
what the hijacked TWA' passengers' - 
f?*L But this is, I beEeveTtEtirsi, 
tune a stewardess has been rivma 
public honor for an exceptional-act of 
«wrage cat duty. I thank. TWA trad 
™ American media, and offer my. 
“^Sratnlations to Ulj Derickson. ' 

- {NaxneSuep&edl '■ 



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signature name and' full ad- 
oress. Utters should bt brief and 
are subject to editing. We camd 
oe responsible for _the retW7t of 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 1985 


Aryid,'&& 


Page 5 


OnE 


partheid Minister Airested 


ve 




apartheid syste^Si? 1 Boesak was trusted near the Mpebia Xundu, an Anglican priest 

iuesday,. a day hefrwJiJ 11 ™ 16 ^ Umvershy of the Western Cape af* and Natal province chairman erf 
r^, am arch io demand !? ”?* to te S°“B there to ay to dense a the United Democratic Front, had ' 


Act, which allows indefinite deten- 
Uon without charge. The spokes- 
“^refused to elaborate. 


end anti-apartheid activists to be 
arrested. In Durban, police con- 
firmed Tuesday that the Reverend 


S T~.*raarcti!od*nM«.w*rt: . ■** ““ s^b mere to try to aa me * u*uuiwuanocraucrroni,. 
k Nelson Mand^S? Sf ” kase «mfrontati<xi. his office said He been detained without chaises, 

ft black Tpasi ” a,in cunpnsoiied serves ns Hmm. • •' _ 


black leader. prisoned 

*»U P^dem of the 

ChS^« ?f Reformed 

TO 0 ” 1 “herding «° » wil- 


sgvesoslhcctjpldnofte umvc r- ^ 

A?ri£aTS ^ blades uied iota f«« m d 

mixed race. buddings in six townships, but 

ine South African Press Assoa- were: dispersed 
soon said that police hadiited tear , ,■ 

g as at about 4aHmrchera at the IojnOther development, it ap- 

unrversity *hat the tnp of three EC 

Mr. BtoMfr * f«i,nrW nf tile -foreign ministers would be delayed 


icehadfiiedtear 
marchers at the 


In Washington. a c, , - Mr. Boesak, a founder of the fowgn ministers wotdd be c 

mt spokJ^ P*P*n- United anti. P?«>«y tanceled The 


delayed 


United Ste^fc j that the 

Protest * formal 

Jirejr “ Soa,1, Afnea over the 

ihnioc to South Africa hv 

lers minis- 

tt _ a PP®ared m leonantv arm 


anc possioiy canceieo. tne minis- 
ters of Italy, the Netherlands and 


apartheid »iKnnc*» had called a , w “"w* “* wetneriands and 

march for Wednesday to Pollsmoor ir*i!^!5 OU - g ^ er f l ° arrive 
Prison, where Mr. Mandda is serv- r Wednesday m South Africa and 
ing a life sentence for plotting sab- . rc P° fl ^ ^ meeting on Sept. 10 
otage. It was unclear whether the possible .sanctions against the 


march would go » V«i 
The minister erf law and order. 


white-minority government. 

Mr. Botha said Monday that if 


ti oned the — . — • wuut ques- 

In ****■ to prevent the protest which. Eke complex problems and to lay down 

said that KiT n^V r ni ^° kesman an outdoor political gatherings, is tune soaks for the implementation 
rested under tOe^l in South Alika. of those formulas, then the visit will 


Pfflay Lords Le Grange, warned Saturday the visit “is designed to prescribe 

comaques- that “stem actron" would be taken foreign formulas for South Africa’s 



Prices of Liquor, Beer 
Rise Sharply in Russia 

New Move Against Heavy Drinking 
Will Increase Alcohol Revenues 


By Serge Schmemann 

Sr*' Vrvfc Times 5emcr 


mem daily Izvestia. the new food 
industry minister. .Anatoli M. Beli- 


MOSCOW — The Soviet Union cbenko. said the goveramenl’s ef- 
has sharply raised the prices of ti- fon 10 Huor production has 
quor v beer" and champagne, bring- 001 been ^ easy process, and it has 
ing the price of the cheapest brand no1 8 one smoothly everywhere. 

. 1. . , nr, 1 1. ■ 1 1, !• “Aiwv-flmn trt rm,rfc rmrn tlV* 


of vodka to 6110 rubles' a half-liter, 
or $S a pirn. 


“According to reports from the 
provinces, some local leaders have 


egal in South Africa. of those formulas, then the visit will 

Mr. Boesak was the of sev- serve no purpose.** 


KOREAN MEETING — Red Cross delegates from North and South Korea reopened 
talks in Pyongyang on Tuesday aimed at reunifying families. This was the first visit to 
Pyongyang since 1973 by a South Korean delegation, on the right side of the table. 


U.S, Senators 
Assail China 
For UN Votes 


By Jim Mann 

Angeles Times Service 

BELONG — a delegation of sev- 
eD t senators denounced Chi- 
na's United Nations voting record ' 
m a meeting Tuesday with Deng 
Xiaoping. They complained that 
China has consistently supported 
the Soviet Union and opposed the 
United State. 

The delegation, headed by the 
Senate majority leader, Robert J. 

Dole, Republican of Kansas, told - 

Mr. Deng, the. principal Chinese ap 

leader, and other officials that an n.w* t t^i„ 

examination of records of last" . KODerT IJole . 
year's General Assembly session 

showed that China, had voted with was counterproductive and “would 
‘'the Soviet Union 86 percent of the . only add more fuel to the fire for 



UN Chief Says Nuclear Powers Violated Pledge 

Reuien Mr. P6rez de Cufellar told the [Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Sovi- space-based defease system in ex- 

GENEVA — Javier P6rez de delegates that many countries are et leader, called Tuesday on all olh- change for “dramatic reductions’* 
Cu&Qar, the United Nations secre- now t echnic al l y capable of launch- er nuclear powers to join Moscow of Soviet weapons. The Associated 


The increases were announced objected 10 the closing or changing 
Monday on the televirion news as °f ^ £ I uor factories,** he said, 
part of the anti-drinking campaign But Mr. Belichenko said retail, 
of Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Sow- oudeis were refusing deliveries of 
et leader. They came as no surprise some alcoholic beverages, even 
to the thousands of men who had *bousb government quotas had not 
been standing in line outside liquor foreseen decreases in production 
stores for up to three hours as ru- before next year. He said the Mos- 
mors of price increases spread. cow ' Champagne Factory was 
The announcement did not spec- working at A) percent of capacity, 
ify the new prices. But the percent- 3041 demand for beer had fallen oil 
age increases indicated that vodka 25 percent. . . 

would rise bv three rubles a liter, or J also noted that while the 

S4 a quart. 'Lesser increases were demand Tor champagne and beer 
announced for champagne, fruit bad dropped, the sale of perfumes 
and berry liqueurs and for beer, had increased, 
which is to increase by five kopecks f rc | m P°^t and vodka, the dte- 

for a half-liter bard alcoholics have been shifting 

Die price increases may not 10 perfumes and ^industrial fluids 
seem exorbitant bv Western stan- containing spirits, “ !™ e , ^ 
dards. But fora Soviet worker earn- be«>mins =l^nned. The 

ing 250 rubles a month, an extra of P“*«i ^ 

I JO rubles ter a dufly pint cun 


et leader, called Tuesday on all olh- change for “dramatic reductions” P*®?* substantial expenditure. meni had found price increases of 
er nuclear powers to join Moscow of Soviet weapons. The Associated Although the increases evidently dubious value because they they 
in renouncing first use of nudear Press reported from the U.S. Air ar ? intended to discourage heavy to c h anne ] more of a work- 

weapons, United Press Interna- Force Academv in Colorado. dnnkmg, Soviet sources said they . eaminas into liuuor and en- 


ln past campaigns, the govem- 


tary-general, delivered a sting 
rebuke to the world’s major nuc 


ing military nudear pr 
have vohintarfly adopt 


weapon powers Tuesday at the of restraint. 


arcs but 
a policy 


start of a conference to review a 
nonproliferation treaty. 


“There must be recognition of 


tional reported. 

[“There should be no doubt," be 


Unless the nudear arms race be- cannot reasonably be demanded in 
tween the migor powers is halted, the fa« of unlimited expansion on wou]d CTaie f avorab i e conditions 
Mr. Pfenez de Cu£0ar said, “the ter- the other, be said. for concluding an international 

rible possibility of wholesale de^ When the maty was ; “grated treaty on a complete and general 
struction wilJ increase yet further many experts beueved that 15 to 20 pfohibilion of nuclear weapon 
and the fear of a Fna[ catastrophe countries would have atomic weap- | es j s _~j 

wiB shadow our dafly existence.” ons by 1985. With the exception of ™ on 

About 80 nations,^ including the a “peaceful” nudear blast by India ■ Carter Opposes Space Plan 
United States, the Soviet Union in 1974, no new country has dem- Jimmy Carter, the former UR. 


. • — • J | - ..w, V JUVIMU VW uv UUUUL, lib 

the fact that restraint on one side ^ a mun]a] U.SR.R.-U.S. 
rannot reasonably be demanded m mca^um on nudear explosions 

Ovn-iriMAn rtfl ■ . . «... 


and Britain, attended the start of a onstrated its a 
month-long review of the Nudear atomic device. 

ap Nonproliferation Treaty. Die 1968 

n.i ^.1 f tw>i« agreement is aimed at preventing 

Robert J. Dole the spread of atomic weapons and FTC » . 

halting the nudear arms race. 1 

wasccmntaproductive and “would In a statement read to the confer- 

only add more fuel to the fire for ence, Mr. Perez de Cu&Uar said tire Nev Yori 


in 1974, no new country has dem- Jimmy Carter, the former U.S. moving the “almost insurmount- 
onstraled its ability to explode an president, said the United Slates able wall” to negotiations. Mr. Car- 
atomic device. should forego deployment of a ter said. 


-- * “ # ■ | ■ h . . ^ • ■ ■ • set vbu iv kttuiuiu iiiui w ui u 

Force Academy in Coicmdo. drinking, Soviet stnirccs said che> er « s j n | 0 liquor and en- 

• ... , - . suspected that they a!so_ were gQyj—gj spread of ill egal stills. 

In a speech Monday to a largely aimed at slowing the decline m gov- . camnaiurThowev- 

^ from Uquor sale, ^ Gorbachev ap^S to have 

Carter said the Umted States has The revenue decline resulted nulled all stoos 
faded to make sincere negotiations from the introduction of laws June v j^ e Uncs^tside liquor stores 
on arms control over the past few 1 that raised the legal drinking age bave discouraged all but the most 
- vears - from 18 to 21, restricted sales to the determined drinkers, and police 

The most important issue for period from 2 P.M. to 7 P.M. on dragnets for public drunkenness or 
President Ronald Reagan to ad- working days and increased penal- nippai liquor sales have driven 
dress at his summit meeting with ties for public drunkenness. The drunks off the streets. 

Mr. Gorbachev in November is re- government also has closed him- - 

moving the “almost insurmount- dreds of stills and placed illegal 

able wall” to negotiations. Mr. Car- brewers on a blacklist 

ter said. In an interview with the govern- 


U.S. to Probe Chemical r Rhk 5 to Envoys in Moscow 



time and had aligned itsdf with the support for the Taiwanese people spread of nuclear weapons to addi- 
U oiled States in only 14 percent of in the form of more advanced tional countries had been halted, 
the occasions- where the two super- weaponry." But nations possessing a nudear 


the occasions-where the two super- weaponry." 
powers were in opposition. - Despite the sen 

U5L officials said the United. Chinese policies, 1 
States has been particularly an- Mr. Deng and otl 
noyed with China’s repeated back- . not characterized 
ing for “name-calling’’ resolutions Senator James A. ] 
attacking the United States, such as- Kean of Idaho, f 
one last year that they said m«<fe relations between 
the false claim that the United United Stales wm 
States was in “coDnsion" with Meanwhile, the 
South Africa’s nuclear program. - lion secretary, Eli 

Senator Daniel Patrick Moyrti- . Mr. Dole’s wife, 1 
han. Democrat of New York and a day tfiat she had 
former U&' representative at -the meat opening (he 
United Naticxts, tdld Mr. Deng Army Corps of E 
that China was carrying out what - vide greater assist 
he called a “two United States po- developing its poi 
Iky” working closely with the inland waterways. 

United States on bilateral issues 

bat opposing it in pubSc foriuns 
like tire United Nations. T J • , 

Another member of the ddega- I flfllQ | 
tiofl,Saiator Pete Wilson, Rcpnbh- ^ ^ 

can of CaUfomia, later told Peng • _ . . 

1 3 hen, a member <rf the Communist By Lo^cn Jenkins 

* Party Politburo, that China’s pub- . Washington Post Srmce 
tic positions in opposition to the NEW DELHI- — An intense dip- 

United States were “difficult to un- lomatic effort by India is reported 


weaponry.” But nations possessing a nudea 

Depute the senators’ critidsm of force, he said, have not hoooro 
Chinese policies, the meetings with their pledge to end the arms race. 
Mr. Deng and other officials were “In tins regreci, the implements 

not characterized as acrimonious, don of the treaty has been large! 
Senator James A. McClure, Repub- one-sided,” be said. 

Kean of Idaho, said he felt that The nonproliferation treaty be 


iocc, »»r rc rea. uc «.u u« JVe* York Tunes Service 

st astasia “sssi-jr.s 
t-tiRSt-iS! 

heir pledge to end the arms race. Moscow to detarmne the health 
“In this^spect, the implementa- K^^, ac ^ ,nical R? 
ion ot laxgely !S£rJ“« Sf ** “ 


ties had been using chemical sub- The Soviet Union called the sounder, more sustainable fool- 
stances “to monitor the activities of charge an “absurd fabrication” and ing.” 


employees” of the embassy. .1 — *» Redman said there was no 

It said the most widely used of evidence that the chemical agents 

the agents, nitrophenyl pen ta diene Mr. Redman said Monday that been spread by any Soviet em- 

aldehyde, or NPPD, had been de- the government had made its find- p i oy ecs of the U.S. Embassy. The 
tertnined through biological mgs public to make U.S. residents embassy employs about 200’Soviet 
screening tests to be a mutagen, in the Soviet Union aware of the m Jobs nol requiring U^. 

which can cause genetic change health risks. security clearances, such as me- 

and possibly cancer. The govern- “Our policy toward the Soviet ebanics. custodians, servants. 


said it was intended to poison rela- 
tions. 

Mr. Redman said Monday that 


residents in the Soviet Union. 
Charles Redman, a State De- 


Hcan of Idaho, said he Felt that Die nonproliferation treaty be- t-nanes Redman, a biate ue- 
rda turns between China and the came effective in 1970 andhas been parunentqxjkesman, said Monday 
United Stales were “progressing.” signed and ratified by 130 conn- the investigators from the National 
Meanwhile, the U.S. transporta- tries. Four other countries have Institutes of Health and the Envi- 


aldehyde, or NPPD, bad been de- the government had made its find- 
termined through biological ings public to make U.S. residents 


security clearances, such as me- 
and possibly cancer. The govern- “Our policy toward the Soviet chanics. custodians, servants, 
ment said tests were nettled to de- Union has not changed.” he said, chauffeurs and translators, 
termine the extent to which Ameri- have no illusions about Soviet 

cans had been exposed. behavior. Periodically they are go- But he said the State Depart- 

U.S. officials said the chemical ing 10 do these kind of tilings. The ment was looking at the possibility 
was fluorescent when subjected to use of tracking agents is only the of reducing the number of Soviet 
certain agents and could be used by latest example. We cannot let such employees. A recent study on the 
Lhe Soviet security police to show actions pass. We will defend our security at U-S. embassies overseas 
that dissidents and others might interests and protect our diplo- drew attention to the problem 
have been in contact with U.S. dip- mats. But we will nol be deterred in posed by the employment of Rus~ 
lomais. our efforts to put our relations on a sians in the Moscow embassy. 


Meanwhile, the U.S. transporta- tries. Four other countries have 
don secretary, Elizabeth H. Dole, signed but not ratified the treaty. 


ronmemal Protection Agency were 
to “systematically sample residen- 


But he said the Stale Depart- 


Mr. Dole’s wife, announced Tues- whir* extends to 1995. to -systematically sample resioen- 

day that she had signed an agree- The United States, the Soviet ^ areas, work areas of the embas- 
ment opening the way for the U.S. Union and Britain were the driving automobiles, clothing, to deter- 
Army Corps of Engineers 40 pro- forces behind the treaty and are the to 111 ® to® ®*toni and the level of 
vide greater assistance to China in only nations with nuclear weapons contamination. 


vide greater assistance to China in only nations with nuclear weapons 
developing its ports, harbors and to have signed it- France and China 
inland waterways. have refused to participate. 


con tamin at io n 

Last week, the government said 
it had learned that Soviet auihori- 


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India Optimistic on Sri Tanka Talks 


Jayawardene of Sri Lanka, had re- 
peatedly delayed his departure 
from New Delhi 


hours of talks with Mr. Bhandari 
Mr. Gandhi has leaned on the Sri 
Tjnkan government to defuse the 


dexstand and unwelcome” to his to have revived peace negotiations 


California constituents. 

The senators said Mr. Deng, 81, 
made no attempt to answer their 
criticisms during the m ee tin g. 


between the Sri Lankan govern- 
ment and minority Tamil rebels 
that broke down a week ago. 
Senior Indian government offi- 


“He heard all our questions and dais expressed optimism Monday 


He was to have stopped in the crisis and has also sought to soften 
Indian capital only to pay respects the most intransigent Tamil rebels 
to Mr. Gandhi. The visit, however, now bring in Madras, capital of the 
turned into a new round of oegotia- southern Indian state of Tamil 
dons with the Indian government Nadu. He expelled three of the | 
including at least an hour of talks most militan t opponents of the 
with Mr. Gandhi and more than 10 Bhutan talks. 


C:vp z-m •*a»it zs c uw ■wptmps '-un? 

■ ■ Ul ESS CU^ •» D1NE=5 CHJi 
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<® WM-RS CLUB -* I^N£I»S ClUt 
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Oit&l CIOS <9 Du'S!.; CI.US TiUR *®D1M 

3l ! S >#DWb hS CUB •» 0::HC5 CIU» iWOINESS CIUI 
DifiSE Oil; C;UC ^OUiERS Clxtr. 

auB4w«e ruie-wtfMK aue •aow&i cum 

OtNeK CLL-t R!*crPS C! S Dalg5S_r- U3 »» Di?t» 


looked at his watch,” Senator Moy- 
nihan said later. An account by the 
Chinese press agency made no 

mention of the senators’ com- r , 

olainls. gotiator, Hector Jayawardene. may 

F During their sessions with Mr. be dose to restarting the peace 
Deng and other officials, the legis- taftsm Bhutan, 
htors also voiced unusually strong The talks, offiaalstere ray, 
suDDort for Taiwan. broke down Aug. 17 because of a 

sSStor William S. Cohen, Re- fraying of the June 18 cease-fire 


that three days of talks between 
Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi and 


S55S5E Top Offwials to Skip Meeting 

gotiator, Hector Jayawardene. may T sy -are • • Tzii 

be dose to restarting the peace Un U-\ Missmg m Vietnam 


I require worldwide acceptance from 

my Card. And I get it. 


publican of Maine, said he told Mr. tiiat had been a condition for the 
Deng the Taiwanese “are long- Bhutan talks. Indian officials add- 
sSing Mends of the United ed privately that Jfa Lankmi 
Smteand we have made an obb- government had refused to make 
garira to help defend their security, mbsMntive proposes to addrte 
SuwofHfe, their system and the Hindu Tamil mmonty’s com- 
3 ”JnfHinicr” plaints about dommatroc by the 

Lted’snMsortySmh^. 

the noraibflitv of These sources said they were op- 

casl< f 1 ^Jf Ik JekSe orotb- timistic because Mr. Jayawardene, 

wSygiiL' hnxter of Wfc. Junim R. 


By Don Shannon 

Los Angeles Times Service 

WASHINGTON —The United 
States has downgraded a delega- 


A State Department official, 
who declined to be named, blamed 
tire c hange in plans on Richard 
Childress, a National Security 
Council staff member wbo was iu 


These sources said they were op- 


timistic because Mr. Jayawardene, to visit Hanoi, the State 
brother of President Junius R. ment announced Monday. 


tion gping to Vietnam for talks on counai stall memoer wno was id 
A mericans raiding since the war charge of arrangements for the tnp. 
there. Officials had speculated that Mr. 

Assistant Secretary of Defense Thach’s absmee might have been a 
Richard L Armilage and Assistant calculated snob because of Wash- 
Secretary of State Paul D. ingtan’s emphasis that the talks 
Wdfowitz are no lower scheduled should not be seen as a move to 
to visit Hanoi, the State Depart- normalize relations with Hand, 
ment announced Monday. But the State Department offi- 


Animal Sacrifice, Feasting 
Bring Moslem World to Halt 


But the department said the visit rial dismissed this, along with theo- 
would proceed as planned on ties that Moscow was seeking to 
Wednesday and Thursday. Lower- demonstrate its primacy in yiet- 
offi rials 


r anking 


(Continued from Page 2) 
day. The sacrifice and the feasting, 
in rich areas and poor, area family 

^Fakri^ a taxi driver, sakh 'ltjs 

tike vour Christmas. Evoythmg is 


S^llv Ssaid, few could affOTd to^d badL But hrs lawyer said 

g's&S'SKSMS 

■ “jsJSS-Sf** 


7 p both sides, a department spokes- 

World to Halt kCJSSKrK 

will be m Moscow when the U5. 
Sheikh Hafez Salg*n» ? the most driegauon is in Hanoi 
cons picuous Egyptian ftmdamen- 
talist leader at tte moment, was A 

rdeased from prison to go on the \!C/ H/m 

hqj this year. 11 JfL Lsttll 

Western analysts aeculated that ^1^ 

Sheikh Saiama nri^ht not be al- mb M 


trill take part on namese affairs by summoning Mr. 


spokes- Thach. 

Minis- Mr. Childress now will be the 
ie tnam nominal bead of the group, which 
ae U5. seeks to learn the fate of 2,464 
servicemen. 


VniHgOt. 


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LEMANOIR 

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^^^bvnaigious extremists, “ 

sassmateu *con»~ctflcc4x«<iii»prn 

asatSw ar-. -Ssssr J 

rested. 


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ifitm — r *■’ UJ “ “ irr~ *" — and aandeiwbb. 8a Mart 5L TAi 09 3385. 

mmm lammi 

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1 







Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 1985 


- 1 - v 
: " r'_ , I 



INSIGHTS 


.. * r-v** 1 


Women and Their Rights in Egypt: A Fundamentalist and a Liberal 


By Jeffrey Bartholet 

Washington Paa Service 


C AIRO — They were roommates first in New 
York's Greenwich Village, where both studied in 
the 1960s, and then in Qanatar prison near Cairo, 
where they were sent by President Anwar Sadat in 1981. 

But while coincidence has pulled them together, their 
ideals have pushed them apart 
Safinaz Qazim. a Moslem fundamentalist who sup- 
ports the establishment of an Islamic government in 
Egypt modeled on Iran, and Nawal Saadawi, a fierce 
proponent of secularism and women’s liberation, repre- 
sent the extremes of two strains in Egyptian life. 

As Egyptians, they are participants in a mounting 
political and social struggle over the essential character 
of Egyptian society. As women, they are proponents of 
opposing views of the woman’s role in that society. 

The struggle, which now centers on a fundamentalist 
demand that the government should put strict Islamic 
law into effect, has caused much debate in the press, 
among politicians, in law courts and mosques. 

The government is winning the majority of the battles. 
Ii arrested Sheikh Hafez Salama. a fundamentalist lead- 
er. this month, holding him briefly. But most liberals say 
that the fundamentalists are now winning the war. 


-If you were to take a vote tomorrow on Salama’s 
version of Islamic law, yes, the majority of people would 
vote for it*" ltaid a Moslem liberal during a recent 
interview. 

Yet the primary concern of both liberals and funda- 
mentalists extends beyond putting strict Islamic law, 
miifti sharia, into effect. 

“More dangerous than the concept of applying 
sharia," said Sayed Yaseen, a sociologist, “is that they 
want to establish a dosed Islamic society in which the 
private sphere is controlled by public authorities.” 

Safinaz Qazim is representative of such thinking. 

“You can’t construct a secular body and put an 
Islamic badge on it," she says. Wearing a dress reaching 
her aniriw and a veil that conceals her hair and neck, she 
adds, “What concerns us is the establishment of an 
Islamic state in Egypt; not merely sharia but an Islamic 
state which governs 24 -hours of our life.” 


— w -ves a Znan the right to request 

Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini and Khaled al-Islambuli, dragnet by Egyptian hJhS^idSa^ 

the leader of Sadat's assassination, are displayed along- The overnight crackdown occurred just . decide whether polygamy beamed me t\ 

side a smffing graduation picture from New York Uni- before Sadat's assassination by more liberal law, enacted by 

veratvl Miss Qazim, the fundamentalist, and Miss Saadawi, months ago, declared that prtyganywas^^ ^ 

Miss Qazim says her nationality is Islam, which gov- the women’s rights advocate, were the fostre'® . - _ harmful to a first wife and automatically S 8 . - A 
eras eveiy act of her life. When she enters a room, she released by the new president, Hosm MubaraK, ana mey w ^yorce her w »«__ Saadawi ”ItV"- 

should utter a certain Islamic phrase; when she sneezes, walked from the prison arm m arm. But they ha ^Whois the judge to decide, said A ’ harmed -erw 

there is another. tittle of each other since. ^ woman who decides whether she has oeen , 

She contends that Christians as well as Moslems not.” 

should be required to veti all but the face, hands and feet, "» yf ISS Saadawfs apartment is in a more affluent some of Miss Saadawi 's view* , conaoCTeo 
and that the woman's primary role should be in the I m/I neighborhood than Miss Qazim’s. Inside, Bed- u v fundamentalists tike Miss vjamn.. - 

home. _Lt A onin rugs cover the floors, and books in Arabic ^en by liberals as being “too W ester* Uberag . 

Miss Qazim said that in the society she envisioned, a line the shelves, yet the atmosphere suggests she is ^ women, argue for tneir ngms 

woman Eke Nawal Saadawi would face an Islamic court comfortable in a Western setting. an Islamic framework. 

an infidel, if she expresses her views, she will be ^ ^ Bodies, Ourselves” and “Selected 3 ^ ^ g^wi argues that Islam, cm ““££3 


n °Some of Miss Saadawi 's views, couadered 

mous by fondaMttltate like Lam®?: 



cried, and given a chance to repent," said Miss Qazim“If Works of Lenin” compete for space on the shelves with a 


she insists on opposing Islam, she shook! be killed” weaithof dectromc^uipmenl: stereo tape recorders, a 


Miss Qazim had not yet embraced fundamentalism large television set and a videocassette machine. 


J UST a few blocks from her apartment, which is in a 
relatively poor neighborhood of Cabo, is the 
mosque where on July 14, Sheik Salama worked a 


when she and Miss Saadawi lived together for three m;« Saadawi has written several books on women’s 


if mosque where on July 14, Sheik Salama worked a 
crowd of about 3.000 worshipers into a fever pilch before 
nailing off a planned protest march to the presidential 
palace. 

Inside Miss Qazim's modest apartment, pictures of 


months in 1965. They saw films, went to the theater and and is the elected president of the 125-member 

sometimes discussed the role of women in society. Arab Women's Solidarity Association, one of several 
Miss Saadawi was studying at Columbia University to CTna ^ groups lobbying for women’s rights. 


sometimes discussed the role of women in society. 

Miss Saadawi was studying at Columbia University to 
become a psychiatrist, and Miss Qazim at NYU to 
prepare for a career as a drama critic. 

In prison, 16 years later, they met again. Along with 
about 35 women and 1,500 men, they were swept up in a 


Recently, these, women’s groups gained what they 
called a partial victory when the government passed a 
law in early July recognizing certain basic ri g hts for 


here, both men and women, argue for their ngms 
an Islamic framework. _ 

But Miss Saadawi argues that Islam, even «■] "Mg 

hghl^tetpretorioruhasnoplacem either pofitica^ 

law. . • • . "■/. 7 : 

AH Hflal Dessouki, a Cairo University P rof ^°^^^ 
‘The issue is not Islam versus annTslam,^ <**■?£=: 
medieval versus modem Islamic thinking. 

Though Miss Saadawi concedes that todammtaagfci 
is gaining adherents in Egypt, die does not exp ^t ^^ 
wearing a veil or sitting before one of Miss QaainrS.. 
courts in the near future. _ „ •' 

She says confidently. “Egypt is not Iran. 




> 10 1" 


wer 


By Allis ter Sparks 

Washington Post Service 


J OHANNESBURG — The earnest young 
man in a yellow T-shirt that proclaimed his 
membership in a black political movement 
paused for a moment from the singing, chanting 
ritual of the big funeral rally to answer his 
questioner. “Nelson Mandela is my leader,” he 
said in tones of reverence. “He is a great man. 
He is going to lead our people to freedom.” 

He could not have been more than 16, which 
meant he had never seen the subject of his 
admiration nor heard him speak Nelson Man- 
dela, 67, the acknowledged leader of South 
Africa's main black nationalist movement, the 
outlawed African National Congress, was im- 
prisoned for life 23 years ago on charges of 
sabotage. 

Since then, only Mr. Mandela’s family has 
been allowed to visit him regularly and only an 
occasional second-hand report from him has 
seeped through the controls and gag laws that 
enclose bis celL 

Yet, instead of fading from memory as the 
government hoped when it sent him to a wind- 
swept prison oif Cape Town in August 1962, 
Mr. Mandela's fame has grown with the years 
into a legend that has assumed an almost messi- 
anic importance to many of the 21 million 
blacks who live under the apartheid system of 
white-minority rule. 

The swelling demand for his release could 
lead to a major confrontation Wednesday. A 
march of 20,000 people is planned to Cape 
Town's Pollsmoor Prison, where Mr. Mandela is 
held, in defiance of a warning by Law and Order 
Minister Louis le Grange that the march is 
illegal and police will slop it 
It is not only the nutitant youth who respond - 
to the Mandela legend Even black political 
opponents, including conservatives who work 
within the apartheid administration and are 
despised by the ANC, acknowledge it and join 
ritually in the calls for Mr. Mandela's release. 
To do otherwise would be seen as an act of 
sacrilege in the black community. 

An opinion poll published in a Johannesburg 
newspaper on Sunday showed that more than 90 
percent of the country’s blacks want Mr. Man- 
dela released unconditionally. 

“He has become the symbol of our people,” 
said Bishop Desmond Tutu, winner of the 1984 
Nobel Peace Prize. “His imprisonment repre- 
sents their oppression. His self-sacrifice is what 
we would all like to be in resisting that oppres- 
sion, and his release has come to symbolize the 
liberation they are longing for." 

Mr. Tutu said, Tt may seem almost childish, 
but the faith in him is so complete that somehow 
I think people believe that u he were to come 
out, things would be all right." 

Mr. Mandela's stature among his own people 
and bis growing reputation abroad have become 
major political problems for the Pretoria gov- 
ernment, which now finds itself involved in a 
sort of shadow negotiation with its prisoner over 
the conditions under which he might accept his 
own release, and the policies of his outlawed 
organization. 



tics and was expelled for helping to organize a The trial was probably the mo^i^wti^ 
swdml strife^ 


wuau sui&c. “ — — — - — D-- , , y. - __ 

He went to Johannesburg, where he became With crowds attending court earaday, ne con- * * . 
mrentioeri tn a firm of white lawvers and later ducted lrimself. in the words ot a defense lawyer^-' 


apprenticed to a firm of white lawyers and later ducted himself, in the words of a detense lawyo;^ 
established his own law firm in partnership with “in a manner that was almost regaL cn™* 8 -- 
OliverTambo, a lifelong friend who is now the with a Socratic address to the court that aasi 
president of the ANC in exile. ; become part of tbeKlany of the black resistance!..: 

Mr. Tambo and Mr. Mandela rose rapidly Mr. Mandela spoke of his ideal of a dano--:'; 
together th rough the ranks of the ANC, the cratic and free society in which all peomecoiatr.J 
oldest black nationalist movement in Africa. - live, together in harmony and withequal appor-; 
Founded in 1 Q 1 X the ANC at that staeewas still tunities. then declared: “It is an ideal whKn;Ii*.y 


seeking majority rule. .• sage. -There has been no act of compromise or ^ 

When a National Party government of white nnsjndgment to tarnish the image of self-sacn- ' 
Afrikaners came to power in 1948 and tightened - fice. IBs invisibility has added to the mystique. : 

.■ .1 - J 1 .1 . . TU.. t tk. ftkarrtmA tn ont) , 


segregation with its apartheid ideology, the two - -There, for a time, the story seemed to end. ■'&«* 
young lawyers formed a militan t wing of the The ANC, its leaders jailed and its orga niz at ion 


ANC called the Youth League and soon int broken by extensive arrests, seeaned no longer to 


posed its views on the old organization. exist as a viable political movement, above or 

As the government began dosing in on the below ground. Guerrillas of Spear of the Nation-- - • , 

increasingly militan t organization, Mr. Man-, made occasional bomb attacks and were usually A 

rMn onw K ref oiwn a enovmHni sentence fnr ' nmatrf olnwcr nnmiviifllriv ' ' 


dcla was first given a suspended sentence far caught almost immediately. 


organizing a campaign of civil disobedience, ‘-jFrom the moment Mr. Mandela went to jms- 
then silenced and restricted in his movements an, however, the ensign of defiance was taken 
with a harming order under a catch-all security. -over byttis wife. 


/fcro*™ 'VLPSZS'X'- 

dants TOE acquitted after four was. - : | \ on^r 20 when die left a remote roral . 

In the international onlay toTwiowed the “T " m the Trantta an d tre veleti to ■ 

police shooting of 69 passhie resisters nr the Johannesburg to become .the iirsl tWadcwonan. 
Stick township of Sharpe^Ue inI960,lhe'gov-" “ ““S' “i-T^ “f-i 
eminent Zed the ANC. The otganiza&n. : S' ‘‘S" 1 f' S f .' K ? ltla ' h? 

which until then hnd waged pasaveraamce/ ^m« Mr Mandela, then 35, she says she immedt- 

campaigns in the style of India’s Mohandas K. . m m ^ ve \ -j 

GanSito try to piJssure the govemment-inU)- .T™ ** “»?* ‘ 

ending apartheid and calling an all-race conven- ^S ? 00 !. 10 Nelson s ima^" ..said Mr. Turn, 
tion to write a new constitution, decided that. ^Cyhave bectHnea ! 0 ^ 5 ol)C<xwle with theu:_ 
peaceful methods were no longer possible: i "--’ to : be broken. . - 

The ANC has long had anSnce witlfthtf 

small predominantly white Sooth African-^ ** topi mm from Mud m .. 
Commimist Party, which was outlawed in 1950 the strange dialogue between him and Mr. Bo- 
and today receives arms and other aid for its **. a. hard-Hne statement that he would refuse 
guerrilla forces from the Soviet Union. to J 0111 a constitutiaiia] convention with the 

government if it released him. 

r | 1 HERE are several known Communists The catiy.ihhag toat is left to be discussed by 


The Auocntod P>n 

Mourners show their sympathies for Nelson Mandela at a funeral in Port Elizabeth for three vic tims of recent unrest 


F OR seven months, a land of dialogue has 
been going on through the media be- 
tween Mr. Mandela and President Pieter 
W. Botha. First Mr. Mandela has presented a 
position through members of his family and 
other occasional visitors, and the president has 
replied in major public pronouncements. 

This spectacle of the long-term political pris- 
oner forcing his chief jailer to respond to him, 
and thereby increasing the international pres- 
sures on the white government, has added to 
Mr. Mandela's reputation. 

In a way, said Tom Lodge, a specialist in 
black politics at Johannesburg’s Witwaiersrand 
University, the Botha government has become 
Mr. Mandela's prisoner, trapped in the choices 
it faces over how do deal with him. 

“On the one hand, it would lik? to demytholo- 
gize him by releasing him,” said Mr. Lodge. Tt 
is also worried that be may die in prison, which 
would cause a massive black reaction. 

“On the other hand, it is worried about the 
impact he would have on Lhe black population if 
he were released to become politically active 
again And Mandela is not making it easy for 
them. He is playing it tough, refusing to accept 
any conditions and malting it clear that he will 
not renounce the ANC or any of its policies." 

Last December, Mr. Mandela rejected a gov- 
ernment offer to release him into the Transkei 
tribal homeland, which is run by a relative. 


Chief Kaiser Dalrwonga Matanama. Mr. Man- 
dela made it dear that he would not accept any 
restrictions, nor have anything to do with what 
he regards as puppet states established under 
the apartheid system. 

In February, Mr. Botha offered to free him if 
he would renounce the ANGs commitment to 
guerrilla struggle. Again, Mr. Maud da rejected 
the offer out of hand. 

“Only free men can negotiate. Prisoners can- 
not enter into contracts," be said in a statement 
read for him by his daughter, Zindziswa, 23, at a 
rally in Soweto. He added (hat T cannot and 
will not give any undertaking at a time when L 
and you the people, are not free." 

His wife, Winnie Mandela, 52. who has her- 
self been restricted during the 23 years of his 
imprisonment, said in an interview Saturday, 
“If they were to release him unconditionally, he 
would crane right back here to Soweto and pick 
up where he left off when he was sent to prison. 
He would completely disregard the banning of 
the ANC and all the other laws imposed on him 
by a government he does not recognize. 

“I do believe he would be back in prison 
within hours.” 

By the accounts of those who knew him 
before, and the few wLo have seen him in prison, 
the figure behind the legend is a man of consid- 
erable presence — tall, now gray-haired, vigor- 
ously healthy, with a dignified bearing that 


visitors describe as being incongruous in the 
prison surroundings. 

“Throughout our meeting I fell that I was in 
the presence not of a guerrilla figfaier or racial 
ideologue, but of a head of state," wrote Samuel 
Dash, former chief counsel to the Senate Water- 
gate committee and now a director of the Inter- 
national League of Human Rights. He saw Mr. 
Mandeb last January. 


Tss**»rnS 


IfelC.'-Ct-M 


guerrilla forces from the Soviet Union. 

FT! HERE are several known Communists 


T HERE are several known Communists TTiecmlyihmgtoat is left to be discussed by 
on the ANC national executive commit- the people of this cpuntiy and the ruling Afrika- 
tee. But' both Mr. Mandeb and Mr. nets is the handing over of Dower to the maior- 


Even the white prison wanders show him 
respect, according to Neville Alexander, who 
spent 10 years with Mr. Mandeb in a small 
“leadership group” of political prisoners who 
were separated from the others on Robben Is- 
land, where Mr. Mandela was held until be was 
moved with four others to Pollsmoor Prison, 
outside Cape Town, three years ago. 


-L tee. But both Mr. Mandeb and Mr. nets b the funding over of power to the major- 
Tambo have denied that the ANC is itself Com- . By,” she quoted him as saying. 


munist, as Pretoria claims. 


The statement dismayed white liberals and 


Announcing the 1960 decision to switch to some members ofwhat is known as the “enligfat- 
guerrilb struggle in what was to be his last ened” wing of Mr. Botha's National Party. 


public speech, Mr. Mandela, then a provincial These whites see Mr. Mandeb as the only blade 
president of the ANC formed an underground leader with across-the-board support in the 


N ELSON Rolihlahla Mandeb was bom 
on July 18, 1918, a prince of the royal 
house of Tembuland, which now falls 
within Tr ansk ei, Some think his royal upbring- 
ing freed him at an early age from the emotional 
and intellectual shackles of second-class citizen- 
ship and helped build the assured manner he 
later displayed. 

As a student at the black university of Fort 
Hare he is said to have become convinced that 
the prospect of tribal rub was not to his liking. 
He became involved in African nationalist poli- 


military wing called the Spear of the Nation. 

As its first commander, Mr. Mandeb slipped 
abroad to arrange training facilities in Algeria 
and to undergo a brief training course himself. 


fragmented black community, and say the rally 
way to avoid an all-out racial confrontation is 
fra: the government .to strike a deal with him. 
Winnie Mandeb hinted last week that her 


He returned to South Africa to a daredevil husband’s refusal to negotiate is not immutable. 


underground existence, teles of which have add- “If the government abandons apartheid, lifts the 


ed greatly to his romantic image among blacks, ban on the ANC, releases all political prisoners 


Eventually Mr. Mandeb was caught and sen- 
tenced to Give years’ imprisonment for incite- 
ment and far tearing the country illegally. 

A year later he was back in court, this time as 


mid allows the exiles to return, then Nelson and 
the other ANC leaden would be prepared to sit 
down and talk," she said. 

Mr. Botha seems a long way from con sidering 


the main defendant in a trial, on charges of that He has ruled out the oae-person, one-vote 
sabotage, featuring the entire high command of formula the ANC demands and nmdr it 


the Spear of the Nation: blacks, Asians and that the only changes he is prepared to consider 
whites caught rat a snail farm near Johannes- allow for little more than black participation 


burg. All were sentenced to life imprisonment and consultation in the current political system. 


50 Years After Leaving Poland and Its Jails, Former Dissident Finds Much Is Familiar 


By Michael T. Kaufman 


York Tones Service 


mm i T ARSAW — In February of 1935, my 
father, Adam Kaufman, jumped bail, 

TT and carrying skis he did not know how 
to use. he slid and stumbled from his native 
Poland into temporary sanctuary in Czechoslo- 
vakia. This summer, after 50 years, my 82-year- 
old Tather came back, to visit me in Warsaw. 

In Lhe half century of his absence, Poland’s 
borders have shifted about 200 miles (325 kilo- 
meters) to the west; my father’s nationality, the 
Jews erf Poland, have been killed or have fled; 
and though in his day it was Communists who 
were hunted and imprisoned as dissidents, to- 
day a Communist government hunts and im- 
prisons others. 

Yet, though the demographics have changed 
radically and the landscape has been altered by 
war and time, there is much in the conspiratorial 
and romantic culture of contemporary Poland 
that my father found movingly familiar. 

At the outset, I think I am obliged to declare 
myself. From an intimately subjective perspec- 
tive, this story begins cm a subway train in 1946, 
when my mother and father and I were return- 
ing home from visiting friends in Brooklyn. 

During the evening, my father had used the 
Polish verb “to sit” in a way I had never beard it 
used before. “Yes. I sat with him." he had said, 
or, "We sat there for two years." On the train 
home, I timidly asked him did that mean be had 
been in jail. Very gently, he said yes, that in 
another time, in another place, be had been a 
Communist revolutionary and that he had spent 
nine and a half years in jail between the time be 
was 22 and 33 years old. 

I was then 8 . and I regularly listened to the 
radio program “Gangbusters.” I believed that 
bad people went to prison and good people put 
them there, and here was the best man I knew, a 
man who had saved me from occupied France 
and the furnaces of war, and he had been 
imprison®! many times. In that instant, I think, 

I received my Polish patrimony, which in large 
measure includes an awareness that in this 
world the good often go to prison. 


Over the years, after that moment on the 
train. I came lo know' many of the details of my 
father's early life. Once, when he was 70 and I 
was 35, he gave me a 100- page typescript spell- 
ing out as dispassionately as he could the details 
of what he did and thought in the years before I 
was born, in 1938. 

As I prepared to welcome him to Warsaw, I 
reread this account of trials, interrogations, be- 
trayals, hunger strikes, suicide attempts and 
illicit flights across borders. What had seemed 
distantly romantic and dated when I first read it 
in New York felt almost contemporary amid 
today's Polish realities. 

Now, my father often scorns his youth as 
naively misguided, and for almost five decades 
be has been an intensely private man. He has 
allowed me to write about his visit to Poland 
only with great reluctance, once again indulging 
his only child. 


pal defendant in that trial, and he eventually 
drew the longest sentence, four years. 

As he prepared for his return to Poland, my 
father had vey much wanted to meet Mr. Mich- 
nik. the 38-year-old son of his old colleague, 
who uses his mother’s name. He admires Mr. 
MIchmk's anti- totalitarian essays and he re- 
spects the political and humanistic activities of 
the man whom many in the Polish opposition 
consider to be their most articulate champion. 

Since Mr. Michnik’s arrest in February, he 
has not been allowed to see visitors. But a few 
days after he was sentenced to two and a half 
years, the Polish historian’s fiancee, Barbara 
Szwedowska, came to visit and spent a few 
hours with my father. 

He greeted her with almost courtly respect. 


do I see? The whole nation knows perfectly well 
that the problem lies with the system and only 
the leaders are saying, No, the difficulties are 
the fault of individuals, former leaders, mistak- 
en politicians, or, as during the anti-Semitic 
purges of 1968, Jews." 

Miss Szwedowska laughed. She then de- 
scribed for my father how she had nursed Mr. 
Michnik’s father for the half year during which 
he was dying of cancer. At the time, his son was 
in jail awaiting a treason trial that was never 
held. She said that Mr. Szechter had some years 
earlier actively turned against Communism, and 
that he even participated in protest hunger 
strikes in the Catholic churches he had once 
regarded as bastions of obscurantism, repres- 
son and bigotry. 


| ROM the very first hours or my father’s 
recent monthlong, visit, both of us were 


H recent monthlong visit, both of us were 
JL absorbed by often uncanny symmetries 
and striking ironic twists. Just after he arrived, I 
had to go to Gdansk to cover the trial of Adam 
Mic hnilc and two other Solidarity activists, who 
were subsequently sentenced to prison for hav- 
ing advocated a 15-minute general strike to 
protest price increases. 

When I returned, my father asked me what 
the specific charges bad been, and when 1 told 
him, he replied, “In my day, it was paragraph 
102." He recited from memory: “Membership 
in an illegal organization that has as its aim to 
abolish most of the existing social order." He 
added, “Then it meant Communists, now it 
means Solidarity." 

There was more symmetry. The last time my 
father had been charged under that law was 
when he stood trial with 19 other men, among 
them Mr. Mic hnik’ s late father, Ozjasz Szechter. 

That trial was held in Lvov, then a Polish, 
now a Russian city, in 1929. All the defendants 
were members of die Communist Party of the 
Western Ukraine, an autonomous part of the 
Communist Party for the Polish provinces with 
a large Ukrainian pop ula tion, which my father, 
then 27, headed as secretary. He was the princi- 


In his day it was Communists who were hunted and 
imprisoned. Today a Co mmunis t government hunts and 
imprisons others. 


He told her that his wife, my mother, who died 
in New York five years ago, had once waited a 
total of eight years for him, and that her sacri- 
fice, which had been for lows, had turned out to 
be more fruitful than his own. which had been 
made in tbe mhw of dogma.. 

Miss Szwedowska asked my father about bis 
first impressions. He told her that there were 
many, but that one struck him as particularly 
ironic. He said that when he was a young Com- 
munist organizer in the 1920s. people in Poland 
had many ways to explain and account for their 
unhappiness nwd dissatisfaction. 

Tnere was a pluralism of blame,” he said. “A 
worker might blame the factory owner, some 
anti-Semhes Named wealthy Jews, Jews said tbe 
problem lay with anti-Semites, and the peasants 
resented wholesale merchants. Others pointed 
to Germans or Ukrainians as tbe source of 
trouble. Meanwhile, we Communists, a small 
group, ran around saying, no, it’s not a question 
of individual grievances, it is the system that is 
to blame 

“Now, after 50 years, I crane back and what 


History is everywhere in Poland, and the 
often tragic past is unavoidable. Everywhere 
there are monuments to sacrifice, to sujTering. 
Families visit cemeteries regularly and bus loads 
of schoolchildren go each day to the concentra- 
tion camps of Auschwitz, Majdanek and Treb- 
linka. In Warsaw alone, there are three former 
prisons that now axe museums. The sense of 
national history is everywhere. 


O N the day we went lo Auschwitz, as we 
walked in the rain among the rows of 
barracks, my father seemed to be think- 
ing of specific losses — his sister, my mother’s 
sisters, his nephews and nieces and the friends 
of his youth who perished in Nazi camps. 

There is a long gravd road that leads to the 
crumbling crematorium. My father walks slowly 


and uses a cane, and 1 could see that pieces of 
gravel were cutting into his thinly soled shoes. I 


gravd were cutting into his thinly soled shoes. I 
asked him if he wanted me to ask for permission 
to drive him. He said, “No, this is the Via 
Dolorosa: it is supposed to hurt, and it is right 
that it is raining.” 


We made our way to the end and stood in 
front of one of Lhe crematoriums. Tbe thoughts 
of family victims were replaced by barely com- 
prehensible images of as many as 24,000 people 
a day, among them children too young far tme 
passing to their deaths. 

We needed some ritual some incantation, to 
ease and affirm awe. My father intoned Kad- 
dish, the Jewish prayer fra: the dead that he had 
last recited as a 14-year-old boy after his father’s 
death. Something else was needed, but in the 
end neither erf us could think of anything more 
appropriate than silence. 

A few days later, we went to the Museum of 
the Revolutionary Movement in Lodz, which is 
boused m the jail in which my father on three 
different occasions spent the better part of a 
year. 

We tried to find the pun i sh m ent cell where he 
had almost suffocated, but it was gone. Instead, 
there were display cases of dandratine periodi- 
cals with names such as “The Worker,” “Strug- 
gle” and “Independence,” all looking quite sim- 
ilar to the materials published clandestinely 
today by Solidarity groups. There were tetters 
snuggled from jaR such as he had written, and 
there were photographs of illegal strikes. 

When, among the photographs of people be 
had known and worked with, my father spotted 
the face of Jan Tenenbaum- JeUki he gasped. 

“Naturally, it doesn’t mention that he was 
finished in tbe Soviet Union by Stalin,” he said, 
pointing to the photo of the man who had bre n 
his mentor and model as a revolutionary. My 
father had often told me about Jelslti, whom he 
still admires for his physical and moral courage. 

Once, in Wronki Prison. Jelski spent a year in 
an unhealed cell, wearing only underwear, rath- 
er than accept prison clothes. Later, he wa^ pr ri 
in handcuffs from a Warsaw trolley while 
transferred from one prison to another and 
made his way to Moscow, where my father 
visited him in 1928. 

Later during our day in Lodz, after we had 


grappling with his thoughts about Jelski and his v 
past: - 

“He had great courage and characta; bot r* 
now realize his inteffigaK* was limited by Ufi 
political faith and submission to party disci-" 
pline." - - 


How could so many people have accepted ! 
such idiotic positions, he wondered, recalling 
particularly the time before World War II when 
“le party hne insisted that both “Fascism” and 
social democracy” were equivalent sins. 

Back in Warsaw my father looked up a few 
old survivors Jrom his political past, in one case 
a woman who is dying, a woman who after the 




war se 9 'ed on tbe Central Committee <rf the 
reconstituted and ruling Polish Communist Par— 


hisl ^ 9 ex P Q i £ ionfrran the 
party for “Polish patriotic aberrations," when 
5 * 5 ** heea ^ dedicated and energetic -official, 

J® ^ reganfod my father as a hateful apos- 
tetoThoi, as Solidarity bloomed and wassop- # 
pressed, this woman— I don't use her name * 
£L^^- posa ‘ bIe bother —sent 

STS?' sayia * ^ aftcr ^ - 

cou1 ^ “o longer belong lo a party 
that turned guns on workers. • . 



looked at buddings that my maternal grandfa- 
ther had built, including the house where my 


mar bad buut, including the house where my 

mother was born, and as we were walking in tbe 
weedy, large Jewish cemetery, my father was 


She is lame and has a blood disease and: Eke 
^ ^ b earing, but she has the ¥ 
gnwe <rf self-awareness and truth. Afteras*a- - 

Jfedogma I differences, the 
hugged each other m human solidarity, • • 
After dozens of conversations, my father W * 

mow convinced that the drvSraB hTpSand „ 

ve SL wuie ^ that no effective"'-" 

wh^hr e Er? k ^ y 10 **** ^ abyss sooa.StiH,' ; 

22* A*?* about the" . 

g^rarftte nation, which hedeariystiG > 

311 

his^pod J 


fclStio- 


yp p * 198; 


er feelings and 
made intimate. 







^■sv-. 


ARTS / LEISURE 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 1985 



Page 7 


Presley Bio-Musical: Necrophiliac Rock 


Lain (second from 


Tha NawYorV Tim 

ngfat), a favorite character in “Ham Log,” and family members commiserate over his loss of plane ticket 

Can India TV Soap Opera Beat Films? Stay Tuned 


By Steven R. Weisman 
vj; T York Times Service 

TNJr™ PJM 11 —The possibility that Badke, 
Z? “ attr actrve young social warier. nnghl 

abn!^ 17 t J c ,^ andsomc Dr. Ashwani kZt 
farmed and dismayed the viewers of India’s 

“SBES* Revision soap opera last year. 

Hundreds of letters paired in demanding 
that the couple be reunited, and demonstrator 
the house of the actress who plays 

This summer the viewers got their wish. On 
wedding night, stores and mops closed early 
across India as people rushed hone to their sets. 
It was one of the most widely watched shows in 
the country's history. 

It was also a milestone for Dodi&n television. 
The phenomenal success of its pioneering series 
“Hum Log” has led to a new era of program* 
ming and a proliferation c rf serials. For the first 
t une , television is rihaTtwngmg film* as India’ s 
most popular naw ente rtainment 


- — — -r j c onsumer raw . 

gam challenged the taxi indnstty for cheating 
customers, a hundred taxi drivers picketed the 
studio in Bombay. 


Tnm-of-Centoiy Park Designer, 
Poiret, Honored atTokyo Show 

Agcnce Fraxce-Presse 

TOKYO— Tne French couturier Fanl Poiret, 
who popularized the hobble skirt and revived 
the Empire style at the tom of the century, is 
being remembered in an exhihhiairliere at the 
hwi<lqniirtwt of the derigner Hanae Mori. 

The exhibition, organized by Paris’s fashion 
inutfnm and the Japanese Fashion Foundation 
and scheduled fbr Paris in- December, includes 
40 Poiret dresses Jroro.f 922-33. 


is “Khandaan” : — which 
— a steamy melodrama about the 
Indian jet set wrtb more than an accidental 
resemblance to its American counterpart. But it 
is “Hum Log” that led the way. 

“It has acquired die status of landmark," said 
Harish Khanna. director-general of the govern- 
ment-owned television network. 

“Hum Lpg,” Hindi for “We People," was 
modeled by the government after a television 
sales in Mexico credited with helping bring 
down the bath rate there: The idea was to 
an entertaining but mildly propagan- 
rogram emphasizing family planning 
and other social issues. 

“Hum Log” has dealt with birth control, 
alcoholism, political corruption, the controversy 
over dowries and numerous other presang is- 
sues. In the process, it has become the first long- 
running Indian television serial to portray the 
travails of everyday life for a working-class 
family. Indeed, all year, life for the spreading 

extended family of RachneW Bam hat fap 

disaster after another. 

Grandmother is dying of cancer. Father is 
perpetually drunk. Mother fights with danghtex- 
m-law. A gullible daughter runs off to Bombay 
to get into the movies bat ends up duped and 
humiliated. A son becomes a suspect in the 
minder of his gjrifricad’ s father, a smuggler. 

For comic relief, another sea, Lalu, the 
show’s most popular character, always finds his 
plans gang awry. In one episode, he tried to get 
ajob in the Gulf, lost his ticket and was deport- 
ed bade to India. 

The creators of “Hum Log” recently tried to 
elevate LahTs stains by moving him out of the 
house and having him act responsibly. Once 
again, the viewers protested. Now Lalu is back 
to Ids old ways and his name has come to be 
widely used as an endearing term for a foolish 

h mnp fan. 


In many respects, “Hum Log” was a concept 
whose success was inevitable sooner or later. 
One obvious factor was the tremendous growth 
in television ownership. Indians own about five 
million sets, double the number two years ago 
and half what it is expected to be two years from 
now. The government estimates an average of 1 0 
viewers a set 

Last year, the government approached P. Ku- 
mar Vasudev, a Bombay film director, to help 
put together a soap opera to run two or three 
times a week — something that had never been 
tried before. 

“At the time, 1 thought television had no 
future,” recalled Vasudev. ‘‘Suppose the show 
flopped? My film career would be ntined also.” 

He agre ed to serve as director only if the 
government turned the production ova to an 
independent team that would raise money from 
a commercial sponsor. 

This, too, was a new concept that set a partem 
for Indian television. “Hum Log” is brought to 
the viewers by the makers of instant coffee and 


By Sheridan Motley 

International Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — If the immense 
• amount of preshow publicity 
is to believed, the reason Alan 
Bleasdale put together his musical 
biography of Elvis Presley. “Are 
You Lonesome TonignT (at the 
Phoenix t, was io correct the unflat- 

THE LONDON STAGE 

tering image of The King offered 
by various recent biographies. But 
the Elvis he gives us is not in much 
better shape. We first meet him, in 
a memorable performance by Mar- 
tin Shaw, as a bloated, mawkish, 
dying drag addict in a purple velvet 
tracksuit, a man patently at the end 
of his life and career but still trying 
to recall his former greatness while 
surrounded by corrupt managers, 
grasping relatives and a former em- 
ployee who returns to blackmail 
him ova some unsa vory connec- 
tions with the Mafia. 

Bleasdale, from his television 
track record, is a savagely good 
writer, and there are a few' mo- 
ments when rae can glimpse what 
might have been a wonderfully 
black comedy about rock super- 
stardora. Presley was, it would ap- 
pear, obsessed by a stillborn sibling 
(“We coulda been the Everly 
Brothers,” be says) and by a dog 
whose death several years earlier 
nobody had quite Hired to ex plain 
to him. He also seems, according to 
Bleasdale, to have flirted with the 
idea of having his wife’s lover killed 
until a last -min ute change of mind 
sent several henchmen tearing 
through the local telephone direc- 
tory in search of men with I talian- 
sounding names who might be 
about to pull the trigger. 

All this might have been made 
for an Ortonesque farce about 
fame and lunacy. Bleasdale, how- 
ever. is faced with the needs to slot 
in about a dozen of Presley's best- 


loved hits (sung by a pelvis- thrust- 
ing double on a platform above the 
ghastly living room where the idol 
would appear to be dying of a sur- 
feit of chocolate ice cream) and to 
appeal to fans of necrophiliac rode. 

Robin Lefevxe’s production re- 
flects this uncertainty of style and 
purpose; against a sei of crushed 
Cadillacs apparently borrowed 
from “Cats.” the show opens wth 
an Evita-type funeral before set- 
tling down into a straightforward 
song-by-song revivalist meeting. 
Apart from the older Elvis, the 30 
charactos are sketched in the most 
shadowy outline, presumably be- 
cause most are still alive to reach 
for libel lawyers. We get to know 
very little of the intriguing colonel 
who ran the Preslev enterprises, 
and even less about the parents and 
colleagues in what would appear to 
have been a deeply depressing life. 

□ 

For late nights in the Donmar 
Warehouse, the final offering in 
David Keman's summer-long cab- 
aret season is “How Lucky Can You 
Get!” — a tribute to the songs of 
John Kander and Fred Ebb, ami- 
ably if blandly performed by Jose- 
phine Blake, Ray Evans. Diane 
Langton and Angela Richards. The 
trouble is that Kander and Ebb 
need setting up; though they have 
written some of the greatest Broad- 
way and TV-special scores in the 
last 15 years (“The Rink,” “Chica- 
go.” “Liza with a Z” and “Caba- 
ret”), they lack an identity in Brit- 
ain. What is needed is the script 
treatment that Dick Vosburgh gave 
Jerome Kero in the best of these 
cabaret treats. 


The star of the American Acting 
Company’s production of “The 
CratSe WiH Rock.” in a guest sea- 
son at the Old Vk, is undoubtedly 
its venerable director, John House- 


the viewers by tiie makers of instant coffee and III l /^r in, . p T? 1 •! •- 

toothpaste, and there are 10 commercially spon- JJlOOCty OOU OlCGl TOT JCjXtHUlt 
sored series programs. Several more are due in J J 


series programs. Several more are due in 
the falL 

As mass entertainment, “Hum Log” is unusu- 
al because of the general dominance of escapist 
fare in the media. Popular Indian movies, as 
opposed to art films , are famous for their vio- 
lence. fantasy and torrid romance. Some critics 
say that ™mia may well be influenced by the 
success of “Horn Log.” 

For now, it has certainly given new vitality 1o 
the careers of its cast, most of whom were 
unknown stage actors or amateurs before the 
“Hum Log” boom. They stiH are paid only 
about $40 an episode. 

The show, in fact, is produced so cheaply that 
rehearsals take place in the lounge of a govern- 
ment guest house. The studio has only three 
cameras, the tights aren’t movable, and shooting 
has to take place after mi dnig ht. 


Reuters 

P ) ADUA, Italy — An eight-week 
exhibition featuring objects as- 
sociated with vampirism, such as 
silva nail s and ash wood stakes, as 
well as relics of cults of the undead, 
has opened here with a midnight 
“feast of blood” so exclusive that 
hundreds of would-be guests were 
left out in the cold. 

Local officials said people trying 
to gel invitations to the event had 
claimed to be related to President 
Ronald Reagan of the United 
States or forma President Sandro 
Pertini of Italy. 

The opening of the exhibition. 


man, who appears at a downstage 
lectern before the show starts every 
night to give a brief recap of the 
events surrounding its first staging 
in 1937 — Houseman and his co- 
director, Orson Welles, carting a 
piano through the streets of New 
York in search of an empty theater 
after they had been locked out of 
theirs in a government project that 
considered the show loo risky at a 
time of industrial unrest, and the 
ultimate performance of the work 
in the orchestra because the com- 
pany had been forbidden to appear 
in it on any stage. 

Houseman’s wry. professorial 
delivery of one of the more intrigu- 
ing chapters of U. S. theater history 
is followed by his staging of the 
labor opera that caused the trou- 
ble: a brisk, raw, juvenile satire 
written and composed by Marc 
Blitzstdn under what would seem 
to have been the influence of Kurt 
Weill and Thom ton Wilder. Noth- 
ing dates faster than agitprop, how- 
ever, and though Houseman has 
brought ova a strong company, 
beaded by the wonderful Patti Lu- 
pone (Broadway's original Evita) 
there's not much they can do to 
hide the fact that Bhtzstein’s satiri- 
cal writing was about as intelligent 
as that of an average Superman 
comic. “The Cradle WiH Rock" 
could have done with a writer as 


well as a composer, it’s .American 
Wall without the Brecht, and the 
result is predictably a few good and 
haunting songs but not a lot else. 
□ 

For a brief lunchtime run at the 
Donmar Warehouse in Covent 
Garden, until the end of this week, 
Kenneth Branagh's ^TeO Me Hon- 
estly" is a curious little backstage 
musical that seems to have started 
out as a sketch for a Royal Shake- 
speare Company cast party. Two 
neurotic actresses (Sarah Wood- 
ward and Jan Revere) confront the 
director (Nicholas Wcodeson) of a 
large subsidized company with 
their ambitions and his megaloma- 
nia. Along the way we get a couple 
of songs of truly stunning inade- 
quacy. 

What is intriguing is that this 
piece should have come at the end 
of Branagh's two-year stint with 
the RSC as Henry V. He is either 
trying to tell us that the kind of 
directors who run large subsidized 
companies have lost all touch with 
their players and their original am- 
bitions, or that the kind of actors 
who join large subsidized compa- 
nies are raving neurotics who ought 
to find something better to do. Un- 
til he decides which of those argu- 
ments he wishes to complete, uis 
show is bound to look a little schiz- 
oid 


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Guests for the midnight f&te Sat- 
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ill uminate d a portrait of Vlad the 
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biscuits and pig’s blood cakes. 


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Page 8 



Dow Jones Bond Averages 


utnittos 

Industrial* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 1985 


Dow Jones Averages 


OPOH Hlvfe Low LOS cm 

Indus 1331-34 1328+3 1315.19 133247 + 4+2 

Trans «0+3 «S+1 M4.ll M5S5 — 123 

Util 1SV.11 14003 15044 15942 + 041 

Como HUM 55445 547+0 55T.13 + 053 


NYSE Drarles 


Advancad 

Dacnosd 

Unchangad 
Total issua* 
New High* 
Now Low* 
V olume up 
Volume down 


877 790 

429 732 

-501 4 42 

2007 1904 

41 34 

.14 7 


■0794230 

2643040 


NYSE Index 


II 


Composite 

industrial^ 

Tramp. 

Utilities 

Finance 


High Low Claw Oton 
10941 10BJ1 10941 + jUJ 
12447 124.53 T2447 + 0+7 
100.95 W8£l 1M79 — J21 
57.53 5729 57.53 +0J1 
114.19 U4 jD1 114.19 +143 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y 


Bar Sales *SfcYt 

nua 380224 1418 

mu5 365.143 2J 

151.117 422446 ,«9 

210442 38L09 1+64 

162466 397415 1-395 


■Included In ttw sales flpuras 


Tuesday ^ 

NiSE 


Closing 


VoLWbPM. 

Prav.4 PJVL VOL— 

PnrrcantolMoM ctasa 

C.MMM 

Tusam 

S7592J7I 


Tables Include ttie nationwide prices 
up to ttw dosing on Wall Street and 
da not reflect late trades etsewtiere. 

Via The Associated Press 



Standard & Poor's Index 


Industrials 

Tramp. 

Utilities 

Finance 

Composite 


HU Urn aw Clive 
209 JO 208.19 20947+ US 
17245 17241 17141 —g-1* 

IS §J§tS$ 

18820 157J1 148-10 +079 


NASDAQ Index 


Y J£ 

dam arm A*» 


GattPUtt? 

industrials 

Finance 

imurooee 

utmum 


S35 +S1 K In 

34970 


amex Sales 


5,400+00 

4P-M.voftuna 6,160000 

Pm. 4 P-M. volume . 6.160000 

Prav.ean*. vowme 



amex Stock Index 


Stocks Make Gains in N.Y. 


KMemt) 
HWiLow Stock 


IN*. YML PE Mb High Low OuoLOrtt 


L:> T 



TZ 1 





Wt- 


m 


47 
9fM* 
06 

143 1 
BB3 241*1 
653 3V* 

135 19V, 
162 61b 
101 MSS 
1641 141b 
1073 29V, 
65 575b 
6Ub 


The Associated Prai 

NEW YORK — Prices edged higher on the 
New York Stock Exchange in quiet trading 
Tuesday with most of the gain coming in the 
opening hour. 

Retail, paper, drug and chemical issues paced 
the advances, while airline and precious-metal 
stocks retreated. 

Prices opened ahead and then steadied for 
most of the session. The Dow Jones average of 
30 industrials, for example, gained 4.82 to 
1322.47 after drifting between 1,320 and 1,323 
during the final three hours. 

About four stocks rose for each three that fell 
on the New York Stock Exchange, whose com- 
posite index rose 0.42 to 109.01. Volume swelled 
to 82.14 million shar es from 70.29 milli on in the 
previous session. 

While the market managed to retain its early 
gains, it also displayed the lack of conviction 
that has Homing ipH the past few sessions. Seme 
brokers said they look for the trend to continue 
at least until after Labor Day. 

While pre-holiday trading is typically slug- 
gish, analysts said investors are particularly 
cautious because of uncertainty over whether 
ihe economy will pick up steam later this year, 
as some economists have forecast 

But few economic indicators are scheduled to 
be released until Friday, when the government 
reports on leading indicators, factory orders 
and the trade balance for July. 

The Labor Department said Tuesday that 
business productivity fell 0-3 percent in the 
second quarter after dropping 2 j percent in the 
first quarter. 

“Obviously, for any rally to get very far we 


KX 




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2716 

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886 

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211% 


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187b E 

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241* 

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2916 


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are going to need some pickup in volume and 
that is not easy in this pre-Labor Day week,” 
Newton Tind er, senior vice Dresden t of EJF. 
Hutton & Co., wrote in his daily market com- 
mentary. 

Daily volume has not climbed above 100 
mttlicm shares since Aug. 8, and in the past two 
weeks has averaged about 83.5 mtOion shares. 

AMR, the parent of American Airlines, tum- 
bled 2ft to 45ft in heavy trading and led other 
airline issues lower after the brokerage firm 
Prudential-Bardie Securities Inc cut its third- 
quarter and full-year earnings estimates for 
AMR. 

Pan American slipped ft to 7ft, UAL 
dropped 1 to 56ft ana Delia skidded 1 to 46ft. 

The declines helped pushed the Dow Jones 
transportation average down 2 . 23 to 688J5. 

Revlon fell 1ft to 44ft and topped the 
NYSE’s active list. The company plans to buy 
back 10 milli on of its common shares to curb a 
takeover bid by Pantry Pride, which lost ft to 
6%. 

Portae plummeted 5 to 17ft, or 22 percent 
The company said it delayed its proposed 
$23.50-a-share leveraged buyout because of a 
possible drop in second-half 1985 results. 

On the upside, Cessna Aircraft jumped 4ft to 
25, a 5? -week high. Cessna officials weren't 
immediately available to comment on the gain 

Union Carbide rose ft to 54ft after GAI^said 
it raised its stake in the company to 7.1 percent 
from 5.6 percent GAF slipped ft to 32ft. 

Nationwide turnover in NYSE-listed issues, 
including trades in those stocks on regional 
exchanges and in the over-the-counter market 
totaled 100.74 million shares. 



m 


a 


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22 
12 
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16 
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131 8.1 
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SO 42 16 
154 44 9 

130 45 15 
100 3L4 14 

JJS 

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80 42 14 
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1-60 4.1 B 
1+0 » 13 
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132 SO 
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5+4eT3+ 

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9 

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3L12 54 8 

150 51 8 

137 00 

14 15 10 
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1.96 6 S 15 
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6-25 1TJ 
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131 U I 
4Jlo 85 

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151 125 
.16 O 






Tm just nuts about Grow Grwpproductsr 


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9**iL 

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+*• 


ft# 


75 + to 

66 +86 


4S 4+ 




351b 231% ICInd 144 45 
1916 1516 ICMO 55a 35 
111b 776 I CM 
38 72 to ICNpf 27S 10.1 

IBM 148b IMA In 152 11.1 

2786 22 IPTVmn Til IB 

22 177b IRTPr 157 85 


184 45 72 1978 3216 31Tb 321b + 7b 
550 16 . 99 15to 15to 1514 

_ rn 10 91b 10 

270 10.1 12 » » M t ft 

152 11.1 6 178b 178b 171b 

Jim 2S 36 25W. 25V. 35to + Vb 

157 85 I 27 21V. OTS 21 


3614 2514 ITT Cp 150 35 10 5799 3316 XM XM + 7b 


6316 47to ITT PIK 458 64 
67 to 4786 ITTpfO 550 85 
65 49V» ITT pfl 450 7.1 

1914 118b III fill AS 46 
24to 16» IfkNwPs L72 82 

19 10H lOOOlB 

27W 19Vk ItlPuwr 254 105 

20 T41A IlFowpf 254 115 
20U 15 IIPowpl 213 115 
211b 1 7Vi llPowaf 255 115 
387b 287b IlFowpf 4.12 115 
35 Vj 27 UPowpf 3J8 105 


3 ffiHh em 621b 

12 4016 6014 am— 16 

13 63 62 63 +1 

1713 131b 127b 13 +14 

9 239 21 2DV> 21 + 8b 

89 108b IOV^ 10W— Vb 
7 374 247b 24U 347b 
2302 18 18 1 8 —1 

HOX 1916 1H4 19 . — Vb 
100120 20 28 —1Tb 

400Z 3616 36 36 — 84 

11831b 35 34 3416 


36V4 26 (TW J2 25 13 131 3114 3086 3076— I* 
4DV4 31 Vb ImpCbm 251a 6.1 7 2125 36Vb 36 36 


12 6 liTurtCp 11 577 814 S4b - 81b— Vb 

158b 98b IN CO 58 15 1137 14V6 14V* MVb 

198b 14Vb IndWW pf US 115 4 187b 1BW IWb 

298b 151b IndIMPf 255 UJ 13 WVb 19 19V. 

30V. 2416 IndIMPf 353 126 2 287b 2B7b SJJb— Vb 

288b 19V*. IMflGss 254 87 7 54 23% 23 231* + Vb 

416 Inaxoo 571 57 584 5V*, 5W + Vb 

S3V. 39 InoarR 250 5.1 17 49 5114 SOU 5TV4 + Vi 

37V, 28 IngRpf 255 65 8 3SH 36Vr 3Slb— U 

ISM 11 InarTac SA 45 24 4 12W 128b 13Vb 

26 1 >m InldSti 50 2.1 197 241b 24Vb 24V6 

41 V6 38» inwstpf 475 705 1 471b 471b 471b 

2116 1M l«Ho> 15tto 55 18 1M2 W6 URfc IBVj— 16 

78b 37b IrapRS M 514 S 516 + 16 

2SVb 117b IntoRac 9 S120ib2BlA2D8b + lb 

28 19 IntBRpf 353 115 35 25* 2516 251b + Vb 

357b 25W IntoRpf 455 135 229 327b 32V. 328b + Vb 

98k 78b InftaOR 1021 9W 91b 91b— Vb 

UVb 8 IntRFn 6 131 11 107b II + Vb 

197b WSb ncpSo 2.18071.1 20 19 187b 19 + Vb 

72V. £516 Infarco 358 45 14 3032 72 7076 72 + 7b 

156 T219J IlMW-pf 7J5 55 12 1S5 154 155 — Vb 

UVb Wb intrftt 40 &l 6 ion 117b 718% 118b 

537b 41 Inmk 250 54 8 49 48W 4816 4814— Vb 

137b 8tb Infmort B6 10W M8b TOVb 

13816 116 IBM 440 34 13 7868 1287b 12786 128V4 
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33 24 InfFtaV 1.12 35 16 <34 298b 2BV4 297b + W 

1114 61* InlHorv 1498 I7h 8W 8H 

7Vb 37b InJHrwt 299 58b 5Vb 5V.— 1b 

60 2BWIMHPK S 53 52V6 521*.— 86 

42 23 IDfHPfA 4 338b 3284 3284— IV, 

3484 19 IlltHpfO 35 278b 271% 27Vb— 8b 

44 34 IntMJn 240 65 10 IS 421% 42 42tb + 1% 

38 238b tot* toSt US 54 11 202 327* 32V*. 327b 

578b 47H InfFopr 240 49 57 531 49Vh4SW49W + « 

178b 9Vb IrrfRC* .. 23 94 121% 717b 121b + Vb 

54W 2SVI llUHrth 248 SS 9 277X42 4IW 417b + Vb 

185 1301b IntmpfJUUO 75 1 146 146 146 —1 

4384 306b IntpbOp 158 2J 14 247 408b 408b 40** 

IW 121b int&Ar 13 5 19W 198b 198b— lb 

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U.S. Slocks 
Report, Page 8 


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Page 9 


■=* t 


5 Sir 




ln«heO,rp owteCnltare 
The Suite Suits the Style 

ByfflEERY BUCHANAN 

I J a Lniaacfa film “If I Had a 

F »» fe&E 

otto^td^S a Sy P bcA <* ?«« for 

cngloyecs to desecrate d fantaa «» for frusmied 

opulence, origiaaKtyw^bQ^c 1 opoi-floor-spaoe plan. 



f 




rather a ^ orecutrve suite is 

expression of the chief e L2? na ? an J 1 cor P orate culture or an 
five's personal desires. 

™JSSJttB , H ? h : teci,com P anie8 

SssASaass w,r ytoward 

a move toward more demo- “* e aHu-StatllS 

ME B fr$£££ ““"^office, 
team of architects in Germany — 

SSS & *sssss;iS 

Some h^b-ted! companies concerned with promoting team- 
wor^such as computer and electronic compame&tedihe way 
SSS 8 ™ 1 * 1 ; 1 Office- At flfcS-Pactard^ 

mt^ya, the European headquarters of the U.S. computer 

3SEh3Sb«5SK3BS 

F ACILITY Management Institute erf Ann Arbor, Michigan. 
which is conducting a study on how executives viewmdx 
offi ces, f ound that, even in closed offices, some chief 
execu tives prefer to work, in an informal office rather than use the 
extravagant executive suites at their disposal. “A lot of top 
executives have another office, separate from the ceremonial one, 
where they do their ‘real work,’ " said Clark Malcolm, manager of 
co m munications at the institute, who is conducting the study. 

Some companies shun opulence and preserve the aB-woik and 
no-play image at all cost BTR PLC, the British engineering, 
l energy and transportation group, has sys tmmt irelly sofr l off fhf * 
r extravagant executive offices they acquired after fating over 
other companies. After buying Thomas .TQHng PLC, BTR sold 
off Crewe House, an attractive London mansion surrounded by 
an impeccable lawn on Cuxzon Street in Mayfair. Crewe House, 
which had been Thomas l iking's headquarters, was bought by 
the Saudi Arabian Embassy. 

Recently BTR acquired Dunlop Holding s PLC and put oh the 
market Dunlop's historic headquarters, once die home of the St 
’ James’s Theatre, in one of London's most attractive areas near 
Piccadilly Circus. 

“To us, function is more important than style,” said Audrey 
■ Turner, property manager for BTR, whose offices are in a 
modem B uilding - - 

But, at the other cad of the spectrum, many chief executives 
plm their offices accordmg totheir own taste. 

“I don’t think ‘status wjfl eveF-go away,-” smd John Frauds, an 
rWf^L-^Lt^ioh-haaed ‘architectural; 
it thfcycotddtoiyit.Btk it?*’ important 1 


; jpleri . rm .'„ r 

f firm. “SRkne^peuplif — „ . 

" for bowthejcffice operates.'* - . 

In some traditional companies, executive offices are the sym- 
bols of power and hierarchy. In some office towers, luxurious 
■ executive offices occupy the top floors and have breathtaking 
views, snch as the French advertising agency, Pnbhris SA, which 
" overlooks the Arc de Triomphe, or MoEt-Homessy US Carp., the 
US. executive suite of the French champagne company, on the 
(Continued oafty 13, Col 6) 


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Talking Machines Now Learn to Listen, Too 


By Kathleen Lander 

New York Timet Serrice 

NEW YORK — It began about five years ago, when a universe of 
chattering appliances descended on American consumers. Clocks 
that admonished “You're late for work." Refrigerators that remind- 
ed u Dust myc oHs." Microwave ovens that hollaed when dinner was 
ready. Bathroom scales that blurted out the bad news. 

But consumers lost thwr interest in many of the products. “A lot 
of companies introduced mltcing products at trade shows, but most 
didn't make it to retail stores or last very long if they did," said Janet 
May, nwlmtmg wuwmy r of speech products for General Instru- 
ment Corp n a pioneer in speech chips based in Hicksville, New 
York. ‘^Customers didn’t want 'nagging appliances* that reminded 
them of chores to be done." 

These days, speech synthesis — the science of leaching computer 
chips to taut — and speech recognition — the science of teariihig 
them to listen — are going beyond gimmickry. 

Speech technology has now advanced ! 10 the pout where a spoken 
request gets products to perform the chores their predecess or s, 
merely nagged about. Given a verbal command, some can turn off 
the lights or vacuum the rug themselves. Two telephones now 1 
sold in the United States, the Command Dialer from Audec 
Saddle Brook, New Jersey, and the Dialess from TTC of Carson. 
California, win place ralic upon spoken commands filre “call home." 

And the products are not just proliferating in the consumer 



des tinatio n to computers that then send bags to the correct bin. 
Similar systems hdp some factory workers control production lines. 


Because speech technology can involve everything from talking 
toy bears to global communications surveillance, the size of the 
market is difficult to Hfiwinin* 

“It's hard to quantify such a diffuse market, but we may have 
some figures by the fust of the year," said Linda O’Keeffe, associate 
director of office systems for Daiaquest Inc. of San Jose, California, 
a market research firm that tracks the electronics industry. 

Sian Goldstein, publisher of Speech Technology magazine, a 
trade publication, estimates that voice technology is a S450-mIHion 
industry now and may grow to SI billion by 1990. Most of the 
growth will come in the area of voice recognition, he said. That 
market will grow from SIOO million to 5600 million over the next 
five years, while voice synthesis will only move from S350 million up 
to 5400 million. The Japanese have the technology, too, he said, but 
so far they have pretty much confined their marketing efforts to 
Japan. 

Bultbe makers and users of the speech chips are remarkably mum 
when it comes to evaluating the market or confirming any estimate. 
Nor wiD they reveal the technology’s impact on their revenues or 
profits. For the most part, the many small companies that use the 
chips and the handful of companies that produce them — Texas 
Instruments, P hilips, Harris and General Instrument, for example 
— do not divulge their related sales figures. 

The two basic types of technology, speech synthesis and speech 
recognition, can be compared to miking and likening. Of the two, 
synthesizing a voice is the easier scientific task 

The machine speech that emanate from talking products most 
often is created by taking speech sounds — phonemes or allophones, 

(Continued on Page 13, Cot 4) 


Trade Surplus 
Sets Record in 
West Germany 


Reuters 

WIESBADEN, West Germany 
— West Germany’s current-ac- 
count and merchandise- trade sur- 
pluses swelled last month to the 
biggest ever for July, the govern- 
ment reported Tuesday. 

The current account had a 2.1- 
bfllion-Deutsche-mark ($764-mfl- 
lion) surplus in July, compared 
with a 300-miUion-DM defiat in 
June and a S66-mfllion-DM sur- 
plus in July 19S4. 

The July merchandise-trade sur- 
plus more than doubled, to 6.S bil- 
lion DM from 3 billion DM in July 
1984. The June merchandise-trade 
surplus was 5 J billion DM. 

Exports continued to boom de- 
spite the weakening of the dollar in 
the past several months, the gov- 
ernment said. 

The dollar has slid from highs of 
almost 3.50 DM this winter to 
around 2.75 DM recently. It was 
fixed at 2.777 DM Tuesday in 
Frankfurt, up from 2.7586 Mon- 
day. The dollar was boosted Tues- 
day. analysis said, at least partly by 
concerns about the political effects 
of West Germany’s burgeoning spy 
scandaL 

The figures for merchandise 
trade and the current account, a 
broad measure that includes trade 
in both merchandise and nonmer- 
chandise items, such as services, 
strengthened West German econo- 
mists' expectations that both ac- 
counts would set records this year. 

Inflation was also showing a fa- 
vorable trend, the Federal Statistics 
Office said, falling to a provisional 
annual rate of 22 percent this 
month from 2.3 percent in July. 


The record trade figures ap- 
peared to support the government’s 
view that companies would contin- 
ue to attract strong foreign demand 
because of the quality of their 
goods and despite the greater US. 
competition caused by the dollar's 
recent fall. The dollar's decline 
tends to make UB. goods more 
competitive internationally be- 
cause it makes them relatively 
cheaper to buy in the international 
marketplace. West Germany has 
been a major beneficiary of the 
strong dollar during the past year. 

West German tanks have pre- 
dicted that the current-account and 
merchandise- trade surpluses would 
grow sharply for 1985 as a whole. 

Westdeutsche Landesbank, 
based in DQssddorf, said that the 
ament-account surplus should 
about double this year, to a record 
3S billion DM from 17.8 billion 
DM in 1984, when West Germa- 
ny’s economy was hard hit by the a 
seven-week metalworkers’ stake in 
the spring. 

The bank also said it expected 
that the 1985 merchandise- trade 
surplus would surge to a record 75 
billion DM and grow further, to 88 
billion DM, in 1986. The previous 
record was set last year, when the 
trade surplus was 54 billion DM. 

Peter Wolfmeyer, an economist 
at the bank, said that the July trade 
and current-account figures were 
surprisingly strong, especially be- 
cause tourist travel outside the 
country in the summer holiday sea- 
son would normally te expected to 
weaken the current account for 
West Germany. 


South Africa 
ShutsMarts 
1.2 



Complaint Rule Called BrasUian Banker 

r Is Selected to Be 

Key to Keagan Strategy Finance Minister 


U.S. Productivity Rose 
At 1% Rate in Quarter 


rear M*** V, «. pound FFH LknaD aw* t £CU); Rmifrs jjqquc conditions.” 

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7219 



Compiled by Or* ' Staff From Dispatches 

JOHANNESBURG — South 
Africa on Tuesday suspended trad- 
ing on the Johannesburg Stock Ex- 
change and on all currency markets 
until Sept 2 because of what the 
government called “abnormal pres- 
sure" cm the country’s economy. 

The country’s finance minister, 
Barend da Plessis, suggested that 
the curbs were needed to allow the 
country's economy to cool off in 
the wake of spreading rivD turmofl. 

Analysts said die action was a 
tacit admission that the flight of 
money from the country had 
reached crisis proportions. 

South Africa has come under 
heavy international pressure in re- 
cent weeks ova- its apartheid race 
policies and government moves to 
quell Made rioting in the country. 

Die move followed a 4-coat 
plunge by the South African rand 
against the U.S. dollar Tuesday, to 
a record low of 35.45 cents. The 
rand later recovered to dose at 
3620 cents. 

Howard Kmz, chief currency 
dealer at Bank of Americans trading 
center in New York, said South 
African traders told him that busi- 
nesses in their country are buying 
dollars and other foreign currency 
because of fears that foreign credit 
fines will be withdrawn and loans 
will not be renewed in an economic 
protest of the racial turmoil and 
continued state of emergency. 

“All South African companies 
are in desperate need of doflars,” 
Mr. Kmz said. • 

South Africa has come under 
heavy international pressure in re- 
cent weeks ova its apartheid race 
policies and government moves to 
quell blade rioting in the country. 

In his statement late Tuesday 
evening, Mr. da Plessis said that 
abn ormal pressure had been put on 
the country's capital account “as a 
result of reasons unrelated to eco- 
nomic conditions.” 

He said the government would 
negotiate with all aff< 
including trading partners in 
southern Africa, and make ar- 
rangements “to allow orderly cir- 
cumstances to prevail and normal 
financial and trade relations to pro- 
ceed. 

“These steps have been taken so 
that South Africh can continue to 

meet all its international- obliga- 
tions,” he said. 

Economists have blamed the de- 
dipe of the rand on a continued 
outflow of capital and internation- 
al campaigns for economic sanc- 
tions against South Africa in pro- 
test at its apartheid race polities 
and the recent imposition of emer- 
gency laws to tty to quell black 
rioting. (Reuters, AP) 


By Clyde H. Farnsworth' 

New York Times Serrice 

' WASHINGTON — The Reagan 
administration’s emerging new 
trade strategy, defusing protection- 
ism at borne by putting pressure on 
foreign governments to open their 
markets, turns on a provision of 
UB. trade law that permits the gov- 
ernment itself to file an unfair- 
trade complaint. 

-The president's reported deci- 
sion against imposing shoe impart 
quotas was linked by White house 
officials to a commitment to invoke 
Section 301 of the Trade Act of 
1974 in a campaign to induce for- 
eign countries to accept more 
American-made goods. 

Administration and congressio- 
nal o fficials said the cabinet was 
now weighing the “self-initiation” 
of unfair-trade complaints against 
Japan. South Korea and Taiwan, 
among other nations. 

Such complaints are filed with 
the UB. trade representative, who 
is appointed by the president In 
/yo gs of this kind be make* his 
recommendations to the president. 

Until now. Section 301 com- 
plaints have been filed by indus- 
tries, such as the semiconductor in- 
dustry’s complaint against Japan 
last June. Each case goes through a 
formal administrative process. At 
the end of the process, which takes 
a year, the law gives the president 
broad power to grant relief, such as 
imposing duties, quotas or other 
measures. 


against imports of American alu- 
minum and Taiwan's failure to 
crack down on manufacturers of 
counterfeit brand-name merchan- 
dise in a way that would satisfy 
American producers. 

Congressmen, most of whom are 
still out of town for the August 
recess, were reluctant to comment 
rat the emerging administration 
strategy until an official decision is 
issuedby the president This could 
come ar midweek. ■ 

One problem, as noted by both 


United Press international 

BRASILIA — Dilson Funaro, a 
51-year-old banka and business- 
man, has been appointed finance 
minister of Brazil, replacing Fran- 
cisco Dornelles, who resigned 
Monday following growing dis- 
agreement ova economic policies. 

Mr. Funaro, appointed late 
Monday, is an economist who fa- 
vors economic growth over reces- 
sion and spurns blind acceptance 
of policies advocated by the Inter- 
national Monetary Fund. 

As minister, he will play a key 


Democratic and Republican con- in talks with the IMF and 
gressional aides, is that those who private bankers on BrariTs $103- 
may be helped by curbing foreign • billion foreign debt which Presi- 


protectioaisro — employees of 
American export industries — are 
not those hurt by imports, such as 
domestic shoeworkers. 

Congress will return after Labor 
Day with more than 300 protec- 
tionist Mils in the hopper that 


dent Josfc Sarney has pledged to 
honor. 

Last year, when asked about 
IMF suggestions that Brazil might 
use part of its foreign reserves to 
meet debt payments, Mr. Funaro . The seamd-quarta performance 
replied: “Bnml should in no way indicates that productivity growth 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Nonfann 
business productivity rose at a re- 
vised annual rale of 1 percent in the 
second quarter of 1985, the Labor 
Department reported Tuesday. 

The rise was fueled by especially 
strong gains in the manufacturing 
sector due to competitive pressure 
from imports, it said. 

Meanwhile, the department’s 
Bureau of Labor Statistics said that 
unit labor costs moderated in the 
quarter, meaning that American 
workers produced more goods at 
less cost to their employers. 

The agency said that output in 
the nonfann business sector rose at 
an annual rate of 22 percent in the 
second quarter compared with the 
first quota, while hours worked 
rose 12 percent. 

The second-quarter increase in 
productivity represented an up- 
wand revision from the 03-percent 
preliminary figure issued last 


lea Sinai, chief economist at Shear- 
son Lehman Brothers Inc. 

Manufacturing productivity rose 
at an annual rale of 73 percent, 
due to intense competitive pressure 
on U.S. industry from imports. 

At the same time, unit labor 
costs in manufacturing fell 23 per- 
cent and in nonfaim business they 
rose 23 percent from April to June. 

He said that traditionally in the 
third year of recovery after a reces- 
sion, there are labor shortages, 
which show up in substantial wage 
increases and less productivity 
growth. 

But intense competition from 
abroad and the slackening econo- 
my have forced “American busi- 
ness to pressure labor very hard.” 


thing from textiles to water beds. 

Robert J. Dole, the Senate ma- 
jority leader and Republican from 
Kansas, said last Friday in Hong 
Kong that the Senate would vote 
on some kind of protectionist b£0 

— “we call it fairness legislation” 

— between Sept. 15 and Oct 15. 

The shoe industry sought protec- 
tion unda Section 201 of the trade 
law, which is intended to help in- 
dustries severely injured by a del- 
uge of imports. Imported shoes 
represent nearly 80 percent of the 
market in (he United States. 

The administration earlier grant- 
With the government miHwHng ed protection unrig this law to ba- 
as well as processing the complaint, sic steelmakers, specialty steel- 
tneft rsefes hemrn* mom crxnmn t.t- makos and Hariey-Davidson, the 
tional — government against gov- maker of motorcycles in the 
eminent — and the UJ5. trade pos- United States, 
tore looks more aggressive. While not commenting on the 

In addition, trade analysts be- shoe case, the president gave some 
lieve that with the administration insigh t into nis thinking about 
itself filing the complaint, chances trade issues in a Saturday interview 
would be greater that, if the target with Washington Broadcast News, 
country fails to respond, the presi- “I am opposed to protection- 

dent wul retaliate. . ism," he sauL “Protectionism is a 

The cases that -the cabinet is two-way street, and you may hdp 
looking at were described by offi- some industiy with protectionism 
dais as South Korea’s reported re- or smne group of anployees, and 
fusal to la foreign com panies com- you find that you have done it at 
pete equally mttab^ Korean the expense of other industries and 
insurance market, Japan’s barriers other employees." 


uums mils in uc uoppa «uu -j — *5 homing upm the face of the 
would, restrict imports of every- ^own the pa* ofan^ly follow- ^oSSinbe econo^srid Al- 


ing IMF recommendatio n s.' 


( c^agPl 

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"ft*: 

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, OUR J9th YEAJL 


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w* + 1J5 

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35548 —85* 

mo -wo 

31490 +U5 

XPJO +1* 


' f0l% Dnrts and UYtdert oftid* ® e ‘ 
Zorich mmkte and 
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Source: I Ww*"* 


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Loews La Napoule 

ON THE BEACH NEAR CANNES 

arc pleased to announce 
ih e in s!ul la non of a j uHy < (perati ve 
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CANNES: SJaCrofecoe GENfeVE: me du Rh6ne ClU>&StlR-61ERRET -Us Trois Vttenms- 




•WT-v? »-7: — . 





international 


Tuesday^ 

MSE 

Dosing 

Tables Include (he nationwide prices 
up to the closing on wall street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


12 Month 
Htoti Low Stock 


17 
70 
70 

I 33 

5b. Hw ‘ U 1 

Dtv. YkL PE HXfc Hlstl LOW QllOtCh'M 



37* m phh ijoo zb m n 36* as* as*— * 

47U SI* PPG 160 34 10 in 44* 431b 44* + * 

3 T* IS PSA 40 22 W 73 26* 26V. Mb— * 

23% IN PSA dpt 1.90 95 13 20% 30 3D 

14* 11* PacAS 164 112 31 1M 1M 1» 

20V 1311. PocGE 144 92 7 2004 1BV 10* 1H + Yb 

46V 32% Pad-Ip 112 U 14 311 42* 42Vb 431b + V 

29V. 24th PcLum 120 42 n 111 2 BVj 20% SB* + H 

10 51b PacRM JB5* 4 12 24 8* 8* DU 

194* 13th PocRspf 200 109 14x IM lath IB* + 14 

17% 121b PocSd 40 34 10 SB 13* 13% IM 

82 * 6116 PocTeJe 5-72 74 9 980 75* 74V 75% +1 

31% 23th PocHcP 232 TS 0 1503 2Mb 2914 3916— lb 

36 29th PodfPf 4.07 121 11 3314 33lh 3» 

431* 26th PoinWb 40 14 19 1365x3216 311* 31th 
34Vh 261b PalnlW pf225 7.9 451x2M6 28th 381b + Ob 

39 33V, Palm BC 140 15 33 18 34% 3414 34% 

40tb 2014 PanABk 20 U 11 20 3Kb 384b SB*— 16 


2 0* 14^6 PrlmeC 




PSIltpf 1JM 132 

9 
9 

of 
pt 

»P» 

8! 
pfD 

PfF 


EG Pr 

■EOpIH 

PSEGpt 4.18 lUI 
pseopf 430 11 j 
■EG pf ■ 

EG Of 

■eg Pi ■ 

PS EC pf1225 11.3 
PSEGpt 720 11 J 

HGPfjlf 

MkflB 


!T!P 






■V 4 PanAm 
4 IV PanAwt 
31 131* Pandck n 20 12 23 


41* 32* PanhEC UO 64 11 1109 35 


511 8 746 716 — 16 

448 314 3Vb 314 + V* 
95 16V l«b 1646— Vb 


8 34* PantPr 

194b 134b PaOKff 6Q[ 

181* ft* Pardvn 
211* ill* ParkEi 
8% 44b PorkOrl .16 33 
391* 2814 ParkH 1.13 X3 


31 1775 7tb 6tb 69b— 14 
601 15 251 1914 191* 1916 + V* 

200 10U 99b 10tb + 16 

10 33 13 1346 129b— V* 

.16 33 380 SVb 5 5 

1.13 33 II 107 341* 3346 34th + t* 


141* ParfcPn J2t 2L5 51 136 2946 304* 2IFH + V* 


2th lib PatPlrl 2 234 21* 2 2 — 1* 

16V lit* PavNP 44 45 13 58 13 129b 13 

234b 14 PayCtfl .16 LO 14 866 16 1516 16 

111* 6% Peafadv JO 19 28 1547 109b HW 1046— K 
19b * Pengo 1084 V % V + * 

58* 43V PenCen 12 646 S2th 511* 51V 

5516 444b Penney 236 49 9 1008 48V 4816 484b 4- 4b 

27V 2216 Pa PL 256 94 9 444 26th 259b 261b + M 

401*31 PaPLpf 450 114 20* 30 38 38 


40th 31 PaPLpf 450 114 
7816 57V PaPLpf 850 114 
291b 241b PaPLdDlX42 114 
271* 21V PaPLdpfZJO 1)4 
7246 SB Pa PL PT BA0 nJ 
28th 231b PaPL dPfSJS 1L6 
31V 25V PaPLdprfLZS 12J 
911b 71 PoPLPf 941 10J 
TOO 81V POPLPT1148 113 
107 94V PaPL prl 349 124 

7m* 55 PaPLPT 840 119 
741* 59V PaPLpr 870 114 
411* 34 Pmwtt 220 54 12 
25V 20 Ptnwpf 140 64 


150* 73 72 73 — 4b 

560 2916 29 29 — V 

20 26V 26 26V + V 

380* 72 71 72 +1 

56 28V 28 28 

10 31V 30V 30V— Vb 
SOz 89V 89V 89V— V 
30* 98 98 98 

10*105 105 105 — 1* 

10* 67 67 67 +1 

44100* 74 73 74 + V 

43 381* 38 3BV + V 

51 23V 23 23V + V 


30 289b Pennzoj 220 44 20 SB8 48 471b 47* + V 

18V 10% PeopEn 120 72 7 136 16V 16V 16V + V 

24V 14M. PepBys 28 79 23V 23V 23th 

601* 39* PepsiCo 128 30 11 1390 58tb 581* 58V + V 

30V 21V PerfcEl 56 22 13 956x26* 25V 26 + V 

9V 7* Printer 43*105 6 314 8 7* 7* 

24V 16V P error 28 12 16 Z74 211* 23* 23th— V 

15V TO* PervOwI 10 15* 15V* 151*— V 

44 31 Petrie 148 19 14 144 36* 35* 35* 

20V 24V PetRS 3728144 136 26* 26 261* + V 

17 14 PelRsef 157 95 B 16th 16V 161* 

6 2V Ptrtnv .93*30.4 331 3V 3 3V— * 

53V 33V Pfizer 148 11 15 4048 48 47 48 + * 

24 12* PhelPD 649 28* 20 20V + V 


148 IT 15 4048 48 47 

649 2Hu 20 


55 34 Ptwlppr M0 97 35 51V 51V 51V + * 

46V 28 PtHbrS 54 14 21 4485 40V 39V 40 + V 

16V lltb PhllaEI 220 147 6 4828 15V 14V 15 — V 


31 23* PMIEpf 380 115 

56 40V PMIEpf 720 117 

67V 52V PMIEpf 875 136 
HVh 9V PMIEpf 141 111 
10* 7* PMIEpf 123 13ii 
60V 46 PMIEpf 755 134 
10* 7% PtlllE Pf 128 13ii 

126 lOOt* PWI pf 17.12 U O 
10 61 PMIEpf 952 124 

60* 47 PMIEPf 780 113 
60 461b PhtlE pf 775 134 

23V 15V PMlSull 152 62 13 


lOOz 32 32 32 +1 

500Z 55 55 55 — t 

20z64% 44% 641* 

87 11 10V 10V— V 

ES> 10% 10V 18V 
SOz 50th 58Vb 58tb— V 

117 io p?;? « 

15Dzl22 122 122 
20OZ 76V 75 76V +1V 

750z 59th 58th 581*— % 
mum SB 58 +1!h 

7 21M 20* 211b— * 


95th 73V PhllMr 480 42 10 3169 02th 81* 82V + V 

25* 13V Ptillpln 60 15 13 20 23* 236* 23V 

18V 1TV PnHPfs 1X0 U I 6180 12V 12 12 — V 

24V 22V PfllPt Pf 154a 4J 1008 24V 24V 24V 

281* 20V PMIVH 40 16 12 72 26V 25* 2Slb— V 


35V 23V PledAS 28 


25V 14V Pier 1 


PVNG 2J2 74 II 


9 2230 32th 31V 31V— IV 


12 31V 31 
28 24V 24 


31V6 + V 
24V— V 




56V 36V Pltstjrv 766 18 12 166 51* 57V 51V— V 


! 


34 22V Pioneer 121 5.1 5 

26V 131* PionrEI .17r LI 


687 24V 24V 241* + V 
1 15 15 15 


451b 29* PltnyB 120 10 11 342 40 39V 40 + V 


13V* 9* Plttstn 

16V SV PteiRs 
121b 7 Pkmtra 
13* BV Playboy 
28* 19V* Ptasey 
22V 13* PoaaPd 


33V 24V Patorld UOO 32122 177 
21 Iff* Pandrs 40 4 25 225 


420 12th 11V 12 + V 

20 12 17 69 15* 151* 15V + V 

-16D 14 14 81 11* 11 11V— V 

13 23 9* 9th 9V 

■94e 42 14 222 22 22 — V 

60 43 33 172 14* 13* 14 


5* 1* Oak lad 346 It* IV 1* + * 

36* 251h OaklteP 162 45 12 2034 33V 34 +V 

35V 23* OcdPet 260 72 10 3551 32V 32 32* 

14* 9* OcdPwt 25 13 13 13 + V 

21* 17* OcdPpf 2.12 106 5 20V 20V 2DV— V 

22V 18V OcdPpf 230 106 6 21* 21V 21V + Ml 

57 48* OcdPpf 625 11 J 55 551* HI* SSV* 

113 10S* OcdPpflSJO 14.1 173 110V IN 110 — lb 


i-i i ov, Pandrs 40 4 25 

21V* 15V PapTM 80 46 

23V 14* Porter 40 2J 29 

21* 1«* PortGE 150 94 8 

106 901* PoGpf 1160 11.1 

24* 18* PorGpf 260 107 

35* 30 PorGpf 440 110 

34* 29 PorGpf 422 127 

38th 20 Polftdi 166 47 12 

34 22 PotmEI 116 72 9 

46V 361* PatElpf 460 92 

41V 32V PafElpf 484 104 

25* 18* Premia 26 16 18 


45 33 172 14* 13* 14 

•n s sa aa ?ia 

2J 29 2789 U* 17% 17*. 


182 19* 19* 19* + * 
103*104 104 104 +1 

2 24V 24V 24V + V 
42 34* 33* 33*— * 
21 34 33V 34 + M 

200z 46 46 46 +2 

,s ?s* sa ss- 1 * 




w 




fb 



r 


435 32* 
442x40V 



Boating-Rale Notes 






ADVERTISEMENT 


AMERICAN EXPRESS COMPANY 

(CD Re) 

The undersigned announces that as from 
5th September, 1985 at Kjs- A sso- 
ciate N.V., Spuiatraat 172, Amalerdam, 




ran Express Com 


4.23 net (dir. per record-dale 
07.05.1985; gross S -,32 pash.) after de- 
d union of 15% USA-lax ■ S -J24- =• 
Dfls. -.74 per CDR. Div.cpa. bdonging 
10 non-reaidcnlB of The Netherlands will 
be paid after deduction or an additional 
15% USA-tax 1 - 3 -2* - Dfls. -.74) 
with Dfls. 3.49 net. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 
Amsterdam. 22th August. 1965. 








55* 35V Xerox 320 58 14 7714 52* SI* 52 

55* 46*: Xerox Pf 545 92 31 ™ 

29 19% XTRA 64 26 12 10 2« 2Mb 34*- 


30V 24* ZaleCp 122 42 9 ST 27* 7T 27 — * 

21* BV. Zapota .12 16 61 30* BV BVh Mb 

57* 31* Torres 68 s w sn sgb « — g 
27 17* ZenffhE _ 11 407 18V 18V » + * 

21* I5V Zeros .32 17 IS 11 19% 19* 19* V 

35V 22V Zumlo 152 32 12 329 15V 34V 35 +» 


IWSE Highs-lxn\s 


NEW HIGHS 41 


AmHaspH 
CaDhnMna . 
CruyRndis 
DetE 275PfB 

KhnbOcrk 

HatGypsm 

OtiEdacflA 

Itovton 

SoumrkCo 

WsfsMktss 

World Alrw 


Bem-fowaH 
CesanaAIr 
Crock Nt ad 1 
Eaumk pfC 
LACMInrlR 
Nerafrodfp 
Perryoro srt 
Rohr Ind 
Tmnswry Int 
wrvAir 2pf 


Berkey Pha 

CmwEdwtO 

DnlfonaCp 
FietPB Odlp 
LeesMasan 
Nucor 
pneianpf 
RororGp 
T nmol Ind a 
Wootworth 


BoftBernk 
Crate Coro 


NEW LOWS T4 


ASA AsdDGdStvl BASIX . 

Dallas FalfXMd RHrdild pf 

Wool Basic LearPet cvp AtahwkDat 

Rubermaldwi TmCdaPlpe n 


KeUwooUCa 

NIKA Inc 

O fTl PHtfl? 

PrudRfyCe 

SafesnaSd 

Varco 2t)f 

WoMwttipf 


Bekertndpf 
I CM Prop n 
Reoallafl 


31* 25V W1COR 262 88 f 
3BV 25* Wadnw 120 11 9 
23V 16* Waddit 60 22 
MV 6* Wainoc 
56* 37V WalMrt 28 2 25 

30V 18V WWams 64 17 17 
25% 17V WkHRsal6B 


7 27* 27* Z7%+ * 
13S 32* 37* 32 - 

118 21* 21* 21* +* 
108 8* 7* 8V + * 

1075x51* 50* 51 +% 

1032 25* 25* 25* + * 

23 24* 24 24* 


Sales ftsarss are umfftdoL Yearly hlshs and lows rWlscf 
tba pretrknis 52 wsskx ptos tlw cunwil week, but not IHs Ia*ss 1 
fradbio day. Wtwrs a spilt or Node dhrtdend amoanflnB to 25 
percent or mar* ba* been paid It* ysars Nod-low ronoe end 
iflvldend are shown for the new stock only. Unless otherwise 
noted, rotes of (Svkiends are annual disbursements band an 
the tatosl dadaratlon. 

a— dividend also sdra(s). . . _ , . 

b—aanaot rate of dividend pias stock dlvMond. 

C— liquidating dividend. 

CM— called, 
d— new ready low. 

•— WvMend Osctarsd or poM la precedbiB U pxxiffis. 
b— dividend In Canadian funds, subject to 15% non-reuWonce 
tax. 

I— dividend de cl orsd after splbte> or stock tfiyktext • 

I— <SvM«id paid Ibis roar, omitted, deferred, or no action 
fnkkn at latest dtvidena rneottnu. 

K— dividend dodorsd or paid this year, an accumdlatlVD 

issue wtfti iSvkkntde in arrears. ■ . . 

n — now bone In 111# nas* 52 weeks. Tin Moit-iaw ranaebepins 
with me Start of tradblB. . 
nd — next day delivery. 

P/E — prl ci -earnings ratio. „ 

r — dividend declared or paid In preceding t2 morttH, plus 
stock dMdand. _ _ 

s — stock nilt. DMdand begins wffli date of mm. 
sit— flam. 

t — dhrtdend paW In stock In praadkw n monfm, wllmofed 
ensb vnhio an e»tf vldend or ex-dlstrttuflen dato. 
u — new yearly hblL 

V— trod mattered- • . • __ _ • . . 

vl— In bnnknipfcy or raeelvwsnta or being rwreanbad un- 
der me Bankruptcy Actor sKurTHos assumed by »di com- 
pardvsw 

wd— wtisn dWr touted, 
wl— when issued. . 


World Bank Considers 
Issuing Samurai Bond 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Hie Wodd Bank is mnwlrring 
issuing a Samurai bond in September bat has 
not. decided on any details yet. including size 
and issuing date, a Weald Bank nfKe iar said 
Monday. A Samurai bond is denonrinated in 
Ven and issued in the Japanese capital mariret 
by foreign borrower. 

' The Brad Journal, a dafly, financial paper, 
reported Monday that'the Worid Bank plans to 
issue a 100-biIHoE-yea ^about $422-nriiHra) 
Samurai bomi 

Hub 10-year nra-caHabte bond was expected 
to be agned Sept 4;ibc.£^er said. 


(fiJTmi’l 


x — ex -dividend orex-rtohfx. 
xdis — ex-d isl rlbuftev 
xw — without warrants, 
y— ax-divtdend and solos In tofl. 
vM — view, 
z — sates kifML 


oflntematioiial Herald 
Tribune readers own 
Stocks, Shares, Bonds 
and Commodities. 

Tribadswodc 


ADVERTISEMENT - 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by. Funds Listed) August 27, 1985 

Hat asset value quotations am xnppfled by tlw Fundi Hstetf wtib the exception of sonm nootos Bated on issue price. 

Tlw marginal symbols inAoato tf — w at nootaHons soppHodrM) -dafly; tw) - weekly ;Cb) -M-moattUr: Cr} -regularly; CU-Inreg ofa ytr. 


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Other Funds 


DM^ - DHttedH Mark; BF - Bototom Francs: FL- UWdtFlorfnj LP - Luxonilnura Ptmcu ecu^ - European 
p/vsto ton per unit; njl Not Avaitobin; NjC - NoiComnxinlcatidjfl- New.- s-suawndoa; S/s -Stock' 
RcdWTBW- Price- Ex-Coupon; — -Forroerly WorMwMo Fin* Ltd; 9 ■ OHerto^^ubdl^^teMMSSi 


tidkm 






xi 












































































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«gg, m , 5gr .™ w , 

wo . : «&* 8£ w !$* 
121 * 234* US «25 130 ub* 

2 M-.-3JO* JuF aS£ jKff* 2J3^ 

Sk. ISS g£ §£ «k f3% 

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Prav. Day Open int.g j jSi 
SOYUEAM MEAL (CBTl 

IDQtlnvriatlimnA.^ 11 


fgf 1 


gj* j§*2j laoS m3 

Sisssss 

Ss E&52 133J5 ° 122.00 

ft*Y J5$M 13150 13460 
Jul 137.50 13 fl . n o ny cn 

{JJ JJJ® HVJDO 137_5Q 

P^.S^J# 00 ™ 


er 


JUlttfciMI MEAL (CBTl 

100 tom- union perion * 

179 .SO ■ .Itti SS _ 
mso i g» WJB 

18400 -12&40 

WMO WOO 
20450 - T30D0 
1*250 mm 
WJ» 13400 
ML50 13550 

WOO 13*00 

EstSqfnt _ f’rw.Solm *< 

. Prav. Day Opm Int. *iA» iJp22o 

22J0 M 

jg i S 3 g n 

ii m E is i i 

Sw! 2230 2270 2170 

, p2|£|_ 33J ® s«* _ 22.70 535 gS 

iAH; 5 ?* 1 - Prcv. faiM In m ““ 

«^Prov.DoyOpem«. 5«w wi.ua 
OATS (CBT) 

Sjnotwmlnlrmnn-iMkirapn'tMstiBl 

Ss ^ ggsji»» 

£ R SF - »* s* 

Esf.Salcs Prev.Sotes 27a 
Prev.Dayopan inL X454 own 


2-74 — JQVa 

g “fS 

27M4 -JOiS 


iBVfc ^.MlA 
»« — Al«4 

“O •mMIa 

23714 + 

222 MI +3,5 


s.12% 

f9 » +jSw 

a* 

a 

536 +j0a 


123A0 +1*) 

l&tS +*> 
+■» 

12920 +60 

J310O +j£ 

135.10 _3o 

13&0Q +50 

13900 

WMQ +1J0 


?J1 +37 

S5S + ai 

2J» +51 

£xg + - 43 

+ AS 

2267 

31 *8 


1.17 —5114 

36 -5114 

3914 —am 
139V4 —5114 
13SVS — 5114 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

oanf * 1 t * r •* 

45-90 53-65 Oct wm mt 

5J5 SIS g«- 5«3Q w! 45 

*7 AS 56.00 Fab 57.90 SB. 

6757 57 JO Apr ta an so — 

%% Sin i 1 * S9J0 “»0 

_*5X0 58.40 AuO 58*0 SOM 

Est, Series la. 90* Prav. Sates 1857a 
Pray. Day Open InL 45523 UOL746 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

*40«i toi-canh per It 
7^50 5755 Sop 6100 6X90 

3^ 57.15 Oct 6225 6257 

. 7X20 5820 Nov 63.95 445$ 

7950 fiO*J Jan 45.10 as *ift 

7055 61.10 Mar 659<1 ss9s 

70*5 6L1S Apr 65.1S ww 

6A25 6120 May 64*8 *460 

Eat. Sates 2J6C Prev.SaiM2545 
Prow. Day opm inL 72*2 up 152 
HOGS (CME) 
sutoo lbs.- cents p«-B». 

2,-75 3523 Oct 3X7S 272S 

,5085 37-92 Dec 3aQS 39AS 

WSEE 39M Feb 29JJ2 41^ 

.Wjy-M 36J0 Apr 37 JQ 3820 

Jim 4flflS 41.15 

40A0 Jul 41 jOQ 4120 
4035 Aub 4IH0 4120 
»55 Oct 3880 3820 
_ 3920 Doc 4020 4020 

Est Sates &67I Prev.Sales 4J6A 
Prav. Day open Int. 18293 up 446 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

30200 Um.- cents bw lb. 

«20 55.75 F «b 57 JB 5887 

7X40 5565 Mar 5590 5*25 

7X60 5785 MOV 5780 59-90 

7X00 57 JO Jul 5X65 59 JO 

AW 57 J| SOLID 

Est. Sates X92J Praw. Sates 4.122 
Prev. Day Open InL 5259 up S3 


*4735 
49 JK 
4985 
5MO 
41.10 
49 JO 


S&SS 

5785 

5760 

5550 

9fS5 

5860 


*260 

6180 

6325 

6420 

6466 

6420 

6400. 


3562 
37 JO 
2960 
3480 
4885 
4180 


5665 

99.15 

9880 

5927 

UMO 

5920 


6X65 

6265 

6417 

6520 

6540 

6X40 

6445 


+48 

+40 

+3S 

+22 

+20 


+25 

+85 

—.10 


3720 

3942 

4120 

38.12 

4095 

4145 

4045 


+L33 

+1JS 

+UJ 

+VD2 

+45 

+23 

+25 

+.10 


4070 40 20 —85 


5740 

5040 

5720 


S887 

5825 

5980 

5X80 

5820 


+280 

+280 

-WOO 

woo 

woo 


j Currency Options 


'Aag-27 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 

tonO SWe* • * ••■'•■ • 

Sep . Cue -J*ar •Sap^B^^Lt 
■eentspN-nnlt T _ ^:.v j-.T?-, 

& E- 


124N BrttMsPfMflJPQnK 

B Pound 12Q ’ r ‘ r r_ 

: ^ 13984 IB ■ 1420 UJO ... ■ x 

13984 130 r 1025 r 

— 13984 135 465 725 .T 

13984 140 1JB 4JO f 

13984 145 030 1B0 


CDollr 

7388 

7158 

7X58 

7158 


80 460 

per wit 


r 

085 


545 


IN TERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AVGUST 28, 1985 

Gem Utah Low CNM 0*8. 



Page 11 


— — Pood 

C (NTCSCE1 

£T®r 

H?-7S 13050 

9S 

!SI? {H 

^5dpm 


eenteiSV 

^ sa iss 

i"W >4180 14145 
/tor Ml Jo 74280 
Jut VCJO 14120 
5 m 14225 14135 

Prey-Sotes 67* 


13040 13745 
139.15 >4041 
14031 14142 
14 MO 14213 

a?* 


925 
985 
7.75 
922 
7.1S 
469 
_ X15 
|6t. Sales 


434 4J0 


JA* Sep 

“} Oet _ ^ 

“1 Jan 449 447 

X*< Mar 440 
xa May 484 X13 

329 Jul 580 529 

407 Oct vS xS 
Pray .SateTii9£B 


PrL IXttS 

p rw.DdYOp«n inL B9.244 uutujQO 

CpCOAIMYCSCEl 

lOmebte^, ^ 


12S S» 3145 21 n 

^ 2S gs g 

^ «ay 2271 22» 
.20U D<K 


2(15 
ven 
2285 

2299 

2300 

mo 

_ ass par 

n lw? Pro*. Sates 853 
Prev.Dov Opm nw. hj»« off 627 

PJSSBga JUICE (NYCE) 
emit* eer 

iSfSS 'J5- 55 See 11545 13520 

18180 12740 N4v 13945 130J5 

mso J«5 JOn Woe 

<77.50 12X80 Mar 1264)0 1264)0 

162J0 mso MOV tSm mn 

Jol 12525 12525 
i? 8 Rtev-Sates w 
Frew. Day Open InL 4421 OH 103 


423 449 

447 456 

a- a 

481 £11 

SM US 

X4S 54) 


2135 2174 

2200 22(2 
225) 2273 

2271 2209 

2121 


+160 

+.99 

+87 

+73 

+80 

+42 

+42 


+.W 

+13 

+.14 

+84 

+85 

+87 

+89 


+38 

+37 

+37 

+21 

+30 

+36 

+40 


13400 13480 
12960 12960 
12X50 12X60 
12480 12480 
12X10 12380 
12X00 12X50 


— 2_£t5 


1 ivi 

—200 


Metals 


S%?E IRnOMBO 

2S600 lbs.- cents oer 1b. 

6215 5865 Aub 58J0 

S210 57J0 Sep 5880 S9J30 5885 5*85 

SfS Dec 6025 6030 6006 UJD 

8420 5960 Jan iflS 

Ba« S9.M Mar *185 *149 *l.ia 6x20 

67.10 MOV 41-70 

7440 61 JO Jul 6130 *9-M| 62.10 10 90 

7090 62J0 S*p S3S5 6245 6*70 

70^ 09 % 88 08 86 050 

K20 6440 Jan *170 

tHS *** r “AO “AO 4440 *05 

47 JO 4680 May 6480 6480 6450 6460 

Est-Seto _ Piew.Sates 11J27 

Prev. Day Open lot. 77J34 w+9 
ALUMINUM (COM EX) 

<2000 Iter cent* per lb. 

AIM 4445 

7430 4380 Sen 44.90 4490 4465 4480 

Oct 4480 

7060 4450 Doc 4X05 4X05 4X05 4X70 

7680 4X65 Jan 4X10 

73*0 4X35 Mar 47.10 47.15 4680 4X85 

6X75 5X95 May . 4760 

6X45 4785 Jul 4*30 

5210 • 5180 Sep 49 JO 

Dec 5085 

Jan 50*0 

Mar 51.10 

SXX5 5385 May 5180 

Eel. Sates . Prev.Sales 390 

Prev. Day Open InL 1677 up 50 
SILVER (COMIX) 

XOQO troy oz.- cents per tray nz. 


6405 

6036 

AUB 




6340 

11036 

6*66 

5710 

6106 

5*?- 

Oct 

6325 

6376 

62X0 

6^ 

12306 

5VU 

Doc 

6456 

A*nn 

6426 

6475 

12156 

59U 




6S2J 

1)910 

5B?Jt 

Mar 

6596 

6436 

4645 


10486 

6216 

May 

6685 

6496 

6456 

9456 

6366 

Jul 

6786 

6785 

<765 

6*00 

9496 

6*16 


6W6 

6906 

6875 

6906 

11 

6606 

6786 

Dee 

Jan 

ms 

7075 

7876 

£4 

7706 

6776 

Mar 

7256 

7256 

7356 

7234 

7526 

6986 


7326 

7346 

7326 

735.9 

Est. Sate* 


Prwv.Solu 21608 




Prev. Dav Open int. 7X491 up 973 
PLATINUM (NYMB) 

50 fray az.- deflate per troy ax. 

30680 27508 Aub 33400 

39X00 25080 Oct 33250 33900 33X00 33*10 

37380 25788 Jan 33680 34180 13X00 34080 

35700 26450 Apr 33900 34500 33900 34300 

3*300 27300 Jul 34780 

34000 30X50 Oct 

Est Sate* -4605 Prey. Sates 0354 
Prev.Day Open ml. 1X175 wM 

PALLADIUM CHYME) 

180 tray <n-ittfan per at 

T41L75 


+05 

+05 

+05 

+JJ5 

+OS 

+OS 

+.10 

+10 

+.10 

+.10 

+10 

+.10 

+.10 


—80 

—AS 


-JO 
—JO 
— .70 


W4 

+20 

+21 

+22 

+23 

+2J 

+26 

■428 

+26 

+20 

+29 

+30 

+22 


+210 

+580 

+X20 

+X0Q 

+480 

+5J0 


9080 Sep 10475 10X00 10300 10X15 +290 
Oct 75 

14180 9100 Dec 10580 10*00 10450 10785 +X20 

12780 9170 Mar 10680 10981) 10X00 10*95 +020 

11400 9180 Jun 10X65 10*75 10*66 109 JO +320 

10509 10500 Sep _ 10965 +380 

Est Sates Prev.Sales 519 
Prev. Day Openlnt. 7063 up<0 


GOLD (COMSX) 

100 troves.- dollars par troyOK. 

48500 29100 Aub -33X30 33780 

34080 3183) .sea 33X80 33700 

49X00 29700 Oct 33*70 34*10 

40980 30180 Dec 34280 34450 

30X00 Fab 34780 34870 
31470 Apr 35100 35300 
43570 32080 Jun 

33700 Aub 
39570 33500 Oct 

Dee 

Aar 

, Jun 

Est Safes 24000 Piev.SOjMJoW 
Prev. Day Open un.nx32l off 515 


33500 

33X00 

33X50 

34100 


337.10 

33780 

33960 

34400 


35280 

35700 


30*30 35*50 38230 


36780 

37X10 

38410 

39000 


+180 

+ 1.10 

+1.10 

+ 1.10 

+ 1.10 

+180 

+1-20 

as 

+180 

+180 

+180 


r 

loi 


*42 


*1800 we*i German MartoKOBta per unit 
DMarfc » 

3609 M 

3X09 31 

; 3*09 33 

I 3X09 34 

36 


Z2S r 

400 r 

*60 r 

r r 

034 . r 

r r 

r r 

r r 

r? i 


a 



37 QJ* *97 181 108 

38 002 060 100 f 

it Fnaa-IIM el a cbm per enlt 


3609 

mow French L — 

6BUB Japanese TenWBa^a caaT per mUt 
J Yen « WO EOT r 0.1* 



*220 — 

*2800 5MSS FTBM»«Mteper MR. 
S Franc 


007 


4400 

+400 

4400 


XM 

401 


37 

38 

39 

40 

41 r 

43 1.18 

44 0-40 

4400 45 0.12 

4400 46 006 

Sfronc , +6 s 

Total coll voL 
TetalpateaL 


X22 

561 

461 

361 

203 


r 

087 


r 061 

007 057 

_ 0-19 100 

“I a “I a 

0 n„pur W Z£C ““ SSSSKK S ^S 

r=N0ttr«tetL s-NOMltonoHOTBd. 

Lost ]f premium (punJmse ence). 

Sourao:AP. 


L 


Finonclol 


US T. BILLXC1MM) 

SI odldon- ptaor roo net. 

*XX3 0684 Sep 9302 9307 

9X07 0*77 Dec 9272 9200 

9289 8X60 Mar 92J9 9264 

923B 0701 Jun 9202 9200 

9201 6X00 S«p 

9178 8905 Dec 

91-39 09J8 Mar 

9*94 9*50 Jun 

Est Sales 5452 Prev.Sales 48(5 
Prev -Day Open Ini. 37.194 up 21* 

10 YR. TREASURY (CBT) 
SlD*OOOpTln-pb*32ndSBnaOPd 
88-21 75-10 Sep B7-1 07-15 

87-13 75-13 Dec 06-1 86-15 

86-2 75-14 /tor 45-13 05-18 


74-30 Jun 84-19 . 

0*7 SeP 83-2* M 
00-2 Dec 

Prev.Sales 9,110 
Open Int- 62536 up 104 


>5-7 
f+4 
83-11 

Est Sates 

Prev. Dav 

US TREASURY RONDS (CRT) 

(8pd-S10Ob0Q0-pts8i32ndso> IDO pet) 
79-12 3538 e “ *■ 

75-13 
77-29 
756 
7501 
7524 
7515 
7526 
72-27 

ZV 

Est Sal 


57-10 Sep 77-19 
S7-B Dec J5I5 77 
57-2 Mar 75-12 75-31 
5629 Jun 7514 75 
5529 Sep 73-10 753 
5525 Dec 
36-27 Mar 
S3-T2 Jun 

*3-* SOP 71 71-6 

*2-24 DOC 

*** PrwTspteslVLW7 


9X00 9305 
9270 92)9 

92J5 9244 

Vim ns* 
9187 
9168 
9182 
9086 


8531 *7-14 

85-31 8514 
05-13 85-17 
8519 8522 
83-2* 83-31 


77-16 70-3 
7512 76-31 
75-12 75-30 
7514 74-31 
73-18 753 
73-9 
72-17 
7+27 
71 71-6 

70-19 
70-2 


+03 

+07 

+08 

+09 

+09 

+09 

+09 

+09 


+16 

+14 

+17 

+17 

+19 

+18 


+20 

+20 

+20 

+ 1 * 

+19 

+19 

+19 

+19 

+19 

+19 

+1* 


Prev. Day Open (ntjzxaa o«7JW 


Season Season 
H(8fi LOW 


Open 


Men low Close Cha. 


OMMA(CBT) 

SlKIO»prfcvPle*32ftMa#7»pet __ 

77-2* 59*13 SOP 7M 77-7 71-3 77-5 

8? ^ S5 %£ SS U 

n-l ft ° Ste 7514 

Est. bates Prev. Sale* 124 

Prev. Day Open int 4J13 UP 22 
CERT. DEPOSIT (I MM) 

81 million- Pts et (M PCI _ 

9271 8S08 tee 9227 «J2 JU 

9237 BSJ4 Dec *»81 *101 JgJg 

91.75 8XM MOT 9187 9188 9165 9189 

9160 0X43 Jun 91.10 9U0 fU5 91.19 

91-15 0786 Sep «B 

WJB 8*34 Dec - J069 

0981 8*20 MOT 90-17 

Eel. Solos 265 Prev.Sete* 233 

Pr»v. Oav Open Int ISIS oft a 
SURO DOLLARS II MM) 

SimlHlon-pnonoopct „ „ 

9245 04J3 Sep 9183 9200 9182 *1.99 

9200 84J0 - OeC 9160 9168 9160 °167 

*18* 04.10 M or YU 7 ns* 91.16 91JS 

91.15 HX73 Jun KU7 9084 90J4 KPS 

9084 07 JX 5w> 90 40 9QA4 9*31 9*49 

9083 87JB Dec 9X0+ 9U7 9*04 *0.15 

9X24 8764 Mar 8973 8983 89J2 fla 

1985 8*14 Jun 1964 *944 0964 0983 

Ext. Sales 22028 Prev. Sates MM* 

Prev. Oav Ooen int129,f«S up 231 
BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

_ _ 

16190 18200 Doc U830 16840 1 J7C U 

16160 1JI4M Mar 1J7S 16770 18700 1- 

1J990 1.1 KJ Jun USfO 16690 7J690 L 

Eel. Sates 0844 Prev. Sate* 7858 
Prev. Day Open im. 418*0 eH653 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

‘°^ r - lD 5!S s * au & HU 5S6 «S J32. «2 

JS66 JD04 Dec 7314 -7335 J311 JOT 

JS04 8907 Mor J310 ^310 J7314 

J3A0 JTJ70 Jun 82*0 8297 8380 8293 

Est Sates 1878 Prev. Sates 90S 

Prev. Day Open Hit. 8899 eH <3 
FRRNCM FRAJICOMM) 

‘.nsSS Jj3(i n,< s5? l3 .1im 0 !n735 .11735 .11780 

:iBS AS 85 :?JSS 

Est. Sales S Prev. Sates 
Prev. Day Open Hit. 397 

GERMAN MARK ((MM) 

Spermark-l point equals SXOOOI 
6667 6930 Sep 6687 6*15 658* 6*13 

J698 6971 Dec 6638 JAM 6*19 6*47 

6731 6040 MOT 6672 6680 6*56 6440 

6759 6335 Jun 6*85 6605 6605 6717 

Sep 67*2 6762 67(2 67*3 

Est. Sales 22208 Prev.Sales 22624 
Prev. Day open Int 5*522 eft 558 
JAPANESE V BN (IMM) 

S o£a St"" ioSOT^Se P 4)04223 604225684774604225 
0043X0 603905 Dw: JD04242 JKteKS X04215 JX6244 

004307 X04Q35 Mar J04268 J04MB JO«2*8 J04 2 68 

I^^MlsSOOOOl 

6830 6400 Sep 64)0 64)0 63*0 6400 

6512 6531 Dec 6448 6440 6402 6C7 

6555 6635 MOT 6473 AMD 6450 6475 

Est. Sates 22621 Prev. Sates 1*152 
Prev. Oav Open IM. 3*070 UP 278 


+14 

+14 

+13 

+U 

+13 


+JH 

+65 

+60 

+69 

+.10 

+vll 

+.11 


+JB 

+67 

+J0B 

+J59 

+.10 

+.10 

+.™ 


—18 
— M 


industrlqU 


LUMBER (CME) 

130J00 bd. ft-Sperl600bd.fi. 

197-50 12760 Sep 13X30 13460 

18X10 12X50 Nov 12*80 131.10 

147 Ofl 13360 Jan 13X60 137.70 

19560 13970 Mar Ml 60 143.10 

17X60 14X28 May 14X80 14760 

i in fin y*o_a> j u i 

17X60 15X50 SeP 15560 15X00 

Est. Sates 1622 Prev.Sales 1J8* 
Prev. Day Open Int. 8680 off HO 
COTTON 2 INYCS) 


50000 IM.- cents per lb. 



7750 

S7te0 

Oct 

5760 

58.10 

7360 

S7JS 

Dec 

58)5 

5820 

74JS 

89.10 

Mar 

59 JS 

5960 

7000 

5965 

May 

5950 

9950 

7065 

5S.I0 

Jul 

5960 

59 J5 

6550 

5460 

Oct 

5509 

5365 

59.25 

53.15 

Dee 

5460 

5465 

EH.Sates 

1606 Prav. Sates 1617 


13260 13470 
12X10 130J0 
13560 13760 
141.10 143-30 
14*60 14*70 

15X50 

15560 1 5* sn 


5755 5*00 
5*11 5*30 
59 JS 5963 
5970 59.95 
5960 5960 
54J8 54» 
5X95 5X95 


Prev. Day Open Int 20.958 olt4* 
H BAT I NO OIL (NYMB) 

42600 »oJ- cents per aal 


76X5 

<6.90 

Sae 

74X0 

7460 

7600 

77.10 

<765 

Ocf 

77X5 

7760 

7665 

77X7 

6850 

Nov 

78W 

78JD 

77X0 

7865 

69.15 

Dec 

7860 

787S 

7800 

7810 

6960 


7808 

7960 

7825 

77 JD 

7060 

Feta 

7800 

7815 

7760 

7465 

6860 

Mar 

7560 

7560 

7465 

7400 

6800 


72X5 

72X5 

72X5 

7850 

6800 

May 




Est. Saha 


Prev.Sales 3655 



Prev.Oav Open Int. 25693 atf 22S 
CRUDE OIL(NYMR) 

1 600 bOL- dollars Per bbt 


2950 

24X5 

Od 

2825 

2832 

2807 



Nov 

2768 

2812 

2760 

2950 

23l» 

Dec 

27X5 

27X0 

27X5 

2950 

2466 


276* 

27X4 

2731 

29X6 

2425 

Feta 

2730 

2732 

2703 

29X5 

29X5 

24.13 

2193 

M or 
Ape 

2495 

2700 

2467 

27-96 

23X5 

MOV 

26X5 

3155 

26XS 




1465 

2665 

2420 

2560 

2560 

Jul 

Od 

Doc 

26.11 

24.11 

24.11 


2461 


.13 

69 


+260 

+270 

+260 

+490 

+260 

+260 

+260 


+65 
+.17 
+J0 
464 
+. 1 * 
+JS 
— .12 


+66 

+.13 

+62 

+. 1 * 

+.10 

+65 

+75 

+65 


—62 
—61 
-61 
—61 
—61 
—61 
-61 
—61 
— 61 
—61 


Est Sates Prev. Sales *91* 

Prev. Day Open l m. 51740 up 111 


2569 —61 


Stock indexes 


SP COMP. INDRX(CME) 
polnte and asms 

19860 1*060 Sep 10*30 19065 

2K6S 17X30 Dec 19090 IfTJO 

20X75 19*10 Star 19170 19X85 

20X50 mSO Jun 19X30 19X30 

Est Sates 4063* Prev.Sales <7770 
Prev.Oav Open Int *0625 otfMS 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
points and cents 

ZU30 1S5J5 Sop 30*10 20*25 

21765 20060 Dec 30X40 20360 

20960 20495 MOT 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales 4635 

Prev. Day Open ira. 10650 oft 51* 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (HYPE) 
points and cents 

M86S 41 J5 Sep 10978 10*35 

117-20 101 JO Dec 11065 11160 

11*75 - 109 JO Mar 11260 11260 

12000 11X7S jun 

Est. Sates X538 Prev.Sales two 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 10602 up 329 


1B7J 
1KJJ3 19095 
19X20 19X70 
19X10 19X40 


+70 

+J5 

+J0 

+70 


79*85 199 JS +.)0 
20X10 20X15 +75 

20X45 +75 


10065 109.15 
11*45 11*75 
11240 11275 
11X95 


+.JJ 

+.13 

+.15 

+.15 


Commodity Indexes 


Moody's. 
Reuters 
DJ. Futures. 


Close Previous 

890.901 891 J00 f 

1,651.60 1675^0 

115JJ3 11-4^2 

Com. Research Bureau- 219DD 218D0 

Moody's : base 100 ; Dec 31/ 1931. 
p - preliminary; f- final 
Reuters : base 100 : SeP. 18. MJl. 

Dew Jones : base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


Coamwfities 


A&2? 

' ^ Hteb Low Bid 71 ” As* Cb*9 

SUGAR 

FrencB Ames per BMtric tea 

'J-‘,te6E ,'SS SS S S Vi 

: s i I a 

&L vaL: 3J40 lots of X WM- Prev. octual 
sales: 1J73 Inis. Open Interest: 23JM3 
COCOA 

is° a " r tsr^L K ’^ Ms, +■« 
g as "2 JS 

■ ^ ii si iss = t* 

• sates: 11 tot* Open Interest: 011 
COFFEE 

ta^ lS lW L875 +« 

^ tZ 

r B:t: g US 11 

. Source: Bourse qoComtrmn*. 



Aug. ST 

, PT0VWW 

bS 8 ** As* Bta A* 
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Aug 

27 


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YM 

735 

738 

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7.M 

7.W 




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Commodities 


Ag.27 

HONG-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
U^P^OB*. ^ pmiw 

HIM! Law Bid Art Bid Ask 
AM- N-T. N.T. 33460 33X00 33260 33X00 
Sip— NT. N.T. 33460 33X60 33260 33X00 
33- — 339-00 33960 33760 33960 335JW 337-00 
oS:“ N.T. NT. 34160 34360 33960 34160 

3£60 34X60 34560 

YTJB 3*860 35066 
>60 35260 35X00 


Feb — 34X60 34X00 
Apt _ NT. N.T. ; 
JS_ N.T. N.T.55S60: 

Volume: H lots at 100 az. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UJSJ 


Sep - 

Oct 


vtRume: 40 tots of 100 ol 
KUALA LUMPURRUBBER 
Matontan cents PwrUla 


■» n Wk s 

3(260 34260 34270 34160 


Sep. 

Oct. 


_ __ Pr evte es 

BM AS* Bid ASK 
18X25 18460 18360 18460 

102.75 18340 18275 14X50 

18250 18X50 1D60 18X50 

18260 18X00 lH» 18560 


SINGAPORE RUBBER 

li«SSSHJc« , »*g^w 

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bm Asb 


London 

Commodities 

Aug. 27 


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Dec 


NT. ‘ N.T. 14340 14X40 
■. KT. 14060 149*9 


BW Ask 


12280 19 090 
12460 72770 
U1T) 13170: 
13X00 135-40 
13860 141601 
>4X0014X40 


May 

D^ »Lf. 

volume: 2J43 lot* ot 50 torts. 


COCOA 

SteritaB per metric tan 
Sep 1 J54 IJB 1J52 1754 1JV. U34 


^ ^ i 1 ^ 


r*9 1J39 1J40 
1J54 IJSS 
1767 17*8 


jly' 1799 l|g 1^ jj98 i5g 1775 

ss » & i® 3# at 

Volume: 3J44 lob oflO tom. 

COFFBE ^ 

SMrtiOB per metric ton 

ns, 

jm 1750 1724 17*5 1749 1718 1720 

=■ ^ m ^ 


MOT 17g 17B 1778 J7K 

jfv I7» LW IJTO t*g 

gep NT. N.T. 1790 1620 

Volume: 1429 late of 5 tan* 


i asr isxoo 

15U0 15X50 

14970 15*50 
145L50 147 JO 

14050 14250 


gilZSz »» »»• — ' 

RSS 2 SeP— 130J0 151 

5ls 3 Sep— 14850 149. 

^4 IS- IW® 144 

RSS 5 SeP— 1»® Ml 

KUALA L UMPUR PALM OIL 

g? — : S- S8 S 

PSL 750 ' 7M «0 800 

^ s S 

I 730 770 7* Mg 

SS ■— 73(1 770 780 

MW 720 7*0 730 778 

f fS * 720 760 738 7)0 

"ohnne:0 lots o«25 ions. 

Source: gm Mrs. 

DM Futures 
Ofkioiis 

iwt-HdOarh <*w»tar 1 


7™ 

163* 


A# 37 

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g i a S a 

■ III*? 


giga;?aS55St& 

jMun ar.' CMB- 


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lls. donors Per roetrte tan 
M 2MJ0 24175 24450 24550 239-25 23950 
^ IS60WJ5 24075 24160 axJSZJXJD 
Snj5 23850 23968 239 JS 23550 2357S 
gym 23*75 23960 2)550 22SJS 

SSam50 J3860OT7Sa5^OJ60 

yolUPie: 3611 WbolUIO Ion s. 

Sources: RetOon a* London Petroleum Ex* 
?£*u* feosoU). 


oet 

Nov- 

Dec 

Jon 

Feb 

Mar 

AM 

May 


S&P100 

Ind^Options 




soar 

Pric* See OD Nw Dec 

|g w n n » 

n i a » h 

U5 A IN. » At 

« S 11/U1VU1R 
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nMOdlsP(eU.dlNl 
TBWMt *wn* ii^n 

■Wolirt wesW.37Mn 


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Sip Od dot Ok 

in* M 5(16 7/1* 

vs R m 
(» » i% 
A R 1 5k 
8 A • 


IM* I 

Sfl 


STujxi tawisui cteetufl+tfl 

sootn.CBOE. 


satire inwordsand PICTURES 

doonesbury 

daily in theiht 


Cash Prices | 


Aog.27 

SUoR Toe tSo 

Coffee 4 Santas lb 142 145 

PrlntCta!b«4733 38VLvd_ Ul 87* 

stew) w/fflts (PfttJ. Ion 47X00 47160 

Iron 2 Farr. Phlla. ten 21X88 21X00 

Steel scrap No Ibvy Pm. - 76-72 ■*» 

Lead Spot, lb 19-2D 2*32 

Cooperated, a « (XX* 

Tin (Straits), lb — t-279t xira 

23nc. E. St. L. Basis. Q> *41 *u 

Palladium, az 1*3-107 134-13 

Silver M.Y. 00 X28S 747 

Source.- AP. 




BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


Hongkong Bank’s Profit 
Rose 8.8% in First Half 


Kerducfcy Carrtr LI 
NcnCywim.Co 
Distribution 


Aug 37 

Per Amt Roy ttec 
INCREASED 

S 50 X30 9-12 
Q 57 10-1 *10 


By Dinah Lee 

Intenuumnsi fienlJ T nf* me 

HONG KONG — Hongkong & 
Shanghai Banking Corp. reported 
on Tuesday thai its unaudited prof- 
it for the six months ended June 30 
was 1.11 billion Hong Kong dol- 
lars, ($142.6 million), an increase of 
8.8 percent over the like period last 
year. 

At the end or 1984, Hongkong & 
S hang hai declared total assets of 
481.61 billion Hong Kong dollar s, 
not including the S22 billion assets 
of hs subsidiary in the United 
States, Marine Midland Banks Inc. 

In the absence of any central 
banking authority. Hongkong & 
Shanghai Banking Corp. and Stan- 
dard Chartered Bank act as a no- 
te-issuing banks for the Hong 
Kong government. 

The bank's directors announced 
on Tuesday an interim dividend of 
15 cents per share, the same as last 
year’s interim dividend. They reit- 
erated an earlier forecast that the 
dividend for die last half of fiscal 
1985 will at least match the 3 1 cents 
issued in the like period last year. 

The bank recently has resumed 
an aggressive posture following 
more than a year of recovery from 
the British colony's property 
slump, in which the banking group 
was seriously affected 

In mid-Juiv, the bank raised 400 
million dollars in new capital 
through the issue of undated float- 
ing-rate notes in London, its big- 

First Arabian 
Unit Asks for 
Protection 

By Bet) Hagerry 

Intemananal Herald Tnbtmc 

LONDON — TamoU Italia SpA. 
an Italian oil refining and market- 
ing company controlled by First 
Arabian Corp.. has been granted 
protection from its creditors by a 
bankruptcy court in Milan, oil-in- 
dustry sources confirmed Tuesday. 

First Arabian, a Luxembourg- 
registered holding company head- 
ed by Roger E. Tamrax, a Lebanese 
businessman, set up Tamoil in 1983 
to manage operations acquired 
from Standard Oil Co. (Indiana), 
now Amoco Corp., for an estimat- 
ed $275 million. Those operations 
include about 840 gasoline stations 
and a refinery in northern Italy. 

A senior oD executive in Italy, 
who asked not to be identified, said 
First Arabian appeared to have had 
trouble refinancing borrowings 
fnmi Italian banks made to acquire 
the Amoco operations. Fust Arabi- 
an officials were not available for 
comment. ___ 

In May, a plan by First Arabian 
to acquire Chevron Corp.'s Italian 
refining and marketing operations 
for about 5200 million fell through. 
Industry sources have suggested 
that First Arabian had trouble fi- 
nancing that proposed acquisition. 

A First Arabian director said at 
(he time that the proposal foun- 
dered because the company did not 
wish to acquire Chevron’s 24-per- 
cent slake in a Milan refinery. 

As recently as last spring. First 
Arabian officials spoke bullishly 
about their prospects for building 
up a major presence in the Italian 
market. “If one can take the long 
td, it's just fairly solid business 
ise,” said Matthew Sleek ef a 
Fust Arabian director. 

The company is believed to have 
filed for protection several weeks 
aga 


gest fund-raising operation to date. 
The notes carry an interest rates of 
0.25 percent above the six-month 
London interbank rate, and the 
bank has the option to r»-t Wm the 
notes after five years. 

The financing move refueled 
speculation that the h-inV was one 
step closer to its stated intention to 
acquire a bank in Europe; a so- 
-called “third leg” to match its op- 
erations in Hong Kong and the 
United States. 

Prior to the July issue, the bank’s 
last capital-raising issue was in 
1981, for two billion dollars, winch 
was used in an unsuccessful bid for 
the Royal Bank of Scotland. 

The hank acquired in June four 
New York City branches of the 
failed Golden Pacific National 
Bank for $635 million, announcing 
that it intended incorporating the 
branches — which serve predomi- 
nantly Chinese- American clients 
— into its existing U5. network. 

There has also been considerable 
speculation recently in Hang 
Kong’s business community about 
the possible retirement of the 
bank's chairman, Michael Sand- 
berg, to make way for the deputy 
chairman. W illiam Purves. 

Speculation that Mr. Sandberg 
will step down in late 1986 has been 
based largely on the fact that his 
reappointment to the colony’s ex- 
ecutive council this year was only 
until August 1986 rather than for 
the usual two to three years. 


Toyota Shifting 
To Luxury Cars, 
Executive Says 

The Asudaied Frets 

DETROIT —Toyota Motor 
Corp. wilt move increasingly 
into the market for larger, more 
expensive cars as its current 
customers get older and as new 

companies mote into the sub- 
compact segment, a senior com- 
pany offidal says. 

Bob McCurry, senior idee 
president of the company’s U.S. 
subsidiary, Toyota Motor Saks 
USA Inc, said Monday that 
Toyota is outgrowing the sub- 
compact car crass that launched 
the company as a world auto- 
motive power. 

In the next few years, a grow- 
ing flood of imports is expected 
from South Korea, Taiwan and 
Mexico, further crowding a 
market where profit margins 
are low, he said. 

“We see the subcompact as a 
questionable market,’’ Mr. 
McCurry said in an interview. 
“There’s going to be a real 
shootout down there.” 

Toyota will keep making cars 
in that class, but will increase its 
attention on larger, more ups- 
cale models, be said. 

The base for this move will be 
the Toyota Canny, a sporty 
compact which the company 
has decided to build in the 
United States, be said. 


Castlemaine 
Endorses 
Bond Offer 

Reuters 

BRISBANE, Australia — Cast- 

lexoaine Tooheys directors recom- 
mended on Tuesday that share- 
holders accept a takeover offer 
valued at 121 billion Australian 
dollars ($843 million) from Bond 
Corp. Holdings. 

The Castlemaine statement, is- 
sued after a long board m e eti ng 
here, followed the company’s earli- 
er announcement that Mike with an 
unnamed major company on a pos- 
sible alternative bid had collapsed. 

Analysts said the failure of Cast- 

lemaine to attract an alternative 
bidder had removed the last obsta- 
cle to Bond’s offer for the brewery 
group. 

Castlemaine directors 
Bond’s first bid of 7.10 
share for 50 percent of the i 
ay and a second offer of 7: 
tars for all its 146.53 miffion issued 
shares. 

Last week, they advised share- 
holders not to accept Bond’s final 
offer, of 8.25 dollars a share, pend- 
ing the outcome of talks with the 
potential white knight. 

However, by then Bond had 
gained nearly 43 percent after Cast- 
lemaine Tooheys’s lamest share- 


holder, Allied Lyons PLC, accept- 
ed the enhanced offer for its 24.87 
percent stake. Bond then declared 
its offer unconditional. 


Midland Bank Unit Considers Listing 


By Warren Getler 

fntemnjumal Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Trinkaus & Borkhardt 
KGaA, a leading West German 
private bank, is expected to seek a 
share listing later this year on the 
Frankfurt Stock Exchange. 

The move is seen as part of al- 
ready announced plans by Midland 
Bank PLC, Britain’s third largest, 
to reduce its stake in Trinkaus, now 
at 92 percent, to about 70 percent. 

Dieunar Vksrtd, a Trinkaus ex- 
ecutive, confirmed that a “stock 
listing is one of the options the 
bank is preparing for.” A public 
share issue appears to have eclipsed 
the possibility erf a private place- 
ment, officials at Trinkaus said 

“While no decision has been tak- 
en yet, the most likely option is a 
stock floatation of T rinkaus shares 
on the German exchanges,” Alan 
Macdonald, a Midland spokesman, 
said Tuesday. 

The Dusseldorf-based bank had 
assets at the end of 1984 of 5.9 
billion Deutsche marks (about 
..$2.15 billion). 

According to analysts, Trinkaus 
has posted steady profits, although 
bank officials decline to discuss op- 
erating results. 


Michelm Posts Profit 
Of 400 Million Francs 

Reuterx 

PARIS — Ge. Gfctferale des 
Etablissements Mich din said 
Tuesday that its first half 1985 
consolidated profit was about 
400 million francs ($45.6 mil- 
lion), compared with a loss of 
1222 billion francs in the first 
half of 1984. 

ft said consolidated sales in 
the first half of 1985 rose 3i 
percent in volume and 125 per- 
cent in value from the year- 
earlier period to reach more 
than 23 billion francs. 


Having changed its corporate 
structure earlier this year from a 
limited partnership to a company 
with general partners, Trinkaus 
will be required to report earnings 
for the current year. 

Executives at both banks indi- 
cated privately that continuing 
bullish sentiment on West German 
slock exchanges has set the stage 
for a Trinkaus offering later this 
year. 

Trinkaus has called a special 
shareholder's meeting for SepL 27, 
where authorization for a 15-mil- 
lion DM capital increase, from 85 
mini on DM to 110 million DM, 
will be sought. Sources at Midland 
and Trinkhaus said a decision to 
list up to one-third of the compa- 
ny’s existing equity could be agreed 
to at the meeting. 

Mr. Macdonald said Midland 
would maintain **al least two- thirds 
control, probably a bit more” of 
Trinkaus. He noted that other ex- 
isting shareholders might also par- 
ticipate in a stock offering to the 
effect that outside shareholders 
could acquire between a quarter 
and a third of the company. 

Midland, which has sought to 
bolster its capital in the wake of 
problems with its Doubled Califor- 
nia unit, Crocker National Corp., 
could realize some $30 million 
from a floatation of a block of its 
Trinkaus shares, according to mar- 
ket sources. 

Asked whether a desire to bolster 
Midland's capital position was a 
major factor in the bank’s apparent 


decision to consider a Trinkhaus 
issue, Mr. Macdonald said: “It’s 
not the reason why we would do it, 
but the incrane from a stock listing 
wouldn't do any harm." 

Mr. Macdonald said Midland 
has long intended to reduce its in- 
vestment in Trinkaus to its original 
holding of just under 70 percent, 
with the intent of restoring us “pri- 
vate bank” character. 

Midland's stake in Trinkaus 
grew substantially after it acquired 
a 20-percent stake held by the 
French bank, Banque Indosuez, in 
October 1981 

Pechiney Plans 
Trading Changes 

Reuters 

PARIS — Pechiney, the govern- 
ment-owned al uminium and spe- 
cial-metals company, is planning a 
major reorganization of worldwide 
trading activities grouped under its 
subsidiary, Pechiney World Trade, 
a Pechiney spokesman said Tues- 
day. 

A plan is being worked out by 
Micbel Castera. who took over as 
Perfuney's trading director earlier 
i his year. 

Swiss-based Pechiney World 
Trade is wholly owned by Peduney 
and runs two leading nonferrous 
metals and minerals trading com- 
panies, Intsel Corp. in New York 
and Biandeis Intsel Ltd. in Lon- 
don. 


COMP AHY NOTES 


UBG-UnfesaiOBWl - J60 9-30 X15 

UW Fire& C cbuoJTy 


Q JO 9-14 9-3 


OMITTED 

Now Orotans PuMIe Ssrykai 
Lootskmrw Power X UsM 

STOCK SPLIT 
Matrix Corp— Star-4 _ 
Natl Craum Co— Star-2 


USUAL 


Am 




Tmfi 


M3 

W 


9-3 


M 720*39-20 . M 
0 .10 10-31 10-10 

Q 5S 1W 9-13 
Q M W4 9-24 
Q 63 .10-7 9-27 
O M 104 9-5 

Q 6*2S W-7 M 

Q -Ji 9-1* 9-5 

a .2* 10-1 *20 

a AS 9^7 XU 
Q 73 V. 10-1 9-11 

Q 67 11-15 10-11 
D M IM M3 
<3 it* MO M* 
Q 64 1*2 *5 

Q .12*8 IMS 1*15 
Q .12 VS 1*15 *2* 
Q JO MM 
O JS 9-17 
O M JV22 „ 

Q JR 11-B 1*21 
Q J5 9-U 
Q JS 
9 JB ... 

O .10 9-23 
Q 63 9-20 
» M . 10-1 9-10 
Q .» 9-30 +30 
Q .90 1*1 *10 
Q JO *14 9-3 
0 50 *13 9-3 

3 67 Vi 1*7 9* 

S .10 1*7 9+ 
Q .19 1*1 *U 
Q M 1*1 *10 
Q J3 *30 *10 
Q JI 1*25 1*11 
Q 63 1*15 *1* 
g 6 MS HO 
0 JDS Ml M 
D -)0 1*12 92* 
g .12 Vb !*1 ** 

Q SO IM *9 
Q 69 *2* *10 
Q .10 10-1 *13 
Q -15 1*31 1*17 
b pan ao i ; H MM n W r: a qmrlw ty; s-semt- 


inn _ 

MrktaWR 
Branca toe 
CeooTxnrCoro 
Onto* C orp 
Cintron CofD 
Commerce Union 

Excateior manShra 

First Eastern Carp 
Friedman Industries 
FuouOtn dm 
Ga2 Metropolitan 
Gruntol Find Corp 
JadynCorp 
Jacobson Stares 
Karat) Services 
KaltoMdCo ^ , 
Landmark Land Co 
LummCorp 
Maple CMf Inc 
McGill Manftra 

MDCV(RH) 

McCroe Indus d A 
N o ra tes cslnc 
PMmPwrAU 
N BSC Cora 
New England Etac 
Narflm Cara 
Ota Null Bancorp 
Oriels Hamss Cora A 
Or lota names Cora B 
Orion Capital Corp 
Po nr PaworiLkM 
South Jersey I nds 
Standard Products 
StaepoCwe 
Summit Banaira 
Tanka Cara 
Tons Co 

United Cos Find 
United iihimmattao 
WaiUnfrJotmson 
Wmaau Paper Mflb 
Whittaker Cwp 


9® *10 
IM *11 
*9 
9* 


Source: l/PL 


Alps Electric Co. of Tokyo said 
its subsidiary, Alps Electric USA 
has signed a contract to buy Apple 
Computer Inc.’s plant in Garden 
Grove, California. It did not dis- 
close the price. 

Enterprise Oil PLC of London 
said it is acquiring interests in nine 
North Sea blocks under an agree- 
ment with Conoco Inc. that will 
involve Enterprise contributing to 
the cost of eight wells. 

Fremont General Corp-. a Los 
Angeles insurer and financial -ser- 
vices holding company, said it has 
stopped writing commercial prop- 
erty-liability insurance because of 
the disproportionate losses that the 
business has generated. 

Lend Lease Corp. said it will 
raise about 92 million Australian 
dollars ($64.7 million) through a 1- 
for-10 nghts issue at four dollars a 
share and an issue to an employee- 
investment trust at the same price. 
Each issue will involve about If J 
milli on shares. 

Matsushita Electric Industrial 
Co. of Osaka said its subsidiary, 
Matsushita Electronics Coro., has 
sharply cat output of 64-K 
>dom 


non of the holding company’s Fan 
American Airways Inc. and will be 
convertible to Pan Am Corp. com- 
mon stock. 

Seagram Co. and Hudson’s Bay 
Cot said ihai Seagram’s Canadian 


unit will acquire the Hudson’s Bay 
share of their jointly owned Cana- 
dian wine and spirits marketing 
venture, Hudson's Bay Distillers 
Ltd. Terms were not disclosed. 

Philippine Gold Mine Layoffe 

Reuters 

MANILA — About 350 work- 
ers at Benguel Corp.’s gold-mining 
operations in the northern Philip- 
pines have been laid off or have 
taken early retirement as pan of an 



ic ran 

ed production to 256-K chips. 

Mzdde South Utilities Inc’s two 
subsidiaries in Louisiana have vot- 
ed not to make tbar quarterly divi- 
dend payments to the parent com- 
pany because of a cash drain from 
the $3i-m31i(Hi Grand Gulf 1 nu- 
clear power plant. Last quarter’s 
dividend from Louisiana Power & 
Light Co. and New Orleans Public 
Service Inc. was more than $36-5 
million. 

Nissan Diesel Motor Ok, 452- 
percent owned by Nissan Motor 
Co., said it has agreed to sell the 
China Automotive Industry Im- 
port & Export Corp. design and 
production technology for its 
heavy truck plant in Hubei Prov- 
ince. Value of the agreement was 
not disclosed 

Pan Am Coqx said it has filed to 
offer $200 million of convertible 
subordinated debentures due in 
2010. The shares will be the obliga- 


Nsveffaifui 

CBOT 

BOND 

FUTURES 

& ESSO 

FUTURES 

OPTIONS 

Also Futures and 
Futures Options on 
COMEX-GOLD & SILVER 
IMM-CURRENCIES 


Loo 


>15 


* Ri JOSH TUBS 
raw AND 
IftfXNlUHT 


'Applies unit f> mules 
mmlinjt _’W» nuirmets per 

lulethiir nuritth first J 50 

ruMirMifg SJ5 rtuind turn. 

Oil# sit- of itar pnUtnnumab. 

212-221-713B 

Trie* ’-’Ofts 

BEPUBLIC CLEARING 
COBFOBRION 

452 Fite Me. ST NT *08 

MmuliHr WW Bnft ri RuufaA 

\ SIJ Bulbs) 1 •manmU ILmW 


BOEING 

MICROWAVE/TROPO 
OPPORTUNITIES 
IN GREECE. 


BOEING SERVICES INTERNATIONAL 
is a major U.S. Government support services 
contractor with contracts in the U.S. and 
abroad. 

Right now. we're in the process of accept- 
ing resumes from interested and qualified per- 
s<Kinel to work on an expansion of our USAFE 
Base Maintenance contract in Greece. 

The expansion win involve the perform- 
ance of Troposcatter and Microwave Communi- 
cations Systems Operation and Maintenance 
activities and Logistics Support at various loca- 
tions in Greece. 

We expect to have openings in the follow- 
ing skills: 

AFSCNo. Title 

‘ 30470 Micro wave/Tropo 

Maintenance Supervisor 
30470 Miaowavef&opo O&M Technician 
30474 Ground Radio Technician 
30770 Technical Control 
54290 Power Production Supervisor 
54252 Power Production Specialist 
54272 Power Production Technician 

Applicants should have recent U.S. Air 
Force Troposcatter/Microwave CE experience. 
Positions may be accompanied. 

Please mail your detailed nfesumd showing 
specific Mjcrowave/Tropo (486L and 490L) re- 
lated training, experience, present and ex- 
pected salary and clearance level status Ur. 

BOEING SERVICES INTERNATIONAL 

P.0. BOX 220-IHG 

COCOA BEACH. FLORIDA 32931 


BOEING 

SERVICES INTERNATIONAL, INC 


U.S. citizenship is required 


An equal opportunity employer. 







Page 12 


Tue sdays 

AMEX 


n Month 
Hum Low Stock 


Oc rtn pi 

Pto. Ytt. PE 1QBHWIUW QiwtOiW 


Closing 


Tables Include ttie nationwide prices 
up to the dosing an Wail street 
and do not reflect lote trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


12 Month 
High Low Slock 


SO. ri»m> 

Dto.YW.PE HOSHishLow Owjt.Ctrte 


414 ADI n 
SK ALLaba 
12 AMC .15 
24* AM Inti 
66 ATT Fd S07a 
Ms Action 
1% Acton 
lft Admffe 
111% AdRuSl .14 
15V. Adobe at 
4 Aoranc 
241% AHIPta i M 
51% Air Exp 
Sft AlrCm 
944 ArCalpf 120 \ 
651% Almlto n 
614 A1MM 


99a Atotwin JOS 
ft Alto* 

16 AtzaCp 
UPS Amdahl JO 
5VS Amedeo m 
SVj Aral am .15 
4 AmCop 
m AEwivt 
54% AFrvcA 
514 AFrucB 
544 AMIttlM 


444 Alsroel 
124% AMtaA J2 
Ki AMBId 
3 AmOII 
5i?% APoM 2JW 
12 V, APrec 34b 
614 AmRltv 
T 1 i% ARtnrln UKe 
3 ASclE 
IV. Arrmol JM 
44% AndoJ 
21% AndJcb 
10 Andrea 22 
4% Aiwefwf 
3ft ArooPt 
5V% Arley n 
7ft Armdi 
7% Ai TO wA 3D 
61% Asmrg .15 
9ft As! rex 
1. Astrate 
ft AllsCM 
2 Audlofr 


261% 
1714 
446 
47 
644 
im 
1246 
0114 
646 
111 % 
1 % 
>146 
1314 
54k 546 

114 1046 
61% 614 
itk ms 
546 544 

51% 51* 

546 544 
84* 


5V.— ft 
1546 
1644 
346 

814% + 44 
1214 

2 

316— 1% 
2 H% — 16 
1716 

446— 1* 
4716 + 16 
644 + 14 
1046— 14 
1244+1% 
eii%— v% 
646 
114% 

1 %— 1 % 
2146— 44 
134% 

546 

11 + V4 

614— 4k 
31(4 + 46 

544 

5V% — I* 
546+1% 
8 — 1 % 

34k 

56 +14% 
1416—1% 
714 

13 + 1 % 

5 +1% 

214 + V# 
544 

21 * — 1 % 
111 * + 16 
im— n 

4—1% 
544— 1% 
714— 1% 
BVj — 44 
946— 14 
1244+16 
1 %. 


n% sro 

4 2 

1716 121* 

an# m% 

2TV6 161% 
124% 71% 
3816 1644 
3314 116% 
3Bk 17 
3346 1844 
4ZV* 341% 
124* 646 
45 2216 

224% to«s 
64% 31% 
104* 646 
846 246 

22 846 

1246 81% 

131* 646 

1244 714 

18 41% 

1014 5%* 
2046 1444 
1216 69k 

154* 64* 
251% 131% 
94* 54* 

59k 19* 

, 0 J% *** 
2114 161% 
154* 546 

10 74* 

264* 1516 
144* 1046 

T M fi 

39* 24* 

1016 546 

35 2444 

4816 234* 
1714 914 

134* 74* 
7 44* 
24* 4* 

71% 14* 

25 1344 


7V. 64* 

216 21% 
134* 134* 
24V* 2344 
18% 124* 
814 74k 
32% 311* 
29 39 

294* » 
33 3ZU 
384* 3816 
84* 84* 
3916 3916 
144* 1446 
51% 514 

w* g% 

7>6 71 ft 
2116 301% 
91% 91% 
131% 12 
74* 7 
74* 7V. 

7 64fc 
1646 1646 
744 74* 
13V* 131% 
204* 2016 
Bft 816 
44* 416 
54* 544 


716+16 
214 — 1% 
139* 

234* + |6 
1846— 14 
744 — 44 
314*— 1 
2V + 1% 
29ft 

3246— 1% 
3816 

84k- V* 
3916— 16 
144* + 4* 
51% 

94* + V. 
7V*— 14 
21 +16 
914 

12V*— 44 

714— 9* 
7V* + 44 
646— V. 
1644 + U 
71* 

131%— 1* 
2014— «fc 
84* — 14 
44* 

54* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 1985 

„ n . BUSINESSPEOPLE 

France rosts 


R Month „ 
High LOW Stock 


51 s. rim 

Dtv. YM. PE l«a High Lew Qanl-Ctfot 






184* 1846 
124* 124* 
154* 154* 

nr 
't ^ 

24* 2* 

9 84* 

34 331k 

371% 3716 
1446 1446 
1246 1246 

% 

2214 21V* 
26M 26]£ 


1846 

124*— 1% 
159* + 1% 
194*— 46 
12 
1 H 6 


1*VS 79* 
134* 99k 
44% 21% 
1816 121% 

5 21* 

6 24% 

161% 91* 
14 716 

416 11* 
124* Bt% 

B*'r 

3S46 191* 
37 2SK 
446 2*6 
746 3 

U6 4* 
194* 1546 

11 Sft 
244* 161* 

12 746 

154* 1016 
4416 27 
36 1 24* 

13 546 

T3V6 846 
1516 11 . 
3646 234* 
151% 8 


1.20 4.1 13 101 

157 

21 2 


88 56 9 
JO 62 13 


JO 1-9 IS 
5 


lJO u 
JO 25 13 


JH U 7 

um>ir 22 


26 X9 8 
TJUe 2 S.l 
M 21 12 
11 
16 

M 1.1 It 


.500 44 10 
53 

40 L 2 U 
Me A 23 


1216 12 
14* 146 

29 2846 

9ft 844 

1 «* t 2 M 

Vm 34* 
1516 151* 
316 31% 
41* 4 

101% 1016 
121 % 121 % 
3ft 34* 
111* 114* 

20 194% 

1744 1644 
3344 3246 
2646 26ft 
34* 346 

^ ns 

194* 1944 
71% 74* 

1846 1844 
814 816 
11 11 
3946 3946 
281% 2816 
1146 1144 
111 % 1116 
1446 141% 
334* 3346 
13 13 


12 

1*6 

29-1% 
916 + 1% 
tit* — 16 

316 + 14 
1546 + 1* 
3ft + ft 
416 + lw 
101 % + 1 % 
121 % 

3ft + ft 
11 * + 1 * 
191* 

1716 + Vk 
331% + 4% 
2646— ’A 
39* + 1* 

3 a- s% 
in*— vk 

744— 14 
1846 + 4* 
8V. + 16 
11—4% 
3946 

2846— 1% 
11*6 + 1 % 
1116— 46 
1446 + 1% 
3344— 1% 
13 +4* 


Surplus 
In Trade 


Guinness Names Steel 
As Brewing Director 


U.K. Balance 
Of Trade 
Improves 


214 + Vk 
81% 

3314— 16 
3716— 1% 
14*6 

1246— 1% 
546— V% 

1 % 

19k + 1% 
2216+1% 




.13# 62 6 
32 IJ 10 
TJX 16J 
230 1U 

5 

175 I7A 
.16 IJ 

4 

32 13 11 
IM 109 9 


30 19* 

2 244% 
116 1246 
77 121% 
154 394 

1 2146 
10B 124* 

15 JV. 

2 3546 
21 1514 

616 24k 

24 416 

15 BV% 
2 131% 
46 91% 

45 894 

bIJ* 

21 19% 

319 6246 
4 35% 

35 5*1 

1841 21% 

13 * 

26 15 
W 23*. 
9 11% 

2 11 
20 2746 
268 9* 

3x20 
17 139* 
376 121k 
<6 29 


19k 19k 

244% 241% 

121 % 1216- ft 
13ft 12 <A 
3ft 39* + ft 
21ft 21ft + ft 
124* 124*— ft 
51k 5ft + ft 
3546 3544 
15ft 15ft + 4* 
2ft 2ft 
4ft 4ft + ft 
Sft 81* 

13ft 13ft— ft 
916 9ft— ft 
89% 8 ft 
746 746 + ft 

as 35ft + ft 
146 146 

*2 62 —I 

3ft 3ft 
54* 51*— ft 

2 ft 3ft 
ft 4* 

149* 15 
2344 MVS + ft 
IV* 11 % 

11 11 — ft 

1946 1946— ft 
1346 139* + ft 
12ft 12ft 
2844 2814 + ft 



lQM 6 ft 
144* 10V* 
2046 9ft 
104% 7ft 
294* 22ft 
3544 181% 
21% 46 

391% 19 

S 22ft 
1 % S 8 % 
2546 17ft 
1QU 54% 
191% 81% 
154* 11 
94* 61% 

171% 10 
4ft 2ft 
lift 3ft 
> ft 

17** % 

n* ,r 

21 20 


3914 2BV* 
T4ft 7ft 
54* IV* 
1946 1246 
6 ft 3ft 
18ft 10 ft 
13V6 Oft 
23ft 16ft 
24V4 1SV 
21ft 174* 
IQ 6 ft 


HAL ,10a 12 
HMG M SO 
HUB C M O XI 
Homptl .931124 
Hndvmn -Q5« J 
Honfrds M IJ 
Harvey 

HasOrs .15 3 

Hasbro# 2 j00 S3 
Hatting Mo 12 
HI tnCre 2 JMa U 
HJWiCh 
HtthEx 

HelttlM M 48 
HoftiWr 2De 24 
Helnlck .10 3 

Hektor 
Helton! 

HeimR 

HershO 

Htotrwi 

HolivCo 84 IJ 
HmeGn 

Hmlnspf2J5 144 
Harm! 1J0B 28 
HmHor 71# B2 
HmH wl 77! VU 
HOtiPtY 180 10.1 
HouOT 89eUL3 
HOvnE 

Howl In 20e 20 
HubetAs 
HubelBS 
HudGll M 22 
Husky a J6 46 


Sft 

12 — ft 
ms— v* 
74* 

321% + ft 
35ft— (6 
1*6 

3216 + 16 
361% + ft 


25ft— ft 
9ft— ft 
81% 

13ft— ft 

816 

15. + ft 
2 ft— 16 

^f- 1 % 

3(4— ft 
1«4 + 16 
U + ft 
1844 — 4* 
20ft + ft 
3816 

Bft— 16 
19* + ft 
1746 

49* + 1% 
lfl*— ft 
1816— ft 
219*— 16 
23ft— 4* 
mt + 4* 
71* + ft 


Retucn 

PARIS — France had a season- 
ally adjusted trade surplus of S.l 
billion francs in the second quarter 
c*f 1985. compared with a revised 
deficit of 7.8 billion francs ($605 
million) in the first quarter and 3.3 
billion francs in the second quarter 
of 1984, the Finance Ministry said 
Tuesday. 

The first-quarter deficit was 
originally put at 6.9 billion francs, 
and second-quarter 1984 figures 
were revised from a 23- bmi on- 
franc deficit 

The cumulative deficit in the cur- 
rent account, which includes the 
trade balance and trade in nonmer- 
chandise items, for the first half of 
1985 narrowed to a provisional sea- 


By Brenda Erdmann 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Guinness PLC, 
which is aggressively seeking to in- 
crease its beer sales in the United 
States and continental Europe, has 
appointed a new head for its worid- 

TheLondon-baM^ brewing and 
retailing concern named Victor 
Steel to the new post of m an a g i n g 
director of Guinness Brewing 
Worldwide, effective Oct. 1. In this 
position, he fakes over responsibil- 
ities formerly held by Ernest 
Saunders, who remains Guinness's 
chief executive. 

Mr. Steel joins G uinn ess from 


filiate of Mobil Oil Corp. of New 
York, has named RX. Howard fi- 
nance director, succeed i ng 7.Ki~ 
Moore, who wfil retire Sept- 1. Mr. 
Howard had been, assistant con- 
troller of Mobil Europe 

Borgwa Bank SAK of Kuwait has 
appointed Richard finitely to the 
new post of chief econo m ist. He 
was a senior international econo- 
mist for Laurie, MDbaok & Co., the 
London stockbroker. 

Mkfiand Bank Group Interna- 
tional Trade Services, a unit of 
Midland Bank PLC of London that 
specializes in trade finance, has 
opened a representative office in 
Bahrain. Heading the new office is 
RJE. Worthington, who was ap- 
pointed group , representative and 
manager. 

HamBtonOilCorp. has named 
Michad Qaiy vice president of in- 
ternational exploration. He wiD be 
. responsible for tire U.S. oil con- 
cern’s exploration activities world- 
wide, except for North America 
and tire North Sea. Formerly, he 
was manager of exploration for Af- 
rica, the Middle East and Latin 
America at Arco International Oil 
& Gas Ox, a unit of Atlantic Rich- 
field Co. of Los Angeles. His suc- 
cessor at Arco has hot yet been 

iuhmH 

Doyle Dane Bembach Group 
fixL, the New York-based advertis- 
ing agency, said Alim Pffldngton 
was named to the new post of presi- 
dent of tire Aaa/Paafic region. 
Mr. Pfljrin gtnrij Whn wiD be based 
in Sydney, was corporate executive 
vice preateit/director of business 
development with DArcy Mao 
Manus Matins Worldwide 


sonally adjusted 2.7 billion francs 
from 9 billion m the like period last 


Beecham Group PLC where since 
May 1984 be has served as chair- 
man of the international division of 
the Beecham Products sector. Bee- 
chain's international division is re- 
sponsible for the consumer-prod- 
ucts business in Africa, 
Australasia, the. Caribbean and the 
Middle and Far East and for Bee- 
cham Group's minority interest in 
associated companies in India and 
Nigeria. His successor has not been 

nanrat 


year. 

On an unadjusted basis, the sec- 
ond-quarter surplus was revised to 
9.5 billion francs from 10.8 billion 


reported last month, after an 18.1- 
bmion-franc revised deficit in the 
first quarter and a surplus of 2.9 
billion in second quarter of 1984, 
the ministry said. 

Revised figures show that 
France's trade deficit was about 25 
billion francs last year and not 19.8 
bQlion francs as originally estimat- 
ed. 



Mr. Steel, who will also join the 
uard of G uinness PLC, refin- 


Dominiquc Ferraro, adviser to 
Edith Cresson, the minister of in- 


board of Guinness PLC, refin- 
quisbed his spot on the board of 
Beecham Group on Tuesday. 

Mobil CXI Fran^mse said Ren 6 
Lanqon has been appointed execu- f 
dve assistant to its president, Marc 


day that the revision was due main- 
ly to a revised rate of conversion for 
import prices from the CIF, or 
cost-insuraoce-freight, basis to the 
FQB, or free-on- board, basis, 
which is the international standard. 


Casanova. Succeeding Mr. Langon 
as marketing manager is Guy 


as marketing manager is Guy 
Touron, who moves to Paris from 
London, where he had been mar- 
keting manag er for Mobil Europe 
Inc. Separately, Mobil Oil Gx, the 
British refining and marketing af- 


Reuurs 

i ondON — Britain recwdecU 

« 3 n (SB. JESS' 

after June’s revised £2l6-nnluoc. 
deficit, the Trade and Industry De-- 
Da-oncnt said Tuesday. 

trade deficit was origi- 
nally put at £243 tcaihon. . • • 

T^e current account 
eludes the trade balance and tradc. 
in nonmerchandise items, was esu~ 

iimo'c unwaidlv revised 


Exports fell to about - 

licmTfrom £ 6 J3 tnUKTO Me m- 
ports droroed to about £6.38 biF, 
lioufromt6J5 billion. 

trixsafi*' 

sources said. 

The oU surplus fdl £150 

in July to £693 million, department 
figures show. The fall in the : surplus 
reflects a 10 -percent cutback m - 
North Sea output for routine main- 
tenance work. ' , ". 

The deficit on manufacture 
goods narrowed to £187 million m 
July from £383 milliem. reflecting ^ 
the drop in imports. " 

The current-account position for 
the first quarter has been revised to 
a deficit of £535 million from a 
£123- nriIli on, figures show. 

For the first seven months of tire , 
year, the current-account surplus is* - 
estimated at £1.19 billion, com- 
pared with a surplus of £935 m0-^ 
lion for all of 1984. 


1746 1246 Joctvn -59b 15 9 
746 5ft Jacobs 
49* 216 Jet Am 8 

3 ft JrfA frt 


9 9 1416 14ft 14ft 

16 Sft 546 546— ft 

• “S X Tt V* 


*4* 5ft Jctran Tit M 14 11 71* 716 716 — ft 


6 ft 3 John Pd 


5 31* 31* 3ft— ft 


1 11* 716 JohnAm JO U 11 211 Bft 79* 79* 


179* 10 ft Lirnicx 
Uft 8 LundvC 
1516 9ft Lurto 
lift 10 Lvdol 
26ft lift LmCSl 
10 ft Sft LvnchC 


JJ 8 A 35 345 19 

17 44 13 

9 22 TO 

5 5 13 

JO 13 8 204 IS 

JO 22 20 U 9* 


345 19 1746 19 +116 

44 13ft 131% 1» + ft 

22 10 ft 10 ft 10 ft + ft 

5 !3» 13ft 13ft 

204 1216 lift 1146— 4* 

13 9ft 9 9ft + ft 


lift 6 Johnlnd 
7ft 34* JmoJkn 


56 8 ft 846 846— ft 
14 31* 316 Sft — ft 


3046 201% ROOtra 
546 11% ROOBYP 

7 31* Roy Pirn 

34 22U Rutfck 

7ft 4ft RnW 
18ft lift Russtll 
29ft 149* RyfcafT 


\S6a 22 9 
7 

M 18 13 
JO 20 U 


14 209* 209* 201* 

26 19* 1ft 146— ft 
23 6 ft 64* 6 ft 
P 25ft 2516 2516 
60 716 7 7ft + ft 

52 1646 164* 16ft — At 
76 25 249* 25 


44* 1ft 
16*6 10 
13 104* 

16 946 

34 15ft 
23ft 1346 
91% 5ft 
16ft 8 
8 3ft 
49* 2!6 
5 34* 

Sft 2ft 
Sft 39% 
Sft 2 
17ft 1016 
16ft 10 V 6 
30ft 224* 


KapofcC 

KovCp 

KovJn 

KearNl 

Kemrin 

Ketctim 

KevCa 

KtyPti 

KevCa 

Kidds wt 

Klnark 

Kirby 

KlfMffl 

KtoerV 

Knoso 

Knoll 

KootrC 


5 

JO IJ 7 
TObU 9 
JO 28 19 
.BOaAl 10 
AM 21 19 
30* 14 
20 IJ 20 
7 


15 

mr 3 

18 

16 

232 22 80 


30 Sft 
lx 12 ft 
18x111% 
40 1416 
9 19ft 
287 18ft 

14 Bft 
467 114* 

48 Sft 
50 31b 

2 39* 
82 2 ft 
8 4ft 
77 2ft 

15 1716 
67 15ft 
74 28ft 


3ft 

12ft + ft 

Uft 

1416 

19ft— ft 
I 8 ta + ft 
846— ft 
lift— 16 
Sft 
3ft 

Sft + ft 
246 

*46— ft 
2ft 
1716 

15ft + 16 
281% — ft 


2 1ft lJB 
34* 2ft LnBarg 
7ft 34* LoPnt 


lift LfldBnn M 32 10 


Uft lift Lndmk JO 34 12 

144* 91% Laitr J£ 

13 9 Lauren 33 

2746 211% LrarPP 208 1X3 
9ft 2 ft LeePti 


31ft 17ft Loti toil S .101 J ID 


1 446 446 446— V* 

119 12 2ft 2ft 2ft— ft 


6 ft 346 LelsurT 
Bft 5 Levitt 
3016 7ft LbtFPfl 
31% 1 ft UfeRsI 
4 21% UltW 

3ft 146 Lodge 
394* 27ft Lorhnr 


7 

11 

AOe 1 3 10 


70 2ft 
34 246 

5 4ft 
46 164* 
18 17ft 
31 Uft 

5 9ft 

12 22 *. 
91 546 

38 29ft 
10 51% 

4 69* 

59 27ft 
134 1ft. 
12 3ft 

6 1 ft 
225 35ft 


19* 2 ft + 16 
2ft 246 + >6 
4ft 4ft 
16 1616 + '6 
17ft 174*— ft 
10*. 1046— *6 
9ft 9ft 
22ft 229* + ft 
5ft Sft— ft 
29ft 29ft + ft 
54* 54*— ft 
6 *k 69* 

2716 27ft + ft 
lft Ift 
346 39* + ft 

19* 1% 

3446 349k— 16 


AUTOS TAX FREE | INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED I HOLIDAYS* TRAVEL 


NEW MERCEDES 

TORSO*, far imnxxfede dtfiv*y 

ROM STOCK 


(Continued From Back Page) 


AUTOS TAX 


, ca u b*i »i o M in USA 

RUTE INC. 


LEGAL SERVICES I HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


TAUNUSSTR. 


TK. 5^ 6000 HMNK7UKT 

td (D|Sl 232351 ( Itx 41 1559 


» TEAKS AUTO-G 8 ANER 
ReUde Gorman an doeft crffea new 
M*ro*d*v BMW, Pondie, Fsrran. life 
(OJ 721 -40033, 0x712061 AU1EX 


Crime in Beganoe 


EDUCATION 


to tim GREK ISLANDS 


DAWAJI TRADE 

MTl DELIVERY 


uflfl stock at 
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most COT braids 
Tek 02/648 55 13 
Teiax 6565B 
42 rut ten, 
1050 Bn«k 



FASMON STUDY PBOGCAMbagini EGYPT, ISRAE & TURKEY 

4 September - 4 weeks. Paris Arasn- 

CHOCS W 7-M-Z.l DAY 

atUtSES oat of 48m (Plraw*) 

HOTELS 


THE MAGNIFKBiT 
STELA 
SOLARIS 

7 AND 14 DAY CRUISES 

To the Greek Uands. Turkey, 
Eoypr & fcrant 

Safag Every Monday from Pranos 
and 

THEYACHMOCE 

STELLA 


[•> J-T, 


3 AND 4 DAY CRUISES 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 





To the Greek Uands & Turkey. SaSng 
every Monday & Friday ham Fvaaus 


EPIROTIK1 CRUISES 


Heeae apply Agent or: 

2. Kar. Sarvira St., Athens 10562 
Telex: 215621, Phone 3228883. 


Para tot 265 90 36 
Munch tek 398 811 
Geneva tek 327 110 
Zurich tek 391 36 55 





184* in- 1 % 

71% 74* + 1* 

346 346 — 4*. . 

2V6 Sft- , 

14 16—1% 

6446 65ft — Vf 
416 44* + 1% . 

13ft 134* + I*. 
11% 11% + ft. 

714 2ft- l* 1 
3346 334*— ft 

1 Oft 10ft 

646 6ft— Vs. 
44* 49* + ft 
4 4ft - ■ 

916 9ft— Vi/' 
231% 231% J 

18ft 184* + ft 
49* 4ft + ft- 
1916 1916+1%-. 

2 2ft 
14* 14* 

3ft 4 +16 

4b 1 + 4k> 

61 61 —1 
76ft 761%.— 1 
4ft 446 + ft 

27ft 27ft— ft. 
121% 1216 + 1% 
1316 13M +4* 
>SUi 151% +1% 
10 ft 18ft— ft- 
1346 13ft 
416 416— ft 

7ft 746 + 4% 

24* 24* — ft 
1716 1716 + ft 
2flft 2816 
99* .946 
2 21* + ft 


1 Ml UNA 

.‘ITJUIRIM. . . . ,v- 

8ft Ultmte 11 

81% untcera 

Uft Untcppf 25 50 - 

846 Unimrn iA4eH» 
Uft IWUrPd 34b23 J2 
169% UnCooPe 511,16 1 
1ft UPOHtA :.18. 52 

11 * U Foods. 

in* utMad •; 

U USAOwt . • 

..Sft UmMV .. . .. 22 
. 9ft UairCm- • • ,15 

69%UnhR»,.- - ••••.19 
lOftlfnvPM'.'. 


I 146 

• 

168 131% 
75 121% 

12 144% 
60 18ft 

13 211% 
1 19ft 

28 lft 

14 lft 
12 15ft 
4 18V* 

19 74* 

20 12ft 

50 71% 

15 12ft 


lft lft— n 
: ’29*-"2lt r - 
131% 13» + 4% 
lift Uft- ft 
14ft 14ft 
Kltt 104* 


211% TVh + ft. 
19ft 191% 
lft lft + 1% 
14* 14* 

151% 151% 

181% IM — ft 
7ft 7ft + ft. 
12ft 12ft 
7 7—16 

121 % 12 ft 


toft : 9ft VSTn’ V 


57 

91% 

94. 

*9% + ft 

2746 1748 Vntmra _44 ia i5 

5 

25ft 


25 — ft 

W 24% v*m •• 


6 

Bft 

B 

8ft + 1% 

2346 Ml* VtAmC 

Mb 23 10 

128 

174* 

17ft 

174* + ft 

. 61%. m vmti 

. 

14 

44% 

41% 

4ft— ft 

ft ft Verna 


2 

ft 

ft 

ft 

14ft 9ft 

M 13 16 

m 

104% 

toft 


9 . Sft Vkon 

12 

24 

6 

6 

6—16 

49k ' 21% Vinton 


2 

24% 

2ft 

29% + ft 

U9h 12 Vlrca 

34r J 14 

4 

14ft 

14ft 

!4ft — ft 

12ft 8 Vtautcx 

M 4.1 12 

1 

*46 

946 

946— Vk 


221 * 

15ft Oakwto 

JMb 

A 

11 

8 

18 

1746 

17ft 

12 

4 OdalAn 




4 

51% 

Sft 

5ft 

16ft 

4ft OdfcfSs 




14 

7ft 

6 ft 

716 + 4* 

19 

IJft OtiArt 

2A 

U 


6 

1846 

1846 

Wft— 1 * 

Mft 

18ft Oftalnd 

M 

IS 

7V 

13 

21 ft 

20 ft 

20 ft — ft 

27ft 

101 % Olsten > 

24 

3 

21 

61 

25ft 

251% 

251% + ft 

7ft 

3ft OOktop 




13 

4ft 

44* 

41* + 1* 

7Vj 

346 Oooenh 

J>5e 

3 

58 

11 

5ft 

546 

Sft 

7» 

44% (^tolHB 

30 

4.1 


1 

41* 

4ft 

4ft 

25ft 

16 OSutvns 

A2 

20 

14 

13 

20 ft 

m 

2M*+ 46 

71% 

Sft OvarSe 




2 

Sft 

5ft 

5ft 

14ft 

6 ft OxfrdF 

331 62 

10 

31 

1346 

13 

1316+46 

121 * 

816 OzarkH 

20 

1 2 

12 

38S 

12 ft 

lift 

lift- 16 


lift 4ft T Bar 
1316 7ft TEC 
13ft 4ft TIE 
14ft 6ft Til 


J3t 5L0 24 106 7 6ft 64* + ft 

.16 IJ 21 10 Bft 846 Aft + ft 

1077 5ft 51% Sft + ft 

32 10 Bft 846 846 


GAPs Holding 
In Carbide Rises to 
7.1% From 5.6% 


1616 16ft + ft 

12ft 12ft + ft 
Bft 84% 

181% 181% + ft 
31% 31* 

. 391* 40ft + ft 
431% 431%— ft 
74% 74* 

416 416 

W4% UM* + 4* 

fi fc* 

361% 364* + ft 
Uft IBM + ft 


The Associated Pros 

NEW YORK — GAF Corp. has increased its 
Union Carbide Corp. holding to 7.1 percent of 
Union Carbide's snares outstanding from SA 
percent, a GAF spokesman said Tiratay. 

Mark Kappel of Fred Rosen Associates, a 
public relations agency representing GAF, said 
GAF now holds about 5 million of Union 
Carbide’s 70.4 million shares outstanding; 

A GAF disclosure earlier this month thqt it 
had acquired 5.6 percent of Union Carbide’s 
shares has fueled speculation that GAF might 
be attempting to acquire all or part of the 

chemiml maker 

GAF said in its filing that it had bought the 
Union Carbide stock because it presented “an 
attractive investment o ppo rt u nity," and that in 
doing so GAF had considered “the possibility 
of a business combination between GAF and 
Union Carbide." But it added that it “has no 
present plans or proposals with respect to 
Union Carbide that relate to or would result in 
any extraordinary transaction." 

GAF is a Wayne, New Jersey-based maker of 

chemicals and btrilding material* . Tt had 
5731 3 million last year. Samuel J. Heyman t ook 
control of GAF in December 1983 m a bitter 
proxy fight Union Carbide, one of the largest 
U.S. chankal concerns, had 59 J billion in 1984 
revenue. 

Analysts have suggested that GAF might be 
interested in buying parts of the Carbide that 
relate to GAFs own business. They also have 
suggested that GAF might not have the cad) to 
acquire more than 10 percent of Union Carbide 
without outride help. 

A gas leak at Institute, West Virginia, Mon- 
day was one is a aeries of problems Union 
Carbide has had recently. On Aug; 13, another 
toxic leak Institute plant sent nearby residents 
fleeing. 

Last year, a toxic-gas leak at the plant of a 
Union Carbide unit in Bhopal. India, killed at 
least 2,000 people. Union Carbide is facing 
lawsuits seeking MUkms of dollars in Hgmg» S 
as a result of the leak. Q 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 1985 



Page 13 


tCmpo 


■ywg Helps lift Dollar in U.S. 

1 —r_ 


JDg 



°P®“S AH markets were dosed in Sriiam 

Tuesday mei technical 11 M ««Klay for a holiday. 

& Uttl/SS P^ed” te L r “;« an « In earlier trading in Frankfurt, 

<%* °M. vSV ? 8 ?^^, 1 ? 710 rbe dollar was fixed at 2.7770 DM] 
CUrtcncv ' ua '* , ~ from up from 17586 at Monday’s fixing 

T 1 ^ currency Jimed to Si itm Thc Brilish P 00 "^ meanwhile, 
against the SiS^Ih l 7™ ^PP«* agam * 1 the dollar but 
SI-3980 on Monday p0 ™ d fn)m strengthened against the main Eu- 
Oiher late rates rAr - «>!**& currencies. It ended at 

New YoTkTiSSv^l^JS SU^5, down a cent from Friday, 
with Monday mducfe5° ^? 7 is but. up. slightly from its opening 
Swiss fran^’un S13905. Against the markTd* 

8-4595 FreS trLcs. curraic y rinDC d u> 3-8825 

^859.0. The dollar roe to 23«0 VIoasdase<rf18580 - 


Machines That Work 
On Voice Command 


Crocker Bank Fined $2.5 Million 


* 

■" ai- h 




— V,,' 


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peal ? Sa ,dAe-— 
nonncmdiMtois. ^ U-S> co °- 

jnihe Uotoodo, chief tradJ^’ 
Manufacturers 

jESSS^-taKE. 

Dealexs said an earlier rise in 

S:s”4^rur 

7> where the dollar 
Federal Reserve in- 

- Tbey said there was also some 
concern about having short 22 
dOHsan the dollar ahead ofdL^ 

U h holiday weekend? 

In New York, the dollar jumped 


wuar rose 1C 

Japanese yen from 236.75. 

in earner ta ^ 

agar rose as market scathociH 

4SJ5 ^ US. “"cncy rented 
slightly optimistic. 

. “The market is a little more boD- 
u “ the dollar right now," a trad- 
er m Frankfurt said. “People don’t 
want to be caugbt short if the mood 
shifts sharply .* 1 

In London, the dollar dosed at 


Other late dollar rates Tuesday, 
compared with late rates Monday, 
included: 22790 Swiss francs, up 
from 22538; 8.4830 French francs, 
up from 8.4225, and 1,864.00 lire, 
op from 1,852.10. 

Dealers said the dollar was likely 
to continue trading in only a nar- 
row band until the market can as- 
sess the US economic data on Fri- 
day. Most dealers said they 


* ■jfwt#r T ^ n wvutu l JOJUIOV UK / • mvds uwiuyi a Dtuu uibj 

a. 7900 Deutsche masks, up more expected the dollar to move in a 
a pfennig from its opening range between 275 DM and 280 
z.7780 and more than three pica- DM for most of the non three days, 
tugs from its Friday dose of 27530. (Aeuters. UP J, IHT) 


IMS EUROMARKETS 


Traders Seem to Be flaying Waiting Game 


By Christopher Pizzey 

Reuters 1 

LON DON - — Most secondary- 
market sectors of the Eurobond 

market ended Ettle changed after a 

da^dealOTsak t*"* 113,11118 Tocs ’ 

Seasoned dollar-straight i ss ue s 
ended with occasional gains of !4 
poini, where changed, as the U.S. 
credit markets edged ahead during 
the afternoon, they added. 

The primary market was also 
very qmet but dealers noted that 
the Public Power Corp. of Greece 
was widely expected to lannch 
soon, possibly as early as Wednes- 
day, an unusual floating-rate note 
issue through Orion Royal frank 
Ltd. 

_ The new 12S- m31i on Eon 
^yurrency-nnit bond for RJ. 
olds Industries Inc. ended 
Tuesday within the lK-percerit 
setting concession at a discount of 


about Jk The total fees are 1% per- 
cent 

The six-year issue pays 8 % per- 
cent a year and was priced at par. 
The lead manager was Morgan 
Guaranty Ltd. A trader at a Conti- 
nental bank said that be had seen 
“quite reasonable dient interest" 
for the bond. 

The recent 20-nriliion-ECU 
bond on b ehalf of Landcsbank 
Rbdnland-Saar added around J A 
point Tuesday !© trade at a dis- 
count of about A. 

On the seoosdaxy markets, deal- 
ers said one reason for the market’s 
quietness Tuesday was that very 
little UJL economic data was due 
out this .week. “Unless the (U3.) 
markets do something drastic in 
the interim, it looks like we’ve got 
to wait for Leading Indicators (the 
U.S. Index of Leading Economic 
Indicators) on Friday foe sane sort 
of guide," a dollar-straight dealer 
.at a US. Bank said. 


The Japanese convertible market 
was also quiet while sterling 
straights were a fraction lower fol- 
lowing light declines on the British 
government-bond market, dealers 
said 


United Overseas Bank 
To Cot Singapore Prime 

Retaen 

SINGAPORE — United Over- 
seas Bank, which reduced its Singa- 
pore prime lending rate by 025 
points Tuesday, said it would fur- 
ther cut the rate by half a prim to 
6.75 percent effective Aug. 28. 

Its fixed deposit rates would be 
cut 025 points across the board to 
4 percent for me month, 425 per- 
cent for three months, 4J percent 
for six months and 4.75 percent for 
nine and 12 months. 


(Continued from Page 9) 
as they are called — and storing 
them, along with the rales for com- 
bining them, in memory chips. The 
information in the chips then is 
converted into audio signals that 

mimic speech. 

Already, speech synthesis is in- 
creasing productivity at some tele- 
phone companies. A system de- 
vised by votrax Inc, of Troy, 
Michigan, which helped pioneer 
the technology, and Lockheed 
Corp„ which booked up the system 
to computers, is being used by die 
directory assistance services of sev- 
eral phone companies. 

When a customer requests a 
phone number, the operator brings 
it to the computer screen and hits a 
specific key to get the computer to 
say the number to the customer. As 
the synthesized voice takes over, 
the operator hangs up and takes the 
next call. 

“The system is expected to save 
five seconds on each call to the 
operator, which adds up to 20 to 25 
percent of the time used to deal 
with a call," said Dennis Diraf* 
fade, a staff manager at New York 
Telephone. 

Speech recognition systems — 
the other half of spee ch technology 
—are tougher to design .They must 
deal with differences in people’s 
voices, accents and variations in an 
individual's voice. Many systems 
are created by having one person 
imprint Ids or her voice pattern on 
to the speech chips — to create a 
template against which to compare 
spoken commands later on — and 
thus are speaker-dependent They 
can be used by one person only. 

Researchers are attempting to 
create systems that respond to any- 
one’s voice. 

The thorny problems surround- 
ing speech recognition have stalled 
some products. For example, the 
technology Tor a voice-controlled 
automobile ignition lock is ready 
now. But so far, no car manufactur- 
ers use the feature. It is speaker- 
dependent ami thus becomes a 
problem for a parking valet or a 
friend who has borrowed the car. If 
it were not speaker-dependent, 
however, it could be useless, since it 
might respond to the voice of a car 
thkf. 

Products now available include 


an appliance that can , bn voice 
command, control lights, mak e 
phone calls, delect intruders and 
talk back to the owner, a personal 
robot which performs a variety of 
vrice-controlied tasks, induding 
light vacuuming; a speech synthe- 
sizer for computers that, among 
other uses, can be an oral typewrit- 
er for the visually impaired, and 
several educational toys that teach 
spelling, phrasing and inflection. 

Consumers can expect to see a 
number of other new products in 
the near future. Companies soon 
will introduce cellular car tele- 
phones with voice- activated dial- 
ing. Late in the fall, two versions of 
a talking smoke alarm from Audec 
will be sold: One will speak a stan- 
dard message to warn of fire, the 
other can be voice-programmed to 
give directions to the nearest exit. 

And. according to Steven Vdtri. 
president of Research in Speech 
Technology in Brooklyn, “in two 
years, prices will drop to the point 
where people can buy voice control 
televisions and radios at a premium 
of only about $ 100 ." 

In industry. Burroughs, Gulf Oil 
and Owens Corning Fiberglas are 
beginning to use the speech tech- 
nology to provide 24-hour- a-day 
product information for customers 
and sales organizations — without 
banks of operators. 

The system that runs these prod- 
uct information hot lines is similar 
to the workings of a round-the- 
docl “alert line” maintained by 
tbe National Association of Trans- 
plant Coordinators, based at the 
University of Pittsburgh. A com- 
puter questions callers about a pro- 
posed transplant recipient and tbe 
organ requested. Then it searches 
donor records and reports to the 
caller on organ availability. 

The medical field has discovered 
other uses for speech technology. 
Some physicians are using voice 
input to construct and store a pa- 
tient's medical chan and at the 
University of California at San 
Diego, anesthesiologists during 
surgery can verbally note a pa- 
tient's vital signs and other data. A 
computer equipped with speech 
chips repeats the doctor’s com- 
ments aloud, displays them on the 
screen Tor double-checking and 
stores them. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
er’s reporting failures were system- 
ic and pervasive," Mr. Walker said. 

He said that Crocker’s actions 
had deprived law enforcement offi- 
cials of “potentially important law 
enforcement leads (hat could have 
been useful in drag, tax. money- 
laundering and other investiga- 
tions." 

Tbe assistant secretary said dm 
tbe “systems 1 failures" that led to 
Crocker’s reporting violations had 
originated before the installation of 
tbe bank’s present management. 

Mr. Walker added that the pre- 
sent management had cooperated 
with the Treasury Department in 
developing the scope of tbe bank’s 


liability and officials had made a 
commitment to full compliance in 
the future. 

The bank’s parent company, 
Crocker National Coro, is 100- 
percent-owned by Mi maud Bank 
PLG, Britain's third-Iargesr com- 
mercial bank. Midland had boost- 
ed its ownership in Midland to 100 
from 57 percent in May. The Brit- 
ish bank took over control of 
Crocker in 1980 with a 51 -percent 
stake. 

On Feb. 7, the Fust National 
Bank of Boston agreed to pay a 
$500,000 fine after pleading guttty 
to a felony charge of fatting to 
properly report $122 btUioo in in- 
ternational currency transactions. 


New AiUo-Manufactzuing Processes 
Reported Being Developed in U.S. 

The Associated Press 

DETROIT — Genera] Motors Corp. and Chrysler Corp. are 
developing molded, composite chassis manufacturing systems that 
“would virtually eliminate the assembly line as a means of producing 
cars," an industry journal reported. 

The new process was aimed at replacing the hundreds of pieces in a 
car interior with larger, molded components. Automotive News said 
in its Monday edition. 

An internal GM study estimated that a molding operation compris- 
ing four robots and fewer than 500 employees could replace about 
10.000 employees in stamping, diemaking and final assembly opera- 
tions, the journal said. 

Ford Motor Co. sources, meanwhile, told Automotive News that 
the No. 2 US. automaker also was developing technology io build 
extruded and molded chassis for jts early- 1990s cars, the journal said. 

Automakers have produced composite exterior body panels since 
the early 1960s, Automotive News said. 


In June, penalties ranging from 
$210,000 to $360,000 were imposed 
against four New York banks. 

Federal officials accused tbe 
Boston bank of failing to report 
$12 billion in cash transfers with 
Swiss banks from 1980 to 1984. Tire 
$500,000 fine levied against the 
bank was tbe largest fine levied at 
that time against a financial institu- 
tion for violating federal currency- 
reporting requirements. 

Mr. Walker said that “the ex- 
tremely serious nature of Crocker's 
violation warranted a substantially 
more severe penalty than in prior 
cases.” 

Tbe Bank of Boston pleaded 
guttty to a charge of “knowingly 
and willfully" failing to report cash 
transactions with nine foreign 
banks. 


Insurance Firm Pays 
Air India $96 Million 

Reuters 

NEW DELHI — Air India has 
been paid $96 million in insurance 
for a Boeing 747 jumbo jet that 
crashed off Ireland on June 23, the 
Press Trust of India news agency 
reported Monday. 

Asbok Goenka, chairman of 
General Insurance Corp. of India, 
which paid the claim, said it was 
the largest single loss suffered by 
insurers in aviation history, accord- 
ing to FTL Tbe crash lotted all 329 
people on board. 


Executive Suites in the Corporate Culture 


(Continued from Page 9) 

46th floor of a building on West 
57th Street overlooking New 
York's Central Park. 

For some chief executives, their 
offices are an extension of the souL 
In 1972 a fire destroyed the offices 
of Publicis. Marcel Bleustdn-Blan- 
chet. Publids’s founder and presi- 
dent. rebuilt his office around his 
original desk. The desk had es- 
caped the flames, and it came to 
symbolize for him the company's 
rebirth. 

Some executives express their 
personality in astonishing ways. 
The offices of Laboratoires Servier, 
a family-held French pharmaceuti- 
cal company, in Gidy, are built as a 


village in the regional style. The 
chief' executive’s office is in the 
steeple of the church, and he sits 
where the bett would otherwise be. 

Jennifer d’Abo, chairman of Ry- 
man Ltd, a British stationary re- 
tailer. says she bought office space 
on London's trendy King’s Road in 
Chelsea because the building is 
right above her hairdresser. Having 
her hair done is a must in her daily 
routine. 

Jean- Louis Courtois, president 
and owner of Pema 2B. a French 
advertising agency, recently moved 
his offices from the prestigious for- 
mality of the Quai tTOrsay to the 
cozy, laid-back atmosphere of a 
white stucco bouse overlooking the 


Seine on the lie de la Grande Jane, 
in Neuitty, a Paris suburb. The 
wooded island in the middle of the 
Seine is only a two-minute walk 
from La Defense, a large complex 
of office towers. 

Mr. Courtois’s office, which 
opens onto a patio equipped with a 
barbecue and a glass-enclosed 
swimming pool is representative of 
his own relaxed style. 

“Our clients love it,” he says. 
“But you have to draw the line 
between working and having a 
good time.” Tins winter he plans to 
cover the swimming pool with a 
wooden floor and tarn tbe glass- 
enclosed space into a tropical gar- 
den. 





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9% 

45 

12 

11% 

206 

17% 

17* 

707 

8* 

71b 

ras 

XT* 

33% 

2 

It* 

Mto 

9 

TO 

9* 

1085 

12* 

12* 

43 

33* 

33* 

5 

17% 

17% 

TO 

u* 

13* 

TOO 

19* 

19* 

IBM 

3% 

a* 

12 

14 

12to 

12(6 

5914 

58* 

MTO 

18to 

17* 


11*— U 
9 

7 — * 
31W 

II*— Vb 
36 — * 

B* 

13U. + * 
14*— * 
2D*— * 
&S* 

4* 

llto + W 
32 — Vb 

31* — to 
20* 

12 — * 
s — u 

33*— * 
II* + U 
TO*— W 
6V. 

13* 

16*— U 
37V6 + * 

e 

1616— V. 
36 
20 

15* + Vb 
W* 

I9U 

2*— * 
7Vb— Vb 
616 + to 


* 


3* 

22 
34V. 

6*— * 
37*—* 
J — Vb 
3BW + to 
2 — > 
21*— «■ 
9*— * 
11* 

17* + * 

on. +1* 

3316— to 
18* + * 
9*— to 
13* 

33* + to 
17* 

13* + * 
19* 

3* + * 
14 + to 

59 

18 +* 


13 

4* 

9* 

24* 

SO* 

28to 

16 

U 

7* 

I* 

10* 

10* 

12 

9to 

S3 

12* 

it 

ao* 

2Mb 

6* 

U* 

JJU 

W* 

7* 

12* 

at* 

52* 

43* 

8* 

»* 

16to 

ao* 

33* 

36* 

34* 

ss* 

7 

9to 

aiu. 

ion 

13* 


4* NCACp 
2* NMS 
3* Nopcds 
18* NBnTen 
38* NltCty 
11* NICptrs 
6* NData 
16* NHJtCt 
4* NILumb 
2* NMlcm 
4* Msusle 
6* NebnT 
6tt Nation 
JVb NwkSec 
14* NiwfcSs 
19* Neutral 
Mb NBtvnS 
23* ME Bus 
14* NHmpO 
16 NJNaB 
3* NYAlrl 
Ito NaMBk 
18 Meant 
Ito NwpPti 
2* NIColO 
6* Nike B 
15* NorBO 
33 to Nordstr 

38* NnkBs 

5* Norston 
5 NAtlln 
ito NestSv 

Uto NwNC 
17* Kwffns 
28* HwNU 

If* NwtfPS 
3Mb Maxell 

5 NwcMNl 

6 Nomrax 
I8U Numeric 
6* NirfrtF 
6* NuMedb 


J4 36 
200 43 
30 l.l 
64 36 
JM1 3 


52 1.9 
JO 19 
1.12b 48 

JSe J 
M J 

l 

60 36 
64 19 
64 1J 
33t J 


164 LI 
68 26 
JO 36 
2.M 95 
1 JB 2.1 


JB 19 


2 

53 
2 

55 
64 
57 

56 
74 

» 

54 
II 
14 

151 

ID 

3072 

26 

280 

3 

53 

42 

258 

600 

151 

187 

WS 

651a 

M 

287* 

331 

3 

U 

<43 

175 

178 

823 

38 

118 

216 

129 

0 

23 

5 


4* « 
5* 516 
8* 8* 
23V. a* 
47* 47* 
1Kb JMb 
13Vb 12* 
17* 17 
4* 5* 
3to 3* 

5 Sr 

7Va 7 
Mb «b 
23 to 23* 
32to 31* 
1016 10V6 

a v 

=1 27* 

ans. 27* 
6Vb ito 
17* ** 
33 22* 

« % 

9 P 

45U 4416 
43U 41* 
6* 6* 
7* 7* 
16* 16 
IB 17* 
28* 28* 
2M 22* 
22 * 22 * 
sets SOto 

6 5* 
6to 6* 
30* JOto 
9to 916 
IDto lOto 


4* 

5* 

D* 

23*— to 
47 V.— * 
18* 

13* 

17* + to 
4*— to 
3*— * 
5 + lb 
4*— to 
7 —lb 
6* 

22*— * 
31* + to 
10*— to 
28 + to 
28 + Vb 

28to + to 
6* 

16* + to 
22* + to 
1!*+ to 
2* 

11* 

17 +1 

44* — to 
43to+lto 
6*— to 
7* 

lttb + to 
17* 

28* 

22* + to 
22* 

SOW 

n 

6to + to 
30* 

9to— to 
lOto + to 


5Vb 

17* 

46to 

S52 

32* 


Ito Oceaner 15 3* J 

13 OeJUal 80 161b 16 

31to O SiGp 1JB 26 75 45TO 

3Mb OtiioCa 180 46 IM «* 

I6U CUdKnts 1J0 36 159 2Mb 28* 


31b + to 
Uto + to 
45to 

60to- to 
29to+ * 


11 Month 
Man Lee Slock 


Div. YkL I* Hilb Lee 3 PAL OTM 


41% 23 
22* IB* 
24 Vb 
9* 3* 

iv* Uto 
48* 22to 
19* II* 
Bto 5* 
7 « 

20*A 14 
34Vb 2SH 
S4V. 12 
6* * 


OKIRPS .74 26 397 
OktSofC 260 12 2 2 
OneSco J9r 17 


OnUne 
OPttcC 
OetlcR 
Ortaaac 

Orbll 

OrtoCe 

Oinmn 30 U 
OttrTP 276 8* 
OeenM -40 U 
Oxoco 


90 

75 

1213 

197 

114 

410 

1 

34 

21 

45 


31* 30* 
21 * 21 * 
23* 23 
•to 8 
13* Uto 
28* 2616 
13* U 
6* 61b 
6* 5tb 
16* U* 
31* 30* 


31*— * 
21*— * 
23* + to 
8*— * 
Uto— to 
28* +1* 
13*— * 
4* + to 
ito + * 
14* + to 

him 


Setasta Net 

Phi. VIA mu HKV Lee 3 PAL OHM 


32* 21U PNCS 168 

S3* 39% Paccar L20o 27 42 

15* 7 PocFB 146 

15 10% PocTH JO LO S3 

17V. lOto PocaPt) 2*7 

Bto 6 PoucMx .13 17 12 

Hi* 10* Paraph BO 


30* * 30 

45 44* 44 

14* 14* 14*— * 
Uto 13* 13* 

14 Uto 14 + * 

7to 7% 7to + to 
24* 34 24 + * 

12to U 12 


16* 6* PrlcCm 5 

46 3a* PrtceCo 

22% 9 prtronx 
6 4* PretfOo .16 

42 20* PreaCs .12 

IS* 12* ProPtTr L2C 
19* 13* Previn 

7to “ 

26* 


35 

J 

93 


3to PuUmn 

12* Purl Bn 


60 13 


I 

50 

S8 

9 

44 

109 

15 

105 

90 


11 11 11 — 
57* 56% 57* + to 
12* 13 12* + * 

4* 4* 4* 

39to 39 39 — * 

12 * 12 * 12 *— * 
17* 17* 17Jb + * 
7* 7* 7* 

23* 23* 23* + * 


14 ■* QMS* 

9* 3* QuoOnt 
Uto v Quotes 
32* 16* Quanta* 
5* 2* OuestM 
13 av. Oulxota 
13* 7* Qualm 


344 

580 

iS 

a 

1410 


10* 10* 10*— to 
Bto 8* Bto 
II* 11 11 

23 72to 22*— * 
4* 4* 4*— M 

12* 12 12*— »b 

ID* 10 ioto 


T4to 

18* 

14* 

14* 

7* 

33* 

20* 

7* 

23* 

10* 

35% 

12* 

7% 

20* 

Mto 

TO 

20* 

16* 

1616 

29% 

43% 

IS* 

10 

22* 

171b 

31% 

!6to 

13* 

24to 

13 

17* 

IB* 

191b 


6* RAX 
11* RPMS 
8* Rods vs 

6% RadtnT 

2* Room 
19% Rota'S 

Uto RavEn 

2* RefflCr 

15% Reoctao 

5V ; Recetn 
25% RedknL 
3% Reave s 
5% RacvEI 
11 fteojbi 

4to RotlOb 
7* RpAutO 
97S RpHtftl 

11* Restrbv 
•to ReuTerl 

17to ReutrH 

29 ReyReV 
9% Rnedes 
3* RftXlml 

12* RtcnEls 

10* Rival 
34% RxxxtSv 

11* RtbNw 

Bto RoOVsn 

16* Reuses 

ito RovPfatt 
3* RovIRs 
11 RustPet 
11% RvanPs 


Jle .1 
56 L4 


23 

145 

100 


45 

3J 1*6 
13 40 

2 
178 
45 

2J VS 
144 
II 235 
J 2 
70 

1J 95 
273 
5 

1J 1 
13 tO 
11 50 

17 43 

423 
1 

SJ 133 
It 341 
5 4 

34 

26 6 
w 

366 

23 

237 


7* 

16to 

12 

11* 


1** 

2* 

21* 

9* 

27* 

12 

416 

141b 

5* 

9* 

Uto 

14* 

Ito 

26* 

39* 

14* 

7* 

21* 

15 

21* 

II* 

12* 

22to 

lOto 

31b 

IS* 

17 


7 

14 

11* 

II 

4to 

30* 

19 

2* 

31* 

9* 

26* 

II* 

6* 

141b 

5* 

9 

13* 

14* 

8to 

24to 

39* 

14 

7 

31* 

14* 

28 

11* 

13 

22* 

ID* 

3* 

15to 

16* 


7 — * 
16* 

11* + to 
lllb + Vb 
4V. 

30% + * 
19 
3* 

21% 

f* 

27* + * 
11% 

6%r— U 
141b 

5* — to 
91b 

13* + to 
14* 

■to— * 
2616— to 
39* + to 
14to + to 
7* + * 
21* 

15 + U 

28 

11*— to 
T2 — * 
23V. — to 
10% Vi 
3% — to 
15Vb 
16% 


16 

7% SAVliMf 



120 

13% 

13% 

13*—* 

w* 

iff* sci Sr 



74 

15* 

ISto 

15* 

19* 

ID* 5EI 



21 

17% 

171b 

1714 

16 

7 SFE 

,H)r IJ 

80 

8 

71b 

7% 

H 

16 SRI 

JO 

18 

1110 

21 

30* 

31 + * 

20* 

6 Soteeds 

JO 

IJ 

750 

2DV4 

20 

20 lb + lb 

44* 

29 Safeco 

IJO 

40 

1176 

40* 

40% 

40* + * 

23 

11* SOfHltti 



1138 

1914 

18* 

1814— to 

16 

7% St Jude 



119 

15% 

Uto 

ts*— to 

7S% 

39* St Pari 

100 

4J 

744 

70* 

70 

718b + Vs 

6* 

TV. Sc 10,1 



16 

5* 

51b 

5% + to 

46% 

32% ScvnP 

MOa X4 

29 

47 

461b 

47 + % 

20* 

10% SBkPSs 

-44 

2J 

145 

2Mb 

20 

20 — % 

K% 

6* ScanOo 



47 

7* 

7* 

7* 

Mto 

TO* SeonTr 



tv 

14 

is* 

J5TO 

13% 

8* Senerer 

32 

IS 

156 

13 

12* 

13 

25* 

15% ScnimA 

At 

1A 

a 

25* 

24% 

25 + % 

81b 

3% SClMiC 



35 

4* 

414 

4* + Vi 

16* 

7 50541 



75 

1% 

SVb 

8% + % 

20% 

12% Scltex 



582 

13W 

12* 

12%' — to 

Mb 

5% SeoOel 



58 

fib 

5% 

5%— to 

8% 

4 Seoaate 



1542 

7% 

714 

74. + * 


2* Sec Tag 



72 

2* 

2* 

3* 

n* 

1* SEEQ 



20 

2* 

2% 

2%— to 

30% 

U Seferi 

JO 

43 

35 

16* 

16V. 

16* — % 

11% 

SVb semlat 



5 

7* 

6* 

6*— to 

urn 

6 Sensor 

S6 

J 

553 

8* 

Bib 

8k 

Ulb 

10* SvcMef 

J8 

£ 

60S 

IS 

14* 

14% + to 

25* 

17* Svmsts 


19 

253 

21 

20% 

20% — % 

23 

13* Service 

J0 ( 


17 

■ 19% 

19V. 

19*— to 

8* 

4* SvcFlCt 



4 

5% 

5% 

Sto + % 

18 

12* SevOek 

.16 

9 

6 

TO* 

16* 

16* 

34% 

23* ShrtVd 

J3 

U 

455 

32* 

35* 

32% + Vb 

39* 

29* StMMitl 

1 JB 

43 

366 

36* 

36 

36 — to 

30* 

12 Sheisra 

.16 

J 

10 

19 

IB* 

19 

14* 

7to SheMs 



4B 

10% 

10* 

10% 

35* 

24% SnonevS 

.15 

J 

1544 

27% 

26* 

26*— % 

MTO 

10 StwoSos 



203 

11* 

11% 

11% 

11% 

5% Silicon 



(145 

6* 

tVs 

<te + to 

22* 

9* Silicons 



105 

11% 

llto 

11* + % 

23% 

11% StlicVoi 



35 

TO 

M 

to — * 

24* 

11% Sfllcru 



25 

30% 

20* 

201b 

12* 

4% siKec 



10 

SU 

5% 

5% 

17% 

11% Slrrtpln 

JO 

SJ 

5 

16 

16 

TO 

IS* 

TO* Sippins 



168 

13* 

13 

T3H + % 

24* 

13% Sigler B 



U 

MVS 

16 

16 — % 

12* 

8% Skipper 

J6 

J 

8 

9 

8% 

8% 

4* 

7* SmliHL 



419 

2* 

2% 

3% — W 

54 

31 Sadr* 

154 

u 

61 

46% 

46* 

46* 

21* 

10 SocrvSv 



131 

20* 

20% 

20* 

ion 

SVb Sottech 



51 

916 

9* 

9to + * 

21* 

n* sottwA 



38 

15* 

15* 

151b 

29* 

18% SonoePs 

JB 

u 

43 

28% 

28% 

28* — % 

27* 

TOi SenrFd 

J5e 

23 

3 

19% 

19% 

19%—* 

61b 

4 SeHosp 



14 

4* 

4* 

(to 

38* 

21* SthdPn 

52 

23 

396 

24* 

34 

34 —to 

28* 

TO* Scutrat 

JO 

15 

16 

17* 

17% 

17* + % 

9* 

Sto 5evrgn 

.w 

IJ 

2110 

6% 

6* 

6% + to 

3116 

>1% Sovrans 



913 

28* 

28* 

28* 


19* 

a* 

8* 

to* 

19% 

9to 

30 

34 % 

27 

34* 

6Vb 

7* 

Mto 

25 

41b 

Uto 

3816 

35* 

1711b 

*5* 

to* 

10 % 

14 

14* 

5* 

18% 

26* 

7* 

11 % 

llto 

2Sto 















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v.- * 








































Vrr} 














B-ri-Ll 

r r i f A 



ml v^ln 





r i ,'U 










w ‘ l. 

















17to She tat 
5* StMH 
7* Stratus 
26* Sti-eCls 
191b STrvker 
97 Suborn 
35% Sucre 
2to Sunune 
j Swnltll 
to SunCst 
8 Suo Sky 
3. Suprteu 
h viSvkas 
6to SvmbT 
6* Svnlech 
21b Svnlres 
llto syscon 

14* SvAsoc 

3to Svsiln 
6% Svslnlp 
61b SrttGti 
12% Systmf 


32 XI 


74 23 


IM IJ 
153 3J 


.10 9 


16 


31 

973 

a 

■ 

ii 

21 

ill 

693 

7 

35 

368 

85 

24 

116 

3 

13 

38 

11 

16 

16 


6% 4V. 6% + lb 
17% 14% 17 + to 

36* 33* 34* 

32 31to 311b — to 
I70to I70to 170*5 + to 
64 63 “ ’ 


3* 2to 
11* llto 
I* Ito 
8% B% 

\ 

10 9* 

13* 13 

R 3W 
18 

15* 14% 
SU 5 
9% 9* 
11* II* 
25 341b 


8* — to 

13W + to 
3% 

18 — * 
IS* 

5 + * 

9* 

11*— to 
24to 



■■■■■ 


■ 




HI 

14 

8V, TBC 



9 

9* 

9to 

9V, — % 

25* 

13 TCAC6 

.12 

£ 

i 

2Jto 

ztto 

23* + to 

71b 

4* ToCVtv ! 



17 

(* 

4to 

4te— % 

20* 

14 Tandem 



2833 

14* 

I3M 

13Tb — * 

9te 

4 Tendon 



1489 

4* 

4% 

4% 

10* 

5Tb TcCom 



6 

10% 

1D% 

10% — % 

22 

11 Telcn 



925 

14% 

MTO 

13*— % 

33» 

IfiTO TJcmA 

f 


231 

JOTO 

37* 

32* + * 

12* 

8% Tel PI® 



836 

10 

9* 

10 + * 

25VS 

I3VS Telecrd 

32 

IJ 


iv* 

19 

19 

28% 

13 Teieplct 



145 

2S% 

25 

25 

5% 

2 TelvW 



272 

2* 

2* 

2% 

20 

13 Telaba 



29 

16Vb 

Mto 

Mto 

17te 

Ito Teixons 



432 

14% 

15* 

16 

o* 


1 


25 

S 

4* 

4* 

15% 

Bto TherPr 



28 

Vto 

9* 

»to + * 

17VS 

Bib THrmds 



6 

15* 

Mto 

15* 

57% 

29% ThrdNt 

IJB 

2 A 

98 


51* 

52% + % 

Mto 

6% Tiwrfec 



115 

7* 

7* 

7*— to 

29to 

9* ThooTr 



1793 

10Tb 

Mto 

lOto + % 

Mto 

(to TtawEn 



225 

7* 

(to 

7* + % 

14 

Bto TmeFlb 



22 


'VTO 

R 

3% 





Vs 



17* 

a Tofu s 




14 

13* 

13* — * 

33 

llto TotESvs 



2 

32 

32 

32 +1VS 

17% 

10 TmkAu 



2 

iDte 

IDte 

IQte 

12* 

&% TrtaOSv 




7* 

7* 

7* 

30% 

23to TrnsJo 

-40 

1 J 

107 

25 

221b 

23*— 1% 

| 




U 



| 

BLJ 


JO 

34 

75 

23* 

E3 

23* — * 

24 Vi 

ISto UTL 



1« 

21* 

2»b 

JH4 + % 

20TO 

5 Ulfrsy 

Ml 

J 

S97 


9 

9 

23 V, 

IOTO unamn 



B96 

IS 

14* 

14* + to 

■UM 




103 

llto 

11* 

11*— * 


r.-iL'-," 

UOW 

3J 

138 

38% 

28 

28* + * 

52Tb 

20% UnTBca 1J0 

29 

5 

Slto 

Mto 

Slto 


IL1 . J'LI-TTTJ 

JM 

J 

147 

23% 

23 

23% + % 



■15r L5 

133 

10 

9* 

9*— to 

B ':. 

19 uacnl 

U» 

<1 

4 

26% 

26% 

26% 

ii 

6 UFnGro 



21 

7* 

7to 

7*— to 

22% 

11* UFUFd 



11 

17* 

lTto 

17V,— % 

17% 

7% UGrdn 

1J4112J 

13 

13* 

13* 

13*- % 

Uto 

7% UPread 



43 

lllb 


llto 

fib 




254 


4* 


32 

21% US BCP 

1J0 

35 

222 

28 rb 

28 

2Mb + * 


114 US Cap 



13 

3* 

3 

3Vb + to 


2to USDaon 



40 

2* 

2* 

Sto 

201 

11% USHCs 

JOB 

J 

231 

28* 

27* 

28 

22te 

ID* USSor 

JOe IJ 

153 

IB* 

18* 

18* 

*-.-1 

25% US Tr 3 

1J0 

3-4 

162 

35* 

3Sto 

35* 

tlj 

inraFTifm 



98 

22* 

L-vJ 

22* + to 

tzl 

’ . l‘A m 

L44 

3J 

56 


tel 

43* + * 

22 

12TO UnvFm 



152 

■ 71 

18% 

iBto + U 

20* 

9TO UnvHn 



566 

16 

15* 

15* + * 

13 

5% UFSBk 



57 

11% 

11% 

11% + to 

6% 

3* U sente 

Jle Al 

306 

Sto 

Sto 

5to— * 

c 




V 



1 

9* 

4% VLI 



2U 

6te 

6* 

6* + * 

16 

7% VLSI 



736 

12 

11* 

12 + to 

12* 

4% VMX 



529 

S* 

5* 

5* + * 

30% 

6* Valla Lb 



758 

7Tb 


7* 

20* 




170 

10* 

17* 

IB — * 

42% 

26 ValNti 

1J0 

XI 

lSJx 

38* 

38* 

38*— * 

IB* 


A0 

2J 

924 

18 

17* 

17TO— % 

15% 




291 

7% 

6% 

6*— * 

6* 

2* Ventres 



667 

4% 

4% 

4*— % 

28% 

13% VTcorp 

JS9a A 

370 

24 

23* 

34 + to 




09 




20% 




41 

Uto 

13* 

14% 

12V4 




MB 

7TO 

7* 

7TO 

22 

14% Veltinl 



280 

W 

ISto 

Mto— % 

im 



w 



1 

Ira 


9t 

49 

41 

19* 

19to 

If* 

M% 

TO WatbCs 

34 

IJ 

18 

13* 

131b 

I3to— to 

13% 

S% WMlTel 



462 

Vto 

9 

9% + % 


14* WshE 

1J6 

HJ 

4V£ 

21* 

21* 

21*- % 



JO 

25 

29 

24% 

23* 

241b + * 

■Oil 




196 

ISto 

IS* 

15* + % 

9% 




95 

7% 

6TO 

7% 


r t m 

AS 

33 

IS 

12% 

i »y~J 


B '~j 

6)4 WeUFn 



14 

16% 

1 J V J 


B t 

m-VV. + igsi m 



33 

IS* 



B^jBB 

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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE; WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28v 1985 


PEANUTS 


THIS 15 UMSSE UJ^LL I 
CATCH THE SCHOOL SOS f 
NEXT WEEK- _ f 




THBl.U^U, WAIT OVER 
THS^E IN- THAT 
UTTLE SHELTER— 


writ] 

( HA/E A J 


BOOKS 






ACROSS 


1 Resting 
5Spamsh 
courtyard 
! 10 Amphora 

■ 14 

contendere 

IS Arden law 

.16 Raines or 
Cinders 
■'17 Start of a 
quotation from 
. WUde 

■ 26 Varieties of 

beryl 

21 Ellipsoidal 
.22 Swiss painter 
23 Weathercock 
25 Gulped 
28 Piano keys 

32 Repeat 

33 Headdress 

34 Scrap 

35 Middle of the 
quotation 

39 Poet's word 

40 Appointed 

41 Elysiuxn 
■42 Published 
44 Chair 

repairmen 

46 Elec, current 
units 

47 Set of rules 

48 Devil-may- 
care 

51 Paid regularly 
under a 
contract 
55 End of the 
quotation 


58 Seed 
appendage 

58 Thin metal 
disk 

60 Schliemaron 
find 

61 Outlaws 

62 Waspish 

63 Uses a sniggle 


24 Prefix with 
business 

25 Inhibit 

26 Pigment for 
Gainsborough 


1 Cough up a 
poker chip 

2 Arm of a crane 

3 Magazine in a 


27 Furniture 
caster, e.g. 

28 Banqueted 

29 I priging 

30 Certain con 

31 Getz and 
Kenton 

33 Multiplication 
word 
36 Glaze 


4 Opener of a 
sort 

5 Emulated 
Gypsy Rose 
Lee 

6 Charged 
electrode 

7 Vast amount 

8 Diamonds, to a 
hood 

9 Exclamations 

10 Winnings, to a 
gambler 

11 Communica- 
tions code 
word 


12 A buttonhole is 
one 

13 Facilitate 

18 Word of 
farewell 

19 Lasting a long, 
longtime 

23 Article of food 


37 Take a deep 
breath 

38 Produce 

43 Props for de 
Kooning 

44 Group of ants 

.45 Enos's 

grandfather 

47 Proofreader's 
mark 

48 Spill the beans 

49 Messina 
money 

50 So that, to 
Henri 

51 NCO’s 

52 About 

53 E.P.A-’S 
concern 

54 Ottoman 
Empire 
officials 

56 Choose 

57 Banff rebuff 



JEAN RHYS: The Complete Novels 


Introduction by Diana AthilL Photographs 
by BressaL 574 pages. $25. 

W. W. Norm & Co. Inc, 500 Fifth Avenue, 

New York, N. Y. WHO. 

Reviewed by Michiko Kakutani 


. h-. characters' complicity- 

one side, revcal “? «sbe is duotudjagStoa 

. . _i xtvufff Sareasso SeaT 


sense or napn^— — . 

Th ?5 £ ^i. SStartSESoaiir toot 


NICE GOibief NOV/ 

You'Ve attracted 
A HEATSBEKlNG 
MISSILE.' y 


W5S1LE 

RANGE 


I 


.She grew thm_ She began to Hve her hard and 
monotonous Hfe very mechanically god list- 
lessly. A vague procession of towns all exactly 
alike, a vague procession of men also exactly 
alike: One can drift like that for a long time, 
she found, carefully hiding the fact that this 
wasn’t what (me had expected of Efle.” 

The sentences describe Maxya, the naive 
heroine of ‘'Quartet,” but they mi gh t just as 
easily apply to any of the women in these five 
novels by Jean Rhys. They drift along, dimly, 
allowing strangers and hHnd r i nr-iimctawy to 
dictate the narratives of their lives. Almost 
inevitably, the. Rhys woman finds herself 
alone, penniless, moving from one cheap hotel 
roots to another, from one man to the not 

Thp worlds inhabited by these women re- 
main remarkably nmilar ■ — shabby hotel 
rooms, on the fringes of bohemia in Baude- 
laire’s Paris or Slot’s London, a demimonde 
populated by yet-to-be-discovTTed artist* 
bourgeois tourists, ineffectual con nxn and 
aimless poetic souls. WhDe Rhys documents 
this landscape wjth carefully observed details, 
it remains more a projection of her self-ab- 
sorbed heroines^ state 1 of mind than a precise 
. location, a virion of the world as a cold, prcda- 


St iSSjf “Bsss" 

foraysinto ta 


of a bSul downed woman 

die l asting ro mance Of m&L- 

Midiiko Kakutani is an the staff of The Ne*. 
York Times. 


bestsellers 


The New VaA 

OT rtoorts fmni ibotc tolflOObootow 


iIh^wii ihe United 
comecndve. 


fiction 


* : w 


3- TOE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBSCb* 
Tom amey — 7 - Trsr- - 


|gm y if"j ■ ■■■ ■ _ 

i isr» 5 

6 ^ffiOD^HKJUSERULES, byTcton ^ 

7 I 


ANDY CAPP 


pitying abouTlSiys's women — a readiness to 
play the rale of victim tiiat simply serves to 
validate i 



r ifV EOOME 1 
EWXTDNDa 
PET-I&Wj 

> yCLHZ 

j /WE 9 S AGE) 

> INTH E — 

/pboonalY 

\ COLUMN ) 


ANDTHEYS/EV] 

’'acveotSt fl 


.Tun 


WIZARD of ID 


® New Yak Times, edited by Eugene Malabo. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


mm umrfz » woet. 


Wife 


play the rote of victim that simply serves to 
validate then disffluaooL. Reading this coflect- 
ed edition of the novels together, one becomes 
even more aware of the depressing sameness of 
their complaints (men are always cruel, money 
is always scarce, hfe is always unfair) and the 
limited boundaries of Rhys* ffcriona! canvas. 
The first four, largely autobiographical novels 
— “Voyage in the dark,” “After Leaving Mr. 
Mackenzie," “Quartet 7 ’ and “Good Morning; 
Midnight” — could be chapters of a wngfe 
story. 

What keeps these novels from becoming 
mamTiin is Rhys’s lean, geometrically precise 
use of lan g ua ge and her meticulous control of 
tone: She write almost entirely from her hero- 
ines’ point af view but also stand* slightly to 


10 wnffiv THE DREAM, by Barbara Tk^oc ' 
Bradfont — * 

n BR^aaaaaffg&s- » 

13 TOO MUCH. TOO SOON, by JaoqneHne 

•n . i«M .i - — — “ 

14 FAMILY A LBUM , by DatricBc Sled . — — 

15 INSIDE, OUTSIDE, by Herman Woafc — U 


NONFICTION 

1 YEAGHL An Autobiography, by Onric 
Vettec and Leo Janos , =-—=-* 


Yeager ana uco Janos =-— ; — r“ ‘ *- 

1 IACOCCAj An AaloMomp t y. by Lee la- • • 
coco midi WHJrani Novak 2 .43- 

3 A PASSION FOR EXCELLENCE, by. • 

Tom geteband Nancy Austin 3 W 

4 SMART WOMEN. FOOLISH CHOKES, - 

. by Camfffl Cowan aal Mrfvyn Kinder — 4 21. 


by Comdl Oman saw Mdvyn Kinder _ 
THE MICK, by NBckey Mantle *rilh Heib 


ON^TBFDl. 







REX MORGAN 


XU Be STOPPING By 
“THE HOSPITAL TO 
see CLAUDIA ! VO 
RATHER YDU D1DNT 
VISIT HER THIS 
EVENING, BRADY / 


whatever you SAV, 
DR. /MORGAN ! WHEN 
WILL "SHE BE ABLE 
TO COME HO/HE 


BARRING ANY COMPLICATIONS, SHE SHOULD BE 
IN THE HOSPITAL FOR ABOUT THREE DAYS f THEN, 
RATHER THAN GO HOME, IV LIKE TO BEE HER 
ENTER A PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL FOR DETOX- 
IFICATION AND THERAPY ' mm ; 


PLEASE, DON'T 
BELIEVE HER WHEN 
SHE TELLS YOU SHE 
CAN DO IT ON HER 
OWN f 


'IF I EVER GET/VWZRJEO,Wm.TOU 

COME AND COOK FORME?' 


Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to form 
lour ordinaiy words. 


FOMIT 


VENOW 


LOPARR 



□bob Gjaans □□□□! 
□eqd aaana nagal 
□naaaaaaQsaaraaoia 
bgo □□□□□ Bosnia 
□ana □□□ 
HCBaniaaaQatQaaao 

EEQE3S !!□□□ 300 

□noD atsaaia aaaa 
□□□ anna aoiscia 
loDasaQaaamaaagai 
nmm □□□□ 

□EQDia aianaa gga 

aEnannnaananGiaE 
ECQH aaaaa oiaao] 
Ibehd □□□□□ □ann! 


L Ki! i tf.1 V ly« a 1 1 rTij fi ilFTA5!f?53 


ii , ; i :f , ; ; r.V-.i : !t; 'j a :%>•/.> J1 .. J V ' ■ ■ " 




Ms* 


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Bl 




Li*/ ^ 'j : (• 1 ••i'j 4 i».«i T i .»> :*.T| 



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mini 



V'.W 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Tmscott 

O N the diagramed ( 
margin of victon 


THAT SCRAMBLE) WORD GAME 
• by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


O N the diagramed deal, the 
margin a victory would 
have beat much greater if 
West had hit on the winning 
opening deaL North and South 
bid briskly to six spades after 
an artificial start to the auc- 
tion. Two diamonds indicated 
a weak two-bid in one of the 
major suits, .and when this 
turned out to be spades. North 
drove to slam. 


queen hdd. Sooth was weD 
placed. Hecashed thednbace, 
raffed a dub and drove out the 
trump! ace. He won the ; dia- 
mona shift in dummy, raffed 
another dab and drew trunks. 
The remaining diamn^f catty 
to th; (tammy allowed Mm to 
discard his heart losers on the . 
ortahfished dubs: • 


West would have , defeated 
the slam if he had guessed to 
lead either a diamond, remov- . 


;• • -NCHCZS 

?$’• . 
r-: -./• .0 AK72 

: ■ ■ 4AX1SI3 

"f J* OQ J88S5 

, 4QWSI 

. SOUTH ff>) 
4KJUSII .*• . 

• VAsta 
' 0 4 3 

NoJtber dde'W wi— hm> 
l/Mug: 


ing lead was the 


ing a key entry from the dum- 
my, or the heart king, driving 


out the heart ace and giving the; 
declarer insoluble problems. 


ao. ta. 2 tr.T. . 

3 ♦ ... Pam 4K.T. ' 

SV Pm 6 * 


West led the bout Jack. 


RALFOL 


HOW HE FEITT 
AFTER EATING TOO 
MANY PANCAKES. 


WirldStockMarkete 


Via Agence France-Presse Aug. 27 

dating prices in local carreaaes unless otherwise indicated. 


sre 90 a 

Std Chartered UA ta 

SunAfflance 500 503 

Tate and Lyle 4 a 465 

Tessa 255 255 

Thorn EMI 3B1 375 

T.I.Graup 366 361 

Trafalgar Hm 374 375 

T HE 138 138 

uifnmar 221 220 

Unaware » 27/6410 29/M 
United Biscuits 187 M6 

Vickers 293 285 

vwmwarth 470 448 


CanedbmuadctvnAJP 

Sates Stack HHrti Low, CRM Chs. 









Tlirt*- -4—- 


i»b: + 





BAOf neOAT B<t THE OfT 


































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 1985 



Page 15 



SPORTS 


Iu World Cup Move 

ItUemarU—i rw ... * 


-isssr*-*- 

FIFA 




Member rui- 
ns run for the World 


xue bad news For Israetta — - 

?S»s 

contrived 


5S* £ad been described by the 
FA as “bteeaih madam.” 
One manager, Englishman Jade 
Man sell, described the national 
kpro five years ago as “dismtegrat- 
eo — half the players tfidn't come 

to training when caHed.” 

Manseflwcdced toward instilling 
xnewe collective effort, more bodQy 
commitment among players whose 
national — *■ *■ 



Better news fnr national service m other fidds 

that few krad^=«^^ nies “ ?5 ,b J less the physical 


OVKn *>oaiig^^ of ^ they wanted to take, 

51S-?®ssss 



Rob Hughes 


i: 


Group 7 (cnnenUy a dose-nm 

^imongSpain.'scotSSfS 


According to soccer statute, Isra- 


together when 
are wilting is sometimes less a 
lent of Hi«ww thaw jvdft irtnl 
conscience. Tbe squad that recently 
toured West Germany fm invalu- 
able experience was inevitably 
drawn From Hapod, Maccabi. and 
Betar, dubs bnked respectively 
with the Labor Party, the tightest 
Head: Party and the Liberal Party. 
Apart from, stimulating debate, 

the national manager Josef Med- 

tnovic, traveled with consi drably 
greater optimism than outsiders 

mi ght t hink, ' 

His souad includes Avi Cohen, 
who a few years ago played for 


J „| ...» '•'“WJ 3UHU 

a should be most welcome 
thefinahstsux Mexico. The Wort 

S-M _ 1Maa . 

tolerate all manner of warrinc fac- champion Liverpool; left 

dons, all creeds, all rdigions/ back David Pizanti, for whom FC 
South Africa excludes itself be- CoJ °g ne has paid £75,000 (about 
caus e apartheid directly breaks S105 -°0°). ana midfielder Moshe 
FIFA law. Israel's virtual isolation ^ Dai ’ w “ om Manchester United 
is brought about by Arab and East- had on trial this summer. 



By the Numbers: An Uncertain U.S. Open 


By John Fein stein 

iViuhutglcn Ptrzi Service 

NEW YORK — In teams, this 
bas been a year in which words 
often have failed. They can’t fully 
describe the wonder of the French 
Open women’s final between Chris 
Even Lloyd and Martina Navrati- 
lova. They seem inadequate to re- 
count Boris Becker's stunning vic- 
tory at Wimbledon. 


the quarterfinal round. On Sunday, 
he overpowered Mats Wflander of 
Swedes for the ATP champion- 
ship, which was played on the same 
surface — hard-court DecoTurf II 
— as the open. 

• Gabriela Sabatini, 15, and 
Steffi Graf. 16, the babcs-in-wail- 
ing of the women's tour, don't seem 
ready to beat Evert or Navratilova, 
but then neither does an von e else: 


Most of all, thev can’t pin down Hana Mandlikova. the only seeded 

a a: ■ _ - I ■ r ■ .» 1 !4 vr J 


Avi Cohen: Elegant style and constructive ideas from defense. 


■■ ..A 
•- s-.- ■ 


era European manipulation of 
those same rules. 

No competitiras, outside the 
world Cup and Olympics, rive Is- 
rael homeroom. The Asian Foot- 
ball Confede ration expelled it in 
1976. ignoring FIFA advice that it 
was illegal to do so. 

Aria needs the Arabs. Eleven 
Arab countries boycotting any 
tournament Israel entered were 
overwhelming odds. Hie federation 
finally announced it could no long- 
er tolerate the “disadvantageous el- 
ement.’' 

The Russians have ance blocked 
moves, urged by IOC President. 


Tim lari time three current Israe- 
li internationals transferred to Eu- 
rope, the team was a World Cup 
finalist Samuel Rosenthal (Borus- 
sia MSncbengJadbacb), Giora 
Sprigel (Lyon) and Mordechai 
Spiegjer (FC Paris) were on the 
team that tied Italy ((Ml) and Swe- 
den (I-I) and lost, 0-2, to Uruguay 
at the 1970 cap. 

The best since then has been Co- 
beo who, at 22, joined Liverpool in 
1979. He played a mere 18 First 
Divisio& games in two years before 
returning to Tel Aviv. I could not 
have see a them all, but his defiant 
style and his constructive at 


i m 'T 


... . ideas from defense left a dear im~ 

a Joan Antonio Samaranch, to bring nression of a player at p py with 
> Israeli soccer into Europe — where European demands, 
its basketball flourishes. Europe Liverpool found flaws. It was 
needs the Russians, or at any rate said he lacked stamina and defen- 
cannot resist their wring strength, sivecaundi and, jokingly, that Sal- 
Small wonder that Israel loses unlays were his day of rest. But 
heart from time to time. Its players Liverpool never tried 
had scant incentive: Its playing 


Liverpool never tried Cohen at the 
heart of defense, his best position. 


Pizanti, 23, is the 1 0th Israeli to 
break into top European soccer. 
Cologne spotted his attacking qual- 
ities during Olympic competition 
and have guaranteed him two sea- 
sons ax £40,000. 

He may be too young to appreci- 
ate fully the meaning of Ge rmans 
Importing Jewish talent. Few, how- 
ever, mistake the implications of 
Arabs on die Israeli national team. 

There are two. Rifat (Jimmy) 
Turk, bom in Jaffa 30 years ago, 
has collected 26 caps in five y care. 
His midfield flair, it was said will 
inspire a generation of Israeli Ar- 
abs. 

Not a generation, but two years 
later came 7a hi Anneli who. as 
Israel's main goal -scorer, provides 
even more obvious following. A 
bustling, no-nonsense center-for- 
ward, he shot Maccabi Haifa to the 
championshi p in his first season, 
and has scored 12 goals in his first 
12 internationals. 


From impoverished beginnings 
in Shfaram, a Moslem -Christian 


the direction of this year in the 
spun. One year after Navratilova 
left the U.S. Open with a sixth 
straight grand slam tournament ti- 
tle and seemingly invincible, be r 
status as top woman player in the 
world has been challenged not by a 
rising star but by Evert. One year 
after leaving here as the dominant 
men's player. John McEnroe may 
have a half-dozen challengers. 

Thai is why numbers may be the 
best way to explain what might 
unfold in the next two weeks at the 
U.S. Open, which was to begin 
Tuesday at the National Tennis 
Center. 

Some numbers: 

• McEnroe still is the No. I 
player in the world. Lhe No. 1 seed, 
the defending champion and the 
favorite. He will be seeking his fifth 
open championship in seven years 
when he plays his first-round 
match against Shlcmo Glickstein, a 
capable player who stretched Ivan 
Lendl to four tough sets in the third 
round at Wimbledon. 


player besides Navratilova and 
Even to win a recent grand slam 
event (the 1981 French Open) re- 
mains too inconsistent ana flaky. 

• The three main threats are 
Pam Shriver and the Twin Towers 
— doubles partners Helena Sukova 
and Claudia Kobde-KOsch. each 
over 6 feet (1.82 meters) and each 
improving rapidly. Shriver. who 
also is 6 feet, is in Navratilova’s 
half erf the draw. Sukova and 
Kohde-Kilsch are in Evert's. 

• Lendl is the No. 2 seed and the 
game's No. 1 bridesmaid- He has 
been runner-up here the Last three 
years and has lost six grand-slam 
finals in his career. Wilander is the 
No. 3 seed and. unlike Lendl, 
seems to rise to the occasion in 
majors, having won two French 
and two Australian Opens. Wi- 
lander. just turned 21. has an inter- 
esting draw: In the second round, 
he is likely to face Slobodan Zivo- 
jinovic. who upset him in the first 
round at Wimbledon. 

• And then there is Jimmy Con- 
nors. He will be 33 on Monday and 
is the oldest player in the world’s 


Paris, and Becker in London. No 
U.S. man readied the final in those 
tournaments. 

That never has been the case 
here. The last non-American to win 
a singles tide was Argentine Guil- 
lermo Vilas in 1977, the last year 
the tournament was played at the 
clay of Forest (fills. On the nation- 
al center's fast hard courts. U.S. 
players have dominated the finals. 

The first week should provide 
some upsets, especially among the 
men. Careen, who bait McEnroe 


and Connors to get to the Wimble- 
don final, faces a tough second- 
round match against Henri Le- 
conte. who beat Yannick Noah in 
Paris and Lendl at Wimbledon. Ed- 
berg plays JosS-Luis den: in the 
opening round; Joakim Nystrom. 
the 10th seed, plays big-serving 
Chip Hooper, and 1 2th -seeded Jo- 
han Kriek meets Paul McNamee. 
On the women's side. Sabatini 
should have a difficult time with 
Barbara Potter, a 1981 semi fi nal ist 
here, in her opener. 


Evert is the No. 1 seed in the 

town in Galilee where street games women’s draw even though Navra- 
were barefoot, Anneli was held by dlova has won two straight titles top 50. He has won the U.S. Open 
his local Third Division club for 10 here. Evert will be trying to win her five times on three different sur- 
yeare until at 26. Maccabi finally seventh open and her 17th grand faces, but hasn’t won a tournament 
prized him away. slam tournament: Navratilova has in 1985. He has been at least a 

N j. l, arowomed to ex- won 1 1 and the two of them semifinalist here 1 1 years in a row, 

trenw* There ire cmwds who *** the onl - v women to win grand but faces a tough road with rising 
tremes. mere are crowds wno a]flfn ev _ nls Since ^ iqgj u.S. star Stefan Edberg a likely fourth- 


taunt him as a “dirty Arab" or as . . , ... . _ 

“PLO filth. "And there crowds that 

German, is the No. S player in Lhe probable quarterfinal opponent 
world and has had an excellent were Connors to survive Edberg. 
summer coming off his magic fort- 
night at Wimbledon. He was the 
major reason West Germany beat a 
depleted U.S. Davis Cup team in 


hoist him shoulder high. 

“1 fed vety proud,” he insists, 
“both as an Arab and an Israeli, to 
wear the national colors.” 

What if that pride should 
spread? If 1 1 Arabs played for Isra- 
el, would Aria want Israel back 
again? 

Too remote to- contemplate? 
Then consider a lesser embarrass- 
ment A coincidence, an omen per- 
haps, but the one and only time 
Israel reached the World Cup finals 
the tournament took place in Mexi- 
co. 


Three grand-slam tournaments 
have been played since McEnroe 
won last year’s open. The winners 
were Wilander in Australia and in 



Wimbledon fitiist Boris Becker, above, recently routed Mats 
Wilander on die same hard-court surface as the U.S. Open’s. 


SCOEtlBOARD 


Baseball 


Tennis 


Monday's Line Scores First-Round Pairings in the U.S. Open 




Dodgers, Valenzuela Shut Down Mets, 6-1 


CompMfy Our Stag From Dispatches Canfinals 3,, Reds & In Cindn- 

NEW YORK — Is Dwight Goo- nan, Danny Cox pitched a six-hit- 
den more valuable to the New York ■ ter and Terry Pemfleton keyed a 
Mets than Fpipaiido VaJenznda is., tfaree-iun second with an RBI an- 


te the Los Angdcs Dodgers? Goo- gle. The Reds’ Pete Rose went 1- 

l- . for-4 and needs ll hits to break TV 


den has the more spectacular ^num- 
bers this season m pitching (be 
Mels into contention in the Na- 
tional League East, but Valenzuela 
also bas been superb in leading the 
Dodgers to the top in the West 
Valenzuela fooled New York 
with his wide assortment of pitches 
Monday night and notched his 


Cobb’s career record erf 4,191. 

Braves 2, Pirates 1: In Atlanta, 
Gerald Peny singled home Dale 
Murphy with one out in the ninth 
to end a six-game losing skid and 
give Bobby Wine, who replaced 
Eddie Haas prior to the game, a 
victory in his managerial debut. 


here. It's the best performance any- 
one in baseball has seen the last 10 
years. He earned the player-of-the- 
week award in one game.” 

Royals 9. fingers 2: Is Kansas 
City, Missouri, George Brett bo- 
roered for the fourth consecutive 
game, scored three times and drove 
in four runs to lead the Royals. 

Indians 43, Brewers 3-& In 
Gevdand, Charlie Moore's two- 
out tingle keyed a tie-breaking, 
three-run uprising in the eighth 
that gave Milwaukee a victory and 


Tigers 6, Mariners 3: In Seattle. 
Darrell Evans and Lou Whitaker 
drove in two runs apiece to help 
Detroit beat the Mariners. 

Blue Jays 4, Twins 3: In Minne- 
apolis, George BeD hit a bases- 
empty home run (his fourth homer 
in as four games) and Garth Iorg a 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
First Game 

Milwaukee TH MB BOO-3 11 1 

Cleveland DM 1M Ml— « t • 

Hlauera GiUson (71, Schroeder |91 and 
Schroeder. Moore (9); Heaton and Banda. 
Willard (8). W— Heaton. &-1X L — Gibson. A-7. 
HRs— Milwaukee. Simmons (101. Cleveland. 
Ttnmlon 2 (13). 


two-run double to roark Toronto. 

2: In Oakland, 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


A - •- *• 


l " •„» r 


f ’••• 


16th victory in 24 decisions in lead- 
ing the Dodgers to a 6-1 triumph. 
The victory helped the Dodgers in- 
crease their divisional lead over 
San Diego to Th games. 

- Valenzuela struck out eight and 
walked one in winning his ninth in 
a row and recording a league-high 
14th complete game on the year. 

“He’s has been tremendous all 
season.” said catcher Mike Sdoscia 
after watching Valenzuela scatter 
10 singles, many of them b/oopers. 
“He gives us a consistent effort 
every time.” , , _ 

Valenzuela is one of four Los 
Angeles starters — Bob Welch, 
Orel Herefciser and Jerry Reass are 
the others — with earned-nm aver- 
ages undo - 3.00. 

The Dodgers scored four runs in 
the sixth to wipe out a 1-0 deficit 
*. Successive singles from Pedro 
c Guerrero, Greg Brock, Mike Mar- 
shall, Sdoscia and Steve Sax pro- 
duced a 3-1 lead, and Valenzuda s 
sacrifice fly to left scored Sdoscia. 

Valenzuela faced a one-out, 
bases-loaded situation in the ninth. 
“How dose was I to taking him 


opater on_ Jerry VfiHani's Dneroui 


Francisco. 

Ptriffies 4, Padres 3: In Philadel- 
phia, Juan Sanrad’s bases-loaded 
single with one out in the ninth put 
the PinDies past San Diego. 

Chicago 10, Astros 4: In Hous- 
ton, rookie pitcher Steve Engel hit 


RBI sacrifice fly in the ninth. 


A’s 3, Yankees 
California, Dave Collins beat out 
an infield hit with bases loaded and 
two outs in the 15th as the A's 
outlasted New York. 

White Sox 7, Red Sox 6: In Chi- 
cago, Greg Walker’s upper-deck 
home run in the 10th beat Boston 
for the White Sox. (AP. UPI) 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


his first big-league home run to cap Bulgarian Sets Weightlifting Record 


Chicago's five-run sixth and 
lected his first victory in the majors 
on a three-walk, three-strikeout 
seven-hitter. 


SODERTALJE, Sweden (AP) — Bulgarian Alexander Varbanov set a 
world dean-and-jetk record of 465.3 pounds (211.06 kilograms) in the 
165-pound class at the world weightlifting championships Monday night. 
Varbanov bettered the mark, set in 1984 by compatriot Zdrawko Stoicb- 
■ kovn. by 3 pounds. Varbanov won his class with a total of 814 pounds. 

American League, in Anaheim, Renault to Withdraw From Formula 1 

California, Eddie Murray hit three 

PARIS (UPI) — Renault, the financially troubled automobile manu- 
facturer, anrawnenH on Tuesday that it wll withdraw from Formula 1 
racing at the end of the 1985 season. The comp any will continue to supply 
itsV6 turbo engine to the Ligier, Lotus and Tyrrell teams, with whom it 
has current contracts. 

Last year, Renault showed losses of 12.55 billion francs (about SI -56 
bOfionV. Formula 1 operations cost it between 150 million and 200 million 
francs annually, and results were viewed as unsatisfactory, 
league record with four home runs The team’s two drivers, Frenchman Patrick Tam bay and Briton Derek 
in a game fell short when Iris drive Warwick, have 15 championship points between them from this year’s 11 
to right was caught in front erf the races (a winner earns nine points; a ranner-up gels six, and third through 

sixth places gel from four points down to one). 

' In its eight seasons on the grand prix circuit, Renault has won 15 of 1 19 
races. No Renault driver has ever wot the world title and the team has 
never won the constructors’ championship. 


home runs and drove in nine runs, 
tying team records and leading a 
5eveD-homer attack that crushed 
California for Baltimore. Murray 
hit a three-run homer in the first, a 
bases-empty shot in the fourth and 
a grand-slam in the fifth. In die 
seventh, his bid to tie a mqjor- 


Snmid Cone 

Mllwaoktt >t0 000 033—3 14 0 

Cleveland lit DOB IN— 3 11 • 

Burris. Flnsers <S) and Moore; Smith. Reed 
IS). Thomason (9) and Wll tort. W— Burris, 9. 
». L— Smith, 1-2. Sv — Fifteen (16). HRs— Mil- 
waukee. Cooper (11). Clovelond. Nixon 13). 
Toronto 030 001 MO— 4 12 0 

MMoesofa M0 )M »))— 3 » 9 

Alexander. Acker (7). Henke IB) and Whitt; 
Blvleven and So lax. W— Alexander, ISA. L— 
Blvtovan, 13-11 S«#— Henke {71. HR— Taranto. 
Bell (27). 

Texas 2M 000 000—3 > 1 

Kouas aty no 303 an— 9 n 1 

Russell, Harris Ml. Henrv (7). Schmidt (8) 
and Brummer. Slaughl 14); Lelhrondt, Out- 
senberry [9|ondWathan.W— LHbrortdLIM. 
L— Russell. 1-4 HR— Kansas CrtV. Bretl 121). 
Boston 200 00) 310 0— « 12 1 

Cklcaoe DM 020 lit 1 — 7 II 2 

Boyd. Stanley (7) and Gedman; Davis, 
Gloat on {«). Salllner (71. Agosto (8), James 
(« and Fisk. W— Jamas. 4-S. L— Sfonlrv, *6. 
HRs— Chlcoao. Baines (13». Fisk (33). Walker 
(17). Boston. Evans (It). 

Baltimore 433 140 003—17 17 0 

CaHtorUa 200 100 000- 3 4 0 

D. Martinet, T. Martinet (9) and Demasev; 
Condetarta. Fowlkes (2). Holland (5). Moore 
(B),Sanchej (9) and Boone, Norton (5)-W — O. 
Martinez. 11-7. 1 Candetarta.2-1. H Rs— Mur- 

ray 3 (24), Shelby 13), Rayford (9). Roenicko 
(12). Demasev »). Calllomla. Beniauex (7). 
Grit* (8). 

Demon 000 110 Zto-4 f 0 

Seattle 000 001 102-3 7 0 

Berenouer, Cary IB). Hemandes (9) and 
Parrish; Wills. Vande Bera (8), Laiorfco (9) 
and ICeamev. W — Berenouer, 3-1 1.— Wills, 4* 
A. Sv— Hernandez {27). HR— Detroll. Evans 
(29). 

new York no oea o» ON 100-2 w l 

Oakland 000 001 000 OOO 101—3 7 3 

Cowley, RWieHl (9). Bordl {12).5hlriev (13) 
andWvneoar; CocflrelLHevyeJ! IS), Mure (11), 
Lonatord (13) and Tettletea W— Landlord, 2- 
S. L— Shirley, X HR— New York. Poolloniio 
114). 


warning track. 

After Us grand slam, the crowd 
of 25,805 gave Murray a standing 
ovation so prolonged that he ca m e 


— r. ' -« s^a, ovation so prowngea uuu oe ca me never wou 

you how dose if y Thev out of the dugout to acknowledge __ w-w -K w- -j-j- -pT* XQ T 

^OT™^enzueik fcjjngr Braves Fire Manager Haas, Hire Wi 

SStffflJfliSSS. 8 Penance anyone’s ever seen 


me 


JO' 



ATLANTA (AIO —The Atlanta Braves fired Manager Eddie Haas on 
Monday and placed him with Coach Bobby Wine, who will manage the 
National League baseball team for the rest of the season. 

Haas, 50, was hired after the 1984 season to replace JoeTorre, who was 
fired after three seasons; under Haas, the .1985 Braves were 50-71 (on 


Monday night, under Wine, they ended a six-game losing streak). Atlanta 
had one first-place finish and two second-place divisional showings under 


Torre; they currently are in fifth place in the N ational League West 
Wine, 46, ' - — 


coached at P hiladelp hia from 1972 to 1983. He played for the 

Fhiffies and Montreal in his 12 years as an infielder. Prior to becoming 
Atlanta's third base coach, he was an advance scout for the team. 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
SI. Loots 030 080 MB— 3 7 I 

ClockmoM 999 080 MO— 0 4 > 

Cox one Portor; Tibbs. Price (91 and Oku. 
w— Cox. 1-4-7. L— Tibbs. 4-15. 

Pittsburgh 180 000 000-1 5 0 

Atlanta 000 MO 101—2 8 I 

Walk, Robinson IB) one Pena: Johnson, 
Gortoer {91 and Benedict. W— Garber, 4-4. L— 
Robinson. 44. 

LOS Angolas MO 0B4 MB-4 13 I 

n«w York Boi mo Mo-i ib 0 

VatMuuata and Setose to; Lvncft, L«aai (4), 
Gorman (7), Sisk (9) and Carter. W— Valen- 
zuela, 1*4. L— Lynch. 10-7. 

Son Freadsco 282 OM TO— 7 8 I 

Montreal TO #02 010-4 18 1 

LaPoint. Gamtts IB) and Trevino; Laskey, 
Burke (7). O'Connor IB). St. Claim (9) ana 
FltzaarakL Butera (91. W— LaP-alnl.7-11. L — 
Laskey, >1 A HR— Son Francisco. Davis (11). 
San Meao 8» IM WO-3 f B 

PMIadetptrto 2B1 obo #bv- 4 9 o 

Hawkins. MCCullem (B) and Kennedy; 
Rawlev. Carman (8) and VlrsIL W— Carman, 
5-4. L— McCullera. D-i. 

ebicage on oh mi— )• is i 

Houston 101 M0 026 — 4 7 2 

Engel and Davis; Knepper. Dawlev (7), 
Madden (9) and Boltov. W— CnoeL, 1-2. L— 
Knepper. ltMO. HRs— Chicago, Engel <l). 
Houston. Doran (13). Bog 1)2). 


Quotable 

• J immy Conuore, on why the Open is his favorite tournament: 
“When you pity in New York, they come to see two guys kill each other. 
They know rD gP out and spitf my guts to win. At the French, if vou spill 
your guts, they just ignore iL And at Wimbledon, theyTIjust ask you to 

d ^»Oev3and Brown Coach Marty Sdiottenheinw, cm why he puis in 


Major League Standings 


Ftrs6roendealrloBtlnntalf.S.OpefiAam- 
ptansMps, wtUcb was to beg la Tuesday In Mew 
York isaedlngs In pareatoesis): 

MEN 

John McEnrne (I), Ui, vs. Shlomo Glick- 
stein. Israel 

Hans Glldemelstor. Chile- vs. Marlin Was- 
tenhoime. Canada; Stowe Domoa Ui. vs. 
Richard Motoszewskl. U^.; MJkr Leoch. ui. 
vs.BudSOtulto.ua.; Roberts ArgeUa,Ara«v 
Itna. vs. Jimmy Arias. UJS; A mas Mansdarf. 
Israel vs. John Sodrl. Ui.; Guillermo Vilas. 
Areenllna. vs. Wallv Masur, Austratia. 

Tomas SmM no. Cmdiaaievaklew vs. Marc 
Ffcir. U^. 

Jeaklm Nystrom (to), Sw ede n , vs. chip 
Hooper, US- 

Ronald Aganor, HaltL vs. Robert Green. 
Ui; Dan Goldie. U^_ vs. Martin Davis. Ui.; 
Mike DePatmer, Ui vs. Marian Void& 
Ciechostovakla; Jlmtnv Brown, UA. vs. 
Llpyd Bourne. US.: Lawson Dunauv UA, vs. 
Kelly Evemden. New Zealand; John Fltoper- 
ald. Australia, vs. Huub van BaecfceL the 
Nethertands. 

Berts Bator (U. West Germany vs. Peter 
Ooohan. Australia. 

Mats Wilander (3). Sweden, vxVIlayAmrl- 
tral, India. 

Stabodan zhrollnevlc. Yugoslavia vs. Bruce 
FaxworUi, UA.; Paul Annacone.uA.vs.Tcim 
GuMIksoa UA.; Ricardo Acuna Chile, vs. Pe- 
tor Fleming, a*.; Raul Vlver. Ecuador, vs. 
Oanie visser, south Africa; Marco Ostola 
Yuaastavta. vs. ftafaario Saoa. Argentina; 
CnstJo MoHa Brazil, vs Greg Holmes. U5. 

Johan Kriek <121. US. vs Paul Mcnamea. 
Australia. 

Tim Mayotte C12). , J.Sv vs. Terry Moor, Ui 

Victor PeacL Paroauay, vs John Uovd. 
Britain; BnM Drewett. Australia, vs Nduko 
Odlzor, Nigeria; Jonathan Corner. UA. vs 
Robert Seguso. u A; Pavel Slazu. Czhchosto- 
vokla. vs Francisco Gonzalez. Poraouay; 
Vince Von Patton. U A, vs Tim WI Ik Ison, u A; 

I Ue Nastase. Romorva. vs Mike Bauer. UA 

Anders Jerryd It). Sweden, vs Mikael 
PWirtors Sertffi, 

Kevin Correa 13). UA, vs Guv Forget 
Francs 

Henri Leconte. France, vs Woltek Fibc*. 
Poland; Batazs Taroczv. Hungary, vs Hans 
ScTiwator. West Germoiv; Thomas Hogstodt. 
Sweden, vs Tony Mmeh. Nigeria; Heinz 
Gunth ar df . Swltzertand. vs Ramesh Krish- 
nan. India; Lleor Plmck.CzeChaelavaklsvs 
Mel Purcell. UA; Diego Perez. Spain, vs 
Steve Melster. UA 

Kearlk SuwMtrom (M). Sweden, vs Martin 
Jolts Argentina 

Stefan Edberg (11). SvaxJen. vs Jose Luis 
Oerc. Argentina. 

Ken Plot*. UA, vs LaansPdoLoVaUe.Mex- 
ico; Brad Gilbert, UA vs Christo Van Rens- 
berg. South Africa; Luke Jenson. UA vs 
Mott Mitchell, U A; Jam Novratiu Czechnsto- 
vakla. vs TTvierrv Tuiasne. France; Shaltar 
Perktss IsraeL vs Peter LMidgren. Sweden; 
Hank Pftotor, UA vs Scott McCain, UA 

Jimmy Connors (4). UA vs Gary Muller, 
South Africa. 

Yonok* Hook (7), France, vs Jeremy 
Bates Britain. 

Jim Grotto, UA vs Give Ido Barbosa. Bra- 
sil; Mark Dickson, UA vs Todd Nelion. UA; 
VI las Gerutattts. UA vs Torik Benhebtles 
France; Colin Dowaaswell. Britain, vs 
Eduardo Banpeachea. Argentina; Jov 
Barger, UA vs Derrick Rastagna. U A; Ato- 
fandroGcnudbal, Argentina, vs Brian Teach- 
er. UA 

Scott Davis (757, UA vs *ta*»CI«TO 
Italy. 

MDOtlav Madr (9), Czechoslovakia vs 
Andy Kahiberg, UA * 

David Pate, U A vs Bruno Oresar. Yitoosto- 
vta; Jakob Hlasek. Switzerland, vs Jaime 
YzooftPeru; DanCassidv.UAvsAliRigdEI 
Mehelmy, Egypt; Haroclo Da la Pena. Argen- 
tina, vs Lea Polls Finland; Tim Gulinaan. 
UA vs Claudio Panatia. Italy; Ben Tester- 
man, U A vs MU Scanlon, UA 

Ivao Lend) IB, Czechoslovakia, vs Joy Lo- 
pMus UA 


Gabriel a Sabatini (IB), Argentina vs Bar- 
bara Potter. UA 

Carling Bassett (IS). Canada vs Ivo Budor. 

ova Czechoslovakia. 

Mercedes Paz. Argentina, vs Vicki Nelson. 
UA; Linda Gates. UA vs Lea Anlonaplls, 
UA Lisa SPObvShart, UA vs Amo-Marlo 
Fernandez. UA; Camille Beniamin. U A vs 
isabalia Demaaoeat, Franca; Laura Car- 
rara. Italy, vs Kathy Jordan, UA; Beverly 
Bowes UA vs Susan Sloans UA 

Helena Sokova (7), Czechoslovakia vs Pe- 
tra Delheee-Jauch. Switzerland. 

Man treia Male fro (t), Bulgaria vs Sudan 


Mascarin. Ui 

jenny Klttch. UA vs Isabel Cue to. west 
Germany; Petra Huber, Austria vs Debbie 
Seenca UA; Ellse Burgia UA vs Yvonne 
Vermoak, South Africa; Helen Ketesi. Cana- 
da vs Anne White. UA; Peanut Louie, UA 
vs Shown Foltz,UA; Anno Minter. Australia 
vs EUzabem Minter. Australia. 

SteHt Gref 01). west Germany, vs Potty 
Femflck. UA 

Aadrea Temesvari (14), Hungary, vs Ko- 
torlna Maleeva. Bulgarta. 

Lori McNeil. UA vs Carol In# Kutilmaa 
UA; AlydoMoultoaUAvs Boverlv Mould. 


brlno Gotes Yugoslavia; Rosie Casals UA 
vs Betsy Nogeisea UA; Anne Hobbs Britain, 
vs Jo Durto. Britain; Eva Pfafl. West Germa- 
ny, vs No Hu. San Diego. UA 

Pam Shriver (4), UA vs Tine Scheuer- 
Larsen, Denmark 

Ztaa Garrison (41.U A vs Barbara Gerken, 
UA 

Pam Cosola, us. vs Etenl Resskfes UA; 
Myriom Schroao. Weal Germany, vs Mari- 
anne WordeLUA; Betinda Cardwell. Britain, 
vs Marla Llndstram. Sweden: Patricia Me- 
drado. BrazfL vs Kate Sampert. UA; JaAnno 
Russell, U A vs Jam Young, Canada; Terry 
Hal ladav, UAvs Lilian Dresctw, Switzer- 
land 

Kathy Rinrtifl (v), UA vs Andrea Holl- 
kova. Czechastovakia. 

Catarina Lln^vtst 03), Sweden, vs MoU»- 
jo Gurney, Ui 

Elizabeth Smyiie. Australia, vs Amy Hol- 
ton. UA; Leigh Ann Thomason. UA vs 
Sandy Collins UA; Emllse RoPonLLoneo. 
Argenllna. vs ftegina MarstLova Czechoslo- 
vakia; Wendv While. UA vs Molly Van Nas- 
trand. U A; Sandra CacchinL Italy, vs Etsuko 
inouc. Japan; Uso Bander. UA vs Anno 
Ivan. UA 

Martina N avratil o va CM. UA vs Pascaie 
Paradis Franc*. 


Transition 


BASEBALL 


TEXAS— Activated Don Sloueht, catcher. 
Ptocod Bill Stein, fatfielder. on the 15-day ms- 
aided list 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Association 
ATLANTA— Stoned John Battto.guard.toa 
mulllyom contract. 

BOSTON— Announced that ML Carr, 
guard, retired and will become a scoot. 

CLEVELAND— Announced the resignation 

of David WotfcJA&vJce president ot mortetfna 
and solos 

FOOTBALL 

Notional Football League 
ATLANTA— Released Raton Gtocumone. 
aunfer; Oanrw Milter. olacskJcker. and l/fnce 
Courvtlle. wide receiver. Placed Mike Lan- 
drum, light end. on the Injured reserve list 
CINCINNATI— Traded David Verser.wtde 
receiver, le Green Bar tor an un qi tc tasr d 
draft choice. 

DENVER— Signed Dean Mlraldl. tackle, to 
a series of one-year c o nt r a ct s Re l eased Ray 

Alexander, wide receiver ; Anthony Woodson, 

ttnehocker; Wilbur Myers safety; wlitord 
Sclssum. tackle; Jay Soldi toto Dan Summers 
t lent ends and Don Brackaa pwdtr. Placed 
Morsnarne Graves end Billy Htosea otton- 
slvellne men, and Aaron SmMbRnobadcgr.on 
Inlurad reserve. 

GREEN BAY PACKERS — Traded Scott 
Brunner, auariertwck, to SL Louis lor an un- 


disclosed draft choice. Released Kurt Ka- 
Pischkc, guard; Alvin Ruben, defensive end; 
Delbert Fowl or. linebacker, and Latov Tar- 
tar. wide receiver. 

KANSAS CITY— Released Tam Condon, 
guard; J.T. Smith and Ira Hlltarv. wide re- 
cehwn; Kerry Parker tmd Matt Courtney, 
carnerbacks; John Zomberiln and Chortcs 
Merritt, linebackers; Vince Thomson, defen- 
sive end. ml EJ. Jones, fullback. Placed 
A/tdv H1IL wide receiver, on Inlurcd reserve. 

LA. RAIDERS— Traded Malcolm Barn- 
well, wide receiver, to Washington tor a 19M 
second- round draft choice. 

MIAMI— Released Eddie Garcia kicker; 
Steve Patter, linebacker; Ray Condrea run- 
ning bock; Ken Southerland, tackle; Adam 
Hinds, safety/ George Shwittasa wide receiv- 
er, and Dan 9nrp, tight end. Placed Bryan 
Ctaric, quarterback, on the waJyed-Inlured 
HsL 

NEW ENGLAND— Stoned Don Blackmon, 
linebacker, and Cedric Jones, wide receiver. 
Named Raymond Hamilton assistant coach. 
Released Rodney Moore, defensive bock, 
Nick Llewellyn ota Jett Hol tmon. offensive 


ST. LOU IS— Released Victor Heflin and Bil- 
ly Dovfs, defensive backs,- Richard Dawson. 
center; Bennie Smith and Reno Patterson, 
defensive tackles; KLD. Dunn, light end. Kurt 
Allerman, Itoeboricer. and Keith Catalan, 
wide receiver. Placed Quentin Walker, run- 
ning back, an lnlured reserve. 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Dtrittoa 

W L Pet. GB 
Toronto 78 4 7 434 

New York 73 50 

Detrail 47 57 

Baltimore 45 57 

Boston 58 *4 

Milwaukee 54 44 

Cleveland « ® 

Wetl Mvisioe 


J93 
JStO 
S33 
ATS 
AS 9 


10W 

im 

18(6 

MW 


J5S S3W 


on 

why 1780 wasn’t a had year: "My ancestor, me urn lotq ucroy. and his 
neigKbor Sir Charles Braabiy decided to have a race for colts. ^ They tossed 
to see which of them it would be named after. My ancestor won. Other- 
wise, it would have been the Epsom Bumbry, and you might be calling it 
the Kentucky Bumbry. That wouldn’t have done at all, would itT 


For the Record 

Archie Mooting, whose 14-year National Football League 
tartly spent as a scrambling quarterback for the New Orl< 


je career was 

□mstly spent as a scrambling quarterback ror tne rsew urleans Saints, 
announced his retirement Monday. Maiming, 36 and for the last two 
years a backup with Minnesota, cited problsns with his right elbow. (API 


ColKornla 

71 

s* 

.568 

— 

Kansas CItv 

48 

54 

SS7 

Ito 

Oakland 

45 

40 

£30 

6 

Chicogo 

40 

OZ 

A» 

9fc 

Seattle 

*57 

48 

454 

14 

Minnesota 

55 

47 

.451 

141b 

Texas 

44 

V 

J74 

2d 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 




Bad Division 





W L 

Pei. 

GB 

SI. Louis 

74 

44 

423 

— 

NEW York 

75 

49 

405 

2 

Montreal 

49 

54 

£53 

Bib 

Chicago 

61 

61 

JOB 

15 

Philadelphia 

58 

45 

472 

18to 

Pittsburgh 

39 

82 

322 

J4fe 


WOMEN 

Chris Evert Lloyd CD. U& vs. Joolne 
Thom won. Austral to. 

Carina KarBsaa Sweden, vs. Rntarilo 
Rai. Italy; Man Lou Ptafek, Ui.vj.OirO- 
ttane JoKtoaint, Switzerland; Betttno Bunaa, 
West Germany, v*. Groce Kim, UA: Robin 
White, U.S, vs, Catherine Tanvler, Franca; 
Andrea Betzner, West Germany, vs. Petra 
Keppetor, West Germany; Mima Jauaavee. 
Yugoslavia vs. DtanM Bales! rot, Australia 
Barnife Garfaiek (T«), US.vs.Gfal Fernan- 
dez. Puerto Rica 

Wendr Turaball n», Australia vs.^ Virginia 
Ruzlef, Romania 

Beth Herr, UA. vs. stwren WaWi-Peto. 
UX.; Ml chet I r Torres. UA. vs. Ktm Shaeter. 
UAj Sophie AmkKh, France, vs. Katerina 
Sknmska Czechoslovakia,- Am Henri ctcsion. 
U A. vs. Kamiegn Horvatn. UA; Sara Gamer. 
Britain, vs. Mary Joe F ernandez, UA; 
Adrians VJIIopran. Argentina, vs. Angetlkl 
Konellopoulou, Greece. 

Ctoodta Kobtto-Klltch (5). West Germany, 
vs. Nlege Dias, BrastL 
Hana ManAfluva (3), CzetbosigvaMa. vs. 


Forward-guard ALL. Care, a valuable sixth-man defensive specialist for 
: Boston Celtics 


gritimore's Eddie Murray 


ThsWcmtwpeaftX 

: ffiree bon** ****** ^ RBIs ' 


the Boston Celtics, announced to retirement on Monday, aiding a nine- 
year National Basketball Association career. Carr, 34, played three 
seasons with Detroit before joining the Critics in 1979. (AP} 


Los Anodes 

Son Diego 

Cincinnati 

Houston 

Atlanta 

Son Frondsco 


west Dlvfstoe 

72 49 

47 58 
44 58 
54 67 
51 71 

48 75 


MB — 
.534 7VZ 
9 

AS 17V* 

.418 23 

JSO 2SM 


Amende Brawn, Britain. 

Amabel Craft. Britain, vs. Mania Ski*- 
neraka Czechorio vtoUs; Catharine Sulra. 
FrcaKB, vs, Leslie Alton, UA; Sylvia Hanika 
West Gernmy, vs. (teahm Felrfiank, South 
Africa; Kathy Joraaa UA. vs. Marcolto 
Muter, the Netherlands; Andrea Jaeger. 
UA, vs. Laura ArTova-GUdonMlstor, Peru; 
Stephen la Rohe, UA, ve. Tarry Photo*. UA 









frwws 

.w. 

- 'i£' -'P’ 1 '±^ a* JAy 1 *!! 


ft- * ? t',: . :-r . ' " • 

P' evsuv; t ^ _ ,■ ... ? 

;,V : f£L28W36 ' 

J: 7 .’ : CHESERV eiATZ GSTAAD TEl‘ 03CV411 65 ! : 'I 













Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL 


TRIBUNE* WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 1985 


OBSERVER 


people 


Bom Again in August A Border Town PonteCompetition 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — August Birth- 
day People: 

. PESSIMIST: From here on, it’s 
still all downhill. 

OPTIMIST: Now — if next Feb- 
ruary doesn't get me, lU bet I can 
make it all the way to my next 
birthday. 

REALIST: Those people wbo 
say you'rejust as old as yon feel are 
all wrong, fortunately. 

SKEPTIC: Sure I'm a Lea, just 
like Napoleon. So how come I’m 
not emperor? How come Tm so 
easy for other people to push 
around? 

SENTIMENTALIST: Poor 
Mama. Having a baby in August. 
And all the doctors away on vaca- 
tion. 

EXECUTIVE: Take a memo, 
Miss Piccolo: “Henceforth family 
members are not to schedule new 
baby arrivals for August.” 

PHILOSOPHER: The advan- 
tage in tuning an August birthday 
is the natural reluctance of all but 
the most insensitive gift-giver to 
present the celebrant, in that 
steamy month, with neckties. 

MILKSOP: As a child, I loved 
my August birthday because that 
day they let me stand under die 
shade tree and eat all the watermel- 
on I wanted and get the juice all 
over my clothes, but now that they 
make me sit at the head of the tahk- 
wearing the new neckties they al- 
ways give me, and make me eat the 
watermelon with a knife and fork, 
Td just as soon forget it and go sit 
with the kids watching the soap 
operas, if they’d only let me. 

YUPPIE: So the calendar says 
71 — all right, why lie about it? — 
The calendar ays 73, and so what? 
August babies age at only half the 
rate of others, so, say that main* 
me 3&A in real terms. All right, let’s 
be realistic: Say Fm 48 or 49 in real 
terms. So what? Nowadays you 
hear 50-year-olds being called 
“yuppies,” so starting today it’s go- 
ing to be a little exercise program 
— jogging, those new-fangled 
weight machines. Not until I check 
with the doctor, of course. And 
that'll take a while, what with all 
the sawbones at the beach tanning , 
drinking too much, flirting with 
each other’s wives and doing all 
those other thing*; they warn you 
against Where was I? Irs not bang 


49 years old that makes the mind 
wander, it's this awful' August 
steam — 

COMMUNICATOR: Concen- 
trate harder next year on not drop- 
ping dues that tip the mass audi- 
oace that I am more than 17 years 
old. Never use antique words or 
phrases like “new-fangled” and 
“tight as the baric on a tree,” or say 
“milksop” when referring to a 
wimp. Avoid boasting about being 
bora in a month named for Augus- 
tus Caesar; audience win think fin 
talking about a dreary old-timer 
who invented salads. Talk young, 
young, young. 

ENGINEER: The defect of Au- 
gust birthdays is that the parties are 
commonly held outdoors under 
.shade trees where It is inappropri- 
ate to wheel in a cake large enough 
for a scantily dressed female to 
jump out of. with a modest budget, 
it would be easy to construct a Large 
shade tree that could be wheeled in 
after necktie presentation, a tree 
with trunk large enough to contain 
a lightly dad female who could 
leap out after activation of a ample 
spring- and -ratchet mechanism 
made the trunk fly open. Remem- 
ber to mention this to procurement 
people at the Pentagon, who might 
want to have' one built to entertain 
August-bom defense contractors. 

FATALIST: Considering the 
year I was bom in, the necessity 'of 
enduring yet another embarrassing 
birthday is the less depressing alter- 
native. 

HISTORIAN: A development 
of profoundly depressing conse- 
quence occurred approximately 
three quartos of the way into the 
20th century. This was a societal 
change that abruptly made it un- 
fashionable, even during the insuf- 
ferable heal of August, to drink gin 
and tonic. In its place, the wretched 
people of that era, to be socially 
correct, were required to ingest a 
cheap pale liquid tasting strongly 
of metal and referred to — it was 
an age of heavy-handed irony — as 
“white wine." After that develop- 
ment, August birthdays, which per- 
mitted one to drink a bit more than 
one should, ceased to be worth no- 
ticing. 

LABORER: A birthday, espe- 
cially in August's filthy heat, enti- 
tles a working stiff to short-sheet 
the boss. 

New York Times Service 


By Frank J. Prial 

New York Tima Service 

P i ERPIGNAN, France — Sal- 
vador Dali once declared that 
the dock in the Perpignan rail- 
road station was the navel of the 
universe. It is a question of per- 
spective, and Dali's guess about 
the true center of thnigs is proba- 
bly as good as anyone’s. What 
can be said with some degree of 
accuracy is that this is very much 
the center of a part of France on 
the verge of profound change. 

It is a border city. Its history, 
commerce and culture are rooted 
mils relationship to Spain, which 
starts a dozen miles to the south. 
That relationship, or at least the 
formal, governmental part of it. is 
about to be altered: Spain is 
scheduled to join the European 
Community in January. 

“Spain is moving into the 20th 
century ” said a load importer of 
Spanish fruit and vegetables, 
“but Tm not sure which way Per- 
pignan is going to go” 

I -ike many Perpignauais, the 
importer fears that Spain's entry 
into the community wig lower 
living standards on the French 
side of the border. “We cannot 
compete with them,” he said. “It 
could be the end of our agricul- 
tural base, which is even now in 
serious trouble.” 

The value of agricultural prod- 
ucts produced in the region has 
fallen 20 percent in the last de- 
cade. It' does not help that the 
average farmworker's wage in 
Spain is a third of what guwilar 
workers earn cm this side of the 
border. 

Optimists expect the Perpi- 
gnan region to profit from the 
easy access to Barcelona that EC 
expansion will provide. Barcelo- 
na, a large, rich industrial center, 
is 95 miles (155 kilometers) away. 
“Spain is a market as well as a 
competitor,” said Bernard Daure, 



Ita New Yor* Tis 


a major importer and distributor 

of wines and spirits in Pcrpignan. 

Wh2e EC membership ma y 

bring Perpignan and Barcelona 
closer economically, they already 
share a long and colorful heri- 
tage. They even share a lan g ua g e, 
Catalan. Barcelona is the capital 
of Catalonia and Perpignan is its 
second-largest city. Legend has it 
that Perpignan’s Catalans, asked 
* to name the capital of their coun- 
try, immediately say Barcelona, 
not Paris. 

“Parisians think of us as being 
meridionaux, unambitious south- 
erners,” said Claude Caustier, 
who heads a company that makes 
fruit-processing equipment and 
ships it all over the worid, “But 
we are in fact northern Ca talan*, 
the most industrious and hard- 
working of all the Catalans And 
now we will have access to the 

V^have to benefftfrom that.” 

Perpignan is the cento: of the 
Pyrfen^es-Orien tales department, 
in the ancient province of Rous- 
sillon. It is a dry, sunny land, the 
southernmost department of 
France, ranging from the Medi- 
terranean to some of the highest 
Pyrenees peaks. Each summer 
tens of thousands of vacationers 
crowd onto its beaches while, 10 
miles away, where the mountains 
begin, the country is wild and 
empty and populated mostly by 
fruit trees and vines. 

Vacationers in this region are 
bargain-hunters compared to the 
sybarites of the Cdte d'Azur, 250 
miles to the east They travel 
mostly with trailers and tents. 
Many stay only a day or two on 
their way to even cheaper resorts 
in Sp ain Perpignan rnftnpgfty , 
barely, to keep a single one-star 
restaurant, Ddcros. It has the du- 
bious distinction in France of 
having turned one of its finest 
historical buildings, the 14th-cen- 
tury Loge de Mer, into a fast- 
focid outlet. 

Local opponents of EC expan- 
sion say Spain is medieval and 
backward, but Perpignan has ac- 
tually suffered more from Spain's 
growing prosperity in the post- 
Franco years. 

Locals love to talk about Perpi- 
gnan's one pornographic film 
bouse, now closed. “Perpignan 
has a population of about 
128.000” said Yves Hoffman, a 
retired secretary of the chamber 




mm 



Sbs 






of commerce. “But the porno film 
theater often matched that figure 
in a few months’ time.” He said 
the patrons were mostly Span- 
iards «capmg the rigid morality 
of tiie Franco regime. The local 
casino also flourished in those 
days. So did Perpignan’s shops 
and restaurants. 

Now the casino languishes, and 
Barcelona has its own shops and 
other attractions. Many Perpig- 
nanais, and particularly the farm- 
ers in the nearby countiyside, 
view the Spanish in a different 
light- Some of them regularly am- 
bush and pillage tr uck* lnarir-H 
with Spanish produce, largely to 
protest the considerably lower 
Spanish prices. A spokesman for 
a young farmers’ group in the 
region predicted that the violence 
was far from over and asserted 


Kpnaa/Alain Hwl 


Perpignan: 
Salvador Dali 
once called its 
railway station 
dock (left) 
the navd of 
the universe; in 
the meantime 
its Loge de 
Mer (above) 
has been tamed 
into a 
fast-food 
outlet 


that Spain’s EC entry would 
make thing s worse. 

Drivers hauling fruit and vege- 
tables north from Spain have 
sometimes blocked the main road 
at the French border to demand 
protection while driving through 
the Pyrenees-Orientales. The 
Spanish government, apparently 
fed up with theproblon, is build- 
ing a pmnal through the moun- 
tains west of Perpignan so tracks 
can avoid the attackers. 

One group appears mostly un- 
concerned about the EC expan- 
sion: former postal workers from 
Lille, former railroad men from 
Metz, retirees from cities where 
the sun is only an occasional visi- 
tor. People over 65 make up mare 
than 18 percent of the arrars pop- 
ulation. 


The husky voice of flea! Bsls? 
came over the public-address as- 
tern of an Am trak train, urging fel- 
low passengers to stay calm after 
the New York-bound Broadway 
Limited struck a truck stalled on 
the tracks near Mansfield, Ohio. 
The entertainer was not among the 
52 people injured in the acddenL 
“She got on the P-A- system and 
urged them to take it easy and not 
to panic." Sberffi Richard Petty 
said. “She was quite calm and she 
helped calm the passengers down. 


off and helped settle them down. 
She was a great help-" 


IngerJohaime Gerwig has final- 
ly found the soldier who saved her 
life in 1945. Gerwig was 10 years 
old and could not swim when she 
fell into the sea whDe reaching for a 
starfish outside Oslo. All she knew 
of her rescuer was that he was as-.' 
signed to the U. S. 99th Infantry. 
Now a professor of Norwegian lan- 
guage and literature at the Univer- 
sity of Colorado, she learned re- 
cently that the unit was holding a 
reunion in Denver. She arranged to 
appear before the veterans to teD 
her story and see if anyone remem- 
bered her. Oddvar Nass, 61, from' 
Portland, Oregon, nudged his wife 
and said, “I think it was me.” Ger- 
wig said, “AH my life I wondered 
who he was. Finally, I found him.” 


Arid Sharon Jias signed a con- 
tract with Simon & Schuster to 
write his autobiography. The 
Washington Post reports. The 
newspaper said the former Israeli 
defense minister, now minister of 
industry and trade, also signed a 
contract with the publishing house 
to cooperate on a book dealing 
with hu unsuccessful libel suit 
against Time magazine. It will be 
written by Sharon’s framer spokes- 
man, Uri Dan, and scheduled for 
release in the aut umn of 1986, The 
Post said. No publication date has 
been set for the autobiography, it 
said. . . . Jane Muskte, wife of 
the former U. S. secretary of slate 
FAmmri S. MusHe, and Abigail 
McCarthy, wife of former Senator 
Eugene McCarthy, have teamed up 
to write a spy novel, “a political 
thriller centering on the drugging- 
Iddnappine (time vice president’s 
wife,” - Publisher's Weekly says. 


r “One Woman Lost" is lo be pub- 
lished next spring by : Charles 
Scribner’s Sons. 

□ .. ... 

Gary Dotson says Cathleen 
CrowB Webb, who reamted testi- 
mony that convicted himof rape, 
tried to convert him to C hr i stian 
fundamentalist beliefs, according 
to an article in Playboy nug a yinr s 
October issue. Dotson t rad Playboy 
that Webb tried to convert Inm 
May 14 when the two met privately 
before appearing on television. 


WeDD KUU sus , rjj : 

her Christian beliefs. Coventor 
James R. Thoapsoo of fifing 
commuted Dotson s 25- to SIM 

sentence to time served, but said, he 

believed the jury had acted conera- 
ly in convicting Dotson m 1979. 

Dotson is seeking a new trial 

□ 

In a book to be published not 
month, Priscffla Presley sa ys E Ms 
Presley, despite her pleas, refused 
to have sex with her until their 
wedding night — after they had 

been living together five years. Pris- 
cilla, now an actress on the idqvi- 
sion series “Dallas,” married the 
rock ’n' roll star in 1967. She brae 
him one Hniit During the mar- 
' nage, which ended m . divorce ip 
1972, she bad affairs with a-danse 
teacher and a martial arts instruc- 
tor, she writes in “Elvis and MejL 
(Review of a stage-musKol bwgrdT- 
phy of Elvis in London, Page 7.) * 

□ ~ 

Andrew .Wyeth, who paints in a 
starkly realistic style, says he ooce 
had a friend X-ray him from head 
to toe so he could accurately jjaml a ■ 
fleshless self-portrait. The painting 
a birthday gut four years ago Tor - 
his wife, Betsy, shows Wyelh as a 
skeleton dad in an 1812 navy coat 
looking out to sea from -ft. light- - 
house watch tower. But the skeleton - 
could not be just anyone^ 
no,~ the artist told Arts & Antiques . 
magazine, “those are my bones.” ' 

□ 

The West German historian 
Goto Mam, 76, will receive the 
biezmial Goethe prize from the aty 
of Frankfurt today fra: his Hfejg. 
work. The prize, worth 50 fna' 
Deutsche marks (about S18JKXB, is - 
presented on Goethe's birthday; - 
±e poet and dramatist was bran in - 
1749. Golo Mann’ s father, Thomas 
Mom, won the prize ml 949... 


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