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INTERNATIONAL 


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Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


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Pakistan Authorities 


PARIS, FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 1985 


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ESTABLISHED 1887 



Under M 


V Miss Bimuo flew to Karachi on 

T- PESHAWAR ft,**'"* Tuesday from her native town of 

nlacaf ■ 5? adm *nistrauan “ d week- At the vffla in Kara- 

nent ©Doraitift^i proin * - ^ Bddressed hundreds erf sup- 

S*ttS£J e ^\ ailder ■ ST 5 i mS 

aftsT Q Sh«- days Mohammed Za uJ-Haq and his 

posed 60111 “tf-im- ^^^govemmeSti “repres- 

enie. The move appeared to ave - 

ufmaintam 0 ^!^ 1,5 inTention „ But she *al the People’s 
doS^IiSSf^^ 011 811 £“? w ° uJ d not press for aa i£me- 
oo^soc political activity. &*lc rad io martial law, but would 

Aimed police surrounded the ® vc **“ government a chance to 
BhQtto famfly honie in Karachi T f tum «> civilian rule by the end of 

and oidawl _# « — ■ the war u i p n - m< . 


V\ 

43- .• 

~ * Si - 

3 J 

-• •: «? 


, “j mwujc ui ivaracm, .r — — - me oia 

S:J ?, i d ^S. su PP 0rlCTS of Miss fi? promised by Prin 

. uttos Pakistan People’s Party Minisier Mohammed Khan Juncja 
wim sathenvi „•«. r ’ The Movement for the Restora- 

tion of Democracy, an umbrella 
group embracing the People’s Party 


-uodr-. 


and 10 other leftist and center par- 
ties, declared in a statement that 
Miss Bhutto’s arrest “exposes the 


‘-aea* 


wspene. Although Miss Bhutto’s 
arrest was not officially an- 
“wraed, police and government 
officials in Karachi and the capital, 

_ Lsiam&bad, said she would be con- — ~ « , 

“fined to her home for 90 days. and contera P l m which 23a holds his 
would not be permitted to meet 0W ^ P^^cnt and prime nrims- 

anyohe outside W household. A 

Miss Bhutto’s arrest, after she 
returned for the funeral of her 
brother last week, indicated the 
military government’s apparent de- 
termination to prevent spontane- 
ous political activity while it man- 
ages a cautious evolution toward 
limited civilian rule. Opposition 
politicians said the arrest also dam- 
aged the credibility of those civ ilian 
politicians who have cooperated 
with the military's plan to hand 
power to a cavil administration. 

Some Western observers sug- 
gested that Miss Bhutto may, in the 
government’s eyes, have violated a 


ter-” Hie statement said the arrest 
had cast doubt on Mr. Junqo’s 
assurance of civilian rule within 
four months, and eallwl on him to 
resign. 

N J). Khan, a Bhutto spokesman 
reached by phone in Karachi, said 
the arrest showed the government 
was “shaky — really afraid of Ben- 
azir,” 

Benazir Bhutto is the dughw of 
the former prime minister Zulfikar 
Ali Bhutto, who was deposed in 
1977 by General Zia and executed 
in 1979 on murder-conspiracy 
charges by the geaeraTs martial law 
regime. 

Miss Bhutto's return has been 



East German 


Defects; Bonn 
Scandal Grows 


Eberhard von Brauchitsch, left, Hans Frideridis, center, and Otto Lambsdorff outside the court Thursday in Bonn! 

Flick Political Payoff Trial Opens in Bonn 


• * * _ — i niN a PIIPttQ 9 i r un n 

tMt agreement in which she was widely regarded as a primary politi- 
penmtted to return to Pakistan cal challenge to GenmdZa’s plan 



freely but was not to be politically 
active. 

* A senior Interior Ministry offi- 
cial, Shah Mahmoud JChurro, said 
last week that Miss Bhutto would 
remain free if she did not “start 
agitating." That position was re- 
peated Monday by the Sind chief 


to return the country to civilian 
rule, in that Us plan dearer aims to 
exclude her party from power. 

Mr. Khan said that. 10 party 
leaders in Karachi who were de- 
tained earlier this month had been 
ordered held for a further 90 days. 

Miss Bhutto returned last week 


: v.-:«n rcir 


* — . l«XLN UUUVIU UUb WVteft 

minister; Sayeed Ghous. Depute after 19 months of erile with the 
such assurances. Miss Bhutto said body of fa brother Shahnawaz, 
at a press conference last week that ^ died , mysteriously in France 
she was pessimistic about bring d- last month. She was released from 
lowed to travel in Pakistan mid was. nearly three years of detention in 
unsure she could leave the country 1984, for medical treatment in Lon- 
freely. don. . 


By James M Markham 

Sew York Times Service 

BONN — Otto Lambsdorff, 
who until last year was West Ger- 
many’s economics minister, went 
on trial Thursday with two other 
defendants .accused of corruption 
in connection with the nation’s big- 
gest political payoff scandal. 

Two of the defendants are 
charged with accepting 510,000 
marks (S 190,000) in bribes for the 
Free Democratic Party while they 
woe ministers in a coalition cabi- 
net led by (he Social Democrats. 

Mr. Lambsdorff, a senior figure 
in the small Free Democratic Party 
and still a member of parliament, is 
accused of accepting 550,000 be- 
tween 1977 and 1980 from the giant 
Flick holding corporation in return 
for granting lucrative tax waivers. 
He is the first West German cabi- 
net minister to be indicted while in 
office. 


His predecessor as economics 
minis ter, Hans Friderichs, is ac- 
cused of taking 5140,000 from 
Flick for similar favors in the years 
1975 to 1977. He resigned as chief 
executive of the Drcsdener Bank in 
March. 

The third defendant, Eberhard 
von Bnuichiisch, is charged with 
having paid the bribes, which are 
said to have gone into the Free 
Democratic Party coffers. They 
were allegedly to secure tax waivers 
worth 5175 million. Mr. von Brau~ 
chitsch was dismissed as Flick gen- 
eral manager in 1982. 

The three defendants have de- 
nied the charges, which cany a 
maximum sentence of five years. 
They also face the possibility of 
heavy fines if convicted on other 
charges involving alleged tax eva- 
sion on party donations. 

The trial is the most significant 
outcome of a three-year scandal 
that tarred the reputations erf West 


Germany's three established par- 
ties and shook confidence in Chan- 
cellor Helmut Kohl's government. 

Revelations of Flick's influence- 
buying in Bonn were regularly 
made by the weekly Der Spiegel, 
which generated a' major parlia- 
mentary investigation ibat took 
testimony from virtually all of the 
country's leading politicians. 

An understanding between Mr. 
Kohl's Christian Democrats and 
the opposition Social Democrats 
ended the investigation last March 
over sharp protests from the leftist 
Green party. 

Rainer BaxzeL the speaker of 
parliament, was forced to resign bis 
post in October following dislco- 
sures that he had accepted more 
than half a milli on dollars from 
Flick for consulting work. 

The Lambsdorff trial, which 
opened in a crammed court, is ex- 
pected to last for al least a year, 
keeping the corruption issue before 


the public as all parties gear up for 
general elections in February 1987. 
Hearings have been set on Thurs- 
days and Fridays. 

Mr. Lambsdorff has ann- 
nounced that he intends to seek re- 
election in 1987. A self -confident, 
abrasive figure, he has told many 
friends that he expects io be acquit- 
ted on the corruption charges. 

A 58-year-old politician who still 
retains considerable influence in 
the Free Democratic Party, he was 
instrumental io swinging it out of 
coalition with the Social Demo- 
crats in late 1982. This parliamen- 
tary maneuver toppled Chancellor 
Helmut Schmidt and brought Mr. 
Kohl’s Christian Democrats to 
power. 

The proceedings Thursday were 
con su med by defense motions chal- 
lenging the competence of the 
judges in the case, and claiming 
that they had no experience in deal- 
ing with economic crimes. 


By James M. Markham 

AW York Times Service 

BONN — A major spy scandal 
lock fresh turns Thursday with the 
disclosures that a high-ranking 
West German counterintelligence 
officer had been detained for ques- 
tioning and that a senior East Ger- 
man diplomat had defected to 
Bonn. 

The Federal Prosecutor's office 
in Karlsruhe disclosed that Rein- 
hard Liebeianz, 48, an officer in the 
Cologne-based counterintelligence 
agency, had been detained and 
questioned about a 10-year friend- 
ship with an East German agent. 
Mr. Liebeianz was later released. 

Later in the day, a government 
spokesman said that Martin 
Winkler, the East German charge 
d'affaires in Buenos Aires, had de- 
fected to West Germany. 

It appeared that Mr. Winkler 
may have been an undercover 
agent for West Germany who fled 
his post after the reported defec- 
tion to East Germany last week of 
Hans Joachim Hedge, a counterin- 
telligence officer at the Federal Of- 
fice for the Protection of the Con- 
stitution in Cologne. 

Mr. Uebetanz, according to the 
prosecutor’s office, had been a 
close friend for a decade of Eber- 
hard Severin, an East German 
agent who was infiltrated into West 
Germany in the 1960s. 

Mr. Severin worked in Cologne 
for an electrical company, but aL 
the end of July had legally deregis- 
tered to move to Vienna. 

Earlier this week, Mr. Uebetanz 
told his superiors in the govern- 
ment that while he was on vacation 
in Austria this month Mr. Severin 
and a third man — assumed to be 
an East German agent — had put 
him under “massive pressure” to 
defect 

Mr. Liebeianz said he fled and 
reported the situation to the Austri- 
an police. 

Alexander Prechtd, a spokes- 





Of Riots in South Africa 


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By Glenn Frankel . 

Washington Post Santee 

MITCHELL’S PLAIN, Sooth 
- : Africa — At least 11 more people 
■ were JriUed in political unrest 
Thursday as black and mixed-race 
townships of the Cape Town area 
erupted in violence for the second 
straight day. 

The death toll around Cape 
Town has reached at least 16 in two 
days of mass protests against the 
white-minority government and 
harsh prolice response. Three other 
deaths were reported in separate 
incidents elsewhere in a fresh 
round of the political violence that 

A U.S. official plays down 
Washington's influence on Pre- 
taria. Page S. 

ha s claimed more than 650 lives in 
the past year. • 

Policemen and soldiers struggled 
throughout the day to enforce or- 
der over a widespread area, firing 
shotguns, rubber bullets and tear 
. rgas at roving bands of residents 
* who pelted them with stones, bot- 
tles and gasoline bombs. 

But the rioiing that began 
Wednesday in two townships — 
after the police broke up a series of 
illegal but peaceful demonstrations 
spread like a brush fire Thurs- 
day to neighboring commu nitie s. 

.Angry mobs set up hundreds or 
makeshift barricades of burning 

tiros, mattresses and refuse to blot* 

police access to the rabble-strewn 
streets. Columns of black smoke 
mingled with clouds of tear gas 

throughout the area. r ^ 

By nightfall security forces soil 

were battling «*£eats j* Hjj 

six townships, all of 
been cordoned off to the P 1 * 85 .?™ 
public by ministerial order Wh- 
oesses described a vast nng of fee 
they said was visible over a targe 

area east of the an. ^ 

■ and ambulances refused to enter 

i the area for fear of attMC- 

Like on Wednesday, most oftbe 
deaths occurred in the bjack jown- 
shipa of Guguletu 
where the police agam open** 

nn stone-throwing crowos. 

SSZi-KSJgi 

££3. The pofee "P"® 1 89 

“Cat least toee P«pte mm 

rrfst^^eentaieaofhoes« 

stones ami bottles 0“ 
^schools h«e 


arid in nearby Mannenburg town- 
ship were afeo turned into battle- 
gronuds. Policemen stormed school 
grounds to disperse protesting stu- 
dents, according to the South Afri- 
can Press Association. The associar 
turn said that local reporters had 
seen policemen firing shotgun 
rounds toward (me Mitchell’s Plain 
ekanentary school and lobbing tear 
gas into the grounds of at least four 
high schools. Classrooms at one 
Mannenburg school were damaged 
byfire. 

At a Methodist day care center 
in Mitchell’s Plain, witnesses said 
that workers had frantically round- 
ed up small children and bundled 
t hem into the binMing as clouds of 
tear gas wafted over the yard. 

Hundreds of students marched 
from the University of the Western 
Cape toward the house of the Rev- 
erend Allan Boesak. The mixed- 
race cleric was detained without 



mao for ihe prosecutor's office, 
said Thursday that an investigation 
of Mr. Uebetanz was continuing; 
but that his story “appeared to be 
true” and that the officer had been 
unaware that Mr. Severin was an 
East German agenu 

“There is no pressing suspicion 
against him,” Mr. Prechiel said. 

A spokesman for the Austrian 
Interior Ministry in Vienna stud 
that an arrest warrant had been 
issued for Mr. Severin and that 
there was reason to believe he was 
still in the country. 

Other accounts said he; hgd es- 
caped to East Germany. ' - 

The 2,000-member Office for the 
Protection of the Constitution is 
concerned with both espionage by 
foreign governments and domestic 
threats such as terrorism. Mr. Ue- 
betanz is a specialist in far-right 
groups. 

JQrgen Sudboff. a government 
spokesman, insisted that the defec- 
tion of Mr. 'Winkler, the East Ger- 
man diplomat, was unrelated to the 
Hedge case; he characterized the 
defector as an expert on Latin 
America who had served in Cuba. 

From various sources, it ap- 
peared that he had surfaced in 
Bonn on Aug. 25. or two days after 
Mr. Hedge's defection was an- 
nounced by the East German press 
agency. 

The last spectacular defection 
from East Germany was in 1979 
when Werner Stiller, a top-ranking 
agent, crossed into West Berlin 
with his wife and child. He be- 
trayed scores of East German spies 
in West Germany who then were 
arrested. 

Since the beginning of the 
month, two Bonn secretaries and 
an army messenger have disap- 
peared from their posts and are 
believed by the authorities to have 
fled to East Berlin. 

On Sunday, Margarete HOke, a 
secretary in the offices of President 

(Confirmed on Page 2, CoL 6) 


Tactics of an East German Spymmten 
Defections, Seductions , Stolen Identities 


Two South African soldiers, one holding a trained attack dog, in an exchange Thursday with 
- M — ’■ — **“ — ~ the township of Soweto, outside Johannesburg. 


(Continued on Page 2, CoL 2) a black who was arrested moments later in 


South Africa Acts to Head Off a Financial Crisis 


LONDON — The governor of 
South Africa’s central bank arrived 
in London on Thursday, reportedly 
to hold emergency talks on his 
country' 5 foreign debt. 

The British Broadcasting Carp, 
said the official, Gerhard de Kock, 
planned to negotiate a lempormy 
suspension of payments on his 
country’s debt. South Africa is 
scheduled to repay more than $12 
billion to foreign banks over the 

next year. .. . w 

Sources in London, sard that Air. 
De Kock was to meet with Robin 


Ldgh-Pemberron, the governor of 
the Bank of England. 

The U.S. Embassy said that Mr. 
De Kock would go to the United 
States on Friday to meet with Paul 
A- Volcker, the chairman of the 
Federal Reserve Board. 

A debt rescheduling would re- 
duce, foT the short term, the 
amount of foreign exchange that 
South Africa would have to spend 
to 1 pay back its loans and would 
extend the timetable for the repay- 
ments. 

South Africa's ability to repay its 
debts- has. ;been hampered by a 


plunge in the value of its currency, 
the rand, from more than 51 three 
years ago to a record low of 35 J 
cents on Tuesday. 

In an attonpt to bait a flight of 
foreign capital and to strengthen 
the rand. South Africa halted trad- 
ing Tuesday on the stock exchange 
and the currency markets until 
Monday. 

Some commercial bankers in 
New York said Thursday they be- 
lieved that Smith Africa could face 
a worsening financial crisis in the 
weeks ahead because international 
banks might stop extending credit 


to the country unless the racial si tu- 
ation was stabilized. 

The fall in the rand's value has 
made it difficult for Smith Africa to 
keep up repayments and servicing 
on foreign debts, estimated at more 
than $18 billion. 

Sources in Johannesburg said 
they believed that Mr. De Kock's 
hurried departure to London was 
to negotiate terras for possible new 
loans with Western banks, as well 
as to discuss the rescheduling or 
payments on short-term debt. 

Banking sources in London said 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 2) 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Pm Service 

BONN — He is often cited as ihe 
model for Karla. John Le Carre's 
fictional spymaster. But to Western 
intelligence experts, the exploits of 
Markus Wolf, East Germany's 
chief of foreign espionage for ihe 
past three decades, are all too reaL 

The defection last week of one of 
Bonn's top counterspies. Hans Jo- 
achim Tiedgc, is the latest of the 
espionage coups that remind West 
German authorities of the vulnera- 
bility of their society to the Com- 
munist superspy. 

Renowned as an innovator in a 
rigid totalitarian system, Mr. Wolf 
has been aided inestimably by- 
Bonn’s open-door policy to Ger- 
man refugees and the common lan- 
guage and culture linking rwo 
states across the East-West divide. 
At least 3,000 spies are believed to 
have infiltrated West German insti- 
tutions, with thousands of other 
informers poised to serve East Ber- 
lin. according to Interior Ministry 
officials in Bonn. 

Mr. Wolf was raised in the Stutt- 
gart area of what is now West Ger- 
many by Communist parents who 
fled to the Soviet Union when the 
Nazis came to power. There he 
picked up the nickname Mischa 
and received his education at Mos- 
cow University. 

When (be German Democratic 
Republic was formed in 1949. he 
joined its diplomatic service and 
undertook his first two-year assign- 
ment in Moscow. Mr. Wolf then 
joined the Ministry of State Securi- 
ty, the intelligence apparatus that 
was set up under close Soviet su- 
pervision. 

Known by the abbreviation 


Stasi, the ministry was responsible 
for suppressing internal dissent, 
controlling the heavOy guarded 
borders, monitoring foreigners in- 
side the country and carrying out 
foreign espionage. At the age of 33 


'He’s got the cards 
stacked In his favor 
in dealing with an 
open society in the 
same language.’ 

A Western 
intelligence official 


Mi. Wolf was placed in charge of 
foreign intelligence operations. 

In that role, he has earned the 
grudging respect of his opponents 
in espionage in the West. 

“wolf has a lot of brains, experi- 
ence and patience.” said a Western 
intelligence official. “But most of 
all, he's got the cards stacked in his 
favor in dealing with an open soci- 
ety in ihe same language.” 

Mr. Wolf also has endured a few 
blows to his prestige. In 1979, Wer- 
ner Stiller, a lieutenant in East Ger- 
man intelligence and one of Mr. 
Wolfs bright young proteges, de- 
fected to the West. Mr. Stiller, then 
31, had been active in supervising 
agents in Western nuclear centers, 
among other places. His defection 
led to the arrest of 17 East German 
agents and caused 15 others to flee 
across the border. 


Nonetheless, Mr. Wolf's reputa- 
tion has been so enhanced by valu- 
able acquisitions, such as Mr. 
Tiedgp, that he remains the obvious 
choice to become bead of the entire 
Ministry of State Security after 
Erich Midke, who is 78 and ailing, 
steps down. 

Mr. Wolfs most clever tactic, 
according to intelligence sources, is 
a refinement of forged identity 
called “seamless penetration." 
From the 1,000 to 2,000 West Ger- 
mans who move to East Germany 
every year, Mr. Wolfs department 
confiscates identity papers and 
turns them over to agents who then 
enter West Germany through a 
third country. Sweden, France and 
Canada are described as favored 
choices. 

The spy entering West Germany 
simply renews with the West Ger- 
man police the canceled registra- 
tion of the West German who bas 
left the country. The spy faces no 
risk of a computer spotting flaws in 
forged documents, and He enters 
with a dean background. 

Two of the spy suspects who 
vanished from Bonn in recent 
weeks were ascertained to have set- 
tled in West Germany in this man- 
ner. One was Sonja Luneburg. the 
private secretary of Economics 
Minister Martin Bangemann, who 
had assumed the identity of a West 
Berlin hairdresser before coming to 
Bonn from Colmar, France, nearly 
two decades ago. 

In addition. Mr. Wolfs spies are 
accomplished at persuading Bonn 
secretaries to betray classified ma- 
terial in return for pledges of love 
or marriage. These spies are known 
to cruise Bonn bars on weekends 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 


INSIDE 

■ Israel said it seized a boat 
carrying Palestinians who 
planned an attack. Page 2. 

■ California police seek the 
•Night Stalker,’ who has been 
linked to 14 murders. Page 3. 

■ A priest’s family is publiciz- 
ing the cases of seven U.S. citi- 
zens seized in Lebanon. Page 5. 

■ The U5. government ordered 

inspections to check for cradis 
in some commercial attune jet 
engines. Pages. 

business/finance 

■ British Pefi , okmn^rQwrt‘ 

ed an increase in net income of 
5.5 percent during ^ second 
quarter. IL 

■ The United States woo a bat- 
tle io get major trading nahons 

. to discuss a new round of tt ade 
talks, sources said. Page**- 






i I i 

Keith Haring graffiti, as 
a sample of American art 
todays an essay in 
Weekend- . rage '7* 


U.S. Is Facing Shortage 
Of Qualified Teachers 


By Keith B. Richburg 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Schools be- 
gan .opening across the United 
States this week without the labor 
stri/e of recent years, but with a 
new problem: a shortage of teach- 
ers. 

The shortage is the result of com- 
plex demographic and labor trends, 
including the aging of the current 
teaching force, a "baby boomlet" 
filling classrooms and declining 
numbers of college students enter- 


ic school districts were giving 
emergency certificates to those 
with degrees but no training in the 
field of education. Such moves 
prompted the nation’s larg&t asso- 


ciation erf teachers, the National 
Education Association, to charge 
Tuesday that unqualified appli- 
cants were being put into the class- 
room. 

In Los Angeles, for example, a 
school district recruiting ad reads: 
“Want to Teach but Have No Cre- 
dentials? Relax!” 

Other districts facing shortages 
have gone overseas to fane, particu- 
larly for bilingual teachers. New 
York City recently hired teachers 
from Madrid, while Houston ad- 
vertised in Mexico Gty. 

Washington area schools have 
been an exception, with superin- 
icndenis there reporting no prob- 

( Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 



The Washington Port 

With a shortage of teachers, schools are opening this week across the United States. 



Page 2 


Nigerian Coup Leader 
Consolidates His Power 





Roam 


LAGOS — Major General Ibra- 
him Babangida, who seized power 
in a coup on Tuesday, has named a 
28- member ruling mili tary council 
with himself as chairman. 

A spokesman. Lieutenant Colo- 
nel Anthony Ukpo. in announcing 
the membership of the council 
Wednesday night, said General Ba- 
bangjda would become the first of 
Nigeria's six military beads of state 
to bear the title of president 

General Babangida win be as- 
sisted by a chief of the general staff, 
who has responsibility for political 
affairs. Ibis marked a significant 
departure from die arran gements 
of former military governments 
here. 

Ebitu Ukiwe, 45, a navy commo- 
dore was appointed as chief of the 
general staff. He is a former state 
governor and was a member of the 
military council in the deposed 
government of Major General Mo- 
hammed Buhari, which was in 
power 20 months. 

Nigerian political analysts said 
the new arrangement appeared to 
have made the position of the mili- 
tary leader considerably stronger, 
with no effective No. 2. 

Reports from around the coun- 
try indicated that most areas woe 
c alm. The authorities also reopened 
all airports Thursday. 

State television described the 
change in government as bloodless 
and the Nigerian news agency said 
work had resumed in most offices 
Wednesday after a two-day Mos- 
lem holiday ended Tuesday. 

[Nigerian radio announced the 
lifting of the dusk-to-dawn curfew 
imposed after Tuesday's coup, The 
Associated Press reported from 
Abidjan, Ivory Coast] 

The number of persons in the 


would be a council of ministers and 
a national council of states to 
group state military governors. 

Also listed as members of the 
ruling council were two senior' 
members of the former govemmen t 

who were on a pilgrimage to Saudi 
Arabia with the framer No. 2 ™n 
during the coup. 

They are Major General Mam- 
man Vatsa, who was minister in 
charge of the proposed national 
capital of Abuja in the old govern- 
ment and Chief Air Vice Marshal 
Ibrahim Alfa. 



Israel Says It Captured Palestinians 
At Sea Who Were Planning Attack 


WORLD BRIEFS 



P 
f (0 


Compiled f y Ow 1 Siajy Fnm Dapetehe 
TEL AVTV — Israel's navy has 
captured a group of Palestinian 
guerrillas who were s ailing in a 


yacht to south Lebanon in the hojre 


Ibrahim Babangida 


South Africa Is Reported 
ToActonDebt Crisis 


(Continued from Page 1) 


that while South Africa might 
achieve a rescheduling of its exter- 
nal debts, any economic gain 
would be short lived without some 
political initiative to alleviate the 
country’s racial problems. (AP. 
Reuters) 


■ Mixed Reaction 
Reaction in South Africa to the 
government's suspension of trad- 
ing on the currency and stock mar- 
kets has been mixed. The New 
York Times reported from Johan- 
nesburg. 

Some people contended that less 


extreme measures could have been 
taken to protect the rand, including 
ordering South Africa's gold-min- 
ing companies to return dollars 
they earn to South Africa. 

Others analysts said, however, 
that any efforts to help restore con- 
fidence and stability m the foreign 
exchange markets were welcome. 

Newspapers speculated about 
what the government might do be- 
fore the markets are reopened 
Monday. The Star, of Johannes- 
burg, suggested there might be a 
major devaluation of the rand 
against foreign currencies, along 
with the introduction of foreign ex- 
change controls. 


of crossing illegally into Israel, 
military command announced 
Thursday. 

A Foreign Ministry official said 
that the yacht had two crew mem- 
bers. one a U.S. citizen 3nd the 
other an Australian. 

The official refused to further 
identify the two. He said that the 
Israeli police were arranging for 
representatives of the U.S. and 
Australian embassies in Tel Aviv to 
visit the prisoners. 

Military sources said that the 
guerrillas had planned to carry out 
an attack in Israel’s northern Gab- 
lee region but gave no further de- 
tails rad declined to say bow many 
people were being held. 

The captured Palestinians were 
identified as members of the Pales- 
tine Liberation Organization’s el- 
Fatah faction, which is headed by 
the PLO chairman, Yasser ArafaL 

In another development, the Is- 
raeli military authorities ordered 


An army statement said that the 
expulsion orders were issued to 
Amin Makbul, Walid Nazd and 
Bahajar Jaousi for “subversive po- 
litical activity,’’ but gave no further 
details. AH three have served prison 
terms fra guerrilla activities. 

The 15 other Palestinians were 
placed in “adminis trative deten- 
tion,” under which they can be held 
for up to six months without triaL 
(AP. Reuters) 

■ Mifitias Continue Fighting 

The Christian, Israeli-backed 
South Lebanon Army militia bat- 
tled Modem mfliuas Thursday oat- 
side the port city of Sidon, United 
Press International reported from 
Beirut 

In the Lebanese capital, hun- 
dreds of me n from the country's 


the sources said, but no casualties 
resulted. Bombardment of the city 


GENEVA (Reuiets) — Afghanutan.and Ptte&m begffl Mgowgos.: 


is rare. 

A member of tbe pro-Synan 
Ba’aih party was killed Wednesday 
as he detonated a car loaded with 
about 660 pounds (299 kilograms) 
of explosives at a checkpoint nine 
mil es (15 kilometers) east of Sidon. 

Israel Radio said tbe man, 
Manaa Hassan Kadaya, and a 
South Lebanon Army militiaman 


‘ Nari^jons^d peace. talks- 
Thursday in the fifth round of 
begun in 1982. He talksareaniKd at getting six-vear Afghan 

Kabo] government out of Afghanistan and en g year ; . : 

acting ns . & b®-«n s spokesman said.- 

different rooms at the UNsEurogean neanqu" __ davs'CCffBBtitimt 
Before the talks bepm, Mr- ,£°r?°SL^MSerShh^S-- 
infernally YaqubEtan ; 


read Dost of Afghan te «o « three days. 


of Pakistan. The talks are I 


were killed and two persons were 
wounded in *’ ~ J ‘ * 1 


the suicide bombiflfr TT_* r p Heads for U-S- GuIfOwSl 

Lebanese guerrillas, however, said Hill 1 1C3II6 UCaUft . . 

that a total of 75 people were killed 


or wounded in the attack. 


East German 

two most powerful Modem militias 

fought for hours to control a gaso- JFLGG8 TO FT SSL 


MIAMI (AP) —The hurricane 
Gulf Coast on 

coastal residents .. — . _ . . 

The National Hurricane Center m Flonaa 


a from Honda to & ■ 


Elena froiaa* 

winds reached 75 r 


\i ; - 


trapical storm to a ett^ectad to St tte' 


the expulsion of three Palestinians 
m the o< 


from the occupied West Bank rad 
detained 15 others without trial in 
apparent retaliation for recent 
guerrilla attacks. 

The crackdown, viewed as the 
most severe in years, followed an 
outcry by Israeli rightists over the 
authorities' failure so far to track 
down the killers of several Israeli 
Jews. 


line tanker. 

The police said that at least one 
man was killed and three were 
wounded before the Draze Pro- 
gressive Socialist Party andAmaLa 
Shiite Moslem militia, withdrew 
from the streets. Later, firelights 
erupted between rival Christian 
and Moslem miiiyiamen along the 
Green line dividing East and West 
Beirut. 

Security sources in Sidon said 
that members of the South Leba- 
non Army had fought with Shiite 
and S unni Moslem militias alon g 

the mountains east of the city. 

South Lebanon Army members 
also fired seven shells into Sidon, 


16 KRled in 2 Days of Rioting in South Africa 


ruling body was significantly in- 
rf the old military 


creased over that of i 
council, and it is made up only of 
military men. Nearly half of the 
new niling council was drawn from 
the military council of the old gov- 
ernment. 

Like the deposed government, 
the new council is dominated by 
the Moslem north, with 16 mem- 
bets. 

Commodore Ukiwe is an Ibo 
from eastern Nigeria. His tribe 
fought and lost a war to secede 
from Nigeria between 1967 and 
1970. 

Colonel Ukpo said that, in addi- 
tion to the ruling council, there 


Taiwan Leader Has S urgery 

Reuters 

TAIPEI — President Chiang 
Ching-kuo, 75, of Taiwan has had 
successful cataract surgery on Ids 
right eye, a presidential spokesman 
said Thursday. 


(Confirmed from Page 1) 
trial this week after he had planned 
a march to PoQstnoor Prison to 
protest the imprisonment there of 
Nelson Mandela, tbe African na- 
tionalist leader. 

The breakup of the march by the 
police led to the outburst of vio- 
lence over the last two days. The 
police dispersed the students 
Thursday with rubber bullets and 
tear gas. 

The police crackdown turned 
many of the demonstrators into an- 
gry rioters in Guguletu and the 
nearby mixed-race township of 
Athlone. They began a nightlong 
spree of arson and stomngs that 
continued throughout Thursday 
and spread throughout the area 
east of Cape Town. 

■ U.& Is Critical 

In Washington, the Reagan ad- 
ministration indirectly criticized 
the South African police for “bru- 
tality” in halting an anti-apartheid 
march, Reuters reported. 


Charles Redman, a State De- 
partment spokesman, said, “Yes- 
terday’s tragic events indicated 
how quickly confrontation between 
police and demonstrators can lead 
to brutality and bloodshed.” 

Mr. Redman did not answer di- 
rectly when he was asked if he was 
anmdng die South African police 
of brutality. “We consistently con- 
demn tbe violence in South Africa 
whatever its cause,” he said. 

Radio South Africa, reflecting 
government irritation at 


Wednesday rad accused erf ob- 
structing the police. The case was 
postponed until next month. 

White and black South African 
business leaders jointly called on 
the government to lift a state of 
emergency imposed last month and 
to begin tallcc with accepted black 
leaders, including those in deten- 
tion. 

The country's four major busi- 
ness groups said in a statement that 
their appeal was prompted by tbe 
temporary closure of exchange and 
coverage of (he unrest, ac- . stock markets as foreign banks 
the Western media of unbal- called in more loans tfam the na- 
tion’s gold rad foreign-exchange 
reserves could cover. 

The statement was issued by the 
Associated Chambers of Com- 
merce, the South African Federat- 
ed Chamber of Industries, the Na- 
tional African Federated Chamber 
of Commerce rad Industries and 
the Urbhn Foundation. 


Council of Churches, including 
Bishop Desmond M. Tutu, said 
Thursday that the government has 
imposed unacceptable conditions _ _ 

on a visit by West European for- * Mr. Hedge in his sensitive position 
eign ministers and they will meet — overseeing the tracking and ar- 


( Continued hast Page 1) 

Richard von WeizsScker, was ar- 
rested on spy charges. 

Research on tbe HOke case has 
persuaded investigators that tbe 
woman, who had worked for 21 
years in the presidential complex, 
may have delivered highly sensitive 
secret documents since 1968 to an 
East German control officer named 
Franz Becker: 

The West German president is 
informed of the *"**»*"£« of tbe 
highly secret Federal Security 
CouncdL 

Chancellor Helmu t K oh l formal- 
ly retired Heabert Hellenbroich, 
the head of the Federal Intelligence 
Service, on Thursday and replaced 
him with Hans-Gcoxg WIedr, West 
Germany’s r ep r es e ntative in Brus- 
sels to tbe North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization. 

Until Aug. 1, Mr. Hefienbroich 
had been president of the counter- 
intelligence agency sn *R H*d left 


mOes (120 kflometert) per 

s*d u», h— 




faster than any storm m 


the memory (rf experts 


Obituary, Spy Case May Be linked “ 

J 1 - gus death notice published in The Tunes ' 

est Germany could have been a coded. 


i: 


LONDON (Reuters) — A 
as a spy scandal erupted in 




Thursday. "I would not necessarily link the two. said Benti MWajdow; ' 
press attadife at the West German Embassy m London, Tmt IrraHiiot- 


exclude tbe jjasability that it is a message. It *s certainly rate 

P< He notice announced the deaths of Timothy, Mark and Jea aatyp^ 
Hessen, sons of the Countess and die late Count Richardt yctt ifeH &fc; 
on the same day in the southwest fishing port of Penzance m Cornwall: 
“Funeral service to be held in Germany," it raid. 

The police in Penzance were unsuccessful in tracing the wo man W ho 
paid to insert the notice last Saturday, and the West German E mba ssy-, 
declared after a search fra any evidence of the deaths that there was no 
frirfi family | only a Princess Margaret von Hessen, who isTZ^and. 
childless. She currently is Queen Elizabeth’s guest at Balmoral Ca stle ay 
Scotland “She is not the lady mentioned in the notice,” said a royal press;: ■ 
officer. . 


the delegation “reluctantly,” He 
Associated Press reported from Jo- 
hannesburg. 


anced reporting. 

“For months the Western media 
have been giving saturation cover- 
age to those aspects of unrest that 
remforce an impression that the 
whole country is in duos,” it said 
in a commentary. It dismissed as 
absurd the idea that the country 
was on the brink of revolution. 

Nine foreign and local reporters 
and photographers were arrested in 
the Cape Town disturbances 


Bishop Tutn and the church 
council’s secretary-general, the 
Reverend Beyers Nande, said they 
would refuse to meet future foreign 
delegations that are not allowed by 
the white government to visit Mr. 
Mandela. 


rest of East German spies — de- 
spite a long history Of alcoholism, 
debt and family problems. 

The appointment of Mr. Wiecfe, 
a former ambassador to MOSCOW 
with a reputation fra bring exact- 
ing with his subordinates, was seen 
as a gesture by Mr. Kohl to assuage 
West G ermany 's allies that me 
Federal Intelli gence Service was in 
good hands. 






Tbe rfgatfi notice that appeared in The Hines of London. 


Hie Tactics of a Spymaster: 


B ulkhead Cited in Japan Air Crash ^ 

TOKYO (UPI) — Tbe U.S. team investigating the Aug. 12 crash of a.. 
Japan Air Unas jet is almost certain that . a pressure wall known as jr 
buDdie&d in the rear cabin faded, causing the Boeing 747*8 tail to burst,, 
sources said Thursday. 


| t j ■ • -j m The investigative sources, who spoke on the condition that they nor be 

stolen Identities, deductions 


1978, and file Beam joining the new section was found to have separated, ■ 


I EC Ministers to Visit 

Leaders of the South African 





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FMNtM COMPANY HANDBOOK 1985 

Published 
Intovncrtioncd Business 
with the 

Herald Tribune 




In tem crion d Herdd Tribraie, Book Division 
181 avenue ChccrJes-de-Gau8e, 92521 Neuffly Cedex, France. 

Please send me copies of French .Gompany Handbook 1985. 


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|aaBirbadiaR|adn| 


-B0>. DATE 


(Caafinued from Page 1) 
seeking to seduce secretaries or to 
approach secretaries on vacation at 
Black Sea resorts. 

East Berlin's, spies have also 
.started to cultivate West Germa- 
ny’s two million unemployed by 
scouring tbe “Jobs Wanted” list- 
ings in newspapers to recruit peo- 
ple desperate for work. West Ger- 
man students also are drawn into 
spying through dummy research 
organizations that offer fees for 
useful commercial, political or stra- 
tegic papas. 

Lately, East Germany has 
worked hard at gathering technol- 
ogy secrets, with considerable suc- 
cess. A report by Bonn’s Interior 
Ministry says East Germany de- 
votes prahaps $3 million every year 
to economic espionage but reaps 
$170 million in research and devel- 
opment savings. 

Many agents are planted among 
those East Germans who, rejecting 


the Communist system, are permit- 
ted to leave to settle in the West 
after a long wait for exit visas. In- 
telligence specialists say that East 
Germany’s allowing a wave of 
40,000 to emigrate last year is in 
part attributable to. its desire to 
“seed” a new generation of long- 
term agents who win by to attain 
influential positions in politics and 
industry. 

One of Mr. Wolfs most accom- 
plished “seeds" was Gtinter Guil- 
laume, who left East Germany in 
1956 and became active in the So- 
cial Democratic Party. He worked 
his way up and joined Chancellor 


They said that U.& officials were “80 percent" sure that the bulkhead 
split open before the crash. - r 

Fli ght J23 was enroate from Tokyo to Osaka when it crashed into a - 


mountain in centraUapan, killing 520 peqpteL A Japanese g overnm ent 
report released Tuesday said the accident be 


impact 


began with an “abnormal 
in tbe tail and the sudden depressurization of the cabin. .. 


Colombian Troops Kill Rebel Leader 


J.’ 








Gandhi Revokes Order 
To Deport Tamil Leader 


troops hat 

leftist guerrilla April 19 Movement, dr M-19, in what nntitary sources' 
said was die most serious blow to th^gnoup in several years. 

General Rafael Forero, chief of die army, said that Ivan Marino 
Ospina and three bodyguards were killed Wednesday in a gun battle witii^ : 
troops who raided an apartment in tbe city of Cali, 278 mdes (450 

kilometers) southeast of BogptL. . - . 

He sources said that Mr Marino Ospina, militaiy chief of M-19 and - 

wmv Brandt’s staff as aneraonal n ?™* er °f five-man central command, had returned recently from an. 
adviser in 1973 penonal to Lftya. M-19, founded in the 1970s, was Cotambia’s most active 

Mr. Gufflaume was exposed as a gr ™F iLsigued a one-year tnu* with the government last 

Communist agent 15 August He mice frequently has been broken. . - 

after he had gained access to dassi- ^ __ 

Greenpeace Names a Lawyer for Suit 

a spy exchange between the East PARIS 
Germany and West Germany. battle against 

- overt' 

environmentalist group’s c h ai rm a n , David McTaggart, announced' 

Thursday. 

He said that Lloyd Cutler, who was counsel to President Jimmy Carter, : 
wifl provide his legal services free of charge to help the environmental 
orga nizatio n obtain compensation for the sabotage of its ship and the 1 

death of a member of its crew, Fernando Foma. 


x • j .. 

> (Reuters) — A former White House lawyer will lead -a legal' 
ainst the French government by the Greenpeace organization; 


i 


The Associated Pros 

NEW DELHI — Prime Minister 
Rajiv Gandhi revoked an order to 
deport a Sri I-animn Tamil Wd*r 
on Thursday, a day after the ex- 
pelled militant returned to India 
from the United States. 

The revocation followed a state- 
ment by the leader, Samuel C 
Chandrahasan, pledging his sup- 
port to Mr. Gandhi's initiative to 
revive peace talks between Sri Lan- 
ka and Tamfl rebels. 

Mr. Chandrahasan, who report- 
edly is on a hunger strike, also 
appealed Thursday to Mr. Gandhi 
to rescind the expulsion order. “In- 
dia has to play an important role in 
solving our problem," tbe Sri Lan- 
kan said. 

Mr. Chandrahasan, who was de- 
tained Wednesday on his arrival 
from New York, was flown by im- 
migration and in iriligen oe officials 
to Madras, in Tamil Nadu state, 
where he was set free. 

Meanwhile, authorities in India's 
southernmost state arrested more 
than 700 activists under a preven- 
tive detention law Thursday on tbe 
eve of a railroad blockade cam- 
paign, the United News of India 
repeated. 

The blockade was called by lead- 
ers of India's 55-mtHion member 
Tamil community to protest gov- 
ernment orders expelling three Sri 
Lankan Tamil leaders, including 


Soviet Nuclear Leak Alleged 

— A Sov,el nodear waste dump in Estonia 
used to store fuel from nuclear submarines is 


Mr. Chandrahasan. The other two, 

Anton S. JBalasingam and Nadesan 

Sathyendra, are now in England. — 

A guerrilla group, meanwhile, re- “iiod at least one worker. Swedish Radio reported Thursday • 
ported that army troops killed He radio quoted a Soviet engineer who recently defected toSwe dcn 


about 100 Tamil civilians, indud- spying that nudear waste was stored under very primitive conditions ala ttu 
ing children, in reprisal shootings ate, nme males (15 kilometers) south of the Estonian capital Taffinn. F 
Tuesday in Sri Lanka’s eastern Bat- radio described the engineer as a former ■ . 


ticaloa area. didnot idratifyhiirL It saidthe waste, which 

Tbe Sri Lankan High Commis- nudear submanne base at Paldisld, west of Taffinn, was 4>red in a simbln 7 
sion in New Delhi, however, said in concrete bunker staffed by nnskilled wortrrry an V?- 


a statement that the report was 
“without any basis whatsoever." 

Talks between Indian and Sri 
Lankan officials on resuming the 
peace talks, in Thimpu, Winnn ; 
rqxntedly were set back again. 

He pro-government Hindu 
newspaper of Madras reported that 
Sri Lanka’s failure to agree to give 
more powers to proposed local leg- 
islatures in Tamil-dominated areas 
has caused “a marked hardening" 
in the Indian attitude. 

India has suggested that top 
elected officials of Tamil areas 
should have powers similar to those 
conferred on state chief ministers 
in India and state governors in the 
United States, official sources said. 


Schools Opening Across U.S. 
With Shortage of Teachers • 


IiecfateriHtein-Yatifian links 


NAME fa «b* bint. 


POSITION- 


COMRANY. 


ADORES. 


CTTY/COUNTIW. 


30-8-85 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


BACHHOTS • MASTERS - DOCTORATE 

Rw Wotfc ffnifa w H Ub Taqi a rf a nn a 


Senddetoiied resume 
far free evofuattan. 


PACffIC WESTERN UMVBSTTY 

600 N. Sepulveda Blvtl. 

Los Anoefes. Callfamta 
9004V, Dept. 23, U^A. 


Reuters 

VADUZ, Liechtenstein — Tbe 
principality of Liechtenstein said 
Wednesday it had established dip- 
lomatic relations with the Vatican, 
11 days before a planned papal 
visiL About 85percen t of the i 
lation of 26,700 are Roman 1 


lies. Pope John Pad □ is doe SepL 
8 for a one^day visiL 


(Cmfinmed from Page I) 
lems in filling posfrkms with piop- 
eriy certified teachers. 

“These so-called emergency and 
alternative certification policies 
make a mockery of the education- 
reform movement,” said Mary 
Harwood Futrefl, presklait of the 
National Education Association, 
which has 1.7 milli on members. 
The politicians have called for 
stronger teacher standards. Now 
they want to lower them.” 

To deal with the shortage, she 
said, states should establish reci- 
procity pacts to allow teachers cer- 
tified in one state to move to a state 
f x l? eri a»cing a shortage without 
losmg benefits and experience lev- 
els. In addition, she said, the De- 
partment of Education should es- - 
tablish a national clearinghouse to 
hdp suites place certified- gradu- 
ates. 

Noting that many teachers left 


states 


tile field when they were unableto' 
find jobs during the surplus a d©-’ 
rade ago, she said 
should 

them bade into service. 

Those steps, along with fit-- 
creased teacher pay, would sol vS’ 
me shortage, she said Increased- 
caucatiMi fimdrng has nosed the 


s* 






the J v 
oukl'ff 



salary above 516,000, all 

association says that figure 
be $24,000. - T 8 ; 

Teacher pay increases av«aaM 
^percent for the current scfaod 
y«r- ^ The jaigest increases came in 
the South, where teacher pay has 
traditionally been lowest ” 1: 

TheNatiorud Education Assod- 
aaon has raged all certified teach- 
ras to di^jlay framed teaching cer- 
tu icaies on classroom T ~ v 

B New Jcnqr ]MBninnn1Pay. 
The New Jersey Assembly 
wL^ Wednesday making 
™e mmumim salary forall 
public school teachers in the state: 
-The New York Times ' 
from Trenton. - 
He legislation is bUw^ , 
Goywnra Thomas R Krrr and 





‘butX 


-*o 


V. 


5'- 




iwpdrted 


£ 

tir • 

t. 

V- 


approved by rfiih 


• ■V*'' 


rate New Jersey the first stale to- 
^pt a m m i mirm salary focteadir, 


M- 





_ -i 


•- -~1 


- 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGLST 30, 1935 



Page 3 


• 1 

■'< V 

P*j-. r ? 

T ... - l+. 

- sv 

y - ' -ft-o. 

•— r* 

? 


Honduras to Prohibit U.S. Embassy 

Prom Handling M 

% ^i^^Carrncy 

TEGUan^rS^ 

The Hondiira.T'™' Honduras — Mr. Paz Bdmica said he was guan l/enwcrauc run*, ins largei 

« “conipleidv** unaware of any plans rebel group, and has played a lead- 
hen; l0 Embassy for the embassy in Tegucigalpa to . ing rote in nuang funds from pn- 

in nonmSf^^ 527 handle the aid. But he add that the vale sources dunng the past year. 

CongrSiw y x? ld Woved by assistance was a concern only of- Mr. Calero also is one of ihree 
QRhSn^n f ^L.L 1Cara « uan rebels the United States and the guerrillas lop leaders of the United Dcmo- 
Rovwnl2,^ hrow ^ Sandinist and that Honduras should be left, era tic Opposition, an umbrella or- 
6“»«*nmentu3 Managua. — ~ rt «* •» 1e 


save face" on the- issue, the 
sources said. 

Mr. Paz - Bdmica said be was 


hiding ; Adolfo Calero Portocar- 
rero. He is president of the Nicara- 
guan Democratic Force, the largest 


*'«»iwsua. 


outofiL 
“I do not believe, then, that the 




- t\ -m.. “■ v 
- -X‘r^- 

- <5.-, 


Belinke 


foreign Minister EdaaidoPM ha? 8 ov «nmem of Honduras is going 

to a«pt iha theU^Embusy m 


V 

iuL-fv-* 

.i t„.. *• •■*.S 


2 : r . 
y,! 

MV?* V-£j 

>3 hasUriV 

9 * Hi ■ 


i-r-v 1 


:.c 




nv iu3» o?U, 


r Virfe 


! Rphelk 







«;j v? < * ues “ Cm s about how the « mat me u curoassy in 

aid would be delivered to the euer- Tegudgalpa would deliver money 
rfllas. to people who are fighting against 

-•Current! v ... »he regime of a neighboring cojra- 

• arms and othU? Sucrnllas bring try,” MnPazBim^said. “Both 
’Honduras tn w Supptes .through the embassy and the Honduran 
border with vr 56 ““P* along the government are caught between a 
■ N|Car ag na - The exis- Set and a w «l«^" 

°f this supply route is an 
pen secret, but the Honduran gov- 
eramem pubHcly denies that the 
rebels operate in Honduran territo- 
ry because it does not want to ad- 

SliiSjlL* 1 “ h 5jp iQ g the effort to 
overthrow the Nicaraguan govern- 
ment 

The Honduran position ap- 
peared to make it necessary for the 
Hj government to hand over the 


ganization that also includes Nica- 
raguan civilian opposition leaders, 
Arturo Jos£ Cruz and Alfonso Ro- 
bdo Callejas. The umbrella group 
js considered a likely channel for 
the new. U.S. aid. 



50 Firms Paid No U.S. Taxes, Group Says 


Edgardo Paz B&rnica 


incompatible with the principles 
of Qonintervendon and self -deter- 
mination of peoples." 

Congress approved the nonmili- 
lary- aid for the guerrillas in June 
after several months of debate-and 
controversy. The vote marked a re- 
sumption in the flow of official 
- — a-'wuiucm uj nano over tne US. aid to them, which had been 

aid to the rebels somewhere outside cm offlasi year. 

Honduras, according to sources fa- Under the previous aid program, 
miliar with the issue. about $80 million of arms and oth- 

Ttw Dm... „ i ■ . . . er assistance was supplied by the 

coSLri^Si f dmu f“? Upn ^ US. Central InteOi^ice Agency, 
ooradnmg what «th«m wiD n,, ad was chmSi ihreoji 
b?sa up to debver the ad, and a Honduras> ^ & c progra in was 
.de^onisexpected wttinna week coveruand the Hondu^Svero- 

'll , ,S ‘ EmbaSSySp fiT! mem was able to deny that it exisi- 
dec lined to comment on Mr. Paz. 

B&nfica’s statement, saying he The U.S. aid approved in June is 
could not say anything about the not covert, and Congress spedfical- 
aid until Washington decides how ly ^ CIA ^ ^ Defense 
the program wall be set up. Department from administering it 

- But unofficial sources dose to The problem is bow to manage a 
the embassy said it does not want public aid program when it has to 
to have a role in handling the aid be delivered by clandestine means, 
because such involvement would One possibility under consider- 
embarrass the Honduran govern- alien was to deliver the aid to the 
menL The United Slates has to do guerrillas in Miami, which is the 
its part to help the Hondurans home of several rebel officials, in- 


Salvadoran Envoy Is Named 

rock and a hard place L. a AAA 

By Mexico, First Since 1980 

“incompatible with the principles ct s»h«,dnr_ Atihoue 


Compiled fy Our Staff From Dispatches 

MEXICO CITY — Mexico has 
named an ambassador to El Salva- 
dor for the first time since August 
1980. He is Federico Urruchua 
Durand. Ambassadors to Jamaica 
and Colombia also were named. 

A statement from the Foreign 
Ministry, issued late Wednesday, 
said that the appointment responds 
to the need “that diplomatic action 
of Mexico in Latin America, Cen- 
tral America and the Caribbean 
might continue." 

The move is the latest in a series 
of steps that have indicated a grad- 
ual warming of relations between 


By Michael Wines 

Las Angela Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Fifty major 
U.S. corporations paid no’federal 
income taxes during President 
Ronald Reagan's first term in of- 
fice. despite earning nearly S5S bil- 
lion in profits, and instead received 
tax refunds totaling $2.4 billion, a 
labor-backed lobbying group has 
reported. 

-It's a public scandal when 
members of the Fortune 500 pay 
less in taxes than the people who 
wax their floors or type their let- 
ters," Robert McIntyre, director of 
Citizens for Tax Justice, said 
Wednesday in releasing the report. 

The group, which surveyed 275 
profit-making companies, also said 
that 79 other corporations paid no 
federal taxes in at least one of the 
years between 1981 and 1984. 

For last year alone, it said. 40 
companies received tax refunds to- 
Mexico and 0 Salvador. Although taling $657 million, despite earning 
Mexico has maintained its diplo- profits or more than S10 billion in 
matte mission in 0 Salvador, it has 1984. 

been without an ambassador since Such moves were all legal, and 
jqoq the data offer **a picture of unpar- 

Mexican government officials alleled success in beating the feder- 
credii the shift in policy to the aJ tax collector." said Mr. Mcln- 
election of Josi NapoJedn Duarte tyre, the group’s director of federal 
as president of 0 Salvador last tax policy 
vear But Mexican political com- He credited that success to the 
mentators. particularly those lo the White House's landmark 1981 tax 
oolidcal left, attribute the improve- legislation, which increased depre- 
ment in relations to the more con- nation rates on corporate equip- 
smvative style of foreign policy be- ment and expanded tax credits for 
W followed by the administration investment, 
of President Miguel de la Madrid, The Reagan administration s 
who took office in December 1982. newly proposed lax reforms, he 
(AP. NYT) charged, “would do nothing to put 


Reagan Rejects Tax Break for Couples 

ll ashit&im Post Sen icc 

WASHINGTON — President Ronald Reagan will not propose 
restoring to his tax-revision plan the deduction for married couples 
who both work, administration officials said Thursday. 

The proposed elimination of the deduction provoked sharp criti- 
cism from members of Congress in both parties utoen it was an- 
nounced by the president in May- Administration officials said at the 

time that they would consider reversing their decision. 

Now, thev sav, revisions of the tax package to be sent to Congress 
next week will ‘not include restoration of the deduction. It is the 
responsibility of Congress to decide whether to reinstate the provi- 
sion. officials said. 

The deduction now allows working couples to subtract from mar 
taxable incomes 10 percent of the income of the spouse who earned 
less, up to 53.000. It helps save a few dollars in the lower tax brackets 
and as much as SI .500 in the top bracket. 


these corporate freeloaders back on 
the tax rolls" and would expand 
depreciation benefits for some 
firms. 

The study, which updates a simi- 
lar report issued last year, analyzed 
taxation of the largest industrial, 
service, financial, transportation 
and utility companies that had re- 
corded profits in each of the last 
four years. 

It concludes that nearly half the 
275 companies paid taxes equiva- 
lent to 12 percent or less of their 
profits during Mr. Reagan's first 
term, compared to the corporate 
tax rate of 46 percent before deduc- 
tions and credits on profits above 
SI 00,000. The group said that 12 
percent is the effective average tax 
rate on individuals. 

Boeing Corp^ the Seattle aero- 
space company, was termed the 


leading tax avoider in the Iasi four 
years, earnin g profits of S2 billion 
and receiving federal income tax 
refunds totaling S285 million. 

AT&T alone received a 5242- 
miliion tax refund in 1984 despite 
earning profits of $1.9 billion. 

During the 1981-84 period, six 
companies besi des Boeing — Dow 
Chemical: ITT; Tenneco; Santa Fe 
Southern Pacific; Pepsico. and 
General Dynamics — earned con- 
sistent profits but received federal 
tax refunds exceeding S 100 million. 

All told, the report contended, 
the 129 companies that escaped 
taxation at least once since 1981 
had $66 J billion in pretax domes- 
tic profits in the Iasi four years, and 
received Lax refunds totaling $6.4 
billion. This amounted to a nega- 
tive tax rate, minus 9.6 percent 
Had all 275 companies in the 


survey paid the Tull 46 percent^ tax 
rate instead of taking deductions 
and credits to avoid some taxation, 
the report stated, federal revenues 
would have been S124 billion bigh-^ . 
er during the Tour years. [ 

A Boeing spokesman said.; 
Wednesday that the company hod , 
legally avoided federal taxes, but 
called the lobbying group's esti-. . 
mates “excessively high." Dow',.- , 
meanwhile, said that the study ig-. - 
notes sales taxes and other lev*® I 
and said that the company bad . 
paid $3.1 billion in various taxes • 
since 1973. 

The corporate tax avoidance.,’ 
Mr. McIntyre said, was all legWj 
and was often accomplished" 
through new or expanded tax loop- 
holes created in the 1981 tax legis- . 
la lion. Besides giving individuals a 1 
25 percent tax break over three 
years, that law loosened corporate ■ 

taxation rules to promote economic • 

expansion and help pull the nation , 
out of recession. _ ' 

In arguing for reforms. Mr. Me- - 
In tyre contended Wednesday that ‘ 
some of the tax breaks in the 1981 
legislation did not produce the in- ^ 
tended economic effects. 1 

Despite tax credits for invest- 
mem, he said spending for new 
factories and equipment rose at 
only a 3 percent annual pace during 
Mr. Reagan’s first term, less than . 
half the rate in the previous four 
years. 

The money has gone instead to 
take over corporations, buy slock . 
and pay stock dividends, he said 


California 'Night Stalker 
h linked to 14 Murders 


m \ By Katherine Macdonald 

Washington Post Service 

LOS ANGELES — He enters, 
almost always, through an . un- 
locked window or door just before 
dawn. It is almost always a yellow 
or beige house. And then, almost 
always, be shoots his steeping vic- 
tims in the head 
' The public now calls him the 
Night Stalker, the latest serial killer 
to terrorize Los Angeles. He has 
been linked to 14 murders and 21 . 
rapes, assaults *nri kidnappings in 


composite drawing of the Night 
Stalker. The police have the pa- 
tient’s records, but voiced no opin- 
ion on possible connections . 

Last week the Los Angeles sher- 
iff, Sherman Block, said that the 
Night Stalker had been linked firm- 
ly to 14 murders, the first on March 
17. The authorities now say they 
are investigating the possibility 
that he also was responsible for a 
series of child molestations in the 
San Gabriel Valley- 
On Wednesday, the Los Angeles 
impounded 


rMpc^r ” - police impounded an orange 

jssscsnsB fesasss'i 



The OnlyTime We Make 


IsWhe 


You Feel Small 


pie. The police said that ah anony- 
mous caller had tipped them about 
tihe Jobation of 'the- car, which had 
been stolen last week in China- 
town- - 

Commander Booth said they 
have yet to find a pattern that 
would warn the police where the 
killer will look for his next victim, 
but leaflets telling, citizens how to 
themselves from the Night 
s mode of operation are 
available at police stations. 

Dr. Alfred Coodley, professor 
emeritus of clinical psychology at 
the University of Southern Califor- 
nia, sees a faint pattern. 

“It’s true that in the past serial 
killers have seemed to select arath- 
er definite kind erf person,” Dr. 
Coodley said. “They looked for an 


habit of entering through unlocked 
windows and : doom inspired- ihe 
name the Walk-In Killer. 

But the pattern : did not hold. In 
one of the: killings attributed to 
him, the victim — a 30-year-old 
student — ■ was dragged from her 
tar and shot to death. - . 

The Los Angeles Herald-Exam- ... 
iner coined the name “Kightagte 
'{ er ” Some police officers called him 
the 818 Killer because he at one 
time had selected all of his victims 
within telephone area code 818 of 
the San Gabriel and San Fernando 
valleys north of Los Angeles- 
But last week be apparently trav- 
eled to San Francisco and fired 
bullets into the heads of a sleeping 
couple lo whom the Night Stalker 

was previously only dderiy person, or a'cbild, or some- 

Los Angeles to wor ^^f^ f L t S i1 i one with a particular kind of hair- 
ern California wondered if the kul- the surface, does 

er had migrated north. • n ot seem to have done this. He has 
Then last Sunday someone en- 
tered a house in Orange County 
south of Los Angdes just before 3 

AJML and shot Bill Caros, 29, m the 
head. His fianefee was raped. 

Police investigators, who are r 

withholding some information Coodley surmises that the 

about evidence the killer leavra oe- ^ gripped in a sadistic rage 

hind as a “signature, had no by some recent event in 

doubt: the Ni^t Stalker had re- 
turned to Southern California. 

' His victims are yourjg and old, 
men and women and children, 

Caucasian and Oriental He does 
not always shoot them. Some have 
been beaten to death. Some tore 
been stabbed. Two have tod their 
throats slashed. 


UUL iw — 

selected a whole family/ 

The “compulsive, dnven kill- 
ings. Dr. Coodley said, bring to the 
Night Stalker a sick gratification, 
which rapidly disappears and 
needs to be repeated. 


his life. 

In Los Angeles, people are shut- 
ting and locking windows, no nat- 
ter how high the temperature might 
climb. And many people in yellow 
or beige houses are wondering if 
the pattern will hold. 


Not all of his victims tore dwL 
Some who were shot in the bead 
survived, including Mr- Cams, but 
he^was in critical condition on 
Wednesday. 

Some of the survivors described 
ihdTattacker. A«ordmg to Co^ 
Sander Wifliam Boothoftto 
Angeles Police Department, to tsi a 

cKan withatancompteMW. 


□unos two , j 

badly stained, a ^ 

ShtaerOwmpa gne: 

Bubble but No Buss 


Reuters 



j aJCouoi-*‘“' 
f the campaign 
fass said. 



COQOUC vu»»- 
y produced m 

c report said 

ainst alcohol 
r Mikhail S. 

, Communist 
i was brough t 

ens this week 

dka, beer and 

ed by up to 30 


PiageT 



Gam’s watch 

iolBearaifld®. 

vttur-resistaiu. 

with wnra'N** 

quam (THWofnom. 

instant tima-zona champ. 

r Pio0cL> 

lJ\lonie-Carwis. 

3 avenue ties Baaux-Arts 

' monte-carlo /I 



ive You A Seat 


Settle back in a Pan Am seat and 

there's so much room you'll think you've 
shrunk. 

Especially in First Class on a 
Sleeperette® seat, with its extending 
footrest. 

You won't feel much bigger in the 
new Clipper® Class either, where there 
are new wider seats, only six across as 
well. 

But as well as all the room in your 
seat, there's all the room around it. 

Room to stretch out and relax. 

Room to enjoy the marvellous 
cuisine,fine wines,and the new in-flight 
entertainment system. 

You'll notice the sound's bigger too, 
with new lightweight electronic 
headphones. 

And for First and Clipper Class 
passengers travelling to New York 
there's another bonus. A free 
helicopter from JFK to Wall 
Street, East 61st Street, and 
Newark airport. 

In a Pan Am seat you may 

\ feel small,but we treatyou big. 

I I No wonder then, in 1984, 

i It more people chose Pan Am 

First Class acr oss the Atlantic than 
any other. It's a bigger experience. 
JCall your Travel Agent or 
" the nearest Pan Am office. 





Rin Am.You Carit Beat The Experience. 




Page 4 


FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 1985 . 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


Puhfisbed 'Widi The New Yorft Tima and TV Washington Port 


tribune Reagan Is Sending Gorbache 

'TV WaAinfiioo Port O O _ __ 




Oil, Coups and Nigeria 


As a major oil exporter, Nigeria lived pros- 
perously on a rapidly rising flow of foreign 
earnings through the 1970s. Although there 
were some troubling side effects of that pros- 
perity, they seemed manageable at the time. 
The country's strong currency raised Nigeri- 
ans' purchasing power and undercut — fay a 
process that Americans have recently come to 
understand — Nigeria’s industry and agricul- 
ture. Local production had trouble competing 
with imports despite many protectionist mea- 
sures taken by the gov ernment. 

The oil revenues peaked in 1980, then start- 
ed to falL Anxious to maintain its recent stan- 
dard of living, Nigeria began to borrow 
abroad. Under Sheba Shagan, the elected ci- 
vilian president who had replaced the previous 
military rulers, the government acquired sub- 
stantial debts. But President Shagari was re- 
elected in the summer of 1983 for another four 
years. He turned to the International Mone- 
tary Fund for advice; the IMF suggested, 
among other things, dropping the exchange 
rate of the now overvalued currency. Mr. Sha- 
gari announced an austerity program but, at 
the end of 1983, was deposed by a mili tary 
coup that pledged itself to end “the crisis of 
confidence now afflicting our nation.” 

That, unfortunately, is not what happened. 
Major General Mohammed Bohan, who led 
the new government, made a mistake that 


Who Sank the Warrior? 


President Francois Mitterrand of France 
has a diplomatic, political and moral problem 
that will not go away. Almost from the mo- 
ment that the environmental ship Rainbow 
Warrior was bombed and sunk in New Zea- 
land, people in and out of France suspected 
official French involvement. Now the official 
report by Bernard Tricot, a respected opposi- 
tion figure, has if any thing, rnarie the suspi- 
cions worse. They will endure until the French 
government explains the inconsistencies. 

The Rainbow Warrior, a ship belonging to 
the environmental-action group Greenpeace, 
sailed to Auckland, New Zealand, prior to 
protesting French nuclear tests in the South 
Pacific. On July 10, bombs attached to its boll 
exploded, rinlnng the ship and killing a crew, 
member. A few days later. New Zealand police 
arrested two suspects who turned out to be 
French intelligence agents. 

The Tricot report confirms that these two, 
and also four other suspects, were agents car- 
rying out an officially sanctioned intelligence 
mission against Greenpeace. Three of the fugi- 
tives, all frogmen, or underwater specialists, 
were secretly smuggled back to France: Still. 


the French report concludes, there is not suffi- 
cient evidence to prove that the fatal bombing 
was officially sanctioned, or that the agents 
themselves went beyond intelligence gather- 
ing. Perhaps, but then why send frogmen? And 
if there is no convincing evidence to link these 
operatives to the fatal explosions, why was it 
necessary to spirit them out of the reach of the 
authorities in New Zealand? 

The French Left, facing an unpromising 
parliamentary election campaign t speculates 
that rightists in the intelligence service set out 
to embarrass the government. From the Right 


hypocrisy. Meanwhile, it would not be surpris- 
ing if New Zealand’s government, already at 
odds with traditional allies over its anti-nucle- 
ar stands, were quick to see in this episode a 
link between nuclear weapons testing and a 
disregard for international morality. 

Without facts, and with the French nuclear 
tests crffmng next month, speculation wifi spi- 
ral, which is reason enough to hope that 
France will now produce findings that invite 
more respect and less ridicule. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Protectionists in the Wings 


When Congress reconvenes next week, it 
intends to take up foreign trade and protection 
from imports. Citing a trade deficit that will 
probably be well over $140 billion this year, 
the Senate majority leader, Robert Jf. Dole, 
says that he expects votes on protectionist 
legislation by mid-October. But that tremen- 
dous trade deficit is not the cause of the 
trouble in the U.S. economy. It is a result. 

Protection and the drive to keep out imports 
will not help prevent further losses of jobs in 
American manufacturing. The U.S. trade defi- 
cit is mainly caused by the dollar’s high ex- 
change rate. Dollars spent an foreign goods 
push the dollar downward. Cutting off imports 
by legislation will push the dollar higher, and 
that will make American exports less competi- 
tive than ever in foreign markets. 

Congress keeps avoiding that reality. Ameri- 
ca is still by far the world's largest exporter. It 
will sell more than $200 billion worth of goods 
abroad this year. That represents a lot of jobs, 
and protectionist legislation is a threat to 


them. Tariffs and import quotas do not pre- 
vent unemployment; they only redistribute it. 

Any real solution will have to deal with the 
dollar’s exchange rate. It has dropped since the 
peak late last winter, but the drop so far will 
not have much effect on the trade balance. 
Trade flows generally reflect the exchange 
rates of a year or more earlier. Even after six 
months’ decline, the dollar now stands almost 
exactly at its average 1984 value. 

To get it down safdy will require two things: 
a far lower federal budget deficit in the United 
Stales, and faster growth of internal demand 
in the major economies elsewhere, meaning 
primarily Japan and West Germany. The U.S. 
trade deficit is a UiL responsibility. It is gener- 
ated not by obscure financial technicalities but 
by an American inclination in the 1980s to 
consume much more than America produces. 

Japan and especially West Germany cur- 
rently depend for their prosperity — more 
heavily than is wise — on exports to America. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


West Germany’s Spy Record 


In afl the long history of spies, no country 
has managed to make itself leakproof. Right 
now the United States is prosecuting a special 
agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
on charges of passing secret documents to a 
female agent of the Soviet KGB. A Navy spy 
ring that operated for years has recently been 
broken up. Britain has never lived down the 
case of Kim Philby. But nobody in recent years 
has topped the West Germany’s record as an 
open book in which spies browse undetected. 

In 1954 Otto John, the head of Bonn’s 
counterintelligence operation, turned out to 
have been a Soviet agent all along. Twenty 


years later Chancellor Willy Brandt resigned 
because Gunter Guillaume, a close aide, was 
exposed as a Communist agent. Now a key 
official in the counterintelligence service has 
defected to East Germany, and secretaries to 
the president and the economics minister have 
recently fled to avoid arrest 
The West Germans do face some uniquely 
difficult problems. .People in East and West 
Germany speak the same language, frequently 
have relatives in the other zone and toad to 
consider themselves as two halves of one na- 
tion. The flow of immigrants from East to 
West Germany is enormous, and it is inevita- 
ble that sleeper agents are among them. 

— Los Angeles Tones. 


FROM OUR AUG. 30 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Officials Seize Smuggled Pearls 
NEW YORK — After the indignation excited 
by tbe midnight blanket and mattress-shaking 
expedition in the Mauretania, the New York 
Customs officials have confounded all their 
critics by soring a 1.200 guinea pcari necklace, 
cunningly concealed in the hat of the wife of a 
well-known millionaire, who arrived hoe on 
tbe Baltic. The scene at the docks when the 
matronly smuggler was unmasked was most 
dramatic. A female searcher placed her foot in 
Mis. J. Reynolds Adriance’s cabin door to see 
Mrs. Adriance remove her hat, a straw turban 
with peacock-blue velvet and adorned with 
two blue wings. Tearing the velvet at (lie bade, 
she opened a deep fold in the brim and 
ashower of pearls fell to the floor. 


1935: Heaist Calls lor Party Break 
NEW YORK — Coincident with the move- 
ment of conservative Democrats to map their 
course in next year’s ejections, W illiam Ran- 
dolph Hearst, in a letter which was given front- 
page prominence, not only in all the Hearst 
papers throughout the country but in the press 
generally, declared that President Roosevelt 
was no longer entitled to regular party support 
and that conservatives in the party should 
draft Alfred E. South to lead them in 1936. 
Hearst suggests the formation of a Jeffersoni- 
an Democratic party, with traditionally con- 
servative policies, as contrasted with what he 
calls “the Socialist Democratic party,” into 
which he insists the New Deal has transformed 
a traditionally Democratic organization. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


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SAMUEL ABT Deputy Editor RIC HARD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

ROBERT PL McCABE Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Ddraor oj Opermwnt 

CARL GEWIRTZ Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Director of Cimdmioo 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL D i r ector of AdnrasJng Safer 
International Herald Tribune; 181 Avenue Chartes-de-GaflUe, 92200 NcuxUv-nr-Sdne; 

France. Tel: (I) 747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 029W052. ^ 

Direaeur de la ptdthcation: Walter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters. 24-34 Hennasy ReL Hong Kong. TeL 5-285618. Telex 6II70. 
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C 1985. International Her&ld Tribune. AO rights reserved. HgggfflB 


W ASHINGTON — “There is 
nothing like the deadline of a 
summit to knock heads together and 

im a ktrpQit/W^n; ” 


By Joseph Kraft 


America and 


shape up a bureaucracy. Richard 
Nixon wrote recently in Foreign Af- 
fairs. But he is a back number 
speaking for yesterday’s me£ 

The Reagan approach to the No- 
vember summit with Mikhail Gor- 
bachev finds expression in a cacoph- 
ony of odd noises coming out of the 
Washington and Santa Barbara ba- 
bels. For the interplay of personality 
among the president and his top 
security advisers works against 
knocking heads together. 

The opening note of discord was 
an announcement from Santa Bar- 
bara that the United States would 
undertake testing of an anti-satellite 
(or ASAT) weapon in the near fu- 
ture. The Pentagon’s warriors want- 
ed that to prove to Moscow they are 
under no pressure from Congress to 


many other governments have made over the 
years: he confused the defense of an overval- 
ued currency with patriotism, the flag and 
national pride. Unemployment spread in the 
cities, and, because agricultural capacity had 
shmnlr, food shortages began to occur. Im- 
ports were no longer an easy alternative, for 
foreign loans became hard to find and more 
costly. Chi revenues continued to drop and 
currently are probably little more than half the 
level they reached five years ago. The general 
told the country to expect even more drastic 
austerity in the coming three years. 

That led to the coup this week by other 
military officers under Major General Ibrahim 
Babangjda. Are General Babangida’s chances 
any better than his predecessor's? Very possi- 
bly. If his government is prepared to compro- 
mise with the IMF and the other lenders, they 
are prepared to compromise with him. 

Bui no country has been more severely 
whipsawed by fluctuating oil prices than Nige- 
ria. In a country with a large and poor popula- 
tion, it is difficult to keep rising oil revenues 
fuimeled into long-term development and in- 
vestment And when revenues fall, it is even 
harder to prevent a sharp drop in the standard 
of living. What Nigeria needs is a better kind 
of economic shock absorber than it or any of 
the low-income countries, has so far devised. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


abate the arms buildup. 

In fact, tbe United Stales a 
to be way ahead of Russia in 


lack of confidence spreading from 
spy scandals in West Germany and 
France. No high American official 
was particularly concerned about 
the Soviet reaction which was — 
predictably — a denial 

Mr. Reagan positively declared 
bis lack of concern in a radio inter- 
view with Washington Broadcast 
News. He said that in his view the 
purpose of tire Geneva summit was 
to “eliminate . . . hostilities . . . and 
suspicions.” He said he did not want 
“just a session on particular, specific 
issues.” But that is exactly what the 
Russians do want, as they have 
made clear with ahimrianf bints and 
nudges about limiting “star wars” 
and cutting back on offensive arms. 

Apart from asserting his nnre- 
spoosiveness to the main Soviet con- 
cern, Mr. Reagan indulged anew in 


ideological sloganeering. The Rus- 
sians, he said, “believe in the one- 
world ConmnmBt state, the world 
of revolution." But if Mr. Gorba- 
chev is fixed in that conviction, 

there is little point in trying to reach 

an accord with him. And still less in 
disciplining American military and 
intelligence services. 

Robert McFarlane, the presi- 
dent’s national security adviser, 
knows much better than that In a 


Santa Barbara speech, wrongly 
billed as “hard-line,” Mr. McFar- 
lane held out the possibility of ‘in- 
cremental improvements” in Big 
Two relations. He named several 
conditions, inrlnrimg changed Sovi- 
et approaches to human rights 
whicn is not Hkdy. But he died two 
others: regional issues and Russia’s 
unconstrained defense buildup. 


There, if Mr. Reagan knocked some 
beads together, accommodation 
might indeed be possible. 

felt while Mr. McFarlane is mak- 
ing an opening for progress at the 
summit, his status m the Reagan 
administration is unclear. The in- 
side gossip is that the national secu- 
rity adviser has not been happy m 
his job and wants out The gossip 
weakens Mr. McFariane’s hand. 

Secretary of State George Shultz 
also knows that heads have to be 
knocked together. But his style is to 
emerge as the man of consensus 
whom everybody mists. In the past, 
he used Mr. McFarlane to run the 
hall against his bureaucratic rivals. 
Recently he has been lying back to 
the point of fading from view. He 
has had nothing to say about Big 
Two relations. South Africa. Central 


meeting the new SowBL hW; 
SeTEclufird Shevaidnadz^ai ;£• 
United Nations next month. Bur 
Mr.ShuItfsbaigainin&i«nnct»^ , 
avoid seeming eager. WhMr. Got- . 
bacbev pressing far accord* -U 

Shultz naturally hangs badL l^ 

the bureaucracy, - & 

to win victories quietly; with way- . 

•hine set up in advance so that op- • 

SntslSetothrowtoisdt«m r: 
Sot of an ongoing. tram » JJejJr. :j 
him off. But there is no otrnomg - J : 
train now. There is a new Smg , , 

i-ader with abundant public rete- 
dons skills. And Washington seems. ..%• 
baffled as to how to faanffle hi m.- . - - jjf 
So Mr Ragan slouches toward' W 
Mr. Gorbachev ahead of the sunt - - 
mil, flashing contradictory signals. . «K\ 
Los Angela Tima Syndicate. - • y $; 


■ ; 


op men t of a capacity to shoot down 
in space. But (he ability to 
HU satellites impairs their use in 
reconnaissance tor arms control 
purposes, and even for such defen- 
sive programs as “star wars." So 
America could easily have post- 
poned further testing until the Ge- 
neva meeting in November. Instead, 

by announcing the UStS, MOSCOW 

was handed, and immediately 
turned to account, a propaganda 
claim against U.S. bellicosity. 

The ^spy dust" story announced 
next day deepened the dissonance. 
To track Americans in Russia and 
elsewhere tbe Soviet secret police 
has been using a chemical substance 
which might cause cancer. Assum- 
ing new evidence of the carcinogenic 
effect, the right way to break the 
news is to tell the Russians quietly 
first so they can make adjustments. 
Instead tbe State Department, at the 




WCSCDN 





behest of security officials, broke 
the news withoat having enough de- 
tail to answer American questions. 


One intriguing question is why 
the announcement nad to be made 
in late August, 198S. Probably tbe 
chief concern was to air the danger 
as soon as it became known to avoid 
any dereliction of duty to exposed 
Americans. But a widespread allied 
suspicion is that American intelli- 
gence services wanted a Russian 
horror story to counter the growing 




r«.o 


i JetE“ 


In'p^ 


rihe cleaning lady is here to dust, sir .* 






We Are Ignoring the Plutonium Issue at Our Peril Reagan’s 


G ENEVA — Delegates of the 130 
member nations of the treaty on 


VJ member nations of the treaty on 
the nonproliferation of nuclear weap- 
ons begin meeting here on Tuesday 
for a monthlong review of the accord. 
But the matter that should be most 
on their muds is the one that will 
receive least atteution. 

Plutonium: the original “man- 
made” element; the stuff of the first 
atomic test and of the bomb that 
destroyed Nagasaki; a waste product 
of civilian nuclear reactors and now 
the preferred fuel of the future of the 
nuclear power industry. 

Each year 100,000 pounds (45.000 
kilograms) of plutonium are being 
discharged as waste in the spent fuel 
of nuclear power plants throughout 
tbe world Industry wants to recover 
the plutonium and use it to supple- 
ment fresh reactor fuel In this way, 
supplies of non explosive uranium 
fuel can be conserved and the world’s 
uranium resource extended 
The problem is that plutonium, 
separated from spent hid, becomes 
an explosive. Less than 15 pounds is 
needed for an atomic bomb. 

The amounts of explosive plutoni- 
um to be brought into existence for 
use in civil programs are staggering. 
Within tbe next decade, explosive 
plutonium for civilian applications 
will eclipse the 200 tons that the su- 
perpowers now use in weapons. By 
the year 2000. some 3 million pounds 
of plutonium will have been pro- 
duced in spent fuel — the equivalent 
of about 200,000 nuclear weapons, 
compared with the 50,000 now de- 
ployed by the superpowers — of 
which nearly a million pounds may 
be separated into explosive form. 

Why all this plutonium? Is it need- 
ed? Can it be monitored and con- 
trolled down to the relatively few 
pounds that, if diverted by nations or 
stolen by terrorists, could be turned 
into bombs? Similar questions need 
to be asked regarding the other nude- 
ar explosive material, highly enriched 
uranium, the stuff of the Hiro shima 
bomb, which is produced in smaller 
but significant quantities to fuel 
many research reactors worldwide. 

These questions go to the heart of 
mankind’s need to control the atom 
or to be controlled and destroyed by 
it. They should be hig h on the agenda 
of the cumait NPT review confer- 
ence. Yet. by all indications, they will 
receive scant attention at a confer- 
ence preoccupied with protests about 
unfulfilled treaty commitments by 
the superpowers to curb their arms 
race and by nuclear suppliers to pro- 
vide all the nuclear assistance de- 
manded by treaty states. 

There are a number of factors be- 
hind this bizarre neglect of the prolif- 
eration dangers of explosive plutoni- 
um and uranium. The treaty itself is 
blind to the weapons potential of 
these materials so long as they are 
dedicated to peaceful purposes and 
subject to a system or audits and 
inspections known as “safeguards” 
administered by the International 
Atomic Energy Agency. 

The treaty is crafted to prohibit the 
manufacture of nuclear devices, not 
the materials needed to make them 
explode. By making explosions and 
the acquisition of explosive devices 
the basic measure of proliferation, 
the treaty permits nations to acquire 
the technology and materials re- 
quired for bomb-malting, short of ac- 
tual fabrication of devices. 

The treaty provides a cloak of le- 
gitimacy for ^latent" proliferation in 


By Paul L. Leventhal 


dear explosive materials by terrorists 
— a danger that increases in propor- 
tion to the amounts of materials pro- 
duced, traded and used. 

The impending widespread com- 
mercial use of nuclear explosive ma- 
terials confronts the world with the 
most momentous decision on the ap- 
plication of atomic energy since the 
decision to drop, rather than demon- 
strate the bomb over Japan. It is not 
too late to avoid the plutonium path. 

Most commercial reprocessing of 
spent fnel has taken place in France 
and Britain. Although some 60 tons 
of civilian plutonium have been sepa- 
rated worldwide, (including Belgium, 
West Germany, India, Japan and the 
United States) more than 90 percent 
remains in France and Britain. Four- 
fifths of spent fuel from modern 
plants remains unreprocessed. 

The economics of processing and 
using plutonium is unfavorable m the 
extreme. Original assumptions that 
plutonium would be needed to aug- 
ment scarce supplies of uranium have 


proved false. Tbe world resource of 
uranium is projected to be as hi gh as 
20 milli on tons — enough to provide 
a lifetime supply of fuel for at least 
4.000 nuclear power plants compared 
with about 300 now operating. Far 
plutonium to become economical, 
uranium would have to increase in 


iking international custody JVv/t/nw AT ff £9 
r nuclear explosive materi- 1 1 UMTUfil HULL 

nrlndps p hrtrtninm in sepa- - O 

i or contained in spent fueL T TT 

Is Hainan 


prioe to SI 50 a pound, compared with 
its present price of about $20. 

Of greater concern, the IAEA — 


hanriter raking qifw niwimial Custody 

of “excess” nuclear explosive materi- 
als. This melndgK p hrtftninm in sepa- 
rated form or contained in spent fueL 
It is tune that explosive plutonium 
and uranium were seen for what they 
are: unnecessary and too dangerous 
for world commerce. Nuclear power 
and research reactors can be run effi- 
ciently and effectively without them. 
Continued failure by the public to 


By Michael Hooper 


N EW YORK — President Ron- ' 
aid Reagan talks a' lot about a 


Of greater concern, the IAEA — 
long defended by nuclear advocates 
as having an effective safeguards sys- 
tem — is now widely acknowledged 
to lack both the technical and the 
political means to detect and give 
timely warning of diversions of na- 
tionally held explosive nuclear mate- 
rials. The IAEA was never given the 
police authority to prevent such di- 
versions, even though the treaty calls 
for application of IAEA safeguards 
“with a view to preventing diversion 
of nuclear energy for peaceful uses.” 

On the other hand, the IAEA is 
authorized by statute, but was never 
empowered, to assume a task it can 


demand that policymakers constrain ‘ country 1 dose to the U.S. southern ' 


those who would make civilian fuels 
out of atom-bomb materials will lead. 


border that is “a to talitarian dim-.' 
out of atom-bomb materials will lead, geon^ given tr holding Soviet-style - 
inevitably to a world in which nuclear sham-elec tic os. persecuting the 


explosives and nuclear violence are 'church and suppressing internal dis-~ 
commonplace. Such a world would sent He wains that if nothing is - 
be horrible. Tbe NPT conference is done^a tidal wave of refugees" will !' 
tbe logical place to start the mow flood the United States, 
away from mKtiear proliferation. - . In a sense, the president is rights 
— — — .' ~ .* > There is such a country. But he seems \ 

The writer, president of the Nuclear _ to have made a mistake in geography." 
Control Institute in Washington, is an The neighbor that best fitshis de- v 
observer at the NPT conference. He scrip tion is not Nicaragua, but Haiti:- 


The writer, president ofthe Nudear 
Control Institute in Washington, is an 
observer at the NPT conference. He 
was responsible as a U.S. Senate aide 
for legislation leading to enactment 
if the Nuclear Nonproliferation AcL 
This comment appeared in The Chris- 
tian Science Monitor. 


Nonproliferation Pact Sets Moral Norm 


L ONDON — Pushing a senior Pa- 
j H<rtarn cabinet rnmiftter to the 


1 j H<rtarn cabinet nwni&tgr to the 
wall during an argument about Paki- 
stan's nuaear weapon program, he 
shot bade “You have it. You say it 
keeps the peace. Why can’t we?" 

Even during a relaxed dinner in 
Islamabad, it was a difficult question 
to answer, especially when some na- 
tional leaders display resentment and 
annoyance at bang preached at by 
the white race, whose own track re- 
cord on armaments and wars is poor. 

It is this kind of raw emotion that 
Western and Soviet bloc delegates 
will encounter at the monthlong re- 
view in Geneva of the Nonprolifera- 
tion Treaty drafted in 1968. 

Tbe NPT is one of the most re- 
markable international treaties. 
Some 130 countries have ratified it, 
voluntarily relinquishing their sover- 
eign right to build nudear weapons. 
And the few who have dot, like Paki- 
stan and India, feel immense pressure 
to be beholden to iL 
One gauge of the NPTs effect is 


By Jonathan Power 


India, having shown it can explode a 
“device", has chosen to go no further. 


“device", has chosen to go no further, with diem. Since many 
There are, it appears, great moral or militarily-influenced 
and political constraints. The NPT, Mr. Waltz argues that 
even if not signed, is a norm. inbuilt soberness win 

it is surprising, then, that many tbe rashness of civilian j 
people continue to argue that it In reality there are v 
would not be too serious a matter if a sons why Thud Woi 
number of Third World countries should not have nuclem 
went nuclear. Professor Kenneth lie simplest tie more su 
Waltz, a former CIA expert on nude- tbe greater tbe chance 


enabling them to run down their con- recorded, aj 
ventional armies. He dismisses the (he 1971 j 
notion that Third World govern- which 100 p 
meats are too unstable to be trusted recorded as 
with them, ance many are military, valuer's desii 
or militarily-infiueiiced governments, son to sncce 
Mr. Waltz argues that the military’s The ref en 

inbuilt soberness win triumph over Haiti’s treal 
tbe rashness of endian policymakers, and of in ten 
In reality there are very good rea- principal all 
sons why Third World countries the Roman 


scrip tion is not Nicaragua, bat Haiti:‘ : 

Accor ding to Um ^H aitian govern^ 

ed in the referendum on July 22, and 
99.98 percent backed the system on - j 
der Much Haiti is tided by Jean-' r 
Claude Dnvaliex, president for life ' 
with the right to name Ids successor. • • 

Such results put most Soviet Woe- 
countries to shame. They rank right 
behind the 1983 elections in Albania . i 
when only a single “no" vote was 
recorded, and behind the results c&f 
the 1971 referendum in Haiti,' in* 
which 100 percent of the voters were 
recorded as approving Francois Du- 
valier’s designation oflris I9-ycar-oId , 
son to succeed him. v . 

The referendum shed some light on ~ 
Haiti’s treatment of the the ctrarch • 
and of internal dissem. The country's 
principal alternative source of news; 
the Roman Catholic Chinch’s radio 




! : 


I '• 

i . 


Vft 

bQtme 


at matters, in a paper published by when put in a corner, will give the 
the International Institute for Strate- order to use one. Once nndear wean- 


tbe International Institute far Strate- 
gic Studies, argues that nudear weap- 
ons couldprovide a s tabilizing bal- 
ance in a Third World conflict, just as 
they do in tbe East-West contexL 
Indeed, since they are relatively 
cheap, he believes they could save 
developing countries a lot of money. 


order to use one. Once tradear weap- 
ons are used, the 40-year-bId taboo 
against their use will be broken. It 


station and two fellow priests were, i 
summarily expelled from Haiti t * 
Several of Haiti’s small-drcalatkai.l 
weekly journals have also tried, in .- 

inrinna rlnnin ■ ■■ - — * - *• ~ 


could be tbe bqpnning of the end. to SS 

Joseph Nye, the former state de- 
partment official responsible for with ^riLrh? 
no^rplrf^on _ ^ argues this yea ' 




point in the current issue of Foreign 
Policy. He observes that the rides of 
the use of nuclear weapons “are evai 
greater in the early stages of a nndear 
program, when new weapons are 


LETTERS 


that in 1963 President John Kennedy - * n _ • 

envisaged a world in the 1970s with Oppression DJ Kaosm 


with similarly. Over the last few 
years, their editors have endured ia3- 
mgs, beatings during interrogatioo, - 
and exile. The editor of an* weekly i 
acknowledges that he practices sdf- 
ccnsordiip to stay m b usines s.' - 
But is Haiti really a “totalitarian/ 


t.r ^ w 


15 to 25 nudear weapon stales. Apart 
from America, tbe Soviet Union, 
Britain and France only China pres- 
ently has a major nndear weapons 
program. Israel probably possesses a 
handful. Pakistan, India and Sooth 
Africa may be within months of be- 
ing able to assemble a bomb. 

Other “danger zone" countries, 
like BrariL Argentina and Taiwan are 
perhaps years away. Significantly, 
however, not since 1974 when India 
conducted a test of a “civ ilian " nude- 
ar explosion has there been a con- 
firmed report of a nudear test, other 
than by the Big Five. 

India and Pakistan, in particular, 


I respect the thoughtful and coura- . . — — 

geous criticism of two U.S. allies v 30001 electronic safety locks and 
made by Mark A. Bnrzonsky in his secure , battlefield communications 
analysis of oppression in Israel and uetworks all indicate that the danger 
South Africa rCriticizing South Afri- of nuclear weapons use by new prefif- 
cor Israel Should Clean Up Its Own exceeds that embedded in 

Act,” Aug 22). This is in marked the U.S.-5qviet relationship.” 
contrast to the elitist mishmash of _ But sensible argument is not every- 
examples irrelevantly presented on .thing™ a world of political sensitiv- 
the same page by George F. Will lUcs - “ the present nndear countries 
C Alight Fran the 77ger and Be Eat- *° sure the NPT remains a 
en?”) that gloss over the an gular op- commitment and moral norm 
pression of legalized ra cism m South they are gom^ to have to do more to 
Africa and mock the efforts of Bishop keep tbeir end of the bargain. At the 
Tutu for swift and peaceful change f^ iew they are going to 

MARGARET WARD. SLfv!II2?Sl ^ ^ 


wSS’SmtriS] sboitE^ofS 

vanced eleetrrS’.SS^LS ^^^ Last Novanber vS<HD e 35 of ' 


. end of the bargain. At the 
revi ew c onference they are going to 
be reminded again and again that 


S lay a kind of sublimated nudear 
iplomacy with each other. The other 
day Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi 
was accusing Pakistan of being near 


Bielefeld. West Germany. 


them were rounded op and taken to.a.'! 
military detention and interrogation' 1 
center, where they were confinedinri-" 
der appalling conditions. Several . 
wa« severely tortured. The minister" 

™ the interior and national defense,^ v 
Roger Lafontant, was said-to fiwd'jF 
presded over the tortnre. Some of the ' 
ymurns say the minister hdned":to 
luffict the wounds. .- : r j.* 

The 35 were freed onApril 3G,antL 
two were ordoed to leave tfe jeona*. 
try. No court had a- say about thejrf; 
OTrest, .con fi n e ment . or . release, so 
they cannot obtain redrm. : 

Finally, therr. lc the tna»t*r 


^ ■ ■ 






to having a nuclear weapon. 

But this kind of talk by India has 
gone on for years. It is four years now 
since I was told in New Delhi by 
high-level government officials and 
by the U.S. Ambassador to India that 
Pakistan was less than a year away 
fromhivinga bomb. While it is likely 
that Pakistan has now reached the 
position where it has only to put in 
the last few screws to have one, the 
fact is Pakistan chooses not to. And 


the form of stockpiles and know-how 
that can be rapidly transformed into 


that can be rapidly transformed into 
nuclear arsenals at a time of regional 
or global crisis. Hie treaty also con- 
tributes to the danger of ihefl of nu- 


A Galician Precision 

Regarding the feature "Out on the 
Celtic Fringe " ( Weekend, Aug 9) by 
Stephen Williams: 

To most of the three million people 
who speak the Galician lan guage and 
to the linguists who ore aware of its 
unique morphology, the assertion 
that it is merely a dialect or a mixt ure 
of Spanish and Portuguese is not a 
particularly popular one. 

DAVID D. GREEN. 
Santiago de Compostela, Portugal. 


be reminded a pa ; n or. release, 

they have futedtoj honor Article Vr obtain redress. 

°f treaty, which requires tbe an- matter ^ 

dear weapons’ states to take Tne K***® 1 . administration., 

towardsS^namenL Third w3d w '*fc thc 

signatories believe this is an impor- 

tant factor or the treaty. The Cpasc Guard patrols 

On present performance tbe West, rj^tivety deny fleeing Haitians the 
the Soviet Union and the China are nfe V-S- -«ylnm. If I 

gran g to turn up almost empnteS 

ed. Why then, as my Pakhttamffiend surety need (or theseja 

would be the first to ask, should 

5J°dd countries be so The writer - ; : ' 

sdtaisaplmed? So far contrary to jjI? ^ 9®; * execut 




£>.-3: 


1$':L 

.’I ■ “ 

V - 




jJ 1 * a knyer, fc exeattire^ - 

Na tumalCoaiitiehfdr; * 

oramaaatm. He' am-,, 
touted Otis to WteNew Yarlc Times. 


i -e>.. V * ■: 


T^ir *'■ 

_ V.V 










V-O?-:? . :E 
r.-v^^.N |3 

??’*3^S8 

Z'y V, k m 
-^>^1 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 1985 



Page 5 


J ._ x. Lz 

,* m ;" n 


a '<%*,**' ; 


< t* 


-so r' 






: ( i 



eam' 

ImragE 


v. }|: 


• • . ®y Laixy Green 
j tni^'^ 0 adminiscrauoa has not made the 
mnm r^’ Q^ois __ i n .J*. . . “"ic commitment lolbeseveninen 

l°° m ^nted war 1.J aedming that it made to the release of the 
** renuad - Trans World Airlines passengers 
v, J™ dock is set n-; ^ lostJ S c and freed in June. ’ 

niS 1 ^’ a Wor *d man i/SUL** 1 ?* "^ c J cncos arc among three fam- 

^ fnarfcijig places . J 1 * ^ uy to keep their relatives' 

Lawren “^Sj ( !j K R !*~ P G Sfat » the public spotlit Rcla- 
? rved - One pin ^ ? v « <*»nK of ti« seven hooagps 

n °n- ,a Leba- have remained relatively invisible 

Across the room r«>„, , 31 ** State Dejwtmem’s request. 

f 1 * 3 map is a p ic . ^“dock Although Father foaco’s rda- 
Jcnco. The phoroeranh 5*? bVes are amateurs and operate on a 

hated hvtii.n ^ llhinu- small hwis*i (!•><«*<( miihJmc. 


7 f Forgotten 9 U.S. Hostages 


nated by the W - lGumi ‘ sma11 budget financed wjtb dona- 

J* « it has been S, l 2 , T* ?? 0QS - their “awareness campaign” 

<%s since he°S 234 has all the polish of a WgKSd 

Ca ™ 1 ®®init bymaK^l mto 3 F*** Canons crusade, with bal- 
Tbe 50.y ear iLi^ a ^2 t 8Wimeti. ^ loons. T-diirts, posters, videotapes 
of Catholic RelieT television interviews. 

■v^o, is one of seveS^Si!^ 3 " The fara *'y h** earned i 
?cmg held to 17 cities in 10 states, 

shadowy eroiiD ^ a This wee L for «“npki four 

had. The J, ‘ fanu ' l y “embers wffltravel to 

®tiremisi shiliP to be an southern California to take part £ 

links to Iran. ^ vSth a “Freedom Dayor Prayer for th 


planted as seven helicopters hover 
overhead. 

The family also will appeal di- 
rectly for help in a carefully worded 
letter to President Hafez al-Assad 

They shouldn’t be 
given second-class 
citizenship.’ 

Andrew MUiefich 
Nephew of tfae Reverend 
Lawrence Martin Jenco 


panmcnL They do not know how “They were there voluntarily," 
ihcgovemmeni received it. A week one official said. “They knew ihe 
later. Islamic Jihad released a pic* risks." 


itire of the priest. 

“We don't have a human face we 
can communicate with," said John 
Jenco, a brother of Father Jenco. 


■‘Hearing them called ‘the for- 
gotten seven' makes me furious." 
said a diplomatic source who spoke 
on the condition that he not be 


“Nobody has ever said they are the identified. “If people only knew the 


of Syria, who played a key role in 
its cause obtaining the release of the TWA 


One 


5=jJkSte,££ 

room here- to discuss wavs of 
ensurwe that vTT 8 * . -J 5 01 


ensuring 
does 


m 
. the 

Seven Not Forgotten" near Los 
Angeles. They have scheduled a 
press conference and a ceremony at 
which seven rose bushes wiD be 


• Representative George M. 
O’Brien, a Republican who repre- 
sents the Joliet district in Congress. 
has arranged for the letter to be 
delivered this week to Mr. Asad. 

The family last heard from Fa- 
ther Jenco on April 26 in a letter 
passed to them from the State De- 


Islamic Jihad 

Before his kidnapping Jan. 8. Fa- 
ther Jenco “spent most of his eve- 
nings without lights listening to the 
bombs and the rockets." his broth- 
er said, adding: “He slept under his 
desk. He told a fellow priest that he 
could not afford the luxury of 
walking for fear he would be kid- 
napped" 

“He had a chance to come out of 
there.” Mr. Jenco said, “but he re- 
fused because he said he had a job 
to do." 

State Department sources said 
that while the U.S. government 
does not state its position publicly, 
it considers the seven hostages to 
be different from those held on the 
TWA plane. 


hundreds of hours and the hun- 
dreds of contacts we've made on 

their behalf.” 

Other Americans missing in Leb- 
anon are: the Reverend Benjamin 
Weir. 61. a Presbyterian minister 
from California who was kid- 
napped on May 8. 1984: Terry A. 
Anderson, 37. Beirut bureau chief 
for The Associated Press, kid- 
napped March 16: William Buck- 
ley, 56. a political officer at the U.S. 
Embassy, kidnapped on March IS, 
1984; David P. Jacobsen. 54. of 
Huntington Beach, California, di- 
rector of the American University 
Hospital, kidnapped May 28; Peter 
Kjlburn. 60. a librarian at the 
American University who failed to 
report for work last Dec. 3. and 



tNwvun 

Lawrence Martin Jenco 

Thomas Sutherland. 54, acting 
dean of the American University’s 
agriculture depanmenu kidnapped 
June 9. 


ooesmur Uo “ed Slates 

MdfaS, fe?“ ■*“ ««■ hostages 

bT® 1 ~ - Washington Official Plays Down U.S. Influence on Pretoria 


nnH T6 i ey sfeou,dn ’i be given sec- 
ond-dass citizenship," 3 An- 

pJSl H? di ?’ I of the 

tJ.S. Orders 
Jet Engine 
Inspections 

New York Timet Service 

WASHINGTON —The Federal 
Aviation Administration has or- 
dered inspections of Pratt &. Whit- 
ney jet engines on a fourth of the 
airliners operating in the United 
Slates. 

More than 1,000 airplanes are 
covered by the US. Older, but a 
substantia] number could be ex- 
empt from the special inspection if 
they are covered by an existing 
FAA engine monitoring program, 
‘f The U.S. action came Wednes- 
day as British authorities ordered 
inspections of engines on about 60 
airliners. 

The inspections are for possible 
cracks in the combustion cham- 
bers. which investigators believe 
may have cansed a fire. Aug. 22 
aboard a Boeing 737 airliner in 
Manchester, England 
[British Airways said Wednesday 
that four of its Boeing 737s had 
been grounded after cracks were 
found in their Pratt & Whitney jet 
engines. The Associated Press re- 
parted from Londoa 
[The number killed in the Man- 
chester crash rose to 55 when an- 
other passenger died of Ins bums 
Wednesday.} 

The British inspections, an- 
nounced Tuesday, led to the 
grounding of planes using the en- 
gine. The order delayed flights and 
provoked some cancellations by 
nasseoECTs. 

Although the FAA said its UJS. 

-! inspection order was not expected 
to significantly disrupt airline ser- 
vice, industry sources noted that it 
takes eight hours and up to three 
mechanics to inspect one e n gine . 

An FAA spokesman said that 
preliminary indications pointed to 
the likelihood that one of nine com- 
bustion chambers in as engine had 
broken loose, severing a fuel line 
and starting the Manchester fire. 

The target -of the inspections is 
the Pratt & Whitney JT8D-15 en- 
gine. The engine series is used on 
some Boeing 727 and 737 and Mc- 
Donnell- Douglas DC-9 airplanes. 


By John M. Goshko 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration believes that 
“Americans are deluding them- 
selves if they think they have deri- 
sive influence” to end apartheid in 
South Africa through sanctions 
and other pressures, according to a 
senior administration official. 


this began. That's due both to black 
disappointments and the resulting 
unrest on their domestic scene, and 
it’s due also to the rising emotional 
American debate about sanctions 
and tougher action." 

He said that the “Free South 
Africa" movement had helped 
“raise the issue to the forefront of 
American political rhetoric,” and 
caused “negative feedback from 
South Africa." 

I'm not saying that Americans 


The official said in an interview 

Tuesday that litis assessment of the ___ _ 

. ablation explained President Ron- ^ imrej tte o/firial 

aid Reagan s determmauon to ad- ^ -pm just saying that the two 

here to his constructive engage- 

menl” policy of trying to influence 
the South African government 
through dialogue and persuasion, 
despite growing sentiment that the 
policy has failed and should be re- 
placed with a tougher, more puni- 
tive approach. 

At the same time, the official 
criticized the South African gov- 
ernment for being “bloody-mind- 
ed" and having a “tendency to 
shoot itself in the foot." 


But Lite official said it was pre- 
mature and unwise to read what 
Mr. Botha said in strictly negative 
terms and to ignore its hints of 
willingness to negotiate, however 
vaguely phrased. 

He also said that Mr. Reagan 
was misunderstood when he said in 
a recent broadcast interview tbaL 
Mr. Botha's government was a “re- 
formist administration'' because it 
has eliminated segregation in some 
public places. 

Mr. Reagan, the official said, 
was referring to what experts on 


signal to Pretoria" of growing U.S. 
impatience at the lack of reform 
and is not an attempt to force U.S. 
policy onto a punitive course, the 
official said. 

"The policy is not one of quiet 
diplomacy; that’s a lactic, not a 
policy," lie said. “Nor is the policy 
one of ■friendship.' or. os some have 
charged, ail carrot and no stick. 
The problem is how to be most 
effective — how to use your diplo- 
macy in the way that you think will 
be most effective." 

He continued; “We hope to see 


'We’ve never argued that simply desegregating swimming pools or 
park benches is an answer,’ a top U.S. official said. 


He indicated that the Reagan ad- 
ministration has continued to pres- 
sure the South African govern- 
ment. both by urging the 
unconditional release from prison 
of the black nationalist leader Nel- 
son Mandela and by declaring its 
support for an elimination of all 
forms of legal oppression of blacks 
and; eventually, for a democratic, 
multiracial South African state. 

The official, who is dosdy in- 
volved with the conduct of U.S. 


societies are not on the same wave- 
length.” 

The official acknowledged that 
the Reagan administration had 
been led to expect that President 
Pieter W. Botha's speech on Aug. 
15 would contain a blueprint for 
reform proposals by South Africa's 
government. In fact, the speech was 
widely seen as a defiant warning 
that Pretoria will not depart signifi- 
cantly from its system of white- 
minority rule. 

“There's not much to be optimis- 
tic about right this week," the offi- 
cial said in reference to Mr. Botha's 
speech. “The government there has 
managed to shoot itself in the foot 
on quite a number of occasions 
recently. And there seems to be a 


policy in Africa, declined to be sense of digging themselves m 
identified on the ground that, if deeper in recent weeks, 
named, his comments might be re- 
garded as personal opinions rather 
than a statement of a unified ad- 
ministration position. He said that 
the interview was intended to clari- 
fy the administration’s thinking 
and correct what it regards as mis- 
understandings about the nature of 
“constructive engagement" 

Responding to assertions that 
the administration’s five-year ad- 
herence -to its policy has failed to 
produce significant reform or to 
stave off the threat of civil war in 
South Africa, the official said: 

“The past 12 months have seen a 
depressing cycle erf violence. The 
debate we are having in this conn- 
try has been fueled by the wave of 
violence and repressions, deten- 
tions and more violence." 

He said that the reform process. 

.had suffered as a result, as had the 
United States’ relationship with 
South Africa. 

“Today," he said, “South Africa 
is less responsive and more rattled 
and more bloody-minded, you 
might say, than it was before all 


South Africa call the manifesta- 
tions of “petty apartheid," such as 
segregated hotels and swimming 
pools and was trying to praise the 
Botha government’s moves ending 
some erf those practices. 

But, the official insisted, while 
such measures are considered en- 
couraging. Mr. Reagan regards 
them only as partial, interim steps 
toward the U.S. goal of a disman- 
tling of the larger, so-called “grand 
apartheid” system that is the codi- 
fied baas of South African life and 
its replacement by a democracy 
open to all races. 

The administration, while con- 
tinuing to regard sanctions as “self- 
destructive and counterproduc- 
tive," believes that the legislation 
expected to emerge from Congress 
next month is intended as a “sharp 


the official said. “Sure it's emotion- 
al. I understand that. Bui Lfae emo- 
tion is based on a kind of naive lack 
of recognition of where things were 
10 years ago. where things were 1 50 
years ago. The system has been 
going on there for" 330 years. 

“But now we have a land of sense 
that, gee. there’s a series of buttons 
on my telephone that we could 
push if only our heart was in the 
right place, and we could mak e the 
whole thing end. In other words, 
there is the illusion of influence; 
We need a greater sense of history. 
We also need a greater recognition 
pf the limits on our influence in this 
country." 

The official warned that while 
the violence in South Africa had 
perhaps “stepped up the pressure 
and timetable for change,” he did 
not expect to see a solution in the 
coming months. 

“This is a drawn -out. protracted 
struggle between a white national- 
ism and a black nationalism,” be 
said. “It’s been going on for a gen- 
eration, and it’s going to go on for a 
while longer. But what has to be 
stopped — and where we hope the 
limited influence that we do have 


the South African government take 
the wraps off what we sense to be 
an interesting package of ideas that 
might have something in it. I'm not 
saying ii does. We don't know yet 
What they must do is clarify what 
they mean.” 

On the other side, he said, “We 
would obviously hope to see signif- 
icant black leaders lest the govern- 
ment's readiness and not simply c* 0 be of help — is the deteriora- 
escalate preconditions on their lion that breaks down the channels 
side. Right now, both sides are of communication between the rwo 
playing a procedural game, and it’s sides. 

time to get on with it — to see “What would satisfy us? The an- 
people released, to see the state of swer is simple and unequivocal: an 
emergency ended, to move to dia- end to apartheid and its replace- 
logue and" negotiation." menl by a system based on justice. 

“One of the things that makes it We’ve said it repeatedly. We’ve 
so hard to conduct a rational dis- never argued that simply desegre- 
cussion in this country on this issue gating swimming pools or park 
right now is that it is so emotional," benches is an answer." 


Rus^ Paint Chips Found 
In Chinese Aviation Fuel 


^ The Associated Press 

' BEIJING — Contaminated Chi- 
nese aviation fuel caused a Pan 
American World Airways jetlmer 
to make an emergency landing m 
Japan, and the supplier acknowl- 
edged Thursday that dnps of pamt 
and rust deposits were found in 
fuel tanks at the Beijing airport. 

Qantas Airways said it was di- 
verting flights to Manila for refuel- 
ing until it is satisfied that the prob- 
lem has been corrected. 

Eighteen foreign airlines fly to 

Begins- - - 

Pan Am representatives m Beij- 
ing and Tokyo declined conmient 
on the incident, but officials. at Ja- 

panAir Lines and Cgnt^satd i^ 

She trouble began with a fuel Wock- 
aS on a Pan Am flight to Tokyo. 
The plane made an emergency 

landing at Fukuoka in southerc J a- 
pan, Mid Yoshirmcht Furakata, 
'^station manager for Japan Air 

After first denying knowledge Of 

j— csrissi- 

the contamination- 

I, said that the Pan Amjetlri®. 

jgiSfl&BS 

sss 

CAAC laud- iro0 jj. 

1 WSSTS wm r i» ff 

‘“^r^fud Sty was conuminai- 
01 M 


storage tank No. 3 at the Beijing 
airport,- slivers of paint, rust and 
grime were discovered, the report 
said. 

Filters of tankers on the airport 
apron had not been cleaned and 
“the contaminated fuel was piped 
into airplanes without being puri- 
fied.” 

The report blamed Beijing's hu- 
mid summer for water in the fueL 

CAAC China's national airline, 
has a reputation for poor service. It 
is undergoing reform to modernize 
operations and improve manage- 
ment. 

To remedy the problem, CAAC 
said, underground storage tanks, 
pipelines and tankers have been 
cleaned and filters replaced. 

“Since July 26 there have been 
no reports of contaminated fuel” it 
said. 

Sunday’s Qantas flight from 
Sydney to Bering was diverted to 
Manila to refuel because of the risk 
erf using contaminated fuel, a Qan- 
tas official said. 


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U.S., Vietnamese Report 
Progress on MIA Issue 


Reuters 

HANOI — U.S. and Vietnamese 
officials said Thursday that they 
had productive and substantive 
talks on settling the issue of Ameri- 
can servicemen missing in action in 
the Indochina war. 

The head of the U.S. delegation, 

Richard Childress, said after a two- 
-day meeting thaL both sides had 
drawn up separate working plans 
that a joint technical group would 
try to reconcile soon. “We’ve 
reached some very good basic un- 
derstandings," he added. 

He said that the U.S. expressed 
its appreciation to Vietnam for its 
commitment to settle the issue 
within two years and “our hope for 
productive efforts in the future, 
which we fed are coming.” 

The acting Vietnamese foreign 
minis ter, Vo Dong Giang, said be 
agreed with the U.S. assessment 
that the talks were “very produc- 
tive and substantive." 

Mr. Giang said the question of a 
U-S. office in Hanoi to speed up 
resolution of the issue would be 
discussed at a higher level. Viet- 
nam, he said, would welcome U.S. 
financial assistance for the task but 
would not request iL 

“What we expect from the U.S. is 


its contribution in creating an at- 
mosphere of detente," he said, so 
that “we can have favorable condi- 
tions to mobilize the people to take 
part in the search for MlAs; that is 
more important than any financial 
contribution." 

The United States still lists more 
than 2,400 Americans as missing in 

Indochina — 1,820 in Vietnam. 
in Laos and 82 in Cambodia. 


U.S. Feminist Group 
Plans ERA Campaign 

The Associated Press 

PITTSBURGH — Seanor C. 
SmeaL president of the National 
Organization for Women, says she 
plans to begin a grass-roots cam- 
paign to revive the proposed Equal 
Rights Amendment and to press 
for civil rights. 

Ms. Smeal. 45, who was re-elect- 
ed president of the feminist organi- 
zation July 21. takes office Sunday. 
“We’ve had enough of reactionary 
politics." she told about 200 sup- 
porters at a rally Monday honoring 
the 65th anniversary of the ratifica- 
tion of the 19th Amendment, which 
gave women the right to vote. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 1985 



From the archives of Magnum Photos, a photographic record of Europe in 
the immediate postwar years — striking images of a continent shaking off 
the debris of destruction and coming to life. 

Mary Blume, the International Herald Tribune's distinguished feature 
journalist, sets the postwar scene and interviews many of the photographers 
in her introduction. The LILT, is pleased to present this unique volume that 
captures a decisive epoch and commemorates the work of some erf the 
20th century's master photojournalism. 

Here you'll find some of the most famous images and faces of our 
time. Once you open its pages, you will want to spend hours poring over this 
magnificently produced collection. Truly this is a book to treasure for 
yourself, and a beautiful gift as welL 

Available from the International Herald Tribune. Order today. 


Hardcover, 
200 pages, 
168 duotone illustrations, 
32x26cm (12.5xl0.25in.) 


TtcralblSI^Sribunc. 


AFTER THE WAR WAS OVER 

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30-8-85 


Stricter Law 
On Wines 
Adopted 
In Austria 


Reuters 

VIENNA — The Austrian par- 
liament adopted a strict law Thurs- 
day aimed at restoring faith in the 
country’s wine after a wine-doctor- 
ing that has 'ta ranged sales 

in much of the world. 

The ruling Socialist Party and its 
coalition partner, the Freedom Par- 
ty, which have a parliamentary ma- 
| jority of 21 votes, had a dear ma- 
jority in the voice vote, 
parliamentary sources said. 

Members of a conservative op- 
position party, the Austrian Peo- 
ple’s Party, said the proposal would 
create untenable burdens for wine- 
-growers. They voted against the 
law, which provides for production 
and marketing controls and tight 
restrictions on additives. 

Agriculture Minister Gflmer 
Haiden said the law would “signal 
to other countries Austria's deter- 
mination to beat this unprecedent- 
ed wine-doctoring scandal and to 
restore the reputation of quality 
Austrian wines." 



Freed) union 


ion members blocked traffic for dree hoars Tl^y on the Ctamps-Jftsfe.: 


Paris Union Activists Protest Renaidt PoUey 


Police said four perrons were ar- 
rested Thursday, bringing to 54 the 
number of farmers, wine traders 
and chemists charged with lacing : 
wine with diethylene-glycoL The | 
chemi cal, which was used to sweet- 
en wine, is toxic and is used in 
vehicle anti-freeze. 


The People’s Party said in a 
statement the law would “not stop 
wine doctoring, but would pose- 
cute 53,000 wine fanners with bu- 


The Associated Press 

PARIS — About 200 members of the Commu- 
nist-led General Labor Confederation rolled 75 
new Renault cars into the middle of the Champs- 
Elysfes early Thursday, blocking the avenue for 
three hours to protest the assembly of French 
autos in foreign countries. 

They left after police intervened. The cars, 
which had been commandeered from a suburban 
Renault factory by the muon activists, were towed 
away. 

The union has accused the automaker of sacri- 
ficing French jobs by assembling its cars at Re- 
nault subsidiaries in Belgium Spain. Renault 


lost 12.55 billion francs ($156 billiou) last 
plans to cut 17,000 jobs by the end of 19L 

Renault, France’s state-owned automate,:^ 
nounced it had filed criminal charges in connec- 
tion with the theft of the automobiles. ^ 

A French television cameraman was injured, 
when he was caught between police and dempa- 
strators, but there were no other reports of violence 

or of any arrests. . • . 

Late Wednesday, about 300 union members m 
Bordeaux boarded a freight train carrying Rmuunt. 
auto parts destined for an assembly plant m Spam 
and dumped hundreds of parts on the track, pre- 
venting the train from leaving for several hours. 




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sfi.f*- 

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reaucratic regulations.* 

Mr. Haiden said six million gal- 
lons (22.75 million liters) of wine 
had been seized in Austria alone. 

He conceded the law would cre- 
ate more work for winemakers, but 
said that this was necessary to cur- 
tail the wine doctoring 


For Foreigners in Moscow Fishbowl* 
Life Can Be Enticingly Comfortable 


■f • .. 

E*‘ “ :; 


t , . 


■ 2 Japanese Wines Tainted 
Japan’s Health and Welfare 
Ministry said Thursday that dieth- 
ylcncglytol has been discovered in 
two brands of Japanese-made wine. 
Hie Associated Press reported 
from Tokyo. The minis try ordered 
the producer, Manns Wine Compa- 
ny, to recall the brands. 

A spokesman said the ministry 
also ordered an investigation of 
whether the two brands, 1978 Es- 
tate Kifu Wine and 1981 Estate 
Kifu Wine, were blended with wine 
imported from Austria. 


By Serge Schraemann 

of the UJS. Expert Doubts 


This tends to foster strong bonds: 
within the isolated foreign codu 
nity and provides a life of comfbrW 1 
ably limited choice — no haodw: 




New York Times Service 
MOSCOW — For many 

'Spy Dust’ Foundin 
Moscow k Harmful 


London and Bonn 
Support Calls for 
Global A-Test Ban 


Reuters 

GENEVA — Britain and West 
Germany backed calls for a world- 
wide ban on atomic testing at a 
review Thursday by 80 nations of 
the Nuclear Nonproliferation 
[Treaty but said verification meth- 
I ods had to be worked oul 

Richard Luce, minister of state 
| at the British Foreign Office, said 
! problems over monitoring nuclear 
blasts continued to be a major ob- 
j stacle to a comprehensive treaty. 

Jflrgen MdOetnann of Bonn's 
Foreign Ministry, called on signa- 
tories to overcome this by setting 
p a worldwide seismological veri- 
cation system. 

Britain, the United States and 
the Soviet Union signed a limited 
test ban treaty in 1963. But talks on 
a full halt to testing, including un- 
derground explosions, were broken 
off in 1980. 

The three countries are the only 
declared nuclear powers among the 
treaty’s 130 full signatories, ffrina 
and France, the other nations 
known to possess nudear arms, 
have refused to sign, although Paris 
says it follows the treaty’s guide- 
lines. 


was used to track their movements 
came as only another element in. 
one of the world’s more imrrenal 
environments. 

The life of foreigners here is one 
that blends the pressure of possible 
official surveillance and "pervasive 
distrust with, on the other hand, 
elaborate privilege. 

It is a setting that fosters both 
brightened suspicion and strong 
bonds; a world that foreigners be- 
moan while here and miss when 
they leave: 

The foreigners have apartments 
in a dozen or so buildings whose 
entrances are guarded around the 
clock by policemen who monitor 
comings and goings and turn away._ 
unauthorized Soviet ritsens. 

The cars of foreign residents 
have special license plates that are 
easy to identify. The telephones are 
presumed to be tapped and tile 
apartments bugged, and contacts 
with Soviet citizens were assumed 
to be monitored even before the 
U.S. assertion that a special track- 
ing powder has been used to trace 
movements and contacts. 

Yet within this fishbowl, life is 
enticingly comfortable and safe. 
The dangers of crime are negligible. 
The apartments and other benefits 
allocated to foreign residents arc 
far beyond anything Soviet citizens 
could ever have. 

Hard-currency shops stocked 
with the finest goods insulate for- 
eigners from the chronic shortages 
that beset Soviet society, and a spe- 
cial agency of the- Soviet Foreign 
Ministry stands ready to supply not 
only diplomats but all foreign resi- 
dents with anything from secretar- 
ies and maids to horseback riding 
lessons; furniture repair, a weekend 
retreat or linoleum. 

It is a system that reflects a dual 
attitude deeply rooted in the Rus- 
sian mind. On the one hand, there 
is an awe of foreigners, a sense that 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW —The head of a 
team of U.S. scientists testing a 
chemical purportedly used to 
track U.S. diplomats in the So- 
viet Union said Thursday the 
chemical probably loses its cell- 
mutating properties after it is 
absorbed into the body. 

Dr. Ernest McConnell said at 
a briefing for American resi- 
dents there that the team will 

test whether NPED/ar nitro- 
phenyi pentadiene aldehyde, is 
absorbed throu gh the skm. 

• Normally, NPFD is nmia- 
gnric; . meaning it can change 
the structure of cells. Or. 
McConnell said. Mutagens can 
be, but are not always, carcino- 
gens in humans: But. he said 
scientists, believe the chemical 
changes into other com pound^ , 
they suspect are not mutagenic. 

He said his team of four in- 
vestigators from 1 the. National 
Institutes of Health and the En- 
vironmental Protection Agency 
would gather samples in Mos- 
cow, and expected to have pre- 
liminary results in 30 to 60 
days. The team arrived in Mos- 
cow Wednesday. ... 

The State Department al- 
leged last week that the Soviet 
KGB security police had used 
the chemical to track U.S. dip- 
lomats in Moscow. The Soviet 
Union called the allegation 
absurd fabrication." 


an 


they must be treated as special 
guests and isolated from life's hard- 
ships. On the other hand, there is 
deep distrust, nourished by official 
propaganda that depicts foreigners 
as potential spies and ideological 
foes. 


Embassy has organized seminars : 
for families returning to the United- 
States to prepare them for the reali- 
ties there. 

The treatment of foreigners is 
rooted in the Russian past. Under 
the Communists, as under the 
czars, the purpose has been to iso- 
late foreigners in order to prevent 
permissiveness and independence 
from infecting the Russian people. 

Many cities and large areas of 
the Soviet Union are closed to for- 
eigners, presumably because of the 
presence of military industry and 
other secret activities, and evmvis-^ 
its to so-called open areas require 
prior notice to the government. * , 

For those diplomats and carre-; 
spondents whose jobs require con- 
tact with average Soviet citizens, it 
is.a system that can turn ugly, 
v £a the Stalin era, meeting a for- 
• earner could be fatal for a Soviet 
citizen. The dangers are less now, 
but scores of dissidents sit in labor 
camps after trials at which their &- 
contact with foreigners was the 
main evidence of anti-Soviet activi- 
ty. 

Several times in recent years re- 
porters have been blocked or 
poshed around by plain clothesmen 
when trying to meet with Soviet 
citizens, and several correspon- 
dents have been summoned for 
grilling by the KGB, the Soviet 
secret police and intelligence agen- 
cy, about their contacts. 

So extensive is the evidence of 
KGB watching that many diplo- 
mats and correspondents come to , 
presume it at all times. 

It is an atmosphere that leads to 
habitually constrained conversa- 
tions, as well as a special lexicon of 
hand signals — a knock on the 
table means informant, a finger 
pointed upward is a reminder of 
hidden eavesdropping. 


’ f*i. :> ;■ 


! f?f- 


Church Reports Attacks on Activist Youths in Chile 


By Lydia Chavez 

. New York Times Service 

SANTIAGO — Roman Catholic 
Church officials here have pointed 
to an “alarming" wave of kidnap- 
ping and torture cases over the past 
few months, many of them involv- 
ing young people in church-based 
social action groups. 

The church officials say the ab- 
ductions have been carried out by 
armed men in civilian clothes in a 
hit-and-run style reminiscent of 
death squads in Central America. 

Human rights officials in the 
church suspect that the operations 
are executed with the participation 
of the security forces, ana have 
asked the government to name a 
special investigator. 

“We find ourselves facing re- 
peated crimes that have produced 
alarm in the public," the church 
stated in its formal request for a 
special investigator. It said that the 


president, about 600 Chileans dis- 


victims of the recent inci- 
dents have been kidnapped in day- 
light and held for several hours. 

Some victims said they had been 
forced to listen to diatribes against 
priests and threatened with death if 
they refused to act as informers or 
leave the church’s social action 
groups. Some were tortured by hav- 
ing crosses scratched on their 
chests and arms, they said. 

Human rights officials said they 
suspected security forces were in- 
volved because the kidnappers ap- 
peared well organized and had ac- 
cess to radios, cars and detailed 
information on the victims. 

The incidents have shaken the 


poor neighborhoods surrounding 
church 


acts were “terrorizing the faithfuL 
nnaJ activities of 


I impeding the noi 
the church." 

“It’s a very dangerous develop- 
ment.” said Carlos Fresno, a law- 
yer with the Vicariate of Solidarity, 
the human rights office of the 
church. “Since no one recognizes 
the kidnappings, no one has to take 
responsibility.” 

Andres Dominguez, the presi- 
dent of the Chilean Human Rights 
Commission, called the kidnap- 
pings and torture “a return to the 
initial stage” of the military gov- 
ernment that President Augusto Pi- 
nochet has headed for 12 years. 

In the five years after the 1973 
I militaiy coup that overthrew Salva- 
dor Allen de, the elected Marxist. 


Santiago, where the local 
always has been viewed as a posi- 
tive force. With youth unemploy- 
ment levels of more than 50 percent 
and high rates of alcoholism and 
drug addiction, parents have en- 
couraged their children's participa- 
tion in the church. 

“These produce a great distrust 
in our work,” said the Reverend 
Patricio Rojas, referring to the kid- 
nappings. Father Rojas is in charge 
of 1.000 members of the youth 
groups in Puente Alto, an area of 
120,000 people in northern Santia- 
go. 

Five young people from the area 
reportedly have been kidnapped 
since April, some of them more 
than once, and Father Rojas has 
received repeated death threats. 

The youth groups reject violence 
and encourage participation in po- 
litical parties, trade unions or any 


social groups fostering change in 
their neighborhoods. 

Marccla Pradenas, 18, an adviser 
to Father Rojas and a find-year law 
student, said has been kidnapped 
twice, on June 12 and July 1. Both 
times her captors demonstrated a 
thorough knowledge of her work in 
the church, she added. 

“They knew everything,” she 
said. “They had pictures of the in- 
ride of my home, knew the meet- 
ings 1 had been to, and even knew 
about a conversation I had in the 
hallway at school.” 

A dvflian judge has given Miss 
Pradenas police protection. But the 
police guard only her home in Pu- 
ente Alto, and in other cases such 
protection has proven ineffective. 

Rodigo Muflos also received po- 
lice protection after being kid- 
napped. But as the police stood 
ou [side his borne, the boy was 
roughed up and tortured by armed 
men who had somehow entered the 
dwelling, according to Mr. Fresno. 

Alejandro Herrera,. 19, a youth 
adviasr, was kidnapped on July 3 
and held for several hours. He said 
ne has received repeated warnings 
that he will be killed bn Aug. 29 
unless he leaves the church. 

Although the kidnapping has 
cost Mr. Herrera his job at aliqaor 
plant and has frightened his moth- ’ 
er ’ “e said he would continue to 
work with the church. 

. A 1 fast they made us all suspi- 
aous . another, , and some 
peopteleft the organizations.” he 
sam. but others have come back, 
audit has made us stronger." 

Church and human rights offi- 
cials and political opposition lead- 


ers have different theories abotii 
the kidnappings. ‘j 

Some believe they are carried out 
by na tional policemen who are tm- 
happy about recent legal assaults - 
on their force. 

Others said the kidnappings 
could be a military faction's way of 
aanonstraimg opposition to Arch-; 
bishop Juan Francisco Fresno’s 
reconciliation" initiative. The- ^ * . ' v- . . . 
Santiago archbishop has met with i. - 

political parties in ait effort to' L 

bring the country closer to a peace- j ^ ' V -s? - ‘ 

ntireturn to democracy., ■ ' '• 

It is a way of showing their - 

annoyance." said the Reverend • ^ 

Lius Borremas, 62, a Belgian priest. ‘ - > ’ • 1 

m charge of parishes in tjbc Puente i « £j r> " ~- r « • 
“Maybe they fear rcpcf- A . 

sals if there is a return to democrat b- - 

°y- 



The Associated Press . . . 

~J he Briti&Med^ 

cal Association has urged the "fidvr 
moment to take immediate, steps 
toward banning all advertising and 
promotion of tobacco products. 

The association inged-Tueaiay 
that sterner health warnings: be' 
pnnted on cigarette pack&and Chat 
tobacco companies be lo-ao^ '• 
«pt responsibility for their uibt&iij 

nets. . • 

The recommendations were con- 
^ied m a letter, tinted tooomdde 
with the start of talks between the 
Sacrament and the tobaccoindus 1 ' 
«y on a new code of practice • 


I *; 




I'.'v :.v*. t 









IW? 


' ■'Vi 


lr> 








V 


^ ust 30, 1985 


WEEKEND 





Page 


Hard Times, Good Times and the Producing of Art 



— * 


» simile exnlaf^ ?“ ““WMS societies.' 7 
dilemma of voSa* gI ^ at aboQ l the 
in the 19 wis°tv B Amwican creative artists 

fflmmakeir JSi 8enera ^ 0I “ <* writers, 
have (vun^r and visual artists 

War nS&SLP.?® 40 years since World 
the die economic promise of 

er. hlasl “to ftm flow- 

create? of them, these 

“■“aumt now live m a <t«reiu thpt is the 

Ste nw^jJlfiFi 0 * **“ *“* wfaen * 

nooi?hSfV~ y McI «eriiey put it, “there’s 
P^S^£? nSUS the idea that a 

gS SiJSSP oon ^ered Intimate 

°J vn “aerial ease, and in that erf 

80 0ften «»"* * e P<«twar 

IJSIVJW m contrast to their peers in 
K* “d’jdent countries and to their forc- 
“ /S ™ca, the creators shmed. in- 
~ de ™^i b y the national cataclysms of 
wo World Wars and the Gnat Depression. 

• .mat is not to say the equation is simply 
F^cncnce equals art; built does mean that 
in the absence of great, galvanic events, 
artists must find other means «*iH other 
subjects to stir their passions. 

Some, like the playwrights David Mamet 
and Sam Shepani, have im mersed them- 
selves in the underclass in the twamw of 
Ernest Hemingway or Eugene CNdH The 
film directors Stephen Spielberg and Law- 
rence Kasdan have left the fantasy vehicles 
that typified their careers for more probing, 
naturalistic work. The playwright Christo- 
pher Durang and the filmmaker Susan Sd- 

sutus-cqnstiwisway of ^f^duougfa satire. 
Dramatists like David Rabe and novelists 
such as Bret Easton Ellis and Mclnemey 
have reacted with direct revulsion to the 
narcissism of the age, forging what might be 
called a literature of outrage. But the unf” 
mg factor for almost all these artists is 
tense, perhaps expressed best by Dura. 
Jtat the suburban generation has a tale to i — 
that is not dependent on having endured 
gunfire or breadlines. 


“There’s a fine from ’Endgame' — ‘You’re 
on earth, there’s no cure Tor that,' ” said 
Durang. the author of the ' bitterly comic 
plays “The Marriage of Bette and Boo” and 
“Sister Mazy ignmhis.- Explains It All for 
You.” “It applies as mudx to someone on a 
suburban street as someone on a freighter. I 
don't think my writing is a response to the 
suburban experience; it’s a response to life” 

But as Durang continues talking he raises 
the other side or the argument. “It is true,” 
he said, “that if one was worried about 
gening food on the table we wouldn’t have as 
much time to worry” about one’s own psy- 
che. The social historian Christopher Lasch 
put it iiiuflail y in his book “The Culture of 
Narcissism”: “Economic man has given way 
to the psychological man of our times — the 
final product of bourgeois individualism. 
The new narcissist is haunted not by guilt 
but by anxiety.” 

It is true over the span of history that the 
well-fixed and well-born have produced in- 
spired and innovative art; indeed artists for 
centuries imagined and executed at the suf- 
ferance of the church or the crown. Even 
amid outward security there can be the inner 
struggle central to ait Beyond that is a hard 
reality: Today’s American artists, without 
vast patronage, must survive in the market- 
place as well as the salon. 

But the contemporary view, as expounded 
by Llosa among countless other artists and 
critics, is that great upheaval, great issues 
and great conflict give birth to great art. 
Who can deny the power in the films of the 
Pole Andrzej Wajda, the plays of the South 
African Athol Fugard, the paintings of the 
the German Anselm Kiefer, the novels of the 
Mexican Carlos Fuentes and the Czech Mi- 
lan Kundeza — power that seems absent so 
often in their American counterparts. 

The contrast is equally extreme between 
America past and America present. The par- 
ents and grandparents of current American 
artists, in both literal and metaphoric senses, 
fused modernist style with social and politi- 
cal engagement. Hemingway, the soon of 
suburban bluebloods, went to war and came 
out calling it “something quite irreplacable” 
for a writer. William Faulkner ana Tennes- 
see Williams married their personal visions 
to a social landscape: the demise of the 
planter aristocracy in the South. During the 
Depression, the Works Progress Administra- 
tion's programs thrust into a sea of poverty 
artists induding the writers Nelson Algrcn, 
James Agee ana Studs Terkel the photogra- 
phers Walker Evans and Margaret Bounce- 


White and the painter Ben Shahn. In New 
York, the Group Theater united the drama- 
tists Clifford Odets, Sidney Kingsley and 
Irwin Shaw with the directors Cheryl Craw- 
ford, Harold Chirman and Lee Strasberg. 

“Never were writers so militant in their 
challenge or so conscious erf what was want- 
ed, so anxious to participate in society and to 
liberate it,” the critic Alfred Kazin wrote of 
the ’30s in “On Native Grounds.” As Kazin 

himsrif points out, however, the quality of 
the art depended on a writer's ability to 
internalize and personalize larger events. 

T HE .self-satisfaction and self -absorp- 
tion of Americans, artists very much 
included, is as old as Thoreau. Nor is 
the self-obsessed artist solely an American 
phenomenon, as anyone who has read D. H. 
Lawrence or seen an Ingmar Bergman film 
can attest. 

Still, h is dear that in the boom decades 
after World War II, American artists began 
looking in much more than out. Many of 
them grew up with parents who had scraped 
to rise from Depression deprivation into the 
middle class and who made freedom from 
need the rule of domestic life. At the same 
time, modern America grew so large and 
complex as to d««ih the 30s ideal that one 
good person could change the system; Mr. 
Smith would not go to Washington in the 
’80s. except perhaps as a lobbyist. 

The Vietnam war only briefly provoked 
the deep self-examination that the world 
wars did for writers like Hemingway. Faulk- 
ner, Norman Mailer and Joseph Heller. For 
one thing , college deferments from the draft 
spared thousands of future artists any first- 
hand exposure to the war or the issues it 
raised; most of the directors who conveyed 
Vietnam on screen — Francis Ford Coppola, 
Michael Gmino. John Milius — spent the 
war attending film school Certainly excep- 
tions existed in the writers David Rabe 
(“Pavlo Hummel,” “Sticks and Bones” and 
“Streamers”), Michael Herr (“Dispatches”) 
and Timothy O’Brien (“Waiting for Cac- 
ciato”). But now, only a decade after the war, 
their hard questions nave been shunted aside 
as the nation at best craves a conciliatory 
communion on the plight erf the Vietnam 
veteran and at worst embraces the cartoon- 
style revisionism of “Rambo.” 

Artists without any ghosts and with a 
short memory of even their own times can 
easily enough produce a static culture — a 
cultural terrain that often appears barren. If 



PAINTING: In the ’30s the WPA fostered work by artists like Ben Shahn 
(right); today' the graffiti artist Keith Haring is a wise investment. 


the stock character of social realism was 
Odets's cabbie named Lefty, then his equiva- 
lent today is Ann Beattie's publisher named 
Hildon. Other novelists simply write novels 
about being novelists. 

Many of the major films, both critically 
and commercially, were fantasy adventures 
like “E.T.” and “Star Wars." Popular film 
fare, meanwhile, can seem like a procession 
of so many “Gbostbusters," “Goonies" and 
“Gremlins.” The contemporary films on 
larger social and political topics are dispro- 
portionately the work of writers and direc- 
tors with roots in the Depression — Martin 
Ritt, Sidney Lumet, Haskell Wexler, Horton 
Foote. These men, in their 50s and 60s, serve 
as the heirs to John Ford. King Vidor, Pres- 
ton Sturges and Frank Capra. 

If there is an overriding issue for visual 
artists, it is the media. Important artists such 
as Robert Longo and Cindy Sherman have 
created their most urgent work in examining 



how the popular media. 


particularly 
lie’s response 


televi- 


sion and film, shape people’s responses both 
to society and to themselves. The work of an 
artist like David Salle expresses the difficulty 
of sorting through the innumerable, of ten- 
contrary images of an electronic culture. 

The art world, especially in New York, 
functions like an interchange of celebrity 
and commerce, transforming the Julian 
Schnabels and Keith Harings from scuffling 
eccentrics to wise investments in months. 
“There’s such a thing as a modernist ego 
ideaifor the artist: you do one outrageous 
thing and suddenly you’re important,” said 
Perry Meisd. an associate professor of En- 
glish at New York University and the author 
of a upcoming book on modernism. 

The same is often true of popular music. 
Given exceptions like Bruce Springsteen 
(most clearly on “Nebraska,” an album 
deeply i nfluenc ed by the work of Woody 
Guthrie), Randy Newman (“Good Old 
Boys”) and Stephen Sondheim (“Follies” 
ana “Pacific Overtures" particularly), the 
most talented songwriters have directed their 
scrutiny inward, producing memorable work 
only as long .as their romances or general 
angst could yield sufficient grist. 

■One counter-argument to the state of so 
much American art is that it reflects only too 
acutely the life around it. “In the ’60s,” said 
Howard Stein, the chairman of the graduate 
theater program at Columbia University and 
a professor of playwrighting, “the plays re- 
flected the country's examination of itself, a 

as a 


as the ’60s were over, the social issues went 
down the drain, or were done in TV dr amas . 

I don't know what the artistic subject be- 
came, except the scream for help, which is a 
private story." 

Works like Arthur Kopit's “End of the 
World” and Larry Kramer’s “The Normal 
Heart” do carry on the tradition of the play 
of ideas, but their respective ruminations erf 
nuclear war and AIDS stand like lonely 
sentries. Is that solely the artists’s fault? The 
fact is that, without a king's coffers behind 
them or even the governmental largesse of 
most modem European nations, American 
artists often must Wanes the creation of 
serions work with the need to make a living. 
Probing art, difficult art, rarely pays the rent 

I F anything, the idea of political commit- 
ment merits mostly parody and skepti- 
cism in the 1980s. Early in the film 
“Risky Business,” for instance, several stu- 
dents from an affluent suburban high school 
are comparing the annnal incomes of differ- 
ent professions. “Doesn’t anyone want to 
accomplish anything? Or do we just want to 
make money?” one student abruptly puts in. 
“Make money," another responds. “Lots of 
money.” 

“The Big Chill” generated a great deal of 
controversy, particularly on the political left, 
for suggesting that social ties rather than 
shared political values bound a group of 
friends who attended the University of 
Michigan dining the ’60s. The anti-war ral- 
lies in which they participated, one felt, 
could just as wdl have been fraternity par- 
ties. But Lawrence Kasdan, the director, sajfs 
that rather than endorsing his generation’s 



fleeted the asm try’s i 
coining to terms with our own 


MUSIC: Woody Guthrie (left) sang of hard times; Randy Newman sings of today’s America. 


would use Arthur Miller’s ‘AH My sx 
model for those kinds of plays. But as soon 


said “It's just that their concerns chan ged 
over time and their political concerns didn't 
stand the test of time. 1 never meant that 
they were all phony, but you have to lode at 
where those people are now." 

At the same tune, there exists among 
young people a sincere, if inchoate, desire to 
connect — to some cause or at least to a life 
with some grit to it. The massive response to 
the Live Aid concert attests to the longing, as 
does the activism on college campuses on the 
South African divestment issue. It also helps 
explain the massive appeal of Bruce Spring- 
steen, who can sing to a crowd of lads m 
Lacoste shirts about a jobless auto worker. 

That wistful, naive yearning for working- 
class roots is familiar to many artists who 


grew up in the middle class. “I had this 
feeling for a long time that it was a handi- 
cap ” said Mdnemey, the author of “Bright 
Lights, Big City," the screenplay for its film 
version and a new novel about American 

X uiates in Japan, “Ransom." “I felt that 
1 to be a bartender or something, that 
the grittier strata of American life was the 
repository of truth and vision. And I did feel 
obliged, when I graduated college, to go 
across the country doing odd jobs — a real 
Kerouac number. I'm not saying I changed 
my class stripes, but there was an attempt 
not to be just another dean, well-educated 
white boy. But ultimately I dedded I had to 
write out of my own experience. I couldn't 
just cobble up a persona from scratch. I had 
to trust who I was or the writing wouldn’t be 
authentic.” 

Susan Seiddman, the director of “Smith- 
ereens" and “Desperately Seeking Susan.” 
recounts a similar passage. “At one point I 
did have the idea that art had to have big 
themes,” she said. “I admired those artists 
who seemed so aware of their times — the 
Berlin artists before World War IL I’ve 
thought at times 1 should do something 
about apartheid. Bui then I realized it was 

Continued on page 8 


Another Embattled British Landmark — The Red Phone Box 


ION — The British telephone i sys- 
em, which used to be part o f. the 
»ost Office, has bem privatized 
md is doing very nicely on the 
Icet Cm July alone, shares wait Bp 

o»« if tlw> mmnanv 15 10 the 



Britain’s traditional bright red metal 

Mary Blume 

SSSSgBB* 

Frances of things past. 

, Englishman’s telephone box is his 
like the London taxi, it ra n be en 

k V a gentleman in a top hat It protect 

keeps him warm and is, it 

enough for a smaU 
proposed by 

and ears to urban 


to send them £ 3.50 in return (3 Part Square 
West, London NW 1 ). . 

Why is the red box so importan t? Because 
it is so much a part of British life- just this 
summer an extremely successful swim of 
uxmst postcards came out featuring the box- 
es flanked by punks and other London fauna 
— and because it was designed by Sir Giles 
Gilbert Scott, the architect of Liverpool Ca- 
thedral and of Battersea power station. 

Scott’s design, known as the K2, was the 
winning entry in a 1924 competition. It is 
described by the Thirties Society as stately. 
tempIe-Kke and thoroughly architectural 
with almost square window panes, fluted 
corners, and a domed roof inspired by Sir 
John Soane (1753-1837), a leader of Lbe 
flagging] Revival school noted for hjswonc 

on the Bank of England. Fewer than 200 are 

thought to survive. 

In 1935, Scott designed the K6, also 
known as the JubfloKiask, a , aMjeM md 
slightly streamlined version of the K2, which 
was made until 1968, when a new, greatly 
simplified model came in. The TJgiswa; 
Syis not trying to save the 1968 verson 
although they admit that- there may be 
places where it forms an appropMtecoun- 

rb" only 

incorporated a letter box tm? 

chineTt was, says the soaety sreporiaflop- 
“It was found that the telephone users were 
distorted by the chmb t*- *»«■>£ 
machine was being used, and the stamps 
ctitrik together in wet weather. 

According to Clive Ariel, who wrote the 

Joban the boxes to a wish w modmmM its 
nrnved. be says this can easily be done with- 

as SSaa.M-'siS 

*ia«ndaI-proof braedoesnotyeiensL 


Newer boxes have been vandalized with 
pray paint: No one has dared do tins to a 
ucott box. The old models are nearly inde- 
structible, some having been in place for 
over 50 years, while reportedly the new ones 
of only 15 y 


have a 


years. Since a 



s, expectedly, ipimu 

iding the baalc is the 

iservation group that 
ione booth rather as if 
ion and the Unicom, 
the Thirties Society, 
079 to conserve post- 
lesign, “the old boxes 
> Age virion that the 
' Tbone "■•anflBement 


pUULIW 

w aresuD 
fxe much loved by 
tain an aura of more 
ve a solidity lacking 
sodety. Their regal 

^ bear add dignity 



sjnst 


I yea 

. lifetime of only L „ . 

Scottish f«o.nd.iy still has the K2 and K6 
molds, they could, if necessary, be repro- 
duced in versions that are lighter and cheap- 
er than the present cast iron. Thirties Society 
scouts report that 10 boxes in a light alloy 
could be cast for only £1300 (about $1,820). 

I T will require a vote of Parliament to 
put the Scott boxes under the protection 
of the Department of the Environment. 
In the nwamtirne, the Thirties Sodety has 
been urging local authorities to act ana it is 
especially admiring of the Gty of Westmin- 
ster in central London, which has cleaned 
up old Scott boxes, replaced or added new 
ones and informed British Telecom that the 
Scott boxes are so closely identified with the 
British national character that it would be 
un thinkab le to lose them. 

The Borough of Kensington and Chelsea 
has done little, although the boxes so nicely 

matffii the Chelsea pensioners’ uniforms, but 

a Manchester headline ran “Hands Off Our 
Red Telephone Bax” and a member of the 

» islands Council in Scotland stated 
Scott boxes “add character to the 
email -scale vernacular Scots and Norse ar- 
chitecture.” . 

Melton Borough Council invested the red 
tx>x.fs with an almost mystical air: “The 
Scott kiosks ... in most cases are easily 
recognizable links between uncertainty (and 
even desperation) and civilization.” But the 
Peak District National Park damned with 
faint praise or praised with faint damn, it is 
hard to tell which; "The great virtue of the 
Scott kiosk,” it ambiguously stated, “is that 
it is invisible by virtue of its familiarity.” 

It is said that Telecom is already selling 
uprooted boxes for £200 and not everyone, it 
must be admitted, responds to the Save the 
Scotts <*n?pa»‘g n- Some people even like 
glass boxes, but then some people would. ”1 
suppose," Clive Arid says, “that one or two 
people just do like new things.” ■ 



MoL Kernes 


Scott's K2 and Battersea power station; right ; a new Telecom model 








Page 8 



AUSTRIA 


SEPTEMBER CALENDAR 


FRANCE 


LINZ. Festival (lei: 273130). 
BALLET — Sepi. 28: Ballet du Rhin. 
CONCERTS — Sept. 20: Bamberg 
Sympbf'Qiker. Horst Stein conductor. 
Sept. 24: Moscow Philharmonic Or- 
chestra, Dimitri Kitaenko conductor, 
Alexander Rudin cello. 

OPERA — Sept. 18: “Die Walkflre" 
I.R. Wagner). 

VIENNA, BOsendorfer Hall (tel: 
6S.66.5l). 

CONCERTS— Sept. 2-4. 9-11: Viea- 
na Jess Trio (Cboprn, Brahms. Racb~ 
maninof. Schubert). 
•Kunstierhaus(td: 57.96.63). 
EXHIBITIONS— To SepL 30: “1984 
— Looking Ahead to 2000." 

To Oct. 6: “Vienna 1870-1930 Dream 
and Reality: The greatest names of the 
Viennese fin-de-side." 
•Staatsoperttel. 53240). 

OPERA — Sept. 27 and 30: “Maria 
Sluarda" (Donizetti). Adam Fischer 
conductor. 

DENMARK 

COPENHAGEN. Tivoli Han (tel: 
15.10.12}. 

BALLET — Sept. 10-15: Dance The- 
atre of Harlem (“Giselle " “Serenade,” 
"Streetcar Named Desire"). 
CONCERTS — Tivoli Symphony Or- 
chestra — Sept. 2:, Flemming Vis'tisen 
conductor (Nidsen). 

Sept. 4: Lars Johansen conductor 
i Mendelssohn. Weber). 

Sepi.5: Antoni Ros-Marba conductor. 
I vo Pogorelich piano (Tchaikovsky). 

ENGLAND 


LONDON. Barbican Centre (tel: 
638.41.41). 

CONCERTS — London Symphony 
Orchestra — Sent. 1: Antony Hopkins 
conductor, Richard Markham piano 
i Beethoven). 

Sept. IS: Richard Hickox conduaor 
i Vaughan Williams. Elgar. Walton). 
Sept. 26: Gerard Schwarz conductor 
Carol Rosenbeigerpianof Beethoven). 
Sept. 28: Gerard Schwarz conductor. 
Pierre Amoyal violin (Stravinsky). 
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra — 
SepL 6: James Judd conductor. Cris- 
tina Ortiz piano (Handel. Rachman- 
inof). 

SepL 21: Victor Pablo Perez conduc- 
tor. Joaquin Achucbano [nano (Tur- 
ina, Brahms). 

SepL 27: Nicholas CTeobuiy conduc- 
tor. Vovka Ashkenazy piano (Tchai- 
kovsky. Ravel). 

SepL 19: English Chamber Orchestra. 
Daniel Barenboim conductor. Man 
Haimovitz cello ( Schubert. Mozart). 
EXHIBITIONS — SepL 12-Nov. 3: 
RodericO’Coner." 

SepL I2rNov. 3: “Gwen John.” 

To SepL 29: “Paintings of Traditional 
British Sporting Events.” 

SepL 24-Nov. 3: Egyptian Land- 
scapes: Weaving from the School of 
Ramses Wissa Wassef." 

Through December: “Matthew 
Smith." 

OPERA — Welsh National Opera. 
Richard .Armstrong conductor (Bizet, 
Verdi. Brittenl. 

RECITAL —SepL 23: Ivo Pogorelich 
I Bach. Chopin). 

THEATER — SepL 2 and 3: “Red 
Noses” (Peter Barnes). 

Sept. 6. 7. 1 J, 12: “Love's Labour's 
Lost” (Shakespeare). 

SepL 9 and 10: “Richard III" (Shake- 
speare). 

SepL 4, 5. 13. 14: "Hamlet" (Shake- 
speare). 

Sept. 27. 28. 30: “Les Miserables" 

( Hugo, Musical Adaption: Boubil and 
Schftnbure). 

^British Museum ( tel: 636.1535). 
EXHIBITION— To Jan. 1986: “Bud- 
dhism: .Art and Faith." 

* London Coliseum (tel: 836.01. U) 
OPERA —SepL 4,6.9, 11, 14. 17. 20. 
27: “Rigotetto" (Verdi). 

SepL 19,21.25: "Cossifan tutte"(Mo- 
zani 

SepL 5. 7. 10. 12. 13. 16. 18. 26. 28: 
"Orpheus in the Underworld” (Offen- 
bach). 

•Havward Gallery (tel: 92837 .08k 
EXHIBITIONS —To SepL 29: “Ed- 
ward Burra.” 

•National Portrait Gallery (tel: 
930.15.52). 

EXHIBITIONS —To SepL 8: “How- 
ard Coster." 

To OcL 13: “Charlie Chaplin 1889- 
1977." 

•Tate Gallery (td: S2 1. J 3. 1 3 ». 
EXHIBITIONS— To SepL 8: “Bruce 
MJean." 

SepL I l-Nov. 10: “Pound's Artists." 
SepL 18-Dec. 1: "Howard Hodgkin: 
Prints from 1977-1983." 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (id: 
589.63.71). 

EXHIBITIONS — To October 22: 
“Textiles from the Wellcome Collec- 
tion: ancient and modem textiles from 
iheNear East and Peru." 

To SepL 15: “Louis Vuiiton: A Jour- 
ney through Time." 

To Ocl 6: “Julia Margaret Cameron 
IS15-I979." 


FINLAND 

HELSINKI, Festival (tel: 65.96.88). 
CONCERTS — SepL 4: Finnish Ra- 
dio Television Orchestra. Esa-Fedda 
Salonen conductor, Teresa Berganza 
soprano. 

SepL 5 and 6: Orchestra de Paris. Dan- 
iel Barenboim conductor. 


•Musee du Louvre (tel: 260.3926). 

)Sej>L9;“XyiH 


DIJON, Musee National Maurice 
Magnin del: 67.11.10). 

EXHIBITION — To Nov. 18: “XL\ 
Century French Portraits." 
HONFLEUR. Musee Eugene Boudin 
(id: 89.16.47). 

EXHIBITION —To SepL 30: “Alex- 
ander Dubourg." 

LYON. Berlioz Festival (tel: 
860.85.40). 

CONCERTS — SepL 14: Lyon Na- 
tional Orchestra Choir. Jean-Sebas- 
uen Bureau conduct or (Berlioz. Cheru- 
bini). 

SepL J4: Lyon National Orchestra. 
Serge Baudo conductor, Nicolai 
Gedda tenor i Berlioz). 

SepL 16: Pro Musica Chorus of Lon- 
don. John McCarthy conductor. John 
Birch organ (Berlioz, Gounod). 

SepL 18: Rotterdam Philharmonic Or- 
chestra, Netherlands Radio Chorus, 
James Conlon conduaor (Liszt). 
OPERA — SepL 20: “Eafanee du 
Christ" (Berlioz). 

NICE. Gallery of Contemporary An 
(tel: 6X37.11). 

EXHIBITION— To SepL 22: “Tout 
Ben." 

•Musee de Terra Amaia (tel: 
55 39.93). 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 30: “Ex- 
perimental Prehistoric Pottery.” 
PARIS. ADAC Gallery (tel: 
277.%.26>. 

EXHIBITION — SepL IJ-Ocl 17: 
“Isabelle Emraerique, Patricia Gian- 
nini. Michel LacosL Raphael Levy, 
Jean-Pierre Pignanl" 


roe (tel: 

EXHIBITIONS— To S 
Century French Pastels." “Drawings 
in Genoa: XVI - XVU Centura." 
ToStpt. 30: “ Ingres Ponrai is" 
•Muscedu Petit Palaisftel: 265. 12.73). 
EXHIBITION— ToSepL 29: “Gus- 
tave Done." 

•Mus6e Rodin (tel: 705.01.341. 
EXHIBITIONS— ToSepL 15:“Alain 
KiriUL" 

To SepL 30: “Rodin Works by Five 
Photographers." 

•New Morning (tel: 52331.41). 

J.AZZ — SepL 6 and 7: Monty Alexan- 
der Trio. 

SepL 9 and 10: Dave Holland Quintet 
•Opera (tel: 7423730). 

OPERA — SepL 30: “La Vera Storia” 
(B£rioi. 

•Salle Favan del: 296.06.11). 
OPERETTA —Sepu 21 . 23-25. 28. 30: 
“La Belle Helene" (Offenbach). 

•Salle Pleyd ( tel: 563.07.96). 
CONCERTS — Orchestra de Paris — 
SepL 25 and 27: Daniel Barenboim 
conduaor. Jessye Norman soprano 
(Wagner). 

SepL 26: Daniel Barenboim conduc- 
tor. Luben Yordaneff violin (Brahms. 
Stravinsky). 

•Theatre du Rond-Point 
Ucl:256.70.80). 

DANCE — SepL 17~Ocl 19: Classical 
Music and Dance of India. 

•Theatre Musical de Paris (tel: 
261.19.83). 

DANCE— SepL 24-28: Martha Gra- 
ham Dance Company. 

SAUMUR, Festival (tel: 512)3.06). 
BALLET — SepL 20: “Contemporary 
Dance" (Bean, Hetanger, Menaka). 
SepL 2 1 : “Dance and the Soul" (Her- 
anger, Maigand). 


OF SPECIAL INTEREST 





■: v;* 

The Philharmonie, home of the Berlin Philharmonic 

BERLIN FESTIVAL 

BERLIN — In its 35th year, this music festival runs to OcL 1. Events 
include: 

CONCERTS — SepL 4: Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Lorin 
Maazel conductor (Dvorak. Stravinsky). 

SepL 5: Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, Riccardo Muti conductor. 
Claudio Arrau piano (Beethoven. Bruckner). 

Sept. 7: Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra, Riccardo Chailly conduc- 
tor, Dietrich Fischer- Diesdau baritone (Stravinsky). 

Sept 12: Washington National Symphony Orchestra, Mstislav Ro- 
stropovich conductor (Schubert, Shostakovich). 

SepL 17: Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, Juri Temirkanov conductor, 
Ekso Wirsaladze piano (Shostakovich, Tchaikovsky). 

Sept. 20: Baden-Baden Symphony Orchestra. Pierre Boulez conduc- 
tor. Phyllis Bryn-Julson soprano (Banok, Boulez). 

SepL 23: Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra, Fliagu Inbal con-, 
ductor, Augustin Dumay violin (Messiaen, Sait-SaSns). 

Sept, 27: Alban Beig Quartet (Berg. Ravel). 

Sept. 28 3nd 29: Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, Herbert von Karajan 
conductor (Beethoven). 

RECITALS — SepL 4: Gerd Zacber organ (Bach, Kagel). 

SepL 7: Dang Thai Son piano (Chopin, Dubussy). 

Sept. 14: Omar Zobolie oboe, Antonio Ballista piano (Donizetti, 
Rossini). 

Sept. 19: Krystian Zimerman piano (Bach, Liszt). 

SepL 24: Maurizio PoIIini piano (Bach). 

For further information tel: 25.48.90. 


•HCnd Meridicn (td: 758.1230). 
JAZZ — Sept. 1-15: Nlarim Saury and 
his orchesira. 

Sept. 16-25: Benny Carter and his trio. 
•Hfnel de Ville (tel: 276.40 66). 
EXHIBITION —To Ocl 5: “Victor 
Hugo and Paris." 

•LaVillettedd: 533.7430). 
EXHIBITION —SepL 1 1-15: "Clas- 
sical Music." 

•Le Louvre des Antiquaires (tel: 
29737.00). 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 29: “Per- 
fume: XVT-XIX Centuries.” 

•Le Petit Opponun(td: 236.0136). 
JAZZ — Sept. 11-17: Claude Guilhol 
and Georges Arvanits. 

Sept. 18-24: Babid ReinhardL Chris- 
tian Escoude and Boulou Ferre. 
•Maine du ler arrondissemem (td: 
260.38.01). 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 29: “Four 
Centuries of Ballet in Paris.” 

•Musee CaraavaJet ( td :272J 1.13). 
EXH I BITION— ToOa. 27: “The Big 
Boulevards of Paris.” 

•Musee d'Art Moderne (tel: 
723.6137). 

EXHIBITIONS —To SepL 8: “Rob- 
ert and Sonia Delaunay.” 

Sept. 25- Jan. 5: “Vera Szekdy." 


EXHIBITION — SepL 20-OcL 4: 
arch] 


“Con temporary t-rencr 
RECrTAL— SepL 22: F: 
dean cello (Bach). 


Lo- 


GERMANY 


BERLIN, Deutsche Oper (tel: 
341.44.49). 

OPERA— Sepu 2,6. 11,17: “Aida” 
(Verdi). 

SepL 4, 9, 13: “The Flying Dutchman 
(Wagner). 

SepL 8 and 10: “La Bohfane" (Puccini). 
SepL 14. 18, 25: “Die Zauberflate” 
(Mozart). 

SepL 22 and 26: “Cod fan tutte" (Mo- 
zart). 

COLOGNE. Oper der Sudt (id: 
2135.81). 

OPERA — Sept 8. 15. 18. 20. 24, 27: 
“Lucia di Lammermoor" (Donizetti). 
SepL 17,19. 26, 29: “Agrippina” (Han- 
del). 

SepL 22,25.28: “Turandot" (Puccini). 


SepL 14 and 15: “Salome" (Wilde). 
SepL 20 and 2 1 : “Cbriolanus" (Shake- 
speare]. 


ITALY 


BOLOGNA. Aula Mama dcll’Acw- 
rit-mia di Belle Arti Hel: 3239.99). 
OPERA —SepL 10 and 1 1: “Pygma- 
lion” ( Rousseau). 

•Chiesa di S. Antonio di Padova (id: 
2 229.99). 

CONCERTS— SepL 12: Prague Phil- 
harmonic Choir. Lubomir Mail con- 
ductor (Liszt). 

•Chiesa di S. Martino (td: 22.29.99). 
CONCERTS — Sept. 14 and 15: Or- 
chestra del Teatro Comunaie di Boio- 
, Alan Hacker conductor. (Weber. 


•Chiesa di S. Michele in Bosco (td: 
2239.99). 

CONCERT — SepL 16: Bucharest 
Madrigal Choir. Marin Konstantin 
conductor 

•Chiesa di Rispannio (id: 2239.99). 
OPERA— SepL 17 and 19: “Paradeed 
Elena" (Gluck). 

•Galleria d’Arte Moderns f tel; 
503839). 

EXHIBITION —To SepL 30: “Mor- 
an di in Galleria." 

•Teatro delfe Cefebrazioni (tel: 
2239.99). 

CONCERTS — Orchestra dd Teatro 
Comunaie di Bologna —SepL 21 and 
22: Ounar Maga conductor (Satie, 
Banok). 

SepL 28 and 29: Roberto Abbado con- 
ductor, Paolo Bordoni piano (Schu- 
mann. Prokofief). 

MILAN, Teatro alia Scala (tel: 
80.9136). 

CONCERTS — Orchestra dd Teatro 
alia Scala — SepL 19. 20, 21: Kurt 
Sanderiing conductor. Bruno Leonar- 
do Gdber piano ( Beethoven). 

SepL 26, 27, 28: Carlo Maria GiuEni 
conductor. Salvatore Accardo violin 
(Beethoven, Schumann). 

SepL 17: Monteverdi Choir, English 
Baroque Soloists, John Eliot Gardiner 
conductor (Handel ) 

OPERA— SepL9, 1 1, 13, 16.18,23:“D 
Viaggio a Roms" (Rossini). Claudio 
Abbado conductor. 

STRESA. Festival (td: 31095). 
CONCERTS— SepL 9: London Roy- 
al Philharmonic Orchestra. Vladimir 
Ashkenazy conductor/piano (Beetho- 
ven. Brahms). 

Sepu 15: Archi della Scala Ensemble. 
Anahi Carfi violin (Bonporti. Fergole- 
si). 

SepL 18: Orchestra da Camera di San- 
ta Cecilia, UtoUghi condnaor/viohn 
(Handel Mozart). 

RECITALS — SepL 7: Mario Delh 
Ponti piano (Debussy, Scarlatti). 

SepL 14: Vadim Brodski violin, Canzic 
BucdareUi piano (Brahms, Debussy). 
SepL 17: Christqphe Boulier violin. 
Thomas Girard piano (Dreisler, Rav- 
el). 


NETHERLANDS 


AMSTERDAM, Amsterdam Muse- 
um of History (tel: 253832). 
EXHIBITION —To SepL 8: “Imagi- 
nation Seizes Power a brief survey of 
European protest movements in the 
60’s. 

•KoninkH/k Palds op de Dam (td: 
2436.98). 

EXHIBITION — To SepL 8: “French 
Bibliographic History in The Nether- 
lands. 

•Maison Descartes (td: 22.61.S4). 
EXHIBITION —To SepL 27: “Des- 
cartes and The Netherlands." 
•Rijksmuseum (td: 733131). 
EXHIBITION —To SepL 29: “Rem- 
brandt,” drawings. 


SCOTLAND 


EDINBURGH. National Gallery of 
Modem Art (td: 556.8931). 
EXHIBITION — To SepL 8: “SJ. 
Pepsoe, 1871-1935." 

•National Portrait Gallery (id: 556. 
8931). 

EXHIBITION —To SepL 29: “Trea- 
sures of Fyvie." 

GLASGOW, Scottish Exhibition Cen- 
tra (td: 332.72.44). 

CONCERT — $cdl 7: Scottish Na- 
tional Orchestra, Neeme JSrvi conduc- 
tor, Jon Vickers tenor (Beethoven, Ver- 
di). 

•Theatre Royal (id: 331.1234). 
OPERETTA— SepL 4, 7. 10. 12, 14: 
“La Vie Parisienne (Offenbach). 
INVERNESS, Eden Court Theatre 
(tel: 22.17.1 S). 

CON CERTS — Scottish National Or- 
chestra — SepL 28: Matthias Bamert 
conductor, John Harrington viola 
(Berlioz, Debussy). 

SepL 29: Matthias Bamext conductor. 
Jos Kimura-Parker piano (Stravinsky. 
Tchaikovsky). 


SWITZERLAND 


GENEVA, Muste de I’Atbinie (tel: 
29.75.66). 

EXHIBITION —To SepL 29: “Cha- 
gall. Picasso. EmsL Klee. Liger and 
Colder Tapestries and Engravings." 
•Parc L iill in (id: 74.10.16). 
EXHIBITION — To SepL 8: "Prome- 
nades.” 

•Petit Palais lie] : 46. 14.33). 
EXHIBITION — ToSepL 30: “Mont- 
FRANKFURT, AIlc Opcrt td: 13400). pamasse ‘Belle Epoque': From Cha- 
CONCERTS— SepL 6: Freiburg Vo- gall to Buffet” 


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cal Ensemble. Wolfgang Schafer con- 
ductor (Lisz L). 

SepL 7: Joachim Quartet (Beethoven. 
Zexnlin&kyi. 

SepL S: Toe Koenig Ensemble Lon- 
don, Jan Latham- Koenig conductor 
i Poulenc, Satie), Frankfurt Chamber 
Chorus. Hans Michael Beuerle con- 
ductor (Offenbach). 

SepL 12: Musica-Viva Ensemble, Wulf 
Konold conduaor (Poulenc, Ravd). 
RECITALS— SepL 8: Saschko Gaw- 
riloff violin. Siegfried Palm cello. Bru- 
no Canino piano (Rihm. Schumann). 
SepL 9: Bernard Warn bads piano 
( Liszl Rihm). 

MUNICH. Artcurial Gallery (tel: 
29.4131). 

EXHIBITION — To SqjL 8: “Ecofc 
de Paris 'Les Naifs’.” 

•Staategalerie tnoderaer Kunst (tel: 
2937. U5T 

EXHIBITION— ToSepL 15: “Ger- 
man Art since i960 .” 


LUCERNE. Festival (td: 2335.62). 
CONCERTS ■— SepL I: Berlin PhD- 
bannonica Orchestra, Herbert von 
Karajan conduaor. 

Sept. 2: Ensemble lntercontemporain 
Paris. Pierre Boulez conduaor. 

SepL 4: Basel Symphony Orchestra. 
Pierre Boulez conductor. 

Sepu 6: Washington National 
phony Orchestra, Mstisiaw 
tropowitscb conduaor. 

SepL 7 and 8: Royal Philharmonic Or- 
chestra, Vladimir Ashkenazy conduc- 
tor. 

Sept 10 and 1 1: Vienna Philharmonic 
Orchestra. Lorin Maazel conduaor. 
LUGANO, Villa Favorita (tel: 
52.17.41). 

EXHIBITION — To Ocl 15: “47 
Masterpieces from the Museums of 
BudapesL” 


UNITED STATES 


GREECE 


ATHENS. Festival (lei: 322.M39). 
BALLET — Sept. I : Ballet Kirov. Len- 

C§NCERTS —SepL 2: State Orches- 
tra of Thessaloniki. Josif Coma con- 
ductor. 

Sepl. 3 and 4: Zurich Chamber Orches- 
tra. Edition d de Stouts conductor. 
SepL 10: Greek Radio and Television 
Symphony Orchestra. Horst Neu- 
mann conduaor, Ferenz Rantos pi- 
ano. 

SepL 17 and 18: Wl 

ny Orchestra. Mstilslav 

cbnducror. 

THEATER— SepL 1 : “Helen” (Euri- 

lept S, "7 and 8: “Lucrece Borgia" 
(Hugo). 


NEW YORK. American Museum of 
Natural History (td: 873.13.00). 
EXHIBITION— To Oct. 15: “The An 
of Cameroon." 

•Metropolitan Museum of Art (id: 
535.77.30). 

EXHIBITION— Sept 14-Jan.5:“ln- 
dia!" 

ToOcl 13: “Karl Bodmer's America." 
•Museum of Modern Art 
(ld:708.94.00). 

EXHIBITON — To Ocl 1: “Kurt 
Schwitters. 

SAN FRANSISCO. Museum of Mod- 
em Art l td: 863.88.00). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Ocl 6- “Ex- 
tending the Perimeters of Twentieth- 
Century Photography.” 

To Ocl 13: “Henry 'Moore: The Re- 
clining Figure," 


Reminiscences of Grand Hotels 


by John Russell 


N EW YORK — There are hotels 
with which I identify to a degree 
that may well be aberrational. 
Such is their hold upon me that 
when I go to stay in one of them I foreswear 
the habits of a lifetime and give traditional 
sightseeing a miss. The hotel is the city, at 
such times, and vice versa. 

This is what I do. I check in. I go up to a 
single room, long known to me, on the top- 
most floor. It has a view. I open the window, 
draw up a chair, sit down and look oul In 
other cities I should already be prowling the 
streets with a 19 12 Baedeker in one hand and 
an 1 897 Murray' s Guide in the other. But in 
this case I sit there like a frog in deep mud 
Unlike the frog. I am not crouching in 
readiness for- an Olympic-style leap. I am 
waiting for the hotel to mediate between 
myself and the city. I call room service few 
lunch and dinner, and I discuss the state of 
the local theater and opera bouse with the 
concierge. Prompted by ruinous impulse. I 
make some intercontinental calls. But funda- 
mentally the hotel, the city and I are in 
conference from morning tOl night. And the 
hotel gives out uninterruptedly. 

When 1 was younger, and a charge on 
other people, they resented all this very 
much. “'We did not bring you halfway across 
Europe to skulk in your room," they would 
say. But 1 did not agree. In Venice. I had only 
to draw them to the window to make my 
point. In Athens, there was the Acropolis 
just across the way, and in Istanbul the Pera 
bridge and the Golden Horn. 

In Basel, the weight of traffic on the broad 
Rhin e, as seen from the top of the Three 
Kings Hotel, was worth a wnole semester of 
geography lessons. In Vienna, from the 
Sacber. there was a great museum, the Alber- 
tina, to the right, and the back of a great 
opera house, with scenery being trucked in 
and out every morning, to the left. These 
were historic spectacles, and brooked no 
arguing. Bul then it was almost always so. 

No matter where I was, I got the view by 
heart I also noted every last nuance of my 
room — among them the design of the news- 
paper that came with breakfast — and with- 
out even opening the door I monitored the 
alien voices in the corridor, the alien work- 
ings of the elevator, the alien tinkle of the 
orchestra that played for dancing and the 




Tum-of-the-century room in the Majestic, ; Nice. 

footfall of the black-stockinged housemaids Sometimes the hotel brought the outside 
as they went about thSr bt^ncss. inside. The palm court spoke for the botani- 

In^ume, I could tell one country from cal gaiden. The thunderous colonnades 
another by sound alone. Church bells, street spoke for parliament howes and law courts, 
cars, taxi meters, street musicians, the brat Tbe double staircase spoke for_ an anstocra- 

of an express train coming into the main cy that 
station and the cries of newsboy, lottery The 
ticket seller and flower girl — all bore a 
specific brand. And they came filtered, by 
courtesy of the hotel. Without the planned 
neutrality of the hotel, do such concentrated 
stillness would have been possible. 

In leading this possibly rather peculiar 
life, I was fulf illin g the wishes of the inven- 
tors of the grand hoteL It was not their 
intention to cater only to the tourist, or to 
tbe person who wants to be taken care of. 

They wanted their clients to become part of 
the hotel, and to think of it as a place that 
fulfilled their every need, thereby making it 
unnecessary, if not actually futile, to con- 
front the world outside. 

Rooms were huge, so that in pre-adoles- 
cence we could have ceilings to bounce or- 
anges off, closets big enough for a growing 
elephant, and windows that started at the 
floor and rose to a height of 14 feet. Service 
was highly characterized, with unmistakable 
ethnic overtones. And the city was orr ’ 
ent, though nowhere obtrusive. We 
so much see it as live it 


outside. It was as if the city 
inside out, like a summer jacket, and shrunk 
in the wash. 

If I do not include resort hotels — not 
even the best and most seductive amon« 
them — it is because one of the things that I 
prize in a hotel is the awareness of othtr. 
people getting up and going out to work. JW 


not 



picture them cutting and slathering their way 
through a business breakfast, treading the 
lobby like racehorses waiting for tbe start, 
standing in line for taxis and waiting a little 
to one side far the limo that they feign to 
take for granted. 

\\" T HDLE dreaming of that purposeful 
11/ hubbub, I go over my room piece by 

▼ T evocative piece, dating almost to the 

year the heavy glass inkwell that has long 
ceased to know ink, remembering the prehis- 
toric telephone on its gibbeL unhooking the 
19th-century battle piece from the wall and 
rh wiring it for title, date and exhibition 
label. If the writing paper is still headed with 
a steel-engraved view of the hoteL complete 
with phaeton and beriine at the door, l clap 

my liantb. 

For I like above all things a centenarian 
desgn, a design so innately right that noth- 
ing would be gained by changing il )< 

My favorite linen has been in the Hold 
National in Moscow since before 1917, and 
my favorite lamps have been shedding tbe 
same pale gold light in the Hotel Lutetia in 
Paris, the Hotel Doelen in Amsterdam and 
the Hotel d’Angleterre in Copenhagen since 
before World War L I like bells that you pull 
and pens that you can freshen up with — 
what else 1 ? — a penknife. 

All this being so, I should have been crazy 
about a new volume, “Grand Hold" (Ven- 
dome Press, $45). But I would rather read the 
novel of that name by Vida Baum any day. 
“Grand HoteT — the new one, that is — has 
some banal and repetitive essays by the au- 
thors (David Watkzn excepted) who should 
have known better. The 416 illustrations — 
not all of them fascinating — are captioned 
in a way that makes it almost the work of a 
life time to tell one from another. So 1 think 
ni stick with memory. 

Room service, anyone? ■ 


The Hotel d’Angleterre in Copenhagen. 


e 1985 The New York Tima 


Art in Tranquil Times 


Continued from page 7 


important to say something about my own 
rimes.” 

David Mamet personifies the writer who 
can literally penetrate tbe working-class and 
even criminal worlds. Mamet, who grew up 
in both a middle-class Chicago neighbor- 
hood and a suburb he calls “New South 
HelL” shipped on a Great Lakes ore boat, 
did clerical work in a seamy real-estate of- 
fice, played cards with ex-convicts and 
taught writing in a prison. 

“I don’t thipk any writer worth anything 
goes out trying to gather materiaL” Mamet 
said. “The mark of a great writer is that his 
writing and his life are one.” As for his 
succession of odd jobs, Mamet said, “I did it 
to pay the rent, so what I gained from it was 
being able to pay the rent," By which he 
means something more: “People who grew 
up as I did and became accountants or 
lawyers or doctors never experienced that. 


rent Which is why I didn’t write about them 
for a long time. There’s a baric feeling of self- 
worth that’s lacking. It’s not bec au se you live 
on a tree-lined street; it's because you have 
an institutionalized profession.” 

In the case of directors like Stephen Spiel- 
berg and Lawrence Kasdan, artistic growth 
can be measured simply in the movement 
from fantastic or extra-terrestrial characters 
to humans. Spielberg is currently directing 
the screen version <5 Alice Walker’s “The 
Color Purple” — a Pultizer Prize-winning 
novel about two black sisters that is both 
earthly and earthy. 

Kasdan buflt his Hollywood reputation 
writing films that largely evoked the adven- 
ture movies he had seen during childhood. 
But more recently, with “Body Heat” and 
“Tbe Big Chill,” K.mhm has shown an in- 
quiring mind to match his technical wizard- 
ry. “Both films,” he said, “dealt thematically 
with the same tiring — the distance between 
a person’s values and their behavior. It’s just 
that one was a melodrama and the other was 
more naturalistic and satiric. It's a struggle 
to live honorably, and that struggle fasci- 
nates me.” It is also a struggle. Kasdan adds, 
that has little to do with one’s financial 


status. “I don’t think 1 — — 

makes a better artist,” he said. “Yon re limit- 
ed by your abilities and they’re not going to 
be expanded because you went through trau- 
ma.” 

Durang and Sdddman illustrate an alter- 
native, a way of using satire both to entertain 
and to critically comment Thor specific 
methods, however, differ widely. Serdefman 
takes a gentler tone, accenting the ridiculous 
in deadpan style. “Desperately Seeking Su- 
san," for instance, trades heavily on advertis- 
ing and artifice. Her characters seek ro- 
mance in the personals ads and fame in 
television commercials; even the hero of 
sorts, Des, lives in a realm of illusion- He 
works as a film projectionist and the movie- 
within-a-movie that he shows, Seidelman 
points out “isn’t ‘Wild Strawberries' but a 
B-movie called Time Travelers.’ ” 

Durang favors black comedy drenched in 
Catholic guilt and rage. “The Marriage of 
Bette and Boo” has alcoholism, cancer and a 
series of stillborn babies; in “Sister Mary 
Ignatius” the former students of a nun con- 
front and then kSI her; the title character in 
“Baby With the Bathwater” barely moves— 
except to try to commit suicide by running in 
front of a bus. 


P ART of the problem for irony, satire 
or world-weary detachment — all fa- 
miliar viewpoints in the art of the ’80s 
— has always been in being taken as serious- 
ly as fury. And foxy is the currency of the 
literature of outrage, a body of weak that 
responds to the ever more conspicuous con- 
sumption. “When you’re writing about deca- 
dence and the apathy that leads to it, you’re 
looking at a complete lack of spirituality,” 
said Bret Easton Ellis, the 21-year-old au- 
thor of “Less Than Zero ” a novel about the 
sybaritic children of California. “That’s 
America in the *80s and especially the new 
generation. There’s never bran more stress to 
gain style and stature and wealth. There's 
never been more emphasis on fashion and 
style for its own sake.” 

David Rabe’s play “Hurlyburty” is a pro- 


totype for such literature — one of its first 
works and one of its most enraged. His 
principal character is Eddie, a movie casting 

past but who, faced^with theTaflure of both 
ideals and marriage, is determined to anes- 
thetize himself with drink, drugs and sex. 
What torments Eddie most, it is clear, is not 
being able to reconcile himsdf to hedonism. 


With s 
Mclnemey and 
same question. 


t ri kingly different approaches', 
y and Mis have grappled with the 
rtton. Mclnemeys “Bright Lights, 
Big City” is on the surface a picaresque jaunt 
along the cocaine trail of New York night- 


life. The heart of the novel, however, is a*ciy 
against the excess and a realization by the 
central character that he must “learn every- 
thing all over again.” Ellis's “Less Than 
Zero follows a college student as be returns 
on Christinas break to his Los Angel es 
home. With a frighteningly subdual style. . 
Ellis catalogues alcoholism, cocaine and her-f> 
oin use, omnivorous sexnality^po mography 
and homosexual prostitution. Wien the nar- 
rator, Clay, decides to return to college, it 
comes as nothing less than a decision to live 
rather than die. 

What is perhaps as striking as the litera- 
ture of outrage itseif is the difficulty audi- 
ences have farina it. New Yorkers tended to 
distance themselves from “Huriyburly” by 
viewing it as a play about California rather 
tha n about narassism. Both Mdnerney and 
ESis have been struck by how many readers, 
and friends, take their novels as baedeckers 
erf the night. 

“The irony in the book,” Mclnemey said, 
“was often missed. It’s become, unfortunate- 
ly, a sort of hot consumer item in itself, and 
some people take it as an endorsement of the 
values it critiques.” 

“A lot of the people the book is based on," 
Ellis said, “either aren’t reading it because 
they don’t read or are reading it as a travel 
guide to LA. nightlife. They take it as a kind 
of advocacy for their lifestyle. Tve gone to a ( ‘ 
few dubs lately and people come up to me 
and say, THdyou really go there and do 
that? Sounds like fun.* ” ■ 

C 1985 The New York Times 


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'Avoiding Taxi Rip-Offs: 

Allies and 




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^ d “J ration ’ however, can tarn to para- 
noia when you arrive in New York fortbe 
first ume and are taken from JFK to Man- 
^. fa y of New Jersey for $200 in- 
stead of the normal $25 or so. (A Nigerian 
- d ride from one terminal to 

^another at JFK, no more than a short walk.) 
inere are similar cantionary tales of those 

marvelous London cabbies." 

Of course, not all taxi drivers are crooks. 
I nose in Asia (except for India, where the 
metera don’t work and drivers pursue you 
into the hotel to haggle for a higher rate) are 
me most obliging and offer the best value. 
Singapore taxis offer discounts and taxis in 
Jakarta are among the world's last great 
bargains. And taxis in big cities are generally 
more closely policed and cheaper tbandse- 
where — Pans, for instance, as opposed to 
the C6te d’Azur. f*™* 

Avoid becoming a victim of taxi rip-offs 
by taking the following precautions: 

• Observe the military marim that *irpi» 
spent on reconnaissance is -never wasted. 
Bone up before you arrive in a place for the 
first time; guide books are mostly useless on 
this subject, so ask a friend, colleague or a 
neighborly flight attendant how long it takes 
and how muen it costs by taxi, bus oir train 

'^frorn the airport (sometimes it’s better to 
take a taxi direct to the hotel rather than wait 
in line at the downtown terminal)' and 
whether tips are customary (yes In London 
and New York, no in Brussels and Copenha- 
gen). Get a street map and acquaint yourself 
with landmarks, routes and distances. 

• Travel only in licensed taxis; find out 
what they look like and if there is more than 
one kind (as in Mexico, where the expensive 
sitio cabs with orange stripes work only from 
a stand, while you flag those with yellow 
stripes and they cost half as much). Avoid 
the taxi touts that infest airports and train 
stations. These are. either “cowboys” with no 
meter, or legal but expensive Hmo- type cabs. 
Watch out at some airports, sucb as Bang- 
kok, which have a taxideskfor cats that cost 
four or five times as much as those in the 
rank outside. In Jamaica, there are two class- 
es of taxi, for locals and for viators. 

• Make sure your taxi has a meter, that it 
is switched on and zeroed at the start of the 
journey and that it is viable. Besuspidousif 
a telephone taxi arrives with an unreason- 
ably large sum already an the dock. Taxis in 
some cities, such as Paris and Geneva, have 

J two or more meter rates — higher outside the 

• ft Ml At viinltt QjYmMimAC rWvnro 


WHCU U1 uuiil Uft. oup^xu SUU wuu 

double or triple the fare. A favorite trick is to 
charge a return journey on top of this. Check 
on “extras” such as this and whether night 
rates are tgyti and what they are. When a 
driver leaps out to open the trunk you can 
probably expect an extra charge for baggage- 
Take what you can inside the cab with you. 
Be wary of accepting a hotel car, especially 
one with a “bilingual" driver. These can 





The only safe way is to be picked up by a 
company driver, fa fact, that’s not bad ad- 
vice wherever you are. ■ 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 1985 




Page 9 


TRAVEL 


Vienna, From A to Z 


sometimes.be viciously expensive; a cab in 
the street will often do just as well. 

• Find out from airport information or 
the hotel whether there are official rates for 
certain journeys, such as city center to the 
airport. Avoid offers to negotiate a price for 
the trip unless you really know what you are 
doing. However, in same dries, such as Lon- 
don, the meter applies only within a 20-mile 
radius of the center (Heathrow is on the 
meter), so you may have to agree on a fare 
(do this before entering the taxi). A leaflet 
put but by the British Airports Authority 
gives the rules of the game and a list of 
suggested fares. If in doubt, ask a traffic 
warden on the terminal forecourt. London 
has a number of ‘'minicab'’ companies (one 
is run by women for women) that operate on 


A short list of 
precautions for 
unfamiliar places 


the basis of a fixed fare between their home 
base and your destination. Although they do 
not have meters, they can sometimes be 
cheaper than regular cabs fen- extended jour- 
neys outside the metropolitan area. 

• It’s often hard to know whether you are 
being taken on a circuitous itinerary. Estab- 
lish your credibility by brandishing a map 
and pointing to the address. Have the ad- 
dress written out, especially if you don’t 
speak the language. This is important in a 
city like Tokyo. There is nothing more 
Haim ling than being launched into an un- 
comprehending city with a driver who 
speaks not one word of En gl ish, who has 
been briefed by the hotel porter and whom 
you suspect is losing his way. 

• Sharing a taxi can sometimes make 
• sense —in Washington, for example. But try 

to be sure there is no route conflict or you 
may end up as the last passenger paying a 
huge amount for a wide detour. 

• Taxi drivers are notoriously mean about 
making change, often in order to extort a 
larger tip when you leave the cab in exas- 
peration. So make sure you have plenty of 
small denomination hills 

• Be aware of the shop-switch scam in 
countries such as Thailand: You ask the 
hotel dispatcher to direct your driver to a 
certain shop and he directs it to another, 
other one owned by his brother or one that 
pays him a hefty commission. This can apply 
to restaurants and nightclubs as wdL Cairo, 
where there .seems to he a conspiracy at 
misinformation, has endless permutations of 

fhi sgamfr 

. • If you do have reason to believe you've 
been taken for a ride; it’s wise to wait until 
you leave the cab before remonstrating with 
die driver. An American businesswoman 
took a cab back to her hotel one evening in 
thie center of Paris. She knew the journey was 
no more than 50 francs but the driver de- 
manded 200. Not speaking French, she 
wrote the word “police” on a piece of paper, 
whereupon the driver locked the doors and 
set his Doberman on her. She paid. 

The worst honor stories are from Africa 
(Anglophone countries are said to be the 
worst). Meters are just redundant instru- 
mentation; there’s not even the pretense of 
sticking to an agreed fare, and bang beaten 
up and robbed by the driver or hijacked en 
route are not unheard of. Having a knife at 
your throat is the ultimate rip-off. 

In a city Eke La g os, never hail an un- 
known taxi (ask the hotel management, not 
the desk clerk) and make sure that the car 
you ordered is really the one you ordered. 


by Paul Hofmann 

A LBERTINA — A visit to the world's 
£\ laigesi graphic collection in the 180- 
JTX year-old former palace of an arch- 
duke at 1 Augustiner Strasse (tel: 52.42.32), 
near the State Opera, is always worthwhile. 
The sullen gray building contains 45,000 
drawings, watered ors ana etchings. Includ- 
ing works -by Durer, Rembrandt, Raphael, 
Michelangelo and Titian, and a million 
prints from five centuries, which are dis- 
played in rotation. Open Monday, Tuesday 
and Thursday from 10 A.M. to 4 P.M., 
Wednesday from 10 to 6, Friday from 10 to 
2, Saturday and Sunday from 10 to L 

B REAKFAST — It is included in the 
rates of almost all hotels. The break- 
fast offered by coffeehouses at 50 to 
80 schillings ($2.50 to $4) features good 
coffee or tea, the omnipresent roll called 
SemmeL a croissant, butter, jam and a soft- 
boiled egg. Some Viennese ding to their 
traditional GabelfrtihstQck (fork breakfast) at 
around 11 A.M, with a couple of frankfurt- 
ers, a small goulash or kidney and eggs with 
a beer at a tavern for 80 schillings or so. 

C OFFEEHOUSES — They continue 
to outlive their periodic obituaries. To 
habitats the coffeehouses are havens 
away from home, places to read newspapers 
and magazines free, pull off business deals, 
make or receive telephone calls, play chess or 
cards, muse, write letters or poetry, flirt and 
even drink coffee. The beverage' comes in 
more than a dozen varieties, from a “large 
cup, brown” to espresso to Turkish, at 20 to 
40 s chilling s, which entitles the customer to 
linger for hours and use all the available 
amenities. Snacks and simple warm dishes 
are also served in most coffeehouses. To the 
foreign visitor these places offer a chance to 
get a bite or a drink and observe a quintes- 
sential and enduring aspect of Viennese life. 
A few favorites: Frauenhuber, 6 Himmelp- 
/ortgasse (52.43.23); Priickd. 24 Stubenring 
(52.61.15). in business since 1903; Sirk, 53 
Kimtnerstrasse (52.73.79), a fancy An Nou- 
veau revival near the State Opera; Sped. 1 1 





In the Cafe Museum. M 

Gumpendorfer Strasse (56.41.58), once the 
haunt of Franz Lehar, now designated as a 
historic landmark. 


D ANUBE — A visitor may see most of 
Vienna’s major sights and yet never 
glimpse the mighty stream that Jo- 
hann Strauss celebrated. The Danube Canal, 
a domesticated arm skirting the inner city an 
its northeast, is a reminder that Europe's 
second-longest river (after the Volga) once 
flowed much closer to the city’s core. The 
best view of the river is from the Kohlenberg, 
the 1,585-foot-high “house mountain" from 
which, on clear days, one can see down- 
stream as far as Czechoslovakia and Hunga- 
ry. From that hill, the Danube actually looks 
blue if the light is right. 


NGUSH — It is taught in Austria 
starting at the elementary-school lev- 
el. This, and the do minanc e of Ameri- 


_*■■■ ^i^arestourant courtyard. 


can lyrics in the programs of Austria 3, the 
rock station that is also popular in the neigh- 
boring Communist countries, explain why 
man y younger Viennese understand English. 

F REUD — 19 Beiggasse is a- nonde- 
script building in a sloping street near 
the neo- Renaissance main b uilding of 
Vienna University. Sigmund Freud lived in 
the bouse for many years, and wrote many of 
his books and received bis disciples and 
patients there. The study where the first 
couch of psychoanalysis stood is now a 
Freud Museum (31.15.96), open 9 AM. to 1 
P.M. Monday through Friday, 9 to 3 Satur- 
day and Sunday. 

G REEN BELT — The Viennese get 
tbdr excellent water from Alpine 
springs and can reach vast forests, 
grasslands and wooded hills with a streetcar 
ride. The Vienna Woods stretch from the 
Kahlenberg, on the city's northern outskirts, 
to beyond the resort (own of Baden where 
Mozart and Beethoven took the waters. In 
the city's east the huge Prater grounds and, 
across the Danube, the Lob&u wildlife refuge 
provide additional green spaces. Well- 
marked hiking paths crisscross the Vienna 
Woods; a tavern or inn is never far away. 
Get a map of the public transportation sys- 
tem for 25 cents at its information office in 
the Opernpassage, the underpass near the 
State Opera, aodlook up streetcars or buses 
to any point near the Green Belt. 

H APSBURGS — The Viennese wince 
when they see this English spelling 
for the Habsburgs, the family that 
for more than six centuries niled over vast 
domains from their city. A visitor from outer 
apace might think they still do. Pictures of 
Emperor Franz Joseph as a whiskered patri- 
arch and of his Empress, Elisabeth, as a 
newlywed, are everywhere. The show win- 
dows of bookstores are filled with the latest 
additions to the iniennaable Hapsburg lit- 
erature. The Hofburg, the sprawling former 
imperial residence in the heart of the city, 
and the summer palace of Schtabnmn, on 
the western outsorts, are sight-seeing musts. 
DemoTs, the renowned confectioners near 
the Hofburg, and other prestige firms pro- 
claim themselves purveyors to an imperial 
court that vanished in 1918. 


I NFORMATION — Before plotting 
their program, visitors can stop at the 
office of the Tourist Board in the under- 
pass near the State Opera. English-speaking 
women there hand out free folders listing 
museums, hotels, restaurants, coffeehouses, 
taverns and other sights and facilities, and 
offer advice on special events and guided 
tours. Open 9 AM. to 7 P.M. daily. 

T EWISH VIENNA — Only a few thou- 
1 sand Jews live in the city today as 
«JF compared withperhaps 300,000 in the 
days before Hitler. The Jewish contributions 
to arts, science and civilization — especially 
during the intellectual brilliance of fin-de- 
siicle Vienna from about 1880 to 1910 — are 
substantial and indelible. The center of Jew- 
ish life today is in the historic ghetto between 
the Hoher Markt and the Danube Canal. 
The main synagogue, built in 1828, is at 4 
Seiien&teitengasse, the Jewish Community 
Center next door at No. 2. 

The nearby Judengasse (Jews’ Lane), 
which until ibe Nazi years was the place to 
buy second-hand clothing, is now lined with 
jean shops. The entire former ghetto has 
la tely become a swinging neighborhood with 
discotheques, cafes and taverns, patrolled 
around the clock by policemen ever since 
terrorists attacked the congregation in the 
synagogue some time ago. 

Kosher restaurants: Arche Noah, 2 Juden- 
gasse (63. 13.74J, and Orthodox Kosher Res- 
taurant. 3 Hollandstrasse (3335.65), in the 
Leopoldstadi district beyond the Danube 
Canal, which in the 16th century was as- 
signed to the Jewish population because the 
old ghetio was overflowing. 


K IDS — The eyes of many Viennese 
melt when they look at their own or 
somebody else’s dog but harden 
whenever a child is heard instead of just 
seen. Don’t expect much friendliness when 
your travel-tired or bored small fry gel rest- 
less. Aware of children’s needs, the city has 
built an impressive network of playgrounds, 
swimming pools, libraries and clubs for the 
young. For foreign visitors with offspring, 
tile nearest public playground ma t be m the 
Stadtpark, the splendid gardens between ihe 
Hilton Wien and Inter-Continental Hotels. 
Except in deep winter, the 300-year-old Prat- 
er amusement park with its merry-go- 
rounds, fun houses, roller coasters and 210- 
foot-high Riesenrad (Ferris wheel) will 
delight children. 

I ODEN — Vienna’s young generation 
has long embraced the international 
i blue-jeans and casuals fashion, but 
many middle-aged and elderly people look 
as if they had just come down from a moun- 
tain fastness, out of deep woods or from a 
village wedding — loden coats, dirndls, 
green stockings, hunters' hats with tufts 
from the coal of the chamois. Loden makes a 
good souvenir and is good all-weather wear. 
A large assortment of Alpine wear can be 
found at Loden-Plankl, 6 Michaeler Platz. 


M USIC — There is hardly a day with- 
out some high-quality concert, re- 
cital, opera or operetta perfor- 
mance, or sacred music. There is the bonus 
of visiting the places that evoke memories of 
Gluck. Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schu- 
bert, the Strausses, Brahms. Bruckner, Mab- 
ler, Scb tin berg and other composers. 

Tickets to the subscription concerts, about 
one a month, by the Vienna Philharmonic, 
one of the world’s great orchestras, are sold 
out before the season begins, and it -requires 
high-level connections, dealings with scalp- 
ers, or last-minute luck at the box office to 
get into the Musikverem. the Philharmonic's 
home. For the countless other musical offer- 
ings, watch the cylindrical columns along the 
Ring and in other strategic locations on 
which notices of forthcoming events are 
posted. If box offices are sold out, try one of 
the licensed ticket brokers in the city center; 
they are entitled to charge a commission. 

Good churcb music — usually one of the 
famous masses by the Viennese composers 
— may be heard at the 11 AM. service 
Sundays in Sl Augustine’s, entrance from 
Josefsplatz. Admission free, voluntary con- 
tributions welcomed. Watch also the music 
announcements posted outside Sl Stephen’s 
Cathedral and and many other churches. 
The Vienna Boys’ Choir can be heard at the 
9:15 AM. Mass in the Court Chapel (Hofka- 
pelle), in the Hofburg, every Sunday from 
mid-September to late June. Reserved seals 
cost 50 to 300 schillings (phone 52. 12.86). 

The Volksoper specializes in light opera 
and classical Viennese operetta. The Theater 
an der Wien, Linke Wienzeile, built for Mo- 
zart's last librettist, Schikaneder, features 
Broad way-style musicals. For good jazz, try 
Jazzland, 29 Franz Josefs-Kai (6335.75), 
from 9 P.M. until 1 AM. most nights. 

N AMES — Business signs and the 
telephone directory teem with Nav- 
ratils, Magyarys, Zawilinskis and 
other non-Germanic names. Austria’s cur- 
rent government chief. Chancellor Fred 
Sinowatz, is of Croatian origin. For hun- 
dreds of years, the city was a Central Euro- 


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pean melting pot, and to a degree still is. The 
latest newcomers are refugees from Poland 
and many young Arabs who have carved out 
a near-monopoly in newspaper-hawking. 

O PERA — During its 300-day season 
the State Opera performs daily ex- 
cept on Feb. 6, 1986, when the-fabled 
Opera Ball is held, and on Good Friday. 
Prices range from 1 .800 schillings a seat at a 
gala performance to 15 schillings for stand- 
ing room in the gallery; 500 to 600 schillings 
will buy a good seat for most performances. 
Tickets can be bought up to seven days 
before each performance from 9 AM. to 5 
P.M. Monday through Saturday, 9 to noon 
Sunday, at 3 Hanuschgasse, near the State 
Opera (53243655). 

Nearly 500 standing room tickets are 
available on a first-come, same-day basis 
regardless of whether all seals are sold (for 
most performances they are). The box-office 
window for standing room opens two hours 
before curtain time, but the line on some 
days starts at 6 AM. 







Big wheel in the Prater. 


P OLICE — Relatively few policemen 
and policewomen in their dark green 
uniforms are seen in the city, but 
street crime is almost nonexistent. It is safe 
to walk in any neighborhood at any hour. 
The emergency police number is 133. 

Q UASI- VIENNESE — Old-timers will 
tell you it’s not enough to have been 
bom in the city — one must be a 
g elemter Wiener, a person trained to cope 
with the pitfalls and ambiguities of Viennese 
ways. This class includes streetwise natives 
and foreigners who have lived in the city for 
some lime and by trial and error have gath- 
ered enough experience to hold their own. 
John Irving, the author of “The World Ac- 
cording to Garp.” may qualify. Many of the 
most authentic Viennese hail from Czecho- 
slovakia. Poland, Hungary or Yugoslavia. 


R ESTAURANTS — Stick to what Vi- 
ennese chefs can do best: Tafelspitz, 
the boiled, tender cuts of beef that 
Emperor Franz Joseph is said to have eaten 
every day; schnitzel: smoked pork with 







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dumplings and sauerkraut; venison in sea- 
son; braised onion steak; fried chicken, and 
those rich desserts that justify a pre-emptive 
crash dieL 

Following are a few recommended places 
in the gemutlich category: Griechenbasl. 1 1 
Fleischmarkt (63.19.41); Leupold. 7 Schot- 
tengasse (63.93.81); StadtbeisL 21 Nagler- 
gasse (633333). A full meal with beer or a 
carafe of wine wifi run to about 600 schil- 
lings for two in any of the three. 

S HOPPING — KSrntnerstrasse and 
the Graben, which meet near the ca- 
thedral are the smartest shopping 
streets. However, most Viennese and practi- 
cally all the many visitors from neighboring 
Hungary who look for merchandise not 
available at home favor the department 
stores and other businesses along Maria- 
hilfer Strasse, a busy thoroughfare leading to 
Schonbrunn palace. Shopping hours are 
from 8 or 8:30 AM. to 6 PM. Monday 
through Friday, 8 or 8:30 AM. to noon or 
12:30 P.M. Saturday. Stores are closed Sat- 
urday afternoon and Sunday. 

T ITLES — Vienna has a Byzantine 
mania for titles. A Herr Professor 
expects to be addressed as such, and 
will take Ms title to the grave, as the head- 
stones in the cemeteries show. His wife is 
automatically a Frau Professor. Every waiter 
is a Herr Ober. whether or not he is the head 
waiter, and about everyone wearing eye- 
glasses is a Herr Doktor. 


U -BAHN — The word means subway; 
a sign with the letter U indicates a 
subway stop. The six-year-old sub- 
way is safe, graffiti-free and usually un- 
crowded. Streets in the city’s east and in 
other neighborhoods are being tom up, with 
ensuing surface traffic bottlenecks, as a new 
east-west subway line, U-3, is being builL 


IT 7~ERB0TEN — It translates as “pro- 
\f hibited," and many things are. Signs in 
▼ the city’s lovingly tended parks warn 
that it’s verboien to step on the lawns. “Ein- 
triti Verboien” has a sterner ring than “No 
Entry." Visitors used to jaywalking at home 
will face outraged stares and may even pro- 
voke m litterings. Dropping gum wrappers or 
tissues on sidewalks is a no-no too. Small 
wonder that to many foreigners the streets of 
Vienna seem eerily neat. 


W ” IEN — The city's name in Ger- 
man. It is also the name of a little 
river that rises in the Vienna Woods 
about 15 miles west of the city, runs through 
the western and federal district — covered 
and built over for long stretches — and joins 
the Damube Canal at the easternmost point 
of the Ring. 


X IU, xnn — Such inscriptions on 
chunks of stone dug up in the con- 
struction of the new subway line are 
additional testimonials to Vienna’s Roman 
past, destined to join the many archaeologi- 
cal finds in the museums. The crack 13th 
Legion, and later the 14th, were garrisoned 
in what was to become Vienna from about 
AD. 100 to 500. Vindobona, as the encamp- 
ment was called, secured the Roman Em- 
pire's Danube frontier, and held barracks for 
6,000 troops. Roman officers' billets exca- 
vated near Sl Stephen’s can be visited from 
10 A.M. to 12:15 P.M. and 1 to 4:30 Tuesday 
through Sunday. The entrance is at 3 Hoher 
Markt; admission free. 


Y " IDDISH — Listening to the Vien- 
nese talking among themselves one 
frequently nears words derived from 
Hebrew or Yiddish. No other branch of the 
German linguistic family has drawn so 
heavily on Jewish roots. Few of the Viennese 
who pepper their everyday conversations 
with Yiddish are aware of the idiom’s ori- 
gins. The Viennese dialect, incidentally, is 
also replete with terms borrowed from the 
Slavic tongues, Hungarian and Italian, a 
legacy of the multi-ethnic Hapsburg monar- 
chy. To a German from Hamburg or Berlin, 
thick Viennese makes almost as little sense 
as Algpnquian would to a New Yorker. 

Z AHLJKNOPF — A device that invari- 
ably baffles the foreigner who for the 
first time tries to use a pay telephone 
in Vienna. After putting the requisite one- 
shilling (5-cem) coin for a local call into the 
slot and dialing or punching the number, an 
answer may be heard, but after a couple of 
hellos the parly at the other end will mad- 
deningly hang up. The explanation is that 
the caller failed to press the red “pay button" 
and therefore could not be heard. Press the 
black button to get your schilling back, call 
again, and the moment you hear an answer 
press the red Zahlknopfi ■ 

Paul Hofmann, a native of Vienna, is a 
former correspondent of The New York Times, 
for which he wrote this article. 




Page 10 



Princess Diana will make the Fair ‘A Right Royal Occasion 


T he setting for an antique fair is all 
important. The Burlington House 
Fair, originally the British Antique 
Dealers’ Fair, can expect to command the 
attention of buyers, dealers and the public as 
this year it is being held in the historic setting 
of the Royal Academy of Arts in Piccadilly. 

It will also be a ‘right royal occasion’. Not 
only is it being opened on September 11 by 
the Prince and Princess of Wales, but the 
theme of the fair marks the Quincentenary of 
the founding of the royal House of Tudor 
(1485 - 1985). 


A Tudor Room is being 
created by three English deal- 
ers showing oak furniture, 
Elizabethan portraits and pot- 
tery, as well as several items 


loaned by private collectors to 
give the Fair a final touch of 
authenticity. 

There will be a bronze gun 
and pewter from the ‘Mary 



is 



_ i 


The Burlington Home 
Fair 


Exhibitor: Athenaeum 

Monte Carlo 

One of a pair of bronze angels by “Guiseppe S at m u uti no ”. Napoli 
1723-1793 . 


THE 

BURLINGTON 

HOUSE 

EAIR 


The Antique Dealers' Fair 


THE ROYAL ACADEMY OF ARTS 
PICCADILLY LONDON WL 
Uth-22nd SEPTEMBER, 1985 


Opening Times: 

Wednesday llfch September, 5 -8pm; 
Thursday 12th- Sunday 22nd September, 
11 am -7 pm daily. 


Leading British and International dealers in both Fine Art 
and Antiques will offer for sale strictly vetted pictures, 
furniture and works of art of the highest quality. 


For further information about the Burlington House Fair 
contact Elm House, 10-16 Elm Street London WClX OBP 
Telephone (01) 278 2345. 






WE SUPPLY BMWs 
FOR EXPORT IN ALL 
SPECIFICATIONS. 

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Rose’, Henry VLETs flagship 
which sank in 1345; a portrait 
of Henry VH, and one of 
Henry VUI after Holbein; as 
well a& the Processional Cross 
found on the field of the battle 
of Bosworth, a collection of 
Tudor silver and miniatures, 
an Elizabeth I cameo ring plus 
a wax impression of the 
queen's Great Seal. “Few 
Fairs have staged such an 
array of history,” one of the 
organisers has said. 

Now biennial the Burling- 
ton House Fair, which alter- 
nates with the Paris Biennale 
des Antiquaries, goes inter- 
national for the first time this 
year with exhibitors from 
France, West Germany, Bel- 
gium, the Netherlands, Mon- 
aco, Switzerland and the 
United States showing paint- 
ings, furniture, porcelain and 
glass, gold, silver and jewell- 
ery, together with Oriental 
works of art, docks, scientific 
instruments and objets d’arL 

T .wading European dealers 
will be there including Didier 
Aaron, Galerie Perrin and 
Bernard Steinitz from Paris, 
Bemheimer of Munich, 
Vanderven and S tender from 
Holland, and Berko Fine 
Paintings from Belgium. 

All pieces are being strictly 
vetted to give buyers the best 


guarantee of authenticity. 
Nevertheless, the criterion is 
hi gh quality rather than a 
rigid adherence to any specific 
dateline. While several of the 
exhibits will be of museum 
standard, the majority will 
have a direct appeal to private 
collectors including many 
with modest budgets. 

Several items have been 
loaned by members of the 
British royal family. Queen 
Elizabeth the Queen Mother, 
patron of the Fair, is lending a 
George HI gold snuff box 
with the royal cypher in dia- 
monds, and The Queen is 
providing three Derby biscuit 
porcelain figures, modelled 
on a painting fry Zoffany, 
while the newly formed 
Derby Porcelain International 
Society will display 84 rare 
pieces from more chan 30 
private collections. 

Presented by arrangement 
with the Burlington Maga- 
zine, the Fair stays open until 
September 22. On the open- 
ing day, from 5pm until 8pm, 
admission is £5 and after- 
wards £4, including an illust- 
rated handbook. 

Another major antiques 
show in London is the 1985 
Park Lane Hotel Antiques 
Fair from October 1 to 6. 
This, too, will have royal. con- 


nections. As part of die qmn- 
cemennial of the founding of 
the Tudor dynasty the Board 
of Governors of die Museum 
of London has agreed to show 
a selection of die museum’s 
Tudor collection of plate and 
pieces from the Gheapside 
hoard of jewellery displayed 
against a of 

Braun and Hogenburg map of 
mid-16th century London. 

There will also be a portrait 
of Queen Elizabeth I, known 
as the ‘Sieve 1 portrait. This is 
one of the major works of 
George Gower (1540-1596). 
In it the Queen wears a three 
quarter length red velvet 
dress and, as always, is fest- 
ooned with jewels. She holds 
the Sieve, the symbol of 
Tucda, the Vestal Virgin. 

The rest of the exhibition, 
which is being opened by 
Sally, Duchess of Westmin- 
ster, will show English and 
Continental furniture, paint- 
ings, ceramics, silver and jew- 
ellery, docks, prints, textiles, 
and an nouveau and deco in 
the spacious ballroom of the 
Park Lane HoteL 

One of the most fascinating 
displays should be the collec- 
tion of toys on loan from the 
London Toy and Model 
Museum, including road, rail 

(the mus eum Haims to have 


the finest collection of model 
trains in Europe), air,- sea, 
novelty and mechanical play- 
things Haring' from die 18th 
century. The museum, ’which 
is housed in Craven H3L not 
far from Marble Arch, recent- 
ly won a special judges’ award 
in the Museum of the Year 
scheme. 


Admission to the Park 
Lane Fair is £4, including the 
illustrated catalogue. 

Early in 1986 sees another 
first in London’s ca le nd a r of 
unique art occasions. Heather 
McConnell, Gay Hutson and 
Ivan Winstone are staging the 
World of Watercolours, the 
first fan of its kind ax the Park 


hotel from January 


Lane 

22-26. . 

Says Heather McConnell 
“Only works on paper of 
highest quality - watercolours.;; , 
and drawings - will be shown. ; ;. 
However, we shall not impose ; 

any dateline. The rote criteria; 
for selection and display win -. ; 
be excellence.” . n;.‘‘ 


„ . ... 



I “ 


liCi- 


The Boxfington House Fair Exhibitoc Athenaeum. Moote Carlo 

Scene depicting the island ofVadce. Painting attributed to F. Guardi. Venice 1712-1793. . 


When Driving on the Left is Right 


L ondon is the centre from which 
almost every visitor to Britain sets out 
to explore the rest of the country. 
There is much to see. But if you wish to. 
visit most places in the shortest, time, 
travelling in your own car is best. 

Once it is remembered that they drive on the left (not the 
right) throughout the British Isles, newcomers will find the 
standard of driving high, but tire signposting not always as 
good, or as easy to understand, as in many European 
countries or tire US. 

Car rental firms have offices in every town and city. All the 
major companies offer easy form filling, a wide selection of 
care and, in many cases, facilities for leaving the vehicle at 
the point of departure. Some will even collect it from you. 

Because many visitors from overseas have families and 
luggage with them, companies like Town and Country, at 
Key House, High Street, West Drayton, Middlesex, offer a 
selection that includes the Mercedes automatic 380SEL, or 
the Jaguar Sovereign, both at £127 a day, or £765 weekly. 
Town and Country also has a fleet of chauffeur driven Rolls. 

Without doubt a chauffered car makes shopping and visits 
to the theatre easier, as 'well as being excellent for longer 
journeys. Visitors can then concentrate upon the changing 
scenery, not the crowded roads. Chauffeurs not only park 


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Green's 

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Cbcmpagne, oysters and cold 
seafood. -In heart of St. James’s - 
now we have a new section sew- 
ing tracSHonci hex Engfesh ashes. 

36 Di*e 51. let 030 6566 




THE ELEPHANT ON 
THE RIVER 


Dmer & Dance by the river n 
ewefosnre location Stpert* 
Mernabanci cuisne Open 
Tuas-&jnmd Closed Mon 12Q 
GrosvenorraaSWl Tel. 834 1621. 


94 Gfoswenor Rood. WesTrrtnstet. 
CosnKjpoBon food from For and 
Mdcfle East. Europe and the 
Americas. Rec. by Mcnefin, Gautt 
IVRau Roney and N.Y. Times. Mon 
- Sat reservations TeL 828 6560. 


the car while you visit a cathedral, or dine in a restaurant but 
they also look after any valuables you wish to leave behind 

But as well as visitors and tourists, London has a large 
population of ex-pa triates who rather five here because Ihey 
Eke ft, <* because their work is in Britain. For them a right 
hand drive car, such as the popular BMW 5-series, is 
essential. Most overseas families in tire UK own two, 
sometimes three, care depending upon the age of the 
children. Few are more popular than tins range of German 
built and designed care whktii offer space, safety, speed and 
performance. 

Park Lane Export, who are the sole official BMW agent in 
the U.K. for export sales, specialise in tire supply of care for 
shipment all over the world at factory tourist prices. Personal 
Export needs to be carried out correctly if the advantages are 
to be maximized and problems avoided; Park Lane’s very 
professional staff have the necessary expertise to meet these 
objectives and their service extends to assistance for 
customers even after delivery overseas. 

An equally popular continental car is the Mercedes. If you 
want a car that is different go to 65/67 Park Lane where 
Trasco .concentrate on coachbutit Mercs, each built to 
individual requirements. Extra seats, larger boots for more 
hrge^ge or company equipment, bullet proof glass, are all 
part erf everyday jobs for this Swiss based company which, 
despite offering a product in the de luxe class, has a pricelist 
from the bargain basement 

Overseas viators, or residents, in London can purchase a 
50QSEL Mercedes for $40,000, instead of the $52,000 it 
would cost in the US. A president size seven seater 1000SEL 
se&s at approximately $120,000 in America. In London the 
Trasco price is $85,000. 

Obviously, these are not care foreveryman. But the Volvo 
increasingly is. They are among the most popular buys by 
American servicemen stationed in Britain, as well as for 
members of the diplomatic craps and business community in 
London. Today the range extends from the smafl^ runabout 


to hmny EmoiMnes for famffies or senior execufivesJ AH can 
be purdiaseii.free of tax by overseas nationals, subject to 
certain Emitatiohs, from Volvo’s export department in 
London'-s Albemarle .Street, a few yaids^frpm both Bond 
Street and Pkxa^y~ 

A few weeks ago Volvo took a party of more titan one 
hundred customers on a day trtp to Wfcfes aboard the Orient 
Express. The idea was fo.offerthem aTuxury day out ending 


until the defivery of. thrar cars in ^"shadow of ancient 

jam C'jvdlc* ■ ’ 


Margam Castle. 

One of the customers was heard to say, “These are the 
care to takeyou anywhere In both comfort and complete 
safety. ’’ He sounded fike a salesman, rather than customer. 
In away he was.ft turned out that fffe car he had come to 
collect was his fifth Volvo. 




ORMOND'S 

Defightful restaurant tucked away 
tn St. James’* Nouvele aisine phis 
other favourites. Private member- 
ship ctab downstairs. 

6l Ormond Yard SW1. off Duke of 
Yak St. Closed Saturday lunch and 
Sundays. Tel: <W0 2842 


KEN LO's MEMORIES 
OF CHINA 


Probably the most prestigious 
Chinese restaurant n Europe 
Higrty thought of by over 150 
Chinese and Far-Eastern delega- 
tions who efine here The only 
restaurant featured by "Now York 
Times - . - Goumet* and ■'People's 
Dafiy" of Beyng. Cuisine features afl 
A cufinary regions of China Res. 
essential 67-69 Ebury 9 . Betgrcnna 
SWI Tel: 01-730 7734 


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Executive Health Screen for 
the International Traveller. 
Complete metficaf check, 
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Phone 01 -370 7731 /2 for 
appointment. 


G Pennon Rd. London SHIS 
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65 Brompton Road, London SW3 1 DB. ' 
Tel: (01) 584 9361 


170 Regent Street, London W1R 6BQ. 
Tel: (01) 734 0906 


2 Queen Victoria Street, London EC4N 4TL 
: Tel: (01)248 6661 *: 


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Tel: (01) 626 3171 




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> v':?*** 

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— 

TKHNOtQGY 

:^Gm Pick and Choose 

Wlth Hypertext’ Programs 

J By ANDREW POLLACK 

P alo ai ™ y °'* Tima Sfrykr 

• specific orfo^^^^^^I^P^niusthe 
particular order nf a £ ticle ' for instance, has a 

®aOy faSS fc fag 1 ®*#*? 811(1 * c reader^fl] nor- 
rastuon. u rom begmamg to ead in sequential 

; not b* bound by such 

• have mdividuaj^j^^-^ 1 ^ awnputers it is possible to 
• Wp m any order the renter **“* «w ** ca^cd 
nonsequential text, or “hvfSSS*,^? 10 1135 been called 

in computCT and u is slowly gaining 

prions iSs.^SidP^^G^Su? 31 peo Pk' ““ hx* at « 

Xerox Corp.’s Palo AJtolS H ^ aS2taresearofa scientist at the 



1_ _ — r- “ low ftlio KA, 

scan* Center. Last week Xe- Z7 

Notecards, a The new system is 
.sorrware program embodying , J 

■“£**■* Of hypertext. S more advanced than 
one analogj traditional 

j£*Sr£Efi'<E. «>“P*«er dam bank, 

iprcwte that takes a visitor past “ 

'■ 0theis would concentrate on certain exhibits and 

;ch “£ . e ^ ectromc hypertext document would offer 
=£2^38^ a Pf 5 ® 11 readin 8 a hypertext article abouta 
tiSTSLn^t^f Ve a rf faow muchdetaU he wanted on 
"S 4 h0w mudl 011 **“« *n» concepts 

■ ? son* electronic novels and computer gamST in 

•' on choices made by tfep^ra. 

.But hypertext would also allow users to link different docu- 

, for “^ce. now often contain cross- 
to wl ? ch m 10111 contain cross-references 

= *“} foflowmg the cross-references is tedious. With 

'liSES* 1 encydop ^ a ' a reader conld press a button and jump 
• .to the relevant part erf the cross-referenced article and from there 
, another cross-referenced article. 

■ J Jn S°*^ °? e ? ould bop from article to article following a given 
Jdea. Similarly, instead of just seeing a reference to another bode 
in a footnote, a reader could move immediately to the relevant 
•• .part of that book. 


I system is more advanced than traditional banks, 
which permit the retrieval of documents quickly, but do 
not allow movement from one document to the of 


-another. 

■ The first hypertext system was developed in the early 1960s by 
’Douglas C. Engel bart, then at the Stanford Research Institute. As 
part erf the same project, Mr. Engdbart also developed a device 
for controlling the computer that is only now «»mng into 
-widespread use — the mouse. Mr. Engdbarf s system is marketed 
•by Tymshare, now part of McDonnell Douglas, under the natrw» 
Augment 

The tenn hypertext was coined in the mid-1960s by Ted 
Nelson, an author and futurist His attempt at creating such a 
system, known as Xanadu, has foundered for lack of financing 

It is only now, however, that the computer technology has 
Improved enough to allow soqh programs to become more wide- 
spread, and a few systems are being developed. At Brown 
University, ahypertert system has been developed to work on the 
Macintosh computer. Nacfyear ifwfll be tested in an English 

(Continued on Page 16, Cot 5) 


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BUSINESS/FINANCE ^ 




(J.S. Stocks 
Report, M-l, Page 12 

Page 11 


New Talks 
On Trade 
Expected 

GATT Nations 

Support U.S. 

By Stephen Weeks 

Reuters 

GENEVA — The United Stales 
has won a battle to force major 
trading nations to discuss this year 
the convening of a new round of 
world trade talks, official sources at 
the 90-nation General Agreement 
oa Tariffs and Trade said Thurs- 


rorty-nine countries have 
backed the U.S. move to require 
high-level officials to meet this au- 
tumn to discuss holding a world 
trade negotiation to fight restric- 
tions, the sources said. 

At a full council meeting of 
GATT in July, the United Stales 
invoked a previously unused proce- 
dural tactic to demand the meeting. 
Approval by a majority of GAIT 
members was needed before the 
end of this month to pass the initia- 
tive. 

The 49 supporting votes have ar- 
rived by mail at the GATT offices 
and more could come by the Satur- 
day night deadline, the sources 
said. 

GATT now must call the meet- 
ing by mid-October. The sources 
said that efforts were being made to 
find a compromise that would per- 
mit all nations to attempt volun- 
tarily. 

A number of developing coun- 
tries, led by India and Brazil, have 
blocked efforts to launch a new 
round of talks. 

They have strongly opposed de- 
mands by the United States, the 
European Community and Japan 
that futures discussions indude 
trade in the sendee sector, which 
groups so-called invisible trade 
such as banking, insurance, trans- 
port and tourism. 

Brazil and India have said that 
industrial nations want to force 
concessions on services for conces- 
sions cm traditional trade in goods. 
The seven GATT trade rounds 
since World War II have been con- 
fined to trade in goods. 

Developing nations fear that ser- 
vices supplied by industrial coun- 
tries would swamp their domestic 
service markets. 



BP Net Up 5.5% 

In 2d Quarter as 
Margins Improve 


_ ___ __ Tk« Now Yort Time* 

Bruce K. MacLaury, left foreground, of the Brookings Institute, rnllrc with Akira 
Nambara of the Bank of Japan during the recent fed symposium in Wy oming, 

Discussing a 'Dollar on the Rockies 9 

High-Level Talks at the Fed’s High-Altitude Camp 


By Robert D. Hershey Jr. 

New York Times Senice 

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming — The most strik- 
ing thing is the double-barreled incongruity of it 

Learned professors from places such as Harvard 
and Stanford spoke of “ regressions, ” “simulation 
models" and “third-order polynomial lags" while 
the folks from industry fumed that nobody seemed 
to understand ihat, in the real world, the roof is 
collapsing. 

“They’re all so theoretical/' complained James 
Hairing of Motorola Inc. The United States is 
losing 3,500 jobs a day to foreign competition, he 
asserted, and “you haven't seen anything yet." 

These sentiments were expressed at a sympo- 
sium held amid the spectacular natural beauty of 
Grand Teton National Park, with about $50,000 of 
the cost of the session bong picked up by a 
government whose budget deficit is probably the 
biggest cause of the problem being discussed. 

This was the eighth rendition of what has be- 
come the Federal Reserve System's premier sym- 
posium, an annual summertime retreat in the 
northwest comer of Wyoming sponsored by the 
Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. 

This year's topic was “The VS. Dollar — Re- 
cent Development, Outlook and Policy Options," 
or. as the Bank of England’s emissary more acutely 
put it in light of the dollar's recent decline: “The 
Dollar on the Rockies." 

They came from all parts of the country to what 
Bruce K. MacLauiy, head of the private research 


group Brookings Institution and a former Fed 
official, called “old home week." 

Here, over an outdoor buffet lunch of scallops 
Newburg and roast beef, Robert V. Roosa, partner 
at the securities firm Brown Brothers Hamnun & 
Co. was recounting how he started a major curren- 
cy intervention program in the Kennedy years with 
only a few tens of thousands of dollars in the 
nation’s foreign-currency kitty. 

There, ai the opening cocktail party, was Henry 
Kaufman, the Salomon Brothers economist, mar- 
veling at how he was able to keep secret his 
recruitment of David A Stockman, the former 
budget director, and declaring that Mr. Stockman 
"will be a worker," not merely a double-dome 
adviser, when he joins the securities bouse in No- 
vember. 

Then there was Henry C. Wallich, cigar-chomp- 
ing and expansive, describing the Federal Reserve 
Board on which he sits as a “very Japanese" 
collegia! place. He also labeled G. William Miller, 
a Fed chief in the Carter years, “the perfect chair- 
man — he had no views of his own. 4 

And everywhere there was intense discussion of 
the “overvalued" dollar’s crippling effect on the 
world economy and of the possible candidates for 
the two Federal Reserve Board vacancies that 
President Ronald Reagan must soon fill The latest 
name mentioned was Representative Doug Bar- 
nard Jr., a Democrat of Georgia who is a former 
banker. 

The symposium is “a genuine intellectual exer- 
cise." one of the Kansas City hosts said. weD aware 
(Continued on Page 17, Cot 4) 


By Bob Hagoty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Improved profit 
margins on oil refining and market- 
ing helped boost British Petroleum 
Co.’s net income 5.5 percent in the 
second quarter, the company said 
Thursday. 

BP said net income in the quarter 
rose to £344 million (5482 million 
at current exchange rates), or 18.8 
pence a share, from £326 million, 
or 17.9 pence a share; a year earlier. 

On a replacement-cost baas, 
which excludes changes in inven- 
tory values, BFs net soared 49 per- 
cent, to a record £457 million from 
£306 million. 

The results were above most ex- 
pectations. ‘They're fabulous num- 
bers,” said Chris Rowland, an oil 
analyst at de Zoete & BevaiL On 
the London Stock Exchange, BP 
shares gained 15 pence to close at 
573 pence. 

Sales in the quarter grew 10 per- 
cent, to £9.97 billion frpm £9.05 
billion. 

First-half net income rose 29 
percent from a year earlier, to £859 
million, or 47 pence a share, from 
£668 milli on, or 36.6 pence a share, 
BP said. Sales increased 21 percent, 
to £21.47 billion from £17.76 bil- 
lion. 

The company, in which the Brit- 
ish government owns a 31-percent 
stake, declared an interim dividend 
of 12 pence a share, up from 10 
pence a year before. 

BP said its operating profit from 
refining and marketing outside 
North America surged in the sec- 
ond quarter to £1 15 million from 
£32 million. 

Because crude oil is priced in 
dollars, a weaker dollar reduced the 
local -currency cost of making oQ 
products in Europe, where BFs op- 
erations are concentrated. 

At the same time, prices at the 
gasoline pump held up better than 

BP also IjOTefited'ftxiinaWper- 
cent rise in worldwide crude oil 
production. 

Standard Oil Co. (Ohio), which 
is 55 -percent controlled by BP, 
contributed roughly half of BFs 
second-quarter net. A year earlier. 


Solno accounted for about two- 
thirds of net. 

BP reported a smaller operating 
profit from chemicals and a bigger 
loss on minerals in the second quar- 
ter. 

The operating loss at Sohio’s 
metals- mining division widened in 
the quarter to the equivalent of £35 
million from £15 million. In a bid 
to stanch those losses, Sohio last 
March closed its Bin gham CanyoD 
copper mine in Utah. 

Bat BFs new in-house banking 
unit, formed last year to milk more 
effectively the company's cash re- 
serves, lacked in more than £10 
million of profit in the first half, 
Robert Horton, a BP managing di- 
rector, said at a press briefing. 

The unit has been trading securi- 
ties and currencies and making 
(Continued on Page 17, COL 4) 

New Home Sales 
Increase in U.Se 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Sales of 
new homes in the United States 
climbed 1.4 percent in July, 
pushing housing sales to their 
highest level in almost two 
years, the government reported 
Thursday. 

New single-family homes 
were sold at an annual rate of 
704,000 last month, the highest 
since a pace of 767,000 sales in 
December 1983, according to 
the report from the depart- 
ments of Commerce and Hous- 
ing and Urban Development. 

Even more encouraging was 
the fact that the government 
substantially raised its esti- 
mates of housing sales from 
April through June. Sales for 
June originally had been report- 
ed as a 0.1-percent decline. But 
the new report revised that to a 
strong 2.2-perceni increase fol- 
lowing a 4.6-percent gain in 
May. Housing sales had been a 
major disappointment to ana- 
lysts because of the reported 
June weakness. 


China to Launch Probe 
Of Economic Crimes 


Reuters 

BEIJING — China's state coun- 
cil has ordered an investigation 
that will seek to put an end to tax 
evasion and economic crimes, the 
overseas edition of the People's 
DaDy said Thursday. 

The Communist Party newspa- 
per said that the eight-month inves- 
tigation, to be conducted by the 
Ministry of Finance, will cover 
state-owned and privately held en- 
terprises. 

The newspaper said the ministry 
will look for possible profiteering, 
false bookkeeping, keeping of pri- 
vate accounts, speculating to vital 
Taw materials, bribery and misuse 
of public money. 

■ Fraud, Enws Reported 

Earlier, Daniel Southerland ofthe 
Washington Post reported from Betj- 

^raud, waste, and tax evasion 
costing China more than 4.6 billion 

Mexico Signs 
New Pact on 
Foreign Debt 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — Mexican offi- 
cials and more than 600 interna- 
tional creditor banks signed on 
Thursday the second and final in- 
stallment erf a $48. 7-billion agree- 
ment to reschedule Mexico’s for- 
eign debt 

The package is the largest com- 
mercial-bank restructuring ever 
undertaken and is the first mul- 
ti-year refinancing for a Latin 
American nation since the region's 
debt crisis Oared np three years 
ago, bankers noted. 

The agreement signed Thursday 
covers about $20.1 billion owed by 
34 Mexican public-sector borrow- 
ers maturing from 1985 through 
1990. The loans will be repaid over 
14 years with one year of grace. 

The first part of the package, 
signed March 29, covered the refi- 
nancrng of a S5-billion loan signed 
in March 1983 and the reschedul- 
ing of $23.6 billion in debt (hat 
initially matured between 1982 and 
1984 and had been rescheduled 
once before. 

Both portions of the package pay 
interest at % percent over the Lon- 
don interbank offered rate for the 
period 1985-86, rising to 1ft per- 
cent for '1987-91 and to 1% percent 
for 1992-98. 

The same margins npply to 
hanks funding themselves in tire 
U.S. market instead of the Euro- 
market and the domestic rates for 
banks who elect to convert their 

(Continued on Page 17, CoL 2) 


yuan (nearly $1.6 bflbonl has been 
uncovered by the country’s rela- 
tively young audit administration, 
according to the government-run 
China Daily newspaper. 

The auditor general. Lu Peijian, 
told the newspaper to an interview 
published on its front page 
Wednesday that bis office had 
checked thus accounts of more than 

24.000 units and enterprises across 
the country and discovered numer- 
ous cases of fraud and errors to 
accounting. 

Mr. Lu cited a case of fraud in a 
county of Shanxi Province. The 

yuan^n^&l. But an audit revealed 
that the county was “juggling the 
figures" to hide a surplus of about 

350.000 yuan. 

The problem of tax evasion has 
become more serious than it once 
was because, with the process of 
economic modernization and de- 
centralization, the state is more de- 
pendent on taxes for its income and 
less dependent on income coming 
from state enterprises. These enter- 
prises have become increasingly 



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China's foreign exchange re- 
serves dropped sharply toward the 
end of last year, partly as a result or 
uncontrolled loans and heavy ex- 
penditures on imported consumer 
goods. 

Mr. Lu said that Use government 
planned to dramatically increase 
the number of auditors by almost 
SO percent over the next three 
years, adding 20,000 new recruits 
to the 26,000 auditors now working 
in nearly 3,000 bureaus around the 
country. 

He said that the auditors would 
concentrate initial efforts on coun- 
tering fraud and the exploitation of 
loopholes to the laws. 

Meanwhile, the deputy chairman 
of the Communist Party's military 
commission, Yang Sh&ngkun, ac- 
knowledged this week that “some 
units" in the armed forces have 
engaged in "unhealthy tendencies." 
The People’s Daily on Monday car- 
ried a summary of a speech by Mr. 
Yang. 

The People’s Daily editorial gave 
little in the way of details, but the 
official Liberation Army Daily in 
an earlier report said that the un- 
healthy tendencies in eluded indis- 
criminate spending and distribu- 
tion of money and goods, excessive 
wining and toning, and the use by 
some leading military cadres of po- 
sitions and power to assign jobs to 
their children and other relatives. 

The report on Mr. Yang’s speech : 
followed official confirmation last 
week that Chinese Navy airplanes 
were used illegally earlier this year 
to transport imported consumer 
items from China's Hainan Island 
to Sichuan Province for resale al a 
high markup, despite repealed in- 
junctions from central government 
authorities against such activities. 


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Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 1985 


NY$E Most Actives 


Hfflb Law Lost CM. 


WsteE 

KonCE 

UnCort) 

MldSUt 

UnEnrg 

TWA 

/WWW PI 

Tiger In 

VtfnAlrL 

DioSOfn 

RCA 

TevOGs 

G/fWoI 

Rev ton 
Oca Pat 


39% m, 
17ft 14% 
57V, 55V, 

9% 8% 

40V: 40 

22% 22 
13ft IB 
7% 7 

7% 7V* 

30% 30% 
47% 445V 
IS*. 15% 
42% 40% 

45 44% 

32 31 vj 


39% +1% 
14% — 3% 
94% +1% 
9% + % 
40% 

22 — % 
10% + % 
m + % 

7% 

20 % 

44% +2% 

15% + % 

47V* +1% 

44% 4 % 

31% — % 


Dow Jones Averages 


Opn Hum Law Lost CM 

I nous 1331.21 1340.05 132S.16 1335.13 + 4JM 

Tran* 40727 69476 68322 69140 + 421 

Ulll 160.19 16060 15906 15923— 020 

Comp 55306 55720 55034 554.90 + 1J1 


NYSE Diaries 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Banda 
Ulliifiei 
indu sir lots 


Oom CM 

0036 +036 

7827 +030 

8X45 +022 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 
volume up 
Volume dawn 


799 045 

676 620 

£08 510 

1983 1975 

37 32 

9 16 

405984140 
30437250 


NYSE Index 


him mw Close Ch’ee 
Composite 109.47 J09.19 10937 +0ffl 

Industrial* 12S37 25D3 +0-^ 

Transp 10935 10809 189J5 +052 

UHHIles S7J0 5733 57.70 --ODA 

Pfawrte* 11433 114.12 11633 Unch. 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Bay Soles ”81111 

Aug. 20 140767 390594 737 

Aug. 37 140686 390086 1216 

Aug. 26 _ 132340 380226 l/HI 

Aua.23 — 139335 365,143 931 

Aug.22 151.117 CZA46 699 

‘Included in itw sales Hgurcs 


Thursda y 

M S I 

Closing 


VOL 0t4 PAL— 84MUN 

Prev.4PJM.voL 8&53MB0 

Prev eoasoMotod Oosa 185214264 


Tobin incfode (be nationwide prices 
up to tbe cfoslng on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


masoAQ Index 


aaafx Most Actives; 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unchanged 

tom issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 
Volume w> 

Volume down 


Standard & Poor’s index 


High Law Close CVge 
Industrials ZW04 20929 3MUH +012 

Tronsn. 174.10 17221 17410 + 120 

Utilities 8441 8418 8429 — 001 

Finance . 2108 7121 21J9 —003 

C o mposite 10824 18828 18493 +0.10 


Campasile 

industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

Transp. 


i!Si 

iiiri 


vwksces 
; bat In 
TeKAir 
FrntHd 
Echoes 
EvrJA 

SSft 

SSSS& 

GttCda 
Lorimr 
AizaCP 
Lurta , 
Wichespf 


Hh* W* 

495 # 

4% 4£ 

IS SS 

15 M*5 

8 B 
16% W* 

m- iw 

il wva 
33Vi 03 
14% J4% 

32% 32 

12?* 

29% 2995 


Last CM . 

S-.+ fc- 

ss.ig. 

-5 

16% ♦ » 

s it 

32% +2 

94 U. +295 

TO — * 
29% + % 


AMEX Sales, 


4 P.M. volume 
Prav. 4 P JW. vpHime 
prev. cons, voluine 


AMEX Sto ck Index j 

CM) Ch*ge 

W* JfZ 23425 
23422 7S332 


UMenlh 5b. Oasa 

High Low Hock Div. VM.PE HttHMlLew QuoLOlW 


NYSE Posts 3d Straight Gain 


23% 16 AAR 
17% 9*. AGS 
T6"J 9% AMCA 
219: 13 AMP 
50% 24% AMR 


10ft 7% AcmeE 22b 41 11 

19 15V: AdaEx 192C1O0 

20 13V* AdmMI 22 10 7 

10% 0% AdvSvS 031 43 19 

40% 22% AMD 16 

12% 6% Advest .12 12 21 
15*5 9% Aertlex 12 


26 25 15 184 22** 22% 22% 

13 121 15% 15% 15%—% 
t 11% 11% 11% + % 
25i 96 2230 13% 13% 13% + % 

8 4067 45% 45 45% + % 


23% 18% AMR pf 2.1B 9J 2 23% 23% 23% 

25% 23 ANR pt 227 112 2 23% 23% 23% 

14% 7% APL 16 «% 9% 9% + % 

61% 34% ASA 200 52 1167 37% 36% 37% + % 

27 12% AVX 32 U 19 55 13 13 13 

28% 18% AZP 172 llO 7 540 24% 24% 24% 

60 36% AbtLab 120 14 16 1636 58% 50% 53% 

25% 20 AccoWd s JO 12 17 331 22% 22% 22% + % 

24% 12% AcmeC 20 19 36 14% 14 14 — % 

10% 7% AomeE .32b 41 IT 5 8 7% 77 b — % 

19 15% AdaEx 102elO0 72 17% 17% 17% + % 

20 13% AdmMI 02 10 7 5 16% 16% 16% + % 

18% B% AdvSvS 031 43 19 47 12% 12% 12% 

40% 22% AMD 16 2028 27% 27% 27% — V* 

12** 6% Advest .12 10 2t 74 9% 9% 9% + V* 

15% 9** Aertlex 12 129 13% 13% 13% + % 

49% 32% AetnU 164 5.9 15 734 45 44% 44% — ft 

57% 52% AetLpf &79*1DJ 286 57 56% 57 — % 

37% 18% Ah mm 110 3.7 8 2164 32% 32 32% +1 

3% 21: Alleen 5 3% 3ft 3ft— ft 

57 42 AlrPrd 120 13 12 638 53% 53% 53% — % 

24% 15 AlrbFrl DO 16 13 251 23 22 % 22% + % 

2% 1% AIMOOS .10c 4.7 183 2% 2 2% 

33% 27ft AkiP cIA 3.92 lie 5 31 31. 31 


3% 2i: Alleen 
57 42 AJrPfd 120 13 

24% 15 AlrbFrl M 20 

2% 1% AIMOOS .IOC 4.7 

33% 2 Tm AlaP pf A 192 lie 


B% 6% AlaP dpt 07 tl.l 

B2 63% AlaP pf 900 11,7 

74 SBft AlaPpf 8.16 tlJ 

16% 11% AlWSCS 104 7 A 10 

26% 11% AISkAIr .16 J B 

25 11V: AlbrtOS J* ID 19 

33% 26% AJbtsns .76 17 12 

31% 23% Alcan 1.20 42 2« 


31% 23% Alcan 1J0 42 29 2085 28% 27% 28% + % 
38% 27% AlcoSId 1J0 14 12 100 35% 35% 35V* — % 


12% 4% AIIFsCtl 

34% 24 AllsCPl 

29% 21% ALLTL 1JB4 46 

39% 29% Atom I Jo 3J 

22% 13% A max .101 

40 32 Amtu pf 3JJ0 80 


22% AmHes 1.10 30 23 3136 29 


2% 1% AmAgr 

21% 16 ABakr 
70 58% ABrand 3.90 63 

30% 25% A Brd pt 175 94 


30% 25% ABrdPf 175 9-4 8 29 % 29 29%—% 

70% 59% ABrd pf 167 44 5 60% MH* +1% 

115% 56% ABdCSI 1 M M 17 72 115% 115% 115% 

30% 19% ABMM Jt 11 15 6 27% 27% 27% + % 

28% 20% ABusPr 04 14 14 13 26% 26 26% 

60% 45% AmCon 190 5® II 479 58 57% 58 + % 

25% 22 A Con pi 150 11.1 43 25% 25 25% 

S2% 40% ACon pf 3.00 £9 66 50% 50% 50% + % 

114% 103 AConpt 1175 111 1114 114 114 

20% 17% ACopBd 220 1X7 68 20% 20% 20% — % 

30% 25% ACaaCv 251 b 9J 6 27% 26% 27 + % 

11 6% ACentC 169 17 6% 6% 6% 

57% 44% AC von 100 30 14 1001 54% 54% 54%— % 

27% 18% ADT .92 19 23 49 23% 23% 23% — % 

24% 17% AElPw 2260103 9 1078 22% 71% 21 ft — % 

49% 31% Am Exp 1 JB 11 14 5544 42% 4T% 41%— % 

25% 12% A Fermi s X8 10 13 949 24% 24% 24% — M 

36% 22 ACflCp 100 12 9 3341 11% 30% 31% + % 

16 6% AGfil wt 324 13 12% 12% + % 

56% 51% AGnlpfASJI7al(L4 205 56% 56% 56% + % 

71% 45 AGnpfD 164 4J 174 63% 62% 63% +1% 

36% 25% AHerlf 1J0 30 ID 49 33% 32% 33% — % 


IS? 15 % 15 % ST- ft 77ir .Associated Pros 

iso 13 % 13 % ii% + % NEW YORK — Prices oa the New York JMLl JtlffiBS BffliOft 

+ " Stock Exchange advanced Thursday, posting LWX x •'“"r 3 ^* U 
2 23 % 23 % 23 % + ^ their third straight g»n in another quiet session. 77ur Assodased Press 

i67 37 % 36% 37 % + % The Dow Jones average or 30 industrials rose NEW YORK — The narrowest measure of 
S40 24% »% w* 4.04 to 1,335.13, bringing its gain over the past the U.S. money supply, M-l, rose $2.8 biltion in 
m “2 22 % + % three days to 17.48 points. the week ended Aug. 19, the Federal Reserve 

“ ’a* * 7 % ' 7 %— % Broader indicators also increased. The New Board reported Thursday. The rise was above 

72 17% 17% in* + % York Slock Exchange index rose 0.08 to 109.47. mosl expectations. 

47 12 % 12 % «% ' Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index rose 0.10 to -The Fed said M-l, which comprises currency 

» 3 S% ^ 9 % + % 188.93. The price of an average share added jn circulation, deposits in checking accounts 

m 45 W ’ «%- % three cents. and nonbank travelers checks, rose to a season- 

feS 32 % n' S% + 1 '* Advances outpaced declines an 8-7 ratio, ally adjusted $606 billion from $603.2 billion 

5 3 % 3 % 3 %— % Volume came to 85.66 million shares, down the previous week. The latest increase puts M-l 
hi §2 22 % + % from 88.53 million Wednesday. well above the upper limi t of the Fed’s targeted 

® j 2 31 " In the market's fitful advances this week, growth range for the monetary aggregate. 

ooz 7 H% 77* 77 ** 1 * analysts noted, trading has been light, with : 

;ioz 70 70 70 - % activity concentrated in stocks rumored as take- . ...... 

over candidates or involved in corporate buy- md is consdenng seflmg its cable tdewaon 
39 24% 24 24 — % nians business. 

I IS IS IS ^ % Analysts generally said that it was difficult to V™ axmonm^ a rrattuo- 

” 28 % 28 28 % + % mot any significant trend in stock prices with ph*“ OQ Wednesday, rose to 56% m 

lo 76% 75 % 76% — % many investors on vacation or taking a cautious ac J** t 

£ SSS IRS approach until after Labor Day. . Gaj “ “ West ?^^S d T U “ 

% |» | «3 7 j; talk persists on Wall Street that the pace of hav * push, the Dow Jones industrial 

is 30 % 30 % ao% business activity will pick up over the second average higher in the past two sessioos while 

g 5?% 2 S half of the year ot J CT ’ b ^ adxx maAel ^asoies showed less 

if !SS!KS in% + % J*"* h °P es ^ 8 et . a j** 5 on Fnda y’ Kansas Gas & Electric feU 3% to I4fc for the 

£ sS: s2«: sSS + 1,1 the goyeniment is scheduled to report on ^ biggest percentage loss among NYSE is- 

S 3 S S % ?“ mdex ^fns^nonuc mdtcatora for Tb? coSpanyldd that itlronld face 

July, as weU as the U.S trade balance for the serious finand3piSblems if it is not granted a 

w i5% 15 % is% + % same month. rate increase large enough to cover its stake in a 

i6 If** n %>* + 1 % Westinghouse Electric led the most-active list nuclear power plant 
» 21 % otjIS + h climbed IVi to 39\4. The stock jumped 4% Kansas Gty Power & light, which has a large 
» ««. m m% + % Wednesday on news that the company plans to investment in the same plant dropped to 

l ao% 5®% «■% + 1 % buy back as many as 25 million of its shares, 20%. 


1410Hz 78% 77 77 —1 

210z 70 70 70 — % 

20 14% 14% 14% + % 

B90 21% 21% 21% 

39 24% 24 24 — % 

70 28 Vi 27% 20% + % 


32 20% AlexAlx 1D0 X5 332 28% 28 28% + W 

25% 20% Aletdr 22 17 24% 24 24 — % 

89% 72% AllgC o 1541 2D M 76% 75% 76% — % 

26% 24% AFoCppf 286 108 1 26% 26% 26% 

28% 90% AMInt 1.40 <L6 53 21% 21 21% 

20% 16% AJglnpf 2.19 1 2D ID 10% 18% 18% — % 

98 85 AlglafCllJS 12D 3 94 93% 94 + % 

34% 26% AllgPw 2.70 SD 9 1015 JD% 30% 30% 

23% 15% AIICflG 60b 27 14 102 22 21% 21% 

46% 37% AlktCp IJD 4L3 0 1809 41% 41% 41% 

66 57% AldCppf 6.74 106 121 MU, 63% 63% 

115% 102% AMtCDPfl2J» 107 6 112% 112% 112% 

105% MD% AMCof 11-S7«116 17 101% IOTA 101% 

23% 15% AIMPd 12 2 18% 1BU> 18% 

60% 45% AlUStr 212 U 8 252 54% 56% 56% 


|J0 U B 1809 41% 41% 41% 

674 106 121 MU, 63% 63% — % 

2D0 107 6 1)2% 112% 117% + % 

1J7«1L4 17 101% 101% 101% + % 

12 2 18% 1BU> 18% + % 

112 U 8 252 54% 56V. 56% 

3517 4% 4% «% 

3 30% 30% 30% — % 
144 66 9 117 28 27% 28 + V, 

T JO U 32 1801 35% 35% 35% + % 

.101 1478 15% 15% 15% + % 

IDO 66 19 34% 34 34% +1 


sues. The o 
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rate increase 


2S0 1% 1% 1% 

159 21% 20% 21% + % 

220 40 V. 60 60% + % 

8 29% 29 29V,— % 

5 60% £03* 60% +1% 

72 115% 115% 115% 

6 27% 27% 27% + % 

13 26% 26 26% 


60% 45% AmCon 190 50 11 <79 58 57% SB + % 

25% 22 ACon pi 2D0 11.1 43 25% 25 25% 

S2% 40% ACon pi 300 S.9 66 SR* 50% 50% + Vi 

114% 103 ACon Pt 1175 111 1114 114 1U 

20% 17% ACopBd 210 107 68 20% 20% 20% — % 

30% 25% AConCv 251a 9J 6 27U. 26% 27 + % 

11 6% ACentC 169 17 6% 6% 6% 

57% 44% AC von 150 35 14 1081 54% 54% 54% — % 

27% 18% ADT .92 19 23 49 23% 23% 23% — % 

24% 17% AElPw 2-2*01 DJ 9 1078 22% 71% 21 %— % 


13% 7V* A Hoist 


324 13 12% 12% + % 

205 56% 56% 56% + % 
174 63% 62% 63% +1% 
49 33% 32% 33% — % 
68 12 % 12 12 % — % 


66% 46% A Homo 190 50 12 3528 58% 58 U, 58% 

47 26% AHosp 1.T2 2 A 15 1676 46% 46% 46% — % 

97% 72 Am rich till 72 9 « 91% 90% 91% + % 

«S% 62 AlnGrp M 5 22 391 86% 85% 86 — % 

150 112% AIGPP« SDS 4.1 IS 143 143 143 

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4% 2% AmMof 287 3% 3 3 

» 16% APresda J025 5 335 20% 19% 20% + %, 

13% S ASLFIa H II 6% 6% 6%— U> I 

10% 12V. ASLFI pt 119 14D 25 15U 15% 1S%— % 

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67% 35% AmStor D4 1.1 10 259 57% 56% 57 

78 46% AStrptA 438 65 10 68 67% 67% 

57% 51 AStrpfB 6J0 12J 10 55% 55% 55% + % 

24% 17% AT&T 1 JO 5D 16 7329 21% 21% 21% — % 


<1% 32% AT&T Of 3D4 9J 
42 33% AT&T pi 374 93 

27% 16% AWatfS 1D0 3D 8 
13U TO A Wat pf 1 J5 100 
13% 10 AWaSpf 1J5 9D 
28% 17% AiriHaH 240 1X4 7 
72% 59% ATrPr 5D4 8J 
18 6 Vji ATrSC 
89% 66% ATrUn 5D4 6D 
40% 26% Amerofl I DO 42 I 
50 24% AnWD JO J 21 

29% 22% Anwtali DO 33 13 
28% 18% Amfnc 
16 6% Amfnc 4 

69 50‘A Amoco 330b 5.1 8 

37% 28% AMP .72 22 22 
23% 11% Amoco 30 24 17 
23% 13% Amro PS 11 

36 21% AmSItl IDO 43 8 

45% 30 A mated 1D0 3D 16 
4% 1% AlWCTOP 

24% 16'U Anloo 23 

27% 19V. Anchor 1X8 6.1 
46’* 29% AnOay 132 33 30 
12% 9% AndrGr JO 1.7 14 

27 1 * 17 AngollC .40 23 14 


1D4 9J 100 39V, 39 39V, — % 

174 93 90 40% 40 40% — % 

IDO 3D 8 54 26% 26% 26V. + % 

IDS 10D 5Dz 12% 12% 12% + % 

135 9D 150z 12% 12% 12% 

1X0 13X 7 IBS 18% 17% 17% + % 

i*4 SJ 32 69 68% 68%— % 

7 13% 13% 13% + % 

3 Si 8 + * 

JO J 71 742 44 42% 44 +1% 

DO 13 13 272 34% 23% 24 +% 

60 26% 26% 26% 

4 88 6% 6% 6% + % 

130b 5.1 8 1828 65 64% 64%-% 

.72 22 22 55® 32% 32 32% 

30 24 17 24 12% 12% 12% 

11 12 20% 20% 20H— '* 

1X0 43 8 394 32% 32% 32% 

DO 3D 16 32 44% 44 44% + % 

„ 2884 3W 2% 3% + % 
22 112 22 % 22 % 22 % — % 

XB 6.1 35 34% 24% 24V.— % 

32 33 30 96 40% 40% 40%- % 

70 1.7 14 TO 12V. 12 12 + % 


34% 21% Alllwus S DO 25 12 1214 

71% 48% Anhaupt 3DQ S3 21 

19% 13% Anlxtr 78 17 18 59 

16% 9 Anthem 04 J 21 24 

15V, 10% Anttinv .44b 2? 9 103 15% 15 15% 

13 9% Apache 78 2D 10 70 11 10% 10% 

2 % ApctiPwt 194 Vi 1 1 — % 

19% 15% ApchPwaiO 113 596 18% 18% 1B%— % 

74% 55% ApPwpr 8.12 115 272Qz 70% 70% 70% + % 

34% 29 ApPwpf 4.18 127 3 32% 32% 33% + % 

31% 26% ApPwpf 3D0 125 3 30% 30% 3®% 

39% 22 ApIDta 1761 7D 22 509 23% 22% 23% + W, 

15% 8 AppIMfl 63 25 I4M 13% 13% — % 

24% 16% Arc/lDn ,14b 7 13 979 20% 20% 20% + % 

sm 24% ArlPpf 358 12.! 30 29% 29% 29%— % 

24% 14 ArkBat X0 17 9 80 TA 23% 24 

16 Arklo IDS SD 24 2035 18% 18% 18% — % 

% ArlnRI 2% + Ki 

12% 6% Armco 383 9% 9% 9%— % 

Zt% 15% Armcpf 2.10 10X B 2D% 20% 20% — % 

24% 14% ArmsRb 48 11 9 8 15% 15% 15% + % 

39% 26% Armwin 1J0 3D 9 342 34% 34% 34% + % 

34% 21 AroCP ITT 47 7 14 28% 2B% 28% + % 

23% 12% ArowE 70 15 16 6 13% 13% 13%— % 

»% 16 Art™ .72 7151 27 2S% 23% 25% — % 

27 15 Arvln 5 HO 34 f 239 23% 23% 23% + % 

62% 36 Arvln Pt 2D0 3D 1 56% 56% 56% +1 

17% Asorco 298 22% 22% 22%— % 

37 p% AshICHI 1D0 4D 367 34% 34 34% + % 

45% 34% ASillO pf 450 10.1 12 45 44%- 44% 

44% 33% AshlO Pf 3.94 9J 2743 47% 47% + % 

69% 49 AsdDG 2D0 4J 11 1127 65% 63% 64% +1% 

32% 31% AsDGwl 17 32% 32 32% +1 


31 25% 25*b 25% 4014 Tgi* 

\U 33V* 32% 32% — % XS 

21 60 68 68 — % 22% 

59 16% 16% 16% + % 23% 150% 

24 14% 14% 14% + % 17 


11 Month 
HKtfi Law Shu* 


14% 11 
25% 19% 
31% 26 
66% 43% 
136% 92% 
31% 21% 
27% 22 
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28 16% 
41 29% 

25% 19% 
37% 30% 
26% 14% 
31% 23% 
SA 32% 
40% 28% 
40% 29 
191* 15% 
20 15% 

21% 14% 
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23% 19 
S3 46% 
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59% 25% 
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1D8 XI 16 1211 59% 59% 99% + % 


f 200 ID T3 124% 134% 124% + % 

l-BOe 57 8 62 31% 31% 31% + % 

> DI* 2J 332 28% 27% 28% + % 

99 2% 1% 1% 

132 5.1 21 36 25% 25% 25% — % 

112 7.9 B 15 39% 39% 39% + % 

12X7 9D 6 25% 25% 25%—% 

r 195 11J 1 35* 35 35 + % 

70 .9 8 135 22% 22 22% + % 

106 *3 21 1073 11% 31V* 31% + % 

1D8 2D 18 475 53% 51% 53% +1% 
IDO 2.9 a 900 35% 35 35 — V* 

S3 ID 15 538 33% 33 33% + % 

DO 44 9 15 18% 18% 18% + % 

2.16 I1D 11 18% 18% 18% 

12 90 17 16% 17 + % 

TD4 5.9 104 27% 27% 27% + 1* 

1X0 U 1 711 61% 61 61% + I* 

2.12 9.1 2 23UL ZJV, 231* 

&33elOD 19 50% 50% 50% 

X4 3D 20 413 12% 12 12% + % 

2D0 40 12 1234 65% 65% 65% 

02 3.1 IBS B 16% 16% 16% — 14 

650 2 1% 1% — % 

1051 58 3% 3% 3% 


1X0O6J 262 22% 22 22%—%, 

ISO 24.70 2575 JM 112% 114 +% 

8 82 5% 5 5% — % 

200 47 36 717 55% 55% 55% + % 


12% Conroe X0 2D 6 37 

26% Cons Ed 2X0 6D 8 2396 

36% ConEpf 4D5 103 4001 

39 ConE pf 500 liO 2 

23 ClMFrt 1.10 30 II S3 

35% CnsNG 202 57 S 901 

4% CoraPw 461 

19 CnPpfB 4J0 14J Sth 

31V* CnPpfD 7X5 147 1609 

32% CnP pfE 772 140 1000a 

15% CnP prV 4X0 ILO 67 

13V* CnP prU 3 jSS J47 7 

14% CnP prP 3.98 143 3 

14% CnP pfN 3DS 14X 7 

9% CnP prM 2.50 140 8 

15 CnPprS *.m. I4D 14 
9% CnP prK 2X3 130 8 

30% CnllCp 2D0 60 20 456 

4% Conti II 16 137 

% Contll rt 1S2 

26% Cnttllpf 23 

% CHlHdn 148 

4% Cntlnfa > 2t9 

19% ContTel 1D0 7D I 472 
21 ClData J2 3D 2193 
26% Caowd 1.10 XI 13 411 
1 vlCookU 207 

27% Caaar 102 40 16 1226 
31 Coopl pf 250 70 32 

14 V* CoprTr .43 2D 7 


IJ4 11.1 12 11% 

174 20% 
2J0 50 12 1924 44% 
1.40 4J 9 17 23 


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11 11% 

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43% 44% + % 
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2070100 167 21 20% 30% + % I 

1.16 4X 9 1076 26% 26 26% + % I 

1D0 30 11 33% 33% 33%— % 


34% 29 ApPw pf 4.18 1X9 
31% 26% ApPwpf 300 1X5 


30% 24% ArlP Pf X58 1X1 

24% 14 ArkBst X0 17 

16 Arklo IDS SD 

% ArlnRI 
12% 6% Armco 
22% 15% Armcpf 110 10X 

24% 14% ArmsRb X8 XI 


69% 49 AsdDG 200 4J 11 
32% 31% AsDGwl 
110% 79 AsdDpf 4.75 4D 
24% 18% Alhlone IDO BJ 10 


I 103% 103% 103% +3% 
4 19% 19% 19% — % 


29% 21'- AtCyEI 758 10 199 27% 26% 77% + % 


64% 42 AtlRkh 400 60 

101 32% AtlRCPf 175 37 

153 100% AHRcpf 2D0 1.9 
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31% IB% Auoat XO ID 26 

54% 34% AutoDI D8 10 21 

5% 4'A Avalon n 10 

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JHt 28% Avery DO ID 13 

24% 10 Avtall it 13 

39% 77 Avne! DO ID 18 

25 17% Avon 200 90 11 

28% 16% Avdln 19 


400 6D 1426 60% 40% 60% 

175 37 260Z1D1 101 101 

LBO 1.9 7 145 144% 144% + % 

15 12% 12% 12% 

XO ID 26 96 2<% 24% 24% + U, 

D8 10 21 553 52% 52 52 + % 

10 173 5% S 5% + % 
DO 1.9 15 7 31 30% 30% 

DO ID 13 129 325* 32% 32% + % 

13 579 24% 24 24 

DO ID IB 720 331* 33% 33% — % 

200 9D II 461 22% 21% 22% + V, 

19 54 22% 22% 22% — % 


17% 7% BMC .12/ 127 8% 8% 8% + % 

35% 22% Baimoo DO 13 10 108x26 25% 25% — % 
19% IS Skrrntl J2 il 15 30*2 18V* 17% 10 

24% 18% Baldor 06 ID IS 52 22 21% 22 + ■* 

2% % vIBoldU 123 1% 1% )%— % 

ID 2 vIBIdUpf 4 7% 7% 7% 

61% 34% Barren ix< 2x M as 40% 59% 59»- 1* 

19% 11% BollyMf JO 1.1 340 177* 17% 17% — % 

11% 7% BollyPk 12 22 10% 10% 10% — % 

46% 33V, BallGE 3X0 77 I 135 44 43% 43% + 1* 

23V, 16% HUGE wt 6 22% 22 22 + % 

35% 22% BncOne 1.10 14 11 72 32% 32% 32% 

23% 15V* BncOnwl 31 22% 21% 21%— % 

5% 2% BanTex 113 2% 2% 2%— % 

a 46% BandOQ 100 22 11 44 53% 53% 53% + U, 

55% 34% BkBcn UO ill S 151 41 47% 47%— % 

53% 49% BkBpfB ,99e 1.9 542 S3 52% 52% 

47% 28% BkNY 204 4.9 7 274 42 41% 41% + U 

331* 20% BankVa 1.12 40 8 «9 27% MV, 2i%— % 

22% 15 BnkAm 00 13 2240 15V* 15 15%- % 

47 40 BkAmpf DJlellX 20 43 42% 43 +% 

74% 65% BkAm pf 703eT1.9 5 66% 66 66 — % 

16% 12% BkAmpf 208 4* 15% 15% 15% 

32% 26 BkARfY 2X0 80 12 14 20% 28% 28% — % 

75% 46% BanfcTr 2.70 4.1 6 207 65% 65% 6S%- % 

27 21V* BkTr pf 2JO 97 6 25% 25% 25% — % 

13. . .8% Banner D3e J 15 40 11% 11% 11% 


39% 19 Bam -56 ID W 773 35% 34% 35% + % 

25 m. BoraGP DO 3J 15 3S 2 4% MVs 24% 

41% 25% Ba mel & 104 17 11 176 38% 37% 38% + % 

33% 17 Borywr DO XV 15 30 20% 20% 20% 

13% 8% BASIX ,12b IX 11 SB B% 8% 8% + % 

35% 22% Bousch .78 2A IB 254 32% 31% 32% + % 

17% 11% BaxITr 07 2D 74 2510 14% 14% 14% + 2 

27% 29% Boy Pin JO 0 M7 23 26% 26% 26% + % 

34% 24 BOVS tG 2D0 70 9 15 33% 33% 33% + U, 

38% 31V* Bearing 100 X? 13 1 34% 34% 34% + V* 

34% 26% BeofCo 100 50 7 3566 34% 33% 34% + % 


109% 100% 
13% 10 
40% 29% 
26% 18 
30% 21% 
25% 50% 
48 35% 

11% 5% 

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46% 22 
10% 
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29 15% 

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40 28% 

27% 19% 
129% 68% 

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27 11% 

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13% 8% 
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28% 15% 
25% 16% 

£2* 1B ** 
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54% 45V: 
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63% 39% 
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56% 51 
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44% 27 
39% 32 
38% 31% 
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200 130 
»% 16% 
11% 7% 
54 2B% 

13% 5% 

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56 44% 

38% 25% 
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27% 20 
51 36% 

19% 13% 
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74% 52 
26% 18% 
37 26% 

31 20% 

» IS 
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100% 82% 
102 97% 

41% 26% 
9 6% 

7*% 8 
32% 23% 

16 9 
22% 17 


' 4J5 90 
J5b 10 
.12 D 126 


XB 214 13V 

I DO 538 19V 

JO 21 325 219 

J7 15 9 596 2ZV 
901e 9D 1 108V 

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W 15 I 9 31 
X0 10 II 108 23 

160 9J 7 2678 27 

2D7 10D 7 25V 

X1Q 5X 14 29 39V 

D7 ID 10 58 7 

DO 19 9 54 21 

102 4X 23 36 27V 


108k 
DO *4 
DO IX 
J6 .10 II 
4X0 16 11 


48% Beat of 308 50 


16% 12% Becor 


60 63% 62% 63% + % 


X4 19 62 154 15% 15% 15%— % 


IDO 3D 11 33% 33% 33%—% 
431 62 9 0% 8%— % 

.92 17 9 350 25% 25 2S% + % 

18 3256 16% 15% 16% + H 

X8 13 5 1505 21% m 20% — % 

f 475 9D 38 50% 49% 49% — % 

J5blJ 112 20% 20% 20%—% 

.12 D 126 31 15% 15 15% 

XO 788 25 24% 24% — % 

.161 223 3% 3 3% 

12 210 37% 37% 37% + % 

XB 214 13% 13% 13% + % 

I DO 538 19% 19 19% + % 

JO 21 325 219 217 218 + % 

77 15 9 596 22% 22 22 — % 

901e 9D 1 108% 108% 108% 

X8 9 10% 10% 10% 

W 15 I 9 31 30% 31 — % 

XO 10 II 108 23 22% 23 + % 

260 9J 7 2678 27 26% 26% 

2D7 10D 7 25% 25% 25% 

X10 5X 14 29 39% 39 39% 

D7 10 10 58 7 6% 7 

DO ZD 9 54 21 20!* 21 + % 

102 44 23 36 27V* 27% 27%— % 

S3. IX 12 181 37 36% 37 + % 

O 74 7 72 16% 15% 16V* + % 

758 11% 11% 11% 

108k 53 25ft 25% 25% 

DO *4 264 14% 14% 14% 

DO IX 1049 36% 36 36% — % 

74 U II 4 25% 2SU, 25% — % 

440 16 11 63 121% 120% 121V* +1 

D4e X 26 342x 9% 91* 9% + % 
208 50 9 241 41% 40% 40% — % 

05 1.1 10 82 23% 23 23V* + 1* 

202 70 8 2877 25% 2S% 25% + V* 

206 100 6 122 28% 28% 28% 

104 8D *® 834 19% 19% 19% + V* 

24H &1 7 35 25% 25% 25% + % 

418 1X2 1 34V* 34% 34% 

1X0 110106 154 12% 12% 12%—% 

1.90 90 6 52 20% 20% 20% + % 

331 4% 4% 4%— % 

DO 60 0 70 12% 12 12—% 

X40 1X8 0 46 18% 18% 18% 

70 17 12 68 25% 25% 25% + % 

XO 17 22 2919 2«% 23% 23%—% 

D2 X3 1064 23 22% 23 

100 4D 1 36% 26% 26% + I* 

400 80 13 52% 52% 52V* — V* 

XO 48 IS 1163 8% BV* 8%— V* 

74 2% 2% 2%— % 

6 2% 2% 2% — % 

300 60 6 368 55% 551* 55% — % 

505 100 . 4 48 48 48 + V* 

IO04e!97 606 54 53% 53% + % 

72 34 9 2 21 21 21 +V* 

1D2 5.1 12 35 29% 29% 29% 

2XS 60 4 588 49% 40 40U— U 

107 46 80 40% 40% 40% + % 

104 34 II 13 37% 36% 37 — % 

200 50 10 493 34% 34 34% + 1* 

2X0 64 9 2809 37% 37% 37% + V* 

112 2 136 136 136 — V* 

DOe 1.1 10 43 27% 27% 27% + % 

041 3D 200 13 8% 8 8 

X81 0 23 52% 51% 52 — % 

7 10% 10% 10%— % 
40 21 12 12 12 

7 55 54% 55 — % 

IDO 27 3 3568 37% 36% 36%—% 

220 10 13 270 73% 71 73% +1% 

405 60 283 62% 41 62% +1% 

X4 X9 13 1116 15% 15% 15V* — V* 

X22 90 9 <2 24% 24% 24% + Va 

112 6D I 24 48 47% 47% + 1* 

XI6 110 7 602 18% 18 18% 

400 120 130z 32% 32% 32% + % 

900 111 140* 71 70 71 +1 

.72 14 Z7 104 21% 21% 21% + % 

74 20 12 71 31% 31% 31%— % 

.10 X 13 263 23% 23% 23% 

16 258 29% 28% 29 

X26 40 6 2118 46 45% 45%— % 

90Se 90 20 rav* 98% 98% + % 

8X7e 80 4 101% 101% 101% + % 

7 HOC 4 27V4 27V* 26% 27% + % 

.72 9.9 6 17 7% 7% 7V* 

.10 D 2B 164 21% 21V* 21%— V* 

1.10 14 33 220 32% 31% 32 — % 

14 20 15 14% 14% — % 

100 50 10 37 20 19% 20 — % 

200 9X 6 21% 21% 21% 

X52 110 6 1345 23% 23% 22%— % 
7X0 120 lOQz 60V* 60V* 60V* 

7J6 7X1 270x63 42% 4216 + % 

11040119 23 1 03 101% 103 +1% 

-Ml 278 12% 11% 11%— % 

1.111 29 14% 14% 14% — % 

021 36 13 19% 19% — M, 


15 Goopvts XO 17 16 993 
9% Copwtd 021 7 

19% Cpwfdpf 2X8 1X4 7 

17% Cardura 04 30 15 80 

11 Carp In 06 40 12 4 

30% ComGs US 17 19 480 
261* CorBIk IDO XI 8 

4% Cmla 28 

32 Crane 100b 40 11 99 

23 CrayRs 25 1450 

17% CrdcNpfXIS 114 2 

49V* CrckN pf 2D3e 50 19 

18% ample 100 U 12 58 

- 40% CrwttCk 14 120 

44% 2% CrwZel 100 2D 18 671 
50% 43% CrZelpf 443 90 4®) 

35% 22% Culbro 00 27 16 3 

XH* 16V* Cullnet s _ 22 1385 

88% 58% CumEn 208 14 4 25B 

10% 8% Confine 1.10O1IL7 14 

38% 30% CurfW 108 13 16 26 

52% 33% Cvetaps 1.10 15 B 33 


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300 60 6 
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I044e!97 
72 34 9 

1D2 51 12 
2X6 60 6 
107 46 
104 34 II 


112 

DOe 1.1 10 
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112 6D 8 
216 110 7 
4J0 123 
900 111 
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D6 30 II 20 17V* 17V* 171* 

00 ID 61 12V* 12% 12% 

108 50 7 1202 24% 24 24%— % 

12 44 8% BU 8% + % 

.18b 10 209 9% 9% W* + % 

106 44 11 1342 35% 35% 35% + I* 

17 733 39 37% 38V* — % 

1104 5% 5 5 — % 

04X6 10 20 9V* 9 9% + V* 

04 1.1 11 263 21% 20% 21% + % 

74 1.9 17 2663 40 39% 39% + I* 

200 110 8 162 18% 18% 1814— % 
707 111 301 41 61 61 

04 IX 78 19 38% 38% 38% + % 

100 16 42 1572 20% 28% 2S%— % 

172 77 9 176 34% 24% 24% 

100 20 7 1049 44% 45% 46% + % 

744 10 9% 10 + % 

104 27 17 291 39 37% 37% —1 

100 47 13 31 25 24% 24%—% 

1X0 41 IB 5 33% 33% 33% + U> 

1X0 111 7 823 14% 16% 14% 

902 125 50z 74% 74% 74% 

7X5 117 lOz 63% 63% 63% + % 

706 11X IQQz 64% 64% 44% 

275 107 3 25% 25% 25% 

304 1X1 1 26% 26% 26% 

113 120 38 261* 25% 26 

112 110 22 26% 26% 26% 

X75 100 3 25% 25% 25% + 1* 

3X0 1X1 67 281* 28% 28% 

3X2 1X1 73 28% 28% 28% + % ! 

400 120 TO 31% 31% 31% + % 1 

412 120 31 32% 32V. 32% ! 

100 HD 7 115 115 115 

Z0O 110 5 109V* 109% 109% 

972 97 12MB 98% 98 98% 1 

2JS 1TJ 7 28% 20% 28% 



100 47 13 31 25 24% 24%—% 

1X0 41 10 5 33% 33% 33% + % 

108 50,1 7 823 16% 16% 16% 

902 125 SQz 74% 74% 74% 

7X5 117 lOz 63% 63% 63% + % 

706 11X 10Hz 64% 64% 44% 

205 100 3 25% 25% 25% 

304 1X1 1 06% 26% 26% 

113 120 38 26% 25% 26 

112 110 22 26% 26% 26% 

ITS 100 3 25% 25% 25% + V* 

3X0 1X1 67 28% 28% 28% 

3X2 1X1 73 28V* 28% 28V* + % 

400 1X8 TO 31% 31% 31% + % 

412 120 31 32% 32% 32% 

ADO 134 7 115 115 115 

200 110 5 109V* 109% 109% 

972 97 12MB 98% 98 98% 

208 IT J 7 28% 30% 30% 

00 18 11 199 21% 20% 21% + % 
04 41 89 15% 15% 15% + M 

176 10X 1356 17 16% 16%— % 

400 180 27 37 36% 36%— % 

*126 20% 20% 20% 

00 12 3 23 9% 9% 9% — U 

100 19 II 242 35% 34% 35 

14 2750 WS% 104% 104% + % 

100 L3 48 713 89% 88% 89% + % 

1X0 57 8 57 24% 24% 24%—% 

3 67 5% 5% 5% — % 

.10 3101 9% 9% P»— % 

272 87 9 565 31% 30% 31% + % 
06 30 f 218 18% 18% 10% + % 
1.14 23 15 1221 53% 52% 53 V* — % 
100 41 12 17 29% 291* 29% + % 

08 2X 73 400 37% 37% 37% — % 

1 JO 50 14 1529 35% 35% XPA — % 
78 10 21 1387 44V* 43% 43%— % 
00 48 140 12% 12% 12%— % 

08 17 10 195 21% 21% 21%—% 
2.00 70lS 12 19% 19% 19% — V* ' 

DO 7 15 351 64% 62V* 64% +2% 
300 SJ 14 2205 57 561*' 56% + % 


X10 11X 
200 120 
X10 12X 
201 120 
27S 110 
700 120 
DO 41 12 
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X50 9J 1 36% 36% + M. 

450 9 D 5 47% 47V* 47V* + V* 

2DO 80 8 206 32% 32% 32% 
pf «JD 110 2BQz 79V* 79% 79**— 1% 

pf 700 107 *0z 71% 71% 71% + % 

Pf 305 110 8 34% 341* 34V*— % 

pf 1100 ISA 10000.1061* 105% 106% + % 
pf BAB 110 59z 74 74 74 —1 

- 200 27 21 760 77% 751* 75%— 1% 

206 120 7 393 16% 16% 16%—% 
Z10 11X \W& 18% 18% 18% + V*. 

200 120 180z 16 15% I5%— % 

X10 12X 4 17 17 17 

201 120 500z 19V* 18% 191* + % 

205 1 1D lOz 24 24 24 + % 

700 120 20z 5V 59 09 +2 

DO 41 12 77 14% 14% 14%— % 

00 7 11 28 22% 22% 22% + % 


58% 35% BeCtnD 100 XI 14 217 56% 56V* 56% — % 


8% 2% Beker jm 

11 3% Beker pf 100 350 .. 

17% 12% BefdnH XO 27 11 

37 22% BeiHwl 06 ID 12 

97 74% BellAtl 600 7D 9 

33 24 BCE 0 238 

27% 19% Behind 03 10 19 


09/ 2*3 2% 2% 2%— V* 

00350 464V**%4% + 1* 

XO 27 II 35 14 13% 14 +1* 

06 ID 12 135 37 36% 36% — % 

DO 70 9 741 91V* 90% 90% — % 

L08 376 31% 31% 31% + % 

03 10 19 27 23% 23% 23% — % 


44* 30% BeZISou 200 70 9 3375 40% 39% 40% 


57 41% BefoAH 00 ID 22 

32% 22% Bernls 100 30 11 

45% 27% BenfCP 200 49 

40 3016 BenelPt 400 11D 

40% 32% Benefpf 400 11.1 

22% 18 Benef Pf 2D0 110 
19% 17% appeal n 100 *9 

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15 10% BetfPd ■» !■! 

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49% 37% BethSIPlSDO 11.1 

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40% 28 Beverly 02 
26% 19% BlgTtir 

24% 13% BlOCftn 

26% 18% Block D — — 

34% 31% BIchHP 1.93 AD 

291* 14>* BlalrJn 081 


00 ID 22 42 48% 48% 48% + % 

M 33 11 61 33% 32% 33% + % 

LOO 49 9 377 40% 39% 40% + % 

130 114 7 37 37 37 + V* 

100 11.1 10* 40% 40% 40% +1% 

33 HD loot 22% 22% »% + U, 

20 6D 36 17% 17% 17% 

071 372 5% 5% 5% 

109 8% 8% B% — <M 

04 10 35 509 13% 13% 13% — % 

XO 13 227 17% 17% 17%— % 

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33 110 31 23 22% 22% — 1* 

02 7 1* 1782 36% 36% 36% + % 

00 30 18 358 24% 24% 24% — % 

29 243 20% 19% 2D1* + % 

64 30 16 588 19% 19V* 19% 

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i7o 21 zfe mk + w. 


59% 39% BIckHR 2X0 41 13 181 M 57% 54 

snvi 3314 Boeing s 1JB 22 1ft 31IP ^ 40 

51 36V* IShwC IDO 40 20 606 £% 46% 47V 


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24% 19% Bora Wo 72 40 11 1941 53 21% 21% 


9% 4% Boanns 16 

44% 28% BosEd 124 12 8 
11% 9% BuG nr 1.17 100 


2 9 9 9 

58 40 39% 59%-J* 

14 11% 10% 11% + % 


14 20 I 

100 50 10 37 ! 

200 9X 6 

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08 10 20 1738 
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32% 23% E SVSt 00 10 
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20% 12 EOBCO X4 20 
12% 3% East Air 
5 1% EALWtO 

2% % EALWfA 

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33V* 9% EAh-pfC 


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[06 70 19 161* 161* 1*1* 

00 10 14 146 27% 77V* 27V, 

04 40 8 48 23% 23% 231*—% 

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14 2600 llVfc 10% 11 — % 

90 4% 4Vh 41* 

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!J5k 19 21% 211* 21% + % 

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30 31% 31 31 %— I* 


33V* 9%. EAirpfC 30 31% 31 31%— I* 

28% 21% EastGF 100 S3 144 1134 22% 22% 22% + % 

23% 13% EaitUtl 206 90 8 152 21% 21% 21 %— 1* 

50% 41% EsKodi 200 SD 13 7144 <£* <3% 44 + % 

60V* 47V* Eaton 1X0 20 7 «4 55% 5MJ * 

15% 10% Echllni 12 256 12% 12% 12% 

32% 20 Ecker* 104 35 14 1980 30 30%— % 


nUaeSt Sts. not* 

High Low stock Wv. YlcL PE WteWilow PootOrte 
30% 25% Egmkpf 49 30% 30% 30% + % 

50% 31% Eat Res 172 37 10 207 46 45% 46 +% 
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14% 10% ErbmrP 00 25 13 493 12 11% 13 

24(4 !2% Essa*n X4 20 14 26 22% 221* 22V*— % 

29% 18% EssexC 00b 20 16 35 29 78% 29 + % 


29% 18% EssenC 00b 30 16 
30% 15% Estrlne 72 40 23 
25% 12% Ethyls Ha 20 15 
6 1% vfEvanP 

9% 2% WEvan pf 

43% 32% ExCetO 172 4.1 11 
17% 14 Excelsr I06eil0 


00 X5 13 493 12 11% 13 

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06 20 15 672 24% 23% 24 -+% 

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30% 24% Hotel ID 200 80 14 
42% 28% HOUOtlM 06 20 14 
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39% 28% Hoaslnt 101 50 9 
81V* 65 HolPt Pf 60S 8.1 


120 5% 5% 5V* 

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XB 30 10 23 M% 14% 14% 

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100 17 13 

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104 40 76 
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70 J 6 
2JSS 60 
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GAP 00 D 10 257 

GATX 100 40 13 42 

GCA 10 1122 

GEICO 100 IX ID 32 

GEO 583 

GFCP 5 

GTE 116 70 8 6696 

* TE Pf ZiC 6J> 3 

TE pf 200 70 29 

GTE pf 2X8 10X 55 

BolHou 39 

Gannett ixa 2D 19 isn 

Goplne 00 10 26 122 

Georht 001 30 135 

Gelco 06 27 15 64 



65% S% + % 
24% 24% : 
10% 10% 

12% 121* + % 
9% 9%— % 
28% 2B%— Vk 
12% 12% 

20% 21 

17% 18% +1% 
8% 8% 

4% 4% 

42% 42% - 

48% 4S%— % 1 
34% 34% 

35% 35% 

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191* 19% 

28% 29% + % 

22 % a + % 
18% 18% + % 
58% 59% + % 
26% 27 + % 

29 29 

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5% 59k— % 
18% 19V* + % 
24% M%— % 
57% 57% + % 
38% 38% 

30%- 311* + % 
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23% 23% +% 
47% 47% + 4* 
72% 72% + % 
12 12 +% 
40% 40% 

8% S%— 1ft 
23% 23% — 1* 
57% 58% +1 
48% 49V* + V* 

30 30% + % 
9% 9%— % 

29% 29% 

6V* 6V* 

27% 27% — V* 
20% 28%—% 
»% 25% + % 
321* 32V* 

35% 35%—% 
11% 11V* 

37% an + % 
19% 19%—% 
37 37%— % 

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26% 28% + % 
33% 33% —1 
41% 41% — % 
26% 26% — % 
17% 17% + % 
5% 6 +% 

17% 17% 

16% M% + % 
53 53 — M 

4X% 4316— % 
12% 12% 

78% 79 
12% 12% — V* 

11 1% + % 
25% 25% + V* 
24% 24% — 1* 
19% 19% 

13 13% — 1* 

9% 9% 

18% 19 
26% 271* + V* 
24% 24% — % 
79 29V* 

30% 30%+ V* 


29% 19% ttoufnd . 204 90 7 1756 27% 27% £ 

15% 8 HOuOR 109D19X 72 10 ,9% 9%— % 

231* 14% Howl CP XO 20 31 13 T7% 17% 17% — % 

27% 21% Hubbrd 208 80 11 

eSt35!S£t,;s s 12 £ 

36% rnSS 3 « « ^ I SJJTS 

■3SS SftSSSIE 3 i? IS hUli 

31% 18% Hydra! 200 6* 10 46 30% 39% 30% + % 



GENEVE 


00 XI 10 2601 37W 3SV4 37U, + % 


23% ic tnd 1X4 40 
15 ICMn 05# 3D 
7% ICN 

22% ICN Pf 270 Ml! 
14% IHAJn 102 11.1 
23 IPThnn 77# 30 
17% !RT Pr 107 9.1 


1X4 40 12 579 32% 321* 32V* 


25% ITTCp 100 20 10 4627 34% 34 


126 15% 15% 15% + 1* 
218 10 9% 10 

3 26% 26% 26%- 1* 

9 17% 17% 17% 

23 25% 25 25% + U 

12 20% 20% 20% — % 


47% ITTpfK 400 *4 
47% ITT PfO SOO 8.1 
32% ITT PfN 205 5J 
49% ITTpfl 400 70 
11% IU Inf DO 40 
1«b idoboPa 102 80 
Ideal B 


23 62% 62% 62% + V* 

22 62 61% a +% 

2 42% 42% 42% + % 

1 64 64 64 +1 

774 13% 13 13 

338 Xl% 21% Zl%+ % 
137 10% 10% 10% — % 


]9%.|||powr 2D4 100 7 1126 2SH, 25% 25' A 


M% llPowpf 204 117 400z 17% 17% ink— % 

151* HPewpt 201 109 5007 201* MV* 20% +1 

28% llPowpf 412 110 200136% 3Hfc 3fflb + % 

27 llPowpf 378 109 ZHWz 3fl* 34V* 34% — % 

37 llPowpf 4.14# 9J »44%-0%44% + % 

llPowpf 4X7 110 SOX » JX, g, — JJ 

28% llPowpf 400 110 M 3SV* KV. MV* +1% 

26 ITW . 72 Z3 13 35 31% 31% 31% 

31% ItnoOim X13# 50 8 678 36% 36% 1M + % 

6 ImpiCp . 11 735 8% 8% 8% + % 

«* INTO 00 TX <029 14V* 74 14% + % 

35% IndlMpf 80S 117 17001 73% 73% 73% +1% 

91% lOdlM pfliOO llJ IQzlOf 101 101 

M% IndlMpf X15 110 9 18% 1MJ 1MJ— J* 

15U. ImUMpf 233 11X 6 20 19% in*— J* 

24% IndlM Pf 3D3 1X5 1 29% 29% 29% + 1* 

19% IndIGBS 204-10 7 32 23% 23V* 23V* + % 

4% loexco 071 « 5ft Hi a 

39 lngprR XBO ■ il T7 162 51% 51 511* 

28 IngRpf X3560 336 35% 35% 

Il fnarTpc 04 40 25 1 in 12% iz% + % 

19% I rildStl . JO 2J 96 24% 34% 24*— Vfc 

16% Irutfco 100b 50 ID 778 18% 18 1B%— V* 

3% intpRi 79 51* 5 5%—%, 

n%. rmsRw: » a® 20% 20 20 — % 

19 IntgRpf 303 1X0 30 25% 23U. 25V* 

251* IldgR pf 405 130 290 33% 32% 32% + % 

7% Inttaon - 973 9% 8% 9% + 1* 

8 InfRPn 6 100 111* 10% 11 — % 

1Mb ItcpSe X1O0IU 38 19V* 18% 19 





55% lotprco 308 44 13 711 70% 69% 70 — % 

9% Infa-ftf DO 50 6 444 11% 11% 11%—% 

41 Intrtk 200 3X I 31 48 47% 47%—% 

1% Intmed 371 10% 10% 10% 

15% IntAto 02 30 9 1 18% 18% 18%— % 

116 IBM 4X0 30 73 5051 128 127V* 127%— % 

16% IntCfrl XO 10 10 63 27% 26% 27% + % 

34 . IntFlav 1.13 30 16 257 29% 291* 29% + % 

6% intHarv ffil 8% 8% 8% 

3% IptHrwt 20T 5% SV* S% 

3% IntHwtB 10 3% 3% 3% + % 

38% IntHPfC - 6 53 52% 52% — % 

19 IntttpfD 78 36% 36V* 36%—% 

34 InfMln 200 40 10 194 42% 42 42 + % 

23% IntMult 176 50 11 ' 34 33% 32% 32% 

47% Inf Poor 2X0 40 51 854 49% 49% 49% + % 

9% Inf Res 24 275 12% 11% 12% + % 

35% IntNrlh 2X8 50 10 653 43% 42% 47% + % 

rasu infNt PG0O5S 7.1 3 148 148 148 43 

90 InttftpfHODO 100 1 90% 90% 98% 

30% IntpbGp 108 Z7 14 DM 40% 48% 40% — % 

12V* lutBakr 12 51 19 18% 19 

16% IntSfPw 100 90 9 50 20 19% T9% 

17% InPwpf 208 1QX 300x22 22 22 + % 

10% intsacn 12 -21 11% 11% ll%— % 




-V' 


am 


16% intstPw 100 90 
17% InPwpf 208 10X 


15% lowaEl 100 90 10 207 30% 20 


GeorW 001 30 135 

Gelra 06 X7 15 64 

GemllC 37 

Gemii 1 .40# ax 53 

GflCorp 100b 37 51 169 
GAInv lD3e 90 18 

GrBcsh 100 10 11 95 

GC Inms XO 10 10 128 
GnOota 14 TO 


32% + % 

zm +% 

14V*— % 
D9% + U 

a%— % 
s%— % 

48% + % 
36 +1% 

2S%— V* 
239* + % 

33*+ % 


24% lewllG 274 BJ 7 
26V* lawaRs 108 9.1 9 
29% I natal 304 84 9 
7% IpcoCp 04 27 14 


26% IrvBnk 106 50 


35% 20% JWTs 
37 23% J River 


J_ 

U2 30 It 


SO 31% 31% 31% + % 

46 33% 33% 33% + % 

329 36% 35% 36 + % 

47 12V*. 12% + % 

33 37V* 37 37% + % 


16 32%. 31% 32% + % 


12 Month SU. On . . 

HletlLow Stock Dlv.YM.PE lOatHMiLow awLOOt 

42V* 25% JWfrHan 120 80 5 328 37% 37% 37% + * 
56% 44% MfrHpf *50«1X0 184 5«* 54% 54V*— V* 

52% 41 AAfrHpf 5720110 1 49% 49% 49%—.% 

8% 9% vIMonvt 3 157 5* 5% 5% .. 

25% 17V* vlMnvIpf 13 18 17% U 

38% 23% MAPCO 101 27 f 44 36% 36%-3<%— % 

5 3 MamtZ 87 4% 3% 4% + % 

Morale • 325 % % -ift + h 

MorMM 100 57 7 21 31% 31% 31%— V* 

MorM pf 4070 9.1 606 03% 53% 53% ■ 

Morions 08 0 37 469 35% 34% 35 +% 

MarkC 72 3D 37 10% • 10% T0%‘+ % 
Morkpf 100 7 A 36 16V. 16.. 16% + % 
Mtmiot 04 0 17 150 96V* 9S% 95% — V* 

MnrflM 2X0 14 18 197 - 71% 70% 70% + % 
Mor-tMs 1.00 ' 24 1129 39% 38% 3B%— % 


37 23% J River 06 14 11 301 34* 34% 34%— % 
28% 16 Jormwy .12 D 10 160 19% 18% 18%— % 


13% 10% JoPflF !X3e120 

47% 31% JeffPU 102 ax 

77 57 JerCpf 976 1X6 

m* 14 jorcpf xia tz4 


50 11% 11% 11% . 

464 45 44% 45 + % ' 

100(74% 74% 74% — % 

8 17% 17% T7% — % 


49% 30V* JohnJn 170 20 15 2231 47% 47 


46V* 37% Jnbncn U6a 44 9 
27% 21% Jaroen 100 4.1 il 
26% 17V* jastane 00 30 14 


376 42% 42% 42% + V* 
3 24% 24% 24% + I* 
71 24% 24% 244* 


MortM* IDO 24 1129 

MnryK D6I 20 3606 
Moico 06 10 16 425 
MosiiMr 00 14 IP 29 
'MbsevP • • •• 1W 

Marti, XM 702 10 

MUInc 172-100 52 

MatsuE Mr. J' 9 347 
Mattel J . 18 267 
Motet Wf > -. *' 53 


3606 12%-p% 12% 

429 32% 32% 32% — % 
29 14% 14% 14%— V* 
1094 2%, 2% 2% + % 
10 29% 28% 29 + % 

52 12% 12 12% + % 

347 514* 51% 51% 

267 15% 15% 15% 

53 114* 11% 11% 


27% 22V* JovMfO 140 £015 136 24% 23% 24% + V* 


Maxum • 4 31 13% u% 13% + % 

MayOs .108 30 10 936 52% 50% 52% +1% 

Marts -200 40 11 156 57% 56% 56% — % 


GnDyn 100 17 9 758 
Gen El X2D 3D 12 45W 
GnFd* 200 12 12 400 
GGthn DOa 90 115 

GnHme • 9 

GHaell 70 10 4 1449 
GnHnui J4 24 2 

Gainst 05 10 284 

GnMIll* 204 40 406 

GMot SJOr 7 A 6 2356 
GMES D51 .1 1121 

GMot pf 175 97 15 

GMot pf 500 90 4 

GMC .16 12 17 77 

GPU 7 1717 

Gen Re 106 10132 344 
GnRefr 6 23 

GnStenl 100 40 11 160 
GTFlPf IJ5 TOX IKK 
GTFIpf 170 107 5002 

Ggnsca 200 

GnRod .10 0 76 85 

Gens! a 100 5.1 456 

GanuPf 1.18 38 14 736 
GcPac 00 30 29 1166 
GaPcpf 204 50 61 

GdP ptB 204 67 52 

GaPWPf Iffii 110 51 

GaPwpf 1D6e 60 £92 

GaPwpf 3X4 1X3 38 

GaPwpf 176 1X7 1425 

GaPwpf 206 110 8 

GaPwpf 202 117 24 

GaPwpf 203 107 2 

GaPwpf 700 120 400z 

GaPw pf 772 1X1 450z 

GerbPd 172 19 11 279 
GerbEs .12 7 11 «2 

Getty 3 .16 0 121 

GIANT 32 

GibcFn 4 912 

GfffHIII 02 2X B2 35 
GHIeltc 2D0 42 12 526 
GtensC 7 

GlenFd 5 286 

GtoUM .12/ 465 

GlobMpf 1751 48 

GtdNug 15 1566 


9% 7% KOI 04 20 10 78 0% 8%. .8%- 

20% 10% KLMS 0% 26 8 2468 20 19% T9%— % 

41% 32% K mart 1X0 40 10 2186 33V* 33 33 — V* . 

40% 28 KN Eng 1X8 37 19 . 10 40 39% 40. 1 

16% 12% KalSl-AJ .151 448 16% 13% 16 


24% 16% KCtvPL 276 11X 4.7234 22% 20 


12% 9% 7% KOI 04 XI 

.77% 20% 10% KLMS 0% 2i 

■tfl% + % 41% 32% Kmart 1X0 4J 

79 +% 40% 28 KN Eng 1X8 19 

6% 16% 12% KataTAJ .151 

4 . „ 2M» l«i KabsCe . 00 10 

17% + % in* 15V* KalCpf 177 70 
10% 13% 7% Koneb XO 40 

16% f % 24% 1 6% KCtvPL 276 11X 
+ % 34 g% KCPUPl 300 13X 

67V*— % WVz » KCPt-Ot 475 1X3 
WT*— % « 2fV- KCPLPf 400 111 

4RY + % 20% 15 KCPLPf 200 120 

Sf6— V* 21% 16 KCPL Pf X33 110 
3 . ^ 58% an* KCSou 100 10 

14% + % 14% 18V* KC0OPT 100 77 

87 + V* 19% 15 KonGE 276 16D 
£1% 29% KanPLt X96 70 
«%- % 23% 18% KoPLPf X32 1X1 

12 —% 23 18 KaPLpf 203 1X1 

13%— % 45 13% Kotvln 

Wt- % 2D 13% KcwfBr XO 2D 
14%—% 88 73 Koufpf 875 JOB 


448 16% 13% 16 
47 17 16% 77 ,+ % 

6 17% 17 17% + V* 

425 8% 8% B%— % 


34 g% KCPLPf 300 13X 
39% » KCPLPf 475 1X3 
« 2fK KCPLPf 400 1X1 

aw 15 KCPLnf 200 ixa 

21% 16 KCPLPf 273 110 
58% 39* KCSou 100 10 
14% IOTA KCSOPf 100 77 


1570(31% 38% 30% -5% 
3300K 36 35V* 35TA— Vfc 

200( 37% 37% 37% —1% 
736 19 18 18 —1 

U 19% 19* m* 

55 58% 57% 58% - 
29O0E 13 12%. 13 + % 


12 — % 
12 % — % 
3*— % 
1 «%— % 
23% + 1* 
31% + % 
22 *—% 
37% + % 
35* + * 


19% 13 KanGE 2J6 160 522373 17% 14* 14*— 3% 
41% 29% KanPLt 204 70 8 1788 38 37% 37*— % 

23* 18% KoPLPf X32 1X1 B 23* 22% 22% — % 

23 18 KoPLPf 203 1X1 7 22% 22% 22% — % 

45 13% Katvln 370 15 - - Ml* 14% — * 

2D 13% KoufBr XO 2D 5 337 15% 1516-15%—% 
88 73 Kaufpf 875JOB 1 81 81 81 — W 


McOrpTaJO.Mv 59 
McOrpf.TDOTDH 19 
McOerf '108 87 916 

McOr! wt 135 

MTOld. ar 12 14 8 

McCM* 00 IX 14 606 

McOaO 104. 27 9 412 

MCG»H 1X0 11 15 570 

Mclifrg . 14 

McKaw 2X0 40 13 33 

IJdCpf :j0O 23 1 

McLeawt 66 

McNeil IDO 19 8 23 

Mead • 100 3D to 043 

04 ID 13 119 
UMltni 00 XT 14 584 

Mellon 2D8 XI 8 119 

WOM1I 1X4 37 13 820 

51% Merest 170 20 10 128 

7n* Merck 300 20 16 1Z73 

47% Morum in UM 97 

’KSKS? » 


32% Kellogg 104 XI 15 54459*58 59 +* 

23% KeltWd 100 XI J 422 38* 38% 38% — % 

% Kenof 506 % 

19V* Kenmt 003014 319 21 20*21 +% 


37% + % 26 19V* Kenmt 00 30 14 319 21 20* 

3a* + * 29% 21* KvUtll 2X4 XB 9 YB 27% 27V* 27% + V* 

n* KerrGI X4 . 4D 67 ll •. 10% ink + % 

27% + % 24% 17% KerGpf 170 f.l 33 19 ; 1B* 10* — % 

28 33% 26V* KerrMc 1.10 37 28 516 29% »% 

29%—% 31% 18 Kevcra 170 40 8 92 2** 28% 

22% + % 4% 2% KeyCon 2 2* 2* 


tg* 28% 28* + %! 
2 * 2 * 2 *— % 


25% MerLyn 00 20 13 
1% Metaor 

12V* ManPt 8 

5% - 75el!0 8 

2% MesMc 

47 MtEpfG 7X8 120 
48% MIE pfl X12 111 
49% MfEpfH 872 120 
2 MexFtf 738115 
17% MhOi pf X05 90 
13% MChER 1X0 BX 11 
4% Mlddby 06 77 34 
37 . MUccn 134 47 9 


21% + % 15* 12 Key Inti X8 20 19 694 15* 15 


.12/ 445 

*11751 .48 

15 1566 
2261 

00 D 7 630 
106 40 474 

1D0 57 8 1560 
02 30 19 3 

D8 23 2225: 

200 6D 12 796 
1 08 20 13 397 

X8 2D 9 333 

7 159 

100 1.9 II 2T 
102 XI 12 112 
100 30 9 1249 
172 90 9 12 

7 43 

172 4X 11 1798 
9 165 

70 3D 14 218 
08 J ID 121 
JJH1 2 9 10 3754 
200 100 309 

.16 XI 47 63x 

DO 27 11 11 

.90 XI 13 7880 
575 10 1 

2 X 233 

00 ID 1 

170 50 I 

104 1X3 6 2472 
4X0 110 10X 

6XM110 5 

305 137 64 

4X0 130 40 

800 106 46QZ 
DO ax 12 25 


21% HallFB IDO 37 741 30* 

26V* Halbln 100 60 13 802 29% 
* HaUwd Ml 50 17 269 1% 

06 Hotwdpf 04 5X 35 10% 

26% HcmPs 176 37 15 « « 
12 HanJS 1X70102 « U% 

16% HanJI 104a 90 M 20* 
16% Handig 0* 27 12 1577 21 
16 HondH DA 37 22 « 0 

U* Horn X0 21 23 177 in* 

33V* HaTBrJ 100 17 16 1036 m* 
21% Hortnas 04 17 20 38 32* 

7% Horntah 82 729 10% 

24* Horn PfB 2X0 187 32 M 

24% Ham pfC X13 XO 156 20* 
24% Harrtf 08 15 13 392 25% 
10% HarGrn • 34 IS 

21% Hartcp 108 4X 10 11 » 

24% Hortfnx ITS 30 10 428 


25% J7% 26% KMd# UD 3D V 249 34 33% 33% — % 

65V* + V* 63% 43 Klinba 272 37 IT 783 63% 62ft 63* 

64 +1 «* 26 KnghIRd 76 XI 17 311 37% 36% 37 + Vi 

33% — % 29 23% Koger XSO 9J 48 58 27% 26* 27 + % 

16V* — % 27* 14% Kolmar 72 10 49 181 17% 17% T7%— % 

34% +1* 22% 17 Kopera 00 4X 126 18% 17% 18 

11 +* 104 97% KopprpflQDO 1X0 4 100% HJ0% 100% - • 

8% 16% 12% Korea 03e 3D 42 14* 14% 14% 

21* + % 46 35% Kroger 2D0 47 11 34242%42%42% + V* 

62 +1 24* B% KuMme X0 10 17 9322 71* 22 +% 

12*— % 67% 291* Kvocer 730 1.1 15 65 29% 29% 29* + V* 

13H 23V* 15% KVSOT 08 4X 7 102 19% 19% . 19% + % 


«%MW3Ut 1J3| 

15% MkfRoa 100 5,9 
23%-MWB 276 90 

WJfc MIltnR X4 40 
73% MMM 150 40 
26% MjnPL 27* 70 
5% Mtonins 


813625 
TSellD 8 20 

11 

708 1X8 400z 

X12 1X1 10th 

872 120 60z 

-320130 72 

?JJ5 90 6 

1X8 BX 11 2 

.06 17 34 33 

234 47 9 cam 
1-331 316531 

1-W 5.9 57 

276 90 11 53 

X4 40 IS 1 
1M 4D 13 1351 
276 70 8 32 

73 

200 70 IQ 2721 
76 

11 4* 


13H 

ZV* 

6%— 1* 
I0V* + V* 
2% 

35% + % 
32% 

2S% + % 
16V, 

27 — % 
42% — I* 
3D*— % 
15* + % 
15* + % 
52%—% 
37* + % 
26ft + % 
19% + * 
28* + » 
29% +% 
5% +% 
10%— % 
10 + % 
34% +1* 
26% + % 
5ft 

25 — * 
42% +1* 
65 +1 

15% + * 
20* + * 
21% + * 
13% + % 
38 —1 
54% + % 
29 — % 
31* 

83* + * 
17% — * 


93 22 21* 22 + * 

65 29% 29% 2V* + * 
102 19% 19% 19% + % 


32* 26* EdbBr 1D0 SD 13 3 31% 31* Jl%— ft 

18% 14% EDO JB 17 14 14 16* 16* 16* — ft 

34% 22* Edward 00 27 14 W} 30 29% 29% + % 

24% 20% EPGdPf 275 97 45B 24* 24% 24% 

29% 27% ePGnf X75 1X4 42 28 27%28+% 

19* 10% El Tara Me J 17 73 18% IB 18 — % 

12 8% Elcor 76 41 10 9 8% 8% 

5ft 2* EleCAS .2 S -ffl* 1 491 + Yf 

30V, 19% ElCttPft JJB J 28 27 79 28% 29 + U 

16 lift Elgin 00 5X M TO 14% 14* 14% + V* 

12% 3% Ebdnl 97 3ft 3% 3ft 

78* 65% EmrsEI 260 3D 13 444 7Tft 71% 71ft— * 
14% 8% Em Rod 0«f 9.1 11 m 10ft 10* 10ft + ft 

20ft 15ft EmrvA JO 10 13 VS 18% 18 18 — % 

33ft 26* Emhart IX0b48 9 304 29ft 28% 29 

22ft 15* EmpDb 17* .«X 7 .931 21 21 

5 A 4 Emu pf 00 100 200r 5 S 5 

ft Enexc M _ ft ft ft 

32* 24% EnglCp 72 20 18 271 25* 2Sft 25ft— % 

20 11 Enhifiue J6 2D W JJ4 18% 18* 18% - % 

29% 17% Ensercn IDO 70191 41M 23 22ft 73% — V* 


U HottSe 100 1D0 II 
16V4i Hawei 1D4 77 9 
9* HdVMA X0P 40 8 
22% Hazhrtn XO IX 16 
9ft HczLab 72 20 » 
12* HlfhAm 31 

21 HKGrPn ,18e 0 
10% H/fUSA 


2 17ft 
582 21ft 
6 IBM 
24 28 
19 13 
340 23 
11 21 % 
53 16 
186 Mft 
431 17* 


10* Hecks JB XO 186 14ft 

13* HeclaM JO IJ 431 17* 

14% Heflmn X8 20 12 754 19ft 

14% Heing X0 id 13 » 25% 

37ft Halm 1D0 X9 14 769 54* 

12* HelneC 17 9 17% 

18 HeimP 76 10 27 2215 19* 

30% Hareuto 1D0 47 12 1445 37% 

10ft He lilCs 041 36 617 18ft 

20 HerttCPf 100 40 175 33 

16ft Merman 16 ZM 19* 

30* Hentiy 1X0 13 12 244 40* 


04ft eg* Enact) PI1072 1X1 12Md02U 107 102* — * 

21% 17* Eng&cn DO# 33 79 2D* 20% 20ft 

2ft 1% Ensrco 2D 743 2 3 2 

13% 9M Entera 19 12% 12* 12*— Hi 

19% 15% EnftxE XSOelSJ „ 242 16ft ISft 14ft + % 

21% 17% Entexln 176 7.1 11 12? l»ft 18* 19ft 

35 19* Eauf4 8 1.14 3X 17 88 33ft 32* 3JV1 

6ft 2ft Eaulmk ... 196 4* 4ft 4ft 

22* 12ft Eomkpf XJ1 1X6 13 21% 21% 21% 


196 4* 4ft 4ft— ft 

13 21% 21% 21% + * 


9 Hestnpt 
31* HewfPk 72 0 

24 He#e#l DO 10 
14ft Hisneor 00 2x 
9* HI Volt .17 IX 
18ft HIMbrd 74 XI 
49* Hltton 100 Z9 
27ft Hitachi 73# 1 J 


7 11% 

0 4 1! 2197 36% 

DO 10 17 329 31* 
00 24 9 • 20* 

.17 IX 7 79 12* 

74 XI 14 36 25* 

100 X9 13 696 62ft 
73# IJ 10 1020 27% 


35* Monday 100 20 12 219 60% 

65 HotlyS 100 IX 30 2 72ft 

10ft HomeD 26 1378 11% 

15% HrtlFSD 6 906 21% 

7 HmeGpf 1.10 I1X 50 9% 

20% HifuHce 00 0 33 I94J 27 

HmsfFn X0 2J 5 1* 14% 

Honda XOe 3 9 970 37% 


X — ft 
29 

1%— ft 
10% 

40% + % 

14*— ft 
20ft— ft 
aa* + ft 
20 

IS* + ft 

59ft — * 

32% 

WV* — * 

24*— % 

26*— * 

25*— % 

15 
29 

33V* + * 

17ft + V* 

21* +% 

10ft— ft 
38 + * 

12% + ft 
23 + ft 

21% 

16 + ft 

14* 

17%— * 

19ft + ft 
25% + ft 
54* + % 

17ft 

19* + ft I 

37*— % — 

18% + ft 33ft 15* 
33 +1ft 69* 30* 
19* + % 24% 19* 

43 — * M% 8* 
lift 38 26* 

36* — * 42ft 34 
30% — ft 18 9* 

20*— * 26* 10 
12ft Tift 2ft 

25% 8% 7% 

61% 11% lift 

27*— ft 22* 14* 
30*— * 38* 16% 

72ft— * 35* 38ft 

11% + V* H 11% 
21*— % 46% 29% 
9% + * 29* 1* 
26ft— 1ft 19% 12% 
14% + ft 21% 12% 
57ft— ft 29% 14% 


22* LAC n 681 

24* LN HO 207# 9D 10 42 

12% LLE Ry Z94el60 464 

1ft LLCCb 3 

« -LLCpf 12 

7 LTV _ 682 

73ft LTVpf 106 144 139 

41 . LTV pf 5J5 100 10 

10ft LTVpf 1JS 90 13 

10ft LQuInt 22 72 

16% LodGs 1J0 70 7 14 

6* Lafarge JO 2D 44 

23 Lafrg pf 2X4 nu 3 

0% Uxnurs 04 20 12 107 
1* LMiSos 188 17 

10* Lowflnt 06 40 IA 74 
11* LCarPt JO 10 242 

21% LeorP pf X87 13J 19 

41 LcarSg 200 17 10 64 

15 LeaRnle AO 23 is u 
25% LiwyTr 1J0 5J 12 1473 
23% LMfEnt 02 22 19 7 

9ft LegMoa JOb 1.1 19 59 

Igb L#gPkrt 02 XI 10 49 

2% LoftVol 7 

13ft Letimn lDBelOJ 71 
ll Lemur JO 10 12 52 

T2 LeucNts 4 5 

24 Lgytst IDS 17 27 207 

42* LOF U2 XB 8 289 

*|ft LOP Pf 4.75 6J 186 

22ft UblvCP J2 2J 13 8 

54% Ulty 120 17 12 456 
11% UmiMB M A 27 1342 
30* Unctttt 104 40 II 66 

18% UncPI 2J4o 90 1 

61% Litton 200# 20 12 640 

39ft-LeckM -70# 10 10 1554 
Z7 Loctllo JO 37 11 46 

28ft Loews B TDOa IS) 10 573 
23* Lag Icon JB . 0 18 106 
28* Lorn Fla 7X0 4.1 12 25 

18* LamMll 2X4 80 11 103 

2 LomMuvt 88 

21* LnSfar 100 72 6 217* 
44 Lanes Pf 507 WA 17B 


SV. LILCa 2 685 

19ft ULPfB . tOSi 

28ft LILpfJ . IQz 

IlftLILpfX 29 

11% LILpfW . 16 

11* ULpfV 33 

14ft LILpfU I 

11* ULnfT 8 

2* LILPfP 17 

9* LILpfO . 39 

19% LangOs 33.27 14 167 

23ft Loral 02 10 19 94 

10% LaGenl 07 40 to s 
26% LaLand IDO 11 10 750 
IE# Lapac 00b 4.1 42 196 

25* LOPL Pf 400 160 44 

IT* La PL of 116 15.7 200 

n*k LouvGO 2X4 15 I 273 
77)6 Lowit 2J00 30 9 76 

19* L0WB3 06 10 14 1603 
19% Liibrzl 1.16 S3 14 200 

M% Lubvs DO 1 J 13 62 

16ft luefcvfl 1.16 S3 11 91 

ID* Lukens XI 30 15 2 


28ft— 1 
29*— ft 
13* + ft 
2% 

ID 

*ft 

18% — ft 
48 — ft 
12* 

13ft + ft 
22% 

7% — ft 
24 - 

9* 

3* 

lift + * 
12% + % 
21% — ft 
54* + ft 
18ft— • Vfc 
29 

41ft— ft 
18% — ft 
24% + ft 
2ft ; 

14* 

lift 

19% 

49% — ft 

7@* + * 
30* + % 
■7% + * 
24*— ft 
43% 

22% + ft 
■Oft + ft 
53* +% 
30ft— % 
49* + ft 
34ft + ft 
34ft— ft 

27% 

JH— ft 
2fi%+ ft 

n* + ft 
23*— % 

31* + % 
49. 
tf* ' 

19% 

19% + ft 
23* + ft 
18% 

14* ' | 

15% — ft 
27 + ft 

B4%— ft 
12 — ft 
32ft + % 
19% 

38ft +-% 
SO*— ft 
2B%+ ft 
56% 

34 — % 
31* 

K 

a 

14% + ft 


4% MHgl 162 

“ft CfAtoMH 130 7S 10 ^ 

ModCPt 11 M 

'SJSSSffi ^ ” " ss 

40% Me ngon 200 u 12 jo. 

I*}? JMJJS* 100a 97 16 

,7* MONT 08 90 10 116 

5?* M??? * 72 30 12 27 

» MoorM ID4 4J 14 30 

ISz X5 246 

Monm • 200 40 7 2092 

2S5 *5°™»Pl7DOe &0 1 

2m MarKnd 1X8 3J 11 384 

18ft Morses 00 X6 15 92 

s# Jfi? 1J9# M 10 W 

gft 

SS ’s n )i ^ 

lift M^ 1X4 10X s 


59 24ft 34 241«— ft 

19 25 24% 24% 

916 21% 21ft 21* + ft 
135 4V6 4* 4ft— ft 
8 9 9 9 

65 

79% + ft 
44% * 

«*—.%. is? 

78% -1ft 
3ft 

25%—% 

40ft + % 

23ft +% 

30% + % 
32ft— % 

43* + ft 
Sift — ft 
113 — ft. 

62 —1ft 
31*— ft 
21b + ft 
18V» + ft 
6% 

3* 

60 

61*— H* 
64ft—ft 
. 2 % . • 

21ft ' • 

16ft— ft 
4* • 

30 +3% 

9%+ft 
16% + ft 
29%.+ ft 

lift 

76%+ ft 
35ft . 

5% - 
7ft 

-6% 

27* + ft 

1ft — ft 
51ft + ft 
16 

S1« + ft 
2m 
181b 

9 — ft. 

IBM + 


+ fti%, 


29% — .* 
48ft— ft 
86* + ft 
46 + ft 
22ft 

18ft + ft 
34% +.ft 
36* — ft 
3Wb - 
12* + ft 
28% + ft 
18* — ft 
13% + ft 
2ft - 


Oil 


a a 2 i §'»»'■*.* ; 

102 ax i6= Us ‘3§?‘ + * 

J P" a • 

i5w M ^ sa sl s£ + i* 

1JB 1 A H « 521 «•* 83*- 83% + ft 
iao 40 13 in am 24 % ja+iv 

06 .9# ,5 S3* 26V* 26VA— ft 

““ u « JS ^ 3217 am— ft 

a* 18% 18ft .18* + % 

® i? ? s| W% IT l» + * . 

5D0 80 'S S& r 

■“ V U 15 S * ? 

!D6 18 W 4 27% 27* 27* + % 

X ! 2 % 11%-Mft + ft 4k _= - 

s 

38% 15 15 - IS-. 

N-aamDS- 

- 

141 1TV, 37ft 27ft— ft- 
9 je» i8%- lm + ft 

35 355 45V* 44%.. 44%.+ ft 
2 jm , ,£ «b ift -ift 

M0 119 ■.'+!% 

MO 40 . 9 380 68% ,6m 68* + % 

SJ* c , -iaft.-ia% isft +■!%.. 

® M il ^ 
i£4] w 


-24 1*2 20 623 iou ibv 

& B’j %as h±i 

111 11% 11% n% f % 

ufc"* 455 : 5 -« 

M A 22 409 am Jf* % 


3DB 1X4 7 
200 110 
300 11.0 

4.10 11J 
405 1X0 

6.10 130 

105c 1 20 
■12 0 ia 

304 100 


(Contained oa Page 14) 










iwmr 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 1985 



Page 13 


l^olvo Pretax Eamin 
'« in First Half 



;! ' 7 By Juris Kaza 


• v„ i 



WHsSSSSi** 

a 3®“ earlier. to 
424 1 biffian kronor ($5lS.«-«iL 

Btra),.£rom 4.62 billion kronor. 
_i^° I l d ' <Juarler earnings rose 
^fly.froro a year eartier, to IL05 
baaor from 2.02 billion 
, iJjf JJ® 6 down 8 percem 
-^xTJXl bDlioa. kronor in the 
finrt quarter of 1985, Volvo said in 
its interim statement, 
i: First-half sales were down 3 ner- 

kronor from 
43.62 billion kronor a year earlier 
Excluding oil trading, where activi- 
n has been deliberately cut, and 
Volvo BM, a constniction-eqaip- 
n*^ subsidiary no longer conscfli- 
oatedi.saks of its main industrial 
divisions fibre up 12 percent, Volvo 
said. 

: Car sales rose 15 percem in the 
half, to 18.48 billion kronor, and in 
the quarter were up 21 percent, to 
9-51 billion kronor. 

It said first-half truck sales were 
5 percent, to 7.98 billion kronor 

- Analysts said the results wore 
good and in line with expectations, 
considering that extraor dinar y fac- 
tors boosted last year's first-half 
earnings. 

Anders Lindquist, a partner in 
Merchant, Gnmdstrom & Partners 
Fondkomission AB, a Stockholm 
securities brokerage, said second- 
quarter earnings were “in the add- 
cue of various expectations.” 
i Mr. Lindquist said it was likely 
that Volvo would sharply i ncrease 
its 1985 dividend from the 5.40 
kronor it paid out in 1984. 

Mitsubishi Plans 
To Raise Dividend 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Mitsubishi Heavy 
Industries Ltd. said Thursday that 
it will raise its dividend one yen to 
six yen a share in the year aiding 
March 31, 1986. 

. The increase will cover part of 
the 55-billion-yen ($231 -million) 
profit resulting from MHTs sale of 
140 million snares in Mitsubishi 
Motor Corp. to Chrysler Coip, 
Mitsubishi Corp. and Mitsubishi 
Bank Ltd. from April to August 
1985. 

Before the sale, MH1 held 595 
million shares, or about 85 percent 
of Mitsubishi Motor. MHI wEQ re^ 
duee i is ownership in' Mitsubishi ' 1 
Motor to 25 percent In the year, 
ending March 31, 1987. 


h A l aaother Stockholm - 
an analyst tennedTe 
fantastic compared with 
evds *** a few 

I 1 . I s a return to more normal 

conditions, he said. 

Volvo said that demand for pas- 
*®SPr cars in North America — its 
biggest market — increased during 
the fust half. 'Worldwide deliveries, 
jwwver. were Hide changed ai 

It said worldwide deliveries of its 
/bO-senes models more than dou- 
“ *e half, to 70,000 from ' 
28,600 last year. 

Mr. Lindquist said thatthe lower 
dollar would cut margins on U.S. 
sales, but at the same time would 
reduce the group’s debt-service 
costs cm dollar borrowings. In ad- 
dition, Volvo was now selling more 
higher-margin passenger cars, such 
as its 700-series, he observed 

He also predicted that the Deut- 
sche mark would appreciate faster 
against the weakening dollar fhan 
the krona, so that “the Germans — 
BMW, Audi and Mercedes — will 
suffer more than Volvo, which will 
keep its relative advantage.” 

Volvo said that food-division, 
sales, mainly by its ABBA subsid- 
iary, rose 12 percent, to 2.584 bil- 
lion kronor, in the first half. Volvo 
said the rise largely reflected the 
general level of retail sales in Swe- 
den, the main market for the food 
operation. 


Profits in Japan 
Seen Declining 
In Current Year 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Profits of Ja- 
pan’s major companies are like- 
ly to be lower in the fiscal year 
ending next March 31, the first 
decline in three years, the Wai n 
Research Institute of Econom- 
ics said Thursday in a survey. 

The study, covering 421 com- 
panies listed on the Tokyo 
Stock Exchange, predicted that 
combined profits for the year 
would fall 4.1 percent from a 
year earlier, to 4.6 trillion yen 
(about $19.4 billion) from 4.8 
trillion. 

Wako said combined sales 
are estimated to rise 3.3 per- 
cent, to 205.9 trillion yen from 
199.3 trillion in 1984-85, it said. 

Both sales and current profit 
projections for were revised 
lower from Wako’s June survey 
of the same companies, which 
account for 41 percent of Japa- 
nese companies listed on the 
main section of the exchange. 

At that rima, the institute 
forecast a 53-percent rise in 
current profits and a 4.6-per- 
cem gain in sales. 

The downward revision re- 
sulted from the worsening mar- 
ket environment for the elec- 
tronics industry, especially 
semiconductor makers, which 
had previously led the Japanese 
economy’s expansion, a Wako 
economist said. 


Creditors Agree to Ask Court 
To Pay Debts of Sanko Ships 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Nine of the trading 
houses that financed the construc- 
tion of more than 100 ships operat- 
ed by Sanko Steamship Co. hare 
agreed to ask a court official to pay 
the debts of Sanko ships detained 
in foreign ports, trading house 
sources said Thursday. 

They will put the request to Mit- 
suhide Miyata, appointed by the 
Tokyo district . court to handle 
o^nico steamship's affairs until the 
court decides bow to handle its 
application for protection from its 
creditors. The sources said the 
houses also will ask that Mr. 
Miyata take steps to avoid future 
detention of the ships. 

The Sanko group, which says it 
owns 27 ships and operates 217 on 
charter, has debts totaling about 
520 billion yen ($2.2 billion), ft 
filed for protection from creditors 
on Aug. 13 — such filings usually 
are followed by the appointment of 
a receiver to preside over the com- 
pany's recovery or decide if it 
should be liquidated. 

After the filing, several Sanko 
ships were detained in foreign ports 
as stevedoring companies and bun- 
ker oil suppliers demanded cash 
payment for their services. The 
sources said that some of the ships 
were released after Sanko or the 
cargo holders paid the debts. 

The trading houses, which have 
been the cargo holders of most of 
their 100 ships on charter to Sanko, 
want Mr. Miyata to guarantee pay- 


COMPANY NOTES 


Adolph Coots Go. said it would 
build a brewery in Rockingham 

County, Vi rginia, b eginning with 

construction of a $70-mfllion beer 
packaging and distribution facility 
slated for completion early in 1987. 

Adas Yellowknife Resources Ltd. 
of Canada said it planned a share 
exchange bid for Que West Re- 
sources Ltd. on the basis of IW 
shares of Allas Yellowknife for 
each common share of Que West. 

GJ. Coles & (X the Australian 
chain store group, said its selling 
area rose to 138 million square 
meters (1.65 milli on square yards) 
in the year ended July 28 from 1-27 
million in 1983-84 because of store 
openings and acquisitions, includ- 
ing, 1 14 fashion stores and 33 liquor 
stores. 

General Motors Crap. said it 
would dose a diesel engine plant in 
the Detroit suburb of Romulus be- 
cause of increasing imports from 
japan, and Europe and the 01 ef- 
. fret* of foreign competition on its 
customers.! - 

' • Gnmfig AG said it expected to 
reduce losses by about 100 nriffion 


Deutsche marks ($36 million) in 
the year ending March 31, 1986, to 
around 80 million DM. 

Hongkong & Kowloon Wharf & 
Godown Co. said it had completed 
the sale of 21.8 million shares of 
Cross-Harbour Tunnel Co. at 10.10 

Hong Kong dollars ($1 29) each for 
a total of 2202 milli on dollars. 

Japan Aria Airways, a subsidiary 
of Japan Airlines Co., said it would 
would replace two McDonnell 
Douglas DC-8s next year and the 
remaining fleet, two Boeing 747s 
and another DC-8, in 1987. 

fOSdmer Humboit Deutz AG, 
the West German machinery 
group, said world group sales rose 
to 14 bilHon Deutsche marks ($867 
million) from 2 billion DM in the 
1984 first half. 

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd- 
said it may sell Mitsubishi Aircraft 
International Inc. its wholly owned 
' US. subsidiary, to a ILS. aircraft 
maker. 

- . People Express Airlines said the 
carrier is protected against un- 
friendly corporate takeovers fd- 


If your market is corporate America, 

Forbes will put you on the map. 


tc vn „ wan t to make your mark on corporate 
If you want to i x ^ impression on its 

America rt help i by a leading inde- 
leaders. And in ** Inc:, Forbes 

pendent researches, di by more C or- 

was largest ser- 

g'g ga.i coi»l»nig<" 

-^sssssasass?- 




P 



r veter M. Schoff, Director of 

9300161 


For 


with Fortune and Business Week, Forbes was 
judged to be overall favorite by 44%, versus 29% 
for Business Week and 19% for Fortune. 

When regular readers were asked which of 
the three reflects best the excitement of busi- 
ness, Forbes had twice the scores of the other 
two/ And when asked which of the three stands 
for "free enterprise" 71% named Forbes, com- 
pared with 13% for Fortune and 7% for Business 

Week. ' _ , 

These results confirm surveys done over the 

past - fifteen years showing that more officers in 
big business read Forbes regularly than either 
Fortune or Business Week. 

As the graphs so eloquently show, Forbes is 
the most cost-effective business magazine for 
reaching America's most effec- 
tive executives. If you want to 
make an impression on this . 
elite, not only is it good busi- 
ness for you to put your 

advertising in forties, it's 
bound to be good for 
your business. 

Forbes 

Forbes Magazine— 60 Fifth Ave.. N.Y., NY 10011 



lowing a reorganization approved 
by its shareholders. 

Texaco Inc. said it had complet- 
ed the sale of its stock in Getty 
Coal Co. to Utility Fuels Inc. or 
Houston, continuing a program of 
selling unwanted assets it acquired 
in last year’s $10.2 billion takeover 
of Getty Oil Co. 

Toyota Motor Sales USA said it 
expected to sell 900,000 cars and 
tracks in the United States this 
year. 

United Guarantee Corp. of 
Greensboro, North Carolina, has 
filed suit charging that the troubled 
Equity Programs Investment Corp. 
had misrepresented the nature of 
its real estate transactions. It was 
the first time since Equity Pro- 
grams failed to make payment on 
some of its $1.4 billion m mortgage 
obligations that a formal charge 
has been made. 

Wbeefing-Pfttsburgh Steel Corp. 
has been ordered by a U.S. federal 
court to settle a 40-day walkout 
prompted by a court-approved ter- 
mination of its labor agreement 
with striking steelworkers. 


mem of the ships’ bunkering and 
stevedore charges, the sources said. 

The companies involved are 
Marubeni Corp.. Sumitomo Corp., 
Mitsubishi Corp.. Toyo Menka 
Kaisha Ltd.. Nichim’en Corp.. 
Kanematsu-Gosho Ltd-. Nissho 
Iwai Corp„ Tokyo Boeld Ltd. and 
Kawa&ho Corp.. the sources said. 

The companies were expected to 
meet with Mr. Miyata next month 
to discuss, among other things, the 

possibility of reducing the char ter - 

ing fees 'Sanko pays the trading 
houses. 

The sources said that some of the 
houses were considering jointly op- 
erating bulk carriers they own and 
have chartered to Sanko if no 
agreement is reached on rehabili- 
tating the shipping company. 

However, a trading house offi- 
cial who asked that his name not be 
used said that it was unlikely that 
the nine companies would jointly 
operate the snips because their in- 
terests are different. 

Meanwhile Thursday. Sanko’s 
president, Yoiehi Akismno. apolo- 
gized to a meeting of approximate- 
ly 800 Japanese creditors for the 
company's business failure, a 
Sanko spokesman said. 

He said that creditors did not 
raise questions at the meeting dur- 
ing which Mr. Akishino briefed 
them. 

CBS Says it Plans 
To Sell s Units of 
Publishing Group 

.VfM York Times St race 

NEW YORK — CBS Inc. is try- 
ing to sell off three of its publishing 
units — Holt, Rinehart & Win- 
ston's general books. Praeger and 
Winston-Seaberry — according to 
a company spokeswoman. 

Formal" invitations to buy these 
publishing companies were sent 
out by CBS this month to a number 
of prospective purchasers in the 
publishing field. 

In May. CBS’s Educational and 
Professional Publishing Division 
dismissed 65 employees. The three 
units that have been put on the 
block employ abouL 125 people. In 
the last lew years, a number of 
editors have left Holt, Rinehart & 
Winston for other companies. 

In a statement for CBS's Educa- 
tional and Professional Publishing 
Division, the spokeswoman, Jo- 
anne L. Bag, said Wednesday that, 
“In terms offocus, these publishing 
assets do not fit as well into the 
mainstream of CBS’s educational 
and professional marker." She de- 
clined to say if any offers had been 
made. 


Blue Circle Industries PLC 
Posts 5.5% Decline in Profit 

Reuters 

LONDON — Blue Circle Industries PLC. the British cement 
producer, reported Thursday that pretax profit iu the fust half fell 5.5 
percent from a year earlier, to £45 million (S63 million) from £47.6 
million, because of higher interest charges and unfavorable currency- 
exchange rates. 

The decline came on a slight increase in sales, to £427.9 million, 
from £426. 3 million, the company said. 

Blue Circle said its first half pretax profit would have been £73 
million higher if results had been translated at average exchange rates 
for the period rather than rates on June 30. 

Higher interest targes mainly reflected two major plant modern- 
izations in Britain, it said. Extraordinary charges of £2 million, down 
from £4.8 million, were charged against pretax profits to reflect the 
cost of employee layoffs. 

British cement deliveries of 3.9 million tons in thehalf were about 
the same as last year, it said, and are not expected to differ much in the 
second half. 

The acquisition of Atlantic Cement in the United States for $145 
million, completed at the end of May, made a positive profit contribu- 
tion in June, the statement said. Other U3. units also performed well 
in the period, it said without elaborating. 

Blue Star said that a 45-percent U.K. cement-price increase from 
June 1. the first Tor nearly 34 sears, will partly offset cost increases. 
But the full benefit will not be felt until 1986 because of the 
continuing cost of modernizing key plants, it said. 

The companv said its stake in Blue Circle Ltd. of South Africa will 
be reduced to 42 percent from 503 percent at the end of this month 
because the unit has increased the number of its shares outstanding. 
The unit’s results have teen impaired because of the country's severe 
economic downturn and the declining rand, it added. 


Textron to Offer Shares, Sell 3 Units 


77ii’ AssocuiteJ Press 

PROVIDENCE Rhode Island 
— Textron Inc. announced plans 
Thursday to offer 4 milli on snares 
of common stock and sell three 
divisions to fun her reduce the S 1.4- 
billion debt incun-ed by its pur- 
chase of Avco Corp. 

Textron stock closed Thursday 
an the New York Stock Exchange 
at $54 a share, down 51.125 from 
Wednesda/s dose. 

The divisions Lhe company plans 
to sell are Bostitch erf East Green- 
wich, Rhode Island: Dalmo Victor 


of Belmont. California, and Valen- 
tine Sands Ltd. of South Mel- 
bourne,' Australia. 

Bostitch, bought by Textron in 
1966. manufactures stapling, nail- 
ing and wire-stitching systems for 
industrial, construction and office 
products markets. 

Dalmo Victor, a Textron divi- 
sion since 1954, makes airborne 
electromagnetic surveillance equip- 
ment and antenna components. It 
also is developing aircraft collision 
avoidance systems. 


Company Results 

Revenue and profits or losses, in millions, are In local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated. 


Britain 

Blue Circle ind. 
i*i how ms ]9M 

Revenue 427.9 4243 

Pretax Net— 45J 
piiShare — 0X31 0256 


British Petroleum 
todQuar. 1WS 1984 

Revenue 9.97IL «H0- 

profits 344j> Bed) 

Per Share 0.188 0379 

lit Half 1985 1984 

Revenue 21^00. 17JMJJ. 

profit MW) 668JJ0 

Per Snare— 047 OJM 

Cmwh 

Gaz Metro pa I Ita in 
let Halt 1985 1984 

Revenue— 442.8 400.0 

Profits 21-58 2034 

Per Share— 033 0.70 


Hudson's Bar 
2nd Qwar. 1985 1984 

Oo«r Lass 4X77 4181 

1st HaH 1985 1984 

Revenue 1340. 1110. 

Ooer LOSS — 96.97 105.95 

Hong Kang 

Hongkong Eluc.Htdg. 
Ut Half IMS 1984 

Prefils 4883 4083 

Per Share — 036 031 

Sweden 

Investment ab Beiler 
1st Halt 19*5 1984 

Revenue— _ 551 J) 511.0 

Profits— — 23131 17931 

Volvo 

1st HaH 1985 1984 

Revenue 4im 4X420. 

Profits. -A260. 4,630. 


United States 
Avnet 

4th Qmr. 1985 1984 


Revenue 

Net Inc — 
Per Share — 
Year 

Revenue 

Nrt Inc 

Per Share 


3443 4S66 

7J6 2338 

023 067 

1905 1984 

133 a iffl. 
4938 8631 

139 244 


France Plans 
To Ease Rule 
On Currency 

The Associated Press 

PARIS — The French govern- 
ment plans to relax, in coming 
weeks, exchange controls for direct 
investment abroad by French resi- 
dents. a senior Finance Ministry 
official said Thursday. The official 
who insisted on anonymity, said 
that the measures involved lower- 
ing the percentage of foreign in- 
vestment that must be financed in 
foreign currencies. 

Residents currently wishing to 
make a capital investment outside 
the European Community must fi- 
nance 75 percent of the total 
amount in foreign currency. A sim- 
ilar restriction affected investment 
inside the EC until the government 
lowered the minimum amount to 
50 percent in last November. 

The official said that the new 
measures being studied would 
probably try to bring laws for non- 
EC countries into line with those 
affecting investments in the nine 
other EC countries. 

France gradually has been lower- 
ing barriers to capital transfers es- 
tablished after the Socialists’ elec- 
tion victoiy in May 1981. But most 
of the measures have been largely 
symbolic, and the government has 
maintained many controls severely 
restricting the margin of maneuver 
of importers and exporters in their 
foreign-currency management. 

Most French corporate treasur- 
ers favor legislation allowing free 
access to the currency-futures mar- 
ket. That would permit them to 
hedge foreign-currency risks more 
effectively. 

But senior government officials 
have indicated that such access was 
unlikely to be granted, at least be- 
fore the legislative elections set for 
March 1986, because of concern 
about the short-term negative im- 
pact that such a move would have 
on France's balance of payments. 

Finance Minister Pierre Benfrgo- 
voy has said that the government’s 
ultimate goal was to lift exchange 
controls completely. But be has 
cautioned that this would only hap- 
pen in stages. 


Fleetwood Enterpr. 

1 st door. 1985 1984 

Revenue 319 J 3512 

Net Inc. IT 9 1S5 

Per Share — . 851 036 

Phlllips-van Hu Sen 
JndQtwr. 1985 1984 

Revenue __ 

Net Inc. . — . 

Per Stare— 

Is) HaH 
Revenue 



Singapore Port Ailing 

Reurers 

SINGAPORE — Business at 
Singapore's container terminal has 
declined by 20 to 30 percent this 
year, officials said Thursday. They 
said the port had lost about $25 
million in revenues since last Sep- 
tember and blamed a recession and 
growing competition from Hong 
Kong. 






.-.-1 .■ 









Page 14- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 1985 


Thursdays 

N1SE 

Goso^ 

Tables Include ttw nationwide prices 
up fo Hie dosing on Wall Street 
end do not reflect late trades elsewtiere. 


rjMonffi 

'UN* Low Stack 


Sb. Close 

Dl». VIA PE IflOsHWibow HuoLOrtn 


66 v> Rahrln 1i 1137 66 6 tH 66 + <A 

57V. 12% RoInCm 60 16 SO 43 24% 2J% 24% 

34% 10% RollpEs .IP A 22 1PM 23% 22% 2314 +1 

uu sv. Rains «i 5 in, nu. rat + i* 

12% Bit Ratlins 66 4X 17 Zfli 11% HVn 11*t 

m 3 Raman 80 !h 3 7v% 


UUi 5V. RoinEwt 

in* Bit Ratlins 
3ft 7 Raman 
19 I3vt Roper 
3Kt 74 mm 
13 7% Rowan 


17 0% Roylnts 17 

55% 37V, Rub mid M is ia 
27% 36% Rubmdwi 


80 2% 2 2% 

64 AS 15 4 13V* 19% 13% 

1.12 19 IB M2 38% 37% 38% + % 

.12 1.4 S2 2221 V 8% B% — % 

£D7c 43 7 1611 67lt <2% «m + It 


22 14 13% 14 + ft 

34 52V* 51% 51%—% 
3 46% 26% 26ft 


20% 15% RusTog A U 10 

Silt IV RronH 1X0 17 ii 

30ft 22 Rvders 60 2.1 11 

20V* 8ft Rvmor 5 

rat lift Rymer Pfl.17 '•A 


13 287 20ft 19ft 20 


60 2.1 11 624x28% 28 
5 57 1BU 18 


10 lVft 19% 19ft + ft 
25 27% 27% 27% + % 
24x28% 28 28% + % 

57 1BU 18 18 — % 

17 13% 12ft 12ft 


UMaHfti 
HWl Low Stock 


Dlv. YhL PE 100s HUH Law Oucrf. OTK 48% 3n* SCM ^ 
“ “ l«fv5 t™ aU I HO 

„ „ 32% 19ft 5 PST pc 

tinned from Pane 12) in is sabine 


(Continued from Page 12) 

«ft 35% NSPwpf 4S6 HL2 500X 44% 44 44ft + ft 

19 5?? NSPwpf 6» 10-1 100z 47ft 67% 67ft 

78.. 60ft NSPw pf 784 1IL6 200* 74 74 74 — ft 

*V b BE? 0 ' ■» 1129 34% 36ft 34% + ft 

4ft 3 Nltiaata 64 4 3ft 3ft 

Mft 30% Nwirp 1 JO 2J 11 2624 54ft 53ft 54% + % 

«% 19ft NwIPpf 260 IU 2 23% 23% 23%- ft 

]gt 8 NwStW 4 9ft 9ft »ft 

JH 32ft Norton 2 jD 0 56 14 21 38ft 37ft 38 — It 

28% 21ft Narwst 1J0 78 16 359 25ft 25% 25ft + % 

39ft » ft Nova J6e 18 10 3297 25ft 23% 24ft— ft 

47ft 27 Nucor 40 S 12 322 47% 46% 46%— % 

Jj% 3 NulrtS 881 67 4ft 4 '4ft + ft 

93 64% NYNEX 640 78 8 1040 86 85ft 85% — % 


.5% 1ft Ouklnd 403 1% 1% 1% 

36ft Eft OofcJfeP 182 43 13 44 35% 34% 35 + ft 
35% aft OcdPot 280 78 10 7475 32 31ft 31ft— % 


280 38 16 049 67% 46% 67 — ft 

22 19 10 7 lift 11% ID* + ft 

80 2.7 14 S 29% 29ft 29% + % 

84 2 42 73 17ft 17ft 17ft 

266el4J 2S5 18 17% 18 

JO U U 85 18ft 18 18% — ft 

35 78 12ft T2 12ft + ft 


44 

44% + Vi 


12% SlBdBS 

XO 

16 

16 

BS 

18% 

18 

67% 

67% 





35 

78 

12% 

12 

74 

74 — % 






63 

2% 

2% 

36% 

36% + ft 





25 

170 

36% 

3AM. 

3% 

3% 

34% 

24% Sofewy 

160 

SJ 

in 

1300 

31ft 

30% 

Dft 




X2 






23% 

23% — % 


16% SMoLF 

1J2 

BX 

7 

12 

20% 

20ft 

9% 

9% 


9% 3 Paul 

1X8 I0X 





Dft 

38 — ft 


3ft vISolont 







25% 

25% + ft 


24% SollteM 

.16 

X 

16 


34% 


23% 

24ft— ft 



3+2S 6J 


380 

52% 

52% 





£24 

88 

9 

325 

26% 

26% 

4 

■4ft + ft 

9% 

6% SJuanB 

J2e 9 J 

11 

875 

9% 

9ft 


1 12 Mailll 
HWiLbw Start 

14 II 
21ft iBft 
57% 44 
25% 19ft 
13ft 7ft 
25ft 22 
13% 6ft 
46ft aws 
41ft 28 
23% 12 
34ft 26% 

17ft 1S» 

49% 33ft 
58ft 50ft 
27ft 22 
30 31ft 
28ft 7ft 
31% 22ft 
49ft 29ft 
6% 4 

8ft 5ft 
18% 12ft 
25ft 14ft 
14ft 9ft 
43ft 30ft 
16ft 9% 

19ft 16 
41 30 

17% 13% 


Mv.YM.PE IfeiHMiLnw OootQma 

180 11 63 3 12% 12% 12% + ft 

nl.li 48 8 £ m* 1 Bft Wft ■*- ft 

2.16b 48 10 97 48 47ft 47ft— ft 

236 113 134 Zl% 21 21% 

6 34 8ft 8 S 

ISO 9.9 3 25% 25ft 25ft 

10 73 9 8ft 9 + ft 

180 19 13 589 46ft 45ft 45ft— % 

A 13 >3 1091 39% 39 39% 

It 19 Zl% 21ft 21ft— ft 

180 63 1 32 32 32 — ft 

1.90 118 3 17% 17% 17% 

286 4.9 10 B49 42% 41% 41ft— ft 
4.16 78 49 52ft 52% 52% 4- Hi 

35$£l3.1 Z32 27 26% 26% + ft 

£50 08 4 IBft 27ft 28ft + % 

89 X T 223 27ft 24% 26ft— ft 
180 34 9 3 29% 29% 29tt— % 

84 18 16 233 46% 45ft 46 — ft 

810 9.1 B 20 5% 5% 5% + % 

30 38 13 107 6ft 6% 6% 

JO 36 141 13ft 13% I3%— % 

,10b A 21 122* 22ft 22ft 22ft + 9* 

1.10 88 51 14 13ft 13% — % 

380 73 10 158 40% 40% 40% 

M 28 17 92 15ft 15% 15ft + % 

JO 48 ID 62 19% 19ft 19% + % 

80 28 11 99 39ft 39ft 39% + % 


US. Ritures 


Season Season 
Hteti low 


Doan HKrti Low 0050 CM*. 


Season Season 
Higll Law 


Open Hioft Law Close 


Grains 


coffee eorvcstu 

37iOOIb*-cenBPerlD. 13S xs gy, -2.12 

!33 m S il ls Sif i£S? 

1S3 IS SS SS Sf ««» \ss ~ s 

148X0 13580 Jol MIJ» M1JB M1JB Sub -V# 


AO 2.9 10 1934 14% 14 


12ft 8% SJuanR 22 

49% 31 Sandr 36 13 19 

25% 20 SAnrtRt 1.94 B8 13 


73 13 11% 11% 11% 

13 19 744 34% 35% 36% -Hft 
B8 13 79 24% 24% 24% 


'4% 9ft OcdPwt 5 12ft 12% 12ft— % 

24% 20% OcdPpf 230 108 5 0ft 33ft 23ft 4- ft 

2Jft lTftacdPrttlZlM 51 20% 20ft 20%+% 
22% 18% OcdPpf 2JO 103 17 21% 21ft 21% + ft 

57 40% OcdPpf 425 116 190 55ft 55% 55% — ft 

113 105% OcdPpf 1530 14.1 265 110% MO 110 — % 

IJOft 101% Ocd Pi 1482 138 111 IKH* 110% 110% + ft 

32% 20 OOECO 180 48 2 191 24ft 233* Oft 

3«% 24V* Oodan 180 60 17 224 30ft 30% 30ft — % 

16ft 10% OhloEd 180 118 6 2564 14% 15ft 16ft 

42 Oh Ed pf 734 122 Itfflje 59ft 59ft 9»ft + ft 


35% 23% SFeSoP 180 11 14 3420 33ft 32V> 33% 

44 29% Sara Lee 184 33 II 734 41% 40% 40% 

35% 29ft Sptwel 180 48 15 3 35 35 35 

19% 14ft SauIRE 20 1.1 47 15 IBft 18ft IBft 

22% 16ft SovElP 180 8.1 7 64 20ft 19% 19% 


3 35 35 35 — K 

19% 14ft SauIRE 20 1.1 47 15 IBft 18ft IBft 

22% 16ft SavElP 180 8.1 7 64 20ft 19% 19% 

9ft 5 Savin 207 8 7% 8 — ft 

13% 9% Savin of I JO 11.9 6 12% 12% 12% 

9ft 19% 5 CANA £16 82 9 1379 26ft 26ft 26% 

52ft 33 SdirPIo 188 38 13 061 47V* 46% 47 + ft 

49V. 34ft Sefilmb 120 32 10 3490 37% 36% 37ft— ft 

14% 8 SdAtl .12 J 19 298 13% 13% 13%— ft 

73 22ft Seoalnd ,76a 28 14 648 32ft 32ft 32% 

61ft 49% ScotFot -90e 18 10 552 56% 56 56 — ft 

44ft 28% ScortP 124 3.1 1C 1909 40% 40ft 40ft— ft 

16% 12ft Scot tvs J2 £9 10 40 13ft 13% 13ft + ft 

45 24% SeaOll 82 1J 8 245 3» 3Zft rat— % 


26% 26ft 011 Ed Pf 
£% 47ft OhEdpf 820 127 
®% 21 Oh Ed pf 3J0 127 
31% 2SVi Oh Ed pr 3.92 138 
16ft 12ft OhEdpf 180 11 J 
70 50ft OhEdpf 884 132 
89% 76 OhEpf 1088 112 


JO 53 OhP pIB 780 IU 

«% 55ft OhPpfC 780 118 

,21% 16ft OhPpfG 227 118 

111% 99% OhP pfAT480 13.1 


80 11 17 100 13 


lDOz 59ft 59ft 99ft + ft 
2 26% 26% 24% 

7B0t 67ft 64 64ft — 3% 
32 23 27% 27%— ft 

21 30% 30ft 30% + ft 
36 16ft 15% 15% + ft 
1002 65% 65% 45% — % 
490z SV B8 B9 42 


59ft 35% UAL 180 18 126 173B 55% 55 55% 4- % 

36ft 26 UAL Pf £40 78 244 34ft 34 34ft. 4- % 

17V* 9% UCCEL , 17 41 15% 15% 15% 

30 25% UDCn ljwe £8 18 162 26% 26ft 14% — ft 

24ft 17% UGI 284 &8 11 145 23% 73 23% — ft 

25', 19ft UGI pf £75 118 400z 24ft 24ft 24ft + ft 

11 % 8% UNCRes 68 10% ra 10ft 

14 10% URS 80 £4 13 42 11% 11% 11% 4- ft 

38% 21% USFG £20 4J 4B 2919 0% 32% 33% + ft 

44ft 26% U5GS 188 4J 7 251 39% 38% 38% — % 

19% 12% UnIFrst JO U 13 13 16 15% 15%— % 

63 44 Unllvr £124 37 7 1 58 58 58 4-1 

110% BB% UnINV 5J4e 58 10 74 106% 105ft 104 — % 

41% 31% UComB 184 47 13 1443 39ft 38ft 39ft 4- % 

56% 32% UnCarb £40 68 1418665 57ft 55% 56% 4-1 ft 


WHEAT KBTJ 

5800 bu mini mum- dal la rsjxjrbustwl 

376ft £69 Sep £67 £69 284ft 287% —JO 

16T, 23T Dk 281ft £83% 279ft 782ft -80ft 

£74 ft £89% Mar £89 2J91U £87 £90% +80% 

482 £84 May £06 £88% £85 £88 +8093 

3.72ft 285 Jut £64 287% 283 286ft +JD0ft 

385 289ft Sep 287ft 168ft 287 288% —Off* 

ESt. Sales Prtv.Sole* l£3S3 

P rev. Dav Open Int 39,113 otf483 


£Z7 230 +A 

£16% £17% +8 0ft 
£25% £27% +81 

£31 £33% +JHft 

£33 £36% +83% 

£25 228ft +J3ft 

£21 224% +J03ft 



SOYBEANS 1CBTJ 

5800 Du m Inimum- doltar»per bushel 


6-71 

5X0% 

See 

5.10% 

5.14ft 

5.10% 

5.11% — X0% 

668 

5X3 

Nov 

5X6% 

5.11 

5X6% 

5X8% 

+xa% 

679.. 

3.13 


3.16ft 

5J0 

5.15% 

5.18% 

+X1% 

762 

5X3 


5X6 

5X0 

SJ5ft 

329% 


7J9 

5X1U 

May 5X4% 

5X9 

5X3% 

5X7% 

+X2 

6X8 


Jul 

£39 

582% 

5X8% 

581ft 

+X2 

6J4 

5^Vj 


5X8% 

582 

5X8% 

581ft 


6X8 

SM 

Sep 

5X7 

5X7 

5X6 

5X6 

+JI 

6X2 

SJB 

Nov 

5X4% 

SJ7 

5X3% 

5X5% 

+X0% 

Esl. Sale* 


Prev. Sotos 25X13 





147JS LETS S« 

T38JX) im on Dec . 

e£satcs Prev.Sdles IJ03 

PTev. Dav Open Ini. 10307 up 25 
SUGAR WORLD II f MY CSCE J 
11X000 IDs.- cent* per lb. 

«S Z64 S«P 475 4J 

90S 174 OCf 4.90 4J 

775 JtO JW J* S 

933 334 War KB J- 

7.15 £58 MOV S3S V 

489 379 Jul £50 » 

6.15 432 Oct 5JB 5J 

Ext. Sotos 1X423 Prev. Sotos I&564 
Prev, Dav Open Hit 91713 iip639 
COCOA (HYCSCE) 

10 metric tors- Spar ton _ 

MIS 1963 Sep 2W 21 

2337 1945 Dec 2245 22 

2295 1955 Mar ZOO 33 

2313 I960 May 2237 0 

2340 19*0 JUl 2320 33 


u nrmne njns*»imr ran . •,«. •n w n 

IS UK SS S3 ^ |S 

2295 1%5 Mar 2280 2281 2247 2251 

2U? I960 May 2»7 000 2270 2275 

2340 1960 Jul £320 2320 2285 225B 

^ SS ^ 2345 2345 035 SI 

Est. Sales £488 Prev. Sato* 2823 
Prev. Dav Open lnt 19715 pp!9 
ORANGE JUICE {NYCE7 

, ® te '!SSSr r st 134.15 13485 13480 U4.1S 
18180 1Z78D Nov 12980 130*40 12980 12970 

18000 I2£50 Jan T2SJ5 13680 1 2560 1 2680 

177 JO moo MOT 12470 12480 12440 12485 


14078 — Vg 
141.00 — I-® 


477 +J« 

483 -4J7 

4.93 — « 
5.17 —JB 
SL 29 — & 

SM —M 
576 — *« 


14150 12450 May 12400 12400 13400 12160 jKJg 1 

157 JO 12110 Jul t»A0 - • 


7V* 4% UntonC 


36 6ft 6% 6ft + ft 


44Vi 28% Sea HP 174 £1 
16% 12ft Scnttvs J2 £9 
45 24% SeaOll 82 17 

13 10 SaaCtpf 186 117 

16% 12% SooC plB£10 13J 
16% 13ft SeoCptCllQ 1£1 
27ft 17% SeaLnd 88 13 
5ft 3ft SeaCa 


245 33% 32ft 32%—% 

29 12ft 12ft 12ft + % 

8 15% 15% 15% + ft 

6 16 16 16 + ft 

261 21% 239* 21 — % 

81 4% 4ft 4ft— ft 


44% 35% Seaarm 80 £0 II 937 39% 39% 39% 


1000Z 67% 67ft 67V* + % 
6200Z 67ft 67ft 67ft — % 
4 17ft 19ft 19ft — ft 
100Z107 107 107 +1 


21 ft 14% Seacul 


31% 22% SealAIr 84 18 17 170 30% 30 


14 16ft 16% 16ft + Hi 


19% 13ft UnElec 184 98 7 1510 19ft 19% 19ft + U 


19 — % 
44% — ft 


52% 37% UnPac 180 38 12 1837 49ft 48% 49% + % 

115ft 87% UnPCPf 77S 68 3 110% 110 1W1* + ft 

21% 12ft Unlrovl .18 8 13 3204 21% 21% 31% 

TO SO Unryl pf 880 1A1 lSfa 61% 61% 61% . 

5% 3% UnlFDr H » » M 

2S% 10% UnBmd 10 63 19ft 19ft 19% + % 

16% 9% UBrd pi 37 13ft 15% 15ft + % 

33% 17 U COTVs 52 222 32 32 32 

40ft 22ft UnEnro 288 £1 31 ISAM 40ft 40 40% + ft 


40 

34% 

30 

26 

UnEl pi 450 1£1 
UnEl PfM4X0 1£5 

30e 37ft 
10 32 

37ft 

31% 

28 

30 

UnEl pf £98 MX 

SO 26% 

25% 

20% 

14ft UnEl pt £13 11 J 

5 19 

w 

68 


UHEIpf 784 UX 

640z 6+ft 

64 

72 


194QZ 67 

A5ft 

24 

22 

UnExpn 

322 23 

22% 


Prev. Day Open inL 63JM7 off 999 
SOYBEAN MEALtCBTI 
i DO tom- dal tors per ton 

179 JO 12080 Sep 12370 12570 12X50 12490 +80 

18090 12230 Oct 1249 12620 1249 12600 +120 

18480 12580 Dec 127.90 129 JO 12778 129.20 +180 


18090 12230 

1IM.ES 12580 
163.00 12780 

23S.50 13080 

162J0 13250 

16780 13400 

14170 135J0 

16780 13880 

Est. Sales 


12780 Jan 12970 131.00 129 JO 13070 +180 


13080 Mar 1329 13370 13280 13370 +L20 

13270 MOV 13450 13570 13670 13570 +180 

13480 Jul 13780 13870 13670 13X30 +IJ0 

135J0 Aug 13880 13970 13770 139 JO +170 

13X00 Sep 137 JO 137 JO 137 JO 13X00 

Prev.Sales 17J72 


Prev. Da v Open Mt. 42J42 up 374 
SOYBEAN OfLICBTl 
60800 Itn- dollars pec 100 lb*. 


32% 22% SealPw US 19 8 36 26V* 25% 25ft + ft 

65ft 46% SearlcC 180 17 18 79 64ft 64% 64% — ft 

39ft 29% Sears 176 XI V 3136 34% 34% 34% — ft 

31% 23ft SecPacs 1J4 48 7 1211 28 27% 20 + % 

18ft 11% SofgLt 1 18V* IBft IBft 

40% 26% 5VCCP S 88 IJ 17 995 37ft 36 J7ft +1% 

16ft 11% ShaklM 72 47 23 23 15% 15ft 15ft— % 

26ft IS Shawm 80 £5 8 2B 24 23% 23% + % 

39% 29ft ShtHIT 2J7a *8 8 2004 39% 39ft 39% + % 


26% 20% OtlaGE 2® 66 10 229 23ft 23 


9% 7ft OkloGpf 70 97 
36% 28% aim 170 58 12 

17% 5% Omncre 

19% 12 Ondda 70 57 9 
33% 264* ONEOK £56 B8 11 
29 21% OronRk £14 XI 10 

12% 7% Orange 731 5J 16 

28ft 20 OrkmC 76 38 
25% 23ft OrkmC pH. 12 87 
12% 8ft OrianP 34 

9% 6ft Orton pf 70 57 
33% 24 Orion pf £75 X9 
31ft 19% OutbdM 74 27 8 
36% 23 OvmTr .72 £0 14 
19 13 OvShlp 70 3J 12 

37 28% OwgnC 180 61 9 


70 97 ICfe 8% 8% It + ft 
170 58 12 B5 30% 29% 30% — ft 
75 6ft 6% 6ft + ft 
70 57 9 13 13% 13% 13% + % 

LM 87 11 75 30ft 29% 29ft— % 

L14 XI 10 59 26ft 26 26ft + % 

731 59 16 74 9% 9 9 — t 

76 38 176 25 26% 25 + ft 

1.12 07 86 24% 24ft 24% — % 

34 340 12 11% H%— % 

70 57 21 HV 8% 8% + W 

L75 X9 123 31% 30% 30%—% 
74 27 8 >2 23% 23ft 23’*— ft 

.72 28 14 497 36% 35% 36ft + % 

70 3J 12 B45 15% 15ft 15% + % 

80 61 9 449 35 34% 34ft— t 


51% 38ft Owen III 170 37 10 742 50% 49% 49%—% 


15% 10ft Oxford 


12 13% 13% 13% 


1 18ft IBft IBM 

88 IJ 17 SM 37ft 36 J7ft +1% 

72 47 23 22 15ft 15ft 15ft— % 

70 £5 8 2B 24 23% 23% + % 

L37o *7 8 2004 39% 39ft 39% + % 

30% 17% ShdGto 70 11 6 49 26 25ft 25ft— % 

Eft 21M ShelGnf 180 58 1 2B 28 28 + % 

40 25ft Shrwfn J2 £5 13 348 37% 37ft 37ft — % 

8% 5% Shoetwn 10 293 7% 7% 7% + ft 

16% 12 ShowM 70 47 12 92 12% 12% 17ft 

19% 141* SlerPac 176 9J 9 153 18 17% 17% — ft 

44ft 2B% Slunol 1.00 28 16 Ml 41% 41 41ft— ft 

65 52% Slonl pf 4.12 67 20 61 61 61 + ft 

41 26% singer 80 1.1 9 1172 36 £5% 35% + ft 

33% 27ft Stngrpf 3-50 10.9 2 32% E E 

18 12% Skyline 88 £3 21 48 14% 14% 14%— ft 

15% 7% Smith in J2 £6 101 9% B% 9 + M 


22% 11% U ilium am 9J 

30% 22ft Ulllupf £97 1£2 

IBM 12 Uillupr 2.20 127 

31% 22% UllhiBf 600 1£1 

14% 10ft UltUlPt 1.90 138 

25 15% Unltlnd M 27 e 

43ft 35% Unttlrm 72 J 37 


47 28ft UJerBk 1J6 £3 10 

16ft lift UMMM 11 

3 2 UPkMn I 

38ft 26% UsalrG .12 8 7 

8% S’* USHom 

42ft 32% US Lem 70 £3 10 

40% 24% USSItoe 76 28 14 


im 9J 4 387 21% 21% 21% +% 
L77 1X2 21 30% Eft 30ft— ft 

L20 127 200z 17% 17% 17%— % 

Uffl 13.1 3 Mft 30ft 30ft + % 

1.90 138 9 14% 14% 14% + M 

M 27 9 105 23 21% 22M— % 

72 J 37 3 42% 42% 42% 

J6 13 10 34 46% 46% 66% + ft 

11 36 14 13% 14 

I 445 3% 2% 3% + % 

.12 8 7 750 33ft 33% 33ft + % 

1784 6% 6 6% — ft 

70 £3 10 26 34% 34% 34% 

76 £4 14 674 36ft 36 36ft + ft 


31.10 

22.15 

Sop 


22X3 

22X6 

2227 


30X7 

21 JS 

Od 

21J5 

22X0 

21J5 

21.96 


29X5 

21X5 

Dec 

21X5 

21.93 

21X1 

21X1 

—73 


2L55 

Jan 


22X5 

21X5 

21 J5. 


2860 

2£10 

Mar 

90* 

2225 

2200 

2222 

—.13 

2785 

2230 

MOV 

22.50 

2250 

22X5 

22X9 


2525 

2257 

Jul 

2250 

22JD 

22X0 

2250 


25.15 

2268 


2£75 

22X5 

99 Cl 

2251 


2405 

22.50 

Sep 

2265 

2265 

2258 

2258 




Oct 

•n an 

22X0 

22X0 

22X0 


Est. Sales 


Prev. Sales 1X912 





| Est. Sales 400 Prev. Sates 61 
Prev. Day Open Int. 6473 off 277 


1 1 Metals 

COPPER (COM EX} 

B SSf~’%5 r& 5. -15 *1*5 59*. 

Qcf 4 TjOO 

j *425 S&50 DvC 61.10 6150 «J5 «J0 

m*i 5980 Jon 6270 

8000 5980 Mar 62J5 6270 61« 8280 

7608 61.10 May 3270 6330 gJD 

76« 6130 Jut 6370 6375 62K 

70.90 6230 Sep 6155 6600 6335 43JS 

7030 £380 Dec 6645 6485 6620 6470 

7020 6470 Jan Wj 

67.90 6470 Mar 6££ 

47J0 6650 MOV 6570 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 16*541 

Prev. Day Open InL 70019 off 61 


31% 22% USSIeel IJD 47 19 5131 30% 29% 30% — ft 

561* 49% USSIlDf 780*137 60 S3*. 53ft 53ft— ft 

142ft 115% USStl PTl2J5e 98 BOB 135% 133ft IB — % 
31% 24ft USStl cf 225 78 167 30ft 30 30% — V* 

39% 32% USTab 1J2 97 11 206x34% 34% 34ft— ft 


USWmt 572 73 8 1575 79% 79 


71% 50% SmkB 270 62 II 946 67Vi 66% 67% + % 


37ft 22% PHH 170 £8 14 539 35% 35 35% + ft 

47% 31ft PPG 180 36 10 444 44% 43% 44% + % 

31 ft 15 PSA 80 £3 19 36 26% 26% 26%— % 

23ft 13% PSA duf 130 98 378 20% 19% 20% + % 

14% 11% POCAS IJ4 11.1 32 13% 13% 13% + % 

20% 13% PocGE 174 9J7 7 3278 19 18% 18% + % 

46% 32% PoCLIg 3J2 77 14 168 43 42% 42% + V* 

29% 24ft PcLum IJD 62 18 57 28% 28V* 2Bft 

10 5% PocRes TSe 8 12 48 8ft 8ft Bft 

19% 13ft PocRSOf 2JD 108 20 18% 18% 18% + % 

17ft 12ft PacSd 80 £0 10 29 13% 13ft 13ft— % 


79% 42% Smuckr 178 IJ 16 12 73 72% 72% + ft 

41% 31% Snapon 1.16 XI 13 314 38 37% 38 + % 

15% 12% Snyder 270 137 15 45 15ft 15% 15% 

43ft 31ft Sana! £00 57 8 619 34<A 33% 34% 

19ft 13ft SonyCP .150 17 12 1128 151* 15ft 15ft— ft 
30% 22 % Sob Lin 1 JO 62 23 14 28% 28ft 28% + ft 

40% 31ft Source £30 98 35 38ft 38% 38% — ft 

23% 18ft 5rcGopf £40 10J 2 22% 22% 22% — ft 

30ft 22% SaJerln £48 97 12 17 27% 27ft 27ft 

49ft 38ft Saodwn 170 £4 10 143 41ft 41% 41% 

35 24 ScelBk 1 JO IB 10 132 31ft 30% 31ft + ft 

10 6% SaelPS £131318 40 15 6% 6% 6%— ft 


13 

6% UnStck 



17 

17 

7V» 

7% 

45 



180 

3X 

10 

1909 

40% 

40 

39ft 

31ft UTdipf 

2X5 

72 


380 

35% 

35 

25 

18% 

Uni Tel 

1.92 




37% 

92 

31 

23 

UniT2pt 1X0 




27% 

27% 

71 

15ft 

UWR 

1X8 

6.9 

12 

IB 

18% 

18% 




20 

X 

19 

27 

24ft 

2« 

20 Hr 15ft 

U ii Ivor 

XO 

42 

7 

26 

19% 

19ft 


40% + ft 
35% 

22ft— % 


28 21% UnlvFd 1,12 65 9 22 25% 25 25 — M 

23ft 171* UHLeaf 170 64 8 83 23 22% 27% — % 

53 26V* Unocal 1J0 61 8 2579 29% 28% 29ft + M 

122ft 52 Uplahn £56 £3 20 5936 112% 109% 109ft 

43 26% USLIFE 174 27 10 468371*37 37 — 1* 


10% B% UsIfeFd lTBalQJ 


16 10% 10% 10% + M 


27ft 20 SCalEd £16 88 8 3118 26 2S% 25% + ft 


15 6% 6% 6% — ft 26% 20% UlaPL 232 9-7 13 93* 24% 23% 24 — % 


82% 61% PocTele £72 78 9 1245 751k 75 


15 9% PocTtn 80 £7 

31% 23ft Padfcp £32 7.9 
36 29ft Podfpf 607 1£1 


31 14% 14% 14% — V* 

246 29% 29 29% 

19 33% 33ft 33ft + % 


431* SAM Palnwb 80 1.9 18 642 31 30% 305*— V* 


34V* 26ft PalnW pf 2J5 XI 
39 33% Pol m 8c 1 JO U 32 

■JOft 20% PanABk JO 17 11 
8% 4 PanAm 
4 1% PanAwt 

21 13ft Pandckn JO IJ 23 


IBS 28% 27ft 27% — % 
46 34% 34% 34ft— % 
1 38ft 38% 38% + ft 
4195 8ft 7% 8ft + ft 
136 3% 3% 3ft + V* 

71 16% 16ft 16% + ft 


41ft 32% PantiEC 130 66 11 630 35 34% 35 + ft 


8 3% PootPr 

19% 13% PaprcK 801 
IBft 9ft Parttyn 
21% lift ParkEI 
8% 4% ParkDrl .16 £3 


31 772 6% 6ft 6% + ft 

15 619 19V. 19ft 19ft 

3807 10% Oft 9% — % 

10 12 13 12% 12% — % 

152 5ft 4% 4% 


3WS 28% ParkH 1.12 £3 11 227 34 33% 3J%— ft 

21 14ft P ark Pn 721 £5 SO «1 20% 20% 29% 


21 14ft ParkPn 721 £5 50 
2ft Tft Pot Phi 2 

16% lift POYNP 84 69 13 
23% 14 PayCxh .16 17 14 
lift 6% Peabdy JO U 27 
IM ft Pengo 

58% 43% PenCen 12 

5SU. 44% Penney £36 69 9 
27% 2216 PaPL £56 97 9 
40% 30ft PaPL pf 640 11 J 
29ft 24M PaPL dpr£42 117 
Eft 21ft PaPL dpiX90 11.1 
28ft 23ft PaPLdpdJS 117 
31ft 2S% PaPLdpdJS 12J 
91ft 71 PaPL Pf 9J4 10J 
100 81% PaPLprlTTO 11J 

70% 55 PaPLpr 870 117 


721 £5 50 «1 20% 20% 20% 

2 213 2ft 2% 2ft + ft 
84 69 13 1036 13 12% 13 

.16 IJ 14 319 16ft 16 16% + M 

JO IJ 27 69 10% 10j£— ft 

12 319 52 51ft 51ft— ft 
L36 69 9 746 48% 48ft 48ft— ft 

156 «7 9 1495 26M 26 36ft + ft 

80 11J 210z 38ft 37% 37% + ft 

82 117 5 29 29 29 

JO 11.1 184 16% 26ft 26ft — ft 

J5 117 10 28ft 28ft 28% + ft 

J5 12J 16 30% 38% 30% — ft 

34 10 J 30z 89% 89% 04% 

00 11 J 30* 98 98 98 

70 117 unite te te 


23% 16 SouttlCO 1J2 93 6 
26% 18% SoInGss 170 77 8 
44 30** SNETI £72 07 II 

39% 31% SoNEpf 372 9J 
31 Z4ft SoUnCo 1.72 XI 
39ft 24% Sauttnd 170 2J 9 
50 49ft Soulld pf 600 87 
16% lift So Rov .12 .9 13 

B% 5% Soomrk J4C 37 6 
31 16% SwAIrl .13 7 18 

18% 11% SwIFor 
IBft 10% SwtGax 1J4 77 8 
88ft 62% SwBell 670 77 8 
29 19% SwEnr 72 IJ II 

26% 18% SwIPS 178 77 9 
17% lift Soarton 72 38 388 
27% 151* SpedP 
59 34% S Derry 1.92 £7 9 

38 30ft Springe 172 47 13 


1J2 93 6 855 20% 20ft 20ft— ft 

170 77 B 30 24 23% 23% 

£72 &J II BS 41ft 40% 40ft — ft 

372 97 9 39ft 39ft 39ft— % 

1-72 61 112 28 27% 28 + ft 

1.00 £9 9 500 34% 34ft 34% 

470 80 SB SO 49% 49%— ft 

.12 .9 13 3S9 13 12% 12% 

J4D37 6 387 8 7% 8 

.13 7 18 122 28 27ft 27ft— % 

519 13ft 12ft 13U + % 
134 77 8 4T 17% 17ft 17ft— ft 

...» 7 J B 456 83 82% 82ft— ft 

32 IJ 11 19 27ft 27V* 27M 

178 77 9 203 24V* 23ft 24 + V6 

72 38 388 27 15ft 15% 15M 

43 21ft 21 21 — ft 

1.V2 £7 9 1)01 Sift 50ft 51ft + % 

172 47 13 1 33% 33% 33%— ft 


27% 22% UIPLPf 270 107 
28ft 22% UfPLpf £90 107 
23% 18ft UtPLPf 236 107 
27 16% UMIICo 180b 5J 

24% 18% UIIICo pr 261 10J 


4x 26 26 26 — ft 

33x 27ft 27ft 27ft +ft 
4x22% 22% 22% 

23 24% 24ft 24% 

2 23% 23% 23% 


22% VFCan* 1.12 27 10 421 40% 39% 40% — ft 


43% 3SVS SauarO 174 4.9 M 146 38 37% 37% 

72% 45 Squibb 176 27 18 367 68% 68ft 48ft + ft 

23% 17% Staley jo £* 73 im 2 o% 20% 20% 

23% 17% 5IBPnt 76 27 II 383 21% 20% 21 — IM 

20 11 StMotr J2 17 13 8 12ft 12V* 12ft 

50ft 39% StdOOh 270 £1 8 531 46 45ft 45% 

23% 9% StPacC X 80 2J I 259 17ft 17 17ft + % 


16% 12% Standex 72 XV ID 

31% 23% StonWk 1.04 £5 11 

35% 26% Storretl 178 £1 10 

lift 9 StaMSe IJOaiU 

3% 2% Sleaga .12 £7 

2Dft 15 Sterctil 76 47 10 

12ft 9% StrIBcp 76 67 9 


8 12ft 12V* 12ft 

531 46 45ft 45% 

259 17ft 17 17ft + % 

45 13% 13ft 13% + ft 

67 30 29% 30 + V* 

2 3Sft 35V* 35V* 

84 10% 10% 18% + ft 

34 3ft 3ft 3ft 
2 19ft 19M 19ft — ft 
11 lift lift lift— ft 


14% 5% Valera 

25% 14 Voter Pf 384 164 
4ft 2ft VaSeyln 
28ft 19 VonDm 170 63 7 

4 2ft Vareo 

45 26% Vartan 36 7 20 

13% 9% vara 80 38 33 
25% 17% Veeco 80 £1 15 
12 3ft Vanda 1* 

11% 9ft Vest So lJ0a107 
52 29% Viacom 88 17 22 

49ft 36ft VaEPpf 570 117 
83 63ft VaEPpf 874 II J 
93 67% VaEI pt £70 9J 

73 57 VaE Pf J 772 11.1 

70ft 53 VaEP Pf 785 10B 
27% 13ft vishavs 16 

45ft 31% Vornad 12 

85 66ft VuldlM 270 38 13 


590 11 IBft 10%— % 
184 164 14 23% 23% 33% 

11 2% 2% 2% 

70 63 7 8 23% 23M 23ft 

188 3% 3% 3% 

36 7 20 77 31% 31V* 31»— % 

80 38 33 36 11% 11V] 11% 

80 £1 15 79 1 9ft 18% 1916 + % 

19 105 10 «ft 9ft— % 

JOalO-8 33 lift lift 111* 

88 17 22 1777 50ft 49% 50 + ft 

SJtS 117 Hte 45ft .45ft 45ft 

174 117 41SQZ 8D% 80% B0% + % 

L6Q 9J 30z 93 93 93 

'72 11.1 25DZ 69% 69% 69% +1% 

'85 107 lOOz 69 6V 69 +1ft 

16 14 25ft 25ft 25ft + % 

12 31 45 44ft 45 +% 

!70 38 13 6 83% 83ft ISM - 


Prev. Day Open Hit. 56742 oaBZl 
OATS (CBT1 

5700 bu minimum- dd lara Per bushel 
1JV 1.141* Sep 1.12 M3 l.llft Mil* —73 

1721* 1J4 Dec 1JT 1J3 Ml M2 —.82ft 

187% 1J6V* Mar 1 J7 U* IJ6V* — Jlte 

163 1J7V* May 177ft M9ft 177ft 1-20 — JJOVi 

M8ft M71* JU 174ft 

Esf. Sates Prev. Sates 544 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 3846 off 7 


| Livestock | 

CATTLE (CMC) 

6M»0 lbs.- cents per Ux 

65.90 5385 Oct SSJ0 5575 5575 55-32 — JB 

6775 55.15 Doc 5X15 5885 5780 5777 — J5 

^7.45 5670 Feb 5785 5776 5775 S7J0 —M 

6777 57 JO Apr 5&50 5X95 5X10 5X17 —85 

66JS 5X10 Jun 59 JS 59 JO 59.12 59J5 —85 

6580 5X40 Aug SXTffi 5X40 5870 5X10 —80 

Est. Sates 20791 Prwf.SOteS I5J74 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 46721 up 768 

FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

46aoa im.. cento per lb. 

7£B0 5785 Sep 6£5D 62SD 6L30 61 JO —177 

72J2 57.15 Oct 61.40 6180 6027 60M —37 

7320 5X20 Nav 6370 6X10 62.10 — L03 

7970 6X40 Jan 6638 6630 617S 6375 —77 

70J5 61.10 Mar 6470 6480 6X75 6135 —75 

WAS 61.15 Apr 6375 64JQ 6175 6375 -80 

6625 6120 May (SS 6320 6£95 6£9S -20 

Est. Sales 2252 Pray. Solos 1845 
Prev. Day Open lnt 7772 off 84 
HOGS (CME) 

30700 lbs.- aen Is per lb. 


ALUMINUM (COMEX) 




4425 

44X0 


74J0 

43J0 

Sep 

4480 

4480 



7060 

76X0 

4490 

Dec 

4165 

4565 

4145 

45XD 

4590 

-JO 

7360 
66X5 ■ 

6385 . 

S2.W 

46X5 

5355 

47X5 

51X0 

Mar 

May 

Jul 

Sep 

Dec 

Jan 

46X5 

46X5 

46X0 

4660 

4780 

48.10 

4SJB 

49X5 

5OJ0 

5090 

— 

—JO 

-JD 

-2 
— JO 

wS&m 

53X5 

May 

Prev.Sates 

406 


5160 

—20 


51X5 

■K44 

Oct 

36X0 

36X7 

3197 

3620 


50X5 

37 J0 

Dec 

38X0 

3985 

3862 

39X2 


5087 

3960 

Feb 

4020 

40X2 

«L10 

40.50 

+20 

47X5 

36X0 

Apr 

37X0 

37X0 

3725 

37X0 


49X5 

5S 

Jun 

4057 

*1X0 

4065 

4065 


49X5 

Jul 

4M0 

4160 

41X2 



51 JO 

4025 


4060 

41J5 

4060 

40X0 

+J05 


3865 

Oct 

38X2 

38X2 

38X0 


4960 39.90 Dec 40J5 40J5 

ESI. Sales <852 Prev.Satoe 5853 
Prev. Day Opwi inf. 20272 up 482 

40JS 

4025 

—82 


PORK BELLIES (CME) 
[ 3X000 Ibx- cants per lb. 


41ft 34 Penwll 120 58 13 1037 39 38ft 39 + ft 

50 28% Ponnzol £20 65 21 1102 49ft 47% 49V* +1 

18% 10ft PeopEn M0 7J 7 106 16ft 16ft 16%— ft 

24% 14% PePBYS 19 SB 23ft 23 23M— ft 

60ft 39% Pend Co 1J8 £0 11 525 59% 59 ft 59% + ft 

30ft 21% Perk El J6 £1 13 585 26% 26 26ft— ft 

.7% Prmkm 1.14*163 6 348 8 7% 8 


3% 2% Steeno .12 £7 34 3ft 3ft 3% 

20 U, 15 Sterctil 26 47 10 2 19ft 19M 19ft — V* 

12ft 9% StrIBcp 26 67 9 11 lift 11M lift — ft 

34ft 24% SlerlDe 120 18 13 2868 31% 31M 31ft— % 
23% 15ft StevnJ MO 5J 13 1374 23 22>A 22% + % 

34 26 StwWm 188 67 18 15 26% 26% U% + ft 

12 9 5tkVCpfl73 9J 500x 11% UM lift + ft 

45% 37% SSonoW 180 32 9 

36% 24 StoneC 80 £1 13 


SteoS hp 1.1 0 2J 


5O0s lift lift lift + ft 
1 43% 43% 43% 

203 29% 28ft 28% — % 
640 30% 38 38% — M 


21% 16ft StarEq 1.92 97 14 274 19% 19ft 19M + ft 


9% 7% PrmJra? 1.14*163 6 

24ft 16ft PgrvOr JB 12 16 97 23ft 23 23ft + ft 

15% 10% P*rvDwt 9 15% 15% 15% + ft 

44 31 Petrie 180 £8 14 504 37% 37 37ft + ft 

28% 24% PelRs £770142 60 26% 26M 26ft + ft 

IJ 14 PelRsPf 1S7 9J 16 16% 16% 16ft— V* 

6 2ft Plrlnv .95*292 21 3ft 3ft 3ft 

53% 33% Pfleer 188 11 IS 1310 48ft 48 48ft 

24 12% PhejpD _ . . 129 21% 21ft 21ft— M 

55, 34 Pfielppr 570 98 29 52 51% 52 — ft 

** ??.. P 5 !*? M 22 2371 40%39%40ft + M 


340 8 
97 23ft 
» 15% 


44 31 Petrie 180 37 14 504 37% 

28% 24% PelRs £770162 60 26% 

17 14 PelRs Pf TJ7 9J 16 16% 

6 2ft Plrlnv .95*392 31 3ft 

53% 33% Pfleer 188 11 IS 1310 48ft 

24 12% PheipD 129 21% 


12% 2 vIStorT 1001 2ft 2ft 2ft 

88% 38% StOfW 80 J 79 B7M 871* B7M— % 

21% 17% StrtMln 72s 48 a0 18% IBM 18ft + ft 

19% 14V* SlrhfRt 70 65 40 61 17% 171* 17% + V* 

7ft 3% SuovSll - 32 5% 5ft 59* 

3? 26ft SunCIl 88 IJ II 21 33 32ft 32V*— % 
mEI . 73 10ft 10 10ft + ft 

"CO £30 67 10 335 48% 48 48% + ft 

nCpf £25 £3 9 W0 98ft 99% +1U. 

ndstr 170 X8 12 243 47V* 47 47V* 

nMn 923 6% 6% 6% 

nM pf 1.19 158 619 7% 7% 7% 

nTrst M0 34 18 34 33% 33% - ft 

prvalus 199k 19 199* + % 

PMId 88 1.1 13 64 44ft 44ft 44ft— ft 

lank .90 67 22 11 15 15 15 — M 


6% Sun El 
43% SunCo 


11% PhllaEI £20 168 6 2243 tS 
DV* PhllE Pf 370 123 100Z 31 

25% PhllE Pf 480 12J 300z 34 


14% 14% — M 


40ft PhllE Pf 770 137 
67ft 52ft PhllE pf X75 112 
lit* 9ft PhllE pf 181 1X1 
10% 7% PMIE Pf M3 1£7 
60ft 46 PhllE Pt 775 138 
1 0ft 79* PhllE pi 1J8 137 
115 91 Plllie Pf 15J5 133 

19 61 PhllE Pf 9J2 1£J 

74 54V* PhllE pf 9 JO 132 

60ft 47 PMIE pf 770 1X2 
60 46ft PMIE pf 7J5 1X2 
Dft 15ft PhllSub M3 63 
95V* 73% PhllMr 470 69 
2S% 13% Phllpln 80 28 
62 33V* PtilllnpflTO 17 


J* Z'v* B lift S^rvS 

?S? fSS f5£ +’ 2^ 16ft & 


112 70(b 66ft 65ft 66ft +1 

HI !B4 10% 10% 10%— ft 

[£7 no 10ft 10ft 10ft + M 

38 338158ft 58ft 58ft 

3JJ 37 10% 9% 9% 

I3J 502114ft 114ft I14ft 

'£2 502 77% 77% 77% +1 

3JS 72 70ft 72 -W 

33 940z 59% 99% 59% + % 

32 WOz 58% 58% 58% + % 

63 12 3021 20% 20% + % 

69 ID 1560 82 81M Bl%— % 

28 14 104 24% 24% 24% + 9* 

17 1 61 61 '61 +1 


issuer 

am 32 %|£t& 

2%KS i^Mw 1 

17ft 14% Swank 
21ft 16ft Svbron 


108% 90ft SunCpf £25 £3 
49ft 40 Su ndstr 170 37 


iunMpf 1.19 158 
iunTrst M0 37 
uprValus 

uaMkf 88 1.1 13 
iwank .90 &J 22 


lift 25% 

38% 25M 
Dft 16V* 

10% 6ft 
569* 37ft Wa 
30ft 18% Wa 
25% 17% Wk 
39% 28% Wa 
39ft 25% Wa 
26% 17% 

32% 10% 

46ft 30ft 
Dft 15% 

28 ft 189* 
24ft 16ft 
66% 38% 

28% 20ft 
12% 8% 

12ft 4ft 
23% 17ft 
20 19ft 
32ft 22 
A2ft 39ft 
SDft 41 


17 U I 54 27V* 27ft 27ft + ft 

170 3J 9 SD 31% 31ft 31% — ft 

70 27 12 31ft 21% 21ft 

95 8% 8ft B% 

38 J 25 B7B 51ft 51 51ft 

84 1.7 17 S99 25ft 25ft 2Sft— ft 

H80 204x 24ft 24 24 + M 

85 13 16 70 34% 34 34% +1 

U« 47 7 70 15% 35% 35% — ft 

78 17 13 481 24% 24% 24%- M 
1345 31ft 30ft 31 + ft 

188 37 13 4784 39% 39 39ft + % 

176 7.9 9 150 21ft 20% 21ft + ft 

178 48 7 34 24% 23% 24% + % 

281 IM 8 72 22V* 21% 21%— ft 

.92 IJ 19 840 62% 61% 62 — ft 

36 IJ 11 192 24% 24% 24% + ft 

30 2.1 * 3 9% 9% 9% 

8 6ft 6..- 6ft + M 

JOB 17 11 104 20% mt> 20% — ft 

151 19% 19% 19%— M 

459 Oft 31% 32ft + ft 

280 43 7 225 56ft 56ft 56ft 

4J08 9.0 12 49% 49% 49%— ft 

£80 1X9 II 99 25% 25ft 25% — ft 


76JD 

56X5 

Feb 

5880 

59X0 

7140 

SSM 

Mar 

5825 

58X0 

7560 

57X5 

May 

5965 

60X2 

76X0 

5720 

Jul 

60X0 

60X0 

5887 

5765 

AUO 

58X0 

SBX0 


Est. Sales 4790 Prev. Sales 4771 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 6757 up 140 


280 43 7 
4JM 97 
£80 10-9 11 


16V* Svbron 170 5J 13 1028 51ft Dft 20ft 
30% Svbrnpf 2A0 67 B36V*35ft36+ft 

lift SymsCp 17 6 13ft 13ft 13ft 

41% Syntax 1.92 £2 15 2053 60% 60ft 60ft + ft 

30% SV9C0 36 .9 16 219 Dft 38 38 - ft 


lift PhllPts 170 &J 8 4588 12% 17M 12ft 


2J% 22% PTrtPlId l*te 43 96 24’ 

Dft 29% PhllVM 80 17 II 39 25 

35% 23% PledAs J8 .9 9 110 31- 

25ft 14% Pier I 17 22 24 

56% 36% Plbbry 1J6 £0 12 587 52 

34 22% Pioneer 134 4j 5 816 25= 

26% 13ft PlonrEI .I7r M 25 14' 

45ft 29% PltnvB ID 37 11 440 AT 

90 611* PltnBpf £12 £7 3 80 

13V* 9% PIHstn 837 IZ 1 

16% 8% PkeiRs JO 13 17 117 151 

12V* 7 Plantm ,16b IJ 13 56 101 

13% 8% Playboy 13 5 9> 

28% 19ft Plesey .94e 43 14 1 221 

22% 13% PogoPd 70 43 32 300 14 


96 24ft 34% 34%— ft 


SOft 30% TDK 
36% 25% TECO 
12% 7% TGIF 
21% 12ft TNP 
26% 18V* TRE 
8 1ft 66ft TRW 
7% 1ft TacBoat 


J7e 7 13 33 33 33 — ft 

£36 73 9 244 32% 32V* Dft + ft 

15 74 1S?% 10ft Wft 

MS 73 8 14 17% 17M 17% + ft 

170 43 15 49 23% Dft 23% — ft 

370 19 11 M 77ft 76% 77 + M 

61 2 1% 2 


29ft 23% WelFM £80 1X9 11 59 25% 25V* 25%— ft 

19M 12 Wend vs 31 13 16 2166 16% 15% 16 — ft 

27ft 17 WestCa 88 1.9 14 359 Dft 25% 2S%— % 

45 35 WstPtP 230 58 14 32 40% 40W 40% + % 

14ft 9% WalctT g 174 30 » 12% 12% 12% + ft 

B 3 WnAlrL 5IWT3 7% 7V* 7% 

WlAIrwt 7D 

WAlrpf £00 83 42 

W Air of £14 1X1 1418 

WCNA 238 

WPoef 10 1 

WUnten 935 

WnUnpf 5 

WnuPfC 5 

WnUPfS 121 

WnU pfE 94 

WUTlpf 3 

WUTlPlA 25 


Ckimency Options 


Jag .29 

PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE ^ 

OnftanA Strike 

ifndeiiylng Price Coll* — Last Pals— Last 

Sen Dec Alar Sep Dec Mar 
1UO0 Bi-Ms* powUraints per unR. 

B Pound 115 2570 r 25.10 r t 

139.96 12s 1450 r r r r 

13936 135 r r r 0.15 370 575 

13936 140 130 480 r 170 r 

139.96 145 0.15 £75 r r r 

50700 Canadian DoHars-cndsper unit. 

COollr 71 r r r r 0.11 

7338 73 030 r r r 077 

7338 74 r 037 r r r 

7138 74 r am s r r- 

t£j«i West German Marks-cents per unit 


Prev. Day Open lnt .1302 up 14 
SILVER (CONVEX) 

5700 tray oz.-cents per tray az. _ ... 

11837 5737 Sep 6297 6317 6217 6227 —103 

6467 6187 Oct 6263 —107 

1ZM7 5900 Dec 642J 649.1 6337 63X0 —107 

T2157 5957 Jail 639J — W£ 

Iran 6077 Mar 6567 6567 64U 6487 — WJ 

10487 6717 May 6577 5677 6617 5577 — 117 

9457 6337 Jul 6757 6757 67X0 6663 —11-1 1 

9407 6417 Sep 6893 6B97 6847 6777 — 1IJ 

7997 6607 Dec 7W7 7007 6977 692J -113 

7897 6787 Jan 69X3 —113 

7707 6777 Mar 7197 7193 7177 7093 —113 

7S£» 6937 .May 7213 —127 

Est. Sales 1X000 Prev.Sates 20818 
Prev. Day Open InL 74J19 up 505 
PLATINUM CHYME) 

5Q trovo*.- do ham per trove*. 

34770 3£»Jt Sep 33X50 —1130 

39370 25070 Oct 34X00 34270 33230 334J0 — Hid 

37X50 257 JO Jan 34370 34470 33470 33630 —1170 

35770 36430 APT 346JD 34630 33X00 33970 —11709 

34£ua 27X00 Jul 34X90 39070 34X50 34X30 —1170 

36000 30X50 Oct 35570 35570 35170 347.10 —1170 

Est. sales 7714 Prev. Sola 7J2i 
Prev. Dav Open lnt 17769 op 1722 


10670 106 JS — £70 
10XJS 10X25 —270 
10930 109 JS — £70 
11030 10930 — £70 
11X80 109JS — £70 


GOLD (COMEX) 

iso troy az.- dai Ian per trey az.* 

34X50 31530 Sen 33570 33570 33570 33120 — *50 

<9370 29770 Oct 33X60 34X60 33AJ0 337J0 —570 

48930 30130 Dec 344J0 34578 34030 34130 —5.70 

485-50 30670 F*b 35070 35X00 34570 34670 -*7B 

49670 31470 APT 33170 35170 35070 39030 —5.90 

439J0 33030 JIM 257.10 35830 35670 2SL4® -670 

42X80 33170 Aug 360JO +1970 

395.70 33570 * 0(3 36X40. MX40 36600 36U0 —420 

mm 34200 Dec 37X30 373JO 37230 37080 -4J0 

38X80 35570 Apr 3BM0 —630 

39450 38870 Jim 387.10 -680 

Est Soles 2S70D Prev. Saha 3X751 
Prev. Dav Open im.T37.765 up 833 



Financiai 


US T. BILLS (IMMI 
Si million- pts of 10Q pet. 


36 Dft Tandy 
15% 12% Tndvcft 


16 677 34ft 33% 33%—% 
12 14 13% 13ft 13% + ft 


17r IJ k 5S mw- ft I2T? 12 M W% 13ft 13% + ft 

sf S" - \ SSJss? ^ ,J,, 5 

an 19 220% Tetavn 9 m £47% 246 246 —2 

* !■? !? IPS ?l% + w ^ 5 ™ - H,J, ag$]5S2*i£i + v ’' 


TV* 7 Ptantrn ,16b 13 13 56 10% 10% 10% — V* 

ra* 8% Playboy 13 5 9ft 9ft Oft + ft 

25 325 HSL 42 14 1 22ft 22ft 22ft + ft 

25 ,80 47 n 300 14 13% 13%- % 

2?* SISrr POWW T -5S 11 123 480 32ft 31% 31%—% 

3Sf* E on S. r ^ 80 8 25 140 lift live lift— ft 

?1ft 15ft Poptol 70 48 7 IB 17% 18 + ft 


“ 'Sj; 'SS '^7 1! I fS §ES i°™' n ^ * 

■ -TV* r ™ .T M T ™ I 45ft 33ft Tmmrn 90* 7 A u HUl *M6 wu mu. 


45ft 33ft Termco £92 78 14 860 39% 39% 39% 


84% 68 Tencor 
33ft 30 Terdyn 
15 9% Tesara 


Toncpr 780 BJ 


101 83ft 02ft 82% — ft 
916 73 22% 22% — ft 


55 ESEl 01 •“ 7 T8 17% II + ft 

u 27 1JS i7v« i7ft + V* 
53 1 J0 98 B 96 20 19% 19ft — ft 

£60 107 ■ 24 23 Vj 24 + ft 

J5% 30 PorGpf 480 119 17 34ft 34 34 

5S 5 EsrSLP ,la 10 34 33+4 33%— ft 

S' 4 5 £ o llt ?. 48 14 204 35V* 33% 35ft +lft 

34 22 PotmEI £1* X9 9 538 31ft 31 31ft + ft 

5^ Erf" 1 !* .a «» 9 23ft 23V» 23ft — % 

* ?8% Prjrnrk £20 5J 8 34 38ft 38ft 38V* 

•gf 'JS „ 14 868 1BV* 17% 17% — ft 

CT* 16ft PrlmM s 79 J 33 713 36ft 36 36% + ft 


U , 9% Tetoro 80 41 399 9% 9% 9% + ft 

27V* 20% Tesorpf £16 1X1 20 21V* 21% 21% — V* 

«ft 32% Texaco 370 8J 33 3439 36% 36% 36% 4 % 

38% 31ft TxABc 132 48 9 33 32ft 31% 32 

46% 30% TexCm 136 48 7 1698 32ft 32% 32V*— V* 

39 26% TexEst £20 68 9 329 34% 34% 34M— % 

58ft 52 TxETpf 6AM1X7 10 57% 56% 56ft— % 

34% 25 Texlnd 30b £B 13 13 28% 28% 28% — ft 


329 34% 34% 34M— % 
10 57% 54% 56ft — % 
13 28% 28% 28% — ft 


1 J T8 9 23ft 23VS 23ft — % 

5-7 8 34 38ft 38V* 38V* 

14 868 18% 17% 17% — ft 

J 33 718 36ft 36 36% + % 


146% 86ft Tex Inst 270 £1 13 272 97% 96V* 97ft + ft 
4% 1 Tex Int 1236 3% 3% 3% 

23ft 14% TexOGS .18 M 10 81D T5ft 15ft 15% + M 


50% ProctG £60 43 15 1716 57% 57ft 57% — % 


35ft 28ft TxPac 80 IJ 
31% 24% TexUtll 232 X7 
i 4% 2 Text! In 


9 31% 31V* 31ft— ft 
713 29 28% 29 

73J 4ft 4V, 47. 


15 I PrdRs* 

2% 2V* PruRCn 

10% 10 PruR un 
24ft 17V* PSvCol £00 97 
70 53V* PSCol Pf 7.15 117 
21ft 16ft PSCol Pf £10 1X4 
10% 6% PSlnd 170 11.1 

9 6 P5lnpf 174 137 

8% Aft PSInpf ITS 123 
63 46 PSInpt X53 148 

8ft 3V* PSvNH 
16% 7V* PSNHpf 
17ft 7% PNHpfB 
24% 11 PNHRfC 
22 9% PNHpfD 

Dft 9ft PNH pfE 
19% 8% PNH pfF 

20% »% PNHptG 

29V* Dft PSvNM 238 103 


86 13V* 13V* 13V* + ft 
22 2% 2ft 2ft— V* 


59ft 30ft Textron 130 £3 12 381 54V* 53% 54 —IV* 
M 32ft Textrpl £08 33 4 59 58ft S*ft— ft 


in mu in imi. 1^ I , 1' 4 S'* ThOCk 

12 12^- ^ I 34% 15V* TherrnE 


£00 97 9 2D 22% D 32% 

7.15 117 20007 AS 65 65 -1 

2-W 108 4 Dft 20ft 20ft — ft 

170 11.1 11 609 9% 8% 9 — % 

174 137 mu 8 8 8 

1-55 1X5 60z 8% 8% 8% + ft 

833 148 220z 59 58% 59 +1 

3 527 Bft 8 8 — ft 

400z 15ft 15ft 15ft 


Oft 30V* Thai Bet 136 £6 16 
19% 13% Thom In 38b 16 10 
ra* 13ft ThmMed 80 £6 10 
22% 17% Thrifty 80 £2 12 
34% 13ft TWwtr JO 53 
10% 5M n serin 
61ft 40 Time 170 13 17 
Dft 14ft Tlmplc 17 


£08 33 4 59 58ft Sift— ft 

94 1 9% 9% 9% 

27 105 34ft 34 34 — ft 

136 £6 16 4 37% 37V* 37V* + ft 

68b 38 TO 17 19 18ft 18% — % 

80 £6 10 42 15V* 15% 15M + % 

80 £2 12 80 19% 18% 19 

JO 53 1661 16 15V* 16 + ft 

T29I9 7% 7 7% + % 

170 13 17 1358 57% 56ft 57M— % 
17 73 19ft 19% 19% 


WstflE M0 13 1235760 
Westvc M2 £S 10 106 
Werem M0 43 24 743 
Weyrpf 270 77 26 

Weyrpr A50 9J IB 

viWhPH 30 

vfWhPltpf 2SBte 

Whirl pi 270 42 10 115 
White 130 47 74 

White pfOTO 73 2 

Whilchl 11 16 

WhHtak 30 25 12 145 
WleDIdt 37 II 

WIHrd n 13 3 

WlllcxG 6 46 

william 180 45 16 497 

W llm El 269 

WllshrO .10 13 6 

WlnDIx 1J4 4J 13 48 

Winners JO 27 9 209 
Winner IBB 74 

WlnterJ 63 

WlscEP £48 6J B 139 

WISE Pf X90 10J SOOz 

WlscPL £76 73 9 37 

WtecPS £86 78 7 20 

Wltce 188 41 9 10 

WoivrW J4 IJ 3342 
Watvrth £80 *7 10 908 
WrMAr 76 

WyleLb J3 27 II 132 
Wynns 30 £2 8 27 


2V* — % 
22 %— % 
21ft— % 
3%— % 
128 

14% + % 
37% 

41 + % 

7 

12% + ft 
35 + ft 

13V* 

39% +lft 
38% — % 
25% — % 
40ft + % 
49 — ft 
8% + % 
16ft +lft. 
47% + % 
31% + % 
40 — % 

29ft 
23ft 
lift 

12ft + ft 
13V* — % 
30%— M 
3%— ft 
6% 

35%— % 
10% — ft 
5% + % 
7ft 
35ft 

87 — % 
36ft— % 
381* 

35% + ft 
13ft +2 
49% + % 
4%— M 
11 % + % 
1B%— % 


□Mark 

32 

r 

r 

r 

r 

0X8 

36X0 

33 

r 

r 

r 

r 

0.18 

36X0 

34 

1.93 

£56 

r 

r 

r 

36X0 

35 

1X5 

1X3 

262 

0X5 

r 

3»xe 

36 

027 

120 

r 

023 

r 

36X0 

s 

0X8 

0X3 

168 

r 

s 

36X0 

38 

r 

as 

1X7 

r 

r 


12S7N Frwcn FranawlBlM of a cent pot gptt. 

F Franc 120 _ t r 180 r 

4JSUW Japanese Yeo-lOtth* af a coed pot wilt 
jYen m r 282 r r 

4£i7 <2 OJT DM r 0.13 

'£17 43 075 X54 170 075 

4£]7 44 r 0JI r r 

623M Swta Frapcbcefits pot mH. 


*329 

4379 

4179 

Total call VOL 
Total pat voL 


9323 

8694 


91X8 


93X6 



93X7 

8SJ7 

Dec 

92X2 

92X5 

97,72 



9259 


-Mar 

9250 

9250 

9287 


+XS 




92.14 


92J» 



92X1 

80X0 

Sep 






91X8 

89X5 

Dec 






9129 

8958 

Mar 






9095 

9068 

Jun 




9QJ7 

+X3 

st. Sotos 

£008 Prev.Sates 6757 





Prev. Dav Open InL 37707 off 457 
IS YR. TREASURY (CUT) 
siaoToa prin- on X33mti of mpet 


88-21 

75-18 

Sep 

87-.T7 

87-17 

87-7 

87-12 

45 

87-13 

75-13 

Dec 

8+17 

8+17 

8+8 

8+14 


1+2 

73-14 

Mar 

85-13 

85-19 

85-13 

85-17 


US-7 

74-30 

Jun 

8+21 

84-24 

8+31 

8+23 

-HI 

8+4 

80-7 


83-29 

84-1 

8+29 



83-11 

80-2 

Dec 



81-10 

+9 

Est. Soles 


Prev.Sates 15X08 



| Prev. Day Open inL suw off 4373 
US TREASURY BONDS (CRT) 

I (8pcf-S100700-pts&32ndJOf IDOpct) 
19-12 57-W Sep IB-9 189 

78-13 57-8 Dec 77-5 77-4 

77-29 57-2 Mar 76-2 766 

766 5 629 Jun 75-3 75-5 

75-31 56-29 SOP 748 74-0 

74-2* 56-15 Dec tyi 73-14 

7+15 5+27 MOT 

7+26 63-12 Jun 

72-27 «»4 Sep 

72-18 62-2* Dec 

69-27 67-5 Mar 

Est, Sales Prev.Saiesl4X674 

Prev. Day Open lot J1X995 off 460 
GNMA(CBT) 

xioxoaoprin- pn xjbxtoaf inpct 


77-29 78-2 
7+25 77-7 
7525 76 
7 +87 75-1 
74 7+7 



SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
points and cent, 

19X00 1SW Sep 18X45 18X80 18X15 HBL75 +J0 

20X85 17570 Dec 190JD I9M5 19065 191 JO +J0 

20375 19X10 Mar 19180 19X85 19338 19X85 -K10 

20630 19430 Jun I96JS 19X20 19X30 19673 +40 

Est. Sales 30J33 Prev.Sates 37,184 
Prev. Day Open lnt 4X032 offM9 
i VALUE LH4EIKCBT) 
potato and conn 

21X20 1B6L73 Sep 19935 199.90 199.10 19980 +33 

217J05 20030 • Dec 201*5 20X10 20X30 202J0 - 

2St9M ■ 2D4J5 Mtte. . . 20640 

Est.Satos Prev.Sates £977 

Pnrv. Day Open lnt. HUO offSa 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
pobinandcwds-. -■ 

17815 . *135 Sep- 10933 10980 109JW 10945 +.15 

11930 1IUB -Dec. 110X5 11 LOO 11X40 11X95 +.18 

mg 10*30 Mar nzeo uxao ms 11255 +j>s 

12000 J1373 +Jun 114J0 114J0 11X95 n+15 

E*t5ates SM6 f*w.5ate3 6897 
Pr»v. Day Open tnL 1X393 up 194 


aoso 

, _ . g&AKlf 

P*"* 4 ** 1,493.10 

[ DJ. Futures 

Com. Research Bureau. . 219.00 

Moodies - base 100 : Dec 31,1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Rulers : ban TOO ; Sep. Ifl, 1937. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


. r— NaUraded- s— No option ottered. 
Last Is premium (Purchasa price). 
Source; AP. 


Cotmwfities 


/tag. 2 9 

High Low BuT* Ask ChUe 

SUGAR 

French francs per metric ton 


154 r 284 r 

Coil open lnt. 227856 
Pot open InL 1X18*9 


77-26 

59-13 

Sep 

77-15 

77-15 

77 

7+28 

59+ 

Dec 

7+23 

7+24 

7+18 

7+8 

5+20 

Mar 

35-24 

73-25 

7+16 

7+17 

5+25 

Jun 

75-3 

7+2 

7+M 

75-2 

65 

See 




Est.Satos 


Prev. Sales 

91 



Prev. Day Open lot. 4J98 off 6 


NY CSCE: 

NYCE: 

COMEX: 

NYME: 

KCBTt 

NYFE: 



55% 35ft Xerox £00 5.7 14 4799 5Zft 52ft 52"* + % 


55V* 46% Xerox pf 585 93 , 

29 19% XTRA 34 26 13 


2227 55% 55% 55% + ft 
49 25 Dft 24%— % 


1800 7,390 M9Z 1800 +D <** 

1800 1795 M9S 1805 +19 Oac 

1819 1800 1815 1818 +33 M*F 

1860 1830 1855 1856 +37 M« 

1300 18»S 5/590 1 898 + 40 £*0 

N.T. N.T. 1J34 1355 +35 


London 

Commodities 


Dm Previous 
SUGARS ^ Bk. A* B« ASk 
Sterling par metric tea 
Oct 13200 12800 127 JO 12X00 12630 T27J0 
DK 13500 13100 rax® 13£00 129 jo mm 
Mar 142X0 13730 13730 138X0 13630 137X0 
May 14500 141 J0 T41JD 14180 13930 14X0 
Aug 14930 149 JO 146X0 14680 14130 14500 
Oct 15460 15100 151X0 15180 14960 15080 


2 IMk M. m u. 34 TlmoM IJ6 2J 14 1242 49% 49% 49ft — % 

4 Af" 52 ^ <*, Timken 130a 36 33 34 49% 49% 49% + ft 

f 55 k, S' ^ *ft 4% Tltefi 36 7% 6% 6%— % 

11 21ft Hft — u. I!? 4 S' 1 " Titan Pt 1X0 93 77 10% 10ft 10% + ft 

11 21ft 2M. 21ft - % 2|V1 15* ToWlmi 88 £6 II 104 18% 18ft 19% 


22 18% 17% 17** — ft 

65 19ft 10 19ft 

257 27% 77 27% 


72* ESS* ?84 9J 8 7184 30% 30ft 30% 


15 IS* 4 PJEGpr 180 97 
PSECPf 4.18 11X 
20% 16 PSEG Pt £17 I IX 
63ft 49% PSEG Dt 630 103 
Dft 17% PSEG Pi £43 10J 
loey* 94% PSEGpfl2J5 11 J 
*5^ E?EGpf 780 103 
4ft 2% Puhllch 
75ft 9ft Purtrto .16 1.1 12 
9% 6 PRCem 6 

I?., !2i? p ug»IP 1-76 113 8 


8 14% 14ft 143* — ft 
1001 38 38 38 

494 20 19% 19ft— ft 

SOOz 63ft 63ft 63ft + ft 
4 221* 223* 22% 
1002109 109 109 +1 

I3QZ68V* 67 68% +1% 

42 2ft 2ft 2ft 
IB 14% 143* 143* 

,70 7 6% 7 + % 

546 15 14ft 14% 


21 Vi IS TolEdli 233 T£1 
2% 24% TolEdpf £72 13X 
Wft 22ft TolEdpf 3.75 1X4 
2B 21 TolEd pf 387 1X1 
33% 26% TolEdpf 4JB IM 
20% 14% TolEdpf £36 123 
18% 14% TolEdpf £21 126 
X 8% Tonkas .10 8 

53ft 26 ToatRoi 88b IX 


30 8% Tonkas .10 8 8 ID 27% Z7U 27ft 

53ft 26 TaOfRoi 88b IX 13 26 48% 47ft 48% 

57% 26% T r chalk 1X0 £3 12 730 44ft 44% 44% 

17% 10 Toro CO 80 28 11 65 >6% 16% MV* 


487 28% 20ft 20% + % 
13 20% 28 20% + % 

12 28% 36 28 — % 

8 26V* 2SV* 26% + % 

1 Dft 32ft 32ft + % 
5 18% 18% 18% + % 

2 17% 17% 17% 

ID 27% Z7ft 27ft— % 
26 48% 47ft 48% + % 


30ft 24% ZotoCp M2 4.9 

23% 19% Zalrt+A 30 IB 

71% Bft Zapata .12 18 

57% 31% Zovres 88 J 

27 17% ZenJthE 

21% 15ft Zeros J2 IJ 


353* 22ft Zumln M2 £7 12 


X 41 f 26 27% 27 27 

JO 19 1 21 21 21 —ft 

.12 18 61 421 •% 83* 8% — % 

88 J 16 98 52% 52% 52% + % 

12 402 19ft 18% 19ft + 3* 

X2 1 J 14 9 19% 19% 19% — % 

J2 £7 12 57 35V* 35ft 35% + ft 


N1SE tfigh&TLons 


Esl. vol j 2X0Q lots of- 50 Ian*. Prev. actual Volume: 3661 tats of 50 Ions, 
sales: £200 tots. Open Interest: 22848 
COCOA COCOA 

French francs perlOOkg Sterling per metric ton 

Sep 2X60 2X25 £014 £026 — 40 Sep 1J53 L7}7 JJJ3 1J14 

Dec £075 2X35 2X35 £407 — 33 Dec 1J45 1,712 TJ3J 1J21 

Ator 3X60 £4)55 £050 2X60 —30 Mar 1,775 1.734 1,738 1J39 

May N-T. N.T. £060 — — 3U 1JM 1,75a 1J55 1J36 

Jly N.T. N.T. £070 — ily IJD 1J67 1J64 1J67 

Sep N.T. N.T. £080 — — 30 Sep M9S IJM 1.772 1775 

Dec N.T. N.T. £080 _ — 30 Dec 1X00 MOO 1.777 1J79 

Est. vol.: 55 lots of 10 Ians- Prev. actual Volume: 5X99 tots of 10 ton*, 
sales: 43 tots. Open Interest: SIS 

COFFEE COFFEE 

French francs per lMks Sterling per metric ton 

Sep N.T. MT- UTS 1X60 -25 Sep 1631 1390 1388 1392 


CommoijHties 


HONG-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
U33 per ounce 

„ Htafa LOW 
Aug _ N.T. N.T. 

S)5_ N.T. N.T. 

Oct _ N.T. H.T. 

Dec _ 340X0 340X0 
FMi „ N.T. M.T. 

API _ N.T. N.T. 

Jun. - 359X0 3S9JB0 
Volume: 26 lots of 

ulStor* 6 * OLD Ftm,Res 


1J14 IJD 1J53 
1J2I 1764 1365 
173? 1J73 IJ74 
IJM 1J87 L789 


1^4 1-738 1^9 1J73 IJ74 

1J54 1J55 UM 1J87 L789 

1J67 1J64 1J67 IJM 1J95 

IJ75 1.772 1775 1795 1399 

1700 1.777 1J79 1X01 1X82 


S 1 Taaca 
17ft Bft Towle 


IS! EUlSl 1 " I?. A 17 945 '7*» 13% 13ft + % 


31% 20% Pure lot 
10ft 6% Pyre 


205 21ft 21** 21% + ft 
8 226 7 6% 6% 


+ % flu, 35v, TayRUs 

+ ft S' 4 1 3?J. rocrs ■ 32 1J 

T !? 23 8% TWA 

+ ft 16 123* TWA Pf £25 1+0 

34% 18% TWApfB 2J5 6X 


349 3% 3ft 3%+ % 

15 9% 9ft 9% + % 

26 5126 35% 34% 35 — % 

J2 13 14 5D 21% 21% 21%— V* 
14241 22ft 22 22 — % 

L2S 150 121 15% 14% 15 

J56X 958 33ft 33 33 — % 


NEW HIGHS 


53 33 QuakOs Ml 28 13 379 JDft 50% 50ft + ft 

OT* 16% OuakSO 40 U II 35 20% 20ft 20% 
20 201 7ft 7% 7% 


»* 24ft Traram 164 5J 13 492 28% 28ft 28% + % 
21% 16% Tron Inc £22 10J 21 20V* 20ft 20% 


10% 6% Quanex 20 

34ft 25% Ouestar 160 5J 11 

261* 14% GkRall J4a l.l 15 


9% 6% RBInd X4f 6 

49% 34 RCA 1X4 £2 
40 29% RCA Pf £50 9J 

112 79% RCA pf 4X0 £8 

38% 31V* RCA pf 365 9J 
9% 6ft RLC JO 38 
4ft 3V* RPC 
19ft 12% RTE 
14V* 8% Radio* 


1X4 1 U 13 5229 47% 44% 46% +Jft 
TM 9J 30z 38ft 38ft 38ft 


JO 28 15 177 8% 8% Bft + ft 

.. , , _ 17 4ft 4% 4% + ft 

36 XI 9 25 18% 18 18 — ft 

■ 11 30 13% 13ft 13% 


16% 

11 R It Ref 

IX3elOL4 

18 

17ft 

B% RecnEa 



14 

12% 

7% Redmn 

60 

36 

16 

12% 

1% 

43ft 

flu. Reece 



35 

27% RridlC 

XD 

£1 

13 

10% 

4% RoeAJr 



3 

3 

1ft R#o*w»f 




12% 

5% RpGyps 

60 





164 



34% 

24% RepBk 

164 

5X 

7 

30 

23ft RepBk Pf£13 



24% 

15% RstlCof 

62 



33% 

22% Revco 

XO 



IS 

9% Revere 




47ft 

32% Revten 

1X4 




» 21V* Revlnpf 

24ft 17ft Rextwn 
16% lift Rexnrd 


,, 20 201 7ft 7% 7ft Sales flgures are unatfletaL Yearty Mohs and taws reflect 

ii is raS ra* S the previous D weeks plus the cuiront week, but not the latest 

^ " trading doy. where a split er stock dividend omountlno to 25 

R | percent or more has been paid, the year's Woh-tow range and 

~ 3 ^7 " dividend are shawm lor the now stuck only. Unless otherwise 

£2 13 8229 47% 44% 46% +2ft noted, rates ot dividends are annual dtetwre e ments based on 

9j 3dz 38ft Dft 38ft the tateef dedarattan. 

9J *3 'STft'STft’jTft^ft o— dividend also estralslJl 

28 is 177 s% ‘*8% Bft + 2 b — annual not* of dividend Plus stock dlvklentiyi 

17 4ft 4% 4% + % c — Uguktatlno dividend-/! 

* it » cw— ealtod/1 

] J 38 W 13V I39ta d-Mwvflfvlif imH it 

£3 14 958 43% 42% 47% — ft » — new v«ariy lowji 

D ES13 e% 7% 8 —ft e — divtaend declared or paid In preceding 12 monttisJI 

49 9 1 T' 4 " 12ft + ft n— dividend In Canadian hinds. subted »15% non-reswcnce 

108 4% 4 4% + % tax. 

*10 ii% n» — •— dividend declared after spJH+jp or stock dividend. 

J-i t2 1127 5lft 50% 51% + ft l — dividend paid this voor, omitted, deferred, or no odtai 
ilx ?9 rr& lift lift 15 *** dtvWend "”«*lng. 

17J l ib% 18% 18% 11 — «Evtdend declared or paid Ihls year, an accamulattve 

108 18 3 12% 12ft 17%—% issue wtttidtvMendski arrears. 

16 ia ’S* at Su. "ewteuie In the past 52 weeks. The htgh-tow range begins 

** to « nVm BVh Bill wffh Iho rtir_ ■ A - » 

33 7 111* 11% 11% wn irwstort ol trading. 

12 ft S Ti, nd —next day dellverv. 

2-1 W 7 M M M - % P/E -prlcMornlnge ratio. 

n S% S* 5* r— dividend declared er paid In preceding 13 monlhs. Plus 

3X 9 164 8 Tft 8 + % stack dividend. 

15 5 .if iS* ££ 03: 1 $ “—stock spill. Dividend beolns with daw of sMlt. 

5X 7 144 33 32% 32ft + ft sis — sales. 

lis 4 lift ill* lift + ft !■— divtaend paid Instock In preceding H months estimated , 

XI 24 1205 26 25% 25ft — ft cash value on ex-dividend or ex -distribution dale. 

2 144 14% 14% 14ft— % U “ - new yearly high. 

+1 14 7497 45 44% 44% + % v — lradliw hnitwi 


AsdDGds wl 
Bril Pal 
ClevElpfL 
Deltona Cp 
G ruman 
ITT CP pfO 
NatGvPsm 
PSE 1235pf 
Twin Disc 
Wart worth 


AvalonCpn 
Britrapp 
COtan Penn 
EaumkPtC 
GuKweut 
Medtronic 
Nucor 
Royal Dutch 
Un Carbide 


BemisCo 
BrawnGrp 
Craig Cons 
Gaolnc 
dfSUdeopf 


Benpfl Sot 
Caesars wid 
Crown Crt 
GoPacpf 
Harh-Bncp 


N.T. 

N.T. 

1X15 

1X40 

— 251 

1.915 

1.905 


1910 

— 38 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1.985 

1.985 

— 30 

N.T. 

N.T. 


2X05 

— 35 

N.T. 

N.T. 

mm. 

£040 

— 29 

N.T. 

N.T. 

mm 

2X50 

— IS 

N.T. 

N.T. 


£895 

UnchTl 


Margceiodpf MorKnud 
OvemTr PrlmeMol 

StellTms Svbron Pi 

UnPark Mn WestghEi 


ggtoPy 1X0 2J 14 950 43% 42% 47% — ft 

9V* 5% Romod 57 2013 Bft 7% 8 ft 

16% tonoo X4 4J 9 " 9 17ft 17% »7ft + ft 
7% 2% FtanarO 108 4ft 4 4ft + ft 

84 6 26 129 75% 74ft 74ft— 1% 

17% 9% Ravmk 10 n% 11% ill* 

53% 36% Raythn 160 XI 12 1127 51% 50% 51% + ft 

lift 7% ReodBt 80 SJ 177 7ft 7% 7ft + ft 

21% 1«* RdBotp!£T2 12X 19 17% 17% 17%— ft 

24ft M F.dBatpf 3J9IB17J 1 18% 18% 18% 

16% II R It Ref M3el(L4 10 3 12% 12% 17%— ft 

17ft 84* RecnEa 14 169 9ft 9 9ft — ft 

30 36 16 » Bft Bft Bft — ft 

35 J ,1ft „ fc l, e 

XD £1 13 7 38 38 38 — ft 

5 887 10ft 10ft 10% 

3 1ft RacAwt 79 7% 2% 2% 

12% 5% RpGypS JO 18 9 1*4 8 7%8+% 


X4 4-1 14 7497 « + ft v-lradlno hotted. 

.70 £0 15 101 23% 23% 23% ^ — In bankruptcy er receivership or being raoroonlzod un- 

84 £9 10 174 15 14% is + % der ihe Bonkrupicv Act. or securities assumed by suchcom- 


32% 26 Raynlns 180 5X 7 3339 28 27% 27%— ft 

41ft 27% RevMII 1X0 £8 9 345 35% 35% 35% + ft 

38% 26% Renvcfc 188 4X 12 1919 37 36% 36%—% 
Dft 22 RIleAld JO £0 15 1191 24% 24ft 24% + ft 
Tft 3% RwfQk n 8 D 3% 3ft 3ft — ft 

36% 28% RobShw 1.12 3J B 27 35 34% 35 + % 

44% 26 Rabtsn 160 5,9 53 77ft 27% 27% — % 

24% 5V» v[ Robins 290 Bft 8 .Bft + % 


24% 15ft RochG £20 9.7 


125 22% 22% 224*— ft 


!7%— % Dantes. 

SSii* wd — wtwn distributed. 
JSS+ft wl— when issued. 

3ft— ft WW— with warrant*. 

x-ex-dJvktendor™^,^. 
8ft + % — ev-cHstrlbutbin, 

34*— ft xw— without wWronls 


42% 29% RochTI 284 6-6 10 42 37ft 27 37ft + ft y — ex-dividcnd and sates In full. 

41% 57% Rockwl 1.12 17 10 1344 41 ' 40% 40te— % yld _ tf i eW . 

147 103 RklnlPf 1J5 .9 1144 144 144 +1% 

73 55% RofimH £20 38 II 90 65% 65% 65%-% z - sales In lull 


EntmcEng FalrcMd Falratiidpf GCA Cp 

Harnshfgrpf KanGasEl Matsush El ■ McDer220Pt 

RlverOakn 


Brazilian Officii 
14% Inflation in August 

The Associated Press 

BRASILIA — Finance Minister DiLson Fun- 
aro, confirming dismal forecasts in the press, 
said Thursday that inflation for August would 
be 14-perceni, the worst single month in Brazil’s 
history. 

Thai would bring ibe annual rate 10 about 
227 percent, up 10 points from July. Mr. Fun- 
aro, who took office Monday after a major 
shakeup of top Brazilian economic officials, 
told reporters Thursday that “we are going to to 
work hard, maintain price controls ana take 
operational measures that really allow .us to 
contain inflation.” 

Brazil, the Third World’s most indebted na- 
tion — with about S 103 billion in debts — has 
repeatedly told the International Monetary 
Fund ana private foreign banks that it wiu 
reduce inflation. 

The inflation rate here has been over 200 
percent for more than three years. 


Esl. vol.: 29 tots of 5 Ion*. Prev. ocfual sales: 
53 tots. Open Interest: 411 
Source: Bowse tiu Commerce. 




Strike CaHs-Lsu PuteU* 

Price See Oct Nn Dec Sep Ocl NwDk 
in 12% 1» W* 14% 1716 1* ft % 


COFFEE 

Sterling per metric loa 
Sep 1631 1X90 1XS 

NOV 1674 1631 163 

Jan 1,710 1665 165 

Mar VS) 1695 169 

May 1.755 1J40 1,72 

JtV MB0 1.765 M4I 

Sep 1X00 1X00 MO 


1X92 1641 1642 Oct 
1634 1682 1685 Nov 

!£ 31 

i3S 3! ss 


W«h Low Settle 

IS 5f-I- to- 1 "- 38X9,1 

*>>L N-T. 341X0 

HOC 345-50 34580 345X0 

Volume: ID tola of 10Bu7 
KUALA LUMittin RUBBER 
MotoviiM cents par Mb 

bS°“ A* £2"** 

Ss 182X0 183X0 18250 

E= iSS » S3 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 


Volume: 3X11 lots ot 5 Ions. 


1X00 1X00 1X28 S*»wo«eeel*ejjMo 


GASOIL 
UX. donors i 


SfJSSS— 14*75 164X0 

■L RSSlOct— 164XD “165X0 16£28 

Mien per metric ton gssas«i_ l»xa jsruo i Sg 

7*735 244X0 244X0 265X0 246X0 247X0 gSfSSep— 148X0 143JS 

242X0 238J5 239X0 239JS 241X6 241J5 SHjSep— .144X0 146X0 14423 

248X0 »L75 237JS 237JU 239 JS 339J0 RSS5Sep_ 139X0 M1X0 J39^ 


23450 234X0 233X0 234X0 230X0 236X0 B 

N.T. N-T- 228X0 H9XB 22620 73320 .H 1 * 


Art 225J3 223X0 724.75 2£>X0 22SJ5 225J5 See 
May N.T. N.T. 212X0 230X0 211X8 228X0 Oct 
Volume : 2.180 krt* of 100 tons. Nov 

Source s: Reuter* onet London Pe/mfoum Ex- Dec 
chanoe foasont. Jan. 


in 

in 

IM 

Wl 

14ft 

1/16 

ft 

ft 

ns 

7 a 

SB 

9ft 

IM 

ft 

7/M 

ft 

no 

3% 

M 

5% 

6% 

n/uit/uni 

us 

T3/163 

A 

3V 

3ft 

3ft 

4ft 

IN 

t/16 

ft 

1ft 

1ft 

7* 

Tft 

■ft 

ns 

lftt 

ft 

im 

_ 

13 

13ft 

19* 

m 


I/M 

ft 

- 

— 

— 

— 


Ixmdon IVIeials 


Volume: 0 lots of 25 tons. 
Source; Routers. 


ToMfcollMljnw 58X19 
Total can Open fed. 511 J7» 

Total pal vWuaw 15*99 
Total nut open int. 4DS5< 

HtohOTK Low 18141 aose«2D-0JB 
Source: CBOE. 


DM Futures 
Options 

* German Mcrt-OSAB marts crab per mart 


Jag. 29 
Ouse Prevloos 

BM A*k Bid Axfe 

ALUMINUM 
Mtadlng Per metric too 

toil 724X0 724X0 724X0 725X0 

747X0 M7X0 iom 7raxa 
CATHODES f HIM Grade) - 

Stertloo ear metric tea Unwfh 

Spy * . . 99H.5D 999X0 996X0 997X0 .+*lWfllh 

Fonjrgrd 1024X0 102430 10SXD 1022X0 ^ 

ggSSeNCATHopas laSSertT °"* 

storting per metric too Sovrco- • 

. J71XO 973X0 968X0 970X0 

Forward 988X8 1000X0 997X0 999X0 

ftorttoowr metric loo ' Trr^. / 

5 ™ SiS U %% BS We8l( 

Start log dot metric tea 

ss-™ sssaffisaims , FR * 


11 

See 

Cofl+SetMe 

Dec MOT 

Sep 

Jag. 29 
Pet»4eRU 
Dec Mm 

34 

2.84 

£59 

111 


029 

060 

35 

1X6 

1X8 

£45 

0X9 

065 

an 

% 

0X9 

1-26 

IJO 

025 

0.91 

1J0 

37 

08) 

0X2 

166 

0.99 

162 

1J4 

38 

— 

062 

1X5 

IM 

£M 

231 

39 

— 

861 

0X5 

— 

£88 

— 


Source: Saloon, Brothers 


ESHmaied lou nL 6.155 
MU: Wed. reL £127 oven M.3&2M 
Pots : WWL *aL £550 bp» taL 30.M9 
Source: CME. 


Start lag dot metric tap Hamers 

FJytNKRJRT - Incoming or- 
fi^Sirirev ounce di« for the West German aigi- 

J53SSS rwenng mtiustry rose ^ percentln 
TIN (standard) July, the industry aewut win coid 

^-^'* r,ne Ss , Sffi5gSSx8 ,0Bifl0 Thursda Y- Domestic ordere rose 24 
For«rd 9050X0 fosixo 9050X0 9051X0 percent from July 1984, while for- 

Igteoper-teteton^ ^ 14 percent, 

f ZZZ? AP «7X0- §bi *e»»oaa^i said. If gave no 


ZI < NC° rd «50XO 

Sternoo per metric ton 
jpg* . 4*7X0 

Forward 501X0 

Source: ap. 



Previous 
BM Ask 

760 ■ mm 

»' gg 

i a 

3 f 

res 7TO 


Treasury BiBs 


Aug. 79 

Prev 
*Wd Yield 
7X7 7X0 

7X6 UndL 
7JS 7X4 


1 









auimn a 




c yy ic ^\-js& 


fifl 



M 1.? I 2 
17 

ua iai i 
M U 21 
24 

M Z6 10 


5H DkmB S3 

?* DtaSth JO J 25 

Digicen 

3«k Dliird JO J 14 

J ls - Diode* 7 

3ft Dir Art n » 

1ft DenwP 
ft DllMPwl 
11*1 Domtrs 

7* Do nitty 3 

lft Driller 

23ft Duccmt JO « 17 
ft Ovrtlop 

137k Dimms J U 11 

13 DurTif ,40 b U 13 

,«• Dyniet J7o 3J I 

lBVk Dvmor JO 24 « 


S3 3 7ft Tto Tto— ft 

J 35 147 37* 34ft 1M- to 

1 lto lto lto 
J 14 15 43V. «to A3ft + to 

7 W 3% 31* m 

» u a » m 


IS: 6r«Cl» 

15% 11 GKCda 

** XtftGlIS 


-106 o io » nw m% him + <4 

■32 1175 lA. 1<% la + 'ft 

■40 1J 13 S3 33% Sft 3M- Ik 


5k. j\% Nifrtn n 
11% 6W NueiDt 
«*■ II Humac 


b& 

Ato 

22 U< 

3Vm 
5% 
2ft 
a% 
>16 
« 4 

Aft 
20% 14% 

12% Aft 
15% 

»ft 13ft 
94k 54% 
5* 19k 
5VM 


4-75 

.17 J 20 

1.006 34 a 
13 11 l 
une 5.1 
MU 1 
JSe 2J H> 


14 

ji u n 
14 

a 


NO A A A 
242 6 fe- 

Tl W% 14 V. 14ft _ ft 

■ Z3to 2Jto 23to + to 
30 lft lVi lft 

«8 *J£ "£** + »* 

9 194% 19to 19ft + ft 
S3 IXOt 130% 13% — to 
173 120% 1214 1214— % 
22 29 28ft 2670 


00% 0% 

1414 141b 
Mb Aft 
Alb Mb 
3 3 

9V. 19% + lb 
14V. 1414 * 04 
40% 140%— 0% 
114 114 
1ft 31ft 
50% SIM 
4ft Aft— lb 
lto lift 

TtK 

1304— 14 
9to— *% 
5ft 

Alb— ft 
20 
10 % 

lAft + ft 
JOft — 0% 
B — ft 



54ft lift 
23-b , ?i 

lA'a 4to 

24% 18IM 
37ft 10ft 
7»% 3ft 
7 *m Jft 

Pi 4to 
2H 1 

25ft U 
14ft A T, % 

lift 00. 


M 1-9 » 

J4 .9 21 


OEA 13 

OcbnO 406 J 11 

ooetAii 
DUMB 5 

OBoInd M 1.9 10 
OWftS J4 ,9 21 
OOUCP 

O wwmi- SK* -9 Sf 
OrtolHB JO 4.1 
Omwno 

OSrtvn* 42 3 j 0 14 
OxfrclF J2t 5.9 11 
OzOfKH JO 1-7 12 


9 2ft 3H 2ft 4- lb 
11 41% 60% Aft — to 

9 914 9to 9ft— ft 


9 201% 20to 10ft + to 

13 17ft 170% 17H— ft 
27 Sft 5ft 5ft — ft 

2 7 7 7 — ft 

10 21 31 21 + ft 

43 26 25ft 25ft 

3 4ft 41% 41% 

1 Sft 5ft Sft 

2 A A 41 

10 1ft lft Ift 

9 209% 20ft 30ft— 1% 

(0 14 13ft 14 + to 

7B1 12ft lift 13 


7ft 1ft SwftEHB « 

30 190% Swift In IJ0 54 33 

14ft 47% svnEna -io u n 


7 lft lto lft 4- to 
14 22to 22ft 23ft— ft 
2 Bto Sft Sft- to 


7 

10 

fto 

9to + ft 

■ 

109% 

IBto 

101% + ft 

13 

13 

129% 

I2to 

5S 

17to 

17ft 

17V%— to 

17B 

Ato 

41% 

Aft 

A 

llto 

llto 

llto + ft 

199 

13 

12ft 

12ft — ft 

5 

20to 

29to 

roto + ft 

49 

T2to 

12% 

1244 + ft 

23 

9to 

9V% 

9ft— ft 

4 

aft 

28ft 

20ft 

93 

7ft 

7 

7ft + ft 

20 

40ft 

40 

40 — ft 

21 

25% 

2Sto 

25% 

1 

M 

•ft 

Sft— ft 

7B 

Tto 

7to 

Tto— ft 

1 

23to 

23% 

23%— ft 

2B 

36 

25to 

26 + ft 

142 

lto 

lto 

lto 

1 

J(V% 

38 ft 

30ft 

54 

22ft 

21ft 

21% — to 

22B 

10ft 

10% 

10% + ft 

2 

23 

23 

23 + ft 

2304 

I4to 

lAto 

14% + ft 

11 

7ft 

7 

7ft + ft 

109 

10 

10 

10 


A ICEEn 

20ft fCHt 

2= ,co 
2to ipm 
A ft IRTCP 
11% ImoGp ,11c 43 
I Imoind 
30 impono i4s 
Aft inftont 

II imtma Jo 13 
lto irratSv 

2ft insSypf 351103 
Ml intcryg 40 
2ft IntBXnt 
to Intel wl 
Aft intHva 
3ft infPwr 
lft intProf 
A IntSeow 
A inIThr n 
A. inTftrpf 
to Intota 
12ft ionics 1 13 

19% I reward 25 

7ft Isoly -06 2.9 25 


13 3ft 
3 Sft 
10 17 
30 A 
IB lto 
110 39ft 
32 lift 

43 19ft 
B3 1ft 
27 2ft 

44 12ft 
132 3ft 

42 ft 
38 7ft 
5 5ft 
2 31b 

1 Aft 
902 7V% 

240 7ft 
a to 
983 21ft 
0 38ft 
27 2to 


AM 

44% + ft 
7ft- to 

*ib t ft* 

lib 

39V. + to 

lift 

19H + to 
lto — to 
ZH + ft 
i2ft— to 

X-% 

7ft— to 
Sft— ft 
31% 

Aft 

Tto— to 
7>4— to 
to + v. 
211% +1 

300%— to 

2ft 


4% 2ft JalAm I 93 4ft 4 4 

2 to Jet Awl 10 ft % % 

ffi 5to Jelron .Tit 9J 14 A 7ft 7ft 7ft— to 

JohnPCI 40 3ft 31% 30% — to 

lift 7ft JotwiAin JO U 11 111 1 7ft B 

lift A Johnlnd 4 SA Bft Oft Oft + ft 


JDr 24 17 
.ISo I J 9 
M4 4J 1 a 
UU a 30 0 
52 

1.92 34 

I 


3 19% 

01% Sft 
15ft 12V% 
15ft lift 
7ft 3ft 
29to 171% 
341b 19ft 
339b 10to 
7 3ft 
37ft 2S» 
15ft 12ft I 
Sft 2 ; 

7 4 

raft 71% 
IA lift I 
llto 9ft 

9ft 5ft I 


-S2 »4 17 
1J0 11.1 9 

J» SLA 11 
-92tltfi 11 
•4 

J0e 3.1 

A3 


SO 2 

10 7ft 

73 12H 
133 171% 
451 4ft 
S3 21 
IS 221% 
1S1 12ft 
29 Sft 
1 34 

236 

11 n% 
24 12ft 
3A 9ft 
40 Sft 


lft 

7ft + ft 
12ft + ft 

lift 

4ft + ft 

21 + ft 

221 % +1 
12ft 
sto 

M ■AM 

15ft 

2to * ft 

a-* 

17% — ft 
9ft + ft 
Mb + V% 


4to «to * ft 

Sft Sft 
2 12 

1ft Ift— ft 
Bft 0ft— ft 
2V. 17ft— ft 
3ft 3ft 
5% 15% 
lft Sft 
4ft 4ft — ft 
ffft 10ft + ft 
2ft 12ft 
Sft 3ft 
ift nvi 
0ft JOto + ft 
Aft i Aft— «• 
3 33V. + to 

Mb 2Pto 43 
Sto 3% + ft 

Bft iMb— ft 
9ft 9I%— to 
7ft 7ft— ft 
Ift 19 — ft 

•to “to=ft 

Mb 11 bft 
?ft 40to + ft 
7ft 27to— to 
IBB llto— ft 


JO 1J 19 

i 


30ft KnGspf 440 124 
1V% KDDOfcC S 

10 ICoyCo JO 14 7 
,9to Keorttt 40 18 19 
13to Ketctim 481 11 19 
Sto Key Co JOe 14 17 
8 KevPti JO 1J 19 
Sft K*vCo a 

2ft KKKMwt 
Sft KILem 30 

3ft KJnart 

3ft Kirtr 

3ft KlIMfo IS 

3 KleerV jar J 

JD^ Know IB 

10ft Knoll U 

22ft K6MTC 133 lA 77 


«400z37to 

is sto 

70 12to 
10 14to 
25 IBto 
10 Sto 
545 lift 

44 4 

49 4 

13 3to 

B 3to 
64 31b 

7 49% 

5 21% 

45 17to 
33B lAft 
123 27% 


3A —lto 
Tto + ft 

13ft— ft 

I4to 

106% — ft 
■to 

10ft— to 

4 * to 

4 + ft 

34% 

3to— ft 

2ft 

49% 

31% 

17ft 

IA — ft 
77 —ft 




IBM 
lffto 
279% 
10 

23% 
Aft 
14ft 
Ato 
9 

1 49% 
ltft 
649% 
•to 
12V% 


3 USR I rid 

•to Uftmro II 

Blv Unicom 
lift Unlcpof J5 5.1 
Sto UrHrnrn IA481SJ 
15% UAIrPd 446 14 12 
1ft UFoodA ,M AJ 
lft UFoodB 
14 USAS Wl 
Sft UnlielV 34 

141% UnHIln 140 74 7 
91% UnvOn IS 

Ato UnivRs 19 

10ft UnvPat 


9to VST n 40e A.1 
12to VallyRs 140 74 11 
17% VOISPTB 44 IJ 14 
39% Verli 

1AI% VtAfflC 40b U 70 
39% VIRifi 

0ft Vemlt JO 1.9 IA 

2 to V triple 

51% VI con 12 

2 ft vimpe 

12 Vlrco JMr 4 14 

S3V% Vointl 

Aft VbualCr JO U I 

B Vortex 40 44 11 


76 31% 

41 13ft 
AB llto 
13 lift 
12S 10ft 

12 23ft 
7 ito 

34 lto 
1 18% 
20 I 

13 21 
10 129% 

170 7ft 
I I2to 


50 9ft 

14 18ft 
S 24to 

15 Oft 
217 T7H 

3 4to 
A 10ft 

1 41% 
10 Sft 

S 2ft 

2 lift 

2 65V. 
2 79% 

13 9ft 


3 — ft 
L3to 

119k— to 
14to 

10ft + ft 
22ft + ft 
19% 

19% 
lB9k 
fl + 

21 + 
12ft — 

7 — 
12to— 


iftto 4 'a Ouebos 


SB 10ft 999 10ft + 9% 


Moadiig-Hafe Motes 


Dollar 




m 


m 


STOCK 

US* 

US* 

DeVoe-Holbein 



International ov 

6*4 

7V5 

Gty-C3ock 
International nv 

2% 

3% 

Quotes as of: August 29, 1985 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
Herwgrariit 483 
1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone: (0)31 20 26090 1 
Telex: M507 firconl 


NOTICE OF PURCHASE 

BOWATER INDUSTRIES PLC 
9Va% Bonds doe 15th July 1986 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to 
bondholders that US $1 ,250.000 
nominal amount of the above 
issue was purchased in the 
market durtiw the twelve month 
period to 15th July 1985 and 
applied in respect o! the man- 
datory redemption instalment 
payable on that date. 

Bowater Industries pfc 
Bowater House 
Kniahtsbridge 
London SW1X 7NN 
August, 1985 


Notice U» the Holders of the i»« 1 977-19 97 

of US *100,000,000.- made by the 

European Coal and Steel Community 



& 


m 








m 


S 


lft LSB 
Tto LaBano 
3to LaPnf 
lift LndBnn 
llto (.ndmfc 
Oft Laser 
21ft LAOfPP 
2ft LeePh 
17ft LMilVhi 
3to LMsurT 
7ft LMFP6 
1ft UftRst 
2ft LlffU 
ivi L«to« 
27V. Larlmr 
10W Luntcx 
B LundvE 
9ft Lurto 
10 LytJal 
lift LynCSs 
ift LvnchC 


A 12 

40 34 10 110 

40 24 12 9 

37 38 

340 13J 5 

H 30 

JDI 7 11 1 

7 29 

40e 14 II 7 


27-02 
09-11 
34-12 
1401 
12-11 
tft 20-11 
Sft 29-11 
9ft 11-10 
Bft DA-12 
Bft 2301 
Sft 7702 
7ft 1209 




29-11 

1102 ■ 

1M1 9947 
18-10 JAS 
2W1 Will 
20-ugmd 

0901 

CM! 

20-11 
1809 
12-n 
U02 

14-12 ■ 

09-lBIBja 9U5 
2102 9635 99JS 
U-ll 9942 9942 
HQ2 WJ0 9941 

U09HNH 

11409 



13ft NRMn 240 I7JB 
19ft NRMpf 

11% NtCsO 406 34 11 
12ft NtPcrtnt M 4 
to NctsLB 

141b NMxAj- J9t 40 IS 
11W NPInRI 145 A4 16 
13 NProe 1 JOe 54 11 
31 NVTlitvts M 14 14 
41% NswbE JSr 3.1 7 

11 Nmwcor 42 24 121 
12W NewLsn 
13 NwpEI 140 94 II 
Sto Nlctilnn 

Aft N!tftob 7 

2% Note* 18 

lDfc NordRs 10 

9ft NCdOgs 
29to NIPS pf 4J5 120 


73 lift 
49 20 
S 12ft 
12*9 18 
4 4% 

73 20ft 
190 16ft 
2A 20ft 
SWZK44 
49 5 

7 121% 

348 I3W 
71 IAW 

7 Sto 
13 9ft 
40 3 

349 lAft 
J 10ft 

2001 15ft 


14% 14ft— ft 
19to 20 + 1% 

12ft 12ft 

H ft 17^ + ,ft 

19ft ifft + «% 
14ft 14ft 
20% OTto + lb 
43 44 + « 

4to 4to— 1% 
121% 12ft— 1% 
13ft 13ft 
TA id — ft 
Sto Sto— ft 
9to 9ft A ft 
Tto 2 to— ft 
lAft lAto— to 
10% 10% 

3SW 35ft + W 



9ft Sto Yank Co 12 11 7 


9to 4ft ZJntor M 20 4ft 4to 4ft 


AMEX Highs-Lov^ 




Hues 

days 

in the Trib. J 


(Thursdays and 
Saturdays, too) 

Start your day 
with a smile with 

Art 

Buchwald. 


Non Dollar 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) August 29,1985 

Net tuef nine Rira fo Ho nt arm supeUtd by M Funds Udtd wHb n» ncedln of somm nuotas bond on issue price. 

The marMoat xrmboH imllcate freftaeaev of auDfattaw sapeUed:(tf) -daHv; tw) -weridv; (b)-W-mmtMy; (rl - reortarty; (11 -Jmgvterfy. 




.T. National Westminster Bank PLC 

(Inccrpomttil in England oxtk lirrutM liability) 

Issue of U.SJl,OOOJ)OO t OOO PRIMARY CAPITAL FRNs 

< Floating Rale Nolttl 
. Comprising 

U.S4900,00(M)00 PRIMARY CAPITAL FRNb ISERIES “A") 
US-S500JK)0,000 PRIMARY CAPITAL FRNs (SERIES “B") 

Id accordance with the Trust Deed dated 9th July, 1885 (the 
“Trust Deed") made between National Westminster Bank PLC 
(the “Bank") and The Law Debenture Corporation pltu, 
constituting the Notes, the Bank hereby gives notice that 
completion of the distribution of the Notes took place on 12th 
August, 1985 and that accordingly 11th November, 1985 has 
been determined as the Exchange Date (as defined in the Trust 
Deed). 

Persons entitled to delivery of any of the Notes are 
accordingly advised to obtain from the specified office of any of 
the Paying Agents, the office of CedelSA. in Luxembourg or 
the office of Morgan Guaranty Trust Company ofNew York as 
operator of the Eurootear System C'Euro-dear") in Brussels, 
the form of the certificate to be completed stating that such 
Notes are beneficially owned by persons who are not U-S. 
persons (as defined in the Offering Circular dated 24th May, 
1985). Completed certificates should be delivered to the office of 
Cede! SA. in Luxembourg, or to the office of Euro-dear in 
Brussels within the 15 dayB prior to, on or after the Exchange 
Date. 

August 1985 



DM- Doialsclw Mark; BF - Batolwn 
p/v SIB Io 51 per wiiy N A - i»t woW^ 
r Attempt- Prteo- Ex-Coupon; m - Fornwly wor 


FtorkuLF-umnii 


Swiss Francs: a -astod; +- Offer RrJces:b ■ bkl chanae 
1; *■ • En-Ris; - Gross Performonot Index July; • - 
t os on Amsterdam Stock E*dwns« 


str s Zfs*2*sr-S35 y gt t g^ggssr U not s t s fsU sfgfc 































































, 1 
I 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 1985 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


WEAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


K*WW*5HB> IHTIHGS IN S.W. 

Wndoiv Sum* t Bw fahi re. Contort 
P3? 284) 3B1UX 


■*PW**5CH tea 20 yeas experience 
tea*. tom or Jhort tarn*, 
& suburtm London & Aba- 
ten. Birdra, Co. 01-499-8802. 


MAM* REEVES LETTMG Office 
’""•Iher bating for a homo - or have 
afroMrtytofeteiN.W.Lradracd1 
_2S2oS*0M35968T. 


AIL VISITORS TO LONDON - for 

1 01 -837" 7365. 


USA 


Brand New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 


A Unique 

Hole) Suite Residence 


pre-opening sewings on 
6 mo., 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 

factoring 

Studio, 1-Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 

All magnificently 

furnished and aH with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 


Executive Services Available 
Model Suites 

(212) 371-8866 


RUM BEACH ROMM. 150m to 
Jwadj, 5ftn to loto. Hrfi that hewn, 
farnohod with tufa & nly 

4bndroomL 3 bo<J», (vine 

I"*** 1 - fool & garage, $10,000 par 
njjnljL Bn 262, Her db Tribune, 
92571 Neuily Cedax, Frtnos 


HOLLAND 


DUTCH HOUSING CENTRE B. V. 

Deluxe rentals. Vcteriusrtr. 174, 
Amsterdam. 020421234 or 62322. 


PETER BRUM MAKHAARDU 
Irtfi Houeew ! 
todra. Te 


AuulenJum. Tab 029-768022. 


ITALY 


COSTA SMEEALDA. SEAFRONT. De- 

Eghtful 4-bedroom vOa avaiUlla Sep- 


tember, sea water pool terracing, 

Tel 41T22/31 17 


barbecue area. 

office horn. 


MftAN RAMBHB) APARTMENT to 

lei 5900 morttty. Monaco 30 52 39. 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


AT HOME M PARIS 

PARIS PROMO 


APARTMENTS FOB RENT OR SALE 
25 Awe Horfw 
75006 Para 


563 25 60 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSEES 8th 


Shxia, 2 or 3-raocn aportme ri . 
One month or mare. 

IE CLARBGE 359 67 77. 


EX' 

sur 


ICEPnoNAL HE DE VH1B4NES 
ur SeinOO an. Wat Park npait 
state, 4D0 nun. .house, for rent. 


8,000 eqm. park, pier. Unobstructed 
Summer & Winter salons. 


5b**ma, 3 balls. Tet (3) 975 6593 
/ (3] 958 72 04, 


SHORT TERM STAY. Advertises of a 
hotel without inconveniences, feel at 
home in mat studios, one bedroom 
and mars in Park SOfiEUM BO rue 

de rUdvOTitk Pare 7th, 544 39 4Q 


SHARB) ACCOMMODATION in nice 
3 becfraani raartmant near BfW 
Tower, even short term. F2900 per 
month. Tet 306 78 79 




SAME share 


s pacious old Hat, modern e quipm ent. 
5 replaces. Areal home. ReterenOM. 
Teb 77006 84 


RUOLMAIMABON. Lovely long 
term 2-roam flat, chanting vflane 
near Wed Pork F3900 + doges. 
Teb 708 41 26 eves 


02 lam* 

, 3 bedrooms, 7th Boor garden 

Sfflww n0QB " n '’ 


NEAR MONTPARNASSE. Urge 
beautiful deSer, deeps 3, garden. Tft 
325 78 33 / 542 «8Te<i£rn - 1 lan. 


20IH. ROOM M HOUSE forqjg}|g 


untfl Dec. 31st. F2500/monfh. 
7100. 


SHORT TERM in Latin Quarter. 
No agmte. Tet 329 38 B3. 


(Continued From Back Page) 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


MARA I S. Sena! but faauriatis studio, 

F3300^6mertheisituniuBi.'2779234 


16TH. SMALL APARTMENT fa 
mantis. Tab 500 41 77. 


MONTPARNASSE. Artist atefier fa 
rant Sept thro May. Tel: 321 4712 


ST. GERMAN DE5 

ream Bat, 


2608813 


TROCADERO. luxu rious 2-ra owi + n- 

de p endent roonv 6475BB2 / 5534275 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


MVAUDES 
1 3 reams, maids r 
;2boths,F15 


newly 


WEST SUBURBSl Laipe house in large 
5 bedroom!^* 
|W90aagiWg3l| 


SPAIN 


COSTA pa sot- A1M UNECAR.KB- 

poobm 

1 52 35 23 Geneva I 


SWITZERLAND 


VAUDl EXCEPTIONAL FARMHOUSE 

35 met. Geneva Fatty r e novated, 4 
bedroom, 4 baths, 2 vatf reoapfea, 
atahfe, bans. Unipait village near 
woods. Suit senior exocubvo/tSplo- 
mM with enterttarownt requirement. 
Ideal for honeridng, aoSKSuntry. 
AL W rite Box 2623, nenAi Trixme. 
92521 NeuBy Codex, France 


BETWEEN G8CVA & tamanw. foot 

of Jera. comfortable 125 sqm. unfur- 


of Jura, conre 
nished 4roara .. ..... 

land. Tet 5wtr m lciid.__ 

Sept 2, preferably cun. / 224 98 69 
Pork evening from 3/9. 


t country haute on 1 ha 
rated fetZY 


^77 52 29 « 


REAL ESTATE 
WAOTED/EXCHANGE 


SECOND HOME/FRANCE- New 
York couple seeking histone, Fuly re- 
stara d, modest sized second home in 
the Loxe River Videy rat mare that a 
3 hour drive ham Charles De Guale, 
Airport. Chateau has ample land, 
modem conveniences and Body ab- 
sentee mdntaned with no mare Aon 
8 reams. Al repSes should be in Bi- 
gtsh, prompt action assured. Bax 
tol. Harara triune, 92521 NeuBy 
Cedex. France 


AMBBCANARORTECIURE& (teste 
ner/ writer Melting furnished Hat (1 
Chefaaa / Xiedusridge / South Ken- 
dngton area for 10 


„ . r _ to ham 

resit. Bra 2674, Herald Trite, 92521 
NeuJy Cede*, France 


AMBHCAN FAMR.Y of 3 needs large 

(Iffl s qjp. or larger] unTurrashed haai- 
tre io n ei West rare for nvtimum of 3 
years. Modem bdhs & kitchen (te- 
sted. Cxi Paris: Z73 92 00 Erf 838 & 
leave message. 


URGENT, MTT COMPANY SEEKS 
for American executive 7/8 rooms for 
rent. Pans 7ft or 
minimum. Tel: Pare 555 91 


NEED HHP TO LOCATE unhrmhed 
rtrnent with fireplace m Ptrs 1st 
threurfi 6th. Tet 325 29S2 Ptrk 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


ATTVES WANTED 

FOR AMSBCAN COMPANY 

Bt ob Mied Ameriora rnpart-axport 
ca, deokig wift EuropejrMcb 


if**, see ks p rofessiond. experi- 
enced datribufaRy (onuneidd ogsnfs 
to sd automotive products, tires for 
truda, buses, passenger vehides 
throughout Europacr ccr&rent. For fur- 
ther information contort: MUTUAL 
TRAE4NG CORPORATION, Managing 

Drccter 222 W.Adcrro, Suite 463ft? 
enga, L 60606 USA Tefara 27^38 
AMSVWAVnUAl. WKCGO. Tel: 312- 

3465174 or MIC htamidfond, Ltd, 19 

Stratford Ploce, London WI 
Td {l)49i3B4i Tbt, 291429 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


AMBBCAN EXECUTIVE rndenf in 
Manam, seefa ponond aniltait wlh 
wfne seennara ex p er i en c e , un- 
enbered, Frencb/Engfish, attrac- 
tive, 35/45, wel groomed, con fi dent . 
$25^>00/year or equivalent, expenses 
+ . Resume, recent photo toe Bax 
2636, Herald T ribune, 92521 Nealy 
Codex, France. 


■UBMADONAL ARTIST seek trow 


641 / <8091 7283720 
Bax 2638. Herald Tribune, 
92S21 Nnuily Cedax. fnmee 


ENGLISH SPEAKING saieuirl wonted. 

■ Tek 770 80 69, or prefora Hy wit us in 
I person at bjuadme, PARHJM3HE. 3 
I rue du Hdder, Paris 9, Metro Opera. 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


VETERAN A ME RIC A N NEWSMAN. 

WeByo u nded m e ritmg, production, 
grepfeesi mtabfidied psitofi umAl 
& foreign carmpandert for major US 
newspaper; strong on geo-pofitici and 
fct-flted World. CorSder ray loca- 
tion with dwHengira job. Bax 2648, 
Herald Tribune, 92571 NeuRy Cedux, 
France 


HOTEL GENERAL MANAGER with 
British Cyprio t + G reek hold ex pen- 
once roqwm cncwnpnQ paGinon. E*- 
caBent fBftfvm Hr qucdfcotionL 


Fhient Greek, finish, some German. 


P.a Bax 215, 
5040. Cyprus 


yean old. C/O 
Cyprus. Telex 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


now 

1(09 


40, AHUTT To move pep- 
tap performer, redo 
h^a Write BP 2a 

Belgium. 


GERMAN FASH ON MODE. We*- 
educoted. nrnMnaud. loot s far m ter- 
edmg positron. London 245-0080. 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 




Enflfoh,. 

■eaatanet. 




SfflCS for AMBBCAN 
FIRMS in PARS: 
Dutch or German 
of French rs- 
Hngual 


Victor 
727 61 


phone: 138 Avenue 
75116 Paris, 


i Paris, France. Teb 


COSMETIC SURGERY Director of btfl 
Organization soda executive osss- 
trat secretory with ft and ides aba- 
tes. For interview this week ki Pros. 


■shone our Athens Cknc (01 13609952, 
r * ' Ids. DY SA, San Francaco, 


Mr.Sdtrakfis.DYSA.San 
London, Athens. 


BtUNGUAL ENGLISH/ FRENCH 
esptionist / seaetay. WI 5chool of 
Paris, starting 1st Seat. Cdl 224 43 40 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


LANGUAGE SCHOOL seeb ful tune 
mother-tongue English teachers. Mat 
have SC passport or valid working 
■yRK 747 12 80 Stfor 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


AU PAIR, w 

Khoal age 3*iren. mueiff free 
during day if interested (I tdang 
caurres. Central Honda. Housework 
and oodting. Driven tense pre- 
ferred. Sendpirture and resume. Start 
at soon re potubte. Write Mrs M 
Brown, 732 WRkirean 
Rarida 32803 USA 


St, Orfanda, 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


__JyearoliJ/ 

icon girt, ELS. Speod Ed., reeks past- 
ban ki Europe or AustraSa Hts wade 
re f a uncu s. Con- 


tad Julie. 323 W. Mocop, Deoaw, H. 
625ani7| 43BL1644. 


BHSUSHNAfNES 4 irattm’ hdps 
Nosh Agon’, 53 Church Rd, H 
Sussex. OC. Tot frighten {Z73f 2S 


AUTOMOBILES 


NON MERCEDES 500 SEC 

19B5. black, |yay leather inte rior, cfl 


gray leather n 

options. Teb 022/46 51 59 Geneva 


MERCEDES, 280 MODS, Moor, 5- 
water coupe. White vrith red leather, 
1969, 54.000 tides, porf«J aandbon 
for die coBecter. Private sde, 
£1 3.00a Phone London 01 -722 5609. 


85 RAT PAMM 45S. Pdfod. IT 
let. S2B0a Td: M- Lasiin 261 50 91 
llmPfcns 


AUTO RENTALS 


CHARC RB4T A CAR. Prestige an 
with phone: Rob Spirit, Merotdas, 
Jagura, BMW, fanousews, smdl an. 
46 r Hone Ovxron 750W Pant. Td 
72tt3(L4a Tdex 630W7 F CHAFLOC 


I Fait. Teb 


AUTO SHIPPING 


RANSCAR 

ncousHnwG 

SPECIALISTS 

'll 225 64 44 


. 39 43 44 
I 071 80 51 
2281 212921 




10 45 


PAIB5 

CANNES/NICE 
FRAMCFURT 
BONN / COLOGNE 
STUTTGART 

S&SWn 

NEW YORK 
HOUSTON 
LOS ANGBES 
MONTREAL 

AGB4I5 WORlb 
Leave if to us to bring it to you 


104711 43063 
121 695 70611 


931 7605 
I56B 9288 
866 6681 


'. H. 


F»AHKFWRT/M»»5-W 

■hormenn GmbH. TtlflHBI 
1 Pick-up aU over Europe "ro/ra-ships. 


AUTO CONVERSION 


EPA / DOT 

CONVBtSlONS 
Customs brokarage/bonding service 


Pick-up & delivery anywhere in die 
LS.&TI 


. .. US. 

Prafossond work using onty die 
folest quaity comp one nts 
Guaranteed W A / DOT ap 
CHAMPAGNE IMPORTS U 
2294 NorBi Pmm RiL, HMfidd 
PA. 19440, USATefc 215 *22 6« 
Tele* 4971917-CHAMP 


DOT/ffA CONVERSIONS 

us 


_ banding, enur- 

. outomative cumpfi- 

oncas. Europe to USA guaertned. 
Sdeposhtraat 117, 25&T HC The 
Hague, Holcrai Phone (0(70-559245 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


MBV) MBKB3E5 300 E WWo / bhm 
■■■tor, wel equipped. DM61,000. 
DrKai Itel Bax 120433, 5330 
I Bonn. Teb (01 2i&-234006.Hx. 885594. 


tTRASCO. MER0BDE5 t OTHER 
makes. Tax free LHD export for USA 
6567 Park Lrae, landw Wl. Td 01- 
629 7779. Tlx 8^56022 IRAS & 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


BUY YOUR NEXT CAR 
TAX FREE AND USE OUR 
BUY-BACK PROGRAM 

AND SAVE 


WRITE FOR FSKCATALOGOR 
■ FIBS BUY-BACK lOUMTCfel 


S HRVDffY, P-O. BmTSgjnjDI 


Amsterdcsr Ajmort T 

101152833. 


Phone (020)13 


The . 

Tdex: 12568 


SHBPSIDE 
7lhFtoqr.Now 
Phone ffl2) 


SHPSBXE S A, Chautsee de Wdvre 


Cars of 

COPBWAGB4 

TAX FREE 


• k it ernotiond Sales 

• Waddwida Defiwjy 

• European Price leaders 

• Teb u*45 1 37 7B 00 

• Telex 19932 DK 


55 Vbdroffcvd DK 
CPH V.-DB4MARK 


DK-1900 


MERCEDES SPKfAUSTS 
FOR USA + MIDDLE EAST 


for 20 yeart. 
LARGE STOOC OF NEW 
MSKH1B CARS 

280 S, 




sec 


both, velours & 
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mobile business. 

Now Chzyster is again at a cross- 
roads of sorts, and Mr. lacocca's 
reputation is again on the line. The 
two key things he did to save the 
company — pare costs and create a 
family of cars based on the K-Car 
— may not serve to keep 'Chiyskx 
healthy. Already the United Auto- 
mobile Workers union is detrand- 
ing that Chrysler give back more of 
the miTTirmg of dollars in wage con- 
cessions that the workers had 
agreed to when the company was 
sl id ing . If n^ouations go badly, 
the union conla strike whai its con- 
tract expires Oct. 15. 

Meanwhile, the K-Car famil y — 
by far Ctnyder’s main product line 
— is vulnerable to rising sales of 
small Japanese cars and to the re- 
surgence of the American driver's 
taste for big cars. “If the market 
shifts, they could be in trouble,” 
warned Harvey Hembach, an ana- 
lyst with Merrill Lynch & Co. 

Mr. lacocca seems unfazed by 
the doubters. 

He has larger and sportier cars in 
the wings, and some already in pro- 
duction, which he expects will woo 
a younger, more affluent buyer 
than the current Chrysler models. 
He is expanding into new business- 
es, paying $637 million to buy 
Gulf stream Aerospace Corp., a 
maker of executive aircraft And he 
has ins manufacturing specialists 
wo rking on the Liberty project 
which, like GM’s publicity- 
drenched Saturn project is an ef- 
fort to cut $2,000 out of the cost of 
each small car by using advanced* 
production technologies. 

And he remains, as always, the 
supersalesman, whose television 
commercials helped persuade peo- 
ple to biw Chrysler cars when it 
seemed likely that the company 
would fail 

Chrysler’s future remains in Mr. 
lacocca's hands. Ihe 61 -year-old 
chief executive has pulled back a 
bit from day-to-day operations, 
even taking a month-long vacation 
this summer. He has moved three 
executives into an office of the 
c hairman, which shares decision- 
thority. But Bennett E 
Bidwefi, executive vice president 
for marketing and a member of the 
chairman's office, has quipped: 
“Lee settles the tie voles — includ- 
ing the 3-0 ties.” 

Even Mr. lacocca’s severest crit- 
ics concede that he has shored up 
Chiysler’s bottom line. The compa- 
ny is solidly in the black today — it 
earned a record $2.4 billion in 1984 
and another $1,104 billion in the 
first six months of this year. Sales, 
which were $19.6 billion last year, 
continue to climb. 

But the fiscal health has come at 
a price. As part of the process of 
back to avoid bankruptcy, 
Chrysler sold virtually all of its 
overseas operations. Thai leaves it 
confined to Nonh America al a 
time when both Ford Motor Co. 
and GM are more and more be- 
bal enterprises. Mr. la- 
cocca Has established links with 
Japanese, French and Korean com- 
panies, but he still has less flexibili- 
ty to maneuver than his major com- 
petitors. 

Mr. lacocca is fighting back. He 
is earmarked $11-5 billion to 
build more modem, productive 
factories and to develop new cars. 
But that money still must be earned 
by selling cars. 

When Chrysler desperately 



Lee A. lacocca aid some of bis successes. 


Chrysler’s white-collar work force 
to 21,000- from 41.000 during the 
crisis period or 1979 to 1982. Al- 
though about 35,000 blue-collar 
workers have been, called back to 
work in the last lew years, only 
about 1,000 office workers have 
beeaxehired, 

Mr. lacocca has been as: strin- 
gent about capital expenditures as 


venture to build and operate < 
the United 


auto assembly plant in 
Stares. 

• Cultivating outside suppliers. 
Chrysler adds only about 30 per- 
cent of the value of the vehicles it-, 
sells, compared with 70 percent for - 
GM. At one trine this was ihrmght 
to be a disadvantage, since Chrys-. 
ler had. to pay suppliers a profit on 
p urchase d parts. Bui the emergence 
of low-cost suppliers in Third 


gram," said Malcolm Salter, a pro- 
fessor at the Harvard Business 
School who is preparing a book on 
the American auto industry. "If the 
union demands parity in the cur- 
rent negotiations, and if they don’t 
develop closer ties to overseas part- 
ners, they will wind up as a design- 
er and assembler of cars manufac- 
tured elsewhere." 

Still, the Chrysler boosters seem be has about labor costs. His 1 
to outnumber the naysayers, is that it is better to miss a 

“Chrysler is the only company [with increment of sales in a boom yaa : . Wcridocx^ries has made such 
record- earnings adjusted for infla- than to be crushed by expensive^ - “outsomangT" an attractive propo- 
tion in this period, said Martin L unused fatalities during a down- siticuL • * 

■Anderson, a consultant with Sector turn. He balked at adding a second Ibese last two facets of Mr. 

Research in Boston. “Fm more pp- plant for mini-vans, and only tc- cocca^sstrategy — technology and 
timistic about its prospects than I cently decided to convert a fadfity outsourcing — are, for now, thet?.. 
was a year ago.” in Sl Louis to double Its capacity ones most vulnerable to external’*-.' 

Chiyslerhas a krt going for iL It 

swing assembly plant and be mak- 
ing a lot more money right now,” 

Mr. lacocca said, “out when the 
downturn comes, you’ve got a 
$600-million plant sitting dead 
empty. You just don’t want to. do 
that wheat you're trying to husband 
your investment resources.": 

Analysts concur. “This is a very 
profitable 13-miQiacHmit compa- 
ny, but it could have real troubles if suffer -when he leaves, 
it tries to obtain the capacity for 25 behind me are as good as*I am 
the first seven months - «id Mr. TlXL, tta - ^ybe better,” he s^“AdverSty 


?Vi:T 


•tl" Z i l ~ 


has had spectacular gains in pro- 
ductivity under Mr. lacocca's cost- 
cutting tutelage- In the second 
quarter, Chrysler sold 618,463 cars 
and trucks, for a pretax profit Of 
$1,378 a unit GM, in me same 
period, sold 2.44 million units, for 
an average profit of $767 a vehicle. 

In addition. Chiysler is taking 
small bites out of GM’s sales. The 
Chrysler share of the market for 
cars made in the United States was 


variables. The Liberty project will 


depend a great deal on whether 
Chiysler can, in fact, generate the 
$1LS billion that Mr. lacocca is 
canning on. And the UAW has 
said that a key goal in the negotia- 
tions is to limit Chrysler’s freedom 
to shift work outside. 

Mr. lacocca probably will leave 
at the end of 1986, when he will be 
65. Hie has little patience for outsid- 
ers who suggest thai Chrysler will 
s.Thepe 


people 


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l ' - , . - , 14 irercrat in uw ursi sevea monuu nrinioo," said Mr. Anderson, the .uj 

needed cash to avoid bankruptcy of this year, rompared with 1L8 consuItanL “They will do all right if is 
and finance the K-Car, the govern- percent m 1981. Industry analysts theypick their targets and ve 

say the growth came almost enure- gn^jy^ . ^ 

!y at GM’s expense. Keying costs in line will not by 

Chrysler executives asser that itself insure Chrysler’s future, 
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meat helped out with Sl-5 billion in 
loan guarantees. This time the com- 
pany does not have that option, 
and Chrysler executives say it is not 
needed They say the cash will 
come from profits and depreda- 
tion. in addition to the $3.8 billion 
in cash that is available to the com- 
pany now. But should a sharp re- 
verse — an expensive labor con- 
tract, a drop in sales, or even a 
general economic downturn — re- 
duce Chrysler’s sales or per-car 
profits, the investment program 
could fall apart 

“It will take several years of 
back-to-back, after-tax earnings of 
52 billion per year (o finance 
Chrysler’s minimum-level pro- 


good experience. Three, four 
years in the trenches have molded a 


team. Well see in the next 


r :T*T i iwr. nemDacn, me Mernu L.yncn n 

GM and Ford, Chrysler gladly dis- analysL “They have expanded their Uetmam ting playi 
doses its break-even point — the market share without spending a ® 

munba: of cars that it must seUto whole lot of money.” - Set for YPTUVrilAa^ 

cover its cost of operations. The Mr. lacocca recognizes that T ClUXUlOgf 

more than cost-cutting is needed. Reuters 

His strategy includes: CARACAS — Yenezolana de 

• Broadening the product line. Cementos wiD sign a $7Zl-mQHon. 

In the middle of the 1987 model debt restructuring plan with ]2for- 


break-even, it says, has been 
slashed from more than 2 million 
■units a year in the 1970s to 1.2 
million today. “We had lo get effi- 

aem in 1980 or die,” said Robert s, year, Chrysler will begin introduo- dgn banks, Venttuda’s first mafor 
k f^y^ er , s cfueffipanoal ing larger, front- wheel-drive cars, private sector refinancing, banJane 
officer. And we ve stayed ton. including a top-of-the-line Imperi- soutces said Thursday. 

Staymg ton has always been a alto compete with Cadillac, Lin- The agreement covers three bond 
key point m Mr. lacocca s strategy coin and hish-Diiced Eurooean rm- — “**• ' — — 


j pout m tw. lacocca s strategy coin and high-priced European im- series with interest set at 1_25 vez~ 
for Chrysler. For example, he cut pons. The company mH-’-- 


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cars, 

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developing with MaseratL 
• Applying advanced tedmol- 
ogy. In some 


ports 

in traduce a new 
led by a $25,000 car that 
refo 


cent over the London interbank of- ' 
fered rate. 


The sources said the Vencemos 


FRANKFURT “TOP TBT Escort Ser- 
vice. 069/59-40- 52. 


(Contiuned from Page 11) processors or idea processors, allow 
course as a way of providing stu- users to manipulate blocks of data 


some ways, Quysler has 


irankfurt somja ESCORT Ser-I dents with information and com- 
Tet 06948 34 42. I ments on the literature being read. 


FRANKFURT 069/23 33 80 V2J\| 
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into outline form. 

Xerox’s Notecards also aims at 


itsrdativdy\eaIthy^Ei^; 
psuwl With other Venezuelan com- ’ 
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Tet 01-82 1 02m ~ | such a system for 

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its computer laboratory. 


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MUMQi 

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infor- 
t in 
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ifcywL Tefc p222) 26<7385 IbcTs of documents and when a 


electronic version of the system 
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Washington’s battles will be i 


of ~in/ ormation a b om plant in Canada 


HMMRMo - sabsina Escort Sar- Norman Delude, a senior software section of the report dealing with 
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text system, with the relevant parts 
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stems Inc. of Pitts- 
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A big use of such systems might 
os that 


duplicate cards. 


(JnUed Press International 

TORONTO — South Korea's 
Hyundai Motor Cb. will build an 
assembly plant in Canada to pro- 
duce 100,000 cars annually at peak, 
the comoanv said Thursday. 


(also be in computer programs 


e Ha rafH* bdp people write papers. Simple 

Esoort5anncB. Tet 02/731 7&4i. I concept ^ated to hypertext are 


En- 


flhh assart iwte 0221/55 5/88. 


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AshtonTate. These pro- 
sometimes called outline 


A,^i? 0t ?^ h0Wp S , - i ? ei ! . Canada’s industry minister, Sin- 

do not have to be organized into a dair Stevens, said the $150-tnUlion 
hneor outlme. The system allows 
any card to be connected to any 
other in a complex network. One 
can envision the system as consist- 
ing of cards with lines between 
them, like a map of cities and roads 
between them. 

Of course, the report writer even- 
tually must organize the various 
thoughts into a sequential pattern, 
if they are to be printed on paper. 


pricetag represents the single larg- 
est foreign investment ever by a 
Korean company. . 

The automaker said a new Cana- 
dian plant would begin production 
in 1988 and be at. full steam two 
yiare later. It expects to create 


UODUi “ Canada, where it has 

sold 25,123 Pony models in 1984 


and 39^97 Pony and Stellar units 
so Far this year. 


It owns 15 percent of Mitsu , v 

Motor Co„ and already gets many largest cement company. 

of its small cars, truda and option- 

al engines from that corpmation. 

Now Chrysler is increasing its 
h olding s in Mitsubishi Motor lo 24 
percent, and has agreed to a joint 





Get the big picture on 
world business trends in 


Leonard 













INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 1985 



Page i: 


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J e »sen Chief Executive 

itOS ANGELES — Ti 
tbc Los 11 


Fed Sponsors WyommgCamp 
For Discussions on die Dollar 


CURRENCY MARKETS 


Dollar is Stronger in U.S., European Trades 


mwortatam 

torjretDni to sustained ornfii»Kl 8 
s^ff that Robert p. iSwoSd 
assww djgKo^ay managed 


in dfe *- 2 Ioss of sl4 -9 million 
^£“5 ax months of 

°f renewed lossesainS 


execunvft. ^OP S& U> Opm 

*££5&S£2&-*g Hon S &>ng Office 

By Brenda £dm£L 


In addition. KOP named Jukka 
Suomela to head its Tokyo repre- 
sentative office, effective Jan. 1 . He 
win join KOP Oct 1 from Fin- 
land*^ Finance Murisay, where he 
is serving as a senior ministerial 
secretary with responsibilities re- 
lating to the country’s foreign bor- 
rowing. 


1 1 affiliai- 

S2f * Co. wai 


MHenHehi Want Ltd- said FumiO 
Matsunaoto, who was senior deputy 
general manager of its London 
branch, has been transferred to the 


% Brenda Erdmann 

LmS^^ ae ^ Tri f me 

raplaoe Wajiioi a PmMti - Finland's' bn^h, h»s been nidemd'tolhe 

4.»saSs ss*afSS S 15 ?? 

; post,: "with responsibilities for Bsu * (Asia-pS) LtdTSSSd busmess-devdopmem office. He is 

***-*“■-• - J g>en a representative office in 

™S Kong m October. 

The new office, a further step in 
Je expansion of flic Hdsmki- 
oased bank’s international 
uons, will serve 


by Yasihiko Wa- 


tanabe. who was with the bank in 
Tokyo. 


{^SBSrtSK* 

• ."This move is a continuation of 

Ottr m a nag ement-succession nlan " ««««, '-ii waa- saw nauuuuin racyers, woo wns 

said Mr. Hoffman, who planTto SSdWhSt? 011 ! manager of its Belgian desk, has 

retain the positions of chairman ed bvr&SoT* V * 11 **= h ^ ad ' movedto BelgumBank m Hong 

ter’s air-carsn K- W °L who has been Kong, where he will be responsible 

•»— i : -i appomted regional representative, for corporate-finance and capital- 

ize was with Royal Bank of Cana- market products. Banque Beige is a 

was the unit of Gfcnfole de Banque SA of 
wnurs Beijing representative. “ *- 


Banque Beige Ltd. in London 
said Baudoum Meyers, who was 
of its Belgian desk, has 



though Mr. Jensen will be responsi- 
ble for its day-to-day operations. 


Brussels. 


(Continued from Page U) 

that some Fed officials are skepti- 
cal about such grand gatherings, 
particularly when some in Con- 
gress are seeking to reduce the 
Fed’s independence through closer 
scrutiny of its budget “U does us 

r j," he said, “lo associate with 
kind of people we get on the 
program.” 

The program was high-caliber 
indeed, featuring some of the 
brightest young academics, as well 
as such luminaries as Ounar Em- 
dinger, the peppery, 74-year-old 
former Bundesbank president, who 
said this was to be the last address 
be would make in the United 
States. 

In his speech, Mr. Emminger 
said that the international value of 
the dollar was now the most impor- 
tant price in the world — 10 years 
ago, it was the cost of oil — and 
that “sooner or later 1 ' the dollar 
must fall to “more normal” levels. 

One top Fed official, who asked 
not to be identified, said that what 
he found most arresting in the two 


Mexico’s Debt Agreement 



£ r 


><12:011 * 

cam 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 
'' LA PA2 Bolivia’s three- wee- 

k-old centrist government lifted 
fl^tmancy controls Thursday as part 
of an overall economic package 
that also includes an end to all 
subsidies and the freeing of im- 
ports. 

Bolivia’s official exchange rate 
was 75,000 pesos to the U.S. dollar, 
although dollars could be bought 
pn unofficial markets for 1.4 mil- 
lion to 1.5 million pesos. The gov- 
ernment said that the currency 
would now trade at an official rate 
equivalent to the weighted average 
bf public currency sales to be con- 
ducted by the central bank on 
Tuesdays and Thursdays. 

! When Victor Paz Estensoro took 
office as president earlier this 
month, he vowed to implement 
tough economic measures to save 
the country from what he called 
“the risk of bankruptcy.'’ Bolivia's 

C ual inflation rate is 10,000 per- 
t, the world’s highest 

f Htwlpn AFP | 


(Continued from Page 11) 
loans into home currencies will also 
be comparable, according to Citi- 
bank. co-chairman of Mexico’s 
bark advisory committee. 

Mexico has agreed to prepay 
SI -2 billion of the 1983 loan. It 
made a downpayment of S250 mil-- 
lion at be ginning of January and, 
according to Citibank, Mexico’s fi- 
nance minis ter, Jesus Silva Herzog, 
confirmed that the rest of the pre- 
payment was proceeding as sched- 
ule! 

The multi-year rescheduling 
agreement the terms of which were 
agreed to in principle a year ago, 
was designed to pave the way for 
Mexico to regain free access to the 
international capital markets next 
year. 

Mexico recovered quickly in 
1983 and 1984 from the economic 
and financial difficulties that 
forced it to suspend debt repay- 
ments in August 1982. But that 
progress has faltered this year, 

northi Iwnnv nf ftprlinitlC rCVC- 


nues from oil exports, raising 
doubts among some bankers 
whether Mexico would be able to 
find willing lenders as early as next 
year. 

■ Peru Cancels 03 Contracts 

President Alan Garda Pfirez of 
Peru canceled contracts Thursday 
with three U.S. -owned oil compa- 
nies that pomp two-thirds of Peru’s 
1 80,000- barrd-pei-day crude out- 
put, Reuters reported from lima. 

The president ordered the Ener- 
gy Ministry and the state-oil com- 
pany Pctroperu to negotiate new 
contracts within 90 days with Occi- 
dental Petroleum Corp-, Belco 
Corp. and the Occidemal-Bridas 
consortium. 

The government said it also 
would review extra tax benefits and 

order the companies to invest those 
funds in exploration. 

Mr. Garda said that the moves 
would end the colonial concepts 
that enriched other nations but nn- 
ooverished Peru. 


BP Earnings 
Rise by 5.5% 

(Continued from Page II) 
substantial profits through “swap” 
t ransactions, in which it Borrows in 
the international bond markets at 
fine terms and rdends the proceeds 
at a higher rate. 

BP officials confirmed that the 
company is looking at other posa- 
ble opportunities in financial ser- 
vices. But Mr. Horton said specula- 
tion that BP would buy a major 
British commercial bank was “way 
out of the ballpark.” 

Another BP official said: 
“There’s no question of service sta- 
tions taking deposits." 

The company noted that oQ 
prices have strengthened this sum- 
mer but warned that the market 
remains “fragile." 

BFs exploration efforts off Chi- 
na's shore have proved disappoint- 
ing, said Roger Bexon, another 
managin g director. So far, the com- 
ppny Tins completed 13 wells there 
without a acoificant discovery. 


mornings of proceedings — after- 
noons were left free for outdoor 
diversions — was the strength of 
sentiment for aggressive govern- 
ment action in the currency mar- 
kets to drive the dollar dowi there- 
by making U.S. industry and 
agriculture more competitive. 

Two such voices were those of C. 
Fred Bergsten and Richard N. 
Cooper, scholars who bdd high 
posts in the Carter administration. 
The Fed official said he was “taken 
aback” by the vehemence of the 
interventionists and worried that 
such a move would jeopardize the 
inflow of foreign funds the United 
States has relied upon to help fi- 
nance its budget deficit. The lob of 
such inflows, he said, would raise 
interest rates and that could per- 
haps push the economy into a defi- 
cit-raising recession. 

But probably the most provoca- 
tive of the half-dozen academic pa- 
pers was that delivered by Robert 
Solomon, a former head of the 
Fed’s international finance divi- 
sion. who argued against the popu- 
lar notion that the U.S. economy 
has become “two-tiered,” with a 
manufacturing sector that is lan- 
guishing amid vigorous service and 
construction sectors. He said bis 
analysis of the composition of 
American output shows little, if 
any, relative weakening of manu- 
facturing. 

In the end. the participants here 
found a strong consensus for the 
not- so- surprising conclusion that 
the U.S. budget deficit was at the 
root or the problem of a still-over- 
valued dollar. 

Since the Kansas City Fed’s 
symposium was moved to Jackson 
Hole in 1982, its attraction has in- 
creased steadily. About one-half of 
the 137 people invited this year 
attended, a remarkably high re- 
sponse, according to Barry Robin- 
son, vice president for public af- 
fairs. The price of S95 included 
three meals, two receptions and 
two continental breakfasts as well 
as copies of the lengthy academic 
papers. 

Australian Bank to lift Prime 

Reuters 

SYDNEY — Australian Bank 
Ltd. said Thursday that it mil raise 
its prime lending rale point to 
18.25 percent, effective SepL 2. 


Compiled fa r Oar Stuff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dollar was 
strong most of the day Thursday in 
New York trading, gaming support 
from unexpectedly vigorous U.S. 
housing starts and buying ahead of 
the release of U.S. economic data 
on Friday. 

The 24-hour closure of banks in 
Bolivia and effective 95-percent de- 
valuation of its peso also might 
have sparked some flight capital 
buying, dealers said. 

“Afte 


Fter trading higher in Europe, 
the dollar initially faltered in New 
York then rose after the housing 
starts were released,” said Daniel 
Holland, vice president at Dis- 
count Corp. of New York. 

“It wasn't as much July's 1.4- 
percent increase that did it as the 
strong revision in last month’s fig- 


ure," he said. The government re- 
vised June housing starts upward to 
a strong 22 -percent gain from a 
0 . 1 -percem drop originally report- 
ed. 

Traders said buyers were antici- 
pating Friday's release of more 
U.S. economic figures and Mon- 
day's Labor Day holiday in the 
United States. 

“The Federal Reserve did not 
inject liquidity into the market as 
expected.” Mr. Holland said, "and 
dealers are hesitant to sell the dol- 
lar ahead erf money supply and the 
leading indicators.” 

In London, the pound was little 
changed at S1.4000 from SI. 4002 
on Wednesday. In New York, it 

eased to $1.3995 from S1.4035. 

Other late rates in New York, 
compared with late rates Wednes- 


day, included: 2.778 Deutsche 
marks, up from 2.769: 8.495 _ 
French francs, up from 8.449; 
2276 Swiss francs, up from 2.267 '* 
and 3.1255 Dutch guilders, up from 
3.1200. 

In Europe, currency dealers said - 
that the Soviet Union bought dol- 
lars, but they did not know why. . 
The dealers were divided on wbetn- - 
er the Soviet purchases were larger 
than normal. 

The South African rand con tin-' 
ued to attract much interest, even 
though only a few London banks . 
were prepared to quote it and very 
s m al l amramp; were trade! 

Dealers said that quotes ranged 
from 35 cents to 43 cents. The rand 
finished Thursday in London trad- 
ing at 38.4 cents and at 41.9 cents in 
New York. (Reuters. A?, IHT) 


THE EUROMARKETS 


14 DM Issues Are Planned for September 

Corp. International It pays 10 per- 
cent a year and was priced at 99%. 
This issue closed just within the 
total fees of IK percent at a dis- 
count of Itt. 

Other new issues launched in- 
cluded two Canadian -dollor bonds, 
bringing the total to four in the last 

^For/credit Canada issued a 75- 

million-dollar bon! guaranteed by 
Ford Motor Credit Co~ paying 
10 ft percent a year over seven years 
and priced at 100ft. Goldman 
Sachs International Corp. was the 
lead manager- The issue was of- 
fered at a discount of about 2 ft on 
the market, outside its total fees or 
lft percent. 

University du Quebec issued 25- 
miUion-dollar bond issue with a 
coupon of KW percent and seven- 
year maturity. The par-priced bond 
was guaranteed by Banque Inter- 
nationale Luxembourg. 

The first dual-currency issue of 
the week was launched Thursday, a 
12 -bilHon-yen bond for Westing- 
house Electric Corp. The issue pay's 
7 Vi percent, matures in March 1991 
and was priced at 101ft. It is re- 
deemable for $5638 million, which 
gjves an effective exchange rate of 
212.85 ven to the dollar. The yen 
has beat trading at around 237 to 
the dollar in recent weeks. 


Reuters 

FRANKFURT — Banks are 
planning to launch 14 Deutsche 
mark Eurobond issues in Septem- 
ber, for a total volume of 23 billion 
DM, a Bundesbank spokesman 
said Thursday. 

The entire calendar is composed 
of straight issues. No floating-rate 
notes, zero-coupon or dual-curren- 
cy issues are planned. All but one 
are public bonds, with the single 
private placement being for 50 mil- 
lion DM. the spokesman added. 

In August, banks registered the 
planned launched of eight DM Eu- 
robond issues, with a total volume 
of 1305 billion DM. 

In the Eurobond market Thurs- 
day, aggressively priced new doUar- 
siraight issues starred in a day in 
which secondary-market prices 
generally ended little changed from 
Wednesday's closing, dealers said 
Traders in the secondary market 
are thought to have been waiting 
for guidance from Friday’s an- 
nouncement of the U5. Index of 
Leading Economic Indicators. 

By the close of secondary-market 
trading, three dollar straights had 
been launched for UJS. corporate 
borrowers, totaling $700 million. 

The dealers added that there was 
also talk in the market that further 
“sushi” issues — targeted at Japa- 


nese investors — were near to mar- 
ket. 

Texaco Capital Corp. issued a 
S230-nrillion bon! guaranteed by 
Texaco lnc„ paying 10 percent a 
year over five years and priced at 
10114. On the market, the issue 
dosed well outside its total 1 ft- 
percent fees at a discount of about 
2 ft. 

A dealer at a U.S. bank said the 
terms on the issue were the result of 
fierce bidding for the mandate. “1 
think the market price is fair.” he 
sai! 

He noted that only on July 17, 
Texaco Capital Inc. had issued a 
S 300- million bon! paying 10 per- 
cent a year over 10 years and priced 
at 98ft. This bond quickly slumped 
to trade at a big discount to the 
issue price and Thursday was 
quoted at about 95ft. 

General Electric Credit Corp. is- 
sued a S200-million, 9ft-perceat 
bon! priced at 100ft. The bonds 
initially mature in 1992. but can be 
extended until 2005. This issue was 
also outride its total lft-percent 
fees on the market, ending at a 
discoun t of about 2ft. The lead 
manager was Mitsubishi Finance 
International 

General Motors Acceptance 
Corp. launched a 5250- million, sev- 
en-year bon! through Swiss Bank 






Thursdays 

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7% 7* 7% — 
13% 13* 13ft + 
»* 20* »M + 
13% 13* 13ft 
•% 6 % 4% + 
7* 6% 7ft + 
16ft Kft »* 


34% 2S% OttrTP Z» 
15 9% Ovt-Exp 

24* 12 OwenM .40 
6 % ft Oxoco 


31* 31ft 31* + * 
10 * M* MHk— % 
21 £ Tl^fc 2l£— ft 


32ft 71ft PNC S 
53ft 39% PdCCOr 
15% 7 PacFat 
15 10% PacTel 

17M 10* PoeoPti 
BM 6 PfsiCMX 


12 PorkOil 
4 PotnlM 
5% PaulHr 
5% Paul PI 
7% PaytS» 
9% PoafcHC 


U2 44 43 

1 JOO 26 W 

JO 4fl 31 
W 

13 u £ 
60 48 13. 

f T* 

142 

15 


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21 PenaEn ia JJ a 
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7% PeopEx JBe A 3» 
24% Petrlte 1.12 4A 73 
4 Ptirmct . , .305 
Tft P5FS .10e U 21» 


2ft PlmxAm 


7 PlonSI 

8* PoFdk 

16% prcvMo 
21 Porex 
1% Powell 
9* Pewrtcs 
5ft PwConv 


9 4ft PrpdLo 
SM 3 Priam 
16ft 6% PrtcCms 
66 36ft Priced 

22% 9 PrtTora 

6 4* ProdOo .16 14 

42 20% PraoCk .12 J 

15% 12% ProelTr 1 JO 9B 

m% 13% Piavin 

7% 3% PiHImn 

26% ie% PuriBn 60 L7 


BOe 3J 1002 

40 

I486 

60 72 m 
82 2L7 2479 
.12 1 J ID 
81 
716 
13 
13 
67 
70 

■” - ,3 
110 
30 
85 
38 
63 
7 
04 
17 
563 
1 


30* 30 30* + * 

45% 45 45* + % 

14% 14* 14% + ft 

13* 13ft 13ft— ft 

14% 14% 14* 

7% 7* 7% + * 
24ft 24 24ft + ft 
12% 12 lift 
M 69k 6*— * 
11 * 11 % lUfc— * 
11 % 11 * 11 % + ft 
16* 16* 16ft— ft 
14* Mft Mft 
32* 32% 32* + * 
10 9* 9*— M 

34 33ft 31ft 
27* 27 27* + Vfc 

14* 13ft 13% — ft 
28% 27% 27% 

69k 6% 6%— ft 
9% 9* 9% + * 

15* 15ft 15% + * 
2* 2* 2* 

25% 25% 25%—* 
22 21% 22 + % 
34ft 34* 34ft — ft 
9 9 9 + ft 

13* 13* 13% + ft 
22ft 21% 22 + ft 

24% 24* 24% 

2 % 2 M 2 *— ft 

12 11 % ll%— ft 

UM 11* U*— % 
32* 32ft 32* + % 
B* 7* B + * 
4 3% 3%— * 

51 10 % II + * 

58 57* 57V» 

12ft 12 12 

4ft «% 4ft „ 
38% 38% 38% — ft 
12% 12* 12% + * 
17% 17* 17* — ft 
7% 7* 7ft + * 

39ft 23ft 23ft— % 


16 8* QMS 6 

9% 3* Quodrx 
13% 9 QuafcC* 
32* 16% Quantm 
5% 2* QueslM 
13 8* Quixote 

13* 7ft Quotm 


285 
20B4 
3B W 
248 
1727 
43 
2033 


10% 10% HW + M 
9% 9* 9* + % 
10% 10* 10% + ft 
23* 23 23ft + ft 
4% 4% 4% + ft 

12ft 12 11 — * 

10% 9% 9%— % 



5 StatBM 

JO 

26 

190 

30 

19ft stondvs 

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19 Shuttle i 

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11 





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7% 

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10* SlewSlv 






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21 


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7ft Stratus 




38* 

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26 

22 



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6% SvmbT 





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18ft 

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14* syAsoc 




7* 

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lift 

6% Svslntg 




11M 

6* SvStGn 




25M 

12ft Sysimi 





7% 7 7% + % 

27% 27% 27% + * 
15% 15% 15% 

22M 22ft 22* + ft 
31% 31 31 Ik — * 

4% 4* 4* 

4% 4* 4% 

17* 16% 17* + * 
23ft 23ft 23ft 
6% 6* 6* 

10 17% 18 + * . 

34 33% 34 —* . 

32% 32* 32% + ft 
170% 169% 170 + * 

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9M 9* 9ft 

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10% -9% 9% ' 

13* 12% 13 — * 
3* 3*. Jft— ft . 

18* 18 IB* + ft 
75ft 14% 15* + % 
5H 5ft 5% 

9% 9% 9%— * 
11 % 11 * lift 
24* 24* 24M — ft 


It* 

18% 

U* 

14% 

11 

7% 


ID* 5V 
35ft 254 
12% 34 

7% 51 

20* 11 
M* 41 
10 74 

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12% 31 

18% 11 


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Ale 

.1 

94 

7 

6% 

7 

RPMs 

B6 

14 

107 

16M 

16* 

16* + * 

Rods vs 



297 

12* 

11% 

12* + * 

RodtnT 



79 

11% 

11* 

11*— * 

Rodion 



6 

7ft 

7ft 

7%— % 

Room 



109 

4* 

4% 

4% 

Ralnrs 

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3J 

198 

31 M 

304k 

31* + % 

RavEn 

J4 

13 

40 

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19 

19 

RedJCr 



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23 

3 

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28* +1 

Reeves 



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12 

11* 

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6% 

6% 

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Reels s 

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1 

15* 

15* 

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Rellab 



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5M 

5M 

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S2 

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9 

9* 

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479 

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13 

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17 

14ft 

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215 

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ReufrH 

350 IJ 

22 

26% 

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Rev Rev 

1J4 

11 

20 

39* 

39* 

39* + * 

Rhodes 

J4 

IJ 

23 

1416 

M* 

14* + * 

Rodims 



556 

7% 

7M 

7* 

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10 

21% 

21ft 

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15* 

15 

15 + M 

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162 

28* 

28* 

28* 

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3 

25 

11% 

11% 

lift + M 

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53 

12* 

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12* + % 

Rouses 

B4 

2B 

386 

22% 

22 

32 — * 

Roy Rim 



58 

ID* 

10% 

10ft— M 

RUYlRS 



2(0 

3* 

3% 

3ft — M 

Rust Pel 



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lift 

15% 

15% 

RvanFs 



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16ft 

16* 

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80 19 
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160 38 


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60 18 


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33 11% 5afHHtl 
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lift 6ft San Bor 

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10 % 6 ft ScanOP 
M* 10* SconTr 
13% 04b Scherer 

25ft 15ft SchknA 
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20 % 12 Sdtex 
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4% 2* SecTap 

12ft 1% SEED 

30% 16 SeB»l 

11 % 5M Semlai 

10% 6 Sensor 
16* 10 % 5i/cM«r 
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8 % 4M SvcFret 

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34% 23MSIWMK1 
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38* 24% S honey S .15 S 

16 % 10 ShenSes 12 

11 % 5% Silicon 

22% Wt 5IUc»n$ 

23U 11% snkVol 

24M 11% SUIcnx 

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17% Uft Slmpin 80 58 

15* 10% SI owns 

24* 13% Slxderi. 

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28% 16* SOUtrsf 80 3B 24 
9* SM Sovran .10 1 j 121 
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19ft 8% Speedy 37 

2B* BM Spctnm 47 

g% 5% SeecCtl J i 1IB 
16% 13 Sol re 64 

19% 3M SlorSr* 238 


13% 13* Uft 
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7% 7* 7M 
20% 20* 20% + M 
am 20 * 20 % + % 

48% 40* 40% + tfc 
19* 19ft If* 

15% 15 IS — % 
71% 71% 71% 

5ft 5ft 5ft 
6 % 6 % 6 % 

5% 5% S%— * 
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20* 20 20 — Jk 

7% 7* 7M- ft 
16 15% 15% — * 

11% T2% 13* + ft 
25* 25 25% + % 

4* 4* 4» 

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12% I2M 12% 4- ft 
5* 5% 5%— * 

7% 7ft 7% + % 
2% 2* 2* 

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7* <% 6ft- * 
8% 8* Oft— M 
15* 15 ■ 15 
21* 21 21 
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32* 32ft 32ft— M 
36% 36 36% + % 

19 18ft 19 , „ 

11 10% 11 + ft 

27* 26% 27* +% 
lift 11% im „ 
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13% 13* ]3* 
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9 » 9 

2% 2* Mfc 
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28* 20ft 21* 

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4% 4* 4* 

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17* 14%. 17* + * 

4% 6* 6% 

29% 29% 29% — * 
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23* 23% 23% — ft 
6 % 6 % 6 * + * 
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•ft 6 * •* + h 


| 



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10 

9% 

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138 

4ft 

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341 








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498 

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8 


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13% 

12% 

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13 

78 

17% 

17* 

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lift 

11* 

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10 

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32* 

32 


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161 

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18 

111 

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lift 


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4.7 

30 

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29* 

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M 

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27 

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31% 

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B4 

17 

109 

20* 

20* 

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40% 30ft ZlWIUt 
7* 2* Zltai 

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15% &* Zondvn 


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36% 34M 34% + ft 
2% 2% 2% + * 
•ft 6ft 4ft 
12% 12 12% 


' I 


Page 13 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 1985 



PEANUTS 



WHEN WE BPE THE-BUS 
ID SCHOOL NEXT WEEK, 
I'LL PROBABLY SIT WITH 
MY 5WEET BA 0600.. 

V 



IM NOT YOUR SWEET 
Ibabboo. AND 1*0 CRAWL 
TO SCHOOL ON MY 
I HANDS AND KNEE5 BEFORE 
l‘P 5IT WITH you; 


IM SURE HE'LL 
INSIST THAT I SfT 
BY THE WINDOW.. 


ILL INSIST THAT VOU 
|» SIT ON THE ROOF*! 



books 


BLONDIE 


ACROSS 
1 Ribbonlike 
fabric 

5 Artists' cuit 
9 Hide one's pelf 

14 Plant having 
fleshy leaves 

15 Surrounded by 

16 Dye for mi lady 

17 Hostage of 
Cort£s 

19 Platform 
26 Hi-fi pans 

21 Claim 

22 Periods 
24 Tip over 

26 Spanish duke- 
general 
27. Writer Ben 

Williams 

28 Gal. or lb. 

31 Year in 
Sylvester II’s 
reign 

32" 

Heldenleben,” 
Strauss work 
34 Braid used for 
trimming 
37 Bounders 
39 Authority 
46 Windflower 

41 David 

LilienthaJ of 
A.E.C. fame 

42 Famed poet's 
initials 

43 Acme 

44 Designer 
Cassini 

® New York 


46 Certain 
charges 

47 Wrongs 

49 Horae for 

"Mona Lisa" 

51 Hors d' oeuvre 
item 

54 Coyote State 
capital 

56 Diminish 

57 Mexican 
industrial city 

60 Loose garment 

61 Lament 

62 Music halls 

63 Heap 

64 Sapling, e.g. 

65 Nictate 

DOWN 

1 School of 
whales 

2 An arm of the 
U.N. 

3 Capital of 
Uruguay 

4 Singer Clark 

5 Bewilders 

6 Cast Asian 
river 

7 Chinese pasta 
appetizer 

8 "Lolita" shelf- 
partner 

9 Fissile rock 

10 Revealing 

11 Feed the pot 

12 Unexpected 
impediment 

13 Lagomorph 
Times, edited by Eugene Maluku. 


8/30/85 


18 Like some 
G.I.’s 

21 Jump and 
thump 

22 Latin dance 

23 Easily swayed 

25 Long John 

Silver, for one 

27 April 21 is this 
saint's day 

29 "Orfeo” 
composer 

36 Quoits player 

32 Self 

33 Disregard 

35 Utah Beach 
craft 

36 Georgia 

Clark, former 
U.S. Treasurer 

38 Very striking 

45 Sans 

(hopeless): Fr. 

46 Rut 

48 Loesser’s “A 
Bushel and 

4® River of 
forgetfulness 

56 Pyrites, e.g. 

51 Broadway nit 

52 Be contiguous 

53 Unfortunate 
Zola courtesan 

55 Soprano Borkh 

57 This lies 
between P.S.T. 
and C.S-T. 

58 Suffix with 
velvet 

59 Buffalo's kin 


DENNIS THE MENACE 




ANGELS UNAWARES: 

20th Century Portraits 

By T. S. Matthews. 294 pages. 517.95. 
Tichwr <£ Fields, 52 Vanderbilt Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. 10017. 

Reviewed by Jonathan Yardlcy 

T S. MATTHEWS is almost as aid as the 
• century and has been, witness to much of 
its excitement and glamour. Bom into nigh 
privilege as an heir to the Procter & Gamble 
Co. fortune, he chose journalism over business; 
be ginning with The New Republic m the 
1920s, he moved to Time magazine (erf winch 
he eventually became managing editor), then 
entered a career as free-lance writer and me- 
moirist “Angels Unawares" is his latest ven- 
ture in this latter pursuit, a collection of brief 
s of ■»»» w omen — and one Jack 
terrier — whom Matthews held in 
than customary regard, 
y are a mixed lot, and “Angels Un- 
awares” is a mixed book. Its two best chapters 
are about rather eccentric men for whom Mat- 
thews had great if unsentimental affection: 
John Potter Cuyler, who for a time was Mat- 
thews’s father-in-law, and Whittaker Cham- 
bos, with whom Matthews worked at Time. 
The less succeKful chapters, of which, unfortu- 
nately, there are quite a number, are brief 
portraits in which Matthews either fails to 
bring his subjects to life or does not demon- 
strate a connection with his subjects sufficient- 
ly strong to justify writing about them. 

Matthews was an adolescent when he first 
met Cuyler, who lived in Princeton, New Jer- 
sey, with Ins large family and int e r mit te n tly 
conducted an undistinguished career as an 
artist. His real vocation was as an observer of 
the passing show and as a consumer of its 
greatest pleasures, among them good drink and 
good fellowship. He was given to aphorisms, 
whether his own (“The only perfect dimate is 
bed") or those erf rustic philosophers (“As soon 
asyougetootofbedinthe morning, it’s ten to 
one against you"). His family included Ms 
wife's unde, Dr. Alfred Baker, a gentle old 

fellow of firm habits: 

“He insisted on going to the post office to 
mail his letters, of whichbe wrote several every 
day, because he answered all Ms second-class 


should reply to him- 



*0* them — g" i* who 

SSSSS-keiffiSSS 


out to turn that an advertisement from Realsilk 
Hosiery or Wearever Shirts was not meant to 
be answered. Dr. Baker was unconvinced. 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


conspiracy: — 

mesne Chambers: ... 

“After the tumult of the Hiss trial, 
beis lived in isolation with Ms wife ^“d 
children on Ms Maryland 

there to see him. I often wished thM the 

who were so sure he was a scoundrel, or those 
who had doubts of Mm, cotM see him at baas* 

with Ms family or could meet Ms wife»Es*c^ 

. . Neither Chambers nor Ms brifr «*r-- 
drank spirits, but whenever I 
always a bottle of wMskeyforim- BJrwt 
good cook, and those farm meals wot feafla. 
taMsovra house, Chambers was notAe sar- 
donic, warily silent character he seemed out- 
side, but hospitable, relaxed, : 

These portraits of Cuyler and Chamber^- 
affectionate yet clear-eyed, arc the high m*£ 
meats of “Angels Unawares. ’ lha«ghffie»- 
are other good ones, most of the rest tend to- 
fall into predictable categories: passing en- 
counters with the eminent, of the f amous 
persons-I-have-met variety tc > wMdi retired 
journalists are unfortunately addic ted, skeus^ \ 
es of family members whom Matthews fads to 
maif<» interesting to readers not privileg ed to 
belong to the family; and portraits of vanons 
retainers — chauffeurs, governesses, odd-job. 
mim J bootl egge rs — that are intended to be 
affectionate rat that succeed primarily in be*. 

redeemed, though, by Mat-: 

Potter Cuyler lie has Ms view firmly fixed on 
the h uman comedy; more often than not be, 
sees through its vanities with clarity, and he 
He y a jbes with a cranky tolerance that 
not without charm. “Angels Unawares” is not 
a very substantial memoir, but its best mo-* 
merits are good ones indeed. 

Jonathan YareBey is at the staff (rf The Wash 7 
ington Post. 


REX MORGAN 

z 


“THE REAL PROBLEM WITH 


IV 


COCAINE \S THAT THE ft JON DOES NT LAST 
l VERY LONG— AMD AS THE VICTIM CONTINUES 

to use rr, rr must be snorted more and 

MORE OFTEN TO GET THE H/Gtf ' SOMETIMES 
AS OFTEN AS FOUR TO FIVE TIMES AN HOUR/ 


jasper I 

JEDGWSUI 
VfrS 


U AFTER A WHILE, ONE'S WHOLE LIFE IS 
[ COCAINE— NOTHING ELSE MATTERS' IN 
ADDITION TO THE PHYSICAL HARM IT PRODUCES, 
IT OFTEN CAUSES MENTAL DISORDERS, 

OFTEN SERIOUS ONES / y\ rrr - 

ANYONE 

WHO 

EXPERIMENTS 

with ms A 

FOOL/ 




•I'm okay. Ijust felt so bad for Joey 

THAT I HELPED HIM CRY." 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
Is by Henri Arnold and Bob Lae 


GARFIELD 

DKAV, SLURP, GO OUT AND FIND 

A COSTUME BEFITTING THE SIDE 

KICK OF THE CAPED AVENGER 



c n n in 


□ 

BHD 

□ 

Enm 


□anno aaaa 

□□□so □□□□ 


a/30/85 


AinsterdamPortCi^^ 
To Dance Night Away 

The Associated Press 

A MSTERDAM — Nine giant dockside* 
cranes at the Port of Amste rdam are to. 
make a dancing debut Saturday as part of S 1 
local art student’s final examination project ? 1 

The student, Barbara van Loon, will open' 
the performance with the cranes hoisting large, 
yellow weights into the air. The sounds tbs' 
machines make will be amplified to form their 
, accompaniment, as, guided by their operator^ - 
they dance a pas-de-deux and a waltz. ■ 

The performance is being sponsored by the 
a ty, with help from a local stevedore company:- 


BRIDGE 


UnecramMe these four Jumbles, 
one lensrlo each square; to form 
four ordinary words. 


GLITH 



□ 



ORRIP 





1 NOCARE 


!■■■■ 





By Alan Tmscott 

O N the diagramed deal. 
North and Sooth reached 
a highly optimistic four-spade 
contract after North baa fol- 
lowed Ms original pass with 
two consecutive negative dou- 
bles. The dub king was led, 
and Sooth could see little hope. 
He seemed doomed to lose at 
least one trump trick and three 
tricks in the minor suits. 

He took the club ace and led 
the spade king. He hoped for a 
small miracle, and was reward- 
ed when the queen mipeaied 
on his left East coma have 


and played a chib to defeat the 
game and win the match; But 
Be did not see the danger. Be 
allowed the spade king toyriii, 
and South took advantage of 
the opportunity. He cashed 
four rounds of hearts, discard- 
ing a loser, and a contract that 
seemed impassible was thus 

mflrir. ... 

Had East found tb& right 
defense South would have 
been left to brood on Ms deci- 
sion to take the first trick. The 
advantage of a holdup was not 
easy to see at the table, bat it 
would have cot the defendera’ 
communications, as would a 
dob return at the second trick. 


NORTH CD) . 

♦ 185 • - 

a q j a 

OQ /732 
. ♦ B 3 

ik., t 111 IF* * 

♦ KQ 1 D 75 *9642 .? 
SOUTH 

♦ KJ 9843 
O K 42 

B 5 .•* 

♦ A J 

South 



North 

Pass 

East 

Pass 

Sntt 

1 4k 

r? 

DU. 

2 ♦ 

DU. 

3 

DU. 

Pass 

3 4% 

Ptari 

4 4 

Pass 

Pass 

Pas^ 

West led the 

dob king. 



UDDEGI 



■■ 


WHAT THE 
CARD ©AME AT 
THE OIL FIELD 
MUST HAVE BEEN. 

Now arrange the circled letters to 
rami the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Print answer here: " j, I I I I I ] ’ 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: GRIPE MOUTH GYPSUM SUPERB 
Answer What small sled dogs are called— 

"MUSH" PUPPIES 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Atoms 

Amsterdam 

Athens 

Bar ce lona 

Bel euwl e 

Berfln 

Brussels 

Bucharest 


Copenhagen 

Caste Del sol 

Dublin 

Edinburgh 

Florence 

Frankfurt 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

Istanbul 

Las Palmas 


London 


Milan 

Moscow 

Munich 

Nice 

Oslo 

Parti 


Reylclavlk 

Rome 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 


Zurich 

MIDDLE 


HIGH 
C F 
24 75 

23 73 

30 86 
38 82 
20 68 
2T 70 

24 75 

26 79 

25 77 

21 70 

27 81 
U 57 
M 57 
27 81 
73 73 

21 70 
16 61 

26 79 

31 SB 
29 B2 

23 73 

32 90 
2* 79 

22 72 
n M 

25 77 
19 06 

26 79 
19 66 
10 50 
25 77 

19 66 
73 73 

24 73 
IS 64 
22 72 

20 68 

EAST 


LOW 
C F 
17 63 
12 54 
21 70 
17 63 
14 57 
10 50 

10 50 
20 68 
16 61 
14 57 
17 63 

11 52 
41 

56 


5 
12 

V ._ 

8 46 
55 
68 
77 
64 
57 
54 
54 
48 
41 
64 
46 
14 57 

7 45 
3 37 

14 57 

15 59 

8 46 
IS 59 
15 59 
11 a 

6 43 


lr 

d 

fr 

r 

fr 

fr 

fr 

o 

fr 

fr 

fr 

fr 

fr 

fr 

fr 

fr 

fr 

fr 

ei 

fr 

fr 

d 

cl 

fr 


ASIA 






NIGH 

LOW 



c 

F 

C 

F 


Bangkok 

31 

88 

26 

79 


Bel line 

28 

82 

18 

64 


Hem Kang 

26 

79 

24 

75 


Manila 

38 

86 

25 

77 


New Delhi 

34 

93 

27 

81 


Seoul 

30 

86 

23 

73 


Shanghai 

38 

86 

24 

75 

fr 

Singapore 

31 

88 

26 

79 

0 

Taipei 

33 

91 

23 

73 

cl 

Tokyo 

AFRICA 

32 

90 

25 

77 

fr 

Alelm 

28 

82 

12 

54 

fr 

Cairo 

— 

_ 

— 


no 

Cape Town 

24 

75 

10 

5D 

d 

Casablanca 

26 

79 

19 

66 

d 

Harare 

21 

70 

6 

43 

fr 

Lagos 

— 

— 

— 

— 

no 

NaWbl 

26 

79 

W 

57 

a 

Tunis 

29 

84 

17 

63 

fr 




Buenos Aires 

22 

72 

11 

52 

0 

Caracas 

2B 

82 

2D 

68 

r 

Lima 

19 

66 

14 

57 

0 


18 

64 

11 

52 

d 


29 

84 

19 

66 

0 





Atlanta 


9 48 
25 77 
21 70 

18 64 
23 73 


Ankara 33 91 

Beirut 31 81 

Damascus 36 07 

Jerusalem 26 79 

TeiAvl* 30 M 

OCEANIA 

Auckland 13 56 7 45 fr 

Sydney 16 61 13 55 r 

cl-ckkidv; fo-forov. fr-lolr, tvholl; 
Mv showers; sh-smm; sl-Mormy. 


17 
29 
24 

CMCMB 2B 

Denver 33 

Detroit 27 

Henoliitn 32 

Honshu, 32 

Los Anooles 33 

Miami 31 

Mlmwaeolb 24 

Montreal 25 

Nassau X 

Hew York 26 

San Francisco 31 

Seattle 21 

Toronto 24 

Washington 32 

OHtvercasf,- pc-aartly 


a o 
84 21 
75 18 
H 18 
91 15 
81 16 
90 24 

90 22 

91 21 
88 27 
75 16 
77 16 
86 21 
79 19 
88 25 
70 10 
75 IS 
90 20 
cloudy; 


48 PC 
70 PC 
64 fr 
64 St 
59 PC 
61 d 
75 PC 
72 it 
70 fr 
81 VC 
61 It 
61 fr 
70 O 
66 PC 
77 Cl 
50 fr 
59 PC 
68 fr 
r-roln; 


5WXF *2P^SfiEL, , = CHANNEL: Slight. FRANKFURT: Fair. Terms, 
*?— J I7 , “*8}. LONDON: Rain. Temp. 20—13 (68—551. MADRID: Hr. 

HEW YORK: Partly cloudy. Temp. 27— 19 (81 —66). 
PARIS' Cloudy. Temp. 26 — 13 179 —551. ROME” Fair Tema yc_.ii m — cc i 


W>rid Stock Markets 

Via Agence France- Presse Aug. 29 

Casing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated 


10900 10780 
13700 13710 
4290 4199 
57600 56990 

10300 vm 

45600 45KB 
1713 1645 

104000 vem 

119300119050 

2280 2225 


ABN 

ACF HoWbia 

AEGON 

AKZO 

AhoM 

AMEV 

A ‘Dam Rubber 
Amro Bank 
BVG 

Buehrmann T 

Coland Hlda 

Ebevler-NDU 

Fokker 

Gist Brocades 

Heineken 

Haoaovens 

KiJUt 

Naanfen 

NatNedder 

Nadlloyd 

OceVander G 

Pokhoad 

Philips 

Rnbeca 

Rndamco 

Rallnco 

Rorenlo 

Royal Dutch 

Unilever 

VanOmmeren 

VMF Stark 

VNU 


51030 509 

24430 244 

9620 9630 
1200 12440 
239 23740 
283 T Wi m 
B30 130 

8930 88 

220 220 
104JO 

3840 3830 
129 JO 12930 
78 77 

215 21630 
150 15U5B 
6280 A2JD 
6240 6180 
49 49 

7170 77.10 
180 ISO 
33S 336 

62-90 6530 

47.90 4729) 

75-80 7560 

13X60 13X70 
6830 6830 

46.10 46J0 
19440 19240 

wnoi 33030 

29.10 29.10 

250 25030 
22138 216 


AHP CBS Gem index : 21848 
Previous : 21730 


Artwd 

Bekoerf 

Cockerfll 

CObepo 

EBES 

GB-Inno-BM 

GBL 

Gevoert 

Hoboken 

interc om 

Krodl eibonfc 

Pe Iran no 

Soc Genera le 

Soflna 

Solway 

Titian Eh* 

Unerg 

Vlellle Manluwne 

£"[Tenf Stack Index 
•frovtaus : 2370 JS 


1585 1600 

6000 5850 
207 205 

2970 ZwcP 
3730 3700 
1905 1910 
4040 4010 
5400 5360 
224S 2230 
9080 9M0 
6140 6230 

1800 1805 

7350 7400 

4980 4775 
4040 4000 
4950 4980 
1700 1700 
8120 8158 

; 237X59 


AE^-Tdefumten 

Amarauera 

BASF 

Baver 

Bav Hypo Bank 

B« Vereutsbank 

BHF-Bank 

BMW 

Commerzbank 

ContGuRimi 

Dolmler-Beni 


143 1U 
1410 1407 
356 356 


Oeu«»-— =— 

Deutsche Bonn 

Dresdner Bank 
GHH 

H oinenor • 


44 

fS g 

ease 

Z£ 9 


HUGtUH 
IWKA 
Kan + Sab 
Karafadf 
Kouftiaf 

KJoeckner h-d 
K hwckner werke 
KruanstaM 
Unde 
Lufthansa 

MAN 

Mannesman/) 

Muertch Rueck 
Nix (tori 
PKI 

Porsche 
Preussaa 
PWA 
RWE 

Rhdnmetall 

Scherlns 
SEL 
tHeme ns 
Thvssen 
Veba 

Commu hanh Index : M68JS 
Previous : M68.10 


Close Pre*. 

715 725 

21640 21630 
121 JO 12M) 
194 193 

365 359 

_ 310 289 

31530 31450 
ssasu 264 
295.90 295 

2Sfl 285 
61 6738 
115 113 

516 50630 
22X00 229 

16730 163 

20030 19830 
1835 1825 
54430 543 

657 660 

1330 1336 
284 281 

13030 141 

191J0 191 

311 313 

466 460 

357 34530 
5S3 567 

129 JO 130 
23830 ^7 o' 
334 33X70 
614 61850 


I Hwngftaog 1 


Bfc East Asia 
Oieune Kang 
China UsM 
Green island 
Hans Seng Bank 
Henderson 
China Gas 

HK Electric 
HK Realty A 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HK Shane Bank 
HK Telephone 
HK Youmotel 
HK wharf 
Hutch Wha mp oa 
Hyson 
inlT City 
Jardlne 
Jardlne Sec 
KewtaonMofor 
Mlramar Hotel 
New World 
Orient Overseas 
SHK Prans 
Slehm 

Swire Pacific A 
To! Cheung 
Wan K« 


wine On Co 
winsor 
World Inti 

Pn^Mtilua^' 


2230 2240 
1848 1840 
1540 15.90 
8 8.10 
4U5 4SJ5 
245 240 

1040 1030 
825 030 

1140 12 

36 3630 
635 645 

7 JO 7J5 
8JS X90 
330 X42S 
745 7.10 

til to to « 
043 045 

093 094 

13 1110 
1450 1440 
930 9 JO 

44 45 

7 JO 740 
1.95 2 

1X20 1X20 
2-55 ISO 
2530 2540 
1.97 IDS 
048 090 

*!£ .5 

545 115 

2J» 295 

165119 


AA Carp Sll 

All led-Ly cuts 333 

Anglo Am Gold S6B 

ass Brit Poods 232 

ass Doirles no 

304 
569 
313 
341 
220 


BAT. 

Bjedu.m 


SUM. 

226 

iTWi 

228 

146 

384 

562 

30# 

338 

213 


BL 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Boats 

Bowater Indus 
BP 

Bril Home St 
Bril Telecom 
Bril Aerospace 
Brltall 
BTR 
But-mah 
Cable Wireless 
Cadbury Sdn* 
Charter Cons 
Commercial U 
Com Gold 
Courtaulds 
DahKfv 
De Beers* 
Distillers 
Drlefonteln 
Fl sons 
FreesiGed 
GEC 

Gen Accident 
GKN 

Glaxo I 13 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

ICI 

Imperial Group 
Jaguar 

Land Securities 
Legal General 
Lloyds Bank 

Lonrha 

I iifff l 

Marks and Sp 
Metal Box 
Midland Bank 

Not West Bank 

PandO 
Pllklnoton 
Plessev 
Prudential 
Rocai Elect 

R i md f o n lem 

Rank 
Reed Infi 
Reuters 
Royal Dutch E 
RTZ 
Saotchl 
Salnsbury 
Sears Hokflaus 
Shell 
STC 

Sid Chartered 

Sun Alliance 

Tale and Lvle 


Thom EMI 
T.l. Group 
Trafalgar Hse 
THF 

Ultramar 

Unilever ( 
United Biscuits 
Vickers 
Wool worth 


34 33 

920 491 

288 287 

198 198 

328 323 

570 558 

289 289 

202 177 

365 358 

218 213 

358 348 

§ 3 

148 145 

IS 180 

227 224 

404 377 

132 129 

416 416 

435 447 

351 345 

SIS* S19I& 

303 358 

ClTSh SI 816 

192 188 

628 616 

2Z7 228 

19/641261/64 
323 318 

740 736 

260 265 

800 B60 

210 210 

399 401 

657 60 

in iB2 

276 275 

304 3S3 

724 719 

427 427 

152 152 

336 323 

150 149 

488 475 

3M 392 

6S7 654 

396 395 

273 273 

150 148 

709 677 

160 158 

171 *3 f74 

413 411 

687 687 

317 316 

44*h 44 3/32 
SB4 569 

665 665 

IW 332 

77W VTVl 

711 698 

90 90 

452 447 

503 493 

470 470 

250 250 

407 384 

376 365 

376 373 

138 138 

225 223 

10<W1027/64 
107 188 

390 273 

468 468 



Astra 

Aftas Copco 
B ofldon 
Electrolux 
Ericsson 
Euette 

Handefsbonken 

Pharmacia 

Saab- Scania 

SandvHt 

Skanska 

5KF 

SwodtshMaldi 

Volvo 


Previous : 37468 


Index : 3709 


Min pi treat index : M41 
I Previous : 1634 


Air Ltauldg 
AlStlrom Alt. 

Av Dassault 

Boncofre 

BIC 

Bongrafn 

Bauvuues 

BSN-GD 

Camefour 

Chargeurs 

Club Med 

Darty 

Dum«z 
EH-Aaultatne 
Europe 1 
Gen Eaux 
Hochetfe 
Lafarge Cop 
Leg rand 
Lesleur 
roreal 
Martell 
Mafra 
Merlin 

Michel In 

HST 

Pernod Rlc 

Perrier 


HadJotecfin 

Redaufe 
Rourad Udaf 
Sanofl 

Skis RoHlonel 


[SB [ Thomson CSF 
Total 


574 570 

JB7 310 
1179 1157 
634 632 

51B 510 

1781 1880 

779 774 

3145 3130 

2355 2360 

693 693 

523 518 

1435 1425 

833 840 

201 204.10 
77S 772 

648 646 

1450 1450 

548 543 

3170 2137 
619 04 

2430 2418 

1655 1645 

1739 1703 

2180 2170 

1225 1235 

1895 1880 

B2M 82JD 
723 726 

685 685 

513 513 

405 480 

290.10 2S8 

318 332 

1548 1568 

1538 1540 

676 ATS 
1401 1400 

2600 3680 
574 572 

238 237 


ACI 

ANZ 

BHP 

Bocal 

Baugahivtlte 

Castlemolno 

Coles 

Camalco 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunlop 

Elders Ixl 

ICI Australia 

Magellan 

Ml M 

Mver 

Hof Aust Bonk 
News Core 
N Broken Hill 


Old Cool Trust 
Santas 

Thomas Nation 
Mining 
Bon kin 


Weslpac _ 
WaodsWe 


Ing AM 


Previe w : HUI 


1J8 1J0 

i: M5J0 


- 

Chile 

Prav. 

U Mitsubishi Bank 

1560 



474 

508 

3 hThH 

341 

344 

4 l3. , , J ■ 1 i-ifl 

400 

395 


660 

6S6 


435 

428 

1 ...... mm 

7D6 

689 

1 Mitsumi 

670 

680. 

2 NEC 



7 NGK Insiilatarj 

797 

772 

> Nlkko Sec 

806 


Nippon Kaoaku 

906 

879 

I NhmonOII 

832 

835 

’ Nippon Steel 

179 

179 

Nippon Ynsen 

319 

312 

Nissan 

630 

630 

Nomura Sec 

1230 

1260 

Olympus 

963 

951 

_ Pioneer 

1750 

1758 

1 RlCOh 

813 


| Sharp 

805 

803 

. SNmazu 

699 


Shlnetsu Chemical 

453 

670 

Sony 

35» 

3620 

Somltomo Bank 

■L.n 

1! 

l Sumitomo Chem 

255 


! Sumitomo hinr)na 

720 

725 


168 

161 

! Talsel Carp 

363 

350 


615 

630 


909 


TDK 

3870 


1 Tallin 



Tokla Marine 

917 



2180 


Toppan PrlnSto® 

805 


Toray ind 

Tests foil 

551 


Toyota 

1150 

IT49 

Yamal chi Sec 

820 

B15 

NJkkflL/D_J. Index : 

1272818 I 

Previous : txtem 



Mew Index : Wit^S 



Previous : mfJ7 



II Zorich II 


Tohyn 


Agefl index : 207.51 
previous : 20851 

cac index : Xzlsg 
Previa u* : 221 JO 




Cold Storage 
DBS 

Fraser Neave 
How Par 


F.T.38 Index : loftue 
Previous : 99150 
F.TAE.100 Index : 122X90 
Previous : ISM50 


Mai Banking 
QCBC 
OUB 
DUE 

ShangrMo 
5kne Darby 
Spare Land 
Sucre Press 
S Steamship 
SI Trading 
United Overseas 
UOB 


166 253 

4J6 4J6 

5J0 555 

107 104 

215 215 

5J0 i45 

7J5 7.90 
251 240 

122 NO. 
155 N.Q. 
1.73 IJ2 
126 216 
SJSB 550 
029 045 

3 296 

15* 1.45 

140 136 


Akal 
AsoMChem 
AsoM Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 
Bridgestone 
Canon 
Casio 
Citoti 

□al Nippon Print 
Dalwa House 
Dafwo Seeurftfos 
Fanuc 
Full Bonk 
Full Photo 
Fulltau 
Hitachi 
HltacM Cable 
Hondo 

japan Air Lines 
Kallmo 
Kansal Power 
Kawasaki steel 
Kirin B r ewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec Inds 
Matsu Eloc Works 


366 365 

825 819 

805 SOB 
810 791 

929 

1470 1470 
aso m 
1070 1070 

935 930 

7250 7280 
1580 1600 
1728 1908 

53 ®S 

670 670 

555 560 

1330 1350 
5610 5600 
480 4H 
1720 IM 
155 156 

740 730 

599 585 

.368 366 

3460 3510 
1220 1230 
870 875 


2980 AMI Prce 
19810 Agota) E 
51010 Ait Energy 
4^ Alta Not 
imAigomaSI 
4670 Argcen 
24050 Atco If 
702 BP Canada 
37« Bank BC 
176667 Bank NS 
98344 Barrtdeo 
KM Baton A f . 
251 B0 Bonanza R 
2W0 Brakmie 

®9Bramalea 
10 Brenda M 

sen bcfp 

34805 BC Res 
39411 BC Phone 
SO Brunswk - 
MMBurtICOn 
1019. CAE 
8300 Cad FTV 
71 00 Campeon I 
68BCNar West 
SSOCPackrs 
5876 Com Trust 


Canadian stocks via AP 

** . Hfgh Low Close Ow. 

Aug.29 


JETc 


*20% am 3ow 

2m 209h- 
*20 1W. JS + „ 

SJta 1416 14W+ U> 
niMi 21WI 2»+ M 
522 22 22 — U 

sim ii im-f * 

*33 xw 33+16 
SSVi 51 1 5Vk 

S? fc 1 S* S ,S* + » 

190 187 187 —7 

*19 19 17 — Ik 

*S M8 365 
420 420 420 

nn i7» xm 

S10 1C 10—16 

»» m 

239 236 236 — 1 

*2468 24 344% + 16 

Sf* HS !a»+»h 

*31 271% 


+ 16 


Adla , 

Aiusulsse 
Autaphan 
Bank Leu 
Brawn Bavorl 
ObaGelsy 
Credit SuIsm 

BWUI UWUU 
notgciuuiPi 

Interdbcaunt 

Jacob Sucbard 

JdmalT 

Landis Gvr 

Maevenplck 

H«3«e 

Oerllkon-B 

Roche Babv 

Sandax 

Schindler 

Sutxer 

Survel nance 

Swissair 

SBC 

Swiss Reinsur ance 


4800 41! 

810 
6200 
3S®! 

1775 
34W 
3070 
3408 

670 
2840 
6900 


Swiss Valksbank 

Union Bank 
Winterthur ' 

Zurich ins 

SBC Index : 5TSJ8 
Previous : SI5JS 

NjQ.: rat meted; NJL: nofj 
available; xd: ex-dividend. 



Straits Times Ina index : 747 JS 
Prevtou* ! 78X67 


Milan 


Seize the WMid. 

Theta^onatiaial Herald Tribune. 

IfPinAintt llus Hi J . -a m 


Banco Comm 241 B0 24180 

Centra kt 2390 341a 

Ctatatolels 10010 9«M 

Grid Ital 2915 2907 


Staefclwlni 


AGA 

AUa Laval 
Asm 


130 116 
188 1B6 
305 303 


—.—1 to tbeWodtfs 

■imiKk bint Au/Hrrirw 


100 GL l 
_M0Grevhnd 
37892 Hawker 
8388 Haves D 
33500 Hees Inti 
BWHBayQi 
61600 Imasoo 

Irntol 

«=a 'aSr 

572 Kerr Add 
14660 Lnbott 
MMLOntCem 
IWOOUxxma 

rnnutatawco 

4Z1D0 Lumonles 

6700 MICC 
3110 Mdan H X 
ITtaMOrtMlSef 
_^M«1ondE 
15377 MoteonAf 
.ISgMekgnB 
12300 Murphy . 


>116: 

JSKi 1H%- v, 
12%+ Vi 
*38 TPS 28 +16 

S4U 2416 24)6- 1% 

S34V1 341b " 

. 841 m 

■ *13 13 

jmb gw 6flv%-m 

K 3 

wj im+» 
^ lSS » 
*71% 716 716— 

VP 

2T1 725 230 f k 

^ S Si zj 

ss; b* 

SS jw- ^ 

5* ,2% 8 — lb 

*7lh 78% 716— Ik 

K 

*S£ ^ a; t 

IS* 

SS' 4 20 

*i3 m 

a* ss 

*3016 20 2016— 16 

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• • . ‘ 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 1985 



SPORTR 

— -H rl* ^ 


Page 19 


=«£?& 
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Forget Ends Curren’s Hopes; 
McEnroe Reaches 3d Round 


I**** by TU Anooond hn 

Guy Forget, left, reaching for an overhand return during his upset victory over Kevin 
Cinren in the U.S. Open. Chris Evert Lloyd, above, easily eliminated Janine Thompson. 




fiurren Wins Few Hearts in Early Elimination From U.S. Open 


% - ... ^ >etcr Alfiano image and self-promotion are placed an the 

* nfw vrrol *"*" ^ table by Curren for aD to see. He was capable 

. " ^ — His name wiD be pre- of winning Wimbledon but he may not have 

;r ~ hutuxy books of Wimbledon won many hearts. 

hcadin S’ “runner-up." Bat that He was seeded fifth at the US. Open but 
‘ . c j^' gumantees a tennis player immortal- hisfirsz -round match against Forget was on 

-- 'SL 80 "? ® eckeT won the singles (tampion- the grandstand court, not on center stage in 

■ ship at the all-England Club and reaped the the stadium, where Becker played on Tucs- 
spoib. Kevin Curren settled for “nice day. If he fdl slighted, it probably did not 
^ match" and a front-row seat where he has 
watched Becker take a worldwide victory 
«£» lap. 

’’ _ .^ 1 - ; H would be understandable for Curren to 

^ trade places with Becker, to fantasize about 
how a few well-placed shots here and there in 
^ that Wimbledon final early last month could 
have put him on center stage. And the final 
was certainly wi thin his long reach. Bnt Cnr- 
, ren knows himself too well to think- that the 
ht Tcne\ jl> adulation and riches showered on Becker 
would have necessarily belonged to him. 

, : “I face up to reality,” Curren. said 

r» VirfmA Wednesday after bring upset in the first 
round of the U.S. Open by Guy Forget of 
France, 7-6, 6-1, .6-2. “Baker is young and 
; r : . _t t : - frit he couldn't lose. I know better thaw that 


matter anyway. Following Wednesday’s 
match, Curren said the tournament and set- 
ting had never been particularly to his liking. 
And he knew that would sound lihi sour 
grapes. 

“I hate the city, the environment and 
Flushing Meadow,” Curren said. ‘There is 
noise, the people in the grandstand are never 
seated and it takes an hour and a half in 
traffic to get here. It's sickening that with all 
the money they get from Tv, the USTA 
doesn't build a better facility. The USTTA 
should be shot And they should drop an A- 
bomb on the place." 

This is not the way to endear onesrif to the 
New York fans. It is not the way to go about 
did ting rave reviews in the news media. It 



“Coaches are always tdfing me dial Tool' also is not the way the International Man- 


better than I think.. But I look at thing s 
negatively, rue always Been that way. A lot 
of guys win say things on die surface, but if 
. . .71 yon dig briow, youT find the same msecuri- 

7" 777 ties.” ‘ 

• Curran is a tall, gangling individual with 
... sharply angled features andJongishtair that 

'.‘7 was more in st#e a _ decade ago. He is by Ins 

own ttdnriswnn ap introvert who rations his . ly or wrongly, Americans would expect him 
r 7~ smiles. Some of tbe opimons that many play- to embrace Ids new home and its national 
era keep to themselves inthe bestmtoest of tournamaiLTheywouldbercmmcl^thatat 


agement Group — which represents Curren 
— would have chosen to write his postmatch 
speech. 

Although many Americans may share 
Curren’s viewpoints about New York City, 
this is the U.S. Open, not New York Open. 
Curren, who was bom and raised in South 
Africa, became a UJ5. citizen in April Right- 


Kevin Curren 

Wimbledon, Cunen said he was proud to be 
an American but was a South African in his 
heart. 

“My agents understand Kevin Curren,” he 
said. “It’s not important to me to be in the 

and 
frit 
andbdng 

an American citizen is not going to make the 
traffic any better.” 

It would be easy to dismiss Curren as 
tennis’ gray cloud but there is something 
refreshing about his honesty even if he 
doesn’t always say things we like to bear. 



There are too many people in public life who 
smile only for the cameras. And although 
Curren decided to leave his troubled home- 
land for economic reasons and not princi- 
ples. one can understand if not sympathize 
with the ambivalence be feels. It may be 
difficult for Curren to feel at home in a 
country that is becoming increasingly out- 
spoken about the land where he was bom. 

“I’m caught on a fence," Curren said. 
“People in America want me to cm my ties to 
South Africa. But my youth was spent there. 
My mother, relatives and a lot of friends are 
there. I love the wildlife country, so I spend 
my vacations there.’' 

South Africa's policy of apartheid has 
made it an outcast in the world sports com- 
munity. South Africa was excluded from the 
Olympic Games, and many countries refuse 
to participate against it in team competition. 
South African athletes do compete as indi- 
viduals in sports such as tennis, although 
Curren and Johan Kriek did the most expe- 
dient thing and became American citizens as 
a precaution against future sanctions. 

“I don't agree with the system and believe 
apartheid should be abolished," Curren said. 
“It’s a shame when people are denied their 
rights. But I'm not for a one-man, one-vote 
system yet, either. There are other countries 
in Africa that were granted this and are 
having coups and dictatorships.” 

As an athlete. Cunen said he was entitled 
to his viewpoint. But he does not think that 
an athlete should use his celebrity status as a 
forum for politics. “I don’t consider us legiti- 
mate spokesmen,” he said. “We’re sports- 
men. not politicians." 


By John Fdnscdn 

Washington Past Server 

NEW YORK — It was Wimble- 
don revisited. Kevin Curren was on 
the court and the aces were flying. 
Serve, volley. Serve, whiff. Serve, 
duck. 

But something was wrong. The 
whistling, unhit table selves were 
not coming off Curren's racket. 
They were coming off the racket of 
Guy Forget, a slender, curly-haired 
Frenchman. By the time Forget 
was finished, Qrrren was finished 
with the VS Open, 7-6, 6-1, 6-2. 

Curren's surprising loss on 

U.S. OPEN TENNIS 

Wednesday has overshadowed all 
other events so far in the champi- 
onships. 

. Certainly, it dwarfed Martin 
Jaitc’s first-round upset of 14th- 
seeded Henrik Sundstrom. 

John McEnroe, the defending 
champion, reached the third round 
by defeating Martin Wostenholme 
of Ca n ada. 6-0, 7-6, 6-1, on Thurs- 
day. McEnroe had been extended 
in the first round to a fifth set tie- 
break by Shlomo Giickstem before 
he could pull out the victory. Joa- 
ltim Nystrom, the 10th seed from 
Sweden, also reached the third 
round with a 6-3, 3-6, 6-3, 6-0 deci- 
sion over Robert Green. 

On Wednesday, other men’s 
seeds advanced to the second 
round with ease: No. 2 Ivan Lendl 
in three quick sets against Jay Lapi- 
dus; No. 4 Jimmy Connors in four 
sets against Gary Muller, a South 
African qualifier. No. 7 Yannick 
Noah over Jeremy Bates of Britain, 
and No. 25 Scott Davis over Mas- 
simo Cierro, 

Seeded women continued to win 
with one exception. Kathy Rinaldi, 
seeded ninth, lost in the first round 
to Andrea Holikova. 7-6, 7-6 (8-6). 

Hana Mandlikova, seeded third, 
mid Helena Sukova, seeded sev- 
enth, advanced to the third round 
with easy victories in Thursday's 
second round. 

Mandlikova chased Annabel 
Croft, 6-3, 6-3. Sukova needed just 
58 minutes to defeat Beverly 
Bowes, 6-3, 6-1 . Sylvia H a nil a ana 
Ann Henri cksson also won early 
second round matches. 

Chris Evert Uoyd, Martina Nav- 
ratilova, Pam Shriver, and Steffi 
Graf were all first-round winners 
Wednesday. Only Graf struggled, 
going to 7-5 in the third set before 
beating Patty Fendick. 

But Graf is still here; Curren is 
not. 

T just never got going,” said 
Curren, the losing finalist at Wim- 
bledon this year who is ranked fifth 


in the world. “He’s a big hitter who 
goes for winners, a lot like me.” 

Forgot, 20. is a big hitter and he 
served 15 aces against Curren, 
whose terrific serve ousted both 
McEnroe and Connors from Wim- 
bledon. But Wednesday, on the 
breezy grandstand court. Forget 
was the player with the shots. 

“It's my biggest win ever," said 
Forget, a left-hander who suffered 
last year with tennis elbow. “My 
serve has been gening better the 
last Tew weeks and 1 fed confident. 
1 thought I had about three chances 
in 10 against him but he didn’t 
serve anything like at Wimbledon.” 

Forget, like his countryman 
Heui Leconte — whom he may 
face in the second round — is a go- 
far-broke player. He hits out on 
everything, constantly trying for 
winners. His style was best 
summed up by the' sixth game of 
the third set, in which he served 
three near aces, an ace and two 
double-faults. 

T never got a feel for where his 
serve was going,” Curren said. “He 
serves that quick wrist serve that 
can be deceptive,” 

In the last game. Forget served 
four balls and Curren touched one 
of them. That was on match point 
when he managed to get his racket 


frame on the ball to avoid being 
served out by four aces. 

"The U.S. Open is over for me 
for this year." Curren said. *Tm 
not that unhappy.” 

The same coiud not be said for 
Andy Kohlberg, who had eveiy 
chance to pull off ihe biggest upset 
of his life, Kohlberg got into the 
draw by just pulling out a last-set 7- 
5 victory in a qualifying match over 
Leif Shiras on Sunday. On 
Wednesday he had MDoslav Mecir, 
an unpredictable player, virtually 
beaten. 

In the third set, Medr was down 
15-30 while serving at 2-5. Kohl- 
bexg let him off the hook. Still, be 
served for the match. Quickly, he 
was down 0-40. Medr botched two 
returns. But on the third, his back- 
hand landed at Kohlberg s shoe 
tops and he netted it Now it was 4- 
5. This time Medr dug an 0-30 
hole. Again, Kohlberg was two 
points from victory. Again, he 
failed 

The tiebreaker went to 4-4 before 
Mecir reeled off three winners: a 
backhand return, a serve and a gor- 
geous lop-spin lob. That was the set 
and, as it turned out, the match. 
Mecir cruised through the last two 
sets for 5-7, 4-6, 7-6 (7-4) 6-3, 6-1 
victory. 


Wo men Propose New Rules 
For Young Players on Tour 


Complied by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The Women’s 
Tennis Association has announced 
a new set of eligibility rules for 
young players on the pro tour. 

“We have formulated the most 
reasonable rule* possible that will 
rationally limit a young player's 
schedule without hindering her ca- 
reer," said Chris'Evert Lloyd presi- 
dent of the WTA. 

Tbe WTA rules will be submitted 
for approval to the Women's Inter- 
national Professional Tennis 
Council which meets next week. 
They are: 

• The WTA will not lift restric- 
tions on tournament appearances 
until a player reaches her 17th 
birthday; current WTA rules re- 
quire a player to make a specific 
minimum number of tournament 
appearances. 

a A player will be accepted In a 
ma ximum of 10 supported series 
tournaments each year until she 
reaches her 1 5 th birthday. Support- 
ed series events are the tourna- 
ments played on the highest level 
such as the U5L Open and Virginia 
Slims series. 


• The maximum of supported 
series is increased to 12 between a 
player’s 15th and 16th birthdays. 

• A player may participate in as 
many lower level professional tour- 
naments as she chooses. But no 
player under 16 may play in more 
than three successive tournaments 
at any level without taking a one- 
week rest period. 

• All players under 16 wiD he 
required to abstain from tourna- 
ment play for a minimum of two 
30-day periods each year. 

• Until age 16. every player must 
present proof that she is satisfacto- 
rily completing the educational re- 
quirements other country of ori- 
gin. 

• Every pro player up to age 18 
must annually present a medical 
certificate that stales her fitness to 
play. 

• The WTA, at its expense, will 
sponsor three seminars a year, be- 
ginning in 1986. for all players un- 
der 18 who are ranked in the top 
200 in the world. The seminars are 
expected to cover such topics as 
nutrition, public relations and 
sports psychology. (UPJ. Af) 


Rebel k 




SCOREBOARD 


Tennis 




Putor Lundanm. Swodnn, def. Surtwr Per- 
kins, Israel. 6-C 74 .17-3), «-Z . 

Dtooo Perez. Spam, def. Stove Mefcrier,U.&. 
44,6-3.6-4. . 

Claudia P m i u tfa Italy, del Thn GulllKxon. 
IU« 7-4 f MU M. 3-A 6-4. 

5IH Samian, U-S. Baa Testerwwn, UX. 7-4 
(7-3). W (7-7), 0-6. Sri, 4-3. 

Todd Nat9oa.U.S» dot. Mar*. Dickson, U&.7- 
6 (7Sl. 4* 7-4 CM), M (7-0). 

£tafan t*db«ro ni),5*radon.daL Jasaiads 
Clare. ArwiHna, H M> M. 

- Htnrl Lacaota. Franca, dal. Woftak FTbak, 

' Potato. M, 6-3, *■*. 


: ~~U.S.Open Results 

- - MEN'S SINGLES 

v First Hand 

. . . rtvoo Lendl (2), CzKtoaskwakla, dot Jay . 

•• - ' .Loptdu* U.&* 6-2, 5-1, 6-3. 

C. Yannick Noah 17). Franca, dot. Jaranty 
_ ■ - . Botox Britain. M> 7-4 (7-4), M 

' Ton vMrw^Ntaortadct Thomas Hob stadl, 

*- Swvdcn, 6-4. M M (74». 

Martin Jalfx Amantkia. daL Hanrtt Sana- 
Hiom (14), Swadon, 6-L 1-6, 6-2, 6-3. 

Eduanio Bensoachaa. Amntlna,daf. Colin 

t ,, t- Dowdeswall, Gmat Britain. M 7-4 C7-5),7-& tr 
III "4. . . 

Kan Flaetv Ui- OoL Leonardo LnVOUfc 
- . - Mexico, 7-5, M M 4-1. 

Jlai Grabtv U-S-def. Ohxddo Barbosa, Bra- 
. . elL M 4-7 (3-7), 7-5. M 
• 1 ’■ Mliaslav Mecir l»), czactMndovaUa def. 

• . ^-Andy Koh War*, UJJ- 47 . 44 ^ 7 - 4 ( 7 - 4 ), MM. 

Paul Asmocana, UJL. dot Tom QuIHkm, 

U-S- 44. 4-4i 3-4, 4-1. 

-• Guv FotboL France, deC Kevin Curren IS], 

“T - 'TUJ5- 7-4 I7-4J, 4-1, M 

Luka Jensen, Ui, art. AtattMMetia)LUA.2- er, Australia. M 4-4. 

fcMMMwT Carotlae Kuhbnan, UA. dot Lori McNeil, 

Jimmy Connars C4l.UA Oof. OarvMuMw, U&, 4-7. M 


WOMEN’S SINOUes 
First (tooad 

- Catarina Llndawtst 03). SsmdMt,doLMeU»- 
so Oumov, US. 4-1, 44 
Lotah Ann Thompson, OJL dot Sandy CoF 
Dnx ILS- 4-1, 34 4-1. 

Anno Hafabo, Britain, def . Jo Durix Britain, 
74 4-1. 

Kathy Junta, U-S-dof. Marcella Maker. 
NaUwrtcnds. 34 4-1, 44 




South Africa, 44 M 44 *4 
Jaime Yzoaa, Ponj, def. Jafcoh Mlaiek. YU- 
p asfDvfx S-7. 74 34 44 44 
T TWarrv Tutaene, France, def. Jwo Nawth 

• ; 4lLCrw i >o » tawafclx4-7(B-10),M47(M),M 

^Qrkei Teacher, UA. del. Alalondn) Gama- 

Argentina, 4-1. 44 74 

-■ -iovp pate. UA. «tat Bnmo Oresar, Yupo- 
J ttavla, M M 34 64 

• Dan CossMv, U A, dot Ahmod El Mehetaiv. 
-T-Epypt, 44 4.7 (5-71. 4-2. M 

. HankPfWw,UA,doLScottMcCatn,UA,4- 

^BTOd^Gttaeri, UA, def. Christa Van Ren*- 
,- Toraczy, Hungary, 6-7 0-7), 44 7-4 (7-5). 74 


Leslie Alta UA, d«C. Catherine Striro. 
France. 44 M • 

Martina Navratilova (zi.UA.det. Pascal# 
Paradis. France. M 4-1. 

Pam Carafe, UAdoL Efeni RossWexU-S. 
44-4-2. 

Shawm FoUxUA,deLPeanut Louie. UA.7-6 
IIM), M 

Belinda ConhwHI. UA, deL Maria Llad- 
strom. S weden. M 44 

Amy Horton. UA. deL Elisabeth Smyfle, 
Australia, 5-7, 44 4-1. 

MoMy van Nastrand. UA.det. Mltaidy White, 
U A 7-4 (84), 4-1. 

Jane Young. Canada, dot JaAnne RusadL 
UA, 74 (74), M 

Owls Evert Uoyd (1), UA dof. Jantae 
Thumpaon, Australia. 4-1, M 

MlehHfeTorrex uA.dofL Kim Shaefer, U A 
74 (Ml, 6-7 (4-7J, 4-2. 


I 


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Wednesday’s Msgor League line Scores 

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TunneU. Quanta W, Scurry (7t end Pena: 
Barker. McMtirtry W> and Benedict. W— 
Barker, 24 L— Tunneil, 14 Sv McMuriry 
ft). HR — ATionta. Honor (22). 

SLLoaiS NIMINM4U ■ 

CVnCnom. « 

(» IniHna*) 

Ando tar, WWraB (*>« Porecfi It), OavJ** 
(I), Lahti (*>. Honan (121 ond PQ^nt; Seta. 
Rotwnso f» 13), Stuper 14), Pric e ffl. Pn wy 
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iff power, 54 L t x ih ft 2-2. 

W ^ W TeME(UCAN LBAGUB 
T^octo - 9»«0*3W»-S I 5 

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"tEEtavotlo (•). Henke 

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ISTS’ jmr« IW ond Neloon,#- 

Lime (2). 


Mercedes Paz, AraenHno,dcL vtckl Netson, 
Wooeter, Ohio, 04 4-). 44. 

Steffi Gref (17), West Germany, del. Party 
Pendlck, U A 44 14 7-S. 

Hu No, U A. def. Eva Plaft West Gcrmory, 
*4 64 

Pom Shriver (4). UA del. Tine Scheuer- 
Lorsen. Denmark. 6-3, M 
Lilian Drosctwr. Switzerland, def. Terry 
Koliada y, UA. 44 4-2. 

Marianna WordeL UA def. Mvrtam 
Schroon. west Germany, 49, 44 
Katarina Skranska CuriMetovaklataef . So- 
phia Am loch, France. 64 47 (8-10), M 
Anne White. UA, def. Helen Ketafli Canada, 
M 24 64 

Rasta Casals. Sousallto. Colli, dei Betsy 
Novefsen. UA. 14 retired. 

Atvcfa MouHon. UA, def. Beveriv Mould. 
South Africa. 44. 74 
Regina Marstfeova, Ca e cho ota vofcig, def. 
EmfiJt Rapont-Lonoa. Argentina, 4-3, M 
Sandra CecchlnL Haty, def. Etsuko Inoue. 
Jaoan, 34 41, M 

Andrea Holikova, Czechoslovakia, dot 
Kathy Rinaldi (91, UA. 7-4 (79), 7-4 (84). 

Kate Dampest. UA. dot Patricia Modroda. 
Brazil, 6-3. 64 

Lisa Bander, UAOef. Anna Nan, UA 6-2.4- 
6. 64 

Sabrina Colas, VuaosMnda, def. Rena Uvs, 
South Africa. 47 13-7). 41,74 147). 

Barbara Potter, U A. def. Gatorieta SabafM 
(18), Argentina. 44. 42. 

Zina Garrison (4), UA, dof. Barbara Ger- 
kea UA, 74 44 

SECOND ROUND 
WOMEN’S SINGLES 
Hana MandOkiwa <3h Czechostavakio. dot 
Annabel Croft, Britain, 44 43. 

Srtvto Hanfka West Germany, def. Leslie 
A Hen. U A 44 44 

Bonnta Gadusetc (14). U AdeL Mima Jouso- 
vec. Vugoslovlo. 64 *4 41 
Grace Kbit, UAdet, Mary Lou Plata US. 
7-4 (74). 7-4 (7-5). 

Helena Sukova (7). Czechoslovakia, del 
Beveriv Bowes. UA. M 41. 

Undo Gates, UA, dei. Usa Soa In- Short, 
UA 44 34 M 

Am Honrldum UA, dei. Mary -toe Fer- 
nandez, U A 41. 44. 

MEN'S SINGLES 

Tim Wllklson.UA.def. Pavel StariLCzecho- 
ttawakfa, 41, 42. 4L 
DmGaldl 4 UAlW.MartenVolda.Cxects»- 
slovakla. 14 M 42, 64 
Bud 5dwrtz. UA, def. RWwnf Maho- 
zewskl. u A M 64 74 (84). 

joaMm Nystrom (18), Sweden, dot. Robert 
Oneen, UA. 43. 34 4X *4 


Bases-Loaded Walk in 12th Inning 
Puts Reds Over the Cardinals, 7-6 


Los Angela Tima Service 

CINCINNATI — After collect- 
ing two hits earlier in the game, 
Pele Rose drew a walk with the 
bases loaded and two out in the 
I2th inning Wednesday night to 
give the Reds a 7-6 victory over the 
Sl Louis Cardinals. 

With the two hits, Rose moved 
closer toiy Cobb's record of 4,191. 
Rose now needs nine hits to break 
the record. 

The Cardinals scored all their 
runs in tbe third inning and went 
into the sixth, behind the 20-game 
winner Joaquin Andujar, holding a 
64) lead. But the Reds tied the 
score, knocking Andujar out of tbe 
box. Rose drove in the tying run 
with a ground-out. 

The Cardinals’ Willie McGee 
went 3-for-6 and increased his av- 
erage, highest in the majors, to 363. 

Astros 3, Cobs 0: Nolan Ryan, 
who had not won for the Astros 
since he beat Atlanta on June 17, 
ended his eight-game losing streak 
in Houston. He gave up four hits 
and had eight strikeouts before 
leaving with two out in tbe seventh 
inning and a 2-2 count on Jody 
Davis. “I wasn't concerned about 
the streak,” Ryan said. “I’ve 
pitched wed lately. My job basical- 
ly is to keep the team in the game." 


Jeff Heathcock replaced Ryan and 
retired all seven batters he faced to 
gain his first save. He had three 
strikeouts. 

Braves 6, Pirates I: Len Barker, 
hampered by ueck and elbow ail- 
meats all season, gave up three hits 
in five innings at Atlanta as the 
Braves handed Pittsburgh its 17th 

BA5EBAIX ROUNDUP 

loss in a row on the road. Craig 
McMurtry. another struggling 
pitcher, gave up one run in the last 
four innings. "1 was real gratified," 
said Barker, who made 95 pitches. 
“It’s been a long time since I’ve 
pitched like that. I was ready to 
come oul My arm was a tittle 
tight." 

Twins 6, Blue Jays 5: In the 
American League, Tom Henke 
served up a tying two-run homer to 
Mark Salas in the eighth inning at 
Minneapolis, then lost the game for 
the Blue Jays in the 10th inning. 
Although Tom Brunansky angled 
off Jim Acker with the bases loaded 
to end it, Henke had pul the run- 
ners on base. Brunansky’s hit end- 
ed a 1 -for- 18 slump. Henke had 
won three games and saved seven 
since joining the Blue Jays late in 
July. 


Royab 8, Brewers 1 Tbe Kansas 
City Royals hit four home runs at 
Milwaukee, including a three-run 
smash by Darryl Motley and a two- 
run homer by Steve Balbonl Mark 
Gubicza gave up six hits in eight 
innings- George Brett had a single 
in three official at-bais to extend 
his hitting streak to 11 games and 
move him into a tie with Wade 
Boggs for the baiting lead with a 
J56 average. 

Indians 7, Red box 4: Julio Fran- 
co hit a grand slam home run in the 
seventh inning to break open a 
dose game and give the Indians 
their seventh triumph in eight 
games. Despite Tony Annas' 1 8th 
home run, tbe Boston Red Sox lost 
their fifth in a row and 11th in 12 
games. Jamie Easterly, making the 
second start of his eight-year ca- 
reer, gave up two runs in 6% in- 
nings. The Indians stopped Wade 
Boggs’ hitting streak at 17 games. 
Boggs was 0-for-5. 

White Sox 5, Rangers 1; Bryan 
Li tile, who hit his first home run of 
the season Saturday, hit his second 
Wednesday in Chicago, a three-run 
smash in the fifth inning Gene 
Nelson and two relief pitchers com- 
bined on a six-hitter for the Chica- 
go White Sox. 



m om it» f _ _ _ . . . 

Ihe 

Julio Franco slogging a grand slam against tbe Red Sox. 


VANTAGE POINT/ Thomas Boswell 


An AUrMissouri World Series? Intriguing Possibilities Abound 


Transition 



Ingush first Division 
£££»■ a choieoc o 


FOOTBALL 

Natloul FoortwH League 
buffalo— W aived Eaton Rantean. fight 
and. 

CHICAGO— waived Nob Fatta. auata. 
CINCINNATI— Waned J omea Bra ofct, rurr 
nine bock< to 0 ene-veor contract 

CLEVELAND— Acquired Sam Ctancv. d* 

fcMIvo mwt from K» Seddto Sooho»loi f» on 

undbcMod draft ehofct. 

INDIANAPOLIS— Acouired Dave Alums, 
nmbacter.from ffwSLUwtoCanftwbta-on 
uMsctoeca draft choice. Waived Wvat! Hen- 

(jetton, conwiwdt. 

N. Y. GIANT S— Signed Bert OMVfc confer, 
to a four year contract 
N. V. JETS— Claimed Dave Jennings, punt- 
er, on waivers. 

PHILADELPHIA— Wahtad Brvon Cold- 

mtldefansivt >nd; Joe HayoknuMUna bade; 
Mark Kota*. »«y: Judtous Ueta wWo 
rec lever, Non MAW*. Board, ond Rowland 
Tatum, mwbackor. 

PITTSBURGH— Waived Wayne Canon, 
wide receiver; woody Pipnora-runferafeKta 
and Russell Holmes. Itoebocvw. 

SAN DIESO-Cwt Vernon Mfficwett# llno- 
baeter. ond John Turner, safety. Reteosod 
BIN eiko and Ktflft Guthrie, defensh* Dne- 
rmi TlmmfeWore.wide receiver; MariiSto- 

veraan, offensive linemen; Marvin wllltanew 
lloht end, end Mark Wilson, safety. Pieced 
Bdhbv M)c«M,ttBM enBLand vimOsuy.Une- 
MCker, on tnlursfl rtwrve. Announced thot 
Uftort Hobby, tnttty. foiled hiJ Physical end 
will not be stomd. 


Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — BasebalTs 
concluding chapters of 1985 ought 
to be exciting. When did baseball 
last have more intriguing division- 
al, playoff and Worid Saies possi- 
bilities? 

With the Los Angeles Dodgers 
and California Acmes both lead- 


'orid Series is not farfetched. 
Watching the Dodgers’ Tommy 
Lasorda manage against Gene 
Maud) would be too much fun to 
bean Tbe best dumb manager 
against the worst smart manager. 

Chavez Ravine and The Blg A 
would just be too nice in a year 
when the Series has the latest 
scheduled closing dale in history — 
Oct- 27. How can the demons that 
ordain such things pass up the 
chance to finish the season in hid- 
eous, exposed, blustery Exhibition 
Stadium in Toronto between snow- 
sfomst! 

New Yorkers have noticed that 
the Mets and Yankees both are in 
second place with solid chances to 
create the first subway Series since 
1956. Would Dwight Gooden (20- 


3), the best child pitcher ever, 
against Ron Guidry (16-4X who 
has the best winning percentage in 
histoiy. attract a tad of interest? 

If all these are dream Series, then 
we have potential niglhmares, too; 

an All-Can ada or an All-Mi ssoun 
Series. Given the alternatives, this 
might not be the year to send up 
prayers to see Blue Jays vs. Montre- 
al Expos or Sl Louis Cardinals vs. 
Kansas Gty Royals. 

Thank fully, the Expos — whose 
Olympic Stadium is almost as ugly 
as Toronto’s park — already are 
staggering. The first meeting be- 
tween the Cawtinak and Royals is 
more plausible. 

This has been a uniquely good 
year for managerial contrasts. 

In the National League West, 
Tommy Lasorda. who prefers 
cheerleading to chiding seems to 
wear far better with his players 
than acerbic Dick Williams, whose 
welcome with his defend in g Na- 
tional League champion San Diego 
Padres may be wearing thin. 

If any race ever held promise of 
offering a fascinating managing 


test, it’s the September show be- 
tween the Cardinals' Wfaitey Her- 
zog and Davey Johnson of the 
Mets. Herzog may know the game 
better at more levels than anyone 
alive, and he can milk mediocre 
buiipens with tbe best. Johnson is 
tbe prototype of the New Manager 
— half-jock, half-brain. A four- 
time All-Star player, Johnson also 
has a college degree in mathematics 
and understands novel slat theories 
and computer use better than his 
peers. 

Johnson already has shown 
amazing restraint for a man who’s 
never managed in a race. When 
others might use an ace such as 
Gooden on less rest, Johnson is 
ins is tin g that he have more, giving 
the 20-year-old pitcher five days off 
this week. 

Alarm bells went off in John- 
son's brain when he saw Gooden 
have a poor game followed by a 16- 
Slrikeout, 143-pitch masterpiece 
followed by another poor perfor- 
mance. That spelled: “tired young 
pitcher.” In three previous pro 
years, Gooden has worked 79, 191 
and 218 innings. This year, count- 


ing postseason, Gooden might be 
the first pitcher of his age (in lively 
ball times) to be asked to pitch 300 
innings. Any arm can be ruined. 

What if Billy Martin leads the 
Yankees into the playoffs? Will be 
meet tbe Angels and his old buddy 
Reggie Jackson? Would he face his 
former coach, Dick Howser of 
Kansas Gty, probably baseball's 
most underrated manager? What 
about Martin vs. Lasorda or Mar- 
tin vs. Herzog rematches that 
would recall battles of the late 70s? 

Can the Toronto pitching staff, 
gasping for a fourth and fifth start- 
er, use its fabulously deep bullpen 
to hold off the voracious Yankees 
and their 850-run offense? If run 
differential is the true measure of a 
team’s quality, then nobody in 
baseball is nearly as talented as the 
Yankees and Blue Jays. Both have 
a chance to outscore opponents by 
200 runs. 

Can tbe Cardinals, with Jack 
Clark already injured, ignore their 
complete lack of bench strength 
and their novice bullpen? The Mets 
almost have a monopoly on the 
established scan; when they meet 


the Cardinals, but Sl Louis has a 
three-game lead. 

WDi the Dodgers' starting pitch- 
ing depth immunize them to the 
plague of coflapses and near folds 
that have struck NL West leaders 
in the '80s? Could tbe Padres' old- 
pros make one last run at the 
Dodgers' kids? 

And what about the closest race 
at the moment — in the AL West, 
where the Royals want to beat the 
repeat jinx? If one man deserves 
our sympathy in coming days, 
haps it is Mauch of the Angris. 
record (20 finishes of fourth or 
worse in 23 seasons) is a much- 
beaten dead horse. So arc his ten- 
dencies toward archaic one-nm 
strategies. This is a bright, decent 
man who has had enough unhappy 
endings. 

The baseball season's final chap- 
ter has ended twice with Mauch as 
the corpse in question. Both times, 
with the 1964 Phillies and the 1982 
Angels, self-inflicted wounds was 
the cause of death. If Mauch finally 
reached a Worid Series after his 
career seemed buried, that would 
be a surprise ending indeed. 





f 


Page 20 


ENTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 1985 


OBSERVER 


Hidden Facts of Life 


Quebec’s Far North: Land of the Broken Promise 


By RusselJ Baker 

N EW YORK — Fifty years ago 
men wore hats, but now they 
wear mustaches. You fan confirm 
it by looking at photographs of 
baseball crowds in the 1930s. 

See? Men are wearing hats. No, 
not all of them, and not all men 
nowadays wear mustaches, either 
— bur a lot do, enough so we can 
call this the age of the mustache, 
just as we could have called the 
1930s the age of the hat. 

So what? So this: How many 
mustaches do you see in that 1930s 
crowd? How many baited heads do 
you see when you look out the 
window today? 

The answer in both cases is: 
none. And yet, consider that 80 or 
90 years ago. at the dawn of the 
century, the typical American man 
wore not only a hat, but also a 
mustache. Are the implications 
dear, or must I spell them out for 
you? 

For an entire century — from the 
golden age of the horse and buggy 
to the brass age of the interconti- 
nental ballistic missile — the 
American man has been the site of 
an indecisive struggle for suprema- 
cy between two powers, the hat and 
the mustache, which at the centu- 
ry’s beginning coexisted in harmo- 
ny on that rough masculine terrain. 
□ 

What has been happening over 
the lost century to create this ten- 
sion between hat and mustache, so 
similar to the international political 
tension that has made our century a 
time of terror? 

Certain facts are obvious. It is 
clear, for example, that the hat and 
the mustache are both the kind of 
objects that psychologists call 
“adornments of concealment.'’ 
That is. both purport to be decora- 


tions of the male body, although 
their true purpose is to hide an area 
that the body is not too happy 
about. 

The hat bides the top of the 
head; the mustache hides the terri- 
tory lying between the nostrils and 
the top Up. Why at different times 
in histoty have American men 
wanted to hide just one and expose 
the other? 

In trying to solve this mystery, 
psychologists at the Gullsbmy In- 
stitute used the usual research tech- 
niques — laboratory rats in hats, 
chimpanzees given theatrical paste- 
on mustaches to play around with. 


and so on — with ludicrous results. 

Their conclusion: A generation 
whose father wears a hat but no 
mustache will always grow a mus- 
tache and refuse to' wear a hat just 
to moke the old man climb the wall, 
and vice versa. 

What about the generation at the 
turn of the century, which wore 
both hat and mustache? Easy, say 
the Gullsbury researchers: The in- 
vention of "die telephone made 
them the first generation that could 
drive the old man up the wall by 
keeping the phone tied up day and 
night; they didn't have to use the 
hat-and-mustache technique to do 
the job. 

Absurdities of this sort must be 
expected when you spend your 
time trying to make a snap-brim 
fedora "stay on a laboratory rat. 
Such, alas, is the destiny of the 
laboratory scientist, so blinded by 
the romance of science that he can- 
not see the dust on a poorly oiled 
scalp or the razor nick on an di- 
shorn chin. 


Yes. this is the sort of stuff that 
governs the American male's seem- 
ingly quixotic shifts between bats 
and mustaches. If we ask ourselves 
what those “adornments of con- 
cealment'* are trying to hide at vari- 
ous stages in American history, ev- 
erything becomes dear. 

What was the bat concealing in 
its heyday? Well that heyday coin- 
cided with the era of gooey hair oil 
which produced two unhappy ef- 
fects: (1) when freshly oilerl the 
hair was apt to give off blinding 
glare in full sun; (2) the goo attract- 
ed thick layers of unpleasant mat- 
ter floating in the air, including 
gnats and tinders. 

Note that the disappearance of 
the hat coincides with the introduc- 
tion of ungooey hair oils, while the 
rise of the mustache occurs at the 
same time that increasing use of 
drugs and alcohol by young men 
has them rising from bed too shaky 
to shave their kissable region with- 
out leaving ghastly scars. 

What we nave is simply a natural 
response to changing technology, 
both cosmetic and narcotic. Way 
did hat and mustache nourish to- 
gether at the start of the century? 
WeU, the primitive state of the hair 
oil can be easily imagined, if noi 
the terror of a mankind waiting for 
the safety razor to be invented. 

Hew York Times Service 


By Christopher S. Wren 

Hew York Times Service 

K UUJJUAQ. Quebec — 
When 10.000 caribou 
drowned trying to ford the swol- 
len Caniapiscau River last Sep- 
tember. the loss amounted to two 
years* supply of meat for the in- 
habitants of northern Quebec. 

But the ecological disaster cre- 
ated some temporary jobs for the 
local Eskimos, or Inuit, as they 
call themselves. About 160 of 
them were hired to clean up the 
carcasses. 

Steady work comes as scarce as 
trees in northern Quebec, a flat, 
mosquito-ridden expanse of bush 
and lakes the size of France. 

“Sixty percent of employable 
people are not working at this 
time." said Willie Makiuk, a rep- 
resentative of the Kativik regional 
government, which looks after 
5.500 Eskimos scattered in a doz- 
en isolated settlements along the 
rocky northern coast. 

Such an unemployment rate is 
not much worse than in other 
pockets of poverty across Cana- 
da. But the Eskimos of northern 
Quebec have a particular griev- 
ance. Ten years ago, they signed 
away title to land for a major 
hydroelectric project near James 
Bay in return for assurances of a 
better life and millions of dollars 
in compensation. 

The hydroelectric power is pro- 
ducing a profit for Quebec, but 
the Eskimos have yet to see a 
substantial improvement in their 
lives. 

“If nothing is done, it will be 
bottling up the frustrations until 
it explodes," said Mark R. Gor- 
don. president of Makivib Carp., 
which was set up to handle com- 
pensation from the James Bay 
project. 

Kuujjuaq, which used to be 
called Fort Chi mo, looks like a 
dusty frontier town. It lacks 
paved roads, running water and a 
sewage system, among other ame- 
nities. Most of the town's 1,100 
residents drive battered pickup 
trucks and three-wheeled motor- 
cycles. without license plates. 

Because of Kuujjuaq’s condi- 
tion and its isolation 900 miles 
(1.450 kilometers] north of Mon- 
treal the water, sewage and gar- 
bage services, all provided by 
truckers, cost 21 times what they 
would for a small town in south- 






« i i 






Ovolopw 5. Wiw/Tho Nn York Tin 


BP* ( N 



Y 


uTJJt 


Ccannowcto v.. --"'1 

H* QUEBEC J 


% 

EL.- 


Iha New York Tima 


Nearly all supplies come by truck, but satellite dish puDs in entertainment. 


era Canada, said the town's secre- 
tary-treasurer, Ian Robertson. 

Ottawa is aware of the condi- 
tions. Three years ago, the De- 
partment of Indian and Northern 
Affairs acknowledged in a report 
that there had been “serious prob- 
lems" in trying to carry out the 
James Bay agreement, and it 
promised to do better. 

Nor has Kuujjuaq benefited 
from being in Che northern tip of 
the constituency of Prime Minis- 
ter Brian Mulroney. In eariy July. 
Mulroney visited Kuujjuaq and 
seemed distressed by what be 
found “We've failed seriously 
along the way. but 1 don't think 
it's because of any lack of opti- 
mism or any malice in the Cana- 
dian spirit,” be assured constitu- 
ents who turned out to greet him. 

David Crombie, minister of In- 
dian and northern affairs, visited 
Kuujjuaq later but nothing result- 
ed, Mayor Johnny Watt said. 

“1 would like to see them pro- 


vide the funds rather than say 
they're going to do it. because 
they always say they are going to 
get around to it, but in fact they 
never do," he said in the Eskimo 
language. 


KuuS uaq’s links with the south 
are relatively recent The region 
was taken away from the North- 
west Territories and tacked onto 
Quebec in 1912. No provincial 
presence was established until the 
1970s, when the Parti Qu4b6cois 
leader, Rent Levesque, flew up to 
Kuujjuaq and distributed frozen 
turkeys to win over the English- 
and Eskimo-speaking InrnL 

“Now the turkeys come up with 
their own briefcases," said Gor- 
don, alluding to officials who kept 
appearing to study what needed 
to be done. 

Makiuk, at the Kativik regional 
government complained that the 
province had neglected the Eski- 
mos because they remained stub- 
bornly federalist when the Parti 


Qu&becois was trying to advance 
its French- Canadian separatist 
philosophy. 

Gordon had a more practical 
explanation. “There's not many 
votes up hero,” he said. 

Some wd]-meacing steps taken 
by the government have damp- 
ened the initiative of the Eskimos, 
Nearly everyone in Kuujjuaq has 
been assigned to government- 
owned houses, which tenants are 
not permitted to improve. 

Kuujjuaq's social life centers 
around the hotel which opens its 
bar three nights a week. A visitor 
reported that patrons consumed 
more than 2,000 bottles of beer 
one recent evening. The regional 
hospital attributes 90 percent of 
its cases, excluding pregnancies, 
to alcohol-related accidents or 
rights. 

Rules posted outside the bar 
suggest what has gone on. No 


more than two beers may be or- 
dered at a time. Weapons, includ- 
ing knives, must be left outside. 

Patrons who assault the bartender 
will be asked to leave. Anyone 
beating his spouse will be refused 
admission for six months. 

Lack of opportunities in the 
region has been hardest on the 
young. Gordon said that half the 
population was 16 years old or 
younger, and that they would 
start looking for jobs thai did not 
exist. 

“It's a worry with me and the 
other elders," said Mayor Wall, 
“because these young people have 
nothing to go to. nothing to work 
at, so they nun to other unpro- 
ductive dungs. We have a lot of 
problems. Young people turn to 
vandalism because they have 
nothing co do." 

Makivik Corp. is using wbai 
cash compensation it has received 
to find ways to create jobs. “The 
government has no im a gina tion, 
so the ideas have to come from 
us," said Gordon, 31,an art school 
dropout who has helped lead the 
drive for Eskimo self-sufficiency 
in northern Quebec. 

The corporation wants to set up 
a slaughterhouse to process and 
ship meat from the herd of 
600,000 caribou that migrates 
across northern Quebec. So far 
provincial law foritids the com- 
mercial sale of game. 

Makivik is also studying the 
feasibility of collecting and pro- 
cessing down from rider ducks in 
Hudson and Ungava bays. It 
wants to clear river channels to 
fish commercially for arctic char, 
which tastes much tike salmon. 
An attempt at shrimp trawling in 
the Davis Strait oft Greenland 
was abandoned after it lost sever- 
al million dollars. 

After a decade of waiting for 
the government, leaders like Gor- 
don believe, the Eskimos of 
northern Quebec have to come up 
with their own solutions. 

“At least three-quarters of the 
psychological problem is with the 
government and their righteous 
attitude,” Gordon said. “They 
rhink they're doing you a big fa- 
vor providing welfare and hous- 
ing. We are trying to change 
things and it is going to take 
time." 


people 

Houston Housewife Sells 
first Novel for $350,000 

Karfeeo Koen. 37. a HousiJ 
housewife, recently completed tar ,■* 
first novel picked a literary agent s 
name out of a writers* magaane 
and sent her manuscript to New 

York. The agent sent it w editors a 

five major publis h i ng houses. Ail 
expressed interest. Now Random 
House has bought the book for 
S350.OOO. “Through a Glass. Dark- 
ly" (the title may be changed) is set 
in England and France in the 18th 
century. It is scheduled to be puo- 
lisbed in September 1986. 

□ 

Milton Berie. 77. who underwent 
a quadruple-bypass heart opera- 
tion in June, feels terrific and wul 
return to the stage this weekend, hp 
j wife says. The comedian plans ■ 

take part in the Jerry LewisMuscu- 
j lar Dystrophv telethon, Ruth Bene 

said. After tfie telethon, he plans a 

guest appearance on a Bob Hope 
television special then will travel u> 

Sl Louis and Atlantic City, New 
Jersey, for personal appearances, 
she said. “He is vwv anxious to set 
off again.” she said, “He said he 
hasn’t laid off so long since he was 
j 7 years old 

□ 

Midtael Kfa g 27, rolled his 
wheelchair ro the foot of t be V. S. 
Ca pitol to end a 5,400-mile (8,750- 
IdJomerer) journey across the Unit- 
ed States in a band-powered wheel- 
chair. The voyage proved, be said, 
that “you’re only as handicapped 
as vou let yourself be”. A kan. ^ 
band played the theme from ^ 


•TT2 rtfov 1 1 -111 1 1 Kl 


ty of Pennsylvania graduate stu- 
dent, who began his trip April 30 in 
Fairbanks, Alaska. King was para- 
lyzed from the waist down in a 
1979 motorcycle accident. 


Mick Jagger and the fashion 
model JerryHaD are the parents of 
a 7-round (32-kilogram) baby boy, 
their second child. A publicist said 
the rock star's first son — he has 
three daughters — had not been 
named yet. 


James Irwin has abandoned his 
fourth attempt to rind the remains 
.of Noah's Ant on Mount Ararat in 
eastern Turkey, the Anatol^ a 
News Agency reported. The former 
UJS. astronaut and rive other fun- 
damentalist Christians began their 
climb Saturday. 


announcements 


AMERICAN PHYSICIAN 

AND SURGEON 
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AMERICAN MEDICAL CENTS 

Via M Dorati 7, Lucca, Italy. Phone 
0563-588530. Hows by cwontmenfc 
Mon, Wed, IQ ■ l2ajn,/2-ip.ffl. 


worldwide. Write: Residence La 
Chantorie, 86000 POTHERS. FRANCE 


ALCOHOUCS ANONYMOUS in 

fngkhJRarij (doty) 634 39 65. Rome 


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(069) 250066 

DUSSELDORF/ RAT1NGEN 

(02102) 45023 LMLS. 

MUNICH i.nls- 

1089} 142244 


BEAUDART 

Bonce 8 International Moving 
Fu*y professional - Reasonably priori 

PARIS (1} 867 42 46 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FOR MORE REAL ESTATE 
OPPORTUNITIES SEE 
PAGE 5 


BELGIUM 


, „ _ , Borage, terms courts, 

in high standing Fabron area of Nice. 
Piece* edl F5 cb TO 81-974)1, (93) 86- 
3582, or contact owners: Assataurian 
9465 WfchreBW. S/724, 
CA 90212. Tela*: 194795 


YOUR CONTACT IN PROVENCE. 
Houses with character. Oiarming 
properties. Estates. Ernie GARQN. 
S> 55. 13532 5T-REMY-DE -PRO- 
VINCE Cedes. Td 1901 92JJ7J58 +. 



SAINT PAUL DE VENCE. sea view; 
Exceptional estate, modern, stone, 
450 iqjn. fang space, 6000 sqjil 
lend. pool PouibKty tenris. 
F7AOO.OOO. Promotion Mceart. Plane 
Maccrt, 06000 Nice, let 9387 08 20. 
The IMMOZA8 461235 


DEAUVILLE memo triplex condo, fur • 
ashed designer modem, own dads, 2 
bedroom, good investment. Adam 
570,000. Bexnsand. M (6) W8 *0 69. 
Boot 2647. Herald Tr&ne, 92521 
Neuily Gedex, France 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


EXCB'TIONAL CANM5, CaSfomie. 
The best 4-bedroom apart m en in Co- 
(Horn*, sold by the owner. Price 
USSljOOOJXXhM 634011 after 7 pm 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


1NQUE CANPK Croiseha, right on 
the seafront, a MUST far the dacem- 
ng motor. PrmhgiotJi 336 
apartment, 207 iqjn. terrace. 

dehAaatlJANY.SSl 

47, LoGobelte, 06400 



COTE D’AZUR, VBKE Newly butt 
vfla, 4 bedrooms. 3 bafts, pool, pan- 
•brwric view sea 4 mourAam. 
5280,000. (93) 24 03 66 / 2424 49. 


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FRENCH PROVINCES 


COTE D'AZUR 
5 Mantes From CAhMES 
Ftsry-teie mew on lea 
and ftvT of Gotfa-luai 
IE MONTEVERDI 
B apartmem-vflas of 3 roams. 
High dess. Wonwfton: 
COG1CA Transactions 
de Belgique, 06220 Galfs-Juan. 
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5300,000,0004- In Various Amounts 


BUSINESS 

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YESI Inve st in one trf America! most 

□ Wian dSarnSSy. Wte^wwsptof- 
ed more nut trees n 1984 them any 
other developer in our 5We. 

High anneal owning* projected for 
many, many years rmd, we gecran- 
tM to rapurtdKB# inve s tment. 
BROKH? ENQUIRIES JNVITHX 
Moterid available m English, French, 
Germwi Box 2353, Herald Tribune, 
92521 NemBy Cede*. France 

M inaT HOT i investment - US 57 ,9 SO 


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XWSD48TON dose to HoEand Parii. 
Modern haute, 4 bedrooms, 2 bath- 
room, do ob oom. 3 receptions, 74 


(Morocco) NEAR 
CROWN PUKE PAL 


1884 V8ars, Switzerland. 
Ibb 456213 GE5E CH 


SWITZERLAND 






ffiSHOU) RESTAURANT PREMISES 
far sale near Regent's Port London, 
NW1. Full detaSTefc O0W21 569 


Magnificent Juxurins viOo » the fam- 
«at readenfei Aria, 1 700 mjil, OSrtrd 
heating. 2 floors, parents and chil- 
dren's apartments, 6 reception tana 
roams, amg roam, 3 latchens, 12 bed- 


NYC 43-Story CONDO 

Bag Ho mm a rafc io M Tower 

240 EAST 47th ST. 

1 Hod To United Nations 
•SPECTACULAR. 

1. 2, 3, & 4 Bedroom Apartments 


LUXURY EXECUTIVE APARTMENTS. 
Knghlsbridge/ChsSsea Over 100 
fuSy serviced Oik4cb. 1 & 2 bedroom 
a partments. All modem convewatces. 
Mmirawn stay 22 days. Priats from 


rooms, v nattwjon 
tiondl architecture. 



Mmimwii stay 22 days. Frias from ' 
£145 per week. Please contact Lor- 
route Young, NGH Apartments *HI 
Gwynn House, Soane Ave. 

SW3,Td 01-589 1 105. TV 29581 / G. ,'3. 


New Fu8 Service Butcfra With 
Swim m ing Pool, Health Oub and 
Housekeeping Services AvaSaUe 
ttXTAL APARTMENTS 
ARE ALSO AVAILABLE 
For Info Col 212759-8844 
Sat, Sun 71 -4,- Mon to Fri 9-B 



BEHR 6 WTCHOfF. A large selection 
of properties in Sl. Johns Wood. 
Regents Perk, Swiss Cottage. Haro, 
stead & environs. 6 months +. Tel 
01-586 7561 -Hu 883168 ACO G