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The Global Newspaper 

Edilcdin Paris 

.Printed 5 mill ta wTy "• 

in fens; London, Zurich, 

WEATHER Data appear on page 20 - 

No; 31,971 ; ; 49/85 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


Published WithThe New York Times and Hie Washington Post 

**K . PARIS, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1985 


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By Seth Mydans 

. New York Tima Sen ice ' 

‘ MANILA — Although demon- 
stratoxs- banied tires, honked horns 
and .banged on lamp posts here 
Tuesday to protest Monday’s ac- 
quittal of 26 men accused in toft 
killing of Benlgno S. Aquino Jr., 

NEWS ANALYSIS • 

the /scattered demonstrations 
jitHfed the passion that has fired 
huge rallies in the past. 

■A day after the acquittals, atten- 
thn was quickly Ahffting to what 
appeared to be the more pressing . 
matters of mflitary reorganization 
and a presidential election cam-' 


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The assassination in 1983 of Mr. 
Aquino, the nation’s most popular 
opposition figure and. the mam ri- 
val of President FerdinandT. Mar- 
co, brought the Philippines to the 
brink rtf chaos two years ago. The 
slaying remains the divisive back- 
drop for the new developments. 

Bin Mr. Marcos’s opponents ap- 
pear to have accepted the outcome 
of the trial with weary cynicism 
rather than with the angry outburst 
the president may have reared. 

One reason for this is the timing 
of the verdict, over which most peo- 
ple here believe the president had 
die final word. It came after two 
years of slow and frustrating legal 
maneuverin g and in -the midst of 
pre-election jostling among Mr. 
Marcos's opponents. 

The president took pains to 
move actively to other marten as 


Liberals End 
9-Year Rule 
OfQuebecois 

By Douglas Martin 

New York Tima Service 

. MONTREAL — The Parti Qo6- 
bteois, which once advocated at 
least partial independence from 
Canada, has been overwhelmingly 
defeated in a provincial election by 
. he liberal Party after nine years px 
office. • 

The 52-yeax-aldIIbcral leader in 
Quebec, Robert Bourassa, will re- 
turn to the office of premier, which 
he held in two Quebec governments 
from 1970 to 1976. 

As Liberals waved Canadian and 
Quebec flags and a band played at 
a celebration Monday night, Mr. 
Bourassa, said: “What a great vic- 
tory for Quebec, Canada, and for 
change.” 

But Mr. Bourassa lost to his Parti 
QuAbtoois opponent, Jean Guy- 
Parent, in his own district of Ber- 
trand, near Montreal. As a result, 
another Liberal may be asked to 
step aside to create a safe seat that 
Mr. Bourassa could win in a by- 
election. 

“If it doesn’t work, I will go 
somewhere else,” Mr. Bourassa 
said as early returns indicated that 
he might lose inhis district He said 
there were several safe districts in 
which he could seek a seat almost 
immediately. 

As party leader, he automatically 
becomes Quebec's premier under 
Canadian law. 

The Liberals won 99 of the 122 
seats in the provincial legislature 
while the Parti Qu£b6cois captured 
23. When the assembly was dis- 
solved prior to the elections, the 
Parti Queb&ois held 61 seats, the 
Liberals 53 and the independents 6. 
Two seats were vacant. 

Pierre- Marc Johnson, the 39- 
year-old Parti Qu6b6cois leader 
and premier since late September, 
won a dose race in his own district 




Robert Bourassa 

after trailing in the vote count far 
much of the evening 

In a statement concedi ng his par- 
ty’s defeat, Mr. Johnson said the 
vole indicated a desire for “pro- 
found change.” 

“1 respect this verdict of the Que- 
bec people, ” he said. 

Most of the 4.5 million eligible 
voters turned out for the vote de- 
spite harsh weather. 

The Parti Qu6b£cois came to 
power in 1976. It was formed in 
1968 with the- goal of protecting 
ftnd enhancing the rights of Que- 
bec’s French-speaking majority. 

In a speech Sunday, Mr. Johnson 
said tins year’s campaign differed 
from those of the past in that En- 
gEsb-speakers and French-speak- 
ers were “not at each other’s 
throats.” 

Sepa ratism and cultural con- 
cerns have long dominated political 
discussion in Quebec, which is 
Canada’s largest and second most 
populous province. But in this 
year’s «m»pnig n , Mr. Johnson and 
Mr. Bourassa emphasized econom- 
ic issues. 

Mr. Bourassa's return to the post 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL 1) 


dear Tfr Bt die 
made or that 




Corazon Aquino declared 
her camfidaity in the Phi- 
lippines. Page 5. 


soon as the verdict was announced. 
First he reappointed the most 
prominent defendant. General Fa- 
bian C. Ver, as armed forces chief 

midnight to sign an deo^i^m 
Kve television. 

On television again Tuesday, Mr. 
Marcos received senior officers for 
the widely publicized start of a mil- 
itary reorganization that General 
Ver is heading. 

tbefirst announcements abouMhn 
reorganization did not make it 


S would be 
er would be 


After an . immediate outpouring 
of condemnation by mady public 
figures, many of ’whom repealed 
. their earlier criticisms of toe pro- 
ceedings, attention turned quiddy 
to other matters. 

As planned, Mr. Aquino's wid- 
ow, Corazon, announced her candi- 
dacy Tuesday to run for preadenL 
She had been waiting only for Mr. 
Marcos to give the official go- 
ahead for the election. . 

To chants of “Cory, Cray,” she' 
said that she would oppose the 
president because “we. must get 
somebody who is almost the com- 
plete opposite of wbat Marcos is.” 

She said she could offer the na- 
tion integrity, in contrast to the 
potitical.virtnosity of Mr. Marcos, 
whom she called “die most brilliant 
Rhpino.” - - 

People who have become accus- 
tomed to seeing the president’s 
hand behind most developments in 
their nation saw evidence of this 
brilliance not only in the timing but 
in the substance of the trial verdict. 
To a notable degree, the decision 
supported the details of the presi- 
dent’s position on the assassination 
from the start 

“Who on Earth is going to \»- 
Heve snob a preposterous deci- 
sion?” said Jaime V. Ongpin, presi- 
dent of Bcnguet Corp. and a 
supporter of Mrs. Aquino's candi- 
dacy. “ Thi< ~ nmwrtignted injustice 
has. proven beyond doubt that Mr. 
Marcos controls the judiciary sys- 
tem. It is a decision rendered in 
contempt of public sentiments." - 

Not only did the court, whose 
three judges were all appointed by 
Mr. Marcos, find the defendants 
innocent of involvement in the as- 
sassination, but ft also spent much 
of its 90-page decision disparaging 
the prosecution’s case ana its wit- 
nesses. 

It went farther than would have 
been necessary simply to acquit the 
26 defendants. Instead, it took 
pains to argue the logicof the gov- 
ernment's contention that Mr. 
Aquino was killed by a Jane gun- 
man. Rolando C Gahnan. 

; The court h^ been criticized al- 
most from the start, azzd die prose- 
cution was accused rfpro-govem- 
ment bias. One member of the 
prosecution team resigned in the 
last days of the trial, saying he and 
his colleagues had been pressured 
not to pursue the case vigorously. 

Criticism of the prosecutors fo- ■ 
cosed in particular on two legal 
maneuvers that made an acquittal 
of General Ver almost certain. 

In one of these, the prosecutors 
failed to appeal a rating by the 
Supreme Court that barred the use 
of the primary evidence against 
General Vo-. 

This was his testimony before an 
1 1 -month fact-finding commission. 
The commission declared that the 
testimony showed that General Ver 
had covered tip a military conspira- 
cy to assassinate Mr. Aquino as he 
arrived in August 1983 from three 
years of self-imposed exile in the 
United Stales. 

In the other maneuver, the prose- 
cutors declined to accept swam af- 
fidavits by six U.S. airmen posted 
at a base in the Philippines. The 
airmwi said the Philippine Air 
Force bad scrambled two jets on 
the day of the assassination. 

The prosecutors said that a U-S- 
State Department seal on the evi- 
dence had not beat property au- 
thenticated. 

Critics said this evidence could 
have been used to argue that Gen- 
eral Ver had known more than he 
admitted about the arrival plans of 
Mr. Aquino at Manila airport, 
where he was killed. 



EC Leaders Back 
Majority V otmg 
OnaKey Issue 


Mourners in MameJodi, Sooth Africa, as they carried the coffin Tuesday of a 2-montb-old 
boy who was among those killed in a dash between protesters and the police Nov. 21. 

Winnie Mandela Addresses Rally , 
Vows Vengeance for Fallen Blacks 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Times Service 

MAMELODL South Africa — 
Winnie Mandela, an ardent black 
nationalist, pledged vengeance 
Tuesday for the blood of fallen 
blacks at what she said was the first 
mass Tally she had addressed in 25 
years. 

In doing so, Mrs. Mandela, the 
wife of the jailed leader Nelson 
Mandela, defied authorities by 
breaking an officially imposed si- 
lence. .. 

“This is our country," Mis. Man- 
dela proclaimed in a soccer stadi- 
um, shortly after 12 persons slain 
heie.by potice l^ti^th were bur-, 
ied in a mass funeral ' 

“In the same way as you have 
had to bwy our children today,” 
she said, “so shall the blood of 


these heroes we buried today be 
avenged." 

Diplomats from 11 Western 
countries, including the United 
States, attended the funeral. 

Timothy M. Carney, political 
counselor at the U.S. Embassy, said 
it was the first time an official Un- 
representative had attended a polit- 
ical mass burial in South Africa. 
Mr. Carney was not present when 
Mrs. Mandela spoke. 

Mr. Carney said the U.S. deri- 
sion to be represented reflected 
Washington's commitment to 
“peaceful protest and due process.” 
He said h did not represent a shift 
or reatisjjmeni erf the U.S. policy 
to , .;ar<sSci-ffi' Africa. 

In Pretoria, meanwhile. Presi- 
dent Pieter W. Botha announced 
the lifting of a state of emergency in 
eight of 38 districts where it was in 


force: “The revolutionary dimate is 
fast losing momentum,” he said. 

Tbe eight districts, in the Eastern 
Cape and the Transvaal, wens all 
small settlements that had not fig- 
ured highly in the nation’s 14- 
montb spasm of violence, which 
has claimed more than 900 lives. 

The emergency is still in force in 
large black areas around Johannes- 
burg, Port Elizabeth and Cape 
Town. 

Mamelodi, a black township 
near Pretoria, is not covered by the 
state of emergency and therefore 
was open to journalists. 

- An estimated 30,000 Mack peo- 
■ple; including Mis. Mandela, gath- 
ered in the cemetery under the 
black, green and gold banner of the 

(Contmned on Page 5, CoL JO 


By Steven J. Dry den 

fmemmkmal Herald Tribune 

LUXEMBOURG — European 
Community leaders reached tenta- 
tive agreement Tuesday on limited 
reform measures that included a 
narrowing of national veto powers 
and a commitment to expand coor- 
dination of monetary policies. 

The leaders of the 10 member 
states met late into the night Tues- 
day in an unusually long summit 
meeting in which they sought final 
approval of measures to revise the 
Tkeaty of Rome, the community’s 
1957 founding document. 
wi The leaders settled an important 
issue on the right of members to 
maintain their own health stan- 
dards. The agreement limits the use 
■ of the veto by removing the current 
.requirement for unanimity and al- 
lowing majority voting on the re- 
moval of internal banters to trade 
— frontier controls — within the 
community. 

It would allow members to ask 
that the controls be maintained in 
individual countries if they be- 
lieved that their elimination would 
threaten national health standards. 

The unanimi ty julc hnc been 

blamed for delaying or preventing 
derision making on important is- 
sues. 

An Irish official s»*iH that the 
agreement was tikdy to open the 
way for change* in the fo unding 
treaty. 

The reforms also would include a 
pledge by the community members 
to cooperate in coordinating their 
monetary policies to promote eco- 
nomic growth. 

The monetary reform proposal, 
made Monday by Wen Germany, 
does nor require immediate policy 
changes by the member states. 

The leaders also tentatively ap- 
proved treaty revisions increasing 
environmental and technological 
cooperation and providing greater 
community aid to less developed 
regions of the EC, as well as a 
separate agreement that would for- 
mally establish foreign policy coor- 
dination. 

Officials stressed ihat tbe mea- 
sures approved in principle must be 
agreed toby the leaders. 


House, Defying Reagan, 
Votes Textile-Import Cut 


m 


By Mike Robinson 

The Asso ciat ed Press 


imports. Much of the concern 
stems from this year’s estimated 


WASHINGTON — Tbe House S150-billion U.S. trade deficit as 
of Representatives, defying a veto w P 1 ™ 1 dosings and layoffs 
threat Cram President Ronald Rea- attributed to foragn compemion. 
gan, passed and sent to him on The bill would cut textile and 
Tbesday major trade legis l ati on apparel imports from Taiwan, 
that would cut textile and apparel tfong Kong and Korea by up to 30 
nnports entering the American percent, and limit the growth of 
market from Asia. imports from Brazil and right other 

16Iwas^sbart af Asian nations to 1 percent a year. 


oval 255- 
two-thirds 


Canada and the European Com- 

Tbe United States Is expected to munity would be exempt. Mexico 
retaliate soon again** Japan and Caribbean nations would get 
over leather products. Page 13. special status. Shoe imports would 


be limited to 60 percent of the 
support sponsors would need if Mr. American market apd quotas 
Reagan vetoed the measure and if would be imposed on luggage im- 
an effort to override a veto were ports, 
organized before Congress goes in a two-hour debate. House 
home for the Christinas holidays, critics disclosed a letter from Clay- 
Tbe vote also represented a re- ton K. Yeotter. the U.S. trade re- 
duction m House simport from a resentative, repeating that he 
version approved in October. would recommend a veto. 

Nonetheless, the textile bill has _ . . 

emereed as the onlv maior trade . countered by saying 




3PTC1 








emerged as the only major trade ^ 

measure to come nem topassage in the White House has recaved three 

a year of hei ghten ari concern over (Continued on Page 5, CoL 5) 




Yelena G. Bonner, en route from Moscow to Rome. 



It was still uncertain whether Ita- 
ly, which has called for more exten- 
sive changes in the treaty, would 
find the package adequate. EC offi- 
cials said. 

Unanimous agreement appeared 
to be impossible because of the 
inability of the Danish government 
to approve any changes without the 
agreement of its parliament. 

Another major area where the 
leaders sought agreement was in- 
creasing the powers of tbe Europe- 
an Parham enL 

Tbe new monetary proposal also 
included an amendment to the 
treaty that said that the member 
states “shall cooperate” to “secure 
tbe convergence of economic and 
monetary policies.” 

The West German proposal stip- 
ulates , however, that any institu- 
tional changes to further coordi- 
nate monetary policies can only be 
made by an inter-governmental 
conference. The proposals under 
consideration in Brussels were 
made by such a conference called 
by the EC leaders at their Milan 
summit meeting in June. 

West Germany has opposed ef- 
forts by the EC Commission, the 
ECs administrative body, to pro- 
mote greater coordination of mon- 
etary policies. Bonn said that mem- 
ber states with exchange controls 
— France, Italy, Greece and Ire- 
land — should relax them, and that 
Britain should align its exchange- 
rate mechanism with that of tbe 
European Monetary System. 

Tbe West German move was 
made easier, officials said, by the 
French derision Monday to ease 
foreign -ex change controls. 

President Franqois Mitterrand 
of France told Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl of West Germany that France 
was prepared to take further steps 
to loosen exchange controls next 
year. West German officials said. 

Mr. Mitterrand met with Grand 
Duke Jean of Luxembourg. EC of- 
ficials interpreted the meeting as an 
attempt by Mr. Mitterrand to re- 
pair relatives between the coun- 
tries fallowing French rejection of 
participation by a Luxembourg 
television company in a French 
commercial television venture. 


Sakharov 
Fed by Force, 
Relatives Say 

By Serge Schmeraann 

New York Times Service 

ROME — For 207 days of the 
past 18 months, Andrei D. Sakha- 
rov was separated from his wife 
and fed by force, his nose damped 
shut to Trace him to open his 
mouth. 

For much of that time, relatives 
of the dissident physicist said Tues- 
day, Soviet authorities tried to con- 
ceal Mr. Sakharov's hunger strike 
by forging or tampering with mes- 
sages from the Sakharovs to friends 
and supporters. 

Mr. Sakharov’s last hunger strike 
began April 16. It continued, ex- 
cept for a two-week interruption, 
until Oct 23, when be finally 
learned that his wife, Yelena G. 
Bonner, had been given permission 
to travel to the West for medical 
treatment. 

Mrs. Bonner’s son-in-law, Efrem 
V. Yankdevich, said that Mr. Sak- 

(Coatinaed on Page 5, CoL 3) 






U.K.’s GEC Seeks to Buy 
Plessey lor £1.18 Billion 


INSIDE 


Europe Sits by the Phone, Awaiting a Revolution 


1 1 's By Bob Hsugercy 

/ menuawnal Herald Tribune 

J ' ' ' LONDON — General Electric 
Ca of Britain proposed Tuesday to 
.buy Plessey Co. its biggest British 
fP rival for £1.18 billion (S1.75 bil- 
,‘lion). Analysts said the combina- 
fv* non.. would boost the country’s 
.jA# lackluster performance in export- 
tyjing electronics equipment. 

Plessey called a board meeting to 
discuss the approach from GEC 
which is the biggest British eke- 
/ homes company. It is unrelated to 
j^pfthe U.S. company of the same 
namt * 

‘ A The combination would consoli- 
/ "date GECs position as the third- 
J j largest European supplier of tele- 
M I communications and other 
m I electronics equipment, after Sie< 
m \mens AG of West Germany, with 
m $22 billion in total sales, and Phil- 
w kps NV of the Netherlands, with 
$19 billion. GEC and Plessey have 
combined annual sales equivalent 
•• about SI0 bfflioiL 

- - ' GEC said the combined concern 

^ v would be the world's seventh-bug- 
- .y est maker erf .tdectmmumicaticins 
equipment in terms of sales. At 
present, GEC is No. 8 and Plessey 
is No. 1 1. American Telephone & 
Telegraph Co. is the largest 


i 

h 


Some analysts have long advo- 
cated combining the two as a 
means of avoiding costly duplica- 
tion in research, development and 
production. 

“This gives ns one company that 
has a dunce to go for it in the 
world mark et," said John Tysoe, an 
analyst at the stockbrokerage of 
Grieveson, Gram & Co. 

The offer comes amid an unprec- 
edented wave of big takeover bids 
in Britain. Both DistiDezs Co„ the 
biggest Scotch whisky maker, and 
AJEed-Lyons PLC, a brewing and 
food giant, are resisting bids of 
about £1.8 btUion each. 

GECs suggested price would 
value Plessey at 160 pence a share. 
But Plessey shares raced up 40 
pence to dose at 176 pence, reflect- 
ing hopes that GEC would raise its 
proposed offer. 

At a news conference. GECs 
manag in g director, Lord Wein- 
stock, called 160 pence a “full " 
price but declined to say whether it 
was tbe maximum that GEC would 

^Tbe combination would require 
approval of the British gowsm- 
ment, by far the largest buyo- of the 
companies’ electronic weaponry 

(Cootinned on Page 5, CoL 6) 



At NATO, Defense 
Minister Jacob de Rio- 
ter defended the Dutch 
decision to cut back nu- 
clear missions. Page 5. 

■ Nabfc», the West Bank’s larg- 
est city, is divided over apartial 
return of local rale. Page! 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 
■The Stock Exchange of Sin- 
gapore is to reopen trading on 
Thursday. Page 13. 

SPORTS 

■Tbe Miami Dolphins ended 
the Chicago Bears’ winning 
streak at 12 games. Page2L 


By Joseph Fitchett 

Imernasiaoal Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The commonplace 
telephone is at the center of (he 
next technological revolution, and 
there is a growing fear that what 
the revolution calls. Western Eu- 
rope will not be able to answer. . 

No one doubts that the stakes 
are g i gan tic. 

“The nations that develop the 
new planetary communications 
will command economic and even 
political power in the next century 
as surety as the rafiroad-buOding 
countries have dominated the last 
century of histoty,” said Michel 
Poniatowslri, a former French min- 
ister of the interior, in a recent 
report on technology adopted by 
the European Parliament. 

As computer technology revolu- 
tionizes the public phone network, 
telecommunications is becoming 
tbe world’s biggest business. Tele- 
communications is expected to 
generate worldwide sales wrath 
more than $500. billion annually 
within five years, the US. Com- 
merce Department says.. Last year, 
sales of equipment and services for 
circulating toe world’s messages 
and pictures amounted toS325 tm- 
lkm. 

Europeans hope to collect their 
share. Western Europe has long ex- 
celled at building and idling tde- 


Getting Down to Business 

Europe’s New Approaches to Competition 

In the face of American and Japanese competition, is Western 
Europe in an irreversible economic decline? Can it catch up 
technologically? Are European economies too rigid to change? Can 
Europe move from a managerial to an entrepreneurial society? 

This is the third in a series of articles, appearing from time to 
time, that will focus on these questions and some answers. 


communications, probably the 
only high technology in which Eu- 
rope is roughly «pal in perfor- 
mance to the United States and 
Japan. 

Now “this bastion is endan- 
gered,” says Konrad Seitz, policy 
planning chief of West Germany's 
Foreign Ministry. As recent inter- 
views with numerous businessmen 
and political leaders confirmed, the 
European phone industry has be- 
come so accustomed to nationalis- 
tic protection that it may not be 
able to compete in what is becom- 
ing an international business. 

"The future competitiveness of 
all businesses operating from Eu- 
rope is at stake in this clash he- 
tween " national versus European’ 
in tdecommunications,” warns the 
Round Table of European Indus- 
trialists, a pand grouping 20 corpo- 
rate leaders. 


The challenge for Europe is 
threefold; Telephones and comput- 
ers are merging into a single tech- 
nology, releasing a flood of new 
products and services; deregulation 

in toe United States, Britain and 
Japan is accderating. this flood; 
these modernized telecommunica- 
tions are dr ama tically improving 
productivity and profits. 

“Data, and the ability to move sit. 

has become a sourced competitive 

advantage and added productivi- 
ty,’’ asserts Ann Rad, a telecom- 
munications analyst at tbe Organi- 
zation of Economic Cooperation 
and Development in Paris. 

But h iigmwtcrim m pnlitirians and 
economic analysts say that much of 
Europe is failing to keep pace with 
these innovations, mainly because 

tdwwnmnnirarinns is tOO tightly 
controlled by government monop- 
olies. Known generally as PTTs 


from their official names of Post, 
Telegraph and Telephone agencies, 
these monopolies were set up many 
decades ago in an age when phones 
were viewed as a service that oily 
governments could afford to pro- 
vide. 

Today, idecomxnunkations is a 
market that profit-minded manu- 
facturers want to enter. Europe’s 
phone equipment manufacturers, 
however, have de pend ed so heavily 
on their national PTTs that experts 
believe many erf these companies 
may prove too weak to survive in- 
tense international competition. 

“To get this improved competi- 
tive strength throughout our indus- 
trial and business communities,” 
warns Kaspar V. Cassani, the 
chairman of IBM-Eumpe, “a key is 
liberalized telecommunications.” 

Some forms of telecommunica- 
tion are taken for granted these 
days. Instant worldwide airline res- 
ervations, like the ability to get 
cash with a single credit card from 
automated idlers throughout the 
world, are mundane. 

Still unavailable to the general 
public are such existing corporate 
innovations as teleconferencing, a 
global video hookup that can allow 
researchers in different countries to 
discuss blueprints as conveniently 
as If they were standing next to 
each other. Another coming tech- 


nique is international electronic 
mail, which allows executives to 
leave each other computer mes- 
sages anywhere in the world, rather 
than depend on the telephone. 

In Europe, these innovations, all 
of which use te lephone networks, 
depend on PTTs. They control not 
only lines but the transmissions 
they cany, the rates, the technical 
standards of equipment that can be 
attached to toe network, and access 
for all value-added networks, or 
VANs — such as electronic bulletin 
boards or banking by phone. 

The growth of these services in 
continen tal E urope has been 
slowed by FIT charges and conser- 
vatism. A West Gennan business- 
man, for example, has access to a 
dozen VANs while his counterpart 
in Britain, winch has deregulated 
telecom mimical ions, has access to 
more than 600. 

Professor Herbert Giench, the 
West Gennan economist who 
coined the t erm “Eurosderosis,” 
cites the PTTs as a major source of 
rigidity contributing to the disease. 
“T elecommunicalion services in 
continental Europe's government- 
owned networks are notoriously 
expensive,” he has said, rihflT g m g 


The French Fit until recently 
sa its phone charges so high that 
(Continued on Page 8, CoL 4) 


v 






* *. 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 198& 


Partial Return to Local Rule 
Divides Israeli-Occupied City 


By William Claiborne 

Washington Pan Service 

NABLUS, Israeli-Occupied 
West Bank — A measure of local 
rule is to be restored to the occu- 
pied West Bazik’s largest city this 
month for the first time in nearly 
four years when the Arab Chamber 
of Commerce takes over the run- 
ning of civil functions from an ap- 
pointed Israeli mayor. 

The planned takeover has deeply 
divided Nablus. Critics of the move 
call it a sellout to Israeli interests. 
But its advocates say that it could 
lead to elections within a year, 
winch would be the first on the 
West Bank since 1976. A vote, in 
effect, would be a plebiscite en- 
dorsing the Palestine liberation 
Organization and its leader, Yasser 
Arafat, the advocates say. 

If other West Bank cities were 
permitted to follow suit, Palestin- 
ian leaden here said, the revival of 
politics could have a profound ef- 
fect, shaping future decisions an 
who will represent West Bank Ar- 
abs in any peace negotiations be- 
tween Jordan and Israel 

The elections, the Arab leaden 
said, would demonstrate clearly 
that West Bank Palestinians insist 
on having the PLQ represent them 
in peace talks. 

The new mayor of Nablus, the 
West Bmk military government 
has decided, is to be Zafir al-Masri, 


44 He heads the chamber of com- 
merce is an unde of Jordan's 
foreign minister, Taber al-Maai. 

Mr. Mam is to succeed an Israeli 
Army Druze officer, Jabr Hanon, 
die latest Israeli appointee to the 
job since Mayra: Bassam Sbaka was 
deposed in Maxch-1982, two years 
after his kgs were blown off by a 
car bomb planted by Jewish set- 
tlers. 

Mr. Masri, a member of one of 
the most powerful families in the 
Nablus political hierarchy, is apro- 
Jordanian supporter of the FLO. 
But he is better known as a success- 
ful industrialist and community 
business leader. 

He has become the target of bit- 
ter criticism by Mr. Shakn and oth- 
er opponents of the turnover of city 
government, including the leftist 
faction of the trade union move- 
ment and local Communists. His 
critics say that accepting an ap- 
pointment by the military governor 
and participating in Isracli-spon- 
sored elections is “traitorous.” 

In an interview Imre, Mr. Masri 
contended that essential municipal 
services had deteriorated so much 
m recent ycare that as tong as Pales- 
tinians were unable to bring an eod 
to the occupation, they should at 
least try to make life bearable. 

The city's electric generating 
[ant is nm-down, water services 
ave worsened, taxes and unem- 


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it have risen and businesses 
stopped growing under the 
Israeli administration, Mr. Masri 
said. Moreover, he added, 500 city 
workers have been on. strike since 
the municipal council was disband- 
ed in March 1982, compounding 


THE GIN OF ENGLAND 


“The question became, who 
should represent the people of 
Nabhis if the Israels were willing 
to step out?” Mr. Masri said. 
“Some said we should have a 
broad-based municipal leadership 
and not just the chamber of com- 
merce running thing s This is a 
good ilka in principle, but practi- 
cally not, because to get a broad 
base you need to hold meetings 
among many different groups,” he 

y jilwl 

Israeli security regulations, be 
noted, prevmt the bolding of such 
meetings. 

Mr. Masri said the purpose of 
the takeover was to “get the Israelis 
out of office, bring back the strik- 
ing employees and, after a year, 
hold elections. Then we can say, 
we have brought back the 
Arab municipality.* ” 

If the transition goes smoothly, 
militaiy government sources said, 
the cities of Ramallih, Hebron and 
Bin, all of which have Israeli Army 
officers serving as mayor, could fol- 
low Nablus’s example. 

Mr. Masri said that he made re- 
peated inquiries to the Jordanian 
government and the PLO about 
their petitions on die changeover 
and received no answers. 

“About six months ago, they 
said: “Stop asking us what to do. 
It’s up to the people.’ I figured if 
than was no objection from Jordan 
or the PLO, then they approved. 
They could have made a statement 
either directly or on television, but 
there was notmngT Mr. Masri said. 

Mr. Shaka, a former Syrian 
Ba'ath Party activist, has turned 
increasingly toward radical. pro- 
Syrian FLO splinter groups since 
be was deposed by tire nuK tazy gov- 
ernor. He stands to became even 
more politically isolated if Mr. 
Masri succeeds in gaming elections 
next year. 

But he continues to oppose Mr. 
Masifs compromise with the mili- 
tary government, saying that as 
long as Nabhis is occupied it 
should not cooperate with the Is- 
raelis. 

■ Palestinian 3s Killed 

A radical Palestinian group 
claimed responsibility Tuesday for 
the killing Monday of a West Bank 
lawyer, Aziz Shehadeh, and said all 
“hirelings” of Israel faced the same 
fate, Reuters reported from Da- 
mascus. 

The Fatah Revolutionary Coun- 
cil, led by Sabri d-Barma, who is ■ 
known as Abu Nidal, said that Mr. 

Shahmteh wag kilted tnwmtf nf hig 

“double allegiance” to King Hus- 
sein of Jordan and to Israel. 

Mr. Shehadeh was found 
stabbed to death in Ramallah. 



French Entertainers Occupy Tuileries 

An elephant is put up against French policemen at the Tufleries Gardens in central I^ris, as 
about 1(X1 faiigr<xindentertainasoccn{^ the paik with then: exhHnts to pxitest the barnimgcf 
entertainers at many areas in Fra«h dries. The protesters said that if thepoKoe tried to evict them 
they would shelter behind their elephants and “defend ourselves with firecrackers and rockets.” 


WORLD BRIEFS 


France Assails Ethiopia for Ejecting 

Relief Group That Saved ' Thousands 9 Ex-Teamsters Leader Ordered to Jail 


Archbishop Backs Criticism of Tories 

LONDON (Reuters) — The archbishop of Canterbury., the Most 
Reverend Robot Rimtie, strongly backed Tuesday a eburch commis- 
cri tiemng manyof^te Conserved government s economic 

on urban conditions, winch referred to Prime Minister 

Marozrt^atcher’s economic policies as dogmatic aa £|J flenbl& 
endowed by the opposition Labor Party, while an u nnam ed government 
minister had called it “pore Marxist theology. , 

Praising the report. Archbishop Runci* who is the toad of d* 
AnriianChurch, said: “It is deep in our tradition, as it is in Ma rxism, to 
beronceroed with such things. In that respect, and that respect only, can 
one say our report shares something with Marxism. 

Reagan May Accept Democrat Tax Plan 

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican congresskmal leaders met Tues- 
day with President Ronald Rragan and predicted that he would stop 
short of rejecting a Democratic alternative to his tax-rwiswn plan and 
might even give the Democratic measure a qualified endorsement. 

The White House said that Mr. Reagan would make no decision until 
he had studied reports by the Treasury Department and the Cannes] of 
Economic Advisers on the economic impel of the proposal, which is 
expected to be approved by the House Ways and Means Committee. 

The Republicans have written an alternative that would be somewhat 
more favorable to business. The Senate majority le ader , Robert J- 
said that Mr. Reagan “is going to look at the Republican package. I don t 
know what he win da Maybe he win endorse them both. 

Thatcher, FitzGerald Confirm Accord 

LUXEMBOURG (AP) — Prime Ministers Margaret Thatcher of 
Britain and Garret FitzGerald erf Ireland met Tuesday and confirmed 
that the British-Irish accord signed last month would be put into effect as 
planned, despite opposition by Protestant leaders in Northern Ireland. 

The Nov. I S agreement calls fra a consultative role in Northern Ireland 
by Ireland, with safeguards fra the Roman Catholic minority. Protestant 
leaders have objected that the agreement endangered the future of the 
Protestant majority in Northern Ireland. 

A statement issued by British and Irish officials after the 45-minute 
meeting Tuesday said the two leaders “confirmed the agreement would be 
implemented as planned.” The statement said the two hoped that the 
Protestants in favor of continued mwm with London “would come lo 
understand the reassurance on the status of Northern Ireland” in the 
agreement. 


Agtna Frxmce-Presse 

PARIS — The Foreign Ministry 
issued a communiqut Tuesday de- 
ploring Ethiopia’s decision to expel 
representatives of Doctors Without 
Braden, a private French humani- 
tarian group. 

The French ministry said the 
young doctors had performed “ad- 
mirable'* relief work under difficult 
conditions in Ethiopia, and h de- 
plored that the agency would be 
unable to continue a mission that 
already had saved “thousands of 
human lives” in that cotmtiy. 

Ethiopia's decision to bait the 
group’s operations was announced 
Monday night in Addis Ababa. 
Doctors Without Borders has been 
working in Ethiopia since March 
1984. 

The ministry also said that 
France had no intention erf contrib- 
uting in any way to the Ethiopian 
government’s program of transfer- 
ring refugees from the north where 
than is drought to more fertile ar- 
eas in the south. 

Doctors Without Borders has 
charged that* many people were' 
forced to move and that the reset- 
tlement has caused up to 100,000 
deaths. It was that all e gation that 
led to the relief gram's expulsion. 

The organization had a team of 
25 in Ethiopia, including seven 


doctors and 11 nurses, arid em- 
ployed 250 Ethiopians. It has been 
operating in four centers, three in 
Wollo- province and one in the Ti- 
gre region. 

■ foprifakn Was First 

Blaine Harden of The Wi 
ton Post reported earher from, A 
Ababa: 

The emulsion of Doctors With- 
out Bonders maAs the first time 
once the famine emergency began 
last year that the government has 
ordered a relief agency out of the 
country. The group was one of 47 
private relief organizations operat- 
ing in Ethiopia. 

Bcrhane Deressa, the deputy di- 
rector of the gov er nment's Relief 
and Rehabifiratian Commission, 
said the group's members “are 
wasting our time and ttey are wast- 
ing the resources of the French peo- 
ple by spending their money an 
political activities.” 

Mr. B erfiane declared Monday 
night that Doctors Without Bor- 
ders ^does not exist anymore irr 
Ethiopia” and ordered the^avem- 
ment to take over the organiza- 
tion’s four medical and feeding op- 
erations. 

The agency’s medical coordina- 
tor in A tkfis Ababa reactedangrfly 


As Campaign Nears, Polk, 
Say Kohl’s Appeal Rising 


Roden 

BONN — The government of 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl, buffeted 
over the part year by scandals and 
low popularity ratings, has made a 
powerful comeback in opinion 
polls as West Germany gears Dp for 
a yearlong election campaign. 

An authoritative survey conduct- 
ed this week by the televison chan- 
nel ZDF indicated that Mr. Kohl’s 


Danish Robbers 
Steal $7.7 Million 

The Associated Press 

COPENHAGEN — Two men 
stole about TCI zmUion kroner ($7.7 
million) in cash and ehMtr Tues- 
day from a bank transport in the 
suburb of Herlev north of here, the 
police reported. 

The police said the robbers took 
Monday’s receipts from Heriev’s 
post office and fled through a near- 
by pedestrian tunnel after dubbing 
two bank messengers. One of the 
messengers was slightly injured, the 
police said. 

Danish radio reported that o=N 
about a millio n kroner was in cash, 
the remainder probably in checks. 


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Christian Democratic Union had 
moved ahead of the opposition So- 
cial Democratic Party fra the first. 

time in nine mon ths a nd th at Mr. 

KohTs personal appeal was rising. 

But Christian Democratic offi- 
cials found another outcome of the 
poll to be even more encouraging 
for their electoral hopes. 

The survey showed that opti- 
mism about West Germany’s eco- 
nomic prospects is sweeping the 
country while fears about unem- 
ployment are receding. 

“The poll,” said a senior aide to 
Mr. Kohl who asked not to be 
named, “reflects a substantial shift 
in the mood of the population to- 
ward greater confidence in the fu- 
ture. That will work in the govern- 
ment’s favor and cany us through 
the next election.” 

The apparent change of mood 
has da mp ened spirits in the Snriat 
Democratic Party as il prepares to 
open its campaign for the 
election scheduled for Fe 
1987. 

Johannes Ran, the Social Demo- 
crat who will run against Mr. Kohl, 
is to present his prairies Dec. 16 in 
a speech in the town of Ahlen. 

Polls showed Mr. Ran to be the 
most popular politician through 
most of the year. But a rierihu*. in 
his ratings and the rise of the Chris- 
tian Democrats have tempered his 
optimism about his riunwra erf end- 
ing the ruling coalition's majority. 

He conceded last week in Bonn 
that the gove rnm ent was firmly 
Ahead in the polls, but said that he 
expected the picture to be different 
in a year. 



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WM&W.9L9 


Chancellor Helmut KoH 

Social Democratic officials, who 
only a. few months ago were pre- 
dicting a Ran landslide in 1987, 
now are markedly more pessimistic 
in their private assessments of .the 
party’s dunces of returning .to 
power after four years in opposi- 
tion. 

The ZDF poll found that the. 
Christian Democratic Union was 
supported by 45 percent of those 
surveyed, compared with 40 per- 
cent to 42 percent in the summer.,' 
Support for the Social Demo- 
cratic Party had slumped from 47 
percent a month earlier to 44 per- 
cent in the latest poll 
Backing for Mr. KohTs coalition 
alius, the liberal Free Democrats, 
rose from 3 percent in October to 4 
percent at the end of November. 
The radical Greens drew 7 percent 
A pcffl published Tuesday by the 
FmmH research institute showed 
the Christian Democrats with sup- 
port from 44 percent of these 
polled, the Social Democrats with 
40 parent and the Free Democrats 
with &J percent 
The results of both polls indicat- 
ed that the center-right coalition 
would be returned to power with a 
more than- adequate parfiamcntaiy 
lorityif electrons were held new. 


: ZDF poll also showed that 
54 percent of those questioned be- 
lieved the country was in the midst 
of an economic upturn, compared 
to only 41 percent who said so last 
spring and 46 percent earlier this- 


to the expulsion, winch be said had 
been anticipated by die group. 

“We are not & MaJ humanitar- 
ian organization. We do not work 
in a country at any price,” said Dr. 
Bertrand Desmoulins, who over- 
sees the group’s doctors, nurses and 
logistics officers in Ethiopia. 

“It is much easier to do your 
work and not look around at the 
things that are wrong,” he said. 
“We have been peaking out to 
emphasize the needs of the Ethiopi- 
an people.” 

m a series of statements that 
were highly publicized in Europe in 
recent weeks. Doctors Without 
Borders has accused the United 
Nations’ emergency operation in 
Ethiopia of covering up abuses of 
the government’s resettlement pro- 
gram. Nearly 600,000 persons nave 
been moved from die north to the 
southwest under the program. 

The French agency also has 
charged that 50,000 to 100,000 peo- 
ple weakened by famine have died 
as a result of being transported 
forcibly to the south. .. ' 

' ' '"The chums of Doctors Without 
Borders, however, are disputed by 
die United Nations and by donor 
governments such as the United 
States, which often criticize Ethio- 
pia's fammerehef efforts. 

Ethiopian donors say that Doc- 
tors Without Bordos has no evi- 
dence to back up its charges about 
the deaths of thousands of resettled 
people. Several donors, both pri- 
vate and governmental, also have 
remarked recently (hat the French 
agency appeared to want lo be ex- 
pefledfrom Ethiopia. 

Doctors Without Bonders, which 
operates in 30 countries with 350 
doctors and muses, has demanded 
a “moratorium” on the resettle- 
ment efforLTIre program is a prior- 
ity of the Marxist government. 

When Ethiopia announced the 
pro g ram last rail, rt promised that 
resettlement would be voluntary 
and that families would be kept 
together. But according to reports 
from relief workers, the -program 
has not been voluntary m thou- 
sands at cases, and many, families 
have been. qrlit up. . . 

During the past year. Doctors 
Without Borders has been willing 
to say publicly what many relief. 
pgenrieg would say Only anony- 
mously. 

In April, die agency .declared 
' thata cholera epidemic had broken 
out in several northeraf eeding cen- 
ters. Other relief agencies con- 
firmed the report but refused, to do 
so publicly, fearing expulsion from 
the Ethiopian government .. 




Rat Ur* 

- CAIRO — President Hosni Mu- 
barak said Tuesday (hat Egypthad 

no plans for warwith Libya despite 
reports of a buildup of troops along 

both sides of the frontier. , 
“Egypt is an Arab and an Afri- 

Egypuofight an 

brother,” Mr.Mnbarak repeatedly 
told aamferenceof African interi- 
or ministers. . 

Meanwhile, police set up barriers 
around a luxury hotel on-Cano’s 
outskirts and four tracks fined with 
plaiodothes security men stood by 
as Egyptian and Israeli officials 
met fra- fresh tafia on .a dispute 
over the Taba beach resort, 

Taba, a 760-yard (690-meter), 
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claimed by Egypt and has been 
held by Israel since it withdrew 
from the rest of Snai in 1981 The 
talks wiH be informal, officials said. 

Mr. Mubarak's remarks on Lib- 
ya were relay ed to reporters by the 
interior minister, Major General 
Ahmad RnsbdL 

A military alert was ordered on 
the. Egyptian border after Arab 

E a hijacked an EgyptAir jet- 
to Malta on- Nov. 23 and offi 

Sixty persons were kjffled frfihe 
hijacking and the Egyptian com- 
mando assault on the plana 
- Libya dismissed the aocnput i OTi t 
of compbdty and said that Egypt 
was planning to invade. That 
charge in tom was rejected by Mr. 
Mubarak and other Egyptian offi- 
cials. . 

. But Mr. Mubarak’s ■tfwifwnt 
Tuesday that the alert was “mere 
calculation for any expected deveil- 
opmaus" was his most specific re- . 
buff to the possibility of war. 

Egypt’s aimed farces , chief of 
Ban; General Ibrahim d-Orabi, 
raid that Libya also had beea con- 
centrntmg troops along its 
borders with Egypt and Sudop_ 
“We have spotted increasing ac- 
tivities on bout front lines and ac- 
confingty took preraatidnary de- 
fensive measures” he •- told 
reporters. Tbe Egyptian alert, he 
saw, “is im ordinary mflitaiy mea- 

i _ • . . ‘ . 


sure to confront any possibilities.” 

He said that Egyptian ground 
and air forces had just ended & 
three-day exercise that had no con- 
nection with the Libyan troop con- 
centrations. 

■ Passenger Forced to Help 

A Greek passenger was forced r* 
gunpomt to help tbe hijackers, 

nflrmrtv .l. .... 


to think he was an — xmubiux, 
Midtese government spotesma 
said Monday, The Associated Pre 
reported from Valletta. 

Maltese sources said that on] 
tour hijackers were on the jet tin 
Egyptian commandos stormed t 
end a 22-hour standoff at Valletta 
Luqa Amort The plane had bee 

<n route from Athens to Cairo 
The pilot Captain Ham Gala 
has said be thought there were a 
many as five hijackers. 

Riid Mfeud, the spokesmai 
“id that according to passenger 
the hnackers forced (he Greek t 
sexw food and collect passports. 

MeanwM* a Maltese score 
ctose to the investigation of th 
taaddng said that investigator 
had determined that one hnaefe 

medm a midair shoot-oni and tw 

m the commando raid, while th 
fourth was in a hospital in Malta. 

it had not been estafa 
'JSf hijackers ww 

nom or with what organizatioi 
they were affiliated, 

. .1 


*! 


4 

h 


CHICAGO (LAI) — A federal 
judge has ordered Roy L Williams, 
former president of the Interna- 
tional Brotherhood of Teamsters, 
to report to prison to begin serving 
a 10-year sentence for conspiring to 
defraud a Teamsters pension fund 
and to bribe former Senator How- 
ard W. Cannon, Democrat of Ne- 
vada. 

Under Monday’s ruling, Mr. 

Williams becomes the third of the 
union's four former presidents to 
go to prison. He was convicted in 
1982. He is the first to break the 
code of aiknee and speak both in 
public and in secret about orga- 
nized crime finks to the Teamsters. 

Mr. WfiHams attorney, Michael Le- 
Vota, said that he feared dial his 
dient, who has severe emphysema, 

“will die in prison.” 

In recent months Mr. Williams, Roy L. W illiams . 

70, sought to have his sentence re- 
duced or changed to probation by giving secret testimony to a presi- 
testifying at a trial of crime synch- dential commission on organized 
cate figures in Kansas City and by crime. 

Mugabe Signs Accords With Moscow 

MOSCOW (NYT) ; — Prime Minister Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe, 
concluding his first official visit to Moscow, reached agreement Tuesday 
with Soviet leaders on two accords aimed at Improving relations, Tass 
announced. 

The Sowetnews agency said that Mr. Mugabe and Nikolai L Ryzhkov, 
the Soviet prime minister, signed an agreement to increase economic and 
technological cooperation and a protocol to expand political ties. No 
details were provided. 

Mr. Mugabe also met with Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, in 
what tass described as a “warm and friendly atmosphere.” Although an 
avowed Marxist. Mr. Mugabe rebuffed Soviet overtures in tbe past 
because cf Soviet support for Joshua Nkomo, another black nationalist 
leader, during the seven-year war against the white regime of what was 
then called Rhodesia. 

Jaruzdski, in Paris, to See Mitterrand 

PARIS (UPI) — General Wqjciech Jaruzdski. the Polish leader, 
arrived Tuesday in France for talks with President Franqois Mitterrand 
on a visit that received sharp criticism in Fiance even bdTore it began. 

Gentiral Jaruzdski who came at his own request in an effort to 
improve relations with the West, was greeted only by the Foreign 
Mmistey’s chief of protocol He will see Mr. Mitterrand, toe first Western 
leader to receive trim, cm Wednesday. The Polish government was 
virtually isolated by Western nations after General Jar uzdski declared 
martial law Dec. 13, 1981. 

The c en ter -right union of French managers, professional people and 
technicians called the visit “shameful for France.” The newspaper Le 
Monde in afroni-page article titled “Why?" called the visit ^ “an extraordi- 
nary broach in the Western front” 

For die Record 

,'TbeU.S. sp*x shuttle Atianfislaaded Tuesday in California, returning 
from a week m oritit and a first test of construction techniques tint will be 
used to baQd an American space station; (API 

Israel troops kilted fire Pa le s tin ia n guerrillas in tbe Hasbaya area of 
southern Lebanon on Tuesday, an army spokesman said. The Israelis 
captured several guerrillas and seized weapons, he said. (Reuters) 

■ In central Ode, it least one man (Bed and nine mere wounded in 19 
bomb explosions Monday night, the police reported Tuesday. No one 
claimed responsibility. The explosions destroyed six buses and damage 
other targets. 


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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1985 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


A Collegiate Roster 
Of U.S. Presidents 

Although George Washing- 
ton's schooling ended when he 
was 15, the next five presidents aQ 
went to college- According to a 
new compilation by the U.S Inte- 
rior Department 30 of the 39 
presidents started college, and all 
but Monroe, McKinley and Wil- 
liam Henry Harrison finished. 

Five presidents graduated 
from Harvard — both Adamses, 
both Roosevelts, and Kennedy. 
William and Mary, in Virginia, 
was the alma mater of three — 
Jefferson, Monroe and Tyler. 
Princeton nurtured two, Madison 
and WUsoo, as did the U.S. Mili- 
tary Academy at West Point 
Grant and Eisenhower. 

Colleges attended by one presi- 
dent are Yale (Taft), Hampdeu- 
Sydney in Virginia (Wffliam Hen- 
17 Harrison), North Carolina 
(Polk), Bowdoin in Maine 
(Fierce), Dickinson in Pamsyha- 
nia (Buchanan), Kenyon in Ohio 
(Hayes), W illiams in Massachu- 
setts (Garfield), Union in New 
York (Arthur), Miami of Ohio 
(Benjamin Harrison), Allegheny 
in Pennsylvania (McKinley), 
Ohio Central (Harding), Am- 
herst (Codidge), Stanford (Hoo- 
ver), Southwest Texas State 
Teachers (Lyndon B. Johnson), 

■ Whittier (Richard M. Nixon), 
Michigan (Gerald R. Ford), the 
' U.S. Naval Academy at Annapo- 
lis (Jimmy Carter) and Eureka in 
Illinois (Ronald Reagan). 


Those who got their higher 
education at the school of hard 
knocks were Washington, Jack- 
son, Van Boren, Taylor, Ffflmore, 
Lincoln, Andrew Johnson, Cleve- 
land and Truman. 


Short Takes 

In a New York Times- CBS 
New Poll IS percent of those 
surveyed say the term “liberal” 
makes them think better of some- 
one; 17 percent said it makes 
than think worse, with the rest 
having no opinion. “Moderate” 
does better, 21-d, as does “conser- 
vative," 27-13. So what can liber- 
als do? “Populist” does even 
worse than liberal 6-21. The an- 
swer seems to be “progressive,” 
with the best rating of afl, 37-7. 

Tbe invitation read, “Come to a 
shower," and the gifts included 
dishes, flatware, crystal tumblers 
and an electric juicer. But the 
guest of honor was male. When 
Andy Hoffmann and his wife 
separated 18 months ago after 
two years of marriage, he lost the 
china, silverware, pots and pans, 
towels and sheets, stereo, even the 
bed frame. Since then Mr. Hoff- 
mann, 28, a Manhattan attorney, 
has eaten a lot of take-out food 
from cardboard containers, has 
borrowed towels and slept on a 
mattress and box spring on the 
floor. So bis friends threw him a 
divorce shower. 





Ha NnvYcriiTnai 

TREE TRIMMER — Silhouettes of Dodey and James 
Madison adorn tint year’s White House Christmas tree 
ornament. Information on ordering the decorations is 
available from the White House Historical Association. 


Of tbe 535 members of Con- 
gress, 25 are women: two sena- 
tors and 23 representatives. The 
House figure is a record high, but 
it represents an increase of only 
four in the past 10 years, some- 
thing less than a revolution. The 
Senate figure of two is about av- 
erage for the past 30 years; the 
record of three women in the Sen- 
ate was set during the 83d Con- 
gress in 1953-54. 


Across the envelope received 
by Sandra Mayer of Great Neck, 
Long Island, in New York state, 
according to The New York 
Times, was a message from the A 
& S department store of Brook- 
lyn: “An Extraordinary Opportu- 
nity Just for You!” Beneath that, 
in much smaller type: “Or Cur- 
rent Resident.” 


ARTHUR HI 


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Lung Cancer Rale Falls Among U.S. Men 


By Philip M. Boffey 

New York Tima Sennet 


first time - that a ri gnificant decrease can mm and 35,600 v/ODKO- 
in long cancer has been observed other cancer site comes dos^ to 
pynrwip jmy race-sex group in the that,” Mr. Socdik said. 

Umted States.” In another significant finding. 

The findings are conadored par- Monday’s report concluded that 
ticulariy Vorfftirng because «"ig rdativety few women were under- 


WASHINGTON — For the first afflopg a nyra c^sex group in the 
rtihe mm' m the 


The statistics made public Mon- 
day cover cancer cases reported 
through 1983. the latest year for 
which full and reliable national 
data are available. 

The decline in incidence has not 


cancer is the most prevalent fonn going the mammography and phys- ycl affected the death rate from 
Unitea States, according to the Na- 0 f ynri tm* nf the la- Kti ouumnation recommended to lung cancer among white men. but 


tkmal Cancer Institute. 

Lium cancer rates among women 

amt blade nw»n did not fail as 
sharply, however. 

Toe dramatic decrease in new 


thaL Only about 13 percent of pa- detect breast cancer early. 


dents survive for five years; most 
die within two years. 


The report noted that a study 
many years ago by tbe Health In- 


Was attribute d primarily tO'B Shar p 
drop in smoking that began mare 
than two decades ago. 

“This proves that people can suo- 


Lang cancer experts say current sorance Plan of Greater New York 
treatments are relatively ineffeo and a recent study from Sweden 
tive; the only sure way to conquer both found that screening pro- 
tbe disease is to prevent new cases, grams conld reduce the breast can- 
In tbe United States, hmg cancer cer death rate by 30 percent, 
is the major cause of ™vw itmtln But no decrease in the death rate 


Monday in mairitig public the gov- ■ 

eminent’s annual update on cancac TAT A o A /n • / 

St ^SSls at the institute said that Cfll6| 

cmrtlfTng among w frmrn Kail de~ ' •. 

creased numli more slowly than ThtAssadeted Press 

among white men. They said the WASHINGTON — James M. 


place over the last decade." 


if the downward trend in new cases 
continues as expected, the death 
rate should fall as wdl 
In noting no decrease in either 
incidence or mortality from lung 
pinner among women, the study 
also reported that lung cancer was ; 
expired to surpass breast cancer 

this year as the leading cause of / 
cancer deaths among American >r i 
women and had already done so in 
ai least 15 states. 


NASA (Mef Reportedly to Step Aside 


takes, who said President ing." and vowed to “vigorously de- 
Reagan “believes Mr. fend the case. He said he would 



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Shufas Rejects 
Talks With 
Nicaraguans 

By Alan Riding 

New York Times Service 

CARTAGENA, Colombia — 
Tbe United States has no intention 
of resuming direct negotiations 
with Nicaragua in the context of 
the peace initiative by Panama, Gs 
lomoia, Mexico and Venezuela, ac- 
cording to Secretary of State 
GcoageP. Shultz. 

At a meeting of the Organization 
of American States here Monday, 
Mr. Shultz said past talks had re- 
sulted in a Nicaraguan effort “to 
undermine*’ die so-called Con fe- 
dora peace process, “so we don't 
intend to go bade to dial” 

He spoke after c onferrin g with 
tbe foreign ministers of Mexico, 
CdomMs, Venezuela and Panama, 
the four Contadore Group nations. 

Mr. Shultz said he had heard 
no thing to suggest “Nharagna’a 
willingness to engage in the kind of 
internal nrecvrahation that we feel 
is an essential attribute to any dia- 
logue we might have with them.” 

Mr. Shultz, in an address Mon- 
day, die first day of tbe OAS con- 
ference, avoided sensitive political 
issues and concentrated instead on 
explaining die new U5. approach 
to the Latin American debt crisis. 

Mr. Shultz said the U.S. propos- 
al, known as the Baker Flan after 
Treasury Secretary James A Baker 
3d, required regional governments 
to open their doom to foreign in- 
vestments and end restrictive bade 
practices. 

In exchange, he said, it envi- 
siaued an increased flow of cqntal 
from such mrittOaleml « »e«ipck as 
the World Bank as wdf as from 
co mm ercial banks. 

President Bdisario Betancurcf 
Colombia, in opening the confer- 
ence Monday, said the Baker Flan 
was “positive, although insuffi- 
cient,” adding that interest rates 
should also be brought down, com- 
modity prices strengthened and 
protectionist barriers in industrial 
countries lowered. 

Mr. Betancur said that the- “time 
bomb” represented by Latin Amer- 
ica's foreign debt, now estimated at 
S380 billion, could only be defused 
by a “new Marshall Plan” for eco- 
nouuc development. 

The main objective of the-pre- 
sent OAS conference is to study 
possible changes in the ort niza- 
tion’s charter, with Colombia, in 
particular, favoring enforcement of 

nrit*Gibato resamT^iLmljtt- 




Los Angeles 
Gould Lead 
U.S. Gties 

By Spencer Rich 

Washington Pari Service 

WASHINGTON — Los Ange- 
les will surpass New York by the 
year 2000 as America's largest met- 
ropolitan area in population and 
jobs, and San Francisco will lead in 
per capita personal income, ac- 
cording to a Commerce Depart- 
ment report. 

Overall population and jobs will 
grow fastest in metropolitan areas 
of tbe West and die Sun Belt, the 
department's Bureau of Economic 
Analysis said Monday, giving pro- 
jections for the 55 largest U.S. met- 
ropolitan areas. 

h , • The national population will 

TANKER OVERTURNS — Fheflgbtera sprayed foam 

on a gasoline tanker truck that struck a utility pole in Sun Brit and Western metropolitan 
Peabody, Massadmsetts. The accident dosed a highway areas, which have been experienc- 
drding Boston for several hours. No ooe was injured. ing above-average growth rates for 

' - • ; • __J a number of years, will exceed the 

national average by a wide margin. 

r t n ni m a w fm & The 10 large metropolitan areas 

U.S. bays suspect s Wife 

r^r tf, n " &> _ ed in the Sun Belt states at Honda. 

3ad Secrets for China 

Beach. Florida, the national leader 
By Stephen Eneelberc- - valuable to any espionage service at61 percent, followed by Phoenix, 
New Fak Tima Service because it woidd confirm its sue- Arizona, al 55 percent and Orlan- 

WASHENGTON —When Amxe 0688 failure in concealing covert do, Florida, at 50 percent, the bu- 


U.S. Says Suspect’s Wife 
Had Secrets for China 

By Stephen Etxgelberff - valuable to any espionage servic 
New Yak Tima Service because it would confirm its sue 


L. Henderaon-PoDard was arrested efforts to gather information. reau projected, 
last month, she was planning to Officials said it was not dear The 10 areas with the slowest 
offer the Chinese a secret docu- whether the Pollards had provided projected population growth are all 
ment that described in detaiJwhal info nnation to the Chinese, in the Great Lakes industrial area, 
American intdhgence knows about The document quoted an un n a m ed according to tbe projections. The 
Beijing's espionage activities in the witness as recounting a conversa- bureau said the population of the 
Um ted States, according to prose- tion Mrs. Henderson-P ollard. Cleveland area was expected to de- 
colors. - According to the witness, Mrs. dine by 8 percent, and the Detroit 

In a 23-page document filed Hcadersoa-PoUard wanted to meet and Pittsburgh metropolitan area 
Monday in federal district court at a hold where they would burn populations by 2 percent each, 
here, prosecutors contended that dassified documents hidden in a Although Los Angeles will only 
Mrs. Henderson- Pollard, who has soijeas®- grow about 13.5 percent in popula- 

been charged with obtaining dassi- The court papers, which were don, that will bring it to 8.87 uni- 
fied documents, was far more deep- mbmrttod to support a motion to lion, enough to surpass New York, 
ly involved in the alleged erokma^ deny bond to Mrs. Henderson-Pol- New York, with a growth of only 
activities of her husband, Jonathan lard, said that m a phone call over- 1.7 percent, will fall to second at 
Jay PcDanL than previously indi- bo “ ld federal agents, her hus- 8.43 million. 

band asked her to remove the In jobs, as in population, the 
In the court papers, the govern- ca^s from their apartmenL biggest gains will be in the West 
ment said for thT&« tiie that ^ys^aSiapannsovadoo- mid other parts of the Sun Bell. 


band asked, her to remove the 
cactus from their apartment. 


In jobs, as in population, the 
biggest gains will be in the West 


ment said for tibTfirst trie that ?*** parls „ of ^ Sun BelL 

Mrs. Hcaideraoa-Pdlard had been pmXat 

intending to ddiver secret doco- “f apartm ® Jt ' dlscover f 5 a Mdonafiy, to 1383 million, 
mmtstothc Chinese. Her husband K tcxeacc to a weapon system “Job erowth from UK m TPm « 


weapon system “Job growth from 1983 to 2000 is 


fc^^^ron^ CACTUS, pretaad to be fastest in Phoenix 
seactinteffigence doCTmeatsto^ Beach, 77 per- 


indicted/nor have they indicaied J* 1 f d ma f ? fi T b ?! ty j V 2 til Ul ®5 » u ^ [ » u SAld - 

would , Je doommls her husband has With its anployment growing 

. _ J , been accused of stealing from the 25.2 percent by 2000. Los Aneeles 

? avtd ' ha ¥^ aux Se ™ ce > wbeTe ^ have 5 million employed^ 
Monday thatlsrp ei had a^ewl to ■ he wasa civilian engilqyee. take tbe lead fromNew Y^c 

return doraments jxtrpOTtt^y &v- ■ At a court hearing last week, an which will have 43 m.Hi'^n em- 
ea to Israeli agents by Mr. Pollard. pBI agent disdosed the existence ployed after growth of only 14 4 
.The official said this waa part (rf of the documents related to China, percent in jobs. 


STOCKHOLM ESCORT 6 OUR* Ser- 
-"fa. 6pm -11pm. T«L 68 34 68. 


BCORT **^+J«*!!gWCORI Sa- 
va. Tat mm 98914. I *» Tit Mat 02/685035 


Mr. Sbuhz, recalling that Cuba 
was enpeOed in 1962 after Bdd 
Castro aad seized control, said that 
“since that time, its behavior has 
art improved and, if anything, has 
deteriorated, so I don't see any case 
for read mission-" 

The United Stales and Nicara- 
gua held a of meetings i& 
Mamanfflo, Mexico, last year, bat 
no progress was made. 


Father, Son Held 
By Bonn as Spies 

The Associated Peers 

KARLSRUHE, .West Germany 
— A West German man and his 
son have beat jailed on suspicion 
of espionage, according to the fed-, 
eral prosecutors office. ■ 

A spokesman, Alexander Precfa- 
td, identifi«i the father only as a 
62-year-old whitoodlai-.eroi^yee 
from Hodribcro^aad sauf me son, 

34, wasa tedmicianata construc- 
tion company in die Mannheim 
area. They were arrested Friday, 

Mr. Prechtd alk^cdtbaf the <dd^ 
or man had been wodEitig for East 
Germany's intelligence service - 
since 1965. He said Monday that 
the father and son supplied- taped 
radio conmranicattons of .west. 
German security officials' to, the 1 
East Germans. - " ' 


the agreement worked out by Sec- 
retary at State Gewgei P. Shultz 
and Prime \finister Sbimcm Peres 
in a telephone conversation early 
Sunday, which was the culmiiiation 
of dbcusioBs bdd earlier by XsrariE 
and. U.S. Embassy officials. 

Doting the convessatioii, the of- 
ficial said, the two men in effect 
negotiated both the Israeli state- 
ment that was issued ® few hours 
later and the enthusiastic response 
by Mr. Shultz; 

In Jerusalem, Israrii go vernm ent 
sources said Monday that Ameri- 
cans would bepexfitifted to' inter- 
view the senior Isracfi counterter- 
mrism official who is said to have 
obtained secret documents from 
Mr. PoQard beginning in the ^rmg 
of 1984.. 

. A h^h Israeli offidathas report- 
ed that_Mr. Rdlaid, aXLS. Navy 
■ mnntgrinteJKg mcft analyst, gave 

Terartl fnfnrmarifin nhnnt Arab mil- 


ft’s Israel's Abie Nathan to the Resaw 
After $7,000 Robbery at $L Patrick's 


The Associated press 

NEW YORK — Abie Na- 
than, an Israeli businessman 
who said he was angry about 
the armed robbery Saturday at 
. Sl Patrick’s Roman Catholic 




in Arab lands arid seasrtiw Israeli 
defense matfera. V 
According to fbe papers JSfcd in 
court-Monday bythe prosecution, 
Mrs. Henderadri-Prflard had been 


agents in a search, the prosecutors 
said, were “detail analyses of iri- 
tdligence-gathering cajaMitiw ' 
and activities of the People’s Re- 
public of China wfthip , the United 
ftates.” . ! _ 

Such- infonnation. would , bri ine : 



AbieNatimn 


Cathedral in New Yoirk; has do- 
nated 57,000 to the cathedral. 

Mr Nathan, 58, has spent 
naif a lifetime promoting peace 
between Israelis and Arabs. He 
said be saw on television that 
two gunmen bad taken about 
17,000 from the cathedral on 
Saturday, locking up four ush- 
ers and twojamtorsm a walk-in 
safe. Police said nobody was 
injured. 

Mr. Nathan was in New 
York on his way home from 
Colombia Where he helped peo- 
ple displaced by last month's 
volcanic enrotioo. He said he 
felt' he owed something to the 
Roman Catholic Church be- 
cause be was educated by Jesu- 
5* m a boarding school in In- 
<ua. 

•Kfr- Nathan foe in Td Aviv, 
where he operates a radio sta- 
tion called the Voice of Peace. 
Its aim is “to m Arabs and 
Jews together” he said. In be^ 
mtf. . or peace, he made three 

SuaCamd three timrarn the 
1970s and carried out a 45-day 
hunger strike in 1978. . 












** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1985 


Page 5 




Mrs. Aquino Declares CandUJacy, Asks Laurel to Run With Her 



Ur 

S: 

: n- 



ities 


r;. . 


• V 


hr 

Pol/**' 


I* 


. - ; -/-By Abby. Tan .... 

Washington -Past Serna 

MANILA — Corazon Aquino formally wn^mniH 

day and asked Salva&rftla^^tobe her vice- 
presidential running mate. 

Mr. Laurel, ’ who heads an alliance of opp osition 
parties known as the United Nationalist Democratic 
Organization, did not immediately give Mrs. Aquino 
an answer. 

Bat he said: “I will settle for anything to ensure 
unity and total victory of the opposition, and to bring 
about the dismantling of the unwanted regime.” . 

Bis i words boosted the opposition's hopes that a 
unified ticket would oppose President Ferdinand E. 
Marcos in the election scheduled Feb. 7.- Mr. Laurel, 
57, previously had insisted that be would run only for 
thepreadeacy. 

’Ifc various opposition factious have been unable to 
decide on a common candidate to challenge Mr. 
Maroci. 

Mrs. Aquino, 52, is the widow of BemgooS. Aquino 


Jr., apopolar opposition leader who was assassinated 
asherebzined tothenn^ppinesm August 1983. She 
received 1.2 million signatures endorsing her 
candidacy. 

Explaining her deciaqn to run against Mr. Marcos, 

a creeping belief t^oomanCTwhat atase^may be 
thrown at our faces, we are powerless to do anything 
about it"' . 

Mr. Maicos has denied any role in the killing of Mr. 
Aquino. 

General Fabian C. Ver and 25 others were acquitted 
Mooday by a three-judge trial court of any involve- 
ment in the slaying. The immediate reinstatement of 
General Ver as -the chief of staff of the Philippine 
armed forcesprompted demonstrations in Manila. 

Mr. Marcos, after meeting for four hours, with his 
top generals, ordered Tuesday that 23 stflitaiyperaon- 
nd wbowere confined to barracks daring the trial be 
returned to their, units. . The *"*»*w»g wwwwiwi the 
reorganization of the armed farces. 

Analysts saidlthat an Aquino-LaureL ticket would 


present the strongest challenge yet to the 20-year- rule 
of Mr. Marcos. Mrs. Aquino’s moral leadership and 
Mr. Lanrd’s well-placed political machinery, they 
said, would be a formidable combination if elections 
were held fairly and honestly. 

A wdl -placed opposition source said that the U.S. 
ambassador, Stephen Boswonh, and Cardinal Jaime 
L Sin, the archbishop of Manila, had met with the two 
contenders and had told them that they must unite if 
they hoped to unseat Mr. Marcos. 

Pressure from their own supporters also had been 
budding, aides to both candidates said. Most of the 
right regional parties and many of the elected assem- 
blymen identified as supporters of ML Laurel were 
said to have begun leaning toward Mis. Aquino. 

In announcing her candidacy, she said: “I hereby 
affirm my candidacy and confirm my willingness if 
elected to serve our people as president of the republic 
of the Philippines." 

Wild cheering and chants of “Cory, Cory,*' filled an 
auditorium in a downtown budding. 

Mis. Aquino nude her announcement only hours 


after Mr. Marcos signed into law a bill authorizing the 
election. Campaigning officially begins Dec. 11. 

The cur rent six-year term of Mr. Marcos does not 
expire until 1987. He called for an early election after 
he was criticized by the United Slates over his han- 
dling of the Communist insurgency and the economy. 

Meanwhile, General Ver announced Tuesday that 
he was reshuffling six officers and retiring a navy 
commodore. He appointed a loyalist, Commodore 
Brilliante Ocboco of the coast guard, to replace him. 

It is not known bow long General Ver will remain at 
his post Mr. Marcos said Tuesday in a statement that 
the mili tary reorganization- would involve SO senior 
officers. 

The statement also said that Manila’s police chief. 
Major General Prospero Olivas, bad resumed his post 
but had indicated a desire to retire. 

Mr. Marcos complained in the statement that a 
military bufidop that he had initiated to fight the 
Communist insurgency was being hampered by a 
delay in the delivery of $60 million worth of military 
aid. 


Allies Criticize Dutch 
For Cut in Nuclear Role 


Return 

BRUSSELS — - Defense minis- 
ters of the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization criticized Tuesday a 
unilateral derision by the Nether- 
lands to reduce the nuclear mis- 
sions of its armed forces and ap- 
pealed to the Dutch to reconsider, 
officials said. • 

A senior NATO official said the 
ministers were “profoundly unhap- 
py" with the Dutch decision to 
cumulate two nuHww t«fa; that 
would be assigned to the Dutch Air 
Force in case of war. The tasks will 
be dropped after U.S. cruise mis- 
siles are deployed in the Nether- 
lands in 1988. 

“Nearly all of them made the 
point that the political implications 
for sharing risks and burdens on 
the part of the Dutch by dropping 
these two roles were unwelcome," 
the NATO official said. 

The most outspoken criticism 
came from the other countries de- 


Uberals Defeat 
PartiQu&becoism 
Provincial Election 

(Continued from Page 1) 

of premier, despite his defeat in his 
own district, represents a remark- 
able comeback. 

When he took office in 1970 at 
the age of 36, he was Canada's 
youngest provincial premier. Six 
years later, his career seemed to be 
at an end when the Parti Qu£becois 
won 71 seats to his parly’s 26, and 
the Parti QiteMoois leader. Read 
LSrvesque, became pr e mi er. 

Mr. Bourassa began working to- 
ward political recovery by traveling 
abroad and studying. He was elect- 
ed Liberal leader in Quebec in 
1983, arid in June won a legislative 
seat in die Bertrand distort, the 
seat he lost in Monday’s election. 

The Parti Qu£b£cois has been 
trying to redefine its mission since 
1980, when Quebec voters rejected 
by a 3-2 margin the party’s propos- 
al that it be allowed to negotiate a 
new relationship with Ottawa 
called sovereignty-association. 

Mr. Johnson has tried to con- 
vince the party to turn away from 
separatism, a cause that bitterly 
split its ranks when it was adopted 
last year in a resolution. 

Surveys have shown that Mr. 
Johnson's popularity among voters 
and the Parti Quebficois campaign 
were based largely on his personal- 
ity. Other candidates routinely 
identified themselves as members 
of "the Johnson party” rather than 
of the Parti QufiMcms. 

Notably absent during the cam- 
paign was the former premier Mr. 
Levesque, who is reported various- 
ly lo be in Greece, Egypt or a Scan- 
dinavian country. 

in a pamphlet published shortly 
before he resigned as premier and 
party leader in June, Mr. Lfevesque 
called the Parti Qn£b6cois “a beast 
backed up a g a i nst a wall gnawing 
at its own limbs.” 



ploying U.S. cruise and Pershing-2 
missiles — Britain, West Germany, 

Italy and Belgium. 

Diplomats said the British de- 
fease secretary, Michael Headline, 
called the decision “profoundly 
disturbing” and suggested the 
Dutch had given in to pressure 
from anti-nuclear protesters. 

The Dutch defense minister, Ja- 
cob de Ruiter, replied that if the 
cabinet had not decided to drop the 
tasks, it might have been impossi- 
ble to persuade the parliament to 
approve the basing of the 48 cruise 
missies. 

The Dutch cabinet derided last 
Friday to drop the nuclear roles 
a-«jgn<»ri to two squadrons of F-16 
fighters and 13 Orion sea patrol 
planes despite a personal appeal by 
NATO’s secretary general. Lord 
Carrington. The F-16s axe 
equipped to deliver nuclear bombs 
and the Odom to drop atomic 
depth charges. 

The NATO official said the min- 
isters did give credit to the Dutch 
for agreeing to deploy cruise mis- 
siles. But diplomats said the discus- 
sion was one of the harshest ex- 
changes heard at a NATO meeting. 

Diplomats quoted Defense Min- 
ister Giovanni Spadotim of Italy as 

Sakharov Was Force-Fed 

Xavier de Donnea, said the Dutch 
move could have damaging effects 
on nuclear the diplo- 

mats reported. 

They said Caspar W. Weinber- 
ger, the UJS. defense secretary, 
warned that other countries would 
have to pick up the nwnifar tasks 
the Duuh were dropping. 


New Caledonia Court Is Bombed 

A bomb destroyed tite courthouse in New Caledonia’s capital 
of Noumea on Tuesday. Hours later, the National Assembly 
in Paris passed a measure giving amnesty to Caledonians 
convicted of minor crimes committed before September 1985. 
The bin was opposed by anti-independence organizations. 


House Defies Reagan, 
Votes Textile-Import Cut 


On Ocu 10, the House passed by 
262-159 a version of the measure, 
under which Brazil and 11 Asian 
nations would have taken the brunt 
of the provisions. The Senate re- 
drafted the bill to narrow to three 
the number of countries that would 
face actual cutbacks, and approved 
its version 60-39 on Nov. 13. 

The Senate also added shoe quo- 
tas to enlist support of New En- 
gland lawmakers and the copper 
provision to attract senators from 
the West. 


For 207 Days, Relatives Say 


■ UJK. Participation in SDI - 

Mr. Weinberger said Tuesday 

that the United Stales is reasonably 
dose to si g nin g an agreement with 
Britain to participate in President 
Ronald Reagan’s Strategic Defense 
Initiative for a space-based missile 
defense. United Press International 
reported from Brussels. 

Mr. Weinberger indicate d the ac- 
cord couM be signed later this week 
when he meets with Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher in London. 
Mrs. Thatcher said last week she 
hoped an agreement could be 
signed by Chnstroas- 

■ New Munster Named 

General Heinz Kessler was ap- 
pointed East Germany’s new de- 
fense minister Tuesday as Warsaw 
Pact ministers b^an a meeting that 
had been delayed by the death 
Monday of his predecessor, Gener- 
al Heinz Hoffmann, Reuters re- 
ported from Berlin. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
harov’s condition after the ordeal 
was “certainly very precarious." 

During the hunger stoke, he 
said, abnormalities in the physi- 
cist’s heart rhythm grew more pro- 
nounced and his weight dropped 
from 180 to 136 pounds (from 81 to 
62 kilos). But Mr. Sakharov’s 
weight rose to 163 pounds, Mr. 
Yankelevich added, during the 
month that he spent with his wife 
before her departure. 

He released a photograph of Mr. 
Sakharov in winch the dissident ap- 
peared gaunt and aged. It was tak- 
en two days after his release from 
the hospilaL 

“He says he feds good, he does 
exercises every day and has re- 
sumed his scientific work,” Mr. 
Yankelevich said. 

For the Sakharovs, Mis. Ban- 
ner’s release marked the trium- 
phant breach of a wall that Soviet 
authorities had erected around 
thrir lives in Gorki. 

“It was a major reversal of the 
Soviet government’s policy of the 
last years of completely isolating 
the Sakharovs," said Mr. Yankrie- 
vicb, who came with Miss Bonner’s 
son. Alexei L Semyonov, from their 


(Continued from Page ]) 
outlawed African National Con- 


Le Monde to Sell 
Shares to Public 
ForFirstTime 

Return 

PARIS — The daily newspa- 
per Le Monde has offered the 
public 30.000 shares, or a 12.28 
percent stake, in the paper, 
which until now was owned and 
run by founders and employees. 

Sale of the shares, at 500 
francs (S62) each and limited to 
10 a buyer, signals a radical 
shift for the paper created in 
1944. 

The paper said Monday it 
hoped the sale would raise 15 
million francs to help put it 
back on a sound financial foot- 
ing. Last year executives an- 
nounced that the newspaper, 
prosperous during much of the 
1970s, was near collapse, with 
an arrnmiilated debt of 90 mil- 
lion francs. 

Since then, wages have been 
trimmed 10 percent, the Le 
Monde bailding has been sold, 
and 253 jobs have been elimi- 
nated. The rescue effort has 
erased the debts, senior staff 
members said. 

Editorial staff members, who 
had owned 40 percent of the 
shares, will now odd 35 percent 
and will have veto power over 
board decisions under French 
law. The remainder wiQ be held 
by the editor-in-chief, Andrt 
Fontaine, adminis trative and 
technical employees and 

founder-members. 


Winnie Mandela, at a Roily, 
Vtncs to Avenge Fallen Blacks 

“I bring you a message of love 
from those you sent outside to help 
fight for this liberation that has led 
to our burying our children," she 
said in reference to the African 
National Congress. Her husband is 
life president of the congress, the 
best known of exiled guerrilla 
movements seeking the violent 
overthrow of apartheid rule. 

“Pretoria has failed to rule this 
country." die declared. “We are 
here as testimony to the fact that 
the solution of this country’s prob- 
lems lies in black hands.” 

“The day is not far when we shall 
lead you to freedom,” tire said. 

The speech presented the au- 
thorities with a dilemma. If Mrs. 
Mandela is permitted to continue 


Those buried included five 
blacks over the age of 50 and a two- 
, month-old boy who was said to 
have choked on tear gas fired by 
the police. 

Mrs. Mandela, whose husband is 
sowing a life sentence for sabotage, 
is what is known in South Africa as 
a “harmed” person. 

She is offidaDy banished to a 
blade township outride the remote 
town of Brandfort. She may not 
meet with more than one person at 
a rime and may not address public 
gatherings- She may not be quoted 
m South Africa, but ber words of- 
ten appear in overseas publica- 
tions. 


borne in Newton, Massachusetts, 
to meet her in Italy. “We hope it is 
a permanent reversal” 

Mrs. Bonner spent her first full 
day in Rome an Tuesday resting 
from her trip and from a reunion 
with’bef TdativesI She maintained 
the public silence that Soviet au- 
thorities told her would be a condi- 
tion erf the trip. 

She will travel to Siena, in central 
Italy, this week for treatment for 
her eyes and is to fly later to Boston 
for a heart bypass operation. 

Mr. Yankelevich said Miss Ban- 
ner had to rest frequently because 
of her weak heart and that she had 
since he last saw ber in 1979. 
it psychologically she has not 
changed,” be said. 

He said Miss Bonner had sent a 
telegram to her husband Monday 
during a stopover in Milan that 
said: “The three of us are drinking 
coffee in Milan.” 

Mr. Yankelevich and Mr. Se- 
myonov provided the information 
about the Sakharovs’ life in Gorki 
in interviews and a press confer- 
ence Tuesday. They said their ac- 
count was based on telephone con- 
versations with Mr. Sakharov last 
month and on facts that had 
slipped oat of Gorki. 

Mis. Bonner, they said, 
“clarified" information 
had not added to its su b stan c e. 

Their report, supplemented by 
others from friends who had talked 
to Mrs. Bonner in Moscow, provid- 
ed a stark glimpse of the lonely 
couple’s struggle against the KGB’s 
efforts to isolate than. 

Mr. Sakharov, winner of the 
1975 Nobel Peace Prize, has been 
exiled to Gorki, a city on the Volga 
River that is forbidden to foreign- 
ers, since 1980. He was one of the 
Soviet Union’s most noted nuclear 
physicists until his outspoken ad- 
vocacy of human rights resulted in 
government efforts to silence him. 

Mrs. Bonner joined him in Gorki 
in 1984 after bong sentenced to 
five years’ internal exile cn charges 
of slandering the Soviet state. 


(Continued from Page I) 
million lefts* from textile workers 
1 Mr. Reagan to sign the bUL 
jporters predicted a new 
round of plant closings and layoffs 
without approval of the measure, 
which also provides import relief to 
copper industry. 

^Thrir backs are against the 
wall,” declared Rep. Olympia J. 

Snowe, Republican of Maine. 

Rep. Philip M. Crane, a Republi- 
can of Illinois, however, called the 
bill “protectionism in its worst 

form." 

As the House opened debate on 
the measure already passed by the iipon 1 . n 

Senate, the House speaker, Thomas (zLL ijfiCKS tO JjUY 
P. O’Neill Jr„ said the Reagan ad- 

mmismition’s“big^efidt policies” Ple$$ey 9 ItS RivaL 

and Tiands-off attitude" were re- J 7 

sponsible for U.S- trade problems. V nr £ 7 7/? RiTHm 

“The trade bffl we consider to- COTXrXmiO M>UiWn 

day wfl] provide relief to industries 
that have been absolutely slaugh- 
tered by Reagan policies," the 
Massachusetts Democrat said. “It 
will signal to the world that the 
U.S. Congress does not share the 
president's soft line on trade.” 

• Sponsors continued to hope Mr. 

Reagan would change his mind. 

“I'm stiD not totally convinced 
that he win veto it,” said Rep. Ed- 
gar L Jenkins, Democrat of Geor- 
gia and the one of the measure’s 
key supporters. He acknowledged, 
however, that he saw no signs that 
the White House would not keep 
veto threats. 

Leading critics, including im- 
porters and retailers, say the mea- 
sure would raise dothmg prices, 
narrow consumer choices and un- 
leash retaliation in Asia against 
UJS. farm exports. 

Estimates of the cost to U.S con- 
sumers have ranged from $16 bil- 
lion- to' $32 billion a year, while 
supporters say price increases 
would be negligible. 

Supporters — chiefly textile and 
apparel companies and organized 
labor — say limits are the only 
answer to Asian competition that 
has caused 300,000 layoffs in five 
years. A Commerce Department 
report says fewer than 200,000 jobs 
have been lost, not all necessarily 
because of imports. 

Opponents argue that the bill 
would violate 34 international 
agreements and cast America in the 
rale of a hypocrite, since it has been 
the leading exponent of free trade 
for four decades. 


(Continued from Page t) 
and nwH tafy-m mminiiea rinng sys- 
tems. 

Also important will be the reac- 
tion of British Telecommunica- 
tions PLC, the main buyer of tele- 
phone equipment from the two 
concerns. A senior BT official, who 
did not wish to be identified, said 
his first reaction was positive be- 
cause of the scope for creating a 
more powerful British supplier in 
the world market. 

BT has squeezed its suppliers 
hard for lower prices over the past 
year, and Lord Weinstock ac- 
knowledged that such pressure 
helped persuade GEC to seek an 
allianc e with its biggest British ri- 
vaL 

Neither GEC nor Plessey has 
had modi success recently in sell- 
ing telecommunications equipment 
abroad. The System X public 
switching equipment, which both 
companies produce for BT. has 
failed to attract significant orders 
overseas, while such rivals as Telo- 
fon AB LM. Ericsson and ITT 
Corps, have won orders worldwide. 

Plessey suffered a huge disap- 
pointment last month when the 
UJL Army awarded a S4.3-biUion 
contract for a battlefield commum- 
catians system to a group using 
technology owned by Tbomson- 
CSF of France, bypassing Plessey’s 
more expensive offering. 

In the six months ended Sept. 27. 
Plessey’s pretax profit slumped 13 
percent to £70.2 million from £80.7 
million a year earlier. 


had 

but 


GIVENCHY 

Couture - Boutique - Bijoux 

SOLDES 

du 2 dec. au 6 dec. 1985 inclus 
de9h30a17h30 
3, avenue George- V, Paris 8 e 



Liard: 26 different colon 


AUBERCY 

Over 40 years 
of traditional 
perfection 

J4 roe Vmenne, Pm-f (Place deb Bonne) 
J rue du pgSc-Hbnore, Pwi*4)P (Madeleine) 


Since her home in Brandfort was flouting her banning order, then 
ftamagwd by fire in August, Mrs. fee white government could appear 


Mandela has shown increasing 
readiness to defy the white authori- 
ties, who set the terms of her most 
recent banning eight years ago. 

Her appearance at a gathering of 
more than 24X)0 blacks after Tues- 
day's mass funeral, however, was 
her most audacious and defiant 
challenge to the authorities. 


weak in the eyes of blacks and 
whites. But if the authorities en- 
force fee ban. fee action almost 
certainly would be presented by 
their critics as evidence that fee 
government's promises of pnlitirHl 
and racial reform are hollow. 

By early Tuesday evening there 
had been no reports of violence. 



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Page 6 


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER,^ 1985 


llcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


Sribiutc, 


PnbUfbtd TThh The New York Tbm» and The WuUngMa Pom 


America’s Angolan Fantasy 


A fantasy is overtaking American thinkin g 
about Angola. It is that America can go back 
into the business of supporting Jonas Savim- 
bi’s rebel forces in the National Union for the 
Total Independence of Angola through a door 
opened by congressional repeal of a 10-year 
ban cm such support, and suffer no untoward 
consequences. Mr. Savimbi’s admirers in the 
U.S. administration and Congress are acting 
as though the strategic and ideological rewards 
of aiding this African “freedom fighter" are 
there for the picking. 

Mr. Savimbi is certainly somebody in Ango- 
la, although those who know of his earlier 
incarnation as a Maoist may wonder about his 
recent debut as a democrat. As a tribal leader, 
be has shown military and political staying 
power. No less than the rival tribal leader who 
is the country's Marxist president, he can 
c laim to deserve a place in its future: 

But that is not the whole of it Mr. Savimbi is 
South Africa's man in Angola. He takes apart- 
heid’s support reluctantly and only for his own 
goals, he insists, but he takes it That makes 
any foreign badcer an implicit partner of 
South Africa. To ask Africans to overlook this 
link, or to explain it to them as a tactical 
■ allian ce that the United States enters for the 
purpose of curbing Soviet power, is absurd. 

■ Enthusiasm for a cause that it was uncertain 
the administration embraced led Congress to 
! try to force the adminis tration's hand by offer- 
ing the Savimbi forces public aid. Now offi- 


cials seek to tuck new aid discreetly under the 
CIA's wing. American diplomats hope Angola 
will be sobered just to see the aid being dis- 
cussal, and they have resumed their stalled 
effort to negotiate. Cubans out of Angola and 
South Africans out of Namibia. 

Tt is necessary to be dear, however, about 
just who was responsible for the impasse in 
that negotiating effort. It was considerably 
more Smith Africa than Angola. And that is 
what is so troubling about the idea of new aid 
for Mr. Savimbi. The country that tended to 
cooperate with Washington is being “reward- 
ed” with the threat of American support to an 
internal challeng er. The country that defied 
Washington is being “penalized” by the offer 
of an implicit Ameri can alliance of trancm- 
dous strategic and political value. Can this 
really be called diplomacy? 

Mr. Savimbi, as we say, has a claim to a 
place in the Angolan sun. But his chances of 
getting it seem to us to diminish if the United 
States intervenes in the Angolan dvQ war in 
his behalf. Large scale aid, enough to replace 
South Africa's, would have to match a Soviet 
commitment that has already brought Angola 
several billion dollars' worth of assistance. 
Anything less would only hurt the United 
States politically without helping Mr. Savimbi 
much militarily. The better way is to try to 
revive the negotiations that were dragging, but 
not dead, earlier this year. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


'Licensing’ of Journalists 


One of the more insidious ways in which 
Third World countries have reached out to 
control the press is by the “licensing” of jour- 
nalists. Ostensibly done to give journalists the 
full protection of the law, the practice actually 
enables governments so minded to control the 
entry and tenure of journalists in tbeir chosen 
profession. An effort to extend state licensing 
and give it legitimacy has been at the heart of a 
long-running Third World campaign to reduce 
the sling of a critical and inquiring press. That 
a community of the not-so-free press has been 
created under UNESCO patronage has helped 
this unfortunate practice to spread. 

All this is why partisans of a free press are 
cheering a recent unanimous decision by the 
Inter-American Court of Human Rights in a 
case brought in Costa Rica. It is an advisory 
opinion, not one that binds even Costa Rica, a 
democratic and generally benevolent govern- 
ment that has long had on its books a statute 


'requiring local journalists to belong to an 
. official eofegio of journalists. Nonetheless, it is 
apparently the first time that a forum of this 
sort has ruled on the issue, and the community 
of tree-press groups is rightly seizing on the 
court's decision in order to make it the stan- 
idard to which all governments wQl be held. 

A robust standard it is. “It is not enough to 
'guarantee the right to establish and manage 


organs of mass media,” the opinion said. “It is 
also necessary that journalists and in general 
all those who dedicate themselves profession- 
ally to the mass media can work with sufficient 
protection for the freedom and independence 
that the occupation requires.” The court went 
on to acknowledge that there is an argument 
based on considerations of general welfare, 
that licensing journalists is a way to guarantee 
society objective and truthful information. 
But it sai<C with what seems to us unanswer- 
able logic, that it would be a contradiction to 
invoke a restriction of freedom of expression 
as a means of guaranteeing that very freedom. 

Tbe global battle of a free press is never 
finishe d In the letter in which it reported tbe 
licensing decision, the World Press Freedom 
Committee summed up the latest push and 
pull at UNESCO. We also learn that only a 
few weeks ago the White House dropped a 
longstanding requirement dial foreign corre- 
spondents accompany applications for press 
credentials with a letter from their embassies. 
The White House had used tbe requirement as 
a convenient way of double-checking the bona 
Tides of the correspondents, the committee 
reported, “apparently without realizing it gave 
foreign governments a potentially effective 
veto power over granting of credentials." 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


West Berliners Grow Restive 


For Americans old enough to remember the 
Berlin airlift and the erection of the wall be- 
tween the eastern and western sectors of that 
city, it is shocking to hear what a large minor- 
ity of West Berliners are saying these days — 
that they no longer need nor want the protect- 
ing presence of troops from the United Slates, 
. France and Britain. This while they live on an 
island of affluence and freedom surrounded by 
the grim and gray reality of Communist rule. 

If the day ever comes when a majority of 
West Berliners truly prefer to take their 
chances without allied protection despite the 
-presence of 21 Soviet divisions around Berlin, 
they should of course be accorded that privi- 
. lege. But a withdrawal could trigger dangerous 
instabilities in Europe, and should be avoided. 

Fortunately, the situation has not readied a 
critical stage. With flexibility by America, 
Britain and France, perhaps it will not 

The restiveness in West Berlin is a reflection 
of tbe generation gap. Growing numbers of 
people on the western side of the wall have 
grown to adulthood since the days when occu- 
pation by Communist forces seemed possible. 

The major problem, though, is tire outmod- 
ed legal and political situation. Berlin was 
occupied by UiL, French, British and Soviet 
forces at the end of World War II, and it is still 
technically under military occupation. 

In West Berlin, the city council is elected by 
the people, and it in turn chooses the mayor 
and the executive authority. But supreme au- 
thority still lies with the Komman datura, 
made up of the three occupying Western pow- 


ers. About 6,000 or so occupation laws remain 
on the books; until recently a West Berliner 
could have been imprisoned for “defamation" 
of the allies. The death penalty can still be 
imposed in Berlin, although it is forbidden 
under West German law. 

A recent poll showed that 60 percent of 
West Berliners are unhappy with that state of 
affairs; about half of than want tbe “occupa- 
tion” forces out. But the allies cannot disman- 
tle tins legal framework without undercutting 
the justification for their military presence. 

Whatever can be done should be done. 
Richard Burt, U.S. ambassador to West Go- 
many, is one person determined to remove the 
occupation laws from the books. 

— Los Angeles Times. 


France’s Vote on Falklands 


Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher of Brit- 
ain is understandably angry with the French 
for ignoring ho appeal not to oppose Britain 
at this yearis United Nations vote on tire 
Falklands. France did not even adopt a neutral 
position: Rather than join the 41 nations 
which abstained on the motion caning on 
Britain and Argentina to “initiate” negotia- 
tions, she became one of the 107 countries 
which voted for the Argentine text. 

What Mrs. Thatcher will doubtless bring to 
President Francois Mitterrand’s attention is 
the principle governing Britain's dealings with 
the Falkland Islands; the principle of self- 
determination. Tins simple prerequisite of 
freedom makes a mockery of the UN vote. 

— Sunday Telegraph (London). 


FROM OUR DEC 4 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Can New York Buy a Subway? 
NEW YORK — Declaring that the city is 
unable to raise enough money to construct the 
projected 5100.000,000 triborough system of 
subways. Mayor William Gaynor recently 
caused consternation among supporters of 
that plan. The Board of Estimate followed 
with statements so opposed to the Mayor's 
sentiments that persons familiar with the situ- 
ation declared the bomb which has long been 
lying at City Hall would burst before the eyes 
of the public. The Mayor stated: “All of the 
city's credit cannot be devoted to subways. In 
the years following we shall not have the ex- 
traordinary increase in assessed values of this 
year, but only the ordinary increase, affording 
a borrowing capacity which, after being dimin- 
ished by the needs of government, will leave 
only a small sum for subway construction." 


1935: Law to Protect f German Blood* 
BERLIN — Wilhelm Frick. Minister of the 
Interior, itemized the rules [on Dec, 3] of a 
prohibition of mixed marriages. A couple ap- 
plying for publishing of banns in order to 
prove their extraction must produce the mar- 
riage certificates of their parents, besides their 
own. A doctor’s certificate that the couple is fit 
Tor marriage will be made compulsory later. 
Until then the registry official is authorized to 
demand such a certificate if he apprehends 
that tbe offspring of the couple concerned 
would be pernicious to German blood. Mean- 
while, in the first trial based on the Nuremberg 
law “to protect German blood and honor," 
Martin Weber, 3 9-y ear-old Ge ntian, was sen- 
tenced to one-and -a -half-year’s penal servi- 
tude. The charge against him was that be had 
not severed his relations with a Jewish woman. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M.FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARLGEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Publisher 
Exeaitnt Editor 
Editor 
Depan Editor 
Deputy Editor 
Associate Editor 


Deputy PubbduT 
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Associate Publisher 


Director if OradMon 
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6 1985, International Herald Tribune. All rigjkts reserved. 


— “ ■- ■= . ~ Reticence 

Work in Space Can Make the Desert Bloom i y )OUt t 


L EXINGTON, Massachusetts — What should 
t be done about African famine? The answer 


J -# be done about African famine? The answer 
is not “aid projects" that result in settling no- 
mads around overcrowded towns, as has hap- 
pened in the SaheL Take tbe people out of their 
element and they win be unable to fully use their 
skills . Force them to settle in a. place other than 
that of their own choice, and they will sit waiting 
for you to solve their problems. Grain will only 
feed tiie people today. We must also Hlummate a 
way for them to feed themselves tomorrow. 

ft is ottf duty to humanity to use our abilities to 
lessen the impact of devastating droughts in the 
future. We have leaned how. to deal with most 
natural disasters in this country. We should also 
learn and teach others bow to do the same in the 
hostile, arid desert environment. 

□ 

First, we should learn that the desert is not tbe 
enemy. No matter how harsh, it contains the 
seeds of survival of its people. Rain in the geolog- 
ic past left behind vast areas of arable land that 
may be hidden by sheets of sand. Some of that 
water seeped through the rock to be stored in 
giant underground aquifers. Today we have the 
means for locating such hidden resources. 

NASA’s space shuttle is a very useful tool in . 
this regard. In November 1981 a shuttle-borne 
radar instrument unraveled tbe terrain beneath 
the sands in the southern reaches of the western 
desert of Egypt. In an area that is now bone-diy 
without a single blade of grass, the radar revealed 
ancient river courses as wide as the Nile Valley. 
Nearby a region was selected to drill for water. 
Eight wells were dug and all brought fresh water 
from depths between 25 and 250 feet (7.6 and 7 6 


‘ By Farouk El-Baz 

This is die second of two articles. 


States. In industry, lagging output is unprofit- 
able. In agriculture a failed crop can be fatal. 
Searching for water and land resources with 


meters). Today there is an experimental farm 
that may be the nucleus for a vast agricultural 
settlement in thfe p^rch^d land. 

More recently, in October 1984, the large- 
format camera developed for NASA by Itefc 
Optical Systems, of whteh I am vice president for 
science and technology, obtained high-resolution 
photographs of Ethiopia, Somalia and Sudan. 
The photographs dearly showed the migration of 
people from Ethiopia into Somalia and their 
refugee camps. They showed the best routes to 
reach the camp« f wmrthing that W8S IHOSt diffi- 
cult to ascertain during the early stages of refugee 
aid in Ethiopia. And they showed the areas with 
potential ground-water resources. This kind of 
information may make a difference in the long- 
term resolution of drought in Africa. 

For this reason, a recommendation was recent- 
ly made to NASA to refly the large-format cam- 
era on a shuttle missio n later this year. This 
“flight for f amine" would be devoted to the 
acquisition of high- resolution photographs of the 
drought-stricken areas of Africa. 

□ 

Second, we should study the ways of desert 
nomads and try to reinstate, as much as possible, 
their age-old practices and desert-bom wisdom. 
Nomads roam the land followed by their meager 
herds not because they are a restless loL They do 
so because theirs is the only way of using the 


scarcest and most inconsistent of resources: rain. 
In the desert, when it rains, it does so m one small 
place and not in others. And when the ocacdbaal 
rain clouds return, it rains in some other place.' 
Desert dwellers have developed a remarkable 
sensitivity to such happenings. 

The Bedouin also mow when to make their 
animals.' stop grazing to preserve the range, be- 
cause they know tiny win. have to return to it 
someday. -Arab folktales iodude numerous ex- 
amples of grazing rules, and even a case of a war 1 
between tribes that resulted from a cm H i that 
grazed on- protected land. They acquired this 
wisdom from thousands cf years erf experience of 
living in an environment where the only constant 
is the scarcity of resources. ■ * 

It is not the fault of the nomads that deserts 
exist It is part of the natural environment of the 
Earth and we should study it in this light in order 
to make parts of it mem beneficial td mnprinH 
Let us put aside the blame for “desertification” 
and direct our attention to doing something 
constructive that would have lasting benefits. 

□ 

Third, we should accept the cyclic pattern of 
the moods of nature. Remember the dream of a 
biblical pharaoh of Egypt: “Seven years of grain, 
fa t and healthy, growing on a single stalk. Behind 
them sprouted seven ears of grain, shriveled and 
thin and Masted by tbe east wind.” Joseph inter- 
preted that as seven years of plenty followed by 
seven years of famine. 

The story’s moral is as relevant today as then. 
Part of tbe harvest in years of abundaxice should 
be stored for lean years, as is done in the United 


and use the wisdom of nomads and collecting 

grain for use in lean vears is a tall order. I have no 

illusions about that. However, we must start 
somewhere if we are to lessen the effect of 
droughts upon humanity. 


There is one more important human lesson to 

. v. j ■_ :.L A famine 


be learned in coping with drought and f amine. 
■We must require the harsh but fruitful policy of 
making the afflicted people work rather than at 
and wail. When human beings are sick and 
without hope, they quietly become resigned to 
their fate and await death. However, they are 
rarely in the mood to argue and are eaaly influ- 
enced to assume a more positive attitude. 

There is nothing more humiliating and spirit- 
breaking than being herded into a refugee camp. 
While in these encampments, these people 
should at least be made to work; dig for water if 
there is nothing else to do. To make them work is 
to giye them mental strength, which gradually 
translates into physical strength. Above aD, work 
re-ins tills a measure of human dignity. 

' Living with the desert and its changing moods 
was done for thousands of years. It can be done 
Hgamj and we have tbe opportunity to lead the 
way. However, if we cannot understand the de- 


sert, we should not embark on projects of que 
deniable value and Should save our aid funds. 


The writer, a Massachusetts geologist, was sci- 
ence adviser to the late President Anwar Sadat of 
Egypt and is a former director of ike Smithsonian 
Institution's Center far Earth and Planetary Stud- 
ies. He contributed this to The Washington Post. 





' in 


Mind Over Aid to Savimbi 


N EW YORK — The news that 
tbe White House is considering 
giving secret aid to the rebel group of 
Jonas Savimbi in Angola is one of the 


By Jonathan Power 


most serious foreign policy depar- 
tures of the Reagan administration. 

Already it is causing consternation 
among West European allies. If car- 
ried through: could be the harbinger 
of a major race war in Sooth Africa. 
It comes as unconfirmed reports 
from Havana speak of Fidel Castro 
seeking Moscow’s permission to 
launch a full scale onslaught against 
South African troops occupying Na- 
mibia and Southern Angola. 

The indications are that tbe State 
Department is not happy with tbe 
While House initiative, either. But 
die department, under Alexander 
Haig and George Shultz, has a poor 
record concerning the Namibia dis- . 
pule. The complex maneuvering? of 
the assistant secretary of state for 
African affairs, Chester Crocker, 
have led him a long way from his 
objective of a peaceful settlement in 
Namibia, a goal he described in an 
article in Foreign Affairs immediate- 
ly before bis appointment five years 
» gn as “tantalizmgly dose." 

Just before the Reagan administra- 
tion took office the United Nations 
called a peace conference at tbe re- 
quest cf all the parties to the Namibia 


dispute and the five Western nations 
which together had led the settlement 
negotiations — the United States, 
Britain, France, Canada and West 
Gomany. To all intents and pur- 
poses, after fooryeais of hard negoti- 


Western ambassadors present au that 
was required for a final signature was 
a signal from the incoming Reagan 
administration that h agreed. 

Tngtwari there was a deafening s- - 
knee and the South Africans knew 


ations, all conditions had been met they could s tall. As soon as the Rear 


by both rides, namely the South-West 
Africa People's Organization, die 
guerrilla movement in Namibia, and 


gan government opened its. mouth it 
laid a new condition on the table* one 
that even South Africa had never 


If President Reagcm acts on hispmposal to help 
Mr. Savimbi, all hope of compmmise vM be losL 


their Angolan allies on one hand and 
South Africa on the other. 

Controversial issues bad been the 
rate of withdrawal of South African 


brought up — that the Cuban forces 
in Angola m u st leave. 

It has always been an unanswered 
question why, during those four years 


troops, the disarming of SWAPO, the of negotiations, the South Africa ns 


size of the demilitarized zone in An- 
gola, elections, the role and composi- 
tion of the UN peacekeeping force 


and the interim authority of the never set foot in 


never made the Cuban presence an 
issue. Perhaps they felt they were on 
weak ground because the Cubans 


South African administrator. 


South Africans in' 


ila until the 
Angola dtif- 


Tbe agreement was a superb ao- ing its civil war. Or maybe they just 
jmpli&hmeut, (he product of great assumed that once tbe Namibian war 


com pltthmen t, the product of great assumed that once tbe Namibian war 
tact and perseverance. The UN con-/' was over the Cubans would go. . 


tary for 


ference met in Geneva under the But the Reagan a dministr ation not 
p of the UN undezsecro- only raised the matter They made it 
ideal affairs, Brian Ur- the central issue. The Sooth Africans 


quarL ln his opinion and tbose of the' played on H. Wide they had always 


; as help to Mr. Savimbi was kept 
within bounds. But no longer. If Mr. 
Reagan acts on his proposal to aid 
Mr. Savimbi, the worst case fears of 
Luanda will be realized and h wifi 
demand more help from tbe Cubans. 
. All hopes of compromise will be lost 
The Cubans appear to be saying lo 
Luanda and Moscow that if the situa- 
tion h going to deteriorate in Angola, 
Namibia and South Africa itself, why 
-not lance the boil and send in the 
troops to confront the South African 
army for a do-or-die battle? Would 
' the United States really dare to go to 
the aid of white South Africa and 
wouldn’t a Cuban onslaught on 
Sooth African troops trigger off a 
massive uprising inside South 
Africa itsdf, precipitating a final 
black-white denoummt? 

Mr. Reagan is playing with fire. 
There is still tune to reflect. It ap- 
pears that the CIA has not yet been 
oven its formal marching orders. For 
toe sake of avoiding an all-out war in 
South Africa, Mr. Reagan must 

- diwip his mind- • 

International Herald Tribune. 

All rights reserved. ■ 


L OS ANGELES — The outponr- By Mi chael E. Levine 
/ mg of concern about airline J 


safety, prompted by a worldwide 
spate of accidents and incidents, 
has led some to question whether 
airline deregulation has been car- 
ried too far and ought to have its 
“excesses” corrected. 

While interest in air safety is cer- 
tainly not misplaced, (he focus on 
deregulation as the target for cor- 
rection certainly is. 

The U.S. Airline Deregulation 
Act of 1978 look the government 
out of the business of telling airlines 
where to fry and what to charge 
But it in no way deregulated air- 
lines from a safety, operational or 
technical standpoint. It actually in- 
creased the potential for uncover- 
ing and combating safety problems. 

Several of this year’s most serious 
accidents occurred outside U.S. 
safety jurisdiction. And no one has 
suggested that the most important 
of those within federal jurisdiction, 
the wind-shear accident at Dallas- 
Fon Worth International Airport 
was linked to deregulation. 

Indeed, critics have difficulty 
pointing to any fatality (hat was 
caused by dere gulati on UJS. air- 
lines woe safe m 1978 when they 
were deregulated, and have become 
progressively safer. While 1985 has 
hardly been a ■vantage year, it is not 
a historically bad one. Heightened 
public attention probably comes 
from the raised expectations pro- 
duced by tbe remarkably safe re- 
cord of the last five years. The in- 
creased volume of activity has 
mode it statistically more likely that „ 
some incidents win occur. 

Since deregulation does not ap- 
pear to have caused any increase m 
accidents, critics have mainl y fo- 
cused on possible future problems. 
The most widely publicized has 
been a series of maintenance prob- 
lems, with some spectacular associ- 
ated incidents, at one UJ3. airline, 


and some training and record-keep 1 
ing problems at another. 

But the real story is that the 
known problems were uncovered 
by the Federal Aviation Adminis- 
tration with the cooperation of the 
airlines affected. They have led to 
substantial an A stepped up. 

FAA surveillance. 

Critics ray that there is a down- 
side to airime deregulation. So 
there is. In this tragically imperfect 
world there is a downside to just 


skiesneednotbtindusto 


about every desirable public policy. 
We deregulated to get new'entrc- 


surveillance of deregulated airlines 
to the extent that budget politics 
. have permitted. Still, room for im- 
provement could be found by- an : 

m illing tn admit that 

some nanmOitary problems require, 
moreresdurces to fix. . 

That is little doubt that an extra 
measure of safety insurance could 
be obtained by investing some of 
the unspent user taxes lying in the 
aviation trust fund in more airline 
surveillance, Doppler radar to de- 
tect wind shear and expanded air- 
traffic-control capability. 

But this doesn't mean that we 
need to randate the airlines. Our 
unders tandable desire to mom tain 
- safe skies need not blind us to tire 
real-world fact that we always 
choose between, imperfect polities 
— here between imperfect regula- 
tion and itqpecfect deregulation. 

We should “fix" airime d«x^tila- - 
turn only , if we have, reason to her 
lieve that whatwewill get. wffi be 
better than whatwe have now. In 
the .case of airimes, we .can. gam.. 


Unfounded 


By David S. Broder 


W ashington — The head- 
lines on the front-page stories 


VV lines on the front-page stories 
Sunday indicated surprise; But the 
surprise is not that there were three 
American military officers accompa- 
nying Egyptian forces in (he hostage 
rescue effort on Malta, but that the 
Reagan administration found it nec- 
essary to conceal their presence. 

The reticence may have been occa- 
sioned by the seeming need of Presi- 
dent Hosni Mubarak of Egypt to 
demonstrate his independence from 
the United States. But it suggests 
something sneaky and improper 
about an effort for which America 
should not be apologetic. 

Gradually. Americans are coming 
to understand that terrorism is the 
characteristic form of warfare of this 
age, and that the choice of strategies 
to counter it is no different from what 
it was when Hitler was the threat: 
alliance or appeasement. 

This threat has a different face to 
it. Its weapons are not Panzer divi- 
sions and Siuka dive-bombers, but 
handguns and grenades. It is the form 
of warfare that those who are weak in 
conventional arms employ against 
powers which are stronger. 

It relies on stealth but also on in- 
timidation, and that was pan of Hit- 
ler’s arsenal. He managed for too 
long to stare down the free nations of 
the West and convince them that they 
might buy peace for themselves by 
ignoring his attacks on others. 

Eventually, even tbe United States, 
which had an ocean's protection from 
his assaults, came to see there was no 
way lo avoid the confrontation. But 
tbe lost lim e cos t countless lives. And 
so it is with terrorism. 

• A nation that sits bade and hopes 
that its citizens will not be targets of 
terrorism makes h ever more likely 
that they will be targeted. A nation 
that demonstrates its readiness — in- 
deed, its eagerness — to make terror- 
ists pay for their crimes will offer its 
citizens tbe only real protection they 
can have in such an age. 

It would have been commendable 
and preferable for the Reagan ad- 
ministration to announce at the end 
of the incident with the hijacked 
Egyptian airliner that U.S. officers 
had been on the scene and that the 
United States was ready lojoin in tbe 
rescue effort with the Delta Force 


supported Mr- Savimbi, their defeat- 
ed candidate in the dv3 war, Pre- 
toria's support had waned during the 
Carter years. Now it was stepped up." 
The stronger Mr. Savimbi became, 
the less Kkely it was that the Ango- 
lans could agree to compromise on 
the Cuban presence. It became a 
question of principle. 

Indeed, lately, the Cuban forces 
have grown and, according to tbe 
xeceaiissueof Military Balance, pub- 
lished by the International Institute 
for Strategic Studies, “Angola is in 
the process of substantially improv- 
ing her air defease systems with Sovi- 
et and Cuban assistance. " 

Nevertheless, at one point, three 
years ago, some outride observers 
sympathetic to tbe Namibian cause, 
including myself, began arguing that 
Angola must back down. It was a 
question of real politik. Mr. Reagan 
was not going to be convinced and, 
besides, the window of opportunity 
with Sooth Africa had closed 

For Sooth Africa was now cod- 
fronting so much internal turbulence 
that Pretoria needed to concentrate 
on concessions at home, and not ap- 
pear .weak-kneed over Namibia. 

The case for leaning on Angola to 
compromise could still be made as 


commandos it had flown to Italy. 

Tbe administration may have had 
plausible reasons for not wishing to 
associate itself with an operation that 
cost 59 lives. But in fact. President 
Ronald Reagan and his associates are 
entitled to credit for steadily moving 
the United States toward a realistic 
anti-terrorist policy. 

It is tough to say it, but the point 
must be made: Such a policy requires 
that the lives of the hostages not be J 
the sole determinant of appropriate 
retaliatory action. 

For the best of reasons, the United 
States has resisted that premise. 
America's value system, its Constitu- 
tion and religions assert the impor- 
tance of the individual and human 
life. Compassion is stirred when U.S, 
countrymen or citizens of other na- 
tions become hostages through no 
fault of their own. Whatever is neces- 
sary should be done to save them, 
ana only then should terrorists be 
brought to justice, this theory holds. 

But in most terrorist situations, 
that time sequence will not work. The 
terrorists either begin killing — as 
they did on TWA 847, the Achille 
Lauro and in this latest incident — or 
trade hostages' Eves for their own 
freedom and political demands. 

11011 is why we are gradually ao- u 
cep ting that retaliatory moves must 4* 
be swift, even if they inevitably cany 
risks for tbe hostages. 

Clearly, the United States and oth- 
er countries have much to learn about 
mounting such operations. The car- 
nage in Malta is not an example any- 
one would want to see repeated. 

But instead of concealing coopera- 
tion and participation in counter-ter- 
rorist strikes, America should publi- 
cize and proclaim that it wu] be 
policy to lend all possible assistance 
to any friendly government whose 
citizens are taken hostage. 

Thai notice, a dear, advance wam- 
ing'to terrorists that if they strike 
against anyone, America is coming 
after them, is the best insurance po- 
licy against terrorism. i 

Does such a policy make Ameri- ~ 
cans accomplices in tbe deaths oF 
innocents? I do not believe so, for I 
really do think it is the most effective 
deterrent against terrorist attacks. ; 

let us not use oar compassion for l 
the i nn o c ent as an excuse lor appeas- \ 
mg terrorism. And let us not conceal 1 
or be coy about the fact that U.S. 
government policy is to go after ter- 
rorists, rather than to wait passively 
For thorn to strike again. 

The Washington Fast 


LETTER TO THE EDITOR 


preneurs into the airline business . more and lose less by working hard- 
anrf to let dynamic existing- man- er within the existing structure of 


agemenis expand and change. Dra- ■ " safety regulation than by change. .; 


Manila TheorylVosedives shrinking economy. They see Mr. 

VIA.. **££«<* IffiKSSiaSSS 

Ntew Much Offers?” i 


maticfllly changing the costing atr- Lnbcs of telephone dereguiauon. 

tines and new ones has pul have accused antitrust zealots and 
more pressure on the safety syston . deregulated of ^ fixing 'romething 
that we left in place. -fliat wam'fbttdom. Butthereis no 

Deregulation has benefited: both - disputing that airline deregulation 
the traveling public and well-man- has crcated-a mass madeet 1 in' air 
aged airiines. But dynamism and travel, saved the traveling public 
stability are natural opposites. And ■ money, reduced waste and iro- 
in the stable world of regnlaied air- proved -the- connection between 
lines, the safety regulalocy system management performance, and 
depended— -in practice; but notby, company fortunes. This- system is - 
design — on a lot of informal con- not “broke." Let’s not fix iL . ■ 

tact and trust between regulators' ... — 

and a few unchangingrompanies, - The writer,, a professor cf law at 
Tbe safety system tsable to ban-. -- the UniverrityoJ Southern Cahfbr- 
dle tbe pressures, of d ynamism as; ma, formerly was general (Bredor of 
long as resources are'.made avail- international -end domestic, aviation 
able for the higher level of snrveit*: at the U.S.' Civil Aeronautics Board 
lance required. Deregulate 1 

the FAA’s attention to this need in V peer of Hew York Air. He contnbia- 
1978, and tbe FAA has increased its -■ ed this to the Los Angeles tpmec. 


• Thesrrker.a 
the Uhivmlty q 


refessor cf law at 
Southern Cahfbr- 


international and domestic, aviation 
at the US. Civil Aeronautics: Board . 


(Nov. 21) floats along pretty wdl be- 
fore naming out of go s and making 
the reader regret the exercise. 

His engines begin to flutter when 
■be describes the' population of rite 
Philippines as bang motivated by 
narrow allegiance to -family ana 
friesd^asifthehfllkgmncetotheir 
oountry counts for nothing. Filipinos 
are, if anything, more actively patri- 
otic than any other Southeast Asian 
people. Bren in . the darkest years of 
Mr. Marcos's rale, they hare never 
forgotten the . distraction - between 
tbeir cqrmtty.and their government. 

The wannng tighfr«»mean when 
Mr, Komcw’s flight of fancy charges 
rajpmo. bnsiiiessmen who oppose 
Mr^Maicos as being noihiog but a 
g«»F0f “outs” who wmlV 

^Businessmen and women in Ma- 
nila have.fevenr right te be ccmcerued 
and distressed^ witir the state of their 


years. There is no reason for to 
be so sorely maligned. 

. Air Karbow’s nosedive occurs in 
its final smtence when it raises the 
canard of the Communist mgnac* 
and suggests an unpleasant end if 
they should ever come to power. The 
communists, if they can even be 
cafled that, have as much rfumry of 
®*ing over in the Philippines as Mr. 
Marcos has of going down in history 
as an enlightened leader. 

JAY HENDERSON. 
Hong Kong. 






Letters intended for publication 
be addressed " Letters to the 
Editor 7 ' and must contain die writ - 
s signature, name and full od- 
dress. letters should be brief and 
ore subject to editing We cannot 
w responsible far the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1985 


Page 


ARTS /LEISURE 



usic, by John Cale, the ’Godfather of Rock’ 


ChrhfanRoM 


John Cale: “Nobody knows what I*m going to do next” 


By. Michael Zwerin 

tnnmatkmal IJemld Tribute 

P ) AKJS — John Cale, no relative 
of J. J. Cate and nai to be con- 
fused with John Cage (except by 
influence), has been called the god- 
father of rode. His latest album, 
released after 21 years in rode, is 
titled “Artificial Intelligence.” He 
describes his childhood in .Wales 
(his father was a suiter, his wwtw 
a teacher) as “quastnonnaL” His 
bistosy, English and music studies 
in British schools were all terminat- 
ed “by request of the warden.” 
Wlulc plunging headfirst into 

the mysteries of the viola,” Cale 

wrote an "aberrant symphony” and 
“established a correspondence with 
the avant-garde Fhuras movement'’ 
in Wiesbaden, West Gennany. Hie 
composer Aaron Copland recom- 
mended' him for a Leonard Bern- 
stein scholarship at the Berkshire 
Music Center mTangJewood, Mas- 
sachusetts. He studied than for a 
summer and then drifted to New 


York, where be became “indigent” 
and co-founded — in 1964, with 
Lou Reed — a renegade band 
sponsored by Andy Warhol and 
called the Velvet Underground. 

Gale's concepts, keyboards and 
viola were behind the Velvet's 

sound, which included electronics 
and classical music elements. War- 
hoi featured the band as part of his 
traveling mixed media show, the 
Exploding Plastic Inevitable. 

Cale said recently, more slumped 
than seated in the lobby of an inev- 

S plastic hold near the Place 
j: “Lou was very good at 
making up lyrics on stage — he 
could give Dylan a run for his mon- 
ey.** His voice was next to inaudi- 
bly hoarse. “One performance was 
never the same as another.” His 
four-piece band had just arrived by 
bus from Vienna. “Sometimes we’d 
just make up a song and jam on it 
for an hour.” It was 6:30 P. M. and 
their concert would begin in two 


boors. “The idea was to put avant- 
garde ideas on top of commercial 
material” 

He was also nauseated: “Some- 
thing I ate on the road this morn- 
ing. Lou's songs weren’t babble, 
like most rock at the time, they 
were literate songs.” Tb's was not 
megastar stuff; asked if he ever 
longed for a No. 1 hit. he rasped: 
“It haunts but it doesn't dog me/ 

After the summer in 
Tanglewood, he searched out the 
composer John Cage. “Thai was 
the whole point in my going to 
America. Td written lo Cage. But 
when I saw him, he told me that he 
had passed the baton of contempo- 
rary music to La Monte Young. He 
said be had told him, You can 
carry the flag now.' 

“So 1 got involved with La Mon- 
te. It was a string-quartet situation, 
basically. He called it the Theatre 
of Eternal Music. He was always 
interested in the macro side of 
sound. We used to play a heavily 


d: possi 

" Diene 


amplified interval drone, like a B 
with an F-sharp. It said, *HoId for a 
very long time.' So I held it and 
listened and concentrated and after 
a while you hear weird harmonics 
and all sons of wild changes going 
on. 

“Some of my music used that 
The idea is to reduce it lo the lowest 
ible denominator, to get the 
iggest orchestra] sound posable 
out of limited means. It’s also a 
good way to express pain through 
music.” 

While the “serious” composers 
Cage and Young, theoretically con- 
demned to starvation in tinh**t*A 

garrets, began to collect subsidies 
and fellowships, Cale the “pop 
star" remained a struggling cult fig- 
ure. After leaving the Velvet Un- 
derground in the early 1970s. he 
became a staff producer (“I was the 
corporate freak”) for Warner 
Brothers. He returned to London 
to work with Brian Eno and Bryan 
Ferry and their progressive group 


Roxy Music. He produced Patti 
Smith's first album in New York, 
where he discovered an exploding 
punk subculture and formed a 
band that “just banged it oul” 
Working the downtown dub cir- 
cuit, be found himself looked up to 
as a father figure by a new genera- 
tion that considered the Velvet Un- 
derground the fust punk band. 

As punk waned. Cale continued 
expressing pain singing literate 
songs of His own. “1 couldn't make 
up my mind to write a song just to 
selL If I said, 'Now okay, Tm going 
to do it,' something would happen 
that would take it oui of that caie- 
goiy." 

In the United States, the state of 
his popularity mostly affords only 
solo performances. He accompa- 
nies himself on piano or guitar in 
what be describes as “more redials 
than concerts. The songs run into 
each other and it’s sort of stream of 


consciousness. Recently I played 
some bars in Arizona, where it was 
pointed oul to me that the way l 
run doesn't endear me to dub own- 
ers.” 

He can afford a band in Europe, 
where tradition is more appreciat- 
ed. His audience is younger in Eu- 
rope, not so many yuppie nostai- 
gics. In the Netherlands and West 
Germany. “They go crazy. 1 mean, 
they’re ravers. 

“I have one piece that's totally 
free improvisation. 1 never know 
how it's going to start or go. 1 don’t 
mind taking a chance on stage. It's 
a way to stay sane on the road; 
‘How am 1 going to make this inter- 
esting tonight?" That keeps every- 
body on their toes. Nobody knows 
what I’m going to do next.” 

John Cale: Arhus. Denmark. Dec. 
5; Malmo, Sweden. Dec. 6; Copen- 
hagen. Dee. 7; Stockholm. Dec. 8; 
Goteborg, Dee. 9; London, Dec. 11. 


I'-Ti* 

/. 'Sfe; 


f Fatal Attraction’ Almost Succeeds in Resurrecting Genre Slain by r Sleuth’ 


, .-•*!<• 
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By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribune 

L ondon — it would not be 
/ difficult, in a West End still 
besieged by the moribund “Mouse- 
trap” and “The Deadly Business of 
Murder.” to suggest that “Fatal At- 
traction” (at the Haymarket) could 
be the best thriller in town. The 
problem is that the genre seems to 
.bare died alongside its victims. 

Just as “Beyond the Fringe” ef- 

THE LONDON STAGE 

feeiiveJy killed the stage revue, 
making the Sloane Rangers at the 
Duchess look more dead iban alive 
20 years later, so “Sleuth” made it 

all but impossible to come up with i • mg, « 

an intelligent whod unni t. Tony W OTKlUff MlTRClC 
Shatter's classic was at the same 

time a parody and a memorial: It With yvftm Street’ 


laid to rest forever the body in the 
library, but by breaking all the 
rules of the postmortem it also 
proved a treacherous act to follow. 

Bernard Slade, writer of “Fatal- 
Attraction,” is a Canadian drama- 
list — largely and usually wrongly 
dismissed by the British press — 
who has made an intriguing career 
out of putting good characters into 
shaky plots. His “Same Time Next 
Year” (now back at the Old Vic) 
and “Special Occasions” were es- 
sentially Neil Simon comedies giv- 
en the rare benefit of real and 


Color Company 


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The Asiociared Pm* 

N EW YORK — Everyone 
knows San ta Claus wears a red 
outfit, but what shade of red? That 
was no idle question for the people 
converting the classic 1947 movie 
“ Miracle on 34th Street” from 
black and white into color. 

The answers to- such questions 
were found in archives of Macy’s 
department store and in examina- 
tions of color movies of the time. 
Gene Allen, executive director of 
the Society of Motion Picture and 
Television Art Directors, who won 
an Academy Award os art director 
of “My Fair Lady,’* was hired to 
odor the film by computer. The 
total cost: SI 88.000. 

“Miracle,” which will be broad- 


touching people. His other Broad- 
way hits were “Tribute" (still un- 
seen in London), the blackest 
show-business satire since “All 
About Eve,” and “Romantic Com- 
edy,” which essentially explained 
why American audiences were nev- 
er again to be told any Philadelphia 
stories. Slade is, in other words, a 
romantic with a strong sense of a 
last theatrical past, and what he is 
doing in “Fatal Attraction” is not 
to be glibly dismissed. 

Thriller plots should not be light- 
ly given away, but it seems fair to 
reveal that we are in a remote Nan- 
tucket beach house in the company 
of a fading film star and a crum- 
bling cop who writes murderous 
best sellers. There are also one or 
two other bodies, both dead and 
alive, act to mention a center-stage 
whirlpool bath, which has about 
the most exciting rde of the eve- 
ning. 

Beyond that the plot does look at 
times as though pieced together 
from the off cuts of “Deathtrap,” 
but thou is something deeply en- 
dearing about Denis Quilley's wea- 
ry sleuth muttering, “Jesus, how 1 
liate all this crime,” as the bodies 
pile up around him. 

There is something equally en- 
dearing about Susannah York's so- 
cial -climber actress (“We were in 
Spain, staying with the Dalis," she 
tells QuilJey. “What Dalis?” be 
asks) who has slept her way up to 
the middle of her profession and is 
not much more ambitious than Eva 
Per6n. Not for the first time, Slade 


has written two extremely attrac- 
tive. intelligent, touching, midd- 
le-aged wrecks, then not known 
quite where to put them. But at a 
time when the thriller Jias been re- 
duced to a 30-minute rerun of a 
Roald Dahl short story on televi- 
sion, “Fatal Attraction” is at the 
very least an attempt to get us back 
into a world where the bodies in the 
bath ore never less than immacu- 
lately dressed for the occasion. 

. □ 

As Royal Variety Shows go 
(about three and a half hours on 
average), the one staged last week 
at the Drury Lane and televised 
over the weekend was a lap-dance 
ahead of the rest. Somebody back- 
stage bad noticed that the West 
End was filled with shows derived 
from or leading to old movie musi- 
cals — ”42nd Street.” “GigJ,” 
“Guys and Dolls” and until recent- 
ly “Singin' in the Rain” and “Seven 
Brides for Seven Brothers.” It 
therefore made sense to build a 
fast -moving and unusually intelli- 
gently structured evening around 
the history of the movie musical, 
though, curiously enough, the best 
and worst musicals in London at 
the moment were ignored despite 
the fact that “Les Misfcrables” and 
“Mutiny” can also claim honorable 
Hollywood antecedents. 

The stars of the evening were 
three singers who seem to have re- 
fined and matured (bar acts over 
the past half-century or so to the 
point where they should now be on 
permanent display in some living 
museum of great musicals: Celeste 


eSPBCMUYMY 

UNOEDUKBl 

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COUNTON 

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cast in color in the United States by SvmnTinnv 

television this holiday season, is the M,na0n SymjMHmy 



*23 MUON! 

i must be 

DREAMING- 

o 



first feature-length, black-and- 
white film to be electronically con- 
verted to color by Color Systems 
Technology Inc. of Los Angeles. 
The company has been experiment- 
ing with color conversion of televi- 
sion shows and newsreel footage 
since 1978. 

Ralph Wringer, the company's 
board chairman, invented the pat- 
ented process. Its first major expo- 
sure came earlier this year, When 
the revived “Alfred Hitchcock Pre- 
sents” featured original introduc- 
tions by Hitchcock from the 1950s 
series, but now in color. A competi- 
tor. Colonization Inc. of Toronto, 
has colored two movies for cable 
television using another process 
and is working on the holiday clas- 
sic “It’s a Wonderful Life,” for the 
1986 season. 

In color conversion, black-and- 
white film is transferred to video- 
tape and played into special 
chinery. Color values 
electronically assigned to key 
frames using computer graphics 
equipment. The rest of the frames 
are colored based on the key 
frames. 


1 Stym- 
ied to 


To Perform in Oman 

The Assoekued Prets 

LONDON — Tbe London 
phony Orchestra is scheduli 
leave for Oman on Thursday to 
give three concerts in what is be- 
lieved to be the Gist visit by a major 
symphony orchestra to the Gulf 
states, the orchestra management 
announced Tuesday. | 

The orchestra is to perform Sat- 
urday, Monday and Wednesday at 
the new A I Btistan Palace Hotel, 
with John Gecngiadis 

commissioned works 

folk music as well as 
works by Mozart and Beethoven. 



***** 


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'Chorus Line 9 Hit 
Of Film Festival 

The Associated Press 

L ONDON — The. 29th London 
* Film Festival won record at- 
tendance — and warm applause for 
a surprise screening of Sir Richard 
Attenborough's long-awaited treat- 
ment of “A Chorus Line.” 

“Everyone seemed to be very 
pleased that was the film,” the fes- 
tival press officer, CaroHne Aode- 
mais, said of “A Chorus Line,” 
which opens Jan. 10 in London. 

Organizers said the festival, with 
248 screenings, played to 77 per- 
cent capacity over 18 days. It 
opened with Akira Kurosawa's 
“Ran.” 



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Holm dang an arrangement of the 
best Cole Porter numbers from the 
“High Society” she filmed in the 
1950s, Ron Moody doing the clos- 
ing number from “Oliver” that he 
first sang 23 years ago, and Elisa- 
beth Welch doing the Jerome Kern 
standards she brought to London 
in the late 1920s. 

These are three of the great stage 
turns of all time, and it seems more 
than a little sad that they can really 
only be seen now in cabaret or at 
special one-night stands such as 
this. If Britain can support subsi- 
dized companies devoted to Shake- 
speare and Shaw, surely it ought lo 
be possible to set up. a musical 
repertoire house where the great 
scores of Hollywood. Broadway 
and the West End have a chance of 
survival for new audiences. 

Broadway has lost, for reasons of 
economy and rock-opera addic- 
tion, any real claim to be a home 
for Porter or Kern or Gershwin or 


Rodgers and Hammersiein. and 
Hollywood too now finds those 
scores untouchable. London still 
seems to have the dancers, the sing- 
ers and the actors, as wdl as a 
box-office price structure that can 
allow such shows to survive a few 
months. 

The Royal Variety Show was a 
chance to see how the current 
-running musicals are holding 
up: well enough, on balance, 
though Frankie Vaughan seems to 
be finding the dialogue a problem 
in “42nd Street” and Beryl Reid 
clearly has now token over “Gigi” 
to the' point where it has become a 
mod-aunt show like “Marne.” It 
was also a sharp remainder of how 
strong the musical- theater memory’ 
is at present, and how unwise it 
would be to let all that slip away 
after the Christmas celebrations. If 
1986 is going to be the year of 
“Chess.” I hope it might also turn 
out to be the year of “Carousel.” 


TRAVELLERS REASSURED ‘WATER 
IN BOMBA V SAFE TO DRINK'. 


Based on his long and intimate acquaintance with 
Bombay our foreign correspondent writes: 

"Of all the things that people drink in Bombay, 
water has n ever figured prominently. 

Most prefer Tonic in Bombay. Mar 
tini in Bombay or Orange in Bombay. 

Indeed, anything that one would 
usually mix in Bombay. 

But, let me assure you, 
is no need to stay clear 
of the water. 

Those rumours 
which infer that 
water does not mix 
with this most 
distinctis’e of Im- 
ported London Dry 
Gins are well and 
truly ill-founded.' 1 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1935 


INSIGHTS 



? ln Geneva, Mr. Jackson engag ed Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, in an impromptu discussion on Soviet Jews. 

Jesse Jackson Embraces the Nuances 

^LerujungTIirough Burning 9 Gives Political Preacher New Sensitivity 

!!i By Joseph Lelyveld 


G 


New York Timet Service 

ENEVA — “I simply assumed the re- 
sponsibility.*' the Reverend Jesse L. 
Jackson said in reply to a question from 
jjjie floor after a speech at a church center here. 
Jj He was not talking about his remarkab le 
stand-up encounter, in the midst of the first day 
jjrf a summit conference, with Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev. He was talking abouta visit he paid on the 
Reverend Jerry Farwell, in some respects his 
opposite number on the political scene, to make 
the case that Mr. FalweU's stance on South 
jjlfrica was un-Christian. 

J But the phrase stuck as the start of an expla- 
nation as to how and why this evangelizing 
Candidate and political preacher — the catego- 
ries inevitably blur and overlap — manages to 

^ pd himself, with increasing frequency, into 
foreign policy arena as well as the debate. To 
those who say he presumes as well as assumes. 
Jesse Jackson responds that the question of 
Where he gets his authority, his marching orders, 
is the same one that was Dung at biblical proph- 

► 

He is not without vanity, but he does not seem 
to intend an immodest analogy. Over lunch at 
his hotel on the Quai des Bergues, what he seeks 
And manages to provide are some insights into 
how his role developed, why he feds it to be 
legitimate and feds, in addition, that he has 
earned the righL to be taken a lot more seriously 
Jban he sometimes is taken. 

“You get your learning through yocr burn- 
ing," said Mr. Jackson, 44, as be body acknowl- 
edges that there were many “nuances” of drplo- 
Jpacy that passed him by in his early ventures 


M 


onto the world stage. He notes especially a trip 
to die Middle East in 1979 when he allowed 
himself to be wrapped in an embrace by Yasser 
•Arafat, the leader of the Palestine Liberation 
Organization. 

“Good God Almighty," he remembers re- 
flecting in the course of that trip, “these interna- 
tional waters are treacherous." 

R. Jackson thought be was being sensi- 
tive to the customs of the Levant when 
he returned Mr. Arafat's embrace. He 
has learned that a diplomat must be sensitive, 
first of all, to bow his gestures and actions play 
at home. 

It was a sensitivity he thinks he i 
his encounter with Mr. Gorbachev, the 
leader, whom he pressed not once but twice on 
the matter of human rights for Soviet Jews. 

For instance, he considered bringing up the 
sore point of Soviet involvement in Afghanistan 
but decided not to do so because be thought Mr. 
Gorbachev might riposte by mentioning the role 
of the United States in Central America, a 
matter on which Mr. Jackson decidedly does not 
support President Ronald Reagan. He did not 
feel free, he said, to criticize the president in the 
mids t of a summit conference. And he did not 
want to provide Mr. Gorbachev an occasion for 
“that diatribe.” 

Mentioning Soviet Jews, however, struck him 
as a moral and political imperative. “I had to 
look him in tire face and soy, ‘We care about 
human rights.’ That was important to my self- 
respect and standing as a person. Gorbachev 
had to know that be did not have some ‘dissi- 
dent,' a pro-Gorbachev guy he could ease 
through the back door. He had to know that he 
can’t leave Reagan and jump to me on the 


Montazeri, Iran’s Heir Apparent: 
AnEarthy Contrast to Khomeini 



i 


By Elaine Sciolino 

New York Times Service 

N1TED NATIONS, New York — His 
face is featured on huge posters at air- 
ports, shops and offices throughout 
Iran. The posters are equal in size to those of 
dron's leader. Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, 
•who calls him “the frail of my life.” 

• ! But Ayatollah Hussein AH Montazeri, 63, 
■who was named last month to succeed Ayatol- 
lah Khomeini after his death, hardly resembles 
■his spiritual mentor. 

Long considered the heir apparent, the 
•stocky, grizzled cleric is known for his down-to- 
^arth language and candor. Those traits are in 
fSharp contrast with the stem demeanor and 
•Convoluted pronouncements of Ayatollah Kho- 
Jmeini, who is 85. 

‘ Although Iranian press organizations refer to 
/Ayatollah Montazeri as a “grand ayatollah," he 
Jacks the lofty religious credentials of Ayatollah 
•Khomeini and the handful of other leading 
clerics who bold that honorary title. UnHke 
■them, he cannot trace his ancestry back to 
Mohammed. He is not noted for great intelli- 
gence, and his squeaky voice is often ridiculed. 

Unlike AyatoDah Khomeini, who has a rigid 
lapproach. Ayatollah Montazeri has embed his 
■early radicalism to gamer support among key 
Interest groups in Iran. 

■ At tire same time he has kept the support of 
judical elements, mainly because of his un- 
swerving commitment to spreading the m e ssage 
’of Iran's Islamic revolution to other Moslem 
nations. 


The son of a poor peasant family from the 
agricultural town of Nejafabad, in central Iran 
near Isfahan, Ayatollah Montazeri spent his 
childhood working mi the family farm. 

At 11, he went to school in the holy city of 
Qum and later to Isfahan. He stodied with 
Ayatollah Khomeini in Qum and latw taught 
philosophy there. 

T IKE many other banian AyatoDah 
I Montazeri became an enemy of Shah 
■ J Mohammed Roa Pahlavi and was im- 
prisoned and tortured at times for his political 
activities. He made secret trips to Iraq, where 
Ayatollah Khomeini was in exile, and became 
his personal representative in Iran. 

Early in the revolution, AyatoDah Montazeri 
gained a reputation as a hard-finer for his strong 
support for the summary justice of the revdn- 
tionary courts and his deep involvement in 
drafting Iran’s far-reaching land redistribution 

leader in Tehran were dismptivef^^^hcrwro 
removed from the highly visible post. 

In recent years, he has worked to defeat new 
land-redistnbution proposals and has strength- 
ened his links to the politically important bazaar 
merchants by qnqting verses from the Koran on 
the sanctity of private property. 

Ayatollah Montazeri lives in a heavily guard- 
ed house in a sealed compound in the center of 
Qum, where he teaches Islamic law and receives 
delegations of visiting dignitaries. 

He says little on matters of foreign policy and 
has been ridiculed by opponents of the regime 
for his simplistic view of the West But although 
Ire defended the lairing of the American hos- 
tages by 1 atomic militan ts in 1979, he told an 



-For U.S. Law Schools, 



By Myroa Oliver 

Let Angela Tones Service 


OS ANGELES — Carefully surveying the 
prospective law students as they wan- 
jllj deed from table to table, the recraiier 
jjfor the VQlanova University School of Law left 
tbOlhillg tO ehancp 

i Betide her stack of Chamber of Commerce 
'.maps of Philadelphia and order forms for law 
t school catalogs, she set up a small basketball 
•goal with a hill securely in the net Villanova, 
ctest any prospective lawyer forget, is the 1985 
i National Collegiate Athletic Association bas- 
ketball champion. 

fl. Such gimmicks became commonplace this fall 
;as recruiters for about 100 law schools hop- 
f scotched the country with the Law School Fo- 
il him to shore up enrollments of quality students, 
tj Over tire last two or three years, applications 
Sio the 175 law schools approved by the Anreri- 
{can Bar Association have declined nearly 20 
tjpercent, said S. Paul Richard, deputy executive 
r director of the Law School Admission Council. 
' His group sponsors the forum, which just 
i wound up its second year. 


Recruiters, law school officials and students 
interviewed in Los Angeles gave a number of 
possible reasons. 

• The last of the postwar babies are already in- 
law school and other graduate programs, and 
the number of 22-year-olds is declining. 

» The large influx of women and members of 
minority groups that spurred the profession's 
growth in recent years has stabilized. 

• When the economy is healthy, many stu- 
dents opt for high-paying jobs after college 
instead of law or graduate school 

•The widely hdd perception that the country 
has too many lawyers has discouraged students 
afraid of not finding a job. 

Finally, many suggest reluctantly, the luster 
has worn off law as a career. 

“We started our great growth in tire late ’60s,” 
said Leigh H. Taylor, dean of Southwestern 
University School of Law in Los Angeles, 
“when law was seen as a way of changing soda] 
positions, and we had another surge with 'Water- 
gate. But right now then is nothing to make a 
lawyer look glamorous, good or noble or to 


Judging the PITs: Sorry , Wrong Number 


human rights question. He can't think, ‘We can 
slide by Reagan an this question became tire 
peace movement won’t raise it' No, no, no, no.” 

That was finance, and it was not the only one 
Mr. Jackson had in mind when he confronted 
the Soviet leader. His trip to Geneva was spon- 
sored by a coalition of American anti-war 
groups, including Sane and the Nuclear Weap- 
ons Freeze Campaign, which had collected more 
than one miTtinm signatures on petitions for a 
comprehensive agreement on nu clear tests. 

Half the petitions were to go to the American 
tide at the summit meeting and half to die 
Russians. As -a courtesy, it was decided that the 
first request for an encounter with the two 
leaders should go to the Americans. Instead of 
Mr. Reagan, the delegation met a deputy assis- 
tant secretary of state. 

When the Soviet response proved to be warm- 
er, Mr. Jackson knew he had to be careful about 
tactics, but he was not afraid of bang “used.” 
Asked if that wasn’t a danger, he laughed and 
replied, “That’s happened ever since I started 
dating ho grammar school” 

He was then told that news agencyreports 
said his emphasis on the question of Soviet Jews 
bad been totally deleted from the evening televi- 
sion news in Moscow. He knew all about “selec- 
tive sound biles,” he said, because he faced 
them all the time when he tried to make a point 
about foreign policy on die evening news in 
America. 

At home, the breadth of Mr. Jackson’s social 
and political agenda has, if anything, grown 
since he sought the Democratic nomination far 
president last year, a goal that he probably will 
pursue again in 1988, ms associates in the Unit- 
ed States have said 


Jacques Dannon, Bureaucrat Ti 

By Joseph Fitchett 

International Herald Tribune . 

P ARIS ■ — Not everybody is convinced 
that for the sake of progress West Euro- 
pean governments wHlghneup their PTT 
monopolies. 

“Most people esjrect the new technology will 
shatter the PITs, hut I wonder how andtpOTer 
the PITs win fight to retain," says Jacques 
Dannon, a French technocrat campaigning to 
change the monopoly status of European phone 
systems. . 

Other experts have even greater doubts. “Po- 
litically, ft’s going to be mmd-boggimgly diffi- 
cult,” said a participant at aEnrope&n telecom- 
munications meeting last- month at the 
Organization for Economic Cooperation and 
Development 

“The real switch has been that the FIT S now 
recognize they have far-reaching impact on their 
countries’ economies,” said the participant. 

“Before, they would simply say that the OECD 
should not even be discussing them and their 
economic role.” 

Hints of change are mowing in Europe. 

In West Germany, Christian Schwarz-Schil- 
ting, minister of posts and telecommunications, 
is said to concede privately that more flexibility 
is needed. In France, Jacques Dondotn, head of 
die Direction G6n£rale des T6l6commnni ca- 
tions, the telecommunications arm of the PTT, 
reportedly has prepared contingency plans for 
naming a separate stale-owned company rather 
than a public-service agency. “We’d like to get 

rid pf T n i m ' i tftri n l jrniI mrTTg Anri me ntir asset*. In 

compete,” says a Dondoux aide: 

. But there is no consensus about how to 
change a century-old system in Europe. Mr. 

Dannon argues for the introduction of maxi- 
mum flf w npgritwi His model is Britain', which 
last year turned British Telecom into a private 
company, with- a regulatory agency, Oftd, en- 
couraging competition. 

“By giving up their monopoly, governments 
lose a useful tod,” Mr. Daemon says. “But the 
economy gains tremendously because you get 
fresh activities and fresh competition.” 

Mr. Daemon, who is 45. left France's Industry 
Ministry in 1979 and joined Thomson, the 
French electronics manufacturer, winch was na- 
tionalized in 1981. In a book this fall, “Le 
Grand Derangement: La Guerre du TH6- 
phane,” or “Out of Order: The Telephone 


n*i r vi 


Executive, Leads Fight for Competition 



Jacques Dannon 


War;” be set out the views of the main conserva- 
tive opposition parties, which have pledged to 
deregulate France's telephones if they win par- 
liamentary ejections next March. 

T HE outcome in France will have reper- 
cussions beyond its borders, Mr. Dar- 
mon contends. Tt will tip the European 
balance.” 

Led by Britain, a liberalizing trend toward 
more competition is gaining adherents in the 
N etherlands, Ireland, Norway, Finland and, 
timidly, Switzerland — all smaB countries that 
do not- have major phone industries dependent 
on die state monopoly for business. 

. “If France followed,” Mr. Dannon says, “it 
would put strong competitive pressure on the 
conservative bloc led by West Germany, which 
includes Austria and Sweden, with Italy and 
Spain wavering somewhere in the middle.” 

His views about the urgency of drastically 
cutting die. role. rtf’. European gn wmmmts in 
telecommunications draw on his experience as a 
civil servant and as a corporate executive. 

“When companies, like so many in France, 
make more money by negotiating subsidies 


by pseudo-bureaucrats, not competitive manag- 
ere," Mr. Dannon rays. 

His view that local suppliers have become * 
powerful lobby supporting the nationalistic. 
FITs is confirmed by comments from govern- 
ment officials. The French PTT is so embed- 
ded in our industrial tissue, it would be difficult 

to remove it from state control rays Jacques, 

Altali, an adviser to France's president. 

The PTTs succeeded in gening their monopo- 
lies exempted from the free-trade rules of the 
General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, the 
Geneva-based watchdog on world trade. The 
EC Commission in Brussels has been pressing to 
break up the PTTs. but emissaries from Brussels 
lack the clout to overcome domestic lobbies in 
the member states," notes an EC official. 

P OLITICAL support for PTTs is rooted 
among voters. The Bundespost, for ex- 
ample. is West Germany's biggest em- 
ployer, with 500.000 employees and nearly that 
many people on the retirement roll 

If Europe deregulates in a piecemeal fashion, 
it is liable to miss the “big bang" effect of. 
economic stimulus provided by the break-up of 
monopolies in big markets such as the United 
States and Japan, notes Ann Reid, a telecom- 
munications specialist at the Organization for 
Economic Cooperatio n an d Development. Mr. 
Dannon prirU, The PTTs will try to keep then- 
monopoly over the carrier network, so we won t 
be as competitive as the United States.” 

An obstacle to liberalization, in the view of 
many advocates, is that European consumers 
are not organized in effective pressure groups to 
defend their interests. The best-organized cor- 
porate pressure group, the British-based Inter- 
national Telecommunications User's Group, 
prefers discreet tactics, unlike the forceful busi- 
ness lobbying that led to U.S. deregulation. 

As a result, the institutional voice of the PTTs 
has prevailed. “The key is with European busi- 
ness, which needs to be more vocal about its 
needs," Mr. Dannon says. 

Asked how Europe's phone-makers are likely 
to fare if they are thrust into a deregulated, more 
competitive world, Mr. Dannon says: “If you 
rfiangi- (be rales, new, more entrepreneurial 
managers mil rise to the top fast.” 



A group of busuMssmen in New York participating u a teleconference with tbeir colleagues in Paris. ' 

Next Revolution Centers on the Phone 


Sr^ma- 


AaodiMd ftwi 

Ayatollah Hussein AH Montazeri 

Interviewer that it was “impractical to sever 
relations between ns and the United States.” 

He occasionally has shown an independent 
interpretation of events. When several Iranian 
leaders described Iraq’s bombing of an Iranian 
border town early this year as “a new crime of 
American impe rialism ” Ayatollah Montazeri 

saw the event differently. He said the missiles 
were made in the Soviet Union. 


(Conthned from Page 1) 

many corporations based in Paris routed trans- 
Atlantic calls through their Loudon offices to 
take advantage of Britain’s cheaper rates. In 
Bdj ~ 

the United States 
does to place the call via 

Another kind of problem is po litical interfer- 
ence with the governmental PTTs. This year, the 
French govern m ent is diverting I5.o billion 
francs (about S2 bflKon) of telephone earnings 
to other sectors. 

“Yet anew wave of investments at all levds is 
needed to develop modern, low-cost and effec- 
tive communication services in Europe,” notes 
the Round Table of Eu rope an fadnstriaHsts. •; 

Western Europe’s PTTs do not lack teebno- 
Jogical strengths, but the technology tends tobe 
yesterday's or even today's, bnt not to morro w's. 

La October, for sample, the French FIT was 
aedahned after it changed the country’s phone 
numbers overnight to an eight-digit system that 
doubled capacity. . 

In the d ays le ading up to the switch, Denis 
Fraysse, a TIT engineer, sat in a toadstool- 
shaped concrete tower in the Beds de Boulogne 
in Paris, watching a bank of computer screens 
that showed technicolor maps of the main tele- 
phone regions in France. 

With & itingwirfin computers, Mr. Fraysse 
was rherimp for possible hitches in. the opera-; 
tioo, which cost $600 m illion and took five' 
yeanf preparatory work. PTT technicians re- 
wind aremte in the nation 1 * TOfiOO rid electro- 
mechanical exchanges and programmed com- 
puter software in TO, 000 new etectroic phone 


scriberx to shop 'from home or read the latest 
headlines at any hour. These are both conve- 
nient services in a country that lacks Sunday 
shopping and around-the-clock television. 

Even mare successful is France’s hfimtd, a 
small screen a nd ke yboard that attaches to a 
telephone. The PTT has installed 12 million of 
there machines free and expects to supply nearly 
-2 mflHbn more by the end of next year. 

Muritd, which offers 2,600 services ranging 
from computer dating to airline bookings to 
access to statistics in data banks, is dose to 
traffic to pay for the free 
Tt has been quite , a successful 


show that law is intellectually and socially re- 
warding.”' . 

T HE decline hits harder at smaller and less 
prestigious schools and on those in less 
populated areas of the Midwest. 

Because only about 70 percent of applicants 
are accepted into law schools, no institution has 
had to dose its doors or resort to open enrofl- 
ment, in Much every applicant is admitted. 

The Law School Forum was instituted to 
ward off such catastrophes, after educators be- 
came alarmed by the dwindling number of ap- 
plicants. The thought was that by placing in- 
formation in the- hands of undergraduate 
students, we could attract more appHcaits,” Mr. 
Richard said. 

About 100 law schools dhqnised brochures, 
app licatio n s and advice during the 1985 forum 
to about 3 ,000 prospective lawycra in New York 
Guy, 1,600 in Chicago, 2,000 in Boston and 
1,500 in Los Angeles. 

With about 40,000 slots available, Mr. Rich- 
ard a peak of 72^)1 1 students applied to 
law schools approved by the bar association in 
1982. But applications fell to 71,755 in 1983, 
64,100 m 1984 and 60,132 this fal 


On. the day of the big switchover, Mr. Fraysse^ 
using his computer keyboard, probed the na- 
tion’s phene network, verifying new numbers 
and monitoring the electronic that are 

the pulse of modern digital-dialing systems. 
Region by region, the computer display maps 
tamed from red to green, signaling all dear. 

Late cm Oct 25, a Friday night when (dame 
traffic was light, the system switched at the push 
of a button. By Saturiay lunchtime, the biggest 

changB of its kind was untiling mo re- than ft 

footnote in technical history. 

The feat typified the technological accom- 
plishments of PTTs in the century, since the 


m the United States in 1876. Still, Mr, Fraysse 
was the first to acknowledge that “the operation 
could have been done faster, if ueceanry; by a 
private company operating under commercial 
pressures.” ' . : - 

The potential of Weston Europe’s private 
and statfrowned tdec nm mnmc a tion s compa- 
nies is directly finked to -FITs, whkfc-tiaw 
traditionally directed these companies design 
and commercial policies. . 

Helping them to export, particularly fo devd- ■ 
oping countries including missy formercolonies 
in Africa and -Asia, tire PTTs have enabled 
Europe to gain a25-peroent share of world trade , 
in phone equipment In contrast to Ejaoite’s 
trade deficit in most high-technology “Fo- 
ment, the European Comnamity recorded a $2- 
bflKon surplus' in telw w rtirm m nations equip- 
ment last year: ' - 

Thanks to PITs, Europe is also much better 
served than the United States or Japan in video-. " 

tex, a system of providing information services 
to homes and offices on a tdeviskn screen 
through the telephone. . . . 

The first version of videotex, Prestd, was 
laun c hed in Britain is 1977, enabEmg sob- 


says die Paris-based Mr. Cassani of IBM. The 
company's “West German subsidiary set up the 
Bundespbsfs equivalent which is known as 
Bfldsdrinntcxt 

The trouble is that the taste of new technol- 
ogies has created tbe appetite far more technol- 
ogy, much mare than any conservative PTT is 
Bcdy to supply. -. 

• “Only competition can enable countries to 
dope with the challenges and opportunities of 
rapid technological change in modem tdecom- 
muoRationsT ays Henry JEigais, a top planner 
with theOECD, winch groups the leading non- 
ri fl j ^ Tmin igt industrial nations. 

Competitionis slight throughout Western Eu- 
rope smee there are .few oppcatnmties for anall 
private enterprises; most countries get their 
phone equipment from ooe-or two domestic 
-suppliers. 

*we don't get many proposals for new trie- 
comprodnctsandwedcn'tccmsiderthcc nesw e 
do get because we would have to buck, tbe PTT,” 
explains a leading venture capitalist hi Paris. He 
asked not to to identified. 

Businessmen are pressing for change. Some 
multinational corporations now have private 
phone systems, using microwave relays, that are 
larger man all the combmed pubEc networks in 
the 1960s. An' uncompetitive phone industry, 
evayome agrees, han<Ecap& the whote business 
community. , ' ; 

■ In addition to seeking cheaper phone services, 
many busmesres want to seJLnew tdeommnnm-. 
-.cations products: Nixdarf, West Germany’s 
fastest growing computer company, had to wait 
seven .years for Bundespost authorization to 
market an electronic corporate switchboard. 
Called aprivate branch exchange, or FBX. Heinz 
Nixdoif, tbe company’s Founder and president, 
has publicly accused the Bundespost of “bann- 
ing the interests at German industry." • 

* Industrial firms' want 'fines, linking tire com- 
puter consoles in their showrooms to thdr fao- 
. tones and head offices. Eqmynem' to do fids s 
slowly- becoming available m Europe but is 
akeady instdkidm Japan arid the United States,' 
where there arc no PTTs to impede its use. 

The potential impact of the new technology is 
Olnsfrated by the replacement of copper wires 
with Sber : optics. These hair-fine glass tribes 
cany messages as laser flashes, -a. technology 
that multiphes the lute's capacity a thousand 
times. . A fiber-optics cabk being laid now wifl. 
double; this capacity of coasting trans-Atlantic 

With extra capacity, morc computers and 
advanced software, tele pho ne s are becoming 
d^tal— -carrying conversations by breaking dp 
speech- into imDious.of bits 

are reconstituted at the receiving end. Previous, 
ty, speech was carried alopg wires by electric 
waves that r^icated the sounds of the voice. , 

Ua n^d igpalizatkm, compotes, winch o^g- 


data with human conversations on a single 
phone line. 

This development has prompted industrial 
nations to start planning a universal phone 
system capable of carrying, at the same time, 
conversations and data flows, facsimile trans- 
missions and possibly television. 

Such a system, known as the Integrated Ser- 
vices Digital Network, or ISDN, is “the key to 
the information society,” says Michel Carpen- 
tier, who is based in Brussels as head of the 
European Community Commission's Task 
Force on Information Technologies. 

This system would make possible the long- 
heralded “office rtf the future," in which every 
desk has a console combining phone and com- 
puter keyboard, and screen. Equipped with an 
array of accessories, this console would let peo- 
ple communicate around the globe, lo oking at 
the same documents and working on them to- 
gether almost as easily as if they were in the 
same room. 

Japan has started work on this system but 
Europeans are stiD discussing it Mr.. Carpen- 
tier’s task force has launched a pr o gr a m, RACE, 
for Research and Development in Advanced 
Communication Technology for Europe: 

To build a high-speed network, European 
countries have to adopt uniform technologies to 
supplant the different national systems devel- 
oped by the FITs. Resistance is strong. 

“Eventually, they will have to cooperate.” 
Mr. Carpentrer contends, “because the bigb- 
speed digital network will overwhelm anyinlcs- 
race.” He was referring to the software systems 
mat allow international calls to shift from one 
natioo’s technology to another’s. 1 

While. seeking a common standard for “tbe 
office of the future," European governments 
have agreed to freeze technological At 

the he art of the quarrel is European electronics 
companies’ desire to impose tbeir own comput- 
er -to-com puter language, called Open -Systems 
mtereonnect, to help protect them against IBM, 
wwse computer language is called Standard 
Network Architecture. 

Meanwhile, -Europe is losing m omentum in 
laying fiber-optics cable because, as one of Mr. 
Gupento-s aides says, “European nations 

080 t ^^ sn ^^ mvestmHlt snghtnow”As 
a result, Europe probably will devdop -in 10 
years’ tune what engineers call a “small ISDN" 
capable of handling conversations and camput- 
er data, but not television transmissionJ on the 
same wire. 

. A more pressing issue for 
coittMuaies is the equipment 
rfHTsTJqy nowbuy an' average of only 2 
fKm snH,Bns 

. As a result, “Tbere are trine com puni** 
^^d^swftches, with a very heavy 
search and development cost, while there is 

^J^^tbemaxltetfOTfouratinosL‘‘savs 
ej*aromcs manufacturer flat is the largest in 


bidding, it 


Europe. 
If the] 



tf flie FTTs open up to uha 

will be a risky transition for j 

"od'd-dass firms: 

Phffi P s “ Ne *- 


(tott V 
AT&T.) 


Euptjpe cn ugjkt between IBM and 



r 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1985 



Page 9 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


ADVERTISING SECTION 




A look at some of the latest developments 
which have brought renewed confidence 
to one of the smaller members of the United Arab Emirates. 



Emirate in a 
Growth Pattern 

Come to Sharjah and you'll be greeted eve r ywh ere by the large- 
pent exhortation to "Smile! You’re in Sharjah.** And there is 
plenty to smile about in Sharjah these days. 

Look around From the humble municipal gardener planting 
saplings in the attra c t i v e road-center gardens to the businessmen 
chasing capital-intensive oil-based projects, you’ll find intensive 
activity in civil works and in commerdal and industrial programs. 

Confidence is founded — and rightly so — on the Sajaa gas 
field, which provides an income from royalties and petroleum tax 
of around 1.3 billion dirhams a year. This income will increase in 
1986 when a pipeline project for carrying die gas from die Sajaa 
field to industrial Installations in Dubai's Jebd All port and 
industrial free-trade zone is completed 

The 75-kUometcr pipeline is bong built by a Greek contractor 
and ar least 70 million cubic foot a day of gas arc expected to be 
used in Jebel AIL, generating an*income of around $25 million a 
year to the emirate. 

In November 1978, the Amoco Sharjah Oil Ox, a subsidiary of 
the Standard Oil Company of Indiana, was awarded a concession 
for a period of 35 years covering 600,000 acres onshore in Sharjah. 
Lace in 1980 Amoco discovered a gas condensate reservoir of 
commercial proportions in what is now known as the Sajaa field 
- In 1984, seven additional producing wells were completed in the 
field and that brought the total number of production wells 
connected to die Sajaa separation plant to 16, including 15 Sajaa 
wells and one in the nearby Moveydd field 

Another somce of revenue in 1986 wifi be a liquefied petroleum 
gas plant at Hamriya. The plant, expected to come into production 
in June; will have an annual capacity of 400^X30 tons of butane and 
propane. The plane will take around 80 million cubic feet of Sajaa 
gas a day, worth about $50 million a year to the emirate. 

. The plant is being established by the Sharjah Liquefied Gas 
Company (Shalco), which is owned 60 percent by die Sharjah 
gover nm ent, 25 percent by Amoco and 7.5 percent by the Japanese 
JGC Corporation and Tokyo BockL 

Ac present; only the Emirates General Petroleum Corporation 
(EGPC) is using Sajaa’s gas — about 80 million cubic feet daily -fra; 
distribution to power and industrial plants in the northern emir- 
ates. It is expected to increase liftings once the distribution 
network is expanded 

Sharjah is negotiating agreements for two petrochemical pro- 
jects — a 1,000 ton per day ammonia/ urea plant and a 500,000 can 
per year methanol complex, both using Sajaa gas as feedstock. 

The government will have majority shares in both projects but 
foreign partners will be invited to share financing and marketing. 
Saudi, British, American and French interests are involved in the 
negotiations. 

Sajaa feedstock could also go to the Abu Dhabi Gas Industries 
(Gasco) natural-gas liquids plant ar Ruwais. The latter has an 
annual capacity of propane, butane and pentane but has rarely run 
at mare than 50 percent of capacity because of a shortage of 
feedstock. 

Tbe Sharjah government is also studying an Indian proposal to 
set up a sponge iron plant to run on natural gas. A feasibility report 



Expo Center 

Attracts Global 
Traders 


View of the King Faisal Mosque in the heart of Sharjah. Muslims gather to pray and learn about Islam here. 


has been submitted The proposed plane will have an annual 
capacity of one million ions a yean 

The discovery of the Sajaa field has deariy brightened Sharjah’s 
economic prospects. 

There are currently 142 factories in Sharjah. The municipality 
issued 1,157 commerdal, professional and industrial licences last 
year. Tbe department also issued 84l licences for building construc- 
tion — 245 for Arab houses, 337 for villas, 40 for multi-storied 
buildings and 119 for industrial establishments. 

The Sharjah Chamber of Commerce and Industry had 15,703 
members ar latest count. Last year, 1,939 new members were 
registered 

Several large public-works projects are under way, some financed 
by tbe federal government and some by the Sharjah government: 
The federal budget for investment in the .emirate last year was 158.3 
million dirhams but only 103.6 million were used 

Among the projects were schools, mosques, hospitals, houses 
and roads including flyovers and underpasses. Ar Dibba A1 HIsn on 
the cast coast, a fishing port is being built which will provide 
additional income for the area's rural inhabitants. Ocher fishing 
harbors will be created ar A1 Haira and on Sir Abu Nuair island 
about 120 kilometers east of Sharjah city. 

Extensive landscaping in urban areas is under way and several 
public parks are under construction. 

A new feature of the Sharjah scene is a 5 million dirham 
fountain in the Khalid lagoon. This spout, which shoots up to 100 
meters, has earned a place in the Guincss Book of Records as the 
world’s highest fountain. 

The Sharjah souk is already famous for its architectural splendor 
and it will soon be joined by a smaller shopping area near the 
waterfront. This is expected to be completed in early 1986. 


Long before Sharjah emerged as 
the tourist leader in the United 
Arab Emirates, irs greatest at- 
traction was its colorful World 
Trade & Expo Center, recently 
described by an international 
trade journal as "the compre- 
hensive shop-window of the 
Arab world” 

The Expo Center has staged 
an average of seven national 
and international exhibitions 
annually, each attracting mote 
than 150,000 visitors over a pe- 
riod of about ten days — cer- 
tainly the highest exhibition at- 
tendance in the Arab world 

A few years ago. Emirates 
News, the English-language 
daily newspaper based in Abu 
Dhabi, warned a nearby exhibi- 
tion competitor chat its annual 
fair, stocked with products at 


Sharjah covers an area of approximately 2ft00 square kilometers 
and tbe population has been estimated at over 170,000. Approxi- 
mately 30 percent are nationals with the rest coming mainly from 
other Arab states and the Indian subcontinent. 

Agriculture and horticulture are being developed but there are 
irrigation problems. Experts .have pointed out that underground 
reserves of water ate being depicted by tbe rapid extension of 
irrigated areas and thar conservation must be given priority. 

The best farming projects may be seen ar Dhaid, where several 
enterprising United Arab Emirates nationals, cooperating with 
European and other experr institutions, have covered large areas 
with air-conditioned, moisnirc-con trolled and soil -enriched green- 
houses. These private-sector "bums” now supply the local markets 
with tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce, melons and ocher produce as 
well as such flowers as chrysanthemums. 

Egg fanning has spread over tbe years and there are ready 
markets in Sharjah Gey, Dubai, Abu D*“>bi and other fresh-egg 
cent e r s . 

Despite the harsh dimarc and the huge expenditure erf capital 
required farming docs exist. Date palms — a traditional Arab 
agricultural crop — arc becoming more common in regions which 
were once just desert scrub. Here again, the Dhaib area has the best 
development plans, as row after row of palms stand there in various 
stages of growth. 

There are also okra beds and animals. Chickens, turkeys, deer, 
cattle, sheep, camels and horses are all to be found not only in 
Sharjah but throughout the United Arab Emirates. 

British agriculturist John Thomelou believes thar by producing 
about 26 percent of its food requirements, the United Arab 
Emirates is now well on its way to self-suffidency. 


tenrial exhibitors must carefully 
weigh the marketing impact of 
competing exhibition centers 
and more importantly, the cost 
of booking space. 

Fame brings its rewards. On 
December 26, 1984, Expo Cen- 
ter Sharjah was the site of the 
first Arab States’ Fair sponsored 
by the various chambers of 
commerce and industry in the 
Gulf and other Middle Eastern 
countries. 

In competition with at least 
five regional rivals and numer- 
ous hotels for the prestigious 
contract. Sharjah's Center was 
the unanimous choice of the 
organizers. 

The same sponsors dedded 
to follow the December show 
with a large week-long Arab 
nations' trade and industry ex- 



Shorjah Expo Center President Frederick Pittera, left, 
with Turkish President Kevin Evren, right 


"bargain prices,” might find 
the cheapness "not all that use- 
ful for the thousands, who have 
already exhausted their shop- 
ping funds ar the Sharjah fair 
held earlier this month." 

That just about sums up the 
Gulf exhibition situation today. 
The biggest problem of com- 
petitors new to the region is die 
fame of the long-established 
Expo Center. Especially during 
times of general recession, po- 


hibirion in January. It was 
called an "outstanding success” 
Best known of the Expo 
Center fairs is the annual Inter- 
national Expo event. At last 
year’s show — the eighth — 
exhibitors came from more 
than 40 countries, with Austria 
booking most space. It dis- 
played a galaxy erf widely diver- 
sified products, everything 
from jewelry to heavy maririn- 
( Continued on next page) 



Minding your business 

The National Bank of Sharjah can help your business grow and 
expand by providing the commercial and retail banking services you 
need. 

Over the years, we have been playing an increasingly active role in 
the development and advancement of not only Sharjah, but of the 
UAE as a whole. We are well equipped to do so. Because we are able 
to offer ail the benefits of a local bank, together with the support of our 
extensive international connections and correspondents. 

Let us make your business our business. The sky is the limit. Move 
through the ’80s with the National Bank of Sharjah. 

Authorised capital Dirhams 500,000,000 

Paid up capital Dirhams 260,000,000 

Shareholders funds in excess of Dirhams 310,000,000 



NATIONAL BANK OF SHARIAH 

The local bank with extensive ntemattond conecfions 
Hrad Office and Man Branch Al Boq Avenue. 
P.O.Box 4, Start*, UAE 
Tel: 547745 (16 kies) Telex: 65065 NATBNK EM 

Gordon D.Abemefty 
Aslam Majid 
Ibrahim Abu 
Joseph! 

Baton I 


Assistant Gerard Manager 
Assistant General Manager 
Manager Operations: 



Sharjah New Souk Branch, Manager Mr. Khawaia Ahmaduddm, 

P.0. Box 4. Sharjah. UAE Tel: 355872/3 

Khor Fakkan Branch, Manager Mr. Ra* Ahmed 
P.0. Box 10308, Khor Fakkan, UAE Tel: 85735® 

Abu Dhabi Branch, Manager Mr. Mohd. Hube^il 

P.0. Box 7650, Abu Dhabi. UAE Tel: 820588/822012 Telex: 23807 BANKSHA EM 

AlArooba Branch Manager Mr MohdYotsut 
P 0. Box 4, Sharjah, UAE Tel: 355521/3 


Dibba Branch Manager Mukhter Alem 

P.0. Box 1 2005, DKa Al Ken. UAE Tel: 44295 


Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4*1985 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


■ (Condmcdfivm previous page) 
ay. International Expo '85, 
which comes to a dose Decem- 
ber 8, features exhibitors from 
more than 30 countries. 

Much has been written in 
the press and in the trade jour- 
nals of the advantages of gener- 
al (horizontal) and specialized 
(vertical) exhibitions. From the 
'beginning, Sharjah's Center has 
■been a proponent of the general 
fair Business opinion — in the 
Arab world at least — has come 
down firmly on the side of the 
general, or multi-pavilion, type 
of show that has earned Sharjah 
. its reputation as the pivot of the 
. Gulf exhibition world. 

Frederick P. Pittcra, the pres- 

■ idem: and managing director of 


the Expo Cenrer, and its 
founder, has always been a 
"general exhibition man.” 

"The horizontal fair is the 
only type of event compatible 
with the needs and echos of the 
Arabian trading region," Pic* 
ccra said in a recent interview. 
"We muse always consider that 
the Arab traditional trade 
springs from the country -fair 
style of the oriental market*, 
place. After all, the Arabs were . 
among the first in history to 
organize fairs at the crossroads 
of the great caravan routes. 
This trading pattern has sur- 
vived despite attempts at west- 
ernization. The Arab merchant 
today is a multi-specialist. No- 
where in the world is trade 


diversification so ardently fol- 
lowed as in the Arab world" 
"Thus, the dunces of at- 
tracting the trade to chevertical 
or specialized fair are slim ” 
Pittoa said "In this region, 
general fairs — national, re- 
gional a international — fit 
tiie Arab partem and, at Expo 
Center, we long ago reached the 
stage when we could guarantee 
all-around success at any gener- 
al exhibition. In traditional 
style, our fairs are flowing, 
moving events. .They are not 
hammered down to meet one- 
product specialists, who are as 
cue hereabouts as the proverbi- 
al needle in the haystack. We 
have always exposed the Expo 
Cenrer to the cultural identity 


of the people it serves. It has 
paid big dividends worldwide.” 
Adherence to tradition has 


thus far outweighed the comt 


noon of the vertical exhit 


rions. Cost, too, has played a 
major role, especially during re- . 


major role, especially during re- . 
cent recessionary rimes — cost 
and impact and the facilities 
offered 

Pittcra says the success of the 
Expo Center has been achieved 
by the one-price comprehensive 
services provided for exhibitors 
arriving from faraway coun- 
tries. Furthermore, be adds, the 
great complex of pavilions 
available for any cvenr has been 
the magnet to attract success. 

One-price operations banish 
the specter of subcontractors 


Under :he patronage of 

H.H. Shaikh Sultan Bin Mohammed Al Qasimi 

Member of the Suore-me Council of the UAE and Ruler or Sharjah. 


WORLD TRADE & 

EXPO CENTRE 

Sharjah, United Arab Emirates. 

The No.1 Exhibition Centre in the Arab World 



Unanimously elected as the venue for the first major food and industry exhibitions by 

• The Arab Federation of Food Industries, Baghdad 

• The Federation of the UAE Chambers of Commerce and Industry 

• The Arab Federation of Chambers of Commerce. 

Industry & Agriculture, Dammam. Saudi Arabia 


Upcoming International Fairs: Jan. to April, 1986 


Arab Asia Fail* Jan 27- Feb 9 

Designed and staged to meet the industrial and consumer needs of 

the lucrative Arab world. 

Gulf International Trade Fair April 1-13 

Organised to attract buyers from the capital-surplus Arab Gulf Co-operative 
Council countries of Saudi Arabia. Kuwait, Bahrain. Qatar. Oman and the UAE 


and extra cost, explains Pittcra. 
"That's the Sharjah distinction 
rhar rrakry us unique in the 
whole of the Middle East. We 
have all the exhibition equip- 
ment, materials, theatrical 
props and expert personnel in- 
house. This means we can pass 
on big savings to participants in 
oar shows.” 

Other centers have to sub- 
contract, thus building- up 
costs. This gives the Expo Cen- 
ter a decided advantage in at- 
tracting diene worldwide: An- 
other asset is the availability of 
space for mammoth spectacu- 
lars, which can call on the larg- 
est warehouse of exhibition 
equipment in the Middle East. 

The Genoa’s gaily colored 
poviliqns have long been a land- 
mark in Sharjah. There are 
more chan seven of them; the . 
Largest has a stand area of 
2^67.67 square meters. In addi- 
tion, its Super Dome can. ac- 
commodate a seared audience of 
6^00 persons for major cultural 
and entertainment attractions. 

A vast outside space and a 
large are available for 

staging arcuses or shows with 
casts (5 hundreds. For the chil- 
dren there is Expo Center Fun- 
hnd and, for all visitors or ex- 
hibitors, a wide variety- of 
restaurants and snack bars. 

In the future — the date has 
yet to be fixed — the Expo 
Center will be moving to a new 
and larger ate in Sharjah. There 
the available space will be from 
15,000 to .17,000 square meters 
with more than 20,000 square 
meters available outside the pa- 
vilions and theater. The infra- 
structure has yet co be prepared 
and so, for the present, the 
Expo Center remains arits well- 
known location dose to the 
busy business heart of Sharjah. 

The policy of the Center, 
whose chairman is tourist chief 
Sheikh Ahmed bin Mohammed 
al Qarimi, is to encourage peo- 


ple to operate a succesful mar- 
ket in the region, to set up 


And be a participant in the most effective sales forum at the lowest 
gq^-sss^space rates in the Middle East. Fully integrated utilities, fittings. exhibition 


services with shell scheme stands and more incorporated in the cost. 
Don't miss this unprecedented opportunity to exhibit your products in the Arab Gulf. 





Write., telex or telephone 

EXHIBITION MANAGEMENT COMPANY 

p O Box 3222 ■ S^agah U'vee Arab T el eon one 009716- 35S633. telex 68306 EXPO E'. 1 


kec in the region, to sec up 
agencies, co sign up for joinr 
ventures and do expand busi- 
ness nationally and internation- 
ally. 

In the Islamic world, the 
Center is the only exhibition 
ate to have its own mosque — 
a thntighrfu l innovation that 
has brought much praise from, 
exhibitors and visitors alike., 

In 1986, new space rates will 
be offered which, according co 
Pitted, will make Sharjah's 
Expo Center the most effective 
exhibition center in the whole 
of the Middle East. 

Much of die success of the 
Expo Center has been due to 
the support it has received from 
the Rtuer of Sharjah, Sheikh 
Sultan bin Mohamed al Qasimi, 
a member of the United Arab 
Emirates Supreme Council. The 
Qasimi -connection has helped 
die Center tx> attract widespread 
participation from exhibitors in 
the And) world and beyond. 
The chairman. Sheikh Ahmed, 
was named by the Ruler as the 
head of the Department of In- 
formation. Culture and Tour- 
ism. 

... There has also been active 
and cooperative support from 
the Sharjah Chamber of Com- 
merce and Industry and from . 
national business organizations. 


TRANSFORMING RESOURCES 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


Firmer Base for 
Mini “Wail Street” 


A syndicated loan of $105 mil- 
lion was recently extended to 
Sharjah far die oonscrocrioa of 
desalination units at a major 
: power station. - The . five-year 
loan — the first of that impor- 
tance tio be ntgooaoKlby Shar- 
jah— proves chat the emirate 
has die confidence of Che inter- 
national money market 

Several joint-stock compa- 


This year, however, the solid 
foundation of the emirate’s new 
onshore gas industry has 
spurred a move toward a new 
era of growth and prosperity. 

The fortunes of Sharjah, die 
third largest of the seven emir- 
ates rhar comprise the United 
Arab ■Emirates, took a turn for 
thebetter in 19S0 when a mas- 
sive gas condensate discovery 


In addition to the banks, 
many finance companies, com- 
mercial houses and government 
departments have moved to 
Boorj Avenue. Recent sacristies 
show that 50 banks are located 
in the emirate, 18 of which are 
national and 32 foreign. Total 
budgets of the banks increased 
from 31.35 billion in 1980 to 
$2.14 billion in 1982. 



A l Boorj 'Avenue, site of most of "Sharjah's banks and commercial organizations. 


tries have made inroads in 1985, 
and die revival of bonnes ac- 
tivity has been accompanied by 
a considerable increase in the 
circulation of money and the 
sale and purchase of stocks. 

National as well as interna- 
tional opinion is' confident in 
Sharjah’s ahility to tide our the 
recession. Indeed; the past few 
yeas have undoubtedly been 
lean, to the point that some 
large companies — and many 
small ones — have collapsed. 


was made onshore. Since then, 
the economic strength of the 
i-mirauft tva< been acknowledged 
by the world’s money markets 
and the major international 
banks. 

The emirate h« its own 
"Wall Street": the elegant 
Boorj Avenue in Sharjah City. 
Most of die banks are to be 
found there They include the 
National Bank of Sharjah, the 
Bank of Sharjah, Investbank 
and the United Arab Bank, 


A survey of the industrial 
sector by the Sharjah Economic 
Department revealed that the 
value of investments in that 
sector rose from $71.23 million 
in 1976 to $188.50 million in 
1980 — an increase of 164 per- 
cent. Since then, both the num- 
ber of industries and the value 
of investments have tripled. 


British Bank 
Services 


The Britidi association with 
Sharjah has been a long one, 
. and it is therefore not surpris- 
ing that the biggest and the 
oldest foreign bank in the Unit- 
ed Arab Emirates is the British. 
Bank - of the Middle East 
(BBME), which opened an of- 
fice in Sharjah in 19537 Ar one 
rime, the BBME had 29 
branches in the country — 
there arc now only right. 

The chief executive officer in 
the United Arab Emirates, 
D.W. Paterson, s tr e s se s chat 
the BBME has a "very positive” 
approach to. recruiting U-AJE. 

. nationals do work in the bonk. 
"Wc do want' to increase our 
national intake,” he says, point- 
ing out char the BBME looks co 
the University of the UJLE. in 
Al Ain for future executive staff 
and to school-leavers for lower- 
level employees. 

The bank has established its 
own training .center, and pupils 
come from all over the Arab 
weald, including Jordan and 
Egypt. Training is given in 
computerization, audit and oth- 
er banking practices. . 


Commenting on business 
prospects for 1986, Paterson 
says: "There is a downturn at 
the moment, although as far as 
Sharjah is concerned there has 
been a shot in the arm through 
the discovery of the large gas 
finds in Sajaa and Mawa'eid 
fields.” ; i- - • : 

The BBME, says Paterson, is 
not only "keeping up with the 
time but is going ah ea d of the 
rimes.” 

Among chc space-age aids to 
easy banking, the BBME has 
installed the automated teller 
machine (ATM), which pro- 
vides a 24-hour instant cash- 
withdrawal and deposit: facility. 
These machines, connected 
through the bank’s electronic 
data communication channel, 
operate ac a very high speed 
.Complex* financial arrange- 
ments can be transmitted 
through chc system in a fraction 
of a second 

.Similarly, the bank is now 
seeking to expand its computer- 
ized services and all branches* 
will be equipped with chc latest 
technological equipment. 


Other United Arab Emirates 
national banks with branches in 
Sharjah are: National Bonk of 
Abu Dhabi, National Bonk of 
Dubai, National Bank of Ras 
Al Khaimah, and National 
Bank of Umm Al Qaiwain. 

Other banks include Arab 
Bank Ltd, Bank of the Arab 
Coast, Bonk of Credit & Com- 
merce (Emirates), Bank Melli 
Iran, Bank of Oman, Bank Sa- 
derat Iran, Banque du Cairn, 
Banque du Liban et d’Oucre 
Met, Banque Indasuez, Banque 
Libanaise pour lc Commerce, 
Barclays Bank International, 
British Bank of the Middle 
East, Chartered Bank, Citibank 
NA, Commercial Bank of Du- 
bai, Dubai Bank (now parr of 
the Union Bonk of the Middle 
Ease), Federal Commercial 
Bank, First Gulf Bank, Grind- 
lays Bank; Habib Bank AG Zu- 
rich, Habib Bank, Janata Bank, 
Middle East Bank and United 
Bank. 


Local banks have reported a 
noticeable drop in letters of 
credit but this trend is regarded 
by financial experts as likely to 
be remedied in 1986 with the 
start of several new projects. 

The picture for banking in 
Sharjah in the years to come is 
likely to improve, thanks to the 
increased revenues from the 
sale of condensates taken from 
the recently discovered gas 
fields. 


• • . v\:- '<•:*- 

-■V.1 V »«-- : 










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.St, 


Helping buikia modem nation. 

Sharjah: P.O. Box 289. Shar^vUAE Tel: 591444 The 88082' G18CA EM Abu Dhabi: P.O. Box 2570, Abu DhabFUAE Tat 


I* t 


A 


I QUaRRV UFfcHdTtDNS CO 


EOICD 


Suppliers of Quality 


Electro-Mechanical 


Sand for Building & 


Engineers & Contractors Roadwork Projects. 


RpCONTlNEWTAL 

AUCO A 

■g 

TJ trading 

AL 1 CO IMPALLOY LTD 

Suppliers of 

Industrial, Building 
and Cleaning 

Chemicals. 

Manufacturers of Curtain 
Walls, Double Glazing, 
Polyester Powder Coating, 
and. Aluminium and Metal 
Welding/ Fabrication. 

Manufacturers 'of Cathodic 
Protection Systems and - 
Architecture! Castings. . 

A GlBCA/RTC COMPANY - 





ENA Lubricants Co Ud ReadymrxGulf Limited 

' ..SuppRersdf : ■- . 


Lubricants. 


Accessories. 


AK3tBCA/MC®t COMPANY 


Specialist Readymix 
Concrete Suppliers 


S - -'*5 
r 


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A OeCMRBXANO COMPLY 












(J7O-J sis—* 

k 1 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1985 


Page II 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


ADVERTISING SECTION 



•— ■ *.%•**»- -Mu ■■ r • 


•• ■*■**• , .^r** 

-t* ’ . , • 

' ■ u~* r 

• ‘ ** if*' ’ 

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77ie control lower, reminiscent of a minaret, is surrounded by dt 
structures such as the main terminal, ail a reflection of Arab Islanth 


. ~s 


d by domed 

Islamic art 


Sharjah Ports Upgraded 


traffic at Sharjah Airport 


Shaijih’s international airport 
is/im architectural gem. Its de-‘ 
sign. reflects the country’s Is- 
lamic heritage and. combines 
aesthetic appeal with a practical 
layout designed to ease the han- 
dling of both passengers and . 
cargtx 

The terminal was built with 
traveler comfort in mind, as 
well as convenience of opera- 
tion. Air bridges to waiting air- 
craft free passengers from hav- 
ing to leave the air-conditioned 
building which accommodates 
all the usual facilities: duty-free 
shops, banks, post office, res- 
taurant and information points 
for travelers, car-hire, hotel res- 
ervations and the like. 

The system of separate 
domes for separate functions 
and the addition of individual 
holding lounges near the air- 
craft help to upgrade passenger 
facilities and streamline aircraft 
loading. The mm -around time 
for large aircraft is less than an 
hour and, even during that 
short period, " travelers can ex- 
pect test and. refreshment in 
true Arab style: 

The airport employs a staff 
of more than 600 people, oper- 
ates around-the-clock and can 
handle about 2 million passen- 
gers per year. Its landing instru- 
ments, navigation aids, commu- 


nications apparatus and 
fire-protection services all bene- 
fit from rhe latest technology. 

The airport is managed by 
the Sharjah 'Airport Authority 
and assisted by the Frankfurt 
Airport Authority, whose advi- 
sory board chairman, Mr. R 
CroUmann, said in October char 
there had been steady progress 
during the past few years and 
that there was every reason to 
believe char growth would con- 
tinue at an accelerated pace in 
the fo r e s eeable future. 

The management contract 
was renewed in March 1989, 
and it was Ekely the association 
would continue for a long time. 

Until a few months ago, the 
soaring value of the US. dollar 
had taken its toll on the bur- 
geoning tourist trade in Shar- 
jah, resulting in erratic arrivals. 
The Sharjah Tourist Depart- 
ment, which played the major 
cole in attracting European 
tourists to the United Arab 
Emirates, had to admit that die 
linking of the dirham to the 
dollar had made the Europeans 
with weaker currencies think 
rwice about booking package 
tours to the emirates. 

More recently, of course, the 
dollar took a dive and the Euro- 
peans found their currencies 
buying many more dollars or 


dirhams. Thus, the airport be- 
gan handling more aircraft 
from West Germany, Austria, 
the United Kingdom and 
France, in particular. 

' As a result of local changes 
in the airline business. Gulf Air 
increased the number of its 
weekly flights out of Sharjah by 
more chan ten. Sheikh Abdul- 
lah al Thani, chairman of the 
Sharjah Gvil Aviation Depart- 
ment, announced in October. 
This brought the number erf 
Gulf Air flights out of Sharjah 
to mote than 30. Most of the 
flights arc to Pakistan 1 and In- 
dia, destinations, previously ser- 
viced by Gulf Air out of Dubai. 
These were stopped when 
Emirates Airline started Airbus 
services to those destinations on 
October 25. 

Other major international 
airlines operating our of Shar- 
jah include Syrian Arab Air- 
lines, Air France, China Gvil 
Aviation Authority, Saudfa, Ye- 
menis Air, Austria Airways and 
Air India. In addition, several 
cargo and charter lines from 
Europe arid the Middle East 
regularly use the Sharjah air- 
port. 

During the period from Sep- 
tember 1, 1984, to October 1, 
1989, a total of 523,767 passen- 
gers used the airport, an in- 


National Bank Set to Expand 


The National Bank of Sharjah 
anticipates the continuation 
of its supportive rale in the 
government’s. . economic!, dts 
velopment -program. Further- 
more, its expected growth 
will assure a safe bastion foe 
investments and the contin- 
ued financial well-being of 
the emirate: 

Profits in 1984 declined but 
since then revenues from the 
Sajaa oilfield have helped 
build up government reve- 
nues, thus improving the 
cash-flow situation. 

The National Bank has an 
authorized capital of 900 mil- 
lion dirhams ($136 million) 
and a paid-up capital of 260 
million dirhams. Profits de- 
clined from 6l-2 million dir- 
hams in 1983 to 33.2 million 
in 1984, due largely to the 
overall recession in the Gulf. 
Unlike other banks during 
that period, however, Nation- 
al Bank showed continued 
economic growth. Total as- 
sets increased by 2U percent 
and loans made rose by 23.3 
percent over 1983 figures. A 
total of 26.9 million dirhams 
was transferred to the general 
reserve and 2.9 million to the 
statutory reserve. 

Cash, balances with banks 


Focus 


and short-term funds rose 
from 490.5 million dirhams in 
1983 to 669 million in 1984. 
Deposits with banks dropped • . 
from 443.6 million dirhams to 
346.5 million. Marketable se- 
curities rase from 31 million 
dirhams to 117.8 million. 

Founded by the Sharjah 
government in association 
with several prominent trad- 
ers and businessmen in the 
emirate, the National Bank of 
Sharjah began operations on 
March 29, 1976. The present 
government sharehold in g is 
26.35 percent. 


Hotel 

Choice 

Where to stay? Sharjah’s hotels 
offer luxury with five-star flair 
and varied international cui- 
sines specially tailored for 
guests from faraway countries. 

The Holiday Inn is located 
dose to the new souk on the 
banks of dbe Khalid lagoon. 
There are 270 rooms as well as 
various suites. Conference and 
banquet facilities cater for up to 
800 people. There is also a 


In 1983 the National 
Bank’s assets and earnings 
placed It 13th among the 100 
major banks in the -Arab 
wodd and its capital-assets ra- 
tio placed it second, ratings 
which reflect the bank’s baric 
strength. 

The National Bank is seek- 
ing to increase its presence in 
the United Arab Em ir ates 
market and is studying pros- 
pects for business in the inter- 
national financial markets. 
The bank’s reserves in 1985 
provide it with a sound base 
to expand operations in 1986. 


Holiday Inn on the beach ar 
Khor Faldcan. 

The MaifceEa Gub, adjacenr 
co the Holiday Inn Shaijah, is a 
popular rendezvous. Built in 
the style of an Arab- Andalusian 
village in the midst of exotic 
gardens, it combines first-class 
hotel facilities and the social 
bonhomie of a residential dub. 
There is equipment for water- 
skiing, windsurfing and sailing. 

Other leading hotels include 
the Sharjah Continental, the 
Beach Hoed, the Grand Hotel, 
-the Sharjah Carlton and die 
Hotel Nova. 


Terminal One of Best 


World shippers have, for sever- 
al years, placed Sharjah’s con- 
tainer terminal as one of the 
most efficient of its kind. 

The credit goes to the Shar- 
jah-owned Gulftainer Co. LtxL 
Formed in 1976, Gulftainer de- 


veloped the present container 
terminal at Port Khalid — one 
of the first fuDy equipped con- 
tainer terminals to be construct- 
ed in the Middle East. 

Gulftainer has three divi- 
sions: the Sharjah Container 


Luxury you’ll enjoy... 
Value you’ll appreciate 

No cliches, no platitudes, 
no six-star hotel bills ... 

At the Holiday Inn Shaijah 
we simply offer consistently 
superior products and services, 
with no unpleasant surprises. 




m' 


Sharjah 


crease cl 17.82 percent over the 
previous year. 

Measures to expand facilities 
at Shaijah Internationa] Airport 
have been outlined by Moham- 
med Saif al Hajery, Civilian 
Aviation 'Department Director- 
General He told travel agency 
executives that Gulf Air would 
sochi have 35 flights a week out 
of Sharjah and that it was vital- 
ly necessary for travel agencies 
to launch a marketing cam- 
paign co sell tickets and cargo 
space. The director-general said 
. the services offered by the air- 
port at Sharjah were considered 
to be among the best in the 
world. Some 70 percent of the 
goods offered at the duty-free 
shops were less expensive chan 
ar other airports. He said char a 
transport company would be 
formed in 1986 to carry passen- 
gers to and from different 
points in the emirate. 


for reservations please call your nearest Holiday Inn 
or dial direct Sharjah 357357, Tttex 68305 HOUNN EM 


Terminal, Truckcaincr and the 
Gulftainer Shipping Agency. It 
has maintained its reputation as 
an innovator by introducing 
free-trade zone areas, dedicated 
in-house transport operation for 
delivery of cargoes and special 
packaged deals for transship- 
ment operators. 

The container terminal divi- 
sion bandies cargoes for such 
international lines as Willine, 
Barber, FOSS, United Arab 
Shipping, K Line, IRISL, DSR, 
NYK, Orient "Express, Noraria, 
COSCO, Maecsk, and others. 
These and other carriers have 
used the facilities because of the 
port’s well-established reputa- 
tion for fast turnaround .rimes 
and cargo handling efficiency. 

The development of a free- 
trade zone within the terminal 
area and the construction of a 
200 -meter berth extension (giv- 
ing a total frontage of 586. me- 
ters), combined with an. 11.5 

merer draft, ensure that the con- 
tainer terminal division can ser- 
vice the largest vessels currently 
in use. Altogether, about 12 
ships a month use the terminal, 
which this year has handled 
about 90,000 containers. 


There are good days ahead for 
Sharjah’s Mina Khalid and 
Khor Fakkan ports. Following 
several lean years when ship- 
ping was scarce and berths of- 
ten empty, the tide has finally 
turned. Development in both 
ports points to a return to the 
busy berths of the early years 
after independence in 1971. At 
the rime, the construction 
boom had produced the urgent 
need co build port facilities ca- 
pable of handling the flood of 
building materials and ma- 
chines that often remained un- 
loaded offshore for weeks on 
end 

The Sharjah Ports Authority 
has earned a reputation for wise 
foreright and sensible planning 
One of the first container ter- 
minals in the United Arab 
Emirates was built at Port Kha- 
lid a decade ago. Now the au- 
thority has sec in morion a de- 
velopment program thar 
includes dredging the Khalid 
harbor entrance, the basin and 
the berths so that modem con- 
tainer ships, large cargo carriers 
and bulk vessels can unload day 
and night. The container termi- 
nal now has three fully 
equipped berths. The latest 
gantry cranes average about 40 
lifts an hour. 

The major container lines’s 
trend toward increasing the size 
of their ships was foreseen by 
the Ports Authority in 1983 
when an Amiri decree autho- 
rized construction of the third 
container berth with an along- 
side draft of 11.5 meters. Fur- 
thermore, the latest container- 
handling equipment was 
installed co give the terminal 


greater flexibility and space 
economy. 

The Dubai-based contractor, 
Boskalis Westminster Middle 
East, was awarded a $21.6 mil- 
lion contract to dredge the six- 
kilometer approach channel to 
a depth of 15 meters and the 
harbor basin to 14 meters. The 
work is due co be completed 
next May. 

The operation is pan of the 


ing and storing ro-ro items, par- 
ticularly automobiles. Next 
year, a three-storied office 
building will accommodate 
both port and cuscoms authori- 
ties. 

The port is a major handler 
of break-bulk and reefer car- 
goes. Its customized facilities 
and berthside storage points 
make it an ideal port for con- 
ventional and neo-bulk cargoes. 



Sharjah ports: the tide has turned. 


Hal crow International Partner- 
ship's program co allow lique- 
fied petroleum gas carriers to 
load at a new terminal under 
construction. A breakwater is 
being built by the Greek firm, 
Archirodoo Construction, and 
is due for completion next 
April It will contain about 
800,000 cubic meters of rock 
and support structures. 

Other improvements are be- 
ing made to improve the han- 
dling of general and "ro-ro” 
(roll-on, roll-off) cargoes. The 
port is getting a new paper- 
damp system to reduce the un- 
loading time for paper reels, a 
fast-increasing import. Transit- 
shed facilities are to be extend- 
ed and there will be extra 
strong-surfaced areas for carry- 


A cold store for refrigerated 
cargoes allows ships co dis- 
charge directly. More than 90 
percent of chicken imports ar- 
rive at Sharjah, mainly from 
France and Denmark, but im- 
ports from South America and 
Africa are now increasing. 
These ate handled speedily and 
reach the supermarkets within 
three days. 

Khor Fakkan is anticipating 
a brighter future as well This 
container port, which for some 
years saw its two cranes com- 
pletely immobile, has now add- 
ed two more co help cope with 
anticipated traffic. 

The horizon has brightened 
thanks to die worldwide mar- 
keting campaign carried out by 
the Sharjah Ports Authority. 


Over rhe past four years, the 
authority has promoted Khor 
Fakkan as the ideal location for 
a midway stopover on the Eu- 
rope-Far East services of large 
container vessels. Containers 
could be unloaded and taken 
overland to the Gulf Coast, 
freeing vessels from having ro 
go through the vulnerable 
Str.iir of Hormuz and pay high 
insurance rates. This promotion 
coincided with the shipping de- 
velopment chat required large 
capacity container carriers serv- 
ing intercontinental routes to 
unload cargoes at convenient 
parrs cn route and link with 
regional feeder services. 

"The Sharjah Ports Authority 
signed an agreement last July 
with the United States Lines for 
rhe use of Khor Fakkan as a 

regional transshipment point. 
The new service was inaugurat- 
ed on September 20 when the 
vessel, American Illinois, 
berthed at the port. The ship 
carried 2,228 containers, and 
some of these, unloaded at 
Khor Fakkan. wore carried by 
United States Lines relay vessels 
to other Gulf ports, the Indian 
subcontinent and other points. 

The port has a 5,500 TEU 
(twenty foot equivalent units) 
storage capacity as well as an 
extra stacking area. The along- 
side berthing of -130 meters 
means that Khor Fakkan can 
accommodate two large ro-ro 
ships simultaneously. Ro-ro 
ships can operate stem ramps 
while other cargo can be dis- 
charged simultaneously via the 
overhead gantry cranes. 

The constant upgrading re- 
flects the Sharjah Ports Author- 
ity's belief that Sharjah ports 
will continue to attract more 
shipping lines. 



Talk to us first. 


As the first bank in the Emirates our 
local knowledge and experience is 
unsurpassed. With our international 
connections through the HongkongBank 
group, The British Bank of the Middle 
East is the bank to contact if you are 
contemplating doing business in Sharjah 
or indeed, anywhere in the Middle East. 
We have been operating in this region 
since 1889 and as part of the s 

HongkongBank group, we have />& 


more than 1100 offices in 55 countries. 
That adds up to nearly a century's 
experience of operating in new markets. 
In addition to providing a complete 
range of financial services to meet your 
needs, we also offer valuable market 
information in our Businessman's guides 
to 34 countries. 

If you’re planning to do business in 
v Sharjah or anywhere in the Middle 
S\ East - talk to us today. 


The British Bank of the Middle East 
I t^_SAS 1 CALJ I 

A] Oruba Sweet, P.O. Box. 25. Sharjah Tel: 350055 Tlx: 68044 BBMESH EM 

<z> 

member : HongkongBank group 

UAE OFFICES: ABU DHABI • ABU DHABI SUO • AL AIN • DE1RA • DUBAI* FUJAIRAH • RAS AL KHAIMAH • SHARJAH 








Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1985 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


ADVERTISING section 


As the national carrier of Sharjah,GdfAir operates 48 direct 
services a week to/from the above destinations. 

Now, go International fiam Sharjah. 

For more information call your travel agent 

or Gulf Air. a. 


Telephone: Sharjah 354024/5 Abu Dhabi 
332600 (6 lines) A1 Ain 636440 Dubai 
282473 Ras A1 Khaimah 29523 


GULFJUR 


Inbound, outbound, 

eastbound westbound. 



Ship through Sharjahports 


Within lh«f U. A.E., the Emirate of Sharjah is unique 
in having developed ports on two coasts inside * 
and outside the Gulf. . vyt 

The Ports /-A 

Port Khalid on the West Coast ol the / / 

peninsula is just on the doorstep of major 
U. A E. markets with easy trucking logistics ImI j 
to Qatar. Saudi Arabia and onwards. The j iHE M 

Port is a .nod cm deep water 12 berth l l ityj 

facility. Container, bulk, ro-ro, reefer and VJp\\ 
general cargo terminals are backed by y\ \ 

spacious warehouses, open storage and v 

a five trade zone. 

Port Khor Fakkan on the East Coast is "'s 

the only natural deep water harbour in the ^ 

Middle' East. This up-to-date terminal with 
its exceptional container handling and .o*ro facilities 
serves as a perfect feeder service point for destinations 
in theCulf and Indian peninsula. 


Both ports operate their own stevedores and are 
open round the dock, 365 days a year. 

The System 

\ • ‘ The Sharjahports system provides the latest 
\ in equipment and benefits inducting Free 

{ai Trade Zone advantages, simplified 

r I procedures and no fuss customs and 

H documentation. In-bond cargo movements 
| 1 can be arranged between die ports and 
' / between Sharjah's International Airport. 
The Ports, Airport and onward links to other 
Gulf countries. are served by modem 
multilane highways. 
Whatever your cargo or destination, you'll 
save time and money when you ship 
through Sharjahports. , . 


You're bound to see the advantages 


Sharjah Ports Authority 

P.O. Box 510, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates Tel: (06) 356000 Telex: 68138 Seagul EM. 








.2 




mi 




* ■ -*• ir If. 


t £ 



And for the more aquatic. a carnival of water sports at the Sharjah Lagoon r estiva 

Desert Safaris and Camel Racing 


The United Arab Emirates, 
with its divase attractions, is at 
the forefr o nt of the Gulf states 
in araacung "overseas tourists to 
the region, and the Sharjah 
cm ir ate has so far played the 
key role. 

" Smil e, you’re in Sharjah” 
has been the emirate's official 
slogan ever since oil wealth pro- 
vided the impetus for all- 
around expansion — and for 
the birth of a tourist industry 
that has progressed steadily 
during the past few years. 

Officially, Sharjah’s tourism 
industry is-con trolled and guid- 
ed by the Department of Tour- 
ism and Culture, whose director 
is Sheikh Ahmed bin Mohamed 
al QasimL Sh eikh Qasimi is 
alsn rhairman of rhe Sharjah 
World Trade & Expo Center. 

The department has support- 
ed the private sector and has 
eased many entry restrictions 
and other formalities to place 
the emirate on the world's trav- 
el map. FOr instance, airlines arc 
helped by. the dvil authority’s 
open-sky policy and its provi- 
sion of excellent arrival facili- 
ties. Sharjah has thus become a 
semihub for Lufthansa, whose 
pa s s e ngers from Frankfurt and 
DusseLdorf break their journey 
in due **»■««** while on their 
way to Colombo or the Mal- 
dives. In addition, many charter 


. flights from Europe bang tour- 

. ist groups by arrangement with 

Sharjah . bonds. Via and ocher 
formalities have been relaxed 
for such parties and the result 
has ban a spectacular increase 
in Sharjah's tourist ' income. 
One of the leading companies 
in the tourist field providing a 
wide range of attractions for the 
discerning visitor is Orient 
Travels. 

Sharjah has much to offer 
the tourist. The . magnificent 
Grand Mosque, which can bold 
5,000 worshipers, is the latest 
land -most spectacular landmark 
in the emirate. It has a library, 
and a school for Islamic studies 
is attached to it. 

Smaller, but still architectur- 
ally attractive,, mosques axe to 
be seen throughout the emirate. 
One particularly fine example 
is set ar the edge of what used 
to be the runway and buddings 
of the Royal Air Force during 
the . days; when Sharjah was a 
British protectorate. The main 
runway is still in use — as an 
auto highway. 

Another indent landmark is 
the. Old Fort. Nearby are the 
harbor and lagoon where, in the 
1930s, die flying boats of Brit- 
ain's Imperial Airways used to 
refuel en inure to India. The 
fonr then .served as a guest 
house for passengers as the.lint- 


Ship Ppssenger 


Sharjah’s Fort Khalid has been 
chosen as the base for the first 
regular passenger shipping ser- 
vice between the United Arab 
Emirates, India and P akist an. 

The service, which started 
on November 10, is operated by 
the Marathon Gulf Shipping 
Co., a joint venture between the 
Greek firm Technical Marine 
Planning (Overseas) Led. .and 
Sheikh Faisal bin Khalid Mo- 
hammad al Qaami of Sharjah. 

The service was open«3 
when Caravan, a roll-on roll-off 
carri er, sailed from Sharjah" to 
Bombay arid Mangalore. The 


Focu& 


ship gives passengers the choice 
of five classes ar prices cheaper 
than , those, charged by airlines. 

According to Dimi trios Tar- 
aziz, . Marathon’s managing 
partner* five sailings a month 
will be off er ed to Bombay, 
Mangalore and Karachi. The 
fully air-conditioned ship will 
carry cargo with space available 
for 100 cars and 22 trailers and 
containers. 

Voyage times will be: two 
days to Karachi, two- an d-a- half 
days to Bombay and three-arid- 
a-halif to Mangalore. ’ ; 


ury hotels of the present were 
SHU many years away. 

Amid the modem ships us- 
ing the high-technology port 
facilities of Sharjah are the tra- 
ditional dhows, which still sail 
to Iran, the neighboring Gulf 
countries and the Indian sub- 
continent. Old and new exist in 
dose harmony in Sharjah, and 
the traditional architecture of 
the new palace of the Ruler 
recalls the Islamic heritage of 
the A large cannon in 

the center of a traffic island 
close to the palace recalls more 
turbulent times. 

The desert, of course, is the 
main attraction, and Sharjah is 
ideally located for safaris from 
October to May when climatic 
conditions are ideal for visitors. 

The desert is scenically satis- 
fying, often absolutdy breath- 
taking. From its unique culture 
emerge a special way of life, 
religious buildings, cuisine, 
art — all different, all available 
in the comfort of 20th-century 
surroundings. There are also 
miles and miles of beaches. 
While Sharjah is by no means 
solely a beach destination, its 
sandy coastline offers marvel- 
ous opportunities for all kinds 
of marine sports, from sufiaqua 
diving to deep-sea fishing. 

Excellent shopping facilities 
are available and the pictur- 
esque new souk (market) has a 
fascinating range of items, par- 
ticularly 22-carat-gold jewdery. 
Gold i$_sold at slightly . more 
than the market bullion rate 
but, since there is usually no 
charge foe workmanship, the 
tourist gets a better deal here 
than ia Europe 

Sharjah and die northern 
emirates appeal to four distinct 
groups of visitors. Tbc first in- 
cludes conference, exhibition, 
and business-related travelers. 
Second is the group of long- 
haul travelers, usually more ma- 
ture and culturally aware of the 
locations they visit They are 
seeking a new and different des- 
tination and tend to be over 35 
years of age. Such people now 
travel to the Caribbean, East 
Africa, India and Southeast 
Aria. 


Then there arc the travelers j 
who visit friends and relatives 
working in the United Arab 
Emirates. They provide good 
business for food-and-beverage j 
outlets and they are important ' 
to the travel agencies, particu- 
larly for safari and sightseeing 
tours. For airlines, they form a 
very important (although 
somewhat neglected) source of 
revenue 

There is also the stopover 
traffic The Singapore route is a 
good example of long-haul 
stopover visits useful in pro- 
moting longcr-stay tourism. 

What does Sharjah have to 
offer? A typical tour might start 
at one of the hotels with an' 
informal get-together at which 
coffee is served. This could be 
followed by a town tour and 
perhaps a traditional Arab din- 


perhaps a t 
ncr aboard a converted dhow. 
The next couple of days could 
be left free to tour the souks 
(there are several besides the 
gold market). Then off to the 
desert for an overnight safari 
barbecue dinner in the dunes. 
Early next morning camel rac- 
ing. Then a drive through 
mountain and desert along the 
cast coast on the Arabian Sea. A 
visit to the oasis town of Al 
Ain, an ancient caravan stop on 
the trade routes from Oman to 
the fertile crescent of the “Tigris 
and Euphrates. And, finally, the 
camel market. 

The last few days could be 
spent lazing on the beach, a 
good combination of adventure 
and leisure. Among the many 
ocher variations are self-guide 
holidays, which enable visitors 
to follow existing safaris in 
their own vehicles. 

The idea is not to flood the 
United Arab Emirates with 
tou ri sts, to make it a Costa 
Brava or Costa del SoL In light 
of the Islamic heritage of the 
emirates and the need to attract 
responsible people, the tourist 
goal could be about 60,000 peo- 
ple arriving during die cool 
months on charter flights or 
travel -agency or hotel-arranged 
tours. The attractions are many 
and varied and the memories 
will certainly last a lifetime. 


GIBCA Group Builds 
Souk and Heliport 


National enterprise is .reflected 
in the success of che Sharjah- 
based General International 
Business. Contracting Asso- 
ciates, known as "GIBCA. ” 
The company was established 
as a sole proprietorship in 1975 
but by alula’s decree was con- 
verted to a limited liability 
company in Se pt e m ber 1977. 

The GIBCA chairman is 
Sheikh Faisal bin Sultan al Qa- 
simi and the vice-chairman is. 
fihirilth Khalid bin Saar al Qa- 


amL The, managing director is 
Sheikh Sultan bin Saqr al Qa- 
simL 

The company, which _em- 
/ ploys 700 people q£ various na- 
tionalities, is engaged in several- 
. dvil contracts, electrical and 
mechanical engineering works, 
tradin g and marketing of engi- 
neering produce,, cranspcra- 
' don, quarrying and ocher activi- 
ties. Ir has a paid-up capital of 
20 million dirhams and a loan 
' capital Of 7 million dirhams. 


. GIBCA has consistently 
been a profitable enterprise and 
has completed many dvil engi- 
neering contracts throughout 
“the United Arab Emirates. Ac 
present, the company is en- 
gaged in conducting the Shar- 
jah -Dhaid highway inter- 
changes, building premises for 
the UAJE, Central Bank, com- 
pletuig the Abu Dhabi heliport 
facilities and constructing a 
souk shopping center in Al 
Dhaid, Sharjah. 



SHARJAH CONTAINER TERMINAL 

(A DIVISION OF GULFTA1NEH CO. LTD) Shariah 

PORT KHAUG SHARJAH, U.A.E. 


SHARJAH CONTAINER TERMINAL, ftw temimaf operating division of GULFTA1NER CO. LTD. together with 
TRUCKTAINER arid'GULFTAINER AGENQIES provide a package of sendees offering shipping lines, shippers and 
exporters the benefits of Economy, slmpfidty and speed io'cargo hanefling and clearance. 


GULFTAINER CO. LTDi. 

P.O. Box 225. Sharjah, UAE 
Tel: 354201735771* . . 

Telex; 681 43 TAiNEREM : 


SHARJAH CONTAINER TERMINAL 

P.O. Box 225, Sharjah, UAE 
Tel; 354205/354207 ‘ 

Telex: 68207 SERVK7EM 




.ckeA ^ \Xj^ 


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SmEXMIck - M*.’ *Eon>ta»« 
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Mdendl Mi Utnr morti 


Wednesday, December 4, 198 s 


INTERNATIOliAL MANAGE 


emain 






A Big Fins lor Executives 


' , *n(|£2.1(»XS3,125) in tax on. a 

y ^nmp any car 'worth £30,000. 1SX rctorms 8TC 

'■f%2!X£2fiffS2St companies 

to get rid of ihe 

■ ~ '•have £30,000 after taxes to pay more mtimnal perks. 

- J! '/ Var the car on his own. If the _. 

'Executive had gotten, the extra 

: ^income instead of the car, the Inland Revenue Service would have 

- -^collected £70,000 in tax instead of £2,100. 

' • In addition, the recent increase in employers’ conttibtitionsto 
.^Britain’s National Insurance may encourage companies there to 
v remunerate their top executives with pecks rather than raises in 
salary. Effective next Oct. 5, die increase in employer contribu- 
... tkn to the National Insurance on a £30,000 salary will rise to 
^£3,135, from £1^440. 

Financial consultants agree that tax reforms are pushing com- 
"* 1 ^Jianies to get rid of the more exotic perks that are often difficult 

- ■ £nd costly to administer, such as paying for personal telephone 

- ~ ..-.calls, for fuDy equipped kitchens or for doihmg. 

- "The zamer perks are on the way out,** says Christopher 
^Whitehouse, chief executive of MWP Ltd, a London-based 

- financial consulting company. 

L ; ';f1 AVILE Row suits, for instance, bought or rented by compar 

' ' -^1 nies for some toj) executives were once tailor-made to 
-ky escape the Inland Revenue, but no longer. 

- vi{ “Some years ago they were considered as a perk. But they died 
•“-.a natural death because it’s a very gray area in terms of taxes,** 

laid Alan ISO, of Anthony J. Hewitt, a Savile Row tailor; who no 
... longer has clients being dressed by their corporations. It seems 
~ that the denial last year of a tax exemption to a barrister for her 
' ''"court robes was the final blow to the tax-shelter suit 

But many perks remain a good way to remunerate top execu- 
tives. According to PA Consulting Group’s International Pay and 

- benefits Survey for 1986, fringe benefits far the top financial 
. .-.executive of a medium-sized company with a base salary of 

. . ..£30,000 represents as much as 375 percent of baric salary in 

- Britain, 36.6 percent in the United States and 15.13 percent in 

. ... . France. The benefits include such things as supplementary pen- 

* ~ ‘ rions, private medical insurance and other insurance, the compa- 

■ ay car, telephone expenses and subsidized lunches. 

New perks are appearing to replace ones that are no longer tax- 

* “ tsxempL Financial nmmerfing is a benefit that is gaining In 

■popularity, especially in the United States, and personal home 
computers are popping up here and there, although some execu- 
tives wonder whether they are really perks or a subtle hint to take 
your work home. 

- - But, even in countries where most peaks have never been tax 
: shelters, such as Sweden and West Germany, die company car 
.'xmains the most popular perk. 

“Doing away with the company car would be self-defeating 
_ . because it would cripple the car industry throughout Europe,** 
iaid John Boley, motor correspondent far Chief Executive, a 

. _ (Continued on Page 19, CoL 5) 


* .- i By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

. Tribute 

B lRIS —Perquisites are the ultimate in corporate tender 
pvingcare. And although' the United States, Britain and 
franco are trying hard to discourage sane executive 
•pda by taxing them, most companies, executives and 
advisers believe that perks are here to stay, 
ie income taxes axe high lor big earners, the value of 
wtally greater [to an executive than the cost of thepcdcis 
mpany. And, in spite of tax reforms, many pedes remain 
^ kind, of shelter far individuals in high tax brackets. The only 
losers are the tax authorities. 

For example, under the 1986 tax rate an company cars, a 
.British executive will pay ; 


Tax reforms are 


to get rid of the 


more 


3 teralbrfris&£ribtme. 

BUSINESS / FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 14 


io Sets 



Israel Unemployment 

Annual awnuje rate 1974-B4. quarterly 
average lor flru nme months on 985; 
mparcvM 

' Source- bneuQoremment 
Central Ounau o/Stataocs 


$1.15 Billion 
In 4th Quarter 

CtmfiU by Our Staff From JUipa uhas 

CLEVELAND — Standard Oil 
Cd (Ohio) said Tuesday that it will 
t jiire a S1.86-b3fion charge against 
fourth-quarter earnings to reflect 

the cost of reorganizing its mineral 

operations and writing down the 
value of certain assets. 

The company said toe charge 
would amount to $1.15 billioa after 
tax, or $490 per share. 

In the f earth quarter of 1984, 
namirig s of $290 UnBiOn, 
or $195 a share, on sales of $3.2 
bQKon. 

In a related devdopmeut, British 
Petroleum Co, which owns 55 per- 
cent of the U.S. co m pany, sod h 
would take an estimated after-tax 
charge of £600 nuQkxi ($888 mil- 
lion) for 1985 to reflect its share of 
the Sohio writedown. 

BP, Britain’s largest oil compa- 
ny, reported attributable, at net, 
income of £U billion in 1984. 

Sobio said the reorganization 
will indude expenditure of $400 
nrittkm over three years to modern- 
ize its copper mines near Salt Lake 
City, Utah, which were dosed earli- 
er this year because of operating 
losses. That project will m&e some 
assets obsolete or surplus, the an- 
nouncement said. 

Also contributing to the special 
duuge, Sohio said, will be the reas- 
sessment of the value of some min- 
eral reserves; previously an- 
nounced staff reduction and 
organization programs; regulatory 
measures associated with its Alaska 
ofl operations, and the sale of some 

assets. 

“Apart from these special 
charges, oar basic oil and gas pro- 
duction, refining and marketing 
businesses continue at a pace some- 
what stronger than indicated m the 
third quarter,** Sohio’s chairman, 
Alton W. Whftehoose, said. '. 

Snhin «riH the modernization 
project will allow annual produc- 
tion of about 185,000 tons of re- 
fined copper, plus gold, silver and 
molybdenum byproducts Cram the 
mine outside Salt Lake Gty. 

Regarding the fourth-quarter 
charges, Mr. Whitebouse said: 
"This action rempma* concern 
about future o3 prices, continued 
weak coal and copper markets and 
general economic uncertainties, hot 
addition, we expect to realize sig- 
nificant cash flow from this action 
as a result of asset sales and tax 
reductions.*’ (AP, Reuters) 


Singapore Mart 
Plans to Reopen 
Trades Thursday 



Apiece Fnaee-Pntatf 


would extend to the 25 broker 


SINGAPORE — The Stock Ex- members oF the Singapore ex- 
change of Singapore is to reopen change a 10-year credit line of 150 
trading on Thursday, the exchange million Singapore dollars (571.4 
said Tuesday. million). Mr. Pfflay said that a fnr- 

The exchange said it would need ther 30 million dollars in shon- 


dollars (571.4 
I said that a fur- 
ollars in short- 




one more day without trading to tenn credit Unes was also being 
put in place a multimillion-dollar offered by the four banks — the 
standby-credit facility to prop up quasi-government Development 

■Mil KmlrMV in rli ff iwilHi n >. n* ... 


any brokers in difficulty. 


Bank of Singapore, Overseas-Chi- 


Tht Mmt Yoefc Tina 

Youths look for work at the Jerusalem government employment bureau. 

Israeli Austerity: Worse Yet to Come 


The announcement came at a nese Emiring Corp., United Over- 
joint press conference called by the j^ n y and Overseas Union 

Monetary Authority of Singapore, pa n k 

the exchange and top managers of Mr. Pillay. Ong Tjin An, the ex- 
the “big four” local banks offering change’s Airman, and others, de- 
theacdit line. spite repealed questioning, de- 

There was no offioal announce- clined to di snw what trouble the 
ment of when the Kuala Lumpur stockbrokers might be having to 
Stock Exchange would reopen, but warrant the rescue package backed 
Singapore exchange officials said by the authority, Singapore’s de- 
the Malaysian exc h a n ge was also facto central bank. 


By Thomas A. Friedman 

New York Times Service 

tel AVIV — In the bad old days of the Isncfi 
economy, btae-ctdlar laborers at the huge Osem 
noodle factory near Tel Aviv used to spend their 
morning coffee breaks lined up at the pay phone 
near the front gate. Inflat ion was so rampant that 
workers strained to stay in almost constant contact 
with their bankers and brokers to retain the value 
of (heir paychecks. They shifted funds from toe 
stock market to money markets to US. doflar- 
tinked bands — day-by-day, even hour-by-hour. 


ptoyroeu heading toward 10 percent from 6 per- 
cent. It has also slashed personal incomes by about 
25 percent and the government budget by the 
equivalent of neatly $1 Union. But it has dragged 
(town the rate of inflation from 800 percent to a 
"manageable” 50 percent to 60 percent a year. 

There has been a re turn to sanity” said David 
Klein, head of strategic p lanning for Bank Lcnnii, 
Israel’s largest bank. “We have gone from a mood 
in which people felt the government bad lost con- 
trol of the economy and that there might be a need 
for a ‘strong hand,’ to an atmosphere in which 
people believe the .government knows what h is 


expected to 
Both exd 


reopen Thursday. 


“We hope there will be no takers 


Dlh exchanges suspended trad- for the fund," Mr. Pillay said 
as of Monday foDowing the An earlier report on gpvem- 


couapse of a big Singapore and ment-owned radio had said that all 
Malaysia-owned industrial con- 25 stock b rok erages with member- 
glornerate, Pan-Electric Industries ship in ihe Singapore exchange 
Ltd. The Singapore and Kuala would each be liable for 6 milli on 
Lumpur exchanges share more dollars and brokers must set aside 
than two-thuds of the companies p is percent of commissions for a 
listed on their exchang e s. special fund against future liabil- 

The Monetary Authority's man - itj^s under the plan completed 
aging director, Joseph Pillay, said Tuesday. 


Today, the Osem booth is usually empty people believe the .government knows what it is 
and (be only tin** are at the coffee n m tehrngL Now dong and has a plan that we can achieve, I only 
workers have another worry about thrir paycheck hope it lasts.** 

— whether they will keep the job that gene rat es it The new post-binge mood in the countiy is 


waters have another worry about their paycheck 
— whether they will keep the job that generates it 

After seven, years of steadily mounting economic 
?4n»oc midur the rightist lltnid go ve r nm ent — 
stagnation in real productivity growth, South 
American-style mflw&wi and a wild personal and 
governmental spending binge— the Israeli econo- 
my is finally coming back to its senses. 

A Draconian economic refarmpackage institut- 
ed last July by P rime Minis ter S him on Peres and 
Finance Minister Yitzhak Modai has sent urnem- 


hope it lasts.** 

The new post-binge mood in the countiy is 
palpable and is summol up by the often-repeated 
phrase: “Well I guess die party is over.” 

Israel recently bdd its biggest government lot- 
tery ever, with a SI - milli on payoff. When televi- 
sion interviewers asked people standing in line 
what they would do if they won, no one raid “take 
a trip to Europe." It was always basics: They 

(Couthnid on Page 19, CoL 1) 


22 Pan-Electric, a marine, hotel and 

property group with 28 subsidiaries 
« MalaySa. Srunri, Hong Kong, 
T 1 * suspensions caused wide- Britain imd Bermuda, went into re- 
s^read panic among investors in cejvgj-sijjp Saturday with unpaid 

debts exreeding $167 million to30 
the paces ^companies traded m foreign banks. 

London and Hong Kong that have „ ... 

Singaporean and Malaysian inter- ^ ^y defended the suspeo- 

sion of stock trading because of the 
The plan to allow the re-opening finan cia l problems of only one of 
of Ihe Singapore market, Mr. Pillay 315 companies listed on the ex- 
said, was hammered out in a series etoaSft saying .that u had been 
of Monday and Tuesday. done “ maintain the stability of 

UtukxtlK plan, the four banks ^ secmrm« industry. 

An exchange official said that 
Pan-Electric was so large a compa- 
ny that shares of some other com- 
k£3 -§- I panics were beginning to be 

loir JdlJclJJ. “worthless.” 

JL At the dose on Friday, the last 

which 


U.S. to Announce Trade Action Against Japan 


CaufOed by Our Staff Pram Dispatches 
WASHINGTON — The United 
States will soon announce retalia- 
tory action against Japan for al- 
leged unfair closure of its markets 


meeting Tuesday with Japanese of- Agriculture Department confer- 
fidals and would stress the United cnce in Washington, he said his 
States’s intention to increase ag- office would make an official an- 
gressiveness in trade policy. Mr. nouncement of the details later. 
Yeutta-sudhehopedforaconchi- Industry mimsters from the Eu- 


are not covered in the agreement. 
British representatives to com- 


aon, the Straits Times Industrial 
Index had dipped 67.12 points, to 


leged unfair dosure of its markets Yeutter said he hoped for a condu- Industry ministers from the Eu- Frid ^i 
to U.S. leather and leather prod- aon of the trade complaint again st rAmmmiiiy will in accord, 

nets, administration officials said Japan’s restrictions on imparts of Brussels Wednesday in emergency The 1 


691.81, since Pan-Eecirib’s shares 
irere luspoided from trading Nov. 

A/vyuv) 

[Many brokers welcomed the 


Tuesday. - leather and leather products soon, session imlgas RrHam has by then the commission that it would im- 

There was no immediate mdica- On another trade issue, Mr. lifted its objections to an agree- pose obstacles to EC steel imports 
tian of the nature of the UiLretafi- Yeutter said that the Ifcited States meat limiting EC steel exports to this week if the accord, limiting 
ation and what Japanese imparts and the European Community had ihe United States, community community sales cm toe US. mar- 


it be affected. settled their di 

le UjS. trade representative, dies on canned 


Clayton K. Yeutter, said he was United States. In remarks at an 


settled their dispute on EC subs- sources quoted by Agence France- ket to around 6 million metric tons Meanwhile, Thai Chee Ken, one 

5 Press said Tuesday. f6.6 million short tons) a year for of ihe four partners of the accoun- 

Britain is reportedly prepared to four years, was not endorsed. tants Price Waterhouse, appointed 
scuttle toe tentative accord signed The United States has said it as receivers and managers of Pan- 
last month between the ECs exccu- intends to Hunt imports of semi- Electric, said: “Our first priority 

five oonrnii’gdon and UJS. officials finished sted products beginning in will be to establish the present fi- 

if it does not obtain guarantees on 1986 to 600,000 tons a year. nanrial position of the Pan- Electric 


The United States had warned Tuesday agree m ent but said inves- 
e c o mmiss ion that U would lm- tors were >1111 very nervous and 
jse obstacles to EC Steel imports prices were likely to plunge when 
is week if the accord, linn ting trading resumed on Thursday, 
mmunity sales on the UJS. mar- Reuters reported.] 
t to around 6 million metric tons Meanwhile, Thai Chee Ken, one 


Gummy Rates 

reo sBates a*. 3 

• t DuM. FJ=. IU, eWr. BJ=. If. Yn 

■ WHnl w i 2B5T 4314 rOSZS* 3&S>* aiW* SS»» 134JB* 13MSV 

51 -• MAOS 032 AMI U«* VUW 2UU HJ6S* 

-Wkfart 2 SOS 3JM 3L7B* UUSji MJ7 ■ UTI* TWJJ* 1J3I5- 

■doa (b) 1.015 lia 11A4S3 ZBA5Q 43236 7S.1K U9 3BU5 

tan 1374M X54AU WUB BUI «SJI 3U3I S14A5 XOI 

. w yohc(c) — nos * asa uni uas» xms su» xii 

n* m it ten lam — unx znw ura* not vm* 

- *ro mas mo wn nss nn- 7 zoo nan* vn — 

•rteft UW a. USA BIOS* 2731 • 0.T22J* 74B3S • 40K7* UTO* 

ICO M7M osiff 22M1 ATM* MU* UD MBO 1 MW 17U* 

■ or lami (0354 ha wm imum iwm na 22 m 222022 

- Kinoa In London and ZurlcK ftxtnom In ottwr funywi cmntnn. Mw York rates at 4 PAL 
, Commercial franc tbt Amounts needed to buy one pound (c/ Amounts neadndlo buy aaa 

HartV Units of 700 (jt) Units of ljrOD(r) Units otliBOONA: not quoted; NJU: not ovuHable- 
Te bar eon pome: SUS3M15 

toerDallarValRM 

“'mam Pte UAJ Chuky twr uss Cummer iwr IUI Cmr oiu r par UM 

muhM MO H&RMrtkti 5M Max. pan 467JH SovMrabM 0760! 

ok«Ls LXUI Creak Ane. U075 UarmkrOM 7309 SM&paaalO UUJ 

atr.xML 17M HanaKoMI 7JU4S FtAmo 17JW Smed.krWNi I MS 

ta.fla.fr. 5010 reman ram nmn tatnads U&10 Tafnl 1939 

azScraz. *,10000 lado-roptafi 1,12000 SawHrlynl USDS TbalbeM 20665 

Daman t ijnt irWia OIW7 Haa.s 2.1295 ireftMiBni 5SUD 

treat rean 32013 nnwaakaa. \AB7JB S.A*r.rwmJ 2401 UAEtfkTwm 34723 

;o6AkraM V.H Knremi maar 02905 S.Kar.maa U029 VaaaLbaRv. 1323 
'n&paretf 1255 Motor, rtoa 24295 

farSoa: 1213 irlafit 

- Jncrec Boomm ttu Benelux rBrureW; Bonco CUmmanMa itallano <MHon); Bamsoe No- 
nab de Paris (Paris} ; Benp of Tokyo (Tokyo}; IMF (SDR}} BAH (tOnar, rtytd. tBrham}; 

, strank (rvOM. Other Onto kem Reuters and AP. 


U.S. Indicators Show Weak Advance 


Britain is reportedly prepared to 
scuttle the tentative accord signed 


if it does not obtain guarantees on 
ihe export to the United States of 


(Rearers, AFP) group." 


nandal position of the Pan-Electric 


Interest Rales 


non iMr4ft> 

Matts SHrln M4k 

Matts BHrlM. 

-reaffes I«w4«h 

INr IKrfih 4*M 


BepMltS Dee.3 

P M art Franc StertlMi *F«rec ECU SDR 

aes-etk *-«» iitt-11^ sre-m i*w 

M4 k 4-flk 11 re-11 *w VMV. 1 

OMI 4-Ms 11 tt-11 «. Wfrnfc MM* I 

*-4Vk iTK-rm low-iore «m» ?<*. 
4W4 AMUL 11 W-ll V. 10W-TOW MMM I 


«xes: Morgan Guaranty (doBar. DM. SF. Pound, FF)e Uovds Book (ECU)} Reuters 
Ml. oaten QppncaUe to Interbank deposits of SI million minimum (areavhmlenl). 



' Mwity 


• Psotf *t-\7f ton 755 735 

•UbTrMnrr Mi 7J8 7.1* 

r oafa Tremar BOi 73b 7J6 

/> 36-51 ton 745 745 

i fare ton 755 741 


Ul SJB 
SJO 540 
540 415 

AM 415 
*30 450 


eu m 
M w 


Aahui BeHar Btpiritt 

Dec. 3 

Imantti IfW-lK 

snuottn Btb-IM. 

1 maittn BMi-atk 

< moflttu Sh-liw 

1 rear IM-Mi 

Source: Roofers. 


U^5. Motoy Market Finds 

Dec. 3 

VumHloreckRaoHrAants 
M day enroraoa VWd: 747 

fckre ta totarem Rate Itoto! 7J9I 
Source: Merrill Lynch. TMerate. 


Canyflerf.fij’ Our Stoff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — The index 
of leading indicators, the govern- 
ment's barometer of U.S. economic 
trends, rose a modest 03 percent in 
October, the sixth consecutive 
month of im provement, the Com- 
merce Department said Tuesday. 

The dqwtooenl also reviaed up- 
ward the index for September, 
showing a 0.4-percent increase in- 
stead of the 0.1 percent initially 
reported. The increase for August 
was revised downward to 0.8 per- 
cent from 09 percent. 

In a separate report, the Census 
Bureau said Hnmmg antes fell 5 J 
percent during October, the third 
monthly decline and the biggiest 
drop since ApriL Analysts woe 
surprised by the housing figures, 
given the lower interest rates of the 
past several mouths. 

The index, which economists use 
to predict economic activity about 
three mouths ahead, has improved 
in every month since May, but 
modestly. 

Revised figures placed the in- 
crease in the index for the third 
quarter at 1-5 percent, after a sec- 
ond quarter that showed no in- 
crease. 

Commerce Secretary Malcolm 
Baldrigc said October's gain 
hroaght the average monthly in- 
crease during the past six months 
to 0.4 percent. 

“Past relationships show that av- 
erage gains of 0.5 percent per 

mon th in tlin leading indicators awi 
consistent with next year’s target of 
4 percent gr owth in real gross na- 
tional product,** Mr. Baldnge said 
in a prepared statement, adding 
that toe mAre was “p orn ting to- 
ward continued expansion in 
1986.” 

Many private economists were 


year, Mr. Gough asked: “How do economy will grow anywhere near 
you get 4-percent growth out of a 4 percent next year.” 

03-percent increase in the index? Lawrence Orimerinc, president 
That’s got to be magic, hocus-po- of Chase Econometrics, said the 


“What if s showing is the econo- bc reflccthvg weak personal-income 
my is basically g row in g slowly and gains ca u sed by stagnant unem- 
wm continue to do so,” said David ployment levels this year. 

Bereon, an economist with Whar- “We are just not getting the kind 
ton Econometrics who predicts of response from lower interest 
growth of 2 percent to 2 Vi percent rates m housing and throughout 


for the first half of the year. “We the economy that people had ex- 
think its very unfikefy that the pcctod,” he said. (UP1, AP) 

C&W’s £933-M£Uion Offer 
Is Quickly Oversubscribed 

Renton Exchange. The lower offering price 

LONDON — The per-share partly reflects this week’s fall in the 
price for Cable & Wireless PLCs value of shares on the London 
stock offering was set at 587 pence Stock Exchange 
Tuesday. The company announced The issue mainly consists of the 
soon thereafter that the £9334nfl- Conservative government’s re- 
lion (about $$ 139-billion) issue, maining stake of 22.7 percent in 
being sold in Japan and Canada as C&W, totaling 102.5 million 
well as Britain, was oversubscribed, shares. 

The issue managers said that in- Cable & Wireless will also sefl 
stitntiomal demand for Ihe 146.1 43.6 million shares by way of rights 
million shares to be offered in Brit- issues to existing shareholders in 
ain on behalf of the British govern- Britain- Investors in Japan and 
ment and the company itself was Canada can buy 12.8 million shares 
weB in excess of what is available, through separate sales. 

“The issue is folly subscribed,” Da- The world's largest offering took 
vid Netoerton of J. Harry Schroder place last November, when the gov- 
Wagg & Co, a merchant bank ar- eminent sold a 503-percent stake 
ranging the sale, said at the sale, in British Telecommunications 
the second largest such stock: offer- PLC, raising £4 bDKon. Those 


rag. 

C&W, Schroder Wi 
other issue managers, 


shares have nearly doubled in value 
and the in a year. 

einwort, In a move designed to make toe 


Benson Ltd_, spoke to joomaHsls C&W issue more attractive, inves- 
after announcing that the offer had tors will be asked lo pay only £3 on 


been underwritten at the fuDy paid 
^KkmwOT^BeoTOQ said toe total 


I rtjcaiian, with the balance pay- 
ein March. 

The sale of the government 5 s 


offer of 159 nhlHon shares was to stake is in line with the policy of 
dose Dec. 11. Prime Minister MarsaietThateher 


Gold 


“It's extremely consistent with a 
modest outlook over the next sever- 
al months,” said Robert Gough of 
Data Resources Inc. Referring to 
the ad ministr ation's target far 4- 
pexcent economic growth next 


Prime Minister Margaret 


Some 146 million shares are of- of roDmg back state ownership of 
fered in Mtain. The 587-pence industry by selling off public com- 
price is a discount of 5 percent panies. 


ram Monday’s 618 pence dosing The company had a pretax profit 
rice. The stock dosed Tuesday at of £245 miftioo in the 12 months lo 
10 pence on the London Stock March on revenue of £862 million. 


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Call us in I^ondon or return the coupon below and we’ll send you our 
brochure SIMPLIFIED TRADING and an account application. 

.Andrew Peck Associates is prepared to give you the best deal in l ; .S. 
markets and we invite vou to ca - us. 



arket Closed 


he stock exchange in Si 
securities crisis there. 









Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1985 



Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 

Utilities 

Industrials 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unchanged 

Total issues 

NOW HlatB 
New Lows 
volume up 
volume down 


W S« 

453 1094 

473 429 

3033 2051 

W 99 

IS 11 

51.107,170 
39,81 M® 


Dec. 2 ' M2J20 

Nw-»- ML® 

Nov. 27 -- 301,473 

NtW.M lS*4S 

Nov. 25 177J77 

‘Included In lb* sales nouns 


■or sales 

i£$ 

98 2® HI 

WOT sajn 331 


Tuesday^ 


AMEX DfarTes 


NASDAQ index 


&ME=X Most Actives 


IMSM 


Closing 


Advanced 
Declined 
UndHAoed 
Total issues 
Now Highs 
Kew lows 
Volume ud 
volume dorm 


2» 9Sf 

324 318 

341 254 

906. 133 

31 31 

12 4 

1027.140 

xnMn 


Composite 


Rnanca 

inwranae 

UllUttu 

Banks 

Tram 


close arc* 

313.14 +aw 
31S8S 4-048 
41X85 -Ml 
J77J2 — 1.06 
3M.M— QJO 
m» +0 39 
U9Ja +0.14 


Week Year 
An ABO 
31058 2403 
31254 25450 
41043 211.57 
37658 2T4J1 
291* D446 
33936 mJ*> 
274 W !3X« 


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tUM 22244 22150 +048 
mm 18144 1BU2 +1J5 

87JP 87.14 8747— Dja 

24.15 2485 2411 +094 
20098 20010 2B0M +040 


AMEX Stock index 


4 Pjjl vohime 
Pl»V. 4 P 4ft. veturtic 
Prav. cans, volume 


I I 1 B 


Stocks Qose With Small Gain 



United Press Titumatumal 

NEW YORK — The New York Stock Ex- 
change manngptt to nieff out a small gain Toes* 
day, edging higher in the last minutes of trad- 
ing. The Dow Jones industrial average finished 
up 1.15, at 1,459.06. 

Broader indicators also advanced. Tbe NYSE 
index rose 0.25 to 1 15.88, Standard & Poor's 
500-stock index rose 0.40 to 200.86, and the 
price of an average share rose 7 cents. 

Advancing issues outpaced decliners 902- 
653, and volume rose to 109.7 million shares 
from 103.5 million Monday. 

Analysts said investors nibbled at stocks, 
curbing losses early in the day and allowing, the 
gnin at the end of tbe session. But they said a 
14.22- point plunge Monday, the largest angle- 
day declare in nearly four months, could still 
him out to be the start of something more 
substantial than a one-day phenomenon. 

The decline on Monday was attributed to 
investor concern about an unexpected rise in 
interest rates. 

“A cooling-off period after recant gains is 
probably overdue. " said Charles Jensen of MKI 
Securities. He said the Dow could move down 
20 or 30 points before it moves up again to 
challenge the 1,500 levd. 

“Over the next week or two, the market wlQ 
be choppy, with a downward bias," be said. 

Robot Kahan, head of equity trading at 
Montgomery Securities in San Francisco, said 
the market could “bade and fOT for a week at 
two. 

But Mr. Kahan said he r emains “very bull- 
ish." He said the Dow is likely to go down 40 or 


50 pants and test the 1,400 leveL From that 
levd, it would resume its advance, be said. 

He said he believes that interest tales have 
stabilized but. in the near-term at least, wffl not 
move significantly lower. He also does not ex- 
pert lire Federal Reserve to cut its discount rate. 

Mr. Kahan said an assertion by Preston Mar- 
tin, the Federal Reserve's vice chairman, that 
the central bank would “do its part” to sustain 
economic expansion next year “regardless of 
the budget policy outcome” helped alleviate 
some feats that interest rates could rise again. 

The government reported Tuesday that its 
Index of Leading Economic Indicators roseOJ 
percent and angle-family home sales fell 5.5 
percent in October. 

Texaco was the most active NYSE-fisted is- 
sue, falling K to 31. It had no comment an 
rumors that settlement talks between it and 
Pennzofl were under way. A jury ordered Tex- 
aco to pay $10.53 billion to Pennzoil for im- 
properly lining Getty Oil Co. away from a 
merger frith FennzoiL Pennzofl was up 3% to 
66& It denied rumors about a settlement with 
Texaco. 

Pennsylvania Power & Light was the second 
most actively traded issue, unchanged at 27. 
Kansas Gas & Electric was the third most 
active, earing Hi to 1314. 

Viacom was the session’s biggest winner; 
climbing 5 to 63V an a volume of nearly 2 
miBion shares. The company described some 
potential acquisition transactions in an SEC 
riling, including its intent to bid far CBS Ina’s 
KMOX television station in St Louis. 



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oose 


Texaco Ts Denied 

Agip Makes Offer for Fhfllips’s Stake Delay of Hearing 
Di 4 North Sea Fields; Follows Elf Bid 


Unilever PLC Nominates Chairman 


S ThtAssodataiPrm ■ “The report u right,” said the 

DETROIT — Toyota Motor Toyota official, who asked not to 
^Xsrp. of Japan hasseketed a tract be identified. Other company 
central Kentucky farmland for sources said the announcement 
; S500-miIBon US. automobile would be made Dec. 11. in Ken- 
j* scmWy plant, a company source mcky. 

** ' - id Tuesday. “If you write that Toyota has 

S The Fo nunmt followed, a story chosen Georgetown, Kentucky, 
lesday in the Tennessean, a . you will be w on the money.*’ 
^xashvflfe newspaper, that quoted (he Tennessean quoted its source as 
auto industry source as saying saying. 

' ■»» Toyota would ansounoe hs . rTfwrnoP Tavn . 


is right,” said the 
who asked not to 


.mice nod week. 


Trafalgar Shows 
26 % Profit Gain 

Roden 

LONDON — Trafalgar 
'■ House PLC said Tuesday that 
* ■’ oretax profit for the year ended 
'■ Sept 30 rose 26 percent from a 

- : year earlier. to £14251 minion 

-$210.9 million) from £113.15 
™tHnn- Operating profit rose to 

• {160.03 million from £12459 
: ™ninn, the company said. 

/; Trafalgar’s chairman. Sir Ni- 

■ jd Broadces, said the company 
- JotD centime to focus on direct 

■. . issels investment over the com- 
ing year. 

: ^We have spent £173 millinn 
direct asset investment in 
1985,” he told a news confer- 

■ -race. “That’s really what Tra- 

* falgar has been about and wQl 

- .'be Tor the next few months.” Of 

i total of £100 million expected 
lo be put into capital invest- 
: meat over the next year, about 
- ; £70 million would gp to the oQ 
and gas sector, he said. 


saying. 

Governor Martha Layne Collins 
said in a news conference Tuesday 
that rumors of Kentucky's selec- 
tion “sound gpod, but wc have not 
been notified” 

Until the stale gets confirmation 
of its selection, “I think it’s un- 
healthy, I think it is not a good idea 
to. assume Toyota has selected 
Kentucky ” she said ‘There's st31 
a lot of work to do.” 

Mrs. Coffins would confirm only 
that Toyota officials were “back in 
Kentucky” for more fact-finding. 

Toyota’s site-selection group has 
been to Kentucky several times and 
reportedly was considermg at least 
four sites. The Georgetown site has 


Boom 

ROME —The Italian state oil company, Agip SpA, is offering 5180 
million for Phillip s Petroleum Co.'s 35-percem stake in four North 
Sea fields known as T Block, the parent company, Bate Nazionale 
Idrocarbori SpA, said Tuesday. 

An ENI spokeswoman, confirming a report in the financial daily 11 
Sde/24 Ore, said Agjp’s offer had not yd; been accepted 
The report said Agip sought either to buy Phillips'S stake oatright, 

thus increasing its own stake to53 percent, or to diwdeit with other T- 
Block partners. 

Last month, Elf Aquitaine of France said it was bidding to acquire 
Phillips’s stake, conditional cm taking over from Phillips as operator. 
But Phillips’s partners on the block, Petrofina SA of Belgium, Agip, 
London & Scottish Marine Oil PLC, and Century Power & Light lid, 
had first right w acquire Phillips’s stake by malting a matching off a. 

D Sdc/24 Ore said the Agip offer was mteaded as a counter bid to 

one “substantially of the same order” by Elf. 

The ENI spokeswoman said she could not confirm the newspaper's 
qs-s ^ T Tioi) that a decision an Phillips’s participation would be 
this week. 

In London, a spokesman for Century Power, a subsidiary of 
Imperial Continental Gas Association, declined comment cn a Fman- 
tial Tunes report that it was bdiewd to have offered S31 2 nriflioa for 
6 percent of the Phillips stake. 

Oil industry sources said reserves on the block are estimated at 250 
to 700 miffio n barrels. 


COMP AMY NOTES 

Bdl Gnup Lfed. bought about 10 


New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — A judge has 
dosed Texaco Int’s request for a 
week’s delay of a bearing scheduled 
for Thursday to review the jury 
verdict that Texaco must pay Peon- 
203 Co. $1053 button. 

Judge Solomon Casseb, in the 
state district court in Houston, 
gave no reason for Monday's deci- 
sion, which dears the way for his 
review of the jury verdict and 
award of damages. In November, 
the Houston jurors found that Tex- 
aco bad improperly enticed Getty 
Oil Co. to back out of a merger last 
year with Pcimroil Texaco subse- 
quently acquired Getty for $10.2 
bfltton. 

Texaco, whose stock has fatten 
more than $7 since the Nov. 19 jury 
verdict, dosed Tuesday on the New 
York Stock Exchange at $31, down 
75 cents. Pennzoil stock, which has 
climbed more than $16 in the same 
period, finished Tuesday at $6625. 
a gain of S3 from Monday. 


By Brenda Erdmann 

Inirrmnwnai Herald Tribune 

LONDON —The boards of the 
Unilever companies said Tuesday 
that they plan to elect Michael An- 
gus as chairman of I Jm7<nw PLC 
and as a vice c hairman of Unilever 
NV, sneewriing Sr Kenneth Dur- 
ham, who is to retire in May at the 
annual general meetings of the 
companies. 

Upon his retirement, Sir Ken- 
neth, 61, will have been with Unil- 
ever for 36 years, the past four as 
chairman of the British arm, Unil- 
ever PLC 

Mr. Angus, 55, has been with 
Unilever for 3] years. He currently 
is a member of the special commit- 
tee, which acts as a joint chief exec- 
utive of the combined companies, 
and a vice chairman of Unilever 
PLC 

Unilever, the Anglo-Dutch con- 
sumer products company, also said 
its boards intend to appoint Johan 
P. Erbfc, currently chairman of the 
overseas committee and a vice 
chairman of Unilever NV, to be a 
member of the special committee. 

In addition, at the annual gener- 
al meetings in 1986, the companies 
said they intend to nominate Wal- 


Hardey, Unocal Chief, 
Gives Up Presidency 

La Angela Tima Service 

LOS ANGELES — Fred L 
Hartley, the feisty and outspo- 
ken 68-year-old chairman, chief 
executive and president of Uno- 
cal, is relinquishing the title of 
president to Richard J. Stegp- 
mtier, a Unocal senior vice 
president who also becomes 
chief operating officer. 

The move, approved Monday 
by Unocal’s board, elevates Mr. 
Stegemder. 57, to the No. 2 
post at the teg energy company 
and positions him as the likdy 
heir-apparent to Mr. Hartley. 
The shift marks the first time in 
21 years that someone other 
than Mr. Hartley has held the 
title of president at Unocal. 


nance director, succeeding Eber- 
bard Pothmann, who has left the 
company. Mr. Stenuer previously 
was in BMW’s headquarters in Mu- 


ur sites. The Georgetown site has Bell Ghoop Ltd. bought about 10 province flowed 40.&-degree Api ml 

been mentioned most frequently in milKon shares of Broken Hitt Pty. at the rate of 4,411 barrels a day. 
news reports as among the fmabsts. on the market Tuesday at 8.85 Aus- Foratniam Little & Co. will re- 
T suppose anything could hap- t ^ an doHars . t 55 - 98 ) «eh. wefl c cive $2 0 milKon in ex chan g e for 


its first quarter aided OcL 31. Dur- SS^sSeL 

■ns nnarftfi* tliv i>nmnam, HfiTOn 35 dlTCClOTS 01 UK pSJ£Qt _ _ _ . _ . . 




succeeds Robert Monroe, who is 
returning after two years in Lon- 
don to the carrier's Newark, New 
Jersey bead office as team manager 
for construction and development 
at Newark International Airport's 
Ter minal G Mr. Burke previously 
worked for People in various U.S. 
cities. 

Nordic Investment Bank has 
named Jannik Undbak of Norway 
as manag in g director, effective in 
March. He will succeed Bert Lind- 
slrom of Sweden, head of NIB 
since it was established in 1976, 
who is retiring. Mr. Lindbak was 
president of Storebrand Norden, 
the largest insurance company in 
Norway, from 197$ until June of 
this year, when he and a number of 
Other senior executives resigned 
following a dispute with manage- 
ment, Nordic Investment Bank is 
owned by Denmark, Norway, Fin- 
land, Sweden and Iceland. 

Bank of Ireland has opened a 
repr ese ntative office in Brussels, 
headed by Frank Hayes, who is the 
bank’s European representative. 

KaaribOwkeftaMd of Hel- 
sinki has appointed Teppo Tabor- 
man a director. He was deputy 
managing director of Bank of rid- 


ing the quarter, the company nam 35 fetors or the parent .. . 

bought bade about 35 percent of its com P amcs - To™ a join L sec- Rabobank Nedajmd hM opened 

'X^yricv*PLCjrd Una ; » rite in Pms and 

& *> Sl.l Mien from S1.7 


sumed trading an West G erman 
stock, exchanges Tuesday and deal- 


newMty is.schai- m said they expected the price to 
ulirf to begm producing 200000 rise up to the 310 Deutsche maiks 
nnd-size cars annually m late 1988 (JI2Z53) offered by the Swiss par- 
or early 1989. ent company for a further 10-per- 

The Tennessean said the 1,000- cent interest in its West German 
acre ate . (400 hectare) is on the subsidiary. Trading was suspended 
outskirts of Georgetown, about 1 1 Nov. 27. 

miles (18 kilometers) northwest of Continental 03 Co. of Indooe- 
Lexmgtoh. - sia's appraisal wefl in Irian Jaya 


Hoatin^ltatelVoks 


Tennessean's source. sumed trading on West German purchased last month for SI B3bil- 

_ ^ , , _ . • _ stock. exchanges Tuesday and deal- lion by Pantry Pride Inc. Forst- 

Toyota s newjE^ty is_sdirf- ^ said they expected the price' to mann little said all litigation 
uled to begm prratecmg 200,000 rise op to the 310 Deutsche marks would be ended “as promptly as 
nnd-szre cars annually m late 1988 ($122^3) offered by the Swiss par- practicable.” 
or early 1989. ent company for a further 10^a- Gowal Motors Corp-may phase 

The Tennessean said the 1,000- cent interest in its West German out its current Chevrolet Camaro 
acre ate. (400 hectare) is on the subsidiary. Trading was suspended and Pontiac Firebird models by 
outskirts of Georgetown, about 1 1 Nov. 27. 1988. GM had pledged to keep its 

miles (18 kilometers) northwest of Continental 03 Co. of Indone- Van Nuys plant in Los Angeles 
Lexington. sia's appraisal wefl in Irian Jaya open only as long as the current 

^ Camaras Firebirds remain in 

! unwr/Mot cmpmuxt bm Aon the lineup. The plant employs 4,300 

seoHondintn n. mjihxiius bouriy and 500 salaried weskers. 

OK 1MJ1C3 S SSS55S Litto Imtostries Inc. rqiorted a 


Commuter has signed a contract to ^Koitadam, art sue- m , 

buy five ATR 42-300 twin-engine <xed Mr - Dnon * Leyland Tracks has named Rog- 

turboprop planes and take an op- S hera ton, the hotel cham owned cr Dougherty to the new post of 

lion cm four more. The 46-seat by ITT Corp^ has appointed Andre European operations director. He The undersigned announces that the 
ATR 42-300. built by a consortium Rendaries as area manager for the wiD head a team aimed at spear- SemMiiinjaJ Rrwn 1985 of Mnkim 


ADVERTISEMENT 

MAKfTA ELECTRIC WORKS, LTD. 

(CDRa) 


consisting of France’s Aerospatiale Benelux countries, succeeding Kari heading the company’s return to EacetricWork*-Ltd.wiiibea*«laWo 
nd Ws Acriulta SpA, is de- Fogyr. »t. continues ^vic, Ic, Evropcnmutte write s ^ N . v , 


ComNnf aid AsH 


si gned for ghort flights. preddm^ sie, mxuges. for Shera- Er^mdlheB«dra. hfcEtou- 

Prenssag AG reported that group ton’s operations m West Germany, ^exty returns to Bntam after near- Rotterdam Bank N.V.. 

profit in the third quarter of 1985 Austria and Switzerland from his ty three years m France as head of Bjmk Mee> & Ho ^ 
was slightly lower than in the third base in Munich. Mr. Fendaries will Leyland Vehicules Industriels, a Kas-Assnciaiic N.v. 
quarter of 1984. It gave no figures, continue to serve as general manag- subsidiary. In France, Mr. Dou- iM8T _ nil| . 

a 'or nine er of the Brussels Sheraton. gherty is succeeded by Owen AMSTERD^f DEPCfinv 


Dollar 


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Domestic group revenue for nfnp er of the Brussels Sheraton, 
months fell to 3.17 biflion Deutsche BMW (GB) LuL, the British unit 


AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 


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$43.7 zmflion from $67^ rmTHon in prices. 


marks ($1 XI billion) from 3.48 bfl- of the West German automaker, 
lion, mainly because of lower metal Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, 


of the West German automaker, People Express Airlines has Amsterdam, 26th November, 1985. 
Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, named Timothy M. Burke as man- 
has named Frank S tenner as fi- ager for London and Brussels. He 


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VFlnOc97IMth) 

icflOfEnropoW 

ton 

W* 

MRS 

•4 

VIMIMv) 

>2 

M 87/91 

HNWD77 

onto 0097 

or Export 92 

vonaabIQ/W 

ttnnatt 96/97 

nmatett/M 

reaaaii91R5 

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vwmfcJsaSt/ti 

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tor Ha >9 
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U 

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. wfctj llAnArl 

■ M* 92/19 
*ri*Mo»97 
ndMWBWrl 
pP»wr9WW 
Boston 91/94 

, MSvsM 
Bk$M97 

■ MSwlJOW 
gtom 97 
gtoiats 
aikomu 
OtYTutnsfJ 

• I MB 95 
.■ 71 

■ 541.92 
at MRS 

nmatBOTl 

«niw 


XTNI5ISCW92 

LflHeSS+1.97 


BM 1802 HUSH8.U 
I 99-0 10UIW.1* 
ax. 12-12 nxuismw 

M IM3 99J0 99J0 
n 2401 10U5HB.I5 
8V1 2M2 9BX5 1UI 
Bk 2141 MO25M8L50 
Bk 2905 99X5 9955 
8225 13-05 9954 9956 
Bk B981 99X1 9958 
B» 31-01 ifluraoxt 
Bk - IMS HUS 
Bk 12-62 9954 9956 
to 2602 99.14 9924 
Bk 27-12 108.1816621 
S¥t 2602 9850 9845 
BV, 31-12 99P# 99J0 
Bl 1*029962 99 J2 
Bk 1901 99x0 9UD 
BN 1302 9950 10025 
to 660S 99J5 mai 
91k 1903 *50 99.15 
B. 1*2527-12 99J0 99 JO 
m uoa no 9ua 
to 19-12 99.82 99.92 
to 31-01 ff J5 VMM 
TV. Wfll 9953 99X3 
to 12-U HUMUS 
to 1501 99511 H6J8 
to 3101 maornu 

U2S 2705 99,45 9955 
1B03 99JSWJS 
81k 27-n99J»99J0 
Bk 2102 9954 M8M 
to 2MS 180.17HK27 
Bk U4199ASWM 
Ilk nos 9MS 99JB 
to 21-M tf 52 1BU3 
Bk 9601 99 JS 9953 
Bik aaam.miM.ss 
to 8M4H0J5HB.U 
4.165 2702 9950 
Bk 2703 T9J1 9951 
U3 WOI 1000210032 
8V. n-nioiusious 
to 9401 HUBM1H 
to 0904 9950 moo 
K B01 9958 M808 
to 1104 H052M643 

to W04HOOSNI.15 
to SU1 HU1W.il 

Bk 25*05 ltdCZHB-92 
Bk 27-12 WQJ21Q042 

to mi marnus 
to !H)29M*9»Ji 
to 1H1 M0.HN620 

Bk 16-n raunavo 

to 2101 HJ0.13M623 

to 11-auawm.n 

A425 S02 M.WM3I 
to wn mu mu 
to 2702 H6021W12 
to - 9955 mos 

to BMO 99JS 99.15 
K DOS KO28H0JJ 
N MIWIIW 
to H-niuma 
Bk 8M1 995S H02B 
to lsomuomun 
to Haioasnwu 

Bk 2941 99.91 10801 
to 2VM19UHWU4 
to SMB 9954 MOB 
Ik 27-07 1002710057 
M 2*01 99 J2 9955 
Bk 27421005210652 
to 1603 9950 9950 
to 2MS99J09WI 
to 0343 9M8 IWM 
«M 77-15 PWB9U* 

Bk 2742 9950 
to 2*01 WAS 9954 
to 8M199J2 9M7 
to 2H2 995* 10006 
Bk 3803 9952 99J2 
Bk 2881 10600108.10 
Ilk 1HS 9M5 9155 
99J8 99J3 
to SMI 9954 HUM 
Ilk 2M5 WJS 9950 
Bk 1341 99 JO 99A5 
Bk 1M099J# 9955 
to 2602 99X1 9252 
Bk 0742 99 JO 9958 
1UB1S42 W.40 9941 
Bk 21421950 99^ 
to 2M1 9109 MJO 
Bk I6-R9MB9990 
Bk 1545 99 J2 9952 
Bk 5441 99,45 9*55 
to boi mmooao 
m Jl-12 9955 MOJO 
to 2241 mnuoa 
n rwnottinm.il 
to H-H MQJ7WL47 
•H 1445 99.» 99JS 
Bk 2MS lOUDHUO 
to : aMUBttUO . 
to 1744 9MS 995J. 1 
to 0440 9U5 9925 ! 


UMM 

Utuw 

MatowlaMRt 

lAatovsln eo/15 IMHO 

MatoTtfo AprV/92 

nrnmta Mcvm 

Malania 18/93 

MMonia eo/as 

MmW 

MtnHm97 

MovHmHnikM 

MoriMdM 

HorMHOI 

Mar MUM 

Mcon>97 (MIWV) 

MettmUN 

MkaoodBkPirv 

M I lBp iQ Bfc PorpHaa 

BBlremd InttS 

MdtareUMB 

Mkamdli«92 

iWOtaHIntfl 

MMtavdmilt 

MttmlHa97(Cap| 

Mitsui FblM 

ManOrenMI94 

» BkDca92 
97 (Cap) 

MtUMrettH 
MB Comp Dk 09/14 
HOtWHtF«t»(A) 

Mat West PMv(B) 

MB Wart Ha 91 
Not Wart Fbi Os 
Nat West Puv (C3 
MIMM 
NiX Wort Fla 92 
tMwestmnni 
Nano 09 94 
how Zealand 17 
Nz Start Dev 92 
NanflcMn 
out« 
ohm 

Ota 95/99 

onshore JMntaa 91 
onshore MHm 04 
pirem n/94 
Pne97 

PfeSankMHRl 
OuMnrtmd (BaO M 
ReMan 
MB 94 

RmBfcQollaifX 
RevNylt 
RoaNrU 
RataKhHriiWS 
RhcOS 
RbsPorv 
KM 86/94 
Son oma 91/IB 
SiaMainiFkIO 
Sanaa Ini FkM/M 
SmwtafHnlZ 
Scandl Fla April 
ScanA Fla DaciS 


Stand Chart 94 
Stand Onrl 91 
Stand Chari Marti 
Stand Chart Mtenatch 
Stand Chart Pore 
StatattlndfeiD 
SumHomo TW 92/94 
5undnaflrtmkanf2 
Swann 
awMtonfSRS 
SMdmt2/B(MMy) 


Ttfyo Kok»97 (Cm>l 
TUVB92R4 
Totaaoin 92/94 


TnyvTrt 92/99 
TWO *4/94 
UBMorwjyfl 
UbMorwOT9* 
UMKkmomiORZ 
WMtaFarMS«Mf7 
VMtaFomn 
DMhFema 
waits Farao Frt> 97 
Wa*taac97(Cop) 
MtosGtyntl 
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V tartdBk 09/94 
Yokohama 91/91 
Yokohama 97 (Cop) 
XHdr Mmto mtl 


2307 9953 1DBJS 

m 0M1 mmooai 
to 2MSUOM1Q6.U 
n* ivaiaaaa 

to 0301 99J0 99JS 
to WB100571RU7 
to XMB 99J7 MH37 
to noa HD.1410U4 
Bk TM3 9950 99 JS 



At the heart of 
Germany^ financial capital: 

Helaba Frankfurt 


L; Non Dollar | 

Imar/MaL Goman Hut Bid AsM 

AhhavNoltaUl 92/61 
ABtaHHrlMcBKn 
/SnzBSffliW 
BkMonhvolM 
BkMovvScattaOl 
BfcTDkvvBRD 
Mindooure9l 
Brtotam*4 
Brtah46Wsrt92 
BiftaantalO 
OUonrvB/91 
COWMH 
Cr Fonder 00 
Or Hatknd 9V9S 
DanpartfSRi 
Halifax 92 
III 94 

Iretaadn 

L retad *6 

UwdieareM 
MtaBJDMHR, 

MattamrtdaB5.95 
HBWZBi And 97 

ssr -* 7 

5nd90RS 

Stand QartSta tore 
WaaiwIdiBSocM 
Yarkfhbv Ini 91/94 

CW97lY*nl 

p Fonctar Am97Ym 
NOW JUyasHU: 19/94 
Bre>92|Dn) 

Batoioai 97 (Dai) 

□be 95 (Dm) 

ConnntwhunkWCDw) 

DmdaM-Fk9ilDm) 

Ikb FtaBvfSCBp 
IU95 (Dm) Cm 
I reland 97jpni) 

MatavstaSttB 
jJ>.Marem9SCap 
RbclDailtS 
Sec Pacts Cap 
SmedsniTIDm) 

PWta Faroe *3 Cto> 

gBSSSE,^ i 

jretand^.Eort j 

StMhatntore i 

. 5aw rg CnttBt Sutsar-ftrd Boston LM. 
Lonoon 


"’if* <*:&&'■ 


LUXFUND 

SodM Anonyms 

SUge Social: 2, boufmvord Reycd, Luxemfsourg. 

H.C. Lax tn Jwog B . 7287 

Meauems lee actuwuaiieB eoal pri£s d’ansisiar & Faesemblfie g£ofinde 
exbaonfinairc qui se tieodre cn rb&tel de la Basque Intenabanale i 
Uocembouzs S_A_ 2, boulevan] Royal, Is 20 dfcmshiB 1965 & 11 beam, i 
I’effet de dSiberar our le Bsrivant : 

ORDREDVJOVR 

L Refonie des Malms pour lea mettre e® eoocoidanoe noc cartainee 
modifications de la loi. La ref mite comporte nolannntait la roxfiTicarion 

(kaanicks 1, 3, A 5. 6. 9, 10. 1L 12, 13,1^16.17,18, 19.20,21.22. 
23 et efle ccocerae pins parti cuK^twnem lea points suivanls : 

— exuudon de la durie de la soeito an 31 odobre 2015; 

— erratum (Ton capital amorist de 10.000.000 doDua UA rmrisentfi 
nor 8.000 actions de 5k- doflare dtacune de categoric 0 et par 
1.992.000 octumi de 5.- ddQore U^S- chacuno de catenae A. - 

2. CoafumatioD pour uds nouvelk dnrfo de cinq on de ramotisation 
acooidee on conaeil d'admipigtHUion d'augmoiter le camtal social 
jusqn’S concurrence de dix millions de dollara UJS. (US. SlO.OQOtOO(h 
par la citatum nonvdle (Tactions de ca^gorie A (Tone volenr nomiiialc 
de cinq doOaxs U A (U A S5) chacnn e . 


Helaba Frankfurt in brief. A solid 
banking partner. 

Helaba Frankfurt is a govern- 
ment-backed universal bank rank- 
ing among Germany's foremost 
financial institutions with total 
assets exceeding DM 66 billion. 

It offers a broad range of commer- 
cial and investment banking facili- 
ties as well as brokerage and invest- 
ment advisory services. 




imZ&mzm 


Iff 


Helaba Frankfurt serves both 
domestic and international clients. 

Concentrating on wholesale 
banking, especially in the medium 
to long-term sector, Helaba Frank- 
furt tailors its comprehensive ser- 
vices for large corporations, central 
banks, government entities, and 
other financial institutions. More- 
over, it acts as banker to the State 
of Hesse. 

Funding is facilitated through 
issuing its own bearer bonds and 
SD Certificates (Schuldscheindar- 
lehen). The total outstanding is 
some DM 27 billion. 

Helaba Frankfurt is also at 
home in key international markets, 
operating for example full service 
branches in London and New York 
as well as a Luxembourg subsidiary 
specializing in Euromarket transr 
actions and private banking. 


You’ll find Helaba Frankfurt In 
major financial centers. 

Head Office: 

Junghofstrasse 18 - 26 
D-6000 Frankfurt/Main 
Tel. (069) 132-01, Tx. 415291-0 

New York Branch: 

499 Park Avenue 

New York, New York 10022 

Tel. (212) 371 2500, Tx. 234 426 

London Branch: 

8, Moorgate. London EC2R 6DD 
Tel. (01) 7264554, Tx. 887511 

Luxembourg Subsidiar y: 

Helaba Luxembourg, Hessische 
Landesbank International S.A. 

4, Place de Paris 

Tel. (52) 499 40 11, Ts. 3295 heUlu 


lea ptoprietains (factions de catEgorie A n’roromt pas de ptiffirence 
poor la aoascription dcs actions oouVellee de categoric A i emettre dam 
le cadre dn capital autcnii£. 

Le bade refondu des statute esl daponiWe an o£ge social de la soafefi ob il 
peal etre consult* darent lee beans no nn al e B dourortare da bureaux et 
donl une copie peul 8tre obtenoe grataitement sar simple demands. 

La acliojmain* ami inionnea quo 1« poinB 1 Tordre da jour de 
raseemUee generaJe extraordinaire reqaierant qo'aa moms 50% da 
actions an drculatioo soir prfeeotes oo roprfeeailfeee d FaBsanblae, lee 
resolutions fctanl prises a la majoritt dee 2/3 dee actions prfeaues on 
wprt o ent ter . 

Pour parti riper 3 Tawembloe. tea acrioonaim soot price de dipoeer lean 
litres au porteur aux ginchsu de la Banqne Internationale 3 Luvrenlximg 
SA., 2 , boolevard Royal, an moins cinq joara francs (want TaaManbl^e. 

Lo GmbwmI iTAdm iiibirafl cHi. 


Helaba FiiddtiCA]^ 

Hessische Landesbank -Girozentrale- 







yftMW iw\ A/i DLUfl 3H 1 -g 


17k % 

a* 27% 

4110 31% 

am u% 
28* IS 
15* 8* 
23* 17 
27% 17% 
15* 11 
52% 33* 
50% 27* 
10* 5* 
11 6% 
yPn 32 
tau. a 

53* 47V, 

U ie% 

>3% 43% 
44% 2B% 
S3 44 
tf* 50% 
23* 18* 
17* 23% 
31% 13 

bb% ss* 

II 9% 
33* 30* 
52% 33% 


viCoakU 

Coopr 122 17 
Ceoplpf 190 72 
CoprTr j 40 12 
Cooovta .40 U 
Owwld 221 
Cpwtdpf 148 148 
Cardura M 17 

Corwin JJ 4i 

CamG s 123 11 
CorBIk 1-00 L7 
CnfCrd -24r 17 

Crons 130b 42 

CrckN Pt 1890 TJ 

CrmpK 120 53 
CrwZrt 1 1230 16 
12 

8ft" JO 22 

Cullrwt J 

CumEn 120 12 
Curnnc J.lHias 
Curiw 120 10 
CVdops 1.10 11 


IS 28 9 8* 

13 33 9% 9% 
IT 99 38% 38 
33 2377 47* 66% 
73 53 57* 

17 3B 24 23* 

13 BO 81% 81% 
M3 39% »* 
88 53 S3* 

8 59* 59 
2473 21% 20* 

17 15 35% 35* 
23 1558 14% 15% 

9 122 59% 47% 

22 io% io% 

18 11 39% 39* 

8 9 52% 52% 


59 — * 
30%—l% 

?&=3S 

4Mk +2* 
10 % 

39% — * 
52% — % 



Season Season 
Hiffft Law 


□POT Hlati Low Close Che. 


Grains 


WHEAT (CBT) 

XOOObu minimum- dollars per bushel 
153% 229% DOT 134% 142 

324% 287 Mar 328 142% 

<Xfl 284 5509 321% 3.18 

323% 283 Jill 184% 288 

X45 Z£T SSP 285 287% 

105% 2.93 Dec 197 198% 

Est. Solos 9800 Prow. Solas 5207 
Prev.Dov Open int. 2BJD3 aftl 
CORN (CRT} 

9800 bu mbthnom- dollars per bushel 
2.95 114% Dec 144* 245* 

197 224% Mar 244 245* 

in* 2J1 Mav 244 247% 

185 223 Jul 242* 244* 

270 224* SOT 131 225 

225% 120* DOC 125% 228% 

274% 222* Mar 235% 224 

EM. Solos 38800 Prow.Sates 21.100 
Prow. Day Open lnt.Ml.592 off 1299 
SOYBEANS (CBT) 

5800 bu mini munvdol Ion per bushel 
429 428 Jon 491% 984% 

742 485* Mar 498% 5.11% 

729 489 Maw 585 5.18% 

458 497 Jul 5.12% 525 

424 498% Auo £12 523% 

528 495 SOP 589 5.13 

422 498 Nav 585% 5.17% 

5JU 589 Jon 520 523 

427% 5.19% Mar 5JS 538 

Est. Sales 33800 Prev.Sales 24839 
prev. Day Open Int. 74215 up is 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT} 

100 tan-daiian per ton 
1B480 T2S40 Dec 14430 14580 

14380 1 27 M0 Jan U2SQ >4520 

20450 13080 MOT M12B 14580 

14250 13150 May W2O0 14780 

16780 13480 Jul 14280 14780 

15220 13550 Auo 14250 14450 

1*780 13580 Sap 14280 14480 

149 JO 13580 Od 14280 14130 

15080 13580 Doc 14450 14780 

15400 13480 Jan 

Est. Soles 20880 Prev.Sales 11M3 
Prev. Day Open Ini. 42250 off T75 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBT} 

60800 R»- dollars per 100 Ita. 

29 JB 1022 Dec 1829 19.14 

29.07 1082 Jan 1928 1925 

3880 1985 Allar 18.98 1950 

2785 1923 May 7925 1980 

2525 1984 Jul 1985 2085 

25.15 1988 Auo 1920 1925 

2405 19-55 SOT 1980 1983 

2280 1930 OCt 1980 1990 

2i.ro 1950 Dec 1988 19.90 

21.40 1988 Jan 

Est. Sales 14000 Prev. Soles 9209 
•’rey. Day Open Int. 43.905 oH28T 


325% 181* +83% 
134% 181* +84* 
3.11 3.17* +83* 

283% 286% +81 

284% 287 +80% 

226% 2.98% +80% 


282* 284% —80* 
283* 285% +80% 
284 287* +82% 

282* 244* +84 

381 2JM* +jnv. 
224* 229* +81% 
225% 224 +80% 


583* +89% 
All +.10% 
5.10% +.10% 
524% +.10% 
£23% +89% 
5.12* +85% 
A12 +.04* 


14220 14520 
MU* 145.10 
14120 14580 
14150 14780 
14280 14670 
14230 14650 
14280 14580 
14280 14150 
14180 14750 
14580 


1883 19.1] 
1822 »9J1 
1888 19 JO 
1921 1980 

1980 2080 
19 JO 2080 
1920 1983 

1975 1920 

79JB 198 7 
1980 


29 EGG SU30 238 Wo 

IS* FQKn 124 7 A 2 17 

23% E Svsl JO 1J 15 400 29% 

30 E<5£p 184, 14 11 m 28* 

12% Easts 221 73 15* 

3% East Air 4 4104 6% 

1% EALwtO 313 2% 

%EALnrlA m .JJ* 

0 EsAiret 3.5* » 14* 

»% EAIrptB420k 112 lg% 

11% EAlrpfC 106 22 

21% Eost&F 120 £2 Z18 25% 

14% EatfUtl 186 M * 04 24% 

41* EsKodS 2J70a 48 IS 4239 48% 

49% Eaton 180 22 8 144 40* 

11% E dil Ins 84 32 13 1329 13% 

20 Eckert 184 34 4 1107 30% 

26* EdlsBr 180 42 15 55 33* 

74 EDO 28 17 15 70 14% 

1 EdOnp .16 18 17 M3 11% 

22* Edward JO 27 M 473 30* 

21% EPGdpt 225 72 4 25% 

9 EITort 86a 8 11 339 10* 

7% Bear 2* 32 20 11 

2% ElecAs _ 14 » « 

15* EldSPS 88 8 25 47 33V» 

12% Eloln 80 42 IS as 13 

2 EtSdnt 203 3% 

64 EmrsEI 274 37 14 TO 75* 

4* Em Rod .Mf 104 10 510 9 

15% EmrvA ,-SO 37 13 464 15% 

24* Emhart lAOb 47 10 731 30% 

18% EmpOS 188 9.1 9 7 33* 

4 Emppt 87 98 Ite 5 

4* Emppt -50 108 300* S 

12* Energen ’84 72 10 « 14% 

EnExc 139 

21% Eooicp 72 38 13 318 24 
11% EnlsBus 26 1J 15 52 21% 

18% Ensercb 180b 7.1 141 3 96 23 

94* Ensch Pfl043Bl(J8 . RIBS 

17* ErtsExn 1700 42 9 124 19 

17i Ensrce 23 358 7% 

9% Enters 2403 11* 

12% EntexE 2508192 200 13* 

17% Enlexln 126 72 12 177 19* 


Season Season 

High low Open Hleh 

17226 12820 Mar 17280 1777S 

17545 13180 Mav 17470 19185 

17+57 13550 Jul 17880 19457 

17784 13275 SOT 18386 18784 

18380 13080 Dec 18680 18980 

17450 14230 Alter 

May 

Eat. Sales Prev. Sales 1738 

Prev. Day Open Int. 11JI1 up 35 
SUGARWORLD II (NYCSCE} 

1 12800 !b+- cents per lb- 

775 180 Jan £55 SJS 

923 324 Mar 649 6-51 

7.15 358 MOV 489 £70 

670 179 Jul AID 481 

682 424 SOP ATS 653 

720 4313 Oct 788 788 

725 625 Jan 

782 451 Mar 7J7 7J7 

Ert. Sales Prev. Soles 17815 

Prev. Oar Open Ini. Wa UP 2257 

COCOA (NYCSCE) 

1 0 metr k tons- *per ion 

3337 1W Dec 2140 2140 

239! 1955 Mar 2210 22T2 

2422 I960 May 2240 22*3 

2*29 1W0 Jul 2292 2297 

2430 2823 Sea 2305 2317 

2*25 2QS5 Dec 

2385 3029 Mtr 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 578 

Prev. Day Open Int. 1783* oft 47 
ORANGE JUICE (NYCE1 
15800 Ibsr cents per lb. 

18080 111.70 Jon 11150 113J5 

17750 11250 Mar 11585 11580 

14250 111.95 May 1 15.90 11580 


39% 39% + % 

17 17 — * 
29% 29% — % 
28* 28% + * 
17% 18* + % 

4% 5% 

2 * 2 % + * 
1% 1% 

■4 16* + % 

18 15% + % 
21% 21% 

25 25 

24% 24% + % 
48% 4B%— % 
59% 40 
11% 13% + % 
30% — % 
33 33* + * 

15% 1<% + % 
10* II* + % 
29% 30% 

25% 25% 

10% 10% + % 
10 * 11 + % 
4% 4% + % 

217k 22 
12% 13 + % 
3 3*— % 

74* 74% — % 

sm m + * 

13* 15% 

30 » 

22% 23* + * 
5 5 +% 

9 5 — % 

14% 14% + % 

23% 27%— * 
21 % 21% + % 
22% 22%—% 
103% 703% 

18* 19 
2 * 2 *— % 
10* 11% + % 
13 13 — * 

18% 18*—% 


1ET80 111.70 Jan 11150 I13J5 

17750 11250 Mar 11385 11580 

14250 111.95 May 1 15.90 11580 

15750 11180 Jul 11600 11600 

180.50 moo Sep 11128 11125 

11483 11150 Now 

11380 11280 Jan 

161.25 I IT JO MW HUS 11225 

May 

E si. Sales TOO Prev. Sales ijoo 

Prev. Day Open I nL 7,136 


COPPER (COMETv) 

25800 ibv- cents per lb. 

842S 5950 Dec 6180 6150 40J0 

6420 5175 Jot 

Feb 

5080 59-20 Mar 4150 61 JO 4130 

7400 4080 MOV 6185 6280 61-70 

7480 4035 Jul 62.15 6285 6280 

70.90 4090 SOT 6255 4265 4255 

7030 6185 Dec 6113 <385 5105 

7080 6130 Jan 

67 JO 4235 Mar 

6730 4290 May 6413 6415 6400 

4480 4125 Jul 

5440 61-50 Sep 

Est. sales Prev. Sales 

Prev. Day Open Int. 75,105 


COFFES C (NYCSCE) 

37300 lbs.- cents per tb. 

17185 12985 Dec 16BJ0 17380 15830 14985 — T38 


Currency Options 


Doc. 3 

PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Opt too A Strike 

Underlying Price Cath — Last Put* — Last 

Dec Jen aav Dee Jan Mar 
12JOO British PountH-COTt* per on ft. 

B Pound no 3880 5 r r s r 

148.19 1M r r r r r 085 

148.19 135 1260 r 1260 r r OJV 

14419 140 42) r 400 r 035 1 30 

148.19 M5 380 180 SJ0 085 s 380 

148.19 150 445 130 2J3 280 r 425 

14419 155 DOS 085 135 r r r 

SUM Canadian DoUareceati per ana. 

CDollr ra r s r r s 0.17 

71.96 71 r r r r r 082 

7154 72 aU r 080 086 r r 

71.9* 73 r All r 1.19 r r 

71.94 74 r r r 1J9 r 2J7 

52300 W«t Oermaa MorKs-cents per untt. 

OMark 33 457 e r r ■ r 

JR8 34 S. 50 s t r s r 

3»-53 34 387 r r r r 0.13 

39 JJ 37 160 r 190 r r r 

39-52 38 131 1J7 222 DJI 0.14 0X1 

19J2 39 0.70 H9B 133 039 0J0 0.75 

3932 40 AM 035 1J9 034 085 181 

3932 _ 41 r A18 038 r r r 

rmmo Preedi Pnmo-lltla et a ctetf per unit. 

FFronc 120 r r r A15 r r 

12932 125 430 r r r r r 

1293? IX r r 3JC r r r 

485*3*0 Japanese Yen-noms of a cent per unit. 

JYen 41 730 s r r j r 

4883 43 574 r 582 T r r 

4883 45 334 r r r r 0JM 

4833 *4 232 239 220 r 0.03 All 

*333 47 132 138 104 r r 086 

4833 48 A90 1.13 1+0 036 124 155 

4U3 49 A» OJS A0» 036 A63 AW 

4833 50 0J5 080 050 180 r r 

0500 Swiss Frana-cents per unit. 

SFnanc M 1US ■ r r s r 

4787 40 788 s r r 5 r 

*787 41 6«47 e r r s r 

4787 42 585 s r r s r 

4787 43 482 r r r r r 

4787 45 r r 381 r r r 

4787 45 r r 247 002 r r 

4787 47 A43 r 150 0.1S r r 

4787 48 A16 0J2 182 A7J r r 

Feb May Awe POT M*r Ana 

antMafinK»«nvMlL 

5 Franc 49 A52 s 9 fa s 

Total call v*L 11813 Call open tat. MBJ5S 

Total PUt wl. 9.198 Pul open Int. 171818 

r— Nat traded, s— Hu option ottered. 

Last Is Premium (Purchase price I. 

Source: ap. 



9180 8834 Dec 9188 

9085 BS80 Alter 91.10 

Est. Sales 70 Prev.Sales 94 
Prev. Day Opot Int. 1742 
EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

SI mllllorv-pts otlOOncL 

9217 1430 Dec 9134 9135 9130 *134 

9214 86.10 Mar 9181 01.84 91J7 9133 

9133 0573 Jun 9133 9137 91 jV 9135 

9181 *738 Sep 9183 9180 9182 9187 

9180 8788 Due 9135 91.12 9134 9186 

9130 8734 Mar 9089 9032 9077 9030 

9069 BAS* Jun 9034 9034 9030 9033 

90.41 8989 Sep 908$ 9089 9A25 9084 

Est Sains 31300 Prev. Soles 51731 
Prev. Day Open I nt.U+257 upl 
BRITISH POUND (IMHO 
S oer pound- 1 odnt equals SUN01 
1.4775 13200 Dec 13745 13830 13710 13785 

1.4845 1.0440 Alter 13625 13725 13400 13673 

13755 1.1905 Jun 13570 13515 U57D 13575 

1.4*65 1.1590 Dec 13455 

Est. Sales 9822 Prev. Sales 9341 
Prev. Day Open Int. 3&5tf 


J per tu r - 1 po*nl equals SQJOOT 
7555 -7006 Dec 7193 7197 71*2 7192 

850* 3981 Mar 7149 7176 8140 8171 

8340 8070 Jun 8149 8157 8U2 7152 

.7303 7130 Sep 7135 7135 7135 7134 

7548 77*0 Dee . - - 7117 

Est. Sales 4,113 Prev. Salas 3794 
Prev. Day Open Int. 8J16 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

Sper f ranc- 1 point oauaicSUOQOI 
.13070 39670 Dec .12900 .12950 .13100 .12950 

.12985 .10985 Mar .12X5 .12915 .12875 .12890 

.12645 -17120 Jun .12050 

EU. Salts 17 Prev. Sales 73 
, Prev. Day Open Int. 170 

GERMAN AtARK(UUM) 

Sper mark- 1 point OTualsSOJOOl 
3009 8971 Dec 8947 8967 8938 8956 

X046 8940 Mar 8982 3003 8972 J991 

3060 8335 Jun .4019 3033 3009 3324 

3122 8743 Sep 3075 3075 3075 3066 

31S4 8300 Dec 3114 

EH. Sotos 26384 Prev. Sales 29,930 
Prev. Day Open Int. 57847 
JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

Sper yen- 1 point ooucis BLOOOOO] 

004988 803905 Dec 304882 304893 304872 304081 
004995 304035 AAar 304888304903304880304891 
005010 30*220 Jun JXMM8 304919 30€B»J)04H9 
' 005003 30*490 Sep 304922 

004985 304159 Dec 304941 

Est. sates U327 Prev. Sates 10770 
Prmr.Oay Opot Int. 39,405 
SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

S per franc- lpelrd equals 03001 
3831 8S31 Dot 3741 3782 3725 3741 

3885 8835 Mar .4790 38a 3784 3792 

3925 3190 Jun 3010 3861 3837 38*3 

3930 3790 Sep 3899 3900 3899 3W0 

Est Sales 2X195 Prev. Sates 22,164 
Prev. Oent Open Int. 25047 off4J5B 


LUMBER (CA4E) 

uw 

19530 129-70 Mar 14A80 1S1J0 

17630 13520 May 15530 15640 

18380 1*9J0 Jul 14830 16030 

17680 15X90 Sep 74350 16*30 

in JO 15650 Nav 15470 15430 

14880 14680 Jan 

Est.Sotes UM7 Prev. Soles U55 
Prev. Day Open Int 6487 
COTTON 3 (MYCE) 

50800 lbs-- cents per %. _ 

7380 5751 . Dec 4075 51.19 

7675 5877. Mar 4030 M80 

7080 BJJC MOV 407* 51.10 

7005 5A20 JUI 5975 S9M 

6550 5230 Oct SX70 5375 

5975 5085 Dot 5170 5175 

657S 5255 Mar 5259 4271 


Financial 


UST. BILL5CIMM} 

SI million- Pis Otiaopcl. 

9388 *5.77 DOT 9270 9293 9285 92.93 

93.13 6U0 AAnr 02J5 92.« 9285 92.93 

92-91 8781 Jun 9178 7130 7272 9277 

9163 8880 SOT 9149 9152 9238 9151 

9135 B9J5 Dec 9123 9123 9220 9123 

7107 4958 Mar 9134 9174 9174 91.95 

9182 9050 Jun 9175 9175 9188 9170 

91-53 9083 ..Sep, 9134 9134 9134 9135 

ESI. Sates 4822 Prev.Sales 11895 
Pray. Day Open int. wJT 
10 Y(L TREASURY (CBT1 

sioaooe t*>n-pn «- of 100 «s 

90-14 75-13 DOC 89-16 89-21 89-10 39-71 

B9-1B 70-14 AAar 88-17 88-24 88-10 88-24 

SB-19 MOO Jun 07-27 

87-34 ■ 80-7 Sea 87-1 

B7-1 80-2 DOT 86-10 

Est. Sates _ , Prw- Soles 
Prev. Dav Open ini. 44733 
U5 TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 

1 iBPct-n00300tets&32n(l3oiimpct] 

8M 578 Dot 30-25 9MT 88-74 tC-X 

B0-31 S7J Alter 79-15 79-21 79-5 79-21 

7940 56-29 Jun 78-14 78-18 784 78-17 

70-31 56-29 SOT 77-11 77-18 77-5 77-15 

788 56-25 Dec 74-18 76-20 74-7 76-17 

77-12 5647 Alter 75-27 75-27 W-M 7Kf 

76-20 63-12 Jun 7S-S 75-5 7+25 7+28 

7+5 43-4 Sep 7+11 7+16 7+2 7+10 

75-24 53-24 Dec 73-15 7H8 78-15 73-21 

7+24 67 Altar 73-13 

74-4 5+25 _ Jun 73 


Prev. Dav Open Int. 2X30B up 112 
HEATING OIL(NYME) 

4X000 gat- cants par eaJ 
7075 4930 Jot 8730 87J5 

W.T5 7030 Feb 8630 8730 

8535 6130 Mo r SI JO 813S 

S38 SS tSS, %£ 

7£39 7A25 Jun 7100 7100 

7430 70JB JW 7130 7130 

%£ & %£ SS 

I^OPOT^.WSt2J77 

CRUDE OIL (NYME) 

1300 bbl.- dollars perbM. 

21.17 2439 Jan 79M 2935 

3033 24JS Feb 2935 29.10 

2938 24J3 Mar 28J9 2A35 

29+5 ZL93 Apr 2730 Z730 

2S35 2X65 May Z7.10 2735 

2736 23JH Jun 2+45 2+75 

2733 2435 Jul 2+45 2+45 

7JS3 2490 Aug 2538 2635 

2730 2430 Sep 2536 2330 

2+73 2115 Od 2531 2530 

2+N 2+ 'O Nov 2£43 2533 

2+20 2430 Dec 

Est Sales ii3U Prev. sates 11306 
Prev. Day Open Inl. 57399 off 400 


Stock Indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CUE) 

Points and cents 

20430 17570 Dec 20030 20135 

70+50 18230 Mar 20230 28X90 

20A40 18X99 Jun 20430 20535 

210.10 1*239 Sep 20+15 OAJ5 

Est. Soto 5+127. Prey. 5gjes 40092 
Prev. Day Open Int. 74309 
VALUE UNB(KCBT) 

points and cents __ 

217.Q5 18330 Dec 205J0 207 JO 

21230 19030 AAar 2DA5D 21035 

21130 19730 Jun 

3MJS 20035 Sep . 

Est Sales Prev. Sale* +977 

Prev. Day Open Int. 11345 off 341 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYPE) 
points and cents 

11735 WUB Dec 11X70 1163S 

119.25 1D£5D ' Mar 117.10 117 JO 

120.10 10+90 Jun 11830 11335 

1SJJ5 108.18 SOT 11930 11930 

Est. Sale* KM 60 Prev.Sales 9323 
Prev. Day Open Int 7318 off 51 3 
MAJOR M KT IN DEX (CBT) 
ootetsendejphte 

281 2*9% Dee 275% 277% 

281% 270* Jan 278% 27E 

282% 221 AAar Z7W4 278% 

Est. Soto Pnrv-soto 

Prev. Day Open Int. 1,765 


1400 14538 
149J8 15088 
lg.M IC30 
15930 16850 
14350 14430 
UX50 16+70 
14830 


4075 <L15 
6030 4874 
4878 6055 
59JB 5931 
5X70 5175 

5U0 3135 

5259 5159 
SU3 


8035 80.10 
7530 7530 
7130 7130 

7030 7130 

7OJ0 7030 
7030 7030 

7880 7030 


733 2735 
735 2737 
+70 2+70 


21% 1516 NAFCO 130 S3 16 4 10 17Ai 17%—* 

38% 23% NBDs 130 18 7 349 36% 36% 36% + % 

2H6 10% NBI )1 304 12% 11% 12* + % 

22% 17% NCH 72 X3 14 120 31% 21% 31% + % 


London 

Commodities 


Mar 147J0 16430 16430 16438 IgJB 16730 
May 17130 M930 I68DJ M84fl 171JK 17130 
Ate* N-T- N.T. 17330 17*3017530 17430 
OO 18130 17830 T773Q 17830 18030 18130 
Volume: 1370 late of ® tens. 


Commollities 


Cash Prices 





Commodify and unit 

CojfOT 4 Santos, lb 
PrW*Bjh6*^03S%. Vd — 

Sleet billets (PIH.I, Ian 

Irena Fdry. Philo, ton 

Steel scrap No 1 hw Pitt. _ 

TUO 

130 

«J4 

47830 

nsjo 

73-74 

» 

AOT 

1JS 

Ml 

<7X80 

91336 

81-82 

2J-S0 

Tin tsiralta), lb 

OiR E- St. L Basis, lb 

Paltoclurn, . 

HA 

IU5 

*8101 

XU 

148)43 

Source: AP. 

+60 

7.W 



29235 20X85 
28435 20530 


11&70 114J5 
11730 11770 
118JM 11X85 
11935 12035 


275% 276% 
276% 277 
377V. 278% 


J« 1385 1335 1,« 1340 M40 W5 

Mar 2338 1375 2307 2M UB UN 

May 1054 7AM ion £M0 Z3J1 2333 

Jly 2390 2350 2347 2375.1360 2361 

Sep UU 2370 2391 2399 23*5 2392 

NOV XI 35 XI 20 XI 11 2.720 X100 X10S 

JOT XT35 XI 20 XT2B 2A«0 1130 X1S5 

Volume: +4*7 lots of 5 tons. • • 

GASOIL 

as. dultars per mMc ten 
Dec 27033 24430 24434 24450 24+75 24+00 
Jan 24*30 23X75 2SX75 23936 299J0299 J5 
Feb 23930 23*30 23430 25*30 23430 23+73 
Mar WMS 2*X73 242J3 24X25 2*430 24+7S 
AM 23+50 Z3123 23X00 23X50 23X50 234.00 

Sr--38SSSSBSS» 

Jly 22890 772 wi 22X75 22438 1 itt.rn 

Ate 22790 22538 22X00 22730 22X50 22930 
Volume: 2331 lota OflOO tens. ' 


CRUDE OIL (BRENT) 

UJ8. BBHnre par barrel 

Jot 3870 3X35 3830 2BJ» 3830 2X40 

Feb 2830 27 AO 27A5 2773 27 JS 77 MO 

Mar 2730 2730 5+90 J7.10 3+40 2738 

AM N T, N.T. 3+10 3690 2+00 2+90 

MOT N.T. N.T. 363B 26J0 2530 2+00 

Jot N.T. K.T. 25 JO 2730 2540 2+70 

volume: 3)9 lets at 1300 barrels. 

Saunas: ftcvfersoml umOon Pptr e lvw n E*- 
chonoe fpaseU, crude oH). 


London Metals 


RS5 1 Jan_ 1SX7S 15X25 UXS0 -1SX7S 
RSS 1 Feb_ 15X73 15*35 15X50 15438 

RSS2Jan_ i4xoo i«3o i*xoa 1*930 
RSS J Jan — K+00 M730 .16+30 - 14730 

RSS*Jchl_ 1*230 14410 . -1*230. ■ 14108 

RSS 5 Jan _ 15739 13930 13730 13930 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL - - 


DM RiUires 
Options 

iy. AmeiMet-nMmartsiMMriiHtt 



Esun ctea to tal VUL 5357 
CeBs: Man. yeL 4437 epee let 


Dec. 3 

dose Prev tees 

•Id Aik BU Aik 

ALUMINUM 
Starting per metric ton 
SPOl 65130 65330 65850 65130 

Forward 67+50 67+50 67450 47+00 

COPPER CATHODES (HWi flrud e ) 

Serftm per metric ten 
Spat 91630 91730 91X50 . 91430 

Forward _ 9*30 93X50 &S436 93S3o 

COPPER CATHODES WmUvST 
Benina per metric ten 
Spat 89030 89530 89X00 89530 

Forward 91930 921 30 91+00 93030 

LEAD 

Stem paper metric to* 

Soot 26730 26030 36X00 2d 50 

Foreart 27*30 2)530 2)030 27030 
NICKEL 

Starting per m te r lctnn 

Spat J*70J10 SOUS 248+00 249+00 

SILVER J7XJS 173530 273000 273530 

Peace per *reyeuacs 

Spot 40*30 41030 40430 40+00 

Forw ard <130 42230 41630 41738 

TIN (Slasiterul 

SleriRip per metric tea 

Spot . . . Sues. Sun, ■ — • . — . 

Forward Soap. Sum, — — 

ZINC 

SterRna per metric tea 

Soot 41X00, 41530 41X30 41+00 

Source: AP. 


BM 57S Dec 9025 SM7 8 M4 SOX 

B0-31 S7-2 Alter 79-15 79-21 7X5 79-21 

7+30 56-29 Jun 78-14 78-18 784 78-17 

79-31 56-29 SOT 77-11 77-18 77-5 77-15 

78] 5825 Dec 76-18 7820 787 76-17 

77-12 5837 Alter 75-27 75-27 W-M 7Kf 

7820 63-12 Jun 75-5 75-5 7825 7828 

785 63-4 Sep 7811 7816 782 7810 

75-2* 62-24 Dec 73-15 7H8 72-15 7MI 

7824 67 _ Altar 73-13 

74-4 6825 Jun 73 

E5t.satoi40jni Pm EaiesNoooa 
Prev. Day Open Inl .30+778 
MUNICIPAL BONDS (CBT1 
Si 000* indes-eta & 32nd5 of H» Pd 
2^° Si:! 7 ^ 87-20 87-24 87-13 87-5* 

8J-I 0W Mar 8813 8817 885 8814 

ES 2,- ^ un 8S-W 85-10 85-7 854 

84-20 79-10 5«a 8812 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales 
Prev. Day Open Int. I137B 

CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

SI million- pbaflOOpa 

8SJ4 Dec 9113 9X13 9237 9X12 

«.« 8+54 AAar 9111 9X11 9X11 9X11 

9X13 8643 Jun 91,96 

91J9 8736 Sen 9137 


Commodity Indexes 


Ctose 

Moody'S— 924.90 1 

Reuters — .. — 1J3190 

DJ. Futures 12X25 

.Cam. Research Bureau- 22X00 

‘ Moody’s : base 100 : D*C 31. 1931. 

0 ■ preliminary ; t- final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sea. 18. toi. 
Dew Janes : base 100 ; Dec3i, 197+ 


Previous 
92730 f 
1,70830 
12235 
227.90 






NWB WMf PNslasI 

Mtt-DK J* Fcft Mor DvC Jm M Msr 

IN — — — — 1/14 1/14 l/W — 

173 T9B 19% B — 1/14 1/14 H _ 

B wm w - 1/14 ft % to 

w yu Wto »* Hto VH 7/u to IH 

na M M 6to 7« 9/U 17/162% m 

35 3S 9SF4Wi m Hi 

,m to Tto 2 1/M 2ft 6% M 7ft S 

as i/m ft i m in nit - im 


TeU cNI vttsm BUEB ■ 

TsWcMeete tat 50725 
T4M pel Wfttet- 99867 
TMdMt teuel*74STB 

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Company 

Results 

..^W qn tfPniH ta or toses. in 

“•ssssr-” 


•- .10 1 
a 39 
Q 31 ■ 

§ £ 
Q AS 
Q- S3. 

■ . so 

e 36 

a 37 

Q J2fe 
'Q 32%.' 
.9.. SB 1 
O 36 
Q JS 1 
0 .12%. 

e m 



DtteOTM pm. 

INT BM Yield YMd 


HnentabW 
Freer bfll 


. .“ b* oner Yield v%m 

te-yr. bond 9937/77 9929/32 939 ?J4 

smerSoiimn'aniiten. 

Merrfli bmt*TVtoi » ry tad w; 13X68 

awpeefenbeaerri-asi 

A«wOTe.vwa:?23'% - 
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\ s 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1985 


Page 1' 



Aerial Spraying Contract 
Onchocerciasis Control Program 
West Africa 


, ..tljl.V' 


; i* 


The World Health Organization (WHO) will be invit- 
ing tenders from aerial spraying contractors for the 
provision of suitable helicopter and fixed-wing aircraft, 
together with the necessary support and services to 
continue the spraying operations of the Onchocerciasis 
Control Program in West Africa. This program is being 
executed by WHO in Benin, Burkina Faso, Ghana, 
Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Ivory Coast, Mali, Niger, Senegal, 
Sierra Leone and Togo. One aerial base will be at 
Odienng, Ivory Coast, with a second at Kara, Togo. 

The operations involve the application of precise 
quantities of larvidde to rivers and streams where breed- 
ing sites of the blaekfly, which transmits the disease 
onchocerciasis, are located. Flight circuits, detailing rivers 
to be treated and type and quantity of larvidde to be 
applied, are planned weekly and must be followed as 
prescribed for successful control to be achieved. Helicop- 
ters will also be used for surveillance of the rivers. The 
total length of river systems throughout the program area 
where surveillance and treatment will be required to be 
.undertaken during the course of the contract is of the 
order of 50,000 km$. in the rainy season, with reduced 
distances during the dry season. 

To date Hughes 500D helicopters and Turbo Thrush 
fixed- wing aircraft hove proved adequate for these 
operations but alternative helicopters and aircraft of 
equal or improved performance with the required char- 
acteristics for this flying will be considered. Fuel for the 
operations will be provided by WHO. 

Currently, formulations of five different larvirides are 
being applied to the river systems in the area and others 
may be introduced during the course of the contract. A 
critical requirement will be the development and provi- 
sion of suitable application equipment, compatible with 
the larvidde formulations used, to meet the on-going 
needs of the program. Details of such equipment, proven 
to be capable of meeting precise specifications will be a 
prerequisite to bid consideration. 

The next contract for the three-year period 1987-1989 
will call each year for a core of four helicopters for the 
period January to April increasing to six from May to 
December, plus one fixed-wing aircraft from January to 
May increasing to two from June to December, with a 
guaranteed minimum of 10,560 helicopter flight hours 
and 2,850 fixed-wing flight hours being paid oyer the 
contract period. Additional helicopters up to a maximum 


of three may be requested by the Organization to meet 
the increased workload of the rainy seasons. 

A single contractor with a proved successful manage- 
ment structure will be appointed to be responsible for all 
the required aerial operations; a consortium of compa- 
nies with a complex management structure will not be 
acceptable to the Organization. However, sub-contract- 
ing will be permissible with the prior agreement of WHO. 

Contractors who wish to be considered to tender are 
invited to write to the address below marking the enve- 
lope "OCP Aerial Spraying Contract" and providing the 
following details: 

(1 ) Number of years company has been in operation; 

(2) Details of management structure and experience 
in aerial spraying; 

(3) Number and types of aircraft owned and operat- 
ed; 

(4) Number of pilots and engineers in permanent 
employment; 

(5) Names of countries where company has carried 
out aerial contracts wrath indications of type of 
work carried out; - 

(6) Experience in the development of specialized 
spraying equipment; 

(7) Proposals, £ any, for sub-contrading; 

(8) Indication of the method by which a Bid Bond of 
10%, Performance Bond of 25% and Payment 
Bond of 20% respectively of anticipated contract 
price will be provided. 

All such information, which will be treated in strictest 
confidence, must be provided in English or French and be 
received in Geneva by January 17, 1986. Companies, 
pre-selected to tender on the basis of an adequate 
response to this advertisement, will then be required to 
attend an on-site briefing in Ouagadougou and the 
program area, during the week commencing Febru- 
ary 17,1986. 

It must be emphasized that the final selection of 
contractor will not be on bid price alone, but will also be 
based on technical merit. 

Chief, Liaison Office 
Onchocerciasis Control Program 
Work! Health Organization 
1211 GENEVA 27 
Switzerland. 



Tne Dutch nave a worldwide reputation. For being good, astute businessmen. 
Were proud of this. But we also know that it’s just not enough. Not in the world of 
international banking which grows daily more complex and sophisticated. 

Today, AMRO has an international banking capability precisely 
tuned to institutional, commercial and corporate needs. Indeed, we 
are built around diem. 

Why not get in touch and test our competitive edge. We’ve got 
ah of die Dutch business virtues as well. 


Amro Bank 

AjristeidanvRrtteiidam^rik 


A\TWEW BASLE BERLIN BERNE BONN COLOGNE COLOMBO DUBAI DCSiELDORF FRANKFURT 1 GENEVA HAMBURG IKlNI. KUM. HOUSTON JAKARTA UWUOX 
LOS ANGELES MELBOURNE MONCHfiNGUUJBACH MOSCOW MUNSTER NEW DELHI NEW TORE PARIS SAN FRANQSCU MM-APtlRE SVDNET TAIPEI Tumi) Zuiunj 






















































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08- OU a-iru: 
09.00 a.m.: 


10.00 un.: 
10.30 a an.: 


11.00 a-nu: 
11.25 a.m.: 


01.00 p.m. 

04.00 pan. 
04>0S p.m. 
04.25 p-m. 
04.45 p.m. 
05. 15 p-m. 


08.00 p.m.: 


THE ARAB BANKERS ASSOCIATION, LONDON 

is pleased to announce its Third Conference. 

"ARAB SHIPPING INDUSTRIES AND BANKING” 

to be held at the 

Sheraton Hotel, Kuwait, 26 to 28, January. 1986 

in collaboration with 

Hie International Centre for Shipping and Shipping Finance, 

The City University Business school, London 

sponsored by 

THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY, Kuwait 
H.E A. Alsagar, President of the Conference 

SUNDAY, 26 lb JANUARY, 1986 

REGISTRATION 

Official opening. Welcome addrese, HLE A- Aloagar, President, Chamber of Comment & Industry, Kuwait, Hr. B. Zoubairi, Chairman, 
Arab Bankers Associations, London. Introduction Professor C. Th. CrammeoM, Director, International Centre for Skipping & Supping 
Finance . City University Business School. 

Co Bee Break 

MORNING SESSION, Skipping Markets & Seaborne Trade, H-E A. Alaagar, Chairman, President Chamber of Commerce & Industry, 
Kuwait Speakers 

Mr. A.L. Al- Hamad, Chairman. Arab Fund for Erotumtie and Social Development, farmer Kuwait Minuter of Finance, The Maritime Sector b 
Arab lxorwtfitci3cW$pment A Critical Look 

Ur. R.M. Siopford. Director, British Shipbuilders, London, U.K, Emerging Nations in Seaborne Trade The Arab Case 

Mr. A. EL Satan. Chief Executive, United Arab Shipping Company, Kuwait, Gulf States Future Pranerts in liner Shipping. PaneHats: Mr. 

A.L. At-Hamad, Dr. R.M. Siopford, Mr. A.H. Satan. Mr. K. Faradon, Editor, Lloyds List, London, Mr. AJP. Kl i m a, Chairman, B. 

Clarkson & Co. London 

Luncheon 

AFTERNOON SESSION, Mr. A. Al Tmnmar, Chairman, Governor, Central Bank of Kuwait, Speaker* 

Mr. A. Al-Badr, Chairman & Managing Director. KOTC, Kuwait. Kuwait Oil Tankers Influence b 1984-1965 
Mr. A.F. Klima. Chairman. H. Clarkson & Company, London, UK, Tankers - All is not Gloom 
Afternoon Tea 

Mr. T. Rafgard, Secretary General. Intertanko, Oslo, Norway, Arab Shipping Role m Scrapping. Panelists: Mr. R. Fanadon, Mr. A. 
Al-Badr. Mr. A.F. Klima, Mr. T. Rafgard and Mr. A. Sultan, Pice-Chairman and Managing Director of Arab Maritime Petroleum 
Tankers Co. 

Dinner heeled by the Chamber of Commerce & Industry Kuwait 

MONDAY, 27 tb JANUARY, 1986 


ping. Panelists: Mr. R. Faradon, Mr. A. 
fanaging Director of Arab Maritime Petroleum 


09.00 a-tn. 
09.05 a_m. 

09.30 a.m 
09.55 a.m. 
10-15 a.m. 
10.45 a jn. 


01.00 p.m.: 

04.00 p.m.: 
04.05 p.m.: 

04,25 a.m. 
Gk-15 p,n». 
05.15 pjn. 


08.00 p.m.: 


09.00 a.m.: 
09.05 a.m.: 
09.30 a.m.: 
09.55 wl: 
10.15 a.m.: 
10.-15 a. m.: 


01.00 p-m.: 

04.00 p.m.: 

04.05 p.m.: 
01JS p.m.: 
04.45 pjn.: 
05.15 p.m.: 

08.00 p.m.: 


OAPEC Speakers 


Mr. M. Karat Add, Chairman, Sues Canal Authority. Suez Canal and World Shipping 

Mr. Graham Day, Chairman. British Shipbuilders. U.K London, Training & Transport: linking Needs in Ocean Shipping Development 
Coffee Break 

Dr. G. Moukfatar, Director General Maritime Aeadmy of Alexandria, Human Investment b the Arab Maritime Sector. Panelists: Mr. L 
Gbalaby. Mr. M. Exrat Adel, Mr. Graham Day, G. Mookbtar and CapL A. Al-Diwani, Director General Arab Maritime Transport 
Academy. Sharjah 
Luncheon 

AFTERNOON SESSION, Mr. B. Papaehristidw, Chairman. Chairman, Papathrititidis. (UK), LteL, London 

Captain A. Al-Drwaai, Director General Arab Maritime Transport Academy. Sharjah, The RoUof the Arab Maritime Transport Academy b 
the Arab Maritime Economy 

Mr. A. Vgeaopoalos. Vgenopaulos Law Offices, Piraeus, Greece, Legal Aspects for the Development of Arab Shipping 
Afternoon Tea 

Mr. A. AJ-Jadir, Former Director of Shipping, UNCTAD, Geneva, financing Arab Maritime Transport for the next IS years. Panelists: Mr. 
G.CM. Cooke, Consultant, Baker & McKenzie, Solicitors, London, U.K. , Captain A. Al-Diwani, Mr. A- AJ-Jadir and Mr. A. 
Veenopoukra 

Dinner hosted by National Bank of Kuwait 

TUESDAY, 28th JANUARY, 1986 

MORNING SESSION, Shipping Finance & Investment, Mr- Graham Day, Quantum, Chief Executive, British Shipbuilders, London 


; b the Growth of Arab 


MUKIMPivi snipping Finance & Investment, Mr. Graham Day, Quantum, Utuf Executive, LSntuti Shipbuilders, London 

Mr. A. Al-Turki, Managing Director, National Shipping Co. Saudi Arabia, The Role of Banking in the Growth of Arab Shipping 
Mr. L Dabdoab, Chief General Manager, National Bank of Kuwait. Shipping Finance in Arab Banking 

Mr. B. Papacbriatidis, Chairman, Papachristidis. (UK), Ud London, Initiatives b Ocean Transportation: A Foreign Owner's Point of View 
Coffee Break 

Mr. T. Petropouloe, General Manager. OMNIBANK, London. Changes in Maritime Investment Opportunities: The Case for the Creation of an 
Arab Maritime Investment Fund. Panelists: Mr. I. Dabdoab. Mr. & Faradon, Mr. EL Papacscristidhs Mr. T. Petropouloe and Sir. 
A. ALTurki 
L unche on 

AFTERNOON SESSION, Professor Costas TY Graznmenos, Qufirmm., Director, the International Centre for Shipping and Shipping 
Finance. Tie Gty University Business School 

Mr. M. Ridha, Chairman, Iraq National Insurance Company, Ranking, I paicmrg and the Shipping Industry 

Mr. J-J-P. Toomer, Deputy Chairman Jardine GlanviU Ud. (Lloyd's Brokers) London UJL. Marine Insurance in the *9 O’* 

Afternoon Tea 

Mr. G.CM. Cooke. Consultant. Baker & McKenzie, Solicitors. London UK, Financing Joint Ventures . Minimising [be Risk in Law. Questions 
and Diseussiofu. Closing Remarks and ReeommendatioiM 
Dinner hostrd bv Kuwait 03 Tankers Co. 


ABA Members: £400.00. Non Members: £500.00. Cheques pavablr to .Arab Bankers Association. 

Arab Bankers Association, 1/2, Hanover Street, London WLR 2WB. England. Telephone (01) 629-5423. Tdet 297338 ABA-G. 


Beijing Warns Japan 
To Cut Trade Surplus 

Reuters 

BELLING — The Chinese leader, Deng Xiao- 
ping, has fl grin told Japan that China will not 
tolerate a continuing major trade deficit, the 
official Xinhua News Agency reported Tues- 
day. 

“If the imbalance in Sinc-Japanese trade is 
not corrected, it is impossible for China and 
Japan to further their economic contacts and 
trade,” the agency quoted Deng as saying. 

He told a delegation from the Japanese Assd* 
dadon for the Promotion of international 
Trade that China could support a trade deficit 
for one or two years, but not a third. 

China’s foreign trade minister. Zheng Tuo- 
bin, said Tuesday that be expected the trade 
deficit with Japan to widen to about S5 billion 
this year from $1.25 billion last year. 


Reaching More 
Than aThtrd of a 
Million Readers 
in 164 Countries 
Around the World. 
HcraliC^rEribunc 


■ ^ ADVERTISEMENT — — 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Dec. 3, 1985 

Net amt veto* oeotatiem raw supplied brlM Funds iblcdwHfc Hie exeertfonoffeim mutes bared an Iswe price. 

Ttiomm phatmrrnWe^lumealvtr ommo g rfuuulBllBui mpO e d ifdl-duPrJ M-nctUy; tb)- hl me nW U y; Irt-nsaoiurir; (H-Irreoatartv. 













































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1985 


Page 19 


, (Cooftmedfrom Pagel3) ,■ 

. ! ( ■ i •; would boy a car, an apartmou, a 
' 1.' < |deviaoa l except for one man who 
' % .laid be would U buy tomatoes” —a 
~ ,ig at the new high pikes of some 

^^^rodobt: 

Dan Proppa; co-manager of 
S^Dsem Group, one of Tsratfslafgat 
: £ tood producers. said that “people 
-• \ kre starling to.be proud again to 
w ; "I ) ive off d» work of the shop floor 
f; ^rather than whaiw® had m me last 

^ lyulrTprofit mboT^ma finanti ral 

'■ r ’■ niggling and wizardry ihan-wony- 

’jpg aborat productivity." 

But tfcc bad news is that things 
1 7\>are Kkdy to get worse before they 
-? *' ' ■'s^bdJa.Jftbc carnal jaimm 
:'i . i\ fo be sustained and to lead to both. 

• v noninflationary growth and a 
. ; :• (ondt-oceded shift in the lasdi 

•V ' 'fl’W^momy from do mination hy g/w- ; 

•i j*Tnnent spending to growing ex- 
‘ \ oort industries, there is almost cer- 
triply going to be a prolonged 
■' oeriod of unemployment and nir- 
r. .f ' i, iber cats in government services 
"•andinflitary spending. 

^ Because of its tiny domestic max- 
; *'■ i.'aet, Ac only way jbat the Israeli 
^ sconnniy- can grow is by finding 
; %■ jartomens abroad. Bot many of its 

" '-IjaditkHial exports no longs’ suf- 
!• ilcc: cotton is in a weddwidedump 
■- V«jf that China has jumped into 
i.ihe market and the Jaffa oranges 
^ -^^nd grapefruits sent to Europe ftce 
■ 'stiff competition from Morocco : 
2 ;i nd Spain with their cheaper labor 
’costs. 

: M Hence, the consensus among 
/.? xxmoaasis is that the only answer 
- _ - •</.: s a structural transformation away 
l ~~~~^rom an agricuhme-based ocono- 
rT^T^ny, in which one oat of every three 

^srwtis works for the huge govem- 

■ ■ -^nent bureaucracy, to one oriented 

r - ■' oward high-tech jmiiwtriai growth. 

— ^Jn other words, a Jewish Japan. 

i A heated debate is now taking 
*** iKVjlace in the cabinet over Mr. Mo- 
iafs demand that tiw eqinvaleni of 
» „w, n mother $600 mflKmi be 

rom the budget next year. Cabinet 
’punsters are pidi pointing fingers 
•it the other to cut spending first. 

• ; in one indication of the bitter- 
; i: jess of the debate. Health Minister 

Vfordecbai Gur reportedly called 


Me, Modria“mani«f , wh 0 setmd- 
get aimnarig would destroy the 
health system. An incensed Ml 
M odai boycotted a recent cabinet 
meeting, demanding .an apology 
from Mr. Gnr. 

too pleasaT^wSutT has already 
been achieved,** said Michael Bru- 
no, a Hebrew Ifowraity economist 
and one of the main architects of 
the economic recovery program. 
“We haw given a very ill patient a 
huge dose of tranqnflizera mid the 
immediate effect has he r n to mutw 
hbn feel good; many think it was 
the core and that the operation is 
not now needed. But the truth is, 
we are stffl m the midst of surgery, 
and we must not stop now." 

When Israel’s national unity 
cabinet, bu3t anxmd a coalition of 

the Labor and LOaid parties, came 

into office in September 1984, it 
was widely agreed that it had two 
bask (ado; to cure the economy 
and to get the army oat of Leba- 
non. The exodus from Lebanon, 
turned out to be easier. 

Chi the economic front, the cabi- 
net opted tor a gradual approach 
based on a social contract, or 
"package deal” worked out by the 
government, the Efistadrut Labor 
Federation, winch com pri ses 90 
percent of the country's wage earn- 
ers, and the Marnifactorer’s Assod- 
atxxL 

Two basic packages were at- 
tempted, one in November 1984 . 
ana another last March. Both in- 
volved partial wage freezes; near- 
total pobe freezes and promises by 
die government to cut demand by 
slashing its budget, which is equiv- 
alent to $23 hmkm. These plans did 
manage temporarily to brmg down 
inflation to around 7 percent a 
month last May through artificial 
controls, but inconsistencies m the 
plans and the failure of the govern- 
ment to soak op demand hy trim- 
ming its budget eventually made 
bothfafl. 

9y June inflation was back in die 
double-digit- and -soaring range 
and dollar reserves were faffing well 
below the government “red lintf* of 
$2 bOfian. The cabinet seemed to 
be losing its grip on the economy. 


to eariy June, Mr. Peres and Mr. 
Modai ordered a team of govem- 
ment and nhiyeraity economists to 
meet secretly in a Jerusalem apart- 
ment and draw up an economic- 
s Utilization plan, which was 
sprimg On the public on July 1. 

The key to the new plan was that 

ins tead nf fneniwng rm wittingiifliw. 

inal prices it iocnsed on all tik 
gfaiiMin that go into the p i< % 
process: demand, wags and the 
exchange rate: 

The shekel was devalued 188 
percent, to roughly 1,500 to the 
dollar, but the inflationary impact 
of that was lessened because the 
sh&kdYvaine was frozen at the 

same level for three iwnwtlw, and 
wages and prices woe also frozen. 
Ccst-of-hvmg increments to com- 
pensate for inflation were sharply 
reduced, so that inflation-adjusted 
wages were almost immediately 
eroded by 25 percent. Government 
manpower was ordered cut by 3 
percent, or 10,000 people, and the 
government deficit was reduced by 
$940 mifffon through a combina- 
tion of higher taxes and reduced 
sohskfies and services. 

With the rise in October's con- 
sumer price index being hdd to 4.7 
percent, in contrast to 278 percent 
m July, the program is ckacy hav- 
ing an effect But the government, 
the country’s biggest employer, still 
has not fired two-thirds of the 
1(M)00 workers it vowed to dismiss. 
And another $600 million will have 
to come off the budget next year, if 
the government is going to be able 
to lower taxes. 

The government is hoping that 
by lowaing taxes it can increase 
take-home pay and mute 
fra- higher wages, and thus enable 
manufacturers to keep their prices 
relatively flat 

Since further reductions in de- 
fense spending haw® been ruled out 

hniMiM tlMUnniftaititlwMn tpro- 

grams, such as free doctor visits 
and secondary school education, 
are going to softer. With the decline 
in spending ty the government, uih 
employment is expected to to 

10 percent in coming wnnthc from 


7 percent now, a atuatioc that is 
an ti thetical to the whole notion of 
Zionism.. The government cannot 
ask Jews to emigrate to an Israel 
that cannot employ 

While moat Israelis remain sup- 
portive of tim government mea- 
sures in the abstract, they are start- 
ing to comp lain as the measures 
begin to impinge on their lives. 

A few sectors fedmg thepinch erf 
austerity include: 

WORKERS. Hie plight of toe 
Israeli weaker is best fflastrated by 
the situation of those who are the 
lowest on toe pay scale but tradi- 
tionally highest in status: career 
soldiers. Following tire latest re- 
dactions in real wages, scares of 
. career officers are trying to get out 
of their service contracts became 
they can no longer afford to be m 
the arm y. Requests for v*n« by 
army officers are at a record high. 

DEVELOPMENT TOWNS. 
With less money craning in from 
taxes and the carnal gover nm ent, 
dozens of development towns, 
which AmA nw imm igr an te imA 
spread the population into outlying 
areas, are in serious trouble. 

Acre, fra example, a town of 
14*000 Jews and Arabs north of 
Haifa, gets 17 percent of its budget 
from local taxes and 83 percent 
from the central government. For 
the past few months, municipal en> 
pkryees have been receiving their 
checks later and later. Every month 
they strike. Soon the walkouts may 
be open-ended. 

BUSINESS- Because the rate of 
inflation has come down faster 
than tte rate of interest, many busi- 
nesses find themselves squeezed by 
their bankers on one side, charging 
20 percent interest fra dollar loans, 
ana shrinking domestic demand on 
the other. 

FinanceMimstiy sources say the 
government may have to but out 
several cooceois to prevent a chain 
reaction of ban kru p tcies. Among 
those most in need are some of the 

Tfidimjpiil "ftnwrwt the 

ccJlec&vefanns, private farm*, Tim 
SfltpKite ^ SnM iStnrft unn^ hnrtiiw 

oo many , Beit siwnwii Engines 
and Israel Shipy ar ds. 


Thais Consider 
Oun Tin Market 

Romos 

BANGKOK — Thailand is 
studying ways to set up its own 
tin market following the sus- 
pension of trading at the Lon- 
don Metal Exchange and the 
Kuala Lumpur tin market, gov- 
ernment sources said Tuesday. 

The sources said the govern- 
ment is considering a proposal 
made by Thailand Smelting & 
Refining Co. to fix a daily refer- 
ence pace for Thai tin. 

Two weeks ago, the cabinet 
approved an Indnkxy Ministry 
proposal for Thailand to try to 
open its.own market in the ab- 
sence of tin quotations from 
London, Kuala Lumpur or 
New York 


Perks Still 
ABigPlus 

(Controlled from Page 13) 
mo nthl y British nu g^inc, Mr. Bo- 
ley pointed out that company cars 
represent 65 percent of new British 
cars sold last year. 

According to the Brussels-based 
Executive Service 

too, a division of Wyatt Co., a UE. 
consulting company, 92 percent of 
lop British managers have a com- 
pany car. According to the same 
survey, in spite of higher tax rates 
on more expensive can, British 
chief executives are more, not less, 
mnwn i w i about the stains of their 
can 

Among the readership of fhirf 
Executive, whidi runs a rcgnlar fea- 
ture on executive can, the Ford 
Grenada is the mori popular car, 
the Rover is a close second and the 
Jaguar comes in third. And if fewer 
chief executives have sports cars, 
such as Ferraris or Poaches, h is 
because of board members’ con- 
cern fra their safety. 

“Board members get twitchy 
about their top executives driving a 
sports car," Ml Bdey said. 


vi i. r-t .TTTTTr 


Dollar Strengthens in Europe, U.S. 


CorpUed by Our Staff From Dupmdus 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
closed stranger in Europe and the 
United Stales on Tuesday, under- 
pinned by corporate purchases and 
news of better- than-expected U.S. 
economic data. 

Dealers said the dollar also was 
buqyed by a statement by the gov- 
ernor of tbe Bank of Japan that the 
Japanese central bank is satisfied 
vrith the yea at ament exchange 
rates. The governor, Satoshi Su- 
urita, also said that he did not an- 
ticipate a cut anytime soon in the 
U.S. discount rate, the Federal Re- 
serve’s benchmark lending rate. 

“The market was dollar positive 
following Monday's rebound,” said 
Carmine Rotondo, chief trader at 
Manufacturers Hanover Trust. 
“Mr. Sumita’s remarks then helped 
drive tbe dollar up.” 

In New York, the dollar traded 
as high as 205 yen before earing 
back in profit-taking to firwch at 
204.70 yen, up from 203.70 Mon- 
day. Fattier in Tokyo it closed at 
3)3.95 yen, up from 203.10. 


The dollar also rose in New York 
against all other major currencies. 
The U.S. currency dosed at 2J300 
Deutsche marks, up from 2J 1 80 on 
Monday, at 2.1 100 Swiss francs, up 
from 2.0960, and at 7.7215 French 
francs, up from 7.6805. 

The British pound, which had 
briefly traded above the SI .50-level 
on Monday for the first time in 
mare than two years, closed at 
$1.4815, down from $1.4885 at the 
previous dose. 

Dealers said the dollar's advance 
began in European markets after 
the U.S. C omm erce Department 
reported that its Index of Leading 
Economic Indicators rose 0 3 per- 
cent in October, the sixth consecu- 
tive month of i mp ro v ement 

to London, where the dollar fell 
briefly below 230 DM on Monday 
for the first time in 2 Vi years, the 
US. currency ended at 2^335 DM, 
up from hs previous dose of 
23)85. Dealers said the LLS. cur- 
rency traded as high as 25415 DM 
at midsession. 

The British pound dosed in Lon- 


don at $1.48)5, down from its pre- 
vious dose of $1.4885. But it gamed 
against the mark, ending at 3.7532 
DM versus 3.7518 on Monday. 

The dollar also finished in Lon- 
don at 11 120 Swiss francs, slightly 
up from 11015 at tbe close there 
Monday, and at 7.7250 French 
francs, up from 7.6S2S. 

In other European markets 
Tuesday, the dollar was fixed in 
Frankfort at midafternoon at 
25325 DM, up 3 pfennigs from 
2.5030 at Monday's fixing; at 
7.7280 francs in Paris, up from 
7.6350. and at 1,724.00 lire in Mi- 
lan, up from 1,703.00. 

Dealers cautioned that the dollar 

could soon retest the 150-DM lev- 
el 

One dealer pointed out that 
many corporations have been short 
of dollars over tbe past few weeks 
and decided to buy the currency at 
low levels, which has acted to brake 
its fall “Bui I don't believe toe 
bearish sentiment towards toe dol- 
lar has changed." be added. 

{Reuters, UPl ) 




Market Eases Following Sell- Off in U.S. 


By Christopher Pizzcy 

Ratios 

LONDON — Secondary marke t 
prices in the Eurobond market 
were lower Tuesday with the dc4- 
lar-straight sector seeing declines 
of % to 34 point after Monday’s 
sefl-off on toe U.S. credit markets, 
dealers said. 

However, most of tbe dajitw: 
occurred in the mnrnfng , and the 
dealers said trading tended to 
slacken in toe afternoon. Floating- 

shnnp in the paces of issues^or 
Malaysia, dealers added. 

In the primary market , General 
Motors Acceptance Corp. issued a 
$200-million bond paying 9% per- 


cent over seven years and priced at 


Morgan Stanley International It 
was quoted on the when-issued 
market outride toe total fees of lft 
percent at a discount of about 1 
15/16. 

Textron Inc. issued a SlOO-nril- 
fion doflar-straight with a lOft-per- 
cent coupon and priced at 99ft. The 
12-year tssne was quoted around 
tbe total fees of 2ft percent and was 
trading at a discount of about 2ft. 

In the sterling sector, J. Sains- 
bwy PLC made its debut in the 
international capital markets with 
a £60-m3Koa bond paying 10ft 
percent over seven years and priced 
at par. The issue has a further £40 


million remaining on tap and was 
quoted on toe when-issued market 
within the total lft-percenl fees at a 
discount of about 1ft. 

Tbe Anglia Building Society is- 
sued a £1 00- millio n floater paying 
ft point over the three-month Lon- 
don interbank offered rate, al- 
though the first coupon has been 
fixed at 1 1ft percent from Dec. 30 
until April 14. 1986. 

The 12-year issue was priced at 
1 00.05 and has investor put options 
after eight and 10 years. It is call- 
able after five years at par. The lead 
manager was Morgan Guaranty 
Ltd. and the issue ended just on the 
total cost to co-managers at 99.925. 
The fees totaled 19 basis points. 


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at x at + a 

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5* 5* 5ft— A 
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154*10*154* + A 
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Wyman 


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a» 37 - a 


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Soles figures ore unoffldaL Yearly highs and lows reflect 
the previous 52 week* plut Hw currant week, but nol tha latest 
trading dDv. where a stall or Nock dividend amounting A Js 
percent er mora has been paid, n* wart high- law range tma 
dMdend era shown Ar the new stock only, uniew otherwfce 
noted rates of dvMtndt one annual dhteirumanis basad an 
me lat te l d e temuHuM . 
a-4Mdedam«dn(tlJ 
h— annual rale of dividend Plus Mack dMdend/l 
C— TfaHdoftng dtvldand/1 
CM— called/1 
d— new yearly towyi 

e— dividend declared ernaM in arecedinD 12 monitKTi 
D— dividend bi Conadltei hmta,cub|ectte 15% nan-midenee 
tax 

I — dividend declared after softt-uo or stack dividend 
I— dividend POM ml* yoar. omitted, deferred, or no action 
token at tatea dividend meeting, 
k— dividend declared er paid this year, an aecumulaHve 
tone with dividends in arreaift 

n— nemhaue In Ihe past 52 weeks. The high-low r an ge begins 
with the start of trading, 
nd — nest day dotlverv. 

P/E — price earnings ratio. 

t — dividend uetarad or raid to preceding 12 montta. aim 
stock dividend 

9— slack spfii Dhrkfcnd bentos wfth date of sallt 
Ns— tales. 

1— divtaend paid to siadt to preceding U months, estimated 
cash value an es-divltieiid er ewtUoributian date. 

u — new yetelv high. 

v— trading hatted. 

vt— to lwiknielcy or racotoorrtlp or being r eorgon lml un- 
der Hie Bankruptcy Ad. or seauWes assumed by such cam- 
ponies. 

«m— teien dlstrfbuiea 
wt— when issued, 
wvr— wftti wteTonts. 
x— ototttvldend er ex-nghts. 

MBs — ex-tfistr I button, 
xw — without w w rc pi t s . 
v— ax-tttvidend and sales In full. 

vld— Mew. 

2 — min Intuit 








Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HER AT. n TRIBUNE, "WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1985 



PEANUTS 

( SO HERE I AM 
g LEFT ALONE IN 

Lthe car again.. 


ANP WITH TWO 5ACKS 
FUU. OF CHINESE FOOP 
j IN THE BACK SEAT! 


THEY KNOW I CAN I 
BE TRUSTER THOUGH., f 


EXCEPT I OPENED 
ALL THE FORTUNE 
COOKIES,. 


BLOND BE 


SOLUTION TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE, page 19 ,2 ' 4/85 


AC ROSS 

1 Creator of 
Schmoos 

5 Christie was one 

9" first you 

don’t succeed 

13 Largest 
continent 

14 Muscat is its 
capital 

15 Cordial 
flavoring 

16 Fender hollow 

17 Word heard at 
church 

18 Mushy dish 
from 

buckwheat 

19 Comely 
Czechs, 
perhaps 

22 No, at the 
Capitol 

23“ She 

Sweet?" 

24 He wrote 
"Hyperion" 

27 Had on 

29 Tuscaloosa's 
loc. 

32 Panay native 

33 Gulp 

35 Science of 
vision 

38 Game you only 
lose once 

41 Horizontal 
beam 

42 "1 could 

horse!" 

o Ne w York 


43 Actor-director 
Howard 

44 Diocese 

45 Shoemaker’s 
model 

47 Tendency 

49 Mob disorder 

51 Season in Paris 

52 Fog and mist, 
maybe 

60 Actor Delon 

61 Optimistic 
feeling 

62 Elvis was one 

63 Salts’ talks 

64 Copycat 

65 Feed 
storehouse 

66 Hitch 

67 Student’s book 

68 Give a leg up 

DOWN 

1 Chaps who 
chicane 

2 Where to meet 
Bobby Shaft oe 

3 Four gills 

4 Protect an idea 

5 Wheelbarrow's 
cousin 

6 Mine, to Fifi 

7 Shopping plaza 

8 Evoke 
affection 

9 Overwrought 

10 Piscator’s 
prey 

11 Noted netraan 

12 Mad Hatter’s 
affairs 

15 Similar 


20 Knight’s 
heroine 

21 Become 
extinct 

24 One of the 
Marxes 

25 Needle cases 

26 Oise tributary 

27 Be the victor 

28 Fairy-tale 
monsters 

30 About a quart, 
in England 

31 Medieval 
knight’s 
garment 

34 Act like a pig 

36 Neb. river 

37 Dispatch 

39 High grade of 
silver 

40 Morsel for a 
Suffolk 

46 As matters 
now stand 

48 Hot-dog 
condiment 

50 Atomic 
particles- 

51 Turn inside out 

52 Bain ter and 
Wray 

53 Panache 

54 Woman 
Zhivago loved 

55 Use a lariat 

56 Pinnacle 

57 Ernie 
Kovacs’s 
widow 

58 Canary’s trill 

59 Spillover 



1 LOVE HAVING WNNS3 
AT TOOTSIE'S ^ 



THAT'S HOW‘T KEB?L 
TRACK OF ALL VW ) 
MK55INS SERVING f. 
I PIE 


BEETLE BAILEY 

/ BACK IN THE Olt? PAYS 
JL.W0I MEN WERE FLATTEREP 
U 1 WHEN X APMlREP 

^them ^ 


\ BACK IN % 
} THE OLP i 
< PAYS NO- I 
OhIECALLEP | 
Me ,, SEXf5T" | 


BACK IN THE OLP PAYS 
HE ALSO WASN'T 50 OLP 


ikxx 

w&e 


ANDY CAPP 

I I fl”J II 


, TWTGO MISSING NTHS HOUSE 


so 

SHI 


THAT WAS OLHCK-1 
VOU^FOUND J 
-»AtV WATCH x — y 

T ALREAEr^pX*. 


•JFEJSSi. 


LCIQARErrE< 
\> UQHTB??-] 


: T 


O New York Times, edited, by Eugene Malaska . 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


VIZARD of ID > 

f 1 HUN5 


I 


‘rv ;, i|/f nst ft 




REX MORGAN 






ffimr 



S ' lT-L DROP YOU OFF HERE 

'at your Place, kay' vll cso on nome^ 

and GET INTO SOME CLOTHES FOR ^ 
DINNER AND THE THEATER ( Vll BE SACK 
^ IN ABOUT AN HOUR TO PICK YOU UP ' ^ 


YOU’RE SPOILING ME, GRANT' 
MEN POWY HOLD POORS OPEN 
*-r FOR WOMEN ANYMORE ' A 


THEY > 

SHOULD 
. FOR- 
. LADIES {' 


books 


A GRAM) STRATEGY FOR THE 
WEST: 

The Anachronism of National Strat- 
egies in an Interdependent World 

By Helmut SchmidL 159 pages. 512.95. 
Yale University Press, 302 Temple Street, 
New Haven, Conn. 06520. 

Reviewed by Stephen S. Rosenfeld 


foreign policy, Hetant Sdunidt has come 
along wrth. a mercifully short and readable 
tract that mfllrea shar p sens e and provides a 
framework: in which to understand everything 
else. 

Occasionally, Schmidt seems bored by mere 

mortals. .Otherwise be is nothing lessthan the 
wisest of the center-left in the West. This 
is nq tired has-been pursuing of power lost but 
someone who, drawing on unparalleled experi- 
ence as defease minister, economics ana fi- 
nance minister »nri chancellor of West Germa- 
ny from 1974-1982, is worth listening to. 

Schmidt is above the daily battle, but be is 

aware of ihe stresses borne by those stQl in the 
trenches .and also of the larger purposes that 
politics must serve. He does not, in this book, 
d ea l with incrimination, nor with self-serving 
poienrirists’ slogans or survivors’ platitudes, 
lie offers cogent strategic advice, fitting to- 
gether the economic, diplomatic and military 
aspects that the West must master in order to 
prosper, remain free and be true to its best seif. 

Schmidt appeals for policies that take into 
account the ti ghtening of Western economies, 
and the level erf Third World economies as 
compared with Western economies; the net- 
works, of compromise and confidence (hat 
must be built, again and a g ain, among the 
allies; the r eq ui rement for a «ern«n coopera- 
tion with the Soviet Union. 

Here, in a book that issued from lectures 
Schmidt gave last June at Yale University, his 
views are packaged rationally and coherently. 
For instance, arms control does not come 
nearo- simply because Schmidt pronounces it a 
good thing. 'But it becomes more logical, less 
utopian, more connected to ocher things worth 
striving for when Schmidt connects it to a 
stable balance, along with changes in conven- 
tional forces topennit a no-first-use nuclear 
doctrine, a NATO affirmation of strength and 
openness to negotiation, a fresh commitment 
to American- European-Japancse security col- 
laboration, and drawing France into the for- 
ward defense of Europe. 

The contribution erf Helmut S chmid t is to 
see the forest, to rise above technical solutions 
to the pofiticai challen^s, and to describe 


Schmidt, without getting personal or parti- 
san, is plainly not Ronald Reagan’s biggest 
fan. But he has a gracious appreciation of 
“America's, leadership potential." based on 
sra, vitality, generosity and optimism, “which 
sometimes stakes us rather skeptical Europe- 
ans as naive and embarrassing out obvioudy 


helps Americans.* 

That there is now no coherent strategy in the . 
West Schmidt attributes to a shortfall of lead- 
ership on both sides of the Atlantic. But it 
hurts more inthe United States because of its 
natural primacy. The difficulty, as he sees it. is 




that “isolationist. America-centered. 

Sr tendencies vie in Washington with inter 

ni sSS"«S5« Italy's >° m “; 

rnixiQdersiaDdiDg Europe s 
Soviet Union not just as the expansion^ 
threat it is but as a neighbor that one must get 
along with on a certain leveL. . «■ 

Schmidt will gel an argument . on muefrof 
what he says. But he has the high ground, 
respect for the values of the WesL knowledg 
ofthe ways of national and uiteraauonal pi 
liey-making and an elevated but feasible vision 
of the way things c ould be. 

Stephen S. Rosenfeld is on the staff of Hiefe 
Washington Post. 


best sellers 

He Ne*r Yu* Haws 

This list is based on reports (i ran BOR ton 1000 &****““ 
ihnwgtoat ihe United Sums. Weeks on &« arrow n«e»affl«' 


FICTION 


U> W««ks 
Wok eo U* 


1 THE MAMMOTH HUNTERS by Jean 

2 LAKE^ WOBEGON DAYS "by Gamsoo 

KeOtar 

3 TEXAS by James A. Micbener 

4 SECRETS, bv Damdic Steel 

5 CONTACT, by Cart Sagan 

5 

$ LOCKY.by Jackie Cotow 


, WORLD'S FAIR, by EL Dociorow 

10 THE VAMPIRE LKTAT. by /^oeRxc 
1] THE SECRETS OF HARRY BRIGHT. 


,2 SSSXs-siH f 

WALLS by Roben A. Heinlein M 

13 SKELETON CREW, by Stephen Kit* „ 13 

14 THE INVADERS PLAN, by L Ron Hub- 
bard -■ — — ■ 

15 DEPTHS OF GLORY, by Irving Stone — 

NONFICTION 

1 YEAGER: An Autobiography- by Chock 

Yeager and Leo Janos — — — — 

2 ELVIS AND ME by Priscilla Beauheu 

Presley with Sandra Hannon — - — ..... l 

3 IACOCCA: An Autobiography, by Lee la- 

cocca with William Novak ..... — — — — 4 

4 DANCING IN THE LIGHT, by Stanley 

hfacLainc — — — ■ * 

5 I NEVER PLAYED THE GAME by 

Howard COseB with Peter Booventre 5 

ALT. by Claries Kuralt , ' 

S ONLY ONE WOOF, by James Hemot ... 13 

9 CHARLES & DIANA, by Ralph G. Mar- 

Itfl , - — — " 

10 FERRARO: My Store. by Geraldine A. 

• Ferraro with Linda Bird Franeke 1 1 

1 1 GODDESS bv Anthony S umm ers 9 

12 COMMON GROUND.’ by J. Anlhoery Lo- 
las — 10 

13 A LIGHT IN THE ATTIC by She! Silver- 

stein tzsst ' 

14 SMART WOMEN. FOOLISH CHOICES 

by Coandl Cowan and MeNyn Kinder 12 

15 SHOOT LOW BOYS — THEY’RE RID- 

ING SHETLAND PONIES by Lewis 
Grizzard — «-- — 

ADVICE HOW-TO AND MISCE2JLANEOUS 

1 FIT FOR LIFE by Harvey Diamond and 

Marilyn Diamond - 1 

2 THE BE (HAFPYl ATTITUDES by Rob- 
ert Schuller 2 

3 CALLANETICS. by CaEm Pinckney wi* 

Same Bataon — — 3 

4 WOMEN WHO LOVE TOO MUCH, by 

Robin Norwood 4 

5 THE FRUGAL GOURMET, by Jeff 

Snub 5 




BRIDGE 


'Miss Smoti , WHO /MADE THE LOUDEST CHALK 
squeak... me or 0ewey? # 


sss 


GARFIELD 


COT THAT 
OOT.OPI Ci 


HOW WOULP YOU UKE IT 
l IF I UCK6P VOU? 


y*l THAT SCRAMBLS) WORD GAME 
P by by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 




IT OUST OCCURREPTOMt-SOME- 
FW rMOOINO TO HAVE TO PUT 
THIS TONGUE BACK WMV MOUTH 


Unscramble these tour Jianbiee, 
one letter to each square, to term 
four ordinary voids. 



By Alan Ttuscott 

O N the. diagramed deal. 
South landed in the weinl 
pontractof four hearts. Setting 
aside foe the moment how this 

happened,, consider the play. 
He reoeived a spade lead far 
the ace. 

When he led a second 
trump, the defense was help- 
less. Putting up the queen 
would help with a slightly dif- 
ferent kyoat af the frumps but 
had no merit here. ; 

East won -and drifted to a 
diamond, won with the ace. 
South led a third round of 
trumps, hoping far the best, 
and was rewarded. The 3-3 
split, combined with a later fi- 


nesse of the made nine, gave 
trim hb improbable contract. 

South’s bidding is logical if 
he is using transfer bids, and 
be was. He thought his partner 
held a five-card heart suit, but 
as it happened he was lucky 
that there were four. 

One might *brnk thaf North 
had- nrissoited iris hand and 
had a diamond in with her 
hearts. 

He had, however, had a 
c o mpletely different accident, 
he was buffering from ihe ddn- 
sion, provoked perhaps by a 
bid at another table, that East 
had opened one heart. He 
thought that her partner had 
shown length in the minor 


suits, and was somewhat con- 
fused by subsequent develop- 
ments. 

NORTH 
» K IB C 3 
?S782 
dll 

* R 10 

WEST EAST 

ty.v in sii,. 

* J 72 1,111111 0 1OB9 3 

♦ QB3 * 3973 

SOUTH CD) 

* Q 8 5 

O A54 , 

0 AKQ 

* A 6 5 4 

Bom sMcs were vulnerable. Tbe^'V 
tftk&ng: f 

*Wta Wo at North East 

3 N.T. Pus 3 9 Pass 

8 ^ Paas 3 N.T. Pass 

4 f Pass Pass Pass 

West led the spade two. 


































c 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1985 


SPORTS 


Page 21 





Navratilova, Mandlikova to Meet in Semis 


- v 







mi receiver Nat Moore, scoring one of Us two first-half touchdowns against Chicago. 

hicago 9 s Streak Stopped at 12 

irmo Throws for 3 TDs as Dolphins Beal Bears, 38-24 


The Associated Press 
[AMI — The KMaHed un- 
able team had jost been beaten 
team that a year ago had itself 
called unbeatable. So hoar did 
hicago Bears feel about hav- 
b dr 12- game winnin g streak 
-i by the Miami Dolphins here 
/lay night? 

: obody’s invincible, nobody’s 
'ct" Chicago Coach Mike 
t said after his team suffered 
1 rst National Football League 
of the season, 38-24, to the 
bins. “We'D bounce bade It 
e good for ns. I only have one 
1 hope they go as far as we’re 
to go [in the playoffs] and 
play them again.” 
e Dolphins suddenly look as if 
can go a long way indeed 
Jay's was like a game from 'a 
igo, when they began 1 1-0 en 
to a 14-2 regular season re- 
^nd a berth in the Super BowL 
asider 

fianri scored on all five pos- 
_ns in the first half, and had 31 
tat intermission — more than 
•go had surrendered in the 
■ Jus six games, in which it ont- 
"1 opponents by 170-29. 
tan Marino looked like the 
io who in 1984 had the best 
i any NFL quarterback ever 
is passing stats weren’t bril- 
-14 of 27 for 270 yards and 
touchdowns — but he was 
1 just three times by a feno- 
rnsfa that had racked up SO 


entering the game. And he con- 
stantly made' the big play, passing 
for first downs an tinra-and-18 and 
third-and-19 to keep MumPs first 
two touchdown drives aUve: 

• The defense, bolstered by the 
retard of defensive end Doug Bet- 
ten ‘from a knee irony and the 
headypIayoflinebackerBobBnid- 
zinski, registered six sacks an Steve 
Fuller and Jim McMahoo. 

Their fourth straight victory 
moved the 9-4 Dolphins i utp a 
first-place tie with blew England 
and the New York Jets in the 
American Conference East Miami 
also protected its place in history: 
The 1972 Dolphins (17-0, including 
the postseason) were the last team 
to post an unbeaten year. 

The triumph also boosted (he 
morale of a team that has had 
doubts about itself since its 38-16 
thrashing by San Francisco in the 
1985 Super BowL “We beat a team 
that was playing the best football in 
the NFL,” Marino said. “We know 
we can compete at their leveL” 

Chicago got a morale boost of its 
own from Walter Payton, who car- 
ried 23 times for 121 yards to seta 
league record with his eighth con- 
secutive 100-yard game. 

Miami stopped die Bears with- 
out a yard on the game’s first series 
and then weot 56 yards in five plays 
for a 7-0 lead. The drive was culmi- 
nated by a 33-yard TD pass from 
Marino to Nat Moore, who caught 
the ball in tho flat at the 25 and cot 


bade far the scare. A key play was 
Marino’s 30-yard completion ' to 
Mark Doper on iKid-and-liL 
rhioigj n came right bade, gning 
80 yards in four plays to set up a 1- 
yard soaring sneak by Fuller; 69 of 
the yards came on a bomb from 

Fuller to WiIHe Gault 
Fuad Revaz’s 47-yard field goal 
gave Miami a 10-7 lead before the 
Dolphins zoomed to a 31-10 half- 
time margin with three second-pe- 
riod touchdowns, two in a 40-sec- 
ond span at the end of the half. ’ 
The first TD came on the first 
play of the quarter on Ron Daven- 
port's 1-yard plunge. The Bears 
controlled the ball for the next 
8:20, but Betters’s sack of Fuller 
faced Chicago to settle fa a 30- 
yard Kevin. Bader field goal 
Miami made H 24-10 on its next 
possession, going 79 yards in eight 
{days in a drive marked by Mari- 
no's 52-yard connection with Dup- 
er on a thnd-and-13 {day. Daven- 
port again took h in from die one 
with 1:57 left in die half. 

Twenty-nine seconds later, after 
three quick time-outs, WDKam Jud- 
son blocked a Maury finfordpunt 
to pye Miami the baS at die Chica- 
go six. Rom there, Marino again 
hit Moore and it was 31-10. 

“It was probably as good a first 
half as I’ve seen around fa a long 
time,” said Dolphin Coach Dan 
Simla. “In the sec on d half we ac- 
complished our objective — to stay 
even.” 


Caiftied bf Otr Staff From Dbpaeha 

MELBOURNE — Martina 
Navratilova has won hundreds of 
matches in her career, bat Tues- 
days was one of the most satisfy- 
ing . Navratilova helped wipe out 
memories of one of ner most bittg 
defeats by beating Helena Sokova 
of Czechoslovakia, 6=2, 6-2, in the 
quarterfinals of the Australian 
Open temtis championships. 

It was Sukova who defeated 
Navratilova in the semifinals here 
last year, ending her lad to com- 
plete a calendar-year grand slam. 
Ibis time it was no contest as. the 
secoutseeded Navraticva toother 
career record against the dgbtfc- 
‘ seeded Sokova to 9-1 with a dnrical 
56-mmnte victory. 

"It wasn’t a personal vendetta — 
just a professional one,” said the 
Ctcdhbom Navratilova. *T think I 
was ready from the first point. I felt 
like a prize fighter out there.” 

Navratilova earned a semifinal 
meeting Thursday with Hana 
ManriTikfW H, a fap of Czechoslova- 
kia. Mandlikova advanced by de- 
feating the No. 6 seed, Amaican 
Zina Garrison, 2-6, 6-3, 6-3. 

Wimbledon champion Navrati- 
lova is looking forward to a re- 
match with MandHkova, whom she 


AUSTRALIAN OPEN 


beat in the fmn) of the Sydney toar- 
naxnent late last month. ‘Ton'd 
Setter believe Tm ready for Hana," 
Navratilova said. "It will be a good 
serve-and-vdley nmtrh and 1 think 
I can break Hana’s serve more than 
she can break mine.” 

The other semifinal will be be- 
tween defending champion Chris 
Evert Lloyd of the United States, 
the top seed, and fifth-seeded Clau- 
dia Kobdo-KQsch of West Germa- 
ny* 

RoMe-KHsdk on 1 Tuesday ended 
the. ran of IOtiKeeded Catarina 
Undqyist of Sweden by defeating 
the basdiner, 6-4, 64), while Evert 
Lloyd downed seventh- seeded 
Mannela Maleeva of Bulgaria, 6-3, 
6-3. 

Two-time champion Mats Wi- 
lander of. Sweden raced past un- 
seeded American Thn Wmtison, 7- 
6, 6-3, 6-3, to move into the men’s 
quarterfinals. 

Wflandcr, 21, aiming to win the 
fifth grand dam title of his career, 
has dropped only one set in the 
tournament. He was too consistent 
and penitent fa power-serving 
Wffldsoa. 


Unfazed by rain showers that 
interrupted the match in its early 
going, WHander took the 6m set 
tie breaker 7-1 and was in com- 
mand from then on, 

"I think I played my best match 
of the tournament,” smd Wflander. 
"I was steadier thro in my previous 
matches.” 

Wifcmdex said he had begun to 
consider the possibility of becom- 
ing only the third player ever to win 
three straight open titles; he next 
will men another two-time cham- 
pion, South African-bora Johan 
KricL 

Kriek advanced on Monday by 
defeating Jay Lapidus in straight 
sets. 

Tm thinking about it, bat it will 
be vay tough,” Wflander said. “TO 
have to play a bit better than I did 
today. Tm confident against Kriek, 
but he’s certainly dangerous.” 

WUander defeated sixth-seeded 
Kriek 6-1 6-0 6-2 in last year’s 
semifwu>1« here. 

The rest of the men’s quarterfi- 
nal lineup: Mkhid Schapers vs. 
Stefan Edbera, John Lloyd vs. Ivan 
Lendl or Christo Steyn (Tuesday’s 


moning rains postponed the top- 
seeded Lendl’s match against 
Steyn, an unseeded South African) 
and John McEnroe vs. Slobodan 
Zivqjinovic. 

Said loo Hriac, the former Ro- 
manian star now guiding Zvojino- 
vic: “On a given day, Bobo can hr 
more powerful than anyone. He's 
ready to handle any player, al- 
though McEnroe is a special entity 
in the game.” 

Schapers, an unheralded Dutch- 
man who scored a second-round 
triumph over Wimbledon champi- 
on Boris Becker, led Tnn Gullikson 
7-6, when the American was forced 
to withdraw with severe back 
spasms. Schapers, ranked lS8th 
worldwide, won the tie breaker, 7- 
0, before Gullikson decided he’d 

had enough- 

Lloyd, the beaten finalist here in 
1977, played extremely well in de- 
feating the No. 7 seed, Joakim Nys- 
crom of Sweden 6-2, 1-6, 6-4, 6-7,6- 
4. Lloyd rallied from 0-3 down in 
the decisive set. “I thought he was 
never going to lay down and die,” 
he said. 

The fifth-seeded Edberg saved 
two third-set match points before 
defeating Australian Wally Masor, 
6-7, 2-6, 7-6, 6-4, 6-1 (AJ>. UPJJ 






Mats Wfiander 

. . . Looking for a third straight tide. 


Between Villainy and Scandal , a Referee Stands Tall 


Inunwkevd Heraid Tribune 

LONDON — Does the sarit, the person- 
ality, change with the shirt? 

Less than three weeks ago, players from 
Bordeaux Gxrohdins and Pans-St Germain, 
shared yet another ecstatic French embrace. 
They, the of the national lMm ] 

had qualified fa the World Cup. 

Last weekend, on separate sides in dub 
colas, six of thoseplayers bitterly contested 
a league match in Botdeanx. 

Nobody won, and nobody except the fans 
Lost. The scordxxtrd was never troubled, 
although referee Michd Vantrot was, and 
sorely. "I fed mentally and physically ex- 
hausted,” he said after the scoreless draw. 

"I coukl not believe the language and 
insults between men who played together fa 

the French national twwn so short a time 

ago. 

Vantrot took four names, an unsurprising 
tally in so crucial a Fiat Division match. Yet 
his evident distress at what passed between 
the playas in perturbing. 

Vantrot is no Boy Scoot shocked by the 
competitive arena. He handles villainy, ten- 
sion and p r e s s ur e cm all continents with such 
calm authority that he will nor be far from 
the World Cup final itself next gimmar in 
Mexico (assuming France doesn't go all the 
way). 

. Blessed with a langnage filler that goes 
fittle fndba: than saarbieu, 1 earsonly imag- 
ine last wedoemFs insuhs from GalHc broth- 
er to brother. 

But I know Vautro t. He is nq^reQ^to 
vation on Ms countrymen's schizophrenia 


vatkxu on Ms countrymen's schizophrenia 
invites other questions. 

Has the French mood — so ebullient, so 
romantic in the European championship — 
soured so drastically mside me yen? 

Cynical tackles that shored up national 
captain Mkfad Platinfs fine brace of goals to 
beat Yugoslavia last month suggest it might 
be so. 

Platini’s own statements (that winning is 
the only joy, that Baron de Coobertm’s 
Olympic credo is a dead encumbrance on the 
French) aredreadfully sad. 






k 


Referee Michel Vantrot 

. . . Honors and postcards, but not bribes. 

Sadder still was the bdutvia in Bordeaux. 
Vantrot may be baffled by men who share 
heroism one month and squabble Gke street- 


fighters the next The sax who ran together 
against Yugoslavia in Paris — Alain Giresse, 
Jean Tigana, Patrick Ra tt is tm, tuis Fer nan - 
dez, Joel Bats, Dominique Rocheteau — 
have come through 209 internationals be- 
tween them. 

has not attributed to the vmuung'of the 

Rob Hughes 

European champ ionship, the 1984 Olympic 
gold medal and now the World Cup qualify- 
ing. 

They have roomed together, eaten, 
dreamed, talked together. They probably 
bank together. 

They have been honored togetherfmosi of 
die 1984 diampnndiip team are official he- 
roes of France), and been reviled and doubt- 
ed together when defeats outside France 
threatened World Cup qualification. 

And many of them have been brought up 
together through the national youth system 
that is the envy of scores of nations. 

Yet now, with Paris-SL Germain about to 
rf»wn (from St. Etienne) tire all-time French 
record of 22 games without defeat and per- 
haps finally to take the cham pionship from 
Bordeaux, they would scratch each others* 
eyes out 

The childishness of the in ternatio nal soc- 
cer star is at times so appalling it is almost 
worth nrilc*«hiiw a whole gamut of Califor- 
nia shrinks on them 

Still, French follies would register nothing 
cm the Richter scale of Italian Ask 

Monsieur Vantrot. 

By the long arm of coincidence, 18 months 
ago in Rome Vantrot refereed the European 
Cop semifinal in wMcb AS. Roma over- 
hauled a 0-2 deficit from the first leg against 
Dundee United. 

Dino Viola, the Roma president, is not 
denying he handed 100 million lire (about 
$60,000) to two intermediaries who offered 
to influence die referee. 

Vantrot denies any approach was made to 
him. 


The two — a former Inter Milan player 
and a former Avellino general manager — 
absconded with the money. 

Viola, protecting Ms reputation as a na- 
tional senator as weQ as Roma's figurehead, 
has engaged one of Italy's lop criminal law- 
yers to conduct Ms attempts to recoup the 
cash. 

His own defense is that, far from seeking 
to bribe Vantrot, the good Viola thought his 
outlay might help to unveil “the Mr. Futit” 
who bedevils Italian soccer. 

The betting around Rome this week is that 
the affair will, like the two intennediairies 
and untold previous cases, disappear into the 
sands. 

Vamrot will dol 

I know him to be an extraordinary man or 
extraordinary integrity — bedridden with a 
serious heart complaint thr ough his child- 
hood and early teens, he then dedicated Ms 
life to seeking perfection as an arbiter in the 
game be believed denied to him. 

1 have been to the home he shares with Ms 
mother in Besangon, in Southern France. I 
have seen his correctness as a government 
inspector in education, his physical fitness, 
his pride in a medal — presented by Italy, of 
all places — fa being 1983’s best European 
referee. 

He collects honors and postcards, but not 
bribes. 

Things Italian are harder to vouch for. 
Barely a month ago, film and stage directa 
Franco Zeffirelli complained that nil lawyers 
were not allowed to offer a shred of evidence 
when a criminal court fined him 41 million 
lire fa his “libelous” claims that Juvenius 
influenced referees. 

And last weekend, the stars of Italy’s First 
Division were Paolo Rosa and Bruno Gior- 
dano. 

JEach scored twice fa his new dub — AC 
Milan and Naples, respectively — and only 
those of shallow memory ww forget that 
each began the decade under two years’ sus- 
pension after a massive betting scandaL 

As you and 1 breath in carbon monoxide 
with our air, so the Italian inhales corruption 
with Ms soccer. 



7TTTFTTT 


Basketball 


ional Basketball Association Leaders 




gamos ol Doc. l: 

Detroit 

19 

2251 

118J 

: FENSE 


Milwaukee 

21 

24*2 

1T&2 

G PL 

Ava 

Denver 

10 

2107 

117.1 

17 2DM 

1227 

Portland 

SO 

2201 

TUI 

19 2207 

1214 

Datta* 

14 

tool 

1124 


Football 

onal Footbal League Standings 


.... IMERICAN CONFERENCE 



East 




Gtovaknd 

7 

6 

a 

230 234 

205 

‘ 

W 

L 

T Pet. PP 

PA 

Cincinnati 

4 

7 

a 

242 344 

352 


9 

4 

0 

492 334 

249 

PtthUtarah 

4 

7 

a 

442 295 

219 

. island 

9 

4 

O 

j 02 m 

231 

Houston 

5 

0 

0 

205 223 

315 

i " b 

9 

4 

0 

492 323 

220 


wait 




^ PoHi 

3 

10 

0 

231 245 

330 

LA. Raiders 

9 

4 

0 

492 300 

205 


2 

11 

0 

-154 149 

294 

Denver 

9 

4 

a 

492 325 

275 







Seattle 

7 

6 

e 

438 291 

250 

' ■ 






San Dtoao 

6 

7 

a 

442 359 

339 

iiwT/m 20s 



Kamos atv 

4 

9 

D 

30 220 

302 


P » towns In UN UndgM Pr«*» 
MM pan (with Bit p i OC8 vote*, 
near*. total point* based «n 9MMC, 
tact wwlfi raaktaflO: 

Rpcn n t Pta Pvc 


-- i State (47J 

ll-M 

1.144 

1 

■ i'm. fio. ai 

10-1-0 

1JN3 

4 

u> 

live 

WHO 

2 

' homo <51 

9-1-0 

IAN 

3 

■- -toon (1) 

9-1-1 

935 

5 

"1 l~ Oa ■ 

9-W 

903 

6 

1 taka 

MB 

779 

5 

■r«Bae 

0-1-2 

745 

10 

v*. tarn Yauno 

UhM 

457 

9 

J -oroe 

IV VO 

417 

11 

' v . . >6 AIM 

9M 

SB 

15 

:• i 

0-1-1 

531 

12 

nsm 

9-24 

414 

M 

-« k 

8-M 

410 

14 

' 1 • -ama 

5-2-1 

363 

'th 

IM 

318 

7 

Hate 

EM 

255 

19 

'-do State 

MH> 

140 

13 

- soma State 

M4 

*7 

17 

' ' *■ r ' r Hw Green 

IVO-O 

73 — 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
Eat 

Dal la* 9 4 * M2 

N.Y. Giant* t S b SIS 

WasNnsMI 7 4 0 

Phltodtoltta 4 7 0 M2 

SL Louts 4 9 0 JOB 

Control 

x-Gikuao 11 1 0 JD 

DnfroU 7 4 0 338 

Out" Bar 6 7 0 M2 

Minnesota 4 7 0 M2 

Tamm Bay 7 11 0 .154 


M2 309 231 
.415 315 331 
.530 204 240 
jam 238 


529 302 145 

530 2S1 200 
.442 047 201 
542 272 301 
.154 247 371 


Botaon 

17 

1004 

1109 

Phoenbc 

IS 

1995 

1108 

Utah 

19 

2101 

1104 

CMcaoo 

20 

2204 

1103 

L-A. Climera 

10 

1979 

189.9 

New Jersey 

If 

2077 

1093 

Cleveland 

17 

1840 

1007 

Golden State 

19 

3042 

1005 

PMIadetotila 

17 

1834 

ISM 

Sacramento 

17 

1834 

ISM 

Indiana 

17 

1024 

1874 

Sen Antonia 

14 

Has 

1047 

Atlanta 

19 

1978 

104.1 

waohtaatan 

17 

1740 

I0L0 

Seattle 

10 

1054 

1333 

New York 10 

. IM 


nt 

TEAM DEFENSE 



G 

No. 

Avo 

New Ybrfc 15 

1795 


IW 

Seattle 

18 

1803 

1002 

Bataan 

17 

17S5- 

1837 

Washington 

17 

1743 

1837 

San Antonia 

17 

1912 

1967 

Philadelphia 

17 

1013 

1004 

Atlanta 

19 

2030 

10M 

Milwaukee 

21 

ao 

(003 

Cleveland 

17 

1838 

100.1 

LA Laker* 

17 

1878 

iias 

Utah 

19 

3099 

nos 

Portland 

20 

2234 

HU 

Doha 

16 

1791 

1113 

Indiana 

17 

ms 

11X4 

Golden State 

19 

2143 

1123 

Now Jersey 

19 

2153 

11X3 

Denver 

10 

3040 

1133 

Sacramento 

17 

1941 

1147 

Hantaan 

19 

3107 

115.1 

Detroit 

19 

3202 

1148 

Chicago 

25 

3319 

1163 

LA COPPers 

10 

3119 

1177 

Phoenix 

10 

2127 

1102 


■’■Pt tOdrt of caacMS top-M eonm 
/.niton {Wr it pi an o vtfw ami ro- 
^OalPMati. based «■ IS potato tar finRr 
• JMLefoaodlaitanak'iraHfctatf: 


- yWWe (37) (11-02 

581 

1 

.-■tamam (M> 

517 

2 

110-11 

493 

3 

*1 (FkU (10-lt 

480 

4 

*,.totoi (9-i-D 

425 

5 

-.afcsalvn 

316 

8 

-«M (7-V2) 

292 

9 

‘^foe (11-1) 

274 

7 

'- «n Ywna (TO-2) 

350 

» 

l > Am Slate (B-i-il 

OT 

12 

. .s A&M (9-2) 

193 

14 

mbs (an 

124 

13 

-AIO-H) 

118 

IS 

«ta (8-2-1) 

M 

t 

tm (8-3) 

82 

4 

Stale (0J) 

51 

18 

do Sme (0-3) 

38 

11 

• id State (1MM) 

19 

W 

lend (»> 

21 

s 

.no (83) 

20 

z 


LA. Rams 9 4 0 M2 241 227 

San FrandscD 0 5 0 515 329 201 

New Orleans s 8 o jbs 249 324 

Atlanta 2 11 0 .154 3€2 391 

[x-dlnctwd division tttisl 

Mopdayl BcmK 
Miami 30. Chlcose 24 

OKI 

Atlanta M Kama CMv 
tmoMnotan of PMladetaMa 
Dallas of Cincinnati 
Detroit at New £natona 
Indtanapafis at CMcaao 
Miami atomn Bay 
Mew Orleans at SL Louts 
N.Y. Jets at Buffalo 
LA. Rahtarc at Denver 
N.V. Giants at Houston 
Tampa Boy al MfOMMta 
Ocr eian tf at Saatfla 
pmsburah at San Dkaa 
Dec 

LA Ram at San Francisco 


NBA Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 

AttaoMc Pt e tatao 

WLM « 

Boston 15 2 582 — 

PtiftodeWita II 53 I 

Now Jersey 10 9 526 4 

Htufilnaton 7 it 47! I 

New Yorfc 4 14 522 11M 

Central OhMn 


MltamAeo 

Detroit 

Atlanta 

OevetaxJ 

CMcaoo 

Imflana 


IS 4 jm — 

n 7 533 a 

0 11 521 4 

mi at i 

7 11 » M 
3 14 .in 10 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
MMimf DMftoa 



Cop Draw 


y Jwil 

/ - rMoientwltbllwAnHiiapiFeeltiefl 
. Aomduttuui team on NCAA nr eon- 

--^probalton and boms tram bawl 
ji ? - » iMflatala tar taa-2# csnoldoraffart 
I .• fhase teams are Florida and Rwlft- 
;* y«dlsU 


Tbo drew tar ttt mr root* anton Mtartd 
Cap ft New Tsataoit aoa AaftroRa (eoaaot 
ond data* yvtta ba decimal: 

POOL A 

Anrtrafia, Poluua Japan, Utatod States 
POOL B 

iralanfc Wafts, Canada, Tcnoa 
POOL C 

Now Ibatnna. Aiuoattsn. FHL Italy 
POOL D 

Ft*** Saattaad, Romania- zraaB nOw e 
CSeedsd taosos to bold fPCOl 


Houston 

. 12 

6 

484 

— 

Denver 

12 

6 

447 

to 

Utah 

12 

8 

400 

life 

Dallas 

9 

7 

J£3 

2to 

sm Antonia 

18 

8 

su 

2Vl 

Sacramento 

5 12 

PadHe DtvKtaa 

39* 

7 

LA Later* 

15 

2 

382 

_ 

Portland 

12 

8 

400 

4VS 

Seattle 

8 

10 

AU 

7to 

Goldm State 

0 

12 

J * OP 

no 

LAdtoaera 

4 

12 

733 

9«r 

Phoenbc 

3 

15 

JUT 



MOtfDATTS RESULT 

SoMn State 21 21 22 2S— «• 

Utah 21 22 24 34— W 

Malaria B-Q 1-5 17, Boltey 441 47 14, Wllktas. 
M4 0-2 14; Carroll 7-14 W 22. Start 9-UV2 It. 
iwlwaadr GaUen stale 4t (Carroll. SmBh 
10);UMi44(Matana,eatai],H<nHnt).Ao- 
tfsta: Gotten Stale 22 (Ftovd ail Utah 30 
(Staektan 17). 


EnoHtfLOm. 
OanftaK, Utah 
WoairUoo-ad. 
OlahMn, Hau. 
Wilkins. Aft 
Davis. Ptae. 
Jetmaan. LAC 
Bird. Bos. 
AWons PM. 
AsutiTw Dan. 


Warttnr. LAL 
Turptn. dev. 


Lsdm&ssr, DeL 
Wllltens. NJ. 
RulaacL Wash. 
Malone. PWL 
Otatawen, Hoa. 


Johnson. LAL 
Thomas, Dot. 


Ftoya GwS. 
Oraeks, PML 


INDIVIDUAL 

Scorisa 

G FG FT Pta Av» 
10 213 130 544 315 

19 204 148 576 303 

20 191 143 527 2L4 

19 171 122 444 244 
If 171 104 442 245 
10 149 05 <29 235 

U 155 40 3292X7 
17 lfl 100 402 235 
77 »l U* 399 2X4 

14 143 05 371 233 

Goal Perrsetaw* 

FG PGA Pet 
90 132 582 
9* 152 551 
■3 134 519 
742 OH 514 
SO 144 511 

Rsbaeodtaa 

G OH Del Tat Avo 
19 41 1«3 250 112 

19 78 151 239 125 

15 54 T* 178 119 

17 » w miu 
1* 90 131 221 115 

Asftsts 

G Me. Ava. 
15 307 US 

18 207 115 

17 155 9.1 

19 T7T 95 
17 152 13 


NHL Standings 

WALKS CONFERENCE 
Patrick D 4 * i sto n 

W L T Pis GF GA 
PMledeipMa If 5 0 30 1 U 49 

Wa tadnetan 14 7 3 - 31 *s 75 

NY I slenders 10 0 5 25 so 07 

NY Ranaen n 73 7 23 91 04 

Ptm&urah 9 12 3 21 *3 S 7 

New Jersey » 12 1 19 77 09 

Ada ms Dtwtsloa 

Boston 12 8 4 W 93 79 

Montreal 12 9 1 27 10* M 

Quehec 12 10 1 25 05 75 

Buffalo 12 11 1 25 07 74 

Hartford 11 11 a 22 87 ft 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 


Hockey 


National Hockey League Leaders 


SL Louis 

Chicooo 

Minnesota 

Detroit 

Toronto 

Ed m onton 

CUoarv 

Vancouver 

Winnipeg 


ft 9 3 n 71 04 

9 10 4 22 95 99 

4 12 S 10 05 M 

4 13 4 14 75 117 

5 IS 3 W 79 103 

IM DtvtslM 

H 4 3 37 121 84 

13 8 3 29 103 04 

9 14 3 21 101 114 

9 14 2 30 04 117 

5 14 3 13 75 119 


NHL leaders through eanw 

set Dec. l: 

Sauve 

294 17 

0 

347 

5CDRIMO 




Bomirmon 

1M7 75 

1 

470 


B 

A 1 

Pit 

Skorederakl 

to 6 

0 

LOO 

Gretzky, Edm 

It 

H 

S3 

CMccwo O) 

reel »* 

1 

LM 

Lemtoax, Pgh 

14 

24 

30 

Bernhard! 

736 54 

D 

440 

Nasiund. Mil 

It 

21 

37 

Edward* 

M3 49 

0 

443 

Prapp, Pba 

14 

20 

34 

TOrento 

1399 Ml 

e 

442 

Anderaoa Eckn 

It 

1* 

35 

Bouchard 

400 29 

0 

lit 

Kerr, Pha 

33 

ID 

33 

Heyward 

)0to 83 

0 

04 

Gartner, W mb 

It 

17 

33 

Behrend 

26 S 

a 

1LS4 

Mauler, Edm 

14 

17 

33 

Wtoeftea 

ISM 117 

1 

L44 

TantL Vcr 

14 

13 

31 

Stefan 

SS9 St 

0 

3.91 

B rotor, Minn 

14 

17 

31 

Pueey 

40 3 

0 

450 

Pnomr. cm 

IS 

U 

31 

Mlauef 

325 3t 

0 

646 

SavortL CM 

13 

14 

29 

MJo 

180 21 

0 

7 M 

Fronds. Hart 

It 

It 

29 

outran Ol 

1404 117 

9 

IN 

Unaeman, Bas 

0 

21 

29 


426 30 

0 

481 

Ba**y, NYI 

u 

12 

21 

Bitot 

728 tl 

0 

sj a 

SUkrtk Vcr 

IS 

13 

28 

Hraty 

ST 4 

0 

7M 

T. Murray. CM 

12 

14 

20 

Le* Aneetos (Z) 

totoi 119 

0 

889 


Tennis 


Australian Open Results 

WOMEN 

Quwrterttaalt 

Martina Navratilova, U5. dot. Helena Su- 
kova Cxechaslovakta. 4-Z 4-Z 
Chris Evert utovd. UA. def. Monueta Ma- 
lms. Bulgaria. 4-3. 6-3. 

Hana Mandintava CnUnolovakia def. 
Zina Garrison. U5. 25. 4a 40. 

Claudia Koiide-Kllscn, West Germany, del. 
Catarina Undavlst. Sweden, 4-4, 6-0, 

MEN 

Fourth Roued 

Mats Wltander. Sweden, def. Tim Wllklson, 
U5- >4 (7-1). 6-3. 4-3. 

Staton Edbera Sweden, del. Wally Masur. 
Australia 4-7 I4-7J, 2-6, 7-6 17-*). 6-4. 4-2 
John Ltoya Britain net. Joakim Nyotram, 
Sweden, 6-2. 1-4. 6-4. 6-7 (4-7), 6-4. 

Mkldel Scnopers. Netherlands, del. Tim 
Gullltaon, ui- 7-6 17-1 ), (reU. 


Sdected College Scores 


Army SI. Ranert Morris 50 , OT 
Bataan GoL 7 E Now Hampshire £ 
Bataan U. 71 Massachusetts 47 
C.W. Post 71 Brldpspart 47 
Duqubsw 79 , Indiana, Pa 52 
Mammon Si Colon to S3 
Hetv Gross 91 , Dartmouth 71 
John Jay 7 L Hunter 70 
Navy 101 Cirw Western S3 
Ntaama 71 Dnxel 47 
Pom O, Southern Col 54 
PfevfdNK* ol Morth BO taem 40 
SprtaafWd 03. 1 ceanoettcut 44 
SL Boncve nlu rp 71 St. Marrt 71 
Trinity 71 WsstfteU SL St 
SOUTH 

Atobatna 9 », Utah 49 
atadta 91 Pisdmaw 44 
demon m Alder 43 
. Daks H East Carolina 44 
N. Goraana 5 t Si Taripa M 
S. M tartutoPl «, McHsooe St 77 
VMI 91 . Jamas MadUett to 
MIDWEST 

CaMrvlne 37 , Nebraska 80 
CretaMon 41 Nsb^Omotia 51 
Gearpta Tech 42 . SL Louis SI 
llUoaio St 51 WIsvGrom Bay 39 
Indiana St 71 St. Ambrose 45 
MkMoon 07 , Tennessee S 
Minnesota 07 , E. Illinois 59 
Wisconsin 91 Son Ftanc t sca St 61 
SOUTHWEST 

Baylor 81 . Concordia. Texas M 
Bradley 74 . W. Illinois 42 
Tam Tech 49 . Qreaea 40 

Toxas-Arilnstan 71 $W Tem St. 73 

FAR WEST 

Air Force 74 . Adams 5 t S3 
Colorado 101 . Santa am 71 
Cotarado SL U IL Cotarado 40 
Florida A&M 49 . Jadsat «. 9 
LmWatta SL 77 , HawidUra a 
Portland 41 Idaho St. 55 
Stanford HL Gal-Sart Diaoe 49 
Wua h l n gten St. 44 , Qenaoo <1 


OtONnAY? RESULTS 
PBtabproh 2 I 3-4 

N.Y. town 0 • 0—8 

Sheddm (U), Nokm ( 1 ), Hannan {Si. But 
lard ( 10 >. Errev Ml. Bedoer (t) .Sbataen oaat: 
Pittsburgh (on Scott, Va nMata TeuckJ 0 - 125 — 
21 : New York Rongora (an Romano) 18 - 11 - 
11 — 40 . 

Vftwoovor • 0 0-0 

Smith ( 5 ), Nasiund 2 111 ), Detain 2 (IS, 
Gcdney ( 71 . Rablnoon m.Stwtaeaooal: Van- 
couver (on SOOtadrt) 944 MN: Montroal (on 
Brodeur) 135 A- 57 . 


Transition 


KANSAS CITY— Sfttwd Lvnn Jones, eut- 
fteMor. to o or e - v eor cunfrpct 
TEXAS— Aael wo d Bobby Jenas^uHMdor. 
<nd Grao Tctaor, biflelder, to Oklahoma aty 
of the American AsoodoOwi. 

Nonwta Lasse 

HOUSTON-Notnod Fred Stanley vice 
prexktont of baseball oaertatonB. 

PHILADELPHIA Named Rabta Roberta 
minor iKftis ettchlng coenBnatar, Andy Sm- 
mMck mlnor-taagu* eattaiina b m i wjur . 
Mftrk Andoraon aoofttartt trafter end Jee Mc- 
Donald Ftarido scout. 

BASKETBALL 

miUmWl Badkethtal Assodaflaa 
BOSTON— WWIvod Sly WHflami, torwanL 
. DALLAS— Elgnod Jay VkieonL lorwanl. to 
a etx-voar mml racf nteneiaa. 

POOTBAU. 

Ufttod Ibft r oO tb a ll l—ioo 
Arizona-Stoned miartaftacfc Rick Neuhet- 
«L 

_ HOCKEY 
National Hadn t en aiia 
N.Y. RANGERS— Readied Da— Garner, 
cantor, from New Haven of the American 
Hockey Looguo. 

COLLEGE 

KANSAS STAT E to ned San Pgrrfefi 
football coach. 

Iff. LOUISIANA— Named Don Skrrton bf 
tarim looctscril coach. 


MP OA : 
657 25 
40D 23 
307 20 
MW 0 
179 I 
90S 42 


D 1 Amour 
Lemefin 


Pttttaunti (4) 
iMmtoy 
Milton 
May 

5 L Looto CD 
Saetaort 
Boy 
Pen ne y 
Meftraal ai 
Casey 


MtanoWk OJ 
BIMnaton . 
Rosdi 

Oievrter 
New Jonoy OT 
Uot 
Waeka . 

Hartford ( 1 > 
Brodwr 
Gaorlco 
V— iw r ( 2 ) 



7i i- 








Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1985 


OBSERVER 


Pickling AU 'Gourmets’ 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — Why is il now 
stylish to look down the nose 
at turkey? I believe the rise of this 
patronizing attitude coincides with 
the spread of the word “gourmet-" 
Not so long ago, most Americans 
didn't even know how to pro- 
nounce “gourmet.’' The few who 
could pronounce it didn’t know 
what it meant. What it means now- 
adays is sdli a puzzle, but I am sore 
it doesn't mean what it used to 
mean when almost nobody could 
pronounce it, because I now hear 
tell of “gourmet hot dogs” and 
“gourmet delicatessen." 

Surely no self-respecting gour- 
met would enter the same room 
with a hoi dog or be caught in 
public gorging on two pounds of 
pastrami packed between two slabs 
of rye bread. Strictly speaking, eats 
of the class that includes hot dogs 
and delicatessen fare ore called 
“chow,” “fodder" or “heavy ton- 
nage" and are consumed by “gour- 
mandisers," “trenchermen,” “sniff- 
ers” or “h uman anacondas,” the 
term favored by my mother in the 
dining situations where “hogs” 
seemed too delicate to give ao accu- 
rate description of the feeders. 

□ 

In those days dieting had not 
become the United Slates's nation- 
al neurosis. Americans were con- 
tent to pack it down, and devil take 
the cholesterol, until the innards 
blew out after two or three score 
years, or three score and 10 if they 
woe lucky. 

This wasn't pure foolishness, as 
you may suppose if you are too 
young to remember when there was 
no such thing as non-dairy creamer 
to add to the saccharin in your 
decaffeinated coffee. In those days 
if your innards didn't go in good 
time there was no nursing home to 
look forward to. All you could ex- 
pect for the sunset years was the 
poorhouse. 

The poorhouse was just what it 
sounds like. If you wanted to make 
the sunset years last, you had to 
pack on plenty of extra weight at 
table in the youthful eating years 
while the packing was good. 

Well nowadays, of course, 
“gourmet" has infested the Ameri- 
can table. As suggested by terms 
like “gourmet hot dogs,” it has 
been turned into an adjective 
meaning “pretentious.” And since 
pretentions are invariably accom- 


panied by high markup, “gourmet" 
has taken on the added meaning of 

“expensive." 

Have you noticed your super- 
market has a counter devoted to 
“gourmet" products? They often 
have pickled watermelon rind at 
the “gourmet” counter, just like my 
grandmother used to have in rows 
of Mason jars stored in her cedar 
when the canning season ended. 
She has been dead 52 years, hut I 
always *hmlc of hex when I see the 
“gourmet" watermelon rind and 
wonder what she would have done 
to anyone with the gall to accuse 
her of bong a “gourmet pickier ” 

p ickling watermelon rind was 
one of those tilings that the unrich 
did on the principle that, with a 
tiKk ingenuity, nothing ever need 
be wasted. 


After the onset of gourmetim, a 
lot of eats produced by peasants 
reluctance to call anything garbage 
found themselves elevated to the 
“gourmet” shelf. Goat cheese made 
iL That produced a bizarre eating 
era when sensible people insisted 
that this miserable cheese produced 
by these miserable creatures reared 
on miserable hardscrabble earth 
was actually superior to the mag- 
nificent creamy cheeses of the no- 
blest dairy antm^ bred in the rich- 
est green valleys of the earth. 

Goats had been pronounced 
“gourmet” just like watermelon 
rind that hud escaped the compost 
pile, but many foods, though far 
tastier, couldn't make the grade. 
Turkey wasn’t fit to share the same 
table with goat cheese. 

One was supposed to joke about 
turkey, deplore turkey, brag about 
refusing to eat turkey despite 
Thanksgiving. 

Maybe turkey could not be made 
expensive enough to qualify for 
“gourmet" status. It is apparently 
hard to drive turkey prices as high 
as the price of goat cheese. Though 
turkeys were expensive in my 
grandmother’s time, being compet- 
itors with the vital chicken crop, 
she always raised a few for ceremo- 
nial occasions. It was dramatic to 
watch her decapitate one with an 
ax the day before Thanksgiving. 
Nowadays the expense of hiring, 
grandmothers for the ax wort 


so honored with “gourmet" status. 
New York Tones Service 


Spielberg & Co. Conjure Up Sherlock’s Roots 


By Leslie Bennetts 

New York Tima Service 

N EW YORK —The setting is 
Victorian London: streets 
teeming with horse-drawn car- 
riages and harrying figures in 
dark capes, venerable boys' 
schools wnh libraries dating bade' 
to the Middle Ages, characters 
with D ickensian names as 
Waxflatter and Cragwitcfa, Bad- 
cock and Bobster, Soelgrove and 
Mrs. Dribb. 

A familiar enough milieu — 
ii n Vet you rnncifW qipb addi- 
tional dements as an Egyptian 

Hwilh tyU, a flyin g machine , hor- 
rible winged harpies with wicked 
talons and hot red eyes, writhing 
serpents that lash themselves 
around a terrified man in the 
blink of an eye, scaly pterodactyl- 
tike buds with vicious beaks, 
fierce warriors wielding giant 
swords above their shaved heads, 
beautiful maidens wrapped like 
mummies boiled alive, and an 
elaborate temple u se d for ^ini<iw 
quaswdigious rites. 

The resulting mix is “Young 
Sherlock Holmes,” a lighthearted 
murder mystery that weds Sir Ar- 
thur Conan Doyle to the kind of 
rollicking action-adventure that 
has made Steven Spielberg a suc- 
cessful filmmaker. Thus h is not 
surprising that “Young Sherlock 
Holmes," which opens in New 
York Wednesday, is the latest 
motion picture from Spielberg’s 
Amhtrn Entertainmen t and that 
he was executive producer. 



Nicholas Rowe, left, as Holmes, with Freddie Jones, and Alan Cox as Watson. 


Set in 1870, “Sherlock” places 
the young sleuth-to-be at a Lon- 
don boys’ school, where he meets 
John Watson, a chubby, bespec- 
tacled youth with a weakness far 
custard tarts «md dreams of be- 
coming a doctor. Directed by Bar- 
ry Levinson, the film stars Nicho- 
las Rowe, a former Etonian, as 
Holmes and Alan Cox as Watson. 


with a script 
by Chris Columbus, 27, whose 
previous credits include such 
yarns as “Gremlins" and "The 
Gocnies," also Amblin products 
supervised by Spielberg. Colum- 
bus had been reading Dickens 
and was “completely inspired” by 
the Victorian period, he said. 

Holmes's early years, heajso read 
Conan Doyle and watched the 
generations of movies based on 
his i mmo rtal character. 


“I was very worried about of- 
fending some of tiie Holmes pur- 
ists,” Columbus said. Using Co- 
nan Doyle’s bodes as a guide to 

maintaining mitlimti i-iiy Colum- 

bus focused on talcing the charac- 
teristics traditionally identified 
with Holmes and tracing thgm to 
their imagined nrtgme . 

“The thing that was most im- 
portant to me was why Holmes 
became so cold and calculating, 
and why he wta alone for the rest 
of his life," Columbus said. 
“That’s Why be is so emotional in 
the film; as a youngster, he was 
ruled by emotion, be fell in love 
with the love of ms life, and as a 
result of what happens in this 
film, he becomes the person be 
was lata." . 

Spielberg helped refine the 
script, makmg a particular contri- 
bution to the sequences involving 
lurid hallucinations that require 
fantastical special effects. 

Given the elaborate technical 
d eman ds of the movie, Levinson, 
also a successful screenwriter, 
might seem in unlikely c hoice as 
director. EEs previous directorial 
credits were “Dina,” which be 
wrote, and “The Natural.” 


“I fdt Barry was sort of a frus- 
trated action-adventure director 
who had always wanted a shot at 
making an adventure story into a 
movie," Spielberg said. 

“We spent a lot of time taBting 
and he tatted about tempo 
pacing _ about havin g .nc dead 
air, no ti me tn find ihchnlcc in the 

story, just going straight through 
with a lot ctf energy. He said, Td 
tike this movie to go bim bam 
boom!’ I was convinced he could 
doit." 

Levinson, 42, waspleased to 
take the chance “They don't 
have a *bow to. direct* book," be 
said, “and as a director, you leam 
by all the experiences you come 
up against. 

“ An intrig uin g aspect of this 
for me was the chance to push 
against those borders and expand 
my abilities, so that even if you 
return to a Diner’-Hce movie lat- 
er, you have these tools at your 
disposal.” 

Although Spielberg neither 
wrote nor directed “Sheriock.” his 
fans are Likely to find man y of his 
signatures in the film The flying 
contraption may recall the flying 
bicycle in “E.T." “Sheriock” of- 


fers a secret Egyptian cult and its 
spectacular temple of death; 
“Raidas of the Lost Aik” boast- 
ed an Egyptian crypt filled with 
live snakes, and “In diana Jones 
and the Temple of Doran” fea- 
tured a temple and an Indian cull. 

Asked whether there is such a 
thing as a Spielberg movie, Spiel- 
berg replied, “If s hud for me to 
be objective about it, but I think 
all the movies Fve produced but 
not directed — and I guess some 
of the ones I’ve directed too — are 
pretty good Saturday matinee 
films, the kind I enjoyed seeing at 
raie o’clock in the afternoon on 
Saturday when I was a kid. 
They’re strong stories; they’re en- 
tertainments without ranking any 
excuses for. it — movies made 
principally to' entertain rather 
than to malfft you think" 

Levinson said: “In the best 
days of Hollywood/there used to 
be such a thing as an MGM pic- 
ture or a Warner Bros, film, and 
even though they did a B lands of 
films, you sort of knew the MGM 
film from the Warner Bros. film. 
That's applicable to Steven and 
Amblin.” 


Columbus attributed the simi- 
larities between his work and 
Spielberg’s to similar ustes. Ob- 
viously the projects Steven re- 
sponds to are going to « 
that resemble what he Ukes to ** 
in films. He works with people 
wbo view the world the same wa> 
he does. For me. the collaboration 
with him has been tenific. we « 

sort of on the same wavelength: 
we both come up with outrageous 
ideas, and if they work we can put 
them in the screenplay. He s the 
greatest mentor; he's like me 
greatest older brother you could 
ever have. You just couldn't get a 
better teacher” 

Spielberg is quick to credit Co- 
lumbus with the script of "Sher- 
lock" and Levinson with casting 
and directing the film according 
to his own vision. However. Co- 
lumbus acknowledged that Spiel- 
bag's influence was pervasive. 
“He wasn't on the set much, but 
his shadow was ever-present He’s 
like a terrific football coach. He 
expects a lot out of you. and 
pushes you further than you think 
you can go yourself.” 

Spielberg, having established 
his cinematic Hallmar k and devel- 
oped other talents to help create 
such films, is moving on to new 
rhallmg es. His new movie is “The 
Color Purple,” a film he directed 
from the Pulitzer Prize-winning 
novel by Alice Walker. It is the 
story of a poor Southern black 
woman spanning the first 40 years 
of this century. “The Color Pur- 
ple” will be released lata this 
month in the United States. His 
next project will be “Schindler's 
List,” based on Thomas Keo col- 
ly’s novel is tic account of the real- 
life efforts of Oskar Schindler, a 
German businessman, to save 
more than 1.000 Polish Jews from 
extermination by the Nazis. 


“I’m trying very hard, at the 
age of 37, not to begin to accept 
my own stereotype,” Spielberg 
said, “and the only way to do that 
is to challenge myself with differ- 
ent kinds of material that don't 
trade on my strengths, but per- 
haps utilize some of my weakness- 
es, so I can strengthen them too. 1 
don't want to bore myself by 
making the same kind of movie 
ova and ova again. I need to 
rhalleny myself with material 
that's a little more provocative.” 


PEOPLE 


Truck Hero Among 22 
Cited by Carnegie Fw$ 


Who: Louis Joseph Gateau. 
j Canadian truck driver, heard’^ 
his citizens band radio that a inti 4 
cr behind him had lost his b:ak<..l | * 
on a mountain road, he used j^j* *" 
own vehicle lo stop the runs** 
because the man “didn't have mas j l , 
of a chance” otherwise. “1 figu E |-|S j 
we could both jump if wc bad i*.j t 
Gallant, of Wellington, Prince & 
ward Island, said upon being hot 
ored by the Carnegie Hoc Fa 


Commission in Pittsburgh. He 




f 

f * 



one of 1 3 Americans and nine C- 
nadiaas giyen awards for rk 
deeds: six died as a result of 
heroism. Each hero, or a sunn,: 
received 52,500 and the Cjmtgi 
Medal. The commj&sjon has cue 
6.455 persons since Andrew Cam 
pie founded it in 1904. 

□ 

The filmmaker Steven Spidbcx 
and the actress Ajuj Irving 
married last week in Santa Ft Nd 
Mexico, according to Judge Thw 
as A. Donnelly. 

□ 

Jem Lee Lewis, saying he w, 
hungry for hot chili and a odd 
has been released from the. 
phis hospital where one- dniddf 
rock V roll singer's uioerat 
stomach was removed Nov. 12 
□ 

Martin Bangenuum, the W®-' 
German economics minister, h:_ 
reportedly received hundred* t 
telephone calls inviting him j. 
wash the dishes after he injud . ** 
ciously mentioned in a tdevisio 
interview that washing up wa< oi 
way he relaxed from political car; j 
“You just have to invite me to v.v - 
home to wash dishes," he us 
“and I will be that" ' 

Serge Lentz, a French journal!? 
won the Iniaallie book prize Tur 
day in Paris for “Vladimir Roi 
baiev," a novel set in Phh-ceniin 
Russia. 

□ 

A top Chinese director. 
Ruocheng. says his Beging iheas 
plans to stage “Amadeus” by if 
British playwright Peter Static 
Ying. in an interview with RodT 
Australia, noted that, though if 
play depicts Wolfgang Amrin 
Mozart as foul-mouthed, “the Ch 
nese language is a very rich la 
guage and we have more four-leUi ■ 
words than the Eng lish language 
The play is scheduled for Februar 


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DUPIEX 

T 


of ctoout 250 iqjn. o*d wood penolna 
refined decor, 4e o efa gs, 3 feldspars- 
dent bedrooms sodi wrth OMiptooss 
bdhroom end dvuiu, ssefs room. 

PIERRE BATON . 

THEX BATON 630AU F 

47.04 J5J5 


{700 ho. Inducing feddn^ 


PARIS -NULY 


Near Bars de Boulogne, . 
butanes* detrid De fen se B ofc . 
PROHTABIE KJHDMO 


FOR HABITATION. 
MI 1«7a on 3 LEVHS 
13 AnumHBfH AVAIA8I 


one of which 200 sqm. 
K, terrace. 

GLOBAL SA1E 


top floor, 
EXaU&VE 


Write to Bef 71% l 

17 rue de fa Bcncjue, Pari : 


Charm, beam, 70 tqjn. d u pta s t, top 

floocl taring + 1 bedroom, perfect 

COOatKXly nigh poos. 


(1) 47 27 25 23 


luxurious 430 


30 w/n. 4 1 

OPilM45l 


FOCH ON PRIVATE WAY 

TO WNHOU S E, 700 SQ JA 
Beaatfid reapdons 
IMMOCOM, 4727 84 76 


18TH MONTMAXIE 


Lovely torplex, hidi up, 2 bed room 
te,lBrroce7Z4®iXXL 45620303 


{replace,! 


BOULOGtC (92>, near mefeo Moreta 

Sernfaot, sum Stutocy 30 s tun , erv 
feonos, “farth, Idtdwn, bdoony. 
F350/D0. No agent 47 09 56 52 pro. 


REAL ESTATE . 
FOR SALE 


PARIS 4 SUBURBS 


SPAIN 


PRIVATE 
A I R PORT 


SOUTHERN SPAIN 


runway & omi u3 t un4 land. S orted 
ear tourist arfeocneit ft u a, 

Tel Geneva 36 54 40 office hours 


SWITZERLAND 


SWnZBUAND 


LAKE GENEVA OR 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS; 
For Offers ca n buy farefe .r yu r lw epta 
or chafes wahraoffincrtvwwsJton-- 
ireu*, vSerj V«&r r Los Diabtarefe 
Ovsteau dOes near Gstaad, Leysrv 




65% or 6W% irterost 

SJL, Av Man Repo* 24, CH-1005 lou- 
same, Swfeertand. Tek CH 22 35 12 
The 25185 MRS 
Ve 


LAKE GHCVA + IDOANO, AAorv 
tretee, Gtosud region locorao A 
nawngrttaiim' 

cart Dmr superb new . 

iA_Taur Grin 6, 01-1007 Lanin 
7im»11, Lugano office 91/6876« 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


H WAYS TO RAISE TIC IO of a 

chdd Parents ire invited to 


of a new book fay Hot 


sd tolowndw^ 


pro fen or and wife. Hbonlrternrtion- 

d Hotel, Ptefe Fri. Doc A 3J0-&00. 
The IQ FplNDATlON, Pfearland, 


Texas 77588-0333. 


LA VARBME CONTBW>ORARY 
Cunne das now offered evenings. 
Serins 5 drinsr pertidpaban dales in 
state-of-the-art French cuisine. 
VMctfaesdtM 6-1 0 pm beaming Jav 
qy 8, 1986. Cbifer iMs 
47505.10.16. 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS in 
Pais (cfaiy) 4634 5965. Borne 
0320. .- 


MOVING 


INTERDEAN 


WHO BSE FOR YOUR 
NEXT MBNAHONAL MOVE 


FOR A FRS ESTIMATE CALL 


AMSIBDAM: 

ATHENS: 


CADIZ: . 

HtAPBOWi 

OMVA: 

LONDON: 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


OOMMCAN DIVORCES. B<x2080Z 

Sana Domingo, Domrseoi RspubSc. 


MANOCSIBb 

MLRJCH: 

NAFIK 

PARS: 


VIENNA: 

ZURKHs 



MOVING 


FOUR WINDS 
INTERNATIONAL 


WHY USE AGENTS? 

The Best Sendee ham the 
largest Wor ld wide Mover 
CALL PARIS 111 3 036 63 1 1 
LONDON (01) 578 66 11 


PERSONALS 


MAJOUCA. To our beloved 

plerae cortad offico a home 


HAVE A MCE DAY! BOHR. Have a 
rice day! BoM. 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVE 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


MAJOR MTBMATIONAL 

ccusaau express group 

Roquiros coutoy m onoga fa West 
Germany. (Mata a Female]. It is e mi*- 
aged tha appficorts vd hove the rele- 

vant background & amerience re- 
girad to operate A develop ow West 

Germai activities an a compreh en sive 

sede. Basing in Fradcfurt area 


Se nd co mmute CV. to 
Bo* 2937, Herald Tribune, 
92521 NeuBy Cede*. Frm> 


GENEStAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


GOIF TOUR MANAGB - 


French spealmg. raqurred to ta» . 
Ainencan group* towing France; U 
ceriqnd / hafe. Asugrtmertts- tB'jfi 
rtx>w 5 montm in Modi - &r4» - 
period. Mature persoriatty and b*>4 . 

edge of courses an Biviera. Svtawriar 
ofa hoian lain in o m er y. Pmferencr 
la Poro a Rnneroreeder*. TopsaoL. . 


Reply p r omptly: 9a> 42253. IHT., . 
63 longAer.; Usncfan. WC2£ *JH H . 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


YOUNG LADY, 29. En^fah Free*. 

Drteh, having worked m fall agto 

wfcora, npenenoed in servos 1 

oommeroal dept'fe keen sense de» 
tod mb ful erne potation re fen 
Tefc Pais 45 53 68 96 after MO pi , 


AMBHCAN PSYCHOANALYST «l« 

ested in working n Wat fenpt w 

COnsdar dternaBve position P. If ■ 
vimhd, 11624 Ventura BfeL Srt- 
402. Stutao City, CA 91604 LKA ■ 


BAUBBNA- Private Aerobic Imfeertc . 

NIC, seeks pafaon. For further itaa 
mafiai odk 212-734-9240. ; 


YOUNG HIBIOi LADY PA seeks Pi 

fe Con travel. Bax 2954, I 
■buna, 92S2I NouAy Cede*. I 




SECRETARIES AVAILABLE. 


IOOMNQ FOB TOP BHINGUAL pe 
sonneB CaB Ihe expert* G« »fTB» 


AlBUfeRANSD, Peril fth. 4299 S77 
Sea/dr, cor, baggage, of countries 


IdVBESEAS POSITIONS. Hundrecb of 
top paying portions avertable. Tax 
free incomes. Attractive benefits. Op- 
porfemiSes far rtl occupations. Free 
detail. Overseas Employment Ser- 
wra. Deff . HT, P.O. fea 460. Town 
cfMajmt Boyd, Quebec; dmada 


sonnef? Cot the enter* GR I 
Mr* Mufler 47 58 8230 Pans 


PAGE 4 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


International Business Message Center 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


GUARANIS) INCOME 


ANNUtnES 
One of the fo remost kmi 
fees in the worid offera 

* Guora n tesd Return Qnlrwtetnwrt 

* US. doflori, * Corrertete iquvdty 

* To* Free, * WortdWictatoe 
« Corraleto Aiuiyuity 

raoK plan La. 

Av. Alton Repos 24, 01-1005 Looscms. 
Swrtzmicnd. Tek (21B2 K 1Z 
Tab* 25185 Men Ot 


MIERNAHONAL OnSHORE 

COMPANY INCORPORATIONS 

ROM £110 

Co mprehens i ve Adminotrcrtfan. 
Ncntfeiee service* Powers of Aflomey. 
BeffStered offi ce*. 7dm, telephony 
in® ranirarcsn^ 


Brtfacwrie House, 
Summertril, 

Ue of Men 

TetJ>524] J90T0-2Q240- 23933 
lS« 62B352 Uend G. 


SWB5 M5MEBMAN Meta new 
orpriwb to tittrftu to. Wife Bo* 
2961, Hartad Tribune, 92521 NeuRy 
Cede*, tan 


BU0CELLAT1 

Jeweller-Goldsmith 



Silverware and Flatware 

4 Place Vend6 me Paris l er - Tel. (1) 42.60.12.12 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE 8 UK 
LTD COMPANE5 

mcorponjfcon ond nxi myomen* r 18L 
ble of Man. Turfa, AnguBe, Chonne! 


CiLiiikr and 


• Cctrfidertid advice 

• feewed fa te ovcilabitty 


• Bool refftarotiara 

9 Accounted & odm faislra fion 

• Ms£, telephone & Men 
Free ■ t refaei nten i be*Ue« freac 

SfiKT CORPORATE 

sanncEs ltd 

Head Office 

Ml Pleanta, DaagkNv Ue of Man 
Tab Doofllra (5 6241 23 7T8 
Tela» fel 554 SHBT T Q 
London PeureentLilivi 
- 2-5 OW Bandit, London W1 
Tel 01*493 4244, Tlx 38247 5CSLDN G 


BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


U. S. A. 

UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 

Cd o bfa he d successful co mpany seefa 
adc&iand a^xtd to exploit revofafiorv 
ay lechnaiaffcnl breadhrough fa the 
rwt industry, ported by prouwant uni- 
versity professor in Ihe U5A. finf cSvi 
cfand p nid E y c ep tion ojh' high annual 
returns projected far decodes. 


STEEL EXPORT TO RAN 
THU CONNECTIONS. 

1. Up to 5000 M7T el ectrol y tic copper 

wire rods cort inu ous castinft d j n eter 

Sratt acoordng ASTMB-49/78 99.9X 
purity. In aafaupto4000Ue»«n wood- 
an pul bl k 

2. wfa^OO M7T one epedd fegh 
grqde99,9Xpiifey.oBJuw0J03-lJ. 
QJ0Q2 & Copper, ] fa 10,000 rmonxim 
Buyer fetam Gmernmert. Poyment ir- 
r e v ocorte um» L/C 360 day*. Com- 

’■ “ pajj^e thru bonk gumrty on 

5% good p er forman ce bend guaranty 
requeued. Nonn rt t hfapfag doatmenta 
re q u ited with ir ap e eft a n certified by 
&S5. or Cntecna. 

C onpnfa already ha ving deoil wife 
Iran, or new wife axnknt re ferenc es 


ra^oNy ofjpj|r & offer fine to Bar 


Cedes. France 


frfaune, 92521 Nerfly 


FNSHNG/MODHJNG 

SCHOOL 


One 


aid 


located in FmfWor*,TBwj*Sfer safe. 
Has senred Fart Worth far 27 yean. 
Bwel e i* repoKtaon. Writ* 

Fort Worth, TX 74106 USA 


avnrtabfa fa Ma t o yn w V Co. 

Write; 8a* 2935, Herdd Trfaoe, 
92521 Nedy Cede*. Franco 


DAY AX 

Profestaonrt E hg b fenon with o Dayrti 


QtOUE _ _ ______ 

nyloheipfincrcBiiUTOrt^p^W 

Son, marks tina sotes or a pHbnvo & 


mode m tr^m uoyck artj project (Srect 
from Rw mtenor of fcjueo, wWi Am 


proraohon M _ 

‘Keuivd and frenwertion of 
Dayak Arta and Cmtog*'. 

For further infaraaticn pfaae wile tai 
DaeUl HGLBON 
JAlAN TfiUKU CKXTIEO W - 83 
JAKARTA - PUSAT 
NXDhCSM. 


TOO BM TO HAWXE 
What Parted o» on ooBy c oritrofed 
regiond butanes* fa Goal) has now 
developed into an nil butarieB appor- 
hnhr. Ormpa ty fa butanes* of marto- 
no & Mjpn rt noudi nehrark of d* 
tributes |0 oountriesTof unique phytacd 
security ffadods end syttens. 

Heavy pressure to upend Company 
before* if'* fine-to be asqsired by a 
stedum or fang; cun puny with inti 

re who a 


to 

dp* 


us neodi our goals, pravfafag 

btp w hcw & odire atasionet 


prtawr effadiM nanaanafa - prin- 
x* only. Tek 49488050. 


Tie 2164108 NGD D 


SF YOU BEUBfE fee RA BBftab Mfot 

wil coroe bod: strong, here's fee op 

portwity of a Bfenrae. fiedian 9 
ran Beach Caturty be aJrtiui e , 
oeeen A gaff court* condos, far 
fl J j taA a S22M vdue. Only 
SpOJXQ cceh, "No dstang carts. 

tire cash flaw. 2 to 1 write effort* 

S&SffitnSS&flLS 

Cedasc, Prance 


BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


INVESTMENT 


LET US ADVISE YOU ON HOW A 
WHERE TO MUST WITH SAFETY 
AID WOH KTUBN5 
Write fa Confidence ler 
■YAMT15A 
POSTMCH 6926, CH-8023 ZURICH 


CHANCE OF A UFEHME 
New & ntaque worldwide. Too can 
make SIOAXL ar more eeach rsorth. 
Absolutely renou* - legd - harasr. No 
St&ig inrehwd, can be rectazed fa your 
spare time e re r y wher*. for further de- 
toik write te H*» W. Frrtn, 5utfateJ»- 
wng -8. 701 5 KarrUol - AAienchngen 2, 
West Germany '' .- 


BCCHi«T 04YESTMBW fa .teWty 

BrariL ftapriteor of Q large property 

wife a prorate wfoe sandy bpoeh, 
picturesque boy f tafc Swooy d 
year round, 45 ranutos front tatT ar- 
port. C mu iii uJ oa O on FocSnl. A fast 
devfaoping tourita aea, Wtfag far 
isriavs ewestors to derelop faro e 
hotel eamptasL Write toTfa, 2959. 
Herald Triune,’ 92571 Neu9yC«dng 
Prcra . • -* — 


WVKTMBirS 
SS OUR AD ON 
PAGE 7 ^ 
TRANS CONTARB 
MARKEQN&.AG 


YOUR A8H«r M MOROCCO 

SCHAMASCHMAROCSA 

Write 4 Aw Hatane Soghir 
Casablanco OT, Mo rogp 

CJa 272504, 27265 1, 222221 - 

Tie 22901 


PANAMA COMPAffi wife narnfaee 

Dfaedon ml mfidwH 5w« 

LtMroboura brat occourt Termed it 

48 horn. Smh brendt affiob opened 

far fafrfiee fcwfcig. Anooywwi tone 


deposits, fadgp edowi btfeiao 
deafan. Mona*, lO fore %£ii„r 
teWt, London SW1. Tek-riB M7- 


Genowy (B27# 



flBMW C AR DtP ORTBi aag 

WOnflWBBt v 

1971, Tfo 531021. 

Imprimi par Offprint, 73 rue de I'Evan&ie, 750 J 8 Park 


Center 

| BUSINESS SERVICES 


HUSH 

1 BUSINESS 

| OPPORTUNrnES 

ppig 


* Cbmgary ainmotrahon 

JSraiSKSSss’aK 

Td: tfr) 31 8448 -Tele*: 428 682 EDM. 










HOW TO or A 2nd PASSPORT, 
report - 12 countries aidyzed. be- 

GaBBT W. OOXON. or Csccr <» 

.. tcn.f1eoee contort Tnd Bel, Sacra- 
nato Bee. 916446^522. Siridy an- 

. r » -i ■ 

. nwna* 








BUSINESS SERVICES 

rVU.i-.S !w 

^TfeX BCE CAPITAL GAMS | 

YB, at, »fo Eiropecm Opfer, Ex- 


[ j 

2943. tierold Tribune^T2521 NeuOy 
CuHttp Franca 

en yBam ao TAX ■ - 

SUE OPTIONS BY, « Pubic Order 
^fonjtar & floor Broker is ipodefaed.ia 

apnre. Vfey not gire in a try & oed ut 

*eefly aj fee Boor: pi^tLjn950) or 
• Send ta 
SWEOPnONS 
' «-SO NX Vnetbuiuwii 
~ 1012 SC ItewteguTBdtosd 



MISEIB 

■USDCKSHmakcUKEMROUROr 





2ND PASSPORT 35 cooterfa*. GMC | 
25 Kfaommu, 10676 AtjtentGreece* 


DIAMONDS 




Your best buy. 

nito dfamondi in any pno* rnngs 
ot lowest wholesale pores 


tints from Antw e rp * 
* of fee di am ond wori& . 


Ful guarantee. 

For free price 1st write 
Jeadtim C eld enriefa 


928 


Fglkflonstroci 62, B-2018 Antwerp/ 


Tbt 


Btaflismi - Tefc & 31 234 07 S' 
t 7JTJ9 ijrf b. At theDramand Os' 


•/ V’ w uiunfljng 

of Antwerp Diamond indu* 


OFFICE SERVICES 


YOUR OFRCE IN PARC 

iSrig-'*"" 

* widiond modern 
“"wrenco roams to rent by If 
"Ontn. ofc_ 

I Z 9 *. or BBrmonert bate. •- 

ri SfLSSfST*- run PA»: 
Tefc 4ZA6.9075. Tba 642066 F' 


gdkva svmmA^S 

YOUR OFRCE 


. Ma il, Phone. Telex. Fat 

e«KK. MULUFK 


^^J AOORBS. Mol elite** 

S?™?-. Mm Buwb Center. Tfl 
517 72 n n2 8rari- The: 6 1344 B 
PW ADDRESS. atanpeMrt'. 

^fetawgraoms. 5 roe tfArtoe 
Tel 4559 4754. The 642504. 


ygUR Office 11 SAP PAuroara^.. 


OFFICES FOR RE^I 


GBSEVA ^^S lBBBWW EH^ 


TWPPid office* ^SSf^tac* 


Merete 


5**ri«e*«te __ 


WO BT. HONORS/ROYALE. 3rd four 

'SBRicaSSSS 1 *!' 


. -J — si Afe-rX"* 




> ^ ■ 1- y £ 


■9S*!