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INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


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rik Times and The Washington Post 


LONDON, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1985 


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ESTABLISHED 1887 


; '•Ftfi. 




For 4.5 Billion DM 


By Warren Gctlcr 

Jnummbnal HeeaU Tribune 

- FRANKFURT - Deutsche 
Bank AG, West- Germany's largest ■ 
bank, pirns to ’buy the country’s 

hugest family-held mdustrial enter- 
prise, the Flick -group, Deutsche 
’ Bank and Flidc. sad Wednesday. 

A Deutsche Bank source said the 
.takeover tad, which was initiated 
by Flick, would be worth about 4.5 
bfflioa Deutsche marks ($1.8 bil- 
lion). That would make it the larg- 
est takeover in West German histo- 
ry- 

■ After the purchase, expected be- 
fore the ad of the year, Deutsche 
Bank would offer the public “a 
broad placement of stores" in (he 
Flick gnapthragh a stock market 
Friedrich Karl Ffick fisting sometime next year, the 

- bank said. . 

The takeover offer follows a ma- 
}Or payoff scandal in which a se- 
IjUl/iyo - mar Hick company executive and 

JLnZMJi 9 kJUjS . two former West German ecouom- 
•' ic ministers were indicted on brib- 

T | L m JH»T ery and tax-evasion charges linked 

lUCr XjibCXMtQfi - to alleged Flick efforts to gain tax 

O capital gHrng 

TVT m Tt i • J Flick's major owner, Friedrich 

W III Aid fit J Karl Flick, made the offer to sdl 

the Dfisseldorf-based company. 

By Steven J. Dryden ““** *£“*** 

Inu-matUmai HrreU Tnbunr Fhdt IiKlnsmeverwaltung KGaA. 

LUXEMBOURG - 

Dekns, president of the European wSt German corporarkm going 
Community Commission, said pubHj^SSas jKffirAGmS 
Wednesday that several lumted re- KL Aft m rasa an n 






. ViS 


McFarlane Leaves Post 
As Reagan Security Aide 

His Deputy 
To Be Named 
As Successor 


' 


- * • 


V • _ - 




public, such as raxdorf AG and 
Porsche AG in 1984 and the chend- 

■> the flnt snch modifk*dooj m EC in , 

tastoiy. opmupnewtimooi/or tfut iTteided te- 

- .h. a w tUrndf of totag rin dMttid 

- holdings through Datache Bank as 

- nanuw and that they were ap- safeguarding the future 

- proved by only 8 of the 10 current ia&asaia operatic! fee group 

"3?*% “indeperaJentof his person anda 

- nons that ended Tuesday, did not c^n^goieratroiii^ 

■'S2*JSicrissE ^vo^s^ttauingd^ 


. , , , - By Judith Miller w — — . , . ^ rr 

The ract that the changes were holdings through Datache Bank as Now York Tima Sana Party and the conservative oppoa- Poland and France.** Mr. Fabius ™o powerful cabinet memboa, Mr. McFarlane, 48, a former multiple-warhead strategic missile, 

narrow Md that they were ap- amS of M&ndhur the future parts ^ PrwImi non. France, and the Socialist Par- said, quoting Mr. Mitterrand. The Secrecy of Stale George P. Shultz lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Ma- On the issue of South Africa, 

ss^rtKSMS of ^ ^ 2sc22s‘saisiJ!!: a -tatab- !S -ii ! -d. sssnj^nsis'^ 


By Lou Cannon 
and David Hoffman 

WoMngion Post Sorrier 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan announced the res- 
ignation Friday of Robert C. 
McFarlane. his national security 
adviser. He said Vice Admiral John 
M. Poindexter, Mr. McFarlane’s 
chief assistant, would be nominat- 
ed as his successor. 

Mr. McFarlane and Vice Admi- 
ral Poindexter flanked Mr. Reagan 
as the president announced that be 
bad accepted Mr. McFarlane’s res- 
ignation with “deep regret” Mr. 
Reagan said Mr. McFarlane 
planned to gp into private business. 

A source close to Mr. McFarlane 
said the national security adviser 
had found his working relationship 
with Donald T. Regan, the White 
House chief of staff, to be “intoler- 
able.” Several officials acknowl- 
DwAaoooad riw edged that Mr. McFarlane was un- 
General Wojciedi Jarnzelstri, due prerident of Poland, cruising on the Sane on Wednesday, happy with what he perceived as 

Mr. Regan’s ill-informed attempts 
to interfere on national security is- 

Mitterrand Meets With Jaruzekki, 

-rn--r , -§m m l in* any problems with Mr. Regan, re- 

Upsetting Folitical Opponents, Allies 

A CP . J. X have become weary of trying to 

leaders of Fr ance ’s ruling finriaiict lations between two natinng such as referee a series of disputes between 
Party and the conservative opposi- Poland and France.” Mr. Fabius two powerful cabinet members, 



Gomoia Pnm 

Robert C McFarlane 


John M. Poindexter 


Reagan Imagines Star Wars 

Rrulen 

FAJLLSTON, Maryland — President Ronald Reagan said Wednes- 
day he told Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, at their Geneva 
meeting last month that the U.S. and Soviet Union would quickly join 
forces and forget their differences if aliens attacked Earth. 

“I couldn't help but say to him, just think how easy his task and 
none might be in these meetings that we held if suddenly there was a 
threat to this world from another species from another planet outside 
in the uruveire," Mr. Reagan said after addressing students at 
Fallston High School in Maryland. 

“We’d forget all the little local differences that we have between our 
countries,” he said, “and we would find out once and for all that we 
really are all h uman beings here on this Earth together.” 


of hijacking an Italian cruise ship, 
the Achille Laura 


such as the best way to seek con- 
gressional approval for the MX 


X most outspoken critics of theimpo- president, reminded tbe assrinbly 
9 ^.' sitionof martial law m Poland and feat Chancellor Helmut Kohl of 


warmer ger. for months that he wanted to leave, the lead in arguing for limited sanc- 

Otber sources said that a desire Mr. McFarlane told the president lions because he recognized that 
to spend more time with his family of his intentions during Mr. Rea- Congress would impose more puni- 
had played a part in Mr. McFar- wj recat trip to his California tive ones unless the administration 


tance of fee revisions, Mr. Ddon 
said. 


pules wife the West German gov- 


president of Poland, amid vehe- 
ment protests and consternation in 
virtually all political circles except 


fee continuing dampdown on po- West Germany and Prime Minister 
and consternation m Hlica i andsSal dissent. 


Bettino Craxi of Italy, and even 


iQ - anmat over fee Ffick gram’s - tax fe^CMmnmaPartv *” Several hundred people, indud- Pope John Paul ff, had met with lane’s desue to leave after two years ranch and Los Angeles. acted. Mr. Regan at first opposed 

The changes, fee first to fee 19S7 burden ako gave an incentive to -rn,. ' rin iT ««« th* leading non-Ccnmnumst trade Goteral Janadskt to raise human in the national security post. Mr. Roan, who has or ganized s^^ons but ultimately joined 

raw erf Rome under which the th. _ iac w™nuie meeting was tne —j rights issues wife him. ao , McFarlane in rwnmmmHinff ihnr 


: ‘dr , ii Treaty of Rome under which, the 

7 ~ ~cooHnumty was founded, included: _ 

' ’’ .■ • Tbe substitution of maoriQr feep^offacandaL singed a nosy protestin front of ^ “Xvf p ? r ? va i de of national security experts. He 

voting for the requirement erf una- A Cartel Office ^okesman in «i«: c_cj or jKi mui» the Polish Embassy Wednesda y lowed by Poland, Mr. Fabius said, was fee architect of the administra- 

uimity in derision-making affect- Berlin,. Hnbertns Schbn, said in tv_ hut pdKce turned awaythe demon- agam quoting. don's successful plan to force the 

King fee removal of barriers to trade Wednesd^ that Deutsche Bank of- ,„.iw 198] ‘ , / stratras \feen they tned to march lhedecifflim to receive or not to landing of fee F-gyprian jetifriw 

across, the. borders, of member bdals had said that fee bank- iirn rii’m -i bo- the Ehnte Pdaoe, President; (Contfimeff on Page 2, CoL 4^' ' carrying four Palestmiahs accused 


seObgcff fee assets of the cxxnpa- in a Western carritel between ““P" rq>««ntatives and exiled 
& made no direct comxnat on (U. ^ _ Western PoEdl su PP® rter s of Solidarity, 

the payoff acandaL w PriJd cradSd «ag«i a noisy protest in front of 

A Cartd Office reokesman in SraM^Salidarityttie union Jf P ? sh Embassy Wednesday 
Berlu*, Hnbertns Schlfe, said and dechuwLmSSd law in De- hut P^e turned awaythe demon- 


.■ states. 

- - • A commitment to achieve the 

■ • * ;‘convergenoe” of national eco- 
. nomk and monetary policies. 

' • Increased powers for tbe EnrO- 
Dean PaihamenL 

• • A formal arrangement for oo- 

Trdinating member states' foreign 

"“policies. 

• jj_ • The strengthening of common 

x • ■■ mvironmatal policies and tedmo- 
; ogjcal and scuntific development. 
■ Mr. Ddora said that the mea- 
'iores would help prevent European 
‘ -economic and political stagnation. 
Italy said that its acceptance 

- vould depend on approval by tbe 
European Paiiiamat while Den- 

— "nark delayed a decision until its 
*' wn parliament could examine the 
..revisions. 

Details of the proposals must be 
" . /arkedout by EC foreign ministers 

4 ter this month. EC crffirials said 

hat they hoped the Italian and 

■ i^7?) anish reservations cold be lifted 

y fee banning of next year to 
Dow speedy final ratification by 
atioonl parliaments. 


tended to seQ off tbe entire, acquisi- 
tion sometime pext year. 


General Jazuzelski describedfes 
session, winch lasted 20 miriutes 


itterrand’s official reridcnca 
Prime Minister Lament Fabius 


rightsjssnes wife him. Vice Admiral Poindexter, 49, is the WhiteHouse along emporate McFarlane in recommending their 

“This meeting m no way mdaat- virtually unknown outside the dr- and hierarchical lines, was said by bnposition after Republican con- 
r ralof feepohaes fol- de of national security experts. He sources to resent Mr. McFariane’s gressmen told him Congress would 

lowed by Poland, Mr. Fabius said, was fee architect of the administra- independent access to the presi- not sustain a veto. 
ag ^. q ^ t l n ^ lion’s successful plan to force the dent bi addihou to the disagreements 

deriaonto receive or not to landing of fee Egyptian -jetlinw The .two men dashed over what 00 P°bcy, Mr. Regan and Mr. 
■ ‘(Contimierfori Pi^e l, CoL 4) ' carrying four Palestinians accused crffirials called “process issues” (Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


m, v longer than scheduled, as “very Mmister Lament Fabius 

Mr. Schta smd Da^he Bank useftd ^ y^y sneere.” astounded members of the Nation- 

amitives would mat wth C rtcl naeetmg,” he said before ** AssemWy later in the d ay by 

ul . Bo 7 leaving for Tunis on Wednesday saying that the meeting had “trou- 
afternoon, ^pernritted both parties bte£’himdeqpjy ^He raid that the 


He riA thajas long as ^ kniw eS^sl^SSs 
and imations better. andtofiSa 


quesikms raised by officials about 
fee maesmg. and vrindi he had tmt 


and intentions better, and to find a fee meeto^ and which he had put 
YOU,™ an tr- trust considerations caX ^ n ^ points of under- to Mr. Mitterrand, were “fee most 

Wt n«JlS?'T»«nV HiH «v 66 standing. We are agreed on fee de- distill to^whkfa I have -had to 

^ 0 T at ,^^r ro ' isb "f - . 

•ho* i7iwv..M r^n .n for **» good of our peoples Mr. Fabius told members of the 

that it would resell all assets ac- A c. .u. .k-. w- 


, ..t? 



mm- 


.a.. >V ' • 


r* “ ■ and peace in Europe and fee 

qnired from Flick. The assets to- ^ 


dude three major industrial con- 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 1) 


The vial, which was not an- 
nounced until Monday, shocked 


assembly that be was merely relay- 
ing President Mitterrand’s answers 
to them. 

“There must be state- lo-state re- 




U.S. to Warn Romania to Improve 
On Rights or Forfeit Trade Benefits 




By Bernard Gwertzman 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON —Die Reagan 


, ■ v Tbe deri son to move to majority administration intends to warn Ro- 

■ * oiing on certain questions con- mania that it is in jeopardy of kxs- 

;Q;peming trade barriers was seen as a iog its benefits in trade wife the 
‘ styuOeut Step by EC United States if it does not improve 

^j^j-Tfirials and leaders who believe human rights record, according 
^^aat decision-making by unanimity to State Department officials. 

ST 1 ^ ^ 

;iumiy on in. . a dvisc the Romanians that, unless 

ag.yua— 

■ -ESssiitEsa 

gofjhcvao andacMplmqority ^ I^^ToUlcul 

ssa^ssssias 

Aib^M»e U>atthdrnano<ial 

• MromneutaL health or safety wifer^itoMFNextoBnoonat 
imuuuimuu,. , . year. There are vtsrv powerful ef- 

_^indards would be threatened. It to have 


foreign policy while underscoring 
concerns, about human rights. 

The Romanians were given trade 
benefits in 197S because they were 


But, in recat yean, there has 
been concern among Christian 
groups in the United States that the 
Ro manian government harasses 




often at odds wife the Soviet Union Christianfaithsthataienotoffi- 
in foreign policy. Alone among the daily sanctioned. 


Warsaw Pact nations, Romania did 
not sever diplomatic ties with Israel 
in 1967. Throughout the Soviet- 


TTie Christian Response Interna- 
tional, headquartered in Zurich, 
has taken members of Congress to 


Chmesed^te. Romab main- 5£nS to^udm feSlrith 

tamed good relations wife China. It ,^ 5 ^ of chnn^^ng bulldozed 
also eased restnetions on emigra- 

tiou- (Cootinned on Page 2, CoL 3) 


^ v ^ ^ " i* 

A mother and son flee the dond of acrid fames in New Delhi on Wednesday. 


Gas Ooud Causes 
Chaos as People 
Flee in New Delhi 

The Associated Press 

NEW DELHI— Adoud of 
acrid but nonpoisonous gas 
leaked from a fertilizer plant, 
sending thousands fleeing here 
and causing chaos briefly 
Wednesday, one day after fee 
first anniversary of fee Bhopal 
gas leak that lolled more than 
2,000 people. 

More than 200 people were 
given first aid and released, but 
142 were hospitalized, includ- 
ing nine in serious condition, 
India's minister of stale for 
home affairs, PA. Sangma, told 
Parliament. 

An opaque white vapor en- 
veloped fee congested west and 
cater of New Delhi, causing 
tens of thousands of people to 
flee. Many held handkerchiefs 
to their faces to overcome 
coughing and gasping. 

All businesses, major bazaars 
and schools were dosed, homes 
locked and traffic snarled. But 
activity was back to normal by 
midafternoon. 


Mugabe and Gorbachev 
Discussed Military Aid 


year. There are very powerful ef- 
forts to have it repealed. In fee 


By William J. Eaton 

Los Angela Tima Service 


Mugabe after strains devekped 
wba Moscow backed his chief ri- 



Time of Crisis for Commodity Cartels 

Oversupply, Falling Prices Leave Producers in Disarray 


By James Stemgold 

New York Tima Service 


are on fee way up and pan or the 
way down, because they retard fee 


MOSCOW — Prime Minister va k Josh “* Nkomo, in the war 


^wallows states to take wtotever a^ce of ^dencc feat the Rohm Mugabe of Zimbabwe said against vdnte-imn^ty rule m fee 
tfder control measures they con- g OTnan j a | M ^ making progress in Wednesday that he had discussed fanner Bnlish colony of Rhodesia. 


'^(Continued cm Page 2, CoL 3) 


INSIDE 

* :>,„IMaka intends to by fee sur- 
, 'iving aHeaed hijacker of the 

- - j j 


Romanians are mairmg progress m Wednesday that he had discussed . , , 

these concerns, it will be difficult.” possible Soviet military aid to help 7jj£r abwe won mde P endenoe 10 
The official said that even defend his nation against attack by 
though Mr. Shultz's one-day visit Safe Africa in talks with the Sovi- Military cooperation, Mr. Mu- 
te Bucharest “is a short one, 1 think et leader. Mikhail S. Gorbachev. gabe said with a cryptic smile, was 
it is an important one, and perhaps Mr. Mugabe, who is scheduled to discussed “in general terms” with- 
a watershed visit.” become (he leader of the no- at any result. If any agreements 

Mr. Shultz also will visit Hunga- aligned movement next year, said on military aid “are going to be 
ry and Yugoslavia following a the views of Zimbabwe and the readied, they will have to be 
meeting next week of foreign min- Soviet Union became “very much worked out by Soviet-Zimbabwean 
istere <rf the North Atlantic Treaty closer” during his visit. beams,** he said. 

Organization. “Our fri endship will last foiw- Britain is a major military sup- 

Of the Soviet bloc countries, er” he said at a news. conference, p iier for Zimbabwe. 


Irion request. Page 2. j 


-/SCIENCE 


NEW YORK — Throngbout the 

1970& the industrialized nations Rudoif Wollf Futuri^. a New 
found themselves at the mercy of York commodiues firm But what 
Thhti World cartels that sent prices wes®«w*sagHMraldismtegra- 

soaring on a half dmseo conunod- *"*** 

«*i i are so far down. 


Robert Mugabe 


j he world is taking shape in 
'Jew Mexico, seven other states 
fc .j**ind the Vbpn Islands. Page &. 

HJSINESS/F1NANCE 

. I PkaeyCa ejected an infor- , 
'■ aal $1.75-biUion takeover offer | 
. ■ rom Britain’s GEC. Page 9. j 


TOMORROW 


Of the Soviet bloc countries, er” be said at a news. conference, piier for Zimbabwe, 
only Romama and Hungary bare where he raterated Us daunda- ^ Mugabc said he was con- 

stSsS’StXH 

Suies at the lowest appricable ttr- S^riSojUhA^^ SSSg 

Trade between fee United Stales it’s hypocritical" he said of Presi- who make cross-border 

^ROT^aaroseff^raAmi 1 - dan .^nald Rojgn*s 'P^ax SfeSS fe^w^iled 
lira m!9« to a record $1.2 bahon fa: dxplomanc dialogue over eco- z^babwe has denied the Sarees. 
hstyear.Tbereisabrgesu^usm nonneanctionsas a means of pres- ^ ±e outlawed in 

Rcroama s favor, wrfeits 1 9^ ex- sunng Soufe Affia to reform ra s^Afrjc^S not operate 

Sy’Si s—i- 


,^f..31adk and Blue," a new all* 
\ Y ■ merican black revue in Paris, 
a productia by a pair of 
rgentine showmen. Mary 
ume rqxirts in Weekend. 


Romania also values having fee bea the largest donor of aid to V e 080 1 
beneficial tariff status for political Zimbabwe since its independence, “¥“ ??? 
reasons, since it underscores its rd- the asastance has decreased in re- gabe added, 
ative of Moscow, cat years as Mr. Mugabe has in- aefeuaouis 

_ _ w - i ■ 1,1 nrinul II E TUllini nCR 


State Dcpautment officials said Mr. 
Shultz would emphasize continued 
U.S. appredatioo far Romania’s 


criticized U.S. pohq. 
let Union has bea try- 


“We can't just lie tow and say 
this is an empty threat," Mr. Mu- 
gabe added. “We are preparing to 
defend ourselves against Safe Af- 
rica.” 

[South African-supported rebels 


soaring on a half dozen commod- pnce5 

ides, including cal, cocoa and tin. ^ 80 “ “ 0WIL 
“A Cartel That Has World by ^ Peweriaaness of OPEC lo 
the Throat," is how one headline 
described the Organization of Pe- _ 

troleum Exporting Countries in 1 lie more they 

CenmKm |979. _ 

Robert Mugabe Today, those producer assoda- produce, the more 

tions are foundering. As inflation *i~ dpnms nripi» 5 L 

mat s^d Wednesday feat they has the of tin, sugar, oeprew yrnx*. 

had captured three garrison towns, rubbe r, cocoa a nd oil have aD come But because they 
Iriffing at least 85 Zmibabwean soL under pressure. 

diers and 39 Mozambican troops as Toe cartels are groups of produc- need the money, 

part of a major counteroffensive ere feat atiempt to oomrd fee pria , , , 

against goveramat forces and a commodity by regulating us they Can t Stop, 
fear Zimbabwean allies, Reuters supp^ A heavy oversupply of ba- 

reported from Lisbon,] sre commodities mreoent years has — DamdCarim 

Zimbabwe and the Soviet Union o^whelmed feose gke-catral Outse Econometrics 

mechanisms and now threatens the 

viabffit y S everal of the world's 

eahe said the aarards wold two- - Thor troubles could sod prices on inrecat years, tor example, nas 

£&SKtt£ 
3ffi=S£H£EK? SAKSXSSbS; 


troleum Exporting Countries in Tile more they 
, 979. , - J 

Today, those producer assoda- produce, the more 

tions are foundering. As inflation *i~ TtrirPA. 

has abated, the prices of tin, sugar, ““J ae P ress prices. 

rubber, cocoa and oil have all come But because they 
under p i w wi w * 

The cartels arc groups of raroduc- need the money, 

ere that attempt tootmtrcJ the price 149 

of a commodity by regulating its they Can t Stop, 
supply. A heavy oversupply of ba- 
sic commodities in recent years has — DamdGariin 

overwhelmed those price-control Quue Econometrics 


pening in many of the major com- 
modities markets: 

• An association of sugar pro- 
ducers met in London last math 
in art unsuccessful effort to prop 
depressed world prices. It was fee 
second such attempt by fee associ- 
ation after talks collapsed in July 
1984. 

• The members of the Interna- 
tional Cocoa Agreement similarly 
met for price talks in October and 
failed ace again to come up wife a 
price that members felt they could 
support. The cocoa association ran 
out of money 10 continue its pro- 


Ryzhkov, ^ 

amity during a Kremlin banquet - m ” instances,’ International Tm CoundL 

for Mr. Mugabe when he praised finnnrafll nrnbWnS The nmhlems of oil and ti: 


of these commodities would suffer. 


severe financial problems. 


The problems of oQ and tin 


mg to improve relations wife 'Mr. fighting the Mozambican govern- (Cootinned on Page 2, Col. 4) “Cartels arc good when prices ducers are typical of what is 


market purchases- Although prices 
have risa in recat years, fee pro- 
duction of cocoa is now outpacing 
consumption. Also, large crops are 
expected in West Africa and Brazil, 
keeping prices down. 

• The five-year-old Internation- 
al Natural Rubber Agreement has 
been beset wife problems. Unde 
the toms of the agreement, rubber 
is bought from fee market when 
prices are falling and sold when 
prices rise too high. This inventory 
of rubber is known as a buffer 
stock But the buffer is now bulging 
wife about 375,000 metric tons 
(412^00 short tons) of nibbo 1 
sopped up at a cost of about $300 

(Continued a Page IS, CoL 1) 









Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBI NE. THIRSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1985 


Malta to Deny Egypt’s Request 
To Extradite Hijack Suspect 


The Associated Press 

VALLETTA, Malta —The Mal- 
tese government does not intend to 

comply with a request by Egypt 
that it extradite the man thought to 
be the sole surviving hijacker of the 

EgyptAir jet, a government spokes- 
man said Wednesday. 

“Our position is that in the ab- 
sence of an extradition treaty and 
because of the fact that a murder 
took place on Maltese soil, we do 
not see why the judicial process 
should not lake place here," said 
the spokesman, Paul Mifsud. 

in Cairo, Foreign Minister £s- 
mat Abdel Meguid said: “Egypt 
believes it is her right to take deliv- 
ery of the terrorist presently in 
Malta despite the fact there us no 
extradition treaty between the two 
countries." 

The jetliner was hijacked Nov. 
23 on an Athens-to-Cairo flight 
Five people were shot two fatally, 
before Egyptian commandos 
stormed the plane on Nov. 24 in 
Valletta. Fifty-eight people died 
during the rescue attempt 

{Maltese authorities prevented a 
UJ5. general and two other senior 
officers from playing any role in 
the commando assault The New 
York Tunes quoted U.S. and Mal- 


tese sources in Valletta as saying. 
Two of the officers were asked to 
r emain m the U.S. Embassy in Val- 
letta while the third. Major General 
Robert Wiegand, who oversees 
U.S. military programs in Egypt 
was kept isolated most of the tune 
from the commandos and the con- 
trol tower, the sources said. 

[The Maltese sources said the au- 
thorities in Valletta had been infu- 
riated by the arrival of the three 
officers, in full battle dress, on the 
plane carrying the commandos. 
Malta also refused to permit the 
landing of UH. aircraft carrying 
sophisticated listening equipment 
and anti-terrorism experts.] 

Mr. Abdel Meguid noted that 
early this year Egypt returned to 
Malta two Maltese arrested as sus- 
pects in a 1984 plot to kill a former 
Libyan prime minister, Abdel Ha- 
mid Bakoush. The two were never 
charged. 

“Egypt expects Malta to deal 
with it rat the same basis since this 
is the diplomatic practice between 
friendly countries," Mr. Abdel Me- 
guid said. 

He said Malta had not yet offi- 
cially notified Egypt of its refusal 
to extradite the accused hijacker. 


Bonn Grants $40 Million to Fond 
For U.S.-European Understanding 

Woshmpon Pott Service 

WASHINGTON — The West German government announced 
Wednesday a new 540-mfllion grant to the Goman Marshall Fund of 
the United States that will enable the organization “to continue 
indefinitely," according to Frank E. Loy, president of the group and a 
former high official in the State Department. 

The fund is an independent American organization wholly fi- 
nanced by West Germany as a memorial to the Marshal) Plan. Named 
for Genoa! George C. Marshall, who was secretary of state at its 
inception, the plan provided $13 3 billion in U.S. assistance that was 
cnirial in the recovery of Europe after World War 1L 

Originally, Bonn provided a gift of 147 milli on Deutsche marks in 
IS «nmml installme nts, be ginnin g in 1972. The amount equaled SS4 
milli on at different rarfiange rates over the years. The additional 
grant is for $40 millio n over 10 years beginning in 1987. 

Mr. Loy said part of each year’s installment will be added to an 
endowment fund that has been reinvested over the years, and which 
now totals S4S millio n- That wiD permit continuation of the current 
annual budget of about $5.5 million indefinitely, Mr. Loy said. 

The fund carries out educational and other programs to promote 
understanding between Europe and the United States through grants 
to scholars and institutions. 


Deutsche Bank Plans to Buy 
Flick for 4.5 Billion DM 


(Continued from Page 1) 

cents, including West Germany's 
largest paper-making enterprise, a 
large chemical group and a tug 
steel-engineering company. 

Equity holdings of 25 percent in 
WJL Grace & Co., an American 
chemical concern, and a 10 percent 


Your HOTEL 
on the 

Swiss Riviera 


stake in Daimler-Benz AG. maker 
of Mercedes-Benz automobiles, are 
also among the assets. 

Analysts said such a large offer- 
ing would likely give an additional 
boost to the booming German 
equity markets. 

Deutsche, in its vaguely worded 
announcement, appeared to pre- 
sent its role in the takeover offer as 
that of a investment broker, pur- 
chasing the Flick group's assets 
temporarily to later sell them to the 
public through a dare offering. 
The bank has the potential of real- 
izing a major capital gain if the 
share price were to jump after the 
offering. 

Peter Beton. European securities 
analyst at Phillips & Drew, based 
in London, that Deutsche bank 
“could well realize antt profit from 
the transaction of a half billion 
dollars*' if it timed the Flick offer- 
ing right. 

The announcement follows 
sharp criticism in recent weeks 
from Bonn's top anti-trust official. 
Wolfgang Kartte, and a high-rank- 
ing Economics Ministry official, 
Otto Schlecht. that commercial 
banks in West German have 
amassed holdings in West German 
industry so extensive that they 
threatened free competition. 

Deutsche said that details about 
the timing of the stock offer would 
be disclosed early next year, follow- 
ing the transformation of the pri- 
vate Flick group into a joint-stock 
company from a limited partner- 
ship. 

Flick, with interests in nearly ev- 
ery aspect of industry and a work- 
force erf 42^00, reported sales of 
10.32 bQUoa DM in 1984 and profit 
of 206 minimi DM, down 30 per- 
cent from 295 million DM the year 
earlier. 

Mr. Beton said Phillips & Drew 
immediately upgraded its per-share 
earnings projection for Deutsche 
next year to at least 60 DM from 55 
DM from before the announce- 
ment 


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LAUSANNE 

PALACE 

:*:• r<\ 

CH-1002 Lausanne 


CHRISTMAS 

DREAM 

Cashmere and silk 
for indies and men 

Alexandre Savin’s 
collection 

Hxciusivirv: Oshmcrc House. 


Cashmere House 

2, me d'Aguesseau 
angle 60. Faubourg St-Hoaart 
• PARIS 8* 



tentatively identified as Omar Mar- 
zouki, 20. 

Mr. Mifsud said investigators 
had determined that Mr. Maizoukj 
and two dead men who were pulled 
from the airplane were Palestinian. 

Mr. Mifsud said be bad no infor- 
mation about what country they 
may have come from or whether 
they belonged to any group. He 
said, however, that Maltese investi- 
gators had turned up “no proof” of 
Libyan involvement in the hijack- 
ing. 

“We have no reason to believe 
that what has beat printed in the 
international about Libyan 
involvement is coned," be said. 

Egypt has accused Libya of insti- 
gating and Cmsmrino the hijacking. 

“We are not saying that the 
Egyptian a l legatio ns are wrong," 
Mr. Mifsud said. “But Malta does 
not have any direct evidence of 
Libyan involvement and has not 
been provided evidence of this by 
Egypt or any other party." 

Western diplomats have said 
that two suspects carried false Mo- 
roccan passports, while Maltese of- 
ficials say Mr. Marzouki carried a 
Tunisian passport. Tunisia bas de- 
nied issuing a passport in that 
name. 


Delors Says 
Pact Change 
WUlAidEC 

(Continued from Page 1) 
rider necessary to combat crime 
amt to monitor immi gration. 

“A chang e in behavior is as im- 
portant as a charge in the rules," 
Mr. Delors said. “In the next year, 
we shall see if there has been a 
change." , 

Mr. Delors and other EC leaders 
gave differing assessments of the 
significan ce of the summit deci- 
sions, which were first debated at a 
special intergovernmental confer- 
ence on reform earlier this falL 

Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher of Britain, who opposed 
the idea of calling the conference, 
said Wednesday that she still be- 
lieved *hni the summit decisions 
could have been made without the 
intergovernmental meeting. 

Mis. Thatcher praised the deri- 
sion to reduce community trade 
barriers, saying that this would 
h<4p Britain’s financial services in- 
dustry expand on the continent. 

Bui she said that the commit- 
ment to monetary policy coordina- 
tion was merely a “description of 
th£'pr£3erilritfikfion." 

Prime Minister Bettmo Craxf of 
Italy, who had sought greater pow- 
ers for the European Parliament 
than were agreed upon, said that 
his government's approval of the 
reforms depended on the judgment 
of the parliament. 

Prime Minister Poul Schlnter of 
Denmark, who must seek endorse- 
ment of the reforms from a parlia- 
mentary majority that has consis- 
tently opposed treaty changes, said 
that no aspects of national sover- 
eignty had been given up by the 
summit agreements. 

U.S. to Warn 
Romania 

(Continued from Page 1) 
ft aH riiiiirhmm being imprisoned. 

Two bills are pending one in the 
House, and one in the Senate, to 
suspend tariff benefits until Roma- 
nia improves its rights record. 

Tuesday, the State Department 
made public its semiannual repot 
to Congress on Soviet-bloc compli- 
ance with provisions of the 1975 
Helsinki agreement. The report 
said Romania's observance of hu- 
man rights “continues to be poor.” 

Religious activity, it said, was 
permitted only for the 14 faiths 
recognized by the government. 
They include the Romanian Ortho- 
dox. Roman Catholic, Hungarian 
Reformed, Unitarian, Lutheran, 
Baptist, Pentecostal, Seventh-day 
Adventist and Jewish faiths. 

“Attempts to gather for worship 
by members of other faiths are 
treated as illegal assemblies, with 
participants sometimes arrested 
and fined," the department's report 
said. 

So far, the United Stales has fa- 
vored annual extension of the tariff 
benefits for Romania on the 
sound that independence from the 
Soviet Union should be rewarded. 
Officials said Thar without the trade 
benefit, the United Slates would 
lack leverage to influence develop- 
ments in Romania. 

Officials said Romania had been 
sensitive to U.S. pressure 









Bomb Damages Bank in Antwerp 

A bomb heavily damaged a Bank of America office in Antwerp, 
Bdgjnm, Wednesday. Belgian police said the li ghting 
Communis t which rfaimad responsibility for 26 
previous bomb attacks, called police and the bank before die 
blast The bank was evacuated bat five persoos were injured. 


WORLD BRIEFS 

Bonner Goes to Sie ^ K f ^ e JSSSS-.' 

SI ENA, Italy (U PI )— Helena G. University Opthalimc 

the Soviet dissident, wa5 ^ n ' ,e , ^ undergo an eve examination 

Institute from Rome on Wedncs^J w ^ 

because of glaucoma. She thrtS -hcmr trip by her son. 

Mis. Bonner. 62, was v. Selevich tod a friend. 

Alexei LI Semyonov. ' retCT since Mrs. Bonner arrived in 

Irina Alberu. who has born ^ “XsSivonov and Mr. Yanked, 
Italy from Moscow laic Monday. Mr- f*™- . k»k afier Mrs. 

who live in Newton, she ftes 10 the United States for 

Bonner and to accompany her when sne rue* 

irmunenl of a heart ailraeni. „ meet with Western 

Mrs. Bonner is obeying 3 y J ^ Tuesdav thev 

reporters. But Mr. 

by the KGB. the Soviet intelligence agency 

Jordan Said to Want Syria at Talks 

TFRIISALEM fUPI) — An assistant secretary of state, Ridiard V 
Murphy said Wednesday that Jordan feels “very stror^Iy that Syna 
deluded in the Middle East peace process. Syria is Israel s 

spote^. Avi Mr Mar 

phy*s report means that Jordan's attitude toward direct talks wuh Israel 

has taken “a turn for the worse." ...... . . 

Mi. Murphy, ending a 12-day trip to the Middle East and Soutii Asia 
reporting ot the Geneva summit, said Jordan and S y na J“ d three 
nwndsof talks at the prime ministers’ level, with a fourth round to be 
held “in the near future." 

Retu rning Ghanaian Greeted Warmly 

Arm A r,h»S /API — A Ghanaian convicted of spying in the 
UdSs^eSSd retard in an exchange for right Ghanaians allegedly 
working for the CIA, has returned home to a hero s welcome. 

Michael A Soussoudis. 39. a nepbeu^ofiheG^^Uad^gh 
Lieutenant Jerry J. Rawlings, was greeted by officials and thousands of 
cheering supporters Tuesday at Kotoka Airport in .Accra. 

LaawcdkGham expelled four U.S. diplomats saying iheyhad been 
involved in “wholly unacceptable" activities. In relaliauoo .the United 
Stales ordered the expulsion of four Ghanaian diplomas and said it was 
re-examixiing U.S aid to Ghana, running at about SI5 million a year. 

Minis ter Defends Irish Unity Remark 

LONDON (AP) — Britain's 


Contract Ban WORLD 

J* Aaailed , BotmerGoeTtoSi* 

Bv General SIENMldy(UPl)-Yel«ii>G 

. J. W11V1CU the Soviet dissident, was driven I 
-g-v • Institute from Rome on Wedncsa 

I tvnairnpe because of glaucoma. She is expect* 

MJJ ilollULS Mjs. Bonner. 62, was accoropann 

- Alexei L Semyonov, her son-in-law. 

o„ r' -r, - .- Irina Alberti, who has been her inte 

S^nTofaSSt. \‘ 
Navy deoaon to bar it from receiY- ^ b obeyiog 3 Sovu 

' teportere. But Mr. Semyonov and 
tracts inappropriate. knew of no plan to release Mr. Sakh; 

u A .^?f^ f °y hCCOn,i ^ y * the West and suggested that rumon 

an indictment early this week for o • 1 XVT 

■contract fraud of thecompany and m Ufiflfl .Sfllfl tO W 31 
four present and former executives " 

“involves hi ghly gn phieij rated teg- JERUSALEM (UPI) An asst 
ulatory and ftra^wring matters" Murphy, said Wednesday that Jon 
that should have been resolved in a should be included in the Middle 
civil forum. mam adversary in the region. 

One of the four, James M. Beggs, An Israeli Foreign Ministry spo! 

a former executive vice president, ph/s report means that Jordan s at 
called a news conference for has taken “a turn for the worse. 
Wednesday to disclose his plans for Mi. Murphy, ending a 12-day tn] 

Ins job .as administrator of the Na- reporting on the Geneva summit. & 
rional Aeronautics and Space Ad- rounds of talks at the prime mimst 
ministration. Later, Mr. Beggs held “in the near future." 
abruptly canceled the session. 

D^SFMda^cSS Returning Ghauaia 

of tbe House Science and Tedmol- aCC Ra, Ghana (AP) — A Gh 

ogy Commute^ said Itasdw that Uni ted States and released in an ex< 
B^*% refanqmshmgtodu- ^ for ^ CiAi has returned I 
ties during the period m winch the a. Soussoudis. 39. a nef 

courts wffl judge the charges made Lieuienam ^ j. Rawlings, was g 
tn the indictment. Mr. Fuqua said. supporters .Tuesday at K<* 

“He informed me of hisdeoaon to Last week! Ibarra expelled four 1 

st *f. a f d£ ^ • , . ■ . involved in “wholly unacceptable" 

Unde* the navy^s deason, Gen-- Stales ordered the expulsion of four 
eral pynannes cannot sim new u.S aid to Ghana, rui 

ccmtracts or renew or extend east- 
ing ones with any federal agency 

Minister Defends I 

pension comdbe short if the indict- LONDON (AP) — Britain’s 
mentezids in a prompt dismissal or Northern Ireland secretary, Tom 
plea-bargaining arrangement, or King defended Wednesday his 
could last several years if a trial is statement that there would never 


wvv..5r.r* 

•••>' '0, 
. ' .Til 


followed by appeals. 


be a united Ireland because of the 


The company reported that British- Irish agreement on Norlb- 
about seven-eighths of its business cm Ireland- 


McFarlane Resigns Post 
As Reagan Security Aide 


for the year ended SqiL 30. was 
with die government. 


Mr. King said he regretted if he 
had embarrassed Prime Minister 


(Continued from Page 1) 

McFarlane, both marine combat 
veterans, had personal conflicts. 
One story tokl by officials is that 
Mr. Regan put down Mr. McFar- 
lane by saying that it had takes him 
20 years to reach the rank of colo- 
nel while Mr. Regan had attained 
this rank is ane-foarth the time. 

The remark irritated Mr. McFar- 
lane, a veteran of the Vietnam War, 
because Mr. Regan’s promotion 
came in World War n, when pro- 
motions were more plentiful 

Mr. McFarlane, who is known as 
“Bnd," talked to friends last sum- 
mer about quitting but was con- 
vinced that be should stay through 
Mr. Reagan’s November summit 
nwfing in Geneva with the Soviet 
leader, Mikhail S. Gorbachev. 

Mr. McFarlane considered the 
meeting an overall success because 
it had produced agreement for ad- 
ditional Reagan-Gorbactaev meet- 
ings and “kept the arms-control 


_ which was signed by Everett Pyatt, 

ilintv A iHp assistant navy secretary for ship- 

LUL liy xliUC hmifKng and logistics. 

. , The suspenskm went cemsidera- 

source said. “He had made a coa^ bly bcytmd^shmenl meted out 


General Dynamics was given 30 Garret FitzGerald of Ireland. But 
days to appeal the suspension, he stood by remarks be made Tues- 



day that Mr. FitzGerald, in signing 
the Nov. 15 accord, had “for all 
practical purposes and into perpe- 
tuity" accepted that there could be 
uo united Ireland. 




outment to his wife to quit, had Lee months Ireland a con- 

been m public service a_v g y tong beginning m May, when the navy, sultative role in Northern Ireland 


^eandwpthedof theinfightmg. pending contracts at two in return for accepting that there 

aum ? t, - wfaldl ^ a toto General Dynamics divisions until can be no cfa^Min 5e status of 
*** con V an y revised contracting North ern lSand without the con- 
f P°Knes and practices. sent of a majority of its people. In a 

A navy spokesman said the sus- television interview. Mr. King said, 
r Geneva nmumL pension oould delay product! oo of u f was «Hrinp to put rather fore- 
«»I4» Angei^dass nudear SJlI St 

2 >UICeS ?^L b iL a . nu ? ber P^ 811 — submarines, one of Genoal Dyoa- that consent will not change." 
Regan slights, beginning with a do- utics’s mmor weapon systems. 

dswn by the White House drief of The conqwny also buflds Trident ™, . ■ n n 


in return for acceptir 
can be no ^ange in 


(hat there 
e status of 


- • ■ _ 

it 


Tom King 



staff to sd next to the president at aobmarines, F-lfrjet fighters, M-l 
the mee tin g s despite Mr. Regan's ^ Tomahawk missiles, 

relative inexperience in foragn po- TTios the su^iejiHon “could have a 
, . , « . _ , sutetantial impact,” said Captain 

^rarces dose to Mr. McFariane ji maie B Fmkelstein, a navy 
said be is likely to become apnvale sp^esman- 
oonsultant, perhaps in association But one official, speaking on 


Filipino Rebels Release 2 Hostages 

MANILA (AP) — Moslem separatist rebels freed on Wednesday an y 
American and a German whom they had held hostage for 13 months in -i 
the wilderness of Jolo Island in the southern Philippines, the U.S. 
Embassy said. 

Helm nth Herbst of Munich and John Robinow, a native of New York 


consultant, peroaps in association But • one of ficial speaking on net™*™ nerrai or jviumcn on a jonn koouiow, a native ot New York 
with Henry A. Kissinger, a former that he not be named, wh P. “ Munich, were released to Pakistan's ambassador to the 

secretary of state and national se- ^ would .delay Kw»l Aftab Ahmad Khan, who flew to a rebel camp on the island 


curicy affairs adviser. 

Mr. McFarlane was Mr. Rea- 


dedtions on contracts for Los An- 


for the turnover. 

Mr. Ah ma d Khan said the two men were 


oduced agreement for ad- gan’s third national security advis- 
Reagan-Gorbachev meet- er. He replaced William P. Clark u 


Kea_ ades-dass submarines until Gener- "f- «“™*» sain uk two men were 'all right" but needed 
advis- rfryvnami^ ^ hack in the run- n ? edlca] attention. He said they were released “without conditions." The 


gan s mini nanonai seauny aovis- *1 Dynamic was back in the nm- 
cr. He replaad Wiliam R Clark in ^ rathcr than automatically 
1983 when Mr. Gadc .left to be- awarding tiiem to the only other 


process alive, said a source dose come secretary of the Interior Do- sobmarine builder in the 

to Mr. McFariane. partmaiL Mr. Clark had succeeded country, Newport News Shipbuild- 

“On balance. Bud figured that Richard V. Allen, who resigned af- jng and Dry Dock Co. 
this was a good time to leave," the ter allegations of wrongdoing. «y ot daft want to ehminate 

: — • — competition," he said. ' 


. ine seven-count moicunem, is-- election 

Mugabe and Gorbachev Talk 

._ ° s took part in the alkgsd conspiracy already 

About Arms Aid to Zimbabwe e '“K 

Hawes Jr^ general manager of the . seif pre* 
(Contianed from Page 1) ownership rights to blacks as part Valley System Division in Caca- hisdosr 
the Zimbabwean leader as a cham- of a gradual reform program. monga, California; David L. tribunal 
pion of peace. The decision would affect “ur- McPherson, vice pretideat for re- most vo> 

At bis news conference, Mr. Mu- ban blacks," who already have search and engineering at the Val- percent 
gabe extolled his Soviet hosts and rights to live near white cities, be ley Systems Division, mid James C 
said: “We are closer, very much said, bat did not imply a change in Hansen Jr., who directs die campa- 
closer now in our ideas, in the rap- requirements that whites, blacks, ny*S-S linger missile program. l?ni* 
port we have created and in our Asians and people of mixed race • The indictment charged them A UA 
assessment of issues than we were live in separate neighborhoods. with comp il ing to defraud the De- Britai 
yesterday." Sbeena Duncan, president of the fense Department of $3J2 mfliion in effective 

He mentioned agriculture, min- Black Sash, a multiracial women’s a government contract to build Tfe t 


ng rather than automatically kidnappers earlier had demanded a ransotn of S25.000 that both the US. 
warding tiiem to the only other Wcsl German governments refused to pay. 

^or submarine builder in the 

Honduras to Recount Election Ballots 

“Yon dart want to eliminate TEGUOGALPA, Honduras (UPI) —The National Elections Tribur 
mpeatwn, he said. nal has postponed its dedaon on the winner of the Nov. 24 presidential 

The seven-count mdtetment, is- elections until Dec. 23 to recount ballots at the request of opposition 
ed Monday by a federal grand parties. 


med Monday by a federal grand parties. 

jury in Los Angeles, said Mr. Beggs But the vice president of the tribunal, Pablo Vallardes, said. “It’s 
took part m tire afeged omspiracy already known who the winner is." The Liberal Party Jose 

before jommg NASA m 1981. . Azcona Hoyo, is expected to be named the winner. 

Also indicted were Ralph E. ' Rafad Leonardo Calldas, a National Plartv candidate, derfawri him- 


before joining NASA m 1981. . Azcona Hoyo, is expected to be named the wi nner , 

Also indicted were Ralph E. ' Rafad Leonardo Callqas, a National Party candidate, declared him- $ 
Hffwes Jr^ g“«|J tpanager of the self president last Friday because be received almost double the vote of 1 ‘ 
Valley Systems Diviswnm Coca- his closet rival, Mr. Azcona. But under the election law endorsed by the 
monga, California; David L. tribunal, the winning candidate comes from the party that gained the 
McPherson, nee president .for re- most rotes, and ah Liberal Party candidates combined won morethan 51 


yesterday." Sbeena Duncan, pretidec 

He mentioned agriculture, min- Black Sash, a multiracial x 
ing and trade as possible areas of organization that opposes 
Soviet-Zimbabwean cooperation in had, said that about four 
the future. binds would be affected. 

In contrast, he said the United 

States “led us down the garden 

Uganda Releases' 

He added: “Constructive en- Ex-Aide to Amin 
gagement means Africans most tie 

their hands while South Africa iM*d Pm intmudmi 

rains blows ou them." KAMPALA, Uganda — Ugan- 

■ Black Laid Ridds to Change rdeasriRobotAstles, toe 

__ c . Bmisb-born aide to the fonner dic- 

A ^. go^ emmenl Utor, hG Amm, after he agreed to 
said Wedn«day that itwiU propose renounce his Ugandan dSenship 
next^tMibk^ aUou^to andkarothwx^foras^imin 
own land for the first tune m 72 p n - ta ; n J . , ■ 

years, but the laws will not lift YSjLondon, a spokesmsx ' " 
r«tn«ions on wherethey can Dv^ Home Office said Mr. Asti 
The Associated Pros reported renounced his British dti 
from Johannesburg, while serving Marshal 

Cons Heums. the minister of ^ granted British 

constitutional planning, said the asmn. The Associate 


Hansea Jr^ who directs die compa- 

n/sS linger missile program. Fnr thp Rp/>nrd 

The indictment charged them rur 11115 IteCOrtl 

with inspiring to drfraudthe De- Britain wffl say llmisday whether it wifl withdraw from UNESCO, 
fense Department of $3.2 mflhon m effective Dec. 31, official sources said Wednesday in London. (AFP) 
a government contract to build TlietriaJofa fonner Thai prime .-Meter. khL .1 rr, L 1 


anti-aircraft weapOT known as the but was adjourned until January at tfiTp^ti^remS^fr 
Want York Dryiaon Air De- Kria^sak and 39 others bee possible deNhMteoeSrJrffiStS 

tense gun. particqiatioa in an attempted coup on Sept. 9. (UPI) 

Joseph P. Kennedy M ml enter the rae for the U 5. House seat from 

OukSm^WBon^ v 

• The Ajsodmed Press ; would enter the Democratic primary in September. The seat is held bv the <‘ 

■ SANTIAGO —Nineteen bomb- House speaker, Thomas P. O’Neill Jr, who is retiring. (AP) 

mgs in two days have left om man A former Navy mteffigence analyst, Samuel L. Morison, 41. was 

dead and nme wounded, police re- sentenced Wednesday to two years in prison on spy charReT He was 
ported Tuesday. Targets have in- convicted by a federal jury Oct. 17 of two counts of espionage and two 
chided ml tracks, buses, shops, counts of theft of government property for leakinR three U nh^rnc 
banks and a recruiting center. to a British military journal. ™ p . 


Chile Struck by 19 Bombings 

■ The Assodmtd Press 
■ SANTIAGO— Nineteen bomb- 
ings in two days have left one man 


cabinet derided Tuesday to imple- 
ment President Pieter W. Botha’s 
statement of intention in Parlia- 
ment early this year to extend land 


other way to govern, and to govern 
well he said. 


Mitterrcmd-JcuTizelski Meeting Causes Stir 

Home Office said Mr . Astles, who ' . ; ' . . . 

renounced his British citizenship ; " (Continued from P^*e I). “Never has a prime minister so other way to govern, and to 
while serving Marshal Amin, receive a h ea d of . state belongs to dearly, shown ms disapproval," well” he said, 
would be granted British dtem- thepre5idenioCtliei«}ublic,andtt> .. said Gffliert Gander, of the oppod- There was little indicatic 

ship again. The Associated Press him alone,” Mr. Fabius said. • bon Union for French Democracy French politicians, except ] 
reported Wednesday.] ■ The prime ministers explanation .Party- Communist Party, were pen 

The former Bntidi Army ser- vvas graded by jeers and shouts of: In an interview in the French Roland Leroy, a Communis 
gcaot was head of th e drea d Sale . “Receive Pinochet," a reference to . morning daily Le Matin, President leader and director of the G 
Research Bureau, the secret pouoe. President Augusto ■Pinochet.' the Mitterrand, who left after the meet- nist daily, L’Humanite, said 
until Maishal Amm was deposed m rightist Chilean leader who ishated ing with General Jangelski cm a “about time that France re 


former British Army ser- 
vos hod of thedreaa State 


Chilled 

T I O PEPE 


geant was head of the dread State 
Research Bureau, the secret police, 
until Marshal Amin was deposed in 
1979. According to diplomats, the 
bureau was responsible for the- 
deaths of more than a million 
Ugandans under the eight-year 
Amin regime. 



by the French' left Some members, three-day visit to the French Antil- 
ot the National Assembly ex- : le, said the meeting had been an 
pressed astonishment at what ap- .opportunity to raise questions 
pored to be MftFabrart effortsto about, rdigious and trade union 

distance himirif fmm the megring. freedom in Poland. 

— ■ 1 ■■■■ ' ■ I - He said that he had decided to 

take the risk that the meeting mighi 
mu Trw^ mp i be nnsinterjHeted. “There is no 


POWERFUL TOYS FOR 
POWERFUL BOYS 


There was little indication that 
French politicians, except for the 
Communist Party, were persuaded. 
Roland Leroy, a Communist Party 
leader and director of the Commu- 
nist daily, L’Humanite, said it was«A 
about tone that France re-estab* ” ' 
lisbed official, direct diplomatic re- 
lations with Poland." 

The director of Paris's Bateaux- 
Moitohes, one of the best known 
companies on the 
Sane, refused to take the Polish 
. ead€ T° fl 85 a passenger. Another 
tow- boat company, Les Vedettes 
de la Tour EffeL agreed to. 


PUfa B LI Dost Equpnenf. 
A-H0I Vcnon better StaweM, AinMa 






INTERNATIONAL IIKRAM) TRIBI NK, TUI RSDAV. DECEMBER 5, 1985 


Page 3 


The biggest problem with per- 

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....that’s why. 




■tiul) Bi 




recalculations 


is the long delay. 


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use a specific application, the less 
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Zero wait state means instant 
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is our information brochure. 

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lb: ITT Xtra Dept, ITT Europe, Avenue Louise 480, 
B-IOSO Brussels, Belgium. Tel: Brussels 649.96.20. 

Name Bill Title. 

Company 

Address 


TteL 


ITT 


: 


<T * i 


Page 4 


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1985 


Heralh 


Pnblttbed Widi The S« York Thw* and The Wadringtno Ptort 


Eribune. 


Europe: No Short Cuts 


Condemning this week’s European sum- 
mit as a failure is short-sighted and faint- 
hearted. Europe amply failed to achieve the 
impossible task it set itself at its last summit 
in Milan. Discouragement is out of order. 

After some thin years, Europe has been 
inspired by the new president of the commu- 
nity, Jacques Defors, to go for a real com- 
mon market, with virtually no economic 
frontiers, by 1992. Although tariffs no long- 
er exist inside Europe, there are still huge 
obstacles to the movement of goods, ser- 
vices, people and money. As a result, a group 
bigger than either the United States or Japan 
is far from reaping the economic toolkits 
of a large unified market Europe today 
is little more than a geographical expression 
of 10 separate mini-markets. 

Breaking down all the remaining barriers 
will be hard. Progress in Europe is slow 
because all important decisions require una- 
nimity. The original Treaty of Rome envis- 
aged majority voting, but this had to be set 
aside 20 years ago to appease General 
diar ies de Gaulle. The unwritten rules of 
the game today give each country the right 
of veto where its self-stated major interests 
are at stake. West Germany recently in- 
voked this right to block a minute reduction 
in the excessive price of wheat. 

The feeling surfaced last July in Milan 
that decisions could not be taken unless the 
unanimity rule were circumscribed. So the 
summi teers (with some misgivings) instruct- 
ed their juniors to come up with proposals to 
chang e this in December. This week, pre- 
dictably, no really major change in commu- 
nity practice could be agreed upon. 

Public opinion in Europe is not ready for 
majority voting, which implies a readiness to 
ante narrow, national interests in the com- 
mon good. Successive governments have 


done little to boost the European ideal, be- 
cause they End their doctoral prospects bet- 
ter served by concentrating on short-term, 
inward-looking questions — or by capitaliz- 
ing on xenophobia, the fear of foreigners. 
The European Parliament could have been 
useful here. But it has been treated with 21- 
conodved contempt by most governments, 
and is of small interest to the public apart 
from the dues that its elections give to 
domestic political swings. 

More fundamentally, the problems to be 
solved before Europe's economy is truly 
without frontiers are fiendishly difficult. 
The economic barricades are partly the heri- 
tage of outmoded bureaucratic tradition. 
Bui many of tb<™ are considered, simulta- 
neously, to be vital to the chosen conditions 
of life in the mitigating countries while 
countries on the other side of the barriers 
regard thorn as unjustified interference with 
market mechanisms. Just where do import 
checks to keep your animal stock free of 
disease become unacceptable agricultural 
protection in disguise? The same question 
can be asked about any of the present na- 
tional systems for industrial standards or 
government procurement. 

There are no short cuts to a genuine free 
market in Europe. Community governments 
can only dog on, attacking one barrier after 
another and think themselves lucky if, seven 
years hence, Europe’s economic frontiers are 
a thing far the history books. 

The task is important, because it promises 
great rewards. But this particular road to 
ridies is long and bumpy. Tuesday's failure 
to find a bypass does not mean that the 
voyage is wrong, but only that Europe 
should stop being quixotic .about the early 
surrender of titular sovereignty on the way. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


Manila’s Shameless Verdict 


To nobody’s surprise, a court in M anila has 
absolved 26 FilipuuK accused of murdering 
Benigno Aquino, including the key defendant. 
General Fabian Ver, now renamed to his for- 
mer post as chief of staff. Worthless as law, the 
acquittal is a political act It suggests that 
those who risk their necks Tor President Ferdi- 
nand Marcos are legally untouchable. 

Worse, the verdict implies that Mr. Marcos 
and his wife have reason for maneuvering: to 
assure the loyalty, and silence, of the accused. 

Hard facts justify these inferences. Mr. Mar- 
cos vowed that an impartial commission 
would uncover die truth about Mr. Aquino's 
death in August 1983 at Manila airport. First 
he named a family friend to head the inquiry. 
Only when he was forced to back down did he 
appoint a civilian fact-finding board headed 
by former judge, Corazdn Agrava. 

A majority of the five-member Agrava panel 
rejected the government’s contention that a 

lone gunman killed Mr. Atprinq jmd c ondndrd 

that “the evidence proves the complicity of 
General Ver.” But the charges were submitted 
to a lower-levd court, witnesses vanished and 
eventually the Marcos-appointed Supreme 
Court agreed that crucial evidence against 


General Ver was inadmissible. The prosecu- 
tion even refused to accept the testimony of six 
U.S. airmen against the general. This tainted 
record is the basis for the tainted acquittal 
from another Marcos-appointed court. 

The timing is as shameless as the result 
Only weeks ago President Reagan's personal 
emissary, Senator Paul Laxalt warned Mr. 
Marcos of a “firestorm” in the U.S. Congress if 
General Ver were renamed chief of staff. In 
response Mr. Marcos affirmed his support for 
the general and to deflect American pressure 
abruptly announced elections. Facing a divid- 
ed opposition and with the leverage of incum- 
bency, the House of Marcos is almost sore to 
prevail in the Feb. 7 vote. 

The Communist guerrillas in the rapidly 
growing mid increasingly brutal New People’s 
Army are banking on that Yet as the country 
slides deeper into turmoil as outsiders talk of 
another Vietnam or another Iran, a cheerful 
voice is heard. It is that of Mis. ImeLda Mar- 
cos, and she has her own historical parallel 
She compares her husband and his 20-year rule 
to John Kennedy’s Camelot This Marcos mo- 
ment, alas, is neither brief oor shining. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Spying Between Friends 

Israel's government has progressed from 
“shock and consternation” at exposure of its 
alleged es p ionage activities in the United 
States to a cabinet apology for such misbehav- 
ior “to the extent that it took place.” In be- 
tween these official statements came a stream 
of unattributed comments seeking either to 
obscure some of the messier political issues 
raised by the arrest of Jonathan Jay Pollard or 
to provide high- horse justification for Israel's 
alleged employment of him. Tins included the 
suggestion <h«t Israel was using Mr. Pollard 
only to lay hands on information that Wash- 
ington should have been supplying anyway. 

The U.S. government, which welcomed the 
Israeli cabinet's apology, seems no less eager 
than Israel to see this whole business quickly 
disposed of for the sake of the mutual long- 
term interests of both countries. The short 
term, however, is something else. The arrest of 
Mr. Pollard, a civilian employee of the Naval 
Investigative Service, on charges that he sold a 
bundle of classified material to Israel is a 
serious matter, not so much for the intrinsic 
harm that might have been done — recent 


cases invoking Americans spying for the Sovi- 
et Union and China are almost certainly far 
more grievous — but because a friendly and 
allied country was involved. While alliances 
are often based an expediency, friendships 
depend on trust. That trust has been damaged. 

— Los Angeles Times. 

Esteem for Mandela Grows 

From the point of view of the South African 
government, it may not be very clever to keep 
Nelson Mandela in prison. IBs incarceration 
has done wonders for his reputation. Through- 
out the world roads are named after him, 
statues raised to him, and songs sung about 
him. Foreign governments Hamand his release 
if further sanctions are not to be imposed. The 
setting free of Mr. Mandela would test the 
faith of all those foreign governments who 
have set so much store by it. The South Afri- 
cans are lucky in that his release would involve 
no great sacrifice. Those countries which have 
threatened to implement further sanctions in 
the event of Mr. Mandela not being released 
would then have to think again. 

— Daily Telegraph (London). 


FROM OUR DEC 5 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910; China's Navy Seeks U.S. Loan 
PARIS — Another significant development in 
American-Chinese relations was disclosed [on 
Dec. 3] when h was reported that, as a conse- 
quence of Prince Tsai-Hsun’s visit to America, 
the Chinese Naval Board had begun negotia- 
tions with the Morgan-Ruhn- Loeb group of 
capitalists for the floating of a loan of forty 
milli on tads. A certain p« T*ntag«*. of tine loan 
is to be employed in the construction of naval 
dockyards and arsenals. The remainder, and 
this, for Americans, is the significant feature of 
the operation, is to be aDotiu for the bufldmg 
of warships in the United States. American 
statesmen, financiers, manufacturers and mer- 
chants are now alive to the fact that the next 
great field for expansion of U.S. commerce is 
China. “Westward the star of empire takes its 
way.” So does the star of American trade. 


1935: Stronger Defense* for America 
WASHINGTON — In view of war threats, 
Congressional leaders are planning a vast 
strengthening of U.S. military defenses in the 
Parific and in the air through a record-break- 
ing peacetime Army a pp r opri ation. Chairman 
Tflman B. Parks, of the House Appropriation 
Subcommittee, revealed [on Dec. 4]. Represen- 
tative Parks said ins committee will seek ex- 
pansion of the Army Corps, fortifications and 
bases in Hawaii along the Pacific Cbast, in the 
panama Canal Zone and along the southwest- 
on frontier. “Before we finish we expect to 
make Hawaii as impregnable as Gibraltar and 
afford adequate protection to West Coast de- 
les,” he said. He intimated that a five-year 
airplane bunding program might be included 
to raise Army air strength from the present 
1,500 planes by adding 300 craft annually. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 19S8-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARL GEWIRTZ 


Deputy Publisher 
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AaocUuc Pubfehr 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Pubtuher 
Eucunte Eduar R£N£ BONDY 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR 

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Deputy Eduar STEPHAN W. CONAWAY 

Assoame Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Director of Ctr 

ROLF D, KRANEPUHL Director of Adrerasmg Sola 
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0 1985, International Herald Tribune. AH rights reserved. 



U.S. Should Not Brush Off Pollard Case 


• 9 


YTT ASHINGTON — Standing alone, the dis- 

VY oovery that Israel has been buying U.S. 
Navy secrets might be disminMri as tlx: equiva- 
lent of a “third-rate barefaiy,” as the Israelis 
ctearty would hkeit to be. The oddities of Israd’s 
hireling, Jonathan Jay Pollard, would tend to 
support such a minimalist reading of the affair. 

Mr. Pollard is a dvffian intelligence analyst for 
the Navy. He was arrested Nov. 21 outside the 
Israeh Embassy with a load of sensitive docu- 
ments. Two of his Israeli contacts were promptly 
called home. As subsequently portrayed by 
friends, Mr. Pollard emerges as an amateurish 
and sophomoric braggart, living in a wodd of 
James Bond fantasies and even boasting of a 

cokmdey in Israeli intellig ence. The ba gging of 

an agent so unlike Israel's storied professionals 
might normally mark the affair as an aberration. 

But the Pollard case did not arise out of a 
vacuum. In the perspective of recent UA-IsraeK 
relations, it can be taken as part of an increasing- 
ly unwholesome pattern: a pattern of excessive 
dependency in wfidi impudence has become a 
substitute for independence. 

The pattern started to take shape in 1981, 
when by unfortunate coincidence the Israeli 
jingos got the upper hand even as the Reagan 
adminis tration was giving Israel what amounted 
to a carte blanche For military adventurism 
in the guise of self-defense. 

The first result, from which much mischief has 
flowed, was the invasion of Lebanon, long de- 
sired but previously checked by pressure from 
the Carter administration. Maybe the United 
States did not actually give Israel the go-ahead. 
But no veto was. exercised and only when the 
Reagan administration found it 
picking up pieces in Beirut in and 
the price of permissiveness begin to dawn. 

The Lebanese adventure was a calamity, for 
Israel as well as Lebanon. But as if to rub m his 
impenitence, its architect. Arid Sharon, was soon 
parading a charge of “blood KbeT against Time 
magazine in an American court — and this with 
fuugovenuneait financial harfring Official Israe- 
li sponsorship of this escapade was revealing. 

Meanwhile, in no partknlar arid, the Israelis 
were brusquely rebuffing President Reagan’s be- 
lated peace initiative for the West Bank; picking 
the week of a visit by King Hussein of Jordan to 
Washington for a bombing raid against Palestine 


By Edwin M. Yoder Jr. 

Liberation Organization headquarters near Tu- 
nis; and, of course, petitioning Israel’s friends in 
Congress to keep U^miUtaiy and economic aid 
flowing. Indeed, after the Lebanon invasion, that 
aid was substantially augmented. U.S. taxpayers 
were indemnifying Israel's self-inflicted wounds. 

It was predidable that limitless indulgence in 
Washington wo^eacouragelxmitkss arrogance 

in Je nwalem. It ic tfwaTI t nn familiar pgyriidngy. 

of dependency, soaring to resentment and ag- 
gressiveness. No wise government expects grati- 
tude of a friend and bendlciaiy. It is entitled, 
however, to expect discretion and sdf-restrainL 
It is important, but hardly all-important, to 
know whether Mr. Pollard's paymasters were 
lower-levd Israeli bureaucrats or top cabinet 
officials. That he was employed at all to steal 
U.S. secrets reveals an attitude which, un- 
checked, could lead .to dangerous estrangement. 
Among the many undocumented suspicions 


afloat is tire Pollard channel was being used 
m rap L via in tellig ence, into confiden- 

tial IIS -Egyptian military exercises. Does the 
foolishness of this need underscoring? The Unit- 
ed States has been, and still is. the linchpin of 
peacemaking between Israel and Egypt spo- 
ilage that jeopardizes Egypt’s confidence in U 

gcwdcfficesisreddessnessofarareordcr. 

There is a school of thought that the Pollard 
affair should be brushed aside, left hanging in the 
hope it wifl be eclipsed by the next 24 -hour 
wonder of a television story. Sunday’s stilted 
exchange of bland pleasantries between Prime 
Minister Feres and Secretary of State Shultz is 
part of tire brush-off, no doubt 

But evasion is false friendship. Israelis drifting 
into the compromising position of an economic 
ward erf the United States, and its resentment is 
taking rash forms. The Tunis raid was an exam- 
ple; the Pollard affair may be. Painful candor 
now may prwur dangerous strain later, and we 
should insist cm no less. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 



Wailing Wall 


. . . But It Should Act to Deter Any Would-Be Spies 


Vermont — 
What’s going on here? Not 
only does the government seem to 
be infested with spies; bat they 
aren't even the kind of subversives 
good Americans have been taught 
to fear and loathe. 

Four mostly ordinary persons 
were arrested within the last two 
weeks and charged with spying for 
China, Israel and the Soviet Union. 
Together with last summer’s Walker 
family spy case and other recent 
espionage scandals, all this must 
have given a rude shock to those 
wbo*ve bought the idea that it's the 
press and undetected Communists 
who “give away” vital U.S. secrets. 

None of these cases — all serious 
breaches of U.S. security and per- 
haps cumulatively an intefligeoce 
disaster — had anything to do with 
the press or with anyone “leaking" 
sensitive information to some sen- 
sation-hungry reporters. 

Nor, it seems so far, were any of 
the accused spies ideological Com- 
munists burrowing away within a 
government so riddled with leftist 
intellectuals, pinko do-gooders and 
trilateral internationalists that no 
secrets were safe anyway. 

Instead, while the motives of 
those charged were no doubt differ- 
ent in each case, the accused appear 
to have been wdl paid and to have 
given good value for their money. 

No one can take satisfaction from 
these cases. If the charges are prov- 
en, they would represent too much 
damage to U.S. interests, not to 
mention the possibility of impaired 
relations with Israel Biut a few com- 
ments may be in order from one 
who lived through the McCarthy- 
J. Edgar Hoover hysteria about 
“Communists in government” and 
the long history of suspiaon and 
mistrust to which it gave birth, who 
was himself a participant in the 
Pentagon Papers affair, and who 
bas suffered quite enough cheap 
talk about a “treasonous” press that 
is not “on our side.” 

Fust, and most obvious, the press 
is not the prime threat to U.S. se- 
crets; to legitimate secrets like those 
Jonathan Jay Pollard is charged 
with delivering to Israel, it is scarce- 
ly a threat at all — except possibly 
by some accidental disclosure. In 
the entire history of the UJL press, 
including World War n, when seri- 
ous security breaches occurred, no 
newspaper ever has damaged Amer- 


By Tom Wicker 


ican interests to the extent that 
Lany Wu-Tai Chin is dunged with 
having done in more than 20 years 
as a Chinese “mole” made the CIA. 

Second, and almost as obvious, 
the United States caxmot protect its 
vital secrets by morcand more clas- 
sification of documents, with the 
consequent need for more classi- 
fiers and more people to be cleared 
to read the classified material 
Aside from the absurdity of having 
thousands of officials authorized to 
put a classification stamp on things, 
the result is the degradation of se- 


crecy. Where everything is secret, as 
Justice Potter Stewart mice ob- 
served, nothing can be truly secret. 

The necessity for dealing so 
many people also overwhelms the 
security agencies charged with the 


task. Too many government work- 
ers are not adequately checked be- 
fore clearance; and too few axe re- 
chccked frequently enough after the 
original clearance. 

Being a liberal or a “leftist” or 
even a Mantist-Lenimstis in itself 
no more a security threat to the 
United States than being a Republi- 
can, a Rn tarinti or a churchgoer. If 
any of the last three were in a sensi- 
tive government position, or other- 
wise had access to secrets, and 
found himself in dire need of mon- 
ey, or in fear for relatives abroad, a 
spy might be bom more easily than 
in a class taught by a Marxist pro- 
fessor of economics. 

And all those go v en unc ntsecuri- 
ty flaps - — usually resulting only in 
more lie detector tests tar more peo- 


ple — are essentially measures to 
stop leaks or to eateh leakers, nei- 
ther of which is the real security 
problem. Nor will more limits on 
the Freedom of Information Act or 
a new official secrets act get at the 
necessary target. These, too, would 
be efforts to restrict the public re- 
lease of inf ormatio n — most of 
which, inevitably, would not be le- 
gitimately secret but only inconve- 
nient or politically embarrassing. 

The direct passage of real security 
secrets to foreign governments, by 
professionals or by coerced victims, 
is the problem. The Espionage Act 
provides ah the prosecutorial power 
the government needs; what’s lack- 
ing is an effective counterespionage 
program, not just to lock the barn 
after the horse has been stolen, but 
to deter the potential thief. 

The New York Times: 


Are WeAUBeaBy Under Surveillance? 


L OS ANGELES — The Soviet By Gary T. Marx 
t Union’s use of an invisible • . ■ J 


chemical dust to monitor the where- 
abouts of Americans raised eye- 
brows last sommer. Yet this tech- 
nique is only one in a broad famfly 
of methods revolutionizing surveil- 
lance. These methods' application 
in democracies should raise concern 
about liberty and privacy. 

Consider, for example, the elec- 
tronic leashes marketed for children 
and convicts. One device consists of 
a tiny transmitter that fastens to a 
child. A monitor gives off an alarm 

distance. An^etectromc ankferthat 
signals a central computer if it is 
removed or if the wearer strays, is 
being tested. Beepers can be put 
anywhere, without a warrant. 

Other devices measure people’s 
internal states as presumed indica- 
tors of behavior. Police in New Jer- 
sey arc testing a machine that scans 
brain waves to detect drag use. Vir- 
” are testing a “passive 
sensor” in a 


that automatically measures j 
levels in the breath when merely 
pointed at a person. There are other 
new truth verification, mechanisms 
that draw inferences from voice mi- 
cro-tremors and stomach flutters. 

Satellites, mini-radars, conven- 
tional aircraft and night- vision de- 


vices have greatly extended visual 
surveillance. Submimaturc tape re- 
corders the size of a matchbox and 

video cameras the size of a deck of 
cards facilitate covert surveillance. 
By picking up sound vibrations on a 
window, lasers and parabolic mi- 
crophones permit eavesdropping 
without entering the premises. - 

The average person may never 
encounter these innovations. But 
tins is not the case with other forms 
of surveillance because broad new 
categories of persons and behavior 
have become fit subjects. The cate- 
gorical monitoring associated with 
computers, video cameras, metal 
detectors, urine analysis for drug 
screening and electronic markers on 
consumer goods and even library 
books, is creating a society in which 
everyoM^npt just those under sus- 
picion. is a target far surveillance. 

The new domestic forms of sur- 
veillance have been generally wel- 
comed by business, government and 
law enforcement Storing examples 
of their effectiveness are readily 
available: The elderiy heart-attack 
victim who was saved when her fail- 
ure to open the re fr i g erator seat an 
alarm through her telephone to a 
centralized monitor; or the: main- 


taring of factory compliance with 
pollution emission standards 
through satellite photography. 
Americans seem willing to five with 
intrusive technologies because of 
the expected benefits. 

There has been insufficient atten- 
tion to the negative aspects of these 
trends, on privacy. We tend to take 
privacy for granted without realiz- 
ing how technology is malring ft 
irrelevant. Privacy is difficult to 

E X because much of the surveil- 
either is almost impossible to 
detect dr truly invisible. 

The things we wish to keep pri- 
vate increasingly consist at intangi- 
ble information stored in Large bu- 
reaucracies rather than in our desks. 

A report ou electronic surveil- 
lance and civil liberties just released 
by the Congressional Office of 
Technology Assessment makes it 
dear that new technologies have 
outstripped existing statutes and 

S afides. There are no easy answers. 

at if we are to remain a society 
with individual liberty and limit* on 
government, there must be greater 
awareness of the changing nature of 
-privacy and emerging threats to iL 

The writer is a professor at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technol- 
y. He contributed this comment to 
Times. 


Mideast Peacemakers Can’t Afford to Ignore Assad 


N EW YORK — President Hafez 
al-Assad of Syria has once again 
maneuvered himself into the center 
of the Middle East peace equation 
and stands by ready to exercise his 
well-practiced veto powers. This is an 

seeking peace ignore it at thdurperiL 
The dogfight last month between 
Israeli jets and Syrian MiG's was just 
the latest reminder that Mr. Assad is 
determined not to be ignored, as the 
diplomatic prospect shifts once 
again, this time away from an Ameri- 
can sponsored step-by-step process 
toward a brooder regional parley. 

There has been a finny of diplo- 
matic activity in the last few weeks. 
Reports of a secret meeting between 
King Hussein and Prime Minister 
Shimon Peres gave rise to hopes that 
the king might be moving toward 
direct negotiations that would in- 
clude Palestinians acceptable to Isra- 
el. But the long complicated the pic- 
ture by sending Ms prime minister, 
Zaid Rifai, to Damascus. 

King Hussein thus made it dear 
that no matter what else happens, be 
still needs an Arab “umbrella" — a 
supportive Arab consensus — for any 
peace talks. Mr- Assad would be a 
crucial part of this — for if be is 
occluded, he rmght well unleash a 

terrorist campaign a gainst Jor dan 

Why should Mr. Assad agree to 


By Dennis Mnfliw 


one 
being Left out 


Mr. Assad fears 
any peace confer- 


ence. He wants to be sure the Golan 
Heights is on the agenda, and is con- 
cerned about the possibility that 
Moscow may resume diplomatic ties 
with Israel Leaving him atone to face 

Israel's militar y might . 

Second, he andKmg Hussein share 
an antipathy to Yasser Arafat The 
king is disgusted with the Palestinian 

The twhmpping of four 
Russians in Lebanon 
threatened Syria’s 
suppfy- of Soviet arms. 

leader over the hijacking of the ltal- ' 
ian cruise ship Acbifie Lamo and for 
waffling on the selection of a defega- - 
lion to talk with Israel .Mr. Assad’s 
contempt for Mr. Arafat is rooted in 
years of battle in Lebanon! 

Thud, Syria, needs a new strategy 
to counter events in the Galt' Mr. 
Assad’s Ba’athist enemy, 

Hussein of Iraq, has not, as the Syri- 
an hoped, been destroyed by the ' 
Iran-Iiaq war. In fact, the Iraqis have 
been doing better latety, and then-jets 
have cut off tire oil flow from Xbarg 
Island, thus depriving Mr. Assad of . 
the mfllious of dollars worth of subsi- 
dized oil shipments from Iran, ’ 

As a result, Mr. Assad needs new 


financing from Saudi Arabia. In re- 
tain, Syna has agreed to modify its 
support for Iran and allow King Hus- 
sem to try to get an international 
conference off the ground. .. . 

Fourth. Mr. Assad k concerned 
about the strength of ^Lebanese 
Suite mn wm i m l The kidnap pin g 
tins fall of four Soviet diplomat? in 
. Beirut alarmed Damascus and threat- 

ened its supply of Soviet aims. 

finally, tosatisty Syria, the Pales- 
tinian issue most be settled m ail its 
aspects. For Syria; Kuwait, Jordan, 
and several other Arab nations, the 
Palestinian problem k above all a 
refugee problem with serious domes-' 
tic political implications. Thesc-statcs 

want to settle tire status of tire mil- 
lions of displaced Palestinians — ^par- 
ticulariy now that the' cal boom is 
o ver and Palestinian labor fc no Icmg- 
er needed m the Gulf. 

Thns, for Syria, it -would be better 
toenoptttagcao an f c repcethalwonld 

address the Palestinian-. issue in a 
comprehensive way than to allow 
King Hussein to go it alone. But for 
aU the amyromise, Syria will extract 
a heavy pnee. Apart from an agenda 
mduding tire Golan Heights, it will 
demand that its hegemooyover Leb 1 
anon not be contested. 

That in itself is a veto of sorts. 

T«wn»J w highly nalflwiy tft gfi<Kat (ny 
A comprehensive c onfe rence is un- , 
likely to be acceptable to all Israelis, - 


and if by some chance one were held, 
the Syrians themselves might sabo- 
tage if by using proxy' fighters to 
destabilize Jordan and cause mischief 
on farad’s northern border. 

Given the dim outlook for a broad 
accord, the United States, load and 
Jordan will undoubtedly continue to 
tty for a partial settlement But all 
involved, particularly tire Americana, 
would be wise to emulate King Hus- 
sein. and keep looking over their 
shoulder for Mr. Assad. 


The writer, a fellow at die Council 
on Foreign Relatione, is on leave from 
U.S. News A World Report He con- 
tribvted this to The New Yak Times. 


'Star Wars’: 

A Political 

¥ ' 

Cover-Up 

Bv Flora Lewis 

P ARIS — The hyper-selling of 
“star wars” has gone far beyond 
die childish crayola spot aimed at tire 
general public on TV. beyond the 
claim made to businessmen and allies 
by the program director. Lieutenant 
General James A. Abrahamson, of 
progress at an "incredible pace.” It 
has gone to the point of covering up 
scientific failure in a way that endan- 
gers the honesty of research. k 

Some of the scientists involved are “ 
bursting with frustration- They don't 
know how to cope with this govern- 
ment disinformation campaign. A 
top official at Lawrence Livermore 
National Laboratory, in California, 
and another at Los Alamos Scientific 
Laboratory, in New Mexico, the two 
national labs where the key research 
takes place, have resigned, though 
they are too discreet to explain why. 

Ray Kidder, a physicist at Liver- 
more, was quoted in the Los Angdes 
Tunes as saying: “The public is get- 
ting swindled by one side that has 
access to classified information and 
can ay whatever it wants and not go 
to jail, whereas we (the skeptics) can't 
say whatever we wanL We would go 
to jafl, that’s the difference.'’ 

Energy Secretary John S. Herring- r 
ton, however, has both denounced 
the doubters for hurting the national 
interest in speaking up and called it a 
“little squabble” among sdentias. 

Mr. Herrington said that the next 
test, scheduled in Nevada this month 
and name d “Gctidstone,” was going 
“full speed ahead” despite clear evi- 
dence that it cannot be properly mea- 
sured with existing instruments. The 
X-ray laser, pet project erf the physi- 
cist Edward Teller and the center- 
piece on which he sold “star wars” to 
President Reagan, is the current fo- 
cus of many of the scientists’ distress. 

It was Mr. Teller himsdf who 
leaked last April that a test took place 
March 23, and his cronies put out 
word that it was highly successfuL It 
wasn't. It turned out that the moni- 
toring instruments themselves were 
excited by the X-rays to emit lighL 
Therefore the brightness they mea- 
sured was much greater than what the 
device produced and the result was 
completely unreliable. One scientist 
in the program concluded that “in- 
stead of a weapon we have a toy.” 

Undaunted. Mr. Teller went to Mr. 
Reagan and wangled another S10Q 
millio n for the project, including this 
month's test, which wifl probably 
cost S30 million. Participants urged a 
delay until the measuring problem 
could be solved, which would take six 
months to a year. That was rejected 
on the grounds that loss of momen- 
tum would be politically unfavorable, 
even though the test is almost sure to 
be futile in the circumstances. 

Furthermore, although the admin- 
istration keeps saying its anti-missile , 
program is nonnuclear, the X-ray la- f 
ser relies on a nuclear explosion for 
its energy. Insistence on continuing 
these tests is a major reason Washing- 
ton won’t even listen to Soviet pro- 
posals for a comprehensive lest ban. 

There are other well grounded sci- 
entific doubts about the X-ray laser. 

The assumption that it can kill Soviet 
missiles while they are bang boosted 
rests on their current technology. 
They take three to five minutes to 
burn out and carry warheads sobw 
200 nnles (324 kilometers) above the 
Earth. But US. experts know that it 
wouldn't be hard, nor inordinately 
expensive, for the Russians to accel- 
erate burning tune, bringing it down 
to some 30 seconds and completing 
the boost at 50 or 60 mfles high. - ■ 
X-rays can’t penetrate the atmo- 
sphere, and at that altitude they 
wouldn’t get through even if the loss J 
of shoot time couldbe overcome. But ^ 
nothing else has been developed as 
far, so X-ray lasers remain the chief 
hope for boost-phase missile defence. 

The willful distortion of research is 
a scandal, reminiscent of Stalin’s sup- 
port for Trofim Lysenko's phony the? 
ones of genetics because they were 
politically pleasing. The resulted So- 
viet biology back a generation. 

The American physicists working 
on the Strategic Defense Initiative 
aren’t threatened with the gulag, but . 
duty are being pm in a demeaning 
poation that, undermines their integ- 
rity. It isn’t a violation of theirhigb 
security c l earance to say that, but it 
could be if they gave out dptaile to 
support their stand. 

They have been arguing tmid#. the jp 
program to no avail, tmatMn to tell ** 
Mr. Reagan what’s happening. That 
is why their concerns are seeping inrn 
public print, despite (he gag rule. 

Apart from the other arguments 
for and against “star wars." fffrisn’t 
based on good science it can never be 
anything more than what Mr. Rea gan 
calls it, his “dream.” But it could baa 
devastating nightmare, s app i ng the 
authenticity of American 

The New York Times. 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “ Letters to the. 
Editor and must contain the writ- 
ers signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Leners should be brief and , 
on? subject to editing. We cannot & 
be responsible for the return of? 
unsolicited manuscripts. . I 


LkitekTOTHE editor 

Outdoing the Israelis 


The Washington Post editorial “Is- 
rael: Spying on a Friend” (Nov. 28) 
has all the marks of a shabby attempt 
to present the J onathan Jay Pollard 
spy case as nothing more than a mod- 
est misunderstanding between 
frknds,The argumeail is firstly that 
any nation must not ratty know what 
tbeeoQ^isupU>;baimsstkeq)an 
eye an its friends as wtjl; and second- 
ly, that even, if there has been some 
dirty work -between Israel and an 
American, it only balances US. spy- 
ingOT Israel riunng (be 1967 war. 

To Wock that so-called spying, Ig. 


radi air and naval craft tried to sink 
the oomunmications ship USS Liber- 


„ . as ^ 

shooting up lasted for 75 nnn- 
utes, lo lling 34 and wounding 75 of 
the Liberty’s crew. And when pneu- 
matic hfe rafts were lowered over- 
board, they were sunk 
Even Israel isn't so hypocritical as 
to call the Liberty’s presence in operj 
waten spying.” It finally admitted 
wiiat it first denied doing, and then 
apologiaKl, blaming “mistaken iden- 
ttty. The Washington Post now 
seeks to outdo the Israelis. 

JAt BRADLEY. 

Bonn. 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBI NE. THl'RSIMl - DECEMBER 3. 1983 


Pog** 5 


Report Says Terrorism 
Is Almost Routine, Calls 
Nuclear Action Unlikely 


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By Joanne Omang- 

' Washington Port Service 

WASHINGTON — Interna- 
tional terrorist incidents, increas- 
ing at. a rate of 12 to IS percent a 
year, have almost become institn- 
rianafaed. according to a Rand 
Crop, report. The study calls a nu- 
clear terrorist incident unlikely. 

Brian M. Jenkins, chief analyst 
for terrorism studies at the Califor- 
nia research institution, said the 
trend toward state-sponsored ter- 
rorism wfl] continue and could lead 
to “a new land of global guerrilla 
warfare” in which terrorists launch 
operations from “badlands” na- 
tions .and retreat there afterward. 

The study, “The Future Course 
oMnleraational Terrorism," is ex- 
cerpted in the December issue of 
Mr. Jenkins’s Terrorism Violence 
Insurgency Repot! It says that ter- 
rorist tactics “have become a rou- 
tine way of focusing attention on a 
dispute” and to a certain extent 
have become ‘institutionalized.” 

“A semi -permanent infrastruc- 
ture of support has emerged," it 
continues, providing connections, 
safe houses, arms, counterfeit doc- 
uments and other services around 
the globe. 

Smce the 1972 attack on Olym- 
pic athletes in Munich, Mr. Jenkins 
said, terrorist incidents have risen 
at an annual rate of 12 to 15 per- 
cent, Iasi year involving terrorists 
and victims from 60 countries. The 
incidents increasingly involve 
large-scale, indiscriminate vio- 
lence, such as bombs detonated in 
public places. 

In an interview, Mr. Jenkins said 
that “the most insidious trend" is 
toward public indifference. 

“Terrorism is becoming com- 
monplace — ordinary, banal and, 
therefore, somehow tolerable,” he 
said. “Extraordinary security mea- 
sures no longer attract any com- 
ment. We expect di ploma t* to be 
assassinated and states to be in- 
volved.” 

He said that measures to combat 
terrorism could cause “a lot of 
humpin g and shoving around the 
Fourth Amendment” to the U.S. 
Constitution, which prohibits un- 
reasonable search and seizure. 

A Stale Department official ex- 
pressed general agreement with the 
report. 

Tbe report said terrorists' tactics 

Li Peng to Vial Prague, Sofia 

Return 

BEIJING — U Peng, a deputy 
prime minister, visit Czechoslova- 
kia and Bulgaria from Dec. 13 and 
22, a spokesman for the Foreign 
Ministry announced Wednesday. 


and targets probably will not 
change touch. 

‘Terrorists blow up things, kill 
people or seize hostages, Mr. Jen- 
kins wrote. 

Although attacks on data-pro- 


and nuclear reactors have occurred 
and wjB recur, they require sophis- 
tication and persistent follow-up to 
be effective and lack the public 
drama of a hostage- taking. 

“Terrorists want a lot of people 
watching, not a lot of people dead,” 
Mr. Jenkins said. 

Nuclear terrorism “is neither im- 
ininent nor inevitable” because of 
technical reasons and because it 
involves mass murder, he said. 
Some terrorists would oppose it on 
moral grounds or because nuclear 
events would provoke public revul- 
sion and government crackdowns, 
exposing a terrorist group to divi- 
sion and betrayaL 

Under a nuclear threat, ”Lbe 
rules that now limit police authori- 
ties in most democracies would 
change,” Mr. Jenkins said. 

Similarly, chemical and biologi- 
cal weapons involve uncontrollable 
m as s ifiiirngc that are less useful to 
terrorists than to nations at war. 

“If chemical warfare becomes 
more commonplace,” be wrote; 
“we cannot dismiss its potential use 
by terrorists. The same is true of 
nuclear weapons, but probably 
over a longer time period." 



SDI Software Possible , Senators Are Told 


Da Nm Votfc Tim 

Shopping for Cabbage Patch Dolls in New Jersey. 

Doll Collars Said to Pose Choke Risk 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The most popular toy this Christmas season is 
also one of the most dangerous, according to a group that has asked 
the Consumer Product Safety Commission to recall the Cabbage 
Patch Kooea Doll. 

The consumer committee of Americans for Democratic Action said 
Tuesday in its annual toy-quality survey that a removable collar on 
the doll, introduced last year by Coleco, poses a serious risk because it 
can fit snugly around the necks of young children. In one incident, a 
six-year-old girl nearly choked before a doctor cut the collar off, 
according to the group. 

Coleco officials said that the Koosa doll collar had been changed 
this year to make it easier to play with and that both collars met 
federal safety standards. The original collars, deemed dangerous by 
the Americans for Democratic Action, are still being sold. 


U.S. Fertility Rate Is Lowest Since ’76 


By Boyce Rcnsbcrgcr 

ll'ushtnghHt Post Sen he 

WASHINGTON — Computer 
programming expens who say it 
would be nearly impossible to write 
the software for "Star Wars" repre- 
sent a “stagnant subculture” that 
“grossly overrates" the difficulty of 
the task, according to the head of 
the software committee of the Stra- 
tegic Defense Initiative Organiza- 
tion. 

Danny Cohen, a computer scien- 
tist at tne University of Southern 
California, told a Senate panel 
Tuesday that the software needed 
for an anti-missile system can be 
created without breakthroughs in 
programming technology. 

“There are those who claim that 


Man Ends Divorce 
Against Russian 

The Associated Press 

AUBURN. California — An 
American who married a Soviet 
woman in Moscow to help her emi- 
grate asked a court on Tuesday to 
drop divorce proceedings, citing 
the expense ana the unwanted ce- 
lebrity the case has brought him. 

Gary D. Talanov, who married 
Elena V. Kaplan in 1 978 when both 
were students, said in a signed 
statement that they never lived to- 
gether and never planned to. Mr. 
Talanov, a ski instructor, said be 
married Miss Kaplan out of sym- 
pathy and to help her emigrate to 
the United States. 

In Moscow, Miss Kaplan said 
Soviet officials have made her life 
difficult and have refused to lei her 
leave. She said that if divorced, she 
could no longer go to the U.S. Em- 
bassy for protection. 


they cannot produce adequate soft- 
ware." Mr. Cohen >aid in testimo- 
ny before the Senate Armed Ser- 
vices Subcommitiee on Strategic 
and Theater Nuclear Forces, “we 
agree that they cannot. There are 
experts who claim that they con. 
We agree with them, too." 

Although he conceded that it is 
impossible to “de-bug" programs 
completely, Mr. Cohen said the 
software can be designed so that 
errors do not disable the system. 
Such a system, he said, can be one 
that “copes with imperfections and 
corrects for them, rather than at- 
tempts to achieve an unattainable 
perfection.” 

David L. Pamas, a leading critic 
of SDI software potential, told the 


senators that while components 
could be tested before deployment, 
there would be no way to measure 
the reliability of an operational sys- 
tem. 

Mr. Pamas. a professor at the 
University or Victoria in British 
Columbia, was appointed to an ad- 
visory committee of the Strategic 
Defense Initiative Organization. 
Bui he resigned in Judy on the 
ground that he could not in good 
conscience work on a program that 
he thought was doomed to fail. 

“You never really know when 
you’ve found the last bug," Mr. 
Pamas said. He said that all experi- 
ence with software has shown that 
errors show up long after a system 
is put into use. He cited aborted 


launches of the space shuttles that 
were traced to software errors that 
showed up only when certain con- 
ditions occurred simultaneously, a 
situation that years of previous 
testing had failed to simulate. 

Mr. Cohen told the senators that 
software could be made to work by 
using redundant programs that 
could function semiautonomouMy 
and that would be written by inde- 
pendent groups of programmers. 

“To achieve this," Mr. Cohen 
said, “we should not look for help 
from the institutionalized and stag- 
nant subculture of the 'software 
engineering' establishment.” 

He said “this sect grossly over- 
rates the perfection of Swiss clock- 
work. and strives to achieve U.“ 


‘The T70 offers the beginner 
r|, decision-free photography 

E and simple operation . . . the 
experienced photographer 
has a camera unsurpassed 
in versatility.” 

A quote from ‘SLR Camera’ in the UK. 


By Robert Pear 

New York Times Senior 

WASHINGTON —The fertility 
rate in the United States dropped 
last year to the lowest level since 
the late 1970s, but the rate in- 
creased for women 30 to 34 years 
old, the Census Bureau has report- 
ed. 

The overall number of births per 
thousand women 18 through 44 
years old rase from 1976 to 1980, 
but is now back to a level lower 
than it was at in 1976, the bureau 
said Tuesday. 

The Census Bureau said the in- 
crease far women 30 to 34 years old 
did not herald a baby boom, but 
inilifliwrf a shift in the timing of 
childbearing for these women. The 
30-u>-34 age group was the only 
one that experienced an increase in 
the fertility rate from 1980 to 1984. 

For the 12 months ended in June 
1984, according to the bureau, 
there were 65.8 births for every 
1,000 women 18 through 44 years 


old, down from 71.1 in 1980 and 
67.2 in 1976. 

By contrast, the rate for women 
30 to 34 years old rose to 112 per, 
thousand, from 56.4 in 1976 and 60 
in 1980. 

Census officials said the terms 
“birth rate" and “fertility rate" 
were often interchangeable. But 
they said a birth rate was normally 
expressed as the number of births 
for every 1,000 people in a given 
population while the fertility rate 
was the number of births for every 
1,000 women in a particular age 
group. 

Women who postpone child- 
bearing lend to have fewer children 
than those who start in their teens 
and early 20s, Census Bureau offi- 
cials said. They said that one of the 
main reasons for postponing child- 
bearing was to pursue higher edu- 
cation and employment opportune 
ties. 

The study confirmed that wom- 
en were delaying childbearing and 
then returning to the work force 


more quickly than in the past Fif- 
ty-two percent of those over 30 
years old who had a child the previ- 
ous year were in the work force at 
the lime of the survey in June 1984, 
the report said. The comparable 
figure for 1976 was 28 percent. 

The chief of the fertility statistics 
branch of the Census Bureau. Mar- 
tin O’Connell, said the changes in 
the last nine years, though signifi- 
cant, were rather small fluctuations 
when compared with rates in earli- 
er decades. In 1960, be said, the 
rate was about 120 births for every 
1.000 women of childbearing age 
and in 1970 it was about 90. 

“The fertility rale now is about 
half what it was in the late 1950s 
and early ’60s," he said. 

The bureau said the needs of 
working mothers for day care and 
other social services had grown in 
recent yean. The number of work- 
ing women with children under the 
age of 5 increased from 4.7 million 
in June 1977 to 6 million in June 
1982. 


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Sunday in Salamanca. 


Salamanca, some 200 Km. to the West of Madrid, is not 
in the geographical heart of Spain. 

But there you can fed the heartbeat of Spain more 
strongly ihan anywhere else. 

On Sundays in the Plaza Mayor, study one of the love- 
liest squares in ihe world, the people of this ancient city stroll 
in a seemingly choreographed procession, forming groups 


that briefly duster, then reassemble in different groupings. 

The atmosphere is a curious blend of gravity and gaiety. 
And this is very Spanish. 

Here you will see young couples proudly displaying their 
children; infants in strollers, toddlers playing with bright 
ha Ik, older children aware of their Sunday clothes, imitating 
the pose of their parous. 


Here you will see trid men arm in arm, talking in measu- 
red tones. And AMidenly a pah ofyounggiris on roller skates, 
made up as downs, dart through and vanish, laughing, 
through an archway. 

Musicians in medieval costumes play in a shady comer. 
They are medical students, surprisingly enough. 

Storks fly overhead. 


The late afternoon light turns golden on ihe Eastern 
side of the plaza. You and a hundred others sit observing, 

unwilling to leave this magical stage. 

Nearby are two cathedrals. Three universities, the oldest 
in Spain. Monuments. Museums. But they can wait. They .Ti m 

have waited for more than forty thousand Sundays and will 

wait for one more while you listen to the heanbeai of Spain. Fl» T< lob 

Spain. Everything under the sun. 


■j 









Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5; 1985 


Shultz Seeks Delay on Angolan Rebel Aid 


By Doyle McManus 

las Angela Tima Serna 
WASHINGTON — Secretary of 
Stale George P. Shultz has indicat- 
ed (hat Ik; opposes any immediate 
decision to provide covert aid to 
Angolan rebels, hoping that a delay 
will spur Angola's Marxist regime 
toward a negotiated settlement. 

Mr. Shultz said that a U.S.- An- 
golan meeting last week offers new 
hope that the Luanda government, 
faced with the threat of large-scale 
US. aid to the rebels, will agree to 
long-standing US. demands that it 
send Cuban troops home and nego- 
tiate with the insurgents. 

The talks “really were useful." he 
said Monday during a trip to Co- 
lombia for a meeting of the Organi- 


zation of American States. Td put 
it in a positive way.” 

He said that the Reagan admin- 
istration backs Jonas Savimbi, 
leader of the rebel group known by 
its Portuguese acronym of UN IT A. 
But he said Washington would pre- 
fer negotiations to an escalation of 
Angola's 10-year guerrilla war. 

"The question is, what's the most 
effective way to do it?” Mr. Shultz 
said. "And if a negotiation can take 


from Angola and Namibia — that 
gets a Namibian settlement — well, 
men that's a good way to. support 

Savimbi.” 

The United States baa sought for 
five years to negotiate a withdrawal 
of ihe estimated 30,000 Cuban 


combat troops propping up the An- 
golan regim e, as well as a with- 
drawal of South Africa's army from 
neighboring South-West Africa, or 
Namibia. Both Angola and South 
Africa have resisted the effort. 

Mr. Shultz is opposed by conser- 
vatives in the administration and 
Congress,- who want to give Mr. 
Savimbi enough aid to overthrow 
the government of President Jose 
Eduardos dos Santos. 

President Reagan said last 
month that be and Mr. Shultz fa- 
vored coven aid to Mr. Savimbi 
But other officials said that Mr. 
Shultz wanted to give the. Angolan 
government a last dunce to n^oti- 

ate before committing the United 

States to a secret military role. 


“Our policy is to try to find a 
d the violence/ 


Mit einem neuen Superlativ 
wartet Canon jetzt auf: Der 
grdfete Hersteller von 
Spiegelreflexkameras pra- 
sentiert die Canon MC, 
apostrophiert als ‘kleinste 

Autofokus Kamera der Welt’. 

‘Color Foto’ in Germany wrote this about the 
latest compact to come out of Canon. 


Canon/MC 


way to end the violence/ a State 
Department official said. “We have 
not backed away from that" 

Chester A. Crocker, assistant 
secretary of state for African af- 
fairs, traveled to Zambia last week 
for two days of talks with Angola’s 
interior minister, Manuel Alex- 
andre Rodrigues, the first such con- 
tact in five months. . 

Mr. Crocker said after the meet- 
ings that the United States wants to 

“re-energize” negotiations, and. 
Mr. Rodrigues said the two coun- 
tries had agi^ ro meet again soon. 

The Central Intelligence Agency 
aided UNUA during the 1975-76 
civil war until Congress learned of 
the practice. The legislators lifted 
their prohibition on aid to UNTTA 
this summer. 


■ Affiances in Congress 


The more than 100 House mem- 
bers who urged Mr. Reagan in a 
letter last week to continue his po- 
licy of withholding overt aid for 
Angolan rebels were primarily lib- 
eral Democrats who often oppose 
his foreign policy. The New York 
Tunes reported from Washington. 

And the “members who spon- 
sored a bill to require the adminis- 
tration to reverse its policy and aid 
the rebels were mostly conservative 
Republicans. 

The Angolan rebels exemplify a 
continuing debate on Capitol Hill 
over how far the United States 
should go in aiding what Mr. Rea- 
gan likes to call “freedom fighters" 
around the world. The answers and 
alliances often do not follow obvi- 
ous lines. 

It also demonstrates the many 
ways Congress tries to influence 
foreign policy, most often by prodr- 
.ding the administration in a direc- 
tion through strategies short of ac- 
tual legislation. 

In addition, the congressmen 
were warning Mr. Reagan that any 
request for Angolan aid would spur 
a major dash on Capitol HUL 


fagiian women mardirng during a mili tary parade markedthe 10th year of Communist rule in that country. 


Laos Appeals for Talks With Neighboring Nations 

Commimists Mark 10th Anniversary Calling for End to f External Interference 


Koreas Fail to Agree 
On Family Reunions 


SEOUL — A meeting between 
Red Cross officials of South and 
North Korea ended Wednesday 
with disagreement on how to re- 
unite 10 million separated family 
members in the divided peninsula, 
but with resumption of talks set for 
Feb. 26. 


North Korea insisted on free 
border crossing for people search- 
ing for friends and relatives. South 
Korea called this an attempt to 
infiltrate “trained political agita- 
tors.” Last September, SO visitors 
from each side crossed the border 
in the first exchange of ordinary 
citizens in 40 years. 


By William Branigin 

Washington Pan Service 

BANGKOK — Laos marked its 
10th anniversary of Communist 
rule this week with an appeal for 
talks between the Indochinese 
states and their non-Conmninist 


rin. the president of the Hanoi- Foreign aid amounts to about 
installed government in .Cambodia. $100 million a year, with Soviet 
In his speech, Mr. Kaysone said bloc countries supplying about half 
Laos wanted to improve relations of iL Even so, Laos remains one 
with Chinn and Thailand, which the world’s poorest countries, with 
have long been hostile to the pro- . per capita income estimated, at less 
Vietnamese regime in Vientiane than $150 a year. 


neiKbbara on how to rid the region 
of “external interference." 


and have given support to 
in Laos. 


United Press International 

SEOUL — A meeting between 


The appeal was made Monday in 
a speech by the Laotian prime min- 
ister and Communist party chief, 
Kaysone Phomvihane, before a pa- 
rade through the capital, Vientiane, 
by mili tary units and civilian work- 
ers. The procession also featured 
floats representing various eco- 
nomic enterprises, a fly-past by 
Laotian Air Force jets and a walk- 
past by several elephants. 

ti nlike celebrations in Vietnam 
in April to mark the 10th anniver- 
sary of the Communist victory over 
the Uil.-backed Saigon govern- 
ment, the Laotian festivities were 
fairly low-key. 

Only a few Western reporters 
were allowed into the reclusive, 
land-locked country for the event, 
and dignitaries from other Com- 
munist states provided the princi- 
pal audience. Among those present 
were leaders of the two other Indo- 
chinese countries: Le Duan, gener- 
al secretary of the Vietnamese 
Communist party, and Heng Sam- 


on n- 

Connnunisr rebels 

Mr. Kaysone called for talks be- 
tween the Indochinese slates and 
ihe six-member Association of 
South East Asian Nations, which 
indudes Thailand, Indonesia, Ma- 
laysia, Singapore, the Philippines 
and Brunei - 

“We want . the the Southeast 
Asian region to be free from exter- 
nal interference," be declared. 

Yet, a decade after the Commu- 
nist faction in a T .anti an coalition 


ffinrw the Communist takeover 
there has been a “leveling of in- 
come — all downward," said a 
Western diplomat recently as- 
signed in Vientiane. “In the old 
days there was a middle class," but 
it has largely disappeared under the 
Communists, the diplomat said. 

Much of the relative prosperity 
during (he Vietnam War era was 
undoubtedly due to massive U.S. 
aid as the Central Intelligence 
Agency organized and funded a se- 
cret army, largely made op of 
Hmong hill tribesmen, to fight the 


according to Thai and Western 
sources. Resistance groups, mainly 
hilt tribesmen, are fragmented, and 
many opponents of the government 
have fled the country. 

Since 1975, according to refugee 
officials, about 315.000 people, 
nearly 10 percent of (he popula- 
tion. have fled Laos. About 96.000 
refugees from Laos remain in five 
camps on the Thailand border. 

Perhaps a greater threat to the 
Laotian government, than the 
armed resistance is what Mr. Kay- 
sone has called a continuing strug- 
gle between socialism and capital- 


ism. In a January 1985 speech, he 
said this struggle hac 


government succeeded in ousting Pathet Lao Communist insurgents 617111 
its Unsupported partners and and their Vietnamese allies.- bee ° 

joining the ranks at Vietnam and The Pathet Lao eventually l > * 


jaming 

Cambodia, Laos is a country domi- 
nated by Hanoi and heavily depen- 
dent on Soviet bloc aid. 

According to Western diplomats 
and Thai military sources, Vietnam 
maintains some 50,000 troops in 
Laos, some of which are used to 
help fight insurgent groups of hill 
tribesmen. In addition, said a se- 
nior Thai officer, the Soviet Union 
has about 500 military advisers as- 
signed to the country. 


The Pathet Lao eventually 
fought their way to a compromise 
in which they joined a coalition 
government in 1973. They soon 
came to dominate it, and by De- 
cember 1975 were able to abolish 
the Laotian monarchy and send 
tens of thousands of suspected op- 
ponents to tie-education camps. 

Since the Communist takeover, 
resistance has been steadily beaten 
down and now no longer represents 
a serious threat to the government. 


id “developed to 
a new phase in a fiercer arid un- 
compromising manner." 

Since 1983, more than 100 gov- 
ernment officials reportedly have 
arrested, according to Amnes- 
International. Many were 
charged with corruption, but at 
least some were believed to have 
been detained for. political reasons. 

Despite the country's position as 
a virtual Vietnamese satellite, rela- 
tions between Laos and the United 
States have been improving lately. 
This has been largely the result of 
Laotian cooperation on resolving 
the issue of American servicemen 
still missing from the Vietnam 
War. 


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2 leading Brazilian Bishops Appear 
To Answer Vatican’s Own Criticisms 


: ByRJ. Dionne Jr. 

■ 'Neie York Tana Service 

ROME — Some bishops from 
Latin America have strongly de- 
fended the teachings known as lib- 
eration theology during the ex- 
traordinary Synod of Bishops 
meeting here. 

Croups of prelates have began 
offering the synod divergenl pro- 
posals for a final document on the 
futureof CatiwHdsm. 

The proposals ranged from polit- 
ical statements on peace and Hurd 
World debt offered by a group of 
Canadian bishops to a traditional- 
ist caS from a German-speaking 
study group far support of church 

authority. 

Support for liberation theology 
was expressed by two leading Bra- 
zilian bishops, who appeared to be 
answering criticisms not only 
by their fellow prelates but also by 
the Vatican itself. 

“Against false interpretations, it 
must be. clarified that liberation 
theology is not a theology of vio- 
lence or one that pushes toward 
vkrkslce,” said Bishop Jos6 Ivo 
Lorschriter of Santa Nuria, Brazil, 
in a written comment. 

“It is not a theology that assumes 
or justifies Marxist ideology,*' be 
continued “Nor does it apply Eu- 
ropean political ideology to 
America. Nor does it break with 
Catholic theological tradition.” 

Bishop Lraschdter that lib- 
eration theology “presupposes a 
new consciousness of the context of 
oppresaon” and also “a conversion 
toward the poor and a co mmitmen t 

to their liberation.” 

“liberation theology is indis- 
pensable to the church's activity 
and to the social commitment of 
Christians, even if it carries with it 
risks,” be concluded 

IBs C ommen ts were striking be- 
cause they appeared to be an al- 
most point-by-pomt rebuttal of the 
views of Cantiual Joseph Ratzinger 
of Germany, the prefect of the 
Congregation fra- the Doctrine of 


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the faith. Cardinal Raizingef’s cri- 
tique of liberation theology, issued 
last year, argued that it relied too 
heavily on Marxist ideas and en- 
couraged dass struggle. 

The proposals fra a final docu- 
ment on Catholicism's future were 
made amid indications of a struggle 
among contending forces at the 
synod over how the bishops would 
express their conclusions. The syn- 
od was called by Pope John Paul II 
to review the effects of the Second 
Vatican Council (196245). 

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A debate appeared to be shaping 
up over whether tbebishops should 
issue only one goads! statement, or 
also a second, more specific com- 
ment, before concluding their wait 
this weekend . 

Synod and Vatican officials said 
die second, detailed statement is 
being sought by bishops who want 
the synod record to reflect the sense 
of a meeting m which issues have 
been freely and at times sharply 
debated. 

They want to insure that the 
meeting^ generally positive assess- 
ment of Vatican H, the desire of 
many bishops for greater autono- 
my from Rome and the sheer diver- 
sity of viewpoints that have been 
expressed is reflected in a final doc- 

Supporters of a more traditional- 
ist line, according to some officials, 
may seek to avoid such a detailed 
comment, possibly by making 
some concessions to liberals in the 
general message that wiB be ad- 
dressed to “the Catholic people” of 
theworid. 

The debate on liberation theol- 
ogy, w hich emphasizes the church's 
obligation to support the social and | 
political struggles of the poor, has ! 
emerged over the last several days 
in statements issued by Latin 
American church leaders. 

Although the Reverend Diar- 
tnuid Martin, a Vatican spokes- 
man, denied that there had been “a 
rift, a split” within the synod over 
liberation theology, it lias dearly 
been a contentious issue. 

On Saturday, Bishop Dario Ca- 
trillon Hoyos of Colombia at- 
tacked liberation theology, suggest- 
ing that it envisioned “a church 
with a machine gun.” 

Cardinal Aloisio Lorscheider, 
archbishop of Fortaleza, Brazil, 
supported iL He offered a vision of 
a church that would draw its inspi- 
ration from the poor and develop 
an attitude “of listening, of humil- 
ity” 

The various small groups from 
the synod, essentially subcommit- 
tees organized around lan gpugM 
that have met over the lust few 
days, issued their suggestions to the 
synod as a whole on Tuesday. 

They were striking both fra their 
diversify and fra the general sup- 
port they gave to the tihurch’s ecu- 
menical -initiatives toward non- 
Catholics, the importance- of local 
bishops' conferences and the desir- 
ability of seeking to root the church 
in diverse Local cultures. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5. 1983 


American Nurse 
Stages 'Mass’ at 
St. Peter’s Altar 

The Associated Pros 

VATICAN CITY — An 
American Catholic nurse, pro- 
. testing the church's ban bo ad- 
mitting women to the priest- 
hood, staged a mock Mass rat 
Wednesday in St Peter’s Basili- 
ca. 

Babi Burke, from Fort Lau- 
derdale, Florida, approached 
tile sanctuary with a lighted 
lamp, kissed the altar and 
blessed herself with a ism of the 
cross. Then, she raised bar arms 
in a priestly gesture of 1 welcome 
and skiwiy raised a diver chal- 
ice. 

As two Vatican guards ran 
over to stop her, she drank from 
the chalice and blessed the al- 
tar. 

Ms. Burke, 44 who has four 
children, was dragged from the 
bariHca. to Vatican security 
headquarters. Also taken with 
her was Marie Tberise Soumoy, 
a fanner non from Brussels. 

The two women interrupted a 
Vatican news conference Satur- 
day, fluffing on the church to 
end “aflducrimmation based 
on race; social dass or sex.” 


Quebec’s New Premier Rose From Political Ashes 


By Dougins Martin 

New York Times Service 

MONTREAL — The career of 
Robert Bourassa, the newly elected 
52-ycar-old premier of Quebec, has 
known its peaks and valleys. 

In 1970, when he became pre- 
mier at the age of 36, he was the 
youngest leader in the province’s 
histray. In 1976, be was swept out 
of office in a landslide for the Parti 
Qufbficois, which favored indepen- 
dence for the predominantly 
French-speaking Ganadiim prov- 
ince; Mr. Bourassa was also regard- 
ed by some as an ineffective leader. 

But he scaled perhaps his highest 

S op Monday, when his Liberal 
decisively defeated die Parti 
tcois after nine years in oppo- 
sition. The liberals won 99 seats to 
23 fra tiie Parti Qu£b£cots, which 
once advocated Quebec's separa- 
tion from Ganada 

While issues of culture, language 
and Quebec's identity were high an 
the ntrti Qutbfcods agenda, Ml 
B ourassa appears certain to focus 
on creating jobs and economic de- 
velopment. 

Although his party won derisive- 
ly, Mr. Bourassa lost his own seat 
He ran in a district that had been 
solidly for the Parti Qotbtoois, one 
of the few that voted in a 1980 


referendum in favor of seeking po- 
litical separation from Canada. 

There was concern that his per- 
sonal defeat might diminish his ef- 
fectiveness in leading the province. 
“It’s a bad way to start your gov- 
ernment, a tough way.” said a Lib- 
eral legislator who was also elected 
on Monday. 

liberal Party figures said Mr. 
Bourassa hoped to be sworn in as 
premier later this week and would 
then try to persuade a newly elect- 
ed Liberal legislator to vacate his 
seat Mr. Bourassa will then seek 
the seat him^f in a by-election, 
the party sources said. 

Mr. Bourassa -yemed nonethe- 
less to treat his defeat as a logistical 
problem that could be easily 
solved. Under Canadian law and 
precedent, he does not need a kgif- 
Lative seat to become premia-. 
Seemingly, be has never chosen to 
do things the easy way. 

Jean Robot Bourassa was bran 
on July 14, 1933, in Montreal, the 
only child of Aubert Bourassa, a 
bookkeeper in the Canadian civil 
service, and the former Adrienne 
Courvillc. 

His father died when be was 16, 
and the family was left with modest 
mewin A cflKnlory hi p student, Mr. 
Bourassa graduated in 1953 from 
Jean-de-Br6beuf College, and in 


1956 he was the highest-ranking 
graduate of the University of Mon- 
treal Law School. 

He earned a master's degree in 
economics at Oxford, where ne was 
a Rhodes Scholar, and a master's in 
international tax and corporate law 
at Harvard. 

In 1966 he was elected to the 
Quebec legislature, and three years 
later he won a hotly contested race 
for the province's liberal Party 
leadership. In April 1970, a Liberal 
victory in provincial elections 
brought Mr. Bourassa to power as 
premier. 

In his six years as premier, Mr. 
Bourassa struck many Quebecers 
as indecisive. He tried to chart a 
moderate course on the language 
issue, a position that could never 
win over the French-speakers and 
could only alienate some his par- 
ty’s strongest supporters, the Ea- 


Gibraliar ' Talks to Resume 

Return 

MADRID — The foreign minis- 
ters of Britain and Spain resume 
talks here Thursday on cooperation 
and sovereignty over Gibraltar but 
there are few prospects for any con- 
crete agreement, according to dip- 
lomatic sources. 


Allegations of corruption involv- 
ing party members close to Mr. 
Bourassa. although never extended 
to the leader, created an impression 
that he was not in control. 

Pierre Elliott Trudeau, then 
prime minister and a fellow Liber- 
al, once dismissed Mr. Bourassa as 
“a hot-dog eater” apparently a ref- 
erence to his working-class origins. 
Others said they found him cold 
and arrogant. 

After the 1976 defeat, “he had 
the decency and intelligence to dis- 
appear,” L lan MacDonald, his 
biographer, wrote. Mr. Bourassa 
traveled, wrote and lectured. 

He re-entered public life in 1980, 
when a referendum was held on 
whether Quebec should seek sover- 
dgmy-assodatioo. which was in- 
tended to be essentially political 
independence from Canada but a 
continued economic union. 

He campaigned strongly and 
successfully against the proposal, 
but he still found himself not quite 
welcome in politics. 

The Liberal Party’s defeat in 
*1981 left a void that only Mr. Bour- 
assa seemed able to fill. “In the 
beginning be made himself wel- 
come again,” Mr. MacDonald 
wrote. “In the end, he made himself 
inevitable.” 



Robert Bourassa 


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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBI NE- THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5. 1983 


SCIENCE 


World’s Biggest Telescope: 
An Array 5,000 Miles Wide 


By William J. Broad 

,Vrw York TVao Service 

O N a plateau in Not Mexico's 
mountain country, astrono- 
mers have begun to build the 
world’s biggest radiotelescope.y 
Their goal is to construct an array 
of dish-shaped antennas stretching 
5,000 miles (8.100 kilometers) 
across the United Slates and its 

territories. 

With this system, whose power 
of resolution would be 1,000 times 
as great as that of any existing 
optical or radio telescope, astrono- 
mers hope to solve some of the 
universe's most baffling mysteries. 
For instance, why do some galaxies 
shoot out enormous jets of energy 
at nearly the speed of Light? Specu- 
lation is that such galaxies may be 
tom at their cores by black holes. 

“Dearly there’s something in- 
credibly violent going on.” said Dr. 
Peter Napier, an official of the Na- 
tional Radio Astronomy Observa- 
tory, who is helping oversee the 
design and construction of the vast 
network. “The greatest payoff will 
be understanding what’s happen- 
ing at the center of these active 
radio galaxies." 

The system of 10 radiotelescopes 
is scheduled to be completed in the 
early 1990s at a cost of $68 million. 
The dishes will be orchestrated 
from the New Mexican plateau. All 
the sites are remote, in order to cut 
down on interference from televi- 
sion and radio stations, automo- 
biles and other sources of electro- 
magnetic pollution. 

Scientists at the National Radio 
Astronomy Observatory say the 
network wtQ be unparalleled in ex- 
ploring the universe of the invisi- 
ble, which often holds the most 
fascinating secrets of alL They say 
the star-filled sky, which often ap- 
pears to be unchanging, conveys a 
false impressioa. 

The true violence of the universe 
was revealed only after astrono- 
mers developed sensors capable of 
delecting celestial emanations far 
beyond the range of h uman vision, 


including gamma rays. X-rays and 
radio waves. 

For example, radio astronomers 
discovered in the late 1 960s that the 
universe was populated with pul- 
sars — stars that often look ordi- 
nary in optical telescopes but Ibat 
Ore bursts of radio waves with ex- 
traordinary rapidity and precision. 

“The universe is popping all over 
the place,” said Dr. Rtccardo Gioc- 
com. bead of the Space Science 
Telescope Institute at Johns Hop- 
kins University. “Violent processes 
are now seen to be the norm rather 
than the exception.’* 

Today’s huge radiotelescopes 
can easily probe the hidden vio- 
lence of the Milky Way, the Sun's 
galaxy of about 400 billion stars. 
But tracing enigmatic bursts from 
distant galaxies requires radiotele- 
scopes that are even bigger. 

“The real beauty of this project is 
that it will enable us to watch 
things happen over time,” said Dr. 
Robert L Brown, associate direc- 
tor of the National Radio Astrono- 
my Observatory. “If matter is flow- 
ing oat of these galaxies at the 
speed of light, and your resolution 
is a thousand light years, nothing 
happens in your lifetime. But if the 
resolution is one light year, you can 
watch thing s happen. This wall 
greatly extend our dynamic reach.'’ 

The network under construction 
is known as the Very Long Baseline 
Array, or VLBA. It will resemble 
the existing Very Large Array, or 
VLA, whose 27 antennas are 
spread across a small patch of New 
Mexicaii desert. Each of the VLA’s 
dishes measures 82 feet (25 meters) 
in diameter and weighs 235 tons. 
Their output, when combined by a 
supercomputer, creates a radio- 
telescope with an effective diame- 
ter of 21 miles- 

The VLBA will use a similar 
technique, but its 82-foot dishes 
will be spread out across the hemi- 
sphere, creating a radiotelescope 
with an effective diameter of 5,000 
miles. An tennas are to be in New 
Mexico (with two sites), Hawaii, 


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California, Washington, Arizona, 
Texas, Iowa, Massachusetts and 
the Virgin Islands. 

“We’re basically doing what a 
big, single dish would do if we 
amid make it as large as we liked," 
said Dr. Napier. Construction has 
begun on some of the system's elec- 
trical components, he said. 
Groundbreaking for the first an- 
tenna site is scheduled Tor this 
month or early next year. 

Radiotelescopes such as the 


VLBA are so much bigger than 
optical ones because of large differ- 
ences in the size of electromagnetic 
waves. Light waves are very com- 
pact, only a few hundred- thou- 
sandths of an inch long. The lenses, 
and minors of optical telescopes 
are huge in comparison with these 
waves. Thus, even a six-inch re- 
flecting tdesoope is big enough to 
“resolve” the reflected light of dis- 
tant planets. 

But radio waves are thousands of 


times larger than waves of visible 
light. In order to “resolve” these 
wavelengths, or to be able to distin- 
guish one from another, the collect- 
ing apparatus has to be similarly 
large. The world's largest is the 
1,000-foot behemoth in Aiedbo, 
Puerto Rico, which was made by 
shaping a wire mesh over a natural 
bowl in the mountains. The Ared- 
bo device pushes the physical limit 
of single dishes, however, and fur- 
ther gains in the resolution of ra- 



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The Now Ycxt Tim* 


dioLdeacopes had to await the link- 
age of relatively mu»n dishes into 
networks. One of the first was the 
VLA, completed in 1980. 

Latex, a committee of the Na- 
tional Academy of Sciences decid- 
ed an eves bigger array was “criti- 
cally important foe the rapid and 
effective progress of astronomical 
research.” Originally it was esti- 
mated that die VLBA, winch is 
being financed by the National Sci- 
ence Foundation, could be bmh in 
two years. But the U. S. budget 
deficit has resulted in the financing' 
being stretched out over half a de- 
cade or longer. In fiscal 1984 about 
$2 mill ion was received for design 
work, and in 198S about $9 minion 
was provided for the start of con- 
struction. 

Dr. Napier said the new technol- 
ogies that nude the VLBA posable 
-were mostly based on rmcroeleo- 
tronics — atomic docks, micro- 
processors and tape recorders that 
can quickly store vast amounts of 
data. The separate .radio telescopes 
wiU put their findings, on tapes that 
are later analyzed on a custom- 
built supercomputer that can per- 
form one triHioa multiplications 
per second. Most superco mp uters 
can do only hundreds of millions of 
such operations per second, al- 
though they usually have greater 
flexibility titan their special-pur- 
pose cousins. 

Radio astronomers said the 
quest for higher resolution would 
not end after the VLBA was fin- 
ished in the 1990s. “There's apian 
to have an orbiting link.” said Dr. 
Napier. “It's being investigated by 
both NASA and the Russians." 
The idea is to extend giant net- 
worts into space, having satellites 
cany antennas to creating a radio- 
telescope that would in effect mea- 
sure tens of thousands of mites 
across and be even more powerful. 


Calcium May Prevent Colon Cancer 

BOSTON (API - 

amcer fay OTlratog the nc rsal AS grt lhar 

of the colon *ai wlh Harold Ncwmark a 

Dr MaronL.pkmwbo Yo ric. cartoned lha 

nreEurv and ihai no broad changes in din could be 
thefindm^ were pretagOi|d j^jehevskv of the Wistar Institute in 

if. htcfu) finding. Il is coirfirmalop- of a hu of 

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a lotSmlk appeared to have less colon cancer said of the new research. 

right on the frontier of a very major fnwf. 

Wire Mesh Urged for Earth Houses 

can FRANCISCO (Reuters) — Reinforcing earth houses in the Third 
wSff ««— rnilliocs of deaths in earthquake,, 
scientists said after shaking a one-room adobe bouse on an earthquake 
cimulauw at the University of California, Berkeley. 

by a SI 27,000 grant from the National Science 
Foundation, the model was subjected to tfara snmtlaied quakes, up to a 
magnitude rimilar to the ones that struck San Franosoo m iW6 and 
Nfauco City in September. The walls cracked and some bncks crumbled 

hut the roof remained intact. . , _ _ 

“It’s a real success,” said Charles Scawthome of the San Francisco ci .il 
engineering firm Dames & Moore. The scientists said that, at JeaslKO 
pSa-nt of homes in the world are built of sun-dried clay and that these 
account for the largest number of deaths in major earthquakes. 

Mr Scawthome noted, however, that wire-mesh reinforcement would 
cost about $100 a house — the equivalent of a year s income for man> 
f amili es in poorer nations. 

Atlanta Center Replacing Virus Lab 

ATLANTA (AP) The national Centers for Disease Control has 

begun work on a $20-miUion laboratory for research on viruses, to relate 
the building that has been the site of much of the centers indues; 

rC Di^X?Dowdle, director of the Center for Infectious Diseases, said 
the old building — which will be used for other research when the new lab 
is finished in about February 1987 — was inadequate Tor virology work 
because of the growth of medical technology. 

“Probably the greatest increase in knowledge in biology has come ui 
virology,” he said. “One of the things that was not planned for was the 
enormous explosion we’ve had in terms of sophisticated equipment. 
We're not doing bench-type microbiology anymore; it’s sophisticated 
microcbemistiy." 

13-Century Ruins Discovered in Iran 

BEIRUT (UPI) — Archaeologists have discovered the remains of 
seven cities devastated during the 13th-century Mongol invasion of 
Pasia, as well as remains dating back nearly 5,000 years. Iran’s news 
agency reports. 

The Islamic Republic News Agency quoted the Tehran daily Kayfaan 
as saying that the dries, which were thriving in the 13th century, were 
discovered at Torbat-e Jam, about 100 kilometers (60 miles) southeast of 
Meshed near the border with Afghanistan. 

“Also remains of a civilization in the fourth millennium B. C in 
Cheshr-tout hill, northeast of Torbat-e Jam. have been discovered," the 
agency said. It said the archaeologists, whom it did not identify, found 
more than 40 historical sites in the area last year. 

Drag Approved for Wilson's Disease 

WASHINGTON (UPI) — The government has approved a drug to 
beat Wilson's disease, a rare, inherited disorder that is fatal if untreated. 
Tiientioe hydrochloride is designed for the small number of Wilson's 
disease victims — 100 or so in the United States —who cannot tolerate or 
do not respond topemctUamine, the only other drug on the market for the 
disorder. 

Margaret Heddet, secretary of health and human services, said the aew . 
drug, commercially known as Cuprid, was the 21st drug approved under 
die 1983 Orphan Drug Act, which offers tax breaks and research money 
to develop drugs that are unprofitable, help only small numbers of people 
or cannot be patented. 

Wilson’s Disease is characterized by an inability to excrete excess 
copper, which forms poisonous deposits in the kidneys, liver, eyes and 
bram. Treatment consists of agents that bind to copper so it can be 
excreted. It is estimated that there are 8,000 victims in the United States, 
but only 1,000 have been diagnosed. 

Cannibalism Seen in Stone Age Ritual 

BERLIN (Reuters) — Damaged human remains discovered in Europe 
show that Stone Age people probably indulged m cannibalism as apart of 
death rituals, according to an East German anthropologist. 

. Herbert Ullrich told the news agency ADN that scratch marks and 
chips on long limb bones and skulls found in East Germany, Czechoslo- 
vakia and areas of southern Europe were typical signs of cannibalism. He 
said his research su g gested that Stone Age people selected long bones and 
skulls from crapses to deposit in burial grounds and did not bury the 
entire body. 


) 


The Evaporating Science of Chemistry 


By Malcolm W. Browne 

fte» York Timet Service 


_. dox, editor of the scientific journal Nature, wrote 
recently, “Chemists have done wonders in losing their 
identity in the rest of science." Some might argue the 
point, , but it is a fact that the Nobel committee 
awarded its 1985 dhenristiy prize to a pair erf 
mathematicians. 

Meanwhile, the practice of what stiH passes for 
chemistry seems to have been largely pre-empted by 
physicists, quantum theorists, com puter mavens, stat- 
isticians, instrument designers, laser experts, genetic 
engineers, medical researchers, psy chiatrist s, astrono- 
mers, materials specialists and a host of other species. 

Chemists most stiD be up to something, of course. 
The Guinness Book of Records lists the 1983 Tenth 
Collective Index of Chemical Abstracts (a oanpenrii- 
um of brief su mm aries of the papers published by 
chemistsjas the largest index ever pubfisned; compris- 
ing 75 volumes and weighing 380 pounds, it contains 
nearly 24 mfllioa entries. 

But today's chemical discoveries are bang rooted 

out in ncntracfitional ways. Analysis and synthesis, the 
yin andyaug of cbemistry.are increasingly based on 
physics and mathematics, with bdp from a welter of 
Lter-controQed instruments. 

and mathematics are becoming the mam 


The dressing gown 
that every man dreams of 

Lounging about the house in his dressing gown is alums a 

pleasant moment in the day for a man. 

So why riot give him one? 

One qf Lanvin’s great classics is a model in plain satin, with „ 
matching ; lining in pure silk. Then if you really want him tn hr 
elegant you will add pyjamas in the , now color or with tZ saL 
design as the lining. 

For men who travel a lou Lanvin has a dressing sown in 
light and fine wool, which, has the advantage oleins crLJJ 
resistant. Slip it in his suitcase with a pair of traivUinSSfoL 
m box.caJf, in their leather bag. ” Ppers 

LANVIN 


*L- 


ik- 


— — > and synthesis, enabling chemists to 
I the complex nature and effects of catalysts 
and topredict the rates and results of chemical reac- 
tions. Thanks in part to quantum mechanics, designers 
of specialized chemicals can substitute ma thematical 
calculations for hit-or-miss expe rimen ts 

As extensions of chemistry, the “life sciences” — 
biology, genetics, medical research and so forth —are 
also becoming increasingly dependent upon physics. 
As the Nobel laureate Richard P. Feynman pul it, 
1 n ere is nothing that living things do that cannot be 
understood from the point of view that they are made 
of atoms acting according to the laws of physics." 

But physics ami mathematics are the hardest of 
Taro sciences, virtually impenetrable to some other- 
wise intelligent children. Will there be enough bright 
kms to replenish science’s ranks with the required 
breed of chemist-tumed-pbysicist? Elementary chezn- 
istiy students still titrate acids and bases and learn to 
calculate molecular proportions from Avogadro’s 
Law. Those things remain essential. But to eftmh to 
the cutting edge of research, ibe student must come to 

By whatever name it may be called, the practice of 
chennstiy promises payoffs thai were undreamedof a 
few years back. Bat big payoffs require big mvest- 
ments — especially investments by students . in the 
study of m ath, math and more math. 












Statistic* Index 


*MEX fries* >.19 
AMeXttfBteAn»P34 
•rvse.oMM P.» 
NYWiNMflMP.n 
omatBonmaa P.ifi 
conancy -rate* P. T 
CemmodHiM P.12 
phtfwfl P.I2 


Earning* reports P.13 
Pttng rate .unto* .P .13 
Goto markon P . « 
Internal rotes p, 9 
Market aumfnory P.1B 

Options " P.13 

Ore nock ■ p.u 
Othor markote P.U 


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1985. 


■ f v I'TERMiUrtU fObti 

Ilcralo^&^enbnnc 

BUSINESS / FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10 

Page 9 


WALL STREET WATCH 


£>t 

#5* 


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; “p; 

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• r7 lV % - : 

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Jcir. 


i iiilrs 




All the News Is Good News 



German 

jobless 


Bhopal Tragedy Haunts Carbide 


By EDWARD ROHRBACH 

' international- Herald Tribune 


that investors “stand on their heads” to get the right 
perspective on Wall Street. “Because all too often^” he explained, 
“current investment sentiment simply correlates with the trend of 
the stock 'market** 

When stocks are dimbing sharply, as they have been for six 
weeks, he notes that investors’ enthusiasm rises with the Dow 


average, becoming more bullish as expectations feed on them- 
selves that stm higher prices lie ahead. 

“But what is the most bearish position the stock market can be 
in?" he asked. “Obviously, at — - 


the top, just before a severe » * \ . 

decline — and this jg at odds AtUu^ Al 8&yS tlUlt 
with investment sentiment 

which is then extremely bull- investors should 

^Conversely, he pointed out, aversely 

ihe attraction of stocks dims to market news. 

as prices become cheaper, 

with investors typically turn- 
ing most bearish right at the bottom, when the market itself, in 
terms of potential, is in its most bullish mode. 

Not suprisingly, his view now on Wall Street, with stocks 
m archi ng into new high territory, is that a major retreat of 10 
percent to 20 percent can be expected after a “final market top 
later this year or early next." 

“Selling, not buying, is recommended now and in early 1986," 
he warned. 

Mr. Beige also observes that “stock-price trends make the 
news." That is, he explains, “Since there is always enough good 
news or bad news to justify any movement in stock prices up or 
down, it merely requires putting the emphasis on the news that 
applies." 

This helps explain, he continued, “Why news is good at the top, 
bad at the bottom.” 

Most of the news cited daily as reasons for Wall Street’s ascent 
to all-time highs can be turned upside down — and would be, he 
maintains — if stock prices suddenly went into a sharp decline. 

T HE DOLLAR is an example, he said. “Now its weakness is 
touted as a boon to U.S. manufacturers, ensuring higher 
corporate profits as foreign competition is beaten back. 
But if Wall Street goes into a tailspin, the focus will abruptly 
change to the fear of rekindled inflation, and interest rates 
pushed higher to defend the dollar." 

Value Lane, the investment advisory service, expounds an this 
same theme in its current market letter. As stocks have risen to 
record levels lately, observed Value Line’s Radey Johnson, it had 
“less to do with more bullish economic prospects than with the 
market’s tendency to treat ah news as good news when a strong 
advance is underway." 

Eric Miller, chief investment officer at Donaldson Lufkin & 
Jenrette, noted that Wall Street’s strong advance has brought into 
“sharper focus" the good news about the economy, notably 
progress on federal deficit reduction, tax reform possibilities, and 
a lower dollar and interest rales. 

“Now the market’s getting the reasons why it’s gone up,” he 
said. 

He further observed that Wall Street’s reputation is “on the 
line" as a so-called leading indicator of the U.S. economy. 

“If the economy should all of a sudden go into a sharp. decline 
on the heels of this singe in stock prices, people win be scratching 
their heads, questioning the market’s ability to forecast business 
(Coatimied on Page 15, CoL 5) 

| Currency Bales 


Monthly Record 
Set in November 

Roam 

BONN. — Unemployment in 
Wat Germany hit a peak for any 
November on record last month as 
the eady onset of winter prevented 
much outdoor work, the govern- 
ment reported Wednesday. 

The jobless total in November, 
unadjusted for seasonal factors, 
rose to a record 221 minion, or 8.9 
percent of the work force, from 
2.15 million, or 8.6 percent in Octo- 
ber, official figures showed. Sear 
sonally adjusted . unemployment 
was unchanged at 229 milli on. 

In November 1 984, the unadjust- 
ed jobless total was 2.19 million, or 
8.8 percent of the weak force, while 
seasonally adjusted unemployment 
was 126 milli on. 

The president of the Federal La- 
bor Office, Heinrich Franke, 
blamed the November rise on sea- 
sonal factors and said cold weather 
and mow masked ri g™* of im- 
provement caused by the general 
upswing in the economy. 

“The early onset of winter last 
month was deariy fell on the labor 
market," he told a news conference. 

Workers in such outdoor indus- 
tries as construction were more 
likely to have lost their jobs than in 
other sectors, he said. 

Mr. Franke said the number of 
workers on. short time rose by 
32,768 in November from October, 
to 159,527, wfafle job vacancies fell 
1,873, to UQ.172. 

Separately, the Hamburg-based 
HWWA economic research insti- 
tute said Wednesday that West 
German unemployment is expect- 
ed to fall to an average Z 15 million 
in 1986 from 2J0 million this year 
as the number of people in work 
increases by around 250,000. 

The projected drop of 150,000 in 
the number of unemployed com- 
pares with an 80JKX) fall expected 
by the government’s Council of 
Economic Advisers. The cotmcfl 
said in a recent report that it ex- 
pects employment to rise by 
300,000 next year. 


Year Later, Low Morale, 
Lawsuits Still Threaten 

By Thomas J. Lucck 

New York Tima Sendee 

DANBURY, Connecticut — As Union Carbide 
Corp- passes the first anniversary of the accident at 
its pesticides plant in Bhopal, India, the company 
is shaken by riant lawsuits, the threat of a takeover 
and low employee morale. 

No American company has bad to deal with 
greater tragedy than Bhopal, where more than 
2,000 people were killed Dec. 3, 1984, in history’s 
worst industrial accident. Now, few companies 
face a more troubled future. 

Billions of dollars in Bhopal-related claims re- 
main unresolved. Other suits are pending over the 
toxic leak last August at the company’s plant in 
Institute, West Virginia. Samuel J. Heyman’s GAF 
Corp. has acquired 10 percent of Carbide's stock 
and is seeking permission from the U.S. Securities 
and F«rinmgi» Commission to buy more. And a 
broad restructuring under way since August, which 
is aimed at reducing layers of middle management, 
has shaken Carbide's work force, according to 



m an interview, the chairman, Warren M. An- 
derson, conceded that broad uncertainties cloud 
the company’s future. 

But the bold that Bhopal had on Carbide imme- 
diately after the disaster nas eased and the compa- 
ny is going about its business with renewed vigor, 
Mr. Anderson said. 

“Those first two months wore tough," the chair- 
man said. “But my health is good. My blood 
pressure unproved.” 

“I used to spend 100 percent of my time on 
Bhopal," added Mr. Anderson, who turned 64 last 
Friday. “Now it’s maybe 10 percent.” 

Because of expenses associated with the restruc- 
turiag program. Carbide reported a loss of $371 
million for the first nine months of the year, 
compared with earnings of $310 milli on a year 
earlier. 

But Mr. Anderson’s mood is upbeat and the 
financial benefits of restructuring will start to 
become dear early next year, be said. “People wQ] 
have to wait until the first quarter," he added. 
“Then they are in for a surprise.” 

Still, no one at Carbide’s headquarters contends 
that devoting fewer manhours to analyzing the 
Bhopal accident, its causes and its consequences 
has made it any less of a problem. The company's 
attempts to reach an out-of-court settlement and 
avert years of litigation have so far failed. 

“The Indian government has been antagonistic 
from the word go," Mr. Anderson said. “Our 
position hasn't changed; we want to get relief 


1 Poison gas teak at a 

Union Carbide factory in Bhopal. India, 
kSsmore&an 2.000 people. 

Aptft&IS&S: Indian Government files 
sufr againsTUnton Carbide, foBowring 
btfoosof doHara worth of suits by 
Aawrican attorneys. 

. Aprs tteA Federal judpe asks the 

■ cofflpatg!to|ww4detemffionto$l0 
mtowemafgencyaidtoylcte 
JMp 90s The company announces s 
. majorresfructuring of management. 

An*. 'f itCheoteal leak occurs at a 
oompanyplant in Institute, W. Va. Over 
135 people wereseafto the hospital, 
most of where were heated are! released. 

Aug. 2& The company announces it will 
layoff 4.000 Workers. seB weaker 
business urate, and dose some plants. 

Si pt SsTte.GAF Corporation increases 
takSngs of Carbide slock to 9.9 percent 
Sk. 20 b Federal judge approves 
corapany’spten for (fisbtawnient of $5 
ro8P(» to assist Btapal victims. 

The Nm. York Tub 

where it is needed. Their position hasn't changed 
either; they are still anta gonistic. " 

Some analysis have ram, however, that Carbide 
has been unbending in its negotiations with India. 
One offer made by Carbide last spring, of $300 
million to compensate the Bhopal victims in pay- 
ments stretched over 30 years, was summarily 
turned down by the Indians. No other offers have 
been publicly disclosed by either side. 

“Carbide is being unrealistically tough," said 
Aiian tha Raman, president of Anantha Raman & 
Co„ a securities research firm in New Jersey. 
“Given the magnitude of the Bhopal disaster, yon 
would expect them to go an extra mBe. So far they 
haven't." 

He said a reasonable offer would be $500 million 
to $600 million, paid immedialdy. And while no 
one knows how much Carbide might be forced to 
pay if the Indian lawsuits are decided in court, 
analysts have noted the S 10.53-billion jury award 
won last month by PennzoO Co. in its suit against 
Texaco Inc. 

Although the lawsuits against Carbide deal with 
safety procedures instead of takeover maneuver- 
(Coatinued on Page 1L CoL I) 


GEC Overture 
Is Rejected by 
Plessey Board 


By Bob Hagercy 

I ni manorial Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The board of Ples- 
sey Co. rejected on Wednesday an 
informal offer by General Electric 
Co. of Britain to buy (he smaller 
electronics company for £1.18 bil- 
lion ($1.75 billion), or 160 pence a 
share. 

As an alternative to the proposal, 
announced Tuesday, Plessey’ said it 
might make an offer for GECs 
interests in making switching 
equipment, used by telephone com- 
panies to route telephone calls. 
GEC, which is not related to the 
U-S. company of the same name, 
replied laic Wednesday that it was 
considering Pkssey’s statement. 

Many observers — including 
Lord Lucas of Chii worth, Britain’s 
undersecretary for trade — have 
suggested combining the two com- 
panies’ public switching business to 
eliminate costly duplication and in- 
crease chances for foreign orders. 
Both companies make the same 
System X digital switch being sup- 
plied to British Telecommunica- 
tions PLC. which has a near mo- 
nopoly on British telephone 
service. 

Hessey said its interest in bid- 
ding for the GEC operation hinged 
on discussions with BT, so far the 
only major customer for System X. 
which hiss suffered from long de- 
lays caused by techni cal hitches. 
Some BT officials privately have 
welcomed the idea of combining 
the GEC and Plessey switching op- 
erations. 

Plessey’s chairman and chief ex- 
ecutive, Sr John Gaik, said in a 
prepared statement that GECs 
takeover offer was not attractive 
for Plessey shareholders and lacked 
commercial logic. Sir John, whose 
father and grandfather built up 
Plessey. also said the company’s 


board believed Plessey should re- 
main independent 

A former senior Plessey execu- 
tive, who did not wish to be identi- 
fied, said that Sir John and his 
brother Michael, who is deputy 
chairman, would consider it a dis- 
grace to surrender the company to 
GEC. Lord Weinsiock. GECs 
managing director, declined to 
comment Tuesday on whether be 
would make a hostile takeover offer 
for Plessey if the company's direc- 
tors resisted the idea. 

Before Plessey’s statement its 
shares had dosed on the London 
Stock Exchange Wednesday at 174 
pence, down 2 pence from Tuesday 
but still wdl above GEGs offer of 
160 pence, reflecting hopes of a 
higher bid from GEC or another 

p^y- . 

Some investment analysis were 
lukewarm or even hostile to GECs 
approach. 

A combined GEC and Plessey 
could cut costs in areas where the 
two overlap, such as in telephone 
switching, radar and military com- 
munications, analysts said, la addi- 
tion, GEC would gain access to 
Plessey’s technology in producing 
sonar devices and customized semi- 
conductors. 

But said David Gibbons, an an- 
alyst at James Capd & Co., the 
combination would not solve a fun- 
damental problem faced by the two 
companies: overdepeadence on 
sales to British Telecom and Brit- 
ain’s defense ministry. Both of 
those big buyers have been squeez- 
ing their suppliers for lower costs. 

The- former Plessey executive 
agreed. He argued that GEC 
should instead seek to diversify 
into areas of higher growth and 
away from dependence on Britain. 
“Plessey gives GEC more of what 
it’s already got" he said, “and what 
(Continued on Page 15. CoL 1) 


U.S. Investment Firms Eye Frankfurt 



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Ooslnos In London and Zurich, fixings in other European concern. New York rate* or 2 PM. 
lot Commercial franc (b) Amounts needed to buy one pound Id Amounts needed to buy aw 
motor Cl Units of IOO lx) UnHaofljm tv) Units of ItLOOO N.a : not nuoted; ALA. notoeoHctote. 
fr) To bar oae pound: SUSA M) 

Other Dollar Values 


r?i i0 


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UAJ 

Qrrr— cy per U41 

Cnrrnncr par UJU 

Currency per 4144 

BnnnBral 

040 

FI*, markka 

5X7 

Max. ptto 

47*40 

Soviet ruMo 

07*42 

An strut.* 

1.481 

Gmricdrae. 

15020 

eiBtenao lOMOarit 

74935 

SpmLPMta 

154.15 

AWfr.KUL 

1744 

Ham Kona* 

7405 

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Samd. kroon 

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Brio.fln.fr. 

SI. IB 

iOdkWraPM 124919 

PorlMcudo 

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TafwanS 

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BmHCTML. 940540 

Indo. raptati 

1,12340 

SomHrtyri 

34515 

TM babS 

20475 

Canadian] 

14875 

Irfriic 

04183 

Slop.* 

2.U05 

TMriOn Bra 

55770 

CHnncn yuan 

02015 

tsrnefl stek. 1X0940 

S. Mr. rand 

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34725 

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S. Kor.nmn 

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1575 

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2423 






C Stamm: 12115 I r tans 

Sovran: Know Uu Benelux (Brunets); Banco Commerckde ItaBana t Milan); OiemiaO 
Boot I New Yon); Bantam rtatfonote do Porte (Ptwte); Ban* of Tetovo (Tokyo); IMF (SDR); 
BAIl (dinar, rival, dirham); Gasbonk (ruble). Other data from Reuters and AP. 


FaetoryOrders 
Stump in US. 

TheAstocuoed Pros 

WASHINGTON — Factory 
orders fdl 1.1 percent in Octo- 
ber, the third decline in the last 
four months and the biggest 
drop si n ce July, the government 
reported Wednesday. 

The Commerce Department 
said that orders declined to 
$195.1 bilHon, a S22-bilKon 
drop from September. Orders 
had fallen 0.7 percent in Sep- 
tember and 1.2 percent in July. 

The October setback was 
conce nt rated in the defense cat- 
egory, which plummeted 263 
percent in October following a 
2 1.1 -percent decline in Septem- 
ber. Without the bag drop in 
defense, orders would nave 
been unchanged in October, the 
department said Orders for 
nondefense capital goods fdl 
7.1 percent, erasing 3 6.1-per- 
cent increase in September. 
This category is closely watched 
for signals it gives of industry 
plans to expand and modernize 
production facilities. 


By Warren Gerler 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — U.S. invest- 
ment bonks, encouraged by recent 
moves to liberalize West Germa- 
ny's capital markets, arc consider- 
ing establishing a presence here 
next year. 

Salomon Brothers Inc. has re- 
cently leased spaced in Frankfurt 
for an initial corporate-finance rep- 
resentative office and has a strong 
interest in expanding into a larger 
operation, possibly a fan-under- 
writing subsidiary, according to 
John Brim, managing director of 
corporate finance at Salomon 
Brothers International LhL, the 
London branch of the firm. 

“We’re currently selecting staff 
for an office in Frankfurt that will 
address the investment-banking 
needs of German clients," Mr. 
Brim said. “This corporate-finance 
presence can be expanded — easi- 
ly-" 

Mr. Brim described as “remark- 
able” the West German central 
bank reforms last spring that allow 
foreign lead management of Deut- 
sche mark-denominated Euro- 
bonds and the use of floating-rate 
notes, zero-coupon bands and cur- 
rency-swap arrangements. 

“We’re studying vary closely 
progress made in capital-market 
liberalization. Obviously establish- 
ing a larger presence is a possibility 


that interests us greatly,” Mr. Brim 
said. 

Salomon Brothers earlier this 
year established a full- underwrit- 
ing subsidiary bank-in Zurich, but 
Mr. Brim said the bank had made 
no firm decision to do so in Frank- 
furt He declined to say whether 
Salomon Brothers, one of the 
strongest international securities- 
trading houses, would seek a seat 
on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange. 

Morgan Stanley ft Co., another 
major U.S. investment bank, said it 
was also leaning toward establish- 
ing a p resence in Frankfurt al- 
though no formal decision had 
been made. 

Archibald Cox Jr„ managing di- 
rector of corporate finance at Mor- 
gan Stanley International Ltd. in 
London, said: “We’ve been looking 
at Frankfurt for some time, partic- 
ularly since liberalization moves 
were taken; we think it’s important 
to be in London, New York and 
Tokyo, as wdl as in secondary mar- 
kets like Germany and Zurich.” 

Mr. Cox stressed his bank’s 
“very large presence" in the sec- 
ondary market for DM-denomi- 
nated. Eurobonds and domestic 
DM bonds and fainted that Morgan 
Stanley was considering obtaining 
a seat on the Frankfurt Slock Ex- 
change, after the bank’s purchase 
of a seat on the Tokyo Stock Ex- 
change earlier this year. 


Although Frankfurt’s appeal has 
grown as a result of the capital- 
market reforms and of a booming 
equity market, officials at some 
U.S. investment banks are troubled 
by. the existence there of a calendar, 
or official queue, that establishes a 
month in advance the schedule of 
issues to be brought to the market. 
The complaint is that this inhibits 
the banks’ flexibility to capitalize 
on business opportunities that sud- 
denly present themselves. 

David Watkins, an executive at 
Goldman Sachs International 
Corp. in London, a branch of an- 
other major UJ>. investment bank, 
said, “We are constantly monitor- 
ing what options there are in vari- 
ous capital markets and what we 
have to do to take advantage of 
those.” But he did not indicate that 
Goldman Sachs had any immediate 
plans to come to Frankfurt. 

The calendar system, supervised 
by the Bundesbank, may deter 
some U.S. investment banks from 
establishing a fully incorporated 
subsidiary, which under Bundes- 
bank rules is a prerequisite for for- 
eign banks’ participation in Lhe 
lead management of DM Euro- 
bonds. Zurich, which has no com- 
parable calendar system, is still 
more attractive than Frankfurt in 
the eyes of several UjS. investment 
bank executives, who asked not to 
be named. 


SupermmryfommtiteeSet Up 
To Run Singapore Exchange 


The Associated Press 

SINGAPORE —The Monetary 
Authority of Singapore announced 
Wednesday the formation of a su- 
pervisory committee to run the 
Stock Exchange of Singapore, 
where trading is to resume Thurs- 
day after a three-day suspension. 

The Singapore exchange, third- 
busiesi slock market in Asia after 
Tokyo and Hong Kong, and the 
Kuala Lumpur exchange, were 
closed Monday following ihe col- 
lapse of an industrial conglomer- 
ate, Pan-Electric Industries LtdL, 
which is Singapore and Malaysian- 
owned. 

In neighboring Malaysia, Fi- 
nance Minister Daim 7-iimiH/tin 
told Parliament Wednesday that 
trading on the Koala Lumpur 
Slock Exchange also would resume 
Thursday, and also announced 
tighter controls. 

AH 13 local banks in Singapore 
have reaffirmed to the supervisory 
committee that their credit facili- 
ties committed to stock exchange 
members will oontinue to be made 
available, the monetary authority 
said. 

“Several member firms of the 
SES have pledged to increase their 
capital by injecting fresh funds 
amounting to an aggregate of not 


less than 70 million (Singapore) 
dollars,” (532.8 million) it said. 

It said the supervisory coranrii- 
tee's eight members include Joe Y. 
KDay, managing director of the 
monetary authority, and Ong Tjin 
An, managing director of Ong ft 
Co. and chairman of the exchange. 

The exchange mil reopen under 
an agreement that eventually will 
see control taken away from the 24 
stockbrokers who have run iL Mr. 
Pillay said self-regulation would 
end through revision next year of 
the Securities Industry Act- 
Forward trading is to be banned 
when the market reopens. All 
transactions will have to be com- 
pleted within 24 hours. 

Mr. Daim said that on the Kuala 
(Continued on Page 15, Col. 4) 


Viking Resources 
International N.V. 

NAV, os at 29-11-85 
$45.91 


INFORMATION: 

Pierson, Heldr'mg & Pierson N.V., 
Herengrochf 21 4, Amsterdam. 


Interest Rates 


6 Firms Buy Into European Microchip Venture 


Swlu 

Dollar D-Mark Franc 

start ion 

Franck 

Dec * 

ECU SDR 

1 month 

OUr-m 

444-0* 

4 Mi-4'4, 

11 Mrll Mi 

9ft-9* 

MkJklL 

V "7 “ " 

B 

Imoritt 

B1W4K 

4*-m 

IMh 

UH-lltb 

VrirfUk 

MW 

TO. 

Imoottn 

Bfe-l*. 

«w-nk 

4Mh 

u»-iivk 

* W-Wk 

Mb-SVi 

7*. 

. • nvsotti* 

IMH, 

M-4% 

4<te-n* 

UM-llW 

imn-mt 


79. 

1 year 

IMh 


4m-4Ui 

IIM-Ute 

inn-imn 

04»BW 

7%fc 


Sources r Maroon Guaranty (dollar, cut SF. Pound FF); Uovds Bank (SCO); Reuters 
ISDR). Rotes applicable to Interbank deposits at S) million minimum (orooutvotent). 


Key Money ftaftew 


UaJfard Stem 
HKMHIMi 

MtralFwdi 

MnUi 
anker LMeBaM 
Cm* Pe>#f W-T7T days 
SmMk Trwrsnrr BHK 
6-enattTracaury BBb 

an readers 

nnwffon 


Own IfM Rate 
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r-mooiti Interta* 
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Franca 

MemattonRote 
Caanuan 
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Lnwntt (nMmk 


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CM Moony 
M-dor Treason dm 
J- raontfi Inttrtwn* 


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CM Manor 


Ctaw Pin*. 

71* TVs 

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♦vs m 

WVj «4V1 

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721 736 

7-S5 755 

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UO UD 
AX SJBO 
4J0 

4J» «B 


M fU 

n w 

IIVK 1 13/74 


Antaa Dollar Pep e d ln 

Dec. 4 

1 month ll-lli 

1 month* Bfe-SW 

3 month* ■H.-BH. 

f months Bh-BK. 

Irtor in-in 

Source: Reuters. 


UJS. M—e y Market fturfs 

Dec .4 

Mnrrtn Lynch Reetfv Asset* 
aBtfavmmerteW: xso 

Tricrate Merest Rate lode*: isn 

Source: Merrill Lynch. Telerate. 


Gold 


IU/1& 

1 13/1* 

1 1 

I* 





Dec * 

119* 

n» 


AM. 

P.M- 

0*9* 

12 

in* 

man Kona 

32330 

0445 

+ US 

11* 

11* 

Luwmbom 

12435 

— 

+ 205 

1! 5/32 

11* 

Pari* €124 kilo! 

32549 

12592 

4-274 

Zarlrii 

32470 

2M4S 

+ 140 



London 

32450 

32420 

+ 140 



Mow Yarn 

— 

32170 

— MB 

1 


Luxembourg. Paris an d Lontoa oMcM Rtt- 

0* 

1* 

togs,- Horn Kona and Zurich opening end 


By Axel Krause 

International Hendd Tribune 

PARIS — Six West European 
industrial companies have agreed 
to take a 39-percent interest total- 
ing $25 million in European SDicon 
Structures, a company established 
three months ago to supply West- 
ern Europe’s growing market for 
custom-designed microchips. 

Jean T ne Grand -dement, man- 
aging director and one of the 
founders of the company, said 
Wednesday, “This corporate back- 
ing is a nuyor step forward in what 

we think is a brand-new approach 
to cooperating among European 
companies in the field of high tech- 
nology.” 

Die company, known as ES2, 
drew prase from the European 
Community Executive Commis- 
sion and industry analysts. 

“There should te more of these 
kind of ventures, because ES2 was 
started and is functioning with no 
direct government or Common 
Market financing — and therefore 
it is a very welcome development,” 
said an industry planning official 
of the commission in Brussels. 

Adrian Tan at Dataqnest Ino, a 


London-based consulting firm, 
said, “If they can execute thor pro- 
gram, it will be a breakthrough, 
because no one really addresses the 
market they are after today.” 

Mr. Grand-Qement said the in- 
dustrial companies, acting as inves- 
tors as wefl as customers for ES2’s 
custom drips, will include: Philips 
NV of the Netherlands; Olivetti 
SpA of Italy, Saab-Scania AB of 
Sweden, and Brown, Boveri ft Qe. 
of Switzerland The names of two 
other companies were not dis- 
closed, bat sources, familiar with 
the negotiations said one of them is 
British Aerospace PLC. 

Talks were continuing with in- 
dustrial companies in Spain and 
Norway, the sources said One of 
fhte mam goals is to have comp anies 
from France, West Germany and 
Britain, said Jean-Pierre Demange, 
ES2's director for southern Europe. 

Several large companies, includ- 
ing the government-owned Thom- 
son SA of France, have declined to 
invest, but were expected to be cus- 
tomers for the microchips, the 
sources said. 

Within the next several weeks, 
the company plans to have lined up 


a minimum of $65 milli on in fi- 
nancing. About $20 million in 
loans has already been raised with 
banks, pension funds and other fi- 
nancial institutions, and another 
$20 million is being negotiated with 
financial institutions and industrial 
companies, which win eventually 
have a total shareholding of 62 per- 
cent, ES2 executives said 

Six venture-capital companies 
will own a total of 13 percent. 
Among these are Techno- Venture 
Management of Munich, compris- 
ing 10 West German groups, and 
the London-based Advent Capital 
Ltd The remaining 25 percent wxD 
be owned by 140 founders and em- 
ployees. 

Mr. Grand-Clement said that by 
January, ES2 will be based in Mu- 
nich and that design centers were 
being established in Munich, Paris 
and London. A manufacturing 
plant near Aix-en-Provence in 
southern France will be operating 
by early 1987, and a second plant is 
being considered for 1989, be said 

Starting in mid- 1986, the compa- 


r i 


Saunas: Reuters. Q t mm enbat*. CrtcBl 
Lyamois, Bank N Tokva. 


Market Closed 


closing prices; New York Come* arrant 
contract. Ah prices m US. Soerounas. 
Source; Reuters. 


The Stock Exchan^ of Singapore remained closed Wednesday because 
rf the securities crisis there. 


Weekly net asset value 

Tokyo Pacific Hokfings N.V. 

on Dec. 2,1 985: U.S. $151.70. 

Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 

lntormatio(xFtaraorcH6kiringAiHwsonN.vi, 

Herengracht214»1016BS Amsterdam. 




ny plans on delivering custom 
chips from a plant in Exel, Califor- 
nia, that is under contract. Next 
year’s sales have been estimated at 
$2 millio n TO 54 million, rising to 
$100 million in 1991, Mr. Grand- 
Gement said. He added that the 
company taped to begin making a 
profit in mid- 1988. 

By using advanced computer 
programs and a new chip-etching 
process, the company hopis to pro- 
duce custom chips in only two 
weeks, compared with the usual 10 
to 12 weeks, at a lower cost than 
that currently charged by large 
manufacturers of similar chips. The 
new process, called electron-beam 
lithography, has been developed by 
Perkin- Elmer Corp. of Norwalk, 
Connecticut ES2 plans to bay 
eight of the chip makers over five 
years at a total cost of 525 million. 

The annual market in Western 
Europe for these chips, currently 
estimated at 5120 million, could 
rise to $1.1 billion by 1991, ES2 
executives said. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


Dm Htvk Law Lotf CM. 

Indus 1443.19 U8876 U57AS Mil * + 
Trans *91 -AO 71 OX 689J7 TWJa + 18*4 
mu 16138 16101 IHi2 + 17* 

cSU aSS JSn s»« »7 ja + ii3i 


NYSE index 


Composite 11548 IU59 1UJS 11703 

industrials 132-72 mjl Uzfi 130) 

Tra» 1112! IIU 11123 UZ78 

Utilities 5931 5931 5931 SOM 

Finance 12480 nos .1*04 mu 


NYSE Diaries 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

Ultimas 

Industrials 


Declined 
Undimod 
Total issues 

NM HtflltS 
Mew Uma 


doe prcw. 

1599 967 

J79 442 

m *74 

2044 2BJ3 

m M 

IT 15 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Dec.3 141329 507371 1743 

Dee.2 142320 499315 L324 

Mow. 29 MUM 292373 137? 

How. P . 20M72 SOm 2JU 

Mew. 24 UX.M5 3X377 US* 

■inctedtd m me sates (inures 


Vfednesd ^ 

Ml® 

Closing 


V0Lat3PjA m,T7ww 

Prav.3PJN.wL HMM 

PrevcansoHdoMdose 127847,9% 


Tables Include me nationwide prices 
up to Hie dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

f'ia The Aseodaeed Press 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQindex. 


AMEX Most Actives 


Advanced 
Declined 
Undiaiioed 
Total issues 
Maw Hleht 
Hew Lows 


372 . 271 

an an 

244 241 

837 880 

42 31 

14 12 


Standard & Poor's Index 


AMEX Sales 



Hlfk 

Leer 

OOM 

3 PJA 

InduitrMe 

223J0 

22284 

mso 

225J9 

Tram. 

icun 

1SM4 

18342 

18569 

utnnies. 

■7J9 

S7J* 

*767 

SKM 

Finance 

3415 

2405 

3411 

2423 

Canuaeae 

26091 

300.10 

20086 

razor 


AMEX Stock Index 


3 PJVL vahwTW 
Prev. 3 P.M. volume 
Piw.cMtuaim 


prev lows 

Low 


Today 
aese l*AL 

24155 KUS 


NYSE Prices Up; Volume Heavy 


25% A 
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1« 

IDS TIM 

’"is 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock E*ehanp» made a broad, sharp move op 
late Wednesday in very active trading. 

The Dow Jones industrial average was up 
14.79 to 1.473.85 an hour before the dose, just 
below its dosing high of 1,475.69, set Nov. 27. 

Advances led declines by a 3-1 ratio. Volume 

Although prices in tables on these pages are from 
the 4 PM dose in New York „ for time reasons, 
this article is based on the market at 3 PM. 

amounted to 115.17 million shares, up from 
88.6 auBkm in the like period Tuesday. 

'The market is getting its second wind," said 
Trade Latimer of Evans & Co. She said one 
healthy development for the market has been 
the widening of interest into secondary stocks 
and into certain blue-chip issues that had not 
yet shown signs of life. 

The entire move up for the slock market has 
occurred against the backdrop of expectations 
for lower interest rats, she said, and the Dow’s 
decline early in tlK week occurred because mon- 
ey managers have been edgy about a correction, 
not because of fear that interest rates would 
rise. 

'The possibility of a correction is in the bade 
of everyone's mind as the market goes higher," 
she said. “No one seriously thinks interest rates 
will move op in the near future." 

The market is consolidating its recent 
gains," said Kevin Keeney of Southwest Securi- 
ties. He said the market could go back and forth 
for a couple of weeks but that a rally at the end 


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49 ZMk 23% 231k 

in site 389k 31te + «k 

B43 4216 414k 42th + te 
2 414k 411k 414k + 4k 
iaa a 344* 37* +Hk 
570 41te 40% 41% + 4k 
IB a 361b 3744 + tk 
a 137 135V. 136te— V< 

n 4£te 43Vk 44 —I 

122 23 224* 22% — te 

251 fib Fte Mb + Ik 

60 SB* 524* 534* + te 

1 11 II II 

194 14 154k 14 + Ik 

2 73 73% 73 + % 

141 44% 434b 441b + 4b 
593 SS% 5* 55% +1% 

IS 484k 474* 404b + 4k 
045 19% IBM 184* — lb 
121 744 7 71b + % 

120 a 26% 75 + % 

31 50te 494* 581* 

44) 19H Wte 19% + Vh 
1704 33% 32 33 — % 

in 38 a a — ?% 
12BZ8D 77% 79% 

4301 78% 78% ran— 1 
Wte + 4b 

24% — Vk 
2S + % 
48 +14* 

7%— V> 
I8te— te 
25% 

I4te + Ik 

iau + te 

29% + te 
234* + 4k 
42te— te 
43 

Ilk— te 
104* 

1%— te 
68% +1% 
2Mb + te 
40% + % 
2S% 

12% + % 
36% + K 
1318+Itt 
17% — % 

av + u. 

304b + U 
4844— Ite 
28% +11* 
15% + % 
34% — % 
43% + Ik 

am + % 

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22% + 4k 
113 +1 

110 
51 

294k + te 
23% + % 

a 

v 
17 n 
18% 

106 

77% +1% 


of the year or at the beginning of 1986 could 
easily push the Dow up to 1,500 or 1,520. 

Mr. Keeney believes the Federal Reserve wfll 
let interest rates stabilize or drop. 

Harry VUlec of Sutro & Co. in San Francisco 
forecast the Daw at 1^00 by the year’s end and 
said it would climb 100 more points by early 
March. 

The government that reported U.S. factory 
orders fdl 1.1 percent in October. 

Texaco was near the top of the active list and 
up slightly. 

Baxter Travenol was higher is active trading. 

Viacom was gaining. It rose 5 Tuesday amid 
takeover speculation. Gould also moved higher 
on takeover talk. 

Tandy Corp. was up. The company said its 
November sales rose 25 percent. 

Airline issues climbed. UAL Inc^ AMR 
Coip^ Della and NWA were all up. 

P harmacAntfad companies also attracted 
buying. Merck, SyntexJPfizer and Bristol-My- 
ers were jD gaining. 

General Motors, Ford and Chrysler were all 
gaining. Genera! Motors said it was offering 
8.5 -percent financing on some sobcompact cars. 

Among high technology and semiconductor 
issues, IBM and Digital Equipment were ad- 
vancing strongly. Texas Instruments, National 
Senricooductor and Advanced Micro Devices 
were also moving up sharply. 

In blue drips, gamers included General Elec- 
tric, AT&T and Minnesota Mining & Manufac- 
turing. 

Some other gainers included Time Inc^ Har- 
court Brace Jovanovich, Campbell Soup, Dis- 
ney. and Honda. 


am 23% 
66% 53 
m 22V* 
384* 25% 
2544 23V. 
354* 23% 
294* W 
*4te 9% 
419b 34% 
28 14 

33% 23% 
15% 12V* 


324k 21% 
Ztte 1144 

sr, is % 

106% 7844 
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21% 17% 
94k lte 
13% 9% 
17 13% 

21% 17% 
37% 21% 
4% 91b 
23 V. 141* 
Site 25% 
50% 334k 

&h-i a 

26% 144k 
26% 15 
•38 5 

37% 15% 
276 158 
*5% 33% 
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55% 63% 


Etnppf At 96 
Enereen 1-04 73 18 
EfiEke 

EfWHjD n 11 u 
EnWas M 1J 14 
£ riser eft UMTS M2 
EfMChpnOJI 18l3 
Emeu pflQ63elCLl 
Ens^ifl ime 4J 8 
Ensm 23 

Enfera 

EntcxC 350*193 
Entwin 1-36 7JI 12 
Eaufr* 144 12 23 
Eoutmk 

enuepf 231 116 
Eqmksf 

Eofftee 1-72 4 j 0 10 
Eooltec .16 1J 4 
Erbmpt JO 25 13 
Ess&us M 15 15 
EsexCl JO 35 14 
Urine J3 *J 23 
mvls M 13 u 
ttrytef 260 S 
ExOfo 1J2 38 12 
EjtceW 1J4018L8 
Exxon 3-60 66 9 


i3 U 14% 14% 14% 

163 23% 231k 21%-% 
137 2M* 23% 23V. +14* 
826 22% 22% 22% + % 
2a>zioe no ioo +i 

58 1(0% 1034k 1034k— te 
53 19- 184* 19 

149 Zlh 2te 2% 

76 Ute IT .UK + % 
131 13te 134* 13 
162 19% 1S4* 19% + % 
63 38% 37te 3Rk +1% 
323 4%- 3% 4 


312 431* 42% 43V* + 4h 
135 84ft Ste «t + % 
612 15% 14% 151ft + % 
30 2* 234* 34 

95 19% 194ft 19% 

1M 17% 17% 17% + % 
502 27% 264* 27* +% 
5277 277 277 +5 

94 45V. 64% 45V. + Ik 
10 17% 17V. I7te — % 
13082 54% 531* 54% +14* 


VI 185 

50 41% 

38 26% 

47% 38% 
8% 4% 
35 20(6 

Site 34 
59 3614 

snh 35 
31% 17te 
36% 164* 
28% 15 

22 if 4 
18% 10% 
17 10 

2 ]j% 

48% 33% 
10% 69* 




2JB6 8J 9 
M 26 11 
1.16 U 16 
1J0 12 14 
JO 12 14 
1J0 4J 17 
n u 21 

AO* 7 4 
JD 13 
K till 
ZOO M 
60a 3 19 
one o 17 

3J0 « 
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zee 7J » 


A XI 13 
181 AS 10 
158 42 
625 72 
244 94 I 
187*172 
A0 28 35 
228 82 11 

J2 U 13 
74 22 U 
JO 1A 2D 
JB 15 13 
ZOO 62 11 

‘«eiS M 


iOO 72 
235 42 . 

<50 64 
80 44 
123 82 9 

286 118 7 
210 184 
in n.i 
4.12 112 
321 112 
72 23 14 
Z2Be 58 6 


115 11.1 
235 118 
143 no 
224 78 8 
J71 

240 47 17 
235 *3 - 
.54 27 30 


1516 3% 
5767 33% 
37502 28 
9b 30 
30b 37% 
10b 341ft 
313 32% 
483 421ft 
342 M% 
3131 
U0V 
2x 


12% + % 
26 + 4ft 

64%— % 

354ft +1 
57% + % 
70% 

11% + % 
25% + % 
9% 

23% + te 
15% + % 
584* +2% 
7216 +14ft 
37% 

27% 

*% + % 

S%-4k 
39 + % 

154* + ** 

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27%“* 
8% + % 
17 

254* + 1ft 
12ta + V* 
13% 12% + te 
33% 2346— V* 
26% Z7% + 4fc 
341ft 35 +% 

364* 354* +1% 
31% 31% 

37% 37% + % 
14% 15 + 1ft 

Km 12% +1% 

274* 29% +2% 
17% IS + % 
22% 22% — % 
« 16% 

33% 36% 

66% 64% 

644* *5 

664ft 65 + te 

46 46 

65» 65% +% 
13% 734*— % 
21% 21% + te 
3 3%— te 

224* 23% + % 
18% 19%—% 
20 20 + % 
37% 37te 
341ft 341ft + te 
22 U. + 4ft 
<2*5 + W 
10 + te 

13 + % 

761ft 

i^-% 

30% + te 
264ft + te 
6% + % 
564ft 55% + % 
36% 37% + % 
17% 18% +1% 
23% 24% +lte 


6% + 1ft 
26% 491ft 
28 +1% 
36 +4* 
84* + te 
9V, 

11 + te 

174ft— Ik 

■ 69% +1% 

149 +1 

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I 17% + % 

■ 141% 43 

■ 39% 

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GENEVE 


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184 18 11 

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201 88 7 
1386 68 16 
180. Z3 8 
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136 38 14 
188 48 IS 
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STsS” 

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JO' 8 25 
JO 43 14 

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541102 18 
JO 33 11 
180b 48 10 
1 88 W 9 


338 60% 
142 17% 
325 29% 
in 29% 

64 10. 
5881 64ft 

65 2% 
76 lte 

a 16% 

19' 11% 
411 23 
93 -25% 
176 24% 
6735 494* 
437 61% 
3560 Ute 
559 30% 
84 33te 
109 16% 
287 114ft 
4*1 Site 
5 25% 
57 104ft 
45 11% 
SB 6% 
30 22% 
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241 3te 
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766 384* 
23 23% 


39% 48% +1% 
17 17% + % 

29% 29% + te 
ate 29 +1* 

17 % 17 % — 4 * 
6 % 64ft + te 
3% 2% 

1 lift 
16% 16% + U 
18% tl%— te 
214* 21% 

25 25% + te 

26% 24% 

684* 49% +1% 
60 61te +lte 
134b 13% + Vk 
30% 304k— % 
221* 33 - te 
16% 164*+% 
11 % 114ft + % 
30% 314* +llft 
25% 25% 

10 % 10 % 

10 % 11 % + % 
4% 4% + % 
314* 23 
12* 13*— % 
1 3Vft 
74% 75% +1 
04* 9% + te 
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30 30te + te 
33% 23% + % 


37 
30V. 

31% 

23% 

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264* 22 
69V. 57% 
48% 5ft 
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16% 
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30% 30*+ % 


23% 23% 
40% 39% 
37% 371ft 

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L2 M 777 
L9 9 1768 




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48% m 
24%. 23% 
26% 25% 


J M* 

S&tZ 
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36% + % 
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17 

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1*8 + 4* 

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80 te— % 
7tek + te 

684* + % 


55%— % 

56 

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144b 

71ft— % 
19% +1% 
a +14* 
53% — te 
4Mb 
5% 

164* 

3Ste— te 

3% „ 

37% + te 
464%—% 
11 % + % 
Mte + te 
106 -1 


59* +2% 
66% + % 
23%—% 

mft + te 
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■% 
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60 
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133 n 
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162 19* 
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3J II 441 
Z7 15 94 

KU 10 360 

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15^ 




im HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER S, 1985 

Page 11 


5*** s 

'*1 
Vu 



2 Moire Japanese Finns 


By Susan Chira - . 

- Jiwtt York Tima Service ■ 

TOKYO — TwomoreJapajiese 
semiconductor companies are iu- 
ovasing their d ollar prices for aft 
•; types of semtconductots by about 
2D percent, and otbcrs-say they are 
considering such increases. 

- They said the increase was m- 
. tended to cover currency-exchange 

losses caused by the appreciation 
of the yen against the dollar. 

Fujitsu Ltd. and Ob' Electric In- 
dustry Co. announced Tuesday 
that they would increase their dol- 
lar prices. Mitsubishi Electric 
Corp. indicated that it would act in 
the future, and Ltd. 

Toshiba Carp, are amsdering sim- 
ilar increases. 

NEC Corp. announced its price 
increase last weekend. 

Although Japanese companies 
said publicly that die rapid change 
in exchange rates had forced the 
new prices, analysts here said that 
the f f >mp nnit»g had told than that 
fears at ‘"dumping** charges fraH 
alx> prompted the decision. Dump- 
ing occurs when a company sells a 
product abroad for less than its 

■ m 9 ni if »ffhiring tt X& Sr 


A third interpretation of die 
price increases, advanced by some 
analysts in the United States,. is 
that the Japanese companies have 
been so successful in swing market 
shares that they can raise prices, 
with Hide fear of losing business. 

Japanese semiconductor exports 
to the United States have bcea-the 
focus of an increasingly heated 
trade dispute. The U& govern- 
ment is investigating dumping 
charges against Japanese compa- 
nies, and just last wed; US. trade 
negotiators met with their Japanese 
counterparts to discuss friction 
over semiconductor. 

The NEC announcement was 
aimed primarily at 64-K and 256-K. 
dynamic random access memory 
chips, the most commonly used 
memory drips for computers. Mo- 
torola Ido, Intel Corp., National 
Semiconductor Corp. and Ad- 
vanced Micro Devices Inc.- have all 
pulled out of the 64- K. market as 
Japanese competition drove prices 
as low as 35. cents each. 

Two U-S. concerns remain major 
sellers of random access memory 
chips: Texas Instruments and Mt- 
cron Technology Inc. 


Saatchi Reports 
Profitjumped. 
120% to Record 

. Roden 

LONDON — Saatchi & 
Saatchi, the British advertising 
.agency that keeps a profession- 
al eye on Prime Minister Mar- 
ram Thatcher's image, said 
Wednesday that annual pretax 
profit in the year to September 
rose 120 percent to a record 
£40.45 million ($60 million) 
. from £18 Jl million. 

Revenue increased to £L31 
billion from £855.43 mdEoa. 

S aatchi the fifth largest ad- 
vertising agency in the world, 
said its UJ5. activities provided 
58 peiteatof the profit and 62 
percent of revenue. Business in 
Britain provided 29 percent of 
earnings and 24 percent of reve- 
nue. 

The company’s publicity 
campaigns are credited with 


helping Mrs. Thatcher’s Con- 
servative Party win the general 
elections of L979 and 1983. 

Saatchi, which has bought a 
. number or . British and UJS. 
companies -in advertising-rdai- 
. ed fields this year, has also won 
trade awards for its campaigns 
for commercial products. 


Venture Formed 
To Manufacture 
New Locomotives 

Agence France-Presse 

LONDON — A consortium of 
British, Sins and West German 
companies has been farmed to 
manufacture a new generation of 
(fiesel dbaric locomotives, the Brit- 
ish participant. Northern Engi- 
neering Industries, announced 
Wednesday. 

Its associates in the new consor- 
. than are Brown, Boveri & Ge. of 
Switzerland and Krupp Mak Mas- 
chinebau GmbH of West Germa- 
ny. 

The consortium was formed in 
light of apian by the govemmenl- 
owned British Rail to replace about 
2,500 diesel electric locomotives, 
most of which have been in service 
for more than 10 years. British Rail 
dans an initial order ofi about 850 


Sir Robert Reid, the chairman of 
British Rail, recently complained 
about the reliability and perfor- 
mance of British equipment. 
Northern Engineering, therefore, 
decided to attack the British mar- 
ket with the assistance of two West 
European companies that are 
among the leaders in railroad tech- 
nology. 


Airbus Industrie, a consortium of 
French, West German, British and 
Sp anish aircraft companies, has 
sold 10 A-320 passenger jets for 
$300 million to G ATX Air of $an 
Francisco, which will lease them to 
commercial airlines. 

BeD Group Ltd.’s holding in Bro- 
ken Hill Pty. is a major position 
purchased as a long-term invest- 
ment. the chairman, Robert 
Holmes a Court, said at BHFs an- 
nual meeting. Bell is 'not seeking 
board representation at the mo- 
ment, he said, quashing speculation 
that be intended to make a partial 
bid for BHP, Australia’s largest 
co mpany . 

CGEE Atstbom, a subsidiary of 
France's state-owned Cie Gfenferale 
d’ElectririiA is dose to acquiring 
an' unnamed U.S. industrial-engi- 
neering company in a bid to pene- 
trate the UJL industrial -automa- 
tion market, according to the 
chairman. Philippe Boisseau. 

DC BANK Deutsche Genossen*- 
chaftsbauk of Frankfurt is taking 
over the banking business of Mu- 
nich-based Bayerische Raiffeisen - 
-Zentralbank AG, Lbe Federal As- 
sociation of People's and 
Agricultural Credit Banks said. 
BRZ was rescued with a 750-mil- 
Uon-Deutsche-mark ($296-m3hon) 
support package in October. 

Fiat SpA of Italy has sold a 20- 
percent equity stake in its U.S. ma- 
chine- tool company, Comau Pro- 
ductivity Systems Inc. of Troy, 


Michigan, to General Motors 
Corp. The price was not disclosed. 
Comau will also help GM design 
car parts so that assembly is made 
easier. 

Gutehoffmmgslmtte Aktieaver- 
dn, a West German engineering 
group, reported group net profit of 
128 million Deutsche marks (S50.5 
million), excluding extraordinary 
earnings, in 1984-85, after a net loss 
of 172 million DM the previous 
year. 

Goodyear Tire & Robber Co. 
said its Celeron Oil & Gas Co. unit 
agreed to purchase ofl producing 
properties near Bakersfield, Cali- 
fornia, from Chevron USA Inc. for 
about S395 million. 

Uoyds Bank PLC has placed its 
entire 213-^ereem holding of 46.3 
million ordinary shares in Royal 
Bank of Scotland Group PLC at 
270 pence per share. Profit would 
be around £80 million ($118.5 mil- 
lion) after tax. 

RH. Macy St Co-’s senior rice 
president. Donald Eugene, has de- 
nied a Wall Street Journal report 
that the management or the 10th 
largest U.S. retailer is having trou- 
ble raising the financing for its 
S3.5 8-billion oiler to take the com- 
pany private and is considering 
cutting its $70-a-share bid by $1 to 
S4a share. 

People Express wants to add Zu- 
rich or Frankfurt to its airline net- 
work, the chairman, Donald Butt, 
said. 


ZSoacl 

Take advantage of our speaal rates for new subscribers and 
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A Year After Bhopal, Carbide Faces Lawsuits, Low Morale 


(Continued from Page 9) gies of Mr. Anderson through the 
mgs, “the bottom line in both is streets of Bhopal to mark the first 
corporate responsibility," Mr. Ra- anniversaiy of the leak. Paramfli- 
m»n said. tary forces guarded the company's 

In India, as in Danbury, adver- 

sarial Kiw-y an twytmitig more Carbide, although it declines to 
firmly drawn. Indian nfr«^i s re - offer evidence, is suggesting that 
leased cm Friday another in a siring lbe Bhopal toaster was caused by 
of reports Carbide with sabotage or vandalism. A turning 

negligence in operating the Bhopal point in the' litigation could came 
plant and said that Mr. Anderson “ early 35 Jan- 3, when oral argu- 
should be questioned in India nients are scheduled in Federal 


gies of Mr. Anderson through the GAP executives would agree to be 
streets of Bhopal to mark the first interviewed. 


rAF executives would agree to be But the restructuring, which 
llerviewed. many analysts say is long overdue. 

Under federal law, both compa- chang ed perceptions of the compa- 


armiversaiy of the leak. ParamiH- Under federal law, both compa- cha 
tary forces guarded die company’s nies have been asked to submit in- ny. 

formation about their businesses to 


Carbide has also started a stock . _ _ u 

purchase program in which it plans « ■ EAmornhi 

to buy backlOmfllion of its 70.4 § f+ 2 weelcifraej 

mlilion shares. Sofar ihecompany manner of Airb^htduanTS! I 
abOUt 3 nnm ° 0, ^Ttes post to head Dtomier ■ 


I To: Subscription Manager, International Herald Tribune, 

Airbus Executive [ 

To Head Dornier 


“We always thought of Carbide 
Carbide, although it declines to ** Just5ce Dqwrtmeat far anti- as a family, a place that takes care 
Efer evidence. Mnnatestina that bust review. Mr. Anderson said of you, where you have a career 


Please enter my subscription for: 

* DUmontfe 
| [+ 1 mordhfree) 

_ [2 6 monthi 


has purchased about 3 million, Mr. 
Anderson said. 


Spaod knoductay Ron 

Pha*arde*wmduadBjbo«*aniro mImmI Fb im aistcbm ert, 

(fan iddfeiftdii MsKhSI. TV 8 &) 


Country 


]K£I]BK£3 


1+ 1 week free) 


lbe Bhopal toaster vrascaused by that he expected the review to bc^n instead of just a job," said Albert 
sabotage or vandalism. A turning 50011 111111 ximi P A ^ would be free Stewart, a former national market- 
point in the' litigation could m«w to begin baying more Carbide ing manager for Carbide who re 


ucisuu smu. m GmbH, the West German aeronau- I □Mycteck 

Taken together, Carbide said its tics company, sources said " sendtsed 


restructuring was designed to in- 
crease the value of its shares and 


Wednesday. 

Daimler-Benz AG plans to re 


““ has been a boon tons" baause its 

. J . ■ .. ^ J where the lawsuits should be tried, investments have been widely per- 

, And it was reported Tuesday Carbide hopes to bare the cases cereed on Wall Street as a takeover 
that protesters earned burning effi- inHin when- mme leml tineat, and thereby increased the 


3 BigU-K. Banks 

Han Free Service 

The Associated Prta 

LONDON — Three of Britain’s 
four biggest commercial banks 


as early as Jan. 3 when oral anm- shares by late this month. tired on his 65th birthday only days 

meats are scheduled in Federal K^Amteson said that “GAF beten the Bhopal disaster. 

District Court in Manhattan on has been a boon to us because its Now associate dean of students 
where the lawsuits should be tried, investments have been widdy per- at Western Connecticut State Col- 
Carbide hopes to hare the cases cereed on Wall Street as a takeover lege in Danbury, Mr. Stewart said 
tried in India, where some legal thrcat - ““d thereby increased the that many employees that Carbide 
experts hare said that monetary value of Carbide shares. The stock, had hoped to keep had resigned in 
awards are hkely to be lower than which traded in the $52-to-$57-a- recent months, while those remain- 
m U.S. courts. share range in September, is now ing had adopted a far less familial 

tv, . ■ n trading in the low 560s. Immedt- attitude toward the company. 

™ etefy before the Bhopal incident, it “The days of naive optimism are 

had been tradingin the high $40s. over, and that’s probably good," he 
either way. For months, Wall Street “Bn* » w 


m a k e its remaining businesses structure Dornier, in which it ac- 
more profitable. A rise in the price quired a 66-percent interest in 
(rf its stock would also make a lake- May. 

over attempt more expensive, ana- Mr. SchMler, previously an ex- 
lysts noted. ecu five with Messerschmitt-BOI- 

Carinde executives hope the re- kow-Blohm, the West German air- 
structuring will not only improve craft company, has held his 
earnings, but also foster enough position with the Airbus consor- 
shareb older loyalty to resist a take- lium since April. France and West 
over attempt. Germany each own 37.9 percent of 


eamfng g. but also foster enough 
shareholder loyalty to resist a take- 
over attempt. 


rumors have cast Carbide as a take- 


dy before the Bhopal incident, it “The days of naive optimism are 
id been tradingin ihe high $40s. over, and that’s probably good," he 
-Mr. Anderson added that “what- said. “Bat a lot of Carbide people 


over candidate, and the company ^now " 


ever the takeover threat is, I don’t are bitter.” 


have said they wm switch to free to- “Whatever Sam Heyman is up bide offered financial incentives 

banking for their 14.7 nriffion cos- to. doesn't shake me,*' he said. “Af- aimed at reducing its U.S. work 

tomers on all checking accounts ^ anybody n*o has been force this year by 15 percent, or 

kepL in credit, bringing them in line oal analysis, seems to be reduced, through Bhopal is hard to shake 4,100 employees. As of late No- 


with Midland Bank PLC. 


“Carbide was in disorder after 


The move by Barclays Bank Bhopal; now they have a takeover 
PLC, National ^Westminsto Bank breathing down their necks, and 
PLC and Lloyds Bank PLC is de- the disorder has turned to panic," 
signed to halt the loss of customers ^ Butler, an analyst at 
to Midland, the other one of the Paine Webber, 
four biggest, and to other smaller-.- _ , .. ■. • .■ 

banks Share also beeii bGeona"' . Toe tekeorer speculation stems 
free hankms largely from m vestments over the 

.Jrn .Ci _ . I.., U, KT T__ . 


_ 4 _. vember, however, more employees 

Cartaders. as tbeemployees here had taken advantage of the pro- 
call themselves, mamium that com- gram tiian h«ri been anticipated, 
pany morale has been affected leaving the company with 4,640 
more by the radical corporate re fewer workers, 
structuring than by the tragic after- The res tru ct uri ng also includes 

math ofiBhopaL (| _ 'dresaleof assets,mdst of them part 

Some' beadqumtera' anfftoyecs of Carbide’s slow-growing metnl'* 
said privately that the Bhopal di- and chemicals lines, 
saster, followed' by die West Vir- A chemical plant in Ponce, Puer- 


MuHand said that since intro- [f 1 ^ New Jersey* 

during free banking a year ago it oasod wAr. 
had gained 450.000 new customas. GAF told the SEC in September 


/tl„ . * - t j uuflicta jiauuuu. irxim miuw- 

son said, Bbopdand the events of 
the last year have permanentiy 
charwdtbelrayartnSwfflop^ 


over attempt. Germany each own 37.9 percent of 

While offering no assurances Airbus, Britain owns 20 percent 
that the Bhopal dispute can be re and Spain 42 percenL 
solved soon, Mr. Anderson said the 

impending court bearing in New Head of NIkko Co. Unit 
York might prompt Carbide and T 

the Indira government to come to Leaps to Death m Tcm^O 

termS - Raaen 

“As you gri closer to Jan. 3 tokyo ~ The president of 
maybe, just maybe, something wdl Nikko international Capital In- 
happen, he said He declined, vestment Management Co., Goro 
however, to say what Cartnde was Fujikawa, k-ped to his death from 
wmmg to offer as part of an out-cf- the window of his fifth-floor office 
court settlement. on Wednesday, police said 

Whatever happens, Mr. Ander- The 57-year-old Mr. Fujikawa 


court settlement. on Wednesday, police said 

Whatever happens, Mr. Ander- The 57-year-old Mr. Fujikawa 
son said, Bhopal and the events of was suffering from high blood pres- 
the last year have permanently sure and was worried about the 
changed lbe way Carbide will oper- illness, police said without dabo- 



5-12-85 


saster, followed' by the West Vir- A chemical plant in Bonce, Puer- 
ginia leak, made many work hard- to Rico, ra international welding 
er, galvanizing a sense of team and cutting tools business, and sev- 


“Out of events like this we learn 
to do things differently,” he said . 


rating. The company is the invest- 
ment advisory body of Nikko Secu 
rides Co. 


Barclays and National Westmxn- that it had acquired 10 percent of spirit. When asked for contribu- eral other businesses have already 
ster will switch immediately, they Carbide's stock, and that its stake turns last spring, the Carbide staff been sold, and the company said it 
said Tuesday, and Lloyds next might be increased to 15 percent, gave $150,000 from their paychecks hoped to raise $500 million from 


Neither Mr. Heyman nor other for the Bhopal relief effort 


the divestitures. 


All of these securities having been sold, this announcement appears as a matter of record only. 




New Issue / December, 1985 


$ 150 , 000,000 

Credit National 


Convertible Floating Rate Notes Due 1995 


Unconditionally Guaranteed by The Republic of France 


The Notes are direct and general obligations of Credit National unconditionally guaranteed as to 

payment of principal and interest by The Republic of France. 


The Convertible Floating Rate Notes Due 1995 (the "Dollar Notes") are convertible at the 
option of the holder into Floating Rate Notes Due 1995 denominated in ECU (European 
Currency Units) (the “ECU Notes"), on any Interest Payment Date failing in 
or before December 1987, at the conversion rate of $0.85265 per ECU. 


interest on the Notes will be payable quarterly on March 1, June 1, September 1 and December 
1. The interest rate applicable to Dollar Notes for each quarterly interest period will be equal 
to 35 basis points above the 91 -day Treasury bill auction rate (expressed on a certificate 
of deposit equivalent basis). The interest rate applicable to ECU Notes for each quarterly 
Interest period will be that applicable to Dollar Notes notionatly hedged into ECU 
utilizing spot and three-month forward U.S. doflar/ECU exchange rates. 


How CitiBanking Electronic L/C’s speed trade 
to deliver the goods to your bottom line. 


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handling Letters of Credit in traditional ways, 
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for yourself. And missing out on profit oppor- 
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efficiency.' You can open new L/C’s in minutes. 
Determine the status of outstanding L/C’s in 
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Tb find out how your Import Department 
can benefit from the world's most advanced and 
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And put the Citi of Tbmorrow** to work for 
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i ici rnrnc. rn 
utcuLunC tu 


tuc rin * 
inC li#/ 


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CmCORPO CITIBANK 


Salomon Brothers Inc 

Bear, Stearns & Co. Inc. The First Boston Corporation Goldman, Sachs & Co. 
Kidder, Peabody & Co. Merriii Lynch Capital Markets Morgan Stanley & Co. 

Ifl CQipofUtd Incorporated 

PaineWebber Shearson Lehman Brothers Inc. 

hwocporetMi 


OlSBSCMwnk. KK Hmfar r FDIC 








I 












INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBI NE. THl'RSDAYi DECEMBER 5: 1 985 



S 3 
1U 
125 
12.1 
25 
114 
111 
114 
1 L 2 

114 

115 
11 J 5 
11J 
11 

pfB 740 112 
pfH 175 114 
pfG U 7 104 
OIA 14 JB 110 
GE 100 10 
Girt JO 9 J 




LISl Futures 

Via The Associated Press 




% 




TO* TDft 

<m oatt 
sc* aew 

2ft 2ft 
lift 15 ft 
7 ft 7 ft 
15 ft 14 ft 
Oft Oft 
13 ft 13 ft 
17 ft 17 ft 
5 ft 


1 « 78 T 41 ft tO Sift +lft 
19 059 23 ft 23 23 ft— ft 
21 129 4 ft 6 ft Ah + ft 


t* 




Season season 
Hhrti Low 


High Low a dm Chg. 


Season Season 
High LOW 


Open HKrh Law Ckne cba. 


WHEAT LCBTl 

SJHObu minimum- dal lore per busftei 
343 ft 179 ft Dec X 42 U 345 

174 ft U 7 Mar 043 145 

JJD 184 Mav 110 121 

172 ft 163 Jul 2 J 8 107 ft 

145 1*7 SOP IBS 190 ft 

3 . 95 ft 193 Dec 190 ft 100 ft 

Est. Sales ejoa Prev.Saies 11343 
Prev.Day Open Inf. 29.123 up 300 
COBH (CBT 1 

5 JOO bu mini mum- dollars Mr bushel 
195 114 ft Dec 144 ft 145 

197 124 ft Mar 245 fc 147 

1911 * 131 MOV 148 1491 m 

186 123 Jul 247 ft 248 ft 

2.70 124 ft Sep 136 2 J 61 A 

135 ft 120 ft Dec 129 ft 129 <ft 

174 ft 212 ft Mar 136 ft 236 ft 

Esi. Sales 30400 Prev.Saies 33 JM 6 
Prev. Day Open Inf . 142688 OPL 096 
SOYBEANS tCBt) 
smo bu mlnlmum-dollors per bushel 
679 4 . 7 S Jan 5 J 8 5 . 11 ft 

742 445 ft Mar 5.1 B 520 

7.79 4 J 9 Mov 574 ft 519 

658 4.97 Jul 533 135 

174 4 . 90 ft Auo 530 ft 533 ft 

673 496 Sea 137 117 ft 

632 498 NOV 115 117 

S 43 5 J 9 Jan 576 527 

637 ft 119 ft Mar 535 ft 537 

Est. Solos 33400 Prev. Sales 34328 
Prev. Day Open ini. 74306 up 90 
SOYBEAN MEAL tCBTJ 
100 tons- doi lore per ton 
18*40 12540 Dec 14630 14770 

I 63 JOO 127 JJ 0 Jon U 650 14730 

20650 mm Mar 14730 14750 

16150 132 iS May 14750 14 S 30 

16730 I 34®1 Jul 1 «J» 14850 

15170 13530 AUO W 94 Q 14930 

16730 13530 See 14730 14730 

14930 13630 Oct 14430 14430 

15030 13600 Dec 14730 14730 

15030 1341 ® Jan 1473 U 14730 

Est. Sales 20300 Prev. Sales 15724 
Prev. Day Open Jnt. 42,121 o« 6 » 
SOYBEAN OILICBT) 

60000 lbs- dollars per 100 EK. 

2935 ISA] Dec 1940 1930 

2 MJ? 1473 Jan 1960 2030 

24*0 1490 Mar 1935 2440 

77-45 197 S Mav 20.10 2030 

2525 19.46 Jul 2035 2095 

25.15 1940 Aug 2035 Wffl 

2405 1935 Sep 2 SL 2 B 2080 

2230 1930 Oct 2030 2030 

31.90 1930 Dec 2038 583 ? 

2140 I 960 Jan 2025 2070 

Est. Sales 16300 Prev. Sales M 374 
Prev. Day Open Int. 4 X 373 OH 532 


13 Bft 144 ft + 33 ft 
138 ft 344 ft +33 

114 k. 170 ft +JOft 
236 ft 239 ft +33 

237 ft 230 +33 

2 * 8 ft 100 ft 431 ft 


240 ft 244 ft — 30 ft 
245 ft 245 *i + 30 ft 
247 ft 248 ft +31 ft 
247 ft 248 ft +31 ft 

^t^+jSi Si 

236 234 ft v 30 ft 


5 . 10 ft + 34 ft 
5 . 18 ft +JJ 7 V. 
S 28 ft + 39 ft 
534 ft + 39 ft 
533 + 39 ft 

5.15 +JJ 2 ft 
5 . 14 ft + 32 ft 
526 ft + 31 ft 
537 +33 


14550 146 J 0 +130 
145.10 14620 + 1.10 
14540 14630 +30 

W 30 14730 
14730 14730 +30 

14730 14730 +30 

14440 14440 -40 

14140 14140 -230 
14330 143 JU — 450 


1945 1790 +37 

1*45 1998 +37 

1941 2037 +37 

20.10 2037 +97 

2045 203 d +38 

M -45 mm +30 

2030 2080 +97 

2030 1080 +130 

2030 203 * +99 

2033 2080 +180 


Season Season 

HiBti Low Often Htan 

CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

Si minion- ptsot 100 pet . 

*2 50 S 534 Dec 92.13 9213 

9244 as . 56 Alar 92.18 92.18 

92 . 1 B 8643 Jun 9232 9232 

9139 87 Jt SOP 

9140 0834 DOC 

9035 8838 Mar 

Est. Sales 78 Prev.Sata 243 
Prev.Oav Open lot 1401 aft 161 
EURODOLLARS (IMM) 
sl mJlIlorwrtaof lOOpct. 

9217 8480 Dec 9185 9186 

9214 8610 Mo- 9136 9139 

91.93 1673 Jun 9130 9133 

9141 B 73 B Sep 9142 914 * 

9130 8738 Dec 91.13 91.15 

9130 0744 Mar 9035 9038 

9049 BSt®J Jun 9055 9 &SS 

9041 8739 Sep W 0 L 29 9039 

Eat. Sales 31400 Prev. Soles 40482 
Prev. Day Open lnt.l 66 HM up 1563 


9218 9213 
92.15 9219 
9189 9233 

9135 
9146 
91.18 


9132 9135 
9132 9138 
9146 9132 
9139 9145 

9139 71.16 
9081 9088 
9052 9041 
9037 9034 






+V-+1 


th 


CANADIAN DOLLAR(IMM) 
spot dir- 1 point eauols SOOOol 
35 66 3 DM Dec 3208 3207 3184 3185 

7504 4901 Mar *173 3188 3164 3 MS 

7360 .7070 Jun 31*5 3165 3130 3146 

7303 3130 Sep 3141 3141 3140 3 D 9 

3548 3140 Dec __ 3112 

Est Sales Prev. Sales 4.127 

Prev. Day Open lnt. 9 40 up 967 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

* S^ QnC JW 6 ^ TwS" !l 3020 .13020 .13000 

IltSI IiaiSo Jim .12930 .12730 .12980 !w 

EeL Sales Prev.Saies 17 

Prev.Day Open lnt. 155 off 15 

GERMAN MARK (MUM) * 

Spermarfc-l polnteauals 500801 

4009 3771 Dec 8978 3700 8768 3973 

40 ® 3040 MOT 4015 MU 4003 M* 

-4030 3335 Jun 4040 4047 4040 4043 

.4122 3762 Sep 400 

4156 3300 Dec , 4133 

Est Soles Prev. Sales 32346 

prev. Day Open lnt. 55338 oft 2809 
JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

S per yen - 1 point equa ls S QJOOOBl 
804788 J 00390 S Dec JHW 45 804938 40492 1 884735 
004996 .«WraS MOT 80(945 804947 804931 JJ 04744 
005010 80*220 Jun 804960 80*963 804953 8 MM 0 

005005 - 00*690 Sep -£04973 

004905 80(158 Dec 804990 

, Est. Soles Prev. Sales 20042 

-M* I Prev.Day open lnt. 36403 otflSH 
64 JD +75 
6SJHJ +70 
6530 +85 

6560 +80 







Growing with America s 
wine industry... 

Ametek's Valley Foundry 
Division is the country's 
leading supplier of winery 
equipment 

Write for latest reports to: 

AMETEK 

Dept. H. 

410 Park Avenue, 21st Floor, 
New York. NY 10022. 


12 Month 

Mian Lew Matt 

28 ft 19 VanDrn 
5 ft 2 ft Vorcn 
42 ft 22 ft Vartan 
15 9 ft vara 
25 ft 11 Veeca 
12 3 ft Vendo 
lift 9 ft Vests® 
13 ft lift Vestrn n 
63 ft 29 ft Viacom 
73 ft 59 VoEPpf 
83 ft 66 VaEPpJ 
85 70 ft VaEP Pf 
95 74 VaElpi 

94 ft 74 ft VaEP Pt 
74 ft 50 ft VoEptJ 
71 55 VaEPpf 

74 SB VaEP Pi 
32 13 ft VIStavs 
SS 33 ft Vornod 
B 7 V!i 66 ft VlrtcnM 


Dt* YM. PE TOPS HH» Low OwXCtiJf 


■ 184 26 ft 

151 4 ft 

24 411 MVS 

*2 177 15 ft 

13 314 17 ft 

16 56 9 ft 

98 lift 
13 80 ir* 

25 19008 66 ft 

190 s 73 
100:81 
82 

Hi 91 ft 
1420 * 94 
480 : 74 ft 
2507 70 
27507 71 ft 
IB 70 31 ft 

35 237 77 ft 

13 IB 88 ft 


28 ft *lft 
15 ft + ft 
17 +!«• 

?L 

11ft * ft 
12ft + ft 
63 V= •• 

73 ♦ ft 

81 

n — ift 

91 ft— ft 

M 

74 ft +r« 
70 +lft 
71 ft— 
00»i— 1*3 
76 + 7 ft 
BBft +t 



*5* 



SB 


WnAlrL 
WtAIr wl 


M- :»• 5 


2 J 6 7.1 9 

286 73 9 


industrials 


r 

1 

52 ft 25 ft VFCerw L 2 I 24 12 
Wft -.6 Valera 140 

2 Sft 14 Vote-Pi 344 13 * 

3 ft 216 Vcdeyln 

440 * 52 V) 51 ft 52 ft +Tft 
S 7 > 12 ft 12 ft 12 ft— ft 
100 Mft 24 ft 24 ft + ft 
150 } . » 1 + ft 

— WET 



5* ^ g nt *9* !■» *4 tj 104 28ft 28ft 2Sft 
]I ? raoto .n 13 65 454 9ft 9 9ft 

61ft 32ft Zavres 48 8 17 1563 51V. 56ft 58ft + 1 V 

25 16ft ZenlthE 925 H9 lBft 17ft lift + 5 

21* is* zeros 32 u 17 zb 20 ” 20 S * 

41ft 24ft Zumln 132 14 15 130 39ft Sft 39ft + N 


mezmm 

1 


Commodities 


Cash lYiccs 


flu- V 

PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
OPWee* Strike 

Uiwcmnw Price CaHs— Last Puts— Last 

„ jfflt Mar oee Jon mot 
lUBOBrlltah Paund+ceati per unIL 
BP"* 1 W J820 9 r r s r 

148.19 130 r r r r r (L2S 

jjjj IJJfl r 1260 ' r r OJO 

148.19 140 8,20 r 888 r 035 130 

148.19 US 330 388 530 039 I 330 

_!A* ? - 085 US 185 r r r 

SUM CaMMRanpaUan-cmti per eeit. 

CD®"! » r s r r 1 M 7 

718 * 71 r r r r r U 

7184 71 Ml r 040 836 r r 

JJ -94 »3 r 0.11 r 1.19 r r 

7 I.W 74 t r t r 237 

0808 wan oermaa Markxentg ewnaH. 

M 6 J 7 s r r s r 

39 ^ 34 sjo 5 r r • r 

25 HI r f r r an 

JJ-il 2 188 r 280 r r r 

^87 38 181 187 122 0.01 034 041 

2 H-Z® 3 - w 183 089 030 8 JS 

JJ » H «r “r 

1 K 000 Fmcb Frencviennef a cent per unit. 

3 ? r r r MS r r 

132-52 J 25 480 r r r r r 

, JWjj® , 130 r r 380 r r r 

Umooo JapenoM Y 6 A- 180 (tie 6 ta OHit per (MIL 
JY °r 41 780 5 r r 1 r 

4 JM 43 L 74 r 5 JC r r r 

455 45 384 r r r r 086 

4883 46 282 289 280 r 083 OH 

*7 182 188 286 r t 02 * 

4883 48 090 1.13 180 0 J» 024 OSS 

4083 49 020 085 089 036 063 DM 

. 4 &fl__ » 085 020 080 130 T t 

6 UM SWIM FroacKMttt per unit. 

SF J 7 S C 36 1135 » r r 8 r 

4737 40 738 9 r r a r 

41 0*7 9 r r ■ r 

42 535 » r r ■ r 

47 J 7 43 432 r r r r r 

* IS < r f XX) r t r 

•'JJ 46 r r 287 082 r r 

4737 *7 04 } r 180 0.15 * f 

4737 48 016 082 132 033 r r 

**«y Am Fab Mav Aefl 

*X 5 MSwtn Fraec+eenKperaan. 

S F .t°n c *9 0.42 i 5 r 1 ■ 

Total all vol 11313 Call (wen tat. 200*55 

Total pet « 0 L 9,191 Pet open btf. T 7231 B 

. f T* l at ft"jQ di >— Na option oWered. 

Last Is premium (purchaie price), 

source.- AP. 


Spot 
Forward 
COPPER • 

Stamm pi 

Spat 

Forwanj 

COPPER 1 

Stamm pi 

Spat 

Forward 

LEAD 

stemnam 

Spot 

FariMird 

NICKEL 

Sferllm PI 
Sate 
Forward 
SILVER. 


66050 66180 65180 65380 
60480 68500 67580 67650 
cathodes (mm erode) 

er metric tan ' 

92280 92 X 00 91680 9 T 7 J 0 
9*389 94480 99880 93880 

CATHODES (Standard) 

“W 91380 MM BK 80 
93280 93580 91988 92180 

«r metrtcMn 

27580 27580 26780 26880 
27888 27980 27480 27 S 80 

‘ fB "«W 8 B 1 270509 2690 80 OTO JO 
274080 Z 75 B 8 B 273088 273980 


Spat 40880 48988 40980 41U0 

Forward 42088 427 JW 42788 *tU 0 

TIN ( B li e ide r d) 

Stwflm per moMc tea 

spat Snip. Sum.. — — 1 

Forward Simp. Sup. — — 

ZINC 

Sterling per m et ric tow ' 

Spot 41880 42180 41280 4UJ0 

Source: AP. 



Cbne Pi ane w 
HM Low lid M Id Air 
SUGAR _ . 

SNeUm per metric tee 
MPT 16740 16180 16480 16440 16480 16440 
May 17080 16680 16740 16820 1*880 16840 
A MB 17480 17340 T 7160 17380 17380 17480 
act . 17940 17648 17748 I 7 B 48 1774 ) 17840 
Valunw: 13*4 tats at 50 tons. . 

COCOA 

Stemm pw metric too 
Dec 1428 7415 1417 1418 1419 1433 

Mar. 1472 1463 1468 1469 1471 1472 

Mm . 1491 1481 I 486 1487 1491 1492 

Jly 1 JOT L *98 1 JD 3 1 J 0 S 131 D L 7 I 1 

SOP lJZt 1 J 15 1317 1319 1 J 25 1327 

DOC 1 J 22 1 J 19 1 J 15 1 J 20 1 J 23 1324 

Mar - 1334 1334 1338 1334 1336 13*4 

- VMume r 14 M lata of 10 too*. 

COFFEE' ’ 

StarHm ear meMc ton 

Jaa 1355 1*20 1*15 1320 1*55 - 1*60 

Mar TJW 9 1*58 1365 1 JHA 2807 2 JXK 

MOV 2034 1 * 99 . 1*96 1,997 2839 28*0 
Jly 2865 2833 2830 2833 2867 2875 

SOP 2100 2862 2862 2865 2891 2899 

Nov 1128 XWO 2 .JOO 2.105 2.111 1130 

JOP - N.T. N.T. 2.120 1150 . &I 2 D 1181 

Volunte: 4390 iota of S tons. ' ' 

GASOIL 

US. da W a n par Metric tew 

Dec 26080 25780 29935 3 S 9 J 0 26480 26440 


1419 1433 

1471 1472 SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
1491 1492 U 44 per ounce 
1310 1311 

1325 1327 Pro*. 

1323 1324 Web Low sente Settle 

1336 1344 IW - N-T. N_T. 322.10 92340 

- Feb 32730 32740 3 MJ 0 22730 

MO r N.T. N.T. 32830 32930 

Volume: 41 Ms of ISO oz. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 

sJoCtr 3 Jb 0 K 


Com m o di fy ami unit 

Coffee 4 Santas, lb 

Prlntdoth 64/30 38 ft. yd 

Steel billet* -(Pitt.), ton 

Iron 2 Fdrv. PMkc. tan 

Steel scrap Na 1 tvvy PHI. _ 
Lend Soar, lb 

Coppw elect, lb 

Tin (Slraita). lb 

gn&E. St. L. Basis, lb 

POUodlum, o> _ 

Sliver N.Y„ at 
Source: ap. 


wed aoo 
140 131 

874 879 

47 JJ 0 * 70*1 

21108 21380 
7 > 7 j own 
U 23-28 
66-48 63-66 

HA 880 
« 3 f US 
99-101 M 0 - M 3 
*LA. 7873 


Dhidonds 


! ... ; c- 




rnc 4 - 

"PrM 


RSS T Jan— 15580 15150 1S275 IS335 

RSSlFeb- 15*75 15+75 13335 15*25 

RSS2 Jan_ 14080 14980 14800 14980 

R5S3 Jan— 14680 14780 14S80 14980 

RSS4jan— 14280 1*480 14280 14480 

RSSSjan— 13780 T39J10 J37JI0 1S980 

: KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Mdtavitan Haaoils per 15 tom 


S3 


US T. BILLS (I6MU_ 

Sl mlnign. ptsef 100 PCt. 

9380 8537 Dec 9195 92*5 

9112 8660 Mar 92*4 92*6 

92*1 8781 Jun 9239 9284 

9283 BU0 Sop 9242 9248 

9235 89-05 Dec 9237 9237 

9287 8948 Mar 91.96 91*6 

9182 9040 Jun 

9143 «LS 3 SOP 

Eft. Sales 4422 Prev.Saies 10896 
Prev.Day Open lnt *U« W823 
10 YR. TREASURYtOm 

nnun0prtn-»ls8i32nd09f 100 Pd 

90-16 75-13 DK 89-25 90-3 

89-18 75-14 MOr 18-25 89 ft 

81 - 19 74-30 Jut 8 S -2 88-10 

87 - 2 * 80-7 5 ep 87-8 87-15 

87-1 . 80-2 Dk 

Eft, Sales Prov. Soles 3 X 900 

Prev.Day Opon Int. 65306 up 1 88* 

US TREASURY BONDS (CRT) 
uect-sioiux»-atsBi 32 nd 8 of lOOoct) 

82 - 5 57-6 Doc |l-l 81 - 1 J 

00-31 57-7 Mar 7934 80-5 

79-30 S 6-29 Jun 78-21 7*3 

7841 5+29 SM 77 -Q 78 

783 56-25 DK 7+24 77 .? 

77-12 5+27 Mar 75-30 7+0 

7608 63-12 Jun 75 ft 75-17 

76-5 63-4 Sep 7+13 7+29 

75-24 63-24 Dk 7+1 7 +S 

7404 67 tear * 

74-4 6+25 Jun 

Est. SalesUOJHO Prev.Sateanm 
Prav-Day Opoh lnt 404JI5 tell*)7 
MUNICIPAL BONDS (Can 
SIOOOk Mn-M)6BMnl ioDpc] 

0900 81-17 Dk 87 -SI 8+15 

89-1 80-4 MOr 8+20 87 * 

87-22 79 Jun 86 8+4 

0+20 79 -ID Sep 

Est. Solos Prev. Sates 3338 

Prev-DayOPoninl- 11.133 up IBS 


92*1 92.92 

92*1 92*5 

*2J» 9 U) 
9252 9248 
9234 9126 
91*6 91.98 
91 J 2 
9147 


W-20 KM 
18-21 89 ft 
17-36 BM 
87-5 87-14 

8+23 


80-28 81-14 
79-18 88-4 
78-15 79-1 
77-15 71 
7+18 77-2 
7 + 2 * 7+8 
75 75-17 

7+12 7+29 
73-28 7+12 
73-29 
73-14 


87-25 88-11 
B+U 57-7 

85-23 1+2 

85 ft 


Brltfam 

, Hoc Group 

Tew 1WS 

Revenue IMA 1448 . 

Pretax Profit 171J . U7* 

Por Share — U* 09 &1887 

WeHcome Foundation 

Yoer IMS . 

. Revenue . 1400 . 1 B 0 A 4 

Pretax Profit 1Z1J 894 


Volume: l loti of 251 cm. 
Source; Reuters. 


fe 


Commodity indexes 


Oat* 

Moody's 1 N-A- f 

Reuters — -- ■ 

D_l. Futures ■ »i ■— ... na 

Com. RMeardi Bureau- na 


Lesieur 

MOuer. . 1 «t 5 1 W 

Mel Lao* — 548 140 

fJMadh ' IMS IM 4 

Profit* 394.. .764 

iTBrieedficEd«E-. - 

Best Products.. 

MCbw. IMS -. 1 M 4 

Revenue— *887 -«M 

Net Lo» 1 M . 7.17 

9 Maa 8 ho IMS 1 M 4 

Revenue — 14 NL ia 
Net Lass _ 304 m 

19ti net results restated for chatm m 
accounting. 

Mitchell Energy-. 

Previous jwowc. • ■ IMS 19B4 

,jgs f S5T 4 - 

injB PerShare— 03 U*. 

22 UB 9 Man*. IMS - IM^ 

Revenue _ 6184 4984 

Not mt JM .. JOB 

PerSftanr— . _ BJ 3 14 * 

Fall mono at company Is Mtctwll en- 

ergy and Development Carp. . 

Wwt Cti Enwy 

GutehoffnufigrtuetTe 

Yew IMS - TM 4 

Profits — r . 5 W 4 la >»4 
or toss. . 


SbM . Mb-Lnt 
Prtct Dec 4ee . Fft i 


Gonmi^lides 



ur 141 .143 
ST- W. 3 M 


+inantbbn 
*mMbbBi 
i-rear »a 


™ r . ■« Yield yield 

131 740 74S 7 „ 

«» « 7*7 


NYT.boed 9927/32 ^ 

4»rarSo«Bma«Brtwiw» 

w»^iujrna. Trwasrrlnrt(tt; 

“"■***■ 8»dey;+tuB 
BwtaeWaldiTaft . 

Source- Merrei Lrnai 































































-SiSSli&i 




. Tables include the nationwide prices 
■ op to the dosins on wall street 
and da not reflect fate trades elsewhere. 

Via. The Associated Press 


□ MOWI 

High Low Suck ON. 

YM. 

PE 

51 *. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 19 «5 


Cape l.'t 




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(Continued on Puec 14) 


THINKING OF CHANGING ? 

. And ready to act ? 

If so. here is a third ijucsiion : your annual salary, is it over 
S 50.UU0 7 Like many other executives who have' reached the 
higher brackets, you may well HikJ that the job-change methods 
you used earlier m your career can no longer produce the result 
you seek today. 

Alain Forgcot. Harvard MBA. Willct Weeks, former 
President of the International Herald Iribunc and Fnrgeni 
Weeks consultants have helped for the past 9 years more than 
3.000 top executives such as yourself to mount and conduct 
a sophisticated search of the bidden side of 
the international job market. 

Telephone for an iniiiai meeting without cost or obligation. 
We will review your situation, check out your objectives and 
explain if and how we can be helpful to you in achieving your 
particular goals. 

Forgeot Weeks 

Pam : 50. rue Si Ferdinand 75017 - Tel. : ft) 45.74.24.24 

Geneve : 9, route des Jeunes 1227 - TeL : (022) 42.52.49 


DiTERHmOm POSITIONS 


REGIONAL MANAGER 
INTERNATIONAL SALES 

We are a well-known leader in the Food Service Equip- 
ment industry. Our search ib (or a Regional Manager of 
International Sales with the following qualifications: 

9 A minimum of 3-5 years international sales experience 
preferably in food service equipment 

• fluency tn German and French (spoken and written) 

• Degree in International Management or Business with 
emphasis on marketing 

• Record of International work travel 

• Verifiable record of sales success. 

As our Regional Manager of International Sales you will be 
instrumental in developing the full ranee of distributor sales and 
marketing activities in Europe. South Africa and the Middle East. 
Approximately 50% travel is expected. Relocation to the U.S. is not 
required. This position reports to the International Sales Manager. 

Qualified candidates should send your resume and salary 
requirements to: 

Barbara J. Felton 
Personnel Manager 
Henny Penny Corporation 
1219 U.S. 35 West 
Eaton, Ohio 45320 


THE COMPUTEKWORiD INTERNATIONAL NEWS SBtVKE 
is seeking 

AN EDITORIAL ASSISTANT 

for rts 

PARIS BUREAU 

The ideal candidate would have: 

— excellent organiKthond skills 

— fluent English, German, and at least one other European language 

— the abibty to work independently 

- Journalistic experience is not required, although it would be a plus. 

Valid working papers essential. H you are interested, pfease send CV. fbc 

Mr. AnM KomeJ, Camputarworid Gomnumicaliaiu Inc. 

185 , Avenue Ch<«lesrde-G«iiilfa 92200 NeuBy-mr-Salne, fame. 
Tel.: (83 I) 4747 12 72 . 




' , 4 





i 







& v y 


IF YOU KNEW THAT REPUBLIC HAS THE HIGHEST CAPITAL TO ASSET RATIO OF ANY MAJOR Ui BANK, YOU'D BE PHONING THEM TOO 


Republic National Bank of New York. Traditional banking in an age of change. 

NEW rORX 1 1-2 1 2r.vaj.6000 ■ LONDON M4 lj-409-2426 • IMMSl 33-lj-2bO-3tkW • U.'otMBCiUPCi JS.>-»70 711 MILAXIl W .1 W| II A VU HA t'.AI II WiHi ■:a| i1/-.| Gi iMKH MAiuwCmO 















































Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. DECEMBER 5, 1985 


Wed nesdays 

AMEX 


R Month 
huilbw stock 


9I&. iTtpy 

W&i Hkti Law Qu6t.Olta> 


13 Marti 
H Ml Low Stock 


3s. Ooa 

mtHWlLow OuoLOW 


dosing 


Tables Include itm nationwide price* 
up hi the ckislny on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


Sh. aoH 

Dhr. YW. Pfi lflfaHMiLow OnotOitec 


(Continued from Page 13) 


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21% 14b 
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13% t 
1Mb 1I1& 
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914 IK. 
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31 lb 
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149 us. 

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14 54 28 17% 

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20 538 18 I&b 
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4 S H W 
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64 4b 4% 
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8 9 19 10 

33 8 9 9 

8 89 22% 21% 

114 TV. 3b 
4 14% 14% 
74 11% 11% 
28 10 18b 18 


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6b 

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8 %+ % 

10 

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28% + % 
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Surplus Pushes Prices 
Of North Sea Oil Down 



By Bob Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — North Sea oil 
prices plummeted as much as SI JS 
a barrel Wednesday as traders re- 
ported a huge surplus of crude oil 
available for delivery this month. 

Brent crude for delivery in De- 
cember was quoted at S27.60 a bar- 
rel, down from $28.95 Tuesday and 
more than $30 early last week. 
Brent for January delivery fell to 
$27.55 from $28 JO Tuesday. . 

Brent is the most widely traded 
grade of North Sea etude and 
serves as an indicator of worldwide 
supply and demand. 

Until late last month, oil prices . 
had been strong this autumn as oil 
companies found themselves -with 
lean inventories of heating oQ as 
winter approached. But traders say 


that increased crude oil supplies 
from Saudi Arabia, Britain and 
many other producers are putting 
pressure on the market. 

Wednesday's price drop came as 
some ofl mmistasfrom toe Organi- 
zation of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries began gathering in Ge- 
neva for discussions on how the 
cartel should deal with widespread 
expectations of an oil-price war. 
OPEC’s full ministerial meeting is 
due to begin Saturday. 


The Associated Press 

BRUSSELS — Belgium’s unem- 
ployment rate feO to 12.8 percent of 
the work force in-November from 
13.1 percent in October, the Labor 
Office reported Wednesday. 


Bankers Reject Cali by Tin Council 
For Easier Loan Terms to End Crisis 

Reuien 

I ONDON - A group of banks on Wednesday, relied calls from 
JSlA rm Council for 
deltas said. Hie derision pushes ihe world i.n crisis into a suili 

"Sc group of 16 banks heard die proposals al an emergency 
meetiiiB of the ITC. The council has been in session since Month) in 
1° resolve tke crisis, which has shata banks, meals 

dealers and tin-mining companies around the 
Tlie r?C announced on Oct- 24 that it had no m fa*, 
prompting the London Metal Exchange, the worlds leadmg meials 
trading fomm, to call an immediaie halt to tin busroes*- 
peter Graham, of Standard Chartered Bank, said the creditors 
would not agree Wednesdav to what the council describes a> a 
“burden-sharing scheme** unless their loans were fuUy repaid. 

The banks, which are owed £352 million (S5- 1 million) by the 
council have offered a new £900-milhon refinancing loan. 

The creditors have sought debt guarantees from the council s 
member governments as a prerequisite for the new loan. However, 
they have said thev would also accept an arrangement under which 
[TC members agreed to buy tin from the council s vast stock, which 
was built up in a vain attempt to suppon flagging P n «f- 
The stock proved to be the council’s downfall as it racked up debts 
totaling £1 billion. 


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Treasury Secretary James .4. Baker HI, cerUer, and nepmsenlatives / othermc^ntxi^Communist industrial cotmoies. 71zey cue, from left to rig?>: Ge 
Slobcnberg, Mimsterof Finance, Germany; Pierre Maus^of Economy & finance, France; Nigd Lawson, Chancalorof the Exatequer, 

Kingticxn; ami iVobow Taktshila, Minister of Firunux, Japan. 

When the finance ministers of the five leading industrial nations met in New 
York in September, they decided on moves to lower the value of the dollar. Their decisions 
are already reverberating through woiid markets, provoking a rethinking of investment 
strategy worldwide. 

On December 9, Personal Investing, the International Herald Tribune’s monthly 
reportfor international investors, will look at the rapidly shifting outlook for 1986 on a 
market-by-maiket basis. Can the surge in West German shares be sustained? How will the 
Tokyo market cope with higher interest rales? Is Wall Street’s optimism justified? Drawing 
on scores of interviews with investment professionals worldwide, Personal Investing will 
describe the trends, opportunities and risks. Get an early start on your year-end portfolio 

review with Personal Investing on December 9. 

The International Herald Tribune. B ringin g the world’s most important news to 
the world’s most important audience. 


FOR INFORMATION ON .VDVERTBING IN IBIS SPECIAL ISSUE, CONTACTYOUR LOCAL IHTOFFICE: 


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Page IS 


; ’ * “ \**f*:\ . - '• 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1985 




Cartels Are Facing a Time of Crisis 


{Coativaed {ron Pigel) 


remain near the bottom of 
tfahtaigetnuige; 

. An exception tothe- downward 
price spiral is coffee, , which is the. 
sccoori-rankiEg international txim- 
moefity after oQ, with about S10 
hfflian traded anmttBy. la lact, 

Mondsy. Akhougb then are some 
strains m the cartel coffee prices 
have been stabilized hy the Interna- 
tional Coffee Agreement. 

.The coffee carte), by Bunting 
output, has kept prices above what 
they would Hkdy be, experts say. In 
drang so, it has also ironed out the 
violent price swings in the market 
— - perceived as a pins for both 
producers and consumers. 

H»prcssure on cartels is part of 
a profound turnaround in com- 
jDOi*W« — from an inflationary 

environment jnst 5 to 10 years ago 
jn which csera and gwegtarsagmy. 
bled to get their hands on supplies, 

to today's low inflation, winch pe- 
nalizes those who hold commod- 
ities. 

Ironically, it was the 
prices ef the 1970s that i 
higher output and contributed to 
theghtt- 


. Bearing the brunt of this depres- 
*rc developing countries that 
produce the biuk.of commodities, 
mchidmg Brazil, Bolivia, Mab yd? 
Thailand, Ivory Coast and Ugan- 
da. Many of th^cotmtriesdeper^ 

<m commodity exports for most of 

their haid-cnrremy e amrng^ They 

j need those earnings to 
with large foreign debts that 
many of than built up when com- : 
motfities prices were believed to be 
m the fast-lane of a one-way high- 

W *^oBvia f for instance, estimates- 
that revenue from tin sales, which 
accounted for a third of its exports 
last year, cooid be cm by more than 
half this year because erf the price 
decline. 

■ StiB, the recent troubles under- 
score one fact. Despite, thdr prob- 
lems, the cartels have generally 
kept prices above what they would 
have been in a competitive market 
“If yon lode at commodities 
where there are no cartels, you’ll 
see that prices have eroded even 

further,” David Hartman, an inter- 
nariooal economist with Dam Re- 
sources, said “If you look at tin, 

they kept marginal producers in 
business for longer rt»n would 
have been the case otherwise.” 


Some of the cartels, such as cof- 
fee, by to manipulate, supply and 
prices by .jetting quotas that limit 
the amount that members may exr 
porL Others, such as tin, use buffer 
stocks to buy or seQ the commodity 
in the open market m as attempt to 
keep puces within a set range, . 

The tin market exemplifies both 
the ffiffaih odds that the cartels 
have faced and the degree of suc- 
cess they have achieved. 

Trading in tin is in a state of 
after the 108-year-old 


Plessey Rejects GEC Offer 

GEC and Flessey also share the 
problem of stagnant profits. The 
stockbrofcerage of Wood, Macken- 
zie & Co. forecasts that GECs pre- 
tax prefit in ihe year ending March 
31 will faD to £685 million from 
£724.6 million a year earlier. For 
Plessey, Wood Mackenzie forecasts 
a decline to £160 million from 
£163.7 mininn. 


(Continued from Page 9) 
it's already got has given it no earn- 
ings growth in the past three 
years." 

Nor, analysts noted, is Plessey 
large enough to transform GEC 
into a company on the scale of its 
largest overseas rivals, such as 
American Telephone & Telegraph 
Co. or Siemens. AG. AT&T spent 
about 52.6 billion on research and 
development last year. That com- 
peres with the equivalent of about 
5900 million at GEC. 

In the fast-growing market for 
telecommunications equipment, 
neither GEC nor Flessey has man- 
aged to perform strongly outside of 
Britain. System X, the cente rpi e ce 
of their technology, has faded to 
win any significant export orders. 


In the 1960s and 1970s, GEC 
swallowed and streamlined its two 
biggest British competitors, En- 
glish Electric and Assodated Elec- 
trical Industries. In recent years, 
however, many analysts have com- 
plained that GEC seemed to be 
indecisive about how to invest its 
“mountain” of cash and short-term 
securities, which currently totals 
nearly £1.4 billion. 


down on Oct. 24 because of a credit 
crisis in - the tin cartel. In recent 
.years, die market has suffered from 
a growing oversupply. Tin has sold 
in the U 5 . merchant market for as 
low as 54 JO a pound recently, ac- 
cording to Rudolf Wolff Futures, 
compared with $5.35 a pound in 
London before the suspension. 

Tin prices were manipulated by 
the 22-member International Tm 
Council, consisting of both produc- 
ing and consuming nations. The 
council was one of the most active 
cartels in operating a buffer stock 
-—buying tm when prices were low 
and selling when it was too bigfr. 

The cartel kept prices at snch a. 
high level, however, that many 
marginal producers — inrfn^ing 
miticR in Britain, Brazil and China 
— were encoura ge d to start up or 
raise output. The buffer-stock 
manager was, therefore, forced to 
buy up a swelling surplus. 

There are several major depres- . 
sants an the commodity cartels. 
First, the high prices enforced by 
some cartels, particularly OPEC, 
forced consumers to nse less or find 
alternatives. Thus, demand for oil 
in the industrialized countries has 
dropped almost 20 percent from 
the pnk readied in 1979. 

Also, when prices were soaring, 
many Third World countries began 
expensive development projects 
aiul borrowed heavily. Now, they 
are spurred to produce more to 
earn hard currency. 

“The more they produce, the 
more they depress prices,” said Da- 
vid Cariin, director of industrial 
economics for Chase Economet- 
rics. “But because they need the 
money, they can't stop." 


U.S Turkey 
SgnAgreement 
On Investment 

7V 1 Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON — The 
United Stales has signed a trea- 
ty to encourage mutual invest- 
ment with Turkey. 

The treaty, signed Tuesday, 
provides guarantees for free 
transfer of money and for pro- 
tection against nationalization 
of private property, as well as 
for settling disputes between a 
government and a private inves- 
tor. Clayton K. Yentter, the 
U.S. trade representative, said 
the United States had about 
$200 million invested in Turkey 
and “we hope it will increase.” 

Sukru EJafcdag. the ambassa- 
dor to the United States who 
signed for Turkey, said bis 
country hoped for more Ameri- 
can investment in processing 
farm products, mining , tourism 
and other industries. 

The United States had al- 
ready signed investment trea- 
ties with Egypt. Panama, Haiti, 
Senegal, Zaire and Morocco. 


New Controls 
In Singapore 

(Continued from Page 9) 
Uiinpur exchange, sellers would be 
required to deliver share certifi- 
cates within 24 hours. 

He said banks have been encour- 
aged to give loans to restore confi- 
dence in the stock market He as- 
serted that the banking and finance 
system of Malaysia was sound. 

The two exchanges are separate, 
but Pan- Electric and hundreds of 
other shares cross-trade on both, 
and developments on one have a 
direct impac* on the other. 

Both exchanges suspended trad- 
ing to prevent panic selling is a 
sharply declaring market, influ- 
enced by Pan-Electric going into 
receivership last Saturday. 


Investing 
On Flip Side 
Of the News 

(Costumed from Page 9) 
conditions and wondering if it's 
really efficient," be said. 

His new is that the current rally 
is “not yet fully exploited, not yet 
exhausted." 

Robert Farrell, chid market ana- 
lyst at Menrill Lynch, also ad- 
dressed the topic of the market as a 
leading indicator. “It certainly is 
anticipating that the economy will 
get better,” he stated. 

But he makes the point that Wall 
Street's advance has not been led 
by big cyclical stocks, the type of 
heavy-industry companies that are 

the most economically sensitive. 

“The rally has been more inter- 
est-rate driven than eamings-driv- 
en," he pointed oul “At the fore- 
front have been defensive stocks, 
utilities and financials. The cycli- 
cal haven’t moved much from 
where they were at the begining of 
the year. It's been a two-tier mar- 
ket/ 

Mr. Farrell sees the chances of 
any near-term pullback ahead for 
Wall Street being only “modest," 
and Forecasts a year-end rally in the 
last half of December. 

“It might push the Dow moder- 
ately above 1 J 00 ” be said. 

In a recent essay called "The 
Power of Positive Psychology,” 
Greg A. Smith, research director at 
Prudential-Bacbe, raised a similar 
point about whaL really influences 
the market. 

After noting that economists are 
increasingly expecting business to 
be moderately expansive next year 
— a good envi ronmen t for the 
slock market — he remarked: 

“From an investor’s point of 
view, it's not particularly important 
if this forecast actually comes to 
pass. What is important is that a 
consensus develops about what can 
be expected. It is this latter pom 
that is the basis for our very opti- 
mistic outlook for the market over 
the next seven to eight months." 


CURRENCY MARKETS 


Dollar Closes Weaker in Europe 


Reuiees 

LONDON — The dollar closed 
slightly weaker Wednesday in Eu- 
rope after drifting steadily lower in 
a session marked by the building of 
new long yen positions. Dealers 
said the new round of yen pur- 
chases signaled an end to the recent 
bout of profit-taking in the Japa- 
nese currency. 

The U.S. currency closed in Lon- 
don at 2.51 95 Deutsche marks, 
down from 25335 cm Tuesday, and 
dropped to 20272 yen from its pre- 
vious dose there of 205.80. Dealers 
said that few operators wanted to 
open new dollar positions as the 
year-end draws nearer. 

The British pound, meanwhile, 
firmed to 51.4865 from Tuesday’s 
dose of $1.4815. It was also steady 
ainsi continental currencies, 
ag little reaction to lower oil 
prices. The pound recovered to 
close at 3.7465 DM from an open- 


ing 3.7415. but still ended bdow 
Tuesday's close of 3.7530. 

Also in London, the dollar weak- 
ened to 2X1940 Swiss francs From 
21 120 on Tuesday, and slipped to 
7.6775 French francs from 7.7250. 

Dealers said the morning saw 
active two-way trading but that 
transactions were not large. Corpo- 
rate customers were not active and 
most business was professional 
trading on short-term positions. 

Dealers said most traders felt 
that profit-taking on the yen, after 
it readied the key level of 200 to the 
dollar recently, had probably been 
overdone and operators started 
buying the Japanese currency back. 

News of a L. I -percent decline in 
U-S. factory orders in October hart 
little impact on trading as the de- 
cline was in line with forecasts, 
dealers said. Other data due this 
week includes November unem- 
3 ! on Friday, 
i said the market remains 


generally short of dollars but (hat 
the long-term view for the U.S. cur- 
rency is still negative. In the short 
term, they said, trading is likely to 
remain uncertain, with some poten- 
tial for a technical bounce back 
from key levels reached recently 
against (he yen, mark and sterling. 

The chan points are 200 yen, 
2.50 DM and $1.50 on the pound. 

Some year-end corporate de- 
mand has tended to support the 
dollar at its lows, but interest is 
visibly slackening, on: dealer in 
London said. 

In other European markets 
Wednesday, the dollar was fixed at 
midafteraoon in Frankfurt at 
25224 DM, down from 2.5325 at 
the Tuesday fixing; at 7.6820 
French francs in Paris, down from 
7.7280, and at 1,717.30 lire in Mi- 
lan, down from 1,724.00. 

In Zurich, the dollar closed at 
20963 Swiss francs, down from 
2.1090 on Tuesday. 


THE EUROMARKETS 


EJB Launches Sterling Bond in Quiet Session 


By Christopher Pizzey 

Reuters 

LONDON — Another new issue 
was launched Wednesday in the 
Eurosterling sector, this time for 
the European Investment Bank, 
but most areas of the market were 
quiet because of Listless activity in 
the secondary market, dealers said. 

.After Tuesday’s strong response 
to J. Sainsbury PLCs debut issue, 
the EIB followed with a £50-mil- 
lion, 10-year bond priced at 98V4 
with a 1 (Mi-percent coupon. 

In the floating-rate-note sector, 
Italex Ltd. launched its expected 
S 230-million issue, which will be 
used to help refinance Brazilian, 
trade credits to Italy. 

The EIB issue was lead managed 
by Baring Brothers & Gx, which 
quoted the issue at a discount of 
about 1 % percent, just within the 
total fees of 2 percent. 


Dealers said that at this level the 
issue yielded about the same as 
comparable British government 
bonds. They added that it appeared 
tightly priced, bearing in mind that 
the EIB is a regular borrower in the 
Eurobond market. 

Tuesday's issue for J. Sainsbury 
continued to trade well within its 
total fees of 1 % percent at a dis- 
count of about 1 3/16 percent. The 
lead manager for the issue, S.G. 
Warburg & Co., reported strong 
demand, especially from Swiss in- 
vestors. 

The 5230-million floating-rate 
note for Italex emerged at a margin 
of 'A point over the six-month Lon- 
don interbank offered rate. The 
616-year issue has a sinking fund 
that reduces the average life to 4 } 4 
years. 

Italex is a company incorporated 
in the Cayman Islands, and (he 


money raised from the issue wilt be 
used to support a loan to Brazil at 
an undisclosed rate over Libor, 
which has been agreed to in discus- 
sions with the Paris Gub of West- 
ern creditor governments. 

The issue was quoted on the 
when-issued market at 99.83, with- 
in the total fees of 20 basis points. 

In other new issues, Chrysler Fi- 
nancial Corp. issued a 75 - mil lion - 
Canadian -dollar bond paying 11 
percent over seven years and priced 
at 100 V 4 . The issue was lead man- 
aged by Orion Royal Bonk Ltd., 
and was quoted just on the total 
fees of Hi percent. 

Parbd Finance issued a bond for 
50 million European currency 
units, paying 85i percent over 3 1 .* 
years and priced at 101. The issue 
was guaranteed by Banque Paribas 
Belgique and was quoted within the 
116-percent fees. 


I 



Prices 


NASDAQ prices os of 
3 pan. New York time. 

Via The Associated Press 


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1» BabEv 

t gsm 

£S» 

ft BrwTom 
.§* BrtJrtfls 
Uft BuJMTt 


200 47 16 

JO SI 13 
1J6 3J 13 

„ m 

JB 73 311 
208 35 213 
150 106 fl 
201 

M 1 J 1072 

£ 

18 

1641 11.9 32 

JOo 20 2 » 
soon 20 mo 
.12 1.? 199 
11 
54 

1J2 28 144 
2 ® 
SO* 
45 
341 
3884 
56 
70 
41 

ISO 4J 145 
00b ill (14 

.w u ai 

1JBW 2$ 
Me U 38 
178 

.» U 413 
168 

.14 13 263 
304 


47ft 44ft 
7Vi ‘ 7ft 
18 17ft 
J 6 ft 34ft 
■ft 8ft 
10ft 0 ft 
51ft 50ft 
Oft Oft 
18ft 17ft 
Z 1 U 10 ft 
10ft 10ft 
18ft 18ft 
10 Oft 
■ft 8ft 
30ft 30 
43ft 43ft 
6 ft 5ft 
18ft ilfe 
13ft 12 ft 
34ft 34 
13ft Uft 
30ft 18ft 
Bft 8 ft 

1 7ft 
17ft 15ft 

2 1 ft 

8 7 

Oft 0 

34ft Ml/z 
21 20 V» 

7 6 ft 
27ft 27ft 
4 3ft 
30ft 20 ft 

ins n 

3ft ■ 
lft 
13ft Uft 
2 4ft 34ft 


47ft — ft 
7ft 

17ft + ft 
36ft + ft 
tft + ft 
10ft + ft 
Sift + ft 
Oft— ft 
17ft — ft 
21 ft +>ft 
10ft + ft 
lflft + ft 
Oft 

8 ft— ft 

30ft 

Oft + ft 
4 ft + ft 
V. + ft 
Uft 

3*ft + ft 
13ft + ft 
30ft +3 
Bft 

8 + ft 

17Vi +2V. 

1 ft 

7 - ft 
Oft + ft 
34ft 
20ft 

6ft- ft 
27ft 
4 

20ft— ft 
10 -ft 


ft ft. 


Ifc- ft 

Uft 

34ft + ft 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 



a 

a 

aa 

in 

□ 

aa 


BQEHiEiaaagiaasrnrio 


Donna aiaas 

ddd araaa e 

QBaBnoaaQCDaaaaa 

QBQE3HQ 


QBBaiaaaanaaEsaQQ 


Donna 


□□can 



1? 5 05 


17 Mm#' 

HbbUM Stock 


Salts in 

Dhi. YUL 100 s HKDl 


Net 

LOW IPACN'gc 


Xft 

12V Bredtm 

54 

Ut 

T7A 

1 A 

15ft 

lk + V. 

21 

15 BurrBr 



1580 

18 

17 

17V 4 V 
31ft — » 

32V 

23V BMA s 

154 

13 

297 

32ft 

X 

9M 

3 Buslnld 



1561 

Bft 

7ft 

6 + ft 


4ft C COR 

_ sr 


■ ilnv. 


Oft 

10ft 3ft 

12V. 7ft 

21ft 14 CPI 
Bft 4ft CPT 
Uft 4 CSP 
4ft 2ft CACI 
ttft 17ft CbrySc 
12ft 7ft Cal WUc 

4 2ft 
4ft 2 

15ft 

** 1 

18ft 12 CrdnlD 

5 3ft CanarC 
5ft Cormnk 
4ft Carfnrt 
Oft Corny** 

5ft Concurs 

94ft CirtrBC 

tt&hrl- 

Bft Coins 
3ft OiOPEn 
15ft Charms M 
lift ChfcPnt 


Uft 

14ft 

21 ft 

£ft 


23 

31ft 

4ft 

24 
4ft 

24ft 

21ft 

11 

31ft 

Mft 

15ft 

XI 


Mk GMcTch 


_54a 13 


OiLwn 
4ft “ 

Oft 

Bft Chi 
23ft Ciill 

44ft 25ft Chi la* 

34ft 10ft Cipher 
12 ft 5 Clprico 
7ft 4 Circan 
23ft 14ft ClzSGa -B 8 45 
17 24ft CtzFM UM U 
47V. 27V CtzUlA I 
42 27ft ClzLttB 1 J 6 4J 
14ft Oft atyFod M U 
33ft 20ft OvWCp 38b 23 
2Bft 22ft C lurid 33 35 
l*ft Uft ClearCh 
21ft Wft CkrvtR} 2J0 11J 
20ft 4ft CltMm 9 
10ft 13ft COasfF 
24V Oft Cube Lb 
4Bft 24V CocaBIJ 
18ft 12 ft Coour 
4 l*r* Coaenlc 
24ft 13 Cofiemf 
Aft 2ft ColabR 
14ft 10ft Cotaoen 
5ft 3ft Collin* 

Uft 24ft ColLlAc 100 
20ft 15ft CrirTle 
21ft 15 CrioNt .74 
14ft 5 Comars 
20ft 13 Comae .12 
15V 1 0ft Comoro .14 
4ft IV Comdleil 
43ft 33ft Cmeric 200 
44ft 24ft CmcsU UM 
13 SV CmlSh 54 
37ft 24ft CfflftTI 150 

4ft ft CamAm 

30ft 16ft Comlnd JB 
12V 8 CumSoi ,10n 
24 14V* CmpCUs 

12ft 4 Conwoa 
25ft 14ft CmpCrs 
4ft 2V Compos 
15ft SV CCTC 

lift CmpAS 
7ft CmpDl M 
3ft CplEnl 
Aft CmriH 
A Cnwldn 
5ft CmpLR .12 
2 CmctM 
Aft CmoPds 

Oft CmTslc s 

Aft Cmptrtn 
lft Cslcft 
A Camshr 
OB* a Cencptl 
27 13V CnCaP 258 

18ft 10ft CCaoR 1580 
24ft 1TV CCopS 2.14 
Bft 4ft ConFbr 
54ft 32V CnsPap 158 
5ft 3ft ConsPd JOS 
Aft lft Consul 



150 


-32 


X 

13Va 

«*. 
14ft 
♦ft 
Bft 
6ft 
I Oft 
22V 
lift 
8 

17ft 


IBft 

■ft CtIHIts 

22 

10 ft 

19 

8 

4 CtLoir 

32 

5 

4V 

11V 

4ft Convff 

5246 

UV 

UM 

21 ft 

tlV Convrse 

29 

14ft 

14 

SV 

V CupfBlo 

798 

IV 


AM 

2 ft CuarLsr 

6 QA 

SM 

4V 

22 ft 

1 4ft Coon B AO 

XI X 

19ft 

I9M 

16ft 

5ft Qjoytri 

727 

14V 

13ft 

9V 

A Cor corn 

23 

7ft 

7M 


10ft 19V 19ft + ft 
36ft JSft MAS + ft 
42V 41W 41ft— V 
41ft 41ft 41ft + V 
1BV 18ft I Oft— ft 
3! 38V 31 + V 

»V 25ft 25ft— V 
17ft 17V 17ft + V 
17V lift 17 + V 

23V 23ft 23V + V 
18ft 18V IBft + ft 
Xft 26 26ft + V 
47V 47V 47V 

« * 

MV 1AV 14V— V 
5ft 4 SV +1V 
15ft 15 15ft „ 
4 3ft 4 + ft 

34 34 34 

10ft 10 10ft + V 
20ft 20ft 20ft + ft 
Oft Bft Oft + V 
20H 3DV 20ft + V 
12ft Uft 12ft + V 
2 ft lft 2W + ft 
43 42ft <3 „ 

44ft 44ft 44ft + V 

UV lift 11 V + ft 

29ft 20 20 

9V 9ft Oft + ft 
19V 19 10 — V 

13V 12 Bft+lft 
18 17V 17V 

3ft 3H 3V 
41* 4ft Aft + ft 
28ft 27 Z7V— ft 
BV Bft SV+-V 
7ft 7 TV + ft 
14V Uft 14V + ft 
7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 
7ft 7ft 7ft + ft 
2ft 2ft 2ft 
0 Bft Oft + V 
21ft am 21V— V 
4V 3ft 4 — V 
lft lft lft 
lift lift lift -I- ft 
7V 7ft 7ft 
14V 14ft Uft 
12V 12V 12V— ft 
13 12V 12ft— ft 

AV 4V AV + ft 
49V 48V 40V + ft 
3ft 3ft 3ft + V 
TV 2ft 2ft + V 
43ft 42ft 43V— V 
10 

5 + V 


.14 


lift AV Cordis 
31ft 20ft CoroSIs 1J4 
5 lft Corvus 
7ft 3ft Cosmo 
lift 10W CrfcBrl 
1BV 10ft Cronu* 

29V 20ft CrosTr 
14V 0 CwnBk 

34V 15V Crumps 
20V 18V3 Colin Fr 
2BV 15ft Cuhim 3 
27 1BW Cycure 


1107 

W S? 

593 

IB7 

in bo 


JO 35 2IQ0 
30 

.M 43 38 
50 15 70 
I 


. - 7W 

lov in* 10ft + v 

aill-tS 

14ft 13ft 14 +1 

l*ft IB lift— ft 
25ft 23 23ft— 2V 

14ft UV Uft— ft 
20V 19V 19V 
21ft 21V 21V- ft 
19V 19ft 10ft 
XXX 


17ft 

10 DBA 



193 

4ft 

13V 

2M DDI 

6« DEP 



23 

17 

30ft 

Aft DSC 



M3* 

37ft 

JQft DatavSy 



1«? 

Xft 

Xft Oala&F 



iSS 

7ft 

AM DmnBle 



109 

83 DoriCp 

.13 

,] 

25 

29V 

19M DatcrdS 

34 

15 

S5 

14V 

83* DtolO 



9ft 

3M DtSwtCh 



AX 

X 

11 Datscp 



82 

5M 

2M D tenth 



9 

8ft 

43* Datum 



265 

7ft 

4ft Dawson 



3B 

21 

fv DebShi 

50 

15 

904 

19ft 

9M DedUD 


25 

lS 

30M 

am DekibA 

72 

2ft 

Aft 

> Dfftwi* 
M Deneicr 



27 

264 

lift 

4V DentMd 



412 

15ft 

Bft DiosPr 



2 

SV 

2M Dtesonc 



1417 

18 

U Dlceon 



s 

Uft 

3ft Dtemed 




12ft DigtOn 



182 


22 DMnex 



89 

F*tT 

17 DfrGrU 

50 

3 

s? 


24ft Dome 

153 

X8 

5 

typ 

12ft DrcltH 

50a 

1 A 

2 

27 

17M DoylDB 

58 

45 

501 

13 

9V> Drontz 

■Me X0 

6 

19 

10ft Drexlr 



7* 

23ft 

lift DrevCr 



2Sf 

25ft 

149* DunkDs 

54 

15 

107 

I2V 

9W Durban 

56 

AA 

72 

15V 

9ft Dvr Fils 

.15 

U 

I 

7ft 

3 ft Ovnsai 



33 

17ft DvntchC 



428 


1A 15V 14 4- V 
2ft 2ft 2ft 

Uft 12ft Uft 
6V 6ft Aft + V 
2W6 27V 27ft +2V 
20V 201* 20V 
« Aft • + ft 

138 1» 110 +1 
Xft 20ft 20V + ft 

lev lov lov— v 

A SV A + V 

20 27V 20ft + V 

7ft 2ft 2ft 

Sin 5 5ft— ft 

4ft 4ft 4ft 

21V X 21 +1 

12 ft UV 12 ft +1 

7ft Bft +,ft 

17ft 17V + V 
3V 3ft- V 
35 36ft +lft 
36V 37 + V 

23ft 22ft 23 + V 

3SV 35 35 

14V 14 V 14V— ft 
1»V » 19V +1 

tow ew low 
14V U 14 — V 
23ft Ztft 2) +ft 
23ft 23V 23ft + ft 
Uft 12ft 12ft 
13V 13 » ^ 

7 Aft 7 + W 

31V 31V 31V + V 


av 

* 

18 

4 

37 

37 


17ft 

7ft ECI Tei 



3 

Bft 

2 S 


IS 

5ft EIP 

.12 

XI 

18 

6 ft 

5V 

»— 6 

Mi 

ft EOffTI 



&13 

1 M 

1 

1 — » 

11 V 

5ft EarlCal 



41 

10M 

10 

TOM 

off* 

24M E can Lb 

154 

25 

7*3 

39V 

39M 

39tt + ft 

12 ft 

7ft EICMc 



25 

9t* 

9M 

9M— ft 

1 A 

126* EIPOS 

1J2 1X0 

262 

lift 

UM 

15ft + M 

lift 

6 * Elan 



31 

10V 

Uft 

WV 





Sotos to 



Hal 

I HtobLaw Stock 

Df». VIA 

U» 

■non low a pjh. aree 

12V 

SM EtMta 




TM 

TM 

7M + ft 

14ft 

IBM Eldons 

.16 

1J 

63 

1AM 

16 

TAM + M 

US* 

4V ElecBlo 
9M ElCafhs 



474 

BM 

nv* 

BV + V 

2BU 



19 

11M 

UM 

UM + ft 

19% 

7 EleNad 



167 

18ft 

17V 

IB — ft 

TO* 

19V ElcRnt 



565 

18 

17Vi 

IB + V 

15ft 

2M ElctMJs 



BS 

3M 

3 

3 

13V 

AM ElronEI 



94 

7V 

lft 

7M 

MM 




49 

14M 

MM + V* 
I2M + M 

14V 

Sft Emulax 



3329 

12ft 

UV 

7V* 

2M Endta 



10B 

Sft 

3Vt 

Sft + ft 

•V 

TO* 

SV Endvco 
AM EndoLs 



2 

1295 

7M 

SM 

7M 

8 

7M + ft 

B - M 

32M 

lsv EnaCov 



143 

20M 

ltft 

Xft +1 

32ft 

tv EnFact 



54 

22M 

97V 

22V 

17M 

SV Engptis 

JB 

U 

6 

13V 

13 

13V- V 

21ft 

IB EmoBi 



1049 

14 


M +1V 

XU 

AV Eauat 



2250 

■M 

74* — V 

BV 

SV EaiOli 
23ft Erictl 

58 

XS 

1A9 

7V 

7ft 

7V + V 

X 

.sse Xl 

AW 

27V 

7AV 

27ft— ft 


11 EvnSut 




21 

20V 

20V— V 

1AM 

7M Exovlr 



316 

13V 

13 

13V 

r~ 




F 



1 

9M 

5V t=DP 



lft 

TV. 

7M 

7Vh— M 

HM 

SM FM1 



IX 

10M 

T* W 

3ft 

1ft PamReaS 


111 

IV 

22M 

10V* FarmF 



19 

12M 

11V 

12 + V 

71ft 


L7A 

25 

asi 

. 71 

X 

70 —V 

,23V3 

IX FedSo* 



m 

. 20ft 

X. 

70ft + M 

7ft 

|3V Fenjflu 


• 

$ 

-4V 

4M 

4* 

17V 

7ft Fibrons 



16V 

I6M 

16M 


2iv Fdtcrs 

1.39 

4.1 

73 

32V 

Xft 

32V + ft 

JBV 

91M Fhmie 

A3 

1.9 

11 

3AM 

36 

SAM 

Sft 

3ft F Iraki] 

33 

55 

17 

38* 

!H* 

3* 

9 

4V Flngmx 



302 

AV 

AM 

AM— V 

16V 

B FUdoan 



if 

Iff* 

Bj, J 

Iff* + V* 

37ft 

7IM FAtaBk 

1.12 

Xt 

39 

37 


37 


24V FtAFln 

50 

24 

U 


33ft 

33ft 

IB .i 

16V PtATn * 

54 

IB 

134 

2SM 


25 


20V FComr 

UO 

XI 

7 

23V 

1'iil 

2JV + V 

9ft 

AV FIQml 

150*1X7 

135 

4U 

6V 

AV— V 

u 

UV FExec 



2570 


17V 

IS + ft 

nv 

BV FFCot# 



3 

27V 

22 

22 — ft 

1 v. 

14M FFFIM 

-40b TJ 

2 

22 

23 

22 + ft 

B-* r 1 

13 FtPnCP 

A0 

XS 

U 

14 

14* 

16 + ft 

^ 

10V FIFnMs 




23V 

22 

23V +1M 


21M FTFIBk 

AA 

u 


31V 

JIM 

Jl* + M 


2BV FJerR 

UO 

43 

50 


41V 

42ft + ft 

V* j| 

23 FMdB 

U6 

X2 

H 


45ft 

5SM— M 


24ft FNtanslJO 

35 

15 


UM 

38M- V 

I 60 

26 FRBGc 

158 

23 

41 


44M 

47 — M 

1 31 

19V f=Bvna 

50 

27 

218 


29M 

29M 


18V FSecC 

1.10 

4.1 

564 


26 

27 + V 


19ft FTennl 



291 


26 

2flfc + M 


31 M FsKJnC 

134 

21 

W2S 

998 


J* 

44V — M 
IV— S 


10M Flexed 

A0 

XS 

16 


Uft 

]» .. 


15 FtoFdl. 

30 

1.1 

273 


IB 

U — ft 

. J 

27M FtataFI 

30 

1.9 

37* 


42 

42 — ft 

19V 




23 

uv 

Uft 

11V 

I7M 


33 

13 

15 

14V 

16ft 

*M 




2430 

JV 

7ft 

7M + V> 


12ft F Lion A 

59 

5 

213 

i, .j 

X 

X + V 


Uft FLlonB 

JU 

3 

421 


Xft 

2DM + ft 

1^1 

25V For Am 

36 

35 

30 


31V 

31V 

24V 


150 

55 

77 

17M 

1AV 

T7V* 

XU 

3M 

14ft Forth F 
lS Forms 



U 

IX 

■* 

19ft 

IV 

HU* 

vm 

A Forum 

m 

5 

2150 

10ft 

■ jl,. J 

WV + J5» 

7 ft 

4 Folder 

M 

24 

337 

4ft 



f*l 

15V Fremnt 

A3 

25 

469 



24M— V 

IMnd 

«V Fudrck 



133 

BftfJ 


AV + ft 

B M 

12ft FulrHB 

-32 

20 

693 



W — ft 

1 




5 



1 

19V 

Sft GTS 



S7 

3ft 

Sft 

3ft 

lAft 

ffA Galileo 



27 

12 

UM 

UV + ft 

UM 

Aft GomcB 

.10 

22 

1910 

4V 

Aft 

4M + ft 

» 

31M Genetch 



2756 

72 

A7V 

73 +5ft 

ID 

S CenetS 



13» 


»V 

10 

7V 




799 

1 

m 

2 + ft 

« 




72 

25ft 

25M 

25V— M 

3V GcriMs 



140 

AV 

4M 

6M 

2*V 

16 GUaGs 

34 

13 

AM 

20V 

X 

20V + M 


T3M GlgaTr 



2 



14 —M 

18ft 

12V Gatoas 



<51 

18ft 

IBM 

18ft 









18M 

14M GOUldP 

36 

43 

340 

18 

l/V 

10 + V 



AA 

23 

as 


‘K 

19V . .. 

W, 

A Grantre 



12 


SV + V 

14M 




IS 

14 

13V 

13V— M 





409 

AV 

AM 

6* + V* 

23M 

13M CWSav 

ASr 

21 

1 

22V 

22V 

22V 

WV 

B GiSoFd 



X 

BV 

SV 

.BV _ 








17V + V 

19 

15V 

12ft GuUfrd 5Se 
V GHBdc 1550c 

J 

212 

15 



IS^-ft 

| 



H 



b 



30 

13 

691 

17 

16M 

n + v 





129 

17ft 

16ft 

17ft + U. 





123 

AV 

AV 

AH + ft 





1407 

2V 

2V 

2V- » 

1W. 


.10 

5 

430 




250* 

15V HaraG* 
25V HrtiMt 

34 

132 

1J 

21 

151 

583 

34ft 

IBM 

34 

1 1 



33 

23 


& 

81* 



■Ml 


XO 


4V 

am— ft 




15*4 

3M 

J 

3V+ ft 



.16 

J 

80 

17M 


17M + te 



58 

4 

36 

19 

IBM 






41 

4 


JV— V* 





15 

Xft 

X 

X - V 

38V 

31M HWfdF 

J2o 23 
150b 44 

10 

84 

23 

34 

22V 

34 — V 
22V 





IX 








1U 








A 








332 






AA 

23 

19 



2fl 

6ft 

3M Hortmd 



40 


4* 

4V— ft 

33M 

15 HtvBNJ 



J64 

3TV 

Jl 

31ft + ft 



30e 

.7 

2 

27M 

27VS 

27M +1 





17S 






54 

33 

B1 


Xft 

»te + ft 

29V 

14 HybritC 



Il» 

2*V 

27* 

28V 

14ft 

4V Myponx 



49 

T3M 

Uft 

UM 

■ 



1 



■ 





52 

9ft 

BV 

9ft + ft 

ten 

■ t , v 

30 

5 

831 

31V 

31 

sm + v 




1789 

MV 

13V 

M» + V 





318 

7V 

7V4 


12ft 




1496 

12V 

1!V 

12V + M 





83 


S 



32V IndlN 

150 

12 

36 

50M 

X ft 

SOte— ft 





321 

23ft 

92V 

23* + 94 

24 

12M Inftnt 



141 

15M 

14* 

15M 





149 








569 

SM 

4V 

S . 





821 


MM 


4V 

7JVs 

3 intsGon 
10ft issco 



4541 

25 

5 

\5*k 

3* 

«» 

S +1 
15VS— ft 





4090 

29ft 

a 

29 + V 

9V 

3 ih«Sy 



655 



4 +ta 

XV 

15V 

lft IntrTet 



35 

R7 

VA 

13 

12M 

12M 

1AM 

7M IntrfFIr 

JB 

15 

118 

13 

m 

WM-tt 

35ft 

WV 

Bft 

rJBBTy/ -[T B 

lT. ■! mi x'!* 








143 

271 

S 

13M 

TV 

tm 

12V + ft 

13M 




37 


8 

8 — M 

17 

8 IntCHn 



an 

11 

uv 

11 

UM 

IV* iGatne 



34 

SM 

BM 

Bft — ft 

X + V 

25Va 

14M inriUno 



64 


19ft 





283 

ISV 

15V 

ISM + ft 

12 

tsir 



418 

774 

n 

% 

T8- V 

MM +1 

97V 




1030 

28V 

m 

14U 

13V 

10 

r-JpTTTl 



S8 

331 

332 

12ft 

12V 

W 

uv 

12ft 

9V 

3*3 

1 1 + 

■ 







1 

isv 

9M JBRsli 

.16 

U 

199 . 

12V 

12 

12ft— ft 

BM 

3V Jackpot 



54 

6ft 

6 

6ft + ft 

41 ft 

25ft jockLfe 



64 

40 

39V 

40 + ft 





<4 

22V 

29ft 

2Zte + h* 

8V 

Aft JefMort 



337 

51* 

4V 

5 —V 

»M 

14ft Jerfco 

.IS 

3 

576 

23V 

23ft 

23te + ft 

7ft 


7 


22 

6ft 

Aft 

Aft 

10V 

AM Jearivsn 



S6 

BV 

BV 

SV— M 





19 

23M 

22V 

27V 

20M 

UV Jvfftn 

AD 

2 A 

199 

T7 

14M 

16V + ft 


12 Mori* 
wo* Low Slock 


Softs In 

Wv. Y*L lCte Hlpn 


Low 3 PJH. CRM 


24te 

13te KLAl 



223 

20V 

SOM 

OTM 


4ft KVPItr 




Bft 

Bft 

■ft 

2AM 

13V Koran 5 

AA 

15 

134 

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Sales lloures ore unofficial. Voariv hbta and lows reflocr 
lb* previous S3 yM*s plus ihe current weeb.bul nontw hriest 
trading day. Where a will or stock dividend amnunilna la 25 
percent or mare has been paid, ttw year’s hiffWowranseami 
dividend are shown lor the new slock only. Unless other wise 
noted, rates of dividends ore annual dlsBursemenls based an 
the kites) declaration, 
a— dividend also extraisivi 
b — annual rote ff dividend plus stock dlridendJI 
c — llquidatlno AlvIdmdVI 
cid— cffied/i 
d — new veoriv low.n 

e — dividend declared or paid « Preceding 12 monthsyl 
0 — ffvMend In Canadian hinds. sublecf Id 15% nonresidence 
tax. 

— dividend declared alter aPii-ao or neck dividend. 

I — dividend paid this yen, omitted, deferred, or no action 
taken at West dividend meefino. 

k — dividend declared or paid Hils year, an accumulative 
H$u* with dividends In arrears. 

n — new tseue in the past 52 weeks. The NttvAow ronoe boalns 
with the start of trading, 
nd — nm l dov delivery. 

P/E - prlcp^orniiM* ratio. 

r— dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 monins. Plus 
stock dividend. 

s— stock split. Dividend beams with dole al spilt. 
sk-saK. 

t— dividend paid in slack In preceding 1i martins, estimated 
rash value on ex-dlvWend or ex-mstrlDuiion dale, 
u— new yearly high, 
v — trading hatted. 

vl — In bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganized un- 
der the Bankruptcy Aa.nr securities assumed by such com- 
panies. 

wd — when distributed, 
wi — when tehied. 
ww— with warrants, 
x — ex-dividend nr ex-rigm*. 
xdto — ex-dhtrl button. 

*w — wllhout warrants. 

v—ex4ividend and sales in full, 
via— view 
2— soles In full. 


5 






1 





Pagft 16 


.umncnv4lCUVy .il UUDO H A »»>«»»■''« nn*n‘n£>*vi v. ■> 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIM NK- Till ’RSI) A\t DECEMBER 5, 108 


I II l M hi " Mi ■ 


I,-, hi in | PE AN ITS 


you know u)hv r 

PON'T WANT YOU TO 
BUY ME ANTING FOE 
CHRISTMAS THIS YEAR? 


BECAUSE r kNOUH * 

, YOU MATE ME ! J f 


Vve never sw ) ; * THEN BUY ME 

V 1 HATE ' ,0U > / CflAACTLJUIC I 1 


BOOKS 


SOMETHING:; are you toigh enough? 


1231 \27 




[39 I II ■■ I 


i € 


1M 155 ]5G^HS7| 1 56 ISA 


[M 1 I 65 


BLONDIE 

HERE, I'Ll- ) 
TAKE THAT < 


OH.A PICTURE OF 
MRS.OITH32S 


YES, I ALWAYS CARRY 
A PICTURE OF CORA r 


rr OtSGOU8fi&3G 
r PICKPOCKETS r- 


SOLUTION TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE, page IS 


ACROSS 

1 Kind of tax 

5 Fenced in 

10 Speak gruffly 

14 Caesar's sister 

15 Affirmed 
forcefully 

16 Air 

17 With 28 and 49 
Across, a 
riddle 

20 Cheek 

21 the 

Moon,” 1953 
song 

22 Hanker 

23 '* deal!" 

26 Arab garment 

28 See 17 Across 

36 Prior to 

37 Priestly garb 

38 Meanders 

39 islands, 

off Ireland 

41 Topgallants 

43 Escape 

44 Helicopter 
pan 

46 Dingles 

48 J.F.K.abbr. 

49 Sec 17 Across 

52 Nightfall, to 
Donne 

53 To be. in 
Toulon 

54 Expression of 
disbelief 

57 Designer 
Schiaparelli 

60 Midterm and 
final 


64 Answer to 
riddle 

68 Asiatic palm 

69 Parker 

(busybody) 

70 Writer Mazo 
— — Roche 

71 Dither 

72 Stone 
monument 

73 Erotic 


1 Chess piece 

2 Will wisp 

3 Mythomaniac 

4 A Soviet 
republic 

5 Omega 
preceder 

6 Barley beard 

7 Calif, city 

8 Son of 
Aphrodite 

9 Down 

10 Barnyard 
sound 

11 Chichi 

12 Risotto 
ingredient 

13 Songwriter 
Gus 

18 Sailing vessel 

19 German 
composer: 
1786-1826 

24 Con man's 
ruse 

25 Musical 
composition 

27 Jot 


28 Compassion 

29 Weapon in 
“Deliverance" 

30 Former inti, 
pact 

31 Loses a lap 

32 English prime 
minister: 1945- 
51 

33 Like some 
walls 

34 Perle . 

memorable 

socialite 

35 Attempt 

40 Bank 

certificate 

42 Louver part j 

45 Fasten 
securely 

47 Kind of 
propeller 

50 Some pepos 

51 Groups of six 

54 German 
novelist 
Hoffmann: 
1848-1909 

55 Pan of B.T.U. 

56 Promotional 
gimmick 

58 Predicament 

59 Cathedral's 
east end 

61 To 

(exactly) 

62CCXC 

quadrupled 

63 Light carriage 

65 Aphorism 

66 Wriggler 

67 Tincture 


BEETLE BAILEY 


w herb's 
SARSE* 


HE HAS A COLP 
AMP TOOK A 
SLEEPING PILL, 
v. SIR 


TH/S IS HIS 
RESPONSIBILITY/ 

get Him out here 

immediately/ 


x Hope he 

RTS THROUGH 
THE vViNDOVY | 




ANDY CAPP 

y '/hOJWWT 

[ SHALL. WE 

»~ -fO THE xtT THE 7! 
'ROSE AND V'REb UON 1 
CSDWN 1 ? iV - - ^ 



f tor 

I mm. 



VvC*JlJ>YOu LIKE 
■ A UTTLEShEERV ■ 

pok a Change? 


, FEEL LIKE 
y -AG4ME < 
OFDAFET5?' 


NO WON DBZ THEY 
> calltwemthe r' 
OPPOSITE SEX-x 5 


1 

m 


1 veasan; 

7 - DKJMK.-C^ 

/ GETAAE 
^ A BEER J= 

m 

NO. LET'S 

JBl qqiNto M 


ay 



ap 

Sr ric 


WIZARD of ID 


O New York Times, edited by Eugene Moksha. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


ir 



?A&NCfo 
, Gemmfr' , 


-± 



f m \ 

I You 

CM?.J 


| { u^iwrippicK- cd& 

■H THA r-wtth- 6W&6&V 

■V Acc\p&tTAur 





1 ;-^N Tn El 


REX MORGAN 


THAT WAS A 
WONDERFUL ^ 
MUSICAL- -AND j 
THE FIRST I'VE 

seen in years ' 


ITS THE FIRST I'VE EVER 
SEEN ON A STAGE 6RANT i 
IT MAKES ME FEEL LIKE ^ 
_ SINGING / THANK YOU SO 1 
I MUCH FOR TAKING ME { A 


THANK YOU FOR GOING WfT« 
ME, KAY.' I CAN'T REMEMBER 
SUCH A LOVELY DAY IN A LONG 
TIME? I HATE TO SEE IT END' 


HOW, I'LL ™ 
GETYDU HOME? 
YOU HAVE TO j 
BE AT WORK j 

m early." ^ 


sis 


‘Mr. Wilson threw his wekohemat atme !' 


GARFIELD 

/'w£Y / BOPtHi* I'M A 
1 BATHROOM SCALE 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
• by Henri Arnold and Bob Lea 


Unscramble tnese lour Jumbles, 
one tetter io each square, lo lorm 
tour ordinary words. 


IREtf.tjr/9 

> fcSsSSzr.lj 


SO I DON'T DO 
. LIVESTOCK J 


l ME AND 
MM BIGr 
VOICE CHIP 


SHAMC 


CROFE 


PAMERC 


NUTTAR 


Answer here: a 



Cm VW& 12-5 


effljiag! r— bseSvndeotalnfc 


HE WAS HOPIN© 

TO GET HIS TRIM 
FIGURE BACK, BUT 
ACTUALLY HAD TVilS. 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
lorm the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


WwW Stock Markets 

Via Agence France- Presse Dec. 4 

Qosing prices in local aurenda unless othenmse indi ca ted. 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: SHINY EPOCH GIGOLO NOUGAT 

Answer With that deadbeat, it's often a matter or 
this- TOUCH « GO 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 

4Ugsr«e 

NIGH 
C F 
19 44 

LOW 
C F 
14 57 

Cl 

Amsterdam 

tl 

53 

10 

50 

r 

Athens 

30 

68 

H 

52 

Ir 

Barcataaa 

IS 

9* 

B 

44 

Fr 

Betorade 

IS 

59 

1 

34 

Ir 

Benin 

12 

54 

11 

52 

a 

Brussels 

19 

54 

11 

52 

r 

Bucharest 

fl 

52 

7 

34 

0 

Budapest 

3 

34 

a 

32 

la 

Copenhagen 

9 

« 

7 

45 

fl 

Costa Del Sol 

19 

44 

14 

57 

d 

Dublin 

10 

50 

B 

44 

t 

Edinburgh 

8 

44 

B 

44 

a 

F tore n co 

IS 

59 

ID 

50 

0 

Frankfort 

12 

5« 

9 

48 < 

> 0 

Genera 

II 

52 

1 

34 

e 

Helsinki 

-2 

28 

-3 

27 

S<w 

Istanbul 

14 

57 

9 

48 

tr 

Las Palmas 

25 

77 

17 

43 

Cl 

Lisbon 

14 

61 

13 

S5 

0 

London 

13 

AS 

13 

54 

0 

Madrid 

11 

52 

2 

34 

d 

Milan 

■ 

44 

7 

45 

la 

Moscow 

-10 

14 1 

■16 

3 

sw 

Munich 

16 

61 

4 

39 

cl 

Nice 

13 

55 

B 

44 

a 

OHO 

1 

34 

0 

12 

a 

Paris 

14 

57 

11 

52 

a 

Prooue 

11 

52 

1 

44 

T 

Revklavlk 

0 

33 

-1 

30 

d 

Rome 

14 

57 

7 

•*5 

a 

Stockholm 

3 

37 

1 

34 

lo 

Stratbourg 

12 

54 

7 

45 

0 

Venice 

5 

41 

2 

34 

Cl 

Vienna 

7 

45 

2 

36 

n 

Warsaw 

10 

50 

B 

44 

0 

ZurtGn 

11 

57 

3 

37 

0 

MIDDLE EAST 
Ankara 7 45 

-4 

25 

Cl 

Beirai 

— 

— 

— 

— 

na 

Dsimmm 

13 

54 

-1 

30 

tf 

Jornsatem 

(6 

61 

6 

<3 

tr 

TSI Aviv 

20 

48 

10 

50 

tr 


Bangkok 

Benin 

Horn Kong 

Manila 

Now MM 

5MDI 

S hanghai 

Sl n u w wa 

Tolpel 

Tokyo 

AFRICA 

Atolen 

Cohn 

Copt Town 
cesabtancn 


LOW 
C F 

24 75 *9 

■1 » W 

31 70 tr 

2* 70 o 

13 55 Ir 

1 34 Cl 

J 48 Ir 

IS 77 tr 

18 44 Ir 

9 48 fr 


OCEANIA 

AucUMUt 19 44 18 it It 

Sydney 19 A* 18 u > 

cKteuay: totoggy; h-Jotr; h-nall, 
sh-stwwersi sw-snew. al -stormy. 


Alolora 22 72 8 43 Ir 

Cairo 25 75 13 55 fr 

Capt Town 25 77 18 M fr 

caxaManea M 15 11 2 d 

H one s 19 aa 16 51 a 

Logos 29 H 33 73 o 

Nairobi 1A A1 13 55 o 

Tunis 1* AA 8 46 fr 

LATIN AMERICA 

twnHMm 2S 77 22 72 a 

caracn 2S 77 ib A« r 

Lima 24 75 19 AA d 

Modem ary 22 72 i 4] m 

R la do Janeiro 19 44 10 44 r 

NORTH AMERICA 

Anchorage -A 21 -iz 10 pc 

AKoata M SB -1 30 fr 

Sartos 2 3A -A 21 fr 

CWcwja S 32 -a 21 sw 

Oonw 11 52 -A 25 fr 

Damn 1 14 -■ i8 d 

Hondo la 37 fit 2D Al fr 

Hourton 17 A3 I AA el 

Los Anpoias 23 72 id SO pc 

Mfcunl 2» 79 30 AS PC 

Mipanpoiis ■« 2S -t3 9 d 

Montreal 7 A5 -11 12 fr 

Mossau 29 >4 19 AA fr 

New York 4 39 -4 35 PC 

San Fraud ico 14 61 9 48 PC 

Seattle 12 54 4 39 d 

Toronto >3 37 -8 18 fr 

WOSMpBton A 43 a 37 PC 

o-avereosfi oe -portly dowdy; r-ralni 


ABN 

ACF HotokHr 

Aoaon 

AkZO 

Ahold 

Amev 

A' Dam Rubber 
Amm Bank 
BVG 

Bue hri nami T 

Co kind HWfl 

ElMvier-NDU 

FokMf 

GW Brocades 

Hefnefc en 

Hoo B (»ons 

KLM 

Noarden 

Nal Nader 

Nodliovd 

Oce Vender G 

Pakhoed 

Philips 

Roboos 

Rodameo 

Rallnco 

Rorenlo 

Royal Dvtdi 

Unilever 

Van Oiumeran 

VMF Stork 

VHU 

AMPjCBS Seal In 
Preyloos: 234JI 


Cltu Pm. 

! HQPChSt 255 m90 

Hoesdr 1A320 mo® 

Horton 222 224 

KUSSrt 410 408 

IWKA 312 304 

Kan + Sail 329A0 329JB 

Karstodl 333 333 

Koulhot 342 342 

KJoecKner H-D 307 305J0 

KtoedcnerWerke n t»J0 
Krupp Stahl 15B lto 

Undo 572 572 

Mom 219 21A 

MAN 18550 182 

Ma nn es ma tin 2tzse 257 

Muench Ritode 2370 2110 

Nbtdorf 548 547 

PKI AH <72 

Porsche IBS 1244 

PretMoau 237 238 

PWA IBM 137 JO 

RWE 189 190 

Rholirmotod 495 475 

Schorl no A20 A23 

SEL 322 31A50 

Sit, mum 447^0 ATI Jfl 

Thysson 173 ifrUffl 

Vebo 272J0 271 JO 

VWkswaaomierk 401 3M 

I w«ia 679 jo AH 

Com u wra n sAr Indox : 173L20 
Pr evtotn ; iamj* 


Arbed 2845 Z729 

Bekaert 9000 VOID 

Cocker! 1 1 208 304 

O Ob— B 4505 4515 

EBE5 3910 3950 

GB-img4M mm saw 

I GBL _ 2560 2400 

Gevoerf sm sis® 

Hoboken 5240 JM0 

Intercom 2935 2»0S 

Kradtotbank 12500 12000 

Pdroflna 70» 7030 

SoC Generate J79 2325 

Sottna 8338 8340 

Sdvoy AltS 4100 

Traction Etec 5040 5000 

UCB 5740 5798 

Unera 2335 2320 

VtoiftoMonfBono SATO AH 

Current Stock roctex : 299UW 

Previous : 2*0.14 



AEG-Totofuntam 
Allianz von 
Altana 
BASF 

Bayer 

Boy Hypp Bank 
Bay Vervtautiank 
BBC 

BHF-B<mk 

BMW 

Cwnnwrtbofto 
Coni Gum ml 
Dalmler-Bmc 
Dtgitaa 

Deufschp Babcock 

DeutodisBank 

Drosdnsr Bank 

CHH 

Harvenor 

Hodittof 


226 221 JO 
1777 1742 
40AJH 408.10 
28450 242 

IBM 250 

459 450 

458 441 

299 900 

*» 441 

505 Sk 

2J2J0 243 , 

159.40 IB JO I 

lUTWi 1142 I 

430 425 I 

215 3B . 

789.80 447 

34120 333 , 

2)8 213 i 

349 344 

780 740 


BJt East Asia 
Otouna tumi 
China Ught 
Green island 
Hang Sena Bor* 
Hondanon 
China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK ReaUyA 
HK Hotels 
HK Laid 
HK Shane Bank 
HK Telephone 
HK younoMl 
HK Wharf 
Hutch Whampoa 
Hyson 

iirtichv 

Jarcflne 

JanfliHSee 

Kowloon Motor 
Miramar HaM 
Now World 
SHK Praps 
SMn 

swtre PodfteA 
Tai aieurw 
Woh Kwone 
wing On Go 
Wlnsor 
World inn 

Haas Sana Indox : 
pravtoas : UACB6 


AECI 

Anglo American 
Ansda Am Goto 
BOMPWS 
Blyvoor 
But fen 
De Bee rs 
DrMan lekl 
Elands 
GFSA 
Harmony 
Hlveld Steel 
KtoOf 


940 940 

392S 3900 
ltAH 19300 
MOB 1340 
1750 1700 
8325 8125 
1590 1530 
5100 5000 
N.a — 
3775 3740 
3450 3300 
5AS 570 | 
2375 2325 i 


3 

Ruspfat A in 

SABrmn 000 

5t Helena 4550 

Sosal too 

west HaWine oioo 

Composite Stedi Index : s 
Prevlocn ; NJk. 


AA Coro 
AlUaLLvans 

Anglo Am Gold 

AM Brit Foods 
Ass Dairies 
Barctovs 
BBSS 
BAT. 

Beechan, 

BICC 

BL 

Blue arcio 
BOC Group 
Boots 

Bawatyr Indus 
BP 

Brit Home St 
Brit Telecom 
Bril Aerospace 
Brito 1 1 
BTR 
Burmah 
Cdble Wireless 
Cadbury 5chw 
Charier Cans 
Commercial U 
cans Goto 
CaurtauMs 
Dainty 
De Bearsr 
Distillers 

DfMeotoin S 

FI sons 

Free 51 Ged 1 

GEC 

Gen Accklenl 

GKN 

Glaxo c IS I 

Grand Mot 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hansen 

Hawker 

ICI 

imperial Group 
Jaguar 

Land Securities 
Legal General 
LkmtsBank 
Lonrhc 
Limn 

Marks and Sa 
Metoi Bex 
Midland Bank 
Ndf Wart Bonk 
p ana o 

PUUnstan 
Piassev 
Prudential 
Racai Elect 
Randtontom i 
Rmk 
Rood inti 
Reuters 

Rwal Dutch t AT 3 

RTZ 

SaatOil 

Salnsburv 

SaaraHokfiim .1 

SMI 

8TC 

Std Chartered 
Sun Alliance 


Tat* and Lvw SM 5M 

Tesco 288 290 

Thorn EMI 429 427 

T.l. Group 485 40 

Trafalgar Hse 348 387 

rHF JS H! 

i Ultramar 200 20 

Unilever c 12 13/44 T2 13732 
United Biscuits 257 257 

Vickers 2H » 

Woolwonti SAI 588 

F-T. 38 Index ; 111540 
Prrvkxn : 112838 
F.T JJ8.H* Index :rattM 
Pnwtaa : 14O.T0 


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Cred llol 
Erklanlg 
For ml to! la 
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I la leas 
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Pharmacia 

saab-scanto 

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CRA 

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Naf Aust Bank 


By Anne M. Burford with John Greenya 29i pages. SI 6.95. 
McGraw-Hill Inc, „ 1221 Avenue of ihe Americas, New York, A. « • 


Reviewed by Jonathan Yardley 

A NNE M. BURFORD .it will be recalled. 

was appointed administrator of the U. S. 
Environmental Protection Agency in 1981 and 
resigned that position two years later amid 
controversy. She had been accused of misman- 
aging Superfund, the toxic-wastc-deamip pro- 
gram, and of using the agency to advance 
partisan political ends; she was also the admin- 
istration's point woman in a clumsily orga- 
nized attempt to confront Congress over the 
question of executive privilege. 

When she finally stepped down, it was to the 
accompaniment of howls of righteous approval 
from every conceivable quarter. 

During all that noise-making Burford was 
no shrinking violet. She remains true to charac- 
ter in “Are You Tough Enough?" 

. It is a bitter, angry book, and it is likely to 
produce bitterness and anger in reaction: not 
so much among her old foes the professional 
environmentalists, whom she treats perfunc- 
torily, but among her ostensible allies in the 


she showers written a cautionary 

k °uL ail 0 f us Burford has her biases, but in 

SS’SSSK'SSWS 

K instinct o( the pnss - she 

seu -criticism and is willing lo acknowledgL 
least some of her mistakes. 

The most interesting aspect of uie oouL 
hovwver. is the portrait she paints of pohucal 
infighting. 

Jonathan Yardley is on the staff of The Wash- 
ington Post 


THE COURAGE OF A CONSERVATIVE 

By James G. Watt with Doug Wead. 221 pages. SI 5.95. 

Simon and Schuster Inc, 1230 Avenue of the Americas, New York, N. > .10020 

Reviewed by Edwin M Yoder Jr. The truly disabling flaw of Watt's o 


N OW as ever, political celebrity tends to 
get confused with intellectual authority. 
That is presumably why James Watt, a man 
with interesting tales to tell, felt moved instead 
to share his views on “modern conservatism." 

As Ronald Reagan’s secretary of the interior 
from 1981 until his resignation under pressure 
in October 1984, Watt was mainly noted for 
saying odd, sometimes controversial things — 
such as that Indian reservations are revealing 
examples of the failures of socialism at work. 
-But now be has set aside his jesting to prophesy 
solemnly upon conservatism. 

There is, however, a. slight problem. Watt is 
not, by any useful or traditional definition, a 
conservative. The proof is that he believes “we 
conservatives are revolutionaries." And while 
it may be true that his own brand of conserva- 
tism is revolutionary, as a rule conservatives, 
properly so called, are people who seek by 
timely adjustment of traditional values ana 
institutions to prevent revolutions, not perpe- 
trate them. 

If Walt’s taste for mild upheaval disqualifies 
him as a traditional conservative, what then is 
he? His views strike me as a variation on a 
familiar Am eri c an political theme, prairie pop- 
ulism. His approach smacks or ibe wide open 
spaces where a verity is a verity, and is usually 
cranky, idiosyncratic, and not oversorupulous 
in its attention to historical fact. 

Here is how his system works. Whatever 
. Watt .finds disturbing, he blames on a set of 
faceless adversaries known collectively as “the 
liberals." They areWatt' s SMER5H, the politi- 
cal anti-force. "TheliberaJs" constantly appear 
throughout this book, but are never identified 
-by name or allowed to speak for themselves. 


The truly disabling flaw of Watt's outlook is 
not that his views are especially extreme or 
disagreeable. It is his unmanageable compul- 
sion to polarize every issue along a lincrai- 
conservative axis. 

In between the faulty analysis of issues as 
diverse as the 55-mph speed limit and L>. ».- 
Israel relations, there are lapses throughout the 
book. For example: 

Item: Watt argues that blacks and conserv a- 
tives got at cross purposes 20-odd years ago 
because Barry Coldwaier. running for presi- 
ded, stood for states rights, his stand attracted 
southerners and some of these recruits^ were 
racists. “The consequences." he writes, “were 
tragic, both for blacks and for conservatives. 

This is a recurrent theme in the official 
Reaganite view of civil rights. If only blacks 
were discerning enough to see their real inter- 
ests, how they've been defrauded by liberals, 
and would be helped by conservatives, they 
would flock to the GOP banner. Bui Wait, as 
usual, omits a critical fact. Any useful history 
of the relationship of GoldwaleT and blacks 
must begin with the senator’s strenuous oppo- 
sition to the 1964 civil rights bill. That Gold wa- 
ter’s opposition probably had nothing to do 
with race does not hdp. No such "conserva- 
tism." however principled, is likely to win the 
loyalty of black Americans. 

Why then, one finally asks, does a man of 
some liveliness of mind ignore his riotous days 
as a cabinet member and plunge, instead, into 
murky issues that are beyond ms depth? Il is. I 
ihink the pernicious assumption tnat a little 
brief authority confers wisdom. Of that old 
illusion, James Watt is not the first victim. 

Edwin M. Yoder Jr. is a syndicated columnist 
with The Washington Post Writers' Group. 


QMCool Trvrt * 
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Thomas Nation 
Western Mining 
Wostpac Banking 


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144 14} 

NjQ. 175 
174 179 

213 217 

445 445 

210 2D8 


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345 345 
149 149. 

548 542 
241 135 

XII. X12 
ASS 445 
174 U7 


By Alan Truscoct 

O N the diagramed deal. 
East ventured a jump cue- 
bid, hoping that West would 
be familiar with the treatment 
used by many experts. Three 
dubs was intended to indicate 
a solid suit, presumably dia- 
monds, and request three no- 
trump if partner could stop 
dubs. 

In view of the spade weak- 
ness, the East hand was not 
ideal for such action,' and there 
was a serious danger of a mis- 
understanding. Looking at a 
dub void. West assumed club 
length and strength in his part- 
ner’s hand. When West did not 
say “alert” to indicate an arti- 
ficial hid. East had a sinking 
feeling in the pit ofhis stom- 
ach. 

South came to the rescue 


MRaueism oam 
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MUtouBUN Hoovv- 
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BRIDGE 


withabidof three spades, and 
West was delighted to double 
the spade game even without 
being sure about the meaning 
of three dubs. The fog d eared 
when be led the diamond jack 
and South ruffed. 

A. low trump lead ran to the 
jack and it was East's turn to 
be surprised when he led bis 
singleton club and his partner 
ruffed West missed a chance 
here: If be had refused to ruff. 
South might have led a second 
trump and lost 1,400. As it 
was, the penalty was only 200. 

If East's three-dub bid bad 
been understood. West could 
have bid five diamonds, reach- 
ing the right gone from the 
right side of the table. 

But North-South had their 
own regretting to da If South 
had considered the possibility 


that his opponent* might be en 
route to confusion, he could 
simply have passed three clubs 
and collected 700 points. The 
East- West cards do not play 
well in a 1-0 fit. 


NORTH 
* 10 8 2 
UAQS4 
O 3 

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WEST <D) EAST 

<r J 10 8 5 4 •> A KQ97B2 

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*K>763 
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Both sides wore vulnerable. The 


bidding: 

West North 

Ease 

Santa 

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Pass 

Pass 


West led tbe diamond Jack. 


Canadian, stoda tin AP 


meaty 
Sh orn 

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I Sony 

Sumitomo Ban* 
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| Sumitomo Marin#. 

Sumitomo Metal 

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TOKodaCham 
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Yamolchl See 
MUnf/DJ. Index : 120112* 


294 Abtl Prce 
lOOAcMomte 
111250 Analca E 
12OS Agra Ind A 
40972 Mr Energy 
ISBASAIto Nat 
11930 Aiaorf 
640 BP Canada 
59374 Bonk BC 
1609*4 Bank NS 
65750 H or rick O 
200 Baton A t 
2AM4 Bonanza R 
OTWBrodame 


AH Ordinaries Index : 987 Jt 
Prevtota : 98478 


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Abtftom AH. 

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Banco ln» 

BIC , 

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£838* 

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roreai 

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Canon 

corto 

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Dahwa Haute 

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Panvc 

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Futl Photo 

FuIHhj 

Hitachi 

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Japan Air Urns 
(Colima 
Kantoi Power 
KawasaU Snei . . 
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Kamatou 
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Matou Etec ind* 
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MKAublrtil Bank 


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725“ 735' 
530- 535 
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730 730 
495- m 

330 335 

4050 4040 
1170 1170 
870 880 

1470 144QI 


He* Index riosm 
j*re*tnee : 10 KJ 3 


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Credit Same 
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prevhNHzNijl. 


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Tte International HerrfdTribune. 
Bmfgng: tbe Wodtfs Most- . - 
la^orteittNews to the Wcricfs - 

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197*0 CAE- 
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3173 Can Trust 
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234 230 224 +3 

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48118 Nva AHA I 
3400 NOWOGO W 
7200 NuWU SPA 
4150 Oak twod 
150 OirmIDu* o 
23000 Oshowo At 
30970 gOCW AIrln 
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5800 Ratnblna 
1 K0 Pine Point 
28434 Placer 
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1700 Ravrac* 
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14450 Roman 
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300 SI Broacst 
17980 Stolen A 
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40 39 40 —2 

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270 270 270 —5 

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13*4 13*+ W 
SM* fit 9t— <\ 
34* 34te+ % 
no 17* 17*— vj 
«9V, J9V. 19V*— if 
S* * 24* 24*+ * 
390 390 390 —10 

57* 7* 7* 

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*45 44* 44* 

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*15* 15V4 15’*— * 
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OF SOCCER. ■ 

rob huqhes 

.. WEDNESDAY'S IN THE IHT 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1985 


Page 1’ 


SPORTS 



Zivojmovic Overpowers McEnroe 


Caapikd by Our Staff From Ddpelches 

MELBOURNE — Unseeded 
Slobodan Zwqjmovic unleashed an 
awesome display of power tennis 
Jure to Mas* Jobs McEnroe oot ot 
the Australian Open quarterfinals 
here Wednesday. 

Ibe towering 22ryear-oId from 
Belgrade battered the petulant 

AU51IUUAN OPEN 

McEnroe into submission, 2-4, 6-3, 
1-6, 6-4, 6-0, in a sensational three- 
hour bUtz. 


In the semis, Zhrojinovic will 
play Sweden's Mats WBander, who 
has won the last two Australian 
Opens — but whom Zivojmovic 
beat in the first round at Wimble- 
don earlier this year. 

Wdandex readied the semifinals 
by beating Johan Kiiek of the 
United Stales, 6-3, 7-5, 6-2 in 
Wednesday’s second quarterfinal. 
Die third-seeded WHander seemed 
in control throughout against 
Kiiek. the No. 6 seed and the win- 
ner here in 1981 and 1982. . 

on ; no to T Wilaodcr played the latter part 

* awrw itu- match with his right elbow 

meanit. McEnroe said across the bandaged becanse of reci^ 

xsnt muscle stain. It's usually 
gone in a week, but tlds time it's 


John McEnroe: ‘You’re going to pay for Has — I mean it’ 


net as he wilted under a nonstop 
barrage of power serves and can- 
nonball returns that lad taken the 
Yugoslav to a 4-0 lead m the decid- 
ing fifth set. 

Someday McEnroe may make 
good on his promise. Bat this time 

it was all Zzvminovtc; ranked 66 th 
in the world, he dominated the fi- 
nal two sets. 

“He disappointed me, but he is a 
good guy and igood player,” said 
Zrvqjmovic, who last year had only 
SI 7.601 in tennis earnings (be wQl 
make $24,903 for making the semi- 
finals here). 


getting worse," he sai A It could be 

S within a few days, buz I don't 
it wflL” 

' * Meanwhile, top-seeded Ivan 
Lendl of Czechoslovakia moved 
into the quarterfinals with a 6-3, 6- 
2, 6-7, 6-2 victory over up seeded 
South African Chnsio Steyn. Lendl 
next wiD play Briton John Lloyd; 
Midiid Schapers of the Nether- 
lands win face Stefan Edberg of 
Sweden in other quarterfinals. 
McEnroe’s 10-day stay in Md- 


■tt. 


VANTAGE POINT/ George Veoey 

Boys and Girls Together? The Regents’ Decision 


*!■ , 


I- . 




New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — This was in the coalfields of 
southwest Virginia more than a decade ago. My 
hosts had just finished serving a sumptuous 
Sunday dinner, and some of os were quite con- 
tent to Hop on the porch swing and enjoy the fall 
colors on the opposite ridge. 

The younger generation had another idea for 
the last hour before the sun dropped behind the 
mountain: a touch football game. They pro- 
duced a ball and draped extra T-shirts to create 
sideime markers on the sloping front lawn, and 
then they recruited the sluggards on the front 
porch. 1 was a late-round draft choice. 

1 don’t remember her name but I do remem- 
ber her elbow. Caught me right in the chest and 
sent me tumbling down the Appalachian hill- 
side like some left-over slag from a strip mine. 

She was a student at a local community col- 
lege, bat nothing she had said about life in a coal 
camp had impressed me as much as her elbow 

00 a suicide-squad kickoff return. 

That moment of truth made a feminist of me. 

1 became a walking advocate of the Bill of 
Rights; aD men and all women were created 

|ual, at least in their right to knock somebody 
his feet in a touch football game. 

It didn’t surprise me in the least that shortly 
thereafter women began working in the mines. 
Some of them had been carrying water, fixing 
' care, chopping wood and digging a garden since 
childhood. Why not get pad union wages for 
the same kind of labor, and take their dunces of 
-getting killed or maimed, just like the men? 

The loucb-football experience has helped me 
as a journalist to appreciate the courage of Janet 
Guthrie to race in the Indy 500 — and to brave 
good-old-boy garages. It helped me respect the 
nerve of Nancy Ueberman to walk into a men’s 
basketball game in Harlem and earn the nick- 
name “Big Red," and the poise of Lyrtette 
Woodard when she convinced the Harlem 
Globetrotters she was a sister who could play. 

My battlefield conversion also made me a 
strong supporter of female reporters in press 
boxes, dugouls, clubhouses and wherever else 
they need to go to make a living. The issue of 
nudity is mostly a red herring. A few towels and 


2 


a partition or two can protect the modest. Been 
in a college dormitory lately? 

Having long since slaked out my position mi 
women in sports, I support — with reservations 
— a recent decision by the New York State 
Board of Regents to allow giris to play on teams 
with boys in contact sports. Before they can 
play, however, the girls must first be evaluated 
for fitness by a special panel of a school physi- 
cian, a pK ydraii-^Hii^iifm teacher and, if re- 
quested by the student, a personal doctor. 

The decision is baacatfy a recognition by the 
regents that they cannot legally bar a girl from 


Separate and equal doesn’t 
seem like a bad idea, 
particularly if the bad guys 
don’t get away with trashing 
Title DL 


joining a team, even for a contact sport. They 
are now turning over responsibility to the school 
boards, a move that should produce some mar- 
velous local squabbles in the months to enme. 

The regents are right, and they have no 
choice, but there are still some major dangers in 
contact spoils to women. There is the 
and psychological danger to giris who 
try out, the danger of disrupting the value of 
team sports to adolescent boys and the danger 
of weakening female sports programs. 

The past genera tirai has seen most school 
systems strengthen their female sports pro- 
grams. Separate and equal doesn’t seem like a 
bad idea, particularly if the bad guys don't get 
away with trashing Title IX. Sally Ride, the 
astronaut, has talked about sport's teaching 
women how to feel part of a group effort, and 
there is no denying the health value of lifelong 
athletic participation. 

But too much legal skirmishing could lead to 
a backlash, or a fiscal weakening of female 
sports programs. In the Long run, most women 
will gam the most from vying mostly against 


Rookie Red Wing Goalie Weathers Trial by Flyers 


Con^ikd by Ov Staff Front Dispatches 

DETROIT — Rookie goal tender 
Mark Laforcst look a brief snooze 
before Tuesday night's game with 
Philadelphia, but woke np in time 
i put the Ffyere to sleep. 

After joining Lhe Red Wings ear- 
'**■’- tier in the day. Laforesl, in his first 
National Hockey League start, 
-nrned aside 35 shots and blanked 
; . - he league's second-highest scoring 
earn over the final two periods to 
■" ■ race Detroit to a 4-1 victory. 


NHL FOCUS 


“1 rook a nap before the game 
and — I know h sounds crazy — 1 
dreamed I was going to play well,” 
said (he Welland, Ontario, native. 
“I played well at Adirondack pn 
the American Hockey League], and 
I just tried to play well hoe." La- 
forest, 23, posted a 9-0 record in the 
AHL. 

Tbe Flyers, who enured the 
game with the NHL’s highest 


points total (39), lost for the second 
straight game and fell to 19-6. Phil- 
adelphia had beaten Detroit in tbe 
teams’ last 15 meetings, dating to 
Dec. 6, 1980, and all but once in the 
last 26. 

Other NHL winners Tuesday 
night were Minnesota and Edmon- 
ton; Winnipeg and the New York 
Islanders tied. 


Greg Stefan, who had started De- 
troit's previous 15 games. “I 
thought, ‘What the hell’s the differ- 
ence who he plays against?’ " said 
Detroit Coach Hany Neale, who 
tabbed Laforcst to start against the 
team with the most victories in tbe 
le ag u e. “He’s got to play against 
everybody at one time or another.” 

“1 don't think the shots are any 


i „- 4 v harder up here than they were m 

Laforesl opened the season with llu . t Jia t -f~.. 

the top Red Wing tans dob and 
was summoned Tuesday to relieve 


Pacers Beat Cavs to End Road Slump 




- Ccmytiod by Our Staff From Dispatches 

; RICHFIELD, Ohio— The Indi- 
; na Pacers have had as much luck 
; . <□ tbe road as a faint-hearted trav- 
eling salesman. But Tuesday night 
ley finally earned a commission. 
Herb Williams scored 20 points 
nd Vera Fleming added 17 in hdp 
k Pacers end a 23-game road los- 

- tg streak with a 98-84 National 
askeihall Association victory over 

. e Cleveland Cavaliers. 

The Pacers’ losing skein had 
retched over two seasons, and 
1 as pan of a string in which they 
. id dropped 95 of 114 games on 
' c road since the 1982-83 season . 
- * idiana lost its final 14 road games 
st year after a 114-96 victory at 
hicagoon Feb. 15. 

‘The hardest thing in the world 
~ ay be being devoted Pacer fans," 

- id Coach George Irvine after tfl- 
ana also ended an eight-game 
fnl! slump. 

T can’t say how grateful I am for 
sir support at our home games. I 
-sh we had them on the road with 


NBA FOCUS 




s s 


: “We'vc been averaging very wdl 
’*619] at home. We just need 
w composure, more maturity 
’ ' i more concentration." 

■ ‘Winning one ot the road — 
;. ining one, period —takes a load 
; . our backs," said Pacer rookie 
yman Tisdale, who has been on 
>d for only nine of die team's 23 
d defeats. “We’re going to have 
‘Ti/alis, and we let ourselves get 
sm into a big one this time." he 
“I hope now we can start 
. rung more ballganses." 

. - r $. levdand raced to a 22-7 lead 
.way through the first quarter, 
x' the Pacers outscored the Cavs 


by 48-27 for the rest of the half to 
lead, 55-49, at intermission. With 
the help of six points from Md 
Turpin, Cleveland rallied to dose 
the gap to 69-67 after three quar- 
ters, but its cold fourth quarter 
sealed the loss. 

Other NBA winners Tuesday 
night weft New York. Washington, 
Philadelphia, Boston, Houston, 
Sacramento, Dallas and Seattle: 

Williams’s two baskets and 
Fleming’s three-point play fueled a 
1 1-3 fourth-quarter spurt, and with 
lhe Cavaliers missing seven straight 
shots, Indiana moved to an 80-70 
lead with 8:20 left to play. 

“We’d lost eight straight games, 
and maybe Cleveland wasn't in- 
timidated by a 3-24 team," said 
Williams. 

“Whatever tbe case, 1 think we 
shocked them." 

“We led 22-7 in the first quarter, 
and couldn’t keep it up ” Slid the 
losing coach, George Karl “We 

were awfuL 

“Tbe crowd was on oar backs 
and our lousy free throw shooting" 
— 17 erf 31 for 54.8 percent —“set 
a bad mental tempo." 

“We stunk. That’s bow pathetic 
it was out there," said the Cavs’ 
World B. Free, who sowed 16 
points but was only 7 for 21 from 
the field. “As far as the other guys 
gp, I don’t know, but 1 take every- 
one seriously. Those are profes- 
aonals out there: " 

Roy Hinson led the losers with 
19 points, while John Bagley had 14 ■ 
assists. The Pacos’ Steve Stipano- 
vicb missed all 10 of his field-goal 


attempts, but contributed 10 re- 
bounds. 

“We started off not playing wdl 
and Cleveland playing great." said 
Irvine, “but our bench came in and 
played hard, real hard, and turned 
it all around." (UPJ.AP) 



Herb WOtiams 

7 think we shocked them.’ 


esL “IPs just that the other team 
comes into your end a lot faster. I 
had a lot of shots tonight but that’s 
tbe way I like it. It was fun." 

Philadelphia’s coach, Mike 
Keenan, said Laforest’s starting 
didn’t surprise him, and that the 
rookie’s presence wasn't the only 
reason the Flyers lost. “I really 
thought Detroit outplayed us,” 
Keenan said. “They were hungry, 
particularly in the first period. 
They established their game." 

The teams battled neck-and- 
nedc until Ron Dnguay scored his 
eighth goal of the season late in the 
second period to snap a 1-1 tin 

Laforcst surrendered Dave Pou- 
lin’s ninth goal of the year at 16:21 
of the opening period, but was 
sharp the rest pof the way. He re- 
peatedly thwarted the Flyers, in- 
cluding point-blank saves on Tim 
Kerr and Ron Sutter and a two 
dose-range stops against Murray 
Craven. 

Reed Larson scored on a 65-foot 
slapshot 47 seconds after Poulin 
had given the Flyers the lead, and 
with 1:13 left in the middle period 
Duguay brake the tie when his 50- • 
footer slipped through the legs of 
Flyer goaliender Bob Froese. 

Warren Young added an insur- 
ance tally 17 seconds into the final 
period, and with 2.-Q5 to play 
Dwight Foster added a power-play 
' as tbe Red Wings improved 
record to 7-13-4. (AP, UP I) 


Holmes, Welsh Rugby Star, Turns Pro 


Complied by Oar Staff From Dispatches 

BRADFORD. England— Tory 
Holmes, the Welsh national rugby 
union captain, turned professional 
on Tuesday, joining the rugby 
league dub Bradford Nonhem. 

Holmes, 28, whoplayed amateur 
rugby for Cardiff, the national 
team and tbe all-star British lions, 
signed a 3-year contract reportedly 
£80.000 pounds (about SI 18,000)- 


Said the 28-year-old scmmhalf: 
"This is a big decision for me, bat 1 
am sure I have made the right one. 
The contract is right and I am very 
happy to be turning professional. J 
have happy memories of my days 
with Cardiff and the Welsh rugby 
onio n, but the time is right for me 
to leave. I was planning to retire 
Crum international rugby at the end 
of the year anyway.” (UP!, AFP) 


bourne began with controversy and 
ended the same way. 

He scuffled with a reporter and 
photographer soon after arriving 
and accumulated 52,750 in fines 
following on-court incidents in ear- 
lier matches. 

In Wednesday’s match, Peter 
Belienger. tire tournament referee, 
came on to tire court after tire um- 
pire had asked McEnroe to play a 
let early in the fourth set. “What 
are you doing here?” McEnroe de- 
manded of Belienger. “Get off the 
court” 

During tire altercation, Zivojino- 

vic joined some spectators in a 

courtside box and nibbled on a 
sandwich. “You know how McEn- 
roe is. Every match he tries to do 
tbe same things," he said. “I just sat 
down. 2 don’t drink be meant any- 
thing bad. I mean. . . . What can 1 
say?” 

The capacity center-court crowd 
of 9,500 gave Zivojmovic a stand- 
ing ovation following his triumph. 

McEnroe has never won an Aus- 
tralian Open and has gone through 
1985 without winning a grand slam 
event. 

His latest loss meant he would 


not be able to overtake Lendl at the 
top of the grand prix standings; 
Orel place is worth 5800,000 in bo- 
nus money, and second place about 

5550.000. 

McEnroe, the No. 2 seed, was 
jeered as he stormed off the court 
shortly after his defe&L He failed to 
attend the post-match press confer- 
ence, drawing another fine of 

51.000. He will now begin a three- 
week suspension after passing tire 
$7,500 annual limit. 

McEnroe was not the only player 
to draw a fine Wednesday. Lendl, 
bidding to win this title for the first 
time, was given a code of conduct 
violation for ball abuse in the third 
set and bounced his racquet angrily 
ot a couple of occasions. 

Steyn, ranked 170th worldwide, 
frequently bad Lendl off balance. 
Lendl, tbe world’s Up-rated player, 
delivered four aces in his first ser- 
vice game and breezed the first two 
sets. 

But Steyn, a 24-year-old gradu- 
ate of the Umvereity of Miami, 
rallied in the third. He led, 5-2, had 
a set point at 5-3 and, after Lendl 
had fought bade, look tbe tie break- 
er by 7-3. (AP, UP I) 



Ha An o riren d Pin* 

Slobodan ZJvojinovic, daring bis upset quarterfinal victory. 


SCOREBOARD 


Soccer 


Basketball 


equal competition, that is to say, other women. 
Nothing nhp nlfl be allowed to disrupt the ff»rn< 

It would also be foolish to underestimate the 
dangers to some giris because of tire general 
diffe rence in strength after puberty. When John 
Lloyd tried to practice with his wife, Chris 
Evert, one of the great champions of her sport, 
be was too strong for her. In our town baseball 
league, some of our 11- and 12-year-old boys 
were hitting line drives that were a Hangar to 
some boys and most giris. 

Musdc and size are huge advantages in con- 
tact sports. In the past, even football coaches 
with no-cut policies have found ways to discour- 
age weaker candidates from contact drills. It 
will be harder now, if a pond certifies that a giri 
is strong enough to imp- it — and no 
mistake, same giris wiB be able to take it. 

Civil liberties aside, is there really a need to 
allow giris into wrestling, the most intimate of 
sports? Maybe I’m a puritan or have a dirty 
min d but just when boys and girls we discover- 
ing the complexities of sexuality, is there any 
justification for letting them wrestle together? 

Men must leant to compete with women, for 
space in law school, for space at a crowded news 
conference, but shouldn't there be some place 
where beys can retain the old values erf male 
hooding? Shouldn't there be a place where giris 
can establish parallel values? 

In the past, many successful male high-school 
coaches mixed in a ritual taboo against dating, a 
fYWitemp t for wom en. t» ynrn pf gentleness and 
crying with an admomtion 6T“don‘t act Eke a 
gui" In the all-male sanctuary 'of a clubhouse, 
boys have learned to challenge, strut, boast — 
and keep their feelings to themselves. 

Maybe it’s time those values were challenged, 
but tbie unyielding toughness of sports, the sense 
of being an endangered warrior, often comes in 
handy “out there” in a competitive world. 

Sexually integrated teams just might change 
tbe conflicting balance of teamwork and sdf- 
interest that athletes team. Yet one worthy, fe- 
male teammate or opponent, like the one who 
clobbered me, might r emin d men and women 
that we’re aD in it together, and that tbe differ- 
ences are not as absolute as we used to think. 


World Cup Qualifying 

Qualify I rq records or ibo M teams mat wdl 
COWMM hi farm* Uferid cup soccer limb la 
Mexico from May 31 to Jom »- 

MEXICO: Hoit. 

ITALY: rtuMnnlnn 

POLAND (wiener, tororoax Group Ul vs. 
Greec*won3-l (athorn*)*-l (away).vL Alba- 
nia 3-3 (ham*) 1-0 (Oway). vs. Belgium u 
(away) 0-0 (home). 

BELGIUM Mmv of Mavaff bOtWMa Et>- 
HP— Onwi W n— s livsJHboNBl- 
1 (home) Mliwy), vs. Ornop 0 0 (a way H-0 
(homal, vs Poland 3-4 (horn*) 04 (away). 
Playoff: vs. wmwtow dP 1-0 (home) 14 
(qwqv); QOBTpflat* 3-3. qualified on owav- 
BOd» rule. 

WEST GERMANY (*Vnir, Enrn—i 
Groans: vs. Sweden 24 (home) 3-2 (away), 
v«. Mafia 3-3 (away I *4 (tom*), vs. Portugal 
3-1 (away) 0-1 (home), vs. CxadmlovaMa 5-1 
(away) 3-9 (ham*). 

PORTUGAL (ramer-ep, nraeta Groan 
3>: vs. Iw d t n 1-0 (owov) 1-3 (Horn*), vs. 
CxactaslovoMa 3-) (Mom*) M (away), vs. 
Molto 3-1 lowavl 3-3 (home), vs. West Germa- 
ny (home) 1-0 (owavl. 

ENGLAND (winner, European Group jJ: 
vs. Finland SO (home) 1-1 (ewavhvv Turkey 

0- 0 (away) 5-4 (heme), vs. Northern Ireland 1- 
a (away) M (home), v*. Romania 0-0 (oway) 

1 - 1 (home). 

NORTHERN IRELAND U u»i**l VA Buro- 
Ptw Grow 3): VS. Finland 0-1 (awav) 3-1 
(hemal, vs. Romania M (home) 1-0 (away), 
vs. Ena land 0-1 (home) 0-4 towny], vs. Turkey 
34 (home) 04 (away). 

FRANCE (wtaaer. European Grow* 4): vs. 
Luxembourg 44 (owov) 54 (home), vs. Bai- 
aorlo 14 (home) 0-3 (away), vs. East Germa- 
ny 34 (home) 04 (oway). vs. Yugoslavia 04 
(away) 34 (home). 

BULGARIA (raoaer-ap, Eur— ■■■ Group 

4): vs. Yuposlavto(H>{away)3-1 (home), v*. 
France 0-1 (away) 24 (home), vs. Lurom- 
bourg44Choine) 31 (oway),vs.£a*IG*rmo- 
0V VO .Uuatel 14 (crwavL - - 

- HUNGARY (winter, Ecrmai Group 5 ): 
vs. Austria 3-1 (home) >4 (away), vs. Nether- 
lands 3-1 (mnr) O-f <m mtl. vs Cyprus 3-1 
(Owavl 34 (home). 

DENMARK (wfaucr, European Group •): 
vs Norway V4 (home) 5-1 (owov). vs Switzer- 
land O-l (awav) 04 (home l, vs Ireland 34 
(home) 4-1 lavrov). vs Soviet union 4-2 
(home) O-l (awav). 

SOVIET UNION (nmner-o*. European 
Group *): vs Inland 0-1 I away) 24 (hemp), 
vs Norway 1-1 (awav) |4<hem*l,vsSwfter- 
iand 3-2 (awav) 44 (home), vs Denmark 34 
(away) 14 (home). 

SPAIN (winner, Eurapeoe Group 71: vs 
’ Wales 34 (home) 44 (away), vs Scotland j-3 
(awav) 14 (heme), vs Iceland 2-1 (awav) 3-1 
(home). 

SCOTLAND ( wtaweref plovelf between So- 
HWM 7I WM ■PidO i e u nlii Ou sp 


vs Seam 3-1 (heme) 0-1 (awav), vs Wales 0-1 
(home) 1-1 (bomel. Pkivull: vs Australia 34 
(home) 04 (awav). 

ARGENTINA (winner. Seatk American 
Group II: vs Venezuela 32 (away) 34 
(home), vs Calemble 31 (awav) 14 (heme), 
vs Peru 0-1 (oway) 32 (heme). 

URUGUAY (winner. South American 
Osaap3): vs ecuudor 31 (home) 34 (owov). 
vs Chile 32 (owov) 31 (name). 

BRAZIL (winner. Soon American Group 
3): vs BolMa 30 (owov) l-l home, vs Para- 
guay 34 (away) M (home). 

PARAGUAY (winner of playoffs between 
ru nn er s — ef South American Group* 1 / 3/1 
and lhe thir d plac e team In Groan t): vs 
Bolivia 1-1 (awav) 30 (home), vs Brazil 33 
(home) M (oway). First ptOYotf: vs CPtom- 
bk>34 (home) 14 (awDv).*oggroooto4-2. Sec- 
ond playoff: vs Chile 34 (home) 32 (away): 
ogpregofe 51 

CANADA (WCBW *f North, Centro! Amerf- 
cen and Caribbean playoff*) : First round bye. 
Second round : vs Holtl 24 (home) 34 towoy ), 
vs Guotomolo 31 (heme) 1-1 (owov). Third 
round: vs Cnrto Rico 1-1 (horn*) 44 (owov). 
Honduras 14 (away) 31 (home). 

IRAQ (Asian avail Her): First round: vs 
Lebanon 34 (home) 44 (owavl. vs Jordan 33 
(away) 34 (homo), vs Qatar 34 (oway) 31 
(home). Second round: vs United Arab Emir- 
ates 33 (away) S3 I home] ; opg.e uu te 4-4. 
Iraq Qualified on away-goats rule. Third 
round: vs Syria 30 (away) 31 (homo): ag- 
gregate 31. 

SOUTH KOREA (Astae eeallfler): First 
round: vs Nepal 30 (away) 44 (home), vs 
Malaysia 31 (away) VLJhome). Second 
round: vs Indonesia 24 (home) 4-1 (oway). 
Third round: vs Japan 31 (awav) 14 (home). 

ALGERIA Uertcaa euoRflort: First round 
bye. Second round: vs Angola 44 lawovl 32 
(home). Third round: vs Zambia 34 (home) 
14 (mur). Fourth (Final) nuul: vs Tunisia 
31 (away) 30 (home). 

MOROCCO (Africa eoellfler): First 
round; Sierra Leone 14 (owovl 44 (home). 
Second round: vs Malawi 30. (home) 30 
(awairLThird round: vs Eavnt 30 (awav) 30 
(home). Fourth (Final) round: vs Ubvo 30 
(home) 14 Ionov), 


National Basketball Association Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic DhrlUon 



W L 

Pci. 

GB 

Boston 

14 2 

JM9 

— 

Phliodelpnio 

IS 1 

SSi 

6 

New Jersey 

10 « 

324 

4V> 

Wasiilnatan 

8 ID 

444 

6 

New York 

5 14 

.263 

ll'l 

Ceetral Division 



Milwaukee 

IS 7 

A82 



Detroit 

12 8 

ADD 

1 

Atlanta 

8 11 

.421 

5IO 

Cleveland 

7 II 

387 

6 

Chicago 

7 M 

333 

71S 

Indiana 

4 14 

xn 

9 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Midwest Division 



Houston 

14 4 

JU 

— 

Denver 

12 7 

jtn 

IW 

Utoii 

12 8 

ABO 

2 

Dallas 

10 7 

368 

2*4 

Son Antank} 

10 9 

324 

3W 

Sacramento 

4 12 

333 

7 


Petfflc Division 



L_A. Lakers 

IS 3 

jm 

— 

Portland 

12 * 

371 

5 

Seattle 

« 16 

474 

7 

Golden Stale 

6 13 

381 

9 

UL CUppors 

6 12 

333 

Ola 

Phoenix 

3 16 

.156 

13 


European 


WEST GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 
Stuttgart X Boyer LMrkuan 2 
Cologne X wgidhof Mwdielm I 
H onoue r 3 Kaiserslautern 2 
EinfraeM Frankfort X Hamouro 0 


Petals: Barosslo Mdnehenglodboch. Bav- 
eroMunk*i23: MaroburoZT; Bavvr Lnvsrku- 
■en 30; WMdbof Mannheim tS; BochunwStun- 
gort 17; Cotoane, Boyer Ucnanoeiw Kutser- 
stoutem 14; Schalke, Be r u srio Dortmund. 
Elntrocftt Frankfurt, Hanover 14; Soar, 
bruecken H; Nurember g Id; Fortuna Duee- 
eetdorf f. 


NFL Leaders 



TUESDAY'S RESULTS 

t« If 21 3t- M 
New York n 24 n 71— lit 

Cummings 314 34 1 *. Tucker 312 04 It; 
Evans7-11 3S 10, English 314 44 12, Lever 6-11 
30 12. Rebeends: Denver 47 (Cooper tl. New 
York 57 (Bannister 101 . Asrisls: Denver 24 
(Lever 4). New York 27 (Walker 4). 
Portland je i» 39 ss — iis 

Washington 37 25 st 27—110 

Moiane 1321 32 22. Rukmd 321 310 24; 
V i m dawaghP 1325 1310 30. Thompson 314 34 
21. Rebounds: Portland 42 (Corri2).woNilna- 
ton a 1 Rutand IS). Assists: Portland 24 1 val- 
entine 7). Wash! noton 31 (wiUfams 12). 
Indiana 25 3* 1 * 2*— *6 

Cleveland 27 22 » 17-04 

WIIUom»3l434S0. Fleming 34 1-1 17: Hin- 
son 7-1737 1*. Turoln 3153013 Free 7-21 2-4 
13 Rebounds: Indiana 4S (Stteanevlcn W), 
Cleveland 4? (Hinson. Tuna knB). Assists: Indi- 
ana 27 ( Richardson S). Cleveland 23 (Bosley 
M). 

P tata d eta hta so 32 32 2 s— 127 

Detroit 24 3» 27 27—1*7 

Malone 311 11-11 27. Ervins 315 30 II; V. 
Jahnron 1322 35 2£ CdfflPbei; 315 34 2R Re- 
bounds: Philadelphia 45 (Malone 17). Detroit 
46 (Curotan 10 ). Assist*: ptuiodripnia 27 
(Cheeks SI. Detroit 27 (Thomas. Dumnrs 71. 

32 22 32 23-112 
22 «2 27 34-110 
Lloyd 318 74 a Sampson 1318 1-4 21; 
Nance 1323 11-15 35. Doris 7-22 34 17. Re- 
bounds: Phoenix 55 (Nance 14). Houston 51 
(Sampson IS). Assists: Phoenix 28 (Davis, 
HumMMies 81. Houston 34 (Lucas 8). 

34 24 24 23- 112 
21 27 27 24—187 
McHale 11-14 7-727. Afnge 311 1-2 17; Pros- 
per 11-17 5-7 2B, Cummings 318 74 25. Re- 


bounds: Boston 40 1 McHale 10), Milwaukee 48 
(BreuerlQ).A*sl*ts: Bosun 31 (Ainaee). Mil- 
waukee 25 (Prossev 101. 

Chicago 34 14 38 33-118 

Sacromenio 34 27 34 36-IJ1 

Johnsonll-1474 29. ThMM 13173327; Wool- 
ridae 31* 5-7 2X Maey 7-ID 1-1 17. Rebound*: 
CMcooo 45 (Corzlnr 8). Sacromenio 58 
IKIPne 18). Assists: CMcoao 18 (Macy 10). 
Sacramento 31 iTneus 10). 

Dallas 28 33 a 24—187 

Golden Slate 24 18 38 27—188 

Aguirre 1318 1-3 21. Donaldson 8-7 4-5 20; 
Snort 13235-425. Floyd317S-S7I.Refaoaad4: 
Dalle* S3 (Donaldson 12 ). Golden Stole 48 
( Smith 10 ). Assists: Do no 4 26 (Dov Is 41. Gold- 
en Stale 21 (Floyd 7 ). 

Sea Antonio 17 24 ffl 33-103 

Seattle 23 33 27 38 — 123 

McDaniel 1314 3s 23. Henderson 5-10 7-7 17; 
Mlicneii 1322 4-5 3a Hughes 7-15 54 23. Re- 
bounds: San Antonio 30 (Gilmore 7). Scam* 38 
(Slkmall.AHtats: San Antonie 2B (.‘Mere 10). 
Seattle 36 (Henderson 7). 

Selected College Results 

EAST 

Bataan 76. Worcester Tech 49 
Bentiov so. Lowell 48 
Brooklyn Co L 74. Concordia. N.Y. 72 
Columbia 44. NYU 56 
Connecticut col. 8A Nlcnoit 9» 

Cornell 73. Martel 65. OT 
Fairfield 09. Brawn 67 
Fordham 46. Hartford 42 
Hotetro ML Iona 58 
Maryland 74. Frirleien Dkftinson 51 
Seton Hull 44 Princeton 4 
Siena 51. Ullco 5D 
St. Jam's 85. weoner 55 
SOUTH 

Auburn 84. Wesl Virginia 57 
Geor g etown 75. Georg* Mason 63 
Kentucky 84. Cincinnati 54 
Memphis SI. 81 Keni St. 68 
Mississippi 72. Mississippi COL 53 
Richmond 64 Vet Commonwealth 57 
MIDWEST 
indlano 82, Notre Dame 67 
I own 55. Drake 43 
New Orleans 75. Lavnia. ill. 84 
Ohio St. BO. Florida 73 
Ohio U. 85. Morsnail 7* 

Purdue 82. San Francisco SI. 70 
SOUTHWEST 
Arkansas 74. Son Dleeo SI. 44 
Texas- El Paso 48, New Mexico St. 59 
W. Texas SL 07. Panhandle St. 47 
FAR WEST 

Arizona SL 83. Denver 45 
Californio 74, CoL-Dovis 51 
Fresno SI. 41. Wichita SI. 51 
Fullerton 78. Univ. of San Diego u 
Howell 78 Cal Stare-Long Beach 74 
Loufslona Slate 70, Howall-Hllo 41 
New Mexico 132 , us. inn. 75 
Son JOM st. 74. Sm FrondOCD 55 
Utah SI. 82. Brigham Young 80 
Washing tan 75. Si. Manrx Calif. 54 


Football 


Tta » nnu i e * d hen 

Frank McAvetuse (9), who had set np one goal and scored 
another in last month’s first-leg victory, helped Scotland be- 
come the final quafifier for the 1986 World Cop soccer finals 
.by holding Australia to a 0-0 draw Wednesday in Melbourne. 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
TEAM OFFENSE 

Yank Rah Pats 
5138 1274 3847 

4871 1787 2702 

4858 1375 3463 

4572 1747 2B23 

4470 1772 2678 

4407 1712 2675 

43*7 1548 2837 

4275 1740 2535 

4127 1375 2742 

4857 1877 2162 
3923 1784 2137 

3110 111! 2492 

3537 1225 2312 

2512 1376 7134 

TEAM DEFENSE 

Torts Rush Pass 
3517 1314 2303 

3775 1176 2597 

3840 1347 2473 

mi io» om 
3775 1357 2418 

4026 1477 2527 

4364 1552 2752 

4313 1775 23)3 

4361 1407 2754 

4463 1721 2742 

460) 1526 3075 

478) 1898 2883 

4M3 2157 2783 

5020 1447 3373 

INDIVIDUAL' 


Green Bov 

436S 

1771 

2577 

SI. i-euis 

*245 

1551 

2694 

Philadelphia 

424J 

1374 

2848 

Washington 

4232 

2008 

2224 

Minnesota 

3PM 

>187 

2399 

Atlanta 

3892 

1870 

2022 

Tampa Bay 

3773 

1243 

2479 

New Orleans 

3457 

1447 

2188 

Rams 

3411 

1623 

1984 

Detroit 

3478 

1223 

2255 

TEAM DEFENSE 




Yards 

Rush 

Pass 

Chicago 

3418 

1077 

2341 

Giants 

3513 

1444 

2269 

Washington 

3634 

1433 

7141 

Rams 

3710 

1258 

2451 

Green Bay 

4009 

1758 

2251 

Philadelphia 

4051 

187* 

71(2 

San Francisco 

4219 

1434 

2785 

Dallas 

4221 

1370 

2851 

St. Louis 

4256 

1876 

2378 

Minnesota 

4433 

1864 

2M* 

New Orleans 

4500 

1582 

3918 

Detroit 

4551 

213S 

2416 

Atlanta 

4856 

1728 

3199 

Tamna Bay 

4919 

IB67 

3050 


INDIVIDUAL 




RaNwrs 



ATT YDS AVG LG TD 

Riggs, AH. 

333 1343 

42 

33 8 

Pavtan, CM. 

253 1306 

S3 

40 8 

Dorset). DalL 

250 1102 

4 A 

40 7 

Wilder. T.B. 

272 1D62 

3 K 

24 B 

Morris, Giants 

212 *25 

44 

58 14 


Quarterback* 

ATT COM YDS TD I NT 


Hockey 


NHL Sta ndings 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Potrfc* Division 



w 

L 

T Pts 1 

GF GA 

PhlladelPMo 

17 

6 

0 

38 

114 

a 

Washington 

14 

T 

1 

31 

75 

75 

NY istonders (0 

a 

6 

24 

92 

71 

NY Rangers 

11 

» 

1 

a 

71 

84 

Pittsburgh 

* 

n 

3 

21 

*3 

87 

New Jersey 

7 

12 

T 

17 

77 

07 


Adams DivMaa 




Boston 

12 

a 

4 

a 

73 

79 

Montreal * 

12 

7 

9 

27 

104 

re 

Quebec 

12 

10 

1 

a 

■5 

73 

Buffalo 

12 

n 

1 

2S 

87 

76 

Hartford 

IT 

IT 

0 

22 

57 

BP 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 



Nonis Dirtefeu 




St. Lams 

10 

7 

3 

a 

78 

B4 

Chicago 

7 

TT 

4 

a 

97 

10 a 

Minnesota 

7 

» 

6 

a 

74 

94 

Detroit 

9 

K 

4 

>a 

» 

118 

Toronto 

S 

13 

2 

13 

77 

103 


Sanrtbe D Frisian 




Edmonton 

18 

4 

3 

a 

127 

90 

CoWary 

12 

8 

3 

a 

103 

84 

Vancouver 

9 

14 

3 

21 

101 

114 

Winnipeg 

9 

14 

3 

a 

70 

121 

Las Angeles 

S 

14 

3 

13 

77 

127 

TUESDAY* RESULTS 




Amlel (S).Howerchuk (IS), Motion (4). Car- 
ry l* (21; Latantaho 2 (14), Bran) Sutter (4). 
FkJtlev m. Shuts on goof: Winnipeg (on 
Smith 1 1M-1D4-8.- n,Y. Ishmders (on Bau- 
Chort) 674- 21. 

(MCOOO 1 1 6—2 

Minnesota 1 4 4-7 

BlvottoO 2 19), Gronam (*;, Me xeanev 3 
(II), Nil boo (7), Qccorofll (6), Bylaws (11); 
Watson (3L Paterson (4). Shots on goal: Chi- 
cago (an Cony) 166-17—37; Minnesota (an 
Brnrnan) s-13-11-32. 

1 a 5-6 

1 2 1-1 

Coffey (10), Kurtl 2 (t2), Gregg (1 ),MacTo- 
vlsh (II). Napier 17). McSeriev Hunter 
(5); WltOamt (7), CMotme (7),Tgvior {?;, Ket- 
)y [1J. Shot* on goal: EtbnanWi Can Janecvfc) 
12-7-14 — 33; Us Angeta (an Fuhr) 7-12-10- 
31. 



Restart 




McMahon. Chi. 

237 

139 1838 13 

8 


ATT 

YDS 

AVO 

LG TD 

Montano, 5.F. 

306 

238 2647 17 

7 

Alton, Raiders 


304 

1292 44 

61 

7 

Hlppfe, Def. 

303 

148 2300 16 

13 

McNeft, Jets 


221 

nos so 

49 

3 

□.White. Doll. 

480 

236 2831 18 

15 

Mock. Ciev. 


188 

758 5.1 

61 

7 

Simms. Giants 

405 

238 3140 17 

15 

Warner, sea. 


248 

941 IS 

24 

7 


Receivers 




CJamefciLE. 


174 

912 4 3 

6S 

4 


NO YDS 

AVO LG TO 

Qaorteroacks 



Craig. S.F. 

77 

843 I1J 

73 

5 


ATT COM 

YDS TD INT 

HIM, DgtL 

70 1044 14.9 

53 

7 

0*arftiL Jets 


386 

237 3145 a 

6 

Monk,' Wash. 

67 

BS4 127 

53 

1 

Estason. Cin. 


328 

196 2551 20 

9 

Lofton. G-B. 

SB 

7S4 164 

34 

3 

Fouls. SJ). 


175 

222 3045 24 

16 

Clark, wash. 

SB 

764 '12 

55 

3 

Marino. Mia. 


466 

274 3464 22 

18 

'Ecertag rroachdawns) 



Kenner. K.C 


319 

17) an IS 

9 


TD Rash Dec Ret Pts 


Receivers 




Morris. Giants 

14 

14 0 

0 

84 


NO 

YDS 

AVO LG TD 

Craig, SJ=. 

12 

7 5 

0 

72 

Jamas. S.O. 


72 

915 12J 

67 

5 

Dickerson, Rams 10 

10 0 

0 

40 

Christensen, RaWrs 

48 

854 !U 

41 

S 

Darseff. Daft 

IS 

7 3 

0 

40 

Loroent, Sea. 


46 1072 M2 

43 

5 

Parian, CM. 

10 

8 2 

0 

40 

Wool folk, Hou. 


64 

466 MA 

80 

3 

Scoriag (tacking) 




Allen. Raiders 
LI ppj. pm. 
Brooks, Cln. 
Byner. Ctev. 
DovonporL MkL 


Tennis 


Australian Open 


PMIodafpMa 1 e 0—1 

Demit I 1 2—4 

Lor son (7). Duguay (I). Yeung I3L FWtr 


Ivan LendL Czechoslovakia def. Christa 
stevn, South Africa, M, «, 4-7 (3-7) 4-1 


Stallworth, pm. 63 757 11D 41 4 

Scoring (Touchdown*) 

TD Run Roc Ret Pts 
12 7 3 0 72 

12 0 ID 2 72 

10 5 5 D 40 

10 8 2 0 40 

K) • 2 0 40 

Scoring (Kicking] 

PAT FG La Pis 
Anderson. Pm. 31-31 2644 53 107 

Leahy. Jots 3M7 21-27 S3 97 

BroetfeClA 37-39 20-27 53 97 

Korils, Den. 34-37 21-34 48 77 

Revel*. NUg. 3740 19-23 O 94 

Pu«ttr» 

NO YARDS LONG AVG 
Stark, md. 65 3000 46 462 

Roby. Mia. 47 2 M0 63 432 

Camarilla N.E. 82 3562 75 434 

Mctreniv. an. 47 7112 u 43.1 

Mdislplenko. ID. 58 2477 67 422 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
TRAM OFFENSE 


Butler. Chi. 
Andersen. ND. 
Murray, Def. 
lawebuike. t.tl 
L uckhurst, AIL 


Celemm Mina 
Lanoeto. Giants 
Donnelly, AIL 
Hatcher, Rgms 
Buford, CM. 


PAT FG LB Ph 
44-44 23-28 46 113 
74-25 29-29 55 77 
27.28 22-26 51 73 
25-76 2046 S3 85 
25-25 20-23 53 85 

Punters 

NO YARDS LONG AVG 
37 2503 62 417 

64 309 48 0.9 

59 2574 id 434 

72 3074 67 4U 
56 2400 69 42J) 


Transition 


□ 


C2): Potato (7). Shots ea goal: PMiodeiphia 
(on Latarost) 7-14-13-34; Detroit (on Freese) 

Quartet fluuli 

SlaDedenZNellnavlc.Yugeslavta.dBf.Jehn 

Chicago 

Yards 

4806 

Rash 

2373 

Pass 

2515 

12-14-11—37. 

McEnroe, U-S. 2-4. F4 1-4. 4-4, 40. 

Giants 

4685 

IBM 

2821 

Wkutaeg 12 10-4 

Mats WlltosJer, Sunday del Johan Kriek, 

Dallas 

4650 

1516 

3134 

K.Y. (itnhn 2 2 6 0—4 

South Africa, M.7-4 6-2. 

Smt Francisco 

4587 

1842 

2727 


FOOTBALL 

Notional Football League 
BUFFALO— Waived Vince Ferragc 
auerterbaek. Aeaalnfed Jim Valek odm 
Iratlve asstetam » coach Hwik But low 
NEW O RLEANS— Released Male 
BarnwelL wide receiver. 

COLLEGE 

. VANDERBILT— Announced the real 
Nan of George MacIntyre, foomaff cod 












INTERNATIONAL HEK VIJ) TR1BI NE. T1U RSDAV. DECEMBER 5. 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


PEOPLE 


Punishment for Spring Status Puzzle for Tiny French Holding F dm on Biko Banned 

v MT J C7 « , 1 , nv. In 1983. the pope gave par 


W ASHINGTON —The tough- 
est thing about catching a spy 


is <w^»ng that he gets the punish- 
ment he deserves. As soon as one is 


arrested his attorney starts bargain- 
ing for a lighter sentence in ex- 
change for the Fink’s revealing bow 
much information he turned over 
to the other side: 

“Hello, Justice Department? 
This is Mat O'Hara representing 
Collard Cosmos, the weasel who < 
sold the plans 


m 


for the Stealth 
bomber to the 
Bulgarians. 

What kind of 
deal are you of- 
fering us?" 

“We don't ne- 
gotiate plea bar- 
gains for spies, 

O'Hara, Your 
guy sold out his vwn — -ih 

country and the BuchwaW 

government in lends to hang him by 
(he neck until he is dead." 

“You better think it over. Except 
for the Stealth bomber you have no 
idea what secrets Collard walked 
away with, and we have no inten- 
tion of telling you if you keep de- 
manding a pound of flesh.” 

“We're not talking about some 
two-bit code clerk, O'Hara. Cos- 
mos is the biggest Fish we've caught 
in years. We intend to put him in 
the freezer for life." 

□ 

“What if 1 were to tell you that 
my client is willing to name over 
120 people in the U. S. government 
who are still on the KGB payroll?" 

■'O'Hara, did it ever occur to you 
that we may not want to know who 
they are? The more spies the gov- 


ernment uncovers, the worse we 
look in Washington. Every time we 
arrest somebody, Congress wants 
to know why it took ns so long to 
flush him out. We reject your offer 
for the Esi of KGB agents, and 
we're still bolding the position that 
Cosmos has to serve a minimum of 
20 years.” 

told you my client smuggled* blue- 
prints of “Star Ware’ in Nancy Rea- 
gan's cosmetic case when die went 
to Geneva?" 

"That’s impossible.” 

“Here are the films of Gorba- 
chev switching cosmetic cases with 
Nancy at the airport. My client 
knows the whole story and will tdl 
you how be did it for a reduced 
sentence." 

“The law is the law. Every person 
in this country must be punished 
according to his crime: In this case 
Cosmos has to do at least seven 
years for compromising the securi- 
ty of the nation.” 

□ 


By Christopher S. Wxcn 

New York Times Service 


S T. PIERRE. Sl Pierre and 
Miquelon — Once upon a 
time on the east coast of Canada 
there lived a French cokray called 
Sl Pierre and Miquelon- 
Then in 1958 the islands were 
renamed a territory, and in 1976 
they became an overseas depart- 
ment of Fiance. Last May, Paris 
redesignated them a “ collecti - 
i riti >" and the inhabitants are not 
sure where that leaves them now. 

The barren islands, which in- 
clude SL Rene, Miquelon and 
T jin glMie, sit blanketed by fog 
most of the year a dozen miles 
south of Newfoundland. They are 
the last vestiges of the empire 
France bdd in North America, 
before it lost out to Britain more 
than two centuries ago. 

When the inlands were made a 
department on a par with metro- 
politan France, their new status 
collided with the tariff structure 
of the European Community, to 
which France belongs. 

SL Pierre and Miquelon Lm- 


“Apparently you don't realize 
what a predicament you're in. You 
people have spies coming out of 
your ears and spies coming out of 
your socks. If you don’t show mer- 
cy to Cosmos HI advise him to 
remain mum about the nuclear 
submarine codes Lhat he has 


CANADA ^k- Ocean 


CANADA Ocean 

— -pjk 




1 


l M 3T 


HBOUELOftl 


Zimbabwe has been chosen for 
the shooting of a film about the 
black South African leader Steve 
Kko by Sir Richard Attenborough, 
an Information Ministry official 
said Wednesday in Harare. Biko 
died in police detention in Septem- 
ber 1977 after receiving extensive 
head injuries while in custody. At- 
tenborough's location manager 
said the director would probably 
hire a relatively unknown actor for 
the key role, as he did when he 
selected Ben Kingsley to play Mo- 
h atwkxs K. Gamin. 


ay. In 1983. the pope gave pennis. j 
sion for the validation of their mar- 
riage. They renewed their wedding \ - 
vows and their marriage was retro. ■ 
actively blessed by a Catholic '• 
priest. Thev have two children. I . 
D 


set 


stashed away in a pumpkin in the 
northeast part of tne United 


Rambo for Holidays 
Canceled by BBC TV 

IVuied Pros International 

LONDON — The BBC planned 


to air the Sylvester Stallone film 
“First Blood" at Christmastime but 


decided to delay it until a season 
when fewer children were likely to 
be watching, a broadcasting source 
said Wednesday. 

The BBC confirmed that it had 
canceled the showing of “First 
Blood.” Bill Cotton, director of 
BBC television, said a BBC official 
had viewed the film and “decided 
to postpone it untQ a more suitable 
placing could be be found." 


northeast part of the United 
States” 

“What sub codes?” 

“I can’t say because we might 
have to sell them to another coun- 
try for legal expenses if you make 
us go to trial ” 

“O’Hara, we have an open-and- 
shut caseoo yonr client committing 
treason. No matter what informa- 
tion you say he can turn over to us 
he still will have to rot for 30 days 
in the county jafl.” 

“I can’t behove my ears. Collard 
made one lousy mistake of selling 
his country down the river, and 
when he says he’s sorry and offers 
to make amends, your response is 
that he spend a month behind 
bars.” 

“What do you think Cosmos 
should get for cooperating with 
u ST 

“It wouldn't bother me if you 
rhatyd him with one count of fail- 
ing to curb his dog.” 

“The government can live with 
that We were afraid you were go- 
ing to bold out for die Medal of 
Honor.” 


SL Pierre and Miquelon im- 
ports about 70 percent of its sup- 
plies, including fuel and building 
materials, from Canada. (The 
rest, including clothing and con- 
sumer goods, is shipped from Le 
Havre by way of Nova Scotia.) 
Canadian goods became subject 
to stiff tariffs that threatened to 
double the cost of living. Fishing, 
the only viable industry, faced 
qmilflr problems because fish 
caught off Canada would Tall 
within France’s quota in the EG 

So Paris created a different cat- 
egory for SL Pierre and Mique- 
lon, to just about everyone’s con- 
fusion. 

“We were proud to call our- 
selves a department. * said Rent 
Dagort, a local businessman. 
“Now, when we say we are a 
collectivity, we don’t know our- 
selves what it means." 

Like Guadeloupe and Marti- 
nique in the Caribbean, SL Pierre 
ana Miquelon is a regional anom- 
aly. with ties to France that reach 
bade three and a half centuries. 
The brightly painted frame 
houses that hog the rocky hillside 
of SL Pierre, the only town, could 
be in Maine: But the French tri- 
color flies over public buildings, 
and bine and white French signs 
mark the narrow streets traveled 
by Peugeots and Citrotas. 

“The architecture of the houses 




Chritiophgr & Wton/Tba Now Volfc ftw 

The harbor at St. Pierre, only town in St Pierre and Miquelon. 


is much daser to that of North 
America than to France,” said 
Georges Poulet, a former gover- 
nor who married and retired in 
Sl Pierre. “Bui when you go to 
the United States or Canada, 
when you come back here, you 
feel you have arrived in a French 
village.” 

Paul Dijon d, a former French 
minister of overseas develop- 
ment, Dew to SL Pierre this fall to 
lest the electoral waters. He want- 
ed to run for one of the two seats 
allotted to the islands in the 
French legislature. 

France, like Britain, does not 
require its politicians to live in 
their constituencies. After Jac- 
ques Vendroux, a relative of 
Charles de Gaulle, was elected a 
deputy from Sl Pierre and Miq- 
uelon, “he never came back," an 
islander recalled. The town coun- 
cil was sympathetic to Dijoud, 
but some townspeople want the 
candidacy to go to one of their 
own. 

France ha* been slow to con- 
cede the islanders full control 
over their lives. Military doctors 
from France run the hospitaL 


Gendarmes are rotated from Par- 
is to keep order on the islands, 
winch cover about 93 square 
miles (242 square kilometers). 

“There are 35 gendarmes, and 
they have nothing to do,” said 
Hubert Roulet, a tan driver. 
“There is no crime because there 
is no place to ga” 

By one estimate, France has 
been spending $26 million a year 
on the 6,200 inhabitants. The 
government employs about half 
the local work force. Sl Pierre's 
television and radio station has 
80 people from France handling 
local news and satellite broad- 
casts from the mother country. 
“The island is loaded with civil 
servants,” said Jean-Piene An- 
drieux, a hold owner and Cana- 
da’s honorary consul. 

France maintain* a conspicu- 
ous presence partly because of 
potential oil deposits in the sur- 
rounding Atlantic waters. No oD 
has been found, and f-awaHa has 


with tire Parisians sent to govern 
them. Last February angry work- 
ers from the town's fish process- 
ing plant barged into tire office of 
the prefect appointed by Paris, 
Girard Lefebvre, marched him 
down to the harbor and deported 
him to Canada after he tried to 
settle a labor dispute. 

It was the latest in. a lively his- 
tory of small rebellions. In 1965, 
after a wave of strikes, sit-ins and 
demonstrations. . the governor 
summoned troops from a warship 
under cover of darkness. They 
did not leave until 1974. 


“The villagers called a general 
strike but it didn’t last long; be- 
cause the local girls married the 
invaders," Andneux recalled. 

Unrest also broke out in 1975 
and 1983. Some islanders waved 
small Canadian fla gs as a gesture 
of defiance. But most admit that 
SL Pierre and Miquelon would 
fare no better under Canada. 


disputed France’s claim to a 200- 
mile offshore economic zone: 


mile offshore economic zone: 

The islanders, descendants 
mostly of Neuman, Breton and 
Basque seafarers, do not mix well 


“It would be a rock off New- 
foundland like any other ” An- 
drieux said. “We're onlywhat we 
are today because we have a 
French flag.” 


Laurence Ofiner will make his 
music video debut in a dip for a 
Pad Hanfcasde angle, “Just for 
Money." Hardcastle, who wrote 
and produced “19,” a synthesizer 
record about the Vietnam War that 
became an unlikely dance-dub bit, 
has kepi his focus on violence in 
“Just for Money," whose subjects 
are the Sl Valentine's Day Massa- 
cre and the Great Train Robbery. 
Lord Olivier joined another actor, 
Bob Hoskins, in recording spoken 
parts for the record and video. The 
video indudes newsreel-style foot- 
age and sepia-tinted shots of Olivi- 
er and Hoskins as commentators. 

D 

The French writer and political 
scientist Alfred Grosser was award- 
ed the Adolphe Bentinck prize 
Wednesday in Paris for his book 
“L'Ailemagne en Occident," and 
the body of his work. The prize, 
established in 1973 and named af- 
ter a Dutch diplomat, is given for 
contributions to “European coop- 
eration, the safeguarding of peace 
and the fight against f anati cism.” It 
carries a$5,000 award. 

□ 

Prince Mtehad of Kerf and his 
wife will have a private audience 
Monday with Pope John Paid H, 
more than seven years after the 
Vatican refused themjpenmssion to 
many in a Roman Catholic cere- 
mony. “They have both wanted this 
for a long time. It is the fulfillment 
of a long-cherished wish," said Mi- 
chael Fanner, their private secre- 
tary. Prince Michael, 43. belongs to 
the Church of England and his 
Austrian-born wife, Princess Mi- 
chad, 40, is a twice-married Roman 
Catholic. They wed in Vienna on 
June 30. 1978, after the Vatican 
refused them a dispensation that 
formerly married Catholics need if 
they are to have a church cerexno- 


Jerry Lee Lewis, who left a hos- • 
piutl Monday hungry for a bowl of . 
chili and a cold beer three weeks 
after stomach ulcer surgery, has 
been rehospitalized for observation 
because of nausea. “He's OK. He’s 
walking around. He was probably 
just eating too much loo fast." said 
the singer’s road manager, J.W. . 
Whitten. Lewis had a third of his”-' 1 
stomach removed Nov. 12. 

□ 


Bruce Springsteen, whose songs 
have rhapsodized blue-collar life, 
and the country singer Wiffie Nel- 
son have signed 3 letter in a news- 
paper advertisement on behalf of 
430 workers who are expected to 
lose their jobs at two 3M plants in 
Springsteen's hometown of Free- 
hold, New Jersey. The ad — spon- 
sored by Local 8-760 of the Oik 
Chemical and Atomic Workers 
Union and by the Labor Institute, a 
New York-based public interest or- 
ganization that provides services 
Tor unions — appeared in The New 
York Times, the As bury Park (New 
Jersey) Press, the St. Paul (Minne- 
sota) Pioneer Press- Dispatch in' 
3 M’s hometown, and the show- 
business newspaper Variety. Below 
the letter appear lyrics from “My 
Hometown," Springsteen's ode to 
Freehold. They read, in pan: 

Now Main Street's whitewashed 
windows 

And vacant store 
Seems like there ain't nobody 
Wants to come down here no more. 
They're closing down the textile mill 
across the railroad tracks 
Foreman says these jobs are going 
boys and they am ’ t coming back 
To your hometown. 


Connie Frauds has been booked 
on trespass and battery charges and 
released from custody after ref us-' 
ing to put out a cigarette aboard a 
Delta flight to Los Angeles that 
was being refueled in Atlanta. Po- 
lice said the singer kicked one of 
the officers who escorted her off 
the aircraft after she ignored the 
captain's personal request to extin- 
guish her cigarette and refused to 
leave the plane. 


LEGAL NOTICES I ANNOUNCEMENTS 


COMMONWEALTH Of MASS, 
Plymouth County Probcuo Court No. 
850107001 Gcd-Aim T. ffauioton, 
Ptanhff . vjl i. M riid U oulohan. De- 
fendant, Summons by P u bhc u tion To 
the above-named De fa nd m t-- A com- 
plant ho beat presented la ttta 
Court by far spouse, r. 

Houtahan, mlang to rireohe the 
bonds of nKtfrsnony, for joint custody 
of mnor dridren. ter co nve y a n ce of 
red property fa c eted at 44% 34th 
Street. Arfcigton. Vrrenia. Storing in 
the none oFGci-Ann Huuhim n retd 
J. Mdnel Houtohan, o r ecorded 


52 WAYS IO RAISE DC K> 
cMd Parents are invited >o kmm 
of a new book by HavatMa 
professor ond wire. Hbon Interne 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


Dl U nvn IMWt WJ I Mvuvnwuwru 

profe s s o r ond wire. H3ton Hermdion- 
al Hotel, Pad, Fii Doc. 6, 33MHXL 
The IQ FOUNDATION, ftmifand, 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


LA VA R P D C CONTEMPORARY 
Gone dais now offered evenety. 

Series 5 dfanm portidfxeian doses m 
tfeta of the art mndi canine. 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED I PARIS AREA CTJRMSBEP 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


EMPLOYMENT 

EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


EMPLOYMENT 


Plan Your Classified Ad Quickly and Easily 

Iq tbt 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


* * 


1986. Cal far dtfafc 


with Artmgun County. Virginia land 
Records, Book 1899, Page 29. And 
at aqwiabie dnrbion of proper- 


ly purjuart » M.GJ- e. 336, section 
34. You at required to servo upon 
Charles I Bowser Jr, ffaq, pfa iflliff's 
attorney, whoso oddren a 399 Boyl 
slon St, Bastari MA 02116 your an- 
swer on or before Jan. 20, 1986. If 
you fail to da so, the Court wB pro- 
ceed to the hrerrtg and adjudication 
of this action. You are tdso reqwred fa 
file a copy of your answer n th office 
of die Regsier of ifes Court at Plym- 
outh- Wmss James A Lawton, fan, 
first Judge of son! Court at PhrrnoiXn. 
Od. 29J?85 John J. Ddey Register 
of Probate. 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS in 
En^W^Prea jdoiy} 4634 5965. Rome 


51H VAL DC GRACE 
Near Jordon de Luxembourg, 2/3 
rooms, 62 sun, kitchen, battl fast 
Boor, Eft + 32 sqja. terrooe, facing 
south, parking. Price FI. 350.000. 


SUN. N.Y. TIMES - Eurojet defivwy. 
Write Keyser, P06 2. BIOOO Brussels. 


Write Keyser, POB 2. BI000 Bren 

REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE . 

FRENCH PROVINCES 


1RTH MONTMAKTE 


Lovely duphm, high no. 2 bedroom*, 
fnepfaoe, terrace F2AS0JX10] 456203m 


el c - QUAI VOLTAIRE 

embassy SCrVlCfl Vary bariM, double Svina 1 bod- 
8 Atm, do Mnb* room, redone. r90HL 45 63 68 38 

73008 Preis 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 
4562-7899 


O WR 'S DUPLEX APARTMENT, 
wall fambhtal high dens. 425? 0314 


BD MADHBNE. Very favdy&udfa, 
phone, bath, tochenetlc. 4/toQSD 


MARAIS. Roam + Svina, dtaradar. 
short term. 84500L Tek iff 74 09 ^ 

PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


■naMAtlOMAt BU S — g- Seo k a 
onwgamant career opportunity m 
' mtL immiess imm^gumenl vmni a inul- 
fa m io nul COr portion. 2 Bachelor of 
Sdence degrees from MT in Owniad 
Engineering & M Biomass. 6 yean 


EXECUTIVE 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


SAINT JEAN CAP FERRAT 


MOVING 


MAGMHCBTT YTLLA 
For Safa, overlooking the Me ril er m - 
noon and the Bay ofwfafr u i dio , o 5 
bedfoonx/ljijiliuom preporty, oombim 
mg style and fatal comfort, soch a 


PRIVATE 

AIRPORT 


Bysees-Concorde 

Aparenenls / Homs 
S hort term renbde 


ABP, 9 Aw Royde, 75006 Peril 
Tab (1) 42 65 II 99. Telex 640793F. 



ST. GERMAM-iN-lAYE. 5 item. RBL 
new, an gaden, st* same 3- & 4 
room left, podang, ham F670Q. Tel: 
42 25 32 0> 


Sauci Aoblo & Japan. SpocA Japa- 
nese, Frond: A Engish. UJL arizen. 
For resume & fate n fcw ad US Mi 
21776*3821. 


AMERICAN / MDEAST mdmtrid 


42 25 32 25 

STH U I X B HBOMI Q GonJenv Lovely I yom etdffi yn m .fadiidry A oS m 


manager MBA fa red Midead joint 
venture tor USA or European corp. 8 


SWITZERLAND 


outomaric shutters, o newly in it c i e d 
dorm system, a hooted pool and dou- 1 
ble qproj)« , and ho us ekneper's faofaies 
mdbn tfus credence complete. 

For further dehab pieree oanfoch 

A.G.EJD.L 


ALLIED 


SOUTHERN SPAIN 

TOO ho. indudng buhfngL ou n cre fa 
runway & agricStanJ knd. Stuafad 
near loured deveiopinaef zone. 

Tel G enevo 36 54 40 offioe fan 


SWITZERLAND 



lBfcSUOCT. Very elegmd large dou- 
ble Eying, big bofamy, 2 double bod- 
rooms, modem Eilchen ond boSh^eon. 


SSTAAD: rent dg 

ruory, cont r ol nam 
mod, 2 double roa 
grease, sauna. 001 


corauttwig iKi atioo 
ape re USAs Mori 
Rrensac SL Adt 2, I 
Egypt Tel 291208 


EMPLOYMENT 


M ARKETIN G EXECUTIVE, me 37, 
American, s n ^o, fanrengo tire, no- 
pr re rid e xperienc e m tn rope, UL5. 
financed background et leaiing A 
ounriods des ires re s po re fcle po rti o n 
with London or Garmon based fra. 


USGBmY WANTED 

MARKCT NG LEA PERS 
C EXPERTS 

Earning pofarriU of USS1 50,000 + in 
1986. Altracrive inoenfiva baud on 
performance. >*• P r ofii shorrig/itock 
options, falemariond i nve s tment group 
seeks og re e mw e 

MBC* MANAGERS, 

SAUS EXECUTIVE 
AMT DYNAMIC 5A1E5 
OtOANBATIONS 
to pui ri uuu l e m the h^Ny p mB t uld y 
"Tharoumbred Racing end Breadng 
Industry being offered far die first rime 
with return or capital guoronleed. Ap- 
pSstsfis mat bo Irigh achieven vrth 
bodmg bariquwd in futuna: securi- 
Ses, inwroncB or badang. Rooney in 


By Phonos Gal your local IHT roprese n t u rive with your text. You 
wil be in formed of the cut enmodkttoly. ond once prepayment is 
made your ad wA ropers' within 48 hours. 

Coet: The baric nde 4 5930 per fine per day + toed faxes. There are 
25 fattars, signs and spaces in ihe first fine and 36 m the faRowmg fines. 
Mesnium space is 2 fines. No abbreviations otxepted. 

Credit Cards: American Express, Diner's Grib, Eurocard, Master 
Gred, Acorn ond Visa 


HEAD OFFICE 


LATIN AMERICA 


Pure: (for dassfied only): 
PI C747MJXK 


EUROPE 


too kxiguages desinddre En^bh slut , 
German, Japanese, Qxnesa re Arabic 
IrdorvieM ond orierdalian in rector Eu- 
repeai mid Anan cities. 

Appfioreiti should send c u rriculi i m vdao 
and one phc*> to 
Ml ffandd Tribune, Box 99999. 

■ 1005 Td Sang Cammaraol Bdg, 


ITH1 BO SOM. Large Kvmg + sdon 


+ 3 bed r ooms 2 bathe btefiorr, pan- 
try, very writ furnnhed. F 22.000 per 
month. Tei 4278 61 36 


FOR Ttt FEATURE 

MTGRNATIONAL 


Trovol no problem. Rspiy MdOxiey, 
c/oTidm,57 EAh RdT tendon Wl4 


VAN UNB INTL 


OV« 1300 OfTKXS 

WOUOWIDE 


26 bis. Id __ 

MC 98000 MONACO 
TeL 93 50 66 00 -The. 479 417 MC 
or Agenu du liilprd 


5 W ITZER L AM) 
CRANS-MONTANA 


owner, ktxuriou. | 


USA AUred Von Iras faTl Ccrp 
(0101) 312-681-8100 


Or cdl out Agency Euraperei offices: 

PARIS Dubordm. fatamotional 
(l; 43 43 23 64 


FRANKFURT 


(069) 2S0066 

DUSSELDORF/ RAT1NG04 

(02102) 45023 UVLS. 

MUNICH i.MJi. 

(089) 142244 

LONDON Ji XS 


AUTTUDC S2S METERS. Spterxfid 
stone vSta with amanng premranic 
views of die Meifiterronearv the Is- 
fawfa: SI Casrien Labe end much 
more. Beautihdly fambezmed H acre 
tot. Qdy 20 ninuSei from either 
Comes or KSoe Airport. A red bar- 
gan. Ody FI .990 flOO. GuB Mrefc on 
W 38 19 19. SaT47 La Gobcrte, 
06400 Cremes. 


RIGHT ON 1W BEST RJROKAN 
M04MTAM GCU COURSE 
WeseS superb apartments 2 to 6 roonii 
from a^285.iXO. 


AT HOME M PAJHS 

PARIS PROMO 

AFARDW4TS FOR RENT CM SALE 

“gSr**- 4563 2560 


ETOBE. Hfah cfati stadfa wUi kitchen, 
bedroom & color TV. No agent- Tefi 
46 24 09 27. 


POSITIONS 

TIMNTO PACE 
13 ATLANTIC KXTION, 
II PACmC EDITION 


EXECUTIVE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


2434 Hermesty RcL Hong Kon 
fan Hercdd Tribune, Bra 421 


63 Long Acre, London, WGL ' 


MAJOR MTERNATKMAL 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


Amstordant 26-36-15. 
Athene: 361-8397/360-2421. 
B rore e ic 343-1899. 
Copenbagen: (01) 329440. 
fraihfurt: (069] 72-67^5. 
Ljusamm 29-58-94. 

UdNNi; 67-27-93/66-2544. 
London: pi) 836-4802. 
MwMd: 455-2891/455-3306. 
Mare (02] 7531445. 
Noway: (02) 41 2953. 
Romo: 679-3437. 

SwadatK (08) 7569229. 

Td Aviv: 03455 559. 
Vienna: Contact Frreddun. 


■wont* Am: 41 4031 
Pept 31^ 

Caracas: 33 14 54 
Ga ay oq u H: 51 4505 
Lena: 417 852 
Panama: 69 09 75 
Santiago: 6961 554 
Sao Part* B52 1893 


MDDUE EAST 


Bahrain: 2463CO. 
Kuwcnh 5614485. 
Lebano n. 341 457/B/9. 
Qatar 416535. 

Said Arabia: 

Jrtfddu 667-1500. 
UAL: Dubai 224161. 


FAR EAST 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


METRO EXHJAANS. High floor, mod- ' 
am 4 rooms, 2 bams, prefang. : 


NEAR FAMOUS CHANS PLATEAU 
AT TSAIAT HAMLET 


74 GHAMPS-BLYSBS Slh 


Stwfia, 2 or 3«oani qtarenenl. 
One month or more. 

L£ OARJDOE 4059 6797. 


ern 4 rooms, 2 both 
FI 2^00, Teh 42 25 32 25 
MUETTE. Kah dan buhfa 


MUET1E. Koh dan buMna 8di floor, ■ 
lovely Uixfo, a* comkxtv F4CXXX Tct j 
45 77 95 34 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


Erahit opportunitiei far fareignan 
&nt mret a one owdable 
at 61® mfored. 


BOULOGNE. Beautiful modem fivma, 
doing, 2 bedrooneL 2 bulla, lovely 


TREMENDOUS 

500 earn. OUPU5X 


JMUVn brtl Mevi 

(01) 953 3636 
Call far AAeds bee estimate 


af about 250 jqjr. 


refined decor, 4m ceifinp, 3 indepen- 
[d ent bedr oonn each vrilh neifAmus 
| bodnoom ond dresrir 


CONT1NEX. Smd A meefium moves, 
baggage, con workhrido. Cal Chor- 
EeTferi>42BI 1881 frioar Opera). 


waodpoMCng, 
ingL 3 mdepen- 
wnti sunptuous 
g. makfi room, 
irictna no vverk 


A g oneo Ranreidn Im web iH Itn SA 

GoL O ni re is n Comtant 1 
1003 Uuant - Switzerland 
Tel P21] 20 71> 1 1. Tb 25873 AOL CH 


30SL 2 baths, lovely 
e ffawermg fcnooe, 
. Tab 47 20 37 99 


PB41HOU5E AVE MONTAIOML 
near Chresps Bysoot, 130 iqjtc + 
large terrace, high dare. 723 43 28. 


fared AcaouiksV of m IS years an- 
cesdU experience m die profitable - 
nanugeiDert of ffifah comporves. 
induang e rtenm m overseen experi- 
ence. psticulariy n USA & Aostrafia, 
seeks general mon g g em ent pndtin n 
with Rrttmationd arganieotion where 


Requras country mcnager far West 
Germany. (hVrie or Fernrtej. It k enviv 
aged that appfiogrts wfl ban the rele- 
vant background & experience r*. 


URGD4TLY NffilHJ, Amoricrei moth- 
er tongue trandecot with previous 


UPOTED STATES 


cnperiancE and Art Kshxy bade- 
aouad for hUtubfinfarn Trench to i 
Engirt mgxirtont retbook on French 
Impresnonst printers. Work to bean 
at rent: Send re feren ces, CY.& seft- 
addrened envatopei Brec 2953, Her- 
rid Tnbune. 9^5 Neri»y Cedo. 


yred to operate 8 de velop ore We st 
German odivtries an a asipdivniva 
icofe. Bremg in Frankfurt area. 


SHORT TERM M IATM QUARTS 

No aganM. T«t 4329 3883. 


hit portidre riAies HI mt'l manage- 
ment can properly be utSied. Art- 1 
able early I®. Bra 42149, IKT, 63 
Long Acre, London, WC2E 


Send amplale CV. to 
Bos 2957)H#raJd Tribune. 
92521 NereRy Codex, Frcrnoe 


Pbnsr York pi2] 752-3890. 
Wert Cmrefc (415) 3628339. 


Bangfatle 3908657. 
Hang Kang: 5-213671. 
Jtrtrertra 510092. 
Mediae 817 07 49. 
Snort: 735 87 73. 
angaparre 222-2725. 
Trtvrare 757 44 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 


SOUTH AFRICA 


AUSTRALIA 

Melbourne: 690 8233. 
Syrinm 929 56 39. 957 <3 20. 
Pnrtfa: 328 98 33. 
Pt-J^QuMn-and: 


International Business Message Center 


OVBSEA5 rosniGNS. htondrtdi of 

tap paying portions amiable. Tax 
free incomes. Attractive benefits. Op- 
^rtwita far al occupations. Free 
tfam. Overnai Enmfoyment Sen- 
W. Dept ffT, P.oTSxc 460, Town 
c# AW Royal, Quebec, demoda 
H3P3C7. 


employment 


AUTO SHIPPING 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


SWITZERLAND 


ALPHA-TRANSIT, Pans Brit 4289 2577 
Seo/rer. car, baggage, al cowitries 


PIERRE BATON 

THEC BATON 630855 F 

47.04.5535 


PERSONALS CBiE ST C HXJQ (7 1). More rerideo- 

SATtSH KAPOOR plerar contoct yore 

Brertfa^Tridcamex TW8 9EW, IX ”, t^jl I K 
HAVE A MCE DAY1 BOKH. Have o ftrepioce, sauna, quite imuwol. man- 
race doyl Baled. ay’s worth. Tet 4500 61 50. 



, Cj'o Khnver PubWvng Lid. 
gui A ve, Great Wed Kd. 
hfaWmex TW8 96W. IX \ 


REV AC SA. 

52 MontfarBree, 0+1202 GBCVA 
Tet 022/341540. Tehee 22030 


ATTBITION EXECUTIVES \ 

in tbe tVnrtrariaoref HorcSJn- 
bvrtm, where mare Sian a AW 
at a aMen nadmrt warid- 
wrtfa, mart af wham mo m 
btninat* and nxkntry, w flf 
road it. Just Max as fflreit 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFICE SERVICES 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 




YOUR AOHIT M MOROCCO 

SCHAMASCN MAROC SA 


GENEVA 


dt3S9SJ bafara TO am, ret- 
ruring Aat wo nrei to t ax you 
bank, mtd your m o it agm wBt 
appear emb 48 fmn. lire 1 
rata it US. SOM or toad 
eierindenf par fine. Toe atari 
tnd o da ao uqd a l o and we riff - 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


Wide: 42, Are Honan 5eghir 
Creefclcmco 01. Morocco 
Crib 272604, 272652, 222221 
Ife 22901 


omownY. TRUST FOR 


Fufl S*rvic« 

is our Busunss 


FRENCH LADY 25 

Iml Law Gcaduote, Engfirt, Sporirt, 
9 re *i. ESS#* ”. «p?bnc« at 
me UNBCO, freekmco in terpreter, 
oon lypa tree to travel, good prarerta- 
wm, mnb rh rtongmg wrioui portion. 
Box2906> Herrid tribune, 92521NortJ- 
ly Cede*, France or (!} 42 24 74. 50 


Engfiriv Mnret Duidi or German 
aia^QTW^ kno^cdn. oi French r» 
•tored, &riUi tharmond. Bbiguri 
Irimafb. Vriite or phone 138 Av£ma 


transcar 

THE CAR S»mmG 

5PEOAUSIS- 

(1) 42 25 64 44 


Jtore^gHfPari,Frre«e.Tat 


mdudet 90 ft. irefcoos vndii in emi- 
tonl oonriimn vriued iMlROD: Freiv 
ow yodtf OMiger, famous yadd 
builder. 9m of land development 
on Corel that wR trim a profit of 
53^00000 I it the next. 3 yerev Sril 
fart far $2800000. Contort: Mv 
Urtrs Tab Span 34-1-276 3551. 


CANADA 


hicdkction 

\fonCleef&Arpels 

Paris 


TORONTO. CANADA - LUXURY. 

PuBy fumuhed ond equipped 1 & 2 
bectoom Mfaa, Superar srevices. 
Short/long farm reriok. Mreket Suites 
80 front St East, Se. 222, Toronto 
Mg 1T4 Gmada (416| B62-1096 


BUSINESS 

om>RiuNmES 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


• International kw and trere* 

• MaJba*, letaphone and tries 


FRENCH PROVINCES 

SAMT-MUL Stane-buit mm. 7 


raoa«.trlpto re otp»ion.4bedrocim,« 
batfa: toxurioudy erei ip ped bkhea 
6000 tom. poric. raOjSoO 7 month. 
SSI. 5 Are de Nee. 06800 CAGNE 
SUB MSL Tefi 923.16.16. 


OFFSHORES UK 
LTD COMPANIES 

Incorponrtan and mananmoal im LK. 

trie of Man, Turfa, AngeAx. Chcxwwl 


Lrtira Tab Spuin 340376 3S31. 
qpSHQBE 6 (JR COMP A NI E S. Sore 
Tax. fidmry trust, domidkrion, 
company fansten, jrdernatianri tax, 
bank CKCounb opened, a oaowtfi nft 
WtHiiitoton Serwom 
Ltd.. 23 Colegs HR, temJon GC4R 
22D. Tet Q1-2AOB02 .Hl 884587 G. 


MTL 

BEAUim PEOPLE 

UNUMITB9MC 


® Trmtoboo reid jouetreiri nmios 
re fijumlidv donriolion cmd 
o dminB tiri ion of-.Swbl and foreigri 
-compmei - 

fi A confidence ond dberetion enured 


FBOFESfflONAt YACHT CAPTAIN, 
reriouc, wHi rimaa 20 yen bag 
range ocean aririhg experience 
kxge power & mi. enginee ri ng & 
■W tromg, Britirt Sconce, freetolo- 
eato renr area reria owner irierastod 

. Franco 94.74 6098 focal fiew. before 
10 ore, tree after 6 pee 


Dent mke 
WT HNATIONAL 
- SSOBETARUL POSITIONS 

TUESDAYS 

In Rm MI CkortRod Sredion 


&NN5/NICE >3(39 43 

ffiAhKFURr (061 071 80 

BONN / COlOGFC 0^1 2129 
STUTTGART feral) 880 

MJJNIOI (SWIVS 10 

aSMBMAVBX fOi?]] « 

NEW YORK pft) 70 

HOUSTON frli 931 76 

LOS ANG&B pi 3 568 92 

MONTREAL B66 « 

, AGBffs w-mm mx 
Leaw it to m to- bring it to you 


AUTO CONVERSION 


U-S-A. A WORlJDIWtt 


THE NEW WATCH. 

From £ 800 - 


VAL DTSBE. Luxury rid homes for 
rant, up to 12 pencm. Al dealing & 
finery sauna, TV, video, etc. Expert 
local knowledg e. Contact: Mowdaia 
Late*. BP »^150 Vd cfbtre. T«± 
790630 77. YrtncVALlNV 980O5F. 


• ConGdentiri advice 

• Inundate awluUkfy 
6 Nominee services 

• Bearer shares 


ires (factories + haring + re tal 4- 
lerwce] far hIb. Tumorer up la SF30 
niton. Ste residency pggiible.Cbn- 


A complete persond & hrenereierece 
proviring a unique cc lec ti on af 
trieried, vemrib & mufOngrtf 
rnritrtudi (re. ol eodri I; 
projnohcxid occnrian. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56lh Sl, N.Y.C 10019 
Service Hepreseototiws 

II..1.J l«* 1 » * -I 

HNwa vrcrowioo. 


BUSINESS ADWSORY 
SERVKBSJL 


AMBHCAN PSYCHOANALYST inters, 
estedm werifag in West Europe wilf 
consider ritemotrv* essfcj. P. U- 


J Roe Atow, 1207 QENEtK 
Tab 36 K 48 Tden 23342 


YOUR RJRNSHBD OfNCE 
MUNBON 

• 7 day 24 hour oaoe»& wwerphene 


consefer OHernatN* poatm). P. U- 
wtfri I (624. Ventura BfwL Suite 
402, Storio Gty, CA 91604 USA, 
FRBICH LADY. PoMai Srierme^ocF 
uak,a, Eogiuh, ffuod itafcn, knowl- 
edge of booUiMpaig & computer A 

brei*wS3Tre»7?wS 0^“ 


■in. COMPANY, world toad* mbs 
field teeia secretary far its gwtori 
Ftoent French & &>gErt 
Gannrei an aree*. Hoco of Work; 

sSjgjifflssirBS' 

NreMy Cedrei. France 

Bofa, seeks bfa 
girt French/Engfah person to work 
wnntoren of araben a sries - 


KiBVsS^lS"" 




W: 


GREAT BRITAIN 


t,/ re Y 


UNION, far the batt famrtod Arts 
end hornet. Conn* the Speao fata 
Pf®p^ Kay ond Lew*. Tub South of 
Prek 352 8111. North of Prek 722 
5135. Trie* 27846 RESIDE G. 


re Aoccrmtirig & orinmotrobon 
• Wbl, tolcFhreie & tefca 

Fret owfinfafy bnoldet fcrere 
S&ECT GMKXArE 
SHWICES LTO 
ffewd Office 

MiPlerareri, Dwakre. UeefMai 
Trir Dourias (6624) 23718 
Trim £UUS4 SOECT O 

London fltryptff rfulivg 

25 Old Boodlt. London W1 
Td 01-493 4244, Tfac 26247 5CSLDNG 


toch K 5EB0LD SA, Tour Grim 4 
CH-1007 Louranng. Tab 21/25 26 11. 

OL D SIGN. A re iyo self irtratod 
iwninatod sign creating ntga nt 
poo. Arofabto dl tonguaga. Agerrti 
required rtroughori nmpe. write 
now to boon Mernatianof Ud, 14 
CSffard Sheet, Torb, Y0T IK). UK. 


PAN AMANUW cBipowfea. prtwidt 
the uriuu tuyu of cvnpleto coefiden- 
ttefity, sera tax KabBy & US dobr 
currency etmwmeA we o8er com- 


pany fanncimn services an a. fad 
Friiabte end comp eti tive face*. Con- 
tact H L Drefagton, FOB 1327.IW- 
mo 9A, Knsu Too 3121 Kama- RG 
Tdl 330834/ 234819 fn*.2W77W 


• Gorpcrato Re p re sen ta ti on Service 

• Short or tana term awridbjBy 

W orld-Wide . Bo el neei Centree 
llOTlto Stared lwrtonWC2ROAA 
Tit 01 8364918 Tfac' 24973 


GERMAN LADY, 26, onlreo pre- 
(Utatiref feefa porHenc Borignmeri 
(B PA/lrovri aemearioR. Haase 
write to Bon 2220. LtiT, Friarikhrt . 
15, 06000 franknirt/Man 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE i 

WGUSH mS rteep. I 
mg pre», London bated Bax 42220. I 
faT,63 long Acre, London WC29JH i 


_ * SLMECONV8ET • 

The retest way to impest re 

fibfnpnaa car Mfa Are ILSA. 

Workhwfe Araoricwr insurer 

pnndmdl requred irwronco ■ 

“ your money U** mdu rinB 
tAnverrion art.- • 
Wrjtaor phone far free brodrira 
G»W?NYJBl®71S«50f 

W 7031 / 2 23059 

AMBBCAft WrtWDBnWBTHa 

OberintnrTSTB' 

D4000 Fradkfart/Moin 




lAllflflNA-friwafa Aerobic frttnidor' 
NTQ sreb predion. For further mfor- 
matioori* 21 2734924a 


^^IWMESnc 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

AU IWR- Erefirt cperidngt nHvmgh- 


BPA / DOT 

OONVBtSiaNS 


— - wnuAewn 

er, rireari fieense writ tresriteecinn * rfofaBwnri work uang nriy ihc 


YOUR ATHB0 OfNCE 


YOUNG FRENCH LADY PA seeks PJL 
tab. Cdo. trawl Beet 2954, Herrid 
Tribune,92S21 NauAy Crete 


HOLLAND 


DUTCH HOUSMG C84TRE LV. 
Deluxe rentals. VatariuMh. 174, 
Anwwdom. 020621234 re MXlto. 


REAL ESTATE UMTS prxfaerahip 
group nrire aggrereno aries naoded 
mrividurit to irerbot their product in 
Mtokfc fort. UJC. end other 
oaumriet woridwide. High c re wm a - 
siom: sofas overides mid bomne*. 
Sand resume in M confitfena to 
MaririSng Dtredor, AKES Lid, 1499 
Wari Fobealto Pori Ed, Sues 314, 
Boca toon, R 33432 re aC in USA 


SOUTH AMD8CAN GOVBMHBff 
offers to grifed farad mdepon- 
dent persons: aiaamhip, riptornaic 
dolus with riffamatic jamsport. 
Please write kk LH.T, Bax 2221, rrie- 
dridntr. 15. MOOO fixmUurt/Mrin. 


HONG H0NQ, YO UR TAX shehery 
rr invoicing center, isoairfaos, trade 
r«L managrexeni agent, at roam 923 
Sta HouseT TiT/tora Kano. Tlx 
39644 DS6AGT. Teb3iWlB33. 


Executive Services & Batinere Centre, 
Athens Tower B, Suita 506, GS-TISV 


Athens Tower B, Suita 506, GR- 
AtW Greece. Tet 37W232 
21427 EXSE. TrieEba' 7795509. 


Tribune,92S21 NedBy Pete France 
BRITISH LADY M/ PR. safes axprt- 




manat lady pa/pr safes oxperi. 
tateo »uks portion m USA, West 
Cart, linden 01 -737 5947 ovw 


HNEST MVE5TMGMT NEWSUETTBL 
AvuretfewMieg fal Hany Schulta Leh 
far it its 2 2nd y ore. S50 for tool 
subraripnon. FBK, P.O. Bax 381, CK- 
1001 Lawns, Switrerlrexl. 


HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT, 
report - 12 couatriso onriyaed.. Ore 


WMA. 45 tynduxt Tsrrdeo, 
Suite 563. Cmtrd,nano Kong. - 


DIAMONDS 


SECRETARIAL 

posmoNs available, 


HOUaHOLD MANAOBAB4T poo- 
hon awUls. Mud have dim B- 
«***: Salary commoreunjle wbh a- 

-ateliPfaretaafeifa, 


cT 

UMTriiSlS 

fate 4971917-CHAW 


VAN Cim ARPIiLS 


LONDON 

I5J NEW BOND STREET. 

TEL: 01-491 1405 TELEX: 260265 


When in Rome: 

PALAZZO AL VHABRO 

texu ry opartmert house with furnishrd 
nab, cmxhrtfe far 1 weal and mere 


EXPORT TO GBMANY. Consumer 
goods + non-food Experienced 
msm avolte in buessekferf, flexible : 
farm Cortreh Duanriderf 49-211- ; 
381012. The BB 6833 


FINANCIAL' 

INVESTMENTS 


Phone: 67M325, 679345a 
Wntm Via del VMabra 16, 
00186 Rome. 


LONDON 

iFWfadory & tort services 1 Company 
formations & domdlkreon 1 lnfarnrt»re>- 
al tax I Bank oceownfa eflabhhed I 
Geaerrt butinaa advire A rasimta I 


DELAWARE, PANAMA. Uberfa Car- 

SSlfcflSVMtt 

G. (via UKL 


3-YEAR KVCSTAHW HOLRRED. 
IfSEBQJOO to start up prafitahle 
Tosfcnrefcetad' eenrire asmpmiy in 
Tfuman ffesoOrca' cotmAmg. Tab 
Bute 32*721 ,48^3. The 23M0. 


DIAMONDS 

. Ymt but buy, 

fine riamondi n cnr price range 
rttawast whohsrix pens * 

rirert from Ar toven r 
cenier of Ihe riantotd wcrid. 
M gtwoM,' :- 
Tor free price Sit wrifa 


M 2 dridren. 


epa/dot 


_ *.te Nrire Engine toftm * ' 

Curturr wqysraooe R 


EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 


JPCR, 17 Widegota Sl. Lretdon El 7W 
Tab 01 377 IttA Tk 893911 G 


TRADE MiaBUnONAL For fun 
ond prow, swap, seR re buy onyding, 
For jnfarmaion write tor VS.O.G. 
Ud. P.O. Bm 3443, Umatsol, Cypras. 


OFFICE SERVICES 


IMPETUS * 228801 • 2S2 76 21. 
PHONE /THB/THSWt 


EdbfaEdiad 1920 

Pefikjuuliud 62. B-Sli Antwerp . 
i ■ Mm .-Tri-lb 3 23407 51 • 

I Tlxj 7l?79syf LAt thoPkwcndOrij. 
I Heart .of Antwerp Dwoaad nbahy 



AUMBt . WANTS- M iwaute Wt 
Wte Mr. NowahnwddSWK Pat 

aateW teShB^OTl^ 


AUTOMOBILES 


^.^OgPMWrpRI 

rir ySSs? 7 ' w 18929 

Trip 705514 ■ Qis W . W 

DafteMataeTtafiShteW 

’ . C«rertingi fas Europe j 


\amm s hi$ *bo nous, royce. 




Bolitaim»rii7T/3«Tl 35. - 

AOIC? BOYCE 'Ster Site 1 
37000 lore. Ut BbdSm 
iatsw.Teblcndbn 01 -5B9 OSB 

paKcar.Ms sn i98i. 74000 
: Ateaatic. tedoM. ScnroaF. T 
Bfatec. P2SJOOO. Plorit 43 31 92 


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