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INTERNATIONAL 



Sri bum' 


Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


PABIS, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6 ? 1985 


on 


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$5* 


Laurel Expected 
ToBeAqumo 9 s 
p^Running]\^ 

Bf Seth Mydans . - 

rl" 4 ; Nen York Times Service 

”7 MANILA — Corazon C. 
^ *iqirino, the widow of Benigno S, 

: uCi Hcpkp Jr-, the assassinated oppo- 
i-j*r r’SftlpB leader; emerged Thntsday as 
--..r.^be’ candidate of a unified opposi- 
iv 4on to /ace President Ferdinand E 
\ • 1' VMaroos in elections scheduled for 

. v ';.!>;*• 7 - •- . 

Statements by opposition figures 
.. . i^&tdeif dear thar Salvador H. Lan- 
* . ^ a former senator who had been 

"f «er chief rival, has agreed to join 
' ! ',er as her vice-presidential candi~ 

7 Mr. Laurd said Thursday that he 

' ‘v.>.ud Mm Aquino, whohave been 
weting privately to seek a unified 
late, would hold a press confer-. 

- •rr^nce on Sunday. He said they 
• * ' ' *•( jould announce then “the official 

'• candidate of the united opposi- 

- ’ -’■v.ion/’ ; 

■"■'.•‘•s. Reached at her home, Mrs. 

< c - -.Aquino showed surprise that Mr. 
~ juffd annnuntwt the press 
onference and said, “You’ll have 
J o wait till Sunday" for details. 

A source close to Mrs. Aquino 
f onfiimed that “unity has been 
■Achieved.” 

. Mrs. Aquino, who announced 

!er candidacy Tuesday, reiterated 
.. .artier statements that she would 
", " ot nm for vice president 
. “1 have beat perceived as the 



-**f~ .... 



Stocks (ME 






ore 


Setting h Heavy 


Salvador H. Laurel at a news conference Thursday. 


unifier, and many have indicated 
they would give way only to me,” 
she said. “1 don’t think it would 
solve anything in this country for 
mo to run as vice president.” 

Mr. Laurel has indicated he 
would set aside political ambitions 
and accept the second spot if the 
opposition so decides. 

If no new problem arises to 
shake what stances described as a 
fragile unity, the accommodation 
ends the competition for dorm- 
nance between the two camps. 

The sometimes- acrimonious 
split had seriously threatened to 
reduce the opposition's chances to 
unseat Mr. Marcos, who has held 
the presidency for 20 years. 

Although Mr. Laurd has worked 


for the nomination for two years 
and built up a nationwide political 
network, analysts saw Mrs. Aquino 
as offering the only hope of bring- 
ing together the opposition’s dispa- 
rate factions. 

With Mrs. Aquino at the head of 
the ticket, radical and young voters 
who have become disilmsiGned 
with Philippme politics may beper- 
suaded to participate, analysts said. 

They also said support from the 
church is. this heavily Roman Cath- 
olic country may have helped her. 
Sources dose to the influential 
archbishop of Manila, Cardinal 
Jaime L. Sin, said he was favoring 
her candidacy. 

The 52-year-old Mrs. Aquino, 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 7) 


New Cancer Treatment That Activates 
^~f$ody 9 s Defenses h Called Promising 


; Tiiiuv By Cri seine Russell 

Washington Post Service . 

• ■ • . WASHINGTON — A new can-, 
er treatment .that activates the 
: -ody’s defenses,, turning.- white 
- - joui cdls iafocdisthmsdectivdy^ 
back tumors, has shown highly 
mousing results in its first experi- 
mental test in patients, tire Nafion- 
_pt;m a»SH Cancer Institute has announced. 

Some researchers caDed this tire 
. m new approach to the treatment 
f cancer m decades. 

The institute reported Wednes- 
ay that use of the new technique 
7Z-: ■ a 25 patients produced measur- 
„ lUpjfit’Wc reductions — by more than 50 

— -ercenl— ^in the sizes rtf tumors of 

- ; - ^ 1 of thepatients. The cancers were 
■ > advanced that the 25 patients 
>uld not be treated with converi- 
; J a -‘; : onal drug or radiation therapy. 

^ ^ . One patient with a severe fonn of 

.j tin cancer called melanoma 
—y towed complete disappearance of 
■V* v . *. idespread cancer for at least 10 
\i~ r ' tenths, and the other 10 patients 
* ... : towed partial responses in colon, 

'dney, lung «nd melanoma can- 
: - us that had spread. 

^ “I don’t know where this is going 
«iJ 5 TWj;i lead,” said Dr. Steven A. Rosen- 
,. . • ag, head of the research team and 

tieF of surgery at the cancer insti- 



. ^^ate. “It’s dearly a begmning and 
' sw direction,” he said. 

^ He called it me of the first whd- 
K new approaches since the devd- 
■. s:^.wnent of cancer drugs began 
' - —-^ree decades ago. 

- ^ »; 5 / Dr. Rosenberg was the medical 
~ .-fukesman for the that treal- 
‘ -v— I President Ronald Reagan tor 
don cancer last summer. 

“For the first time,” Dr. Rosen- 
3 ^ said, “we can take the immune 
'stem of a patient, alter it, and use 


ItautanUn 

Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg 

it to cause r^ression of a tmnor. 
This represents the first step in the 
development of a whole new treat- 
ment of cancer.” 

Previously, cancer treatment has 
been honied to surgery, radiation 
therapy and chemotherapy. 

The initial signs of success woe 
bailed by officials at the institute 
and by outside experts as a major 
development in the campaign to 
develop new therapies that might 
be used to treat the moGt common 
deadly cancers. 

But they cautioned that the find- 
ings were pretiminary. A limited 
number of patients have been stud- 
ied for periods of six weeks to 10 
months. The treatment is now very 


expensive, time-consuming and 
may have nugor side effects. 

Mr. Rosenberg said he began 
test-tube arid laboratory tests with 
in 1978 using a. protein 
_is. 

produced in tonalf- amounts in tlnT 
body by certain i mmu ne system 
cells. 

In humans, the technique in- 
volves attaching a cancer patient to 
a machine that cbcuhues the blood 
and removes only lymphocytes, a 
type of white Mood cells. 

The lymphocytes are cultured 
for several days in i solation con- 
taining a genetically engineered 
version of interleukin-! The pro- 
cess apparently turns some of the 
lymphocytes into cells that selec- 
tively attkdt abnormal growths, in- 
cluding cancer. 

The activated cells are infected 
back into the patient, along with’ 
interleukin- 2 , which apparently 
continues to stimulate their growth. 
The procedure must be repealed 
over a period of weeks. 

The tiny amounts of znterlenltin- 
2 that are naturally available sty- 
mied full-scale human research un- 
til a genetically engineered version 
became available in 1984. 

“It is the most interesting and 
exciting biological therapy we’ve 

seen so far,” said Dr. Vincent T. 
DeVita Jr., director of the National 
Cancer Institute. 

Dr. Bruce A. Ghabner, head of 
the institute's division of cancer 
treatment, said that Dr. Rosen- 
berg’s work represented the most 
convincing demonstration in hu- 
mans that an immune therapy can 
help turn the body’s natural de- 
fenses against solid tumor masses. 

A slightly more cautions assess- 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 7) 


OfExdwnge 

Reuters 

SINGAPORE — Share prices 

plunged Thursday in frantic selling 
on tbeSngapore and Kuala Lum- 
pur, Malaysia, stock exchanges 
when trading reopened after a 

three-day suspension. 

Prices dropped by 20 percent to 
30 percent across the board, and 
brokers warned that the worst was 
to come. They estimated that share 
values had fallen by more than 1 
billion Singapore dollars (5470 mil- 
lion). 

The Straits Times Industrial In- 
dex for Singapore tumbled 82J27 
points to 609.54 and the Kuala 
Lumpur Stock Exchange Industrial 
Index lost 36.65 points to 399.57, 
the largest drop in a single day 
recorded on either exchange. 

The suspension of trading ou the 

Pan-Electric crash shows shaky 
investment structure in Singa- 
pore- Page 1L 

exchanges was triggered when Pan- 
Qectric Industries LuL, a large in- 
vestment holding group with debts 
of more than 350 million dollars, 
was put into receivership. Pan- 
Electric, with bolding? in shipping, 
property and electncal manufac- 
turing. has 68 subsidiaries in Hong 
Kong, Bennuda, Bruno, Malaysia 
and Britain. 

A senior broker in Singapore 
said the selling pre ssur e was ex- 
pected to last at (east until the end 
of next week when, he predicted, 
“the purge would have almost run 
its course." 

- ■ Not even blue-chip stocks, those 
of well-established companies, 
were spared. Declines of blue-chip 
strides ranged from 20 Singapore 
cents to 1 Ju dollars in trading ol 17 
miUion shares valued at 32 millian 
dollars. ; - 

Brokers said large institutional 
buyers, particularly Americans and 
Japanese, appeared to be keeping, 
dear of themarket “tte are certain 
tbey'MU cpiae'tn if prices fell fur- 
ther,'’ a broker said. 

(holy cash transactions were al- 
lowed, and brokers said the ban on 
“buy now, pay. later" transactions 
had helped to oontrol panic selling. 

In Kuala Lumpur, Finance Min- 
ister Daim Zamuddin said Malay- 
sia would not follow Singapore m 
setting up a committee to supervise 
the xxchange. Singapore an- 
nounced Wednesday the formation 
of such a committee to supervise 
the Singapore -exchange, previously 

under the control of brokers them- 
selves. The committee will behead- 
ed by the chief executive of the 
Monetary Authority of Singapore, 
J.Y. Pfllay. 

“There is bo need for” such a 
committee in Malaysia, Mr. Daim 
said “The capital-issues committee 
is good enough.” The capital-issues 
committee is a supervisor panel of 
the securities industry under the 
Finance Ministry. 

Mr. Daim said the sharp drop in 
share prices was expected. 

“It is panic selling by small in- 
vestors," he said. “We hope that by 
next week the market would con- 
solidate itself, and people would . 
come in to bay.” 

Pan-Electric Industries and two 
related companies remained sus- 
pended on both exchanges. 

Three other companies. Grand 
United Holdings BHD, Supreme 
Carp. BHD and Everpeace Carp. 
BHD, asked Thursday for a sus- 
pension on both exchanges. 




















Dealers on the trading floor of the Singapore Stock Ex- 
change began transactions after Thursday's reopening. 


Tax Reform May Fail, 
O’Neill Warns Reagan 


United Press International 

WASHINGTON — Thomas P. 
O'Neill Jr., speaker of the House of 
Representatives, said Thursday 
that President Ronald Reagan’s 
qualified support for die tar. reform 
bill passed by the House Ways and 
Means commitlee was not enough 
to reverse opposition to the bill by 
Republican members of Congress. 

“If he wants it to fail,” Mr. 
O’Neill said, “that’s all right with 
ns.” 

Mr. O’Neill, a Massachusetts 
Democrat, noted that Mr. Reagan 
had lobbied extensively in 1981 for 
a major package of tax reductions 
and said: 

“The president needs to lobby 
just as hard if we are to accomplish 
the historic, bipartisan overhaul in 
the tax system that be has prom- 
ised.” 

He added: Tf he doesn't want it 
to fafl, he better start getting the 
votes. I think it's got a tough road.” 

A Republican aide said there was 
such opposition to the bill Thurs- 
day “that it would be difficult to 
seenre more than 40 or 50” Repub- 
lican votes. Democrats contended 
that about 75 Republican votes 
were needed to pass the bilL 


Dav id £ Rosenbaum of The New 
York Tunes reported earlier: 

President- Reagan, despite the 
solid opposition of the Republican 
leadership in the House, strongly 
urged the House on Wednesday to 
pass the tax legislation next week 
and send the bffl to the Senate. 

Although five of the 13 Republi- 
can members of the Ways and 
Means Committee voted for the 
legislation Tuesday, overwhelming 
opposition tojhe bill was expressed 


Synod’s Final Documents Stir a Traditionalist-Liberal Clash 


By Kenneth A- Briggs 

m «v«'i Wnv York Times Service 

"~“T - '. ROME — A major clash has 
J. Aen out among the bishops at 
’ • extraordinary synod here over 
v form and substance of the as- 
-ably’s final documents. 

^-fbe debate has become a test of 
j. i-. trentacybetwera twooonqseti^ 
ws of the church among the 161 
hops here. 

tfiynod sessions are dosed, bm 
- shape of the" dispute has be- 
: - '..-oe known through news confer- 
and in interviews with those 
;,$e to the proceedings. 

, :■ j>rbe pivotal question is whether 

X s % *, bishops will issue a statement of 
proposals as wefl as a pas- 

***■' 7i*’ s ’ Sl tngacatu* 


Tie Reverend Diartmrid Martin, 
Vn Vatican spokesman, said 
CpA vhesday that the shape of the 
^ document or documents “is 

■ ^ ' open,” He indicated the 

-;^dth <rf the debate by saying 
-\;.i j I- . 30 bishops took part made- 
^ oa the subject Wednesday ev& 
and that many others wished 
0 seak. 

sked if there was a dispute, 
liter Martin smiled and said, 
PdS* ".fife's still reflection going on." 
K ^ I#! another point, he said, ^ 


think the Hedy Spirit will have to 
work overtime, and I think many 
people in the synod will have to 
WC« overtime.”' 

According to church sources, 
two matters are under discussion. 
One is the pastoral exhortation to 
the faithful that the bishops al- 
ready have agreed will be released 
after the synod ends Sunday. The 
other is the content and disposition 
of a summary of the synod by Car- 
dinal Godfried Danncds erf Bel- 
gium. 

One faction favors keeping the 
cardinal’s document, a bill of par- 
ticulars, only in the hands of Pope 
John Paul IL The other side advo- 
cates r eleasing a form of the sum- 
mary to the public. 

Joaquin Navarro Vails, the chief 
Vatican spokesman, said the bish- 
ops would publish their concluding 
propositions only if “the suggestion 
Is overwhelming/’ 

Thai, he indicated," would mean 
that two-thirds of the bishops 
would have to support this ap- 
proach. 

The bishops entered the final pe- 
riod of the two-week synod on a 
note erf unity. But conflict over 
such matters as relations between 
the Vatican and local bishops, lib- 



eration theology and the limits of 
dissent have stirred beneath the 
surface. 

A successful effort to issue asep- 
arate public statement of concents 
could be a significant breakthrough 
in the campaign by some bishrips to 
assert a degree of independence. 

By defimtion, a synod advises 
the pope and cannot legislate foe 
the church. But the form of that 
advice can vary depending on the 


'Behind the human 
exterior stands the 
mystery of a more 
than human reality. 
Without a view of 
the mystery of the 
church, the church 
becomes a human 

construction.’ 

— Cardinal Ratzuiger 


bishops’ willingness to set forth 
their conclusions apart from the 
pope’s direct control 

One reason some bishops have 
sought such a public report is their 
concern that the pope might ignore 
the problems they lave explored in 
his summing up of the proceedings. 

“The fcashops came and acknowl- 
edged that they have a divided 
church," said a Vatican official 
“They know they have ro hang with 


the pope or hang separately- So 
they’ve chosen unity." 

Traditionalist prelates, led by 
Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger of Mu- 
nich, who beads the Congregation 
for the Doctrine erf the Frith, set 
the agenda by saying that the 
church had lost much of its sacred 
quality and needed an infusion erf 
mystery. The congregation is the 
papal guardian of doctrinal ortho- 
doxy. 

For the most part, the tradition- 
alists have used the term “mystery” 
as a rallying point around which to 
promote a highly Roman, hierar- 
chical view of the "church. In its 
practice of authority and sacra- 
ments, the dmidi is seen as a pft of 
God and as having structures and a 
nature that are basically unchang- 
ing. 

The professed rim of the tradi- 
tionalists is to promote a rigorous 
interpretation erf the Second Vati- 
can Council, which the synod has 
been assigned to review, that focus- 
es on its consistency with tradition 
rather than on its spirit of liberal- 
ization. 

Against this stance, sometimes 
called the “vertical" view, are liber- 
al bishops who see the church more 
as a local, communal society erf 
believers living oat the Christian 


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ESTABLISHED 1887 




Britain Leaves 
UNESCO, Citing 


life at the practical “horizontal” 
level 

The traditionalist drive for great- 
er control of the church and unifor- 
mity in belief and practice has tak- 
en the form of an attack on what- 
they see as a capitulation to secular 
forces that have robbed it erf nfyp 
tery. "- , 

“Behind the human exterior 
stands the mystery of a more than 
human reality, in which reformers, 
sociologists, organizers have no au- 
tboritywhatsoever,” Cardinal Rat- 
zmger said in his book, “The Rat- 
zinger Report." 

“Without a view of the mystery 
of tire church," be wrote, “the 
church becomes a human construc- 
tion.” 

Traditionalists have used tbs 
same ling to argue against moves 
such as a strengthen mg of local 
bishops’ conferences that might 
threaten the authority of the pope 
or the Roman Quia, the central 
administration of the church. 

The team “mystery” has been 
used to explain various moves at 
the synod. Cardinal Joseph Malnla 
of Zaire, one of the synod presi- 
dents, arid that the church could 
not be described in the language of 
civil democracy because, he said, 
“the church is a mystery.”. 




"■m: 


in a general meeting of Republican 
congressmen Wednesday morning. 

Mr. Reagan, speaking later in the 
day, called the committee’s bil] 
“substantial progress from current 
law.” Bat be srid. that many de- 
ments need to be improved in the 
Senate next year and that he con- 
sidered the House measure nothing 
more than “a good start” 

The view in Congress and the 
administration is that if the tax bill 
fails in the House next week, no 
other comprehensive tax legislation 
will be considered by Congress 
during the Reagan presidency. The 
measure is scheduled to reach the 
House floor for a vote at the end of 
next week and, if it passes, to be 
taken up by the Senate early next 
year. 

Republican members of the 
Ways and Means Committee plan 
to offer an alternative proposal on 
the House floor that would be mare 
favorable to business than the com- 
mittee’s bin, but the Democratic 
majority in the House is so large 
that neither side gives the Republi- 
can proposal any dunce. 

Representative Dan Rosteokow^ 
ski, chairman of the Ways and 
Means Committee, said that the 
president’s statement was “not as 
strong as we wanted” but that “we 
didn’t come this far to lose.” 

Representative Robert H. Mi- 
chel of minds, the Republican mi- 
nority leader, said than were two 
grounds far the opposition. 

Substantively, he said, Republi- 
cans believe the bill would damage 
bustness- and the economy. Politi- 
cally, he said. Republicans believe 
it is unfair to expect than to vote 
for Democratic legislation that the 
president would probably veto. 


Britain said 
Thursday that it was withdrawing 
from the United Nations Educa- 
tional Scientific and Cultural Orga- 
nization ou Dec. 31. 

Its reasons for doing so echoed 
charges made by tbe United States 
when it left a year ago, saying that 
the UN cultural agency had an 
anti-Western bias and was pooriy 
managed. 

In a speech to the House of Com- 
mons, the overseas aid minister, 
Timothy Raison, said that UNES- 
CO had “gone wrong” and was 
“ harmf ully politicized and badly 
managed.” 

Britain, like the United States, 
has charged that UNESCO often 
involves itself in extraneous politi- 
cal issues, including taking stands 
and funding projects on nudear 
issues, human rights and control of 
the international mwtia that are ad- 
dressed from the perspective of 
Eastern European members and 
are detrimental to Western values. 

Mr. Raison said that up to 70 
percent erf the UNESCO budget 
was spent alits Paris headquarters. 
He emphasized overall support for 
tbe UN system, and said Britain 
would maintain observer status in 
UNESCO, like the United States. 

But, he said, Britain was deter- 
mined (hat its support “should be 
for effective and deficient organiza- 
tions.” 

“Unfortunately,” he said, 
“UNESCO is not such a body." 

Britain first gave notice at the 
end of 1984 that it would leave 
unless substantial changes were 
made in UNESCO’s organization 
and spending priorities. Mr. Rai- 
son said that Britain acknowledged 
that some steps toward reform had 
been taken, including budget re- 
ductions and depolitidzing the 
agency’s priorities, but that they 
were not enough. 

In Paris, UNESCO said it “deep- 
ly regrets” Britain’s move, which it 
raid “must come as a surprise to all 
those who have been engaged over 
the past two years in a far-reaching 
effort to agree on UNESCO’s pro- 
grams, budget, structures and func- 
tioning.” 

Britain was scheduled to contrib- 
ute $9 million to UNESCO next 
year. It said tbe money now would 
be redirected to overseas aid. 
UNESCO already had cut aB exist- 
ing programs by 25 permit, the 
percentage of ils 5382-million bud- 
get that had been contributed by 
the United Stales. 

The loss of Britain's presence in 
the organization, however, is in 
some respects more damaging than 
tbe loss of funds. Britain bis played 
a historic role in UNESCO since it 
was founded in London nearly 40 
years ago. Julian Huxley, its first 
director-general was one of many 
prominent Britons instr umen tal in 
developing and fostering the agen- 

cy- 

The decision brought an imme- 
diate storm of protest across a wade 
political spectrum in Britain, in- 
cluding many within Prime Minis- 
ter Margaret Thatcher's Conserva- 
tive Party. In an acrimonious 
parliamentary session. Mr. Raison 
ftwiwi r a n ges that the decision 
had been made under UB. pres- 
sure. 

Opposition Labor Party spokes- 
men called the decision “shabby 
and disgraceful” and “a kick in the 
teeth for the Third World.” Former 
Foreign Secretary David Owen, 
head of the Social Democratic Par- 
ty, said it branded Britain as an 
‘international Philistine” that is 


INSIDE 

■ The EC somite Out of reces- 

sion comes a first step toward 
more flexibility. Page 2. 

■ As a quiet insider became 
President Ronald Reagan’s se- 
curity aide, the chief of staff 
consolidated his power. Page 3. 

■ In South Africa, tbe question 

is: Who is winning? Tbe an- 
swer, for mow, seems to be nei 1 
ther ride. Page 4. 


WEEKEND 

■ San Shepard, like earlier 
American playwrights, has cre- 
ated a personal vision of the 
American family. Page 7. 

BUSTNESS/FINANCE 

■ Britain dropped its objections 

to an accord limiting European 
Comnnmiiy sled sales to the 
United Stales. Page 1L 

■ British unemployment fell 

slightly in November to stand 
at 13.1 percent. ftge 12. 


TO OUR READERS 

Became of technical problems 
in New York, 3 P^l NYSE and 
Amoc prices are listed in to- 
day's issue instead of doting 
prices. 


“shown to be insular, inward-look- 
ing and mean-spirited.” 

A U.S. official said ibai the Rea- 
gan administration had expressed 
us views on UNESCO io the Brit- 
ish government, but denied that 
any pressure had been exerted. He 

said the administration and Mrs. 
Thatcher “s« eye io eye on a lot of 
the problems" of UNESCO. 
“Many of our criticisms are the 
same, and we’re not surprised that 
they came to the same conclusion.” 

Mrs. Thatcher has received nu- 
merous collective and personal ap- 
peals from abroad io stay in 
UNESCO, including from the 48- 
member Commonwealth, the Euro- 
pean Community, Chancellor Hel- 
mut Kohl of West Germany and 
President Francois Mitterrand of 
France. 


. j 





Caspar W. Weinberger 

SDI Research 
Gaining, Says 
Weinberger 

Reuters 

BONN — Defense Secretary Ca- 
spar W. Weinberger said Thursday 
that the United States might have 
tbe ability to deploy an anti-missile 
shield using ground-based laser 
weapons as early as the mid-1990s. 

Addressing aG^rnan- American 
seminar in Bonn. Mr. Weinberger 
said recent breakthroughs in re- 
search on the Strategic Defense Ini- 
tiative, or SDI. had convinced 
Washington that a working space- 

Jane’s says Russia is using 
Western technology to narrow a 
gap in fighter jets. Page 2. 

based missile defense system could 
be ready much sooner than previ- 
ously estimated. 

Experiments in Hawaii he said, 
have made the most important re- 
cent advance by finding a way of 
removing the effects erf the atmo- 
sphere on lasers and showing that 
high-quality beams could be pro- 
jected into space in any weather. 

“In Ibe past we Lhougbi that a 
ground-based laser system would 
not be available until the turn of 
the century.” Mr. Weinberger said. 

“This and other breakthroughs 
convince us that a ground-based 
laser missile-defense system with 
space-based elements may be feasi- 
ble by the mid-1990s.” he said. 

The defense secretary made the 
remarks at an annual conference of 
American and West German mili- 
tary leaders. 

He then held talks on the re- 
search program and other military 
issues with Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl before flying to London to 
meet with Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher. 

Mr. Weinberger attacked critics 
of the program as misguided and 
urged the European allies to join in 
the technological research. 

He said the most pressing reason 
for developing research on Lhe SDI 
program, popularly known as “star 
wars," was that Moscow was al- 
ready well ahead in developing 
space defense systems such as la- 
sers, nuclear particle beams and 
kinetic energy weapons. 

“They now possess ground- 
based lasers that could interfere 
with our satellites.” he said, “and 
by the late 1980s they could have 
prototypes of ground-based lasers 
able to hit ballistic missiles.” 

Mr. Weinbetger rejected argu- 
ments by some European oppo- 
nents of’ the program that such a 
system would shield only the Unit- 
ed States and effectively “decou- 
ple” American defense from that of 
its European allies. 

Mr. Weinberger said Washing- 
ton was still eager for allies to join 
in SDI research, but he refused to 
be drawn into a debate that has 
gone on for months in West Ger- 
many on whether to sign a govern- 
ment accord or let companies sign 
up independently. 



? 



Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, ERJD AY, DECEMBER 6,1985 


** 


Soviet Is Gaining, Using 
Western Technology in 
Jet Fighters, Jane’s Says 


■V.T’ir 


WORLD BRIEFS 


NATO Pn^oses to. Cut 

'^ ;:V TrOOp Levefe in Europe 9 Soviet . L i S . Families to Be Reunited 

To Unblock Vienna Talks — - 




Reuters 

LONDON —The Soviet Union 
is narrowing the technology gap 
between its advanced aircraft and 
their Western counterparts, in 
some cases with the aid of Western 
technology, Jane's, the authorita- 
tive publishers of military refer- 
ences works, said Thursday. 

In the 1985-86 edition of “Jane's 
All the World's Aircraft," the Lon- 
don-based group included the first 
published photographs of the new 
Soviet Sukhoi Su-27 fighter plane, 
which is equipped! with radar to 
shoot down missiles and is compa- 
rable to the U.S. F-15 Eagle. Jane’s 
said the Su-27 became operational 
in recent months. 

“There was a time when the most 
advanced Soviet aircraft trailed far 
behind their Western counter- 
parts," the book said. “A glance 
through the Soviet section of this 
edition of Jane's will show how 
much the technology gap has nar- 
rowed." 

In the last year, Jane’s said. The 
Soviet Union also produced an An- 
tonov equivalent to the Lockh e ed 
C-5 Galaxy, a transport plane, and 
an Mi-28 helicopter to match the 
U.S. Apache. 

Jane's would not reveal the 
source of the photographs. 

Referring to the Sukhoi photos. 
Jane's said: “They reflect the high 
cost -to the West of U.S. technology 
transfers to less- than- reliable 
friends and of the shady activities 


that the press describes as ‘spy 
scandals.' 1 

The publishers quoted a U.S. 
government paper issued in Sep- 
tember as saying the Soviet Union 
had estimated it saved five years 
and 155 million in developing radar 
in its latest generation of fighter 
planes by using U& military docu- 
mentation. 

The paper, Jane's said, also stat- 
ed that there had been hundreds of 
other examples of Soviet militaiy 
equipment being developed with 
the aid of Weston technology. 

The Reagan administration has 
been trying to restrict the export of 
some high technology to the East- 
ern bloc; which has caused friction 
with allies in Western Europe. 

Jane's also criticized President 
Ronald Reagan’s Strategic Defense 
Initiative. 

It said the proposed space-based 
shield against nuclear missiles of- 
fered unachievable panaceas and 
involved spending so large and un- 
predictable that all estimates tend- 
ed to be meaningless. 

In another section, Jane's said 
passenger aircraft should have bet- 
ter escape routes, and that repair 
systems should be reviewed in the 
light of the large number of deaths 
in air accidents in the past year. 

The book noted that an accident 
in which 55 people died in a Boeing 
737 at Manches ter in August. was 
not the first in which victims were 
unable to get out of a plane in time. 






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The photograph of the Soviet Sukhoi Su-27 fig 
Jane’s said it was timihr to the UA F-15 


r, above, 
below. 


“Bearing this In mind," Jane’s 
said, “it would be more reassuring 
to know that exit facili ties woe 
being improved universally rather 
than reduced in certain aircraft to 
make way for further money-gath- 


publication said there were 

about 1,600 deaths involving corn- 
modal aircraft in 1985. It said that 


EC Summit: Out of Recession, a New First Step 


By Steven J. Dry den 

International Reraid Tribune 

BRUSSELS — When Jacques Delors, the 
president of the European Community Com- 
mission, compared decisions made at this 
week’s European summit meeting with the 
1957 agreement launching the EC, those pre- 
sent greeted his remarks with skepticism. 

Mr. Delors admitted a few hours later that 
the remarks, made immediately after the 
meeting raided at midnig ht Tuesday, were 
perhaps influenced by exhaustion and the 
late hour. 

But in one sense, his observations were not 
as grandiose as they first appeared to be. 

It Look two devastating world wars to con- 
vince at least some of the major countries in 
Europe that economic cooperation was better 
than brutal competition. 

The fruits of the Treaty of Rome, the 
community’s founding charter, were robust 
national economies and a dramatic improve- 
ment of the standard of living in Western 
Europe in the 1960s and much of the 1970s. 

Now. EC officials said, it has taken West- 
ern Europe’s economic difficulties of the past 


several years to push the community’s mem- 
bers to attempt a further modification of the 
way they do business together. 

The most potentially important decision 
made by the leaders, these officials said, was 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

to approve the use of majority voting to 
remove national barriers that have kept the 
EC from functioning as a true common mar- 
ket. Previously, any one country’s opposition 
could block community decisions indefinite- 

!y- , 

As the member states have gone about this 
exercise, these officials said, some important 
thing s have happened. 

First, the principle of majority voting has 
been confirmed at the highest level by the EC 
leaders themselves. 

At the previous EC summit meeting in 
June in Milan, the member states voted, 7-3, 
lo call an intergovernmental conference that 
would seek, among other things, to revise the 
voting procedures as defined under the Trea- 
ty of Rome and to redefine the powers of the 


European Parliament. The conference, in fact 
a senes of meetings of the EC foreign minis- 
ters, began in September. 

The meetings kd to the Luxembourg sum- 
mit talks, where the leaders again used major- 
ity voting to accept some of the conference's 
recommendations. 

Second, Britain and Greece, who voted 
with Denmark in June against the idea of 
holding the intergovernmental conference, 
approved the changes recommended by the 
conference to the participants in Luxem-~ 
bourg. 

The adoption of majority voting was con- 
sidered essential to stop the community from 


once its membership is enlarged to 12 

the accession of Spain and Portugal on Jan. 1. 

After several years in which Britain and the 
rest of the EC woe bogged down in an 
argument about the British contribution to 
the community’s budget, the dedsion by Brit- 
ain to join with the majority this time, at 
though grudgingly, was a pn 
sign for the community’s future, the i 
said- 


U.S. 



By Bernard Gwertzraan 

Sew York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The United 
Slates is considering stationing mil- 
itary anti-hijacking specialists 
overseas because of their failure to 
get to the scene quickly enough in 
the hijacking or an Egyptian airlin- 
er to Malta and of the AchiHe 
Laura cruise ship. 

Reagan administration officials 
said Wednesday that a debate had 
arisen within the government over 
the policy of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff to keep the anti-terrorist units 
at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, and 
not send them overseas except dur- 
ing emergencies. 

Based at Fort Bragg are the Dd- 
ta force commando unit, which 
specializes in rescue operations, 
and technicians and advisers who 


operate cqupment for the storming 
of hijacked planes. 

They were instrumental in help- 
ing Venezuelan troops storm a hi- 
jacked airliner in Curacao in Au- 
gust 1984. In that incident, the two 
hijackers were killed and all 70 pas- 
sengers and crew were rescued. 

The administration is now con- 
sidering stationing anti-hijacking 
experts in West Germany or Italy, 
to be on call for emergencies in 
Western Europe or the Middle 
East, a State Department official 
said. 

In the Nov. 23 hijacking of the 
EgyptAir jet, the Egyptians asked 
for American support after decid- 
ing to send a commando team to 
Malta. They were dismayed to 
learn that the anti-terrorist special- 
ists were in North Carolina. 

As a result, tire Egyptians asked 


Brigadier General Robert Wie- 
gand, who oversees US. military 
programs in Egypt, and two aides 
to accompany them to Malta to 
serve as liaisons. 

The Egyptians wanted to dem- 
onstrate US. involvement to Lib- 
ya, which they believed was behind 
the hijacking. 

In addition, the Egyptians asked 
for US. Navy air cover to protect 
the two Egyptian C-130s carrying 
the commandos to Malta. Three 
jets from the U.S. aircraft carrier 
Coral Sea escorted the Egyptian 
planes to Malta, the State Depart- 
ment official said. 

The Maltese government al- 
lowed the Egyptians to send forces 
and said it would permit Ameri- 
cans to assist the Egyptians, so long 
as they did not appear to be part of 
a separate U.S. action. 





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fact should prompt a reassessment 
of the amount of time older engines 
remain, in use and of the practice of 
repairing damaged aircraft parts 
rather than replacing them. 

Experts cited a faulty tail fin as a 
factor in the crash of a Japan Air 
Lines Boeing 747 in August in 
winch 520 people died. 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Port Service . 

VIENNA —The North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization unveiled 
Thursday a new proposal for troop 
reductions m Central Europe that- 
seeks to break the deadlock over 
East-West talks on conventional 
force levels by. adopting a frame- 
work suggested by the Warsaw 
Pact 

In the. first aims control initio 
tive since the Geneva meeting be- 
tween President Ronald Ragan 
and the Soviet leader, Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev, NATO representatives 
pi id they 'had - mpdf a significant 
concession by dropping a demand 
far prior agreement on the size of 
East-bloc forces stationed in the 
region. 

The Vienna negotiations, for- 
mally catted the Talks on Mutual 
Balanced Force Reductions in Eu- 
rope, haw languished foe. most of 
their 12 yOis because of a protract- 
ed dispute over troop numbers. The 
West claims that the East underes- 
timates its traces by 230,000 men. 

Prime ■ Minister Margaret 

T h a trhw nf Bri tain and rhatiggllrw 

Helmut Kohl of West Germany 
have persisted for months in urging 
a dramatic new Western proposal 
at the Vienna talks, according to 
senior Western diplomats. 

The new proposal quickly ac- 
quired widespread support among 
NATO governments berause of the 
belief that bolder, mere imagina- 


Malta did not want Americans in 
uniform to be seen at the airport, so 
General Wiegand changed to civil- 
ian dothes and was able to work in 
the rirport control tower with 
Egyptian and Maltese officials. 

The two other officers in uni- 
form remained at the UJS. Embassy 
because they had no special mis- 
sion to perform. 

Washington had ordered the 
Americans not to storm the plane. 

Tire experts bran Fort Bragg, 
carrying explosives and listening 
devices, got as far as the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization hue 
in SigooeOa, Sicily. But because the 
Maltese did not want them to enter 
Malta cm military aircraft, they 
were too late to aid the Egyptians. 

A Slate Department official said 
the Americans’ expertise might 
have limited the death toll Sixty of 
the 98 persons aboard tire airliner 
were med during the hijacking 
and rescue attempt . 

U.S. o f ficials said the Delta force 
also was sent to the region during 
the Achflle Lauro takeover in Octo- 
ber, but arrived too late to aid in 
any rescue operation. One Ameri- 
can was lriued in that incident. 


Church Envoy 
Is Denied a 
Kuwaiti Visa 

Reuters 

KUWAIT — Kuwait has refused 
an entry visa to Teny Waite, a 
representative of the Church of En- 
gland who is seeking the release of 
four Americans held hostage in 
Lebanon, an official source said 
Thursday. 

Mr. Waite, who visited Lebanon 
and the United States last month, 
has he wants to talk with Ku- 
waiti o fficials about 17 Arabs im- 
prisoned for bombing attacks two 
years ago in that country. 

The Lebanese kidnappers have 
link ed the freedom of the hostages 
to release of the 17 prisoners. The 
17 include pro-Irahian Shiite Mos- 
lems convicted of tire bombings of 
government buddings and the U-S. 
and French embassies in Kuwait. 

Speaking of Mr. Waite's request, 
the source said: “Kuwait does not 
seesuch a visit as necessary. It does 
not see any connection between the 
hostages mid those who carried out 
tire Kuwait bombings and who 
have been given a lair triaL” 

In London, a spo k es man for Mr. 
Waite said Thursday that the envoy 
remained cautiously optimistic 
about th e-negotiations despite Ku- 
wait’s reported refusal to grant a 
visa. 

Relations with several govern- 
ments, including Kuwait, had been 
constructive and helpful since ne- 
gotiations began, he said. . 

Mr. Waite, an aide to the Most 
Reverend Robert Runriiy arch- 
bishop of Canterbury, saidNov. 25 
that he had met the Kuwaiti am- 
bassador in London. 

Washington has pubBdy reject- 
ed the kidnappers’ demands that 
tire United States pressure Kuwait 
to free the 17 prisoners. 

The four US. hostages are tire 
Reverend Lawrence Martin Jenco, 
a Roman Catholic priest; Teny A. 
Andeison, a correspondent for The 
Associated Press; David P. Jacob- 
sen, director of the American Uni- 
versity hospital in Beirut; and 
Thomas M. Sutherland, the univer- 
sity’s acting dean of agriculture. 

Mr. Waite, 46, whooded his last 
visit to Beirut an Nov. 24, is cur- 
rently in London. 

In an article in a newspaper in 
the United Arab Emirates, Af-Kha- 
leej, Mr. Waite said he hoped to 
return to Beirut soon to continue 
ins efforts and that tire visit would 
not be his last 

“There are other captives. Euro- 
peans and Lebanese, and I could 
find that I might be able to help 
them,” Mr. Waite said. 

Meanwhile, in. Beirut, Mr. Suth- 
erland’s wife, Jean, said she did not 
beKeve Kuwait’s reported dedaon 
on a visa would end Mr. Waite’s 
mttBnnn 


five steps wot neoosaiy w restore 
public faith in arms control and to 
recapture the irritiatiw from Mos- 
cow after a spate of Soviet offers to 
freeze or reduce nudear arms test- 
ingand devetopmeut. 

Tire West’s new proposal “saDcd 
through NATO in record time once 
■the summit concentrated every- 
one's minds,” a senior Western dip- 
lomat said. “It is hard to believe we 

would have gotten one before 

rfrriqtmas without the summit.” 

Ambassador Michael Alexander 
of Britain declared Thursday that 
die NATO countries bad now 
.adapted their position to such an 
extent that they had established 16 
areas of agreement with tire War- 
saw Pact over how to bring about a 
treaty on troop cats in Europe, 

.Hie said that the West's latest 
offer would help enormously in 
overcoming many years of “a dia- 
logue of the deaf.” 

The Western proposal embraces 
the East-bloc concept of a first 
phase reduction involving U.S. and 
Soviet- Traces, followed by a “no 
increase” c o mmitm en t to be under- 
taken by both alliances for the next 
three years. 

Last February the Warsaw Pact 
proposed opening cuts of 20,000 
Soviet troops and 13,000 Ameri- 
cans as wdQf as a ceiling on soldiers 
currently deployed. The new West- 
ern version accepts this format but 
prescribes a smaller initial troop 
withdrawal of 11,500 Soviets and 
5.000 Americans. 

Despite the narrowing of key dif- 
ferences on early troop withdraw- 
als and a ceding on bloc forces, the 
n egotiating positions between the 
Eat and West remain in sharp con- 
flict over whether to reduce the 
quantity of armaments and ways to 
verify observance of the lower 
troop levels. 

The chief Soviet ddegattyValcri- 
an Mikhailov, responding to the 
Western offer put forward at the 
dose of the negotiating round 
Thursday, said that even though 
Western countries seemed formally 
to accept the East-bloc scheme, 
“they filled it with dubious con- 
tent" 

Theseven Warsaw Pact nations, 

anxious about NATO’s arms mod- 
ernization plan, have demanded 
that all troops bein§ removed 
should take away then weapons 
and combat equipment The West 
says that Hah sira; “should have 
the discretion to decide far itself” 
how to dispose of its weapons. 


WASHINGTON ( Reuters j — Nine Soviet citizens separated From 
American relatives have received official contortion from Sovi« an- 
thoriries that they may join their family members m the United States, the 

S ^ewlc^^&^«‘ U ^“8 n€SS w forward m ^ > f e CaSeS ''' 
the department said in a statement 

and theyoung son of a U.S. citizen are being permuted to leave* 

The plan t! bring separated families ; tether was annrammi sbort> 
before the meeting of President Ronald Reagan and Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev. the Soviet leader, in Geneva last month. Altogether 25 families are 
divided between the United States and the Soviet Union. 



Mr. Cnuri and Mrs. Bonner at die Grigi Palace. 

Craxi Receives Bonner in Rome 


ROMEfUPR — Yelena G. Bonner met with Prime Minister Bettino 
Craxi on Thursday 


r and called the 35-minute meeting at theQngi Palace a 



Farook Kaddoumi 


States pressure Kuwait m A . 1g 

a* PLOOffioalSap 


KJinghoffer’s Wife 
Should Be Siospect 

United Press International \ - 

UNITED NATIONS, Not 
Y ork — An official with the Pales- 
tine Libaation OiBannaticm has 
suggested (hat Lean Klnghoffcr’s 
wife may have gashed Turn, over- 
board from the hijacked Italian 1m- 
er, thcAdnBe Lauro, so she could 
collect his insurance. 

“When one peracn was killed, 
the word spread out that Palestin- 
ians are terrorists,” Farouk Kad- 
doumi the PLO foreign policy 
said Wednesday. Mr. 


TRAVELLERS REASSURED ‘ WATER 

IN BOMBAY SAFE TO DRINK’. 

» . 

Based on his long and intimate acquaintance with 
Bombay our foreign correspondent writes : 

"Of all the things that people drink, in Bombay* 
water has never figured prominently. 

Most prefer Tonic in Bombay, Mar- 
tini in Bombay or Orange in Bombay. 

Indeed, anything that one would 
usually mix in Bombay. 

But, let me assure you, there 
is no need to stay clear 
of the water. 

Those rumours 
which infer that 
water does not mix 
with this most 
distinctive of Irn- 
1 ported London Dry 
Gins are well and 
truly ill-founded." v 



;er, 69, was on the Medi- 
terranean aniseship with his.wife. 
wirenitwashgatiBdOct7.. 

“It might be his wife who pushed 
trim overboard m order to get his. 
insurance,” Mr, Kaddoumi told a. 
gathering of UN leaders and diplo- 
mats. “Nobody has tire evidence , 
that he was lolled. 3 ’ \ 

According , to U.S. officials, the 
Palestinian gunmen: who hyacked 
the ' ship ana held more than' 300 
people hostage for two days shot 
Mr. Klinghoffcr and tossed ttt 

body and his wheelchair over- 
board. After tire body was found, 
tire US. gpvanmentsaid an 
-syndicated he died from a. 
wound to .tire head. . 

; LastmontiimGenoa, a 
tor.' said one of the ! 
confessed- to the kjEEmg- 
In New York, a spokeswoman 
For Mr. KEnghcfler’s. vfiCA Man- . 
lyruSaid she.woobl .liavn no com- 
ment on Mr. Kaddoumfri sugges- 
tion. - . ■ 


Cram on Thursday and caned tne j>minuie raccuug ai uB uagi ra 
tribute to her husband, Andrei D. Sakharov, the Soviet dissident. 

Mrs. Bonner, 62, who was allowed to leave tire Soviet Union fra the 
West to twif medical advice about problems with her eyes and heart, 
arrived Monday in Italy fra medical treatment. She said she probably 
wcrald leave Saturday fra Boston to consult heart specialists. 

Qadhafi Eases Support for Chad Rebel 

DAKAR, Senegal (Reuters) — Libya’s leader, Colonel Moamer Qa- 
dhafi, se eking for a way to end the stalemate in Chad’s 20-year civil war. .. 
scaled down his commitment Thursday to former President Goldman.-' 
Oaeddei, his rebd protege in north Chad. 

After a three-day visit to Senegal for talks with President Abdou Diouf, 
chairman of the Organization of African Unity, Colonel Qadhafi told 
reporters he was prepared to treat Mr. Gcukouni and Chad’s president, 
Hisstne Habri, as rivals on “the same footing of equality.” 

Colonel Qadhafi, who in 1983 sent an estimated 6,000 troops into 
northern Chad to aid the rebels, has until now insisted that Mr. Goukouni 
was the only legitimate Chadian head of stale. But he said no one could 

claims an areaof destrUerntory^ in northern Chad known aslfte'Aouzou 
strip. 

Weinberger Shifts on Military Reform 

WASHINGTON (NYT) — Under pressure from Congress, Defense 
Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger has said that he could accept changes in 
the structure of the US, armed forces, including proposals to strengthen 
the authority of the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. 

The comments, in a letter Wednesday to senior members erf the Senate j. 
C ommi ttee rat Aimed Services, reflect a significant change in position./ 
Testifying before the committee on Nov. 14, Mr. Weinberger opposed' 
major changes in militaiy structure. 

In his letter, he noted that the Joint Chiefs of Staff helped the defense 
secretary to commnaicate orders from the president to field commanders, 
and bdped supervise the way such orders were carried out. “The role of 
the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in this regard should be 
strengthened,” he wrote, “provided it is clear that he acts on behalf of the 
JCS.” 

U.S. Extends Bid Deadline for Subs 

WASHINGTON (NYT) — The U.S. Navy has “extended indefinite- 
ly" a Friday deadline for bids to build four nuclear-powered attack 
submarines in an effort to keep General Dynamics Corp. in the competi- 
tion. The navy said it wanted to avoid awarding the contracts to a single 
source. 

’ Tbe “v/s announcement Wednesday followed Tuesday’s barring of 
General Dynamics from nredving new government am tracts. On Mon- 
day, the corporation and four erf its present or former executives were 
tn dieted on fraud charges. One of those indicted, James M, Beggs, the - 
adminis trator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration,^ 
took a leave of absence Wednesday. 

Senior Defense Department officials suggested Wednesday that the 
tomng of General Dynamics would be lifted before the production of 
wtal arms was affected. Without the extension of the bid Hga/tw 
contracts fra the submarines would have gone to Newport News Ship- 
bufldmg m Virginia, which, navy officials asserted, could have increased 
its pace at tbe last minute. 

W alesa Answers Summons in Gdansk 

• WARSAW (Rniters) — Ledb Walesa answered a summons Thursday 
to the prosecu tor’s office in Gdansk, where he was asked to read an 
amount of investigations of charges that he had slandered electoral 
officials, a spokesman for Mr. Walesa said. 

The spokesman said that Mr. Walesa, the former leader of the Sdidari- 
ty uniOT nwvement, and ha lawyer spent about three hours reading 70 
pa |£ 1 d would continue the reading Friday. 

.. Walesa has been accused of slandering Polish dectiSffidals byv. ' 

For the Record 

One person £ed from the gas leak at a fertilizer plant that sent sulfur 
trtoxide gg acotmxMmt of oleum, over crowded bazaar districts of New 
Delhi on Wednesday, AH India Radio reported Thursday. {Rotten) 

Tja ^, S S^^ tor fed?** 0 has dismissed ite loi^ 

Smeral HabibAchour, and elected Sadok Alioucfae toSccS?£ 
AHourfte said Thursday, emit — l.jT 10 ir P asc nun ’ 



r_:~ . J w me uenerai union erf Tunisian 

'orkers wim were arrested durmg strikes last month. (Reuters) 




that 


PcMdent Ronald Reaganwould v^oaMb^^S^trict quotas on - 
textile and shoe nnports. The bill was approvedteS^h, 
and the Home of Representatives. a ^ ,UV6Q 11118 mtheS^^ 



UNIVERSITY 
DEGRBE 

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PACmC WESTERN iMVERSTTY 

MOW. Sepulveda Btvct, 

** Los Angeles, CaJHOmto , v 
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n note (127 j ldlomaerg) nonhTOtrflTv^ m Nw,a “ ^ 

Correction 

MmisterRichard Hu. Mr. Hu 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1985 


Page 3 


8 A dmirai Poindexter: 



•ves 



Colleagues Say New Security Adviser 
SpeaksSoflly But Carries Lot of Weight 


r - 'V 


“Si Pit, 

ome 

" —'Chpit 
’J'-- »tij; 

^ *p' 


By Michael R. Gordon 

, ! . .Nae. York Times Service . . 

: WASHINGTON — Ata White 
House news conference, Tice Ad- 
miral John Marian Poindexter was 
asked ay the press would ever see 
him again. 

“Maybe,” he replied and there* 
mark drew general laughter. =' • 
Admiral Poindexter, whom Pres- 
ident- Donald Reagan named 
Wednesday as his national security 
adviser* has shunned publicity ami 
press contacts since he joined the 
staff of the National Security 
Council in 1981. 

• Soar 1983 he has served as the 
'deputy to Robert C, McFariane 
and has been been known as an 
insider. But those who know him 
describe him as intelligent, ex- 
tremely hard working, politically 
conservative and personable, 

A dmirai Poindexter, 43, is the 
fourth national security adviser to 
save Mr. Reagan and the 14th to 
bold tire position since it was estab- 
lished in 1953 under President 
Dwight D. Eisenhower. 

He graduated from the US. Na- 
val Academy in 1958. “He was not 
only, first in his class at the Naval 
Academy but .also brigade com- 
mander” of the class, Mr. Reagan 
'said Wednesday. 

Admiral Poindexter also earned 
a doctorate in nuclear physics in 
1964 from the California Institute 
of Technology. 


Admiral Poindexter was bom in 
Washington, Indiana and is mar- 
ried to the former Linda A. Good- 
win,' a coJoridV daughter. They 
have five sons. 

From 1978 to 1981 he served as 
the deputy chief of naval education 
and traunng; Then he. went to the 
National Security CoundL 

As Mr. McFarlane’s deputy. Ad- 
miral Poindexter was more in- 
volved in regional issues and crisis ' 
management than arms control 
But administration officials said he . 
was knowledgeable and active on 
arms control issues. 

Admiral Poindexter headed the 
Security Council's so-called crisis 
pre-planning group. He was in- 
volved in the administration's han- 
dling of the Acbille Lauro ship hi- 
jacking, according to a- White 
House official. The official also 
said that the admiral was »lsn in- 
volved in the administration delib- 
erations over the hijacking last 
summer of the TWA plane in Bei- 
rut 

He has also taken, an interest in 
the organization of the Security 
Counci] staff and was said by one 
official to have been the favorite 
candidate . of Mr. McFariane and 
the staff to follow Mr. McFariane 
as national security adviser. . 

A State Department official said 
that many in that agency were 
pleased with the appointment of a 
military officer who had a pragmat- 
ic approach to issues. 



Da An adoM Pi*a 

Ronald Reagan with Vice Admiral John ML Poindexter 


“He is a smart, .energetic guy 
who has tried in an energetic way to 
get thin gs done,” one official mM 

Bat some in Washington said 
they were disappointed that Admi- 
ral Poindexter was selected instead 
of otlber candidates with more ideo- 
logical approaches to national se- 
curity issues. 

Richard A. Viguezie, a conserva- 
tive publisher and publicist, de- 
scribed Admiral Poindexter as a 
technocrat and said his appoint- 
ment reflected a “mind-boggling 
insensitivity” to conservatives. 

Others have questioned whether 
he will be willing tojplay the sort of 
assertive role that is necessary to 
resolve the continuing bureaucratic 


' ' * * 1 tV 

• 'c? 


-n Refc 


■-/ 


FahvelTs Inf luence on Voters Appears to Be Slipping 


By Dudley Gendin en 

New York Times Service 

RICHMOND, Virginia — 
Here in the Reverend Jerry Fal- 
wril*s home state, the base from 
which he flies off to forums in 
Washington. South Africa or the 
Philippines to try to influence po- 
litical opinion. Us ability to sway 
the electorate appears to be in 
decline. 

Seven years ago, as the reli- 
gion-basal new right was gather- 
ing power as a political force. 
Republican and Democratic sen- 
atorial candidates from Virginia 
made the trek to Mr. FahvelTs 
Thomas Road Baptist Church in 
Lynchburg to sit in the second 
row in hope of receiving the trie- 
vision evangelist's blessing 

Since then, Mr. F&lwell, 
founder of the Moral Majority, 
has made himself a powerful bro- 
ker in the national affairs of the 
Republican Party and has 
achieved international renown as 
the chiefprophet of an moused 



GnwtlVtt 

Jerry Fafwefl 

political coalition of conservative 
American Christians. He speaks 
frequently of his relationship 
with the Reagan White House 


and says he can deliver the race 
for governor in Virginia. 

Mr. FahvdTs visibility is a re- 
sult of his outspokenness on 
many subjects and of the pre- 
sumption that he speaks for a 
potent political constituency. 

But in the years in which that 
visibility as a national cultural 
figure has grown, Mr. FalweQ's 
political reputation in Virginia 
has been turning sour. Democrat- 
ic and Republican national polls 
alike have reported that public 
reaction to him is strongly nega- 
tive. 

Here in Virginia it is now com- 
mon talk that Mr. FahvdTs active 
support of a candidate is wel- 
come mly so long as it can be 
kept a secret - 

The general feeling, both 
among Democrats and Republi- 
cans, is that public awareness of a 
Faftvell endorsement costs a can- 
didate more voterin the elector- 
ate as.? whole than it drums np 
among conservative Christians. 


Mr. Falwril, asked if he be- 
lieved that ins endorsement now 
represented a net loss, said, “I do 
not.” But he acknowledged that 
he had taken on “a lightning rod” 
quality that has led him to play a 
careful, duplicitous game. 

Last month, the Richmond 
Times- Dispatch newspaper pub- 
lished the results of a poll of near- 
ly 1,000 registered voters, with a 
margin of sampling error of plus 
or minus 3 percentage points. 

The poll-takers reported that 8 
percent of the respondents were 
“more likely” to vote for someone 
Mr. Falwril had endorsed and 51 
percent were “less Hkdy." To 33 
percent of the respondents, the 
newspaper reported, an endorse- 
ment would make no difference. 

In the Senate race in Septem- 
ber 1982, the last time the Rich- 
mond newspaper asked that 
question, 28 percent of those 
polled said they would be “less 
likely** U> -vote for a candidate 
Mr. Falwril, had endorsed. ■' 


-r Bomb Threats Parly Poll on Bush’s Appeal Angers 

: Close Offices Likely Rivals for ’88 Presidential Race 
In Washington 


iV»r 


Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Twenty- 
— three bomb threats were made 
Wednesday against federal bn3d- 
- mgs here, cansing the Supreme 
Court, the Department of Housing 
and Urban Development and two 
_ agencies to evacuate thousands of 
• woikers while police looked for ex- 
. ..... plosives, officials said. 

•A ' Threats also were received by a 
v - : - bank and a wing of the National 
Gallery of Art, where guards 
. cleared about 700 visitors from the 
" ' ~ museum’s Treasure Houses of Brit- 

‘ am exhibit fra an hour. 

No explosives were found. Other 
supposed targets included the U.S. 
Capitol, two Senate office budd- 
ings, a House office budding, the 
departments of State, Justice, La- 
. bra, Interior, Commerce and Ener- 
jri the Federal Bureau of Investi- 

4 .. gation’s Hoover Building and the 

.. Internal Revenue Service building. 

“It appears that the person or 
- " persons responsible may have been 
.. a crank caller,” the District of Co- 
' lumbia police department said in a 
; - r statement. 

Officials said the threats were all 
, made by telephone, and in at least 
six of thfrrn, the caller identified 
himsdf as a member of “The Peo- 
ple's Liberation Army." He did not 
explain the purpose of the threat- 
ened bombing officials said. 

In 1972, two members of a group 
with the same name were linked to 
: .the bombing of the police and fire 
department headquarters in Man- 
chester. New Hampshire, and to 
. the planned bombing of President 
- v Richard M. Nixon’s New Hamp- 
■ ..Thire primary campaign headquar- 
; ten, according to news accounts 
‘ . published at the tune. 


Washington Past Soviet. 

WASHINGTON — The Repub- 
lican National Committee has 
commissioned a major poll “to as- 
sess personal and job-related per- 
ceptions’’ of Vice President George 
Bush, provoking angry protests 
from probable competitors fra the 
1988 Republican Party presidential 
nomination. 

Senator Robert J. Dole of Kan- 
sas, the Senate majority leader, 
charged Tuesday that the poll 
which is estimated to cost $40,000 
to $60,000, violated party rides that 
the committee remain neutraL 

“I didn't know that the RNChad 
become a Bush headquarters," Mr. 
Dole said. 

Howard H. Baker Jr., the former 
Senate majority leader and a pro- 
spective candidate, said, “I'm sur- 
prised and, if this is true, someone 
ought to be fired.” 


Accompanying the poll was a 
cover letter describing it as bring 
financed by the Republican Na- 
tional Committee with three pur- 
poses. One purpose, it said, was to 
examine “voter support fra Vice 
President George Bush in both the 
primary and general elections for 
president in 1988." 

The committee's political direc- 
tor, William Greener, said this de- 
scription was inaccurate. He said 
that the committee and Mr. Bush 
had entered into a complex ar- 
rangement under which the com- 
mittee would pay only for those 
portions of the poll that relate to 
general issues and job perfor- 
mance. 

The remaining part of the poll, 
which specifically tests Mr. Bush's 
political strength compared with 
that of his probable competitors. 


WiD be paid for by Mr. Bnsh'spolit- 
ical action committee, the Fund for 
America’s Future, according to Mr. 
Greener and Robert Tetter. Mr. 
Teeter runs Market Opinion Re- 
search, which is conducting the 
poll. 

I Campaip) Foods Bl Dehyed 
The UB. Senate has voted in 
principle to curb the growing-inf] Li- 
enee of political action committees 
on congressional campaigns, but it 
avoided any moves to apply the 
principle any sooner than • next 
to The Washington 


By an 84-7 vote, the Senate re- 
jected Tuesday a motion to kill leg- 
islation limiting the amount of 
campaign contributions that House 
and Senate candidates could accept 
from political action committees. 


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Megan Consolidates His Power 

Ouef of Staff Likely to Exert Influence on Foreign Policy 


dashes between Defense Secretary 
Caspar W. Weinberger and Secre- 
tary of Stare George P. Shultz on 
arms control US. -Soviet relations 
and other issu es . 

But R. James ■ Woolsey, who 
served as an undersecretary of the 
navy during the Carter administra- 
tion, disputed that view. 

“He is not the table-slamming, 
cigar-chewing type of railitaiy offi- 
cer,” said Mr. Woolsey, who has 
worked with Admiral Poindexter. 
“He speaks in soft tones but no- 
body will have any doubt that be is 
a major player. He has no trouble 
at aU mafong it clear where he 
stands." 


By Bernard Weinraub 

' New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — In his ap- 
pointment of Vice Admiral John 
M. Poindexter as his national secu- 
rity adviser, President Ronald Rea- 
gan has cemented the power of 
Donald T. Regan, the White House 
chief of staff, over the domestic and 
foreign policy apparatus of the 
White House, administration offi- 
cials said. 

By all accounts Mr. Regan’s 
emergence as the most powerful 
figure in the adminis tration after 
the president will mark a faint but 
perceptible shift in White House 
operations. 

Officials point out that with the 
resignation of Robert C. McFar- 
iane as national security adviser, 
reportedly after tense wrangles 
with the chief of staff, the White 
House now has one focus of power 
in Mr. Regan. 

Beyond this, officials predicted 
that Mr. McFarlane’s replacement 
teii his deputy. Admiral Poindexter, 
means that Mr. Regan will now 
play a far more active role in for- 
eign policy matters. This is an area 
in which Mr. Regan has treaded 
softly, partly because of his own 
inexperience and partly because of 
Mr. McFarlane's control over na- 
tional security policy in the While 
House. 

In a brief telephone interview, 
Mr. Regan sought to play down the 
possibility that he will increase his 
involvement in foreign policy. “I 
don’t think m play any different 
role than I did,” he said. 

Mr. Regan said he was "worry- 
ing about” numerous domestic is- 
sues such as tax simplification and 
deficit reduction legislation. 

“But quite obviously," he added, 
“1 have lo stay alert to the foreign 
side of issues-” 

Mr. Regan denied that his rela- 
tions with Mr. McFariane had been 
poor. “Strangely enough I thought 
I had good relations with Bud and I 
hope to have a good relationship 
with John,” be said. 

Another official said that in a 
private conversation with Admiral 
Poindexter late on Tuesday, Mr. 
Regan said he would not hinder the 
national security adviser's access to 
the president or involve himself in 
every aspect of foreign policy. But 
Mr. Regan also said be viewed his 
role now as a bridge and counsel to 
the president on foreign policy, es- 
pecially when decisions on national 
security had an impact on domestic 
political considerations. 

“Regan is not, after all & novice 
now in foreign policy" a White 
House official said. “He was in- 
volved before. He's intimately in- 
volved now.” 

In an allusion to Mr. Regan's 
turf fights with Mr. McFariane. the 
official said: “Regan told Poin- 


dexter that he didn’t like surprises, 
he warned to be told what's going 
on, he wanted a collegial decision- 
making process. He said: ‘If it's 
good news or bad news, tell me. I 
don't want surprises.' ” 

On a personal level Mr. Regan's 
ascendancy in the administration 
mirrors his remarkable rise on Wall 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

Street as chief executive officer of 
Merrill Lynch & Co. That was a 
rise that was marked, according to 
friends of his, by a constant under- 
estimation of ms shrewdness and 
abilities. 

“Like Reagan, people have con- 
stantly underestimated Don Regan 
— in New York and in Washing- 
ton,” one of his White House aides 
said. 

While House officials said that 
Mr. Regan, who shared planning 
fra the recent summit meeting in 
Geneva with Mr. McFariane, will 
now seek an active role even in 
arms control and strategic arms 
questions. These topics deeply con- 
cerned Mr. McFariane and are not, 
for the moment, viewed os Admiral 
Poindexter’s strong points. 

The departure of Mr. McFariane 
from the White House marks the 
end of the team that dominated the 
first Reagan term and leaves the 
chief of staffs appointees in total 
control not just within the White 
House but at several cabinet posts. 

“Regan dearly wants his own 
people. That’s important to him, 
that’s his style," a White House 
official said. “People in the While 
House who had a prior relationship 
is the first term do not fare well 
with Regan.” He died the recent 
departures of such figures as Ed- 
ward J. Rodins, the political advis- 
er, and Max L. Friedersdorf, the 


legislative coordinator, as well as 
Mr. McFariane. 

Despite Mr. Regan's denial that 
he had problems with Mr. McFar- 
iane. it is widely acknowledged 
within the White House that the 
chief of staffs aggressive manage- 
ment style and his involvement in 
foreign policy troubled the national 
security adviser. On the other hand. 
Mr. McFarlane's efforts to bypass 
Mr. Regan and use his own prerog- 
atives with the president annoyed 
the chief of staff. White House off i- 
rial5said- 

“If you sum Regan up. he’s a 
firm believer in creating no new 
power centers,” said a Republican 
close to the chief of staff. “He un- 
derstands that all the power centers 
need to be subservient to him. 

“What he does is get capable and 
influential second-level men for 
what in the past were first-level 
jobs. This is not in any way dispar- 
aging or these people. He creates a 
pyramid with him at the top and 
others beneath him,” he said. 

“The removal of McFariane 
means the removal of the last ves- 
tige of anybody with an indepen- 
dent power base in the White 
House but Don Regan. It's doubt- 
ful that there'll be any more inter- 
nal struggles in the White House 
for a while now ” 





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In U.S., Bomb Sent 
To Abortion Group 

Los Angeles Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — Four pared 
bombs have been mailed to abor- 
tion-agency employees in the Prat- 
land. Oregon, area, apparently re- 
suming a violent campaign that has 
included 43 arson and bomb at- 
tacks on U.S. abortion-related fa- 
cilities in recent years. 

One bomb was delivered Mon- 
day to the Portland Feminist Wom- 
en's Health Center, while the others 
were intercepted by postal inspec- 
tors. None exploded, but abortion 
supporters called the bombs an es- 
calation of the anti-abortion cam- 
paign, saying that people, not 
braidings, were the targets fra the 
first time. 

Postal investigators said they 
had no suspects. 



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South Africa’s War of Attrition 

Deq)Ue the Arnior^Trucks^Elai^ Youths Sense a Victory 




By Alan Cowell 

New York Tima Seme* 

JOHANNESBURG — After 15 
months of violence in South Africa, 
the different assessments of the sit- 
uation by the government and its 
foes seem to beg a question: Who is 
winning? The immediate answer, 
for those seeking rapid outcomes of 
intractable crises, seems to be: nei- 
ther side. The battle is more one of 
attrition than of decisive moments. 

Since September 1984, the im- 
ages of blade unrest and white re- 
pression have hurt not so much the 
whites' standard of living as the 
country’s economy, which, over the 
long term, has nurtured white pros- 
perity. 

The rand has fallen to its lowest 
levels. South Africa has been 
obliged to suspend repayment of 
pan of its foreign debt. And the 
white-ruled country has been con- 
fronted with an economic vulnera- 




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bility to outside pressures that it Winnie Mandela, the wife of 
had disavowed for years. Nelson Mandela, the jailed anti- 

Mean while, a sense has grown apartheid leader, seems determined 
among radical youths in many of to keep that torch alight- On TUes- 
the country’s black townships that day, violating her banning orders, 
a victory is somehow imminent, de- she addressed a rally at Mamelodi, 
spite the displays of raw power near Pretoria, and pledged vat- 
symbolized by armored police geance for blacks killed by the gov- 
trucks and firearms. eminent. 

When President Pieter W. Botha A ycar^>. the Mican Nation^ 
lifted a state-oF-emetgency decree Q^ban^wasararea^tar 
Tuesday in eight districts,' the ges- P°h ucaI gatteungs. Now it seems 


NEWS ANALYSIS 

ture was largely symbolic. The dis- 
tricts had not been known particu- 
larly for unrest, and the industrial 
centers of Johannesburg. Cape 
Town and Port Elizabeth remained 
under emergency rule. 

But nothing is that simple in 
South Africa. Townships east of 
Johannesburg, the centers of pro- 
test earlier this year, have seemed 
[ess violent since the state of emer- 
gency took effect July 21. But the 
violence has spilled into areas unaf- 
fected by the decree, so much so 
that Cape Town, not named in the 
initial decree, has been included. 

What seems to worry the au- 
thorities most is the growing open- 
ness with which black protesters 
are prepared to embrace the Afri- 
can National Congress, the banned 
guerrilla movement. The organiza- 
tion has had only limited military 


success, but nevertheless has grown _ 

in status as the rallying point of a ^ ^erallf ineffective 


almost routine. 

When a new federation of labor 
onions, called the. Congress of 
South African Trade Unions, was 
launched last week in Durban, 
many of the songs that were sung 
were those long used by the African 
National Congress. 

The federation's chairman, Eli-' 
jah Barayi, took part in the organi- 
zation's civil disobedience cam- 
paigns in the 1950s. Pamphlets 
distributed at the gathering were 
issued in the name of the outlawed 
Sooth African Communis r Party, 
an ally of the African National 
Congress. 

“The ANC is the spirit of oar 
people,” Chris Ncgobo, a militant . 
student leader, said at Tuesday's 
gathering in Mamelodi. 

For the authorities, such com- 
ments are anathema, because the 
African National Congress is com- 
mitted to the violent overthrow of 
the apartheid system 

The threat from the organization 
seems to lie not so mnefa in its 



YoutlsdaiK^hliKhoniebf a policeman in a Mack township near Johannesburg- Blacks 
working for the South African government have been frequent targets of demonstrators. 

Police in South Africa Use Whips , 
Tear Gas to Break Up Church Vigils 


barely discerned revolution. 


Karpov Formally Seeks 
Rematch With Kasparov 

Reuters 

MOSCOW — Anatoli Karpov, 
who lost his world chess title last 
month, on Thursday challenged the 
new champion, Gary Kasparov, to 
a rematch, the Tass news agency 
reported. 

Tass said Mr. Karpov had made 
his challenge in a letter to the Inter- 
national Chess Federation, which 
has set the rematch for Feb. 10 to 
April 21. Tass quoted Mr. Karpov 
as saying in the letter 'This is to 
inform you that 1 want to take 
advantage of my right for a re- 
match with the world champion, 
granted to me by the rules of the 
1985 match.” 


military activities as in its appeal to 
many black South Africans as the 
vanguard rtf a new era free of racial 
inferiority. 

The contest in South Africa, 
thus, seems in part a collision of 
moods: black militancy sensing a 
victory pitted against white resolve 
to engineer the country's future. 

What the authorities do not seem 
able to control is the mood that has 
overtaken some of the country’s 
non white teenagers. After Tues- 
day’s gathering in Mamelodi, a 
youth in his early teens accosted a 
reporter to deliver a message. 

“Negotiation,” he said, “does 
not work So we, the youth, have 
decided on armed struggle.” 

On the fringes of the township, 
the police and the army had set up 
roadblocks in a manner that sug- 
gested that the youth’s ambitious 
would not easily be fulfilled. 


The Associated Press 

JOHANNESBURG — Police 
using whips and tear gas broke up 
candlelight vigils for imprisoned 
anti-apartheid activists and dis- 
persed thousands of mourners at a 
black gild’s funeral, witnesses said 
Thursday. 

National police headquarters in 
Pretoria, reported stonings and gas- 
oline bombings late Wednesday 
and early Thursday in most of the 
mixed-race townships east of Cape 


reported. It was the second grenade 
attack in two days on a police par 
trol in the township. 

The Reverend Allan Boesak, a 
mixed-race religious leader, said he 
led a caodZeUgnt vigil Wednesday 
night at his church outside Cape 
Town. Some of the 700 people who 
attended went outside and were bit 
by tear gas from an armored police 
vehicle across the street, he said. 

“I just ilwriV the South African 
police once « gnn have shown 


light vigils protesting detentions of 
activists under the emergency laws. 

In Athlone, a mixed-race com- 
munity, police used rubber whips 
and lock candles from the hands or 
demonstrators, the press associa- 
tion said. The vigils have become 
regular Wednesday night events in 
the Cape. 

■ New Peace Bid Expected 
Efforts to find a southern Afri- 
can peace settlement, stalled for 
months, are reviving rapidly, West- 


A spokesman denied charees themselves to be the pigs that the cm diplomatic sources said Tburs- 
thal riotnairols broke np the can- people think that they are,' said day in London, predicting a “pre- 
dldight services without provoca- Mr. Boesak, who faces subrasoa Oiristmas flurry of contacts, 
tion. He said the gatherings charges and is free on baD. “There 
— is absolutely no excuse for what 

happened here.” 

Lieutenant Attic Laubscher, a 


■HAP 

ISOLDE 


SES COLLECTIONS 


Mr 

34, Fg SAINT-HONOR^ 


Wednesday " ffir were illegal and 
police moved m after their warn- 
ings were ignored. 

A witness said police fired tear 
gas Thursday morning to scatter 
about 5,000 mourners at the funer- 
al of an 18-year-old girl shot by 
police hut week in Soweto, the 
black township near Johannesburg. 

Police said that they warned the 
crowd that the gathering violated 
roles under a state of emergency 
that limits funeral attendance to 50 
people. 

Most mourners regrouped after 
the initial charge and the service 
went on. but police returned and 
fired more tear gas canisters to. 
drive the mourners away from the 
dead girTs home, the witness said. 

In other incidents in Soweto, a 

C s officer was wounded by a 
grenade and a school was 
damaged In an arson attack, police 


police spokesman, said that about 
200 people gathered outside Mr. 
Boesak’s church and “police asked 
them to disperse. -Hie majority did. 
Police then warned the rest who 
were standing around, and then 
used tear gas to disperse them.” > 

The parish council sent a mes- 
sage to Louis Le Grange, South 
Africa’s minis ter of law and order, 
demanding assurances that 
churches “may carry on with their 
worship without bong threatened 
by your police.” 

It called the pdHoe assertion that 

a wanting was given before the tear 
gas barrage a “blatant lie.” 

The South African Press Associ- 
ation quoted witnesses throughout 
the Cape peninsula as saying police 
broke up at least nine other candle- 


Renters reported. 

The sources said that Angola and 
South Africa, the key parties to any 
package agreement, were now anx- 
ious to resume negotiations with 
U.S. mediation. 


Uganda Says 
Guerrillas 
Attacked 
2 Barracks 


The Associated Press 

KAMPALA. Uganda — The 
military government has an- 
nounced that guerrillas have un- 
leashed a heavy artillery bombard- 
ment on two besieged army 
l^rracks in territory the insurgents 
control in southwestern Uganda. 

The report Wednesday night cm 
oovemmeni-owned Uganda Radio 
coincided with verbal attacks be- 
tween the two sides that have jeop- 
ardized peace negotiations. Ke- 
nyan officials mediating the talks 
in Nairobi had hoped an agreement 
would be signed this week. 

The radio said the National Re- 
sistance Army “delivered over- 
whelming artillery gunfire” on the 
barracks in Masaka and Mbarara 
and other government positions. 
No details on casualties were given. 

The radio quoted Uganda's head 
of state. Lieutenant General Tito 
Okello. as saying the leader of the 
guerrillas. Yowen Museveni, “shall 
be held totally responsible Tor the 
consequences that may result." 

General Okello said his govern- 
ment "has tolerated with enough 
patience Museveni's atrocities 
against the people of Uganda.” 

The general took power in a coup 
July 2 from President Milton 
Obote. 

Mr. Museveni whose guerrillas 
began their insurgency in 1981 
against Mr. Obote, blamed the mil- 
itary government Wednesday for 
the delay in signing a peace agree- 
meaL He said the government had 
initiated the recent military action. 

The government, in turn, has 
blamed the National Resistance 
Army for the latest fighting and 
claimed Wednesday it had cap- 
tured a secret guerrilla document 
outlining plans to “eliminate” Gen- 
eral Okello and other miliuiiy 
council leaders. 


■ V 


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Opposition Unites, Backs 
Mrs. Aquino in Election 

(Continued from Page 1) 
who appears to have accepted die 

prprtirlary with gpmime rrfnciance. 

announced Tuesday that she would 
run, one day after a court acquitted 
26 men of involvement in her hus- 
band’s killing in August 1983. 

The most prominent of the de- 
fendants, General Fabian C Ver, is 
a dose assodate of Mr. Marcos, 
and upon Us acquittal the presi- 
dent immediately reinstated Iran as 
chief of staff of the armed forces. 

Mrs- Aquino said she did not 
believe justice had been done, and 
said she would sedt it if she became 
president. 

•The challenge facing the oppo- 
sition is not merely that it field one 
candidate to face Mr. Marcos,” she 
said in declaring her candidacy. 

“The challenge it also faces is to be 
able to field a candidate who can- 
not, rightly or wrongly, be seen as a 
continuation, political or actual, of 
the Marcos regime.” 

Her remarks, delivered in her 
characteristically mild tone, was 
considered a direct reference to Mr. 

Laurel, who is viewed as a politi- 
cian. in the Marcos mold, adept at 
the game of political maneuvering. 

Some Marcos supporters have 
said they believe he fears an 
Aquino candidacy, with its reraind- 
os of the assassination, more than 
that of Mr. Laurel, whom he could 
fight on his own terms. 

is a man whose measure it 
to take,” said the labor 


minister, Bias F. Opie, using Mr. 
Laurel's nickname. “And we have 
taken his measure.” 

He said the emotional impact of 


Mrs. Aquino as a candidate would 
be more difficult to gauge. 

On television Thursday, Mr. 
Marcos was quoted as saying that 
he welcomed Mrs. Aquino sugges- 
tion that the candidates meet for a 
(devised discussion of the issues. 

In reporting tins statement, the 
government-controlled station's 
announcer made r eference three 
times to what is seen as Mrs. 
Aquino’s main liability: her sex. 

“President Marcos said his con- 
versations with ladies have always 
been pleasant,’' the announcer 
said, “and ‘I presume I will survive 
this encounter.' " 

(The Philippine Supreme Court 
set a bearing Thursday for Dec. 17 
to decide whether Mr. Marcos's 
roll for early elections is constitu- 
tional since he has refused to resign 
before the vote, United Press Inter- 
national reported from Manila.] 

■ Ver Reinstatement Criticized 

An official from the U.S. De- 
fense Department told Congress on 
Thursday that (he reinstatement of 
General Ver as bead of the armed 
forces of the Philippines will ham- 
per needed adJiiary reforms in that 
country, The Associated Press re- 
ported from Washington. 

“The return early this week of 
General Ver as chid of staff will 
unavoidably handicap reorganiza- 
tion and reform," Janies A Kelly, 
deputy assistant secretary of de- 
fense for the Pacific, told a House 
of Representatives subcommittee. 

It was the first direct criticism by 
a Reagan administration official of 
General Vet’s reinstatement. 


«• 

yi. 


New U.S. Cancer Treatment 
Shows Promising Results 


(Continued from Page 1) 

mean came from Dr. Michael Col- 
vin, professor of medicine at the 
Johns Hopkins Hospital Oncology 
Center. He noted (hat there had 
been initial enthusiasm about other 
biological agents, such as interfer- 
on, but that they had turned out to 
have limited applications. 

In this case, he added, the “initial 
batting average appears better.”. 

Dr. Chafoer said that the Na- 
tional Cancer Institute planned 
over the next year to begin human 
tests. At several cancer centers 
around the country, in addition to 
oontmmo'g Dr. Rosenberg’s ■work 
at the institute’s clinical unit in 
Betbesda, Maryland. 

The new findings are published 
in this., week's issue of the New 
England Journal of Medicine in a 
“special report.” Arnold S. Rei- 
man, the journal's editor, said it 
was only the second time the jour- 


nal had published p reliminar y evi- 
dence in this form. 

“We think it’s interesting and 
important enoug h for our readers 
to bear about it now,” be said, 
“even though the final stray has not 
been told." 

Dr. Rosenberg said that during 
several weeks of therapy, patients 
experienced a variety of side ef- 
fects, including, in 16 of the 25 
patients, major weight gain due to 
fluid retention. 

In all patients, the adverse side 
effects disappeared when fly- treat- 
ment Stopped, the cancer institute 
team reported. 

It was also announced Wednes- 
day that Dr. Rosenberg would 
share the prestigious $ 100,000 prize 
awarded annually by Armand 
Hammer, the U.S. industrialist 
who heads President Reagan's can- 
cer pand, to the scientists deemed ^ 
to have made the greatest contribu- 
tion toward a cure for cancer. 



7 he Associated Press 


■- GENEVA - 7 - Radiation from 
video display .units bas not been 
found' to.be dangerous to pregnant 
women or other, users but may 
cause or aggravate skin disorders, 
eye troubles and bone and muscle 
hgnoes, a . World Health Organizer 


. .'Ihejptnp of 15 -experts, after 
examining existing studies, con- 
cluded that there was. “no evi- 
dence” tint VDU use poses a haz- 


ard to p regnant women or unborn 
children. But temporary visual dis- 
comfort “must be recognized as a 
health problem,” it said. 

“hgmy from repeated stress to 
the musculoskeletal system is play- 
able" in VDU work, the 
said But such problems are 1 
preventable through corn e a . 
of equipment and the workplace, it 
said. The sand noted that skin 
rashes tea been reported but said 
they appeared to have been aggra- 
vated, not caused, by VDU use. 

















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1985 


Page 5 





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CANBERRA- — An official re- 
port on Britain’s nuclear tests in 
Australia in ibe 1950s and 1960s 
criticized both the British and Aus- 
tralian governments Thursday and 
said London shook! pay for clean- 
ingup radioactive contamination. 

The three-volume report by a 
Royal Commission also said Can- 
berra should compensate aborigi- 
pes denied their land for more than 
30 years because of the tests. 

The commission said it would be 
“grossly irresponsible" if Britain 
did not bear raD cleanup costs. 

[No figure was given for the 
costs, "Die Associated Press report- 
ed from Canberra. However, Peter 
McClellan, the counsel assisting 
the commission during hearings, 
estimated the cost at 1 billion Aus- 
tralian dollars- ($700,000).] 

The commissioD recommended 
immediate work a t the remote Mar- 
alinga and Emu test sites in South 
Australia and the Monte Bello Is- 
lands off Western Australia to 


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Temples in Kyoto 
Bar Tourists to 
Protest Gty Tax 

United Pros International 

TOKYO — Buddhist priests 
"l s* dosed 12 temples Thursday in the 
" • ancient capital of Kyoto to protest 

\ c: i a city lax, leaving sightseers outside 
'■' r - and tourist-related businesses fac- 
Zz ±i ingluud rimes. 

r - The doors were locked at some of 

•‘-'■i the most popular of the 1,500 tem- 
■r. pies in and around the city, which is 
V 250 miles (400 kilometers) soutb- 
west of Tokyo. Ibey included the 
v Kinkakuji golden temple and 
Kiyomizudera. which is known for 
its serene atmosphere and a sacred 
stream. The Kyoto Buddhist Asso- 
dation said die temples would re- 
main dosed indefinitely. 

The dispute involves a decision 
Iasi spring by the dty to levy a tax 
on visitors at the temples. The Bud- 
dhist group opposes the levy; it 
argues that a tax on religious orga- 
nizations violates Japan's constitu- 
tion. 

The tax calls for adding 51 yen 
(25 cents) to admission fees to the 
temples, which is to be returned to 
the dty. City officials said revenue 
from the tax was estimated at about 
$4.7 milli on a year. 

About 39 million tourists visit 
the dty each year, with the tourist 
industry generating about SI 1-5 
billion annuall y for local business- 
es, about a fourth of Kyoto’s total 
commerce. 


make the areas fit to five in again. 

In Loudon, the British govern- 
ment said it was ready to discuss 
ibe report witbAostralia and that it 
would be studied carefully. 

Britain repeatedly has refused to 
pay compensfttum for the 12 nucle- 
ar tests it carried oat in Australia in 
the 19505 and 1960s, denying that 
anyone suffered as a result of the 
explosions. ' 

Australia’s Labor Party govern- 
ment, which presen ted the report in 
Parliament on Thursday, said it 
would be given urgent consider- 
ation. 

Thecommissian, headed by for- 
mer judge and fonnerXabor minis- 
ter, Jim McClelland, was set up by 
the government in July last year 
after allegations that soldiers and 
aborigines had become ill from ra- 
diation exposure. ' 

The inquiry, which gathered 
10,000 pages of evidence from 400 
witnesses at hearings in Australia . 
and London, dismissed reports that 
four aborigines had been found 
dead at Maraimga. 

But it added that if aborigines 
were not killed or injured it was due 
more to good luck than good man- 
agement 

The report said investigations at 
the Maralinga and Emu lest sites 
had found unacceptably high levels 
of plutonium radiation. 

The commission recommended 
that legislation should be amende 
so that compensation was available 
not only to members of the armed 
forces but also to civilians and ab- 
origines. 

The report also criticized Sir 
Robert Maudes, then Australia's 
prime minister, for lending test 
ales to Britain without consulting 
bin cabinet. 

It said the decision was made 
without the benefit of any scientific 
knowledge of the hazards involved 
and apparently without Sr Robert 
being informed of more than a 
broad outline of die British plans 
for a long-term program. 

In London, Lord Penney, the sd- 
emist in chaise of Britain’s nuclear 
test program m the 1950s, said talks 
are now needed between the two 
governments. 

“1 would like to see the British 
and Australians discuss whether it 
is necessary to clean the area up. 1 
do not know that it is — it is 30 
years ago." 

Commentators forecast that 
Britain would proceed with caution 
because any move towards paying 
compensation could open the way 
for claims from British servicemen 
who said they suffered injuries as a 
result of taking part in the tests. 



Nicaragua, China Meet 
To Arrange Closer Ties 


Compiled by Our Staff From D ispatches 

BEIJING — China and Nicara- 
gua expect to normalize relations 
during the visit of a Nicaraguan 
delegation that began Thursday, a 
senior Sandinist leader said in Beij- 
ing. 

Henxy Ruiz Hernandez, Nicara- 
gua’s minister of foreign coopera- 
tion, said, This is a friendly vtsit to 
make our relations closer and nor- 
malms relations.” The delegation 
includes Foreign Minister Miguel 
(TEscoto Brockmann. 

Mr. Ruiz, asked if Nicaragua 
would sever its diplomatic ties with 
Taiwan, said, “Everything is set 
up.” 

Nicaragua's switch would be the 
third diplomatic victory for Beijing 
in the Americas this year, following 
establishment of relations with Bo- 
livia and Grenada. 

Beijing is waging an internation- 
al diplomatic campaign to per- 
suade countries to recognize it as 
China’s sole government. Several 
Latin American nations, including 
Paraguay and Uruguay, retain ties 
to Taipei. 

Meanwhile, the Soviet deputy, 
foreign minister, Mikhail S. Ka- 
pitsa, began a nine-day visit to Chi- 


Latin Rift Threatens Contadora’s Effort 


By Alan Riding 

New York Tuns Seruce 

CARTAGENA, Colombia — 
The Contadora Group of nations 
are struggling this week to keep 
alive their throe-year-old peace ef- 
fort among signs of a deepening rift 
between Nicaragua and three other 
Central American nations. 

A well-placed Latin American 
official said the foreign ministers of 
the four mediating nations — Mex- 


ico, Colombia. Venezuela and Pan- 
ama —were very pessimistic about 
their chances of moving forward, 

Nicaragua's deputy foreign min- 
ister, Nora Astorga. unexpectedly 
boycotted a breakfast meeting here 
Wednesday morning with ministers 
from the Contadora Group and 
other Central American nations. 

Miss Astorga said that the Con- 
tadora Group should give priority 
to ending U.S. “aggression” toward 


na on Thursday and said lies be- 
tween the two Communist rivals 
were “improving very rapidly" 

Mr. Kapitsa said be would brief 
Beijing officials on the U5L-Soviet 
summit meeting, exchange views 
on President Ronald Reagan's plan 
for a space-based missil e defense 
and discuss other international is- 
sues. 

In another development, a 
spokesman for the Chinese Foreign 
Ministry rebutted Wednesday a 
U.S. complaint about the activities 
of some Chinese diplomats in Los 
Angeles. 

A diplomat was reported to have 
been involved in the establishment 
of a student group and another was 
said to have attempted to buy real 
estate without the permission of the 
U.S. government. 

(Reuters, UPL LAT) 

Qrina-Sfongolia Air Service 

Room 

BEUING — Air services be- 
tween China and Mongolia will re- 
sume next year for the fust time 
since they were broken off in the 
mid-1960s, a Mongolian spokes- 
man said Thursday in Beijing. 


U.S. Now Can Buy 'Contras’ 
Transport for Weaponry 

By Doyle McManus 

Las Angela Times Service 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration's program of “hu- 
manitarian’' aid for Nicaraguan re- 
bels will move one step closer soon 
to military aid under a new Jaw 
allowing the purchase of vehicles 
that can move guns and ammuni- 
tion as well as food and medicine. 

Under an intelligence bill signed 
Wednesday by President Ronald 
Reagan, the administration also 
can pay for “transportation equip- 
ment.” Officials said this can in- 
dude trucks, helicopters and even 
airplanes for the guerrillas fighting 
Nicaragua's Marxist regime, as 
long as the vehicles are not outfit- 
ted for combaL 

“This will allow them to trans- 
port weapons as well as humanitar- 
ian aid." a senior State Department 
official said. “If a truck carries 
1,000 pounds of food and 500 
pounds of guns, that will be fine." 

Democrats said the change goes 
beyond guidelines the administra- 


tion negotiated with the House and 
Senate intelligence committees this 

summer to provide 527 million in 

nonlethal supplies for the rebels, 
who are known as “contras." The 
shipments began in October and 
have not included transportation. 

But the State Department offi- 
cial said the House and Senate 
“specifically OX’d" the change 
last month, reflecting wbat he 
called “steadily increasing sup- 
port" for the guerrillas' fight. 

Meanwhile, the Nicaraguan De- 
Tense Ministry announced Wednes- 
day that an army helicopter on a 
mission against the insurgents 
crashed Monday in the mountains 
of Matagalpa province in central 
Nicaragua, killing 14. 

Rebel spokesmen in Washington 
said their forces had shot down 
shot the helicopter. If true, it would 
mark the fust time the rebels have 
destroyed one of the government's 
two dozen combat helicopters, said 
to be the Sandinist's most effective 
weapon against the rebels. 


jean dinhvqn 

7tvecfeidPdfic. 



Nicaragua. “This is the central is- 
sue,” she said. “Without an agree- 
ment between the United Stales 
and Nicaragua, the rest has abso- 
lutely no importance." 

In September, the Contadora 
Group completed its draft regional 
peace treaty, but Nicaragua has re- 
fused to sign it unless the United 
States pledges to end its support for 
Nicaraguan rebels based in Hon- 
duras. 

Honduras. El Salvador and Cos- 
ta Rica, in contrast, have accepted 
the draft peace treaty and argue 
that Nicaragua's differences with 
the United States should be dealt 
with by direct negotiations between 
Lhe two nations. 

At the same time, the three coun- 
tries said Wednesday that they 
could not endorse a draft resolu- 
tion on Central America presented 
by eight Latin American govern- 
ments, including the Contadora 
group, Tuesday at the United Na- 
tions. 

The draft includes a call for a 
resumption of direct negotiations 
between the United States and Nic- 
aragua as well as an appeal for an 
end to all military maneuvers by 
powers outside the region, an indi- 
rect reference to new war games 
planned by the United States in 
Honduras next year. 


■ U-S. Links Sandinists. M -19 

The Reagan administration 
charged Wednesday that Nicara- 
gua was supporting Colombia's M- 
19 guerrilla group with arms and 
training and that some Nicaraguan 
officials help (hem smuggle drugs 
to earn money. United Press Inter- 
national reported in Washington. 

The State Department elaborat- 
ed on a statement by Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz earlier in 
Colombia. 

“There is a pattern to the rela- 
tionship between the M-19 and the 
Sandinistas which indicates a com- 
mon goal; revolutionary armed 
struggle in Latin America. Links 
between the two go back to the late 
1070s," said a department spokes- 
man in a written statement. 

The State Department spokes- 
man said the M-19 maintains an 
office in Managua and that on “M- 
19 operative” is an official in the 
Nicaraguan Directorate for Inter- 
nal Security and that another is “on 
loan" from the directorate to the 
leftist guerrillas in El Salvador. 

“We also have intelligence re- 
ports indicating that Nicaragua 
provided military training to as 
many as 60 M-19 combatants in 
1984 and that anus have come to 
the M-19 in Colombia from Nica- 
ragua,” the statement said. 


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Page 6 


Hcralb 


PuUbhed With The No* YmLTuiMt wodTbe Warfringua Port 


(tribune. 


Now for the Follow-Up 


Israd has apologized guardedly (“to the 
extent that it did take place") for running an 
American spy in the United States. In a state* 
ment that was a long time coming, it promised 
tha t “if the allegations are confirmed, those 
responsible will be brought to account." The 
confirmation is evidently to be left to an inter* 
nal government inquiry, not to an independent 
one. In the statement, no specific assurances 
were given that the United States would re- 
trieve stolen documents or interrogate two 
Israelis with diplomatic immunity who left the 
United States last week before U-S- officials 
could question them — although ride assur- 
ances have since been reported on both counts. 

Secretary of State George Shultz called it an 
"exceflenl statement." Certainly it serves the 
purpose of mi nimizing frictions with the Unit- 
ed States and curtailing the possibility of fur- 
ther disclosures potentially embarrassing to 
both sides. But it leaves much unsaid. Unless 
damaging popular suspicions are to be fed, the 
follow-up will have to be much more inclusive. 

The Israelis evidently fed that the fuller, 
more independent and more public the inqui- 
ry, the greater the chances of damage to the 
unity of their government as well as to the 


reputation of laud and to the standing of its 
intelligence. The United Slates has another, 
conflicting set of interests: finding out what 
happened, who Is responsible for it, how severe 
the security damage is and how comprehensive 
and widespread the Israeli operation was. 

Spying on America, said the Israeli state- 
ment, "stands in total contradiction to our 
policy." Well — that is not quite right, either. 
The two countries have their own reasons for 
spying on each other plenty: these have noth- 
ing to do with being friends and everything to 
do with the way each defines its security needs. 

But there is gpod reason to keep the forms of 
spying consistent with shared notions of pro- 
priety and common cause. In the Pollard oper- 
ation, there was a loss of balance. Whether this 
was the work of a complititous government or 
an uncontrolled rogue operator is interesting 
to Israelis and Americans in different ways. If 
an American passed secrets to the Israelis, he 
committed a serious crime. If Israelis conduct- 
ed an intrusive intelligence operation, they 
committed a serious breach of the code of 
respect that ought to bind the two countries. 
That is what the Pollard affair is about. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


The Makings of a Bhopal 


Two thousand people were asphyxiated by 
the chemical that escaped a year ago from the 
Union Carbide plant in Bhopal, India. At the 
time, the lax training of the Indian staff and 
the excellent workplace safety record of the 
U.S. chemical industry suggested that no such 
accident was likely in America. Now that com- 
forting inference seems too complacent. 

Union Carbide officials assured Congress 
last March that “a Bhopal- type situation is 
inconceivable at Institute," the town in West 
Virginia where the company has a similar 
plant. But last Aug. 11 a chemical escaped 
from the Institute plant, injuring 135 people. 
And that was just one in a daily run of minor 
accidents involving toxic chemicals. A partial 
catalogue by the Environmental Protection 
Agency has tallied 6,928 accidents at Ameri- 
can plants since 1980 — an average of five a 
day. Because the human suffering was so 
spread out, no one noticed the appalling cost: 
139 deaths, 1,500 injuries, evacuation of at 
least 217,000 people. Many of these accidents 
involved the same kinds of neglect that caused 
the catastrophe at Bhopal — malfunctioning 
valves, overpressured tanks and unrepaired 


gauges. Safety t raining is taken seriously at 
many companies, like Du Pont, but at others it 
is little more than advice to wear a safety mask. 

An industry that condones so many small 
accidents is dearly vulnerable to catastrophe, 
especially when so many highly unde chemi- 
cals are handled in plants situated in densely 
populated areas. All the ingredients for anoth- 
er Bhopal are present. Some 6,000 chemical 
plants operate in cities that house three- 
fourths of America's population. The plants 
handle and store so many toxic chemicals that 
no one has even begun to assess the risks. The 
EPA recently listed some 400 widely used 
f4u»miral< of immediate hazard to human 
health. Yet some plants refuse even to reveal 
what toxic chemicals they keep. 

How can disaster be prevented? By better 
manag ement and training in the industry; by 
emergency planning of local authorities; by 
making a federal agency responsible for safety. 
But the most effective prevention should come 
from the industry itself. Having protected its 
own woriuxs so well, it ought to apply the same 
discipline to protecting the public. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Another Regan Incident 


It is too late to save the president’s resigning 
national security adviser, Robert G McFar- 
iane, from what befell him at the White House. 
But there may still be time to save him from 
transformation by administration critics on 
the left into someone he never was — a kind of 
doomed and valiant closet dove shoved out by 
the forces of reaction and darkness. By about 
Friday, we should guess, the aforementioned 
dark forces will be striking back, countering 
that Mr. McFariane, mourned by so many erf 
the administration's ideological foes, can hard- 
ly have been the right man for the job. 

Let us tty a little pre-emptive strike here. 
Mr. McFariane is no dove. He is a very conser- 
vative and sober-minded military officer 
turned civilian, who has become a specialist in 
national security policy. The job he had has 
always been a delicate one to fill and has 
regularly been redefined by those who held it. 
Some were more and some were less assertive, 
intrusive, imaginative, self-starting and ego- 
maniacal. McGeorge Bundy, Wail Rostow, 
Henry Kissinger. Brent Scowcroft, Zbigniew 
Brzezinski, Richard Allen, William Dark — 
you don’t exactly find a pattern there. 

Some of these men were more illustrious 
than Mr. McFariane, but we can think of none 
who was more helpful to the president he 
served. This, we suspect, wall be noted as time 
goes ml By the time Mr. McFariane took the 
White House job, a major task awaited: to find 
a way to turn the fruits of Mr. Reagan's 
military buildup into actual policy options. He 
gave over a groat deal of time and thought to 
this. Mr. McFariane also had some successes 
as a manager and arbiter of departmental 
clashes. He has been Lhe kind of public servant 
who is not fully appreciated until he is no 
longer around to do the countless quiet, essen- 
tial tasks that an employer tends to take for 
granted. He has been that rarest of public 
officials, a loyal, honorable and unassuming 
man who was also intelligent and rough. 

A near frantic effort has been mounted by 
persons dose to the While House chief of staff, 
Donald Regan, to counter stories that his ma- 


nipulating and musding had a part in Mr. 
McFariane's decision to leave. Both Mr. 
McFariane and the president have dismissed 
the reports as nonsense. We wish they were 
nonsense. The muscling and ma nip ulatin g 
were egregious, and they did have an effect 

Neither Mr. McFariane’sjob nor that of Mr. 
Regan is subject to Senate confirmation, and a 
president has the widest possible discretion in 
choosing the persons be wants for them. 
Chemistry, as it is called, work habits, style 
and personal quirk all play a part, and for all 
we know Mr. Regan may suit Mr. Reagan's 
needs just fine. But from the outside it sure 
doesn’t look that way. Mr. Regan’s ascendan- 
cy has been one grating episode after another 
— George Bush, Margaret Heckler, Robert 
McFariane — just as his cabinet years were 
marked by open combat with others high up in 
the Reagan government Mr. Regan is a very 
ambitious man. He is said to like to be seen in 
the right places at the right time. The stories 
are legion. At Geneva he had himself photo- 
graphed draped over the back of the couch on 
which Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev 
were sitting. Mr. McFariane is just the oppo- 
site, and you would think that the self-effacing 
man would have presented no particular chal- 
lenge or threat to the other. But it seems not to 
have been regarded by Mr. Regan that way. 

Mr. McFariane's successor is to be his depu- 
ty, Vice Admiral John Poindexter. That the 
choice evidently had to be agreeable to Mr. 
Regan as weQ as to the president puis a couple 
of extra bricks in the new fellow’s knapsaoc. 
But Admiral Poindexter must know, from his 
lime in the White House, how great is the 
president’s need for someone capable of per- 
forating the crucial balance-wheel function 
defined and assumed by Mr. McFariane. 

Atthe summit the president put himself in a 
way to move toward major policy decisions. 
Bui he has not yet made those decisions. In the 
absence of a McFariane, the internal chemis- 
try of the Reagan administration's policy pro- 
cess will be different. Let us hope it works. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


FROM OUR DEC 6 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Crete Appeals to tbe Powers 
PARIS — The European Powers have recog- 
nized that the basic element of the Cretan 
population is Greek, by allowing the King of 
the Hellenes to appoint the Cretan High Com- 
missioner and by making the latter responsible 
not to Turkey, the suzerain Power, but to tbe 
Protecting Powers, Great Britain, France, 
Russia and Italy. Crete does not even pay 
tribute to Turkey, and the Cretan militia and 
gendarmerie are officered not by Turks but by 
Greeks. Turkish sovereignty is a political fic- 
tion, given a semblance of reality by tbe Chris- 
tian Powers of Europe. Crete is a living body 
bound to a corpse. [The Cretan Assembly's] 
recent appeal to the Christian world is a plea 
for the right to break and cast away the fetters 
that bind her. WIU the Powers shut then- ears? 


1935: Business As sails the New Deal 
NEW YORK — Demanding that American 
business throw off the yoke or the New Deal, 
the National Association of Manufacturers 
has drafted a platform urging the maintenance 
of Constitutional guarantees, the preservation 
of freedom of enterprise, tbe maintenance of 
sound tax and financial policies by the govern- 
ment, and a search for security through eco- 
nomic progress rather than brain-trust theo- 
ries. The businessmen, who recently beard 
their officers and others bitterly attack the 
New Deal from all angles, received the report 
[on Dec. 5] of the Resolutions Committee, 
couched in terms most critical of the Adminis- 
tration. Such terms as tyranny, raw deal and 
arrogance appeared frequently as speakers 
urged business to fight further regimentation. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY, Putma n 1956-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


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WALTER WELLS 
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ROBERT K. McCABE 
carlgewirtz 


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Eucutne Editor RENE BONDY Deputy Publisher 

Editor ALAIN LfiCOUR Amaate Publisher 

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Associate fiftw FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Director tf Cim&ocn 

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International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Charles-do-Gaulle, 92200 NeuiUy-sw-Sdne, 

France. TeL: (1} 47.47.12.65. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Puis. ISSN: Q294805Z 
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0 1965, International Herald Tribune. AS rigfus mated. 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 19*5 



\ wf&t SoumMiE. Wow Un 6 VotiVe 

COOKIE... 

vnevl m M6- WOW MANY 
COOKISS DID You STEAL? 
w „YJWM‘KlNDo?fooKiK 

£fe Viiw/lnwi l XNW 




Full Steam 
Ahead ata 
Snail’s Pace 


ft- 




By Giles Merritt 


RUSSELS — For Europe this? 




4 


Get on the Side ol Certain Change in South Africa 


gosroN — A dispassionate ob- 


server of South Africa most see 
one certainty: Rad change is coming. 
When, no one can say, out there is a 
momentum in events, a sense that the 
abused black majority cannot forever 
be denied its place in political life. 

That was the meaning when Win- 
nie Mandela spoke at a funeral for 12 
blades shot by the police in the town- 
ship of Mamelodi. For 25 years she 
has been banned, jailed, forbidden to 
Speak in public. Now she felt able to 
defy that ban — because the govern- 
ment might fear to move against her 
lest it arouse even more resen tmenL 

It was also the meaning when Eli- 
jah Barayi, president of the new Con- 
gress of South African Trade Unions, 
called for disinvestment by foreign 
companies and set a six-month dead- 
line for an end to apartheid and white 
minority rule. Such a bold assertion 
of union power in politics would have 
been impossible even ayearagb. 

All this confronts U S. policy with 
an urgent challenge: How does the 
United States associate itself with the 
profound movement that is taking 
place? How does it help change to. 
come in a way that will produce an 
economically and socially healthy 
South Africa, friendly to America? 

Tbe most obvious requirement is to 
identify with the process of change, 
with the end of racism. That seems so 
elementary that it should not have to 
be said. But it does, because U.S. 
policy over the last five years has 
alienated the black ma jority in Sooth . 
Africa to an astounding degree. 

The Reagan administration's pd- 


By Anthony Lewis 


icy of “constructive engagement" was 
designed to wheedle reforms. But 
blacks saw Pretoria happily accept- 
ing friendly gestures and making no 
real political changes. They conclud- 
ed that America was giving the white 
regime legitimacy. The record is laid 
out, deprcssingly. in an article in For- 
eign Affairs by Sanford J. Ungar and 
Peter Vale. In a dozen ways, substan- 
tive and in courtesies, Washington in 
recent years has offended South Afri- 
can blacks. Many now refuse even to 
attend U.S. diplomatic functions. 

Of course the United States must 
relate to the present government of 
South Africa — constructively. But it 
is the simplest common sense that 
U.S. wfifl di plomats 

also be relating to tile blacks who win 
play an important part in tbe future. 

Thft ITngar-Vwl«- ar ticle mnkwi eng- 
gestions on how to overcome the pre- 
sent deqp suspicion of the United 
States. AH involve identifying with 
what are, after all, American values: 
democracy, law, free trade unions, 
respect for human rights, education 
without racial discrimination. To be 
effective, gestures toward black aspi- 
rations have to involve a certain ri.sk. 
Thqy wiB have to displease Pretoria. 
Things “may have to be said or done 
many times," Mr. IJ ngar and Mr. 
Vale say, “before they are believed or 
credited by disillusianed Macks." 

A first step has been taken by the 
Reagan adminis tr atio n in that direc- 
tion. Timothy M. Carney, political 
counselor at the U.S. Embassy, at- 


The Philippines Needs 
A Policy of Hai 



By Benedict J. Tria Kerkvliet 


C ANBERRA — Today the 
United Stales faces in South- 


east Asia the most serious question 
since the war in Vietnam: What 
should and can the US. govern- 
ment do in the Philippines? 

Economic conditions there are 
the worst in 40 years. Rebellion is 
growing rapidly. Tbe acquittal of 
the 26 defendants accused in the 
1983 assassination of Benigno 
Aquino is certain to exacerbate the 
popular feeling that there is no 
justice under the Marcos regime. 
The military remains ineffective in 
everything accept driv- 
ing people to support the rebels. 
Am tbe Marcos government scans 
incapable of responding well to 
any of these problems. 

UJS. support porists because 
President Ferdinand Marcos has 


The best way to help 


u 


to 


nor Mr. Marcos 


served well the objectives foremost 
in the minds of most U.S. policy- 
makers: protect U.S. military bares 
and foreign (especially American) 
companies in the Philippines. 

when Washington looks for al- 
ternatives, it finds, as Mr. Marcos 
warns, that tbe fnost organized po- 
litical movement is the most criti- 
cal of the U.S. military bases and 
foreign investors. Tbe less radical 
opposition groups seem too to be 
disorganized and unpredictable for 
Washington's objectives. 

But one major reason why mod- 
erate. above-ground organizations 
are disorganized is the harsh poli- 
cies of the very government that 
Washington has helped perpetu- 
ate. Such groups ore vulnerable to 
the deception and outright repres- 
sion of the Marcos government 

Their leaders are persecuted and 
bought off, and elections in which 
they participate are rigged. No 
wonder many moderates have be- 
come critical of the U.S. relation- 
ship with Mr. Marcos. Increasingly 
they aim criticism directly at U.S. 
bases and investors. Without these, 
the moderates can reasonably con- 
clude, Washington would stop re- 
inforcing a ruthless government. 

Now is the time, before tbe situ- 
ation becomes intractable, for U.S. 
objectives to change. For several 
reasons, the policy should be to let 
Filipinos work out their problems: 

First, only with high risks of 
dreadful civil war can the United 
States intervene directly in an at- 
tempt to bring about a new govern- 
ment that would back up U.S. mili- 


laTy and material interests. 

Second, trying to diannd sup- 
port to moderate political organi- 
zations is also inadvisable. It can- 
not be done without corrupting 
and discrediting them. . The best 
way to hdp moderate groups is to 
help neither them nor Mr. Marcos. 

Third, a hands-off policy would 
minimiTff . ( I miffge tp mpbuSTS, for- 
eign investments and friendly rela- 
tions. By m a ki ng clear that it is no 
longer trying to manipulate Phflip- 
pine politics, tbe U.S. government 
would enhance its ability to com- 
municate with a variety of groups. 
This in turn could lead to good 
relations with a moderate or left- 
of -center government. 

To advance tins objective, the 
United States should stop military 
aid sales to the Philippines. 
And it should appose any other 
foreign group or government (hat 
might attempt to supply weapons 
to me gov er n m ent or to other perfit- 
ical forces in the FUippmes. 

Hie UR. government should 
also indicate now its wfflmgness to 
negotiate about the future of the 
military bases with any govern- 
ment that cranes to -power. It 
should be wiBing to reduce and, if 
necessary, phase out the bases. 
Military strategists in Washington 
should accelerate the planning of 
alternatives for zry f acuities in the 
Philippines that are essentiaL 

An immediate step should be to. 
reject a recent Pentagon proposal 
to rink another billion dnftars into 
“upgrading" flark air bare and lhe 
Sumc Bay naval station. Such an 
expenditure now would send ex- 
actly the wrong signal to a broad 
spectrum of opposition groups. It 
would confirm the impression that 
the United States in tends to defend 
those bases at all costs. 

Finally, it should withdraw all 
economic aid that goes directly to 
the current government. The aid 
should pass through international 
and nongovernment organizations 
with programs seeking to improve ; 
conditions for poor people. 

If U.S. policy fads to take tins 
direction, I fear, America will fell 
into a syndrome in the Phflmpmes 
similar to its experience in C&ma in 
the 193% and ’40s, Vietnam in the 
following decades and Nicaragua 
and Iran in the 1970s. Polarization 
will accelerate, revolution will wid- 
en, pressure mil intensify inside 
the US. government to intervene 
directly and forcefully, and ulti- 
mately there will be another “quag- 
mire in Asia" for Americans. 


The writer is a senior fellow In the 
Research School of Pacific Studies . 
at the Australian National Universi- 
ty. He contributed this comment ^ . 
the Las Angeles Times. 


tended the funeral in Mamelodi, as 
did 10 other Weston diplomats. It 
was the first time an official U.S. 
representative had gone to one of the_ 

mass burials that nave become com- 
mon during the protests and police 
repression of the last year, with more 
than 800 blacks kfiled so far. 

The Mamelodi funeral had partic- 
ular significance. On Nov. 21 some 
50,000 blacks, most of them women, 
marched on government offices there 
to dmumri the withdrawal of troops 
occupying the township. Police fired 
into the crowd. Many erf those buried 


this week were shot in the back. 

Police action of that kind, or the 
continuing detentions and reported 
torture, are not going w stabilize Lhe 
situation in its old pattern of white 
dominance. That is plain now to 
many in South Africa, including 
some restless members of the govern- 
ment. And it is plain to foreign bank- 
ers negotiating with Pretoria about its 
$24 button in foreign debt: They are 
not going to agree to rescheduling 
unless there is meaningful change. 

America has only limited influence 
on events, but it can at least put itself 
deadly on the side of change. 

The New York Times. 


Violence? The Question Is 
How Much, Not Whether 


By .William Raspberry 


J OHANNESBURG — it seems h 
fair question to ask a winner of 
the Nobel Peace Prize. Why, in a 
country where Mahatma Gandhi and 
Martin Luther King are so greatly, 
admired, has there been no real non- 
videat movement for blade rights? 

“Well," says Desmond Tutu, An- 
glican bishop of Johannesburg and 
arguably the most recognized South 
African face in the world, “you know 
the ANC [African National Con- 
gress] was nonviolent from 1912 to 
I960, when Albert Lutbuli won the 
Peace Prize. But it wa^never able to 
make a dent at all ig^tfoe govern- 
ment’s repressive policies. 

- “But as to nonviolence as astrar 
iegjc weapon, I have a theory. Noti- 


f It is going to depend on 
wdtat the international 
conununity is prepared - 
fodo .’— Desmond Tutu 


What we are really asking is whether 
we can keep the levd of violence 
within manageable proportions, keep 
down the number of deaths and keep 
as low as possible the destruction of 
propCTty. What chance do we have of 
doing that? In many ways it is going 
to depend on what the. international 
community is prepared to do. You 
have seen just what a disaster ‘con- 
structive engagement' has turned out 
to be. Because the West has refused 
to take effective action is one of the 
reasons we are where we are. 

“If the South African government 
did not believe —and believe rightly 
— that it would almost always be 
protected from the consequences of 
its intransigence and quite vidous 
actions, it wouldn’t go on doing what 
it’s doing. Look at tbe audacity that 
they have of constantly making in- 


B has been the Year of the Snail, -i 
The efforts of the main European 
nations to pull together and reverse 
their industrial decline by streamlin- 
ing the European Cotnmmmy have 
advanced at a snail's pace. On the 
bright side, though, it does seem that.! 
1986 will not after aB turn out to be ’ 
the Year of the Mule. The threat of. 
stubborn nationalism and paralysis 
of the ECs political machinery ap- *5 
pears to have been lifted. 5e 

The Luxembourg summit, attend- *5 
cd last Monday and Tuesday by *2 
heads of government of the present 
10 Community members and of im- ^ 
mineni newcomers Spain and Porro- g 
gal. was of key importance in deter- i 
mining Europe's future direction. ^ 
Had it broken up in the same iti-tem- > 
pered confusion as the previous sum-. £ 
nut. in Milan last June, the outlook * 
for Europe would now be grim. ■. 

This time the summiteers refused 
to accept the idea of failure. They 
sweated out a deal in a final 15-hour 
negotiating session that had them V 
rolling up their sleeves and peering * 
with unaccustomed eyes at the small 
print. It was a marathon that showed 
their political commitment to cooper- “ J 
ation and EC unity more firmly than . 
any number of resounding speeches. 

The package they produced is com- 
plicated and still incomplete, with a 
□umber of loose ends left dangling. It 
is also modest in its achievements, 
considering that it had been billed as 
the first overhaul of the Community’s - 
legal framework, the 28-year-old 
Treaty of Rome. Yet for all its short- 
comings the Luxembourg pact is 
prompting sighs of relief. 

Failure would have had disastrous - 
consequences. In the short term it 
would have meant that Spanish and 
Portuguese accession on ran. 1 could - 
plunge the Community into adminis- 
trative chaos. But the summit's deci- 
sion to introduce much more major- 
ity voting in the EC Council of 
Ministers should avert further stale- * 
mates in which a single dissenting ; ^ 
member state can hold up decisions 
affecting the whole Community. 

In tbe medium term, the Luxem- 
bourg package means that the Com- 
munity can probably meet its time- 
table for clearing away more than 300 ‘ 
hidden trade barriers so as to create a 
genuinely common market by 1992. - 
A unified market is crucial to efforts 
to fight back against U.S. and Japa- 
technological supremacy. Ex- 


?0I 


nese 


perts in Brussels say abolition of the 
protectionist devices that still shelter 
national markets would boost eco- 
nomic activity overnight by lopping 5 
to 7 percent off many selling prices 
and creating four million new jobs. 

But it is in its long-term implica- 
tions that the Luxembourg pact is 
most tmportanL -The price of failure 
this week could easily have been the 
disintegration of the Community. 

Had the leaders thrown up then- 
hands in despair over the unfamiliar 
detail of the negotiations, the result 
would have been a serious political 
split between those nations that favor 


curaons into Angola, knowing full 
well that they wall get the backing of greater unity amounting to European 
the UA, because the Reagan admin- federalism, and those who distrust 


Violence pr es u pposes a minimum 

moral levd And when that minimum 
moral level does not operate, I don't 
think nonviolence ran succeed. . 

■ “Gandhi' was able to appeal to 
a constituency in Britain that would 
be aghast at the things they saw the 
British troops doing. ShnQady in the 
United States, Martin Lather King 
knew that there would be a constitu- 
ency that wpulrTbe outraged by the 
spectacle of buOwfaips and police 
dogs and that sort of thing being used 
against people who were demonstrat- 
ing peacefully. So there was a moral 
revulsion that happened in both, the 
United States aria Britain. I don't see 
that happening here.” 

Is this man of peace suggesting 
that change will come to South Africa 
only after massive violence? 

“You put your question very well, 
because you are riot saying violent or 
nonviolent, bat only how much vio- 
lence. The situation here .is intrinsi- 
cally violent, with the violence being 
basreally the violence of aparthei£ 


. istration has the same interests as 
South Africa has . . . 

Pretoria is saying these days that 
apartheid is morally, politically and 
pragmatically dead. Is u possible that 
at last it means it? 

“When you look at performance, 
they have been very long on words 
and very, very short on matching ac- 
tions. Tbe victims of apartheid nave 
not been aware- of any significant 
chang e s . [The authorities] have over- 
turned Lhe mixed marriages act, 
which I agree is some considerable 
relief for those caught up in that 
mesh. But they haven't moved on 
'poop areas’ and they still provide us 
.with inferior, discriminatory educa- 
tion. There were 160,000 arrests just 
last year on pass law offenses. 

*They tejLyou we are going to have 
common citizenship, and just when 
you get exerted then they tell you: 
Actually, no, it does not involve po- 
litical power.’ Well, what is citizen- 
ship if it does not mean fundamental- 
ly having tbe vote? 

“We have a government that is a 
..past master in semantic games." 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


An Entirely New Policy for South Africa 


W HAT is needed from the United States is an entirely new and more 
imaginative approach to South Africa. A policy must be crafted that not 
only recognizes and works with the current grim realities there, but also tries to 
ease the transition to an al£o^thia-differait, aIb«t unknown, future in which 
blacks wiH take part in the government of their county. There is no longer any 
question that this change win occur in South Africa; the question ishow, 
according to whose timetable and . with what sort of outside involv emen t 
Only by establishing much more direct communication with tin; majority 
and by granting it far greater and more practical assistance can ihe United 
States hope to influence the course of events. In effect, a new, parallel set of 
diplomatic relationships is necessary. And only by t aking further steps that 
risk hurting die pride of Sooth AforaY current rulers can American leaders 
hope to win enough. credibility among blacks to be listened to in the debate 
over the countiy’s future-—- a debate that will have profound consequences in 
all of Africa, in the United States arid in much of the-rest of the workL 
— Sanford J. : Ungpr andPeter Vale, in the winter issue of Foreign Affairs. 


anything beyond a customs onion. 

This divide between the six found- 
ing states and all the latecomers can 
never be fully bridged France, West 1 
Germany, Italy and the Benelux . 
countries will always be tbe soul of - 
the Community, and the others will . 
never share their idealistic vision of 
union. But the doubters, notably 
Britain, made symbolically impor- 
tant concessions at Luxembourg. .. 
They accepted that the Community 
will in future be legally defined as “an 
area without frontiers" rather than - 
just as an economic marketplace , I 
without them, and they agreed that 
reference to eventual monetary union 
be written into the Rome treaty. 

The sort of haggling that was need- ~ 
ed to fine-tune the summit’s 45-page , 
communique inevitably Frayed tem- 
pers. President Francois Mitterrand . . 
at one point comanpturiusly re- : 
proached the meeting for degenerat- 1 
ing into a "grocer’s squabble” And . 
when Chancellor Helmut Kohl back- 
tracked on a pledge to Britain, a se- 
nior aide to Margaret Thatcher 
snapped to repraters that "the Ger- . . 
mans have never stood firm since * 
Arnhem." Meanwhile, the Italians . 
are still withholding approval of the -> 
Luxembourg deal because it does not 
go far enough toward integration, 
and the Danes because it goes too far. 

There are fringe probkans. The do- . 
mestic politics of Denmark and Italy ~~ 
are unlikely to unravel the broad 
agreement reached in Luxembourg. 

It is true that the agreement is far 
from a giant step forward, and also — 
that it does Hide to address Europe's— 

vwy pressing difficulties of rising un- * 
employment and waning industrial i 
power. But it contrasts with' the Com- : _ 
munity’s earlier setbacks —and with 
the low point of the Luxembourg 
talks, when it was glumly remarked . ' 
that "the snail seems to have turned 
around and is going backwards." 

International Herald Tribune. ' - 



i: 

)■ 


UTTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Gold War Language 


I welcome Norman Davies's cedi 
for us to rid ourselves oftinsinfonna- 
tion about the Soviet Union. ("Polish 
Isn't Russian; Russia Isn’t America, ” 
Nov. 2&yOat hopes that the . recent 
summit at Geneva wiR hdp’us to do 
that, if nodiing else. Rut Mr.. Davies 
must tty harder. The "evil empire" 
language that. President Reagan now. 
seeks to disown is stiB too muqh with 
us in Mr. Davies's cramnents. 

the SoSuniOTU'not^^^ as the 
country, over which General Secre- 
tary. Gorbachev presides. 


. To speak of the Soviets as charac- 
terized by militarism and glorifica- 
tion of war is an injustice to the many 
millions among them who want any- 
thing but war. We cannot afford such 
generalizations any longer- 
Let’s keep, trying. It is worth the 
effort, and indeed we dare not give 
up: Mr. Davies's approach can be 
improved, asT hope rt. will be when 
.his next column appears, 1 . 

- WRENCE KlJff PENSTEIN , 

. London. 




issue of the rights of the people arid 1 C 
nation of Palestine. Beneath Mr. . - 
Perimutters column is a film review, 
of "Shoah” by Geoige W2L 
. I expect of -your newspaper that it 
inform its readexs and try to clarify. . 

the issues in the Middle East I do not " 
wpect gratuitous assumptions and', 
filni reviews on the editorial page. .. 

MARIE PECK, 'p 

. Amman. 


Not Up to Expectations 


Goodman’s Good Deed 


Your; Nov. 14 editorial page, is 


To call the “greatest ^onqers in - ' amazing. Amos Ferimutter, surety no 

[Mn - hi«fvrti n ■ “ffrwitMt rwnRHsrif <nT - Kino HiMwin- «*!awne t*. 


Russian history" -. also _ its ^gpreatest . oonfidant of King Hussein, claims to 


tyrants”. is not much help. Tins is the:/ know what is in the ldn£s mind con- 
sort of language inflation that .only coning the West Bank, whDe neatly 
makes matters worse. ‘ ■ T ■ - . Isdestepping the^ central Middle East 


Thank you for Elkn GoodmanV * . 
column on family, ties, “A Family xC .. . 
Celebration for Individuals" (Ndo."^ 
28). It bdped me formulate a letter to 
a close relative who is having prob*- 
lems with his; teen-age children. - 

OLGA PICURL V 
Zurich. - 







ffisA scene from “Black and Blue. 



os to the Black Revue 


r u ~ it 

■ iji 

‘ -ton 

it 

■ ITilo -t*. 

■■ -«a- : 

■■■' Ei;-* 

fv (>: 


P ARIS — The new show at the The- 
atre Musical de Paris, “Black and 
Blue,” has been described as the 
first black revue to originate in P aris 
since Josephine Baker in 1925, a desorption 
that is inaccurate, patronizing and rt>»t 
misses an essential point: that this begaiHng 
all- American revue was devised by two Ar- 
gentines. 

Claudio Segovia and Hector Qrezzoifs 
last show was “Tango Argentmo.” which 

Mary Blume 


-ala's 

w L - — 

’ • ' , T\cr, 

3:b 


$ i 


had its first brief Paris booking in 1983. (The 
company, unable to afford airfare, was. 
flown up by the Argentine Air Force and. 
shared die plane with an Exocet missile in' 
need of repair.) The show came back to Paris 
triumphantly last spring. 

“Tango Argentine” is now the surprise hit 
of Broadway — such a surprise that no one 
bothered to light up the marquee of the 
Mark Hettinger Theater opening night, as- 
suming that the show would promptly fold, 
and such a hix that Segovia and Orezzoli 
have been asked to find artists far two tour- 
ing companies as well as to persuade the 
tango dancers and singers who have been in 
New York since October to stay an indefi- 
.mtdy. 

: “The performers are anguished, they want 
to go home. Some are over 50 and their 
mothers are very old and they fear they will 
.never get back,” says Orezzoli, 32. He is lean 
.and dapper, with sBcked-backed hair and a . 
.tendency to Musk 1 “On the other hand if*, 
like a Cinderella dream for them.” 

“Tango Argentine” was Segovia and 
Orezzoli’s second revue after a long collabo- 
ration in theater and opera. Their first was 
called “Flamenco Puro,” and it is not as 
nervy as it sounds, Orezzoh says, for Argen- 
tines to claim that the flamenco they present 
s pure. “The fust pure book on flamenco- 
ogy was written by an Argentina For us It is 
very familiar -” 

Nor should it seem odd on second, or 
perhaps on third, thought that Argentines 
ibould put on a synthesis of black revue 
rom roughly the 1920s to the ’50s and do it a 
ot better than U. S. products like “Sophisti- 
cated Ladies.” As such Paris-based Argen- 
tines as Alfredo Arias of the TSE theater 
company have shown, no nation has wider 
— or more eccentric — cultural references, 
or a deeper belief in theatrical illusion. Nos- 
talgia provides an impetus for art 

“Nostalgia is very important” Orezzoli 
say s. “In a sense we are very decadent I 
dream of things that I have lived in art 

“We work with forms of art that are disap- 
pearing, we fed that anguish of things that 
disappear. Since we are so attached to them, 
t is more than nostalgia — it is a need to be 
n touch with things before they go.” 

Like Arias. Segovia and Orezzoli ravish 
he eye with lavish detail, but unlike Arias, 
rbo inhabits a world of Theater with a 
apilal T, Segovia and Orezzoli bring their 
’ indy tuned and sophisticated sensibilities 
o popular and traditional arts — flamenco, 
ango, jazz and blues. 

“We want to show an art that is near to 
■ ife. and art that is as natural as walking or 
-sating.” 



Mnahlagofaon 


Sandra Reaves-Phillips. 


Song and dance have become so homoge- 
nized in the United States, thanks to televi- 
sion and Las Vegas, that when Segovia and 
Orezzoli went to there at the urgi n g erf Jean- 
Albert Cartier, director of the ThhSlre Musi- 
cal de Paris, who had suggested a black 
revue, they found many of the artists they 
auditioned were perforating to a dull stereo- 
type. “Black ana Blue” is a mixture of vin- 
tage champagne and bathtub gin. Segovia 
and Orezzoli are proud that the cast has been 
urged to be themselves. 

“Some of the performers have begun to 
feel a kind” of pride. You don't need to tell 
gypsies to be proud because they are, and 
with the tango the success was to make them 
realize that tango is worth preserving. With 
this show, I was worried about the problems 
of stereotypes which it is ideologically hard 
for a foreigner to understand. It is a very 
simple and traditional show, but we pat it 
together to show the difference between 
something sterile and something alive.” 


Segovia and Orezzoli as usual did the sets 
and costumes, choreography is by Henry Le 
Tang, who did the film “Cotton Chib,” and 
the performers indude a soft and sweet 
bunch erf lap dancers called The Old Hoof- 
ers,” the rhythm and blues anger Ruth 
Brown, Linda Hopkins who has both sung 
gospd and played Bessie Smith in “Me and 
Bessie,” and the comically disabused Sandra 

Bessie Striftb^Jbsephine Baker, Holi- 
day and Mabalia Jackson among others and 
who has dedjeated her present performance 
to her AilHrwi, her grandmother Matilda, 
her mother Rose, her Aunt Grace, and God. 

Segovia and Qrezzoifs. visual inspiration 
runs from old minstrel shows (the nwirhing 
plaid taffeta tailcoats and huge bow ties 
worn by 75-year-old and 12-year-old tap 
dancers) to the foolishest of follies: spangles, 
bugle beads, boas and a dress with a train 
that is nine meters long and ten meters wide 
that Sandra Reaves-Phillips wears while 
seated in a high swing for “Am I Blue?” 

“It is a very poetic mmy of someone very 
alone with her solitude prolonged,” Orezzoli 
explains. . 

T HE show begins with Linda Hopkins 
singing “Boro on Friday” without ac- 
companiment, followed by a tap num- 
ber, also a ca prila. The point is inunechatdy 
made: The artists are the music. By the third 
number, when the scrim curtain rises to 
.reveal a band, cunningly placed a nd lighted 
into a gleaming, hard-edged 1930s configu- 
ration. tiie audience knows that the perfec- 
tion of detail is there to showcase the artists. 
By curtain fall, the artists are a pretty happy 
lot. The audience is, too. 

Orezzoli studied literature and psychology 
in Buenos Aires, loves J. B. Priestley, and 
says his favorite plays are “The Seagull" and 
“Macbeth.” He and Segovia first worked in 
France in 1975 doing sets and costumes at 
Aix-en-Provence for Campra’s “Camaval de 
Vemse,” an opera-ballet that had its pre- 
miere in 1699. 

Totally international, they live nowhere. 
“Some of our friends who stayed in Paris 
integrated into that society” Orezzoli says. 
“We couldn't accept that, we were always 
thinking of the things we were missing. The 
anguish of having to accept a comer some- 
where! We feel more completed because we 
are not in our country anywhere. The only 
way to accept exile was to become universal. 
You lose a lot, but if you can also add you 
can complete an image . 

“In flamenco it is too bad that most audi- 
ences cannot understand that one singer can 
construct a whole universe. They improvise 
but it is so structured in its spontaneity that 
they can build whole cities in a moment and 
become universal.” 

Orezzoli is now off to New York to see 
about doing “Blade and Blue” there. “Well 
sea We don’t sell what we do. .The work for 
us is always a big anguish. If it happens, 
perhaps it would be marvelous.. 

“It is the same for the artists in the flamen- 
co and tango shows. That is the wotk we do 
— these people who are putted apart, we put • 
them' together and fill them with pride. 
When you love something very much you try 
not to restore it as you would a painting, but 
let its purity show.” ■ 


Sam Shepard’s Portrait 
Of the American Family 


by Samuel G. Freedman 


N EW YORK — Whatever else any 
great American playwright has 
done, each one has created, and in 
turn become identified with, a 
personal vision of the American family. If 
anything, the measure of achievement in 
American drama has been a writer’s ability 
to place a vivid family portrait within a 
larger, societal frame — or, more to the 
point, to make the family represent not rally 
the writer's inner life but a set of outer 
conditions. 

One thinks of Arthur Miner's me", hus- 
tlers »ho lived through one Great Depres- 
sion and live in fear of another; of Tennessee 
Williams’s women, cut loose with the fall erf 
the plantation aristocracy and thrown into 
the cruel dries. O’Neill, Odets. Inge, Albee 
— all cotg'ure images of the family at war 
with itself. 

And in a cycle of family plays stretching 
over a — and culmmating with the 
New York opening of the newest one, “A Lie 
of the Mind” — Sam Shepard has painted, a 
picture of domestic disharmony as 
as any that preceded iL The wastrel father of 
“Curse of the Starving Class," the Cain-and- 
Abel brothers of “True West,” the incestu- 
ous lovers of “Fool for Lore” have become 
indelible characters in the cont e m p o rar y 
American theater. So. too, has Shepard 
Staked his «larwi to the landscapes — both 
geographical and psychological — of the 
rootless American Southwest and the belea- 
guered Middle Western farm belt. 

The dements of Shepard’s mythology co- 
alesce again in “A Lie of the Mind.” This 
sprawling play runs more than three hours 
and follows two famili es, one in Montana 
and the other in Sou them California, that 
are bound by the brutal marriage of two 
children. .(The lovers are played by Harvey 
Keitel and Amanda Plummer; the rest of the 
cast mrj ndes James Gammon, Geraldine 
Page, Will Patton, Aidan Quinn, Ann 
Wedgeworth and Karen Young with music 
by the Red Clay Ramblers.) 

In its vast scope and in several of its 
themes — possessive and violent love, guilt, 
escape and lies — “A Lie erf the Mind” 
resembles Shepard's screenplay for “Paris, 
Texas" more than his recent plays; the film 
version of one of these, “Fool for Love,” 
opened here this week, directed by Robert 
Altman and starring Shepard, and a French 
adaptation of the stage version is r unning in 

Pans. 

As Don Shewey points out in his recent 
biography (“Sam Shepard,” Dell Books), 
Shepard’s cycle of family plays departed 
from his earlier work. Shepard lived and 
wrote amid the East Village’s experimental 
theater movement, and from 1963 through 
1976 his plays tended toward the fantastic 
and his creations included cowboys and rock 
stars, bayou monsters and B-movie gum- 
shoes. Then, with “Curse of the Starving 
Class," he began to penetrate his past and 
work in an increasingly naturalistic vein. 
Each play since then has peeled back more 
layers of the playwright's itinerant upbring- 
ing, particularly his relationship with his 
father. 

“I don’t think it’s worth doing anything,” 
Shepard said in a recent interview, “unless 
it’s personal. You're not dealing with any- 
thing unless you're dealing with the most 
deeply personal experiences. It’s empty oth- 
erwise.” 


H E acknowledged the transition in his 
work since “Curse of the Starving 
Class.” “I thought for years it was 
boring; uninteresting to write about the fam- 
ily,” he said. “I was more interested in this 
thing of being wild and crazy. 

“But the interesting thing about taking 
real blood relationships is that the more you 
start to investigate those things as external 
characters, the more you see they’re also 
internal characters. The mythology has to 
come out of real lifa not the other way 
around. Mythology wasn’t some trick some- 
one invented to move us. It came out of the 
guts of man. And myths are related on an 
emotional level They’re not strictly inteUeo- 
taal programs.” 

The presence that looms over Shepard’s 
recent work — and, one would surmise, over 




his life — is that of his father. Samuel Shep- 
ard Rogers died in 1983 when he was hit by a 
car near his home in Santa Fa New Mexico. 
His death Left forever unresolved the influen- 
tial and often volatile relationship be lwH 
with his son. Their torturous bond permeates 
“A Lie of the Mind” and the film of “Fool 
for Love.” 

Shepard has created two fathers in “A Lie 
of the Mind,” each with apparent echoes of 
Rogers. One lives with his family in Mon- 
tana but longs to leave, blaming his wife and 
daughter for ruin mg his lifa The other father 
is never seen onstage; he deserted his family, 
the audience learns, and went to live in a 
house trailer. Stumbling dnmkenfy along a 
highway after a drinking contest with his 
son, he was hit by a truck and killed. 

In the film of “Fool for Leva” the charac- 
ter of The Old Man, father of the lovers 
Eddie and May, assumes an even greater 
importance than in the stage version. There 
The Old Man sat on the side of the stage, 
sipping whiskey and occasionally speaking. 
The Old Man erf the film is a constant, active 
presence — a “Twilight Zone”-style gr emlin 
or some kind of malevolent puppeteer. The 
film opens with The Old Man plaintively 
playing harmonica, as if to summon Eddie 
toward his confrontation with May. The Old 
Man steals tequila out of Eddie's truck, 
eavesdrops on Eddie's fights with May. and, 
until the secret of his two lives is revealed, 
delights in their destruction. 

Shepard’s actual “old man” was an even 
more complicated character. A World War 
II flyer (like the offstage father in “A Lie of 
the Mind”), be attended college on the GI 
Bill, read Lorca, Neruda and Vallejo, taught 
high school geography and Spanish and 
studied at the University of Bogoti on a 
Ful bright scholarship. He could be a beguil- 
ing teacher and storyteller. He was also an 
alcholic, a father who fought bitterly with his 
son, a husband who frequently vanished. 


The playwright ; above, in the 
film version of “ Fool for Love. " 
and Harry Dean Stanton, left, 
as the Old Man. 


“It was hit and miss , always hit and miss," 
Shepard's sister. Roxanne Rogers, remem- 
bers of the relationship between the play- 
wright and his father. “There was always a 
kind of faring off between them and it was 
Sam who got the bad end of that. It was Dad 
who always set up if it was on or off. Dad 
was a tridry character — because be was a 
charismatic guy when he wanted to be: 
warm, loving. land of a hoot to be around; 
and the other side was like a snapping turtle. 
With him and Sam it was that male thing . 
You put two virile men in a room and they’re 
going to test each other.” 

Shepard left home at 19. “There was this 
big fight with my old man,” be recalled in a 
recent Newsweek interview, “and at that 
point I fled. And 1 thought, well Tm just 
going to have to start over, pretend I don't 
even have a family.” Rogers remembers that 
their mother. Jana was sure Shepard would 
succeed as a writer, bat that their father 
remained skeptical. He saw only one of his 
son's plays. The occasion typified the pica- 
resque and pathetic nature of his lifa 

“Once there was a production of 'Buried 
Child' in Santa Fa” Shepard said, “and my 
dad took it upon himself to go, and he was 
rolling drunk and started talking to the char- 
acters and stood up and made all this noise. 
He definiidy struck up a relationship with 
the production. When the audience finally 
found out he was my old man, everyone 
stood up and gave him a standing ovation. 
He was in a state of shock.” 

AS Shepard became a husband and a 

/\ father, as he approached middle age 
JLjL — he is now 42 — he sought reconcil- 
iation with his father. Sometimes the effort 
took the form of writing, like the speech in 
“Buried Child” in which a teen-age boy, 
Vincent, tells of looking in the mirror and 
seeing his face turn into his father’s. Some- 
times it meant father and son going out 
drinking together. 

“Yeah, we had bouts of drinking,” Shep- 
ard said. He drew breath, paused. “Strange.” 
Again, he was quiet for a moment “Because 
it would always veer on that thing of acctisa- 

Continued on page 9 


ATri] 


Hill 


er Sarah Caldwell Returns 




H** 


by Andrew L. Pincus 

B OSTON — Sarah C&ldwell is 
healthy and raring to go again — 
and so, she says, is her Opera Com- 
pany of Boston. 

'■ A year ago, at age 60, the founder, artistic 
' .hector, guiding spirit and chief everything 
'• ’-,r the Boston troupe came down with double 
. ammonia- For two weeks nobody knew 
hether she would crane out of the hospital 
ive. Denied the services of its chief conduc- 
' t and stage director, the board of directors 
sled the entire five-opera season. The 
'-year-old company embarked on what 
ajdwell called “nightmarish limes” during 
.inch the house remained dark and a loyal 
, “ .aff labored without pay to keep the organi- 
. - ition going. It was, she said, "probably the 
■ugliest time the company ever had.” 

Now the lights are going up again and 
:-*• aldwdl is returning to the pit for the first 
ne since her recovery, staging and con- i 
.icting five performances of Humper- 
••• nek’s “Hansel and GreteL” Next month 
e new subscription season begins, offering 
- American premiere of Peter MaxweS 
•' ivies’s ‘Taverner" and J anacek’s_ u Makro 
ulos Case” in the original instrumenta- 
t^n, along with Puccini’s “Torandot” and 
torubinj’s “Mfidfia" In those works, too, 
-Jdwett is scheduled to double as condnc- 
" - and director. For 25 years, this has beat 
' accustomed role with the company. 

■ . Caldwell is trim ami dripper. Her face, 

.‘ ; med by iron-gray hair, is unlined. She 
Iks two miles every morning, plays tennis. 


swims. She has even come down with — and 
recovered from — tennis elbow. 

“I fed marvelous,” she said. Tm enor- 
mously fortunate to have a wonderful doctor 
who not just saved my life but also super- 
vised every phase of the activities that Ira to 
my getting stronger and better. I fed better 
than I’ve fdt in 20 years.” 

Rejuvenation has also come to the opera 
company. Postponements of single produc- 
tions were nothing new in the unpredictable 
process that puts opera on stage in Boston’s 
old B. F. Keith Memorial a former vaude- 
ville palace. “Taverner.” for instance, had 
been postponed from the 1983-84 season 
before bong rescheduled again from last 
year’s canceled season. Bat, alarmed by the 
loss of a whole season, the board and Cald- 
well have strengthened the artistic staff and 
fund-raising apparatus to prevent furore 
blackouts or dependence cm a single leader. 

Forty new volunteers have come on board 
They have gradually relieved the director of 
many fund-raising chores. Goals have been 
set and long-range planning is under way. 
Caldwell has added assistant stage directors 
to the roster, who, along with “oover” con- 
ductors, guarantee that “if I were to develop 
tennis elbow or tennis-knee or tennis brain 
tomorrow, we'd be in fine shape.” 

With the benefit of sickbed hindsight, 
Caldwell agreed that she had let the compa- 
ny, like herself, get run down. Fund-raising 
and guest-condaking, both of which she 
finally had to cut back on, had drained her. 
“Very stupidly,” she said, “I tried to do all 
kinds of things, and I tried to do too many 


things at once, and so I got fatter and sicker 
and duller and less effective. And in a sense 
the sickness was a blessing in disguise be- 
cause it gave me a chance to reassess whatl 
was doing that was so stupid and the places 
where I needed help.” 

T HE new season is one production 
smaller than usuaL The Makropou- 
los Case” and “Taverner” are car- 
ryovers from last year, and Caldwell bad 
done extensive preparation abroad for both. 
For Janacek’s penultimate opera she went to 
Czechoslovakia, particularly the Janacck li- 
brary and museum in Brno, for copies of the 
manuscript and original seme and parts. 

She said that, like “Boris Godunov” in 
Mussorgsky’s original version, Janacek’s op- 
era is more difficult in the original instru- 
mentation, but that the sounds are “distinc- 
tive and characteristic and very special ” 
For Maxwell Davies's dramatization of 
the life of the 16th-century English composer 
John Taverner, Caldwell visited the compos- 
er — she calls him “a nifty Mend" — at his 
home in the Orkney Islands to plan the 
production. He will also come to Boston to 
take a hand in the staging. 

“Iteandot,” the opening production, will 
star Eva Marion in the title role and /the 
Hungarian tenor Janos Nagjr as Calaf. The 
Central Opera Theater of Berjing created the 
costumes ax CaldweD’s request, made while 
she was conducting the group in 1981. and. 
members, of a Boston Rung Fu academy will 
perform original choreography. 

“M6dee," to be sung in French, will dose 


the season in June. Shirley Verretl will be the 
heroine — her first time in the role. 

Caldwell has scheduled the U. S. premiere 
of Olivier Messiaen’s “St. Francis erf Assisi” 
for 1987. She plans Leonard Bernstein's 
“Candide” for next fall and has obtained the 
to the Bernstein opera “A Quiet 
” which she expects to do in a 1987 
double biD with Its companion pieca “Trou- 
ble in Tahiti." 

The losses from cancellation of the season 
came to $812,000. according to the company 
president, Laszlo J. Bonis. He said that, with 
the stepped-up fund raising, which he called 
“encouraging” to data the company hopes 
to reduce its deficit to $500,000 by June and 
eliminate it by June 1987. 

Caldwell is boundlessly grateful to her 
board staff, family and friends, who, she 
said, “have walked many a mfle with me to 
make sure that Sarah didn’t backslide'’ into 
her pre-600-calorie-a-day ways. Sintilariy, 
she said, subscribers have responded sympa- 
thetically to a plea that they turn their 1984- 
85 payments into donations and resubscriba 
paying again, for the new season. 

“Fve lost tjuite a bit of weight but I’ve got 
a lot more to lose,” she observed with a 
chuckle and a trace of a Missouri drawl 
“And the company has gained a certain 
amount of weight bat has a lot more to 
gain.” 

Despite improvements, Caldwell said, op- 
era perform as in the United States “never 
realty have enough time anywhere — any- 
where— to rehearsa and theybecomefacda 
They learn how to learn music rapidly, and 
they leant bow to sometimes look like they’re 




Jo* Wrim. U» Nn> fori Tima 


Sarah Caldwell at rehearsal. 


acting in a production — how to adapt 
quickly when there isn’t time. And so, be- 
cause you're the sum product of your experi- 
ences, you develop a kind erf artistry that is a 
product of this. And we are all capable of a 
much higher level of artistry. We want to 


create the conditions so that we can develop 
that higher level here." ■ 


Andrew L Pincus, who writes frequently 
about music and musicians, wrote this article 
for The New York Times. 




* 


J 


f 



t** i i ms I i ir 




Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6,1985 




TRAVEL 


Following Hemingway’s Footsteps Around Spain 


“Spain , ” the woman of Pablo said bit - 
terly. Then tamed to Robert Jordan. “Do 
they have people such as Ms in other 
countries?” 

“ There are no other countries like 
Spain , " Robert Jordan said politely. 

“ You are right . ” Fernando said “ There 
is no other country' in the world like 
Spain . " 

“Hast thou ever seen any other coun- 
try T* the woman asked hint. 

"Nay," said Fernanda. “ Nor do / wish 
to . " 


by James M. Markham 


T HE words are spoken in the Sierra 
de Guadarrama, the small moun- 
tain range that rises from the sun- 
bleached meseta that Madrid sits 
upon, before Robert Jordan blows up the 
bridge in “For Whom the Bell Tolls.” It must 
have been wild country during the Spanish 
Civil War. Were he alive today, Ernest Hem- 
ingway would probably be dismayed by the 
sprawl of suburban bousing developments 
and weekend A-frames that has crept into 
the evergreen oaks and pines of the Guadar- 
rama; he might find the funny little ski 
resorts at Navacerrada another taming touch 
in the sierra. 

Yet if he left the good roads and set off 
into the woods, he would still be able to 
encounter the wildernesses (though not the 
utterly fictional caves) where Robert Jordan, 
Maria, Anselmo, Fernando and the woman 
of Pablo played out their destinies. The Al- 
pine Club, where Jordan rested for three 
hours, is still there; so is the bridge — though 
it is stone, not w a steel bridge of a single 
span.” In a letter, Hemingway once called 
Spain “the last good country left." His 
Spain, in fact and fiction, is still a wonderful- 
ly unchanging place. 

I lived in Madrid For six of the best years 
of my life. As a man writing in English for a 
living, 1 found my footsteps dogged by the 
giant presence of this writer who had done so 
much to fix Spain in the contemporary 
imagination. He wrote things that one was 
tempted to steal, or pilfer from around the 
edges, like this from "Death in the After- 
noon" about a capital city that is perched at 
2, 1 90 feet: "Madrid is a mountain city with a 


mountain climate. It has the hig h cloudless 
Spanish sky that makes the Italian sky seem 
sentimental and it has air that is actively 
pleasurable to breathe.” 

One could not get around him, or even 
avoid some of the carnage he'd left behind. 
Hemingway drank and ate in as many places 
as George Washington slept in. By imp aling 
Botin in the last pages of “The Sun Also 
Rises" with these words — “It is one of the 
best restaurants in the world" — he guaran- 
teed this rustic spot off the Plaza Mayor an 
eternal clientele of American tourists and 
Spanish businessmen impressing their 
American contacts. There is nothing wrong 
with a restaurant patronized by American 
tourists, but if they are the only customers 
you might as well be eating your roast sadd- 
ling pig in Boston. 

Another Hemingway haunt in Madrid, the 
Cervecerfa Alemana on the Plaza Santa Ana 
— a square where old men play chess with 
giant white and black pieces — retains its 
wooden facade, its blackened oil pointings 
and yellowing photographs of bullfight 
scenes, which hint at its dwindling matador 
clientele. I know a number of American and 
English men. working at the fringes of jour- 
nalism and literature, who systematically de- 
stroyed their livers by sitting for years at its 
sturdy tables downing Fun dad or brandies 
and talking Hemingway-tough about bulls 
and women. I do not say that they would not 
have destroyed their livers without Papa 
Hemingway’s inspiration, but it seems to me 
that his ghost was a spiritual accessory to 
their sdf-mfUcled wounds. 

Never having developed a hankering for 
Fundador brandy in such a hot clime, I 
slipped relatively unscathed out of Heming- 
way's Madrid in 1982 to the more subtle 
enticements of Bonn. But, though one can 
leave Spain, Spain is not a country (hat 
leaves you. Hemingway’s Spain is not the 
tourist Spain of the coasts and beaches, but 
of the interior. In this heartland he encoun- 
tered, and reinvented in literature, a tragic 
Spain of impassioned living and violent dy- 
ing, a nation of Goyas and Garcia Lorcas 
that seemed cast to his own virile, existen- 
tialist morality. The epicenter of this uni- 
verse, to which I returned this summer, is 
Pamplona »nd the surrounding hPls of Na- 
varre dining the festival of San Fe rmi n. 


I had been to the legendary sanfermines 
once before, in 1977, when Spain was in the 
midst of its momentous transition to democ- 
racy. It was an amusing but tense festival 
because the emergent partisans of Basque 
nationalism were constantly dashing in 
Pamplona's streets with the police. Showing 
the red, white and green ikurrunia, the 
Basque Bag, oould get one clobbered on the 
head by the cops; it was certainly as danger- 
ous as running with the bulls. 

All that has changed- Next to the Iruna 
Bar on the Plaza dd Castillo, where Jake 
Baines and his friends besotted themselves, 
the ikurrunia hangs harmlessly on the head- 
quartos of the Basque Nationalist Party. A 
kind of political normalcy reigns. 

A bust of Hemingway was put up by the 
town fathers of Pamplona in 1968 next to the 
Pima de Toros an a small pedestrian way 
(hat bears the American’s name; the brave 
and the foolhardy who -make the three-min- 
ute morning sprint in front of the bulls dash 
past it as they spill into the ring, if they have 
not already stumbled in a human traffic 
pileup or been gored. 

F.rnft«tn | as many Sp aniar ds call him, both 

out of fondness and an inability to pro- 
nounce his surname, came to regret in some 
measure the success with which he had 








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spread the raucous sanfermines. In "The 
Dangerous Summer,” describing his 19S9 
bullfight toar across Spain, Hemingway de- 
nounces tiie intrusion of the modern world 
on bis beloved fiesta: *Tve written Pamplo- 
na once and for keeps. It is all there as it 
always was sxoept forty thousand tourists 
have been added." 




Don Bodmcfc. Woodfm Con « 




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In the Cerveceria Alemana in Madrid. 




F OR a while, many natives concurred. 
“There is a debate over whether or not 
Hemingway was positive for the iden- 
tity of the sanfermines" said Julian Balduz, 
the city's mayor. "What happened is that 
Hemingway put the sanfermines at the dispo- 
sition of the whole world, and the whole 
world doesn’t fit into Pamplona.” Yet the 
number of foreign tourists has dropped off 
in recent years; the eight days of menymak- 
ing and bullfights are dominated by native 
Spaniards in their uniforms of white pants, 
white shirts, red sashes and red scarves and 
rope-soled shoes. (This time 1 decked myself 
out in this gear and, to my surprise, felt quite 
at ease. The wine helped, too.) 

A hard core of perhaps 200 Americans 
and Englishmen returns annually to Pam- 
plona. One of their leaders is Matt Carney, a 
model from Paris who achieved momentary 
notoriety by insulting Hemingway during his 
1939 manifestation in Pamplona; another is 
Jeff Garth, a TWA steward, who was gored 
this season. American college students, with 
their well-thumbed paperback copies of 
"The Sun Also Rises,” seem to dwelt in for 
the opening days, then drift south to the 
Costa del Sol or east to the Costa Brava. But 
even these seem to be thinning ool 
"T here are fewer groupies and fringe peo- 
ple,” said Allen Josephs, a professor from 
the University of West Florida who is writ- 
ing a book on Hemingway and Spain. "Some 
people have complained that Hemingway 
mined Pamplona and the sanfermines. 
That’s nonsense. IPs still an entirely Basque 
festival and a Spanish festival.” Carlos Bar- 
rena, an eminent bullfighrcritic bom Bilbao 
who has been going tome sanfermines for 27 
years, concurs: “It is more comfortable for 
us now than it was during the Hemingway 
boom years.” 

The festival has two ingredients: wine and 
bulls. The Basques are good drinkers, which 
is a mercy in such an alcohohc event Wom- 
en seem to move around without much dan- 
ger of being pinched or -menaced. The 
rhythm of the day is set by early rising or no 

anTiSt After this event, many younger 
people flop in the city's gardens and sleep 
until lunch, which in Spain is usually eaten 
about 2 PJvL A preferred place to flop seems 
to be the gardens behind the cathedral 
A good place for lunch — now we are in. 
Hemingway’s poignant late-in-life footsteps 


The Irate River \ where Hemingway and his characters fished, near A rive. 


— is Marcdiano’s down behind the ayunta 
miento, or city hall, “where we went in the 
morning to eat and drink and ring after the 
enderro; MarceHano’s where the wood of 
the tables and the stairs Is as dean as the teak 
decks of a yacht except that the tables are 
honorably wine-spilled. The wine was as 
good as when you were twenty-one, and the 
food as marvelous as always." I had a blue 
trout and a green salad and talked to three 
gnarled men from San Sebastian about the 

In Spanish, you don’t go to a bullfight, 
you go to the bulls, a las form. The expres- 
sion hints at the centrality of thi« mysterious 
animal As H eming way found, Sp aniards aw; 
perplexed to come across an American who 
is interested in the bulls, or who knows a 
little bit about them: It is as if die American 
has crashed some secret society. 

The toreros, or bullfighters, go to Pamplo- 

taros after Madrid, which meansf&ey get 
paid weft. But they don’t like the unserious, 
drunken spectators who prance and cavort 
on the low-price, sunny side— raining cush- 
ions and hunks of bread down onto the 
picador when displeased — and they don’t 
like the big bulls that traditionally come to 
the sanfermines. 

The literature on bullfighting often seems 
nothing but a series of laments for a golden 
age that, when it existed, "was bring lamented 


for not being as good as the one before it. 
Hem in g w ay falls a bit into this mode in "The 
Dangerous Summer." It is satisfying to be 
able to report that in Spain today a consen- 
sus among aficionados is building that both 
bulls and toreros are rising out of the deca- 
dence to which they had been condemned. 
The corrida has been embraced anew by 
many who at the time of Franco’s death in 
1975 spurned it as a legacy of a dark, retro- 
grade, anti-European Spain; the same is true 
Of flamenco. Having become a stable Euro- 
pean democracy, Spain may now have redis- 
covered the pleasures of bring itself. 

In "The Sun Also Rises” the beautiful 
foothills of the Pyrenees are — with the 


the moral counterpoint to the debauchery of 
Jake’s loss-generation friends. So it is neces- 
sary, and.. uplifting, to leave wine-soaked 
Pamplona far a one-hcrur drive to the village 
of Buxguefe, which sits at 2^82 feet (910 


meters), and to the Intti River, where Jake 
and Bui do, some heavy male bonding and 

catch trouL , 


In his fiction, Hemingway is not always a 
iiableimide to aeoKnmbv and nlace. which 


xriiableguide to geography and place, which 
he shunts about for higher lileraiy purposes. 
He makes us befieve, for example, that one 
can see the monastery of RoncesvaHes from 
Burguete; it is not possible to do so, but the 
linkage heightens the religious overtones of 
Jake and. B01’s quest 


Even Allen Josephs, with all his research, 
has not been able to figure cut exactly where 
Jake, or Hemingway, fished the Irati, a pret- 
ty. shallow, swift-moving river that winds 
through green hills where you can walk for 
hours without seeing another human being. 
On his return to the foothills in 1959, Hem- 
ingway found them as unspoiled as they are 
now, and drove "further up that lovely trout 
stream into the great virgin forest of the Irati 
that was unchanged since the time of the 
Druids." 

He declined to give details of his move- 
ments or his secret trout spot, "because we 
want to go back there again and not find 
fifty cars or jeeps have found it.” He never 
made it back 

At the Bar Zubiondo, which is next to a 
rickety bridge over the Irati in the hamlet of 
Arive, I made some inquiries about the fam- 
ous American writer, but the proprietor, 
pumping a cafe sola confessed: "The Irati is 
very long, so I don't know where it would 
have been." She had only dimly beard of 
Hemingway: The Irati had triumphed even 
over him. 

Somewhere above Arive, I plunged into 
tiie underbrush and had a picnic of bread, 
rosado wine, plums, pears and peaches on a 
little stone beach by the river. I didn't catch 
any trout, or even try, but I think I saw one 
jump. ■ 


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VIENNA, Koazerthaus (tel: 
7212.11). 

CONCERTS — Dec. 9: Vienna 
Symphony Orchestra, Semyon 
Bychkov conductor, Andrea Luc- 
chesini piano (Chopin, Shostako- 
vich). 

Dec. 10: Artis Quartet (Beethoven, 
Schubert). 

RECITALS — Dec. 7: Oleg Mai- 
senberg piano (Debussy, Mozart). 
Dec. 11: Salvadorc Accardo violin, 
Bruno Canino piano (Beethoven, 
Prokofiev). 

Dec. 13: Virginia St Michael so- 
prano, Joseph DJeck piano (Schu- 
bert, Schumann). 

•Musikvarin (td: 65.81.90). 
CONCERTS —Dec. 7: TokOnstler 
Orchestra, Gflnther Theming con- 
ductor (Bach). 

Dec. 12: Vienna Symphony Or- 
chestra, Christoph Eschenbach 
conductor (Blacher, Mahler). 
RECITAL — Dec. 13: Alexander 
Jennex piano (Debussy, Jdinek). 
•Staatsoper (tel: 53240). 

BALLET — Dec. 13: “Vienna 
Waltzes" (Balanchine, J. & R. 
Strauss), “Die Puppenfee” (Hass- 
retter, Bayer). 

OPERA — Dec. 7: “11 Trovatore” 
(Verdi). 

Dec. 8: “Rdelio" (Beethoven). 
Dec. 9: "La Boh&ne" (Puccini). 
Dec. 12: “Jenufa” (Janacek). 


BELGIUM 


the iRish house 


RESTAURANTS 


Unique in Paris 

For a treat, drop 
in to our tea room 


hi nsrctw mm. 


sunn silmin 


BRUSSELS, Palais des Beaux Arts 
(td: 51250.45). 

EXHIBITION — To Dec. 22: 
^Spanish Splenders and Belgian 
Villages, 1500-1700." 

•Musics Royaux des Beaux-Arts 
de Belgique (td: 51355.46). 
EXHIBITION - To Dec. 22: 
“Goya.” 

•Musfees Royaux d’Art et dTfis- 


Garcia conductor/ violin (Bach, 
Haydn! 

Dec. 9: National Westminster 
Choir, London Chamber Orches- 
tra, Ian Hranphris conductor (Han- 
del). 

Dec. 10: London Concert Orches- 
tra, Robert Ziegler conductor, John 
Alley piano, Ian Watson piano 
(Mozart, Offenbach). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Dec. 23: 
"Miracles in Carved Ivory: Kodo 
Qkuda.” 

To Jan. 26: "Matthew Smith," 
“Told: Tradition in Japan Today,” 
“Nihonga." 

' MUSICAL — Dec. 30: “The Pi- 
rates of Penzance 1 ” (Gilbert. & Suffi- 
van). 

THEATER — Dec. 12-14: “As 
You Like It” (Shakespeare). 
•British Museum (tel: 636.1555). 
EXHIBITION — To Jan. 1986: 
"Buddhism: Art and Faith.” 
•Hayward Gallery (teL 92857.08). 
EXHIBITIONS — To F«*. 16: 
‘‘Torres- Garcia: Grid-Pattern- 
Sign," "Homage to Barcelona’’ 
•National Theatre (teh 633.Q8JS0). 
THEATER — Dec. 10 and 11; 
“Love for Love” (Congreve). 

Dec. 12-14; "Mrs. Warren’s Profes- 
sion (Shaw). 

•Tate Gallery (tel : 82 1.1 3. 13). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Dec. 8: 
“Scott Barton.” 

To Jan. 10: "Kurt Schwitters." 
•Victoria and Albert Museum (tel: 
589.63.71). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Feb. 2 
“Beatrix Potter The V&A Collec- 
tion." 

To Jan. 26: “Hats from India." 

To May 25: “British Waterco- 
lours.” 


EXHIBITION —To Jan. 15: “Sur- 
vage” 

•Jardin des Tuileries. (tel: 
45.71.20.85). 

EXHIBITION — Dec. 9-15: 
"Opening up France to Children.” 
•Maison de Victor Hugo (td: 
4272 16.651 

EXHIBITION— To Jan. 31: “Vic- 
tor Hugo’s Drawings.” 

•Mus6e d’Art Modeme (tel:. 
4723.6127). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Jan. 5: 
“Vera Szekdy," “Modem Masters 
from the Thyssen-Bamemisza CoJ^ 

lection.” 

•Musfee du Grand Palais (td: 
4261-54.10). - 

EXHIBITIONS — To Dec. 16: 
“Sir Joshua Reynolds: 1 723-1792.” 
To Jan. 6: “La Glows de Victor 
Hugo” • 

•Mus&c du Louvre (tel: 
4260.3926). 

EXHIBITION — To Jan. 6: “Le 

Bran & Versailles.” • • 

•Musfcc du .Petit Palais (td: 
4265.1273). 

EXHIBITION — ToJanJ: “Soldi 
D'eucre,” Victor Hugo's manu- 
scripts and drawings. 

•SaHe Pleyd (tel: 4233.7L89). 
CONCERTS — Dec. 7: Munich 
Philharmonic Orchestra, G Cdi- 
baidache conductor (Bruckner, 


OPERA — Dec. 7: “Tristan and 
Isolde" (Wagner). ■ 

Dec 8 and 12: "Hansd and Cre- 
te!" (Humperdinck). 

Dec. 10: “The Barber of SeviHle” 


Dec. 11: “Madame Butterfly" 
(Puccini). ... 

• Philharmonic (td: 25488-0). 
CONCERTS — Berlin Phffliar- 
momc Orchestra — Dec. 7 and 8: 
Herbert van Karagan conductor 


Dec. 11: Bamberg Symphony Or- 
chestra, Horst Stein conductor 
(Dvorak, Schumann). 

Dec.' 13: GUmliugj. GdmettL con- 
ductor (Brahms, Zemlindcy). 
COLOGNE, Oper der Stadt (let 
2125.81). 

OPERA — Dec. 7: "The Magic 
Fluto" (Mozart). 

Dec. 12 and 13: “Hansel and Gre- 
tel” (Humperdinck). 

FRANKFORT, Alte Oper (tel: 
13400). 

CONCERTS —Dec. 7: Bamberger 
Symphonic, Horst Stem conductor. 
Andris Schiff piano (Mozart,: 
Schubert). 

Dec. 11-13: Frankfurt Radio Sym- 
phonic. Orchestra, Eduardo .Mata 
conductor, Tedd Josdsan piano 


MILAN, Padjalione d'Arte Con- 
idnpojaMa (td: 78:46.88). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Jan. 13: 
“Gina Pane: Partitions,” "Richard 
Long - Salvatore Scarpitta." 
ROME, Accademia Nazkmale di 
Santa CedHa (td: 679.0329). 
CONCERTS — Dec. 8-10: Acca- 
demia Nazionale di Santa CedJa 
Orchestra and Chorus, Guenmufi 
Rqjdestwenski conductor, Damela 
Somova soprano (Dvorak). 
TRIESTE, Teatro Comunale Giu- 
seppe Verdi (63.19.48). 

OPERA — Dec.7. 10, 12: "Rus- 
salka" (Dvorak). 

TURIN, teatro Regio (tel: 
54.80.00). 

OP)ERA— Dec. 8, 10, 13: “Rosen- 
kavalicr” (R. Strauss). 


CONCERTS — Coocertgcbouw 
orchestra, Dec. 7 and 8: Bernard J 
Haitink conductor, Alfred Brendd - 


piano (Mozart, Sjosiakowiisj). 
Dec. 10: Netherlands Philharmon- 
ic Orchestra, Jack P. Loorn con- 
ductor ( Hfindel). 

Dec. 11-13: Bernard Haittznk con- 
ductor, Murray Perhia piano (Bee- 
thoven, Tchaikovsky). 


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toire (tel: 733.96.10). 
EXHIBITION —To Dec. 22: “Los 


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Doify TRA1TEUR until midnight 
«?.*» Wo*o»mnvi7* I«t (11423/1479 Cl 


' LONDON, Barbican Goitre (td: 
638.41.41). 

CONCERTS — Dec. 8: English 
Chamber Orchestra. Jos£-Luis 


MONTPELLIER, Opera (td: 
6631.11). 

BALLET —Dec. 9: Le Jeune Bat- 
let de France. 

PARIS, Centre Georges Pompidou 
(teL- 4277.1233). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Dec. 16: 
“Matta." 

To Jan. 1: “Klee d la Miudqoe.” 
•Galerie Nadine Bresson (tel: 
22258.09). 


Dec. 9: Cologne Orchestra, & Na- 
gano conductor (Beethoven, 
Brahms). 

•Tfa&tre Musical de Paris' (td: 
42.61.19.83). . 

JAZZ MUSICAL — To Pec. 19: 
“Blade and Blue" (Segovia/Orez- 
zoh). 

•Tour Montparnasse (tel:. 

42.72^3.41). 

EXHIBITION —To Jan. 5: “Four 
Centuries of Ballet in Paris." - 

•Wally • Findlay. • Gallery 


RECITAL— Dec. 12: Hakan Ha- 
gegard baritone, Geoffrey Parsons 
piano Schubert). 

STUTTGART,. Staatstbeater (td: 
20320). 

OPERA — Dec. ?: “Fiddio” (Bee- 
thoven). 

pec. 9. and 12: “Hansd and Gre- 
td" (Hoimeritinck). 

Dec 11: < udomeoa>”QMkizart)... 
Dec. .12:. “La Cenerentok” (Rossi- 
ni)- - ; 


ITALY 


EXHIBITION. — To. Dec. 17: 
“Andr6 Bourrifc." 


OBUHANT: 


BERLIN,' Deolsche Opv (tel: 
341.44.49). : . ■ 

BALLET — Dec. 13: “Les Syl- 

phldes" (Fokine; C2wpin): • . - . 


BOLOG3VA, Teatro Comunale 
(td: 5299.47). ■ 

OPERA — Dec 7, 10, 12: “Der- 
Frascharir (Wd>er). 

FLORENCE^ Teatro Comunale. 
(td:. 277.9236). _ 

CONCERT.—. Dei: ‘8: Orehe st ra. 
del Magpo MnsiCale Fiorehtiflo, 
Zubih Mehta conductor (Schubert, 
Verdi)'. : ■ 


TOKYO, Idemilsu Gallery (td: 
213J1.11). 

EXHIBITION — To Dec 22: 
“The World of Rim-Pa SchooL" 
•Matsuoka Museum (tel: 
43727,87). 

EXHTBIIIpN — To Dec 26: 
“Ornate® Potteries.” 

•National Museum of Western Art 
(td:-828J)Jl). 

EXHIBITION —To Dec 8: “Vin- 
cent Van Gogh." 

•Okma Shokokan Museum (td: 
583.07B1). V 

EXHIBITION — To Dec 19 : 
“Earfy Modern Japenese Painting 
Stiles." ... 

•Suntory Museum of An (td- 
470.10,73).. v ’ 

EXHIBITION — To Dec 15: 
“300th' Anniversary of Bach's 
Birth." • 

•Tobacco and Salt Museum (td- 
476.20:41). ■ • ’ • ' ' 

EXHIBITION — To Dec 22: 
“Ancient Mexico: History and Civ- 
ilization in Midhoacan.” 
•Yamarane Museum , (tel- 
669.76.43). • - V ’ 

EXHIBmON To Dec 25 ; 
“Japanese Painting?.” ... 


LISBON, CaJouste Gulbenkian j 
Foundation (td: 73.51 Jl), ! 

BA LLE T — Dec. 7: "Hero” (Louis 
Falco), "Ghost Dances” (Christo- 
pher Bruce). 

CONCERTS — Dec. 12 and 13: 
Gulbenkian Orchestra, -Max Ra- 
binovitsj conductor (Dvorak). 
RECITALS — Dec 10: Jean Pierre ^ 
Rampal flute, John Steele Ritter 
harpsichord and piano (Bach, 
Roussd). 

Dec.1 1 : Aureli Blasczok vioHn, Eu- 
ganiuzz Knapik piano (Ives). 
SCOTLAND 

EDINBURGH, National Gallery 
(td: 556.89^1). 

EXHDBmONS — To Dec 24: 
“Nethe r la ndi sh Drawings.” 

To Jan. 5: “The Christmas Story." 
•National Gallery of Modem An 
(td: 556.89.21). i 

EXHIBmON — To Jan. 5: “Bda 
Uitz: Prints 1920-1923." 


NKTHHUAWS 




UiiUBI STATES 

NEW YORK, Metropolitan Mus 
um of Art (td: 535.77.101. 
EXHIBrnON — To Jan. 5: “I 

dial"- 

°f Modem A 
(tel:708.94.00). 

EXffiBITONS— Decl 2 to Man 
II: “Variants," Works by Ama 
and European photographs. 
To Jan. 7: “Contrasts of Fort 
Geometric Abstract Art 191< 

SAN FRANCISCO. Museum < 

Modem Art (td: 863.88.00L 

S H1B £™N — To Eeb. ! 
Elmer Btschoff 1947-1985 ” 
WASHINGTON D.C, Nation 
KSSilSSfT W: 35 7^7 .001 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1985 


Page 9 


FUN AND PROFIT 




• , ] ,/ by Roger Cottis : . 

of. the worid’&feadingstrategic' 
-■planners, Dr. Mictoad Kami, is 
| iond of raying that the essence of 

I successful corporate p lanning k to. 

%pea the unexpected" The. same applies ' 
to badness travidLThe most carefully crafted 

t itinerary can come irrevocably unglued if 

yfeulre kefrt waiting' for three days for an 
C^fidal meeting In Africa or the Middle East 
Snow can strike-in Maraeflle.leadmg to a’ 
cascade of broken appointmaits. (Would 
yon believe Lisbon airport being closed for 
36 hours because of high winds?) .Or maybe 
the restaurant where you’d planned to host a 
power loach is closed that one crucial day. 

State-of-the-art travel means checking out 
the /options not only before yon go, but 
“What if7" scenarios once you're on the 
rpa&Thesavvy traveler minimizes hassle 
expense by having alternative reserva- 
tions, avoiding back-to-back meetings on a 
- .^^hdestination trip and allowing a day or 
fyo/as a buffer fen rest or rescheduling, 
especially before vital appointments in a 
new time zone as wdl as honing up on local 
lore. It’s thorough preparation, staying flexi- 
ble and paying attention to detail that count. . 

Here’s the second part of a checklist (the 
first part ran last wed:) to guide you through 
the jungle of options. It is by no 
exhaustive, but it may help you to refine 
your own business- travel strategy. 

• Keep trips short and travcHigbt. Some 
pundits believe that two weeks is long 
enough for any trip; when you’re away a 
t&ini week, your efficiency fads off (especial- 
ly when crossing several time zones — you 
fed jet lag more flying east, but going west 
you’re tempted to wear yourself out by ex- 
tending your working day) and schedule- 
changing can be a logistical nightmare. Re- 
strict yourself to carry-on luggage whenever 
posable. You shouldn’t needmore than two 
suits, a jacket that serves as a blazer, half a 
dozen shirts and maybe a spare pair of shoes. 
Most women executives can travel just as . 
tight Dramatic jewelry and a selection of 
blouses and sweaters means you can dress 
t)ie same skirt up or down for nearly all 
business occasions. 

. Carry-on luggage is becoming a conten- 
tious issue but there are no hard rules. You 
can get away on most airlines with two 
pieces measuring up to 22x19x6 indies 
(about 56x48x15 centimeters). If you do 
have to check baggage, never consign vital 
papers to the risk of loss or mi srou t i ng. - 
Remember that excess baggage Tates are 
outrageous — each excess kilogram (2 2 
pounds) costs 1 percent of the first-class fare. . 
A solution at Heathrow arid Gatwkk is the 
London Baggage Company, which can save 
you up to 75 percent. Charges include collec- 
tion within central London and delivery at 
the destination airport 

• Consider the Schiphol connection. If 
you're flying long haul from a European city 
you can usually save money by buying a one- 
way ticket to Amsterdam (or an APEX/PEX 

1 or a British Caledonian “Time Flyer” fare) 
and then a return ticket from there which - 
you can use to return direct to your home 
airport Unlike fares from most cities, those 
from the Netherlands (on KLM and other 
airlines) are fully flexible, allowing unlimited 
stopovers, rerouting and change of carrier. 
The best bargains are in first and business 
class on routes to North America and the 
Far East Flying from Amsterdam to Sydney 
> can be $800 less than from London. From 
Amsterdam to New York costs tittle more in 
first class than the business-class fare from 
, London. (First-class fares are normally twice 
those in business class.) In Amsterdam you 
' ean buy a round-trip Air France Concorde 
ticket to New York (via Paris) for almost 
' half the prioe charged by British Airways in 
London. An added bonus at Schiphol is the 


Sam Shepard 

tion. It would always turn, inevitably, on this 
accusa ti on that there was something wrong 
and it had to do with me.” 

Yet Shepard is more elegiac than angry 
when he talks about his father's death. “It 
hasn't really clarified anything,” be said. 
“Nothing’s clearer to me. You spend a lot of 
time trying to piece these things together and 
- It still doesn’t make any sense. His death 
brought this whole thing to a head, this . 
yeaniing tor some kind of a resolution which 
.could never be. But at the same time, it was 
well worth the journey, trying to make some 
kind of effort to re-establish things.” 

• Death and time also have given Shepard 
some perspective, as a person and as a writer, 
on his father: 

-i “When you’re younger, that rage is com- 
pletely misunderstood,” he said. “It seems 
.personal when you’re a lad. This rage has to 
■do with you somehow. Then as you get older 
you see that it had nothing whatsoever to do 
with you. It had to do with a condition this 
-man had to cany because of the circum- 
stances of his life, those being World War IL 
the Depression, the poverty of the Midwest 
farm family. And all these firings contribut- 
ed to this kind of malaise. Then it becomes 
much more interesting, when you have some 
distance on iL because then you can see here 
was a mm who happened to be my father 
and yet he was more than just that.” 

One consequence of the mrbulent Rogers 
.household, and of Rogers’s death, was that it 
made his children hunger for family. “1 think 
it gave us a concrete perspective of what we 
had as a family, that it wouldn’t be around 
» forever,” Roxanne Rogers said. “We’ve al- 
ways been spread around and kind of care- 
free in our relations. What happened is we 
derided to try to put tins family back togethr 
er” 

Rogers is working as assistant director of 
"“A Lie of the Mind,” The other daughter in 
the family, Sandy, wrote and performed 
■ right songs for the "Fool for Love” sound- 
track. Shepard and his companion, the ac- 
tress Jessica Lange, live in Santa Fe and are 
.expecting a child soon. Before that be head- 
ed an extended family on a northern Califor- 
nia ranch with his first wife, O-Lan Johnson. 

"Sam's always needed a family,” Roxanne 
Rogers said. “He's always needed a base, 
even though it hasn’t always taken the most 
. traditional form.” 

“A Lie of the Mind” has brought Shepard 
back to New York, his fim home away from 
his family and the scene of his early tri - 
umphs. Here he formed part of a downtown 
theatrical c ommuni ty that included the play- 
’ wright Lanford Wilson and the producer 
Ellen Stewart. But for a man who disdains 


ntion to Detail 


abundance of connections, the famous dnty- 
- freesbopsand an average connecting time of 
commutes. 

• Watch lot the Brussels connection. A 
British-Brigjan air traffic agreement signed 
'on Oct. 10 is. the most liberal "yet establShed 
within. Europe, It opens the way to radical 
experiments in fares and services -between 
• the two countries. British arid Belgian air- 
lines will be free to operate whatever services 
and fares and at whatever frequency they 
‘ wish, subject only to disapproval by both 
governments. British Caledonian has al- 
ready announced a winter round-trip “Time 
Flyer” fare of £55 ($81) starting in Decern- . 
ber. between Gatwick and Brussels. This 
compares with the normal economy fare of 
£162. It is available only on off-peak flights, 
but it has none of the Saturday night stay 
and advance booking restrictions of APEX. 
A seminal feature of die agreement is that 
airlines can combine services to more than 
one point in either country and to points in 
other European countries. 

■ • Round-the-world fares. If you are trav- 
eling around the world in either direction 
consider a RTW ticket, winch can save you 
up to 40 percent on the full economy or even 
business-dess fare. Starting in Europe, a 


Fallback plans 
are necessary 
sooner or later 


typical routing migbt take you to die Middle 
East and on to die Far East. You could then 
gp on to North America via the North or 
South Pacific. There are dozens of prices and 
options for RTW as well as restrictions re- 
garding advance booking and number of 
stopovers, but it’s well worth chairing with 
your travd agent. 

• Oubs and lounges. Use of an executive 
lounge comes with a business-class ticket 
when you fly some airlines (such as SAS, 
with 18 lounges around the world), with 
others,' such as British Airways, you have to 
pay a membership fee. The International 
Airline Passengers Association has lounges 
at Schiphol, Tegel (Beilin) and Fmmicmo 
(Rome). The Heathrow Business Centre 
(Terminal 2) provides a fully equipped office 
and staff for basic dues of £50 a year. 

• The duty free bazaar. This is a bargain 
or a rip-off depending on where you shop 
and what you buy. Tne best values are in 
shops that are tax free as well as duty free. A 
shop with limited space tends to carry only 
top of (he line items. Best buys are usually 
items local to a country. For variety, Hong 
Kong, Kuala Lumpur and Singapore are 
bard to beat. A recent innovation is the 
arrival shop where you can buy goods enter- 
ing a country. In Europe, Schiphol has the 
best reputation for variety and prices, but 
the new duty free shop at Gatwick is worth a 
look. Last July, prices at Copenhagen’s Kas- 
trup Airport were cut on some items to 
compete more effectively with SchiphoL . 

• Car rentals. A spot check at Heathrow 
revealed that to rent a car at the airport costs 
50 percent more than far the same vehicle at 
a downtown location. Some firms, for exam- 
ple Swan National at Heathrow (associated 
with Interrem) offer cars at advantageous 
prices from airports at off-airport rates. 
Many rental companies, especially the ma- 
jors, are providing _a “business service,” in- 
cluding phones in the higher priced cars and 
discounts at some hotels. Car rental is so 
competitive that you should be able to nego- 
tiate a discount of at least 20 to 30 percent ■ 


Continued from page 7 


particular. New York stirs tittle sentimental- 
ity. He likened the city to “a kennel” and, 
asked how he coped with the congestion, 
said, “I got a J8. That’s my escape hatch.” 

As for his memories of the downtown 
days, Shepard said: ‘Tor the most part, it 
was a land of survival act- 1 wouldn’t go 
through it again if I had a choice. 'When I 
came here I was 18 and I didn’t know any- 
thing about New York. I had no idea what it 
was like except it was some land of cultural 
center. At the time I didn’t realize I was a 
kid. I thought — wdL I don’t know what I 
thought. And now, looking back, I see I was 
pretty much of a kid, running around in an 
overcoat But there is a mixture of feelings. 
There’s a sense of tins is where it all started, 
where I started writing, in this town. So 
there’s a nostalgia. But I don’t miss the city, 
FI1 leH you that.” 

More than 20 years after he first arrived in 
New York, Shepard also faces vastly differ- 
ent expectations. No longer is he just anoth- 
er aspiring writer, holed op in the East Vil- 
lage; no longer is he even the Off Off 
Broadway hero whose name meant little up- 
town and even less west of the Hudson. Now 
he is a movie star, gossip column fodder, and 
.arguably the finest American playwright of 
hisgenerafion. 

The surroundings have changed more 
than the man. Shepard sits for an interview 
wearing cowboy boots, jeans, a flannel shirt 
and a thermal vest His conversation grows 
most animated not on the subject of writing 
but of music. He speaks knowingly of Light- 
nin’ Hopkins and Roscoe Holcombe, two 
favorites; he is up to date on “Don’t Mess 
With My Toot-toot/' the surprise hit from 
Cajun country. And it sounds genuine when 
be professes not to feel the pressure to top, or 
at feast equal himself. 

“I don’t think it’s possible to second-guess 
the reaction to your work,” he said. “You 
just can’t gel involved in it. If you do get 
involved in it. then you tty to predetermine 
things or calculate things- And I don’t think 
you can work that way. It just doesn’t seem 
possible. My work has always come out 
almost like a miracle, some kind of strange 
accident. You stumble into a certain territo- 
ry that starts to excite you in a way that’s got 
to be manifested. It comes out as a play or a 
character. But that kind of work cannot be 
fonzrabred by *My next project is this’ or 
They’re expecting me to do this.’ Then it 
gets shot to heD, because then it becomes a 
career. I'm not interested in a career. I don’t 
want to have a career. I want to do the work 
that fascinates me” ■ 

© /OSS The New York Tuna 


TRAVEL 


Food, History and an Art Deco Revival 


P ARIS — Overnight, the word went 
out. “Manger au Boeuf* became the 
slogan of the hour and from the 
moment the newly reconstructed 
Boraf sur le Toit opened its doors in late 
.October, fins huge and historic Ait Deco 
brasserie has teen home to 500 to 700 diners 
daily. 

Even more rema rk able, Jean-Paul Bucher 
currently turns down 500 reservations daily, 

Patricia Wells 

and the popularity means that reservations 
must be made at feast three days in advance. 

: In Paris? In a city with such an astonishing 

wealth of grand old brasseries? Even Bucher 
— the director of the enormously successful 
group of restored brasseries that comprises 
Flo, JFuhen, Vaudeville and Terminus Nord 
— is sort of twittering with relieved content- 
ment over the success of this monument to 
Art Deco architecture and the lifestyle it 

represents. 


Clearly, Bucher is a man in touch with the 
times. For the taste of the Parisian of the 
1980s is not all that different from the Pari- 
sian of the 1 920s, when Le Boeuf sur fe Toit 
( n a m ed after the American jazz bar in the 
1920 ballet of the same name by Jean Coc- 
teau and Darius Milhaud) was home to Pi- 
casso, Coco Chanel. Maurice Chevalier and 
the pianist Jean Wiener. 

Now, as then, people go out looking for a 
good time, not simply gastronomic revela- 
tion- They want to eat well, yes. but the 
surroundings, the ambience, the total experi- 
ence are what count in the end. 

Bucher says it himself — he is selling a bit 
of history. And he is in the right market. 
Who in Paris does not want to feel, emotion- 
ally at least, part of those magic Art Deco 
days, when the creative class gathered at 
night near (he piano to celebrate in public 
into the wee hours? 

At the new Boeuf, all is as it should be. 
From the moment you approach the en- 
trance on Rue du Colisee you know exactly 
what to expect. There will be no surprises 
and there will be a fate. Mountains of shell- 


fish — oysters, sea urchins, clams and mus- 
sels — sparkle with gemlike clarity on glis- 
tening beds erf crushed ice. Inside, the sheer 
volume and presence of the space is instantly 
exciting, visually overwhelming. You feel, 
for certain, you’re in the right place. 

T HE piano bar, peach-toned walls, 
posters, potted ferns and massive Art 
Deco chandeliers, set the tone, as do 
the hip and happy looking diners, sharing 
those plateaux de fndis de mer and sampling 
classic brasserie fare, such as salade Jrisec; 
herring and warm sliced potatoes in a rangy 
vinaigrette; cassoulct, and roast leg of lamb 
with tender green flageolet beans. 

The rood and the service are really about 
as good as a diner can expect from a space 
this large and at a price this affordable. At 
Boeuf sur le Toil, a 200-franc note easily 
takes care of the bill. 

Bucher’s secret is really a combination of 
American-inspired business sense and tradi- 
tional French respect for gastronomy. His 
brasseries and charcuteries share a central 


kitchen ihat handles desserts and some of 
the other common food preparation. But 
high standards for fresh ingredients and a 
well-trained staff keep his restaurants from 
becoming mundane food factories. 

And though this is the first Bucher restau- 
rant that is a total architectural recreation, 
not a simple renovation, it hasn’t seemed to 
bother diners in the least. 

He could, he knows, export the theme to 
the United States tomorrow, but without 
service personnel and a guaranteed full 
house at lunch, the Bucher formula would 
soon lose its magic. 

Still, like many Frenchmen, Bucher 
dreams of America! But for now, he is con- 
tent knowing that the Parisian appetite for 
the solid, medium-priced brasserie that 
tosses in a touch of nostalgia is far from 
saturated. 

Boeuf sur le Toil. 34 Rue du Colisee. Paris 
S: tel: 4 3. 59. 83. SO. Open daily until 2 A.M . 
From 150 to 200 francs a person, including 
wine and service. Credit cards: American Ex- 
press. Diners Club. Eurocard, l ’iso. ■ 


Gowning Around With Serious Eating 


by Katherine Knonr 

P ARIS — We all know that France is 
the land where food is not only 
delicious but beautiful, with much 
care lavished on composing an at- 
tractive plat, on decorating p5fes and cake s . 
But the latest book, from a group of France’s 
wilder cartoonists shows that France is also 
the land where food is, well, weird. 

The latest offering from HA! (for Humor- 
isles Assodes), “La Table," is for anyone 
who takes food seriously, or rather not seri- 
ously at afl. 

In the eyes of this motley crew, food is all 
sorts of things: surrealistic, frightening, gro- 
tesque. erotic. It's not particularly appetiz- 
ing, and it’s not for children. 

Diners indulge while a dozen frogs roll 
around in wheelchairs — yes. they lost their 
legs. Giant mice on some other planet rush 
up with forks to eat the cosmonaut caught in 
a giant mousetrap. A huge and confused 
scene with dozens of cooks in a restaurant 
kitchen is interrupted by a delivery boy 
bringing their lunen: takeout hamburgers. A 
n mn opens a can labeled Russian sardines 
only to find <°**S h nine a slightly smaller can 
to open — like Russian dolls. 




“La Table" is an obvious companion to an 
earlier book, “Le Yin.” One of the favorite 
themes of the cartoonists thae was, not 
surprisingly, corks and the devices used to 
pry them out of bottles. Corkscrews some- 
how get stuck upside down in bottles like 
ships in bottles. A contraption modeled on 
the Swiss Army knife is a seven-pronged 
corkscrew with a French flag. A pirate miss- 
ing a hand has not a book but — yes, a 
corkscrew. There is, of course, a drunk Mona 
Lisa, and a highly decorated military man 
whose honors are French wines. And the 
inevitable French cops with the inevitable 
breath analysis tests — but with some rather 
unexpected results. 

The HA! cartoonists contribute to a num- 
ber of France's magazines and newspapers 
— from the staid France- Soir magazine and 
Le Monde to the raunchy-bu t-hilari crns Hara 
Kiri — as well as to such publications as 
Playboy and Penthouse. They also publish 
their own books of cartoon strips and illus- 
trate other books. They formed the group 
HA! in 1980 with the intention of producing 
a book every year. In between “Le Ym” — 
which had a German and a Dutch edition — 
and “La Table,” came “Le Slri” and “Les 7 
Pechfcs Capitaux." 

Bon appetit. ■ 








. '• ' jV 

H/* V ' 


MuBrowaa by Mirthr 


Nuttnnon by Serr*! 1 

l* 


London’s Dickensian Holiday Season 


by Jo Thomas 

I ONDON — If there is a time when a 
visitor can sense Jolly Old England 
in his sprawling capital, part an- 
^ dent and part still growing up, it’s 
in December and January, when the nights 
are long and florists put pots of violets in 
their simp windows and toe holiday lights 
have been strung since early November. 

The English celebrate the holidays with 
Dickensian zest and amazing staying power: 
Christmas trees in homes are decorated by 
the second week in December and stay up 
until Twelfth Night (Jan. 6), long after the 
last of the chocolates with which they are 
laden have been unwrapped and eaten. Bear 
in mind, though, that museums and most 
restaurants dose Dec. 24 to 26 and on Jan. 1 
and theaters take a break on Christmas. 

The Norwegian ambassador, Rolf T. 
Busch, switches on the fights of the gigantic 
Christinas tree on Trafalgar Suare on Dec. 
12, and carols are sung around it from 4 to 9 
each night until Christinas Eve. The lights 
stay on until Jan. 6. 

The return of Halley’s Comet has prompt- 
I ed exhibitions at two popular London al- 
! tractions, the British Museum and the Lon- 
I don Planetarium. The British Museum 
I displays the recently discovered Babylonian 
observations of toe comet’s visits in the years 
: 164 and 87 B.C, as well as other sightings 
made before Edmund Halley predated It 
would return in 1758. The Planetarium, not- 
ing that the real comet will be small and faint 
compared to past visits, is shouting it dose 
up in perfect skies in its “Once in a Lifetime" 
show every 40 minutes from 12: 15 to 4:20 
P.M. and from 11 AM. on weekends and 
holidays, li wiD be dosed on Christmas but 
resumes Dec. 26. Admission is toe equivalent 
of 54. 

The British Museum also has, until Jan. 5, 
the most comprehesive' exhibition on Bud- 


dhism ever staged in Britain, inducting early 
manuscripts, sculpture and painting. (Daily. 
10 to 5; Sunday, 2:30 to 6; free.) At the 
Barbican Cditer, a festival of traditional 
Japanese culture is under way through Jan. 
26. The exhibit, “Told — Tradition in Japan 
Today,” centers around the paintings of 50 
of Japan’s lea din g Nihon ga artists, who use 
traditional Japanese techniques while re- 
flecting Western influences. A traditional 
Japanese garden and tea bouse will also be 
displayed, along with jewelry and other exhi- 
bitions. From Jan. 13 it will also include £ 
retrospective of the Japanese film director 
Akira Kurosawa. (Daily, 10 to 7: 15; Sunday, 
noon to 7:15; admission free, except for 
Nihonga exhibit, which is $2.80, and the 
films, from SI) 

“German Art In the 20th Century”, is at 
the Royal Academy until Dec. 22 (admis- 
sion: $4.50). From Jan. 16 through March 
31, the Academy will present the first major 
exhibition on World War I, including toe 
engine from toe Fokker triplane that Baron 
Manfred von Richthofen was flying when he 
was shot down, and a ventriloquist’s dummy 
used to amuse troops in toe trenches. (Daily, 
10 to 5:50; Sunday, 2 to 5:50; suggested 
donation: $1.40.) 

A LSO under the museum's jurisdiction 

j\ are the Cabinet War Rooms, the un- 
Xi derground emergency offices of Win- 
ston Churchill, his cabinet and chiefs of 
staff, in the Government Offices on Great 
George Street. To find the entrance, go to the 
Give Steps on King Charles Street, (Tuesday 
through Saturday from 10 to 5:50; $2.80.) 

The Yictoria and Albert Museum has 
three exhibits focusing on fashion: a cofiec- 

the fas^ra^^Stogaphcr, until Jan. 19; hats 
from India, until Jan. 26; and historic and 
contemporary knitting. (Daily, 10 to 5:50; 
Sundays, 2:30 to 5:50; dosed Friday; dona- 
tion: $2.80.) 


Concerts include Yehudi Menuhin at toe 
Barbican Center on Dec. 26 at a Beethoven 
evening conducted by Norman Del Mar ($7 
to $17.50). The London Festival Ballet opens 
“The Nutcracker” Dec. 26 at Royal Festival 
HalL and it will run through Jan. 15. ($5 to 
$1750). Peter Wright’s production of this 
magical story will be performed by toe Royal 
Ballet at Covent Garden from Dec. 14 to 
Jan. 8 ($6 to $30). Wright also has a new 
production of “Giselle” at Covent Garden, 
running until Jan. 17. His **Copp£lia" will be 
at Sadler’s Wells from Jan. 3. 


The English National 
production of Mozart’s 


has a new 
Giovanni.” 


directed by Jonathan Miller, at toe Coliseum 
until mid-January ($550 to $24.50). To mark 
the Handel tercentenary, the company is 
also presenting his “Julius Caesar” from 
Dec. 16 to Jan. 15 ($5.60 to $2450). At 
Covent Garden, the Royal Opera, with Pla- 
cido Domingo, will begin Verdi’s “Simon 
Boceanegra” on Jan. 14 ($10 to $52). 

Two delightful Coven i Garden restau- 
rants with French cuisine are within easy 
reach of both the theater district and some of 
toe best shopping this season. Inigo Jones, 
14 Garrick Street (836-6456), offers nouvelle 
cuisine in a former stained-glass factory. The 
service manages to be both friendly and 
Unobtrusive. While prices for dinner are 
from $24.50 a person, a three-course lunch 
or pre-theater dinner are available for $21. 
Among the offerings are a salad of thinly 
sliced eggplant and zucchini with mint yo- 
gurt, a ragout of hare with red wine, prunes 
and vegetables, and a fresh sorbet for des- 
sert. (Closed Sundays and Dec. 24 to Jan. 1.) 
A t Thomas de Quincey’s, 36 Tavistock Street 
(240-3972), toe menu at lunch indudes a red 
pepper mousse with avocados and a main 
course of filet of pork thinly sliced and 
shallow fried with slices of pears served in 
layers of puff pastry and a wild mushroom 
sauce. A recent lunch for two, with drinks 
and wine, cost $86. (Closed Sundays and 


Dec. 22 to Jan. 1 ; opens for dinner Jan. 2.) !j 
SalJoos. 62 Kinnerton Street, in Belgravia < 
(235-4444), serves delicious Pakistani cuisine ’ 
in an intimate setting. Abdul Aziz, the curry 
chef, and Noor Mohammad, the tandoori 
chef, provide dinner for two with wine for 
$66. (Closed Sundays and Dec. 24 to 26 and 
Jan. 1.) 

M ANY hotels have festive traditional 
dinners over toe holidays. At the 
top of toe price range, toe Grosve- 
nor House’s restaurant, called Ninety Park 
Lane (409-1290), offers an eight-course 
Christinas Day menu starting with fresh 
goose liver rolled in truffle dust, and going 
on to turkey venison, or Dover sole with a 
lobster mousse and champagne sauce for 
$105 a person. Taxes and ups but not wine 
are included. The Four Seasons (499-0888) 
at Inn on The Park has an eight-course 
Christmas lunch ibai includes smoked 
Scotch salmon, roast turkey with chestnut 
stuffing or roast goose with prune staffing, 
and Christmas pudding with brandy sauce 
for $77, and $3850 for children, who wfll 
also get a visit from Father Christmas. Ser- 
vice and lax but no drinks included. Lanes 
Restaurant, at toe same hotel, has Christmas 
lunch for $63. $31.50 for children, and a New' 
Year’s Eve dinner with a buffet, dancing and’ 
Champagne, for $126, service and tax in- 3 

eluded. " 

• 

Winter visitors can find sales at many of' 
toe best stores. The Harrods sale is from Jan. ! 
8 to Feb. 1 ; Burberry’s from Dec. 27 for two i 
weeks; Liberty’s, from Dec. 27 for about a- 
month; Simpson’s, from Dec. 27 for four! 
weeks; Aquascutum, from Dec. 27 for 10 to? 
14 days, and Form urn & Mason, from Jan. 3 \ 
for two weeks. The Marks & Spencer chain t 
does not have a sale as such but offers end- ; 
of-the-season reductions for about a month { 
after Christmas. ■« 

i 

0 1985 The New Y#k Tuna 


/ 




* . f 


Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERA t n TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1985 


ADVERTISEMENT 


■ ADVERTISEMENT 



London Shopping . .A big choice in international Style 


T he recent arrival of Ilias Lalaounis at 
174 New Bond Street is an event of 
international importance. This Athens- 
born master in gold is a progressive jeweller 
of immense skill and already there are 
Lalaounis galleries in Athens, Paris, Geneva, 
Zurich, New York, the Virgin Islands, Tokyo 
and Hong Kong. London is the last, so far, to 
discover the work of this creative Greek 


artist. 


Inspired is the right descrip- 
tion for the collections desig- 
ned by Lalaounis which are. 
in fact, based on past works of 
art seen in the various coun- 
tries he visits. His first crea- 
tions. for example, were 
directly influenced by the 
sculpture and iewels of An- 
cient Greece and since then he 
has looked at such diverse 
things as Minoan vase shapes. 
Byzantium architecture. 
Holbein paintings, seashells 
and. recently, space and the 
computer age. 

In the new gallery, which 
stands next door to the ele- 
gant London premises of Car- 
tier. there are also obiets d’art 
in silver of great simplicity 
and beauty, all with strong 
historical connections. 

Most of the'iewellery is set 
in bright. 12 carat gold. At 
times the reasonable price 
surprises, but that is because 
semi precious stones are often 
used. 



Women will find these 
jewels very emotive and 
warm. Designed to tell a sto- 
ry. the create a link with 
centuries of artistic beauty*. 

Bond Street is an exciting, 
expensive shopping mecca. 
full of che best of everything. 
At 26 Old Bond Streer the 
Chanel boutique is currently 
full of French charm, in 
clothes, quilted handbags or a 
sequined hair bow. Over all. 
the new Coco perfume is a 
delectable winner. 

The same applies to a 
Hermes silk scarf, to be found 
in a large selection of colours 
and design at 155 New Bond 
Street. 

A stroll round Belgravia 
will take in two places of in- 
terest to Christmas shoppers. 
Simone Mirman at 11 West 
Halkin Street. SW1 is a very 
Special millin er who holds two 
royal warrants, one from the 
Queen and the other from the 
Queen Mother. The hats are 
great, but in her friendly bou- 
tique Mirman sells other 
things — things like exclusive 


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selection of Victorian and period 
jewellery and silver. 

Tel: 493 47925610 
Tax-Free Export Prices 
Monday-FrUtay. 10.00 1 o5 JO 
Thursday. lOMtt>630 



At the Roof Restaurant Buffet 
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highlights of a London visit. 

Perhaps that’s why 
"ther London restaur- 
ants look up to us. 

For resen-anons. oall ni-4W 
V.W. extension 4S7S. 


LONDON HILTON- 


PARK LANE 


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handbags in stitched leather, 
leather jewel cases with 
smooth rounded comers, 
mink and cashmere scarves, 
silk ties made in London. Ita- 
lian made luggage, belts and a 
useful business woman's brief 


case. 

Ch er at 45 Elizabeth Street. 
SW1. Inca, of Peruvian 
nationality, sells many things 
besides extraordinary good 
sweaters at extraordinary 
good prices. There are bright 
rugs with ethnic patterns, 
ceramics, in pain red frames, 
lots of wooden objects includ- 
ing salad spoons and large size 
figurative ceramic animals 
that are decorative statues in 
their own right, suitable for 
living in ancient or modem 
decor. 

An interesting happening 
that took place in London a 
couple of weeks ago was the 
occasion of a dinner, held at 
Les Ambassadeurs to cele- 
brate the 25th anniversary of 
the Reject China Shops and 
the 1st anniversary of their tie 
up with Lenox, distinguished 
American makers of fine chi- 
na. who, since 1918 have desi- 
gned and produced official 
state dinner sendees for the 
White House. 

Reject CTiina Shops, of 
which there are three in Beau- 
champ Place and a fourth in 
Regent Street, also has 
branches outside the capital in 
Windsor, Oxford. Bath. 
Chester and York. They are a 
treasure trove of china and 
glass for the home. Don’t be 
misled by the name for there 
are perfect sets of china and 
glass, although through the 
year there are special pur- 
chases at extr e m ely low 


for approximately half the 
price, you can buy the gar- 
ment of your choice in a knit- 
your-own kit. 

. A walk up Beauchamp 
place in the trendy Knights- 
bridge area can clear up a lot 
of dress problems, as well as 
taking care of gift teasers. 

For pure. High Society 
looks Caroline Charles at N'o. 
11 has the prettiest selection 
of dresses and separates that 
run the gam ut from grand 
silks for the county rum-our 
to soft paisley separates, super 
jackets and rose-splattered 
handknitted sweaters. Lovely- 
fabrics, meticulous finish and 
flattering cut keep customers 
loyal. 

Up-market, and ritzy too, 
is Tan Giudicelli at Xo. 12 
Beauchamp Place with clothes 
for the wo man of the world 
who always wears the best and 
likes, to dress up often. 


dudes a big selection of pure 
cashmere scarves, stoles and 
blankets. . 

With a big range of elegant 
clothes made under their own 
label in Italy Scruples at No. 
26 specialise in dothes for the 
business woman to wear 
through the day into the eve- 
ning. Also there are Max Ma- 
ra’s super Italian day clothes. 

The fashion trail continues 
with. Paddy Campbell at Xo. 


17 with super crushed velvet 
suits in jewel colours for 
theatre, and cocktail octa- 
sions. Other glamorous dres- 
sing found here is in black 
crepe georgette suits and 
some interesting coat dresses. 

Round the corner from 
Beauchamp Place at 109 Wal- 
ton Street, Moussie is proving 
a smashing success with Lon- 
don's visitors who are loving 
her hand knitted sweaters in 


witty, pretty styles and 
ywirhing remotely like them el- 
sewhere. 

Walton Sueec is notable for 
the unusual. Dragons specia- 
lise in pain ted furniture which 
they do with astonishing good 
taste. Beatrix Potter’s bunnies 
decorate the smart nursery 
while sophisticated paintings 
are bril liant ly done on bed- 
heads, book cases and other 
furniture. 


The Monogranuned Linen 
Shop at 1 6S Walton Street is 
used to com puisne shoppers 
necessary luxuries like init- 
ialled towelling robes or a 
more esoteric musical cushion 
would be super gifts as would 
their matching sets which in- 
clude beauty bags, slippers 
and all the paraphinalia neties- 
sarv to a successful traveller. 


Ann Price 



Chanel style, hat, boss, necklace 
andszzeaier 


prices. 

St. Christopher’s Place is 
full of ideas for Christmas 
shoppers. Janet Clark at 5, 
Gees Court specializes in knit- 
wear. either ready-to-wear or. 


Apart from clothes, Beau- 
champ Place boasts two very- 
good jewellers selling real and 
costume quality. Ken Lane 
and Annabel Jones both, have 
lots of gold, real and false, the 
most important metal look of 
the season. Luxury Needle- 
point at No. 36 can take care 
of your highly artistic handi- 
craft side of things and Ashley 
and Blake at Xo 42 ran 
conjure up a shirt scene such 
as makes choice difficult. 

Old England at No. 18 spe- 
cialises in tradtional merchan- 
dise from Britain. This in- 


Good Eating during the Festive Season 


P erhaps it’s just as well that Christmas comes 
but once a year - for it isn’t only turkeys that 
get stuffed in December! Human beings 
wade into food and there’s no doubt we all 
consume far too much rich sustenance not only 
on the 25th but for days before and after. Small 
wonder the eating-places of London are geared 
up and ready for the annual onslaught. 


This year why not try some- 
thing less traditional for a’ 
change? So mething classically 
Oriental, for example? One 
of those Chinese all-day 
breakfasts at a Soho spot - say 
the welcoming Chuen Cheng 
Ku on Rupert Street where 
dim sum is eagerly consumed 
by many local Chinese. Or 
something grander and more 
stylish at Ken Lo’s Memories 
of China on Ebury Street 
where this year die imperturb- 
able Mr Lo will be presenting 
his traditional menus. 

Indian special dishes? At • 
Bhaai on Great Queen Streer 
in Covent Garden Mr Puri is 
enthusiastic- about his set 
price Christinas Eve supper at 
£9:50. •‘We serve classical na- 
tural cuisine of India,” he 
says, “and we often make spe- 
cial dishes for customers. 

Along Beauchamp Place in 
Knightsbridge there is a 
plethora of unusual places.of- 
fering Lebanese. French and 


Portuguese food. Pons pro- 
claims its national base as 
soon as you descend the stairs 
which are richly tiled arid 
where Carlos gives his guests 
a typically warm Portuguese 
welcome. . 

Across the street is the. 
decidedly mitcd-European 
Borshich n’Tears, where the 
air is festive all year round. 
Here, surrounded by mirro-* 
red lamps and plush red wall- 
paper, diners can sop up the 
. atmosphere and listen to sen- 
timental songs to a guitar. At 
Pomegranates ■ . along the 
•Thames in Pimlico all sons of 
dishes are on offer from the 
exotic to specialities from 
South Amenta, so no doubt’ 
you could find a suitably unu- 
sual and delicious Christmas 
dish. Manage a ■ Tnis is Unu- 
sual in that there are no main 
courses on offer and you 
choose a appetiser (or ‘star- 
ter’) and, since: it’s.a generous 
one, you proceed on to dessert 


v,or ‘pudding’ 1. 

Hotel dining is popular at 
this time of year, and several 
are vying with each other to 
produce alluring menus. Six 
courses at Braceitvlls, the res- 
taurant at the Park Lane Ho- 
tel will cost you £45 on the 
day, with musical accompani- 
ment in This beamed and 
wainscoted room. Lunch or 
dinner are much less expen- 
sive at the Cumberland where 
Christmas menus at the ITv- 
vem are £14:50 for lunch, 
£18:75 for dinner for the run- 
up to die period, while the 
menu for the day is set at 
£39:50. At Lavmdes Hotel 
booking is essential for their 
small, handsomely decorated 
restaurant, the Adam Room 
for Christmas meals. 

The Hilton Hotel is now ser- 


ving a Traditional Christmas 
Fayre in its Bntish Harvest 
Room until December 24. i'On 
Christmas Day there are spe- 
cial menus in this restaurant 
and in the glamorous Rwjf 
Restaurant with lower prices 
for children. ■ 

And if you feel overweight 
after all this eating, you can 
alwavs plan a Holiday Inn fit- 
ness weekend - one is on offer 
at Swiss Cottage in February; 
or. there is the Knightsbridge 
Diet Clinic. A 3 week slim- 
ming course under medical 
supervision costs £45. 


Michael Leech 




i-**- .s~ ■- .'jsa. 

of Walton Street Ltd 

SPECIALISTS IN CHILDREN S 
HAND PAINTED 
FURNITURE AND 
PAINTED ANTIQUES 
19 23 Walren Street 
London SWT 2HX 



FURNISHED RENTALS 
KNIGHTSBRIDGE. 
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6 Arlington Street. Si. James's. 

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Tel: 01-493 5222 Telex: 2534* * 


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St Christopher's Place. Wl 
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17 Beauchamp Place. 

London SW3 • - - 

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• 63. Lambs Conduli 5 l WC1 • 
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OF CHINA 


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0 


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a l 






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AMEX MBtlS/liWKlMS PVng rat* am* P.16 
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Hcralb^feSribunc. 



BUSINESS / FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, M-l, Page 12 


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 19S5 


* * 


Page 11 


TECHNOLOGY 


To Catch an Auto Thief, 



5 



i 

'■ s'. 1 


By MARSHALL SCHUON 

• - New York Timas Sernce 

EW YORK .Itis no . secret that electronics have 
played a major role in getting better performance from 
today’s automobiles. Nor is it any surprise that the 
microchip has found its .way into everything from 
dashboards to suspension systems. But now, after a year of 
testing, a Massachusetts company has come to nuaket with a 
unique application of the chip, one that promises a radical 
decrease in auto theft 

Quite simply, his the sort of “bug” that has figured prominent- 
ly in spy fiction, a small electronic tracking device that can. he 
activated when a car is stolen 


Tests in the past 
year hare located 
most vehicles 
whfahi 10 minutes. 


an p 


rue 


on 






Sens 


“V 

/ 


COM 


and that wifi lead police to the 
vehicle. 

The bug is the brainchild of 
William Reagan, a former po- 
lice commissioner in Mod- 
field, Massachusetts. It is 
called Lo-Jack and it is being 

manufactured by Motorola _ ; . , 

and marketed by Mr. Rea- 
gan's Lo-Jack Carp, in Braintree, Massachusetts. 

“For a start, well be selling it through 225 nrw-car dealers in 
the state," said William Duvall, Lo-Jack’ s -sales and marketing 
vice president In the spring, he said, the company wiD open two 
installation centers, and many more are planned. H ardwa re and 
installation wifi cost the customer $495. 

The unit itself is a narrow-band FM radio that is activated by a 
police computer when the car's owner files a theft report. A 
tracking unit, made by Lo-Jack*s subsidiary, Micrologic Intx, is' 
mounted in the police car. Mr. Duvall said tests in the past year 
have located most vehicles wi thin 10 oodnutes. 

AT PRESENT, according to the Federal Bureau of Investiga- 
te tion, only half of the cars stolen in die United States are 
-L A- ever found. In 1984, more than a million cars were stolen, 
and the annual cost has been put at $5 billion. In Massachusetts, 
which has the worst auto- theft record of any state, one of every 87 
registered vehicles was stolen last year. 

“Our first move is to get the State of Massachusetts up and 
running with the system," Mr. Duvall said. “Then, using this state 
as a model, we’ll spread out through New England, into Connect- 
icut and New York, and then the West Coast and Texas." 

Basically, he said, there are eight major problem areas for auto 
theft in the United States. “Not surprisingly,” he added, “they are 
where most of the cars are: Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Miami, 
Boston, New York, Detroit and Los Angeles." 

Automakers and the insurance industry have expressed inter- 
est in the new device, Mr. Duvall said, but be added that it would 
not become a factory option until the system was in place in the 
eight problem areas. The company has been talking to the 
insurance commisaoner of Massachusetts, he said, and it is 
hoped that rates will drop. 

In Massachusetts, state police cars have been equipped with 
tracking uniis, and the computer that will activate the beepers in 
stolen cars is operated by the Public Safety Department's crimi- 
nal history division in Boston. A series of police transmitters 
around ibe stale will send the signal to activate a car’s bug when 
the owner reports a theft 

The central computer contains not only the Lo-Jack activation 
codes but also the registration number and the year, make and 
color of the car, so troopers know exactly what they are looking 
for. 

In the police. car,- the tracking, unit is mounted on. the dash- 
board and has indicators for relative dir ect i on and relative' 
distance of the misting auto. 

“The distance works with a two-stage signal -strength meter," 
Mr. Duvall said. “There’s a local-distant light, and when you 
really begin to get dose to the car, the indicator comes on and the 
vertical scale marker drops back down to the bottom." That way, 
he said, the detector fine tunes the distance. In addition, the 
tracking unit has a code of light-emitting diodes that provide 
relative bearing. 

“If you pass the stolen car,” Mr. Duvall said, “the light will go 
(CoDAmned on Page 17, Col 7) 


j Qinrency Rates 

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I Sources: Bmteue du Bmrtux fBtvasott); Banco CommerOakf TWtow (AUkei); Bow No- 
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Interest Rates 


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D-Mark Prune 

4*647% 456414 

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44644b 441% 

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| Sources: Maroon Guaranty (dollar, DM, 5F. Pound, FF); Lloyds Sank (ECU): (teuton 
\ (SDR). Rates applicable to k iter tank deposits of SI million minimum (or emrivahnt). 


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Source: MorriULmA Mem to. 




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-yomvi^ Bank of Tokyo. 


L ux embourg Paris and London official fix- 
mas: Man a Kona and Zurich opordna end 
dookwi Prices; Mew York Cemex currant 
contract AH prices In US. S tor euncs- 
Source: Reuters. 



The Nn, Yort Tmw 


British Designer Fashioning a Larger Habitat 


By Steve Lohr 

New York Tones Sendee: 

LONDON — Sir Terence Conran, one of 
Britain’s great entrepreneurial success sto- 
ries, is about to enlaige his retail and design 
empire, and the question now is whether be 
can continue to work- his magic. 

fir Terence’s company, Habitat Mother- 
care PLC, which owns more than 750 stores, 
including the Conran’s home fa mishing * 
efo»n in the United States, announced Nov. 
25 that it was merging with British Home 
Stores PLC, a department store and food 
retailer. The transaction is worth $2.12 bil- 
lion. 

Although the merger is a combination of 
approximate equals and the board wifi be 
dmded evenly between the managements of 
the two concerns, Sir Terence win be chair- 
man and chief executive of the new, as yet 
unnamed, enterprise. 

Under the guidance of Sr Terrace, Habitat 
Mothercare has earned a reputation for being 
dynamic, fashionable and fast-growing, and 
many think his touch will prove useful for 
BHS. “Terence Conran can do a great deal 


for British Home Stores,” said Paul Deacon, 
a senior analyst for Wood Mackenzie & Co. 

In his London office me evening last week. 
Sir Terence compared BHS to Mothercare, a 
retail chain sdlmg merchandise for young 
mothers, babies and children, which he ac- 
quired three years ago. It was, he recalled, a 
solid, wefi-run company whose products and 
stores lacked pizzaz?- 

“BHS is something of the same thing,” Sir 
Terrace said. “It is a vary good, very decent, 
very straightforward company, but its prod- 
ucts are dnll. There is a great deal of opportu- 
nity to bring style and design to BHS." 

Sir Terence, who was knighted two years 
ago for his contributions to British design 
and retailing, would seem to be the right man 
for the job. Trained as a textile and furniture 
designer, he began his retailing career in 1 964 
with Habitat, a cash-and-carry home f omisb- 
ings store in London geared to young people. 

The goods were modem, trendy and af- 
fordable. He began just as the postwar baby 
boom generation was striking out on its own, 
setting up households and eager for the kinds 
of products Sir Terence was offering. The 


concept blossomed and, today, there are 103 
Habitat-style stores in Europe, the United 
States and Japan. 

Sir Terence has also diversified and ex- 
panded bis retailing network through acquisi- 
tions. The Mothercare merger m 1982 was 
followed a year later by the purchase of Heal 

furniture best known for its beds. TbeWince 
and Princess of Wales, for instance, sleep on a 
Heal’s bed Also in 1983, Sir Terence joined 
with Morgan Grenfell & Co., the merchant 
bank, to buy Richards Shops, a British chain 
of 21 1 women’s clothing stores. 

With British Homes Stores added to Habi- 
tat Mothercare, fir Terence will be oversee- 
ing an operation with 880 stores, 35,000 em- 
ployees and yearly revenues of more than 
$1.5 billion. 

Both as a retailer and an author of books 
on borne design, the 54-year-old executive 
has become a tastemaker to millions. 

For a wealthy corporate executive, howev- 
er , his educational background is ordinary. 
He was trained at the Central School of Arts 
(Continued mi Page 13, CbL I) 


U.K. Gears Way 
For Steel Pact 
Between EC, U.S. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dnpatcha 

BRUSSELS — An agreement 
limiting European Community 
steel sales to the United States will 
go ahead as planned in January 
following a decision by Britain to 
drop its objections to the plan, EC 
officials said Thursday. 

The EC Council of Ministers was 
to notify Washington late Thurs- 
day that the Last obstacle to the 
arrangement had been overcome, 
with formal ratification scheduled 
for next Tuesday. 

Britain had threatened to veto 
the four-year agreement covering 
most sled sales to the U.S. because 
of dissatisfaction over Washing- 
ton’s plans to curti shipments of 
semifinished steels, which are not 
covered by the pact 

Britain’s state-owned steel- 
maker, British Steel Corp-, ships 
steel ingots to a VS. subsidiary for 
processmg into finished products. 
The finished products are then sold 
in the American tnarkeL 

The U.S. has already shown its 
discontent at the delay in ratifying 
the Nov. 1 accord by holding up 
customs clearance of all EC steel 
entering the country. 

Washington also threatened to 

tmpftwq iinlflgimflnit-rall y ^wi wwi - 

firiiaherf steel if there were no early 
accord by the EC. 

The VS. government had an- 
nounced that it would limit EC 


Pan-Electric Collapse Reveals Shaky Investment Structure 


By Barbara Grossetre 

New York Time* Sendee 

SINGAPORE — The laissez- 
faire government of fingapore is 
bong faced to consider for the 
first time that it may have to bail 
out a private company for tin sake 
of economic stability and its finan- 
cial image. • ■ - 

The government was jolted by 
the insolvency of the huge Pan- 
Electric Industries Ltd., revealed 
last Saturday, which caused stock 
exchanges in Singapore and in 
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to dose 
for three days this wide to protect 


brokerage houses and investors. 
For the government in Singapore, 
and perhaps more so in Malaysia, 
the crisis may inflict great political 
and economic damage diplomats 
and economic analysts said. 

The receivership of Pan-Electric 
poses what one Western diplomat 
called a “philoscrohical’’ difficulty 
for Singapore, which is cushioned 
by a stronger economic base and 
less political uncertainty than Ma- 
laysia- Luring investment from 
abroad is critical to Singapore’s ef- 
forts to pull out of a slump that 
may bring the first contraction of 


the economy this year in its 20-year 
existence. 

“We’re already getting calls from 
back home asking. ’How’s it go- 
a Western diplomat said, 
has also been com- 
pdled to take the first steps toward 
closer control over its stock-ex- 
change system, where brokers 
make and enforce their own rules. 

On Tuesday, J.YM. Pillay, man- 
aging director of the Monetary Au- 
thority of Singapore, which func- 
tions as the country’s central bank, 
said a supervisory committee 
would be set up to oversee the Sin- 


gapore stock exchange until a new 
regulatory code could be drawn. 

The exchange has been marked 
by the use of “forward transac- 
tions" — buying or s ellin g stock 
but contracting to make the 
ments or deliver the stock mon 
later — that has aimed transac- 
tions into what one diplomat called 
a “paper game.” Brokers were also 
borrowing heavily from banks for 
speculative purposes. In the mean- 
time, smaller investors, some of 
whom rdy on stock portfolios as 
collateral, became vulnerable as the 
economy constricted. 


Economists and writers in finga- 
pore are suggesting that brokerage 
bouses were running up hundreds 
of millions of dollars in debts at a 
rime when income in many eco- 
aowic sectors —property in pariic- 

mths u * ar — was fating- Part of this 

“ week’s emergency package was the 
marshaling of a standby credit of 
$86 million to be put np by banks 
for use by hard-pressed brokerage 
bouses. 

Many questions remain about 
what went wrong at Pan-Electric. A 
Malaysian businessman and politi- 
(Con tinned on Page 16, Col, 5) 


shipments of semifinished goods to 
400,000 tons next year, a figure it 
later increased to 600,000 tons un- 
der EC pressure. 

The British clearance was given 
only hours before European indus- 
try ministers were due to meet here 
to' debate the crisis. The meeting 
was subsequently canceled. 

The officials said it was not im- 
mediately clear what assurances 
British Sled might have obtained 
in direct talks with U-S. trade offi- 
cials about scheduled shipments to 
its U.S. subsidiary for distribution 
in the United States. 

But U.K. officials said British 
Steel was satisfied with the out- 
come of last-minute nlks with the 
Americans aimed at safeguarding 
future supplies of semifinished 
steel to its U.S. subsidiary, Tusca- 
loosa Steel Co. 

“We do not have final details 
about the discussions, but we know 
British Sled is satisfied with the 
outcome," one British official said. 

Britain had sought extra ton- 
nages for the Tuscaloosa unit and 
wanted assurances about access to 
the UB. market for semifinished 
steels after 1986. 

Total EC steel sales to the UB. 
are worth about S2.5 billion a year. 

U.S. sted importers had com- 
plained about the impact of a delib- 
erate slowdown in U.S. customs 
processing of EC steel shi pmen ts. 

The slowdown was a U.S. ad- 
ministrative counter-measure in- 
troduced to protest at delays in 
signing the new trade pact, needed 
to replace a 1982 agreement expir- 
ing a! ibe end of tins month. 

In Washington, meanwhile, the 
special UB. Trade Representative, 
Clayton L Yeutter, said the week- 
old slowdown would be lifted im- 
mediately in the wake of Britain's 
decision. 

“Yes, the answer is that the deri- 
sion will take away any problems 
we have with the agreement,” he 
told a British television reporter. 

“It can go into full force and 
effect, and certainly we*Q now be 
able to withdraw those restrictions 
which were not intended to be trou- 
blesome to anybody,” he said. 

(Reuters. AP) 


Institutions Are Gaining 
More Power an NYSE 


By James Sremgold 

New York Times Serricr 

BOCA RATON, Florida— The 
number of Americans who invest in 
the UJL stock market has risen 1 1 
percent in the past two years, but 
the increase has come fromindivid- 
uals buying through mutual funds 
rather than trusting their own 
stock-picking abilities, according 
to a survey carried out by the New 
Yodc Stock Exchange. 

“This movement is gathering 
steam,” commented Greg A. 
Smith, president of Prudential- 
Bache Asset Management 

The results of the survey were 
released Wednesday at the annual 
meeting of the Securities Industry 
Association. 

Individuals* increased use of mu- 
tual funds as their means of awning 
stock adds momentum to another 
important trend: Institutions and 
professional stock traders are ac- 
counting for an increasingly large 
share of stock trading. 

According to the association, in- 
dividuals now account for only 29 
percent of the NYSE’s daily trad- 
ing volume, with the rest by institu- 
tions or professoriate. 

“It's almost despair,” said Rich- 
ard J. Paget, a senior vice president 
at Shearsan Lehman Brothers. “In- 
dividuals don’t want to get get 
whipsawed in a market increasing- 
ly dominated by institutions.” 

Mr. Paget said individuals were 
buying more professionally man- 
aged, or packaged, products not 
only for stocks, but fear a range of 
securities. 

The number of individuals who 
own stocks, directly tar through a 
mutual fund, has risen to 47 million 

as of mid- 1985, from 42.4 m£Dion 
in 1983 and 253 million a decade 
ago. according to the survey. 


But the number of individuals 
who directly own NYSE stocks has 
declined 3 percent in the past two 
years, to 253 million, and the num- 
ber of owners of stocks listed on 
other cxrihanges or traded in the 
over-the-connter market has 
almost 5 percent, to 11.6 


Meanwhile, the number of indi- 
viduals who have invested in a 
stock mutual fund has jumped 33 
percent, to 11 million. 

“Almost all of the growth in the 
past two years was among owners 
of stock mutual funds only,” John 
J. Phelan Jr., chairman of the 
NYSE said in Ms speech at the 
wnmuii m eetin g. “Investment pack- 
ages prepared by stock mutual 
funds and other broker dealers are 
rivaling frozen gourmet dinners in 


toward M. Brenner, executive 
vice president of Drexd Burnham 
Lambert Inc. and head of its equi- 
ties and options department, said 
the figures suggested several 
trends. “A lot of this is coming 
from Individual Retirement Ac- 
counts,” he said. “But what it also 
means is that with the increasing 
institutionalization of the market, 
individuals are afraid of bring tak- 
en advantage of if they act alone.” 

Mr. Smith said that a reason be- 
hind this growth is that in the past 
four years, the stock market and 
mutual funds have generally out- 
performed many other investments 
that individuals might have made, 
such as money-market funds. 

The trend is not without its per- 
ils. Mr. Brenner said that mutual 
funds tend to confine the risks they 
take by investing mostly in large- 
capitanzation stocks and thus can 
suffer from a herd mentality, rising 
or falling with the general market. 


Unemployment Eases in Britain; 
Trade Surplus Put at £1.16 Billion 


in November 
it of 


Return 

LONDON — Unemployment in Britain fell sli 
to stand at 13.1 percent of the work force, 

Employment reported Thursday. 

Provisional, seasonally adjusted figures, excluding out-of-work 
school graduates, showed that 3,165,200 adults woe reported without 
jobs in November, down 8,100 from the previous montb. 

In October, unemployment fell a revised 5,800 to 3.17 million, also 
13.1 peit^rrfthevvofkforc^Tlrefigurcswererevisedf^adropof 
4300 to 3.18 million. 

It was the first time the seasonally adjusted figure had fallen for 
three successive months since July, August and September of 1979. 

In another report, the government statistics office said that Britain 
had a seasonally adjusted surplus of £1.16 billion ($1.72 billion) on 
current account in the third quarter, narrowing from a surpJas of 
£1 .44 bilHan in the second quarter. 

The third-quarter surplus was originally estimated at £700 million. 
Current account is a measure of trade performance that covers 
CTr-hany s of goods and services, as well as remittances. 

In the third quarter, service trade was in surplus by £1.71 billion, 
while merchandise trade showed a deficit of £543 million. 


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Page 12 


CVTER 1 NATION AL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 




Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bondi 

Utlllltn 

Industrials 


Dow Jones Averages 


Cw HM in etna ana 

Indus 1490J7 150*01 1*77.58 

Trans 71032 71 US *99*1 7009 —127 

UTH 14SX7 UUS WJA MM +<LM 

comp ana tout ansi ana -133 


NYSE Diaries 


Advanced 
DPCJKMd 
imctxmoed 
Total Issues 
NowHiBhs 
New Lows 

Volume up 

Volume down 


7M 

<16 

SOTS 

367 

10 

SH 


NYSE index 


HU Low dan cm 
Composlto US41 117J7 1T7J7 —0.13 

Industrials 1319? 13*89 134J? —ail 

Transp. 1U44 nzn nisi —la 

UHntm <044 6022 *031 —US 

Finance 12021 127J4 1Z7JS +037 




Buy . sates •sim 
DOC. 4 L IfOfffS 555*$? £047 

Dec. 3 i. 1*1 X» S07.971 1343 

Dee.3 lfiD 499415 M24 

Nov. 29 — 141,404 J9W75 1.677 

NOV. 27 _ 200472 550*73 239* 

-Included In me sales figures 


Tfavsd^ 


kVC HI 


3pm. 


VoLot4PiA — 1MHM 

Ptw.*PMKH 153.1604M 

Pm OMnelMatad das* 18Q4ZUM 


Tables i ad ode the i w ttanwtde prices 
up to the dosing on wail street and. 
dona! reflect late tradas elsewhere,. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


Advanced 
Declined 
U n chained 
roraJ issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 
Volume up 
Volume down 


Standard & Poor's Index 


HU LOW CMS* cm 
industrials 229.12 220*4 7701 —051 

Tramp. mu wsj* ium -142 

utnnies mar boss +aas 

FInmce 204 20? 24J2 +aio 

Composite 2DSM 2BL79 2KLM — 025 


Composite 

industrfah 

Finance 

insurance 

Utilities 

Bunks 

Tram*. 


Week Tear 
a aie Cm Ape Ago 

31019 + MJ — wm 

32Z4B + 109 - m-” 

41530 +1.14 — 2WJJ 

381 AH +1flCw«l Via 
29424 +091 — 225.94 

tk n —038 — 222.4J 

283J6 +050 — 2»2’ 




4 PM. volume 

Preu. 4 PJA. volume 

Prev. cons, volume 


11510000 . 

10060000 

10040000 


Most Actives 


aaafx stock index 


High W ««* 

245.11 2*3+’ 


Dlttartti 
High Low Stock 


Wv. VIA PE TOsHWiLow OujtOra* 


43 
9.1 
42 

13 20 70S 
15 IS 75 
2d 14 IS 
U 13 5767 
26 


48* 

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39 ft 2 m 
78 52 

20 '* 13 ft 
1*+. 10V* 
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12ft 9* 
M 
ISft 
55 

st 

Oft 
17 ft 


1416 

61 * 

35 ft 

21 U 


15 V* 

2414 

IBM 




2 ft 





IS 

7 ft 

24 ft 

lift 

48 ft 

39 

35 

16 

1016 

8 ft 



13 

48 H 


39 ft 

54 Ui 

49 ft 

10194 

99 ft 

Oft 

31 ft 

MM 

a** 



47 

371 * 


59 

lift 

14 ft 

32 ft 

24 ft 

7 SM 

51 ft 

V 

21 ft 

46 ft 

Sift 


9 ft 

41 ft 

19 

273 * 

1916 

41 ft 

25 ft 

aw 

16 ft 

im 

6 U 

3 Sft 

aft 

16 ft 

lift 

50 ft 

SOft 

46 V* 

4 IH* 

aft 

20 ft 

3 *ft 

27 ft 

av> 

lfft 

39 

31 ft 

47 

a 

B 6 ft 

KW 

lift 

12 V. 

62 

39 

7 ft 

ft 

11 

lft 

17 H 

12 ft 

37 ft 

22 ft 

37 

22 ft 

100 ft 

74 ft 

31 

reft 

2 H* 

I 9 ft 

45 ft 

31 ft 

57 

41 ft 

43 ft 

74 ft 

47 ft 

31 M 

40 ft 

32 ft 

43 ft 

a 

204 

142 ft 

19 ft 

14 ft 

6 ft 

Oft 

f 

3 ft 

15 ft 

11 

21 V* 

13 ft 

49 ft 

aft 

aft 

lav* 

40 ft 

a 

24 ft 

19 ft 

at* 

tit* 

26 ft 

17 ft 

36 ft 

2 M* 

27 ft 

14 ft 

34 

20 ft 

50 VS 

aft 

41 

37 

41 

toft 

3 * 

18 ft 

49 ft 

29 ft 

aft 

19 ft 

10 ft 

4 ft 


Dow Tests 1,500 and Retreats 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — The New York Stock Ex- 
change tested the 1*500 level Thursday but 
f inish ed mixed in the fourth heaviest trading 
session in history. On the Big Board. 181.01 
milli on shares changed hands in tbe most active 
session since OcL 19, 1984. 

The Dow Jones industrial average broke 
through the 1,500 level in an early afternoon 
surge, crossing a centennial mark for the second 
time in a month. The Dow passed the 1.4Q0 level 
on Nov. 6. 

However, late selling caused the Dow to dose 
with a modest loss of 1.49, to 1,482.91, down 
from its record, set Wednesday, of 1,484.40. 

Analysts said a tug-of-war between comput- 
erized buying programs pushing tbe market up, 
and profit-taking pulling it bark, characterized 
the session. 

Other indicators also fell. The NYSE com- 
posite index eased 0.13 to 117-57. Standard & 
Poor’s 500-stock index feQ 0J5 to 203.88 and 
theprice of an average share declined 4 cents. 

The lead of advancing issues over dedhuas 
was wide at midday, hat narrowed late in tbe 
session. Advances finally outpaced dedining 
issues 867-787 among the 2,056 issues traded. 

After the market dosed, the Federal Reserve 
reported that the nation's basic money supply 
rose $4.4 billion in the week ended Nov. 25. 

Edward Nicosia of the Minneapolis- based 
firm of Piper Jaffray & Hopwood said a Dow 
dose above 1,500 would not have die major 
significance that it might once have enjoyed 

Mr. Nicosia said tbe most important event 
that has occurred among the various indexes 
that market analysts watch was the “confirms- 


M-l Jumps $4.4 Billion 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — The narrowest measure of 
the U.S. money supply, M-l, jumped $4.4 bO- 
1km in the week ended Nov. 25, the Federal 
Reserve Bank of New York said Thursday. The 
increase was wdl above expectations, but large- 
ly reflected computer problems at a system 
dealing bank daring the reporting week, ana- 
lysts said. 

M- 1, comprising cash in circulation, 
accounts and non bank travelers checks, rose to 
a seasonally adjusted $621 billion in the latest 
week, die Fed aid. 

don" of the rally provided when the Dow Jones 
transportation average reached a new high an 
Wednesday. 

“That really brought people off the side- 
lines," be sakL 

Chester Pado, of A.C. Securities in Los Ange- 
les, agreed that the 1,500 level on the Dow has 
less significance than previous centennial 
marks. 

“People do not expect 1^00 to pose as formi- 
dable barrier as 1,300 did,” he said. Sometimes 
a round number makes investors wonder if a 
move up has en ded, he said. At this point, 
however, there are no signs that the market has 
topped, Pado said. 

Pacific Gas & Electric was the most active 
NYSE-listed issue, up 14 to 19ft. Texaco fol- 
lowed, up ft to 31ft and AT&T was third, 
falling ft to 23 ft. 


UMonM 
Htah Lou Stack 


Dtv.YH.PE Ws High Low 


82 9 98 « 

107 20CI 33 
18S 12 lift 

1(M 29 1416 

10 9 P2B 24* 
57 13 SIC 28 
25 17 3692 65* 
42 I 727 32ft 

" ,5 22 

ITS 14 3314 
A I* 55 25 
4JJ 22 474 3414 

3.1 IV 572 6036 
13 10 TO *3 

15 M 91 3491 

4.1 45 32 19Vi 

lie 8 19ft 

13 2 ta 17ft 
52 71 981 31ft 


1 7* 

24 49ft 
292 12ft 
2784 61% 
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Ji^A ini 


^ BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD. TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1985 


ij Of Failed Banks’ Debt 

'i 1 V . ■ 

j- , ValuiPnaiatmatkmal ‘son Fttnaro had said ihe goveto- 
i . *; BRASILIA. — Brazil' has art- m«t. woold not accept respocsibii- 
^^^Tounced that it wonld irimbnrse. ity for aH of the losses suffered by 
^/^iroinid 25. percent of thelosses seif* the international creditors. 1 


Hanson Reports U.K., Japan Seek Phone Business in Third World 


Page IS 

HIGH PROFITS 
EVERY YEAR 


25 percat of the tosses saf- the international creditors. 1 
:r>SJ6wl by foreign banks when, three ' Mr. Rmaro said the foreign 
--■.private Braz& banks failed Nov. banks bad made the loans “with 
The- ^payment win come to higher spread^ than cm a less risky 
,-*s» iboot SlOOimffion. goveramem-^uaranieed loan, “but 

5 ^The National Economic Council “w they want the government to ' 
made the decision Wednesday, two can y ^ responsibility/’ 

after die central bank closed . Bat officials woe said to be wor- 
^Xiiie large 'CooMnd flfld Amriliar tied that creditois — particularly 
. -i hanks and the small er Maisomuti e smaller UJ5. regional banks — 
..'■'■bank. would withdrawtbdr support for 

'' * • ■::% The decision calls for arorari. ^ Fs w over its 5103- 
• (maidy JH» nriBion in monetary fotd Sn debt if the gprcra- 

. v | reserves to be drawn -to reimburse ' ®mred the losses. 

... international creditors who knt an Brazfl “ lI T U3 S to reschedule 
" - ^estimated $415 milEon to the three : payment of about $46 KBion in 
‘banks. Together, the three had un- ™ that falls due before the end of 
. .'i;»vered loans of $764 nriffioiL the decade. Tbe negotiations with 
'“v* "Local creditors also wiD be renn. J* banks have been Stalled until 
parsed for 25 percent of their frazfl rc^es agreement with the 

• '■ ~ t- losses, the council arid Payments Intanadonal Monetary Fund on. 

; l 'ho all creditors wfll begin Dec. 16. “ ““™ c ****£ P««nm to 

• Financial sources said about 150 budget deficit and bring 

^^U.S. banks and some Japanese and the i country's 224-percent inflation 

lenders had faced losses under contrcl - ... 

?-*>*» Mergm.Houra.mUA 

These are sums lent by interna- Untied Press Luemadoaa/ 

■ jional creditors to Brazttian banlfc PHILADELPHIA — A total of 
/arhkh then re- lend the money 2o- 646 U.S. com panies were acquired 
-i- v adly. The loans do not cany a by or merged with other U.S. com* 

... >*ovGtmnent guarantee but the add- panics in transactions worth at 
.r -;rf risk normally is compensated by least $1 tmUkM in the third quarter 
.. - ibigber interest rales. of this vear. Mercers A Acozws- 


Mergere Flourish in UA 

Untied jPress Intentatloaat 

PHILADELPHIA — A total of 


ms it guarantee bat tbe add- panics m transactions worth at 
lormally is compensated by least $1 mTIKon m the third quarter 
iterest rales. of this year, Mergers A Acqma- 

Uy, Finance Minister DU- dons magazine Tgptwwvj T fmrxrift y 


Pretax Profit Up 
49.5% on Year 


. LONDON — ffwKnn Trust 
FLC reported Thursday (hat its 
pretax profit in the year ended 
Sept. 30 had risen 49.5 peroeni 
from the previous year, ■ to 
£252.8 TTBlfifm ($375.4 mflfom) r 

The group also announced a 
one-for-three bonus issue. 

Hasson’s sales rose to £167 
■ bQBon from 1238 When a year 
earlier, and its profit, up from 
£169.1 mfllioo, was above many 
analysts’ expeditions. 

But shares of the group, 
whose £520-miQian rights issue 
earlier tins year attracted limit- 
ed stockholder support, showed 
little change. Hanson shares 
traded Thursday at 20? peace 
each on rite London Stock Ex- 
change, up bom 207 pence at . 
Wednesday’s dost 

Gordon White, chairman of 
Hanson Tn^imijw Tw. , said 
Hanson was looking at other' 
opportunities in the United 
States wide it awaited an ap- 
peals court’s decision, on its of- 
fer for SCM Crap. 

Hanson is appealing last 
week’s decision by a UiL dis- 
trict court to allow an investor 
group kd by MecriD Lynch A 
Co. to exercise an option to boy 
two SCM businesses. 


By Bob Hagemr 

International Herald friasae 

LONDON — The national tele- 
phone companies of Britain and 
Japan are starting campaigns to sell 
their expertise in the Third World. 
For Nippon Telegraph & Tde- 


jrire. C&W*s He 
.dona account for 


tong opera- in preparation for the govern- The British government, which 
1 60 percent meat’s plan to sen as much as two- owns 49.8 percent of BT after last 

j .i .hU). .r : • i r .1 . : .j 


of its operating profit, and most of thirds of NTT to Japanese inves- year’s sale of the rest, is expected to 
the rest comes from smaller opera- tors. announce soon whether it win al- 

tions in the Third World. ffisashi Srinio, president and low the Mitel acquisition, opposed 

CAWs diversification, by eon- chief executive of NTT, said the by some of BTs British suppliers, 
treat with its bigger rivals, is atmed international unit would seek to 


^ . . ... ON FOREIGN STOCKS WITH THE 

INTERNATIONAL economic 
ms 49j8 percent of BT afte hsl ^ MARKET FORECAST 


BT might seek other acquisi- 

v w . ..-v 1 _ - 


phone Cwp. and British Tderom- at die developed countries. In re- design, build and operate phone lions, Mr. Kin| said, hit is more 


mnmeattona PLC, operating their cwt years the company has begun systems. 


likely to form joint ventures with 


respective domestic t e le ph one net- budding up tdqvhone and data- Both NTT and BT say they will forejjg? equipment makers. 


works will remain the dominant transmisaou ventures m Bntan invest in foreign tdecommumca- NTTs Mr. Shinto said his corn- 
business. But both see opportune- tbe United States. Investors tions networks where prvesnments pany w ould stay out of manuf ae- 
ries to create a useful sideline have a c hanc e to gamble on that want fradgn equity partners, 
through overseas service units. strategy with this week’s sale of BTs Mr. King said Ms company 

“We’re putting a lot of increased £933 nriffion ($1J8 trillion) of hopes co have formed at least two 


irtnors. hiring. NTTs expertise is as a buy- 

Ms company er erf equipment, he noted, 
at least two American Telephone A Tele- 


said in an interview. 

BT and NTT thus are moving 


by the company. 

In October, Japan's NTT opened 


to operate one country’s telephone ers, including Philips NV and lug. 


into the traditional business of Ca- a new subsidiary, NTT Interna- 
ble & Wireless PLC of Britain, ttonal, to seek projects overseas. 
which provides telephone service in Such business was off limits to 
36 developing countries and tern- NTT until last April 1. when it was 
tones, a legacy of the British em- turned into a jouu-stodc company 

Telecommunications Imports 
Stir limited Interest in Japan 

International Herald Tribune DM&t and tti ppE*^ about 5 percent 
LONDON — Japan does not df which came from outride J^nn. 


system, be said. 

BT also is trying to diversify into 
manufacturing. It agreed earlier 
this year to boy 5 1 percent of Mitel 
Corp„ a troubled Canada-based 
maker of digital switchboards. 


C. Olivetti A Co. 

But Robert C. Holder, AT&T’s 
regional director for Europe, ««ft 
the company sees operation of for- 
eign phone networks as “not par- 
ticularly attractive." 


which tor over 30 yean ha» kept in 
readers informed accural cty every week 
about trend* in eurreneieft, stocks, sold 
and bonds, with clear BUY and SELL 
recommendations. 

In the Us yean wf remmmemJed *10 
Dutch stocks for the New Year with po- 
tential gains*. 

Results: 

198Z+46V, uieia a e pla wtrtrfa 12 mth. 
1983+72*/, average gala wHW* 12 mth. 
1984+12*/, average gain within 12 mth. 
1985+4?/, gain to present (9 months) 

SUBSCRIBE NOW to our English edi- 
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IntanafiOQal Economic and Market 
Forecast 
FL-9494 Schaaa 

!m Rietle 13 - Ucchtcn«cin/&irope 
Phone (00411 75/2 67 95. Telex 77860 


I R M 



appear likdy to go on a buying 
spree for foreign trfecomiramica- 


Mr. Shinty to predict 

how modi foragn equipment NTT 



■ Italy’s AerUalia 
: To Seek listing 
For Its Shares 


uuci okcwjuvc uuicr ch niupun 

Ferranti Reports Flat Profit, t 

• JT 7 Thursday that the yen’s rise would 

Better Margins, in First Half goods. BuT^^said that Ja^moe 

O 7 . makers sriH offer the hesrt. mices 


turns equipment, eventhoogh the ^Jdb ^ ii 

ste^t me of the yen this year Iras conmany has nbtaraei for such 
made impommiK* cheaper for the pm^sK but ooaSmthem case 
wwij y- by case. 

sans * 

shkj m an interview here __it n -n ,*p Q .* , 

Thursday Ura, U* r* weld -W---- “*.««■ 


Comue Colbert 

Jean Patou: Exdusivety Yours 


Agerxe France-Preue 


has seen « gn i« of improvement in and quality for most equipment. 


hdoWs^anv^morTf n«i puter software systems in Japan. 

makers stiD offer the best prices NTr ^i°^J llh ff 01 ®? 1 

concern, axe expected to be made 



LONDON — Ferranti PLC, a the dmaou’s market and increased 


s ROME — Aeriialia, the Italian British electronics malrw and nuli- new orders. 

" -urcraft manufacturer, said Tburs- tary contractor, said Thursday that New customer 


“Nobody can compete with Jap- 
anese products which are manufac- 


by IBM. . 

NTT is interested in more such 
ventures with foreign companies, 


.--urcraft manulacturcr, sam Ihurs- tary contractor, said Thursday that New customer project activity is ^ured rat a mass-production baas.” ventares won toragn companies, 
;lay that it wffl soon obtain a stock- pretax profit ID its first fiscal half high within tbe division, but these said Mr. Shinto, who virited Lon- M* - - Shinto said. But, he added, “we 


. exchange listing. ended SepL 30 rose cmly fractional- favorable factors were unlikely to 

' The company’s two sbarehold- ly from a year eariier, to £18.9 mil- affect trading performance until 
: : tbe state-ewned Institute for lion (about $28 million at current the next financial year, it said. 

: ndustrial Reconstruction, with 20 rates) from £18 5 million. Ferranti said new orders t 

''percent, and IRJTs engineering The company said that a strike at significantly higher dsewhen 


: ndustrial Reconstruction, with 20 rates) from £185 mOHon. 
: x*rcenx, and IRTs engineering The company said that 

-jranch, Fnunecaimica, with 80 per- its Dundee factory in June 
; ; sent, have decided to seek a listing it in tbe half by about £1 
..it the same time as an unspecified Ferranti was one of the 


gn wirnrn me cnvisioQ, out inese said Mr. Shinlo, who visited Lon- 
rorablefectorsvrare unlikely to don this Soa toriness t^ 
feet trading performance until w - _. ... , ,7L_ 
e next financial year, it said. Mr. Shinto indicated that NTT 

Ferranti said new orders were was interested m imports only of 
Snificantly higher elsewhere in eqtmmmt and technology mu yet 
e group, m particular for air- on alargescakm Jj^an. 

>me radar units and for naval F °f instance, he said, U A satellite 
CT- p, technology is ^ar beyoncT that of 


berease m share capitaL It did. not ish dectronics con^anies omected 
Specify cm which bourse it would to show any increase in profits tins 
eek a listing. year, but its first-half performance 

- Sharefaoklens have been invited was below analysts’ test expccta- 


Thie company said that a strike at significantly higher elsewhere in “pnpn*™ 1 ana leamoiogy ikh yet 
its Dundeerertory in June cat prof-' the group, m particular for air- available on a lar^ sale mJjman. 
it in the half by about £1 milli on, borne radar units and for naval For instance, he said, U.& satellite 
Ferranti was one of the few Brit- systems. techndoq is “far beyond" that of 

ish electronics companies expected Recent export success for tbe Japan, and certain foreign software 
to show any increase in profits this Tornado and Sea Hairier aircraft P roducls attractive, 
year, but its first-half performance and the agreement on tbe Europe- U.S. trade officials have focused 


year, but its first-half paformance and the agreement on tbe Europe- 
was below analysts’ test expects- an fighter aircraft project were en- 


' .-hen 

; • A 


o a meeting on Dec. 18 to discuss tions. Tbe company’s riiare price couraging for the company, it said. 


cm »ri«« nwii mi«>tinn< equipment 
as one area in which they believe 


slipped Thursday on the London Investment in new capital equip- Japan should buy more foreign 
was profitable in 1984 Slock Exchange to 134 pence from mept continued to be substantial, products. In the fiscal year ended 


or the fourth successive year. It 138 pence at Wednesdays dose. and in the first half totaled over £18 last March 31. NTT says it spent 

Ferranti said its margins, apart mfltion, an increase of 20 percent 700 billion yen (S3.45 billion at the 
from those on semiconductor pro- from the year-earlier period, it said, current exchange rate) on equip- 


: ' arned 17 billion lire (about $10.5 Ferranti said its margins, apart 
nOlion) on sales ofl. 16 trillion lire, from those on semiconductor pro- 
'• The company builds wings for duction, have inqjroved and its or- 
' he European Tornado fighter air- der book is at a record level. But the 
' reft and assembles the 100 Toma- production of semiconductors re- 
- [os bought by Italy. It is develop- mained below full capacity and 
ng a G-222 aril and military margins for the first six months 


or the DC-9 and DC-10, and has a year previously, it said, 
n equal share with France's Aero-" * . * Ai though dectnmics di 
patiale in the ATR-42 regioual ders have fallen con&der 
ransport aircraft mg the year, the compax 


_ . Boots Co. said itisdiscusriiig the Breweries PLC, said pretax profit 
were agmficantjy down on those of acquisi^on of Glaxo HoldW for the year ended Sept 30, 1986. 
* lt . - - • wholly owned subsidiary, Farley would be not less than £9.7 miTTirm, 

■ Aiihod^dectromttdiwnOTor- Health Products UtL, a supplier of an increase of lS percem. 

food and numtional supplements. Rabobank Notated said it was 


ders have fallen considerably dm- food ^ nomdoual supplements, 
mg the year, the company said, it dechned to reveal a target 


are not getting any realistic propos- 
als yet.” 


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De Voe-Holbon Im emotional ov 
and Gty-Cbdt International nv 
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World Trade Center 
Strawinsfcylaan 857 
1077 XX Amsterdam. 

Tbe Netherlands 
Telex: 14S07 Onw nl 


Jean de Many, President 

The d i stinc ti on of a fabled boose of 
Ittiirr. c ou tur e, the dynamic energy 
of the youngest creative fashion 
iwm in Pant, an ym ro mp pimwing > 
old-fashioned idea of service, a 
bcand new dcietn > w«rin n to 
exclusive elegance for the contem- 
porary woman: In spell-binding 
style, the bouse of Jean Patou has 
set its rights on maintaining chat 
quintessence of quality that has 
been is b y wo r d since the legendary 
couturier established his business 
over 70 years ago. 

To be sure of perfection,” saws Jean de Mouy, Expats act 
Jean Patou’s grear-nephew and Patou president cion, a 25 


Sir Terence Conran’s Habitat 
Faces Challenge of Expansion 


price for the unit. 


discussing an acquisition offer for 
Nederiandscbe Scheepsfaypotheek- 


for several hours each spring, a. 
scented opulence only Patou would 
dare to produce. I 

In tbe same spirit, Patou is bringing 
our a rare “Book of Perfumes," 
containing the 12 fragrances of Mi 
Collection, the recently rerived 
"parhinu tfepoque" launched be- 
tween 1925 and 1964. Available by 
special order, the three-volume 
work recounts the glittering history 
of die house and the stories of such 
evocative scents as Amour, Amour, 

- — j -p— Divine Folic and Normandie. j 

To be sure of perfection,” saws Jean de Mouy, Expats account for fi5 percent of perfume produr- ’ 

Jean Patou’s grear-nephew and Patou pr e si dent cion, a 25 p erce n t increase, with major markers 

since 1980, "one must make everything oneself.” evenly split between the United Stares and die Far 

So this 100 percent family-awned company con- East tallowed by Europe and die Middle Raw- To 

-tinues to be one of the tare couture houses to better control distribution, Patou repurchased the 

design and produce every product bearing its New York firm in 1982 and have established others 

name in Lo n don, Milan, Geneva and Hong Kong. 

The haute couture is designed by rhriman La- Parou’s dedication to what de Mouy calls "small is 

aoix, at 34 tbe same age as de Mouy, whose beautiful” is perfectly illustrated by their world 

brother Guy, 32, head at the New York subrid- r enowned bcsr-sdkr, Joy, whose rare natural in- 

iary, makes up the tripartite of this bright young gradients mean production will always be exdti- 

team all in their 30s. Lacroix, called "a talent to tivdy limited. They will continue to concentrate 

watch” by The New Yodc Tunes, the on offering each diem the same regal service in 

couture dotfaes, the hats, which play a prominent the things they do best: couture and fragrance, 

part in his colleaions, and all accessories indud- De Mouy's mission is to provide a climate where 

ing behs and shoes. Pfecoa designers can produce "tbe most exception- 

Patou’s fabulous fragrance, Joy, "tbe costliest al things powjblc* which their loyal distinguished 

perfume in the world,” was created by a Patou dientdc has discovered are found nowhere else in 

perfumer just as Jean Kcrico, the present house the wodd. Like a arc Burgundy. Patou’s designs 

"nose” composes luxuriously extravaganr foemu- will continue to be strictly limited and equally 

las like the one for "1000” in 1972, based on the precious - a symbol of die peerless perfection of 

Osmamhus flower rif China which only blooms the best of tbe best. 

•AN ASSOCIATION OF Till: MOST PfttSTlUIOUS NAMhS OF Till FtTNCII *ART U1 VIVRI -JW5 RUl'UI LA hAUMI . 7*W PARIS 


IAN ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE COMITE COLBERT I 


(Continued fan Page 11) 

ad Crafts in London, not on the 
" \lwing fields of Eton orin the halls 
r Cambridge or Oxford. For years, 
2 had boundless energy and ample 
leas, but commercial success came 
owly at first 

- .Yet today, tbe British press calls 
^im tbe “King of High Street" 
"nigh streets in Britain are the mam 
toroughfaxes in dty or town cen- 
ts. Perhaps most accurate was the 
' ascription offered last week by a 


1WYH H/lfllf/lf Caiman MBDs, UiL textiles pro- bank NV. Scheepshypotbeekbank, 
M 11*1’ 9 U-UUUUi/ ducer, said it will sell its bedding which is internationally active in 

and towel operations to Fiddcrest tbe financing of ships, has an issued 

0 KVn/meiVkn Mills loc. for $250 million- The share capital of 234 million guil- 
[? I/I L4ll/Ullol(/ll> units account for about 80 percent ders (S8.4 million). 

” x of Cannon’s sales. SAAB, the Swedish automaker, 

the Conran Family. Sr Terence’s Club M£dftemn£eSA said ft has said its U.S. sales in tbe first 11 
son, Jasper, is one of Britain’s crop reacted agreement with Cie. Inter- months of 1985 itae 17 percent 
of young internationally recog- nationale des Wagons- Li ts to from a year earlier, to 34£30 cars, 
razed fashion designers. Shirley merge their tourism rental activi- Sapac Corp.. Canada-based 

- - j.- j «_ J— v-i _r .1 _x:u. - r e 


Conran, the second of Sir Terence’s 
three wives, is a former newspaper 
editor and a best-selling author 30,000 beds, was not disclosed. pean operations, wfll pay a dr«- 

whose successes indode “Lace," a Kumagj Gum Co. of Japan was diaid of 660 Swiss francs (about 
women’s novel filled with steamy awarded a contract to form a con- S3 15) for the year coded Sept 30, 
bedroom scenes. sortium to finance, build and oper- up from the previous 625 francs. 


merge their tourism rental activi- Sapac Corp.. Canada-based 
ties. Value of tbe merger, which holding company for F. Boff- 
covers 93 properties and a total of mann-La Roche & Ca’s non-Euro- 


pean operations, wfll pay a divi- 
dend of 660 Swiss francs (about 


q- „ ale a tunnel across Hong Kong 

mirk ^ New Hong 

maA^apopokr amhor aithoogh Kong Tunnel CoTmdudes Lfll^ 
his bedroom scenes are of a differ- & 


. ondon cdumnist, who called Sir struction Co. and China Intema- 


erence “the closest thing retailing 
is to a superstar." 

He is not the only lummary in 


; Texaco Bequests 
Award Be Cut 

The Associated Press 

HOUSTON — Texaco Imx, 
• hying to mvaBdate a S10J3- 
afflkm judgment it, ar- 

- sued Thursday in a Texas court 
hat Pennzoil Co. should get no 

-note tb«n $500 million in its 
; aQed bid for Getty Oil Co. 

Judge Solomon Casseb must 

■ kdde whether to accept, re- 
' ■erse or reduce the award. A 

my ruled Nov. 19 that Texaco 

- legally persuaded Getty to 

- .bandon a merger with Penn- 
ofl. Texaco then purchased 

■ irttyfo/SJO^teffiou last year. 

. Texaco has said the award 
paid threaten its existence, 
exaco lawyers said the award 
hould at most represent the 
ifferencc between what Perm- 
Oil Offered for Getty and what 
exaco paid. 


have been best seflexs in Britain 
and have also sold briskly in the 
United States. His fifth tide. The 


sortium to finance, build and oper- up from the previous 625 francs, 
ate a tunnel across Hong Kong Trefim£taax, a 100-percent- 
harbor. The group. New Hong owned unit of France's state- 
Kong Tunnel Ox, includes UHey owned Pechincy SA, said it will set 
Construction Ox, Paul Y. Con- up a joint company in France with 
struction Co. and China Interna- Japan’s Mitsui Muring A Smelting 
tional Trust and Investment Corp. Co. The venture will produce 2,000 
Matthew Brown PLC, subject of tons of copper a year to be used in 


sssK £as££* ,B -*“ 


published in the United States. 

Much of Sir Terence’s success 
stems from his attention to detafl. 
When the company was smaller, he 
used to approve every product be- 
fore ft was sold. That has changed, 1 
but only slightly- His attentive 


within the company. One official at 
headquarters recalled the time Sir 
Terence “read everyone the riot 
act" when be found an unused 
sheet of paper in one of the office 
wastebaskets. 

Thai bit of corporate lore is 
passed along as an example that the 
boss hates waste, not that he is a 
□riser. In fact, every Monday morn- 
ing the staff finds flowers on each ; 
desk because Sr Terence thinks | 
they lift morale. 

Zn Sir Terence’s view, a penchant 
for detail is a key irreredieat in 
re tailing success. “Retailing has got 
to be an act of total conviction,” he 
said. “You can't do well without 
attention to all the details. You 
can’t just fiddle with a bit of it. You 
have to have an idea, acmcept that 
you pursue with conviction." 


U.S. $100,000,000 Guaranteed Floating Rate Notes due 1992 

Lloyds Eurofinance N.V. 

(Incorporated in the Netherlands with limited tlabfuiyj 

Guaranteed on e subordinated basis as to 
payment ol principal and interest by 


Lloyds Bank Pic 

(Incorporated In England with limited liability) 

In accordance wllh the toms and conditiera of Ihe Note widlba provMoni 
of the Agere Bank A g re em ent between Upydx E u ro fi mmco N.V-, Uoyds 
Bank Pie. and Citibank, MA., dated December 2, 1980, notice a hereby 
given that the Role of Interest has been fixed at 8tt% pA end that the 
nterest payable an the relevant interest Payment Dale, June 6, 1986, 
against Coupon No. 1 1 vr3l be U-S. $214,86 per U.S. $5,000 Note. 


December 6, T985, London 

By: Citibank, MA. (CSSI Dept), Agent Bank 


CITIBANK * > 


Forbes. 

The most efficient way 
of reaching America's 
most influential 
executives. 



CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC 


INVITATION TO PREQUAIJFICATlON 

Conhactore interested in bring prequalififd for the land preparation 
of the 0UAKA SUGAR PROJECT estate, should obtain Mainst 
of 50,000 F CFA to the President of the NATIONAL 




the prequalificatkm form and submit it at least for Dece m be r 16, 

- 1965, 1 pjjL local time. 

Hie land preparation is financed by the SAUDI FUND FOR 
DEVELOPMENT. 

The land preparation involves: busb clearing, vegetation burning, 
.wavy subsoiling, laud leveling on 1JJ0O ha, agricu ltu ral road 

- tetwork constrnction for about 100 km and s mall road chril-woiks. 

• Ihe prequalified coostnactora would participate in the final bidding. 

•’ WtlONAL COHHBSlOy FOB THB OUAXA SUGAR PBOJECT 
Avwmae Prteklent David Dado- 
UP. No. 1370 BANGUI - RCA. talax 5217 RC oo 5329 RC. 



sans devoir aetpritter ies ban demiaaion privw dns le i^fement re^icctif 
do foods. Dans ce cas, le iCumarisHmeDl se fera nr hoc de la valeur 
dTunsbire de U pert viable le jour de Topfaxtion. Cea conditiaia seront 

j plwiwBl wluhlm pur In nmntmt CO opeGU qp Beat Wte 6D CODTplA' 

me nt da prodait de Venctmsunmt du cocpoo, poor pariahs i ToaitS 
np£riems le nambe de pern i louscrire. 

Basque DSpositrive, Ageal Financier J Luxembourg. 

BANQUE EVDOSUEZ LUXEMBOURG 
39. all fee Scheffer, Luxembourg. 


A glance at the graph will tell you what a 
study by a leading independent researcher, 
Market Facts, Inc., told us: That Forbes is 
preferred reading by more corporate officers in 
1,000 of America's largest service and industrial 
companies. In comparison with Fortune and 

Magazines read regularity by corporate officers 
in 1,000 of America^ largest companies.* 

Forbes 

68.3% • i— — , 


FORTUNE 

48.4% 


61.8% 


* Market Rice, Inc. 1984 

Cost per Thousand Circ ulat ion 


Forbes 

4CfegeS46.89 


4C Page 55639 


4CPageS52.79 




for further information, please contact Peter M_ Schoff, Director of 
International Advertising, fortes Magazine, 50 foil Mall, Londcm 
SW1Y5JQ, England, Tel: (01)9300161/1 


Business Week, Forbes was judged to be overall 
favorite by 44%, versus 29% for Business Week 
and 19% for Fortune. 

When regular readers were asked which of the 
three reflects best the excitement of business, 
Forbes had twice the scores of the other two. 
And when asked which of the three stands for 
"free enterprise," 71 % named Forbes, compared 
with 13% for Fortune and 7% for Business Week. 

These results confirm surveys done over the 
past fifteen years showing that more officers in 
big business read Forbes regularly than either 
Fortune or Business Week. 

As the graphs so eloquently show, Forbes is 
the most cost-effective business magazine for 
reaching America's most 
effective executives. If you 
want to reach this elite, 
not only is it good busi- 
ness for you to put your 
advertising in Forbes, 

it's bound to be good Wf 

for your business. 

Forbelrw 

Forbes Magazine— 60 Fifth Ave.. N.Y.. NY 10011 







4 


Thursday 

MSE 

3pm 

Tables Include Hie nationwide prices 
up Id ffte dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


n Month 
High LOW Start 


SB. I PA 

ttteMoti Low Oust. Or* 


(Coatmaed from Page 12) 


3 m w> 

low 5W 

rrw it 

a» at* 

8 22W 

12*a m 


l» BW 
9* 6V1 
33* 34 
jivj im 
«m 2«fc 
19 13 

37 XV, 
Ssu 38* 
lift WW 


I onn 1 JO 

Omncre 
Oneida JO 
ONEOK 258 
OranRk 2 .14 

OrtonC .76 

OnonCpfl.12 

OrtanP 

tS 

OutbdM M 
OvmTr jo 
OvSilto JD 
OwenC 1A0 
Qwtnlil 1X0 
Oxford M 


10S0 3 6* 
430 TV. 
247 174* 
IIS 314* 
317 27* 
07 « 

109 3036 
9 » 
503 lau 
5 7* 

51 27* 
101 27 
652 40 

619 18V* 
477 36* 
1314 3» 
154 IJtt 


35tt 3M + * 
7* TV*- to 
17 17* + V* 

SI* 31* + V* 
2ft> 28* 

SO* M4 

30V*. XV. 

» 29 + » 

10 l(Wi + V* 
7* 7* + Vh 
ZTVi + V* 

26* 26*i— * 

390* 39* + * 
17* 18* + * 
35* 3tM> 

540* 55V. + W 

VOk 7At 


160 

29 

176 

37 

60 

24 


9-2 

1-54 

106 

1X4 

*4 

148 

74 

1X0 

3X 

2X0 

10X 

40 

27 

5.72 

7J 

240 

BX 

4X7 

116 

60 

17 

175 

76 

.901 


JO 



no 110 

jjssgs 

ilSi 

fiitt & 

71 8 70* 

if ftW 

Apr 


29 19V* Rvtond 66 27 12 257 Mt Ml 24*- 06 

3* 9 Knur- 5 44 w 1716 17*—* 

131* UH* Rrmerpfl.17 9 A 32 12V* 12* MV* 


a 33 QuakOt M U U W fl tf* 414* + M 

8 T7 OuakSO ,80a 36 IS 421 2M 22V* 23 - V* 

10W 5 Ouanax 20 232 8* 616 6Vi — 1* 

MM 27 Qnestar 1 40 11 11 444 311* 300* tt* + 7* 

27V* 107 QHReit JHaJIt 074- 270* 27 270* + Oh 




3 94 

22 IB 4520 
92 20Cr 
14 22 

U 9 

27 n as 

229 

14 11 373 

11 512 
11 15 1405 

jS 1547 
114 

12 2202 
.292 


US, Futures 

Via The Associated Press 


20 w in* 
7*5 71* 
94 24 

70* 7W 
7* 7* 
45 449* 

54 54 

52V* $2 

a 

57 
8V* 

17 
T794 
240* 

22 

190* 

210 * 


51* 50* 

470k 48 +16 

38 38 

no no +2 

40* 80* + * 

k 3*3 

284* XI V* + 1* 
ISM 16V* + M 
4416 47 +86 

74* 79*— U 

in* lsoi— v* 
-4 4M 
89 92V4 +4 

98* 98*— M 
2SV6 2Be 
3H6 SB06 + M 
SM SM-V* 
196 1506 + i* 

’SIS 


Season Season 
HM> Low 


Oaen High Low 


Grains 


WHEAT (CUT) 

5X00 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
X43W 2J9W Dec 141 142* 

174V* 2J7 Mar 342* 146 

4JB2 184 MOV 11916 124* 

172W 143 Jul 188* 154 

145 167 Sop 2.9004 155 

3X5* 19] Dec 10186 304(6 

Est. Sales Prev. Sates 9344 

Prev.Dav Open lot. 29214 oHll? 
corn cam 

5UW bu m in Im inn* dellart per bushel 
195 114W Dec 242W 143M 

257 224V* Mar 144W 14536 

151 tt 131 Mav Z4716 24SVS 

2X6 Z33 All 247* 2.48* 

270 124W SAP 22516 235* 

235* 220(6 DK 12B04 2J0VS 

174W 132(6 Mar 227 137 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 30J79 

Prev.DavOaenlnt.142JSO aflt38 
SOYBEANS ICBTJ 
5X00 bu minimum- dollars eer bushel 
425 438 Jan £07 5.11 

762 4X5* Mar 5.14* 5X0* 

779 4X5 Mar 5L24* 52504 

6X8 4X7 Jul 5X1* SX6* 

434 4X8* Aug 5X8* SJ4* 

428 45A S*P 5.15* 5.14 

02 LW Nov 5.13* 5.15 

563 5X9 -tail 523* 525 

6J7* S.I9W Mar 

EsI. Sales Prow. Sales 38309 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. >2X04 oH 1X00 
SOYBEAN MEAL ICBTJ 
loo tana-doll urs per ten 
>84X0 >2540 Doc >4400 14400 

143X0 127X0 Jan 14520 U5X0 

20650 130X0 Mar 145X0 145X0 

14150 13150 May 14420 14450 

147X0 134X0 Jul 14450 147X0 

15230 13550 Aug 14450 147X0 

147X0 mOO Sep 14450 M45B 

14950 134XD Oct 141.30 14150 

150X0 134X0 Dee 143X0 14100 

150X0 134X0 Jan 143X0 143X0 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 12X77 

Prev. Day Ooen Int. <3X42 u»9ji 
SOYBEAN OIL(CBT) 

60X00 lbs- dollars oor 100 Ita. 

29 53 1843 Dec 1935 2026 

29X7 1172 Jan 19X0 2042 

2H40 18X8 Mar 2020 2032 

2725 IMS May 2055 27X0 

2525 1946 Jul 2080 2125 

25.15 1948 Aug 2035 2125 

24X5 19X5 tel 20X0 2125 

22X0 1950 Oct 2030 20X0 

21.90 1950 Dec 2035 20.95 

2140 T940 Jon mxJ 21 JD 

EsI. Sales Prev. Sales 15.980 

Prev. Dev Open int 43,186 OB 187 


Livestock 


CATTLE fCMEJ 
4aooa BMw cents per lb. 

49 JS 55X0 Dec 8875 6750 

6745 54X5 Fob 63X0 64.10 

4757 5SJ0 Apr 6> JO 4250 

6423 5425 Jim 6130 62X0 

4540 &5J0 Aua 60JD 6035 

4050 5750 Oct 59X0 5935 

65J0 59.10 Dec 6030 A1XQ 

Est. Sales 20X03 Prw.Sales 20X67 
Prev. Day Open Ini. 66X93 off 7537 
FEEDER CATTLE <CME) 

44X00 tbs.- cents per lb. 

JV50 *050 Jan 66J0 6655 

7130 4052 Mar 4450 64X5 

71.00 4050 ACT 64X0 6650 

nun 40.10 May 4463 65.15 

6850 65.10 AUO 64X0 44X0 

Est Sales 1X12 Prev. Sates 2J72 
Prev. Day Oaen Int. 10631 up7i 
HOGS (CUE) 

30X00 lbs., cents per lb. _ „ 

50X5 34X5 Dec 4955 5030 

50.47 38.10 Feb 4755 4840 


3X9V. 340 — X6N. 

141 342 SB*. 

1178* 3.19*. ~X0* 
tflh 231V. +X18* 

2X08* 2X1 w +jnw 
1018* 3X2 +X18* 


242 2428* — X1M 

244 24416 — X1M 

247 247M —XI (6 

247 247V. — XIV* 

2X5 2X5W — XOV. 

7JMV7 2298* 4JXH* 

2X7 2X7 +X0V. 


5X516 5X7V. — X3 

5.138* 5.16M — XZ16 
523 5X0* — JIW 

S3SV. 5J3V6 —XIV. 
52BW 5X1 V* — JTIVb 
513 5t3 — X2 

512 512 — X2W 

&22M 52ZW — X4 
533W — X3V* 


Season Senen 






High - 

Low 

Open 

High 

LOW 

CtaM 

On. 

177X0 

12850 

Mar 17650 

178X7 

17420 

,7867 

+4X0 

1814S 

18+57 

U1D0 

May 1B0XS 

18266 

17976 

18226 

+4X0 

13550 

Jul 133X0 

18572 

122X0 

18572 

■MX0 

18SJ50 

132JS 

S4B 116X0 

188X0 

155X0 

WB60 

+4X0 

19168 

138X0 

Dec 18890 

19166 

18190 

191X6 

+4X0 

IJfJ« 

74X50 

Ate- 793JJ 

mjn 

181,7 

19X33 

+4X0 

17200 

189JH 

May 19567 

19567 

19567 

19567 

+4X0 

Est.5a(« 

Pr*v. Sales 6X69 




Prw. Day Open Im. 12.307 uo3Q2 




SUOAR WORLD 11 (NYCSCEJ 
11X000 IUA, amts per M. 





7X5 

360 

Jan 564 

6J8 

5JB 

5X8 

+60 

9J3 

334 

Mar 6JS 

4X2 

432 

451 

+.18 

7.15 

350 

May 656 

467 

44* 

666 

+.15 

6,90 

379 

Jul 673 

6X0 

462 

480 

+.13 

665 

464 

Seo 6X7 

4X7 

4X7 

6J4 

+.12 

7XO 

4JB 

oa 6X7 

7X4 

688 

7X1 

+X9 

765 

6X5 

Jan 



7.14 

+X9 

768 

461 

Mar 7X5 

7X8 

765 

7X8 

+X8 

E^t. Sates 


Prev.Sales 11X13 




Prev. Day Omn int. 99X27 off 604 




COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric tana- S per tan 





2337 

1945 

Dec 2120 

2124 

2115 

2123 

"{£] 

23 72 

17SS 

Mar 21*6 

2203 

2112 

' 21*8 

—2 

2422 

I960 

May 2234 

2246 

2233 

2246 

+1 

2427 

1940 

Jul 2267 

2275 

2245 

2277 


2430 

2023 

5#p ZZ90 

2305 

2290 

2307 


2425 

3055 

Dec 2310 

2311 

2380 

2317 

-\ \ 

23S5 

2029 

Mar 



2B0 

Est. Sates 


Prev. Soles 1X31 




i Prev. Day Onen Inf. 17.943 oftW 




1 ORANGE JUICE (NYCE, 
UXOO Iter cants Per lb. 


11235 



isexo 

17760 

11170 

Jon 113X0 

11565 

1,365 


nut 

Mor 11545 

11545 

11570 

11465 

11475 

16260 

15760 

111X5 

May 11570 

115X0 

115.15 

—6# 

11140 

Jul 11575 

11575 

115X0 

11540 

—70 

1BO50 

111X0 

Seo 



11215 

+65 

114X5 

11L5D 

Nov 



112X5 

+68 

113X0 

112X0 

Jan 



11260 

+60 

16165 

111XB 

rear 



112X0 

+60 



Mav 



11310 

+X0 

Est. Soles 

600 Prev.Sales 

468 




Prev. Doy Om> Int uwuphS 





36 Mb 36 , +11* 
258* 251* 25*6+8. 


& 

9 

ra 

16 

3 

u 

12 

26 

15 

13 

13 

U 

It 

7J 

8 

56 


86 

9 

71 

M 

34 

10 

IX 

17 

2J 

13 

L5' 

Tl 

26 

11 

3J 

11 

L5 

r 

T2X 


110 


13.1 


20 

14 


1X2 33 P 
IS u c 
1X4 45 13 
1X6 22 20 
JO 3X128 
58 Z7 T2 
22 22 17 
2J0 54 9 
40 L9 9 
54 ax ■ 
52 36 11 
1X4 34 IT 
1X8 29 II 

’S'S 
S S]8 

1X0 IX 15 
1X0 4X 
158 57 21 
LB U 1 

40 13 43 


S% «1W 


NigOLOnJW 


S'i If Vorti 
58* 2 1 - Vore 

t<a> «(j Vnrc 
4P* SVrVarU 
15 1 * 9*. Worn 

IS 5 # 13 V«« 

t« 3»* V«K 
live f^verf 
liS T18*W«» 

4AU 3*** Vine 
ttfe 66 VOE 
701* VOE. 
Oita 768* VOE 
7<W 58W 
71 55 VOE 

32 Wit Visb 

15 335* VOrti 

tew 66't Vtrtc 


I >41 27 
TI3 S 

t 14 
24 916 2» 
42 209 ISV. 
13 304 I7-* 
" 

II 2M 82V. 

2321874 63 

1007 8, 

300:78 
II TJ 30^ 
35 H3 2? 


28V* 2* ♦ * 
4— 5 * 

14 14 + Vi 

2*8* SB * ** 
14 * ir* 

,6'<t 168*- -4.- 

iw* in*— 
Jgti Ulk-s^ 

SiSfl. 

94 94 

72 S. 77- -IN' 
6iit a8 L t— 1+- 
Si* 30**- i*. 
76 76»*+ *b 


150 3L9 
48 IX 

wtA 

pt 2X8 52 
pt 130 94 
ler 2X4 4J 

- SJ 

i3 6 

M 15 


14280 >6360 —AID 
143X0 144X0 —2X0 
144X0 14100 —1X0 
145X0 14650 —50 

14530 147X0 
146X0 14650 —JO 
142X0 >42X0 —160 
13950 139X0 — 1JB 
14150 142X0 —1X0 
14150 14150 —150 


50X5 3635 Dec 4955 SO30 

50.47 38.10 Feb 4755 4840 

4735 3612 AW 4250 4365 

49X5 39X0 Jim 44X0 45X2 

49X5 40.45 Jul 4475 45X5 

51 xe 40X5 Auo 4890 44X0 

4LI0 3807 Od 4050 4075 

4950 3037 Dec 4160 4150 

4175 4040 Ftb 41 AS 41X5 

EsI. Sales 7576 Prev. Sales 7J00 
Prev. Day Open Int. 2SL091 up 696 
PORK BELLI ES (CMEI 
38X00 ibL- cents per lb. 

76X0 5575 Feb 63X0 6555 

7560 5565 Mar 64X5 6577 

7560 57X5 May 65.15 66X2 

74X0 5730 Jul 65X0 6675 

7115 5550 AUO 6Z3D 6460 

Est. Sales 4711 Prev.Sales 3436 
Prev. Day Open Int. 8.993 up 27 


1962 19X2 — X8 
1970 197S — 23 

20X6 2812 — XS 

»<2 2048 -29 

2065 2077 —.11 

2075 20J7 — X3 

ss -« 

2870 2873 —.13 

2070 auo -%w 


6742 +57 

43X0 +7B 

6235 +68 

62X0 +55 

6070 +AB 
5945 +.15 

6060 +30 


6640 +45 
6677 +62 
86X5 +50 
65X0 +35 
6635 +49 


SOXS +X3 
4832 +77 

4335 +53 

45X0 +55 

45.17 +45 

4365 +X5 

4055 +.15 

4170 +30 

4165 +30 


COPPER CCOMEXI 
25X00 lbs.- cants per Ih. 






84X5 

5B50 

□ec 

82X0 

6145 

82X0 

5360 

+140 

84X0 

5875 

& 




6360 

6360 

tis 

■0X0 

59X0 

Mar 

8270 

6375 

6230 

6360 

+70 

74XO 

60X0 

May 

tint 

6190 

62A0 

63X0 

+xo 

7440 

60X5 

Jut 

63X0 

64.10 


5195 

+45 

7U.90 

<099 

Sep 

6170 

64X0 

8*15 

+60 

70l30 

61X5 

Dec 

64.15 

6*75 

6*15 

6*55 


70X0 

61X0 

Jem 




6470 

6770 

6265 

Mar 

8580 

85X0 

6450 

6*95 

+35 

47J® 

6290 

May 




65X0 

+XB 

*6X0 

612S 

Jill 




*545 

+.15 

8460 

8160 

Sen 




8570 

+.11 

Est. Soles 


Prev.Sales 





Prev. Dov Open Int. 78.1*8 up24S2 




1 ALUMINUM ICOMEX) 
40X00 lbs.- cm boerlb. 






7060 

41X0 

Dec 

4540 

4640 

4540 

46X0 

+75 

7450 

4460 

Jon 




4660 

+75 



F+b 




4490 


! 7360 

4290 

Mar 

4640 

4740 

4545 

47X0 

1 8675 

4450 

Moy 

47X5 

RUB 

47J5 

48,10 

+75 

6345 

4460 

Jul 

4870 

4BX0 

4870 

4BX5 

+73 

52.10 

4490 

See 




4940 

+g 

49.10 

«K 

D«c 




5070 

+75 



Jon 




SUB 

+75 



Mor 




51X0 

+75 

5165 

4940 

Mar 




3CJ8 

+75 

50X0 

mm 

Jul 




5130 

+75 

5215 

5160 

se» 




5*05 

+75 

Est. Sales 


Prev.Sales 





Prev. Dor Open Int. 161B up 10 





SILVER CCOMDQ 






1X00 tray QLr rents pot troy oz. 





1230X 

5900 

Dee 

6Q5X 

8086 

6046 

6064 

+17 

1215X 

595X 

Jan 

612X 

8186 

&09X 

616.1 

+16 

619X 

419X 

Feb 




81*2 

+16 

1193X 

607X 

Mar 

819A 

6206 

5155 

8186 

+16 

1048JJ 

4196 

May 

526X 

ms 

6215 

mi 

+16 

945X 

839X 

Jul 

635X 

<386 

633X 

635J2 

+14 

940X 

621 X 

Sen 

6436 

846X 

643J 

840 

+G 

799X 

4520 

Dec 

ULO 

661 X 

*0 

658.1 

+14 

789X 

■mn 

Jut 



662.9 

+14 

7700 

S70X 

Mar 

872# 

672X 

6700 

8713 

+44 

7510 

8B1X 

May 

883X 

8820 

881X 

6821 

+14 

7440 

894X 

Jul 




8924 

+14 

7296 

4496 

Sep 




7934 

+14 

EsLSate 


Prev. Sates 





Prev. Day Open Int. 86626 UP 865 




PLATINUM CHYME) 






50 troy at- 

dal tare par trv 

rvL 






U04MS -B0419B Dec __ 

Est. Sates 10623 Prev. Sate 12767 
Prev. Day Oeen Int 35617 oft 7*5 
SWISS FRANC (I MM] 

Sperfrnnc - 1 palnf e^jatsJOXOOT 
4831 3531 Dec 4759 4785 JOS 4 AJT7 -7 

4885 3S35 Mar 4H11 ^ 4»B XB -4 

4925 4190 Jun 4845 ABBS AMO ABC —2 

4930 4790 Sep __ .4935 

Est. Sales 15X14 prev. Sole* i 13X21 
Prev. Day Open Int. 22,127 off 1730 


36M 
401* 

62V. 

7V. 

20 

30 30 

37 37 

9 32 

71* 71* 
27V* 27V* 
19* 19* 
26* 26* 
O 6916 
20 20 
SOB* Sit* 


47 
2M* 

29V. 

JCrt Mi 30W 
15 14* 14* 

25 24* 25 

44B* 44H 44* 
36 35* 36 

V ^ 


30V* 30 Sff * 
79h 23'- 2f?-- 
Om 4»* *5 . 
3B<6 29* 30-6 + 

IS W}-» 

T S. T b 

34* — 

«R* 44'- 

Jl'i 

404 Z7Vi 76W 

136 23 22* 

4066 36 s * 34* 

BSX26W 28* 

52 


m 


53* 25H VF Q>rp 1X0 24 12 SB 
14* 6 Valero _ _U4 15*7 

28* 14 Voter Pf 244 119 • a 
3* 2(6 Vateyln 167 


to Vi K* Xerok 1X0 5X 20 B972 60 SB* 59W + * 

56* 48* Xerox pi 56S 101 607 5<* 54 Li 54 'j — 14 

» 19* mS “ 27 12 401 24* 23* 2JW-I 


30(6 24* ZaleCP 1J2 46 13 ID H DW 3? + 

17 7* Zapata .12 IX 64 67S 9* 9 9 — 

6114 32* ZoyrcS 48 X 17 774 59 57* 58* + * 

5s 16* ZmUtiE 93, 1294 IS* ,8* II* + * 

CT* 15* TrtOS X2 16 17 118 2CR» 20* 2Q-i 

24* SSln 1^ 34 15 73 39* 39 39-* 


German Capital Account 
Has $2.9-Billion Outflow 

Reuters 

FRANKFURT — West Germany’s capital 
account recorded a net outflow of 7 J2 billion 
Deutsche marks (S2.9 billion) in October, the 
Bundesbank said Thursday. This marked an 
increase on a revised net outflow of 4.62 billion 
DM in September and an outflow of 2^3 billion 
in October 1984. 

The account, which combines long- and 
short-term capital flows, was in deficit (5 3334 
bflGan DM in the first 10 months of 19&5. The 
deficit widened from 14.55 billion in the yearia 
earlier period. " 


T-.i 






London 

Commodiiies 


Goninmlkies 


i ijiTsa 


Dec. 5 

CtaM 

KM LOW BM Ask Ch'ge 

SUGAR . 

. Fr — di f ranc * p gr rovfrtc tan . 

Mor MW 1X97 1403 ,405 —3 

May 1430 1415 1433 1425 —6 

Aua 1499 1496 .1463 1471 —4 

Od 1685 1565 1490 1JM —11 

Dec N.T. NX. 1X05 1625 —20 

Mar N.T. N.T. 1670 1680 — U 

. Est. vd.: 1 JOB lots ot 50 tons. Prev. actual 
sales: 1461 lofeOpen Interest: 28059 


Cash Prices 


Commodity pod Untl Tim Ago 

Coffee 4 Samoa, lb 161 1X8 

Prbitclatb 64/30 3S W, Vd — 8M 879 

Steel Wlteti (Pltt.).ion 47XJ4 mm 

Iren 2 Pdrv. Ptela. ton 2136# 31340 

Steel scrap ho 1 ttw pul _ 73-M iva 

Lead Soot, lb - . If 2Mt 

Coaeer etod. lb — _ 4+48 6M4 

Tin IStroHs), U> HA. 64347 

ZbK. E. St. U Basis, tb 83S M 

Palkidium.cz T+m WHO 

Silver N.Y.ai, 6JB 7X6 

Source: AP. 


NJu U347 
■ *k aa 

9M01 14MXJ 
SXS 7X6 


65X5 +2X0 
6577 +2X0 

£2 :is 

64AS +1XS 


COFFEE C (NY CSCE) 

37J00lbL- cents per Rl 

172.90 129XS Dec 170X0 175X5 17800 17SXS +475 


Qirrency Options 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
ooitoea strike 

U oddly kt9 Price Calls— Last Pub— i 

Dec Jaa Mgr Dec Jan Mar 
12300 Brmm PflBuo+cents par untt. 

B Pound 120 2745 S r r 

147.96 135 1240 r 1800 r 

147.96 140 7 JO r 120 r 

147.96 14S 275 170 495 r 

14796 150 0X5 1,10 270 r US 

14796 155 r r 1X5 t 

58008 Caeadtae Daoarvcsnh per unlL 
CDollr 70 r s r * 

7177 71 r r r r 

71.77 72 0X9 r 853 832 864 

7177 73 r r 817 r 

7177 74 r r 0X7 r 

4U00 West oenaan Markxents per wH. 

□Mark 31 858 8 r r 

3971 33 633 s r r 

3971 34 T % 5.71 T 

3971 35 477 r r r 

39.71 36 360 r r r 

39.71 37 273 r X17 r 

3971 31 1.74 .1X6 238 0X1 

3971 39 077 r 160 CUM 

29-77 40 8)2 84f S r 0j2 

3971 41 002 0.18 075 r r 


Stock Indexes, 


Financial 


r 065 

r ijo 

S 3X0 
345 SXS 


market ctaee) 


20465 20370 

287.10 M825 


21 U0 2t?75 
21495 71543 
211X0 21U0 


VWM. 

IBM 12273 


3971 34 r ■ 877 r ■ 

3971 35 477 r r r r 

19.71 36 360 r r r r 0X9 

39.71 37 273 r 117 r r 81 

3971 31 1.74 .1X6 238 0X1 r r 

3971 39 077 r 160 CUM r 067 

39J1 40 8)2 849 f r Ojt T.T« 

3971 41 002 818 873 r r r 

125X00 Freacb Fmet-iomt of a coat per unit 
f Franc 115 1460 r r r r 

13822 130 r r 4.18 r r 

usano Jownew ybb-IOHM pf a ent per rnitr, 

JYcn 41 812 B t t k 

49X0 41 7.17 r r r r 

49 JO 45 4X0 r r r r 

<9 JO 46 3.17 r r r r 

49 jo 47 119 r 247 r r axo 

49 JO 46 171 179 >72 r aw 

49 JO 49 045 073 1X7 816 042 

49 Jo 90 0X5 U9 870 r r 

42600 Swiss Prencs-cefits per wiil 
SF ranc are 10X0 r s 
4771 41 660 S 7X5 r g 

4771 42 560 e r r s 

4771 43 471 r r r r 81 

47.71 45 262 r r r r 

4771 46 1.79 r r r r 

47.71 47 0X6 r 2X0 0X5 DJ5 

4*71 48 ft!7 8M 16J r t 

47.n <9 r 831 1X4 t r 

TWol can voL MU cow nj- »fci« 

Tela) PUT vet UN „ „ P«t open M. 1796M 

r— Hoi traeetL s— Hooptten offered. 

Lost is premium (purcbose Price!. 

Source; AP. 


(Indexes complied shortly befor 
5P COMP. INDEX (CMEI 
paints and cenfa 

2CBX5 17570 Dec 20530 206X0 

20765 182X0 Mar 20860 20946 

209X0 1B890 Jun 2HLOO 711X5 

77340 147X0 Sep TWJ0 BV B 

Est Sates Prev.Sales tltbo 

Prev. Day Ooen Int. 75X49 up 4X26 
VALUE UNECKCET) 
points and cents 

717X5 isSjW Dec BITS ZUJB 

214X5 19855 Vat 215X0 217X0 

217X0 197X0 Jun 218X8 211X0 

Est. Sates Prev. Sates 7X35 

Prev. Day Open Int. 11X53 9*260 
NYSE COMP. INDEX OBY Ft) 
points and cents 

11865 101X0 Dee UUS 11960 

mi a 10550 M 12CJS T2US 

121 JO 104.90 Jun 122X0 122X0 

122JS 104.19 Sep 12195 12195 

ESLSatee Prev.Sales 13797 

Prev. dbv Open Int. 7XM up7m 
MAJOR MKT INDEX (CBT1 
paints and rights 

32 249* Dec 282* 285* 

M2* DO* Jan JB *6 ’ 

283* 271 MW 285 2871(6 

Est. Sate . Prev. Sates 341 

Prev. Day Open Int, 1AM up 183 


Commodity indexes 


Close 

Moody’s 929^0 f 

Reuters 1,751.10 

D J. Futures ' 12865 

Com. Research Bureau „ . 22960 

Moody* : base 100 : Dec. 37, 1WT. 
p - preliminary; f- Anal 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. IS, 1931. 
Dow Jones : boss 100 : Dec. 31. 1974. 


CBT: Chicago Board of Trod* 

CMS: Qilaage Mercantile Excbanae 

imm; Inf cm onomd Monetary M WW 

Of Orieese Mereectffle Excbaig B. • 

CONKX: ComnxxStY Excfxmsa. Nmr York - 

NYME; New York- Mercantile EndWB* 

kcbt: Kanos atv Board at Trade 

ibyfe: New York Future# Exchange - 


London 


Dec, S 

•Mn, cefl»«Hte Pgt>4eMe 

2“Sf £ £ £££ 

1 i * S S ?3 S 

| : =* s a ? s a 

^ J23-2- 

m.mw(.uBiQn)iirt4Ju 

Soorcm: CMC. ' 


Dhidends 


“"Wt Per Amt Poy mil 

EXTRA 

Anmfceap Cb . 60 TM1 1 M« 

INCREASED 

Mn lmmrMtol. 9 X IN J 2 - 2 B 

a J5 1-1 12,16 
s .is- >i i-if 
Hew Plan Realty q sa 1-2 ll-ie 

INITIAL 

Bear Steams _ , w t2 -it 

OMITTED 

C«*f 0 l Puhfic Utfb 

SPECIAL ' 

Sewfbem Bancorp _ . jg i.m qji 

STOCK SPLITS 
Cdnjtt menm Bank 2-for-l - 

Petrie stare# 24er-l 

USUAL ‘ 

§*f£2<»Eg™gjfe3 3 

§^,u?ss 

a»ry»er Core ^ ?5 i.m n<a 


Previous 
92560 f 
174030 
12134 . 
^2890 


Of*r . l w VMd . Vlete 


IN .» 

D3 ZZU BU N - — 

m . i» 2M-.ua jm 
is -m at in im 

HB . » .9 UK » 

1*5 n » M 7K 

2K m >« » « 

2B m*.i3innyi*3 _ 

TNBUH ippei 5M7P 

lMala«N.9UB. 

Tftel pff- nfwnr 2MJM. 
THpbI WMH.KM - .- 


MB* 1*W3 IM1I7A DM 197a- 
s eurce : caam. ■ ■ ■; - 1 --- 


OX4W IM 

gSSiS" wo I I -iii 

1.1-S 

^^B^sewch § 63 1-1 

goctflcCasT rosns q. ji 

p5£SnS5 1w '« -KM 

nS?S;. Car * a 65 S' 

. O' at si 

iESf??,, Q 48 2-1 

ftSSSa rtS tjft-. ° M 

a .12 M 

I “ i.i 
WStt? 0 ^- .1 I” 

™*kl; OMBMIMy, Vetertertyi 

»w»: UPJ. . 


BM -otter Vie 

te yr .teaM 993W3J 1* 

apOTT tp h tew Buarteni. 

M u l lll Lynd+Trcawry liete*. N/l 
C keaneter ihedpr: — ' 

Average vtiiaLi— 
Mi wa lie BN tw*-, ' ■ 


wo 7X5 
. Fpe*. 
new Ytaht 
*61 966 


yr’i 


-united Pros huenaHtmat : " 

"TORONTO — Oiympia AY-ort. 

a.pnvatdyowj»d real estate dewsk 
(^mentfinn, said Thuisdav that* 

would open an office ia (Maado, 

r«Wda,in Jaiaiaiy ' 

































































INTERNATIONAL, HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1985 


Page 15 


I ft 



Hh 3ft AHlJtSjP 

. ■ m «* Alsrari 

■; _»V5 ink AMaA 

??« 

- .« a AmOti 

: 

' ' iVfc 616 AmRHy 
ir^rilk lift AHa^|n 1 

: !ft U Annpr 
.- f tM svi A nn k 
' V5 MA Amncrf 
.f-.ft 446 Antal 
:<M lft AnOicb 
,■■ -ft 4 Andrea 
•,-vfi »Annm 
-4k 46 AmxKwt 

3 Areopt 
■«.ft 5V* Artey 
Vi 39k Anram 


Vi 39k Armhn 
— — J5 416 Anmli 

__ Vi 16ft Arandl 

Wiiri 

x 9ft Astra 

. ft Ashute 

“ ” --ft 7ft Astro* pf 1 

Vi V> AttsCM 

— — -46 3 AudloJr 

-- lb mkAinimtn 

^~M6 13ft Avondl 


«s Siam stt 
MlOZDDz 4ft 

5 *» SJ 

'67 40 14ft 

t <S 21 1394 
794 5 

1* 42 39k 

t 17 13 5316 

r JO 7 1» 

3 • 74b 

I 345 1M 
22 1* 41k 

' 17?^ 

I a & -a 

27 2V2 

I 17 3 9 

111 91 Mk 

1 1 
2 m 

8 3 4 

9 41k 
■ 431 «k 

is i m 

I 53 1373 10 

II IS 1415 

545 116 

1 5 13. 

U4 7k 
34 M 
355 1415 
I 14 24 Uft 


Mb 54k 
41* 41* + Ik 

41A 445 
Ok 81k 
1895 14 + ft 

134k 134k + 15 
49k 5 +15 

5& sSZfc 

w» i»— n 
79k 795— Vk 
1445 1415— Ik 
49k 49k— 15 
4794 471* + 15 
595 59k 
24k 295 — 15 
69k 54k + 45 


895 89k 

1 I 

39* 345 + Ik 

59k 5*— 15 
49* 495 + 15 
445 415 + ft 
2014 20% + 15 
9ft 10 +94 

1415 1415 + Vk 
115 lft— ft 
13 13 

15 ft 
345 245 
1394 1315 + 15 
15 16 — ft 


280 m 

123 815 

340 7°k 
390 4*5 

11 2145 
- 35 24 
+595 J4g 

23 3 

M 394 

128$ 

11 4 

14 91k 
95 1415 
52 9 
79 795 
48 to 
9 2815 

5 in 

112 7315. 

3 37 
94 4 

SJ28 k 

122 95 

IS 1594 

4 115 


115 14* 

I « — 15 
TA 795 + 15 

2Uk 2115— 9k 

gSSfc + S 

a #+s 

31k 35k ‘ 

T>--* 

i3* iJn + 5 

a a 

715 745 + 45 

73 .7394— 15 
369k 3445—1* 
31k 4 +15 

1 1: 
115 m— 15 
289k 2945 + 9* 
21 2115 + 15 

139* 09*— 45 
14% IS 
2515 2615 


735 U2 
Si 13 U 


9 1 84k M 

9 14 » 2445 

14 14 » 2595 

3 14k 14k 

» 1170 37 35 

26 4115 «5 

8 S iSiS* 

» « a a 

» 7 IS Uft 

9 13 H Hi 
W 100 W5 U 
47 I IS 19 

4U » at 
1137 4k »C 
54 57 415 445 

14 2 1445 1415 

S » 2* 

7 26 m TO 
1869 2ft 206 
3S9 7m 2215 

12 49 244k 2(15 
492 7ft 7ft 

14 Uplift 
19 415 695 
815 41* 39k 

11 25 14ft 14V, 

8 13 1395 1315 

13 28 2A4 2415 

& 

98* 715 69h 


269k + 15 
2195— ft 
145 

3615 + 15 
4045— 15 
>9* 

WVk— 15 
8V5— 4* 
915+15 
1415 

i2* + w 
ilk— ft 
*5 + 16 
4k 

495 

lift— 15 
2V5 

20V. + n 
2dk— « 
2215—15 
2415-95 

3ft — «5 
1445— 15 
13% 

2*15- « 
259k + 95 
22 +15 
7 



JO IS 21 

astwj * 
& 3 


10 89 49k 

i 33 51* 
125 302 115 
35 *| 

in si* 

254 15 

149 3945 
7 131 445 
21 38 Zl 

9 797 145 

14 245 
12 1215 
If IS 
362 315 

110 4k 
21 209 74k 

12 in* 
I 415 
527 3% 

45 3 

21 45 719* 


A* M— Vk 
SI >5 SI 15— Vk 
115 116 + 15 


345 346 + 4k 
815 815— Hi 
4% 446 
3ft 3ft - 
9» 15 + 15 

389k 3746 + 15 
J. 415 + 15 
2015 21 + 9k 

146 l«k 
395 315 
045 1295 
15 15 

3% 315 + 95 
44 99 

7ft 79k + 15 
104* in* + >5 
4ft 415 
395 395 
3 3-15 


14% II Jodvn JBb4J l| 
746 515 Joeota 12 

a vxte 

m 51* j*tnn jitu H 

6V, 2Vj JoftnPd 

1115 5 JotMAm JO U 8 
mi 6 Johnind 3 

416 215 JumoJk 33 


5 ink >146 1195 + 15 

s a.a 

Jit 84 14 107 »5 8* 815 + ft 

118 4 39k 4 + lk 

-"‘ 4X1 595S45 94k + lk 

23 816 8 *5 

10 4 39b 4 


945 415 
164* 1315 
815 5 

8% 215 

315 215 

239b 171* 
48 3016 

’SS n 
SS’S 

045 2 
13V5 10%5 
7V5 23% 
95 15 

”2*8 


ieco jz 2.1 

E5I 371 43 

Eos* Ci 

EstnCa 130 53 
E»h»> 6M&U 
Echo B B .12 
ElAudO 

EICAm 130 53 

IS ‘ 

EniMdn 33m 3 
ErnCor 
EBYDVWt 
ED*t uo 330*23.2 

asar 

ESDn" JU 2 LB 
EnatrsW 38*112 
Eralod 

Eaksy p( 130 133 

EtzLov llfl 3 
EvrJ A 30 20 
Exeat 3B>33 


M 44 43 35 

32 11 27 US 

18 40 

371 43 13 63 

13 144 
OO 53 TO 11 

LM82M 7 3 

.12 1121 
93 

M S3 10 U 
42 14 

143 

33* 2 163 

4 8 

10 

30*212 24 

32 

7 35 

31 

a u * i6 

•48*122 24 

9 6 

30 133 4 

M 21 8 64 

SO 

.11* 3 15 111 
30 20 26 212 
Mb 33 13 378 


9V5 OH 

a a 

10 1896 

SSia 

49 46 

24V. 2X95 
696 645 

2*5 215 
1346 1215 


915 + 4k 
1515 + 15 
71k— 15 
89*+ Vk 
24* — V* 

n +16 

3295— it 
1346 
4k 

239k — Ik 
446 
295 

13 +46 


4)5 2V* KOMkC 
1616 10 KovCd JO L3 
1495 1045 XoyJ n jo* 11 
15VI 946 KaorNt JO 05 
239* 14 K»Tchm jtSt 16 
1246 715 KfllPh JO) 

71k 2% K«Ca 

215 «i Ka+Cawt 
495 2V, KJddBWt 
415 39k Kfim 
49k 31k Kkwrft 

$46 T* K A 

» M 2 KlavV 32r 3 
1646 10% Knoll 
3095 2296 K«MrC 232 63 


29 315 3Vk 3V5 
34 1515 144k 15tk + 46 
57 1415 1415 1415 + V* 
38 1146 lift 1115 
74 1815 17W 18 +15 

MS MM W* VB5— 15 

fill.. 

1 tt ft 31 
9 315 316 31* + 15 

20 746 295 3N— Ik 

4 515 515 516— 9k 
10 215 2% 346 

4 1449 144k 14ft + lk 
141 WA 2546 2ttk— Hr 




846 315 SFM 10 

845 7 SFNpfA 
40% 2145 SJWt 1+5 17 13 

S 295 SMO 9 


15 445 44fc 415— Ik 

21 84k 8% 846— 15 

5 39V5 39V> 3815— 15 

17 34k 316 315— 15 


3ft 2 USR Ind 
22V* 84* Ultra l« 17 

131b Bfc Urrlcoro _ 22 

1546 111* Unfcnpt JS 5.1 

114* 846 Untmar 173*177 

234b 1546 UAJrPd 340 23 14 

26 1615 UnCOlFt JO 20 7 

TV. 1% UFoodA .10 73 

2 IV. UFoodB 

1616 1115 UtM*d H 

271k 129* USAOwt 

815 515 UnlMV 

2216 1415 unlttln 172 83 7 

1415 WVk UnvOn 17 

8*5 695 UnJvH* 16 


16 24* 216 24* + V* 

17 80 221* 2116 2115— 46 

22 25 1115 114* 1115— V* 

2 1446 149* 1415 

47 in* 109* 104b 

14 11 2346 234* 23% 

7 1 349k 244* 244* 

46 115 145 14k 

17 W 14k 14b 

12 94 171b 129b 1246 + lb 

12 IS W15 141b— 4k 

23 515 546 5% 

7 29 21 201*, 209b— 4fc 

17 7 1115 1116 1116— 4k 

16 27 71* 7)6 716— lk 


BOCA RATON, Florida — The Securities 
and Exchange Commission chairman. John 
S.R. Shad, proposed Thursday that new issues 
erf corporate and municipal bonds be made in 
the form of an electronic "global certificate” as 
a first step is saving money on engraving and 
delivery erf securities certificates. 

“It just has got to be incredibly better lhan 
shuffling all that paper,” Mr. Shad said at a 
convention of the Securities Industry Associa- 
tion. a group of Wall Street securities traders. 
He said the securities industry' spends vast sums 
on engraving, cutting, and delivering tons of 
securities certificates daily. 

In addition. Mr. Shad said, millions of dollars 
in certificates are lost, stolen, mutilated and 
counterfeited annually. Most of the cost, which 
is ultimately paid by investors, could be elimi- 
nated, he said. 

Mr. Shad said the SEC wanted to “immobi- 
lize” certificates by placing them in central 
depositories and by using an dec ironic book 
entry system to record investor purchases and 
sales. 


IF YOU GET 

A KICK OUT OF SOCCB?, READ 

ROB HUGHES 

WEDNESDAYS IN THE 1HT 


;i-h Vrr 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Dec 5, 1985 

Not met valve qootatfto* arc HPPlIee by »* Funds fated wtth tte «co*pNob of min* oootes based on aria. 

The morainal iviiibols Imlkot* Irwureiicy «f wioiatteat smiled: (cD-tfaHv; (rt-wettr; {&) -bimonthly; (rl-ragolarty; (D-imwriaiir. 




Photos by: Bischof, Burn, Capa. Cartier-Bresson, Erwitt, Hass, and other Magnum photographers. 

From the archives of Magnum Photos, a photographic record of Europe 
in the immediate postwar years — striking images of a continent shaking 
off the debris of destruction and coming to life. 

Maiy Blume, the International Herald Tribune’s distinguished 
feature journalist, sets the postwar scene and interviews many of the 
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work of some of the 20th century’s master photqjoumalists. 

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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1985^ 


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LONDON — Citicorp, the par-' 
eat company of Citibank, has an- 
nounced top-level management 
changes in its operations around 
the world. 

The New York-based bank said 
Victor Menezes, the country corpo- 
rate officer for Hong Kong, has 
been named senior corporate offi- 
cer with responsibility for Latin 
America ana Africa. He succeeds 
Michael A.' -CaBen, who has be- 
come group executivefor the North 
American banking group. 

Mr. Menezes, who is based in 

New York, will also be a member of 
Gticorp's policy committee'. He 
will turn over his duties as country 
corporate officer for Hong Kong to 
Steven KL Baker, who was manag- 
ing director of Gticorp Australia in 
Sydney. Mr. Baker is succeeded by 
bis-depnty, Martin Cooper. 

David Gibson has been appoint- 
ed group executive for the newly 
constituted worldwide private 
banking group. He will be based in 
New York and will be replaced as 
division head for Southeast Asia by 
Dennis Martin. Mr. Martin moves 
to Singapore from Buenos Aires, 
wbere he was Citibank’s division 
heed for the South Andean and 
River Plate region. 

Citibank also has appointed 
Nicholas Greville division bead for 
Europe, the Middle East and Afri- 
ca, within the private banking 
group headed by Mr. Gibson. In 


this post, which is new, Mr. Gre- 
ville will be in London. 

Succeeding Mr. Greville as coun- 
try head for Singapore was Robert 
McCormack, who previously was 
in Caracas as Gti bank’s senior of- 
ficer for Venezuela. 

Nando Pamnani has become 
Citibank's country corporate offi- 
cer for the Philippines, replacing 
Rafael Buenaventura, who was 
tr ansf erred to Milan to take over as 
country corporate officer for Italy. 
Mr. Buenaventura succeeds Jared 
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Mr. Pamnani, who was Citi- 
bank's senior officer for India, has 
moved from Bombay to Manila to 
take up his new post. He turns over 
his duties in India to David H. 
Roberts, who was in Jakarta as 
Gtibank's head of corporate bank- 
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pham. 

Jacques Degoove, who most re- 
cently was in Saudi Arabia, will be 
Gtibank’s regional trade coordina- 
tor, based in Hoag Kong. He takes 
over responsibilities previously 
held by Ed Pozon. 

Australia & New Zealand Brak- 
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Iran for the Tehran representative 
office of Grmdlays Bank, an ANZ 
unit, to also represent the ANZ 
Bank there. F. Behruun, the Grind- 
lays representative in Tehran, will 
also serve as ANZ's representative. 

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International Finance Corp. Appoints 
SpecM Represent ativeinParis Office 

Internationa/ Herald Tribune . . 

LONDON — International Finance Corp. has appointed Gunter 
H. Kreuter special representative in its Paris office. 

LFG an affiliate erf the World Bank that specializes m project 
financing in developing countries, said the establishment of the post 
was part of an “intensification of promotional efforts" in Europe to 
main- its “expertise and services botes* known and more available to 
European corporations and banks." EFC also has a special representa- 
tive in London. 

As bead of the Paris office, Mr. Kreuter will mainly work to develop 
relations with the European corporate sector and act as a liaison with 
DFCs investment departments in Washington. 

Before joining the World Bank group in 1962, Mr. Kreuter, a West 
German, was with Forges &Acieries of VoUdingen and Ge-Fran^aise 

des Petioles in Paris. In his most recent post, Mr. Kreuter was 
director, department of investments, Africa, at IFG . . 


has appointed David S. Noble gen- 
eral manager of its new Australian 
subsidiary, NatWest Australia 
Bank LuL, based in Sydney- He 
previously was in the London head 
office, where he was in charge of 
the shipping section of the interna- 
tional banking division, a post in 
which be was succeeded by Alan 

Atkinson. w . . 

Dai- f rid Kangyo International 
Ltd. in London has named Tak eo 
Soma managing director, succeed- 
ing Taiji Yamada. Mr. Sonia was 
r frfiirTpan, president and chief exec- 
utive (rfficer of Dai-lchi Kangyo 
Bank (Canada) in Toronto. 

Lloyds Bank PLC has appointed 
Sir George Jefferson a director, ef- 
fective Jan. 1. Sir George is chair- 
man and chief executive of British 
Telecommunications PLC. 

PtaOfas/Dn Pool Optical has ap- 
pointed A.B. Bok chief executive 
officer, effective Jan. 1. He current- 
ly is director of the corporate re- 
gional bureau Far East at Philips 
NV, based in ibe head office in 
Eindhoven, the Netherlands. He 
will be succeeded in that post by 
GJL Kunnen. Philips/ Du Pont 
Optical is the joint venture that 
Philips and Du Pont Co. will form 
in the field of optical media. 

Arab Latin American Bank said 
Greville MacGillivray is retiring at 
the end of the year as senior repre- 
sentative of its London office. He 
will be succeeded by Charles Bur- 
kin, until recently chief executive of 
UBAF Bank Ltd. in London. 

Gulf International Bank BSC of 
Bahrain has named Stnart 
Westwater executive vice president 
»nH head of its assets and liabilities 
group. He moves to Manama from 
bis post at Bank of America as 
senior vice president and treasurer 
of the North American regjon. 

Cedd, the Luxembourg- based 
Eurobond clearing house, said 
Alain Meyere is joining its repre- 
sentative office in London, where 
he win be in charge of the Middle 
and Far East, a new posL He previ- 
ously was with Cedd in Luxem- 
bourg. 

Badt of Ireland has named Brian 
J. Goggin to the new post of senior 
manag er, cotp o ralc b ankin g, based 

in the London office. He was in the 

Dublin head office as a lending 
manager in the corporate banking 
division. 


Singapore Assesses Laissez-Faire Approach 


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(Continaed from Age II) * 
cal leader. Tan Room Swan, had 
been promwing to finance a recov- 
ery plan for the Singapore compa- 
ny, with the assistance of aevoal 
banks, until last week. But he - 
out after wiring wfaal he 
called a “legal bitch.” Bankas said 
he M set unacceptable demands 
for priority repayment far his loans 
over those of the banks. 

Several of Mr. Tan’s companies 
were linked by shareholdings to . 
Pan-Electric, which collapsed un- 
der more than 350 million Sugar . 
pore dollars (S170 million) in debts 
to 30 banks. 

Mr. Tan has just been elected . 
head of tiw Malaysian Chinese As- 
sociation, a major component of 
the National Front Coahtian that 
gove rn s the country under Prime 
MilPSTffr Mahathir M nlumuid- 

A former Pan-Electric director, 
Peter W. F. Hum, has-been miss- . 
ing from Singapore since last* 
spring, and he is being sought for 

S ' suing on missing- company 
He is thought to be in Tai- 
wan or South America. 


“I don’t ihinir even the govern- 
ment leaden know exactly what 
was going on,” said a diplomat with 
close ties to the banking industry. 
“This is going to get worse before it 
gets b etter, another Westerner 
added. 


pore w hile a debate. was in full 
swing over whether the government 
was interfering too modi in the 
economy! ; 

Complaints from tire private seo- 
tor were that gawnument enter- 
prises were cutting into their op- 
tions for expansion, that tax and 
service charges were becoming too 
high -and mat the government’s 
compulsory socaal-wetf are program 
—requiring an employer’s contri- 
bution eqnivaknt to 50 percent of a 
worker's monthly wage — was eat- 
ing op money that wbuld be more 
usefully reinvested. ; 

Singaporeans have the third- 
highest standard of Irving in Asia, 
after. Japan and the cal kingdom of 
Brunei. ' , ■ *_, 

The government of- Prime Minis- 
ter Lee Knan Yew has also been 


criticized by business leaders for 
encouraging the overbuilding of 
hotels and shopping complexes by 
making land too readily available. 

The budding boom has at the 
same time obliterated much of his- 
toric Singapore, reducing its tour- 
ism potentiaL 

Government encouragement, 
some politicians and diplomats 
surest, may have also led to overly 
optimistic expansion by smaller 
concerns, which are going into 
bankruptcy at what some feel is an 
alarming rate. 

The most notable of these col- 
lapses — and the largest bankrupt- 
cy before the Pan-Electric case — 
was that of Lamipak Industries, 
whose 38-year-old president, Fran- 
cis Siah, had been until this year 
one of the wonder bays of Singa- 
pore. Mr. Siah had built up a 
worldwide plastics industry with 
the kind of advanced technology 
Singapore fosters. His empire col- 
lapsed and he is now under crimi- 
nal prosecution for illegalities he 
allegedly entered into to keep him- 
self afloat 


Texas Air Names 
JSeiv President i 

Ht'Ulcrr 

HOUSTON - Tep *«r 

Corr has announced that Ocr-. 

aid L Gitner. who ha- been tire 
chairman of Pan Am Corp. and 
ii> Pan American W.d Air- 
wavs sub>:diary. h3s beetr 
named president of Texas Air. 

The companv announced 
Wednesday that Mr. Gitner 
would succeed Frank A. Lor- 
tf ruo who will take the 'acani 
position of chairman and who 
will remain chief cxecume offi- 
cer. . . L 

Mr. Gitner was senior \Kcjr 

president of Texas Internation- 
al Airways until 1980, when be 
left to cn-found and become 
president of People 
.Airlines Inc. Texas imemaiion- 
al wa> acquired by Tesas -Air 
Corp.'s majoritv-owned Conti- 
nental AirLino Inc. subsidiao- 
in 

British Steel Coqx said Robert 
Scholey, its depuLy chairman and 
chief executive, will be its next 
chairman. He will take over from 
Sir Robert Has] am in April when 
Sir Robert leaves to become chair- 
man of the British National Coal 

jSomura Securities Co. of Toicy-^ 
said Yoshio Terasawa. executive 
managing director of Nomura and 
chairman of Nomura Securities In- 
ternational its American affiliate, 
has been promoted to executive 
vice president in charge of the par- 
ent company’s U.SL, British and 
European operations. He continues 
as chairman of the U.S. affiliate. 

CXBC Ltd., the investment and 
merchant-banking unit of Canadi- 
an Imperial Bank Group, 
ing a representative office to To- 
kyo. Canadian Imperial has named 
Lowrey Christie, a former execu- 
tive director of CISC Ltd., to the 
new post of general manager of its 
entire operations to Japan. 

S.G. Warburg & Co, the Lon- 
don-based merchant bank, sar - 
Alan Peck would leave the Londofi 1 
law firm of FTeshfields on Jan. 31 
and join the bank as a director to 
March, thereafter becoming a 
member of the corporate finance 
division. 

German GNP Set 
To Grow 1,5% 

lineman chit Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT-West Ger- 
many is expected to nmort a 

f rovisional. inflated-adjusted 
.5-percent rise to gross nation- 
al product for the third quarter 
from ihe second quarter, gov- 
ernment officials said Them-, 
day. .f 

This third-quarter rise in scar 
sonally adjusted GNP would 
compare with a 2-percent in- 
crease to the second quarter and 
a 1.5-percent drop to the first 
three months of the year. GNP 
measures the value of a nation's 
production of goods and ser- 
vices. 

Officials said Thursday that 
the economy expanded at an 
average 2.25-percent annual 
rate to the first three quarters, 
undergirding expectations that 
West Germany would post 2,5-. 
percent GNP growth for the 
year on the heels of an antici- 
pated strong fourth quarter. 
Growth to 1984 was 2.6 per- 
cent. 






































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1985 


Page 17 


'Portugal Moves to Revive Bourse 

iif \ 


Vtsr. 


By Ken Pocrihger 

fatcmatioMl Berakt Tribute • 
r '\JSBON — Today the trading. 
■p (.n, with only three brokers and a 
■'-ydfiil of active issues, is a shad- 
^of its frenzied former sdf. 
V^hristoas 1973. was the Lisboa 
' . b'cfe Exchange’s watershed. At' 
Lisbon was flipped by 
■^CuIative fevCT. People invested 
: '<i ,t market conducted Largely out 
: >4 ( he tranks of cars paihedm front 
be exchange, by the Tagcs Riv- 
"t -The dealers frequently offered 
: '-p.e mcwthan promises — to boy, 
le and deliver — but the public 
-■-.-.heedless. 

: 'voor months later the babble 
Leftist military officers 

- ^ tcd die conservative dictator, 
V rceflo Caetano, and a rewoiu- 

- >iaiy aimed forces junta took 
■ * r.t 

- : - ,n one of its first acts, the junta 
> ’’.'sed the exchange, nationalized 

3 of the consumes traded there 
nJ left thousands of investors 
fog worthless paper. Many 
.) got hurt are stm trying to <ac- 
»• .Ok promised compensation from 
■_ government. 

-■ -i: hit now, moves are afoot to reju- 
_■ i. ate the Lisbon Bclsa in advance 
.Portugal’s Jan ] entry into the 
” ,~;opean Community and the 
ngps that this will bring to do- 
v.r.stic investment and financial 

- .. ' ^lymp g those malting the moves 
r.j;. in the government of 
Lir^'me Minister M&rio Soares, 
ch, determined to build a last- 
. economic recovery, wants more 
- » LStnvait outlets for investors. 
..^V.iently, most investors put (heir 
i'.ings in high-interest savings ac- 

nl&, winch burdens hanks with 

' moan tains and starves the 

ital market of investment funds. 

J 1 *,iks in Pormgal have strict ced- 
-'-■ ■‘■s on the amount of lending that 
/ can do and interest rates at 
i:re than 40 percent mean that 
' •- L companies can afford to bor- 
vf money anyway. 

• recently installed minority 
, t . ial Democratic government is 
' " igod to give a transfusion to the 


nefl-mqribond exchange. The gov- 
flinnemhopesthatbyrdiivigom- 
zsg the stock exchange companies 
needing capital can rake it ihroogfr 
stock issues.' 

Describing the market as a fun- 
damental financial tool, a top Trea- 
sury official, Tavares Mordra, has 
announced a pubtio-rdattans cam- 
paign to encourage investors away 
from longterm bank deposits and 
into the stock market to help recap- 
itahxe stag; companies ami, thus, 


: as the stock exchange pred- 
denLCariosAflrerroRo^ sard re- 
cently: “It’s an uphill battle to re- 
store people’s confides in the 
cgdumga.* 

Mr. Rosa vividly remembers the 
day . Um police swooped down on 
. traders perched cm. car fenders out- 
side the BoIsq, hairing rhr lucrative 
trade in bundles of shares selling at 
■prices rally distantly related to 
those on the official board inside. 

A local cement company, for ex- 
ample, quoted on the board at 
73p00 escudos a share, was trading 
outride at 180,000 escudos, winch 
at that time equaled about 56,500 a 
share. 

Today the exchange is far staider 
and closdy regulated. 

“Gone are the days when the 
punters (gamblers) ruled," said Mr. 


Rosa: Tire three registered stock- 
brokers have tight settlement dead-: 
limy of three days; rfmrmaams 
are controlled by the government, 
and Are spread between buyers’ 
and seflerc prices each day is Emifc 
ed tolO percent. 

The newly 1 computerized flora 
opens fra business every monring 
except Monday at 10:30, but trad- 
jra in the 23 companies left on the 
white board is hardly brisk. 

Pedro Caldeira, a stockbroker of 
15 years’ rianding. said most of bis 
vabmre cranes from quoted govern- 
ment bonds, debentures and other 
public debt paper. 

“But there have been short-lived 


best single day of dealing 
around 70 million escudos .(about 
$424,000)," he said. 

Mr. Caldeira and others before 
that a boom could follow the dis- 
mantling of foreign investment 
barriers. Portugal has agreed to be- 
gin such a dismantling during its 
transition to fiill EC membership. 

“I have recently started receiving 
inquiries from American bankers 
and investment groups interested 
in the Lisbon exchange. But at pre- 
sent, they have to get central tank 
clearance for foreign investment 
and there are problems repatriating 
profits," be said. 



CURRENCY MARKETS 


Dollar Ends Unchanged 
In Quiet U.S. Trading 


Inside the Lisbon Stock Exchange, with an electronic screen 
displaying prices of the few shares that are traded there. 


CmptWfy Ota- Sufi From Dispareha 

NEW YORK — The dollar end- 
ed virtually unchanged Thursday 
in Europe and the United States 
after a quia session marked by 
heayier-than-expected corporate 
buying. Dealers said that markets 
were showing increased signs of 
settling into a pre-Christmas calm. 

‘Traders aren’t doing much as 
the ead of the year approaches,” 
rare Frankfurt dealer said. “Most 
of the trading is technically based, 
but the volume is getting thinner 
and a few trades have a bigger 
effect in such a market.” 

Many participants believe the 
dollar will go lower over the longer 
term, but the slight rebound this 
week, and the firmness of overnight 
interest rates has made dealers 
wary about selling. 

In New York, the dollar ended at 
15175 Deutsche marks, down from 

Company 
Results 

Revenue am prefTti or Jraaiii 
mimona. an to local currencies unless 


THE EUROMARKETS 


Borrowers Turn to Nondollar Sector and Warrant Issues 


By Christopher Pizzcy 

Reuters 

LONDON • — Eurobond trading 
remained listless Thursday, with 
prices confined to a narrow range. 
Borrowers continued to shun fixed 
and floating-rate, dollar-deno uri- 
nated issues, turning instead to 
warrant issues ra nondollar sectors, 
dealers said. 

Two b or row ers launched a total 
of 250 million Deutsche marks of 
new debt, as DM Eurobonds 
finned modestly. In the dollar sec- 


tor, Monsanto raised $100 mfifion 
through an issue with attached war- 
rants exercisable into more bonds, 
while Merrill Lynch Capital Mar- 
kets offered bond warrants. 

“Warrants are what investors are 
looking for, since many just don't 
know which way rates are going," 
said an official at Merrill Lynch, 

whirfi also Irani managrai theMoD- 

santo issue. 

The Monsanto issue, a five-year, 
914-percent callable braid priced at 
lOOtt, carries warrants exercisable 


into a noncaDable but otherwise 
identical issue. As with other 
Tuxmless-waxrant” issues, in the 
period before the call option takes 
effect, die warrants may only be 
exercised by tendering the host 
bonds, and thereafter exercise is for 

The issue ended at a discount of 
about IX, around die lA-percent 
fees. The warrants, priced at $11, 
dosed at about $12. 

Merrill Lynch’s other warrants 
transaction was a novel issue of 


125,000 call warrants at $14 cadi 
into a total of $125 nwiUnn of 10- 
p e ro eat Merrill Lynch bonds, doe 
in 1990, and 125,000 put warrants 
at $17 each for U.S. Treasury 9H- 
percent bonds, due in 1990. 

VHle de Mon trial issued a 10- 
bfllioa-yen bond paying 6K per- 
cent over nine years and priced at 
10191 The issue was lead managed 
by Bank of Tokyo International 
LtiL, which quoted it within the 2- 
percent fees at a discount of about 
IK percent 



2.5205 on Wednesday; at 202.80 
yen, up from 202.60; at 7.6755 
French francs, down from 7.6785 
and at 2.0955 Swiss francs, up from 
10945. The British pound eased to 
$1.4805 from $1.4850. 

in earlier trading in Europe, the 
US. currmcy ended in London at 
15190 DM virtually unchang ed 
from Wednesday's dose of 2-5195. 
and at 203.15 yea, up from 20272 
on Wednesday. 

The British pound, meanwhile, 
eased slightly on nervousness over 
oil prices ahead of the scheduled 
Saturday meeting of the Organiza- 
tion of Petroleum Exporting Coun- 
tries. It sBpped to $1.4790 from 
$1.4865 on Wednesday and to 
3.7273 DM from 3.7465. 

In other European markets 
Thursday, the dollar was fixed in 
Frankfurt at 25266 DM, up from 
2S224 at the Wednesday fixing; at 
7.7035 French francs in Paris, up 
from 7.6820. and 1,723.25 lire in 
Milan, up from 1,717.50. 

In Zurich, the dollar dosed at 
20988 Swiss francs, up fractionally 
from 20963. (Reuters, A?) 


$10.2 Billion 
WasSoIdinBid 
To Lower Dollar 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The United 
States and 10 other industrial na- 
tions sold SI 0.2 billion on foreign 
exchange markets in the six weeks 
after a SepL 22 agreement to re- 
duce the value of the dollar, ac- 
cording to the Federal Reserve 
Bank of New York. 

The Fed sold nearly $32 billion 
of the total to buy Deutsche marks 
and Japanese yen, making it the 
largest U.S. currency intervention 
since 1980. 

The intervention was outlined 
Wednesday in a report on foreign 
exchange operations by the Fed 
and the U5. Treasury for the three 
months ended Oct. 31. The report 
said all the dollar sales by the New 
York Fed on behalf of the Treasury 
and the Fed system had occurred 
after the agreement by the United 
States, Japan. West Germany, Brit- 
ain and France. 

From the days before the agree- 
ment through the end of October, 
the value of the dollar fell 13 per- 
cent against the yen and 105 per- 
cent against the mark, the Fed re- 
ported. 


The Microchip as Detective 


T: trillion. 


(Continued from Page 111 
from, say, 12 o’clock to 6 o’clock, 
so you know the target is behind 
you." 

Signal power of the crystal-con- 
trolled Lo-Jack unit mounted in the 
owner’s car has been held to 1 watt, 
so it will broadcast only to police in 
a two-to-five- mil e area, avoiding a 
clutter of beeps on patrol cars ev- 
erywhere. 

Unlike sirens, lodes and other 
theft deterrents, the idea with Lo- 
Jack is secrecy and there are no 
identifying deoils or telltales on the 
car. Toe unit looks like a rectifier or 
any of the other tiny “cans" in the 


car's wiring system, so it is difficult 
to find. 

"It can be put under the hood, in 
the trunk, inside the frame, inside 
upholstery, anywhere," Mr. Duvall 
said. "So anybody who wants to 
steal the car will have to start look- 
ing in all these places to find iL 
And lei’s say he does steal the car 
and even has some sort of radio- 
frequency detector. That won't do 
him any good until the unit goes 
off. and then he is going to have to 
stop at the side of the road and 
start tearing the car apart to find it 
He'll have to do that or leave it. We 
think hell leave iL" 


Thursday’s 

OTC 


n* .a h. if 


Prices 


NASDAQ prices os of 
3 pjn. New York time. 

Via. The Associated Press 


jm Stock 


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Solution to Prevkxts Puzzle 


UNtaoBl 
High Low Stock 


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32ft 23ft BMAB IM U 9 

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lift PieCOfe 

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37ft 

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202 

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358 

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47 

32 

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171 

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6ft 

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77 

13ft 

129k 


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lift 

11 

« -ft 

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174 

20ft 

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19*6— ft 

39 

13*4 Puri Bn 

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ID 

219 

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25ft- ft 


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356 




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1140 

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240 

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7ft 

33ft 

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354 

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34 

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toft 

17ft 

toft + ft 




IX 

1ft 

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41 

22*6 

22ft 

22ft + ft 





116 

12ft 

lift 

12 

35*6 

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M 

XI 

23 

30*6 

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640 

lift 

lift 

life + *6 

7*6 

4ft Racy El 

30 

X6 

M2 

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.12 

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72 

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lift 

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30ft 

toft ReutrH 

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168 

3Bft 

M 

28ft— ft 

47*6 


140 

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9*6 Rhodes 

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3*6 Rfitllms 



2133 

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f 

22ft 

12*6 RlchEls 



2 

21ft 

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lift Rival 

M 

44 

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24*6 RaadSv 

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32 

34ft 

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11 RobNua 

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1 


312 

9 

9ft + ft 
3ft— ft 





131 

3ft 

3ft 

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12ft SBkPSs 

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203 

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96 

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34 

34 — ft 

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149 

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12575 

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4ft 

1ft SacTOB 



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34 

4155 

33 

2*k 

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2 

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311 

ra 

61% 

ift + *4 



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1348 

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8H 

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4 

1501 

131% 

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IM Swks 

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148 

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.15 

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2816 

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toft 

10 Shonsoa 


343 

13ft 

lift 

lift 

10*4 

3ft Silicon 



1054 

4*6 

4ft 

ife + ft 

17ft 

9ft Silicons 



1140 

15ft 

141% 

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life sinevoi 



196 

life 

14 

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11*6 siiicnx 



1303 

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23ft 

23ft— ft 

IM 

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79 

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1514 

10ft sippfna 



£ 

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lift 

lift 

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lift 

16 

14 4- ft 

12ft 

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DE 

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63 

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4 

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1008 

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54 

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1D4 

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341 

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335 

2Sft 24ft 

2491 + % 


ift Saftuch 



470 


fft 


21ft 

life SoftwA 



365 

17*6 

16ft 

17ft + ft 

381% 

tofe SonoePa 

JMa 2J 

131 

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39 

29ft 

26*6 

14*6 SoorFd 

Me is 

11 

17 

17 

17 

61% 

3*6 SoHosb 



IW 

41% 

4ft 

41% 

X 

30ft SthOFn 

S3 

2D 

694 

71ft 

Xft 

21 +14 

2 fit 

lift Sorfrst 

Jti 

12 

IW 

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15% 

If + U 

91% 

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968 

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311% 

22ft Sovrans IDB 

42 

451 

31 

30ft 

30*6— ft 

toft 

10 speedy 



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116 

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112 

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life 

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X 

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lift 

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192 

toft 

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8 

5 StotBtd 

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2M 


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34 —ft 

411% 

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199 

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cte vniueaie^gvkiend or uKJIsMlwHon dote. 

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I— oa too In full. 


imonHUMus 


: 









Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1985 






IS I to lit 112 113 


PEANUTS 


Ian 


UH 1 II I 129 130 131 132 



books 


THE WINE-DARK SEA 


By Leonardo Sciascia. Translated from the Italian by Ami Bardoni 142 pages. 114.9: 
Caramel Press, 108 £ 31st Street, New York, A*. Y. 10016 


Reviewed by Herbert Micgang 


A S a novelist and essayist, Leonardo Scias- 
cia is the most authentic voice writing in 


BLONDIE 


LOOK. THERE 
GOES EDNA 


LET H0R GO... I 
CANT STAND 
HER r*~S\ 


WHV? 


SJHfS £»UOH ; 

ATERRI0UET 

HCUSEKEEFfcR 


i xs «; 
SHE 
THAT. 
SAD ? 


EVEN HER WATERP©D 
-r IS POLLUTED -1 


153 15* 155 156 


SOLUTION TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE, page 17 


A CROSS 

1 bang 

(recklessly) 

5 Drams 
9 Mansard 
features 

14 Claudius's 
successor 

15 Kind of 
Aust ralian 
grass 

16 Hives 

17 At anytime 

18 "Oz" author 

19 A sister of 
Jupiter 

20 Lessor's 
return 

21 “Little Iodine" 
creator 

23 Party to a bill 
of exchange 

25 Store 
detective, at 
times 

26 Catenaries 

28 Etna and 

Pelee. e.g. 

33 Annulments 

37 Mother of 
Romulus and 
Remus 

38 Composer of 
"Rudolph the 
Red-Nosed 
Reindeer’* 

39 Proper 

40 Assign 

41 Teen malady 

42 Arrange 
systematically 
again 


44 McCoy 

46 Early 
Virginian 

47 R.L.S. 
component 

49 Delivered 
goods in trust 

53 “Little Orphan 
Annie" creator 

58 QB Brian 

59 Look 

{hunyup) 

60 Demanding 

61 Rocket ryorg. 

62 EnLertainer 
Anouk 

63 Yugoslav of 
yore 

64 Organic 
compound 

65 Noted violinist 

66 Snick and 

67 L.A. sports 
team 


DOWN 

1 Klinker cohort 

2 Simple 
machine 

3 Cobo Hall, for 
one 

4 "Beetle 
Bailey” 
creator 

5 Theme 

6 Jai 

7 Egret feature 

8 Golf great 

9 Cheat 

10 Neighborhood 

11 Green. in 
heraldry 


1Z High-born, In 
Hesse 

13 Mediocre 

22 Slangy 
affirmatives 
24 Goddess of 
strife 
27 Certain 
windows 
29 "The Spirit” 
creator 

30" 

Cinders." 1926 
film 

31 Tumult 
32Stufr 

33 He loves: Lat. 

34 Musical family 
name 

35 Eure neighbor 

36 Umpire’s call 
40 Astral body 

42 “Anthem" 
author 

43 A role for 
Beverly Sills 

45 Actress 
Brennan 
48 Drill 

50 Woody vine 

51 College in S 
England 

52 Monty Hal! 
achievements 

53 German 
composer 
Joseph 

54 Got off a steed 

55 Frost 


r\ n'a is the most authentic voice writing in 
Sicily today. He remains in Palermo, avoiding 
the literary mains tream in Milan and Rome, 
sp inning stories that unfold so naturally they 
seem derived from folk tales. Some are; they 
can ivy ?™ with a great-grandfather who ran 
through the streets of Palermo with Garibaldi’s 
Thousand, and suddenly turn into a story on 
Mafia vengeance. 

The better-known ltak> Cahrino, who died in 
September, also drew strength from (rid tales 
for Ids fabulist novels. 

In The Wine-Dark Sea,” a collection of 
short stories, Sciascia works Us native soil 


phrase in its title (“II Mare Colore del Vino"), 
it is now published in English for the Hist tin*, 
with a fine translation by Avril Bardoni. 

The 13 stories show Sciasda’s range. Son* 
are hilarious, such as “Apocryphal Carespoo. 
deuce re Crowley in which Benito Mussed 

corresponds with the chief of police of a anfl : 

town in Sicily, ordering him to spy upon a 
British artist who is living with five young 
women in a villa and painting obscene ft* 
coes. It becomes a statement on the diciaior. 

.Another lighthearted story, “A Matter of 
Conscience," touches upon one of the favptes 
themes of Italian writer?: cuckoldiy. Arao^j 
Sicilian writers who have also played with la 
subject in this century are Luigi KrandeHoand 
Elio VittorinL In Sdascfc's modern tale, these 
i 5 a feminist twist — the discovered young wife 


realistically, without Calvino's literary Hour- 0 f the old lawyer endsup Laughing at him. 


isbes, but he also has a few tricks up his sleeve. in “Mafia western," the author returns to a /' 


BEETLE BAILEY 




Quite often there is a double-twist because subject he has handled powerfully in Us my. 



Sdasda’s characters are cunning; their enemy 
always seems to be some higher authority — a 
landowner, the clergy, the Mafia, a police 
chief, whoever happens to run the government. 


els. Sciascia does not romanticize kilim, a 
fundamental fault of American novelists oft 
filmmakers. In his story, revenge polls the 

triaaer and blows up an assassin’s car; the 
°P - ■ ..j i w.r..' i_ . 


Still, the author manages to find flowers in the aul bor is not enchanted by the Mafia's code of 


island's cactus. 

“The Wine-Dark Sea" is a good introduction 
to Sciascia, author of such novels ks “Equal 
Danger," “A Man’s Blessings,” “Salt in the 
Wound” and, most recently, “Candido." Al- 
though The Wine-Dark Sea” appeared in Ita- 
ly a dazes years ago with the same Homeric 


honor. Sciascia has often been categoraeQasa 
detective story writer. He is not, Like Krandd- 
lo. he is a writer of metaphysical mystoau, 
rooted in human affairs. 


ategorizedj 
Like Piram 


Herbert Mitgpng is on the staff of The Ne» 
York Times. ' ^ 


FOXYBABY 


-ANDY CAPP 


I’VE HEARD I 
ALL ABOUT ./ 
>- IT.' HOW 
COULD NOLI-?? , 


I’D HAVE THOUGHT^ BUTNW MM iGAi’IJwiP’)' ij 

Tstwposnou Jyvoii NES> t most, 


By Elizabeth Jolley. 261 pages. SI 4.95. 

VUdngPatguin Inc, 40 W. 23rd Street, New York. N.Y. 10010 


Reviewed by MIchiko Kakutani 


MEjtOO. 
l PET- 


H OW, wonders the heroine of “Foxybaby ” 
has dm gotten into such a ridiculous 


into what she hopes are appropriate expres- 
sions of hope, interest, or sympathy, and trying 


L 

3 

r mj 



, 








== 




WIZARD of ID 


: Again 
1 Urfizidi 


0 New York Times, edited by Eugene Main dux. 

DENNIS THE MENACE" 


display 


W what 

V cr ? 


INVI£I0U^ 

INK- 




isrrf 


predicament? Here she is, Miss Alma Porch, 
novelist and lecturer, stuck in some godforsak- 
en little town in Australia, trying to teach 
drama to a bunch of unhappy women, who are 
more intent on shedding a couple of pounds 
than thinking about ait. - 
Can she really use them as a sounding board 
for her latest work of fiction? Can she inspire 
them to create something vaguely artistic 
themselves? Gan she find, here, a respite from 
her own boring life at home? 


ttcxeor-mse 

£MPrr«7TTl££ 


Using tins ludicrous situation as a spring- 
card, Elizabeth Jolley gets her third novel off 



board, Elizabeth Jolley gets her third novel off 
to a fine, bouncy start. 

Certainly, Jolley has a bright eye for the 
absurd — for the pretentious posturing of 
qiinte- mnngftrmg nnademi cs and for the impor- 
tunate inquiries of their philistine students. 
Indeed, Trinity College, as this glorified sum- 
mer camp is called, toms out to be an awful 
place: students, like their tutors, are housed in 
cramped rooms, obliged to study with teachers 
barely capable of speaking English and sub- 
jected, to classes in such matters as chicken- 
wire weaving. ... 

They’re starved on a diet of lettuce and 
lemon juice, forced to buy additional food on 
the load black market, and generally incon- 
venienced, embarrassed, and conned. 

' - Needless to say, the prim Miss Porch is 
appalled by Trinity College and wishes she had 
never agreed to come. A well-meaning spinster, 
die seems afflicted with an overwhelming self- 
consciousness, forever arranging her features 


sions of hope, interest, or sympathy, and trying 
id make soothing noises when she's at a loss for 
words. 

Her imagination likes to take quirky little 
turns, it also has a way of embroidering the 
lives of people she has just encountered in- 
stantly turning them into fictional creations. 

When Mrs. Castle. Tor instance, starts dith- 
ering on about her poor darling daughter, bar 
lovely son-in-law, and their four Siamese cals, 
Miss' Porch conjures up. in her mind a picture 
of the Castle home, in which the lonely old 
woman makes a pest of herself in her duuren's ; 
lives. • 1 

The other characters Miss Porch meets',} - 
Trinity tend to be as one-dimensional as Mn. 
Castle. 

The narrow, cartoon-like characterization 
leads to some very amusing, if broadly drawn, 
moments, but it creates problems when Jolley 
makes it clear that she does not merely warn to 
write a straightforward satire, that she also 
wants to make a commentary on the conse- 
quences of loneliness and isolation. 

As she did in her last novel, “Miss Peabody^ , 
Inheritance,” Jolley tries to use the overall 
narrative structure to reflect and refract, the 
relationships that east between the author of a 
work of fiction, its characters and its audience. 
But this time, the three elements — that is, 
Alma Porch, her fictional creations and her 
students — seem too flimsy to support such a 
thesis, the geometry that develops between 
them, all too predictable and paL 


Michiko Kakutani is on the staff iff Thr fyf - 
York Times. ;3‘ 













































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1985 


SPORTS 


Page 19 


f-i 

K 

1L 

3$ 

1^1 


J?«zr, Hear, Rugby 
Isa Friendly Game 

■ 4mce Fimce^Presse^ 

LONDON — Soccer, ft .ajh 
pears, is nol the only sport on 
this island that can become yfch 
lenLAad fee good guys are not 


Evert, Navratilova Gain Australian Open Final, but Not Easily 


CfiBfsW by Ow Stttff Fram Dispatches 

MELBOURNE • — ‘ Hwc Evert 
Lloyd and Martina Navratilova, 
the workfs two best women play- 
ers, will meet for the 67th time 




■im 


During a “friendly”.' mrijy 
union match in South Wales, 
British newspapers reported 
Thursday, Newport’s Keith 
Jones had. the lobe of his ear . 
lorn off by an opponent A Car- . 
diff player, nnutenffffcd. had 
his nose broken. . 

The ’match was played bo- . 

tween police teams. 

Afterward, other police, inter- 
viewed aB30 players as weB as 
spectators. 

The case, as they say, is still 
open. 


of the Australian Open, and which 
of than will be rankal Na 1 for the 
year. 

Each struggled through hersenri- 
6nal mat ch Thursday. Evert, the 
top seeded (towuting champion, 
had to survive a set pant in the 
sebond set of her controversial, 6-1, 
7-6 (8-6) triumph over the fifth- 
seeded . Claudia Kohde-KUsdi of 
West Germany. Navratilova, seed- 
ed second, triumphed by 6-7 (5-7), 
6-1, 6-4 in a thriller a gainst the 
thud-seeded Hana Mandlikova of 
Czechoslovakia. 


hi the men’s draw, the top-seed- 
ed Ivan Lendl of Czechoslovakia 
had fittie trouble in movinginio the 
semifinals with a 7-6 (7-5), 6-2, 6-1 
victory over the nnseeded English- 
man. John Lloyd, who is Evert's 
husband. 

Lendl next plays the fifth-seeded 
Stef an Edberg- The pcwi-serving 
Swede won, 6-0, 7-5, 6-4, over Mi- 
chiel. SchaperSj, the unseeded 

Dutchman who had ousted Wim- 
bledon champion Boris Becker. 

Evert trailed Kohdo-Kilsdu S-6, 
in their tie breaker and lux. a shot 
that clearly was ait, apparently 
giving (be set to the West German. 

But the ball was called in, and.two 
pants later Evert had won the 

Navratilova bad to calm herself 


Basketball 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Alkmtlc Dtvwoa 


we 12-24 T2-15 34, Motane 11-16 H&l 
batata: l_A. Laterals (JotaraonV); Mob 


laston 

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lew York 

( 

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Jetrefl 
itknta 
Hevtlcnl 
■ weave 
•-.r? . infiaxi 


W L Per. OB (Malone 15}. Antota: I-A. Lokerx 25 l Jotaaon 
17 2 ms — «J; Utah 38 (Stockton T7). The Associated Press 

n e 37 ? « mn -a w to u 22 31 .. __ 

11 10 300 7 te.UA. ctippen MUM to— ut KAANAPALI, Hawan — The 

• 11 X 21 v M. Johnson 12-17 7-rn WlWto 7-ll 6-7 28 ; frfaar York Y anlrag, pwraoirt cmw 
5 14 343 13 TlieiiBM3»414,Woo«l*inS-U**U r Thorpe*- „ n ,. r , iWa _ ./*% . ... 

WM 11 1-3 n Drew 5-0 s~4 13. wm4i: sacro- tama* until the waning days of 

_ menta 44 (Thorne 10); LA. atoaen 43 (Maw- last SOBOH, WCTC DaSebalTs DeSt- 

2 weH 91 . AaUc Sacramento to (YImus TO; paid playm in 1985 . vdufe the 

S la oispen 3* (Nbm tsi. Worid Safes champion Kansu 


-i Yankees Led 
In Salaries if 
»*s Not Victories 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Mldwea DMEan 

toutton 14 4 Joe — 

totwtr 13 7 43 1 

— -Mllaa 11 7 3BB 3te 




12 9 371 

10 9 324 

« 13 314 

PadRC DMtftn 

U 2 30? 

12 10 .545 


371 2te Holy Croat 78, Harvard 70 


10 9 324 3te Lthtah W. Marttattan t? 

6 13 314 7te Navy 101 Fm «. 3D 
Hta Pittsburgh 95. Lafayette 44 

- ■ ...T -A- Lnfcerv 14 2 30? — Provhtaac* 187, Brgwa 88 

. ~ Lomond 12 10 345 6 Rhode Island 45, Near HompNitre 43 

i.^.onm# ? w 374 7Vi SL Bonaventura T7. CoWemliL Pou SO 

V-^IOldtn Stott ■ 13 381 9Vt TenaXe 74, Poim 53 

aincera 7 12 3U ffi Vlllanavo SO, La Salto 46 

' ‘^imetnbi 4 16 300 U ■ SOUTH 

. WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS Alabama 91. Rider 63 

umMu 36 31 11 33— 133 AADIrmMnii 43. E. Tnrnm St. 4 

. „ . tow tenet 30 30 2S 36-111 Ctomtan 7WMt(«an St 36 

- r- AJnoe M0 64 26, Dutotomm 11-21 VI 23; Duke 84. Vamtorbllt 74 

^ilrdwno 1&-20 (Hi 2a Gnrtratt 9-11 1-219. R» East COreHna tX Edtabara SB 
aaadt: Boston 47 (WiniaaU); New Jertay 43 Florida St. 76 H. CaroOna SL 67 
WHUamt 91. Attotot: Boston 26 (MKHato. C toralo Tech w. Tib-OiattomMa 74 
• M 4JilnLAImto6);l4awJartey23(RiChaniMn9). Vkwnia lffL VMI Si 

•orttand It 23 If 36— M Vlrstota Tech 72. CUddln SL 4S 

. "41 onto 25 35 31 30—109 Woke Forest 67. DuvMbm 61 

" WllldiH 14493331, RlvBrsVM6-7 16; Carter MIDWEST 

- 7 - ' 'MSM30,Dr»xler 44H-3ULPaxaonM4-41L DePaui 92. SL Fronds, N.Y. 48 

. .. .After £9 0-2 10. Reeoeads: Portland 40 Illinois 84. WtorOraen Bay 34 
" 'tones 91; Atlanta 43 (Rodins 123. AsiMs: Indlm SL SI. Evonsvlito « 

■■ortksid lfl| Porter 41 lAHantaaoiRtyers 10). Iowa SL 83. N. Iowa 40 
. -envtr 31 34 31 33-41? KantOt 101. Mtott Carolina 79 

. . . nflaaa M to 28 36 -MS Kansas StSXM. IIUEOwaniti/Ma 53 

- - Ena Ibh 1V22 3-4 27, Matt ll-l? V6 27, Lever 4- Marquetto 82, w. Mich tan 70 
-14-416; WHtlam® 12-184-7 28. Retiring 9-15 7-8 MiamL OMo 78, Dayton S7 

•* • i-Rdwonds: Denver 45 (Cooper 8); Indiana Michigan to. Yaunattown St. 42 
. . ' “V (Tisdale 121. Assists: Denver 36 (Mount Mchfoon SI. 87. Oeorae WtwMrwton 61 
■ * — -si laflono 20 (Rldnntoa 5). Mlnnasota 83, Detroit 71 

. j.:.~ z.WMmrtaa si IS to to 8— lit Morthwestom 82, Loyoia. (H. 74 

. ^ - Mndtkikln 34 12 » 17 is— 115 Xavier. OMa 56 CratoMm to 

" Thompson 8-22 0-10 ZL Barkley 8-15 V5 20, M. SOUTHWEST 

- -UiMoae Vto 4-4 20; Rutad 13-21 MR J. Baylor 84. Tens Lutheran S3 
- . TOlcne 9-» 44 22. R ebo un ds: Washington 48 Oral Roberts I?. San Dleao SL 77 
.. uland 16); PtinadetoMa 63 (Barkley 18). Ae- Sa Mettiodtot 83. prakle View 56 
‘ ~ sttzWOtfilnafDn to (Roland Ml; fttnodot- Tutoa 76 CataMo 45 
' - . ‘.da Jl (Cheeks 141. FAR WEST 

— — Heave 33 27 38 33— *f Arizona 63. Denver 5? 


Vlrstota Tech 72, CUPP In SL 4S 
wake Forest 47. Davidson 61 
MIDWEST 


-da Jl (Cheeks 141. FAR WEST 

Heave n 27 to 33— »f Arizona 63. D e n ver S3 • 

toeidx - ' Ukte^coChVm. HfwSJfT Pndfic *T" 

Nance 12-205429, DQVtS 1I-T7 5-727; ytooi- N. Arhono R Or ego n 61 
goal 1-22 7-1029. Green 6-182-2 14. Rebaandm: Utah 76. Santa Clara 71 
ff iknva«9 (Green 10I; Ptnen<x53 ( Nance Ul- WasMneloa ». 7R Idaho 57 
fttots; CMcaeo 18 (Paxaon Si: Phoenhc 34 TOURNAMENTS 

A. Lakers 32 91 3» 34 11—01 First Roeed 

Ml to 38 to to 7—127 SE Louisiana 92. Florida ARM 77 

-detvisan 9-16 13-11 29. Lucas 6-11 M21; Danh NE Loulstana 69, NW Louisiana 60 


Hockey 

National Hockey League Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE ! 

Patrick tNvfslaa . Lmai * * 

W L T Pli CFGA Hutoiee 611. Andreychuk (10L Selllna 2(6). 

• : Utaeinhta 19 6 8 to 116 73 Fellano 031. Tucker (8); Ftacklwt! 

tohtavtan 14 7 3 31 9S 73 derko (61, Hunter fl». Shots seooal: 

f Istaders 10 8 6 to 93 91 (cm Mllkn) TO- 0-14 — 34; St Louis ( 

i • v Rangers 12 13 I 25 ?8 88 rosso) 10-9-HJ— ». 

Ustourotl 10 12 3 23 98 89 H art ford 7 

nr Jersey *13 I I? 84 99. Calgary « 

•.»' — ^ Adgnw Dlvleta Wilson (91. Otto (2L Suter (3), Li 

u 11 i v « 79 B«Mk 2 (II). Rmnhart (1). Berezoo 
** S la 1 to M S Bvdl (5), Gavin (8), LawtaM (5). Tt 

- SSJLi n e e » m 2 (U). Shots ■■ goal: Hartford (an un 

- m n k ! n « " n-iF-toiCatataTtaUuiiiw- 

-■ r* CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 

Norm Division P 

^^.Latas 10 10 J 23 II 98 TpIllUR 

iCOBO 9 11 4 22 97 108 1 ClUUft 

'’imesata 7 12 6 28 *4 M 

- -Troll 7 14 4 18 81 128 

r: rwrto snvtbe oivista 15 m 1,0 AustRilMUi Open Res 

i * m onion 18 4 3 3f 129 90 AAEN 

• loaiy 14 B 3 31 111 89 Hum Hu Hull! ■ 

"? MW * r 2 15 ? 2 ™ Ji? (von Lendl owdiastavalda, <M 

mlpeg 9 15 3 21 94 lto Lloyd. Britain. 7-4 <70 6-2. 61. 

- i Anastas 5 is J U T* 127 st^fon Edberou Ssseden, del 

. • WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS Schopert, Netherlands. M, FR toL 

scouver 2 1 1—4 - 

•. J itmc l 3 l "fi wnMr m 

-outata (U).Hunter m. Atoastny (7). Cole ."T 

: ; Skrlka (16>.LeMav (B).Smvl (10), Craw- 
: 5 ( 1J. Skats o. goal: Vancouver (on Malar- 

7-10-5—22; CXiabac (on Brodeur) 6-14- ^ 

■ V 3 1—4 nhov «* Czechoslovakia. 6-7 (7-S>, 6-1 

, ’. Rttaors 4 3 1-7 — — — 

•',sbonw (71, Greschner (9). Raatsaiainen 
: Sandstram 2 (11). Brooke 2 (14); Mower- 

v k ( 16 ), Turnbull (Ul.SmaH ( 5 >.AmM ( 6 ). V Tf to T* 
i tsoegoal: W tan tavv (on Wnbleobrmick) ■ -M- I r-, %/ -mww 

XX IS -▼ in 

S Jersey 3 j l— 7 

eata 3 4 1— « — — i . 

.astny 2 (9). Hodg so n (4). Banning (I), Uy Jraill J 

; mat 2 (51. Koteapoalas (1). latrafe (2). Loa Angeles Tin 

VW (8). beemnn (4) ; Bruton (S), PIJJU DAT U OPDTNn^ Palifn 

' Fitnfon (?), Verbaefc 2 (5>. Higgins IS), PALM SPRINGS, LalllQ 


SrJccted College Results 

east tare. 

2?" " to90fl - w _ „ Atoof average salaries com- 

pWUy^M^orUagMRiKMl 

Franklin & Monholt 55. Gettysburg 9 PiayCIS ASSOda&OIl, * OODy of 

H°ty prtne TU Harvor d 7 P winch was made avaiiaWe Wednes- 

day, showed that the Yankees 
Pittsburgh 95 . Lotayeft# tt made a mean salary of S54d^64 

BSSAST^Lvewb. 

SLBonaventureT7.CamernlRPa.de lUe executive DOara Oi Hie piay- 

Tempie 76. pam 9 era’ irmrr q {j holding meetings in 

vntanovasauistoigto^ the resort center of Ktum&pm an 

Alabama 9 i. Rider a the island of Mam. 

Ata.-amnktaom 63. e. T mnpi st- 44 The Yankees, who «i«s had fee 

*S&* ftiary structure of tte 26 
East caraHna 43 , Edtabara 58 major league teams in 1984, 

S£ttfi3S££.7. 2&£25T-* aa ** i ** 1 

vkvtnta in. vmi » or iy_i pocent. 

virotota Tech 72. cpppin sl 4 s They finish ed second m the 

***• Fond 47 . DniteMfl American League East behind the 

DtPout 93 . sl FriSr^ 4« division champion Toronto Blue 

iHtoob 84. WtarUreon Boy 34 Jays, who ranke d I.Sth in eamings 

Indlm SL 5L Evansville 42 ^ 5335^995 

kom'ir wM^nim tt One notch below fee Bine Jays 

Konm st a s. fib-EdMardgvKM a - were the Royals, who beat Sl Louis 

® the Worid Series. He Royals 
Mictibgan 56. Youngstown st. 42 averaged $368,469 in salary last 

me w l 91. 87. George Wotanvtan 61 yflSOTI 

rZ^^’KLta.ro /U thebtmom <rf fee list were fee 

xovier. aula 56, crataMan 5 a Seattle Manners, with an average 

Southwest salary of $169,694. They finished 

Bovtor 84. Tana Luttnrah S3 «**». in thn AT Wm 

Orai Roberts to. Son Diego 5L 77 sixth in the AL west, 

so. Methodist S3, prairie view 56 The Atlanta Braves, who aver- 

TtaKotabE aged $540^88 in salary last season 

Artema 63 , rm™*" *° raT> ^ second on fee list, wound 

LdHv~Beadi~sm Hhsdirpnctnc «T Dp'fiftb in^e^Narionah'LeagDC 

Uta 7^2ta n West, woo by Los Angeles. The 

waaMnataa ». 7 r Idaho 57 IJodgOT were sixth in salary, at 

TouRNAMEirra $424^73. 

The Braves, who ranked fifth on 
se Louwano n. Fiorkfo aam 77 fee salaries list in 1984, had a jump 

NE Loubtano 0. NW Laublana tt of $138,299. 

The Baltimore Orioles made the 
i ~ biggest move up the ladder, going 

key from 12th in 1984 ($360,204) to 

1 No. 3 0438^56) in 1985. 

, lt Ihe biggest drop was by the Qri- 

5 landings cago White Sox, falling W8,793 in 

Botfeto i 2 3 -* average salary from 1984 to go 

sl Leal* s ■ 8—3 from second to 19th on the list. 

Huotws fii. Andreychuk no), sdiing 2 (6). ^ the.wboJe, the average major 

Foltano rn>. Tucker (8) ; Ftoekhort (7), For- leagUCT got a 12.6 peaCCDt I81Se last 

year, wth the earnings growing 
stUw *‘ [ “' Bor ' from $329,408 to $371,157. 
ik v tford i i 3-a By comparison, the average 

° a,g * rv 8 8 4 -a player salary in 1967 was $19,000. 

Witten (9). Otto CL Suter (3). Lnoto (6). . Z. ..... . 

Boaok 2 on. Reinhart (i). Benwaa (6>; bo- The initial base agreement be- 
bveh (5), Gavin (8), Lawieta (5). Turomn 2 tween fee club owners and the 
(12). Shots 6P goal: HartfOnt (an LemcflnlT- j 

Ti-iT— as; coigary (an uut) iw-». piayov union was negotiated the 

following year, and, although no 
- ,| 11 1 average figures are available for 

Tennis feat gar, fee average salary in 1 969 

Boosted by bidding far free 
AllStrananOpaaKesans agents, the salaries grew constantly 
^ ovct fee intervening years. 

omiii nii npiiii The Tnvniinn-m salary, mean- 

**■ *** increased tenfold, from 

Mtata. $6,000 in 1967 to $60^XX) in 1985. 
schopen, itomiiu mta. Mi . 7 a , «. The hi^iest-pmd players now 

are, predictably, those wife the 
ivnwito. longest time on the job. Of those 

owis Evertuoyd.ux.def. Ooodia Kohde- who have played in fee majors at 

Kittdi. Wait G erm any . 6-1, 7* (8-6). , , c u, 

MorttaNavrtrtllava.Uidef.HanaMand. ^ 15 “®. avera ^ m 

Dkova. CzechoolavaMa. 6-7 (7-5), 6-1. 64. 1985 WSS $673,825. 


(an Mdlcn) W- 12-14— 34; St Louie (an Bor- 
raxao) 10-9-W— ». 

Hartford i l 3-s 

Catganr 6 • 4-4 

Witten (9). Otto (2). Suter (3), Leah (6), 
Bowk 2 (II). ReJaharT (1). Berg zan (6): Ba- 
bych (51. Gavin (8), Lawiets (5), Turgeon 2 
(12). Shots n goal: Hartford (an Lemcfln) 7- 
tt- 17— as; Calgary (an Uut) n-9-9-29. 


Tennis 

AnstraHan Open Resuhs 


Ivan Land. QwdiealavalOa. dot John 
Lloyd, Britain. 74 (Ttf) 6-2. 6-1. 

Staton Edbvra, Sweden, del Mich (el 
Schapere, Netherlands. M. 74, 6-L 


OmIs Evert Lloyd, U*. def. Claudia Kohde- 


Morttna Navmtllava.UA. def. Hana Mand- 
nkova, CzechoolavaMa. 6-7 (7-5), 6-1. 64. 


after dropping the first set against 
MandUtora, who beat her in fee 
U5. Open final in August Navra- 
tilova, the Czech-bom left-hander, 
tfaea played superbly for the last 
two sets, using her power and an- 
ticipation to wear down Mandli- 
kova. 

Evert, 30, kept alive a remark- 
able record She now has made the 
final each of tbe.five times she has 
entered the Australian Open, with 
a 2r2 record in finals. And. she will 
be playing in the 32d Grand Slam 
angles final of her remarkable ca- 
reer Friday, while Navratilova will 
be playing m her 19th. 


Bui Navratilova, 29, holds a big 
edge in her recent meetings wife 
Evert Although her career advan- 
tage is only 34-32, she has won nine 
of their 12 meetings in Grand Slam 
finals and 16 of their last 18 match- 
es. 

Many of their previous battles 
have been epics, as likely will be 

(his final 

"This tournament means a lot to 
both Martina and I,** said Evert 
w Fm kind of aware about it derid- 
ing Na I, but I've tried to put it to 
the bade of my mind." 

“This can pretty much decide it” 
said Navratilova. 


Even, playing very aggressively, 
led by 6-1, 4-1 against Kobde- 
Kilsch before the lanky but hard- 
hitting German rallied. 

She raced the tie breaker play- 
ing wife greater confidence and 
mobility, but was stunned by fee 
controversial call. The spectators 
booed and Kohdc-Kdsch, asked if 
she had been robbed, replied, “I 
think so. but you must live wife 
that in tennis, what can you doT* 

Even tried to play down the inci- 
dent. 

“It’s unfortunate it happened at 
feat point, bnt that's tennis," she 
said. 


Navratilova said she was in just via. who on Wednesday pulled fee 
fee right Frame of mind to play upset of fee tournament bv ousting 
MandUkova. John McEnroe. 


“I was really psyched up. maybe 
loo psyched up.” she said “1 was a 
tittle flustered after losing fee first 
set. so I tried to calm down. 1 felt 
comfortable. 1 went into fee third 
set relaxed” 

Lendl, 26. who is trying to win 
fee Australian title for the first 
time, struggled through fee first set 
against Lloyd but feeu used his big 
serves to good effect and romped to 
victory in 1 hour and 44 minutes. 

In the other men's semifinals 
Friday, the defending champion 
Mats WQander of Sweden, fee 
third seed, will play the unseeded 
Slobodan Zivqjinovic of Yugosia- 


“I thought I'd have a chance, 
particularly on grass." Uoyd said. 
"Bui I couldn’t get my service to 
work. And when your service 
doesn't work that doesn’t give you 
a chance against a player erf Lendl's 
caliber.” 

Lendl served magnificently and 
broke Uoyd three times in fee final 
set — in the first, third and seventh 
games — and conceded only two 
points on service. 

Afterward, Lendl left the grass 
center court and quickly headed for 
the Royal Melbourne Golf Cub to 
play 18 holes against his Australian 
coach. Tony Roche. (AP. VP1 ) 



Walton’s 'Old Days’ 
End With New Team 


By George Vecsey 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The Boston 
Celtics did not want Bill Walton to 
fed they were skeptical about his 
past quests into the counter-cul- 
ture, so they went out of their way 
to extend a welcome when he 
joined the team this September. 

Larry Bird, for example, ambled 
up to Walton at one of fee early 
practices and offered a pleasant, 
‘'Hey, where’s the ponytail and fee 
beard?*’ 

Walton's rougb-bewn features 
broke into a smile as he replied, 
‘Those days are over.” And it was 
about that time Walton decided be 
was going to like the Boston Celtics 
even more than he had imagined. 

“1 love being here. 1 really love 
it," Walton said recently. 

[Walton was superb Wednesday 
night at East Rutherford, New Jer- 
sey, as fee Celtics extended their 
winning streak to nine games with a 
130-1 1 1 victory over the Nets. The 
Los Angeles 7imes reported. 

[Wahon played just 23 minutes 
and scored right points. But be had 
13 rebounds to trigger numerous 



Bill Walton 

Clippers as a satisfactory replica of 
what he once had been. 

“Those days are over now.” he 
said. Not just the ponytail not just 


faslbreaks that helped the Critics fe c beard, those trademarks or an 
shoot a red-hot 622 percent in fee athlete identified with protest, fee 


gamej 

lt has been so long feat it needs 
repeating: The big redhead once 
was fee d ominan t player of cham- 


last trace of the 1960’s hippies in 
fee age of the yuppies. 

The latest stage in Bill Walton's 
odyssey is fee Critics, the most 


ptonship teams at UCLA and fee fa ^ 0 J ^ ^ admired uam m 


PortlandTrafl Blazers, a star whose basketball. The unselfish game be 
rebounding and passing and de- , ^ for j ohn Wooden at UCLA 
fense were a model for otto cen- Jack Ramsay al Portland has 

, n „ tcre. Five stress fractures of his foot made it seem that his red hair and 

hnn cut nearly four seasons ^tic jollv-greeo-giant looks have 
toloveofbaritefeaDaL been jutniigabove Celtic urnform 
5-1, 7-6 (8-6). lowed lnm to come back with the jg Q 5 forever. 

“This reminds me of UCLA,” he 
said. “Going on fee road, every 
■* -jmj m y-y gym sold out, everyone Hying to 

ole Jyew Ball Game 

of fans on the road rooting for us. I 

ers preceded them, today’s philosopher-coaches love it. It’s a lot of fun.” 
ice embrace monotheism; converrely. atheism Hc fun recently against the 
by has DOpiacem fee l«±er room.Indwd, most New York Knicks. ccming off the 

»« Iwveadvanced this theory & hd by syflogEzng bench as a substitute for Robert 

n’t ihusg: B there is a God and if be cans about Parish, playing 19 minutes, scoring 

nly mankind, be must logically be an avid, apbv- 5 points wife 11 rebounds, onebe- 

iot tst fan of gridiron gyrations. Post-Super Bowl fow Parish, fee game leader, 

i ce interviews wife winning coaches are always . „„ 

sprinkled liberally with praise and credit to Minutes. Walton mused. To 

■ed fee Almighty, who seems to throw his sup- Ff* 11 5 m01 ! e im P9 rtanl to fee afe- 

180 port to a different team each year. tele to wm. lean t be out there for a 

Jd Like a team on a winning streak, phfloso- 

di- ply is gaining momentum in the NFL. Dur- Sr? . stre *s ractures hen I do. 

Y%*j lt ‘ o TiUS IS & CTfi3l iPfliYi for me lo COIDC 

(S mg a recent preseason game one television * vr ^ l “ lu 

me commentator observed: “Will you look at the „ ... 

dal size of that left tackle! Well feat’s been the , J®™,**™ ““ “* ,ea ^ ie . m 

ike Raider philosophy: huge linemen.” 1979-80, when Walton was playing 

ae Probably the next great intellectual up- 14 abortive games for Sax i Diego 

on beaval in pro football will be an attempt to between^ fractures. Bud knew 

ive somehow fetegrate and homogenize these nu- Jiat Walton was conuoveraal but 

oe merous and (fiverae schools of feraighL An be fed not know that .Watou 60s 

nd anthology of Eric Hoffer-like aphorisms - ldeahsm ^ found expres- 
“No pain, no gain,” “Newspaper dippings non “ “ a ksl ' 

)« don’t make tackle? — also would be handy. second blocked shoL 

«- Perhaps someday soon we will see BUI *** * ^ •*« *** <* » 

=?- Walsh of fee San Francisco 49ers or Tom ^ ,? e . was - *™{. admitted. I 

m Landry of the Dallas Cowboys rushing on to fedn t know whm his morale was 

te fee field to argue an official's call — and 1 J ol ?dom be loves fee game 

nd screamina, “Cesr absurde »" of basketball. 

e£r The Celtics had been looking lo 

rf- David HoUthan is a freelance writer who move Cedric Maxwell because they 

played defensive safety for Yale University in did not feel he fought back hard 

ho the 1969-70 season. enough from knee problems last 

season. They received a man who 

had already fought back, and was 

g- , # willing to play behind Parish. 

■ £|/v-|- \ ^wiq -m — “Bill Walton means that Robert 
h ^ 1 1 can stretch himself out for seven 

" minutes or so. and know feat Bill’s 

behind him,” said K. C Jones, the 
team driver for Ferrari, be won everything from Le Celtics’ smooth and eloquent coa- 
Mans to Venezuela , and in 1961 he became fee first ch. “We’ve got two all-stars at cen- 
Amer i c an to take the World Drivers Championship, ter, and you should see them go at 
HQL 58, is the proprietor of a successful antique and each other in practice, 
elastic car restoration business. “I try to get Bill his minutes, but 

Dan Gurney. Built like a long board, blond as a the other night I only played him 13 
surfer, pure Southern California, he stiQ sees every minutes, and he asked me after- 
other driver as a rogue wave: The only safe thing is to ward. ‘Coach, are you mnd at me? 
keep them behind you. An intense combination of If you’re not, I have no problem 
faith and aggression earned Gurney his place as one of wife 13 minutes.’ I swore on a stack' 
the greatest U.S. drivers of all time, wife victories in of Bibles that I wasn't mad at him . 
Grand Prix, sports car, endurance, stock car. Indy car, feat fee game dictated my moves. 
Cao-Am and sedan raring. He understood feat” 

In 1967, in a V-12 Eagle of his own design and “I’ve been on both ends of the 
constnumon, be won fee Belgian Grand Prix. It was s dck.” Walton said. “And I've no- 
fee first US. car to win a Grand Prix in 46 years. deed that when guys are interested 
Gurney is 54, builds Indianapolis race cars and in jn w innin g, fee ball moves a liule 
celebrity and vintage racing events continues to follow' morc . These guys are unusually 
his creed: “I'm cornin’ through.” motivated." 

The public festival for 25,000 became feeir personal Kn —a 


Martina Navratilova had reason to seek help before defeating Hana Maadfikova, 6-7 (5-7), and only his love of basketball al- 
£i;'<pr Chris Everf^ Oaiafia Koh3e^Glscfi,'6-ir7-6^ (£6). lowed him to come back wife the 

AsSocrates Would Say, It’s a Whole New Bad Game 


By David Holahan 

Washington Pen Service 

WASHINGTON — Vince Lombardi, 
George Halas and Knute Rockne were foot- 
ball coaches, period. They forged strategies 
and molded men. Despite ruling their teams 
with a Nietzschean “wiD to power,” they were 
never thought of as anything but football 
coaches. 

Today they would be as obsolete as the 
flying wedge. In 1985, football coaches must 
be philosophers first and foremost Tost listeo 
lo the “color” analysts on the weekend’s 
professional games and you wtD bear some- 
thing like this: 

“Wdl John it’s third and short; what’s 
Coach Shula’s philosophy in this situation?” 

“The beauty of his thinking hoe, Pat, is 
that he studiously avoids fee dialectic alto- 
gether. 1 suppose you could call him an exis- 
tentialist; he’s liable to do anything." As the 
play is called, John is proven correct 

Ironically, Lombardi himself, the arche- 
typal coach, may have unconsciously sown 
fee seeds of the modem phflosopto-coacfa. 
Students of National Football League history 
describe bis pifey “ran for daylight” tenet as 
a thinly dugoised Samian exposition of ab- 


The late mentor of the Green Bay Packers 
is also famous for his Nietzschean in«ostgnrfr 
on excellence and superhuman exertions by 
fa is playera. (Some scholars insist be was not 
molding men, but supermen.) “Winning isn’t 
everything" Lombaidi averred, “It’s the only 
dung.” That philosophy, although it was not 
such in his time, has had a profound influence 
on 20th century NFL tboughL 

Modem football also has been influenced 
by Kari Mane, who foresaw a century ago 
feat in its advanced stages the sport would 
resort to specialization and an increasing di- 
vision of labor. No one plays “both ways” 
anymore. In fact, hardly anyone plays one 
way the attire game. There are “special 
teams’* and “situation players” galore, like 
fee third-down pass-catching halfback. There 
are run specialists and pass specialists an 
defense as well Recently, many teams have 
adopted a two-place-kicker philosophy: one 
man for field goals and extra points and 
another for kicking off. 

As football has grown exponentially more 
complex, schools of thought have proliferat- 
ed. One trend can dearly be termed Orwell- 
ian: Big Coach (not the quarterback, as in 
days of yore) calls all the plays from fee 
sideline. Only three of 28 NFL teams — and 


solute freedom. On fee other ode of fee fewer and fewer college squads — grant thdr 


argument, and fee scrimmage line, Lombardi 
heralded the linebacker's total freedom to 
obliterate that daylight, ergo the ballcarrier. 


fidd generals the freedom to choose the of- 
fensive plays. 

Unlike many of fee great thinkers who 


It Is Vintage Grand Prix When Four Legends Meet Again 


.410 ( 1 ). Start* 00 veal: New Jersey (on 

■tanw 16.13-7-36; Toronto (an Bounetwh racing in Enrope. 

•nor) 9-184-28. ( 1 Stirling Moss, fee virtuoso. Innes Ireland, the ras- 

■awwi ) : M caL Ptnl HtO, fee deceptive introvert. Dan Gurney, 

oaten (ui. sctim/at at. Erre v ls). fee dangerous g™ 

iSwSJ; Thor names were linked wife other famous raring 
tatatoi (on staion) 04-15-36. names of the 1950s and ’60s: Ferrari, Lotus, Jaguar 

and Mercedes. Le Mans, Monaco, Sflveretooe and the 
f ~~ T • a Nuibnrgring. In any of those cars, across several 

transition countries, Moss and Ireland of Great Britain and HiE 

and Gumey of fee United States paced or chased each 

baseball other for almost a dozen seasons. 

Amerfeaa Lmw They broke machines and bones and marriages. 

•icAGo— Homed doub Rodw iwnH«» They certainly drank thdr weight in Moet, shared * t> „ « , 

fratcroafism, mourned heavily and angrily for Mike StaBng Moss got made Dan Gnraey to™ 
wm. Hawthorne, Jimmy Clark, Jocben Rinat, Peter Col- 

t tavac ifajc Wolfgang van Trips and a dozes other young- reaDy was not long enough to tire a beguminrjogger 

friends —while fee public shook its head and wins- rowing his dbg. Concrete berms and hay bales and 
fated™ Asso:taii«L p^rftd what w»« mnodered foregone: “If they live long large plastic drums created chicanes and a hanpin — 

basketba ll p qffl igh . . . " But they did live. Real legends wifi. more of a best paper dip. actually — that kept 

■ And they came here, about 75 mOes (120 Jtikane- entertainment to a maximum and aggression to a 
trtM sum (Doc) Rivera, simtt ters) southeast of Los Angeles, last week as grand past minim u m . 

football masters of the relatively new ceremony of vintage car “A Mickey Mouse errant,” Moss said. 

: jMtaoi F»«taH r aring- visiting lairds at a thund ering two-day reap- Stilling Moss, There have been only two descrip- 

taadGs^umv, ntatov ***. « pearancc of their Bngadoon. tjona rfthis Eng lish ma n . He either was fee greatest 

-rf roar**. They raced thrraigh rity streets. Just the way it used driver of all fime, or he was destined to become the 

■ yy i I' ^ tBi ??- oan au ? , - l h y < ^ r : to be. They slipped in and out of cars that they bad greatest driver of all time. A barely survjvable aeddent 

i «. campaigned in 20 or more years aga Ferraris and — His own pat description: “I was unconscious for 

' ^sas city — P laced fimnn. nm. I rthiwa in I talian red and British raring peep because one month, paralyzed for six” — in 1962 forced 

i l " teg 5tlwS in yesterycare wearing national colors was the digni- retirement before fee world knew for sure about his 
v England— P laced Kenneth siah. Red, nationalistic norm. Moss stroked a C-iype Jag- greatness. But before the end. Moss had won fee 
uve Daemon, on won« rcserva, Re- uar feat once was fee Tastest sports cotod four patches Grand Prix races of Britain, Italy, New Zeal a n d,' 
i Smiley ctomml itoiensivo end. of rubber. Monaco, Australia, Sweden. Holland, Argentina, 

NattaoTtaaCT Leoaitt They were slower than they were in fedr primes, of South Africa, Austria. There were 222 victories, 

rangers— ftaaiittd Gien nontax course. A little crtakkr perhaps. So wKe the cars. enough for immortality. 

New Hotaiacitto Alii, seni But no matt „ 7 ^ comge, a six-Wock rectangle, Now a saccessful London businessman and author, 

,’i' con. voflKQfwi 1 , to Ntw ) «ev an. 


oi. By Paul Dean 

Lea Angeles Times Service 

is). PALM SPRINGS, California — They are four 
ten horsemen of the epochal years of grand prix motor 



Transition 


BASEBALL 
Americas League 

-1CAGO— Named Dauv Rader IMnt-Vae 

t 

~K Land— S tarted Bruce Bocffle, flrs) 
nan. 

Untlnnol Lettat 

KlNNATI— Named Robert Howtam Jr, 
%d*nt md getwral manager e( Denver al 
J"Wtato As8o:taltan. 

BASKETBALL 

. NanMMl Baskaitain Aisectatkn 
LANTA— WcrivrU Rev WBitanw, guard, 
of*) Glenn (Doc) Rivera. ouartL 
FOOTBALL 

NaHeaal FooHmH Loavae 
■ HVER— signed Nattwn Pootak runntno 
Aaeod Gene Long, rvnntov sack, an 
reurw. 

TRoit— S igned Don Bum, Unebocfcor. 


stag Hngmon. on Wontd reserve, Ro- 
> Smiiev CrasMML doiensiw end. 
HOCKEY 

Hattaaol Hacker Leavitt 


Stirling Moss got inside Dan Gurney to win 1959 Italian Grand Prix. Pfail Hill was second. 
Tally was not long enough to tire a beginning jogger Moss, 56, stiU runs cars and events be considers ftm. 


preceded them, today’s philosopher-coaches 
embrace monotheism; conversely, atheism 
has do place in fee locker room. Indeed, most 
have advanced this theory a bit by syllogizing 
feusly: If there is aGod and if he cares about 
mankind, be must logically be an avid, activ- 
ist fan of gridiron gyrations. Post-Super Bowl 
interviews wife winning coaches are always 
sprinkled liberally wife praise and credit to 
fee Almighty, who seems to throw his sup- 
port to a different team each year. 

Like a team on a winning streak, philoso- 
phy is gaining momentum in fee NFL. Dur- 
ing a recent preseason game one television 
commentator observed: “Will you look at the 
size of that left tackle! Well that’s been the 
Raider philosophy: huge line m e n .’* 

Probably the next great intellectual up- 
heaval in pro football will be an attempt to 
somehow integrate and homogenize these nu- 
merous and mveise schools of tboughL An 
anthology of Eric Hoffer-like aphorisms — 
“No pain, no gain,” “Newspaper dippings 
don’t make tackles” — also would be handy. 

Perhaps someday soon we will see BUI 
Walsh of the San Francisco 49ers or Tom 
Landry of the Dallas Cowboys rushing on to 
fee field to argue an official's call — and 
screaming, “ Cest absurde!’' 

David Hofahan is a freelance writer who 
played defensive safety for Yale University in 
the J969-70 season 


rnimimmi. 

“A Mickey Mouse circuit,” Moss said. 

Stilling Moss. There have been only two descrip- 
tions erf tins Englishman. He either was the greatest 
driver . of all fnne, or he was destined to become the 
greatest driver of all time. A barely survjvable accident 


Grand Prix races of Britain, Italy, New Zealand.' 
Monaco, Australia, Sweden. Holland, Argentina, 
South Africa, Austria. There were 222 victories, 
enough for immortality. 

Now a successful London businessman and author. 


Moss, 56, stiU runs cars and events be considers fim. The public festival for 25,000 became feeir personal 

Innes Ireland. Despite fee surname, he is a Scot who reunion Their first meeting since 1961 and the Italian 
takes life much less seriously than his ladies and Grand Prix at Monza. 

Glenfiddicb malt whiskey. Ireland approaches driving One man and one idea brought them back together, 
fee way most people nm from a bull Flat out. And “It was Thanksgiving a year ago,” said Art Evans. 


motivated.” 

Bill Walton was smiling. There is 
nothing about these Celtics he does 
not like. 


Glenfiddicb malt whiskey. Ireland approaches driving One man and one idea brought than back together. 

fee way mosi people nm from a bulL Flat out. And “It was Thanksgiving a year ago ” said Art Evans. ‘ 

with yet another wonderful hilarious anecdote to tdl He is 51, an owner of vintage race cars. **I was string t wt ji p Gl *D 
He drove for the Lotus works team, won the U.S. around wife John Von Neuman and Vasek PoUk ” Ona Uip aivl Itace 
Grand Prixin 1961, had beaten Moss twice the previ- talking about fee ’50s when we all raced sports cars at In Switzerland Put Off 


oils year. Palm Springs Airport. u.oi*u«nauuru l vm 

His favorite yarn is of crashing a Lotus in fee tunnel “We wondered what it would be like if we could The Assoaaed Press 

at Monte Carlo. stage a reunion of all the care and most of the driven VI LIARS, Switzerland — The 

“I hit the wrong gear, everything froze as the car who had driven at Palm Springs in those days. Obvi- women’s World Cup downhill ski 
disintegrated, and I went forward still strapped in fee ouslyrd had too much wine because I staggered home race scheduled lor Dec. 12 has been 
seat,” he said. “I was the only driver ever to come out and called the mayor " postponed and no pew date set, 

of the tamnel ahead of his car ” Then fee rasping Evans contacted longtime friend Moss in London, organizers said Wednesday. 


of the tunnel ahead of his car ” Then fee rasping Evans contacted longtime friend Moss in London, organizers said Wednesday, 
laugh. “Your round, old boy." Moss committed Ireland. The event was on. Also endangered by the lack of 

Ireland, nine months thap Moss, also Eves The race, of course, was not a race. snow are the women’s World Cup 

in London and is a writer for Roaif& Track mag az i ne. No driver wanted to ding another man’s museum giant slalom and slalom events in 
• Phil HUE Shy, introspective, a loner, according to an piece. And. said Evans, “We T ve made a lot of promises nearby Leysrn, scheduled for the 


Also endangered by the lack of 
snow are the women’s World Cup 


No driver wanted to ding another man’s museum giant slalom and slalom events in 


encyclopedia of auto raring greats. But a winner. Asa to a lot erf car owners. 


Dec. 14-15 weekend. 



Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1985 


OBSERVER 


How Parents Go Bananas Zoe Caldwell: Seeking Lillian Heilman’s 'Clinker’ 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — The woman 

ahead of me in a supermarket 
checkout. line wrote a check for 
three bananas. I was appalled. 

“No wonder the country is going 
down the drain." 1 told the children 
that evening as they settled in front 
of the TV to watch “Miami Vice." 

I wailed for one to ask me what I 
was talking about so I could reply, 
“Would you believe I saw a woman 
today write a check to pay for three 
bananas?" 

Bui of course noneof them asked 
me what I was talking about. It 
made me furious. 

“Why don’t you ask roe what Fin 
talking about when I nuke a pro- 
vocative remark about the country 
going down the drain?" I said. 

They said they knew what I was 
piking abouL I was talking about 
the disgusting condition character- 
ized by children settled in front of 
television sets watching cops wear 
pastel wardrobes. 

1 sneered at their innocence, cry- 
ing. “The arrogant innocence of 
children! How can you think that (, 
who spent the best Saturday after- 
noons of my life watching Buster 
Crabbe dashing about the planet 
Mongo in the fanciesl-cut long 
johns ever seen on the silver screen 
n" 

I had forgotten what f was say- 
ing. 

“Country going down the 
drain," murmured the oldest child 
os he rose to refresh his glass. 

“Exactly," I said. “In my day 1 
had to give up Buster Crabbe on 
the planet Mongo before I could 
drink bourbon." 

□ 

A remarkable onset of violence 
distracted their attention from my 
philosophical rnusings. When it 
subsided I put the question to them 
squarely: 

“Will you all promise your old 
dad here and now that you will 
never pay for three bananas by 
writing a check?" 

They looked mildly curious. I 
urged them to listen because a 
check was too serious to be used Tor 
buying three bananas. 

“Am I getting through? Do you 
know what 1 mean when I say un- 
less we start showing some respect 
for money, the country’s going 
down the drain?" 

“I understand, dad." said the 
girl. She is highly intelligent, a col- 


lege graduate. “You’re saying we 
should always pay for our bananas 
with a credit card.” 

Is it any wonder that President 
Reagan mmsetf, the greatest bal- 
anced-budget man the United 
States has produced since who 
knows when — is it any wonder 
that he doubled the national debt 
in a single presidential term? 

□ 

Some truly evil young people, 
but beautifully coiffed, were firing 
automatic weapons in faraway cor- 
rupt Miami on the TV screen. 

“People who write checks for 
three bananas at the supermarket 
are people too innocent to be 
scared when drey ask a person if 
dinner at La Rive Coach is expen- 
sive and that person replies. Take 
your checkbook.’ " 

‘That’s ‘Rive Gauche,’ dad, not 

‘Rive Coach,' " said the girl with 
ber college degree that, now that I 
thought or it, had been paid for 
with checks serious enough to buy 
an entire boatload of bananas and 
a banana-republic dictator. 

□ 

The TV had passed from blood- 
letting into its marketing mode. Ac- 
tors disguised as bankers seemed to 
be urging the childr en to borrow 
immense sums of money to estab- 
lish heavy industrial plants. 

The younger boy, who is interest- 
ed in antiques, took the opportuni- 
ty to ask why people used to get 
scared when, having asked whether 
dinn er at La Rive Whichever was 
expensive, they were told, “Take 
your checkbook." 

“Because when, money was still 
accorded a little respect in this 
country," I said, “people used their 
checkbooks only for the most seri- 
ous purchases, like buying a car, a 
house, a trip to Europe — ” 

“Miami Vice" resumed with 
screams, gunfire and contemporary 
music. A revritingly evil man was 
buying a car, a luouse, a trip to 
Europe and paying with cash. Be- 
fore be took off for Europe, I knew, 
that man would go to the super- 
market, buy three bananas to help 
him survive the anting food ana 
pay for them by writing a check. 
No wonder we’re going down the 

dr ain 

“You mean to hell in a hand 
basket," said the oldest child as he 
rose to refresh his bourbon. 


Hew York Times Service 


By David Richards 

Washington Pan Strike 

O FFSTAGE, she usually 
dresses all id black. -Today 
she is wearing a black coat, blade 
'slacks, black sweater over black 
blouse, and a black watchband. 
On stage, however, the Austra- 
lian-born actress Zoe Caldwdl, 
three times a Tony winner, goes 
from black and white to living 
color. At the Kennedy Cento’s 
Terrace Theater in Washington, 


life I illiim W ellman in “ Lillian., " a 
new one-woman show. 

Written by William Luce — 
who fashioned ‘The Belle of Am- 
herst” out of the life and poetry of 
Emily Dickinson — and directed 
by CaldwdTs husband, the pro- 
ducer Robert Whiteh e ad, Tal- 
lin" is based on the autobio- 
graphical writings of a woman 
who was as celebrated for ber 
stormy relationship with the writ- 
er Dashidl Hammett, and their 
refusal to bow before the House 
Committee on Un-American Ac- 
tivities and s«mtnr Joseph Mc- 
Carthy, as she was for plays snch 
as “The Little Foxes," “Watch on 
the Rhine" and “The Children’s 
Hour." 

“It really has been the most 
difficult thing I’ve ever done," 
said Caldwell, 52. “I bad morning 
sickness every day of rehearsals. 
Ask Robert! There was some- 
thing in me that just didn’t want 
to give nrysdf over to Lillian. The 
play is set in 1961 in the anteroom 
of a hospital, two hours before 
Dash dies, and the whole evening 
has to be supported by her emo- 
tional resptmse to his dying. Soil 
isn't a one-woman show where 
yon go out and tell a lot of stories 
and jokes. To do it, I have to be 
totally inhabited by TilKan. I 
know that sounds like spooky 
stuff. But it really was most pain- 
ful.” 

For months, she pored over 
Herman's writings, scrutinized 
her on videotape, talked with any- 
one who had a firsthand anecdote 
or impression. She even took op 
cigarettes a gain, since “it seemed 
Eke Lillian always had smoke 
somewhere around her." But for 
the longest time, she couldn't find 
what she calls “the clinker." 

“It’s what I have to find in 
order to play any part — the thing 



ties Committee, she said, T will 
not, now or in the future, make 
bad trouble for other people.’ 
Yes, the voy tame words. 

“That unlocked her for roe. Lil- 
lian was abrasive and outspoken. 
But the cote of her, I think, was 
that she deliberately tried sot to 
make ‘bad trouble for people.’ 
That helped me understand all 
the despair and disturbance she 
suffered, for example, in her sexu- 
al relationship' with Dash, who 
had a lot of other ladies. It helped 
explain her feeling for the blacks. 
She had decency. 

“She also had a lot of enemies 
and I. suppose ITl get flack from 
some, saying how dare I make 


Zoe CakhveH as Liman Heflman. 


that sets a person off from every- 
one else, forms Mm, makes him 
vulnerable. Everybody has a 
choker. It usually turns up quite 
early in life. Whatever happens 
later, you can trace it bade to the 
choker. Bui in Lillian's case, I 
couldn't find h. 

T kept saying to Robert, ‘Ev- 
eryone talks abont Lillian’s fenri- 
ninity.’ And she was deeply femi- 
nine, despite tins image people 
have of her as a tough, smoking 
lady. She was a flirtatious South- 
ern befle. She spent a lot of money 
an clothes. She always had her 
nails and her hair done. And yet 
therein ihemiddle of her face was 
this nose — not just the nose she 
was bom with, but this basbed-up 
nose. A woman who spends such 
an inordinate amount of money 
on her personal appearance in 
this day and age would have that 
nose tended to. But she never did. 
In all her photographs, it’s like 
this great badge of courage she 
wears. That's the dmkerr 

Caldwell dapped her hands tri- 
umphantly, then laid out the evi- 
dence that unlocked the puzzle. T 
discovered that in puberty, Lil- 


lian’s great love was ber father — 
a witty, liberal, good-looking 
ynan- She was the rady daughter. 
When she was 14, she saw her 
father trigs rtiU gi ggling , faded, 
sexy woman and then get into a 
cab with her. LRlian was in such a 
rage of impotence toward her fa- 
ther — and feehng such pity and 
contempt fra her mother — ' that 
she climbed to thetop of a fig 
tree, her secret biding puce, threw 
herself fimm it and broke her 
nose. . 

Tike a lot of Southern people. 


who gave ber nose a prod — 
which must have hurt terribly — 
bandaged it up and put her to 
bed. Sophronia was a great moral 
force, and when she found out 
why TiTHan had thrown herself 
from the tree, she said. ‘Don’t you 
tdl anyone about your father. If 
people ask yon about your, nose, 
ten them you fell in the street. 
Don’t you go through life making 
bad trouble for people.’ Those 
were the words — ‘making bad 
trouble for people.' Years litter, 
when Till u*n wrote her letter to 
the House Un-American Activi- 


we had a few more Lillians- What 
we're lacking nowadays is indi- 
viduality." 

. Caldwell is widely considered 
one of the best actresses working 
in the. American theater. Christo- 
pher Plummer, one of her leading 
men, once called her “the perfect 
chameleon." 

Her ability stems, she believes, 
. from her clinker: a small motor- 
skills disability .she has had since 
childhood. She cannot write legi- 
bly, or sew on a button. Airy talk 
that requires tiny, delicate finger 
movements defeats her. “But very 
eady on, I discovered I could 
move, I could speak. I communi- 
cated with .grand, physical ges- 
tures and this expansive vocal 
quality.” 

Her father was a plumber in 
Melbourne. Her mother had 
played minor roles in Gilbert and 
Sullivan operettas. They recog- 
nized a d ramati c sensibility in 
their child, and let her attend elo- 
cution school By age 9 she was on 
the professional stage. 

On scholarship, she left for En- 
gland to play walk-ons and un- 
derstudy at Stratford-upon-Avon. 
By her second season there die 
was appearing as Cordelia in 
“Lear,"- Helena in “All’s Well 
That Ends Well" and Bianca in 
“Othello." 

Tm a gypsy and Pve gone 
wherever my career took me,” she 
said. Tve always been afraid of 
being a big fish in a small pond, so 
whenever I felt too comfortable; 
Td cut and run. I’d take the first 
job dial was offered me. So I 
played a . lot of parts I wasn’t 
ready for. That didn’t matter. I 


never asked who the director was. 
where the theater was or what I 
was going to wear. I jttsi said yes. 
so I was never out of work. But 
Tve acted in some pretty strange 

^She^ played in the Stratford 
Shakespeare Festival in Ontario, 
appeared with the original com- 
pany at the Tyrone Guthrie The- 
atre in Minneapolis, then contin- 
ued jumping — from the Guthrie 
to the Manitoba Theatre Center, 
to the Goodman Theater in Chi- 
cago, back ro the Guthrie again. 
Broadway never saw her until 
1966. As Anne Bancroft’s under- 
study in “The Devils." she was 
rushed into the second act when 
the star injured her back. Later 
that year. Tennessee Williams’ 
short-lived but vividly surrealistic 
“Slapstick Tragedy" brought 
Caldwdl her first Tony award. In 
1968, for “The Prime of Miss Jean 
Brodie,” she won her second 
Tony. The third came in 1982 for 
the Kennedy Center’s production 
of “Medea.” 

She has amassed a sheaf of lau- 
datory notices — and perhaps the 
rudest pan on record, fram John 
Simon, who found Caldwell in the 
off-B roadway production of “Co- 
lette" “unattractive in every part 
of the face, body and limbs, 
th ^igh i must admit 1 have not 
examined her teeth." 

“Of course, something like that 
hurts," Caldwell acknowledged. 
“But nothing bey raid hurt. You're 
not paralyzed by a critic like John 
Simon. You have to respect some- 
one's opinion before you can be 
paralyzed by it By a Harold Clur- 
man, a Brooks Atkinson, a Waller 
Kerr, I could be paralyzed. ” 

When she was 36 she married 
Whitehead and put her career 
into low gear. They have two sons 
— Charles 13 , and Sam, 16. For a 
while, Caldwdl said, she ‘tjust 
hung in there with the boys to 
make sure they grew into reason- 
ably solid citizens." The family 
lives in Bound Ridge, New York. 

“People must think Tm lem- 
pestous and strong," Caldwdl 
said. ‘They're always saying to 
Robert, “Most be very interesting, 
but very difficult to live with Zoe.' 
But Tm not that way at alL Of 
course, Tve been a theater person 
all my life, and wifi be as long as I 
live; It’s what keeps me balanced. 
Acting gives me a certain calm.” 


PEOPLE 


'Jefferson ' Wine Brings 
A Record £105,000 

A world record f 105.001) ■ 
(S 155.000) was paid Thursday Tor a ’ 
bottle of Bordeaux believed by 
some expert* to have been made for 
Thomas Jefferson. The 17S 1 Cha- 
teau Lafitte was inscribed with the 
vintage and the tetters “ThJ." It 
was bought by Forbes Magaaoe uf 
New York at Christies in London. 
“It's nice to know that some of Mr. 
Jefferson’s wine is finally coming 
home." said Christopher Forbes. 
35. a son oT the publisher Malcolm 
Forbes. He said the wine would he 
added to the family's collection of 
American presidential relics. It was 
sold by Hardy Rodenstack, a music 
publisher from Wiesbaden. West 
Germany, who said it was found ' 
earlier this year among more than a . 
dozen bottles of Bordeaux behind a 
cellar wall in on old house in Paris. 


A college lecturer in Scotland 
says Andrea Mantegna's “Adora- 
tion of the Magi." fra which the J. 
Paul Getty Museum of Malibu, 
California, paid u record £8.1 mil- 
lion uhen about SIOJ million) in 
April, is a 1 9ih -century fake. Ex- 
perts who know the Italian Renais- 
sance picture dismissed the chum. 
“It's absolute rot." said Timotbv 
Clifford, director of the National 
Gallery in Edinburgh, where the 
work is on display. His comment -4- 
followed a lecture by Peter Coffins * 
at the Duncan of Jordansume Col- 
lege of Art in Dundee. Coffins. 50. 
spoke about his doubts after argu- 
ing his case in letters ro newspa- 
pers. The Times of London devoted 
half a page to the subject Wednes- 
day. "No one agrees with Coffins » 
far," wrote the newspaper's art 
sales reporter, Geraldine .Nonna, 
adding: "For my money, it's genu- 




vessel in the picture looks like a 
19th-century hookah base, that the 
turbans of the Magi are not those 
of Mantegna's day. that the 'Virgin 
is wearing a turban and that her 
robe appears to have a lapel, and 
that two of the figures appear to be 
borrowed from other Mantegna 
works. William Mostyn-Owen. who 




tie's, said be considered Collins’s 
arguments “nonsensical." The Na- 
tional Gallery of Scotland, hoping 
to retain the painting, has until 
Wednesday to try to raise enough 
money to match the price paid by 
the Getty museum. TTw seller was 
the Marquess of Northampton. 



7we tj/phtUctlgreeii agate, 
ivttlcr cLhfi t&ld atid diamond. 


Van Cleef & Arpels. RUUS 22,Place\fend6mc,Ta:261.58,5& - GENEVE 31 Rue du Rhone.1el: 28.81.66. 


".PWPVJLM*.