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, The Global JS^apaper 
. Edited in. Runs . 

. Prints Sbij twwwtd y-'. 
in Paris, London, Zurich: - 

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INTERNATIONAL 




WEATHKOAT A APPEAR ON PAGE 20 


Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


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PARIS, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 188 ' 



am; 


LONDON — Britain became 
first ally. Friday to join 
resident Ronald Reagan’s Strate- 

* .; : '- r ic Defense Initiative, which aims 

i-j male an effective space shield 
' " against Soviet nuclear missiles, 
t U-S. Defense Secretary Caspar 
/. Weinberger, who signed the 
■ ■ ■ : <ereement with Defense Minister 
Heseltine of Britain, 
; ronrised there would be ?*major 
; ^.vards” of contracts to British 
- i,. ongjames taking part 
; -• • .Z But no figure was pm on- Brit- 

• ; /.'in , s share of the SDI research pro- 
' 1 r --: ;■> 'iiam. for winch the admirustration 

- ' T^.'as requested $26 bilHon, through 

- " '..jcalyear 1989. Critics of the.pro- 

■ '.'ram 'say it could cost far more if 

- -\;mried through to completion. 

V On March 26, Mr. Weinberger 
.. ad invited U.S. allies to take part 
; - ,'i the SDI research. Britain is the 

- < .- : 7 r xst nation so accept the invitation. 

Few details of the U.S.-Bntish 
Understanding were disclosed at a 
(. ews conference called hastily after 
.. 'll ie agreement was reached over- 
.. ./ . ight between. British and Ameri- 
an opens working in Washing- 

„ | ‘ "’jIL 

• Mr. Weinberger said that British 
articipatioii in the program “em- 

-basizes both (he closeness of our 
Uiance and the special nature of 


our Tdatiourinp, which is a very 
vital thing.” 

The leader of the opposition La- 
bor Party, Nefl Kinnock, said after 
the signing, that the SDL conceit 
was “ddnded, destftbflmng and 
dangerous” and was the “biggest 
angle block to nuclear anns reduc- 
tion." 

Mr. Heseltme, however, said the 
agreement offered “a vay signifi- 
cant opportunity for British indus- . 
try and far British research capabil- 
ity to be associated with a major 
and exciting pr o g r am at the fron- 
tiers of human capabilities in many 
of the technologies of tomorrow” 

Mr. Headline said the accord did 
not guarantee Britain any specific 
amount of research work. 

Mr. WeinbeTger said the 
amounts of moon? appropriated 
for SDI depended cm Congress and 
that contracts would be awarded 
competitively. 

Britain’s en thusiasm for joining 
the SDI research p r ogr am has not 
been matched by other U.S. allies. 

Israel has expressed interest and 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl of West 
Germany has promised a cabinet 
decision by Christmas. But France, 
Norway, Denmark and Australia 
have refused to participate on the 
governmental level 

The Uni led States and Britain 


S. Offer 


had been negotiating the accord for 
months. Britain had pressed for a 
definite commitment from the 
United Stales for substantial re- 
search contracts. 

•' Mr. Weinberger had rehttatfid in 
Bonn oa Thursday rbat the United 
Stales would welcome European 




His invitation in March went to 
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion allies and othex nations friead- 
to the United States. Even before 
invitation. Prime Minister Mar- 
garet Thatcher had said that Brit- 
ain wanted to participate. - 
But she made it dour die (fid not 
want contracts for just “nuts and 
bolts” or “metal-bending,” but 
that would boost British in- 
dustry. 

Britain and the United Stales 
have delineated areas in which 
about 30 British companies could 
contribute to SDI research. 

Those areas include develop- 
ment of a so-called rail gnu, a 
mace-based electromagnetic de- 
vice that would fire metal projec- 
tiles along two rails connected to a 
powerful electric supply. 

In an address at a luncheon given 
Friday by British and American 
journalists, Mr. Weinberger said 
the Soviet Union had deployed 27 
new long-range SS-25 nuclear mis- 



Mkhad Hesettme 


ales in dear violation of the SALT- 

2 arms-fimhation accord. 

Mr. Weinberger had charged in 
October tint the Russians had be- 
gun deploying SS-25s, but this was 
the first U.S. estimate of how many 
of the nnssDes Moscow had in- 
stalled so far. 

U.S. officials argue that deploy- 
ment of the SS-25 would violate the 
SALT-2 agreement because the 
treaty allows each side to develop 
only one new intercontinental bal- 
listic yniiraiB and that the Russians 
have built two. 

Moscow asserts that the SS-25 is 
only a modification of an earlier 
model, the SS-13. 


Child Abuse Reports in Britain Touch Nerve 


Jo Thomas 

New York Tima Service 

LONDON — Jasmine Beckford 
' <as 4 years old when her stepfather 

■ eat her to death. 

'■ Bdore her death in July 1984, 

■ ex stepfather, a former boxer 
- amed Maurice Beckford, had 
• arved and tortured ha for almost 
--.year. During that time, the family 

jeeived 78 visits from a social 
rocker in the northwest London 


KULtv.teaaf BrenL 
: . \i c The social worker said die was 
— .- i —jie to see jamrine only once, how- 
■ • - >! » / gr. and did not notice that she 
■ ^as seriously hurt. reported 
. sr “well and happy.” 

- On Tuesday a panel of experts 
. 'ho investigated the arcmnstances 

. _ . ttT Jasmine’s death for the-BOrougb 
. oundl in ft-ent published a report 
- ; 300 pages that c«?n- 

. uded that hers was a “predictable 

y^ijid preventable homicide” in 
inch the sodal workers, a judge 
ad even Jasmine’s school also 
—ere to blame. 


A panel of experts 
who investigated the 
cir cumstan ces of 
Jasmine Beckford’s 
death concluded 
that hers was a ■ 
^predictable and 
preventable 
homicide/ 



JaamneBeckfonl 


NTT 


The case is one of a number of • 

r 'cent reports of child abuse that 
ive touched a raw nerve in Bril- 
n. 

The series of reports, which have 
. nergedfrom court testimony over 
e last few months, have cited the 
. aths of other children who, hke 
• : smine. died in spite of the com- 
aints of relatives and neighbors,' 
f -metimes right under the noses of 
1 • dal workers. 

Among them was Heidi K c seda, 
...^ She was starved to death by her 
^father, Nkhdas Price, as a 
inishm ent for steahng sweets. A 


noriibQr heard the child crying for 
weeks and rqieatedly conmligned 
to the National Society for the Pre- 
vention of Cruelty to Children. 

She was assured that an investi- 
gation was under way. But the in- 
spector handling the case never vis- 
ited the Kosraa apartment in 
Middlesex and filed a false report 
that ail was well Headi died, locked 
in an unheated room. 

The National Society fot the Pre- 
vention of Cruelty to Children, 
which has an unrivaled reputation 
for protecting children in danger, 
underwent a soul-searching inter- 
nal investigation after the Koseda 
affair, begging contributors not to 
withhold support. It has made 


plans to expand its system of child 
protection teams, gradually replac- 
ing the traditional inspector work- 
ing alone. 

In its annual report, issued in 
September, the society said the 
physical abuse of children in En- 
gland and Wales increased by 70 


state of serious and fatal injuries 
remained about the same. At least 
one child a week dies at the hands 
of htt or her parents, according to 
tire report- In 1984, according to 
the society's estimates, 7,038 chfi- 
drav were physically abused. 

Marital troubles, unemployment 
and debt* were the most common 
stresses found in cases of child 


abuse, tire society said It found 
that fewer than half of physically 
abused duhiren lived with both 
parents and that only 30 percent of 
the fathers of abused children were 
employed. 

Thao are 12 nriffiou children in 
Britain, and 3.68 mflBon live in 
what the Child Poverty Action 
group has called poverty or its mar- 
gins. The divorce rate has trebled in 
tire last IS years, and one family in 
eight has just ang parent. 

*1 have so doubt whatsoever 
that children are more at ridr than 
they ever have been henry career; 
which goes back 25 years,” sud 
David PSthera, a child psychothera- 
pist with the National Children’s 
Home, thesecond largest children’s 
charity in Britain. 

. “Xt-has to do with a society in 
-which daldeen ve.imfcran*£.lie 
continued. “I belonged to tire post- ‘ 
-'war generation. Our parents fed us 
because they felt they were feeding 
the future. Large numbers of peo- 
ple know their children wDl never 
be of any nse to society or society to 
them.” 

Mr. Pitirers added: “Our govern- 
ment emphasizes individuality and 
doing it an your own. The idea of 
co m munity, of tire welfare state, of 
icsponaHKly to the most deprived 
— those values have been under- 
mined or have disappeared. As a 
society, we’re letting children 
down.” 

fix tire case of Jasmine Beckford, 
everyonc invdlvtd “seemed to get it 
wrong,” said Louis Blom-Coopcr, 
tire lawyer who headed tire inquiry 
into her d«»th 


INSIDE 



i- . " - KmtrnUm 

Cl£P Rembrandt Peak’s portrait of Us brother was sold for 
million, a record for an American painting. Page 8. 



■ 1 1 Laurent Fabius’s resignation as France’s prime mimster was de- 
li Friday by President Fmogoas Mitterrand during a dispute over 

‘ visit to P aris by tire president of Poland. ““ "* 


SA A US. agency recommended a series of safety changes for Boeing 
"41 jetliners. PSge3. 

ISmg^pore rffirmed its decision to leave UNESCO. 


tUSlNESS/FTNANCE 

•.-ji " 1 Japan’s fMwmig growth in the July-September quarter slowed to 
‘ . a annual rate of 2.6 percent- Page 15. 

. PECIAL REPORT 

.ITW hory Coast’s planning is more realistic, thanks to the kay 
xtnomic crisis. Fa^ 11. 

MONDAY 

^ij^nalysts take a look at markets around the world and discuss 
pectatkms for 1986. See Personal Investing a monthly report, in 
today’s International Herald Tribunft 


South Africans Defy Ban, 
Meet Black Nationalists 


By Michelle Faul 

The Associated Press 

HARARE, Zimbabwe — South 
African church leaders and univer- 
sity students announced Friday 
that they met with two banned 
blade nationalist groups this week, 
defying South Africa's attempts to 
discourse such contacts. 

They said mane than 30 Sooth 
African church leaders, including 
Bishop Desmond M. Tutu, the 
black Anglican bishop who won 
the Nobd Peace Prize in 1984, and 
nine white university students held 
a series of meetings in Harare with 
leaders of the African National 
Congress and the Pan Africanist 
Congress. Both groups are out- 
lawed by the South African govern- 
ment. 

The groups woe in the Zimbab- 
wean capital for a special confer- 
ence of the Wodd Council of 
Churches on South Africa. The 
council includes more than 300 
iKHt€athalic Christian churches 
and has long been critical of South 
Africa’s policies of racial (fiscrinri- 
nation. : 

The South African dogymen in- 
cluded both blacks and whites and 
at least one Afrikaner churchman. 

South Africa epntemk that such 
contacts are unpatriotic because 
the black nationalist groups are 
pledged to violent change. 

-The Pretoria government has 
sought to prevent such sessions af- 
ter expresting annoyance at meet- 
ings hdd by businessmen and op- 
poation party leaders with African 
National Congress leaders in Lusa- 
ka, Zambia, in September and Oc- 
tober. 

The government withdrew the 
passports erf a group of Afrikaner 
stndmts who intended to meet with 
the ANCs youth wing in October 
and then seven clergymen from the 
influential Dutch Reformed 
Church were prevented from trav- 


eling to Lusaka to meet with the 

organization. 

Neither the church leaders nor 
the students would discuss the na- 
ture of tfiaiT tflTW with the black 
groups. 

“We don’t wish to provoke fur- 
ther friction with the government 
at home.” said a cleric who request- 
ed anonymity. 

- Mr. Tutu, the Anglican bishop of 
Johannesburg, said be conferred 
(Continued on Page 5, CoL 1) 


U.S. Study 
Faults Aid 
To Manila 

40 % of Funds 
For Military 
Reported Wasted 

By JefiE Gcrth 

New York Tima Sendee 

WASHINGTON — A pidirm-" 
nary congressional report has 
found fFial more rhan SI 00 mfffi qn 
in American military assistance to 

speptand^that the United Statcsis 
limited in its ability to trace or 
influence bow the funds are used, 
according to sources familiar with 
the report. 

The investigation covered mDi- 
laxy assistance loans from 1979 
through 1984 totaling $250 million, 
meaning that alleged waste 
amounts to at least 40 percent of 
tire overall imtitaiy aid program. 

The report also said that changes 
had been made recently to correct 
some problems, but that it was too 
early to evaluate tire effects, the 
sources added. 

The findings are contained in a 
classified draft report by the Gen- 
eral Accounting Office, the investi- 
gative arm of Congress, and were 
presented Tuesday in a dosed 
briefing to the investigations sub- 
committee of tire House Armed 
Services Committee, according to 
con g res s ional sources. 

The repeat comes at a time when 
Congress is completing delibera- 
tions on next year’s aid appropria- 
tion for the Philippines. Tim: repent 
is one of several inquiries into aid 

in Manila 

A recent State Department anefit 
found that more than half the 
voocherasubmrtt^byaPhiBppine 
agency awarded S1A million in 
American disaster assistance were 
supported by false documents, ac- 
cording to State Department offi- 
cials. 

While Congress and tire Reagan 
administration agree for the most 
part on tire basic goals of American 
pdicy toward the Philippines, there 



Man Dies 
In Belgian 
ilosion 

Courthouse Hit; 
2 NATO Sites 
AlsoBombed 


Lupino Lazaro, an attorney who represented the family of 
Rolando Gflhnan, the accused assassin of Remgno S. 
Aquino Jr n burned Ms law books and diploma Friday 
outside the Pln^ppine Supreme Court in protest of the 
acquittal of military personnel in the Aquino assassination. 


is disagreement over tire issue of 
aid. 

On Wednesday, the House of 
Representatives voted to cot the 
administration’s military aid re- 
quest. The final figure is fikely to be 
worked out in conference between 
tire Smate and House next week. 

The issue of aid to the Philip- 
pines, which is Hkdy to be debated 
again after the elections set there 
for February, mdndes these ques- 
tions: How much aid should tire 
United States provide? How 
should it be divided between mili- 
tary and economic? How are tire 
funds used? Who should control 
the asastance and, to what extent 
should Washington use the money 
to prod the Phffippines into chang- 
ing its policies? 

The administration and some 
legislators think the Philippines 
should get more military assistance 


to fight the Communist insurgency. 
Others in Congress want lo with- 
hold aid until hitman rights flhnm-s 
and corruption are significantly re- 
duced. 

rnmpHairing tire discnssion is 
tire base agreement between tire 
two countries, signed in 1983, in 
which tire United States pledged to 
provide $900 mflKnn in military 
and econo mic fff dl|nHt over five 
years in return for the use of Clark 
Air Base and tire Subic Bay Naval 
Base. Bound by the executive 
■j in wji nf n t, the administration can 
only withhold money for programs 
not covered in the agreement, such 
as food aid. Congress, on the other 
hand, can approve its own levels of 
aid. 

The Pfritippine government con- 
siders the money to he rent and 

(Continued mi Page 5, CoL 1) 


Catholic Bishops Vote on Documents 
Summarizing Results of Vatican II 


The Associated Press 

VATICAN cmr — Roman 
Catholic bishops a tt e ndin g a synod 
to assess the Second Vatican Coun- 
cfl voted Friday on two final docu- 
ments that contained their findings 
and recommendations. 

The votes were being dosdy 
watched in Vatican aides because 
they may reflect bow successful 
bishops were in pressing for an in- 
creased share of power in the run- 
ning of the church, which has 840 
unman f (dlowcxs. 

The first document to be voted 
cm was a "message to all Catho- 
lics,” a general statement cm the 
work of tire two-week assembly. 

Participants in tire extraordinary 

whether they should, publish*^ 
other, more detailed document, 
which contains their finding s and 
recommendations for Pope John 
Paul IL 

The Reverend Diammid Martin, 
a mod spokesman, said that the 
ballots were being counted and the 
result would be announced later in 
tire day. He said that 155 of tire 161 
bishops at the synod participated 
in the voting. 

The final draft of the pastoral 
message, drawn up by five prelates 
led by Cardinal Joseph Corddro of 
Karachi, Pakistan, was presented 
to tire synod Thursday. 

If tire document is approved, as 
is exposed, it wfll be issued Sunday 


when the synod doses with a pon- 
tifical Mass in St. Peter’s Baafica. 

■ Hard Wodd Role Grew 

EJ. Dianne of The New Yak 
Times reported from Rome: 

. The presence of church leaders 
from tireTbird Wodd has been one 
of the most striking aspects of the 
synod, and this has affected both 
the tone and the content of the 
debate. 

“The axis of the world is mov- 
ing,” said Archbishop Henry Se- 
bastian iySooza of Calcutta. “It is 
th us very important for the church 
to understand and be more open.” 

Because of a modified one-coan- 
try, one-vote form of organization, 
tire synod has given the newer 
cbmches of Africa and Ada an un- 
usual opportunity to speak. 

Thirty-four African countries 
have representatives at the confer- 
ence, as do 17 countries from Asia 
and 22 countries from Latin Amer- 
ica and the Caribbean. 

Compared with tire practical dif- 
ficulties faced by some of the Third 
World churches, the theological 
questions debated by liberals and 
conservatives in North America 
and Europe may seem almost self- 
indulgent. 

For example, the extent to which 
tire laity can administer the eucha- 
rist was broadly debated at the syn- 
od. The essential issue was the 


ch ur c h ’s an pimnii on the priest- 
hood 

But Archbishop Charles Van- 
dame of N<£amena, Chad told his 
ooBeagpes that far most of bis 
dock, having a priest at all is some- 
thing erf a dream. 

“The local Christian communi- 
ties are so numerous and scattered 
about that the priest is no longer a 
member," be declared “He comes 
from outside. He passes through 
tardy and rapidly. The faithful or- 
ganize themselves without him." 

Specific questions that are hard- 
ly of concent to the West were 
pushed to the fore because at the 
Third Wodd presence. 

Bishop Felix Mkhori of 
Cbokwawa, Malawi, for instance, 
pleaded for more help in his 
church’s struggle to compete with 
Islam. 

“Mosques are coming up like 
mushrooms in Malawi,” he said at 
the synod 

The state of the church in tire 
Third World is of critical impor- 
tance to Rome: The pope has made 
it dear, in his words and through 
his travels, that he believes that the 
future of the church depends on 
steady growth in the countries of 
the developing world particularly 
Africa and Asia. 

In Africa, for instance, there are 
65 million to 70 million Catholics, 
substantially more than in the 
United Stalk. 


Reuters 

BRUSSELS — One person died 
and several were injured Friday 
when a bomb, apparently intended 
for Belgium's justice minister, Jean 
Gol, exploded in a crowded court- 
house in the eastern city of L&ge, 
police said. 

The explosion followed attacks 
earlier Friday on a North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization fuel pipeline 
in central Belgium and on the of- 
fices of the alliance agency that 
operates the pipeline in Versailles, 
France. Mr. Gol said that an ex- 
treme leftist organization, the 
Fighting Communist Cells, had 
said it carried out those bombinp. 

Mr. Gol, the hard-line senior 
deputy prime minister in charge of 
law and order in Belgium, had been 
due to attend a swearing-in cere- 
mony for young lawyers in the 
Li&ge courthouse but was detained 
in Brussels by an important parlia- 
mentary debate. 

Witnesses said Mr. Gol’s name 
was on the primed invitations for 
the ceremony, which was about to 
begin when the blast went off. 

By Friday evening, no one had 
claimed responsibility for the Liege 
bombing, and Mr. GoL who visited 
the scene after the attack, said the 
man who died might have been 
trying to plant the device. 

The body was badly mutilated 
and could not immediately be iden- 
tified, police said. 

The two anti-NATO bombings 
brought to 28 the number of at- 
tacks claimed by the Fighting 
Communist Oils in the last 14 
months. Investigators believe the 
group has links with two other ur- 
ban guerrilla organizations, the 
Red Army Faction in West Germa- 
ny and Direct Action in France. 

A six-page communique found 
in central Brussels said an unspeci- 
fied “International communist 
group in France” had helped in the 
Versailles bombing. 

It s&id a third attack on a differ- 
ent stretch of the NATO pipeline 
near Mons, Belgium, failed because 
of a technical problem. 

Belgian radio said that an unex- 
ploded device was found Friday 
afternoon in front of a bank in a 
nw m avenue in central Brussels, 
and that Fighting Communist Cells 
leaflets were strewn about. 

On Wednesday, tire group plant- 
ed a bomb in a crowded Bank of 
America office in Antwerp but 
gave a telephoned warning allow- 
ing staff to evacuate the building. 
But five persons were u j ta r d. -. 

Friday’s first two bombs went 
off within minutes of each other 
around 5 AM, hitting the pipeline 
and NATO’s Central European 
Operating Agency in Versailles. No 
one was hurt in those attacks. 

The Fighting Communist Cells, 
waging a campaign against NATO, 
U.S. and Belgian es tablishmen t tar- 
gets, claimed responsibility for tire 
pipeline bombing in a telephone 
cab warning police to dear an adja- 
cent railway line. 

The attacks occurred almost ex- 
actly a year after tire Fighting Com- 
munist Cells set off six bombs with- 
in a few hours along a pipeline 
carrying fuel from Atlantic and 
North Sea ports to frontline forces 
and air bases in West Germany. 

Neither of Friday’s NATO tar- 
gets was guarded. Security officials 
said it would be impossible to pro- 
tect the entire 3.680-mile (5,900- 
ldlometer) pipeline network, which 
spans five countries. 

The pipeline network, used by 
commercial companies in peace- 
time, has become a frequent target 
foe urban guerrillas. 


Assam Moslems Haunted by Fear of New Violence 


By Steven R_ Weisman 

New York Timer Service 

NOWGONG, India — Tawny 
sheaves of rice dot tire fields of the 
lush Brahmaputra River valley 
nowadays. Bat this season the peo- 
ple are also reaping a harvest of 
an guish, r ecm^ patimi and fear. 

Every region of India has its 
share of sectarian rivalries, but few 
are afflicted with the hatred found 
here in tire remote northeastern 
state at Assam. • 

Nearly three years after the fact, 
Assam «21 lives in the shadow of a 
massacre in which thousands of 
Moslem farm familie s were killed 
by tribe^wple. armed with guns, 
knives, spears and bows and ar- 
rows. 

In the villages of Nellie and AH 
£mg h« a few miles southwest of 
here, whole f amilie s woe wiped 
out. “We are always afraid the per- 
secution will increase,” said 
Moimil Haqne, 27, a grocer whose 
wife and daughter were shun- 

The rancor scons an odd out- 

growth in a tarilory as blessed with 
resources and beauty as Assam. 

. The land is covered with pcanset- 
tia trees, hibiscus bushes, coconut 


palms and bamboo trees. Violet hy- 
acinths blossom in the marshlands. 
Tea plantations carpet the country- 
side. fishermen in boats cast nets 
in the Brahmajmtra, which flows 
from its source m Tibet. 

The area abounds with wildlife. 
People were twTlrm^ for example, 
about how a wild elephant got deo- 
trocuted tire other day on a high- 
voltage power line. 

The bitterness here has its 
sources underneath the surface. 

In the volatile mix in Assam’s 
population of about 23 mOBon are 
people from a score of ancient 
tribes who migrated here thou- 
sands of years ago, some of whom 

five in the forested hUls and prac- 
tice thefr own anhnist religions. 

In the cities, affluent Assamese 
Hindu families dominate the 
schools and professions. In the 
sprawling tea estates are low-caste 
Hinda tea workers whose ancestors 
were brought here 100 years ago by 
British plantation owners. 

Thecal tares often mix peaceful- 
ly. On a forested hill overlooking 
tire river sits a Hindu temple that 

(Continued on Page 5, Col I) 





Abdul Aziz, 73, the leader of All Singha village in India's Assam state, holds his 
graunkfetugbter, who was wounded in the eye by an arrow daring a 1983 attack by Hindus. 









Fabius’s Resignation Declined 
In Dispute Over Pole’s Visit 


Remen 

PARIS — Prime Minister Lau- 
rent Fabius tendered his resigna- 
tion because of a disagreement with 
Presi dent Francois Mitterrand but 
the offer was rqected, the French 
newspaper Le Monde reported Fri- 
day. 

A dispute between the two men 
developed over Mr. Mitterrand’s 
decisio n to meet on Wednesday 
with the Polish leader. General 
Wqjdech Jaruzdski, in Paris. 

Mr. Fabius pubMdy criticized 
the visit and tola the National As- 
sembly he bad not been consulted. 

Hie newspaper said that Mr. Far 
bins offered to resign at Thursday 
in a telephone conversation with 
Mr. Mitterrand, who is visiting the 
French Caribbean islands of Marti- 
nique and Guadeloupe. 

Mr. Fabius, 39, a political protfr- 
gi of Mr. Mitterrand, was named 
prime minis ter in July 1984 and 
once said that ‘'you cannot sKde a 
cigarette paper between his 
thoughts and my own.’' 

■ New Pofitkal Furor 

Richard Bernstein of The New 
York Tones reported from Pair. 


The "wn«iel public disagree- 
ment between Mr. Mitterrand and 
Mr. Fabins has created a new polit- 
ical stonn in France with many 
commentators and officials assert- 
ing that the Socialist government is 
deeply divided. 

Mr. Fabms’s critical remarks 
concerning the visit of General Jar- 
uzdski seemed highly nrnimal in a 
country whose prime minister pre- 
sumably serves at the pleasure of 
thepresdttL 

In addition, they added to an 
impression widely odd in France 
that the Socialists, faring likely de- 
feat in legislative elections next 
March, have been flounde ri n g as 
have attempted to reverse a 
! in popularity. 

"Never has a prime minister 
been so publicly in disagreement 
with a foreign policy initiative of 
die president,’' the newspaper, Lib- 
eration, editorialized Thursday. 
"Never has a president of the Re- 
public been so alone in his diplo- 
matic comae or so illegible in Ms 
initiatives.'* 

Neither Mr. Fabius nor Me. Mit- 
terrand an Mr. Fabi- 


us’s remarks, which led to such 
newspaper headlines in Fads on 
Thursday morning as The Gent . 
Divide,” “Disagreement” and “The 
Trouble." 

Figures in the righ tist opposition 
sensed on the occasion to suggest 
disarray inside the Socialist camp. 

Raymond Bane, a former prime 
tfiwHater, said tbirf if Mr. Fabins 
was “troubled” by Ms president's 
policies, he should have kft the 

i 

pubSdy. 

Alain Mad din, an opposition 
" 7 , said in a television inter- 
view Thursday: "Today, we have 
an affair that is notpopolar, that is 
even shameful for France, which is 
the visit of Mr. Jaruzdski, and Mr. 
Fabins walks away, he takes his 
distance. I would say that that is his 
constant attitude as an anconra- 
geora captain.’' 

In bis remarks, Mr. Fabius said 
(hat he was among those in France 
who had protested General Jarn- 
zdskf s declaration of martial law. 
in Poland in 1981. - 

‘That is why — and why hide it? 
— the visit, even a short one, to 



WORLD BRIEFS 


Egyptians Accuse leaders of Lying About Jet Raid 

By Christopher Dickey 

Washington Pest Service 

CAIRO— Senior Egyptian offi- 
cials are faring mounting domestic 
criticism over charges that the gov- 
ernment distorted and delayed ac- 
counts of what actually happened 
when hs commandos stormed a hi? 
ja<»lr i»d Btriiwwr tn Malta lust month. 

Fifty-seven persons died during the 


Besides the expected condemna- 
tion from Egypt’s small opposition 
parties, the handling of the rescue 
raid has been criticized in recent 
days by a broader political spec- 
trum, including such establishment 
sources as the semiofficial newspa- 
per A1 Ahram. 

The criticism dearly has raised 
concern within the government of 
President Hosni Mubarak. 

. In an interview Wednesday, For- 
eign Minister Esmat Abdd Meguid 
tned to blunt assertions that Egypt 
is being pushed by the United 
States and Israel into using ihe 
Nov. 23 hgackrng of die 
jet as an excuse to attack. Of 

"We will not start a military ac- 
tion” against Libya as a result of 
the hij acking , Mr. Abdd Meguid 
said. However, he added of Colmd 
Moamer Qadhafi, the Libyan lead- 
er; "Bat if he starts a military or 
aggressive action us, that is 
another story.” 


A1 Ahram, in a rare critical oom- 
meolaiy, accused Egypt’s state- 
controlled tdevition on Wednes- 
day of "presenting untruths, while 
smflrag’’ about the “success” of the 
rescue mission. It also accused the 
channels of withholding news of 
the casualties for a full day. 

"The Egyptians found out the 
troth from the foreign media,” pri- 
marily mtwnatinnal radio broad- 
casts, said the A1 Ahram columnist, 
Abdd-Rahman SharawL 
They didn’t believe it at first,” 
he wrote. Then the news became 
mare somber when h turned oat 


died had been 


e hijack vi 
kflkri as: 


a result of 


A total of 60 persons died in the 
hijacking, indnmng a passenger 
killed by the hijackers before ihe 
raid and two who died later. 

Mohammed Sid- Ahmed, manag- 
ing editor of the leftist weekly par 
per AI Ahali, said he believed it was 
the first time in die four-year ad- 
ministration of Mr. Mubarak that 
the go vernment has a ttempted to 
push "the bog lie” on. its people. 

The issue has been sharply dis- 
cussed in the Egyptian pariiament 
in recent days. Bat (hat criticism 
also was given short shrift in the 
official press, provoking more dis- 
sension among Cairo’s politically 

m^lhrtnir^ 


The Government Bars the Op- 

ofYiew” read ^aSadHiie Tuesday 
in the opposition paper EL Shaab. 

As mere revelations are made 
about the death tall in Malta and 
about U.S. cooperation with the 
Egyptian authorities prior to the 
rmfT the opposition m« intm ad- 
vantage of the government's dam- 
aged cnxHxhty in other ways. 

“ Anwira amt I «rnri inci te Eg ypt 

to go to war against Libya!” die 
harmw hodtillB of Al Ahali aaiH 

Wednesday. 

Aware of such criticism, Mr. 
Abdd Meguid took pains to clarify 
Ms government's stand toward Col- 
ond QadhafL The Libyan leader 
has been accused of masterminding 
die hijacking, bat no substantial 
proof has been presented pnbhcly. 

Asked about troop batidsps and 
military alerts that began cm both 
sides of the Egyptian-Libyan bor- 
der the day or the Htjurfrinfc Mr. 
Abdd Meguid said: “We have to 
our precautions vis-a-vis Qa- 

Hhafi 

“We don't want to be caught, as 
you say in America, with our putts 
down,” he said. "But this does not 
mean that we will attack or take an 
offensive action." 

AHudmg to a remark by Mr. Mu- 
barak at a meeting of African inte- 
rior ministers Tuesday, Mr. Abdd 


Meguid reiterated that “we don't 
attack an Arab or an African court- 
try” 

But he did not appear to rule out 
completely some eventual action 
against Cokmd Qadhafi MmsdfL 

Egypt, Mr. Abdd Meguid said, 
has a “code of ethics” in dealing 
with other nations. There is no 
doobt that we have nothing against 
the Libyan people,” he said. They 
are our neighbors, our brothers. 
But our anger is with the Libyan 
leadership.” 

Colonel Qadhafi "is a very 
strange kind of fellow” who uses 
his money and influence to snpport 
terrorism "against everyone,” not 
Egypt alone, he said. 

Mr. Sid-Ahmed of Al Ahali said 
be fdt that Mr. Mubarak was indi- 
rectly “p r e wi red by Washington” 
to attempt a rescue of the EgyptAir 
passengers. 

Mr. Mubarak "at least felt he 
had to do something so he would 
not project once again complacen- 
cy against terrorism,” he said. 

In October, Mr. Mubarak hdped 
end the hijacking of the Addle 
Lanro cruise ship with the loss of 
only one life by enlisting the aid of 
the Palestine liberation Orgamza- 
tionin negotiations. Bathe angered 
Washington later by attempting to 
release the hijackers to the FLO. 


FbmKhC>KchcrnpbnAhrtfhx/ , n>nner-<jpMicheleAJbcxekx 


MssAmerkn 1966, Susan Akir\ predecessor ShaHeno Wfek. 



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7-12-85 


Cypriots Urged to Reject 

Delay in Turks’ Pullout u g Balanced-Budget Bill Approved 


Larrcent Fabius 

France of the Polish chief of state 
has personalty troubled me,” Mr. 
Fabms said. ' He went cm that -he 
had "posed questions” to Mr. Mit- 
terrand about bis reception of Gen- 
eral Jaruzdski. 

SoriaH it have 

expressed dismay at Mr. Fabins’s 
comments, saying that they were 
surprised by the prime, minister's 
dear open Hitagi wm^n t with 
Mr. Mitterrand, winch was seen by 
some observers here as an attempt 
to distance hfmurif politically from 


Si nun 

ATHENS— Prime Mmister An- 
dreas Papandreou urged Friday 
dmi Great Cypriots, who vote in 
general elections on Sunday, not 

^tLfr^drvided idand^tiiat^ 
votved a timetable for the with- 
. drawal of Turkish troops from the 
north. - 

He also said in a speechto parlia- 
ment that Greece wtiuld not accept 
Turkey as a co-guarantor for any 
solution. 

■ Mr. Papandreou said: “We must 
tefl the Cypriot people deariy that 
if they agree to a timetable for the 
withdrawal erf Turkish troops — 
which means Turkish troops will 
never withdraw — we will conrider 
Greece's national interest is being 
banned.” - 

His remarks, which were in line 
with the position (rf the Greek Cyp-' 

riot president, Spyros Kyprianon, 
were immediately criticized by 
Constantine Mitsotakis, the con- 
servative opposition leader, as an 
interference m Greek Cypriot poli- 
tics. 

Mr. Kyprianon, a centrist, is on- 

Cypri^^^mmn^t and conserva- 
tive parties, which between them 
hold 23 of the 35 seats in parlia- 
ment, to soften Ms position. 

Mr. Mitsotakis said Mr. Papan- 
dreou’s statement amounted to an 
attack on members of there two 
parties, and that Cypriots should 
be allowed to deride things for 
themsehra. 

Cyprus has been partitioned . 
since 1974, when Turkish troops 
overran the northern part of the 
island following a short-lived 
Greek-backed coup. Turkish Cyp- 
xiotsanilateraljydedarednorthem 
Cyprus independent in 1983. 

Mr. Papandreon said that he and 
Mr. Kyprianou agreed that Turkish 
troops must leave the island before 
and not after the formation of any 
federal administration group i ng 
Greek and Turkish Cypriots. 



Andreas Papandreou 

Mr. Kyprianou’s Greek Cypriot 
opponents have aitidzed tins posi- 
tion as unrealistic and urged him to 
agree to a compromise United Na- 
tions formula before the partition 
of Cyprus becomes permanent. . 

■ Turkish, officials say they will 
keep trams on the island fra the 
foreseeable future, and that they 
would insist on being guarantors of 
any future settlement Ankara cited 
its rights as a guarantor power 
when it invaded in 1974. 

But Mt Papandreon said accept- 
ing Turkey as a guarantor power 
would mean continued Thridsh oc- 

- flipafwi of ftvs nffly th unit effective 

Turkish sovereignty over the south. 

A. total of 226 candidates are 
seeking el e ction to the new parha- 
meat, Whkh is to have 56 seats. A 
farther 24 vacant seats are to be 
reserved for Turkish Cypriots. 

Hie election is mainly between 
Mr. Kyprianou’s DBCO, or Demo- 
cratic Party, the Communists' 
AKEL, the rightist Democratic 
Rally Party and the. Socialist 
EDEK party. 


Qadhafi Tries to Repair 


aA^ks.ia:K3=assr“ 

If Congress approves it, President Ronald Reagan is expected to sjp 
the mm» few even though some ofhis key advisers have sad & 
olan could cat sharply into U.S. military spending. . 

P The plan, which has been debated m togas for two uAuai 
Qydecreasmg targets for the annual defiat that would be met by 

budget was in 1969. 

U.S. Environmental Agency Is Sued 

York charging ihe Environmental Protection Agency with violating the 

C TtI£ suit arid that the agency failed to obey a requirement to update its 
1971 standards for allowable levels of sulfur oxide pofluncm. Tne plain- 
tiffs said Thursday it had not done so even though the agency's studies 
show that existing standards endangered health a nd failed to curb the 
environmental damages of arid rain, which were documented only over 

lh sSfar mddtrogen oxides produced in bunting coal and in other 

industrial processes are taken afoft by air currents and rain down on the 

earth in acidic particles in other parts of !be country. Joiningu the rat, 
filed in UJS. District Court, are New York, Connecticut NcwHampshirc, 
Massachusetts, Vermont, Rhode Island, Mumraota, the Envrronmmtal 
Defense Fund, the Natural Resources Defense Council, the Siena dub, 
and the National Parks and Conservation Association. 

Pakistani Army to Stay in Khyber Pass 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (Reu- 
ters) — Pakistan plans to Tnarnmin 
a permanent militi 


itary 

pacts of the Khyber 
tribal chief s backed by Afg hani sta n 
have defied Islamabad's authority, 
P akistani offi c i als said Friday. 

The officials said that army posts 
would beset up an mountains over- 
looking the Peshawar plain, the 
area at the mouth of tne Khyber 
Pass dominated by a leading rebel 
chief, WaU Khan KukikbeL 

On Dec. 1, Pakistan sent thou- 
sands of troops and dozens of tanks 
into tire pass, especially Chief Ku- 
ltikheTs area near Peshawar, to 
force the surrender of 16 chiefs 
reportedly armed by Afghanistan. 
Most of them surrendered but 
Qtief Kukikhel fled, threatening to 
re a r m and force a showdown with 
the troops. 



Relations With Africans ^*±±^S5?“!S2 


By Claude Regin 

Renters 

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — Eco- 
nomic difficulties at home and tan- 
sioo on Libya's Egyptian border 
appear to have prompted a signifi- 
cant reversal by die Libyan leadra, 
Moamer Qadhafi, of Ms policy to- 
ward Chad, according to Western, 
and African diplomats. 

Urey said that Colonel Qadhafi 
seems to have realized, and imphe- 

that President 
Habrf, who drove Colonel 
Qadbafi’s prot£g 6 , Goukouui 
Oucddri, flam power -in Nt^a- 
mena, the Chadian cental, three 
years ago, is there to stay. 

Colonel Qadhafi’s current tour 
of West Africa probably is also 
designed to break Libya’s isolation 
on the continent, where it has lost 
many friends as a result of its inter- 
vention in several countries’ affairs, 
the diplomats added. 

“Qadhafi is dearly out to win 
bode some respectability in the 
continent,” an Ivory Coast official 
said. 

The unpredictable Libyan Leader 
was in Bamako on Friday, trying to 
patch op relations with Mali, less 
than four months after his govern- 
ment expelled 3,800 Malian work- 
ers, along with tens of thousands of 
Egyptians and Tunisians. 

Diplomats say he invited himself 
to Dakar this wed in the hope of 
resuming diplomatic ties with Sen- 
egal, me of a number of moderate 
African countries that haw severed 
relations with Tripoli in the past 
few years. 

But the main subject of Ms talks 
with Senegal’s president, Abdou 
Diouf, chairman of the Organiza- 
tion of African Unity, was Chad, 
where civil war has lasted 20 years 
and Libya has about 6,000 troops 
supporting Mr. Goukounfs rebels 
in the north. 

After the talks, Colond Qadhafi 
said that he was wOling to treat the 
Chadian rivals on an equal footing. 
Until now, he has insisted that Mr. 
Goukouui was the legitimate head 


of state, and Mr. HabrA was a mere 
factional leader. 

This IS an implirit <M t n ri wn ii 
that HabrA is there to stay and that 
Goukoum has lost Ms standing,” 
the Ivorianoffirial said. 

Colonel Qadhafi sent several 
thousand troops to Chad to help 
Mr. Goukoum m June 1983, but 
France dispatched some 3,000 men 
to back Mr. Hahrt and Mr. Gou- 
koum failed to recapture the capi- 
tal. - 

Libyan tmnp m gmiinal tn Oiad 
a year ago when French troops 
•withdrew under an agreement be- 
tween Tripoli andPans. Libya then 
virtnaBy anoexed northern Chad. 

Faced with dwindling oil reve- 
nues, tension on the Egyptian bor- 
der. growing discontent with the 
Chad adventure among Libyan 
military officers and factional 
arfhs among die anti-Habnfe forces, 
Cokmd Qadhafi now is seeMng a 
face-saving settkroart, the diplo- 
mats say. : r ..... . 

Colond Qadhafi has suggested, 
therefore, that some Libyan troops 
should stay behind as pen of an 
OAU peacekeeping force. Howev- 
er, this proposal is unacceptable to 
Mr. Habit who has said it would 


Libyan leader is reprated to 
have offered to reriignize. Mr. 
Habrfc in exchange, fra Chad join- 
the 15-month treaty . finking 
and Morocco. 


ing th 
Libya; 


New Security Plan 
ReportedmBeuTit 


CHURCH SERVICES 


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181 Ave. Ql dc Gaulle , . 
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TeL* 747 . 1265 . 


BEIRUT — Prime Minister JUfo 
shid Karami of Lebanon an- 
nounced Friday -that police and 
army mrire would mire control of 
security in West Beirut from the 
Moslem militias that have repeat- 
edly plunged the city into violence. 

Tim latest security plan cranes 
after five days of street fighting 
between Driize and Shnte Moslem 
mditias last month m which 68 per- 
sons were ktDed, 

Mr. Karami said he had agreed 

with die Stinte Amn! mifiria anH tli q 
Druze Progressive Socialist Party 
to revive "as soon as possibLe? 
short-lived measures dravm up in 
Damascus last July after ember 
battles. Mr. Katanai said militia of- 
fices would be sfcm down andpep- 


DHAKA, Bangladesh (UPI) — South Asian leaders gathered Friday 
for the first summit meeting of the region's impoverished and politically 
divided nations. 

• Attending the session, which is being guarded by an estimated 30.006 
troops, are Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi of India; President Mohammed 
22a nl-Haq of Pakistan; King Birendra of Nepal; King Jigme Singye 
Wangchnk erf Bhutan; President Maumoon Abul Gayoam of the Mal- 
dives; President Junius R. Jayawardeoe of Sri Lanka and Preadent 
Hussain Mohammed Erahad of Bangladesh, the host 

Rules of the two-day meeting of the Organization for South Asia 
Regional Cooperation prohibit discussion of bilateral issues, but Indian 
officials said that Mr. Gandhi would discuss with Mr. Jayawardeoe a new 
plan for settling ethnic strife in Sri T -antra. 

Sotheby’s TeDs Italy It Won’t Hah Sale 

LONDON (Reuters) — Sotheby's, the auction bouse, has rejected^ 
request by Italy to halt a sale of Roman antiquities until police complex 
an investigation of looting at sites in the Apulia region of Italy. The sale 
has stirred concern among British museum officials as wefl. 

Sotheby’s said in a statement that that there was no evidence that the 
items had crane from any official or unofficial site. Felice Lo Porto, an 
archaeologist with the Italian Ministry for Cultural Preservation, bad 
asked Sotheby’s to postpone die sale, which is scheduled for Monday. 

Brian Cook, a curator at the British Museum, has said that the museum 
would not bid at tiie auction, though it would indude vases from the 4th 
century B.C that the museum would like to acquire. Elizabeth Goringi a 
curator at the Royal Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh, said the vases 
may have been brought to London without official Indian consent. 

Labor Keeps Seat in Special UJL Vole 

NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE, England (AP) — Britain’s opposition 
Labra Par^ retained thepariiaxnentazy seat of T)me Bridge, an area that 
has been hit hard by recession and unemployment, in results of a special 
election announced early Friday. 

But with a 38 percent turnout by voters, the Labor Party failed to gain 
the sweeping victory that it had hoped would set it on the path to victory 
in the nest general election, to be held by nrid-1 988. The «-ntifut aliiar, A 
OF Liberals and Social Demo crats came in second in Thursday’s voting, 
and Prime Munster Margaret Thatcher’s Conservative Party trailed badly 
in thud place. 

The special election was held because of the death of the former bolder 
of the seat, Harry Cowans. The Labor candidate, David Ckfland, 
received 13,517 votes, or 57.9 percent, to retain the seat for his party. 

For the Record 

Tires mes wane dif ged Friday in Koror, Faina, with rmwriw and 
conspiracy in the June 30 assassination of Haruo I. Randiika, the 
president of the U.S. trust territory, officials said. (AP) 

Demonstrators bnses oa fb« Friday in India’s western Gujarat state 
in new protests over a state policy that reserves some jobs and places in 
schools fra the poorer classes, the Press Trust of India news agency 

(Ratten) 

Yelena G. Bonner, the wife of the Soviet dissident Andrei D. Sakharov, 
met privately with Pope John Paul U on Friday evening, the Vaticar 
spokesman said. Earlier, relatives said she was leaving Italy on Saftndiif 
for medical treatment in the United States. (Reuters) 

A paranriBtary aril guard was shot and killed Friday in Mondragdn, 
Spain, by suspected Basque separatist guerrillas, police said. (Reuters) 

The aern world chess champion, Gary Kasparov, will play a rema&b 
against the framer champion, Anatoli Karpov, starting Feb. 10, the 
International Chess Federation said Friday. (Ratters) 

_ A coorirted himb mraderer, Carroll Edward Cole, 47, was executed 
Fnday m Careon Qty, Nevada, with a lethal imccS after Tiding his 

!£#£ ar *‘ ■“ *3* -a toStal » 

' . ' (neuters) 


U.S. Urges Syria to Join Peace Talks 


By Bernard Gwertzman _ 

Nre York Times Service 

WASHINGTON —The United 
States, in a oo&dliatray statement 
toward Damascus, has 5 aid that it 
ss Syria wffl jdn with- Jordan 
Israel in reviving Middle East 


ties with Syria and to seek its par- 
* Wi 'atiraim peace talks with Israel 


Bernard Kalb, tfaeStateDepftrt- 
meat spokesman, said Thursday: 


ties in the dispute, mduding Syria, 
wil reoogmzB the opportunities in- 
hereat in tbe entreat peace process 
and elect to participate construc- 
tively” 

For the last six months, tire Unit- 
ed Stales has been ttying to arrange 
direct negotiations between Israel 
and a-jomt Jradamjatf-Palesthnan 

tin effort has run. into 



More recmtiy. King Hussein of 
Jordan, imtated by recent actions 
of thePalestmeliberation Oigaoi- 
zation, has been ssekiDg tofrqprove 


the nmbrdla of an interna- 
tional conference. 

. In the Arab-Isradi war of 1967, 
Israel seized the Sinai Peninsula 
and Gaza Strip from Egypt, the 
Golan Heights from Syria, and the 
West Bank, indudiug East Jerusa- 
lem, bran Jordan. 

A United Nations Security 
Council resolution of 1967 provid- 
ed fra Israel's return of Arab lands 

in return fra peace. But Israel an- 
nexed the Golan Heights in 198i_ 

On Thursday the sale Depart- 
ment spokesman said: “Our ulti- 
mate objective is a just, compre- 
hensive settlement between load 
and all of its Arab neighbors. We 

bdieve that United Nations Secnri- 
ty Cornea Resolution 242 applies 
to -all fronts involved in the 1967 
war; indndmxthe Golan Hetahts. 
and that. Syna has a place in the 
peaceprocess, if itwiriies topaiiw- 
ipate.. 


Formally, the United St ntw? bss 
newer deviated fmn the yjgfr < 1 wit 
S yria Aodd be a party to negous: 
bona, but becanse of recent 

over Lebanon, the United Start 
has tmied to omit reference to 
Syria when it discussed peace ef- 
forts. ^ 

— W. Murphy, assistant 
tocrttaty <rf state for Near Eastern 

iTUt A Om ■' _ 


- ouu 10> win, 

a amr <rf the Middle East, h 
paraitly found no interest in 
in joining the talks, a State D 

meat official said. 


rai an Arab ontiiensnii rir 8, 

the Arabs and 


According to Israeli . 
foreign Mmister Yhzhak Siadnr 
trad Mr. Murphy in Jerusalem tbs*, 
whfle Jordan might want to involve 
Syria m talks, Sjria has been trying 
.tpdeter Jordan from the peace pro 














Ilia 






AMERICAN TOPICS 


BVTERIN ATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY -SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 1985 


Page 3 


In Congress, Inconsistency f Goes With the Territory ? 



^.^JLASrr ROUNDUP FOR THE GURU’S UMCOS — 1 Tracks carrying 85 RofeRoyces 
that once belonged to Bhagwan Shree Rajneesb arrive in a Dallas suburb from Oregon. 
>2?h'V* cars were boe^rt for § 6 naffion by aTeocasdealer, wbofrfanned to resefl them. The 
®^. gnra left Oregon for India on Nov. 14 after pleadmegoffiy to imuoignrtian violations. In 
Medford, Oregon, meanwhile, a gun. dealer said he bad purchased nearly 100 rifles and 
other weapons from the {pro's foHomere as they prepared to dose their «— e . 


^ Maternity Homes Try 
^ . To Abort Abortion 

Put / Fundamentalist church 
v\ groups and other anti-abortion 
f\J“ . organizations are creating or 
\ J ' supporting maternity homes 
:A Acjj and adoption services as a way 
— -S . ‘i to persuade women with an* 
** wanted pregnancies to have 
> their babies and give tbww up 
for adoption. 

But in a great majority erf 
.• i'<- .cases, women at such institu- 
f . rions who gjve birth inowe un- 
*■- willing to give their babies up 
-> _ f OT adoption, no matter wbat 

1 \tharongpial intentions and de- 
~ ]_£Spitelbe dim projects of life as 
‘l ■;* single parent, the Los Angdes 
\£M Times reports. 

^ The Alan Guttmacfaer Insti- 
tute, a New York research Sim, 
says that about 15 yean ago, 13 
. • percent of babies ban oat af 
^pSTpJj; .wedlock were placed for adop- 
tion; the rale has dropped to a 
" owe 4 percent today. 


\f:; Short Takes 

V.- The "spreading chestnut 
‘ tree," celebrated by Longfellow 
“ 'and lowering as high as 120 feet 
• .vj’- - (36 meters), was ceasbf wiped 
"Z‘- . . . out by a fungus blight in the 
first half of few century. But a 
few scattered groves planted in 
Mi chigan by pioneers far west 
, n . of the chestnuts natural range, 

( HI [ [j^ winch extends from fed Appa- 
. ladhiaas to the Atlantic, devd- . 
• • :A ■ oped a virus' that neutralizes the 
- -■'.r.*’ devastating fungus. Scientists at 


Michigan State University say 
this may well enable the dost 
not to a comeback- Car- 
penters value chestnut wood for 
its rot-resistance and say it is as 
beautiful as oak, but easier to 
work with. Bears fatten an the 
nutritious chestnuts before they 
hibernate. 

While other labor unions lan- 
guish, the TrTtwnnKrwial Broth- 
erhood of Teamsters has grown 
from L5 mM™ to 15 mflKon 
members in the past 10 years. 
Not onfy trade dnvers but cleri- 
cal, service and high^echnatogy 
workers are joining despite 
news articles about corruption 


other half rrfy on the relatively 
liberal national Jaw. . . . Politi- 
cal action committees, or PACs, 
for business, labor and ideolog- 
ical groups spent a record 51 13 
million m 1983-84, mostly for 
nymlim of- f-nwg ^ W a^wftng 
re-election, according to the 
Federal Election Commission. 
. . . Congress is considering 
moving back to Philadelphia, 
die U.S. capital from 1790 to 
1800, far one day in 1987 to 
commemorate the si gning of 
the U.S. Constitution there 200 
years earlier. . 


• By Steven V. ^Roberts 

• New York Tone# Service- 

WASHINGTON — In recent 
weeks both houses of the US. Con- 
gress have passed legislation that 
would require a balanced budget 
within five years. But they have 
also adopted farmbHls for the next 
four years that exceed die lawmak- 
ers’ own budget targets by several 
IsSion doOare. 

In addition, despite all the ora- 
toay about redueang the national 
deridt, the House Ways and Means 
Committee approved a proposal 
that would slash personal income 
taxes by $140 billion aod raise cor- 
porate taxes by about the same 
amount but would do nothing to 
dose a budget gag that tbrcatensto 
soar past S200 bflHon this year. 

To many lawmakers, these 'mea- 
sures demonstrate dial Congress is 
caught in “a web of contradic- 
tions," as Representative William 
B. Richardson, a Democrat of New 
Mexico, put it. Legislators seem 
perfectly willing to cast mconsh- 
tettt votes and approve poEries that 
lead in di ffe rent directions. 

“We’ve developed a legislative 
y i i ii/y h i Mi ia , ja an effort to bal- 
ance off these conflicting urgen- 
cies," sad Senator An Sasser, a 
Democrat' of Ten ne ssee. “What 
you’re seeing is people passi ng a 
hot potato hack and forth,” 


SafetySteps 
For 747 Jets 


*1 think you’d be a 
nervous wreck if 
you tried to be 
consistent on all 


issues. 


• — Charles Gra&sley 
Senator from Iowa 



Politics, Mr. Sasser noted, is a 
major reason for erratic legislative 

behavior. Next year’s elections, in 
which 22 Republican seats wifi be 
ArMcd. could determine control 
of the Swui«ft for die rest erf the 
century. Many lawmaker are more 
concerned about polhical advan- 
tage than about policy c on sistency. 

Lawmakers titan both parties 
hhme President Romm Rea- 
gan for refusing to rec o gni z e wbat 
they say is the faSnre of Ins eco- 




nomic policies and to acknowledge 

that new revenues are needed to 
re du c e the deficit. 

Senator Charles McC Mathias 
Jr* a Republican of Maryland, 
concedes that Congress votes in an 
inconsistent manner, but he blames 

“the wiwmnnf ppntBMtifftiAnt" m 

theadnnnistraticn’secoonancpdi- 
aes;abalanccdbudget,bigberin3- 
ilary spending and no new taxes. 

“Following that example," he 
said, “am and over again yon find 


people doing things which are dia- 
metrically opposed 10 their rheto- 

“ W9 

nc. 

Members of Congress argue that 
inconsistency “goes with the terri- 
tory," because all lawmakers repre- 
sent different constituencies at dif- 
ferent times. 

“1 think you’d be a nervous 
wreck if you tried to be consistent 
on all issues," said Senator Charles 
E. Grassley, a Republican of Iowa, 
who voted Tor both the balanced 
budget plan and the farm bill. 

"It would blind you to the needs 
of your constituents and to chang- 
ing times," he added. "I don’t think 
there's a particular merit to consis- 
tency as long as you don't compro- 
mise your basic principles.” 

But other legislators are alarmed 
at the trend they see developing on 
Capitol HUL Senator Daniel Pal- 
lia Moymban, a Democrat of 
New York who voted against both 
the balanced budget and the farm 
bOl, said: “What we’re trying to do 
is profoundly corrupting. Dus is 
frittering away the credibility of the 
Senate; It’s just too obvious." 

Four of the 22 Republican sena- 
tors who complete their terms next 
year have decided to retire, but the 
political pressures are fierce on the 
18 who are running for re-election. 
One of them is Steven D. Symms of 
Idaho, who supports both a bal- 
anced budget and the farm bill. 


U.S. to Resume Review^ of Disabled 

Earlier Ben^Emluathms WcacRahed After Har^Critidsm 


Congress is considering tt JT TTfi 

UrgedbyU.S. 


Red-Nosed Reindeer, 
Saporta, the teamsters’ aeganm- Red-Faced Disc Jock 


Saporta, the teamsters’ organiz- 
ing director, says that when 
people look for a union, “they 
want the biggest, toughest 
union they can find." 

Dr. Gary SL Rappoport said 
that the four-foot (1 .2-meter) 
sculpture of a tooth, with three 
- 10-foot toothbrushes, made' an 
attractive sculpture outside his 
office in a residential neighbor- 
hood of New Haven, Connecti- 
cut. “It’s ait," he sakL But Mi- 
chad J. Cappetta, the dt/s 
zoning administrator, didn’t 


bite, “rfs a sign." he said. The 
zoning bond ordered the tooth 
extracted. 

Shorter TAes: About half of 
the 50 stales have iheir -own 
gun-control laws exceeding fed- 
eral standards, according to 
US: government statistics; the 


When a ch ild te lephoned ra- 
dio station WSTF-FM in Mail- 
land, Florida, and to bear 

“Rudolph the Red-Nosed Rein- 
deer," the disc jockey, Michael 
Lowe, sternly replied that the 
station was not yet playing 

flirirtmiw mireM- Twrog np anil 

flwn unaware that his micro- 
phone was tamed on, called 

Santa flaiK an obscene namft 

and began singing a parody of 
the song describing methods of 
H|Kng Rudolph. 

Die station switchboard Ht 
up Kite a QimimM tree. Mr. 
Lowe was suspended from his 
job for a week. Barbara Vardin, 
the station’s general manager, 
said, “It was very, very wrong.” 


ARTHUR 


J ilmmake rs Suing 1 1ST A U.S. Heeds 
For Bias in Export Rules Trade Plea 


'.'“'By Katharine MacDonald 

Washington Post Sendee 

.. r LOS ANGELES — A group of 
jrt’Lli {. .^dependent filmmakers has filed 
. tit against the U.S. Information 
- ^ — ‘"Agency in a federal court here, 
- -'larging that the agency hampers 
iternatiooal distribution of docu- 
icntaryfihns that are ideologically 
• ' j-J woosist«itwith agency positions. 

. The suit, which names the USIA 
ir'irector, Charles Z. Wick, and the 
•-•l. ’• ^SIA’s attestation officer, John W. 
• ••••-' lendmhafi, as defendants, was 
led Dunsday by the Center for 
Constitutional Rights, which is 
. . - • ased in New York. 

The complaint allies dial the 
X>icy uses political criteria in ra- 
ting to grant export certificates 
certain films, thereby violating 
. .. First and Hfth Amendments 
id the Bdrut AgreemenL 


t ’ . ‘ ' ! I 

1 • 


I - r 'X&f -fe- 
If; 4 ■ 


ByNakasone 

By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

No* York Timer Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan blocked immediate 
trade retaliation against Japan ear- 
lier this week after receiving a per- 
sonal plea fnm Prime Minister Ya- 
suhiro Nakasone, administiation 
»iwt congressional 

They said a letter to (be presi- 
dent from Mr. Nakasone was deliv- 
ered Tuesday, die day the cabinet- 
level Economic Policy Council was 


collapse of negotiations to libexaL 
ize access to Japan’s market in 
leather products. 

TV thlitfd maintains that 
7 xxr.Mr ** it loses nearly $300 million a year in 

Charles Z. Wick «ports to Japan as a remit of To- 

when their “ primar y purpose is to kyo’s restrictive quotas on isqxnts 


The Bdrut Agreement, which the mstnxaorinTonn.. .orwhen thar of leatber. 

- "uiled States entered into in 1967, content is such as to maintain, in- The Japanese apply the proteo- 

' tfeasued to facilitate the interna- crease or diffuse knowledge, and turn, which has been dedanxi Sb- 
--.-inal di st ribution of educa ti onal, augment international understand- gal under the General Agreement 
ientific and cultural document*- mg and goodwiH” on Tariffs and Trade, to keep jobs 

.. fihm Signator y nations grant Interpretive guidelines to the for a class of social outcasts known 
' '■ rtificaies to such films, allowing agreement written by the USIA as Etas, who have no other occnpa- 
’ ity-free import by other signatory state that the agency wfll not certify tion. 
itions. films that “attempt to influence Die office of the U^. Trade 

The agreement defines films as opinion, conviction or policy (reK- Representative had prepared a list 
ucational scientific or cultural gious, economic or political propa- of 41 J^wnese products that could 

ganda). to espouse a cause or, con- have been denied access to die 

vercefy, when they seek to attack a United Stales to offset die trade 
'■t^r-wT Cl partk^ar persuasion." loss in the Japanese leather market. 

17.X. Police Seek David Cole,ihelawyer who filed Accreting to several sources .the 
n . , the suit, said that fee USIA grants letter from_Mr. Naka^ce, whrch 

tnrornntions by certificates w films <mly when the was discussed at fee cabinet meet- 
Z views in the films match its own. mg. ureed fee prenten not to re- 

' ’ Changing 9 Race ^ don’t knock out films that ^b^ito^cansegravc 
WMUIgWIg MMMMX arg onc-skted," he said. “They just dif&ulues for the Japanese leader 

The Associated Pros Imnrlr emt films that arfi one-Sldfid mlM Japanese UgBlatOrt. 

ff NEW YORK — Several and with which they disagree." The letter asked tMi, uMr. Rea- 


eiH’ e 


By Richard ‘Witkin 

New York Tuna Service 

NEW YORK — The National 
Transportation Safety Board has 
recommended a series of changes 
for Boeing 747 jetfiners to prevent 
structural breaks like those most 
experts say they believe led to the 
crash of a Japan Air Lines 747 in 
August 

The jumbo jet crash, the worst 
single-plane disaster in history, oc- 
curred after a large section of the 
vertical tail fell off the plane; 

According to prehmmaxy evi- 
dence cited by the safety board 
Thursday, the disaster began when 
a bulkhead at the rear of the pas- 
senger cabin ruptured, releasing a 
rush of pressurized air that blew off 
the tail section. All but four of die 
520 people on board were killed. 

One proposal (hat the safety 
board raid would prevent cata- 
strophic damage to fee ta3 in case 
of a cabin-pressure loss already has 
been addressed by Boeing Co., fee 
manufacturer. The company is put- 
ting an aluminum cover over an 
..opening that mechanics use to get 
np inlo the vertical-tail area from 
an unpressurized area behind' the 
passenger cabin. 

The safely board’s proposals 
were made to the Federal Aviation 
Ad m i n is tra tion. They would be- 
come mandatory for UB. airlines if 
adopted by the FAA Foreign air- 
lines in most cases follow the agen- 
cy’s directives regarding UR-bdlt 
aircraft. 

The safety board recommenda- 
tions were the first comprehensive 
effort in theUnhed States to act on 
the lessons learned so far in fee 
crash inquiry, which is directed by 
the Japanese. 

The following steps also were 
proposed: 

• Changing the Boring 747 by- 
dreulic system to prevent failure of 
aD four systems in case of a pres- 
sure buildup in the normally 
unpressnrized tafl. 

• R&evabiating the design of fee 
bulkhead at the rear of the passen- 
ger cabin. 

• Re-evaluating procedures for 
repairing bulkheads of 747s and of 
767s. 

• Requiring more stringent in- 
spections that would go beyond 
routine visual checks of 747 bulk- 
beads. 

The JAL 747 that crashed had 
been damaged in 1978 in a landing 
so severe that 30 persons were in- 
jured. Boring has acknowledged 
making an improper repair to fee 
bulkhead of fee plane after that 
landing. But the board said it was 
“concerned about the baric Tail- 
safe’ design even in a properly con- 
structed bulkhead.” The same de- 
sign ^ used cm the new Boring 767 
- twin-engine jumbo jets. 

A total of 608 Boeing 747s are in 
service around the worm. Of those, 
26 are short-range various like the 
one that crashed. Those 26 are 
parts of the fleets of Japan Air 
lines and Japan’s AD Nippon Air- 
ways. There are 127 Boemg 767s 
worldwide. 


By Robert Pear 

New York Thom Service 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 

admi n i «l r atio n will Start tO 

review the cases of all 2jS million 
people oh fee Snrfal Security dis- 
ability rolls to determine whether 
they are entitled to continue receiv- 
ing benefits, according to officials. 

Margaret M. Heckler, the de- 
parting secretary of h— lfe and hu- 
man services, who halted the re- 
views in April 1984, said Thursday 
that they would resume next 
month. 

Federal judges, governors and 
members of Congress from both 
political parties harshly criticized 
the earlier reviews, charging that 
thousands of people eligible far 
benefits had been removed improp- 


V ■ :> 


* /'La i 



eriyfrom the xoOs. 

sine* th*n Congress has unani- 
mously passed legislation overhaul- 
ing the disability program. On 
Thursday, the Social Security Ad- 
ministration issued rules to inter- 
pret and cany out the 1984 law. 

The rules provide that individ- 
uals wiD continue to receive dis- 
ability benefits if medical evidence 
shows no improvement in their 
ability to work since they were last 
evaluated. ' 

• “Wehave worked diHgerUly with 
all segments of the pubficin devel- 
oping regulations feat ensure a 
consistent disability program na- 
tionwide," Mrs. Heckler said. . 

But Jonathan ML Stein, director 


Margaret M. Heckler 

of Community Legal Sendees in 
Philadelphia, a legal aid agency 

that ha< rnprfMilf 4 many disabled 

people, said Thursday: “I am realty 
concerned and worried that the re- 
sumption of reviews may lead to 
the same problems that brtdl thoa- 
-sands of people a few years ago.” 

Representative Janies R. Jones, 
an Oklahoma Democrat wbo is the 
chairman of fee House Ways and 
Means Subcommittee on Social Se- 
curity, said he was concerned that 


Israeli Officials Suggest 
Spy CaseLeftNo Damage\ 


“the Department of Health and 
Human Services may once again, as 
in 1981 through 1984. create pres- 
sures to turn out derisions too 
quickly." 

No other social program has 
caused as many legal and political 
problems for fee Reagan adminis- 
tration as disability insurance. The 
earlier reviews were begun in 
March 1981 under a 1980 law, and 
Democrats have often cited (be re- 
sults as evidence (hat the adminis- 
tration farf ffri compassion in its 
efforts to an domestic spending. 

The disability insurance pro- 
gram cost S18.7 billion in the fiscal 
year that ended Sept. 30. 

In fee previous review process, 
said James M. Brown, a spokesman 
for the Social Security Administra- 
tion, tiie agency reviewed 12 mil- 
lion disability cases and informed 
491,000people that they would lose 
thrir benefits because they were no 
longer disabled and coukl go back 
to work. Of these, he said, 291,000 
were restored to the rolls after they 
appealed. Thus, he said, 200,000 
were ultimately removed. 

People selected for reviews win 
be anted to provide the names and 
addresses of doctors and hospitals 
that treated them in fee previous 
year.Tf the evidence is not 

adequate for a dedrion, the govern- 
ment will ask for additional data or 
send the person to another doctor, 
selected and paid by the govern- 
ment, for examination. 

If this evidence infecafax medical 
- impro v e ment that would justify re- 
moval Gram the rolls, Mr. Brown I 
said, fee case will be reviewed a I 
second time, to make sure no errors 
were made. 


The grain and sugar beet farmers 
in Idaho were a factor in his deci- 
sions, Mr. Symms said. But he also 
blamed Democrats for forcing up 
the price of fee farm bill in an 
effort to embarrass the Republi- 
cans. “The way it is," he argued, 
“you always have to buy people Off 
by sweetening the poL” 

Mr. Mathias pointed out that in- 
consistent votes can actually pro- 
duce a political profit: A lawmaker 
can cover all bases and satisfy di- 
verse attitudes baric home. 

"If you had voted for fee farm 
bin and fee defense budget and 
other appropriations Nils," he said,, 
“and y vl you knew that there was 
substantial concern about the na- 
tional debt, wouldn’t you want to 
have one vote to show that you’re 
really for economy, and against fee 
deficit?" 

Mr. Richardson added that fee 
pace on Capitol Hill also worked 
against consistency. “The rush of 
events overwhelms you," he said. 
“Your priorities gel skewed as you 
try to justify yourself politically." 


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By William Claiborne 

Washington Poa Service 

JERUSALEM — Although the 
Israeli government says it is push- 
ing ahead with a formal investiga- 
tion into allegations that Israeli 
agents reentited and used an Amer- 
ican citizen as a spy in the United 
States, officials hoe have begun to 
suggest dial the affair is already 

ifanuy done to American-Israel 
relations. 

Some officials indicate, in re- 
sponse to questions, feat the strate- 
gic relationship the two countries 
have bmlt up in recent years would 
be spared any further strains by a 
quick guilty plea from the accused 
spy, Jonathan Jay Pollard. 

Mr. Pollard, 31, a civilian coun- 
terterrorism analyst for fee U.S. 
Navy, was arrested Nov. 21 on 
charges of selling U.S. military se- 
crets to Israel . 

In the days since Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz and Israeli 
Prime Minister Shimon Peres held 
a long telephone conversation 
about the Poflard case, leading Mr. 
Peres to issue a formal statement of 

apology. Israeli officials have be- 
am to deriine to talk about any 
details of the aff air and to confine 
themselves to minimizing its im- 
portance. 

In the view of senior IsraeB offi- 
cials intimately involved wife US-- 
Israeli relations, the limits of 


American patience with Israel have 
not been even marginally stretched 
by the allegations against Mr. Pol- 
lard and fee pubHc criticisms of 
Israel issued tty fee State Depart- 
ment last week for an alleged lack 
of cooperation. 

The officials said they expected 
some residua] publicity on the case, 
but that basically they consider the 
issue 

One Israeli official, with a back- 
ground cf 12 years of dose involve- 
ment in U.S.-Israeli relations, 
called the disclosures of Israrii es- 
pionage in Washington a "blip on 
the Richter scale" compared to oth- 
er occasions since 1 967, when Israel 
attacked a U.S. intelligence fern, 
the Liberty, at the outset erf the 
1967 Arab-IsraeH war. 

“This is not even a serious cri- 
sis," said the official “It is just a 
juicy story." 

The officials spoke on condition 
that they not be identified. Howev- 
er, their views represent both the 
Labor and Likud factions of the 
national unity co&Htian govern- 
ment, and they mirror, to an extent, 
widely held attitudes in the Israrii 
public. 

The officials’ comments reflect- 
ed a frequently encountered view 
here that the United States is os 
dependent on Israel for meeting its 
strategic objectives in fee region as 
Israel is dependent on the United 
States for financial and political 
support. 



^ The Associated Pros 

T NEW YORK — Several 
tip jrttite policemen are seeking to 
L L iave themselves reclassified as 
slacks or Hispanics to take ad- 
■' V ttntage of a plan to remedy the 
. acial imbalance among ser- 
: v nants, offidals said. 

The officers, wbo identified 
- - hemsdves as white when they 
7. - • anted the force, were passed 
v ■ver for promotion to sagpant 
/hen fee city adapted & system 
v :--aat reserves 20 percent of 
. penings for blacks and His- 
' anics. They began applying to 
v.> ave few race designation 
*■ Janged last week, immediately 
' > Tier the plan took effect, 
■eorge Sanchez, deputy polioe 

” JQimissioner to equal oppor- 

. .nity, said Wednesday. 

- He said that under federal 
-■ " Jes, the officers can qualify by 
wing that either one parent, 
, /o grandparents or fourgreat- 
. andparents were black or 
v *e bora in a Spanish-speak- 

’5 country. 


and wife which they disagree." The letter asked feat, if Mr.Rea- 
. , .. gan frit he could not avoid action, 

A USIA spokesmans^ the hedday it until after the legislature 
agency’s legil department had not Dec. 20. VS. officials 

seen fee smt and could not com- said feat Mr. Reagan probably 
nwfe would act after that date. 

The suit asks for a declaration - 1 

Key Wea Majw’s Baee Ends 

order to grant certificates. The The Asiodtned Press 

films include “In Our Own Back- . KEY WEST, Florida— A bank- 


yards: Uranium Mining in the er. Tom Sawyer, defeated a former 
U.S.,” “Peace: A Conscious boat captain and saloon owner. 
Choice,” “Save fee Planet," “Eco- Tony Tarraano, by 52 votes after 


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“From the Ashes ... Nicaragua 
Today” 


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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 1985 



From the archives of Magnum Photos, a photographic record of Europe in 
the immediate postwar years — striking images of a continent shaking off 
the debris of destruction and coming to Hfe. 

Mary Blume, the International Herald Tribune's distinguished feature 
journalist sets the postwar scene and interviews many of the photographers 
in her introduction. The I.H.T. is pleased to present this unique volume that 
captures a decisive epoch and commemorates the work of some of the 
20th century’s master photojournalists. 

Here you’ll find some of the most famous images and faces of our ^Hfl^^^^Hardcover, 
time. Once you open its pages, you will want to spend hours poring over this 200 pages, 

magnificently produced collection. Truly this is a book to treasure for 168 duotone illustrations, 

yourself, and a beautiful gift as well 32x26cm (12.5x10.25 in.) 

Available from the International Herald Tribune. Order today. ^ 


AFTER THE WAR WAS OVER 

International Herald Tribune, Book Division. 


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7-12-85 




Singapore Confirms Intention 
To Leave UMSCOonDec. 31 


The Associated Press 

SINGAPORE — Singapore is to 
become the first Third World coun- 
try to leave the United Nations 
Educational, Scientific and Cultur- 
al Organization, a goveniniettt offi- 
cial grid Friday. The withdrawal is 
to take effect Dec 31. 

"We are not reconsidering our 
withdrawal,” said one official who 
asked not to be identified. A with- 
drawal notice submitted a year ago 
will stand, he said. 

The island republic of 25 mSlion 
people, which is str ugglin g with a 
serious economic slump, said it was 
leaving the agency for financial 
reasons. Singapore’s contribution 
to UNESCO’s budget increased by 
100 percent from 1965 to 1975 and 
climbed by 400 percent from 1975 
to 1985. Singapore paid $352,000 
over the past two years. 

The United States withdrew 
from UNESCO a year ago and 
Brfr«ni confirmed Thursday that it 
would do so on Dec. 31. 

The United States and Britain 
long have charged that UNESCO 
was a forum for Soviet and radical 
Third World initiatives against a 
free press, human rights and West- 
ern positions on arms control. 


■ Reaction to UJL Derision 

Britain's decision to leave 
UNESCO has dismayed other 
leading Western contributor-na- 
tions of the troubled agency, Reu- 
ters reported Friday from Paris. 

Announcing its final decision 
Thursday, Britain accused the Par- 
is-based agency of defying de- 
mands for deep ref Orm, of showing 
political bias against the West ind 
of bring badly managed. 

Still reding from the loss of one- 
fourth ofits budget because of the 
U.S. walkout last December. West- 
ern dmtomais said the loss of Brit- 
ain’s 4.6 percent contribution, or $9 
million, would add to the agency’s 
financial troubles. 

France’s ddegation to the. UN 
agency called the move ‘historical- 
ly and symbolically distressing,” 
noting that Britain had beat a 
founding memhar of the agency 40 
years ago was «rin the deposi- 
tory of its constitution. 

The British decision brought ex- 
pressions of understanding from 
the Reagan administration in 
Waslungton, which agreed with 
Britain' that a Western drive for 
reform over the past two years had 
failed to bring sufficient change. 


West Germany and France, two 
of Britain’s senior European Com- 
munity partners, disagreed, saying 
there were dear signs of progress in 
reforming the agency. 

West Germany, followed by Ja- 
pan and the Netherlands, bad 
threatened earlier to review mem- 
bership in the organization. 

But a Foreign Ministry spokes- 
man in Bonn said his country had 
'been encouraged to remain a mem- 
ber by decisions at UNESCO's 
General Conference last month in 
Sofia that showed a willingness to 
achieve reforms. 

“Those decisions can only be put 

into practice from withm," the 


Japan also expressed regret at 
Britain’s decision, and there has 
been no response by the Dutch. 

UNESCO's director-general, 
Amadou Mahtar M*Bow,a Senega- 
lese whose management has been 
the bun of much Western criticism, 
noted that Britain had been a party 
to the consensus at Sofia. 

Some Western diplomats said 
Britain's departure was “a slap in 
the face” for the controversial Mr. 
M’bow and had reduced his 
chances of being re-elected for a 
third term in 1987. 


BBC Considers Starting a Global TV Service 


The Associated Press 

LONDON— The British Broad- 
casting Corp. is considering start- 
ing a world television service simi- 
lar to its external radio service, a 
spokesman said Thursday. 

A BBC spokesman, Richard Mc- 
Carthy, said that the state broad- 
casting company's director-gener- 
aL Alasdair MUne, bad appointed a 
five-member committee to study 
the idea. 


The team is to examine the cost 
the potential market and the means 
of producing and broadcasting 
programs on the service, which 
would be named External Broad- 
casting in Vision. 

The study t«*m first met last 
week and is to complete its report 
next month, like the existing radio 
service, the world television service 
would focus on news and current 


Swiss Touch Off Liechtenstein Fire 


The Associated Pros 

BALZERS, Liechtenstein — 
Anti-tank grenades launched dur- 
ing an annyexerdse in Switzerland 
caused a forest fire in Liechten- 
stein, officials said Friday. 

Hundreds of fire fighters from 
Switzerland and Liechtenstein 
worked throughout the night to 
control the blaze, which reportedly 
damaged about 375 acres (150 
hectares) of a forest near here. 


The fire started Thursday after- 
noon during a military exercise in 
Switzeriand’s Sl Luzistrig training 
area, across the border from 
Balzers. - 

The army said that grenades 
touched off a grass fire that was 
farmed by winds and spread to the 
forest. . 

The mayor of Babers, however, 
said that the grenades had been 
fired directly into the forest. 


affairs rather than entertainment, 
Mr. McCarthy said. 

The television service probably 
would start with satellite broad- 
casts in En glish- But other delivery 
methods and other languages, in- 
cluding Arabic, French and Span- 
ish, are under consideration, as are 
methods of funding. 

The idea of a world television 
service was first mentioned public- 
ly during a speech in Los Angeles 
last year by Douglas Muggpridge, 
who was then the manag in g direc- 
tor of the BBCs external radio ser- 
vice. 

The BBCs external radio service 
broadcasts in 37 languages and has 
120 millio n listeners around the 
world. 

The British Foreign Office funds 
the radio service's £90 million 
($135 million) budget. A combina- 
tion of government and commer- 
cial funding could be used to run a 
television service, Mr. McCarthy 
said. 


U.S., Soviet 
Sign Pact on 
Cooperation # 
By Scholars - j 

fie*- York Times Scmce ■ ■ 

MOSCOW —American and So- 
viet scholars have signed an ex- • 
change agreement that they said ; 
would significantly expand aca- 
demic cooperation. ~ ■ 

Among other things, it includes 
the first Soviet -American research : 
project in Judaic studies, an exhibi- 
tion on North Pacific peoples, and. 
cooperative research on cornxnuja-y 
cations technology and its impact 
on society. ‘ ‘ 

More than a hundred joint ns 1 
search groups were established, 1 
covering international relations, fit- • 
eraturc, law, history, philosophy/ 
economics, geography and psy-! 
etiology. / ■ 

Although the agreement is sepa- ■ 
rate from an accord on cultural 
exchanges still being negotiated by 
the two governments, Soviet offi- 
cials and Western diplomats said.it 
was the first step toward improved . 
relations to result indirectly from 
last month's meeting in Geneva be- 
tween President Ronald Reagan 
and Mikhail S. Gorbachev. , . 

One of the projects involves a * 
joint program to study, catalog and 
publish a large collection of ancient 
Hebraic manuscripts in Leningrad . 
and Moscow. The manuscripts, 
considered a potentially rich source • 
of information in Judaic studies, 
have been inaccessible to Western 
scholars. 

The five-year agreement was 
signed by Robert ML Lumiansky. 
president of the American Council 
of Learned Societies, and Pyotr N. 
Fedoseyev. a vice president of the 
Soviet Academy of Sciences. 

Foreign Businesses in Ghana 

Agence Fnatce-Pnae 

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — AH A 
foreign businessmen selling for- 
eign-made goods in Ghanaian so-, 
permarkets and shops have been 
ordered to report by Dec. 15 to 
immigration officials in Accra for 
what is understood to be a check on 
their activities, according to a 
broadcast on Ghanaian radio mon- 
itored here. 



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Page 5 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY -SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7*8, 1985 


Shultz Says U.S. May Further Aid Nicaraguan Rebels 


; ^Spain, Britain End Session on Gibraltar ' ' 

:• Geoffrey Howe, left, the British foreign minister, met Friday with Prime Minister FeJjpe 

i - 7; GonzMez of Spain, tight, as the two countries ended two days of talks in Madrid on the future of 
Gibraltar. The session, one in a series of meetings, without concrete ag remnwifc hut with a 
. - ;C: 'pledge to continue discussing areas of cooperation as wefi assoverdgnty in an attempt to solve their 
_ s long-standing dispute over the territory. The mount ain fortress has been in British hanHs gnm 1704. 

rf:?/ 

Jf J.S. Report Faults Aid to Manila 


(Conti nue d from Page I) 

.^ sents U.S. interference in rtsderi- 
y v .Jns- 

’ - i.nc^ l ' s the prerogative of the Phil- 
-.pines to detenmne how tbe mao- 
- .... will be utilized," said Leonides 
. ; w. Caday, minister for political af- 

at the Phffippine embassy. 

"Mr. Caday said he had nokoowl- 
d congressional ag ency’s 

' ^The draft report found that the 
••• rrchase by Manila of 19 hdicop- 
•: tr. ^ from Sikorsky Aircraft for $63 
v sc ,' iOilion in 1983 and 1984 was 
. • w - vsieful and incompatible with ex- 
■ - ■ -"-:ing equipment, according toccn- 
• ... J "sssioaal sources. Pentagon loans 
•• " ianced the sale. 

'President Ferdinand E. Marcos 
. . .".rifted tbe helicopter purchase 
~~":ay from another company after, 
long other things, a personal 
—i ^?ytin^ about the deal in May 
l ijj iift-83 with Alexander ML Haig Jr, 
— — ^-e fonner secretary of state too at 


the time was a consultant to United 
Technologies Corp, the parent 
company of Sikorsky Aircraft, ac- 
cording to public records and Jim 
Ventrilio, a Sikorksy spokesman. 

Mr. Caday said the helicopters 
were used for a variety of missions. 

The draft report also found that 
tbe UJ5. military group in Manila 
had limited access to information 
and was not able to keep track fully 
of how American agnctiwigg was 
being used. Tbe military group is 
supposed to hdp manage the mili- 
tary assistance which is expected to 
reach $425 million over the p«rt 
five years. 

■ Vert Role to Be Decided 

Mr. Marcos told the commander 
of U.S. forces in die Pacific on 
Friday that tbe future of the JPhiEp- 
pine armed forces chief. General 
Fabian C Ver, wfll be decided “af- 
ter about a week.” The Associated 
Press reported from Manila 


Aa official news release also said 
Mr. Marcos had told Admiral Ron- 
ald J. Hays that he has ordered 
General Ver and the deputy armed 
forces chief, Lieutenant General 
Fidel V. Ramos, to tbe field to 
supervise the government’s cam- 
paign against a growing communist 
insurgency. 

The meeting between Mr. Mar- 
cos and A dmir al Hays «»™ one 
day after the U.S. deputy 
defense secretary, James A. Kelly, 
criticized General Ver’s reinstate* 
merit as chief of staff eariier this 
week. The reinstatement followed 
die acquittal of Mr. Marcos’s most 
trusted general and 25 other men of 
murder charges in the 1983 assassi- 
nation of the opposition leader 
Bemgno S. Aquino Jr. 1 

Meanwhile, about 1,000 leftist 
students and weaker* set off fire- 
crackers and marched through city 
streets Friday to protest (he acquit- 
tals. 


Sole taif 


Assam Haunted by Fears of Violence 


1 (Continued from Page 1) 

— — tndreds of years ago was a shrine 
r one of the local tribes. ... .. . 
At dusk the sky turns pink and 
S-^tkiy encclls tinkle as Hindus gather to 
3rship at an ancient rode that 
1AL3 T 5 !SJl m botiz£s female fertility. 

But the most explosive dement 
• ■* the population mix are about 
"/e million Moslem Bengalis who 
, : *r decades have been migrating 
- : • ; from what was once East Palri- 

• '^- in and is now Bangladesh. 

: " Resourceful and enterprising, 
ese Moslem families cleared 
baTmt jck tracts of forest and cultivated 
mustard and jute. But often 
: ey crowded out the tribespeople 
- • nady living in the area. 

^ The Moslem immigration turned 
■Vj-.- ' to a torrent after the India-Palri- 
_iin war of 1971. Today the flood 
: " ,-ntinues from the overcrowded 
?i!H5iuntry of Bangladesh, 
r^r - Resentment of the Moslem new- 
• ' “ hdcts set off a protest by students 

id other “rndiBeaom” groups in 
*■<»£. 79. It led to a boycott of slate 
- xtions in 1983, with protesters 
1 -‘man ding that newly arrived 
?^E>os/ems be barred from voting. 
Agitations and disruptions by 
-.^s t!f i. — - , . 



NTT 


tbe protesters that year fanned 
emotions across the state, resulting 
in the massacre of Moslems. 


Three months ago, seeking to 
end a crisis that tiueaieued Inman 
national unity. Prime Minister Ra- 
jiv Gandhi reached a settlement 
with the anti-immigrant farces. But 
the accord has brought new bitter- 
ness and fear. . 

Under the agreement, perhaps a 
million Moslems are to be cut from 
the voting rolls and hundreds of 
thousands of these are to be "ex- 
pelled,” although no one seems to 
know where they are to be sent. 

. Bangladesh has said it will not 
take them bade, and last year the 
Bangladesh Army skirmished with 
Indian authorities who started to 
build a concrete and barbed wire 
fence on the border to prevent oth- 
ers from coming. 

In Moslem villages, dozens of 
men said they had been thrown off 
the voter rolls even though their 
families had lived in the area for 
decades. 

“It is these people who are deter- 
mined to get us out," said Narul 
Choodbary, a farmer, referring to 
Hindus and tribespeople. “We T 
in fear that we will be harassed and 
uprooted and that our lands will be 
taken from us.” 


TheAsaxkned Press 

WASHINGTON —Secretary of 
. State George P. Shultz said Friday 
that the United Stales might take 
"further steps” to assist Nicara- 
guan giurriHag in the fight a gains t 
what he described as incraasng So- 
viet and Cuban military involve- 
ment in Nicaragua. . 

At a news conference, Mir. Shultz 
said that a Cuban pilot and co-pilot 
were aboard a helicopter that was 
shot down eariier this week by the 
Nicaraguan insurgents. 

He said the guorillas were right 
to shoot it down and “if I were 
them Td certainly want to,” and 
called the Soviet and Cuban pres- 
' encein (he region “a cancer." 

"The Soviet and Cuban matbrid 
is being used against the Nicara- 
guan people," he said. “Thank 
heavens they got hold of these 

kinds of weapons that could knock 

these choppers down.” 

“Thorn may be farther steps that 
are posable,” Mr. Shulasaid. 

Under questioning, he declined 
to say what further steps the Rea- 
gan administration is contemplat- 
ing, noting-only that c urr e n t legis- 
lation recognizes that the situation 
in Nicaragua is “dynamic" and any 
new request for assistance to tbe 
guerrillas' would be subject to an 
early congressional vote. 

At present, U.S. assistance to the 
guemfflgj is limited to $27 nriUkm 
in assistance. The 

guerrillas have received no known 
military aid from the United States 
in more t ha n a year and a h a l f . 

■ Reports on Cubans 

Eariier, Joanne Omang of The 
Washington Post reported front 
Washington: 

A Reagan ad mi ni s tr ation official 
told Congress that Cuban troops 
have taken a combat nde in Nicara- 
gua, fighting with Nicaraguan 
armed fences against UiL-badced 
guerrillas. 

The assistant secretary of state 
for inter-American affairs, EDxott 
Abrams Jl, said Thursday he had 
received "more and mare reports” 
of Caban military action as part of 
“a massive Soviet arid Cuban inter- 
vention” in Central America. 

“We may be seeing Cubans move 
into a combat role on the mainland 
of North America,” Mr. Abrams 
told the House Foreign Affairs 
subcommittee on Western Hemi- 
sphere affairs. 

Later, be said that Congress 
ought to renew nriHtaxy aid to the 
anti-Sandirrist guorillas, "or we are 
going to be seeing a Soviet base in 
Nicaragua.” 

Mr. Ahrams said that about 
2^00 Coban military personnel are 
in Nicaragua acting as advisers 
"down to very wmnTl units of the 
Nicaraguan army.” Last year, the 
Reagan administration put the 
number of Cubans in Nicaragua at 
3,000 military advisers and 6,000 
Cuban teachers and construction 
-workers. 

Mr. Ahrams also said that Cu- 
bans “were among the casualties” 
when the guerrillas, using a Soviet 
SA-7 surface-to-air missile, shot 
down a government helicopter in 


northeast Nicaragua on Monday. 
Other State Department officials 
said evidence for the expanded Cu- 
ban rote came from intelligence re- 
ports and sightings by rebel units. 

On Thursday night, the Nicara- 
guan government asserted that the 
Reagan administration had 
brought the Central American con- 
flict to “previously unknown lev- 
els" by providing the guerrillas 
with anti-aircraft 

Deputy Foreign Mims ter Victor 
Hugo Tinoco announced that Nic- 
aragua was recalling its ambassa- 
dor in Washington, Carlos Tunner- 
man, for consultations and seeking 
a meeting of the United Nations 
Security CotmcO to protest what he 
called "a new step” in U.S. support 
for the rebel forces. 

A Nicaraguan Embassy political 
officer denied that Cubans are 
fighting in Nicara g ua and said that 
Mr. Abrams was "making it up” 
about Cuban casualties in (he heli- 
copter incident. 

Manud Cordero of the Nicara- 
guan Embassy said 700 to 800 Cu- 
ban militar y advisers are in Nicara- 
gua and described them as “not 
enough to be involved with small 
units/’ 



An antx-Samfinist guerrilla shows the firing position of a SAM missile launcher. 


BuMfi 


OAS Votes Reforms, but Sidesteps Major Issues 


By Juan de Onis 

Lot Angeles Times Service 

CARTAGENA Colombia — 
The major regional organization of 
T-Atin America has faded ngain to 
respond to the principal concerns 
of the region: peace in Central 
America and financing for eco- 
nomic development. 

Delegates from tbe 31 member 
countries of the Organization of 
American States signed revisions of 
the organization’s charter Thurs- 
day that improve its role as a medi- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

ator in conflicts between members. 
Bat even those long-sought reforms 
wfll have limited impact. 

Peacekeeping is the main func- 
tion of the OAS, a regional organi- 
zation founded in 1948, but the 
body has not fulfilled that role in 
Central America. It was paralyzed 
during the U.S. invasion of Grena- 
da in 1983, and it was divided dar- 
ing the Falkland Islands war be- 
tween Argentina and Britain in 
1982. 

Tbe OAS*s most recent peace- 
keeping success came during the 
“soccer war" of 1969 between Hon- 
duras and El Salvador. 

The second major role of the 
OAS is to promote regional cooper- 
ation an economic development, 
cultural exchanges and technology 
transfers. Such efforts are funded 
mainly by the United States. 

But since the international debt 
crisis began in 1982, the OAS has 
not plityed any significant role as a 
forum in which noth the United 
States and Latin America are rep- 
resented. 


“The OAS has simply not been 
relevant to the realities of tbe re- 
gion,” said Dante Capuio, Argenti- 
na's foreign minister. 

Argentina and Colombia led the 
drive for reforms at this year’s con- 
ference. But the assembly timidly 
sidestepped proposals to establish 
sanctions for countries that system- 
atically violate human rights or to 
intervene in the affairs of other 
members. 

The decline of the OAS frequent- 
ly is attributed to its cumbersome 
secretariat in Washington, where 
elderly diplomats, international ju- 
rists and a staff amassed over near- 
ly four decades often seem far re- 
moved from the region's political 
turmoil and social stresses. 

But other observers put the 
blame on member countries, who 
are unwilling to assign political ini- 
tiative to the OAS that could affect 
their national interests or could re- 
quire subordination to regional 
principles. 

Many Latin American countries 
believe that the United States ma- 
nipulates the OAS for its own inter- 
ests in the region. 

Tbe charter reforms, adopted af- 
ter an all-night session at a conven- 
tion center, increased the powers of 
Secretary-General Joao Baena 
Soares, a Brazilian diplomat who is 
in the second year of a five-year 
term. 

The changes must be ratified by 
two- thirds of the members, a pro- 
cess that could take several years. 
The secretary-general then «n0 be 
able to lake the initiative in bring- 
ing issues, snch as a threat to peace, 
before the permanent coundL 


Under current rules, a member 
country must make the first move. 

Tbe reforms also will allow the 
council to provide peacekeeping 
services, which now are blocked by 
the refusal of the United States and 
20 other member countries to ratify 
a treaty aimed at developing peace- 
ful solutions to regional conflicts. 

But these small reforms did not 
increase the expectations of Latin 
American foreign ministers who 
came to tire conference la the hope 
of revitalizing the organization. 
Their unanimous view was that the 
big issues will continue to be con- 
ducted outside the OAS in the im- 
mediate fuinre. 

Effons to bring about a Central 
American peace and security ar- 
rangement wifl continue through 
the Contadora Group, which is 
made up of Mexico, Colombia, 
Venezuela and P anama. The minis , 
tors of these countries agreed to 
persevere in mediation efforts, al- 


though Nicaragua has become in- 
creasingly critical of tbe group. 

The Contadora Group also 
called a new meeting of the Central 
American countries for later this 
month ro consider the draft of a 
security treaty. 

Tbe issue of Latin .America’s for- 
eign debt remains almost entirely 
outride the OAS forum, although 
Secretary of State George P. Shultz 
devoted almost an entire speech to 
economic matters in addressing the 
assembly Monday. 

For the major Latin American 
debtors, who owe a total of $380 
billion, the forum for debt discus- 
sions is the Cartagena Group of 1 1 
countries. Meeting in Cartagena al- 
most two years ago. the group 
called for a "political” dialogue 
with the creditor governments. 

The creditors have refused to ne- 
gotiate outride the International 
Monetary Fund and the World 
Bank, where the luge, industrial 
countries have a voting majority. 


Haiti Closes a Radio Station 


United Press International 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — 
Authorities have shut down a Ro- 
man Catholic radio station that re- 
ported on recent unrest and vio- 
lence in Haiti, and Haitian police 
have arrested a former government 
minister in a raid on his home. 

Interior Minister Jean- Marie 
Chanoine said that Radio Soldi 
was shut down Thursday because 
the church-operated station, de- 
spite a news ban, had broadcast 
information that “would tend to 
excite and alarm the populace.” 


Mr. Chanoine said Radio SoJeil 
had been temporarily closed be- 
cause it had violated Haitian press 
law. 

Authorities imposed the news 
ban last week after two church- 
operated radio stations, including 
Radio Soldi reported on growing 
unrest and anti-government dem- 
onstrations in Gonaives. scene of 
food riots last year. 

Radio Soleil did not broadcast 
news following the ban. but did 
transmit several sermons urging 
youth to "stand finiL” 


r ioufii Africans Defy Regime, 
eet With Black Nationalists 






(Coo tinned from Page I) 


rf’-i 


h the black nationalist leaders in 
days of private talks. 

. Tt is as self-deceptive as it is 
tie" for South Africa’s while-led 
^jj>rernmem “to try and block con- 
_ ••‘ 'tetions between countrymen at 

" '} crucial time," The Herald 

. .. v^'vspaper quoted him as saying. 
t Jbabo Mbeki, a spokesman for 
v ' African National Congress, 

. _ > i the talks were "really a casual 
- ’ 1 iiaa,” adding: “We are all at- 

^ -.Ji> j* ding the same conference and it 
writable that we will sit and talk 
i meet" 

■ . , r vfr. Mbeki said his organization 

■. crated discussions with other 
.. .j. ups anxious “to stop the crisis 
’ jming a lot of lives as well as 
j tJ Ytrqying the economy” in Sooth 
_c - .ica. 

_ .. oj'Jgjla Mueodane, labor secretary 
~ 4 : the Pan Africanist 
. 1 tbe talks with the church 

*’ ^tanged from the “definition of 
struggle” by guerrillas to “the 
'* tS ^ * of today we are fighting for.” 

■ .We are looking for new ideas,” 
Le Kroger, one of five Afrika- 
v-'*- ‘ " - students from the University of 
v }jc®" ’ BenbosdL “We seek a way to 
^ ig about peaceful change, but 
‘ !f , • -*■’ -'k are no options open to us. We 
-f* frustrated” 

>«»,.■ c — i:.u rc_* students 

sTown 


our 

’ n the University of i 


_ V - L -• • met with the outlawed groups. 
^=, 1 * -IT be World Council of Churches 
ting ended Friday with a call 
'^-immediate and comprehensive 
*. - • ^<tions against South Africa and 

„r"u ' i "‘ j ^ rimrehes to support liberation. 
.. ** * emeus outlawed by Pretoria. 

' Vie three-day meeting of the 
v «3 was attended by 85 church 

" ' V* 


leaden. 37 South Africa. Senior 
dergy from Western Europe, Cana- 
da, the United States, Australia 
and several African nations also 
were present. 

■ New Exchange Controls 

The South African government 

announced Friday additional for- 
eign exchange controls to try to 
save the country's battered curren- 
cy, the rand, from a further slide. 
The Associated Press reported 
from Pretoria. 

Finance Minister Barend du 
Pkssis announced that tbe govern- 
ment would stop paying gold mines 
half in dollars and half in rands for 
gold purchases, and would pay 
only in rands, reducing the demand 
on foreign exchange reserves. Gold 
produces half of Sooth Africa's for- 
eign earnings. 

Among other complex changes, 
exporters also are required to bring 
foreign earnings back into South 
Africa more quickly. 

■ Mozambique Bafl link Cot 

Sonih Africa-backed rebels, 

blew up a vital railroad bridge in 
Mozambique on Friday, severing 
Maputo's rail connections to South 
Africa, according to the Portuguese 
news agency, Reuters reported 
from Lisbon. 

Mozambique Radio said explo- 
sive charges destroyed the bongos 
roadway and damaged its support- 
ing pillars, the news agency, 
ANOP, Said 

The radio reportedly said the 
raiders infiltrated Mozambique 
from the South African province of 
Transvaal and withdrew in the 
same direction. 


900 Thais Get 
Vasectomies 
At Festival 


United Press International 

BANGKOK — Nearly 900 men 
have observed the king of Thai- 
land’s 38th birthday by Kiwng up 
inside a government building ana 
undergoing a free vasectomy. 

The vasectomy festival Thursday 
also featured sidewalk displays of 
the male sex organ, fa: 
movies, birth 1 control advice and a 
daylong concert sponsored by the 

Vasectomy Members dub of Thai- 
land. 

The Population and Community 
Development Association, a pri- 
vate nonprofit organization that 
organized the affair, said that 892 
T hais, induding a national legisla- 
tor, underwent the seven-minute 
operation. 

Aided by 300 nurses and staff 
members from the association, SO 
doctors worked during the nine-, 
boor assault on the birth rate of 
Thailand, a nation of 50 milKon 
people. One of tbe five female doc- 
tors had the most patients, 44. 

The National Lottery Bureau’s 
gymnasium was turned into a 
makeshift dime with 50 operating 
tables. 

Free vasectomies are also offered 
on May 1, or International Work- 
ers Day, on the Fourth of July — to 
thank the United Stales for its hdp 
in Thailand’s family planning pro- 
— and on the queen’s 

iy 

Bat the king’s birthday is die 
most popular date fa participants. 
The unofficial world record of 
1,190 vasectomies is one day was 
set on the king's birthday in 1983. 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


Public Relations Coordinator 


KMG KJynvekJ Main Goerdeler, the 
international accounting and consul- 
ting group, is looking for an energe- 
tic European national to be based in 
its Executive Office in Amsterdam: 

o to develop and enact an interna- 
tional Public Relations programme 
o to support and liaise with KMG 
member firms and co-ordinate 
their activities in national public 
relations and marketing 
o to work on specific projects in 
various geographical regions, 
including conferences, seminars, 
sponsored events, publications 


This is a new position and offers an 
exciting challenge to the right can- 
didate. Applicants should have 
several years experience in a public 
relations position together with 
some marketing background. 
International experience would be 
an asset as would fluency in French 
and German. Fluency in English is 
an absolute must. Preference will be 
given to those candidates with 
knowlegde of the accountancy?' 
financial services fields. Attractive 
salary, benefits and excellent poten- 
tial for advancement are offered. 


Ptaasa respond with a 
resume including previous 
experience and compensa- 
tion requirements to: 

KMG tOynveld Main 
Goerdeler. 

Executive Office 
P.O. Box 7259 
1007 JG Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone: 31(20/42 42 45 




ynveld Main Goerdeler 


PHYSICAL 

THERAPISTS 

Senior, Staff & Assistants 

O u t sta nd ing comer oppor- 
tunity for qualified thera- 
pcsts seeking professional ft 
personal enrichment. Hospi- 
tal based Children's Rehab 
Center m scenic New York 
suburb providing out pa- 
tient therapeutic & educa- 
tional services for children. 
Interface with physician di- 
rected team consisting of 
teachers, social workers, 
psychologists, etc. 
Exceptional salaries & excel- 
lent benefits. Flexible hours & 
part time positions also avail- 
able. 

Piectse sand resume to: 
Mrs. Deborah Tartow 
ST. AGNES HOSPITAL 
305 North 5t, White Plains, 
NLY. 10605, USA. 


line importanle societe basee dans le Sod-Est, 
recherche un 

Ingenieur charge d’affaires 

U aura pour mission d’animer el de coordonner les interventions 
commercial es a I'etranger, dans les domaines de I’hydreuliquc. de 
I'amenageraent el de I’agro-indusirie. 

Ses responsabitites concemeront : la prospect! on. {'identification de 
projetgj'gtablissement et la negotiation de conlrals, le suivi commer- 
cdaL adminislratif et financier. 

De formation superieure (grande ecole d'ingemeur ou de sestion). le 
candidal a au mouis 10 ans d'activite technico-commerciale 4 Telran- 
ger, acquise si possible dans un domaioe Engineering comparable. 
La faction est situ6e en LamgaedooRonssiBon el exige une grande 
mobility 

Merd de nous envoyer votre dossier pour une premiere renconlre 
sous reference 436 HT. 




CURSUS 



CONSEIL 


16. rue de la Paix 75002 Piiris 


"INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS” 

appears every Thursday A Saturday 


TO PIACE AN ADVanSEMBCT 


your 


I tat nufi onnl HarflW Ttftuns rspn unt a Bw or Max ftnsro: 


181 Am. OvbcM, 92521 NwOy Cain, Francs. T«L- 47-47-12-65. Tsfeu 613 595. 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


A. 




L' AflMM Nntinnnlo Poor rEnplol 

AGS4CE SP&ClAUSiE DES frK&UEUKS ET CADRE5 

12 Rim Blanche, 75436 Pori* CEDEX 09 
TdL : 280.61.46. Ext 71. - 283.444a Ext. 42. 


• HIGHLY QUALIFIED, 31, lady trifinguol 
cammercid and juridical International »xpc- 
rhna SEEKS position. Froa ta travel. M. : 
493*PAXSS CADRES L 

• MARKEUNG - E55EC, 50, oxtenuvo ex- 
pariwt M In mortart* wtvoy* customer prod- 
ucf tagmantotion dsfinMon of sales and 
profit, targets sotting up of budget, foRow 
up and sates fen* Incentives experimented 
in phoning techniques, open minded on fh 
none* and cash management SEEKS ottrae- 
thv executive position. Oof., 4P2PAOS 
CAUSES L 

• SALES MANAGfift far Europe and Mid- 
de East, French, angle, 32, ELBA MX 
Marketing, 5 yean experience a* manoge- 
merrf eonwhaitf Europe and North America 
(productivity business), fluency in English 
and Arabic. Kef.: 491 -PARIS GAMES L 

• HUNCH BANKER, 32, previously depu- 
ty general manager, general manager or 
chief executiw In bemks wWi soundknawj- 
edge. Practice at international tsni merchant 
bonking- Could bring asnw jHam y or permo- 
nntr cooperation at highest tcvet, espeefatty 
interested wWi Marnotionol finonebig and 
financial engineering. Ae6r 499-PARIS 
CAOKESL 


• TRILINGUAL ENGLISH, FRENCH, 
GERMAN, international experience man- 
aging level in US group. Strong adffllnittra- 

and fop level public relations, sUfii 
profit, dedmted SEEKS responsibte position 
In administrative and international odiviiies. 
Rati 490PAMS CADKS I. 

• MANAGBt, 55, formation fincmciol engi- 
neer PME/PM1, energetic, wishes to help 
□nisi development company, French or fbr- 
e*grv free toon, con easily travsL Kef.: 456* 
PAKIS CADKES L 

• fle«Al MANAGEMENT, Frenchmen, 
36, bilingual, university level, greet practice 
of International financial service* company, 
seek* a position of t*spensab3ify for a profit 
center or cm mlernational sdes and raorW- 
mg team. Very active and efficient, raad^ to 
work in Europe, U.5A-, Canada or For East. 
Ref., 484-PARtS CADKES I. 

• HIGH LEVEL experience in various fields 
(management, public relation fashion, traveh 
(mg), eecefent negodedor , international pro- 
Ge young woman, absolutely biingual Frendi 
ami EngTah, Awe Spanish, wfll study every 
offer. Ref., 48S*AX$ CADRES I. 







Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 1985 


SPECIAL EDUCATION DIRECTORY 



European 
University 
of America 


LONE MOUNTAIN CAMPUS, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 


MBA Master of Business Administration 

Intensive 14-month program specialized in International 
Management combining innovative academic approach with 
practical experience. Personal project integrated into MBA 
allows total immersion in California business environment. 


AMS American Management Studies 

8-week introduction to American business open to students 
and professionals: Marketing, Information Systems, Finance, 
International Business. Sessions begin every two months. 

Information and Admissions: ELIA Center for Europe. 

31 Galerie Mompensier, Paris 75001 France, Tel: (1)42 96 45 11 
EUA, Lone Mountain. 2130 Fulton St, San Francisco 94117, USA 


Get vour degree and 
an education too. 


You want an otf-campua B A. or M.A. 
degree, but you're concerned about 
the cradibtflty ot external programs. 
Among the Oldest In the country. 
Norwich univereitye independent 
study program* ore challenging, accre- 
dttao. end mghty-regerded Moreover, 
they support Intellectual professional, 
and personal growth In a wi 


Learn about our AdoU Degree Program 
- limited residency (I work week a 
semester or 1 weekend e month) — and 
our Graduate Program — no campus 
residency, study whn local mentor. 
Financial aid aval la Die. Affirmative 

admissions. 

Can or write: Admissions 


and personal growth In a way that to uni- (specify HA. or M-A.J, 
qua In American higher education Norwich University. Box 


nowhere wM you find wider latitude in 


designing your own degree program 
based on your interest and goals. (808)229-0522. 

NORWICH UNIVERSITY 

lanMnhiwagiwiMMwialawiwOi 


Vermont College Campus. 
MonipaHer, vtok-TO. 


Montpelier. VT 
(802) 229-0522. 



ARIZONA'S VILLA-OASIS 
SCHOOL 


An (XMnfag B oatin g School Offering Col ogo Flap 
And Generri Courses. Futy Aoou&ed. 

Mao, A hogwi For The Undenno i vcled. 

• Cesd • Photography • Lfietfana Sports •Tennis 

• Grades 7-12 • Wkand AcJivjfies • Settling • hd srn o C onal. 

• Dev. Rearing • Special • Pool Student Body 

• Tutoring Interest Projects •Fencing •Travel 

• Art •Marine Biology •Horses •Computers 

Catalog JohnSieinbeck, PH.D. 

Box 1 21 8-HT, Casa Grande, Arizona 85222 
(602)466-9226 


1986 SUMMER AT S® 


nTTERTiATIOFIAL STUDIES 
(June 9-JuIy 25, 1986) 
LANGUAGE COURSES 


SCHOOL or ADVANCED INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 
THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 
Washington, D.C. 

The SA1S Summer Program offers 4-credit courses in 
International relations. International economics and 
area studies. Language instruction Is available In Arabic 
Chinese. Japanese and Russian. Graduate students, 
government officials, business executives, journalists 
and diplomats are encouraged to apply. 

The Summer English Program is designed for foreign 
graduate students and professionals seeking careers in 
international relations, international business and 
diplomacy. (July 7-August 15.) 

Tor information, write: 

Office of Special Programs. 5A1S 
1740 Massachusetts Avenue/ II. W. 

Washington, D.C. 20036 
(202) 785-6811 


!j Ki 


WOMEN'S, MEN'S & 
CHILDREN'S APPAREL 
DESIGN: 

• Pattern 
Drafting & Grating: 
Draping; Costume Construction & 
Detail: Tailoring - MILLINERY 
DESIGN • FASHION SKETCHING 
• TEXTILE WORKSHOP • Expert 
Designers On Staff • 2-tear 
Certificate • 3-tear Diploma 
* International School Environment 
• Placement Assistance 


• Coed day/eve classes 
• Summer classes • Dorms 
• High School prep programs 
• Write or phone for catalog P-12. 


the school of fashion design 


136 Newbury Street, Boston, MA 02116 
Phone (617) 536-9343 

Uc. by Comm. MA OepL Ed. SFD admits students 
of arty race, color, and national or ethnic origin. 


I inflfl infarm Camp 


nun 


Choose 
2A4.6,orfl weeks ■ 
Each session a complete program ■ 
3 to wit your needs ■ New Yarn's top 


_ Select activities to suit your needs ■ New York's top 

resident co-ed camp * Located at ftoscoe, NY (95 miles northwest NYC) ■ 


ATHLETICS 

8 tennis (lighted). 9 basketball 
(lighted}. 5 softball. 2 hockey. 

2 soccer, gym. golf, archery, 
gymnastics, baton-twirling, 
track, obstacle course, body- 
building. Inter-camp games 
WATERFRONT 

Lake. Olympic pool, waterwheel, 
fishing, 80 boats (sail, kayak, 
canoe, row. water-bike), wind- 
surfing. diving, lila-saving 
WHEELS 

Driver-ed. go-cans, mini-bikes, 
automechanics, bicycles, 
roller-skating 
TRAVEL 

Overnights to Washington. 
Canada, Cape Cod. Niagara 
Falla, Delaware River canoe trip, 
music festivals, summerstock 
theatres, field trips 


WORKSHOPS 
Computers, fine art. leaiher. 
sculpture, wood, ceramics, 
textiles, graphics, cooking, 
jewelry, photo and 24 other craft 
and art studios 
PERFORMING ARTS 
indoortoutdoor theatres, drama, 
dance, musical theatre, stage- 
craft. music (rock, classical. Jazz) 
instrumental instruction, video, 
puppetry 
SOCIAL 

Coed program, films, eookouta, 
guest performers, talent shows, 
twilight swims, discos, intracamp 
contests, league nights 
INTER NATION AUCOSMOPOUT AN 
Dally English lessons 
Bl-tingual staff 
Escorted airport transfers 
New York City sightseeing 


theatres, field inps New York City sightseeing 

A fun-fiHed, unforgettable summer ■ Ages 7-12 & 12-17 ■Tell us 
your age and interests; we'll send along a free folio of photos, 
names of lots of local alumni and, of course, our camp catalog ■ 
Harold Loren, Box' 585H, Anlsfey, NY 10502. phone (914) 6954222 



AND SUMMER SESSION 

Individualized programs for boys 
& girls ages 8-19. Improve study. 
8MHs. academic foundation and * 

seff-confktence. One-to-one 
assistance during evening study- 
haH. Developmental or remedial 
reading. 22-acre Berkshire KBs' 


estate; expanded lab & computer 
facilities. Swing, tennis, basket- 
bait, track, swimming. English for 
Inti students. 


David WMBne,Hdm. 

131 Gale Rd. 

wnoametown, Mace- C12S7 
TW: (413) 488-8138 


Prepare For The World’s 
Most Competitive 
Universities 


Intensive study in advanced math, physics, 
English, philosophy, logic, economics, 
psychology, and languages at American 
Renaissance School, Grades 7-12. 

Now accepting applications for boarding 
and day students. 

Call or write to the Director of Admissions 



___ 


Amf*rit~an H ^nniacanop School 
468 Rosedale Avenue 
White Plains, New York 10605 
Telephone (914) 997-1227 


EDUCATIONAL COUNSELING AND PLACEMENT 

For UJS. Univ e rsiti es and Secondary Schools, by a professional staff cf 
fnnrer Ivy I «tgue a dmkrinns deans and published adiOBL 

HOWARD GREENE AND ASSOCIATES 

FOUNDED 1968 ' . . 

Consultants to multinational corporations 
ntiH hundreds of international families 
237 Post Road West 214 East 70th Street 

Westport, CT 06880. U.SJC New York, N.Y. I0021 U.SA. 
(203)226-1257 <212)737,8866 

Tetac 178285 EDUC-UT 


^iuiimiuiiunuiimuinniiiinnuniiiiiiiHiuiiiiiiuiuniniuiiiBuiiiiifflnniiiuiii& 


» in the California Sierra Nevada welcomes International Students. = 

I •BtTBtNfmGMALB^KiULIUJREATCMnMMPRCKMAM I 

S • Small cJaaaea • Caring staff ■ J • Music, theater, art s 

3 • Work program, including farm ’ • Social' service p r ojec t! £ 

= Wetim-orcoX; WBkaii L Moon, Jr^ PHndprf^ '• §§ 

= Tha John Woofanan School r . r = 

= 125SS Jonm Bar fcL, Nevada Oty. Grift, 93959 USA. T«Lj ' 916-273-31 83. = 

=j Aachoolo*fh« t o« g l mMT BdatyofFrtonai (fto ! n l r ar) «n ra i JaJl«lU6a. ^ 

= AetnMbr WA4C ■ MmOur. HA1& GJUS.lANA.rXJL ' = 

^miiiiiiiBiiiiiiiiiimuniimfflaiiiiiiiuimiiimimBuimmiuiiiitniiiii[nmimnmiin= 


EMMA WILLARD SCHOOL 
TROY, NEW YORK 

Emma Willard is the oldest boarding school for giris in the U.S. It 
enrolls students in grads 9-12 at a. postgraduate year is available. 
Troy, a major dry in upstate N.Y., is 150 miles N. of N.Y.C The school 
(acuity indodes a 32,000 volume library, science laboratories, a gymna- 
sium, & art center. The college ^preparatory curriculum indnaes En- 
glish, history, science, mathematics. Bat * performing arts, A six 
foreign language \ muld-lcvd course is available for students whose 
second language is Engl ish. 

■* For further information : 

Margaret A Gat, Daector of Ateissioas. Emma WiDard School 
Dept A,285 Paw&g Are^Troy, New York 12180, TeL: (518^274-4440. 


Rice University 
Sommer Program 
of Hispanic Studies 

Seville, Spain 
tne2- July 12, 1986 

- Lteyingn and Upper 
DIvWob Comes 
Gndotic Courses 


MSfSr* 





JOHN CABOT 
INTERNATIONAL 
COLLEGE 

ROME 


TWF OKI Y AMERICAN COLLEGE IN ROM E 
OFFERING A FOUR-YEAR UN DER GRADUATE 
DEGREE IN BUSINESS ADMINlST^'nONA^? 
DEGREE PROGRAMS IN THE ARTS, HUMANITIES, 
AND SOCIAL SCIENCES. 

JOHN CABOT COLLEGE, FOUOTED IN ROljffi ^I 
1972. IS AFFILIATED WITH HIR AM COLLEGE, 
OHIO USJL OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPTS FOR ALL 
COURSE WORK AT ^OHNCABOTAMI^reD aY 
HIRAM AND ARE RECOGNIZED ^ INSTITU- 
TIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE UNITED 
STATES AND ELSEWHERE. 

ONE YEAR CREDIT IS NORMALLY GRANTEDFOR 
STUDENTS IN POSSESSION OF MATURITA, BAC- 
GALAUREAT & “A” LEVELS- 

WXNTER CLASSES START JANUARY 6. 
SPRING CLASSES START APRIL I. 

For farther Information contact: 

Director of Admissions 
John Cabot International College 
Via Mstmamn 7, 00162 Rome, Italy. 

TeL: <W) 83155J9; (06) 83L2U5. 

Non-profit organizatkm incorporated in Washington, D.C. 




CENTER FOR UNIVERSITY STUDIES 


Z UNIVERSITY 
< O 

5 RmjI RI 73 

uu n 


<1 ■ 9- 6 • 9^ 




LICENSED ACCREDITED 
DEGREES 

A.A. in Humoniti85 # Social 
Sciences 

A. A.S. in International 

Business 

B. B.A. in International 

Business 


For dofried information wTxfer Via Mcvche 54y 
00187 Rome, Holy - Phone 493.528 - Telex 612510." 






■ ••• ' 



UNIVERSITY 
DEGREE 


MANHATTANVILLE COLLTOC 
ENGUSH LANGUAGE INSTITUTE 


^CHBJ3rS#MASTBrS»l 

tor Warfc, i m tewlr. Ute En paria n ea 


Send dsMtod rnum 
for free evaluation. 


PACIFIC WESTERN; UNIVERSITY 

600 N. Seoul vaddBlvd. 

In Anoetes. CaUfomta 
90049, Dept. 23, U^A. 



• • • in beautiful Westchester County T 1 2? 

north of New York City 

— co urses offered at eight levels 

— TOEFL & University Prep *■ 

— pxmrtlv e/te ehinfai/ hMfniitTipi progranfe 
_ summer youth A teacher programs j 

Six starting times & dormitory rooms available t hroughout the year. 
Far inianoxOan call or write: 

MorUyn J. Ryntnitric - Mrwcfor - ISSC/BLI ' 
OVmliul lun wide CofcgE - HI . 

P*w*ho**, NY 10577. (914) 694-2200 
ws^wT«l«: 230199 SWIFT lAor Astra MVL^n^s^s. 



WDOWJIDACAIXMY 


College preparatory curriculum for bearding 
students, boys juid girls, grade 7-12. 


^ 1662 Rugby Avenue • College ftHcCeagia 30337 * f«M)765«62. 

WXWARD ACAUEMY AnMTMSTBtS A M VM*CR1MINATV«'' IVIUCTCf AOMlSfciNS..;- 


4 Year, aon-denomiMtwml, independent 
co-ed b o a rding and day aciiool 

Grades 9-12, F.G. 

Advanced Pleeement and LB. avmilable 
Accredited by NEASC and EOS 

For catalog plane writes 
Adrafariona Dept. BL St. Stephen** School 
Vie Aventina 8. Rama 0O153, Mr 
T«L 5750-605 or 5146-007 


oxfordOacademy- 

ONE STUDENT. ONE MASTER IN EACH CLASS : 


For boys 14-20 of average to superior Intelligence who have 
academic deficiencies; who have lost one or more years of 


school; who wish to accelerate; or foreign students wishing 
to enter American universities. Completely individual instruc- 
tion in a private classroom setting. RoJIlngadmissions. 

1965-1986 boarding and tuition $22400. 

Summer Term: June 22 -July 25, 1986, S2J300. 

EDUCATIONAL PROBLEM SOLVERS SINCE 1906 
DeptIH • Box P, Westbrook, CT 06496 USA • (203)3996247- 


EARN AN AMERICAN 
MANAGEMENT DEGREE IN BRUSSELS 


Maser af Science 


Maoer aTSdence in 


hBsriqpfarUrae 


Pnaiai wdHncly fpmdi: 

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Pit fhnhr rfrtrrir Tiri rff 
NmBmmjAmA 
-ffA&UKdekTaiMdOtteO . 
KHBnori,Bdrite-Td.(B^ 5 U HM 


BOSTON UNWEHSTTY BRUSSELS 



Over 1,000,000 
test-takers have opted 
for the BEST in 
test-preparation. 

Shouldn’t You? 

Classes enrolling now 


THE EJLC. SCHOOL AATTWERP AND BRUSSBjS 

Tb® independwit hnwnatemai ac6oei that reroonds to the community's 
naada, and cares about each chWa mwda. Our BritWi and American raff - 
haa tmpcaaaed parent* and aducaton with our children's work-in the: 


□ Kindergarten (from age 2 O Primary School □ American Secon- 
dary School □ British CLCE. oartculum through A-IovbL 


dary School □ British (LCE. osticuksn through A-IovbL 

Our highly efficient uss of funds ^ keeps your tuition fees at a rewonahJa 

(aval: from BF 65dUC to BF 1E0XXX) par Bonum. 


THE E^.C. SCHOOL 


Independent Day School 
Grades Nursery-1 2 
Large Campus and 
BdensivG Sports facilities 

Advanced Placement and IB available. 
Accredited by NA1S, K3S, 
Middle States Association. 
*x»ohg pleas* contact 

American Sdrool of Mian — ftdmiiriiwn 
VWasipo Miruwie, 20090 Noveraeeo «£ Opera. 
Milan, ITALY. -Tel^ (02) 524-154*/^ 




Jacob Jortiaansstraat 75-79 - 20T8Antwarp/Baigiuni 
Rua Boysia 302 - 1030 BrussaWBataJum 
For information and ragiatiatian call 
Mr. J. Walls. Headhunt- at 03/237^7.18 
- 03/218^1^2 

Regisntion dBity bH sunmer. .* 


Va 


RiJij{B4G BOOK 86 - B oar din g Schoob 

Germany and Switzerland 

^^! t , S ontoll ^ al1 «Wfng fn Semrairr a 


MOT • GMflT « LSAT • GRE PSYCH/BIO • MT 
SflT ■ PSfiT • ACT • SpedaBzed H.S. Entrance 
Exams Achievements • CPA • NTE • TOEFL 
NMB UL m • MSKP • FMGfiMS I, II • REX 
NDB L D • State Nursing Boards (NCLEX-RN) 
COTIS • Introduction to Law School 
Speed-Reading . MAT • OCAT Jr 


KAPLAN 


1 


i TO LEARN FRENCH 


StthfilYH KAAANB3UO1I0NML CB4TBim 


The wodd's leading 
test prep organization. 


For Info r mation regarding 
programs authorized under Federal law 
to enroll non-bnmtorant alien students 
in the U.S A, please caH: 

2124)77-8200 


I C6ran. a chSleau m the Bdgian Ardennes where you team and live . 

in French. Small groups and private lessons with taflor-made I 

I programmes tor individual needs, ensure real progress. Good food, ■ 
good company, good teachers. Coma and toam, and ar^oy yourself. ■ 
We leach private people, companies, embassies: EEC.SHAI^E etc. g 

I Rwcomptete documentation, s«td this coupoporjjhone;. , ' * 

I am interested in coursesfor: □’Adults' l.pYoiRig People . ■ 

□ Private .□ Busness ’ 


Or Write: DapL HT 
Stanley H. Kiiciin 
Educations! Carter Lid. 
131 West 56 Street 
New Ybtk. N.Y. 10019 


PonnanBre Centere In More Than 25 Motor US-C«bs 
P uerto Ffco & Tbronto Cm 


IW333; 






YOU WANT #0 _ 

W Goethe-lnstitut 


More 3 rmBfen siudwe, i„ 33 

1 46 <ns6lvt« in 66 countries 
«- 9- MILAM Tel. 785474 

HONG KONG, Td. 5-270088 
BO DEJANBRO, .TeL 2324502 
;15 intfifulM in Hta Fedard Republic of Germany 

For defeated information-. e , 

OOBHHNSimit Ji 

7— ma h ra i wd l u n y \JF/ 

UabadhplMi 3 . . / 

O-tOOO MQndren 2 / / 

T«L (O) 89-5999-200 / , 

Telex; 522940 / ^ 


' / / / 


















HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7 - 8, 1985 


Page 7 


rs 



SWITZERLAND 


FRANCE 


?4s 

*4i 

li 


Mofinber of the American Asserrtity of CoBegfcite Schools of 
Business 

Poopfc ana heritor k v rm tlmoni fhoirmac M om 
T hat I* why the undergraduate and graduate schoot of fh* 


European university 



otters you: 

* course* in smal groups • an IndMdual foBowHip of ft* 
students • a buslnessraxperienced academic team • 
accelerated progress by means of summer semester s 

Career oriented undergraduate and graduate pro- 
grams in a variety of fields from business ddminlstra- 
tioa information systems and economics to hotel 
administration and European languages. 

For information and appicqtton contact the odmesiorjs officer: 

Switzerland : 

Morrtreux: Grand-Rue 42, CH-T820 Montreux - TeL 021/63 11 67. 
courses in French or Engteh 


FrMnkhn Celle ge 
w« T una 10 
0900 Lugano 
Svnturland 

Teteehone. <Si - 230S9S 


SSEE5 


FRANKUN COLLEGE SWITZERLAND 
Education for International Competence 
Accredited by Middle States Association 



Franklin Collage 
866 United Nation* Plate 
Ne« York. New York UJ0I7 
Telephone 212-832-7775 



* aged 3 - 

r>: -.:e:G5" 

'ri-ispc*- 

sK 

='e »■ J 




ho Headmen 
Tei 45 W* 


Study mSwftzerland 

• Interahefrench-GouRes (Alliance franpaise) 

• Matu ritfi.su is^^-JWatricuiation ... . 

• Bacc afagr eat francais - Matriculation^ 

• Commercial and Secretary Studies 

• Summer Course in. August and Sept 

f-{( ^OLl Intarnat-ExtHubt EcoteL&nania 

I m 021I201S01 3,chenmdePr6v0ts 


T&ex 26600 


CH-lOOJ Laus&me 



a. to Mrs it, uuumme 
A*tifbom}MtaM. 

Ifcm/BITTJ. TNBC 24J8MC. 


International Boarding School hr Girls 


"• Gilts 12 to 20 yeais- Beauiifally si tualed- Fincst facilities for 
stud? and residence, tennis court, heated swimming-pool. 

• Coroprehenavc academic program in small classes. Official 
certificates *nA diplomas. ' 

• Intensive study of French and English. language laboratory. 

• FnB Ameritan High School Program, Grades 8-12. CEEB 
. (SAT, PSAT, ACH). TOEFL. Advanced Placement College 
guidance. Excellent university acceptances. ■ 

• Secretarial and commercial courses in French or Bngi«ti 
Word processing and computer science. 

• Diversified activities: ait, music, ballet, cookery, spoils. 

‘ Educational trips; Winter vacations in Crans, Swiss Alps. 

Summer course: July 6 - August 2, 1986. 



SWITZERLAND 


oTaj^&Sduob. 

□ KA, BA. as. Progams h Ml 

oufaooifc, AGnBaaicron, CLunoo 

kj. fatted SludM, Mi, Mod- 
•m Inn^ngei and tart State 

□ Co n ipte. Ofcodht toidartid 
facStos on II -acre conipM. 

□ Spin g Mmraatr btgmt in 9. 

im 


Contact! Director of Admfauam, CH-1854 Uyrfn It, Swritzariaid. 

i TaL (025) 3422 26. Telexi 4S3 227 AMCO 


rNSHTUT MONTANA ZUGERBERG 

bTlemodono) boys' boardng school with rigorous LLS. cofagr 
preparatory pr apron for Americans. Grades 5-12 (Separata . ■ 
sections for French, Garmon and llrfaoepodcing students). ,-CpK 
Thorough practice of modem languages. Highly qualified American rS\T^ 
faculty. Affiliate member Ndionof Assoaahon of Independent 
Schools. Galago Boards. IdeoRy booted at 3JXX) fear above sea 
level, in central Switzerland, 45 minutes from Ziiridi end laowne. All 
sport*, ej cce fl erd *lb fbdSHee. Travel Workshop during fring 
vocotiorv Language Program in July and August. 

Writ*: Dean of the American School* bistttut Montana 
6316: 


T 


DtAVOX MODBN MSTflUR OF UNOUAOB 

P JO. Box 138, 1000 Lausanne 9, Switzerland. 
TeL. (021 J 37 68 15. 


Intensive courses for aduHs, 4 to 1 1 we e ks. 

Small groups. Private crash-courses. 

Objective: fluent ard and written communication. 


, icdrprtAt; 
H j.sJiiw 


mmn s»ols in switzhuu 

For all infurnution please apply to our Educational 
Adviser: Mr. Paul A. Mayor. 

SCHOLASTIC SERVICE ‘TRANSWORUXA" - GBCVA 

3 Bn do ViceW-Sevgymrd. Phooc M 15 6S- 


SWEDEN 


Vrsi SC 


Study in 
SWEDEN 

.'Semester and 
Summer Programs 


-International Swedish University 
'Programs at Lund UrivenBy 

.SkorneltvegnanB JSU Representatfw 
5-22350 Lund Mrs Joanna Waffln 

SWEDEN 645 Lincoln Drive 

Tel 046-117720 Idaho Fats, ID 83401 
Tel 1 206 } 523-1039 


SM3i 


: tDcy 

•v.’SC" 


r- SWISS 


-HOTEL"! 


& FINISHING-SCHOOL 
Thomjrft study dfre neb, Ceram Ed- 

dUl Wtfh MwliniiJ frogucc) (fiotoOBS 

(Affiant* Fm^ace, GoB^w^dBi Cbd 
C ocnmeictal lurches. 
AxCamld wiGx e wrrira DMe- 
tic irimx, Sma ae r rad wine mom ■' 

wy A^ riiniilf (Wni ,«n i»h.hwlHt 

eg d itanst ad d^dopmoi of dkonf- 
|I»V> Voadood Per rUmH ixkf. 

SPECIAL COUHSES 
TOR FUTURE 

TOURISM AND HOTEL CAREER 
Srhohafc year ad wueutr 
Mgage canaa b Jdy. 

Sunny P 


propr. aid dr. 
CH-3812 keeriakarv 
WSdors w9 
TA 36/22 17 1& 
Tabu 92 31 73 


< -f' 



SPAIN 


LEARN SPANISH IN MADRID 

— Open all year round — all levels 
— Small groups — max. 5 students 
— Open to pupils of all races, 
religions and nationalities 

For detailed information apply to: 


DINAMICA ACADEMIA DE IDIOMAS 


C f SMkL 2t • 28026 Uaono • Trie*: *3855 04O£ * T* 401 »522 


] 



King's College Madrid 

Bnti-fi Dai and Htardina vh/'O) 


Recognised British School with international 
u student body of 800. 
ioetttf'" * Preparation for university entry i 


•e« 


in U.K., 

USA, etc. 

Examination curriculum includes sciences, 
computer studies, economics, modem 
languages and sports. . 

Senior, jun5or.and infant departments taking 
pupils aged 3-18 years. 

Modem building in extensive grounds. 

New boarding accommodation opening 
September 1985. 

King's CaBe^ Pasco delos Soto deVHtaetes,HGotow.N^drid- 

8452845/5. *7101 KCOM £. Cabte Ktagscoflegc Madrid. 



AIGLON 

Switzerland . - - 

The British International School 
in the French Swiss Alps 

• HMC Independent boarding 

• 260 boys and giris (1 1-18} 

• British GGE, American College Board 

• University preparation: USA, UK. Europe, Canada 

• Character ounding » 

• Shorts, skiing, adventure training 

Apply to: 

The HeaAmster, FUp Ptasoos MA (Cnfiab), Aigkm Colege, 
W5Che9iens,Sirit»danL TeL (0293&27JL The 45621 1ACOLCH 



foment* H 

UM. 

^SyMKofttmibnca 
nrican Etiw 
hEuropa. 


University preparatory • 
for grades M3 
Boarding profyam. 
Educalional & Hege a tiooal 


Superb sports opportunities. 
"Siding at your d oor s tep" 

An Alpha Campus Above 
Lake Ganieva. 

Contact, Leysin American School 
CN-1854 (W) LEYSJN 
Telex: 456.312 
TeL: (41) 25/34 13 61 


A 


John F. Kennedy 
International School 

Soanen-GsfUod 

A uniauD Memaitond school farchS- 
drm o-13 yean. Sound prepaaKan 
for English-language secondary 
schools. Small daises, fanfly atmo- 
sphere, superb alpine location. 
French, riding, marts, excursion*. 
Sumn er bm u|i M y-Aupuef 
Wri*K WKam Lawfl. D fc idw 
CH-3792 Saanen, Swteeriand. 
Teli |03p)41372. 


PARENTS! 

Are YOU looking for the right 
school for YOUR chad? 

For free i nf orm at i o n, phase contact: 

FEDERATION SUISSE 
DES ECOLES PRIVIES 

40 Rue das Vofondes, 

1207 Geneva. 

^.Telephones 022/ 35 57 Oft. . 


SMM 

= STUDY SPANISH IN THR HEART OF MADRID : 


• Spanish courses tailored to your profes- 
sional, educational or personal needs. 

• Small groups. Monthly or trimester 
courses. 

• 7 levels. • 2-15 hours weekly. 

• Lodging and cultural activities offered. 


Centro de Estudios Hispanicos 
Antonio de Nebrija 

Znrbano 41 , 28010 Madrid, Sprin. ($ 4 )( 1^419 5972 . 



SPANBHCOURSB 

INMK&ONA 

- Very mtafi groups 

-Intensive & regular 

courses 

- Open afl year round 

BARNA HOUSE 

HWc Cakduna 112. 
BARCELONA - 080% 
TeLj [34-3} 2370536 


ST. MICHAEL'S 

PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

, Provides an English 
education for English 
speaking children from 
3-1 1 years of age 

Cammo Ancho 89, La Morale^a 
Alcobendas - Madrid. 
TdLs 650.21.15 


UNIVERSITE DE 
PARIS SORBONNE 

Centre bcpfrimenW 
cTfiudede la Qvifoation 

Frauds* o«ectt 
AIVniversM 


GRADUATE COURSES 

• UnhenityCeunes. 
e a> MAGiSTte de tongue « de 

Chnlisotfon FrancaiMs" for all 
not kuiu title* (oovWent to MA 

Credit U^A.) 

• $erbonne Summer Session for 
foreign Teochen & Students. 

e Courses (or Teachere of French 
Language and Civilization, 
e Speaodxed training courses in afl 

fiekh. 



COURS DE 
CIVILISATION 
FRANQAISE 


undbigraduate courses 

French baocobumat level required. 

• French Language and QMzation 
Courses. Limited number of 
Iracriptiom. 

• Fof). Winter and Spring Semestan. 

• Summer Course*! July, August, 
September. 

• Interim 5cssion*i January. 


S!iii«nt oka Mn gubay. ta qu in at Ike Qitlard Mriioa at Pw Frandl [■•any. 

Apply to: C0UBS DE CIVILISATION FRANGAJSE, 

47 Roe da fiwks. Parish. TeL: (1) 43-29-12-13. Ext. 38^& 



ood bnhedry orgaraes cane leodng a 
• ^Certtoeof Amique de rmnpde Co 
by MRter. • INpMrae iupMear d 
by eiata or year rnduded in the *50001 Unherataire text Magi ate" 
e n S pW res i yii . e l u . ua duHranige ta dee Afldte". 

2nd port of the ‘dobne s u pe rior* . 

Staderta anraled in Iheo prepondory esuna teorive both oarefiote 
and ctpixrKB /ton the Sofbaaw 
and Ihe French Onraber of Cbmmera and indutry. 


■ Tho mast ronentmed school for French" 

INSTITUT DE FRANCAIS 

Overlooking the Kviens's meet beautiful bay 

MAKE LEARMINe FUMOI 


LOOGiNG M PRIVATE APTS. AND 2 MEALS INCLUDED. 

For aduh*. 6 lav*b from beginner I to advanced R. 

The nad ovoUta 4 wmIe eMey tneeaon pragam acre Jen. ^ Feb. 3, 1986 ad d yea. 
The fcna* Na Cured e in Unay- 

Kran ef reman* 4 experience h Ae eftaedve teathmg affmodt Is adUta. 

MSTIfUT DE FRAN^AtS - L7 

“ 23 Av. Gte-Ladarc, 06 V1UEFRANCHE/ MSL TaL: 93 01 M 44. Tbu 970.9NF. - 





CEVENOL 

Altitude 3,200 ft 80 mB« from Lyon 
Open Sumner and Winter 

LEARN FRENCH 
IN A FRENCH SCHOOL 

Summer 1986: TWO summer tdtool melons for ages 10-18 

(Students may enroO for either or both sessions] 

JULY 10 - AUGUST 1 and AUGUST 4-24 

• Intensive French course, arts, sports, excursions 

• for French students {8fh through Terminaia), Review courses {French, 
mathematics, languages). 

SCHOOL YEAR 1986/1917; 3 Trimesters 
pepr, Dec, Jan^tareh, AprMunel RngMration open for 1, 2, or 3 trimesters 

• French curriculum 4ffi (trough Terminaia. Forei(yi vmicome. 5pedcf done* in 

French. US. htfi ahool eredr obt u e uh la. Coiage Boards On requert 

LEAXN BY IMMERSION: AH courses m French 
Dormitory Gfe with French schoolmates 

_ 43400 UQIAItoON em UOWnM, TeL 71 59J152 M 


— ALLIANCE FRANQAISE 

Mil l Wind steel te»d*taftonAI—Wre»ddufctata 


(Private school far higher edue nft on) 

' 101, IbdRcepai, 75270 Paris Cete 06, FRANCE 

TeL 4 SAA 34 M. Telexi 204941. CM* oddmss. AUHtAN MBS 

Sdioof epea dl year round eaecep# Xmoe and Barter 

A. Study of fha Fraetdi languagB 

dinedcMBansiaaprApricsd Demote). T2 team par yen. OrieSAan last prior 
to frrt wgitaMian. Ca aiva cr rte A u caunes 

f rTamn aedtan 

b — nto«P»«yr Bitoii i t i u w i un wvima wma 

-Sffados 

■ Piepcsthon far ho ebmertay ewtiBaSa of p roofe d French, (and of second 
Erode) 

- Prapcsrrion far ho French language Dinamo (and of 3rd gods). 

2 -Hgher level 

Acgorten far higher dfAano of Rendi modem dute. 

2 smione Saptorter/Januoiy and February /June 
1 Sumnwr xeaiors Jdy <nd August 

B. S pedcd Courage. frf unmi ion CTioJdta upesi requad) 

- Fteparccion far Diploma in Ffigiwr French Uudas. 

- Wuey Gtrafenta far taucJiag Frendi dvood- 

-Burinea French pnpune faw far Cortificce* ami high Diploma cued by tie Paris 
Oariber of Oora nm ee and Ihe CariScde Mued by the ASceica Tiuivem . 
-Wdtaa ftaerii 
-Cbmndiei dooei 

- Gonwpcndonco tame 

- Pa d o g ogtnl courses far ladder* of frendi 

- Lavage Idxetey (ldgradafaSf 

- language Matehaque P md 3 tewild fexbpandar# wo* 

- Ubonaory of Fhonafic ameoion. 

Fee docunmdtdon actable upon request 


LAJLUTANDUVE THE FUNCH LANGUAGE 

■ m calm and idytc surramSngs near Monte Corla 
Op div e fadA rcsert ate o <te mqgr d tet and pamonc 
The CDfriE MHXIBBMNtol irtTUtB RANI^ASB oiftrs 33 
yam d ea^ansnee. Vteaser )«wr ln«L you may acquie o rraisry d 
French to juj you pofcseond or afavd nsah Smd graye. t, $ er 
12 weAceewesstertegeedi mondv C— e t ppe* gad B»qry 
os oMdode s dudans wpervead by o pro fa s r o r . 
once 1952 Bcmhure <«dh evdirNni fats, done or Mh beard and bdpng 

CB 4 TRE MAMTBUKANiM D^TUDES HtANCAISES 
06320 Cc*> cTAfl (Fnroca). 

Talu 93.78J1 .59 - Telmc CEMED 461 792 F 



American School of Mallorca 


AM INTERNATIONAL ACADEMIC INSTITUTION 

• Acoedtad by the Middfa States Asm. e Ceriffiod by fan D.OD. System for US 
Govt. pcHtonnd • A u tho riz ed by die Spanish Ministry of Education. • Bocnhn g 7 - 
1 2 & day K-l 2 • The only school offering a praengfemering sequence along with 
tap college press. • Notable record of coOega ocMaions • Specific le arn ing 
dbabSity and E5L pr og rams that yield excellent result. 

CALL! ORATORIO, 9 - PORTALS NOUS - MALLOKCA - SMUN 
7R_- 673430/31 -TBEXM6ST AAtSCE 



OUR KIND OF 
CHALLENGE 


Univer.il)- educactun, Ameri- 
can style, in the heart of Paris. 

A choice tit international and 
traditional disciplines. An 
American Bachelor of Arts or 
Bachelor of Science degree 

• all classes in English * 

• now accepting applications for Spring Semester • 


that opens door> anywhere in 
the world. The first step to 
your kind of iimirc: graduate 
school in ihe United Slates 
and. < ir a fh im> Man to an inter- 
national career. Think .tbnutil. 


plan also for Summer Session: June 23 - July 31 


/vr thtudnit , emnemt\ : pjrl-umt i iepn 

■uha ,-t MrW.uv i/uttrs. ban- 

wii n ml sun 

Contact: MrsJ. PtciftVr 

Director of Admissions 
The American College in Haris 
B.P. 1 12, 51 A ve. Bosquet 
75007 Haris, France 
Telephone: (I) *15.55-91.73 


_ lNt>£PEh?DP^TC01l£GE 

COLLEGE 

OF A RTS AND SEIENEE? 

LN PARIS 

UNE ^ALtlLTE AMERIC^NE 




INSTITUT FRANCO -AMERICA1N DE MAN AG EM BIT 


HARTFORD UNIVERSITY 
NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 


une grande 6cote mtemationale 

Cr66 et d6velopp6 en association avec des 
university amdricaines r6put6es Hartford U.,(Conn.), 
Northeastern U., Boston (Mass.). 

3 ans de formation supgrieute 8 la gestion (2 ans A 
Paris, 1 an aux Etats-Unfs). 

2 dipldmes : dipl&me IFAM, Bachelor of Science 
in Business Administration. 

4* annSe : obtention du dipldme MBA, Master 
in Business Administration.' 


aitid»ik»n:B>oc «to irtBt«lB*-i-6pra uwi ond— 
■Oidaslbn pwNAfa m 2- amfo (oaiGL DUt.) 


=b~ 


Renseignements: IFAM, 19, me Cftprft, 75015 Paris. Tel.: 47-34-38-23 
BabHsssnent Imematlonal rfEnaeljyieniom Supine Ltf Piwfr 

Nom : Prenom : 

Bac: 1™langue: 


Ad reuse: 


t6l:. 



STUDY 
PROGRAMS 
v- IN PARIS 

IHBVHISITT LEVELS 

GRADUATE A UNDBK3RADUATE 

AClPIMIf YfAl 

15 OCTOBBt to 20 MAY 

SMUNGIBUK 

3 FEBRUARY to 20 MAY 

| 4 VWBC PROGRAMS | 

JANUARY -JUNE 
JULY - SB*TEMB« 

RCARIS- FASHR3N 
LANGUAGE -ART 
HBTORY - NTBHOR 
DEUGNTARCHITECrURE 

Write or telephone: 

PAJUS AMERICAN ACADEMY 
t. mmdm tlmte^TSOOS Itafa tec* 
TAf 4X35 3SM me 4U5.0R.91 


STAGES DE 


FRANCAIS 

• 2, 3,4 Mtk cowsas 

• bdenriw-hofidoy courses 

• Comprehonsiw fangunga courses 

• 3 or 6 hours per day 

• Qucfffied teachers 

• B o aw fog fei faw8y or hoteb 

For color brochure please write to: 

ACTILANGUE SCHOOL 

2, rue Atexb-Massa, 06000 NICE 
TeLr 93 963384 - Telex.- 462 265 


BSCVKLA BEWOMAS 

NKSUA 

INTENSIVE SPANISH 
COURSES 
3 weeks. 4 boon per day 
three, lour levels, small groups. 

Neefo, Malaga, Spain 
Carretm, 6. TeL (952) 521687 . 





*mifi 

A prwtSe, ncnpmB coed school nee r 

Cams, Go fc rf Aar, atm b u U ng a 

newmodmn uiryj m «w6 Xfadwgreteo 

wi 2 tiednat of beoetSU peek laid 

GRADES 1 to 13 

□ English aniculwn loading to CSE 4 
OOW 4 ‘A’ Levels. 

□ Amaricm curriculum loading to 
OXB SAT/AOI 4 AP. 

□ Smod demos, highly quahhed staff. 

□ French as a second languogo for al 
Grades. 

□ English as a Foreign Language for 
nan-native speakers. 

□ Boarding possibaities with se l ected 
fondles. 


ANGLO-AMERICAN SCHOOL, 
MOUGINS, 

B.F 01, 06250 MOUGINS, FRANCE. 
Tel: 93.90.15.47 or 93.75.52.76. 


ECOLE NICKERSON' 

Longues Viuanies 
Since 1962 

French 

Gorman, Italian, English, Amok, 
Spanish, Portagueee, Russian 
Intensive, extensive courses 
Croupe or private lessons. 
Adults 

ECOLE NICKERSON 

3 Are. du President Wilson 

751 16 PARIS 

Sih floor 

TeL: (1) 47.2336.03, 


SPAIN 


MASTER EV BISIXESS VDMIMSTRATHW 
(MBA) PROGRAMME (IMLISGIAL) 



IBSE 

Institute de Estudks 
Superiores de la Empresa 
Univenity of Navarra 

Barcelona-Spain 


Academic year 1985-1986 - 22nd year of our MBA Program 


This is a 21 - month fulltime Programme 
beginning bi the middle of September 
of each year. 

One of ttte principal prerequisites b a 
completed university study (in any Bdtf) 
cr its equivalent Its aim is to prepare 
tomorrow’s managers to lead business and 
other ttganizations successfully wgbinan 
increasingly complex environment 
App&canls nust speak English or Spanish 
mfBaentiy to be able to foQow ratruetjon 
in Mie of these languages in the bst year, 
in ihe second, students are expected to 
follow courses fn both languages {instruc- 
tion wfil be gven during the Gist year in 
die language not spoken by the student). 



• lESE's MBA Programme was jottaded in 1964 
and is the oldest in Europe. 

• <kr apainad Jaadty is 
recopuxd. 

•AjoddtamaeeeflESEtsidHvmd Business 
School prq/BSors has beet atperrisiitg this 
Prapamne suer its inception. 

•Tke student body is wntsuaify multinational m 
origin and international in outlook. 

•Pomdpants will become fluent in the two 
comiBeraally most important Western languages. 
•A student-exchange programme exists with 
oi dsttnu Ba g American and European business 
schools. 

•Both design Of the Programme and USE'S 
location provide a natural, commercial and cubunl 
fusts on Europe, Spain tad lain America. 

0w gntoto ue sfogM by Manuks araod the 
«mM far (he flotototiM of lUDc itor ftm 
•entered fa on Hfapd MBA Pnpint. 

For fottitcr infonnatkn please wris to: 

MBA Admissions Office, IESE 
Aranda Pearson 21, Bncdoaa 34. Spain, or send a 
Ida (50924 IESB E), Cable us (IESE 
BAKXLONA) or cdl Mcola Hjfam (Bandoaa 

Cl 204 40 00) 








Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL 



TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


Dada Sale an Appropriate End to Absurdist Week 


Inuntatkmal Herald Tribute 

L ondon — This week's Loo- 

i don sales, which included a 
Dada session at Sotheby’s, could 
not have come closer to following 
(he rfiing s of Dada. Words mat- 
ter more than the achievement; 
randomness, not logic, governs ac- 
tions. 

Consider the auctions of Impres- 
sionist and Modem art that started 

Souren Meukian 

Monday with Christie’s evening 
sale. The auction house made a 
£4S-mBwa scons, with only 9 per- 
cent in value remaining unsold, 
even though there was not much to 
be admired. 

Christie’s was particularly 

pleased with a horizontal still Efe 


by Fantin-Latour, showing a glass 
bowl filled with poppies and a bas- 
ket fun of roses. John Lumley, di- 
rector of the Impressionist and 
Moden Master departments, not- 
ed that these still lifes were ex- 
tremely successful in Britain at the 
tfme they were painted. Fantin-La- 
tour, he added, was the only Im- 
pressionist artist who made a lot of 
money. That is a greater compli- 
ment to the painter's business acu- 
men than to his contribution to 
Impressionist pain ting. The En- 
glish never really liked Impression- 
ism- The bowls of roses that Fan- 
tin-Latour churned out and sold 
like hotcakes in the 1880s often 
qualify as kitsch done in a slightly 
blurred manner that is not quite 
enough to turn them into Impres- 
sionist art. Lumley’s estimate, 
£200.000 to £250 000, was thought 


by professionals to be more than 
generous. The final price was 
£486,000, a record for Fantin-La- 
tour (all prices include sales 
Charge). 

Ten lots Inter in the «alr mnu* a 
remarkable picture in the Fauve 
style by Matisse. It was painted in 
1909 in contrasted tones of pink, 
bluish green and arid yeDow. There 
is a dancing movement to the com- 
position, conveyed parity by the 
wavy outlines and partly by the 
brusbwodc. The landscape is un- 
questionably a masterpiece of early 
20tb-ceotmy putting It is further 
graced by a splendid pedigree — 
Michel and Sarah Stan of Paris 
acquired it from Matisse, and it 
later belonged to the Norwegian 
consul and collector, Peter Krog. It 
has been exhibited and illustrated 
many timre winch is something 


Record $4 Million for Peale Painting 


The Associated Pros 

N EW YORK — The National 
Gallery of Art bought Rem- 
brandt Peak’s “Rubens Peak with 
a Geranium” Thursday for $4.07 
millio n, including sales charge — a 
record auction price for a painting 
by an American artisl. 

Peale, who lived in Phfladdphia, 
portrayed his bespectacled younger 
brother, a botanist, with ms right 
hand on a large potted geranium. 
According to a Peale family story, 
the plant was the first of its kind in 
America. The 1801 painting in o0 
on canvas, was sold by Pauline 
Woolwortb of New York, widow of 
the retailing hdr Norman B. Wool- 
worth. 

The previous auction record for 
an American painting was Frederic 
Edwin Church's “Ic ebe rgs.” which 


was arid for $2.75 million at a New 
York auction in 1979. 

Peak, who painted portraits of 
George Washington and Thomas 
Jefferson, was the son of Charles 
Willson Peale, a founder rtf early 
American ait galleries and muse- 
ums and one of the most influential 
American painters of his timt 

The painting was one of almost 
300 American printings, drawings 
and sculptures sold at Sotheby's. 

■ Prints From Quito t r uiUi 

The price record for a print was 
broken six times Thursday at 
Christie's sale of 176 Old Master 
prints from the Duke of Devon- 
shire’s home, Chatsworth, The As- 
sociated Press reported Grom Lon- 
don. Christie's the wa l» total rtf 

£3.62 mfflioa also included record- 


breaking prices for 68 of the artists 
represented in the sale. 

In 1984, the duke sold drawings 
from Chatsworth for £21 million, 
saying he nee de d fhnd$ ^ maintain 
the 300-year-old mansion. The 
print tale was to preserve the art at 
Chatsworth and mimtff n the es- 
tate, he said. 

The prints drew American deal- , 
ers in force, but the top price of 
£561,600 was paid by the London 
dealer Frederick Mulder for Rem- 
brandt’s “Christ Presented to the 
People.” 

Robert light, a California deal- 
er, paid the second-highest price, 
£345,600, for CastigUone’s "The 
Creation of Adam.” David Tumck, 
a New York dealer, paid £275,400 
for Mantegna’s “Bacchanal With a 
wme-rrcss. 


buyers want these days. Yet Chris- 
tie’s estimate was unaccountably 
low, £100,000 to £140,000. The. 
work sold for £453,000, which is 
downright cheap for early 20tb- 
centmy masters. Christie’s under- 
estimation may have kept private 
buyers from bidding higher, the 
fact that profesaouals also did not 
do so im<WTfnKR ih«r apparent re- 
luctance to buy heaviLyidr stock. 

The day after, Sotheby’s hdd an 
astonishing sale in the same line, 
Inqnesskmist and Modem art The 
quality was hi gh er, but not daz- 
zling. A Degas pastel of a woman 
mmhmg her hair is so badly com- 
posed — .the arms look shriveled 
and a dressing table in the lower 
left cocoa 1 rises at an odd angle — 
that wit might question its author- 
ship, ware u not for its cast-iron 
pedigree. Another Degas pastel, of 
two hones grazing in a paddock, 
co mp eted in mediocrity. A land- 
scape by Monet, “Arise en fleure 
prts de Vftheufi,*’ could serve as 
cover art for a camembert cheese 
box. A Pissarro scene of two peas- 
ant women tending sheep qualified 

as an T fflpr e sg iop it rantriKnhVirt to 

kitsch. 

The sale could have done poody 
with such duds. It was, however, a 
th um p in g success for the vendors, 
if riot the buyers. Sotheby’s sold 
£13 minion worth of pictures, £83 
million with sales charges. Only 
10.6 percent in value were bought 
m. Among the few casualties was 
the horrendous Degas pastel of a 
woman. Estimated by Sotheby's at 
£280,000 to 350,000, it failed to sell 
as the banrmgr went down at 
£17(^000. Bat a banal and confused 
beach scene by Boudin was sold at 
£158,400. only £11,000 below the 
high end of Sotheby’s estimate. The 
kitsch Pissarro went up to £154,000 
and Monet’s camembert box illus- 


tration almost doubled Sotheby’s 
high estimate at £253,000. . . 

The fed of the sale resembled 
that of Sothdty’sTs^iesaooistand 
modem master auction three weeks 
eartiex in New’Yoric: new buyers 
looking for weC-known names to 
acquire, regardless of the quality. 
Tins has allowed some dealers to 
make a tidy profit In no other 
context could a landscape by Thao 
van Ryssdbeghe have said as it- 
did on Tuesday. “La pointer dn 
Rossignol, Cap Layet," dated 1905, 
looks Kke a photograph touched up ' 
by a third-rate disapk of Signac 
trying to apply the principles of 
Pamtfflfem. Last March in Zorich, 
the picture sold for 110,000 Swiss 
francs, then the equivalent of 
£35,000. On Tuesday m London it 
made £99,000, setting what most be 
the year’s record for a speculator's 
crap. 

Compared with this. the hi gh ru t 
price paid in Sotheby’s sak seems 
almost reasonable. This was for a 
remarkable seascape by Signac,- 
with rows of sailing boats creating 
a perspective effect on a choppy sea 
at sunset Titled “Brise, Cancar- 
nean — Tresto,’ ” and dated 1891, 
it is one of a series done by, Signac 

to illustrate Us theories abbot die 
analogies in rhythm and harmony 
between painting and music. The 
influence of Japanese woodcuts, 
particularly those of Hiroshige, is 
striking in the color schem e — ' 
mauve, pale yellows, and a greenish 
blue far the sea. It arid for £726,000 
— 20 percent over Sotheby's high 
estimate. The buyer, whose name 
was withheld by the auction house, 
was Karl Flick, one of West Ger- 
many's richest men. 

All tins coukl have paved the 
way for an easy Dada sale Wednes- 
day at Sotheby’s. The going, how- 
ever, was sticky in comparison. 






^ fyy . *• : . . 
, : K- 7 . i c .': 


Signac seascape was 


sold for £726,000. 


WBat Sotheby’s called “A CoDec- 
tiori of Dada Art” was seen by 
professionals as the leftovers from 
a . retiring dealer's stock. Arturo 
Schwarz, es tablished m- Milan, was 
for decades the leading deala in 
Dada art He owned aD the items 
until a short while ago. Thoe was 
only one piece of real historic sig- 
nificance: “Dada MBchstrasse,” a 
cdlage of newspaper cuttings, pho- 
tos and one post card, done in 
1919-20. by Johannes Bander. 
Baada was a writer, forinda and 
sole member of the German Free- 
dom Party, who collaborated in 
Dada sorites from 1918 and took 1 
part in the first International Dada 
Fair. His collage went op to 
£60,500, one-thud above Sotheby’s 
high estimate. 


This was a rare exception in the 
qnrtirtry one-third in value re- 
mained unsold. The rest went 
mostly for prices dose to or well 
below Sotheby’s low estimates, 
largely because these were so high- 
iti law cases, the auctioneer, 
Julian Barran, who was watching 
the vendor seated in the room, let 
the items gp at almost half the low 
estimate. Sandor Bortnyk’s Cubist 
Expressionist composition of 1920, 
“Sonne Zwischen den Hausera,” 
for instance, sold for £3,850. In 
other cases, the vendor unaccount- 
ably stuck to bis guns. A group of 
Dada objects were mere copies of 
originals created by Marcel Du- 
champ early this century. In 1964, 
Duchamp gave permission to 
Schwarz' to have eight numbered 


copies of each made, and agreed to 
sign them. The objects in l hem- 
selves did doi amount to much. A 
bicycle wheel, even when stuck up- 
side down on a stool, is not all that 
precious. Its significance, if any, k 
lies in the gesture made half a cen~ 
tury ago. At £46.000. there was ap- 
parently a real bidder in the room, 
which would have been marvelous 
despite the wild estimate of £75,000 
to £120,000. The vendor would 
have been well inspired to nod 
“yes” instead of “no” to Barran. 
who, after an inquiring look, called 
out “£4S.OOO” and brought down 
his hamm er, buying in the wheel- 
and-stool masterpiece of 1 964. This 
provided a suitable conclusion to a 
sale devoted to the art of the ab- 
surd. 


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The Special Report on 

ekterjvatxonal ebucatiox 

• ?• .’.*■« HR be published on . ’ 

• .FEBRUARY 27, 1986> - . 

. , ' For H^ennaiiQnr please contact Frtmgoise Q&ment, . '\ . 

Summational ByaM; Tribune, tn- your nearest ~1HT ropresotiai&e. 

























Page 9 



cWl 'W JulS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


ow 




” 1 ■ p3j| By Max Wykes-Joyce lustre and Venetian, fan," “Pom©- 

vSt ONDQN — To mack its 60th : "Warn Moras 

:v; - ■-i siv flmvtv ersary as~ adealermOri- Cherries and Doty 

T-.T'Sal 'worts of art/Marchaat o£ „ , . 

ig holding a jnusBua- Gerald Mynott: Cupolas and Ca~ 
' i^u^tjLeriuTHtian x>! 100 piecesof ^^C**®**#* Gofle ^'* 9 
. ^ .V ;]Kanc dcQiine^tbe/white Chinese Maddox Street, Wl r through Jam 
^ . j^xgerfain . that immensely in£tu- ^ . 

'Csaced O 


L* a ' •• ': 


i* 4 * .;•/* * V 


h *• £• .. 


, A ‘ as an artist. Yet, as a show at JPL 
v * Fine Am mate dear, he was a 

^gsss-s, esaassse 

ire also here, such as the eenmem- 

al “Three Friends"— Cbnfncras, a«^Ta3S 

Lao-Tzu and Buddha. ^ 

There are some charming, more m end 
ipwp-u>«irth fignre grwqss, m- ^ ^ danseuses,” astody for 

-• „• Chmcselady a ccom pa- his decorative panel “La Musique Gcmid Mvnotf s “Bn 

- - >uifid by her gardener m&pectmg a Profane" lor theThMtre de Orail- attMynonrs m 

• ? jnmus plant, a pair of joss-stick lot in Pans. _ 

; r-y-^ssssSTsSi 

. L ; -^.-mployee of the patch East India combination of small jewdiy and 

Company living and working in D large sculpture highlights Wat- 

" • .-Thina at the time (c. 1690) that this Tom Reed is a young painter one kmf’* command of sculptural scale. 

' '. . ~ frjiecc was made for the amusement year out of art school, who has „ “P*™* & 

fee. Chinese. passed the interval in photography Otcbto Comal G aUery, 

The selection ranges from pieces and film, die aesthetic problems of ^ Wat S^ \ ac ^j~f wer ,? eff!nt 
onneriy in the Edward T. Chow which haw, mflnwinw l W y p ointing Street, SW1, through Jan. 12. 

. ixiDecticm, and wares similar to the For his first London one-man d>ow □ 

- •V .aSsi in museum collections, to he has accepted the invitation of a t^nikh artists 

/•^vhistles and .small wme eras that Cfadsea furniture design studio, four pamtosand a sculptor — are 
"‘ -* ' -:fft inexpensive but of great be&uty. CarewJones. Much care has been 


»pies of feese as pickle trays). Kg- 
ifes of Bnddha; and other mvmities 



Renovated Hannover Opera House 
Continues SOO-Year-Old Tradition 


* iwy zfi V) k* : : *+ •••!-• . n . ■ 

5 fit. jR ' • m .T 

S; Y ;•> vV, J V v -.y r >’ ' *, : : . 'yj 

pYv ; !iU * : *: ' ' 5 I ’ 

6 1 i v v r. : *■ - -t ■■ u 

^ i v ^ : f - ::: ^ -i * &. *. m f ■■ ? h 

■ •' ' „ •• >r> ^ ; rf “ > «' 

n ■ 

A i V?* ' i- > » • 


t ■* j 



By James Helme Sutcliffe 

H ANNOVER — Hannover's 
elegant opera house, burned 
out by Allied incendiary bombs in 
1943 but still standing stately on 
the square it has occupied since 
1852, has been reopened for the 
second tune in 35 years. 

After 16 months of work inside 
and out, during which the entire 
auditorium was replaced, the gala 
opening night featured Arnold 
Schoolbag’s “Moses und Aron" 
— a choice that raised a storm of 
disapproval among conservative 
Hannoverians. As a concession to 
them Mozart’s “Die ZauberflOte" 
was the following night's selection, 
with stars such as the Texan Helen 
Danath, whose professional career 
began on the Hannover stage more 
than 20 years ago. 

Opera bouses have played an inl- 


and theater. But not until 1837, 
when William lV*s death left Vic- 
toria queen, did Laves's plans have 
a chance of success: Since a woman 
could not become Hannoverian re- 
gent. George I Vs fifth brother, 
Ernst August, returned to become 
king of Saxony. He authorized the 
fifth of Laves's theater designs in 
1845. 

The noble new complex con- 
tained both concert hail and stage. 
Marschner conducted an ac- 


ceased, in July 1945, on an impro- 
vised stage in the Herrenhsusen 
Gallery, and the opera house was 
put in usable condition by 1950 
with whatever materials were avail- 
able, even submarine bulkheads. 
Plaster less foyers were simply 
painted over and brick arches left 
bare, though from the beginning 
the auditorium's acoustics were 
considered deplorable. 

That has all changed now. The 
elegantly restored exterior has been 


claimed performance of Beetho- l? vcn a sn a PPy modem mtenor 
yen’s Fifth Symphony to open the whose stepped acoustic ceiling ran 
former cm May 8. 1852; its dry be extended into the stage area for 
acoustics were criticized by the concerts. Now it remains only to 


Neue Zdisdmfl for Musik. Goe- 
the’s “Torquato Tasso” opened the 
theater on SepL 1, 1852 
Hannover’s musical star began 
to rise again. The Schumanns, 
Brahms and Berlioz praised the or- 


his decorative panel “La Musique 
Profane" for the ThMtre de Chail- 
lot in Paris. TTie seal 

Maurice Denis: Paintings, ^« 0 t c 
D rawings; Watercobn," JPL Free example 

-tJ r* ; on t 


Gerald Mynotf s “Brighton PaviBon in the Snow,” at Frauds Kyle Galieiy 


The sculpture of a combination of ed in “Society Portraits 1850-1939, 
metals is equally finear, the finest spread over two B ane " , *» CoJ- 


example bong the nine-component nagh?* in Old Bond Street and the 
“Kingdom — Day and Night.” The Clarendon Gallery in nearby Vigo 
combination of small jewdiy and Street 


formed in the ducal palace border- 
0884- 1 9371 Ambrose McEvoy mg the Lane river. The Jjmopera 
(1878-1927), Edmund A. WaltS 
18W-1922) a^_L»Mrd Qmp- 


amterooe 
who has 


large sculpture highlights Wat- The right of this elegant dianning marble “Fffleue — a g ” *” W [l!£. , . ta Wa g aer ' s “Ring” was at first pro- 
lans’s command of sculptural scale, i^mniiati/y — many of the works young woman with flowers" by the R^p ancsq uc cathedral and palace^ hibited, but when the ban was lift- 

' David Watkins — Jewelry A aremtoan from great private col- sculptor Albert Carrier- 5^, ed, all Prussian theaters — Berlin. 

te w Crafts Council Gallery, lections --is the mOTxmeatal bbc Bdkuse (1824-1877). Hannover, Kassel and Wiesbaden 

ioo Place, Lonr Regent portraitists allowed themsrfves in “Society Portraits 1850-1939." — v>en ordered to use the same 

M, SWl.tboughJan.il Sc last quarto of the last century Odnagfr-s. 14 Old Bond Street, and r^ral fandy led to a famous scenery. Liszt camr in 1875 for his 

□ and the first quarter erf this. Nota- the Clarendon Gallery. 8 Vigo iZ£t “ SainI Bisabeth ” oratorio “ d 

_ ^ ^ ble »™™g these was John Singer Street, Wl. through Dec 14. 1 Hans von Bfilow was conductor in 


The first right of this elegant 


portent part in the life of Lower cbesira, whose concertmaster was 
Saxony’s capital city since 1678, Joseph Joachim, for whom Brahms 
when Cesti’s “Orontea" was per- was to write his violin concerto, 
formed in the ducal palace border- Gounod came to conduct his 
ing the Lone river. The first opera “Faust." 

h 200 : V s After Hannover was annexed by 
°rdered birili by Duke Emst Au- Prussia in 1866, its aristocracy lost 
pto and opened m January 1689 mKKSl ^ ‘ when 

wrth Agostmo Steffaxu s “Ernico ^ ^ t0 bedicuted by Berlin. 
Leone"; nearby Bnmswic^witfi its Wagner's “Ring" was at first pro 
Roraancsque cathedral and palace, hibfiei but when the ban was lifl- 
had bew the seat of Henry the ^ ^ inters _ Berlin. 


■ ^vhistles and small wine cups that 
- ; : ire inexpensive but of greal beanty. 

Blanc de Oane," S. Merchant 
y. md San, 120 Kensington Church 
-r • Street, W8. Dec 8-20. 


portraitists allowed themselves in 
the last quarto of the last century 
and the first quarto of this. Nota- 
ble among these was John Singer 


Lion and his English wife. Indeed, Hannover. Kassel and Wiesbaden' 
^ fbnitovenan amiKctiQn to the _ ^ ordered to use the same 


Five young Scottish artists - 
four painters and a sculptor — are JSEi 
brought together al^ Le&sto Fine 


George Frederick H&ndd, named 
court co mp oser in Hannover in 


“Saint Elisabeth'* oratorio and 
Hans von Bfilow was conductor in 
1877-79 before answering the call 


uarewoones. much care nas oeea ^ 0 ,^ together at Lemster Fine ' v ** s *?, . 7 *•»» 
taken in mounting the show, and ^toa^wsdected by the an ( 1( J by 78 inches) and “Por- 

the paintings combine, in the an- historian and collector Sylvia Sto 

ist’swortls, “the speed and perspeo- vensoa. Peter Howson produces re- fMdre a isZl bylJSmetera.He 
twe of photography, the color and ,h« antobio eran lrical is also represented, howwaybya 


□ 1710, overstayed Ins second leave 0 f the Berlin Philharmonic. Several 

The jeweler Chanmet has given followed there in 1714 by Ms dS iKffr 
fragments of ancient an and arti- sanded emolover. the elector ™ 


raise artistic standards to match, 
for there is a tendency in Hanno- 
ver's opera ensemble — full of old- 
er artists who should have retired to 
smaller roles some time ago — to 
take the attitude that "We're O.K., 
the rest of the world is crazy." Dis- 
cipline is lax and the pleasant chief 
conductor for the past 20 years, 
Georg Alexander .^brecht, seems 
unable to counter sloppy ensemble 
and faulty siring intonation as I 
have beard other conductors do in 
Hannover. 

The theater director. Hans- Peter 
Le hman n, has had to fight serious 
internal squabbling since he took 
over in 1981. Act 2 of his “Moses 
und Aron" production rose to a 
level of dramatic excitement that 
many larger opera companies 
would find hard to maintain 

James Helme Sutcliffe is a Berlin- 
based critic and musician. 


Under the title “Cupolas and 
lapriccios," Gerald Mynott is 
no rm ting his fourth solo exhibition 
"t the Francis Kyle Gallery. Subti- 
led “A Pursuit of the Rococo bom 
Brighton Pavilion to the Dresden 


apny, me color ana aim antobiogiaphkxd works. Caro 
“““W- . -line McNairn is in the Scots 

F am tings Ca- colorist tradition, with pastel dry- 

a cwinrTfPV ? ff/nf/M v# 1* • - • 


tnre of photography, die color and 
decoration of painting." 

“Tom Reed — Paintings," Ca- 
rew-Jones and Associates, 3 Jubilee 
Place, SW3, through Dec. 21. 

Though Ms chief reputation rests 


nghton Pavtiion to the Dm** lhcmgh Ms chto reputation rests Stares in welded iromrecmS ?S, 1 T^ a 

.winger, this selection of mixed- on Ms designs of contemporary I ^ (1869- 

Imlu ruinfmec hjtimtmclv nrrtlr« i/smslrv Duvid Wflflrrnj! tap . '™™ a mejnOnal piece tO n— m /ljn)Ll 


bioeranMcal works. Caro ^ 8150 represented, howevoyby a ornament, a 4th-centnry-B. C. 
NamHsin the Scots 9°°? rf small pwtrmt Egyptian head of Homs, a Heflenic 

action, with pastel dty- arawngs, mdu&ig two of the female torso in terracotta — to 
dth Nfclntyre isaxnflstCT Amencan-bom Nmcy Artra^j the conUanporary designers, who have 
Midiad Wmdle mat fi* 51 wnnm member of Paxlia- added preoous metals and stones 

mixed-media and somber harbor fragment The 

Take Harvev who does The great names of British por- bronze palanquin ornament was 
totf painlh^ are here— Pfaffipde supplied with a fresh shaft in red 


ESSt£.£SS&Si 

female torso in terra-cotta — to differences. ° 

contemporary designers, who have ^ op^ flourished in London 


added precious metals and stones llfM toH«nH«-t h in Bri»- 

to update each fragment The isMowned Hanncrvw until the pop- 


hedia paintings hauntingly evokes jewelry, David Watkins trained as a 
he spirit not only of the architec- sculptor. The Crafts Council’s ma- 


playwright Hugh SSJSSSflKSi ^ 

uial excesses of British and Ger- jor retrospective, which originated ~ . . .. (1879-1972) and Augustus John 

oan Rococo but of the English at Leeds City Art Gallery, unites . (1 878- 1961X the last with amagnif- 

iarden by moonlight at the vnia both genres. The jewehy, Watkins X* J^ujjora po^jaft of ^ mistress, ^he 

&jmde near Sena, and of Edith ex^lams, *1ias becrane progressive- . WLt mrou & ,Jan - Mardbesa CasatL” Among por- 


iSan 


Die great names of Bnnsh por- bronze palanquin ornament was ular form of the Simtspid with roo- 
tranpamimg are toe — de supplied with a fresh shaft in red ka diaWm &eraraciilarw» 
Y ni3 f m 1“ P«. dragon’s tad of the m^Su Shi 1769. Even after the 

Oipen ( 1878-1931 X Sar John La- ancient piece ornamented with -mnisi/v. tail cs *he Fmv* 
v^ 1856.1941X Sir Gerald gold and* diamonds, die whole 
S^-19 72 ) and Augustus Joto mounted on a pedestal of black ^ ^ nourished, Hannover got 
(1878-1961X the last with amaraif- granite and grid. The terrocotta financial suppartfrom Loudon, 
icent portrait of Ms mistress, ‘The was treated as a personification of t* 1831 Heinrich Mandmer 


itwell at her home, Renishaw. ly more linear and insubstantial"; a 
here are somfe stiB Hfes in the typical example is the fiat, square 
lassie tradition, notably “Pinks, neckpiece of steel inlaid wfih gold. 


. — n ■ • • Man 3163 * Gasan. Among por- 

■ n . traitists less known outside En- 

A vast^ wealth of English, French gland but of masterly standards, 
and American society is r ep re sent- there are works by Glyn PhOpot 


In 1831. Heinrich Mandmer, 


Among por- Venus, rising from a vermeil shell “Da- Vampvr" had S > rm P h£Hi y Ordiestra, made up of 

outside En- on a wave of diamonds; the water beenabmsuccess with the Hanno- 92 , nn « c ^ s f «mi 55 countries, 

i««i J — t- *-» -f 11 D malr«r tie <iaraif ham Viirtri Dxr imdf>r 


Despite the destruction, Hanno- 
ver’s ensemble was the first to per- 
form in Germany after hostilities 

International Ordiestra 
Founded to Aid Charity 

Rouen 

STOCKHOLM — The World 
Symphony Orchestra, made up of 


C , 'j 

V- 
. \ / 


Museum Re-Creates Art-Filled Riviera Villa 


drops on her body consist of small verfans, became musical director of 
ifiamonds. These “new looks" ^ opera, winch was stm in the 
could be hideous and pure latsch, baroque theater —badly in need of 
but so effectively have the frag- SS--attadiedroSScalpal- 
ments been modernized, they male ^ Grorg 

ddightful examples of contcmpo- i^dwig Friedrich Laves (1789- 


raiy sen^turo 


By Frederick M. Wlnship 

United Press International 


D ALLAS — A French Riviera display «« painted for homes, 
house furnished with art *at context," he said, “I think 


rirfcs is having a second life m-a 
ew decorative-arts' wing at the 
>allas Museum of Art 
A re-creation of six rooms of 


was a reminder that the 87 a0 museum later, was bom 69 years and master bedroom, phis storage 
p ainting s and works on papa on ago, in modest circumstances, in room and a conservation laborato- 
display were painted for hones. Marshall, Texas. She said, however, ry. 

“In that context," he said, “I think that this had not influenced her ' In addition, than are gaHmes 
seeing them with fine fnmishingsin decjgiaD to become a benefactor of for the mnseam’s alver autotira, 


1864), whose dassicaQy oriented 


a glamorous setting is 'an unusual the Dallas museum. 


"Noureaux Regards de Chau- style ^ to leave its mark on pub- 
met, Channel, 178 Hew Bond ifc bmWmgs in Hannover and near- 
Street, Wl, through Dec 14. by Herrmhausen (whose baroque 

are the ate of an annmil 
Max Wykes-Joyce writes regular- summer festival), had begun . in 


experience. 
The pain 


ntwll pumting e md sketches, late 


paint i n gs range from Corot, 


“Before my im<hand died in dynasty Qimese poredam and ex- 
1981, we discussed giving our col- part china, and needlework. A spe~ 


ly tofthe Off- art London art exhibi- 
tions.- 


1816 to try to get London’s si 
for the reconstruction of the 


makes its debut here Sunday under | 

Carlo Maria Ghifini with a perfor- / 

man ce of Bruckner’s Eighth Sym- / / 

phony on behalf of UNICEF. j j 

Marc Verricre of France, the or- / [ 

cbesira’ s director, said the idea of 

creating an international orchestra $ fl y 

to play once a year for charity came 3fE> — 

to his muskaan wife, Fran$oise Le- ZL T _ n^r^w 

grand, in 1983. The theme of Sun- U| ](( rl 1 A 1 I 
day’s concert is “music and peace”; L'wV-v.L.U-4 i 
the Nobel prizes for peace and oth- 4 place Veiidome 

er endeavors will be awarded two Paris n ) 42.60. 12. 12 

days after the performance. 


lUa La Fausa opened at the muse- Dan xmer, Courbet and Manet lections to a museum but we had cial gallery devoted to Winston 
m last week. The villa was built in through aich Post-Impressionists riiminmed France and FnglanH Churchill recalls the many times he 
927 on Cap Martin, overlooking as Vuillard and Bonnard. Cfaanne. and decided to gjvc it to Amenca," was ,» house guest with the Revests, 


INTERNATIONAL ART EXHIBITIONS 


: Carlo, by the Duke of West- 
x for Coco Chanel 


Renoir, van Gogh, Gax 
loose-Lantrec, Pissarro, 


:fe: j.’J 


she said. “When the Dallas muse- beginning in 1955. 

tun pcqlp contacted me, I didn t This gallexy contains three of Ms 


PARIS 


|4’S^#sst-seUer “The Anatomy of ^oatzn worses are oy tiranam 
g r . q. ; - .. - - purchased La Pausa from Sutherland, from whom the Re- 

hand in 1953 for the New York «« bought the Ely Cross, a gold 
; s ; Kl- ishion model Wendy Russell, silver sculpture designed for 
liom be married in 1964; she is Hy Cathedral in Engl a nd , 
-xa-siessi^jgj remembered as the model for The official value placed on the 
b Women’s Anny Corps uniform Rcves donation to the mnseran is 
. r - ; World War IL WO millioo, making it one of the 

.. • ; .Emery and Wendy Reves for- Mrarat gifts in U.S. museum Msto- 

shed La Pausa with French Im- ly.T^&ftdouMedthevalneirftiiB 

... -:'- v *essionist p ainting s, sculpture, museum’s holdings, which were 
- - - uropean antiques, silver and ma * I *Iy post- World War n Amen- 
^c^s^assware. Chinese porcelain, deco- CMartandjwfrGolnmbianandAf- 
dve ironwork. Oriental carpets, ri«n art. . 


The London-based publish^ doo, , Sanaj D^sa^ktonet are even know thqr were budding a Rwem Escapes and a copy of 
rnery Reves, author of the 1945 handsomdy represented. The onty new mnsnnm, but they convinced Chassne’a “ TnW - Ms 
at- seller “The Anatomy of ?°^ er P ara.^y Gaima me. they had the place, the space 


tnoatxu wchjcs arc by Ur n ha m mr. they had the place, space 
Sutherland, from whom the Re- andlhe money that was needed. .- 


id the money that was needed. and Ms favorite Don Joaquin d- 
The P -miHip n wmg was bitih gats, Ms m onogrammed cup and 


JEWELS BY ARTISTS 
PRECIOUS OBJECTS 


with funds raised privately in the 
Dallas area. *T consider Dallas a 

dty of the future which has not yet 

reached its zenith, and I want to be 


in the saucer. Ms cane and all Ms books 
iBas a published by Reves, who held 
&ot yet Churchill’s foreign publishing 
ttohe rights. He also left two cases of 
ss said, whisky m the villa. They are not an 

gam's d ^ 5la y- 

lames. One of the first visitors to the 


Basinger a Revelation in Tool for Love’ 


--- -:* : -ressionist paintings, sculpture, museum’s holdings, which were roof that Edward Lanabee Barnes, One of Jim first visitor s to th e 

-" ' uropean antiques, silver and mainly post-World War II Ameri- who designed the museum building wmgwasCdiaSandys,aChnrdnIl 

^^==s»®assware. Chinese porcelain, deco- can art and pre-Colombian and Af- that opened early last year, can- granddaughter who tod stayed 

■ "" dve ironwork. Oriental carpets, rican art. structed the wing. It contains the with hnn at La Pausa. “It’s so Hke 

_^ r -as 3 fie mirrors and remarkable pic- Reves, who intends to give her re-creations of La Pansa’s entry fee real ttang thaf s if s eenc, ^said 
re fnunes and textiles antique jewdiy collection and art toB, open-air patio, great toll, Sandys. “I feel I should go right up 

Wendy Reves, now a widow, said object* from her Swiss chalet to the grand sake, Kbrary, dining room fee stain to my bedroom." 

' ' Sectos” th CI ^ ves — — — - — — — 

Basinger a Revelation in Tool for Love’ 

Vr^ ^‘SJSStiti^stofim P APS i! I £ I ^ 8< l fi te^; a -5^^ Qadc ’ shfihas i erfuimy ^ d ^ dnted ****, K f- 

matinp 14 m /ihiarts from Iji ^ cently ttieased m the United side, botwbat one remembers most osawa^ wrote an early screenplay for 
msa to the oSSsMuseum in Suues: is May’s longing, “Runaway Tram”but hewas 

oi Sheila Benson of the Los Angdes „ ably not re spon s ibl e for the coarse- 

Tte museum trustees had to Times on “Fool for Low": D ness of a lot of its dialogue. 

-I- ... ree to display the Reves colleo- E ^ e and May, fools for each Janet Masha of The New York □ 

gj ' >ns in their domestic setting a other for 15 years, are a roofless Times on “Runaway Tram”: VinaauCanby ofTbeNewYoik 

inner of exhibition generally rodeo cowboy (Sam Shepard), Directed by Andrei Koncha- , Times on "Santa Qbk The Mov- 
- Dided by American museums Ln ensscrosang the country u a horse lovsky, the Soviet-bom director ie”: 

/or of separate galleries for trailer piebald wife mud, and Ms whose “Maria’s Lovers” was an-. As overblown kiddy movies go, 
intings and decorative arts, — ■ ■ ■■ 11 ■ ■■ - other odd but interesting hybrid of this one ranks somewhere below 

; deb provide closer and easier MOVIE MARQUEE international styles, “Runaway “Annie" and “Snow WMte and the 

- --wing. * Train" is at least four movies in Three Stooges.” David and Leslie 

■ \ home setting for the Roves’ fine-boned, hahr-trigger-tempered one. There’s a brutal prison section, Newman, who collaborated on the 

h collection, however, works lady (Kim Basinger). In transfer- a control-room drama, a claustro- story, are very funny people, as 
lliamly in Dallas, right down to ring Shepard's play to the screen, phobic three-party interchange and they’ve demonstrated in then “Su- 


C APSULE reviews of films re- a blond barnacle, she has her funny but disjointed film. Akira Knr- 
cently released in the United ride, but what one remembers most osawa wrote an early screenplay for 
States: • is May’s longing “Runaway Train” but he was prob- 

Shefla Benson of the Los Angeles n ably not responsible for the coarse-' 

Times on “Fool for Lore": u ness of a lot of its dialogue. 

Eddie and May, fools for each Janet Masha of The New York □ 

other for 15 years, are a roofless Times on “Runaway TVtm”: VmcauCaaby of The New York 

rodeo cowboy (Sam Shepard), Directed by Andrei Koncha- Times on “Santa dans: The Mov- 
cmscrossing the countiy in a borse lovsky, the Soviet-bom director ! ie": 

trailer piebald wife mod, and Ms whose “Maria’s Lovers” was an- As overblown kiddy movies go, 
— ■ ■ ■■ ■ ■ other odd but interesting hybrid of this one ranks somewhere below 

MOVIE MARQUEE international styles, “Runaway “Annie" and “Snow WMte and the 

* Train" is at least four movies in Three Stooges.” David and Leslie 

fine-boned, haur-trigger-tempered one. There’s a brutal prison section, Newman, who collaborated on the 
lady (Kim Basinger). In transfer- a emarikootn drama, a claustro- story, are very funny people, as 
ring Shepard's play to the screen, phobic three-party interchange and they’ve demonstrated in then “Su- 


Sheda Benson of the Los Angdes 
Times on “Fool for Love”: 

Eddie and May, foots for each 


Janet Masha of The New York 


Armas 

Georges Amulf 
Marc Boissonet 
Janos Borovi 
Carrera 
R.F. Clark 
Philippe Duperou 
Patrice Fabre 
Olivier Gagnere 
Gilioli 

Robert Goosens 
Goudji 

Philippe Hiquily 
Linda Ladumer 
William de Lilo 


Colette Marchal-Simon 
Igor Mitoraj 
Alicia Moi-Orban 
Yehuda Neiman 
Paul Oudet 

Anne and Patrick Poirier 
Andr6 Ribeiro 
Dominique Roux 
Antonio Segui 
Tben&se Sudre 
Takis 

Barbara Tipple 
Pierre- Yves Tremois 
Onelio Vignando 


GALERIE COLETTE DUBOIS 

420. rue Sdnr-Honor*. 75008 PARIS - TeL 42 60 13 44 

J. COQUILLAY 

Sculptures - Pastels 

— . Until December 31 .. ■■ — 


ofew for 15 years, are a roofless Times on “Runaway TVtin”: 
rodeo cowboy (Sam Shepard), Directed by Andrei Koncfaa- 


MOVIE MARQUEE 


lady (Kim 
ring Shepa 


As ovoblown kiddy movies go, 
this one ranks somewhere below 
“Amtie" and “Snow WMte and the 
Three Stooges.” David and LesHe 
Newman, who collaborated on fee 


December 3, 1985 - January 15, 1986. 

GALERIE EOLIA 

10, me de Seine - PARIS VI e 
(1)43 203654 


i ashtrays — 18 ib-ccntury CM- Robert Altman lets the two lovers a labored, extended visual mete- 


ie poredam sauoos. The exMbi- leave the one room that served on- 
d is a edebratkm of the adven- stage to remind os only too wcD of 


Voight gjyes a fieryper- 
fn an an usually hard- 


d is a celebration of the adven- stage to remind os omy too weu ot ronnance m an unusually hard- 
e of collecting and a reflection of a cage; fear assaults on one anoth- edged rede as a convicted killer who 
era when the art of Jiving was as er now range aD over a crummy has been wdded into his ceD by a 
bortam as art itself. neon-pueblo mold that Altman sadistic warden. He escapes with a 


neon-pueblo mold that Altman sadistic warden. He escapes wi 


r- bly not much that they or anyone 
1- else could do to make Jeannot 
o Szwarc’s film about Santa Claus 
a any more riveting than the idea 
a initially sounds. Dudley Moore, at 


T think mv wing will delight has peoples wife real and memory young sidekick named Bode (Eric Ms roost desperate and least en- 

_ ■ , . v , 9 y.t r- : ^ n o i > ■ — >n.. ^.n.. -j r 


vpie who might be bored with figures, letting time flow as effort- Roberts) and boards a train. The dealing, plays an awfully cate elf 
fery after gallery of paintings," lessly as his camera. Harry Dean engineer dies, leaving the train hnr- named Patch, whose fanny lines 
ves said as she helped arrange Stanton, like an agreeable coyote, fling at breakneck speed on what is depend mostly on phrases like “df- 
play objects before the wing’s is the film’s omnipotent chorus and inevitably a collision course. The explanatory” and “df-assnrance." 
ming Nov: 29. “It’s a diversion The Cause of It AU, and he is mar- nihilism and vkrous intensity of' Somewhat more amasing is a mad- 
Jee fine paintings and furniture vdous. Basinger is a revelation: Voighfs performance are entirety ly mean-spirited Amoican toy 
i cozy setting" Scrubbing in exasperation at the different from anything else he has manufacturer (John Iithgow, in 

larry S. Parker 3d, director of tendrils of hair that cloud her face, done on screen; it’s a shame those the film’s only remotely stylish per- 
museum, said the home setting clamping herself to Eddie’s leg Kke qualities emerge in such a vigorous fanmnee). 


X)NESBURY 



r= WALLY HNDLAY = 

Galleries International 

new yoHi - Chicago - palm beach 
beverty Nils - paris 

2 Ave. Matignon - Pori* 8th 

T«L- naasros*. hW . H^ y rin. mAm tkn , 
lOcun-W 1 pja- - 2>30 to 7 |un. 

EXHIBITION 

BOURRIE 

Permanent exhibition of 
ADAMOFF, ARDISSONE, AUGC, 
BOUDET, CANU, CASSIGNEUL 
CHAURAY, DUCA1RE, STE, FABCN, 
GALL, GANTNER, GAVEAU, 
GOUfVTl, hamboukg, hobo. 

KBME, ICLUGE, l£ PHO, MAIK, 
MIOB.-HB4RY, MUNKOV, NBS1, 
NEUGUELMAN, SQtRE, SIMBAU, 
THO MAS, ytGNOlES, VC X1ET. 

A VDALrOti«3RAS: Portraits 
BAlARINrScuiphiras 

Hotel George V - 47^3^4.00 
31 Ave. George-V - Paris 8th 

M. tn. utlMOiij^l pA-UO %» 9 p*. 

t i ‘i i in r**-ii ii)~ *i 


— Galerie Nad no Bresson - 

56 rue de I'Universite 
75007 PARIS TeL: 42 22 58 09 

SURVAGE 

1920-1930 

Nowwrbnr 21, 1985 • Januvy 15, 1986 
Tuesday through Saturday £30 • 7 pjn. 


PAHS/NKW YORK 

ZABRISKIE 

WILLIAM 

ZORACH 

724 Fifth Ave, New York 

ANDRE 

LEOCAT 

37 rue Quincampoix. Paris 





GALERIE FELIX VERCEL 

9, avenue Mafignon - Paris 8® 
Tel. 42 56 25 19 


TTTTTTTvTI 


« de Paris a Nogent» 

novamber 20 - december 20 


.. — — GALERIE MERMOZ ■■■ 

PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 

m 6. Rue JcarrMemoz, 75008 PARISH Teb 43.59.82.44 , 


BASEL 

until January 1986 

JEAN DUBUFFET 

Retrospective exhibition 

GALERIE BEYELER 

Baumldngasse 9. 4001 Basel 
TeL 061 23 54 12 


EXHIBITION 

DECEMBER 10 & 11, 1985. 

* Holiday Inn Mavfair, London. 

ANCIENT CHINESE GOLD, 
SILVER AND GILT BRONZE 

Warring States up to the Tang Dynasrv 

F”l!y >];ustrarcc cataloc ,iv:,il;ihlc: 

Christian Devdier, 12 Charles Struct. London Wl. 


/ 






Page 10 


SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 1985 


Hcralb 


JIONAL 


tribune American Liberals Prefer Distant Causes Sears 01 


Publuhed With Tie New Yoik Tima and TV Waahfngtoa Port 


Open the Doors Wider 


The Kremlin's masters are ruthless but not 
dumb. They surely knew that the truth about 
their mistreatment of Andrei Sakharov would 
emerge if his wife, Yelena Bonner, were al- 
lowed to travri to tlw West. Thus the ugly Stxny 
of forced feeding and faked telegrams has one 
compensation. It signifies a calculation that 
Miss Bonnets journey to Italy is less harmful 
to Soviet interests than her cruel detention 
in what the couple call “the black hole" — 
the dosed dry of Gorki. 

However callous, it is a calculation that 
ignites a spark of hope for other dissidents. 
The controlling truth is that the West’s con- 
cern for human rights must play on the Soviet 
rulers' periodic desire to exploit that concern. 

This seems an opportune time. Miss Bonner 
was finally permitted medical treatment 
abroad because Mikhail Gorbachev thought 
the gesture would improve his image at the 
Geneva summit conference. He was correct; it 
did. He should be encouraged to follow op 
with more such “humanitarian” deeds and 
unlock the doors that shame the Soviet system. 

There have been a few other sgns of relent- 
ing. With a sdgnorial Sourish before the sum- 
mit, Mr. Gorbachev ended years of separation 
for some Soviet subjects married to Ameri- 
cans. Renewed immigration of Soviet Jews to 
Israel remains only a rumor, but an exit visa 


has apparently been given to Etiahs Essas, a 
mathematician who first applied in 1973. This 
follows a pica, on his behalf by Edgar Bronf- 
man, president of the World Jewish Congress, 
who via ted Moscow in September. 

Every dissident who leaves has a dreadful 
tale to tell; that is the cost of opening up. Miss 
Bonner was allowed out for three months on 
condition that she grant no interviews. But her 
family in the United States is not bound. So it 
is now known that for 207 days in the last 18 
niffprhK, the Nobel physicist was separated 
from bis wife and fed forcibly to foil his hunger 
strike on her behalf. His jailers doctored mes- 
sages and videotapes purporti ng to show that 
aH was well with him. Even so. Western, protest 
surely mitigated the couple's plight and can 
continue to influence Soviet behavior. 

In pleading the cause of human rights to 
General Secretary Gorbachev at Geneva, Pres- 
ident Reagan seems to have indicated that he 
is more interested in progress than in propa- 
ganda, and is willing to confine his pressure to ' 
private diplomacy. That is not always the most 
effective approach, but it can be when the two 
governments axe moving toward easier rela- 
tions on other fronts. If Mr. Gorbachev takes 
that offer to heart, he will recognize the bene- 
fits of decency and open his doors wider. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


A Young Old Quebec 


The Quebec election closes a 20-year cycle 
of French-Canadian separatism that in the 
1970s threatened to break up Canada. The 
separatist impulse has probably not vanished 
forever. In one form or another it is inherent in 
French Canadians’ sense of being a special 
people with their own culture, very different 
from that of the rest of North America. But 
Quebec learned in the 1970s that the separatist 
movement carries a high economic cost as 
businesses depart and investment declines. 
With an unemployment rate now over 11 per- 
cent, the province’s voters have decided to give 
priority to development and jobs. 

Separatism became a political force amid 
the extremely rapid social change of the 1960s. 
French Canada has been through a transfor- 
mation in the last two decades that most of 
English-speaking North America took several 
generations to traverse. In 1960 most of 
French Canada was turned inward toward a 
deeply traditional community life. Except far 
a small elite, most French ranadiawK had 
hardly more than primary education and 
earned their livings in fanning and blue-collar 
jobs. Then, as the education system began to 
expand, young people reached out for wider 
opportunities. But everything of importance 
seemed to be run by people who spoke English. 

Over the years since then, young people 


have poured into the province’s new colleges, 
going into technical fields and business admm- 


istration. Quebec's society no longer splits 
neatly into English-speaking professional and 
managerial classes and a French-speaking 
working class. The upper levds of the big 
corporations are no longer so alien to ambi- 
tious young Quib&xds, and even' among 
French Canadian nationalists the question 
currently is not to get control of the corpora- 
tions but to make them grow more powerfully 
and generate more employment 
Nearly a year ago, its membership faffing, 
the ruling Parti Quftbfcois abandoned the goal 
of national independence that it had upheld 
since the late 1960s. It now leaves office to be 
replaced by Monday’s winners, the liberal 
Party. But the voters did an extra or d inary 
thing. They defeated the liberal Party’s lead- 
er, Robert Bourassa, in his own district Mr. 
Bourassa had also been the liberal leader and 
the province's premier before the Parti Qo£b6- 
cois came to power, and evidently he was too 
sharp a reminder of the way things used to be. 
It seems that the voters knew exactly what they 
wanted: set aside the separatist cause, but not 
turn politics backward or to reverse the great 
changes in French Canadian life during the 
years when die separatists were in power. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST- 


Other Opinion 


Another Blow to UNESCO 


No doubt it seemed like a good idea at the 
time a year ago, when the necessary notice was 
given, but confirmation of Britain's withdraw- 
al from UNESCO managed to seem both sad 
and petty. It was the greater shock of the 
American departure a year earlier, rather than 
the British “me too," which prompted the 
controversial agency to make a start on unden- 
iably necessary and long overdue reform. But, 
like most international bodies, even the most 
efficient and ideologically unexceptionable, 
UNESCO moves exceedingly slowly, a phe- 
nomenon related to the number of members. 

The case for going can be summarized in the 
one word inefficiency. If this is the criterion 
for membership of international bodies, we 
should logically caned our subscription to 
almost everything. UNESCO, like the United 
Nations itself and many another grouping of 
nations, is as effective as its members, co2ec- 
tivdy and individually, allow it to be. Its poor 
management, its vagneaess and the extremely 
high proportion of funds spent on its Paris 
headquarters are grounds for censure and pro- 
test, but in these respects it is different only in 
degree from other forums. The charge that it 
has become highly politicized is made only by 
those who disagree with the politics involved. 

The withdrawal of first the major contribu- 
tor and now of the founder of UNESCO is 
doubtless meant to teach the rest of the world 
a lesson. Unfortunately, it is up to the rest of 
the world to decide what lesson it draws, and 
we can be sure it will not be flattering to the 
Anglo-Saxon duumvirate. 

— The Guardian {London). 


of affairs in which 70 permit of UNESCO’s 
budget is spent at tbeoeganization's headquar- 
ters in Puis. But still UNESCO would be 
dominated by Thiiri World countries who, 
intermittently aided and abetted by the Soviet 
bloc, would continue to propose measures 
which we would sometimes find irritating or 
distasteful. This being so, it would he dishon- 
est to suggest that Britain (at any rate under a 
Conservative government) is likely to return to 
UNESCO in the foreseeable future. 

— The Daily Telegraph (London). 


UNESCO is immune to essential reform as a 
wild animal is immune to domesticity. It might 
in theory be possible even to change the state 


Pressure from Washington apparently pre- 
vailed. Like a knit sweater unraveling strand 
by strand, UNESCO's situation resembles, 
mutatis mutandis, that of the League of Na- 
tions before World War IL The defunct agency 
may now inspire a stately dance whose funere- 
al strains amid well reverberate throughout 
the UN system. Some American adversaries of 
the United Nations openly hope so. 

France well knows that the defection of the 
two principal Anglo-Saxon countries rides en- 
larging the influence of Moscow ami the more 
anti-Western regimes of tbe Third Warid. So it 
is surprising that France — boomed 40 years 
ago as the world's choice to host UNESCO’s 
headquarters, London being among the candi- 
dates then — has yet to launch the major 
initiative that is required to save the inter- 
national Cultural and yientife w ynia if f ffi , 

It’s now or never. France might, with touch 
care, suggest quietly to Amadou Mahtar 
M’Bow that be take dm courageous step of 
resigning before his term expires in 1987. 
Whether or not he shares responsibility for 
the present situation, the director-general 
has become the focus of so much controversy 
that it is hard to see how UNESCO can be 
salvaged with him still on board. 

— Le Monde (Paris). 


FROM OUR DEC 7 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: African Sultans Attack French 
PARIS — A telegram from Dakar has been 
received at the French Ministry of Colonies, 
stating that a severe combat took place on 
Nov. 9 near Dxgete, capital of Massaht, one of 
the sultanates of the Lake Chad region. A 
column of sharpshooters was attacked by the 
forces of the Sultan of Massalit and those of 
Doudmourah, formerly Snltan of OuadaL The 
attack was repulsed The enemy fled, leaving 
numerous dead. French troops also sustained 
serious losses. The Ouadal district is a few 
hundred kilometres east of Lake Chad in the 
neighborhood of Darfour, a centre of Tslwnrir. 
propaganda. In 1898, after the Franco-British 
Convention, the Ouadal Empire was placed 
under French influence. In 1904 France began 
to suppress the roving Ouadal marauders. 


1935: A Fli^b^ to Manila and Back' 

ALAMEDA, California — Successfully com- 
pleting its trip from California to the Philip- 
pines and back, the China Clipper, Pan 
American Airways flying boat, landed here [on 
Dec. 6]. The Clipper, commanded by Captain 
Edwin C Musi, covered the last lap of its 
return flight, Honolulu to Alameda, 2,410 
□tiles, in 17 hours. The entire flight from Ma- 
nila to Alameda, 8,152 miles, was made in 63 
hours, 28 minutes. The flight from California 
to the Philippines and back, 16^04 miles, was 
accomplished in 123 hours, 15 minutes, exclu- 
sive of stops at Honolulu, Midway Island, 
Wake Island and Guam. Although the Clifna 
Clipper carried no passengers on this first trip, 
the line and the planes have been planned for 
passenger, mail and express service. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1932 


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Co-Chaumen 


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SSJwwsnmwS*® 15 DOW Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Dinctar td Orvmatm 

CARLGEWIRTZ Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAEONS DinacrZoraitenm 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Diivtar of AAertum Saks 
International Herald Tribune, [81 Avenue Chartes-de-Ganlle, 92200 Ncuffly-sur-Sdne, 

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0 1985, International Herald Tribune. AS rights Be^SBhI 


W ASHINGTON — The United 
States has come to a curious 


lY States has come to a curious 
crossroads in foreign policy. The 
Reagan dtx^xmeprodmnigAztKrican 
support for anti-Cammunist revolu- 
tions around the worid. For practical 
purposes this means, in descending 
order of remoteness from the United 
States: in Afghanistan, Cambodia, 
Angola and Nicaragua. Congressio- 
nal liberals seem to haw responded. 


By Charles Krauthammer 


They will support half. 

The scorecard reads like this: 

• Af ghanistan: No argument. For 
liberals and conservatives, as for the 
mujahidin, it is holy war. - . 

• Cambodia: The prime advocate 
<rfovmrmlitatyaid todwixm-Gsm- 
munist guerrillas is the leading liberal 
foreign ^policy thinker in Congress, 
Representative Stephen Solan. 

• Angola: Congress is soon to 

vote o& the question of aid to Jonas 

Savimbi' s UNITA rebels. The strong- 
est opposition comes from House lib- 
erals fed by Representative Solan . 

• Nicaragua: liberals overwhelm- 
ingly oppose aid to the “contras.” 

What is curious about this lineup is 
that liberals, by reputation, are grid- 
ed more by considerations of human, 
rights and democratic famw thsm 
conservatives. Yet, compared to the 
insurgencies they oppose, the insur- 
gencies they favor are likdy to pro- 
duce regimes far less disposed toward 
human right s or democratic forms. 

In Cambodia, America sup p orts 
good guys, but they are completely 


dominated by modi, more powerful 
allies madc ap of very bad guys, the 
Khmer Rouge- If Ac rebels tri- 
umphed tomorrow it would be Pol 
Pot, or his disciples, whoKkdy would 
rule. When Pd Pot last ruled lie 
proved himself the greatest murderer 
since Hitler, Stalin and Mao, rand 
they had advantages of Scale. 

In Af ghanistan, thereis much to be 
said for the courage and patriotism of 
the migahidm. Tnere is liras to be sad 
for their interest in the theory and 
practice of democracy. Were Ameri- 
ca’s side to win, it would probably: 
produce a regime politically, as geo- 
graphically , somewhere between the 
dictatorship of Pakistan and the Is- 
lamic fanaticism of Iran. 

Next to their Asian brotbere-ia- 
revotation, an Angola under Mr. Sa- 
vimbi or a Nicaragua under Arturo 
Cruz looks positively Jeffersonian. 
Thus, purely from the print of view 
of political morality — of what life 
for the people will be like if America’s 
side wins — support for the Asian 
half of Reagan doctrine and opposi- 
tion to the rest is incoherent. 

Accordingly, in support of this pe- 
cnKar policy, and in preparation for 
the upcoming vote on Angolan aid, a 
search for coherence hasbeen under- 
taken. This is what it has turned np. 

• International law: Some argue 
that because Cambodia and Afghani- 
stan. have been invaded by foreign 


troops, only there is support for the 
insurgents justified. It is not dear, 
however, why the address of one’s 
oppressor should be decisive in de- 
nning whether resistance is .legiti- 
mate or whether it deserves support. 
* P oland was not invaded by General 
: Jaruzdalri. Is resistance to his rule 
' any less deserving for that fact? 

Moreover, this is astrange argu- 
ment to make in ddense of an Ango- 
lan regime propped up by 30,000 Cu- 
ban troops — which makes Angola 
one of last sub-Saharan countries 
that can be said to be white-ruled. 
The aimed foreigners in Luanda will 
undoubtedly claim that they werein- 

so can^foe Sovietsfo^tof and the 
Vietnamese in Phnom Pehn. Eti- 
quette demands it nowadays: Occu- 
pation is by invitation only. 

• Apartheid: A more serious and 
special charge against Mr, Savimbi is 
that he takes aid from South Africa. 
No one says that be has any sympa- 
thy fra apmlheid, because that would 
be absonL Mr. Savimbi is a lifelong 
.blade nationalist who has been fight- 
ing one dr another farm of cotamal- 
ism fra 20 years, including many 
years spent fighting Portuguese colo- 
nialism when it was supported by 
South Africa. The bdp he gets from 
South Africa is a matter of pore con- 
venience. Or, more accurately, neces- 
sity: Fra 10 years the other potential 


source of help, the United States, was 
cut cfl by the dark amendment. Mr. 
Savimbi had W choose between clean 
bands and survival. To the dismay of 
some, he chose the latter. 

But he is no more an agent or 
South Africa than Washington wasffl 
Louis NVL Mr. Savimbi takes Pre- 
toria's aid because he has noajoi«- 
The United States can gore mm the 
choice. American aid could replace 
Pretoria’s aid. It could even be condi- 
tioned on Mr. Savimbi’s djssooaoon 
from South Africa. That would free 
him oT the South African taint. 

Which suggests that there must 
be yet another principle underlying 
the selectivity erf the liberal response 
to the Reagan doctrine- 

• Distance: What distinguishes 
the insurgencies of Cambodia and 
A fghanistan is that they are the Far- 
thest away. Far enough away that 
their true nature does not come into 
(American) focus too easily. It is 
much easier to support oitt-of-ogM 
intervention, wars whose violence is 
far beyond the ken of American cam- 
eras and American consciousness. 

Representative Solan opposes the 
“global interventionism," as be calls 
iCof “the high priests and acolytes 

of the far right" Instead, it scenes, the 

ffYngrpjffnum from New York is for 
hani-dotal interventionism: Ameri- 
ca wilfsuppon any insurgent, provid- 
ed he is more than eight time zones 
away. Call it the Solarz doctrine. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


At Last a New Sense of Purpose in Europe 


P ARIS — The European Community has fi- 
nally decided to make aserious effort to pull 
itself together. After the Luxembourg «n"wirit 
last Monday and Tuesday, the government 
heads, who usually crow loudly when they have 
produced practically no thing , are being, tmtypi- 
caDy modest about their agreement. 

It is a good ago. At last tiny have accepted 
mm moving on with Boropeaneooiiomjc altera- 
tion is more important than making headlines for 
domestic political kudos. 

It is in the underlying interest of foe United 
States as wefl. A faltering Europe can only un- 
dermine America’s position in foe world, and a 
strong, healthy Europe can mean a better bal- 
anced and stranger affiance. 

In January, Spain and Portugal wfll swell the 
Community’s membership to 12 countries with 
320 nriffiou people — most of Western Europe: 
At the Luxembourg s ummi t the 10+2 set the end 
of 1992 as foe deadline for malting foe common 
market five up to its name as a place where 
people, goods, money and services can move as 
freely as within a single country. 

It is still a long way from a United States of 
Europe, tbe goal of the visionaries who set up the 
original six-member Community in 1957. The 10 
could not even agree on a deadline for a common 
currency, although they promised to aim for it 
The goad in Luxembourg was not idealism but 
a desperate awakening to the reality of 10 years 
of economic stagnation, persistently rising un- 
employment (It now averages lift percent) and 

wiiwMB tfmt mtHiml rj wilriet make the Fnrnpft- 


By flora Lewis 


ans incapable of keeping up with the United 
States and Japan in a high-tech wodd. 

Twenty-seven top European industrialists had 
petitioned tbe summit participants, pleading for 
them to get moving. Tnae is a powerful business 

drive tn {ntejg rata ™ wwW* a«’h m u n« B» nHn 
rn the hu* 1<Klk«nnvadtlM» 0> p |iiii ui i Ity ahepd nf 

hs timetable because they were more eager fra 
its benefits and less fearful of foe short-term 
disadvantages than were tbe politicians. 

When the common market was formed, it was 
inanity in response to the threats of the Cold War 
and me need for a safe framework within which 
West Germany could redevelop and rearm. The 
easing of outsidepiessures andtheeudaringtugs 
of nationalism braked the. momentum. There 
seemed little hope that Europa, as foe vision was 
called, would ever come any nearer unless an 
overwh elming new crisis forced a reaction. 

There was then a relapse into nttorickin& 
grandstanding, grab-bagging. It led to the futile 


aid Reagan to ask Mikhaff Gorbachev to imagine 
“a threat to this wodd from another spedes hum 
another planet." The president said, “Justfomk 
how easy his task and mine might be in these 
meetings We’d forget all tbe little local dif- 
ferences that we have between our countries and 

we would find out race and fra aB that we really 
are human bongs here on tins Earth together.” . 

Ironically, it is not a terrifying mffitary or 


political threat that is knocking European heads 
together this tim*, hut fear of gradual economic 
decline. And it is to the credit of the political 
leaders that at last they have accepted the need to 
act intelligantty before foe brink of disaster. 

They conqntmnsed cm choosing their tools fra 
what is brand to be a difficult, even painful task. 
Differences are still too great, mutual trust still 
too small and attachment to local habits and 
attitudes still too stubborn. . So they proceed 
cautiously, without enthusiasm, without as much 
as they, need in institutional change. 

But they have changed their style. Greece's 
Andreas Pqpandreou dropped his bravura. Brit- 
ain’s MargaretThatcher complained that in Par- 
liament some committee of underimgs would be 
- ftnrnp the tine-by-tine drafting and ha g glin g that 
kept heads of government up all ni ght m Lnxem- 
bourg, but she said that if the Community had to 
work that way, she would adapt and go along. 

There was a new atmosphere and a new sense 
that the point is not to score points but to get an 
essential job done. Of course, there had been a lot 
of preparation, a lot of disappointments, a lot of 
intrigue and friction before they got this far. And 


of course how far they really move Europe will 
depend on Mure behavior and their ability to 
. keep the focus on foe larger goaL 

Stzfl, it is encouraging to find that government 
leadera can, look ahead without being driven by 
“ahocha- species from another planer* to see that 
their tasks absolutely require mare cooperation. 
-One surprising day, it becomes posable. 

The Neve York Times. 

,7-J - ........ 


A Mongrel 
The House 




Can Adopt 


By David S. Broder 


W ASHINGTON — Last May, 
when President Reagan’s tax 


yy when President Reagan’s tax 
proposal was brand new, I applauded 
it and suggested four catena by 
which congressional tax revision 
could be judged. As foe House pre- 
pares to vote on the tax bill that came 
oui of the Ways and Means Commit- 
tee, substantially revised from foe 
Reagan proposal, let’s see how it 
stacks up against those standards: 
the four PS of poverty, ptogressvhy. 


Poverty: Under the existing tax 
code, a family of four at the poverty 
level pays 10.5 percent of its income 
in federal (axes — 2ft times as much 
as it did in 1978. The Reagan propos- 
al aimed at taking the poor e ntir ety 
off the tax rolls, and foe Ways and 
Means lull does an even better job of 
assuring that. Some six nnffioa low- 
income households would be relieved 
of federal taxes, making the bill the 
biggest anti-poverty program in years 
and the best news fra tbe working 
poor. Give it an A grade. 

ProgressMty: The income tax is 
based on tbe idea that taxes should 
increase with the ability to pay, but 
tax shelters and loopholes have seri- 
ously eroded that principle. Tbe Rea- 
gan proposal shut down some of the 
tax-dodging devices in the present 
code but it provided a bonanza to the 
very rich, who would get the main 
benefits of his proposed marginal 
rate reductions. The Ways and 
Means bill still allows some big loop- 
holes, but it shifts the benefits sign in- 



the states. So marie tbe repot card B. 

Productrrhy; Given the realities of 
mtcmatioiiaroraqictiticin, the effects 
of any tax law changes oa the produo 


wright. The Rea^ proposal shifted 
the tax burden significantly from in- 
dividuals to corporations. The Ways 
and Means bill goes further. But even 
the latter would do no more than 


bring the corporate share of overall 
revenues back to foeleveLof 198ft- 

Sdfuhty, some business lobbies 
urge Congress to abandon foe tffort. 
to improve foe tax code. Many profit- 
able businesses have managed to 
avoid paying any taxes once the ex- 
travagantly generous 1981 tax-cut 
bffi took effect; now they are trying 
to protect that privileged position. 

But Republicans m the House 
make a vafid point when they argue 
that the individual tax cots in the 
Ways and Means lull may go too for 


in encouraging consumption, while 
some of the corporate tax hikes sig- 
nificantly increase tbe cost of invest- 
ment. That is especially true for same 
of foe c^pitalfoitenaive, heavy indus- 
tries like steel that are belatedty try- 
ing to modernize. Although the ML is 
betterfoan theprcsent oodeformany 
small, emerging businesses and fra 
the rapidly growing service sector 
that is foe source of most new jobs, a, 
grade of C seems about as high, as it 
deserves on tins. criterion. ' 

Overall, the Ways' and Means Kfl 
— Kke foe original Reagan proposal 
—is a dcar im provemcat as regards 
poverty, prospstivity and principle. 
The potential cff ects on productivity 
are its maid drawback. 

House Republicans, in an alterna- 
tive biD, show plainsibty how to miti- 
gate that problem. THrir bill is Un- 

fikdy to.preraiLm the House, but its 
concepts will surety resurface in the 


lean-controlled Senate, and 
y has many friends on the 
Finance Committee. Mem- 


Senate Finance Committee. Mem- 
bers of that committee are acutely 
conscious of the competition facing 
US. businesses in foreign trade. 

The president is right in saying 
, tbe House should rend its bill an to 
the Senate. House Democrats can 
fed justifiable pride that the Ways 
. and Means Committee has ma<u» a 
good start toward a significant over- 
fall improvement in the tax code. 

House Repubficans should remem- 
ber that if they vote to kill tbe b01 
when their substitute fails, they will 
be gutting the principal policy initia- 
tive — and the only potential land- 
mark domestic achievement — of 
President Reagan’s second term. 
That would be a scary legacy for last 
year’s l an dsli d e and a cynical send- 
off fra the 1986 camp ai g n 


The Washington Past. 


cantty to the middle-income taxpay- 
ers. It cuts by 47 percent the 


ers. It cuts by 47 percent the 
aggregate tax brraks that Mr. Reagan 
proposed fra the few who earn more 
than $200,000. It increases by 48 per- 
cent the gains for the S2ft0Q(^S75JXI0 
group. It includes a minimum-tax 
payment provision fra corporations 
and the wealthy which is tougher 
than what Mr. Reagan proposed. 
Grade fra profflessiv^: 

gan proposal nor foe ways and 
Means bill avoided compromises 
aimed at gamering votes in Congress 
and/or defusing the opposition of 
potent lobbies, but both repair sane 
of the more outrageous distortions of 
tbe easting code On many issues, 
including mortgage interest and busi- 
ness entertainment deducti o ns. Mr. 
Reagan's approach appears more 
principled than the committee's. But 
tbe Democrats — albeit for political 
reasons —are more respectful of foe 
principle of federalism than was the 
presidiaiL The bill More tbe House 
rqects Mr. Reagan's effort to end foe 
deductibility of state and local taxes, 
and thereby preservts a principle that 
has been a cornerstone of the fiscal 
compact between Washington and 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


About ^ Travel in Egypt 


- People flank, travel articles are 
more interesting before you visit & 
place, but I disagree. Egypt, before 
my stay there this past summer, held 
little interest for me, but now that 
I have walked through foe Valley of 
the Kings and the Khan d-Khalih, 
articles about those places draw my 
attention. Thank you for malting 
more concrete fra me some dates, 
people and places that were still loose 
in my ndnd. (" Travel in Egm^Not. 
23.) I am eager te> return to Cairo and 

environs to visit tbe places you men- 
tion which I mi««l last time. 


RUTH C BROWN. 
. -NewYoik.' 


For rich people who travel in air-.: 
conditioned buses and are protected 


mg attodeed by taxi drivers,' molested 
by young. men, infected with; para- 
sites or raped on those idyllic desert 
beaches— the few that foreigners can 
go to. And foe land mines in. the 
Sinai, or. traffic accidents anywhere? 

‘ In two years living in Alexandria. 
I never found the “seedy raewar me-, 
tropolis” of Durrell’s botiks,; al- 
though I have found exactly that 
phrase- in various articles. 

It' might do foe Egyptian' people 
some good if Westemos went time 
with realistic expectations, snch foat- 
they would not comeawiay so sotety 
disappointed Egyptians have a bad 
enough time finding reality in foeh' 
own state-controlled press. 

DAVID. WAlD, 

^ Barcelona. • 


ever anti-Sikh (hey may be. She is 

also entitled to ha view that my book 
.was an effort to cash in on current 
American interest in Indin 
books abou t India give the impres- 
sion of being written fra for eign andi- 
ffides, too. What troubled me were 
her inaccuracies. She surety did not 
read foe bookcarefulty, otherwise foe 
would not have quoted me as saving 
that foe Skh religious figure who 


In Reagan’s 
Star System 


By Joseph Kraft 


W ashington ~ white 
House gossip about Tandy 
problems'’ and “staff conflicts" o b- 
soires a larger mifo. Robert MeFsr- 
la yie quit as national security adviser 
because he could not endure the sty 
system of presidential man a g o nem 
practiced by Ronald Reagan. - 
His replacement wfll almost sunty 
not change the system. So the outlodk 
is for more devolution of authority jo , 
senior cabmen officers, and furrier f 
shake-ups in the White House. * 
Cabinet government is tbe deco* 
rous name for foe present order. Pres- 

jnent to senior associates. WifoiTtyir 
exceptions, cabinet officers hare 
been secure in their jobs. The stabil- 
ity of the cabinet is one of foe tri- 
umphs of the Reagan administration, 
ana several members have beta a $e 
to wield almost plenary powers. 

Tbe so-called hidden-band presi- 
dency of Dwight Eisenhower showed 
that such delegation can sometimes 
work wonders. Mr. Eisenhower re- 
served his personal intervention for 
supreme occasions. When they arose, 
he imposed himself on subonfisatra 
with a sure sense of direction. Be- _ 
rran « be had held aloof, his sen- * 
assertion carried that much more 
weight From behind the scenes be 
put down Joe McCarthy, stopped foe 
Suez invasion cold, backed awty 
from Vietnam and con s olidated rite 
welfare state. He is probably the out- 
standing postwar president 
Bui that kind of leadership re- 
quires more *^ an poor syntax and* 


a Khahstan leaden Not would foe 
have charged that I did not interview 

a smgle labor leader or a peasant 
. , tranaygupte. 

New York 


jty tour guides, your travel section cm 
Egypt is fair enough. But why. not 
consider the pain foat.will be visited 
upon anyone who steps out erf the 
flock to wander around? You might', 
haw mentioned the likelihood of be- 


Reply to a Reviewer 


. IrcadAnhalJesafsrevicwjWmr: ^ ' 

of my book ^erigemcm ^ India After- 
the Assassination of .Indira Gandhi* 
with considerable interest .The .re- 
viewer is entitled to her views,' how- 


Leffers intended for ptddicatum 
.should be addnssed u Letten to the 
Editor^ and t mat contain Ae wit- 
efs signature, name and full ad- 
dness. lftteh should be brief and 
ate subjeci to editing. We cannot 
be respdnsible fpr the return 0 f 


ur 


,ie for long days at foe office. It 

demands an ability to pierce beneath 
the surface of events, to see beyond 
what is superficial and conventional, 
it depends on an instinctive affinity 


John Poindexter will 
probably not even toy ; 
to assert disdptine. 

Certainty there zs z 

little sign that the * -- 

president wants iL ? 


with the obscure forces of bistoiy axyl 
destiny. It is bound up with a feel tor 
what is important and what is tran- 
sient It finds expression in a wflfinfr 
ness to take unpopular portions for 
the sake of future gains. Teffing peo- 
ple what they need to know, not Wh$t 
they want to bear, is indispensable. 
So is self-discipline. '* 

President Reagan certainly enjqjh 
foe opportunity fra historic achieve- 
ment. He Cff" ini Hate an gu di irir^ 
easing of tension with the Soviet 
Union. He can put America ou.&e^ 
path to steady growth without faffed 
tion. But does he have the mettle ib 
doit — the historic insight? And the 
self-discipline to leave the primrose 
path for the sleep and thorny way? 

So far the question remains opal 
Mr. Reagan has been splendid at foe 
easy things — undoing the sdf-doubt 
left behind by Jimmy Carter, cutting 
taxes; standing up to Mikhail Gorba- 
chev: taking Grenada; capturing ter- 
rorists; spending money on defense; 
fighting for law and order and foe 
eradication of drug addiction. He ex- 
cels at what looks good on foe even- 
ing news. He takes the star turns, and 
the impolite term for the way he dob 
business is: the star system. - - 
But unpleasant business gets 
shirked. Splits among top advisers 6b 
central foreign and economic pdfoy 
choices go unresolved. Others haveto . 
bear rite brunt for extracting the imJf 
lines from Beirut and trying to rate 
revenues. Those who take on hard 
tasks without success are often 
dropped or undermined. -s 

Mr. McFarianeis a disciplined for- 
mer marine. For years he <fid exacting 
duty in national security affairs at the 
White Rouse. As the top security 
adviser he resisted the easy accom- 
modations often proposed by the 
State DepartmenL But lus father had 
been a congressman, and be himself 
had served as a staff aide au the 
Senate Armed Services Committee. 
Essentially he held the views of rite 
defense majority on the HBI. i! 

He worked with congressional 
leaders to bufld a strategy for staUe 
relations between foe two great nb- l 
clear powers. To that end he bods-# 
aonally lent himsrif to Secretaiy of 
State George Shultz in his harries 
againa Secretary of Defense Caspftr 
wanberger and the anti-arms con- 
trol gang at the Pentagon. • >i 
u s ™ c time last summer. Mr. 
McFarlane came to the oahd nsi rai 
that the bickering around Mm was 
too modi, that there was no hope flf 
a ssertmsp discipline. His foes foen bj- 
gaa le akin g stories about personal 
reffiojlties with foe White House 
°f staff, Donald Regan. Probt* 
bty those existed, and they giay hay 


foe had been cast long agpulnfle^ 
Mr. McFarlane was on the verge ° 
gating the White House before-!* 
«camc national security adviser. 

J^ Poindexter, the former depq 
ty who now succeeds him. wiDprota 

OiY flOt MM «ni ' s «■ - 


r : j a. uiue sun in 

Prcwtau wants it He has bad fra 
national security advisers m-foe pa 
«ve years. So the barons trf the Ra 
^reala-note^Tfe^sg 

taiy Jam e s Baker in economic mai 
“f* Attorney General Ed« 

Meesc HI Cnmnl - ..Tl ll. 


Meese m sotaal pdky —trill raoh 

wyaoannulate even more authoril 


McFadanrfsexif does ri 
»ok m fois qnartcr tike a final vkto 
for the iflnef of staff. Regal 


burden the president trill 
w mteBectaal rigpi; but ti 

ZVlXIff lamim 


me irnwnw iri 

V «fe in the starqS 


rev* 


.i\V 


■■rM 


. ' X • 







tC— 


JN 


“0-v ■ 

3 S;» . N l 
"s’Xrf 4 ^*^ 

**wa 


HeralhS^nbunc. 

'-^|- * »' «- - ■» ■ 

IVORY COAST 

A SPECIAL REPORT 

SATURDAY-SUNDAT, DECEMBER 7-8, 1985 


Page 11 


president 


g^puceession 

iJSFears 

;. 

*2?^ ABIDJAN — Fife HouphouSt- 
li^i/^Betey.'Iwjry Coast's 80-year-old 
e- ,. '^president, commonly referred te as 
\i^r, trCLe Vkra,’’ the old man, wa8 ro- 
-^fleeted to his sixth fire-year term 
t Oct 27, gaming 100 percent of 

5; ^Xr feJfl* votein a 99-9-percent turnout. 
>1 Ej^^jFoDowing the flection, the atten- 
of many Ivorians has returned 
" »,«, a question that has persistently 
, ‘^dogged Mr. Houpfaoet-Boigny in 
".^X^^ffecent years: the transition to anew 


c^I J ? Before the presidential flections, 
1 “C j 5^8 congress of the country’s sole 
l.T;. -political party, the Parti Ddmocra- 
"T v ’•^.ictiqoe de C6tc dlvohe (PDC3), re- 
st ^t’vjralcd that Mr. HoophooBvBoigny 
■ ■'■ v -iTJr. isUnnM have no vice nmatfentinl 




have no vice 
g male, as had 



Economic Crisis 
Brings Realism 
To Planning 
By Government 


ans, people “came to me __ 

Viability of Developing Off shore Gas Reserves Questioned 

raphooSt-Boi Kay’s plea •/ *! ... A O JJ 


.7 * ' /ears of independence, has also ac- lips’s demand to have a 75-perreat both the Ivorian 
~/jflerated. share of offshore ofl produced at companies engag 

- ■- ‘ ’i However, the country remains the Espoir field ins te ad of its pro- work. 

1 ^-' jghtly controlled in sensitive areas scot 50-percent share. New gas simp 


■ ~ r’esifei ifaa Ivory Coast's sole leader for 
.7]“ ft ^“yesterday, today and tomorrow." 

After the announcement, the 
Rational Assembly moved to alter 
-' ■■ii; u> ^K.jhe constitution, officially efani- 
;i- r * ?tUting the never-filled portion of 
: ^^a^ce prcadenL In the event of a 
‘ jr - -uacjjpirBBdential -vacancy, the new con- 

— ~fflt«tifmal arrangement calls for 

3 . j ''the president of the National As- 

OUutetofsauAy. to assure the interim as 
11. head of state aod party for a period 
. not n^jof 4S to 60 days, daring which time 
j; . j. he must call presidential ejections. 
■'iuWflpnj Mr. Houphongt-Boigny com- 
n L tluli vtodued about the roecnlation and 

- rivalry that had been provoked by 

jtrn JyjjjL expectations of a vice presidential 

*- wwmrnati nwj wying that dmitig the 

lent iranfiipast ^ P°°P te Ucaxoe 

and wrote to me to remind me tiiat 
'I am their ‘customary leader’.” 
Ti-* . Mr. Houphonftt-Boigny’s plea 
. 1.. r^-.Tdr Western observers to under- 
. r - ^tand that African tradition re- 
>- : 7 rjhnies chiefs to rule alone belies his 
'7'7-v^-IIitqneM assertion that he will be 

■ V '.J '“ -^icceeded by a team. Moreover, his 

- '.‘sJ’. ^-assertion that the country’s cadres 

“unarmnonsly adopted the po- 
, " srtion” regarding the suppression 

V ’ i . ' the vice presidency was contra- 

."7 s ": r.Tmcted by several PDCI executive 
' . .7 . Committee members, wdro, inhiterf 1 
‘ . v . '“‘.'laews in the wfajfcii featfrng ty to the 1 / 
""' _ 7i-^*rty conghs^ aud'.fliey- #oul3^ 
T i 7. ; Jrefa tKaif be'Eft - 

."7 V. '".TjnchangedL" ^ ’'*”‘7 " 7 " “ n 
; ; . Pointing-oitt ftii the constitn- 
’ / ; '7;ttonaI guid^mes f^arffing the suo- 
7 /„ 7’~Jessson had been altered at two. 
7 7 . 7;. Consecutive party congresses, in 

«»d 1980, one senior party 
^^V/X.Vfember said that “the stability of 
'-■- j^rjipc country's political institmkms 
' .7 ;"7T ^ called into question, by the con- 
’• - • i -’ / jBast changes." 

• The issue of change is central to 

r-.. - 7 ; „nivate pohtical debate in Ivory 
During the past five years, 
VV'TTjre country has been obliged by 
■ ^ ' 7 wonomic hardship to rethink much 
: ;7jf its development strategy. 

. ’ ' 7^hange in the Ivorian political sys- 

- ■- 'em, which, on die whole has re- 
*: : • nained remarkably static in 2S 
'■f'fjean of independence; has also ao- 
rjdemted. 

:: 'i However, the country remains 
:i ^ Tightly controlled in sensitive areas 
■.x.r* — ; wh as domestic political press 
'joverage, wtere criticism is mated, 

- U best, and the presidem is men- 
.-.•.v^-'-'-.wned wily in reverential te rm s. 

: _> - - -'•'Hie strict management of informa- 

7 • • ' km m the national press is resent- 

. ■ _ ;«d by (be coon fay’s younger geoesv 

: ‘ - - dons and intellectuals, who have 
lenefited from Ivory Coast’s heavy 
■' '/^vestments in education. In ro- 
... - . r-ponse to questiois about freedom 
. .. f esqnessum, Ivorian officials roo- 
, -' indy point out that a wide variety 
. .. ■ v ' ; t foreign publications is available 
. - ; ’ere. 

' - The most substantive measure of 

. . ■ “'beralrauian came in 1980, when 
' ' ^ie party rdmquished control over 

7 7,-r.. -- ; sdeakm of candidates for leg- 
-dative and nmokapa) office and, 
tt the Gist time, opened the way 
dectoral oompetitian and geo- 
_. . G raphical representation. This led 
/ . hotly contested elections in 
980, vnth widespread reports of 
ate-bnying and some violence. 

' In recent National Assembly and 
._ , - mnicipal dections, there was low- 
' ‘ 7: - ; overall voter turnout and fewer 
; r~ adidate per seat. Tie govero- 
mi had issued warnings against 
-. ' iy pditkal diauption and the of- 
- • ..; ;;, nal party would not allow certain 

.> 'mdidaaes, ostensibly because 
.-i- 7 7<r esc candidates lacked the “mo- 
,i-. .. -llity and tmlitancy’’ deemed nec- 

■«•••■ : sary for elective office. 

; - - : 7 Some Ivocians explained the. low 
mouthy saying lhat the choice of 
'7 mdkfates was of limited ggrufi- 
• 'race in a country where power is 
» ■ » i hiriily centralized and the Na- 

' • JnaiAssembly’s h^isiative role & 

7. ' mere formality. One person ex- 
. ./eased his cynicism this way: “In 
„.-■■■ - >80, candidates promised os 

i / 7 ’ ■ ads, schools and dimes. After the 
, . 77 r actions, we never heard ^firein 
.7 emagMn. This time around it win 

•. : ' harder to get people to vote." 

. . i : In recoct years the government 
. : 7.- 1 s used the term “maare" to do- 
, *'.'77>- ibe the electorate, winch was 
. . - ‘ 7 st allowed a choice of candidates 
■7;.' 1980. However, choice has al- 
v. “7:. js be® restricted to the Iowa 
7 . .-' 7: ‘ ielon$ of Ivorian pditical office. 
r‘‘7' r- ice independence, Mr. Hou- 
. 7 . '■ ouft-Boigny has never been cp- 
7 ' t*v. »d on the presidential ballot. 

. . N ; . (Continued on Pige 13) 


The SALO pteniatioD, left, yields 
130,000 tons of pineapples a year, 
provfefing IVoiy Coast with a steady 


By Howard French 

ABIDJAN — Ivory Coast’s eco- 
nomic managers have every reason 
to ted condemned by past success- 
es: They must follow an act that 
wiQ prove all but impossible to 
mater. For two decades following 
independence in I960, the country 
enjoyed one of the world's highest 
rates of real economic growth, with 
a 6 1 -percent increase in gross na- 
tional product per capita. 

By 1981 the fortunes of the coun- 
try that hail long enjoyed the de- 
scription of Africa's “economic 
miracle” h*d dramatically. 
Prices for the country’s principal 
export crops, which typically pro- 
vide over 60 percent of export reve- 


1970s had created a mentality of 
relying on the state's providence. 
The stale undertook the wholesale 

creation of “domestic" industrial 
and commercial sectors; areas that 
had previously been completely 
dominated by foreigners. 

At the same time, salaries were 
allowed to rise, and the civil service 
— the number one employer in 
urban areas — grew rapidly. 

A French banker said that, since 
the onset of the 1980s economic 
crisis, known locally as la coryonc- 
lure, “the Ivorian leadership has 
been forced to inject a strong dose 
of realism in its planning." The 
World Bank and France have re- 
placed commercial banks as the 
□rimarv sources of development fi- 


viae over ou percent 01 export rere- primary sources of development fi- 
nues. had plummeted, and the dancing and have succeeded in re- 
countoy suddenly faced a burgeon- forming ,he country’s development 


Ivorians 
a street 1 


ig at Wan Kitama flml 

in Abidjan, above. 


AJm/BULBouStf 



ing debt service load that soon 
proved nnmaii»gg«hl<» After 20 
consecutive years of growth, the 
Ivorian economy slid into steep re- 
cession. 

Economists attribute many of 
the current economic woes to the 
folly of the late 1970s. Between 
197S and 1977, world prices for the 
country's mum cash crops, coffee 
and cocoa, more than doubled. 
With windfall profits and the sud- 
den prospect of cal exports on the 
horizon, the government embarked 
on a virtually uncontrolled invest- 
ment spree, making liberal use of 
expensive short- and medium-term 


Strategy for the coining years. 

A World Bank official described 
Ivory Coast's recovery program as 

«-m p ha«Hyln g “doin g what thgeoun- 

uy can do efficiently more effi- 
ciently and abandoning that which 
cannot be done efficiently." This 
has meant trimming back the state 
sector, holding the line on salaries 
and disengaging itself from some of 
the disastrous industrial and com- 
mercial ventures undertaken in the 
1970s. 

While the government was creat- 
ing an unprofitable sugar industry 
and introducing protective mea- 
sures for its expensive import-sub- 


By Howard SchlsscI 

PARIS — Tooted in the early 
19806 as a posable “second Nige- 
ria," Ivory Coast has been forced in 
recent times to significantly scale 


American company’s gas field was ward export-oriented liqnifmd nut - Coast for natural gas would be the 
to be developed by 1986 “at the oral gas (LNG) projects, 
latest" - With overseas markets saturated 

There is fittk question that PhO- for the foreseeable future, the only 
lips has uncovered considerable gas prospects for marketing Ivorian gas 
reserves, mostly on Block B, while are on the local market or in ndgb- 


6 “at Ihe oral gas (LNG) projects. 

With overseas markets saturated 
that Ph3- for die foreseeable future, the only 
arable gas prospects for marketing Ivorian gas 


MOlfcm loans. 

If an agreement is agned in com- Zrf its inditjo™] aranglhs, Stomf 

ing months for the development of trade had deteriorated by 48 per- 
a^^nsnvasanJ’thncon- and benh inunaai^tts 


down its offshore hydrocarbon am- driDfeg around the Eqxarcfl field. tx»ing West African countries. 


bitions. _ The largest gas acenr 

Instead of becoming a major oil Srt 33 

exporter. Ivory Coast is now more 
modestly seeking to assore sdf-sof- 

fidency in ofl and bring on stream . ; , f 

fltfahflpe natura l p* resources to WltJQ OVCX8688 mantpis BSuHSteti lOf tu6 

SSSST’ foreseeable fatare, the only pro«pecte for ~ 

maikelinglTOriaii gas are on 4e local 

talks between Phillips Petroleum erf market or in nwg hhnrm g West African 

the United States and the Ivorian . 0 0 

government over the price of gas OOVUdZies. 

and other related matters have yet ^ ^ 

to result in a compromise agree- 
ment. feet (93 bflliori cubic meters), 1ms long-term economic viability of de- 

These negotiations have dragged been named Foxtrot: vd oping gas depdsats located in 

an far over 18 months and are stiD Other Western firms, such as Ita- faidy doqj water, 

deadlocked. The Wadd Bank's In- Agip and Esso Exploration, an PbxEEqjs has made no secret that 

temational Finance Corp. has re- affifiaie of the pant Exxon groeqj, the price must provide sufficient 
cemty started to play a more active have also reportedly strode natural incentive to justify development 
rale m the search for an acceptable gas deposits. spending. The Ivorians, for their 


The largest gas unmnmiaiini^ con- The small scale of these trmrVrttg 


state-controlled utility, Energie ing months for the development of trade had deteriorated by 48 per- 
ElectriquedeCOte d’Ivoire (EECIX offshore gas reserves and the 0x1- cent, <wri both interest rates and 
and the ofl r e fin ery. Socibik Ivor- stxnctioa of new gas-fired power the dollar (zn which many of the 
iwrnp de Raffinage (SIR)- plants, Ivorian economic planners loans were denominated) had be- 

gnm>» gas could be used also by will indefinitely postpone plans to gun to soar, 
the main factories in the Abidjan build a S650-nrinion hydroelectric The ens uing debt crisis, followed 
area, but plans 10 use the gas as facility at Soubrfc 


taming at least 33 ttiffim cubic raises serious questions about the feedstock for a petrochemical plant 


cuity at Soubrfe. by two years of disastrous drought. 

The deadlock over the price of forced a serious re thinking of the 


will probably have to be shelved for gas has led to a virtual standstill in conn 1 


lack of profitability. 


(Continued on Next Page) 


s development strategy. 
»rt-Bved opulence of the 


forgoing investments in boosting 
production of food and cash crops 
for which Ivory Coast is ideally 
suited. 

With the return of abundant rain 
in I9&4, Ivory Coast wasted no 
lime in pursuing an agricultural po- 
licy aimed at reducing food imports 
(Continued on Next Page) 


ADVERTISEMENT 


CA1SSE AUTONOME 
D’AMORTISSEMENT 



compromise. 


Ofl mdustiy sources now believe part, are 


Accenting to diplomatic sources, that Ivory Coast’s continental pla- gas-gm ended 


negotiations were further co 
f ytffd t im ing the summer by 


tean may contain more gas than ofl. 
This poses a serious problem for 


r price so that 
power can be 


competitive with other sources of 


government and “The gap between the price 
i in exploration asked by Phufips and what the gov- 
ernment is willing to pay has coo- 
es for the West siderably narrowed in recent 
the natural out- months, but both sides will have to 


sent 50-percent share. New gas supplies for the West siderably narrowed in recent 

Demonstrating his impatience European market, the natural out- months, but both sides will have to 
with the protracted discussions let for West African gas, are no* make a little extra effort if a modus 
with Phillips, President Ftiix Hon- much in demand at present More- vivei«£ is to be worked out," said an 
pbonfit-Boigny of Ivory Coast de- over, countries like Nigeria and oil industry source, 
dared earlier in the year that the Cameroon have already put far- The principal outlet in Ivray 





The Abidjan deyfine. 


Abidjan, the Tearl of the Lagoons, 7 
Overflows With Uncontrolled Migration 


By Howard French 

ABIDJAN — Ivray Coast's economic capital of 
Abidjan has become one of the African continent's 
largest and fastest-growing cities. 

Desoibed in tourist brochures as “la pale des 
lagunas,” because modi of the city stradd les an 
extensive coastal lagoon network, Amdjan is bunt- 
ing at its seams noth the flow of job and adventure 
seekers bran the interior and from neighboring 
conn tries. 

Foreign visitors to Abidjan have reacted to the 
burgeoning city and its Plateau district of sky- 
scrapers with descriptions rang i ng from “little 
Manhattan* * to “preposterous.” Whatever the re- 
action, it makes a strong impressoo. 

An ardntect and urban planner, Mkhd Sop 
Gbevere, noted that at the turn of the century 
Abidjan was an Ebrie fishing village of no more 
than 5,000 inhabitants. By independence in I960, 
it had grown to 200,000 and the latest estimates 
pnt the city's population at over 2 nriffion. 

Ivorian authorities have attonpted a variety of 


measures to stem Abidjan's growth, now eszimated 
at 10 pereent a yeat^ Beginning in the 1960s, they 
raxed several of shantytown districts, but they have 
continued to sprout up mMoatrollahly since. Re- 
peated examples of tins exercise in “summary 
eviction" hare failed to discourage Abidjan's large 
populatkmofporainnnigranlsnraiipaidnngto- 
geuwr housing of tin, scr^j wood and corrupted 
cardboard wherever unnsed land can be found. 

. Mr. Sopi, whose task it is to bdb> plan the use of 
government resources to “oeate a maximum num- 
ber of affordable dwellings,* said, “Delicate issues 
are involved in urban policy dedskms, and things 
are' not rendered easier by our financ i al con- 
straints.” 

Abidjan's growth was accelerated by the open- 
ing of iheVridi Canal and Port Bouetin 1950. The 
city had been the capital since 1934 and was at the 
bead of the Abidjan-to-Niger raflroad, which, in 
reality, only goes so far as Ouagadougou, the 
capital of neighboring Burkina Faso. 

With the opening of Port Bouet, Abidjan took 
on the role of economic capital and has snrren- 
(Cantinned on Next Page) 


For a quarter of a century, the GAJk. has continued to mul- 
tiply hs relations within the financial milieux and today it 
benefits from an extremely dose network of relationships 
built qp with the international financial institutions. 

At the same time, at national level, it has refined the means, 
and consolidated the channels, through which it taps local sav- 
ings for the needs of the economy, within which it is solidly 
established by directing its roots into all sectors. 

In 26 years of operation the Caisse Autoname d’Amorasse- 
ment has succeeded in encouraging and strengthening die 
confidence of financial backers from abroad. Its internal acti- 
vities have, at the same time, multiplied and diversified at such 
a rate that it would nor be an overstatement to siiyriiat the in- 
stitution, which in 1959 had only one single loan in its port- 
folio, has today become one of the main wheels in the economy 
of the Ivory Coast and a precious tool in the development 
sphere. 

Operational Oz^gamsation of the CAA. 

The CLA-A. consists of four technical departments (the De- 
partment fra the National Debt, the Department for the Man- 
agement ofDeposics, the Deparcmen t for National Funds, the 
Department of New Funds to Guarantee Loans to Business 
Concerns in the Ivory Coast), two operational departments 
(the Ad mini strative Department and the Computer Depart- 
ment) and one Secretarial General coordinating die activities 
of all these departments, which are under the authority of a 
Director General who in turn cakes instructions from a Man- 
agement Board presided over by the Ministry for Economy 
and Finance. 

The CLA-A. in the Sphere ofDevelopment 
Thus the CAA. has a presence in all sectors of national eco- 
nomic activity: energy, construction, public works, agricul- 
ture, national education, transport, public health, etc... 

As a follow-up to the foreign debt being backed by the State 
from 1973, the CAA. has broadened its area of involvement. 
From a simple manager of the State debt, it has become the or- 
ganisation responsible for the whole of the nati o nal debt, the 
authorised intermediary as regards financial budring from 
abroad and an essential part of the Ivory Coast economy. 

By virtue of the Law N0.60-434 of 24 December i960 and 
LawNo.80/1070 of 13 September 19S0, it has become obliga- 
tory for national organisations and enterprises and public cor- 
porations to deposit their available funds with the CAA. The 
funds deposited are managed in accordance with banking 
regulations and norms. For this purpose the CAA. is regis- 
■ tered at the BGEAO under N0JB4 of it December 1975 as a 
financial establishment with special status. 

Mobilisation ofForeign Funds 

Within the framework of its duty to seek out and make avail- 
able funds from abroad, a mission with which it has been en- 
trusted since its creation, with a view to financing public in- 
vestments, the CAA. has successively approached five cate- 
gories of sources of foreign financing: 

- obligatory international loans, 

- • deferred payments agreements, 

- bilateral ra governmental loans, 

- loans from international organisations, 

- loans from private banks. 

In order to mobilise foreign resources on terms which are fa- 
vourable to the Ivory Coast, the CAA. has built up nume- 
rous contacts with financial backers and continuously follows 
foe trends in international financial markets, a task made 
easier by foe purchase of a Reuter Monitor. 


Mobilisation of Savings at 
Home 

The CAA. is not content to 
tap foreign resources alone. It 
is likewise concerned with foe 
mobilisation of local resources 
to finance public investments. 

The collection of national sav- AJ.Lwn.Yafea, 

mgs by CAA. works through: Dinxuur General C.4A 

- issuing public obligations, (CAA. Joans), 

- issuing obligations to holders of FNI certificates, 

- conversion of FNI certificates to long term State loans, 

- deposits made by national bodies. 

The Deposits made by National Bodies 
Still with the aim of tapping internal funds, the CA.A. col- 
lects deposits from certain national bodies which it then makes 
available to the ecomomy in order to finance development 
projects. Consisting of, for the most part, short term and sight 
deposits, these resources are used in the form of loans to the 
economy. 

Thanks to cautious and strict management of these resources, 
the CAA has had almost no need for recourse to redis- 
counting loam which were granted by it and at the same time 
has managed to place large loans at the disposal of foe- 
economy. 

Through its task of management of loan funds, the CAA. 
settles foe public contracts financed by loans from abroad. 

In the 26 years of its activity the C.AA. has ensured this 
public service to the total satisfaction of both companies and 
State. All foe economic sectors are covered: 

- Agriculture (cacao project, coffee project, rubber cultiva- 
tion, cotton, livestock, fishing, rice, soya, sugar, etc...), 

- T ransport (roads, ports, airports, SOTRA, etc...), 

- Urbanisation and accomodation (housing, drainage, sani- 
tation, thoroughfares, etc...), 

- Training (INSET, ENSTOP, national education pro- 
jects), 

- General administration (Administrative City, Palais de 
Justice, Re-education Centre, International Centre of 
Commerce). 

The Ivory Coast, anxious to develop its industrial network, 
has favoured the installation of numerous foreign businesses 
since it gained independence, allowing these businesses to 
benefit from tax exemptions and reductions. Very soon the 
aim of promoting Ivory Coast businesses likewise led the 
government to set up a promotion programme based on three 
axes: 

- CAPEN, k> make technical assistance available to pro- 
moters, 

- foe spedal fond in the hands of SONAFI, ro complement 
foe personal investment of foe entrepreneur, 

- foe Guarantee Fund to make guarantees available to prom- 
oters. 

By Decree 81-140 of 18 February 1981, foe government dis- 
solved foe Guarantee Fund and replaced it with the New 
Funds to Guarantee Loans to Ivory Coast Businesses 
(Nouveau Foods le Garantie des Credit aux Encreprises 
Ivoiriennes) which has been integrated into the CAA 

Aims of the New Guarantee Fund 

- To guarantee loans granted by banking establishments to 
nationals and Ivory Coast business concerns where 50°,, of 
the capital is held by nationals, 

- To provide written guarantees for commitments made by 
banking establishments in favour of Ivory Coast business 
concerns. 


■■ • 




Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY^SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 1985 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON IVORY COAST 


Limited Markets 
Curbs Development 
Of Offshore Gas 


(Continued From Previous Page) 

new exploration activities on the 
continental shelf. The slowdown in 
the pace of drilling win probably 
result in a drop in exploration 
spending in Ivory Coast in 1985 to 
the thir d consecutive year. 

in 1983 and 1984, exploration 
expenditures feQ by 42 percent and 
9 percent respectively, amounting 
to 5154 million last year. 

Agip decided to suspend plans 
for a second exploration hole on its 
E-I block, situated close to the 
maritime frontier with Ghana, un- 
til the gas- pacing issue is settled. 

This acreage is thought to con- 
tain gas resources, although a wild- 
cat drilled earlier in 1985 was re- 
ported dry. 

Esso Exploration stopped drill- 
ing on its APE-4 permit, on the 
maritime boundary with Ghana, 
during the summer. Some hydro- 
carbon shows were reported at this 
well, but the company has not yet 
unveiled its 1986 exploration pro- 

Phillips drilled two wells earlier 
in the year around the Espair field 
on its C-l permit. Evaluation of 
results has not been made public. 

The Houston-based Tenneco 
conglomerate has also suspended 
drilling on its K-l block, located 


150 utiles (240 kilometers) west of 
Abidjan. Two extremely deep dry 
boles were drilled on this acreage 
off the town of Fresco. 

Any hydrocarbon finds in this 
area would have rekindled interest 
in the practically unexplored west- 
ern portion of the continental shelf. 

The only positive news recently 
in exploration for the Ivorian au- 
thorities was an agreement signed 
last spring with a Canadian consor- 
tium headed by Albion Resources 
to review data on Blocks APB-2 
and APEr3, that were relinquished 
by Exxon. 

This group of companies h** the 
option to explore the two permits 
after nu pviuHng term* with the 
state oil concern, Petrod. 

In any case, ivory Coast is well 
on the way to being virtually self- 
sufficient m oil next year. Exxon's 
small Bttier field should produce 
around 8,000 hands a day and 
Phillips Espotr field could see its 
output top the 20,000 barrd-a-day 



Planners Seek 


Diversification 

Of Export Crops 


M 


Government Considers New Debt Rescheduling 


By Edward Fayah Komba 

ABIDJAN — In the first two 

following independence 
from France in 1960, Ivory Coast 
enjoyed one of the world’s highest 
rates of economic growth. 

The rapid expansion of produc- 
tion of the country’s mam exports 
—cocoa, coffee and tropical wood 
— combined with political stability 
and an openness to foreign capital, 
allowed the economy to grow at an 
average rate of 7 percent 

By the eod of the 1970s, the 
country had become the worid's 


By Richard Everett 


ABIDJAN — Ivory Coast must 
decide this month about how its 
debts are to be handled from now 
until the end of the decade. Previ- 
ous rescheduling agreements only 
cover debts falling dne before Jan. 
1,1986. 


seated a whole program, reschedul- 
ing pins fresh money.’’ He said the 
p rog ram would *Tet us free up fi- 
nancial resources for development 
and launch new economic growth.'’ 

Worid Bank officials have de- 
clined to discuss details of the pro- 
posal, but banking sources in Abi- 
djan said the plan would involve 


next few years, making to a marc 
manageable burden. The plan 
would allow Ivory Coast to lower 
its debt-service ratio to what one 
banker called “an acceptable 20 
perce n t," down from 45 percent in 
1983. 


“It’s an exciting, positive propos- 


again, such is the Soubrfc hydro- 
electric and an extension of 
Abidjan’s international airport 
The Ivorian government insists 
that despite ihe recent upswing, it 
will continue to fallow a policy of 
austerity - Mr. ServGnoleba said all 
new projects will be scrutinized to 
determine their revenne-generating 


leading producer of cocoa and was 
third in the pi 


i production of coffee. In 

addition. Agriculture Ministry offi- 
cials said that a number of modem 
industries had sprung up, some- 
what displacing wood exports as a 
source of revenue: 

The country’s cash crops provide 
about 75 percent of export earnings 
of which cocoa and coffee account 


Tile government » cohering »*£££ 

ta<STTLd«l<kM debt bordm over a 10-year period, 


a continuation of .Meriimiltanoen^ ipjeotogne. ^ 


A final agreement on j 
could also persuade 


pricing 
s to re- 
sys- 
tem on the Espoir field with a per- 
manent facility having greater 
capacity. 


year-by-year rescheduling or pay- 
ment of its 1986 debt with its own 


Abidjan Overflows 
As Migration Rises 


(Continued From Previous Page) 
dered liule of its lead since. Indus- 
try Minister Bernard Ehui estimat- 
ed that Abidjan alone possesses 72 
percent of Ivory Coast’s industrial 
tissue. The city has an even larger 
portion of its salaried jobs, due to 
the concentration of industry, ser- 
vices and government offices here. 

As a result of Abidjan’s econom- 
ic weight, it has long exerted a pull 
on youth from the countryside, 
where the vital food and cash crops 
responsible for Ivory Coast’s 
wealth are produced. Nearly 80 
percent of the country’s productive 
labor force is engaged in agricul- 
ture. but the government is fearful 
that it will be short of the workers 
needed to mniniain agriculture’s 

B lace in the economy if the rural 
ighi is not stemmed. 

In 1983, Abidjan was replaced as 
capital by Yamoussoukro, Presi- 
dent Felix HouphouSt-Boignys 
birthplace, situated 240 kilometers 
( 148 miles) to the northwest. A ma- 


jor justification for the transfer of 
the capital was to “decongest” Abi- 
djan. Almost three years later, it 
can be stated that the “transfer" of 
the capital to Yamoussoukro has 
had little effect on Abidjan’s popu- 
lation. Some suggest tins is due to 
the fact that ihe overwhelming bulk 
of government business and em- 
ployment remains in Abidjan. 

Residents note that the econom- 
ic recession of the early 1980s did 
little to slow the city's growth. In- 
stead, hard times have encouraged 
the creation of what are called ^pe- 
tit mitiers,” make-do professions 
that young and not-so-young Abid- 
janis have taken to in order to earn 
a living. These include windshield 
washing, shoe shining , oaf parking, 
laundering and many other occu- 
pations. Hard times have also 
dampened some of the ostentation 
for which the city became famous 
in the 1970s; Paris fashions and 
chauffeur-driven limousines have 
become rarer. 


resources. Interviews with Ivorian 
officials and bankers in Abidjan 
indicare that the government farois 
the fust proposal, a plan designed 
to reduce the short-term debt load 
while financing new growth with 

im wwrfl iil hanV capital 

Faced with Hang debt-service 
burdens in the early 1980s, Ivory 
Coast twice renegotiated its debts 
with the London Gob of commer- 
cial hanks and. the Paris Club of 
bilateral lenders, covering loans 
falling doe from 1983 to 1985. 

Ivoty Coast now stands at a 
crossroads to both debt servicing 
and new investment prospects. 
Bumper harvests this year of its 
major export crops and successful 
austerity measures have given the 
country the potential to pay its pro- 
jected $1. 2-billion 1986 debt 
wthout further rescheduling and 
have rekindled deaies to promote 
new investment, both os winch 
would have been unthinkable sev- 
eral years ago. However, bankers 
have urged caution in dvwang a 
realistic phm to ensure that the 
country’s gradual rccovny contin- 
ues. 

Minister of State Maurice Seri- 
Gnoleba, who has h«iril«H the ne- 
gotiations with the London and 
Paris dnbs, said Ivory Coast favors 
a tnuitia nniuil rescheduling pack- 
age. “We were looking to langer- 


in vestment capital drawn from 
commercial batiks and backed by 
World Bank guarantees. If the plan 


is approved, it would be the first of 
its kind in th 


the region. 

Co mme r cial and multilateral 
lenders in Abidjan seem favorable 
to the nudtiyear rescheduling, not- 
ing that it would attenuate the 
“ h ump ” of debt falling due in the 


somiug and costly process of coo- 
rbineri annnal reschedulings and 
would give it some breathing room 
to conadamcomegeneraling pro- 
jects after a virtual four-year freeze 
on new investment 


were “not serious. 

Bankers generally agree that if 
viable project s can be found, mon- 
ey win probably be provided, al- 
though an American banker said 
commercial lenders might want to 


Critics pcint out that some ques- 
tionable projects abandoned in the 
eariy 1980s are being discussed 


delay availability of funds for sev- 
eral years, and i 


even then make 
them available only as standby 
credits until a dearer picture of 
Ivory Coast's future emerges. 


tore Ministry has promoted exten- 
sive replanting and has diversified 
tire cash-crop economy — a move 
that has met with much success. 
Other crops such as sugar, cotton, 
robber, lumber, oil pahn and pine- 
apples continue to play a vital roie 
as small-scale cadi earners. 

The buoyancy of the cocoa and 
coffee industries, which were estab- 
lished in colonial days, has been 


attributed to Ihe government’s do . 
termination to make agriculture the - 
pivot of the nation's economy. U ’ 
has encouraged small-scale plant- . 
ers by creating incentives for them 
to produce more and sell to 
CSSPPA. the stale-run fund for the- . 
sta biliza tion and import of agri- 
cultural prices, which controls the. 

price, quality and export of agricul- . 
coral products. 

Ivory Coast is not solely depen- 
dent on cocoa and coffee. Huge 
investment has been made in sugar 
production with a projected target 
of 600.000 tons tins year. Earlier 
promotional efforts were marred 
by mismanagement and the fall in 
the price of sugar. 

The World Bank and the'; 
France’s Central Bank for Eco- 
nomic Cooperation have contribut- 
ed extensively to tire rehabilitation 
of the sugar complexes in a bid to 
boost production. Two of tire six 
initial complexes were out of pro- 
duction last year and were conse- 
quently converted to cotton pro- 
duction centers. 

However, with the current reor- 


£- 


Magadan of the industry, produc- 
tion is estimated to reach 200,000 


Crisis Bringing Realism to Economic Planning 


(Condoned From Prorioas Page) 
to a rntniirmm, while investing 
beav3y to boost production of such 
cash crops as robber, pahn oil and 
cotton, wftkdi can be produced lo- 
cally with great efficiency, reducing 
dependence on coffee and cocoa. ' 

Results have been most impres- 
sive in rice caltivation. With sharp- 
ly increased local production, ex- 
pensive imports have been reduced 
from several hundred thousand 
tons three years ago to approxi- 
mately 60,000 tons m 1985. 

Ivory Coast has been successful 

in enlisting the harfcing of the 

Wodd Bam: and development fi- 
nancing agencies, such as the 
French Caisse Centrale de Cooper- 
ation EcooomkjQe, Britain’s Com- 


monwealth Development Corpora- 
tion. the European Development 
Fund and others, to major pro- 
testing solutions to our debt prob- jects aimed at dramatically ex- 
teros^lre said. “We dec id ed to take panding production- of palm oil 
into account all our needs to the and rubber production. These two 
next five-year period, so we pro- crops are expected tejoin tire ranks 


■of the country’s two top cash crops 
asms or sources of export revenues 

in tire 1990s. 

Meanwhile, a major drive is un- 
der way to ensure continued high- 
vohnne coffee and oocoa produc- 
tion well into the next century. On 
the heels of the best cocoa crop ever 
(552,000 Loos), and a good coffee 
crop (300,000 tons) as wdl, the gov- 
ernment is urging peasant farmers 
to prune and reptent old underpro- 
ductive pilots of both aop6. 

So far tins decade, 45,000 hect- 
ares (111,504 acres) of cocoa, plan- 
tations have bem pruned. Over the 
nwt 15 years, tire gov ernment is 
planning to spend about $50 mil- 
lion to prune and replant about 
463,000 hectares of coffee planta- 
tions in a Ind to improve quality 
and ensure adequate production 
levels to the foreseeable future. 

Ivory Coast’s industrial {dans are 
und erg oing a nmflar transforma- 
tion- Along with the large-scale as- 
sistance of the World Bank, there is 


the insistence that the government 
gradually witiidraw from tire indus- 
trial sector and lift protective tar- 
iffs aimed at sheltering inefficient 
local producers from foreign com- 
petition. 

While Ivory Coast enjoyed the 


ivory 

reputation of ah “economic mrr- 
acae” dazing the 1960s and. 1970s, it 
was criticized by many as being a 
country of “growth without devel- 
opment-" It was labeled by some as 
bong economically “extroverted,” 
an export-oriented country depen- 
dent an both foreign capital and 


mriwTMfc tn maintain jmvhiniiwi 
The World Bank prides now 


being pot into place will, if success- 
ful, alter Ivory Coasfs foreign de- 
pendence. The bank’s economists 
say that Ivorian indnstryhas been 
all but export -oriented and must 
now learn to sink or swim on tire 
baas of its competitiveness in re- 
gional, export market?. 

At the same time* the Wcdd 
Bank is urging lest dependence on 


foreign widratrial inputs and an 
end to the strategy of creating mt- 
port-substitnting farinatriw*, which 
Lave largely proved incapable of 
surviving without protection. 

The key to the success of this 
strategy will bie the government's 
ability to mobilize national savings 
mui investment by individuals and 
tire creation of an e ntr e pren eurial 
class from a population that has 
historically known two occupa- 
tions: agriculture and the crtU ser- 
vice. 

One diplomat said that if the 
current Ivorian experiment goes 
well, “the result win be a more self- 
sufficient economy in the 21st cenr 
tmy; an economy that provides 
most of its own food and energy 
needs, manufactures the bask in- 
dustrial goods consumed and fi- 
nances through agricultural and in- 
dustrial exports the imports of 
those goods and services that can- 
not be efficiently produced at 
home:” 


tons next year to cater to local 
consumption and to export on a 
small scale to tire European Com- 
munity. 

According to Agriculture Minis- , 
uy officials, the world recession 
dealt a heavy blow io the country’s 
third export industry. Lumber, by 
reducing the demand for Ivorian 
wood and by cutting its price. Only 
4.S million hectares (11 million 
acres) of timber is exploitable to- 
day dne to a drastic redaction of 
the original 16.5 milli on hectares., 
because of deforestation. 

Efforts by the Canadian govern- 
ment and tire World Bank to ok 
courage replanting and reforesta- - 
turn are expected to yield good 
results, and production levels for 
lumber arc expected to reach two 
mill in n tODS by 1990. 

Following declining world 
prices, severe drought and bush 
fires that brought a sharp fall in 
production dntmg the 1983-84 sea- 
son, the government intensified its ' 
efforts to promote cocoa and coffee 
production on a massive scale in 
the central southwest regions as 
wdl as in tire entire forest zone. 

This, coupled with the efficiency, 
of the state-owned company. SAT- 
MAQ, in modernizing production, 
sharply increased production in (he 
1984-85 season to 552,0p0 tons for 
coooa and 300JXX) tons for coffee, * 
against 457,000 urns and 85.000 1 
tons respectively the previous year. 



SOCIETE DE DISTRIBUTION D’EAU 
DE LA COTE D’IVOIRE 
Tel.: 32.04.33 - Tfttox 23 395 Amural 01 BP. 1843 ABIDJAN 01 
Avtnue Christian! - Treich ville. 


SODEC! 


The Chinese proverb "it is better to 
teach your friend how to fish rather 
than to give him fish” is the new line 
of approach in village waterworks. 
We are aware that the own resources 
of a group, a village community are 
the most effective when it comes to 
improving the standard of living of 
that community- These resources are 
numerous: water, land, vegetation, 
livestock, labour, the know-how of 
the inhabitants, monetary resources. 
These latter are much more important 
in the success of a village action plan 
than money which comes from out- 
side. Such money however, if it is 
used to complement the village com- 
munity's own resources, is nonethe- 
less very welcome. 

In the peasant’s way of thinking a 
"thing" only belongs to them rf they 
have invested their intelligence ana 
their work in that "thing." Everything 
which they receive along the way, 
either from an official or from an 
expert unknown among them, does 


not belong to them but rather to the 
donor. 

As far as village water supplies are 
concerned, this awareness will be put 
into effect by the local population 
taking over and adapting the installa- 
tion by establishing a management 
structure locally. Thus, in each village 
equipped with a pump or which is 
being so equipped, a com m ittee will 
be set up to manage the operation. 
This committee will consist of a 
Chairman (optional), a treasurer (ob- 
ligatory) two members responsible 
for repairs (obligatory). 



Mr. Zadi. Chairman and 
Managing Director. SODEC I 


At the same time, a training prog- 


Viliage Water Supplies 


During this year, we will install a 
wells maintenance team in each sub- 
region the aims of which will be: 

- better coordination with the local 
authorities, 

- closer relations with the villages, 

- making our teams more respon- 
sible. 


mg | 

ramme will be launched for those in 
the villages who are responsible for 
the wells in order that these villages 
can take over maintenance of their in- 
stallations in the true sense. 

From a total of 1 0329 wells in opera- 
tion in 1 983, we have increased to 
1 1 ,51 6 wells at the end of 1 984 sup- 
plying 7,91 7 villages. 

The maintenance of these installa- 
tions is carried out by 39 teams based 
in 28 main locations in sub-areas. 



Maintenance System 


Current 


Breakdown information 
Payment of invoice 


VILLAGE U- Invoice issued -4 SODECI 


Preventive circuit 

Repairs of all breakdowns 


New 


Information of serious breakdown 
Purchase of small individual spares 


Mamtenance 
and repair 
ol minor 
breakdowns 



VILLAGE kJ^d^i^S 0 DECI 


Sale of Individual spares 
Major repairs 



i SETU SOCIETE D’EQUIPMENT DES 
» H TERRAINS URBAINS 


Tel:322432 


PUBLIC INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL CORPORATION WITH A CAPITAL OF 200,000.000 F CFA 
ESTABUSHED.ON APPLICATION OF THE LAW NO.80 OF 13 SEPTEMBER 1980 


IN THE SERVICE OF URBAN DEVELOPMENT 


In Abidjan, SETU develops approximately 800 hectares every yean 

- 600 residential plots. 

- 1600 developing plota 

- 2000 business plots and land intended for public. and private 
development of a commercial, trade and industrial nature.-. - 


SETU Dkewiee carries out a work programme for the sanitation and 
drainage of Abidjan which is financed by the National Sanitation 
Fund. - \ - • 

Apart from these activities, SETU Is also involved in towns in the 
interior bot h in development and sanitation- ABOtSSO- AYAME- 
AGBOVKLE-DIMBOKRO-DALQA- KORHOGO- VAVOUA. 


Abidjan: 


1963: 260,000 Inhabitants 
I960: 600.000 Inhabitants 
1965: 1,000,000 Inhabitants 
1982: 2^)00,000 Inhabitants 


Pursuing an economic and social development policy means that 
existing structures have to be adapted from year to year and 
suitatee new instruments established In order to achieve the goals 
which have been set 


Since 1972 the afro of SETU has been to provide the urban popula- 
tions with pleasant invironmerrts as a result of the development of 
urban space. 

It is one of the means employed by the State, whose Intervention fe 
contributing to achieving the policy defined by the Party end the 
Govemmentaimed atthe development of urban areas- 



M.Manbe Robert 
Dlr6ctnurG6n6ralSEW 



-SETU Head Office 


i 


*'» „ 


U- 


li- 


fe 



SOCIETE IVOIRIENNE DE RAFFINAGE-rS -Ml. (Ivory Coast Ref ining Company) 

Main industrial enterprise in the Ivory Coast 


SJ.R: LARGEST PRODUCER OF ENERGY IN THE IVORY COAST 

- It supplies distribution companies with quality products necessary for the Ivory 
Coast trade and likewise for export 

- ItsuppliesBURKlNA-FASO and the east of MALI 


S.I.R;THE BACKBONE OFTHE NATIONAL ECONOMY 


ITS PRODUCTS: butane-regular petrol -superpetrol -refined oar-aircraft 
fuel -gas-oil -diesel oil-fuel oil 180 and fueloil 380. 


SJ.R: TECHNICALLY ADVANCED 

HVOsincethe installation of the gas turbfnesoftheEECl. , ..m. . 

Limited Company with a capital of 1 3 thousand million CFA francs.Head Office and factory: route deVridi-; Abidjan - 

Telephone:36.91-9936.90-77 BoftePostate 1269 ABIDJAN Telegram; PETROSIR Abidjan telex; 74&Pfci ft OS1R Abidjan 


W 




■wr 










Page 13 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7-«, 1985 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON IVORY COAST 


Confidence of Investors Returns With Debt Rescheduling 



- - 


£ ■ President Ffefix Hoophou£t-Boigny 

Succession Fears Allayed 






' 'C; 




• r 


i. (Continued From PI age 11) 
-ikewise, the countxy’a political 
^ axons, who are kto&ime asso- 
ciates of the president, and the ih- 
^iuential younger members of gov- 
ernment have typically run 
nopposed for the assembly sea: or 
c^ae mayor’s office in their town or 
district. 

si;. In the months preceding the 
ic * M 6 t recent party congress, it was 
or-umored that Mr. Hoaphoofit- 
T-<oigny intended to organize a run 1 
ff among several vice presidential 
-candidates” that the winner. 
> jould then be elected alongside the 
:• president It was signed that this 
Arrangement would conform to the 
^■'resident's expressed wish to “as- 
. ^oriale the people” in the choice of 
Ais successor. 

-A' Picking a successor is now likely 
Aj be made by aae of two bodies: 
J/lieN ational Assemblyor thePolit- 
,.:al Bureau of the PDCL Sometime 
T his month, the National Assembly 
dect a new president who will, 
, 7*1 the view of most analysts, have a 
^ reat advantage in the presidential 
■ 'weepstakes. 

y As interim head of state and 
Ve&klcnt of the sde political party, 
he president of the National As- 
sembly would be a hard candidate 
-o defeat Nevertheless, in explain- . 
-ag the new constitutional arrange- 

- icnts to foreign journalists, Mr. 
louphooSt-BoigDy gave the exaxn- 

- of the former president of the 

- French Senate, Alain Poher, who 
; tiled in his bid for the presidency 

■ - ^espile having the advantage of be- 
-ig interim head of state after tire 
~:eath of President Georges Pompi- 
:.rou in 1974. 



Grfegoire Yacfe 


If, as many expect, the assem- 
bly’s president is challenged for the 
party’s endorsement of a presiden- 
tial candidate, the PoKtical Bureau, 
whose membership was increased 
from 32 to 60 at the recent con- 
gress, will be called upon to select a 
candidate. 

Given the new importance ac- 
corded to these two institutions, 
they became the theaters of intense 
campaigning and coalition build- 
ing immediately after the congress. 
Henri Konan.Bedife, the current 
National Assembly president, and 
PhiHipe Grfcgoire Yacfe, that body’s 
leader from 1960 to 1980, are wide- 
ly seen as front-runners. 

—HOWARD FRENCH 


By Peter Blackburn 

ABIDJAN— Bteaewed braiding 
on . half-finished sites around Abi- 
dj an is one pointer to a recovery of 
investor confidence after several 
years Of uncertainty and economic 
recession. 

Good reins, resulting in excellent 
food and cash crops, have com- 
bined with a successful reschedul- 
ing of official medium-term exter- 
nal debt to improve liquidity and 
provide funds for housing. 

Political stability continues. 
President Ffelix Houpbonfci- 
Btagny, 80, was recently re-elected 
at the age of 80 for a sixth five-year 
term of office. The presidential, 
• legislative and municipal ejections 
raised scarcely a ripple of rarest. 

. Tim potentially divisive succes- 
sion tens has again been shelved 

and a new mechanism approved for 
jHckmgasuccessor— at the appro- 
priate time. 

The country’s continued cook 
ntitment to liberal economic poli- 
cies and its welcome to foreign pri- 
vate capital was.confinned at the 
recent congress of the sole political 
party, the Parti Dfemocrasqoe de 
C 6 te dTvoire (PDCI). 

Despire five difficult years, lhe 
Ivory Coast has managed to keep 

itS B ft d ltlH i»» i<mnni ft»itjnng and 

industrial infrastructure intact 
“The phone waits; the power flows 
and there are no fuel shortages,’* 
one Western executive marveled. 

An increasing number of West- 
ern and Japanese irnitttnatiflnnfc 
haw chosen Abidjan as an efficient 
and comfortable base for operating 
in West Africa. They include 
banks, accountancy firms, insur- 
ance Co mp a ni es, crwwailtmita. ofl 
and chemical companies. 

Doe to colonial ties and Mr. 
HouphonSt-Bcngny’s policy of con- 
tinued close cooperation with 
France after independence in I960, 
the French are by far the most 
i mpor tant foreign investors in the 
Ivorian economy. However, the 




French than: of total investment 
has fallen to just under 20 percent 
in 1983 from nearly 40 percent in 
1974, according to government sta- 
tistics. 

The decline is mainly the result 
at an increase is Ivorian invest- 
ment, which has grown to 663 per- 
cent from 35.8 percent over die 
same period. Although the value of 
French capital investment more 
than doubled to $267 milli on be- 
tween 1974 and 1983, the growth in 
Ivorian investment was much 
r cater. About two-thirds . of 
'reach investment is concentrated 
in industry and commerce, al- 
though the French presence is 
greatest in construction and public 
works and the modern agricultural 
sectors; where it provides some 
two- thirds of added value. 

' The overall share of foreign in- 
vestment in the Ivorian economy 
has fallen to 33.6 percent from 64.2 
percent between 1974 and 1983. 
American equity investment to- 
taled S36 million, or 2.6 percent, 
and is the second most important 
foreign participation. However, 
American fixed assets, mainly in 
the oil industry, are estimated at 
$437 million and are nearly as im- 
portant as the French. 

Lebanese equity investment is 
officially pot at only S21 mQHoa 
but is widely believed to be consid- 
erably higher. There are an estimat- 
ed 100,000 Lebanese in the Ivory 
Coast, more than doable the num- 
ber of French. Initially, their activi- 
ties were concentrated in com- 
merce, although recently they have 
become increasingly active in in- 
dustry. 

Sgjjns of an improvement in non- 
mi investment, which started to 
emerge in 1984, are expected to 
increase this year, according to 
economists and bankers. 

Total non-oil investment rose 2 
percent to S3 14.5 million, accord- 
ing to a provisional sample of Ivor- 
ian industry by the government’s 
financial Data Bank. However, if 


CONTRIBUTORS 

PETER BLACKBURN is an Abidjan-based journalist who con- 
tributes regnlariy to the Africa Economic Digest 

RICHARD EVERETT, an Abidjan-based journalist, contributes to 
the Associated Press, The Times of London and the Voice of America. 

HOWARD FRENCH, a journalist based in Abidjan, is a regular 
contributor to The Economist and The Washington Post 

EDWARD FAY AH KOMBA is a freelance journalist based in 
Abidjan. 

HOWARD SCfflSSEL is a Paris-based journalist who speriafixes 
in French-speaking Africa and the Maghreb- 


IDES 


V“;_ • % 



ASACI 

Association des Societes 
d’ Assurance operant en 
Cote d’Ivoire 


ABEILLEPAIX- Director Mr. Bernard AUSSET -01 BP 1601 
ABIDJAN01-TO.32 15. 07 Tfeiex 2792 

ALLIANCE - Reprfesentant SOGERCO/SAFRACI - Directeur Mr. 
Emile JACOLHN-01 BP 1539 ABIDJAN 01 TM. 32 68. 01 / 32 77. 00- 
TOex 22,414 ■ 

AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL ASSURANCES CoLM- 

Directeur Mr. Michel OUV1E-08 BP 873 ABIDJAN 06-Tfel; 32.87.25/ 

32.87.59-Tfelex22.391 

AMERICAN UFE (AUCO) - Directeur Mr. BROWN 01 BP 5173 
ABIDJAN 01 -m 32. 30. 91 

ASSURANCES GENERALES DE COTE DWOlRESifefle Social 
Immeuble AGCI- Directeur Mr. Antoine LEMESLE- 01 BP 4092 
ABIDJAN 01 -Tfei. 32 99. 32/ 33. 11. 31 -Tfeiex 22502 

ASSURANCES GENERALES DE FRANCE VIE - Reprfesentant Stfe 
MassleyeetJ. Ferres -Directeur Mr. Gilbert HIS 01 BP 62 ABIDJAN 
01-T61. 32. 10.52/32. 10. 53 Tfeiex 3231 

BALOISE- Reprtsentant SOGERCO/SAFRACi -Directeur Mr. Emile 
JACQUIN-01 BP 1539 ABIDJAN 01 -m 32. 66. 01 32. 77. 00 -T6I0X 
22414 

CALEDONIAN - Reprfeseniant SOGERCO/SAFRACI Directeur Mr. 
Emile JACQUIN- BP 1538 ABIDJAN 01 T61. 3268.01 / 32 77. 00- 
Tfeiex 22.414 

- COUNA- President Directeur GfenferaJ Mr. Yohannes KAYPAGHIAN 
01 BP 3832 ABIDJAN 01 -T61. 3225.99 

Cie AFRICA! NE D’ ASSURANCE (CAA.)- Reprfeseniant Stfe 
Massieye et J. Ferras-01 BP 62 ABIDJAN 01 -Directeur Mr. Gilbert 
t HJS-Tfei. 32 10- 52/32 10. 53-T6lex 3231 

.’ Cie D’ASSURANCES MAR/TIMES, AERIENNES ETTERRESTRES 
• (CAMAT.J - Reprfeseniant A.C.C.I. -Dl recteur Mr. DE 
* " BOURNONV1LLE-01 BP 1554 ABIDJAN 01 - Tfei. 32 86. 57 Tfeiex 3503 


Cie EUROPEENNE □‘ASSURANCES DE MARCH ANDtSES & 

•* BAGAGES- Reprfesentant SOGERCO/SAFRACI - Directeur Mr. 
EmHe JACQUIN 01 BP 1539 ABIDJAN 01 -Tfei. 32 68. 01 / 32 77. 00- 
Tfelex 22414 

Cie NATK5NALE D'ASSURANCES- Sifege Social Im. CNA 
. v(SYMPH0NIE)P.D.G. Mr. AMONLfeon- Directeur Mr. Richard 
COUUBALY01 BP 1333 ABIDJAN 01 -TO. 32. 49. 19-TOex 2178 

• EAGLE STAR VIE- Sifege Social Residence “le JECEDA " Av. 

Terrasson de Foogferes Abidjan - Mandataire Gfenferal Mr. Claude 
' FAVREAU-01BPV325AB1DJAN01-T6I.3269.75/ 

3269.82 

GAN-VIE- Reprfeseniant SOGERCO/SAFRACI DirecteurMr. Emile 
JACQUIN-01 BP 1539 ABIDJAN 01 T61. 3268.01/3277. 00-T6lex 
22.414 

GUARDIAN ROYAL EXCHANGE ASSURANCE LIMITED 
ieprfesentaritA.C.C.1.- Directeur Mr. DE BOURNONVILLEQ1 BP 
1554 ABIDJAN 01 -Tfei. 32 86. 57-Tfelex 3503 

JBONOSUISSE- Directeur Mr. HARTEMANN- 04 BP 31 ABIDJAN 
J4Tfel.33.19.76/32.80.57 

JCENCES and GENERAL INSURANCE-Reprfesentant 
SOGERCO/SAFRACI Directeur Mr. Emile JACQUIN-01 BP 1539 
ABIDJAN 01 Tfel. 32 68. 01 / 32 77, 00-Tfiiex 22.414 

4UTUELLE AGRICOLE DE COTE D’IVOIRE Sifege .Social 15Av. 
taeph ANQMA- President Mr. BRA KANON - Directeur 
4r. Philippe GBETlBOUO-01 BP 1841 ABIDJAN 01 TO. 33. 20.24- 
'6iex 3774 


. 


Mr. Kon6 Vakaba President de V. Association 

MUTUELLE CENTRALE D'ASSURANCES DE COTE D'IVOIRE 
DirecteurMr. PhiltippeGBETIBOUO-QI BP 1841 ABIDJAN 01 TO. 
2272 64/ 33. 27. 20-Tfelex 23.774 

MUTUELLE D'ASSURANCES DES TRANSPORTS (MAT.) Directeur 
Mr. KONE Vakaba -01 BP 1217 ABIDJAN 01 - TO. 32 97. 83- 
T6tax2670 

MUTUELLE GENERALEFRANCA1SE ACCIDENTS- Reprfesentant 
AC. CXI. (F. el J.)- Directeur Mr. DE BOUBNONVJLLE-OI BP 1554 
ABIDJAN 01 -TO. 32 88. 57 -Tfeiex 3503 

MUTUELLE DU MANS- Reprfesentant A.C.C.I. (F.etJ.} Directeur 
Mr. Jean Louis HOTTEVART- 01 BP 3803 ABIDJAN 01 T61, 32 23.26 - 
Tfeiex 23.196 

NORTHERN INSURANCE Co Ltd- Reprfesentant SOGERCO/ 
SAFRACI - Directeur Mr. Emile JACQUIN-01 BP 1539AB1DJ.01 
T61. 32 68. 01 / 32 77. 00 -Tfeiex 22414 

PA7ERNEUJE (ACS*) - Reprfesentant SOGERCO/SAFRACI Directeur 
Mr. Emile JACQUIN-01 BP 1539 ABIDJAN 01- 
T61. 32 6a 01/ 32 77. 00 -Tfeiex 22.414 

PRESERVATRICEFONCIERE- Reprfesentant O.C.I.C A Directeur 
Mr. R. DUVERT-01 BP 3949 ABIDJAN OTTfel. 32 65. 59- Tfeiex 3803 


RELIANCE MARINE Co Ltd -ReprfesefrtanlSAFARRJV-Directeur 
Mr. Patrick MANTOUX-01 BP 1741 ABIDJAN 01Tfel.3291.57- 
T6lex2159 

RHONE MEDITERRANEE - Reprfesentant Mr. Jean Jacques 
VILANOVA-01 BP 21 13 ABIDJAN 01 Tfei. 32 12 52 / 32 39. 65- 
Tfelex 23550 

SECURITE iVCHRIENNE- Sifege Social “La Pyramids' ‘ President 
Mr. DIA HOUPHOUET BOiGNY - Directeur Mr. JeaivBapttete BABO- 
01 BP 569 ABIDJAN 01 TO. 32 81. 36/33. 14.99-TOex38T7 

SAINT PAUL FIRE and MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY Prfesldent 
Directeur GfenferaJ Mr. Yohannes KAYPAGHIAN 01 BP 3367 ABIDJAN 
01 -TO. 32 20. 74-Tfelex 23.570 

SOCIETE AFR1CAINE D'ASSURANCES ET DE REASSURANCES 
IVOIRIENNE (SAFARRIV) - Prfesidenl Mr. Tlfemako COUUBALY 
Directeur Mr. Patrick MANTOUX-01 BP 1741 ABIDJAN 01 
TO.3291.57-TOex2159 

SOCIETE IVOiRIENNE D'ASSURANCES MUTUELLES (Si DAM) Sifege 
Social 15 Av. Joseph AN DMA President Mr. Abou DOUMBIA- 
Dlrecteur Mr. KONE Vakaba 01 BP 1217 ABIDJAN W-TO.32. 97.82- 
TOex2670 

SOCIETE NOUVELLE D'ASSURANCES EN COTE D’IVOIRE (SNACf) 
President Mr. Dlagou- Directeur Mr. AhuiatteOI BP 1014 ABIDJAN 
01-TO. 32 ia 1 1 -TOex 2225 

SOCIETE TROPIC ALE D'ASSURANCES MUTUELLES-VIE 
(STAMVIE) - Sifege Social 15 Av. Joseph A NOMA -Prfesldent Mr. J.B. 
AMETHIER-Di recteur Mr. Albert AFFOUE FAUSTE-01 BP 1337 
ABIDJAN 01 TO. 32 20. 24-Tfelex 3774 

UNION AFRICAINEt Directeur Mr. Jean Kacou DIAGOU 01 BP378 
A&DJAN01 - TO. 32 73. 81 - TOex 23.568 

UNION DES ASSURANCES DE PARIS-VIE (U A P-Vie) Directeur 
Mr. Christian FAUCON - 01 BP 2016 ABIDJAN 01 Tfei. 32 77. 46- 
T6lex3568 

ZURICH ASSURANCES- DirecteurMr. Jean FrancoisTiCHIT 01 BP 
3825 ABIDJAN 01 -TO. 32 7& 63 


the oil sector is included, then over- 
all invesuuait fell by 24 percent, to 
{337 million. The overall sample 
was based on 867 companies repre- 
senting 75 percent of the total add- 
ed value of the Ivorian economy. 


value, was more buoyant, rising 3 
percent to 5217 million. 

The director of Chase Manhat- 
tan Bank in Abidjan, Eshagh 
Shaoul, said: “There is a noticeable 
increase in investment by small 


Despite five difficult years, 

Ivory Coast has managed to 

keep its exceDent comimmicalions and 

industrial infrastructure intact 


Oil investment, based on a sam- 
ple of nine companies representing 
SO percent of the sector’s added 
value, fell 83 percent to $214 mo- 
tion and reflected a sharp down- 
turn in offshore olI exploration. 
Offshore drilling came to a halt in 
mid- 1985 and tittle new develop- 
ment has been budgeted. 

Industrial investment, based on 
the returns of 216 firms accounting 
for 80 percent of the sector’s added 


businesses, mainly fra the replace- 
ment of manufacturing equip- 
ment." 

The textiles industry has been 
one of the quickest to recover. 
Uniwax, owned by the Anglo- 
Dutch Unilever Group, doomed 
net profit to $4 millio n and in- 
creased turnover by a third to S32^ 
minion in fiscal 1985. 

Three years ago Uniwax, which 
manufactures real wax prints es- 
sentially for the local market, in- 


vested S5 million in raising capaci- 
ty by nearly 50 percent. As 
domestic demand recovers, it hopes 
soon to fully utilize this capacity. 

The agro-industry, especially 
coffee processing, along with tuna 
eanninfi confectionety and cos- 
metics, weathered the recession rel- 
atively unscathed. But other indus- 
tries such as construction 
materials, electro-mechanical, 
timber processing and drinks were 
sorely affected. Overall investment 
in manufacturing turned from 20 
percent growth in 1980-81 to mar- 
ginally negative in 1982-83. 

However the trend is now revers- 
ing as the government, the main 

engine of economic development, 
stans to increase public investment 
following improved revenue in- 
flows. After slashing the invest- 
ment budget by nearly two-thirds 
to $185 million in 1985 it is expect- 
ed to increase the budget by about 
one-third next year. Investment 
priorities are likely to remain rural 
development, transport infrastruc- 
ture and low-cost bousing. 


The Ivory Coast, with its liberal 
economic policies and encourage- 
ment of the private sector, has long 
been regarded by the World Bank 
as one of its model Black African 
countries and a major beneficiary 
of its aid. A third structural adjust- 
ment loon is currently being negoti- 
ated, which will continue efforts to 
improve economic efficiency. 

Important industrial reforms 
have already been introduced, 
aimed at making local industry 
more competitive. These include a 
new import regime, export incen- 
tives anJ a new investment code. 

The new investment code was 
approval before independence in 
1959 and was felt to be outdated. It 
was oriented mainly toward at- 
tracting large-scale foreign invest- 
ment and provided few incentives 
for the creation of small, locally 
owned businesses. Although it is 
still too early for ibe new code to 
have had much impact, govern- 
ment planners are optimistic that it 
will help accelerate economic re- 
covery. 





Evolution du nombre d’abonnes: 

En Kf K2; 322.000 

En prevision pour 86 : 4- dc 350.000 

Evolution de la longueur du rfeseau: 

En 81/82: 15.500 km En 83/84: 16.400 km 

EnergieBedrique 
deks Cote d'Ivoire 

01 BP 1345 Abidjan 01 


L’OFFICE NATIONAL DES POSTES (O.N.P) 


The Office National des Posies (O.N.P) was 
established by decree No.84-772 of 13 June 1984 on 
application of the law No. 801070 of 23 September 
1980 setting down the general rules relating to national 
public corporations (ENP) and concerning the 
creation of categories of public corporations. 

Resulting from the amalgamation of the ex-Office des 
Posies et Telecommunications (OPT) and the 
ex-Caisse National d’Epargne (CNE), both public 
corporations of a commercial, industrial nature, it 
brings together the functions and duties of the former 
Directorate General of the Post office and the former 
Directorate General of the Caisse National d’Epargne 
(National Savings Fund). 

It constitutes a public 
corporation of an indus- 
trial, commercial nature 
(Etablissement Public a 
Caractere Industrie! et 
Commercial (EPIC) and 
is a corporate body with 
financial autonomy. 

It is under the adminis- 
trative and technical gui- 
dance of the Ministry for 
Public Works, Construc- 
tion and Posts and Tele- 
communications and the 
economic and financial 
guidance of the Ministry 
for Economy and Finance. 

This administrative and technical guidance has influ- 
ence in the following spheres: 

- General organisation of the office, 

- Creation,- classification and abolition of postal 
structures, 

- Approval of issue programmes for postage stamps, 

- Firing , by joint decision with the Ministry for 
Economy and Finance and the Ministry for Trade, 
die postal tariffs proposed by the Director of the 
Office, 

- Nomination of the Director of the Office by a 
decree by the Council of Ministries on the joint 
proposal of the Ministries which are members of the 
Consultative Management Commission. 

The activities of the Office listed below are subject 10 
the prim: authorisation of the Consultative Manage- 
ment Commission: 

- Annual .and several year activity programmes, 

- Tariff adjustments, 

; to the interest rates given to sav- 

lers. 



Organisation 

The Office National des Postes consists of four depart- 
ments and three autonomous divisions at central level 
and nine (9) regional delegations all attached to the 
Director of the corporation at regional level. 

The Director of the Office has the rank of Director of 
Central Administration. He is the director of the cor- 
poration. 

The Office has an accountant and a budget supervisor 
appointed by decisions from the Ministry for 
Economy and Finance. 

Aims 

The Office National des Postes is responsible for: 

- The establishment and operation of the national 
postal service within the framework of the activity 
of the State monopoly, 

- The application, legislation and regulation, in par- 
ticular relating to agreements, conventions and in- 
ternational instruments, within the framework of its 
powers, 

- The operation of finan cial postal services and, in 
particular, settlements of values, bills or postal 
transfers, 

- The promotion of public saving by opening and en- 
suring the management of savings accounts at sight. 


M.DkrrmHa 
Directeur General of ( 


SOME STATISTICS 

Employees : 3,000 of which 2,000 are shareholders 

Budget : 14 thousand million F/CFA 

Mass wage distribution : 3.8 thousand million F/CFA 


Movements in Financial Services 

Orders issued (aE forms): 1.065 thousand million 
Sum 

Orders paid (all forms) 

Sum 

Post Office cheque 
accounts 
Value 

Savings accounts 
Value 


59.3 thousand million F/CFA 
670 thousand 

42.5 thousand million F/CFA 
20,025 

19.032 thousand million F/CFA 
210,689 

5-9 thousand million F/CFA 


Postal Movements 


Items received 
Items dispatched 
Total post handled 


40.7 million 
24.3 million 
65 million items 


Vehicles Available : 250 vehicles 


; J 







Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERAIJI TRIBUNE, SATURDAT-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7-*, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Htptt Low Loaf Ohs. 


Borneo 

DortaCp 

lam El 

Texaco 

AmE*P 

IBM 

TWA 

AT&T 

Soars 

Antetn* 

OeefPet 

BtackD 

TexOGa 

BaxtTr 

FedNM 


MU 44*11 
28 271* 

21* 20* 
32V* 30% 
SO 49* 
141 <6 140% 
iff* in* 
24 23* 

3 8% 37* 
38* an* 
344* 34* 
Iff* 18* 
15% 15V* 
15** 15* 
23* 23 


46 + % 

2746 — * 

20* -4* 

3116 — * 
4946 — * 
1414* +4* 
1C* —46 
24 + 4* 

384* +1 
38% +146 
3446 

19 -4* 

15*6 —4* 
151* 

234* —4* 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bondi 

Utilities 

industrials 


don art* 

8149 +009 

7U1 — 026 

83.17 4-0.10 


Dow Jones Averages 


Indus 1476J2 1«U0 1444JP U77.J8- SJS 
Tran* W9J9 7DU9 48032 67329— 10J4 
™ 16542 lSS 16434 USJ7- on 
Como 593.19 59755 587.15 Sns 6— M7 


NYSE Index 


fii (M> 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


ameX Most Actives 


vat. him low Lmt cm. 


NYSE Diaries 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unction oed 
Total Issues 
New High! 
New Lows 
Volume up 
Volume down 


508 878 

1131 791 

411 417 

3950 3018 

69 246 

15 W 


31,390760 

70090960 


HUM Lew OOM arte 
Contralto 117.18 116)8 11099 —058 

industrials 134JI 13421 13426—063 

Tmnsp. 111.97 11137 111.52 — U9 

Ullirties 6019 SOM 6019—012 

Finance 13147 12626 12006 — L29 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


Bor Aries ■SMt 

Dec. 5 2694109 454481 0977 

Dec. 4 T900K 55&069 2247 

Dec. 3 161429 507.971 171) 

Dec. 2 MUB 499415 UM 

Nov. 29 14WM 393,973 U77 

-Included In the sales ftoures 


MM® 


ClOgHlg 


Advanced 
Declined . 
Unctwnped 
Tefal issues 
New Htafts 
New Lows 

volume up 
V olume down 


216 275 

350 301 

256 274 

822 852 

17 40 

9 8 


Comnesita 

Industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

Tramp. 


Was* 
, Orta Abo 
} —1,60 113*5 
1—010 316% 
1-126 41169 
) — l JB 37052 
» -048 2*041 
Z — 061 23226 
3—2J6 781-33 


Voi.af4P.M~_ 

PIW.4PM.V0L. 


13S5WM.! 

uwun' 


IrioGb 

DomeP 

FCadHd 

BAT In 

HmeGn 

WktartPt 

AMlntt 

GrtLkC 

PetLw 

OataPd 

AEx»wt 

TvtAir 

TIE 

HouOT 

Ultmta 


=38 S 

3293 64* 

3100 4V* 

1*33 £ 
1516 » 
1336 B* 

V& Ik 

995 16* 
960 5* 
» «* 
860 BL 


S* 41* + 66 

ah 2* 

$ a + * 

IS* ISS -2 

H* 5V. 

38 38 

24* 24* 

1646 154* — V* 

441* 44* —146 

15V* 16 — % 

St* 54* —I* 

3% 4*. + V. 

194* an* - % 


Tables IndodC tt» nationwide prices 
up to fee ciosiDS on Wall Street awl 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Standard & Poors Index 


Hie* Low dm arte 
Industrials 2MJ3 2 gd MB -ftg 

Tramp. I«J9 tOS* 1*349 — Z 30 

Uflimee 8847 8809 8849 — 0.U 

Ftnmce Z4J2 2A4I 2443-029 

Composite 2(088 28045 2QM9 -029 


AMEX Sales 


4PJA. votame 
Prev.4 pal voftxrw 
Prev, cons. va*itnc 


13^40000 

10570000 

lisiaooo 



amex Stock Index 


HMi Low Cteff 

242A1 24228 

art* 
— m 


NYSE Lower as Volume Falls 


life- V* 
4046-4* 


*% 

36% 

274* 20 
489* 3JV* 
151* 94* 
279* 17 
394* 234* 
78 52 

MW 13V* 
16% 10V* 
131* 99* 


l3£ 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New Yak 1 
Stock Exchange fini<Jieri lower Friday in active 
trading after Thursday’s brief encounter at 
midsession with the 1,500 mark on the Dow 
Jones industrial average. 

The Dow fell 5.73 to 1.477.18. It established a 
new high at 1,484.40 Wednesday. For the week, 
the Dow rose 5.05 points. 

Broader market indicators eased. The New 
Yak Stock Exchange index dropped 038 to 
116.99. Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index de- 
clined 0.89 to 202.99. The price of an average 
share fell 18 cents. 

Declines outnumbered advances by about 2 
to 1. Volume shrank to 12534 mOlton shares, 
compared with 181.01 millio n Thursday. The 
International Herald Tribune’s NYSE stock ta- 
bles tan late Thursday night because of the 
heavy volume. 

John Havens, vice president of block trading 
at Kidder Peabody, said sporadic buying pro- 
grams and lethargic seffing characterized the 
session. 

"Volume has slowed. The market is tired and 
just sitting here waiting for the next move,” he 
said. 

Mr. Havens said the market was undergoing 
a correction, but not a major one. 

"This is a resting period,’’ he said. 

* Christine Callies, technical analyst at Dean 
Witter Reynolds, said that the market had be- 
come heavily overbought as the result of several 
hedging programs related to stock-index futures 
contracts. When those programs were unwound 
in the past few days, the results were a reversal 


HMvttl 
hmilm Stack 


Div.YM.PE MOiMMhLBw QootOlW 


14V. 6V* BMC .12] 73 74* 7 7 — 4* 

35 Vi 21 V. Balmco AO 25 10 70 244* 24 24 — 4* 

189* 15V* Bkrlntl .92 56 13 1576 16% 1W 161*— I* 

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21* 4* vIBatdU 066 lift 1 TO + % 

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UM in* BallvMf JO 1J 410 154* 15 15% — 4* 

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48V*39 BaltpfB A5C 9J 120k 48 «V* 474* + U 


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311* BkNV 228 45 


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554 441* 434* 46* + V* 


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221* BotAVq 1.12 34 9 1550 314* 30* 314* + * 
12* BnkAm JO 57 5254 14% Uft 14 - U. 


37V* BKArnPf 4478123 
59 BkAmpf 73S«I24 
14* BkAmpf 2J8 
24% DkARtV 140 95 
514* BonkTT 170 XB 
21V* BkTrpf 250 9 A 
35* BkTrpf 4J2 U 


123 113 38 37* 38 + I* 

124 7 59* 59 59* 

129 14* 141* 14* 

95 12 111 25*. 25 25V*—* 

34 7 1327 72 70* 7Mb—* 

9 A 214 2644 24* 26*- * 

M 1 46* 46* 461* 

J 13 ® !« 16VA 1614—16 


19 Bond 56 14 15 124 40V* 394* « - * 

19* BwnGp iJDO 3J 19 76 27* Z7 27 — H 

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in the stock market’s upward path Thurcday 
and a decline Friday, she said. 

Before the market opened, the Labor Depart- 
ment reported that U.S. civilian uneanpioyrneat 
fell 0.1 percent to 7 percent in November. 

Beatrice was the most active NYSE-listed 
issue, adding X to 46. 

Dana Corp. followed, easing ft to 27H. 

Iowa Electric light & Power was third, fall- 
ing % to 20%. 

In the oil sector, Exxon lost # to 5314 and 
Mobil eased K to 30%. 

Texaco dropped % to 3 IVl A Texas state 
district jndge Friday recessed until Tuesday a 
hearing on whether to reduce the record $1033- 
bfflion judgment levied against Texaco Inc. for 

hiring Getty Oil Cd ont of a merger agreement 

_ 


hmng Getty Oil Co. ont of a merger agreement 
with Pbnnn^l Co. Pbmzoil eased h to £3%. 

Among the blue chips, American Express fell 
Vi to 49%, AT&T added W to 231k, Sears climbed 
114 to 38& General Electric eased Vi to 65V4, 
Eastman Knrialr lost % to 50, Minnesota Min- 
ing & Manufacturing dwriinBri Vi to 85Vi and 
Philip Morris dropped 1V6 to79V4. 

Union Carbide added % to 63 after a. roxHt 
that GAF Corp. was about to bid far it. GAF 
Corp. rose 144 to 48. 

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portation index, 15 had losses. AMR Corp. fell 
ft to 40ft, Santa Fe Pacific declined Vi to 35ft, 
Federal Express lost 2 to 55ft and UAL Inc. 
dropped lVfc to 49ft. Buriington Northern fell 1 
to 69ft. The transport index set a new high 
Wednesday, an event analysts said was con- 
structive for die market’s outlook. 


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Japan Is Accused 
Of 'Dumping’ 
Microchips in U.S. ; 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Commerce 
Department charged on Friday that Japanese 
companies had been “dumping” advanced 256- 
K semiconductors on the U.S. market at below 
their fair cost • 

If the imports of the chips are found to be 
riomagmg the U.S. industry, the department can 
impose duties to make up tbe difference be- 
tween the chips’ fair value and tbe dumped 
price. 

The action was the first by President Ronald 
Reagan's Commerce Department “strike force" 
formed two months ago to try to end what tire 
administration believes are unfair trading prac- 
tices. 

The department estimated that the U.S. semi- 
conductor industry would lose $900 million to 
$1 billion because of the lower-priced imported 
Japanese chips. It said the imported Japanese 
256-K chips now command 76 percent of the 
U.S. market. 

The case will first go to the U.S. International 
Trade Commission for a preliminary finding of 
whether the U.S. industry is being hurt by tbe 
imports. If the ITC finds evidence of such 
damag e , the Commerce Department will im- 
pose temporary duties. until the ITC can makes 
more exhaustive permanent finding of damage. 

The initial ITCs preliminary finding is due 
by Jan. 20. ' 

Commerce Secretary Malcolm Baldrige, who 
BTwmnnireri the action, said no Japanese compa- 
nies had been identified. 

■ Mitsubishi Denies Dumping 

Mitsubishi Electronics America Inc. said Fri- 
day that neither it nor its parent company, 


. n m ■) H T* 3 f.’4 •fiTi* 


•Mi] ?»■ 


dumped 64-K dynamic random access memo- 
riesm the U.S. market. Renters reported from 
Los Angeles. 

The company said it intended to coatest the 
allegations vigorously. 

Earlier this week the Commerce Department 
made a preliminary determination that the 64- 
K chips were sold by Mitsubishi Electronics 
America between January and June 1985 at less 
than fair value. 


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JlwalbSEEribunt. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 14 


&ATUBPAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 1985 


** 


Page 15 


ECONOMIC SCENE 


1^* Will U.Si Plan to Ease 

J'4.- » ..... 




Debt Crisis Be Too Late? 



By LEONARD SILK 

New York Times Service 

EW YORK — If the upsurge of confidence in the 
securities m«]Eets,ioimded on a belief in the stability 
■ of the U.S. and wodd economy, is to be validated, the 
In*/ P greatest threat to the financial system stfil needs to be 
solved- That threat remains the huge and still growing debt crisis 
t ^ confronting the developing countries and hunlra fa the United 
>£ it. f >. States and elsewhere in the indus trial wodd. 

\\ The Wald Bank has raised its estimate of the total external 
k liabilities of the developing countries to 5920 h^Kon . from $395 
billioa, as of theend (tf 1984. Of that S920 biDion« S630 bSlion is 

r . t . owed to private banka. 

■ 1 Strains- in the world economy, with deflationary pressures on 

: ^commodities, sluggish growth 

- the industrial countries and 
" the rise of protectionism in the 

industrial countries, jeopar- 
: dize the ability of many devel- 

./’'Roping countries to service 
..’.."■^udrdebts. 

■"* V However, one major devel- 
. , bpment has occurred to allevi- 
.- ....^ - ate the threat to the wodd fi- 

^nanrial system and raise the expectations of investors: the change 
in UJS. policy for dealing with the debt crisis. 

' As Christine A. Bogdanowicz-Bindext, a senior vice president 

j.j .... i of Shearson Lehman Brothers and a former economist at die 
International Monetary Fund, writes in the current issue of 
. j‘ m - Foreign Affaire: “It took three years of muddling through crises, 

- t 'near-panics in the financial markets, a nrihi rm or so lost jobs in 
.^ r «/the United States and social unrest in the developing world for 
r :t vlhe Reagan administration to recognize the debt crisis for what it 
is: a long-term economic and political barrier to development 
i ^ that is slowly strangling world economic growth." 


Hie World Bank now 
estimates defat of 
the developing world 
at $920 billion. 


r. ^ 


UT DOES the change in recognition by the United States 
.come too late, and is the scale of its proposals big enough 
to deal with a problem of such magnitude? 

4 '" • At the Seoul meeting of the International Monetary Fund and 
" '-tf c-World Bank in early October, Treasury Secretary James A. Baker 
3d offered an “initiative” calling on commercial banks to lend 
’n:$2Q trillion to a group -of IS heavily indebted countries over the 
'■ next three years. The list includes the biggest Latin debtors — 
Brazfl, Mexico, Argentina, Venezuela, Uruguay, Chile, Ecuador, 
Colombia, Peru and Bolivia — as well as Yugoslavia, the Philip- 
Paffipe* pines, Nigeria, the Ivory. Coast and Morocco. 

• He also called for the World Bank and other regional deydop- 

vc meat banks for Latin America and Asia to increase their dia- 
Lbursements by roughly 50 percent, to $9 bfltion, noting the total 
- - - ^ three-year package to 529 bflhon- And he proposed a special fond 
Tor Africa, amounting to about 55 bflhon, to be financed by 
reflows of past loans to the IMF and World Bank. 

- The Baker initiative was put together hastily before the Seoul 
conference without enough time to get other governments and the 
. : ,.,IMFand World Bank fully aboard. Many officials voiced skepti- 
'asm and even resentment that the United States was trying to 
‘CTashion a great initiative without putting up any money itself. 

. . . But backing for the United Stales effort is growing. This week 
Jacques de Larosfera, managing director of the IMF, and A.W. 
C lausen, president of the World Rank, issued a joint statement 
declaring their “strong support for the initiative, which, given the 
-r j urgency of the problems, should be t ranslated into positive and 
. .7 'concrete actions as soon as posable.” 

In an. interview in. New York on Wednesday, Moeen A. 

Qureshi, iheWorid Bank’s chief financial officer, said realism 

—/“Thunder the lash of urgency was also growing in the Third Wodd. 

“The protesters are losing steam," be said. “The borrowers 
■realize they, too, have an important stake in the financial system 
and that they will need long-term development capitaL” The only 
(Coafmuedau Page 17, CoL 1) 


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Uaeembouro, Pons and tendon official fix- 
mot! Mans Kano and Zurich op antns and 
etoslno prices; New York Comex aurent 
contract. All prices In UJZSperounee. 
Source: Reuters. 



Tha Nm Vwk Tin— 


Burroughs Sets Big Goals to Stay in No. 2 Spot 


By Leslie Wayne 

Ne w York Tones Service 

DETROIT — W. Mkhad Bhsneothal, 
duef executive of Buntn^s Corp. and for- 
mer secret/ny of the UA Treasury, is in die 
unenviable position of heading a S5~taIKon 
company tmt is considered small by its in- 
dustry's standards. Burroughs is the nation's 
Nol 2 mainrfactarcrof mainframe computers. 
But its mam competition is International 
Business Machines Corp., nearly 10 times its 
size. 

“In any other Grid, Burroughs would be 
considered a Leviathan,” Mr. Blumenthal 
said. “But in mainframes, we’re a rabbit to an 
elephant. And, in that rituatioo, you have to 
be fleet erf foot." 

Burroughs, however, has stumbled of late. 
Its mainframe sales have been sluggish in one 
of the computer industry’s worst years. Its 
hopes to doable in size by merging with the 
Sperry Cap. were dashed when Sperry re- 
buffed Burroughs's overtures. And Bur- 
roughs’s surprise announcement in October 
of a substantial drop in third-quarter earn- 


ings sent shock waves through Wall Street 
and caused its stock to plummet 

Mr. Bhuneothai, however, is setting same 
lofty targets for the company. He predicts a 
short-term growth in sales of 13 percent to 15 
percent and says the company will mare than 
bold its own against IBM and other competi- 
tors. 

“The reason I thmle we will succeed is 
simple," hie said in his office overlooking two 

Detroit landmarks, the General Motors 
Building and the Fisher Building. “We think 
our mainframes are better than IBM’s." 

“WeYe got a lot of mileage in our product 
hne,” said Paul G. Stem, Burroughs’s presi- 
dent, who was lured from IBM by Mr. Bln- 
menthaL 

Some analysts agree. “Bhuneafhal spent 
two years figuring out what to do and another 
two doing it,” raid Peter Labe, an analyst 
with Drexcl Burnham Lambert Inc. “Now 
the company is at the point where it sho uld 
gel the reward.” 

As added insurance, Burroughs is putting 
the finishing toadies on a 1986 budget that 


calls for a continued squeeze on expenses and 

more plant dosings to help cany it through 
another possibly tough year, if corporations 
continue to bold down computer expendi- 
tures. And Burroughs continues to seek ac- 
quisitions. 

But periups the single biggest determinant 
in its fortunes in coming months is what 
happens with its problem-ridden Menaorex 
subsidiary. Purchased in 1981 for about 5100 
miPinn, Memorex, winch make$ disk drives 
— devices that store computer data — is 
caught in a competitive price war between 
IBM and the Japanese: 

The disks' design, which is at the core of 
Burroughs's new thrust to proride systems, 
instead of single machines, is so sophisticated 
that the units have suffered many technologi- 
cal problems. 

Some critics contend that Memorex should 
be sold. Mr. Bhnnenthal, however, masts 
that the problems are now cured and that 
prafitabiMty should return next year. He ar- 
gues that Memorex provides Burroughs “an 

(Continued on Page 17, CoL 4) 


Japan Economy 
Slows in Period, 
To 0.6% Growth 


Compiled by Oyr Stuff Front Dispatches 

TOKYO — Japan's economic 
growth in the July-Sepicmber quar- 
ter fell to an annual rate of 2.6 
percent from 5.8 percent in the pri- 
or quarter, the Economic Planning 
Agency said Friday. 

The gross national product, the 
widest measure of goods and ser- 
vices produced by a country, grew 1 
an inflation-adjusted 0.6 percent in 
the quarter, down from 1.4 percent 
in the April-Jime period, it raid. 

At the same rime, the agency 
revised downward, to 5 percent 
from 5.7 percent, GNP growth for 
the year ended March 31. The 
change reflects a base year change 
to 1980 from 1975, it said. 

The report attributed the slow- 
down in Japan’s economic growth 
to exports, especially to 

China and the United States. 

The Japanese government has 
set an economic growth target of 
4.6 percent for the current fiscal 
year, which ends next March, but 
econo mi sts, both in the govern- 
ment and the private sector, have 
said the target is not realistic. 

Many Japanese economists have 
argued that the Japanese economy 
is at a mining point, pointing out 
that the rapid appreciation of the 
yen against the dollar since Sep- 
tember will likely cause a sharp 
drop in exports during the current 
three- month period. 

Sumitomo Bank LttL's chief 
economist, Masahiko Koido, said 
Friday the July-September GNP 
data confirm that the economy has 
entered a period of slowdown indi- 
cated earher in other statistics. 


Hanson Makes Hostile £1.9-BiUion Offer for Imperial Group 


Compiled by Our Staff From 

• LONDON — Hanson Trust 
PLC nw>4«» a £1Q- hiTHnn (J2g-bfl- 
li<m) hostile offer Friday to acquire 
Imperial Gronp PLC which earlier 
in (he week had agreed to mage 
with United Biscuits PLC in a 
transaction valued at £2.22 billioo. 

The Hanson offer, which was im- 
mediately rejected by Imperial 
Group, was the hugest takeover hid 
in the history of rim London Stock 
Exchange. It capped a week of in- 
teniive merger- and-ac^oisi tion 
maneuvering in Britain m winch 
transactions valued at more 
£6 billion were floated. 

Imperial, which has interests in 
tobacco, brewing, foods and leisure 
products, tamed the Hanson offer 


“unwelcome and totally inade- 

S " Imperial raid it would press 
with its merger with United 
Biscuits. 

Hanson, a diversified company 
with interests ranging from shoes 
to engineering, offered two of its 
ordinary shares and £532 of Han- 
son 8-percent convertible unse- 
cured loan stock 2004-09 for every 
five Im perial shares. 

The offer valued Impiyiwi shares 
at 250 pence each, compared with a 
dosing price -Friday of 240 peace 
ou^ tne London exchange. The mar- 
ket had closed far the day when the 
offer was announced. 

Hanson has been at 
since August to trike over 
Carp., offering $75 per share in its 


latest bid. But Hanson suffered a 
reversal late last mouth when a 
U.S. federal judge upheld an option 
to bey two important SCM opera- 
tions bdd by a rivd group of inves- 
tors headed by MemU Lynda* Co. 

Lord Hanson, chairman of Han- 
$on Trust, said he bad written Im- 
perial’s chairman, Geoffrey Kent, 
on Friday, suggesting that the two 
sides meet to discuss an offer “far 
better than the peredved value” of 
the Imperial-United Biscuits merg- 
er.- -- 

Mr. Kent replied that Ins group 
“saw no merit in a meeting.” 

Hanson posted Thursday a 493- 
percent rise in pretax profit for the 
year ended Sept 30, to £252.8 mil- 
lion. imperial most recently report- 


ed amind rales of £4JS6 billion and 
profit of £220 miTHoc- 
In announcing their plan to 
metge. Imperial and United Bis- 
cuits bad said Monday that greater 
size would help them compete with 
large food companies abroad. 

Rumors were rife at the time of 
die announcement that a hostile 
bidder would emerge far Imperial, 
which some analysts saw as an at- 
tractive candidate for a breakup. 

Also Monday, Argyll Group 
PLC made a £].86-bflboD bid for 
Distillers Co^ the Scotch whisky 
producer, vrindi raected the offer. 

On Tuoday, Genoa] Electric 
Co. of Britain, which is unrelated to 
the UJL company, made a £1.18- 
tallicm offer for Plessey Col, the 


aerospace and electronics concern. 
Plessey rejected it Wednesday. 

Chi Friday, Lord Hanson dis- 
closed that Ins trust had made sev- 
eral efforts over the past two years 
to interest Imperial in a merger. 
But Imperial had always said it 
preferred to stay on its own. 

Lord Hanson said ImperiaTs 
planned merger with United Bis- 
cuits had Jed the trust to believe 
that ImperiaTs board had “dearly 
moved away from that policy." 

He said that Imperial sharehold- 
ers would see in his own offer an 
o p portunity to obtain an immedi- 
ate higher valne for their shares and 
to participate in the future growth 
of the enlarged group. 

(Rouen, AP) 


“Both plant and equipment in- 
vestment and exports have slopped 
leading the economy,*' he said. 
“Even personal consumption. 

West German GNP grew 13 
percent in quarter. Page 19. 

which it was widely hoped would 
support expansion, is now a de- 
pressing factor." 

If the July-September rate of 
growth is maintained in the current 
and next quarters, he said, 1985-86 
growth will be below 4 percenL 

A sharp fall in export growth, 
especially to the United States and 
Southeast Asia, was a major factor 
in the slowdown, Mr. Koido said. 
The yen's sharp rise is further de- 
pressing exports and is having a 
deflationary domestic effect, he 
said. 

At the same time, he said, it is 
extremely hard to see an early re- 
covery of personal consumption 
because personal incomes are 
showing little increase. 

An agency official said Friday 
that the Japanese economy, “al- 
though at a slower pace, stul runs 
the course of moderate expansion." 
But he added that the appreciation 
of the yen against the dollar would 
further soften Japan's exports in 
the Oclober-December quarter, 
dra g gin g growth down. 

Exports in the latest quarter de- 
clined 3 5 percent from the April- 
June period while consumer spend- 
ing, a key GNP factor, rose only 0.5 
percenL (AFP, Reuters) 

■ Technology Lag Seen 

Japan l" g< other major industrial 
nations in several areas of techno- 
logical development and should in- 
crease its spending on research, 
Agence Franco-Press reported 
from Tokyo, quoting from a gov- 
ernment study released Friday. 

According to the report, issued 
by the Science and Technology 
Agency and approved by the cabi- 
net, Japan t rails its major industrial 
partners in the specific areas of 
uranium enrichment and fast- 
breeder reactors, while the overall 
level of the quality and originality 
of its research remains inadequate. 

The report urged that the gov- 
ernment sharply increase its spend- 
ing on research. It noted that the 
government currently funds only 
50 percent of total investment in 
basic scientific studies compared 
with some 90 percent is France, 80 
percent in West Germany and Brit- 
ain and 70 percent in the United 
States. 



. Torino* h London and Zurich, fhdoos kt attmr Eurvpam conkrx NowY0rtrratmal4 PM. 
"a} Commercial frxmc lb) Amounts needed to bw one pound (td Amounts needed to buy one 
. Bfflpr I’} units ol ne (a} Units of cm (y) unite 0 / TftMO MJZ : no* boated; natavaBable. 

o)n tnrr one pound: tUSA/02 


Cummer per USJ 
SovWieMe 07442 
Spen. pasta T55J0 
SWHLItnm 7M3 
rani 39X7 
TMMff 24455 
Turkish Ora 36L70 
UAEdrftam 34725 


Sterttoo; UMSirbhf 

wreot: Bonmer du Benelux fSna*W; Banco OmnwvUi ItaBona (MBonti Bannue to a. 
MOfc do Pam (Paris}; JBan* of Tokyo (Tokyo}; IMF (SDR}; BAH ftfinor. rival dirham}; 
■asbank (ruble}. Omar data Awn Reuters andAP. 


Hong Kong 
Appoints New 
Finance duel 

Can^iledby Our Staff From Dispatches 

HONG KONG — Piers Jar 
cobs will become Hong Kong’s 
financial chief next year when 
the financial secretary. Sir John 
Bremridgie, steps down, the gov- 
ernment announced Friday. 

Mr. Jacobs, 52, a lawyer and 
currently the secretary for eco- 
nomic services, has been in the 
ovfl service in Hong Kong for 
23 years. Sir John wfll retire 
from the post in June after five 
years. 

Marty businessmen viewed 
the choice of a person with a 
background in law as appropri- 
ate. Others wandered whether 
Mr. Jacobs would be able to 
cope with Hcmg Kong’s volatile 
economy, which is vulnerable to 
external factors. 

He will be succeeded by John 
Yaxley, director of trade, who 
will be replaced by the commis- 
sioner of Hong Kong Export 
Credit Insurance Corp., Yeung 
iKai-YIn. (AFP, Reuters) 


U.S. Unemployment Rate Dips to 7% Stock Markets in Malaysia, 

gS Singapore Regain Ground 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON —The UJS. ci- 
vilian unemployment rate fdl one- 
tenth of a percentage point, to 7 
percent of the labor force in No- 
vember, the Labor Department re- 
ported Friday. The figure matches 
the lowest rate of Ronald Reagan's 
presidency. 

The overall unemployment rate, 
combining the 1.7 mflEou members 
of the armed forces with the civil- 
ian job force, declined to 6.9 per- 
cent in November, also down one- 
tenth of a percentage point 

The agency said that payroll em- 
ployment rose 180,000 m Novem- 
ber, meaning that the U.S. econo- 
my has now created 10 million new 
jobs in the three years since the 
depths of the last recession. 

Manufacturing employment, 
considered by analysts to be one of 
the keys to continued economic 
growth, rose by 30,000 in Novem- 
ber. It was only the third increase in 
factory job growth in the past 11 

rnnnths. 

Unemployment fdl by 151,000 
as die total number of jobless in the 
United States feD to just over 8.1 


million in November, the depart- 
ment said 

Despite the improvement, the 
department's Bureau of Labor Sta- 
tistics said the decline was relative- 
ly insignificant, and noted that un- 
employment was only slightly 
below the levd of a year ago. 

Civilian joblessness in Novem- 
ber 1984 was 7.1 percent. 

Retail stores did not do as much 
pre-Christmas hiring as expected, 
as employment in retail trade actu- 
ally declined by 37,000. 

The cautious hiring by retailers 
and other employers may have re- 
flected uncertainty due to a record 
high debt burden being carried by 
American consumers, who cut pur- 
chases sharply in October to send 
persona] spending into its biggest 
drop in in 25 years. 

Nonetheless, there were strong 
job gains in the service-producing 
sector of the economy, including 
121,000 new jobs in business and 
health services. Jobs gams in ser- 
vices totaled 154,000. 

On the manufacturing ride, Ja- 
net L Norwood, conmnsaoner of 
labor statistics, told a joint congres- 


sional committee in a 
statement Friday that “I 
important to note that no further 
factory job loss has occurred in the 
last two months." 

By the end of 1985, more than 10 
million new jobs will have been 
created in the current economic ro- 
covery, nearly 80 percent of them 
in the service sector. 

Mediocre economic growth has 
kept joblessness from moving low- 
er this year, and many economists 
predict slow growth will continue 
through the first half of 1986 before 
showing some improvement. 

The main reason is the sagging 
manufacturing sector. 

The gross national product rose 
at an annual rate of 1.1 percent for 
the first six months of the year, 
while picking up to 4J percent in 
the third quarter. A 3-percent 
growth rate generally is regarded 
by economists as the rate necessary 
to keep unemployment from dang. 

The jobless rate started the year 
at 7.4 percent and was stuck at 13 
percent from February through 
July before falling to 7 percent in 
August- 


OPEC Ministers Focus on Keeping Market Share 

By Bob Hagerty 

temedonal HenS THtm 


International Herald Tribune 

GENEVA — OPEC needs to 
raise or at least maintain its share 
of the wodd oil market despite the 
risk of a price plunge, oil mini sters 
said here Friday. 

That determination, which 
points to further downward pres- 
sure on the glutted market, was the 
focus of discussion as col ministers 

from the Organization at Petro- 
leum Exporting Countries opened 
a series of meetings here. 

Several of the ministers said they 
expected OPEC to make no 
changes at this meeting in its wide- 
ly flouted system of official prices 
and production quotas. Instead, 
many delegates were eager to dis- 
cuss long-tram strategy to deal with 
the decline of the cartel's share erf 
the market in the non-Cornmnnist 
countries to about a third from 
two-thirds in the late 1970s. 

“Our baric problem is that it’s 
becoming impossible to distribute 
among ourselves a decreasing share 
of the market," said a leading min- 
ister, who did not wish to be identi- 
fied. He said OPECs 13 members 
must determine what production 
limi ts they can stay within. The 
market, he added, would determine 
prices. 


If such strategic questions are to 
be seriously addressed, raid a Ven- 
ezuelan delegate, “it may be a long 
conference." 

The need fra- a coherent strategy 
would grow if oil prices begin faff- 
ing again within the next few 
months, as many oil exec u tives 
analysts opera. In the past three 
years, OPEC repeatedly has tried' 
to resist price declines by reducing 
its output 

That policy has given such non- 
OPEC producers as Britain and 
Norway a ‘Tree ride," as (me minis- 
ter put it, to increase their share of 
the market. OPEC members, 
squeezed hard by declining reve- 
nue, now ray they cannot endure 
any further cuts in their output 
quotas. 

"The road to continue lowering 
our production is exhausted," 
Humberto Calder&n Brad, a for- 
mer Venezuelan oil mnuster, sod 
in an article be made available at 
the meeting here. OPECs main ob- 
jective now, he said, is “to keep 
what we have and gradually recu- 
perate what we have lost" 

Toward that end, OPEC mem- 
bers took advantage of unexpected- 
ly strong demand tins autumn to 
raise their total output to an esti- 


mated 18 million barrels a day, well 
above their self-imposed ceiling of 
16 milKon. 


million and set a range of prices as 
its target 

Several members, including San- 

Bul prices have fallen in the past dj Arabia, have suggested imposing 
two weds as increased supplies higher quotas during the winter, 
have hit the market Grieveson, whoa demand for heating oil rises. 
Grant & Co., a London stockbro- and lower quotas in the summer, 
kerage, said in a recent report that, 

OPBC probably would have to re- 
duce its output by at least 1 million 
barrels a day in 1986*5 first quarter 
if it is to prevent a “dramatic fair 
in prices from the current range erf 
about $25 to $29 for most grades. 

It is unclear which members 
would be willing to out back, how- 
ever. Saudi Arabia, OPECs biggest 
producer, until last summer accept- 
ed the responsibility fra reducing 
its output enough to balance the 
market in periods of oversupply. 

Since then, the Saudis have made 
it clear that they will keep their 
prices attractive enough to contin- 
ue selling about 4.35 mulion barrels 
a day, tbar full OPEC quota. Thus, 
following the lead of other mem- 
bers, the Saudis reserve the right to 
ignore official prices and sell at 
whatever tbe market will bear. 


Compiled by Ota Staff From Dispatches 

SINGAPORE — Tbe stock mar- 
kets in Singapore and Kuala Lum- 
pur, Malaysia, made a partial re- 
covery Friday after Thursday’s 
plunge in share prices, but re- 
mained nervous; with big investors 
generally absent from the brisk 
trading. 

The Stock Exchange of Singa- 
pore and tbe Kuala Lamp or Stock 
Exchange experienced a wave of 
panic seDing when they resumed 
trading Thursday after a three-day 
suspension. Share values dropped 
by hundreds of millions of dollars. 

Brokers said Friday that the gen- 
eral tendency still was to sell and 
warned that prices could fall sharp- 
ly again after the weekend when 
brokerage houses and banks were 
expected to demand hefty increases 
in down payments, or margins. 

The Straits Times Industrial In- 
dex, which had fallen 83 points 
Thursday, rose 21.68 to 631.22 on 
Friday. The Kuala Lumpur Stock 
Exchange Industrial Index rose 
12.72 points to 41138, after a 
3736-point decline Thursday. 

The Singapore and Kuala Lum- 
pur exchanges suspended trading 
on Monday after Pan-Electric In- 
dustries LuL, a Singapore-based 
shipping, marine, property and 
electrical manufacturing group, 
was put into receivership with 
debts of 390 million Singapore dol- 
lars (5183 million). 

Also on Friday, Tan Koon Swan, 
a Malaysian businessman and poli- 
tician, released 20 mflHon dollars in 


a farther effort to prop up Pan- 
Electric while a solution to its prob- 
lems is sought, the receivers said. 
He bad put up 27 mfllioa dollars 
last week. 

Mr. Tan, through his flagship 
company Grand United Holdings, 
has a substantia] indirect stake in 
Pan-Electric. 

On the Singapore market, some 
brokerage houses agreed Friday to 
allow buyers a three-day grace peri- 
od, but insisted that sellers must 
deliver shares within 24 hours, in 
line with a rule imposed by both 
exchanges before reopening. Bro- 
kers said this had helped prevent a 
runaway market 

One dealer commented that the 
market “made an impressive im- 
provement” Friday. 

But several stockbrokers called 
the partial recovery a “technical 
rebound" fueled by bargain hunt- 
ers and said it was not a trend- 
setter. One broker said, “There are 
bound to be further hiccups fra at 
least a week." (Reuters, AFP) 


Sobroto, ail minister of Indone- 
sia and president of the OPE£ in- 
ference, suggested in October that 
OPEC keep output at around 16 


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Fridays 


MSE 


Closing 


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up to the closing on Wall Street 
ami do not reflect tate trades ettewtjere. 




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Via The Associated. Press 


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Asian 

Commodities 


High Low JBId Ask 

SUGAR 

Sterling per metric ton 
Mar . 14880 14*40 U440 14548 
MOT 17180 149 JO 14820 14S80 
ADO 17840 17540 T2U0 17409 
Oct 18L48 17940 17740 17800 
Volume: 142* late of SHm. 
COCOA 

Slerllag per metric tan 
Dec 1440 1420 1437 1438 
Mar 1870 1448 1489 1490 
May 1,712 1488 L711 1,712 
Jly W2B I486 L724 1727 
Sep 1744 17Z7 1740 1745 
MC 1737 1732 1741 1745 
Mv U52 UP 1752 UTS 
Volume: U84 lots of 10 tons. 
COFFEE 

Wtrttoo Per metric ten 
JOB 2438 1485 2404 24M 
M V 2475 2425 2447 2450 
May 2.118 2440 2498 2494 
-Kv 2J46 Ijm 2,120 2,125 
Sep 2490 2428 U4B 2,170 
Her 2220 1140 2400 2485 
Jaa N.T. NT. 2400 24S0 
Vottum: U437 Ms of 5 lam. 
GASOIL 

ILS. dollani per metric tea 


1*740 1*240 
17048 17840 
17480 T75J0 
17940 18040 


>422 1423 
1444 14*7 
1484 1485 
1484 1488 
1421 1422 
1424 1427 
1440 14*4 


1445 1475 
2410 2414 
2444 2448 
2400 2487 
xm 24 IS 
1130 2435 
2440 2,185 


Financial 


Stack Indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX ICME) 
points and cents 

204.90 17570 Dec 204JDO 20*55 203-L 

209.55 ItoJO MV 20640 J0*» 205.71 

21145 18390 Jun 208.10 228.15 20741 

21240 18740 Sap 21030 21040 209.11 

Est Sales 74494 Prev. Solas 77448 
Prav. Dory Oma Int. 7SS49 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
points and cents 

21743 10840 DM 20940 21139 2084! 

21740 19153 MV 21175 21*43 212.1! 

J1WS3 19740 Jun 

21*75 201145 Sen . ■ 

E st. Sales Prev. Sales iimzi 

Prev. Day Open Int. 12753 up 1410 

NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
points and cents 

11940 10140 Dec 11740 11040 1174! 

12145 10540 Mar 11940 11948 1129! 

12240 10440 Jun 12840 12040 1204! 

12245 108.10 SM. 12240 12240 1Z14C 

Est. Sales 11/7* Prev. Sates 214X1 
Prev. Day Open InL 9471 IIP 1433 

MAJOR MKT INDEX <CBTJ 

DOfcTtS csJd e Iffi s 

2B5Vb 24914 Dec 20ft 21ft 20 

986 270% Jan 281ft 282ft 28 OT 

287% 271 MV 283 283ft 282* 

Est. Sates Prev. Sates 534 

Prev. Doy Open let. 1425 up 59 


Commodity Indexes 


Qoso 

Moody 1 * «M0f 

Routers.... "A 

DJ. Futures..... r 12447 

Cam. Research Bureau- 22940 

/Moody's : base 100 -.Dec. 31, 1931, 
p - preliminary; f- Anal 
Reuters : base lOO’-Sefl. 1H,1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec: 31, 1974. 


Volume: 2447 Ms el 100 tom 
CRUDE OIL (BRENT) 

U S. doOan per hone) 

Jan 2744 2746 2744 2745 27JD 2745 

Feb 2748 2740 Z7J05 27.18. 27.15 7JM 

MV N.T. N.T. 2*00 2 *40 3*42*00 

API • NT. M.T. 2545 2*55 33M 2*50 

MOV NT. N.T. 3548 2U0 2540 2448 

JIM N.T. N.T. 2*70 2649 2130 2*40 

volume: 42 lets ot 1408 barrels. 


GotmSlities 


SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UJJ per ounce 


Mlgli Law Settle Betfle 

Dec NLT. H.T. 32248 — 

F«0 32540 32440 32440 32740 

Mor ■ — ■ - N.T. NT. 32840 — 

Voiuine: *8 lata at 180 ok. 
kuala Lumpur rubber 
M atanien cents per Uto 

Close prevhws 

Eld Aik Md ■«*> 

Jan 17*48 17740 17740 17140 

Feb 17748 17840- 17848' 17740 

Mar T7K40 17940 17940 18040 

Apr — : im^ 1«1 JO imjvQ 1S2L50 

May 18Z50 183J0 1B3J0 1MJD 

Jun . 18S40 18440 -18440 187417 

Vokmie: ■ lots. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cents P4r Mlo 

.Close . Pravtoas 

■ - _ eh A«if eh 

RSSlJan— ISM U2JO TS3JM T53J0 

RSSlPOb-- 153 JO 15*00 13445 15445 

RSS-2 Jan_ 14745 14845 14840 14940 

RSS3JOn_ 14545 14US 14440 14740 

R5S4Jan_ 14145 14345 U240 14*10 

RSSS-Jai- 13*75 13175 13748 U9JD 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
MakryMan tlaMts pv 21 tens 


LondonMetfak 



Cash Prices 


Commodity muoR rrl Asa 

Cottee 4 Santm in — wj ijt 

PiftilctoHl 44/30 38 ft. yd _ 144 Ml 

Sled billets tPHt.l, tan__ _ <7340 473JN 

IronOFdry.Ptma^tonTZZ 2U40 7UM 

Steel wy No 1 hvy pm. _ 73-71 01-82 

I rrui ,1m#. D. M JJJ 5 

Cooper nteeL Bi _ UM CM4 

Tin tSInilMI. Jh .. NJL unS 

gnae. st. L. Basis. <b _ - us . mju, 

Palladium, 99-1*1 09-M2 

Silver m-y-.it ui am 

Source: AP, 


liSiTreasuries 



■MKeant 


Pnrr. 


oner Bid 

YleM 

Yield 

Unootfi bin 

772 770 

1.6 

7J» 

4*noaftbn 

779 778 

747 

772 

Vrearbla 

173 732 

746 

778- 




Prav. 


Wd Otter 

Yield 

YMM 

M-yr. bond 

KB 3/32 1004/22 

944 

941' 

Source: Salomon Bromen. 



Merritl Lynch Treasury m». ius 


awuoe tor ne day: + OM 
Average yte«: 9.» % 



Source: Merrill Lyots. 


, 




Options 


Previous 
929 JO f 
1751.10 
124-00 
TOM 


Market Guide 


ESt. vaL: 3791 
rates: 1453 lots. 

COCOA 

French frana per iM«g 
Doc 14*7 1415 . 

MV l.«S 1480 

MOy N.T. N.T.. 

JIV N.T. N.T. 

Bap N.T. " N.T. 

Oec - N.T. N.T. . 

Mar N.T. N.T. 

Est- voU 27 lute eflO 
rates: 38 krtLOten Inter* 
COFFEE 



■ftim Mu* OMiftn-u* 
ftblK CBOe. 


DMfidures 

Options 

W- GtRbasAM-Qsmtiaartfc anhpertoart. 


SS ktS&n 

Soorcm.-fME. 









































































JDVI^3KATI0N AL HERAXJ> TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 1985 


Page 17 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 



By Warren Gctlcr 

■ i .. . Irtieniatlonal Herald Tribune 

■? FRANKFURT — Daimler Benz 

mqority diarehokler of Dor- 
- £’.cr GmbH, is intent on bringing 
' £.' f-Jrbus Industrie's executive vice 
p >; Resident, Johann Schfiffler, to run 
r'fi inmi g, but his anival is not cx- 
o ‘ jbted to lead to an immediate 
i1 '"wmor-Airbns Unit, a Dormer 
} '■ tl jnDy member said Friday. 

■> JSDonuff executives raid last sura- 
*.:'? er that the company. West Ger- 
'■ -Many’s second-largest aerospace 
J; ^ oop, was considering whether to 
: ;i Jte a state of 10 to 25 percent in 
.1 . ■’ eutsche Airbus. That company is 
\whoDy owned subsidiary of Mes- 
• "rscfa^-Beikow-Bkdim GmbH. 

■ il’Bnt there are lingering concerns- 
: Dormer headquarters that a 

'■ f rive by Dranwr to formally attach, 
to Airbus could jeopardize 

■ ; 0 oraicr’g contractual rafarimahips 

vjth aircraft builders that compete 
* V ; -?Bn3t Airbus, such as Boeing Co. 

: t' P the United States. 

’ . : i'rConrado Dormer, the son of a 
ijof shareholder, Claudius Dor- 
■ 1 er, ■awl Friday, "We know that 


Daimler waiits. to have Mr. 
■ Sch&fQer as .'the new managing 
board chainnan — they have told 
us. that and plan to discuss it at 
Thursday's shareholders’ meeting.” 

T cannot foresee; however, that 
the presence of Mi. Sdhafflear at 
Dormer will aut omatically fcftd to a 

da n ff: in Dormer's relations with 
- Airbus,” be said. 

Franz-Joscf Strauss, the Bavar- 
ian premier and an influential 
member of die Airbus board, said 
recently that he would welcome a 
Doraier stake in Airbus. MBS’* 
chairman , W«m»; Am V oytg, 
in an interview in July that the need 
to share rides of developing the 
long-raoge four-engine TA-11 air- 
craft “coaid lead to closer Domicr 
ties to Airbus.” Development costs 

for the twin-engine TA-9 and Ta- 
11 have been projected by industry 
sources at a total of S2 billion. 

Motivating the search for new 
industrial partners at Airbus, in- 
dustry sources note, appears to be 
sharp official US. criticism that 
Airbus is unfairly subsidized by 
European governments. 

■Dormer, which sold a direct 


irbus Tie 

state in Deutsche Airbus in the late 
1960s, for yrarshasdone subcon- 
tracting work on several Airbus 
models, accounting to about S.7 
percent of the West German con tri- 


gram through Deutsche 
Deutsche Airbus holds a 375-per- 
cent stake m Airbus Industrie. An- 
other 37.9 percent is held by 
French interests, with the rest in 
the hands of British and Spanish 
aerospace groups. 

A Daintier spokesman thytined 
to provide official confirmation of 
Mr. Schfiffkar’s anticipated, selec- 
tion to replace Manfred Fischer as 
chairman of Danner’s manage- 
ment board. The spokesman, 

Hans-Georg Kloos, said a state- 
ment about important personnel 
changes at Dormer could be ex- 


Domle^Benz acquired a 65.5- 
perceat state in. Domier in May, 
leaving Claudios Doraier. the el- 
dest family shareholder, a 20-per- 
ceut stake, with the rest brief by 
Sflvius Doraier, who is a brother erf 
Claudius, and the state at Baden- 
WOmembeig. 


Court to Bide Tuesday on Texaco Bid 
To Overturn $10. 5-BUHon Judgment 

CwptW ty (ho- Staff From Dapaeha 

HOUSTON — A Texas judge will rule Ibesday on whether Texaco 
Inc. must pay $10.53 billion in damages to Penuaofl Co. as ordered by 
a jury last month 

State District Judge Solomon Casseb Jr. called a recess Fridayaftcr 
bearing arguments from lawyers to the two oil companies on Thurs- 


judge, who can uphold, ovtttum or reduce the award, said he 
would announce his derision Tuesday. He can also order a new trial. 

A jury imposed the damages, which would be the largest in US. 
corporate history if allowed to stand, on Nov. 19. Jurors found that 
Texaco had illegally enticed Getty (XI Co. to withdraw from an agreed 
upon meager with Peonzcil last year. 

During the hearing, Fennzoirs attorneys argued that the award was 
justified because Texaco’s subsequent purchase of Getty, to S10.2 
billion, had blocked Patnzofl’s access to Getty’s huge oil reserves. 

John Jeffers, one of the lawyers, said, “Whoa you’re talking about 
the loss of one hOlkm bands, when you’re talking about the loss to 
Pecmzofl of the ability to become a major oD company, you're not 
talking about damages of hundreds of mini ons of dollars. You’re 
talking about billions of dollars." 

PennzoiTs lawyers dismissed Texaco’s comments that it might be 
forced to seek protection, from creditors under U.S. bankruptcy law if 
thejndgxnent were allowed to stand. 

Texaco said Pennzofl had not proved it had a binding contract with 
Getty, and argned that the damages, at most, should be $500 million, 
representing the difference between what Pennzofl offered to Getty 
arid what Texaco paid. (AP, UP I) 


Bank to Pay 5 Billion DM for Flick 


By Warren Getier 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Deutsche 
Bank AG said Friday that it will 
pay about 5 bfiiion Deutsche marks 
(about S2 billion) to acquire the 
Flick industrial group from its 
founder and sole owner, Friedrich 
Karl Flick, and trill later resell the 
entire acquisition through various 
stock offerings next year. 

Alfred Herrhausen, a managing 
board spokesman, said the pay- 
ment would be for the Flick group's 
three core companies; a 26-percent 
state in WJL Grace & Co, the 
diversified U.S. chemicals concern, 
and a 10-percent stake in Daimler- 
Benz AG, the maker of Mercedes 
automobiles. 

Deutsche Bank’s takeover of the 
group, which has estimated assets 
of 4 billion DM, will take effect 
Jan. 1, Mr. Herrhausen said. 

The Grace and Daimler share 
packages are to be floated indepen- 
dently, he said This will be fol- 
lowed by the introduction cm the 
bourse hWe in late spring of shares 
in a new holding company, Fdd- 
muhie-Noble AG. 


That company will be formed 
out of Flick’s three core industrial 
companies; the paper-maker Feld- 
muehle AG, chemicals group Dyn- 
amic Nobel AG and engineering 
concern BuderuS AG. 

Deutsche Bank executives 
stressed, however, that Grace has 
first option on its shares held by 
Flick, and said that talks with 
Grace officials have been under 
way recently to determine whether 
the U.S. company is prepared to 
see Deutsche take over the stake. 
Mr, Herrhausen said Grace would 
decide well within a year’s <»mr. 

F. Wilhelm Christians, another 
board spokesman, stressed that 
Deutsche had no intention of main - 
taining a stake in the Flick group. 
He said the bank's role was restrict- 
ed to that of an investment broker, 
noting that the bank hoped to offer 
the acquired properties to the mar- 
ket for at least 5 billion DM. in 
further anticipation of a consider- 
able rise in snare prices that would 
yield a capital gain for the bank 

The Daimler shares alone, how- 
ever, are valued by the currem mar- 
ket at some 4 billion DM, leading 


many analysts to believe that the 
entire Flick transaction could yield 
Deutsche a capital gain of at least 
1.25 billion DM. 

Mr. Herrhausen did not rule out 
the possibility that other major 
West German commercial banks 
could play a role in underwriting 
the shares to come to market 
He also said, in response to a 
question, that Deutsche Bank 
would be interested in acquiring 
Mr. Flick's 51-percent slake in 
Gerling Insurance Group, West 
Germany’s second largest 
The spokesman also disclosed 
that Mr. Flick approached the 
hank in March with a firm proposal 
to sell his assets after “several 
years” of ou-again, off-again dis- 
cussions on the subject 

Storer Buyout Is Completed 

Tfie Associated Press 
MIAMI — Storer Communica- 
tions Inc. became a private compa- 
ny Friday after Kohlbeig Kravis 
Roberts & Co. investment firm 
completed its £L5-bfllion lever- 
aged buyout. 


OMPANY NOTES 


BAT Indratries PLC said Sir De- 
is Mountain has resigned from his 
cecutive positions to health rea- 
ms. Sir D enis has resigned from 
"ve boards of BAT Industries and 
■ AT Financial Services Ltd. and as 
uiinnan and managing i^rrMnmF 
agle Star Holdings FLC and Ea- 
'£ Star Insurance Co. 

Boeing Co.'s computer-services 
. .vision signed a contract to pur- 
. iase tdephcme-switchrng systems 
pm American Telephone & Tde- 
; -aph Co. The purchase wiD be part 
7 a telecommunications modera- 
ation plan, with an overall cost of 
MOO muHon. 

. DooaMson, Lufkin A Jesuette 
.eenrities Corp. will increase its 
•ipital by year-end, mainly 
-rough retention of what is ex- 
acted to be a big increase in earn- , 
; gs. according to John K. Castle, 
■cadent and chief executive. The 
: t>kentge had capital of S3 10.9 


Blumenthal Sets Big Goals to Keep Burroughs in No. 2 Position 


millio n at the beginning of 1985. 

Gannett Co. announced it would 
split its newspaper division into 
two units, one groin) for newspa- 
pers with drily caredations erf more 
than 120,000 and another group for 
all other papers. 

■ Lufthansa AG, West Germany's 
government-controlled airline, has 
placed an order with Boeing Co. for 
two 747s at almost $200 million. 
One win be delivered in 19S6 and 
the other in 1987. 

Occidental Petroleum Corp. in- 
tends to sell its 20-percent stake in 
Southland Corp., the DaDas-bases 
convenience-store operator, in an 
agreement valued at about $394 
million. Occidental said it wanted 
to craceutrate on its core business- 
es of on and ^ exploration, chem- 
icals, agribusiness and <*»l 

Socii& G£n£rale d’Eutreprises is 
increasing its capital to 1 J8 billion 
French francs ($179.2 million) 


from 827.7 million through the is- 
sue of about 11.04 millio n new 
shares at 50 francs nominal. The 
construction company’s shares will 
be issued at par, at two new shares 
for every three old shares held. 

STC PLC has agreed with Rob 
WSmot that he mil step down as 
part-time chairman of STC Inter- 
national Computers Ltd., formerly 
IGL PLC ICL’s managing direc- 
tor, Peter Bonfield, will take cm the 
additional rote of ICL chairman 
Mr. Wfimoi became ICL’s nonexe- 
cutive chairman after the merger of 

ICL and SXC m 1984. 

limes Minor Co. has agreed to 
sell 80 percent of its Publishers Pa- 
per division to Jefferson Smurfit 
Corp., an Bfinos paperboard and 
packaging products company, to 
$150 nrimon. The sale win divest 
Times Mirror of much of its news- 
print and wood-products opera- 
tions. 


Beader 9 s Digest 
To Fold in Japan 

The Aaodaied Press 

TOKYO — The Japanese- 
anguage edition of Reader’s 
Digest, published monthly 
. once 1946, wiO close next year 
. recause of falling readership, a 
nagazine official said Friday. 

Circulation, which was as 
ligh as 1.48 million in 1949, has 
amk to about 460,000 a month 
or the subsidiary of the U.SL 
nagazine, Hidetoshi . Kaneko. 
he genoal affairs managin', 
aid. The Japanese verson is 
lowing to stiff competition 
‘tom many Japanese weekly 
nagazines and comic books, he 
aid. He declined to give the 
oompany’s revenues and losses. 

Ninety people, are employed 
yy the Japanese version. The 
abor union of Reader’s Digest 
[ apan is discusang ways to stay 
a business with the manage- 
neat, but there are no plans to 
mblish past February, Mr. 
Canekosaid. 


United, in Major Expansion, 
To Set Up Washington Hub 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — United Air- 
lines, in a major expansion on the 
East Coast of the United States, 
has announced that it wd establish 
a hob at Dulles International Air- 
port in Washington. 

James j. Hartigan, president and 
chief executive of the carrier, said 
that United would begin to set up 
the hub pact May, starting with 50 
daQy.departnres to 24 destinations. 
The number of flights is apected 
to increase to more than 100 a day 
within three years. 

United, the largest U.S. airline, 
already serves several East Coast 
dries and has 16 flights a day out of 
Dulles, but it has avoided the tight 
competition for travelers dying be- 
tween the Northeast and Florida. 
Fares on some routes have recently 
fallen to as low as $39. 

For months, there has been spec- 
ulation in airline industry circles 
that United, which has concentrat- 
ed its operations in the Middle 


West and West, was planning a 
major expansion in the East Amer- 
ican Airlines, United’s archrival, 
recently announced plans to a new 
hub in Ralejgh-Duriiain Airport in 
North Carolina, expanding its op- 
erations eastward. 

Mr. Hartigan said Dulles had 
been selected "because it is ideally 
located for us to serve north and 
south, including Florida, as well as 
ocr two major hubs, Chicago and 
Denver.” 

The step would make United the 
largest carrier at Dulles as wdL 
Another airline that has made Dul- 
les International its hub is Presi- 
dential Airways, a kw-fare carrier 
that began service in October. The 
new carrier could put pressure on 
United’s fares. 

Mr. Hartigan said that United 
would begin negotiations with air- 
port officials to more facilities to 
handle the bub operationAll of the 
new flights would use Boeing 737s, 
which are suited for the relatively 
short flights in the East. 


(Continued from Page 15) 
important technology” and says he 
plans to stay the course. 

But be is not entirely inflexible. 
“If we came to the conclusion that 
there was no way we could mate 
money, we’d look to a better con- 
dusan,” be said. “But we haven't 
reached that point yet and we in- 
tend to stay with Memorexasil is." 

Burroughs's ability to grow is 
critical, since it must grow to sur- 
vive. “In this business, when you 
stop growing, your competitive 
posture tends to deteriorate," said 
David CL MoscheDa, an analyst 
with International Data Corp., a 
computer ran&iitTng Arm in Fra- 
mingham, Massachusetts. 

Mr. Blumenthal understands 
that wriL A framer Princeton eco- 
nomics professor, he came to Bur- 
roughs five years ago from the Car- 
ter cabinet, where his fiscally 
conservative views dashed with 
President Jimmy Carter’s and 

Investor Group 
Bids for Kaiser 

New York Times Sovice 

NEW YORK — An investor 
group that owns 9.4 percent of the 
troubled Kaiser Al uminum & 
Chemical Crap, has offered to buy 
tile rest for a package of cash and 
securities that it valued at $20 a 
share, or nearly $800 trillion. 

The group, headed by Joseph A. 
Frates of Tulsa, Oklahoma, said if 
its offer was not taken seriously, it 
would “rake our proposal directly 
to the stockholders” to remove the 
directors and install its own slate. 

The group’s proposal, consisting 
of $7 in cash and the rest in securi- 
ties, was dehvexed in a letter late 
Thursday to Cornell C. Maier, 
chai rman of Kaiser. 


Utdted Press ItUernatsonal 
DENVER — Continental Air- 
lines added on Friday eight flights 
in Denver, including three daily de- 
partures with $49 one-way promo- 
tional faxes to Oakland, California, 
and Dallas-Fort Worth. 


i ■ 


jhirdWoiid 
-ipJebt Growing 

(Continued from Page 15) 
ty they can get it, he added, is “to 
ike sure they meet tbdr obliga- 

■05." 

Mr. Qureshi said the U.S. pro- 
sal had givm the impression that 
- commercial banks would be 
ced to do much more than the 
?rid Bank. However, he said, the 
t lending of the World Bank, 
dex the proposal would total 
, ...jioul 520 bflilion a year over the 
-!" ,l tt three years, the same as the 
*vaie banks are being asked to 
id. The United States has appar- 
dy played down the role of the 
ematianal Bank to Reconstruc- 
n and Development, as the 
vld Bank is formally known, lest 
e criticized as a “bailout’’ for tbe 
vote banks. 

rhal $40 billion in itself would 
: be enough to ward off the crisis 
be world were to slip into reces- 
n. Nor would it take care of the 
iblems of the small debtor coun- 
s, especially tbe poorest in Afri- 
Tbe World Bank stresses Lhe 
.. -pm need of funds to the Inter- 
^ {> jinonal Development Association, 
L^tcb helps tbe poorest countries. 
*1 *■ crucial as additional public 

t* a *’ —=^1 private money is to ward off a 

racial collapse, with national 
■anils that could wipe out the 
• <ital of Western commercial 
iks, even more crucial is the con- 
ted recovery of (he world econo- 
and trade. 

. .J.S. monetary policy — aimed 
educing interest rates, bringing 
ra (be overvalued dollar, cutting 
trade deficit and sustaining eco- 
fric growth — is essential to 
_ ing protectionism and helping 
developing countries to earn 
ugh to service their debts. 


s )\S I lada Unemployment Dips 

- Reuters 

'TTAWA — Canada's season- 
adjusted unemployment fell to 
percent in November from 
percent in October and 113 
ent a year earlier, Statistics 
ada said Friday. Seasonally ad- 
ed employment rose to 
(69,000 from October’s 
56.000. 



EUROPEAN 

OPTIONS 

EXCHANGE 


-> 


INTRODUCTION 
ECU/DOLLAR OPTION 


Introduction of: 


Series: 


call and put options on the ECL£ listed in 
US. dollars. 

on introduction the following series will be 
listed: 

March '86: 84-86-88-90-92 U.S. dollars 
June ’86: 84-86-88-90-92 US. dollars. 

Series expiring in September 1986 will be 
listed on 23rd December J985. 


Expiration months: March, June, September, December (the 
maximum life of an option is 9 months). 

ECU 10,000. 


Contract size: 
Option price: 

Trading starts: 
Orders: 


Use: 


expressed in U.S. dollars per ECU 100 and 
determined by supply and demand on the 
floor of the European Options Exchange. 

Thursday 5th December 1985. 

can be placed with banks and brokers who 
are members of the European Options 
Exchange and who can also be contacted 
for additional information. 

currency option s4an be used for covering 
currency risks and for anticipating currency 
movements. 


Amsterdam, December 1985. 


eventually led to his departure. 
Since then, be has helped master- 
mind the turnaround of a 100-year- 
old company that had come peril- 
ously dose to skidding into the No. 
3 position in the mainfram e bosi- 


It was an unusual ehaH sngr for 
Mr. Blumenthal, who had no previ- 
ous experience in computers, and it 
was yet another twist in a life filled 
nth many unexpected urns. 

He came to the United States in 
1947 as a refugee whose fantily had 
escaped Nazi Germany by emigrat- 
ing to China. Mr. BlumenthaTs car 
reer has spanned three areas — 
academia, government and busi- 
ness. 

Although he appears to relish 
discussion of business matters, he 
digresses easily to public policy is- 
sues, ranging from tbe condition of 
Detroit to the South African econ- 
omy. Before becoming Treasury 
secretary, Mr. Blumenthal had 
been chief executive of Bendix 
Corp. and is credited with bringing 
that Detroit company to new levels 
of profitability. 

Under Mr. BlumenthaTs leader- 
ship, Burroughs was shaken up 
from top to bottom. New managers 
were brought in, mainly from IBM, 
and many top executives were giv- 
en early retirement. About 25 
plants were dosed worldwide, in- 
cluding right this year, and the 
work force was trimmed .by 4,000. 

Spending to improve the service 



W. Michael Bhanenthaf 


organization and upgrade sales 
training was increased to more 
than $67 million from less than $ 10 
million in 1981. And Burroughs’s 
lackluster product line was given 
new life with competitive new en- 
tries, most recently the highly ac- 
claimed “A" series of mainframes, 
which came to market to compete 
with IBM's new Sierra mainframe, ' 
officially known as the 3090 series. 

Burroughs also broadened its 
product Ime into such areas as in- 
telligent office work stations by en- 
tering into joint ventures with spe- 
cialized computer makers to give 
the company products at the low 


end of the market, where IBM is 
less competitive. In doing so, Mr. 
Blumenthal bucked a Burroughs 
tradition of manufacturing afl its 
products internally. 

And the company has dropped 
unsuccessful products, such as cal- 
culators and supersdentific com- 
puters, and set goals for several 
niches where it frit it could com- 
pete with a broad line of specialized 
products — primarily in finanraal 
services, health care and govern- 
ment services. 

Much of this has already paid 
off. Mr. Blumenthal notes that the 
company's return on equity rose to 
10.8 percent last year from 3.9 per- 
cent when he arrived. Revenue per 
employee has climbed nearly 50 
percent, to $74,000, while pretax 
profit margins have risen to 7.4 
percent from 4.6 percent. 

And earnings aim c limbed 
smartly until the third quarter 
year, when they fell to 71 cents a 
share from tbe previous quarter’s 
Sl.ll. This was attributed to the 
industrywide slowdown in all com- 
puter sales as well as to losses in 
Memorcx. 

This year has been particularly 
bad for all mainframe makers as 
corporate customers have cut back 
on capital spending in the face of 
uncertainty over the federal budget 
deficit and tbe direction of the 
economy. Burroughs executives ex- 
pect the trend to continue into next 
year. 


Some say that Burroughs could 
gain more customers by malting its 
products more compatible with 
IBM’s, but the company rgecis 
that notion. Burroughs mainframes 
— room-sized computers that cost 
SI 00,000 to $8 million — can com- 
municate with IBM computers, but 
are not plug-compatible. That 
means the two systems can ex- 
change data, which is important for 
customers who buy from more than 
one computer supplier, but Bur- 
roughs machines cannot run IBM 
software. 

“If they moved it closer to com- 
patibility with IBM, at least Bur- 
roughs could sell into a broader 
market," said Thomas Grotty, an 
analyst with Gartner Group, based 
in Stamford, Connecticut. 

But Mr. Blumenthal counters: 
“Once you are plug-compatible, 
you are totally dependent on every 
move IBM makes. It’s no accident 
that we are not plug-compatible 
and we do the volume thai we do." 

In fact, because IBM is so domi- 
nant, Mr. Blumenthal holds no illu- 
sions about taking it on, and speaks 
instead of “coexistence." while 
Burroughs hopes to lure some IBM 
customers in the fields where it is 
concentrating its efforts, a large 
part of tbe game plan is simply to 
win customers from its smaller ri- 
vals. 

“This is such a huge market, even 
what’s left after IBM is still large," 
Mr. Blumenthal said. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 1985 


Page 19 


| IUSiffiSS PROFILE / Boaz Mxaholi, Hi^-Tech Whiz Kid 


reneurin 



^’i'XELAYIV 


New York Tima Sente* 

Government eco- 
wiH 


war 


s l ; l| )CTOista bi Kz aH an programs 
■H ^ Sane and go. boi if Israel is 
; t] skiing to get back onto a real 
“ I’ i; lawth paw it wijl probably be on 
:: |! ?«;t backs of a new gecerstica) of 
it j* gb-tcch entrepreneurs sow com- 
1 % of age.. 

A ^Wboa I look out at the Israeli 
^OKHoy I see two parallel, nonin- 
gjsectiag images,’* said A.I. 
v javsky, an expert on Israeli lugb- 
z\ i± companies. "One is a country 
: i; 1 ' fldmg for big trouble with a 
i, f,Maxrt»ctnreof^o(aB,do(Hnairi 
trencnmeiiU The other, parallel 
> ■- \ tck is Ml of energetic hi^h-tecb 
... j trepreaeura, forming all of 
r - i‘ !w companies in pannership with 

* • ■ ^ nerican firms.” 

t . v ^ <Boaz Misholi epitomizes the new 

* ,* . eed of entrepreneurs — people 
'-§po started nearly 700 new high- 
er y xi.sh companies in Israel last year. 
; •$ !; ae 34-year-old computer architect 

i-’id boflt his own computes; before 
^ -1; ii' graduated from the Techmon. 
si -;i«ch dong with the Wdzmana 
I? *' stituie of Science is Israel's coun- 
"I ',^‘Vparl to the Massachusetts Insti- 
■■ I 4 te of Technology. 

^ ; A company in Stamford, Con- 

■; !”l *> tcticnt, snapped him up in 1978 to 
: - ■ Jp design a computer system for 
” >.>' ^fit-checking at Mary's Depart- 
- .^mt Stores. 

1981, Mr. Misholi quit his job 
persuaded another Israeli, a 
landal expert employed on Wall 
'set, to join him. They spent a 



Elders Says Its Offer 
For Allied Has Lapsed 


CURRENCY MARKETS 


Dollar Ends Stronger in U.S., Europe 


BaazMfehoti 


Thi Now Yah Tima 



S traveling around the United 
s studying the market far 
computer message-management 
systems, which allow voices to be 
recorded and transferred to elec- 
tronic telephone mafiboxs, a highly 
advanced form of answering ma- 
chines. 

In 1982, he and his fmanrial 
partner moved back to Israel and 
established Efrat Future Technol- 
ogy Ltd. with $4 5 mfifion in Isradi 
and U.S. venture capital In three 
years they have grown to 60 em- 
ployees and last month their com- 

S Liter system was chosen by the 
j-S. government’s General Ser- 
vices Administration over competi- 


Reuters 

LONDON — Elders DCL Ltd. 
of Australia said Friday that its 
£1 .8-biIEon ($2»6-hfflioa) bid for 
. AlHed-Lyons PLC had lapsed after 
the British, government said it was 
referring the offer to the Monopo- 
lies and Mergers Commission. 

1 Commission investigations into 
large takeovers normally take 
. about six months. In the meantime. 
Elders’ bid will automatically 
lapse. 

John D. Elliott, chief executive 
of Betas, said earlier Friday that; 
be was surprised that the bid had 
. been referred to . the commission 
and that his company was reassess- 
ing its position. At a news confer- 
ence last month Mir. EDiotl said 
(hat if the bid were referred to the 
commission. Elders would mam- 
tain its interest in acquiring Affied- 
Lyons. 

The gov ernme nt had angled out 
(be financing of the bid as the rea- 
son for the referral to the commis- 
sion. Normally, the panel considers 


whether a proposed merger would 
hinder competition. 

The bid f or AIHed-Lyons, a Lon- 
don-based food and drink compa- 
ny, was the largest ever for a British 
company when it was formally an- 
nounced in October. It has since 
been overtaken by another bid — 
rate of £1.86 billion by Argyll 
Group PLC, a food retailer, for 
Distillers Co., the biggest producer 
of Scotch whisky. 

Bders, a brewing, farming and 
finance group, is cmly a quarter tbe 
size of Affied-Lyons, one of Brit- 
ain's tpp 20 companies and its seo- 
ood-biggpsi brewer. The bid raised 
concern in banking circles because 
it was financed by bank banwing 
rather than through the company’s 
own resources. 

Mike Geesing, an analyst with 
London stockbrokers James Capd 
& Co^ said that a month ago the 
bid probably would have gone 
through without a problem. But the 
many new tnds since then h»d put 
pressure on the government to slow 
down takeover activity. 


live system from International 
Business Machines Corp. and Sper- 
ry Carp. 

This success mirrors the growth 
in Isradi high-tech sals abroad. 

Exports of locally developed sci- 
ence-based products have grown 
from $200 mutton in 1 974, about 21 
percent of total exports 
diamonds, to $1.9 bflhan in 1 
30 percent of total exports. 

Grew 1.5% in 3d Quarter 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dhpaehts 

NEW YORK —The dollar fin- 
ished the meek on a firmer note 
Friday as prospects for a col in 
U.S. mtereat rates diminished. 

“With prospects for a discount- 
rate cut fading, the dollar seems 
stock in a 150-155-Deotsche-mark 
range,” said Eari Johnson, vice 
president at Chicago's Harris 
Bank. "Given the uncertain eoo- 
Domic picture there's no impetus to 
push the dollar up, but we scan to 
have found a temporary floor." 

Dealers said year-end corporate 
demand coold cause the dollar to 
spike up to as high as 160 DM, but 
that most look for little real move- 
ment unless some unforeseen event 

ehangffs the scenario. 

“Right now if s pretty bard to get 
anyone to trade, let alone respond 
to the beadfines,” said a dealer in 
Frankfurt. “Most people have theii 
bods dosed tight ami are waiting 
tar the new y ear." 

Another Frankfurt dealer said 
many traders did not expect any 
further major movements in the 
dollar until the beginning of 1986, 
when he expected it to fab further. 


"With the run-up to Christmas, 
traders don't want to be long or 
short of dollars," he said. 

Friday’s report that U.S. unem- 
ployment fell one-tenth of a per- 
centage point, to 7 percent, in No- 
vember. underpinned the dollar, 
dealers said. 

In New York, the dollar rose to 
15255 DM from 2.5175 on Thurs- 
day; to 203.25 yea from 20180; to 
7.7065 French francs from 7.6755, 
and to 11060 Swiss francs from 
10955. 

In earlier trading in Europe, the 
dollar Rnifihftd in Iffl idon at 15240 
DM, up slightly from its previous 
London dose of 15190, and at 
20315 yea, up from 203.15. It also 
rose there to 2.1070 Swiss francs 
from 10960. and to 7.71SQ French 
francs from 7.677S. 

Meanwhile, the British pound 
shrugged off concern about oil 
prices to finish the day at around 
Thursday’s closing levels. Oil min- 
isters from the Organization of Pe- 
troleum Exporting Countries are 
meeting in Geneva this weekend to 
discuss policy amid generally 
weaker ail prices. 


Although Britain is not a mem- 
ber of OPEC it is a major oil pro- 
ducer. Dealers reported caution 
about taking up new positions in 
the pound, and said the currency 
could be pressed next week if the 
ministers are unable again to agree 
on audc-oil prices and production. 

In New York, the pound rose to 
$1.4820 from $1.4805. Earlier, in 
London, it slipped to $1.4775 from 
$1.4790 on Thursday, but rose to 
3.7298 DM from 3.7250, 

Dealers said that any move to 
push the pound above $1-50 and 
the dollar below 2^0 DM or 200 
yen would meet strong resistance. 
“Those ore tough resistance points 
to break, even though they are 
mainly psychological barriers," one 
dealer said. 

In other European markets Fri- 
day. the dollar was fixed at midaf- 
icrcoon in Frankfurt at 2.5240 
DM, down from 25266, and at 
7.700 French francs in Paris, down 
from 7.7035.’ In Zurich, the dollar 
closed at 21080 Swiss francs, up 
From 10988. (Reuters, UPI) 


West Germany’s Economy the euromarkets 


Suspension of Iui Trading Extended 
A Further Weds; J3C to Meet on Crisis 

Agfitux Frmtx-Pnase 

LONDON — The six-week suspension in London tin trading will 
I remain in force throughout next week, the London Metal Exchange 
I announced Friday. 

The exchange said its board and committee would meet next 
Thursday to discuss when the tin market should reopen. Tradmg was 
suspended Oct. 24 after the International Tin Council announced it 
bad no more money to buy tin to support the world price. 

Members of the European Community are to meet Monday in 
Brussels in an attempt to agree on how to settle the £l-biDion ($1.48- 
biHion) debt of the 22-nation tin counriL Britain, both a producer and 
a consumer member of the council,. is the only EC member to have 
pledged to meet its share of the debt. 

About £342 million is owed to a group of 16 financial institutions, 
which have offered a £900-nriHian refinancing loan. 


to business. Eke wars and budding 
an economy from scratch,” Mr. 
Misholi said “We have had the 
opportunity to become real profes- 
sionals. We learned in two yean in 
die States what it took our parents 
20 years." 

Mr. Mlavsky, the expert on high- 
tech companies, had a similar ex- 
planation of the way that Israel's 
new entrepreneurs (finer from their 
elders. a *Ine older generation sub- 
sumed their ambitions in the com- 
mon goals of state-building,” said 
Mr. Mlavsky. “They were brought 
up on the notion ‘We need an in- 
dustry,’ not *We need an idea.' ” 

The young entrepreneurs have 
been able to do something about 
their ideas. Along with their higher 
educations; they learned manage- 
ment commanding brigades or bat- 
talions in the army. They have 
spent time abroad studying their 

licw^e^busmess is done before 
in trodndng their products. 


Return 

WIESBADEN, West Germany 
— West Germany’s gross national 
product rose 15 percent in the 
third quarter of 1985 from the sec- 
ond quarter, the federal govern- 
ment's statistics office said Friday. 

The increase in GNP, adjusted 
for inflation and for seasonal and 
calendar factors, was 3 2 percent 
over the third quarter of 1984. 
GNP measures the value of goods 
and services produced by a coun- 
try, m rind mg income from opera- 
tions abroad. 


The year-to-year rise was also 32 
percent. 

The spokesman said inflation- 
adjusted growth in the first nine 
months of 1985 was 22 percent 
compared with the corresponding 
period last year. 

As in the second quarter, con- 
struction investment showed the 
biggest rise among GNP compo- 
nents with a 45-percent increase 
from the previous quarter. But 
compared with the third quarter of 
1984, it was 22 percent lower. 


Markets Drowse inpre-Christmas Lethargy 


A g poir«emnti for the statistics Taiwan to Offer Incentives 


office quoted the Economics Min- 
istry as saying that third-quarter 
GNP rose 2 percent from the sec- 
ond quarter when adjusted for in- 
flation and seasonal factors only. 

ha the second quarter, GNP rose 
2 percent, seasonally and calendar 
adjusted, from the first quarter. 


Reuter* 

TAIPEI — The Finance Minis- 
try of Taiwan will offer more incen- 
tives to local firms willing to be 
listed an the local stock market. 
Finance Minis ter Robert Qrien 
said Friday. 


By Christopher Pizzey 

Reuter* 

LONDON — Tradmg in most 
secondary-market sectoral of the 
Eurobond market was very quiet 
throughout the day Friday, with 
dealers saying that there was no 
incentive to open new positions. 

The primary market was also 
quiet, with no new dollar straights 
or floating-rate notes bung 
launched by the end of the trading 
day, dealers noted. 

One doUar-straight trader at a 
U.S. bank said, “The market's un- 
changed to a bit lower, but there’s 
no retail interest and professionals 
are only interested in book-squar- 
ing.” 

The senior trader at a UB. house 
agreed. Tm afraid it looks like 
pre-Christmas lethargy has affect- 
ed virtually everyone today," he 
said. He added that many dealers 


were concerned about completing 
their positions before the Christ- 
mas break. 

But he added that the market 
could well be quite active next week 
if the U.S. Congress passed an 
amendment to balance the federal 
budget. 

On the week, doUar-straighi 
prices closed slightly easier, with 
tradmg having remained at quite a 
low lewd throughout. 

Two Australian-dollar bond is- 
sue were launched. The first was a 
75-nrinion-dollar issue for Unilever 
Becumig NV, guaranteed by Unil- 
ever NV and Unilever PLG The 
three-year issue pays 14W percent 
and was priced at par. The lead 
manag er, Bankers Trust, quoted it 
at a discount of about Hi. com- 
pared with total fees of 1 Vi percent 

WestLB Finance NV issued a 50- 


million-dollar bond paying 14 per- 
cent over five years ami priced at 
par. The issue was lead-managed 
by West Deutsche Landesbank 
Girozentrale and is secured by a 
deposit at the bank's New York 
branch. 

Dealers noted that in the past 
there has been retail demand for 
Australian-dollar bonds issued by 
West German banks. 

Banque Paribas Luxembourg is- 
sued a 40- million-N ew- Zealan d- 
dollar bond issue paying 18 percent 
over three years and priced at 
I0CP4. Dealers noted that on Nov. 
6, the same borrower issued a 50- 
million-New-Zealand-dollar bond 
issue, also paying IS percent over 
three years, but priced at par. 

In the floating-ratr-note sector, 
prices generally ended little 
changed. 



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'** 


Page 20 


ACROSS 

1 Survey 
products 
S Would-be tree 
10 Leafy- 

stemmed plant 
15 Take a — 

(lose heavily) 

19 Rights org. 

20 Show-in-a-box 

21 Cut 

22 "Greetings!" 
classification 

23 Level-headed 
groom? 

25 Scented foot- 
growth? 

27 Dispatched via 
overhead 

train? 

28 Dickie of 
comics 

39 " — drink 

as friends": 
Shak 

31 Summery 

32 Gave a sign 

33 Prado? 

34 Corp. officials 

35 General 
assemblies 

36 Mlscued 

37 Church-council 
scene: 143M9 

49 Well-bread 
fellow? 

42 Flop 

45 Bone: Comb, 
form 

49 Company 


ACROSS 


ACROSS 


47 Boss 

48 Jackie's 
second 

49 As written: 
Mus. dir. 

59 Clint at 3:00 

A.M.? 

54 Reclaimed 
wool 

56 Porter’s" 

Day”: 1932 

58 E Indonesian 
island group 

59 Hamlet, near 
the end 

<60 Helen’s 
abductor 

81 Hair net 

62 Pop song of 
Pop’s day 

63 Wheeler’s 
partner 

65 Gropes 

66 Spinks's way to 
lose weight? 

69 Hood's missile 

79 Chief of the 
canoe crew? 

72 Begum’s 
spouse 

73 Attic 

appendage 

74 Winged 
victory 

75 Soupcon 

76 Writer Claude 


78 Aggressive 
newsvendors? 


82 Amusement- 
park 

enticements 

83 Debussy opus 

84 » Ben 

Jonson” 

85 Saul’s 
grandfather 

86 Draftsman, for 
one 

88 Marshy 
meadow 

89 Fertilizing 
mixture 

93 Bread supply 

94 Blue Nile 
source 

95 Understudies 
for the 
Rockettes? 


Doubles Anyone? ByLndssabin 

i 


PEANUTS 


77 Marshal In 
Napoleon’s 
army 


96 Family 

subject? 

99 Sober C. PA. 

golfer? 

101 Mention 
followers 

102 Attuned 

103 Sidles 

104 Kind of beer 

105 Light bite 

106 Coquettes 

197 Laver’s 
opening? 

1 98 Ai r curren t for 
Nelson? 


DOWN 

1 Pool-table 
tactic 

2 "La Cageaux 
Folles” 
segments 

3 Undercover 
agent 

4 Nautilus? 

5 Agon sites 

6 Hamill 
maneuver 

7 Uttered 

8 Decay after 
exposure to 
moisture 

9 Kentucky 
Derby winner: 
1956 

19 "Skim milk 
masquerades 

": W.S. 

Gilbert 


DOWN 

11 Did a smithy's 
job 

12 Popeye.for 
one 

13 Alale fish- 
eater 

14 Directed 
attention (to) 

15 Dressed for 
surf fishing 

16 Hosni's 
predecessor 

17 Like bikinis 

18 Merciless 

24BookforGigi 

29 In time 

29 Mitchell's 
Pittypat 

32 Binding device 


DOWN 



r lovetau-Tkeesj; 

& 


33 Conductor 
RodzinsJd 

35 Hit the books 

36 Park, 

Colo. 

37 Capt.'sdeck 
aide 

38 Italian wine 
center 

39 Bash for 
Bambi? 

40 “Well!" in 
Outremont 

41 Petitioned 

42 Horn? 

43 Prompt 

44 Man who had 
designs 

46 Knack 

50 Broadcast 

51 Abated 


i New York Tones, edited by Eugene Malesba. 


DOWN 

52 On (hot at 

Reno) 

53 Let fly 

54 Decoration 

55 Distinct part 

57 Circle around 
Sol 

58 Farragut’s 
command 

61 Jewish feast 

62 Track star Df 
the 1938 
Olympics 

63 Daily 
phenomenon 

64 Albany canal 

65 He's bluffing 


DOWN 

66 English 
district, once 

67 Cyma recta 

68 Indians' 
carved poles 

76 Dundee 
musician 

71 Reporter’s 
query 

74 Junior, e.g. 

76 Pilot’s shaver? 

78" in 

Terris," 
encyclical of 
Pope John 
XXIII 


DOWN 

79 Facing 

89 Qurn is here 

81 Grand time for 
Pygmalion’s 
creation? 

82 Encountered 
twice 

83 Free-handed 

85 Doctor’s ad- 
vice for 
bumps? 

88 Scout’s rider 

87 Motel quote 

88 Conn 


DOWN 

89 Meter maid, at 
times 

90 Blotto 

91 P.G.A. Hall of 
Famer 

92 Milton Caitiff 
hero 

93 An anagram 
for anil 

95 Utah's flower 

97 Author Jose- 
phine 


98 Nautical Chain 
190 Byrnes of TV 
fame 



/" 


! -f t j 

Ik 1 ' 


J If 

i *- 


INSIDE WARNER BROS. <1935-1951) 
Selected, edited and annotated by Rudy 
Behbner. 358 pages. Illustrated. $19.95. 

VUdng Penguin Inc, 40 W. 23rd Street, New 
York, N. Y. 10010. 


BOOKS 


Reviewed by John Gross 

I N the golden age of Warner Brothers they be- 
lieved m putting things down on paper — there 
was even an injunction urging employes to make a 
habit of it printed on the stationery used fa 1 internal 
correspondence. As a result of this policy, innumer- 


able letters, memos and reports flowed back and 
t files ha\ 


forth, and fortunately the files have been preserved. 
They are now in the Archives of Perfonmng Arts at 
the University of Southern California, and from 
them Rudy Behlmer has been able to piece together 
a bock. 

Behlmer is a television producer and director who 
has several books on Hollywood to his credit, 
notably "Memo From David O. SelznicL” His new 
compilation, while comparable to the Sdznidc vol- 
ume, is even more revealing as a slice of movie 
history. Where the earlier bode was limited to the 
pronouncements of a single figure, the boss, this 


time we hear directly from a wide range of senior 
studio personnel andin some cases the stars, though 
normally their ngwit* did the biHririg for them. 

The book opens a little earlier than the title 
suggests, with a letter written in 1929 giving notice 
that after the current production the studio will 
have no further use for the services of Rin Tin Tin. 
He was one more casualty erf the coming of sound. It 
is only after 1935, however, that the cadre begins to 
yield ns treasures. 

Much of the correspondence registers difficulties 
and riiMwtwfarrirtnn of one kind or another. Bette 
Davis is unhappy with her bitting End Flynn is 
onhappy with his wig. Edward G. Robinson is doing 
nicely in the filming of the Michael Curtiz movie 
"The Sea Wolf,’’ one memo notes, until the scenes 
where he gets into philosophical discussions with 
the character played by Alexander Knox; then he 
"starts dropping his Vs,’ he becomes very New 


the Spanish Civil War, are unhappy at the thought 
of him playing Kmite Rockne. (The part went to Pat 
O’Biien.) Ronald Reagan is fed up because he has 
been in the hospital for six weeks with a broken 1 
and until the last, moment, no one from the i 
bothered to get in touch or ask how he was getting 


WIZARD of ID 


strings pearls together with drill, and 
wherever necessary supplies some. annotation. The 


glimpses behind the scenes range from advice on 
how toio 


“Jeze- 
f or the opening 

of “Dodge Gty” in Dodge <3ty, Kansas. Than are 
some deqdedly intelligent contributions — an 
’ ‘ for example, on how to cope with 


improve the box-office prospects of 
beT to the strenuous publicity mans for the o 
: Dodge Qty, — ~ 






ffl 


REX MORGAN 


movie based on his career, "Yankee Doodle Dan- 
dy.” (One of the authors was the associate producer, 
William Cagney, the Stax’s brother.) 

Provisional plans for casting movies provide 
some of the best material The effect is often rather 
ghostly, as images of what might have been are 


Yoriry,' and I wish MDce would watch this very 
closely.’* 


augured up: John Banymort instead of Monte 
Man Who/Came to Dinner; 


The authorities at Notre Dame University, mindr 
ful of James Cagney’s support for the Loyalists in 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Solution to Last Week's Puzzle 



Woolley in “The- Man 
George Raft instead of Humphrey Bogart in "The 
Maltese Ftticoa." . 

Although “Warner Bros. <1935-1951)" provides a 
.convincing and detailed picture of the way the 
studio worked, it seems likely that tire brutalities 
that crop up sometimes in its pages loomed larger at 


the tiine. PeoplejdonH alway* write the^way ^7 


talk, even in qffice memos. Still, the 
succeed in conveyinga whiff of the battlefield, of 
what EL M. Forster called "die world of telegrams 
and anger." 

Among those on record protesting against the 


prcvaflmg spirit, the most eloquent was 
Chandler. He is represented by a letter in ’ 


explains (hat during the week he. received no pay- 
ment while working on a script, he had been 31, and 
that he bad caught up by wooing over the weekend: 
“What strange delicacy of conscience induced me to 
give any weight to this, I wonder. It must have been 
that I thought I was dealing with people as precise 
as myself in these matters." 


John Gnus is on the staff of The New York Times. 


'te6EORSEWft5UTTLEJffliSEO DOtfXl HAVETDTH1 
10 HIDE IN THE CLOSET WHEN HE HIM EVERYTHING 

hadtoweaewth.* 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 

HIGH 


c 

F 

Alparre 

18 

8* 

AnuttrOam 

10 

50 

AltKBia 

19 

88 

RarcaMna 

17 

83 

Bdgrade 

14 

57 

Beril* 

10 

5U 

Bnsssels 

10 

50 

Bachanal 

IS 

5V 

Budapest 

4 

3* 

C«wsen8s®an 

4 

43 

Cotta DM sol 

18 

61 

DBB«8 

8 

43 

Cdturgh 

4 

43 

Florence 

14 

57 

Franklart 

10 

50 

Geneva 

12 

54 

Hotel okl 

-11 

12 

IsftsaSwl 

15 

59 

Les Polrsas 

34 

75 

LH1KMI 

is 

SI 

London 

10 

30 

KtedriS 

10 

50 

Milan 

10 

50 

IStoCDW 

1 

34 

MoakA 

12 

54 

NIOi 

18 

88 

Oslo 

-1 

X 

Ports 

12 

54 

Prosss- 

10 

SO 

Mavklmrft 

-2 

20 

Rome 

18 

61 

stDddmin 

0 

32 

StrmBOltrg 

13 

55 

Vinlcg 

9 

48 

Vleww 

4 

39 

Warsaw 

11 

52 

Zorich 

10 

50 


Ankara 

6 

43 

BaSrot 

— 

— 

DiJflMJSCU* 

— 

— 

Joruwsfmm 

1* 

68 

Tel Aviv 

OCEANIA 

21 

70 

AaeUand 




LOW 
C F 


ASIA 


ID SD 
39 


4 

18 90 

5 68 
II SO 


V 48 


4 39 
1 34 
4 39 
-4 2S 
3 38 
10 SD 

-a to 

B 48 

a 32 

-3 27 
13 SB 


— — — — no 


0 30 to 


— — — — na 


— — — — no 


Mm 


SB 

30 IS 20 as 



c 

F 


Bangkok 

22 

90 

o 

©siltos 

-8 

21 

-4 

HongKoeg 

24 

7V 

21 


OS 

04 

34 

Del bl 

25 

77 

10 

se<Hd 

1 

34 

•3 

Shanghai 

15 

59 

9 


27 

01 

24 

Talaet 

21 

70 

19 

Tokyo 

15 

59 

8 

AFRICA 




A Igien 

14 

81 

10 

Cairo 

24 

75 

10 


27 

81 

14 

Cai^fenoo 

19 

88 

12 

Harare 

28 

79 

IS 

Legsia 

— 

— 


Notrabl 

25 

77 

13 

Teals 

21 

70 

11 

LATIN AMERICA 


28 

82 

14 

Canon 

27 

11 

19 

Lkns 

— 

— 

— 


18 

81 

B 


25 

77 

19 

NORTH AMERICA 

Anchorage 

-7 

19 

-13 

Alteato 

11 

52 

U 

Bostoe 

4 

39 

-1 

Cttsoeo 

4 

28 

-8 

Denver 

11 

52 

■3 

Detroit 

3 

38 

-3 

Hcnskihi 

25 

79 

19 

Mmrnm 

20 

88 

2 

Los Angelas 

23 

73 

11 

Miami 

M 

77 

21 

MlnraopgHs 

-5 

23 

-IB 

Moatreol 

1 

34 

-8 

Nassau 

28 

82 

21 

Now York 

4 

39 

-1 

Sea FrorotHsg 

16 

61 

11 

Seattle 

* 

48 

8 






vrasktoetan 

8 

43 

-1 


LOW 

F 


57 fr 


30 Sw 

10 fr 


to m 

0 PC 


d -dowdy; Mohyi fr-fofr; Mwjl; p-overcast; pc-Mrtly dowdy; 
SlWhOwerai sw-snow; iMtormy. 


30 d 
r-raku 


SATURDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: Chappy. FRANKFURT: Rainy. 
Tamp. 11—9 152— •). LONDON: Cloudy with mowers. Tamp. 11 — a (52—43), 

MADRID: Fair. Tempi w-2 157-08). nbw York: *"“*■ Tamp. 5— *1 

(4i—»). Paris: Ramy. t™. 12 — ? at — «>. bome: o <wmi. Tamp. 


Cloud v. Temp. 8 —3 133— 27). SINGAPORE: Stormy. Temp. J1 — S (88— 77). 
TOKYO: Showers. Temp. 11—8 <S9— 44). 


W>rkl Stock Markets 


Via Agence Franoe-Presse Dec. 6 

Closing prices in locai aurmdes unless otherwise indicated 



am 

Prtv. 


537 JO 

5MJ0 

ACFHoWhSB 

362 

2*6 






r ■■ 


j-rfM 

im 

lAmav 

-A'Dam Rubber 

80 

79.(0 

S4S 

aoo 

Amro Bra* 

9A80 


BVG 

242 

244 


12050 

T2I 

CatondHIda 

28 

2110 

EtosvtmvNDU 

185 


Fakker 

7150 

»r‘ ■ 






2n: 


76 






5930 

AL2D 


81 JO 

01 A0 

SledStoyd 

20420 

3PU0 




Pakhoad 

81 JO 

81 M 

Philips 

57 JO 

5JM 


0040 



US 



7130 

71 JO 

Rtirohto 

48J0 

48J0 

Royal Dutch 

309 JO 

3*8.10 

VanOmmarm 

30 


VMF Stork 

252 

234 

VNU 

279 

278 

AN PjCBS Beni index : 239 Ji 

Pravkws: Z7X98 




Artec 

B e fc w r t 

Codcartll 

Cotoeoa 

EBES 

GB-Irtno-BM 

OBL 

Gavaart 


Krodtotbn* 
Patron na 
Sac Sonera Ic 
Safina 
SaWav 

Traction Elae 

UCB 

Unero. 

vTsUtoMontogne 


2850 2845 
B7» MM 
205 207 

4440 400 

3875 3905 

5040 4SB0 

2530 2555 

5250 5210 

sm a ao 

ms 2ND 
12775 12080 

7170 7)00 

ram m« 

050 8380 

8110 Cl 30 

9120 5130 
5830 5800 

2320 2320 

sm sm 


Cwrttrt Stack Index : 294441 
Previous : 2KU1 


AEG-Totefunkon 

Allianz Van 

Altana 

BASF 

Barer 

Bay Hypo Bonk 
Bov VarainsJxmk 
BBC 

BHF-Banfc 

BMW 

Commarabaidt 
Corn Gu Irani 
Dalmiar-Bonz 


22S225J0 

1712 1778 


28158 2S4J0 
2SU0 252 
488 « 

440 485 

304 29UB 


Deutsche 

D*uMp . 
DroMkiar Bank 
CHH 
Hanwner 


38170 27150 
18450 18030 

imtissu 

43BJB 427 
2B216J0 
8M50 702 
341JD34U0 
311 217 JO 
348 350 



mm 






j 

f r - • - 



. - - 



A-riH.'sP!'!*; 


H] 

77 1 ^ J 

| - - C •§■ - . .vTii I 

J i j | . - ■ 

^■<7 1 

■ i 



■ j 

k 4f. 

.11 

-J, 1 - 1 fJ \| I ! ).'■" 


KTfj 











Mpr?. 



r i - 

■p.j 







l 1 L .‘V.i( 


H’ ita' i 

1 -rSujlil^^ 


■kt; 

■ 1 ' 7 , , . , . ■r f &/&&&£& 

■ -M V '■ 





fyLr^RHnreq 

fcu. 

ml 

tTcwarii 



mm 

■ 

■ 

Mi: JI 1 



■t* 


■■|'T y 

i7' 


c 


rrr*rTn 

Zi 

(>;■ 


c 


Pj|l . l' ItMB 



* i v | '. 

rrr 




7* 


E 



TT 

-T , 



▼T 


M 

Vi 


X 2 

R>r 


IE 

■rtr 


TtJ 



19 



T7 

Pft; 


• Wti 

p*». 


t 

m 


y 



Kv 



T * 



V 

■r 

• * i ■ 

E 

Ns 


MT: 

TT 

mh L" 



£ 

i 


E 

RKy 


E 

yi 


NR 



8 



1UJB 

ri 

wn\ 





I . I 1 1 

: f.'- 


m 


Kr7-"1 

1 x 2^1 



I • , Tl 



m I- 'j . ' b 




gma, 1 

KL3 



GFSA 
Mormany 
Hlvald Stool 
Kloof 
Nedbonk 
Pres Store 
Rusp lot 
SA Brows 
St Helena 


3775 3775 
3475 3500 


23 SO 2350 
830 BM 


3575 3625 
7*0 7*0 

4450' 4575 

90S *80 

west Holding 8200 8280 


Cwnposlta Stack Mdw : HA. 


aa corp sine sim 

Alllad-Lyans 273 278 

Anglo Am Goto sm* SSBfe 


Am Dairies 

Barclays 


BAT- 


SB 

148 150 

437 422 

875 854 

388 - 274 

340 320 

250 29 

28 
583 
299 
245 
338 
5*8 
418 
IM 
483 
230 
358 
314 
80S 


snail 

STC j n 

SH Chartered 434 

Sun Ankmco 5X1 

Tata and Lyla MS 

Traco 28S 

Thom EMI 417 "AM 

T.l. Group . 399 403 

Trafalgar Hso 364. 385 

THF T5S m 

utlramar m 3BS 
Unllavsrc 1213A4 123732 

United Biscufts 

VI dear* 29* . 293 

Waolworth SSI 555 


p.T.jginm: niTfa 

Prev toes : 1 new 
F.TJJLT88 ladax : WTU0 
PraVkWS : UtUI 


545 

299 

243 

340 

558 

410 

ita 

483 

324 


138 - 180 

918 »3 


224 

47* 

W 

488 


BICC 
BL 

Blua arde 
BOC Group 
Bools 

Bavugfar Indus 
BP 

Brit Home St 
BrHTefccom 
Brtt Aerospace 
Brilaii 
BTR 
Burmah 
Cable Wireless 
Cadbury Schw 
Charter Cons 

Commercial U 
Cans Gold 
Courtautds 
Daioatv 
Dc Boars* 

Distillers 
Drl atonic In 
F leans 

Freest Gad *21 H S2M 

GEC 174 172 

GanAoddent 70S 703 

GKN 253 2S4 

Glaxo E IS 29/64 15 »/M 

grand Mat 388 388 

Guinness 
GUS 
Hanson 
Hawker 
ICI 

Imperial Group 
Jaguar 

LandSaeurHiee 

Legal General 


4*5 

815 


325 

477 

187 

■480 

467 

493 

S15 


Uoydsta* 


Lucas 

Marks and 3p 
Metal Box 
Midland Balk 
Nat West Bade 
P end O 
PBUngten 
Plassey 
Prudential 
Ha col Elect 

Randtontoki 

Rank 
Reed mtt 
Rdutars 


721 723 

2*4 291 

*80 ' W 
208 Z1D 

441 439 

704 711 

240 232 

917 314 

»5 2* 

782 757 

472 472 

194 1*2 

433 • . 430 
IM. . 180 

si* « 


889 85V 

435 430 

315 310 

VO 172 


188 188 

Sim SWi 

457 457 

700 .709 

019 220 

DUttfIC 4213/84 421/32 

521 .519 

Saareil 720 725 


Salnsbury . 378 . 378 

Sears Hotdlngi 110 118 


Banco Comm 
Clod holds 
Crad itcd - 
Erkfcnila 
FormlKllKj 
Flal 

GaneraU 

IFI 

Itotoamantf 

Italoai 

itaimaMlial 


l Mantadlsan 

NBA 

Ollrettl 

PlnHIl 

RAS 

Rtnoscanto 
SIP , 

SME 

Snla 

Stomata 

Slat 




24280 249S0 
12195 12230 
- 31 
13199 1 

18497. 


22*7 

14210014 
12 


8105 8199 

JM 

137979 


1250 1380 

5120 5099 
18080 18000 
3555 3845 


M1B CarrMf ladax : HJI 
:194i 


AlrUaulda 
AJsttiomAtL 
av Dassault 
Bancalre 
BIC 

Bongretn 

Carrefaur 
Chargaure 
□ub Mad 
Darty 
Duma* 

Elf-AguHaln* , 
Europe 1 
Gen Eaux 


80S 810. 
381 397- 
1180 1197 
79V 812 
498 588 
U52 urn 
823 851 
2445 2499 


Laftxge Cop 
Lag rand . 
Ustour 

I ’Oreo) 

Martell 
Metro 
Man In 
Mlcq ailn 
Moot Hennessy 
Moulinex 


Pernod Rlc 

Perrier 


Peugeot 

Printomoe 


Saiafl 

SktaH 


lidaf 


Thomson CSF 
Total . 


681 888 
499 488 

1875 1890 

8S6 8» 

218 225 

900 910 

773 77? 

1399 1409 
880 875 

2473 2480 
723 730; 

2808 2sn 

1548 I5» 
1825 1800. 
2SDD 2536 
1595 UW 
2180 2T*1 

72 71 JO 
717 719 

745 745 

433 438 

489 JO 472- 

-3*3.10 34520' 
'■ 402 4 Of 

,r 1880 .*1899. 
1851 1«7 
882 STS 
. 1400. 143# 
2725 2775 

*0 . m 
299 .310 


cac lodexiaojo- 
Prevlous : MtM 


Cold Storage 
DBS _ 
Fraor Noam 
Haw Par 
Tnchcopa. 
Mai Banking 
OCBC 
OUB 

oue 

Shangri-la • 
Slme Daisy 
SViaraLmd 


17* TJO 
US UQ 
438 420 
7J5 7 JO 
14* US 
. MJQ. — 
UN US 
I/O ' 13* 
UO 1 JS 
55 5 193 


225 209 

U0 1.17 
100- ZM 


Slndls Times Udl 
pravtaaa ; 809J4 J 



AC I ..... 

ANZ ", 

BHP 

Bond 

Bmwakwfll* 
Costlenwlne- . . 

Colas 

COmotco . 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunlop . • 

BUMn Ixf / . 

ICI Aiotreila 1 
MaaaOai . 

MIM 

Mrer 

Nat Awt Bade . 
News Corp 
N Brtften mil '. • • 
Posoldan 
GW Coal Trust . 
Sontol _ 
Thomas Natal 
Western Milting - 
wastage B onKhw 
Wo odn dt 


ITS 

4J8 


M3 113 
LM 1J1 
' 8 ■ t 
4J0 4.15 
.UO 185 

S 5J8 
157 

.237 U 

-239 195 
X13. 2J3 
1 2 
£50 143 
XI0 340 
'488 4JB U 
.150.' 050-1 
118 2.17 

345 345 

147 149 
. £50 .552 
2JB IM 
U0 .3.12 
4JD ess 
123 122 


All 

Preview: 9085* 




410 «5 


Altai . . . 

AsatdOiem 77V , 771 

'AfWd Glass M* BM 

Bank at Tokyo • 734 to 

Bildgailond .. 519 S8. 

Canon 118B 1180. 

Casta . 1848 1100 

Cfiati • • . -385 - 300 

Dal Nippon print 1300 1310 

Da baa HeW* - .878 889 

MMOSOCurlUas; -770 778 

Panic 7450 7440 

Ful iBank . 1480 1460 


Japan AlrLkns 
Kallma 
Kanxdpmmr. 
KuwuMdd Steal 
Kirin Br a v a ry - 
Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec Into 
Matsu Elec Works 
Mitsubishi Bank 

iMItsutatodawm - 
MlteubWii Elec ., 
MUsutobUMeavv 
MltsuWshKtop . 
Mitsui and Co 
MltsukaM 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Inoulators - 
NHdmSac 
Nippon Kogaka 
WppanOU 
Nippon SToat - 
Ntapon Yuaen 
Nissan - 
Nomura Sac 

Olympus 


Rlcah 
Sharp 
Shknwa 

SMnatsu Chamicai 
Sony 

Sum Homo Bank 
S u mito m o Own 
Sumitomo Marina 
Sum Kama Moral 
TalsaJ Carp 
Talsha Marine - 
TataadaCham 

T? J 


508 508 

M3 380 
;344 SSI 
580 381 

*3*5 400 

816 835 

STD 830 
1340 1350 
900 097 

.713 - 719 
1090 UNO 
788 770 

151 153 

332 330 

572 • 372 
1000 -H20 
1030 WW 
1720 1450 
1110 .1130 
910 920 


Tokyo 

TOPPWi Prttdlflo 

Toravlnd 
Toshiba 
■Toyota 
YamoKM 3 oc- 


*33 530 

3940 4000 
1590 1510 
B0 M3 
431 854 

140 141 

3i* m 
- SM SIB 
*23 *0S 

4240 4190 
473 417 
837- . 875 
BOO. 2310 
989 992 


27? 377 

HSO 1158 
710 719 


HkW/lU ladax: 1271351 
Prevtow s iiW84.il - 
Now UWok: WM8 
Prevlow : HI321 ■ 


EH 


Aidcutae 

Adoption ’ 

Bank Lea 

Brawn Beveti 

ObaGatsY 

Credit Sutaw 

E teirumii l 

JntaUteaount 

JBeabSuehard 

JHmaM 

LandbGw 

MOWMPMC 

Ncstto 
Oetiikon-B - 

kodeobn. . 

Sandex 


4470 . 44n 
as 855 
4150 4100 

4125 4180 

lMO 1000 

3440 . 3825 
3495 34K 
3500 .3925 

2275- 3320 

7450 ms 

3850 MM 
22» .22)0 
5100 5150 
7940 7*25 
1380 1270 
11823 1134D 

rm i4M 


Sutter ' . 
SurreiHano* 
SaHaorir . . *. 

sac 


490 . 473 


1553 IBS 


Swtss VoUakaak 
Onion Bonk mm 
wintaritiiir:. 
Zorich las . : 


2175 Z17V 
2370- 2380 
.4910 4920 

5940 - 5850 

Mis aa 


SBC ladax.: 90758 


7i A- not aucMIi' InlaI nor 
xdratodMdimt 


898O0BramalM - 
: m 
UMRBCFP 
33405 BCROS 

- 37B7BBC Phone 

2001 Brutswk 
. 4800 Budd Can 
20924 CAE ' 
300CCLA- - 
30B0CCL B f 
8730 Cad Frv 
8700 ca wip gau t 
3930 C Nor West 
2973C Fsrekrs 
awcan Trust 
4810 C Tunp 
B^ClBkCwn 
45D931 CTIre A I 
MOCUfflB - 
B2SOara 
10300 Cewnese 
_MB Cefan *75 p 
2700CantrtTr 
1 CHUM 

Wsssscineplex 

2200 C Ditto A 
3100CDbtoBf ■- 
117B0 C71_ Bank 
JTVO CtmkaR 
-30900 Conran A 
2*74 Crowns 
9450 Czar Ras 

- 53321 Doan Dev 
lW23 Dan*tOO Ap 
27775 Dmisan B ( 

ZMDeuatcon 
1470 DkSmsn A f 
WDIciwnO 


1300 Donohue 
8377 Du Font A- 


T87S8 PytlX A-9 
■■EKtoianX 


■ 100 EM 
29100 Emou 




1501 

gmCPatcenC 
53730 Flatordge 
- 90B0Pcd.lnd A . 
200 Fad Pldn 
1800 FCMV Pin 
SOOGandtsA 
73900 Goae Comp 
2900 GSmenor. 
11100 GgWcerp t 
1100 GL Forest. 
llOGtPadflc 
2374 Grevtmd 


7V0 Mores O 
30450 How InH 
. *opmnnror) - 
4S1H Boy Co 
31188 Imam 
20 m inM 
400lnMlo ' 
^Ojidandces. 
30000 lidl Tham . 
18091 inter Plow . 
M9B0IMCO 
. HOIvocoB 
. 8930 Jaonack : 
*425 Karr AIM .. 
32771 Liftoff . ■ 

ZUOLOntcem. 

VSeumne 

3g*27LofatqwCo 

700 WCC. 
23300 Melon hx. 




*T -K . 


■*. ' 







, i33l f 


tsswr 

. Total sales 


380 
S17S8 T7V5 

Slfto 170* 

si»s 17V. 

3314ft 31 lft 

S2JV. 22V» 
S2flh MVj 

S71*k 314* 

aa m 
nnt mo 

369-295 : 

sam 27Vb 

S2F& 211A 

315 300 ; 

322M 224* 

S38H 31 

48W 47 
374* 71k 

3744* Ml* 
S !2 in* 
J8W *fc. 
4*. 420 . 

no s® : 
S19K mo 
3183ft i®%i 
Sl» 19* 

sun Met* 

373*. 71* 
STM, 71* 
18L717514 than 


\ ■'ll 


. ^ ’ 

■s 


y-'> 

v * 


v ■ 


^3 v-. 


40oo cb Pm, 


i 

,5E?°omT»tA 

1 ST 


WM Ro yal Bank 




Tatot Solos MS4J37jstXnnL 


High UwCtoMONB- 
334 331ft 3MfcL- *■ • 

Sl3Vk 12M KM4- tt 
3131* IS^ft TJVl'*- » 
S2» 23H 231fc + Jk 

ST! I* IBS* lUt^ W 

SWt If. IB . - 
3141* UMi UM-t-Hl 
512 1118 HHu" ^ 

sin* lsv. it**— J* 

32Mh 21 2JV»-.di 
SUM, an 2i — .w 
SUM 148* U - 

STTRb 171ft im 

S3« ■ 3*1* 341* 

3324* 22V. 

mm' 




i . 

-* 


La' Wt. 

* ‘v 


•d* 


■•■V. 

V ._J% 




wteEiNwososAWDnaues : -i. 































TRIBUNE, SATURDAY -SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 1985 


SPORTS 


Page 21 


Gentle Giant in Disfavor 

New HighSchool Roles Bar Wrestler 

• The Associated Pros during workouts to hrfp sweat off 

MOUNT CLEMENS, Mririgan foewoghL . 

- — nmnatcss^hewookiaotlngt “I don’t flunk he endangers aav- 


. 1 a flea, yet Lyle (Pooh) Bondi will body” said FML Abdoo, a I9&- 
not be able to wrestle forMshigh pound wrestler cm the Mount Qem- 
. : i school team because officials say «ns team. Tve been wrestling him 
•T ’ w thcybdirMchcirtight sqiiash anop- OTCcIwasafrcshmanandlliavtsci’t 
pooenL beeahurt." 

. Bondi weighs 315 pounds (I<tL 8 . Bill Kegmec, due witrfBng coach 
' kilograms). - .at Gass A champion Tqnpeomcfr 

I f -T’ ' When the Monm damans High Bcdford,'said be, too, thinks Burrefl 
m ! ') School team opens "its season next dwald be allowed to compete. 

wedc, the Moot -1 (lB-meter) senior “You don’t see a 7-footer disqual- 
t -wiflbeem foe side&ie hying toahed ified in basketball or you don’t seen 
■ V \ wd^t because the NattonaTFedoB- 420-pcrand kid not allowed to play 
V; ■' V don of State TEj fo School Assoda- football because he will come up 
lions said he is too big to grapple. against someone who weighs 180/* 

T think Uk ruling is kind of silly” R °g i g cr f?^. ' . ' 

\ said Burrefl, who had a 37-1D-2 re- nKz MeGiimess, efitor of the 

coni Sa^soo. “But I am noting high school wrestling roles book, 
■ f/\ to Stop trying to lose weight.” said th e weight hum was imposed to 

1 re ^Sic»t»i 1 .hn^ M h 

n* 5 ‘ moe STSnSgr weight class 

;i rather than one that can be won by 

! • how much yon wash," Ire said, add, 

: “j “What we hope to do is to get a fa g tf»* theN ptirt««ri rnn^atr. A tty- 
s' court injunction to aikiw the ltids to lrtw t«mwi« t iwii Hat mlrntwi a iimi. 

LJfc£r wrestle until the court decides,” Jar rale, effective next wear. 

Waites said. “ft looks to me as if he At birth, Burrell weighed S 

is being disci i ruinated, against be- pounds and 10 ounces, but he grew 
cause of his weight- It seems as if it “bec an sfr fi e fiv** i» *«*,” gain hfa 
'""jiJrr should be against the Constitution.” mother. Gene. He is nicknamed 

Burrell, who played defensive “Pooh” because when he was bom, 

taxWe an the Batl»rs* football team, Mrs. Burrefl said, “ This is my little 
— — said he has substituted salad for his Winnie the Pooh.’ ” 

■j :ov£^> favorite foods, fried rfwAwn and The national high school assoda- 

macaroni and ehawa*. Hit fasts every tiou, however, says Bondi rcsem- 

other day and wears a rubber soft Wes agrizzly bear, not a cuddly bear. 



Wilander, Tourney 
Halted as Rain Falls 
On Australian Open 

CompUtdbyOv Suff Fran Dupauha paying wwal rimes official prices 

MELBOURNE — Mats Wi- to get tickets for the Davis Cup 
lander was on his way to his third final Dec. 20-22 in Munich, where 
successive Australian Open final West Germany will play the de- 
Friday when both he and the tennis fending champion, Sweden, 


tournament were brought to a halt. 
Wilander was leading the un- 


Agence France-Presse reported. 
One small newspaper advertise- 


sccdcd Slobodan Zivcginovic of ment announced; u WiQ pay 850 
Yugoslavia, 7-5, 6-1, M, when the marks [5350] for Davis Cup tick- 
rain that has been so much a fca- ets.** Tickets, the sales of which 
tore of the two- week tournament were limited to two per person, cost 


again began to fall. 70 Deutsche marks. 

Their match, officials hoped. Although reselling tickets is iUe- 

could be resumed Saturday before ^ offenders could be fined 
the final of the women’s singles lt000 DM , that apparently has 
between Martina Navratilova and faded to deter many profiteers. 
Oms Evert One man said he had had 150 

The second men s s emifinal, be- phone from persons willing to 
tween the topseededlvan Lendl of pay 500 DM He said be was hang- 
^ho&bvalaa and Stefan Edberg £g on to them because he thought 


of Sweden, seeded fifth, is to be 
jtfayed after the women's singles 

But more rain and founder- 


the price would rise. 

A woman, who sold her two seats 
for 1,000 DM, said: “1 could have 
got more but I was fed up with 


stmms are forecast for Saturday b^ng disturbed. The phone never 
and Sunday, a weather bureau stopped ringmg." She add she was 

tnnVKnmn UiH ■“ • - 


Slobodan Zivojhtovic of Yugodfania, who was faffing by the score of 7-5, 6-1, 6-1, had mi answer to the rain that cot 
short Ms s emifin a l match •with Mats Wilander of Sweden. Officials were hoping they could resame playing S a turd ay . 


NFC’s lions Have One More Part to Play in AFC East’s Drama 


By Michael Janobky 

—I ,j£ New York Times Sortie* 

NEW YORK — Besides 94 records the 
-'ew York. Jets, the Miami Dolphins and 

■ New Tfa gtanH Patriots of the Foram 

pvisica of the American Conference have 
imerhing dse in common tins season: 
^ raves with the Detroit Lions. The Dol- 
"02 bins played them Oct 27 and lost, 31-21. 
T he Jets played them Nov. 28 and loa, 31- 
« ). 

This Sunday, it is the Patriots' tnm. But 
' lierc is a difference, and a difference that 
.*/' aild go a Jang way toward determining 
clinch of the three team vrins the dhririon: 
j T nc Jets and the Dolphins played the Lions 

, t the S flv erdome in Pontiac, Michigan, 
he Patriots play them in Soffivan Staxhmn 

i Foxboro, Massachusetts. 

“ At htxne, the Lions are 6-0. Away, they 
— re 1 - 6 . 

-v The Patriots have won seven of their last 

.’t- rrighi, with two changes at quartezback. 
- :-:'V itcr starting the first six games of die 
^^_^ 5 ^&soa, Tony Eason separated his left 
q^^Mftoiddier dnnng a loss to the Cleveland 
V -^wrowns. Steve Grogan, who had lost his 


game one to now,” Eason said. “People . I " — 

have to remember this is really the first NFL PREVIEW 

year we have had this offense in; initially, : . 

we had a lot of problems, a lot of growing ha, 19 times. The Jets should win, no matter 
pains. It sometimes takes rinee years to fed how banged up they are. (Jets by 9.) 


do not have their offense totally synchro- another of those 


teams capa- 


s * > 2 ““? an “ ld ' , ... ... , going riding instead of watching 
Zwqjmovic, ranked No. 66 m the thetainis matches. 

world, slipped several times as be — - — — 

was saving the opening games of 

the third set on the soggy grass p **.1 VP 7 * 
center court. Finally he called out | JlU llfllS W lU 
to the referee, Peter BeOeager, “Do 

you want me to break a teg or g~\ j ttw - -1 

what?” and the match was halted. iTrSflfl l 9 d 1 XlP 
The 6 -foot -6 (1.98-meter) Zivo- CU1U 1J<liUC 

jinovk, who overpowered die sec- /’VP /V , • 

on d- seeded John McEnroe in five v/X 1 rVP n lTYI P 
sets Wednesday for the tounia- 

mwfsWfflKt upset, did not play By Robert Fachet 

Wasfonpon P«, Sen** 

the thm^seeded Swede who .s try- WaSH INOTON - Scou Su 
mg to become the third man to win ^, c > h\ e 


imsed. A victory Monday night would not ble of playing brifliantly or horribly. Late- three straight titles. Bryan Murray only oft 

only tie them with the Ramsm the rfiviskm ly, with OHvcr Luck « qnartert»ck, they . . apparently untrou- wrapping Thursday night when his 

but give them a decided edge in tiebreaker have been passing well, and, even though bled by a brace on his nght elbow, shot from the left point at 1:29 of 

considerations because of a head-to-head they have lost three of their last four, still s * rv “ seven m thefirstseL In overtime gave the 

sweep. (49ers by 10.) . could be dangerous. But the Giants make ™ oaa set Zwmmovic. 22. ap- W ashingt on Capitals a 3-2 victory 

(T 6 ) at PUadeipUa (S-7Y. any team look dangerous. (Giants by 6 tt.) peaitxf(»nfused about what tactics nvrr tSr Si Wliws 


By Robot Fachet 

IVasfangion Pott Service 

WASHINGTON — Scou Ste- 
vens' birthday present to his coach, 
Bryan Murray, lacked only gift 


comfortable.’' P lltslm gfa (6-7) at San Diego (6-7): Fcar- 

A team fike (he lions, who have an gel the records and the probability that 
outside dunce to make the playoffs as a neither team will make the playoffs. It 
wild-card fa*™, could make the Patriots should be a fun game became each team 
fed even more co m fo rta ble — but only as will keep passing until it gets it right If that 
long as they are not playing at home. is the case, the Stedea should win because 


fed even more co m fort a ble — but only as 
long as they are not playing at home. 


s Reno Race 


is the case, the Stedos 


Book has their defense is mnch better than the Char- 


but give them a decided edge in tic-breaker have been passing weO, and, even though 

considerations because of a head-to-head they have lost three of their last four, still *- IVCU sc*™ ares m memsisci. in overtime gave the 

sweep. (49ers by 10.) . could be dangerous. But the Giants make ™ oaa set Zivqmowic. 22. ap- W ashingt on Capitals a 3-2 victory 

Waafegton fr- 6 ? at HtiMdplda (6-7): any team look dangerous. (Giants by 6 &) peared confosed about what tactics over the Sl Louis Blues. 

The last time they played, the third week of Daflas (9-4) at O dremli (6-7): The Ben- » use agamst the deafly Krarate victoryi m Murray’s 43d 

the season, the Redskins lost by 19-6. TlMy gals can score in a fanny, and the Cowboys’ Swede, and Wilander finished off K^Krioy extended the Capitals’ 
are still having trouble *c«ffag hot now, in Mmw. is ranked 22 d a gyfaw the pass. set with an ace. _ ’ — 

Jay Schroede^ they have a qpartaback Boomer Eriason is aware of that, bntDao- But by then the rain had started NUT FOTTIS 

them back into ny White of the Cowboys Kkdy has noticed to fan more heavily. r\jvAjp 

ideariy.StiH.it how leaky Cincinnati’s defense is: Only the Zivojinovic repeatedly had unbeaten streak in overtime to 18 
ybytheawdal Falcons have given tro more points. (Cow- dutdied his back, possibly because games — six triumphs and 12 ties 

aed for touch- boys by 3.) of having played 104 games in the — since they last were defeated in 

Given all that, Umqnlb (3-10) at Chicago (12-1): last two days, and although he vol- Winnipeg on Feb. 19, 1984. 


made the Patriots 8 -poim favorites. 
AMERICAN CONFERENCE 


gas 1 , ranking thud. (Chargers fay 4.) 
Ckvdsnd (7-6) at Seattle (7-6): The 


Los Angeles (9-4) at Denver (9-4): This Browns, who lead the AFC Central, are 
could decide the winner of the. AFC West one of the hottest teams in the league, with 


with an arm that can pass back into 
contention if they get behind eariy. StLQ.it 
is hard to wm with poor play by the special 
teams, interceptions returned for touch- 
downs and five turnovers. Given all that, 


eariy.StLQ.it how leaky Cincinnati’s defense is: Only the 
5 y the special Falcons have given op more points. (Cow- 


«T«t rkm tt»hr Wri-fag i firfd fa Seahawks is not good; the faun*; have hue. slowly rotnming to good health, has hisfirst start in a month, he still is the top- called out in the fifdi gain of that 
rtwr ifav! the Broncos have a tmAm- played annually 1977, with Seattle helped Eari Caxnpbrfl nm for 204 yards, rated passer in the NFC (Bears by 18.) set, “Can I go home? rm down 4-1 
. . . : Tlv r«>Kn<i1c kM ^ j.. uuAU\^o- u -n«i£4k.'n u i.ri and I’ve servrd three aces, let me po 



only to 

New 


fly tnydny bft twr fa gnmff agafart w i nn i ng «ht of right, mefarifag rtM»lanttaiw„ TTjC Cardinals have k>St fOQX 

a team they had faced eadier. And they are (Seahawks hy 446.) eight of tbeir last nine. (CarcE 

at home^ where this season they have lost NATIONAL CONFERENCE Tampa Bay ( 2 - 11 ) at Mia 

Do^jhms. (Broncos by 2%.). :• Los Angdes (M) at San FVancfea>(T8-5): The Boocmeers should at le 


The Cardmals have lost four straight and Mfaraa 0M) at Green Bay (6-7): The last aud IVc served three aces, let me go 

eight of their last nine. (Cardinals by 3.) Florida team to play in Green Bay, the home.” 

Tampa Bay (2-11) at Minnesota (6-7): Buccaneers, failed to score in a near-hfind- . A spokesman for the Lawn Ten- 
Tbe Buccaneers should at least find this ing snows to r m . The mere fact tfw the 015 Assoriahrm of Australia, Tony 


to Easam 


the Dolphins. (Broncos by 2 %.) . • ;■ Los Angeles (5M) at San Fkandaco(B6): »*ocaneere should at least find tta 

York (9-4) at Buffalo (2-11): The The Rams are backsliding swifdy, having game a welcome diversion after losing, 21 


NHL FOCUS 

unbeaten streak in overtime to 18 
games — six triumphs and 12 ties 
— since they last were defeated m 
Winnipeg on Feb. 19, 1984. 

The Blues, losing for the first 
time in their last nine overtime 
games, had been the National 
Hockey League’s masters rtf the ex- 
tra five minutes since overtime was 
restored in 1983. This was only 
their third loss in 33 such games. 

The Capitals also dosed to with- 
in five points of the Patrick Divi- 
rion lead as the Philadelphia Fly- 


S- eariy Ja$t. season, replaced Jets will have had 10 days io prepare f or Jost four 
injured Ins left knee two. weeks this one after losing to the. Irons on ^8-14 to 


'5m until be injured ms left knee two; weeks 
go and was unable to finish the season. 
- iason returned as the Patriots lost to the 
ets in overtime, 16-13, but. a week later 
v jfeey beat the Indianapolis Colts, 38-31. 
p “We have made a lot cf strides from 


the 49crs 


'. But the key will' be -game winning streak at the start of the hidooix. {VBdngs hy 654.) 


ing swifdy, having game a welcome diversion after losing, 21- Dolphins could experience a swing rtf per- Peek, said the tournament would 
!*lndndmg oneby 0, to the Packera in the snows of Wisconsin haps 60 degrees could be. a problem for a. have no problems with sc h ed ul ing 
brake their seven- last Sunday. The Vikings’ home games are passing team that (dies so much on timing as long as there was m more rain. 
it the start of the tndoocs. (VOangs fay 654.) and execurioo. (Dolphins by 354.) But, he added, “If it rams again 

Athutfa (2-11) atKmsas Chy (4-9): Truly tomonw we will be in trouble £ 


Peek, said the tournament would era, by a 6-3 score, lost in their 
have no problems with scheduling Spectrum to the Toronto Maple 


ccting the quarterback, Kxir (XBriezu season. What is so alanmng is that the 
Bills no doubt watched how the lions erosion has taken place on defense, which 


INTERCOINFERENCE 
New Yaric Ghats (8-S) at Houston (5-8): 


handled him, but no team in the league has had been such, a strength. The 49ers, even The Gusts have lost to Green Bay.Gsxan- eight of their last nine; the Fakoos, five of 
sailed a quarterback less often than Buffa- though they have won their last three, sriD nati and Cleveland, and foe Oilers are their last six. (Chiefs by 354.) 


(AP, UPI) 

Cup Tickets Hot hems 
West German tennis fans are 


Basketball 

L Standings 


Hockey 

National Hockey League Standings 


■ "Ml WW 

Y<K * 


L eastbrii conference 

AHmHc DMdN 

W L Pet GB 
17 t MS — 
■Iphla 11 I HI t 

‘MfJwwv 10 11 *74 « 

oNll n gMi 1 11 421 V 

-cw York ns m mi 

- Control DhrWM 

^Vfanuka* 14 7 JM — 

■janu u ■ .61* 3 

‘loMB 9 11 AS* SVb 

wwend 8 11 AH 6 


WALES CONFERENCE 


W L T PU SF 6A 
W 7 0 38 m 79 


NY istandtra 
NY Stawn 
Plttrtjuroh 


Transition 


[.^IWIBUtUN 14 7 M* — 

-j l*FW U ■ ^1* 3 

-X.10MB 9 11 AS8 SVb 

- owrftnd I II JXl t 

^taiBO 7 15 Jia SVk 

n*— w 4 is mi w 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
MMwtsi DMston 

• •■aatoi 74 t jtO — 

- «w*r 13 7 M0 1 

- «* 12 * J71 JVi 

'• dlw 10 8 J56 3 

1- n AntDnto 11 9 558 3 

;l.'(n«TMntD 4 13 J14 TVs 

POCffiC DlvMM 

l V. I nlnn 16 2 JOS — 

■ rttend 12 10 s*s 4 

.■ Wtlo V 11 >50 1 

C-'lfoo stoto V 13 An 9 

I- X-CMwwfi 7 13 358 18 

;• oonbl 4 U 300 13 

'' THURSDAY'S RESULTS 

!< hnakn av 31 30 25— M5 

l W YoriC 25 W 2S H- IS 

, Awcrilf 6-157-9 19. T. Q i mminai4-lt 441 IBi 
, .• dear 5-10 l-I U P-Cununlrwi 4-14 1-7 ia 
K-'OamM: Mlhwwk»t50(BnMMr,Pr««ay4). 

w York 59 IP. Cwrwnlnoi 18). IbUc Mfl- 
v . 4ikM 24 ( Pranav 81. Ntw York 22 (Tuckar 

«!• 34 21 2* 21— ft 

r ; mtaBS 37 n 18 32—144 

'• '7*44-13 M-212ATurphl 8-103-4 19; SUono 9- 
1 ■ -822. McOonkj M3 3-4 lf.ltaMmdc: Saot- 

• -5) IStkmo 9), CToMriomlS* IPMMtto MB. 

- Mi: Saottt* 34 (SFtarxx. Hcndanon SI. 

• 'vaiond 31 (Baotav ill. 

>. • Jmn EMM is-111 

• ' ; TOR 25 SI 28 30—113 

; tamas 11-25 54 24, Long 7-14 6-7 20; Dow- 
L - 4 18-1744 24. Gflilmia 45 M 19. SMMOHC: 

*Janav43 (fimMBU Hl.DatrolT 57 (Bon- 
K • 'TO. AidNi: N4W JBTMV24 (Blrttong 181. 
>• Toll 34 (Thomoi 101. 

■'I UHta a 34 17 25— 120 

.1« 3127X7X1—114 

, l . ftmore W-n S-4 25. MKdwii 9-17 34 21; 

• 4rro ai9 11*14 27, Harpor 18-12 44 2k iw- 
c-REi: son AntontoC (GUmora 14), Dallas 
> IPorHns rw. AssMs: Son Antonio 30 
t «ra 14), Dallas 94 (AauiiY# B). 

1 •• - CHopms 24 22 34 24— 1M 

! ; .aMS2al4 M 31 29 33-111 

1 ;lortMeSS4tt > Floyd 8-143-2 II; MiimwII 
: CM2 2a WMt8 7-14 56 W. RafeOaoEi! LA. 

, ’wi 43[Case9) f OaW4n Slate 57 (Smith 
' ' Assists: LA. Cuppers 71 (Nlxoalll.CWd- 
. Uata 27 iFtovd Ml. 


IS 7 3 

10 S 4 

12 13 1 

10 12 3 

t 13 1 

ns DMM 

13 8 4 

W 18 1 
13 11 1 
12 10 3 

11 12 0 


30 101 BS 
27 90 79 

27 *3 79 

27 112 *4 

22 92 97 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 


MILWAUKEE— Acquired David Onren. La - 
outfleidar. from Son Frondeco for a minor- 
ieaouo player to be named laler. Designated ... . 

Won Johns, outfielder, for aastanmnt. 

CALIFORNIA— Boned Don Sutton, PlMwr, lVIiL 
for ilia 190* season wHh an option for 1*47. 

OAKLAND — Hired Dave Naiaoa as mtnor 
looowo coordtaatw. Staned Don Cooper and Etanentan 
RdPh CltareOa. nnchers, and RudV Kmtz, Calaarv 
autftaJdK, is ana AAA CMdrads. VOncauvar 

Matiaaal Leaoue Wlnnlpog 

NEW YORK— Promoted Al Morailfl to m- Los Angeles 
ntor vice president. Named Joe MclIvatM T , 

vice pre si dent for basafcail e p erotlcns and TB ~ ta 
Jean Coen neoaitve aseletaitf to tboaenena] - -- 


23 81 93 

22 97 188 

20 94 94 

» si m 

17 W 113 

40 135 *4 

31 111 89 

21 185 119 

21 h m 

14 85 133 


vuju -ni. .n, THURSDAY’S RESULTS 

dee president for boMtocdl operation and 

lean Coen exec u tive a na l stent to ttie general n ilbel iiNWii 1 1 1—3 

"yffT: — nrDn . 1J Hortwen 151, Smith {2J, Bowling (2), Court- 

nall2l4),Prvoer 19> : Ran Saner {51. Slnioala 
Hwmer mtaeiMeaow supervisor. {in> KmT cw> jjm, — aoet; Toronto (on 

BASKETBALL Jansen. Froeaa) 9-187-34; PMIadeleMa (an 

NaNeaM Basketball Akwdattoa Edmitbl 13-14-7-3*. 

PHILADELPHIA— Stoned Butch Cortar, Mon t real 1 1 4—4 

auanMorwariL Placed volss Wtntars.aua>U Boston I 2 »— 8 

m waivenL Pede rsu n 08], Bnurauo (51. Crowder (18), 

BOSTO N g TaiKflDcvMThln&H l forward. Derfooo (31, Martcwort 2 (4). Mldt&afoa (41, 
ynnr e.i I Raid t5):C nr tMnweau(9).Trendilciy CJl.Che- 

-rnettnn l ennae Dos 2 (S>, McPtwo (4), DdHUn (14). SMtS on 

GREEN BAY— Stoned Chuck Oantan, do- P 0 *? WwUreOt (OP RlOOinl 4-11-18—37; BaO- 


4 EAST 

. wtem U. 42, N ^Greensboro 48 
17 ft Dartmouth 55 
. «« SL 94, Bottiune-Cbokinan 82 
t* 52, RPI 58 
* h, 9S J *ni 45, Vermont 58 
SOUTH 
:de>M.MumanSL71 
. Viand 77. Mruiiam & Worv * 
MIDWEST 
St. 91, Akron 73 
/'*«■), Momtiood SL 71 
, nnstai XL E. Ttxas S». *0 
SOUTHWEST 
..^■nas 72, Smidurd 51 
~ ion 104, Tmnmdan Antonia 59 
• - or 4ft Tern* asm W 
Hama SL 4ft SL MorVS. Toros S3 
FAR WEST 
force 7X Mesa M 
srnfa 87, Hawafl 71 
tort* Gaf H Tombs 42 
ilneton 78, Nav.-Reno 44 


fenslva bat*, taa sertesaf ano-vaor contracts. 

LA. RAMS— Suspended BoMtv Dudcworth. 
whto recetver, lor one game. 

SEATTLE— Stomod Ray Butler, wMo m- 
caivar. Ptocod Byron Fra nkBn. wide receiver, 
on lnlurod reserve. 

DALLAS— PtaCad Robert Lervette, rumble 
back, on Iniared raeerva. Stoned Kamv Duck- 
alb wide reoelwer-fcfcfc refanwr. 

N.Y. JETS— Stoned Carl Howard, cnrnar> 
back. Waived Billy Stdelds, tackle. 

Ouodta Fffflttwil Ut cnu « 

TORONTO— Stoned Bob oninewtch, bead 
caadt (0 a faovear aanfraa 
GOLF 

LPGA— Named Pat Burns m rector of pro- 
motions <ml special prelects amUaff Adams 
director of markatlna far Uw Mazda Hall a I 
Pam* ChaiiwfonMpL 

HOCKEY 

NattonM Hockey Loosuo 

DfiT ROIT— Recalled RlekZombo. defense- 
maiLfromAfSnmdack of it* American Hock- 
ey Leaoue. 

N.Y. ISLANDERS — Recoiled AMkkffl M» 
kelsi, lalt wbHL Iran SprtapAeM of Itw AHL. 
Sant deferaemon Ken Letter and center Rop- 
er Karlfco to SprlnsfleM. 

PHILADELPHIA— Traded Len HadUtam, 
center, to ttw us Anon lei Kino* for future 
co ne fttora tto ns . 

WA5HINGTOH—5entDavto A Jeneen, for- 
ward. and Gary Sampson to Blnshamten of 
AML 

MONTREAL — Named Daub Harvey as a 
parHtnw scout In the Ottawa raaton. 

COLLEGE 

HAWAI I- Hi red Lea Murakami, boeibofl 
ceactx. on full-time status. 

TEXAS TECH— Named John Mize and 
Dean Stovton oesistonMaatban coaches, too- 
hired assistant* Spike Dykes. Ofcfc Winder 
ond Clarence James. 

WESTFIELD STATE— Announced m* res- 
lunation at Howard Murphy, football coach. 

SOCCER 

WEST GERMAN LEAGUE— Suspended 
LofftW Matfhpeun Bayern Munich mtafleuj. 
er, tor three wteks far kicking an opponent in 
thecheel daring a match apeinsr Warder Bre- 

BC RUSSIA MOENCHENG LAD BACK— 
Stoned Jntw nuttorkd Uw Rohn. to thr e e -y * dr 
centred. 


ton (an Soetoert) 10-7-4— 11 - 
SL Leals 18 8 1—2 

W ntt itas f 3 8 0 1-4 

Gartner flTI, Chrtahen OSJ. Sfewnw (4); 
Mullen (141, Sutter (10). Sbets an oeat: St 
Louis (oa Poolers) M3F-U) wmNnaton 
(on Wamslev) S+n-1— 28. 

Las sn— !■ 14 2 8-4 

h w m^ .3 2 2 I 4 

Anderson 2 (It). Napier 3 (9), Coffey (ill. 
Karri (Ml ; Taylor (ID) 1 MocLe Han (5). Goaty 
(I), Sykes (7), Redmond (4), WDifanfc CB>. 
■tall M eoel: Lae Anaetos (on Mona) 4-134- 
1-01; E t b nwJ t e n (00 Elton 17.14-114-44. 



: twwn that sn rwii^i r * 1 tirnfap as long as there was no more rain. Leafs for the first time rince Oct. 

xxiriaa. (Dolphins by 3fL) Bat, be added, “If it rams again 12, 1980. 

j-n .ru-riJiLiv-i.. tomonow we will be In trooWt” The Capitals and Blues had been 

awbo^ ^lTa^SelS stale^ied for more than 48 srin- 

: their last nine; foe Falcons, five of ■ Cq> Hduts Gtot Items 

m mnefefar'UAi -nr_- . . . . , „ ieapcq up with delight as teammate 

a sec (Uncfs by 351) West German tennis fans are fv^T^ gMir, blodced foe goal- 

tender Rick Wamsky’s view and 

foe puck went into the net. 

SPORTS BRIEFS together with Montreal’s American 

Hockey League team in Nova Sco- 

Tripfe Grown Races to Be All or None talking about his pan in the win- 

*«> d- -* -ft 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


bred can be entered in a TripleCrown race is by bang entered in all force u, rT-T 1 

Downs, PimJico IUm CoarsTmd^™ cS^ck^aring Association, M ^? h Si. S R^i I 3 f m bun 
whidb. conduct the races. mends wifo Walmer, but I 

Aconditw to Oridr Tans. Mfienl mmiHn'flf Phnlien. whidi it hntf tn was glad to see t one go m. 


Braves to Add Drag Clauses to Pacts 

ATLANTA (AP) — The Atlanta Braves will include drug and alcohol 


BHMrtljn 

Patrick Ewing had no trouble getting a jtehro d-flie-head 

lost, 

105-9K The Bodes beat them for Ae lOdi straight time. 


Downs, Fimhco Race Coarse and foe New York Kadng Association, walmer fan I 

which conduct the races. 8 *»d friends wifo Walmer, but I 

According to Oridc Lang, general manager ofKuilico, which is ho«u> 9/83 * 7 “ “f . OM 
foe Freakness, supplemental entries to either the Freakness or ftol reo n t “I didn't think it was going in. I 
Stakes, which follow foe Derby, win no longer be accepted. A S600 thought it would hit me or hit 
nomination fee will be dne Jan. 15, 1986, wifo an additional $3,000 due something else, foe way it usually 
March 17. The added purse money for each race will be $350,000 in 1986. does. Usually, I stop, but this time I 

decided I wouldn't just stand 

Braves to Add Drag Clauses to Pads Ul s: edh0Bhelikolhisbinl ^ y 

ATLANTA (AP)— The Atlanta Braves will include drug and alcohol present, Murray said, “They could 
testing clauses in future guaranteed contracts, said their general manager, have done it earlier. But we’re con- 
Bobby Cox, becanse “when you guarantee that much money to a player, fident when we go into overtime, 
you want to make dam surebe's going to be physically able to perform.” We know we're not going to give np 
The Braves became the 10th major league team to say it will require very many chances, so it gives us a 
such clauses in guaranteed contracts, joining Los Angeles, San Diego, lot of confidence. 

Philadelphia, Montreal and San Francisco in the National League and “We change a little biL We try to 
CaHframa, Kansas Gty, Boston and Qewaland in tha A me finm Y.a»gtn» put lie puck in the opposite corner 

and make their defenseman nun 

For liie Record. and s° iL Then ** break for 

foe net Locker made a heck of a 

Albert Rsst, foe goalie of the French soccer team Sochaux FC and play going for foe net Wamsley 
backup on foe nBrinmil team, fractured his right ankle in a training couldn't have seen that shot” 
accident Thursday and is to be in a cast for 6 to 8 weeks. (AP) Wamsley was outstanding over 

Tony Casfflas, the University of Oklahoma’s nose guard, was selected the first 10 minutes of foe third 
as foe 1985 winner of the Lombardi Award as the player deemed U.S. period, when foe Capitals had a 10- 
college football’s top Hnenjan. (AP) 1 advantage in shots. Then, over 

Bobby Boss agreed to remain foe football coach at the University of foe last 10 minutes of regulation, 
Maryland fra a rnfarinnim of four years. Minnesota, which had wanted Washington’s Pete Praters had a 
Ross, instead picked its defensive coordinator, John Gutekunst (AP) cotmle of tough calls as foe Blues 
Barry MeGoigan wiO defend his World Boxing Association feather- baa a 4-1 shot margin while both 
weight title, fra the second time, against Fernando Sosa of Argentina in teams played cautiously. 

Dublin on Feb. 15. (UP/) That's the way our luck has 

New York State and New York CSty have authorized Donald J. Tramp, been — a screen shot gets in after 
the real estate tycoon who owns the USFL New Jersey Generals, to bond they’ve hardly had a shot for 15 
a $286 minion domed sports stadium next to Shea Stadium in Flushing, minutes,” said the Blues’ captain. 
Queens, if he can attract an NFL team to play there. (NYT) Bemie Federico. 


Bobby Cox, because “when you guarantee that much money to a player, 
yon want to make dam surebe's going to be physically able to perform.’" 

The Braves became the 10th major league team to say it will require 
such clauses in guaranteed contracts, joining Los Angeles, San Diego, 
Philadelphia, Montreal and San Francisco in foe National League and 
GaKfnraia, KansasCSty. Boston and Cleveland in the American League. 

For the Record 

Albert Bast; foe poetize of the French soccer team Sochaux FC and 
backup on the national team, fractured his right ankle in a training 
accident Thursday and is to be in a cast fra 6 to 8 weeks. (AP) 

Tony Casfflas, the University of CHcIaboma’s nose guard, was selected 
as foe 1985 winner of the Lombardi Award as the player deemed U.S. 
college football’s top finemaiL (AP) 

Bobby Boss agreed to remain foe football coach at the University of 


weight title, fra the second time, against Fernando Sosa of Argentina in 
Dublin cm Feb. 15. (UPI) 

New York State and New York CSty have authorized Donald J. Tronm. 
(he real estate tycoon who owns the USFL New Jersey Generals, to build 
a S286 nrilfion dosed sports stadium next to Shea Stadium in Flushing, 
Queens, if he can attract an NFL team to play there. (NYT) 


Flabby Executive Attitudes Get Whipped Into Shape at Corporate Adventure 


By Angus Phillips 

Wm$msg®M Pan Sank* 
WASHINGTON — Ever have days 
when foe world looks flat and dreary? 
Whale wwta Eke that? Months, yon say? 

Ever wake up with a cold knot in your 
stamadi and fomk, “Darn it, Tm not going 
in the office today?" 

If so, and if you are a high-levd. employ- 
ee of a corporation that has extra cash to 
dispose of, you might want to talk to the in- 
bouse prarare-foat-be about a Stile trip 
over to Corporate Adventure fra rate of 
their “wOdoness labs.” It could pot that 
aggressive zing right back into your execu- 
tive life. 


goal-oriented success strategies. Laughter, island. “We protect oar cheats against psychological protection comes in. “We we coold get to the oasis at the other side. 
j: short, that brings resufti. physical and psychological irgmy,” said a donT want anyone walking out of here We got the trolley going just about right 

' Tn fact, one of the first thfaga yarn “fo- tadhtalor. Janet W. Long. da m a g ed,” said Long. when the facilitator jumped in and 

cOitaior" — your trainer, ralaby-ritter, Corporate Adventure’s scheme is to take Of cause, our httle crew was just a changed the rules. Gofl-ee, we ad thoughl, 
depending on how you iook at it — wfll ask foe brass hats from a oonmany out into thrown- together demonstration group but what are you going to do? 
you to do over at Corporate Adveutare, the woods at the Madeira School in foe lacking the history of back stabbing that Long said that sometimes, in addition to 


That is Coqxxrare Adventure. Did pose. The Magic Carpet was teaching 
somecmemdcerin foeback? to trust his rapport staff, whether he k 

Good. They fike laughter at Corporate it or not 
Adventure, as long as it is foe right kind. Corporate Adventure is Outward Bc 

Positive laughter. Supportive laughter, for the soft and powerful. No seriods 1 
Laughter foal creates a more energized, here, of coarse. Nobody gets is$ae 
efficient and committed grenp and spawns Rartibo knife and dropped ofa a 


tncr. you sign is, is to sudee up a funny Vnpnia suburbs of Washington, where produces vitriolic fun with a more inbred changing the rules in foe middle, foe way 
name fra yourself. That is hnw Serious Sne . they are taught to let foor hair down, bunch. Since none of us knew each other, companies do, she might even blindfold 
tmd M yriM Manreen, farming Joe, Potato cxradsc office itteeo^pes, touch eadiofo- we had not had time to cultivate good somebody to agnify some poor enployee 
Chip , SaHy Sandy, QazyCarol and a coo- .er.play, “get sdily,” and then, as a group, hatreds, but after a day in the woods lean running arouDd doing a job he has no idea 
pic others whose nicknames frankly have tarilc ridiculous projects and take a few idl you Crazy Carol did not get her nick- why he is doing. Lnckily. she spared ns the 

escaped tins addled mind carae to bebal- pretend risks in exercises that are “meta- name Ira nothing, and I wonder just who blindfolds. 

anting Ambiguous Angns in foe air last phors fra prttfesskud chafienga m the Junqnng Joe junked to get where he is. After “The Electric Wire," which we an 
week, bouncing him around tike so' mnch organizational anma,” as Long pot it. But we had ran fun. First, there was had to chmb over without touching, borne 

pizza dough in an exerchai called *The After a couple days of tins, the exhaust- Mount Evaest, whea all ei^t of us had to again rat the strong hands of oar support 
Magic Carpet" ‘ ed bosses get to sit around for another day climb on an 18-tnch (46-centimeter) square staff, we had ham and cheese sandwiches 

Pun, indeed, bot not fun without a par- roberiy assessing ways to apply thtirobser- block of wood and siiqr there five seconds, and Oreo cookies for lunch, 
pose. The Magic Carpet was teadring him vatii^ to in^nwing performance in the giria and boys together. Talk about prex- That is when we started seriously analyz- 
to trust Ids support sbiff, whether be btew wodt place, which frankly sounds Hke a iaaftyl ing foe lessons feaxned from our fetchal- 

it or not good day to call in skk. . - - Then there was the Australian fiofley, a lenges in foe wikiemess. Right iu the mid- 

Ccsporare Advimtnre is Outward BoQmi .. Later, each exEcnnriitlHing ran Iris own pair of ei^xt-foot (Z4-inet£r) long two- by die of all this, if you can bdieve it,! noticed 

for the raff 'and powerfuL Noseriotfr rides “vertical support stafr for phase two, dnr- iOUMnch pieces of wood that we had to use l^to Chip was breaking his Oreosm half 
hew, of course. Nobody gets issued a ing which foe boa sometimes gets josfled fikedtis to dimq} across a patch of ground and bdring the middle out. 

Razdbo knife and dropped oh 1 dfrierted around by his inferiors. That is where foe that we pretended was a burning darn so Some executive. 


Fun, indeed, bot not fun without a 


Then there was the Australian trolley, a tenges in the wilderness. Righ t in the mid- 
pair ol egfat-foot (14-meta) long two- by dk of all this, if you can beheve it, 1 noticed 
ferawndh pieces of wood that we had to nse l^to Chip was breakinB his Orcos in half 

Kira a( - J 1 V I- „ ° . 


I 


1 



Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 1985 


POSTCARD 

Korea’s Eel-Skin Trade 


Merchandising 'Dr. Ruth 9 


Flakes approached her iecewly 


By Terril Jones 

The Associated Pren 


C HUNGMU, South Korea — 
If s soft as velvet but tougher 
than cowhide, and Koreans make it 

into anything from shoes and 
purses to fuD-length coats and 
briefcases. , , . 

It is eel skin, a satmy leather that 
is fast becoming a f a shio nable ex- 
port to due department stores, ho- 
tels and boutiques around the 

“Just red it. There’s nothing like 
it in the world,” said Kim Won- 
piin managing director of Se-D 
Moolsan Co., South Korea's largest 
producer of eel skin. “If s even softr 
a leather made from unborn 
calves." , 

South Korea claims to be the 
world's exclusive producer of ed 

Ain. Exports last year were worth 
J 25 million and are likely to reach 
540 mini on this year, according to 
the Korea Leather and Fur Export- 
ers Association. 

Domestic sales are the equiva- 
lent of $10 million a year, mostly to 
tourists who buy shoulder purses, 
handbags, checkbook holders, 
spectacles cases, cigarette holders, 
wallets and belts, said the assoda- 


Gault-Millau Dubs 
Verge Super Chef 

United Pros International 


T> ARIS— Roger Verges Moulin 
Jtde Mougjns restaurant has been 
added to the top category of restau- 
rants in the new Gault-MBlau 
guide, jo ining eight other top-ffight 
establishments. 


Last year Vergfc earned 19 points 
of 20 points and four chefs hats, 
the symbol of excellence in the 
GauJt-MiHau, for his restaurant in 
Mougins, in southeastern France. 
This year he made the “super-chef 
category” with 19.5 points. The 
guide rails Verges lamb chops in 
truffle sauce “the best we have ever 
eaten." 


The Gauli-MUIau guide rates 
quality of food, creativeness of 
dishes, service, prices and accom- 
modations at 3,652 restaurants and 
1,914 hotels in France. Belgium 
and Switzerland. Rnmeyer, outside 
Brussels, was the only restaurant to 
lose a hat in the new guide, falling 
from three to two. 


lion's Hwang Woa-myung. “The 
eel-skin style is not so popular in 
Korea,” he said. 

Kim said about 80 percent of eds 
to be used for skin were brought to 
four processing companies in 
Chnngma, cm the scenic shoreline 
at Hallyosudo National Park. 

The 50-centimeter (20-inch) pink 
eels are actually called “mokchan- 
go,” or blade exL They have no 
eyes, and erode a sticky, mucous- 
like substance as a dafaisive mech- 
anism. 

Workers, mostly local house- 
wives, peg the squirming eels’ 
heads to a board and make a shal- 
low cut along the length of their 
bellies, peeling off the ultra-thin 
drin “You have to remove the skin 
while the ed is alive,” Kim said. “If 
if s dead, the skin grows tough and 
unusable." 

Some of the ed meat is sold as 
food. 

Kim would not reveal the details 
of the tanning and dying process 
because “if s only done m Korea, 
and we don't want to give away 
secrets." 

Fran November through June, 
about three million eds are slaugh- 
tered every month for their don, 
Kim said. In the summer, produc- 
tion almost halts because the skins 
spoil in the heat 

The eds are caught around the 
Korean peninsula or imported 
from waters near Ouria and Japan. 
“We have the markets overseas but 
we just don't have enough eels,” 
Kim said. 

The South Korean government 
controls ed exports to conserve the 
resources. Supply is also limited 
because of a shortage of workers to 
dean the ed skins — they earn 

150.000 won (about $169) a month 
— and of ddlkd workers who stitch 
the skins together and who earn 

300.000 won a month. 

Se-E was established in 1978 af- 
ter three years of experimenting 
with skins. Now, Kim said, there’ 
axe so many foreign requests for 
orders, it would take 10 years to 
meet them alL Rp -m nmhnring one 
order for custom-made steering 
wheel covers, he said, “Well make 
anything people ran use. 

“There’s an old Korean saying: 
If you have a purse made of snake 
skm, your money will return,” he 
said, ao we hope ed-skin purses 
will become good-hick signs all 
over the world.” 


By William E. Grist 

New York Tuna Service 


N EW YORK — “People!” 
veiled an overwrought 


IN yelled an overwrought 
Bloonringdale's security guard. 
“You got to buy the board game 
to see Dr. Roth. And that’s fi- 
nal!” He urgently radioed for re- 
enforcements in Stationery, 
where hordes of Dr. Ruth fans 
threatened to overrun his posi- 
tion. 

They lined up to receive auto- 
graphs and give thanks “ Thanlc 
you for changing our lives,” said 
a woman from i/mfoiana, and 
Dr. Roth, always the therapist, 
patted the back of her head. “You 
saved our marriage,” said a Tex- 
an who swore that he and his wife 
had made the trip just to see Dr. 
Ruth in person. “I love you, Dr- 
Ruth 1" screamed a young woman 
from Baltimore. “I bought Mon- 
arch Avalon” — the manufactur- 
er of Dr. Ruth's board game — 
“at $4 and sold at 16." 

Hekme Suval, a merchandise 
manager for Bloonringdale’s, re- 
marked reverentially: ' “We be- 
lieve in Dr. Ruth, nationally, to- 
tally." Then Dr. Ruth was 
whisked up to the executive of- 
fices to discuss a proposed line of 
Dr. Ruth greeting cards. 

Dr. Ruth Westhcuner, the 4- 
foot-7-inch German-bom sex 
therapist who now lives in Man- 
hattan, is a corporate cangkxner- 
ate named Karola (her first 
name) tnc_ She has divisions: 
broadcasting, commercials, films, 
board games, boric publishing, 
newspaper syndica tion , a one- 
person speakers bureau with four 
speeches to choose from, and rite 
mil does private counseling 15 
hours a week. 

Her Sunday night radio show is 
carried on 78 U. S. stations and 
she appears on cable television 
five nights a week. Her videoras- 
sette of home sexual instruction 
has just gone on sale. Her second 
sex boric was released at about 
the same trine as the board game. 
She makes radio and television 
commercials for Dr Pepper, 
Smith-Corona typewriters and 
condoms. 

There isn't a Dr. Ruth candy 
bar yet, bat thafs not because 
someone hasn't proposed it 
Pierre Lehu, a Mend and adviser 
(Dr. Ruth has no manager), says 
she receives all sorts of offers, 



Tha VtaHngton ftw 

Dr. Ruth Westfaeimen As American as apple pie. 


saying “No” to Pontiac dealers 
but “Yes” to a tour operator. The 
17-day Fantasy Tour of India, 
with Dr. Ruth as Celebrity Host- 
ess, is scheduled to depart this 
month. 

The dfin 57-year-rid sits at the 
WYNY-FM radio microphone, 
her legs not quite reaching the 
floor, and she looks for all the 
wodd as though she is about to 
tell ns in her cheery middle-Eoro- 
pean accent how to make a nice 
apple strudel. Bnt when she 
opens her month, she sends forth 
on radio and televirion the most 


two hours an stations all across 
the United States. “Imagine me a 


partner with NBC,” said Dr. 
Ruth, who co-owns the show with 
the network. 

Her television program, “Good 
Sex,” began as a 30-minute show, 
and is now a onc-hoor program 
named “The Dr. Ruth Snow" on 
cable five nights a week with ce- 
lebrity guests such as Burt Reyn- 
olds, George Bums, Joan Rivers, 
Cyndi Lanper and Mayor Ed- 
ward L Koch of New York The 
show started being broadcast in 
England this fall. 

She dispenses frank and de- 
tailed advice, leavening it with a 
dose of conventional morality — 
riie believes in relationships; she 
disapproves of promiscuity. 
AIDS will probably reduce pro- 
miscuity, she says. 

Advertisers say she has great 
appeal among “middle Ameri- 
cans.” Dr. Ruth has always de- 
scribed her program and her au- 
dience as being “as American as 
mother’s apple pie." Only one 
station, in Atlanta, has canceled 
her radio show because there 
were objections to con tent Rep- 
resentatives of Kellogg’s Com 


explicit instructions on sex. 

Still remarkably Teutonic after 
about 30 years in the United 
States, her accent has become 
snmxhrng of a trademark. She 
dropped some money into the 
cup of a blind beggar outride 
Bloonringdale’s after her appear- 
ance and said: “Demzr you go!” 
The beggar replied: “God bless 
you Dr. RRRRRnth.” 

Five years ago, WYNY gave 
her a 15-minute segment in die 
black hole of broadcasting, after 
midni g ht A casual offer of Dr. 
Rnth T-shirt* one night drew 
3,500 orders. The shownow runs 


She flits is and out of New 
York, lectures on dozens of cam- 
puses, indudriig Harvard, Yale, 
Princeton and Montana State, as 
well as speaking to a convention 
of rabbis and a gathering of the 
Junior lea p™* in Indianapolis. 
Her usual fee is $5,000 to $ 10,000, 
as compared with die $0 to $25 
rile was getting fOor years ago. 

, Her fi m book, “Dr. Ruth's 
Guide To Good Sot.” has sold 

169,000 copies and is available in 
German and Spanish, with 
Fre n c h and tr ynciati ong 

in die works. “First Love. A 
Young People's Guide To Sexual 
Information," has just been re- 
leased, and a third book, “Dr. 
Ruth's Guide for Married Lov- 
ers," is to be published next year. 
She writes a monthly column for 
Playgtd magazine. On Valen- 
tine's Day, she is to begin writing 
two newspaper columns a week 
feu Kfng Features Syndicate. 

The Board game, Dr. Ruth’s 
Game of Good Sex (524.95), is 

maniifgrfflrf^ by a company that 
specializes in military-strategy 
games for the Pentagon. “I'm go- 
ing to have to compare this to 
. Trivial Pursuit,” said a Baltimore 
distributor. “The orders over- 
shadow anything we’ve bad in 
our company’s 100-year history." 

Sheplays a principal role in the ■ 
new film “A Woman or Two," a 
comedy by Damd Vigne that 
stars Sigourney Weaver and Ge- 
rard Depardieu. She was so 
thrill wi about being in a movie 
that rite told her representative; 
the W illiam Morris Agency, to 
bade off on salary demands. 

“You think I don’t love this?” 
she said, diving into a limousine 
that contained her mobile hair- 
dresser, a makeup persem and her 
husband, Fred, a tdecormnunica- 
• turns engineer for Gtibonk, who 
was carrying a sandwich for her 
in a brown bag. They have two 
childr en, Joel, 22, a student at 
Princeton, and Miriam, 29, Dr. 
Ruth's daughter from an earlier 
wnawriagt- who is working on a 
doctorale at Columbia. 

“This woman, this Dr. Ruth, is 
big, big, very big." a businessman 
said before making his way 
through the crowd and stopping 
over to speak furtively into her 
ear. “Popcorn," he said. “Think 
about can* of Dr. Ruth popcorn. 
We would have sex questions an 
the outside and die answers in-' 
side. It could be big," he said. 
“Very big.” 


people 

Lang Appointee Quits 


Jean-Pfene Vincent, chosen m spons compi. 
1983 by Jack Lang, the French cul- pus campus o 
ture minister, to run the Coroedie sity of Jeru 
Francaise, has asked that his con- Award is g 
tract not be renewed next year, the Friends of th 
Culture Ministry said Friday. Vin- of Jerusalem, 
cent, 43, the youngest man to ever 
administer the Comedie Franqaise, wflfiam F, 
said he wanted to devote himself to chicken 
directing. Sources dose to Vincent friend ^ 
said he was upset by the poor t* Reagan 
views for Iris staging of “Macbeth Heston to ce 
at the Avignon festival, which he versary of the 
directed on top of bis a riimm stra- conscrvat jve 
live duties. His successor is expect- ^ ^ j, 

ed to be named in January. journalist M 

□ Intelligence i 

The publisher of die Rainer War- sey, the actoi 
ner Fassbinder play whose public writer and fc 
premiere in Frankfurt was Oare Boothe 
scrapped because of charges of 
anti-Semitism says the work ran Seems like 


Award is given by American 
Friends of the Hebrew Univeisity 


i’iiirt 


now be performed anywhere in the 

world. Fassbinder's will requires 
tha t the play have its premiere m 
Frankfurt, New York or Paris, but 
i f a rfli«TiT Braun of the Verlag der 
Auto ran company said legal ex- 
perts decided a Nov. 4 press show- 
ing in Frankfurt could be consid- 
ered a premiere. 

□ 

Christa McAuHffe, who is sched- 
uled to become the first teacher in 
space, has filed lesson plans that 
call for her to teach live from the 
space shuttle Challenger. McAu- 
jjfle, 37, a social studies teacher 
from Concord, New Hampshire, is 
set to lift off Jan. 22 and make her 
apace tnmdring debat Jan. 27 on 

S ublic television in the United 
hubs, with a lesson railed “The 
Ultimate Field Trip.” She will take 
students on a tour of the shuttle 
and explain what the crew mem- 
bers do and what experiments are 
being conducted. Later that day, 
she will teach a second lesson on 
how space shuttle research has im- 
proved life on Earth and why it is 
tnsjer to perform some t a s ks in the 
weightlessness of space. 

□ 

PWw Ueberroth, who beaded the 
1984 Olympics and now serves as 
fra yfown commissioner in the Unit- 
ed States, has been named winner 
of the 16th ihihhI Scopus Award 

for hnmanitarianis m and leader- 
ship. It was also disclosed at the 
award rimnw in Los Angeles that a 

■ I.. I TAap w tfVc imiw 


WiShm F. Buckley Jr. shared 
chicken polpies with 700 of his 
friends, including President Ronald 
Reagan and the actor Chariton 
Heston, to celebrate the 30th anni- 
versary of the National Review, the 
conservative magazine he founded. 
The guests included the television 
journalist Mike Wallace. Central 
Intelligence Director WUKam Cay 
sey, the actor Tom Sdteck and duF 
wnter and former congresswoman 
Oare Boothe Luce. 

□ 

Seems like a John Lennon cari* 
always on the auction block. The 
white 1966 Rolls-Royce phantom 
he once owned will be put up for 
sale Dec. 19 by Christie's in Lon- 
don. Lennon's former m an a g er. Al- 
vin Klein, who bought the car in 
1966 for about $50,000. said he 
would donate some of the proceeds 
to charities, including die Spirit 
Foundation started by Lennon and 
his wife, Yoke Ono. Another Rolh 
that had been owned by the former 
Beatle, who was murdered in 1980, 
was recently auctioned for $2 mil- 5 
lion. -•» 

□ 

A Guatemalan who won 52 mil- 
lion in a California state lottery bn 
Monday has been ordered to leave 
the United Slates because be en- 
tered the country illegally. Jufln 
Morales, 23. surrendered to federal 
officials and admitted he was an 
illegal alien, a spokesman for the 
U. S. I mmig ration and Naturaliza- 
tion Service said. Morales will be 
allowed to keep his winnings, di- 
vided into 20 payments of $80,000 
*»eh year, U. S. taxes take the re- 
maining $400,000. 

□ 


awaiU ii imi n in LUO umu. h. uuuij j — — 

»»nnis crater in Ueberroth's name, lion francs. The government attrib- 
and in memory of the 11 Israeli uted the increase to higher costs for 

m m « mmm « T ■ al ItWI If. rnMiiMllI HMll lAMAAMn' 


iUUl ill IHGUIUIY m tut x a wuvu 

athletes killed during the 1972 Mu- transport, security and temporary 
nidi Olympics, would be built at a constructions for on open-air Mass. 


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Tel: (31)4342-17563 Tx 53461 Gant 


MERCEDES SPECIALISTS 
FOR USA -f MIDDLE EAST 

for 20 yean 


tor M year* 

1985 Models at Dwcownf ericas: 
2*0 SI. 280 SB, 500 & 
500 SI, 500 SEC 
198A Models (ram Stacie 
230t 300E. 3000. 260 SE, 300 St 
300 sa, 900 SI. 500 SB, 300 SEC 
Shipment & deftvery worldwide. 

NASSAR EXPORT GMBH, 

MAINZBt LANDSTR. 191 


RG TEAM 


Offers tax free cars , exuno and 
dasBQ, dl make* New & used. 

POBax 2090. 4800 CB. BDTOA / ' 
HaBond. Tel (0) 76451550 Tie 74282 


PAGE 4 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


THE CROWN JEWS. OF THE SPANISH COSTA DB. SOL 
PROUDLY PRESORTS 
A NEW LEISURE RESIDENCE VILLAGE 
SURROUNDS BY THREE 1 8-HOLE CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF COURSES! 


NUEV A ATALAYA 


nn 

Companions 

uu 

DAKS 

LONDON 


Apartments and Town Housers overlooking the Mediterranean and ad^aent 
to the famous golf courses of GUADALM1NA, ATALAYA and EL PARAISOI 
Unobstrudabia views of the sea ond Gibraltar; large swimming pool, 
beach facilities with all water sports and tennis courts. 

Only minutes from Marbella center, San Pedro and Puerto Bonus! 
Infrastructure and landscaping completed! No further construction 
to be undertaken within the vicinity] 


READY FOR IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY! 

Two bedrooms, two bathrooms, separate guest’s doackroom, 
fully fitted kitchen, marble floors, wall-to-wall carpeting in 
the bedrooms, highest quality of construction; (donned and 
built by German General Contractor! 


Living wurtaf at 728 to 139 m2 
US. $80,000 — fa 83,000— 

Too yoan mortgag o mods avtdhrbla by 
BANCO INDUSTRIAL ML MB>fTERRANEO MARBRJLA 


pre-opening savings on 
6 mo., 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 


WANTS by ont gf the leocBng 
KwAMhi jew s iay d wt prwn <nl 
manifodwn anyone itwsMd _ in 
apemtg an iairlwsnture or [iwming 
tasSgw* ante in he Mowing atm 

N*w YorMtt AnfldtfrHc m w n Mm ii 


Our offer for cm inspection visit! 

Spend tha yean Christmas and New Year vacation in our pleasant 
Leisure Residence ViHage in Marbella! 

We will provide one of the above described Apartments or Town Houses 


which win comfortably accommodate four persons, at the charge of 
U.S. $60 — PER UNIT PER DAY1 


U.S. $60 — PER UNIT PBl DAY1 
We will provide ground tr a n s fer from and to Malaga Airport. 


Should you decide to purchase one of those units before your 
departure, this charge will be waved and we shall reimburse you for 
your air trave l cost for two persons from any European Gtyi 
For travel arrangements please contact your travel agent 
or coll us for direct flight booking assistance! 

Spain will join the European Community in 19861 
This will bring 12% Value Added Tax to Property Transactions! 
One reason more to avail yourself of our offer; combine an enjoyable 
holiday with a useful! inspection visit and, by making a may be 
already l on g - ti me pen di ng decision to buy a holiday home In Marbella 
ATTHE RIGHT TIME, SAVE VALUE ADDED TAXI 
We are at your disposal] 

ALFRED WIUNER A ASSOCIATES MARBELLA 

Developers and Promotors of Leisure Properly 


touring 

Studio, 1-Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificenrty 
furnished cmd dl with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 


London - Pah - G«im - Zurich 


Exclusive DAKS 
clothes ond 
accessories for 
men and women 
available from 
DAKS stockists 
around the world. 


Tokyo - Bund 

Striae enquns wift sound bating 
rtftfHHH only. Into to paths any 
writs or tdmmtoifldbtuppeMinarts 

in ony of fto obow latmanxl ato 
Addrw la Standard Predom Metal 
Privan LtmifwL 3, Stanton Way Way 
09-08. SwSmHow, Snaxxxo 0106 
Tslae RS 53155 Aft? WC 


MTT 

BEAUTIFUL PE0FU: 

UNUMflH) Nt 
U5.A. t woeinwDe: 


A compfeta personal & bustatt area 


Executive Services Available 
Model Suites 

( 212 ) 371-8866 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 




promfing a uriqut cohc£on of 
tabrtnd, vanmA miHnpd 
jn tjvduoh fer aS racial a 
promotional occapocif- 
HM»7m 
213-765-7794 
330 W. 56A SL'HYjC- - 1B0» 
Savkn ftyr sto atto 

ntmaBQ YYanawtao. 
















sue, 350 5UC 


Developers and Promators of Leisure Properly 
Carolina Park NoA Morte^,_^Mate^a|^fxj ln , Tel. (3452) 772388 

We are looking forward to welcoming you in Marbella this C hris tm as ! 




IIM 




T T? 1 1 (’ T TT i'- D F 7 

lL-L4 




fafBkmi, Europe. 


T 


The one-day visit of Pope John 
Paul n to Liechtenstein in Septem- 
ber involved government expendi-. 
cures totaling 4.4 nullioa Swisjr 
francs (then about S1.83 minion), 
according to a draft supplementary- 
budget published Friday. The orig- 
inally budgeted outlay was 2JS mil-