Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats




-"1* 4—* 




VtoA£^>(G3bU Newspaper 
° JQ . / Edited io^Paris 
: v : *«* ajw . Pointed Simultaneously . 
.,?* IpX^ i“ Paris* London, Zurich, 



<11*5 


INTERNATIONAL 



1 Ou: . 51 DATA APPEAR fiy PAGE 18 

i, j- f 5.g:' '•• ’ •- "••• •-••••'. /• 


(tribune 

l Hie Washington Post - 


Mgmi 400 Dn b«L_ LilJOOOO N»wiwJ*Nl(. 

AMwn.. — a>S. W y nmiw Cm — 

Bohnai — OiSOttn u,a~ > xwwk to*®* 


.45 Mi. 


Kmp $h.ZL0D 


Qam- 


.U0U> 


C— — 5* rf “- d 7"J- 

Crfn* CIUO „, m 5au* Arefao_6Wl 

(WA-MOBfc. Sow. 1!0 Am. 

feted 7«FJA rr*" *-*}?- S-fc*tad.ja>LFr 

rran aJM>F. ****"“ 105bt Tuman OSOD* 

Gammy. 25IIXM •**> 35 <** ToiWr — Ti jW» 

rend hwt— OOF. Mwm WOOh Uj\£._ — _ 6J0Wi 

. 103 Dr. MWurtaedi tTSH. UiML fc»J_50B5 

' V/vy- lHM. Mg no 170K. Tngtetem MP 


:&!. £*.31,976 


50/85 




PARIS, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1881 


. iH.?> 



nvaswn 



rilsatian Village Is Latest to Welcome New Jobs, Money 


".:-4 

By Axel Krause 

1 ” unu ^^ B ^^Vnhmt 

,^^S/KIENTZHEIM, France — 
''^Pn^iere are no sushi bars in Kientz- 
im and sake is still unavailable at 
y of itscaffcs, boi there is no 
‘iii- iubt that the Japanese have land- 
^ in this Alsatian village. 


•-•-■a. ^ial school that soon will open’tb 
% fldrca of about 100,000 Japanese 
'U^.imHes working in Western Eu- 
V 7 *- ! -jt/pe. When the boarding school 
' 1 v. : jensJiext spring, it will be staffed 
• Japanese teachers. A cultural 

joter for them is being built not 
-■ V. ^ ^any miles away. 


Others may grumble about the 
“Japanese invasion of Europe," but 
Kiauzhehn’s roughly 970 villagers 
are more (ban pleased. For Kjeutz- 
herm, as for towns and cities 
throughout Western Europe, the 


First of two articles. 

Japanese presence means jobs and 
money. 

Equally pleased is Shop Hone of 
Sony, (me of Japan’s Largest con- 
sumer electronics companies. 

“The school is an fflustnuiori of 
the kind of help and encourage- 
ment we are' getting to establish 
ourselves in W estem. Europe,” he 


CJ.S.-Japan Trade Gap 
inspected to Keep Rising 


•■■•'2ft,* 

c i f. 

. 

"'■* £<■ 

• m V : V^; By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

'■ New York Times, Service 

WASHINGTON — Despite a 
■ . higher-valued yen and new moves 
Japan to open its markets, (he 
/U nited States’s trade deficit with 
.’ .^ipanUexpeaedtymanyitoalysts 
-. ;'■% continue rising, sharpening Mc- 

- 1 * L -ons between the two countries. - 
. . _ Although trade relations have 
'^proved since last spring, when 

• 'J-^Viere were open confficts ovw an- 

and tdecommnmcadoas, new 
_ -■/ ’ ■-■’nshea ^jpear likely as the U5. 
7 ; ( digress drafts legation in tde- 
- "• ^rvnrnimicarifWK and nlhw areas 
*-■ ;2 jh 1 as the Reagan administr ation 
‘ ursues its declared policy of mov- 
- ,ng aggressively against unfair 
" -4 -“ade practices. 

. Only last Friday the Commerce 
tepartment began an investigation 
complaints that Japanese semi- 
jjj .j jvonductor producers are selling 
r^j-^^gh-caparity memory chips, a key 
’ / *^/ L * S2 jmponent of computers, at prices 
Secretary Malcolm Baldrige 
V:’^ might be “substantially be- 

r. " >“ IW 1 the cost of production. 

Meanwhile, many analysts say 
— -- -'-tat the currency changra and. mar- 
'^"^.^et-opening moves will work only 
slow the growth of the hade 
. Few Seethe deficit actually 

LrLi.a rinkma. ■ *- -“r . - :• _• 
jirf»a Data Resowces liic;^of-ie3ring- 
■. ’../^n. Massachusetts, a Leading fore- 
- - ■-, «tfi a st ^ n 8 com*™- sees the. deficit ris- 
- least through I988*altbi 

a slower pace than the m 

i O* iCfne-third increase this year. 

Data Resources projects a deficit 
$46J Uflion for this year, 
, r r gainst $37 billiQn in 1984. It sees a 
' -eficii of $49 j 5 billion in 1986 and 
i, : tt&52.8 Union in 1987. 

‘ Kathleen S. Mokmy, the fore- 
'.^^'asling company’s senior Japan an- 


alyst, said she did not yet have a 
fixed forecast for 1988, buz added, 

“We don’t see a change in the 
trend." 

Stephen D. Cohen, a professor at 
Amencan University in Washing- 
ton, believes the deficit could ap- 
proach $60 billion next year. 

“1 don't thinV the Japanese mar- 
ket has a high price elasticity for 
American goods," Mr. Cohen said. 

“On the import side, we have an 
inelastic demand for many Japa- 
nese goods." 

Yet some analysts find encour- 
aging signs. They point to the 
greater willingness of the United 
States to manage the relationship 
of the dollar with die yen and other 
currencies. 

They also point to firm ted vic- 
tories recently in getting greater ac- 
cess to Japanese markets, including 
breakthroughs in radio-operated 
communications equipment and in 
some medical products. 

“There are continuing signs that 
the Japanese government takes 
very seriously the concern in the 
UJ5. about both the level of im- 
ports and Japan’s wOhngDess to. 
import from the U.S. ana the rest 
of. the wodd," said RJC. Morris, ... 

vice president for 'international dorng wefl but pumy of the anafler 
• v-i ■ - • does- have rite into,mi9or dtfBcui- 


seveo 

miles (12.1otometers) north of the 
city of Cohnar in eastern France. 

Mr. Hone, who is based in To- 
kyo, was not overseeing the 
schools renovation but 
for the opening of 
nese institutiou; a Sony plant' in 
JEuropc. 

The company’s third in France 
and sixth in Europe, it will be built 
in the ac^accat town of Rlbeauvflte. 
When it is completed by the cad of 
next year, the plant will make corn- 
put disc players and parts for vid- 
eotape recorders for the West Eu- 
markeL 

it win be built m Eu- 
the equipment wffl not be 
quotas and Euro- 
pean Community duties ranging up 
to 19 percent of cost This is the 
new point of “the Japanese inva- 
sion." Originally designed to 
broaden markets, the movement 
has been accelerated as a way of 
skirting Europe's increasingly pro- 
tective trade barriers. 

“Some complain about the Japa- 
nese invasion,” said Andrt Klein, 
the head of the region’s economic 
development committee in Colmar, 
“but for us the school and factory 
reflect our de terminati on to inter- 
nationalize our region and create 
jobs." 

His committee opened an office 
in Tokyo three years ago to attract 
investments to Alsace, where the' 
unemployment rate is 93 percent, 
one point under the French overall 
rate. • • 

Not that the Japanese need much 
encouragement. Sony is among 
about 700 Japanese companies and 
banks that have invested in the last 
decade in virtually every country of 
Western Europe, but primarily in 
Britain, West Germany, France 
and Belgium. 

Many of the largest companies, 
such as Sony, Honda and Nissan, 
also have invested heavily in the 
United States and in Sou&east 
Asia. But Japan’s investments in 
Western Europe have risen faster 
than in other areas, and now repre- 
sent about 12 percent of Japan's 
investments overseas. 

The performance record of those 
investments has been mixed. The .. 
largest companies report they are 



Dr. Yevgeni Chazov of die Soviet Union, in white shirt, and Dr. Bernard Lown of die 
United States, with bald spot, joining to give cardiac massage to a Soviet journalist who 
had a heart attack at a news conference. The two doctors won the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize. 

Nobel-Winning Doctors Join to Save 
Reporter With Heart Attack in Oslo 


nude at the National Association 
^Manufacturers. 

The tensions, others say, reflect 
the breadth of the trading .relation- 
ship- “I just see the problems going 
on and on," said Nod Hemmen- 
dmger, co-founder of the United 
States Japan Trade Council, which, 
is now known as the Japan Eco- 
nonhc Institute * 

The rising trade defidt is espect- 
ed to produce legislation in Con- 
gress that would strike at Japan. 


lies in Western : 

Their proWens center on a 
turnover rate among local employ- 
ees,. difficulties in finding high- 
quality components and an inabil- 
ity by some workers to accept 
Japanese industrial goals and 
methods, down to the calisthenics 
that traditionally start the Japanese 
working day. 

“We and some of our companies 

(Continued on Page 7, CoL 3) 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington PoU Service 

OSLO — A Soviet and a UR 
cardiologist, whose anti-nuclear 
campaign has been honored with 
this year’s Nobel Peace Prize but 
assailed by critics as politically na- 
ive, pooled their professional skills 
Monday to aid a journalist who 
suffered a heart attack- during a 
contentious, press conference. 

' On the eve oftheir acceptance of 
tbeprizeonbehalf of International 
Pbysnans- foir the Preventi&a of 
Nudear War, Dr.'Yeygeni Chazov 
of the Soviet Union and Dir. Ber- 
nard Lown cS the United States 
fended off hostile inquiries- about 
their group's refusal to become in- 
volved in human rights issues. 

When a Soviet journalist tum- 
bled to the floor, stridem by cardi- 
ac arrest. Dr. Lown and Dr. Cha- 
zov jumped from the podium and 
took turns trying to revive the pa- 
tient’s heart 1 


shouting in Russian and in English 
for drugs and equipment. 

They were aided by several other 
heart specialists in attendance, who 
had crane to Oslo to participate in 
the Nobel ceremonies as represen- 
tatives of the organization infor- 

Soviet officials insist that An- 
drei D. Sakharov b healthy and' 
living comfortably. Pi^e 2. 

nutfiy-JcnowE as Doqrors Against 
Nudear War. 

The group, which includes more 
than 133,000 members in 41 na- 
tions, was awarded tins year’s 
peace prize fra its work in publiciz- 
ing the medical and environmental 
hazards of nu d ear warfare. They 
have been praised by scientists for 
their cogent analyses oF the likely 
consequences wrought by explo- 
sions of nuclear weapons. 

The doctors’ advocacy of a nu- 
dear test ban and a freeze oq fur- 



South African Treason Trial Collapses ; 
Charges Dropped Against 12 Blacks 


Archie Gwnede, left, co-president of the United Democratic Front, South Africa’s mam 
piltiradal organization, and Mewa Ramgobin, center, a member of the group, congratu- 
f Ovate Ismael Mo hamm ed, their lawyer, after treason charges ware dismissed against them. 


By Allisrer Sparks 

Washington Poet Service 

JOHANNESBURG — South 
Africa's biggest pofitical trial in 
two decades collapsed Monday 
when the government withdrew 
d m ygfts of mgh treason against 12 
top black political leaden. 

The government is to continue 
pressing the treason charges 
■against four labor unionists who 
were' charged with the political 
leaders. But lawyers said the case 
against them had been seriously 
weakened by die events that led to 
the abandoning of the charges 
against the 1Z 

There were wild scenes of jubila- 
tion in the little red-brick court- 
house in Pietermaritzburg when the 
attorney general of Natal province, 
Michael Imber, announced the 
withdrawal of the charges. 

The case has been regarded as 
the most important treason trial in 
the country since Nelson Mandela, 
the leader of the outlawed African 
National Congress, was impris- 
oned in 1964. 

Among those freed woe Archie 
Gumede and Albertina Sisnln, two 
co-presidents of the United Demo- 
cratic Front, the main multiracial 
organization inside the country 


fighting apartheid, South Africa’s 
system of racial segregation. 

Mrs. Sisuln is (he wife of Walter 
Sisulu, one of the African National 
Congress leaders imprisoned with 
Mr. Mandela. 

The collapse of the case is bang 
interpreted as a serious political 
embarrassment for the govern- 
ment, which had been subjected to 
international criticism over the de- 
tention Of those charged. 

Although Mr. Imber gave no rea- 
son for the withdrawal of the 
charges, testimony last week by the 
star prosecution witness crumbled 
under cross-examination. The wit- 
ness, Isaak D. de Vries, a political 
scientist, told the court that he had 
misunderstood Us role in the case 
and made “fundamental mistakes" 
in Us evidence that could have mis- 
led the court- 

Critics have accused the govern- 
ment of using political trials such 
as this one as an extension of its 
detention system, bringing poorly 
based charges against political op- 
ponents in order to tie them up in 
long, complicated cases that put 
them out of action for months as 
even years. 

Twenty-two other leaders of the 
United Democratic Front involved 
in a similar treason case are still in 


prison waiting for their trial to be- 
gin Jan. 20. 

Some of the 12 who were freed 
Monday, including five who sought 
refuge m a British Consulate last 
year, were first detained under the 
security laws in August 1984; oth- 
ers were first held last February. 

Even though this case has now 
collapsed, the legal proceedings in 
the two cases mean that 38 of South 
Africa's most important black 
leaders have been effectively put 
out of action for the whole of this 
year, a period of unprecedented 
black resistance to white rule dur- 
ing which more than 900 blacks 
have been killed. 

The trial reached a crucial point 
last week when Mr. de Vries was 
cross-examined by the chief de- 
fense counsel, Ismael Mohammed. 

Mr. de Vries, 30, is a lecturer in 
politics at the Rand Afrikaans Uni- 
versity in Johannesburg and was 
presented as an expert on revolu- 
tions. Has testimony that a “revolu- 
tionary affiance" exists between il- 
legal or ganiza ti ons such as the 
African National Congress and le- 
gal ones such as the United Demo- 
cratic Front laid the theoretical 
foundation for the treason charges 

(C on tinued on Page 7, CoL 2) 



Vo Victors or Vanquished: Synod’s Final Documents Unite All Factions 

Dal 


By EJ. Dionne Jr. 

New York Timer Service 

/ f 



OME — If there is a single 
’ration that united afl factions at 
dose of the ex tr aordinary syn- 
of Roman Catholic bishops 
h was one of relief, 
e relief was bred by an out- 

NEVS ANALYSIS 

ne in which no one was dearly 
victor and no one was openly 


i its rmal.doouneuts off< 
ground fra expressions of con- 
tinent. 

"Who won the synod?” asked 
retinal Bernard Law, the conser- 
ive archbishop of Boston. “I 


think the church won the synod.” ' 

Fra once, Cardinal Law was on 
the same track as Bishop James W. 
Malone of Young stowa, Ohio, the 
liberal head of the U.S. Conference 
of Catholic Bishops, who teamed 
the synod “a great success.” 

Such talk, of course, is to be 
expected from church leaders who 
do not like their differences aired in 
public. Yet both leaders were un- 
questionably speaking their minds, 
because each had won something. 
Cardinal Law, whose views 


Doctrine of the Faith, was 
because the synod had, among oth- 
er things, endorsed his call for a 
universal catechism to insure 
“sound doctrine" throughout the 
church. 

Bishop Malone may have gotten 


Bishops Affirm Value of Vatican U 

New York Timex Service 

ROME — Archbishop Jan P. Schotte, general secretary of the 
Roman Catholic Oturth’s permanent Synod of Bishops, said Monday 
that the recent extraordinary synod had achieved full consehsus on 
the value of the Second Vatican Council. 

The archbishop summed up the final report of the synod, officially 
released Monday, as having “faithfully reflected the ideas that 
emerged at the synod.” , 

In the report, the bishops affirm Vatican U and diagnose the 
difficulties in the duuth since the council as a combination of internal 
abuses and external challenges from secularism. 


less than he^ wanted oathe legitima- 
cy of local bishops' conferences,, 
but he woo something important: 
an endorsement in the final docu- 
ment of the conferences as “so use- 
ful, even necessary." 

The legitimacy of Tmtvmfll bish- 


ops’ conferences had become toe 
cornerstone of liberal arguments 
for tfiveioty in the church, so some . 
positive wrads on their role became 
fundamental for toe progressives. 


that became most prominent. For 
what was at issue over the last two 
weeks was the meaning of the Sec- 
ond Vatican Conndl, tfc£ most im- 
portant event for the Roman Cath- 
otic Church in the last century. 

Vatican II fundamentally 
changed the tray the church con- 
caved of itself and the world out- 
sides. It marked at the very least a 
truce with (he modem world, and, 
for many Roman Catholics, an op- 
portimiiy to embrace iL 

This would have raised much de-. 
bate in any. event, but the debate 
was sharpened by the fact that (be 
20 years since Vatican 11 aided 
have been difficult for Roman Ca- 

thoticiem- While k was undergoing 
its owo internal revolution, the out- 
side world was changing at least as 
fast . 

The debates created exportations 


Yet it would be a mistake to 
reduce the synod to the^wo issues * that (be synod was n ever likely to 


meet Cardinal Ratzmger, in a 
much publicized book, seemed to 
dismss tite period since Vatican D 
as a failure, His attack, together 
with his influence in Rome, sug- 
gested to some liberals that the syn- 
od would be an occasion for roH- 
back and'ietrendhmenL 

The mere fact that (his did not 
happen is taken by some liberals as 

victory enough. 

Cardinal' Ratzingcr and Pope 
John Paul H are indeed seeking 
more discipline in the church and 
more uniformity in doctrine. But 
the sheer size and breadth of a 
church that counts more than 800 
m ill io n members around (he world 
wffl malm that task exceedingly dif- 
ficult. 

“Fra me,” one Protestant ob- 
server said, “the question is whelh- 

(Confinaed ouPage 4, CoL 5) 



5 Junta Officers; 

Galtieri Is Freed 


ther development of all nuclear 
arms has brought them into con- 
flict with the Reagan administra- 
tion's defense buildup and with 
conservatives who contend that 
their positions are tinged with a 
pro-Soviet ttias. 

But international outrage 
swelled recently when it was dis- 
closed (hat Dr. Chazov bad signed 
a letter in 1973 with other Soviet 
doctors denouncing Andrei D. Sa- 
kharov, the dissident physicist, who 
.won the .1975 Nobd Peace Prizefor 
his campaign to improve human 
rights in the Soviet Union. 

Dr. Chazov refused to respond 
directly to questions Monday 
about whether he regretted signing 
the letter. He and Dr. Lown con- 
tended that the efficacy of then- 
work could rally be sustained if 
their organization avoided politi- 
cally sensitive issues. 

Dr. Lown complained that such 
groups as Amnesty International, 

(Continued on Page 7, CoL 1) 


Compiled by Oar Stuff From Bupatcha 

BUENOS AIRES — Jrage Vi- 
dda and Admiral Emilio M assent, 
former members of Argentine mili- 
tary juntas, were sentenced to life 
in prison Monday by a civ ilian 
court on charges of human rights 
violations during the 1970s. 

Three others among the nine 
members of the three successive 
military juntas that ruled Argenti- 
na after a March 1976 coup toppled 
President Isabel Perrin were sen- 
tenced to prison terms by a six- 
judge federal appeals panel 

mn the last Argentinian military 
president. General Leopoldo GaJ- 
tieri, was acquitted, as were the two 
other members of his junta. Admi- 
ral Jorge Anaya and Brigadier 
Genera] Basilio Lami Dozo. 

Brigadier General Omar Graf- 
figna, air force commander from 
1979 to 1981 in the second junta 
and the only one of the nine defen- 
dants at liberty during the trial, 
also was cleared of all charges. 

General Roberto Viola, who led 
the second junta, was sentenced to 
17 years in prison. Admiral Ar- 
mando Lambruschini, navy com- 
mander in the second junta, was 
sentenced to eight years and Gen- 
eral Orlando Agosti, air force com- 
mander in the first junta, was sen- 
tenced to four years and six months 
in prison. 

Under the three juntas, the 
armed forces led a campaign to 
wipe out leftist terrorism and sub- 
version. According to official fig- 
ures, 9,000 people disappeared for 
political reasons in Argentina from 
1 976 to 1982 Human rights organi- 
zations put the figure at closer to 
30,000. 

President Radi Alfonsfn ordered 
the nine former leaders to be put on 
trial in a decree issued three days 
after his Dec. 10, 1983, inaugura- 
tion. The verdicts come on the eve 
of the second anniversary of Ar- 
gentina’s return to elected civilian 
rule after nearly eight years of mili- 
tary dictatorship. 

The task of trying the nine was 
first turned over to a military court, 
but the Federal Appeals Court 
took over the trial in September 
1984 after military judges said they 
could not reach verdicts in toe time 
provided. 

A public trial that lasted 16 
weeks began April 22 and more 
than 830 witnesses took toe stand 
for the prosecution. There woe 
fewer than 50 witnesses for toe de- 
fense. 

Prosecution witnesses, many of 
them survivors or relatives of vic- 
tims of the repression, gave ac- 
counts of the abduction of victims, 
followed by torture and death in 
clandestine centers run by the po- 
lice- and toe military. 

The five defendants Tor whom 
life imprisonment was sought were 

sible fra a combined total of 264 
counts of murder, 1,879 counts of 
kidnapping and 882 counts of tor- 
ture. 

Accusations also include respon- 
sibility fra dozens of counts of rob- 
bery, forgery, extortion, reduction 
to servitude and other offenses. 

Although none of toe defendants 
is accused of direct participation in 
the crimes, toe prosecution, led by 
Julio Strassera, said they should be 
held responsible for directing toe 
anti -sub version wmpig n a nd ihat 
stiff sentences were needed to dis- 
courage any future coups and 
abuse of power. 

Both the prosecution and de- 
fense will have 10 days in which to 
appeal to toe Supreme Court. 

(AFP, AP) 

■ State of Siege Lifted 

The Argentine government lifted 
on Monday a nationwide state of 
siege declared OcL 25 to combat an 
alleged effort by extreme rightists 
to undermine democratic rule, The 
Associated Press reprated. 

Interior Minister Antonio Tr6c- 
coli said that government officials 
thought a state of siege was no 
longer needed because of a decline 
in toe number of bombings, tele- 
phone threats and other anti-gov- 
ernment acts. 



Jorge Videla 


Oil Prices 
Fall After 
OPEC Shift 


By Bob Hagerty 

International Hcrohi Tribune 

GENEVA — Oil prices fell 
Monday as much as SI .25 a barrel 
as traders reacted to a pledge by the 
Organization of Petroleum Export- 
ing Countries to seek a “fair share" 
of toe market. 

OPEC oil ministers, who ended a 
toree-day meeting here Monday, 
generally said their countries could 
no longer cut production to prop 
up prices. They appeared to hope 
that the possibility of a price col- 
lapse would frighten producers 
outside OPEC, notably Britain and 
Norway, into restraining their out- 
put. 

The organization’s new strategy 
suggests that “the threat of a price 
war is that much more real" said 
Christine Baker, an oil analyst at 
W. Greenwell & Co., a London 
stock brokerage. But she and other 
industry observers questioned 
whether OPEC would continue to 
seek higher sales if prices began 
plunging as a result. 

Sheikh Ahmed Zaki Yamanl oil 
minister of Saudi Arabia, insisted 
that OPEC was determined to win 
back customers lost to non-OPEC 
producers. Asked about the effect 
on prices, be said: “We are really 
heading at something unknown. So 
anything can happen." 

Traders appeared jittery over 
OPECs new emphasis on defend- 
ing a share of the market by pricing 
crude oil competitively rather than 
trying to defend “official” price 
levels by cutting output 

North Sea Brent crude for Janu- 
ary delivery dropped to about 
S26.60 a barrel compared with 
$27.85 Friday and more than S30 in 
late November, when supplies were 
temporarily tight Brent serves as 
an indicator of worldwide supply 
and demand. 

On the New York Mercantile 
Exchange, oil futures prices opened 
with a drop of SI, toe limit allowed 
for one day. 

OPEC agreed in principle Sun- 
day night on toe vague new strategy 
of maintaining or increasing its 
market share, which has fallen to 
about 35 percent or demand in the 
non-Comraunisi world from 60 
percent in 1979. 

The group appointed a five- 
member committee, headed by 
Venezuela’s energy minister, Ar- 
turo Hera&ndez Grisanti. to study 
ways to carry out the policy. Mr. 
Hernandez Grisanti was elected 
president of toe OPEC conference, 
succeeding Indonesia's Subroto. 

The crucial question is how 
much oil OPEC will aim to pro- 
duce, but ministers said they had 
made no decision on that matter. A 
communique distributed after the 
meeting said they had agreed “to 
secure and defend for OPEC a fair 
(Continued on Page 17, CoL 5) 


n^Psgt? 


INSIDE 



Mario Vtnkio Cerezo, a 
Christian Democrat, has 
been elected president 
of Guatemala. Page 2. 


■ Five countries have dropped 

a lawsuit against Turkey over 
human rights. Page 2 

■ The UJS. government is di- 

vided over how to pressure 
Pteadem Ferdinand E. Marcos 
of the Philippines. Page 4. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ CAF Corp. announced it 
would launch a bid for Union 
Carbide Corp. Page IL 

SPORTS 

■ Stefan Edberg defeated Mats 
Wilander in straight sets to win 
the Australian Open mat's sin- 

tide. Page y. 

SPECIAL REPORT 

■ The toamood trade: Follow- 

ing toe gem trail from rough to 
riches. ~ 


■f 






Page 2 


A& 

AB 

AO 

AE 

AE 

AF 

AS) 

AST 

AT 

AT 

An 

AO 

Ad 

Aa 

AD 

Ao 

ad 

AC 

Aa 

Aa 

Ad 

Ad 


Ad 

Ad 

Ad 

Ad 

Ad 

Ad 

AB 

Aa 

All 

All 

M 

is 


Al 

Al 

Al 

Al 

Al 

Ai 

At 

Al 

Al 

M 

Al 

Al 

Al 

Al 

A» 

Al 

Al 

Al 

Al 

Al 

Al 

Al 

Ai 

A 

A< 

Ai 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1985 


** 


Christian Democrat Gets 
68% of Guatemalan Vote 


Compiled fy Oar Suff From Dispatches 

GUATEMALA CITY — Mario 
Vmido Cerezo, a Christian Demo- 
crat, has won a landslide victory in 
Guatemala's runoff presidential 
election. His victory cones after 
more than 30 years of virtually un- 
interrupted military rale of this 
Central American country. 

Mr. Cerezo, 42, said that with 
this election his country had “bur- 
ied the era of stolen elections and 

coups." 

The Supreme Electoral Tribunal 
said Monday that final results from 

Sunday's election showed Mr. Cei- 
ezo, a lawyer, with 1,1335 17 votes, 
or 683 percent. His sole opponent, 
Jorge Carpio NkoQe, a newspaper 
publisher who was the candidate of 
the center-right Union of the Na- 
tional Center, won 524,306 votes, 
or 31.7 percent. 

Mr. Carpio. S3, conceded defeat 
at his party’s headquarters, saying, 
“We recognize this electoral tri- 
umph." He said his party would 
adopt the role of a “constructive 
and watchful" opposition. 

The two men finished first and 
second in the first-round election 
Nov. 3, in which eight candidates 
competed. No one received a ma- 
jority, forcing Sunday's runoff. 



UNIVERSITY 
DEGREE 

BACHELOR'S • MASTER'S • DOCTORATE 

Hr Writ a iM i twrtr . Uh fcy ri mm 

Send detailed resume 
for free evaluation. 

PAC1HC WESTERN UMVBBfTY 

MOW. Sepulveda Blvd* 

Los Anastas, California 
90049, Dept. 7X U^A. 


Visiting 

New York City? 

Gramercy 
Park Hotel 

Distinguished 500 room 
hbtel with excellent 
Restaurant, Cocktail I^nnjf, 
Room Service and Piano Bar. 
Overlooking Gramercy Park 
with newly decorated, 
comfortable rooms. 
Singles $85-95 
Doubles $90-100 
Suites $115475 
Group rates and attractive 
moodily rates available. 
Call Gen. Mgr. lom O'Brien 
(212)475-4320 
Telex 668-755 
Cable GRAMPARK 
21st St. and Lexington Ave. 
New York, NY, USA 10010 


The flavour 
of an island 
in a single 
malt 



jffiMsr 

SCOTCH WHISKY 


mmmm 


The new president begins his 
five-year term on Jan. 14. He will 
succeed General Oscar Humberto 
Mejia Viet ores, the last of five 
successive military rulers 

The country has been ruled by 
military or military-dominated 
governments since a 1954 coup 
backed by the U.S. Central Intelli- 
gence Agency toppled the left-lean- 
ing administration of Jacobs Ar- 
benz. Guatemala’s last civilian 
president was Julio Cesar M&ndez 
Montenegro, who held office from 
1966 to 1970. 

Diplomats and other observers 
have been skeptical that the Guate- 
malan military will fully hand over 
the powers of government to the 
new civilian president 

General Mejia Victores reiterat- 
ed Friday that the military had no 
intention of continuing to exercise 
political Lnfinence. “Armies are not 
designed to govern," he said at a 
ceremony honoring the Guatema- 
lan Air Force. 

But Mx. Cerezo has admitted 
that the armed forces will continue 
to wield considerable authority in 
the country and that the new presi- 
dent will rule only with the mili- 
tary’s approval 

“Nobody hands over total power 
from one day to the next," Mr. 
Cerezo said. 

Mr. Ccrezo’s main political sup- 

S rt comes from the Indians who 
m more than 60 percent of the 
population. He was the only candi- 
date to have acknowledges public- 
ly that die Indians have borne the 
brant of the political violence. 

Human rights activists estimate 
that in the past 20 years the army 
and rightist death squads have 
killed or kidnapped 38,000 people, 
mostly Mayan Indians who live in 
Guatemala's central and northern 
highlands, where a leftist insurgen- 
cy remains active. 

Despite the attention paid 
abroad to the role of the nnklary 
here, the new president’s major test 
may be to revive the economy. Mr. 
Cerezo has promised an “emergen- 
cy economic progr a m," aimed first 
at stabiHziiig the currency. But the 
business sector is likely to resist tax 
increases considered necessary to 
reduce the government's budget 
deficit- (AP. WP, Reuters) 



WORLD BRIEFS 




This photograph showing Andrei D. Sakharov and Us wife, Yelena G. Bonner, was part of 
a videotape given to representatives of a West German newspaper in Moscow. The film, 
believed taken with a hidden camera, purportedly shows the Sakharovs in good health, 
shopping at a food market in Gorki and discussing the recent summit meeting In Geneva. 

Sakharov Doing Well, Russians Insist 

They Say He Is Not in Exile, Enjoys Privileges in Gorki 


5 Countries 
End Lawsuit 
On Rights 
In Turkey 

The Associated Press 

STRASBOURG, France— Five 

West European countries that Cuba, the sole dissenter when the General Assembly's legal committee 

brought Turkey before the Europe- adopted the resolution Friday by a 1 13-1 vote, shifted its position and 
8n Court of Human Rights have joined the consensus at Monday's plenary meeting. Israel which had 
agreed to drop the case following abstained in committee along with Burkina Faso, also supported il 
A nkara's promise to speed up its 

SSlfifg: U.S. Holds 3 Ghanaians in Arms Case 

nounced Monday. NEWARK. New Jersey (AF) — U.S. customs agents have arrested 

three Ghanaian citizens on charges they conspired to buy missiles, anti* 
aircraft g?™* and other weapons to arm a 100-membcr group in the West 
African country. 

The three men, arrested after a four-month investigation, wore identi- 
fied as Joseph Henry Mensah, 67; John Andrews Boaleng, 44; and Kwasi 
John Baidoo, 40. ..... 

Mr. Mensah, an economic consultant, carried a do cum ent identifying 
him as a member of the Ghana Democratic Movement, and investigators 
said the weapons apparently were earmarked For that group. 


UN Unanimously Censures Terrorism 

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The United Nations dosed ranks 
Monday on one of the most divisive issues facing it an d unam mously 
adopted a resolution condemning all acts of terronsm as cmmnal 

The U.S. representative, Vernon A. Walters, hailed the action, taken 
without a formal vote bythe I59membersof tig General Assembly , as^a 
symbol of new times." The text denounced “acts of mtonaaonal terror- 
ism in all its forms which endanger or take innocent lives, jeopardize 
fundamental freedoms and seriously impair the dignity of human be- 
mgs.* 


Roam 

MOSCOW — Two Soviet offi- 
cials dwfontWt on Monday the 
treatment of Andrei D. Sakharov, 
the dissident scientist, saying that 
he was not in exOe but was living a 
comfortable life in Gorki 

Two senior legal officials an- 
swered questions about Mr. Sakha- 
rov at a news conference held by 
the Foreign Ministry to mark 
Wodd Hitman Rights Day. 

** Anadamiffian Rnlrhflm v is nit! in 

exile," said Samuil L. Zivs, vice 
president of the Association of So- 
viet Jurists. “He Eves in the large 
industrial city of Gorki, which 
could' be compared with Detroit or 
Cleveland.” 

Gorki is a “dosed" city, which 
means that it cannot be visited by 
foreigners. Mr. Zivs said that Mr. 
Sakharov received his academi- 
cian's salary, enjoyed various privi- 
leges and was allowed to publish 
articles. 


Mr. Sakharov was exiled to Gor- 
ki in 1980 after criticizing the Sovi- 
et intervention in Afghanistan. His 
wife, Y elena G. Bonner, was sent 
there in 1984. Gorki is 250 miles 
(400 kflometers) east of Moscow. 

Last week. Mrs. Banner was al- 
lowed to leave the Soviet Union for 
medical treatment in the West, af- 
ter her husband had staged a hun- 
ger strike. 

B0d Zehwng , a West German 
newspaper, said Monday it had re- 
ceived a videotape from a Soviet 
source purportedly showing that 
Mr. S akhnm v was in good health. 

Mr. Zivs said Mr. Sakharov had 
been ordered sent to Gorki because 1 
of his knowledge of nuclear secrets. 

Alexander Snldurev, the head of 
the jurists’ association, said that 
Mr. Sakharov was one of the few 
Soviet scientists who “encourage 
confrontation" between nations. 
Mr. Sakharov, he said, was guilty of 
actions that would be punished in 


the United States and many other 
Western countries. 

■ Rebfives Assail Fflms 

BUd Zeitung said the videotape 
of Mr. Sakharov had been made 
with a bidden camera and “leaked” 
to it in Moscow, The Associated 
Press reported Monday from Ham- 
burg. 

“The Soviets want to prove that 
Nobel Peace Prize winner Sakha- 
rov is not seriously ffl," the newspa- 
per said. 

On Sunday, Mrs. Bonner saw 
previously released films of her 
husband for the first time at her 
daughter’s home in Newton, Mas- 
sachusetts, relatives said. They said 
the films had been altered. 

“She was very angry," said her 
son-in-law, Efrem V. Yankrievich. 
“The films were falsified to show 
him eating at a time when, in fact, 
he was on a hunger strike. It was a 
clever trick.” 


The settlement ends more than 
three yearaof litigation on charges 

other violations tL: European 
Convention of Human Rights. 

Observers here said it appeared 
to marie a substantial victory for 
the government of Prime Minister 
Turgut Ozal. 

The five plaintiffs are France, 
Denmark, the Netherlands, Nor- 
way and Sweden. They agreed to 
the settlement when they were as- 
sured that the Turkish authorities 
would redouble their efforts to stop 
the torture and would lift martial 
law. Mr. Ozal said in April that 
martial law would be lifted 
throughout the country “within 18 
months.” 

The Tur kish government agreed 
that the State Supervisory Council 
a body set up to investigate the 
allegations of torture, “will be in- 
structed to have special regard to 
the strict observance by all public 
authorities,” including the military, 
of the convention’s provision pro- 
hibiting the mistreatment of pris- 
oners, it said. 

Turkey agreed to submit pro- 
gress reports every three months 
and to allow members of the Euro- 
pean h uman rights body Lo conduct 

on-scene investigations. 

The litigation, which was initiat- 
ed in July 1982, was a stigma pre- 
venting Turkey's full ari m ias i n n 
into the fold of European democra- 
cies even after its November 1983 
parliamentary elections, which 
ended three years of military rule 

The 2] -nation Council of Eu- 
rope, although admitting Turkey's 
parliamentarians into its assembly, 
has been highly critical Of bnnmn 
rights abuses. 



Maria Rosa Echeverri after her rescue in Annero. 


Gorbachev Quietly Courting Third World Leaders Government, 

or KS __ ^ a r’—i l; - — r a — .1 .t _i r. 

Right Lead 


By Philip Taubman 

New York Times Service 

MOSCOW — WhDe world at- 
tention has been concentrated on 
how Mikhail s. Gorbachev has 
tackled relations with the United 
States, the new Soviet leader has 
been quietly injecting new vigor 
into Moscow's contacts with devel- 
oping countries since he assumed 
power in March. 

“Gorbachev has given a new 
burst of life, if not creativity, to 
Soviet foreign policy in the Third 
World,” a Western diplomat said 
after the visit here last week of 
Zimbabwe's prime minister, Rob- 
ert Mugabe. It was Mr. Mugabe's 
first official visit lo Moscow after 
years of cool relations with the 
Kremlin. 

Mr. Mugabe, who is scheduled to 
become the leader of the Non- 
aligned Movement next year, was 
the latest in a growing list of Third 
Wodd leaders to meet with Mr. 

Gorbachev. 

Potentially, the most important 
development in Soviet ties with de- 
veloping nations may be a gradual 
improvement in relations with Chi- 
na. Bnt Soviet officials and West- 
ern diplomats say this process will 
take many years and is likely to be 
slowed by Soviet doubts about 
Beijing's adoption of Western-style 
economic practices. 

In the meantime, Mr. Gorbachev 
has welcomed Rajiv Gandhi of In- 
dia, who came here twice, Colonel 
Moamer Qadhafi of Libya, Men- 
gistu HaDe Mariam of Ethiopia, 


Hafez al-Assad of Syria, Didier 
Ratsiraka of Madagascar. LeDuan 
of Vietnam, Kaysone Pbonrvihane 
of Laos and Daniel Ortega Saave- 
dra of Nicaragua. 

Some are longtime Soviet allies. 


Moscow is vigorously promoting 
ties with Southeast Aria. Trade is 
increasing with Malaysia, a big 


The changes in Mr. Gorbachev’s approach 
toward the Third World, like those in other 
policy areas, have been mainly a matter of 
style and intensity, Western diplomats say. 


With them, Moscow has been ar- 
ranging new arms sales and shoring 
up relations, which were somewhat 
neglected during the years when 
the Kremlin leadership efamgpd 
from Leonid L Brezhnev to Yuri V. 
Andropov to Konstantin U. Cher- 
nenko to Mr. Gorbachev. 

Syria and Ethiopia, f at example, 
are important aitie, in the Middle 
East and Africa. Laos arid Vietnam 
are considered members of the So- 
viet bloc. 

But Mr. Gorbachev also has 
been f raging new relationships. In 
the Gulf, Moscow established dip- 
knnatk relations in October with 
Oman, a country that Washington 
has courted intensively because of 
its strategic location beside the 
Strait of Hormuz. 

Diplomatic relations also were 
opened last month with the United 
Arab Emirates. Trade with Saudi 
Arabia, which has no formal rela- 


tions with Moscow, increased 16 
percent in the first half of 1985, to 
£235 million. 

These steps, while Knriird are 
preparing the way for long-range 
efforts to expand Soviet lnfinence been successful however. In Octo- 

'ber, a Soviet trade delegation met a 
cool deception in Thailand. Indone- 
sia has rejected a S180-nriBiou loan 
to build three hospitals. Liberia ex- 
pelled all Soviet diplomats last 
summer. 

The changes in Mr. Gorbachev’s 
approach toward the Third World, 
lie those in other policy areas, 
have been mainly a matter of style 
and intensity. Western diplomats 
say. 

“The baric goal still remains the 
building of ties and influence in. the 
hope that eventually some of these 
countries will transfer from a non- 
aligned or pro-Weston status to a 
more pro-Soviet position," a diplo- 
mat said. 

mats^ded, h&^Gorbadiev^ias 
acted cautiously. They cited Nica- 
ragua, where he has cemented ties 
lo the Sandmists by providing des- 
perately needed cal and increasing 
the flow of Soviet arms, but has 
refrained from actions that could 
provoke a UJS. military response 
against Nicaragua. 

“As we look at the overall picture 
in the Third World," an American 
diplomat said after Mr. Mugabe’s 
visit last week, “wr see a more as- 
sertive and confident Soviet policy, 
but so far we don't see anything 
unusually alarming." 


Cyprus Vote 


from the 

devastated Colombian town of Armero more than three weeks after the 
Nov. 13 volcanic eruption that killed about 23,000 people, the city’s 
appointed mayor said Monday. 

Major Rafael Ruiz Navarro of the Colombian Army said that Maria 
Rosa Echeverri was found last weekend in her shack of corrugated metal 
She survived on provisions acquired just before the eruption. When Red 
Cross workers found her, she was cooking her last portion of rice, with 
hot chocolate. >. 

Major Ruiz Navarro said that Mrs. Echivem’s poor eyesight was > 
probably the reason she never found a passage across the sea of mud that 
buried Annero. 


Reutov . •• ’ 

NICOSIA — President Spyros 
Kyprianou’s ' centrist Democratic 
Party has increased its share of the 
vote at the expense of the Commu- « tt i r tv 

j£ neriuny wJyana Holds Parliamentary Vote 


elections. 


in the Gulf rejpon. diplomats be- 
lieve. They said that as long as 
Soviet troops remained in Afghani- 
stan, an intensely Mamie country, 
Moslem leaders were likely to be 
hostile toward the Soviet Union. 

Mr. Gorbachev also must walk a 
careful line in the Iran-Iraq war. 
Soviet aid to Iraq has been increas- 
ing, but Moscow has tried to stay 
on good terms with Iran. 

The Soviet presence in Afghani- 
stan also affects relations with In- 
dia. Prime Minister Gandhi has 
avoided criticizing the Soviet mili- 
tary involvement there but has 
called fra returning Afghanistan to 
nonaligncd status. 

The Indian leader received trade 
and investment credits totaling 
$1.5 billion when be visited Mos- 
cow in May. But he also has im- 
proved his relations with Washing- 
ton. Mr. Gorbachev has agreed to 
visit India, probably next year. 


nents also won more votes. 

With just over 85 percent erf the 
345,500 ballots cast in Sunday’s 
election counted Monday, the 
rightist Democratic Rally Party 


GEORGETOWN, Guyana (AP) — Residents of Guyana voted Mon- 
day in what Preadent De&mond Hoyte promised would be “free and fair” 
elections, but opposition candidates accused the government of planning 
ma s si ve ballot rigging. 

_ rai . ¥ Votera were electing 53 members to the National Assembly, a umcam- 

Sd won 34 percent. tbeDowcrat- Mr. Hoyte’s socialist People’s National Congress party 

ic Party 273 percent, the Comma- SSlii 0 . ut S* ,n ¥ *sembly, am^jared to 10 for the People’s 

— - - - - - - Progressive Party and two fra the conservative United Force. 

Gheddi Jagan, 67, who heads the pro-Moscow Progressive Party, 
accused the government of manipulating the list of 372,708 eligible 
voters. He d e ma nded that ballot boxes be opened and counted at the 
polling stations inst e a d of being moved to 10 regional counting stations 
esta b lish e d by the Election C o m missi on, on which all three parties are 
represented. 

Doctors Protest Abductions In Beirut a 

BEIRUT (AP) — The police searched Monday for two prominent 
Christ i ans , one a physician at the American University Hospital who 
were abducted in Modern West Beirut, as doctors demonstrated to 
protest the seizures. . . 

i _____ . . k was the first protest march by physicians in the Lebanese capital 

: Cyprus’s presidential svs- °f sectarian abductions, bank holdups and carborabmgs. 

. Kyprianou's actions we ™ tw*t WO doctors walked from the hospital compound to Prime Minister 
■ - - - Kasbra Karami s office. 

Three representatives met with Mr. Karami and demanded govern- 
ment action to secure the safe release of Dr. Munir Shammaa, the head erf 
the hospital’s abdominal department, and Joseph Salarneh, a prominent 

htism ewn uwi_ 


Mitterrand Defends Meeting With PoHshLeader 


By Michael Dobbs 

Washington Past Service 

PARIS — President Frangois 
Mitterrand defended his controver- 
sial meeting with the Polish leader, 
General wqjciech Jamzelski, on 
Monday, saying that its a™ was to 
promote himi.ni rights in Poland 



ER MYSTERY 
WEEKENDS 


la the tradition of Agatha Christie, 
BfylhSfCompany will offer for the first time 
across Europe a series of Murder Mystery 
Weekends in English . They represent both an 
intellectual challenge and great amusement to a 
small number of paying guests infiltrated by 
professional actors , amid the splendour of 
some of Europe's finest hotels and restaurants. 


VENICE - "A Death in Venice", the Cipriani Hotel, March 14-lb, 

NICE*"Draih by Dewitt". Chateau Eze Chileau tk b Chevrc if Or. March 21-23 
FLORENCE - “A Murderous Habit", the Villa San Mkhcle. April 4-6. 

GENEVA - “GiiBly She Cried". Aubcip! du Pen: Bn. TulWrcs. April I M3. 
VIE NNA - “A Vintage Affair". Hold Schlou Dunwcra, April 18-20, 

BRUSSELS - "Murder Mmi Foul". Rebus du Marquis, Irk, April 25-27. 
FRANKFURT - "Crimes of Passion". Schtoaholcl Kronbcrg, May 24. 

PARIS - "Sing to Mu a Lullaby". Aiglc Noir, Fontainebleau. May 24. 


About 5300 per person, including meals. For reservations and brochures, 
contact 

Blylb&fCcanpany . ft. jvtok & b Mcr-riCMi $-k» Ca Fcrrat Fima 
B| 9301 2838 Telex 470673 F. In the USA (BOO) 228-771 2 


and political dialogue in a divided 
Europe. 

Mr. Mitterrand's decision to 
meet with the Polish president last 
week provoked a domestic political 
storm when Prime Minister Lau- 
rent Fabius took the unnsual step 
erf saying publicly (hat be was 
“troubled” by the meeting. 

It was the first time that a West- 
ern bead of stale bad received Gen- 
eral Jaruzdski since Poland intro- 
duced martial law in December 
1981. 


The Socialist 
reports that Mr. 


Jdent denied 
abius had ten- 


dered his resignation as prune min- 
ister. He described Mr. Fabius as a 
“sincere" man whose “sensibility 
has been bruised.” 

Insisting in a radio interview that 
he would not retreat a “millime- 


ter” Mr. Mitterrand added: “It 
was my decision and if I had to 
make it all over again, I would. I 
took it because I' thought it was in 
the interests of France.” 

Political analysts said that Mr. 
Mitterrand’s determination to ndra 
personal responsibility for the 
meeting appeared designed to dem- 
onstrate the extent of his presiden- 
tial authority. 

The division of power between 
the president and the prime minis- 
ter is likely to become a sensitive 
constitutional issue in the likely 
event of a rightist victory in ] 
mentaiy elections next Me 

In speeches over the weekend. 
Socialist leaders rallied around Mr. 
Mitterrand and implicitly criticized 
Mr. Fabius for making public his 


nists 27.1 percent and the Socialists 
11.3 percent. 

The final division of seats in the 
enlarged 56-member House of 
Reprraeotatives will be based on a 
complex system of proportional 
representation. 

In 1981 elections for the previous 
35-seat house, the Communists 
took 33 percent of the vote and the 
rightists 32 percent for 12 seats 
each, the Democratic Party 195 
percentfor eight seats and the So- 
cialists 8 percent fra three seats. ' 

Under 
tern, Mr, 
turf: bound by a house majority. But 
the. rightists and CranmunistsJuid 
combined to bring on the general 
election on the issue of whether the 
president or a parliamentary ma- 
jority should decide the future „of 
the divided island. . 

* The rightists and Communists 
had toped-tb win a two-thirds ma- 
jority m. Sunday’s etection, which 
they said would enable them to 
force a presidential election ahead 
of the. balloting due in 1988. 


reservations about the Jamzelski 
visit. 

Mr. Mitterrand invoked his pre- 
decessors „ in rinding Charles de 
Gaulle, to justify has decision to 
receive General Jarazefolti without 
consulting other Western . leaders. 

He said that all French leaders 
had sought to encourage East- West 
dialogue ever since the. division of 
Europe into two competing spheres 
of influence after Worid War H. 

“Destiny has ensured Soviet 
domination and influence in this 
part of Europe for a long time” 

Mr. Mitterrand said. “All those French Official Vigils Israel 
who, through their actions, would 
like to push Poland out of .this ‘ •m'JSSS- 
sphere of influence are fooling A * 


8 Israelis Killed in Fire at Anny.Base 

JERU SAL EM (WP) — Eight Israeli soldiers were killed and seven 
other s inju red when a bunkhouse in an army base in the occupied West 
Bank erupted in flames early Monday, the army command shkL 
A ^rnmirbased Palestinian guerrilla group, the Democratic Front fra 
tne Liberation of Palestine, claimed responsibility fra the fine, saying its r 
anen infiltrated the base- and planted rncenrfra iy charges. However,, ihe 


Mr. Kyprianou has refused; to Israeli itony command said Monday that while it is nbt rnfing out' the 
'ns possibility of sabotage, an initial investigation showed that the foe 


resign, saying he would serve his 
full tenn. 

An additional 24 seats are re- 
served iiL: the house for Turkish 
Cypriots. But they set up their own 
state in 1963 after cnmrmmal fight* 
ing with Greek Cypriots^The state, 
known as the Turkish Republic of 


J ^ . investigation 

appeared to have started accidentally. 

^Tbc fir e occ urred at a small base adjacent tb.a Jewiidi settiLenuait at 
Shiloh, midway between Jerusalem and Nablus. An army spokesman said 
°° explo sion was heard before the fire was dis c overed in the wood 
and aluminum portable structure. He said the victina were aQm sleeping 
bags, and could have suffocated qukUy before bdp arrived. 


" a ® ,feed Chinese Students Call Off Protests 


Atence Francv-Prtsu * 

Roland Dqmas, 


Chilled 


TIO PEPE 


The natural aperitif. 


Very Dry Sherry 


REUjWG (Rraters) — Chinese students backed down from staging 

■JSSfnl 0 ! 1 * Monds P ^ *«ks ofoffidal pressure, as authorities 
atatrftot^Monmmc reforms had cansed alarming price rises and 

, 5f y ^ ^ allies plntmed for Bering and 

-r—~— the French minister' for ® v . were i nt e nde d to nude the 50th anniversary 

iOTKlves and foolmg pubhe Sa«^.«n«d hn °f -.^ 8 Japmsntaca. China. itndcnSSd . 

opmlorL . . two^oflaHa wthfeadiV Sr V tODbB^idii» a >>tidl' 

Mr, Mitterrand said that, al- rials. Tbe taDcs are expected' to fo- ' f < ? tKasm of naag prices and other problems 
though the East-West dialogue euson issues involving the Middle , 

could be “interrupted." h could East and the European Commum-' rwirf "“^day that the economic reforms had sent 


never >e broken off altogether. ty. 



THE BEST OF ALL POSSIBLE WORLDS - 

DOLDER GRAND HOTEL, . 

ZURICH ; ^ 

Rood de Gendre, Or. KuWrtrafM 65/ lurid* 

IMaphono: 01/251 02 3t.T ok* 816416 flranddw 


For the Record 


withTrfie 


AS55 5 =z 35J3«2^S2S 

feA^m-b^ed tribesmen, accused of CSS 

(Reuters) 
onSatnr- 
. ..interest-free 
[tnpmeut and materials" agreed upon by 

„„„ Monday from a 


rdatioSS 


bothgoveraments. 


Correctioii 

■ A rntnonlySorial Dmumw.*** ^uvrmrotan led 








iw 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1985 


Page 3 



AAh 

CCS 





Carbon’s Quiet Revolution: Fibers Strengthen Tools, Trucks, Tennis Rackets 


st. 

Defenses Soon 

*£-; : 

By Richard HaUocan . 

jVcw York Times Sendee ■ 


■ST.KV , 



By Malcolm W. Browne 

’ New York Tlma StrHcc 
. NEW YORK. — Carbon may 
smtidge our bedlam with soot, bni it 
also powers the wodd with coal, 


be strango-, 50 percent Kilter and 
more resistant to corrosion and 
wear than their steel counttiparta. 

Meanwhile, Boeing Co. is under 
contract to replace the aging metal 
wings of the navy’s A-6 electronic 


sailplanes made erf graphite, a class 
of carbon fiber. 

The subtle complexities of com- 
posite material, a dans that in- 
dudes substances based on carbon 
fiber, have spawned anew academ- 


? * WASHINGTON — Ccostranls 

ili. %an Pentagon spendmgfar the nod. 
" ^ ‘five years may reduce the conven- 
tional nriEtaiy capahilifigg . of. .the 
tof United States by one quarter to one 

, v third, according to a new analysis 

by Georgetown University's Cen- 
> : 'r‘ ter for Strategic and International 

^5 Studies. 

js* ‘ The study, carried out ova the 
past year by a group of retired 
senior nnlitaiy officers and civilian 
--specialists on nfiKtary matters, con- 
tends that “the United States may 
r^ : have readied a crossroads in deter- 

• mining the 1 future quality and 
quantity of. its miljtazy capabili- 
ties.” 

The researchers saw two differ- 
ent consequ e nces' for nonnuclear 
forces that would come from cap- 
. rang the growth in military spend- 
ing. pen would be to reduce readi- 
ness, a term that includes training, 
ammuniti on stocks, fuel a nd other 
supplies. The other would be to cut 
forces, currently at 22 million in 
uniform and 1 miffion civilians in 
support positions. 

“The more likely tendency, 
V should defense sp ending be con- 
fX. strained, wQl be to retain force. 
T structure and decrease readiness,” 
the study says. The consequence, it 
says, would be “a heflow force” 
with “reduced operational capabil- 

.ity." 

■ This capability rrflects four fao- 
tots: the size of the force, the quali- 
ty of its training, its ability to sus- 
tain battle in the field, ««d the 
modernity of its weaponry. 

r ' Measuring some of these factors 
relies on judgment rather than 
*0r mathematical certainty, althongh a 
J ftiterion such as the quality of 
training can be estimated oy testing 
.the troops. 

The researchers assumed that 
military spending would rise not 
more than 1,5 . percent a year in 
addition to an increase for infla- 
tion. “Barring a major foreign po- 
licy crisis or a Soviet blunder ” the 
. . study says, “defease spending over 
.oiomii the next sevoui years could be Hm- 
ited to little or no real annual 
^ ‘k* . growth." 

: _ The military budget for the fiscal 


and, in one of its purest 
forms, adorns brides with dia- 
monds. 

And now, it seems, carbon is 
succeeding stone, bronze and iron 
. as the pRMsnineat staff of man’s 

im plements and weapon*. 

The transition has been gradual 
A few .decades ago, few people 
would have guessed that airplanes, 
tracks, high-speed flywheels, deep- 
diving ocean suhmexribks, mis- 
siles, tennis rackets and mndi more 
would cme day be made of carbon 
filaments thinner than h um an 
hairs. 

The infant technology that in 
1979 enabled a man’s unaided leg 
macks to power a fuQ-rized air- 
plane, the Gossamer ‘ Albatross, 
across the 'Fngpidi Channel has 
spread far and wide, promising to 
change the very character of 
“heavy” industry. 

Some cases in porat; Ford Motor 
Co. is making 10,000 vans 
equipped with (hive shafts made 
from carbon and glass fiber. Boyers 
may have to pay pr e mium prices, 
but the new drive shafts are said to 


Hie day may sot be very far off when metal 
products, from cars to cranes, begin to join 
the mechanical adding madiina and the 
electronic vacuum tube in the museums of 
obsolete technology. 


warfare planes with wings of car- 
bon. fiber. The material also is go- 
ing into parts for Frl6 and F-18 
fighters, Boeing 757 and 767 airfiu- 
ers and many other planes. 

According to Hercules Aero- 
space Co. the largest producer of 
carbon fiber, U.S. output of the 
material, now nearly three million 
pounds (1-4 million kilograms) a 
year, is growing by about 25 per- 
cent annually, in mitre fn large parr 
to burgeoning orders from the 
maker? of ama-aft, missBcs and 

space Vehicles. 

One of the pioneering uses of 
carbon fiber has been m sports 
equipment. Those who can. afford 
tojwrf-thfrfine gear buy skis, tenrm» . 
rackets, golf chibs, bicycles and 


ic field awarding degrees in “mate- 
rials sdcnce.” 

Arcane though the technical de- 


pfc of fiber technology ts at least as 
old as the fasces, the Roman sym- 
bol of authority; a bundle of wood- 
en rods bound together for collec- 
tive strength. 

Progress m carbon-fiber technol- 
ogy may seem rapid now, but a 

ccnittry has passed since the inven- 
tion that opened the way. In the 
iriUH8803, scientists in Europe dis- 
covered a practical way to liquefy, 
spin and harden cellulose, which is 
derived from wood, into a strong, 
continuous filament The result, 
known as rayon, was the first com- 
mercially useful synthetic fiber, 


and it revolutionized the textile in- 
dustry. 

But it was only two decades ago 
that rayon emerged from the dott- 
ing nulls and took to the air. In 
1968 an F-5 fighter became the first 
aircraft to fly cm carbon fiber, its 
metal wing tips had been replaced 
by a light and strong carbon-fiber 
composite matwia! partly made 
from rayon. 

The trick that made that flight 
possible involved the Toasting of 
rayon fiber at a very high tempera- 
ture in the absaxx of oxygen- This 

beat treatment, called pyrolysis, 
served to drive away some of the 
atoms making up die rayon mole- 
cule, leaving only the molecule’s 
long spine < neariy pure carbon. 

a left unsupported, the spine 
was brittle and raff. But when em- 
bedded in a polymer, it endowed 
the resulting material with im- 
mense strength. 

FOfymets, some of which are the 


lent base fa many kinds of rein- 
forcing fibere — glass fibers at first, 
and later fibers of carbon, boron, 
sapphire and various polymers usd 
ceramics. 

One disadvantage in making 
things cut of carbon fiber is that 
the techniques require sidled labor 
and are therefore expensive. The 
price of carbon fiber varies from 
about $18 to $50 a pound, depend- 
ing cm its use. 

Whether the fibers used to rein- 


force a machine pan are laid collcc- 
trvety in the form of tape or wound 
as single filaments, they must be 
carefully aligned to counter the 
stresses the part will have to with- 
stand. The accurate positioning of 
hundreds of thousands of individ- 
ual filaments within a part is diffi- 
cult but essential, and up to now 
much of this work has been under 
human control. 

Computer-controlled robots 
have begun to take over, however, 


and some of the latest machines 
can precisely wind filaments 
around even the most complex 
curves and stress points. 

Carbon probably will new sup- 
plant metal as the bone and sinew 
of man’s implements. But the day 
may not be very far off when metal 
products, from cars to cranes, be- 
gin to join the mechanical adding 
machine and the electronic vacuum 
tube in the museums of obsolete 
technology. 


Of lODg nrnVfnlar rjiarnfi of identi- 
cal links, each of which is usually 
some ample carbon compound. 

Chemists had earlier developed a 
family of polymers called synthetic 
pofyether resins, or epoxies, in 
wmch carbon, oxygen and several 
other dements are strong together 
in interlocking structures like 
chain-link fences. Strong in them- 
selves, epoxies provided an exed- 


i «•* 


Experimental Cancer Treatment Kills U.S. Patient 



-NO ID 


By Philip M. Boffey 

New York Timet Service 

WASHINGTON — A new ex- 
perimental cancer treatment that 
generated widespread publicity 
and enthusiasm when it was an- 
nounced last week has killed one of 
the patients receiving it, the Na- 
tional Cancer Institute's chief of 
surgery said. 

The death occurred weeks before 
the announcement last Wednesday 
that the new treatment, involving 
use of a natural substance, intedeu- 
Irin-2, to stimulate the body’s im- 
mune systan against cancer, had 
achieved promising results in II of 
the first 25 patients treated. 

Although all those receiving the 
drug were in the advanoed stages of 
cancer, the patient who died was 
not one of those first 25 and thus 
was not mentioned in the initial 
scientific report and news release 
concerning die new treatment, ac- 
cording to Dr. Steven A. Rosen- 
beig. Dr. Rosenberg is chief sur- 
geon at tire cancer institute and 



- t' i 
*>■ ' < 


Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg 


head of the research team that has 
developed the new tberapy. 

He spoke in a telephone inter- 
view after his revelation Sunday 


morning, cm a television, interview 
program, that one patient had died 
from’ the new treatment. His re- 
marks OH p ro gram marie the 
toxic side effects from the new ther- 
apy seem potentially more severe 
than most early reports had indi- 
cated. 

However, the occurrence of toxic 
ride effects does not mean that the 
new therapy wifl be of no valne. All 
of the major cancer treatments cur- 
rently in wide use, mdudrng sur- 
gery, radiation and potent dregs, 
have adverse ride effects that harm 
so me patients. 

The four-page news release on 
lbcocw'mtezkukm-2 treatment de- 
voted only rate paragraph to ride 
effects. It mentioned transient 
ehilk and fever, and, more signifi- 
cantly, fluid retention that caused 
substantial weight gain in 16 of the 
first 25 patimts and “mfld breath- 
ing difficulties in 20 patients.” The 
adverse side effects, the news re- 
lease said, disappeared promptly in 
all 25 patients when the treatment 
stopped. 


: version provides an in- 
* ~ crease for inflation over the 1985 
• ~.JeveL while theHraxse version holds 
military spending- to. its 1985 leveL. 
: • with no allowance farinflatioiv : 

In the face of the S200-bflfion 
budget deficit’ cnrrently projected, . 
■ . ^ few members of Congress wul- vote 

for the sort of steady rises in mili- 
tary spending that occurred over 
top* the past five years, a period in 
~ ai , ' which spending went up about 50 
percent on top of inflation. 

. ' At the same time, the George- 

. =r' town center’s study says, large 

sums will be needed to finance the 
. n* - Reagan administration’s plan to 
. ;c modernize nodear forces and to 
develop a high-technology shield 
\ . : - against Soviet missiles. 

. In addition, the pod of young 
7 men and women of military age 
. . . will continue to shrink into the 
"j; 1990s, the study says, making it 
“ . ' harder to recruit for the service. If 
~ military pay la p behind that in 
civilian life, recruiting would be- 
^ |jj|i Some even more diffiarlL 


Israeli Minister Visits U.S. to Dimtss Spy (hse 


Washington Pat Service 
... JERUSALEM — Mosbe Arens, 
a cabinet and Israel’s for- 

mer ambassador to the United 
Slates, has returned home follow- 
ing an nnpublkizBd visit to Wash- 
ington, Israeli radio and Slate De- 
partment officials reported . 

Mr. Arens, a minister-wilhout- 
pqrtfoho, met Sunday night with 
Prime Munster Shimon Peres, For- 
eign Minister Yitzhak Shamir and 
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin to 
discuss the case of Jonathan Jay 
Pollard. Mr. Pollard, a former civil- 
ian intelligence analyst for the UJS. 
Navy, was arrested on Nov. 21 af- 
ler attempting to grin asylum in the 
Israeli Embassy in Washington. 

Mr. Arens refused to answer re- 
porters' questions upon his return 


Sunday, and.. aides to Mr. Peres 
wodd not discuss details of his 
msrion to Washington or of Sun- 
day night’s meeting, 

Official sources said the 
of Mr. Arens’s trip was to < 
the limits of “interviews” that a 
team of U5. Justice Department 
investigators will conduct here this 
week. They are to interview Dan 
Ravid and Yosef Yagur, two Israeli 
diplomats recalled from the United 
Sates last month, and RafiEitan, a 
former adviser on counterterrorism 
to Mr. Peres and former Prime 
Minister Menachem Begin. 

Mr. Eitan, a former operations 
chief of Israel's extra 
grace service, Mossad, 
was the senior Israeli 


vdved in recruiting Mr. Pollard 
and controlling his alleged espio- 
nage activities. 

The U.S. investigating team, 
headed by the State Department's 
legal advisee, Abraham D- Sofaer, 
probably would arrive in Israel on 
Tuesday and begin their interviews 
on Wednesday, the sources said. 


UA Paper HatePobKcatiop 

United Press International 

ST. LOUIS, Missouri — The SL 
Louis Globe- Democrat has sus- 
pended publication indefinitely 
Following a decision by a federal 
bankruptcy court to appoint a 
trustee to manage the finances of 
the newspaper. 


on? 


i! Artf 



Conrad Black 


. ; • ' Canadian Taking 
^ Control of London 

Daily Telegraph 

Ageneo Fnmee-Presse 

J LONDON — The Berry family, 

.. which owns the Daily Telegraph, 
confirmed on Monday speculation 
■: that the Canadian irndtinnffionairc 
.. . Conrad Blade, was taking control of 
.* ; : the daily. 

Nicholas Berry, the owner’s son, 
- expressed regret at the decision. 
“There were other alternatives 
which were more attractive,” he 
said. His father, Lord Hartwell, 74, 
mil remain as directa - and editor 
in chief. 

Mr. Black, 41, heads a chain of 
''7' 18 daily and weekly papers in west- 
' T ' era Canada. He bought a 1 Aper- 
ient stake in the Daily Telegraph in 
s hme. Reports said the Telegraph 
• group's board agreed Friday on a 
* CQ-nrfllicm (S29.4-nriDibn) pack- 
age that would give Mr. Black a 51- 
. Jencent stake. 

" Mr. Black also heads a holding 
xxnpany, Ravdston Crap, and is 
w the board of a dozen companies*- 

The Telegraph, which has a dr- 
-ulation of 1^2 milli on, has lost 
eaders to the rival “qualities," The 
■'.rimes and the Guardian, which 
. wwsell abrau 500,000 oopies each. 








Trusted locally. 
All over the world. 


With offices in Berne, Dublin, Geneva, 

I long Kong, Jersey and Singapore, Hill Samuel 
investment Management International are 
well positioned to keep in touch with clients 
in ail parts of the world. 

Your part of the world. To maintain 
personal contact with you, and with your 
local agents. 

Because you may want to create capital. 
Or enjoy a regular income in retirement. 

Perhaps you are looking to plan your tax 


more effidendy, or maybe you already have a large 
sum of money rad need it jxofesionally managed. 

Whatever your requirements, Hill Samuel 
are never too far away to help. 

• As part of a major international company, 
we have a worldwide reputation for consistent 

performance. 

But above all, we have time. Time to 
listen, and time to advise. 

For further details, complete and return 
the coupon today. 


PIvKC M.1N1 to:- 1 lilt Samuel Invisrmem Manage mem International SLA.. 
10 rue Rabert-Estietuw. Geneva 1204. Swinwrland. 


Name. 


Addrrtt. 


Tel: (IJav). 


-Tel: (Evening)- 


Hill Samuel Investment Management Intomtioual iM 


On Sunday, Dr. Roseriberg used 
stronger lan g ua g e in describing the 
toxicity to television viewers. He 
said that "the side effects could be 
quite severe." Some patients gain 
np to 20 or 30 pounds (about nine 
to 14 kilograms) of fluid in the first 
two or three weeks of therapy, he 
said, and that can lead to shortness 
of breath and dysfunction of the 
kidneys and liver. 

Subsequent to the fust group of 
25 patients, he added, the doctors 
-have “even seen one death due to 
lim treatment itself." He called this 
“a death that can be attributed to 
the treatment" 

The patient who died was suffer- 
ing from melanoma, a lethal form 
of *drin cancer; that had spread 
widdy throu^mnl the body, reach- 
ing the lung, kidneys, liver, lymph 
nodes and “almost every organ.” 
Dr. Rosenberg said. 

Dr. Rosenberg said he thinks 
that the patient probably died from 
a combination of the side effects of 
the therapy and the advanced state 
of his cancer. 

But he called it “hard to pin- 
point” the cause of death. “You 
start with a lot of toxicity doe to 
cancer,” the doctor said, “and if s 
pretty hard to distinguish what is 
doe to treatment and what is due to 
the cancer." 



HAPPY CHRISTMAS WITH ALLOFOUR HEARTS 

Capture Her Heart This Christmas With A Rare Gem 
Or A ‘Petit Bnou - From Our Boutique Collection 
From The Most Fabulous COllectionOf It alls In The World 


& 


draft 

Unmistakably 


go} 


viBbompionRoad Knightsbwdce IondonSWi Telepmom: ui-amsati Telex :i:w> 
Worldwide Bv Appoin i went 


Marlboro 











Pj 


Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1985 


U.S. Is Divided on How to Press Marcos 


By David B. Otcaway 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The US. 
g ov ernm ent, after months of sur- 
prising unanimity in pressuring 
President Ferdiiumd E Marcos to 
reform, finds hsdf increasingly di- 
vided over what actions — includ- 
ing proposed cuts in military aid to 
the Philippines — are needed to 
give bite to the U.S. bark. 

The policy dilemma came to a 
head last week with the reinstate- 
ment Dec. 2 of General Fabian C 
Ver as chief of the Philippine 
armed forces and a subsequent 
move by the U.S. House of Repre- 
sentatives to cut military aid to 
Manila from the 5100 million re- 
quested by the Reagan administra- 
tion to 525 million. 

General Ver and 24 other mili- 
tary nan along with one civilian, 
were acquitted of involvement in 
the 1983 murder of Bexngno S. 
Aquino Jr., the opposition leader, 
despite considerable evidence of 
their complicity. 

The return of General Ver, a 
Marcos confidant, to bis post at the 
head of the Philippine mxlitaiy ap- 
peared to Hash U.S. hopes for seri- 
ous reforms and further strained 
Mr. Marcos’s relations with the 
United Stales. 

The policy test now confronting 
the Reagan administration appears 


to foreshadow a more serious battle 
tf Mr. Marcos wins the Feb. 7 presi- 
dential election. Many officials 
here think that a reelected Mr. 
Marcos could make things uncom- 
fortable for the White House by 
d emanding continued U S. support 
as compensation for having heeded 
Washington’s request for Philip- 
pine elections. 

In the past year, there has been a 
remarkable consensus in the ad- 
ministration and Congress about 
pressuring Mr. Marcus with tough 
public rhetoric and visits by presi- 
dential emissaries, including Sena- 
tor Paul Lazalt, a Nevada Republi- 
can, to make economic and 
political reforms. 

Bui there are ti gns this con- 
sensus is about to unravel ova- the 
issue of whether the United States 
should use its considerable eco- 
nomic and xmHtaiy aid as leverag:. 

The Defense Department op- 
poses such a course as being con- 
trary to American interests in re- 
tarding ihe spread of the Philippine 
Communist insurgency. 

The Senate is Gkdy to approve 
this week 570 million of the admin- 
istration’s 5 lOO-mOhon militar y aid 
request Because the House last 
wear slashed the request by 75 per- 
cent, a House-Senate conference 
win seek a compromise. It appears 
certain that the final figure wfll be 
far less than the original adminis- 


tration request and will cause im- 
mediate contention between Ma- 
nila and Washington. 

.Representative Stephen J. SQ- 
Iarz, the chairman of the House 
Asian and Pacific subcommittee, 
originally proposed the aid cut to 
$25 million. Mr. Solan, a Demo- 
crat of New Yodc, says he thinks 
that such punitive action is de- 
manded by General Vet's reinstate- 
ment ana evidence in an unpub- 
lished General Accounting Office 

hadwasted more than 
in U.S. military aid. 

The US. dilemma is corticated 
not only by the Communist insur- 
gency but by the importance to the 
Pentagon of Clark Air Base and 
Subic Bay Naval Base in the Philip- 
pines, the two largest US. defense 
installations abroad. 

The assistant defense secretary 
for internatkmal security affaire, 
Richard L. Armitage, told a House 
committee Nov. 12 that there were 
“tragic flaws" in the policy of using 
VS. security assistance as leverage 
to force military reform. 

“There can be no doubt that the 
outcome of an aid reduction, or its 
elimination, would decrease our in- 
fluence within (he Phffippinc mili- 
tary establishment and severely 
limit” Manila’s ability to fight the 
rebels, be said. 

In addition to a 5900-million, 


of economic and 
military aid tied to the UA-Riilip- 
pine base agreement, Washington 
this year is providing $38 mfiticsi in 
devdopment assistance and 550 
million in food aid to the Philip- 
pines. 

A Senate staff report dated Oct 
31 cited General Ver as an example 
of the conundrum being Washing- 
ton. General Ver, the report said, is 
a Strong anfi-Commnmst “who 
sees himself as a proven friend of 
the United Stales.” 

But he also has been Mr. Mar- 
cos’s “major instrument” in politi- 
cizing the Philippine aimed forces 
and making “loyalty to the presi- 
dent rather than professional com- 
petence” the criterion far promo- 
tion, the repot said. 

■ Ver May Be Retired 

President Marcos said. Monday 
that General Ver may be retired 
before die Feb. 7 election, but add- 
ed that General Ver had requested 

that “he finish his tnisann before 

be goes,” The Associated Press re- 
ported from Manila. 

Ml Marcos said in an interview 
with the Japanese television net- 
work NHK mat General Ver, along 
with the major service commanders 

of the armed forces and 29 other 
genfipd*- had indicated a willing- 
ness to be retired, a palace news 
release said. 



I Laurel Files in Manila, 
Says Marcos Can Be Beat 


: 4 

•iiS . » •.•Sviii 

The Philippine information minister, Gregorio Cendana, 
sorting through posters with campaign workers for Presi- 
dent Fenfinand E. Marcos. A convention of the rating New 
Society Movement party is scheduled to begin Wednesday. 


' By William Branigin 

Washington Pott Service 

MANILA — The opposition 
leadtf, Salvador H. Laurel, filed a 
formal certificate of candidacy’ 
Monday lo run for president and 
said there would be “no more back- 
ing out" in favor of a rival challeng- 
er, Corazon C. Aquino. 

The development occurred as 
President Ferdinand E Marcos 
pondered a list of seven potential 
running mates for his own re-elec- 
tion bid in February. According to 
presidential palace sources. Mr. 
Marcos’s wife, Ixndda. has been 
promoting her own candidacy be- 
hind the scenes despite denials that 
die seeks the vice presidency. 

However, the sources said, she is 
not among those being considered 
by Mr. Marcos as his ruling New 
Society Movement party prepares 
to hdd a convention Wednesday to 
proclaim his formal candidacy for 
re-election to a fourth term. 

Mr. Laurel became the first ma- 
jor opposition figure officially to 
enter the presidential race when he 
went Monday to the Commission 
on Elections to file his candidacy. 

“It's now final, ” he said as he 
completed the formalities. “There 
is no more backing out. From now 
on it’s aD systems go for Unido.” 


party, 
i Democratic 


He referred to his 
the United Natit 
Organization. 

Mr. Laurel's move increased the 
prospect that the fractious opposi- 
tion would field two candidates 
against Mr. Marcos. But Mr. Lau- 
rel predicted he could still win, 
though he conceded that “h would 
be much harder” than if the oppo- 
sition fielded a single ticket. 

“I am not fazed by the fact there 
rosy be two opposition candi- 
dates," he said. He predicted that j£ 
Mr. Marcos would get only 20 per- 
cent of the vote, leaving 80 percent 
for the opposition! 

Mr. Laurel said be thought Mr. 
Marcos would let the election “go 
through if he believes he can cheat 
to win. If not, he may find a way to 

cancel the dcciicrn.” The vote is set 
for Feb. 7, more than a year before 
Mr. Marcos’s term expires. 

Some opposition figures believe 
that Mr. Laurel may be playing 
into Mr. Marcos’s bands with his 
apparent determination to fulfill a 
long-held ambition and run for 
president. 

“He just committed political sui- 
cide," said an opposition legislator, 
Homobono Adaza. . 

“I don’t think he has any chance. f 

He's just deluding himself” 


IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR 
THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

IN RE NORTH ATLANTIC AIR TRAVEL ANTITRUST LITIGATION 
THIS DOCUMENT RELATES TO: ALL CASES 

Lead Qvfl Action No. 84-1013, 

ATTENTION 

Summary Notice of Class Action and Proposed Settlement 


If you flew between the United States and the United Kingdom 
on Pan Am, TWA or British Airways between March 1, 1982 
and March 31, 1984, you may be entitled to share in a fund with 
a potential value of $30 million. 


Wheihcryon are a oompany or »n individual, 
if you purchased an airline acker after February 
26. K?B2 far nrhedufa d sabaotac air travd between 
tbe continental United States and the United 
Kingdom timing die period March 1, 1982 and 
March 31, 1984, on Pan Am, TWA, or British 
Airways, you may be entitled to share in a distri- 
hmmnofapn «BHisllhiv< nfpOM,ny»ij^fffl l pnw « 

naaMe to reduce your cost of (maze UJS.-U-K. 
tarmreL 

The coupons would be distributed as pan 
of the proposed settlement of tins antitrust dass 
action lawman. In re North Atlantic Air Travel 
Antitrust Litigation, Civ. No. 84-4013, currently 
pending in the United Smtes Duma Court for 

iWnjwiwrf f'.nlMinli w 

If you wish ro share in this aetdement and 


full Notice of Class Action and Proposed Settlement. 
All claims for coupons must be sobmined on the 
Clai m Form that accompanies thatNodee-To obtain 
a copy of the M Notice of Class Action and Reposed 
Settlement, together with the Claim Form, yon 
must promptly; *. 

Etiher call 718 236 2337 in the US. or 0272 
277008 in the UJC, 

Or complete the form below and send it, or 
simply send y our name and address^ to rite Settlement 
Ad m imspamr at the appropriate address below: 

USA 

The Settlement Administrator 

PO. Box 1002 

Bowling Green Station 

New York NY 10274. 


receive your conpon(s), or to objea lo this state- 
ment, or to exclude yoandf from this lawtuk, 
you muit follow the procedures set forth in die 

UJC: 

The Settlement Administrator 

RO. Boa 314, Bristol BS997AW. 

PLEASE DO NOT CONTACT PAN AM,TWA OR BRITISH AIRWAYS 

If you wish co share in die settlement and 
receive couponO), yon mtut complete die Orim 
Form and return it postmarked no later than 
February 16. 1986. Failure to submit the Chum 
Form or to ex erase any of the other options 

described fa) the Notice of Class Action and 
Proposed Settlement by February 16, 1986 will 
result in the loss of any right to share in ibis 
settlement or to recover on tbe daims asserted 
in this lawsuit. 

| Please forward Notice of Class Action and Proposed Sctdementur. j 

| NAME 

1 

I ADDRESS' 


1 

1 cmr 


ZIP/ 

POSTCODE 



Mubarak Asserts PLO Must Have Peace Process Role 


By Michael Getler 
and Christopher Dickey 

Watkiagton Post Service 

CAIRO — Presdent Hosni Mu- 
barak has strongly endorsed the 


keep the momentum of the 
process going,** Mr. Mubarak 
warned. “Otherwise we are going lo 
lose evexything.” 

He praised what he called the 


need for a major role by the Pales- ^flexibility” of Prime Minister Shi- 
tine Liberation Organization in die 1110X1 ^ eres °f Isra *l and suggested 
Middle East peace process and crit- fbat all that now blocked a possible 
United States for at- “citing between the two countries 


irized the 

tempting to weaken U. 

“The PLO is the sole representa- 
tive of the Palestinians, whether we 
like it or not,” die Egyptian leader 
said Sunday. 

“You in America can’t, under- 
stand, really, what we mean,’’ he 
said of his motives far backing the 
PLO chairman, Yasser ArafaL 

“Trying to solve the problem and 
at the same time trying to ignore 
the PLO — this will never lead to a 
comprehensive peace,” be added. 

In an interview, Mr. Mubarak 
said that U.S. attempts to water 
down Palestinian repres e ntation on 
a joint Jordanian-Palestiman nego- 
tiating team had gone too far and 


was a border dispute over a <an«ll 
piece of land at Taba on the Gulf of 
Aqaba. 

Other issues that have contribut- 
ed to the “cold peace" between die 
two countries now are largely ro* 
solved, Mr. Mubarak said. 

Tbe withdrawal of Israeli troops 
from Lebanon “is nearly finished,” 
Mr. Mubarak said, adding that 
“Petes has shown very good flexi- 
bility” in attempting to improve 
the quality of hie in the occupied 
territories. “He is doing his best, 
really. The only tiring is Taba.” 

In his first interview with a U.S. 
news organization since the hijack- 
ing of an EgyptAir jetliner to Malta 


wasted more than six months in a last month, and the assanlt by 
crucial period when “time is dip- Egyptian commandos that ulti- 
ping away." matdy cost the lives of 58 persons, 

“That’s why we should do some- Mir. Mubarak touched on a wide 
thing in die very near future so as to range of issues related to that disas- 


ter, and to his complex but dose 
ties with the United States. 

He said he had “very strong sus- 
picions” that tbe Libyan leader, 
Colonel Moamer Qadhafi, was be- 
hind the hijarfring, and confir med, 
that there had been a state of alert 
and a reinforcement of air bases 
near the Libyan bonder. Bui he 
ruled out any main-force attack on 
Libya. 

“rm not going to punish the Lib- 
yan people because of such an inci- 
dent done by a single man, Qadha- 
fi,” Mr. Mubarak-said. “ITL never 
do it Pm a man of peace. I have 
nothing against the Libyan peo- 
ple." 

He defended his decision to 
storm die EgyptAir jet in Malta, 
saying, “We used force when we 
found no way out.” 

“I thought initially that there 
would be a dialogue” with the hi- 
jackers, Mr. Mubarak said. 

He denied reports that the explo- 
sive charges used by the comman- 
dos to enter the plane were respan- 
able for the fire and smoke that 
killed most of its occupants. 

Mr. Mubarak said that U.S. in- 
dignation at the way he handled the 
negotiations to end the hijacking of 


the A chill e Laura cruise ship in 
October played no part in his deci- 
sion to attack the plane in Malta. 

He had incurred American wrath 
in tbe first case for allegedly being 
soft on terrorism when he attempt- 
ed lo hand the hijackers over to the 
PLO formal. 

At one point he said of the hi- 
jacking of the EgyptAir plane: “If 
Egypt didn't use force, and the hi- 
jackers were killing the people, you 
would accuse Egypt. When we use 
force, szlU you are accusing Egypt. 
It's all very strange, really.” 

Mr. Mubarak also denied that a 
joint appearance with Mr. Arafat 
last month to issue a “Cairo Decla- 
ration" was an attempt by him to 
embrace the PLO leader in the 
hope of recapturing wider standing 
fra- Egypt within the Arab world. 

“That's an unfair comment," he 
said. 

In the declaration, Mr. Arafat 
renounced terrorism and pledged 
not to cany out attacks outside 
what he loosely defined as “the 
occupied territories." Subsequent 
PLO statements have indicated 
that this still allows attacks inside 
IsraeTs pre-1967 borders. 


Mr. Mubarak said he also dis- 
cussed with Mr. Arafat acceptance 
of the two United Nations Security 
Council resolutions, 242 and 338, 
that effectively recognize Israel’s 
right to exist. 

“But we didn’t put any pressure 
on him to agree on it here,” he said. 

Mr. Mubarak said bis relations 
with tbe Reagan administration 
were generally good, “but we 
would like the United States to 
make much more of an effort.” 

“The United States is a main 
participant,” he said. “They could 
play a pivotal role” in persuading 
all sides, including Israel, “just to 
help" 

Mr. Mubarak said that other 
sensitive points in ties with Wash- 
ington. including the seizure by 
U.S. Navy jets of an Egyptian 
plane carrying the Achille Laura 
hijackers, have been largely pm be- 
hind them. 

He said tbe two countries had 
“good cooperation" in dealing with 
terrorism. Mr. Mubarak said mem- 
bers of the VS. Delta Force com- 
mando team “were ready to help, 
of course.” but the Egyptians did 
not ask for such assistance. 


Israel Frees 2 Jews in Shrine Plot 


By Thomas L Friedman 

New Tank Times Service 

JERUSALEM — President 
Chaim Herzog of Israd has com- 
muted the prison sentences of two 
members of the Jewish terrorist un- 
derground who had beat convicted 
of plotting to blow up one of Is- 
lam’s holiest shrines, his office said. 

The commutations were an- 
nounced Sunday as the Knesset 
prepared to debate a proposal tw a 

^ Jewish extremists suLTsot^ 
ing prison terms fra orimes ranging 
from murdering Arab sdooolboys 
to illegally transporting weapons. 

The hQl was scheduled to receive 
a first hearing on Monday, and 
Prime Minister Shimon Peres was 
expected to crane under heavy 
pressure from the religious parties 




WHERE TO FIND LUXURY 
IN THE GULF 


X 




ABU DHABI 
INTER-CONTINENTAL 
HOTEL 

Phone: (971-2) 363777 
Telex: 23160 


BAHRAIN 
THE REGENCY 
INTER-CONTINENTAL 

Phone:(973)231777 
Telex: 9400 




DUBAI 

INTER-CONTINENTAL 

HOTEL 

Phone: (971-4)227171 
Telex: 45779 


MUSCAT 

INTER-CONTINENTAL 
HOTEL 
Phone:(968)600500 
Telex: 5491 


V 


THE ADVANTAG E IN THE GULF 
0. INTER CONTINENTAT- HnTETS 

For reservations call: Amsterdam: (020) 26.20.21, Brussels: (2) 751-87-27 
Frankfurt: (69) 27 100620, London (01) 491-7181, 

Milan: (02) 87.72.62, Paris: (01) 47-42-07-92. 


/ 


— whose backing is critical fra his 
political future — to support it 

The prisoners freed by Mr. Her- 
zog are Dan Been, 41, and Yosef 
Tznria, 26, who were serving three- 
year terms forinvoIvaDcnt in a plot 
to blow op the Dome of the Rock. 
The building is situated on the 
Temple Mount in the Old City of 
Jerusalem.lt was built around an 
outcropping of bedrock from 
which Moslems believe that the 
prophet Mohammed ascended into 
heaven. 

According to the court, tbe ex- 
tremists’ plan was to blow up die 
Islamic holy place to provoke the 
Moslem world into a cataclysmic 
holy war with Israel that would 
force the Messiah' to intervene. 

The two would have been eligible 
for release in April, after two-thirds 
of their three-year sentences. Israeli 
“ _* a one- 

in sentencing fra 

good behavior. 

Political commentators speculat- 
ed that Mr. Herzog might be com- 
muting the sentences of some of the 
more insignificant members of the 


Jewish underground in order to 
strengthen his hand for rejecting 
the amnesty appalls af the ring’s 
leadership. The president has been 
under constant pressure from right- 
ist parties to pardon the whole 
group. 

In September thesentence of (Jri 
Mai ex, who had been oonvicted of 
involvement in car bombings that 
maimed two West Bank Arab may- 
ors in 1980, was commuted six 
months before the end of a 30- 
month term. HI health was believed 
to be the reason. 

Ftve other members of the Jew- 
ish terrorist group, most of whom 
were sentenced last July 21, have 
completed their prison terms. 

Three of those still in prison are 
serving life sentences for murder; 
while others are serving from seven 
years to only a few months for 
lesser crimes. Proponents of am- 
nesty for all the. extremists argue 
that the men have expressed their 
regret and that (he Jews’ failing of 
Arabs was a response to the killing 
of Jews by Arabs. - 


No Victors or Vanquished: 
Synod Unites Att Factions 


(Continued from Page I) 
er there is or can be any real leader- 
in the Catholic Church.” 
Vatican takes an entirely 
different view. If the wood came 
out better than liberals feared it 
might, is only because their 
fears were groundless, Vatican offi- 
cials said. 

Moreover, if the synod was a 
demonstration of diversity, its 
members scorned to be trying hard 
to move toward some consensus, to 
avoid debilitating divisions. 

That consensus is contained m a 
final report that at times seems .to 
shift withfa two sentences from one 


rathijliriwn “as a mere iwctfortHy rt- 
al structu^devokiofiraniysteiy” 

Since tbose who are called Hbexal 
in some ways with the conser- 
vative critiijue on many 1 points, 
these passages, might not seem too 
high a price to pay for a firm en- 
dorsoneat of Vatican IL 

And the very fact that John Paul 
agreed to publish the summary re- 
port was a victory for those who 
■want to see toe bishops play . a 
stronger. role and have a voice of 
their own, . 

Yet as cue of the pope’s aides 
pointed out, it was not difficult for 
John Paul to publish .tfae document, 
since he essentially agreed with its 


tendency in the debate to the other. 

For example, it praises plural- . 
ism, but warns against forms of Here'may He the dearest due to 
pluralism that move “to dissolution who won the synod. AH along , the 
and destruction” and can lead “to a pope said he was seeking a 


loss of identity.” It praises tbe good 
work of theologians, but warns that 
some theological discussions “haw 
brought about confusion among 
the Christian faithfuL” 

On the thorny questions raised 
by t}i£ theology of liboatipn, it 
declares that “the church must in a 
prophetic way denounce all forms 
of poverty and oppression.*’ Bur it 
notes that the church cannot sepa- 
rate its concern about mjat&xs in 
this. world from its overriding spiri- 
tual goals that relate to the next 


The document deafly criticizes 
“a partial 3nd selective reading” of 
Vatican II and a “superfidaTinter- 
pretation of its doctnne." ■ . 

And it includes a passage that 
goes to the heart of conservative 
arguments about the church, critic 
dsung those yho would see Roman 


tion of -Vatican n, not partisan 
wrangling] A shmply divided meet- 
ing could only weaken John PanTs 
position; a happy end suggested a 
search for a kind of- synthesis that 
the pope himself hasjbeea seeking, 
and left Iron without a major bloc 
of challengers. ' 

Above ah, and to. contrast with 
many of the partisans, John Paul 
tends to take a mystical view of 
Vatican Q and of the ehurdL This 
often leads him to directions that 
seem to be — and often are — 
conservative. - 

But his papacy is, more than any- 
thing, an attempt to assert the pri- 
macy of the spiritual over the mate- 
rialin an increasingly secular 
world. . . ; . 

If there is any theme that p enny 
axes the synod’sstatament, it is this, 
one. 


Sribune^; 

it Leader** Vow to hnh 
an Economic Recovery 



2fbxl 


Take advantage of our special rates for new subscribers and 
we’B give you an extra month af Tribs free with a one-year 
subscription. Total savings: nearly 50% off the newsstand 
price inmast European countries! 


Tc^ Subscription AAaxjger, International HerddTribune, 

|] 81, avenue QKrie&de-Gaule, 92521 NeufflyCedex,FircBxe. 
.Please enter my subscription for: 


□ KZmortfe 
(-Hi n orthfra e) 

□6morthc 

(+2waefafr ca) 

□3 norths 
(+1\M*fcfrae) 

icandond ; 



- »!££ 


Please charge my: 
□Aa» 

□ Amarkai 
Bqprt* 

□ Dinarri3ub 

□ Browd 
_ □Mcriwaad' 

■ DVto 

Gardeqaydata. 
{ Gra^MDourtf 


1 

I 




mISf 



MAI-71 


— E 52 

■BC3 


« 

wmm 

— 7T? 

■ESI 


— IE3 

■KdH 

— R3 

■Kvl 


■KC1 

—ns 

EBB?*!! 

i — m 


■■03 

IIK^rTt] 









HHQ 

■—El 

■IE3 

■IE] 


IHE3 

— ktijl 


■Erg 


BHG 

mmm 











— 

■ETJ?TT]( 


mmm 

B WKJJiL 

wmuz 






mmn 


■■03 

— s 

■^ 








mms 

iBRS 





BT»i 

PSSMFicI 



■ 



- Sgnalure 



it 


t 


i 

i 

i 

i 

i 

i 

£ 

I 

K 

V 

■> 

i 


Nome. 


Address. 


-*F- 

-t 


- County. 


: . - 

ruL. 10-12-85 

€7 I 





















<- 



?+&&&<&$** •■vT.. 

^>?* ! x-*r* ■■• . IV- ’ 
«% >,'•.'• •' ' 




&S9&& 




b.WV *”■ 


[»r;Tti 


The IBM Wheelprinter. 

If you want your business to make 
a better impression next year, then 
get the Wheelprinter this year. 

It gives you high-quality characters 
and lets you switch printing styles in 
seconds. 


The IBM Quietwriter. 

1986 could be a very quiet year 
around the office. 

The Quietwriter gives you letter- 
quality printing, but its advanced tech- 
nology makes it almost silent. 

Even when it’s printing at 500 words 
per minute. 

A visit to an IBM Authorised Dealer 
or Retail Centre will tell you more 
about IBM Personal Computer 
products. 

Stop by today. 

Because if you can’t beat the rush, 
you might as well join it. 

For further information write to 
IBM United Kingdom International 
Products Limited, West Cross House, 
2 West Cross Way, Brentford, 
Middlesex TW8 9DY, ^ 

England (Telex 27748). ^ 




From now until December 31, it’s 
going to be very easy to find an 
IBM Authorised Dealer. Just follow 
the queue. 

Why this sudden flurry of buying 
activity ? Well, for one thing, smart 
business owners know that the 
IBM Personal Computer can be a tax- 
deductible business expense. 

Why not check with your tax 
consultant right now? 

’Tis the season to do inventory - 
never a jolly chore. 

But buying a PC now can put your 
stock situation in order, making it 
a lot faster and easier in the next year. 

Some of the people rushing to buy 
PCs may simply be starting their New 
Year’s Resolutions a bit early. 

There’s nothing quite like an 
IBM Personal Computer to really get 
organised. 

Since there is an entire family of 
IBM Personal Computer products, 
now businesses of all sizes are joining 
the rush. 

Whether you’re looking for an 
economical printer (check out the 
low-cost, high-function Proprinter), 
a powerful personal computer 
(the PC AT is one of the fastest) or 
anything in between, there’s a PC 
product just right for you. 

The IBM Personal Computer. 

The original PC is perfect for 
businesses that need computing power 
but don’t need a big price tag. 






And starting the year off with an 
IBM PC handling word processing, 
financial forecasting and analysis can 
help make the bottom line look 
a lot more attractive 12 months down 
the road. 


The IBM Personal Computer XT. 

The PC for companies that are 
pl anning to expand in 1986. 

Businesses are buying both models 
of the Personal Computer XT : one 
comes with two diskette drives and the 
other has one diskette drive and a 
10-megabyte hard file. 

They both come with eight 
expansion slots, so you can easily add 
more memory and storage as your 
business grows. 

And right now both models are 
available at reduced prices. 


The IBM Personal Computer AT. 

For some companies, an ordinary 
personal computer just isn’t enough. 

So IBM offers the Super PC. With 
three times the speed of a regular PC 
and up to 20,000 pages of storage, 
the Super PC is the most powerful IBM 
Personal Computer. 

If one of your plans for the new 
year is to clean up your filing system, 
the Super PC can give you a very 
good start. 


The IBM Proprinter. 

IBM’s dot-matrix printstation is the 
low-cost answer for companies that 
want a full-function printer that fits 
their last quarter budget. 

The Proprinter lets you use both 
sheet and fanfold paper without 
changing trays. 


MTm.TIltMPLIMIUCTtRLIItNSIDin RUMBUS. IM .5* GGK 






Page 6 


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1985 


Hcralh 


DVTERMnONAL 


PuWwbed With Tl^IW lock Inwa and TbcW«hrt»fU» Pew* 


The Business of Norms 


A Chinese Lesson: Interest Can Overcome Ideology 


In 1952 the American Psychiatric Associa- 
tion first published a manual classifying and 
describing mental disorders. It has since been 
revised and updated a number of tunes, and a 
new edition is now being prepared. In the case 
of most medical problems, scientists can readi- 
ly agree on the nature of tbe symptoms and die 
effect the disorder is producing. But psychia- 
trists have a mote difficult time accumulating 

data that are specific, and they regularly dis- 
agree over whether a given set of symptoms is 
even a mental illness. Homosexuality, for ex- 
ample, has at various times been classified as a 
disorder and as normal behavior. Alcoholism 
has been viewed as a physical illness and a 
behaviorial disorder. Clearly something quite 
different from scientific analysis has gone into 
the malting of these various judgments. 

The APA T"«mial is published for use by 
medical professionals, but the classifications 
have come to have important social implica- 
tions. Once a set of symptoms is recognized by 
tbe profession as a mental illness, persons 
exhibiting the symptoms can often claim in- 
surance benefits, invoke civil rights protec- 
tions and even offer the fitness as a defense in 
■criminal ca.ves. Public opinion shifts gradually 


to accommodate these designations and to 
tolerate behavior once thought unacceptable. 

In the course of the current revision of the 
manual, three new designations have became 
particularly controversial In an early draft, 
the manna l included mental disorders for rap- 
ist behavior, self-defeating personality and a 
font) of premenstrual syndrome. Many psychi- 
atrists objected to these new designations. Ac- 
cused rapists, they warned, would claim excul- 
patory illness*, abused wives who are victims 
of crime would be treated as if their own 
disorders had provoked abuse; women would 
be stigmatized if premenstrual symptoms were 
treated as mental rather than physical dis- 
orders. Revisions are still under way. 

Psychiatrists play a critical role in our com- 
plex society not only because they treat the ill 
but because, in many cases, they define tbe 
norms. It is important that in their concern for 
the side they be mindful of society’s need to 
reinforce moral codes, to bold people responsi- 
ble — in most cases — for their behavior and 
to provide protection against those who hurt 
others, acknowledge no rights but their own 
and destroy the peace of the community. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Enough Sugar Madness 


Quotas limi t sugar imports have had 
.the effect of tripling the price of sugar for 
American consumers. This protectionism is 
backfiring on U.S. gr o wers because the main 
consumers, commercial buyers, are switching 
to cheaper com sweeteners. So ihe sugar lobby 
has prosed Congress for even tighter quotas 
that would further raise supermarket bids and 
impoverish efficient sugar exporters in Latin 
America. Only a House-Senate conference 
Committee ran stop this madness 
U.S. production is concentrated in a few 
states where it is a dominant economic inter- 
est Their congressmen know it and the grow- 
ers in Hawaii, Louisiana and Florida usually 
get what they want despite the opposition erf 
consumers, refiners and the State Department 
Under die current four-year-old program, 
the government must maintain the domestic 
price at 18 cents a pound. Since that is far 
above the world price of 6 cents, coon try-by- 
country quotas must be used to prevent a flood 
of imports that would force Washington to 
buy up tbe domestic surplus. Quotas are ad- 
justed periodically to keep the domestic price 
at about 21 cents — just enough above the 18- 


cent floor to ensure that tbe domestic crop is 
shipped to private refiners rather than dumped 
on Uncle Sam The unintended side effect has 
been to create a boom market for cheaper com 
sweeteners. And as com displaces sugar in 
processed foods, the Agriculture Department 
hasbeenforoed to reduce imports further from 
2.9 to about 2 million tons a year. 

Were there not some concern for friendly, 
sugar-producing nations abroad, the quota 
might have soon been cut to below one million 
tons. But in September President Reagan held 
the line for foreign countries, including Brazil, 
H Salvador and the Dominican Republic, and 
the sugar price slipped to 19 cents. 

Now the growers have struck back. They 
bartered their support for tbe Senate Republi- 
cans’ farm Mil for a provision that prohibits 
the U.S. government from buying surplus sug- 
ar. If that provision stands, the administration 
would be forced to slash the import quotas to 
drive the price back up to at least 21 cents. 
That would rock Latin American economies 
and add $600 milli on to food prices at home. It 
is a costly treat Congress should not swallow. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Bossy Work on the Borders 

On a visit to France I observed that there 
were no customs or immigration formalities at 
all at Calais. As we drove off the Ferry without 
showing our passports, we might have been 
smuggling a trunkload of illegal immigrants or 
a hundredweight of cocaine* Tbe same was not 
true on our return to Dover. 

Britain opposes plans for the phasing out of 
passport checks between Common Market 
countries on the grounds that this could make 
it easier far terrorists and other criminals to 
cross borders. At the same time, immigration 
officers promise a summer of maximum dis- 
ruption unless more people are employed to 
help them in their useful work. 

I suppose a case could be argued against 
pedestrian road crossings on the grounds that 
they might help a terrorist to moss the road. 
But that does not seem a good enough reason 

he has proved he is not a criminal. 

P eggy Fenner, a junior agriculture minister, 
warned travellers from France not to bring 
more than the permitted 1 kilogram of meat or 
powdered milk, on the grounds that to do so 
might spread unspeakable foreign diseases. 
But if French meat is liable to be poisonous or 
infected, then so is the permitted kilogram. 
There is no possible explanation for the atti- 
tude of successive British governments except 
a passionate desire to boss us around. 1 
— Auberon Waugh vailing in 
The Sunday Telegraph (London). 

Expensive Performers in Space 

People in outer space are mainly useful for 
dealing with problems that would not exist if 
they were not there in the first place, getting in 
the way of undramatic instruments that can 
easily reap the benefits of space. 

But technological sense and dramatic ap- 
peal reflect different values. And that is why 
NASA, hoping to get SS billion for a needless 
cabin in the sky, had its astronauts tinkering in 
orbit recently with aluminum construction 
beams. It is also talking up a similarly super- 


fluous venture, a manned trip to Mars that will 
take so Long that planners say it is possible that 
cancer, heart attacks and other diseases of 
aging might develop along tbe way. 

The wretched tittle secret erf space polities is 
that humans are technologically a dispensable 
nuisance up there, inferior to and far costlier 
than sophisticated instruments. But without 
humans, space would be tike a circus without 
high-wire acts — bad for the box office. 

NASA goes into panegyrics over astronauts 
occasionally salvaging errant satellites. Un- 
mentioned is that tbe cost of outfitting the 
Space Shuttle for human crews far exceeds the 
value of the saved satellites. _ 

A manned Mara mission would be the pre- 
mier example of prodigious waste on useless 
cargo. Relatively inexpenrive unmanned satel- 
lites have already transmitted back volumes of 
precious scientific data. The medical prob- 
lems, though difficult, are manageable. There 
would be no medical problems if useless hu- 
man cargo were left behind, but that would 
reflect a great mistake in space politics — tbe 
triumph of engineering over theater. 

— Syrubatted science commentator 

DarddS. Gree nb erg (Washington) 

Chosen for Temporary Duty 

All one has to do to be assured a retirement 
income of $86,000 a year is become president 
of the United States. The money assures that 
[former presidents] need not exploit the high 
office they have held and can cany oat the 
responsibilities it places upon them for the rest 
of their lives. What is thoroughly unaccept- 
able, thoug h, are the wraiaring costs of main- 
taining Taj Mahal libraries, providing an im- 
perial office and staff and deploying a palace 
guard for.tifetime protection. This is the year 
Congress finally should controls on the 
fringe benefits that recent exjpresidents have 
learned to tike too wdL The Oval Office may 
produce king-size egos, but it is occupied only 
by citizens chosen by fellow citizens far tem- 
porary duty. It should not lead in reti r ement 
to a form of American royalty. 

— The Oregonian (Portland) 


FROM OUR DEC 10 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Greeks Victimized in Rhodes 
RHODES — Indignation prevails here regard- 
ing the administration of justice. When the 
Ottoman constitution was proclaimed, there 
were hopes that public services would be re- 
formed. and notably tbe law courts, but tire 
administration of the law is now in a more 
corrupt state than during tire absolutist rfgime 
of Sultan Abdul Hamid. Greek residents are 
tiie victims of continual persecution and get no 
redress. The Greeks are in reality without a 
Consul, because M. Suidas, who was appoint- 
ed to the post, is not recognized by the Tu rkish 
Government on account of his political ante- 
cedents in Macedonia. Gangs of Mussulman 
mara u ders parade the city, terrorizing the 
Greeks and obliging them to close their shops. 
The police look on but do not intervene. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chatman 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Ckaimm 

LEE W. HUEBNER, MWw 
Executive Editor 
Editor 
Deputy Editor 
DepvyEdatr 
Associate Editor 


1935: Roosevelt Defends Farm Policy 
CHICAGO — Defending the Administra- 
tion’s farm policy as designed to end condi- 
tions which “turned the fanners virtually into 
serfs,’* and denouncing its critics as “political 
profiteers,” President Franklin D. Roosevelt 
told the American Farm Bureau convention 
[on. Dec. 9] that tbe agricultural problem is a 
national matter and must be sutgect to the 
jurisdiction of tile Federal govemmtail rather 
than of the forty-eight states. The President 
claimed the Administration's p r o gra m had in- 
creased farm incomes by S3 billion in the past 
two and a half years. He admitted that some 
retail prices woe too high, bat said: “Lifting 
the prices of farm products to a level where the 
fanner can live is opposed chiefly by the few 


Anotiate PubBdnr 
Assodatr PtAbhtr 
Director of Operation 

ROLF f>. KRANEPUHL Dinar afA&oimg Sola 
International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Charka-dc-Ganlk, 92200 N«aDy-ear-S«ne, 

France. TeL- (1)47.47.1165. Teton 612718 (Herald). Cable Herald Paris. ISSN: 0294-8052. 

Direcieur de la publication: Walter N. Thayer. 

Managing Dir. Asia: Malcolm Gtm, 24-34 Harness? Rd, Hong Kong TeL S-28S6I& Tekx 61170. 

Mana&ng jPjet L K; JWr MxBkhan ; fi? Long dot, London WG. Td 8364831 Titer 262009. [ft*] 

SjL ^^ piS^deScaoSp^SlSm No. dim JfSZim 
cut subscription: S322 yearly. Second-dan postage paid at Lang blend City. N.Y, 11101. PSCM 
C 1985, International Herald Tribune. All rfgAu reserved SiSgi* 


I DS ANGELES— A refusal to be 
t diverted from internal reform 
seems to be the operating principle of 
China’s foreign policy m the 1980s. 
Its reaction to Vietnamese strikes this 
year* in Cambodia has been nrntwi, 
especially in contrast to the “teach 
than a lesson” approach of the late 
1970s. Relations with South Korea 
are edging toward normalcy. 

For good measure, China has 
trimmed its military budget and if 
plans to reduce the sire of die Peo- 
ple’s Army by one million men. As a 
nuclear power China has shown no 
interest m an arms race with anyone 
—maintaining less f han 250 nuclear- 
capable missiles and bombers, com- 
pared to thousands for the Soviet 
Union and tbe United States. 

Meanwhile, the country’s domestic 
trends have birea riveting. 

China has not become a liberal, 
democratic society. Political and per- 
sonal freedoms are stiH sharply con- 
fined. But there have been drastic 
and accelerating departures from the 
Marxist economic modeL 
They began with reform in agricul- 
ture. In 1978 the Chinese started 
shifting fr om fanning communes to a 
system of contracts with family farm- 
ers. They adopted regulation by mar- 
ket forces, profit incentives and ex- 
periments m enterprise economy. 
The agricultural reform was called a 
“self-responsibility system.” (Not a 
bad. way to define U5. aims.) 

It has been stunningly successful 
— bumper harvests for .four years 
running; doubled production of food 
grains permitting sharp cutbacks on 
purchases abroad. The shift has pro- 
duced great wealth in tbe countryside 
and a sense of excitement, perhaps 
even of miMfm, among rural Chi- 
nese. And rural reform has helped 
China resist tbe surge of migration to 
the large cities that has plagued so 
many developing countries. 

Last year the Chinese moved their 
economic revolution to urban areas. 
Reforms indude far-reaching steps 
out of character with a Marxist sys- 


By ‘Warren Christopher 

77te writer was U.S. deputy secretary of state from 1977 to 1981. This is the second of two articles. 


(an. Ihe goal of the 400,000 state- 
owned enterprises in China is no 
longer riming to 5Q bureaucratic or- 
ders but a return of reasonable prof- 
its. Managers now make their own 
plans in sudi areas as wages, sup- 
pliers, investment and production. 
American-style training has been 
adopted in management, marketing 
anti accounting, raring instructors 
from American universities. 

There is official acceptance, even 
approval, of the accumulation of 
wraith. Private ownership is permit- 
ted lot stops, restaurants ana medi- 
um-size businesses. Perhaps most 
staking of afl, Chinn is granting per- 
mission fa- private companies to sell 
shares of stock to tbe public, 

Chinese leaders are not timid 

The party leader him&dZ Hu Yach 


bang, has said that China “wasted 20 
years” after 1949 because of the “rad- 
ical leftist nonsense” associated with 
Mao. As an example of “nonsense" 
he recited Mao's phrase, “Beds 1 to 
have socialist weeds than capitalist 
seedlings.” Now the favored maxim 
is the reverse, summed np in the aph- 
orism from China’s top wader, Deng 
Xiaoping, that a cat of any color is 
welcome so long as it catches mice; 

As Prime Minister 2rao Zryang 
says, “We learned our lessons the 
hard way ... Now we know what 
works brat for China.” 

Quotations from Marx, Latin and 
Mao are still invoked to rationalize 
the new policies, but a rainftse offi- 
cial told me recently that the rtforms 
would create “200 million rich Chi- 
nese.” These changes are historic. 

No major Communist country has 


tried to move so far toward a market 
economy. There is evidence that the 
rapid pace of decentralization may 
have outrun the competence of local 
managers. A mere promise of change 
in the pervasive system of price con- 
trols caused a ripple of panic buying; 
when actual price increases crane, 
discontent is bound to follow. Oppo- 
sition is surfacing among bureaucrats 
wbo are losing power and who call 

the reforms “spiritual pollution." 
This is plainly a time of testing. 

What will happen when Deng 
Xiaoping, now 81, leaves office? He 
gives every indication of being con- 
cerned with posterity as well as pow- 
er. He has df«gn.n«id bis successors 
— Hu Yaobang the party leader, 

Than 7-tymg tbe premier. A cadre of 
younger people has replaced a gener- 
ation of aging leaders, in tbe largest 


power shift since 1949. The strategy, 
is to assure that today's directions; 
win survive their chief author. 

The reforms arc manifestly popo-’ 
Iar — and. on tbe whole, working. - 
China has grown at sustained raie£ 
comparable to Japan in the 1960s and 
South Korea. Taiwan and Hong 
Kong in the 70s. As businessmen 
dealing with China can attest, the 
country hungers for advanced tech- - 
oology, and incorporates it readily— 
in effect, skipping whole generations 
in building an industrial base. 

rhina is a forceful answer to the 
suggestion that every Marxist society 
is irretrievably hostile to Western in-., 
lerests. Nations and peoples can be 
subjugated by stronger outside pow - 
ers, mid we know this is a Soviet" 
ambition. But China stows that na- 
tions. when able, are more likely to- 
follow their own interest than some-'' 
one else’s script. It just might be true 
that time is on freedom's side. . 

Las Angeles Tunes. 


But Why AU This Official Trust in Chinese Nuclear Restraint? 


W ASHINGTON — As U.& in- 
telligence agencies struggle 
with tbe implications of Larry Wo- 
Tai Chin's 20 years of top-level spy- 
ing for China, across town at the 
State Department they are readying a 
celebration: The long-sought United 
States-China nu cl e a r trade pact, un- 
der which China will get technology 
and material* for nuclear power, is 
about to become a reality. 

In its current form, as the Reagan 
adminis tration has acknowledged, 
the accord is tm v erifiab le. China has 
refused to permit the International 
Atomic Energy Agency to keep track 
of US. unclear exports or to aflow 
co mpr e h ensive U.S. inspections. The 
agreement gives Washington a vague 
right to “visits” and “exchanges of 
information” — but not the program 
of systematic accounting required in 
all other agreements with nations 


By Leonard 

that import U.S. nuclear materials, 
including Britain and France. 

In essence, that means trusting 
China's word that it will not misuse 
nuclear transfers. With the U.S. gov- 
ernment accusing China of to years 
of deceit — which continued even as 
the nuclear deal was being negotiated 
—unqualified reliance on sum assur- 
ances hardly seems warranted. 

Moire than potential Chinese nu- 
clear chicanery is at stake. The sensi- 
tive nuclear pact has been treated by 
both sides as a key barometer of U.S.- 
Chmese relations. In the immediate 
aftermath of the spy scandal, Wash- 
ington’s stand on the accord may be 
the single most important indicator 
of- how seriously it views China' s spy 
mg exploits. President Reagan’s fist- 
shaking at all the spies ia our midst 


S. Spector 

seems like so much bluster now that 
he has decided to continue business 
as usual with China on the highly 
visible nuclear issue. 

There is also the question of can- 
dor. Only days before China's spying 
activities were revealed in the press 
— at a time when they were certainly 
known to senior CIA and Justice De- 
partment officials — key members of 
the Snimte Foreign Relations Com- 
mittee were briefed by the CIA. On 
the baas of that briefing, the commit- 
tee expressed its support for the nu- 
clear agreement. Did the committee 
learn of China's spying activities at 
the briefing and decide to endorse the 
agreement anyway? Or was this in- 
formation withheld because h would 
upset the nuclear deal? 

Washington’s real concern is to 


strengthen ties with a potential anti- 
Soviet ally — despite the damage tb ■ 
other U.S. interests. 

The delivery of nuclear materials is , 
still months away, and in the interim 
there will be further talks oa what the : 
“visits” and “exchanges of informs- 
non” specified in the pact really - 
mean. These talks could lead to truly., 
effective safeguards. But there is little 
reason to believe that U.S. negotia- 
tors will be instructed to insist on 
such safeguards — or that China. 
having observed Washington’s solid- , 
tude in the wake of the Chin affair. ', 
will be prepared to grant them. 

The writer is senior associate at the 
Carnegie Endowment for International 
Peace and author of “The New Nvdear * 
Nations, " an annual report an the spread 
of nuclear weapons. He contributed this 
comme n t to The New York Tunes. ' 


When Japan A 

\T EW YORK — At school on the morning 
IN of Dec. 8, 1941, the battle station beU ot 
tbe flagship Mikasa pealed out, as it did every 
morni n g, for rod call. The Mikasa had led the 
Japanese victory over the Russian Baltic fleet; 
the bell was yet one more daily reminder of 
the Japanese mili tary traditions that my 
schoolmates and I lived to uphold. Bat that 
morning the bed had another resonance: At 
breakfast, my mother and brother and I had 
heard the news of oar attack on Pearl Harbor. 

As junior high school students, we had 
learned that our virtual annexation of Man- 
churia was our protection against the advance 
of Communism after a power vacuum was 
created by rite collapse of the Chin dynasty . It 
was also true, however, that the Depression 
had resulted in the collapse of Japan's West- 
ern markets, and the population had doubled 
in SO years. Expansion through military con 

e seemed to be a solution to many of 
l’s economic problems. 

The Japanese group mentality and the 
“samurai” spirit strengthened the cause of 
those who urged military spending and 
strength. Our traditions, after all, taught ns 


By Kensuke Fukae 


not to question leadership and authority. 
Anyone who questioned the military budget 
was considered “hikaku-mm” — a Tian-ati- 
zen” — and as such was thought to be endan- 
gering our sacred national security. Tbe more 
aggressive the military became, the more it 
was able to win concessions from tbe moder- 
ate dements in the government who feared 
being condemned as un-Japanese. 

The United States reacted to the occupa- 
tion of points in Indo china by declaring a 
virtual trade embargo that included oil On 
Dec. 8, we were told that our strike was 
against a hostile nation ihat was usurping 
Japanese property, choking off ofl and de- 
manding our withdrawal from China. In the 
schoolyard, talk was excited and patriotic. We 
were 16; in a short time more than a third <rf 
us would take our places in tbe army and 
naval academies. Soon school was, practically 
speaking, suspended, as tire entire nation was 
mobilized for military training or industry. . 

Along with the virtual annexation of Man- 
churia m 1933 came the establishment of a 


“thought police.” The military establishment 
now controlled not only the administration 
but also the media. Censorship of news was 
sanctioned for “national security reasons.” 
Anyone — editor, professor, politician — 
expressing a dissenting opinion could be ar- 
rested as a Communist sympathizer or similar 
undesirable. Patriotism ran high in our isolat- 
ed land, and the administration defined aD of 
its actions in terms of national security. 

Within a few years the media were being 
used to exhort tbe people to fight to the 
glorious end. The lramilcaTg mentality flour- 
ished as citizens of aQ ages sharpened bam- 
boo spears to ward off invaders. Firebombs 
rained destruction on every major dty except 
die old capital Kyoto. On March 10, 1945, 
200 B-29 bombers incinerated more than 50 
percent of metropolitan Tokyo and 80,000 
residents, (hi Aug. 6 and 9, America dropped 
atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki 
. On Aug. 14, we wwe told that a very 
inqxatant announcement would be made the 
next day. The next day, tbe emperor spaike oa 


the radio for the’ first tune. For over 2000 
years the emperor had been regarded as tbe 
sacred descendant of Shinto God. None of us 
had ever heard his voice. We accepted that the 
war was over, although we were still ready to 
(he for our country. It was a moment of relief 
and di sapp o in tment: almost everybody cried. 

In the next several days many officers com- 
mitted hara-kiri, in keeping with the samurai 
code. Some young men organized partisan 
groups to fight to the death rather than be 
captive. But for most of us the emperor’s 
order to surrender was absolute. We were and 
are a deeply patriotic nation. 

America, unlike Japan, has a strong tradi- 
tion of dissent- America was built on the right 
to challenge authority. Such a tradition was 
-tragically absent ia ary homeland as- 1 grew 
up. Americans should cherish it, for it is such 
rights that most merit their patriotic devotion. 
Our loyally was to our leaders. America's 
must be to the Constitution. 

The writer is president of Kentek Information 
Systems in ABendak, New Jersey. He contributed 
Otis common to The New York Tunes. 


The Media and Terrorism: Coverage 
Should Be Complete and Reasonable 

By Katharine Graham 

Mrs. Graham is chairman of the board af The Washington Post Company. The following die find of tm parts, 
has been adopted from the 1985 Churchill Lecture, which star delivered at GmdhaB in London on Dec. 6- 


L ONDON — Terrorism has eo- 
/ countered a fair degree of short- 
term success, at least in the case of 
die United Sates. Tbe yearlong sei- 
zure of the US. Embassy in Tehran 
contributed to the downfall of the 
Carta- presidency. And terrorism in 
the Middle East encouraged, if it did 
not canse, military withdrawal from a 
region where America’s presence bad 
been declared by President Reagan to 
be “in (he national interest.’’ 

Tto sooctess of terrorism in farcang 
political change has led some observ- 
ers to conclude that terrorism is war. 
It is a form of warfare, moreover, in 
which media exposure is a powerful 
weapon. As a result, we axe being 
encouraged to restrict our coverage 
of ter rorist actions. Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher has proclaimed: 
“We most try to find ways to starve 
the terrorist and the hijacker of the 
oxygen of publicity on which they 
depend.” Many people, mrinHing 
some reporters m the United States, 
share ha- view. Most of these observ- 
ers call for voluntary restraint by the 
media in covering terrorist actions. 
Some go so far as to sanction govern- 
ment control — censorship, in fact — 
should tbe media fail to respond. 

However, I am against any govern- 
ment-imposed restrictions on tbe free 
flow of information about terrorist 
acts. Even media-sponsored guide- 
lines wonld be too broad to be useful 
or wodd be forgotten in the heat of a 
crisis. Instead. I favor as complete 
coverage of terrorism by tbe media as 
possible. Here are my reasons: 

• Terrorist sets are impossible 
to ignore; they are amply too tag a 
story .to pass unobserved. If the me- 
dia did not report them, rumor would 
abound, and rumor can do ranch to 
inflame and worsen a crisis. 

• Specialists find no compelling 
evidence that terrorist attacks wuuld 
cease if the media stopped covering 
them. On the contrary, they believe 
that terrorists would increase the 
number, scope and intensity of their 
attacks. If we ignore them, terrorists 
would tnm up the volume until the 
world could not avoid hearing. 

• Citizens have a right to know 
what the government is doing to curb 
terrorist attacks. Some of the solu- 
tions raise disturbing questions. 

At the same time, I bdieve that the 
media can help the government re- 
solve terrorist crises and save fives, 
.even though it is not our rote to do sa 
Coverage can be an insurance pdficy 
for hostages. As soon as hostages 

appear on television, they may oe 



somewhat safe. By giving the terror- 
ists an identity we make them assume 
more responsibility foe their captives. 

In addition, the gn wynmmt relies 
to some extent on the news media far 
information about a crisis that can be 
used to resolve it One government 
official ackerwiedged to me that 
American news organizations have 
moke resources to devote to these 
crises — in money, people and tech- 
nology — than does the State Depart- 


er access to the perpetrators. In the 
Middle East, government officials are 
often seated in their bunkers. Fre- 

n tly, terrorists refuse to speak to 
rot want to talk to repor t ers. 
These factors are imparted. They 
have nnntrihuteri to die resolution of 
terrorist crises and helped save lives. 
But I would quickly add that cov- 
ering terrorist acts and urban vio- 
lence presents very real and exceed- 
ingly complex challenges. There are 
limits to what the media .can and. 
should da Three critical issues, in 
particular, must be addressed. All. 
touch the central question of how die 
press can minimize its rote as a par- 
ticipant in the crisis and maximize its 
rote as a provider of information. . 

□ ; , 
The first issue involves knowing 
bow to gather and reveal information 
without nuking thingsworae, with- 
out endangering tbe lives of hostages 
or jeqpaidmaig national sorority.' . 

In theeariy days ofcoveringmbah 
viaknee and terrorist attacks, (he me- 
dia would descend on the scene, ’ 
lights ablaze and cameras roffin^ in 
hot pursuit of die hews. Sometimes 
we rad not know what could put fives 
at risk, and we were often less than. . 


tages in Washington in March 1977, 
ahere were live television reports that 
the police were straining a braiding 
wbea in fact they were merely bring- 
ing in food. Some reporters tele- 
phoned the terrorists inside die budd- 
ing, and one interview -rekindled the 
rage of a terrorist leader who had 
been bn the pomt of surrendering. 

Such potential disasters have led to 
discussion between thepofioeand the 
media on bow each could work better 
with the other. A more professional 
approach on both rides has resulted. 

At the beginning <rf a crisis, most 
authorities now know that it is best to 
establish a central pomt where rdi- 
aMe information crate disseminated 
as quickly and efficiently as possible. 
The media, knowing that tbe authori- 
ties intend to help them obtain tbe 
information they need, are much 
more willing to cooperate. 

In partichlar, the media are willing 
to —and doV withhold information 
that is fikdyto endanger twnwan tifc 
or jeopardize nationnl security. 

During tbe U.S. Embassy in. 
Iran, one of our Newsweek reporters 
became aware than six Americans 
known to have been in the embassy 
were not bring held; he orareiefly con- 
dnfWi that iney mre* have escaped 
to the Swedish or .Canadian embas- 
sies. But we and some others who 
knew tins didnot iwort it becwwewe 
knew H would put fives inteopardhr. : 

When Lefeaneso Shutes hijacked a 
TWA flight and todk '153 hostages, 
the media learned — ' but did not 
report — .libaf. one hostage belonged 
to ttoUJS. National Secmity Agency. 

_ Tragically, however, we in the me- 
dia have made mistakes, fit April ' 
1983 son»60pec^tewerekiDedt>a 



bomb attack on the U.S. Embassy in 
Beirut. At the time there was coded 
radio traffic between Syria, where the 

. operation was being run, and Iran, 
which was supporting it Alas, a tele- 
vision network and a newspaper col- 
mnnist rqrortedthat the JJS. govent- 
ment had intercepted the traffic md 
wan the traffic ceased. This under- 
mined efforts to capture the terrorist 
leaders and eUnrinated a source of 
mforination about future attacks. 

Five months later, apparently the 
same group struck again, at the US. 
Marine, barracks in Beirut; 241 ser- 
vicemen were kilted. No one is abso- 
lutely sure ,the news repots caused 
The traffic blackout Some suspect 
that they did. Whatever the answer, 


those detailed reports did not help. 

This land erf result, albeit un- 
intended, pants up tbe necessity for] 
fall cooperation wherever possible- 
between the media and the authcri- 


sensitive information, we an wining 
to idl the authorities what we have 1 
learned and what we plan to report.: 
Wuro reserving the right ^ to make the 1 
final decision ourselves, we are an*. 


A second challenging ia g n e that . 

media have to addresses bow to rap#, 
vrot. terrorists from using tee 
as a platform for their views. 

International Herald Tribune. 


LE 1 TC 


Intellectual Terrorism’ 


cooperative 
while Hi 


Hanafi 


held hoe- 


able. Critidm of Israel Is Nos 

Anti-Semitism, ” Dec. 3.} To brand 
someone u an anti-Semite : because 
he or she disagrees with Israel's poli- 
cies is fafriUnfnal twmricm Tiitt g$ 
the existence of Israd teouM not be . 
negotiable, neither isthefree-exprcs- 
sion of opinion and loyalty. 

MICHAEL M. FRENKIEL. i 
- Heusy-Vcrvicrt, Belgium. 

; Mr. Copeland's agrertioa that most 

jnflnwitittl foreign, policy positions in 
tbe UiL government -are filled by 
Jews” isludicrdas. Justus unfounded 
is his waming tbat Jews for whom 


Israel is a “special concern” risk be- 

Were' a rirml ar ii^mction applied to 
Americans of British, Irish or African 
descent who take, an interest in the 

weifare of those lands, there would be 

few-kftrto shape foreign policy. 

MARC A. SCHWARTZ. 

Edinbu rgh 

OfGoosesandOctopodes 

. w ntiarb Safire’s problem with oc- 
tomiSEs apd octopi ("A Writer En- 
twwedbyOctopMsez” Nor. 25) resem- 
bles that of the suit maker who had 
frequeht need of the smoothing iron 
known ax.a^taflor's goose. To refresh 
his surmlybe wrotem order for “two 


SS Not Hoag the lobi ' 
onhat, he began again and wrote for : 
two tailor’s geese.” Still unsatisfied, • 
be mde a thml try, asking for “one- 
Oblor’s goose and adding: **Winle 
yon re at it, send meacocpte.'” ; 

SCOTT CHARLESL ' 

Geneva., , 

p- ’ , ' f 

and must corltain the writ, '. , 
t&u&tre, name and hdl.ad Z 
?*** jfters should be brief, and . 
We subject to etEdng. We cannot - 

S<* the return if 
‘Otsoucaed manuscripts. ■ ' 






J.- ' -r -• \ . 4 • -V --6» -.-V- ... i 


INTERNATIONAL HERAID TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1985 




xSu!> 


Page 7 


V? 




C.Qf Nobel 


:>: s ^l i WUU . 

^Jointo Aid 

S^Ol Reporter ■; 

V; - (CnntinBfri from Page 1) 

woftiheNpWPeacePjizem 
j a,^f'"ifr 977 for its pob&qzmg of human - 
e^jgjus abuses, are not faulted when 
j-- t- fey fad to address adequately nor- 
,2^ ^ftj.lcar and other issues. ; * ’ ’ ■ 

“Broadening the agenda :wwdd ■ 
-// ^Teak up our movement,^. Dr. 

said later in an interview^ 
«^We have Found a small oasisof 
> ; wninww . interest .we pursue 
~ r -! iyith obsessive mtcnsity..’ , : . 

- Bn Loro said be was “appalled" 

'^.jy the actions taken by Oumcdlor 
r :'^> ^ rfmnt Kohl ol West German and . 
7 '? i: 'i*ker leaders in Weston Europe* 

' '■»>. rho had urged the Nobel oommil- 

ee to rescind the award became of 
>r. Chazov's involvement. 
fih^J Dr. Chazov insisted he was at- 
lf UffJJending die Oslo ceremonies strict- 
er in pis capacity as a physician and 
' ^ - r ^o-dudnnan of die anti-nuclear 

f’~ i^.'Tonp, not in his other roles as 
lepoty health minister « fnii 
; r ^ '- , c jaeniber of (he Communist Party’s 
v i: ‘- z -^.r^cy-maldng Central Committee, 
‘"f When pressed in an interview on 

- ir ..'.he fact that, unKke Dr. Lown, he 

: Serves not as a private physician 

V. y^«t as a govemmem omcial/Dr. 
^’tlazov responded by saying that 
Li ■‘perhaps it is good that a man idee 
''“‘•■‘SC l ne has some influence within my 
r. ^•ovenuMnL” 

• He contended that the issue of 
' ^P.-tir. Sakharov's freedom was “not 
^tour problem as doctors against nn- 

~ dear war, because it is outside the 
;r - 7 ^.jornmitment oT our organization." 
"**■>- b During Monday’s press coofer- 
‘^mce, Dr. Chazov dodged direct an- 
^ ‘F-'- jwers to questions concerning Sovi- 
; human rights abuses. He insisted 

■ Mat the wodd would not be a safer’ 

dace if Soviet physicians were add- 
' -nately compelled to leave the anti- 
m indear movement became of po- 
tl ^onriical considerationS- 
l I^Cll At that point, the news confer- 
mce lapsed into chaos as the doc- 
.. . - ors rushed to attend the heart at- 
tack victim, who was identified as 
’ t Lev Novikov, a Soviet television 
j. ouraaHsL 

Their common interest in “sod- 
_*’-ieu death” by cardiac arrest 

■ wrought Dr. Lown and Dr. Chazov 
’ ■ ; - ogether more than 15 years ago. 
r -fhey first began to exchange medi- 

• L : -al rcseardi findings, an a devd- 

- ~ : : ^>edsnch a dose rapport that they 

- " -tedded five years ago to launch 
: —heir crusade to banish the threat of 

• ‘'—ludearwar. 

Later, a hospital spokesman in 
■ '^Dslo said that Mr. Novikov was 
’ ' dive in “stable but critical condi- 

• - -ion." 



* Japanese Invasion 9 Is Welcomed by a Small Town in France 


Albertina Sisuhi 

TreasonCase 

hWithdrmm 

(Continued from fage 1) 
against the accused and was re- 
garded as vital to the prosecution’s 
(^e. 

Under, cross-examination, . Mr. 
de Vries admitted that the Natal 
Imfian Congress and the Transvaal 
Indian Congress, which are part of 
the United Democratic Front and 
to which many of the accused be- 
long, are not committed to violent 
revolution as be had testified. ' 

Instead, he acknowledged, they 
were guided by the nonviolent phi- 
losophy of their founder, Mohan- 
das K. Gandhi, who lived in South 
Africa before he founded modem 
India's independence movement 

The case produced other embar- 
rassments for the government as 
wdL A security pohee officer. Ma- 
jor Harold Miles, revealed under 
cross-examination that pdfice in- 
formers were paid according to the 
information they gave, getting 
more money for mare valuable in- 
formation. 

The major conceded that this 
could be an incentive to informers 
to exaggerate their reports, and 
that informers' reports often 
formed the basis for issuing restric- 
tion orders against political dissi- 
dents. 

Cremated Renurina Stolen 

The Assoc ia ted Press 

TOKYO — Ashes from cremat- 
ed remains, including those of vic- 
tims of a Japan Air lin« plane, 
crash in August, have been stolen 
from two crematoriums, officials 
said Monday. The crematoriums 
store ashes after family members 
remove the bones according to Jap- 
anese tradition. The remains are 
subsequently sold to those who sift 
through for gold and other 
precious metals. 


(Continued fiom Page 1) . 
have a problem in Western Europe 
communicating what we are trying 
to do —it is not an easy task,* said 
Makoto Kuroda, a senior official of 
Japan's Mimstiy of International 
Trade and Industry, known , as 
MTU 1 

. As reflated in a recent survey by' 
MITI, the communication problem 
involves an inabDiiy by mauy Japap 
ncse companies to adapt thdrman- 
agpntent methods to another cut 
ti i re . 

“Local employees, unlike Japa- 
nese employees, do not consider 
their wont to be the center of their 
fives," the survey reported. 

Nevertheless the Japanese con- 
tinue to come to Europe. About 
200 Japanese manufacturing com- 
panies are exploring sites for new 
investments in countries, such as 
Sweden, that they had ignored pre- 
viously. The Japanese are looking 
to invest in banking and trading as 
weD as manufacturing — consumer 
electronic products, office equip- 
ment, cars and tires,' even pens. 

Japanese companies also are 
seeking joint-venture partners in 
Western Europe in sectors where 
they have been weak international- 
ly, such as pharmaceuticals, bio- 
technologies and telecommunica- 
tions. 

The companies are being sup- 
ported actively by the Japan Exter- 
nal Trad e Organization, an agency 
of MTIT that operates 18 offices in 
Weston Europe. 

“We still inn promoting Japanese 
trade, of course,” said Cnikao TSu- 
innta t head of the trade organiza- 
tion’s office in Paris, “but increas- 
ingly we are becoming involved in 
helping our companies with their 
industrial. investments and strate- 
gic aTHaweea. This means advising 
them on everything from govern- 
ment and union relations and fi- 
nancing, to finding parts suppliers 
and partners. 

“As in Alsace, oar companies are 
getting a warm welcome.” 

The newcomers include little- 
known small- and medium-sized 
Japanese companies, many with 
virtually no previous experience in 
dealing with foreigners. 

“The newcomers are a step down 
from tjhe giants, such as Nissan and 
Sony," said Jim Ivins, an official in 
the British government's foreign in- 
vestment agency in London, “but 
they definitely are quietly looking 
everywhere in Europe, including 
here." 

“They are not coining here for. 
the golf, the tea, nor for our blue 
eyes," Mr. Ivins added. 

He left unsaid the major reason 
the Japanese are c oming : to cir- 
cumvent growing trade barriers in 
the European Commmnty. These 
indnde not only long-established 
tariffs, which the EC is preparing to 
raise an everything from compact 


discs to electronic ctmqxraeats, but 
also a rash of duties aimed at 
“dumping," or selling exports at 
less than the cost of production. 

For car manufacturers, the barri- 
ers indnde import quotas that 
range from 2^00 cars in Italy to 3 
p ercent of the total market in 
France and 11 percent in Britain. 

One result is Nissan’s -role in 

Britain 

. “Our plans for major invest- 
ments in Britain,” said Mhsuya 
Goto, the London-based general 
man a gw of Nissan, “stem partly 
from the fact that we consider the 
hunting of Japanese car imports ' 
hereto 11 permit of the total mar- 
ket a restraining factor on our ex- 
pansion.” 

Nissan sells about 110,000 can 
in Britain annually. Next August, 
the company plans to begin assem- 
bling 24,000 cars a year from im- 
ported Irits at a new plant in north- 
east Engand. 

. A second plant being planned 
for a nearby ate would produce 
100,000 Nissan car* by 1990, repre- 
senting the largest stogie invest- 
ment by the company outside Ja- 
pan and die United States. The cost 
is estimated at £300 nnHion (about 
$450 million) , or £250,000 more 

than rhi» But plant 

Because each car at the second 
plant will contain 60 percent to 80 
percent British parts, rather than 
being made from kits sent from 
Japan, the import quota will not 
apply, Mi. Goto said- “Quite am- 
ply, he added, “if we finally decide 
to proceed, our sales to the UJL 
will double, and we will export care 
from Britain.** 

Europe^tissan has been offered 
generous financial help by its hosts. 
In a move strongly supported by 
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, 
the British government is offering 
grants and other aid representing 
about 30 percent of the total invest- 
ment. 

Japanese officials emphasize, 
however, that ffanmaal aid is rarely 
i hi* A-rifirng nr jq direct invest- 
ment 

Rather it is the abundance of 
skilled workers and managers, gen- 
erated by II percent European un- 
employment, that is the key to in- 
vestment choices. Sony selected 
Alsace after it narrowed the choice 
to rites to Austria, Wales and West 
Germany. 

“We wanted French quality 
workers, mainly Alsatian women," 
a Sony executive said. Several han- 
dled people have already applied 
. forjobs at the plant, which initially 
will emplqy250. The number could 
doable within a few years, the exec- 
utive added. 

The fact that Japanese wage 
rates now approach, and some- 
times exceed, those in Western Eu- 
rope also helps explain the trend. 


A recent survey by West Germa- 
ny’s DrcsduerBmk showed that in 
Japan average bouity wage costs in 
industry ore the equivalent of 2Z8Q 
Deutsche marks (about 59). That 
compared to 23 DM in France, 
2150 to Austria and Italy, 20 in 
Britain, 1610 to Spain and 37.70 in 
theUnilcd States, 31.40 in Switzer- 
land and 29 JO in West Germany. 


rope. They cite the following statis- 
tics^ 

•The total book value of Japa- 
nese investments, even after rough- 
ly tripling to the last 10 years, re- 
mains modest: the equivalent of 
$7.7 bOfion last year, up Sl^ billion 
from 1983. Of that total, about 80 
percent was spent in commerce, 
h anking , distribution and other 


Investment by Japanese concerns, first 
designed to broaden markets, Has been 
accelerated as a way of skirting Europe’s 
increasingly protective trade barriers. 


“The figures do not tell the 
whole story,” said Jean-Hare Leh- 
mann, an associate professor at the 
INSEAD business school in Foo- 
urinebkap. France, “but wage costs 
certainly play a key role to deciding 
where the Japanese deride to in- 
vest" 

Mr. I ^imann said that the next 
big investment push will come to 
Spain. “Spain needs the jobs, with 
22 percent unemployment" he not- 
ed. “Like most gpvmunents, Ma- 
drid is giving the Japanese plenty 
of encouragement.^ 

How are the Japanese companies 
»md hunks actually doing in Eu- 
rope? That question is the subject 
of considerable controversy and a 
source of misunderstanding and 
mythology, according to interviews 
with g o ver nm ent officials, analysis 
and businessmen in Weston Eu- 


scrvices; manufacturing invest- 
ments accounted for only 20 per- 
cent According to government es- 
timates, investments this year will 
rise to S8J billion. Japan has in- 
vested nearly three times more than 
that in the United States. 

• Seventy percent of Japan's ex- 
ports to Western Europe comprise 
primarily goods rather than funds, 
technology and services. In other 
words, Japan still is concentrating 
on machinery and components for 
its plan ts rather than transferring 
its technology and research and de- 
velopment, as many US. compa- 
nies da 

• The rate of increase to Japan's 
trade surplus with the European 
Comnumly, although h has leveled 
off, will push the surplus to around 
$12 billion this year. 

Despite this boom, a recent sur- 


vey by the Euro-Asia Business Re- 
view concluded that Japanese com- 
panies in Western Europe faced a 
growing number of problems. 

In Britain, Japan’s largest Euro- 
pean investment market with 400 
companies operating, marly every 
one of (hem complained about dif- 
ficulties in reennting and keeping 
qualified middle-management em- 
ployees and engineers. Most also 
cited the poor quality of compo- 
nents purchased from subcontrac- 
tors. Some criticized what they de- 
scribed as the inertia of British 
employees. 

In West Germany, Japan's sec- 
ond-largest market, local execu- 
tives complained about the almost 
exclusive use of Japanese in com- 
munications between the bead of- 
fice and the subsidiary. German 
managers also noted limited possi- 
bilities for advancement; despite a 
high rate of turnover of Japanese 
executives, the companies do not 
attempt to integrate local execu- 
tives into top management. 

to France the problems are simi- 
lar — and different. 

The first Japanese investment to 
France was Europ Panel which to 


1967 established a plant near Paris 
that now has 60 percent of the 
market for roller-type pens in 
France. 

Discussing the attitude of his 
French workers, Hiroaki Ann. di- 
rector general of Europ Pentel. told 
the Euro-Asia Business Review: “I 
don’t understand them and they 
don't undos land the company. 
Conditions for workers here are al- 
ready too good, and they are still 
pushing for more money and more 
vacations." 

The situation has improved since 
Mr. Arai was interviewed earlier 
this year, a spokesman said, be- 
cause roughly half the French 
workers have been replaced by 
Spanish, Portuguese. African or 
V ietnames e workers. 

Or, as a Japanese study put it: 
“Trade friction can, in a sense, be 
called cultural friction. Numerous 
difficulties will have to be resolved 
before the recipient countries find 
(corporate investments] totally ac- 
ceptable and the investing compa- 
nies find them profitable.” 

f Tomorrow: How Europe is fight- 
ing back, t 


HOROlGGlSTS 

16 New Bond Street Mayfev London W 1 


TRAVELLERS REASSURED ‘ WATER 
IN BOMBA Y SAFE TO DRINK ’ 


Based on his long and intimate acquaintance with 
Bombay our foreign correspondent writes : 

"Of all the things that people diink in Bombay, 
water has never figured prominently. &£■ 

Most prefer Tonic in Bombay, Mar- E|H 
tini in Bombay or Orange in Bombay. I U, 
Indeed, anything that one would 
usually mix in Bombay. 

But, let me assure you, there 
is no need to stay clear ■ 

which infer that mB 

water does not 'mix 

distinctive of Im- PV (TfJ 1® 

ported London Dry' tow 

Gins are well and o^- 



HUBLOT 


Quartz movement - Water resistant 5-otm IB K gold, 
gold and steel, all steeL Natural rubber strap. Registered model. 














Pi 


A* 

AB 

AD 

AE 

AE 

AF 

AS 

AST 

AT 

AT 

AO 

Aa 

Aa 

Aa 

Ao 

Ac 

Ao 

AC 

AC 

Ac 

M 

Ad 


Ad 

Ad 

Ad 

Ad 

Ad 

Ad 

A* 

A« 

Ail 

Ail 

8 


All 

All 


At 

Al 


A) 

Al 

Al 

AJ 

Ar 

At 

Al 

A\ 

Al 

Al 

Al 

Al 

At 

Al 

Al 



A diamond cutter at work in Antwerp, around 1850. 

For a Skilled Stone Cutter, 
Life Is on the Solitary Side 


ANTWERP — For Horn Lamyssen, diamond 
cutting is a fascinating job, presenting new chal- 
lenges with each precious stone he fashions. 

Tm learning every day,” he tokl a viator to the 
factory where he works, in a comer of a drab room 
whose only light comes from his workbench and 
from windows High in a far wafl. 

Mr. Lanryssen was handling the job of girdling, 
a process already known in Renaissance times. He 
has performed the task for nearly four decades. 

A skilled job that requires concentration and 
steady hands, girdling involves rounding the base 
of a sawed or cleaved stone so that it has more or 
less the form of a polished diamond. 

To do this, Mr. Lanryssea cements a diamond to 
a dop, or bolder, and mounts it in the chuck of a 
lathe that rotates at high speed. He then takes a 
second rough diamond, which he has also cement- 
ed to a long dop, this one hand held, and places it 
against the first as it spins. The friction of the two 
stones gradually gives the desired shape. 

“It's a nice job, fascinating,” Mr. Lanryssen 
said, “Every stone is a new challenge." 

But, despite the satisfaction Mr. Lamyssen gets 
from his work, his job is not without its worries, its 
problems. 

“It’s lonely string here in a comer,” he said, 
facing dark, windowless walls. “No fresh air.” 

The gray-haired man, with the bottom of his 
work apron tacked to his bench to catch anything 
dropped, shifted at his work station and surveyed 
the room. Only one other man worked there, his 
back to his colleague. 

Pondering his trade, the 58-year-old craftsman 
said he was still learning butj “Once you learn 
everything, you are too old. Your eyes are gone, 
and you are shaky.” 

Mr. Lamyssen, whose mother was also a dia- 
mond worker, wore steel-rimmed glasses that he 
said he has had since he was about 40, with no 
change of presc rip tion. It is not the eyes, then, that 
go first. . _ 


The constant movement required in the job of 
bracing the long, wooden dop under his arm and 


back problems, not 
trade. 


he said, in his 


“I've already had one operation,” be said, touch- 
ing bis lower bade, where he said “the bones rub 
together” because of the rocking motion of the 
work. 

“We have more tension now than before,” he 
added. 

Competition and other pressures require that 
now, more than ever, more be gotten out of a rough 
stone. Earlier, as much as 40 percent to 60 percent 
of a stone could be lost in processing, which 
includes cleaving or sawing, bracing or girdling, 
and polishing or faceting. 

Mr. Lanryssen picked up a handwritten order 
that called for processing a stone. The note said a 
3-carat diamond should be fashioned from the 
4.75-carat rough stone on his bench. 

“We have to make 3 carats,” he emphasized, 
shifting uneasily in his chair to roll a cigarette and 
light it on a small gas burner on his bench. 

As experienced as Mr. Lanryssen is in his skilled 
craft, mistakes sometimes occur — but not many. 

“At my ag&.ifs very small, the number of 
mistakes," be said. “Two or three times and you’re 
OUL” 


including modem processing techniques, have al- 
tered the atmosphere of the work place, too, Mr. 
Lanryssen said. 

When the diamond business flourished, he said, 
the workers processing stones enjoyed their work 
more, taking a day’s labor in stride. 

“Twenty years ago, you could hear the polishers 
out there laughing and joking,” be said, gesturing 
to a nearby room where a dozen or so men sat 
silently at their benches and faceted diamonds. 

“Now,” he continued, “it’s like a cemetery.? - 
— GEORGE GUDAUSKAS 




DIAMONDS 


A SPECIAL REPORT 


e Gem Trail 



By George Gudauskas 

PARIS — A tare stone lacking 
luster in the rough, the diamo nd is 
the most paradoxical oT gems, bear- 
ing great fame arid seductive pow- 
er. ■ . 

Through the centuries, April's 
birthstone has emerged as a symbol 
for light, Hfe, the sun, durability, 
incorruptibility, invincible con- 
stancy, sincerity and innocence. 

Today, diamonds are widely 
known as symbols of love and trust 

Diamonds have always been the 
choice of the rich, the royal, the 
famous, gaining high reputation 
because they are the most expen- 
sive, the hairiest, the most brilliant 
and the rarest of gems. 

Pliny the Elder, the Roman natu- 
ralist encyclopedist and writer, 
said, “Diamonds represent the 
greatest value not only of the gems 
but of the good thing s on Earth.” 

And T. Nichols wrote in 1652 in 
“The History of Pretions Stones” 
that “the pure diamond is a hard, 
diaphanous perfectly transparent 
stone, which doth sparkle forth its 
glorie much like the twinefcting of a 
glorious starre.” 

ished dkmamTif determined^^ 
how it reflects light. Its facets are 
painstakingly placed so that it ad- 
mits and returns the mait imum. 
The diamond then literally sparides 
and glitters Hke a star. 

In unpolished form, however, the 
diamond is a vague crystal stone, 
lacking luster. It is downright dull 
and needs skilled cotters and pol- 
ishers to bring oat its beauty. 

The “four Cs" — carat, odor, 
clarity and cut — de termine the 
polished diamond’s real value. 

Despite its value, the diamond’s 
composition of crystallized pure 
carbon does not differ from that of 
graphite, that greasy-feeling blade 
mineral with metallic luster most 
commonly found in “lead” pencils. 

Inferior stones — and 80 percent 
of the world's diamonds lade gem 
quality — are used as abrasives, in 
cutting tods and in phonograph 
needles. Many space-age applica- 
tions eristfor them, too, indndfng 
icsfoMheU.S. space 


Moist of the w odd’s gem dia- 
mond supply comes from pipes, or 
conical semes, of old volcanoes in 
Sooth Africa, although Brazil is a 
source of carbonados, ortriadt dia- 

monds. 

Synthetic diamonds have been 
produced since 1955, when General 
Electric invented the process, and 
they now ou t strip their natural 
counterparts for industrial use. 

But the gem stone is rare indeed. 
Itis so rare, in fr e t. ♦Hat mere than 
1250 tons of rock, sand and gravel 


beauty of a polished 
diamond is 
determined by how it 
reflects Kght Its 
facets are 


so that it admits and 
reborns the 
maximum. The 
diamond then 
literally sparides and 
glitters like a star. 


have to be unearthed to yield a 
single carat of diamonds, or one- 
fifth of a gram. 

Annual world production 
amounts to about 47 millio n carats, 
or nine tons, with Africa by far the 
largest producer. The Soviet Union 
and Australia have also become im- 
portant participants in the world 
market, as wdl as Venezuela. 

It is not known when the first 
diamond was discovered (dia- 
monds axe said to date back 3J2 
trillion to 33 trillion years). But 
where this happened is no mystery. 
It was in India, where an active 
trade in diamonds existed long be- 
fore the birth of Christ. 

Until the 18 th .century, India re- 
mained the only producer. . So it 
was there, in die land of wealthy 


Jewelers Smash Taboos for the New Sun Kings 


By Vicky Elliott 

PARIS — One of the reasons 
Louis XIV is known as the Sun 
King is that he glittered as he 
walked. His royal person was en- 
crusted, it seems, with as many as 
2,000 diamonds: on his hau on his 
cravat, on buttons, garters and 
buckles. 

Gentlemen today are shier, in- 
dulging only in the odd timepiece 
or cuff link. But the purveyors of 
diamonds have been conspiring, 
with limited success, to expand this 
neglected segment of the market. 
Collections for men have been de- 
signed confronting diamonds with 
leather and steel, inlaying them on 
smooth wooden spatulas or letting 
them masquerade as the miniature 
ball at the end of a tiny gold polo 
mallet. There are taboos to be bro- 
ken. 

Faced with a tighter market, the 
great names in jewelry have had to 
become inventive. As they had to 
adjust when the maharajahs and 
many of the crowned heads of Eu- 
rope faded into history, they are 
having to adjust today as the oil 
money flows less freely. Some have 
made multimiUion-doDar business- 
es by refocusing part of their activi- 
ties on new customers in a different 
income bracket There are still new 
“boutique" lines opening on the 
Place Venddme, the mecca of the 
industry, where starting prices for a 
bauble with the odd diamond hover 
at around $800. 

Marketing has evolved. It is true 
that most women in the jewelry ads 
are there only to display their hus- 
bands' spending power, but De 
Beers has a new campaign insinuat- 
ing that only the man whose wife 
(or life partner) has just presented 
him with a diamond can be a yup- 
pie really worthy of the name. 
Many of the highly tailored indi- 
viduals who ply their trade on the 
rue de la Paix are doubtful this 
tactic will really breed a generation 
of latter-day Sun Kings, but thing s 
do f-hany . 

• Take the engagement ring, for 
example, whose function has be- 
come somewhat ambivalent at 
least among the cohabiting middle 
classes. Nowadays, when the cou- 
ple finally reaches the registry of- 
fice, there may be only a single ring 
doing the job of two. (The problem 
is what to call it: De Beers’ Centre 
du P is mnn t not altogether suc- 
cessfully, tried “let nouveau fin- 
ds? hoping to borrow from the 
sophistication of the New Roman- 
ticism and nowelle cuisine.) 

Then, there is the problem of 
clothes. Since the days of Britain’s 
Queen Mary, who was particularly 
partial to baubles, there has been a 
shrinking not only m the number of 
state occasions but in the surface of 
apparel available for adornment. 
No bats, hence no hat pins; no 
jabots at the neck; brooches have 



At top, Jean- Jacques Chaubin’s necklace; zing by Francois 
Panltre, right; a choker from Laurence DofegeaL 


as good as vanished (although there 
has been a concerted effort to re- 
vive them in Paris as the “clip"). 

Life-styles count, too. Queen 
Mary’s great-grandchildren (or 
their wives, who, after all, have 
started to wear their jewels around 
their foreheads) may have to be 
doing the dishes themselves. The 
solitaire in its Tiffany mount, with 
four claws, is being replaced by the 
serti das, which protrots the stone 
in a smooth setting without protru- 
sions and does not catch on the 
wearer’s latest cashmere sweater. 

Conventional wisdom- has it that 
a stone is at its most brilliant when 
it is placed in the least obtrusive 
.setting. But some up-to-date de- 
signs have demonstrated the con- 
trary: that a 1.5 -carat stone, say, 
encircled in a setting of gold, can 
look almost twice the size it does 
when left open to the light. 

Fashions in haute joafflerie are 
not as fickle as fashions in haute 
couture; a jeweler cannot afford to 
have his merchandise look passe 
too quickly. But while there will 
always be takas for the raw materi- 
als rendered in classical splendor, 
for the brute stones and the sheer 
weight of gold and platinum, there 
is room for innovation. 

“We try to nudge the big houses 


into something a little mote mod- 
ern,” said Laurence Dol&geal, 
whose designs can be seen at sever- 
al of the major houses. Her hus- 
band is a jeweler himself, and they 
work together on extending the 
possibilities- of a pvro technical' 
problem. In a recent De Beers se- 
lection of contemporary design for 
solitaires, she showed a necklace 
using a mesh of black gold that was 
inspired by some radiator meshing 
that happened to be lying around 
in file workshop. 

While blade gold uses a process 
of oxydation formerly under indus- 
trial patent to treat the surface of 
the metal, Harry Winston has been 
perfecting its alloys of “blue” gold, 
-and other colors may follow. Alain 
and Patrick Maubuisson had the 
idea of sculpting mother-of-pearl 
from the thickest shells of the 
South Seas, uncovering a material 
of great depth-and~ warmth that is 
put to sumptuous effect in their 
“Nadia" rings. (The name comes 
from nacre and duunmt, or mother- 
of-pearl and diamond in French — 
“Diana” was already heavily trade- 
marked). 

Laser cutting, which in theory 
mafe ^ diamond as malleable as 
putty, may yet have revolutionary 
consequences, although the dia- 
mond in the shape of a noise’s head 


or a Star of David does not so far 
command much of an audience — 
or much of a price. Meanwhile, 
hematite and onyx are enjoying 
something of a vogue, and inven- 
tive designers are mixing cocktails 
of diamonds with smoky quartz 
and rods: crystal, ebony and obsidi- 
an. 

Unfettered imagination and De 
Beers’ biennial international con- 
tests for design have come up with - 
some wild combinations. Francois 
Pautixe, aixmng tor contrast — ^the 
hardest material and the softest; 
the brightest and the darkest". — - 
produced a -necklace in jet-black 


rubber tubing, punctuated with a 
knot plastered in apowMe, or mo- 
saic. of diamonds. Marie-Panic 
Quercy, another of the 25 finalists 
in the competition, produced an 
extravagant necklace in the shape 
of an inverted umbreDa, uring plat- - 
inum mesh set with raindrops of 
pear diamonds. 

These exceptional pieces, collec- 
tors' items, would cost a jeweler 
$35,(100 and $65,000, but they are 
not necessarily expected to mid a 
buyer. De Beers, however, has de- 
cided that it is in its interests to 
keep the industry cm the move. Its 
competitions began with a hyper- 
realist stage: diamonds with paper 
clips, for instance, or another whi- 
ning entry, denounced by I/Hu- 
manitfc, the Communist daily, 
showing off a substantial solitaire 
in the vise of a thoroughly proletar- 
ian monkey wrench. - 

A more recent venture was the 
“Simple Is Beantifnr .oQDectkm, 
which ranges from Art Deco in 
inspiration to unabashed hi-tech. 
Jean-Jacques Ghaubm, one of the 
designers represented, is 23 'and 
rhnfing lHat his desig ns most be . 
scaled down to the inevitable con- 
straints of the market It may be 
some time before Cartier and Boii- 
cheron are ready for-lns futurist, 
mechanical creations inspired by 
science fiction and comic strips. 

Some jewelers «mwifawn that ji is 
their Arab clients who keep the 
motor of invention running. First 
of all. they have bad the means to 
become connoisseurs, and then. be- 
cause they buy jewdiy marc freely 
as gifts, they are timed in to the 
newest models. Bulgari argues that 
Americans are more receptive to 
innovation. Some say the French ., 
are the keenest judges erf good 
work. And many report that there 
has been on evolution m attitudes: 
that customers who used io come in 
to add a facet to thrir -investment 
portfolio, are now more sensitive to 
the beautyof the jewels. 

■- The fata remains that most jew- 
elry lives a half-life in a bank vault, 
and much ingenuity has been ex- 
pended in grappling with' the prob- 
lem of security. 

“1 wish I could leave. the door 
open and let people crane in and 
out as if it woe a supermarket," 
said Midtd 'Eixndm of Vemey,. 
snug in his beautifully appointed, 
comer of the Place Venddme. 
Along with-Ms superb resettings of 
antique stones,"' unique pieces,. he., 
has a fluted gold nog called the' 
u Cofirc-Fort, n or safe, whose cen- 
tral ori/Zanr can he swallowed up by 
the mechanism — ‘Tor those who 
prefer to ride the metro”. 

. Harry Wrnstoq . has perhaps the 
ultimate fir the logic of 
the jewel that h elps to defend 
This Christmas, for around $3,400, 
they are selling a golden alarm 
whistle, studded with diamonds 
and hung on a silken cord. ... 




mahara jas, that many of the myths 

ppri laynds snrm imdmg ^llanvMiris 

sprang forth. 

Unknown to the early Greeks, it 
is said, diamonds won high favor 
among the Romans. They prized 
them for their reputed supernatural 
powers. Diamonds served as talis- 
mans, or lucky charms. In Rome, 
diamon ds also were used for en- 
graving. 

The Persians and the Arabs mo- 
nopolized diamond ^ n i p pin g until 
the Middle Ages. They also held 
priority claim on purchasing, deny- 
ing Europe most diamonds. 

But, after the Crusades, which 
opened new trade routes, Venice 
became the largest Western com- 
mercial power and the center for 
the iiimnw trade. 

Demand for diamonds in Europe 
grew. 

With that demand, diamomd- 

and po ll strin g drUl« spread 

as far west as Flanders, first to 
Bruges and thro to Antwerp, aided 
further; in 1498, by the Portuguese 
explorer, Vasco da Gama, who dis- 
covered the direct sea route to In- 
dia. 

In die 18th century, as Indian 
mines began to give out, new dis- 
coveries were made in Brazil, where 
gold washers accidentally found dr- 
amends. 

In 1 866, in what would begin the 
most significant chapter in the long 
history - of diamonds, a Boer, or 
Dutch farmer, found a diamond on 
a great plain in the heart -of South 
Attica. 

Three years later, near the Or- 
ange River, a Hottentot herder 
picked up. the legendary Star of 
South Africa, an 83.5-carat dia- 
mond that he thro offered for the 
price of a mghfs lodging. 

“Sir,” he said to a Boer, “I have a 
beautiful stone for you if you allow 
me to stay ovsnight” 

He was turned away, but a fruit 
dealer thro offered an his posses- 
sions — 500 sheep, 10 oxen and a 
horse — to the. astonished herder 
for the stone. 

- The discovery sparked “diar 
memd fever” in Scum Africa, and 
caused die biggest diamond rush in 

mining hiring m 

gioinof Cape prowncel' 

A power straggle" ensued, pitting 
thousands of producers working 
their own claims against each oth- 
en Thor corripetitivesdling endan- 
gered die market’s stability at a 
time whro the world faced econom- 
ic hard times. 

The struggle led to the : 
of thc.De Beers Consolidat 
Mines, Ltd, and later to the Cen- 
tral Seffing Organization' in Lon- 
don. The CSQ now.largdy controls 
the market ' 

Fascinating but secretive, the 
•marfait abounds in legends" and 
tales. One of them involves the 
largest sale of diamonds in history 

— a S24-5-mflHoD transaction in 
1974. 

' It only took a wrmnft-j according 
to Ronald" Winston, who wrote 
about it in a book onto® father, 
Hariy Winston, the jeweler and 
creator of- one of the largest dia- 
mond marmfartiiring arid market- 
ing companies in the world. • 

Harry Winston and the De Beers 
chairman, Harry Oppenhomer, 
had. c on clu de d the transaction 
whetthfr. Winston asked Mt Op- 
pe nhetmer for “a little something 
to sweeten die deal.” . 

Unfazed, die chairman readied . 
into his pocket and pulled out. a 
181 -carat .rough diamond and 
rolled it aapss the table. 

, “Thanks,” replied Mr. Winston, 
who racked up the rKanwnd and 1 



The pear-shaped Crilinan I, with its 74 facets on 530 
carats, is mounted in the British royal scepter. 


and one belonged to actress Efiza- 
beth Taylor. 

The late Harry Winston handled 
60 of them. Each has its stray, from 
Koh-i-noor, considered the most 
famous diamond, to the CnHinao, 
the world’s largest 

Although it may not be the old- 
est, the Koh-i-noor, or Mountain of 
Light dionywid has a long history. 
It was first described in 1304, when 
rtbdongBdtodieRqaofMalwa.il 
was said to have started out at 600 
carats. . " 

Later,: the Great Mogols pos- 
sessed it, and its value was said to 
be that irf one day’s income of the 
rotire. population of- the world. In 


The rough stone later was cut 
into five gema. The larpat, a flaw- 
less 453-carat, emerald-cut dia- 
mond, aptly was called the “deal 
sweetener ” 

In the world of precious stones, . 
303 major diamo nd s exist, each 
known. for its unsurpassed color, 
size, fiawlessness or historical tig- . 
nificance. The Iranian Crown Jew- 
els contained 26, while five art -in 
the regalia of Britain, Eve belong 
personally to Queen Elizabeth JI 


the 18th century, it was part of die 
loot of the Parian conquerors. 
Quarrels arid; fighting surrounded 
its ownership. 

“He who owns this diamond wiD 
owrithe worid, but will also know 
all its nnsfortunes. Only God or a 
woman can wear it with impunity,” 
the Hindus said of the gem. 

The diamond came to England 
in 1849, when it was presented to a 
young Queen Victoria, who de- 
creed that it be wren only by a 
woman- The diamond then 


die B ritish -Crown Jewels anj is 
kept in the Tower of London alona 
with tbe Cullinan. 

"The Cuflman was found by a 
supervisor of a mine near Pretoria 
tmd weighed an astounding 3,106 
carats. It is named after the mine's 
discoverer. 


The British monarchy ultimately 
received the stone and had it cot in 
Amsterdam by the Asacfaar larmi - 
ers. They produced nine large 
stones and 96 ample r cues. 

The large stones belong to.. tbe 
British royal family. The largest, 
tbe pear-shaped Cufemn L with its 
74 facets on 530 carats, is mounted 
in the royal scepter. 

The Great . Bhw Diamond, 
Hope, ironically carries the stigma 
of “cursed diamond.” According to 
legend. It is said to bring 
misfortune and tragedy to 
who possess it. " - 

“Nothing is further from the 
truth," according to the Diamond 
High Cornual in Antwerp, the pol- 
ished-diamond capital of the 
world. 

SnggHfw Rtern^n Fateh als o 
givro support to this assertion. Af- 
ter investigating the legend of the 
curse;, riie concluded in a 1976 
book, “Blue Mystery: The Story of 
the Hope Diamond,” that iw n m erf 
the stone's lore cannot; be substan- 
tiated. 

In 

sessedthe' 

out incident, then donated it to the 
Smithsonian Institution in Wash- 
ington, where it is now on display. 
He reportedly amt the gem by “or- 
dinary mail " - . 

The Snithsonian receives several 

letters a year about die gem. Each 
blames America’s 3& on the dia- 
mond and each die museum's 
directors to get iod of it 


1958, Harnr Winston 
1 the “cursed” diamond, wi 








-By Lynne Cuny 

^•LONDON — De Beets Consoli- 
pated Mraes Ltd. has dominated 
ti£ lintemationddiainond industry 
ffic t hiratite y. Bat now, in' the wake 
«£ a sharp downturn in diamond 
jncesancenBe boom days of the 


^19$Q~the gjaist South African 
^^^to merate is facing ^ difficult - 

i*3Eueu with some signs of- im- 
jfiwvemoit in the short -tenn, ana- 
jWtsbefieye- the outlook forDe 
3nti remains uncertain and p erit - 
^n.. Yeta Miller, an analyst at L. 
>§ssd ft Ox, a London stockbro- 
ige, said, “It’s difficult to find 
*jfrone who is buflish on De 
iBeens.” *••. • 

JjLiz Dlunoa, an analyst at James 
£$pd ft Co, another British stock- 
brokerage, said: "The ootloak is 
immaL The company’s stock may 
•jgpc^tp sightly in the short term, 
longer term,- an artificial 
can’t be sustained. We’ve 
that OPEC has fallen apart, 
tin market is in chaos. We 
think market forces will eventually 
#WriL" 

Such assessments are grim news 
De Bcers, which, ever since its 
in 1888 by the British 


Rhodes, has been one of the 
world’s most powerful cartels. It 
monopolizes the muring, distribu- 
tion, cutting and pricing of gwn 
and industrial diamonds. It ex- 
tracts diamonds from its own 
mines, purchases rough stones 
from other producers and sells 
them to various diamond cutters 
and polishers in Tndin 1 twaal, Bel- 
gium and the United States. 

Throogh its London-based mar- 
keting arm , the Central Setting Or- 
ganization, De Beets claims to con- 
trol 80 percent of the world’s 
diamond output. 

Its biggest profits, however, 
come from sales of gem-quality di- 
amonds, winch constitute only a 
small part of world production. It 
is in tins area that De Beers has 
suffered its most serious setbacks, 
the result of falling dwrnmH for 
large ’investment” diamonds (one- 
carat and up) as an inflation 
This led to an excessive buildup of 
the company's diamond stockpile, 
currently valued at about $2 tril- 
lion- , 

These developments can be 
traced to the changes in the world 
economic situation in the early 
1980s. 

“Gem demand «**» almost be 


correlated 100 percent to the U.S. 

economy,” Mr. MTOer said. “The 

-problem was with the depth of the 
1980-1982 recession in the U.S.” 

. Roy Hnddlestone, of Huddles- 
tpne Gemologrcai Consultants, 
said: Thera was a sea change in 
-1980. Interest rates went up and 
stayed op. It was .possible to earn 
money on money rather than trad- 
jug tu diamonds. The gold price 
suffered. The fashion for putting 
money into collectibles just went.” 

For example, in 1980, a small 
number of one-carat D (colorless) 
Flawless diamonds each sold for 
$65,000 between dealers.. At the 
end of October this year, the same 
diamond fetched only 511,000 to 
512,000. according to diamond ex- 
perts. 

Such volatile shifts have been re- 
flected in De Been’ share price. 
Since 1980, it has fallen from al- 
most 510 to barely 55 a share. At 
the same time, pretax profits have 
fallen from 977.8 million rands in 
1980 to a current 932.1 million 
rands. But because of the depreda- 
tion of the rand against the dollar 
during the same period, the profit 
decline in dollar toms has been 
much -Steeper — from 513 biOhm 
in 1980 to 5466 nriUkxi. 



The Kimberley diamond mine, circa 1876. Sir Cedi 
Rhodes, top rigfrt; top left, Sir Ernest Oppenhdmer; 
bottom left, Harry F. Oppenheixner. 


In anticipation of a continuing 
boom, analysts said De Beers and 
other producers boosted their pro- 
duction capacity in the 1970s and 
De Beets is now saddled with a 
huge stockpile. Its inventory has 
become so large that analysts be- 
lieve the company would need sev- 
eral years of sustained strong eco- 
nomic growth in the United States 


to bring it down to manageable 

levels. 

The cost of financing tins dia- 
mond mountain is seen as a serious 
financial drain on the company. In 
1980, De Beers had cash reserves of 
782.5 million rands and borrowed 
61.3 minio n r ands compared with 
last year, when its cash reserves 
were about 163.6 millio n rands and 
it borrowed 1259 billion rands. In- 
terest payments on this debt rose 
about 65 percent in the first half of 
1985 over the same period in 1984. 

Adding to De Beers* problems is 
the steadily increasing diamond 
production in Australia. This 

month, the Argyle mine, believed 
to be the world’s largest single 
source of diamonds, has gone into 
operation, extracting largely indus- 
trial-quality stones rather than the 
more valuable gems. De Beers has 
an agreement to purchase the ma- 
jority of the mine's output in order 
to ensure it main tains control 

At the same tim» , tmnnw cheap- 


er- to-produce discoveries in Aus- 
tralia have been made, and some 
analysts believe more such finds 
are to come. These developments 
are bound to further exacerbate the 
diamond glut, the analysis said. 

De Bern, however, remains un- 
perturbed and insists that the over- 
supply of diamonds is not a serious 
problem. 

“We’re not worried at all about 
tbe stockpile,'’ said Roger van 
Eeghen, a De Beers spokesman, 
“while in money terms it appears 
large, it is soundly financed. It’s 
larger than it’s been in the past, but 
we actually require, a certain 
amount of stock so we can supple- 
ment from the stockpile. We delib- 
erately built up a buffer to avoid 
being totally dependent on the dia- 
mond market.” 

In addition, he noted, “Although 
the Argyle mine is a laige producer 
in terms of volume, the diamonds 
are not a very good color or quality. 
Some 5 or 6 perce nt has beat esti- 


hits Desert 9 Botswana Works Biggest Gem Mine in World 


By Anne Chamock • 

^IWANENG, Botswana — Jwan- 
raraean the edge of the Kala- 
Desat in Botswana is the brig- 
gem diamond mine in the 

•Tt was discovered in 1973 by ge- 
" " is who. were determined to 
their tnmch that a rich source 
of* diamonds lay beneath the deep 

the 1960s, prospectors 
abandoned the region because 
of: the thick sand' cover and there 
n rwas still skeptidsm.wheaprospect- 
mg resumed in I96g. But tfce&olg-, 

of <fcrm rip<fyfh»l wftl tie 


mined side-by-side over the next 20 
years. 

These rich reserves of small gem 
stones supplement Botswana's dia- 
mond income from the. existing 
Orapa and Letihakane mines far- 
ther north. Today, diamonds are 
tbe major export for tins land- 
locked country that borders South 
Africa. 

Jw&neng's diamonds formed in 
vertical pipes, originally the necks 
of active volcanoes, about 60 mil- 
lion to 70 miHi on years ago. 

“We don’t know why diamonds 
are formed in volcanic pipes and 
we don't know why . there are three 
-pipes here," said Sean Daly, the 
^pm^^snperintendantforDebs- 
. wapa, n 50-50 partnership^ between 
-South Africa’s Die Beets Consoli- 


dated Mines, LuL, and the Botswa- 
na government. 

These were not mountain-form- 
ing volcanoes at Jwaneug. Rather, 
the lava rose through the Earth’s 
crust and spread oat on the surface. 
Over the miTIftnia, glaci ers dumped 
barren rock cm top of the pipes and 
winds deposited tons of Kalahari 
sand, creating a smooth, flat land- 
scape. It took two yearn to shift this 
deposit, which was about 45 meters 
(49 yards) deep. 

Debswana has now dug a giant 
bole, over a kilometer at its widest, 
and diamonds are bong . mined 
from the central pipe by blasting 
and excavating die ltimbedite, or 
diamond-laden rock. Eighty-ton 
. t rack*, dwarfed by the size of the 
hole, rfgrag down to the excavation 


site like a procession of worker 
ants. 

Ultimately, the mine win reach a 
depth of 350 meters, the usual limit 
for surface diamond mining and 
almost three times the current 
depth. 

But, Mr. Daly said, “That’s not 
necessarily the end of the dia- 
monds. We could go underground 
then.” 

About 60 milli on years ago, tbe 
kimberlite was a deep blue color. 
But a rich variety of colon has been 
created as water percolated 
through the rock strata, diss olving 
out different dements. Red and 
yellowish-green bands have formed 
over the original, unweathered blue 
kimberiite, which is a much harder 
rock to mine. 


Over the next 10 years, Debs- 
wana will be producing 150 carats 
per 100 tons of excavated material 
{torn the central pipe, tbe richest of 
tbe three. 

“Then well extend sideways,” 
Mr. Daly said. “But as we move 
into the outer pipes and blend, our 
grade will drop so that the average 
over 25 years will be 137 carats per 
100 tons.” 

Looking down into the mine , a 
huge block of kimberiite has been 
left unblasied. This section, ac- 
cording to Mr. Daly, is too rich. He 
added, “We are not taking out all 
the good stnff now because we have 
to blend to come out with the right 
number of carats.” 

Expatriates comprise just under 
a 10th of the 1,900-man workforce. 


They are mainly from South Africa 
and Britain but also come from 
Zambia, Kenya, Uganda and Zim- 
babwe. 

Most of the workers were em- 
ployed at some time in South Afri- 
can mines, and many Botswana 
households depend on a family 
member mining abroad. Some re-, 
training is needed for Jwancng 
mining operations. Indeed, work- 
ers invohvd in drilling and shovel- 
ing must be trained from scratch 
because these jobs were for “whites 
only” in South Africa. 

At the moment, all five foremen 
are Motswana, or Botswana citi- 
zens. They took the jobs over from 
expatriates. 


mated of gem quality that interests 
us. In financial terms, it's not a very 
important competitor. They’re nice 
enough for industrial purposes. We 
have a contract to purchase [most 
of] i hem.” 

The company’s control of dia- 
mond prices has been further com- 
plicated by the Soviet Union's ag- 
gressive entry into the diamond 
market. Ai though Moscow sells 
many rough and cut diamonds 
through the Central Selling Organi- 
zation, last year it bypassed De 
Beers and sold a large quantity of 
polished diamonds in Antwerp be- 
low market prices. 

In an effort to stabilize the mar- 
ket, De Beas withheld diamonds 
and in June of this year negotiated 
an agreement with the Russians. 
This stipulated that the Soviet 
Union would maintain current 
price levels and not increase tbe 
supply Of polished diamo nds in 
1985. 

However, according to Mr. 
Huddlestone, “The actual mecha- 
nism of whether the Russians sell 
more or less depends on their for- 
eign currency or grain needs." 

Earlier this year, Zaire, the 
world's largest diamond producer, 
also tried to sell its gems indepen- 
dently. But in August, Zaire re- 
newed its agreement with (he Cen- 
tral Selling Organization, 
reportedly because De Beers was 
able to obtain a better price for 
Zairean diamonds than Zaire could 
get on its own. 

Zaire's attempt to go it alone, 
however, does reflect a feeling 
found among some diamond pro- 
ducers that sell to De Beas. Ac- 
cording to analysts, distaste over 
dealing with a South African com- 
pany, coupled with long-standing 
resentment at what some view as 
De Beers’ high-handed methods 
have spurred the move toward op- 
erating independently of the com- 
pany. Bat producing countries bad- 
ly need the hard currency that De 
Beers obtains and have therefore 
found it difficult to bypass the car- 
tel completely. 

However, even the sharpest crit- 
ics of De Beers grudgingly recog- 
nize the stability it has brought to 
the market 


“It's a very good thing that 
they’re there to give stability." a 
trader said. “Without them, the 
trade would have been chaotic. If 
De Beas went bust, we would have 
no industry." 

Despite its reputation for rigidi- 
ty, De Beers has made some efforts 
to adapt to changes in the market 
The company has instituted a more 
flexible pricing policy by offering a 
greater rang: of packets of dia- 
monds than it has done previously. 
Experts believe this is, in effect a 
mechanism for reducing prices 
when necessary. 

Tbe slump in the diamond mar- 
ket and the difficulties with its 
trading partners come at a delicate 
time for De Beas. Earlier this year, 
Harry Oppenheuner. who ran De 
Beets for 27 years, resigned. He was 
succeeded by Julian Ogilvic 
Thompson, a veteran of many 
years with De Beers. He is being 
assisted by Mr. Oppenheimer's 
sou, 40-year-old Nicholas Op pen- 
fa cim cr, who heads the Central Sell- 
ing Organization. 

Although De Beers has suffered 
in the large-gem market sales of 
smaller stones have continued to 
improve. Worldwide diamond jew- 
elry retail sales have grown steadi- 
ly, to reach 521 billion last year 
conmared with 518.6 billion in 
1980. With the drop in the sale of 
large gems, De Beers has increas- 
ingly relied on the sale of smaller 
diamonds. 

To offset some of the risks in its 
staple diamond business, De Beers 
has diversified into nondiamond 
assets, a move that has proven to be 
one of the company’s financial 
strengths. De Beers now has hold- 
ings in Anglo-American Corp. of 
South Africa Ltd., a conglomerate 
that produces gold, uranium and 
coal and is involved in insurance 
and finance. It also has a stake in 
the conglomerate's associate, the 
Bermuda-based Minerals and Re- 
sources Corp. 

Analysts say this trend may help 
to protect De Beas from the worst 
effects of the slump in the diamond 
market. But the continuing weak- 
ness of that market and its volatili- 
ty mean that tbe company's present 
difficulties are likely to pereist for 
sometime. 


iH 



■ 


7* 


m 


m 


m 


mm 


3 


m 




m 


mam 


Jx: 


RiiPOSSI 


mm 


m 


Gsa 


m 


mm 






S3 




-,V- 








rres 


r a? 


m 


sm 




m 


wm 




V 


/ 

■/ 


srw 


m 





<&A 


a 


M 




3E 


Betfe-*:. 


ase /t&ajed A? answuswe tA# Au/stcAi/ip A# AmA 

* 2^3 n€p f Ae S'ia/na/i-A) . 

cede&aU /Ati an eme/t&cria/ ccA&ctfon 

GjfceAwseA ^ 6&anuyu& an// < '/fie /a/e>/ </tamwi//fet»e/l&ty t 
c/eti&nJ uh$ 6e- ejrAi&fet/ 

Awjn &'tt&nAer /OAA- f&dJO - '/SA 5 # a/ 

S' « tPaste. 


ANNE CHARNOCK is a journalist based in Britain who special- 
izes in technology and development, 

LYNNE CURRY, a financial journalist based in London, is a 
regular contributor to the Personal Investing section of the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune, The Christian Science Monitor and Business 
Week. 

VICKY ELLIOTT is on the editorial staff of the International 
Herald Tribune. 

GEORGE GUDAUSKAS, a journalist based in Paris, is a frequent 
contributor to the International Herald Tribune. 

BRUCE HAGER, a financial journalist based in New York, is a 
regular contributor to the Personal Investing section of the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 


How to dtoose a travel agent. 
Getting the most 
out of your travel budget. 
When is a train better them an airol 



Every Friday in Weekend 











iiia?y^»nfgm;l 


i»7vJIiu35ST*sIIE5SE 






'.\y\\-'&j& 

n-TViUv^^'^. 


-. • v : > *<* /•• v*\ ■’ 


At the French Table: History in Exhibit 


An invitation to 
the world of 

Ermenegildo 


The finest and most complete 
clothing collection for men, 
compliments a large selection 
of ties scarves and accessories 
for your seasonal gift. 


By Ann Barry 

New Turk Tuna SenUx 

PARIS — The FrendL take 
Lthemsdves quite seriously in the 
gastronomic realm, and never more 
so than in “Les Frantss et la Ta- 
ble,” a retrospective of eating hab- 
its and customs from the Celts to 
the present at the Muste National 

dcs Arts rtTraditicras Populates in 

the Bois de Boulogne through April 
21. Cuttey, ceramics, glassware, 
fflptql pjwH! ) pain tings, p rints and 
f nrnitm ^a"? jnTang pd in showcases 
and in rooms to illustrate the ev olu- 
tion of dining d la frarupise. 

There are few ancient texts dial 
describe a common meal and it is 
accessary to rdy on archaeological 
fiTMtings indeed, what is particu- 
larly s triving in the initial stages of 
the show is an almost desperate 
reliance on shards or fragments of 
ejects — a wom-away knife, a 
scantily patched bowL 

In the beginning, people gath- 
ered in a tilde cm the floor to sop. 
It was not nntil the 12th century 
that the table made sitters of squat- 
ters. Staples of the Celtic diet were 
cereals, vegetables, cheese and 
some mnat, principally pock. In 

of famine, a meal was noth- 
ing more than thin sonp and bread. 
A spoon, a bowl, a goblet and a 
napfcn (this a necessity when the 
custom was to eat with the hands) 
were the basic appointments. 

Drink was a stains symbol — 
imported Italian wine far the better 
off, mead for the lower classes. Un- 
tO'the 19th century it was advisable 
to drink cider, beer or wine, not 
only for caloric fad bat as a substi- 
tute for rain and river water. 

According to a study of Langue- 
doc peasants of the 15th century, 
an agricultural worker consumed 
4,163 calories a day, 84.6 percent of 
which was derived from bread. 
(The average daily intake of an 
adult man today is about 2,400 cal- 
ories, about 15 percent derived 
from bread.) Meat was a rarity, 
constituting 4.6 percent of the did. 
The fork, an instrument proper to a 
society of meat-eaters, did not be- 
come firmly established until the 
17th century. 

At first, people carried their own 
knives to table. There knives, since 
their cods were pointed, probably 
functioned as weapons also. Not 
until the 17th century, when the 
fork and {date came into common 


use (the French court had adopted 
them in the 16th century), did the 
knife taka cm a more genteel round- 
ed end Al that titn^ too, individual 
{dace settings became a fixture. 

A print titled “Repas Servi sor 
one Terrasse” (Meal Served on a ’ 
Terrace), d urin g from about (be 
end of the 17th century, reveals a 
transition m French table etiquette 
Several dozen elegantly attired and 
coiffured gentry are seated — the 
ma n - wn man-man- woman arrange- 
ment has dearly been established 

around a circular table. Fades 

and knives are in evidence, yet two 
ladies are still daintily fi ng e rin g 
thrir food. The table is laden with a 
plethora of dishes in what consti- 
tuted just one of several courses 
that included a full range of dishes. 
This was termed “ service a lafran- 
aase, ,” which was replaced in the 
early 19th century by "s ervice a la 
msse,” a sequential arrangement of 
one dish after another — the tradi- 
tion we know today of progressing 
from here d’oenvres to dessert. 

Turning a comer, both in the 
mctuTritiftn and in time periods, 
there is an 18 th-century room set- 
ting in which the scene is what 
might be thought of la grande cui- 
sine franqcdse in its heyday. The 
elegantly appoin ted table, with a 
spun-sugar extravaganza as a cen- 
terpiece, features extensile floral 
porcelain in a range indicative of 
the elaborate nature of a repast: 
bom egg cops to casseroles and 
gravy bowls to individual refnd- 
chusoin or vessels for freshening 
the wine glass. 

In contrast, a scene of a 19th- 
centmy country dmfa g room in 
Brittany is a study in cozy, down- 
to-earth Irving. The roam was the 
center of all domestic activity, 
housing the beds, a grand armoire 
and a long wooden table sonound- 
ed by benches. 

The hand-painted pottery is 
whimsical and flamboyant, com- 
buring the abstract with images of 
flowers and birds. The women, 
children and old people ale by Ae 
hearth, the table being reserved for 
the working men. When a boy 
"went to table,” it was a sign that 
he had readied manhood. 

Some pieces in the show are re- 
minders that history is ever with ns. 
For example, little tin gtanedes or 
hmrih p ails rnnflar to tum-of-the- 
centmy versions in the show are 


2... 4... 8... AND . . 
Cashmere Plys of Course 


Milano - Via Retro Verri, 3 
Parigi - 10, Rue dela Paix 
Lugano - Riva Vela. 12 


For baSes nd men. 

Best prices/ Export discount. 
Alexandre Savin's 
Cashmere collection 
Ex ibnl f i t y. C as h mere Home. 


Cashmere House 

2, rue d'Aguessean 
angle 60, Faubourg Sl-Hooort 

• . PARIS 8 C • 


A survey on ABC readers. 
Here are the facts. 


Pr i vate Hie insurance and retirement r euni o n 
schemes 


Credit card 


Two 


Three 


More than three 


I nv estments through fin a ncial conc er ns 

(shares , Government stock; fixed term deposits, bonds, 
etc.) 







ABC 


Two 


Three or more 




AMONG 


ABC 




From 1 


Mate them 1,800 c.c. 


Major decinon-takmg responsibility 
in the purchase of the company's 
a utom o tive fleet 



10 I 3 


headers 


¥ : I >1 rt ft f f IlPlmiililliA 



Hi-fi 


Colour TV 


Vider 


Personal computer (at home) 


Decision- taking responsibility in tile purchase of 
the company's data processing equipment 


* According to a survey conducted in Febiuary/Mamh 1985 by GSE, Socioeconomic 
Researchers, within the framework of the Autonomous Community of Madrid. 

ABC. SERRANO, 61 RHONE 34-1-435 SI OO 

28006 MADRID (SPAIN) TELEX 27682 



ABC. Piestigio de la Pmisa de Espana. 


ABC: Madrid's General Daily Newspaper since 1905. 


e nd wed by many .French workers 
to heat their lunches. 

■ Cosiibc Cuisine 
How astroQ&ut cuisine went 
from powdered orange drink and 
tfn ff resembling baby food to fresh 
and freeze-dried shuttle menus is 
the subject of “Space Food," an 
exinbil at Washington's National 
Air and Space Museum. United 
Press International reported that 
the permanent show, a section of 
the Museum’s “Apollo to the 


Moon" gallery, displays photo- 
graphs and artifacts tracing the 

cosmic quest for a good meaL 

Items range from John Glenn's 
1961 beef stew in a tube to modi- 
fied Coke and Pepsi cans flown last 

piTTTtner aboard the shuttle C htu- 
kngqr. The trend has been toward 
food “much more like wbat we eat 
on Earth,” said the exhibit curator, 
Derek W. EIHott. "Today's food is 

essentially taken off file shelf and 
re packag ed for a weightless envi- 
ronment.” 



.fit! * 

•» * 


Tiny waiters serving gourmand in 19th-century woodcut. 


Kaleidoscopes Turn From Toys to Objets d’Art 


New York Timet Service 

N EW YORK — The kaleido- 
scope, once a dune-store chfl- 
drexfs toy, is now the stuff of muse- 
um shops and boutiques. In the 
of modem craftsmen it has 
been elevated to something of an 
objet cTarL 

ln the view of these artisans, not 
only the inner imagery of the kalei- 
doscope but the exterior housing 
riwnands its own aesthetic. Wheth- 
er of sleek Plexiglas, carved wood 
or burnished brass and copper, to- 
day’s kaleidoscopes bear tins mark 
of an individual maker — indeed, 
some are made in signed limi t ed 
editions. Sizes vary from a vest- 
pocket agar-size verson to a 500- 
pound (225-kilogram) giant operat- 
ed with gears and pulleys. The 
imgg fs can be just as individualis- 
tic, ran g in g from sound-activated 
“fireworks” to lyrical abstractions. 
In the United States, prices for 
modem scopes range from less 
than SS to mare than S5.000. 

Eric Semzer, owner of the Light 
Opera Gallery in San Francisco, 
specialized m art Hass and Russian 
lacquer boxes. On a whim, he 
bought an ordinary commercial ka- 
leidoscope at a 1981 trade show. At 
a local craft fair shortly thereafter; 
be met Carolyn Bennett, who was 
making them in several styles, and 
bought a second. When another ka- 
leidoscope artisan, Sheryl Koch, 
walked mto his shop with her brass 
design with two revolving leather- 
bound glass wheels, he thought he 
would see if his customers might be 
as captivated as he was. He bought 
two at what be considered a ludi- 
crous $100 each. That was ion a 
Friday. They were gone by Mon- 
day. 

*T would hear my customers dis- 
cussing their holdings of 30 or more 
kaleidoscopes," be said. “Obvious- 
ly, there were a lot of coDectora out 
there that nobody knew about” 
Julian Baird, owner of Tree’s 
Race In Orleans, Massachusetts, 



Sor Bkxk/Tho N*» Vex* r™. 

Jerry Yoarig with agate and stained-glass kaleidoscope. 


who represents 37 kaleidoscope 
makers, has seen &' marked resur- 
gence of interest, particularly in the 
last two years. In his view, people 
are attracted to “things from a sun- 
pier age, when we weren't set on 
destroying ourselves — the kalei- 
doscope represents a different time 
and period.” 

The kaleidoscope was invented 
in 1816 by Sr David Brewster, a 
Scottish scientist and clergyman, 
and became popular as a Victorian 
parlor amusement. Brewster’s in- 
vention was based on simple scien- 
tific principles. Two or three in- 
clined minors are enclosed in a 
t uV - that has an eyepiece at one 


end and a rotating capsule with bits 
ofcdlored glass' and trinkets at the 
other. The angle of the mirrors — 
90, 60 or 45 degrees — produces 

a ss of four, six or right symmet- 
segments. 

While the baric principle re- 
mains the same, today's kaleido- 
scope makers are expanding the 
medium. 

Carmen Colley, a San Antonio 
artisan, for example, took a course 
in stained glass and in 1978 saw an 
intriguing way to apply her new 
knowledge: Her design was first 
sold through a local artists’ co-op 
and is now marketed through die 
World Trade Center in Dallas. 


F/tc h one-of-a-kind scope has a • 
theme, such as “Through the Look- 
ing Glass.” 

Another maker is Step ben Au- 
ger, who is based in New York and 
has had exhibitions of his paintings 
at the Anas Gallery. “In 1978 1 had . 
the idea to make a kaleidoscope for - 
my brother for Christmas,” he srid. 
“Then 1 became intent on making a 
better one. When I did about 30 for 
a local craft fair and all of them.' 
sold, 1 thought maybe I was onto - 
something.” With a college back-., 
ground in physics, be was at the' 
time studying the harmonic rcla- ■ 
tionships among colors. 

“The kaleidoscope connected 
physics with art” he said. “I was 
fascinated with Old World art . 
forms yet using contemporary ele- 
ments — crystal balls, natural 
gems, handbiown glass and found 
objects. It's an attempt to create in.' 
this little space a universe of color,' 
texture and form.” 

Auger now sells in more than 300- . 
shops, among them the Neiman- . 
Marcus ehain. From Thanksgiving 
through Christmas, he will have an- 
other exhibition at Anas, including 
a small edition of glass cloisonne, 
cylinders, with interiors combining 
unusual stones and gems. 

Judy Karelitz, based in Manhat- 
tan, uses thm colorless sheets at 
double -ref rac tin g material for po- 
larizing light The images that re- 
sult are fluid, spiraling or a feathery. - 
interplay of forms. Karelitz was an - 
elementary- school instructor look-' • 
ing for a tool to leach color and 
tight Her first kaleidoscope was-, 
displayed at the Museum of Mod- 
em Art retail shop in 1978. Three 
years later her Karascope 2 was- 
carried by the Smithsonian fnstitii- . 
don shop. In the Karascope. rotat- ~ 
ing the bottom changes the config- * 
uration while rotating the eyepieces 
changes the colors. Her newest . 
scopes, wrapped in Florentine pa- 
pers, are shaken rather than turned. 


Jazz arid Rock Albums of ’85: A Shopper’s Guide 


By Michael Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 

A -Christmas shopper’s guide to 
some good jazz and rock re- 
cords of 1985: 


“Lost in tee Stars, the Music of 
Burt Weffl” (A&M). After his eo- 
ccntricaBy cast Thrioanous Monk 
collection, “That's The Way I Fed 
Now,” die producer Hal Wflhwr 
has collected Sting (“Mack The 
Knife”), Lon Reed (“September 
Song”), Charlie Baden, Tom 
Waits, Carla Bley, Phil Woods, 
Marimme FmthfuU and otbos per- 
forming material from Kurt Wall's 
Berlin and American periods. 


, treatments 

ful to the original spirit without 
getting lost in the past 

Bennie Wallace, “Twffigbt Time” 
(Bine Note). Robust, sensitive, 
funky, precise, accessible, intelli- 
gent, funny, diligent — all these 
conflicting a^ectives apply to the 
latest album by a longtime “prom- 
ising young” saxophonist who has 
hereby matured and fnlfiDed his 
potential. Together with featured 
ridemen — the former Miles Davis 
guitarist John Scofield, Dr. John 
(The Night Tripper) on piano and 
Stevie Ray Vaughn, the new blues 
guitar sensation from Texas — 
Wallace has put together a free- 
wheeling, bard-driving mix from 
“Tennessee Waltz” toms own sinu- 
ous post-Coltranian lines. Jack De- 
John ette's drumming deserves spe- 
Q 3 i mention. 

Sting, “The Dream of the Blue 
Turtles” (A&M). The fact that this 
fine album sola more than a mil- 
lion copies is an encouraging sign. 
There are those who beueve that 
Sting did not lead his hot young 
jazz bond '(including Branford 
Marsalis on saxophones and Omar 
Hakim on drams) far enough into 
thrir potential and that itYall too 
conveniently commercial, but die 
songs arc .adult and beautifully 
sung, the musicianship is supab, 
the music swings. Like Brace 
Springsteen's “Nebraska” and cer- 


J. LAWRENCE 


STORE YOUR OLD 
FUR IN A NEW 
SILK RAINCOAT!. 
Brochure Oh rdQUOSt 
L417 Fifth AMm NYC Wit 


ESCADft 

in Paris . 

EXCEPTIONAL . 
SALES 

30% off + ' 
15% export, discount 


tain Steely Dan, the record may. 
well physfcaDty wear out before its 
musical welcome does. 

Miles Davis A John CoKrene, 
“Live in Stockholm, I960” (Drag- 
on). lip service has been paid to 
jazz as “America's only native art 
farm" and “the classical music of 
the 20th century." This previously 
unreleased concert recording is a 
co n crete example — the 20th cen- 
tury on-its best behavior. (Wynton 
Kelly, piano, Paul Chambers, bass, 
Jimmy Cobb, drams.) 

Robert Wyatt, “Old Rottenbat” 
(Rough Trade). The author of 
“Rock Bottom” and “Ruth Is 

TL... U k.^r 


after a long absence with a somber 
collection, of esoteric songs' that 
somehow cannot help but sound 
loving no matter bow menacing 
Wyatt tries to be. 

Dizzy GBespie, “New Faces” 
(GRP). Both Sting and his saxo: 


phonist, Branford Marsalis (broth- 
er of the trumpeter, Wynton), have 
been hard to avoid this year. Here 
Branford joins another hot young 
team (the pianist Kenny Kirkland 
among them) who push one of their 
acknowledged masters (Gillespie) 
beyond his recent predictability. It 
is encouraging to hear the new gen- 
eration expand the old, and the old 
fuel the new — particularly at the 
same time and place. 

Sode, “Promise” (Epic). Two 
years ago "Helen Folasade Adu was 
designing clothes and working 
small London dubs. (Her profes- 
sional name is pronounced “Sha- 
day”; she is Aaglo-Nigcrian.) Since 


smoky voice has moved more than 
four million records. One song 
tends to resemble the next, but such 
lovely monotony can be comfort- 
ing. While the debate heats up —is 
it jazz? — a saxophone cries in the 
distance, and Sade sighs: “La la la, 


Transcontinental Sleeper 
Thing of Past on U.S. Rails 


By Robin Toner 

’ New York 1 bites Service 

N EW YORK — It was the 
oigtit sky over Arizona ■ — 
broad dear and filled with 
stars — : that stayed with Belinda 
Johnson. Mark E-pie remembered 
the pecssteoce of Texas as his train 
hurtled onward and the geography 
stayed, the same. “Texas takes a 
long tune,” be said. 

Both remember a peculiar stale 
of mind, being immersed in the 
country but removed from hs. cares 
in the cocoion of a transcontinental 


The Amtrak spokesman, R. Clif- 
ford Black, said Amtrak discoutm- 
ned the service became “it was not 
generating sufficient revenue.” He 
noted that transcontinental 
through-sleeper service was first 
halted reveral years ago, then re- 
sumed in 1984 became of a flurry 
of travel around the time of the 
World’s Fair in New Orleans. 

DOONESBURY 


men? mom. 
MYUmeUFE 



when the Amtrak Crescent 
pulled into New York's Pennsylva- 
nia Station on Sunday, it marked 
the last time that rail passengers 
coold board .a sleeping car on one 
ctmtand enwgofirnn the same car 
four days lata; a continent away. 
Espi& who was headed home' to 
PtHiadriphia, raxid Johnson, who 
finished her journey in New Yodc, 


Travelers can stm travd coast to 
coast t>y malting connections with 
other trains,' an Amtrakspok#sman_ 
said. But. the sovice known as 
“transcontinental throngb-riceping 
cars,” in which Amtrak transferred 
a car in. NetwlOideans — where 
there is a night Bcvovu'of several 
bonis — between ieKne prigjnat- 
ing in .New Yotk and the- fine origi- 
nating in' Los Angete t, has been 

dwwi tinned. - ' ' 


la la — oooh." A one- woman torch-. • 
song revival. 

Woody Shaw, “Setting Stan- 
dards” (Muse). Magnificent bn> . 
ken-field running by an exception- 
al trumpeter we have come to take _ 
for granted. It is rare to find such 
imaginative game plans using old 
formations (“All The Way'*),.?- 
Blocking by Cedar Walton, piano,- . 
Buster Willi am s, bass, and Victor 
Jones, drums. * *• 

Stevie Wonder. “In Square Gr-. ! 
de” (Motown). The onadding vol. - 
cal personality and bubbling dee* - 
tronic cauldron (here marred by an“ ... 
over-indulged drum- machine ruts- 
lion) are immediately recognizable 


of our environment It may haw.' jU 
lost some edge, but the body is still i-. * 
kicking - 

Don Chary, “Hone Boy” (Bar- ' 
clay). He sings ballads, shouts the 1 '" 
blues, raps like a disk jockey and- 
plays the Pakistani pocket trumpet * 
like a griot in Bindland. 

. Straights. “Brothers ufc -t 
Anns^ (Warner Brothers). It would 
be a bit too easy to call this dreanjy J,' 
melange of adnlt love songs amf , J. 
political lyrics “laid back." Tbe,.: 
term implies lack of commitment,' 
lmyness as intellectual preference. 

Dire Straights uses softness as su&- r 
stance, electronics as acoustic tex*~ 

J® 6 ! case as irony. The tinmh song ■. 

Money for Nothing" about bow j 
rasy it is to make a fortune writing. 
dumb rock songs, is malm? a far*. * 
tune. It can either be considereda 
lapse or proving a point. Few rodL . , 
bands have the courage to be so-.--- 
ambiguoiis. . - ., : 


i*Srr *sujrttAa*L\ 

FUNto'MX.n&’l 

WHAit GorsmimcA 

YOUR PEOPLE. AND* \ 

m 

a 






















Page 11 


FUTUBES MO OPTIONS 


World Coffee Prices Soar 




uav -v. . : 

■ ~ ONDON - — Fears- that a long' running drau ght canid per- 
I haps halve Brazil's coffee crop, next year have sent 
1 j coffee bean prices soaring in London and New York in 
i \ recent days and many analysts feel further price rises are 

possible. Traders in Brazil, toe world’s biggest coffee producer, 
1 say that the country’s 1986-87 coffee harvest could »nV to as little 
i/i ; > as 13 mfllion to 1 6 milli on' 60-ldlo (132rpoand) bags, or' around 
7 t?": half of the figure produced this year, as a result of a spell of hot, 

dry weather that began in May. 

The news has faded already buoyant sentiment in die key 
(_ . . London and New Yoifc markets. Figures compiled by the Jhter- 
national Coffee Organization in London, the 75-nation cartel 
l that attempts to control worid prices, show that die average world 

price for coffee otr the spot . 


accounting for the 
bulk of its exports. 


' r: “!r«i 


market is now around $137 a • rn . , . 

pound, the highest level since - wuugllt IMS Jolt 
mid- 1980. p rT ,«i% « ■ 

On the London Commodity 8 prime 

Ex^mge late Monday, the producms areas. 
Robusta contract for Septan- “ 6 

bar ddiveiy traded as high as flm mmtmg far fte 
£28 (about $41) per metric ton , „ , . 8 

above Friday’s settlement . IHliK Of dS exports. 

price and £1 above its open- 

mg, to £2,170, before seating back amid ^ 1 <t profit-taking. 

On the New York Coffee, Sugar and Cocoa Exchange, where 
coffee prices rose their limit-up on Friday amid hectic trading, 
coffee for September delivery closed up .30 cent a pound from the 
previous close, to $1.9220, after being up as much as 230 cents. 

'**1 think there is every possibility that prices could hold at 
level and possibly even go a little further,” said a dealer at a 
leading London trading firm. 

The drought has hit Brazil's prime producing areas, responsi- 
ble for most of the country’s better quality Arabics mimdn novo 
and Arabics tatuai coffees, which traditionally make up the bulk 
of the country’s exports. 

'Exporters in the Brazilian port of Santmt said Brazil, winch 
accounts for nearly a third- of world exports, generally needs 
around 173 million bags erf good quality coffee to m«w domestic 
and foreign demand, far more than will be available next year. 

j ‘ 

T RADERS ALSO are worried that Brazil's coffee trees 
could take years to recover from the damage inflicted by 
the drought, threatening harvests beyond next year. 
Reflecting on the current supply shortage, analysts at the 
London trading firm of EJ3. & F. Man said in a report Monday 
that the coffee market win be in deficit by July 1986, removing 
the need for controls administered by the International Coffee 
Organization. 

The 75 member nations of the ICO agreed in October to limit 
the amount of coffee supplied to the world market in a bid to bold 
world prices within a $130 -to-$ 1 .40-a-pound price band. 

Under the pact, the amount of coffee available by the 
ICO's exporting members is increased or cut in step with pre- 
arranged price triggers. 

But because of shortages, the overall export quota was already 
been raised by 1 milli on bags last mouth, to 57 millio n bags, and 
trades expect a similar increase to be triggered by the ICO this 
week. 

Jhe E.D. & F. Man report argues that the current strength in 
prices means that the ICO’s export quotas could be suspended 
altogether bytheemhcrfFebnmyas^way of defusing the market 
and bringing coffee bean prices back within the ICO’s target 

' The lossof a major portion'of 'the coffee crop would beablow 
to the efforts of the new government of President Josfc Samey to 
repay Brazil’s foreign debt, estimated at about $103 bflhon. 
Although coffee is not Brazil's major foreign-exchange earner, 
the crop has an annual export value of some 53.5 billion, or about 
25 percent of this year's estimated trade surplus of $14 billion. 

f Currency Rates 


. ..,....->SSS>atM Dec. 9 

S C OJA- FJ=. ILL. QMr. LF. If. YM 

■ IMtardnm U5 4.144 11145 * 3&S3" 8.1454" SJJ9- USffl« MUD* 

nnttdsla) 5U4U 7UBS 303175 4415 190SS- «U 34995. 21305" 

.. -;->2nmttarf IDT JJW 3L7SS* UtBSx BUI" **»• m»« LM5* 

, ,ndM(b] T45B5 -14W3 1134 251050 4.U9B 75.175 ItaSJ 2MA5 

- --'Wcm U72JM ISUJD 48092 22117 10447 1M4 BT445 004 

awYoriC(C) 04842* 2523 7J25 W17J8 185 5145 11U5 . 2SU5 

-. Qrt* 77302 1UB2 S05B2 *005* «077 IS* • 14578 X7MS" 

. akro 2BU0 30058 BUM 244] 1UI" 7141 3H4?" M77 

' "nrtcti 3J123 1184 8140" 2»JB> 01227" 74.12" 4.WJ5" 1*88- 

' ECU 0*704 05954 2*24 47178 149977 24198 447734 L8344 1749*7 

.-SDR 1*8* 17*509 HA 8*111 NA M8JS 5401*7 1»44 2217*4 

TosUm to London and Zurlctuflxlnfa to other European content. New York reload 4 PM. 

■ U Commercial tranc (b) Amounts needed ID boy one pound (cl Amounts needed to buy one 
-■ ollarCI Unttaof WO (x> Units ollMIOfy) Untie of HMOOH.O.: ntdauolad; NJL: not avaMuble. 

>7 To boy one pom*: SUSXA3K 

-!^ ; NherBdDarVBtaH 

'wrote* par ulSS CWtvkv par USi Cumrprim C*wno«rUll 

... rwn-awtfrol MO Fta.maridu 54* Mn.m 47SJJ0 Sa*MnM UM> 

BdraLS U741 Greek drac. 14MS Itorw. krona 743 Spronasata UUD 

" Htr.HML 1770 HOTOKOOfS 7407 PWLMSP ■ 1SJ0 SwadLlD-Ma 74*75 

Hc.lta.fr. 5144 Indtaa races VUM Partncado 158.10 Tatawas 3942 

... nnHcraz. *45000 Iwtaruntafe 1.T2UU SMBrtwd 34505 TMMtf 35455 

i--. * Writal U*78 Iridic 84177 Sta.1 11225 TorttobBra 55170 

-. dime ran 37015 InMM. 14*40 V Air. rend 24844 (JAE (Mam 34725 

b*)iIi krone 9.15 KcaaHtdtaar 94902 LKc.imi 0*40 WnMll * . MM 

■ Mttand 1755 Matar.rtop. 24255 

UcrHog: 1.J9M Irfcdi I 

' ‘ 'vreu »: Bantu* du Be weftor WramW/eancg Con u mrcum Itanaaa (MOan); Bamm Me- 
• - no* dr Porta (Portal; Bonk of Tokyo (Tokyo); IMF (SDR); BAH (dinar, rival, c Brftoml; 
. ■ obonA (noom). Olltor data from HmiteraondAP. 


Guii 




I nterest Rates 


MOWUCtj PrpOW tt Dee. 9 

swim France 

Dollar D Mn r* Franc starltag Fmc ECU SDR 
MCttl WUOfik 4 V»0fe 4MI. 1148-1145 *84-10 0 95**5 7*5 

nontax <154 4 5 4 9w49b 1185-1185 V45-10V5 S85485 785 

nontax Bta-SUi 484445 4154*5 1195-1185 W-HR5 8*54*5 7*5 

*0MtM 8ta-n 445415- 4 >5-495 11*5-1195 1015-1115 855-8*5 7*5 

star 015*15 4 15* 4*5415 11*5-1185 1095-10*5 8 850*5 785 

uvm.- Maroon Guaranty tdottar, DM. SF. Pound. FFI; Uorda Bonk (ECU); Kmrton 
DR). Rates ag p OaM e to I nt erbank dooasttsafsi mltOen mMnwm (aroaufuatont). 


SyMoacg r 


tier Lead Role 

» 

Mto 

if Pnwfimdm 

7JS 

7 SQ 

•dam Tnaarr Bflh 

- r.w 

7.1* 



7ji 

S 1849 dan 

7JS 

748 


Source: Reuters. 


PA M O Bey Morfceta 

Dee 9 

148 rrffl LTiKb Ready Anati 
aOdBrcnwnwvWd: 7St 

TeteraSe ktaW Rota todax: 77S 

Source: Merrill Lynch, Telerale. 


ftomrnum 

mot 


^wntataftwak 

Smmnmta* 


- 8 % n 

IIVM IIVU 
813710 B 13/14 
IIVU 815/10 



pt Traanrv MB 

it sm 

11*8 

taWiOWria* 

11 IWH 

uses 

MtRah 

5 

5 

Mm 

87/14 

IVU 


, ',.oOnr Readers 

^ong Kcaig gold futures will no longer appear in the Asian Commod- 
: s statistics because of lack of traifing activity. 


EC Aides 


• : •• . 
vft >v-. . . - 

’• j.;v — " 


''i. --- a’ • - 


Iha Nn* Talk Term 

Vaduz castle, seat of Liechtenstein's ruling family, whose expanding financial empire is 
administered by Christian Norgren, a 44-year-old banker from Sweden. 


LuichtensteirL) the Financial Realm 


Strategy 

God Is to Reduce 
Unemployment 

Compiled by Oar Stiff FrmDtipatdta 

BRUSSELS — Finance minis- 
ters of the European Community 
adopted Monday a strategy for 
economic g ro wth that they baieve 
should lead to a zn^or cut m unem- 
ployment within foor years. 

The plan cadis tot deregulation, 
tax cuts and other boosts to private 
investments, but recommends wage 
moderation fra workers. . 

The EC crammssum, vddeh pro- 
posed the rh a n g ra in jig Xftrni a* 
economic report, said the plan 
could enable the community to 
reach an annual growth rate of 3 
percent to 35. percent next year 
instead of the expected 2~5 percent. 

The ECs unemployment rate is 
now 1 12 percent 

West Germany initially ob- 
jected to the proposal, which gave 
it the leading role in reactivating 
lhi> stagnating Fmr y wtn wmnnmy i 
but chang e* were apparently made 
in the plan and it was finally ap- 
proved unanimously. Officiab md 
not explain, what made West Ger- 
many changft its mind. 

The finance ministers could not 
agree Monday on common interest 
rates for export credits. 

Diplomats said the dis ra iaort n 
focused on a new method to calcu- 
late commercial interest reference 
rates, minimal public export credit 
rates fra low-interest currencies 
such as dollar, yen, British pound, 
Deutsche Dutch guilder and 
the European currency unh. 

The commisskm has proposed to 
KnkCIRR to five-year gover nm ent 
braids. To take account of loan 
costs/a premium of (L3 percent to 1 





GAF to Launch 
Bid to Acquire 
Union Carbide 


Compded br Our Staff From Dispmchrt 
NEW YORK. — GAF Coip. an- 
nounced Monday that it would 
launch a two-pronged bid to ac- 
quire Union Carbide Coip., begin- 


iis tender offer, the remaining 
Union Carbide shares would be ex- 
changed for $68 a share in cash. 
Otherwise, GAF said, the shares 
not purchased in the tender offer 


ning with a cash tender offer for 48 would be exchanged in a subse- 
millioa shares of Union Carbide quern merger for preferred stock 


By Frank J. Prial 

New York Tima Service 

VADUZ, Iicchtcn stern — Edward Crankshaw, 
tbehistorian, once said of the Hapsbnrgs that they 
differed from other nsoaarchs because they literal- 
ly owned their empire. 

That u mp ire, the Austro-Hungarian, is gme, 
and so, far aU practical purposes, are the Haps- 
burgs. Now same dereaidants from a distant 
branch of the family live on in I Whtwwtwnj a 
country of just 62 square miles (160 square kilome- 
ters) b e tw o ai Switzerland and Austria. 

And it might be said of them, as h was of the 
Hapsburgs, that they own it 
- But they do not run it at least not alone. 
Tending to Liechtenstein’s fortunes is largely the 
responsibility of fTiri«ri*n Norgren, a Swedish 
banker who was brought in by the princely family 
in 1981. 

Under Mr. Norgren’s leadership, Liechten- 

dwn ’c frtmnrial wnp ny b uilt lar griy tm the SUCCESS 

of its banking system, has been spreading its wings 
to the United States and other countries. And, all 
tipK -j-p/ fif-ft ta that t injitwictwn' i tt presence is 


going to be even more noticeable in the coming 
months. 

Mr. Norgren, who has degrees from a business 
school in l jmgamiA , Switzerland, «nd from Stan- 
ford University, is chairman of Bank in Liechten- 
stein AG. He is also president and chief executive 
officer of the Prince of Liechtenstein Foundation, 
set tip in 1970 at the behest of Serene Highne* 
Prince Franz Josef ff, Liechtenstein's ruling 
prince: 

Last year, the 89-year-old monarch gave all 
governmental responsibilities to his eldest son, 
Hans Adam, the hereditary prince; who, like Mr. 
Norgren, is 44 years old. A local businessman said. 
‘'The old prince is chairman of the foundation 
board, but Norgren runs everything, in consulta- 
tion with the hoeditary prince.” 

The Prince of Liechtenstein Foundation owns 
practically aB of the bank and invests the royal 
18010/3 considerable wealth around the worid. 

Its holdings include forests in Austria, real es- 
tate in Vienna, a publishing house in Dresden, East 
Germany, and a stunning art collection that, Aim 

(Continued on Page 17, CoL I) 


common stock at S 68 a share. 

The 48 million shares, plus the 
6.96 million GAF already owns, 
would give GAF 80 percent of 
Union Carbide's common stock 
outstanding. 

GAF also filed a suit against 


valued at S 68 a share. 

It would cost GAF $459 billion 
to acquire all erf Union Carbide's 
675 million shares outstanding at 
S 68 a share. 

Union Carbide had no immedi- 
ate comment on the offer. Hcwev- 


Umon Carbide seeking to bar its er. it has established a line of credit 


management from using what it 
called a “pension parachute.” 

The suit, filed in New York Dis- 


of more than SI billion to defend 
itself against any hostile offer. 

The company is faring billions of 


tricl Court, alleges that Union Car- dollars in claims stemming from 
bide management and board en- the accident on Dec. 3, 1984, at its 


acted changes in July to the 
company pension plan, allowing 
unfair discrimination between 
friendly and unfriendly takeover 
bids. 

GAF said that under the amend- 
ment to the pension plan. Union 
Carbide can reward a friendly bid- 
der with a surplus $500 milli on in 
pension assets or if management 
considers a bidder unfriendly, it 
can have the surplus cash distribut- 
ed to pensioners. 

GAF also said it intended to ob- 
tain the remaining Union Carbide 
shares. If the companies reach a 
“mutually satisfactory, definitive” 
agreement before GAF completes 


Baldrige Reaffirms Curbs on U.S.-Soviet Trade 


Canplled by Our Staff From Dtipauha 

MOSCOW — US. Commerce 
Secretary Malcolm Baldrige said 


ing between President Ronald Rea- pay high tariffs on exports to the equipment to a Soviet gas pipeline 


gan and the Soviet leader, Mikhail United States. 
I Gorbachev. It was hoped that 


Bhopal, India, pesticides plant 
More than 2,000 people died in the 
toxic leak. 

Other suits are pending over the 
toxic leak last August at the com- 
pany’s Institute, West Virginia, 
plant. 

GAF. a manufacturer of special- 
ty chemicals and building matarink 
based in Wayne. New Jersey, said it 
would finance its offer through a 
bank loan and the issuance or high- 
risk, high-yield debt securities, of- 
ten called “junk bonds.” 

On Friday, the Federal Reserve 
Board proposed limitations on the 
use of ‘junk bonds” in financing 
corporate takeovers by applying its 
50-percent stock market margin re- 
quirement to the issuance of debt in 
hostile takeovers. The board hopes 
to adopt the regulation as applica- 
ble to agreements after Dec. 31. 

Acquisition experts said the 
Fed’s proposal was aimed mainly 


after the imposition of martial law at companies that make hostile 


Dercoft^woSk^be adSS°to die Monday that the Geneva summit the meetings would fadp boost 

meeting could spur UA-Soviet UA-Soviet trade. 

Diplomats said that countries Mr. Baldrige referred to a law 

with low mtM rate, W^Ger- uSS^and said commerce could 
many, the Netherl ands and Bntm^ grow without a political thaw. 5K 
insisted that the premium raceed 1 Baking; called on about 600 

peremt to align export credit rates Ameriana^ Soviet businessmen 

as modi as possible on commercial attesting the opening day of a nolo gy ^ Union. 

teles. U-S.-UikSjL^ Trade and Economic He also refereed to the 1974 

High-interest France, riimrii meeting to “ maintain a Jackson-Vanik amendment that 

Italy .and Greece;, warned the.pre- strong sense erf realism” about linked impart credits and most-fa- 
mmms below those proposed by trade between the countries. vared-nanoo status to Soviet emi- 

■s the commission, the- diplomats-. The- three-day comes, gration policy. The denial of MFN 

said. - . (APj Reuters) three weeks after the Geneva meet- status requires the Soviet Union to 


the mfiMingg would help boost council president, Janies Giffen, 
U.S.-Soviet trade. said the United States should give 

Mr, BaMrig* «f em d 


Earlier in the day, the trade in Poland. fers for much larger companies, 

council president, James Giffen. “Mutually beneficial trade rela- In 1984. GAF posted earnings of 
said the United States should give H on s cannot be built unless there is $56.7 million on sales of $7313 
the Soviet Union most-favored-na- absolute confidence that the com- million. Union Carbide earned 


that allows the president to restrict hem tra<&g status and repeal the mitmenls assumed by American $328 J million on sales of $95 bil- 
— —4 -- — t — r~. Jackson-Vamk amendment . companies will not be tom up uni- lion. 


Mr. Baldrige said, however, that laterally,” Pravda said. 

Washington was interested in ex- ... ... , , 

panding peaceful, “nonstmtegic ^A^hoi^ Mr. Giffm admowl- 
tradethat iscoosisteni with oast- edged that trade and politics are 


He also refereed to the 1974 ing laws and policies . 1 


connected, he said members of the 


Jackson-Vanik amendment that On Monday, the Communist c °V ncil w ® uld n .? t . hum ?? 

; . .j: j .. n „ . . . nphtc r»r nthw nnlifiral issues with 


strong sense erf realism” about linked import credits and mosirfa- Party daily newspaper Pravda said 
trade bet w een the countries. vared-nanoo status to Soviet emi- the U.S. business reputation suf- 

The three-day comes, gration policy. The denial of MFN feted “grave damage” from Mr. 

three weeks after the Geneva meet- status requires the Soviet Union to Reagan's ban on sales of U S 


rights or other political issues with 
Soviet officials. 


GAF said its offer would be con- 
ditioned on a minimum of 31 mil- 
lion shares being tendered and fi- 
nancing to complete the tender 
offer. 

Samuel J. Heyman, chairman 
and chief executive officer of GAF, 


Hesudlhc council bcliced the n^ucyd a -eeling 


technology-exports act is vague in 
such areas as personal computers 


with Warren M. Anderson, the 
Union Carbide chairman, to dis- 


The Biffion-DoUar Questions in the Texaco Case 


that have both military and civilian cuss the proposal. 

oses. In trading on the New York 

He ako said the law most be Stock Bi dmpg Moo dy.^Umoo 
« to .h. Carbide, a component of the Dow 


By Peter Behr purchase 32 million shares of Getty 

iVcJmgun Pau Service Oil? Or did its agreement really 

HOUSTON — The lawsuit that promise Pennzofl the future rights 
packed a state courtroom here last I WHkm barrels of Getty's tm- 
weekis known among lawyers as dergroondwealthofoO and natural 
“the case with all the zeroes.” ©*S? The answer to the question 
Thai’s not quite accurate. The a * )oat the size of the judgment 
number iM is caus in g all the a- h i n ge s on those two questions, the 
atement — $1 1,792^32,783.83 — lawyers Slid, 
doesn’t actually contain any zeroes. . T«aco argued flat, evengrani- 
But it is so large there is a “S ^ amz °d s version of the ras- 
lendency to view it as as abstrac- P 11 ** Fomzafl was ratitW to no 
tjjXL more than about $500 mflhon. The 

And in fact, the number's rela- nwn AP m ®E5 B .S t 

tion shj p to reality was a cent ra l 5^-35 billion, before adding S3 bfl- 
issue in two days of heated hearings licpm pmritivc damages. 


here this past week. 


Getty's oil and natural 


That colossal sum — damage* serves had become a target for out- 
plus interest charges — is what s * 4 *® 5 aft® a SP 1 * “ ^ of 
Texaco Inc. was ordered to pay the late J. Paul Getty, the founder 
after a jmy had found last month of the Getty fortune, who died in 
that the third-largest U.S. ofl com* 1976. 

party h»H wrongfully intruded cm L l* 80 ! Getty’s son, Gordon P. 
Pennzofl Co.’s attempt to acquire a Getty admimsttator of a family 
stake in Getty Ofl Co. two years frost that owwxL 402 T®c«* had 
ago. become impatient with what he re- 

On Friday, Judge Solomon Caa- gatdedasitedisappcantiiigpezfor- 
seb of the Texas District Court ad- mance and medioae dividends. 
Suraed post-trial hearings in the Gordon Getty began a series of 
case; teffing the lawyers to return movcs . tv ^-, ycars ^?° I J 1 ’ 1,111 
Tuesday. Many expect him to rule control of Getty Ofl. Bnt when an- 
them on the jury's verdict. Judge otto of J. Paul's chaDen^d 
Casseb can accept it in full, re duc e Gordon s control of the trust and 
the amount of the judgment or ^ backed by Getty’s c h ai rm a n , 
overrule the jury and dismisa die 
case. 

The basis of the dispute about - — 

the am of the verdict is the nature 

of the stake in Getty (XI Co. that NOTICE OF EAJRI 

Pennzoil contends it acquired dnr- _ _ ^ 

ing the first week of January 1984. Iv Iflffn fttll 

Had Pennzofl merely agreed to I\IUgUUlll 



don Getty would control the rest 
Their deal was struck on Jan. 1, 
1984. Two days later, Getty Offs 
board approved a modi fi ed version 
of the agreement far & cash merger 
with Pimnzofl, riving Getty Offs 
public shareholders the equivalent 
of $11250 a share for its three- 
sevenths’ stake. 

Pennzofl nffidnh say that they 
counted on gaining control of 
three-sevenths of Getty’s ofl and 
gas reserves, the equivalent erf 1 
billion barrels of ink which was the 
prize in the agreement from Feon- 
khPs standpoint. 

“What Pennzoil lost was 1 bil- 
lion bands of oil,” said James 
l yy T Kronzer, one of its attorneys. 
Judge Salomon Cssseb tad, «d<tay took 

What happened in the next few 
Sumey R. Peterson, the struggle for days -was a large part of testimony 
c omm a n d of Getty’s underground heard by the jury in Judge Casseb’s 
wealth was thrown open. co urtr oo m ii*i< summer and fall, 

On Dec. 28, 1983, Pennzofl an- 7 ^ Pennzofl-Getty agreement 
nounced its intention to buy 20 became tmglocd almost imroediate- 
percent of Getty's stock for $!00 a i y _ wSer Texaco lured Getty 


clarified as to when the president “ ‘T “T - T a 

Joncs industrial mdex, advanced 
omforce busmess to abrogate con- J3 375 to 5 ^ 375 . GAF ako rose 

tracts. .L..L, tm ki 


(AP. UPI) 


$3,375 to $66375. GAF also rose 
sharply, up $10 to $57,625. 

(AP. UPI. Reuters) 


wealth was thrown open. courtroc 

On Dec. 28, 1983, Pennzofl an- 
nounced its intention to buy 20 
percent of Getty's stock for S100 a lv 


share, 25 percem above the market ivay or was invited to bid for Get- 
pnee at the time. ,, «... 


THINKING OF CHANGING ? 

And ready to act ? 

If so. here is a third question : your annual salary, is it over 
$ 50,000 ? Like many other executives who have reached the 
- higher brackets, you may well find that the job-change methods 
you used earlier in your career can no longer produce the result 
you seek today. 

Alain Forgeot. Harvard MBA. Willet Weeks, former 
President of the International Herald Tribune and Forgeot 
Weeks consultants have helped for the past 9 years more than 
3.000 top executives such as yourself to mount und conduct 
a sophisticated search of the hidden side of 
the international job market. 

Telephone for an initial meeting without cost or obligation. 
We will review your situation, check out your objectives and 
explain if and how we can be helpful to you in achieving your 
particular goats. 

Forgeot Weeks 

Paris : 56. rue St Ferdinand 75617 - Tel. : (I) 45.74.24.24 i 

Geneve : 9, route des Jeunes 1227 - Tel. : (022) 42.52.49 ( 


pnee at the time. 

Gordon Getty, taking on Penn- 
zml as an ally, agreed that Pennzoil 
would buy three-sevenths of the 
company’s shares. As trustee, Gor- 


(Contimed on Page 16, CoL 3) 


NOTICE OF EARLY REDEMPTION 

Kingdom of Sweden 




Dec. 9 

ML 

PM. 

arac 

HamKMa XBM 

mss 

— 248 


— 

—246 

parts (tUklbl MW7 

32U9 

_227 

Znridi B MO 

71745 

-CD 

London W! 

31740 

. -«Q 

. Mew York — 

31430 

— 41? 

Luxembourg. Porta end London ofndai fix- 

fries,- Hang Kara and Zurich ceentnv and 

dosing prices.- New 

'orir CamM current | 

contract. AU prices in US. Saeroonas. 

SotFCe: Reuters. 




FOREIGN & COLONIAL 
RESERVE ASSET FUND 
PMQ5 AT 3L12S& 
A 1 LL& DGUARCASH $1062 

B : MJJCUSS94CY CASH $1188 

Ci DOUA8 BOTOS $1148 

Di MULDCUBENOf BONDS $1292 

E > STRUNG ASSET E1L2B 

FCIfJGN & CCtCMAL 
MANAGEMfrtr (JBSYI UNIIH> 
UMlSXlBSfmStMBUBBfp. 
70:053427351 TREfc 41920S3 

FOR OWE? FA C FUNDS, SB 


For the blest information bn 
De Voe-BoEbein International nv 
and Gty-Oock International nv 
please call collect 31-204327762. 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gams in ridhal stock 

markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 

INVESTORS ALERT newdetux 
win be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
World Trade Center 
SnswindEyban 857. 

1077 XX Amsterdam. 

The Netherlands 
Tdex: 14507 fireo nl 


my 

U.s. 9150 , 000,000 

Floating Rate Notes Due 1995 

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with 
Qatise 6(a) of the Terms and Conditions of the 
Nous, die Kingdom will redeem all of the 
outstanding Notes at their principal amount on 
16th January, 1986, when interest on the Notes 
will cease to accrue. 

Repayment of principal will be made upon pre- 
sentation of the Notes with all unmanned 
Coupons attached, at the Offices of any one of 
the Faying Agents mentioned thereon. 
Accrued interest due 16th January, 1986 will 
be paid in the normal manner against presenta- 
tion of Coupon No. 6 on or after 16th January, 
1986. 

WM Banker Ihist Company, 
LI London Fiscal Agent 

10ih December, 1983 


Orange Nassau Group 


International investments and investment services 
Offices in the Netherlands. France and the United States 


oil and gas exploration and production 


real estate development and management 
venture capital and industrial investments 
financial services and portfolio management 


25 Nassauplein, 2585 EC The Hague. Tel. (70) 469670 


Annual report 1934 and additional Infomation available upon request 




















Pi 


M 

AS 

AO 

AE 


£ 

a 


AT 

AT 

Am 

1 

Acs 

*C 

AC 

1 

Ad 

Ad 

I 


All 

?S 




a 


a 


Alt 


Z, 

AS 


At 

A1 

A1 

s 

Si 

5) 

a! 

AI 

aI 

AI 

S) 

a 

Ai 

AI 

AI 

* 


Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1985 


** 


NYSE Most Actives I 


VSL 


hmi Low Lor cm 


Uncart 

PacGE 

AT&T 

intMarv 

Texas® 

owatCd 

IBM 

OcdPet 

AltMUil 

Exxon 

All Rich 

PhllPts 

AMR 

Maui 

Soors 


28961 

25164 

24463 

23AM 

30573 

17756 

16*06 

16343 

15603 

M273 

13770 

13155 

13761 

13791 

12734 


66% 65ft 
20 191ft 

24% 23% 
S'* 7% 

3m 30% 
45% 45% 

144% 142% 

sm mm 

41 VS. 38% 
53% 51% 
63% £2% 
13% 13 
43% 41% 
30% 29% 
39% 38% 


66% 43% 
20 + % 
34% + % 
83* +1 

30% -% 

45% + % 
144% 40% 
32% -1% 
40% 43% 
52% —1% 

63 -1% 

12 % — % 
42% +m 
29% - ft 
39V* +% 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open ffMi Law Close 
Indus 1483.94 1504.13 W78.10 1«7** + »■» 

Tran* sm.lO 70646 69230 7BM2 46^0 

I -Uhl 16532 1«2l MV 1gJ8 +031 

Comp 59*31 6B2J0B 591 3D SHLU +633 


NYSE Index 


Cam pasl lo 

Industrials 

Tramp. 

Utilities 

Finance 


MU uw Oar cnte 
11738 117.13 11762 + 043 
13407 13435 13487 +041 
1120J ll£5 11231 +036 
*0.70 6031 6030 4031 
12631 12630 12631 4035 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 
unlit les 
Industrials 


8177 


era 

4028 
+ 052 
+ 035 


NYSE Diaries 


Close Pit*. 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unction oed 
Total issue* 
New NlfltB 
now Lows 
volume ua 
Volume dawn 


1026 


389 

2077 

147 

34 

98443420 

39474840 


508 

1128 

414 

MSB 

69 

15 


Dec. 6 . 

Decs. 

Dec. 4 , 

Dec 3 . 

Dec 2 , 


Ber sale* 

1704*2 510936 


•Wit 


■Included ft the sales floures 


0873 

- . . 1977 

190095 SO . 069 20*7 

161+29 307/971 Ua 

W&8S3 499/615 1324 


M9JB9 mm 

mmmm g£ 069 


Mondays 



Closing 


VaLaH PJfL 


W41MH I 
12&54M88 


Pr8T.4PJW.vpl_ 

Prev csuolhkitad dose 146336368 


Tonies IncJude the natfwiwWe prices 
upfatba dosing on Wall Street and 
da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via- The. Associated Pitas 


AMEX Diaries 



Oeee 

Prev. 

Advanced 

■297 

Z16 

Declined 

313 

349 

Undwnged 

231 

257 

Tata* issues 

BA 

022 

Now HWn 

37 

17 

New Laws 
volume up 
volume down 

25 

443*010. 

8,179/100 

9 


I Standard & Poor's index 


industrials 

Tranap. 


Composite 


HWr Low CM* era 
227A5 22534 22782 +U7 
IISJ7 1026 1*5.15 +146 
8939 8M8 B90T +0JZ 
2*23 2U3 2*41 +025 
20445 20238 20435 +13* 


IZMantti 

HhALow sack 


so. fi— 

Dir. rid. PE HfcHMiLew QuUCirBe 


•a ■ 

at L 


230a 53 
J2 23 
172 104 


.40 3.1 IV 
32b 44 11 
132S103 
40 13 9 
331 33 15 


26% 16 AAR 
19% 10% AGS 
15% 9% AMCA 

SM 33% AMR 
24% 18% AMR of 2.18 93 
25% 231* ANRpf 247 113 
22 19 ANRpf 212 104 

11% 7% APL 

15% 9 ARX 
55% 33% A5A 
27 10% AVX 

28% 20% AZP 
63% 38% AM Lab 
25% 19% AcCOWd 
24% 10 AcmeC 
HHfj 7 AcmeE 
19 15% AdaEx 

27 13% AdmMI 

16% 8% AdvSVS 
36% 22% AMD 
12% 10% Adobe n 
17 14% AdohPlA 

17% 15V. AdabofB 
12% 7 Adwest 

53% 34% AeinLf 
57% 53 AelLpf 
*3% 22% Ahmns 
3% 2% Alleen 
6* Vi 44% AfrPrd 
2«% 17% AirbFrt 

2% iMAJMaas 

7TA 24% AlaP P* 243e 94 
33% 27 AlaP ufA3J2 14.1 
B% 6% AtaPdPf 37 107 
87% Mft ATOP Pi 91 » 107 
M6M 96% AtoPpf 1130 10L5 
92% 70 AlaP P« 744 104 
79% 61% AlaP Pt 8.16 I0L5 
76% 60 AlaP Pf 038 11.1 
24% 13% AlSkAIr .16 3 J 

30% 12% AlbriOS 38 10 22 
33 V. 26% AIMsns 76 25 12 
31% 22% Alain 30 23 54 
30% 27% AleoSld 134 34 16 
32% 71% AJexAlX 130 12 
33% 20% Alaxdr 35 

8994 72% AlloCp I44t 13 22 
27% 24% AlaCpPf 2*6 113 
20% 19% Alolnt 103 7* 
20% 16% Ata In P< 2.19 134 
98 82% Aljjl PfC1105 143 


36 23 17 133 25% 25% 25% + % 

14 1ST 17% 17 17% + % 

31 11% 11% 11% 

712786 42% 41% 42% +1% 

104x24 23% 23% 

5 23% 23% 23% 

14 20% KP4 2Wt- % 

5 12 10% 10% 10% — % 

15 154 15% 15% 15% + % 

563 35% 34-A 34% — TW 

377 14% M% IflT + % 

7 531 26 25% 25% + % 

23 17 2009 61% 61% 61% + % 
23 1* 241 24% 24% 24% + % 


8*1 13% 12% 13 + % 

41 7% 7% 7% 

93 19 18% 18% 

42 21% 20% 21 

334 16% 16% 16% + % 


148 23 13 
40 33 11 
.100 50 


34% 28% 


136 

130 

.101 


68 9 
33 34 


26 16% AllenG 70 27 14 

23% 16% AlldPd 8 

40% 42 AldSonn 130 43 9 
70% 62 AM5eJA4.II 63 
S3 50% AMS DtC 674 IIjO 
111 103% AMSpf«230 113 

103% 99% AldS Pf F 
67% 47% AlWStr 230 33 9 
9% 3% AUtsOl 

34% 24 AILsCef 
38% 23% ALLTU 
39% 29% Alcoa 
19 10W A max 

36 27% Amaxpf 3J0 102 

34 22% ArnHM 1.10 

2% 1% AmAar 
27% 16% ABakr 
70 53% ABrand 3*0 

30% 25% ABrdpf 275 
70% 54% ABrdPf 267 
120% 57% ABdCSt 140 
30% 20% ABkJM *6 
32 20% ABusPT 44 

66% 48% AmCan 250 ... 

24 22% ACanpt 280 >23 

57% 42 ACanpf 330 54 


44 4391 30% 29% 30% + % 

321 12% 11% lift— % 

49 16% 16% 16% — % 

53 17% 17% 17% — % 

,12a 13 17 912 12% 11% 11% 

264 S3 16 3373 90% 50% 50% + % 

5.19e 93 762 53% 53 53% + % 

120 27 7 2119 4«% *Z% 44% +T% 

140 3% 3% 3% — % 

554 64% 63% 63% — % 

99 20% 19% 19% 

578 1% 1% 1% 

10 27ft 27% 27ft 

44 27% 27% 27% + % 

45 BM 8% flft— % 

34*0184% 84W 8416—1 

3fKHMfe104% (M% +1% 
1400Z 89 89 89 + % 

200z 78 78 78 +1 

250z74% 74% 74% 

1441 20% 19% 20% + % 

54 29% 2846 29% +1 

590 30% 30 30% + % 

9838 28% 26% 28% +1% 

245 37% 36% 37 — % 

588 31% 31% 31% — % 

80 30% 30% 3016— ft 

233 88 87% 87% + ft 

2 36 26 26 

4516x19% 17 1B%— % 

18x16% 16% 16% — ft 
214x80% 79 *0ft— % 

8.1 10 8BVQ 35% 37% 33« + *6 


JUO 


r 


211x 2&ft 25% 26 + ft 

91 19% 19% 17% + ft 
4111 45% 45% 45% + % 
13 66ft 6* 66ft + % 
42 61ft 60% 61% + % 
1 106ft 10616 10616 
4 sm loo ico 
935 46% 66 66% + ft 

^ tT 3?* 27^-ft 

107 29% 20% 29 

4039 37% 36% 36% + % 

1071 12% 1216 ISM— % 

3 29% 29% 29%— ft 

4.1 23 459S 27% 26% 27% — % 

315 1% 1ft 1ft— % 

18 82 27% 27% 27ft— ft 

60 9 944 62 61ft 61% 

9.1 167 30% 30% 30% 

43 5 62% 62 6Z%— ft 

13 20 9275 IK 120 )2Dft + % 
3.7 14 20 23% 23% 23H— ft 

2J> 16 22 32% 31% 32ft +1% 

4J 13 1713 61% 61 61% + ft 

23 23% 23ft 23ft 

3 54 54 54 +M 

3 114 113ft 113ft + ft 

._ .... 1M 21 »*» 

25% ACcpCv 2510 93 31 27% 27% 


110 104% ACai pf 1305 111 
22ft 18 ACOpBd 220 105 


11 4M ACentC 
59% 44% a Cyan 
29% 19% APT 

i AElPw 


24% 19% 


51% 34% Am Exp 13* 
Mmls 


3RV 14ft AFaml 5 08 
36ft 24% AGnCP 130 
16 8 A Gnl wt 

71% 48% AGn PfD 164 


90 5% 5ft 

33 16 3250 57% 56ft 
13 26 426 27% 27% 
93 9 2212 23% 

30 1*11715 51% 

16 18 523 
3.1 9 


i + % 


120 32 11 


37% 29 AHertt 
13% 7% AHotst 

66% S0% A Home 230 46 13 
K» 74% Amrfc/i 600 60 10 
106% 63% AlnGrp M A 23 
173% 114 AIGPPf 535 ' * 


'Sft AmMot 
APrasd 


13% 


S 50 19 


i sE 1 " 1 ;! 

I ” ' 


!* 

51 


34 14 12 




ATBrT 18 120 4.9 T734 


_ 630 113 

18 AT&T 120 

33 AT AT Pf 364 

34 AT&T Pf 334 

13ft 10% AWatP* 

28% 9% Am Hotl 
72% 63 ATrpr 
1B% 6% ATrsc 


69% ATrun 534 62 


36% Ameron 140 22 » 
26% 12ft AmesDs .10 A 23 
29% 19% Amatefc 1JD0 40 If 

r ISH Amfoc 

l vlAmfsc 

7Uft 50ft Amoco 330b 52 8 


AMP 


22 20 31 



18 11% Amoco 30 22 I? 


10ft Amreps 
AmStfi 


38% 22* 

*4% 32% Amstad 
4ft 1% Adeem* 
26ft 16ft An loo 
27% 20 Anchor 
48% 33% AnCMy 
15% 9% AndrGr 

27% 17 Aimrilc 


39% 


Aniwws 30 


78* S* Anheupt 330 
20ft 13% Anixtr 28 


% 

59 

8 

ss 

ii 

.51 S% ii.. 

46 91% 89% 

13 50ft 49% 

901 24% 24% 

218 25% » 

2® *1% T* 

il97 *5 63ft 

056 33% 35ft 15ft + % 

46 14% 13% 13%—% 
396 19% 19% 19ft + ft 

121 36% 38% 38% + % 

116 42% 41% 41ft— % 

774 3% 3 3 

29 1851 2Sft 24% 25% + » 
138 53 74 2Sft 24% 24%— ft 

132 27 34 30 48% 48 48ft + % 

24 13 17 156 15% 15% 15% + % 

60 22 15 40 27% 26% 27% + % 


11 

156 40 10 
130 00 16 


23 IS 15600 41ft 38% 40% +2% 

43 m 81% 78 (1% 42% 

. _ 13 28 906 19% 19ft 19% 

16% 10ft Anthem 04 2 39 22 15ft 15ft 15% + % 

13% 9% Apache 28 U 12 1100 13% 12% 12%—% 

2 % ApctiP wt 941 1% 1% 1% 

19% 15% ApchP urfLlO 113 941 1B% 18 11% — % 

34% 30ft AnPw Of 4.18 126 20 23% 33 33% + ft 

39% 15% Aetata 1 Jit 55 56 88 31% 31% 31% 

15% 8% ApalMO 30 155 14% 14% 14ft 

25% 18% ArchDn ,14b 3 14 2266 24% 24% 24ft— % 

31% 27 AriPtrt 258 120 30 30 29% 27% 

104% 84 ArIPpf HUB 10J 10ffitl01% 101% 101% 

30ft 14ft ArkBst 60 20 10 44 29% 2SM 29% + % 

24» 16 Ark la 108 *2 19 2207 17% 17% 17%—% 


189 % % % 

33 14% 14ft 14% + % 

932 9% 9ft 9% 

11 18% 18% 18% — % 

>29 15% 14% 15% — % 

219 43 42% 42% 

SW&43 m 40 
94 ISM 15 15 — % 

58 22% 22% 22%— % 

103 28ft 27ft 28ft + ft 

3SS 18% IBM 18% — % 
1111 37% 17% 37% 

12 45 45 45 

9 42% 42% 42% — M 


ArtnCp 
15% 11% Armada 
11% 6% Arnica 
22% 15% Armcpf 2.10 113 

24% 13% ArmsRb AS U 10 

43% 30% Armwin 120 30 11 

40 30% ArmWpf 3J5 93 

18ft lift ArawE 20 12 

30ft 16 Arlra 22 10 38 

28% 18% Arvlns 00 24 10 

27% 15% Asarco 
38 23% Ash IOII 130 43 9 

46% 38% Ash tO el *50 HUB 

44ft 35 AaMOaf 326 92 . _ 

.£% 24% AidOGs 130 3J 12 1056 37% 37% 37% + _ 

liry, 79 AsdD Pt A75 *0 36 120ft 11VM lint + M 

»% 16% Athtane 130 73 61 35 21ft 20% 20%— % 

Wj 23% AtCvEI Z5M 94 10 110 28% 28% 28% 

.67% 42 AM Rich 400 62 13770 63ft 62% 63 —1ft 

1*2 10U% Ah Reef 280 12 6 150% 149% 130% — 2% 

IS! 4 129 WSF 0 . 39 12ft 12ft 12% 

79% 18% Aupot 30 U 31 728 27% Uft 26% + % 

60 35ft AutoOl 68 12 23 1231 51%57%58%+M 
5ft 4ft AvtdMIn 05e 12 32 4% 4ft 4ft— ft 

37 17% AVEMC 40 13 16 46 37 36% 36% + % 

39% 28ft Avery 38 15 15 286 36% 36% 36% 

38ft 27 Avnel 50 13 3* HOT 36 35% 36 + ft 

®% 17% Awn 200 70 T4 2314 28% 28% 28% + % 

2S% 16% AvdM 17 79 20% 19% 2B% + M 


14ft 

35% 

18% 

24% 

2 % 

10 

37 

ISM 

15 

2 *% 

r 

5% 

63 

57% 

54ft 

101% 

56% 

47% 

33ft 

22% 

*7 

74% 


6% BMC 
21ft Balmco 
15% Bkrlnn 
IBM Baldor 


H vIBaMU 
vlBMU pf 


2% 

21ft Balls .77 26 13 
11% BallvMI J20 14 
7% BallyPk 15 


. Bally F 
18% BHGE i 1 JO 75 9 
39 Bell SlB 450 93 
16 B neons 00 33 11 


75M 

27 

46% 

16M 

41% 

27% 

<]?• 


1% BortTtx 
48M Bandae 140 IT 12 
39% BkBas 234 43 6 
49% BkB pfB J9e 1.9 
99% BkBPfC 37e J 
59% BkNEOpfiJltoV.l 
31% BkNY 248 48 7 
22% Ban kVa 1.12 33 9 
12% BnkAm 00 S* 
37% BkAm pt 437*123 
59 BkAm pf 745SIZ4 
14% BKAfflpf20B 
24% BkARty 240 
52M BankTr 170 
21ft BkTrpf 250 
35% BkTrpf 442 


■121 . „ IB M 7 7 

60 24 11 418 24% 24% 24M 

52 5.9 13 310B 16ft 15ft 15% 
40 20 14 149 20ft 19% 20% 

352 1% 1 

11 3M 3% 3M 
277 28% 27% 27% 
934 15ft 15ft 15% 
*8 13M 13% 13ft 
1532 23% 23% 23ft 
400* 48% 48% 48% 
299 23% 23ft 23ft 
258 2 1% 2 

43 57 ft 56% 57 
728 57% 57% 57% 
3 51% 51% 51% 
I 100 % 100 -H 100 M 
54% 54% 54% 
4S2 47% 46% 47M 
458 31% 31% 31% 
47AB 14 13% 13% 

26 38 3B 38 

3 59% 59% 59% 
181 1«% Mft 14ft 
172 25% 34% 24% 
20B3 70% TO 70% 
131 26% Z6ft 26% 
151 46% 46% 46% 
108 16% 16ft 16ft 


+ M 

— M 
+ ft 

— ft 
+ ft 

— % 


+ % 
+ ft 
+lft 

— ft 
+ % 
+ ft 
+ % 

— % 


+1% 
— % 
- % 


13% 






16% 

64 

7% 

II 

17% 

37% 

37 

100% 

33 

aw 


93 11 

30 7 

94 
90 

030 J 13 

20 Bod 36 14 15 111* 41 39% 41 

19ft BomGp 10# W 19 189 27ft Z7 27ft 

26% Bamafs T0( 23 12 402 42 40 41% 

16% BorvWr 40 11 15 289 19% 19ft 19% 

6ft BASIX ,12b U 12 241 9% 9ft 9ft 

24% BousCh JB 25 14 1050 31% 30% 31% 

12% BariTr 37 24 65 8426x 15% 15ft 15% 

50% B*1T pfA 436 0 1297x 50ft SO 50 

n% Bx1Tp1B330 6J 2006X 56% 56 56% 

20% Bay Fin 20 J 361 28% 28ft 28% 

27% BavSfG Z72 74 12 36 35% 34ft 33 

19ft Bearftn M 20 1507 21% 21% 21% 

31ft Bearing 100 26 15 147 38% 38% 3B% 

28 BeOICa UO 20 917558x 45% 45% 45% 

32% BeatPf 338 40 00x85% 85 85 

12% Bear M 30114 IX 15ft 14% 14% 

39 BKtnD IJ2 20 14 1898 62% 60% *0% 


- % 
- % 


— % 
+ % 


+1 
+ ft 
+ 1 % 
+ % 


+1 
+ M 
— % 
+ % 
+ % 
+ % 


« vIBeker 
1% vfSnkr pf 091 
12% BeMnH 40 
22ft BOlHwl 42 
22ft BciHwpf 47 
77% BellAll 6*0 


23 13 
10 11 
20 


25% BCE O 
Belllnd 


236 


57 

43% 

s* 

W% 

6ft 

9 

15% 

% 

24ft 

40% 


280 

00 

100 


24 13 


200 4J 12 


21 % 


Mft 

27% 

35 

s* 

36% 

49% 

2«% 


83 1% 1ft 1% 

4! 2% 2% 2% 

211 17% 16% 17% 

255 3» 33ft 33% 

1 33ft 33ft 33ft 

64 10 1393 104 100% 103% 
179x 29% 29% 29ft 

1.1 31 27 28% 28ft 28% 

6.1 10 4510 46% 45ft 46 

10 34 66 47ft 47 - 47ft 

79 41ft m 41ft 
438 47 45% 46% 

390* 22ft 22ft 22% 
32 18% 11% 18% 

256 4 . 3% 3% 

70 7ft 7% 7% 

2$4 14% 14% 14ft 

1290 15% 15% 15% 

*1 39% 3«% 39ft 
109 20% X X 
- -- -- 442 36% 36% 36ft 

00 30 89 1209 25 24% 25 

22 61 18% 18% 18% 

46 34 16 1890x19% 16% 19 

1.92 54 10 11 35% 35% 35ft 

081 460 22% 22% 22% 

20ft BlkHRs 106 40 7 463 34 33% 3* 

34% BeMnos ij» n is szm 51% sm 

37ft BolseC 100 42 25 1946 45% 44% 45 

50% BalssC pfSJN U 144 60% iv 60% 

T,m BallBOr .18 0 33 342 36% 35% 35% 

sm BcmenslS XI 13 1170 48% 40 48% 

19% BarsWa .96 42 12 1422 23M 22ft 22% 


+ ft 
+ ft 
+1% 
— % 
— ft 


+ M 

-ft 


19% u. _ 

31% BMISou 
43 BeloAH 
24ft Bemb 

31% BentCn _ 

19. BaiwlPl 2J0 110 
Mft Benaqt n IX *5 
3ft BenfltB 071 
3% Bar key 4 

11 BeatPn 04 10 1M 
12% BffflSIl 001 
3*ft Bemstpi50O 12* 
18% Both5t pf20D 120 
29 Beverly 02 .9 18 

19% Btariir 
13% Btaeffn 


+m 
+ % 
+ % 
+ ft 
- ft 
+ % 
+ 1 % 


— Vb 
-% 


— % 

- ft 

— % 




25Vfa 

Mft BioirJh 


— % 

+ ft 


- % 

+ ft 
+ % 
+ % 
+ ft 
— ft 
+ V!i 


Stocks Jump 19.84, to a Record 


United Pros International 

NEW YORK — The New York Stock Ex- 
change roared to a record dose Monday amid 
expectations of lower oil prices, subdued infla- 
tion and further declines m interest rates. Trad- 
ing was heavy. 

Progress on legislation to balance (he federal 
budget also encouraged buying, dealers said. 

The Dow Jones industrial average climbed 
29.84 points, to dose at 1,497.02, surpassing its 
previous record finish of 1,484.40, set last 
Wednesday. Broader market indicators also ad- 
vanced. 

The NYSE Index climbed 0.63 to 117.62, 
brushing up against but not exceeding its previ- 
ous record of 117.70. Standard & Poor’s 500- 
stock index rose 1.26 to 204.25, matching its 
high of 204.23 set Wednesday. The price of an 
average share jumped 19 cents. 

Big Board volume expanded to 144.01 milli on 
shares from 125.54 million on Friday and ad- 
vancing issues outpaced decliners 1,020-665 
among the 2,068 issues traded 

Traders said the primary force behind the 
market's push up was the likelihood that oil 
prices would faH. 

Tbe Organization of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries concluded its year-end strategy meet- 
ing by agreeing to abandon efforts to prop oil 
paces through production restraints. OrEC 
ministers as well as some industry analysts said 
this could mean a global oil price war. 

Hfldegard Zagorskl a Wall Street analyst, 
cited the OPEC announcement and progress on 
legislation to balance the federal budget as two 
“excellent" news items that helped both the 
bond and equity markets, 

“It was like Christmas today," die said Pre- 


dictions of oil prices faffing to as low as S2Q per 
barrel excited hopes for stiQ lower inflation and 
interest rates, die said. 

“Blue chip issues, especially IBM, General 
Motors, Merck, American Express and Union 
Carbide, pushed the Dow industrial average 
higher," said George Phrone of Dreyfus Corp. 
He said the ratio of advancing issues over de- 
clines was less spectacular. 

Mr. Pirrooe said the market should pull back 
moderately and then would “race on to higher 
highs before the end of the year.” 

Anne Gregory, publisher of the Merrill 
Lynch Market Letter, agreed that the stock 
market is likely to continue traveling the high 
road in the months ahead 

“Improving prospects for accelerating 
growth in the economy and in corporate profits 
next year will fuel further increases in stock 
prices," she said Additional declines in interest 
rates into the first half of next year could be 
another important positive for the stock mar- 
ket, she said 

Union Carbide was the most active NYSE- 
listed issue, j umping 3H to 66K after GAF 
offered to acquire it for $68 a share. GAF was 
the session's biggest winner, gaining 10 to 57ft. 

Pacific Gas & Electric was the second most 
active issue, rising ft to 20, and AT&T was 
third, adding ft to 2414, 

Inter national Harvester jumped 1 to 8ft cm 
v olume of more than 2 millio n shares. 


The news from OPEC buoyed airline stocks 
AMRG 


added lft 


but depressed oO issues. 
to 42ft and UAL Inc. rose 2 to 51 
OQ issues weakened Texaco lost ft to 30ft, 
Occidental Petroleum 1 ft to 32ft. Exxon 
dropped lft to 52ft, Atlantic Richfield lft to 63. 


12 Month 
KMi LflwStak 


Mv. rid. PE 


Sfak 

H&HMLmy 


Ckaa 

QimLCtfne 


10% 4% Bormns 14 

44% 33ft Bos Ed 144 8.1 » 

85 69 BosE of 808 100 

11% 9% BosEpr 1. 17 100 
14ft 11% BosEpr 106 100 
SA 19% Boautr .72 M 


100 55 13 


31% 25% BrloSl _ 

66% 47% BriStM 101 
4% 3% Brltt_nd 

35% 21% BrftPt 201e 60 


30% 2^BrtT2pp 01c 2.1 14 


362 10% 9% 18 + ft 

250 42% 41% 42ft + % 
660z •*% B?% 83% 

37 11% It 11 
11 14% 14 14 — % 

697 24 23% 24 

_ _ 742 28 27 27ft— ft 

20 17 3Z70 64% 64 64V. + % 

51 3% 3% 3% 

339 31% 31% 31% — % 


63 29% 28% 28% — £ 


603 * V % — 

6V 2B% 28% 28% 

112 42% 42% 42% + % 


77 36% 26 26% + % 

3% 33% + ft 


22 33% 

46 24% 24 


24 


203 34% 33% 34% + % 
+ % 


4 % Brock 

29% 17 Bndcwy 102 4J 14 

43% 34% BkyUG 3.12 70 9 

Mft 21% BkUGpf 207 90 

37ft 30% BkUGpf 305 110 

26% 16% BwnSh 00 0 16 

36ft 2S BrwnCP 104 40 18 _ 

60ft 33% BrwnF 10| 20 19 1030x59% 58 59% 

£> 25% Brnwyk 100 20 9 1617 43% 42% 47% — % 

S5S g r **!0 | W -S '-3 14 542* 34% 34 34% + ft 

19% 16% Bundy 00 4.1 65 28 19% 19ft 19% + ft 

?0 16ft iunkrH 116 110 U 19* 19% 19% — ft 

12 79 17ft ISft 17ft + ft 

72 1398 32 31ft 31ft + ft 
9 1348 70 69% 69% + % 

1 7% 7% 7%— ft 

1 23% 23ft 23% 

*3 49% 49ft 49ft 

351 12% 12 12ft + % 

2492 61ft 60% 61% +1% 

529 14% 13% 14_ — ft 
414 1 % % + ft 

35 1% 1% 1% 


20ft 14ft Burtnct 


24ft Burtlnd 104 50 
72% 45% BrlNttt 100 20 
7% 6% BrlNQpf 05 75 
24ft 20 BrlNpf 2.12 80 
52 47ft BrlNpf 5.10a 1*4 
IBM 9% Bunary 04 30 43 

S. ff |M *2 37 il 
ft Buttes 
lft Buies pf 105ft 


5ft 

12 % 


29 18ft CBI in 

12 9 CCXpf 

63% 39% CIGNA 


00 11 
300 2* 


34^ Mft CIGpf 


105 110 
200 40 27 
2J3 80 
110 70 


104 100 


49 CIGpf 
6ft 1% CtC 
65% 2Sft CNA Fn 
11% 9% CNAI 
28% 16% CNW 
51ft 38ft CPCInt 300 40 17 
27% 17% CP NH 1 JO 50 9 
22% 19% CRIIMI 206el1.1 


19% 14% CRSS 

iTiB SSpr 

40ft 27% CTS 
12% 7% C 3 Inc 
33ft 20% CalJW 
17% 8% Conor 
36% in* CO Fed 


04 20 12 


392 19% 19 19% 

4324 109% 107% 108% — 1% 
41 4% 4% 4%— % 

500z 10% 10% 10 % 
2502x61% 61 61% + % 

132X 33% 32% 33% + % 
116X53% 53% 53ft +% 
35 1% lft 1% + ft 

7*9 64% 64 64%— ft 

10 11% 11% lift— % 
304 19ft 19% 19% + ft 
838 52 51% 51% 

1*4 25% 25% 25ft— ft 
7V 20% »% 28% + % 
13 14% 14ft 14ft- % 


1.16 40-11 9S35_7m2gk 29ft +.% 


7J» 40 1 176 176 176 +6 

100 30 11 261 71 ana 30% — ft 
213 132 Mk lft 8ft 
.92 30 91 25% 25% 25ft — 

14 1299 l&ft 15% 16 — 

10 5 1035 26% 25% 26ft + 


_ ^ 

56ft 38% CcdFd Pf 433 80 52 56ft 55ft 56 + S 

21 13% Colftn 05b 14 13S 20 19% 19ft— % 

34% 19ft Cornwf 40 10 15 IH 12% 32 32%—% 

15% 12 Cgmmt .12 0 42 112 U 13% 13%— ft 

26 15ft CRLkB 00 787 22% 22% 22ft — % 

5% 2% CmcRo .16* 180 2% 2% 2% 

58% 3»5fe Oxnsp* 102 20 78 1422 54% 55 —ft 


00 


20 
3.1 18 


15% 11% CdPoci 
228% 152ft CopCIts 
27% 20% GasHdx 
12% f% Coring g ab 
40ft 27ft Carlisle 108 12 H 
2tn 18% CaroFT 08 10 12 
30% 24. CarP« 200 80 8 
26% 21% CarP pi 247 HU 

40 29% OxTec 110 60 15 

lift 6% Carrol .10 10 13 
26ft 17% CarPIr * 00 20 9 
31 22% COrtHw 102 40 10 

50% 24% Cortwi 00 10 14 
18ft 12% CaxNG 100 70 I 
16% 9% CasMCk 

27% 15% CsHCpI 150 94 

19% 12 CsttCpf 00 60 

41 28% CatrpT 00 10 

29 19% Coca 00 IV 11 

mft 75% Cekmse 4*0 30 12 

46 36% colon pf 450 SOM 

10% 7% Cenay 04a 0 JJ 
45% 35% Cental 208 S3 ft 

26% 20% Centex 05 10 ll 

27 20% CenSoW 202 74 I 

31ft 23 Con Nod 206 103 4 

21% 16% CnllPS 104 B0 11 

29% 21ft CnLaP 2-DH 7 A » 

37 32 CLoEl pt 4J8 110 

13% 9% CeMPw 100 100111 

21% 16% CVtPS 1.90 90 6 

11% 2% Control 

13 9 CntryTI 00 60 9 

23 15% Con y1I| 200 125 7 

28% 19% CrMeed JO 15 10 

30% 16% CassAlr 001 28 

25% 19% amain 52 11 

27% 22ft OimT pf 100 4J 

55% 47% ami Pi 440 u 

9% 7% CtaniSp 08 43 

4ft 1 viatrtc 

1% ft view art 

4% 1% viautpi 

68ft 43% Chase 300 5J 

50% 40% Chase pi 505 107 

56% 51ft Chase Pf &09eiO* 
56% 51% Chase pf *03017.1 
24% 17% Cholsoo J2 30 

32ft 24% Chefned 102 5.1 

44V, 32% ChmNY 248 50 

44ft 32% CUNY pi 1*7 40 

56% 51% ChMY Pf 5090110 


514 Irik 12% 12% + ' 


253 215% 214 215% +lS2 


8?7 26% 25% 26% + % 
« m 8% 87b 
119 33% H 33% + % 
188 29% 21ft 28% + % 
2868 29ft TKSk 29% 

8 26% 36% 26% + ft 
12S 32% 32ft 32% + ft 
119 8 7% 8 + ft 

151 24% 24 24 — ft 

132 » 28% 29 + % 

89 48% 48 48% 

53 15% 15ft 15% + ft 
1631 im 12% 12% + ft 
113 27 26% 26%— ft 

82 14% 14% 14%—% 
2858 40% -Sift 40ft + ft 
B 2B 28 28 + ft 

288 142ft 139ft 141% «ft 
7 45ft 45 45 — U 

343 8ft 70k 8 —ft 
122 45ft 44% 44% 

275 25. M% 24% — ft 
2389 26% 26ft 26% + % 
242 29ft 28% 28ft + ft 
392 20 19% 20 + ft 

77 28 27% 28 + % 

4 35 34ft 35 
215 13% U% 13% — ft 
165 21ft 20 21% +1 

1146 4% 4% 4% — ft 

60 12ft T2% IM- ft 


346 U% 16 16 — % 
130 27% 27% 27% 


12 30% 30ft 30ft— ft 
2837 2flk 34% 24% + % 
18 25% 25ft 25% + % 
. 25 55% Sift 55ft— % 

15 1360 8% Bft 8M + ft 

409 2ft 2 2l u 

517 % ft 111 + Hi 

77 3 2% 2ft 

6 6081 ®% 44% 66% — ft 

23x49 ft 48% 49ft + ft 
689x 54% 53 54ft +1% 
69 52ft 51 % 51% — % 
10 24 24 23% 24 + % 

13 ID 30 . »% 30 + ft 

6 3180x44% 43 44 + % 

8 44 42% 44 +% 

771X54% 53% 53% + % 
58x51% Sift 91ft— 1U 

39ft 32 Chespk 104 30 14 25 38 37% 38 

44% 31 ChesPfl 200 43 13 1257 41% 4J 41ft— ft 

40% 29ft Chevm 200 6* 910036 37 36 3fift— 1% 

- -- y, 12 140% 140 140% + ft 


55% 49% OlNYpf 5019143 


700 124 dllMIW 
80ft S4 CWMI Pf 
29% 16% ChlPnT 0Oe 
11% 7ft ChkFull 34t 
58% 33 QnlsCr 
13ft Bft Chrfstn 
17% 9% ammo 
79 44ft gsrm pflOjOOk.. 
45ft 28% Chrysir 100 20 


3 65U 65 65ft + % 

n 22 21% 21ft— ft 

182 8% 8% Bft— ft 

64 5» 51% 51 ft— % 
S 9U 9% 9U + ft 
92 15% 15% 15% 

4 73U 7JU 73ft— 1 

3 5B2DXD . 42ft 4M + % 


57% 30ft Chubb* 106 20 14 330 56ft 55* 56% 

70% 50% QUASI pf 405 60 . 14 7«i TBft 70ft + ft 

20% 13% Church ■ 04 20 16 7832 18% 17% 18% + % 



lift 5ft CTtvrgn 
- 27ft 21U aicorp 
53ft 48% CbtBeft 
19% 13% OnGE 
35 27ft ClnGnf 
39ft 31ft GnGpf 

80% 68 ClnGpf 
64 48ft ClnGpf 
26% 15ft gnMIl 
24% 19ft ardKS 
31 18% ClrClty 

30% 15% Circus 

51% 35ft Cl Item .. 

,84ft ID Cllhppf *079 8J 

100% 82% CHaiplAUO* 8J 
Bft 6ft dahlr .72 9* 5 
19% 7ft aalrs& .10 10 22 
32% 23% CtartiE 1.10 4£ , 

14% Bft ciayHs 13 

22ft 16% ClvCIf 100 50 10 
21% 19% ClvCIPt 300 90 
34ft 18ft C lev El 264 100 7 
65ft 54ft CtvElpf 706 110 
Mft 6% Oevpk J0j 
17% 8% Clunk pf 1.11 
18ft 7% Ovnkpl ,«l 
50ft 27ft Oarax 106 20 15 
36% 14% ClubMd 2De 3 
40% 27 CluaHP 100 
25ft 16% CUWfpf 100 
71ft 9% Caachm 00 
36% 18ft Ceasiii 00 
60 29% Call pf 103 

85 59ft CocoCI 206 
2ift iSft Coleeo 
32% 2Sft Cotemn 100 *2 19 
33% a% COftPdl 106 40 47 2756 30ft 
50 40% CMP pf 405 8J l40x 50 

29% 17ft ColAlks 00 2J 10 W 30ft 
16% 9 CoUHB .12 0 15 1» 15. 

34ft 25% Col Pen 100 4.1 11 
65% 50 Col find 200 30 9 
40 26% Col Gas 3.11 8J 

17% 14% CaknttSv 2 

28Vh 25 CSOpf 305 
112 103 CSQp(e1S05 13J 
114 102ft CSQntn150S 13* 

52ft 35% Camun 2,14 40 I 
37ft 23% CmbEn 100 W 
24ft 9% Gomdls 00 0 11 


131 7% 7 7 

242 25% 24% 25% + % 
29 SIM 50ft 51 + ft 

446 19% 19ft 19% + ft 
100x 33 33 33 —1 

120z 39ft 39ft 39ft 
2602 80 79ft 79ft— ft 
MK 63ft 61 62ft + ft 
293 17ft 16% 17% + % 
266 20% Sift 20% + ft 
289 25% 24% 24% — ft 

66 26ft 26% 26% + % 
*042 47% 46% 47% + % 
100 78% 781b 78% — % 
1 97ft 97ft 97ft . 
T7S 7ft 7ft 7% + ft 

957 10ft 10 18ft- ft 

578 25ft 36% 24%— ft 
U Uft 14% 14% + ft 
184 17% 2 IZ ft“* 
BS 20ft 20 20% 

205 24ft 23% 34ft +ft 
330x64 63 *4 

SO 7% 7% 7%— ft 

IS 9% 9ft 9%-ft 

IK Bft- 8 Bft— ft 

667 49% 40% 49% + ft 
36 21% 21ft 21% + ft 


2* 31 “SSS SS S8-u 

30 14 3g !!» II. — » 


1.1 12 435 36ft 

3.1 1 60 

30 17 3706 85 

1 228 IS 
57 28% 


35ft 35ft— ft 
«0 40 +1 


84% +lft 
17% + % 

SS+JS 

r »=?* 

M% 14ft 

174x6*2 ^ +1% 

1065 36% 36 36%— ft 

1481 16% 15% 16ft— % 
7 27% 27% 27% 
mod 11 -111 111 
30Dd12 111ft 112 +2 
869 51ft 50ft 50ft— % 
1309 29 - Wfc 2H% , . 
451 24ft 23% 24ft + % 


12 Mona 
HlohUw Stack 


Mv.YM.PE 


3ft 

MO* Moh taw 


OuaLOilpe 


06 


21ft 15ft CamMfl 
21% Bft Camdre 
33% 26 CmviE 300 10.1 
SSH 14% CwEof UO Id* 
18ft 15ft CwEpI 200 100 
HP 99% C«E Pf 12J5 120 
77ft 62ft CwrEpf 808 187 
2Sft 20% CwE pf 207 90 
27 23ft CwE pf 207 100 
76ft 60 CWE pf 800 Id* 
66% 53 CwE Pf 704 107 
30ft 22ft OwtiES 252 V . 
38% 25ft Comsat 100 33 10 
35% 23% CPave 08 10 19 
35% 23ft Crnnoor 00 20 9 
29% 13 CompSc 13 

44ft 9ft Cptvsn 
41% 2Sft CnnAgr 100 20 15 

20 14 CftmE 100 BJ 12 

33ft 24 CnnNG 2*8 80 10 

ISft 12ft Cdnrne 00 2* is 

38 28% CansEd 240 *5 I 

141 188 ConEpf 600 25 

30 41% C«nE pf 500 100 

40% 26ft CnsFrt 1.10 20 13 

38% CnsNG 202 5.1 9 

4ft CemPw 


1J 15 SS 21% 20% 21ft + % 
8 1904 10% 10% 10%— ft 
7 7*86 29% 29ft 29% + % 
17 17% 77% 77% + % 
16 18ft 18ft lift 
450X106 106 106 

2S7Wz 78ft 77ft 78ft +T 
02 25ft 29ft 25ft + 
iU 27 26% 27 + 

339701 78% » 78 40 

60z cm 67ft 67ft +1 
7 42 29ft 2BA 2» + .. 

569 32% 31% 32% + ft 
818 27% 

16 27% 

221 29 
958 13ft 
344 41% 

17 18% 

22x31% 

ID 
2849 




32ft 20ft CnP pfA 4.14 13* 
35 % 21 % CnP ~ 


»PpfB 450 129 

57ft 36 CAP PfD 705 13* 
59 35ft ChPpfE 772 140 
31ft II CAPptV 400 150 
26ft 15% Cnppru 3*8 14* 
28% 16% CnPprT 378 UV 
Mft 35ft CnPpfH 7*8 U2 
28% 16% CnPprR 400 W 
28ft 17ft CftPprP 378 150 
28ft 17ft CnPprN 3*5 150 
lift 11% CnPprM250 Ui 
17 10% CAP pru 203 13* 

29 16% CnP prt 4JE 147 




Uft lift OiPprK 203 U.1 
CANOS 2*0 


48ft 33% 

18ft 4% Cdntl 11 
4ft Cantu rt 
57ft 3JV5 CnHO pf 10% 20 
2 % CtllHId 

14% 4% Cnflnfd 
24% 21ft ContTel 100 7* 
38% 15ft a Data 7W 
40M> 32 CADI pf A50 125 

■» -&&r 


33 39 


smr^- „ 

480Y55U 54 
ipS9y 57U 54ft . 

52X 29% 29ft 29ft— % 
52x 24% 23% 24ft + % 
28X25U 25% 25%—% 
100V 54 54 54 — ft 

29X27% 27ft 27ft + % 
14x26ft 26 26ft 
40x 26 25ft 25% — ft 
14X 17ft 17ft 17ft— ft 
34X16% 15ft 14ft— ft 
34x27 26ft 27 + % 
17X17% 16% 17ft 
788 45% 44% 45ft— ft 
192 8% 8% 8%— ft 

534 2ft 2ft 2% 

3 ^ ^ Tt-l 

2*9 13% 13% 13ft— ft 
531 24 23% 23% + ft 

2232 19ft 18% 18%—% 


42% 27% < 




152 


102 30 16 2926 39ft 39ft 39% + ft 


07ft + ft 


433 37ft 37 
ID 19% 19 19ft— ft 

990x2flh 25% 26% — ft 
77 » ttt 9ft— ft 
2 23? 17ft 17ft + ft 
98 23ft 23ft 23% . 
123 12% 12ft 12% + % 


47% 31% Coapfpf £98 70 

30% 14% CoprTr 00 2.1 18 

28% 15 Coapvts 08, US 17 

15% 8% CapwM 321. . 

23% 17 , QswMPf 208 140 
27% 17% Corttum 02 30 15 

15ft 11 Coreln *6 40 12 _ 

62% 32ft CamGs 10) 20 » 1002 60ft 59% 59% + ft 
58% 27% CorflJK UB U 7B 30 58tt 57ft 51+ % 

Mft 6ft CntCrt 04r 2J 14 78 9 ■% 8% 

n 6ft Craft 13 33 9ft- 9ft 9ft— ft 

39ft 32 Crane 1*0*44 11 1*4 38ft 31ft 38ft + ft 

61ft 23 CrayR 8 33 1506 67ft Mft 66% + % 

19% 17ft Cn*Npf2.1B 110 6 I9ft T9ft I9ft + ft 

53% 49ft CrckN ptaore 70 827 53 52% 52% 

24% 18% CrmpK 108 4* n 39 34% 24% 24% + ft 

•3ft 44 CrwnCk 14 2D 85% 82% 84ft -M 

44% 28ft CrwZlf 1*0 2* 491 40 39% 29% + ft 

53 44 CTZelpf 4*2 85 <2 51% 51% 51 %— ft 

65% 30% CrZel pfC45D 73 10 SPA 58 58% + ft 

23% 18% CmBn 297 20% 20 20ft— % 

37% 22% embro JO 24 17 21 36* 36% 36% + ft 

33% 13, CuHnetS _ .. 25 3715 17ft Mft 17 + % 

88ft 5B% CamEn 200 3.1 9 UI 70% 70ft 70ft— % 
11 9% Corrlnc l.MolQ* 12 18% 10% 10%— ft 

40 30% CartW UB 3* 28 28 39% 39% 39ft + ft 

53% 33ft CVdOM l.M 2.1 8 69x52% 52 52% — ft 


23ft Uft Dal lot _ 06 
17% 9% DamanC 


38 38 134 17% 16% I6»— % 

a 210 17 Uft 14% + , ft 

9 ISM 20 27% 28 + ft 

. Dqnmr .. 7 137 7 6% 7 

6% Daniel Jib 20 294 7% 7% 7% . . 

27% DartKra 1*6 18 13 203 AM 40 48% + % 


30% S2£ DoaoCp 101 


DatoGn 


U 

42 

04 

28% IS DaytPL £80 ll 
Mft ® DPt.pt 7 M 1 

69 55% DPUPl 730 1’ 

46 52% DPl_pf 707 1J.1 

40% 24% DmilFd .06 
sift 24ft Deere 7 00 
26% 20ft DWnP 102 70 
52% 36ft DaHaAT 100 20 
10 4ft DeHam 

44% 25% DftChS 106 20 
28ft 28% DensMf 100 5* 
37% 31ft Desoto 100 30 
17% 14 DetEd 108 180 
80 64 D«tEp« 902 110 

70 54ft DetE pf 7*8 110 
68 51ft DetE Pi 70S H4 
67% 52 DetE PI 706 II J 
2&ft 23% DE PtF 175 18* 
28% 23 DEprR 334 IT* 
27% 21% DEpSS XU 1 


27% 22ft DE pfP 3-12 1 


26ft 22ft DE PfB 233 10* 


29ft » DE pfO 300 

29% 24ft DE pfM 302 120 
33ft 28 DEprL *40 117 
34% 29 DEplK 4.12 120 
117 107 DEp*J 15*8 135 

109% 96 DEpfi 12*0 11* 
100ft 77% DetE pf 9J2 90 
20% 16% DetEPT 208 110 
24% iflft Dexter JO “ 


ISft 13% Bteter 
29 23 DIGk) pf 


2530 48 47ft 47% + ft 
904 5ft 5 5 —ft 

9 336 7ft 7 7 — ft 

9 1*5 17% 17W 17% + ft 

18 3468 46 45ft 45% 

I 378 19% 19% 19% 

MX 47 67 67 + Hr 

. 190X 69ft 69ft 69ft + ft 
10x66ft. 66ft 66ft +lft 

10 U 97 39% 39% 89% 

11 58 2008 26ft 2«h 26U— ft 

11 340 26 25% 26 + ft 

7 5959 « 39% 39% + % 

147 7ft 7ft 7ft + ft 
W W 43ft Aft 43ft + % 
M KM 2416 » 24 —ft 

12 48 35% 35ft 35%+ ft 

7 1551 15ft 15ft 15% + ft 

92Mz 80 78 78 

30x68 .68 68 — % 

100Z 65ft 65ft 65ft — ft 
380X64 64 64 —1 

5 26ft 26 26 

53 27ft Z7% 27*— ft 

4 27 26ft 26ft 

6 26ft Uft Uft 

5 26 26 26 — ft 

3 27* 27% 27% 

59 28ft 27% 27% 

12 31ft 31ft 31ft + ft 

39 32% 32ft 32ft— ft 

1 116% 116ft 116ft + % 
25 10S% 108% 106% +5. 
SOOOx 98% 98% 98% 

4 20 , 19% 2D + % 
WxWfc 24ft 24% + ft 


V4 


15103 


Of 125 7. 

‘ IJTrlO, 

A03 1U. 
n 1008 70 
_js JO 2J 
Jds 1JB0 20 16 
HOI “ 

100 
100 


«* 9 

S ll 
16 

100 U 14 
U 14 


1.16 


33ft 25ft Dl 
21 14% Dl 

38% 34% 

22ft 18% , 

11 7ft Dl 
57ft 81% D 
127ft 85ft Dl 
W2% 57 

28ft 18, DEIS 

6ft 4ft Durum 
10ft 6% Donee .12 
34Vk 26% DomRS 2*4 
Uft 16ft Donald *6 
63% 44% Dadmr 

30ft 23ft Dorsey 

42ft 32ft Davor 
40% 27 Dewai 
50 36ft DawJn 
45ft 8ft Dewnev 
15ft 11 Drava 
Uft 17% Drear 
2ift 17ft DrsxB 
86% X Dreyfus 
65ft 46ft duPonf 
40 31ft duPntpf . 

50 40 duPntpf 4J0 

36 21ft OufcoP 2*0 
148ft 121 Dvfcepf 6J5 
81 65 Dukapf 800 1X1 

77ft -61ft Duke of 7 JO T‘ 
27 20ft Duke pf 2*9 1' 
35% 30% Dukapf X8S 11 
96% 85 DufepfN 8*4 9.1 
87ft 70 DvkpfM 8*4 103 
80% 66 Dukapf 828 100 
83ft 60 DunBrd 200 23 
17ft Mft DuqU 2*6 126 
17ft 13% Duqpt 2*0 11* 
171% Mft Duqpt 2*5 110 
18 ISft Dpq pfG X10 11 3 
IS 15 DuqprKlIO 11 J 
20% 15% Diner 201 121 
28ft 21 DynAm 00 3 


854 18ft 17% 18ft + ft 
680X 38 30 30 +lft 

84 32ft 31ft 32ft + ft 
3168 15ft 15 15 — ft 

15 35% 35% 35% — ft 
728 19 17ft 17%— 1* 
6 lift 11 lift + % 
549 42% 40ft 42ft +m 


II u 


2S_OT_ra% 1MI27M +m 


3 


1426X103% 101% 103% 

100 21% 21% 21ft— M 
112 5% 5ft 5ft 
1969 9% 9M 9ft — % 
949 33ft 32% 33ft + ft 
154 26ft 25% 24 + ft 
475 61ft 60ft 60% + % 
7B 37% 37% 37% 

263 38ft 38ft 31ft 
1JB *4 14 4385 39% 39% 39% + % 

J8 10 22 440 44% 44ft 44ft + % 

008 111 4 79 Aft Aft 41ft— ft 

JO 33 265 15ft 15 15% + ft 

JO O 16 1B5S 18% 18% Iflft 

2J0 9* 38 20% 20ft 28ft'+ 

*00 J 19 444 16% 83ft M% -K 

3*0 4* 17 4S27 gft 44ft 65ft +1 ft 
300 90 2 38ft 38ft 38ft + ft 

4J0 90 131 48 47ft 47% — % 

70 10 3357 .36ft 35ft Uft + ft , 
« aw i» i» +i5ft! 
1233Hz Aft n ->81 +1 1 
IMz 76ft 76ft 76ft— ft ' 
96 26% m 26ft 
IS M, 34% 34% + ft 
9ta97ft 97ft 97ft + ft 
5nx86 86 86 — ft 

1430x81 , 79ft 81 +lft 
970 83% 81ft 82ft + ft 
533 TM Mft 16% + ' 


ISAMU 
Hlnti Low stock 


OlY.YM.Pg MiHMbsw awLO^a 


25 16% EosWtl 2*680 936225 24% 25 + ft 

50% 41% EaModS Z20a4J 16W621 51 . 50 58% +1 
62 49% Eaton 100 20 92U7 63%40%«3ft-H% 

15% lift Eddies M 11 13 1002 lift 14 14 -ft 

32% 20 Edwrd U4 30 14 ■!»» 3B% 30% + ft 

03 V. Uft EdlsBr 1*0 4J 15 121 33ft 32ft 02U— ft 

18% 14 EDO 08 TJ IS 

12 I EdCmP .16 10 17 
34ft 22% Edward -F 25 IS 
21% EPGftif 205 90 
19ft 9 ElTora MSa 5 U 

41 “ » 

S A fs 

SMdnt 




32% 2115 
23% 11% 

29% 19% 

106% 96% 

21% 17% 

2% I« 

13% 9ft 
19 12ft 
21% 17% 

38% 21ft 
6U 2% 

22ft 14ft 
32 2Sft 
50ft 33% 

17 • 7% _ , 

15% 10% Ertrant 


383 Uft 16 . 16ft— ft 
UO 11% 11% 11% — ft 
869 32% 31% 31% + ft 
39 25* 25% '25% 

190 11% lift 5l% 

78 11% 1T% 11% + ft 
80 J 4% 4% 

345 22 21% 21%— ft 

S Uft 13 U -— ft 

119 3ft 3ft 3ft— ft 

2J6 2* 14 2720 76ft 75% 76ft + % 

B JUtia* 10 970 9 8% 8%— ft 

*0 3*14 1014 16% 16ft 16% + ft 

100 45 W 341 31 30ft 30% + % 

1*8 8* 9 51 2Jft 23% 23% 

07 100 48% 4% 4% 4% 

1*4 70 18 163 14ft Mft l»— % 
21771 K • n 

Engl CP J2XT13 7U 23% 22ft 23% + % 
EntaBUS 06 V* 16 92 23ft 22% 22%—% 

1*0b 70130 1268 22ft 22 72ft— ft 


xae un 


Ettsdt PflO03a1Xl 
insExn 1JQ8 9J 8 
rurtx 22 

ntena 

ntexE 2508180 
ntexln 106 70 12 

cnrfXs 104 30 22 

auiink 

amkpf 201 1U 
■amkpr 

OtRes 1J2 A0 10 

Hoc .16 1J 3 

.... 09 08 IS 

24% 14% EssBuS 04 1 J 15 

24% 15 EsexCl JB 1* 14 

28 15 Estrine J2 19 23 

29 15ft EttfylS 00 XI 17 2155 

46% 33ft ExCefcj 1J3 X7 12 1A 461 

17ft 15 Excetar 1*68105 22x17 


310 HDftllQ TOM + ft 

m T8% 18% iM- % 
371 0% 2% 2ft 
IB 12ft 12 lift— % 
286 13ft 13ft 13% 

18% 18% + % 

37% 37% + ft 
4ft 4ft 
9 20ft 20ft ll'-H— % 
1 32 32 32 

397 43 42% 42%— % 

2S4X Bft 7% 8ft — ft 
341 Uft 15ft 15ft + ft 
173 24ft 2416 24ft 
229 29 19% 19ft + ft 

84 lift 18 18ft + ft 
28 2Sft +1% 
46 46 —ft 

16% 17 


55% 42ft Exxon 3*9 SJ 914264 53ft 91% 52ft -IM 


V. 


72 a FMC 200 
86ft 65ft PMC Pf 205 
20 20ft FPL Go 1*6 . 

Uft 9ft FabCtr 08 2J IS 

13% 9% Foart 29 

20% 8% Fairchd 00 L9 

39% 23ft Falrcpf 3*0 11 J 
Mft 11 Fnlrtd .18 10 10 
27 15ft FamDlS JO 1* 21 
17% 13ft FansM 40 IMS 
47% 23 FrWstF 7 

23% 16% Fardl *S 09 11 
13 8 Favors 00 2J 27 

6ft 4M Feders *68 10 8 

50ft 32% RKflCn 2*1 4* 12 
58% 31% Fed Exp U 

48ft 31% FdHm pf 1048 61 
39 ' 30% FdMoO 1*0 40 11 
25ft 14 FedNM .1* * 

23ft 16% FedIPB JB 30 18 
30ft 25% FPOPPf 201 80 
16% 13 FedRIf S 1*4 60 15 

20 14% FdSeal a 40 15 . .. 

<B% 49% FetfDSt X54 3* 10 U76 69% 63 69% +1% 

37 23% Ferro 1J0 3JT7 158 33ft 3214 32% + ft 

35U 25% FUcat 1*0 1* 11 124 33ft 33ft 33% 

lift 5ft FTnCpA *51 10297 9ft 8% MU + % 

» 29 FbiCPPf 6*8e15J 72 38% 3ift 38% + % 

Bft 2ft FnSBar 10 1C « TM 8 + ft 

32ft 25% FlrwFtln 3D 3 2682 32ft 02 32 — ft 

22% 16ft Ffrasffl JO 15 IS 19® 2DH 20ft 2H6+ ft 


273X70% 69% 70% +1 
21 x 86 ft Mft 86 ft +% 
2109 25ft 23ft 25% + ft 
48 10% HIM 1DM 
57 lift 11% 11% + M 
310 10ft 10ft IBM + ft 
42 30ft 3016 30% + % 
403 13% 12% 13 
710x21ft 20% 20% + ft 
37 UM 15ft ISM 
21 47% 47% 47% - 

79 22% 2Zft 22M + ft 
755 8% 8% 8%— M 
244 SM 4M 5 
140 52% 50 52% 42U 

A 52 56% 53% 53% —1% 
258 35% 35ft 35ft 
15 37ft 37 37% 

4181 25% H . 2SM +1M 
OTIVft 18% 19 + % 

796 28 27% 28 .+ ft 

77 16% 16% 16% 
276x20 W% SO + ft 


43 25% FtBJcSV 1*0 4* 7 

38% 22 FBkFlS 1*0 2* 16 
47% 25% FBosts 1*0 2J 11 
36% 19% FsJOdC 102 50 9 
17% 10% FtBTex *0 AI M 
48 35 FIBTxpf502elA7 

19% 6ft FK3ty 6 

29ft 13% FFedAz. 08b 2* 8 
63 44 FFB 2.12 61 9 

55% 40% FlOtet* 75a *3 3 
34ft 25% Flnwtpf 207 70 
11% 6ft FINMS 04 30 U 
31% 16 FfNahin 8 

7ft 5% FstPa 
30% 23% FStPapf 2*2 9* 
3I« 25ft FlUnRI 2*4 7* U 
28% 18% FTVaBk *2 30 11 

36 34% Ftwachn „• 

41% 21% FlWtec 100, 30 10 

A 23% Fbdlb J5T 

13% 8% FWiFd 
a 28% FttFnG 
28% 17% FlealEn 
40ft 32 Fjem f» 

13% lift Fwclpf 
29% 20, FiMSfS 
37ft 15ft FlootPt 
45% 32ft FlaEC 
30% 22ft FtaPm 
19ft 11% FlaSH 
8 3% FlwGen 

22% Mft Flower 
20% 13ft Fluor 
59 - Alik FoaNC 
56% 40M FordM 
13% 11% FtOear 
50% 38% FI Haw* 


+ % 


40ft-39% 40 
38% 38% 38% , 
44% 43% 44ft + % 
24ft 25% + M 
12% 12%—% 

26 36 

61% 61% + ft 


51% 53 +1M 


31% n 





471 Uft *4 
716 17 16% 


2IM ® 

7% + % 

47ft 47ft— % 
54ft 55% +1 
13% 13ft 
44% 46 +1% 

11% lt«— ft 
13% 13ft + % 
24ft 25% +1 

?*%— ft 


15% 10% FastWh 04 3J 12 
14% 7% FoxPIWt *8, 40 14 
30% 22% Foxhro JM 
27 22 F ixinw 15 

22ft 17 FMEP n 1.108 6* 

13% 9% FMGCn 130 . 

vm 7% FMOG 1J3C2SJ 4 .59 7% 7ft 

ZZ% M FrptMc 00b 3.1 11 1498 2D TV , 19%— 1. 

31% 22 Frtatm *0 2*39 195 30% 30ft Bn •+ M 

28% 20ft FrueM -JO 19 6 316 24% 23ft + ft 

32% 26% FnAfpf 2*0 7* f 29 28% 2B%— ft 

36ft 28% Fuacn 00 10 70 132x34%. Mft 34% + ft 




48% 24ft OAF 00 3 17 

37% Z7% GAT X 100 A* 

47ft 36% GATXpfUO. 63 
32% 4ft GCA 

83ft 54M GEICO 1*0 10 II 
6% 3 GEO 
8 3UGFGP - 
44% 38M GTE X16 70 9 4150 


8208 58 54% 57ft +10 

155 30ft 30% 30%— ft 
7 *re ® 40 

1246 6ft 6ft 6ft 
144 83% 8Z% 83ft + ft 
136 3% 3ft 3ft 
87 6% 6 6ft + J6 


64 43ft 43% 


25 21% GTE pf 208 100 17 ■ 26% 23% 24ft + ft 

7ft 3 Gal HMI . 6* m Mk 3ft — ft 

66% 44ft Gannett l*a 29 19 5289x57% 56% 57% + % 
62% 20% Gaplnc J2 10 27 138 Aft. 40% Aft + ft 

13% 7% Gearht 0H 25 9«7% 7%7ft + % 

22% 14% Gefaa *6 30 17 85 77% 17% 17ft— ft 

Uft 9ft Genii 1C 496 lift 11 lift + M 

12ft 10 Gem 1 1 1 00a 50 184 lift 11% TT%— M 

65 32 GnCarp 1*0b 15 35 2142 60ft 56% (Oft +1% 

19 14% GAInv 1*M* 2 42 19 , 1» + “ 

64% 33% GnBcSh 1*0 1* U 22 64% 64% Mft + lb 

41ft 22ft Gdnm JO 10 u «1 40ft 40ft Aft- ft 

40ft 22 GOnpf *6 10 „ 6 39% »ft 29ft —% 

20% 7% GnDofO 18 407 1J 12% 12% + M 

14% NkGnDevn 5 JU 14% n% IA 

4% 2ft GnOevwt 72 4% 4ft Afc 

84 62 GnCMl 1*0 15 7 17U 67% 66ft 67% +1, 

66% 31 Gen El SUB 35 13 (8M 66% 6S% 66% +1% 

9% 4% GnHme U JJ 6% -Mfc 5%— % 

21% lift Gdasta 00 10 21 289 21 28% 2T + % 

12% 8% GnHool 04 23 38 10ft IMS Ilg-. • • 

22ft 17ft Gfllnst _05 U T2H Wft lift 16ft + M 


CMonrn 
HULow SKtk 



& 


fi’i 


^ \\ 


Dlv. YKL PE 


am- era 


08 2.1 
00 M . 
08a 20 12 
A0 10 |6 


M 


25 10 HlttlAm 22 

23% 19 HHCrPn 038 30 
22ft ■% MttUSA 
15ft 10ft Hecks 
18% I3M HecfoM 
33% 15 Hetlmn 
33% 16% Heats 
Mft 20% Hatnzs 
25ft 13ft HrineC 
Mft 18% HeknP 
40% 31% Hercwts 100, 

20ft 12 HarifCB *41 
21 14 Henmn _ 

55 39 Hershy 1A 

10% 5ft Hasston 
13% 9 Heshipf 

38% 28% HewIPtc 
33% 24 Hexoal 
23% ISft HiSheor 
13% 9ft HIVWt 
Uft .19% HllnSrd 
73% 54% Hilton 
36ft 26% Hitachi 
5BK 39 Holiday 1*0 
94ft 65% HoOvS 1*0 


02 

*0 

JO 

.17 

*4 

1*0 


353 12% 12% 12ft— % 

jb^wS-* 

72M 75^ M* 1 M-% 

.. M Z ffi S% £ 

16 2048 33 31ft 32ft — % 

32 a 26ft 23ft 24ft— ft 

19 26 397 19% 19M WJ- % 

AI M TUI 3» 

I 

7ft 7 7 — % 

43 

184 12 lift lift 

64 U 25% 25% + ft 

348x66% 45ft MM +1 

S3 

60x 95 93 *4 +1ft 

uft uft lift 


?7 
28 15 



SS i&KS?& * ^3g^2^ + ft 

g£ S5SJ ^ S S 14 ” as - " + 

6% 3ft Hoc Iron 
52ft 28% HCA JO 1* J 
21% 17% Hollins 2J10 10* 15 


31% HourtdVl 1*4 27 13 
13% HouFob 08 12 14 
28ft HPUPlnt LA 40 11 


19% 

42ft __ . 

92ft 72ft HoIntPf 207 2* 

84 68% Holnf pf 60S 7* 

29% 21% Houlnd 2*4 9* 6 

I3M 7% HouOR l^ezi* 
19ft 14% HawiCP 00 17 22 

27% 23% Hubbrd 2U 

13% - 9ft Huffy 00 

15% n HuuhTI A6 

24% 17% HuahSP 02 

36% 71% Human J6 

36 21% Hunt AM JB 


4t% 26ft HuttEF 
32% 22% 


HVdral 100 


27 37% 37ft 37ft— % 
124 6% 5% 6% + ft 

6574 34% M 34% 

26 20 19ft 20 + ft 

92 39% 39 39 — ft 

488 15% MM 15 

1390 42% Aft AM- % 

I 92% 92% W% + ft 

7 83% 83% 83% 

2432 37% 27ft 27% 

49 8% 8% Bft + Vi 
22 15ft IS 15 — 1% 

35 25% 25% 25% + % 

364 12% lift lift— M 

1 146 12% 1 2ft 13% + ft 

._ 27 24 23ft 24 + ft 

26 13 3012 2Hft Uft Mil + ft 

10 21 54 36 35ft 35% + % 

JJ 12 1313 Mft 35ft SS- % 

60 11 9 32% 31% 32% 


4% 2 Lonwflwt 

20% 19% L*masMnJ»8l5 
33% 2U< LnSlar 1.80 5.9 

Mft 45% LaneS Pi 507 8.9 

9ft 5% L1LCO 
29 21% LILpIE 

A 30% LILofJ 
23ft 16% LILPfX 
22ft 1 6ft ULPfW 
23% 16% LILPJV 
77V. 19% LILOfU 
21ft 15ft LIL PfT 
16% Uft LIL PfP 
19ft 12ft LIL PfO 

31% 21ft LongDi 
39 23% Carpi 

12% 10ft LsGenl 
38 28% La Land 

lSplpJ 30« 12* 
25ft 17% LQPL.pl 2071 10* 
JZli 25% LouvG* 252 80 9 

31% 20% Lowes ,06 1* 15 

25% 19% Luhrll 1.14 

41% 26% LuOVS 00 

26 16% LucfcvS 

14 11% Luke ns 


1.16 

03 


225 7% 3ft 3% + % 

27 30% SB » • 

493 jri r k - 

is « im w>i + » 

1573 7» 7% r.1- 

TflOz 2S 25 25 +, > * 

*S0z 46 45% 4« —1 

50 21ft 21% lift + % 
19 21% 20% 31Kb— % 
38 31% 23*4 21% + ft 
29 2*M WM »V>- * 

46 30 19ft 20 + » 

2D 14% 14% 14ft 

482 30% 29% »% + 5 

32ft 33 —lft 
„ 23ft 22% + % 
25 30% 29% 30% + 'A 
87 23ft 23% 23ft + % 
574 » 29% 29% + % 

826 23ft 23 23ft + ft 
4.9 1« 1998 26 23% 23% + ft 

1* £ W4 40ft 3^ 40% + 1 

A6 « 956 3Sft 25ft 35ft— -I 

30 16 40 15 14% 14% * 


20 M 
10 19 

4* IS 


03 
*2 

1*0 10 10 2426 34 
*00 15 39 349 23 


M 


9* 11 
30 a 
1* 

10 13 


39M 

19% 


ICInd 

ICMn 

ICH 

ICNpf 

IMAIn 


104 


1* 1< 1271x39% 38ft 39% +1% 
*se 6* 61 14% 14% 14% 

12 829 12% 12 Uft + % 

U 24 iCN of 200 90 31 29% 27 29% + % 

18% 15% IMAIn 1*2 10.9 M 17% TB[ 1W)— % 

27% 21% IPThnn 142 b LA 33B 22ft Uft 

5S 8 ii H6j7 J££ 

8M SBM ITT Pffc 4*0 4J 


15 A ITT pfO 5*0 70 

68 52 ITT pfl 4J0 60 

19M 11 lUim M 43 

34% im 1 dahoP s 102 &fl 9 

IM 1M ideolB 
87% 21ft IllPowr 2*4 11* 7 
20 .15% llPowpf 2*4 100 

tm 14M IfPOWPf 2.10 HU 

20% 15ft llPowpf 2.13 110 

22 17% llPowpf 205 110 

38% 31% llPowpf 4.12 10* 

36% 28% llPowpf 308 11* 

55 50% llPowpf 307e 40 

55% 48ft IIPOW pf 505 100 
46% 37 llPowpf 3J3e 80 
54% 47ft llPowpf 5*3 108 
37% 30% llPowpf 4*0 W 
.36% 27% ITW 02 22 14 
43. 32% ImpChm 208e 50 6 
12 - 7% UnpiCA „ 98 

15% 10% INCO 08 10 

a% 50% IndIMpf 7*8 110 

20% 15% IndIMpf 2.15 11.1 

38% 16 IndIMpf 205 110 

AM 26% IndIMpf 3*3 120 

20% 22 laflGSS 2*4 70 8 

7% 4% inexca *7| 
sot 41% InoerR 2*0 4* 16 

37% 30% InuRpf 20S 60 

19M 11 fnerTec *4 2* 31 

ZtiZZE&oo&n* 

^%SSS um49n 

U% Uft intoRsc 13 

28 19% IpfdRpf 3*3 11* 

49M 42 bltORpf 6*7eU7 
36% UM lidgRpf A0S 71* 

a ^ifflujou* • 

IA* * IntRFn 
19ft in* ItcpSe XTQ018* 
73% 58ft litMTCO in UB 
Ha 127 Infarpf 70S 50 
Uft 9-. Intrtst * 00 59 11 
53M AM IntTfl;, 200 5* 18 
UM 8M I ntmed 
»M Uft IntAhJ 
142ft 116 IBM 
29% Mft tniCfrf 

38% 25 IntFldV . 

11% 6M hdHnrv 
7M 3ft IntHrwt 
3% 2 InmwfB 
e» 37% intHpfC 
42 25% llltH pfA 

34% 20% jjA4 jJ P 


38 65M 65 65% + ft 

9 65 65 65 

4 65ft 65V, 65V5 
1135 U 13% 14 + M 

345 2Tft 21M 21ft + M 
2445 2% 2M 2ft 

22A 231* 23 23 

lOOx 19 19 19 + ft 

mu rwt im i9%— i 
6002 18M 18% IBM— ft 
760Z21M 20% 20%— 1% 
3490x38 37 38 +M 

670z 34M 33% 34ft + % 
1 52% 52% 52% + % 
350 55% 55% 55% 

9 44 44 44 

9 53ft 53ft 
, 16 36% 36% 36% + M 
182 33 32M 32%— ft 

643 A2 AM 42 +ft 
7(A Iff 9% 9% 

1467 12% 12ft 12%— M 


+1 




+1M 

tZft 

+1% 


44 


+1 

.. +1 
2% 2ft + M 
30M St +2 

30 32 -MM 

533 26% 24% 26% +3 
690 ADM 3976 ABM 


_ _ _ 200 U B 

43% «% IntMult 10} 4J 12 90 AM «t' Aft f M 
57% 44% tntPopr Z40 4J ^58%A%«R% + M 


ntHce 

nlUrth 


16% 7M 
.54% 39 
79 6«M 

43% 33M 
24% 14% 

22% ISft 
22M 18 
-ISM Bft inISocn 


ih 208 

ntgb ^p M 

oiiaBr 


70 

“ U 
JnMPw 100 U 10 
InPwpf 208 106 


728 -fft 9ft 9M— % 
50 10 1420 46M 45% «%— M 


21% 17ft lowoEl T*4 
JB UM lewllG , 274 
23% IBM I owl 11 pf 201 
37ft 2SM lowORS 3*8 
40 AM Ipafco 3*4 
15% 9% IpcdCp 06 


3* 13 

S 11 

St 


40% UM IrvBnk. l*t 40 7 


20y 83 83 83 +5% 

182 41 4QM A + ft 
1A 25 » . 24% + ft 

103 21% 2TM Z1M + % 
900XZIM 21M 21%. + ft 
70 11 % 10 ft 11 % + ft 
UU2S* 20% 2TO6— M 
TBS' 34% 34% 34ft .+ M 
30Cl 23M 23% 23M +1 
36 34ft 34% Mft + ft 
829 35% 35% 35ft + % 
134 13%. 12ft U — ft 
210 4DM 39ft 40M— M 


M 41% GnMIHs 224b 30 


747 


50*6 5816 — .ft 


•5 64% GAM _ SOW U 7 MB 723* 71ft 9%+lft 


43% 36 GMatpf 305 9* 


91% 48% GMatpf 8*0 9* 


AM 


.151 0 


46ft IBM GAMr 
» A OMtrH „ 

(ft 4% ONC .16 2* 

16ft 10ft GPU 8 

K«4 S9 Gen R* 1*6 1J794 
14% 6 GnRefr 19 

53ft 37 GnSlonl 1*0 40 12 
6% 2% C e m e n 
19ft 8 GflRad .18 J 

2i% 19 Genata 100 50 

U 28ft GenuPI UI 3* 15 1017 

2* HS £?£■=. 11 «o Sis 

38 33% GaPcpf 234 AI 

37 34ft GaPpfB 204 60 
27 23ft GaPwpf U0 11* 

30% 25% GaPwpf 304 120 
31% 27 GaPwpf 306 125 
29ft 19 GoPw-pf 256 110 
23ft 18ft GaPwpf 252 110 
26% 22 GaPW pf 205 18* 

70 57% GaPwpf 7J0 11* 

78% 56 GaPwpf 702 17* 

41M 24 GerbPd 102 20 u 
23ft Uft GorbSc .12 * 14- 

31% 15, GettVS .16 *361 

12ft 8ft GIAKT 
12ft 5% GftrFn 4 

27 18ft GtffHHI *2 2*608 


^JUM 


St*- 


71 M 53M Gillette 2*0 
17ft llto GImsC 
15% 7% GtenFd 00 10 
5ft . lft GJablM .ra 
22% 4M GtabMpfl05l 
13ft 8% GUNU0 
4 1% Gkmwt 

40% 2Qft GkJWF .04 * 6 

35 24ft Gdrldl 1J6 40 

» 8ft Gdrclipf J7 9* 

30% 24% Goodyr 1*0 50 7 

18ft 15ft GordnJ J2 19 25 

37% 19 GauM 08 ll 

4S 25% Grace 9J5Q 62 14 AM 

37 UMGraneri *8 1* IS *91 3? 


... Aft A» + % 

156 ^S* *SV. < 5%+ l ft 
1112 16% . 15ft .16% + % 

_ 43ft 43%—% 
Iff .8% JM JM + ft 

789 12 lift TO* + ft 

' 

33 33% 

.. ^ 25ft 25% -fc ft 

11 38% 36ft 36%. 

1 35% 35% 35% + % 
27X2A* 26M 26M- 
51x28ft 28 U —.ft 
29x38% 30 3QM.+ ft 

49xQ% 22ft Uft+ .K 
7 22% 22% 22ft— % 
Mb(U% K% 26% + % 
-500967 67 67 

Ml T2ft 12ft Uft + U 
518 »M 8% 9 

55 18% 18% 18%— M 


IS 14 1012 »% *9 4BM— % 
ID? .32 16ft JM Mft— it 


5 742 IB* 14% 15 + % 

VU J»^% 


25 1*69 lift lift 111* +1£ 


235 

362 


2 2% . .. 
39V* 89% + ft 


751 33ft 32% 33 
— IQ 10 - 


21^| m* » 


17ft 17 


t 

+ % 
+ % 


39» 32ft 31ft 3M + 2 


20 14% GtA^C 


21ft lift GtAF 


08 20 


19% 15 GNIm. 


30% 22ft . 

20 lift GMP 
30ft 22% Grant 
32% 22 Grevti 
6ft 2% GTofler 
13ft 9% GfimCs 
12% 04 GrvbEt 


44 45M . ._ 

... „ 36% 388* +"% 

446 20ft 19ft 20 + % 

393 19V* 18% 18ft.+ % 
37 T7H Iflk 16ft— % 
W% 39% — M 
— 29ft 30M + IS 

106 9* 10 -17 19% 19ft 19*k— .% 
7 30. 29% 29% +;% 

102 42 U 1718 Aft Aft lift + M 
I 18 M » -6ft .+ ft 
JB *29 U 710 lWS 1£H 10% 


41ft 32% GtHHk tfl. U17 «« 
GtWFTn • 1*0 H 7 1615 38% 


*8 1* 16 .216 7ft 


36% 34% GfUTM 1*0 .3.1 11 SM Z& Wl 
Grump - 


Z7ft 25% Gram pt ZJDHU 2 26ft 26ft 
7% 4% Grunts! . .14.20 42 136 7% 7ft 


J-f % 

_t+l 

7ft + M 


27ft 20 GuIfW *8 2* 14 .164 3jft 26ft + ft 


... 27 GtfWsI 
17% lift GulfRs 
Mft 11% GlfStUl 1*4 12* 
G 31 -GH3U pf.400 160 
44% 35MGlfSUpf 5*8 11* 
32% 27 GUSUPT3J51U 
35ft 30 GlfSU pr 400 1Z9 


.98 10 |J ;19S7 48ft 47ft 4SM + M. 
3* .200 16ft 13% -14% + %. 

6 lnr is 12 % it + % 

8% A 

10x46 
20 31 
37 34 


41 41 . —1 

46 46 *ltf 
90% 38% 

33ft 34 + ft 


23% 14 Gultan JB 25 11 218 23% 23% 23% +% 


1B& !M W . ' f7% + 5 


45% 17% l*ft 17% +1% 
10* 18 IS 18 + ■ 

1 18 18 18 + 
IDQz 19% 19ft 19ft + 
263 27% 27% 27ft- 


10* 74 

iS. a* it 


0a 


A 29)* EGG 
17% 18% EQKn 
32ft Uft ESvst 
29% 3 icnrtoP 
20% 17ft Fusco 
UM 3% g«Ulr 
j 1% EALWIO 
7% ft EALwtA 
22% 8% EaAIrPl 3*3k 
25% «% EAlrpfB 400* 
33% 12. EAlrpfC 
38% 2lft EdAGF U0 $0 


■52 U 20 238 39% 38% 39% + 



17 J7. + : 

39% 29ft + 
■ft 29 + 

% 2 ft -. 
IM IM 


16% 17% 

21ft *l% + jb 


H 


32M 22% HoJtFB" J*W 
32% 31ft Hotain. 


- • 1X32 26ft 
7.1 U 0307 26ft 
£8 M ; 4*3 1% 


11% 7% hSvSpT J* 6J . « 
43% 26ft Heart PS 106 40 12 UA 
UM 13 HonJS 1070 93 
22 18 HanJI 1*40 86 

■ 17% Handle 0 11 V 

20% 16 HOMfH ** XI 24 
Zi% lift Hanna A0 2* 25 
89 fWb HarBrJ l*D'l3 T6 
34% 21% Narindi J6 
12ft 7% Harntsh 


28ft 24ft Horn MBX40 1X0 
in* 24% HarnpK2Jg. 70 


B% 25ft— 1ft 
SM Uft— 1ft 

m l* 

72 21% 71% 2Tft 
403 27 24ft 26% + ft. 
W 15* 1JM 17ft + ft 

499 *% 66 ' SS-^IM 

» w. in 


25% 15% HrpRwS 


35 22% Harris 

ISft ION; ' 
33% 22% I 


20 16 


39% 26ft Hartmx 
_ ' Halts* 


17% 15% 

25% 19% HowEI 
13% 9% HavosA 
30% SUM HazJetn 
Uft 9M HdZLab 


U Iff- 
108 40 11- 
108-17- 18. 
UO 10* 11 
102 7.1 IB 

48 ttJ 

02 20 it 




16 UM 

_ 

ROB 27% 26% 27% + %- 
2E4 15ft 15 15ft— U 

-127.32% 3BS* 32ft— M 
415 35% 35 35 —ft 

30X17% 17 17-. — % 

IIS 2#i OT 24ft + ft 

as am 

a ism 



35ft 23% JWTS 1J2 2*. 18 
31 23% J River *6 1* 12 

38M T6H Jomswv ,J}_*.11 
13% SW JiniF 1030110 
53% 3* Jeff Pfl 152 23 7 
85 61 JerCpf 90* 11.1 

73% 52% JorCof *-t2 11J 
71 a JvCpf-t 7U 110 . 
186 91% JerCpf 123 128 . 
102 86 JerCpf 11*0 10* 
19% 15% JerCpf' 118 
18% 6% Jewfcr 
504* 33% JohnJn 
50 38M JohnCn . . 

59 SOft JhflCpf 405 70 .. 
27% 2Z% Jorpen 1*0 +1 19 
27% 20% JosfenS *8 14 15 
27ft 21ft JovMfP 100 if 29 


172 Aft 51 31 M— % 
349 37 36 - 37 +% 

242 204*. 26% -20% 

130 12% 124* 12% 


M JW* 4?l* gJJ% 


TL1 


250X 84% 84 
30K73M 73ft Uft 
TOtTOMi 70ft 70ft 
l_5PnaSft 105ft 105ft + ft 
3000X101 101 101 + ft 

11 19ft 19% 19%+ ft 
_ 31 18% 1711 18% + % 

100 20 ’16 4995 SM* .49% 50% + 94* 
2*0 4.1 10 . 114X49% 48% 49ft + % 

34X58% 58 SB + ft 

U 34% Mft- 34ft + % 
134 a% 2*_. 26 — J 


218. MM 23% 23%- 


. H ft 7% KDr 
28% 12% KLM . 
46 3^* KMIpf 


AM 


Kmart L4Q 


04 2.7 14 3K 71% 71% 17J*— M 
S»_20 10 , : 468 1J4* TO* IM* 

+ if 


4J0 10J '• 4 43% ASM .. 

4* 11 4253 35% 34% 35. 


17__ 13^ KN Ban 7.10 _U4 16ft 16. ]*%— % 


.«% 12% KofprAI .151 2714 16% KM ISft 

18% 13% KabCo 09 .10 .9 190 15 14ft 14ft— % 

11% 7% Kaneb 00 54 21 2W1x 7% 7% 7%— % 

34ft 18 20# W? S 772 21% 21M 2H* + » 


34 . a 


11* 


32. KCPLpf40j tl* 


32% KCPLpf 4J0 115 

20% Uft KCPLpf 200 11.1. 
21ft T7 KCPLpf 2JJ 714 
*8% 45% KCSou 1*8 22 
19% 9% KonGE 1J8 9.1 
Aft 31% KanPU XW 73 
24ft 18ft KaPCtxf Z37 93 
23ft 18% KaPLpf 203 93 , 
45 rafc Kotyln • „ • 

1U JSft Kalypf 106 30 
« 12M KcaifBr . 00 27 

.U Koufpt 8J5 11* 


TOiazft 32% KM — 
vote M 38 - 8 
15QL39M. 39% KM— IM 
6 19% 19% TO* + % 

4 30ft 20% 20ft— ft 

50 49% 49% 49% 

815 Uft 13 13, — ft 

149 38% 38 . 38ft + ft 

189 21ft 23 ft Tm 

3 73 22%. J3 • + ft 

20* 16ft 16. 16ft— M 

» 43ft 43 43 — ft 

190 15 UM 

-10 79ft 79 


as* a 


72 38ft Kellogg 1*4 27. 16 1506 69 67ft 68 — 1 

AIM 23ft Keflwl 10* 2*- 8 170 48% 48 48, — ft 

23ft rift Keflwd wf. . 8 241* Mft Mft 

. 1*. Kahn, 3458. ft — 

26 -17ft Kewnt- *8 40-. 18 .301 20% 20ft 20ft + % 

18ft .13% KPTeyn 1892 .16% 15ft Uft + M 

an* 23% KylJM 204 a210 2»29%5s%Kft + % 

13% 9% KerrGI 04 12 .00 12% 11% 12 — % 

21% . 17ft KerG pf 100 80 - IB 20% » 2PM— ft 

■ . 86% KarrMG UO ax 23 ,mz 32% 32% .32%.— 1% 

33% 2T% Kavcrp 130 19- 9 131 33% 32% 33%+ % 

5-- 8ft KevaC* • . ^ • — 

70 .45 tornua ,Z32 00 12 

.40% UM KftlMRd 06 U 17 

19% 10ft Knago 19 

29 24% Kooer 2*0 9* A 

tm 12ft Kolmar - 02 


U 


131 33% 32% _ . . „ 

i ^iSSia-% 

574 70®* «ft Wk— 'ft 
922 38% ■ 38 —ft 

IM 19% 19 19 

148 26ft 25* 36ft + ft 

R 16% 15% UK + % 


21% im Uppers JB 4 0604 2*32 UK 17%. Uft + % 


37 33ft Kaprpf 4*8 ll.T . 
17ft, 12% Korea J3o XI . 
40% 36 Kroger -2*0 40 12 - 
KM 35 Kubota *3e 10 38 
26% TO Kuhbns 00 22 13 
58% 2BM Kyoeei' 03* 0 23 
23%. 15% KVMT *8-4.1 f 


a a 

21? 17% 16% 17% +14 
514 47V4. 47 47W + % 

14 32ft 32% 32ft— % 
155 17%. T7M 17ft + % 
104 43ft 42% 43% 

45 21ft 21 71ft 


23ft 12ft MACOM 04 
54% 25ft MCAS *8 
244* 18 MCOrp 1.40 
39ft 36% MCorpf 3*0 
14% 10 MDC 02 
38 28M> MOU 202 

42ft Mft MEI ^ *0 

T8% 11% MGMGr 04 
13% 10% MGMGrot44 
27 10 MG6AL10 JOe _ 

B% 6% ml Conv njoe 2* 
lift toft ML Inc n 
KM 12% MB Ltd *71 
38% MY. Mocmlt *5 1* 19 


10 U 1541 13% 13% 13% + » 
10 31 121* 49ft «Vj «>■ + % 

63 7 A04x 26% 20M a»% * % 

4x 38 37ft M + % 
282 11% 11 11 — '* 
43 37TV 37V / 37''* ~ ?? 

i42s a 37% a + % 
73 17 1*% 1*% + % 

U 17% U U% 

513 U 24% 24% + % 
as 7% 7% 7% — % 

230 11% HR* lift 

3 15 14% 15 

579 37% 36% 37 r * 


90 
20 

10 IS 
26 34 
30 

J 


ASM Mft Mocy 1.1* 10 16 B*C «% 60% MM + 


66 

64% 

27ft 

17 

21 % 

19% 

42% 


MOCVPf 405 7* 


32ft MooiCi 1.129 21 Iff 


1% MdfASt 1800c 
10% Monhin 08 10 
DM ManhNt 02 15 
10% ManrCs .11 * 24 

32% MfrHcxi 300 70 5 

56ft 44ft MfrH pt SJVellX 
Sm 41 MfrH Pf 5068110 
84* 5M VfAtolvl 
25% 15ft vjMnvf pf 
Mft 24% MAPCO 1*0 19 8 
5 3 Momtx 

1% Morale 
38ft 25% MarfWJd 1*0 49 8 
46% 19 Marlons 06 J 41 
12 8% MarkC 02 28 

17% 13% Mark pf 100 70 
108% 70 Marriat 04 * 18 


SOI 56ft Mft aft— 1 
296x 53ft 52% 53% ■* % 

221 3% 3% 3% 

43 15% IS 15% + % 

139 9M 8% *ft + '9 

417 19M 19% 19% 

2704 43% 42 43ft +1 • 

45X51% 51% 51% 

77 U 47% 48 
1458 5% 5% 5% + % 

165 17ft 17M 17% + U 

449 34% 34ft 34% + Vs 

46 3% 3% 3% 

^ *£* 37 

186 44% 4416 44ft 
74 11% 11% 11% 

8 I7M 16% 17% + ft 
271 T07ft T06ft 107 + Mi 


B3ft Sift MTShM 200 X* 19 lip 81ft 79 ft 79%— 1% 


44M 36M Mart Ms 1*6 79 *. 9X7 34% Uft- ft 


40 25% Masco J6 10 17 20U 

3ft IM MaseyF 3M 

30% 23ft MosCn X0a 100 
124* 10% Maslne 102 109 .. 

65% 48ft MntsuE 07* J 11 
17M 9% Mattel 11 

13% 6% Motel wt 

ISM 11% Maxom 6 

AI 37ft MavDStrlja XI 12 
73M G Mavis XOOa 40 13 
Aft 21 McDrpt 200 9* 

26% 30% McDrpf 200 HU 
n% 16% McDeri U0 100 
9% 2ft McDrl wf 
T2K 6% McDId 00 1 J 18 


427 12 


76% 50% McOnld 
87 64 McDnD 

52 37% MeGrH 

29% 35% Mclntg 
51% 37 McKess 
83 40ft McKpf 
15 7% McLean 

6M 1% McLeawt 
29% 22% McNeil 1*0 
44% 33M Mead 100 
26% 15% Masnrn 04 
44 25% Medtrn JB 

Medan 2*8 
MeUen pi 2*0 


■ 384* + ft 

TU 2 ft 2 V» — ft 
22 29ft »% 29ft — % 

*5 12Vk 12M 12ft— ft 

345 60ft 59ft 60ft + ft 

11 % 11 % — M 

7% 8 + 'i 

HI- 12 % + ft 

59% fiOVi + ft 

87% *7%- % 

Mft — ft 

. 25ft— ft 

7ft 

lft 



38= a 




104 X9 14 
100 1.7 12 

V&Vs B 1 . 

*0 20 18.K96 


Km 

nkiaSuM* «% 
1% +1% 


50ft— % 
28ft— ft 


1.930 +1 

7% 5M Mesa* J9eU7 
71 52 MffipfF 4.13 UA 

Bit* MtE pfl 8.12 110 
3 MtEpfH *02 IM 
8% MetfFn Mb 30 
2 MexFd 0U15.1 


18% MitCnpi 


1031 

1-00 


M 


72 

714*- 
30% 

3 

21% 

18% 15M MriiER 
74* 4 MICklby 
62% 40 Mldcon 
UM SM MkfSUt 
20M 15M MldRos 
3Z16 26U MWE 
15M 10% MIltnR 
86% 734* MMM 
KM 38M MlnPL 
9% lft Mhnlns 
8 4% Mil si 

34% 2SVi Mobil 
TM ft VlMoWH 
8% 5% MOdCPT 
33% 20% Mohasc 08 
12ft lft MohkDt 
55 40ft ManC a 1 j» 
54 441A MonCa PfXSSQ 

Uft 14% Monrch JO 
S% 404k Monsan U0 
32% 16% MonPw TOO 
20ft Mft ManSt IJM 
TOM Bft MONT -H 
Z1% 14M Moore S 
a 20% MoorM 
31 Mft MorMpf 
40ft 36% Moron % 



^?4XT 


s» B 

206 40 11 7lS 5*ft 50% sf^’+aft 
- 10_ gft + ft 


4 8036 10M 
„ ~S1* 17^i 



200 


13 
10 11 


75% Morgnpf**6e 7* 
Uft 12% MorKeg 00 10 13 

47 a MorKnd 108 1* 11 

■ft 18% MorseS *0 30 16 

21 16ft MtgRtV 

38 25% Morion 

39% 29ft Motorlo 

15 Munfrd 


5* 

17 R 267 31% 31% 

3J » 154 lift 11% 

4* U 6615 87% 8SV> 

70 8 95 38% 38% 

509 2% 2ft 

70 141279? 30% 29ft 29% — ft 
„ sa % v, % + ft 
K 6 5% 

300 30% 30 
3« - IT* 1% 

IT 41 34% 34% 

59 S 51 SI 

4-7 26 62 17ft 164* 17 + ft 

53 13 2005 48 A 47ft + % 

60 12 1763 324* 32ft 32% + % 

■Jna9.1 109 23ft 19% 19% 

*8 9* 10 123 9% 9ft 9ft— ft 

02 3* 13 145 20% 20% 20ft 

1*4 19 14 317 26% 26ft 26% . " 

X» 14 JJ 29ft 29ft 2P%- ft 

17 8 4572 40ft 58% 59% + ft 




1ft 


try 


Bft Munsgs 
MuraO 


» 23ft 

22% lift MurrvO 
lift 12 MutOm 
4ft lft MverL 


X 87% 87% 87% +% 
MbclSft 14% 15ft + M. 
ZZ7 44% 44ft 44% — % 
— -- Tffl 23% 22ft 23% -MM 
1*0*18.1 18 gV 17ft 174k 17% - ft 
00 10 9 476 364* 36ft 36ft— % 

a si 

» 3 hS sr a 

js ““ aaaats 

59 24* 2M 2M 


1*0 

100 


1*2 


iS 


56 17 8 18 18 18 

18 . 83 37% 36ft 37% — ft 

is J2 l0 S ISf 22* 12*- ^ 

30 14 73 22% 72 32ft + ft 

“ « |% SftJl* 

70 9 U ^ 32 S* -f»% 


100 


1* 

40 

9 

13 21 
6J X 


S’K 


21ft 15% NAFCO 
3Bft 24 NBD 5 
»% 18% NBI 
23 17ft NCH 
44% 31% NCNB 
»% 24ft NCR 
13% 9ftNLInd 
306 37 NUI 
1% % NVF 

59ft 37ft TJWA 
tm 22 Nalco 

294% 23% Nashua 
18ft 0ft NtICnv . 0| 

06% 23% NatDUr 200 
35ft A% NDUtpf 208 
23ft 11% NatEdll 
3014, 3346 NafFGs 2*8 

“ 1 '% ^ % 
CTk NHnf 33 80 

m IN* NMedE *6 25 1] XHJ 32ft 

15 14 W 3W ^ 
.. a'43« ^ 1 3& 

IS 14 


17 
75 8 

U 8 


50% aft + ft 
_ 25% 24% 25ft_n% 
129 27% 27ft 27% +J% 

»4 IIS* IE? IS*— > 

500 36ft 35% 36ft +ft 
. 1 35% 35lo 35% — 4fc 
SA 224* a a -30k 
" 29ft a% 29% + ft 
’ iKk-aft 
JF» ' 
«%— % 
—ft 


lift. 6ft NMtneS 
J1 24 NtPrast 1*6 
TSft ISft NtSamJ 
SB 47ft NtS*mpf4J0 
37ft 25ft NtSvcIn 1.10 



1 + K1 

lie 


a sft 
32 




... LTV 
8U C.TVA 
36 LTV of 

a sm jft ir : ~ 

68ft J1 1 LTV 
294* 21ft -LodG3 

Wt‘« Lotoro* 
XT 21 K. LflftVPf 
lift 


LN^fa 2J4e 90 M 
LLE Ry 201*2X1 
LLOCp 





1J0 

£u m . 

7% Lcetturs- 04 ifi 14 


6W a . 2Sft 

. 43 30ft 294% 

15*4 10 9U> 

.251 14* lft 

MB « « 

2 . 9M 9% 9K— % 
-7 A 40 40 —% 

2T3 Uft 13ft -TW, 

.212 39 37% 38K — % 

6 10 10 10 —ft 

730 12ft. 12M 12% 

16 a 27% .a + ft 


25394 1232 74* Jft ^ + ft 


4ft lft LomSm 
JOft Lowttnt 


2» 


2SM 9 LeorPt 
28M'-wft-t*arP 1 


279 too 2JM . .. 

1st a-ar* 

431 lift Tift lift +- ft 
-441 9ft-- 8% 9 —ft 

a 17 ft in* ®*— K 

33% 


33ft 


■ft 1 1% LoMos 08b 1* 16 
*2 1 J 12 


a -Lft Aj* ajj- % 


217 TO* 18ft 
lUMK — 


39* 


sm mv 

’nirpl 
SS.£tS^P^Sf,4i,?«^ 


30ft 30ft— ft 


;* 29 2676 30ft. 29% 


W 11 S*4 _®ST 49ft- 


147- UncHgf 
19%-UnePl 
«2ft 43 . Urton . I, 
“ «, Uttoopf - 


11. 



37 . XT :LocHh . 
5*ft 2SRfc Loews £ 1J 


A4* 24ft LoafCQIT 24 
m* TOtUunRrt 100 
7046 -im LomMt* 204 


1202 .- 202 

... 3 % ^ 

8* . 122% 22= 

M I 4101 48% 47ft 47ft + ft 

»«*»» 

» » » “ 


333T7M- 



lift NSfond 
10% Nerco 
33ft 27 NwPW 
16 12% NavPpf 

M% 15% NevPpf 
73 19% NevPpr 

25* 9ft MevSVL 
48% 36M N Eng El 
27ft 23 NEnPpf 
2* 24M NJRsC . 

29% 21% NYSEG 
X a NYSpf 
70 64 NY5 Pf 

»» 274* NyIpTO 120 

25 Sanaa ^ ^ 

19 12ft NewMI 

10 7% NwhtRs 

48ft 34ft Newmt 
3ft % Hwporic 
21ft 16ft NiaMP Iflfl 106 
32ft 25ft NiflMPf UB 110 
44 35ft NIoMpf. 4*8 1U 

a NioMpf £3 iu 

S% Oft NioMpf 600 iu 
aft 21 NfoMDt 2Ge ij 
n 53ft NtaMpT -- 
J7M 14ft NlcnSh 
184* 11% Nlcolel 
3?ft U HI COR 
lift 12ft HobtAI 
17ft 10ft NortfRs 


's 

i4% 14% 

ran* to , n 
am am* am 

56 13 ia% 

SSS «ft fit* %% 

25% 25% 35% • 



* 


& 


108* 25 15 
-UMM240 5 

J4e 
1*0 


3S 


702 1?* 
1*5*110 


3^.10 M 


.6 2 Dft 20 M 
« J8% WA .. 

96 22% 21% 22 

a- as srs -ft 
Vw « » * > 
8SN5, V* 

7 1550 19% 19% Uft + \* 

2rs*'s*K 

WO* 67 67 67 —ft 


p^raSscuoix,! 

UH 


31% NAPnn 

20+ 13% NEurO 
JB . l» HoestUI 1*8 fir 
13ft 8% NlndPS 1061 9 

Sift 41ft NeSIPw in 30 t 
V ~30M NSPwpf x*B 100 

2^ S* <-10 10* 

44 35 NSPpf- ,4,16 lft* 

« Uft MSPwVis* 1U 

Off 56 NSPwpf 6JQ i nn 
1W; Mft USPpT 1QJ4 9J 
TO6 834* NSPwpf 7J4 ni 
flft SIM NorTu jo 

atf-rMP 

iffiz SS tjorton 2*0 50 u 

JS p.sss && • 

sm am JSSr . jo $ J2 
4 JKS/lx diSP-ftj H 


lift 17% 1^*-- 



go 50% 49% s%+ii 

MfcB 34ft 34ft— ft 
100ZA A A 
40ft *Qft 

2D0b Mft 44 44 — . 

Ifci 

S%+| 

is a n% m . +> ■ 

IS Su. !S fe + ft 

473 28% a ai* + % 

j» ss si% +% 

|1| a#t* 27% 21% +•%•• 
'S sm 53% 54M + P 


1 


1>S & 93% ^+m 


X lft Oak lad 

»* OcAjteP uj 
.1^* 23% OccfPet- im 
TS¥i 9\% QttfP wf - * 

aK o^pp? iso 9M 
'3% xn ** 

sm SSSS5S! 130 

«BiSR8Sg >l iS3'g: 


s* 12 _ 

48 


^ w* 0% 
— 23ft 


— ft 


iSi£ 


1*0 s* s S 


(Odi&medonP^T^ 











-a*-* 


wumms&mmmm 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1985 


Page 13 


Former Chairman of Carrion Is Arrested, Freed on Bail 


I g \ Germans, Dutch \ TWA and Icahn Discussing 

I I To Merge With Svenska Back Production Revised Merger Agreement 

~ KT ! r*L±l The Associated Pms imu, .tv rum-haw mw 


! '• shav a l98s H*new com- 

i SiQCKHQIMr~Swaknsff>- pany should harepn^ of or least 
(vcminmt-awncd Svenska Petro ](X)miSioiLkrdDuorjn 1986, be said. 
iTnSsv'fiiuaj Afi asd Qfj<fcoaisnaKiit£ma5 : Svenska. Petroleum’s mimamM 
•^^'^orbtmd, tbe consi^eaergyco- director, Lara Hjorth, who win be 
^toperatrve^ “wfll merger ihe Swedish managing director of the new com- 
*s ^[oewsagencyTT reported' Monday. pany, said the new company wooM 
' a » Energy Minister Bijgkta Dahl acquire all of Svcnska’a aerations, 
ai a news conference that it jBdmftn g its gasoline stations and 
'•'■v^iwas in the interests ctf both the its 51-pereeat interest in SP Hxplo- 
v gqvenunegt and oansuinere that ■ rofj 01 * AB- : 
r^^ithere should be one large Swedish “ will a lso take over OK’s im- 
K! 2'- ^ cpmpany in the oQ rtyrtfw port, refining and fusl-dl activities, 

UK Dahlsten, ibe aovemmeni M** wrodaliom that 

a“ .'^negotiato who bronJTSX, : COn_ 

^ftompante together m talks over tone there arogpjtaiesta- 
• i'^L'two years, said thehewcompaiiy, ex P ectet ^ 

, A'frB, would have 21 percent of the s ?£‘ •*. . 

**Qs5»^iiiidttfi^a!nod’ OK Py teom AB wD have an 
• : * 'urtssnd 2 H 0 22txffceru ofS capacity rf about 4 

gasoline market OK^^itly cc^ J^o« ®etoc tons (4.4 short tons) 

s£ir 3 ^ itt “ d 

•T T - . VT. „ . percent stake m a British Petro 
, Both cw^anneshad been affect- leom rrfinay. OK said last month 
cjl by die Stamkmg market for «1 that it had signed a letter of intent 
iwoducts and by price wars. - to sdl half of its 43~perceait interest 

. OK bad losses af 410.5 million in Scanraff to Norsk Hydro A/S. 


pres tic gasoline market and 
£•■ ^Svenska 15 iq 3 percent 
5 f»/ Both cmnpaznes had been affect- 

■C ^ i (^1 by the ahrinVmg market for oil 
— -^Jwoducts and by price wars. - 


„ i;.. s’ ^kronor ($53.6 mOBon) after finan- The new company will also have 
;■ = ~;; i fial income and «penses in 1984, a 50-percent interest is OK 
; ^compared with 1983 losses of 151.6 Kracker AB’s cracking facility, 
r 1 -i vjxrimon- Svenska: Petroleum had with ammai capacity of 12 million 
’'^losses of 6 milHon kronor in 1984, metric tons. 

~i '^fconmared with losses of 30 million Mr. Dahlsten, the negotiator, 

;• ‘ v'i'in 1983. said the government expected a 

- I*?-- OK’s diaxrxnan, Leif Lewin, said good return on its investment in the 
-£*? the cooperative would have losses company and there was no ques- 
' v~of about 200 million kronor in tk» of its activities being subsi- 
•:*.'4985, while SP was expected to Hweri. 


Of aNewChip 

A genre Francc-Presse 

BONN — The West German 
I and Dutch governments, in an 
!' effort to meet Japanese compe- 
tition, witl provide 40 percent of 
the finance for the development 

of amejgadfcup with a capacity of 

four mtuon bits, the Boon gov- 
ernment said Monday. ' . 

The subadles to Semens AG ' 
and Philips NY win amount to 
480 million Deutsche marieg 
($189.6 minion), the Mixustryof 
Research and Technology said. 

The West German govern- 
ment will contribute 320 mil- 
lion DM over four years, 240 
million DM to Siemens and the 
rest to Valvo, the German affiB- 
ate of Philips. The Netherlands 
will provide the eqmvalent of 
160 million DM to PbaKps. 

The Siemens-Philips prefect, 
created by an agreement signed 
in October 1984, calls for atotal 
investment of 1 A billion DM. 

Production of tbe m^achips 
should begin in 1986 at Regens- 
burg. West Germany. 

For chips of 256,000 bits, ; 
which until recently were the 
most powerful on the market, ' 
the Japanese industry had cap-' 1 
hired 90 percent of world sales. 
But lately Japanese companies 
and In tematumaL Business Ma- 
chines Cotp. have begun to pro- 
duce one-mSBon-bil chips. 


NEW YORK — Trans World 
Ah^nesmaoaDceiMaaday&atit 
is rfwwisring a posable amendment 
to a merger agreement with Carl G 
Icahn, the New York financier who 
is said to be having trouble raising 
enough cash to complete his take- 
over of the carrier. 


T\! • Rmm previous counts of conspiracy to fraud Bumiputra Malaysia Finance 

II I HONG KONG — The former defraud linked to the collapse in Lut, the Hong Kong-based unit of 

O chairman of the collapsed Cardan 1983 of Cardan, a Hong Kong Malaysia's Bank Bumiputra Ma- 

-m A Jim .!-»■ group, Geoige S.G. Tan, who was properly and shipping group. lays a' Bat ad. of about 6 billion 

r Agreement arrested Saturday along with two Mr. Tan - S chief deputy. Bentley dollars. 

, . whwawBwonta Ho, was released on bail of 2 mil'- Two former executives of Bank 

lower the purchase price because of onboy a nd conspiracy de- jj on dollars as set under previous Bumiputra are being held in Lon- 

ihe securities probably would trade fraud, has bemfreed on bail, court chains aaainsr him. Another for- don, and Hong Kong has requested 

their extradition. 

In alL 23 charges have been filed 


below their face value. 

An announcement from TWA’s 


fraud, has been freed on bail, court 
officials said Monday. 

Bad was maintained at 52 m3- 


lion dollars as set under previous 
charges against him. Another for- 
ma executive, Carrie Woo, had 
been freed earlier. 


ggnenti ominsd, Ulrich H offm a n n, lion Hong Kong dollars ($6.7 mD- They were arrested in connection in connection with dealings bc- 


said: "TWA stated today that it is 
engaged in discussions with Carl 
Icahn regarding a posable amend- 
ment to the terms of their imager 


Wall Street analysts said the agreement" 
brief armo i HHi e m c ot appeared to Mr. Hof fmann HwJinwt to dab- 


lion), the amount set under two with an alleged conspiracy to de- tween Cardan and Bumiputra. 


1 T Y 


ca afir o t that Mr. Ic ahn wants to orate on the announcement Mr. 
rednee the cadi portion of the pur- Icahn’s attorney, Dennis Block, 
chase price fra the approximately asked abom the investor’s reported 
16.9 million TWA snares he must financing problems, said, “I 
buy to take the company private, ifs improper to comment on storte 

It would appear that the losses like ifmt J 
the carrier has sustamed and is pro- WnB street analysts said they 



“It would appear that toe losses like thaL 
the carrier has sustamed and is pro- WnB street analysts said they 
ject ed to sustain do not justify the saw no indication that Mr. Icahn i s 


price Mr. Icahn has indicated he backing away from the TWA ac- 
would pay," saki one analyst, who quisition, the result of a bitter take- 


spoke on the coodhioD that he not 
be identified. 

TWA, the' fourfh-hrgett U.S. 
anfine, reported a loss of $13 5 mil- 


over battle with Texas Air Corp. 
that three months ago. 

Investor concern about pros- 
pects for the Icahn takeover caused 


Comite Colbert 

Van Qeef & Arpels: Fabulous Firsts 


Boo on revenue of S1j08 bOBon in TWA mmninn stock to fall Friday 
tbe third quarter ended SepL 30, on the New York Stock Exchange, 
and had a loss of $69.7 million on dosing at $18,875, down 75 cents, 
revenue of S2J59 billion for the first cm volume of 1.6 mDlioa shares. 


tbe third quarter ended Soil 30, 
and-had a loss of $69.7 mUfion on 
revante of S2JS9 billion far the first 
nwift yimnthg of the year. 

Me. Icahn owns about Slpoceat 
of TWA’s stock and has offered to 
boy the rest from minority share- 
holders for $24 a share, consisting 
of $19.50 in cash and $450 in secu- 
rities, or an indicated $405.6 mQ- 
fion. 

Monday’s Wall Street Journal, 
quoting sources it (fid not identify, 
said Mr. Icahn wants to change the 
alio to about $14 cash and $10 in 
securities, winch in effect would 


PanelSnggests 
JAL Be Private 

Agenc*. Frmca-Pnsse 

TOKYO — A transport ad vi- 
, sory body recommended on 
'■ Monday that the government 
" trand'er its 34_5-percen£ stake in 
Japan Air linec to the private 
sector and aid JAL’s monopoly 
of regular international ser- 

- vices, official sources said. 

They said ah ad hoc group of 
, the Council for Transport Fo- 

- licy made the recommendation 
to Tokuo Yuntiduta, the trans- 
port mmister. r ' 

The nunistry is to take action 
around April to change Japan’s 
dv-i aviation pdicy. Industry 
sources . said a change would 
pave the way for the private All 
• Nippon Airways and TOA Do- 
mestic Airtmes to operate regu- 
.lar international servic-A 


COMPANY: NOfES 


U.K. Ministers Disagree on Westkmd Rescue 


Fancn agreement to bay a 29.9-percent 

LONDON — A dispute has stake in Westland for about £30 
arisen between Britain’s defense mill i on ($44 nuIHonj within a few 
and trade ministers over the bat days. 

way to save the Westland PLCheh- That would ran against an out- 


survival in an agreement with S5- 
krasky. Government sources said 


U.S. Firm, Fiat 
To Cooperate on 
Plant Automation 

Reuters 

TURIN — Flat SpA said Mon- 
day that it had agreed on a joint' 
venture with Digital Equipment 
Corp. to develop computerized 
manufacturing systems, in a step 
towards automated production. 

. Ezio Salce, managing director- 
designate of the venture, known as 
Sesam, said at a news conference 
that the new company would be 




way to save the Westland PLCheh- That would run against an out- 
copter company from collapse, line agreement that Mr. Heseltme 
government sources arid Monday, has secured with Aerospatiale of 
Defense Secretary Michael Hen France, Messersdmritt-BOlkaw- 
sdtine has been trying to arrange a BJohm GmbH of West Germany 


P °^ tya *** ^ “ owned 50-50 byCwnan Spa, a Fiat 
bs bgrf jbat the company andus subsidiary spSalizing ^robotics, 


shareholders should determine 
their own future. 


and Digital Equipment 


European manufacturing com- 
Wesriand last week laid off 750 panics spent $4.75 billion in 1985 
of its 11, 000-member work force on factory automation systems of 
became of a lade of orders. The which $2.15 bOBon was in areas in 


rescue package with three Europe- and Agusta SpA of Italy for them ^ ^ wmia. bunco was m areas m 

an companies for Britain’s onhr ho- to acquire a mhK«ity interest in. the 


Cc^to^br. But Westl^^ has 
been pursuing talks with Sikorsky 


any, the sources said. 

. Headline saw die agreement 


for its W-30 helicopter has brought cording to company officials, 
it to Ihe brink of collapse. ^ .. 


of the United States and Fiat SpA, as an opportunity to restr u ct nr ethe 
tbe Italian automaker, with the European hdioopter industry so 


-badring of Trade Secretary Leon 
Briitan. - 


that it could compete 
fully with the Unite 


Digital and Comau are already 
lestructmethe A prospective £85-milHon agree- involved in a project with Renault 
1 industry so ment to sell 21 erf the W-30s to Automations France to raise pro- 
more success- India has not been competed de- ductivity in small plants financed 
id States, the spile persistent romois that it was by tlm European Community’s Es- 
er the agree- about to be signed. prit program. 


Philippe Arpels, General Manager 

Flawless precious stones — rare " ro create the soft curves and delicare 

Jonquil diamonds as deep-hued as petals of a jewelled flower or a. 

vintage cognac, rich rubies from ^ ribbon bracelet as supple as silk. ! 

Burma, except i o na l emeralds from 4 Equally impressive is the Van Qeef! 

Colombia, shimmering sapphires business style: First of the grand] 

from the misty mountains of Kash- L *" « - Parisian haute joailliers ro open ini 

mir — spring to life as tbe talented -W York in 1W, first to add al 

fingers of masreraaftsmen translate | .. < boutique of younger, casual jewelry) 

the daring dwamg of visionary de- in 1953, first to go to Japan 12 years! 

signers into splendid jewels signed ago where they now have 10 stores) 

Van Qeef & Arpels. This icputa- '-"^^^Hand die first to create a highly) 

non for reproducing splendor in successful fragrance in 1977 called^ 

imaginative profusion has been no woidcr. First, 

onymous with this legendary jewel- But Philippe Arpels, 31, director of) 

la since tbe three Arpels brothers, Julicn, Louis this family firm, insists on a distinction: "Wc arej 
and Charles, founded tbe firm with their brother- pioneers, but not avant-gardists. Wc try not toj 
in-law, Alfred Van Qeef, at the glittering height follow fashion, nor to precede it. What is fashion-) 
of the Belle Epoch in 1906b able, becomes unfashionable. We create jewels 

. Their intemarional renown is reflected in thriving char live a long rime thanks to classic design ana 

export sales ctf $20 million to $26 million , g2 the high quality of our materials.” Proof of didr 

: percent of rocal French turnover, and has attracted success: The jaunty lin whiskered in diamonds, a( 

a connoisseur clientele including some ctf the best-seller since 1933, the delightful butterfly] 

most evocative names of the 20th century: Mar- brooches, Arc Deco designs their diems ask themi 

j k-rv Dietrich, the Duchess of Windsor, Maria to recreate today and die dazzling prices Van Geefi 

Calk* and Plt-mhffH Taylor to name a few. designs bring at auction. 

At Van Qeef & Arpels an audacious artistry finds They are still making mirades. They hardly had! 

I reality in smnmng innovation: The celebrated rime to photograph two "invisible setting” neck-, 

j "minzudicrc” of the 1930s ingeniously i ncorpo- laces of rubies, sapphires and diamonds whichf 

rates spare for all the ladylike accoutrements, took 18 months to make and were sold two weeks | 

make-up, smoking accessories, even a tiny "domi- later. The exquisite enchantment of a ruf£led| I 

no” watch, into a dim lacquered gold case with collar in finely spun "Tulle d'oc” gold, the inm-] i 

jewelled clasp; the mundane zipper is magnifi - cate marquetry of a diamond bow brooch, their; ! 

cendy ennobled into a diamond necklace and entrancing Qmscmas windows on an Operai | 

breeder, in die wdininl tour de force of the theme, all capture tbe inspired essence of degance 

"invisible setting,” as many as 400 perfectly that is so distinctly Parisian, so unmistalmabiy 

matched precious stones are indedpherably linked Van Qeef & Arpels. 

-AN ASSOCIATION OF THE MOST PRESTIGIOUS NAMES OF TUE FRENCH “ART DC VlVRf ’ BIS KUt Dt LA BAUUt. 7 5008 PARIS 


Now, with both negotiations sources added. Under die agree- 
nearing conclusion, the govern- meat, the foor govenunents would 
mem has to decide which option it commit themselves to buying.only 
favors. European beficoptezs and would 

The Wall Stre« Journal reported streamline the range of aaft pro- 
Monday that Sflraraky, a subsidiary duced. 


nited States, the 


theme, ail capture tbe inspired essence of i 
that is so distinctly Parisian, so unmis 
Van Qeef & Arpels. 


prit pro g ram. 


IAN ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE COMITE COLBERT I 


■> Dadak ( kM jPSg cn sdijtfh b amc^ 
. v the West Gcaaaii'oeiilraMiaiik for 
cooperatives, to increase its 
> capital by 350 irnHinn Deutsche 
. : marks ($1 38. & mOBon) after talring 
- > ova the business last week of tron- 
, . •= Wed Baycrischc Raiffdsm-Zen- 
3 ■ ^ tralbank AG, banking sources said. 

i <*• Hf Aqmtame of France said its 
' Subsidiary Elf-Congo had found oil 
- ; ■.in the Kamfi 1 e^doration wdl 
-i .-‘the CongoqoasL • 

/ £xco Interaafiooal'PLC said it 
f^had sent shareholders a document 
. contflining details of the proposed 
: exchange of its holdings in Gart- 

>more Investment Management 
•’ ;;Ltd. and Hsdec BV for British & 
.'Commonwealth Shipping Co.’s 
; - Voiding in Lcaidon Forfaiting Ltd. 

: General Dynamics Carp, said its 
; .board bad elected Stanley Pace 
. 1 ^yjrnww and chief executive offi- 

; .'.'j-xr effective Dec. 31. He succeeds 
J^jDavid S. Lewis, who is retiring. 


of United Technologies Corp., and 
Flat expected to announce an 


*: Hongkoag A Kbwtooa Wharf A 
Godown Co. reported emwingfi for 
the six months ended Sept 30 rose 
to 3024 million Hoag Kong doQara 
($38.7 nnlHon) from. 2143 mflhon 
ddlars in the year-earlier period. 

EJ. Hidton A Co. denied allega- 
tions made in a lawsuit filed fry 
Schering-Plough Corp. that Hutton 
violated securities law by buying 
large amounts of Schenng stock on 
the basis of confidential informa- 
tion. 

Hoffmann La Rocbe AG said it 
would sefl a 25-percent stake in 
Xyrafin AG to Suomen Sokeri Oy 
mid take a m a l l shareholding in 
the Finnish sugar company. 

Kaiser A hmrianra A Chemical 
Corp* said it had rejected an offer 
from Joseph Frates and a group of 
investors to buy the company for 
about $800 nrilHon. Tbe Frates 
group, which has 9.4 percent of 
Kaiser stock, offered $7 cash and 


But Westland directors reported- 
ly saw a better chance of long-term 


$13 in securities for each Kaiser 
share. 

Kone Oy, a Finnish elevator j 
manufacturer, sad it had acquired 
a majority of shares in Veriinde SA, 
a French electric-hoist company. 

Rabobank Nederland plans a 
public hid of 200 guilders per nom- 
inal 100-guilder dime of Noder- 
landseScheepshypotheekbankNV, 
bringing the cost of a full takeover 
to more than 47 nriHion gnflders 
(516 j milli on), the banks laid in a 
joint statement. 

United Airlines filed an applica- 
tion with the Japanese Transport 
Ministry to start service between 
japan and the United States on 
Jan. 28, ministry officials said. 

Weston Muring Corp. Holdings 
I iH. said the initial phase of the 
Roxby Downs gokl-unwium-cop- 
per project in -Sooth Australia 
would proceed after BP Australia 
Ltd. announced its commitment to 
the project over the weekend. 


At Swiss Bank Corporation: 

We share your belief in successful 
institutional investment : 


Royal Oak 
Perpetuel Calendar 



"At the institutional level successful 
investment is a team effort 
We believe in making that effort” 
Max Students, 

First Vice President, Zurich 

If successful investment is 
your credo, you know it isn’t simply 
an act of faith. .Investing institu- 
tional funds requires a dedicated 
team with a broad base in 
every area of banking, worldwide. 
The stakes are so high and the 
environment can change so fast, 
that if you don’t have a strong 
team of in-house professionals you 
could end up simply running 
with the pack. 

To a newcomer, the world of inter- 
national markets may seem 
complicated. But we’re veterans of 
these markets, and we believe 
they could actually make life easier 
for you. You know our reputation, 
but you may not know all our 
capabilities. And until you know 
what we could do for you, you may 
not be aware of all your own 
possibilities, either. 

When you're thinking of exploring 
new markets, the first step could 
be the most important: talk to 
the people at the key Swiss bank. 






Swiss Bank Corporation 

Schweizerischer Bankverein 
Societe de Banque Suisse 

The key Swiss hank 


Oenersl Management in CH-4002 Basie. Aeschenplatz 6. and in CH-B022 Zurich, Paradeplatz 6. Over 200 offices throughout Switzerland. Worldwide network (brandies, 
subsidiaries and representatives): Europe: Edinburgh, London, Luxembourg, Madrid, Manchester, Monte Carlo, Paris. North America: Atlanta, Calgary, Chicago, Houston! 
Los Angeles, Montreal. New York, San Francisco, Toronto. Vancouver. Latin Americas Bogota. Buenos Aires. Caracas, Lima, Mexico. Panama, Rio de Janeiro, S3o Paulo! 
Caribbean: Grand Cayman, Nassau. Mkkfle East: Bahrain, Cairo, Tehran. Africa: Johannesburg. Asia: Hong Kong, Osaka. Singapore, Tokyo. Australia: Melbourne! 
Sydney. 

Lintas ZOrich SBV 24B5/1 




INTERNATIONAL 


Monday^ 

]\ISE 

Closing 

Toftto include the nationwide prices 
us to the dosing on wall Street 
end do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


27V 
BSU 
99 
57V. 

a 

M 
25% 20 
47% 34 
lBOh 14% 
26% 14V 
70% 40V 
30V 22% 
9% 7 
lfFK 10U 
23V SI 
38% MV 
17V 14V. 
SV 2V. 
54V 37% 
24 13% 

55 34 

46% 29 
16% 13% 


37% 31% 
57% 4BK 
69% 57 


63 33 QuakOt 140 24 1& 669 60% 59% JBk- % 

25 17% QuakSO 40a 33 IS 1R2 23% 22% 22V— % 

10% 5 Qisamx 20 137 6U 5% 6% + % 

34% 27 Quest or 140 5.1 11 400 31% 30V 31% + % 

27% 14% Ok Ret l J4o J U 988 20% 26% 28% +1% 


% 

14%— % 

% — 

5054 — % 

55% + % 

26% — % 

76 +1% 

2B% 27% 

28% jt % 39 

+1% 

60 — % 


39% + % 
2416 — % 
6316—% 
18% 

26 — % 
71 +1% 

25 % ~ % 

.STS 

16 
16 
16 
% 
% 
% 
% 








m-. 




m 



TT 


1.M 9L0 

240 75 

II 

400 168 0 
2JJ4 95 12 

40 14 13 
£20 5J 
IS U 7 
3» 1.2 15 
240* 13 I 
4J0O12 13 
154 42 17 
340 5.1 


* 




MV + 16 
47% — V 
94% — % 
11%—% 
17 — % 
17% + 16 
12% + 16 
8 %— % 

??*=£ 
38% + % 
14% — % 
1BV +% 




tS 




#3 


m 


*r. 


13 10 15 

2.1 14 303 

4J 25 5646 
lUO 22 

8.1 301 
54 10 211 
67 9 1431 


141% 6SV 
43 32% 

11 9% 

26% 21 
20 22V 

2BV 23% 
24 19 

21% 16% 
27 19 

23 19 

24V 20% 


Untehn 230 2-1 2J 
U5LIFE I.T2 28 11 
UsltaFd 1500 9.9 • 
UtaPL 232 9J 13 
UtPLpf 280 105 

u«* lS m VU 

UfPLpf 256 104 

SRS 286 IM 

UIIHCo 14»f8 B 
UtflCo of 244 118 
UfHCflpr25T IU 


3134 137% 
682 *V 

63 10% 
769 25% 
6 26% 
17 27% 
1-23 
0 20 % 
34 24'6 
5 22V 
7 23% 


130% 15% -6 
40 40V 

10 % 10 % + % 
74% 25 + % 

26% 24% - 'b 
77% 27% 9- U 
22V 22V— % 
19% 20% + % 
23% 74 + % 

22%V 22*6 + 'k 

3% 21% + V 


53V. 25% 
14V 6 
25% 15% 
3% » 
21V 19 
5V 216 
15% 6V 
40% 22% 
1516 9V 
25% 13 
12 3% 

)1% 9% 
13% 11% 
66% 30% 
73% 59 
74% 58% 
32 13% 

85 33% 

09% 66% 


,J “ “l36 
344 148 

180 35 8 


40 24 4? 
40 £4,3 

1 All 03 n 

48 .9 22 

1 7J2 103 
772 108 . 

IS 

32 

280 3.1 M 


763 51% 
1000 13% 

a 24 % 
45 jv 
12S 27% 
65 4% 
5 MV 
738 27V 
90 15% 
190 17 
83 9% 
50 11% 
149 12% 
2569 ST* 
1090x 73% 
BOB 73% 
47 30% 
162 73% 
90 90 


50 51 + V 

13'ii m-M 
S4’6 24% 

2V 2* 

26% 27% + % 

4% 4% — !* 

14V* M ! j + V 

07 27% — % 

14*6 14% + W 
,6% 16%-% 
9% 9% — % 
11% 11% + % 
11 % w* + % 

55 54V— 1% 

73 73 

73 73% + 'i 

29V 30 - % 
71 71 —3% 

89% 89% + % 



.10 J 4 
140 50 Z1 

U 17 
174 4> ,3 
JO LI U 


ia 6J 4 
*.*0 10.1 
Ol 7.75 98 
%PL £74 M 9 
acPS 286 73 W 
lea 14 17 O 
dvm 34 1.9 

280 £4 12 


J3 23 44 
80 38 13 


»• «% 
1157 3® 
264 5% 

130 5% 
257* 35% 
319 1Mb 

’*2 
a ■% 
951 38% 
3DXI9 
701 79 
441 .39% 
91 a 
ITS 40V 
503 D'A 
787 19% 

£ H* 
41 3% 
345 15% 
33 Wb 


ir% ,3% ■ 

38 28% 

5% 5V 
5% 5% 
35% 35V 
10% 1SV 
m « 

4*1 S% 
37% 38W> 

79 * 79 
38V 39% 
J9% 40 
apt* M 

«% 125 

09% S9% 
41b 4V 
93 93 

3% 3% 

14% UV 

M% MV 


60>i 36% Keren 380 SO 2D 4025 6Mb 58% 59% + % 

54V 48*1 XHTWPl S4S U0 ,!? 5S* 85 85 *JS 

39 KT-'s XTM 84 38 13 161 22W 20V 71%— V 


J0U 24% 2o«P 1J2 48 13 M 29 2M B%- % 
17 7 1 -* ZaPAfO .12 18 5S 745 |% 8% 8J4“% 


61V 32% Zovre* 
25 IA'm ZcnlltlE 
21 “i 15V ZcTOl 


41% 24*i Zumtn 1 32 14 15 


88 3 17 949 58 St 57% +1 

919 714 W% 17% 1W J : 
J2 13 17 « 29V a% 2B» + I 
32 14 IS Mticaw. 30% 39 + 


\TSE Highs-Lows 


US. Futures 

Via The Associated Press 


HWl Low 


Ooon KIM Low Close du 


40% 41th— % 
33% 33% + % 
8 B — V 
lsv in— v 
29% 30 + M 

tzv ta + % 

m * m *n 
80 % + % 
1816 + V 
X — V 
87% 4- 16 
40 + ft 

16% + V 
MV +1% 
18 . 

60 +1 
4W— % 
40% + V 
182% + V 
•4%—% 
34 + V 
MV— % 
23% — % 
30V— V 
38% + % 
26V— V 
32V — IV 
31V + V 
107 +1% 


Open Htab Low Clone Cho. 


Grains 


N2J9 13275 Sep 19280 19688 

TVS36 13880 Pec 19880 3W.CS 

19780 14150 Mac 30180 21080 

19947 11980 MOV 2D3J0 30153 

EeLSain Pm.Sales 4211 

Pm. Day Opart Ifrt. HSI, up 514 
SUOARWORLD mirrcsce) 

112800 Ibm^ cents per lb. 

Tjs 388 J«1-. 542 5 M 

933 334 Mar 633 635 

7.15 358 May 645 651 

650 171 Jul 440 662 

685 434 Sep 646 667 

730 482 ad 682 687. 

735 625 Jan . 

788 461 Mar 7J9 786 

Eat. Sales Prev^aies 9313 

Preu. Day Open lrrt.Hn,044 up 431 
COCOA (NYCSCGI 
W metric tons-S per ton 

2337 vm Dec 3177 2190 

2392 1955 Mar 2240 2273 

3422 1968 May - 2388 2310 

2429 Jul 2318 2335 

2430 2023 Sep 2340 2345 

Est. Sales - Prwv.Saies X757 

Pnw. Day Open Inf. 17758 up 15 
ORANOfi JUICE (HYCei 

15800 U>s.-cantf per lb. 

18880 HUB Jen 11550 11880 

17750 11250 War 11X00 11980 

162J0 1115S May 11635 11950 

157 JD 11180 Jul 11750 11950 

180L50 nun sep nsjo nsjo 

11435 11150 Nov 

113180 11280 Jon 

16135 11158 Mar 

Mav 

Est. sales 1500 Prev. Sales 1.175 
Prov. Day Open Hit UM ua 567 


19132 19269 
19658 19655 
20050 19858 

20150 msa 


533 538 

631 632 

637 647 

651 662 

666 675 

634 685 

630 
735 763 


TUBS 18J0 
116.10 11935 
11638 11930 
11740 11950 
11530 11535 
11535 
116.15 
11635 
11635 


? sa:s 

18% + V 

r+s 

’tv W 

59% —1% 
20V— Vb 
52 + V 
43 — % 


5eS-Er 

17V— V 1 
21% + % 

2% 

X + V 
33V + V 
19% + V 
18 % + H 
28V— IV 
58V + % 

23 — % 
19% + % 
3%— V 
6 %—% 
3V— V 
37% 4- V 
18% 

13% + Vb 
19 + % 
14% 


.Industrials 


1 


Livestock 


Comrnotlities 


London 

Gommocliiies 


SINGAPORE COLD FUTURES 
UJJ per ounce 

_ HIM Law Settle Mb 

Pry N.T- N.T. 32230 31950 

JJb 32330 32180 32730 32380 

Mar N.T. N.T. 32830 32580 

Volume: 92 Ms at 100 ax. 

KU ALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malaysia cents per kite 

Close Previous 

. BM Ask Bid Ask 

Jan 17530 17630 17600 177301 Dec 

7430 17730 17730 17730 •£- 

Mar 17730 17600 ra» J7930 Say 

*Pr 17950 18050 18050 181 50 1 

MOV J8150 18250 T8Z50 18150 

J «7— — S.JfiOC 18530 18580 18630 
Volume: 0 tots. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
StiNMperv cents par uto 


EM Ask 
R55 1 Jan— 15130 15150 

RSSIFeb. 15330 15350 

RS5 2 Jon_ 14735 1MJ5 
RSS3 Jan— 14535 14635 
R5S 4 Jan_ 141 JS 1*075 
R55 J Jon— 13*35 13835 

KUAL A LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malaysia rlueeits per X tan 


Previous 
BM Ask 
15280 15250 

,5150 15480 

14735 14835 
14535 14675 

14135 14335 

13675 13835 


Previous 
BM 



Gommmfities 


Mar UBB UPS Uff 138 —14 

May MX MX MW M22 -7* 

Aug N.T. N.T. M» 1370 —II 

OCt N.T. M.T. 3/HO 1808 —IS 

Dec N.T. N.T. UflSS 1575 —12 

Mar N.T. N.T. txn 1580 —14 

Est. vaLjUXB lab of X toot. Piw. adwp 
sates: 2802 Ms. Opm interest: 29863 


Kmroffmnq 

CBOT 


I iilJCMl 


FUT U RES 

EHIi & 

FUTURES 

OPTIONS 

Also Futures and 

Futures Options on 
COMEX-GOLD & SILVER 
IMM-CURRENCIES 

IxCemUnAlki 


$ 15 


ROUND TL1LN 

my and 

Ol'tRNICHT 


'Applies t»Ur 10 tmda 
exixtdbtf; J50 ctterracts per 
calendar month First 2^0 
ajturuets S25 round utm. 


Call unc of nor pniresdonah- 

212 - 221-7138 

Telex: 277llhs 




4UR86iVmpc.Nl NT 8X18 

aepaUkSetbaalB^BlflBwM 

A 6,2 tuition Ovnram-Ul ItsiR 


May 22280 ZM35 21435 21530 EZ2S 22330 
Jrn 22280 21100 21325 2,450 22330 224X 
Jhr 22130 Z1280 21150 SMJ® 22235 22400 
Ana 22250 21280 21150 21230 22460 22730 
Volume: 5636 lots aMOD tons. 

CRUDE OIL (BREMT] 

U.S. detke-s per barrel 

Jan 27 JO 2635 2650 2670 2736 2735 

Feb 2620 2530 2530 2585 Z73S 27.10 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2X00 2X35 2630 2660 

MM N.T. NT. 2430 3430 2X95 2655 

May N.T. N.T. 2480 2X28 2X20 2630 

Jm N.T. N.T. 2360 2X20 2470 2630 

Volume: IB tot* Of 1300 barren. 

Source* : R a aMcs t u td London Pot r o in/ m Ejt- 
chanso foasott. crude oHJ. 


Dec 

vm 

1385 

139# 

130B 

+15 

Mar 

1325 

13TO 

1317 

1326 

+22 

(Hay 

N.T. 

N.T. 

W 


+ 38 

JW 

N.T. 

N.T. 

J3® 


+H 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1355 

— 

+ 38 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

13B 

— 

+ 30 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

UN 


+25 

Est. 

voL: 37 lata at to tone. Pnsy. actual 

iotas: 

33 tats, open Internet: 4«0 


COFFEE 





Froacti frnoc* par H8 kg 



Jan 

Z2W 

23BS 

2.195 

2348 

+ 22 

Mar 

2390 

2365 

2365 

23TO 

+ 13 

May 

335* 

2335 

un 

2336 

+ 19 

Jly 

238B 

2355 

2325 

2370 

+32 

Sep 

Z425 

Z415 

2397 

2315 

+ 27 

Nov 

26TO 

237B 

Z4B5 


+ 5 

Jan 

N.T. 

N.T. 

232B 

— 

+ 11 

EsL veL: 70 lata 0(5 tans. Prev. actual sates: 

MS lots. Open Internet:: 

117 



Source: Bourse ftu Commerce. 




US-Treasuries 




London IVletals 


9 


ALUMINUM 

Sktiibb pr aunc (a 

apt . «430 69680 67738 

tonmn, 71930 72030 70050 

COPPER CATHODES mm Grade} 

Start ton per metric toe 

SPOt 95050 951 JOB 94830 

forward 96960 97038 96X50 

COPPER CATHODES (StBBdanO 
Sterling per metrta tan 
■d _ 938JOO 94030 93630 

tanuard 95630 95880 95330 

LEAD 

Stertag per metric toe 

?P°I . 26630 26680 

bnmrd 27330 27480 27160 

NICKEL 

Sterling P6T metr ic tea 

tool . 273036 274030 270030 

forward 276X00 277530 279830 

SILVER 

Pence p*r fray onnee 
spot 48230 40330- 40630 

forward 41430 41530 41830 

TIN (Staada tt l 

Starting per metric 9 m 

snot Susa. SUSP. — 

forward Susa tesa. — 

ZINC 

f teropg per metric len 

SPOt 45330 45680 44330 

Source: Radon. 



Dec 9 

DlMBont 


Prev. 

Oder BM 

YtaM 

YleM 

SmeeRtbia 730 7.18 

733 

735 

tmeatebin 734 734 

743 

737 

WeorBB 768 766 

738 

734 
Prev. 1 

BM Ofler 

Yield 

Yield ; 

M-yr.bend H1WBM1WS 
Source: Sabrnoo Brother*. 

9J2 

9J6 

PMrrta LT»di Treasury teder: 13439 
Change far Ibe day: + Ul 

Average yield: 934 V 

Source: Merrill Lmdi 



w S&P100 
Index Options 




21J1 Jan 2X21 2X80 2X21 2X31 l«t 

24^B Jul 2X10 2X35 2X10 2SM 

74.W AUD 2532 2X02 2SJU 


COFFEE CfHYCSCS) 

37600 Rj^cmrtsperflS. 

1*150 12935 Dec 18030 
18227 12860 Mar 18430 


17760 17730 —237 
WHS 18237 +21 


18626 13130 MOV 18760 RB« W68 lKktt 

l».« 83X30 Jul 19230 19225 18X75 WM —S 


Girrency Options 


■Financial 


Stock Indexes 



sssassssi?*^ 

m* m S ^5 B SJJ 

287V 271 mot mi ££ SSS 

Est. Sale* PrevSahH 28M ' 285% 

Prw.DSopenl^iS 1 ^,, 166 


sa ss 


Commodity indexes 


DM Ritures 
Options 

IK GmntnmsMxmaeiH,m*o*mmk 


Dec. 9 

SHE* f ^ eB flE2 eM E- PsbMlta 

price Dee Mm Jon Dm Mar Jen 

3 MS “ X32 069 - " 

2 SS HS ^ mus- 

41 IS 187 — 149 1J8 — ' 

4} Ul 073 16D HZ IS - 

<1 — 159 — — US—- 

esttnmMl tau vol 1 as 

esBu PfLtai 1409 0PM IrLSJSI 

phn: FrUrnLUMepseiiADMl . . 

Source: CME. 


393 

9 38 

M9 

157 

7.16 

r- 

r 

036 

39/ 

5 39 

IMS 

.079 

144 

685 

Ofls 

649 

39/ 

5 4B 

US 

033 

694 

r 

672 

r 

39/ 

S 41 

r 

as? 

666 

r 

r 

■130 

12X0 

1 FWtodi Prapen-lBlks o( scent per MIL 



PFrt 

yc 125 

460 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

129 

35 130 


145 

330 

• r 

• r 

- r 

435MM Japanese Tb*-s«8k »ta cent per tm If. 



Jrer 

44 

• t ' 

• r • 

■ r • 

r 

■■ r 

004 

49.' 

4S . 

4.14 

r 

r 

r 

• r 

; - r 

49;' 

46 

388 

r 

r 

r . 



49.1 

47 

IW- 

268 

261 



619 

49.1 

48 

1.11 

134 

164 

601 

610 

-040 

49.1 

. m 

AM 

652 

694 

610 

oat 

OM 

49.1 

$0 

fug 

615 

651 

r 

'698 

•134. 

62688 Swiss Praocxents per pair. 





3 Franc 43 

46S 

. r 

. r 

r 

•r 

• • r 

47: 

44 . 

140 

..r 

r 

r 

r 

■ r 

47.1 

45. 

- 2JS 


r 

r 


634 

‘ 47J 

.46 

131 

131 - 

- r 

un 

61+ 

aar 

475 

47 

048 

OJO 

139 


043 

659' 

47J 

48. 

DM 

068 . 

• r 

67» 



473 

Tafed 

Total 

•- 49 

CuEvOL . 11 
pet vat x 

fttn 

\jm 

Uf 


* r 

Col 

• ra 

r 

epenl 

r 

0L 9 

■L 

'C 

07888 

8S3I5 


Market Gu 


WHAT WOULD m BE UK1 
WITHOUT TO 


\ il2Z r 4- 


EACH FRIDAY IN THE IHT 


.... 




































































1 is 







m 




F or investment professionals 
in the United Kingdom, 
1986-the year that is sup- 
posed to end with a bang- 
will also start with one. After well 
over six months of extensive 
planning and research, the edi- 
tors of Institutional Investor will 
present in January the most 
comprehensive report on British 
securities analysts ever pre- 
pared; The Institutional Investor 
All-British Research Team. 

Following in the tradition of ll’s in- 
ternationally known All-America 
Research Team, the British 
Team will be based on a survey 
of teading mdney managers that 
will rank analysts in nearly 40 in- 
dustry groups and other invest- 


ment categories. The result will 
not be a mere listing, but an in- 
depth analysis of the state of the 
research art that no investment 
professional in the U.K. or in any 
of the world's financial centers 
can afford to miss. 

For corporations, brokerage 
houses and firms facing the 
fierce competition sure to result 
from next October Ist’s Big 
Bang, the All-British Research 
Team issue affords a critical, 
strategic opportunity: the 
chance to command the atten- 
tion of the world's business and 
financial elite-the more than 
95,000 subscribers to Institu- 
tional Investor worldwide. (In- 
cluding the nearly 10,000 in the 


U.K. -over two and a half times 
as many as delivered by Euro- 
money.) 

For further information contact 
Christine Cavofina, European 
Advertising Manager in London 
at (01) 379-7511. Or, contact 
Denise C. Coleman, V.R& Direc- 
tor of Advertising-Inf 1 Edition, in 
New York at (212) 303-3388. 

Issue closing date: December 
13, 1985. 


Banque Paribas 
Capital Markets Limited 

Bergen Bank A/S 

Chemical Bank 
International Group 

Credit Commercial de France 


EBC Amro Bank 
Limited 

Hessische Landesbank 
- Girozentrale - 


Bayerische Hypotheken- und 

Wechsel-Bank 

Aktiengesellschaft 

Berliner Bank 
Aktiengesellschaft 

CIBC 

Limited 

Daiwa Europe (Deutschland) 
GmbH 

Genossenschaftliche 
Zentralbank AG - Vienna 

Industriebank von Japan 

(Deutschland) 

Aktiengesellschaft 


Kyowa Bank Nederland N.V. Merrill Lynch Capital Markets 
Morgan Guaranty GmbH Morgan Stanley International 


nsti 


or 


litfflIG IN JANUARY: THE ALL-BM1HI RESEARCH TEAM 


The Nikko Securities Co., 
(Deutschland) GmbH 

Orion Royal Bank 
Limited 

Salomon Brothers 
International Limited 

Trinkaus & Burkhardt KGaA 


Nippon Kangyo Kakumaru 
(Europe) Limited 

PK Christiania Bank (UK) 
Limited 


Bayerische Landesbank 
Girozentrale 


Chase Bank AG 
Citibank 

Aktiengesellschaft 

Deutsche Girozentrale 
- Deutsche Kommunalbank 

Goldman Sachs 
International Corp. 

Kredietbank International 
Group 

Mitsubishi Finance 
International Limited 

Nederlandsche 
Middenstandsbank nv 

Nomura Europa GmbH 




it # sgs isss a f suss* ccsmsifssse trsst cftss scg 



























































Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1985 



9 lft UFoodB 

16tt 11* UHWejj 12 

29* mb USAGwt 
t* su UrHWlV _ 

22ft 14ft UnHjln IJ2 M 7 

T4* 10* UnvCm 14 

8% Mb Unh/Rs If 

vs* isftUnwRu m 44115 

15% 10* UnvPot 


Tables Include Hie nationwide prices 
up to Hie closing on Wall street 
and do not reflect lot* trades elsewhere. 


(Continued from Page 


204. IMS 
3Va ft 

su. 3ft 
in n. 
am as* 
wa m 
16* s* 

m K 

39* 33V. 

V 8* 

19* 12* 
16* 13* 
im m 

6* 3* 

a m 

3* 9Vb 
22 * 10% 
31* 22 
10 7* 

Jft 1* 


TexAE pfl57 137 
ThorEn 

TfirO A .10 27 
Tofu 9 

TdEdpnojs 121 
Toner J9ii« 
toMPte 34 
TolPlwt 

TotPtpf 2JB 102 
TrraL* 3S? 16 
TmaToc M U 
Tronzon M 28 
TrISM JOI 
TrlHmo 
Tridox 
TwbJWflj. 

TumBn 

TumrC IJ0 U 
TmE«n .1* 18 
Tvlrwts 


18* 18% 
l a 

7PK 3* 
8 6% 

! 76* 76* 
9* 2* 
lift It 
1* 1*< 
20* 20* 
13* 1» 
16* 16* 
16* 15* 

Mb ru 
6* 4 
4% 6* 

2 * 2 * 
15* 15* 
24ft 24ft 
su. a* 

i* i* 


Tt-fc 

3* 

7ft— ft 
76* 

2ft— * 

28*- ft 
12ft 

16ft + ft 
15ft 

9ft- ft 
4ft 

6* + ft 
3ft 

13ft- ft 
24ft— ft 
8ft + ft 
1* 


10* 9ft 
20ft W 
30 17ft 
10 2ft 
23ft lift 
6* 3* 
ft ft 
13ft Bft 
a* 2* 
10% 5ft 
9 3% 

4ft 1% 

taft mo 
9ft aft 
12* 7ft 

aw s 


VST MtM 
Vall/R s uo u n 
Valspr* M 1 J T7 


JO 18 34 


VtouelG JObU 10 
Vopto* M AA II 


1ft 1ft 
12ft 19ft + ft 
T4A 15* + * 
5% 5% — ft 
2111. 21* + ft 
10* ink— ft 
6ft Mb— ft 
17 17ft— ft 

11% 12* + ft 


0% 9ft 
20ft 20ft 
28% 28ft + ft 

17ft 18 + % 

* 

M* 10*— ft 
4ft 4ft + W 
5ft 5ft— ft 
5 5ft 
2ft 2ft 
18ft 18* + ft 
9ft 9ft- ft 
9ft 9ft 
4 4 -ft 


IZMaittt git Qw 

HM«uwja* DjV.YW.PE &M1WIUW Sgqro. 

IB* gbW WBf C 19 O M » ntb 

13ft ■»> 14 144 12ft 19ft 12ft— ft 

15ft 6ft WDtsftl 29 574 9ft 9* 9ft + ft 

23ft 7V4 WTMJUi n II 1B6 IT 10ft 10ft- ft 

21ft 17 WIRET US 78 14 5 20 19% 20 + ft 

«* lift WhrEne 30 » mb inb 17ft- ft 

< 3ft Wjgtita . . 44 2ft 2ft 2ft— W 

Sg> 3 WjdcM 9 1608 4ft 4ft 4U 

3* ftWlOtaswt 70 1ft Hi 1ft— ft 

32ft 24ft WldceapQJD 87 25 2? 21% 2Rk + ft 

13ft « Wtenern A0 *A 7 1 9 1 V +* 

2ft 1 WJbnB 32 1 ft l - ft 

6ft lft WtoE B 213 4 3ft A - ft 


7* 3ft WlnEA 
23ft imwtotln 234ellJ 9 
46* 37* WHSPpf 4J0 M 

10ft 8 VWstrm AO *A 33 

22* lift WkWwr J3 U I 

S* 2% WTMdeE 

17ft 13ft WWdepf 1J0 1 U 

21* 9 wontw .351 

21% 14ft Wrottir SB .1 28 


8ft Oft Yank Co 


18 84 7* 7 


3ft 1* UNA 

3ft 2 USRInd 

92* Bft UHmtB 17 

13* *F» Unicorn _ 23 

15ft 11* Untcapf 35 50 
lift 8% Unlmar 173419.1 
23ft 15* UAIrPd -MS 12 15 
2* 1* UFoodA .10 47 


3 1W 1* 1W— W 

4 2ft 2ft 9ft 

17 430 21ft 90ft 21V. + ft 
23 97 lift lift lift—* 

32x 14ft 14ft 14* + U 
432 10* 10* 10*— ft 
15 10 24* 24 24* + ft 

23 I* 1ft 1* 



INVITATION TO BID 


REPUBLIQUE ISLAMIQUE DE MAURITANIE 


Foods National de Devdoppement (END) BPs 648 - 
Nouakchott - Avenue Garoaf AJbdd Nacer • Immeobk 
AFABCO - Mauritania. Telex: FND 840 MTN - TCUnhone: 
533 46 - 535 12. 


FND intends to finance a number of OCEAN FREEZING 
STERN TRAWLERS to be exploited by Mauritanian ship owners 
in Mauritanian waters (North-West Africa) for deep sea filing of 
cephalopoda, shrimps and other demersal species. 


FND — a development bank — her ewith i nvi tes in terested firms to 
submit bids for <I0) ten OCEAN FREEZING STERN TRAWLERS 
having the following characteristics to be delivered in 1986. 


— Gross tonnage: about 270 CRT 

— Overall length: 35 metres 

— Depth: 3.60 metres 

— Breadth: 8.5 metres 

— Main engine power; 1,000 HP 
— Speed on the older of 12 knots 

— Pish hold. Capacity: 160 tons fish hold to be maintained at 

temperature of ■25°C. 

— Freezing capacity: 8 tons per day provided by at least two indepeo. 
deni tunnels 

— Two independent refrigeration systems 

— Accommodation for crew: 18 to 24 men 

— Fresh water capacity: 46 m J 

— Fuel capacity: 100 metric lorn or at least 45 days cruising range 

1 — Fishing gears winches and nets to fish deep sea species ^cephalo- 
poda, shrimps, other demeisals) 

- — Two auxiliary engines 
— Two generators 150 kVA each 

— Standard safety, navigation and fish localisation equipment accord- 
ing to "Bureau veritas", specifications 

— Trawlers can be 

(a) all new; 

(b) all second band not exceeding 6 years of age 

(c) some new and some second bond not exceeding 6 years of age 
— Trawlers should be classified by '^Bureau veritas” or have an 

equivalent classification 

— Second hand trawlers and their main parts should have certificates 
of expertise from "Bureau veritas” or Lloyds. They should be 

maintained in good condition 

— Bids should include maximum information on trawlers and their 
parts; specifications as well as drawings and photographs for second 
hand boats 

— Eng i n e and other main equipment should be from the same 
manufacturers for all 10 trawlers 

— Financial arrangements should be included as well as timing for 
delivery and nil other pertinent information and proposals 

“Bids Mould be for trawlers ready to fish and oil Nouadbibou, 
Mauritania 

“Bids should be submitted to FND at above address no later than 
January 31, 1966 for opening the mim day 

— Bids should be valid for at lust 6 months from die date of bids 
opening 

— References should be given on financial as well as technical 
capabilities of bidding firms and on their previous experience in the 
field of shipbuilding 

— For clarification or additional information FND can be contacted at 
the above address 

■— A 1% guaranty is required to be allowed to BID 

— BIDDING DOCUMENTS can be obtained from the following 
addresses: 

(1) FND: Immeuble AFABCO, Avenue Gamal Abdel Nacer, 

BP- 648 Nouakchott, Mauritania 

Teles FND 840 MTN: Telephone: 535-12/533-46 
for the sum of 20,000 Ouguiya 

(2) 5NTM: 5 Rue Scribe, Paris 75009, France 
Telephone 4742-14-70 

far Inc sum of 2.000 FF. 


4ft 4* 
7 6* 

19ft 18ft 

ft 

12V. 12 
17*115% 
15ft IS 
Aft 6% 
9 Bft 
3K 3ft 
14ft 14 

^ -£ 

3* 2ft 
9* 9ft 
10% 10* 
10 94k 

9% 9ft 

3ft 3ft 
39 39 

1* I 
40ft 40ft 



AMEX Highs-Lovro 


ATT Fd 
BtoRad A > 

FalrmnfFlnl 

Lionel wtA 

NewmrkLewr 
PUs 76401 
Tasty Bk A 


ArgoPilrl 

GoplevPropn 

GamcoMoH 

HWftnsHcs 

FffirflCH 

Tolu s 

MmEntAwl 


NEW HIGHS 37 

Andal AnsWnFnn 

Brown For A Brown For B 
NrWooniS HWlYCpwl 
MCO Holding MoeN&ch 
NohwCs ohtoAif Co 
PBSPLpfD RMS Elocfr 
UnAfrPrd WeMTAm 

NEW LOWS 25 

AMosCM BanwMInd 
DemRexlnn Diatom Inc 
GnDtfnaa Gen Empty 
JetAmerwf KevftCamwt 
Pr«mR»CDto StMpwpIlc 
UNA Carp VemoCP 


Floatin^fiaieNotes 


Ac 9 iMner/NkiL 


MJS ftJS 
99M *934 

9946 9916 

9947 99 J7 

9931 W3S 

9934 

9932 


Texaco Seeks to Answer 
BiUion-Dollar Questions 


(GHrimned from Page 11) 

ty was a key issue in the trial. The 
jurors concluded that Texaco had 
acted ina ppr op ri ately. 

Before Pemtzoil and Getty Oil 
directors had signed their nreger 
agreemeut, it was topped by Tex- 
aco, whose $ 125-a-sharc offer was 
announced Jan. 6. 1984, and ulti- 
mately expanded to indnde all the 
Getty shares at $128 each. 

Texaco had won. Pennzoil had 
lost, bm it convinced the Houstcm 
that Texaco had stolen Getty 


with its agreement. What was the 
value of that, loss? What damag e 
had Pennzoil actually suffered 
when Texaco outbid it? The jury 
concluded that Pennzoil had lost 
access to the 1 billion barrels of 
Getty oil to which its three-se- 
venths share would have entitled iL 
Pennzoil had testified that it 
spent an average of $10.87 to find a 
barrel of oil over the past five years, 
and the jury agreed with Pemuofl 
that it would hive to spend at least 
that much in the next 25 years to 
find new barrels to replace the Get- 
ty reserves that it lost 
_ The multiplication was S10.87 
times 1 billion barrels, producing 
almost $10.9 bHUon as the value of 
the Getty OH reserves that PenuzoO 
lost Then the jury subtracted 
about S3.4 billion, the total cost for 
Pennzoil to buy its anticipated 
share of Getty. That left the 
amountfor actual damages at $7.53 
billion. 

The jury, concluding that Tocaco 
had acted with “intentional, willful 
and wantota disregard” of Penn* 
soil’s rights, tacked on S3 bQlion in 
punitive damages to “send a mes* 
sage” to Texaco and other big com- 
panies about proper corporate be- 
havior. That made the total $10.53 
billion. Interest charges ran it to 
more than $11 billion. 

After risky, but not uncommon, 
tactics for damage trials, Texaco 
offered no evidence during trial at 


what it thought the damage award 
should be. “Texaco chose not to 
bring in its experts,” Joseph D. 
Taro ail Jjr^ Fennzofl’s lend attorney, 
said Last week. Instead, it “chose to 
sit on its hands." 

That left Texaco’s attorneys no 
choice but to offer arguments be- 
fore Judge Casseb about their ver- 
sion of what a fair award would be 
if Texaco were obliged to pay, Mr. 

Jamail sakL 

“Something went wrong with 


were c o nfused," said Texaco’s at- 
torney, Richard Keeton. He argued 

that aQ Pennzoil was entitled to in 
damages was the value of what it 
bad intended to buy — three-se- 
venths of Getty OiFs stock. Penn- 
zoQ’s agreement was to buy Getty 
stock, not Getty ml reserves, Mr. 
Keeton said. 

Texaco's attorneys said the 
agreement in princqjle between , 
Penuzdl and Getty contains mere- 
ly the promise that Pennzoil roigh * 1 
gain access to Getty’s ml in the 


cannot be the baas for the jury’s 
award of damages. 

At best, from Texaco's stand- 
point, it owed Pennzoil nothing. At 
worst, all it had coming was the 
difference between what it had pro- 
posed to pay and what Texaco aid- 
nuudy paid, a difference tf $1550 
a share, or about $460 miHiftn 

Or, damages could be figured an. 
entirely different way to produce 
dama ges in the $500-grinioa range, 
Texaco told Judge Casseb. Uang 
some of the Pennzoil witnesses’ tes- 
timony, Texaco catadated that it 
would cost Pennzoil $ 3,9 bfflkm to 
replace the 1 billion barrels of Get- 
ty oa it lost in the next 25 yean — 
not $10.9 bOfion. Its cost of acquir- 
ing that oil from Getty — had the 

flgfeemoit gone through — would 
“we been $3.4 biHioo. Difference: 
$500 naHjq n_ 


ADVERTISEMENT d) ] 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by 


Net and rofaw wwtatton* an mwl M tor ON Mu* Mad -rtXWMrtr; tll-l 

TV more h*n *mU»o*» IpOKb M ftw w ncy W owBatiow wwMad: W » 


Dec 9,-1985' 


9 1606 4ft 4* 4ft 

25 Vk 1% 1%-ft 

I? 25 29 . 28% 23ft + * 
W 7 1. 9 9„ 9 +ft 

32 t ft 1 -ft 

313 4 3ft 4 — ft 

„ M 3ft 3H 3ft— ft 
[3 9 32 19% 19V: 19% + ft 
J IQQc 46 45% 45% - ft 
A 33 4 9 9 9 

U 8 21 22 22 22 

213 3ft 3% 3ft— ft 

14 9 14* 14* 14*— ft 

345 lift 11 lift--- ft 
.1 28 222 18ft 17ft 18% + ft 



Bio Pod Lb B s 
CrwnCnP B 
LandmorK 
AUdta 
PGE254pfT 
Shorn" Shoo 


Baruch Foot 
FalrrnntCh 
GrahainOG 
Mumtiy] nd 
TharEngy 
Wilson Bro 




Ik 


m 


m 








m 


& 




m 


% 75179 
1 KOJ3 
FI 51.15 

s mn 




one 


DM- OaatKOw Mark; BF-8dn iuni Francs; FL-Dtfth Florin: LF-Uanwwboum Fnww ECU - Bgrown Curroncy UnH; SF ■ Swtei Francs; _a ■ jafcaOi +; OWar.Prtcntra -JUtbe am 
P/V SlOtoSl BBT unit; NLA.- Not Avaltabta; NjC. - NatCMimHmlcaMn- New; S -Mmuhd; S/S- Slock SPOti •- Ex-Ohrtdand; — - Ex-Rts; Gross Pertoi- motiro Indus OdMwr, ■- 
Radaowt- Prtcn-SN-OMMni w-MrmnrtvwSMwMa Fund Lidi 0.-O(tarPrtcnlncLK prollm. dmu ++- dolly stack mice os on Amsterdam Stack Exchange . . u 



INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


AUTOMOBILES 




AN EXOTNO JOftM JOUMAUSM 
it awdable to *• 

HMTOR 

who has at lead H) yean wriiina / 

3SBS»!^a3fe3M 

PAMS AREA UNFURNISHED 

OIA1 0B OMNDS AUGUSTINS everti hamaa taeoce, ott.lei. 


n Stine, 96 Kun. Entrance, krae w*i Mt- 
, 2 beioomt both. F1«X»V ^ 
l T«t 43 44 23 25. ^Eirof 





REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


TheEvopecfiafficeofaniaioriaiBmo- 
liond ma pgim b <xUna a ynuig, 
ww^notiei Editor to ft Trobawd 

CanckJaka ibould md dltaM r*. 
mm, wdwfaa laraplwof tojffci to 


Bat 2980. Hm4d Tribom, 
92521 Nauly Codex, Fran 


P W HA5S T SHIS KNA1AX SOIX 
mtaraatic; 1982 modal, epliarft 
6U00 bm Prioh F35JOOJ. Tafc 47 a 
54 25 from 10 to 2pm 


AUTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCAR 

THE CAR HnWG 
SVH3AUSTS 

PARS ni 42 25 64 44 

ONNE5/NKE 93) 39 43 44 
HMNXHJRT |061 071 » 51 

BONN / GOtOGhE I022S 21 2921 
SIUTTGMT 1070311 B80B1 

MUNCH gj@9] n 10 45 

B8&HHAV04 JD47TJ 43063 
NEW YORK m 2) 695 7061 

HOUSTON na 931 7605 

LOS ANGELES 213) 568 9288 

MONTREAL 514 666 6631 

AGBm WO«n VBBE 
Leaw b to ut to bring it to you 


AUTOS TAX 


TRASCO 


I la’.V 


The Macedes Specrafist 

S a m U i rnl Limamnei 
Anno urod Con 
Gxxfrbuib Can 
H*A & DOT 
100 Units a Stodi 
DrecJ from Sources 
Worldwide Dcfivary. 

65-67 ftik tone, London W.l. 

Tet 144) 1 ■ 6297779 
Tafcw (51) 8956022 Trcn G 

Gomnaiy - London - Switzerland 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


inuMiia 
LAST MINUTE FARE 

rejovonon authoriznd witfin 
3 days pnar to dtperturo 


>;i 


ftvr 


AUTO CONVERSION 



MBKB3E5 SPEOAUSTS 
FOR USA + MIDDLE EAST 

„ 186 Madeb Irani Stole 
SHpwmt & dsfrvnry worldwide. 

NASSAR EXPORT GMBH, 

MARmi LAMSTIL 191 
WdOOmAMOURr/M 
ms (01 69-73 30 61 
TLX: 414018 


COOP® ST. JAMES 

OmOAI. AQENT 
OF BMW (OS) LID 
WHn you w n m Europe, wo can offer 

Wf hmd 

fra !j i T ’ * ' ourai r™* 

prorf BMW i and the Alpina BMW 
range tax free 

Crf London pi) 639 6699 


ACCESS USA 

Om Way band Trip 
Nw York FI 50(5 F2990 

Iro Angeles F2600 M170 

Chiczno FI 590 R4SJ 

HtoaT F2980 F3450 

Odondo F2590 F345D 

Dolac F3430 F3660 

Montmal RB90 . F3000 

and (acre dedmotions _ 

15% cfacomi on Id dam 
RAIS lob (It 42011 46 94 
(Cor- uc 1502) 




*’< Cbiwtaeh now, Fermi 
SOBGft row. P.CT. Belgium Tet 
03/731J9JXL 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


JEAN DELOR 

JEWELER - CREATOR - 

F YOU COME TO PAHS DON7 MS5 
OUR JEWa COLLECTION, 

TO4ch quauty a iwmmoN. 

REASONABLE PBCB. 


SailNG, BUYING. EXCHANGES. 

TAX FREE 


PARIS 8TH 
faonggarest. lazak 
THi 42 94 25 S5 


ESCORTS & GUIDES | ESCOSTS A GUIDES | ESCORTS A GUIDES | ESCORTS A GUIDES J ESCORTS A GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

ravtCE 

USA « WOR1DWDE 

Head office in New Yoric 
330 W. 56th St. N.YC 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212 - 765-7754 



★ LONDON * 

'’SSSTSRS Sf 1 


LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

Escort Sendee. 

T«fc 736 58 77 . 















































































Page 17 




EYFEKNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1985 


echtenstein’s 


furt and Buenos Aires. A Rio de' 


r,^^prtinuedfroei Page 11 ) 

Z!!'s 1 *i has'beeii on display itthe Janeiro office wffl open next year, 
-pb&taii Museum, of Art' in And sources say the h»nk is con- 
-.-f^ rbik CSty — the first time it - - 

^.^S3ea visible in a angle show. 



'Wdttkmd from the Sweden- 


_ a Far East office.. 

. . docs a bank, supported as it 
is by poUtkal and economic stahiL- 


bS';W alknberg finan cia l empire, ■ ity, a tradition of hanking privacy, 
^.Voigren Jsad worked at Scan- and pref er en tial local- tax laws, 
J; & Bank in Loudon and was ' choose to enter the cutthroat worid 


“vjoait of Deotsche-Scaodina^ 
’ • ■Bant in Frankfort when he 


''** - ; '<x.Tcd away by the prinedy rul- 

* a year of his amvat Mr. 

- a was presiding over die 

‘/.v^-'.flsseas branch a the Liech- 

’^s.d tank — ™ London. Today powers to rdax the. hanlr secrecy 
-*./*£• -inch is a full-service invest- -mrfp wW^h ha* tA VHIlA)l 


of international banking? 

Because, according to bankers 
here and in Switzerland, there is 
always (bechance —however far in 
the future — that Liechtenstein 
could succumb to pressure from 
the United States and other major 



e Empire Oil Prices 
Fall After 
OPEC Shift 


CURRENCY MARKETS 


-C-.banL "London is a lough money to the country. 

_:j mx. xt tl_» u l ' . 

C- k 


code, winch has lured so much Crown Prince Hans Adam 


said Mr. Norgren, pfoud- 
'^-Ca it’s the only true market in 

•- -o'i and we’ve become well es- 
-'^.ed there.” 

hanlr snbadsria, itwiHng 
portfolio management 
. ^vestment counseling, fol* 
0\in New York, Zuri c h. Frank- 


3 : : -;^poa to Slash 
\;?^padfy by 25% 

1 The Associated Press 

= V^tTSBURGH — Alumi- 
.>■ l^'Co. of America, the largest 
^^. alummnm producer, arid 
^ -^-Cday that it would charge 
: '™Hion to fourth-quarter 
■;;.C^ngs to cover the eventual 
“ ’ ■i'jJT'iJ® of a fourth erf its metal- 
capacity. 

~ |£f<coa said the after-tax 
■\y fj'je was necessary to bring 
;.*= .©duction capacity into line 
sJ-f—Z.. the world oversupply of 
; ’c^r.'^ num ’ depressed prices 
: growing involvement of 

-'-.gn governments in ahmri- 
• : v^^^production. 

company, now operating 
1 ^ ‘.percent of capacity, said it 
J ■ : ~^d eventually dose fadQmes 
de of producing about 

— ^ 00 tons of metal, or 25 
; --^tnt (rf its capadty of 1.4 

- • r ^ ’’m tons per year. The com- 

— 'Said it also would discon- 
■ n 1 1 *«. funding its new Alcoa 
(OK'ing process. 


Tbat-could happen to the Swiss, 
'too. Bat bankets in Liechtenstein 
also fear that someday Switzerland 
may amend its laws, some of whkh 
are less favorable to corporations 
than are Liechtenstein's, to better 
compete with Liecht^netmii fen: 
banking and corporate business. 

Thai, too, the tax h&vea business 
is not what it once was. Although 
about 50,000 corporations stiH reg- 
ister in Liechtenstein to daim it as 
their official home, competition for 
their business is bating up. These 
days, k is sometimes less expensive 
for a corporation to register m Pan- 
ama or to hide money from tax 
collectors in the Channel islandu 

For now, though, the Liechten- 
stein bank is doing quite wdL Last 
year, it had assets of nearly 3.6 
billion Swiss francs ($1.71 billion at 
current exchange rates), up from 2 
biltion francs four years ago, when 
Mr. Norgren first arrived. .... 

As he takes this mouse-that- 
roared financial empire into the rat 
race erf international ventures, Mr. 
Norgren has been especially active 
in the United States. The ventures, 
he says, have had mixed results. 

In New York City, the Bank in 
Liechtenstein has opened BIL 
Management Inc. as a bank 
branch, which Mr. Norgren hopes 
to develop *11110 a very good port- 
folio management business.” BIL 


recently took on a West Coast part- 
ner to bdp it market its services 
more effectively. Mr. Norgren said 
that once the venture “has proven 
itself, we could weD deepen our 


investment into private hanking.”. 

Is Boston, the Prince of Liech- 
tenstein Foundation has started 
two venture capital companies. — 
Transatlantic Capital Corp. and 
Transatlantic Investment Corp. 
Hie companies are engng pri in a 
joint venture with the WaOenberg 
interests to get involved in U.S. 
industrial and financial projects. 
Most of these ventures, said Mr. 
Norgren, are “computer-linked 
h igh tech.” But, he added, “We are 
also interested in more traditional 
investments, proven products with 
proven markets — mostly pharma- 
ceuticals.” 

An agricultural project in Texas 
and Arkansas, begun by the Prince 
of Liechtenstein Foundation about 
11 years ago, recently signed on 
International Paper Corp. as a ven- 
ture partner. The operation, called 
Farms of Texas Co, involves about 
50,000 acres (20,180 hectares), 
mostly of rice. The company har- 
vests, processes, packages and sells 
the products. 

Mr. Norgren says tire agricultur- 
al project is “quite successful,” BIL 
Management is on target, and the 
venture eapfi results “have been 
pretty good — I shouldn’t like to 
ay successful yet.” 

The Bank in Liechtenstein was 
founded in 2920, the year the na- 
tion of Liechtenstein joined in a 
customs utiinti with Switzerland 
and adopted the Swiss curren cy. 
The bank an inupwmniiar 
start; in the mid- 1930s, h almost 
went bankrupt 


But under Franz Josef n, who 
began bis rule of Liechtenstein, in 
1958, the bank has prospered, 
along with the country. At the end 
of World Warn, half the popula- 
tion was toiling at agricultural pur- 
suits. Today, just four decades (at-. 
er, the country is highly 
industrialized. One in 20 Liechten- 
steiners works in banking. Better 
than half ibe working population is 
engaged in industry, and there is a 
constant shortage of skilled help. 

Unemployment is virtually un- 
known among Liechtenstein’s 
26,000 people. The standard of liv- 
ing is among the highest in the 
world: The average income is more 
than S 15,000, double that of Brit- 
ain. Exports are expected to read) 
$500 nnBiou tins year. 

Liechtenstein has been able to 
offer advantages to corporations 
that not even the Swiss can match. 
The principality, for example, does 
not have the 35-percem withhold- 
ing tax an investment income that 
the Swiss da 

Moreover, banking privacy is 
considered to be even safer here 
than it is in Switzerland, where 
pressure is mounting, notably from 
the United States, to disclose the 
dealings of suspected tax evaders. 
There is a saying in Switzerland 
that hanVjr* here love to repeat: 
“If you want a real Swiss bank 
account, go to Liechtenstein." 

As Liechtenstein pushes to ex- 

S 1 its financial kingdom. Crown 
ce Hans Adam is promoting a 
project that would extend ns diplo- 
matic range — membership in the 
United Nations. 

“We are very small here," the 
prince says, “and who knows, 
somedaysomeone might decided to 
swallow us up. UN membership 
would give us that extra bit of le- 
gitimacy as a national enti ty” 
United Nations membership 
would provide Liechtenstein with 
access to all the economic and so- 
cial data prepared by UN agencies. 

And. Prince Hans Adam says, 
“We could make excellent contacts 
at the United Nations. If Liechten- 
stein is gong to move out into the 
world, we are going to need all the 
help we can get" 


Pound Weakens on Oil-Price Fears 


. (Continued from Page I) 
share in the world oil market con- 
sistent with the necessary income 
for member countries 

Mr. Hernandez Grisami and 
some others suggested that OPECs 
proper share of the market would 
be from 16 million to 18 million 
barrels a day. Sheikh Yamani said 
it should be “wd! above" 16 mil- 
lion. 

OPEC output currently is run- 
ning at an estimated 18 minio n 

barrels a day as producers take ad- 
vantage of a seasonal swell in de- 
mand, but the average for 1985 will 
be closer to OPECs current self- 
imposed ceiling of 16 million. . 

The testing time for OPEC is 
likely to come early next year when 
winter demand for healing oil de- 
clines, analysts said. Some forecast 
that demand for OPEC oil wiB slip 
below 15 milli on in the second 
quarter. 

If OPEC wants to take a much 
larger share of the market, it would 
have to undercut prices charged by 
other producers, a step that could 
speed up the erosion of oQ prices 
registered over the past five years. 

Saudi Arabia, OPECs largest 
producer, holds the key, analysts 
say. 

Sheikh Yamani has said repeat- 
edly that his country no longer 
would slash output during periods 
of weak demand to prop up prices. 
Financial considerations would 
make it very difficult for the Saudis 
to accept a big drop from their 
current level of around 4 million, 
which is double the 20-year low hit 
last summer. 

Many oilmen say prices could 
fall at least several dollars next year 
from the current range of around 
$25 to $29. But Miss Baker, the 
analyst ai Green well, said that be- 
fore prices went as low as $20. the 
Saudis and others would be likely 
to trim their output in an attempt 
to brake the fall. 


Compiled hr Our Staff Fnm Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The British 
pound fell more than 2 cents Mon- 
day in the wake of an agreement by 
oil minister of the Organization of 
Petroleum Exporting Countries to 
protect the cartel’s share of the 
world oQ market 

Hie dollar dosed f inner, but cur- 
rency dealers said trading was slow 
in advance of key U.S. economic 
data to be reported h ter this week. 
Market attention was focused on 
the pound, they said. 

In Geneva, OPEC ministers said 
the cartel would vigorously defend 
its market share and vowed stiff 
price competition with non-OPEC 
oil producers such as Britain. Until 
now, OPEC has tried to limit oil 
production to keep prices up. 

Britain is the world's fifth-largest 
oil producer, and lower oil prices 
would reduce the country's tax rev- 
enues and foreign-exchange earn- 
ings. Thus, the pound is sensitive to 
oil-price swings. 


tn New York, the British curren- 
cy fell to $1.4595 from SI. 4820 at 
Friday's close after falling to 
51.4585 from 51.4775 in earlier 
London trading. The pound also 
Tell in London 10 3.6953 Deutsche 
marks from 3.7310 on Friday. 

Dealers said that currency mar- 
kets had already taken (he pound 
10 its lows by the time the OPEC 
policy was officially announced. 
They said the currency then hdd 
steady for the remainder of the day 
after the Bank of England appar- 
ently intervened to support it above 
the day’s lows. 

Trading remained extremely thin 

for (be rest or the day in the ab- 
sence of any fresh factors, they 
said. “Everyone is wailing to see 
how oil prices move now.” one 
dealer in London said. 

Meanwhile, the dollar firmed in 
quiet trading marked by a continu- 
ing reluctance among operators to 
lake positions, dealers said. Mar- 
kets were awaiting UJs. economic 


data to be reported later this week, 
including November retail sales 
and producer prices, they said. 

In New York, the dollar rose to 
2.5330 DM from 2.5255 on Friday; 
to 20335 yen from 20335; to 
7.7250 French francs from 7.7065. 
and to 11135 Swiss francs from 
2.1060. 

In earlier trading in Europe, the 
U.S. currency rose in London to 
23345 DM from Friday's dose of 
15240; to 203.50 yen from 20335, 
and to 11160 Swiss francs from 
11070. 

In other European markets 
Monday, the dollar was fixed at 
midaftemoon in Frankfurt at 
15310 DM. up from 15240 at the 
Friday fixing; at 7.7203 French 
francs in Pans, up from 7,700. and 
at 1,723.00 lire in Milan, up from 
1,721.00. In Zurich, the dollar 
closed at 2.1123 Swiss francs, up 
from 11080 on Friday. 

(Reuters, AP) 


THE EUROMARKETS 


New Issues light in Pre-Holiday Slowdown 


By Christopher Pizzey 

Reuters 

LONDON — The secondary 
market of the Eurobond market 
was generally little changed Mon- 
day in quiet trading, and the prima- 
ry market also had a slow day, 
dealers said. 

‘The plain truth is, the market’s 
beginning to wind down for Christ- 
mas,” one dollar-straighi trader at 
a U.S. house said. He added that 
trading was almost entirely by pro- 
fessionals during the day. 

One doHar-straigbt t ransactio n 
emerged, the expected two-tranche 
offering totaling $205,765 million 
from Equitable-Lord Realty Corp„ 
a unit of Equitable Life Assurance 
Col 

One tranche, of $105,765 mil- 
lion, pays 10K percent over 10 


years. The other, a S100- million. 
12-year tranche, pays lO 1 -? percent. 
Both were priced at 99 J i. Tne issue 
is secured by an assignment of 
rents payable under a lease by Eq- 
uitable Life: 

The first tranche ended at a dis- 
count of P» percent, and the sec- 
ond dosed at a discount of about 
H 1 ! percent. The fees were 2 percent 
and 2to> percent, respectively. The 
lead manager was Goldman Sachs 
Internationa) Corp. 

Otherwise, new activity was con- 
centrated on other currency sec- 
tors. with two issues emerging in 
(he Australian dollar market. 

ANZ Ba nking Group Ltd. issued 
a 50-million-Australian-dolIar 
bond paying 15U percent over four 
years and priced at 100*4. Payment 
for the issue can be m Deutsche 


marks or U.S. dollars; the coupon 
is payable in U.S. dollars. The lead 
manager, Orion Royal Bank LttL, 
quoted tbe issue at a discount of IS 
percent, inside the total Tees of l’a 
percent. 

Total CFP issued a bond of 40 
million Australian dollars, due Oc- 
tober 1990, paying 14*4 percent 
and priced at par. The lead manag- 
er was Banque Paribas Capita] 
Markets. Dealers said the issue was 
offered outride its total 2 percent 
fees at a discount of 2‘i percent. 

1 matron Voima Oy issued a 
bond of 50 million European cur- 
rency units paying 9 percent over 
10 years and priced at par. The 
issue was led by Kansams-Osakc- 
Pankki and ended within the 2 - 
percem fees at a discount of ltt 
percent. 


Mondayh 

ore 

IVices 

NASDAQ prion as of 
3 p.m. New York time. 

Via The Associated Press 

NO Low 3 PM . Oh* | 

nw 


niton* 
MgbLovr 9 m 


10 



sea 1.1 


I 



r.: - ! _ Amnr* 
- — Amrwst 
• Anwan 
i AmokB 
i Ampdt 
5 hj . Antaalc 

1 | 1 1 Anamn 

* i Andrew 


Mr 2JB 
■24 IjO 


1,40 34 


44 14 


JO 4J 


1« IS 


uw ww- 


4 + Ml 




■MA 
1 + 




I CQnwrs 
Gomctf 


:K Aft 


24W 


Jk CamAm 
16kx Cam I ml 





.14 ia 


nchlvn 

reoSv 

nzB 

rM 

SdHW 

Biot 

tear 

HAtni 

UnFd 

KFhl 

HUMS 

iSeAr 

twdOc 

itTrr 

jfmtx 

oden 

mere 

mJGr 

mtflk 

mar 

flatCp 

rtcM 


M IS 
M U 


JOB S 


.12 tJ 


ISO irj) 231 
14S U7 tS 
2.1* US 2SS 
64 

148 XD 60 
-0B SJk 60 
£_ 212 
244b 47 19 


M 

1252 

5M 

40 2.1 1337 
T70 
23 
5*5 

U4 44 234 
Ml 
97 

.14 14 127 

m 

40 34 3U 
87 
40 

MOW 

jo as 8* 

3 


ss- 




■ ,,B8DO 
a-.. BRCom 
“* .-Bancofcl 
1 ■ BcpHw 
. , Bancto c 

- . BanaH 

BKMEs 
.j. 1 ' BfcMAm 
«• -*■ . goakvl 
. - • ■ . Banto t 
. OaranO 

« - ' Bonus 

>BlTnA 
..,i v BasAm 
li'.*-— .. 

.. BavBks 
„ „T- gwiy 
BnehCI 
■ .Bonhaa 

. BflttLb 

- BjsB 
S Bess' 


IT* 

10 DBA 



58 

16 

15% 

!S% . 

44b 

2fe DO! 



349 

3 

2* 


13% 

6% OEP 



244 

13* 

12% 

12%—* 

30% 

4% DSC 



2125 

6* 

6* 

4% + * 

m 

i&Basr 



3041 

30 

29* 

39% 

85 

29% + % 
29% + % 

9% 

41b OmnBlo 



841 

9 

■* 

8* 

2Z% 

12% Doicrds 
8% DtolO 

J4 

1.1 

17 

21* 

2Mh 

20* 

14* 



145 

10% 

ID* 

10*— * 

9% 

3* DtSwtdl 



43L 

5% 

6fe 

4% 

30 

5* 

11 Dqtscp 
2* Dtesm 



54 

171 

20* 

2* 

27% 

2* 


8* 

44b Datum 



84 

5* 

4* 

5 — * 

74b 

44b Dawson 



27 

4% 

44b 

4*— * 

22% 

10* Deosns 

JO 

.9 

721 

23* 


23 + % 

19* 

9* CfedsO 



1071 

12* 

13 

30V. 

204b DeklbA 

J2 

28 

882 

“St 

25% 

26 + M 

2% 

44b 

% Dbttaus 
fi Denelcr 



234 

254 

* 

M 

*— % 
* 

11% 

4% DvntMd 



230 

8* 

8* 

s* 

15% 

544 

tu DiaaPr 
2* Dlasonc 



266 

1322 

15% 

4* 

15% 

4 

15% 

4 — * 

19* 

10 Dlcsen 



133 

18% 

18% 

18% — % 

15% 

Ir UJ r-~it ' . '] 



147 

4 

3* 

3* 

F7T1 




541 

36* 

94 

34% 





a 

37* 

37 

37 

29* 

17* DlrGnl 

JO 

S 

2S3 

23* 

33% 

23%—* 

37% 

24% DomB 

1J2 

38 

n 

35* 

94% 

35 — % 

204b 

12* DrehH 

J0O 1 J 

s 

14* 

14% 

14*— % 
$% + % 

27 

17* DavIDB 

JS 

48 

454 

18* 


n 

9* Drantz 

■15c IS 

IS 

10% 

10 

19 

10% DroKtr 



199 

13% 

12* 

12%—* 

23* 

12 DrayGr 



29 

22% 

31% 

22% + * 

25* 

14* DunkDB 

34 

18 

217 

24* 

34 

34* + * 

12* 

9* Durlron 

J4 

4J 

480 

13* 

12* 

12* + 8k 

IS* 

9% Dvr Fill 

.15 

U 

257 

12* 

12* 

12* + * 

7% 

3* tTmcn 



47 

6* 


3** 

33% 

17* DvntaiC 



348 

33 

32% 




IJ0 43 14 

J0b U 318 

.16 U 6 

140 17 17 


ijotlTc 

. r fWBc 

>' fismota 

jfenFC JOt U 
.-,-SnwCp 
- .'■■.irenen 
SnwTom 


WOO 


.12 12 


11 

IJM 24 76 

34* 

I J2 104 490 


.1* 14 



; icon 

v «-.* tfwib 
. ‘ • IML 

!•:£! SB* J 

iS? 

<AC1 

-.■»'3wvte .93*4.1 

, v . - JlJMtC 

; Mm .16 1.1 

* • -.ananG 
.- * ^apCro 

«WO 40 A 

* • -amrC 481 2.1 

• orenifc 

-*■- brtert I 
11 • .„esm* 

^ .■ wicors 

_ 'WfBC M0 u 

* {«ntaor 

• BshSs a* 3a 
. . I=4»AS 44 U 

* vrmfk 
■; .BhH 

hcDEn 
- x •>nmS 


JO 7 


258 

4% 

5% 

5% 

+ 

* 

403 

4* 

4% 

* 



25 

12 

12 

12 



257 

21 

20 

20 

— 

« 

193 

6* 

6 

6* 

+ 

* 

g 

SR 

9% 

3* 


+. 

5? 

147 

22% 

22% 

22% 

— 

% 

80 

IX 

11* 

11* 

— 

* 

291 

3* 

3% 


— 


291 

2% 

2 

2* 

— 

K 

4 

15 

14% 

14% 



407 

300 

28* 

* 


27* 

* 

"+ 

% 

200 

19% 

19 

19% 



83 

4 

3* 

3* 


% 

530 

14% 

14* 

}4% 

+ 

* 

1407 

14% 

15% 

14% 

+ 

% 

134 

14* 

1Mb 

16* 

+ 

* 

118 

15% 

14% 

15 

+ 

% 

75 

33% 

32% 

32* 

__ 

* 

496 

27* 

25% 

27* 

+1% 

m 

23 

22% 

23 

+ 

% 

UK 

24% 

24% 

24% 



* 

89 

• 3* 

2* 

3* 

+ 

* 

7232 

59* 

2B% 

29* 

— 

» 

351 

3% 

3% 

3M< 

— 

* 

831 

129 

24* 

15 

& 

24% 

15 

+ 

+ 

* 

* 


1544 EnpCnv 
7W Eli Fad 
BW Engpbs 

10 EnzoS! 
6H Equal 
S» EqlOII 

23V. ErlcT! 

11 EvnStrt 
7Vi Exovlr 


Wi 8 
ID 10 

am am 

814 8 
15W 15V% 
im low 

a Tib 

1*14 UW 
8M 814 


l» 12 M 
3W 31b 
Mb Mb 
TVi 7Vb 
23 V. 22Va 
211b 3llb 
13U 13 
MW V*% 

I 79b 

74b 7T4 


B + W 
W — 1b 

awb 
8 — It 
15W + tb 
iSft + ib 
71b — It 
MW 
tw 

J5W +llfi 
» +14 
17% 

,S5-* 

1244 + 1% 
314—1% 
69b— 1% 

23*” * 
2IW— tb 
13* + * 
14% + 4% 
8 + 1b 

7W— 4b 
2flb— * 
mb— * 
12 * 


S% FDP 11 7* 71b 

Stb PMI GO 1« lJHb 

lUt Pom Beal 78 lfb lJS 

'5%^ i 2 T 

^^‘in u § 

3* FHttiTs 1J0 2J ,17 63W O 

21 <4 FI goto J8 14 133 3Bb 37% 

12% FIBrS . 10 U * IBb 15 

314 FI octal X S3 3 3* 3* 


1 O Month 







1C* 

«*! Lew 3 pal arm 




472 

111 

7% 7 7% + W 

17 17 17 

87% 21fe FAtaSk 

112 

XI 

26 

36% 34% 34* 

94* 25* FtAFm 

Ml 

?J 

7 

33* 33* 33* 

27* 14* FIATOS 

J4 

30 

197 

2Sfe 25 25 — * 

• 20 11% FtCMF 

29% 20% FComrC 120 

52 

30 

50 

19 18* 19 

23% 33 23 — % 


100MS7 

30 

6* 4% 6% 




1844 

18% 18 18% — % 
22* 22% 22* + % 

23% Mb FFCals 



9 


AOb 1J 

00 

22% 21% 22 

29% 13 FIFfiCP 

JO 

25 

46 

16% 15% 16 + % 




171 

22* 22 22% — * 



1J 

33 

32* 32 32% + fe 

41% 28% FJarN 

UO 

43 

190 

42* 42* <2*—* 


1J6 

33 

16x 



XA 

8 

39 38* 39 + % 

SO 34 FRBGo 

1J0 

7J 

80 

44* 44% 44* + % 
29% 29* 29*— % 


Ml 

2.7 



l.W 

XI 

2795 

25* 19% 21*— 4% 



441X 

24* 26* 24*— fe 


124 

29 

412 

44% 43% 43*— * 
1*1* 1* + % 
13% 13% 13% + % 



619 

M ■ ■» .71- — ■ 

JB 

X5 

114 

lr 1 I. fl 

3 

11 

1146 

18% 17* 17*— % 

42% 27* FkjNFI 

J0 

IS 

152 

M X X XI. 11 

745 


tTfe 1T% FkreCb 

Ji 

17 

1 

1470 




J 

14 

20* » 20% + % 

VI aJ 

JO 

J 

127 

20% 20% 2D91 + % 
22% 32% 32% +* 
14* 14% 16* + * 



ts 


IK’ -S 1 


88 

29% 14% FortnF 


107 

343 

19* 19% 19* + * 
2fe 1* 2 + M 


Mb A 

1641 

10% 10% 10*— fe 

7% 4 Fater 

.10 

24 

30 

4% Mb 4% 

24% 23% 23*—* 


M 

20 





249 

.4 .5* 5% 

16* 12* FWrHB 

32 

20 

457 

’ 16 15% 14 




G 

J 

12* 8% GTS 



20 

44 

13% 12% J% + % 


.TO 

u 

221 

5* 5* 5* 




12(0 


M 5., Genets 



1749 

TOO 

* 

25% 9* GaFBk 
Bra 3% GartMs 



235 

25% 25 25% 



1 

** 6* M „ 

34* 16 OftnGs 

J* 

12 

2347 

25 

20* 20% 20%—% 
14 13* 14 + * 

18* 12* Gataat 



70 

5 

10% 18% 18% + fe. 
25* 24% 34% „ 



4J 

*Ka 

17* 17* 17*— fe 

19% 10% oracn 

J4 

20 

108 

19% 19* 19* 

9% 6 Grantre 



32 

9 8% 8% 

14* 5% Grains 
7% .4 , GrahSc 



3 

423 

14* 14* 14* 

XC% 13% Gyvsav 
12* 8 WSoFd 

JOr xo 

31 

44 

24% 24 24 — % 

18* 10 Gfecn 



25B 

18% 18% 18% + % 

19 12% GuiHrd 

15% * GlfBdC 

J5e J 
150«C 

1 

214 


II 



H 

I 


30 

U 

UflB 

U* 14% 14fe— % 

11% 7 HCC 

M 

3 

32 

8% 8* 8* 

17% B%- Habers 



95 

14% 14% 14% + tt 

rn 3% Hadco 



27 

4* 4* 6* 

2% 2* 2*— % 

19% i» iSSSi 

.10 

S 

329 

302 

35* 15% HaraGl 

J4 

13 

18 

18* 18* 18* 

34* 26Vb HrtfNt 

U2 

58 

643 

34% 34 34% + % 

10* 6 Hathws 

& 

23 

58 

9* 8% 8*- % 

10 2* KawkB 


281 

3% 3 3 - % 

!■ iM ..i; m 



133 

p » ai* 




1415 

23% 15% HcteAl 

.16 

J 

«M 


34% 15* HcteBl 

JB 

A 

65 


M 8% HatonT 



120 


37% 15 HHbt 



5 

20 JO 20 + * 

38% 21* HanrriF 

Wn 22 

33 


24% 17% HRwfCp 1 JOb 4J 

67 

23 22* 23 + % 

12 3* Hagan 

32* n Hmfiu 



530 

60* 

4% 4fe 4% + fe 
n% 32% 32% 

10* 1% HmeeJT 



1744 

1* 1 154- % 

28% 15% Ham nd 

J4 

23 

144 

a 27% a + % 

4% 3* Hanind 



9 

4* 4% 4% 

33* 15 HwBMJ 



43 

ST* 30* 30*- % 

28 27% 27*— fe 

12 11* 11* 


JO. 

3 

20 

14* 8% Hntgln 



77 

27 17 HntgBt 

J4 

XI 

76 


30% 14 HverHe 



11*3 


14% 4% Hypcnx 

9 5% HvtakM 



40 

20 

13% 13* 13* + fe 
7% 7% 7% 

MW 


HKiBflmi 


W% 7% ILC 



10 

9% 9 9 

95* 14% IMSs 
15% 7% ISC 

JO 

A 

S17x 

495 

32* »% 31*— fe 

7% 3% icet 



S43 

7% 7fe 7% + fe 




2121 

15 14 14M— % 

7% 3% Inoonc 





S3 32* ItxflN 

M 30* IntoRsc 

140 

33 

76 

87 

f t h 4ti 

24 12* InUrn 



94 

17 1* 14% + % 

24* 24 24 

5* .5 5* + fe 

33* 17% InctNIw 
life 3* Intocm 



114 

454 

14% 8* IfltgOv 



234 

U 15* 14 + % 

6* 2 HrioGen 



448 


23* 10% ISSCO 
32* 30% Intel 



20 

1* 15* 15*— % 



1584 

38 29% 29* + fe 

4% 4% 4% + K 

9% 9 Inttsv 



138 

8% 1% Inh-Tel 




15% 0* Iirimd 



B . 


16* 7* IntrfFtr 

JO 

16 

341 

35% 21 Intgoits 



3301 

l l-TTM 

10% 5 Intnrw 



322 

.7* 7* 7* + % 

22% 10* intmec 



244 

13 12* 12* + fe 

13* 5% Intrint; 



22 

.2* 7*— * 

t7 8 IrtfCDn 



174 

n» u it* + fe 

18* 8* 1 Genre 



127 

8% .7* 8 - * 

25* 14* IntKlnB 



3 

20% 20% 20% + * 

16 7% intLsee 



42 

15* 15* 15* 

12 5* InNtaM 

3% K IRIS 



441 

9% 9 9. . „ 



417 

1* 1* 1* + 

29* 9% ITCpS 



353 

29% 28% 29 + * 

14* 4* lonreoc 



486 

11* 11* 11*—* 

13% 9% iMredx 



5 

12* 12% 12* 

Wfe 10 1o — fe 

10% 5% Itof 



577 


■1 



BBMBBBB II 

1S% 9% J BK« 8 

.14 

1J 

283 

12% 12 12% + % 

B% 3% Jockoei 



139 

6* 6% 4% + fe 

41% !S JoefcLfe 



37 

40* 40 40 — % 

25% 15* JomWtr 



45 

22* 21% 22* + * 

8% 4% JeW*rt 



973 

5 4% 4%- % 

24* 14% Jerica 

.14- 

3 

•3 

22% 22% 22% — % 

7% 3* jenicbl 

t 


4% 6 4% 

5* e% 8% + % 

16% 5* Jaaahsn 



20 




5 

23% S3* 23* + % 

18 17% 18 +% 

38* 13% Jushfl 

JO 

2 3 

95 

!■■■■■■ 


k 


1 

24* 13* KLAs 

9 4% KVPhf 



345 

21* am 2i 



23 

8% 8 8 — % 

24* 13% teamans 

J4 

L8 

44 

24* 24% 24* 

19% U* Kardir 
17% 9% Katkr 



582 

16% U% 16% + % 

JS) 


292 

IT* 11% 11% 

10% 4% Kayden 


139 

10 9% 9% + % 

44% 47 Kemo 

JO 

28 

301 

63% 63* 63*—* 
54* 56% 56% + * 

41% JT* KvCnLr UK 

'J- 

23 

8* 4* Kevex 



40 

6% 6* Ah— % 

11 6% KeyTm 



172 

10* 10% W4- fe 

7 2% Khnbrk 



12 

2% 2% 2V. 

21* 13* Kinder 

36 

J 

S2D 

Wfe 18% 18*— % 

8% B% FS-fe 

13* 4% Kray 

M 

3 

124 

•ttusaeff 

ft 

IS 

a 

£ 

14% 14* 14% 

12* 12* 12*—% 


■■ 

m 


1 


ttltotob 
WPM» Stocb 

3% 1* Laxktta 
!«% 1714 Uttrt 
71b 4H UtCom 
20% llfb LlIVTuI 
389b 191b UnBrd 
37 28% UncTel 

Mb 4Vb LlMbra 
491A 23Vb Lb CIO 
29 20V. LangF 

33% 15V. Lotus 
2*44 19 LVTUtal 
199b « L VttKIl 


Sate Id 

Wv. Vld. 1BB» Wte Low 3 I 

15* 

A 977 
lam 

JO U 71* 

770 

248 4.1 2* 

.1* XI 4 
35 J 1315 
M0 44 17S 
093 
19 
1704 



41 
*9 
12 * 
21 

24 314 

in 

JO U 12 
.W J 1254 


_ ♦ 1b 
30% — % 
3% + % 

9 + * 

lib + * 
7lb + » 
294 + m 
, _ Mb 

44% 44% 44%— tb 

9 . J** 8*— » 

31% 21% 21* + % 
4% 4% 41b— % 

12 11% 12 + % 
20% 20V] 301b— % 

11% n% nib— % 

37 , 3Mb 37 + 1b 

36% 23 26% +1% 

18% 171b 171b— % 
15Tb 15% 159b • lb 
15% 15Vb 15* + Ml 
18% 18% 15% 

3* 3* 3*— lb 
16* 1*14 14% 

19* 18* 19 — lb 


12 Montti 


^ * 


Sate In 




Mon i 



Wv. YkL 

KXh 

High Low 3 PM CTM 

43% 

2TM Freges 

.12 

J 

1I0s 

44 

43* 

44 + fe 

15* 

10% FrrotTr 

1J0 107 

S3 



11% + % 

20fe 

13% Previn 



21 

1K1 

19% 

19% 

29 

13% PurtBn 

JO 

1J 

59 

27 

36* 

27 + % 






Q 



BBBI 

15* 

6 

QMS 



220 

9% 

8% 

9 — % 

9* 

3% Qiradrx 



741 

Ffe 

8% 

B* + Vi 

13% 

9 

QuakC s 

Ji 

XI 

SO 


12% 

12% 




447 

25 

74% 

24% - fe 

5% 

7fe 

§M 



22 

4* 

«% 

41b + fe 





253 

18% 

1 It 

18 — % 

16% 

• 

Quotm 



3085 

12* 

11% 

12 + % 

c 





R 



| 

12% 

5 

RAX 


.1 

288 

7% 

7* 

7fe + fe 

18% 

13 

RPM 

J2 

34 

9S0 

18% 

17% 

Wfe + % 

16% 

0% 

Rods vs 



361 



14* + % 






81 




10* 

5% 

Radian 



12 

7V> 

7* 

7*- % 

7% 

33* 

3 

23% 

K 

1J0 

XI 


3% 

32* 

Jfe 

32* 

2«i{ ; 

20% 

7% 

12* 

1* 

RavEn 

Redl& 

J4 

1J 

* 

& 

18% 

1% 

18 

1% 

’iw+fe 

23* 

17% 




22% 32 

22* 


5* 

Recetn 




11% 

life 

life— % 

35% 

25% 

RatflmL 

44 

XI 

33 

30% 

30% 

30% + % 






441 

11% 

11% 

11*— % 

TV, 

4* 



U 3 

SS9 

5% 

Sfe 

5% 

1 

11 

3* 

82& s 

.12 

% 

17% 

5% 

16* 

5% 

17 + * 


7* 

RoAuto 

.16 

1J 

2!S 

9% 

8% 


nr 

9% 

RoHtm 



10 

V* 


11% 

ReshSy 



ID 

19% 

19% 

19% — % 


6* 

Rbularl 

:S 

1J 

253 

m 

8% 

8fe + % 


19% 

RvirtrH 

S 

29 

20% 

m 

J 


29 

Rev Hr v 

IJO 

2S 

X 


r ■■ -T IT 


15% 

Rhodes 

J2 

1.9 

17* 



:• 

3% 




526 

• 

7% 


12% 

RIchEIS 



30 

21 

21 

21 


11* 

Rival 

JO 

4J 

49 

17% 

l/% 

>7% . . 


24% 

RoottSv 

1.10 

U 

962 

34 

33% 

33% + * 



Robhuo 



104 





8fe 

RabVxn 



167 

9% 

Wb 

9% + * 


16% 


S4 

XI 

157 

25* 

25% 

25fe 

11% 

4% 


1 


13 

9 

9 

9 — fe 

9 

3% 

RoytRs 
Rust Pel 



105 

3* 

Jfe 

3*— fe 

17% 

10% 



27 

11% 

11% 

11%— fe 

IU 





209 

22* 

2 

22 — % 


*% 

It* 

23* 

50% 

21* 

169b 

36 

7* 

5% 

7* 

■ 

11 % 

9% 

27* 

12* 

34 

33% 

3* 

lb* 

30% 

14* 

4% 

14* 

21* 

SH4 

57* 


19* 

20% 

34* 

34* 

*3* 

7 

9% 

19* 

10* 

13* 


2* NMS 
5% Nancos 

U* N Bn Tex 

37 NWItv 
U« NtCptrs 

7% NDate 
12 NHHCs 
4* NILumb 
2 MMJcm 

4% Netsan 
4* NvtoSac 
U* NlvikSs 
7* NBmnS 
23% ME Bos 
19% NHmpB 
21* NJNtf 
9* NwldBk 
II Newt 
1% NwpPti 
* NjColfl 
7 Milter 
« Nortbn 

28% FoocdTr 

30% NrskBs 
5% Norston 
5 NAliin 
6* NeaSv 
IS* NwNG 
19* NWNLT 
19* NwstPS 
40% NawlI 
4% NoeiPh 
4* Nunweut 
18* Numres 

a NutnF 
MuWeds 


22 

42 

J8 X* 274 
200 4.1 777 

JO .9 512 
M X* 211 
34 13 52 

13 
17*7 
287 

■1ST 16 
454 
415 
TSW 
197 

J2 1J * 
JK 17 95 

1.12b 11 434 

.10* 6 70 

JM J 434 
1749 
141 

A0 10 583 
2 38 34 

M 3 UO 
33 A 214 
94 
300 
222 

IJ3 75 6* 

J6 12 200 
2JB 9J 23 
1J8 1.7 186 

437 

J* XI 22 
60 
1394 


4* 4* 
11 % 11 
21 * 21 % 
48* 41 
21* 21 
1** 14* 
79% 71* 
5 4% 

3. 2* 

4* 4% 
6% 6% 
4* 4* 
4* 4% 

34* 24* 
9* 9% 

S* 3S 

34 35* 

17* 17* 
23* 22% 

WT* 

13* 13* 
IS 17 
49* 49 

*si ^ 

7* 7% 
18* 18% 

19* 19% 

25% 24% 
34* 34 
43* 42% 
4* 4* 
5* 4% 

IS j* 

7* 7 


4* + * 
11 - % 
21*— * 
48% — * 
21*+ H 
14* + * 
78* 

4%— % 
3* + * 
4% 

6 % 

4%. 

24% + % 
9* + * 
30% + % 
29*— * 
35* + * 

17%— V* 
22% —1% 

13* 

18 +1% 
49% — (4 
S3* + * 
6 *—* 
7% 

IB* + * 
19* 

25 + * 

24 — * 
43* +1* 
4*— * 
3* + * 
18 — % 
9* 

7* + * 



LDBmk 44 

ay- "» 

LofS*1^0 13^20 

LodFrn .14 A 288 

C3Sw so ta am 

Loncast -72 4.1 157 

LOneCo 52 U 70S 
Lmwtt 32 . « 30 

L aeptn llg 

mwSp mas x 

Lexicon 119 



4* 

1* Oceener 



16 

3 

1% 

1%— % 

17* 

10 Octllas 



41 

12 

II* 

tHS— fe 

46* 

33% OflRQp 

IF 1 

2A 

957 

41* 

41* 

41* 

73% 

41* OMaCa 

280 

43 

53 

71% 

7TJ% 

70% - M 

34% 

20% Old Knit 1.10 

Si 

29 

34% 

34* 

34* — % 

41* 

23 OldRps 

J4 

32 

H 1 


H.T3 1 

22* 

19% owspteza 

1X1 

7 

Bio 

yj 

LlljBR 

33% 

14* One Bob 

J2 

1J 

30 

32% 

31* 

32 — fe 

9 Vl 

3% OnUne 



249 

0* 

,7* 

0 +% 

1«% 

Wfe OwtteC 



251 

13% 


13*— lb 

48% 

22% Optic R 



45 

30 

29* 

29*— % 

19% 

13 Ortanc 



n 

MM 

U 7 

14* + fe 

Bfe 

Sfe Orbit 



126 

7* 

7 

0 

4% OrfaCp 



283 

6% 

4* 

6% 

70 

is* osmtm 

JO 

1J 

23 

15% 

15P 

IS + * 
34* + * 

34* 

27% OtfrTP 

236 

8.1 

27 

34* 

33% 

15 

0% OvrExn 



56 

ID* 

KW 

10% 

17* 

8 OWfiMS 

30 

1J 

157 

16% 

16* 

16* 

4* 

U OteCO 



634 

* 

% 

%— * 



35* 

53% 

15* 

16 

17% 

8* 

17% 

8 

14 

21 

17* 

10 % 

85* 

31% 

19* 

38* 

13* 

12 % 

20% 

4% 

33% 

25* 

37* 

10 

3* 

27* 
3* 
U* 
Wtb 
37* 
9* 
7% 
14% 
44 
U . 
4 


21* PNC* 
39* Pnceor 

8 PbCFlt 
life POCTM 
10* POCDPn 

6* PancMx 
11* Porwh 
4* PatntM 
• 6 PoulHr 
8% Povdix 
10* P0OKHC 
5% PeoOtd 
29* FertsErt 
20* Pamart 

r* Pew Ex 
23* Pel rtte 
4* Phrmet 
7% PSFS 
14% PMIG4 
2 PtnxAm 
17* PIC3CV 
14* PicCOte 
29* PlanHl 
7 PlonSI 

PMWll 
9% Pawrtcs 
5% PwConv 
so PrecCst 

l SC 

7% Priecms 
96% PrjcpCo 

9 Prtronx 
3* PradOp 


1J2 35 

1J0O2J 


JO SJ 


.13 U 
M 5.1 


36 S 
220 44 
40 23 

Mr A 
1.12 4J 

■IJe 1J 
JOB 25 


40 22 
124 10 
.12 12 


.13 A 


1160 

264 

123 
70 
171 
99 
93 
2217 
7 

2035 
1052 
410 
21 
17 
2910 

no 

994 

210S 
MSB 

Si 

SQK 
700 
101 

£ 
15 
SO 

if? 

% 
2420 

iiS 

103 

.14 U 41 


33* 33% 

ie 

15* IS* 

17* 14* 

B* a 
12 11* 
7* 7 
14 ia> 
20* 19* 
12* 12* 
7* 7% 

27 s * 2^ 
a* 7* 
10 »* 

21% 30* 
25* 2S* 
35% 34 
9* Hb 
11* TO* 
21 20% 
25 34* 

1* 1* 
13* 13* 
13* U% 

31% 29* 

9% 9 
6* 5* 
8 7* 

65 63% 

« T8 


33* 

4S% + * 
»%— % 
IS* 

16*— * 
a 

u* 

7% + % 
14 + * 

20* + * 
12*—* 
7 *-* 
Z7V. 

29 + % 

8* + * 

24* 

S —to 
9* 

19*—% 
1% + % 
31* + * 
Wb + * 

35% +1% 

9% 

11* + * 
29* 

24*— * 
7% + * 

i!E + % 

38 — % 

K+* 

62-“ 
13 + * 
4% + * 


15% 7* 
SO* 7% 
B2% 47% 
4* 3H 
10 4* 

8% 5* 
31* 14* 
28* 12* 
10* 4% 

n io% 
14% 8* 
36* U% 
6* 3% 
13* 6* 
30% £ 

9V. 3% 

B% 46% 
4* 1* 

7* 1* 

24% 16 
9% 5* 

99b 6% 
14* 10* 
25* 17* 
27 13* 

7% 4% 
19% 12* 
37* >4% 
41* 29% 
23 19b 

14* 7* 
31* 21* 
15* 10 
10% 3* 

17% 9% 
30* 11% 

am ii% 

11* 3* 
17* 11* 
11% 9* 

12% 5% 

4 I* 
54 34 

10* 6* 
21 * 11 * 
XM II* 
23* 14% 
6% 3% 

33 20% 

28* 14% 
9% 5* 

31* 23% 
19* 10% 
28% 10 
8% 5% 

16* 13* 

13 3* 

I S 
X 20% 
22 % 11 % 
41* 21* 
6* 3* 
7* 4% 
18>t II* 

25 ia% 
5* 5% 
23% 8% 

42* 29* 
MW 15 
m*ii 2 
as* 40* 

4* 1* 

« ^ 
10* 4* 


SAYind 

sClSy 

SEI 

SFE .tOr L4 
SRI JB 43 
Scfecds Jgb .9 
Safeco IJO X5 
SafHIts 
SlJude 

|| XOO X8 


.14 23 


SanBur 
SotblSv 
5avnF* 

SBkPSl AA XI 


14 

5*2 

24 

146 

30 

955 

75B 

43 

201 

25* 

144 

48 

77 

98 


SeaaTr 

isss 

gar 

g§ 

SMoat* 

SbCtdO 

SEED 

SAtl 

Semlcn 

!S5r 

Svmps 
Strut cd 
S vcPrCJ 
SevOak 

Shewed 
Stiwml 
Shaft. V* 
ShMdlS 
S honeys 
ShanSas 
Silicon 
snicons 

Mtovoi 

ass? 

aser. 

»sr 

13& 

SoftwA 
lenog. 


32 23 
AOb 1J 


S thOFn 

SOOlllt 

Sovran 

Sovraas 

& 

«" 

SJorsur 

StolBld 

Sfondy 

SMMIc 

STOStBS 

gojjG 

Steloor 

Xtevsiv 

Slwlnl 

5HW 

Strohis 

StrnCls 

Strvfcrs 

Subaru 

SubrB 

5ummo 

SunMHI 

SunCsl 

SunMeC 


JO X4 

JS A 
JS J 
JO 15 


.14 5 

JB 1 A 

IJO 4.1 
.16 J 

.15 S 


JO 4J 
58 3 

1J4 SJ 


JSo2J 
JOe X4 

J2 25 
JO 12 
.10 1J 
IJB 43 


JO 25 
IJB X4 


JO 1J 
J5a 1.1 


32 11 


2J0 15 
L92 23 


400 

114 

592 

387 

137 

3411 

45 
2426 

■S 

ID 

1540 

788 

474 

27 

46 
42 

486 

1*4 

41 

44 

272 

69 
196 
651 
133 

’B 

41 

100 

149 
102 

150 

25 
715 
200 

22 

26 
24 

121 

306 

320 

40 

75 

30 

95 

533 

315 

£3x 

582 

214 

188 

104 

777 

12 

72 

1602 

113 

131 

313 

70 

367 

183 

154 

1 


10% 9% 9* + * 

14* 13* 14* + % 
22 * 22 % 22 % — % 
6V- 4% 6H— * 
IB* 18 18* -I- * 

23 22% 23 

44% 45V. 45%— * 
life life life— * 
20% 19% 20 ♦ * 

79V, 70* 78*— % 
5% 5 5% + % 

6* 6fe Afe 
6fe 6% 4% 

31* 39 31% + % 

20* 20* 209b— * 
9* 9* 9* + % 
14* 1* 16 — V» 

14* 13* 14* 

27% 26* 26% + % 
4% 4* 4* 

7% 6* 7 — % 
7* 7 7 — * 

4% 4 4 

4* Afe 4* + % 
2 1* 1*— * 
3* 2* 3 + % 

22% 21% 22% + * 
ATb 4* tf* 

.9 M 8* + * 
12% 12* 12% 

23 22% 23 + fe 

»4* 24 24 — * 

.4* Mb 4*— * 
18Tb I8H 18* + * 
35* 35* 35*— * 
41% 41 41% + % 

22 * 22 * 22 * — * 
9* 9% 9%— * 
28* 28* 28* 

12* 11* 11* 

4% 4* 4% + % 
15 14* 14% 

15% 14* 15 + % 

23 22* 22% 

5* 4* 4* 

16* 16* 16* + * 
16% 16* 16% 

11* 10* 10* + * 
2% 21b 2*—* 
5Z% 51% 52 
9% 9* 9% + % 
14* 14* 16*— * 
29% 29 29% + % 

M* 14* 16* 

4* 4* 4* + * 
21% 21 21 — % 
IB* 18% 18% 

4* 4% A* 

30* 29* 30 — fe 
19% 19% 19% + fe 
23* 22* 231b + % 
8% 8* Mb 

15% IS 15% + % 
BTb 8* Bfe— * 

7* 7% 79b + «b 

30* 29* 30% + % 

15% IS 15fe + fe 
37% STfe Wfe + Vb 
4* 4% 4%-fe 
6% 5% 6% + * 

75 74* 14% — U 

23 22% 23 + % 

8% 0 t 
22% 22 22* + % 
40* 39% «%- % 
34% 23* 34% + % 
154* ID 154* + * 
84 53* 84 

9% 2% 2% + * 

9* B» 9 — % 

1% IK IH— ft 
9% 9% 9% + % 


Sales figures ore unofficial. Yearly highs and laws reflect 

the previous 52 weeks plus the current week, but net Ihe latest 

Trading dey. where a spill or stock dividend omauntlne to 25 

percent or mare has been dakLItia year's hloh-lownxnae and 

dividend are sngwn for The new stack only, limes otherwise 

noful. rotes of dividends ore annual disbursement. Based on 

me West dedaranen. 

a— dividend aba extra I s>. 

b— annuel rare el auidend olus slock dividend. 

c— liquidating dividend. 

dd— called, 
d— new yearly low. 

e— dividend declared or arid in preceding 12 months, 
g — dividend In Canadian funds, subject »o 1 5% nan- residence 
tax. 

I — dividend declared otter soilt-Ub or stack dividend, 
i —dividend paid mis yew. omitted, deterred, or no action 
taken of totasl dividend meeting, 
k — dlvlirend declared er paid mb veer, an aeeummatlvo 
Issue with diviaenas in arrears. 

n— new Issue In me past S3 weeks. Tne wgiHgw range begins 
erilh the start of trading. 

nd— nest dor delivery. 

P/E — pr Imremlnss ratio. 

r— dividend declared or amd In preceding 12 months, plus 
stack dividend. 

8— Mock tarn, dividend begins wfm dere el emu. 

Ua— sates. 

1— dividend paid In stack In preceding 12 months, esllmalcd 
earti value on ex-dlvldeM er ex-diif ribuiian date, 
u— new yearly men. 

v— trading halted. 

vl — In bankruptcy er reea i versnipgr being reorganised un- 
der the Bankruptcy Ad. or securities assumed by such com. 
pontoe. 

ml — wten dixtrifiutta 
iri— when Issued i 


12 Month 

H Ian Law Stock 

Dtv. YM. 

Sotelo 

TOO* 

Net 

HWi Low 3F.JH.afto 

18% 

7% 5«pS*v 



7 

>% 

8U 

144— fe 

4ft 

3 SunrtM 



215 

3fe 

34* 

3ft— % 

M 

8V« SymbT 



22 

10% 

lOfe 

TOfe— % 

U’k 

6ft Syntecn 



553 

9ft 

9ft 

9ft— % 

5* 




419 

4ft 

(ft 

4ft + fe 

U 


JO 

u 

39 

13% 

13ft 

13% 

26% 

B SyAsac 



84 

II 

10 

IS — % 

1 

4 Syslin 



31 

I 

7% 

8 + V. 

11% 

4% Syslntg 



21 

10 

9% 

10 

77% 

14% Svstmt 

JB 

J 

174 

26% 

a* 

26% 


| P 


^B 

BR 

□B 

■■I 

BB 

H 

■TB 

■ TBC 



0 

11 

ID* 

10ft— ft 


31* TocVIvs 


18 

3% 

3fe 

3% 


12ft Tondem 



1631 

TDVi 

19ft 

19ft— ft 


2ft Tendon 



2402 

4* 

4 

4* + fe 

22 

9 Telco 



242 

13 

17% 

13 

J6fe 

2IT* TlemA 

t 

440 

JS% 

3VH 

35ft— fe 

12ft 

Aft TelPtun 



1384 

87t 

B% 

8% + fe 

27 

13* Tctecrd 

32 

u 

39 

34% 

23% 

31 — % 
21% +lft 

KlI 

9 1 * Telocts 


3023 

21% 

X 

4% 

1% Tsfvltf 



327 

3ft 

3 

3ft 

a 

8* Tetota 



1026 

10ft 

5& 

10* 

19% 

9% TeUons 



423 

21 

20* + % 

lOfe 

3 TermDI 

1 

93 

Sfe 

3 

Sft=£ 

14% 

5ft TherPr 



196 

6* 

5M 


6% Thrmds 



35 

life 

lift 

lift 

■ Ti 

16 ThrtNs 

M 

15 

42 

26 

25% 

a + % 

Mfe 

5ft Thortee 


829 

7 

% 

7 +ft 

IP 

Sfe ThouTr 



589 

Afe 

6* 

3ft TIineEn 
9ft TmeFIb 



53 

4ft 

3% 

3ft— % 

life 



144 

550 

,4 K 

\ 

l %+ fe 

30 

Bfe TotlSys 



8 

a 

27% 

a + % 


10 TrokAu 



65 

u 

10% 

10% — % 


6% TrlodSv 



107 

10 

9% 

10 4- fe 

Mfe 

20 Truvlo 

JO 

1J 

382 

24% 

24 

26% + % 

| ■ 




U 



| 

tn 

18 USLICs 

JO 

u 

548 

27* 

26ft 

27 + ft 

mi 

13ft UTL 



140 


16% 

16% — % 

14ft 

5 Ultrsv 

Mi 

J 

317 

9 

a* 

Bft— fe 

■ <1, 




1574 





aa b 



134 

14ft 

14 

14% 

B- y 


IJ» 

x» 

43 

27% 

27* 


■ ri* 1 

5 .tLa l ,^i TU I 

25 

53 

62 

61* 

62 + ft 

■ ^ 

12ft UACms 

36 

J 

101 

24* 

34 

»% 

^r1 

8% LIBAlsk 

.1ST L* 

61 

9% 

9ft 

9% 

■ i 


IJB 

X7 

87 

» 

28% 

28ft + fe 

BjH 

6 UFnGro 



153 

6% 

6* 

6ft— ft 


lift UFstFd 

35B 3 

88 

18% 


18% 


6 UGrdn 

M4t205 

35 

8% 

■ 

B — ft 

"A 

9% UPrmd 



84 

11 

11 

11 — % 

2ft US Ant 



23 

4% 

rt 

4ft + ft 

32 

22ft US BCD 

1J0 

35 

46 

29* 

29% 

29% 

Sfe 

1ft US Cop 



54 

4ft 

4* 

4ft— ft 

4 

2* US Dsgn 
7ft USHCs 



50 

2ft 

2% 

2%— ft 

224b 

35 

3 

8311 

17ft 

16ft 

loft— 1ft 

5V»i 

3% US Shell 

.12 

10 

m 

4* 

4 

4 

22fe 

14ft USSur 

J0a 25 

239 

16% 

ISft 

15ft— ft 

42fe 

25% USTrs 

1J0 

2J 

101 



<2% 

25% 

17% UStatn 

J4 

1.1 

423 

B1 

Era 

22 

2Sfe 

15% UnTetev 



31 

24% 

24* 

24ft 

40% 

33ft UVoBs 

154 

35 

141 

46ft 

46ft 

46ft + ft 

22 

14% UltvFm 



100 

21% 

21ft 

21% + % 

a* 

10 UnvHIt 



506 

13 

Oft 

12ft— % 

a 

7fe UFSBk 

J7l 

3 

19 

10% 

10% 

10% — ft 

6% 

3% UtCtU 

JS 

4 J 

72 

5* 

4ft 

4ft 

i BB 

BBRBRBI 

^B 



■ 

■BO 

BBI 

-9fe 

5% VLI 



184 

5ft 

5% 

5ft + fe 

14% 

7% VLSI 



380 

15% 

14* 

15 — U 

life 

3ft VMX 



153 

Sfe 

5ft 

5ft— ft 

lift 

Tfe VSE 

-)6e 15 

104 

ID* 

ID* 

10* 

20% 

22* 

4 Valid La 
8% ValFSL 



370 

f 

19ft 

8ft 

19* 

Bft— % 

42% 

27 VolWtl 

1J2 

33 

1582 

38 

37% 

37ft 

30% 

19% VoILn 

JO 

15 

13 

27% 

27% 

77% 



JB 

2J 

ISA 

19ft 

19ft 

19ft— fe 

15% 

4% Vonzstl 



15 

4 

6 

6 + fe 

Afe 

2ft Ventre* 



299 

5% 

5 

5ft 

a% 

13ft Vleonp 

.121 

5 

326 

a 

19ft 

X + fe 

13ft 

Afe VtedoFr 

JOe 19 


7ft 

/ft 


!5ft 

9ft VlUna 



90 

14 

15 

15% + ft 

20% 

13% Vlroh* 



15 

20 

IV* 

19ft— fe 

reft 

5% Vodovl 



342 

0 

;% 

8 

22 

1414 VotllM 



59 

ifu 

19 

19 

IB 



W 









22 

21% 


17 

10 woibCs 
Aft WikrTel 

34 

15 

22 

16* 

16 

16* 

13% 



97 

9% 

9ft 

9% + fe 


14% wmE 




23 

22% 


til 

I4fe WFSLs 
10ft WMSB 

50 

2J 

45 

27% 

27ft 

27* + fe 

ETl 



471 

15% 

Uft 

15% 

9% 

6 Woven. 



11 

7% 

7% 

7ft— U> 


10* Webb 

JO 

3J 

457 

12ft 

12% 

12% + fe 


i.ra.. J..T1 



25 

17* 

17 

17ft + ft 





951 

17ft 

16ft 

16ft + fe 





20 

8% 

Bft 

8% 

18ft 

6ft WtTlAS 



112 

17% 


17% — ft 



JO 

IJ 

134 

21% 

21% 

71ft 

lull 




244 

life 

lift 

lift + fe 

38ft 

Aft 

24fe Wettra 

3 Wlcat 

58 

25 

107 

2995 

37ft 

4% 



13ft 

3 wucam 



U 

3% 

3ft 

3ft 

50ft 

31 fe wmmt 

55 

13 

165 

49% 

49% 

49% 

KKTI 




378 

15* 

14% 


19 



5 

18* 

late 

18* 

10ft 




87 

5ft 

5ft 

Sft— ft 


r l’?ra , ,'y| 

JDi 


1172 

5* 

6% 

5ft— fe 


r . ■’ 

50 

37 

140 

16ft 

16* 

16ft 

Kizfl 

11% Woodhd 

50 

45 

32 

13ft 

U 


20 

14 Werttes 

54 

22 

1005 

20 

19ft 

X + fe 



.lie 


15 

7ft 


7ft + ft 



JO 


397 



21ft + ft 




: 

E 



| 

4ft 

1ft Xebec 



1559 

2ft 

1ft 

Ift-* 









17% 

10% XWex 



1397 

14* 

14* 

14ft— % 

■1 

■BBH^l 


HuBKi 

HB 

HN 

^■1 

a* 

14% YIOwFs 

J4 

XO 

6521 

27% 

a* 

27ft +1% 

■ 



; 





30* 

5% ZenLbs 

.101 

5 

IMS 

25ft 

75% 

25% — fe 



580 35 

6 

life 

13ft 


45fe 

3i zionut 

Ji 

XO 

IS 

45% 

15% 


9% 

ift mei 



3 

3 

3 

3 + % 

8% 

3% Zlyad 



143 

6fe 

5ft 


15% 

6* Zendvn 

J8I 

3 

I/S 

12 

11% 

II* + fe 


x — ex-dlvldend or ex-rtgnts. 
xdi»— ex-aistrlljutlan. 
kw— wtmeur warrants, 
v — ex-dtvktend ana sates m (u I L 
vld— view, 
z— sales It^uii. 


Industrial Output Rises 
By 1,8% in Germany 

Reuters 

BONN — West German industrial produc- 
tion, seasonally adjusted, rose a proviaonal 1.8 
percent in October after a revised 0.6- percent 
increase in September, (he Economics Ministry 
said Monday. 

Tbe ministry had originally estimated that 
production had fallen 0.2 percent in September 
from (he level of August. The ministry said the 
Federal Statistics Office expected to make a 
sharp upward revision to the proviaonal figure 
for October. Output was 3.9 percent higher than 
in October last year. 

Manufacturing industry increased produc- 
tion by 1.S percent in October from September, 
while the construction sector raised output 7.1 
percent, (he mining industry by 1.2 percent and 
electricity and gas producers by 0.9 percent 




















































Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1985 



PEANUTS 



SURE LOOKS 
FftT DOESN'T HE? 



I WEIGHT L055 IN PATIENTS 
WITH A LARGE STOMACH 
MAY IMPROVE WALKING, 
AMP THUS LEAP ID . 
FEWER AN6WAL ATTACKS 



( MAYBE I AMJN 
\T HE WR0 M6 LINE!, 



BOOKS 


BLONDEE 


ACROSS 
1 Fastener 
5 Nimble 
10 Droops 

14 Opposed 

15 Turner and 
Cantrell 

16 Pelvic bone: 
Comb, form 

17 King of the 
Jungle 

18 Edward 
Teach, 
notorious 
pirate 

20 Wheel rim 

22 Cereal seeds 

23 Spinning 

26 Astronaut 
Evans 

27 Heath 

30 Placebo 
32 Snipe's milieu 
36 Pirate flag 

39 Give whirl 

<uy) 

40 Nickname for 
author 
Wharton 

41 Express a view 

42 Design 

43 Economy org. 

44 Kidd's men 
40 The present 

time 

49 Capuchin 
monkey 

50 British spy. 
hanged in 1780 

51 Aitch preceder 
53 Camel's cousin 


55 Cares for 

59 Bonnet or 
carriage 

63 Fictional 
pirate 

66 What video 
means 

67 Mimicked 

68 Sheer linen 
cloth 

69 Epsilon 
follower 

76 Arctic gull 
genus 

71 Checks 

72 Bridge position 

DOWN 

1 One of a pair 

2 Shrub yielding 
indigo 

3 Zeno’s 
“classroom" 

4 Apex 

5 He wrote 
“Who’s Afraid 

of Vir ginia 

Woolf?” 

6 "My Sal” 

7 pickle (on 

the ropes) 

8 Deficiency 

9 Glacial ridge 

10 Burnt , 

artist's 

pigment 

11 Winglike parts 

12 "Golden West" 
person 

13 Builds a lawn 


*2/10/85 

19 'Bones 

(Icha bod’s 
nemesis) 

21 Neutral color 

24 Town near 
Kingston, N.Y. 

25 Reasonable 

27 Oust 

28 Site of lots of 
bucks 

29 Epic by Homer 

31 Writing tool 

33 Sore as hops 

34 Brenda or 
Belle 

35 Medieval guild 

37 Emulate Jesse 
James 

38 F.D.R. 
measure 

42 Punish 

45 A Hottentot 

47 Order of 
business 

48 Cravings 

52 Works on 

authors' works 

54 Sights an 
ranges or 


55 Grew hero 

56 Small shark 

57 "Let eat 

cake" 

58 Aperture 

60 On the Yellow 

61 Units for Boris 
Becker 

62 Topic in tbe 
tropics 

64 Contend 

65 Shade tree 



TELL THEM IT WAS WONDER- 
FUL 

Selected Writings by Ludwig Bemelmans. 
Edited by Madeleine Bemelmans. 315 
pages. $19.95. 

Viking 40 West 23d Street, New York. 
N. Y. 10010. 

Reviewed by Jonathan Yardley 

I F you are 5fl or younger and grew up in a 
house where books were treasured, you are 
fikdy to have fond memories of “Madame," a 
book by Ludwig Bondmans about a little 
French girl's adventures and misadventures, 
like much of the best children’s literature, it is 
at once funny and faintly frightening, whimsi- 
cal and mysterious. Its brief story is accompa- 
nied by illustrations by Bondmans that exact- 
ly suit its complex mixture of moods. The book 
frag had a large and devoted following since its 
publication in 1939. 

Though he prospered off “Madeline** and its 
wjnricpwTiAniWBi found much more to do in 
life than write books for children. As is delight- 
fully demonstrated by “Tell Them It Was 
Wonderful,” he traveled in cosmopolitan cir- 
cles, enjoyed fmp. food and Armir — to excess, 
if he could — and was richly experienced in 
tifds pleasures. The book is a ctiDection of bis 
autobiographical writings, some of them 

“Tell Them It Was Wonderful" is charming 
and amusing. Bemelmans writes with brio. 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


BHEC3BC1 

onBonaa 



ana 

QQHHQ 03300 Q 

a 0000003 



DGHQH QEQQE3G1G1 
□QDD □□□!!□ QDI0 


UDQD 

□ 

□ 

oa 

QDQDQQU □□□□ 

H 

aa 

DEQcaoca 

QDHQ 

a 

□Q 


|G|B|ElB|E|S| 


□□□□□□ 


whether describing his rather peculiar l.* 
hood in Austria, his wild escapades as a 
employee of several New York holds, b 
youthful infatuation with an actress, his visit! 
(be Hears! fairyland at San Simeon, or h 
renovation of a house in Paris. As he puts a 
“Psychologists say that an excessive intai 
of food and wine is a substitute for hapoin^ 
hfce pudding. I like wine, roast goose.’ 
ham, shepherd’s pie, and lobster stew. I® 
hungry and thirsty a great deal of the tin* 
which accounts Tor the fact that I have & 
quired a reputation as a connoisseur of w vat 
and as a gourmet. If I am hungry, then^tt 
thing I worry about most is that one day aU th 
goodies wfli be taken away from me. Cftrfa 
not by the Russians, by someone infir#*} 
kinder, but still taken away. 1 am speala&gc 
the day or night after which a photograph c 
me, and a bad one, will appear on the 
somber page of the newspaper, and under u m 
npnvt, and a resume of my career, wfcridrwa 
mainl y dedicated to the enjoyment of lift*.- A 
least that is what it will say, for I have -ala 
acquired a reputation as a lover of life and , 
professor of happiness." 

To practice this enviable professorship Be 
mglmaitt traveled far and wide. "My habitat i 
mostly bars and restaurants, hotels and depots 
and the lobbies and entrances thereof, fa 
writes. “In normal times I am found cm tfa 
d w *s of steamships, and on the shores a 
tropic isles. I arrive suddenly, somewhere far 
away, and once there I haunt the piers aac 
terminals and curse if there isn’t a beat oj 
plane to take me back immediately." Tfaj 
tension between the desire to escape am! 
desire to return may well have been the conse- 
quence of Bemelmans' childhood; his parent 
were divorced — in small-town Austria in the 
first decade of the century, this was scandalco: 
— and he saw too little of either of them. 

But he seems to have been even more eager 
to bestow affection than to demand iL His 
circle of friends was huge, and open to all 
Many of his fondest memories are reserved for 
those ordinary men and women, most of them 
Austrian or German emigres, who worked with 
him at the old Ritz-Carlton on Madison. Ave- 
nue, and many of the tales he (eQs about them 
are filled with humor and love. 


12/10/as 


Jonathan Yardley is on the staff oj The Wash- 
ington Post. 


© New York Times, edited by Eugene Malabo: 

DENNIS THE MENACE 



WIZARD o f ID 

^ m., 

THERES 
upsncfc 
ou/net 


CHESS 



nm&wmr 
v&xAmm 
in m&fcfc 
rm '&a&\ 



REX MORGAN 




VOUR SOW 
AMD DAUGHTER MUST HAVE 
SEEN A GREAT SOURCE 
COMFORT AFTER VOUR 
WIFE'S DEATH, MR. PEN! SON; 


THEY WERE— 
MUCH MORE 
SUPPORTIVE 
Of ME THAN 
I WAS C 
-THEM 


u 


I REALIZE MOW -THAT 1 WAS 
IM A SEVERE DEPRESSION , NOT 
CAPABLE OFBEfWfir HEUPFULTO THEM t 
X SHOULD HAVE SEEN A PSYCHIATTO^T 
AT THE TIME— BECAUSE DEPRESSION 
IS A TERRIBLE ILLWESS 


MV DAUGHTER LUCY EVEN ) 
TRIED TO GET ME OUT *~ 
SOCIALLY, *TO MEET WOMEN, 
NOT REALIZING THAT I 
WASN'T READY l 



* Vto DOl^T YA WASH ME LIKE THIS, A\CW 2 


GARFIELD 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD OAME 
|» by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble these (our Jumbles, 
one iettsr to Mch square, to form 
tour onlnwy words. 


CELER 


n 

nr 



DEEXU 



Ll 




i i .cm 



PRAULB 


_u_ 

1 


A BIRD HE GHOUL C? 
HAVE THOUGHT 
OF BEFORE HE 
WAS KNOCKED OUT. 

Now arrange the drdod tetters to 
tom the surprise answer, aa sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Yesterday' a 


Print answer hem: ( J X 1 ] 
(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: FRUIT LADLE FACADE JUMPER 
Answer The only time some drivers obey the speed 
limit Is when they're this— 

IN A TRAFFIC JAM 


WEATHER 

EUROPE 


Mourn 

Amsterdam 

AHtOOl 

H rWua 

Bdoraae 

Berlin 

Brunei! 

Bucharest 

Budapest 

Copen h agen 

Caste Del Sal 

Dablkfl 

Edinburgh 

Horesee 

Frankfurt 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

Istanbul 

Ln Palmas 


London 


Milan 

Moscow 

Mania 

Nice 

Otto 


Reykjavik 

Homo 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Via dob 

Warsaw 

Zurich 

MIDDLE 


Ankara 

Beirut 

DQIMHM 


ret Avtv 
OCEANIA 

AVCKhvHl 
Svdaer 


HIGH 

LOW 


c 

F 

c 

F 


14 

81 

1 

44 

lr 

* 

48 

S 

41 

r 

18 

44 

12 

54 

0 

11 

S 

0 

46 

a 

13 

55 

1 

14 

w 

a 

44 

1 

34 

r 

9 

48 

7 

45 

r 

a 

37 

1 

34 

to 

» 

48 

4 

43 

0 

5 

41 

0 

32 

0 

14 

57 

7 

45 

fr 

4 

39 

1 

34 

*0 

s 

41 

3 

37 

fr 

14 

S7 

S 

41 

a 

9 

48 

6 

43 

r 

8 

44 

2 

36 

a 

.1 

30 

-5 

23 

ri 

10 

50 

7 

45 

ta 

21 

70 

14 

61 

r 

U 

55 

a 

46 

cl 

8 

43 

4 

37 

0 

10 

50 

3 

37 

fr 

IB 

50 

a 

46 

r 

<4 

21 

-is 

5 

tr 

8 

46 

•1 

30 

ct 

U 

55 

9 

48 

a 

-IS 

10 

-V 

7 

Sw 

10 

so 

8 

46 

0 

s 

41 

2 

36 

a 

1 

34 

-3 

27 

0 

15 

59 

7 

45 

r 

■9 

18 

■13 

7 

cl 

9 

48 

4 

43 

0 

11 

52 

9 

4B 

0 

6 

<3 

3 

37 

a 

5 

41 

0 

32 

r 

9 

48 

-1 

N 

d 

AST 




w 

s? 

a 

55 

lr 

FWd 

— 

— 

— 

no 


MW 

_ 


no 

19 

84 

9 

41 

a 

27 

81 

18 

•4 

cl 

19 

46 

14 

57 

cl 


Aa I A 

HIGH 

LOW 



C 

F 

C 

F 


Banokofc 

33 

90 

20 

48 

fr 

Ben taa 

-3 

27 

-13 

9 

tr 

HaeaKooB 

22 





Manila 

32 

« 

24 

79 

d 

tanrOeSM 

w 

M 

9 

48 

tr 

Seam 

•5 

23 



fr 

summits 

2 

36 

-3 

27 


Homagers 

31 

88 

25 

73 

r 

Tafes-S 

— 





Tokyo 

13 

54 

6 

43 

sh 

AFRICA 






Algiers 

16 

61 

9 

41 


Cairo 






Cope Tom 

21 

70 

U 

39 

d 

CotaWopca 

— 





Harare 

— 


17 

43 


Lose* 


— 




»okoM 



__ 

_ 

_ 


Tonis 

» 

64 

a 

46 

e 

LATIN AMERICA 



Boones Aires 


_ 




Canaan 

m— 


__ 

_ 


Lima 

_ 





Mexico City 

a 

73 

3 

41 


Rle de Janeiro 

— 




no 

NORTH AMERICA 



Anduraee 

1 

34 

4 

27 

a 

Atlanta 

18 

64 

6 

a 


Boston 

4 

37 

0 

37 


Oricaee 

7 

36 

■3 

27 

d 

Denver 

-4 

21 

-10 

14 

sw 

Detroit 

2 

36 

•2 



H6 bj;bIo 

28 

82 




Houston 

23 

73 

17 

43 

d 

Up Angela 

U 

» 

10 

SO 

fr 

Miotnl 

34 

79 

19 

44 


MlMeapalta 

-7 

19 

4 

16 

d 


Montreal 


30 86 39 48 


Now York 

5™?**“ 

Toronto 

woMnama 


1 M 0 

39 14 St 

3 it 1 

13 35 9 

S 41 

I 

W 


34 -T 
SO 2 


» *w 
73 tr 
34 fr 

4t PC 
32 <0 

30 r 
34 PC 


«-*» w «*■*» 

<«":» »• MADRID! Cloudy. Tern* 10—2 (50 - MTMSWjroRK^pSrtfy 
.Tgy-.g - a l* — ”1- FARjg; Oouev- Temp. 9- s 48-41 >. home: 


3,-£5 (M-hraSuLT FiS" T&r+Z 1'i Tr-m ffiShSSS 

TTwnckmiornis. Temp. 30 -23 <14 -73), TOKYO: Shewed Temi 13-4 
<55 — 43). « 



By Robert Byme 

I N this year's United States 
Championship, The Paul M. 
Albert first brilliancy prize 
went to Kamrtan Shirazi , a 33- 
year-okl international master 
from Iran. He shone mightily in 
his lOth-roond game -with In- 
ternational Master Boris Ko- 
gan. 

At one time, it was claimed 
that 5 . . . N-Q2 was weak 
because it was thought that 6 
Q-K2 was in White’s favor. 
However, 6 . . . Q-K2; 7 
BxN, PxB; 8 B-B4, NxN; 9 
BxN, B-B4; 10 N-B3, (MW) ws 
quite adequate for Blade in the 
game between Anatoly Karpov 
and Ylastimil Hort in Amster- 
dam, 1980. 

Kogan’s 7 . . . Q-B3!?, lim- 
iting White's replies, may wdl 
be an improvement over the old 
7 . . . Q-R5, but after Shira- 
n’s 8 N-B3, the merits shown 
by 8 . . . NxN; 9 PxN, (MM). 
Instead, Kogna’s provocative 
8 . . . QxP gave Shirazi tbe 
chance to offer a gambit with 9 
Q-R5!? 

It was still not too late for the 
prudent 9 . . . 0-0-0, since 10 
B-K3 could have been met by 
10 . ... N-B3, but Kogan ris- 
kily attempted to hold nis one 
l's worth of booty with 
. N-B317 
After 10 R-Klch, B-K2 
10 . . . B-K3?; 11 RxBch); 

1 0-N5, Kogan had at his dis- 
! a sharp way to justify his 
previous play, namely, 
11 . . . B-K3!; 12 N-N5, Q- 
N3; 13 QxNP, KR-K3!; 12 N- 


N5, Q-N3; 13 QxNp. KR-N1; 
14 Q-R6, P-R3: 15 N-B3, (MW), 
with a complicated, two edged 
game. 

In playing 11 . . . Q-KN5?. 
be was apparently looking for 
the safety of an end game fol- 
lowing tfa: exchange of queens, 
and the trap with 12 (VK57, 0- 
0-0; 13 QxB?, KR-KI had sure- 
ly caught his eye, too. 

What he had overlooked, or 
underestimated, was Shirazi’s 
powerful attack be ginning with 
the exchange sacrifice 12 
RxBcfa! 

On 14 NxN. Kogan could 
not interpolate the exchange of 
queens because 14 . Qx Q? 

lets White interpolate 15 
NxBch to win material 
After 18 P-KN3, defense 
with 18 . . . R-Ql would not 
.have held up against 19 B-B5!, 
R-Q8; 20 BxQ, RxRch; 21 K- 
N2. RxB; 22 B-N5, K-Q2; 23 
Q-Q8ch, K-B3; 24 B-B4. 

Shirazi had already achieved 
a slight materia) advantage 
with 19 BxP, while 
19 . . . KR-KI; 20 B-B4 saw 
the white attack continue un- 
abated. 

His 21 Q-B3! could not be 
met by 2! . . . P-QB3? be- 
cause of the cnuhiDg 22 Q-N4!, 
threatening 23 Q-Q6ch and 23 
QxPch. 

His 23 B-B3! could not be 
met by 23 . . . Q-QN4? since 
24 R-Qlcb, B-Q4; 25 P-QR4!, 
QxRP; 26BxB, RxB; 27 RxPch 
forces mate. 

On 25 B-N5!, Kogan could 
not play 25 . . R/2-K17 in 
view of 26 R-Qlch, B<J4; 27 


• 30U SL‘> 



r _ mm 

las i;? 

iroJfJwak 

m 


SMRAJ WHTZ 

PosttUm after 27. . . R/1-&Z 

BxB, PxB: 28 QxPch. K-B2: 29 
0-Q6mate. 

Kogan’s stubborn sltue^Jcs 
were put to an end by Sfa; as 
•decisive 2S RxB! Oa 

28 . . . R.vR. While wins with 

29 B-R5ch!. QxB (29 . . . K- 
Q2?: 30Q-Q8mate); 30 QxRch. 
K-BI:31 B-R6ch, R-N2:32Q- 
B6ch. 

On 28 . . . QxR; 29 B- 
R5ch. Black could not play 
29 . . . K-Ql because of 30 
QxQ. The alternative with 

29 . . . K.-Q2 was smashed by 

30 B-N4!, the point being that 
30 . . . QxB allows 31 QxRch. 
K-Bl; 32 Q-Q8mate. Kogan 
gave up. 

PETROV DEFENSE 


> HI 
: 

3 


t NxN 
7 M 
1 N-BJ 

I Q-R* 

II Lodi 
II Q4B 
n AM 

U IttM 
M NxN 
IS QxF 


MU 

N-KBJ 

NxP 


HRS 


H MM R«| 
17 k-KbA k«| 
II P-KNJ KOT 


a B-B4 
71 O-W 
77 HI 
S SO 

74 

75 HMS 

a 


P 
ig 
53P 

Ml 
R/1-S7 

- - Q«S 
2* BJUcti K-Q3 
■ BJV4 43*. 



W)Hd Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse Dec. 9 

Clomg prices in lead aurmdtn unleu otherwise mdiceted. 


ABN 

ACFHotdins 

Amen 

Akzo 

AhoM 

Amov 

A-Dom Rutter 

Amro Bonk 
BVG 


Fafcfced 

owBrfl 

HotnoMn 


KLM 


Not Nader 
Nwftlavd 
Oca vendor G 

PokhOOd 

PtllllDS 


Rodorwj 

Ratma 


srr 

VonOnoterm 
VMF Stork 

VNU 

AHFXCS flart ladax : 2Mn 


STS SXUB 
9M 
ios.ia naa> 

MX« I3AJ# 
TUB 7X40 

7SJ0 
SJS MS 
fuo sun 

Ml 242 
lZUO 130JB 

as 28 
140 its 
TLSO TUB 

24050 251 JO 

213 ZIS5B 
75 74 

5250 JU0 
50 99. 
KAO SIM 

3BUD 3001 

300 301 

OZTO 01J0 
54J0 57 JO 

« BGb« 

mao jas 

71 J0 7120 
47 4U0 
175-40 178 

3S4 SOM 
»» _» 
2S0L7D 
277 279 


ArtHd 

Bshparf. 


EBES 
C84mw«M 
GBL 
Garaarr 
HetMkan 
intercom 
Kredla tD a nfc 
Petra Hn u 

3oc Generate 
Sauna 
Sahw 
TgtUrnm 


UtWR 

vietlle 


Carrem Stock III 
Ftwtovs : ZH4JT 


2475 2490 
MO 8700 
IBS 205 
4480 4440 
WS M» 

9070 5040 
WS 290 
5140 3259 
9730 9700 

an ms 

12175 12175 

7000 7B7B 

2U0 2200 
■am bbo 

4040 4110 
4015 9T2B 
9730 9KB 

wm trm 

5790 5770 
: 271 4J7 


AEG-Tottfunkon 

AHTonxVen 

Altana 

BASF 

Bww 

BavHvMBank. 
Bar Ventrabank 


BH . 

BMW 
Oxnmerztxink 

ContCumml 

DabnlaiNBan7 

Dastmo _ 
DaunclM HaMOCK 
Deutsche Dank 

Oew dntr Banfc 

GMH 


m 

1775 TJSl 
410 400 

244J0243JS 

m» 251 JO 

443 440 

4» 448 

290 304 
484 4M 
544 930 
2S3JD2HJB 
14440 144J0 
1139 1199 
4343090 
2T1 201 

71090 49430 

uni 

244 {<4 


Cleie Prtf, 

HoeWtef 785 770 

Hoechet 2S4JD 253 

N°— Cti 14000 l» 

Hww? 214 21050 

{SKP 414 

tWKA nn 3M 

Katl + SaU 322J0 329J0 

KarstDdt ni ffl 

KauOmt 325 331 

Kjaackner H-D 304JQ 3Q1 

Kfuwstonl 17050 171 

{-Inge 575 57* 

Uffihansa 210 215 

«AN 205 190 

Mannaemann 240 259 

Muante Rmdt 2JM 2*00 

Nbodort WAS 

PKt 7004.._ 

Eyww law i2ia 

PnjWtiaH 24050 23? 

PWA 193 154.10 

RWE 10&30 189 

Rtiehmwtall Mr 

|g*rlnB 422JD4 _ 

SSL 310 317 JO 

WHWjW 4CU044UO 

JJWWm 1721MJ0 

■*DQ 271 370 

JWtaewmiert 404S0 40U0 
Wolta 72S 717 

SSKTWr*™ 


JWwg W owot 


BjcEest Ask? 
Ovum Kano 
China LlaM 
Sraen island 

OilnaQas 
MK Electric 

HKHoSUs * 

HK Land 
HKShana Bank 

MKYduKffif 

HKWSS°“ 

Mitch Whanwoa 
Hvean 
InTiatv 
■hsfltat 
JarmneSee 
Kowlson Motor 
Miramar Hotel 

now waru 

SSraPadflcA 
TalChounp • 
Won Kwono 

WnaOnCo 
wfES’imn 


23J0 2170 
2070 M «t 
1110 19 

7 JO 7J9 
44J0 44 

7» Z2S9 
1X70 1340 
&39 A4D 

mo lisa 
3450 3450 
440 445 
745 749 
9JB 955 
US 1925 
740 750 
2&20 2190 
040 040 
059 099 
1370 1370 

1X40 1550 

1050 HUD 
9450 
■ 45S 

1270 

AS 

1 TB 

495 490 
2429 2425 


Job 


AEC1 949 945 

AnHaAmertcon 3935 3970 

Aim Am (MM 19300 19700, 

Barlows 1350 1410 

Btvyaar MK 17* 

Bufflls 0125 0325 

Da Been 1525 1930 

DrtSenMn SON 5075 

Elands N.a — 


GFSA 

Harmony 

Nedtenk 

Mr 

gffls 

Sasoi 

Waxt Holdlmi 


22» 3350 


flto 

2550 

740 

4450 

- 0050 


saw I 

790 

4450 

90S! 


SBStBP—:"- 


AA Com 
AJIIkH-votm 
A nglo Am Gold 
ASsBrtt Foods 
Am Dairies 
Barclay* 


IIM SUM 
295 273 

357 150ft 
240 242 


150 

439 

440 


BAT. 

B ee chan 33B 

BICC »4 

BL a 

Blue Circle 595 

BOC GfDUP 294 

BOOH 263 

Bawuier Indus 3 20 

DP 54* 

Brjf Homo St 41S 

BrttTatamm 195 

snm 216 

|TR 354 

purmcn mi 

Ca b l e Wire teas 973 

CMhurv Sen** 154 

ChortorCon* 214 

Commercial U 219 

ConsGoM 457 

Qwtuutds 104 

Daluety 234 

Do Beers « mo 

Dbtlllcrs 403 

DfhHtanWfl S14* 

rlsacn 45a 

FQteStGad 2204k S214i 

OEC 172 174 

Oeri Accident m m 

GKN 2(9 ■ 251 

gwwc . 15Mi 15 29/44 

gSE 0 * 1 IS “ 

iss"" 

H«2on 2n 

Hawker 43c 

■Cl 7D 

imperlel Group 244 

Jasuer 312 

l^dS ecwrffle a 303 

{Juai General 749 

Lloyds Bank 440 

194 

|^*Ond5p W 

Metal Bax 513 

Midland Bank <29 

FjiMnfion m 

- K7 

^dtertS, Sf S72K 

m*k 452 4S7 

Jjeuwrs 310 310 

KundDutehi <i 41/444213744 

914 521 

730 730 

374 J7S 
109 110 


723 

294 

980 

204 

441 
704 
240 
317 
305 
742 
472 
194 
4X1 
W1 
515 
432 

442 
435 
319 
IB2 
7B3 
144 


RTZ 
Saatehj 

Salnshurv 

Sour* Holdings 


Shall 

5TC n 

5td Char-lened <29 

Sun Alliance 528 533 

Tate a nd Lyfa 3*5 945 

Thorn EMI 411 417 

TJ. Gr oup 393 319 

Trrrtatanr Use 332 3M 

THF IS 154 

Ultramar 203 tbs 

Unllewgc _ 12 13/6412 13/44 
Uidtod Biscuits 237 

Vickers 290 

Woolwarlh 546 553 

F.T. 30 index :1115J0 
PrrrtaH : uffj* 

F.TJJLiee ledex : 

Praoleas : H0190 


BpicaCamm 

C t uah u te le 

Cradital 

Ertdcmla 

^mltana 

Italcnmantl 
■■a leas 
l^maMloTl 

Moniedbon 

Olivetti 

Plratn 

HAS 

ST- 

UB 

sr° 


24090 342U 
11910 12155 
3173 3150 
lNlf 

5318 

73300 ; 

gJWM 

2S4 tS 

MKSJM 
2510 

3549 

S3 35 

>354»1^TO 

2 SJ 

ffli t£o 
5050 5120 
14000 14000 




AlrUouhto 
Atetnom AH. 
AvDcssMutt 
Bcmcolre 
BIC 

Bdngroln 

Bouvouas 

KN-GO 

Corrofour 

Choroeur* 
Club Mod 
Dorty 
Dunttc 

glMautMM 

gurmel 

gen Eauy 

Hedietle 

^fonoa.C op 

LMfond 

LOsieur 

rptsai 


Merlin 

MkMIn 

ST" 

Perrier 

Peupeet 

Prlntemne 

gadletedki 

Redouts 

RprariUdai 

S MsRosslo noi • 

TIWpSOBCSF 

Total 


4oo tat 

391 3N 
1210 1130 
773 799 

4*1 498 

’Sf ’55 

_021 829 

2440 2445 
Z72S 2NB 
M2 «l 
485. 490 
lt» 1875 
■38 035 

212 218 
■98 90S 

730 773 

7340 .1399 
478 480 

•3453 2473 
729 723 

2725 2805 
1525 1548 
15» 1425 

349c an 

1970 WS 
2187 2140 
7240 72 

704 717 

m 28 

<33 

449 JO 
_ 34110 
408JD da 
1854 .1840 
.1459 1451 
0T 442 
14)0 14N 
2645 -2725 

■s & 




Cold Storage 

nsw 0 " 

Inchc np e 

JKJBonWnu 

OCBC 

OUB 

OUE 

ShorprHo 
Sim Darby 
Score Land 

ypw 1 * Pro* 

sffisssr 

UngMOrarmas 

jfrafts Ti mes lad 
Praviein : 4>us 



AGA 

Alfa Laval 

Asea 

Astra 

RSSr 

Eeselte 


ggwocta 

^.shMateh 


HA 115 


NA ... 

T7B 144 
7H 11. 

TO 174 

197 an 

21V 214 

178 184 

SS J& 

£ ■* 

% ss 


ACI 

ANZ 

BMP 

Verol 

BowohMIie 

CajdlffTMIn# 

Comotau 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunlop 

Elders rxi 
[Cl Australia 
Magellan 
MM 
Mvor 

Nat Aust Bank 
News carp 
n Broken Hin 


Old Co m Trod 
santna . I 

ITHamasM 
westaraMliEP 


Z71 ITS 
4J5 ATS 
U L34 
no 3.13 

U0 U5 
■ 8 

4.12 All 

US I JO 
598 590 
199 154 

293 227 
190- 293 

2.12 112 
2 2 

155 150 
UB 140 
453 4144 
190 ISO 
2.14 118 
339 149 

SK 5L» 
298 999 

X13 1W 
450 450 
193. 193 


AdptdlPdrtfs ledex : MSN 




Atari 

AsetilCham 
AseMGieu 
Bqnkot Tok yo 
Brfdgestane . 


sx 


Crtoh 
oai rapponPrin 
Datura House - 
DatwaSeeurtflM. 
Fan uc 
Full Bank 


4M 410 

K - 770 
- OH 
725 734 

STS 5» 
1150 1140 
1330 1840 
382 389 
W9B 1300 
897 87T 

744 778 

« a 


.-..Phota 

ate 

■HHacM Cable 
Honda 

jtaPanAIrLtan, 

Kanaal Power 
Kawauld steel 
KlrtaBnemry 1 
K omot e u 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Motsu eiecJnds 

Matsu Elec works 

MltaJbWU Btrtt 

MtteiMshiawfli 
NUtautataM Etec 
MltsuMsM Heavy 

Mttsufeashl 

NGKtrauiatom 

Nippon Kd - 
Nippon on 


430 


Nomura Sk 
O lympus 


RJcah 
Sharp 
Shlnraju 

Jhtaetsu Otemlcnl 
Sony, 

SumHama Bank 
a mtiBa ma Omn 

SwrdtamoMortM 

Samttanw Motet 

Toum carp 

TatAo Marine 

TMcadoaMin 

TDK 

Teflln 

Takio Marine 
Tokyo Etet Power 

Tapnmi Printing 

sas*. 

Toyota 
Yameldil Sec 

NBdCM 225 : TZ79822 
Previews: 1179391 
iMMximu 

Pie vl e nt MS1L24 


2830 2830 

1070 noo 

721 747 

740 749 

79N 7380 

<57 <96 

W00 1818 
134 -135 
718 734 

SH 4,0 

318 320 

<370 4420 
1230 1220 
Ml STS 
1460 1440 
518 404 

M2 355 
344 344 

“ SO 
395 

— s$ 

1320 1340 

m «o 

702 713 

1040 WO 

‘73 7 * 

. 151 151 

Si 3n 

973 572 

1010 10H 
10N 1030 
1720 17» 

’JS ’AS 

899 910 

BTO SM 

™ *33 

3n0 5948 
1990 \S» 
244 2» 

421 *31 

139 148 

314 >19 

589 SM 

9 24 723 

417# 4240 
474 472 

047 SST 
93N DM 
980 989 

904 5D3 

379 379 

’J 8 ’IS 

Tf! 718 


Mk> 

AKisume 

Aufanhon 

Bank Leu 

BravmBoveri 

gha.Geipv 

Cratftamsse 

E lochP w ul l 

Interdbawnt 

Jacob Sachard 

JeftnoH 

Landis Gyr 

Moewmpfdt 

Roche Baby 


SchktdJar 

Sulzer 

ftsar* 


fS&st 


lefflSSrt&f 

wimrmor 
Zurich Ins 

SBC Index : 9NJ0 
"WiimtswSl 


4400 4470 
574 475 
4175 41a 
4140 4125 
1875 1348 
asa 3440 

3495 3495 

35M. aao 
3290 3275 

MM 7490 

36H 249 
229 

32N5W0 

7999 7940 

139 1340 
117N U425 
179 USD 

"SS % 

- 4875 489 
1570. USS 
525 ' 923 
2100 2173 

2878 2378 

• 4970 4910 
9940 9940 
2410 2SU 


Canadian stocks raa AP 


Salas Stock 
2140 Abn prm 
1290 Ackkmds 
94NAanlooE 
Asm Ind A 
28798 Alt Energy 
4030 AHa Nat 
2S740Ateama St 
■ ArpusCpr 
7444 AtCo 1 1 
134048 BP COnada 
45940 Bank BC 
N722Bank N S 
74427 BarrlckU 

5*771 Boncrao R 

5200 Bralomt 
941 Bramelea 
500 Brenda M 
4041 BCFP 
83834 BC Res 
<1610 BC Phene 
351Q Brurawfc 

nsoOBuddcan 

14575 CAE 
16CCLA 
9137CCLBI 
5100 Cad Fry 
401 SO Coi nti e uu f 
1437# C Nor west 
7220 C Padurs 

Si Can Trust 
1800 C Ting 

— # £®® 

RM14 Cl Bk Com 
130521 CTIreAf 
2250 Cara 
11435 Cekwese 
aOOCclan T75D 

14nCoriMTr 

, IN CHUM 
SOTOnemex 
WOCDtotoA 

4700 CDtottl B f 
SH CTL Bank 
lONQxnmtfA 
34490 CoMka R 
19075 Conran A 
2712Crewnx 
174M Czar Res 
[3404 Doan °w 
WOOOwlianAp 
44105 DenisenBf 


«ei*i at NA~- not 
avallahte; *fl: ejcdlvioeney 


^&AI 

ssa 8 

37385 Donohue 

2300 Du Pam A 

17440 DvfexA 
lsnEMHiemx 
HWEmcD 
w®K3enuHvSvr 
309 FCA Infi 
WgCFrtranC 
T25E33 Flcttbrdge 
l2NFadlndA 
SWPtdPlon 

5W0 P aiv Fin 
12SGerMflSA 
SBlNGeac Comp 
MSOGRrattar 
12260 GoWajTDf . 

■ 1 ON Graft G 
134S0GL Forest 
TMGtPodtic 
TOGrtvhnd 
57421 Hawker 
flOZHaresD 
.4IDNH0M Udt 
. 42DHM0nart 
^8 H Bay C o 
2677* lltvaco 
lOMlndoi 
MSB inland Co* 
192150 Inti Thom 
12910 InIprPtpa 
24914 ipsa. 

SIOWacaB 

995DJunaoek • 
1400 KIRT Add 
aoMLdbmt 
SBNUMCam 
TOfUKana 
- niLoMawCa 

.•woe?:.. 

3T7D4 Melon H X . 
S P Maritime I - 
3873HUriandE 


!-«» Close Cha 
518 17Vi 17 Vj 
S1BU ISM IBM + U. 
*21 ft 2D% 20%V-1I% 
NJJ 9VJ 9H,+ Vi 

SSS I 7 ** 17H— 1 

ss sb sa-"* 

as t 

*34 33V. 33 W— V. 
s» 5ta 5 M 
Wki 149 14% 

170 145 145 —7 

375 340 370 
3M 340 340 —30 

*17. 16% 17 

58% 8% e%+ % 

5"* "«■ nw , 

235 223 223 — 1 

KUU 24% 26V, 4 . h, 
513 12H4 12% 

390 29% 29%— V. 

«7 16% 17+16 

J2SJ I 5 * 4 — w 

*25 23% OT4— 1% 

538 37V, 37V, 

541% 41% 41% 

S10I6 M lc£ T M 

*£% 

IS r * 

* 

520 20 2D 

514% 14U IJU 
MO 40 09 — 1 

3m im+v, 

sa ss 

’ 732* ^ 

232 230 Bo 

KW 5% 516 + % 
51416 15% 16 + S 

5514 514 5%+ Va 

57% 7% 7%I u 

sr b* 

SIM 14% 14U 

-sa » aarS 

gWi «w 13% 14 

527 27 27 + iw 

S» 10% io%— w 

as % 

CS 

tH 22 27%+ J? 

is B 

as is 

tlB% 18% ™ 

S4416 4H mL. 

ST 3T 

i* Bfr* 

■ft-P ar* 

raw 2% 

3fo -8 

aa m i«6 


S54MMoi*>fiAf 

ra«ols«iB 

SDOMuranv 

I3M Nabisco 1_ 

<0467 Noranda 
22226 N or can 

^sasss- 

2NOOmnUkne 
1M00 OshUHOAt 
BMOTPoc WAIrfn 
W* Pomour 
’“WPwiCdnF 
■JOOPemblnc 
322 Ptae Point 
2400 Placer 
ran Que siwu o 
1M0 RayroCk t 
JMRedDolh 

JSS R «««l 1 Sp 

IttORoaOfSA 
4/TO Roman 
2S005ceptre 

’SSSMT 

SfSSA' 

<065 Spar Aerot 

■®ias7 A 

’^2 Tex Can 
. **°2 Thom N A 
>4^2 Tor Dm Bk 
’““Tarrinrai 
li^OTraderSA 1 

’SSI!? 5 ** 

Trinity Res 
.Sg" TrnAlta UA 

)^2TrCcn PL 

ll ^Trima C 
^jSTrilon a 

WwSSmt 

™gW*Sd 

Sssr 

3S??8S* 

Total sales 
T5E 380 hides: 


290 : 

S3J% 
SI4 
S9 1 * 
534 


Wen LwchnCHw 
521'A 21'A 21% * % 
CO % 20V, 2IJVj 
*2S» Z5V. 25%+ Is 
529 29 29 .+ 1* 

*14% 13% M - 
SI4W 16% 1616— It 
*P% 4% fr— — V* 

*1 BK. 18% .18% 

40 3» 39+1 

8% B%— w 

in as 
33'- 3316— '4 
13% .13^+ % 

9% 9*4— % 

— 33% 33%— % 

517% 17% lr+— >.» 
S19W 19% 19% 

524H 24 '6 24V,— % 
■370 335 340 - -35 

57% 714 L\ - V* 

SI 414 14% 1 Kt.fr 
544 V, 44% 44V4— 14 
*10% 10% 10%+Vt 
515% 1$ 15 -r % 

450 450 450 — S 

529*4 29 29 — *4 

*11*4 11% 11% - 
*24% 23% 23'6— 44 
*7*4 TV, ru— Mu 
512*4 12% 12%+ % 
*15% 15% 15% 

525% 24% 25 — % 
ran 23% -23%. 

205 200 205 

350 250 250 —10 

510% 17*4 17%— % 
*>7a 17% JTVmt % 
531*4 11 31%— *4 

S83V4 22*4 22% + *4 
*25% 24*. 25 + % 

*33 31*4 2S + % 

*25% 25% 25% . 
511*4 11% 11%— % 

ao as —io 

5271s 2714 WS- % 
KIN 21% 21% , 

350 291 293 -12 

*27% 22% 2214— % 
<8 44 47 —1 

.*7% 7% 2*4 • 

*H 14 14 - U 

512 lli, Il%-1% 
8% 8%-! % 
<38 410 415 .+15 

3W 300 lit ;-, S 

59% 19V. ld.^% 

16'A lew— % 

512% 12VJ. 1214 
*101 100% 100% . 

*7% 7 7W— % 

7*e 7*4+ 14 

1429*^72 shares - 

CtoW P r*viw 
VBHM U1UD 


Stock 

Sfrasr" 
“Sr™* 
lasa 
JSSSfiS™ 

K^NertOkCda 

■BB" 

JipHSSg 

tWo,s ®*«^fia4awSU. 


Mtah.Law i 

33*4 

*13*4 13 

Jim raw 

523% 23*S 

*n% n 
*30 30 

*18 IB 
*1<% l«4 
*12 )16 
*T«S 18 
VBP zi% 

21 

14N, 

SJS w 

JK% 34% 
22W 
®4 33% 


tadustrfutsuMBjq 


CMM 

12Q.73 


"“^sgaag? 0 —-': 

f^r.NliSoiT * 

























INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1985 


Page 19 


Edberg, 19 , Routs Wilander to Win First Major Title 



SPORTS 


•...rg^Stefan Edberg: Tve never been so happy in my fife.’ 


Om^edlyOvSti^FrvmDbpatdta ' 

MELBOURNE — Swedish 
teen-ager Stefan Edberg stunned 
defending champion Mats Wi- 
landa. 64, 6-3, 
to win the Australian Opm 

anil hk first g nmil-riiwn tumiw ihtr. 

Edberg took just 1 hour and 33 
mintrfif* to aid 'WUSDdtFs btd fdt- 

his third straight Australian title. “I 
played out of my grind, ” said the 
19-year-dd after Ms victoiy, which 
brought Mm $100,000. “I really 
served well, which I ritinfc was die 
key to the match because he had a 
KtdfiMt erf trouble with Ms serves.” 

The find, which had been hdd 
over a day became of continuing 
ram, started two boon late after 
another early-morning storm 
drenched the stadium's center 
court Only mice before had the 
tournament had to be eiitended 
past 14 days — in 1982, when run 
farced Johan Knelt and Steve Den- 
ton to play the final on a Monday. 

Bm finally the clouds parted and 
the final was played in brilliant 
■nra dw fy , Edberg ehrm* i ova- 
powering Wilander with an aggres- 
sive array of boonring serves and 
returns, storming ground strokes 
and intimidating net play. The 
No. 5 seed was the complete grass- 
court player. 

The lan time the two had met in 
a tournament final, in Bsstad last 
July, Wilander won the Swedish 
Open. 

Edberg broke Wilander in the 
10th game of Monday’s opening 
set, the third game of the second 

and ftq] fly. riiiid nnri nin th garage 


of the third set to chnch the tide. 
Wilander took Edberg to deuoe 
only once in the match. 

•W ilander appe ared edgy in the 
early going despite serving mote 
aces than Edberg. In the second 
game of tbs opening set, Wilander 
requested that officials check the 
Might of the net; m (lie next game, 
he requested that a center line um- 

AUSTRALIAN OPEN 

pire be toki to remove hisi acker as 
the stm was reflecting off its but- 
tons. 

Wilander, seeded third, was gra- 
cious in defeat, conceding that Ms 
compatriot had simply outplayed 
him. "If there’s somebody I don’t 
mind to lose very much to, it’s Ste- 
fan," sad Wila nder, 21. “He's a 
very good friend.” 

Sunday night, the two shared a 
few been and, before the start of 
their fm»i, took die extraordinary 
s tep of u m rinm g op against each 
other. Veteran tpn m < nferait said 
they conidnot remember two final- 
ists ever doing 90i 

Edberg is the only player ever to 
win the junior boys title in all four 
grand- glam w nmiwnmh in a ringfe 

year (1983), and Wilander said he 
should now be considered for one 
of the singles berths on the Swedish 
team that will meet West Germany 
in the Dec. 20-22 Davis Cop final 
in Munich. 

Bat, in DGssddorf, Hans Ohls- 
son, the Swedish coach, said that 
“despite Edberg’s triumph, I wifi 


Id create prob- 


dccide on the second singles spot 
after training in M unich and nxy 
decision will be made known at the 
draw” Dec. 19. The i 
has been reserved for 

"The dream final between two 
Swedes m Melbourne is surely 
good for Sweden, but is doesn't 
make our job any easier," said 
Ohlsson. “Switching from grass to 
indoor surface could 
Jems.” 

The only hint of an excuse Wi- 
lander offered for his loss on Mon- 
day was having been “more 
p um pe d op" for his Sat- 

urday a gains t Yugoslav Slobodan 
Zrvqjinovic, who had upset John 
McEnroe in the quarterfinals, and 
that he bad been nn settled by the 
xais-disrupted schedule. 

"This has been one of my great- 
est muniments ever” said Edberg. 
“Tve never been so happy in my 
life." 

Edberg follows BjOrn Bora and 
Wilander into Sweden’s ranks of 
grand «i«ni titlists, although his at- 
tacking game contrasts starkly with 
the baseline tactics of the other 
two. But if his tennis is more excit- 
ing, his temperament is typical. 
"We’re kind of cool people,” he 
said, "we always behave well and 
keep oar cooL” Arguing with um- 
pires? "I can’t to that — Fm no 
good at it" 

Edberg’s victory meant the four 
1985 grand-slam men’s singles ti- 
tles were won by four dSferent 
players: Wilander won the French 
Open, West German Boris Becker 



crew member took the plunge at tarpaulin-covered center court early Monday. 


woo Wimbledon and Ivan Lendl of 
Czechoslovakia took the U.S. 


j reached the final here by 
upsetting Lendl, the No. 1 seed in 
the semifinal, 6-7, 7-5, 6-1, 4-6, 9-7. 

This was the 10th consecutive 
year that a foreign player has won 


the open — the last Australian 
champion being Mark Edmondson 
in 1976. It is expected that this will 
have been the lost Australian Open 
played on natural grass. The tour- 
nament, which is being moved 
from December to January (to be 
played next in 1987), is expected to 


be resumed on an artificial grass 
surface. 

That would mean the four grand- 
slam events would be contested on 
four different surfaces — the 
French Open on clay. Wimbledon 
on natural grass and the U.S. Open 
on hard courts. (AP, AFP, UPI) 




§€€HlBOARD 


»'" 'jf-. 


Football 


Raiders Again Nip Broncos on Overtime Field Goal 


y. College Leaders National Football League Standings 



TEAM OFFENSE 
TOM 

P tors Yds Yds pa 
■no ins ssb sna 

141 5177 4725 
712 5145 4 
515 5106 4644 
N98 5079 441-7 
525 5074 441 J 
511 4551 441-0 
527 9342 4315 
522 4551 4345 
550 4197 427JJ 


Cor Yds Yds po 
097 4117 370 
4993700 3344 
749 304 335.5 
620 3435 3125 
697 3371 3045 


AMERICAN CONFERS MCE 


Now England 
N.Y. Jot* 
Miami 
IndtaiapaRs 
Buffalo 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

PlttsbuTB* 

Houston 

la. Roman 
Denver 
SoaHIa 
Son Diego 
Kansas Cffv 


W L T Pet. PR PA 
15 4 0 JU 301 237 

15 4 5 J714 350 23S 

10 4 0 -714 370 293 

3 11 0 -214 255 347 

2 12 0 .143 176 323 


X-CMOIM U 1 0 529 400 ITS 

Mlmaota 7 7 0 505 291 305 

Detroit 7 7 5 500 347 300 

Orson Boy 6 5 5 439 291 315 

TamN Boy 2 12 O J43 25* 397 


LA. Rams 
San rr on c lo ut 


7 7 0 500 394 376 

7 7 0 500 249 234 

6 5 0 JOS 339 303 

5 9 0 557247 315 

WO0 

10 4 0 . .714 325 299 

9 5 9 543 339 292 

5 6 5 571 322 363 

7 7 0 500 413 253 

5 9 0 597 264 312 


"•am Yam 
i (Flo.) 

' Bead) 5L 


7KO 
I (FTaJ 
oka 


AH CP Yds Yds PO 
540 306 4400 3545 
471 292 3710 3415 
345 227 3501 31&3 
302 347 3292 2995 
456 222 3575 2975 

■ • .9 PH AW 

11 430 39.1 
’ 'll 412 275 
n 444 373 
11 399 345 
11»M 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 


Dallas 9 5 0 443 313 201 

N.Y. Giants 9 5 0 543 350 345 

Wort Un oton 0 6 0 571 343 272 

PtiltodeipMa 6 I 0 529 235 255 

St Louis ' 5 9 0 557 240 341 


9 4 0 592 241 227 

0 5 0 515 329 201 

5 9 0 557255 354 

Athnda 2 12 0 .143 252 429 

to-c Un diod dfcWw title) 

SUNDAYS RESULTS 
Kansas CUy 38. Atlanta 10 
WastUnsfon 17. Phtfadetofalo 12 
an chmoll SO. Datias 24 
Now Enafand 21 oaftatt 4 
CMcaoo 17. Indianapolis 10 
Miami 34, Groan Bay 24 
SL Louis 20, New Orleans M 
N.Y. Jota 27. Bunma 7 
LA. Raldari 17, Danvsr 14 OT 
N.Y. Giants 35. Houston 14 
Minnesota 24 Tampa Bay 7 
SeatHo XL Ctovetcmd 13 
San Diego 54 PHtatwi-gh 44 

MONDAY'S GAME 
LA. Rami at San F nn d Sii 


Canptitdly Otr Suff From Dhpmka 
DENVER — The difference bo- 
tween the Los Angeles Raiders and 
Denver Broncos a Ac points, agd 
the Raiders have had lo work over- 
time to prove it. 

"That’s what football is all 


about,” said Coach. Tom Flares af- 
ter his Raiders edged Denver, 17- 
H in overtime here Sunday. “It’s 
oma/ing (0 play the pwy tmtm m 
three weeks and have two over- 
times." 

A 26-yard field goal by Chris 


Basketball 


TEAM DEFENSE 


xna 

MR 


■ _ H Midi, 
ska 


wno 

la 


Plays Yds Yds m 
450 2129 1935 
40 im 2534 
763 2000 2615 
672 2658 2415 
755 3044 2763 
763 3070 279.1 
733 3100 2015 
745 3101 2019 
726 3111 2025 
722 3)0 230.1 

CvYG Yds PS 
370 773 7U 
405 900 894 

440 1095 995 

430 1099 99.9 

434 1117 T0t5 


National Basketball Association S tanding s 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 


AltaiMc DMMoa 

W L 

Pet 

GB 

ft 

l 

1 

i 

16 ■ 
13 9 

.667 

sn 

2 

Boston 

17 3 

MB 

— 

Atlanta 

10 11 

JOk 

4to 

PhlkxMpMa 

11 10 

JO* 

KVa 

Oiratond 

9 T1 

ASO 

5 

Now Jarsw 

11 11 

500 

7 

CMaago 

■ 16 

JU 

5 

WosWnaton 

10 11 

AH 

7V4 

Indhnc 

5 15 

00 

9 

IM Yart 

5 14 

JOB 

121ft 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 



Hockey 


NHL Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 




Att Co Yds Yds P0 


W 

L 

T PIS GF OA 

l ’_ 

jmo 

145 107 1140 1HU 

PlYllocMDNa 

0 

• 

0 

40 

124 

0 


T«ch 

184 S7 TZM 109J 

WaaMnaton 

14 

7 

3 

35 

10 

75 

j. : 


221 94 120 1T7J 

NY Ranosn 

U 

14 

1 

77 

101 

93 


X A&M 

254 U6 1441 1325 

NY islandsra 

10 

10 

6 

0 

94 

10 


•f 

242 116 1 480 1J*5 

Plttstaursh 

11 

13 

3 

25 

10 

95 

p4 

■* 

Scarlaa 

Navi Jarsav 

11 

13 

1 

0 

93 

101 

- ii 


o Pts Ara 

Adams 1 

DMskM 




. 1 s 

, an 

II 75 43 

Quabsc 

IS 

10 

I 

31 

Ml 

0 

* . 

ivm 

ii n u 

Barton 

13 

9 

S 

31 

106 

95 



11 113 I0J 

Montreal 

13 

10 

3 

0 

118 

99 


' a TWh 

11 118 10J 

Buffalo 

U 

12 

2 

0 

97 

55 

*’ 

Sato 

11 10 114 

1 i, i 6 ■ ■ i ,4 

i mr ironi 

12 

12 

0 

24 

99 

99 


Houston 

15 

7 

JU 



Denver 

M 

5 

jUK 

1 

Utah 

IS 

TO 

AS 

X* 

Dallas 

11 

9 

MB 

3 

San AntaMo 

13 

10 

545 

3 

Sacramento 

7 14 

PacHIc Dtvtstoe 

» 

7V6 

LA. Lakers 

15 

2 

50 

— 

Portland 

13 

11 

542 

7 

Seattle 

10 

12 

AB 

9 

Golden Slate 

. 9 

15 

J75 

11 

LA. Cltoaars 

7 

14 

-333 

111ft 

Phoenix 

5 

14 

50 

13*5 



IM7MDUAL 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 


Total Offense 



SL LOUiS 

11 

11 

3 

0 

0 

97 


Yds Avg YdSPfl 

Chicago 

9 

13 

4 

22 

102 

117 

fc Punfcn 

3589 

45 

2265 

Minnesota 

7 

13 

4 

30 

nr 

104 

BYU 

4141 

75 

3185 

Detroit 

7 

15 

4 

18 

55 

128 

« LnsBcfi 

3457 

54 

2864 

Toronto 

7 

16 

3 

17 

98 

119 

rasJMa n 

3080 

7J 

2800 


Smythe DtvUoa 




l Kaasax 

3214 

54 

2674 

Edmonton 

0 

4 

4 

46 

147 

103 

Rashers 



Catoaiv 

15 

> 

3 

33 

116 

91 


Cm- Yds Avg Yds pa 

Winnipeg 

9 

T7 

3 

21 . 

97 

10 

MlchSI 

384 1908 

44 

1735 

vaneeuver 

9 

17 

3 

21 

157 

10 

, Temple 

779 1514 

5L4 

1484 

Los Anastas 7 

16 

4 

0 

92 

134 

V Aiteurn 

275 1786 

44 

1424 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS 



t OfcJaSt 

302 1553 

SI 

1414 

Buffalo 




T 2 

0 

0-3 

Mfa O 

309 1511 

44 

1374 

Boston 




1 1 

1 

6—3 


O H P urp o se Raman 
Rm* Rk PR KOR Yds YdsPs 
. Nvy 1S7 358 157 488 2330 2115 

Tmp 1516 131 0 96 170 1937 

Ml O 1511 434 0 17 19S2 1775 

4*lSt 1908 25 0 0 1936 1745 

l. Ab 1756 73 5 0 109 109 


LOfUoSf 


Rating 
AHCPYdsTdS Pts 
212 10 1913 15 1437 
258 IN 2657 21 10 A 
351 231 2975 26 1539 
254 IS 2115 19 1505 
229 13B 2009 14 1509 


Ct Yds Cl P9 
11 M 1099 5.9 

9 78 454 87 

11 55 1047 77 

n 82 1071 AS 

11 73 110 64 


Purdue 
Stanfa 
ns. Ill 
o', SO St 
daw 

Interceptions 

O NO Yds TD IPO 
etkl 11 9 160 1 52 

E Con 17 9 IS 1 52 

Futrtn II B 54 I 73 

AFA 12 0 KB 2 57 

Htl 11 7 186 0 

Scaring 

TD XP FO PH PtP* 
•HGm 19 0 0 114 105 

Auburn 17 0 0 102 95 

rsnn 0 30 24 107 95 

Mfii 17 0 0 102 « 

•tat 17 0 0 102 95 

FMd Goals 


ftrrooutt(f2),Lew(l)iKousfcy(7);MM- 
dlatan 15). Crowder (11). Milter IIISMih 
goal: Buffalo (an Rtegfn) 13-1*5-1— 30; Bos- 
ton lan Barrasso) M-12-3-32. 

Philadelphia 1 • 0-1 

N.Y. Rangers 2 1 0-3 

J. Patrick (3). Hdmlnon (4). Grasdmer 
(10); Karr (2n. Shots an goal: PfKfddrtpfiia 
(on vanMestnucfc) 9-4-T2— »; now York (on 
Fraess, Jenson) 13-12-6—31. 

CWCOOO 2 T 0-3 

Edmonton 3 1 0—4 

Kurrl (10). Knnhetnyskl (7), McSortey 2 
(3) B-WUsoa (5), Savard (14),TJ4unav (13). 
Sbotsoagoal: Oricogo (on Moos) 9-12-10-31; 
Edmonton (on Seuvol M-6— 32. 

LAE Anselm 0 1 J— 4 

Winnipeg o i ►-* 

Dtatmsa (12), Erickson |2).Smltfi (4); Mor- 
0*3 (2). Stasis on tool: LOS Ansels* (an Bou- 
chard) 1-11-14—33; Winnipeg (on Eliot) 7-11- 
1-26. 


SUNDAYS RESULTS 

II 27 *1 2S— «t 
. 32 M 24 *1—111 

Robinson 13-32 M 28. RukKMt 10-14 M 25; 
Woodson 5-12 68 18. Tttorae 7-11 1-1 15. R*. 
bsasds: Sacramento 35 (Tlwrao 10), Wash- 
Instoa41 (Roland 111. AmMs: Sacramento 17 
(Thau, Th o mpson . Kelley 3), Washington 27 
(F. Johnson 10). 

Seattle 19 0 0 SO— 1 IK 

Philadelphia 0 0 0 14—10 

Chambers 10-22 5-920. McDaniel 9-196424; 
Ervins 9-17 3-2 2H Malone 4-15 12-1220. Bark- 
ley 684416. Rsbaonds: Seotttem (souna 10). 
PMtodelPiila 47 (Makme 13). AssMsi Seattle 
25 (Henderson 7). PMtadetptala 17 <Cheeks7). 
Golden State 0 0 0 33-114 

Stm Antonio 0 0 0 36—121 

MlteieH 12-21 2-2 2A Rofaerteen 11-103-425; 
W W fsheoq 4-7 6-718. Short 6-194414. Fiord 7- 
30 2-2 14. Rcbeaads: Golden State a (White- 
head 10). Son Antonia 0 (Gilmore 11). As- 
sists: Gokten State 27 (Floyd 4), San Antonio 
V (Moore 14). 

0 36 41 14—119 
0 0 0 20—125 
Scott 1417 2-3 3a Johnson 13-22 3 1 20; 
Aoultre 14224-1032.Vlncsnt9-1534 21.fte- 
bosadE Dallas 4i(Denoidwni0),UNAnee- 
les53 (Green, RombH 91. A^sts: DaUax S4 
(Aswlrrt 9). las Ansotes 0 (Johnson 15). 

Selected College Scores 

BAST 

Stem sa Maine » . 

WlUtams 84, K. Adams SL 71 
SOUTH 

Webber Ua Palm Beach Attontle 73 
MIDWEST 

Oklahoim as, Perm Si. a 
Youooetosm St. 95, SL MonVs (MldU 0 


Qricago's Walter Payton (34) gained 111 yards Sanday;Hm- 
I»re Ed Fiffidc kiMw that some of them came the hard way. 


Bahr lifted Los Angdes lo victory; 
two weeks ago, Bahr connected on 
an 32-yarder to defeat Denver 31- 
28 iu overtime. 

"It wasn’t something we had 
pintmari on,” Flores said. “Bat we 
haw a traifitioo for getting np for 
big games." 

Denver Coach Dan Reeves said 

that ft micnruW l s tanding at the 

start erf extra period led to the chain 
of events that culminated in Baht's 
lates t game-winner. 

light snow was falling when the' 
Broncos won the toss to begin the 
overtime, and ca ptain Barney Cha- 
vous elected to receive. “We want- 
ed to defend the south goal,” said 
Reeves. “We thought ^ with the wind 
and snow blowing right in their 
face, we could pin them down and 
make it difficult far diem to move 
the belL I’D take the blame for the 
aasnnderstanding " - • - , 

At the start of overtime, Denver 
was »nahi« to move the bafl. In 
their first two possessions, the 
Broncos nrinos-2 yards in total 
offense and were unable to move 
past their own 20. But the Raiders 
couldn’t move either — both teams 
punted twice. 

On Denver’s third possession, on 
first and 10 from the 20-yard line, 
quarterback John Hway dropped 
bade to pass when be was sacked by 
defensive end Howie Long. Team- 
mate Greg Townsend was there a 
split second later to jar the ball 
loose and fall on it at the Bronoo 8. 

“I wasn’t trying to knock the ball 
out, I was just trying to sack him 
and give our offense good posi- 
tion,” Townsend said. "The ball 
squirted on the ground. I fell down, 

‘ . I could get it” 
rid Elway: “1 don’t know what 


happened. I saw everyone coming 
at me. The ball was slippery from 
the snow and the wind was blow- 
ing, and I was just trying to get a 
grip on it as 1 got hit” 

Rahr ramp jun to the game imme- 
diately. On the next play, 4:S5 into 
overtime, he kicked the winning 
three-pointer as the Raiders, down 

m ROUNDUP 

14-0 at halftime, completed a 
comeback that raised their record 
to 10-4 and gave them sole posses- 
sion of first place in the Western 
Division of the American Confer- 
ence. 

Los Angdes can clinch the title 
with a victory in either erf its last 
two gumwi, Sunday against Seattle 
or on the last Monday night erf the 
season, against the Rams in Ana- 
heim, Calif ornia. 

Glams 35, Oilas 14: In Houston, 
Joe Morris ran for three touch- 
downs and Phil Shwing threw for 
two more as the 9-5 New Yak 
Giants moved into a first-place tie 
with Dallas in the National Confer- 
ence East. Morris finished wnh 129 
yards rushing, giving him 1,054 for 
the year to become the second 
1, 000-yard rasher in Giant history 
(Ron Johnson topped the 1,000- 
yard mark for New York in 1970 
and 1972.) 

Vikings 26, Buccaneers 7: In 
Minneapolis, the defense forced six 
turnovers and Tommy Kramer 
passed for 309 yards as the Vfitipgs 
toppled error-prone Tampa Bay. 
Jan Steoenid lacked four tick! 
goals for 7-7 Minnesota. 

Interceptions by Chris Doleman, 
Tim Newton and Willie Teal, fum- 


ble recoveries by Doleman, Dennis 
Fowlkes and Doug Martin, and 
two mrl« by Keith Millard helped 
the Vikings drop the Bocs to 2-12. 
The losers also committed 10 pen- 
alties for 76 yards. Minnesota had 
five turnovers. 

James Wider gained 94 yards for 
a season total of 1.156; with 4,034 
career yards, he is the first man in 
Tampa Bay history to top the 
4,000-yard marie. 

Chargers 54, Stedere 44: In San 
Diego, Gary Anderson ran two 
yards for the go-ahead touchdown 
with 2:33 to play and, 24 seconds 
later, rookie safety Jeff Dale re- 
turned a pass interception 47 yards 
for the score that clinched San Die- 
go’s victory. The game's 98-point 
total is the fourtlnhighest in NFL 
history. The highest-scoring game 
ever was Washington's 72-41 vic- 
tory over the New York Giants in 
1966. 

Pittsburgh, which entered the 
game with the highest-rated de- 
fense in the AFC, fell to 6-8 and 
two ffmies back of Cleveland and 
Cmrannati in the Central Division 
with two games remaining. 

The Steders stormed back from 
a 14-point halftime deficit, and took 
the lead for the first time on a 26- 
yard field with 6:37 left in die third 
period that made it 44-41. 

Seahawlcs 3L Browns 13: In Se- 
attle. quarterback Dave Krieg 
passed for four touchdowns, in- 
cluding two to Daryl Turner — his 
11th and 12th TDs of the year — as 
Seattle kept its playoff hopes alive. 
The loss ended a three-game Cleve- 
land winning streak. 

Krieg completed 24 of 34 passes 
for 268 yards without an intercep- 
tion. (AP, VPS) 


Defense Keys 125-119 Laker Victory 


The Associated Prtxs 

INGLEWOOD, California — It 
can't be good news for the rest of 
the National Basketball Associa- 
tion that the Los Angdes Lakers 
canrday defense, tea . 

The highest-scoring team in the 
league (his year hdd Dallas to 14 
points in the fourth quarter here 
Sunday night and rallied from an 
eight-point deficit to beat the Mav- 
encks, 125-119. 

“Defease is the most inconsis- 
tent part of our game,” said L a ker 
Pat Riley. “It seems like 


NBA FOCUS 


we’re happy to trade baskets until 
we’re ready to make a stand. In our 
big garnes, we’ve made that stand 
early. This time, we made no con- 
centrated effort on defense until 
the fburth quarter." 

Riley gave rookie forward A.C. 
Green credit for the team’s fourth- 
quarter rally. “A.C. was our spark- 
plug,” Riley said. “Both be and 
Byron [Scott] made some great de- 
fensive plays.” 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

NFL Oilers Fire Head Coach Campbell 

HOUSTON (AP) — Houston Coach Hi 

ay following the OSere’ 35-14 loss to the ] 


Tennis 


Transition 


BASEBALL 


. .aona 

^ ,'snn 
ilri/Wz 


FGA FC 


Pel FOPO 
29 25 569 VO 

28 24 5S7 2.1B 

29 22 .799 100 


■« Australian Open Results 

MEN 

Singles Pinal 

Stefan Edtaeru (51. Sweden, del. Mate Wi- 
lander (3), Sweden, MUM. 

WOMEN 
Dou M es Float 

Martino Navratilova. I/A, and Pam Sirf- 
vw, us, dell Claudia Kahde-Kiisch, west 
Genifam, and Hriena Sukuwa CzsetwflDiio- 
kkbHU 


KANSAS CITY— Signed Hal MeRaa dsste- 
natad NlHgr, to a aaa y e r contract. 

NEW YORK— Named Buy White Hrst base 
and batttngcooctL Traded BUtr Sample, out- 
IteWsr. to Atlanta tor Miguel Sosa inftoMer. 


Green scored eight erf his 12 
points in the final period and led 
the Lakers with nine rebounds. 
Scott sawed 12 ofhis team-high 30 
points in the last 12 minutes. 

The Lakers trailed, 105-98, after 

three quarters and Dall.ic — t frqn lr. S 
to a 4 1 -point third period — led by 
108-100 in the early moments of 
the fourth quarter. But Los Ange- 
les, winners of seven straight, 
reeled off an 11-3 streak to tie the 
9coreat Ill-Ill with 4:46 left. 

The defending rii a mpi n n Lakers 
scored 25 of the Dune’s last 36 
points in handing Dallas only its 
second loss in its last nine eatings. 

“We're playing very good, but 
not our best,” said Earvin Johnson, 
who had 28 points and IS assists 
for the winners. “This year we have 
a lot more firepower. We’ve won a 
lot of games that we would have 
lost last year.” 

Hie Mavericks’ Mark Aguirre, 
who led all s co r n s with 32 points, 
said it wasn’t the Laker drfense 
that won the game. “I don’t think it 
was their defense; their offense fi- 
nally got going.” he said. “We 
wealhexed most of their attacks — 
until their last one. The Lakers just 
ran away from us in the last eight 
minutes." 



Golden State’s Jerome Whitehead (rigid) and Steve Johnson 
foogrito a third-period jump had Smday in San Antonio^ Texas. 


A 

26 21 575 141 

sash 

24 21 575 141 

Ptndtag 

FA 

Ho An 
S3 4M 

ola 

52 4*0 

• 

55 494 

wburn 

57 455 

Miss 

79 4SJ 

Punt Returns 
Ha 

Yds TD“ Art 

lob 

16 389 2 245 

as Cal 

X 509 1 174 

-Svrcse 

24 384 2 WuO 

aaia 

17 243 1 1*3 

UiCtl 

12 160 1 U.1 

Ktefeaif Returns 

No 

Yds TD Avg 

fall 

24 495 2 29.1 

rite 

29 Ml 2 274 

irtflwn 

11 299 0 274 

, e Cara 

13 332 0 255 

ITEP 

?l? l ' ■* 


European Soccer 


SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
pototSlaadMt: Rool Madrid 23; GilonJi; 
BarcctsMM; AMoflco Mac* kt Bilbao 15; So- 
villa. Cadiz 17,- Valladolid, Zwwom 1*; Batts 
15; Valencia, Real Sodedad 13; HsraiteS 12; 
Espaflal.Omuna 11 ; Santander, Las Palmas 
10; CMTD 7. 

ITALIAN FIRST DIVISION 
Pobrt Staodtaoc: juvenlus 0; Napcrfl 18; 
Inter 14; Fianmffnai, Tortete Milan, Rema 15; 
Udlnssa, AvsWna, Varana 12; samodoria At. 
atanta 11; Ptea 10; Coma 9; Bari ■; Lecce 6. 
FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
P0W StaMtaas: Porb-Sf. Germain M; 
Nantes 0; Bordeaux 31; Lens 2B; Monaco 26; 
AmotreS; Nancy, Nice M; Metz. Laval 23; 
TauUxns, Rennes 0; TauMv Le Havre »; 

18; Socttux LI lie 17; bob I a 


SAN FRANCISCO— Stoned MIR Graff as 
malar league advance scout 
FOOTBALL 

Nanaoal Fastball Leant 

DETROIT A nnounced teat Kevin Glover, 
center-guard, had Murad Ms rioM taws In 
practiceand afH boaut torteUMOKiLSlaiMd 
Mart S te v ens o n, offensive lineman. 

MINNESOTA— Activated Jim House, cen- 
ter, Placed Tim Meatnber, Ibwbacfcar.an bv 
lured restate 

GOLF 

PGA— Denied save BoUataras's appeal 
and confirmed a ane-rear suspension of his 
slaying rights on tee u A lour. 

HOCKEY 

NBHMta Kertsy League 

NEW JERSEY— Reached co n tract buyout 
sefflemert wWi Shasm McKenzie, gaalta, ol 
tee Maine Mariners. Loaned Nell Dover, de- 
fenseman. to Toledo of tee I n ternpHun o l 
Hockey League and Hector Marini, riflfrt 
wtafc from Mattie of tee American Hockey 
League la Fart Wavne of tea IHL. 

MONTREAL — Readied Jam Corfflc. da- 
hnsamatefreiWWeStierbraofcaQmaflleniof 

tee AHi_ 

N.Y. RANGERS— SetdMftaRaavrv center, 
to New Hgvea of tee AHU Recalled Peter 

sufKMrara. right Hrtna, and Ran Whistle, do- 
iJBcmn. tram New Hawn. 


ampbell was fired Mon- 
day following the Oikxrf 35-14 loss to the New York Giants cm Sunday. 

Drfenrive coordinator Jory QanviDe was named interim head coach of 
the National Football team. 

Its 5-9 record assures Houston of a losing season for the fifth consecur 
tree year. Campbell, in his second season with the team, came to the 
OSas from the Los Angeles Express of the United States Football 
League. Prior to that he had coached the Edmonton Fakimos in the 
Canadian Football Le ag ue. His record at Houston was 8-22. 

Long Shot Wins Rich U.S. Turf Race 

INGLEWOOD, California (Combined Dispatches) — Ovedooked at __ __ _ _ _ 

Rangers Put Flyers Back on the Skids 

Ridden by Eddie Ddahoossaye, Zoffany took the lead in the final C7 «/ 

eightiHmleof the 1^-mile (2,400-meter) tinf raceand won by 2V4 Imgths The Associated Press 

m a time of 2:28-2/5. Win also passed the pace-setting Vanlandmgham to 
take secxjnd by a neck in the field of 13. 

Vanlacdinghain, a leading candidate for tad hone of the year as wdl 
as horse of the year, faded to find a finishing drive. Ballots for the top 
thoroughbred honors of 1985 go out Unnsday to about 200 racing 
secretaries, turf writers and Daily Racing Form experts. (AP, LAT) 


Quotable 


• Oklahoma City basketball Coach Abe Lemons, on dinks: “When I 

pve a lecture, I lore: far the guy wire's taking notes. Thafs the gi^r I want 
to sdxdrile a game with next year ” (LAT) 

• Cleveland wide receiver Clarence Weathers, who still weaa Ms New 

England Patriot jacket around the Browns* training facility: “1 paid good 
money far tins.” (LAT) 

•A Yeflow Pages ad for The Good Times Lounge in Anchorage, 
Afaifoj «f ttw rtrraif Alaska Shootout college badtetban tournament: 
"Adult Entertainment! 2o Ccrgeocs Gitls and 3 Ugly Ones!" (Ln. x) 


NEW YORK — PhQaddphias’s 
Tan Kerr scored another power- 
play |oaL Nothing new there; the 
news is that the Flyers lost another 
National Hockey League game: 

The 3-1 New York Ranger vic- 
tory hat Sunday was the Flyere’ 
fourth loss in the five games after 
they had put together a 15-game 
winning streak. 

Ironically, they’d played well is 
Saturday's 4-0 triump h over the 
Rangers in Philadelphia. That had 
extended their winmig streak over 
New York to 14 games dating to 
March 14. 1984. 

Keg get his leagce-iWitinc -£th 


ML FOCUS 

goal (and No. 15 on power plays) 
of the year at 7:18 of the first pe- 
riod, tallying after taking a goal- 
mouth pass from Peter ZezeL But 
the remainder of the game be- 
longed to the Rangers, as James 
Patrick tied it and Remio Hel- 
minen scored one goal and assisted 
on another. The defame did the 
rest: The Flyera, one of the NHL's 
best power-play teams, converted 
only 1 of 9 manpower advantages. 

Hdmmenpnt the Rangers ahead 
in tire first period, breaking a tie 
with his fourth goal of the season 
— a m. £-'!£. 


goalie Bob Froese had made sever- 
al sparkling saves. Hdminen assist- 
ed on a power-play goal by Ron 
Grcschner, who dosed out the 
scoring at 9:50 of the second period 
on a 50-foot power-play slapshot. 

Ranger goalie John Vanbies- 
brouck posted his 13th victory of 
the year, tying him with Calgary's 
Rqean Lemdin for ihe league lead. 

“I was sick and I didn’t even 
think I could play,” said Vanbics- 
brouek. “But Vm glad I did. We 
haven't beaten the Flyers in my 
reign here as a goalie." 

.Other NHL winners Sunday 
~ere Edmonton and Los Angdes; 
ZcKcn ~d Bnifaio player iu a. tie. 









Page 20 


HVTERWAT10NAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 

The Blue-Crayon Defense 



W ASHINGTON I was over at 
Barry IsraeTs the other night 
when his 8-year-old daughter, Ali- 
son, came into the living room. 

“Have you done your home- 
work?" her father asked. 

Alison handed him a sheet of 
paper with a crayon drawing on it. 
*TVhat is it?" 

“It’s Star Warn," Alison said. 
“This is the sun and this is the 
house and this is 
the mommy and 
this is the daddy 
and this is the 
little child, and 
this is the cat 
and this is a 
tree.” 

“Thai's fine, 
but how do you 
get Star Wars 

out of that?" _ . .. 

“This blue cir- Bndmakl 

cle over everyone is Star Wars. The 
rockets can't get through to kill the 
mommy, the daddy, the child and 
cat." 

“I don't see bow that blue arc 
can stop missiles from hitting your 
family," Barry said. 

Alison pointed to three red mis- 
siles bouncing off the arc. “You 
see? The bombs are stopped and 
can't hit anyone." 

□ 

“Where did yon get the idea that 
a blue crayon can stop a red one?" 

“1 saw it on television. It said if 
everyone supports Star Wars we 
will be safe from getting lolled. 

“Don’t lie to me,” Alison’s father 
said. 

“She’s not lying,” I told him. “1 
saw the same TV commercial. It’s 


TMe and My Girl 9 Wins 
ATop Olivier Award 

The Associated Press 

LONDON —“Me and My Girl” 
has been named best mnsical at the 
10th annual Olivier Awards, and its 
star, Robert Lindsay, won as best 
actor in a musical. Patti LuPone 
was named best actress in a mnsical 
for “The Cradle Will Rock" and 
“Les Miserables." 

Alan Ayckbourn's “A Chorus of 
Disapproval" was named best com- 
edy and Peter Baines' “Red Noses” 
won as best play. Antony Sher was 
named best actor for “Torchsong 
Trilogy” and “Richard UL” 


put out by some outfit called Peace 
Shield to convince people that the 
president’s Strategic Defense Ini- 
tiative will work. They're hoping if 


cans will buy it. 

Barry said, “What a crock. 

They’re using a kid’s drawing to sell 

^ said, “Don’t jump to conclu- 
sions that a child was the artist 1 
know several scientists who could 
easily have drawn it” 

“The drawing doesn’t convince 
me we should spend zillions on Star 
Wars." 

“It’s not intended to convince 
you — it’s supposed to convince 
Alison. After all it’s her generation 
that is going to have to live with 
laser and enhanced deter- 
rence. If lads believe a blue crayon 
can stop a red one then they won’t 
be afraid." 


Alison was just standing there 
sheepishly, finally she said, “Is my 
drawing all right?” 

Her father replied, “As far as it 
goes it is. Hand me a ted crayon 
and a black one. Okay, now watch 
carefully. The red crayon can’t get 
through the arc, and the bouse and 
family are perfectly safe. Right?” 

“Uh-huh,” Alison said, not 
knowing where her father was go- 
ing. 

“Now I take the black crayon, 
and it slices right through the shield 
and knocks out the stm, the house 
and the family of three." 

“Why?” 

“Because black crayons can al- 
ways go through bine ones. Even a 
nuclear umbrella won’t stop than. 
That’s why a blue crayon is not 
going to save us." 

Alison looked at me for same 
help. 

“I have to agree with your far 
ther," I told her. “There are too 
many different colored crayons for 
one blue are to stop. Even if only 
one color got through it would wipe 
out your mommy, daddy and 
child” 

Barry said “Did yon hear what 
your Unde Art just said? Listen to 
him. He knows everything .” 

Alison’s lower lip was quivering. 
“You rained my drawing?’ 

Her father replied, “I just want- 
ed to teach you a lesson. Don’t 
believe everything yon see on tele- 
vision." 


Hark! the 'Harold’ Gamesters’ Thing 


Bjr E. R- Shipp 

New York Tutus Service 

i HICAGO — It was dose, 
■but in the end Yale 
astNw 
score of 24 to 21 

It was not a football game, 
however. It was a Harold game, 
with the Purple Crayons from 
Yale playing the No Fan Mod 
Piranhas from Northwestern and 
the Avant-Garfiddes from the 
University of Chicago, who fin- 
ished a distant third. 

Harold is a team “sport” based 
on techniques developed in im- 
provisariooal theater. There are 
seven teams around the United 
States and others are being orga- 
nized on college campuses. Dd 
Close, who is the Abner Double- 
day and P. T. Baraum of Harold, 
says the game may soon hit the 
big time: Two major national cor- 
porations are considering spon- 
soring teams. 

Close, an actor and a former 
director of the Second Gty come- 
dy troupe, has described Harold 
as “a parlor game gone mad.” He 
began developing Jt in 1967 when 
he was directing an improvisa- 
rional troupe in San Francisco, he 
said. Close and his partner, 
Chandra Halpexn, are promoting 
Harold among students they 
meet at college workshops and at 
their school in Chicago. 

At the Crosscurrents Cabaret 

Theater, a comedy chib in a 100- 
year-old framer Swedish meeting 
hall, three teams were put 
through their paces recently by a 

damandfngandi<wiw> nf TflQ 

team took the stage for 20 to 30 
minutes to improvise scenes using 
word games, mime, songs, poetry 
and dance, bat without scenery or 
props. The scenes were aH sup- 
posed to relate somehow to a 
theme suggested by the audience. 

Harold~which might be called 
competitive imprcwisatknal the- 
ater, has some loose rules. The 
teams have no rime at ±e start of 
a game to discuss how they will 
depict their theme, and there is a 
scoring system. 

The Avant-Garfiddes’ theme 
was buttons; the No Fun Mud 
Piranhas’ themes were hair and 
disease, and the Pmple Crayons’ 
were oranges and orange juice. 

The audience applauded, com- 
mented, moaned and booted as 
each team glided In and ont of 
scenes. Some of the scenes did 



54m Kaganfthe New Vqrfc Tumi 

Dd Close (right) explaining Harold to audience; Pur- 
ple Crayon (above) daring group's winning routine. 


not seem to relate to the theme at 
all but, when least expected, there 
c a me an gflnrirm 

A pool-hall scene got around to 
buttons when a man materialized 
from an imaginar y fcn tton on an 

imaginary pool table and 

Igimch^ an w planati iw that 

had to do with a bad joke he once 
told: “The bad-joke police came 
and they took me away and made 
me into a political slogan and pot 
me on a button.” 

The Yale team span skits about 
a poet hying to find words to 
rhyme with “orange;” about sing- 
ing fruit known as the Citrus 
IfiHg and «hmit an anti-Semitic 
man who disparages “orange 
Jews." 

When one team member ap- 
pears to run out of steam, others 
come to the rescue with lines that 
give the scene a lift or lead into a 
new scene; 

Aficionados in the audience 
dissect the performances. Steve 
Wflczynslri, who has tried his 
hand at Harold, said: “When 
something from one scene is re- 
flected in another, you wonder, 
‘How can they do that? How can 
' remember that?’ ” 

! audience votes with its ap- 


plause at the end of each team's 
performance, awarding one to six 
points in each of four categories 
— intelligence, thane, structure 
and teamwork. 

It does not take much to orga- 
nize a Harold tiwm Aytm Halli- 
day, a member of the No Fun 
Mud Piranhas, said, “The way we 
found out was by a note tacked 
up on a board.” 

Eric Berg, who studied impro- 
visation in Chicago while appear- 
ing as Tom Sawyer in the Good- 
man Theater’s production of 
“The Adventures of Huckleberry 
Finn" last winter, has organized a 
team at Yale. He said he had 
received inquiries from prospec- " 
rive teams at Harvard, Vassar, 
Dartmouth and Columbia. 

“One of the things that might 
be making it catch on,” Close 
said, “is that it ^ves ydn a reason 
for your education. You pay at- 
tention in the courses because 
can use the information in 


you can 
Harold.’ 



they re 
The i 


Harold teams can have any 
number of members. The No Fan 
Mud Piranhas are mostlytheater 
majors at Northwestern. The Pur- 
ple Crayon consists of Yale stu- 
dents majoring in political sci- 


ence; architecture, 
literature, art history, electrical 
wn gim »erm|> ainri British Undid. 

Close and Halpem said it was 
their dream that one dayfbe re- 
sults of Harold competitions 
would be reported on the evening 
news. 


PEOPLE 


Opera Choice Backs Ou# 


his minth The executive director of 
the Los Angdes Philharmonic says 
be mil remain at his cornu posi- 
tion rather than become general 
administrator and artistic director 
of the Paris Opera. Fleadunann. 
who announced late last month 
that he would take the Paris job, 
said that he bad not signed the 
three-year contract with the Opera 
and that formal approval from the 
French government had yet to be 
made. The contract was set to begin 
in October 1986. FTrischmann in- 
sisted that his reasons woe strictly 
personal; In a idea to Jack Lang, 

the French minister df culture, he 
said, “The immense outpouring of 
appreciation for my work here, and 
affection for me personally made 
me realize that it was impossible 
for me to leave this great orchestra 
and this remarkable community.” 
. . . Lang annormced France’s na- 
tional prizes fra 1 arts and lettas 
Monday at the Optra. The laure- 
ates included the film director 
Qande Mifler, the choreographer 
Jcan-Qandc GaBotta, the historian 
Middle Parrot, the writers Audit 
Pieyre de Mandzargoes and Andrt 
Fitnand, the composer Pierre Hen- 
ry, the Spanish-born painter Antoni 
Tapifes, the sculptor and painter 
Pal Bary, and the stage director 
Ariaue Mnoodridae along with her 
Theatre du SoldL 
□ 

President Ronald Reagan and his 
wife, Nancy, joined a edebrity- 
filled audience in saluting six 
American artists who received the 
Kennedy Center Honors of 1985 
for lifetime contributions to the 
U. S. cultural heritage. Those hon- 
ored included two old Reagan pals: 
Bcdb Hope and the actress Irene 
Drone. The others were the chore- 
ographer Mercs Cunningham, the 
lyricist Alan Jay Loner and his 
songwriting partner, Frederick 
Loewe, and tire opera adnmnsua- 
tor Beverly SIDs. 

□ 

The S panish singer Raphael says 
he has bought Richard M. Nixon’s 
“Florida White House" for $1.05 
million, primarily for historical rea- 
sons. The four-bedroom ranch 
home in Key .Bjscayne still bears 
many reminders of its former own- 
er, inrinding bulletproof windows, 
the swimming pool Pat Nixon gave 
her husband as a birthday present 
—and Orates (Bebe) Rebozo as a 


next-door neighbor. John 
Jr„ president of the company thaj 
handled the sale, said: "This is the 
house where the president rad ios 
wife and daughters actually Brad 
and stept. That’s the reason Rapha- 
el bought it” The singer's wife and 
children will live in tire bouse when 
he begins a yearlong U. S. tots ear- 
ly next year. 

□ 

Two years after drawing boos 
from the demanding audiences of 
La Scala, Ladroo Pavarotti mpjtf 
ovations and critical praise for hr? 
opening night performance in Ver> 
si's “Alda.” Duffio Coorar, music 
critic fra: the M3an newspaper Cor- 
riere della Sera, wrote. “The voice 
of Pavarotti is a marvel that never 
lets him down” — but Italian crit- 
ics had wondered if the 50-ycar-old 
tenor would displease La Scale’s 
audience as in March 1983, when 
his voice failed in' the finale of Don- 
izettfs “Lucia di Lammermoor." 
Pavarotti, accompanied by Mote 
CUara in tire tide role and Ghana 
Dimitrova, took eight curtain calls 
before the sold-Oul house. 

□ 

The American oil heir J. Fred 
Getty 2d, who has lived in Britain 
for about 20 years, says he wqum 
love to become a British citizen bat 
hasn't applied because he would 
have to pay more taxes and would 
have less money to give away. “For 
years and years. I have wanted to 
become a British citizen, but my 
advisers have asked me not to be- 
cause of tire enormous tax conse- 
quences,” Getty. 53, told the Press 
Association, Britain's domestic 
news agency. 

□ 

A crowd packed a sports arena ifi 
Madrid on Sunday to celebrate tire 
birthday of Dolores tbarmri, (be 
“Pasiooaria” of the Spanish Civil 
War, who turned 90 Monday. Esti- 
mates of the audience at the show 
by Spanish entertainers ranged 
from 1 5,000 people to 25,000. IbU* 
ruri, honorary president of ter 
Spanish Co mmunis t Party, sai qtu- 
ctly during the three-hour show. 
During the Spanish Civil War. 
1936-39, Ibarcuri became famous 
for her fiery speeches supporting 
Republican troops and the Interna- 
tional Brigades against the forces 
of Franco. She returned to Spain in 
1977 from exile in the Soviet 
Union. 


MOVING 


ALLIED 

VAN UNES I NTT. 

OVBt 1300 OfflCB 


USA AflM Van llnta bifl Oof|) 

(OIOI) 312-681-8100 
Or cal wr Agency European officer 

PARIS Dei burdee hUmabnd 

(1)43 43 23 64 

FRANKFURT g^KJCKS! 

(069) 250066 

DUSSBDORF/RAHNGEN 

(02102)45023 LM5. 

MUNICH 

(089) 142244 

LONDON wi 

(01) 953 3636 
Cafl far ASnkTi Iron mtimda 


LM5. 


MOVING 


INTERDEAN 


WHO BSE KM YOUR 
next mibnahonal move 

FOR A MB ESTIMATE CALL 


AMSTERDAM: 

ATHENS: 

BARCELONA. 

BOM 


B8USSB5: 

CADIZ: 

FRANKFURT: 

GENEVA: 

LONDON: 

MADRI D: 

MANCHESTER: 

MINCH: 

NAPLES: 

PAHS: 

ROME: 

VIENNA: 

zunat 



CONTIMX SmaB & medium nawv 

baggage. can woridwide. Col Char- 

Wfara <2 81 1881 (near Opera). 


ALPHA-TRANSIT. fan Mfe 4289 2577 
Sea/ air. car, b^goga, cl eoontriei 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


WE SBBt T EMPORARY PAMS homw 

for find Aroerian academe fara&cv 
1-12 manta. No adtangn. Mo 
Abroad 194 (farads Or, NYC, NY 
lOOZLPorij Mi 4621-3371. 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS in 

‘ Sit Pa 

032a 


Engijh.Jtoro {daily} 4634 5965. Rama 


PERSONALS 


MORRIS 

We an bark Hmh phone day or 
night. Wa dl want you wifi in a> 
soon at pooMe. Wrtti lows, c/L 


HAVE A MO DAT1 

nice dayl Bc*nL 


Have a 


SEAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


COTE D’AZUR VOICE. Pleasant XVttb 

cent- vilopn hom e, 3 lawk + (oion- 
i*n ponbSty. 'SBOfiOO. Promotion 
Monet In Ruhr 06000 Mob. Tat 
9X6837.37. Tbi 461235. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


Cannes - Mounts Sarioux 

Beautiful 6 beckoom/badwxsn 

fy for sdm, ritoemd in ° 

TOJOOO sqjn. ponton, awn 
mountaint . wini a U euthtatong view., 
pool and ha u e ri eeper’e fadBies, bi* 
by On famous mriitoct Gwah. 

For further defctib ptoeee contort 

A.GJE.DJ. 


26bto- Bd 

MC 98000 MONACO 
Telr«3 50 66 00 -Tin. 4794T7MC 
or Agenci Jesn Baybmta 


MONACO 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS ft SUBURBS 


EXCEPTIONAL 
ON G0AI OF SBNE 
FACING RE ST L OUIS 
tNni!nou8& pvinBi (fining, A Mdroocv, 3 
batta, office, maidi room. 1600 nun. 
terrace, fantastic view mrr Parh. high 
price. Vote Gwnficn ray day eweat 
Sdurday afternoon end Sundays 16 
Qua das Gdeda, 75004 Print 


16TH FACING BOIS 


ISO SQ M. 

van BEAvrm reception 

ON SOB 

floor. 2 bedroom, 2 batin 
ROOM, PAMONG • 
EMBASSY SatVICE: 45 62 16 40 


“tasri 


8TH ANJOU BEAJJVEAU. a qa*y 3 
roam betfrocav kWian, 2nd floor, 
praftmiond uae paaSAx. DE Vtfld 
4224 11 97 


International Business Message Center 


ATmmON EXECUTIVES 

Pobliih yoor bvsmess massage 

in Him kif wi Mtw iHf ffe iM d W- 

bunm, where mar» than a dibd 

of a nafDon reader* world- 
wide. meet o f wham one m 
budnem mtd industry, wff 

read U. Jest Mon uc {Perk 

613595) before 10 ajn, en- 

suring that we can IMn you 
hade, and year manage wi 
width i 43 hoar*. The 


note A US.S9.80 or load 
ecfthadeat per Bnm. You mat 
•ndode complete end verW- 
eMo bBRng address. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNTTIES 


OFFSHORE &UK 
LTD COMPANIES 


, Penrana L2a 

motf Other offthore 

• ConfidarOod odnee 

• Immediate ovaJobhy 

• Nomnea services 

• Bern or shares 

• Boat regbtraftcRi 

• Accounting & adne a jgrotion 

. ■ Mad, rid^hane £> latex 
Hw* 7 bririWel front: 

SELECT CORPORATE 
SERVICES UD 
Head Office 

Ml necnant, Bangka, Woof Mat 
Tel: OemkH (0624) 23718 
Telex 628554 SHJECT G 
London Bepratadotme 
2-5 Old Bond 5^ London Wl 
Tri Ql-493 4244. Tl* 23247 SCSLDN G 


ORIGINAL mfaMbte erstoa Own 
your own Arogoncei ttyh Spaiofi 
apartmert m 'Onion Parada. Co- 
banai do Svo, 15 miitj front Zorago- 
za. IB fietshed apartmantl dndfy 
from owners. I nde From Genera 
Motors Spansh plod, Excefeflt saves! - 
mert. Tddprice per 65 nun opart- 
menl only S24 JS30. Mor*p5»ann 
at 8% interest pea&ie. Write for tern- 
pieta broduret JP Batfxm. Itodeft- 
dal Peraio 5, Escaiera 668, 50008 
Zaogau, 5pdm. Tbt 58156 CdbJ E 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MONEY TREES? 

LIFETIME SECURITY 

Imreit ia one of America'* moat ex- 

_fOT_ ■- -A- - *- 1 A 1^- I- - 

WRIg WU R nN w^ t wii IWI MilRl W y 

in the rut nhntry. Over 30^)00 nut 

trees fAvrtnd in 19S4. Projected annual 

income evenlualy readies SSL 
BROKERS 1 BWiffiBES BWITBJ. 

Materid avaSaWe in Erufah, Frendv 
German. Ben 2207. HwSl Tribum, 
92521 NeuBy Ceden, France 


CCM. LTD 

Gxwxms formed UX & wmidwide 
induefing Ida of Mon, Turks & Cmcxs, 
Anpuflo, frinm end Liberia. 

For further mfarmctioa please contact 
us ca - 5 Ubpsr Onmdi 5L, Douglas, Ua 

o* Max™ Great Brtcin, Wfc Dounkn 

(0624) 23733, Ifab 627900 GQWIGmG 


LONDON 

FidiKiary & trust services I Company 
Formc4kjm& domicJotion I Intemolion- 
d lax i Bcmlc accounts ertabUwd I 
Generd busnes advice & n ml n iu i I 
JPCR, 17 Widgarte St. London El 7HP 
TA 01 377 tod. Tbu 893911 G 


ORMORE ft UC COMPANES. Save 

Tax. Fkkidory trust, domipSo&sn, 
company formation. inmm otk - Kj lax. 
bank oanmts Mm d, aoRwrftn, 
mod. telex etc. WWtkrwtor 5frvk: « 
Ltdj 23 Cdlem HB, Won EC4R 
TO. M 01 -24 b 0602 Tbe 884587 G. 


PRIVATE WVESTOR seeks vie He 
KJoa/produtJ/pro^ed to be de*d- 
oped thru active partmnHp. Funds 
ovailoMam any currency anywhere. 
Serious ofera: Box 2981, Herdd Tri- 
bum, 92521 Nerifly Ceow. Fronce 


FINEST NVESTMENT NEWSUTTRL 

AvwdwnfiB hfl Hany Schute Lal- 
tor bi h 73rd year. 550 for h-id 
sujKrphan. FB£ P-O-Ba* 381, Of- 
1001 Uanonne. Switzerland. 


DELAWARE. PANAMA, Iferia. Car- 


„ 2024a Tetoe 6283521 

G-NiaUQ. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


SPORnNG GOODS. AJ big brand 

names CMdabia for agson outside 
Europe. Vary good pneas far big 


EXPORTB OF 5TRATEQK i RARE 

mends, minerals, eheneeab. Mhiouri 

Entarprims lrftP.O. Box 97646 TiT, 

Kowlooa Hang Kong- 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


MTL 

BEAUT1RJL PEOPLE 

UMIMfTH) B4C 
ILSA. A WOMJDWDE 

A comptea panond & burinem service 
ion of 


212-765-7793 
. 232^765-7794 

338 W. 5M> St, N.Y.C 10019 

Sorvica Re 
Needed 


PERSONAL SECUItnY SERVICE far 

importa nt people. We «mI meet free 

at charge anywhore within 48 horn. 

Contact Mr Soelem. Tek Seigbm 
32/71/665891. 


PANAMA CORPORATIONS. Incan. 
pondion, manageaiant. namme an 
vices, corfk tai&A l y . Solaso, Base 6- 
9491. B Dorado, fawn, KJ>. Tba 
3219 Solaso PGrVefcdJLSffil. 

YOUR amaM NEW YORK. Fifth 
Aw. mMm% cmd/or phone as your 
US* afficA Md, phone a* raqntd 


HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT, 


DIAMONDS 


MART 

Foetwy ttdes of facet art dEanomli 
bange Ffarantafaedr 29, Antwerp 
8t#m. Tel: tOttZim 8» 35243 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 

Your best bey. 

Fine demomb in ory price nmge 
at lowest whole sa le pnees 
tired from Anrtwwp 
center of tie cSamand world. 
Full gucranlee. 

Far free price fat write 


Estafafahad 1928 


Heart of Antwerp Diamond inckBtrjri 


OFFICE SERVICES 


ACTE 50 BU5INBS 

CENTERS IN EUROPE 

• Fifty 

• Don* 

• Phono, 


J offices to rent 
mod, tele*, fan. 


P** 1 ® 

Tel (1) 43-5V.77-53, Tbi 6421 17 F] 
Tab (22} 4MCQ^Tfaj421818 OH 
U (69)710 0060 H* 176997263 D 


TOUR FURNJSHHJ OFHCE 
IN LONDON 

• 7 doy 24 hour omen & onwwphone 
9 Fid support services bdrfngs 

i. te aeland .uleat. copying. eta._ 

• Cotponde Kepre sento hon Semce 

• Stcrf or long term avcdebUy 
Worid-WhS Buhnm C«w«i 

HOIIm S trand London WOROAA 
Tel: 01 836-8918 Tbc 24973 


YOUROFFKEMGMVA 

MA 

, COMMERCIAL BU0JDWG 
1 office space 22 sqm with fadfaien 
uruMrinu service, meeting roam, taka, 

1207 O eneua. Tel: (22) 36 69 80. 
Ibc 289392 -PAX (22) 365648. 



i45 port of the COMITE VENDOME’S 3rd Night opening 
and to celebrate his 5th anniversary in Paris 

Gianmaria Buccellati 

Jeweller-Goldsmith 

will stay open to receive his visitors until 11 p.m. 
on Tuesday December 10, 1985 


4 PLACE VEND0ME, PARIS, Tfl. (1) 42.60.12.12 


OFFICE SERVICES 


WORLD-WOE 
BUSN5S CENTRES 

FonsUead Eeacodve-Offioee 
Cuneilali wiA l e aitoH Telex 
A tku I nbOK twe. Cmgaade 
P e p n mntrfn n 6 Other FocMei 

EUROPE 

AMSTERDAM: Euro Busnen Centar 

FePfigr . 99, 1015 CH A nnt e n J u ui 

TeU^227dS5.Toltt 16183 
BOLOGNA: via A. Saffi. 15 
40131 Mogna. Italy. TrtJQ51| 522578 
or SZhGO TJe* 3363 97 
BRUSSH& *. Rue de la Prawi 
1000 Bruceb. Tek 217 83 60 
Tehw 25327 
FRANKFURT: Pfaea Burohms, 
Hamburger Aflee 2-10, 6000 Iranldurt 
m sa lefc 0 69 770641. Tlw 418097 
LONDONi 110 The Strcnd, . 
btadon WC2R OAA. 

Tek (01) 836 8918, Thu 24973 
MILAN: Via Boecacao X 
20123 Mien. Td 49B2251 or 
3452211. Tdfaa 316329. 

PAJUSi BOS. IS Avenue Victor Hugo 
75116 Paris. Teh 502 18 00. 

Telex: 62D093F. 

ROME: Via Sowm 78, 00198 Rome. 
Tek 85 32 41 or 844 80 70 . 

Teton 613*58 

ZURICH: Sennweg 32. 8001 Zurich 
Tek (Oil 214 6T11 
Teton 812656 or 812981. 

MDDLE EAST 

DUBAI: P.O. Bex 1515 DNATA 
Arina Contra. Etaboi, ILA£. 

T«k 214565 Taleie 4*11 

ASIA 

SMGAP0RE; 111 North Bridga Rd 
114)4706 Panliwula Pima, S'pora 
0617. Tek 3366577. Tbu 360 m. 

U.S.A. 

NEW YORK: 575 Modaon Avmn 
New Y«fa NY 10022. TekQTZ 405- 
0200. Tdatt 1258(4 or 2376W 
PALM BEACH. 2875 5o. Ocean BW, 
Palm Beach. R33480 l 
T it 3055867175. Teton 6711421 


. PARIS 

mop CHAMPS ELYSES 
FURMSHH) 

OFFICES 

van wgh oab 

, CON raBUCE ROOM 
SECRETARIAT . TELEX, MX 
IE SATSUIE, 8 nre Cependc 
' 4727 1559. 


75116 


T«M1J 


YOUR OFFICE IN PARIS 

to ready x d»B B yne weed H,ewew fat 

■ Fufly facjawTine detTi pHtotowd 
cotnuenoe ini io nrt by fa 
J*wr, day. month, ele- . 

• Tour tactical or p cm m e n i bate. 
‘ A| 


“7 er RHAtS D*AFFANSr* * 


YOUR OFFICE M PASS: TELEX 

ANSWWNG SHMCE, secretory, 
»«»*, mdltcx, tom 24H/day. 
Tel PAT: 4( 099595. 


IMPETUS * ZURKH * 252 76 21. 
PHOPC 7 TELEX / TBJBFAX.' 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PAHS ft SUBURBS 


SOUTH VIEW ON SBNE 

Mah doss, lop floor 
145 K(iii. + perking 

75 SOM TBWACE 

JasSiad hi^t price- 
FRANK ARTHUR AS 62 01 69 


SaeCINN OP UNUSUAL 

opertments . ortist otefiw styto. k> _ 
Paris tocrionc. From n^OO^XXL Gal: 
4500 61 


1ST RKHEUEU TTsadre Francois. Su- 

perb, 7th floor, d e vqtcr. reception, 2 
bodoooa, bacony. sumy, oabn + 
mod's ream. Do Wert 42 24 09 37. 


SWITZERLAND 


SWITZER LAW 
CRANS-MONTANA 

BOHTON THE BEST EUKOPEAN 
MOUNTAM OOIF COURSE 
IMiiafl superb aportreerti 2 to 6 room* 


HEAR FAMOUS CRANS PLATEAU 
' AT 1SARAT HAMLET 


Swiss chalet 


Bmsllfa* opportunities for foreigners 
60X mortaag. awdabto 
td6HXrierasL 

Agenra farads hw h K Ire 5A 

GcL Benjamin Coastal* 1 
1003 Irilnn - Switzerlan d 
Tel (021) 2D7011. Tto 25873 ABLGH 


SWITZERLAND 

VELARS -A WWTBl AND 
SIMMSt PARADISE 


OT90JME Foyorobla moftooges ok 
65* interest. Aportmenta aEovoi- 
idriein Montreux on Lake Geneva and 

after mountain resorts. GLOBE PLAN 

SA 1 ,AK.MortRapas24 a CH-I005LAU- > 

Switaeriond Tek (211 22 35 12. 
- Tto 25185 MELiS CH 
VtoHs vw h eeeed - Aho srato 


SWTTZBUAND 

Mf wfai buy in fae Aipe 

114 hr ftnn Geneva, in the heort of 
4 V Je vt ova* 300 knw of skana 

aai 80 ski lifts. - 
Aportioont, 64 sqJti^ SF1 
' 74 sqjiL, 5F1 

FAC REAL ESTATE 

52 Mft4br9aM.-CH-l2a2 GBCVA 
Tri 4122/341540. Teton 22090 


LAKE GENEVA + UJO ANg Moo- 
Iras* Gtfaad regiaiv Laonno & 
. mernr Animtam reeorts eta. Fareasen 
can ton- soporb new aparhnerts/cho- 
tote/rtflffl. All prices. Law choke. 
'Swiss reskfancy passfafe. H 5E8CSJ& 
SA. Tour GrneiOhlOQJ laatnw 
21/253411, Lugowt office 91 /6876ft 


REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 


CANADA 


TORONTO. CANADA - LUXURY. 
Filly furnished and equipped 1 & 2 
bedroom sufaL Supenor sssvksk. 
Short/Iongi tenaraadto. Modus! Suitas 
80 Front % East 5te. 222. Toronto 
M5E TT4 Canada. (416( 662-1096 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


SAW-RAW. Unfarrsftad stantbift 
mce, 7 rooms, triple recaptioD,4bed- 

AW* kw ^-SH!g- . 
tofdter, 6000 stun. peri. F2QJDOO / 
martjw a 57jra de hfafc 05800 
CAGhESSJK MS. Tri WJO lI A1& 


CANNES CALIFORNIA lOreooi Co- 
ionkd ftfa vdq; 600 iqjn.-lvtog 
imra, 300CT«qA aorden, pinsd fa. 

R S^monih, free far. 1st ?afc93 


GSEATBBTEAIN 


LOPOON. For the best famobed floss 
and H an e s . ComJl the Speekft t s : 
PtAps, Kay and Inwis. Tri South of 
Park 352 fill], North of flak 722 
5135. Teton 27846 BESOE G. - - 


MAYFAIR, ICAR MLTON HOIH- 

bly farashed 2 bednaa n flat 
ww*. Tri 01-589 8221 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


MAKE YOUKBF AT HGM£ 7 dan 

ta 3 months ia Paris 14th mdlSHv 24 


Imprimi par Offprint. 73 rue de rEvangiie, 75018 Pam 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Embassy Service 

8 Ave. cto Meerine 
73008 fanfe 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGM IN PARIS 
4562-7899 


SHORT IBM STAY. Fran 1 week. 

Fufa equipped Arias aid 2 rtxwn. 
upfadpenans. 


wee parable, tito 


and Mortparnasse. Mads 
.KtoGeorga43' 


>43228250 


REAL ESTATE 7 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


‘81 AVEFOCH 


■ Unae to ue gedtoe . 

Phone, cabr TV, kitche n, sho rt term 
kata. No aatacy feet. F395Q/ month. 
Visit today, 11 an to5 pm 
Tek (1] 43 59 66 72 


• . AT HOME M PARIS 

PARIS PROMO 

APARIMBfTS NR RENT OR SALE 
25 Ava Hache 
75008 Para 


4563 2560 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


74 CHAMPS-ELY5EES 8th 

Shriq, 2 or 3-room apartment. 
One month or mare. 
irtXAJTOGr4359 6797. 


LUXEMBOURG 

View an ptefc, exceptional, double liv- 
ing, 3 bedrooms. 2 baths. FI 3,500. 

Uldwesy S er vice, 45 63 68 38 


AVE MONTAIGNE 

i deee. tuxwy double reoaptiaa, 2 
oonts, short farm. 

Embassy Service, 45 63 68 38 


NEAR PANTHEON. Lovely duplex, 
garden. Tek 4331 64 03 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE - 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


SHORT TERM STAY. Advantages of a 

hotel without tKOOvtmenca, feel at 

home m nice Arias, one beftoom 
and more in faris. S08EUM: 80 rue 

.de JUnwerntt, Pori* 7th. 4544 3940 


AVI DE SUffltPi . 45 00 36 

Luxurious shrio F2900 net. 

FI 0000 net. 


turn. TOWER, by owner, luxurious, 
long term studio, kitchen, baft, loggia. 
F440Q + dmrgev Tri 47 47 4472 


PAGE 16 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


International Secretarial Positions 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


La Male frpn yii e tTon -wportait 


groupe <xn6riumi redtsnha pour sc 

raRECTBJR commbkmUme 

SECRETAIRE 


BHJNGUE ANGLAIS 

Vous ovez 27 ans ef pbs, .une soldo 
formation compto fa e pa- m exp*o- 
ence do 3 era mimmuai dons une fane- 
Son tankxre dm qu'tme indapensdbto 
■neftree de fa itono fran tjone et 


plus, vous powktoc le godt dee eon-' 

S» de rargankation, le sens de Hri 


Da 

tacts, 

tiatrve et du dynaneene. 

Co paste est bo>6 6 NedUy Scbiam. 
Skdut oesmM cadre. 

Adresieii lettre mamrsarfle + CV + 

gteto + prk tai taons sou r*f. 203 

. Sent HORWtTZ 
10 nw de Monceau, 75008 


COOPBS W LYBRATO GONSraS 
seeb for tax 


MUNGUAL SCCRETARY 
&g£di madior tongue (EEC national / 
vrid Frendi wot pertid) 

/Aritown 3-4 yen ee pe r ie u ce. 


orfar warfana with" a young term. 
fapantibat ias indude dy ta-day ad- 
mBustrcWari, cnreepantlefloe, . and 
dr a fting in Eng£sh. Traimq gven an 
ward process o r . 

Send CV.wdh photo 4 ideryrequiro- 
tnents to: .... 

- Mn Parvydn 
Caapert ft Lyfannd Gnaeiv 
56 iiM de Ptrthieu, 75008 Pwts 


Expandmg fanencm company 
in die computw sector seris 
far in mil beodmtortwtm hra, 
to . seoand the executive asdskrih' 

S8CMT ARY 

FOR THE VIC£ PREHDW - 
are iwqund 


-Y porib tfilngucl German, 

or Itafian ■ 

Shorthand in FVwdi and^^iah 
Prior espe i fance in inf) lector mi asset 
Ewrlenf presentation 
Dyncstec. flexible and adcptable ' 
V neusstsy, uvaUfa to work fate 
ramiSar 1 with wara pnsaasntg/ 
spread sheet on-advertage v 
this jab 1 with a young toon and 6 
cdivafagsalary IriMMitoysfaMod Or, 
0*0 arm salary expectoborsr to B« 
Herald TnbuatT^ Ne-*)- 
Cedex. France 


COIE D’AZUR ’ 
Aeranwtie esqsact oam pa n y 
mb far its ftreaar' ■ 
hdm^ial Frontfj/fiiflBlT.- ; 

COMMBKXAL 

SECRETARY / 

«*out 25 , ambitiiwi, "dynomte, 
maker, awefeble, with good mr 


to work 

tnndi 


i*, vwtfi good i 
wtoimfiSy. Free toJ 

. Jab wmt promotion prospects. 

feesSstt tolary & rfaflr’Amk- 

_Wire wijh CV A pfcto.tarSEffi, / 
SS , .06370 MooahfcSortoa^ Fnmae. 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


- PLUS 

INTDtNATIONAL 

ed tasnparary agency leaks 
and EngSsh mother tongue 

_ S ECREIAWB 

Sharthmt md ward pnxeng dotis 
oppredatod. 

04 45 22 01 79 fans 


Mimue SESC5 far AMERICAN 
™™ ll¥C HUMS in PAIB& 
Engfafa Belga^ .Dutdi or Genqan 
' ” ledge of Frond) re- 

armand. BSngual 
phonei T38 Avmm 
V ictor Hugo, 7S1 1o Paris, Ranee. Tri 

p) j o irw-a. 


qUrrnd, Engfah 

tetorita. Wnta 


INTERNATIONAL BANK 

seeks - 

RUNGUAL SECRETARY . 

; Engfah mother tongue; 
floaa aone me i d of Frendv 
Wrifa BAB, 12 R. UendaMs Ben 1st 


SJtEA^Cn 

SECRETARIES 

. Engfahrtrwieh. 

i mother tongue 

» eocwtiei# tSay. 
6U3 or 4233IR2D 


CHAMPS Rim AREA. Wo ore 

Seaeta^Ts^^tinvMuldwtoa 
. young person having nmoamalely 3 
yean aepenenge. Kn o eta pd e of 
m emflry typramer/word processor 
profarrod. • neasoi* enwrorsnent. 
PfaaM aJ Paris: 45 62 32 04 


AMB0CAN LAW HRM to Paris seeb 

bingud setneftsy. firiah mother 
tanrie with e iia e l ent diorttomd in 
: Bepiy with CV. to Bac 2975, 

Henid Triune, 92521 NeufiyGri^ 
France . 


Ui MtOKBAGC RUM seeb Un- 

gad (Etsbh/Friancfa telex operator 
far itxsteiTity lepknemarl frrii Fib- 
. roriy 1«‘- J ura 30 rtv Please send 
rosume-to BoxOTB, Harold Triune. 
92521 NerityCedn, france 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


mndstad KjFKS 

BRRIGUAL AG84CY huBy BiSngual 


YOIMG LADY 24, seeks position » 

r™? ^ fluent 

Pigfcft. Flench, Sp orcK Free to trew- 
Cedex. France 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


Pis 


tOOKMB FOR TOP BILINGUAL 

sonnaR Col the araerts GR 
MnMuler 47 58 3D Paris 


EXECUTIVE Secretary Fheneft/Entfirf! 

ftorthand/typat totax seeks partime 
tob/repfararawl.4651 9&T3Porii 

MALE SECRBARY, 

WJjyV. bSngual in 


83 


SECRETAIRE 
ASSISTANT! 
DE DIRECTION 


PARIS 


4 


Impwtente soci§te de produitscle luxe 
recherraie dans le cadre du 
developpement de son activite 

^ n ??i CiaIe ^ Ext|, eme-Orient une 
secretaire assistant de direction. 

Trflingue japonais-anglals. 

Posie base a PARIS. 

Adressez lenre manuscrite. C.V. 

Ira?: Te p .2?.! ant ^ ‘‘envetoppe ia 
K «84 a MEWA P.A - 9 , bd d^ 
tens - 75002 Paris, qw transmeftra. 



.. experienced 

BnJKGPAL SEGBB fmy : 

^f^S a er a 0r eqUiV ^ n1 - Fluenc y *n French (Dutch 
English shorttiand: essential. 

Sense of human relationships: the assinr.r« M * 

oralmtemabonal contacts. assignment requires mainly 

The Incumbent works to a. Data Pron***:^ A . 

use of personal computer, ^'-essing environownt, with • 

Send C.V, career details and salary ^ 3 : 

;antf Bigiisli under Rrrf. 79326 requ rernent s, both in French gt 

■ •^U PONTDE NEMOURS (FRANCEIc* •'* 

^ > Sehjw du Personnel - 
9. nis Vienne - 7500& Paris