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The Global Newspaper- 
• • Editedin Paris- ■ 

' Printed Simultaneously • 
in Paris, London, Zurich, 




(tribune 


WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PAGE-14 , 


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• *** 


. No. 31,978 


Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


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LONDON, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 188: 





Marcos in Elections 




■ ~ >.i 

• t - *-. 


- j- 

■'Cal .7. 


By Seth My dans 

IVm York Times Service 

MANILA — The moderate op- 
position lo President Ferdinand E. 
Marcos reached a compromise 
Wednesday and restored unity in 
time to register a joint ticket one 
hour before the midnight deadline 
for filing for next year’s elections. 

The slate will be headed by Cora- 
ioa C. Aquino, with her chief rival. 

A LLS. grand jury is investigat- 
ing possible payoffs to Philip- 
pine officials. Page & 


5 /V Salvador H. Laurel, running for 

.7 ;-'rice president in elections set for 
i^‘ feb. 7. They will oppose Mr. Mar- 
r . lif-^-jos undo 1 the banner of Mr. Lau- 
^ Kiel's party. the United Nationalist 

- democratic Organization. 

.;-j’ : Only hours earlier Mr. Marcos 
named a former foreign minis- 
rrr *'-xr and senator, Arturo M. Toien- 
.'•"jW.ino, who often had criticized the 
.7." .J- president's policies, to run as his 

- /ice presidential candidate. 

c Mrs. Aquino said the opposition 
7 tad achieved unity, following a 
’ - -.^upture Sunday of its plans for alli- 
ail*, after the influential arebbish- 
-■ 7 . ' ; jp of Manila, Cardinal Jaime L.' 
"L -f an, met with the two leaders and 
! /' old them “to think of the greater 
__ r.'.fnteresl of (he country." 

- •- 1' “If means subordinating person- 
"_'f ; l interest to national interest," 

' ‘ ‘ ‘J-’iud Mr. Laurel, a former senator, 
,~ i, « he arrived with Mrs. Aquino at 
" _ • . lie almost-deserted office of the 
“Commission on elections. 

: Mrs. Aquino, the widow of an 

ssassinated opposition leader. 
-~-ienigno S. Aquino Jr., said: "I am 
r -ery grateful to Doy for this very 
• ■ •- "-real sacrifice that be is making" 
••-It was Mrs. Aquino who made 
i c final concession, accepting Mr. 
" "surd's party. UNIDO. She and 
IMPlTlr. Laurel said no other agree- 
■ ;i . TTTiems had been a factor in their 
— — xnpromise. 

^ The reunification, both Mrs. 
~~quino and Mr. Laurel said, came 
irring a two-hour meeting that be- 
' 'ui at about 7 P.M.; cwy hours 
"ter Mr. Marcos was proclaimed 
• his party’s candidate. ' 7 . " 

•V The president accepted his nomi- 
• -~:ition with a harsh speech in which 
called his opponents evil, cor- 
iDL godless, slanderous and vio- 


. lent and linked them with the na- 
tion's Communist insurgency. 

Mr. Marcos accused his oppo- 
nents of spitting on the Filipino 
people “since it satisfies their ven- 
omous ambitions, their spite and 
their envy." • 

Asked about the president's re- 
marks. Mrs. Aquino said, “I didn't 
even bear them." 

Both opposition candidates 
withdrew the certificates of presi- 
dential candidacy they had com- 
pleted earlier, Mrs. Aquino filing a 
new one to reflect her UNIDO af- 
filiation and Mr. Laurel refiling, for 
the vice presidency. They also 
signed a declaration by UNIDO 
that it was endorsing them as the 
candidates, for the presidency and 
vice presidency. 

“1 doiTt feel bad about iu" Mr. 
Laurel said. “I fed right about it." 

As described by their supporters, 
talks ou their reconciliation began 
within an hour of the collapse of 
their agreement just before a press 
conference that had been called 
Sunday morning to announce a 
joint ticket. 

Opposition members of parlia- 
ment also pressured them, saying 
they would not support separate 
tickets, said Assemblyman Marcelo 
B. Fernan. 

The burden was on Mrs. Aquino 

(Continued on Page 6, Cot 4) 



LOYALIST FACE-OFF — As Irish and British officials met Wednesday at Stormont 
Castle near Belfast under terms of last month’s accord, a lone Ulster loyalist stood 
outside confronting members of the loyalist Royal Ulster Constabulary. Page 2. 


U.S. Conferees Pass 
Balanced Budget Bill 


Moscow, Pretoria Cited in Reagan Rights Report 


.-.V.v 


% Lou Cannon 

Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan has singled out for 
h uman rights abuses a dozen na- 
tions ranging from the Soviet 
Union to South Africa. 

Additionally, an administration 
spokesman said the Russians were 
engaged in an "odious" attempt to 
present doctored television films 
falsely depicting the dissident, An- 
drei £>. Sakharov, as being in good 
health. 

Signing an annnal . proclama tion 
observing Human Rights Day 'on 
Tuesday, the president condemned 
Soviet behavior in Afghanistan, 
where be said that invading troops 
had slaughtered innocent women 


and children and used poison gas. . 

Mr. Reagan also used some of' 
the- strangest language he has ever 
employed against the South Afri- 
can government, and he criticized 
the human . rights practices of such 
UiL allies as Chile and the Philip- 
pines. 

“In South Africa, the inhuman 
policy of apartheid continues," the 
president said, adding that the state 
of emergency has given the police 
unlimited powers to sOence critics 
of the government. 

Me Reagan has given. _a human 
rights Speech eveiy year during his' 
presidency, but this was the most 
wide-ranging in the number of 
countries and abuses criudzed. 

Administration officials said the 


speech was deliberately "global" 
and that Mr. Reagan still believed 
that quiet diplomacy was the best 
way to resolve specific Soviet hu- 
man rights cases. 

The president said he had made 
il clear in talks with Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, at the 
Geneva summit conference that 
human rights were an abiding con- 
cern of the American people. 

"Human rights will continue to 
have a profound effect on the U.S.- 
Soviet relationship as a whole, be- 
cause they are fundaroemal.ip our 
vision &F an. enduring' peace " Mr. 
Reagan- said. ■ 

1 Earlier Tuesday, Lasy Speakes, 
the White House spokesman, de- 
nounced Soviet film dips, portions 


of which hove appeared on televi- 
sion in the United States. The dips 
show Mr. SaUiarov relaxing in the 
dry of Gorki, to which he has been 
exiled, and carrying suitcases for 
his wife, Ydena G. Bonner, who is 
in the United States for medical 
treatment. 

Administration officials said the 
film apparently was edited so that 
it could not be seen that Mr. Sakha- 
rov. weakened from a hunger 
Strike, could carry the cases only a 
few steps. 

. . "The films are clearly designed 
to:' deflect attention • from Soviet 
mistreatment of Dr. Sakharov," 
Mr. Speakes said. "They do not 
provide credible information about 

(Continued ou Page 6, CoL 7) 


Tax Reform 
Is Sidetracked 
In the House 

By Edward Walsh 
and David Hoffman 

ltVufa/i£riM Post Service 

WASHINGTON — A House- 
Senate conference committee has 
approved landmark legislation to 
force a balanced federal budget, 
and President Ronald Reagan said 
he would sign it if Congress, as 
expected, approved the bill. 

"1 strongly endorse this mea- 
sure,” Mr. Reagan said Tuesday 
night, "and urge the Congress to 
act quickly and make this the law 
of the land." 

However, the president added 
that he would continue to fight for 
funds to continue his military 
buildup. 

White House officials said the 
president approved or the compro- 
mise version of the measure despite 
provisions that they calculate could 
lead to cuts in military budget au- 
thority c4 more than SH) billion this 
year alone. Pentagon officials esti- 
mated that the figure, which re- 
flects commitments to spending in 
later years, could go as high as S18 
billion. 

As approved by the conference 
committee, the balanced budget 
legislation would require annual re- 
ductions in the deficit, now run- 
ning at more than $200 billion, 
leaving a balanced budget by 1991. 
If total appropriations would ex- 
ceed a given year's ceiling, the pres- 
ident would be required to make 
spending cuts, half in the military 
budget and half in nonmilitary 
spending. The Social Security pen- 
sion program and several programs 
for the poor would be exempt. 

[On Wednesday, House Republi- 
cans sidetracked, and may have 
killed for the year, Mr. Reagan's 
tax overhaul initiative, his top legis- 
lative priority. They prevented the 
chamber from voting oh rival plans 
that each had the president's back- 
ing, The Associated Press reported. 

[On a 223-202 vote, a solid Re- 

(Coutiimed on Page 6. CoL I) 



Hie "lt> V lim 

Dr. Anne C. Bay ley examining a child in a Lusaka hospital. 

An AIDS-Linked Cancer 
Changes Form in Africa 


By Lawrence K. Airman 

•V«ir York Time \ Senne 

LUSAKA. Zambia — A rare 
cancer. Kaposi's sarcoma, has 
changed rapidly in Africa and is 
playing a disturbing role in the 
worldwide epidemic of AIDS. The 
cancer is believed to be striking 
young Africans at a significantly 
higher rate than ever before. 

A relationship between acquired 
immune deficiency syndrome and 
this new. more aggressive form of 
Kaposi's has become apparent 
since the development of an AIDS 
blood test two years ago. The lest 
showed that most victims of this 
new form of Kaposi’s had evidence 
of exposure lo the AIDS virus. 

Physicians want to know why a 
cancer few of them have ever seen 
should become such an integral 
part of AIDS, and what the African 
experience means for AIDS and 




il Prices and Production 


millions ol 
'anels daily 
•> ’OTAL r . 



$ 10.53-Billion Award 
Upheld Against Texaco 


OPEC 

FQs te '77 -79 '81 *83 '85 

B P Sijiisdcji Re-vitfw. Pefrofc*um IfthWigeilfe weekly. U S. Energy Dept 

H* Naw Yori Tm 

IPECs oil production and prices have steadily declined 
to uring the 1980s, as the cartel's market share shrank. 

Gsdone Weakness Expected 
■hi Panicky Oil Market 


< By Bob Hagerty 

’ Iniemanutuil HtrraU Tribune 

• ■ ONDON — Oil traders and 

ysis predicted Wednesday that 
1 market would remain panicky 
weak after this week's pric* 
which appeared to repre- 
'** long-overdue recognition of 
trial pressures on OPEC. 

1 te trigger for the three days of 
at price fluctuations was an 
r; nnem Sunday by the Organi- 
- yZr-'jfi i of Petroleum Exporting 
'' itries to secure "a fair share" 
■ • e oil market even at the risk of 

• king prices lower. 

I . htle OPECs bold declaration 
jy '~‘y reflecied a desire lo teach a 
ul lesson to oil producers oul- 
he carteL it also was a recogai- 
,dut OPEC members were no 
able to keep their produc- 
w ”'' . V'OW enough to support prices. 
' e price drop, in turn, repre- 
what some traders called a 
ni lion of the acute pressures 
, : : ^ ,anel whose share of the mar- 
. .... ^Hitside the Soviet bloc has 

*'* i to about 35 percent from 60 

. tu in 1979. 

._y '* a brutal awakening," said a 
- r . r oil-trading executive at a 
V ' oil company. He predicted 
•^■ some small irading firms 
i be bankrupted by this 
•X* lurches in the market. 

> Th Sea Brent, a widely traded 
‘■'is' oiL was reported to have 
' I early Wednesday as low as 
i a hand for January dcliv- 
’ .e lowest price recorded since 
ind down from $30.10 just 
l5 ‘ 7 *eeki ago. The price surged 
*j-jnd $26 by mid-morning be- 
- iding the day in London at 
•' . IS25.25. 


Where will the market settle 
down? "God knows," said the oil 
executive. 

Mehdi Vaizi, an oil analyst at the 
London stock brokerage of Gri eve- 
son, Grant & Ca, speculated that 
the price of Brent would drop to 
$15 to $20 this winter before rising 
to an average of $20 to $22 during 
1986. 

Many analysts have been pre- 
dicting such a collapse as this 
week’s since March 1983, when 
OPEC reluctantly cut its bench- 
mark price to $29 from $34. Thai 
price was cm again last January, to 
$28, but nearly all OPEC oil now is 
sold at free-market prices rather 
than at ofGcial rates. 

Looking ahead, the fundamen- 
tals are daunting for OPEC. The 
International Energy Agency pre- 
dicts that oil demand in the oon- 
Coimnunist world will be about 
level next year after declining I 
percent this year to 45.6 million 
bands a day, 11 percent below the 
1979 peak. 

But OPEC would rind it ex- 
tremely difficult to reduce its out- 
put from the current 18 million 
barrels or so to the ceiling of 16 
million agreed upon in late 1984. 
Almost aD members are above their 
quotas. Iraq, Nigeria and Ecuador 
are over thar quotas by a total of a 
million barrels and have an- 
nounced that they have no inten- 
tion of respecting what they con- 
sider unfairly low limits. 

Many officials in OPEC coun- 
tries still hope that Saudi Arabia, 
OPECs biggest producer, win trim 
its production once again to stop 
the price crash. But Saudi Arabia 

(Continued on Page IL CoL 6) 


fie* Turk Times Service 

HOUSTON — A Texas state 
judge has upheld a jury verdict re- 
quiring Texaco Inc. to )»y $10.53 
billion in damages, plus interest, to 
Pennzoi] Co. for interfering with 
Permzoil’s agreement to acquire 
Getty Oil Ca in 1984. 

The total award, $11.1 billion, is 
believed to be the largest in the 
history of the civil justice system in 
ibe United States. 

The decision was greeted with 
shock by analysts, who said it 
would have a dramatic impact on 
the future of Texaco, the third-brg- 
est U.Sl oil company. 

Texaco now finds itself in an 
extremely difficult legal and finan- 
cial position, analysts said. It has 
suffered a disastrous defeat at the 
trial level, they added, and even to 
begin an appeal could require con- 
siderable legal and financial ma- 
neuvering. 

Texaco said that it would appeal 
the judge's Tuesday derision, call- 
ing it "unjustified." Under Texas 
law, this procedure normally would 
require Texaco to post a bond of 
$12.2 billion, a sum equal to rough- 
ly one-third of its assets. 

But Judge Solomon Casseb Jr. 
waived that requirement after Tex- 
aco agreed not to sdl, pledge or 
otherwise dispose of any assets out- 


side normal conduct of business 
without court approvaL while 
PennzoO agreed not to lay claim to 
any of Texaco's assets without 
court approvaL 

The-agreement appeared to be an 
effort by both sides to avoid a cost- 
ly bankruptcy filing by Texaco that 
might disrupt its business opera- 
tions and cause creditors, including 
Pennzofl, to file liens against Tex- 
aco assets. 

Unless the ruling is overturned, 
analysts said that it now appeared 
much less tikdy that Texaco would 
be able So escape without paying 
billions of dollars, either in a re- 
duced award or in an out-of-coun 
settlement. 

Judge Casseb’s opinion was de- 
livered after the close of trading 
Tuesday on the New York Slock 
Exchange. Texaco shares were un- 
changed Tuesday at S30.75. but at 
midaftemoon Wednesday, it had 
fallen S3 a share on the New York 
Stock Exchange and was the most 
actively traded issue. Pennzoi! 
stock closed Tuesday at $66-25, up 
$3. 

Pennzoi! argued that it had an 
agreement to acquire 40-2 percent 
of Getty CMI on Jan. 3. 1984, for 
SU2J0 a share but that it was 
improperly voided three days later 
when Getty's directors accepted a 



huntfl 

J. Hugh Liedtke, president of PennzoiL, giving a V -for- victory sign after a the ruling. 


$10.1 billion offer, or $128 a share, 
from Texaco for all Ibe company. 

Although opinions vary on 
whether Texaco could make the full 
$11. 1 -billion payment and survive 
as a functioning company, there is 
no doubt that its size and structure 
would be altered dramatically by 
such a payment. 


Stephen D. Susman, a litigation 
expert with the Houston law firm 
of Susman, Godfrey & McGowan, 
said that if Texaco were able to 
post bond and make an appeal, 
"the odds of Texaco getting a new 
trial are good because the amount 
involved of money is so large. Any 
appellate court is going to look aw- 


fully hard to find some error. This 
is going to gel scrutiny like no other 
triaL” 

Many analysts said that for both 
companies the most advantageous 
course would be to settle now. But 
some analysts noted that Pennzoil 
might not be in any mood to settle 
on terms acceptable to Texaco. 


Kaposi's cancer victims in other 
pans of the world. 

For many scientists even the hint 
of a correlation between the AIDS 
virus and a cancer has been ex- 
tremely important because it adds 
one more piece to the puzzle of how- 
tumors may develop. The theory is 
that the new form of Kaposi's sar- 
coma develops as an opportunistic 
cancer that takes advantage of ihc 
weakened immune system of an in- 
dividual with AIDS' 

Some changes in the nature of 
Kaposi's sarcoma have occurred in 
the United States and elsewhere. 
But in many aspects the African 
development is quite different. 

A close study of whai is happen- 
ing to Kaposi's cases, scientists be- 
lieve; may provide insights into the 
character and origin of AIDS and 
help lead to a treatment of the 
disorder. 

Experts who have treated pa- 
tients with Kaposi's sarcoma now 
talk about an extraordinary trans- 
formation in some of its patterns. 

Dr. Anne C. Bayley. a British 
surgeon who has worked in Zambia 
for the last 14 years and who has 
become an authority on Kaposi's 
sarcoma, spoke about il recently 
while making rounds at the Univer- 
sity Teaching Hospital in Lusaka. 
She recalled her reaction when she 
first identified the change in 1983: 

“It was like coming home from 
work and finding that your spaniel 
bad turned into a wolf, it was so 
against one's expectations." 

Before that. Dr. Bayley said, 
about 90 percent or the cases of 
Kaposi’s sarcoma she treated in 
Lusaka responded to a combina- 
tion of two anti-cancer drugs. Acti- 
nomycin D and vincristine. 

But starling two years ago. 8 of 
the 13 patients whom Dr. Bayley 
said she diagnosed as having the 
new form of Kaposi's sarcoma were 
dead within six months despite this 
treatment. The victims were in their 
20s and early 30s. 

Die classic form of Kaposi’s sar- 
coma is rare. It tends to strike men 
of Italian, Mediterranean and East- 
ern European Jewish heritage from 
their 50s to their 80s. It also occurs 
in an endemic form in African men. 
In the United States and Europe, it 
usually strikes men about 10 times 
as often as women. 

A long-known and probably 
even rarer form kills young chil- 
dren in Africa, although there are 
no accurate statistics to document 
how hard different age groups are 
being hit by the various forms of 
Kaposi's. 

Kaposi's sarcoma was probably 

(Continued cm Page 7, CoL 3) 


INSIDE 

■ The Soviet naval command- 
er, who made the fleet a global 
power during his 29-year ten- 
ure. has been replaced. Page 2. 

■ An Iowa farmer's losing 

struggle with debt ended in a 
killing spree. Page 3. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ A rescue package for Pan- 
Electric Industries is being 
drawn up in Singapore. Page 9. 

| The transfer of Pan Ain’s Pa- 
cific routes to United Airlines 
could be held up by Japan's 
Transport Ministry- Page 9. 

TOMORROW 

V/. Somerset Maugham died 
two decades ago but be remains 
a popular author. He is remem- 
bered by Thomas Quinn Cur- 
tiss. In-Weekend. 


In Liberum Bush, Devils Stronger Than Government 


By Blaine Harden 

Washington Past Service 

GBONWEA, Liberia — When lightning 
struck a mud' hut here 23 years ago and killed 
an elderly man. Gboowea's chief did what 
any responsible official in this devil-worship- 
ing region would: He called in a sp e cia l i s t. 

The lightning doctor, a sorcerer from 
across the snake-infested swamps, came at 
once. ■ 

He planted a sacred cbUohwood seedling 
beside the chiefs palaver bouse and barked 
out three magical anti-lightning command- 
ments that were to be obeyed forever Do not 
pour cooking oil on a fire; do not walk into 
the village carrying a bunch of coconuts;, 
never again should a Gbonwean chew Chi- 
clets gum. 

Today, the sacred cottonwood is thriving, 
shading the chiefs palaver house, and no ope 
since has been killed by lightning. But people 
remember the sorcerer's edicts, and they still 
shy from Chiclets. 

For. Gbonwea (pronounced hon- way-a). a 
rice-farming village of 600 inhabitants nearly 
swallowed up by the dead-green bush of 


West Africa, lies in the heart of a region 
where magic, perhaps more so than in any 
other part of Africa, controls the way people 
five. 

Liberian authorities in the coastal capital 
of Monrovia, about 220 miles (about 350 
kilometers) southwest, have been trying for 
more than 140 years to assert temporal au- 
thority ova the sorcerers, the masked devils 
and the secret societies that are both religion 
and government ^in such remote villages. In a 
nearby town in the 1930s, the government 
court-martialed and shot 50 members of the 
secret Leopard Society, which specialized in 
killing people and cutting out their hearts 
and other organs for use in religious ceremo- 
nies. 

.These violent societies have been almost 
eliminated, but about 65 percent of Liberia's 
lwo million people continue to believe in the 
-traditional religions. Thousands of rural 
troys and girls are sent off every year to 
"bush school* a rigidly secluded kind of 
summer camp where they are circumcised by 
"devils" and taught how to farm, dance, fight 
and use herbal medicines. They also are 
indoctrinated in traditional religious beliefs. 


“The devil has the largest percentage of 
believers; the Christians have much less." 
said D3vid Menkua, 37, a bush-school grad- 
uate, father of 10, husband of two, Gbon- 
wea's bead schoolmaster and heir apparent 
to his uncle as village chief. “The devil is the 
only thing we believe in, and when we sacri- 
fice to iu it will help us.” 

Time and outside pressure have mellowed 
the sacrificial appetites of Gbonwea's devils. 
Mr. Menkua said the blood of a sheep or a 
goat, instead of a human, is now a respect- 
able offering to a devil being asked to rid the 
village of illness. Women, who once were 
killed if they accidentally caught sight of a 
devil’s mask, now are let off with a fine. 

Devils in Liberia are not devils in the 
Christian sense. Rather, they are believed to 
be benevolent spirits who live in the bush 
and occasionally come into a village — in the 
form of a costumed man, often the village 
blacksmith — to solve problems. 

Mr. Menkua said a devil last helped out 
Gbonwea by settling a fight that broke out 
after a recent soccer match. He said (he devil, 
a village man who by donning a mask had 


merged his soul with that of the spirit, simply 
presented himself to the brawlers and they 
went home. 

Besides devils, the bush around Gboowea 
also is notable as the home of about 20 
species of the world's most poisonous 
snakes. 

There are slender mambas, blindingly 
quick dayglow-green snakes that live in trees 
and whose bite, according to the Encyclope- 
dia Britannica, is "nearly 100 percent fatal 
without ami-venin treatment" There are 
spitting cobras, creatures 5- to 8-feet (1.5- to 
2.4-meters) long that, when provoked, stand 
up. spread their hoods and spit venom, aim- 
ing for the eyes. And there are Gaboon 
vipers, stout and stubby creatures with pastel 
coloring, an unearthly hiss and a venom tha t 
attacks nerves and destroys blood vessels. 

Snakes, and snakebites, are so much a pan 
of Gbonwean existence that they, like devils, 
long have been incorporated into the vil- 
lage's social fabric. Snake societies meet reg- 
ularly in the village for drinks, singing and 
seminars on snakebite treatment. Unlike the 

(Continued on Page 5. CoL 3) 


■■ Ml* 



: Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1985 


Hussein Hans 
To Visit Syria 



\ V - 


As Ties Grow 




• Reuters 

• AMMAN, Jordan — King Hus- 
, sein has accepted an invitation 
; from President Hafez al-Assad of 

Syria to visit Damascus, Prime 
' Minister Abdul Raoul al-Kasm of 

• Syria said Wednesday. 

Mr. Kasm said before leaving 
Amman after two days of political 
reconciliation talks with Jordan 
! that a date for the visit would be 
announced later. 

Diplomats said Hussein's trip, 
expected this month, would seal a 
rapprochement between the two 

; neighboring countries that began in 
•September after Arab League me- 
diation. 

The Syrian prune minister had 
more than eight hours of talks with 
Hussein and Prime Minister Zaid 
Rifai of Jordan. 

Mohammed al-Khatib, the Jor- 
danian information minister, said a 
joint communique would be issued 
in both capitals later. 

• The talks between the Syrian and 
! Jor dani an prime minis ters were the 
; fourth in a series of reconciliation 

■ meetings to overcome political dis- 
putes that led to border tension in 
1980. 

- Jordan and Syria have differed 
on ways to achieve Middle East 
peace, over Yasser Arafat's leader- 
ship of the Palestine Liberation Or- 
ganization and the I ran -Iraq war. 

Jordan supports Iraq and Mr. 
Arafat, while Syria backs Iran and 
anti-Arafat groups in the PLO. 
Both sides, however, are against 
direct peace talks with Israel. 

The Amman-Damascus rap- 
prochement has led to a drive for 
more economic ties. 


SDI Is Step Toward 'Catastrophe,’ WORLD BRIEFS 

Soviet Winner of Peace Prize Says west Beirut Patrolled to End violence 


[(ft 1 


Tht Associated Press ate temptation to effect a first luikra railing on the Nobel selec- BEIRUT (Reuters) — A token _ Lebanese Anny and police force 

OSLO — The Soviet co-presi- strike with impunity," Dr. Cfaazov lion committee to rescind the prize, patrolled Moslem West Beirut on W ednesday and set up checkpoints in 
dent of the international group of said. “Any defense will inevitably and the British government criti- another effort to end militia anarchy. 


physicians that won the 1985 No- lead to ihe creation of the means to rized Dr. Glazov's sharing in the 
bel Peace Prize said Wednesday overcome it Thus the spiral of the award. 


bel Peace Prize said Wednesday overcome it Thus the spiral of the 
that President Ronald Reagan's arms race — nuclear, conventional. 


award. 

The UA, British and West Ger- 


another effort to end militia anarchy. 

The measures were prompted by five days of street fighting Iasi month 
between the Druze-led Progressive Socialist Party and the Shiite Moslem 
Amal militia. Sixty-eight 68 people died in the fighting: A Druze-Shiite 


space-based Strategic Defense Ini- laser and. other — will again soar man ambassadors to Norway were strike force, which halted the fighting Nov. 24, has pledged lo help the 


tiativc constituted “one more step steeply, undermining strategic sta- out of the country Tuesday in what army-police force keep the peace. t 

toward nuclear catastrophe." btlity.” was seen as a demonstration erf The measures resemble a short-lived plan mediated by Syria m July 


But Dr, Yevgeni Giazov, the So- In an advance text of his post- 


vkt deputy health minis ter whose award le c t ur e. Dr. Lowa said: ~Ev- 
sfaaring in the award to the Interna- ery historic period has its Cassan- 


unhappiness with the award. 

■ Helsinki Watch Protests 

The Helsinki Watch Committee 


after previous Druze-Shiite dashes. Forty Syrian observers, in West 
Beirut since then, will help supervise the new effort. 


□onai rayaoans tor the proven- eras, unr era is ine mst m wnten ine netaiuu which uwuuum _ . T • rv - rrt 

don of Nudear War prompted- prophecies erf doom stem from ob- formally protested the awarding of ^ Aflgan (jTClCFS LlP"D6t6CtOr 1 6STS 

WASKTNCTON (AP) 


political declaration of either Com- physicians concluded that medi- 


munists or capitalists. “ di 
"It is what is demanded by rea- mi 
son, by people the world over who to 
want to live," the Moscow cardrol- 


ane, which in past wans mitigated 


^tS^Se^al^t- WASHINGTON (AP, - Prudent Ronald Reagan, tiyingto crack , 
Strom flSungton. down on spying and news leaks, has ordered that govemmoit emptoya* 

The privaleU^. organization and contractors seeking access to highly classified information submit to 
sent a tfiegram Monday to the se- mandatory lie-detector tests, it was announced Wednesday- 
lection connnittee contending that The White House spokesman. Lany Speakes, said that while “this 


agist said in his post-award lecture, to the physicians group was criti- 
The peace prize was received, rized by human rights activists be- 
Tuesday by Dr. Chazov and his eo- cause Dr. Chazov signed a 1973 


offer following nuclear war." 
The awarding of the peace prize 


The peace prize was received, rized by human 
tiesdav bv Dr. Chazov and his co-’ cause Dr. Chaz 


president. Dr. Bernard Lown, pro- letter 


Dr. Yevgeni Cfaazov of tibe Nobel prize-winning interna- 
tional physicians group, delivering the post-award lecture 
during which he criticized U.S. plans to a missile defense. 


fessor of cardiology at the Harvard kharov, the 
School of Public Health. cist Mr. Sa 


letter denouncing Andrei D. Sa- 
kharov, the dissident Soviet physi- 
cist Mr. Sakharov, the only previ- 


“The ‘space shield’ will mean one ous Soviet recipient of the Nobel 
more step toward nudear catastro- Peace Prize, won it in 1975. 


throughout the world." which Mr. Reagan signed Nov. 1. The Los ^gete Times, which first 

Thecommittee, formed to mom- reported the order, cited estimates that more than 10.000 people would be 
tor compliance with the 1975 Hel- covered. 

dnW accords on human rights, said Even within the administration there has been resistance to the use of 
it would be satisfied if someone lie-detector tests. A Stale Department official, speaking privately, said 
other than Dr. Chazov were select- that Secretary of State George P. Shultz was against the idea “as a mauer 
ed to receive the prize on behalf of of principle." 


phe, not only because ii would ere- The U.S. Senate adopted a reso- 


ed to receive the prize on behalf of 
the phyadans' group. 


!h'i V i 


Soviet Replaces Navy Chief of 29 Years 


Reuters the arrival of “Naval Commander- 

MOSCOW — Admiral Sergei G. in-Chief Chemavin” in Tunis. 
Gorshkov, commander of the Sovi- The ministry spokesman con- 
et Navy for 29 years, has been re- firmed that Admiral Gorshkov had 


placed in the job by one of his been replaced, but would give no 
deputies, a Defense Ministry further details. 


spokesman said Wednesday. Western naval attaches in Mos- 

Admiral Gorshkov, 75, appoint- cow were unaware of the change. 


Connecticut Student, 13, 
Shoots, Kills Custodian 


ed in 1956 by Nikita S. Khru- 
shchev, is credited with building up 
the Soviet fleet from a coastal force 
to a global presence. 

The emergence of the Soviet 
Uniou as an oceanic power is seen 


e arrival of “Naval Commander- Military experts see Admiral 
-Chief Chemavin” in Tunis. Gorshkov, who held his post under 
The ministry spokesman con- five leaders, as one of the major 
med that Admiral Gorshkov had figures in the Soviet Union's rise to 
en replaced but would give no the status of worid military power, 
rther details. Upon taking command, ms first 

Western naval attaches in Mos- job was to dismantle the founda- 
w were unaware of the change, tions of an obsolescent navy of 
but speculated that it was because large surface ships that had been 
of Admiral Gorshkov's age rather planned by Stalin. He then oversaw 
than disfavor. the transformation of the fleet from 


Little was known about Admiral small coastal ships that rarely ven- 


Chernavin, 57, who has served as 
one erf two first deputy command- 


as one of the major strategic events ers in chief of the navy since March 


,V*w V’ort Times Servin’ 

. PORTLAND, Connecticut — A 
13-year-old student armed with a 
semiautomatic, 9mm rifle shot and 
killed a custodian at Portland Ju- 
nior High School and injured the 
principal and a secretary, the stale 
police said. 

The youth, who also held a sev- 
enth-grade student hostage in a 
second-floor corridor of the school 
for nearly a half hour Tuesday, was 
captured after an aunt pleaded 
with him over the school's intercom 
system to throw the gun out a win- 
dow, the police said. A police 
spokesman said he had no idea 
what provoked the shooting. 


of the postwar period. 

Admiral Gorshkov's replace- 
ment by Admiral Vladimir N. 
Chemavin, naval chief of staff, was 
the ble st, in a series of changes in 
the top ranks of the military since 
Mikhail S. Gorbachev became the 
Soviet leader in March. 

His departure was implied by an 
item in Wednesday editions of the 
armed forces daily newspaper 
Krasnaya Zvezda. which reported 


1982, the attaches said. 

Since Mr. Gorbachev took of- 
fice, new chiefs have been appoint- 


tured from the Baltic or Black seas. 

The navy now numbers hun- 
dreds of modem vessels, including 
about 300 submarines, half of them 
nuclear-powered. Under A dmir al 
Gorshkov, the submarine force has 


ed to bead the armed forces' power- become the military’s second most 
ful political department, the important strategic arm. 



Executions 
By Vigilantes 
Reported 
In Kampala 


Arab- Americans in Peril, FBI Reports 

WASHINGTON (NYT) — William H. Webster, director of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, has warned that Arab- Americans have » 
entered a “zone of danger" and are targets of violence by a group seeking * 
to harm “enemies of IsraeL" . ... . 

At the National Press Club on Tuesday. Mr. Webster said, that the FBI 
had found links among a series of recent attacks on Arab- Americans, 
although he did not provide a detailed description of the group purport- 
edly behind the incidents. 

Militant Jewish organizations have come under suspicion in five 
terrorist attacks this year, including two bombings of Arab-American 
groups, that have caused two deaths and several injuries. The FBI had 
said previously that it believed the Jewish Defense League might have 
been involved in at least one of the attacks. The Defense League has 
denied any responsibility. 


The Associated Press been involved m at least one oi me diuu^,. 

LONDON —A spate of vigilan- denied any responsibility, 
te executions in Kampala, capital 

thereto the brink of collapse, the Israel Asks $3.5 Billion in U.S. Aid 

of London reported JERUSALEM (WP) — Israel ,flpr 

ir - presented to the United States a ; 

avoiding thepotholes in the road," t Wednesday for more than 

" 2 " vTtvT- 53.5 billion m economic and mill- -JV f 


Vladimir N. Chemavin 


strategic rocket forces and the Sovi- A theoretician who published _ _ 

et forces in East Germany. books and articles. Admir al Gorsh- Vladimir N. Chemavin 

According to rumors circulating kov was believed to have personally 
among diplomats, Viktor G. KuH- convinced Khrushchev of the no- Zvezda that with its sophisticated 
kov, 64, commander in chief of the cessity of giving the Soviet Union a new weaponry, the Soviet fleet 
Warsaw Pact forces since 1977, global naval presence. could wipe out enemy targets on a 

also may be replaced soon. In March he wrote in Krasnaya worldwide scale. 


sksmms HaSwES 

UtSS? 1 " 


Warsaw Pact forces since 1977, 
also may be replaced soon. 


•topt^saidthatMr.^km- 

2&2SW* 1TSTS5 


seen evidence of 
ty for the past 


could wipe out enemy targets on a week while traveling between his 

worldwide scale. v i. > u:~ u the arrival of a team of U.S. mveso- 


stores in Kampala and his home 
five miles (eight kilometers) away. 


gators to question Israeli officials 


ESCADA' 

in Paris.. , 


U.K., Ireland 
Meet Under 
New Accord 



Geoffrey Grigson, Poet, 
Art Critic, Is Dead at 80 




pala since the country’s most recent 

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PACIFIC WESTERN UMYKSTTYl 


600-N. Sepulveda BIvcL, 
Los Anseles, Cal Mam la 
90049, Oept. 23. U^A. 


The Associated Press 

BELFAST — Irish and British 
cabinet ministers held a historic 
first meeting Wednesday stemming 
from last month's Bntish-Irish 
agreement. Thousands of Protes- 
tants rallied in defiance and 32 po- 
licemen were slightly injured in 
scattered dashes. 

Whb the meeting of Foreign 
Minister Peter Bany of Ireland and 
Tom King, the British secretary for 
Northern Ireland, the Nov. 15 ac- 
cord formally went into effect. The 
agreement gives Dublin an official 
consultative role in the running of 
Northern Ireland 

While the ministers met, workers 
from the Harland & Wolff ship- 
yard and the Short Brothers air- 
craft factory marched during their 
lunch hour to a Belfast building 
that will bouse the British-Irisb sec- 
retariat set up under the terms of 
the agreement. 

They carried banners saying 
| "Ulster is British" and “Ulster Says 


>• $ - 


V V, 


international Herald Tribune Peggy Gddwgter, 76, wife of 

LONDON -—Geoffrey Grigson, Senator Barry Goldwater, Rjepnbli- 
80, an English poet, art critic, an- can of Arizona, Wednesday fofiow- 
Lbologist and polemical journalist ing amputation of her left leg Dec 
with more than SO published 1, in Phoenix. Arizona, 
works, died Nov. 25. „ . 


coup, on July 27, that overthrew 
President Miltcm Obote. It said, 
again without citing sources, that 
soldiers involved in the coup were 
responsible for widespread looting. 

The Times report, written by 
Paul Valldy, cited a “frenzy of re- 




The investigating team, headed 
by Abraham D. Sofaer, a State De- 
partment legal adviser, was to be- 
gin its inquiry Thursday and was 
expected to be in Israel five days. 
Mr. Pickering said die aid request 


venge killings" in the capital that 

streets with oulver- “lly and would _not be influenced 


had littered die streets with pulver- ' ^ 

^ and dismcnAcroi corpS $*£221 “ 



A !:■- 



WMeMs poet^i tended to be 

1 U.. k. editorial writer for The Washnut- 


obscurcd by other Hterary achieve- 
ments, he won praise for bis “Ccrf- KLjSSSiSlS 
lected Poems 1963-80 " published 
in 1984. Mr. Grigson was consul- 

ered to be a minmurist with a gift * e . 

for precise observation. His eSy Stata, Nov. 22 of cancer, in Wash- 


Lt^lpe^Ie^AeEmSlhe Wastogtoc as tong as action 
gogoEmbo, the report said, explain- m ^ mvestl B a,J0n continued. 


Yitzhak Modal 


austerity evolved into a more per- m ® lon ' 

sonal and emotional style. Walter BwGtbsoo, 88, pulp writer 


tug that this meant “deanmg of the 

“Victims range from petty crimi- China Assails Tightening of U.S. Pact 

MMNO (OPI) - Chiaa an Wednesday a.tadccd aa “conylaMy 
ministrations who nw have been UM f ce P t * We a U-S. Saute amendment that would tighten safeguards 
marked men foryears," Mr. VaDely on T A “* na ? 1 nud< ? r » CJiaa under a new cooptation pact. 
renort«d without eitina hii Li Zhaonng, spokesman for the Foreign Mmistry, said the amendment 


The Reverend Ian Paisley 


A respected literary journalist, who under the pen name of Max- 
Mr. Grigson founded the left-lean- wdl Grant created the caped crime 
ing periodical New Verse in 1933. fighter “the Shadow." Friday fol- 


.. _ , . „ . _ conservative 'Morning Post. 

No. A general strike by Proles- 

tents 11 years ago helped block the His woxks mdude ^ev^al Ob- 
last British-Irisb initiative on SSKSi/IS^. 

Northern Ireland. SJ" Q? 43 ** 7 h S. kleS <32JT 

(1946), Legenda Suecana (1953), 
The Reverend Ian Paisley, Ulster “Collected Poems" (1963), “A 
province's most prominent Proles- Skull in Salop" (1967) and. more 

(Ml m! J .1 . «TI,I. MQI. .1. UTL. /n ' ■ L T-. I 


ing periodical New Verse in 1933. fighter “the Shadow," Friday fob 
He also was literary editor of the lowing a stroke Nov. 7, in Kings- 


renorted without citine his iui uic i ivuiusuv , miu me amenamem 

*£££ L 7- ****** a vmkuaal infringement of the U.S.-Oima nuclear accord, 
Z^to^XX^hr winch autOTtetkally went into effect Tuesday. 

packs as soon as a hue Soy is Ql Sf e Q 80V !f , Tf n i *** note lhat J us - Seaztc 3 ^ 

Sd and descend in fronton 9 a J 8 ? taised *^mreasonable demands" Mr. Li 


ion. New York. 

Ca rdinal EnnenegBdo Florit, 84, 


their victims, who are often quite unilajoaHy impored additional provisions beyond the 

■■ _ __ mm. _ * UPrftPrtVn 1 ana rvwni iifriMir imuvartt^hla 


literally pulled limb from limb." * 
The paper quoted Mr. William- 


agreement are completely unacceptable.* 


a former archbishop of Florence son as once heard a bowl 

who played a key role at the Second and the on somrone 


Vatican 


tent politicuui, said at a rally: “We recently, “The Cornish Dancer and 
are giving notice to Mr. Barry and Other Poems” (1982) and “The Pri- 


a stroke in August and kidney 
blockage, in Florence. 

Barbara Jean Abrah&mson, 45, 

Mr. King that this is a harbinger of vale Art: A Poetry Notebook" *k® w *£ e lieuxeiam Graeral 
things to come.” (1982). James A. Abrahamson, who is di- 

' '■ rector of research for the Reagan 

In scattered scuffles, 32 police- ■ Other deaths: administration’s space-based anti- 

men suffered slight injuria, police Dads de Roagemont, 79, Swiss missile system. She and two other 
said, A Protestant politician, writer, philosopher and advocate of persons were killed Sunday in tire 
George Graham, said tie was hit on European unity, Friday after a long crash of a private plane in Calif or- 
the head by a police baton. illness, in Geneva. ilia’s Sierra Nevada mountains. 

Tbe ministerial talks were being 

held at a separate venue, the Star- r n , t rr , . n , 

mont Castle compound, home of LOTUUftl Hefm€S /tOfe Ol letegraptl Deal 
Northern Ireland s elected but vir- J ox 


Sunday following — I couldn't see who or why. From 


Beijing Satisfied About Hong Kong 

HONG KONG (AFP) — China's top official for Hong Kona said 

that fka Qnltplt * - — — J 1 ! - ■ . « 1 


the middle of the crowd t saw & Wednesday that tbe British colony’s economic and social condition bad 
man's arm tossed up; it whirled in been “fairly good" and that Chinese-British cooperation had operate^ 
the air and as it idl some of tbe smoothlv since Behinz and Lnndrni siened a irnnt MunHnn Urvnd 


Chilled 

TIO PEPE 


crowd descended on it again." 

The report said that stoning and 


smoothly since Beijing and London signed a joint declaration on Hong 
Kong a year ago. 

Ji Pengfei, director of China’s Hong Kong and Macao Affairs Office, 


bunting aKve were frequent meth- said at a banquet held in his honor that the satisfactory settlement of the 


Denis de Roagemont, 79, Swiss missile system. Site and two other 
writer, philosopher and advocate of persons were killed Sunday in the 


European unity, Friday after a long crash of a private plane in Calif or- 


odsof teurder. . Hong Kong question last December had ushered in a new period in 

“There is a definite ritual de- Chinese- British relations. 
ment to_it." the paper quoted an Earlier, Mr. Ji attended a lunch given by the chief secretary Sir David 
mmamodUgandan avil savant as Akere-Jones. He was quoted by Man Sai-cheung, spokesman of ihr Hong 
saymg. “They use huge boulders Kong Affairs Society, as saying that the colony should undergo “as little 
for the stonmg and continue long change as possible" in tbe run-up to its changeover to Chinese sovereign- 
after the person is dead. ty. Mr. Ji apparently was referring to local political reforms. 

The Ugandan added: “Often old 
stores are settledm seconds. Some- -ri ■ « n 

one wfil point and shorn. ‘Hira, f or til© KfiCOrd 
him, him.’ and the next victim is — . _ 

found." ^ GeraES ie A. Ferraro, tbe 1984 Democratic rice presidential candidate. 

President Daniel arap Mra of m 86 ^ S“ UiL Seaale *** ^ Alfonse 

Kenya, meanwhile, announced Wednesda y- < AP > 

Tuesday that the Ugandan military k,u^! to ^ waste program to Sl<L 

government plann«l_ to sign , a of financing r^ 


illness, in Geneva. 


nia's Sierra Nevada mountains. 


The natural aperitif. 


tually powerless parliament just 
Outside Belfast 


The Associated Press 


*“ "**««“*“ Mail another British newspaper, as 

LONDON — The British gov- saying that Mr. Black bad bought a 
eminent refused Wednesday to in- 5 1 -percent stake in the Telegraph. 


Very Dry Sherry 


Leaders of the province's Protes- 
tant majority have expressed out- 
rage at the provision giving the 
Irish Republic, which has a mostly 
Catholic population, a say in pro- 
vincial affairs. They have not been 
mollified by tbe clause in the agree- 
ment that says Northern Ireland 
will remain British as long as tbe 
majority so wishes. 


tervene in tbe takeover of the Daily The takeover is expected to be 
Telegraph newspaper by Conrad completed by the end of this week 
Black, a Canadian industr ialist . Separately, Britain’s second-big- 


ack, a Canadian industr ialist . Separately, Britain’s second-big- 
Joumalists at the national news- gest tabloid, (be DaQy Minor, has 


juuiudusuai uic uauumu news- goi uinioiu. me L/auy tvurror, nas iwm uj sign a nn ^ 9nA ^ 

paper had asked Leon Britten, the Sounced an agreement with its peace agreement with the main Tuesday to “JS 

home secretary, to protect editorial unions to cut staff by about 25 guerrilla group on Friday to reunite as the Superfund, was 391-33. (HT) 

independence ii^Mr. Blade, 40, ac- percent and raise prodnetivity. the country. expiodt^ in a chmcli in Assisi, Italy, that contains tbe tiny 


quired a controlling interest 


It said Tuesday about 2,000 em- 


Mr. Paisley told Tbe Associated 
Press that his followers were unim- 
pressed by tbe promise of U.S. eco- 
nomic aid. 


But Mr. Britten said he had no ployees of the Mirror and its sister 
powers to intervene because Mr. papers, the Sunday Mirror and 

AZA ... - r* r * j n Li ij _ ’ ■ - 


Black did not own other British Sunday People, would give up their 


Nicholas Berry, a director erf the $47,000 each in addition 
paper, was quoted in the Daily pensions: 


jobs and. receive payoffs of. up to - 
$47,000 each in addition to their 


EgH Elected Swis* President 

‘ The Associated Press 

BERN —'Interior Minister AI- 
phons EgJi 61, was elected by Par- 
liament Wednesday to tbe cereroo- 


woodm chapel of SL Prands. The b^btog tfyW'SSSZSkS 

the defusing of an exp osrve device found near the tomb of Italv’s natron 
saint m another Assisi church. iimy s pairon 

. (Reuters) 


telks on the struggle against aDartheid in 


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STRASBOURG, ' France , 
Enzo Tortora, an Italian member 
of the European Parliament, las 
resigned, ghraag up his im m u ni ty 
, rom a lB*year prison sentence for 
drag and Mafia offerises m h is 
home country. 

Mr. Tortora. a member of Italy's 
Radical Party, bis consistently 
VTOdahaai his innocence. He said 
afto his resignation Tuesdajihal 
he intended to retum home toba* 
gm the sentence but vowed to fit." 
to dear hte name.: 

^television personaliiy 1 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1985 


Page 3 


’H 


Iowa Farmer’s 


By Andrew H. Malcolm 

f/gtv York Times Soviet 

HILLS, Iowa — When the radio news flashy 
across the snow-covered prairies Monday at the noon 
meal, it carried a bulletin that John Hughes, president 
of HIBs Bank arid Trust Co. had been shot and Hied 
One fanner just outride this town of 550 residents 
turned to his wife and said, “I wonder if it was Date 
Burr." 

It was. 

Mr. Burr, 63, a fanner whose financial troubles wett 
about to claim his land, his machinery, his stored 
grains and his quarter horses, went on a killing ram- 
page. shooting three people to death before commit-' 
ting suicide on a road near his home, 

ll was the latest in a series of violent outbursts 
across the American heartland that have left behind 
investigators, friends, neighbors and family attempt- 
ing to reconstruct and understand. 

In 1983, James Jenkins, a Minnesota fanner and his 
son, Steve, who had lost their land, cattle and credit 
rating lured Rudolph H. Blythe Jr n the local lumlr 
president, and his officer to the abandoned farm and 
killed them both before Ml Jenkins shot himself. 

Last year an armed Nebraska farmer, Arthur KiHr , 
was shot and killed after bolding police at bay for 
several hours. 



inKUUngSpree 


In the last three ' 

of banks and hundreds of rural businesses have Tailed. 
And, according to mental health counselors and rural 
advocates, numerous other potentially violent inci- 
dents are defused regularly by family, friends and 
mediators. 

Monday’s events began when Mr! Burr shot his 
wife, Emily, 40, as she apparently tried to prevent him 
from leaving home with his shotgun. 

Then Mr. Bun-left* noteat home and drove into 
town. At 1 1 :22 A-M-, he walked in the bade door of 
the modem bank on Main Street where his checking 
account was overdrawn^ 

He pulled the gun from inride bis overalls and fired 
one blast at Mr. Hughes’s head as the bank president, 
46, looked up. Mr. Burr then pointed the gun at two 
other bank officers, Dak Kretschmar and Roger Reil- 
ly, who froze. But die fanner did not fire. 

Mr. Burr drove east of town a few miles where a 
fanner saw him fire once into the air. 

At 11:35 A At, Mr. Burr entered the farmyard of 
Richard Goody, with whom he had had a minor i«nd 
dispute. As Mr. Goody, 36. greeted the visitor near 
some hog-feeding pens, Mr. Burr shot him twice. He 
also fired at Mr. Goody’s fleeing wife and six-year-old 
son, but missed. 

Ten mmntes later when David Henderson, a parso- 


pulled Mr. Burr onto the shoulder 
of a road near’bis home, a muffled blast from within 
the pickup crude signaled the fanner’s suicide, 

“It’s another tragedy," said Peter Zevenbergen, who 
runs several mental health programs near Hills. “It 
was bound to happen somewhere. And it’ll happen 
again, too." 

Dan Levitas of Prairiefire, a Des Moines group 
active in rural counseling and legal aid, said: “For 
many of these people, the hammer is coining down. 
They’re shell shocked. Many keep it aD inside. But 
now it's breaking out I'm afraid this violence is the 
beginning of what is to com&" 

When such modems erupt, along with a growing 
number of less publicized rural suiades, Mr. Levitas 
and others say they can almost predict from experi- 
ence the characteristics: a fanner of any age above 35, 
a strong family man, devout churchgoer, well-liked by 
friends but quiet. 

Typically the man. the son and grandson of farmers 
on the same land with family reputations for hard 
work, is not thought to be in fmanrinl trouble until 
after the incident 

Typically, the wife has confided the mounting fi- 
nancial and emotional pressures to dose friends or 
family, who profess shock and offer support. Then, 


shortly before the incident, the husband seems re- 
lieved about something. 

Such was the case of Mr. Burr. The farmer was 
willing to chat, friends recalled, but only for a moment 
because be always seemed on the way to somewhere. 
The Burrs were members of Our Redeemer Lutheran 
Church in Iowa City, right miles ( 1 3 kilometers) north 
of Hills, in eastern Iowa. Their main social activity was 
a card dub. 

Mi. Buit fanned around 600 acres (242 hectares) 
with his son, John, 39. Courthouse records show that 
while few thought Mr. Burr was in financial trouble, 
be had debts exceeding $800,000, many of them due 
last Friday. 

“You get so’s you don't know where to turn," said a 
bank customer who asked not to be identified. “And 
the banks push harder. And killing’s wrong but every 
man has his breaking p o i nt." 

Mr. Hughes was widdy eulogized as a fine family 
man, active in many civic causes, a successful aggres- 
sive businessman who had built the Hills bank into a 
profitable institution with more than 5200 million in 
assets, despite bis town’s small size. 

State officials, who have closed 1 1 Iowa banks this 
year, compared to three in 1984, said the Hills bank 
was not in difficulty, largely because it has a small 
portfolio of agricultural loans. 


U.S. Jury Says Spy Gave 
Encoder Design to Soviet 


- > By Ruth Marcus 

r ■«. MuUngrtm Fast Service 

Washington — a new in- 

diriment charges that Jerry A 
..... .7^- Whitworth, a defendant in the 

Walker family spy case, passed to 
*"?' the Soviet Union technical manuals 
and design plans Tor the machines 
r.'J used to encode sensitive material 

- T , that would enable Moscow to read 

. ” • secret U.S. Navy communications. 

The indictment, issued Tuesday 
by a U.S. grand jury in San Fran- 
cisco, is the fourth against Mr. 
Whitworth, 46, a retired navy com- 
. , . , munications specialist 

in L j According to the indictment, he 
"'"passed on the information as re- 
cently as June 1983, while he was 
»)£. /''S senior chief radioman aboard the' 

• 'aircraft carrier Enterprise. While 

codes are chang ed daily, the coding 
machines themselves are not modi- 
fied frequently. 

UJS. Attorney Joseph P. Russon- 
i irik> said the indictment was the 
*V “result of new evidence which was 

* £“ not previously available to the 

grand jury." A source familiar with 
the case said the new evidence was 
from John Anthony Walker Jr., 
who pleaded guilty to espionage 


assessing the damage that might 
have beat done by the Walker ring. 

James T. Bush, associate director 
of the Center for Defense Informa- 
tion in Washington, said “If you've 
got the machine and the key Hats, 
then you’ve got everything. Then 
you've got a total breakdown of 
security.” 

Tony Tamburdlo, one of Mr. 
Whitworth’s lawyers, said the new 
indictment “obviously cranes from 
what John Walker has said," and 
denounced the information in it as 
untrustworthy. The attorney ac- 
cused the government of “making a 
deal with a shark to go after a 
minnow." 

Mr. Walker, 48, and his son. Sea- 
man Michael Lance Walker, 23, 
have pleaded guilty to espionage, 
and John Walker’s brother, Arthur 
J. Walker, 51. a retired heu tenant 
commander, was convicted of espi- 
onage. 



FAR OUT SPACE SHOT — The outermost ring of the 
planet Uranus was dearly visible for the first time in 
photographs taken 44 9 million miles away by the UR 
apace craft Voyager 2 and computer-enhanced by the 
Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. 


House Votes Decisively In Favor of Bill 
Modifying U.S. Farm Credit System 


Washington Pass Service 

WASHINGTON — The House 
of Representatives has voted over- 
whelmingly fra- a bill designed to 
reorganize the Farm Credit System 
and offer last-resort federal finan- 
dal support to the country’s largest 
agricultural lender. 

The House passed the bill, 393- 
32, Tbesday after sponsors made 
last-minute changes sought by the 
Reagan adminis tration. These re- 
quire that any bailout money for 
the system must go through the 
regular congressional appropria 
tions process. 

The bill now goes to a conference 
committee to resolve differences 
between the House and Senate ver- 
sions. The chief difference involves 
composition of a capital corpora- 
tion board that would oversee re- 
allocation of the Farm Credit Sys- 
tem's assets. 

E. dels Garza, Democrat of Tex- 
as, who is chairman of the House 
Agriculture Committee, conceded 


UNICEF Calls for New Marshall Plan to Aid Africa 




Oct. 28 and was in San Francisco 
^ last week to testify before the grand 

JU The earlier indictments of Mr. 
^ /Whitworth alleged that he gave Mr. 

• Walker “key Hsts" and “key cards" 
- -that are changed daily and used 

i with encryption machines to en- 

^ code and decode sensitive mes- 

* sages. Tuesday’s indictment indi- 
cates for the first time that the 
material allegedly passed by the 
Walker ring included details about 

■, —^electronic coding, machines. This 
suggests that the Russians would 
have been able to build replicas of 
, . .the machines. 

j'Mtl l The chief of naval operations. 
~ Admiral James D. Watkins, said in 

- - a briefing in June that the design of 

- - : - : -'5rane secret communications gear 

"probably has been lost” to the 
- ' Soviet Union. A top Pentagon offi- 
rial said at the time that the navy’s 
worst-case scenario was that Mos- 
: sow could have received manuals 
- -wi fh* ending m-iehines thernsriv es. 

• The coding gear used by the navy 
s similar to that employed by the 
irmy, air force and marine corps, 
.recording to sources. The Defense 

• { ijjih^Pepartmem announced in June 

* ' - hat all the military services were 


The Associated Press 

NAIROBI — A new version rtf 
the Marshall Plan is to pre- 
vent Africa from “staggering from 
one crisis to another," according to 
a report on African children by the 
United Nations Children’s Fund. 

The report, called “Within Hu- 
man Reach: A Future Fra Africa's 
Children,” was released Wednes- 
day. It said that the flow of famine 
relief aid over the past year should 
be converted into merrased,. long- 
term financial support 

As with the original Marshall 
Plan, a program of U.S. aid to 
Western Europe after World War 


H, aid should be provided to Afri- 
can countries according to their in- 
dividual needs, the report said. 

Without' such finance, it said, 
“African countries will be forced 
into a positianof oapg^'ng from 
one crisis to another, Anriing them- 
selves less well equipped to meet 
new problems after new disasters." 

In a foreword to the report, 
fhatli Kane; Senegal’s planning 
minister, said that under existing 
development programs “many Af- 
ricans are being saved from death 
rally to be thrust into permanent 
dependency." 

He said austerity measures and 


economic adjustments demanded 
by foreign lenders derive from an 
overriding preoccupation with in- 
ternational monetary concerns and 
are consequently unlikely to bring 
improvements to Africa. 

According to statistics in the re- 
port, at least 25 percent of the 67 
milli on children in sub-Saharan 
Africa are malnourished, and the 
.region contains 15 of the 20 coun- 
tries with the world’s highest infant 
mortality, rates. 

The report listed six areas where 
programs should be focused, to 
meet basic human needs and en- 
courage sustained development: 


• Achieving self-reliance in food 
production. 

• Expanding and improving ba- 
sic services such as health care, wa- 
ter supply and education. 

• Recognizing the role of wom- 
en, who perform much of Africa’s 
agricultural labor, and expanding 
programs to meet their needs, 

• Protecting the environment, 
particularly in dry areas where the 
soil has degraded. 

• Promoting greater local re- 
sponsibility fra development. 

• Ensuring that any new eco- 
nomic programs protect the poor 
and do not impede long-term 
growth. 


Guatemala’s New Leader: Survivor With a Mission 


Philanthropist, 
Wife Robbed in 
Central Park 


New York nines Service 

• NEW YORK — George T. 

• Delacorte, 92, the phflanthro- 
: pist who has expressed his love 

for New York City with such 
gifts as the Delacorte Theater 
and a bronze Alice in Wonder- 
land statue in Central Park, has 
been robbed in the park. 

Mr. Delacorte said he and bis 
• - wife, Valerie, 66. had been 
. about to enter tbe numel lead- 
^ ing to the Children’s Zoo, when 

. they were stopped Tuesday 
> morning by two young men, 
one of whom bad a knife. 

Mr. Delacorte gave them 
; 5200 from Ins wallet, and said. 

. they took his wife’s mink coat, 
valued at 55,500. Mrs. Dda- 
arte received a superficial stab 
- wound on her hand. 

Mr. Ddacorle has enjoyed 
- " - wasting that be has never been 
he victim of a crime in the city 
' where he grew up and raised his 
iildren. He still occasionally 
■ides the subway. 

“1 have walked through the 
every day for 60 years" 
^'■aid Mr. Delacorte, who made 
tis fortune as the founder of 
r ;|3ell Publishing Co. The ind- 
lent will not deter him from his 
i'i egular walks, he said. 

„■} * i‘ :■ V 


New York Times Service 

GUATEMALA CITY —Marco 
Vuudo Cerezo, of the Christian 
Democratic Party, who was the 
overwhelming victor this week in 
Guatemala's presidential election, 
carries the hopes ofhis countrymen 
as no leader has in more than three 
decades. 

Mr. Cerezo, who will be 43 on 
Dec. 26, is a liberal with an indc- 
ident mind in a country long 
.ted by rightist military offi- 
cers. 

In an environment of ruthless 
terror, he has not only survived but 
has built the most effective nation- 
wide political organization the 
country has seen in years. 

At least three attempts have been 
made to kill Mr. Cerezo, all during 
the government of General Fernan- 
do Romeo Lucas Garda under 
whose rale death squads claimed 
thousands of lives. 

In an attack in January 1980, Mr. 
Cerezo and his bodyguards fought 
a 10-minute gun battle with snipers 
who opened fire as he stepped from 
his party office. Two people wore 
killed, one of them a pedestrian, 
and Mr. Cerezo later counted 37 
bullet boles in the armored jeep 
behind which he took cover. 

Another assassination attempt 
came when a large squad of uni- 
formed policemen stormed a hotel 
where Mr. Cerezo was staying in 
central Guatemala City. The third 
was a bazooka assault against his 
father’s home, where he was tem- 
porarily living. Mr. Cerezo esti- 



Marco Vinicio Cerezo 


mates be has lived in 25 different 
houses in the last five years. 

After the first attempt on his life, 
Mr. Cerezo sent his wife and four 
children out of the country. They 
have lived on the outskirts of 
Washington since 1980. 

Political terror during the Lucas 
government took the lives of the 
country’s two leading ci vilian poli- 
ticians, Alberto Fuentes Mohr, the 
former foreign minister, and Ma- 
nuel Cdom Aigueta. a former 
mayor of the capital. Many Guate- 
malans believe that if either ha d 
lived Mr. Cerezo might not have 
reached the presidency. 

Although ne has been a leading 
activist in the Christian Democrat- 


ic Party since bis student days, Mr. 
Cerezo acknowledges that he is not 
bound by party orthodoxy. Diplo- 
mats and others place him in the 
party's left wing, and he says he 
was attracted to the Christian 
Democrats “in pan because they 
don’t have a ngid political doc- 
trine.” 

As a former secretary of organi- 
zation fra the Christian Democrats, 
Mr. Cerezo has traveled widely in 
every region of Guatemala. Al- 
though five years ago be was borety 
known to the public, today be is the 
key figure in wbat inevitably will be 
a torturous trek toward democracy. 

Mr. Cerezo was bran in the capi- 
tal. His father, Marco Vinido Cer- 
ezo Sierra, was a lawyer who went 
on to become a member of Guate- 
mala's Supreme Court. 

An uncle, Celso Cerezo, was the 
youngest member of Guatemala's 
first freely elected legislature in the 
1940s, winning election at the age 
of 21. A grandfather was a political 
activist who was poisoned at the 
age of 36, apparently for opposing 
the dictator Jorge Ubico, and a 
great-grandfather was wounded 
while fighting to ovenhrow an ear- 
lier dictator, Manuel Estrada Ca- 
brera, in 1921. 

Guatemala lived through 10 


years of democracy between 1944 
and 1954, until a coup planned by 
American officials re-established 
military role. Atthe lime, the Unit- 
ed States feared the leftward drift 
of the elected Guatemalan govern- 
ment. 

Mr. Cerezo said that the coup, 
which look place when he was not 
yet 12 years old, was “a crucial 
moment in my life." 

“I remember sitting in a tree 
watching the rebel planes fly over.' 
he said. “1 thought to myself that 
this was going to mean very bad 
times for our family and fra Guate- 
mala. That was when 1 decided it 
was the right thing to dedicate my- 
self to the cause of democracy.*' 

Mr. Cerezo began his rise to 
prominence while he was in law 
school at the University of San 
Carlos here. At one protest demon- 
stration he attended, a law student, 
Raqud Blandon, burned a copy of 
a controversial electoral law in 
front of the national palace. As 
police moved in, Mr. Cerezo helped 
rescue her. They became friends 
and were married in 1965. 

Accenting to Mr. Cerezo’s asso- 
ciates, his wife is a brilliant think er, 
eclipsing Mr. Cerezo himself. Ene- 
mies say she is a leftist who strong- 
ly influences her husband. 


CHRISTMAS 

•DREAM 

Cashmere and s;:K 
for ladies and men 

Alexandre Savin's 
collection 


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2. me cFAgnesseau 
angle 60. Faubourg St-Hooort 
• PARIS P • 


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Page 4 


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1985 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


Pobtiabcd Vi* The New York Timm *nd The W aUiingtfl e Port 


A Suggestion for a Poster 


tribune The News From OPEC Couldn’t Be Better 


A powerful anti-war poster fhai Americans 
saw everywhere in 1970 showed bodies heaped 
in tiie Vietnamese village of My Lai. The 
caption was terse, taken from an inquiry 
into that massacre perpetrated by Americans: 
“Q. And babies? A. And babies. 1 ’ 

No such postern draw attention to the ghast- 
ly, deliberate crippling of children, by Soviet 
invaders in Afghanistan. Indeed, having 
grown skeptical of presidential anecdotes, 
some people may wonder if Ronald Reagan* 
was tflTHng through Iris evil-empire hat when 
be accused Russians of sowing insmgoit areas 
with bombs disguised as toys. But the evidence 
is not anecdotal The evil is real 

It ties exposed in a report to the United 
Nations Ccomrisnon on Human Rights- This 
inquiry, the first ever by the United Nations 
into abases chatged against a Communist 
state, seems to have been scrupulously con- 
ducted by an Austrian legal expert, Felix Er- 
macora. Barred f ro m Afghanistan, he gathered 
incontrovertible testimony of the slaughter of 
civilians from Afghans who fled to Pakistan. 

The report asserts: “The most horrible type 
of incident was that caused by the explosion of 
anti-personnel mines and especially of ch2- 
drcn’s “toys.’ Many witnesses testified that 
children had been very seriously wounded, 
having their bands or feet blown off, either by 
handling booby-trap toys they had picked up 


Law Rules in Argentina 


The verdicts of the federal appeals court in 
Argentina are a ringing assertion of the rule of 
lawandpublic morality. On Monday the court 
found five defendants guilty of crimes com- 
mitted when they were miming the country. It 
sentenced two. including a former president, 
to life in prison. The acquittal of four other 
defendants is generating further co atro versym 
Argentina; after all. in seven years, from 1976 
to 1983, some 9,000 people disappeared, most, 
of them murdered in military prisons. But the 
coart showed discrimination in assessing the 
evidence against each of these men, and the 
salutary influence of this example of justice 
will reach far beyond Argentina. 

The generals and admrralu chonied, by way 
of defending themselves, that they were saving 
the country from omwimimsm and revolution. 
Urban guerrillas and subversives were not a 
figment of (he generals' imaginatio n. They 
killed dozens of people in the eszly and middle 
1970s and succeeded in bring in g revolution of 
a sort — bringing to power their enemies in the 
military, who embarked on a hysterical and 
vengeful campaign not only against radical 
gunmen but also, as time passed, against al- 
most anyone who held any opinion that the 
generals and admirals took to be unarthodox. 


To defend even the most rudimentary concept 
of dvfl ri ghts put a person in dire jeopardy. 
Officers thought of all opposition as co mm u- 
nism, and to stamp it out they wn ggpri ju 
endless brutality, torture and murder. Among 
the great achievements of thin long trial is an 
accurate public record of what happened. 

An enduri n g inanity has it that authoritar- 
ian government, whatever its defects in princi- 
ple, is at least strong and efficient. For seven 
years the junta ran down a national economy 
that is potentially one of the world’s richest. It 
rolled up the gigantic foreign debts with which 
the country now struggles. It spent lavishly on 
its aimed forces and started a war in the 
Falklauds in which it was rapidly defeated. 

The democratic government of President 
Raftl Alfonsin has led the country into drastic 
economic reforms, of a sort that the junta 
always dodged for being unpopular. It has 
given its predecessors a fair tnal with scrupu- 
lous regard to high standards of justice; under 
the junta’s standards, all of these men would 
have been shot in a barracks basement without 
so much as a magistrate’s hearing. Argentina’s 
democracy is providing a memorable demon- 
stration of moral courage and strength. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Special Confused Forces 

r 


Dan Daniel chairman of the readiness sub- 
committee of the House Armed Services Com- 
mittee. is making trouble, and a good thing, 
too. The Virginia Democrat was deeply shaken 
by the military’s performance in tire Iran res- 
cue mission and the Grenada invasion. The 
services were given separate pieces of the ac- 
tion but could not put their pieces together 
effectively. Command was fractured, and so 
lives were lost and the mission encumbered. 
Mr. Daniel bounced several possible remedies 
off (he Pentagon, got uo adequate response 
and is now working up an idea of his own. 

His subcommittee is considering legislation 
in effect to break off a part of the Pentagon — 
the part devoted to anti-terrorism and counter- 
insurgency missions, among others — and to 
set it up as a separate entity. He would take the 
army’s Delta Force and Green Berets, the 
navy’s Seals and some army and air force air 
units, df^efa them from their home services 
and park them in a new unified command (a 
Defense Special Operations Agency) under a 
single civilian chief reporting directly to the 
secretary of defense. The idea would be to have 
special forces that worked right. 


Washington's many astute students and 
passionate defenders of military turf will tdl 
you instantly what is wrong vnth tins plan. It is 
a legislative (translation: congresskmally co- 
erced) solution. It deals with just part of a 
much larger problem of military organization. 
It treats as a separate function special opera-, 
tious that should not be divorced from regular 
structures and operations. It solves one dilem- 
ma of command and control by creating an- 
other. It ignores the requirement of strong 
military leadership. And so on. 

It would be nice to have a dollar for every 
memo that is going to be written to throttle 
this proposal in the crib. The services are eager 
to retain, if they cannot expand, their separate 
missions, and they are always leery of new 
proposals that threaten their famDiar turf. Bat 
Mr. Daniel has zeroed in on a situation ih«t 
everyone bemoans and no one will grasp. If the 
Pentagon is going to resist his proposal it 
comes under a burden to offer abetter one. In 
Beirut there were six layers of command. The 
commander on the ground literally did not 
know whom he was reporting to. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


A Polish Visitation From Space 

President Reagan said to schoolchildren 
that he had told Mr. Gorbachev at their Gene- 
va talks that the Russians and Americans 
would forget their differences and join forces if 
the Earth were invaded by aliens from outer 
space. And one alien did arrive from outer 
space. General Jaruzelslri was seen floating 
down the Seine in a bateau mouche, inspecting 
the Eiffel Tower through his dark glasses. 

The astonishment in France and throughout 
the West could not have been greater if the 


general had alighted at Orly from a flying 
saucer. President Mitterrand had succumbed 
to a very French impulse to amaze the world. 

There is a seductive argument that to wel- 
come Genera] Jaruzdskj back into the West’s 
definition of “polite society” would allow him 
to be more liberal at home. The British and 
Americans see no evidence for this. Neither, 
I would bet, does President Mitterrand. He 
merely wanted to show that France can reach 
targets in outer space — which is where the 
general will for the most part remain. 

— Neal Ascherson in The Observer (London). 


FROM OUR DEC. 12 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: JonniaintBSpoirfRooseveb 
NEW YORK — The Gridiron Club of news- 
paper correspondents, whose specialty is to 
invite to a banquet political edduities to be 
bantered, held a successful feast [on Dec. llj. 
While President Taft and sodk 300 other poli- 
ticians enjoyed dinner, the club edified them 
with skits. Scarcely had Mr. Taft taken his seat 
when his attention was called to a procession 
of the politically maimed pasting across the 
platform in representation erf the retreat from 
Moscow. The column was headed by an indi- 
vidual in a khaki uniform, wearing large eye- 
glasses and a tawny moustache and mounted 
on a tired charger branded “T.R." Theodore 
Roosevelt, by the way, did not attend. 


1935: Cabinet to Resign in Egypt 
CAIRO — The Cabinet headed by Nessim 
Pasha decided to resign after Sir Miles Lamp- 
son, the British High Commissioner, declared 
to the premier that the British government is 
opposed to the restoration of the 1923 Consti- 
tution. As all political parties are now united 
for the return of the Constitution, the Cabinet 
will tender its resignation to King Fuad. The 
petition of the National Front asking the King 
to restore the Constitution will also be presenir 
ed. It is expected that the King will ask former 
Premier Nahas Pasha, leader erf the Wafd, to 
form a Cabinet Despite the Cabinet’s an- 
nouncement, rioting was resumed [on Dec. 11J" 
and spread to all parts of the dty. 


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Co-Chairmen 


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Executive Bator RENE BONDY Dowry P&hsker 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Associate Publisher 

Depot? Editor RICHARD HL MORGAN Aaodate PiiOAer 


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along the roadway or by stepping on them ... 

"The types of booby-trap toys encountered 
include those resembling pens, harmonicas, 
radios or matchboxes, ami httie bombs shaped 
like a bird. This type erf bomb, consisting of 
two wings, me flexible and the other rigid, in 
the shape and colors of a bird, explodes when 
the flexible wing is torched. The Special Rap- 
portenr was also able to obtain a number of 
photographs, especially those of children be- 
tween 8 and 15 years of age, with hands or tag? 
blown off, rather by handing booby-trap toys 
or daring the explosion of mines.” 

To the generalized horror of a war that has 

claimed 500,000 lives since 1979, there is thus 
added the special horror of toys of death. No 
wonder the Soviet bloc tries to defame the 
messenger. It contends that Mr. Ermacora is 
pro-Nazi because he served Hillert army as a 
private. Tellingly, Moscow found nothing 
wrong with his credentials when he preseated 
reports about human rights abases in Chile 
and Smith Africa. The issue is not Mr. Ermft- 
cora but the validity of his charges. 

If they are false or exaggerated, why not 
open Afghanistan to independent observers'? 
As long as this dirty war is sealed from sight, 
someone should photograph those manned 
youngsters and plaster posters everywhere: 
“Q. And children? A Especially children." 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


W ASHINGTON — OPEC has thrown in the 
towel, abandoning its effort of the past 
few years to prop up prices by cutting produc- 
tion. Instead the cartel has deckled to fi gh t for 
what it calls “a fair share” of world markets. 

That foreshadows a price war with non-OPEC 
producers like the North Sea bloc and Mexico, 
resulting in world economic growth and huge 
benefit to consumers. It reverses the process set 
in motion when, between 1973 and 1979, OPEC 
raised die price of dQ in a series of “shocks" from 
around S3 a barrel to S34. That threw the world 
economy into a turmoil of recession and debt 
crisis from which it has yet to emerge. 

The Saadi oil minister, Ahmed Zaki Yamam, 
forecasts a drop from the current $ 28 -per-barrel 
benchmark to $18 by August. Says Philip Yer- 
legcr, an analyst with Charles River Associates of 
Washington, "I think he’s right — maybe more.” 

In the face of this incredibly good news, there 
are naysayas who would have us believe that the 
price of OH can drop too quickly and somehow 
pose as much of a danger to the global economy 
as did the earlier pike surges. 

That the change is traumatic for people in ihe 
oil business goes without saying. Mr. Verieger 
calculates that in the first few days since the 
OPEC decision the drop in spot oil prices has 
caused a S 12-billion loss in & value of inven- 
tories of oil and oil products. 

cite the effects on Third Wo^ddebtt* countries 
that produce oQ. like Mexico. Bui lower prices 
will help other Third World debtor countries that 
are oil buyers, tike BraziL 
Lawrence A. Goldman tz, president of the Eco- 
nomics and Science Wanni ng firm of Washing- 
ton, points out that while a 20-percent drop 
in international ofl prices would cost Mexico 
S3 billion in export earnings, it would lidy drop 
interest rates fay 2 percent, saving Mexico about 
$2 biOian cm its nearly $100 billion in debt. 

Mexico, like other nations, would benefit from 
a boost in economic growth stimulated by lower 
ofl. prices and a dip in interest rates. In fact, Iowa 


By Hobart Rowen 

prices could be the catalytic factor reviving the 
European economies ana stimulating expansion 
in Japan and mast of the industrialized world. 

Paces are still high, despite a 25-p«cenl slide 
in the average dollar price since the 19S1 peak. At 
$28 a barrel Morgan Guaranty Bank points out, 
real prices, relative to prices of other world 
products, are within a hair of the peak. 

Don’t ay for OPEC The glut — a world 
awash with crude oil capacity — was created b y 
greed. When OPEC pushed up prices after 1973 
with no regard for the effect onthe world econo- 
my, it set off a wave of exploration and conserva- 
tion that spelled OPEC’s doom. _ , 

When Iraq and Iran went to war, diminishing 

the quickly available supply of ofl, the ramming 

members of the cartel could not be restrained: 
They gouged the consuming nations and shot 
OPEC production up to 31 million barrels a day 
in 1979. Now the real world has caught up with 
OPEC, whose production has plunged this year 
to 17 nwHy m barrels a day. Non-OPEC produc- 
tion, which was only 21 million bands a day m 
1979, will he 26.4 million bands this year. In 
sum, OPEC has been pumping only 39 patent of 
total production, down from 60 percent in 1979. 

Those eloquent numbers have dictated the 
carteTs new strategy. Instead of trying to boost 
prices by bolding <ja off the market, OPEC now 
wants to sell more, even if it has to accept lower 


prices, “It’s been something we wanted to do 
but haven’t been bold enough M say.*' Nigeria's 
oil minister. Tam David-west, told The Wall 
Street Journal in Geneva. “Nobody here wants 
OPEC to serve as the world's marginal oil sup- 

S lier any longer ... A fair market-share for 
►PEC is the one you go out and take.” 

Well, that should be plenty interesting. Huge 
gains in stock and bona prices and a plunge in 
energy futures suggest that industry and finan- 
cial experts look for only oneway for oil prices to 
go: down sharply, along with interest rates. 

Not everybody agrees. John Lichtblau. head of 
Petroleum Industry Research Associates, says 
that the 520-a-band price mentioned by many 
analysts is possible but not assured. 

But unless Sheikh Yamani and friends can sign 
up Margaret Thatcher, the Mexicans and the 
other producers for membership in OPEC the 
prices of oil and oil products are gang down. It is 
the best economic news in a long time. 

The Washington Post. 


mm 


Against American Intervention in Angola’s War 


N EW YORK. — The new global- 
ism, it could be called. It is the 
most important conceptual move- 
ment in American foreign policy in 
years. It comes from the source df so 
much Reagan ad mini s tra tion think- 
ing, the ideological right 
The concept is this: The United 
States should intervene in wars in the 
Third World whenever there is a 
chance to fight Soviet or Marxist in- 
fluence. It should do so all around the 
world, without regard to particular 
local conditions. Constraints on 
American power, too. must yield to 
the ideological imperative. 

The doctrine can be seen in its 
purest farm in the current effort to 
involve the United States in the civil 
war m Angola. UK intervention 
would have no chance of resolving 
the war. It would do enormous dam- 
age to American interests in the re- 
gum. Yet a chorus of voces on the 

ri ght, fnfffllftftftml »nil jVilitiMT J is UTg- 

in ^Araenca^o n into Anpola. 

York has made hims elf the principal 
spokesman of the campaign to inter- 
vene in Angola. Abul he sponsors 
would give $27 million in humanitar- 
ian aid to Janas Savimhf s UNITA 
guerrillas for toar fight against the 
Marxist g overnment and toe 30,000 
Cuban troops supporting iL 
South Africa, has kept toe Savimbi 
forces alive for the last 10 years, sup- 
plying them and repeatedly sending 
Us own military into Angola. So the 
obvious objection to American aid is 
that it would connect toe United 
States to the white South African 
regime, hated by the majority of its 
own people and most other Africans. 
How does Mr. Kemp deal with that 
problem? His answer tells us a good 
deal about toe intellectual founda- 
tion of the new riohaHsm. 

If toe United States gave financial 
support, Mr. Kemp writes, “UNITA 
need not rely on South Africa.” In 
other words, America would entirely 
replace South Africa as supplier and 
supporter of the Savimbi forces. 


By Anthony Lewis 


Mr. Kemp envisage a UJS. role of 
that kind? If not, what does he mean 
when he says that UNITA would not 
have to rdy on South Africa? 

Geography is another little prob- 
lem. The Savimbi forces are based in 
southern Angola. The only realistic 
way to supply them is from Sooth 
Africa. Does Mr. Kemp see toe Unit- 
ed States acting as supplier from 
South African territory? And does be 
think this would go unnoticed by the 
rest of Africa? Does be think die 
United States could escape being 
regarded as a partner of the white 
regime? Does be have any idea how 
Africans would fed about that? 

Then there are military realities. 
Moscow has supplied large amounts 
of weapons; the Cubans are there in 


large numbers. Does Mri Kemp think 
US. intervention would wish all that 
away? What limits would be pul on 
U.S. involvement? How far into the 

^^ifiemort curious^ feature of the 
new globalism, as the right would 
apply it in Angola, is its reliance an 
war to advance American interests 
and vahietb But the United States is 
so much more effective in other ways. 
It is, specifically, in Angola. 

In recent years the Angolan gov- 
ernment, for all its formal adherence 
to Marnsm, has opened itself to 
Western trade and investment. It re- 
lies on American ofl companies oper- 
ating there, and treats them wdL Its 
officials make plain that they are dis- 
illusioned with Soviet-style econom- 


ics. Angola is ready to move in Amer- 
ica’s direction — u the war ends. 

The Angolans have told the United 
States in negotiations that they are 
ready to start sending the Cubans 
home if South Africa will finally 
agree to a settlement in Namibia. 
Thai is the way — the only way — to 
reduce Cuban and Soviet influence. 

Jade Kemp's argument for getting 
the United States into the Angolan 
war is striking in its remoteness from 
the military, political diplomatic and 
psychological realities. Everything 
must yield to ideology. A superpower 
may indeed have reason to play a part 
in this or that regional conflict But it 
depends on particular risks and op- 
portunities: on facts. Facts are incon- 
veniences brushed aside by the ideo- 
logues of the new globalism. 

The New York Tunes. 


For American Intervention in Angola 


W ASHINGTON — Jonas Sa- 
vimbi helped liberate Angola 
from Portuguese colonialism m 1975. 
Now he is fighting to free Angola 
from Soviet- and Cuban-backed 
forces that seized the government in 
the vacuum left by FortugaL America 
has a duty to assist this struggle for 
Angolan freedom and independence. 

Angola's government is propped 
up by more than 30.000 Cuban mer- 
cenaries and 12,000 Soviet and other 
East bloc advisers and personnel It 


.By Jack Kemp 

The writer Is a Republican 
representative from New York. 

has violated the human rights of its 
political prisoners with torture, pro- 
longed detention and arbitrary death 
penalties. It controls the trade 
unions, practices forced labor, en- 
forces censorship and recognizes the 
legality of only one, Marxist party. . 

Mr. Savimbi received no hop from 


cated weapons, sent planes to bomb 
the Angolan anny, sent troops hun- 
dreds of miles into the country. Does 


The Last Time Around It Didn’t Work 

T HE people who are promoting an encore in Angola ought to get hold of 
“In Search of Enemies’' by John Stockwdl, toe inside account of toe 
original fiasco. Mr. Stockwell was chief of the CIA’s Angola Task Faroe. 
Describing the effect of a Washington Frist story in 1975 that revealed the 
presence of South African troops fighting with UNITA, he writes: “The 
propaganda and political war was lost in that stroke. There was nothing the 
Lusaka station [CIA headquarters in Zambia,wbere the war was run] could 
invent would be as to the other side as oar atlmiop. with the 

hated South Africans was to our cause.” Now Wadnngtoa is poised to renew 
that alliance with the South Africans in Angola. The chances that we will do it 
again — squander millions erf dollars, hear hundreds of lies and Turn coantless 
fives — are 50-50. Too many officeholder these days, when faced with a 
problem, begin by asking themselves, "What would Rambo do?” 

— Columnist Mary McGrory in The Washington Past. / 


Reagan 9 s Line Is Containment Plus 


W ASHINGTON — Contem- 
porary American conserva- 
tism is haunted by toe ghost of 
Robert Taft's foreign policy. 

The late senator’s doctrine has 
not had a large conservative follow- 
ing for nearly four decades, since 
the days, after the Berlin blockade 
and the coop in Prague m 1948, 
when conservatives jotned Demo- 
crats in an activist, interventionist, 
“globalist'' consensus. During toe 
Vietnam War. Democrats defected 
in droves, moving toward Taft’s 
skepticism about UJS. capacities. 

Now Christopher Layne, writing 
in Foreign Policy, approvingly calls 
Taft's Republican doctrine “real" 
conservatism and depicts Reagan- 
ism as a replay of toe Cold War 
“globalism” of toe 1950s. 

Mr. Layne says correctly that un- 
der Mr. Reagan the idea of “global 
containment" is making a crane- 
back. Actually, it is “postwar policy 
plus.” and the pins is crucial. 

Mr. Layne says the Reagan doc- 
trine “does not differentiate be- 
tween what is vital and what is 
merely desirable.” But Mr. Layne 
misunderstands the costs of the un- 
dertakings he criticizes, and be has 

his own trouble differentiating. 


By George F. Wfll 

able dent in the deficit by eliminat- 
ing the trickles of aid to insurgen- 
cies in Afghanistan, Nicaragua, 
Cambodia, Angola. But small U.S. 
investments can have magnificent 
multiplier effects, multiplying the 
Soviet costs erf aggression. 

Mr. Layne says that “real conser- 
vatives” dunk geopolitical! y, not 
ideologically. But bis geopolitical 
thinking is murky. He is at once 
laconic and eye-opening when he 
says that “America’s strategic posi- 
tion obviously would be less com- 
fortable if Mexico turned pro- Sovi- 
et." There is something mannered 
about the phrase “Ira comfort- 
able.” And his formulations con- 
tain many nullifying modifiers. 

For example, be says that real 
conservatives “know that viral 
American interests are not engaged 
in Afghanistan, Angola, Cambodia 
and similar TTuid world hot spots." 
And they know that “there is no 
Third World region or country 


do not believe that U. S. interests 
are threatened by Sandmist domes- 
tic policies “in mid of themselves.” 

Here is indeed the nub of (he 
difference The crux erf the Reagan 
doctrine is that a Communist re- 
gime's domestic policies cannot be 
considered “in and of themselves.” 
They are part of a seamless web of . 
aggressive behavior, a single dy- 
namic of aggression against captive 
subjects and vulnerable n»tinm«. 

The president believes that “his- 
tory has shown thal democratic na- 
tions do not start wars." His as- 
sumption is that remmes~respectful 
of fundamental personal rights will 
be shaped by the popular win and 
hence wifi lack an aggressive dispo- 
ation. His premise —r that the pop- 
ular wfp is generally pacific — is 
questionable in particular cases, - 
such as 1914. batis true enough. 

Mr. Layne believes that adher- 
ents to the Reagan doctrine have 
fallen into a “tune warp that has 
transported them back to the early 
1950s." He means that they have 
not accommodated thor thinking 


whose loss would decisively tip ’toe,-, to the retire decline of U.S. power 
superpower balance against Ameri- and to the lessons of Vietnam. But 
ca." And that “the loss of Central Mr. Layne, who counts George 
America would not decisively affect Kerman among the "reaT censer- . 




icy erf global containment — by 
which the writer means primarily 
supporting anti-Communist insur- 
gencies — “can bankrupt Ameri- 
ca." But the cost or such support is 
trivial especially compared to the 
cost of strategic and conventional 
forces that comprise the essential 
deterrent that Mr. Layne supports. 

President Reagan’s military 
spending is below toe postwar 
norm as a percentage of GNP and 
of federal spending. So it is peculiar 
of Mr. Layne to say that “deficits 
and strategic overextension are 
really two sides of the.same corn.” 

You could not make "a measur- 


flroching, in toe form of modifiers: 
“vital” “decisively," “core." 

Obviously no single Third Wcdd 
problem, considered alone, is cru- 
cial Equally obviously, such prob- 
lems cannot be considered alraie. 

The Reagan doctrine, as Mr. 
Layne characterizes it, is that US. 
security requires an “ideologically 
congenial world." Hence the Unit- 
ed States must try to build “Ameri- 
can -style democracies” in Third 
World countries. Mr. Layne says 
that “reaT conservatives believe. 
For example that Nicaragua should 
not be allowed to become a Soviet 
satellite exporting revolution, but 


The Reagan doctrine is “cootam : 
meat pins.” It is the postwar policy 
Of. containment, plus two insigfcts.. 
The first is that toe original exposi- 
tion of containment —by Mr. Ken- 
nan nearly 40 years ago ~ was too 
sanguine in hoping total Russian - 
culture would mefiow the Soviet' 
regime. The second is toat mere' 
containment is therefore too pas- 
sive. Ii is too compatible with. toe 
Brezhnev doctrine, ' which bolds 
ihat^So^g^arain«vQ^}l&- 

Thns the Reagan doctrine is tra- * 
dition modified m. the light of eri- ’ 
dense. That is re^ consermista: : 

Washington Post Writers Group. . 


.America after Congress prohibited 
U.S. aid under the now repealed 1975 
Gaik amend m ent. He was forced to 
tnm instead to South Africa, whose 
racial policies he abhors, 
i UNITA’s morale is high. It serves 
. as the de facto government in about 
i one-third of Angola and has wide- 
■ spread support Using limited weap- 
ons, its troops have downed Soviet 
: jets and helicopter gunships, cap- 
tured Soviet-made trades and confu- 
i cated thousands of AK-47 rifles. 

Earlier this year it seemed that for 
toe first time a Soviet- and Cuban- 
imposed despotism in Africa would 
be forced to share power with anti- 
communist forces. But a late Com- 
munist counterattack has severely 
blunted Mr. Savimbi’s drive toward . 
independence. Legislation that I have 
offered would provide a modest $27 
- million in nonlethal h umanitarian 
aid for UNITA’s drive for indepen- 
dence from Soviet neo-colonialism. 

Angola’s government is an outpost 
of white, Soviet-style colonialism on 
the African continent Profoundly re- 
actionary, it flies in the face of the 
historical liberation of Africa from 
colonial regimes and toe gradual 
march toward democracy. We have 
no right to sit on our hands while 
soldiers from Cuba and commanders 
from toe Soviet Union crush the aspi- 
rations of five million blacks. 

Some say we should not “march to 
Pretoria’s tune" by assisting a revolu- 
tion that South Africa supports. But 
this is a case of toe tail wagging toe 
doe. With financial aid from the 
United States;, 'UNITA need not rely 
on South Africa. Our obligation to 
help people fighting for freedom does 
not disappear merely because a gov- 
ernment we don’t Ii™ is on the samg 

• side. Thai is a rationalization for 
shirking our responsibility. 

Moreover, the South Africans of- 
ten offer the threat of communism as 
a reason for not dismantling apart- 
hod. 'This excuse would carry less 
weight if Communist regimes such as 
Angola and Mozambique were re- 
placed by genuine democracies. 

. • • - Although assistance to antd-Marx- 
: ist freedom fighters is bask to toe 
. Reagan doctrine, the State Depart- 
ment has araued that support for 
UNITA would undermine toe neu- 
trality of UJS. efforts to arrange a 
negotiated settlement for toe with- 
drawal of foreign forces. But aiding 
UNITA does not prevent a political 

• settlement On the contrary, the cost 
to theMazxiat government of keqtoog 
its Cuban phalanx ishigh —Between 

. $400 miilion and $800 million a year. 
Jff negotiations snoceed,it will be 

cause UNITA has put pressure onthe 
Marxists 40- remove Torrign forces 
and move toward free eketons. 

Assist the freedom fightra and ne- 
gotiate —we can and should do both. 

Support for Mr. Savimbi is essential 
-to toe progress of setf-goveromeat 
and freedom in southern Africa. 

. The New York Times. 


Letters intended far publication 
should be addressee - Letters to the 
. Editor*' and must contain the writ- 
er's signature, name and full i ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are subject to editing. We. cannot 
be rejporaiWe for -the. mum of 
wtsolicited lyumuscripts . ... 


Spaniards 
Look Ahead * 
In Disarray 

By Victor de la Serna 

M ADRID — The television 
crews and special correspon- 
dents are gone. They invaded Madrid 
on toe 10to anniversary of Franco’s 
death, Nov. 20. hoping to find toe 
sort of pulsating sensations they 
found a d ec a d e ago. or five years ago 
when a military coup was dramatical- 
ly foiled by toe kujg. They found 
none of it and missed most of Spain’s j, 
real points of current concern. * 

Memories of Francoism have re- 
ceded fast in a young country in 

LETTER FROM MADRID 

which life seems to move faster than 
elsewhere, as if this society were try- 
ing to make up for lost time in a 
hurry. Some of toe foreign journalists 
tried hard but came up with rehashed 
stories on how wonderful it was that 
leftists and rightists could address 
one another in a civil manna, with no 
him of gunplay. The Spanish people 
now take all of toat for granted. 

And instead of looking back at toe 
days when toe dictatorship was at last 
ending, they look ahead. Spain’s 
long-awaited return to toe main- m 
stream of Western life looms ahead. r 
European Community membership 
takes effect on Jan. 1. A controversial 
referendum on NATO membership 
may follow in early spring. 

NATO and toe EC are toe issues in 
Spain today, not anniversaries. There 
is fear of toe leap into these unchart- 
ed waters. A 400-year isolation, dat- 
ing bade to toe days of cokxnzauon 
of America and of the Protestant 
Reformation, is bound to leave a 
deep imprint on a society. 

Siades of the Francois! legacy do 
hover on both toe EC and toe NATO 
issues. In one case, a restricted system 
held together by thousands of protec- 
tionist nuts and bolts will be progres- 
sively dismantled and thrown open to 
European partners who know the 
meaning of toe word “competitive- j, 
ness" well, while Spanish business * 
has hardly ever heard of it. In the 
other case, anti-Western perceptions 
nurtured fay the left (and the extreme 
right) during the Franco years are 
hampering Spain’s chances of staying 
in NATO 3S a reliable partner. 

On the economic front, toe intro- 
duction of value-added tax in Janu- 
ary has Spain's business circles aqniv- 
er with concern. The tax is construed 
by them mainly as one more tod for 
tracking down tax evaders. At a re- 
cent convention of 10,000 business 
leaders, pleas were made to toe So- 
cialist government either to delay toe 
tax or to refrain from enforcing it 
seriously. A more open — “transpar- 
ent” is the usual Spanish term — 
society is still resisted by many. 

The NATO problem is more com- 
plex, as in this case toe lack of direc- jd 
lion and toe misgivings are shared by 
government itself. It is trying to get a 
commitment for Spain to remain in 
toe Atlantic alliance out of a referen- 
dum thal was originally designed to 
pull Spain out erf NATO. And it is 
doing so on an issue toat can be easily 
manipulated by anti-Western groups. 

Opinion polls show a steady 2-to-l 
advantage for NATO opponents 
among voters. They also show than 
toe United Slates is number one 
among Spaniards’ “most disliked 
countries.” Not having been in either 
world war, Spain is a nation with 
little consciousness of a Soviet threat 
or of toe need for NATO to exist. 
Misgivings about the United States 
since toe 1953 Spanish-U.S. military 
agreements, which made Franco re- 
spectable, partly explain US. un- 
popularity. A dogged anti-American 
bias in the govemmem-coutroDed ” 
broadcast media has contributed. 

Prime Minister Felipe Gonz&kz 
feds honor-bound to hold the refer- 
endum, although be has warned that 
it will not be a binding poll and that 
he favors continued membership. In 
addition to toe purported help he will 
get from his heretofore anti-NATO 
media, he has chosen a curious course 
(o try to attract votes: He is beating 
an anti-American and pro- European 
drum. This may earn him a few votes, 
but it will also arouse ill feelings in 
Washington —where ail of Mr. 6cm- 
zAlez's talk about cutting down the 
number of American troops in Spain 
sounds preposterous a few months 
before a referendum toat manY be- 
lieve is almost impossible to win. j* 
Whatever the outcome of the refer- “ 
endimi, a great propaganda victory 
will be claimed by toe Soviet Union, 
and opponents of NATO in Western 
Europe wil] take their cue. 

An early election in Lieu of the 
referendum is toe only sensible solu- 
tion. But if the vote does place, 
ance it will not be binding and Mr. 
Gonzalez wishes to stay in NATO, 
toe bulk of the opposition has proba- 
bly been wise to decide to stand aloof 
and let toe Socialists face toe music 
alone in a political dilemma they cre- 
ated for themselves. 

international Herald Tribune. 

letter 

The Bomb U Secular 

If Pakistan is buil ding an “Islamic 
bomb ” then what kind of bomb does 
toe United States have? A “Christian 
bomb” — specially designed, no 
dottot, to tnm the other cheek in a 
cn^ Or maybe we should call it a 
„™b craDc bomb." Seriously, Har- 
old Freeman rPakistan's Islamic 
Is Almost ffere," Dec. 2) 
s hould c ut out the simplistic and eth- 
flocentnc characterizations. He em- 
P asses martyrdom in Islamic bisio- 
pi but Jeans is probably toe most 
of all and martyrs 

na yfoeen many m Christian history, t 
Mr. Freeman has a very important ^ 
message to put across about the seri- 
«td immediate danger of nudear 
projueratioik. And that danger comes 
from diverse countries, no matter 
“tor religion or ideology. • 

*• HEDGES, ‘ 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12. J985 


Page 5 


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U.S. Probes Possible Payoffs to Filipino Officials 


m '‘ y f - . 


•:K V , 






By Jeff Gerth 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — A U.S. 
grand jury is investigating whether 
high-ranking Philippine offi cials 
may have received payments in 
connection with more than $100 
million in military contracts fi- 
nanced by the Pentagon, according 
to businessmen and Reagan ad- 
ministration officials. 

The disclosure suggests that the 
diplomatically sensitive inquiry, 
which began as an audit of a $6- 
millicm communications contract, 
has widened in recent months. 

The United States wanted to nse 
the information in the case to per- 
suade President Ferdinand E Mar- 
cos not to reinstate General Fabian 
C. Ver as chief of the armed forces, 
but U.S. prosecutors to 

reveal details, citing grand jury se- 
crecy rules, according to an admin- 
istration official. 

“It could be a hot potato when it 
materializes.*’ said another official 
“X have the sense that there axe 
more names of Philippine officials 
involved in the case." 

As described by U.S. officials 
and by businessmen in the United 
States and the Philippines, the case 
involves contracts awarded to 
American companies that retained 
Filipino agents close to the Marcos 
government to perform a variety of 
services. 

According to the sources, the is- 
sues include these: Did the Philip- 
pine agents adequately perform 
their services? Did these arrange- 
ments comply with Pentagon regu- 
lations? Was any of the money paid 
to the agents shar ed with Phify- 
pine officials or their representa- 
tives? 

Spokesmen for the American 
companies and the Philippine 
agents denied any wrongdoing, 
saying that they complied with ap- 
plicable laws. 

The Philippine government has 
also denied any wrongdoing and 
criticized the investigation. 

Some in Congress said the inves- 
tigation might affect debate on mil- 
itary aid to the Philippines, which 
is due to be completed this week. A 

DOONESBURY 


I SIR/ LUAKEUP/ 
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ALLWEEXr 
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preli minar y congressional report 
last week criticized as wasteful and 
militarily incompatible some of the 
contracts being examined by the 
grand jury, according to congres- 
aonal sources. 

The grand jury, based in Alexan- 
dria, Vir ginia began its investiga- 
tion last year, subpoenaing the re- 
cords of Amworld, Inc., a 
California company that won a 
1982 contract to set up a micro- 
wave communications system for 
the Philippine armed forces. 

Subsequently, according to 
American officials and business- 
men, the investigation looked at 
two other California companies 
linked to Amworld: Digital Con- 
tractors, which won a telephone 
switching contract in 1983, and Te- 
lecom Satellites of America. Inc, 
which was awarded a radio com- 
munications project in 1983. 

A major focus is the investiga- 
tion is possible fraud and whether 
the contracts complied with Penta- 
gon regulations governing pay- 
ments of fees for sendees on foreign 
military sales, the sources said. 

A secondary focus, they added, 
is the Foreign Corrupt Practices 
Act, which prohibits payments by 
companies to foreign officials. 

The three California companies, 
according to American officials 
and businessmen, are owned by a 
Hong Kong corporation. Golden 
Assets Ltd., which in turn is con- 
trolled by a Philippine business- 
man, Raymond Moreno. 

An American businessman who 
has talked with investigators said in 
an interview that he had been told 
by Imelda R. Marcos, the presi- 
dent's wife, and by a presidential 
aide that if he wanted to do busi- 
ness with the Philippine military he 
would have to work with Mr. Mo- 
reno. 

According to associates of Mr. 
Moreno, he has had business deal- 
ings with the Philippine military. 

Mr. Moreno's lawyer, Thomas 
A. Wadden Jr„ said that his diem 
would not talk with a reporter. Mr. 
Wadden said that “my client. Mr. 
Moreno, is one of the subjects of a 


ZDNKEFtS PRESS 
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HJHAT PRIZE’. \ _ 
EXOTE- 

T 7 


U.S. grand jury investigation," but 
that be was “satisfied that a full 
and thorough investigation will re- 
sult in a finding that Mr. Moreno 
has not violated any U.S. or Philip- 
pine civil or criminal statutes." 

The contracts for the three Cali- 
fornia companies linked to Mr. 
Moreno totaled about $30 million. 
Hie companies entered into a series 
of joint ventures and subcontracts 
with companies in the United 
States, Hong Kong and the Philip- 
pines to perform a variety of tech- 
nical and administrative sendees. 

The grand jury is trying to trace 


what happened to the money for 
these arrangements, a process that 
involves sorting through more than 
50 companies, 40 feet (12 meters) 
of documents and bank accounts 
all over the world. 

The investigation includes trans- 
actions between Mr. Moreno and 
the Harris Corp., a communica- 
tions equipment company based in 
Honda. Harris sold several million 
dollars worth of microwave equip- 
ment to Amworld and was awarded 
a contract to refurbish Philippine 
Navy boats using the services of 
another Moreno company, accord- 


ing to American officials and Har- 
ris executives. 

Another contract under review, 
according to officials and business- 
men, is with Stromberg-Carison, a 
Florida-based electronics company 
that also had an arrangement with 
Mr. Moreno. 

The 1983 sale of $63 million in 
helicopters to the Philippine armed 
forces by the Sikorsky Co. also is 
being investigated. Sikorsky re- 
tained a Philippine company. De- 
tech, to proride administrative and 
marketing services, according to a 
Sikorsky spokesman. 


‘The T70 offers the beginner 
U decision-free photography 
u and simple operation . . .the 
■ experienced photographer 
gT has a camera unsurpassed 
gjr in versatility.” 

HHli A quote from ‘SLR Camera’ in the U.K. 


Snakes, Devils Abide in Gbonwea 


HE GOT SO MANY CALLS FROM 

THEMEDIATHISUJEEKENP. 

H£CZam>TOREAPA 

PKFPaZFD ‘TTTTIP- ^ _ 
MBIT ABOUT HIS 

plans. 


'JWD. OF g£WRB 

THE CHECK 
BED/WN6 CLEARS* 

SHou&Rts' 


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(Continued from Page 1) 

fanatically secretive organizations 
that deal with devils, snake societ- 
ies welcome outsiders. 

October and November are 
prime times to catch snakes in the 
bush, in that two-month interlude 
between the rainy and the hot sea- 
sons, snakes get out, wiggle around, 
eat rodents and, occasionally, bite 
people: Snake societies have their 
best luck catching snakes at this 
time, and a Monrovia snake mer- 
chant, Charles Miller 3d. 35, a Yale 
graduate from Long Island, New 
York, with a degree in anthropolo- 
gy, has his best luck buying (hem. 

Like most everything else of in- 
terest in Gbonwea, snake-catching 
and buying go on at night, after the 
suipefying neat of the day has 
eased. 

On a recent Saturday, with the 
snake merchant in town and the 
promise of his hard currency in the 
air, Gbonwea transformed itself in 
the passage from day to night 

In nudafternoon, with flat white 
sunlight baking the hard-packed 
din yards between circular mud 
huts, most Gbonweans sat quietly 
in the shade, sweating. Little girls, 
bellies distended from worms, 
sucked their thumbs while their 
mothers and older sisters braided 
and picked lice out of each others' 
hair. Guinea fowl and chickens lei- 
surely pecked the din and each 
other. Goats, pigs and dogs slept, 
as did the village chief, who had a 
touch of malaria. In the surround- 
ing bush, cicadas whined like high- 
voltage power lines. 

But by midnight, however, the 
encircling bush was alive with fire- 
flies and bird calls, and outside the 
hut where the snake merchant had 
set up shop, a hundred or so villag- 
ers gathered to dap hands. Two 12- 
year-old girls, with palm-leaf skirts, 
bells on their feet and faces white 
with chalk, undulated to the 
pounding of drums. 

Beyond the kerosene lamp- light- 
ed rircle of dancers, a score or so of 
snake-sellers stood quietly in the 
shadows. With writhing bags of 
reptiles at their feet, they waited 
their turn to bargain with the make 
merchant. 

While the people of the Gbon- 
wea area are more than willing to 
make money off snakes, enthusias- 
tically welcoming Mr. Miller and 
the skittish hangers-on be some- 
times brings to the village, they 
maintain a reverence for the crea- 
tures. which are linked in the tradi- 
tional religion to the powers of the 
devils in the bush. 

A zo, a traditional holy man in 
the Liberian hinterlands, a man 
known both for his contact with 
devils and his air of unflappability, 
often is adept at handling snakes. 

Yosn Peter is Gbonwea’s top zo. 
in his hut hangs a framed certifi- 


Youll always be recognised by your taste in Scotch. 



cate from Liberia's local govern- 
ment ministry that states: "The 
holder of this certificate is fully and 
officially authorized to practice 
herbs as he has been properly test- 
ed and found to be qualified as 
such." 

The zo makes his living treating 
snake, scorpion and spider bites, os 
well as by selling snakebite medi- 
cine- His medicine, the ingredients 
of which "cannot be exposed.” is 
made from roots and herbs be gath- 
ers from the bush. Around mid- 
night, “so nobody can see," he 
mixes up the medicine and stores it 
in deer horns, which be sells for the 
equivalent of $15 each. For person- 
al treatment, he charges $75 for a 
snakebite, $10 for a spider bite and 
$5 for a scorpion bite. 

A zo, he said, sometimes 
has to demonstrate in public the 
utility of his medicine. He said he 
occasionally allows a snake to bite 
him, mbs his medicine on the bite 
and does not get sick. 

“You know, seeing is believing," 
be said, although he would not al- 
low one of Mr. Miller's big cobras 
to bile him. 

According to “Poisonous 
Snakes," a pamphlet written this 
year by Alex Mac Kay. head of the 


herpetology department of the Na- 
tional Museums of Kenya, nothing 
neutralizes snake poison other than 
a serum derived from the blood of 
animals immunized against that 
specific poison. 

Mr. MacKay acknowledges, 
however, that when the amount of 
poison injected into a snakebite 
victim is less than lethal traditional 
cures, of the son Yosn Peter sells, 
“can often do wonders" by calming 
victims. 

Mr. Menkua. Lhe man who one 
day will be the chief of Gbonwea, is 
the best educated person in ibe 
village. He graduatoi from high 
school at the nearby Garplay mis- 
sion. More than anyone else in the 
village, he talks of the need for 
electricity, for a medical clinic and 
for completion of the new schooL 

He sees no reason, however, to 
stop believing in the spiritual pow- 
er of devils and snakes. Without a 
snake society, he said, be never 
would have been bora. 

“1 am a snake baby," be ex- 
plained. “My parents could not 
conceive a child for many years. 
Then my father was advised by a 
snake zb to join a snake society 
here in Gbonwea. Before long, 1 
was bora.” 





a _ 


Canon 



M l like the looks of Lufthansa 


This is an authentic passenger statement. 





Lufthansa 











Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1985 


U.S. House-Senate Conference Panel 


Approves a Bill to Balance Budget 


(Continued from Page 1) 

. publican minority was joined by 59 
Democrats in rejecting procedures 
that the Democratic leadership had 
established for considering the two 
rival bills. Hiis meant that the bill 
r could not be brought up for a vote 
in the full chamber. Either of the 
bills would cut taxes for most 
Americans and make the most 
sweeping changes in the U.S. tax 
system in 71 years. 

[The House Republican leader, 
Robert H. Michel of Illinois, said 
the vote was evidence of consider- 
able discontent by members of 
both parties against parts of the tax 
plan written by the Democrauc-led 
House Ways and Means Commit- 
: tee. The rival tax plan was written 
by Republicans.] 

Mr. Reagan endorsed the bal- 
anced budget compromise after a 
heated discussion among his White 
House staff, according to White 
House officials. 

His new national security advis- 
er, John M. Poindexter, was said to 
have urged the president not to 
accept the compromise because it 
would cut military spending. But 
the chief of staff, Donald T. Regan, 
backed the compromise, and Presi- 
dent Reagan sided with him, ofD- 
dais said. 

On Capitol Hill, the House-Sen- 
ate conference committee cleared 
the bill T uesday by a voice vote and 
with little debate, abruptly ending 
weeks of protracted negotiations 


over the details of the far-reaching 
and complex legislation. 

The bill’s impact would be im- 
mediate, requiring up to $1 1.7 bil- 
lion in cuts in the current budget by 
March 1. In the next budget, which 
Mr. Reagan will submit to Con- 
gress early next year, the deficit 
target would be SI44 billion, or 
about $56 billion less than the defi- 
cit in the current fiscal year. 

Among those likely to be the first 
to feel the effects of the legislation 
are civ ilian federal government and 
military retirees. In anticipation of 
the reduction on March 1, the bill 
calls for cost-of-living adjustments 
in their pensions to be deferred, 
beginning Jan. I. 

The final agreement that paved 
the way for the committee’s ap- 
proval of the bill was reached at 1 
A_M_ Tuesday by negotiators from 
among Senate Republican and 
House Democratic members of the 
conference committee. 


other portions of the military bud- 
get would be required. > 


The House majority whip, 
Thomas S. Foley of Washington, 
one of the negotiators who created 
the final version, said die White 


House had sought “complete, 
across-the-board flexibility” m the 


across-the-board flexibility in the 
military budget for the entire five- 
year life of the legislation. Instead, 
Mr. Reagan was granted only limit- 
ed flexibility, and only for the cur- 
rent year. 




Shultz Hopeful About Negotiations 
With Spam, Turkey on U.S . Bases 


' Rruten 



The last-minute issues that tem- 
porarily stalled the bill centered on 
Mr. Reagan's insistence that he be 
given additional flexibility in im- 
posing mandatory cuts on the mili- 
tary budget that would be triggered 
by the legislation. In the bill’s final 
version, the president was granted 
authority to exempt from manda- 
tory cuts those budget categories 
that set the size and pay of the 
uniformed military services. If he 
did this, however, deeper cuts in 


The balanced-budget measure is 
an amendment to legislation that 
would raise the national debt ceil- 
ing to more than $2 trillion. The 
deadline for its enactment was mid- 
night Wednesday, when a tempo- 
rary debt-ceiling extension passed, 
by Congress last month expires. 

Failure to lift the debt-ceiling could Mr. Marcos, left, his nmnii 

lead to an unprecedented govern- 
ment default by the end of the week 

as the government, stripped of its 1 

authority to borrow, could not L/DiM/alHi/fK' X, 
meet its obligations. JLJL 

Shortly after the conference A «Y/v 

committee acted, the Senate, also 1 U JLXAAMl JjiclijL 
by voice vote, passed a $498 billion O 

omnibus spending measure that is (Continued from Page 1) 
needed to fund government agen- 
cies for which Congress has not 10 convince her supporters in the 


1 • . 


Mr. Marcos, left, his running mate, Arturo M. Tolentino. 


Opposition Leaders Unite 
To Run Against Marcos 


omnibus spending measure that is (Continued from Page 1) After their talks with Cardinal 

needed to fund government agen- Sin, their decisive meeting Wednes- 

cies for which Congress has not 10 convince her supporters in Lbe evening came in the home of 
passed regular appropriations bills. Pf rt >' founded by her late husband. Aurora Aquino, mother of the late 
The so-called continuing resol u- jP e L^ban ng Bay an, or Peoples opposition leader. Two of Mr. Lau- 
tion, which must be enacted by Straggle, to renounce their demand re p s brothers were present and the 
midnight Thursday when current w * orm a coahuon with UNIDO, elder Mis. Aquino was said to have 
stopgap spending authority ex- Mr. Feraan said: “I think to- played a persuasive role. 


piles, now goes to a conference night Cory finally told them, 

nvnmiNAi rn >T nm 


committee to reconcile differences 
with a House-passed version. 


rel’s brothers were present and the 
elder Mis. Aquino was said to have 
played a persuasive role. 

They planned what Mr. Laurel 


Look, this is my ball game. Will called “the first salvo* 1 Thursday 


you please allow me to decide? 1 


TRAVELLERS REASSURED ‘ WATER 


IN BOMBA Y SAFE TO DRINK'. 


Based on his long and intimate acquaintance with 
Bombay our foreign correspondent writes : 

"Of all the things that people drink in Bombay, 
water has never figured prominently. 

Most prefer Tonic in Bombay, Mar- Mj|H 
tini in Bombay or Orange in Bombay. 

Indeed, anything that one would 
usually mix in Bombay. 

But, let me assure you. there / 
is no need to stay clear ■ 

of the water. ■ 


European Parliamen tarians 
Debate EC Treaty Changes 


Roam community was founded would re- 

STRASBOURG, France — The strict the veto powers enjoyed by 


.with a rally in his home town of 

fiatnngas. 

Mr. Marcos fired his first salvo 
at his nominating convention, ac- 
cusing the opposition of of being 
“fraudulent would-be leaders” who 
backed terrorism and Commu- 
nism. 

Noting that his party controls 
two-thirds of the national assem- 
bly. Mr. Marcos said it would be 


European Parliament debated member states, giving the Europe- impossible for an opposition presi- 
Wednesday whether to approve an Parliament a slightly increased dent to pass legislation or to elect a 
modest reforms of the European role, and would set a legal frame- 


Comm unity’s founding treaty. work for reducing internal trade 


In the debate, speakers for all barriers and increasing coopera lion 
major political groups expressed in foreign and monetary policy. 


voiyiug uepra of doubt about (he In Copenhagen, senior govem- 
refonns that were reached last meat and parliamentary sources 
week at the EC summit meeting in said that the Danish government 


Those rumours G 
which infer that K 
water does not mix I 
with this most P 
distinctive of Im- r 
ported London Dry « 

Gins are well and I 

trulv ill-founded." l? 


& 



Luxembourg 


would demand time for more pub- 


The parliament, which normally lie discussion of the proposals. 


has only a consultative role on EC The Danish legislature passed a 


affairs, has been "given effective resolution Wednesday upholding 
veto power by Italy, its main EC the veto right and reiterating oppo- 


supporter. Italy has declared that it sition to greater power for the Eu- 
would block the reforms if the'Eu- ropean Parliament. 


ropean Parliament rejected them. Community diplomats said earli- 

Denmark also bas refused to en- er that the Danes might be hoping 


prune minister. 

“Are they not in fact doomed to 
impotence, even if by accident they 
should win?” he said. 

“Perhaps this is why they persist 
in inviting foreign interference in 
our affairs, in heaping scorn on our 
people and our country, and in 
spreading confusion deceit and lies 
among us,” he said. 

Mr. Tolentino. 75, said he had 
not dunged the maverick views 
that led Mr. Marcos to dismiss him 
as foreign minister in March. But, 
he said, he would refrain from criti- 
cism and campaign all-out. 

His vote-drawing power in Ma- 


Lscuuuu*. diso uua iciuacu io eu- er mat tne uanes ought be hoping asm ana campaign au-ouL 
dorse the changes pending parlia- the Strasbourg assembly would re- His vote-drawing power in Ma- 
mentary approval in Copenhagen, ject the summit agreement and save nils is expected to help counteract 
The a m endments to the 1957 Denmark from being blamed for the opposition's heavy advantage 
Treaty of Rome under which the it’s failure. in the dly. 


BRUSSELS — Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz, who arrived 
Wednesday in Brussels for a meet- 
ing Of foreign ministers of tile 

North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion, said the United States hoped 
negotiations on the future of U.S. 
bases in Turkey and Spain would 
succeed. 

The United States agreed Tues- 
day to open negotiations on a re- 
duction in its military presence in 
Spain. The move was aimed at 
helping the Madrid government 

won a difficult referendum next 

March on staying in NATO, which 
Spain joined io 1981 
Turkey, at loggerheads with 
Greece, its NATO ally, is eager to 
keep U.S. bases on its soil and 
expand facilities for NATO but 
wants more American military aid 
and greater access to the American 
market in return. 

Mr. Shultz praised Spam's So- 
cialist prime minister. Felipe Gon- 
zalez, for his determination to keep 
his country in the Atlantic Alliance 
and said, “We expect a positive 
NATO decision” from Spanish 
voters. 

He said talks on “restructuring” 
the 12,000 U.S. troops in Spain 
could begin only after the referen- 
dum, since the outcome of the vote 
would have an important bearing 
on the future levd of the American 
presence. The United States has a 
naval base and three air bases in 
Spain. 

Mr. Sbultz stressed that Wash- 
ington's willingness to hold such 
negotiations, which it had previ- 
ously eschewed, was “intended to 
be a positive development in the 
NATO referendum.” 

Opinion polls have indicated 
that a majority of Spaniards op- 
pose membership of the alliance. 

Mr. Gonzilez said at a Brussels 
news conference Tuesday that his 
government, while not bound by 
the referendum, would be morally 
obliged to take note of its outcome. 

On Turkey, Mr. Shultz said the 
scope for increasing annual aid of 
$785 million was tightly con- 
strained by the U.S. budget deficit. 
But he said Washington was inter- 
ested in Ankara's proposals for fre- 
er market access. 

“They’ve made some very inter- 
esting economic changes,” Mr. 
Shultz said. “We'd like to respond 
to that in the trade field.” 

The United States has the use of 
several Turkish air and naval bases 
and has listening stations on the 
Blade Sea coast that monitor Soviet 
military activities. 

■ U.S. Hopes for Accord 
John M. Gashko of The Washing- 
ton Post reported from Brussels: 


A senior U.S. official said 
Wednesday that while the Soviet 
Union's position “isn’t clear." the 
United States has “the impression 
and the hope” that Moscow will be 
ready to seek a speedy agreement 
on reducing medium-range nuclear 
missiles in Europe when the Gene- 
va arms control talks resume next 
month. 

H. Allen Holmes, director of the 
Slate Department's office of politi- 
co-military affairs, gave that assess- 
ment after a meeting of the NATO 
Special Consultative Group. 

The consultative session, which 
preceded the winter meeting of 


NATO foreign minister beginning 
here Thursday, endorsed the nc% 
proposal proposed by the United 
Slates in Geneva on Nov. 1 f w 
reduction of intermediate-range 
That is one of the three weapon j 
categories, along with interconti- 
nental nuclear missiles and space- 
based weaponry, under discussion 
in Geneva. 


An agreement on intermediate 
weapons. Soviet SS-20 missiles in 
Eastern Europe and U.S. Pershmg- 
2 and cruise missiles being de- 
ployed in Western Europe, is of 
particular interest to the NATO 
allies. 


Soviet, Pretoria Gted 


In Reagan Rights Report 


(Continued from Page 1) 


his state of health. We find particu- 
larly odious the Soviet practice of 
filming Dr. Sakharov and his wife, 
Mrs. Bonner, without their knowl- 
edge, during medical examina- 
tions." 


A new element of the president's 
human rights speech this year was 
his denunciation of the “rampant 
religious persecution” in Iran of 
members of the Baha'i faith, a reli- 
gion which stresses universal broth- 
erhood. Mr. Reagan said that the 
government of Iran had killed 198 
Baha'is, imprisoned 767 and forced 
35,000 others to flee their homes or 
their country. 

The president also said that the 
Communist rulers of Vietnam have 
launched vicious attacks upon 
Cambodian refugees. 

In Ethiopia, a Marxist govern- 
ment bas used famine to punish 
large segments of its own popula- 
tion, Mr. Reagan said. He also crit- 


icized Cuba and the Sandinist gov- 
ernment in Nicaragua. 

“On three continents we sec 
brave men and woman risking their 
Jives in ami-Comrrumist battles for 
freedom.” Mr. Reagan said. 

Mr. Reagan described South Af- 
rican apartheid as “abhorrent" and 
said that in Chile and the Philip- 
pines, the United States has shown m. 
concern about deviations from 
democratic traditions. 

“Governments that must answer 
to their peoples do not bunch wars 
of aggression." Mr. Reagan said. 
“That’s why the .American people 
cannot dose their eyes io abuses of 
human rights and injustice, wheth- 
er they occur among friend or ad- 
versary or even on our own shores." 

■ 8 Held After Moscow Protest 
At least eight persons were ar- 
rested Tuesday in Pushkin Square 
in Moscow when a crowd of about 
100 gathered to mark Human 
Rights Day. The Washington Post 
reported from Moscow. 


U.S. Business Group Assails Pretoria 


The Associated Press 


JOHANNESBURG — The American Chamber of Commerce of 
South Africa Wednesday called for major reforms recognizing black 
rights, and accused the police of contributing to the persistent riots that 
have killed hundreds of people in the past 15 months. 

Meanwhile, the police saia they found the charred body of a black man 
in Kwanobuhle near Port Elizabeth, apparently killed, by other blacks 
under suspicion of collaborating with the white government. Black 
militants were quoted as saying there should be no public festivities this 
Christmas because of the ongoing struggle against apartheid. 

The Chamber of Commerce organization, a branch of the U.S. Cham- 
ber of Commerce, demanded an end to the state of emergency impnwt 
July 21, under which people can be detained without charges or access to 
lawyers; creation of a single education system for all races; an end tohws 
keq>in§ blades out of white areas: and “meaningful partidpatkm of 
blacks in government through development of a recognized mechanism 
of dialogue.” 


-Mrun 





• " i 






- 


\xX& 


s 

a.^ 


. INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1985 


Page” 


SCIENCE 


Ued 

% 


A -:v M . „ 

, 'V- 


IN BRIEF 

Ski-Safety Principles Take a Tumble 

MAASTRICHT, Netherlands (AP) — Nondrinldog skiers appear to 
be 50 penest more likely to have a mishap on the slopes and 30 percent 
more likely to get hurt than those who had up to five alcoholic rfrrnlcg a 
day, two Dutch epidemiologists say, upsetting conventional wisdom 
about safe skiing. 

Surveying 1,088 Dutch driers after holidays last winter, Lex Boater and 
Paul Kmpschild of the University of Limbtog in Maastricht also found 
that the less sleep a skier apt, the less accident-prone he was the next day, 
and that neither physicafcocdi Orating nor professional equipment care 
reduced the likelihood of injury! 

Mr. Bouter said a night-before binge might make a skier more cau- 
tious; he noted that slows who expressed no fear of being injured were 
twice as Kkdy to have, accidents. The study also found that skiers with 
university educations were 20 percent leas Ukdy to be injured, and that 
skiers wearing outfits that cost more than 500 guilders (SI 75) were more 
accident-prone. 

Next Meteorite Assault in A. D. 2134 

LONDON (NYT) —A meteorite may not one of the major hazards of 
modem life, but a person can be strode by one, and scientists at Herzberg 
Institute of Astrophysics in Ottawa have nyiwiUtwH the magnitude of the 
risk. 

After studying meteorite falls with a networic of 60 cameras in western 
Canada for nine years, I. HaHiday, A. T. Blackwell and A. A. Griffin said 
in a tetter to the British journal Nature that one human should be hit in 
North America every 180 years. Worldwide, they said, one coaid expect a 
human to be struck try a meteorite once in every nine years. 

The factors they based their calculations on included the number of 
meteorite falls of size large enough to be detected, the number of humans 
in Canada and the United States and the average human, size. They noted 
that one such case occurred 3 1 years ago, in Alabama. It is believed to be 
the only wdJ-doannented case of a meteorite striking a human. 

So viet 'Monster 9 Is Only a Whirlpool 

MOSCOW (UPI) — Soviet scientists -say they have unmasked a 
Central Asian version of the Loch Ness monster: What witnesses thoug ht 
was a “dinosaur” turned out to be whirlpools, Tass reports. 

The news agency said an. expedition was sent from the Institute of 
Evolutionary Morphology and Ecology of the Academy of Sciences to 
Kok-kol Lake hi the republic of Kazakhstan after repeated reports that 
“a twisty body about 20 meters long emerges above lake surface,’' 
producing “loud trumpet-like sounds." 

The explanation turned out to be a product of the region's geological 
history. The lake, Tass said, is on sediments ana connected with 
underground cavities by mud-covered cracks. “When the mud is washed 
away and water rushes down, large whirlpools appear on the water 
surface. If air is sucked in as well, the lake starts singing.” 

Laser' Treatment Reduces Vision Loss 


Rare Cancer , Linked to AIDS \ Has Suddenly Changed Forms 


iis [‘rtf, 


WASHINGTON (AP) — A laser treatment that stops leakage in the 
retina can reduce by half a type of vision loss that afQicts many mabetica, 
according to a study published in the American Medical Association's 
Archives of Ophthalmology journal. 

Dr. Morton F. Goldberg, editor of the journal, said the study repre- 
sented “a type of advance that is only reported every five or ten years in 
ophthalmology." Eye specialists recommended that diabetics have annu- 
al eye examinations to see if they need the treatment. 

A previous study showed that intense lasers could heat and seal severe 
bleeding vessels in the eyes. The new study, sponsored by the National 
Eye Institute and involving 23 medical centers, showed that similar 
treatment could help a less severe problem called macular edema. The 
macula is the part of the retina responsible for the land of fine, head-on 
vision used in reading, driving and recognizing faces. 

Kinsey Subjects to Be Polled Again 

INDIANAPOLIS (UPI) — The Kinsey Institute at the University of 
Indiana in Bloomington trill seek federal funding to re-interview thou- 
sands of the people polled in the 1940s by the zoologist Alfred C Kinsey, 
one of the pioneers of sex research. Some of the participants would now 
be in their 90s. 

“We'd like to interview a minimum of 2,000 and a maximum of 4,000" 
of the original participants, said the institute’s director, June M. Reinisch. 
She said the researchers also hoped to leant about the accuracy of 
memory in the Sl-mOBon, three- to four-year study, which would not 
begin before next December. 

Dr. Kinsey questioned more than 18,000 people on their sexual 
activities. His “Sexual Behavior in the Human Male" was published in 
1948 and “Sexual Behavior in the Human Female” appeared in 1953. 

Prize for Finding Weed-Eating Beetle 

PARIS (Reuters) — An Australian research foundation has won a 
515,000 prize from the Uni led Nations F du cat io n al. Scientific and 
Cultural Organization for discovering a beetle that dears dogged water- 
ways by devouring huge quantities of weeds. 

UNESCO said the work by the Commonwealth Scientific and Indus- 
trial Research Organization of Australia should allow tropical countries 
to clear irrigation channels and paddies choked by the weed sahrinia. 
Scientists from the group discovered in Papua New Guinea that a 
previously unidentified predator beetle could eat through tons of the 
thick, matted weeds. 


. (Continued from Page 1) 

the most important due to the dis- 
covery of AIDS in New York in 
1981. Same health officials believe 
that what has become a worldwide 
AIDS epidemic might not have 
been detected then had it not been 
for the conspicuously high inci- 
dence of Kaposi's among young 
homosexual men in New York. 

At the same time, doctors in Af- 
rica began to notice a change in 
their Kaposi’s patients. Dr: Bayley, 
who has examined Kaposi’s sarco- 
ma and AIDS patients in the Unit- 
ed States, said her Kaposi's pa- 
tients in Lusaka had “a shorter 
survival and a more aggressive 
course than many of the American 
cases." 

Doctors suspect more cases of 
Kaposfs sarcoma have been diag- 
nosed since the discovery of AIDS 
in 1981 than were detected in the 
entire previous history of the can- 
cer. back to its discovery in 1872. 

The cancer first manifests itself 
as firm, usually p ainles s, purplish 
skin’ patches. The appearance of 
these pa tches has helped lead to the 
diagnosis of AIDS m about one- 
fourth of the more than 15,172 re- 
ported cases of AIDS in the United 
States, and Kaposi’s sarcoma even- 
tually develops in many more 
AIDS patients. 

More than 90 percent of these 
Kaposi’s sarcoma cases in the Unit- 
ed States have occurred among ho- 
mosexual men with AIDS, but they 
have rarely occurred among intra- 
venous drug users, hemophiliacs 
and children who have developed 
AIDS. In Africa both heterosexual 
men and women are developing 
AIDS, but Kaposfs sarcoma, still 
p rimarily affects men. 

When the AIDS blood tests 

were developed, researchers rushed 
to study samples from Kaposfs 
sarcoma patients. They found that 
most patients with the new form of 


mm 

mm m 

M 





ft .*5W* 


lowfanc* K. AJhnon'TF* Naw York Taw 

Dr. Bayley, colleague examine chest X-rays. 


AIDS virus. 

Some experts suspected that evi- 
dence of the AIDS virus would also 
be found in patients with the child- 
hood form of Kaposfs sarcoma. 
But, to their surprise, they have not 
found any such correlation, though 
they say mote research and testing 
is needed. 

Doctors have long believed that 
the number of cases of classic Ka- 
posi’s in Africa by far exceed those 
elsewhere, though, again, there are 
no health statistics to prove this. 
The African cases had tended to 
duster around the equator, particu- 
larly near Lakes Victoria and Kivu 
and the mountainous areas in Cen- 
tral Africa. 

Kaposfs sarcoma most Hkely ex- 
isted long before doctors came to 
recognize it in 1872 through the 
description by Dr. Moritz Kohn, 
who moved to Vienna from his na- 
tive Kaposvar in southern Hungary 
— from which he later took the 
name Kaposi — to become one of 
the best-known dermatologists of 
his time. 

A review of his discoveries seems 
essential to an undemanding of 
what is happening to this older, 
possibly virus-induced form of can- 
cer, and to the new, aggressive farm 
that appears to be brought on by 
virus-induced AIDS. 

The smooth patches of skin that 
characterize Kaposfs are described 
by doctors as nodules, plaques and 
macules; they vary in size from that 
of peas to that of large coins. Some- 


times they occur os isolated spots, 
enlarged to protrude in a spherical 
shape. Other times they form 
groups and remain flatter. Often 
the first symptom has been a swell- 
ing of the feet and legs, followed by 
ibe appearance of purple, red or 
browmsh noddles in the same area. 

la time, the feet and hands be- 
come deformed from the thicken- 
ing of the affected areas of skin. 
The lesions also can form on the 
scalp, in the mouth, larynx, stom- 
ach and intestines, or, less com- 
monly, the eyes. Sometimes the 
nodules disappear only to return 
after months or years. Then they 
grow and can ulcerate and become 
infected. 

Dr. Kaposi reported that, until 
death occurred, the most persistent 
symptom for which his patients re- 
quired treatment was “the feeling 
of tension and pain in the hanri< 
and feet” Some people also de- 
scribe burning and itching. 

From the beginning, physicians 
had noted that this sarcoma dif- 
fered from most cancers in that it 
seemed to originate in several areas 
in the body. Most cancers were 
thought to arise from one site, a 
rin g!#? malignant <*n 

As the years passed doctors came 
to regard Kaposi’s sarcoma as one 
of the mildest forms of cancer, one 
that someone could live with for 
years, even decades, without the 
malignanc y being more t han a cos- 
metic nuisance. But Dr. Kaposi 
wrote that “the disease is rapidly 
lethal, within two or three years ” 

F OR years, doctors were per- 
plexed as to why, particularly in 
Africa, some young children devel- 
oped an usually virulent form of 
the disease. It was marked by the 
swelling of lymph nodes and by a 
paucity of the cancerous skin 
patches. Often this form of the dis- 
ease was so subtle that pediatri- 
cians did not recognize it. 

Generally Forgotten today is Dr. 
Kaposi's description of an &• to 10- 
year-old boy from Zurich who died 
within a year of developing skin 
lesions. Dr. Kaposi suspected the 
child was afflicted with Kaposi's 
sarcoma. 

Several experts on this cancer 
who were interviewed were aston- 
ished to lean of Dr. Kaposi's origi- 
nal descriptions of the rapid course 
of the disease and of his mention of 
the child as a victim. 

Dr. Bayley, at University Teach- 
ing Hospital, said that for most of 
the early part of her stay in Zambia 
she had seen 8 to 12 cases a year of 
classic Kaposfs, or the endemic 
form, as it also has been known in 
Africa, without detecting any 
change in frequency or manifesta- 


tions of the disease. In perhaps 10 
to 20 percent of the total, Kaposi's 
sarcoma killed aggressively and 
rapidly. In addition, in some indi- 
viduals skin lesions that had not 
changed for years suddenly grew 
worse. 

In 1982. when Dr. Bayley read 
the first reports of unbeatable Ka- 
posi's sarcoma in AIDS patients in 
the United States, she was startled. 
The reports did not make sense, she 
told herself: “This isn’t the Kapo- 
si’s sarcoma 1 see in Lusaka Don’t 
the Americans know how to treat 
it? 1 can get rid of Kaposfs. They 
must be using (be wrong drugs." 

Then, she said, “things changed 
dramatically in 1983." tarty that 
year, a physician from another hos- 

K 'tal referred a man to her who had 
st a considerable amount of 
weight; he needed a biopsy of a 
swollen lymph eland. When Dr. 
Bayley examined him, she said, she 
noted no skin lesions. But she was 
startled to learn from the patholo- 
gist's report that the patient's 
lymph node showed evidence of 
Kaposi’s sarcoma. 

Dr. Bayley re-examined the pa- 
tient. This time she found a purple 
spot in his mouth. To add to her 
surprise, the man failed to respond 
to chemotherapy. 

About the same time, she real- 
ized she had nine patients with Ka- 
posi's sarcoma under her care, an 
unusually high number. 

By the end of 1983, when Dr. 
Bayley presented a scientific paper 
al a meeting of surgeons in Kampa- 
la, Uganda, she said she realized 
what she was seeing in Lusaka was 
similar to what dooms were de- 
scribing among AIDS patients in 
New York and California except 
that the American version seemed 
limited to homosexual men. Het- 
erosexual men and women were 
getting this cancer in Africa, she 
said, though women seemed to get 
it much less often and sometimes 
less severely. 

Of the 23 new cases of Kaposi's 
that Dr. Bayley diagnosed that 
year, 13 showed unusual symp- 
toms: loss of as much as one-third 
of body weight, difficulty breath- 
ing, generalized swollen lymph 
nodes and lesions on unusual 
places, such as the mouth, face and 
thighs. Most were younger than the 
patients she had treated for endem- 
ic KaposTs. 

In the new form, lesions tend to 
develop on the face, sometimes on 
toe tip of the nose, more often than 
in the classic form. Patches have 
also been detected behind the ears 
and on the arms and trunk. Some- 
times the lesions grow in the lungs 
and lead to an accumulation of 
fluid thfti can cause breathing diffi- 


culties. Occasionally they are faint- 
er and flatter than the 'nodules in 
toe classic form, and may be so 
subtle as to be overlooked unless a 
physician diligently searches the 
body each day. 

Even then. Dr. Bayley said, tone 
are cases where no patches appear. 
Experts can have difficulty diag- 
nosing Kaposi's sarcoma without a 
pathologist's examination of a 
piece of skin through a microscope. 
One reason is that the blood-con- 
taining lesions of Kaposi's sarcoma 
can mimic reactions to insect bites, 
injuries, and other conditions, such 
as syphilis. Even a pathologist may 

miw them. 

In 1984, Dr. Bayley saw 37 new 
Kaposfs patients; 22 of them had 
the aggressive form of the disease. 
“About halfway through the year it 
suddenly struck me that I was talk- 
ing to these patients in English, 
that they were better educated and 
that they came from a better socio- 
economic sums," she said. In toe 
past, Kaposi’s sarcoma tended to 
afflict laborers, subsistence fanners 
and other members of the lower 
socio-economic classes, io whom 
she spoke in Nyanja, she said. 

There were other mysteries. For 
several months, she could not find 
evidence of thrush, which is caused 
by a fungus, or other so-called op- 
portunistic infections often associ- 
ated with patients with Kaposi's 
sarcoma. Then in about December 
1983 she sinned seeing these infec- 
tions, particularly thrush and shin- 
gles. 

This year, the number of patients 
with Kaposi’s sarcoma and the 
number of patients with AIDS con- 
tinued to increase, and toe symp- 
tom that usually brings a patient to 
Dr. Bayley's clinic now is lymph 
node swelling on both sides of toe 
body. 

From toe data she has collected 
through questions asked of each 


patient, she said most seem to have 
acquired the disease through het- 
erosexual intercourse. Many pa- 
tients have been promiscuous by 
Western standards. 

Cases of what appear to have 
been Kaposi's sarcoma in Africa 
were described at least as far back 
as 1914. interest in toe disease was 
renewed in Africa after World War 
il when doctors recognized an un- 
usually targe number of cases 
among Bantus in South Africa. 
Then doctors learned that the dis- 
ease was also common among other 
tribes. 

Scientific reports gave widely 
varying figures for toe proportion 
of Kaposi's sarcoma among can- 
cers in Africa, ranging from 12.8 
percent in Zaire to 2.9 percent in 
Kenya. In toe same years it was 
reported as less than 0.1 percent of 
all cancers in the United States. 

Dr. Robert Gallo, a leading re- 
searcher on AIDS at the National 
Cancer Institute in Bethesda, 
Maryland, said that although epi- 
demiological studies had linked the 
AIDS virus and Kaposi's sarcoma 
as well as other cancers that often 
afflict AIDS victims, the AIDS vi- 
rus “does not directly cause Kapo- 
si's sarcoma” or toe other cancers. 

According w John cook, a 

surgeon who worked in Africa be- 
fore moving to Edinburgh and who 
wrote a thesis on Kaposi's sarcoma, 
many years ago some scientists in 
Africa suspected that Kaposi's sar- 
coma was caused by an infectious 
agent. Bui scientists could not cor- 
relate African Kaposi's sarcoma 
with geographical, ethnic or envi- 
ronmental factors. 

The theory of the infectious 
agent was pursued in part because 
another cancer, Burkitt's lympho- 
ma. was found to' be common in 


areas of Africa where Kaposi's sar- 
coma occurs frequently. More re- 
cently when researchers linked toe 
Epstdn-Barr virus with Burkitt's 
lymphoma, they explored the rda- 
lionship of toe Epsiein-Ban- virus 
and Burkitt's lymphoma with Ka- 
posi's sarcoma. No links were 
found. 

Dr. Paul L. Gigase of the Insti- 
tute of Tropical Medicine in Bel- 
gium. who has studied Kaposi’s 
sarcoma in Africa, reported last 
month at a meeting in Brussels on 
AIDS that be had found, contrary 
to reports in medical journals, that 
“the geographic distribution of Ka- 
posi's sarcoma in Africa is quite 
different from toe distribution of 
Burkitt’s lymphoma." 

Another unexplained develop- 
ment in Kaposi’s sarcoma, one not 
associated particularly with any 
geographic region, came about in 
1969 as kidney transplant surgery 
began to become standard. Doctors 
recognized an unusual number of 
Kaposi's sarcoma cases among 
transplant recipients who also re- 
ceived large doses of drugs de- 
signed to suppress their immune 
systems so as to allow them to keep 
toe donated kidney. Kaposi's tends 
to develop about 16 months after 
an. organ transplant. In some cases, 
just one lesion may form. In others, 
toe tumors may disappear with a 
reduction of toe dosage of toe im- 
munosuppressive drugs. 

Though Kaposi's sarcoma can 
behave in various ways clinically 
and epidemiologjcallyl one inter- 
esting fact, according to Dr. A Ber- 
nard Ackerman of New York Uni- 
versity Medical School, is that 
pathologists cannot distinguish be- 
tween specimens taken from all toe 
forms of Kaposi's sarcoma. In oth- 
er words, a pathologist cannot look 
through a microscope and tell one 
form from another. 



Australian Fossil Jaw May Alter View of Mammal Evolution 


By John Noble Wilford led some paleontologists to con- ventional wisdom, mammals did creatures. Judging by toe size of the 
New Tork Tima Service dude that monotremes, toe only not emerge exclusively in toe jaw, toe animal might have been as 

I N a discovery that could change egg-laying mammals, are more Northern Hemisphere and then large os a badger. 

thinking about early mammal closely related to other m a mm al s disperse worldwide: Only in recent The fossil, uncovered in toe opal- 
- • ; evolution, scientists have found the than had been generally assumed, years have paleontologists begun bearing sediments at Lishtnm* 


. By Carl Hartman grams in 

j The Associated Proa agency 1 

- -wS\X7 ASHINGT0N — A 30- on such i 

’ VV month program using a sim- toree tm 

; J /igle remedy for diarrhea has cut two year 
fi wjdfifceatoa from dehydration among “ ar *\ 03 
f f^Mftoildren in Egypt from 130,000 a healLh. 

| to 4&D0Q or 50.000. according 

f-a^jSo the American physician who de- “j® a 8 en 
.Signed toe project toe row 

*Nj» The remedy, a mixture of salt, nexlnve 
n^Wugar and water, is called oral rehy- wjn toe 
, "'^Spration therapy. Its developer, Dr. abteeva 
^ . V^orbert Hirscnhorn of the John Or. H 

^5;^5*inow Public Health Group, a pri- 

research oiganization, said it 

a ’^5r d 001011110 the disease that caused 
diarrhea bnt replaced lost water 
salts. 

1 -£»^S "Even contaminated water will 
35 l on S 85 it’s the best water 
^gyailable,” said Dr. William Smith. 
jgftFice president of the private Acade- 
Jl y? l0r Educational Development, 
r\ Too has advised governments an 
i uftwh programs in Gambia, Swaa- 

— n - Snd, Peru, Ecuador and Honduras. 

Mhe program in Egypt began in 
X J #82 ana ended this year. 

| An international conference on 
*e treatment is being held in 
V^V^washington this week- Representa- 
»/ V jpm of health mini stries of many 
f i wJpird World countries are among 
£ -a «§e 1,000 participants. 

■ » ^ Through the World Health Or- 
"Wm inflation, there are similar pro- 
f ams in 87 countries. 

^Research on toe remedy, in Ban- 
# .>» Wdesh, was heavily supported by 

“F U. S. Agency for International 
/ v Yvdopmeni, which is aiding pro- 


egg-laying mammals, are more Northern Hemisphere and then large as a badger, 
closely related to other mammals disperse worldwide. Only in recent He fossil, uncovered in theopal- 
toan had been generally assumed, years have paleontologists begun bearing sediments at lightning 
fossil jaw of an animal resembling a The other two groups of living finding early fossil mammal s in the Rjclge m New South Wales, was 
■ - platypus that lived 110 million mammals are marsupials, distin- Southern Hemisphere. described in toe journal Nature. 

„ ^ yean ago in Australia. The sped- guished by toe pouch in which they The animal that toe jaw be- The scientists who made toe report 
-'linen represents toe oldest known carry and nnrse their young, and longed to may have been one of toe are Midiad Archer of toe Univerri- 
mammal of toe monotneme sub- placentitis, which cany their young largest mammals living in the Me- of South Wales, Timothy F. 
-..jdass. It is about 85 million years longer in the uterus and thus give sqzoic era, toe time when dinosaurs Flannery and Alex Ritchie of toe 
"rt older than any previous fossil birth to better-developed offspring, and other reptiles were dominant Australian Museum in Sydney and 
mammals found in Australia. The discovery also provided fur- and mammals had yet to come into n p Molnar of Qu een sland Mnse- 

£jg Analysis of toe jaw and teeth has toer evidence that, contrary to con- their own as large and more diverse am in Fortitude Valley. 

Ill ~ ” ~~ — ~ " The authors said the Lightning 

Treatment Cuts Children’s Diarrhea Deaths 

grams in 63 countries. This year toe million children died from diarrhea, hypothesis that monotremes iwere a 
agency has increased its spending last year in poor countries and that branch off the main stem of mam- 
STsucb projects to S35.8 nhflkm- fewer than^ne household in ten mabanevohrtion rather than devel- 
three times what it was spending used the formula. °P m Z independently from a corn- 

two years ago, said Dr. Kenneth J. Doctors said tome were three I ? on 111 1 1111111 3 1 5 n j® re 


had been no fossils more than 25 
million years old. The only surviv- 
ing monotremes are the duckbilled 
platypus and toe echidna, or spiny 
an tea ter, both of which live in Aus- 
tralia. 

Commenting on toe report, Wil- 
liam A Clemens, professor of pale- 
ontology at toe University of Cali- 
fornia al Berkeley, said, “The 
discovery, plus work done recently 
in southern India and South Amer- 
ica. is really causing us to complete- 
ly rethink our interpretations of 
mammalian evolution during toe 
Mesozoic.” 


HAPPY CHRISTMAS WITH ALLOFOUR HEARTS 

Capture Her Heart This Christmas With A R \ke Cem 
Or A "Petit Brjon' From Our Boimout Collection 
Fpom Tht Most F«huion? Con i c tk'n Oi It »u s K T »«l Worn- 


draff 

Unmistakably 


r .^ Bbowion Road KMuHiv«mr>cr I Otoon SVV , Ti irrn ^r »i 
W-TRl DtMIIF Bl •VlV'lMMlM 


on such projects to S35.8 million — fewer than one h 
three times what it was spending used the formula, 
two years ago, said Dr. Kenneth J. Doctors said tl 
Bart, the agency’s director for main obstacles to i 
health. remedy: its unfan 

M. Peter McPherson, director of of those trained to 
toe agency, has said that doubling treatment for dial 


oping independently from a com- 
mon ancestor of mammals more 


main obstacles to toe spread of toe toon 220 mfflion years ago. The 
remedy: its unfamilianty to many brancom 8 “jip have occurred as 
nt !W«. mmwt < n recently as 150 million years ago- 


M. Peter McPherson, director of of those trained to give intravenous recently as 150 million years ago- 
toe agency, has said that doubling treatment for diarrhea, which can This couduaon was based on 
the remedy’s use annually for the be done only in hospitals; difficnl- certain similarities with other 
next five years is a reasonable goal, ties io getting enough salts and dis- mainline mammals in the jaw of the 
with the object of making it avail- trfbuting them in remote areas; and mouotreme. Little was known erf 
able everywhere in 10 years. preferences for traditional reme- toe origins and evolution of mono- 


jject of making it avafl- 
vherein 10 years. 


f^fjvauaoic, said ur. wuuam 
agflFice presideat of the private j 
S r thy for Educational Devdoi 


Dr. Hirschhom said that five dies, some of which can be harmful tremes because previously there 


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TaSubsorptianMarioga', International Herald Tribune, 

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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 1 

VoL HIM UP- Lot Ctnu 


644/5 28% 
MS45 63 
27144 50V* 
24577 14% 
23172 14 
14*41 454* 
19955 149% 
1*949 <114 
18071 IBM 
17079 11 
14437 51% 
14375 29M 
15349 35% 
150/9 11% 
14949 241# 


281# -21# 
43 +9* 

50 + % 

MU — I# 
1591 + U. 
45 +11# 

149 +21* 

ill# + * 
17% - H 
1W# + t# 
51% + Vi 
2914 + V. 
35 + U, 

11 % + lu 

2414+1# 


Dow Jones Averages 


Own <HM Law Last CM. 

Indus 1498.17 1SM70 149209 151170 + 1258 

Tran* 705+4 71900 70002 71412 + 1105 

Ulll 14409 14804 14501 1*7+7 + 108 

Como 60082 409J3 594+3 40590 + 401 


NYSE Diaries 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 

Ultimas 

industrials 



NYSE Index 


9| « » UWI TMm 

High Low a oh 3P+V 
CompOSlM 117 JO I177B 117.77 11075 

IndUSMoll 135+4 13475 134,75 135J3 

Tronic. 11231 112+4 11277 11432 

utlfllia 41+5 4071 61JM 4180 

Finance 137+4 134.9* 127+4 129.18 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Boy Salas 

Owe. 10 2BQJ51 474745 

Dec 9 291702 018*3 

Dad 6 T7U42 540.934 

Decs ; 249+89 434JB1 

Dec4 195095 555+49 

-inchidad in itw tales flouras 


.Wednesdays 

N1SE 

Qoan^ 


UnmtiPM UWH+00 

Prw.JPJA.nd.- 138.148+00 

Prev consolidated dose l«7iS+38 


Tables Include me nationwide price* 

up re me doslm on wall street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


AMEX Most Actives 


Advanced 
Doomed 
Unchanged 
ToW issues 
New Highs 
now Laws 


CtoM Pro*. 

374 Z31 

304 370 

225 249 

853 *50 

43 25 

31 25 


Composite 

industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

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14790+00 


AMEX Stock index 




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Dow Smashes Through 1,500 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Anticipation of lower inter- 
est rates, sandier federal budget deficits and 
cheaper energy pushed the Dow Jones industri- 
al average decisively above the 1,500 mark in 
heavy trading late Wednesday. 

The Dow was up 11.47, to 1,510-66 an hour 
before the dose, and advancing issues were 


emphasis is stQi on the quality blue-chip stocks 
that have been the backbone of this whole 
move,” Mr. Acampora said. 

Ne said investors who do not want 10 chase 
the move up will eventually look for lagging 
stocks. 

“Strength in the Dow is trickling down into 
secondary issues and an across-the-board lifting 


Akhoughpricesin tables on these pages are from “ But 

he 4 PjMlctose in New York, for time reasons, « bong pulled by quality. 
this article is based an the market a 3 P.M. . Alan Ackerman, of Heizfd & Stern, called 

the market's outlook promising. Noting that the 

Litpadng dediners by more than a 2-1 ratio 200-point ^ ^ essentially teen on interest- 
n^ngtte 2,038 issuTcrossing the NYSE tape. ra “f°* 1 BV * move, be said lower od paces 
B^Board volume expanded to about 153 wuld “P kee P £ J d onmQauonaiy.p«s- 
■illSn shares from 130Jmfflion traded in the surest* mcnase the likelihood of lowermter- 


outpacing dediners by more than a 2-1 ratio 
among the 2,038 issues crossing the NYSE tape. 

Big Board volume expanded to about 153 
milli on shares from 130.1 million traded in the 
same period Tuesday. 

Prices were higher in very active trading of 
American Stock Exchange issues. 


Texaco was the most active NYSE-listed is- 
sue, falling about 3 points after a Texas state 


Amen can Stock Exchange issues. judge upheld a jury verdict requiring it to pay 

Analysts said a strong bond market, expected S10 J 3 billion in damages, plus interest, for 
congressional passage of a plan to balance the interfering with PennzoO’s agreement to acquire 
federal budget by 1991 and anticipation of fa rfcttv oil Company in 1984. Pennzofl ad- 


$ 


lower energy costs were all fueling the market's 
advance. 

Several investment-firm computerized buy 
programs, triggered by widening premiums on 
stock-index futures contracts and underlying 
equities, provided the catalyst for Wednesday’s 
midday surge, analysts said. 

Ralph Acampora, of Kidder Peabody, said 
the market was seeing a “flight to quality” as 
investors who have stayed on the sidelines dur- 
ing the 1 1-week rally seek the safest Mocks for 
their portfolios. 

“Market leadership is broadening, but the 


interfering with Pennzoil’s agreement to acquire 
the Getty Oil Company in 1984. Pennzofl ad- 
vanced. 

RCA was the second most active issue, mak- 
ing strong gains on rumors varying from possi- 
ble asset sales to a share buyback program. 

Exxon was ahead modestly after falling 244 
Tuesday. Phillips Petroleum and Atlantic Rich- 
field were both up slightly. Oil issues were 
battered in the two previous sessions by feu of 
a global oil price war. 

Among technology stocks, market bellwether 
IBM was advancing, establishing a new high 
Digital Equipment and Cray Research were 
also up. 


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Statistics Index: 


AMEXsrjaa. PJ2. Eomtao* reports. P41 ' 
AMEX MglBAaMP.U Pltao into nw PJ2 
HYSe prices >-■ Sato markets p.-* - 
NYSE kkn/ioK P-tfl imereti rales P. 9 
Ctnodtan stocks P.U Mortut summary P. 9 
Cwr«nqirBM P.9 Optlqn P.10 

ComflWtfP** P.10 QTC stock P.U 
MvfdendS P.10 Olfw morkais . P.U 


HmliOSSribunc. 


BU SINESS / FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1985 


Page 9 



WAUL STREET WATCH 

Growth in Money Supply 
Is Driving Market’s Rally 

By EDWARD ROHRBACH 

fmenuaionai Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — With the m arket performing its high-wire act at 
1,500 on the Dow industrial average, a lot of investors are 
worried that stocks are working without a net. That is, 
. there’s no visible support from the U.S. economy u> 
justify Wall Street’s daring. But according to Edward S. Hyman, 
chief economist at Cyrus J. Lawrence, the sluggish economy is t he 
very reason why the stock market is a three-nag circus. 

“Wall Street’s booming because liquidity is building and 
liquidity is building because the money supply is growing faster 
than the nominal gross national product," he said. "That's one 
definition of a bull market," 

So, with surplus funds generated that otherwise would be going 
into goods and services if busi- 


Japanese 



Hy man thinks tfcift 
stocks wfll rise 
more as the 
economy weakens. 


ness were expanding fast 
enough to absorb them. Wall 
Street has become the recipi- 
ent, he explained. 

"It’s a period hke the late 
1920s — just a good environ- 
ment for financial assets," he 

added. "My sense is that the 

weaker the economy gets, the 

more the stock market win go up. Then, as interest rates drop 
further, the stock marie** will go up even more." 

Contrary to the widespread view that the Federal Reserve has 
been pumping money steadily into the system, he think* that, "If 
anything, the Fed has been tightening" in 1985. “Therefore, it’s 
been an unprecedented stock market — before Wall Street could 
only tolerate a bad economy when the Fed was easing.” 

What stocks will do when the Federal Reserve actually does act 
to stimulate the economy, winch he said will be reflected in the 
wider M-3 category of money supply rather than M-I, could be 
“spine-tingling," he aserted. 

But it’s his hunch that the yield on Treasury hills, now about 7 
percent, will surpass the discount rate, now a half point higher, by 
□ext spring. With that development, he would no longer be 
b ullis h on stocks. 

M R. HYMAN, perennially voted Wall Street’s top econo- 
mist in the annual poll taken by Institutional Investor 
magazine, said the market’s most recent surge is the 
result of three converging factors. First is the increased likelihood 
that a federal deficit-reduction plan will pass: second is progress 
on tax reform, and third is the big crack in oil prices. 

“The first two are symbolic of a more conservative, responsible 
economic policy, while the third will lower inflation," he said. 
“Plus, they all give the Fed room to stimulate the economy." 

Mr. Hyman believes that economic growth will remain sluggish 
until the Fed cuts the discount rate, probably in the next two or 
three months, and “keeps cutting until it produces an upturn 
somewhere, probably in housing." He warns that there could be a 
down quarter for GNP in the first half of next year, but sees the 
economy picking up to a 5 percent or 6-percent growth rate in 
1986’s second half. 

However, he forecast that the economy will again slow in 1987 
while 1988 will show improvement to coincide with the presiden- 
tial election that falL 

Other major economies around the world share this protracted 
bout of sluggishness with the U.S., be pointed out. "Japan’s 
economy is fading parts of the Pacific basin are in recession and 
in Europe, Germany looks like the only economy with steam in 
it,” be said 

Mr. Hyman 'remains bullish on bonds, arguing 'that. “They ■ 
look as cheap now, as they did in 1 98 1 He also predicted that the 
dollar a year from now will be at about its present level Short 
term, however, he thinks it might decline as U.S. interest rates 
descend, then when the economy picks up and rates rise, the 
dollar should, too. 

James Moltz. president and chief investment officer at CJ. 
Lawrence, noted that if Wall Street avoids a significant decline in 
(Co ntinu ed on Page 1L Col 1) 



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Dec. 11 



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6*745 

IMS* 

11.105 

— 

24*19 

22525 * 

. Frankfort 

254** 

X*3S 

— » 

3276* 

1*575* 

MBS* 

4507* 

119J0* 

12525* 

London (M 

14155 

— 

25911 

iOMa 

2*4400 

4AM 

7324 

2009 

200075 

-■ Milan 

inn 

2*7244 

*0050 

9*119 



UKB 

30*35 

017.15 

0551 

New Yarfctd 

- 

ojwn- 

25107 

77775 

172250 

2AM 

SITS 

213 

30255 

Ports 

7JT7 

11JM* 

20537 



4*15 X 

27125 

14992 • 

285*9 

18275* 

Tokyo 

20440 

39233 

MM 

2*25 

11-83* 

7t.ll 

791 Al* 

9844 

... 

Zortdi 

2127 

20177 

81*75 ■ 

27*15 * 

01230* 

7437 * 

41048* 

— - - 

1A438 * 

i ecu 

08592 

0*072 

219< 

non 

1*9450 

2*498 

44*171 

1*327 

171277 

ISDN 

14X37 

03579 

27*135 

8*3381 

1478J0 

210*8 

5477*7 

23047 

22000 


Closings tn London and Zurich, Nutnusln other European centers. New York i Ww at 9 PM, 
la) Commercial franc t bl Amounts n ee d e d » buy one Pound tci Amount* ne e de d to buv one 
Hollar Cl unHsonOD(K) Unltsof UXX>(v) unite ofULOOON.0.: not wM; AL/L-- not available, 
fol To bay one pound: WSA AZ1S 

Other Dollar Valnes 


Currency ear 

u&s 

Currency per UJU 

Currency oar USA 

Currency per 1)0 

Araen. antral 

tun 

Fin. markka 505 

Max. Peso 

475X0 

Soviet ruble 

07842 

AaaraLS 

1*7*9 

Greek drae. 15050 

Norw. krone 

7711 

Span, peseta 

157-00 

AMr.scNL 

I7AS 

HOW Kona* 7J07 

PM. pen 

17-75 

Swad.krau 

7.737S 

Beto-flR.tr. 

S2A4 

Indfaanjoec 121855 

Port, escudo 

159 JO 

Talmas 

39X3 

■ Bram Cruz. MSSAD 

lodortmtah 1.124 Da 

Saadi rival 

2851 

Thai baht 

28705 

CanMDans 

1-3095 

Irtsoc 0071 

Suras 

2.1235 

Turkii* Uro 

S6SJS 

Chinese voan 

13015 

Iwoonmefe. 1*8000 

S. Afr.nnd 

28774 

(JAEcflrftora 

2*734 

IteotoO Krone 

9.19S 

KownRl dinar 02912 

S.KOT.WM 

0*1.10 

Venez-boDv. 

1575 

. EOVPL pound 

1-355 

Motor, raw. 3*37 






ISfertlO*: 1.1*15 Irish C 

Sovran: aanaae du BMMn {BruMu&l; Banco Commar d aU ItaOana IMUanl; Chemical 
Bank i New York): Brmque HatknaM de Parle (Paris); Bank at TUtvo I Tokyo); IMF (SDR); 
Bah (dmar. rival dkham); Gaebank (ruble). Other data from Reuters and AP. 



Sbtmi 

■rreioey PopmdlB 

Swiss 

Dollar D-Mark Franc 

SterTI no 

Franck 

Franc 

On 

ecu 

t 11 

SDR 

■ moan 

si*-sto 

4W-4TU 

4 ta-4 to 

11 Stall 98 

lOto-llUi 

10 iw-iOto 

8 to 

ImoeflH 

8 Mk. 

410-4* 

4 to* to 

11 4taM US. 

imb-mo 

yto-999 

B to 

Imoates 

SKrBK 

•44-4* 

4 *W-4 Hi 

11 Otall OS. 

llto-toto 

9 owe to. 

B to 

inwates 

Swfl*. 

C 4-4* 

4 to-4 to 

mSrtlM 

1198-1248 

9 to-* OS. 

0 

t year 

09U-8M 

*98-5 

4te-4to 

llVtallOU 

lito-m* 

9 to-9 to 

7 Ok 


Sources: Maroon Guaranty (donor. DM. SF, Pound. FF): Lloyds Bank (ECU); Reuters 
(SDR). Rates applicable 10 interbank deposits Pill million minimum (or eatAvoienti. 


Key Mtmey Rates Dec. u 


IMM! 


7¥9 


' HKMatOflM 
FWMFoadi B 

taMeAm *94 

■rNctr Lean Rate * 

Can Passrff-17* days 7J5 

MBoam Trawrv om» 7.1* 

tfltaBhTrawn’MIs 132 


CD* Mdon 
urstMidm 

wtMCcrmT 
UmtartMc 
OreretsMRuK 
Ohum l u lcrb r fc 
hum MtrJMBfc 
I MMIk htfrtMft 

£352 

IB te fWOfl M llfltt 
COUMOMy 
Doo-iawm Merimk 
- Vmwfli hriarbMfc 
tttertsa* 

BUtom 

flank Bom fed* 

rallMtaff 

: '!■<*■» TrwaufY BU 


7J» 

78S 


IS 

4S5 

« 

4JB 

*.90 


7to 

m 

0 V) 

9 

7a 

7.17 

712 

m 

7 AS 


Sit 

iiB 

4J0 

05 

4*8 


n 

*h 


ii i cwi aa* 

MUtNT 

. MW lUrtftt 


K 
9 

in/u a in* 
n B13/U 
91/14 9 


111* 111* 
11* life 
113/to 113/U 
117/32 117/32 


S 5 
a 7/ia aw 
81/to 83/to 


■ 'auras; Reuters, CommmUonk, Crtdtt 

■nnoats. Boon of Tokyo. 


Aslan Dollar Deposit* 

Dec. II 

1 month 8W • 8* 

a mostas Mt-BU, 

1 months 1M* 

iraooHo 

imp **•»* 

Source: Reuters. 


IL& Money Market FmaOa 

Pec. II 

iMrvm Lynch Rend* AUaK 
3i day overooe view : 7*3 

TotoraM Interest Role index: 7732 
Source; MarrUi Lynch. Tolerate. 



On Routes 


Pan Am-United 
Sale at Issue 

United Press Imernanaml 

TOKYO — Japan’s Transport 
Ministry is threatening to block 
United Airlines from operating the 
Pacific routes of Pan American 

buy, officials Mid Wednesday/The 
dispute is apparently over the shar- 
ing of U.S.- Japan air routes. 

United wants to start flying the 
Pan American routes Jan. 28 but 
could be forced to delay unless it 
gets quick government approval, a 
United spokesman said. 

United agreed earlier this year to 
buy routes to 10 Asian cities from 
Pan Am for 5715 mfTHo n All the 
routes are linked through Tokyo. 

HajimeHatano, a spokesman for 
the Transport Ministry^ interna- 
tional airline division, said the min , 
is try considered United a "new air- 
line," despite Pan Ain’s existing 
route rights. Theministry , he said, 
wants to negotiate route approvals 
with U.S. officials. 

A spokesman for United in To- 
kyo said the airline believed that 
because Pan Am has “certain rights 
already” the takeover “should not 
call for these talks.” 

Elizabeth Hanford Dole, the 
U.S. transportation secretary, ap- 
proved tbePan Am sale last month. 

Untied applied Monday to the 
Transport Ministry to operate the 
56 nights a week that are in ques- 
tion. The Japanese government has 
not yet taken a position. 

Transport Ministry sources said 
the potential roadblock reflected 
dissatisfaction with what the Japa- 
nese claim is inequality in the U!S.- 
J apart aviation relationship. The 
two nations have been trying to 
overhaul their aviation accords for 
several years. 

Five U.S. airlines serve Pacific 
routes through Tokyo. United al- 
ready flies from Seattle to Tokyo 
and Hong Kong, but does not have 
inter-Asian service. 

Until Nippon Cargo Airways 
was granted U.S. routes this year, 
only Japan Air lines operated in 
the United States. 

JAL has been the only Japanese 
airline allowed to fly international 
passenger routes.. But officials are 
moving to dispose of the govern- 
ment's 34.5-percent holding in 
JAL, and next week will move to 
allow Toa Domestic Airlines and 
All Nippon Airways to seek foreign 
routes. Both have expressed inter- 
est in U.S. destinations. 

Fiat, Soviet 
Discussing 
Engine Plant 

The Associated Press 

TURIN — Fiat SpA said 
Wednesday that it had begun nego- 
tiating with Soviet authorities to 
build a factory to make automobile 
engines in the Soviet Union. 

It would be the Italian compa- 
ny’s second major venture in the 
Soviet Union, where 20 years ago it 
built tbe Soviet Union’s largest 
automobile factory. 

Fiat officials did not immediate- 
ly give details about the size of the 
proposed plant or value of the con- 
tract, but industrial sources in Tu- 
rin, Fiat's headquarters, said that it 
could be valued at more than 51 
billion. 

Stock-market analysts in Milan 
said that (be reports of the talks 
helped send Rat shares to a record 
on tbe Milan Stock Exchange: Rat 
common stock closed at 5,465 lire 
($3.16) Wednesday, up from 5,320 
Tuesday. 

Caraillo Fre. a Rat spokesman, 
said that/ there were positive pros- 
pects for a Final agreement but that 
be could not elaborate. 

“I can say talks are about build- 
ing a factory for malting a still 
unspecified number of car engines 
under Rat’s license and know- 
how,” Mr. Fre said. 

In 1965 Fiat built a factory in 
Togliatti, on the Volga River, to 
tom out 600,000 cars a year. 

Rat, which is controlled by the 
Agnelli family, recently had negoti- 
ated with Ford Europe; the Lon- 
don-based subsidiary of Ford Mo- 
tor Co. of the United States, for a 
joint venture that would have 
formed the hugest European auto 
group. 

Negotiations collapsed, report- 
edly because neither side was will- 
ing to give up leadership in the 
joint-venture. 

Fiat shares have also been 
strengthened this week by a rumor 
that Ford Motor Co. was negotiat- 
ing a takeover of tbe 133-percent 
Rat stake held by the Libyan Arab 
Foreign Investment Bank. 


Dec. n 

am. pm cave 

31H0 31885 + 0*5 

Luxembourg Jl/JB — +U0 

Porto Ills UIOI 314-11 315-W +1W 

ZUrtcft 317JH 115.75 -ISO 

l«rt« 31*80 3TUD • — I JO 

MMTVM - 3Ml80 -OSB 

Luxembourg, pgr* and London omcM «■- 
I ngei Hono Konp and Zurich opening and 
dosing prices; Mow Vor* Como* current 
contract. All prices m L»-S. J per otnee. 
Source: neuters. 


AT&T Asks New Canada Rate 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — American 
Telephone & Telegraph Co. said 
Wednesday that it filed a plan with 
the U.S. Federal Communications 
Commission to provide customers 
with 30 minutes of long-distance 
calling time to Canada during eve- 
ning and weekend hours for 510 a 
month. 


Inco: Smaller Work Force, Higher Productivity 


Canadian Work Force 
In thousands. 



Canadian Productivity 
Panels ot nfcM/copper pat 
man -hour, when operating. 2501 


10 

■ao -*i *■* *aa *a* *aat 

-NwMrs do nos apply during 

spans caopany. {Company 


ination daring the past five years 
of more than 12,000 jobs world- 
wide, or 35 parent of its -work 
face, including more than 6,000 
jobs in Canada. Through bonus 
plans and increased union coop- 
eration, the leaner company — 
which now produces slightly less 
than a third of tbe world’s nickel 
— has more than doubled its 
productivity during that time. 

“In terms of cost pa pound, 
this is probably the most effi- 
cient nickel mine in the world,” 
boasted Menno Friesen. manag- 
er of loco's huge Creighton oper- 
. ation here, one of its many mines 
and mills scattered about a land- 
scape so bleak that American as- 
tronauts came to Sudbury to 
practice moon-walking 

The focus on productivity in 
the mining industry is not nniniw 
to Inco, analysts say. noting tAat 
the harsher environment has tak- 
en its toll on other leading com- 
panies. Late last month, the To- 



f Company ettmaM 


Tha New York Turn 


j Belt-Tightening at a Leaner Inco 

Productivity 
Doubles Amid 
Drastic Job Cuts 

By Dougla 

New York Tut 


;ks Martin 
Tima Service 

SUDBURY. Ontario — In its 
heyday three decades ago, Inco 
Ltd. produced 85 percent of the 
world’s supply of nickel, setting 
the price almost as a matter of 
divine right. 

But is recent years, Inco — 

along with the other big mineral 

companies in the United States 
and f* npadq — hftQ been stag- 
gered by stiff new foreign com- 
petition, largely from Third 
World producers. The world’s 
nickd capacity surged just as de- 
mand turned sluggish, driving 
prices downward since 1980. Tin 
and copper have plummeted as 
well, and the precious metals — 

flfttH. diver and ptarinirrn — als/i 

are far bdow their highs. 

For Inco, the harsh new envi- 
ronment translated into SI bil- 
lion in total losses from 1981 
through most of 1984, But since 
(he fourth quarter of lost year, 
tbe Toronto-based company has 
bad profits, despite the contin- 
ued price slump in metals. Dur- 
ing the first nine months of 1985, 
it managed to earn $44.6 million. 

Inco accomplished this turn- 
around with drastic belt-tighten- 
ing measures, in chiding the elim- 


ron to- based Dominion Bond 
Ratings Service put three promi- 
nent Canadian mining compa- 
nies On credit alert — Alumin- 
ium Co. of Canada. Cominco 
Ltd. and Noranda Mines Inc. 
Such American mining giants as 
Amax Inc. and Phelps Dodge 
Corp. also have faced big prob- 
lems. 

As with Inco, tbe strategy 
most of these companies have 
adopted is to slash costs by re- 
placing workers with technology. 
Such a shift "went right across 
the mining industry," said Bruce 
Rdd. morals and minin g analyst 
at the Toronto securities firm of 
Nesbitt Thomson Bongard Inc. 

While the minerals business 
has long been cydicaL the cur- 
rent downturn is different, most 
analysts say. The demand for ba- 
sic metals is not expected to re- 
bound, experts say. and as effi- 
cient as the industry’s operations 
(Continued on Page 13. CoL 1) 


Rescue Package 
For Pan-Electric 
Is in the Works 


Reiners 

SINGAPORE — A Malaysian 
millionaire’s agreement to pay up 
to an estimated 140 million Singa- 
pore dollars ($65.8 million) may 
save Pan-Electric Industries Ltd. 
from bankruptcy, banking sources 
said Wednesday. 

They said that an interim pack- 
age worked out with leading credi- 
tor banks and Tan Koon Swan, the 
Malaysian businessman, called for 
a three- month debt moratorium to 
allow time to find a long-term plan 
to save the ailing conglomerate. 

Mr. Tan owns a substantial in- 
terest in Pan-Electric. The marine 
and property group was put in re- 
ceivership with debts of 390 million 
dollars, plunging Singapore last 
week into its worst financial crisis 
in years. 

The interim agreement awaits 
the approval of creditor banks, the 
sources said. A spokeswoman Tor 
Standard Chartered Bank, which 
shares with Citibank about half of 
Pan-Electric’ s debts, said an an- 
nouncement would be nude soon. 

The near-collapse of Pan-Elec- 
tric led to an unprecedented three- 
day suspension of share trading on 


the Stock Exchange a Singapore 
and the Kuala Lumpur Stock Ex- 
change The Singapore market ex- 
perienced its worst one-day fall 
when it reopened last Thursday. 

Banking sources said that under 
the interim package. Mr. Tan 
would honor Pan-ElectricN con- 
tracts to make future share pur- 
chases. estimated to be worth at 
least 140 million dollars. 

Mr. Tan. who injected 20 million 
dollars last weekend to allow the 
company to keep operating, would 
also pump in another 20 million. 

[Mr. Tan signed an agreemeni 
Wednesday to proride the further 
20 million dollars through an inter- 
est-free loan, according to a state- 
ment issued by him. creditor banks, 
and ihe receivers. Agence France- 
Presse reported from Singapore ] 

The sources said talks on the 
restructuring plan would pick up 
where a committee of creditors left 
off before the move to put Pan- 
Electric into receivership. That 
committee recommended a halt to 
capital repayments for one year 
with interest payments calculated 
on a cost-of-fumis basis. 


Takeover Rumors Propel RCA Stock Still Hi 



Complied by Oar SlaO From Dupticba 

NEW YORK — The stock of 
RCA Coqx, which has been buffet- 
ed for mouths by rumors of immi- 
nent mergers, was up another 55 in 
heavy trading late Wednesday, to 
557.625 a share, after rising $5375 
a share on Monday and Tuesday. 

RCA said it knew of no reason 
for the activity in its stock, but 
tumors circulating among traders 
had General Electric Co. preparing 
a takeover bid for the electronics 


and en tertainmen t giant. By midaf- 
ternoon. more than 3-5 milli on 
RCA shares had changed hands on 
tbe New York Stock Exchange. 

Analysts said that Wall Street 
has recently been swept by rumors 
that RCA stock has been acquired 
by the Bass brothers, the wealthy 
Fort Worth investors who aided 
California-based Walt Disney Pro- 
ductions huts struggle to escape an 
unfriendly takeover last year. 

A spokesman for the Basses said 


that the family had no comment on 
the RCA rumors. 

Separately, analysis said that ru- 
mors have circulated on Wall Street 
that the company is planning a ma- 
jor repurchase of its own stock or a 
restructuring that includes the sale 
of its cornerstone NBC television 
network unit and other assets. 

Interest in the stock also has 
been sharpened since last spring by 
intermittent merger discussions be- 
tween RCA and Los Angeles-based 


Swiss Firm Told to Give Papers to U.S. 


Compiled by Ota Staff From Dispatches 

ZURICH — The Swiss Federal 
Court has ruled that the Zurich 
brokerage firm Ellis AG must sup- 
ply documents requested by the 
United States in relation to alleged 
cases of insider trading there, a 
Justice Ministry spokesman said 
Wednesday. 

The court rgected an appeal by 
three of Ellis’s diems to block de- 
livery of the documents to the 
United Stales, said J6rg Kisder, die 
ministr y spokesman. Hie ruling 
was made during a dosed session in 


it public 

Wednesday, Mr. Kistler said. 

In U.S. court documents, tbe Se- 
curities and Exchange Commission 
has tied Rlio u> the purchase of 
stock and options in more than 40 
American com p anies before take- 
over announcements involving the 
companies. 

The United States approached 


the Swiss government twice for 
help in the case. The first request, 
by the SEC, was denied because the 
allegations were of insider trading, 
which is illegal in the United States 
but not in Switzerland. 

Insider trading occurs when se- 
curities are traded on the basis of 
private or “insider" information 
not available to the general public. 
The United States and Switzerland 
agreed in 1977 that they would only 
help each other investigate matters 
that are illegal in both countries. 

The second request, made by 
U.S. courts, was based on allega- 
tions of acts illegal in Switzerland. 
The Swiss government agreed in 
September 1 984 to help the United 
States investigate alleged insider 
trading, but some Ellis clients ap- 
pealed to the Swiss high court to 
have the government ruling re- 
pealed. 

A draft law to ban insider trad- 


ing in Switzerland is pending, but 
Swiss banks, acting under pressure 
from the United States, have 
agreed by a convention to cooper- 
ate with tbe SEC in insider cases. 

Flli* is u investment house not 
a bank, and is not bound by the 
convention. Mr. Kistler said Berne 
had based its decision to grant U.S. 
authorities “legal assistance" on a 
Swiss law that bans tbe passing of 
company secrets to third parties. 

Georges Dreyfuss, one of Ellis’s 
owners, said that the firm would 
have to hand ova- the company 
papers. He added (hat Ellis had 
always maintained that it knew 
nothing of the alleged insider trad- 
ing. “It is something that can hap- 
pen to any company," he said. 

Mr. Kistler said the documents 
were expected to be sent to the 
United States before tbe end of the 
month. (Reuters, AP) 


Republic Mew York (UK) 

46 Berkeley Square, London W1X 5DB 
Telex 889217 


Please note that as from December 14th 1985 
the new direct telephone number of 
the Eurobond Dealers will be 

01-629 3535 

02 LINES) 

If these lines are busy please use 
our other number 
01-6296662 
(12 LINES) 


The Daily Source far 
International Investors. 






StajaUwoo firtitoiHIm 
NATOWMaePtefas 



MCA Inc., which have yet to pro- 
duce any results. 

The company has been viewed as 
an attractive takeover candidate 
for several reasons. Its NBC unit 
has enjoyed improving fortunes at 
a time when media assets generally 
have sold at high premiums. RCA 
has a strong balance sheet, and it is 
cash-rich, holding about Sl.l bil- 
lion in cash, according to the com- 
pany’s spokesman. 

Many analysts, moreover, con- 
tend that the company’s stock price 
is far below what it should be con- 
sidering the value of the company's 
assets. Several maintain that 
RCA’s stock should be valued be- 
tween 560 and 590 a share. 

“The stock price should bejump- 
ing on the fundamental value of the 
company alone." said Alan Kas- 
san. an analyst with the First Man- 
hattan brokerage in New York 

In addition to the NBC radio 
and television networks. RCA has 
defense and aerospace businesses, 
and makes televisions and phono- 
graph records, electronic parts, and 
broadcast and satellite equipment 
It has been cutting back weaker 
divisions, including its semicon- 
ductor and broadcast-equipment 
operations. 

RCA's own concern about the 
prospect of a takeover has been 
apparent in the last two years. It 
recently adopted a series of anti- 
takeover devices. (LAT, Reuters) 


Reagan Moves 
On Trade Talks 
With Canada 

Washington Past Sen ue 

WASHINGTON — Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan has noti- 
fied Congress that he wants to 
begin negotiating an agreement 
with Canada that could erase all 
barriers to U.S. -Canadian 
trade, which amounted to SI 20 
billion last year. 

Mr. Reagan, in a letter Tues- 
day to the chairmen of the 
House Ways and Means and 
Senate Finance committees, 
said, “The initiation of new bi- 
lateral trade negotiations may 
significantly enhance our ef- 
forts to eliminate current trade 
frictions with Canada.” 

Congress has 60 legislative 
days to block the talks, but is 
regarded as unlikely to do so. 
Negotiations are expected to 
start in spring or early summer 
1986. 

Mr. Reagan telephoned Can- 
ada’s prime minister. Brian 
Mulroncy. to report he had be- 
gun the approval process. 

Among U.S. objectives are 
the elimination of barriers to 
trade in services industries, 
such as banking, and to U-S. 
investment. Canada is eager to 
gain legal relief from future 
trade barriers that could hurt its 
sales to the United States. 


r i 


Weekly net asset value 

Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 

on Dec. 9, 1985: U.S. $152.79. 

Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 

Information: Piereon, HaMrvtg & Pierson N.V_ 

Herengracht 214, 1016 BS Amsterdam. 



ROMULUS. A model registered fay Corum in 1966 
and always in fashioa Now in an ultra- slim, quartz, 
water-resistant version. Four sizes. In 18 carat gold 
or platinum. 


i 


Comm watches are on view al the finest jewellers. For the 
address of the one nearest you or for a brochure, write 
or phone to: France, S.A. Michel Niaiquin. 177. Bd de 
CitlciL 94100 Saint-Maur. tel. I >48.89.36.36 - Conan, 
Antrim. Hollud. Helmut Terin GmbH. Hcinrich-Heino 
Allee 4. D-400Q Dusseldorf. tcL 021 1.320.446 - Grot Britain, Saunders 
A Shepherd Ltd., I. Bleeding Mean Yard. Greville Street, London 
EC1N SSI. tel. 01 -405.266b - Italy, Corum lulia di Amedeo Mcda- 
Folz. Via Tito Vignofi 44, 20146 Mifain. id. 02/42.77.93 - Other countries, 
\^CORUM. 2300 La Cbaux-de-Fonds. Switzerland, (el. 39. 28.66.66. 


i ,.t 1 


-V 





J? U S t! 7 S£ £ H n & 1 ¥ n io U Z n W r -np <4 n n m v>r)-nM~ w h 


Wfednesdays 


Oosi^r 


Tables Indade me netfionwMe price# 
up to me dosing an Wall Street 
and do not reflect kite trades elsewhere. 


* r 



#5 

Y 


f t « i ■ 

i** 


llS-Treasuries 


Currency Options 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Option* Strike 

UMtarirlng Price CoH»— Lost Put* Lwl 

D*c J» Mar Dee Jan Mar 
tjUMgntn Pounds-centa per wdt. 

;w 3l» i r r t r 

143J2 120 3X25 « r r 1 r 

;a t*2S i 1AJO r a r 

15 . «£ r 1M0 r r 055 

I® MO r r r r 1.2) 

JS-g l 4 ? 1M uo sjo mo 1X0 7.W 

JS5 MS 1.10 255 115 U5 5.50 

» IB l« IX mi r MO 

MJ® US r r ass r r r 

SLm Caaadtae I Mtor+cesfs par anil. 

Tii? 3! r • r .* » ms 

CJ-H nr r r w u as 

72 OJM r 040 044 071 lilt 

MAI 73 r r r IAS t r 

gjWWwl Gentian Morkrants per unit 

?i * r r i r 

22-3* 34 us ■ r r ■ t 

35 4J2 r uo r r r 

MJ6 » IB r r r r Ui 

-J9-34 31 135 r r r r o.ia 

3Mt 38 1A0 131 1.99 r 008 034 

3U« 39 Ul UO 140 Ul 02 47| 

3934 40 r US 058 045 on i i* 

*» 41 r 047 D52 r r iji 




Financial 


US T. BILLS CIMM) 

St mHiron- m of loo pel. 

910# #177 Dec 7238 9104 

9114 8650 Mar 9112 9131 

9102 B7JH JU(I 9102 9120 

9174 BWW Sep 9179 91?3 

Wi5 8955 DM 91S0 9X65 

9115 89.58 MOT 9233 9223 

9138 9050 Jon 91.94 9209 

91.55 ran sap »i74_ 9134 

E*t.#plae P rev. Soles 9379 

Prev. Day Open Ini. 31819 off 1353 


»XB6 9197 
9118 9334 

&S9 w-u 

9175 9189 
9144 9159 
91 30 9131 

9154 9234 
9U4 9150 


Prev. Day Open Ini. 31819 of! 1553 


HUM Freocli Pmes-lOttui of a cent par unit. 
FFronc no 1850 r r r 


M YR. TREASURY (CBT) 
siOlWXB prtn-pKl 32ndseT IDO pet 
91*23 75-13 Dec 91*34 92-24 

90-31 75-14 Mar 91 . 91-31 

90-1 74-30 jun 90-17 91 

89-7 80-7 Sep 89-34 90-3 

07-2 80-2 DK 

Esr. Sales ' Prev. Soles 25.170 
Prev. Day Open Int. 49593 up 1510 


FFrpnc HO 1850 r r r r r 

12954 130 r r 95S r r r 

BBS 135 r r £55 r r r 

. 12954 |30 r r UO r r r 

42M50B jaaepMt Yee*i«Miu el a cent per uni). 

JYen 41 8.10 ■ r r i r 

4950 43 75# r r r r r 

5-M 43 r r r un r r 

4950 44 555 r r r r r 

4950 45 4.10 r r t r r 

4950 44 108 r 3.12 r r r 

4950 47 115 r 127 r r r 

49-2 48 LIS 154 154 051 r (JJ7 

£■20 4? 020 1150 059 0.10 053 0.75 

„■£* * Ml 0.14 1ST r 0.99 150 

41SH Swiss hwaceiti per wilt. 


91-2« 92-15 
91 91*23 

90-11 9024 
09-17 90 
09-9 


(Indexes compiled sAortty beta 
SP COMP . IND EX (CMC) 
points and cents _ _ 

206.90 175.70 Dec 20550 28750 

20955 18250 Mar 308-40 21060 

228.15 18X90 Jun 21050 TUX 

21250 18750 Sep 21200 21425 

Eei, Sales Prev.SdBi «WM 
Prev.Dav Oven Int. 82,193 up 1.974 

VALUE LINKKCm 
points and cents 

21755 18X40 Dec 210-10 21X15 

21750 19050 Mar 21X00 21540 

Esi. Soles ^ Prev.Solee 1597 

Prev. Day Open Int. 15*700 up 476 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (KYFE) 
points ana cents 

11940 10150 DK 11X50 11955 

12155 10550 MOT 12055 121 55 

12250 10490 Jun 12110 12X10 

123.15 100.10 SOP 1245S 12455 

j«- Sales Prev. So Its 14,133 

Prev. Day Open int. 11*71 upM 

MAJOR MKT INDEX {CAT} 
petals onaofaMs 

30SY. 24 9* Dec an 2BSM 

27014 Jon 28514 2#fU< 

77VM Fob . 287* 39IA 

3B7V, 271 Mar 28714 29016 

Est. Sales Prev. Sates 240 

Prey. Day Open Int. 1,926 up 10 


205.15 287.10 +1» 
20(55 21050 +115 
2M.I5 21150 +155 
21250 21X55 +1J0 


2B935 2115* +25* 
21X70 21530 «. 40 


11130 11955 +155 
12055 171 !l0 +155 
TZL55 12X10 +150 
12350 12355 +U5 


2Bflb 28714 +314 
28516 28816 +316 


28714 289 «£ 

287U am + 2 ft 


J)T 2X0 Z30O X2TO 2J12 XT7D XI 71 

Sep 2588 229 X2S0 2555 2512 2515 j 

NOV 2529 2590 2575 Z 339 2545 X2S0 

ion 2550 X330 2425 2540 2540 2590 

Volume; 1578 lots of 5 tons. 

GASOIL 

U5. dollan par metric sea 
Jan 23458 20050 23X80 23575 22673 2275a 
FOB 23159 1975* 23159 2325a 2*475 
Mo r 2235018850 222J» 22250 TOM 21850 
AM Z145C 181.00 71175 2US0 3NJ53WJ0 
MOV 20458 17850 20250 28450 20108 20350 
J» 94JS 20050 2IHJ52QS5B 28355 3BL75 
Jty moo 19358 28X00 20650 28150 28150 
Aon 20650 18550 204J0 0650 20058 38150 
Sep N.T. N.T, 20050 21250 New — 

volume: 1.986 lots atilN tone. 

CRUDE OIL CIRINTl 
U 5. Oedara per barrel 

Jar N.T. N.T. 2450 2450 #450 24.90 

Feb 2420 24.17 2475 2550 2158- 2450 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2450 2550 2350 2250 

API KT. N.T. 22JH 2550 2X48 2350 

MOT N.T. N.T. 21J» 2950 2250 2350 

JW N.T. N.T, 2050 2X00 2250 2X20 

vatunie: 2 lots arijDO barrels. 

Sovran: Ro t ri ersBaOi^onaonPttr&tuuiEx- 
eftanoe tuason, crude off J. 


Jan U2S 7525 - 2530 1240 +33 

Mar. 139* X2B9 2W3 7J9« +a 

May N.T. N.T. 1330 1360 +45 

Jhr N.T. N.T.-.W78 M» +50 

SOP 1440 .-Z4« .'7515 24SS +20 

Nov N.T. N.T. 2547 — +30 

Jon N.T. N.T. 2535 — +35 


JOI N.T. N.T. 2555 — +35 

Est. voL: l os lots of 9 tens. Prev. actual 
sales: 102 lota. Open Merest: 345 
Sourer: Bourse dv Common*. 


SmontilUa 7.19 ID . :JJB 743 

Lamm bn - 754 in 751 753 

HrwMR 774 777 7J» 1M 

Prev. 

IM Oftar TUB YWtf 
ib+r.bead mzvxz laim 957 9J2 

Saoroe; Solomon arotoerx 



vabime: 54 lets of 25 tain. 
Sourea: Refers. 


Mertffl LrodiTrecuunr tapes: U5J* 
Oosoe far the day: +055 
A*wOpevMd:C.MC. 

Scvrcr: UarrHt Lyneti. 


London Metals 


Commodity Indexes 


US TREASURY BONDS CCBT) 
»Pd-S10(U101M3 & 32ndsof lOOpct) , 
83-14 57-0 DM 8342 84-17 

S2-10 57-2 Star 82-10 83-12 

81-7 54-29 Jun 01-11 82-7 

BD-5 54-39 Sen 80-5 81-3 

7*6 94-25 Dec 79-11 80+ 

78-12 54-27 MV 78-17 79-9 

77-22 43-13 Jun 784 -78-18 

77-5 43-4 Sep 77-17 77*30 

76-17 43-24 DK 7 + a 77-13 

7+2 67 Mar 

7+24 46-25 Jim 

Esl. Sales Prev.SaleS254575 

Prev. Dot Onen ln159A727 oH 14351 


44 XI2 
49 ZI0 


44 1.12 

47 QJ0 


Total call vaL 18538 1 

Total put voJ. 8J11 
r — Not traded, e— No Option offered. 
Last Is premium (purdioM price]. 
Source: AP. 


r xra r r r 

r r r r 053 

r 153 ai« Q54 lj» 

r IN W r Iju 

CaH eaea tat. 218541 
Put open Int. 187502 


83-19 8+11 
82-10 8+5 
81-7 81-31 

80-5 88-31 

79-11 79-31 

78-17 79-4 
78 78-13 

77-13 77-25 
74-24 774 
7+21 
7+0 


0031 

MoodVS 928J0f 

Reuters : 1J8U0 

DJ. Futures NJL 

Com. Research Bureau. NJL 

MoediTB : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 

D - Preliminary; t - Anal 
Reuters : bass 100 : Sap. 18, 1931. 
Dow Janas : base 100 : Dsc. 31, 1974 


Previous 

n&JOf 
1J7SJQ 
ISSJtS 
22&20 • 


S&P100 
index Options 


INCREASED 

-BontaiOaarseJCa O .10 1-31 

IbH Flavors q jt u 

Magnetics InM . Q -.57 12-30 

WalbreCarp a JR mi 


DMRriures 

Options 


« Afart-tSWnertscPibeer nor* 


Mn Dm jb fs Uw[ dk ien 


WanreCarp q jr mi 

RESUMEO 

Great Atlantic KPae'.- .10 M 

• SPECIAL 

KMar*Vu Induetrlep . . N U 

_ STOCK 

Amor MusmHef Dae S% 1-27' 

-STOCK SPLIT 


Market Guide 


MUNICIPAL BONDS (CBT1 
siOOOv index-eti & 32nds ot 100 pet 
90-7 11-17 Dec 9H 90-30 

89-25 0+4 Mar 89-27 9+21 

88-18 79 Jun SM 89-4 

87-12 79-10 Sec 8+8 8+8 

E si. Sole*. Prev. Sales X303 

Prev. Day Open Int. 1X1*7 up 07 


i ) i I i nI i i te I . 


8948 904 
89-23 9M 
894 894 

88-3 8+3 


1/W l/H l/U - 
UN I/U l/U - 
M4 V14 STM R 
1714 Vi . H/U 15714 
VI* A Itfltlta 
R Ifc » .» 

3 » a a 

«k 7 n IV 
— ii* in, - 


□id rvtt-Caryen Carp— . 
Home Ownera Fed! S8.L — +tar-2 


Home Owners Fed! S8.L — 1 
Peaauola Food Co — 3-far-2 
Price Co— Mer-l 


PtaMen*. 

Sf** *■ *» *tar Jue 5v 
5 xu 259 _ an 040 — 

39 154 28* _ MLA. M2 — 

4D aw L» 1J7. LM U? 152 

£ SS };” ’■« TM 1.99 197 

§ - B± “ ■“ S : 

S^otad fatal yeLOJR 
g^-Tga.raLuaaopMtataup - 
PUN : TUA vet. *57 ppm fax um 
Source: oue. ■ 


Dome Mines Ltd 


&seir Countr Go* Co 
FirafNanOnctamPl 
Fluor Cm* 

Green Mourdoin Pwr 
NottCeovaStrs . 
Norcen Enerev ftn . 
Pnauol* Feed Co 


,-Q .M S-34 1-27 

S O. -58 1-2 12-13 

•35 . 1-19 1K1 
.IB 1-13 1+23 
O M 1241 1241 
O # 1-M B-27 
O ;12 ta ■ 34 . +27 
. J83 24 "MS 


Seize fheworid 


nniw u n l; uMuuulbtv; .*wntarhrj.-+Mm+ 


The In ternplinnal T T f r aM Tnbane; 

Brining djeWo6d“s Most 
■ In^ortantNcwstOtix: Wctifc 
fttost I mrY V iant J iivt l i»hrT“ ’ 

































































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1985 


Page 1 1 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 




France Offers Incentives 
To Win India Contract 


* p 

• * : ! 

■ * 

■ V • n ; 


V . 

.' : 5 ' 


By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — France has agreed to 
give India six advanced-series Dau- 
phin helicopters worth an estimat- 
ed $202 million in order to win a 
contract for 27 of the aircraft, gov- 
ernment officials said Wednesday. 

The French proposal, approved 
by Edith Cresson, minister of for- 
eign trade, follows a competing 
British offer to underwrite “most of 
the cost" of the $91 -million con- 
tract with direct foreign aid. Britain 
is attempting to sell India the W-30 
helicopter, built by Westland PLC. 

The offers of aid reflect how 
heated — and possibly question- 
able — competition for contracts 
can become, French and British 
industry sources said. 

"WewiH certainly get paid,” said 
a spokesman for Westland. The 
British government is providing the 
development aid separately, which 
“happens regularly hi the Third 
World," the spokesman said. 

"Whatever anyone may think 
about it being fair or not, it's a 
buyers’ market." he added. 

Details concerning Mrs. Cres- 
son's offer were less dear and re- 
sulted in some confusion about 
who would pay for the Dauphin 
helicopters, which are made by 
stale-owned Aerospatiale. It was 
understood, however, that the six 
free planes would be included in 


the overall order for 27. and not in 
addition to it 

The net result of the French bo- 
nus would be to reduce the cost of 
die 27 planes to India to about $70 
million. 

According to sources, Mrs. Cres- 
son decided to offer the six helicop- 
ters to India following talks in New 
Delhi last week in which she 
learned about the British offer. 
"Providing aid as the British are 
doing is what we call giving the 
planes away, and so we reacted," 
an aide said. He noted that no other 
companies are currently competing 
for the contract. 

A spokesman for Aerospatiale in 
Paris declined to confirm or deny 
Mis. Cresson’s offer. 

French industry sources said 
that Indian officials had expres s ed 
a preference for the Dauphin, and 
were somewhat surprised by Mrs. 
Cresson's offer. “Even in our in- 
dustry, where the government plays 
the key role, someone has to pay for 
the planes, but it looks like a gov- 
ernment matter,” an industry 
source said. 

Who will pay? “It’s up to the 
French government to find the 
money," he added. 

The Indian government opened 
bidding for the contract two years 
ago. It plans to use 21 of the heli- 
copters for oil and gas exploration, 
and six for executive travel. 


Britain Sells 
Its Shares in 
Gable & Wireless 

United Press International 

LONDON — Britain's 1986 
denationalization program got 
under way early Wednesday 
with the sale of the govern- 
ment's remaining shares in the 
communications giant. Cable & 
Wireless PLC, for £857 million 
(SI 23 billion). 

The company itself is taking 
the opportunity of the sale to 
raise £331 million on its own 
account to eliminate debt and 
provide resources for its current 
rapid expansion program. 

The £S57-million sale of Brit- 
ain’s remaining stake is second 
in size only to the last year’s sale 
of British Telecom. 

Barclays Bank built a barrier 
at its Farringjdon Street branch 
in London to hold back the 
crowds for the new CAW issue 
— but it never came. Only a 
steady — but very small — 
stream of people came in with 
applications. 

"Everything was very order- 
ly," a security guard said. 

The market price of the exist- 
ing shares fell Wednesday by 3 
pence in line with the offer price 
of 587 pence. 


GAF Would Strip Carbide 
For $4 Billion in Takeover 


Oil Market Expected to Remain Weak 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK— GAF Corp. has 
told its stockholders that if it suc- 
ceeded in taking over Union Car- 
bide Corp. it would sell off nearly 
half the company. 

The chemicals and building-ma- 
terials producer said Tuesday that 
it intended to sell Union Carbide's 
consumer-products division, its 
metals and carbon-products com- 
panies ftftd a s ubstantial number of 
its technology, services and special- 
ty-products operations. 

These operations accounted for 
nearly half of Union Carbide’s S9J 
billion in sales last year. GAPs 
total sales last year amounted to 
$731 million. 

Ip documents filed with the Se- 
curities and Exchange Commis- 
sion, GAF said that it might take 
two years or more to sell off the 
properties but that it estimated that 
they might bring between S3.7 bil- 
lion and $4.5 billion. 

GAF, which owns 10 percent of 
Union Carbide, announced Mon- 
day that it would pay $68 a share, 
or $4.2 WUon. Tor tbs rest. 

In the SEC filing. GAF said it 
planned to retain Carbide’s petro- 
chemicals, industrial-gases and 
some of the technology, services 
and specialty-products operations. 

GAF said the Federal Reserve 
Board’s proposed rule to limit the 
sale of debt securities to finance 


liidMn 




Mitsubishi Profit 
Rises in Half 

Reuters 

TO ICY O — Mitsubishi Corp. 
reported Wednesday that group 
net profit rose 21.6 percent to 
20.49 billion yen ($101 million) 
in the first half from 16.85 bil- 
lion yen in the like 1984 period. 

Sales rose 0.05 percent to 8.7 
trillion yen from 83 trillion 
yen. it said. Earnings were aid- 
ed by a 90.8-percent increase in 
the parent company’s equity 
sales, a 48.3-percent fall in re- 
serves for an collectable ac- 
counts and a 4.6- per cent in- 
crease in dividend income. 

Offshore trade rose 12.0 per- 
cent in the first half to 1.49 
trillion yen from 1.33 trillion a 
year earlier because of in- 
creased steel-products sales but 
imports fell 0.06 percent to 234 
trillion yen from 2.71 trillion 
mainly as a result of declines in 
the market prices of oQ and 
grains. 


COMPANY NOTES 


AB Bofors of Sweden said it had 
won a 700-million-kronor ($90.6- 
million) order to supply RBS-70 
anti-aircraft missiles to the Norwe- 
gian Army. 

Consolidated Gold Fields PLC 
said its U.S. subsidiary. Gold 
Fields American Corp„ had condi- 
tionally agreed to sell U.S. industri- 
al «*■«**« to a management group 
led by Richard Secrist The dispos- 
als are Gold Fields American In- 
dustries Inc. and certain assets of 
Skytop Brewster Co. and Skytop 
Real Estate Co. Consolidated 
Goldfields will receive $124 million 
in cash and securities, plus shares 
in the purc hasing company. 

Ford Motor Co.’s fourth-quarter 
earnings are likely to fall below last 
year’s $3.89 a share because of lost 
production from plant changwers 
connected with start-up of tire new 
Taurus-Sable car line; Chairman 
Donald Petersen said. 


Gutehoff 
hd AG, the 


Aktienver- 
est German engi- 


neering group, expects group net 
profit this year to be about the 
same as last year's 112 million 
Deutsche marks ($44.1 million), 
the managing board chairman, 
Klaus Goette, said. 

Mazda Motor Corp. announced 
that it would raise the price of its 
cars and trucks in the United States 
by an average of 4.8 percent. 

Miramar Hotel & Investment Co. 
said it was proposing a special cash 
bonus of 2 Hong Kong dollars 
(25.6 UJ5. cents) a share; a one-for- 
five share bonus and a one-into-10 
stock split. 

Phillips Petroleum Co. an- 
nounced that it would take an af- 
ter-tax charge of about $350 mil- 
lion against fourth-quarter 
earnings as a result of writing down 
the value of minerals and chemical 
assets. 

Scoa IzMhscries Inc- an Ohio- 
based operator of department and 
shoe stares, has been taken private 


in a 5637-million leveraged buyout 
by an investment group beaded by 
Thomas H. Lee Co. of Boston and 
including two top Scoa executives. 

Tate & Lyle PLC posted pretax 
profit of £76.7 million in the year 
ended Sept. 30, up 17.3 percent 
from £65.4 million a year earlier. 

Toyota Motor Corp/s president, 
Shoichiro Toyoda, confirmed 
Wednesday that the company 
would build an assembly plam near 
Lexington. Kentucky. The $800- 
miltion plant is to produce 200,000 
cars a year beginning in mid- 1988. 

Usinor. the French government- 
owned steel group, said the Soviet 
Union had asked it to arrange pay- 
ment terms for a 4- billion-franc 
($516.4-miIlioo) order that Usinor 
had expected would be paid in 
cash. Usinor signed a preliminary 
agreement in May to deliver 13 
million tons of steel, mostly sheet 
and pipes for gas pipelines, m 1986 
arid 1987. 


Money Supply Is Driving Rally on Wall Street 


(Continued from Page 9) 

1986, it will mark five straight years 
of positive returns (which includes 
dividends) for stocks. 

“That’s something really excep- 


tional.’’ he added. “Even the cur- 
rent advance through four years 
has only been duplicated in two 
other periods over the last 40 
years." 


Company Results 

Revenue ana profits or losses. In millions, are In local currencies 
unless otherwise indicated. 





Nei income - 

*46 




Par Stare — 

057 

Canadian Imp. Bit 

Year 

39*5 

Mb (tear. 

1985 

198* 

Revenue 

WSJ) 

’ranis 

101 A 

875 

Net income - 

15.1 

’w Sfxvo — 

156 

Ml 

Per Stare — 

153 

y«w 

1985 

19W 



’rain 

3615 

M2 A 



’■r Stare — 

5J3 

4-50 

Firestone Tire 


«n.i 

14.1 

IJS 


Japan 


«ti (tear. 
Revenue 

1985 

150* 

19M 

1JWL 

Mitsubishi Elec. 

Ooer Net . — . 
Operator*— 

6-0 

*15 

127 

07* 

HttaH. 

1985 1984 


1985 

1984 

Revenue 

171 T 959730. 

Year 

•rofits 

1*570. 20700. 

Revenue 

3530. 

4jna 

,»er Stare — 

*97 1259 

Oper Net 

. 51 JO 

63.0 

r- trillion. 

Ooer Share- 

172 

7-36 


= i.l'olied SlalM 

- Day co 

Hi Poor. lfSS 19W 

tevenue 534.1 341.4 



IMS nets Induce tax credits 
of SSI million til Quarter and 
o!SM million In year, out ox- 
dude prevision of SS7 million 
In boffi ocrlods. 


Gulf A western 
1st floor. 1985 19M 

Rnum aw 4015 

Oder *wt 5*0 327 

Oner Shorn— 077 (US 

Heinz (H-M 

M floor. IMS 198* 

Revenue 1090. UMQ- 

Net Income - 74.* 4*-7 

Per Shore — 0J5 050 

111 Haw 1985 1*8* 

Revenue 7.170. 2MD. 

Net Income _ 15*5 141 j 

Per Stare _ 1.14 1JO 

MH oer shore mutts restat- 
ed to redact a 2 - for - 1 stock 
soil! ettoettvo Seat. SX IMS. 


Supervalu Stores 
3rd Ooar. 1985 1984 

Revenue 1,970. 1.500. 

Net Inc. Z1IB 2054 

Per Shore — 071 038 


However, he warned that Wall 
Street’s current rally is “lasing 
strength.” The firm’s own market 
monitor, a collection of indicators, 
now stands at plus 3, compared 
with a plus-7 reading at the end of 
September when the market was 
bottoming. 

‘The way momentum is declin- 
ing," he said, “ray guess is it will 
reach neutral territory about 
March." 

He noted that one of the moni- 
tor’s main components just turned 
negative, as the earnings rate 
moved below the yield for T-bills. 
A year ago, earnings stood a full -2 
percentage points higher. 

Yet Mr. Moltz thinks the picture 
for corporate profits will look pro- 
gressively better in 1986, partly be- 
cause quarterly comparisons with 
this year’s weak performance will 
get easier. He said the improve- 
ment overall should be in tbe area 
of 10 p a t e nt to 15 percent 

“But for the stock market right 
now, analysis are nervous because 


they see stock prices go up while 
tamings are going down,” he said. 
But he pointed out “Wall Street 
traditionally goes up in anticipa- 
tion of higher corporate profits." 

Asked what tbe current mood 
there is, he replied: “Surprisingly 
somber with a measure of suspi- 
cion.” 

The firm’s investment recom- 
mendations cover three broad ar- 
eas. The most promising, he said, is 
the sector where profit margins 
have long been depressed but show 
signs of improving. High technol- 
ogy is the main beneficiary, with 
the favorite stocks running from 
large companies such as Honeywell 
and Motorola to small outfits such 
as Gerber Scientific and Diceon 
Electronics. 

In the second category — com- 
panies offering high unit growth — 
he placed Lomas & Nettlmon at the 
top of the list. Johnson & Johnson 
rates first in the third promising 
area, he said, where strong market 
share is 'the attraction. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 
ESCORT 

SBIVICE 

USA A WORLDWIDE 

Head office in N«w York 
330 W. 5£th Si, N.YjC 10019 USA 

21 2 - 765-7896 
212 - 765-7754 

MAJOR CREDIT CARDS AND 
CHECKS ACCEPTED 




*• top A mart 

■BKh idhw booeiJ onitM b y ^ 

bthxSng radio and TV. 


LONDON 

KENSINGTON 

ESCORT SERVICE 
3 KBKMGTON CHURCH ST. W8 
TEL 937 9136 OR 9379133 
r* u major awB card* nmnpiirt 


LONDON 

’brimon Escort Agency 

67 ChUtoni Street, 
London WT 

T* 486 372* or 4*6 1158 
U major orwit card* accepted 


ill l* 1 




5 LONDON ★ 

EXECUTIVE BOOST SERVICE 
402 7600 or 499 2225 


LONDON 

BRGftAVlA 

Ewart Sw vi ea. 

Tel: 736 5877. 




AR1STOCATS 

Escort Santa. 

,T28 Wgnore St., London W.l. 
«|P marif Credit Cock Accepted 
fr Tel <J7 47 4 W <742 


12 noon ■ tadnijjht 


■ -ft BITBmtSES WC Escort Set- 
>.01 575 8238 London. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


London Town 
ESCORT SBVN3E 
MORMNGS T1U. MfDMGHT 

724 2972 OR 724 2952 


CAPRICE-NY 

ESCORT SBIVICE IN NEW YORK 
TR: 212-737 3291. 


MAYFAIR CLUB 

ES CORT SRV1CE from 5poi 
ROTTERDAM (O) 10-254155 
TTC HAGUE (O) 7040 79 96 


* LONDON CHELSEA * 

ESCORT 5SCVKS. 

51 Beaudoin? Plot* 5W1. 

TeL 01 584 6513/2749 V*-T2 pm) 


ZURICH 

AlEXK ESCORT SHOTS 
TAi 01/47 55 82 


ZURICH 

S trnimm hn escort + aside Marin 
T* 01/57 n 96 


AMSTERDAM 

EURO ESCORT SERVICE 

020 - 271001 


* JASMINE * 

AMSTBOAM ESCORT SBIVICE 
020-366655 


LONDON ACE 

Escort Suva. Teb 584 3777/8/9 
Cre* Carek. 11cm tf ndnghi 


* Madrid Taste * 

Escort Service. 4117257. Cmd* 


ESCORTS « GUIDES 

ZURICH-GENEVA 

GMGBTS BCOKT SBV1GL 

TH: 01/ 363 08 64 -022/34 41 86 

rome cub non escort 

& Guile SaryiakTeh 06/589 2604- 589 
1146 (from 4 pm to 10 pm] 

** GENEVA-FIRST * + 

Escort Service + waefcaad 86 05 19 

GBCVA ESCORT 

SOVKE. Tel: 46 11 58 

iONDON BEST ESCORT SSNKE 
Heattrow end Carer o( London. 
CrecSt Conk Rat 235 2330 

******GMVA BEST 

ESCORT SERVICE. 022 / 86 15 95 

GBCVA * BEAUTY* 

BCORT SERVICE. 022/29 51 30 


RANKfURT - AN0BJNA*S Eoeort 

Service. Tei QS9/1344151. Cred*oards 

HUNHUET - MMHUK &COT1 

Service. Tet 069/1344138. Cm* cord* 

GBCVA - HB«E ESCORT SOVKX 
Tet 36 29 32 

AMSTBOAM JEANET Emn Service 
Tet (OMJ 326420 or 340110 


1 hmmm 


ISAfKRRT 6 AREA. SMONF5 b*- 

fauud asoort ond (ravel iwvcai Trt 
62 SB 05. Credt cards accepted. 


GBCVA-ZURKH AMA Female & 
Male esovt isnnoe. MuttnguoL 
022/34 29 55. 


AMSTERDAM BBMADBTE MALE 

and fa nc/e Escort Service. (D) 20- 
327799 


DUSSBDORF - COLOGNE - BONN- 

Essen. Pom's escort & Venal service. 

AH era*! cat*. 0211-395066 


MADRID IMPACT escort cmd aw de 

service. lAtfngocL 267 4142 


LONDON TRUCK ESCORT Service. 

Tel: 01-373 8849. 


LONDON ESCORT AGB40T. 

Tet 935 5339. 


LONDON ESCORT SBVKE Tel. 937 

6574. 


ATHENS ESCORT AND GUIDE Ser- 

vice. Teb B0B619* 


LONDON GGME ESCORT Service. 

Tel: 370 7151. 


CIUSTA, LONDON SCANDINAVIAN 

Escort Service. B34 0871. 


SAMANTHA ESCORT SBTVia U*v 

don. Tet 01-328 MS?. 


LONDON, HEATHROW VITO* Es- 

cort Senes. Tel: (01) 386 7671 


HONG KONG: VIPS Western Escort 

Service, fonfaon 7243301/668480 


COIBMAflEN Mia SconSncnia Es- 

cort Service. Tet 01-54 1706 


NEW YOBC-LD5 ANGBES. bee s 

Escort Service. 212-31 53B99. 


HtANKRJRT 9- AREA Oviaino Escort 

Seniae. 069/364656. Credt Cards 


LONDON PARK LATE Escort Semen. 

Tel 01-821 0283 


LONDON ORBITAL GURtt Service. 

Tel: 01-243 1442 


LONDON ERtKA ESCORT Service. 

Tel 01-235 4046. 


VIENNA - XANADU ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tel 75 57 20. 


DOMNA AMSTERDAM ESCORT 

Guide Service. Tet fXXj 762842 


LOUDON HBKH SPEAKING Escort 

Service. TeL 5B9 4900, 1 . IQ pn. 

MAMS SELECTIONS. BCORT Ser- 

vice. 4011507. Credrt Cock. 


MUNICH SECRET BCORT & Guide 

Service. Tel: OW/ 44 96 0S& 


NEW YORK. MIA 8. Renee Escort 

Service. 21 2-223-0670. On* cards. 


QIAStBE GBCVA GUIDE Seme*. 

TeL- 283-397 


hostile takeovers to 50 percent or 
the total cost could harm its ability 
to take over Carbide. But GAF 
noted that the rule would not be 
adopted before Jan. I and that 
there was “no certainly” the rule in 
its final form would apply to GAF. 

Chi the New York Stock Ex- 
change, Union Carbide's shares, 
which rose $3375 on Monday, fell 
$2 Tuesday, to S64.375, in excep- 
tionally heavy trading GAF. which 
jumped SID on Monday, rose 
52J>0, to S60.125. in light datings. 

The traders credited GAFs price 
rise partly to tbe possibility of a 

Carbide counteroffer for GAf. 


(Continued from Page I) 

has repeatedly *aid that it plans to 

E reduce its full quota of 435 mil- 
on barrels a day. 

Nor do producers outside OPEC, 
seem at all willing to make any 
major cuts in production. 

The lower oil prices resulting 
from u battle for market share 
would translate into lower inflation 
and interest rates in most countries. 
If oil prices settled at about S2Q. 
according to economists ai Phillips 
& Drew, a London stock brokerage, 
economic .growth in the major in- 
dustrial countries would be a quar- 
ter percentage point greater than it 
would have been without cheaper 
oil in 1986 and half point greater in 
1987. Inflation would be half point 
lower in 1986 and 1.25 points lower 

in 19S7, Phillips & Drew estimated. 


Banks that lent heavily on (In- 
security of oil would be hurt, as 
would some big non-OPEC oil pro- 
ducers. Bui OPEC might not be as 
successful as it hopes to be in forc- 
ing others to help share the burden 
or falling oil prices. 

In Britain, for example, lower oil 
prices would have a broadly neutral 
effect over the long run. many 
economists say. Oil accounts for 
only about 6 percent of the coun- 
try’s total output of goods and ser- 
vices. according to Simon & 
Coates, another stock brokerage. 
Lower oil revenue would leave the 
government less room for planned 
tax cuts, hut the economy would be 
stimulated by lower energy costs. 

Most OPEC countries are far 
more dependent on oil. and ana- 
ivsts doubt ihai thev will be able to 


gain enough in volume to make up 
for the drop in price. 

In Nigeria, oil accounts for more 
than 9(1 percent i»f export earning*. 
The country’s oil output is estimat- 
ed at 1.7 million barrels a day. 
which would provide total revenue 
of S4S million a day with price.-: 
averaging S28 a barrel. An average 
price of 520 would mean that, even 
at the country's maximum sustain- 
able output of around 1 .9 million 
barrels a day. revenue would be 
only S3S million. 

For all the brave talk of match- 
ing non-OPEC producers “cent for 
cent," many delegates left the 
OPEC meeting in' Geneva with 
grave misgivings. “It’s a risky 
game." one said as the meeting 
broke up. “We might cause a price 
war. We might lose." 








LONDON Q9&Y JAMNBE BCORT 

Service. TeL 01 821 0627. 

1. V.'J*! 

i ' ■ 

PT Tf > i if il'.-rf* :• 







y 1 j 1 g, )'i ■Bi 

k-f.’ 

KARBI fRAMOUKT ESCORT Service 

TeL 069/88-62-88 




ii tii ,, ^>a ll ^ 

HAMBURG > SABRMA bcort Ser- 
vice. TeL D40/5S 65 35. 



BRU55B5. CHANT AL BCORT SiF 
viate TeL 02/520 23 65. 



| L *" 



5HARUE UNION ESCORT Agmy. 
Teh 01-579 6430 


ADVERTISEMENT 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Dec. 11, 1985 

UM goaf vahM mwi l ari nm ore ivpBltert by Me Fatal listed win* tta exception M some motel based on issue price. 

Tbe marginal symbols indicate frequency ef q octet Ion* supplied: <dl - dally; {■»> - weekly; Lb) - M-monttiiy; (r) - regularly; o) - irregularly. 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 

-tw) At-Mol Trust. SA. 


BANK JULIUS BAER £ CO. UO. 




-I d ) Eauitaer i 

■-(d) EauKxwr Europe. 
-(0 i Equiboef- Paeiflc_ 
■ latGrobor— . 

-£ d I Stockbar . 


8np interfunds 

-lw) Intsrbota Fund 

■l*v> imercunrtacy UU- 


f 189.10 

SF 933.U 
$F 132X00 
_ 9 1226X00 
&F 143DJU0 
SF 1229.00 
SF 168200 
SF 149200 


•<wl Intarcurrencv DM___ DM XlM 

-(wl intercurreacv Sterling c laxl 

-twl intarequltv FsctUc Otter V ul?s 

-in) Intereaurtv M. Amor. Offer S 1040 

BAMqUE INDCKUEZ 

-(d) ABan Growth Fund I 1178 

-LwlOiverband SF ss 

-tw) FIF-Ameilcn S 18.13 

-Lwl FIF-Euroee S 14.15 

-4dl FiF-lniornaiMnoi * n.iv 

-fwl FIF.pociflC * 2078 

-(d) indasuo: MidttbonasA * ncL59 

-id) InOOsues Multtbonds B t 18209 

-(d) indueuez usd immfi s 10*457 

bniTANMltePOb 371. St. taWor. Jmn 

•(w) BmXMlar Income * 0482- 

-( w ) Brtt4 Money. CuiT * UU5 

-(d) BrtLiniLSMcnoojJortf $ 1.175 

-(d) BrIL mtU Asanau-PorTi C 119J 

-<w) BrIL Am. Inc. £ Fa Ltd * 1.144 

•(w) BrlLGoW Fund S 0403- 

■Iwi BrltAnanaaXurrencv c 1418- 

Hd) BriLJoaanOir PerLFd * 1.177 

(w) Brltjorsev Gill Fund t 0218 

•(d) Bill. World Lets. Fund S 12« 

-Id) Brtl. World Tecta. Fwid. « 0423 

CAPITAL INTERMATIONAL 

-(w) Capital inti Fund 0 4SJB 

-tw) Cart to I irano 5 a 0 1946 

CITICORP INVESTMENT BANK (LinJ 
POB 1373 Luxembourg Tol.477.9SJ1 

(d ) QHnvosf ECU ECU 101446 

Id i attevert Lteuldltv S 101620 

CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) 

Adlans Sulssos SF MUM 

Bond Valor Sort SF IOHO 

Bond Voter D-morti DM I06J5 

Bond valor US-dollar S 11041 

Bond VOior tSterllna £10013 


Band Voter Yen 

Convert VOtor Sort. 


Yon lOMOO 
SF 12305 


Convert Valor US-OOLLAR. t 124.95 
SF 49500 


SF 7S00 

SF 17000 

CS Money Markat Fund 5110400 


CS Fonos-inn_ 


CS Money Momot Fund— DM1044.00 

CS Money Mortal Fund c lOSCOO 

cs Money Mortal Fd Yen. Yioauun 


«1] Enerale-Valar . 




Eurooo- voter. 
PocJflc -Valor. 


SF 144JS 
SF 6(500 
SF 17000 
SF 14225 


DREXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC 
Winchester Howie . 77 Lond on Wall 

LONDON EC2 (01 92D9797) 

■ (wl Finsbury Group Lid 5 12941 

-(m) Winchester Dlversl (led - I 2l.ro* 

-Im) Winchester Flnondol Ltd. S 944 

■(m) Winchester Franilor lOaoe 

. 5184045 


-(w) Winchester Holdings. 


-I w) Worldwide Securities . 
-(wl worldwide Seeclrt . 


DIT INVBSTMENT FFM 
-+( a ) Concentre 


DM 2444 


-4-Id) inti Rontentend DM 9291 

Dim A Horfltt * Uoyd Soorite Brasuls 

-Im) D&H Commocflty Pool *3*323 — 

-Im) Currency * Gold Pool * 1*4JC — 

-Im) Wbicn. Ufe Put. Pool *s»32J — 

-(m) Tran* World Put. Pool »«79.98 — 

EBC TRUST CO.U ERSE T) LTD. 

1-3 EoaiO SI_St. Heller .-0534-3*331 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 

£{d)lnc.:Bld S 1045-Offer 510 l979- 

gldlCop.: BW 4 1217 Offer 512S55 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 
-(dl snort Term 'A‘(Accuni)_ s Mas* 
•rd i Btart Term A (Di«n__ s i-oobi 
-( d i Start Term ‘B 1 (Actum) __ * 12957 
-t d I Short Term 'B' (Dlstrl — _ * 0.9647 


•tw) Luna Term S 2SJ3 

FAC MGMT.LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
1. Laurence Fount v Hill, EC*. 01-4234480 

•twl FbC Atlantic * UAS 

•Iwl F&C European * 7 d.11 

•Iwl FACOrtenfal * 32)7 

FIDELITY POB *7b Hamilton Ber m uda 
-(ml FAA Holdings S 77.17 


-Id) Fidelity Amer. Assets 

-I d 1 FKteiliv Australia Fund 

-I d I Final I tv Discovery Fund. 

-t d 1 Fidelity Dir. Svos.Tr 

d) Ftdeiiiv For Eost Fund 

.d) Fidelity Inti. Fund 

Id) Fidelity Orlenr Fund 

-Id S Fidelity Frontier Fvnd - 

d) Fidelity PocHIc Fund. 


77.17 
5 1145 

* ltt«9 

S 12259 
5 24.91 
5 77.91 

* 3228 

* 1543 
*152.79 

5 I4J4 
I 39.17 


-(d) Fidelity SpcI.Grawtn Fd. 

Id) Fldelliy World Fund 

FORBES PO BBS? GRAND CAYMAN 
London Agent 01-83*3013 

•Iwl Do! lor Income S 648 

-I * I Forbes High Inc. GUI Fd t 9LDC 

Hwl Goto Income S 7.98 

-(«) Gold Appreciation S 443 

•Im) Strategic Trodino * 1-50 

GEFINOR FUNDS. 

-iwl East Investment Fund * 44291 

-Iwl Seoftksn World Fund l 1X95 

•Iwl Stale SI. American * 17448 

London: 01-4914230. Geneva: 41 -223555X 

8LOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. 

pb 119 , Si peter Port, Guernsey. 0481-28712 

•tw) FutorGAM SJL * 12227 

-Iwl GAM Arbitrage Inc 5 14285 

-Cwl GAMerlca Inc * 15 o54 

-Iwl GAM Australia Inc S 99.18 

-I W ) GAM Boston Inc S II9Q6 

-fw) GAM ErmMaM 5 1761 

Iwl GAM Frone vnl SF 12347 

-Iwl GAM Hong Kong Inc. 5 9922 

-I w) GAM International mc_. S 14250 

-4 w) GAM Japan Inc. - 5 12263 

-Iwl GAM North America Inc S 11241 

-(w) GAM N. America Unit Trust. ii17Sp 

Iwl GAM PoclllC Inc 5 13273 

I W I GAM Peta 2 Chor. Worldw. — llN.BBp 
-Ha) GAM Pens, ft Ctar.u K.Fd— 107-30 p 

-Iwl GAMrlnt * 11423 

Iwl GAM Smoapore/Moloy Inc— * 81.12 
Iwl GAM sierl & I nil Unit Trusl— 15215* » 

-<w) GAM Worldwide Inc - S 19445 

-(wl GAM Tvcbe S A. Class A 5 13921 

-IwlGSAM Interest Inc. UJOrd- * 9*97 
(wl GSAM interest Inc U4 See— * 9745 

-Iwl GSAM Interest Inc SF 9941 

(wl GSAM Interest Inc Yen 9.944 

Iwl GSAM Interest Inc DM 9VJ8 

-Iwl GSAM Interest Inc.— - c laoxo 

G.T. MANAGEMENT I UK) Ltd, 

- d) Berry Poc FALtd. 5 11 J7 

- r)G.T. Applied Science S 1443 

- d l G.T. Asean H.K. GwttvFd * 11.72 

d ) G.T. Asia Fund S 436- 

dl G.T.AusIrollo Fund- * 25.73* 

- d ) G.T. Europe Fund * 1449 

- wl G.T. Euro. Small Cos. Fund — S 15.97 

4flBT nolter Fund . _ I 14JJ 

d > G.T. Bond Fund S 1285 

- d ) G.T. Global Tectintev Fd - * 1X70 

- d ) G.T. Honshu Pathfinder - * XUI4 

d I G.T. invest men! Fund S 21 JO 

- w ) G.7. joaon Small Co. Fund _ * 50.43 

“ ... 5 26.16 

t 121* 

IT. INTLSA 


-L r 1 GlT. Toefmotegy Fund 

•Id) G.T South China Fund-. 
HILL SAMUEL INVEST. MO I 
Jersey, PX3. Bok 4X Tel OSM 7t 
Berne, PXS. Ba> 2632 Tol 4131 1 

rid) Crossbow (Far East) 

-(d) C5F I Balanced] 

-( d I EiKooean Equity Fund— 

rid) Intnl. Bond Fund 

Id) rnl. Currency U.S. 

-Id 1 ITF Fd (Technology). 


51 

SF llJt 
SF 2477 
DM 1147 
. I 1041 
5 24.95 

. 5 1533 

3044 


(dl O'Seas Fa (N.AMERICAI— * ... 

JARDINE FLEMING. POB 70 GPO He Kg 
•< r 1 J.F CurrenevB.Bond— __ * 14)9 

•( r 1 J.F Hong Kong Trust-- 5 37JB 

-I r 1 J.F Pacific income Trust Y 2*48 

•( r I J.F Japan Trust Y 4811 

•( r I J.F Japan Trchnotoey Y Z0JI8 

-I r ) J.F Pacific Sec^.(Acc) * 2648 

LLOYDS BANK INTL, POB 432 Geneva 11 

•+(w) Ltovds infT Dollar—.. S 10770 

-+(W) Lloyds Int'l Europe SF 13230 


-He) Ltoyds Inti Growth. SF 1 7270 

-4iw) Lteyds mil Income - SF EiM 

-FI w) Lloyds InlT N. America * 111 JO 

•Hwl Llavds tna PocMlc SF txxso 

-M w I Uoyds inti. Smaller Cos_ * 1541 

NIMARBEN 

■ t a I Class A 5 9442 

-tw I Class B - Hi S 10743 

(w ) Class C - Japan S 10059 


OBLIFLEX LIMITED 

■4 w | MulHcurrencv 

•Iwl Dollar Medium Term, 
-(wl Da l lor Long Term 

•(w> Japanese Yen 

-Iwl Pound Sterling . ■ ■■ . 
-tw) Deutsche Mart — . — 

-CW) Dutch Florin 

Iw) Swiss Frae 


5 1242 

* 1141 

.* 1144 

-1 1341 

t 1096 

DM 1042 

FL 1040 

— SF 10 14 


1170 


ORANGE NAS5AU GROUP 
PB *5571 The Haoue (070) 46*670 

-(dl Bever Beleortn»*frt-*\ 5 

PARI5BAS-GROUP 

10 1 Cortona International S 29 j: 

fdlECUPAR ECU 103844 

Iwl OBLI-DM DM124271 

(Wl OBLIGESTIOM, SF 9145 

Iwl OBL1 -DOLLAR 51143.94 

tw)OBLl-YEN. 


(w) OBLI-GULOEN- 
-(d) PAROIL-FUND- 


_ Y 1055*5.00 

FL 1061.74 

... 5 9970 

Id) PAREUROPE GROWTH *11.93 

(d) PARINTER FUND— - 5 13207 

-( d ) PARINTER BOND FUND 5 12*7 

-Idl PAR US Troae. Bond Tl B‘. 1 11644 
ROYAL B. CANADA4>OB MAGUERNSEY 
•+( w I BBC Canadian Fund Lid. - * 12.07- 

-F(wl BBC For East* Port nc Fd. S 12TO 

-Fi w) RBC mrl Capital Fd * 77.96 

-F(w> HBC Inti IrrattM Fd 5 1142* 

-*-1 d I RBC MtaCurrencv Fd * 2734 

-F( w) RBC North Amer. Fa I TC.7P 

5KANDIFOND INTL FUND (464-234278) 

-(w)lnc-: BW .S 445 Offer S 698 

-(W)ACC: Bid S 648 Offer S 700 

SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

17 Devon snlrr Sa-Lmdonri)1.377-U40 

-I r) SHBBono Fund S 2574 

-(wl SHS Inti Growth Fund 5 S*48 

SWISS BANK CORP. (I55UE PRICES) 

-Id) Arnerko-Vater SF 51125 

Id) D-Mark Bono Selection — DM 12134 

I d > Dollar Bond Selection S 14107 

-Idl Florin Bond Selection - FL 12876 

I d I Intervator SF B*25 

( d ) Japan Portfolio SF 910.7S 

Idl Stertlnd Bond Setectton f 108.74 

( d ) Swiss Forrton Bond Set SF 11135 


( d I Sort S3 valor New Serk _ 

-( d ) Universal Bond Select.. 
-( d 1 Universal Fund. 


SF 391.75 
SF 7*75 
SF 12(74 
y ioaiijoq 


-Id ) Yen Bond Selecfion 

UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

(d I AlPCB U.S. Sb SF 34.75 

-I a \ Bona- Invest SF isso 

-Idl FonSd Swiss Sh.. — 5F 17930 

-Id) Jopon- Invest SF 95500 

-i d ) Saul South Afr. Sh. — SF moo 

-tdisjma (stock price) SF 23700 

UNION INVESTMENT FrnoKterl 
lelu.lr.eln _ DM 40.10 

( d ) Unlfonds DM 2940 

-(d) Unlrofc DM 8375 

-Idl UNIZINS - DM 10730 

Other Funds 

(wl Art I bands Invovtments Fund. 

Iw) Arthrost inn 

(mi Allied Ltd— 

(w) Aou 1 lo International Fund — 

( r ) Arab Finance if 

1 r ) Arlpne 


w) Truacor inn Fd. (aeifi. 
w) Bondselex-lssue Pr. ___ 
ml Canada Gid-Martgage Fd- 
d) Capital Presorv. Fd. lnf(._ 
wl Citadel Fund- 


tmt Cteveland OttshoroFd.. 
Iw) Columbia Securities.—- 
(r)COMETE. 


tw) Convert. Fd. Inl'l A Certs- 
(wl Convert. Fd. inl'l B Cerli- 

(w) DalMd Japan Fund 

Iwl D C C. 


-I d > Dolla-Soer bond Fd — 
-l d i D-mark. Baer Bond Fd- 


2530 
1730 
_ * 475 

- * 17*57 

- * 94440 

- *195738 
_ 5 11AI 

SF 13900 
~ * *73 

_ S 11.74 
_ * 1.82 
_ *2369.15 
FL 104.91 

- S 94437 

- S 1176 
_ S 33.90 
. Y 10674 

- S 9*92 

- 5 105700 
DM 103100 


id I D Winer tr.ia wide ivt Tsr s 113) 

i r I Drallar Invest. Fund N.V * 1721*4 

I d I Drertes America Fund * 1004 

\OI Drstlus Fund Inl'l * 4139 

Iwl Drntos Intrrcontinen! * 1644 

Iwl The Establishment Trust- -- * 124 

( a I Europe OStaOlions. Ecu 6406 

(wl First Eagle Fund 5 10028.93 

1 r I Fifty Slors Ltd — * 9SS6S 

(wl Fired Income Trans * 10-95 

(wl Fansrlei luue Pr SF 7Q3 00 

(wl Faroktend S 729 

(wl Formula Selection Fd 5F 653 

I tt I Fatal fa I la 5 3763 

Id 1 Fronkl-Tri/sl Inter tins DM 41^0 

(Wl George Vihv.bouQF SU2X 

(d ) Covornm. Sec Fund* * *192 

(w) FioU5smonn HKteL N.V * 1*452 

(w)Hetlte Funds 5 134J6 

IW) Horlron Fund SI3S79S 

(ml IBEX Holdings Lre— SF 12178 

■ rl ILA-ICB S 1904 

% 1347 

5 19.09 

29276 
359 36 
1457 
69.79 
1053 
29.15 
131 17 
11*40 


( a I inlrrfuna SA 

(wl Inlermartrl Fund. 


a i l nier mining Mut. Fa Cl'S'- * 

I r I mrl Securilnts Fund * 

t d i inmmta DW. — DM 

1 r I Invert At’cntiaue? 5 

I r I Ifaiionutir mil FundSA 5 

(w) Japan select -an Fund ■ 

Iwl Japan Pad tic Fund. 


im) Jeftor Rim mu Lid S 1038125 

(a I Alrlnworf Bmvan in>'< Fd — * 2165 

(w) Klelnwori Btni Jdp FG S 88*1 

(w) Korea Growth Tresl KVII 9731 04 

S 1045 

Id I Lelcom Funa 

(w) Leverage Cap How 

I d > Ltoutboer 

iwl Ltnfunc 


(ml Mognotend N V — 

l a i Medulonum Sei. Fd — 

I r i Met pare 

(wl NAAT. 


a 1 Nlkko Growth Package Fd — 

wl Nippon Fond — 

ml NOSTEC Portfolio — _ 

w) Novatec investment Fund — 
wl NAJVLF.. 


fmlNSPFJ.T 

(a I Pacific Horiroo invi. Fd. 
(wl PANCURRI me . 


r | Par ion Sw. R EsI Geneva _ 

r I Per mu I Value N.V 

r ) Pleiades 

w | PSCO Funa N V 

Ml ) PSCO inti. N V 

w I Puinam Em. into Sc Tr 

d I Putnam imT Fund 

r l Prt-Tocn 

V.) Quantum Fund NV. _ — 

d! Renta Fuad 

d) Rentlnvest. 


* 1463*9 
1 19509 
*136600 

* eon 

S 11972 

* 2194 
102518 30 

5 11.14 

S 974990 
1 360?- 
S 5796 63 
S 13217 

* 17260 
S 181.9V 

_i im.it 
X 2126 
SF IJ97JJ0 

* 135329 
S 113774 

* 132*0 
S 105.46 
S 1204 
S 7*38 

* 943 JB 
*5841 75 

LF 282*00 

LF 105SS3 

( d ) Reserve Insured Depavts — 511243)1 

( w ) Rudolf WolH Fid Fd Ltd S 177100 

Iwl Samurai Poritoila — . SF 12*50 

Id ) SCI 'Tech SA Lukembourg- 5 11*6 

I w) Seven Arrows Fund N.V * 1011.05 

iw) Stale SI. Bank Eaultv HdgsNV— s 1070 
Iwl Siraiegv investment Fund — t 7474 

(d) Syntan Lto TCtossA)' * 1151 

(w I Techno Growth Fund SF 85 01 

( d I Thornton Australia Fa Ltd S 954 

(dl Thornton MK. * Chino * 10.15 

Idl Thornton Japan Fund Lid S 17)5 
(dl Thomion Orient jnt Fd Lld_ 5 1003 

(w) Tokyo Pac Hold. (Seal * 11149 

Iwl Tokyo Pac Hold. N.V 5 15279 

Iw) Tronsnodllc Fund S 102.13 

|w) Trans Europe Fund . - FI 5379 

C d I TurauoHo Fund 5 119*2 

(w) Tweedy.Brownen.v CtessA_ 5 234*06 
(w) TwoedvJrowno n.vXIoeoB— *160*83 

(ml Twt>Cfly3rowrw (U.K-) nv 5103389 

(d)UNICOFund, DM 7400 

td) UNI Bond Fund *11915* 

I r I UNI Capital Fund * 173750 

Id) us Federal Securiies— 5 in so 

I a I US Treasury Income tend 5 

(Wl votterblll Assets 5 1286 

t a) World Fund SJL 5 lib 


DM- Deutsche Mark; BF- Belgium Franca; FL- Dutch Flortn; LF • Luicembourg Francs; ECU ■ European Currency Unit; SF- Swiss r Francs; a- astad; + -OHer Prtocs;b - but change 
P TV CM to SI gar unit; HA- Nat Available; NC-- NotCamawnlait«d;a- New; S • suspended: S/S- Stack Split; - - Ex-otvtdeod; - - Es-Rts; — ■ Gross Pertormanca tad»« November: • - 
Rettempt- Price- Ex-Coupon; m - Formerly Worldwide Fund Ltd; 9 • OHer Price incl. 3% orellm. choree: ** - dally stock price os an Amsterdam Slock Exchange 


IF YOU CAN TELL US EXACTLY 
WHAT THESE WILL BE WORTH 
IN SIX MONTHS TIME, 



YOU MAYNOT NEED 
OUR OPTIONS. 


Only last year the Chicago 
Mercantile Exchange launched its 
options on the Deutschemark and it 
quickly became the most actively 
exchange - traded currency option 
in the world. 

And now, with CMFs latest 
options on the British Pound and 
Swiss Franc, together with an 
interest rate option on the Eurodollar, 
corporate treasures, bankers and 
dealers have even greater flexibility in 
managing rate uncertainty. 

Corporate treasurers use CM E 
options as “insurance policies” 
against future rate fluctuations in 
hedging strategies, tender or take- 
over situations and as an insulation 
against translation exposures* 

Leading banks, institutions and 
government dealers use CME options 
as an essential dealing and arbitrage 
tool to lay off foreign currency and 
interest rate risk. The high volume of 
CME options and the tight pricing 


which arises from the link between 
our options and futures contracts has 
enabled our customers to benefit 
from an improved and even more 
sophisticated service. 

For a free copy of “Options on 
Currency Futures: An Introduction" 
and/or “Options on Eurodollar 
Futures: An Introduction", write to 
or telephone Keith Woodbridge or 
Nell McGeown at Chicago Mercantile 
Exchange, 27 Throgmorton Street 
London, EC2N 2 AN. 

Telephone: 01-920 0722, 

Telex: 892577 IMMLON G. 

-fcS- CHICAGO 
sag MERCANTILE 
EXCHANGE 

International Monetary Market - Index and Option Market 

FUTURES AND OPTIONS WDRLDWDE 

27 Throgmorton Street London EC2N SAN 0 1 -920 0722 
30 South Wacker Drive, Chicago. Illmots 60606 
31 2/930-1 000 

67 Wall Street New York 1 0005 2 1 2/363*7000 


*■4 


— Try 










































I k>tf£t* , IISf!SH-ni(i'gw-i|MUi*-nnu< 


Page 12 



Wfed nesdare 

AMEX 


Tables indiMle me iwtioowMe prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER' 12, 1985 


IZManffi 

HMUwJM 


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ljft Aft Bush 


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35 ft ft ft — ft 
52 8ft 8 BW + W 

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71. 5% Sft 5% 

90 8* 8ft 0Vi + ft 


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8 ft 

141ft 

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12% 12ft 12% 
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416 5% AM 

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816 7ft tft 
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8 ft 8ft 8ft 


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lift 10 
14ft 10% 
151ft 9* 

24 15% 

23% 14 
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4 21ft 
12% 7ft 
7% 2% 

Ste % 

4% 316 

4% Sft 
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IM 1016 
SOW 22V 


KlfGS Of 4JD 1M 
KOPofcC 2 

KdvCP 3D U 10 
Kflvjn JOe 2.1 12 
KearNt 40 23 It 
Kenwin JOa 43 9 
Ketchm 451 33 20 
K*yCoB .151 4J 71 
KevCoA .150 43 21 
KevPh J0I 27 

KevCo 8 

KevCdWf 
KJddewt 
Kbwrtc 
KlrtJV 

KltMfa 15 

Kisssrv JOr 1 
Knoll 15 

KoacrC 232 BJ) 94 


38% 38 
Xft 3% 
15 14ft 
14% 14% 
134ft 13 
IB* 18* 
Mft 18* 
31ft 3ft 
m 3* 

n* 

aw 2 ft 
ft * 
3* 3U 
3* 3* 
2ft 216 
5* 516 
2* 216 
14* 141ft 
24* 26 


38 - * 
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15-16 
14*- * 
13* + * 
18*— * 
2D* +1* 
3*— 1ft 
1* 

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2ft— ft 
* 

316 

iw- * 

£ + 16 
14* + * 
36* + * 


24% 14* 
22* 15* 
12 4* 

16* 516 
28* 17* 
24* 18* 
27ft 10* 
7* a* 
7ft + 

I 4* 
7* 4* 

2* I 
24* 16 
17* 6* 
14* 816 


OEA 

Oofcwd S 
OefcHAn 
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Oh Art 

onalnd 
Olsten* ■ 
OOkiep 

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OdofHB 
Ormond 
OSulvn i 
OxfrdF 
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34 J41B 
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j05b I.I 

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30 15 V 

42 IJ 17 

JBt 4J I* 

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21 If* Wtt 

80 18 17* 

36 7% 7 

15 7* 7* 

47 »% 28* 
14 20* 7IH6 
51 28* 27ft 
18 4'6 4 

6 4ft 4* 
4 5ft Sft 

7 5% 5% 

4 1 1 

20 251« 25 
40 17* 17V. 
370 13* 13% 


191k 

IB + ft 
71ft 

7 *— ft 
29% + 7ft 

2016— ft 
28* +lft 


2 1* 
I*" 1* 
20 % 20 
20* 20ft 
9* 9ft 
4* 4* 

17 14* 

8 7ft 
34(6 5416 
6* 6* 
4* 6ft 
3216 31* 
1* 1H 

VS 

3 3 

1 * 1 * 
2016 20ft 
44* 43 
18% 18ft 
13* 12* 
12 1116 
MW 14ft 
12 lift 


2 

1* + * 
20 — ft 
20*— ft 
9* + 16 
*ft— ft 
17 + VI 
7* 

3416 

6*— ft 
6* + ft 
31*— ft 
1* + ft 

V* 

3 

1* 

2816 + 16 
44* +1* 
18ft— * 
13ft + * 
11* + ft 
1416 + ft 
12 + ft 


4*- Hi 
25ft 
2 * 

12* 

11* + ft 

2W~ % 
Sft— ft 
8* + ft 
3ft— ft 
Zft 


1 


5% +* 
■**— ft 
8 *-* 
9ft— 16 
* + ft 
3116 +1* 
22ft + ft 
15*— ft 
27* 

23 —1ft 


9* 

4ft EAC 

40 

44 

35 

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7 

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64 

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TO* S Quehss .14 11 


8 3* 
55ft 33* 

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416 2% 

9 3ft 

£ i 

40ft 30ft 
13% 3 

23ft lift 
2* I* 
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13 7ft 


ICEEn 9 

l CHs fl 

ICO 113 

IPM 

IRTCns 
impGu .We 3.1 
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94 1ft 
7 316 

11 «6 
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307 34* 
129 Aft 
101 2D* 
507 1ft 
15 2* 
148 12 


4 4% + ft 

51* 51* + ft 
1ft 1ft— ft 
316 316 — ft 

$r* 

36 34ft— % 

4ft 6ft— ft 
20ft 20ft + ft 
1* 1%— ft 

2ft 2W + ft 
11* 11*— ft 


17 12ft NRtAn 3M 203 651 13 12* 12ft— 16 


AMEXHighs-Lons 


NEW HIOHS 43 


ATT Fd 
Arundel 
CaroPL p* 
First corns 
Haiml wl 
Lorbnar 
MUnPLptC 
Olstan s 
PoilCorn 
Show Shoe 
UnAIrPnd 


Alamco 
CaroEntA 
Deimocl 
EnovDevI un 
MlaeRty wt 
PtlroUw 
SUHavmswt 
UnlvComm 


AlleuCowt 
Astm 
Citadel Hid 
Poodroma 
HallvCp wl 
MacNISch 
Moon B 
PCE 125nfC 
BM5 Electr 
SC6 759Pf 
UmvRuncBe 


Baruch Fool 
ConCH I Gas 
Dwtflntrnc 
EnerServ 
Murphvlnd 
propCopTr 
Tefeoonaol 
Vkrtccti Inc 


1316 11* 
24ft lift 
39% 31* 


Claremont 
Glatfitr 
Martnels 
Madia 
-MoaoA _ 
PGE ll2pfH 
RaganBrad 
Std Shares 
WorkWear 


Dotorom * 
Greiner 
' KayJewd n 
MercFdSLit 
OMaArtCa 
PGE194pfM 
SDte 7S0pt 
Stanwaad . 


Balden BUut 
CapiavPrapn 
Devon ncslnn 
GnDohao 
NRM EnOyn 
Seen hr® Ran 

TexocoCdoo 

VUWdtnm 


CdnOcdPI 
DomsEnovA 
EnovDevI wt 
McDowEnt 
NRM Eng pf 
Sterradn 
UNA Corn 


Choosing the right XO is easy 
when you can afford Remy Martin. 


IF YOU GET A KICK 
OUT OF SOCCER, READ • 

ROB HUGHES 

WEDNESDAYS IN THE IHT 


ft 9* 
* 1316 

ft TO* 
12 * 
31% 
9* 
20ft 
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3* 
22* 
77ft 
6 

20 % 
2* 

2*1 
416 


4* T Bar 
6* TEC 
4* TIE 
5* Til 
13* TabPrd 
6V. TondBr 
10ft Tastv 
2ft Team 
I* TchAm 
9* TctiSvm 


J3I M 39 
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23 

JO 1.1 13 
M 3,1 IS 


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42 18% 


11 HO IT-v 


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3* TedhTp 13 jy 51, 

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1 ft Technd 10 |5( 

•7 TelonR 100e .4 400 M0i230 


1*6 Tetecoo 
24ft Telllex JO 14 

B* TtHDIa A0 3 A 

416 Tel sci 
2 ft Telesah 

4 Tenney 

4ft Tensor 
21ft Te«Cda 1J0 
7* TexAir 
4ft TexAE J4I 69 
16ft T»«AE prL57 14j 
*■ ThorEn 


JO 14 17 85 3»’v 

40 3 A 16 241 11% 

47 43 8 

200 4 ft 

17 43 S* 

1 T’i 

I JO 194 21* 

„ 2 5642 17* 
J4I 49 34 5 

L57 14J 11 ISft 

15 12 % 

.10 JUS 14 B lit 


BftThrDA .10 JUS 14 B lit 
6ft Tolu 5 27 308 7*a 

28ft TolEdpI 425 127 ISO* 33ft 

55 TolEdPf BJ2 1Z8 3501 65 

51 TolEdpt 7.76 115 AOi 62 

45ft TolEd pnOJXl 1ZJ 30z TO 

2 * Tortel J9M62 32 2* 

(Condnued on Page 13) 


Hoailn^-Uaie Notes 




Dollar 


X- 


.4^ 


V 




K t M Y 


o 




$ 80* IS TREPIUC8QPA sura- 
uon xolThe nuce of an xo 

COGNAC MADE EXCLUSIVELY 
FHOU , GRAPES GROWN IN 


TWO BOOT RBOION8: 


TA GRANDE AND LA PETTra 
CHAMPAGNE, BY OFFICIAL 
DECREE. ONLY SUCH A COONAC 
HAS THE RIGHT TO SB CALLED A 
FINE CHAMPAGNE COONAC. 


THE XO COGNAC by REMY MARTIN 

Exclusively Fine Champagne Cognac 

•SUGGESTED RETAIL PRICE IN THE U.SjV PRICES ELSEWHERE MAY DIFFER. 


luuer/Mot. 
AIBtdiiMitS 
Allied irWin ' 
AHiedirWiD 
Allied IrtaPwp 
Arab Bko Corn 91794 
AttaMeRBlf/14 
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Been Roma mm 
Bae Ol Reman 
Bra Sorts Setrtto 9i 
BcoDISIdllnW 

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Bra CorpT7lMIWv) 
BA Baton 80 (Cat) 

Bk Greece 91/94 
8kGrerat91rt7 
BkHAhimd9tMinh' 
Dk Ireland BV 
Bkimradn 
BkMantmm 
BA Montreal »7 
Bk New York 94 
Bk Neva ScaHa8U93 
Bk Nairn ScoitaM 
Bk Samara Pen* 

Bk Tokyo n 

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M 4807 99 JO. 
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•ft 1603 99J4 99J4 
musioojo 
8ft 0705 9953 10083 
■ft 0604 10009100.11 
•ft 2604 18022TM3J 
Ift 1692 9943 99J3 
ft QWM 9 U 3 nun 
1ft 2945 99J2 99J2 
2605 9959 9018 
8* 0504 9955 9975 
ft 1M4 97J8 98J0 
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ft 1604 90*9038 
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8ft 2701 9975 18050 
8ft 2601 MOOT 0853 
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8* 2004 1104410054 
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ft - 99J7 18037 

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8ft TH2 NOlUHRM 
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Mi OMI WJ5 1025 
8ft 16R 10B59ML19 
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1 17411 9941 9971 

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M MISfflM 
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Bft 044D HtUnOUS 
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Bft - 1883510045 

M 9504 10805188.15 
8* 0*03 10U5H1.U 

!% ZMtoumoui 
I 1704 9940 9M1 
8ft ■ 180X18082 

M 8442 MQOJUBlIS 
M 954110988110.11 
8ft 3141 H1J4MUS 
M OI-OS M0OT00J3 
Ift 0443 HO.I310UI 
8% 13429958 19001 
8% W-H t*M MB09 
M 25029951 U0C 
M 2692 9947 9957 
M 1741 9157 9551 ■ 

-8ft -09811100*1 0014 
8* 114*100.1210022 
•H 11-92 HBJ0HB40 
Sft 18O2UB.H18M0 
jtt 0*04 mrtnoojt 
8ft - - 1801919820 
8ft IMS 9948 99 Jl 
8ft 2441 HUBdon 
«k 26829830 9145- 
M 2101 TOOBtaSJ 
Oft 2695994* 99 J4 

us D0S9U1 uata 

8ft KOI 99.55 9945 
8ft 31-01 noramja 
•ft isos uojnnojo 
fft OKfOMIIOM 
» 2402 99.13 9933 
Sft 27-12 M0J418DJ4 
•ft 2442 9821 5(43 
8% 3V12-9948-99J8 
•ft. HOB 9J48 99JI 
8ft OMI 9947 99J7 
Ift 130299* 188^ 

I* 84039935 18050 
9ft.Jf929M» 

IKSSO-n 9M4 9951 
6ft I3K9U5NU0 
M W-M 9952 9952- 


Non Dollar 


ftwer/AW. 


CwonNeut BU Ajfeo 




























































. INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12. 1985 


Page 13 



CURRENCY MARKETS 



_ ' \ 

*** 


{Caatinaed from Page 9) 
ave become, even more austerity 
pparently is needed, 
loco, for example, announced in 
ovember that it wotild indefinite* 
dose three Canadian aided 
lines next year and curtail prod uc- 
on at a fourth, lay OB’ 125 more 
‘orkers, and dose operations for 
i long as 10 weeks next summer, 
jmpared with seven this year. 
Nickel is now produced by more 
mn 40 companies, a nearly tenfold 
icrease from two decades ago. 
lany of these operations are gpv- 
nmeni owned or subsidized, un- 
ite the North American produo- 
s, and they routinely endure 
eses as a means of gathering for- 
gn exchange. 

World capacity — from France 
i Indonesia — has increased 25 
nrcent in the past 10 years. But 
anand has remained weak as vir- 
ally every product that contained 
ickd or nickel alloys — from cars 
i machine tods — became lighter 
r smaller or both. While demand 
icked up a bit in 1983 and 1984 — 
> 1285 billion pounds (.582 million 

Oograms) last year — it is still 
slow the 1979 total of 1.375 brl- 

oo pounds. 

Far from Inoo’s former ability to 
:t prices single-handedly, market 
trees, chiefly in the London Metal 
xchange, now often drive prices 
swnward. Spot prices fell from a 
of $323 a pound in March 
to a low of $ 1 .44 in November 
before rebounding. Nickel bit 
s high price this year in March, 
hen iL sold at $2.62. It has been 
aiding since, hurt most recently by 
. . te collapse of the tin cartel, which 
tused dealers to unload other met- 
s to cover tm losses. Nickel is now 
tiling at about $1.85. 

Producer prices are usually 15 
mis to 35 cents a pound higher 
tan the metal exchange spot price. 


“We’re not price makers anymore," 
said Waiter Curiook, executive vice 
president of loco. ’‘We’re price tak- 
ers now." 

Last year, Inco’s nickel prices 
were 30 percent below the 1980 
peak. The company cal culates that 
its pretax eamingg last year would 
have esreeeded $500 Bullion bad 
1980 minerals pikes prevailed. In- 
stead, Inco posted a pretax loss of 
$55nii0ioa. 

The solution for the mining in- 
dustry, nowhere more so than at 
Inca, has been to increase produc- 
tivity. 

“The mining industry, motivated 
by heavy losses, has probably ad- 
justed faster to new world realities 
than any other r»narfian indus- 
try," David Yuddman of the Cen- 
ter for Resource Studies at Queen’s 
University in Kingston, Ontario, 
wrote recently. 

For example, Inco is tal^ng big 
steps to cut its debt, reducing it by 
$186 million in the .first nine 
mouths of this year, to 5927.9 mfu 
Bon. 

An even greater component of its 
comeback strategy has been ending 
labor warfare. Last June, for the 
first time since 1972, a labor con- 
tract was signed without any work 
stoppage, much less the sort of vio- 
lence and sabotage once considered 
inevitable. 

Given the company’s difficult 
competitive environment, even 
Ron MacDonald, president of 
United Steelworkers of America 
Local 6500, which represents by** 
workers, sees the necessity of job 
cats. 

More important to the turn- 
around, however, are positive steps 
Inco officials have taken to get em- 
ployees involved. Bonuses for 
greater productivity are immensely 
popular, adding some $800 a 


month, or 40 percent, to the aver- 
age wage. 

Management also has gamed 
considerably greater flexibility 
through the union's agreement to 
decrease the number of job classifi- 
cations to 6 from 26. SmDariy, em- 
ployees eagerly submit suggestions 
for rewards of up to $10,000, and 
they attend meetings on such sub- 
jects as the world nickel market. 

"We don’t have to tell them the 
industry is-in trouble,” said Mi- 
ebad D. Sopko. president of Inco’s 
On ario {finnan. “They see it in the 
paper every day.” 

Indeed, probably the most close- 
ly read item in the local newspaper. 
The Sudbury Star, is the London 
Metal Exchange nickd price, which 
appears in the top right corner erf 

the front page. 

For Sudbury itself — a city erf 
157,000 dominated for generations 
by Inco— the layoffs at the mining 
company have been devastating. 
For many, unemployment benefits 
long ago turned into welfare, a pro- 
cess that is accelerating. 

But the city's bleak economic 
outlook has been moderated some- 
what because of the efforts of gov- 
ernment. A new $5-nu0ion make- 
work program is being readied by 
Ottawa and the province of Ontar- 
io- Subsidized colleges and hospi- 
tals have made Sudbury, where 
Inco amassed 70 percent of hs 
$1.47 trillion in 1984 revenues, the 
service center of northern Ontario. 

Inside the mines, technological 
improvements . have been crucial 
for Inco. New methods of “bulk” 
muting — in which ore is removed 
in huge 200-foot (60.8-meter) pan- 
els — are allowing miners to re- 
move 1,000 tons of me an hour, 10 
times previous levels in some cases. 

The miners are aided by huge 
new continuous loaders Inco has 
developed, by remote-control loco- 


motives and by other pieces of 
equipment that owe part of their 
genesis to the UJS. space program. 

A looming question now is 
whether Inco can continue its effi- 
ciency drive as it continues to show 
a profit A Utter exchange this' fall 
between Flora I. MacDonald. Can- 
ada's employment minister, and 
Charles F. Baird, Inco chairman 
and chief executive officer, points 
up the difficulties. 

Miss MacDonald, with the pub- 
lic support of Prime Minister Brian 
Mahoney, told the House of Com- 
mons that loco had returned to 
profitability “on the backs of the 
employees and is now threatening 
the employees, and indeed the 
community, with further layoffs." 

Mr. Baird fired off a telex saying 
that if Inco is to meet “the exhorta- 
tions of government" to improve 
productivity, further work force re- 
ductions are crudaL 


Semiconductor Index 
Improves in the U.S. 

Reuters 

SAN JOSE, California — A key 
indicator of the state of the U.S. 
semiconductor industry, the order- 
s-to-ddiveries ratio, rose to 0.90 
percent in November, the highest 
level in more than a year, ibe Semi- 
conductor Industry Association 
said Wednesday. 

That figure means that for every 
$90 of new orders, or bookings, in 
die industry term, manufacturers 
shipped $100 worth of product, the 
report said. "Increased bookings 
are being seen in most integrated- 
circuit product categories. Such ac- 
tivity is an indication that business 
is continuing to improve in the U.S. 
market.” the association president, 
Thomas Hmkelman, said. 


CurrencyBiU 
Advances in US. 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — A 
House banking subc ommi ttee 
has approved a bill that would 
establish a strategic currency 
resenre to be used to offset spec- 
ulative movements in exchange 
rales. 

The bill, approved Tuesday 
by the Internationa] Finance, 
Trade and Monetary Policy 
Subcommittee, also calk on the 
president to seek an interna- 
tional conference for reform of 
the exchange-rate system. 

Federal Reserve Chairman 
Paul A. Vofcker said that some 
sections of the bill might limit 
government flexibility to deal 
with exchange-rate changes. 


Pound Continues Lower on Oil Fears 


Reuters 

LONDON — The British pound 
dosed sharply lower against all ma- 
jor currencies again Wednesday af- 
ter a day of hectic trading dominat- 
ed by concern over declining crude 
oil prices. 

In London, sterling ended 2 
cents lower from Tuesday's dose, 
at $1.41550, after trading as low as 
$1.4070. Its fall against the Deut- 
sche mark was even sharper, de- 
dining nearly 5 pfennigs, to 3JS918 
from 3.6490 Tuesday. 

Interest in the dollar was muted, 
although the US. currency dosed 
higher. The dollar dosed in Lon- 
don at 2^430 DM, up from 2.S390 
Tuesday, and at 203.95 yen. up 
from 203.55. It also firmed'in Lon- 
don to 2.1300 Swiss francs from 
2.1 178 and to 7.7650 French francs 
from 7.7500. 


Dealers said that sterling had 
traded quietly until midsession, but 
that t!ie currency dropped sharply 
to its lows on reports of one large 
sell order. 

Its subsequent rebound above 
SI.42 was almost certainly the re- 
sult of intervention by the Bank of 
England, dealers said, although the 
level of central bank activity was 
uncertain. 

At about the same time, dealers 
said. West Germany’s Bundesbank 
entered the market selling dollars 
as the U.S. currency neared a chan 
point at 2.5590 DM. The action 
also helped sterling regam some 
lost ground, they said. 

One dealer said the Bundesbank 

had been increasingly chan -orient- 
ed in recent weeks, “If the dollar 
had closed above 2.5590, there 
could have been a complete change 


in sentiment tomorrow " to the up- 
side. he added. 

The willingness to sell sterling 
depended on market perception of 
the crude-oil market and its future 
direction would be pegged closely 
to North Sea prices, dealers said. 

Trading in Britain's benchmark 
crude. North Sea Brent, came to j 
virtual standstill Wednesday as 
prices for January delivery swung 
wildly between 521.80 and S26 a 
band, dealers noted. 

In other European markets 
Wednesday, the dollar was fixed at 
midafterooon in Frankfurt at 
2.5466 DM, up from 15418 at the 
Tuesday fixing, and at 7.7770 
French francs in Paris, up from 
7.7570. In Zurich, the dollar closed 
at 2.1270 Swiss francs, up from 
2.1 188 on Tucsdav. 


THE EUROMARKETS 


Primary , Secondary Sectors Quiet; Most Texaco Trades Stop 


By Christopher Pizzcy 

Reuters 

LONDON — The primary and 
secondary sectors of the Eurobond 
market were fairly quiet Wednes- 
day, although the psychological cli- 
mate of the dollar sector improved 
as hopes grew that a U_S_ balanced- 
budget bill would be passed short- 
ly, dealers said 

Meanwhile, trading virtually 
halted in issues for Texaco Inc. 
following news that a Texas judge 
had upheld the jury award of 
$10.53 billion againsL (be company. 
“There's no normal market in the 


issues.” a under said adding that 
any prices in them were indications 
only. 

In the primary market, two bor- 
rowers tapped the doilar-straight 
market with issues totaling $175 
million, while two yen bonds were 
launched the first a dual-currency 
bond issue and the second a 
straight Euroyen issue. 

Swedish export credit issued a 
S 100-million Eurobond issue, 
which pays 9?4 percent over seven 
years and was priced at 10 Mi. The 
lead manager for the bond was 
Daiwa Europe Ltd H which quoted 


it at a discount of I ft, inside the 
total fees of I % percent. 

A New Jersey utility. Public Ser- 
vice Electric & Gas Co. launched a 
$75-miltioa bond issue paying 9 1 .* 
percent over 10 yean and priced at 
100W. 

The lead manager was Credit 
Suisse First Boston Ltd. and the 
issue was quoted on the market at a 
discount of about Pi percent, com- 
pared with the total fees of 2 per- 
cent. 

The expected 20-billion-yen 
dual-currency bond for Mitsui & 
Co. was launched during the day. 


The 10-year issue has a coupon of S 
percent and was priced at 1014. 

It will be redeemed at maturity 
in dollars at a rate of I77J yen to 
the dollar, or 5.633 dollars per one- 
million-yen bond. The lead manag- 
er was Nomura International Ltd. 

Allied-Signal Inc. issued a 20- 
billion-yen straight bond issue pay- 
ing 64 percent over seven years 
and priced at 101. Nomura' was 
also the lead manager for this issue, 
which was quoted on the market 
comfortably inside the total fees of 
I ’» percent at a discount of about I . 



Prices 


NASDAQ prices aa of 
3 pan. New York time. 
Via The Associated Press 


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llftt 

Utt 

17ft 

Ti ' ■ ■ '■ i‘~ "tj 

28 

li 

14b 

16 

14-9* 

lft 

[■ b 



1044 

7ft 

itt 

7 

20ft 

m 1 .- .yi 

09 

A 

535 

21 

20b 

21 + tt 

J 

R ~ d l . c *| ~ j 

J0J 

J 

324 

21 

20b 

2096 



M 

30 

296 

23 

S2ft 

32ft + b 


. 1 

\SU 

4.9 

322 

15ft 

«ft 

Uft— 1 

23b 

14b FortnF 



22 

411 

tt 

Tfft 

196 

R-i* 

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1 Forum 

JU 

4 

3058 

11 

IBft 

io* + b 

7b 







j. — y* 


,Ab Frarnrrt 

48 

20 

543 

24 


23tt + tt 


Aft Fudrck 



141 

Ab 

P-1 

Aft— 16 

u 

12ft FlllrVB 




1AV6 


Uft + ft 

1 








12tt 

3ft GTS 



41 

3b 

3ft 

3b 





15 

13ft 

Ub 

U* + b 







5 

5ft — to 

75b 

31ft Genetch 



IMS 

69ft 

68 ft 

6916 + b 





2309 

10 

996 

u 





171 

2ft 

7V6 

2ft— 1* 

’ft 

fft GoFBk 



,24 

25b 

2SV6 

2Sb + ft 

Sb GertMs 




496 

6ft 

Att 


IA GtolGS 

24 

12 

12*4 

38 

19ft 

Tfft — U 

IBft 

1296 Gotocs 



749 

IStt 

1B96 

18tt + b 






251* 


lift 

14ft GeuldP 

24 

42 

1W 

179* 

179* 

1796 



44 

22 

579 

lftt 

19ft 

19ft 


rw*, 1 , 1 



339 

996 

996 

996 + 16 


i- ' ' M 1 1 1 T ■ 



100 

Uft 

Uft 

14b — b 





503 

Aft 

Ab 

496 + ft 



AST 

1J 

36 

24ft 

2596 

26ft +1b 





72 

Ftt 

8ft 

816—96 





1098 

20*6. 

19ft 

20ft +1 

19 

1596 

12b GuJITfd JSe 
ft GlfBdC 1580c 

2 

27 


“ft 

"IT* 

| 




4 






20 

,2 

857 

17ft 

1496 

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04 




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204 

149* 

16b 

lift— b 

3ft 




114 

2tt 

Sb 

3b— b 

199* 

,39* HamOll 

20 

12 

2903 

TM 

1716 

I7b— lft 



24 

12 

18 

19 

18ft 

IStt + ft 



23 

50 

189 

Jib 

34 

34b 



20 

22 

,2 

9 

Stt 

Btt— ft 

10 

2tt HmiritB 

.Ml 


545 

3b 

3 

3 - Mi 

8 

lb Hithln 




8 

ib 

lb 

ib— ft 


Wfednesdayfc 

AMEX 


Tonies inclvde the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Watt Street 
and no net reflect (ate trades elsewhere. 


Sb. Oust 

Hv. tm. PE ma Bite La* QuBt.Ofm 


(Continued from Page 12) 

14 


8ft ToflPto 
S TotPtwt 
23tt TolPtaf 208 104 
Bft TnvsLx JOt 14 
12ft TrnsTK 
7ft TrISM 
6ft TrloCp 
3ft TrMex 
2ft Txteftx 
Wft TumBn 
22 TumrC 
7ft TmEqn 
Ift Trlrwls 


M 30 
JB . 
1J4I 94 


34 

1J0 50 9 
•ISO 15 


2231 

281 

IStt 

196 

IS 

11* 

R=* 

13 

2* 

2796 

2796- 

- tt 

49 

1296 

13b 

Utt— b 

,01 

17V* 

lift 

17+1* 

33 

ftt 

V* 

ftt A 

1- ft' 

10 

ISM 

Uft 

Uft - 


2 

Ok 

49* 

Ctt- 

-ft 

96 

24* 

2b 

296 + ft 

38 

,5 

14V. 

lift — tt. 

32 

24b 

23ft 

Jjft- 

- ft 

201 

8b 

8ft 

8b 


199 

Itt 

ltt 

ltt H 

1- ft 


1 UN* 

2 U&Rlnd 
a> yHmft 


19B ft ft 
9 2ft Ift 
714 22tt lift 


ft— Id 
2(6 — ft 
21ft 









30U 

1 HtaftLo* Stock 

Ob. YU. PE 

TOftHtshUMr OteOftt 





23 

131 

12 

lltt 

13 + ft 

1596 


25 

5.1 


15 

Uft 

lift 

1496 



1.93620.1 


1729 

Ub 

ftt 

WS-tt 



040 22 

15 

12 




24 

lift unCrnF s 00 

It 

7 

3 

244* 

241* 

206— ft 

2b 


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lb 


lift UtMH, 



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93 

12 

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5 

15tt 

15ft 

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55 

596 

596 

5ft— ft 

22b 

14ft Unittl n 

123 

80 

7 

3 

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21ft 

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15 

» 

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!0ft 

10ft— tt 

Btt 




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1JI 

Att 

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Att- ft 



J0 

42127 

125 

19 

1796 

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1596 

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24 

lltt 

lift 

mo— * 

| 




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1 

Uft 

fft V5T 

25c W 


83 

10 

ftt 

to 

30 

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44 

10 

17 

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291* 

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29ft + to 






10 

7* 

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23ft 

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40 

u 

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72 

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18 

19 4 tt 

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45 

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20 

1.9 

34 

90 

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6b 

296 Vertpie 




2 

41* 

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5 —ft 

f 

3* Vkwi 




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A** 

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Aft— to 

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13b Vlrco 

Jlir 

2 

13 

5 

18ft 

IStt 

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JOb 13 

10 

12 

♦ft 

f 

f 



M 

44 

11 

13 

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fft 



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12 

44 

21 

20b 

21 + ft 

8ft 

5 vvausi 



8 

4i 

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A — ft 

1 w 1 





li 

40 

496 

496 

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92 


140 

Att 

Aft 

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15 WpngB 

.14 

J 


4705 

209* 

20b 

2096 + to 

39 

14* WonoC 

.11 

0 


18 

329 

^9* 


21 + ft 

to + tt 





6 

1,2 

12* 

12 

12* +1 



,9a 

8 

14 

144 124b 119ft 123 +4 


15 WRIT & 

>28 

7.1 

11 

94 

18 

17V. 

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li* 

7* WatKS 

M 

1J 

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1 

9 

9 

9 + ft t 


12 Mote 
Utah Low Stack 


DK.Vft.Pg 


mi Him La* 


OBotarw 


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r 4 % 

3 tt 
ift 2ft 

10 7ft 
12 7ft 
6ft Aft 
10 7 

14 6ft 
Wtt 4ft 
Stt h 

4 2tt 
2ft ft 

1*V. 5ft 
13ft Bft 
I5tt 6U 
23ft 7tt 
21 '6 17 
24tt lift 
i 2W 

Hi 

32ft 26ft 
Uft 8ft 
2tt ft 
691 lft 
7ft 3ft 
23ft lift 
46ft 3716 
4ft 3ft 

io* a 

22tt lift 
5ft 2ft 
1796 12ft 
21W 9 
21ft Uft 


Wthfra . 
Wednvn 
Web Kiwi 
Wabcor 

wedco 02a .7 
Wadotn 1J2 119 
wadtOi .. 
Wolman .16 12 
WoWTb M 
WeUtm 
Wrtlco 
WetlAm 
WalGrd 


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10, 

47 
35 hi 
3 2ft 
77K fft 
147 IT 


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WstBrC 


Wstbr b JO 

a m 
tin 

WIRET 158 XI 
Wtu-Ens 
wlchJtn 
WiCkrt 
wtekeste „ 

wrdwpfta w 

wtewn 40 4J 
wirsnB 
WfalEB 
WblE A 

wintln 13491JJ 
WiaPpf 450 90 
WbHHB 


3tt 3 

TJ % 

2% 
9ft 
1094 
5 

994 
Oft 
Uft 
tt 

* 

Btt 


WkWaor 52 24 
WmdaE 

WWdenf 1J0 ii9 
WArttti oa 

Wrofhr 02 .1 


5 

3tt 
1 

Oft , 
159 12tt 12 
24 227 9tt 9,6 
II 5i 10=6 109i 
14 52 70 19tt 

20 31B 17tt 16ft 
66 M 2ft 
11 41727 ift 4ft 
393 216 Ift 
1627 31ft 29ft 

7 3 9tt 9tt 
16 ltt ft 

145 3ft 3ft 
4* 3ft 3tt 

8 40 19ft 19 
ad 45ft 4596 

8 3 3 

33 IS 9 9 

8 67 22ft 21ft 

20B Stt 3 
36 Uft 13ft 
- 175 1116 11 
293 19ft 18V. 


29 


Stt 

m + ft 

lit 

ft 

u + v« 

996- ft 
9tt— tt 
13ft + tt 

rn 

12(6 + tt 
916— tt 
10ft- tt 
19ft- ft 
17ft 4 ft 
2ft- ft 

3i& 

31ft 4-2 
9ft + ft 
,M + ft 
Oft 

3ft + ft 
19ft- tt 
4 5ft 
3 

22ft + ft 
3 — ft 

14 -I- ft 

lift 

19U" + ft 


896 Stt Yankee 


10. 194 Aft Aft 


Aft— tt 


HM Low Stack 


DK. YU. Mb 


1 NM 

Him LA* 3 PAL Chva 


41* 

146 

HIIMvn 



1184 

31* 

3* 

3* + ft 

2396 

1596 

HchoAs 

.IA 

3 

384 

Uft 

17ft 

181* + ft 

3(16 

15ft 

HehoBs 

08 

A 

52 

lfb 

19 

lfb + b 

S96 

3to 

HatonT 



32 

31* 

3ft 

396— b 

37* 

IS 

Hell* 



7 

19* 

,9b 

19b— ft 

31* 

31ft 


.92 a 28 



33 

33 — * 

214* 

17b 

HtoerCp 

I0OD O 

123 

33ft 

27* 

33ft + ft 










12 

3ft 

Hooan 



678 

A* 

4* 

4* 

33ft 

13 







32ft + ft 

10ft 

1 

viHmetl 



331 

It* 

1 

ltt— tt 

3b 

Ub 

Honlnd 

44 

22 

18 

28b 

77* 

27* 

Ab 

3ft 

Horzlnd 



76 

4* 

4* 


33ft 

IS 

HwBNJ 



143 

31 

30* 

30*— b 


» 


20e 






14ft 

Sb 

Hntoln 



438 

1296 

Uft 

1296 + ft 

27b 

17 


J4 

XI 

54 

27b 



3016 

14 

Hvtrltc 



797 

30 

79* 

29*— ft 

Uft 

4* 

Hypanx 



109 

14 

13* 

1396— * 

9 

5* 

HvlaWA 



137 

7* 

7b 

7Vl + ft 


10* 

796 ILC 


113 

9b 

Btt 

3Sto 

14* 1695 s 

20 

4 1574 

32b 

3196 

1SV. 

7* ISC 


1314 

15ft 

lift 

7* 

396 lad 


244 

796 

7ft 

Uto 

4 Imune* 


3149 

Uft 

12ft 

7b 

3b inuanp 


75 

5ft 

596 

S3 

32ft IntfMt 

140 

XI 93 

51 

SH6 

32 

20ft littaRse 


190 

25 

23ft 

34 

12ft Inftm 


2SB 

1716 

Uft 

33ft 

17b Insltttw 


41 

34ft 

23 

lift 

lft iitecm 


12S3 

596 

Sb 

Ub 

ito intaOv 


1119 

Ub 

16 

Aft 

3 MtoGan 


325 

5b 

5ft 

33ft 

10* IS5CO 


6 

15ft 

15ft 

33ft 

20 * Intel 


4493 

30 b 

29ft 

«tt 

3 IntlSv 


473 

496 

Aft 

7ft 

lb Inh-Tal 


119 

2ft 

116 

15* 

8ft lirtmd 


22 

11* 

11b 

Uft 

7ft InlrfFir 

20 

14 257 

13* 

12b 

JSb 

31 intoPh s 


4451 

35 

14 

io* 

5 Intrmon 


398 

■ 

7* 

22b 

10ft Intrrat 


1324 

T 

13* 

Uft 

5b intmtr 


14 

,7ft 

17 

• IniOin 


350 

"£ 

1096 

18ft 

7«6 IGoma 


402 

1 

25ft 

Uto InTKino 


24 

20b 

19* 

16 

796 IntLMS 


121 

14ft 

15* 

13 

5ft InMobJl 
tt IRIS 


484 

p* 

a 

3b 


294 

196 

29ft 

9* ITCpa 


B90 

31b 

29 

14ft 

Aft lomaga 


540 

Ub 

11 

13* 

9b Isomdx 


44 

12* 

12ft 

10b 

51* IM 


473 

1016 

10 


9tt + ft 
32tt + ft 
15ft 4- 9* 
7ft + ft 
12ft —lft 
Stt 

SI ft ft 


35 +1 

7ft ft 1 
13ft ft : 

10ft— ft 
Bft 
199A 
15ft + ft 

*=* 

12ft ft ft 
10 


15ft 9ftJBRa»s 

Bft 3tt Jackpot 
4116 SB JockLiB 
2516 15ft JomWTr 
Bft 4ft jcfMart 
24tt 14ft JerlCD 
7ft 3ft Jon IcW 
I Bft Aft Jaapun 
23ft 9tt Jurns 
20ft 13ft Jialin 


.14 14 481 
51 
HO 
4OT 

urn 

I 53 
44 
148 

M 23 n 


lift lift 
Stt Aft 
«ft * 
24ft 23ft 
4H 4tt 
22tt Bft 
61k A 
8ft ift 
23ft 23tt 
17ft 17ft 


,1ft 
Att 

40 

2496 +116 
Aft— ft 
22ft + 16 
A — ft 
Bft 
23ft — tt 
17ft 


8tt SftZImar 051 


106 ift ift ift— ft 


atft 

9 

»ft 

19tt 

1716 

lOtt 

A4ft 

6196 

Bft 

11 

7 

lift 

13ft 

16tt 

291* 


13ft KLAs 
4tt KVPhr 
1394 Komons M 
13ft Korcnr 
Fit K osier OS1 
Aft Kovdon 
42 Kami 1O0 
31ft KvCnLI IOO 
4ft Kavn 
Aft KeyTm 
2 KJmijTK 
13ft Kinder OA 
Aft Kray OA 

lift Knivcr OA 
Bft Kulcke .121 


835 

51 

IO 441 
431 
2C5 
397 
28 311 
1J a 
70 
130 
84 

J 444 
J BA 

24 621 
10 947 


21ft 21 

34* 22V. 
U 15tt 
lift 11 
lift ,2k 
4516 A3tt 

19ft 18ft 

m tft 

14ft 14ft 
lAt 17ft 


2116 + ft 
8 — tt 
23ft— >6 
15ft— 16 
1116 
10*6 + ft 
65 +1 

SStt-1 
Aft 

10 + tt 

2 

19tt + tt 
Ift 
14ft + ft 
1216 


II* 

5b 

LDBmk 



91 

ift 

A* 

696 

24 b 

9* 

LSI Log 



2774 

23* 

33* 

33* + ft 

S£ 

9b 

LTX 



1470 

14 

12* 

13* + * 

9* 

LoPeies 



429 

20b 

19* 

20 + ft 

54 

33b 

LoZBv 

140 

24 

391 

53b 

53 

53* 

35* 

1316 

LodFm 

.li 

4 

154 

36 

25* 

25* + ft 

18ft 

11 

Laldl* 

20 

12 

184 

lib 

15* 

14* + * 

17 

13ft 

LaraoT 

JB 

58 

5 

13* 

13* 

13* 

17* 

Ub 

| W. . t > 

.72 

4J 

493 

17ft 

17 

17 — * 

r 

34* 

2Jb 


.92 

33 

10 

19 

51 

145 

58* 

28 

R 

5Sb + ft 
27ft 

796 

4H 

Laeoia 



241 

sva 

5* 

Sft 

151* 

8b 

Lein#r 



32 

fft 

fft 

fft— ft 

fft 

A* 

LawUP 

-20019 

41 

7 ft 

7* 

35 — 

4 

2tt 

Lexicon 



347 

2ft 

Ift 

3* 

1* 

Lexldta 



238 

2b 

2ft 

2ft 

25 

17b 

Llebrt 

J9 

4 

41 

24ft 

24 

34 — * 

4S 

41ft 

Lllrtvr 

24 

0 

4 

47* 

47b 

47b— * 

Bb 

496 

LUCom 



509 

Bft 

B 

896 + * 

30* 

Uft 

UIVTuI 

20 

l.f 

SIS 

lib 

15ft 

16ft— ft 

3896 

19ft 

LlnBrd 



3469 

37 

»ft 

37 + ft 

37 

28b 

Line Tel 

220 

XI 

18 

34* 

34* 

34b 

6ft 

ift 

UndOro 

.14 

11 

11 

5* 

5ft 

5M 

49ft 

23ft 

LttOa 

JS 

J 

liao 

44* 

a* 

44b +IW 

29 

20b 

LonoF 

140 

52 

84 

28 

a 

27 —1 

33* 

15b 

Lotus 



5725 

34* 

23 

24* +lft 

34* 

19 

Lynden 



11 

23 ft 

22* 

23ft +1 

19ft 

A 

Lvphos 



1549 

18* 

17* 

IBM + ft 


M 


14* 

Att MBI 



349 

ib 

lift 

7* MCI 



1435 

10* 

996 

4* MIW 



79 

996 

7b 

Sft MP5I s 



X 

4ft 

74* 

15 MTS ( 

24 

u 

182 

2296 

32* 

1796 MTV 




33* 


fb MecfcTr 



435 

lift 


31* ModGE 

138 

u 

*1 

2Tb 

f* 

7* MoIRt 



29 

8* 

14* 

7ft MolrltS 

01a 

129 

11* 


7ft MotSM 



2534 

ftt 

24ft 

IBft Mcartw 

JO 

30 

XI 

23 


31* MfrsN* 

124 

xo 

27 

40* 

rri 

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JO 

10 

X 

lfb 

UB 

2* Maraux 



304 

4* 







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21b MrMNs 

100 

If 

823* 

Jtft 

•a 




34 

■a 


13 Moxcrs 



8382 

17b 

is* 

8* Moxwal 



IX 

'» 

ft 

2ft MoyPI 



494 

Sft triavnOi 




4ft 

38ft 

30ft McCrm 

JB 

20 

151 

35ft 

14ft 

1096 McForl 



74 

12ft 

lift 

4 fete* 

sa 

J 

507 

Sft 

mm 

4 MAdCre 



190 

Aft 


10 Mentor 



159 

Uft 

FT 1 

n. MtrtrC 



842 

20(7 

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utt Marc Be 

1J2 

V 

71 

41ft 

i fft 

42* Merc Bk 

102 

22 

15 

48ft 

<1* 

25ft MrdBcs IM 

<0 

42 

39* 


12tt UerlBs 

24 

X4 

33 

22*6 

L j 




390 

15V. 

fcH 

lltt Mlcom 
lft Micro 



IM 

214 

20* 

4 

ii* 

596 MlcrMk 




7* 

7* 

rift Mlcrdv 

06 

10 

27 

Aft 


3ft MlcrTc 



1524 

fft 


ift Micron 



1408 

Stt 

in 

3ft MicSms 



329 

79* 

Aft 

ift MdPcA 



279 

2to 

24 


JO 

XI 


l»ft 

49ft 

tt MhDBk 

121 

2J 

441 

44* 

ftt 

3 MdwAJr 



7277 

Stt 

37*1 

lib MiliHri 

/ti 

1.9 

1742 

23* 

9ft 

2ft Mliitem 



117 

itt 


31b MllUor 

AB 

1.1 

740 

42 

fft 

ltt Mbtlscr 



4fS 

Jft 

77* 

17 Minster 



212 

23 

lift 

7* MGcak 


.1 

188 

fb 

r 

Aft M0MCB 



111 

ittt 

14 Kiodlneo 

08 

JJ 

149 

21 

9m 

Aft AAottdr 



356 

11 

54* Mote* 

JD 


a 

37 

»* 

u* Mofifa 

050 U 

48 

27* 

if* 

7* MonAnt 



A3 

17ft 

17* 

9* MdrtOlil 



2048 

,4 


25b MonuC 

100 

If 

U 

15* 

TOb 

Uft MocFto 

01 


8 

16b 

7JV6 

14* Uorrm 

AB 

IS 

M0 

Jf 

796 

2 Moseley 



293 

396 

Wb 

12ft MolClb 

.38 

14 

30 

16* 

24* 

lift My Ian 5 

.U 

0 

2251 

lfb 


Bft 


996 

27tt 

4016 

7ft 

Uft 

lift 

296 

Aft 

«8 

7ft 

itt 


39ft 
S9tt 
I Stt 

Att 

fft 

8(6 

fit 

19ft 

lift 

£ 

4 Jft 

R 

is 

lift 


Utt 

3ft 


Btt— ft 
TOtt + tt 
9Vi— tt 
ift 
22ft 

Btt + tt 
II 

27ft— tt 
Bft— ft 
lib + tt 
966— tt 
22ft— tt 
40tt + tt 
lftt ♦ tt 
Aft 

7ft— ft 
34ft + tt 
1996 
116 
17V* 

1496 „ 

29*-* 
Aft 
SStt 
lltt— 1 

lft + ft 
ift + ft 
16(6 — >6 
Btt + ft 
41ft + ft 
68ft + ft 
3*k- ft 
22ft 
15V6 

20ft + ft 
396- 16 

7 + tt 

6 - ft 
99*— ft 
Bft + 96 
7ft + tt 
296— ft 

19tt 

44ft + tt 
Bft— ft 
23V« + ft 
4VS + ft 
4196— ft 
3ft + ft 
2296— tt 
Bft- ft 
lift 

2096- ft 
10ft— tt 
36ft— tt 
2796 +lft 
17ft— 9* 
16 + ft 

ffi 

RiS? 

1696 

IBft- ft 


N 


9 2ft 
*96 2ft 
lift 59a 
22V» lift 
50ft 37 
32ft 12tt 
lift 794 
30 12 

79* ift 
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5 











on. a: 


Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1985 


i 

2 

3 

4 

1 

18 

6 

6 

7 

8 

0 

1 

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12 

13 

14 




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43 



44 

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63 




64 





66 





PEANUTS 



ACROSS 


1 Kind of book or 
roll 

5 Mexican dish 

It Breath of wind 

14 “Typee” 
sequel 

15 Accustom 

16 Woody’s son 

17 With 36 Across, 
event in a 
marsh 


20 Most shabby 

21 Heraldic 

borders 

22 Sweete^the 
kitty 


57 Old bird’s 
comment on 
above 

00 Teener’s woe 

61 Rouse 

62 Feature of 
Florence's 
duomo 

63 Spare-tire 
changer 

64 Renowned 
diarist 

65 Runner Audain 

DOWN 


23 Prong 
25 One of the 


Fords 

29 Mull 

33 Rousseau hero 

34 Musical finale 

35 Rod 

36 See 17 Across 

46 Ending for 
anchor or 
graph 

41 Before 
aujourd'hui 

42T.L.C. 

dispenser 

43 Areas 

46 Helraor hoer 

47 Theatrical org. 

48 Taunt 

4S Candied 

52 Sends by rapid 
transit 

®Ne «. York 


1 Hopalong 
Cassidy 
portrayer 

2 Mine, to 
Michel 

3 Verb’s object, 
usually 

4 King of the 
movies 

5 Giggled 

6" Of 

traitors!” 

7 Brusque 

8 Spanish 

• treasure 

5 Former Kobe 
coin 

10 Colony of 
rabbits 

11 Extra 
protection for 
some seeds 

12 Cut and run 

13 Sling 

18 Tasty fowl 
meat 


19 Singer Teanllle 

23 Historic royal 
family 

24 Moslem priest 

25 Jokesceris 
question 

26 Chew the 
scenery 

27 Kitchen utensil 

28 Newburg 

29 Ramblers 

30 ”1 Wish I Had 

Kahn-Le 

Boy song 

31 French cup 

32 Upper regions 
ofspaci 


r space 
34 Crockery 

37 Bill 

38 Brainteaser 

39 Suffix with fate 
or hate 

44 Uproar 

45 Again 

46 Pies, to a 
cuisinier 

48 Hazardous 

49 Garden bloom, 
for short 

50 Places 

51 Top-rated 

52 tnstr. on a rush 
job 

53 Former Met 
diva 

54 Image: Var. 

55 Draw 

56 Sniek-or- 
58 Chance 
50 Loan word 



BOOKS 


FLAUBERT & TURGENEV: 

A Friendship in Letters 

Edited and translated by Barbara Beau- 
mont. 197 pages. S19.95. 

W. W. Norton & Co., 500 Fifth Avenue, 
New York. N. Y. I0II0. 

Reviewed by Michiko Kakurani 

W HEN Gustave Flaubert and Ivan Turge- 
nev fust met at a Left Bank wriiere’ 
hangout in Paris in 1863. they, were both ac- 
writere. familiar with — and ad* 


coreplished writers, familiar with — and 
mirers gf — ope another's work. Flaubert. 41, 
author of the controversial “Madame Bovary.’ 
had jusi published “Saiammbo" Turgenev. 44. 
was wed-known as (he author of “Hunting 
Sketches” and “Fathers and Sons." Allhough 
they would not start corresponding, regularly 
for about five years, they idt an immediate 
intellectual kinship. They remained in touch 
until Flaubert's death in 1880. 

As presented in this volume — with helpful 
background notes by the scholar Barbara 
Beaumont — their letters give us a charming, 
and at times deeply moving, portrait of Flau- 
bert and Turgenev as 19th-century masters of 
fiction and as aging men sinking into the dis- 
cousolatioas of late middle age afflicted with 
physical infirmities, self-doubt and a darken- 
ing skepticism about literature and their age. 

Certainly the two could not have been more 
compatible. Both had eschewed the possibili- 
ties of romantic love in favor of devoting 
themselves, without distraction, to their art; 
Flaubert’s tempestuous relationship with Ins 
mistress Louise Colei had long since been 
broken off, and Turgenev had sealed into an 
un threatening, if unsatisfying, friendship with 
the married Pauline Viardot. Both were enter- 
ing that difficult period in their careers where 
early enthusiasm and recognition had given 
way to an awareness of tbe intractable difficul- 
ties of their craft And both shared a similar 
aesthetic — a dedication to realism, to (he 
objective and nonjudgmental representation of 
contemporary life; and a belief m the transcen- 
dent ideal of beauty. 

Yet if both writers tried to keep the ephem- 
eral imprint of personality out of their fiction 
— adhering to Flaubert's dictum that an artist 
should be like God, “present everywhere, yet 
visible nowhere'* — they gave full vent to their 


— WIZARD of ID 



Solution to Previous Puzzle 

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opinion*. and crotchets m the* teller?, jf 

exchanging put-downs of ihetr cuIleagneZols. 
rcprojcriri'Z the educated classe. in Russia and 
in France for failing, lo implement social re- 
form. and generally commiserating over the 

difficulties of anting. 

Turgenev, “the gemie barbarian," as his 
friends described him. emerges as a getltJema^ 
a wise, magnanimous fellow who in politic 
avoided the noisy extremes of buih the ngjn 
and the left and who in private life liked lo puv 
a passive, self-deprecaring reic, refcrriag 
himself as an “old fogey, " "an old toaiT htice 
in an “old damp hole." and “a soggy pear. . 
The same air of melancholy that animates 
“First Love" and "Fathers and Sons" emerges 
in his letters. His despair over Russia’s futon, 
his disappointments in Jove ami an. and his * 
precarious health combined w give him a dis 
cidcdlv dark vision of the world. He writes to 
Flaubert about the “general 'taediun vnae,’ 
the boredom and disgust with all human activi- 
ty" that accompanies "the sadness of one’s 
fiftieth year.*’ and he speaks, too, of their 
marking “time like idiots, and I begin to be* 
lieve that to all intents and purposes we are." 

!□ his last years. Flaubert was similarly in- 
dined toward pessimism, though his was. char- 
acteristically. less philosophical in tone, more 
personal in origin He was heset with money 
worries and family problems, and he suffered, 
too. from terrible’ anxieties about his last — 
and unfinished — work, "Bouvard and Pecu- 
chet." “I'm still working doggedly at roy awful 
book." he writes Turgenev in 1878. “On certain 
days 1 feel crushed by this burden. It seems to 
me that l have no more marrow in my bones, 
and I cany on like an old post horse, worn out 
but courageous." 

Having isolated Himxrlf m the countrywide to 

devote himself to his solitary vocation, the 
high-strung, gregarious Flaubert crated hu- 
man companionship, and as readers of his 
letters to Louise Colei well know, he could be a 
needy, demanding correspondent, pouring out 
his indignation and frustrations in florid, noisy 
prose. As for his friendship with T urgency. the 
“hermit of Croisset,” as Flaubert wav known, 
was clearly the more dependent one; He was 
forever beseeching “the Muscovite" to visit 
him or to write, often sounding curiously like a 
neglected lover. 

While Turgenev was devoted and conscien- 
tious — he offered useful criticism as well as 
lain encouragement on every’ one of his 
ri end’s works, from “Sentimental Education" 
onward — he was also somewhat elusive, given 
his busy’ soda! schedule and often debilitating 
gouL This, needless to say, was the source of > 
considerable frustration to Flaubert, who be- 
came especially irked when Turgenev — who 
had agitxd to translate his friend's “Three 
Tales" into Russian — invented a variety of 
excuses to explain his slow ness in finishing the 
task 

Such lapses, however, were rare. Indeed, the 
letters between these two “moles burrowing 
away in tbe same direction." as Turgenev pul 
It, form a remarkable testament not only to the 
literary nourishment the tu-o writers gave one 
another, but also to the sustaining gift of 
friendship they exchanged. 


E 


Dotfr WASTE TIME ON HlM.JOEY- ffe PROMISES 
eVERYTHlN6 AN' AFTER CHRISTMAS )OU CANT 
ggN fl|4D HIM 1* 


GARFIELD 


12/12/BS 


Michiko Kakutam is on the staff of The See 
York Tunes. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


1 THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble those fair Jumbles, 
one tatter to each square, to form 
tour ordinary words. 


□ 

(’EDIT 


1 

K 1 

: i 




DAULT 






i FISHTE 


■ 





LEBALT 



■■ 


I WHAT TALESTOLt? SY j 
| A LON6-WINPEP BORE 
USUALLY HAVE 

TOO MANY OP 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the swpriee answer, os sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 




Yesterday’s 


(Answers tomono 

Jumbles; AGILE GNARL MARTIN BRONCO 


Answer How the so-called “coming'' generation 
spends much ol its time— "GOING” 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Amsterdam 
AttMMf 


uemle 

Berlin 

Brunets 

Bucharest 

Budapest 

Ca wntw e o n 
Casta Del Sol 

DbMh 

Edioswefc 

Florence 

Frankfurt 

Geneva 

HetsisKl 

Istanbul 

Las Must 


London 


MHaa 

Moscow 

Mimics 

Wee 

Oslo 

Parts 

Praoue 

Revklavn 

Rome 

Stockholm 

Sfrattourg 

Venice 


HIGH 
C P 
IS 6* 
3 37 
15 5* 
13 54 
A C 

5 41 
3 34 
3 37 

6 43 

1 34 

19 44 
9 <8 
A 43 

11 53 
5 41 
3 37 

-3 37 

12 54 

21 7# 

13 54 
9 41 
5 41 
B 44 

■2 27 


LOW 
C F 
12 54 


(O 


I 34 ■ 


15 59 


14 57 
-11 13 


Warsaw 

Zurich 

MIDDLE 


30 
53 
37 
37 
39 
32 

32 □ 

» g 

■t 30 0 

9 48 fr 

1 34 cl 

2 34 d 
10 50 r 

2 H d 

0 » fr 
-A 21 a 

#44 a 

10 64 d 

11 52 r 

7 45 a 

1 34 o 

4 39 r 

5 23 o 
4 25 sw 

8 46 fr 

16 3 to 

3 37 a 

2 36 r 
T 34 sw 

9 48 e 

19 -3 fr 
■ 2 2B to 

4 39 a 
J 37 r 
4 39 a 

a 32 o 


EAST 


Ankara 

9 

48 

1 

34 

r 

Betrvf 

— 

— 

— 

— 

na 

Dontaseui 

18 

64 

4 

39 

d 

JerusaWB 

31 

78 

10 

50 

fr 

Td Ay hr 

OCEANIA 

26 

79 

12 

54 

d 

Aackteed 

22 

72 

12 

54 

d 

Sydney 

2$ 

77 

16 

61 

d 


d-ctaudv; to-fogey: fr-folr; h-twJI; 
xlHttewerx: m-s no w; d-stormy. 


ASIA 







LOW 



C F 

C 

F 


Banakok 

34 93 

34 

75 


Bdflhtg 

-4 25 

-11 

12 

fr 

HonoXaM 

15 64 




Mnnlla 

33 90 




New IMN 

IS 64 




Send 

-2 38 

-10 

14 

fr 

SJwagbai 

2 36 

-2 

28 

fr 

Singapore 

33 91 

24 

75 


Toted 

20 68 

14 

57 


Tdwe 

10 SO 

2 

36 

fr 

AFRICA 





Algiers 

U 64 

9 



Oak* 

32 72 

9 

48 


CapeTovre 

24 73 

13 

33 

fr 

CoMbtanca 

— 




1 la ran 

21 83 

14 

61 


Lasn 

32 90 

24 

75 


Nairobi 

26 79 

IS 

59 


Twds 

» 4* 

10 

SO 

fr 

LATIN AMERICA 



Buena Aten 

24 75 

11 

53 


CdfMo* 

27 II 

17 

63 

d 

Uma 

25 77 

17 



Mexico cite 

24 75 

5 

41 


Rto ae Janeiro 

33 91 

19 

66 

d 

NORTH AMERICA 



Aadforoge 

4 39 

0 

32 


Artanto 

19 6* 

8 

46 


Boston 

4 39 

1 

34 


OiIcs-m 

0 32 

■1 

30 


B««tr 

-6 21 

14 

7 

el 

Detroit 

4 39 


32 


Homiafo 

et n 

19 

66 


Houston 

If 

m 

a 


LMAitgefos 

14 57 

to 

54 


Mtotnl 

FBI 




MbmaMm 

■8 19 

10 

14 


Mentreal 

-3 27 

-5 

21 

d 

Nam 

23 77 

20 



Hew York 

9 48 




tom Francfoc* 

13 56 




Seattle 

5 41 

-3 


fr 

Toronto 

1 34 

0 



Vtabtaetw 

U 57 

5 


el 

aavernst.- PC-portly cfoudv; 

recta; ■ 



O N the diagramed deal. 

consider how the defense 
against four hearts has been 
led lo East's ace. 

In practice, East re turned a 
diamond. When West won , he 
returned a dub to defeat the 
contract by one trick- That 
seems, simple, but there are 
wheels .within wheels. 

Suppose that East held the 
.dub ace. without the queen, 
and had a singleton diamond. 
In that case West would have 
to retain a diamond, and the 
dub play would be fataL 
How can West tdl what to 
do? In theory he should cer- 
tainly return a diamond. If 
Hast has a doubleton diamond, 
he can afford to make a passive 
return of a spade or a trump. 


knowing that the three tricks in 
the minor suits can come later 
South cannot dispose of his 
dub losers until he has driven 
ont West's hypothetical dia- 
mond ace 

In practice. West played a 
club because East had hesitat- 
ed considerably before return- 
ing a diamond. The contention 
was that a singleton diamond 
would have been returned 
briskly, and that West was in- 
fluenced, consciously or sub- 
consciously. by the slowness of 
his partner's play. 

'Hiere is an argument on tbe 
other side If East has the hand 
with a singleton diamond com- 
bined with the dub ace but no 
queen be should perhaps cash 
the dub ace before leading his 
d ia mond , malting it dear that 
a diamond is not wanted. 


However, that defense would 
be disastrous in some situa- 
tions in which South has a sin- 
gleton diamond ace. 



Ea*i And West wore vulnerable 
Tbe bidding 


South 


North East 

Pass j * 

3 ;■ Pass 

Pass Pass 

West led the wirln 


4 •: 



Via Agence France-Presse Dec. 11 

Closing prices in local currencies union otherwise indicated. 



ABN 

ACF Holding 
A — o n 
Akzo 
Ahold 
Aitwv 

A ’Dam Rubber 
A mra Bonk 

BVG 

Huohmnann T 
Caland HUa 
Elsovler-NDU 
Fokker 
GtatBro_ 
Hdnefcen 


527 

255 256 

1 07 dO W7O0 
125 JO 135J0 
74J0 75 

79 00.10 
BJB iSS 
96 9470 
in 240 
12050 IX 
2740 2740 
162 161.50 
72 72.90 


KLM 
Naorden 
Nat Neder 
NedUavd 
Oca v coder c 
Pokhoed 
Philips 
Robeco 
Rodamco 
Rollnco 
RBrtrtlo 
Royal Dutch 
Unilever 
vanommeran 
VMF Stork 
VNU 


211 21X50 
74JD 75J0 
54J0 5X70 

5450 5750 


202 TO* 
377 377 

BO 59 II 

SM0 J4M 
80A8 8020 
13540 13530 
72 r,»a 
47 ■ 47 

166J0 173.10 
383 BU0 
30JSO 3DJ0 
25} 251 

27401 27650 


ANP.CBS Goat Index : 2S4J0 


BihiiIb 


Arbod 

Bekoert 

Codtertii 

Cobeso 

EBES 

GBHrmo-BM 

GBL 

Gevaert 

Hoboken 

I n te mai i 

KrodletBonk 

Petroflno 

soe Generate 

5oflnc 

SotvOV 

Traction Eire 

UCB 

Unerg 

vwifowwitagne 


2650 2700 
8550 8550 

to m 

4310 4305 
3850 3850 
5150 5B7Q 
2475 3(85 
400 4875 
5610 5600 
2930 7900 

nan uses 

6480 6780 
2225 2165 
0300 3350 
4150 400 
4760 4740 
5710 [ ‘ 

2250 J 

56® 57W 


Curort Start Index : 2848.15 
Previous ! 2D591 


THUMDA-rSPORECAST- CHANNEL: 5«fl!lt. FRANKFURT: Fair. Tamm 
7—1 145—34}. LONDON: cfoudv. Taro. 10— » <50 — 431. MADRID: Pair, 
Temp. 7-0 145—32). NEW VORK; Rofo.Temp.7- 7 (45—451. PARIS: Fair. 
Temp. 6— 1 143 — 34). ROME: Cfoudv. remn. 13 — 8 (55 — 44J. TEL AVIV: NA. 
ZURICH: Falr Tetnp. 4 — } (39 —38). BANGKOK: RJOOV- Temp, 33— a 
««-»»- "£»£ KONC: Cloudy. Temp. 1-8 {4-461. MANILA: Cloudy. 
Te mp. 36— 24 116— 75). SEOUL; Fair. Temp.- 4 — 10 RS— MJ. SINGAPORE: 
Thundwvfonm. Temp. 31—24(80 — 75). TOKYO: Foggy. Temp. 9— 2 la— 36). 


AEQ-Telehinken 

Allianz Very 

Altana 

BASF 

Borer 

Bay Hypo Bank 
Bar VerelnstMnk 
BBC 

bhf-b«* 

BMW 

Commerzbank 
Cant Gum ml 
DsHmier-Benz 
Deguna 

Babeaek 

Ik 



236.90 23150 
ITU 17k) 
421 413 

24U0XSAD 

25680 2$4 

463 US 
493 471 

295 999 

OS 4*5 

SU 547 

278 27S 

164 165 

113* IT06 
430 43050 
2BS 210 
717 JO 71 650 
34U8 343S8 
23130 21L» 
347 345 


TeLSO 164 

Horten 257.0 wnn 

Huisel IQQ Cfl 

IWKA 307 JO see 

J15 TTIL20 

•Orrstod) uj 335 

Knuftwt 3J» 330 

KfoedcnerH^} 310 3os 

Ktaeeinerwerke 9 sjc 700 

WShW 169 167 

L*nd4 573 S73 


'LwHBanea 

MAN 

Mannesmono 

PKI 

Porsche 

Preuseog 

PWA 

RWE 

RffolBtBetoll 
Sobering 
SEL 
Stamens 
Thvuen 
Veto 


221 


263 M40 


547 5a 
718 719 

1Z7B 1270 
241 241 

15X10 154 

18J1B6J0 
517 511 
W2 623 
716A0 3MJ0 
6S6J0 63340 
17840 17340 
32440 280 


JfolUtaogert^Brt, ajj 4QS 
WHIa 729 735 


I IOVMI . I7jf.ro 


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Bk Epot Asia 

OieungKang 

Chhtg Light 
Green island 
Kano Sana Bank 
Hendefsoo 
China Guo 
HK electric 
HK Realty a 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HKShang Bank 
HKTaieMme 

HK Yaumatel 

HKWTiarf 
Hutch Whampoa 
Hrsan 
inn city 
Jardlna 
Jardtae Sec 

Kawtoan Mater 

Miramar Hotel 

New World 
SMK Props 
Staha 

Swire Pod He A 
TalChauna 

WahKwsng 

Wins Ones 
wiraar 

World mn 


2X70 2X20 

38J0 2090 

15 1440 
740 740 

46 4L2S 
2175 126 
1*20 14 

035 LX 

1220 mo 

34J5 3450 
L70 9X 
745 740 
9J0 9J5 
1275 1925 
740 743 
2410 26 

061 861 
- 1 0 ^ 

1170 UN 
1450 1&30 
1020 TON 
SUO 5740 
,430 430 

1270 1270 
1.92 142 
2840 2870 
*45 iJttS 
(U8 aao 
170 175 
445 445 
245 2425 


HM* Seoa Indo ; imn 

Peer lout : 172X29 


*eei 
Angia American 
Anglo Am Gek) 
Barlows 
Blyvaar 
BuHels 
Oa Beers 
Drletanteln 
Elands 


.950 *65 

3875 3850 
19200 18700 
1300 1380 
1650 1660 
8175 8025 

ISSO 1535 

NJL ^2 


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Vlefcers 2M 

513 


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Prtrtam : 111578 
F.TXE.IK Index : 13773 

Previous : 13B9J8 


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BICC 

BL 

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BP 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. DECEMBER 12, 1985 


Page 15 


SPORTS 


Czechoslovakia Keeps Serving Up Ace Tennis Talent 


By Laiiy Gerber 

The Associated. Press 

PRAGUE — The tradition has been here far years and 
so has the talent. But this small communist country has 
added a dose of Mantist-style central planning to produce 
a string of world-beating tennis players. 

For every Ivan Lendl or Hana Mandlikova, there are 
thousands of Chech and Slovak youngsters raking inten- 
sive training, trying to weak their ways up in a na tiona l 
computer system that ranks practically every player in the 
country according to. record. 

Those who do move up get more playing time , and that 
can be cruoal because there are not ennngfr courts to go 
around 

As of hue last month, five products of the Credtoslovak 
system were ranked in the top IS in the world: Lendl (1) 
and MUoslav Mear (12) among the men; expatriate Mar- 
tina Navratilova (1), Mandlikova (3) and Helena Sukova 
(7) for the. women. 

Opinions differ on just why so many Czechoslovaks 
makegood — so many, at least, in proportion to the 15.5 
milli on population. 

“Hie main cause of success is the support of the 

Czechoslovak Central Committee" of the Communist 
Party, said Sudion, the weekly sports newspaper. 

It's tradition, said Jan (Codes, the 1973 Wimbledon 
champion and now the nonplaying captain of Czechoslo- 
vakia’s Davis Cup team. 

k4 Our history goes back lo 1893 with the first lawn t ennis 

dub,” he said “And there's the background of the small 

club. There's always somebody to tell you how to hold the 

racket and hit the baD. 

“They may be unknown people, unknown coaches, wbo 

know more about the game than some top-name coaches.” 

Prestige drives young players to succeed and so does the 

chance for travel in the West, said Frandaek Pal a, head 

rrvnf-h of the na tional Tennis Union and Dxvis Cup ww* 

Western travel is difficult for most Czechoslovaks. 

Then there’s money. With an average monthly income 

equivalent to $250, few people here can expea to become 

millionaires. But the elite tennis players have a chance to, 

although they must give 20 percent of their winnings to the 

government. 

Practically anyone who wants time on one of the 3,166 
courts in Czechoslovakia must join one of about 1,000 

clubs, and the sooner the better. There are no public 

courts, and even Coding a can of balls for sale can be 
nearly impossible. 

Taira t scouts search the elementary schools; everyone 

over 6 is fair game. On the average, only about 40 percent 


of the youngsters who try out are invited into the inien- 
sive- training program, Pala said. 

And beginners aren’t even riven racquets. “They start 
with exercises, gymnastics, playing with a. tennis bafl. 
First, they have to leant to fed the ball and see it," Pala 
said. 



MUoslav Mean Not just Lendls and MandEkovas. 


“Then they start later with a wooden racket, a little 
tagger than a table tennis paddle but much hea- 
vier. . . .They bounce the ball around on that for a few 
months. Hten they get a strung racket just to knock the 
ball around, maybe on a smaller court” 

Parents pay nominal fees for the training, as little as S10 
for a season of elementary training, up to $50 for summer 
or winter camps for older players. 

In dl, there arc about 90,000 players or beginners in the 
system “from Lendl and Mandlikova on down," Pala sakL 
Tennis is said to be the only self-supporting sport in the 
country, thanks to the Western money that flows in from 
the stars to be plowed back into the national program. 
The government doesn’t recognize “professional ath- 
. lete" as a profession, but top players get special treatment. 
Those over 18 and ranked in the top 120 among the 
world’s men and top 100 women players may play where 
they want except the politically taboo nations of South 
Africa, Taiwan, Israel and Chile. 

Those over 21 pay their own expenses and keep their 
prize money, except for the government’s 20 pe r cent and a 
flat $3,000 a year to the junior tennis federation. The 18-21 
group pays 20 percent to the government, 30 percent to the 
federation; its coaching and travel expenses are paid. 
Things were once simpler. 

Karel Kozeluh, the professional world champion of 
1925-30 and 1932, started at age 5 as a ballboy, became a 
local team coach at 12 and, at 14. bad a professional 
coaching contract with the Munich dub Iphitos. 
Jaroslav Drobrry also did without all the organization. 

He was national champion 1945-49 and emigrated after 

the communist takeover, going on to win Wimbledon in 
1954. 

Still there are problems. Lendl, once a ballboy for 
Kodes, spends most of his time abroad. He has come 
under criticism at home for playing in South Africa and 
for his reluctance to {day on the Davis Cup team, which 
did poorly this year. 

“People today are a little bit angry, and they blame him 

because he forgot too early all the support he got, support 

from his parents and the federation,” Kodes said. 

“The problem is that tennis, as an individual sport, is 
played outside the country for the money," he said. 

■ 1966 Federation Cup in Prague 

The 1986 Federation Cup tournament will be played 

July 20-27 at a tennis complex nearing completion in 

Prague, the state news agency CTK. reported Wednesday. 

It is the first time that the competition among national 
women’s teams will be held in a communist country. 
Czechoslovakia, the current cupbolder, has won the event 
four times. The United States leads with 11 victories. 



tatervUmed haalnamcMpd 

Mameh Mohammed seemed a tittle tentative in facing up to this left from J.B. Williamson. 

A Prince Is Denied the WBC Crown 


By Richard Hotter 

Los Angela Timer Service 

INGLEWOOD. California — 
J.B. Williamson defeated Prince 
Mameh Mohammed for the vacant 
World Boxing Council light-heavy- 
weight title here Tuesday night. 

The judges were unanimous in 
their decision. Marty Sanunon and 
James Jen-Kin both scored it 117- 
1 1 1, and Dick Young scored it 1 16- 
111 

Williamson, ranked No. 3 by the 
WBC, had no trouble at all with the 
self-prod aimed heir to King Issah 
Mohammed’s kingdom in Ghana. 
Mohammed seemed confused and 
off-balance for nearly all the 12 
scheduled rounds. 

Williamson, the No. 2 contend- 
er, never exactly hurt Mohammed. 
Cor that matter.’ He did more wres- 
tling than anything else: now 22-1, 
be still has only eight knockouts. 

Williamson.' 27. was the busier 
and more active fighter, although 
he certainly didn't recall Michael 


Spinks, the man he succeeds. Wil- 
liamson. at 173 pounds (78.4 kilo- 
grams). scored no knockdowns, but 
he did hurt Mohammed with his 
body attacks. After one hook to the 
body in the sixth round, the course 
of the right seemed determined. 
Mohammed seemed rubber-legged 
thereafter. 

Afterward. Mohammed, who 
weighed 17 IVs. suggested that he 
had overtrained and should not 
have come in so light to light for 
the 175-pound title that had been 
vacated by Spinks, the former un- 
disputed champion. 

“Today is my bad luck." Mo- 
hammed said apologetically. "I 
shall try again.'* 

He did not approve of William- 
son's tactics. “What I see. is not 
what l expected" he said. “All he 
did was spin and swerve me, just 
pivot me all around. Fighters come 
to throw the punches and see who 
hits who. I'm not used to rock and 
roll boxing.’’ 


For Mohammed. 28. who has 
fought here exclusively at the Fo- 
rum for the last several years, it was 
a bitter defeat. 

He had been close in the past to 
big money fights with Spinks, but 
that was before Spinks unexpected- 
ly toppled International Boxing 
Federation heavyweight champion 
Lurry Holmes. The elimination 
bout produced just $45,000 for 
each Fighter, and the title itself has 
commercial potential. 

The Fight was something of a 
letdown, although nobody expect- 
ed a slugfesi ( Mohammed numbers 
only 16 knockouts in bis record of 
32-2-2). There was indeed a lot of 
clinching, and neither fighter was 
particularly accurate. 

“1 thought he was going to put 
up a better Fichu" Williamson said 
of Mohammed, “but maybe I un- 
derestimated my own talent." But 
he'd better not overestimate it, ei- 
ther. unless Mohammed is his idea 
of nng royaltv. 


SCOREBOARD 


Football 


National Football League Leaders 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
TEAM OFFENSE 

rw* Rina Pot* 


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tow England 

folders 

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ndtontapolls 
tuttoio 
— luuston 


KM UN 4206 

5376 2107 2269 

5266 1430 3000 

5142 2003 3119 

4799 1990 3831 

4744 1973 1771 

4702 1892 2010 

4406 1647 2959 

4475 1467 3BOB 

4365 1989 2376 

4179 1282 2897 

4155 1183 2272 

2972 1211 2662 

2832 1298 2424 


El wav. Dan. 
Eason. N.E. 
Kosar, Ciev. 
Moon. Hau. 
Panel bid. • 
Wilson. Raiders 
Ferrogoma. Butt. 


NO 

James. SIX 
Christensen. Raidrs 
Loraent, Sea. 
WoolfoHo Hau. 
Stallworth. Pitr. 
CJavton. Mia. 

Shuler, Jets 


526 »1 3158 20 
258 146 1794 9 
197 100 1296 5 
389 156 2006 11 
241 168 2189 11 
227 163 2216 15 
287 149 1477 S 


YDS A VO LO TD 


75 977 125 
74 907 122 
71 1161 144 
71 702 9.9 
68 844 124 
67 952 142 
47 747 114 


67 5 
48 6 
43 6 
M 3 
41 4 
45 4 
29 7 


TRAM DEFENSE 


-.TD Rash Roc 



Yorts 

Resit 

Pat . 

UDM. Pllt. 

14 1 11 

■Ittsburnh 

3965 

1398 

2567 

Allen. Raiders 

13 10 3 

tow Enokmc 

4086 

1472 

2614 

Brooks. Cln. 

12 7 5 

low ora 

4(82 

1444 

2738 

Turner, Sea. 

12 0 12 

Jovatond 

4198 

1fe20 

2978 

Bvner, Clew. 

10 ■ 2 

eto 

4211 

1262 

2949 

Soaring: KUSleg 

oat tie 

4332 

1589 

2743 


PAT PC 1 

leaver 

4586 

1741 

2845 

Anderson. Pin. 

3536 29-37 

Manias Cltv 

4715 

1868 

2847 

Braech. cm. 

4345 28-28 

lufigngpoib 

4791 

19)2 

2079 

Leahv, Jets 

3941 21-29 

'luffaki 

4798 

2113 

2685 

Rnvetz. Mia. 

4345 19-24 

JndrmoH 

4861 

1580 

3271 

Kurils, Den. 

36*9 21-35 

Maml 

5147 

2023 

3124 


Punters 

• Mustan 

5374 

2357 

3817 


NO YARDS LONG 

an Dtogo 

5447 

1799 

2648 

SI ark. Ind. 

69 3198 6 


INDIVIDUAL 



Roby. Mia. 

52 2262 6 

6 

Rumen 



CamartlkL H.E. 

82 3671 7 


ATT YDS AVG LG TD 

Me i natty. Cln. 

51 2190 • 


Giants 

5117 

2062 

3055 

San Francisco 

4999 

1972 

3027 

Dallas 

4910 

1580 

3330 

Green Bay 

4734 

1896 

2838 

SI. Louis 

4420 

1717 

2891 

Waste noloa 

4543 

2174 

2361 

PhlladefeMo 

4444 

1420 

3024 

Minnesota 

4420 

1352 

3068 

Atlanta 

4254 

7129 

2115 

Tamna Bay . 

4049 

rise 

2651 

New Orleans 

3944 

1540 

>404 

Roms 

3875 

1729 

2136 

Del roll 

3734 

1228 

2396 

TBAM DEFENSE 




Yard* 

Run 

Pan 

Chicago 

3650 

11*6 

2474 

Wonts 

3833 

1266 

2567 

Washington 

3836 

1499 

2337 

Rami 

4130 

1369 

2751 

PhHadetoWa 

4364 

2038 

2324 , 

Green Bar 

- - 4417' 

1*21 ■ 

•2596 : ’ 

San Frandsca 

4483 

1548 

2935 | 

SL Laud 

45*3 

1949 

2S94 ; 

Dallas 

4791 

1644 

3147 , 

Minnesota 

4800 

2015 

7785 

New Ortoms 

4883 

1768 

3115 ' 

Dfltrott 

4903 

2351 

2553 

Atlanta 

5227 

1893 

3334 

Tamna Bay 

5393 

2034 

3359 


Basketball 


The Pacers 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


National Basketball Association Standby Bottom, Out Cardinals Deal Pilcher Andujar to A’s 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic DivMoe 

W L PO. 

Boston 18 3 ,857 

Philadelphia U 10 SU 

New Jersey 12 11 .522 

Washington W 11 .474 

Now York 6 14 .272 

Central Dtvtoloa 

Milwaukee 17 8 480 

Detroit 14 9 409 

Atlanta 10 12 .455 

Cleveland 9 12 .429 

Chicago 8 17 -320 

Indiana 5 16 238 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
. ■ Mi dwes t Division 


CB 

7 

7 

8 

1JV» 


2 

SVt 

4 

9 

ID 


vlch4-l264 14 Fleming 4-12 S-7 12 Re 
Indiana 49 (Stlpanovlch 11); New York 64 
(Ewing 18). Assists; Indiana 11 (Fleming 4); 
New Yorti 15 [Soar-row 4). 

Utah 38 M 28 21—185 

Houston 34 37 28 23—134 

Otaluwan 13-19 1-3 27. Leovetl *4 7-2 to: 
Dan May 8-15 54 21. Malone 7-13 58 19. Re- 
bounds: Utah 46 (Molono f); Houston 56 
(Otaiuwon 14). Assists. Utah 14 (Hansen *).- 
Houston 25 I Lucas 6). 

Got dsn State 22 25 34 31—92 

Portland 22 » 26 22—94 

Pnxson 9-18 68 24. Vwtdeweotie 8-16 54 21 ; 
Carroll 7-177-7 21. Snort 7-1868 20i Rebounds; 
Golden Stale 4a (snort 9): Portland 57 
IDrexler 9). Assists: Golden Stole 20 (Floyd 


Rjggfc Alt 
Payton. ChL 
Danett. DalL 
wilder, T.B. 
Morris. Giants 


INDIVIDUAL 

Rushan 

ATT YDS AVG LG TD 
348 1548 44 58 9 

279 1417 51 40 9 

267 1146 44 60 7 

317 1154 34 38 8 

237 1054 44 48 17 


Jton. Raiders 
KNetL JcM 
James. N.E. 


329 1527 4 4 41 10 

281 1194 U H 1 

230 1827 47 65 4 


MolalHenka, SJ7. 60 2571 67 425 

Peel Returners 

NO YDS AVG LG TD 


lock. dev. 


197 

1882 

5.1 

61 

7 

LJ ops. pm. 

33 

434 

124 

71 

2 

ranter. Sea. 


2 60 

965 

3 J 

24 

7 

Pryor, n.E. 

34 

430 

134 

.85 

2 

rooks, Cln. 


173 

BU 

3J0 

29 

7 

walker. Raiders 

SO 

586 

1X7 

32 

e 

■oilaro. Pitt. 


281 

819 

4.1 

56 

2 

Martin. Ind. 

36 

395 

114 

78 

l 

yner, dev. 


207 

B14 

3 S 

36 

8 

Skansi. Sea. 

28 

288 

102 

32 

0 

bereromMe, Pit. 

280 

761 

3.7 

32 

6 

Kiricoff Returners 



eiL Butt. 


195 

718 

3* 

18 

7 

NO 

YDS 

I AVG 

LG 

TD 


Quartertmcks 




Bentley. Ind. 

33 

we 

264 

48 

0 


ATT COM 

YDS TD IKT 

Orawrey. Hau. 

22 

568 

254 

50 

0 

■Brum, Jets 


420 

264 3515 24 

7 

You no. Clew. 

34 

862 

254 

63 

0 

siason. Cln. 


353 

711 2816 23 

* 

vjahnsaa. Den. 

24 

589 

24J 

39 

0 

aute. S.D. 


408 

243 2417 27 

19 

Hampton, Min. 

40 

933 

2X3 

46 

0 


tarlno. Mto. 
oinev. K.C. 
rtaa. Son. 
la lone, PHL 


510 304 2009 27 19 
319 171 2311 15 9 

4S9 252 2203 26 17 
230 114 1411 13 7 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
TEAM OFFENSE 

Yards Rush Pass 
5136 2484 2653 


Croig. S.F. 
Tyler, S.F. 

E Jackson. PML 
MllcftolL SLL. 


Montana. SJ=. 
McMahon. Chi. 
D. White, DalL 
Simms, Giants 
Hippie. Oet. 
Lomax. St.L. 
Brock. Rams 
JoworaU. PhiL 
DeBerg, T JB. 
Dickey. GJL 
Kramer. Minn. 


Transition 


Hockey 


BASEBALL 
American League 

BOSTON — Waived Jerry Remv. second 
’ soman. Traded Mark Clear, pitcher, to Mil- 
wkee tor Ed Romero. I n f letdor. 
XevELANO— Sold the contract a( George 
kavkn, outfielder, la me Sefbu Lions of mo 
poor m P aci fic i maue 
MILWAUKEE— Named Terry Bevtawtan 
anaoer ot Vancouver of the Pacific Coast 
oauecmd Duffy Oyer manager at El PomoI 
> Terns League. Signed Mike Paul, minor- 
iguo puchtng coach, to a ano-voar contract. 
MINNESOTA— Named Blllv Gardner scout 
i Cal Ertner field coordinator of minor - 
■due plover evaluation and de ue l o wm e n l. 
‘PRONT O Hamad Gordon Laker special 
dgnment scant. Appointed David Bhime on 

:a scouting supervisor. 

’ EXAS— Signed Tom Podorefc, first baso- 
tvoulflelder. fo a one-war co n tr a ct. 


NHL Standings 


Crolo. S.F.IRB) 
Monk. Wash. 

HIM. Don. 

Lofton. GJJ. 
dark. Wash. 

Quick. PHIL 
Jordon, Minn. 

SCDrtog: 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Dtotaton 

W L T Phi GF GA 


Mor r is. Giants 
Craig, S.F. 
Payton, cw. 
Dickerson, Rams 


TD Rush Rec Rat Pts 

17 17 0 a 103 

13 7 6 S 73 

11 9 2 0 6fe 

10 to 0 0 60 


■H1LAOELPHIA— Traded Ozzie WglL 
eher.and PM SmlHh Pitcher, lathe Alksv 
B raves far Stew D edra st an, pitcher, and 
t Thompson, outfielder. 

BASKETBALL 
Basketball Association 


LEVELAND— Traded Ron Anderson, tar- 
Dnuaro to Indiana ter a fourth- round 
ft «ek In 1787. 

HOE N I x— ACT! voted Bernard Thompson, 
rd. from tn lured reserve. Waived Charles 
■ man. forw ard. 

FOOTBALL 

Catmrtrs Footed ti League 
3 RON TO — Named Leo Cahill general 


Phllodelptila 

21 

> 

0 

43 

111 

86 

Dorset). DalL 

to 7 a 

0 60 

Washington 

17 

7 

3 

37 

103 

80 

Scoring: Kicking 


NY Islanders 11 

10 

4 

28 

103 

106 


PAY FO 

Lg Pte 

NY Rangers 

13 

14 

1 

27 

101 

93 

Butler, Oil. 

46-44 24-29 

46 118 

New Jersey 

12 

13 

1 

25 

99 

106 

Anderson. 9LQ. 

25-26 2*32 

55 109 

Pittsburgh 

11 

14 

3 

25 

106 

102 

Murray, Dei. 

27-28 24-28 

51 99 


Adams DWteloe 




Lanstord, Roms 

33-32 to-24 

S2 90 

Quebec 

16 

10 

1 

33 

108 

86 

Ludciwrst. Alt. 

26-26 21-24 

52 89 

Boston 

13 

10 

5 

31 

no 

102 

Punters 


(Montreal 

13 

10 

3 

29 

118 

99 

NO YARDS LONG AVO 

Buffalo 

13 

13 

2 

28 

100 

92 

Donnelly, AtL 

59 2574 

68 436 

Hartford 

12 

12 

0 

24 

99 

99 

Coteman, Minn. 

SB 25X 

63 416 

CAMPBELL- CONFERENCE 


Landers, Giants 

71 3075 

68 43J 


Harm Division 




Hatcher, Roms 

77 3309 

67 430 

Si. LOUIS 

12 

11 

3 

27 

95 

100 

BufOriL QlL 

to isn 

69 430 

Chicago 

9 

13 

4 

22 

KS 

117 

Peat Returners 


Minnesota 

7 

14 

4 

20 

107 

no 

NO 

YDS AVG LG TD 

Detroit 

7 

15 

4 

18 

as 

128 

Ellerd, Roms 

33 449 MO 

80 1 

Toronto 

7 

17 

3 

17 

100 

122 

Mondier. Oet 

32 269 UJ 

63 1 

5 my toe Ohrtstoa 




jjmtth, SU_ 

24 265 lio 

31 0 

Edmonton 

20 

5 

4 

44 

ISO 

no 

Jenkins, wash. 

26 272 IU 

28 0 

Calgary 

16 

8 

3 

35 

122 

96 

McGonkev. Giants 

42 378 90 

37 0 

Winnipeg 

9 

17 

1 

21 

97 

135 

KiacoH Retargets 


Vancouver 

* 

17 

3 

21 

107 

125 

NO 

YDS AVG LG TD 

Lae Angelos 

7 

17 

4 

10 

97 

142 

Brows Rams 

24 840 350 

98 3 

TUESDAY’S RESULTS 



Gcull. CM. 

19 535 270 

*9 1 


tlanta— P laced Tiger Greene, safety. 
Cliff Austin, running back, an Injured 
m*. Activated Brett Miller, offensive 
ila- Signed Sv Wester Stomas, kick return- 

1 JFFALO— Waived Eddie McGill. Mil 

TTsburgh— S igned Aoihonv Tuggle, 
tv. 

'■ HOCKEY 

Ka ttegat Hockey League 
'RON TO— Col tod ua Wes Jarvis, center, 
.i St Catharine* of Hie American Hockev 
,1,4* «*■ 

nnipeg — R ecalled WodeCompbefl.de- 
tmen, and Murray Eaves, center, from 
■’ brake of me AHL; sent Dan McFali. 

. ' Ba rma n, rod Brian Hayward, goalie, to 
breaks. 

COLLEGE 

- KANSAS TECH— Named Ken Stephens 

all coach. 

LORADO— Announced that Lou Tcppeft 
all defensive coordinator, has been - 
' - id an assistant coach. 

*A STATE— Named Bill Benton menu 
. coach. 

NT ANA STATE— Announced the reslo- 
'■ to! Bin DtoprtOLOSStatktf taoMwll eno- 
he con accept a position on the football 
at Idaho. 

IDE RBI LT— Named Lynn HalMoCk, 
Nolan, Bill Schmitz and 8kk Chrbto- 
Kswoni foomafl 


Pittsburgh I 8 1-4, 

N.Y. Islanders Z Z S—J 

a Sutter (8), Gillie* (ll.LoFcntolnet 15). B. 
Sutter (5), Bassv (18), Jonssan 13), Trottl or 
HO); Lcmkax (17). Btabdell (81. Lindstrom 
(61. Badger (3). Shots on pool: Pittsburgh (on 
Hradev) 10*4—26,- New York Ion Romano) 

J3-7-H— 31. 

Taranto • 1 *— 2 

Washington 1 S 5-3 

Adams (8), Murphv (71, Haworth (15) j Ban- 
ning (3), Jorvls n ). shots on goal: Toronto (on 
Peeiera) 4-5-7-16; Washington (onwreggeO 
12-19-11— -C. 

Ed m on t o n 1 • *— 3 

St. Louts 3 2 2-7 

Paslawski 3 f». Feaerka m.Glimour (91, 
Norwood (1 ), Hunter CM); Kuril (191. Napier 
(Til, McClelland (4). Shois on goal: Edmon- 
ton (Milieu) 16-10- W—34.- St. Louis (Ftdir) 11- 
14*— 31. 

hmm 1 2 1—4 

PMtodeMta t 3 3-7 

McCrimnwn (3). Howe 2 (9). Pres m 2 (20). 
Poulin (16), EUund (6lf Curran (2). Poshi (8), 
O’Connell III, Crowder (12). Shots on goal: 
Baelon (on J arisen > IMS-7— 21; Philadelphia 
(on Kens) 5-12*— ZL 
BoMa 12 6-3 

Quebec 3 2 2-7 

P-Sfasbtv 2 ( W), Paiement 9 (6J,Mol»r 13). 
GitlEs (7). Plard <]); Hamel CH. Tudwr (9). 
Ramsev (Z). Shots on goal: Buffalo (on Gosk- 
Mn) 5-12*— 25; Quebec (on Pwna. Barrasso) 
14*4-31 

Lot Angeles a 3 2-5 

Calgary 3 8 4— * 

Wilson 3 114), Loob (81, Rlsabrougn (81. Bor- 

em (7); Renwtd (5). nicmim mi, Erick- 
sort (3).SmUh2 |i|.SMMMVWl! Lo* Angeles 
(on Lemefln) 11-13-*— 31; Catganr (on EUbl) 
17-11-13-4). 


Monroe, S.F. 
Rhymes, Minn. 
Jenkins. Wash. 


24 625 265 95 1 

45 1129 2L1 55 0 

<1 1018 24J 95 0 


European Soccer 


UEFA CUP 

(Third R flood. Sealed Leg) 

Hakhik Spilt 7. Dnepr 0 (HoWufc advance} 
an 3* oggregoto) 


Baseball 


Draft 


Ptoyess cfoimed la Tuesday^ annaai droll 
at unprotected went: 

Ed Wllliams,3lLliV Crevatand Hnifn Cbidn- 
noti’s Triple a Denver affiliate) 

Seen Patterwv Pi by Teoas (frem ihe New 

York Yankees' TrteteA Cofombw affiliate) 
Lean Roberts, H. by San-Dfogo (tram Pltte- 
nurghh TrtPlM Hawaii affiliate) 

Jett ParretL o. by Monlroot (from Milwau- 
kee's Triple - a Vancouver affiliate) 

Robarte Boniita,oMb. bv the Chicago White 
So* (from Pittsburgh's Trtpto-A HowaH aftni- 
ote) 

Cart WHttfc p. bv CoWornfo (from Cbieln- 
natlh Trlple-A Denver affiliate) 

CM HgrdtokG.bvSLL«riA (from New York 
Mels' Tripfe-A Tidewater affiliate) 

Jose DeJesuv n by Tunmto (from Kansas 
Cliv-s Trtofe-A Otnano aftflfatei 


Houston 

- 16 

•7' 

Ofo 

— 

6); Portland 25 tvalenirne 71. 

Denver " 

U 

. 8 

036 

ito 

Dallas 33 33 27 M— lit 

Son Antonie 

13 

10 

-545 

3 

LJL CD peers 34 30 30 30-130 

Utah 

13 

11 

-542 

JVl 

Jatason 10-15 K-14 30. Cage s-10 4* 16; 

DoOas 

11 

10 

J34 

4 

Blackman 11-20 0-10 30. Aaulrra 0-19 M 20. 

Sacramento 

7 

13 

018 

8U 

RMteundi: Dallas 48 (Donaldson 13); Los An- 


Pacific Dfvfstoa 



geles 5? (Casete). Assists: Dallas 24 (Aguirre 

L-A. Lakers 

18 

2 

.900 

— 

7); Los Angeles 33 (Nixon to). 

Porltond 

14 

11 

-560 

61* 


Seattle 

LJL Clippers 
Golden State 

10 

8 

9 

13 
M 

14 

<435 

-344 

J*0 

Wi 

11 

11KI 

Selected College Results 

Phoenix 

5 

14 

-238 

13*4 

EAST 


Dfckersoa Rom# 247 1012 41 43 10 


183 890 49 62 7 

171 867 51 30 4 

246 858 35 51 3 

153 H8 £2 60 4 


ATT COM YDS TD I NT 

422 254 2977 22 11 

260 150 1983 12 - 8 

423 238 3M8 20 16 

439 241 3294 19 14 

332 IB 3644 16 12 

435 338 2996 15 12 

317 191 3383 12 13 

393 205 3827 14 IS 

370 197 2488 19 18 

214 172 2206 15 17 

437 234 3886 14 23 

Receivers 

NO YDS AVG LG TD 
79 884 1V2 73 6 

74 963 na 52 1 
73 1104 151 53 7 

62 1045 149 56 4 

*2 784 176 55 4 

61 1090 17.9 99 9 

60 683 IM 23 0 


TUESDAY'S RESULTS 

36 27 27 29— Uf 
Odense 21 21 18 2S— 187 

Robertson 11-11 7-18 29. Johnson 8-10 8836; 
Wool ridge 1 V24 » 25 DaUov 10-19 *4 SSuCor- 
zlne 4-11 5-5 17. R eb ou nd s: San Antonio 96 
(Johnson 13); OUcobo 44 (Canine 12)- As- 
sists: San Antoni# 24 (Robertson 7); Odcaoo 
20 (Paxsoo. Dailey 4>. 

Atlanta 27 22 22 29— lit 

Beslan 25 29 28 38— T14 

McHale 9-17 6-7 24. Parish 11-14 2-2 24. 

□Johnson 7-11 7-8 21; Wilkins 13-24 6-6 32. 
Rivers 7-162-7 14. Robouode: Atianto43 (WH- 
Mns9); Boston 49 (Parish tot. Assists: Atlan- 
ta 23 (Rivera 71; Boston 32 (OJahnson *). 

» U 25 25— M0 
22 25 34 15—106 
Richardson 10-1934 31 Williams 8-133-4 19; 
EJOhnson 8-14 7-7 23. Thous 10-14 M 22. Re- 
bounds: Sacramento 45 (Otterdlng 10); New 
Jersey 51 (Williams 15). Assists: Sacramento 
17 (Theus. EJahnsan 4); Now Jersey 27 
(Richardson 14). 

Detroit 26 31 26 33—120 

C l ev elan d 37 M 25 36—120 

Trfpucko 11-15 4-6 25 Johnson 10-16 0* 20; 
Free 12-26 34 30, Minim 8-17 7-10 23. Re- 
bounds: Detroit 59 (Loimbeer. Curator 11): 
Ctoveiana 52 (Hubbard, Hinton 10). Assists: 
Detroit 30 (Thomas IS); Cleveland 23 (Baelav 
KM. 

Setrtlte 25 39 19 23- 90 

MHwaakee 31 30 35 21—117 

Cummings 9-12 W 19, Moncrtef 4-9 6-7 U; 
Chambers 7-t5 3-3 17, Sober* 3 105*1 7, Vrones 
5* 1-2 11. BAbcwnas: Sealtfo M iMeCormlck 
11) ; MihraukeeSS (LWer 13). Asslsls: Seattle 
17 t Henderson, Higgins 31; Milwaukee 20 
(Hodges 10). 

Indiana *4 21 13 17-40 

New York 20 17 18 27—82 

Wolker 7-155-7 i9.Ewlno 7-T24-7 18; Slloano- 


Amneral 75 Worc e ster Tech 60 
Boston Cot 76. Rhode Island 58 
Clark 75 Yale 70 
Coast Guard 81. Trinity 79 
Connecticut 74. Fairfield 72 
Cornell 75 Colgate S3 
Dickinson 72. Gettysburg 78 
Harvard Bs. MIT 50 
Hunter 82. Lehman 69 
Kings Point 80. Connectfcui Cat 74 
Lang Island U. 45 Delawa r e SI. 45 
Pittsburgh 94. Robert Morris 42 
5 Connecticut 64. Bentley 63 
Springfield 55 UfMen *5 
SL Thomas Aquinas 15 Bloomfield 58 
llnlnuo 19, Swerthmore 66 
W. Virginia St. 97. BYU-Howoil 88 
SOUTH 

AkL-Blrmlnafiom 42. Auburn 56 
Alabama SI. 94. Morris Brown (I 
Delta SI. 54. Mississippi 51. 53 
Jacksonville SI. 97, Ata.-HuntevtUe 69 
Louisville 85 tana 75 
Richmond 69. VMi 61 
Tennessee 54, Illinois 51 
Virginia Tsai 84. Virginia 66 
Webber 17. Floater 70 

MIDWEST 
DePpul la W. Mlchlgon 59 
indkww 75 Kansas Si. n 
Iowa SI. 74 Iowa 61 
Knott 92, Illinois Col 78 
Xavier (Ohio) 83. E. Mkhigon 41 
SOUTHWBST 
Bavtor 95 Angelo SL 56 
HardtnrShnmens 89. Sw Texas Si. 7S 
N. Texas St. 55 Texas Christian 55 
Stephen F. Austin 85 E. Team SL 4k 
Texas ASM 74, Pan Amertcon 67 
Tulsa 54, Artrona 51 

FAR WEST 
Air Force 49. Reals 44 
Son Frandsca 5t. 72, Notre Dome iColH.l 70 
Utah St. 85 Brigham Young 74 



The Associated Presx 

NEW YORK — “It was an of- 
fensive fiasco." said Indiana center 
Steve Slipanovich. Who could ar- 
gue? 

The Indiana Pacers night scored 
the fewest points for a National 
Basketball Association team since 

NBA FOCUS 

1972 in losing to the New York 
Knicks. 82-64. here Tuesday nighL 
Indiana converted only 19 of its 74 
shots — 2S.7 percent — en route to 
posting its lowest score ever, in- 
cluding the Pacers’ tenure in the 
American Basketball Association. 

“This game ranks right up there 
as one of the worst I've ever seen," 
Indiana Pacers Coach George Ir- 
vine said. 

“The Knicks played excellent de- 
fense. but they played hard, not 
wdL When guys can’t dribble the - 
ball, or catch it, it's obvious they're 
not ready to play.” 

Indiana's total was the lowest 
since Buffalo managed only 63 
points against Milwaukee on Oct. 
21. 1972. 

Other NBA winners Tuesday 
night were Boston, New Jersey. San 
Antonio, Detroit, Milwaukee. 
Houston. Portland and the Los An- 
geles Clippers. 

The Knicks’ Darrell Walker 
scored a game-high 19 points, and 
his coach. Hubie Brown, said he 
sparked the team’s defensive effort. 

“DarrcD had a great game, and 
his floor play defensively was con- 
tagious,” Brown said. “He had 
eight deflections. ... He had a 
spectacular defensive game." 

Rory Sparrow started and ended 
an 1 1-0 third-quarter streak for 
New York and Patrick Ewing had 
18 points and a game-high IS re- 
bounds. 

Slipanovich paced the losers 
with -14 points; Vent Fleming add- 
ed J3 and Wayman Tisdale had 1 1 
before leaving the game with a knee 
injury. 



. fauWteUPI 

Joaquin Andujar. 


SAN DIEGO (DPI) — Joaquin 
Andujar. the moody St Louis Car- 
dinal pitcher who threw a national- 
ly televised temper taninim during 
Game 7 of the 1985 World Series, 
was traded Tuesday to the Oakland 
A's. 

A 20-game winner the last two 
seasons. Andujar was sent to the 
A's for catcher Mike Heath and 
relief pitcher Tim Conroy. 

Andujar, a 32-year-old right- 
hander. finished the season with a 
21-12 record and 3.40 eamed-run 
average despite a miserable second 
half. 

Andujar was ejected from the 
final game of the Series when he 
aigued two consecutive dose calls 
with home-plate umpire Don Den- 
kinger and then bumped him be- 
fore being thrown out. 

Andujar had to be restrained by 
his teammates. 

Heath. 30. who can also play the 
outfield, batted .250 with 13 home 
nins and 55 runs batted in with 
Oakland Iasi season. Conroy, 25. 
was 0-1 with a 4.26 ERA in 16 
appearances. 


Robert Parish, blowing past Atlanta's Lorenzo Claries for two of 
histean>bigb24pouilsin Boston’s 114-110 victtxy Tuesday mght 


Gretzky Winner 
But Oilers Lose 

The Associated Press 

ST. LOUIS — With a typical 
performance here Tuesday 
nighti Wayne Gretzky proved 
himself an award-winner. The 
same couldn’t be said for the 
Edmonton Oilers. 

Gretzky picked up two assists 
to run his scoring siring to 19 
games on the same day he re- 
ceived the Lou Marsh Award, 
which gpes to Canada’s top ath- 
lete of the year. 

It is the third lime Gretzky 
has received it, having won 
1982 and 1983. 

“I’m more thrilled about win- 
ning the award a third time be- 
cause it shows consistancy.” 
Gretzky said. “It's more diffi- 
cult every year to win because 
athletes in Canada are getting 
better and better, as yon can see 
in international competition.” 

But Greg Paslawski took the 
edge off the night for Gretzky, 
whom he was assigned to cover. 
Paslawski scored ms first career 
hat trick as the Blues bombed 
the defending Stanley Cup 
champions, 7-3. 

Paslawski also had an assist, 
and Doug Gilmour added a 
goal and two assists to give the 
SL Louis checking line four 
goals in snapping the Oilers' 
unbeaten streak at 12. 


Arizona Stale Is Penalized by Pae-10 

WALNUT CREEK, California (AP) — The Pacific- 10 Conference on 
Tuesday hit Arizona Slate’s basketball program with a one-year proba- 
tion period in which the school will not be allowed to gram new 
scholarships in the sport. * 

In 1986, ASU will be prohibited from off-season recruiting of basket- 
ball players and from providing paid recruiting visits lo campus. Prospec- 
tive recruits may only be contacted by mail or telephone. 

The action was taken because of 20 recruiting rules violations, a 
conference spokesman said. 

In one instance, the Pac-10 determined that an assistant to Bob 
Weinhauer. the head coach who resigned last summer, encouraged a 
former ASU player to report false information and to withhold data when 
contacted by conference and National Collegiate Athletic Association 
investigators. 

For the Record 

Don Mattin^y. the New York Yankee first baseman who last season 
batted J24, hit 35 home runs, drove in 145 runs and led the majors with 
48 doubles, on Tuesday was named major league player of the year by 
The Sporting News. (AP) 

Tiro women’s World Cup ski races have been moved because of lack of 
snow in Leysin, Switzerland. A slalom will be run Sunday in Savognin 
and a giant slalom has been reset for Feb. 1 in Crans-Montana. (AFP) 

A federal judge in Baltimore on Monday dismissed the city's lawsuit 
aimed at bringing the National Football League Colts back to Baltimore 
from Indianapolis. (AP) 


Quotable 


• Bill Fitch, coach of the National Basketball Association Houston 

Rockets, recalling his days as coach of the expansion Cleveland Cava- 
liers: “We were the only team in history that could lose nine games in a 
row and then go into a’sJump." (LA T) 

• Atlanta Coach Dan Henning after Sunday’s 38-10 loss to Kansas 

City, which dropped the Falcons to 2-12: “1*11 search and find something 
po^live from this." (LAI) 

• Tony Barone, new basketball coach at Creighton University, to his 

fellow coaches at the Missouri Valley Conference lipoff banquet: “I’m 
asking you to pray for my team for two reasons. One, we need God’s hdp. 
Two, you need the practice.” (LA 7) 

• Los Angeles King Coach Pat Quinn, after reading written evalua- 

tions from his players about what they could do to improve the team's 
play: “1 think we have some guys wbo selected the wrong profes- 
sion.” (AP) 


UVE TELECAST OF KEY NFL GAME! 

(Large Scr een Precision Projactfon Via Sate llite} 
Sunday, December 1 5 

N.Y. GIANTS 

vs. 

DALLAS COWBOYS 



Kick-Off Tune: 7:00 pjn. (Doors open at 6r30 p.nu) 
AH Seats 250 F. 

Palais Des Cong res - Salle Blew 
Refreshments Available 
Contact: Skip Kerr 
Max Com Associates, Inc. 
Telephone: 46 09 04 82 
Telex: 270 580 P A T 

Limited Seating - Call Tarty For Reservations 




1 





I 


ART BUCHWALD 


Help a Poor Contractor 


W ASHINGTON — Since ii is 
Christmastime I am making a 
fervent plea to my readers for ihe 
“Hundred Neediest Defense Con- 
tractors.” 

Suspended by the U.S. Navy, 
shunned by the U. S. Air Force and 
boycotted by the U.S. Army, the 
hundred neediest defense contrac- 
tors will be wandering the streets 
for the holidays unless each one of 
us comes to their aid. 

Let me give you a case history of 
lust one of these 



Bnchwald 


unfortunate 
souls. His name 
is Corporal, Dy- 
namics. He was 
formerly a gen- 
eral and the 
most successful 
defense contrac- 
tor in the United 

Stales — which 
is why he had a 
private jet. a 
chauffcured limousine and a hot 
:ub in Georgia, 

Dynamics Was a founder of the 
military industrial complex, and a 
friend to five presidents. Fifty sen- 
ators were beholden to him because 
he gave them PAC contributions. 
Then one day tragedy struck. 

□ 

But let him tell it as he told it to 
me from his wooden bench in La- 
fayette Park. “I woke up one morn- 
ing and discovered that without my 
knowledge a sales clerk had piled 
on extra costs for spare pans on 
our all-weather Army barracks 
night-lights. It wasn't much money 
— a million dollars here. $10 mil- 
lion there, an occasional S50 mil- 
lion when no one was looking. 
While each overcharge was chicken 
feed compared to what the night- 
lights cost, there is always some 
wise guy in the Pentagon who tries 
to make a big deal of iu 

“As soon as I heard what was 
going on I became dumbfounded. I 
called in the sales clerk and asked 
him why he had been overcharging 
our best clients. He said they were 


getting the stuff too cheaply as it 
was. Besides, since we were the 
only ones making night-lights, how 
could they say what they cost? Af- 
ter some persuasion he agreed to 
drop the light overcharge, provided 
we jacked up the research and de- 
velopment costs for a canteen cup 
we were testing. 

“This made perfectly good fiscal 
sense, so I told him itwasO.K- with 
me. Everyone was happy until 
some malcontent in army procure- 
ment blew the whistle on us. 

“The next thing I knew the FBI 
demanded to speak to me. Then I 
demanded to speak to my lawyers. 
They said they would talk to me in 
exchange for my house, my car and 
my cellular telephone. 

“To save his neck my sales clerk 
started talking to the Justice De- 
partment. Everyone was getting 
surly so I decided to plead no con- 
test to bilking millions of dollars 
from the Defense Department I 
was tossed out of the company. 

“You are now looking at a man 
who faces the grimmest holiday 
season of his life. I have no money. 
I have no job, and because of the 
scandal 1 can't play golf at the 


Army-Navy Country Club for 
three months. 


'Rodky IV* Top* at Box Office 

The Aumated Pmt 

HOLLYWOOD — Sylvester 
Stallone’s “Rocky IV.** pitting 
Rocky Balboa against a Russian 
boxer, topped U. S. box office re- 
ceipts last weekend, grossing SI 1.2 
million to increase its two-week to- 
tal to S48.1 million. 


But I stQI have my 
pnde and I don’t want charity “ 

I asked him what be did want. 

“I'd like my title of general back. 
Who ever beard of the Defense 
Department giving a contract to a 
corporal?” 

□ 

And so you have heard the story 
of just one of the neediest contrac- 
tors in the United States. 

His friends have deserted him, 
the military no longer talks to him 
and his wife ran away with an in- 
spector-general. 

Before you go to sleep this eve- 
ning think of Corporal Dynamics 
and put yourself in his place. Try to 
imagine what it is to be hounded by 
a power-mad Justice Department. 

Then multiply Dynamics by 99 
more who are sharing the same 
grate — contractors who have been 
indicted, are wailing to be indicted 
or have offered to testify against 
their closest friends. No matter 
what the status of his case right 
now, a defense contractor still de- 
serves a decent Christmas. 

While all the neediest contrac- 
tors march to a different drummer, 
they have one thing in common. 
They all wanted the biggest buck 
for the bang. 


Sinatra: The Champion Stylist of Song Turns 70 


By Richard Harrington 

Washington Pea Santee 

T OOKING back, Frank Sinatra 
A-j could insist that more often 
than not “it was a very good 
year.” There have been 70 of them 
now, turbulent and rewarding, yet 
no rate has come along to wrest 
away his title as the greatest sing- 
er and interpreter in the history of 
that vast reservoir of sophistica- 
tion defined by such names as 
Rotter. Rodgers, Berlin. Mercer, 
Cahn, Kent, Genh win. 

No amount of fractious biogra- 
phy can nnderent the remarkable 
artistry that has consumed Fran- 
cis Albert Sinatra. He would.be 
the first to bow to his influences 
and admire his compatriots, but if 
he is judged by his art — as good a 
standard as any, and the one be 
would prefer — then Sinatra, who 
turned 70 today, remains the 
master, as sensitive to the nuances 
of a lyric as he was in his youth. 

Sinatra's musical instincts, in 
sharp contrast to his social ski He, 
have been astounding. He doesn't 
just interpret bis bat songs; he 
assumes them, absorbs their im- 
plications, seeks out the universal 
in lyrics, personalizes them and 
hands them back, renewed. 

The bobby-soxers, his first 
fans, tended to celebrate mass 
hysteria rather than real musical 
accomplishment. But. like the 
Beatles, Sinatra grew into his art 

New generations may have a 
hard time understanding what the 
fuss was all about They tend to 
read about one Sinatra, the public 
boor and bully, when they should 
be listening to the classic singer 
who gave words worth. 

Those who came to Sinatra in 
his two periods of grace — the last 
days with Dorsey and the subse- 
quent solo career in the 1940s, or 
the triumphant renewal in the 
mid-1950s and early '60s — do 
not see him now, graying, thicker 
in body. They see the bow-tied, 
hollow-cheeked youngster, or the 
savant swinger with the rueful 
grin, snap-brim hat pushed bade, 
tie loosened, trench coat slung 
over the shoulder, an embodi- 
ment of the romantic cynic. 

In that trick of cultural memo- 
ry SO basic to tirelelgia and so 
important to ait, what we see is 
what we hear — The Voice, forev- 
er young. We are enveloped in 
Sinatra’s conversational manner, 
his masterful phrasing, his evoca- 





ho»un 


Sinatra and his daughter Nancy at a party last mouth. 


tion of uncluttered emotions. A0 
tire dissonance of Sinatra’s life 
can be resolved in that voice. 

What has been most astound- 
ing is Sinatra's artistic survival. 
The length of his career has 
forced mm to make painful ac- 
commodations, but he has man- 
aged to remain remarkably con- 
stant in the rapidly changing 
envi ronmen t of popular music, 
anchored in the sophisticated 
songwriting that emerged in the 
1920s and *30i and continues to 
provide the core of his repertoire. 

The voice has changed, slitting, 
as Sammy Calm once wrote, 
“from violin to viola to cdlo." 
Sinatra quit briefly in 1971, a pe- 
riod when his voice seemed erod- 
ed, vibrato widening, breath giv- 


ing oat, pitch wavering, high and 
low notes less attainable. That set 
the stage for 01* Blue Eyes' re- 
markable comeback. The voice 
— darker, thicker, tougher — ser- 
vices the songs in a new manner 
and he tends more to up-tempo 
tunes that, like the showmanship 
and the mythology, made his defi- 
ciencies. 

One mark of enduring genius is 
bong in the right tune at the right 
time. Sinatra’s emergence in the 


five, more adventurous, did indi- 
vidual things better, Sinatra was a 
total package. Intuitive, he never- 
theless worked hard, expanding 
the boundaries of breath control 
to realize in his singing what he 
heard in others' playing. He had 
no formal training hot be had 
formidable instincts, which led 
him to adopt bd canto dements 
— mainly those long flowing 
lines, the seamless legato that he 
heard in Dorsey’s trombone and 
Heifitzs violin. 

Sinatra’s melodic deviations 
have seldom been extravagant or 
his embellishments particularly 
inventive (especially when be de- 
cided to improve a lyric). Some- 
times miscast as a jazz singer be- 
cause he has so often surrounded 
himself with the cream of jazz, be 
has always been most comfort- 
able within the straightforward 
conventions of popular song, 
which may be why be has touched 
so many people. 

Even in his formative years 
with the Hany James and Tommy 
Dorsey bands he was making his 
art accessible. Given the right ma- 
terial — lyrics he could believe in. 
a melody that could enthrall — he 
has always placed himself at the 
service of las song. His most re- 
cent album, “LA. Is a Lady,” 
showed that his Tm Pan Alley 
roots are is immovable as an 
oak’s. When be has tried to sound 
current, or made commercial ac- 
commodations to contemporary 
songwriters, the result has been 
indegant — -or, worse, for Sina- 
tra, unconvincing. 

If there have been golden eras 
in Sinatra’s career, there were 
dark eras as wdL The first, proba- 
bly the worst, came in the middle 
to late 1940s, when Sinatra lost 
his credibility, his record and film 
contracts, his management, his 
family, his fans, his voice. He 
made the first of several remark- 
able recoveries with Hollywood 
and with Capitol Records in the 
1950s. recast as the hip swinger. 

Some of Sinatra's greatest tri- 
umphs came at a nW when rock 
was supplanting pop. From early 


early 1940s (post-swing and lag .-1958 to 1966, he did not have any 
bands) and his revival in the mid- Top-10 singles but produced 27 

Top-10 albums. Still, by the early 
IWOs 


1950s (pre-rock) , illustrate the 
il A romantic idol in the mu- 
tinies of World War H. Sina- 
tra advanced the art beyond the 
genial crooning of Bing Crosby. 
Other singers were more inven- 


be was beset by voice prob- 
lems and out of favor again. 

Since then be . has enjoyed a 
decade of renewed success. Yet 
there has been, no mellowing of 


his public personality: feisty and 
temperamental, blessed for his 
generority and damned for his 
truculence, honored for his in- 
volvement in the arts and politics, 
chastised for his divorces, brawls 
and adolescent antics, berated for 
the company he keeps. 

At 70. be has nothing left to 
prove. His concerts now must be 
considered a risk; the instrument 
is not what it was, no matter how 
delicately or passionately han- 
dled- Some of Sinatra’s most re- 
cent appearances have been 
among his most triumphant, but 
the damag e comes from a dilution 
of a compelling American myth. 
The singer who bridges memory 
and reality courts disaster when 
he insists on denying the end of 
his time, particularly when one 
can nun back to timeless record- 
ing? for comparison. 

There is talk of a movie cover- 
ing the years between his youth in 
Hoboken. New Jersey, and 1953. 
the year he woo the Academy 
Award for “From Here to Eterni- 
ty." There is talk of Sinatra ap- 
pearing in another film himself. 
In retrospect, his film career is 
less inspiring than his recordings. 

Sinatra has often described 
himself as a saloon singer. Two 
images in particular reinforce 
thaL One is the cover of “No One 
Cares,” with Sinatra slumped at a 
bar, solitary, gazing forlornly into 
his drink, his cigarette burning 
down, while in the background 
men and women are warmly con- 
necting. Then there's “Only the 
Lonely,” whose cover shows Sina- 
tra made up with the tears of a 
down. The transcendent moment 
of this album, which many con- 
sider his master-work, is the Har- 
old Arlen-Johnny Mercer song 
“One for My Baby.” A languid 
piano underscores the hurt; a sub- 
tie wash of strings or a mournful 
saxophone brushes by in the 
background. And Sinatra sings it 
as if bis life depends on finishing 
the tale. 

Well that's how it goes, Joe, I know 
you’re getting anxious to 
close. 

And thanks for the cheer, l hope 
you don’t mind my bending 
your ear, 

Bui this torch that I found, it's got 
to be drowned or it soon might 
explode, 

So make it one for my baby and one 
more for the road. 


World's Biggest Cut Gem 
Given to U.S. Museum 

The American Museum of Nam- * 
ral History in New York is being 
given a spectacular Christmas or- 
nament: what’s believed to be the 
world’s largest cut gem, a light blue 
topaz called the Brazilian Princess. 
Joseph Antoaacd, a museum 
spokesman, said the 21,327-carat 
gem, “the size of a large grapefitut” 

at 95 pounds (43 kilograms), was 
cut in the mid-1970s from a 75- 
pound crystal found in the moun- 
tains of eastern Brazil 25 years "ago 
and brought to the United States 
by Edward Swobodo, a gem dealer. 
The cut stone, first displayed in an 
exhibition in San Francisco in g 
1976, was later sold to Art Sexauar, w 
a gem collector from Alaska. Since 
the late 1 970s the gem had been On 
loan to the Smithamifln Museum 
of Natural History in Washington 
but rarely exhibited because of the 
museum’s policy against displaying 
objects it does not own, said John 
White, curator of the Sntiihsooian’s 
gem and mineral collection. He 
said the Smithsonian decided earli- 
er this year not to accept the stone 
as a gift because of changes in tax 
rules. 

□ 


r 


¥ 


f. 


A state judge in Somerville, New 
Jersey, has granted John L De Lor- 
eon’s former wife, Cristina Ferrara 


llioiiiopmdos. custody of ibeircfaQ- jk 

A ■» 1 1 A O #- 


dreu, Zachary, 14, and Kathryn, 8. 
Superior Court Judge Michael ho- 
briani upheld a disputed pre-nup- 
tial agreement, however, allowing 
the former automaker to keep an 
estimated S10 million in assets he 
look into the marriage. 

□ 


John McEnroe, 26, plans to mar- 
ry the actress Tatra O'Neal, 22, 
the Los Angeles Herald Examiner 
reports, quoting the tennis star as 
saying: “The actual fact of the mat- 
ter is that she is expecting a baby ” 
McEnroe was quoted as saying he 
had denied reports of the pregnan- 
cy earlier because he wanted to tell 
bis parents personally. No date for 
the wedding has been seu 
□ 


i- 


3 


The Canadian architect Arthur 
Erickson, designer of the rnnarfan 
pavilions at Expo '67 in Montreal 
and Expo *70 in Osaka and the new 
Canadian Embassy building 
planned across from the National 
Gallery in Washington, has been 
named winner of (he American In- 
stitute of Architects' gold medal. 


LEGAL NOTICES 


COMMONWEALTH OF MASS, 
Plymouth Count/ Probate Court No. 
esoiarooi GaAAnr T. Hautahan. 
Pkmftff. n. J. Mdnl HowWxn, De- 
fendant. Summon by Pub&cohon. To 
the obo-e-rejnmd D ef e n dan t A crav- 
ptart ha been p, a e< Me d kr fin 
Caret by your Sfoua. Gad-Arm T. 
Hoalahon, soefang to dissolve Ihe 
bonds of ma trimo ny. far yard aslody 
of rmnor children, tor cmerem of 
real property located at 4*26 34ft 


Street, Arlington. Virgna. Stcncfing xi 
Ihe name af Col ' 


'Ged-Arm Houkftan and 
J. Mduel Houkftan. a recorded 
with Arlington County, Vxgirwj land 
Records. Sock 1099. Page 29. And 
order on equrtrftle dvacn of proper - 


^ purwart w M.GA. c. 208, section 


You are requred to serve upon 


Ghales J. Bowser Jr, Esq. jfajrtttf: 


attorney, whose address b 
! ton St , Boston MA 03116 your an- 
swer on or before Jan. 20. 1*86. If 
you fol to do id. She Court wJI pro- 
ceed to the hearmg and orfp < h cn hon 
of thts action. You ore afso required to 
file o copy of your a n s we r nth office 
of the Remoter of lha Court at 
uulh. Wdress Janes R. Lawton. 

Fust Judge of sad Court ai . 

Ci 79, 1905 John j Daley 
of Probate. 


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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

WE SEEK TEMPORARY PARIS hemes 
for fine Amman academe FanSes. 
1-12 modhs. No tringn Feifc 
Abroad. IM Rrverdde Dr. NYC, NY 
10025i tea tat 4621-3271. 

JANUARY FASHION STUDY. Class- 
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ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS ei 
E^fah.^ans (ckafy) 4634 5965. Rome 


PERSONALS 

MORRIS 

We ore bock. Please phone day or 
right. We rii want you with us as 
soon as parable. WHh lave, dL 

STILL DESPERATELY SEEKING 
RANDA. 9 yen after CDL Saw you 
in Geneva esafy November. Ftease 
write to Bax 2222. LH.T.. Frietfcidrir. 
15. 6000 Franldurt/Maia 

WELCOME JBttY TO YOUR NEW 
world. Bye Sweetie. Keio Jurior. 
Senor. 

HAVE A MCE DAY1 ROKH. Hove a 
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DBAGANA. WAITING FOR YOU in 

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WOUD IP IIZAL A MAROAL Bora- 
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FOR SALE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

SUNNY CAPMB5. Beautiful Prompt 
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rxheent leaphon wah “ dda weria " 
beans, 4 kxge bedrooms with baft, 
lage guest opatmeni, swimnsna 
pool, sacrificed or F4 nvton. Cal Bob 
on 93 38 1? 19. SSI 47 La CioiseHe. 
06400 Coma. 

COTE D'AZUR NEAR VAlBONtC, 
Superb properly, 5 bedrooms, 5 
baths, carercteer t house. 17.000 sqm. 
land, pool F6.0000M Prooxfoon 
teocan te Ruhr GcOCD N«e. Tet 
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THE RIVIERA'S MOST n> edfoe new 
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ITALY 

CSVMA Smal kixunmn apartmant 
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5 125.000. Cal 212-535 0332 USA 

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Foragers can buy fody aportraenh 
or didets sMih maresfiewe views. Mon- 
treux, Vtors. Varbier, Los Dnfalerari, 
Chateau cTOex near Gstaod. Lrysm. 
PVmes from SF1 23.000. Martgns ra to 
65% at 6WL unrest. GLOBE PLAN 
LA., AvMon Repos 24. Oi-lOOS Lau- 
sanne, Switeriond. TeL Ql) 22 35 12 
Thu 25185 MHJS 

SWfTZKLAND 

rsmfoun eon buy h the Alps 

Ilk Fx from Geneva, in foe heart of 
4 Viieyi over 300 bi of skang 
rad 80 ski Ms. 

Apartment. 64 apn, SF132J00 
Apartment, 74 jq.ru., SF155J300 
Mortnages 60% ri 6*Wt inter «. 
WVAC REAL ESTATE 

52 Monforfcnt. CH-12Q2 G8SVA. 
Teh 41227341540. Telex: 22030 

LAKE GENEVA + LUGANO. Man- 
treux, Gstaod reyon. lacoma & 
mam mouSas rotor Is etc. Foremm 
eon buy superb new apartewixx/cho- 
lets/vfc. Al prices. Lmge choice. 
Swra nradency aamfate. flSBOLD 
S A. Toor Gate 6.0+1007 Laureate 
21 /2S261 1. Lugano office 91/6P648 


REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 

CANADA 

TORONTO, CANADA - LUXURY. 
FWhr fumnhad and equpped 1 & 2 
bedroom iuobl Superior nmca, 
Short/lanq termrentds. Market Suha 
80 hart St Eat, Sta. 223, Toronto 
taSE 1T4 Canada H16) B62-1096 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

SAMT-MUL Lkifirmhed dowfoli 
mas 7 roams, triplu racepMn, 4 bed- 
roana.4 britn. koamoudy equipped 
krtdien, 6000 sqm. pmV. F 20.000 t 
monft 53. 5 AU de Noe. 06800 
CACNES SLR MER. TeL 93.20.14.lfo 

GREAT BRITAIN 

LONDON. For tha beet furnished flats 
and homes. Cornu* foe Speocfata 
PSAps. fay and lews. Tet Souft of 
Prirk 352 8111. North of Pari 722 
5135 Telex 27846 RBW Q. 

MAYFABR, NEAR HHTON HOIB, 

PRETTY MSTOaC HOUSE, £300 / 
week, 4-6 norths eompray to. TeL 
London (01) 794 4859 

HOLLAND 

DUTCH HOUttJO CBfTRE foV. 
foe i meats. Vdemssr. 174, 
Amsterdam. 020421234 or mm 




vrt BUOCELLATI 


J e wel ler-Goldsm ith 


4 PLACE VENDOME, PARIS, 
T6L (1)42.60.12.12 


12 VIA MONTENAPOLEONE. MILAN "* 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


ITALY 


When in Bam 
MIAZZO AL YHAMO 
Luxury apartment house itoh furnafiod 
lbs, available far I week and more 


Phone (094325. 6793450. 
Write: Vfo del VUabro 16, 

00186 r 


PARIS ABEA FURNISHED 


ELYSEES 


CONCORDE 


SHORT TERM RENTALS 

ewfcHeb* 1 we ek enw ixih 

A8P. 9 Am teyok 75008 fob 
Tel: (1) 42 65 11 99. Telex 6AP93F. 


Embassy Service 

8 Ave. 3* Mamtoo 
75008 Peris 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT M PARS 
4562-7899 


NEAR HENRI MARTIN 

to tow nhaeie, styed* Sro om flat, 200 
KLflL. large Nina, ifang. 3 bedroom^ 
2 batfa, equipped kitchen, mold's roor^ 


UmJv*' i, uauLc. I 
Embassies prefe 
dxxget Teh 42 24 64 69. 


STAYING M PADS? 
RflMUMD 6 UNHBMSFCD 

F UST -CLA SS APARTMENTS 

Ikeien rente! 2 M a ti n. 
Alee flats 8 h om es fade 


MTBt UfiStS, 1. nw Molten. 

Pons (Bd* Tel PJ <563 1777 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/ SHARE 


PABIS AREA FUHN1SBED 

74 CHAMPS-H.YSEES 8iti 

Ssufo 2 or 3-roam opatmeni. 

One north or mare. 

IE OARDGE 43J9.67.97. 

VICTOR HUGO 

in towifoomq 220 sqm, 2 reexpriae, 

3 bedrooms, 2 bathe, garage, moieTs 
Mta F20.00a hktyftw 6838 

CHAMPS H.YSSS 

rtgh dasi, modorq lovely studb, parti- 
ble short term F5800. Tel 45 S3 43 41 



METRO MUerc. STIXXO, frty fir- 

nifoed, high dasj, prrvcte garden, 
todtertM A bethroam. F40» net. 
AML 47 <2 80 22 

17TH VBUSRS. SeariM oporietrtfo 
forge reerfrioo, 2 bedioonn, garage. 
FI 11030 + charges. TeL office hart 
48 2034 73. 

STUDIO TO 4 ROOMS. Week, morth. 
year rates. Uaeoiourg & Martptr- 
ncme. No agney Fms. 4325 3509. 

BfflB. TOW8L by owner, luminous, 
long term durio, tatcFwn, baSv logaa. 
F*ft0 + charges. Tel 47 47 4472. 

ETO4LE-WA0RAM, Stadfo whh kMv- 
en, bechoem 8 color TV, No agent. 
T(i 46 24 09 27. 

NEARTIATtOM 3raom apartewnt, 70 
sqm. 4- befcony. F4600; 43 71 84 21 
or 43 71 33 56 or 48 06 76 65 eves. 

METRO COMMERCE, douUe King + 

1 bedroom, khchen, brth, FSV7J 
dwget indoded. AJAL 47 42 80 22. 


8TH AVB4UE MONTAMNZ, ben- 
bedroom, 2 baft*. 


am 
F2SJXJ0. 


living + 

no. Tel: 4 


42 25 32 25. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


8th. 14th. 16th. Tel. 42 25 32 25 


owners duplex apartment, 

wril fometad. hirfi dote. 4257 0*M 


IA11N OUAETBL2 rooms. brth. kteh- 
en, heal, phone. TeL 43 fU 6569 

PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


15TH. Beautiful hAfrig 61 conrforh, 

6th floor, botany. 3 room, Idtrfwn, 

bath, tojieraifa. F4500 + charge* 
TfilH PORTE DAUPWE. Doable Bv- 


mg, 2 bedroar^Tboft*. kitchen, park- 
ing, befcony. F5330 ch u eg w mduded. 
Tab 42 96 61 & 


SWITZERLAND 


LUGANO FOR RBfT, CHAflMMG 
townhauo on mounfexnnde, 5 min- 
utes from center. 3 bedrooms, 2 babe, 
Mr go- 


fOQA nrepoce 

TadefaPy hx neked jwth cJ awritwi 


3 floors. Sacrifice: 
./month. Reajon moving to 
_ _ . A vdloWe Jan Rfi. Contact own- 
er: Private 091/54 36 85 or Office: 
091/23 II 24. 


EMPLOYMENT 


POfl THE FEATURE 

INTERNATIONAL 

POSITIONS 

TURN TO PAGE 3 


EXECUTIVE 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


APPOINT MfNT OFFERS. 

tiondc^t>aty co mpany regu 

top npa freffnonan & rwwwQ 


caAve for long term udoyjnn i . 
_ ■- ~ i, hew* help 


Bated in Athene, Greece, w 

i.bage of o new cruising aancepr 


and orgaia oirimmaite mybtei g 
~ “perish end 


& teles strategy. Rue* Spanish 
^sh n riifiwAfa . Gewr desr- 
. [Vase send cqvSoteion to Nov- 




_ _ FVaeus, Greece, At- 
. E-GorntaL 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


MTSMAUONAI. 8USME5S- Seek a 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


kitL business management unfl) a irui- 
(motional axpcnTtan. 2 Bachelor of 

Sc i ence degfoto from MIT in Qtemicof 
Engmeer mg 5 fcri. Bu dnece. 6 yeati 
profoct rrxvKDBmerf oimerMnoe m 
Saua Arabia & Sopcwi. SpMk Japa- 
ret, French & &^ah. US. dtaen. 
For reJumo A eBu ieuw ad 1 US Wk 
217-762-3821. 


AMBHCAN I AUOEAST WustrW 
mem ug er. MBA, to aid Mideart joint 
Venture far USA or European eorp. 8 
wart Dcpenence in induAy & oe in 
Arab world. General nnonneit or 
coreuttmc pouwen for A6dead/Bir- 
ope or USfc Martin 


tomes St Aft 2. 




Egypt. Tel 29 12288 Tx 22430 HEL 


MAKETMO EXECUTIVE, 
Aoteriaxi. scngfa, I 


37. 


ta> tetoe , , , 

Hi uncial bodtprowd 

canirodi dedras reepc r 

with London or German based frm. 




do Trevor. 57 BSlh I 


MAIKEITCO EXECUTIVE, age 38. 
with x teneve inti e xp erienc e & lan- 

non "l pmpiriih emi axiotiT^ wnpu 

Kt ewtrience am be ubfaed. Write 
Box 2988, Harold Trfaune, 92521 
NeuJly Cedca, France 


B pnSH LIBCA.oy) 34, fluent Engfah. 
French, Gestoi bate A indmby m- 
perience. Svrin B perm*, seeks new 


1 ehJehg e . Wil bond or 
relocnte. Kopiy Box 2991. Herald Tri- 
buno, 92521 NeoSy Cede*. Franco 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


DOCTORS (MJ>.) WANTED to 

ride raneufeabon & nvhxsamari 

mate fat LLS. enmtia campcRyJ tib- 

n>* m m u ner Ui cn for 1 day/morth. 
kadic esxgemv denxatcilo- 
cSet or nirfrrion 


asi, cmd c& 

Werviewing London Dec. l£For cq> 




phone number London 4^*9?^ 
ewanxiBS between 5 &1tl 


DMECFOfl for the FrancDAswrican 
ScBtftrte, Kennel. France. inuolwBi w- 

hngud US. dflmn. TefcW/9 20 S7 


International Business Message Center 


ATTOmON EXECUTIVES 


in thn t atm n o ti oned Hmra/d i 


of a m o ti o n recrin ererid- 
w rdo, moat of eton ore in 
wtt 


bt t ee tiM md mdutOy, 

mad M And letet at (l 

613595) baton TO sun, en- 
nat m tm Mnyw 
and year in e ei age wit) 
wmin 41 ham. The 


tU.S9.30 or toad 
•qoivalont par Eno, You wad 
mdado t o m/d a ta and werfS- 
ablo bUng oddrmo. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OffSHORE ft UK 
LTD COMPANIES 


faanaraton and management im UK, 
bk of Mai, Turin. Angufla. Cheritel 
Woxb, taw, Uterio. GrbrcAar and 
malt dhef 


• Canfidertwl advice 

• bWTWd u te owriabSty 
■ Noffn u ce services 

• Bern sherd 

• Boat regahatioai 

• Accounting & n d ab ii t iiJiun 
, Idephaw & leht 

’ booklet frotm 


SOVICESUS 
Head Office 

saw, 

Td 01-493 4244. Tbr $820 SCSLDN G 


NOVATE MVBTOR ledb aty teoble 

rieo/prodas/propet ib be devel- 
oped Thru actnv pvtnanh^ Funds 
gvofobh m any oinvncy cmywhere. 
Senoui often to Bax 833, Hnld 
Trfoune.92521 Neuflyfr^, tv^ 


sronwG goods, ra bg m 

n or m a vofeble for export nndt 
&«pe- WwjfigJ pw for fog 
quoruity. Tlx222ffl Belgiwn. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNmES 

BUSINESS i 

Om»lTUNrnES 

MONEY TREES? 
URETfME SECURITY 


fora In emefAnerise'i mart aw- 

rtf* ■ e — * - «- ■ ■ e w ■ 

1 neg HUIMOym teVBnVSVn 

ft 8» rot Ower 30^00 nut 

trace planted "m 1984. Protected annuo! 
moome eventeofly roaches 52%. 

W OW5- D4QUU9E5 KVITH5. 
Mcearid dwsftto te in Engfoh, Frondi, 
Ggmcn. to 2207. herrtd Tribune. 
72521 Neuiy Codex. France 

pililij 


REAL ESTATE LIMITED pretnerfop 

AMrfe icd, Europe, UJC, and other 

W4AMA, LtariaCor- 
porabora.from US$150, Phone. 0624} 

fan. soles ovendm rad bonuses. 
Send reswne m FuM amfdenoe to 
Mmbefow tfaedor, ASSS Ud, 1J99 
West PdSm fto Pari Rd, Stete 314. 

igW*.**m 

■ -ff 

1RAI* WTBQ4ATVOHAL Far fan 
. art proH Steely saObr buy amtfwiB.'- 
For .udonttalior write tai V&O.G, 
ltd., PO. to 3463. timasnl Cvorte, 

we have amm evaesta m 

fatawuitt good mronLhand eqrip- 
mert. ^ wtteol (four nil baring 
wright of wfoert FW 12OJJ00 ten- 
d «or. B Beer brewing mdudaQ bofo 
ttog bssM weigte 3 beer KUX0 
ton*/yeor. Heme «vsfi hid detab te 
Stedi hdussrid Cora. Pie [Jd, 425 
for Vrito W, S' Pore 1024. Tet 
7373755, fix 22153. 

BUSINESS SERVICES 

INTLe 

BEAUTIFUL PEORf 

UNUMtiH) MC 

U^Jk. « WOBDWBE 

A pemoqrt fo fortnert sarwoe 

Bszavsea ■ 

wdriidueb for a» soeid S ~ 
prciuuttanrt nrropom. 
212-765-7T93 
21^765^794 ' 

330 W. 56fo St. N.Y XL 10019 . 
Sendee Representobres 
NeerUWtoUwide. 

YOUR AGENT M MOROCCO 

SCHAMA5CHMAROCSA 

Witte 42, Ave Hauroi Segter 
Cowbcnco 01, Moreeeo 

CaD: 27W04. 272652, 222Z21 

Tie: 22901 

OfHHOREA UK COAVAMB. Save 
to. Fdwory Frost, dooaeiohoq 
eompony formrara, mtemrtKnri hm. 
bonk oamm opened, occourtmg, 
mol, tetex toe. whthmgten SereiMi 
Ltd., 23 CoEege HE, Gmdon EC4R 
3RD. Tet 01-2480802. Tk- 884587 G. 

. . 

MARFORWARPfoiG Offend tor 
S-adrt top*-*. V*r ARrtfoi 
hStm. BSW, to 2060 CK8035 Zeridi 

HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT, 
report - 1? countries wriyxed De- 
toes: WMA, 45 Lyndforff Terroee, 
Suite 564. Ccrtrd, Hong Rang. 

SUS 20 MBUON, seared fora need- 
ed. Hum* Atari* 64 47 50. 


DIAMONDS 




Your bed buy. 

Fra cfcmmfc in any price woe 
• OtfowKf whriMoipncw 
cfcea from Antwerp 
ter of foe Amend world. 

M g’tarrxtee. 
fo free price far writs 


fatabfahed 


Wfawttrad 62. B-2D1B Antwerp 
Mghw .%£Jh 31234 07 51 K 
s 71/79 eyl b. At foelXamond Quk 


Tfo: 71779 eylb. At foe Diamond Quii 
Heart ’9f Atdwerp DwmorcJ indudry 


OITFICE SERVICES 


YOUR OFFICE IN PARIS 

• FUfo fundund modem offices ml 

woforto tdoto to rent by the 

hew, day; month, etc , 

• Vow toded or pemmnt fir™ 


“Ter RSAB D'AFFAIRES** . 


TOUR ATHB4S OfflCE 

— Ttiuer A' 
l. Tel 77962M 


ruTtero 


WCW6 / TBEX/ TRBML 


OFFICES FOR RENT 


eq fl. View, uFPfllC from 77* flow. 
Anri to W et hoan Z1 2-2076007. 


ANEXOTING JOB M JOUB4AUSM 
ie ataUbi a to the 


HKTOR 


who has at lecte 10 yen writing / 

mother 


ecStmg enerienoa: idne 
tongue b Engfish, whose fieri ad 
Gerrnanm fwrt; who is farrrior vrirh 
(he fa ir opegn e rawi and wfoaee irter- 
aliae 


ewq, etc. 


wide-ranpng, inrixang ament 
hwnan mterest, e ie i m^ art, lee 


The European offia of a mfoor iriemo- 
n b adde 
fritar » fa 


Cn rx flrintes should send debated re- 
Aine, mcbcSng samples of work, to 
Bax 29®, Heated Tribune, 

92521 Nerily Codex, France 


TAX 


American law fine 


p ® pth 

i at US & French moome tax 


returns. Tot 45 63 91 23 Paris. 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


wtyjsv ntTOl Of ATO 


work r 


Arabic. VoSd 
wroperaliansmon- 
i kitX seeks paalion 
ainmaKSngodan- 
. _ J kntwrbdge of bodt- 
orrice & balking operations & 
dues: barter roan 
egqniMrahi 
■foe of cdkd bra 
of Bxr>-5ocurrties & weHu c faxe 


pgjWri^ Irenshrs & qnhformg, m- 


I of control fi mteradoud b- 


sng procedures, freanino of staff, hm- 
dfog of iffSUuiiacxte & 


mrfividucf 
custome. Hnflng of e i legal & ad- 
iimuJi ulrre amliuiiL fits note. 
Wrie to: for Mrtesoood, 3 rue Beeon, 
75017 Pprg, frtaxxL 


PBBONABU YOUNG MAH 31. 
seeks a chn l nntyfl position, varied 
rafamy and awahoa background, ref- 
erences avaUtee. fome UC P748) 
3685 or 36 Springfield, Sbteby. Beh- 
mond, Ytariafore, LflC 


AVAUAMJE JANUARY, treaned norv 
nieq governesses, hcxaecouples&Au- 
- occelere refarenoei. neoe near 
wdh us now. Fry a m 
Atoershor, 


HSfcTbtb^an^UKEc— eel 


WBPBCSSS 

seeks work n PJL m Pons. Write to: 
WSb Wedo c/o ■ Seht um berger, Le 
Haul Bob, Parc: de Mantes, 92430 
Monies To Coquette, Frarce. 


m YOUNG MAN 30i fall Law 
boefcyound, 5 yean e 
arance & rriraurance, _ 

may se eks posKon France or 

vn. Hertted Tribute, 92S21 
NewSy Cebex. Fra n ce 


f»*CH IA0Y Prffate Science grad- 
5 u nB fj h ' lteAcxl - knowi- 
^e of baoldee p x nj 8 computer A 
stack «dan mechan qi i A m ' 
pastT rcnce 76 09 2202 


cm* WDV, My. tolrt 
steMfon seeks parUmm' 
as PAytrgvel campon 
wade to Bex 2220. 1 HI, 
1&D6DB0 FrimlAxi/Man 


/on 


DATE PROCESSfoW 

Mcrrti Qr rJrr A Qfi grd 

gPPWt, Ifoid French work perm6r 
French fluency. 415-668A21i 173 9lh 
|AvUh Staifrariecu. CA94118 USA 


AMH8CAN, 89. former US Navy, 


Europe. AwribMe note. No depen- 
ds*. Write 8. Dl Cfonto 6® 
OBLftlATO.RTO6.UK. 


■AUjffilNA-Asweo Aerobe hebiictar 
NVC, seels posteon. For fgrfoer infer, 
nraon eeft 212-734-9240. 


MOKAN MALE 35. hdudrial de- 




BRA 25, 

free to IreveL IHT/Bok 289/Pmto 
Texeko B/h tadrid yarsn/y^. 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 




Engfah. 


^rih w_ 'German 
BSngud 

»ie^. W*or pinna. 13&Xritue 


Don’t mien 

Mnwinu 

SeraSABAL POOTIONS 

TUESDAYS 

fo ■» HT (foWSMte 


EMPLOYMENT 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


BRITISH LADY H UNGUAL PA « 
serioiB mlerraing posinon, seereterid 
bode ua dean rining toencn, free to 
IraveLlcxxton (01) 603 4004 evran^ 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


HE seeks qwAfied 

*“ yoong Seocher of EriflSsh 
with oar, free to Mart now. 

CdL 4264 76 24 PAIS 


DOMESTIC 

POSmONS AVAILABLE 


AU PAIR- To core for 2 gris, 6 ywars & 
days < 


9 months. A hours, 5 ... 

Liaht housolmaping 30 nan. from 
NYC own room pus boerd & excel- 
lent ittemy, send pictures 4 resume to: 


590 Doremus Awuo^Gien flock NJ. 
11 44SOT9 


07452 teL 2D1 


HOUSEHOLD MANAOBWB4T posi- 
tion oyoMtee. Mot have dim b- 
urate srith 
resume *> L 
PX3. Bax 15, fWseadv&s, 

PA 1 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


MAN SEEKS JOG os coak/choufW 
bodyguard. Tqfc France 94 73 89 33l 


AUTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCAR 

MGMMPPM 
SPtQAUSTS 

(1)42 25 64 44 
““ 39 43 44 
B 51 
.2971 
88081 
10 45 


PARS 
WNS/haa 

FRANKFURT 
BOfiW / COLOGhC 
STUTTGART 
MUNICH 
BREMHHAVB1 
NEW YORK 
HOUSTON 
IQS ANGUES 
MONTREAL 


AGENTS WOtlfi 

Leave it to us to bring it to yen 



AUTO CONVERSION 


Use 


SUREOQNVBRT * 
way to impart a 
— . — ; ~m into the USJL 
Wcrldwide Americ a n insurer 
Ftavides dl requrad msunsioe 


and gwrantem your an w» 
pass dl US. aovw 


gove r nmeet stondorch 

or your money bode induring 




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„ M 7031 / 223059 

***®cwiNri underwriters 

Obrfndau 7678 
D-6000 Frortedurt/Mcan 


JPA / DOT 

OONVBtSTONS 

e.OMtomjrotoimiu'bondiifl service 

* t ^°^ gio * Kj wfofl only ihe 


Yh. USA Tet ai s KB Ska 

Trttoc 4971917-OtAMP 


EPA/DOT 


isgtf- 

\.wi«iiiy in bnjpi 


autos tax free 


TRASCO 

LONDON 

Maned** Spaddist- 


Shrtdiod timomines 
Anttourisd Cars 
CootftbuSt Ccrr 


^ London W.l. 


Printed by Y.A. Web Offset. Harlow. Essex. Registered as a newspaper at the pas office. • 

1 . .. .. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


GA INTERNATIONAL 

AUTO EXPORT TO; 

USA, Cmcufa, MMrie A fo Ea< 
Japra A Lotos America 


• Worldwide defenry of nmv aid 
used European care. 

* Conversion to your naeamte 1 

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• Oe awn tran spo i t-shpping- 
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a USA/C 

GA INTERNATIONAL 

14, Sd q ftf i uW. 

5061 KB, Oaterwik, Hofcnd. 

TeL P1J4242-I7563 Tx §461 Gainf/NL 


TRANSCO 


TIC LARGEST SHOWROOM 
AMI STOCK *4 EUROPE 
Kea pno c constant stod: of more thrar 
300 braid new oxi of ol Euraperxi + 


Japanese maka oompetrvely' priced 

htopaa pata 


"■ DWraONOT RVf 

Trance SA, 95 Humildirai. 
2000 Antwera. ITiljF — 
Tel 323/ 54I6»«ft* sSwTTrt 


l£S AUTOMOBILES 


EXTRAORDMARES '# 

excaur*. aa*r r siui2, 

ZUHMB, iNSEN. TW. 

Marie Carlo (93) 25 74 79 
TV: 479550 AUTO MC 


. SWAGON5; LANDROVB 

>»rtS3SMS ftffl 

VAN LAARHOVEN B.V. 


POBm 2178, 5600 CDBariiersa 
40-4240S5, The 51213 HBA M. 


RUL 300 SL5O0 SL SOO ffi&w 
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RdsRoyce: . , .. 

^nfoorolwx Countoch Itete, fojWi 
308 0ft raw. P£.T. Befoun Tefc 
03/231 J9 JQ. - . 


VBN PEUGEOT, limd Route; Benge. 
Bow, Toyota 4x4, traded 
Britos, Zocrabocn 1A - Mamran-IC ■ 
—broefc; HoBond Bx 47082 


DHJVm FOR CHRISTMAS. Brand 
[*w MB SOD S0_ TAXASCfiAHel- 
kmd. Td: (0) 34Q2-41346L Tbr 76068. 


LEGAL SERVICES 


do you wamt AaruBASsromr 

IMCBCM 6567 londae WON 3XX - 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


U5T ffiWUTE H UB . . 
ram voter wtfioiiiBd vittui 
3 days prior to do ppMS 

UMQUEPRKE 

To 

NEW YORK, WASHMGTON (VWT) 
OOCAG P or WF ROfT 
foi Urabewy, 


Om way - 1 
{DM699, 


{DM 699, 
(SR 449, 


m 


199 


ft 




0«WHDOonei._, 

round trip abort 1 


275 

4« 


Pw foot* infumuiuj oodresemrifo 
ral,. .ICHAMUUR ' 
fionkfort 069)29 9978. 

Brossfo ^3180880 ,. 

tinropbmg tOM/ft' 

- p)363«®. . • 
ftw . . p) 47 42 52 26 -. 


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