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J jjTfae Global Newspape 
’ Edited , in Paris : 


Simbitaneoualy 
I ' j 1 in Paris, London* Zurich, 
Hoag Kong, S •* ' 

'‘*5* Mi. The Hague and 






INTERNATIONAL 



• r .WEATHSf DATA APfCA* ON PAGE 18 


Published With Hie New York Times and Hie Washington Post 


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PARIS, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


• •>: 



v. 


General Electric 
ees 

or $6.28 Billion 




-■ H. NEW YORK — General Bec- 
.■■> "jb Co. has agreed to acquire RCA 
‘ : ? -Mp- owner of the NBC television 
- '! : =< twork, for $628 billion. 

. Hie announcement Wednesday 
. - .... -is the second this year of a take- 
'■ .. .V ;®r of a network in the United 
- " •^i ates. The acquisition of Ameri- 
: -:n Broadcasting Cos. for $13 bfl- 
; ,m by Capital Cities Communica- 
ms was announced in March. 

- The ABC acquisition, which 
........ ughl most industry analysts by 

v._.;>iprise, caused Wall Street to up- 
. .^ade sharply the value of the three 
C*. \'*sajor UK networks. Shortly after 
w : -at acquisition was announced, 
-' ed Turner, the Atlanta broadcast 
’ “^'trepreneur. tried unsuccessfully 
. acquire CBS. 

- '"Word of the GE-RCA agree- 
ment, which will take several 

. . - M onths to complete, was apparem- 
. v less of a surprise to the rmnneml 

• immuni ty 

^t-Va -.The agreement was announced 

- • .. 1 ^ ter the price of RCA’s stock 

- r _'ared in heavy New York Stock 
..'[change trading amid rumors 

. ■ Vat. General Electric was negotiat- 
■ ‘ "Vi the acquisition. 

' 4 * mm 'Z The NYSE said Thursday dial it 
■- r Td begun an analysts of trading in 

- v . ... CA and GE before the announce - 

fVsnL The exdunge said it had 
. . . V paved inquiries regarding trari- 
V e, activity in the stock of those 

- o companies, but did not eiabo- 
. .. .• _.te. 

The NYSE said it could notindi- 
• -'te when the review would be 
• • i mpleted. It reviews trading in all 
:..)CC5 before merger announce- 

-.-aits. 

-/The price of RCA fell $425 
- lunday on the NYSE to $5925. 

• ".E was up 373 cents to $6825. 
The acquisition serves several 

. .., . rposes for General Electric. 

. 1 - ‘n ong them would be a presence 

a business that complements its 
n, consumer electronics, as weD 
3 i : NTaV the combining of both compa- 
ss: ss’ military-related operations. 

' J ^General Electric has had strong 
erational results under its chaxr- 
' V'.uu JoboF. Welch Jt, bm the 
- . . npany has been more of a seller 
; assets than a buyer. In 1984, GE 
. - -d its Utah International subsid- 
~~y for $2.4 billion. The proceeds 
. ... »m the sale were alwavs consd- 
iS'av'd the nest egg that GE would use 
. make acquisitions. 

"As the money remained dormant 
‘ VI-' almost two years, there was fre- 
ent speculation as to which com- 
ay might be attractive to GE 
va«tore than once, however, GE offi- 
. Js said it might make several 
Tv ;'r *all purchases instead of one big 

•te 

. ■*.-■. General Electric said it would 
L* $6630 a share in cash for 

•'C'f W.4 million shares. 

Vy^rhe total price of $628 billion is 
‘ _'V largest for a nonoil company 

luisition in the United States. 

..rlier tins year, Kohlbcxg, Kravis, 

■■■ 'bens & Co. agreed to buy Be- 
;y ^i;?ce Cos., a consumer-products 
: ViJ^opany, for $62 billion. 

i 9 {j 4 t ge ported net income 
' • '>228 bQhon on revenue of $27.9 
-'^ioo. RCA earned $341 million 
revenue of $ 10.1 billion. 

-rrjwJ' The transaction is subject to the 
. iroval of RCA’s stockholders 
• . >, tit’* var ^ ous regulatory agencies. 

_ . ., >,fhe announcement was made by 
*: -; lci Welch, Thornton F. Bradshaw. 

■ '' A’s chairman, and Robert R. 

. derick, RCA’s president and 
* r r sf executive. 

. ii. Welch said at a news confer- 
Thursday that it was prana- 
: to say whether RCA or GE 
*..»-■ is would be divested after the 
" u - . ger or to comment specifically 


on the operaring structure of the 
kw company. He said those deci- 
sions would be made as he and Mr. 
Frederick, a former General Eec- 
tric executive, weak out the details. 

Mr. Wdch said he did not expect 
. the combined defense badnesses of 
General Electric and RCA to nm 
counter to federal antitrust guide- 
lines. 

Senator Howard M. Metzea- 
baum of Ohio, the ranking Demo- 
crat on the Senate antitrust sub- 
committee, expressed doubts about 
the merger. 

“On its face, the deal raises seri- 
ous antitrust questions,'’ he yavl 

*Tf the merger is not stopped, 1 
wiQ insist on full hearings by the 
Senate Judiciary Committee.’’ 

Mr. Welch said die flfl*n ci rg 
terms of the RCA purchase b--*d not 
been concluded and estimated that 
General Electric might ««ini>a $4 
billion to $5 tuition of bank debt to 
help pay for the company. 

Mr. Bradshaw said he would step 
down as RCA’s chairman after the 
merger but would continue as a 
consultant to General Electric for 
three years. (NTT, Reuters, AP) 




U.S. lor 



NATO Praises 
Cmsidhaimm 
Geneva Meeting 

By John Goshko 

WaJungton PM Senior 

BRUSSELS — North Atlantic 

Treaty Organization foreign minis- 
ters praised the United States on 
Thursday for consulting with its 
European allies on last month’s 



Thornton F. Bradshaw 


Reagan Signs Bill to End 
Budget Deficits by 1991 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan signed landmark 
legislation Thursday that mandates 
an etui to U3. government budget 
deficits by the 1991 fiscal year 
while setting the national debt Hmit 
at more than $2 trillion. 

Mr. Reagan declared that “the 
tough week of controlling federal 
spending s til lies ahead.”*' 

The president said he had signed 
the bin despite “serious constitu- 
tional question^* raised by the role 

What the balanced-budget law 
does and how h works- Page 3. 

it gives to the director of the con- 
gressional budget* office and tlT* 
comptroller general in calenlating - 
the budget es timate s that trigger 
the spending-cut provisions of the 
bill. 

The questions arise because they 
are agents of the legislative branch 
of government, rather than the ex- 
ecutive branch, which submits bud- 
gets to Congress. 

The bill was approved Wednes- 
day night by the Senate, after nine 
hours of debate, on a bipartisan 61- 
31 vote. The House then debated 
the legislation for 90 minutes be- 
fore approving it on a bipartisan 
271-154 vote and sending it to the 
White House. 

In both the House and the Sen- 
ate, a majority of Republicans sup- 
ported the legislation, while half 
the Democrats voting in the Senate 
and a majority in the House op- 
posed it. 

“It is an act of legislative desper- 
ation,’’ said Representative Jim 
Wright of Texas, the Democratic 
majority leader, who voted for the 
plan. 

In a statement accompanying the 
signing Thursday, Mr. Reagan 
said, “The American people expect 
their 'elected officials to take action 
□ow to reduce the size of govern- 
ment and to set upon a reasonable 
and equitable course to eliminate 
federal budget deficits.” 

Early next year, he said, “1 antic- 
ipate that we will have to take some 
significant across-the-board reduc- 
tions in a wide range of programs.” 

At the same time, the president 
said, “We must also never lose right 


of the necessity to ™im«tn a 
strong national defense.” 

Many members of Congress 
have the budget-balancing.hil] 
wil] require the president to accept 
pits in nuBtaiy spending as wdl as 
in the domestic spending that he 
says has grown beyond bounds. 

The House speaker Thomas P. 
O'Neill Jr„ Democrat of Massa- 
chusetts, said “there’s no question 
that the Congress has given up 
power” in the budget-balancing 
bQI, which be called “a fake and a 
fraud” that would hurt defense 
while “it minders the poor of the 
nation." 

House and Senate officials re- 
ported progress; mean while, on the ' 
crucial issue of a stopgap speeding 
bill to fnmneft most government 
programs for the rest of the fiscal 
year. Even so, they said diffoenoes 
on defense spending, foreign aid 
and Interior Department funding 
remained unresolved. 

An existing stopgap spending 
bill was to expire at midnight 
Thursday, but congressional lead- 
ers already were discussing the ] 
ability of a short interim 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL 7) 


ance dialogue as it pursues negotia- 
tions with the Soviet Union. 

Sources familiar with the discus- 
rions at the annual NATO year- 
end meeting m Brussels agreed that 
they were characterized by an un- 
usual degree of harmony and praise 
for President Ronald Ragan's per- 
formance in his iwMiftg with the 
Soviet leader, Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev. 

But the Europeans told Secretary 
of State George P. Shultz of their 
desire that the United States con- 
tinue its voluntary compliance with 
the restraints spelled out in the un- 
ratified 1979 strategic arms limita- 
tion treaty. 

[Reuters reported that the minis- 
ters also said that Western public 
opinion expected concrete steps to- 
ward aims control at the next U.S.- 
Soviet summit talks, expected next 
year. 

[It quoted Foreign Minister 
Hans-Dietrich Genscber of West 
Germany as saying: “Both sides are 
aware that they cannot conclude 
the next summit just like they end- 
ed the first one. There has to be 
more. 

[“One cannot simply say for a 
second time that the atmosphere 
was good."] 

There also were signs of contin- 
ued European uneasiness about 
Mr. Reagan’s Strategic Defense 
Initiative and the effects that this 
program of research on outer space 
defenses against nucl ear weapons 
might have on existing NATO doc- 
trines of nudear deterrence. 

Bat; the sources agreed, the dcmi- 
lEurot themeyvasrftn optmrtstk.<m- 
pharis on what ope source caHod 
the need for .“strength, dialogue 
and realism” as the United States 
prepares for a resumption of the 
Geneva anns-controi talks with the 
Russians and a further Reagan- 
Gorbachev meeting. 

The ministers also approved a 
new policy, pushed strongly by the 
United States, calling for greater 
cooperative efforts to avoid dupli- 
cation and waste in the develop- 

(Coutinoed an Page 5, CoL 6 ) 



Crash Kills 258 
On U.S. Troop 
Plane in Canada 


Secretary of State George P. Shultz yawning as the annual 
year-end meeting of North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
foreign ministers began in Brussels on Thursday. With him 
is David M. AbsMre, the American delegate to NATO. 


Vote in EC Parliament 
Provokes Budget Crisis 


Reuters 

STRASBOURG, France — The 
European Parliament voted over- 
whelmingly Thursday for a 1986 
European Community budget con- 
taining significantly higher funding 
than proposed by ministers of the 
member states. 

The move presented the EC with 
a crisis over its budget for the third 
consecutive year. 

"The. Paiiiament, which shares 
budget powers with the Council of 
Ministers, passed the amended 
budget 230-39. with 20 abstentious. 

Some of the 10 member states 
had said such a move by the assem- 
bly would be illegal and threatened 
to take the members of Parliament 
to the European Court. 

The vote restored 569 million 
European currency units ($482 mil- 
lion) to the budget of 32.7 billion 
ECUS. 

The ministers had made a final 
offer to increase spending by 242 
mOlion ECUS and the elected body 
had the right to increase that 
amount by only about 90 million 
ECUS. 

Finance Minister Jean-Claude 


Juncker of Luxembourg, which 
bolds the presidency of tbe EC's 
Council of Ministers, had made a 
last-minute appeal to the Parlia- 
ment not to pass a budget that 
would be technically flkgaT. 

He warned that member states 
would cany out threats to bring 
court action. 

“I do not want a conflict on tbe 
basis of 200 or 300 million ECUs," 
he said. 

The parliamentarians- argued 
that the budget proposed by tbe 
ministers would leave insufficient 
funds to cover the entry of Spain 
and Portugal to tbe community on 
Jan. 1 and to meet past camndt- 
ments for social and regional 
spending. 

Before tbe vote, both rides en- 
gaged in frantic politicking British 
conservative and French liberal 
members argued that the ministers' 
final offer should be accepted 
along with their guarantees that 
commitments would be honored. 

“It is ridiculous,” said David 
Curry, a British conservative. “Jt is 
almost as if they want a dispute." 

Last month, Britain had objected 
to restoring any cuts to the budget. 


Reagan’s Tax Setback: A Misreading of Minds 


By Bernard Wdnraub 

Netr York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — One of the most abrupt 
congressional setbacks of Ronald Reagans 
presidency left startled White House officials 
trying to figure out where they went wrong and 
making plans to salvage some form of tax revi- 
sion. the mqar legislative priority of Mr. Rea- 
gan’s second term. 

The House vote Wednesday night blocking 
consideration of the tax legislation marked an 
uncharacteristic lapse for White House legisla- 
tive strategists. They had not ganged the depth 
of Republican opposition and did not make fall 
use of Mr. Reagan’s persuasive powers. 

Moreover, the blocking of consideration of 
the tax legislation, which may turn out to be 
temporary, came as Congress moved to endorse 

a budget-bala n ci n g proposal that, administra- 
tion officials concede, threatens key portions of 
Mr. Reagan’s legislative agenda, inducting miti- 
tary programs. 


This put Mr. Reagan in the paradoxical posi- 
tion of losing a key vote on legislation that be 
regards as central to his policy while a budget- 
balancing bill about which he has serious doubts 
moved ahead. 

With only 14 Republicans voting in favor of a 
procedural rule that would have opened the way 

NEWS ANALYSE 

for a vote cm the tax brill endorsed by Mr. 
Reagan, White House officials struggled Thurs- 
day to work out an alternative that would re- 
store the momentum for tax revision and save 
Mr. Reagan from an embarrassing defeat 

Democratic leaders, working with the White 
House, also tooled to revive the measure for a 
vote before Congress adjourns, probably Friday 
or Saturday. 

But the Democrats said Wednesday’s vote 
indicated that tax legislation could not pass 
imless Mr. Reagan could round up more Repub- 
lican votes for lL 


If the president cannot deliver the votes the 
bill is dead, said Thomas P. O’Neill Jr., Demo- 
crat erf Massachusetts and speaker of the House. 

The White House was said Wednesday night 
to be trying urgently to win tbe support of 
Republican lawmakers. “It ain’t over till it’s 
over," said the Treasury secretary, James A 
Baker 3d. 

Mr. O’Neill said that if the president truly 
had control of Us party be would be able to torn 
tbe vote around. “Otherwise," the speaker said, 
“Dec. 11 will be remembered as the date that 
Ronald Reagan became a lame duck on the 
floor of the House." 

On one level, damage control was the key 
theme at the White House Wednesday night, 
with indications that Mr. Reagan and Us axles 
were seeking to press House Republicans to 
reverse their positions. 

The situation is fluid," said a ranking White 
House official- Another key official remarked, 
(Continued on Page 3, CoL 4) 


By Charles Campbell 

The Associated Press 

GANDER, Newfoundland — A 
DC -8 charter plane carrying U.S. 
servicemen borne from peacekeep- 
ing duty in the Middle East crashed 
in fiames Thursday on takeoff here, 
killing all 258 persons aboard, offi- 
cials and witnesses said. 

Major Kenneth Miller of Cana- 
dian Search and Rescue reported 
that 250 passengers and eight crew- 
members had been tailed in the 
crash at Gander International Air- 
port 

The charter flight operated by 
Arrow Air of Miami carried 250 
members of the !01st Airborne 
who were being rotated borne after 
six months service in the United 
Nations peacekeeping force in the 
Sinai Peninsula. 

Cause of the crash was not im- 
mediately known. 

“All we know is that there were 
no survivors," Major Miller told 
the Canadian Press. 

In Washington, the White House 
spokesman, Larry Speak es, said 
tnat preliminary reports indicated 
“there is no evidence of sabotage" 
or of an in-flight explosion. There 
had been reports that the plane 
exploded either in the air or after it 
hit the ground. 

The crash was the worst air di- 
saster in Canadian history. It was 
tbe most deadly single charier air- 
line crash ever and the worst such 
disaster involving tbe U.S. military. 

Even before Thursday’s crash, 
more than 1,400 people had been 
killed this year in commercial avia- 
tion crashes, a record tolL 

Famili es and friends learned of 
tbe disaster as they assembled at 
tbe headquarters of tbe 101 st Air- 
borne Division at Fret Campbell. 
Kentucky, to welcome the return- 
ing soldiers. 

The soldiers were some of 750 to 
800 troops in the force and were 
coming home on a rotational basis, 
according to Major Larry Icenogle, 
a Pentagon spokesman. 

The plane plunged to earth after 
takeoff, plowing through a wooded 
area about a quarter of a mile (400 
meters) from the Gander airport 
and breaking into pieces, scattering 
bodies -“wwl military equipment, 
witnesses said. 

Canada's transport minister. 
Don Mazankowslri, said the plane 
got no higher than 1,000 feel (305 
meters) into the air before crashing. 

The airport was overcast with 
light snow and tight winds at the 
time of the crash, according to the 
aviation weather report. There had 
been a light, freezing drizzle a few 
hours earlier. 

Ed Pike, a radio correspondent 
of CBC, the Canadian broadcast 
network, quoted witnesses as say- 
ing the plane exploded. 

“We were driving to work when 
we saw this big explosion, kind of 
like a big explosion right at the top 
of the trees.” said Aim Hurley, a 
nearby resident, “and it died down 
very quickly. In a matter of sec- 
onds, it was gone.” 

The servicemen killed belonged 
to the multinational force charged 
with monitoring the 1979 peace 
treaty between Israel and Egypt. 

The 11-nation force, called the 
Multinational Force and Observ- 
ers, has been based in the Sinai 
since Israd completed its with- 
drawal from tbe peninsula and re- 
turned it to Egypt in April 1982. 

David Bridges, spoilsman for 
the Multinational Force and Ob- 
servers, based in Rome, said the 
plane had flown from Cairo to Co- 
logne, where it refueled, to Gander 
for a second refueling. 

Gander International Airport is 

(Continued on Page S. CoL 1) 


, .*> ■ 

U.S. Farmers in Debt: 
$A Sense of Powerlessness 


Andrew H. Malcolm 

New York Timer Service 
' ' CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa — 
financially troubled farmer 
>' *Vho walked into his small town 
ank near here Monday and 
^loi the bank president dead 
■" fld no problem driving off 
v^ain into the blowing snow: 
^ he Hills Bank and Trust Co, 
ith more than $200 milli on in 
ijsets, had no security guard. 
’*';*'£* bl an age when body searches 
■ 4 ^ ive become routine for air- 
iane passengers, it may seem 
^ range that a financial institu- 
.jp ,^n like tbe Hills bank could 
" ^^Vmain largely unprotected. Bui 
>■ * stands unguarded no longer. , 

-.One of the first official steps 
1 ^ the shooting was to dis- 
■icfa police officers and guards 
banks in (he surrounding ru- 
1 areas, to guard not against 
bbers but against disgruntled 
n - ; blore. It represented the shat- 
. .* l ^ "ing of one more link in along 
■ al chain of social trust run- 
ig back for generations. 

In 1983, when Rudolph H. 
j /the Jr_, a bank president in 
p^Othtoii, Minnesota, was am- 

«o»5 


boshed and killed, some sug- 
gested it was as isolated inci- 
dent. But as tbe nation’s 
agricultural financial crisis con- 
tinues into its fourth year with 
record numbers of farmers, 
banks and local businesses fail- 
ing and no aid in sight, there 
continue to be violent out- 
breaks and many more nonfataf 
incidents and threats. 

The current farm convulsions 
are the latest in a fundamental 
economic restructuring across 
the country’s midsection, which 
historically has produced so 
much of the nation’s foods and 
factories, its leaders and social 
values. 

For a complex variety of rea- 
sons, all the base industries, the 
ones that produced generations 
rtf guaranteed overtime and a 
better life for every hard-work- 
ing father’s hard-working son, 
are in trouble across the Middle 
West: steel, rubber, milling, 
automobiles. Now cranes farm- 
ing, which has seen its ranks 
shrivel from 6.6 millio n farms a 
half century agp to 2.4 million 
(Continued on Page 4, CoL 5) 



Kami Hughes, right, widow of an Iowa bank president 
killed by a distraught farmer who then kilted himself, 
embraces her daughters at the banker’s fmeral service. 


For Soviet, JVest 9 sNew Threat Is AIDS 

Public Concern Crows as Articles Warn About Foreigners 


By Gary Lee 

Washotgicm Poet Service 

MOSCOW — A rare public lec- 
ture here two weeks ago cm AIDS 
packed a large auditorium so light- 
ly that the crowd of nearly 1,000 
professionals, students, military 
men, housewives and others spilled 
into tbe aisles and kept yelling f as 
the Soviet doctor on the podium to 
speak up. 

After the 90-minnie talk, includ- 
ing an extensive question-and-an- 
swer period, the audience’s curios- 
ity hmdly seemed satisfied. 

This disease has been known 
for a long time but not here, unfor- 
tunately,” said a middle-aged man, 
who had pushed through the crowd 
and grabbed the microphone. “We 
have only known about it for tbe 
last hour." 

That is why, he continued, “all of 
us are scared.” 

Amid signs abroad of a mount- 
ing epidemic of acquired immune 
deficiency syndrome, fears about 
the disease in tbe Soviet Union are 
growing. . 

Although a Soviet doctor last 
week acknowledged that several 
of AIDS have appeared in the 
Soviet Union, officials stiH charac- 
terize it as a foreign problan, ap- 
parently to underline the stigma 


they attach to foreigners, especially 
Westerners. 

The lecturer and other official 
Soviet sources and press reports 
have gone to great effort to keep a 
lid on the Dumber of cases in tbe 
Soviet bloc. The lecturer said that 
in Moscow there had been cases of 


Officials dislike 
* acknowledging the 
presence of 
homosexuals and 
drug users in the 
country. 


Kaposi's sarcoma, a skin cancer 
that can be especially deadly in 
AIDS patients, but he knew of no 
registered AIDS cases. 

Although Hungary and Poland 
have reported cases, they have nev- 
er been mentioned in the general 
Soviet press. 

Two weeks ago, Bom V. Pe- 
trovsky, a former public health 
minister, ss»d that the Soviet Union 
had ”qo registered cases.” But in an 
interview last week in the official 


newspaper Sovietskaya Kuhura. 
Viktor M. Zhdanov, director of the 
Ivanovsky Institute of Virology, 
said that there were some cases: 
“fewer than on the fingers of a 
band.” 

A Western businessman who im- 
ports medical equipment that is 
used to test fra* AIDS estimates 
that the number of cases in the 
Soviet Union could “number in the 
hundreds.” 

Even by Western estimates, the 
Soviet numbers are minuscule 
when compared with the 20,000 
cases worldwide. But Western ana- 
lysts say Soviet officials resort to 
whispers and denials in part be- 
cause they are reluctant to ac- 
knowledge the presence of homo- 
sexuals and drug users in the 
country. 

In his presentation at Moscow’s 
Vishnevsky Institute of Surgery, 
the lecturer, identified only as “Ar- 
kady," fanned the impression that 
AIDS is a peculiarly Western prob- 
lem by detailing its spread through 
the United Slates, West Germany, 
France and other West European 
countries. 

Recent Soviet articles have at- 
tributed the source of the AIDS 

(Continued ou Page 5, CoL 2) 



IMF Loan 
Is Rejected 
By Nigeria 

Agmve Frani Piv<\e 

LAGOS — Major General Ibra- 
him Bubangida announced Thurs- 
day that Nigeria would not accept a 
loan of aboiu S2.4 billion from the 
International Monetary Fund. 

The announcement ended a de- 
bate that has been going on here 
since the general deposed Major 
General Mohammed Buhari in a 
coup Aug. 27. 

In a tdevision address, the Nige- 
rian leader said that “the path of 
honor and the essence of democrat- 
ic patriotism lies in discontinuing 
the negotiations with the IMF for a 
support loan." 

“This is dearly the will of the 
majority of our people on this is- 
sue.” be said. “We will continue to 
honor our legitimate and dearly 
established finandal obligation's 
within the limns of our financial 
resources." 

As a condition of lending tbe 
money the IMF insisted that Nige- 
ria devalue its currency by 60 per- 
cent and end the practice of subsi- 
dizing petroleum products. 

In addition to making Nigeria 
eligible for the low-interest loan, 
tbe agreement would have -opened 
the way for a rescheduling of Nige- 
ria’s foreign debt of more than S20 
billion, most of which is due within 
five years. 

Economists have said that Nige- 
ria was expected to use up 43 per- 
cent of its $U-bfilioD national bud- 
get for paying interest on its foreign 
debt. 

They have said that a further 
drop in oil prices would greatly 
affect the country’s ability to earn 
the foreign exchange it needs to pay 
for Western machinery, spare 
parts, medical supplies and food. 
Oil accounts for more than 90 per- 
cent of export earnings. 

General Babangida announced 
soon after taking power that he 
intended to break the deadlock on 
negotiations with the IMF, which 
started in 1983. 

He began a national debate on 
the merits of the loan and said he 
would be guided in his decision by 
“tbe aspirations and yearnings of 
the people” 

Opponents of the loan dominat- 
ed the debate from the start. They 
expressed the fears that the loan 
money would be misspent and that 
the IMF conditions would cause 
undue hardships on Nigerians. 

Proponents, including the busi- 
ness community and Nigeria's 
trading partners/argued that a re- 
jection of the loan would cause 
greater hardships. They said that 
Nigeria’s imports next year were 
likely to be barely half of what they 
were this year, about S7 billion. 



Coream 

Anne Baxter, the ac- 
tress, died at 62. Page 5. 

■ The Aqmno-Land election 

ticket in the Philippines pairs 
“an radinary housewife" and a 
political pro. Page 2. 

BUSINESS/ FINANCE 

■ U.S. retail sales rose 1.1 per- 
cent in November. Page 13. 

TOMORROW 

The Doni Tondo by Michelan- 
gelo has been restored, reveal- 
ing its artist to be the first Man- 
nerist . 






3 


O' 

* 

*9 


12 


n 




JO DO 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1985 


** i s 


Marcos Rivals: 'An Ordinary Housewife 9 and a Political Pro 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Aquino Is Seen as a Symbol 
Of Accumulated Grievances 


* > ' W V- 


Laurel Has P ersonal Ties NEWTON, Massachusetts (AF) — Andrei D. Sakharov, the exiled 

fWV tu ■ 1 _ ITT* Swiet disadrat,tdd his wife, Yelena G.BOTner,<»Uiiiredayt^t he 

Tn PrPfilflPIlt aUU Hlfi A aia.CC was “more or less in a gcxxl state of health. But their tdepho ne ca ll was 

lUllCSWKJUiauuauoi jammed when she triedtotdl him that she had seen films of hnntabai 

x with hidden cameras, according to Mrs. Bonner's daughter, Tatiana 

By Seth Mydans Uurd became an active member of % 6 

Nrn Yak rme Strict the oi^tk^ca^ new ^ Yankelevich said her mother caDed Mr. Sakharov, 64,a physicist 


Bonner Call to Sakharov Is Jammed 


By Seth Mydans 

New Yak Time Service 
MANILA — Corazon C. 


defendants, all but one of them 
soldiers, in the assassination of her 
husband as he returned to Manila 


Aquino, who will face President £ 1983 after three years in the 
Ferdinand E. Marcos in elections united States. 


set for February, says her advisers Mrs. Aquino has said repeatedly 
keep telling her to stop referring to that she holds Mr. Marcos respoa- 
hersdf as “just an ordinary house- sible for the assassination, and she 


says she is prepared to make die 


“And anyway," she said the oth- a c cusation to his face, 
er day, “I am not a housewife any Mrs. Aquino appear to be a gen- 


more because I catmoi take care of uindy reluctant politician who de- 
my bouse anymore, so many things spite herself has inherited her hus- 
i n band's mantle as unifier of the 


have come up.* 


What has now come up, after fractious Philippine opposition, 
days of last-ditch negotiation, is She says she has accepted her new 


her emergence as the leader of the role only after long sessions of 
Philippine opposition in its attempt prayer and sleepless nights. 


to end the 20-year rule of Mr. Mar- She says that she feds uncom- 
cos, whom it blames for the coun- fortaUe around politicians and 


try's economic decline and growing 
instability. 

Corazon Aquino, the 52-year-old 
widow of Benigno S. Aquino Jr* 
the most popular opposition figure 
and a lifelong challenger to Mr. 


e and growing that she is still learning to speak 
their l.tn g na ge of “hard realities.” 
be 52-year-old But by both her own account and 

>. Aquino Jr* those of her associates, die is of 
josition figure necessity learning the role of lead- 
lenger to Mr. er, learning to be less polite and to 


Marcos, has come to symbolize the contradict the seasoned politicians 
accumulated grievances within the who were her husband’s associates 


nation against the president 
“1 know very well that I am not 


when she was *just a housewife.” 
By these accounts, it was Mrs. 


the victim who has suffered the Aquino herself who decided 
most” she said in announcing her Wednesday to compromise and ac- 


candidacy Dec. 3, “but it just so cept Mr. LaureTs party as her sole 
happens that perhaps I am the best- standard. She told the party found- 



nJL Yak Ttmi Seri" theoppOffltac^ 


MANILA — In away, Salvador «»*s “ 

RLaurd has been preparing all his arranged so that Mr. Sakharov, who has no telephone, amid be sum- 

life to run for president of the Phil- . Mr. Lan rel heated the moned by telegram to show up at a public phone. Hlms of tbc Sakharovs 

ipptries, a fact that made his coo- J8 . 8l JSwft in public havebeen released to Western news organizations m recent 

cession to Corazon GAqinso to be 4 ... 


the candidate for vice prudent un- Mr. Aquino when be returned and itwasthefirst time Mrs. Bonner had spoken with Mr. Sakharov since 
•“ * was assassinated. ’ 


da her aD the more difficult. was assassinate 
A politician from a family of Mr. Lanrd 
politicians, Mr. Laurel spool part Mr. Aquino s 
of his childhood in Malacafiang statement into 


STSlkempted.to.read j™* GorftyonDca2 to 


pared arrival 
recozd of the 


Palace, the presidential residence. National Assembly. He was pre- 
while his father, Josfc Laurel Sr* vented from doing so, and when be VATICAN CITY (Reuters) — Cardinal Joseph Rafimger, headof the 

was the leader of the Philippines took the floor to announce his res- y al i can department that watches over doctrinal orthodoxy, said There- 
dnrwig the Japanese occupation. ignation in protest, the lights in the day jj was preparing a new document on liberation theology. 

His brother, Jos6 Laurel Jr* was haU were turned off . . the Wert Goman cardinal, prefect of the Congreg ation f or the 

speaker of the House of Represen- Despite ms recent leadership of rh*»rfa<>. of the Faith, said the document had still to be approved but 
tatives for many years before the the opposition. Me Lanrd, 57. has might be published early next year. The Vatican imposed a one-year 

rni poriting, of mnrriai law in 1972. not mana ged to nd bunsen of the publication ban early this year cm the Reverend Leonardo Bur, a 

In a nation ruled by a relatively stigma among his colleagues of Brazilian theologian who is considered a leading advocate of greater 

small rnirnhw of powerful famili es, having supported the president chm^]} identification with the poor. 


Document Set on liberation Theology » 


speaker of the House of Represen- 


Mr. Lanrd has personal ties with throughout martial law ana navmg 
both President Ferdinand E. Mar- avoided the suffering of Mr. 
cos and Mrs. Aquino. Aquino and other politicians. 

When Mr. Marcos, as a young When he made new demands 
law student, was aoensed of the Sunday on Mrs. Aqumo that un- 
mnnterof a man wbo had defeated dermined their unity, members of 
his father in a l oc al ft ^ ho - party hinted dandy at a Marcos 

Mr. LaureTs grandfather, a Su- connection that supposedly might 


it martial law and having church sources s aid the new document on liberation theology was 
the suffering of Mr. expected to highlight positive aspects, following trenchant criticism 
id other poli tician s. contained in the c o n g regation's ruling of August 1984. 


Anti-Apartheid Panel Meets in U.K. 

arty hinted daridy at a Marcos LONDON (AP) — A Commonwealth committee of leading politic 

.L-. ji- — i . j / i t iL. R*, M Hicnrcc Ivw 


happens that perhaps I am the best- standard. She told the party found- 
known victim of Mr. Marcos’s long ed by her husband that it must 
list or victims.” accept her decision to set it aside. 

That announcement was made “This time, let me assert 
one day after a court acquitted 26 she was quoted as having 


Mrs. Aquino and Mr. Laurel ifMdwg off their wmpnlg n- 


House Hearings - 
Begin on Marcos’s 
Holdings in U.S. 


New Yak Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — A 


inner circle 

Corazon Cqjuangco Aquino was 
nflgS - bo™ Jan. 25, 1933, in Tame Prov- 
6 ince, SO miles (80 kilometers) north 

fnwnfiV °f Manila. She was the sixth of 
kudJS a eight children in one of the coun- 
TT G try’s wealthiest landowning fam- 

L UaOa Dies. 

i Service She received a privileged ednea- 

. tt lion in an exclusive Manila girls 

a House demeatajy school She continued 


Opposition Starts Campaign 
Amid Brass Bands, Confetti 


prone Court justice, who wrote an 
opinion exonerating Him. 

Decades later, when Mr. Laurel 
was out of the country during the 
birth of his first two dmdren a year 
wart, it was Benigno S. Aquino Jr, 
Corazon Aquino’s late husband 


ote an dilute Mr. LaureTs commitment to 
the opposition cause. 

Laurel Salvador Hidalgo Lanrd, whose 
os the nickname is Doy, was born in Ma- 
gyear nila <m Nov. 18, 1928, and studied 

no at the University of the Philippines, 

where he was obtain of the debat- 


and Ml LaureTs best friend, who big team. He went on, like his fa- our part,” Mr. Fraser said in a British Broadcastin, 

j ■ l? .1 *- ■ J. .*• _ fkar tA Mwi a rlnntrvrat# rn 1*ra< *a fm utKimih fh# rvwl 


LONDON (AP) — A Commonwealth committee of leading political 
and idigious leaden met for the first time on Thursday to discuss how to 
persuade the South African government to disman tle its apartheid 
system. 

Malcolm Fraser, former prime minister of Australia and co-chairman 
of the seven-member group, called Thursday’s discussion “very useful” 
but refused to rfis dnsc details, saying that public discussion would 
hamper the group's work. 

“It will require a great deal of patience, hopefully a good deal or tact on 
our iwrL” Mr. Fraser said in a British Broadcasting Cap. radio inter- 


waited in his place outride the de- 
livery ro om . 

Mr. Lanrd, who was a senator 


ther, to earn a doctorate in law 
from Yale University. 

He is married to Cdia Diaz Lau- 


Rcuttn denq 

MANILA — - Corazon C. dens.' 
mmo and Salvador H. Laurel *q t 
eked off their joint election cam- siou. 


before the declaration of martial id, an artist and stage designer, 
law, first made a name for himself and they have eight children, three 


view, “and we're going to try and achieve the confidence of differrat 
groups, different people in South Africa.” The Commonwealth consists 
of Britain and its former colonies. 


deucy meant “sacrifices and bur- “ w ’ 11 ZrJZZ, 

S ““ as an advocate of justice for the of whom are popular singers here. 

poor. He founded the legal aid sod- Others have successful careers m 


Hoyte Claims Victory in Guyana Vote 


subcommittee has begun hearings ^ education in the United States. Campaigning together in Mr. 

intn fillMMtinnc that Pm. _ . _ “ iC Z 1 J U_._ 


into aUegations that fteridentFer- firet at the Raven HOI Academy in Laurel’s stronghold of Batangas 

riimnn L Moivnc at tna Uhilm. . _ _ _ _ J# >L 


Aqumo and balyadra IL Laurel “It requires not ambition but vi- ety of the Philippmes, and in 1976 business and on the stage, 
kicked off tlmr jomt dec non c am- ^ prudence not Quixotic pas- ^was awax^Tfae title of most Pbpolar with women, I 
nm^Thmsdayto umeat President sion,” be said. “Of course^ there are outstanding legal aid lawyer of the the violin, enjoys a round c 
renunana t Marcos. men and women who bdieve other- worid by the International Bar As- the early mornings, and ii 

Can^aigning together in Mr. wise and who think they can hobble gyviatWi be able to perfonn a fair i 

Laurel’s stronghold of_ Batangas their way to the presidency by pan- UnKke Mr. Aquino and a nnm- of Frank Sinatra. 


GEORGETOWN, Guyana 
(NYT) — President Desmond 


Pbpular with women, he plays Hoytc has claimed an “overwhdm- 
the violin, ezg oys a round of gedf in m g * victory in the ele ct ion s here 




the early mornings, and is said to and has said he was “categorically 
be able to perform a fair imitation denyin g" widespread fHaiy* of 


«• 1 | m .# |W iUOS tu UH. 1V1VU1 iilU flMWIUlIJ LU , W “ “ — w r - V * I MUUKI6 HU. MLI I1IIH J (U1U S HUTU- 

dmand ^ Marcos of the Ptuhp- and then at Notre provmce, south of Manila, the two dering to pubUc emotion, without her of other prominent poKtidans. 

pines and his wife, lmelda, have j^ ame ^ y 0I ^ aa " a ««/« —— - — vi ~r ** ... . 


of Frank SSnatra. 

The stumbling Nodr raised last 


fraud and voter interference. 

In a news conference Wednesday 


accumulated extensive real estate 
and other holdings in the United 


hrarings WcdMSday -MtaSfafcSr wsTvC: 

were Closed. . xr™. .u** 


Mrs. Aquino was graduated in serenades, and snowi 
1953 with a degree in French and fetti and streamers, 
mathematics from Mount Sl Yin- “If this is a promt 


were greeted with brass bands and even a semblance of a program of Mr. Lanrd was not unrated during Sunday to unity with Mrs. Aquino afternoon, Mr. Hoytc, 56, said he 
serenades, and showered with con- government” martial law. hut rather ormtinned was a matter of importance to Mr. «« satisfied that the riectiaru held 




martial law, but rather am tinned 


rraise of things to 
make it,” Mrs. 


wasa matter of importance to Mr. was satisfied that the dections held 
Mrs. Aquino and Mr. Lanrd to support Mr. Marcot He won a Lairai the professional politician, on Monday were “above board and 
reed Wednesday to run on a sin- scat on the interim National As- He insisted that the political group- regular.” He dismissed accusations 
: ticket, with Mr. Lanrd as the sembly in 1978 as a candidate in mg he has built up m the lan two ismed Wednesday by seven church, 
* presidential candidate. Mr. the president's party. years, the United N at i ona l is t D ero- labor and human rights organiza- 

arcos has named Arturo M. To- His property was not seized by ocra& Organization, be accredited tion as wdl as the Guyana Bar 
ltino, a former foreign minister, Mr. Marcos during martial law, al- as their sole party . Association that the dections bad 

Ml virp nndilmnil nmnma thoash the land nf manv nther Known as UNIDO, it IS a group- hem a “snrdid nalahwne nf wide- 


were uosco. cent College in New York, then come, we wfll make it,” Mrs. 

The House foreign affaira sob- returned t^ie Phflqjpines. She be- Aquino said. 

S y° undying tow, but a.t icfr 


pe ticket, with Mr. Lanrd as the sembly in 1978 as a candidate in 
vice presidential candidate. Mr. the president’s party. 


Marcos has nanwri Arturo M. To- 
lentino, a former foreign minister, 
as his vice presidential r unning 
mate. The election is scheduled far 
Feb. 7. 


His property was not seized by 
Mr. Marcos during martial law, al- 
though the land of many other 
wealthy familie s was confiscated. 

It was not until 1982 tint Mr. 


oX§DQ,i 


, ™“__ r , ... . gest senator and a Hkdy successor 

Lawyers for three of the witness- S^Mr. Marcos, whose second and 


Mr. Lanrd info a solid party with 
electoral organization in much of 


Association that the dections bad 
been a “sordid catalogue of vride- 
spread duenfranchiseixKaL” 

The organizations, which have 
generally been critical of the au- 


es said their dients would not be 

able to provide aU the ittfonoatiatt SR'S ** “ nn ™ “ 


sought because rfattomqr^Iieol Corazon Aqnioo 

pnvde*e.aiiditi«Bffiaeniturfc was bearing him the Em It five 

TSJ ■.‘““dJ’' Sl M ? rcoSC S tMdoifcStptag house and «rv- 
^bubeen.fooaotOTpB- ingconeedurin^thepoiiticalgatb- 
uon charges m Manila as well as 2g, ,, tehomea whichte 


IJ1NICEF Campaign Draws Support 

Nations Expect Programs to Hal^ OiUd Mortality RtOes 


the countiy. lt claims to be the only tboritarian government, said the 
opposrtion grouping technically misdeeds in the election included 


prepared to fig ht an e lection, and “multiple voting, qection of poll- 
Mr. Laurel has invested his poHti- fa g a gpntSj ihreaut, intimidation, 
cal future in iL , violence and coDusou by police 


States, but none of ihe holdings cusaons. 
dted in those reports or charges are h-. 


Tv , , cr- cusaous. 

r 2i“ 41X1 Ho- political education accder- 

listedui ithe Marcoses aamra. ated afw 1972 when Mr. Marcos 

Dte Marcos family has tterned dedarcd martial law and impris- 

m^imo ml pctnfp in this llnff#vi . < . . _ . . • 


By Michael J. Berlin 

Washington Pau Service 

UNITED NATIONS, New 


4 ^ cal fut ure in iL . violence and coflua 

<pwm to HahwOiUd Mortality Rates “ d ^ p “ 5OTnd - 

_ _ , . J ' able to many of Mrs. Aquino’s TMTit*;™.— 

The first is inocula t ion against asm. Quid deaths there were cut to more radical backers. ITUUcrraisll 

six diseases that now JdU 3.5 m3- . 30.000 from 60,000 a year after a - _i I * -PARIS f Rcnters \ - 

lion children^ year. The aiare 1984 vaccination effort raised the.. . _ , p nw hJtL n .c.n>.n 



Desmond Hoyte 


Mitterrand Proposes Help for Africa 


York — Forty-four countries have tetanus, pooping 'obpgh, nation’s chfld -i i nnninnatio n rate to i 

joined the United Nations Oril- polk), diphtheria and tubercufesis. 75peroeoL UUM3SI8 111 Ihlucl 


dren’s Fund in a 


That, Mr. Grant said, is dose to 


roperty, opposition leaders in the 


property, q 
PhiUppines have chargj 1 that such 
properties were acquired with mon- * TWS r 
ey from government coffers in Ma- ifaninio Amrinn 


„ - . , . .. tt ... ed martial law and impris- dren’s Fund in a high-visibility 'D* second method [is to teach Thai, Mir. Grant said, is dose to f m i „ 

2!? 11 * *** m «“ £ oned her husband for eight years, campaign to save children, and P®"® 1 ? ^ admmister or^ro- the 80-percent target for achieving Impose BlaCKOUt 

States. WMe it is not ill^al for Durfag this time, she was Benigno many eqxct to halve their child- hydration therapy to treatdianhea, critical mass. • 

foreumers like the Marcos famflv to * —-- 0 ’s link to his supporters out- mortali ty rate s as a result winch now kills four nnlhon dril- “If one kid gets measles, itfs like Ofl Spy TtlfT flir y 

ind carried memorized mes- UNICEF'S executive director, drcn a year. Sutih therapy consists a ^ fa ftfag a sand trap; h ^ * « 

to and from him, some of James Grant, made the announce- stops,” he said. Room 

were Dublished in theforeiBn meat in the organization’s annual . The Irealth - technology needed c™*,**™^:*, „,**.«* JERUSALEM — Israeli an< 


“PAjRIS (Reuters) — President Fran 501s Mitterrand addressed the 12th -u 
French-African su mm it meeting Thursday and set out three basic condi- 
tions for economic recovery in Africa: lower interest rates, greater 
stability in foreign exchange rates, and new public and private financial 
aid. 


foreigners like the hfarcosfandyto mor^tyratesas 

own Amencannal estate or other side, and carried ntemorized mes- UNICES ex 


as a result 
executive director. 


“In tiie face of our multiple problems we must aU act together in 
solidarity — Africans toward Africans, France toward Africa, and Africa 


toward Europe,” be said at the meeting at which 38 nations were 
represented, tn ad diti on. Mr. Mitterrand called for greater self-sufficien- 


meat in the 


i’s ann ual 


^,-ofSc.wSdSaSd^: <s£aau£S2r£ 


Benigno Aquino was allowed to P<*rL 
go to the United States in 1980 for “One could expect by 1990, if 


cy in food prod u ction and regional cooperation in line with the Organiza- 
tion of African Unity’s blueprint for economic recovery. 


60 Hurt in UA Trolley Crash 

United Pres International 


heart surgeiy, and the family spent tiwse 
three years with him there until he plied. 


these programs are univenally-ap- the Third Worid, and cheap, pkati- 
phed, to save the hves of about half ful and easily. Used packets of oral 


nations, coia cnams atmngera- 'T^^Tlr f r*rvr, blackout Thursday on the via t of a 

tion that reachinto remote parts of ^ UJS. team investigating the case of 

fill *nd «.«ilv useH nackrti nf nr»l Utter leaden took more penuar vfliaa miefligence analyst^ ^for the 


Great Lakes Study Finds Toxin Threat 


mice years wiui Dim mac uum uc auuuiuau — : — - -r--——- , • ™ T. 1_, uunuraiK; aiuuyoi iw un> 

returned in August 1983 to fab of the 40000 cfaldren who now die rehwlration mix. AJ tins has been S U^.Navy who is accused of sdhng 

death al Manila International Air- each day hi the devdoninft worid.” ava ^ a ^ c ammtfjerof years but ? military secrets to Israel 


umted Pres international death at Man fin International Air- each day in the developing worid,” 
PHILADELPHIA — Nearly 60 port. Mr. Grant said Wednesday in mi 

people were injured, nine seriously. Since then, Corazon Aquino has interview, 
when a trolley derailed Wednesday grown steadily to become the focus He based tins estimate on the 
during the evening nosh hour and around winch the opposition now success of pflot efforts over the past 
was hit by another trolley, city appears to have been able to unite year, and he died two basic meth- 
transit officials said Thursday. against Ml Marcos. ods to achieve the goaL 


avaiiaoic for a number of years nut , mflitary secrets to Israel. 


The idea to 
work to savech 


o-aged dur- months ago. 


to aU heads of state, and the UN’s J 
40th «nmversny ^on, ^ 


the censors deleted all hut 60 


irons t officials said Thursday. 


ins a seminar time yean ago in- The ceremonies brought more a Ranm disps 
votving UNICEF, the US. Agency than 100 leaders to New York and words on the spy case. 


TORONTO (UPI) — Toxic chemicals, including suspected carcino- 
gens, are getting into the food chain in the Great Lakes area, posing a 
threat to 40 milli on people, according to an American-Canadum study. 

"The lack of effective control measures seems likely to affect many 1 
generations to come,” said the report, which is a review of the 1978 Great 
Lakes water quality agreement between the United States and runada 
The 40 nnlhon people affected by the more than 1,000 cancer-causing 
chemi c ala and other toxins found in the Great Lakes are the largest risk 


^ om a ^ fiutOT dkpitich °f TOO group ever identified in North America, said the report. 



for International Development and produrad a number of commit- *'F rom this moment on, there For the RpPOrH 

AtW I IV ihhvim nvnft JnrW fao mv fmm Ifarntrln. X U1C 


other UN agencies. 

At that aemiasx, Mr. Grant said. 


there was a point at which the par- countries to join. 

tidpants grasped that the only way Mr. Grant concedes that the ma- 

to reach the poorest Third Worid jor tests for his crusade are still to 


ments, indutoone from Bangla- will bend information available on 
dcsh, the lasurf the big-population the salgect,” said a US. Embassy 


Embassy Spamsl g traffic controigrs began a 48-hour strike Thursday caimiw 

■ . ' the nntrnna] nrmnpc Thoria mil I m n-i J 


when asked about the nAtional airtilie& > Iberia and Aviaco. to cancel 70 flights. 


paren ts and convince them to try come: the questions of continuity The investigators will interview at 
ummmizatioa and oral rehydration as the next generation of children fa w a three thnnght in h». 

therapy was to mobifae all^ do- emages, and universality. connected with Ml Poikttl, ao 

ments m asoaety— poj mcalhad - In Cdranbia, Mr. Betancnr is cording to sources, 

ers, religious and social orgamza- trying to build continuity into the Acar carrying an American cam- 
tnms^l new s mgamrariwis. process by revamping the country's era crew from the CBS artwork was 


PresMent Behsano Betoiair of educational cumcnlnm to indwle forced off the Jerusakan-Td Aviv wotmding seven in a 


tne whereabouts of the fiveinvesti- P*«lde»rt Hab& Bondi of Tunisia, 82, has been ordered by his 
ratws who arrived Wednesday. to 5 s * / or days because of “a slight cold,” according to an 

The investigators will interview at official medical bulletin published Thursday. (AP) 

least threefaradis thought to be The U.S. Senate confirmed Otis R. Bowen on Thursday as the third 
connected with Ml Pollard, ao- K^rcLuy of the Health and Human Services Department smee President 
carding to sources. Ronald Reagan took office in 1981. Mr. Bowen, the framer governor of 

A car carrying an American cam- Indiana, was confirmed in a 93-2 vote. (aj>\ 

era crew from the CBS network was SyWa Seegrist, 25, who was accused of kfflinE three DCisons and 


Colombia was Mr. Grant’s first tar- preventive health measures and by highway by U.S. security offictrs 
get and he responded with enthna- xeqoinng an hi^i school students when it followed the investigators 

~ 1 to perform 100 hours of national from their bold. CBS personnel 

health service. said the car was rammed by a U.S. 

UNIVERSITY The cost of universal Third Exnbassy vdnde. The embassy de- 

i\r/»nrr Worid immunization akne would scribed the incident as a mi st a ke. 

UCvKCl be about S500 million a yen; until — 1 ■ ■ 

a40*ars-M«TB«.IXXX*ME the progrm adtiwes a sustaining -j |, W71 

partan and costs drop /4 71X171/^X11 ftfl 

TLj. uu iLi.uim The agencies involved have. /UKiMiUll' -M-Jl I 

- enough 10 finance program s, fait . ... 

PACnC WBIERN IMVBSHY tS»|nE!%?GlS£S.. LONDON TheChnrch of En- 
LSjj u!! 5j|j!!Siitercto casts a financial crisis in 1986 un- gland envoy, Teriy^ Waite, will trav- 
less donors contribute at least Jl 50 d to Beirut within two weeks in a 
. million more than in 1984. ’ new attempt to obtmn the release 


spree Oct 30 at a suburban 


lopping mall, was dedared Thursday by a local judge incom petent to 
and trial because of mental Alness. (UPI) 

Wfirt>.b«gan a Ji-hoar 


only some counts. 


WMLOirs •MASTBn • DCXTOWIE 

Nr Wok, Atmim t It, Uh ttw*— ■» 


Send dafalM rmunw 
tor free evalunttan. 


Anglican Envoy Delays Trip to Beirut 


PAOHC WESIBtN IMVHBHY 

*00 N. Sepulveda Btvd* 

Lag Anoe I**, California 
M04V, Dept. 23, UJLA. 


Ratios week when aides said he would be 

LONDON -—TheChnrch of En- refused an entry visa to Kuwait, 
gland envoy, Terry Waite, will trav- which he had planned 10 visit, 
d to Beirut within two weeks m a The kidnappers have ifaic^ the 
new attempt to obtmn the release freedom of the four with that of 17 
of, four Americans kidnapped in Arabshdd in Kuwaiti for bombing 
Lebflnon, his office said Tbursday. attacks. The four Americans are 
Mr. Waite’s' office, had said Teny A Anderson, a cotwspon- 
Wedncsday that he would return dent of The Associated Press; The 
this week. Bat a spoteswoman said Reverend Lawrence Martin Jenco 
Thmsday: “Mr. Waite is engaged a Catholic uriest: David P. Tar«k! 


Hundreds of troops and police in 
annored cars patrolled the streets 
of Beirut's Moslem sector to en- 
force a Syrian-backed security plan 
aimed a I ending 22 mnmht of rule 
by militias. 


The police reported no vio- 
lence during the night in West Bd- 


. Thmsday: “Mr. Waite is enga 
in a senes of talks relating to 
mission m Beirut" 


a Catholic priest; David P. Jacob- 

sen, director of the American Uni- 
versity hospital in Beirut, and 


She said Mr. Waite, who visited Thomas M. Sutherland, the univer- 
Lebanon and the United States last si t/s acting dean of agricultnre. 


Kith, would fly to Bdrut some- ' 'Ml Waite, an envoy of the arch- 
ie before Christmas. . bishop of Canterbury, Revert Run. 

IBs efforts were srt back last oe, has said he remains cautiously 

: — : — - : • t —1 optntastic about his mission. 

nnriBHMmmnk ■ Strflte Disnqrts Beirut 

. A general strike overliving costs 

shot Moslem areas of Berut on 
Thursday, while a'nni^y formed 
security force continued its efforts 

a second day to maintain peace in 

tbe'eity. The Associated ftess re- 
ported. 


mt, where Moslem mfUrttm have 
feuded among themselves. Howev- 
er, Moslem and Christian mili tia, 
men dashed sporadically daring 
ntghL The police reported ate 
civ il i a n killed and three wounded. 

Tie city also was rattled by lou^f 1 
sonic.booms at midmotnrng, winch ' 
the pol ice said were Israeli, jets 
b™ing the sound barrier ^ in re- 
^waais san c e rims that lave bee® 
000B nuig almost daily. 


creases in fiving costs set off by Ihe 
government’s doubling of foel 
P nces i burned tires in the streets, 

f0rcc ? to stop work and 

° Urcfaed in scattered demonstra- 

hons as they chanted riogans. 








INTERNATIONAL HER ALD TRIBIINE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1985 


Page 3 


GRAMM-RUDMAN-HOLLINGS: 
WHO'S SAFE FROM THE BUDGET AX 


“I'n 


*■ fe- 


,v 


U.S. Women Destined for Low-Pay Jobs, Panel Finds 


EXEMPT 
FROM CUTS 
Sooai Security benefits' 

(merest on the nabonaT x 

Supptametrtal Security Income! 
. MWlWSW .... 

Aid to Families 
' with Dependant Children 
Feeding -Program fc* Women, 
Infants and dutdron 
Food stamps 
CtnWwtrt»n ■ 

. YetBrans’ .compensation 
and pensions' 


SPECIAL TREATMENT 
(das' allowed up 
to 1 percent m FY "86, 
up to 2 percent after that) - 

’ Medicare. "■ 

‘ Veterans' health we 
Community health care 
Mirant health care 
.Indian health care 


TtoVMinglnPM 


U.S. Balanced-Budget Law; 
What It Does, How It Works 

The Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON — Here are some of the major points of the lav 
signed by President Ronald Reagan aimed at forcing a hnlimcg d 
budget for the U.S. government by the 1991 fiscal yean : 

DEFICITS 

The plan establishes statutory ceilings on federal deficits. For the 
1 986 fiscal year, which began OcL 1, the maximum allowable deficit is 
$171.9 billi on, f ollowed by $144 billion for 1987, $108 billion for 

fiscal 1988, 572 biHum for fiscal 1989,536 billion for fiscal 1990 and 
then no deficit for 1991. 

After fiscal 1986, the deficit ceiling can stiU be exceeded by 510 
billion without automatic spending cuts being triggered. 

The While House Office of Management and Budget said the total 
deficit for the 1985 fiscal year, which aided Sept. 30, was $211.9 
billion. 

MEETTBVG THE GOALS 

Early in the calendar year, the president is required to submit a 
budget for the coming fiscal year that does not exe**A the deficit 
laracts. 

Congress then is to proceed with drafting a budget blueprint, 
including instructions to congressional committees to make changes 
in programs within their jurisdictions to "»« the deficit targets. 

The plan tightens congressional rules for the consideration of 
legislation that exceeds the budget limits. 

ENFORCEMENT 

In August of each year, the While House Office of Managem ent 
and Budget and the Congressional Budget Office are required to make 
a report on (he fiscal year abou t to begin, staling the projected budget 
deficit and the gap, if any, between the maximum statutory deficit. 

These reports will be sent to the General Accounting office, the 
auditing arm of Congress, for review. If projected deficits exceed the 
targets, the accounting office is required to draw up a list of cuts in 
accordance with guidelines in the plan and send them to the president. 

The president then would issue an order making the cuts to become 
final OcL 15. 

-.. For the current fiscal year, the process is to begin in January 1986, 
witlian order for cuts taking effect March 1. That cut cannot exceed 
Sll.TbflHon. 

AUTOMATIC CUTS 

Abouthalfof the approximately SI trillion federal budget is subject 
to automatic cots that might be needed to meet the deficit ceilings. 
The law requires the cuts loreduce mflitary and nommKtaiy spending 
by equal amounts. 

Exempt from automatic cuts are Soda! Security retirement and 
disability payments; Medicaid, a federal-state program providing 
health care for the poor; Food Stamps, which subsidize food pur- 
chases for the poor, veterans’ condensation and pensions and various 
welfare and cnfld-niurilion programs. 

Cuts for some other social programs are limited to 1 peremt in the 
current fiscal year and 2 percent thereafter. 

Provisions of the plan can only be waived daring recessions or 
wartime. ...... - . 


By Kennech B. Noble j 

• . Nr* Yerk Tuna Service . 

WASHINGTON — Despite recent progress, most Ameri- 
can. women who are employed will continue to .work hh. 
Imgdy low-paying occupations dominated by women for the 
foreseeable future, a committee of the National Academy of 
Sciences has concluded. 

While saying that affirmative action programs have been' . 
effective in increasing the number of women in predomi- 
nately male professions, the panel expressed concern that’ 
what it caDed reversals of federal civil rights policy under the 
Reagan- admmislradOT are likely to negariwdy affect wom- 
en's future employment opportune lies. 

The 173-page report, which was paid for by Carnegie 
Corp. and the Departments of Education and Labor, esti- 
mates that about half of all men and women work in jobs 
that are dominated by raw sex, that is,- jobs in which 80 
percent of the workers are either men or women. 

The report, “Women's W cat, Men’s Work: Sex 
non cm the Job,' 1 was based on a two-year study by 
National Research an arm of the National Acade- 

my of Sciences. The panel was headed by Alice S. Hriiman 

the president of Sarah Lawrence College, BronxviDe, New 

York. 

While the degree of sex segregation declined significantly 
in the 1970s, the panel concluded only slight further declines 
are anticipated, primarily because occupations that are pre- 
dominately male or fehute are expecred to grow more than 
those that axe relatively integrated. 

Many of the 20 occupations expected to grow the most by 


1990 are those that traditionally employ women. Among 
them are professional and practical nurses, nurse's aides. 
.- secretaries, bookkeepers, typists and waitresses. In 1980, for 
' example, according to the National Research Council, 98.8 
percent of secretaries and 95.9 percent of registered nurses 
Were women. 

Among other occupations where growth is expected to be 
, greatest up to 1990 are truck drivers, automotive mechanics 
and helpers in the trades, all categories that now employ Jew 
women. In 1980, 13 percent of auto mechanics and 13 
percent of truck drivers were women. 

Nonetheless, the report said that in the jpast decade sex 
\ . segregation in the work place has narrowed in some areas. It 
. said that men became slightly more likely to work in a few 
i heavily female occupations, such as office machine operators 
or telephone operators. 

For example, according to census figures, the percentage 
; of male telephone operators rose to 9 percent of the total in 
1980 from 6 percent in 1970. Similar ly, the percentage of 
male maids and housemen climbed to 242 percent of the 
total in 1980 from 5.7 percent in 1970. 

! At the same time, according to the census, women's 
Representation also increased in several predominately male 



11980 from 12 percent in 1970. 

'[ The panel found that despite large gains in employment in 
ibe 1970s, women still made only about 60 cents to every 
(Hollar earned by men. 


“While some of this difference is due to differences in skill 
and experience” the’ report said, "about 35 to 40 percent of 
the disparity in average earnings is due to sex segregation 
among occupations. Sex segregation within occupations ac- 
counts for much of the remaining disparity.” 

A number of factors have limited women's progress and 
will continue to do so, the panel said, including social 
stereotyping, veterans’ preference policies and departmental 
rather than plant-wide seniority systems. 

The evidence, the report continued, suggests women face 
discrimination and barriers in their education, training and 
employment 

Among other findings are these: 

• Among the 503 occupations listed in the 1980 UJ>. 
census, 275 were greater than 80 percent male or female. 
Since World War n many occupations have bad dramatic 
shifts in their sex composition, but the dominance of one sex 
has remained. 

• Among the 10 largest occupations for women in 1980, 
secretaries, registered nurses and bookkeepers were the most 
segregated by sex. The most male-dominated occupations 
flmfwig the 10 largest occupations for men were automobile 
mechanics, truck drivers and carpenters. 

a In 1981, the median salary for women who worked full 
>imi» throughout the year was $12,001, about 59 percent of 
the n**di»n mal e salary of $70.260- While women over 18 
earned about 60 percent of the salary or white men, black 
women earned 76 percent of the salary of black men, and 
Hispanic women earned 73 percent of the salary of Hispanic 
men. 


US. Lawmakers 
Make Progress 
On, Farm, Policy 

Co mpikdbyOaSuflFmDiquidm 
WASHINGTON — House and 
Senate negotiators working on a 
compromise of a new farm bill 
agreed Thursday on key subsidy 
oro visions that could help get the 


legislation ready for a vote before 
Congress adjourns for the year. 

The conference committee re- 
jected four attempts Wednesday 
nigh 1 to break a deadlock that has 
troubled the lawmakers since de- 
late on the government's farm po- 
licy began last winter. That dead- 
lode involved the highest price the 
government pays fanners for 
wheat, com, feed grains, rice and 
cotton. 

Conferees, voting 6-2 with one 
abstention, agreed Thursday to 
freezing wheat and com subsidies 
for two yean, and then gradually 
lowering them. 

Bui they could not agree on how 
much land fanners would be re- 
quired to keep implanted in return 
for receiving federal income pro- 
tection. Many other potentially 
contentious issues remain before a 
final agreement could be reached, 
indudmg food stamps and trade 
matters. 

Congress was scheduled to ad- 
journ Friday, but the Senate minor- 
ity leader, Robert J. Dole, Republi- 
can of Kansas, threatened to delay 
consideration of several bills to 
keep enough lawmakers in town to 
vote on a final version of the farm 
ML (AP, NYT) 


Reagan’s Tax Setback: A Misreading of Minds 


(Continued from Pagis 1) 

“It’s one thing to differ yjiith the 
president on personal principle, 
but to work against the president's 
No. 1 domestic priority — \ that's 
something else.” 

On another level, the defeat in 
the House shows the depth Re- 
publican opposition and aujbiva- 
’ lence toward the tax bill draft ed by 
a Democrat-led committee l and 
what Republican critics term the 
layers of uncertainty in die fl/hite 
House over strategy. 

It is a measure of the situation's 
ironies that Mr. Reagan staked', his 
prestige only grudgingly on a '.tax 
proposal that bad the potential! of 
emerging as a mryor triumph of 'his 
presidency, althoai^h it was shaped 
by Democrats. \ 

On the other hand, Mr. Reagan 
enthusiastically endorsed a budget- 
reducing proposal that had the ptb- 
tential of proving far more harmful 
to the Reagan w gpwrfa thaw the raft 
measure. > 

In essence, the budget 
which conservatives in 
House and in Congress have gener- 
ally opposed, could blur the entire 
Ragan agenda and «hrinlr military 
spending far more than Mr. Rea- 
gan had ever sough l \ 

This measure nwinimw that raft - J 
irary and most domestic programs 
be subject to yearly, automatic, 
across-the-board cots in the budget 
if Congress fails to adhere to cer- 1 
tain deficit targets. Its aim is a 
balanced budget by 1991. 

Mr.. Reagan initially gave luke- 
warm support to the Democratic 
tax revision plan; Although Mr. 


and his aides plainly dis- 
liked portions of it, support for it 
was viewed as the only way of 
achieving some tax revision. 

They screwed up, they handled 
it very badly,” said Representative 
Guy V. Molinari of New York, a 
Republican and a Reagan loyalist. 
They didn't contact the Republi- 
can leadership in the House and 
talk to Bob MicheL That didn’t 
help the cause any. To have over- 
looked him in the process was a bad 
mistake. Bob is a leader everyone 
respects.” 

He was referring to Representa- 
tive Robert H. Michel, a Republi- 
can of Illinois and the minority 
leader, who opposed the bill. 

Discussing the defeat. Jack Al- 
bertine, president of the American 
Business Conference, a coalition of 
medium-sized businesses, said: 
The reason is dear. The Republi- 
cans in the House have never been 
enamored with the whole process 
of tax reform. Michel has never 
been enthusiastic about the whole 
process. The degree of cohesion, 
though, is a surprise." 

A key Republican legislative 


aide said of the White House: 
“They were caught napping. It’s 
not totally their fault It was a semi- 
spontaneous thing, il had an energy 
of its own." 

John Buckley, a spokesman for 
nesentative Jack F. Kemp, Re- 
}lkan of New York, who op- 
posed the Democratic bill, said 
many Republican legislators were 
offended at the “take it or leave it” 
attitude of the Democrats. He said 
Republicans were given no option 
but to endorse the Democratic 
measure. 


The message we have sent” he 
said, “is the process needs to be 
opened up to allow the Republi- 
cans more input than they had." 


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Ransom Demand in Colombia 

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BOGOTA —Colombian guerril- 
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want a S6-mHHon ransom, the De- 
fense Ministry reported Thursday. 
The hostages, Edvard Scholl and 
;Jadt G flies, work for Occidental 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1985 


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Managua Steps Up Pressure on Dissidents 


By Edward Cody 

Washington Past Service 
MANAGUA — Sftnrimist secu- 
rity officials “have tightened censor- 
ship over the last two months and, 
through numerous arrests and- in- 
terrogations,' Lave issued a series of 
tough, warnings to lading Nicara- 
disidents in ; 
ir unions i and die i 


The iocrejased pressure against 
government , opponents has. wfari 

place in the framework of stiffened 
state of ehjikgency restrictions de- 
creed Oct. J5 by President Daniel 
Ortega Saavedra. 

Lino Hejrndndez, a lawyer who 
heads - the , opposition Permanent 
Human Rights Committee, esti- 
mated thalf more than 300 persons 
have been,' summoned for interro- 
gation by ; the Interior Ministry’s 
General Directorate for State Secu- 
rity since t}ie Oct. 15 order and that 
about 20 remained in jaiL 
The Rerlrcrend Bosco Vivas, aux- 
iliary bishop of Managua, said that 
total included “not fewer than 100” 
Roman Catholic lay activists and 
another: 5p priests. 



Within days, more than 120 per- 
sons were arrested in the country- 
side on charges of carrying mes- 
sages among rebel units, the 
government announced. Since 
than, 50 more have been arrested 
on sir niV charges, according to re- 
ports reaching the Permanent Hu- 
man Rights Committee: 

Mr. Hemindez said the addi- 
tional 300 interrogations, and in 
some cases arrests, were designed 
to intimidate political dissidents. 

“I would say the state of emer- 
gency was not directed against the 
armed counterrevolutionaries, but 
against civic opposition to the gov- 
ernment,” he said. “What they are 
domg is dosing the little space that 
remains.” 


Omar Cahwi x ; 



icrs have been mainly po- 
tty leaders, evangelical 
and union activists, ac- 
o diplomatic sourees,-Mr. 
and interviews with 


Hassan, a lawyer and 
(cal preacher who heads the 
; Crusade for Christ in Nic- 
i said he was taken away at 
it by security police who 
up at his house at 6 AJvL 
O c^. 31. He was released eight 


hours later, bat then interrogated 
agarn for more than 10 hours the 
next day. 

Neither Mr. Hassan nor a num- 
ber of others detainees interviewed 
this week reported physical abuse, 
although several complained of 
rough treatment and threats of long 
prison terms for opposition to the 
government. 

Mr. Ortega, in announcing the 
broadened suspension of civil liber- 
ties in October, said it was neces- 
sary to combat an “internal front” 
working to support anti-Sandinist 
guerrillas. 


Deputy Interior Minister Luis 
Carridn Cruz, in explaining the ex- 
panded restrictions; said OcL 20: 
“What they have been unable to 
achieve with mercenary forces, the 
imjyaifl lists try to achieve through 
their agents.” 

“They are trying to achieve it 
through open, cynical and insolent 
political activity," be sairL 

Deputy Commander Omar Ca- 
bezas, a Sandinist security official, 
said in explaining the interroga- 
tions of a dozen evangelical pastors 
ihm their religious sermons were 
encouraging draft resistance in de- 
fiance of the law. 

Resp onding to expressions of 
concern by related LLS. evangelical 
groups, he asked why such concern 
should focus on Nicaragua when 
security forces ip countries such as 
Chile and El Salvador murder dis- 


sidents instead of interrogating^ 
them and releasing them after a few., 
hoars or days as Nicaragua has , i 
done. . 1 P 

“Yes, we have called in CaihbUc^ { 
priests and told than they wea r: . ‘ 
violating the laws,” Mr. Cabezasj- 
said. “It’s the least we can-do; T hefjiv 
were violating the law,** - , >1; 

Jaime Chamorro, co-director oL: ' 
the La Prensfl opposition newspa - 
per. said that ante Oct. IS, that ', 
amount of news that is censored- • 
has risen from about 40 percent to 
60 percent of what his staff tries to ' 

report 

■ Censor, Relent on Letter 

Radio and newspaper spokes- 
men say censors deleted most of-al- ‘ 
letter from Pope John Paul II about* [ff 
tensions between the church and' * \ 
state, them changed thmrnradsand 
allowed its publication and broad- 
cast in full. The Associated Press 
reported from Managua. 

The letter, sent by the pope for 
Monday’s Feast of the Immaculate 
Conception, said church leaders 
should not be discouraged, by “in- 
timidation and critidsn of minis- 
ters” in Nicaragua. 

The manager of Radio Cat6Eca, 
Alberto Caraballo, said the letter 
“was mutilated" by censors Dec. 7 
and “we decided not to transmit it 
that way. since our interpretation 
was that the government did not 
want the people to know'the true 
message from the pope.” . 

He said the government later or- 
dered that the letter be broadcast in. 
full “but only one time: which we 
did Tuesday at noon.” 




.1 


i • • 

Farmers’ Sense of Powerlessness Frays Social Fabric 


todtily 


(Continued from Page 1) 

y, 63 percent of whom are 
smrtU producers. 

TiTie factory workers may resent 
beibg forced to undergo job re- 
training. But losing land and ma- 
chinery means life retraining for an 
independent, middle-aged fanner 
w'ho, despite years of 16-hour days, 
miiist acknowledge that he has 
fetiled to cany on his family’s farm 


.. A bank manager, too, may fed 
•‘angry frustration at haring to warn 
efeen reliable debtors of late pay- 
ment penalties, or having to sum- 
fnon a lifelong friend, and an- 
nounce the end of his friend’s farm 
livelihood. 


In hundreds of conversations in 
recent years, across the rural Mid- 
dle West, both farmers and bankas 
said that much of tins fear and 
frustration, this stress and sense of 
powertessness, seems to come from 
decisions made so far away: inter- 
est rates, crop prices, grain embar- 
goes and even foreclosures by gov- 
ernment agencies or by the main 


office of a local bank recently con- 
sumed by a merger. 

Small towns may never have 
been as idyllic as Hollywood found 
them, nor as venal as Sinclair Lewis 
described them. For some, small 
towns, produced claustrophobia, 
everyone knowing everything 
about everyone. But for many oth- 
ers they produced security, creating 
a rational, predictable system of 
social values and behavior. 

Where handshakes and first 
names and shared coffee hours 
were once adequate social cement, 
now documents are required by 
distant bureaucrats or local au- 
thorities who fear the distant bu- 
reaucrats. 

Once a local customer's over- 
drawn check was likely to be over- 
looked by a bank officer, a friend 
who knew the farmer would have 
the money tomorrow when he sold 
his com; now the check is likely to 
draw a computerized red flag and 
the attention of a young officer 
transferred to the- little bank for 
twoyeais. 

Shortly before the dderly fanner 


in HTHs. Dale Burr, shot the bank 
president, John Hughes, a teller re- 
jected a check on the fanner’s over- 
drawn account 

Last year the Iowa Legislature 
passed a law enabling any credit 
institution to send a list of its debt- 
ors to grain elevators, cattle sales 
barns, or any institution where a 
farmer might generate money by 
selling lus products. The law en- 
abled banks to require these insti- 
tutions to make checks payable to 
both the farmer and the bank. 

This prohibits a few farmers 
from receiving income without ap- 
plying at least some toward their 
outstanding debts, debts that in the 
aggregate were threatening to 
drown creditors in red ink. 

The list suggests to many honest 
customers, who now have to take 
every check to the bank for approv- 
al just to deposit it, that they were 
no longer trusted, a further fraying 
of the social fabric. 

Such precautions also fed fears 
on both sides of the credit crunch, 
especially at bill-paying time in the 
fall and early winter. A recent sur- 


vey of 153 Iowa agricultural bank- 
ers found 43 percent erf the respon- 


dents, up from 24 percent last year, 
farm- 


characterized relations with 
ers as tense: 

Half the bankers said they had - 
been verbally abused, 13 percent 
had been physically threatened and 
4 percent woe actually attacked. .. ■ 
Some bankers admit carrying £nm 
at times. , • 

. The traditional code of the coon- * 
tryside requires silence outside the 
family on personal problems: 
Don't wash duty laundry in public. 

In private and public sessions, 
mental health counselors are trying 
to break those taboos and build 
networks of neighbors for emotion- 
al support to combat the psycholo- 
gical isolation of depression, espe- ” 
dally among rural maks, 

Some have reached for a rifie or " 
shotgun; those long-familiar weap- 
ons that in many rural households . 
outnumber the humans. And they 
have lashed out tike li ghtning at the 
nearest target, a wife, a bank presi- 
dent, a fqpn animal or in many 
cases, themselves. 



Beyond the defat crisis- 

Latin 

America 


the next ten years. 


Sponsored by the International Herald Tribune & the Inter-American Development Bank. 

London, January 27-28, 1986. 


a 


Europe andthe 


, States to examine 


and corporate leaders from Latin Amaka, — 

the outlook for Latin America over the next ten years. . 

As places at the conference are strictly limited, we recommend that senior executives from the i 

banking and business community interested in attending, complete and mail the Rgistratioafonn today. 

JANUARY 27, 1986 JANUARY 28. 1986 ) 


Chairman; Lee W. Huebner, Publisher, 

International Herald Tribune. 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS 
Antonio Ortiz Mena, President, 

Inter-American Development Bank, Washington D.C 
SNAPSHOT OF THE DEBT CRISIS, RESCHEDULING MOVES, 
ADJUSTMENT PROGRAMS 

Eduardo Wiesner Duran, Western Hemisphere Director, 
Internationa] Monetary Fund, Washington D.C 
LATIN AMERICAN INITIATIVES TO TACKLE 
THE DBT PROBLEM 

Jesus Silva Herzog, Finance Minister, Mexico. 

Femoo Brother, Governor, Central Bank, Brazil. 

HOW THE INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL SYSTEM 
SHOULD ADAPT 

Michel Camdessus, Governor, Banque de F ranc e . 

Robin Leigh-Pemberton, Governor, Bcnk of England 

HOW MULTINATIONALS HAVE MADE A SUCCKS OF 
OPRATING IN THE REGION 
GJ. von der Klugt, ViceCharman, 

Philips Industries, Eindhoven. 

Peter Wallenberg, First Vice Chairman, 

Skancfinaviska Enskflda Banker, Stockholm. 

REVIVING INDUSTRIES IN LATIN AMERICA 

The Honorable Edward Seaga, M.P., Prime Minister, Jamaica 

Francisco Swett, Finance Minister, Ecuador. 

Amaldo Musich, Director, Orgarcaddn Techmt, Buenos Aires. 


Chairman: Anthony Sampson, international writer, -l 

Editor of The Sampson Letter. J 

NEW EFFORTS TO STIMULATE TRADE WTTH THE AREA "j 
Claude Cheysson, European Commissioner, Brussels. " 


Felipe JaramiUo, Chairman of the Contracting Parties j 
to the GATT, Geneva j 

THE NEED FOR A LONG-TERM SOLUTION TO THE DBT ; 
PROBLEM AND FOR NEW CRffiTTS { 

Enrique Iglesias, Foreign Minister, Uruguay. / 

Manuel Ufloa Bibs, former Prime Mirferter, Peru. j 

THE COMMERCIAL BANKS' VEW OF LATIN AMERICA ; 
David Rockefeller, Charmer, International Advisory 
Co mmit tee, The Chase Manhattan Berk, New York. > 
Wafiam Rhodes, Choirmcri, Restructuring Co mm itte e , 
Gtibcrk, New York. 

Warner Blessing, Member of the Bocrd of Managing 
Directors, Deutsche Bank, Frankfurt. 

PBSPECTlveS ON ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL DBaORVeifT 

a} Central America: 

Carlas Manuel GastSo, former Vice President, Costa Kca. 
b] Andean Region: 

Manuel Azpurua Arreaza, Fincnce Minister, Venezuela j 

THE FUTURE: REVIVING GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT*, 
THE COMMON INTEREST • 

lord Harold Lever, former Chancellor, Duchy of Lancaster. 
RCXMD TABLE: DISCUSSONOF A CUR0ENT ISSUE j 
Participation from severed key speakers. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1985 


JWest German Protest of Nndear Recycling 

i-vT^A West German poKcarian. right, dra gg ed a demonstrator away by t he hair T hursday during tfa- 
r -: J < "' second day of das h e s ai the construction she for a zrudear recycling plant at Wacfceradorf in 
: iv v Bavaria. Police arrested 17 demonstrators Thursday, after making six arrests the day before. 
."Environmental groups oppose the plant, winch is intended tr» iY>pTrv*»cg qvyit nuclear reactor f»H 

;-4mie Baxter, 62, Movie Actress, Dies 



By Alexander Reid 

Afn York Times Service 

-< JEW YORK — Anne Baxter, 
who won an Academy Award in 
best supporting actress for 
role in “The Razor's Edge,” 
|i Thursday at a New York hos- 
wfaere she had been taken 
*5. 4 after collapsing of a stroke, 
diss Baxter had been appearing 
* - be television series “HoteL" In 
she replaced Bette Davis — 
had suffered a stroke — in the 
playing the role of a 
~ iitby San Francisco hotel owner. 
- >:r c diss Baxter won her Oscar for 
portrayal of Sophie, a heartbro 
.jJ. young American in Paris, in a 
^sen adaptation of Somerset 
: !r^-'ugham's noveL She was nomi- 
“ed for a second Academy 
...- .ard, for her portrayal of Eve 
. / jringion, a scheming, sodal- 
7 abing young actress, in the 1950 
I L vie “All About Eve "In the film, 
_ ■ Davis played the rede of her 
..’""il, Margo Charming. 

. n 1971, Miss Baxter replaced 
iren Bacall on Broadway in 
-voplanse," a musical based an 
L7l About Eve,” in the rale of 
.•180. 


"disasters in ’85 
3lark Aviation’s 
Deadliest Year 






-vt rpiledbv Oar Staff From Dispatches 

~ NEW YORK— Even before 
bursday s crash of a chartered 
•C-8 in Newfoundland, 198S 
id become the deadliest year 
the history of commercial 
nation because of two earlier 
r craft disasters. 

The crash Thursday was the 
ird worst in 1985 and the 
orst accident involving a char - 
r aircraft in aviation history, 
was the 1 9th major civilian 
irline crash this year. 

More than 1,600 persons 
live been killed in 1985 in air- 
aft accidents, surpassing the 
ievious record of 1,299 in 
flA, according to the Gvil 
IviaLion Organization. Die 
ree worst crashes this year 
oked among the 10 worst 
[ashes in history. 

The year’s worst incident was 
e crash of a Japan Airlines 
Swing 747 on a mountain near 
deyo on Aug. 12. With 520 
]aihs, it was the worst single- 
e crash in history. 

On June 23, 329 persons died 
ten an Air-India 747 plunged 
x> the Atlantic off Ireland, 
botage was suspected. 

The crash of an Iberia Boeing 
in Spain on Feb. 19 killed 
8. and 137 died in the crash of 
Delta Air Lines Lockheed L- 
•1 1 at Dallas-Fort Worth In- 
national Airport on Aug. 2. 

1 (AP, UPI) 





e Crash 

s258 


*t 


(Continued from Page 1) 
t . oumately 150 miles (243 Irilo- 
* • ■xPys) northwest of Sl John's, the 
J iv- a] of Newfoundland on Cana- 
Atlamic seaboard. It is often 
by planes traveling between 
h America and Europe, 
te DC-8 is a four-engine jet 
ufaclured by McDonnell 
glas. The plane that crashed 
16 years old and had flown 
1 50,000 hours and 27 million 
; a spokesman for the jnanu- 
rer said. 

(vision’s Greatest Disaster 
s loss of 250 lives was the 
at peacetime disaster for the 
Airborne Division, known as 
'Screaming Eagles,” United 
International reported, quot- 
01 Harralson, deputy public 
nation officer at Ft Camp- 

i division has a rich military 
ion and has performed a 
er or peacetime missions, in- 
ig enforcement of school de- 
lation in Little Rock, Arkan- 

World War II, the 101st 
I Tame during 33 days of cen- 
ts fighting in France after the 
y invasion of Normandy, 
months later, at the Battle of 
dge during Christmas week 
it held off a siege by five 
in armored divisions. 


Miss Baxter was born in Michi- 
gan City, Indiana, and her family 
moved to New York when she was 
4. The granddaughter of Frank 
Lloyd Wright, Miss Baxter studied 
acting with Maria Ouspenakaya. At 
13, she made her acting debut in 
the Broadway play “Seen But Not 
Heard." 

Three years later, she went to 
Hollywood. Her first film was 
“Twenty Mule Team" (1940) with 
Wallace Beery. 

In 1956, rite played Nefertiti, 
Queen of Egypt, in Cedi B. De- 
Mi lie’s “Ten Commandments.” 
Her other films included “Char- 
ley’s Aunt" (1 94 IX “The Magnifi- 
cent AmberBOns" (1942), “Five 
Graves to Cairo" (1943), “I Con- 
fess” (1953), “Walk on the Wild 
Side” (1962), “The Family Jewels” 
(1965) and “The Busy Body" 
(1967). 

Miss Baxter married John Ho- 
rijflk, the actor, in 1946. They were 
divorced in 1953. Her second mar- 
riage, in I960, was to Randolph 
Galt, a' rancher in Australia. For 
several years Miss Baxter Kved on a 
cattle ranch in the Australian out- 
back. She and Mr. Galt were di- 


vorced in 1970. Her book “Inter- 
mission: A True Story," published 
in 1976, told of her experiences 
there. 

In 1977 she married David Klee, 
a New York investment banker. He 
died the following year. 

■ Other deaths: 

Curtis D. MariDongall, 82, pro- 
fessor of journalism at Northwest- 
ern University in Evanston, Illi- 
nois, from 1942 to 1971, Nov. 12, 
from complications following sur- 
gery- 

KB Wamby, 91, who as a second 
baseman for the Cleveland Indianc 
in 1920 madft the Only nn*«!Wrt»ri 
triple play in World Series history, 
Sunday in Lakewood, Ohio. His 
real name was William Adolph 
Wambsganss. 

Kerne Nord, 85, a French author 
of spy novels, Wednesday in Mo- 
naco. A colonel and wartime Resis- 
tance fighter whose real name was 
Andre BrotriHard, be wrote about 
75 novels. 

Drafter Ustinov, 63, the Bulgari- 
an-born tenor who . sang on the 
world’s foremost opera stages until 
vocal cord surgery aided his career 
in 1966, Wednesday in Vienna. 


Fear of AIDS Grates in Soviet 
As Officials Blame the West 


(Continued bon Page 1) 
epidemic to the Central Inteffi- 


have died and there is no sign of a 
cure, said Dr. Fakfary Assaad of the 
World Health Organization, which 


gence Agency or the Pentagon, or 

to tribes in Central Africa. One of called the three-day meeting, 
these, entitled “Panic in the West” The Soviet Union will be repre- 
and published in October in the seated by Dr. MJ. Parfanovich of 
weekly magazine Literatumaya the Ivanovsky Institute of Virolo- 
Gazeut, is credited with touching gy. Hungary also will send a dele- 
off public concern about AIDS. gate. 

Most of those articles have de- - 

scribed it as an infectious disease 
most prevalent among homosex- 
uals, (hug addicts and prostitutes. 

But the ketorer stressed that AIDS 
among children and married peo- 
ple also is incre asin g . 

In the Sovietskaya Kultura inter- 
view, Dr. Zhdanov blamed the out- 
break abroad on increased contact 
between people from different 
countries in the postwar period, 
and particularly since the 1960s. 

The articles appear to have suc- 
ceeded in increasing suspicion 
against foreigners. A rash of offi- 
cial reports about AIDS before the 
International Youth Festival here 
in July has given way to persistent 
but unproven rumors that contacts 
between Soviets and foreigners 
have resulted in an AIDS outbreak. 

Near the lecture's end, the speak- 
er recapped his list of preventive 
measures with a recommendation 
to avoid contact with foreigners 
and undesirable elements. He add- 
ed that blood for transfusions 
should be drawn bom women, who 
he said are less likely to be AIDS 
carriers. 


■ Russian to Attend Meeting 

The Soviet Union for the first 
tim e will join 40 medical experts 
next week in a meeting to discuss 
AIDS, Reuters reported Thursday 
from Geneva. 

Half of those afflicted worldwide 


U.S. Panels Say 
500,000 Bought 
False Diplomas 

New York Times Serrict 

WASHINGTON — Two 
congressional panels have as- 
serted that more than 300,000 
Americans have obtained false 
credentials or diplomas in fields 
ranging bom medicine and zo- 
ology to architecture. 

A report issued Wednesday 
by the House subcommittee on 
health and long-term care and 
the subcommittee on housng 
and consumer interests, and 
testimony (he same day at a 
joint hearing by the two panels, 
suggested that fraudulent cre- 
dentials were a growing prob- 
lem. One panel estimate put the 
number of doctors with false 
credentials operating in the 
United States a 10.000. 

A New York state investiga- 
tor said at the hearing that a 
New York Gty hotel had been 
built under tire supervision of 
an individual who pretended to 
be an architect. 

The profits for selling fraud- 
ulent credentials were reported 
to be enormous. 


FINLANDIA 


nrm, 



FINLANDIA ON ICE 


British, Irish 
Hedge to 
Hold Ground 
On Accord 


Reuters 

BELFAST — Britain and Ire- 
land have pledged to continue im- 
plementing their agreement on 
Northern Ireland despite attempts 
to wreck h during its first session 
by extremists from both rides of the 
divided community. - 

After the inaugural meeting 
Wednesday of the Anglo-Irish 
Conference, the body set up to im- 
plement the accord' signed last 
month, Peter Bany, Ireland's min- 
ister for foreign affairs, said the two 
governments might be mi the road 
to achieving peace and stability in 
the North. 

Speaking in Dublin cm his return 
Wednesday from Belfast, Mr. Bar- 
ry an jtfuww wt, however, «h*r die 
process was at an early stage. 

The co-chairman of the new 
committee, Tom King, Britain’s 
secretary of state for Northern Ire- 
land, said the initiative would hot 
bring quick soccess but added: “I 

thinlr it is a £ pww imH construc- 
tive way." 

As the first meeting took {dace 
the re were demonstrations by an- 
gry Protestant loyalists in which 38 
policemen were injured, and amor- 
tar attack by guerrillas of the Provi- 
sional Irish Republican Army on a 
country police station that left four 
officers hospitalized. 

Bat Irish government sources 
said that both countries had been 
expecting an upsurge in efforts to 
wreck the accora, which is aimed at 
ending the alienation of the Catho- 
tio-nationalist population rhar hag 
provided the IRA with its support 



Peter Barry 


Loyalists see it as a fust step 
toward a reunified Ireland. 

The main result of the first ses- 
sion was agreement that more 
armed Irish police, inducting spe- 
cial anti- terrorist units, would be 
drafted in the South into border 
areas to bdp stop the movement of 
guerrillas. 

The two sides also agreed on 
measures at improving the 
imag e among Catholics of the 
mainly Protestant security forces in 
Northern Ireland. 

These include a new code of con- 
duct for policemen and the inclu- 
sion of regular police officers in 
patrols by the largely Protestant 
Ulster Defense Regiment, which is 
deeply distrusted by Catholics. 

■ Backing in Europe 

The European Parliament en- 
dorsed the British-Irish agreement 
in a resolution Thursday, The As- 
sociated Press reported from Stras- 
bourg, France. The vote was 151- 
28. 

It said the accord offered “a 
unique opportunity to make pro- 
gress toward peace and reconcilia- 
tion.” 


NATO Says 
It Wants to 
Consult on 
Soviet Ties 

(Continued from Page 1) 

ment and production of arma- 
' meats. 

NATO officials acknowledged 
that substantial problems must be 
overcome if the policy is to be im- 
plemented successfully, but the 
U JS. delegation greeted the move as 
a major step toward improving alli- 
ance effectiveness at a time of "na- 
tional budget restraints and a wid- 
ening gap between Warsaw Pact 
and NATO conventional capabili- 
ties.” 

The major European concern 
dearly centered on an impending 
decision by Mr. Reagan about 
whether the United States would 
continue its adherence to restraints 
in the unratified strategic arms 
treaty. Some senior administration 

officials have advocated abandon- 
ing that policy because of alleged 
Soviet violations of the treaty. 

At the time of the last NATO 
ministerial meeting in June, Mr. 
Reagan announced that the United 
States would continue its practice 
of not undercutting the aims re- 
strictions, but would keep that po- 
licy under review in the light of 
future Soviet conduct. 

Some ministers, particularly Sir 
Geoffrey Howe of Britain, report- 
edly emphasized to Mr. Shultz that 
every effort must be made to 
achieve substantive progress in the 
Geneva arms control talks if the 
United States wanted to avoid a 
resurgence of anti-nuclear senti- 
ment in West European public 
opinion. 


Reagan Signs BUI to End 
Budget Deficits by 1991 


(Continued from Page 1) 

bill to tide the government over 
until early next week. 

That would give negotiators the 
time they need to wrap up both a 
farm bill and the long-term spend- 
ing bill and enable Congress to ad- 
journ for the year by the middle of 
next week. 

The House spending measure 
calls for S268.8 billion for the Pen- 
■tagpn for the current fiscal year, 
while the Senate wants S282J bil- 
lion, a level for which the adminis- 
tration is pressing. 

Both measures provide less for 
foreign aid than the White House is 
asking, and more on domestic pro- 
fcr ams. 

Mr. Reagan has threatened to 
veto both versions of the spending 
bill A veto would keep Congress in 
session for at least as long as it 
would take to pass a new appropri- 
ation. 

The votes by the House and Sen- 


ate on Wednesday night sending 
the balanced budget proposal to 
the president ended months of 
stormy debate that continued until 
the filial roll calls. 

The Senate Democratic leader. 
Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia, 
labeled the measure “a cup of poi- 
son,'' and other critics said it could 
lead to a tax increase instead of the 
deep spending cuts envisioned by 
supporters. 

The Senate majority leader, 
Robert J. Dole. Republican of 
Kansas, said: “We've made history 
of some kind and well see how it 
works next year." 

The increase in the debt limit, 
which is the government's borrow- 
ing authority, to S2.079 trillion 
ended months of fiscal turmoil for 
the government, which had resort- 
ed to a scries of bookkeeping mea- 
sures to stay solvent. 

Treasury Department officials 
said the government would have 
been in default without action by 
midnight Thursday. (AP. AD T) 



ADVERTISEMENT 






-Waca 


ftttfeerr 




*»BcdnaoD 


^ an 1 ,. 

/J 


i9SS 






^ ** tip -fia4 g_ . 

ML* **09- a. * . 9 




This letter is published today also in “Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeilung™ world edition. 

This action is a unique attempt to influence a world market price - the US-dollar exchange rate - by a well-founded recommendation. 

It may succeed only if the message is seized and spread widely by more and other media. 

Johann Philipp von Bethmann, Frankfurt. Germany, the initiator and writer of the letter, is a journalist and former private banker. 

He lias written articles for “Handelsblatt^ “Die Zeit" “Wirtschaflswoche" “Welt am Sonntag". etc. He is the author of three books edited in Germany 
and of “The Interest Rate Trap" published lately by the Committee for Monetary Research and Education Inc.. (CMRE) Greenwich, Connecticut. U.S.A. 



>i 











Page 6 


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1935 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune. 


Published Wi* Thf VoA. Time* and TV W«fcu^wu Pta* 


Same Standard for China? 


In the Senate, uneasiness seems to be in- 
creasing over the nuclear agreement with Chi- 
na. Under the agreement, which is now in 
effect, American manufacturers will be able to 
sell power reaclors and related technology to 
the Chinese. In return, the Chinese have 
pledged not to divert the materials or technol- 
ogy to military uses or to help any other 
country — Pakistan, for example — build 
nuclear weapons. Bui the United States will 
have no reliable way of knowing bow faithfully 
the Chinese abide by their commitment. 

Senator John Cleon of Ohio has brought up 
this uncomfortable reality several times re- 
cently, and each time a few more senators have 
joined him. This week they were a majority. 
On Monday he succeeded in attaching a brief 
and useful paragraph on this subject to Con- 
gress’s continuing resolution on federal spend- 
ing. The Senate leadership tried to set the 
Glenn amendment aside but. in the roll call, 
lost by 28 votes to 59. The amendment proba- 
bly mil not survive in the final legislation 
because tbe conference is going to try to throw 
out everything not strictly related to spending. 
But those 58 senators who voted with Mr. 
Glenn represented a remarkably wide range of 
opinion in both parties, and they are right. 

When the United Stales sells nuclear reac- 
tors to other countries, it insists on safeguards 
— specifically, the system of international in- 


spections and materials accounting that is ad' 
minis tered by the International Atomic Ener- 
gy Agency. The Chinese agreement makes no 
reference to safeguards. America has settled 
therein for far less rigorous assurances. 

The administration says that it considers the 
Chinese dependable, and that the commit- 
ments they made will tie China securely into 
the worldwide effort to bait the spread of 
nudear weapons. The Glenn amendment, ac- 
cording to the administration, would force 
renegotiation of the whole agreement and 
would broadly damage relations with China. 
Thai is not a trivial case. China often has 
behaved badly in regard to spreading nuclear 
technology, and even its relatively loose prom- 
ises to America represent important progress. 

But, Mr. Glenn asks, does it make any sense 
to sell nudear technology to China under less 
demanding rules than, -say, to Japan? Why 
trust China more than America's allies? He 
argues that this agree men t wQl become a pre- 
cedent for a general relaxation of the world's 
nudear control standards, and he is right- The 
Glenn amendment would simply apply safe- 
guards to any nuclear technology that the 
United States sends China. It is a reasonable 
and conventional requirement. If it is not en- 
acted with the continuing resolution, the Sen- 
ate mil need to return to it next year. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


New Chance in Guatemala 


For Guatemala, now comes the hard part. 
The military, in power for most of 31 years, has 
honored its* promise to permit the free election 
of a civilian president Tbe vote seems to have 
been fair. Tbe victor, with tbe highest vote 
total in history, is an attractive center-leftist 
Marco Vinicio Cerezo, and he pledges to take 
charge without vengeance against the military 
for its murderous rule. If he succeeds, it will be 
a tremendous advance for democracy in Cen- 
tral America’s most developed nation. 

Success is far from certain. Mr. Cerezo 
plainly does not lack for courage; three assas- 
sination attempts failed to deter his cahdidacy. 
“The only way they are going to gel me out of . 
the palace is to carry me out dead," be defiant- 
ly proclaims. But in fact he has trimmed a bit, 
running a conservative campaign. His Chris- 
tian Democratic Party promised to respect 
landowners and financial interests, to try do 
one for h uman rights violations and to let tbe 


mili tary manag e counterinsurgency. A new 
constitution leaves tbe armed forces in control 
of local government and legal ires tbe resettle- 
ment of Indians into “model villages” and 
their conscription into civilian patrols. Human 
rights 3 buys against urban citizens may now 
decline, but what relief can be expected by 
citizens in the countryside? 

Swollen military budgets and endless war- 
fare have contributed to a severe economic 
crisis. Foreign lenders and donors win feel 
more comfortable about helping a dvflian gov- 
ernment, but until priorities are reordered, 
new money may not make winch difference. 
Mr. Cerezo, an admirer of Clausewitz, suggests 
that his deference to the military is part of a 
grand strategy, yielding to realities. That judg- 
ment. backed by tbe voters, should not be 
second-guessed from afar. Americans join in 
hailing his victory, and his promise. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Save the Tax Reform Bill 


The House of Representatives should rescue 
and pass the tax reform bill to force the Senate 
to deal with the subject next year. No one can 
endorse the bill unreservedly. It is too big, and 
has gone through too many bands. But on 
balance it would make tbe system fairer. 

The measure's most powerful provisions 
would move tax thresholds back above the 
poverty line, so the poor would no longer owe 
income taxes. They generally did not in the 
1970s, but have begun to since. About six 
million families and individuals with very little 
income would be taken off the rolls by this 
step. Many are working poor who pay rising 
Social Security taxes and were perhaps the 
biggest losers in President Reagans first-term 
spending cuts, which tended to lower eligibil- 
ity lids for social programs. The second-term 
tax bill is an important counterbalance to the 
first-term fairness issue. 

These tax cuts for the poor were proposed 
by the president. He also proposed. large tax 
cuts for the very rich. The House Ways and 
Means Committee tapered these down. Its bill 
would reaffirm the traditional progress! vity of 
the income tax. the principle that rates should 
rise with income. The committee also strength- 
ened m inim u m taxes both for individuals and 
corporations. Some lax reformers see this as a 
weakness, a confession that the committee 
could not accomplish all it should have in 


eliminating preferences. But not all prefer- 
ences are bad; the logic of a nwiitmim tax is 
simply that there must be a limit to anyone’s 
use of these tax-reducing devices in any one 
year. Tbe new provisions would achieve that. 
This is the most baric fairness issue in tax- 
ation: Those with income ought to pay. 

There are certain industries — defense, 
banking, real estate — whose effective tax 
rates over the years have been egregiouriy low. 
They have become symbols for discontent with- 
the tax code. The bill would deal decisively 
with several of these. Defense contractors 
would lose the so-called completed con tram 
provision by which many have all but avoided 
taxes in the pasL Banks would lose deductions 
for excess bad-debt reserves. Depredation pe- 
riods would be stretched out on real estate. 

Many in and out of Congress believe that 
next year there will be a tax increase — that 
while the president still will not hear of it, there 
must be. The current bin would be an impos- 
ing vehicle. It is “revenue-neutraT now; what 
it raises by narrowing preferences it returns by 
cutting rates. It would not be hard to adjust 
these combinations to increase revenues, and 
the increase would be tbe fairer for the reforms 
that would accompany ft. It was the presi- 
dent's idea; it is the Democrats’ bSL Both 
parties should vote aye today. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


A Useful Start in South Asia 

The South Asian Association for Regional 
Cooperation, set up in Bangladesh last week- 
end. is a useful, if modest, start to giving the 
area greater stability. It does not promise to be 
a panacea for the subcontinent’s many prob- 
lems. On the contrary, it is deliberately cau- 
tious in its objectives. Its founding charter 
specifically avoids controversial issues, partic- 
ularly of a bilateral kind. It rests on certain 
broad principles that all seven members — 
India. Pakistan. Bangladesh. Sri Lanka, Bhu- 


tan. Nepal and the Maldives — can agree on. 
This is a sensible start. 

What the region needs first, as Rajiv Gan- 
dhi, India’s prime minister, rightly pointed 
out, is “to build mutual confidence and trust." 
The hostility between India and Pakistan Ires 
at tbe bean of the subcontinent’s problems. It 
is this that is the indirect cause of the region’s 
arms build-up and to some extent its political 
instability. Now that both nations appear on 
the verge of acquiring nudear arms, the need 
for a solution is even more urgent. 

— The Financial Tunes (London). 


FROMOURDEC. 13 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910; The Unseen Vampire’ of War 
NEW YORK. — The New York World says: 
“If there were no other reason for making an 
end of war, the financial ruin it involves must 
sooner or later bring the civilized nations of 
the world to their senses. As President David 
Starr Jordan of Lei and Stanford University 
said at Tufts College. ‘Future war is impossible 
because the nations cannot afford il’ In Eu- 
rope, he says, the war debt is S26 billion, 'ail 
owed to tire unseen vampire, and which the 
nations will never pay and which taxes poor 
people S95 million a year.’ The burdens of 
militarism in time of peace are exhausting the 
strength of the leading nations, already over- 
loaded with debts. The certain result of a great 
war would be overwhelming bankruptcy." 


1935; E^yptRestiHiesItsGMistiliitkro 

CAIRO — Events of tbe past month, includ- 
ing country-wide riots, culminated [on Dec. 
12] with tire promulgation of a decree by King 
Fuad restoring the 1923 Constitution. Before 
Premier Nessim Pasha presented the decree 
for the King’s signature, be had an interview 
with Sir Miles Lampson, in which the British 
High Commissioner said that Great Britain 
had no objection to tbe principle of restora- 
tion, but deemed immediate application of the 
political status [of independence] under the 
1 923 Constitution to be undesirable at present. 
The Premier was asked by the King to remain 
in office until elections may beheld and parlia- 
mentary activity restored. Consequently the 
cabinet did not resign as expected. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

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What Keeps 
Kennedy in 
The Blocks 

By William Safire 

TTTASHINGTON —Ethel Ken- 
W Hedy's son Joseph is running 
Tor tbe Massachusetts seat once 
beld by his uncle, and her daughts 
Kathleen is thinking of r unning for 
Congress in Maryland. The Kenne- 
dy dan is making its generational 
move, and it is nicejo see the famil- 
iar gnus on the new faces. 

But what of Senator Edward 
Kennedy, now a ripe old 53. who 
win be Ronald Reagan’s present 
age in the year 2006? Will he run? 
Can he win? I have those answers 
foryou today. . 

Every right-winger worth his fa- 
tally flawed SALT-2 longs for die 
day Teddy Kennedy hits tbe hus- 
tings in what is sure to be an ideo- 
ly wrenching. Democrat-di- 


viding race for the presidency. We 
want to run against Mr. Kennedy 
because he stands there defiantly as 
the Undefeated Lefty in an era erf 1 
right-wing triumph; to beat him de- 
cisively in open national combat 
would drive a stake through liberal- 
ism's bean at midnig ht. 

Shrewdly, deceptively, we make 
the case for his candidate with our 
friends in tbe opposition. 

First of all we say, rest assured 
Mr. Kennedy is running. Oh, be 
won’t let on until late 1987, but his 
political action committee has a 
bundle in (he kitty already, while 
Gary Hart is still in the ted. A 
Kennedy man. Paul Kirk, now runs 
the Democratic National Commit- 
tee. Richard Nixon has told us that 
the litmus test will be Mr. Kenne- 
dy’s weight, and tbe senator’s inti- 
mates tell me that their man now 
weighs in at a respectably trim 200 
pounds (90 kilograms), down from 
230 a year ago. 

Second, we say with furrowed 
brow, he is hip to the issues that 
burn on the television screen. When 
stock in sanctions on South Africa 
was selling at its low, Mr. Kennedy 
remembered his brothers’ call to 
Martin Luther King in jail and 
bought heavily; be now stands de- 
servedly in the forefront of the fight 
against apartheid. 

And the new Kennedy is not 
your knee-jerk liberal He agrees 
with Preodent Reagan on the tine- 
item veto, handing budget power 
over to tire president; he is a bran 
deregulflton he decided early to 



Drawing by Lurta. 


abandon his Democratic allies by 
embracing the Grannn-Rudman 
budget baianring act. and he roiled 
all the special-interest groups by 
speaking out against a party of as- 
sembled constituencies. Balance 
the ticket with Governor Mark 
White of Texas or diaries Robb of 
Virginia or Senator Sam Nunn; 
prospects get hotter. 

At the same time, goes our soft 
sell Mr. Kennedy has hewed to 
progressive principle by making So- 
cial Security off-unrits to cuts, re- 
sisting redactions in Medicare, op- 
posing school prayer, urging gun 
control protecting the helpless 
alien worker and blocking arms 
sales to Jordan unless King Hussein 
deals directly with Israel 

In sum, he has kept the faith with 
the liberal faithful on con- 

cerns while breaking away from the 
tax- and- spend mistakes of the re- 
cent Democratic losers. As the polls 
now show, he would ran better than 
any Democrat, holding the old con- 
stituencies while attract ing inde- 
pendent young voters. 

This is when our Democratic 
friends give us a funny look: If Mr. 
Kennedy is so fearsome a candi- 
date. why are Republicans so eager 
to run a gamsf him? 

Well um, we're into contrasts. 
He is against “star wars,” and op- 
poses aid to the “contras” in Nica- 


ragua and the anti-Communists in 
Angola, and we are for all that. Mr. 


patient of Your Side, and we i 
the on Our Side whip him 
on tbe issues. Like in *64 — a 
choice, not an echo. 

And you promise not to bring up 
the character issue? 

You have our solemn oath! 
Hard-liners can give this assurance 
in good faith, because we know that 
every other Democratic candidate 
for the nomination will be walking 
film crews -around Edgartown, 
Massachusetts. At every Kennedy 
rally, the unfair media wul focus on 
some gtty in a frogman outfit carry- 
ing a sign. Republican candidates 
witi need only to note every day 
that they are just loo high-minded 
to raise the Oiappiquiddick issue, 
central to tbe judgment of a man’s 
character though it may be. 

Our dream lives, butwe will not 
be able to sell the Democrats on 
Mr. Kennedy. He will make run- 
ning noises, poll furiously, titillate 
tbe left until the last minute, and 
then realize his S wiate ter m q|<|ji in 

1988 and a loss would mean oblivi- 
on. Unless a ring-a-ding recession 
carls conventioneers’ hair. Ted will 
then withdraw with a humdinger of 
a speech that w£Q make everyone 
cry. Especially Republicans. 

The New York Times. 


Russians for Peace? 
Are They for Rea 


H P- 


* 


By Jerry F- Hough 


W ASHINGTON — The Nobel 
Peace Committee has been 
criticized for its award of this year’s 
prize to the Soviet co-chairman of the 
International Physicians for tbe Pre- 
vention of Nuclear War. 

Yevgeni Chazov. who is sharing 
the award with ins American coun- 
terpart, Bernard Lown, is a deputy 
minister of health in the Soviet 
Union. He was (and perhaps still is) 
die personal doctor of the Commu- 
nist Party general secretary, and on 
that basis was made a full member of 
the Central Committee — scarcely a 
man independent of the govenunenL 
Even if he wanted to. Dr. Chazov 
could not publicly criticize the policy 
of the Soviet Union. When he goes 
abroad, be supports Soviet foreign 
policy. Nevertheless, much of me 
criticism of this award and the offi- 
cial Soviet peace movement in gener- 
al betrays a real lack of understand- 
ing erf die Soviet political system. The 
role of die men and women in this 
movement is far more complex than 
we in the West usually reco gniz e. 

When we see statements by Soviet 
scholars (such as Georgi Arbatov, 
who heads the Institute of U.S. and 
Canadian Studies) or officials (Dr. 
Chazov) in favor of disarmament or 
peace, we have the very self-centered 
pqsumprinn that they are directed 
only at us and are intended to get us 
to lower our guard. 

What Westerners forget is that the 
scholars who are part of the official 
Soviet peace movement also write in 
the Soviet press. The censors do not 
permit them to criticize Soviet policy, 
at least directly, but they are saying 
thing s that are deeply disturbing to 
powerful military and conservative 
elements in the estab lishmen t- Before 
he was removed as chief of the gener- 
al staff. Marshal Nikolai Qgsukov 
complained bitterly about those in 
the Soviet press who treat any peace 
as a good peace. “It is necessary." be 
wrote; “to bring the troth about the 
existing threat of a military danger to 
the Soviet people in a deeper and 
more well-argued manner." 

The members of the Soviet peace 
movement (who are not to be con- 
fused with the dissident Helsinki 
monitors) must pay their dues by 
supporting Soviet foreign policy. But 
they are arguing against tbe tradi- 
tional militar y way of thinking in 
the Soviet Union. 

For example, talk about winning a 
nudear war and the launching of pre- 
emptive nuclear strikes was part of 


Yithout saying ii openiy. tiK 
tvmnn'e ml# nKv >■’ thfi 3s. v.~ 


When the Pacific Is No Longer an American Lake 


W ASHINGTON — This year 
may be recalled as the year the 
Pacific erased to be America’s lake. 
New Zealand refused port entry to a 
U.S.. destroyer, Australia a hacked 


By Jonathan Weisgall 


payment Kiribati’s annual budget is 
about $9 mthion, so failure to pay. 
was catastrophic and made feeScmet 


down from a commitment to help " offer that much sweeter. 


monitor an MX missile test and in- 
stability in the Philippines has raised 
questions about U.S. bases there. 

Meanwhile, the Soviet Union, after 
setting up a major naval base in Viet- 

In the subtle battle for 
the Pacific, American 
off to a bad start 

nam, has offered economic aid to 
small island nations in the area. One 
accord has been reached — a $1.7- 
miUion fishing pact with Kiribati, the 
former British colony of the Gilbert 
Islands. The Greeapeaoe affair has 
galvanized anti-nuclear sentiment in 
the region, much of it against tbe 
United States. 

A subtle battle for the Pacific has 
started, and the United States should 
take immediate steps to shore up its 
faltering relations in tbe region. 

Fust, Congress should now pass 
the Compact of Free Association, 
which establishes the future political 
relationship between the United 
States and its United Nations trustee- 
ship, Micronesia. The compact is a 
bargain. It provides for indefinite 
“strategic denial” preventing Soviet 
access to Mkroaesia, and assures use 
for the next 30 years of Kwajalein 
Alofl, an important missile range. 

Different versions erf the compact 
were passed recently by the Senate 
and fee House of Representatives. 
Only a few legislative days remaid 
this year, and the Mteroneaans are 
restless. Tbe U.S. lease on Kwqalem 
Atoll has exp ire d, and some land- 
owners are occupying their islands. 

Second, the United States should 
sign a fishing pact with the Pacific 
island nations. Fishing rights are the 
most important resource of these na- 
tions, but tbe United States does not 
recognize their 200-mile (320-lrikwoe- 
ter) exclusive economic zones for 

tuna. Kiribati's fishing accord with 
the Soviet Union does not reflect any 
ideological shift to the left Rather, it 
reflects a need for a reliable source of 
revenue, disgust with the American 
Tuna boat Association's failure to pay 
fishing fees, and disappointment mat 
the UJ&. government did not force the 


The State Department is negotiat- 
ing a regional fisheries agreement 
with the island nations of the area. If 
fee United States refuses to recognize 


their 200-mfle fisheries, it is turety 
that Tonga. Tuvalu and Vanuatu wiD 
sign deals with fee Russians soon. 

Third, America should play a more 
active role in the area. There are two 
UJS. embassies among the dozen or 
so independent or sdf -governing is- 
land states in the Pacific, and one 
regional office of the Agency for In- 
ternational Development that admin- 
isters pi opuM totnfing $6 mflUart 
annually. The answer is not necessar- 


ily more aid -but better .programs. 
America could Jeaxn_£ram. .China, 
whose 1984 aid to Kiribati 'was 200 
(much-loved) bicycles, or Japan, 
whk± gave that country excess rice to 
sell in stores below retail prices. 

Fourth, the United States must 
consider feat these traditionally prey 
American islands are chaQengmgal- 
hed nudear policies in the area. The 
Pacific has had direct contact with 
nudear issues since Hiroshima. Tbe 
United States conducted 66 nuclear 
tests in fee Marshall Islands, and 
France continues testing at Mururoa. 
Japan has proposed dumping nudear 
waste off the Northern Mananas. 

- In response to these developments, 
the 13 members of the South Pacific 
Forum,.indnding Australia and New 


Zealand, have ratified a treaty, ban- 
ning the manufacture, testing or sta- 
tioning of nuclear arms in .almost all 
the South .Pacific. This, wide, anti- 
nudeax sentiment is summed up in a 
poster that says, ‘‘If it's so safe, store 
it in Washington, dump it in Tokyo 
and test it in Paris.” 

Washington should reassess its po- 
sition on deep-sea nudear dumping 
vs. above-ground storage and the ef- 
fect feat French nuclear testing may 
have on the environment in the Pacif- 
ic. If a cohesive policy for the region 
is not devised, the United States may 
lose the battle for tbe Pacific. 


the official Soviet military «ios!ri;- c 
(he 1960s and early 1970:. Soviet ;. j. 
onels wrote malter-of-fjeiiy abc-.-; 
starting conventional . 

barrage erf tactical tedey [ 

(reminiscent erf the artillery 
that were used at the start ertaifc ^ 
World War II) in order “to hsphi • 
huge enthusiasm in cur 
Wil 

movement's role inside 
Union has been to gel politic::! 
military leaders to tinJc^ianti fe-; 
nuclear war would be diffciurt ‘tor j 
World War II. To a large vxicr,: 
have won on this point . Soviet !s^. 
ere, most recently Mikhail S. Gurro- 
ebev at Geneva, say utieijui-.raiy 
that nuclear war is n.>; 

These establishment peace -.L-h.i- 
ars and official* also" attempt 
change Soviet thinking about :/.e 
lationship of military spending ic :Jv 

Sonu> SorcVf scholars 
are writing things t?z:i 
are deeply disturbing to 
Kremlin conservatives. 

achievement of political goeis, 
they try to lessen the country's s ■ 
of threat from the outside. 

In 1955. Mr. Arbatov -rote tbs: 
“the masses in our da; display's viia : 
interest in foreign policy, end in-: 
imperialist government cannot tail 
take their opinion into account to thi . 
or that extent-" 

It was an early effort to 
down the Stalinist images o I an im- 
placably hostile U.5. govern hut.; a, id 
to say that detente is possible. 

In 1973 and 1974. Mr. Arbatov was 
drawing the lesson from V1eir.r.ir. 
feat “military force nos become ,;li 
fee more difficult to translate into 
political influence.'* 

“Tbe more obvious the ifspcltmu: 
of military force becomes in its way. 
fee more evident is the imfx»sint!j>- t 
of using it for political goals.'' :ie 
indicating feat any drive for Soviet- 
military superiority would be a waste 
of money. Perhaps he liau sonic influ- 
ence on the decision to end the 
growth in military procurement - 
few years later. 

In 1982. Mr. Arbatov Mid on Mos- 
cow television that “everybody h di- 
pendent on the stability cf fee inter- 
national economic system, and ihe 
international monetary system.” He 
was calling for a recognition of or 
integrated world economy of which 
the Soviet Union was » pari avJ. 
implicitly, for a rejection of nric 
ideological distinction between ti. 
socialist and capitalist world. Mr 
Gorbachev has become the first gen- 
eral secretary tivtalk in that way. 

Mr. Arbatov's role .is ca;i«i 
. dooimenuhej ri ics a g teai dcJ, S-.it 


had he been the one k-.vavv. it, 
Arbatov would have deserved i N;- 
bel Peace Prize. It is impo'siMo tr. 
judge whether Dr. Chazov does. If I.,- 
talked about nuclear war to LenaiJ 
Brezhnev and helped persuade ti.’ 
late Soviet leader to change doc- 
trines, then he does. la any emc. 
recognition feat the official Soviet 
peace movement has played j !;e\ 
role in eroding simplistic Soviet mili- 
tary doctrine and ideology is overdue. 


The writer. , a Washington lawyer 
who represents the people of Bikini 
Atoll, is writing a book on U.S. midear 
testing in the Pacific. He contributed 
this comment to The New York Tunes. 


The writer, a professor of politic-! 
science at Duke University anti a t,\i <ff 
member of the Brooking Institution 
contributed this comment to ike Lei 
Angeles Times. 


Botha’s Style, Boesak Says, 
Is Much of the Problem 


...and how unfair to me 
if we really did change 
the rules... 


By William Raspberry 


C APE TOWN — The question. 

says the Reverend Allan Boesak, 
is not whether the government vrill do 
what is necessary to bring political 
change, and peace, to South Africa. 
Hie question if whether tbe present 
government con do it 
And, he adds, is the manner erf one 
whose mind no longer allows him. to . 
resist an unpleasant conclusion, ”2 
think we have to seriously reckon 
with fee probability feat tins govern- 
ment cannot do iL” 

Mr. Boesak, l eader of the Wodd 
Alliance of Reformed Churches, fa- 
ther of tbe United Democratic Front 
of groups opposed to aparfeod, is 
one of the more thoughtful intellec- 
tually honest and troubled men you 
are apt to meet He was alone in his 
office in a mixed-race suburb, grant- 
ing another interview; on his confis- 
cated passport, the charge of subvert 
son for leading a march to the prison 
where Nelson Mandela is jailed, his 
opinion of Gatsha BmhelezL 
Bui for some reason he decided to 
saybaldlywhaiso many people of all 
races have been reluctant to say: That 
President Pieter W. Botha is the 
wrong man for tbe job of saving 
South Africa. 


The problem is this: The best hope 
for peace here is through negotiations 
involving authentic black leaders. 
That means, at the minimum, the 
unconditional release of Mr. Man- 
dela and other political prisoners, the 
end to the banning orders against the 
African National Congress and other 
liberation groups, arm tbe return of 
political exiles — perhaps also the 
suspension of the constitution. These 
preliminaries constitute a single 
package. It would take a major leap 
of faith to implement them. 

But Mr. Botha's cautious political 
style seems to be (he opposite of wiuit 
is required. His tiny, arways-too-late 
concessions are met wife contempt 
by blades and with alarm by his own 
right wing. His caution, in a situation 
calling for -bold statesmanship, only 
bays him trouble, and that makes 
him more reluctant b try anything 
bold. Frustrated, he keeps turning to 
fee only thing in which be seems to 
have confidence: more repression. 

But tbe harsh repression that bait- 
ed earner liberation drives (riots, as 
he saw them) is not working mis time. 
The emergency measures may be 
keeping the battles off the airwaves, 
bat it mts not kept them off fee town- 



8v Patman In The Sun [Vancouver. Canada). CAW Sv«icow. f 


ship streets. Mr. Botha does not seem 
to know what' else to do. 

So what is the way out? Mr. Boesak 
says that white South Africans must 
understand that it is in their interest 
for Mr. Botha to be replaced. Soon. 

U I really think that we are in what 
one could call a decisive phase of the 
struggle,” fee nmrister said. “It’s not 
fee final phase yet, but it is the phase 
feat wifi determine whether construc- 
tive c h a n ge is possible. If it doesn’t 
happen by the turn of the century, if 
it isn’t deariy under way by 1990, it 
will never happen.” 

But feu does not mean, Mr. Boe- 
sak adds, that whites would be wdl- 


Berkeley, Cum Laude 

In response to the report u At Berke- 
ley, University Takes on an Oriental 
Aura " (Nov. 21): 

Berkeley should be proud of its 
commitment to admission through 
merit. Officials there must have with- 
stood great pressure from old grads 
and fee establishment Only by giv- 
ing opportunity to high achievers, 
wife fear built-in work ethic and 
determination to succeed, can tbe 
United States continue to forge 
ahead. Britain would do well to learn 
from this. Though there have been 
improvements, many wife little am- 
bition are educated there. 

JACQUES MERCANTON. 

Paris. 


UTTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Paying the Debt Bill 


In response to “Budget Balancing, 
Alas. Requires Doing Just That" (Nat. 
19) by David S. Broder: 

In all the agonizing over the U.S. 
budget deficit and fee debt burden 
on future generations of Americans 
there are two factors feat have not 
been given much attention. 

More than 80 percent of the out- 
standing debt is domestically held, by 
insurance companies, financial insti- 
tutions, pension funds and indmd- 


get, sacrifice is called for by various 
sectors of fee economy (social securi- 
ty, domestic welfare programs, tax- 


A Tearl’ From Wicker Ste SE? 


payers), bat never by those Ameri- 
cans who could most easily afford the 
sacrifice —holders of TLS. 
mart debt While outright 
b'on of US. debt is not beiflg'ad va- 
cated, it seems fair 'that when 
sacrifices are needed, a shaving of fee 
interest doe on government debt 
should be included ' 

The government’ s promise to re- 
pay in foil the bond holders should 
not be more sacrosanct than its 


uals. (U& foreign debt is another' promises to Sodal Security redpi- 
matter.) Thus, it is a case mostly of enis; -dvff servants, penaooers and " 
one set of Americans (tbe general others who have rebec cm fee govero- 
public) owing another set of Ameri- xnent for part of fear security. . 
cans (the bond holders). EDWARD C BITTNER. 

In most plans to balance the bud- • . , . •.•Nairobi. 


The ever more astounding Tom 
Wicker has the gall to complain in his 

Dec. 5 opinion cohmm that be “has 

govern- suffered quite enough cheap tnTIr 

— *’ about a treasonous* press that is not 

‘on our sida’ ” 

But then be graces us wife a pearl 
of nonsense. Being a Marxist- Lenin- 
ist,, he says, “is m itself no more a 
security, threat to the United States 
than bong a Republican, a Rotation 
:or* churchgoer.” 

I respectfully suggest that anyone 


who makes safe an assertion need 
look no further than his own pub- 
lisbed bilge to learn why most Ameri- 
cans view feeir media with suspicion^ 
. • • .'. JACK jo t is 
"ffrassehaat, Belgium. 


advised to ding to power while wait- 
ing for the liberation struggle to es- 
haust itself. The alternative to a foiled 
liberation effort, he says, is not toa- 
tinued white dominance, but a coun- 
try become ungovernable.- 
“People who think feat well be 
going from here to some kind i*f An- 
gola or a Zimbabwe situation are 
making a mistake,” he' says. **I think 
South Africa is moving toward a Leb- 
anon situation." He called (hat pros- 
pect "truly frightening.” 

^We have a generation of kids of £ 
and 9 and 10 and 15 who are being, 
jailed, who are being brutalized by 
the police, who have been tortured, 
wbohave seen their little friends slv 
to death for no reason a 1 , ali, wijr 
have experienced the- violence, fee'’ 
tear gas and fee guns. What will ferce 
like come 1990? 

It is not cute- when mothers br ing 
me feeir 4-year-olds who. when they 
reemcormy picture, stand wife their 

fist in the air and shout ‘Amandla!’ 
PQtosa for “power”] or 'Vive Boe- 
sak! U is not a compliment. I know 
they mean well, but wha: h: ih; world 
arewe doing with our kids? 

“When they arc 15, feev idjv he 
stole to make petrol bombs and io 
throw them — but what does feat do 
to our children? 

“I don’t think yn can hide this jl-y 
longer. We have got io find a wav K 
getting rid of the present guvomriicni • • " 
as soon as possible. White trill have 

“S- thc world will 

nave to help. Something must h-ipwr 
... in fee very, very short term.: / 
Washington Pasi Wn^irs Grdip. 


■ ■ •• 4; . 

■ Jl -- 



I 






4 . 


#* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1985 


Page 7 



a Show of Afghan Rebel Strength Afghanistan 


By Bany Renfrew 

TheAjaoekaed Pros' 

ZHAWAR, Afghanistan— Hid- 
doi in a mile-long complex of man- . 

caverns, guerrillas fighting 
Afghanistan’s Soviet-backed gov- 
ernment have built s. ffliHiary base 
that indudes bomb shelters for 
ranks, a snbtmanean hospital and 

The^base, in a narrow valley in 
the southern Paktia province, is 
ringed by fortifications and. de- 
fended by tanks and artillery with 
anti-aircraft batteries on the sur- 
rounding mountain tops. 

A reporter came to the base in a 
jeep from Pakistan through areas 
of Afghanistan controlled by die 
rebels, accompanied by a guerrilla 
leader who had invited him- Hie 
Comm unist government in Kabul, 
the capital bars the entry of West- 
ern reporters. 

The base area resounded 
throughout the day with dunging 
from workshops where trucks and 
tanks were being repaired and 
heavy weapons serviced. 

Zhawar is a sign of thing* to 
come, said the base commander, 
Bakbierjan Jaber. 

“We’re building, we’re going to 
expand this cen t e r »wri malrr j[ 
even safer for the Mujahidin.” he 
said, referring to what the Islamic 
guerrillas call themselves. 

The base is a remarkable show of 
strength by the guerrillas fighting 
Afghanistan’s army and an esti- 
mated 115,000 Soviet troops.’ The 
facility is also a sign of the in- 
creased covert flow of arms and 
money reportedly reaching the 
guerrillas from the United Stales, 
China, Saudi Arabia and other na- 
tions. 

Mr. Jaber talked about the base 
in his garden as be watched the 
tank crews at work cm their vehi- 
cles, the roar of engines drowning 
out the base's loudspeaker system 
summoning the garrison to evening 
prayers. 

Mr. Jaber wore a large white tur- 
ban oq his head and a bandolier 
across his chest. He earned a pistol 
and dagger at his side. Aides hov- 
ered behind him. Nearby were the 
stacked carcasses of Soviet helicop- 
ter guiudiips and Soviet MiG jets 
shot down in recent attacks on the 
base. 

Living conditions on the base are 
very different from those in the 
mountain hideouts where the rebels 
have lived for years, often short of 
weapons, ammunition and food. 

“This is the only place like it in 
Afghanistan,” said a guerrilla offi- 
cer. 

On the wall of the base head- 
quarters is a green stone outline 
mapof Afghanistan. 

“This is Afghanistan,” ano ther 
guerrilla said. ‘ 3 Thisis our country, 
we love it.” 

Mr. Jaber said Zhawar is indica- 
tive of when the Mujahidin will 



Bakhteijan Jaber, com- 
mander of an Afghan 
guerrilla base at 
Zhawar, in his garden. 
GuerriDa leaders would 
allow only a few areas 
of the secret base in 
southern Afghanistan to 
be photographed. 


y ■ 

c. •.! ; .‘->u - .* ■- 


have forces equaling those of the 
Comnmnists. But, he added, many 
Afghan rebels still have barely 
enough to fight with. 

Little of the base can be seen 
from the air. Nearly all of the ficDi- 
lies are in c a v ern s excavated in the 
sheer valley walls. Guerrillas would 
allow only a few areas to be photo- 
graphed. 

Scores of men with picks and 
shovels were building new caverns 
and reinforcing them with concrete 
walls and steel girders. 

Thick stone and brick blast walls 
had been constructed in front of 
the entrances to the more impor- 
tant workshops as shields against 
bombs exploding in the valley. Sev- 
eral bomb craters could be seen in 
the valley floor, and guerrillas said 
they had been raided several times 
during the summer by Soviet and 
Afghan planes. 

The sides of the cliffs were hon- 
eycombed with chambers and shel- 
ters. Firing ranges and other train- 
ing facilities were laid out in the 
valley. Rebel officers said the garri- 
son consisted of about 200 guerril- 
las and about 50 armorers, techni- 
cians and medical workers. 

A guerrilla officer, Alam Jan, 


and his tank work force and some 
Afghan Army prisoners were work- 
ing on two Soviet-made T-54 tanks. 

Mr. Jan, who was trained in Af- 
ghanistan's Army armored corps 
before the Communists took power 

in 1978, said he had 10 tanks at 
Zhawar and at several nearby bases 
that had been captured intact from 
Soviet and Afghan forces. 

The tanks are used as mobile 
artillery for hit-and-run attacks on 
government positions, hut Mr. Jan 
said he dreamed of the day when he 
would lead them into battle against 
Soviet armored forces. 

“God willing, it will not be 
long, ” he said. 

Armorers worked in the base 
machine shops with industrial 
lathes and drills, repairing anti-air- 
craft guns. A dozen heavy machine 
guns were propped up against the 
wall awaiting attention and more 
weapons were lined up outside. 

Mr. Jaber said the base was 
about four years old, but major 
construction had only begun this 
year. The commander sat neat to a 
captured Soviet-made telephone 
switchboard Knifing his command 
post to hD parts of the base. 


Taba Talks 
End Without 
Statement 


The Associated Press 

HERZUYYA, Israel — Israeli 
and Egyptian negotiators ended 
three days of talks Thursday with- 
out announcing agreement on how 
to resolve a border dispute that has 
strained their relabons- 

The two teams discussed meth- 
ods and terms for settling tbezr ri- 
val claims to the tiny Red Sea 
beach enclave of Taba in the Sinai 
Peninsula, but they did not issue a 
joint st a tement. 

But David Khnche. one of the 
negotiators and director-general of 
the Israeli Foreign Ministry, said 
each side understood the other bet- 
ter. 

; “From that point of view, we 
have made great progress," he said 
in Herzlryya, a Mediterranean re- 
sort town 13 kilometers (eight 
miles) north of Td Aviv. 

Abdel Halim Badawi, head of 
(he Egyptian delegation, said there 
bad been progress but declined to 
slaborate. 

“This has been the most success- 
id round of talks so far,” Israel 
-adio quoted him as saying. 

Also on the agenda was bow to 
iettle 14 disputed points along the 
TOrder, normalization of trade and 
oiirism ties and compensation for 
even Israeli tourists tilled by an 
Egyptian" policeman Oct 5 in the 
Sinai resort of Ras Burka, near 
Taba. 

Israel radio said a meeting of the 
0-meanber cabinet was expected 
text week to decide whether to sub- 
nit the Taba issue to arbitration. 

The Labor Party of Prime Minis- 
er Shimon Peres of Israel has 
greed to go along with Egypt's 
lemand for arbitration, while the 
ikud, led by Foreign Minister 
Itzhak Shamir, insists that conril- 
ttion talks be tried first. 


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Construction work is taking 
place during the winter lull in the 
fighting, Mr. Jaber said. A Inge 
hospital was bring finfeftad, and 
the guer rillas said they hoped to 
have it working, along with an op- 
erating room and X-ray facilities, 
when fighting resumed in the 
spring. 

Soviet troops came within three 
miles (4.8 kilometers) of the base 
during a major offensive in Auenst 
and September, Mr. Jaber said. But 
the base had never been in serious 
dun gw and the enemy could not 
take it, he asserted. 

Everywhere at Zhawar are surre- 


al sculptures fashion ed by the guer- 
rillas from dud Soviet aerial 
bombs, bits of downed aircraft and 
exploded missies. The command- 
er’s garden is surrounded by a ring 
of aerial bombs planted amid the 
flowerbeds. 

Sitting an chairs or blankets, the 
guerrillas sip green tea. Surround- 
ing them are the outlandish sculp- 
tures, which seem a cross between 
war trophies and a vague attempt 
to make a symbolic statement 
about Zhawar's survivaL 

“Mujahidin look at the bombs 
and arc happy,” an officer said. 
They cannot till os.’ 


Says Rebels’ 
Bombs Kill 
9 in Kabul 


The Associated Press 

ISLAMABAD. Pakistan — 
Bombs planted by guerrillas de- 
molished an air force building in 
Afghanistan’s capital and badly 
damaged a nearby university build- 
ing, killing nine persons and injur- 
ing 75, the Afghan government has 
acknowledged. 

The government’s announce- 
ment of the bombings Wednesday 
was unusual. The government rare- 
fy acknowledges defeat, insisting 
that the Islamic guerrillas fighting 
to unseat it have no popular sup- 
port and are ineffective. 

in a broadcast monitored in Is- 
lamabad. the Afghan government 
radio service said that the air force 
meteorological department al the 
Khoja Rawash Air Base in Kabul 
was demolished by a bomb on Sun- 
day and that nine persons were 
killed and 54 injured. 

The bombers struck again Mon- 
day, seriously damaging a building 
at Kabul's Polytechnical Universi- 
ty and injuring 21 students. Radio 
Kabul said. 

Afghan guerrilla officials, 
reached by telephone in the Paki- 
stani dry of Peshawar near the Af- 
ghan border, suggested (hat the 
hnmhings ran read greater casualties 
than were admitted. 

The rcbds and other sources rou- 
tinely report on developments in 
Kabul and a guerrilla official spec- 
ulated the government was trying 
to get a scaled-down version of the 
attack out first 

“It sounds like many people are 
dead. A lot more than Kabul is 
saying,” said a guerrilla official 
who asked not to be identified for 
security reasons. 

Radio Kabul “imperial- 
ist" nations for the attacks and de- 
scribed the attackers as “anti-revo- 
lutionary wage earners of the 
imperialists." The Afghan govern- 
ment diwms that the guerrillas are 
mercenaries supported by the Unit- 
ed States, fTima and other nations 
opposed to the Kabul government. 





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The result : no speed limits in turbulence, no 
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it is the fastest business jet 
available making for tremendous time 
savings while other time savings stem from 




its slow flight capabilities when it can go places 
off limits to other jets. 

Lower approach speeds mean safer landings 
but the essential safety feature is the ease of 
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Falcon 100 is far out ahead. 

Last but hardly least is the durability and 
resale value ; advanced design and sturdy cons- 
truction pay off: the Falcon 100 is at the top of 
the list... year after year. 

In the competition, essential values keep 
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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1985 



Dow Jones Averages 


om> hi*i low Lao am. 

Indus 151254 152151 149479 151144 — lUfi 

Trans 71476 7003 70157 71032— <90 

Util 167X2 16024 16173 14731 — 046 

Cams 604X1 61074 59331 604J3 — 1X5 


NYSE Diaries 


NYSE Index 


High LOW Ctae aree 
Cormaalte 119J8 11072 110.12 +072 

iSusMoi* T34-5S 13191 136X4 +QS8 

Tremo 11060 113X7 11026—070 

uSSna «•» ,&« 

Fbwict 129X6 12976 12957 +072 





NASDAQ Index 


AMEX Most Actives 


VOL KWI LOW Lad CM. 


Camooslte 

indusfrkds 

Finance 

Imuraneo 

utilities 

Bonks 

Tramp. 


dose Cft’w 
32058 + 172 
32075 +177 
41950 -1-225 
33044 -HI® 
297X1 +172 
34150 + 059 
29250 +150 


Advanced 
Declined 
Undtanaed 
Total Issues 
New High* 
NSW Lows 
Volume un 
Volume dawn 


922 1140 

724 535 

42S 364 

2074 2009 

235 279 

19 36 

90570760 
59540390 



Mr Soles 

■ShVf 

Dec. 11 

493.945 73*779 

4,999 

DM. 10 

- 280551 674965 

456S 

Dm. 9 

291703 631583 

3530 

Dec. 6 

178342 540536 

8575 

OeC5 

- 269589 654581 

3,977 

‘included In thg sows flocm 



WL14PJH, 17U4UH 

Pntv.4P.M.»#L 17W7MI 

Prev consoWoW ckse 2 MX«V 64 l 


TuMas todetfe the natimwMe prices 
WP to the dochtt on Wall Street and 
da not reflect lata trades etuwtara. 

Via The Associated Press 


mates 

FtAvW" 

HmiruPf 

WcnoS 

CM MAS 

HmoGn 

am mil 

DomeP 

Com me 

TIE 

AIhsCb 

CM! CO , 

VYlckeSPl 

Chilton 

KevPh 


5 414 

10% 10 
2210 21* 
2ZM 21 
20 In ISM 
3ft 2314 
5* SJ4 
2ft 2ft 
8ft • 
5* 524 

32% 30% 
9* 0* 

3214 31M 
32* 32M 
11 * 10 * 


5 + % 

10% 

22 +* 
21* + * 
10* —1. 
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5ft + ft 
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Standard & Poor's index 


AMEX Sales 


industrials 

Tramp. 

U turtles 
Finance, 

Composite 


High Low dtp CfcVo 
23053 22051 22956 +051 
189X6 18756 10877 —076 
91.12 90.12 90X3—059 
2552 2552 2550 +002 
207X5 20553 20673. +0X2 


4 PJM. volume 
Prev. 4 PM. volume 
Prev. cans, volume - 



Dow Slips During Profit Taking 


United Press Inumpjional 

NEW YORK — Broad market indexes made 
new highs Thursday in the tenth-buses t session 
in Wail Street's history, but the Dow Jones 
industrial average backed off slightly. 

The Dow rose a bit in the morning and then 
fell about seven points on combined profit- 
taking and sell programs before late buying 
erased most of the losses, traders said. The Dow 
finished with a modest loss of 0.46 to 1,31 1.24. 

Broader market indexes made new hi ghs. 
Standard & Pom's 500-stock index rose 0.42 to 
206.73, the fourth new high this week. The New 
York Stock Exchange composite index estab- 
lished. a record for the second consecutive day, 
rising 032 to 1 19.12. The price of an average 
share jumped 10 cents. 

On the Big Board, 17034 million shares 
changed hands, down from 178.47 million 
shares traded on Wednesday. Composite vol- 
ume totaled 203.87 million shares, compared 
with 214.68 million shares traded in the previ- 
ous session. 

Advances beat declining issues 911-722 
among 2,063 issues traded. 

Analysts said investors took profits after re- 
cent advances, with much of the selling focused 
among blue chip issues that have had especially 
strong runs. 

“The market gave op a little bit of ground but 
that should not come as a surprise after its 
tremendous rally,” said John Burnett of Don- 
aldson, Lufkin, & Jenrette Securities. Selling 
sent market bellwethers General Motors and 
IBM fractionally lower, be noted. 

Surest Bhirud, portfolio strategist at First 
Boston, said that as a trader, he would take 


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IS? C0tePpM25 95 160z 48 47 47 —1% 

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1*% * Co FOS .12 J 15 2097 15* 14% 15 + ft 

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m* 50 Colli no X50»9S«64%6«; + % 
*> 2M CofGos 218 87 2342 36* 35* 38* 

,'J* emumsv 2 9520 18% 16% IB +1* 

'W CSOpfol525 137 2010111% 111% 111% +1* 

SS 25? Cembln 216 45 8 655 50% 49ft SOM— ft 

37% 33ft CmbEn 1JM 3J 311 28* 29* Sft % 

36% 9* Carmfls 70 7 11 IBM 2** S* mS + * 

iJS ’£? M lJ W 60 ^ 21* 21* + * 

«* SftCemcve ■ 2938 lift 10* 11% + * 

32* 26 CmwE 350 105 7 2295 30% 39* joft— * 

W* 16* CwE pf 1.90 iff? 13 17* 17* tm— ft 

18* 15* CwEpI 250 iff? 31 IS* IS* U*— % 

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W} SJS CwCbJ 11.70 105 6120X109*107 188% + % 

35% 20* CwEpf 237 9X 31 25ft 25% 25% 


160 17* 17* 17% — ft 
56 20* 20ft 20* + ft 
851 24* 34ft 74* 

16102 63% 62 »3 +1 

94 aw 7 * 7 %—% 

11 10ft 10ft 10ft- ft 
69 1 % 8 8 — % 

757 48* <7ft 48 — M 
288 23* 8% + * 

417 «* 40ft 40ft— ft 
13 25ft 25% 25% 


J 11 181 
17 15 6 

1 m 

M 7 2291 


207 65 64% 64* + % 

00 36* 35* 36* 

mo uft 16% ib +i* 

300X111% 111% 111% +1* 
655 50% 49* SO*— ft 
311 28* 29* jfth-% 


28* 38* Wft- ft 
28* 2Mt 27% + * 
21 * 21 * 21 * + * 
lift 10* 11% + * 

tesasaiia 

iw? i«% i«% + 1 * 
009*107 188% + % 


31 251S 25% 25% 


M-l Rises $5.3 Billion 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — The narrowest measure 
of the U.S. money supply, known as M-l, 
rose $53 billion to a sea sonally adjusted 
$626.1 billion in the week ended Dec. 2, the 
Federal Reserve said Thursday. 

The previous week's M-l level was revised 
downward to $620.8 bQlioo from $621.0 
billion, while the four-week moving average 
of M-l rose to S619J billion from 615.9 
billion. The M-l measures money-supply 
growth, including currency in circulation, 
travelers checks and checking deposits at 
f?«»nrial institutions. 


profits at this point and buy the stocks back 
cheaper a couple of months from now. The 
economy will not be very strong in die first 
ouaiter of 1986, be said. Auto sales will be 
disappointing and shipments of new computers 
will look relatively lackluster compared with a 
strong fourth quarter in 1985. 

“Whenever we have had the market up 15 
percent in two months, the move has been 
followed by a sideways or corrective phase over 
the next three or four months," he said. 

A strong bond market rally, the primary force 
behind the move up in equities, also is due for a 
pause. Mr. Bhirud said. 

“We need a cut in the discount rate,*' he said. 
“If we don’t get it, the market could very easily 
move down five or 10 percent/* 


























































































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% December 13, 1985 

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tribune. 


WEEKEND 


Page 9 


^ French Architects Use f Savoir-Terre’ This Year, Give the Camel 


/•••» „ ; by Vicky EUiott 

'i T ISLE D’ABEAU, Franos — Mao Ze- 
: : jN; I dong was born in a house with 

• V- s,V I earthen walls; so, it seems, was 

•,! Indira Gandhi. The Jong of Moroc- 

']■ co was bora in an earthen palace, and in the 
K •••’: United States, where houses of earth are a 
-j. ^ ji; Sun Belt luxury item, the president has his 

• v t. J- own adobe ranch house. 

In France, a small civilizing mission is 
i't underway, preaching the virtues of unbaked 
earth as a building material, both, in the form 
sun-dried or stabilized bricks or as 
' 5 51^1, rammed earth within wooden frames. An 

• rr ,?' v; excellent insulating material, earth saves chi 
' ■ i‘. ‘ heating and air conditioning; it demands no 

' -■ il; energy-consuming industrial processes, and 
v ;■ it comes under foot (or more specifically, 
V ~ i;- from below the top soil) and not, like ce- 
J i 1 meat, for money in gas-consuming trucks. 

. ij The Pompidou Center’s 1981 traveling ex- 
'll- p hibitiou cm the world’s earth architecture, 
conceived by Jean Dethier. the consultant 
architect of its Center for Industrial Cre- 
[-• n; alien. was dispatched in mail-sized packages 
' ?-■ r\ all over the globe, and has been seen by three 
•* \> ; . milli on people as far afield as Armenia and 
>•'. Mongolia. But in the Third World, where the 
' ;■ ■ • i-i hungry are as often as not also the homeless, 
. U *. earth is archaic. If building with earth is such 
r; j. a good idea, Dethier was asked on his trav- 
£>' els. how is it that nobody does it in France? 
- •• T‘ A pOot project in one of the “new towns” 

; \ *: v of the 1960s, Lisle d’Abeau, 18 miles (30 
' '• . kilometers) from Lyon, is an attempt to 
' K- answer that criticism. Inaugurated in bitter 
; ' ^ cold last month, the “Domains de la Terre,” 
■ :i v a group of 65 housing units planted in small 
p clusters on a rain-swept hillside, was con- 
■- '>■! coved as a kind of plant nursery that would 
■■ help to nurture modem techniques in earth 
"1 construction, both in Europe and in the 
Third World. 

’• ?• '' : The experiment was launched with an 
V architectural competition in 1981, timed for 
.. the Pompidou Center exhibition, which win- 
. . : ; nowcd out 10 designs. The inspiration was 
. \ • • diverse — from self-styled “vernacular-in- 

- 1 - temationaT to solar greenhouse to farmyard 

• I bam — but the constraints were Procruste- 

an: the budget and the norms of France's 
: ; subsidized low-rent housing, or HLMs. 

'• u ' The aim , which put 10 groups of architects 
l ‘ from all over France to work on a single plot, 
. - was to prove that building with earth was not 

- ' • an intellectual hobby horse, but a feasible 
... ■ proposition; to make fools of the skeptics 
-'I*'., who argued that earth would not stand up to 

- ■ the wind and the rain. It was also a way to 

- - . update ancient techniques while stocking up 
\ on experience in the “logic of the raw materi- 
.. . al.” And (be local bousing authorities, 

’ j , helped out with generous research subsidies, 

’ - ' ! : ■ would recoup in monthly rent at least some 
. of the outlay. 

'■ - Paradoxically, in the context of decentral- 
.. • izaiion in France, the initiative came from 

. Paris, but the new town’s authorities had 

- • : various interests in adopting the project. For 

. me thing, L’lsle d’Abeau had underwritten a 
„■ charter pledging both that it would reject 
\ the environment and a pursue a policy of 
: ;eneigy conservation. Then, the two or three- 
story buildings fit in well with the sporadic 
' urban p lanning of a town that spreads in 
. patches over a stretch of farmland 20 by 10 
. . kilometers (12 by 6 miles). 

Moreover, among the cultural baggage of 
’ ■ the region around Lyon, though less familiar 
• • . j to the average Frenchman than its cnlinary 
flair, is the technique of building in pisi, or 
rammed earth. A tradition that is thought to 

'date back to the Gallo-Roman period, it is 

’ ^weil implanted in the Rhdne-Arpes, which, 

■} ' with Devon in England, ranks as the densest 
: concentration of earth houses in Europe. 

Of the buildings constructed before the 
“ turn of the century, no less than 85 percent in 
1 ’■ the region are in pisi. gentle and lowly alike: 

; sturdy, comfortable farm houses, four-story 
- . neoclassical mansi ons and that early mam- 

• • festatiem of the centralized state, the combi- 


nation scho olroom village hnT l In many 
erf the villages between Macon and Lyon, the 
only stone building was the church. 

The pisi is not always apparent: after 
World War L Paris began to impose its own 
norms in building design, and local tradi- 
tions began to be covered with a fig leaf of 
sophistication. Most of the 18th- and 19th- 
century buildings, standing evidence erf the 
viability of pise in construction, are now 
smeared with a hideous layer of fibre-ce- 
ment (and sometimes, as a crownin g insult, 
painted with brickwork). Stub dubious pro- 
tection is not only unnecessary but positively 
harmful. Unlike the traditioiud Hme washes, 
cement is a uon-permeable substance that 
prevents the walls from breathing, and th« 
ultimately leads to structural damage. 

In such villages as Massimy and 'Gbdns 
there are still barns and agricultural com- 
plexes that display the old skills in un- 
adorned splendor the foundation, in flat, 
rounded stones, the granular packed earth, 
the veins where the master piseur started on 
the next layer of his building, and the trian- 
gular reinforcements in gh«TV at each corner. 


I N L’lsle d’Abeau. a village of 800 that 
provided the nucleus of the new town of. 
15.000, the last barn went up in 1953. 
But people still know what it is to live in pisi. 
The mayor, Alain Rosso t, recounts how his 
son practices the trumpet unheard behind 
the 1 9-inch wall into the next room, and how 
he can come back from a week’s holiday 
without having to turn on the heating. 

The architectural tradition, then, had been 
there, though like France's local dialects and 
many other r egional diversities, it was dying 
a slow and apparently certain death. 

But a small nexus of young architects 
based in Grenoble, the CRATene group, 
had been agitating for over 10 years to 
spread the ward. Many of them began their 
career in the Third Worid, and their achieve- 
ments indude not only helping to build a 
housing development of several thousand 
units in the Bede Mayotte, considered exem- 


plary, but to resuscita t e the skills at home. 
They won architectural respectability when 
they helped to institute, at Grenoble's 
School of Architecture, the first university 
course in the techniques of earth-bmklmg. 

This group provided technical expertise in 
Lisle d’Abeau, and the more successful de- 
ments in the project drew also on ihesavoir- 
teme, as they like to call h, of local builders 
who had e xp er i ence of the restoration of 
local houses. (A was (he construc- 

tion of earth cellars for residents of postwar 
-cemem houses who complained that their 
salami and wine just didn't taste the same.) 

Typical of these local sons was Guy Boet, 
who worked on two of the most successful 
designs. He tells how he motivated some of 
the old craftsmen with the promise of some 
good Beaujolais and tried to revive 30-year- 
old memories around a bemehe , or molding 
frame, to ram some earth one Saturday. 

' The L’lsle d’Abean project experimented 
with three baric methods of construction: 
pise proper, earthen bricks stabilized with a 
tmaii per centag e of cement, and a German 
technique using a mixture of day and straw. 
It was something of a struggle to keep the 
costs down, and the consequent postpone- 
ment of many of the projects exposed the 
builders to an iincnnseinnahl y wet spring of 
1983. (The best time to ram earth, in the 
Rhrine-Alpes, at least, is May and June.) 

The administrative tangigs, in a domain in 
which regulations had yet to be established, 
were, by all accounts, wasteful of the energy 
of all concerned: questions of thickness of 
wall, of resistance of brick, of extra insula- 
tion. There were also insurance problems to 
be wrangled with (can anyone guarantee a 
pisi bouse; for example against the fireman’s 
hose? The answer, a ppa r ently, is yes). It was 
all grist for the mill . 

if the project is a seedbed for ideas, it must 
be said that some have fallen by the wayside. 
Some of the architects were more excited 
than others by the material itself; some of 

Continued on page 11 


I ONDON — And now for something 
completely different: For Christ- 
. mas give the camel instead of the 
^ gold, frankincense or myrrh. 
London Zoo, whose idea this is. can sup- 
ply a camel for only £1,000 and the best part 
is that the gif tee needn't even take the beast 
home. Under the zoo’s animal adoption 
plan, the Christmas present remains in its 
habitat, which is embellished for a year with 
a plaque bearing the name of its adopter, 
who further receives a picture of his or her 
temporary pet and a free season pass to the 
zoo. 

Adoption fees are based upon what it 
costs the zoo to feed an animal for a year and 
they range from £10 (about $15) for a spider 

Mary Blume 

to £5,000 for an elephant. A basilisk is cheap 
at £10, two-toed sloths are a frequent gift to 
husbands, and this year's Christmas favorite 
seems to be penguins, hardly a bargain at 
£250. A more seasonal reindeer is way up in 
the pygmy hippo and bongo range at £750. 

The adoption scheme now meets one-third 
of feeding costs, mere crumbs to the Zoologi- 
cal Society of London, which takes in £5 
million a year and spends seven and which 
has had its financial up and downs since its 
foundation early in the 19ih century, when 
its headquarters were still in Mayfair and 
monkeys ate the membership vouchers. 

London Zoo and its country outpost, 
Whipsnade Park in Bedfordshire, are part of 
the Zoological Society of London, along 
with the Institute of Zoology which does 
research in many fields, most spectacularly 
in the breeding of endangered species with a 
view to returning zoo-bom animals to the 
wild. 

Last s umm er the first zebra foal born in 
Britain by embryo transplant was intro- 
duced to the press with its surrogate dam, a 
Welsh pony. Embryo transplants have not 
only made it easier to breed species on the 
verge of extinction such as (lie Przewalski 
horse, which is now being sent back to its 
Mongolian habitat, but they can also in- 
crease the birthrate since several mares can 
be impregnated at once. 

London Zoo is very much a part of Lon- 
don life, being placed in the city’s center in 
32 acres of Regent's Park. It is not the oldest 
or biggest zoo but it is one of the most 
prestigious — its staff architects and consul- 
tants often go abroad to help plan new zoos 
— and it has been greatly celebrated in 
literature. 

Christopher Robin fed buns to its bears, 
Glenda Jackson and Ben Kingsley in the 
new Harold Pinter film free two of hs giant 
sea turtles after 30 years of captivity, and in 
David Garnett’s 1924 novella “A Man in the 
Zoo” there is an early example of perfor- 
mance art when a love-crossed man moves 
wit h his books into a cage marked HOMO 
SAPIENS and bearing rite warning, “Via- 
tors are requested not to irritate the Man by 
personal remarks.” 

T ONDON ZOO is also unhappily unique 
| among great European zoos m that it 
■ J is not government-financed, although 
it has received a three-year grant to cover its 
deficit from the Department of the Environ- 
ment and has in the past been helped by the 
about-to- be- disbanded Greater London 
Council, which adopted its pride of lions and 
whose head, Ken Livingstone, once applied 
for a job as a keeper in the reptile house and 
was turned down. 

There had long been private menageries in 
England (Henry I had lions, leopards, lynx- 
es, c a me l s, an owl and and a porcupine) and 
there were other zoos in Europe when the 
Zoological Society was founded in 1826 by 
Sir Stamford Raffles, the creator erf Singa- 
pore and discoverer of a vfle-smefling flower 
called Raffcsia amoldi. When the zoo opened 
tile following year, only Fellows of the Soci- 
ety were admitted; to prevent “contamina- 
tion by admission of the poorer classes” the 
public was admitted only upon introduction 
from a Fellow, and never on Sundays. Sun- 




House designed by Odile Perreau-H amburger. 



_ 

Young zebra with surrogate parent. 

days were reserved for Fellows and their 
friends until 1957. 

The fact that the zoo was from its start 
part of a learned society accounts for its 
nonsubsidized status and for its long reputa- 
tion as a research center, says the zoo's 
director, David Jones. “The research insti- 
tute is the largest of its type associated with 
any zoo in the world.” he says. He is a 
zoologist and veterinarian, wears a blue pull- 
over and looks like a pipe smoker. 

London Zoo’s pride is less in its collection 
than in the way it is shown. “I suppose the 
prize exhibit is the small mammals Jones 
says. “Very few zoos have a good small 
mammal collection because they're not terri- 
bly money-pulling, but shown well and in 
considerable number side by side, there’s an 
enormous variety.” 

Dr. Brian Bertram, the curator of mam- 
mals, says there are 400 species of mammal 
and the zoo has room for 160. There are no 
whales, which is not surprising. Nor is there 
a koala. 

“I have never seen one and I would love 
to," be ays. “I am sure most people here 
haven’t. I'm also sure no one would want to 
see a dying koala.” ' 

Koalas eat eucalyptus. “We keep anteal- 
ers successfully and they never eat an am. 
But there is no incentive for Australia to 
develop artificial eucalyptus and no one here 
is trained in koala nutrition. We cannot 
afford to train someone in order to have a 
koala in ten years' time." 

So, no koala. “There is no way we can be 
complete,” says Bertram. Jones adds that 
this is not London Zoo's aim. 

“The collection at the Berlin Zoo must be 
the best in the world — it’s certainly the 
biggest — but their approach is that you 
show a representation of more or less every- 
thing.” Jones describes this as an old-fash- 
ioned stamp-collecting approach and com- 
mends a more selective view. 

“Go to Basel or to Emmen in Holland — 
they are zoos that concentrate on a few 
things and show them brill an tly and they 
interpret them well, with magnificent graph- 
ics, hands-on things for kids that relate to the 
things they are looking au 

Jones praises Basel for its gorillas. Indian 
rhinos, pygmy hippos and antelopes. Em- 
men is great for education. “You might think 
sewer rats are hardly a thing you would show 
in a zoo. but Emmen has a magnificent 
exhibition of sewer rats displayed in a sewer 
system and they do it in such a way that food 
is always up so the rats are always active. 
And there axe quite a few in the States that 
use that — Cincinnati has good technology 
to keep animals on the move doing things. 


making tilings much more interesting for the 
visitor.” 

Modern zookeeping has just about elimi- 
nated the horrid trade of capturing and sell- 
ing wild animals. A high proportion of ani- 
mals are zoo-bred (some of Mr. Jones’s lions 
are eighth generation Londoners) and others 
are exchanged according to need among an 
inner circle of approved zoos. There is even a 
computerized international stud book for 
breeding programs. 

London Zoo is now engaged on huge 
building plan in anticipation of which Dr. 
Bertram has given away his bears. “It was 
early to give them away, but we wanted to be 
sure they wouldn't have to be put down 
because people wouldn't want old bears.” 


T HE bears used to inhabit the old con- 
crete Mappin Terraces, which will be 
turned into an approximation of the 
North American tundra, with meadows, 
streams, artificial canyons, walk-through 
aviaries and a centerpiece of polar bears in a 
naturalistic setting which can also be viewed 
from below because, it is said, a polar bear 
swimming underwater is a beautifully grace- 
ful sight. 

The first structure in the building program 
is an aquarium to replace one that opened in 
1924 (“London Finds Its Sole" headlined 
The Daily Express) and which no one will 
miss. “People were gasping to get out after 
the first three tanks,” David Jones say's. 

The new aquarium, described as "a 
planned experience.” will climax in a superb 
tropical reef. “It should be mind-blowing,” 
says Brian Bertram. 

The aquarium will cost more than £2.5 
million to build and £40.000 to stock. The 
entire revamping of the zoo wifi cost £22 
million over the next 10 or 12 years and will, 
with luck, be partly financed by corpora- 
tions. “Instead of putting £1 million in TV 
prime time, put it in the aquarium where 
your name will be seen for thirty or forty 
years," suggests the zoo’s commercial man- 
ager. 

No matter how modem, educational and 
original the zoo’s new planned experiences 
will be. it will still have to keep what David 
Jones calls bread and butter animals — “the 
kiddies- books animals, which they’ll be very 
disappointed if they don't see. Elephants, 
giraffes, lions. They have no conservation 
value at all and they’re often very costly to 
feed, but you have to have them." 

“We have to have animals out and 
around," Brian Bertram agrees; “200,000 
rides, that’s 200.000 delighted customers!" ■ 



Remembering Somerset Maugham 


ears ago nevt 
lections of his 




faugham by Ronald Searle (1954). 


by Thomas Quinn Curtiss 

P ARIS — W. Somerset Maugham died 20 years ago next 
Monday, but the sales erf his novels and collections of his 
stories show no sign of falling off and his plays continue to 
entertain audiences everywhere. He was — and remains — 
among the most popular authors of the century. 

Since his death many have tried to disdose the man behind the 
mask. What they have set down in the main recalls Oscar Wilde’s sad 
prediction that it is always the Judas who writes the biography. 

There was an air of mystery to Maugham and he cultivated it. He 
had been a British espionage agent and he knew how to keep his 
secrets. The Great Exposure broke out as soon as he was bnrietL His 
Boswells have not been generous. 

The most informative of the “lives” is that of Ted Morgan, who 
cannot be accused of betraying confidences for he never met 
Maugham. An outstanding reporter, he had access to Maug ha m 's 
diaries and papers, -interviewed his friends, relatives, enemies and 
associates and presented the evidence So candid and thorough is his 
study that it caused a lady of the British aristocracy who skimmed its 
pages to put down the hook and, waving hex lorgnette, to exclaim: 
“Really, I don’t think I want to know all this about Willi e!” 

Maugham was boro in the British EmbassyinParis in 1874, where 
his father was a legal adviser to the ambassador. The child’s Gist 
language was French and at the age of 8 he was sent to school in 
England. His mother died and he had a miserable boyhood, becom- 
ing the butt of his classmates because of his slammer. The torment of 
this affliction appeared in another font in ins novel “Of Human 
Bondage,” whose protagonist he made a cripple. 

He never overcame his stammer. In old age lie was honored with a 
banquet at the Garrick Cub in London. His speech went well until 
he reached a passage in which he announced that his creative work 
was done and that he would spend the his days sitting on his veranda 
watching the worid go by. “Veranda" was the fatal word. 

“I shall sit on my ... I shall sit on my ... I shall at on 
my . . be repeated, and unable to get the word out be broke off 
and in embarrassment and despair sat down, . 

The family fortunes went awry and he was obliged to select a 
profession- He chose medicine and, receiving his degree as a physi- 
cian, be walked the hospital wards. His observations of his under- 
privileged patients provided the material for his first novel, “Liza of 
Lambeth.” It was praised by the critics and is stffl in print, but it was 
only later when four of his {days were running simultaneously in the 
West End that he achieved financial independence. 

His proKficness was resaited and his popularity frowned on by his 
rivals. He never joined a clique. Unlike certain of his contemporaries 
his work carried no solutions for the world’s fils. He wrote of what he 


saw and knew. Maupassant was his model and cm occasion he 
matched his master with his fearless realism. 

The a e sthetes of Bloomsbury also disapproved of his work as have 
their followers. Edmund Wilson, the American critic, complained 
that his plays were not “written,” an odd charge. Hus was answered 
by the dramatist, S. N. Behrman, who wrote that strangely, though 
Maugham’s plays were "not written," they had been published and 
were constantly performed. His play “The Circle” is one of the few 
comedies that has a Restoration flavor. like the Restoration writers. 
Maugham adopted a French viewpoint, satirizing with cool and 
more often cruel wit the foibles of English society. 

All M a u gha m ’s Haws of character have been paraded and ana- 
lyzed in memoirs, biographies and tittle-tattle to compose an alarm- 
ing portrait He has been accused of hypocrisy for concealing his 
homosexuality. But he was 21 when Oscar Wilde was imprisoned and 
he had no itch to be either a martyr or a reformer. 

That M a u gha m in his last years was prone to fits of bad temper, 
rudeness and incipient paranoia and that be was so absent-minded at 
times that he forgot who was who only proves »hat he had, grown 
senile when be reached 90. 


was set for the following day. He told me that Maugham was eager to 
learn about an adaptation of one of his novels that had opened in 
Paris and was bringing him large and unexpected royalties. 

He was about 80 and bis gait was that of a much younger man. His 
sun-tanned, wrinkled face of tough leather texture gave him an 
oriental aspect, emphasized by bis feline eyes of yellowish tint. He 
looked Eke an elderly mandarin in a Savfie Row suit. He bad recently 
been in Switzerland for rejuvenation treatment, and it may have 
benefited him. He seemed fit and alert 

“Yon know that play in Paris is not by me," he confessed. He 
spoke Leisurely, but without hesitation or stutter. “It is an adaptation 
by Guy Bolton of my novel Theater,’ which has been translated and 
is now ahit in French. ‘Rain' was a similar case. A young man, John 
Colton, asked if he could dramatize my stay, ‘Miss Thompson.’ I 
saw no play in it, but he did and it ran for five years in New York 
with that wonderful actress Jeanne Eagles as Same. Others are now 
writing plays from my stories — Behrman has made a play of ‘Jane’ 
and Zoe Aldus has dramatized The Human Element’ Fve retired 
from playwri ting. 

“Why? First, because my last two plays — ’Far Services Ren- 
dered,’ a strong anti-war play, and ‘Sheppy/ a sort of philosophical 
fantasy — faded. I remember two famous and popular dramatists, 
Pinero and Henry Arthur Jones, telling me sadly that the public 
didn't warn them anymore. 


“Bui there is another problem, too. I don’t gel about as I once did. 
Of course. I still travel, but my circle is limited. 1 have no idea bow 
young people talk these days or about what they talk. Indeed. 1 know 
little about the conversation today of older folk It would be difficult 
for me to write dialogue that reflects the talk of the day. Plot. yes. for 
the basic issues never change: love, hate, envy, jealousy, the money 
chase, the power chase, the sex chase, those are eternal.'' 

In addition to his fiction and plays Maugham has written some 
perceptive criticism. In his “Writer's Notebooks” one finds an 
enlightening comment on Russian literature, not only on the 19th- 
century giants, but on the pre-revolutionary authors who are being 
rediscovered in English now. In the 1950s he was occupied with 
writing prefaces to literary classics, French, English and Russian. He 
kept abreast of new writers, but in his late years he could read no 
longer because of cataracts on both eyes. 

Maugham never wrote movie scenarios, but many of his stories 
and plays were filmed and brought him enormous sums, among them 
“The Painted Veil” with Greta Garbo, “Rain** — as “Sadie Thomp- 
son" — with Gloria Swanson, “East of Suez” with Pola Negri and 
“Of Human Bondage” with Leslie Howard and Bette Davis. 

On a brief stay in Hollywood during Worid War II Maugham had 
offended a star with a wry question. The author was taken to a set 
where Spencer Tracy was dressed as a Victorian physician for a scene 
in “Dr. Jelcyll and Mr. Hyde.” Told the tide, tie inquired in an 
audible voice: “Which one is he now?" 

In the 1950s three films were made from his short stories (“Duo," 
‘Trio” and “Quarter). All enjoyed international success and the 
public appetite was whetted for more. 

Would there be more? 

“I’m afraid not.” said Maugham dolefully. 

“You know during my long life I’ve lived in various parts erf the 
globe and 1 am observant. Among other things I have noticed is that 
women often commit adultery and go scot free. So 1 wrote that in my 
tales. The moving picture censors object to adultery going unpun- 
ished in the movies. A film may show a woman indulging in an illicit 
affair, but later she must pay, be punished for her sin, its wages 
usually being a horrible death. I have never observed that so I never 
write it. The result is that 1 am being punished. The film people won't 
buy more of my stories because the censors won't allow them on the 
screen as they arc written. And they say it’s always (he women who 
pays! How's that for justice and truth?” he asked with a broad smile. 

To some, it seems Maugham was a monster of destructive cyni- 
cism. Others question his greatness as a writer. He was too prolific, 
too facile, too too. Let them argue the issues while millio ns of readers 
respond to his laic- idling. 1 remember him as a delightful personal 
tty. original witty, urbane, and although a loyal Briton, more French 
than English in attitude. B 


t 








Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. DECEMBER 13, 1985 




TRAVEL 




zzjLiz'j&n 


Quarrying History and Legend in Jerusalem 


tm 


by Thomas L. Friedman 


ERUSALEM —Only in Je- 
rusalem could abuse hole in 


J nisatan could ahuge hole in 
the ground have historical 
significance for Christians, 
Moslems, Jews, Freemasons, devil 
worshipers and occasional treasure 
hunters. 

Mind you, the tide in question is 
no meager opening in the earth It 
is a five-acre cave under the Mos- 
lem quarter of the Old City of Jeru- 
salem. It is variously called Solo- 
mon's Cave, Suleiman's Cave, 
Zeddriah’s Cave, Kcrah’s Cave 
and the ha>mt«d cave — depending 
on who is quarrying the history. 

The entrance to Zedekiah’s Cave 
— to choose one popular name — 
is just beneath the Old City wall, 
between the Damascus and Herod 

S tes. The Jerusalem Foundation 
s just completed paths and in- 
stalling lights throughout the cave, 
making it easily explorable by non- 
claustropfaobic tourists who relish a 
good yam with their archaeology. 
The cave itself is the remnant of 


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rather the understated likes of 
“W. E Blackstone Jsxl 1889." 

The paths stretch into every cor- 
ner of the cave, which takes a good 
30 minutes to explore property, and 
along the way are plumes that ex- 
plain the myriad legends surround- 
mgthis unusual hole. 

The oldest and most enduring 
legend about the cave is that ir was 


the quany for King Solomon when 
he built the First Temple. It was an 


important quany because it was 
rich in white massif Mdekeb lime- 
stone, which, because of its 
strength, its suitability for carving 
and its resistance to erosion, was 
used for all royal b uilding s Mde- 
keb comes from the Hebrew and 
Arabic roots for kingly or royal. 

The legend that Solomon built 
his temple from quarry — a 
claim for which there is do hard 
evidence — was made more plausi- 
ble by the discovery in 1873 of an 
ancient bit of graffiti excavated by 
a French archaeologist, Charles 
Clennon l-Ganneau- In a small 
niche now marked by a plaque, he 
uncovered a crude carving of a 
cherub, apopular biblical motif. 

Because two giant cherubs 
flanked the Holy Ark in Solomon's 
Temple, and because cherubs were 
mentioned 75 times in the Old Tes- 
tament, which was completed dur- 



,the biggest quany in Jerusalem, 
which once stretched all the way 


which once stretched all the way 
from the Garden Tomb — where 
many Protestants believe that Jesus 
was buried — to the walls of the 
Old City. Only the mouth of the 
cave is natural: the rest was carved 
by unknown slaves and workmen 
over several thousand years. 

As soon as you pass through its 
□arrow mouth, the cave dopes 
down into a massive 300-foot-wide 
“auditorium,” where a concert 
could be held if the orchestra could 
ignore the drops of water that trick- 
le through the ceiling from hidden 
springs. They are known as “Zede- 
Idah's tears," after the last of the 
longs of Judah, who is said to have 
used the cave as an escape route 
when flaring his enemies. 

Off thi< mum “auditorium" the 
lighted lead into a v arie ty of 
“galleries,” or separate nooks and 
crannies hewn by man and nature 
into some fantastic rode forma- 
tions. Bizarre symmetrical patterns 
and nhispi marks have >v*n left 
behind by stonecutters on many 
sections of the rough limestone 
rode. In other galleries huge, nearly 
finished h nfldin g blocks destined 
for some palace are locked into the 
rode where the stonecutters left 
them centuries ago. when for some 
reason they stopped work. Illumi- 
nated by the ydlow lamp li gh t, 
these geometric shapes help give 
the interior its eerie atmosphere. 

In a few places the stones bear 
Arabic Greek. Armenian and En- 
glish charcoal-engraved g raffi ti, 
but they are the kind of graffiti 
that, in moderation, actually add to 
the historical sense of apiece; there 
is no tacky “Kilroy was here,” but 



Visitors in the former quarry 



tag the First Temple period, the 
cherub graffiti could be evidence 
that the quarry dates from the time 
of Solomon as wefl. So argued Yitz- 
hak Yaacovy, director of the East 
Jerusalem Development Corp., 
which was responsible for carrying 
out restorations of the cave. 

“Even if it is not so," Yaacovy 
added, “even if it is from a later 
period, it’s a nice stop'— some old 


The Chaldean soldiers the 

buck and arrived at the exit of tbe 
cave just as Zedekioh was coming 
out, twflbtifig th*m to capture and 
blind him. Thm was bom the leg- 
end of Zedekiah’s Cave. 


stonecutter leaving his graffiti from 
the days of King Solomon.” 


B UT in this part of the world, 
one man’s daydream is an- 
other man ’s conviction. For 
the Freemasons, the cave is defi- 
nitely Solomon's quany, untiring it 
perhaps the most revered site of 
their society. The organization con- 
siders Solomon the first Freema- 
son, and its tradition of doctrines, 


passwords and symbols derives 
from tbe building of Solomon’s 


from tbe building of Solomon’s 
Temple in Jerusalem. In the ab- 
sence of the temple. Freemasons 
revere the quarry, and they hold an 
elaborate ceremony inside the cave 
once a year. 

“Yon might ray that this cave is 
our Mecca, Medina, Jerusalem and 
W aiting Wall all roDed into one,” 
said Matti Sbdon, the head of the 
Israeli Freemasons, who holds the 
title of First Grand Principal of the 
Supreme Grand Royal Arch Chap- 
ter for the State of Israel “For 
Freemasons around the world this 
is the cradle of masonry.” .’ . 

But if you don’t believe the Solo- 
mon connection, there are plenty of 
other legends to choose from. Per- 
haps the most popular is that of 
King Zcddriah. Rashi, the 11th- 
century biblical commentator, is 
responsible for this story. He wrote 
that in 587 B.C, Zedddah tried to 
escape from the Chaldean troops 
sent by die Babylonian King Nebu - 1 
chadncazar to besiege Jerusalem. 
‘'There was a- cave,* said Rashi, 
“from the palace of Zedddah to tbe 
plain of Jericho, and he fled 
through the cave." 

Rashi added that God sent a 
buck running along the top of the 
cave as Zcddriah was down below. 


The Moslem writer and geogra- 
pher d-Mukaddasi tells us that Ar- 
abic legend in the Middle Ages 
pointed to a completely different 
ancient story regarding rite origins 
of tbe cave. Writing in the 10th 
century, el-Mukaddasi said: 
“There is at Jerusalem, outside the 
ary, a huge cavern. According to 
what 1 have beard from teamed 
men, and also have read in books, it 
lads into the place where He the 
people slain by Moses. But there is 
no surety in this, for apparently it is 
but a stone quarry, with passages 
leading therefrom, along which one 
may go with torches.” 

The “people slain by Moses" re- 
fers to a story that appears in the 
Bible and the Koran about a man 
named Korah — Karan in Arabic 
— who mounted a revolt against 
Moses mti Aaron, maintaining 
that they had led the children of 
Israel out of Egypt only to domi- 
nate them in the wilderness. Ac- 
cording to the Old Testament, Ko- 
rah and his fellow rebels were 
swallowed up by the earth. 

Where? Weil, according- to d- 
Mnkaddasi, the story making the 
rounds in Jerusalem late in the 10th 


century pointed to that big hole 
underneath tbe Moslem quarter. 

Traditions aside, what do we 
know for sure? Herod the Great 
certainly used it as tbe mam quarry 
for buDdmg blocks needed to reno- 
vate the temp i* and its retaining 
walls, including what is known to- 
day as the Wailing WalL “It may be 
thanks to Herod that the cave still 
exists today as a cave,” remarked 
Yaacovy. “Herod was always wor- 
ried about Rome ordering a halt to 
his budding, so he needed a quarry 
that was very dose to Jerusalem 
and usable in both summer and 
winter." He saw to it that his men 
left pillars standing from some of 
the rock to support a cwTing, Yaa- 
covy added. “That way the quarry 
would remain covered all year 
round and not just become a big 
hole in the ground open to tbe 
weather." 

Suleiman the Magnificent, the 
Ottoman sultan who built the walls 
around the Old City that stand to- 
day* also apparently mined the 
quany but was more famo us for 
sealing h up around 1540 for fear 
that people would use it to pene- 
trate his new walls. 

It might have remained sealed 
forever if an American missionary. 
J.T. Barclay,- had riot been out 
walking his dog in Jerusalem one 
day in 1 854. Aocording to Barclay, 
bis dog, apparently charing the 
scent of. a tax’s den, was digging 


furiously through dirt near the Old 

GtywaO when he suddenly popped 
through an opening and disap- 
peared. After the dog reappeared, 
Barclay decided to investigate. 
Waiting until nightfall to avoid de- 
tection, Barclay and his two sons 
dressed in Arab garb and slithered 
through the crack, armed with 
matrhpg candles and a compass. 

His description of the explora- 
tion in his journal, “Gty of the 
Great King," is a classic of under- 
stated 19th-century travel writing. 
Barclay said he and his sons sud- 
denly came upon “a very deep and 


precipitous pit, in which we re- 
ceived the very salutary warning of 
caution from the dead — a human 
skeleton! supposed to be that of a 
person who, not being sufficiently 
supplied with lights, was precipitat- 
ed headlong and broke his neck — 
or rather his skull 1 should judge 
from the fracture I noticed on pick- 
ing it up.” 

Local legend has it that a group 
of yeshiva students exploring tire 
cave in the late 19th century en- 
tered tbe cave arm-in-arm out of 
fear of what they might encounter 
and eventually left screaming after 
they beard the sound of falling wa- 
ter, which they may have mistaken 
for some noisy demon. That was 
apparently enough to keep most 
people away until the 1920s, save 
for some min or quarrying in 1907 
to obtain tbe stones used to build 


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ENJOYTHE BEST OF FRANCE 
IN THE HEART OF MUSEUM LAND 


the Turkish dock tower over the 
Jaffa Gate. 

Bui it was precisely the specter of 
demons, or. more exactly, the devfl 
hims elf, that seemed to attract a 
German sect to the cave. In her 
book “Our Jerusalem." another 
American missionary, Bertha Staf- 
ford Vester, described how a 
stocky, dark German man, accom- . 
panied by his frail wife, a younfc 
couple with three children and. 
three old women “looking more 
like witches than humans," showed 
up at her f amil y’s borne in Jerusa- 
lem one morning in 1885. 

The German roan, Ac recalled, - 
immedi ately announced that “Ire' 
had been led by the spirit from 
Germany to Palestine, to Jerusalem 
and to tins house to take posses- 
sion. How soon could we vacate? he 
wanted to know.” 

Inside tire cave the German sect' 
was reported to be perforating ritu- 
als with fire, among other things. 
The German consul dragged than 
all out after the women in the group 
fell ill from life in the damp, unsan- 
itary quarry. Tbe “mad leader," 
wrote Vesta, was eventually seal, 
back to Germany. 


M ORE than spirits and 
temple stores were quar- 
ried from Zedekiah's 


Cave. In 1968, only a year after 
Israel had assumed control over all' 
of Jerusalem, an Arab from East' 
Jerusalem told the Israeli Ministry 
of Finance that bis grandfather had 
buried three cases of gold in the', 
cave during the Ottoman period. 
The man said he would show them, 
where the treasure was buried in. 
return for a 25 percent cut The 
ministry agreed, and one morning a 
Treasury officer and two laborers 
from tbe Ministry of Public Works 
went into the cave with their flash- 
lights and shovels. 

According to The Jerusalem 
Prist, when a reporter from a He- 
brew newspaper arrived on the 
scene late in tire afternoon, he 
found a deep hole, exhausted work- 
men, some disappointed govern- 
ment officials and nothing even re-, 
sembling gold. 

Who knows? Maybe they were 
just digging in tbe wrong place. If 
you would like to try, the cave is 
open every day from 9 AM. to 5 
P.M_ with admission 50 cents and 
25 cents for children. Most visitors 
lour the cave on their own, but tire- 
site is also included on many orga- 
nized tours of the Old Gty. 

If you plan to look for gold, 
bring your own shovel and be sore 
to cut a deal with tbe Ministry of 
Finance first tt 


C 1985 The New York Times 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1985 


Page 11 


FOR FUN AND PROFIT 


r - 

'V^O: 


A New Terminal to Ease 
Heathrow’s Congestion 


by Bogs' Coffis 


m 


ELCOME to Heathrow the 
world's most successful interna- 
tional airport,” is written bold 
across the entrance to the two- 
~ PA^anc tunnel, the only road access to terminals 
:!v ' and 3. Oh yeah. successful to whom? 
"f x'Xhat tunnel can be a nightmare. Get an 

■ "t ..7 . . .'^ieddent or a breakdown and yon could be 

i.~ ■* jtaring at the slogan for a long time. Add a 
^Jose of fog or ice, especially' before a hoti- 
Z '■}< ‘iay. and the whole airport backs up into a 
J- . querulous mass of humanity. Ask most trav- 
s;:lers what they associate with Heathrow and 
. . ' : * jhepolitest word is likely to be “congestion." 

, ■ j'.'-i;,,' . ‘Tn» is hardly surprising because the three 
‘ 'terminals corseted in a fairly s mall area be- 
"'■/ -'i^. tween the two runways, currently handle 
• ’ J“-“4more than 30 million passengers a year (24 
.1 * - . nullion on international Fli ghts ), in excess of 

^ ^ t. tbar nominal capacity. Heathrow claims to 
y ' Cr : ^be the world's busiest international airport. 
Z r ^ « 'J.. This week’s edition of the airport staff news- 
boasts that half a billion passengers 
through Heathrow since it 
in 1946: “In its busiest-ever year, it 
has handled soine 33 million passengers in a 
month, three-quarters of a million a week, 

: more than 1 1 8.000 in a angle day and nearly 
• . .r, M0-50Q in an hour." O. K., but what is there 
./ ^for tte passenger to rejoice in? 

“Offering a greater range of destinations 

- VV - and frequencies than any other international 
_ /.i.p 'airport in the world is a measure of success 

■ :: V'by anyone's standards, to say nothing of 
. ". ' ^profitability," says a senior executive of the 
British Airports Authority, a public body 
'-^Vthai operates the three major airports in 
" " ' - southeast England (Heathrow. Gatwkk and 
‘ h Stans ted) and four in Scotland. BAA’s annu- 
.. V ^.al report for 1984-85 showed a pre-tax profit 
"■* ~'">of £361.6 mill inn (about S519 million) and 
. ■" --i taxes of £39 million. Heathrow alone made a 
'• it profit of £59 J million- Half the revenue 
: •' ; ■ ;;comes from commercial activities such as 
rents from service companies and conces- 
-stops and half from aircraft landing charges, 

- " rc -which according to the BAA have deceased 
■' ■■■*■' jrjin real terms — on a per passenger basis — 

c-by 26 percent since 1980-81. 

’• : rZ The BAA invested £161 million in capital 

- - projects last year without cost to the taxpay- 

■ j:.: er. Of more direct interest to the traveler is a 

''choice of over 70 scheduled airlines (whole- 

- v. .plane charters are banned from Heathrow) 

■ ; .-- serving more than 200 destinations with di- 

- rect flights and hourly frequencies to major 
-."cities in Europe, which on peak days can 

. ■ mean more than a thousand aircraft move- 
.. . meats. "And we've learned how to deal with 
. ■ a congested airport in an area half the size of 
^..Charles de Gaulle,” says a BAA official. A 
"measure of this is a reduction in the number 
" "of passenger complaints since a peak in the 
late 1970s, he cum. 

,-J' But the news that should cheer all but the 
most relentless Heathrow-phobes is that a 
new Terminal 4 is due to open next spring 

- ' (the target date is April 12). It is on the 

side of the airport, separate from . 

the central ter minal area, with its own access 
roads, parking lots and subway station. It 
tost £200 million 


It is no coincidence that Schiphol, which 
stores best in ail the traveler opinion polls, is 
a congestion-free, custom-built aifport (un- 
like Heathrow, which has grown piecemeal). 
Schiphol currently handles II imilionpas- 
sengers a year with a capacity of 18 miTHnn 
The Dutch have a plan to increase this to 25- 
30 million over the next 10 years. Like 
Heathrow, Schiphol is an excellent transit 
bub (65 airlines serving 170 destinations) as 
is another popular airport; Singapore’s 
Changi (40 airlines serving 75 destinations, 
but nudging its capacity of 10 million). 

To be fair to Heathrow, one should com- 
pare Schiphol and Changi with separate ter- 
minals, like Terminal 1 which handle^ about 
10.7 million passengers, rather r Ka n the air- 
port complex as a whole. And Terminal 4, 
which can be considered ao airport within an 


audites the capacity to 
move 2,000 passengers an hour in each direc- 
tion — a total of eight milli on a year. 

, , . What is important is that it will relieve 

^congestion at the existing terminals; British 
.. ... Airways is moving all its transcontinental 
traffic from Terminal 3 and its Paris and 
«r " Amsterdam flights from Terminal 1. KLM, 
> NLM Gty Hopper and Air Malta will move 

.. from Terminal 2. BA will occupy 64 of the 72 
“-^check-in desks in Terminal 4, but KLM has a 

* - ■ - Lcboicc qjot facing passen g ers as they go in. 

_ *) . Terminal 2, currently used by eight million 
UjcsC-passengers a year on 29 European airlines, 
* ^ wfl] have a £700,000 facelift, while Terminal 

1 \3 will get a £68-million renovation. 


It has all the features, 
in, quid; baggage reclaim, rapid customs 
clearance, ease of changing planes and short 
walking distances, that score high in opinion 
polls. And for the first 12 months of its life, it 
should be under capacity by a winder. 

' According to Eric t Anm^ general manag- 


Space, speed, 
simplicity are 
cited by officials 


er of Te rminal 4, its main attractions are its 
spaciousness (there is a single departure 
lounge — 650 by 25 meters, or 2,130 by 82 
feet), speed (curb-side check-in, an open-pier 
plan, which means no gate rooms — you 
board the plane directly from the lounge 
alone one of two moving walkways) and 
simplicity (2,000 baggage trolleys can be 
taken through the system, freon curb-side to 

? lane). One of the mam differences between 
errnmal 4 and the other terminals, or in- 
deed most airports, is the segregation of 
arriving and departing passengers on differ- 
ent Hoot levels. “That’s the key to security," 
Lomas says. It should also speed passenger 
flows. Transfer to other terminals is about 
tune minutes by bus with a 60- minute con- 
necting time for international and 75 min- 
utes for domestic flights, which compares 
with 40-to-50- minute average at SchiphoL 
The catering concession for Terminal 4 has 
been given to Marriott (Trust House Forte 
has it for the rest of the airport), and the 
emphasis will be on fast food. But Lomas is 
hoping that “the U. S. approach to service 
will now be reflected in T4.” 

The BAA has plans to expand capacity at 
aH three airports in the London area. 
Gal wick, which currently handles 16 million 
passengers (it is the world’s fourth b usiest 
international airport after Heathrow. JFK 
and Frankfurt), wfll open a new terminal in 
1987, increasing its capacity by nine million 
to 25 million. Stansted. a small airport in the 
north of London, which became the city’s 
third official airport in June 1985, plans a 
two-phase expansion, and a fifth terminal is 
being mooted for Heathrow. A total capacity 
of nearly 90 million passengers is being fore- 
cast by the year 2000. 

The government has plans to privatize the 
BAA by selling shares to the. public on the 
basis of a market value of £500 mflhon. This 
wUl happen sometime next winter, according 
to a BAA official. No other major airports in 
Europe or North America, he says, are pri- 
vately owned. 

However successful Terminal 4 turns out 
to be, at least you won’t have to drive 
through that tunnel Welcome to Heathrow. 



Earth Houses 

the subcontractors who did the work revert- 
d to type when it came "to the nhty-jpiLty, 

™ — cement as mortar for earth cinder- 
s. The straw-and-eanh houses needed 

- protection from the elements and are 

-.^cfaced in wood. One design that draws satis- 
, fyingly on the vernacular, by Odfle Perreau- 
kpec. -Hamburger, was executed by a builder un- 
■ i ^comfortable with the medium and could be 
* ,w “ l-sbetter finished. 

C K ’ But competences were acquired and test- 
, t -f Jean -Vincent Berlottier conceived ambi- 

-... - ‘ ious cylindrical stairwells that defied tradi- 
• - ional wisdom, and had to devise his own 
*' T ; ainping frames. Another group of architects 
‘ : '"Viad the idea of building the roof first, to 
'arotect the pist work from the rain —only to 
•- \ , iiscover that they could not nun the last foot 
' ..^nd had to revert to cement. The Third 
r Vorld has already put in its fair share on this 


Continued from page 9 

project: Many of the workers on the con- 
struction site are North Africans. 

The lucky inhabitants of these houses 
(some are already installed) will find out for 
themselves; volunteers have been numerous, 
in this newly developed area that does not 
lack for housing. Meanwhile, three minis- 
tries in Paris have now promised to foot the 
bill for an International Institute of Building 
in Earth, to be based in Lisle cTAbeau and 
to be opened in 1987, which the United 
Nations has designated as a year for the 
homeless. 

By 1987, roughly a quarter of the world's 
five billion people will be either housed in 
leaky shades or without a roof to call their 
own. The crisis is unprecedented, but the 
solution perhaps not; Some of the world's 
earliest towns, from Jericho to CatalfrOytik 
in Turkey, were built in earth. ■ 


TRAVEL 


Taking In Tokyo’s Festive Season 


by Clyde Habermas 


T OKYO — Improbable though it 
may seem, Tokyo is a place to cap- 
ture the Christmas spirit; that is, if 
Christmas for you means eye- 
opening store displays, high-tech guncracks, 
ever-present recorded cairns and enough tin- 
sel to envelop a hundred Hollywoods. While 
streets may be vibrant, it must be said that 
so spirituality is to befound. That will come 
at New Year’s, a religious holiday and a time 
when most Japanese visit Shinto shrines. 

Because erf the approaching New Year, the 
next few weeks mil be rich with festivals. 
One of the brightest, but unfortunately also 
among tbc more mobbed, is ihe Hagoita Ichi 
fair, held from Dec. 17 to 19 near the Scoaqji 
Temple in Asakusa. 

Many viators tike to join Japanese wor- 
shipers at shrines during the first few days of 
the New Year. An exciting time to go is at 
the stroke of midnight cm Not Year’s Eve. 
The Hie Shrine in Akasaka is both central 
and colorful and might be more manageable 
than the majestic but thronged Merji Shrine. 

On Jan. 2, Emperor Hirofaito makes sever- 
al public appearances on the Imperial Palace 
■grounds to wish his subjects a good Not 
Y ear. You might also want to watch the 
amnia! Kairiww a at the Budokan, the mar- 
tial-arts hall near the palace, on Jan. 5. 
Starting at 8 AM, adults and children dem- 
onstrate Their ralHgrap hy skills. 

Fire buffs should enjoy the Dezome-sHld 
at the Sensqji Temple on Jan. 6. This is an 
impressive acrobatic display by men in fire- 
brigade costumes from feudal days, when 
Tokyo was known as Edo. Another event, at 
noon on Jan. 15, is a free demonstration of 
traditional mm-riai arts at the Budokan. 

The city of Tokyo is not its architecture, 
but its people. It is hncksterism unbridled at 
the Akxhabara electronics bazaar, freneti- 
rism in the early morning at the Tsukji fish 
market, exuberance among the thousands of 
youngsters crowding Shibuya at night, 
trendmess almost to a fault in adjoining 
Harajuku, pensiveness among strollers in the 
Shinjukn Gyocn Garden, raffishness to the 
eH gft of sleaze in Kabukicho. 

Here are a few suggestions among oount- 


Take the Yamanote f in* ginUing the cen- 
tral city above ground, ana get off at the 
Nippon station. Walk through the Yanaka 
cemetery under a canopy of cherry trees; and 
explore the rest of this temple-studded area. 

Go east of the Suxmda River, to the Ryo- 
gokn stop on the Sobu Line. The new koku- 
gDcan, or sumo arena, is nearby, and so are a 
number of “stables" that train the huge tra- 
ditional Japanese wrestlers. With the winter 
tournament scheduled to begin Jan. 12, this 
is a good time of year to see many wrestlers 
on Ryogoku’s streets. 

A dollar fetches only about 200 yen these 


days, and the consequences are felt immedi- 
ately OH arrival at Narita airport, 45 miles 
from central Tokyo, A cab nde into town 
that cost a “mere” S80 to SS5 a few months 
ago, comes to more than $100 now. 

Tickets for the “limousine" bus to the 
city’s central air terminal are the equivalent 
of S12J0. The Skytiner train on the Keisd- 
Ueno line, which connects to the airport via 
a shuttle bus, costs S7.50, but its terminus is 
the not-centrally located Ueao Station. 

In town, subways are often the fastest way 
to move about; fares on most lines start at 60 
cents, and children ride for half-price. Most 
travelers will find bus routes too confusing. 
Taxis are abundant, except late at night, 
when they are on the prowl for long-distance 
commuters and tend to zip past foreigners. 

Many viatois like to catch at least a 
glimpse of Kabuki and No theater. In addi- 
tion, Bunraku puppet theater, which is not 

always available, will be staged to Dec. 22 at 

the National Theater, with ticket prices from 
$1450 to S17. 

At Kabuldza, the main Kabuki theater in 
eastern Ginza, plays win be at 11 AM. and 
4:30 PM. throughout the mouth. Tickets 
run from S6 to 555, and earphones with 
En glish commentary are available. 

No and its comedy equivalent, Kyogen, 
will be performed at the National No The- 
ater in Sendagaya on Dec. 14, 20 and 22 and 
on Jan. 4, 8, and 17. Ticket prices range from 
59 to 52230. Starting times vary. 

Tokyo has countless shops where the tra- 
ditional crafts and arts are honored. Bingcya 
(208-1649) in Wakamatsucho near Shinjukn 
specializes in reasonably priced mingd, or 
fidkeraft, such as pottery, fabrics, bamboo 
work and lacquerware. For chiyogami, col- 
orful craft paper, Isetatsu (823-1453) in ven- 
erable Yanaka is an attractive shop. Box- 
wood combs are another Edo-era tradition; 
and at Jusanya (831-3238), in Ueno, Tsu- 
tomu Takeuchi represents the 14th genera- 
tion of his family to run the store. 

The sleek, contemporary Kisso (582-41 91) 
on the basement level of the Axis Buildinein 
Roppongi has laquerware and ceramics, out 
they are not necessarily inexpensive. 

More ambitious buyers of antique paint- 
ings, tansu chests, screens and ceramics «»" 
choose from many good places where En- 
glish is spoken. 


I N Tokyo, which is known for its high 
prices, one can spend 5150 on a mol 
without even trying. One can also spend 
$3 or less in a noodle stop. Most people lode 
for something in between, and there is no 
shortage of good choices. 

Chicken suldyaki — as opposed to more 
familiar beef sukiyaki — is available at Bo- 
tan (251-0577) in Kan da, an area with book- 
stalls and old-print stops. Diners do the 
cooking themselves on an hibachi, and the 
tail comes to 520-530 a person. 



Sumo wrestlers at work. 


Yotaro (584-7686) in Akasaka has a dean 
contemporary lode and serves tempura, with 
a specialty of tai, or sea bream. Prices are a 
bit high at 535 a person. Also in Akasaka, 
near the TBS Building, Torhsu (585-8894) is 
a good spot for chicken yakitori and other 
grilled food. Prices vary, but one can eat well 
for as little as SIS. Much farther north, in 
somewhat out-of-the-way Komagome, Goe- 
mon (811-2015) serves dishes made of tofu. 
The food is worth the trip, and so are the 
traditional Japanese dining rooms in a gar- 
den setting. About $25 for one. 

Mao (591-1076) is an excellent, homey 
restaurant on a narrow alleyway in Nishi 
Simbashi. It offers, also for about $25 a 
person, grilled fish, sashimi and other dishes. 

Most restaurants take last orders by 9 
PM. and, in some cases, as early as 8 PM. It 
helps to ask directions; in Tokyo street ad- 
dresses in the Western sense do not exist. 

A hotel revival is under way in Tokyo's old 
neighborhoods along the Sumida River, in- 
cluding Asakusa, Tokyo’s center many de- 
cades ago. One indicator is the recent open- 
ing of the Asakusa View Hotel (842-2111). 
Its prices, however, are not low at 5100 for 


Exliad K lit**. Magnum 


Western-style double rooms, and SI 50 and 
up for Japanese-style rooms. 

The National Tourist Organization can 
help place adventurous travelers looking for 
a Japanese inn. Prices can be sleep, but one 
possiblitiy for the budget-conscious is Sui- 
geisu ( 822-46 1 1 1 near the Ueno Zoo. where a 
room for two costs $45. without meals. 

No one even noddingly familiar with To- 
kyo needs a reminder that the top-of-the-Iinc 
hotels remain the Okura (5S2-0111) in Tor- 
anomon and the Imperial (5(4-1111) in Hi- 
biya. Doubles run about SI 50 at each place. 
We leave it to others to argue which is better; 
at both, hardships are few. 

Among the most helpful of new guide 
books are "Tokyo City Guide" (Rvuko Tsu- 
shin Co.) by Judith Connor and" Mayurni 
Yoshida, “Discover Shitamachi" (The Shita- 
machi Times) by Sumiko Enbutsu, “Tokyo 
Now and Then" (John Weatherhill Inc.) by 
Paul Waley. “More Footloose in Tokyo" 
(Weatherhill) by Jean Pearce and “Tokyo 
Access" (Random House) edited by Richard 
Saul Wurman. ■ 

r /ftRS The AW York Timet 


Smoothing the Way to a Soviet Tour 


by Enrol C. Rampersad 


M OSCOW — Contrary to the 
suggestion in a noted Western 
guidebook, one can have fun in 
the Soviet Union, and even 
more when the trip begins with a relaxing 
cruise up the Stockholm archipelago through 
the Baltic to Leningrad. 

For most Westerners, getting to the Soviet 
Union can be a frustrating exercise, involv- 
ing endless hassles over visas, transportation 
and accommodation. Individual visa appli- 
cations are rarely accepted, hotels must be. 
arranged through Intourist, the state tourism 
office/and tickets can be issued only with 
proof of avisa. 

A good way to get around this is to begin 
your trip with Soviet transport, which in turn 
serves as your Soviet hotel, thus satisfying 
the requirements for a fast visa. 

The ScanSov line, a Soviet organization 
operating out of Stockholm, offers several 
package tours to the Soviet Union, including 
weekly sailings to Leningrad, on the MS 

Helsinki, but tbcse^o'not include the scen- 
ery of the Stockholm trip. 

Oor trip began at the VSrtahamnen termi- 
nal in Stockholm. A simple piece of paper, 
amounting to a boarding p ass, was given to 
each passenger. This was the receipt for the 
visa, which is not stamped in the passport 
and is handed to yon upon debarking in 
T Leningrad. It also serves as an exit visa and 
must be surrendered on departure. 

We drifted out of Vartahanmen at about 2 
PM cm a warm August day. The prolonged 
Nordic daylight followed os late into the 
evening as we coursed up the Stockholm 
archipelago and into the Baltic. 

The setting sun — not to mention the 
prospects of affordable caviar and vodka. 


Russian style — heightened anticipation for 
dinner. Hie menu, offering a wide choice of 
regional specialties, including borscht and 
blmis, lived up to expectations. 

The show that followed dinner was a tri- 
umph of versatility. Grew members, from 
waiters and bartenders to operators and 
technicians, performed folk songs and re- 
gional dances to the accompaniment of Rus- 
sian balalaikas and rythmic handrifl p ping- 

Next morning, the approach to Leningrad 
was the main event. It is a key gateway to the 
Soviet Union, so military controls around 
the part were not surprising. At li>e passen- 
ger terminal, the transition from ship to 
shore was marked by the usual procedures, 
with a signed declaration of all jewelry, cam- 
era equipment and foreign currency. 

Ana the formalities, we crossed (he for- 
eigner’s threshold and walked into the fra- 
mer capita] of St. Petersburg, with its roman- 
tic canals and shaded streets. After a 
30-mnmte stroll taking in some of the side 
streets, we hopped onto a bus. Fellow pas- 
sengers explained that fares are based on an 
honor system; you drop five kopeks into a 
little machine and roll out a ticket. 

We returned to our floating hotel and 
prepared fra an evening that included dinner 
in town, followed by a dance show. Since 
restaurants, not only in Leningrad but 
throughout the Soviet are best booked wcD 
in advance, sticking with the group fra meals 
and shows has its advantages. 

The second day, after breakfast on board, 
a bus tour of the dry takes in the university 
quarto*, the banks of the Neva, the Peter- 
Paul Fortress, the Winter Palace and other 
sights. Then a long pre-hmeh visit to the 
Hermitage, one of the world’s great art re- 
positories. 

VisitmgSoviet museums individually is 
difficult They seem to cater exduavdy to 
groups, and the advantage of being with a 


foreign group is that it affords immediate 
entry. 

After lunch, a free-for-all stroll through 
the city center and a chance to see — -and be 
seen by — the Russians. Encounters, by no 
means chance ones, soon reveal how eager 
the people are to meet Westerners. 

At about 5 PM, we returned to the Ilych 
for a brief rest and dinner, before checking 
out for the overnight train ride to Moscow at 
1 1 :30 P.M. Between checking out, at about 8 
PM, and boarding the train, there is a 
performance of ballet or folk dance. In sea- 
son, this could mean seeing the Kirov Ballet 
in its own theater. 

On the train, the Soviet “soft” class, which 
conies with the package, consists of two- 
berth compartments, with toilet and wash- 
room fatalities at both aids of the car. Each 
car also is equipped with a guard — and a 
samovar, from which we were served hot tea 
as the evening got cooler. 


T HE punctual lniourist guide on the 
Moscow platform promptly took over 
from her Leningrad colleague. A 
quick check-in at the hotel got our tour off to 
■an early start. First, Red Square and the 
Lenin mausoleum, Sl Basil's Cathedral and 
the Kremlin. Over the next few days, we took 
in the Pushkin Museum and other sights. 

Aside from the need for grouping to get 
into museums and the Kremlin, one is free to 
take in Moscow as in any other major capi- 
tal. Take to the buses or subway, get a look at 
Soviet consumerism at the GUM depart- 
ment store (rubles only) and the Beriozka 
store at the Rossiya hotel (foreign currency 
and credit cards). The Beriozka shops offer 
the best buys in local arts and handicrafts as 
well as in Western duty-free goods. 

Hailing a cab on a Moscow street is a hit 
or miss exercise. All the more reason to 


discover one of the world's best designed 
subway systems, with stations that are veri- 
table works of art. The system consists of a 
ring line that girds the center of Moscow, 
connecting with eight subsidiary lines that 
stretch opt to the suburbs. Some of the 
stations along the ring line represent the 
winning entry by teams of artists and archi- 
tects. Passports are retained for the duration 
of the stay when registering at hotels. 
Guests, not their guides, must personally 
retrieve them before leaving for the trip back 
to Leningrad and the boat. Failure to do so 
could involve lengthy consular intervention 
or missing the boat. 

Stockholm is well connected with other 
European capitals, by air and by train. For 
trans-Atlantic visitors to most European cit- 
ies, the extra leg to Stockholm is far less 
expensive if it is in your overall ticket. 

The frequent ScanSov sailings are ideal 
for travelers who want to vary the length of 
their stay in the Soviet Union. Inland lours, 
pegged to the Leningrad sailings, can also be 
arranged to take in points beyond Moscow. 

The Leningrad tour takes four or five days 
and costs from S250 to 5360 a person; the 
Leningrad-Moscow combination takes sev- 
en days and costs from $400 to S440, train, 
meals, holds, tours and entries included. 

ScanSov offices are in Stockholm, at 
Norrlandsgatan 12 (tel: 24-22-40). Outside 
the Nordic area, tours may be booked direct- 
ly or through agendes specializing in Scandi- 
navian travel. Book at least two weeks in 
advance to allow for visa processing. Sailings 
are once a week from OcL 15 to May 1 and 
twice a week during the summer mouths. A 
New Year's cruise leaves Dec. 28 and returns 
to Stockholm Jan. 2. 

The Ilych has a pool and sauna and con- 
ference facilities for business. All major 
credit cards are accepted on board. ■ 







.JE NNA, Konzerthauaftet: 72.12.11). 
ONCERTS — Dot 14: ORF Sym- 
tony Orchestra, Heinrich Hollraser 
inductor, Gabriele Sma soprano 
» . dozart). 

« 17: Haydn Trio, Wolfgang Schulz 

. fit: l^le (Haydn, Moran). 

\v ^ ec.20: Vknna Symphony Orchestra, 
otsi Sirin conductor, Gottfried Hor- 
k baritone (Handel, Stravinsky). 
Masikverain (td: 65.81.90). 
ONCERTS— Doc. 15: Vienna! 
wny Orchestra. Martin 
inductor (Beethoven). 

cc. 16 and IS: Bach Trio (Bach), 
ec. 19: Oemeudc Consort, Rent 
temenrie conductor (Tondh, Vival- 
)■ 

ec.20: Vienna Symphony Orchestra, 
* orst Stein conductor (Corelli, Stra- 
.wsky). 

Staatioperdd: 53240). 

ALLET— Dec. 19: “Vienna Waitz- 
M (Balanchine, J. & R. Strauss). “Die 
... Jppenf«”{Hassrdter, Bayer). 

PERA — Dee. 14: "Salome" (R. 
raussk 

sc. 16: “Madame Butterfly” (Pucd- 
)- 

sc. 17: “Ariadne auf Naxos" (R. 
raws). 

- mb sc. 18: “The Barber of Seville" (Ros- 

, ^ V 

a * 


•Musics Royaox pcs Bcanx-Arts de 
'o Dec. 22: 
tfArl « d'HuK&Fe 


IBJTJON — 

“Goya.” 

•Musfes Ro 
ftd: 733.96.10). 

EXHIBITION — To Dec. 22: “Los 
Iberos.” 


INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 


ENGLAND 


LONDON, Albery Theatre (Tel 
836.38.78). 

THEATER — Through December. 
“Torch Song” (Fiennein). 

•Barbican Centre (tel 638.41.41). 
CONCERTS — Dec. 14: London 
Symphony Orchestra, RaiTaeUo Moo- 
ter oisO conductor (BeOlni). 

Dec. IS: BBC Concert Orchestra, 
James Galway conduclor/flnlc, BBC 
Singers (Humperdinck, MozanL 
Dec. 20: BBC Symphony Orchestra, 
Gennadi Rozhdestvensky conductor 

(Prokofiev). 

EXHIBITIONS —To Dee. 23 “Mir- 
acles in Carved Ivory: Kodo Oknda.” 
To Jan. 26: “Matthew Smith,” “Tola: 
Tradition in Japan Today," “Ni- 
hooga." 

MUSICAL — Dec. 30: "The Pirates of 
Pe nza nce 1 * (Gilbert £ Sullivan). 
THEATER— Dec. 12-14, 16-20: “As 
You Like It" (Shakespeare). 


THEATER— Dec. 12-14, 16: “Mrs. 
Warren’s Profession (Shaw). 

Dec. 17-19: “The Duchess of Malfi” 
(Webster). 

•Royal Opera House (tel: 240. 10.66) 
BALLET— Dee. 14, 16 , 17,20: “The 
Nutcracker" (Tchaikovsky). 

OPERA —Dec. 18: “La Norae <fi Fi- 
garo" (Mozart) 

Dec. 19: “Giselle” (Adam). 

•Tate Gallery (id: 821.13.13) 
EXHIBITION — To Jan. 10: “Kurt 
Schwitters.” 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (tel: 
589.63.71) 

EXHIBITIONS— ToFeb. 2: “Beatrix 
Potter The V&A Coflecakta." 

To Jan. 26: “Hats from India." 

To May 25: “British Watetcotaura.” 
STRATFORD-cpon-AVON. Royal 
Shakespeare Theatre (teh 2956.23) 
THEATER — Dec M: “Nicholas 
N ickleby" (Dickens/ Edgar) 


SzdodyT “Modem Masters from the 

***• - U nm e ini wa (Vlwtfiwi *» 


x. 20: “Die Zaubcrflotc.’ 


H 3 LOWM 


ILSSELS, Palais des Beaux Arts 
1:51150.45). 

MBITION —To Doc 22: “Span- 
’ Splenders and Belgian Villages. 
XM700." 


•British Museum (tel: 636.155$) 
EXHIBITION— ' to Jan. 1986: “Bud- 
dhism: Art and Faith." 

•Geffrye Museum (tel: 739.83.68) 
EXHIBITION — To Dec. 31: “The 
Solomon Family." 

•Hayward Gallery (id: 92857.08). 
EXHIBITIONS —To Feb. 16: “Tor- 
res-Garcis: Grid-Pattern-Sign," 

“Homage to Barcelona" 

•National Theatre (tel: 633.08.80) 


PARIS, Centre Georges Pompidou 
(id: 42.77. 12J3) 

EXHIBITIONS — To Dec. 16: 
“Malta." 

To Jan. I: “Klee et la Masque." 

Dec. 18-Feb. 16: “Henri Lanreus and 
Cubisme (1915-1 920)" 

•Hotel Mfcridien (td: 4758.1230) 
JAZZ— Dec. 1 8-23 : Clandc Later and 
his Orchestra. 

•Mnsfce d’Art Modern e (tel: 
47335137) 

EXHIBITIONS — To Jan. 5: “Vera 


s de la Mode (td: 47308533) 
EXHIBITION — Dec. 18- Apr. 6: 
“Pierre Balmain." 

•Maison de Victor Hugo (tel: 
42.7116.65) 

EXHIBITION —To Jan. 31: “Victor 
Hugo's Drawings." 

•Mus6c Canmvalct (tch42723 1 . 13) 
EXHIBITION — To Jan. 5: “Eugtos 
B6joL” 

•Mus6e du Grand Palais (tel: 
416154.10) 

EXHIBITIONS — To Dec. 16: “Sr 
Joshua Reynolds: 1723-1791” 

To Jan.6: “LaGloircde Victor Hugo.” 
•Music du Louvre (teL* 41605936) 
EXHIBITION — To Jan. 6: “Le Brim 
A Versailles.” 

•Musfce du Petit Palais (tel: 
4165.1173) 

EXHIBITION — To Jan5: “Soldi 
D*eacre," Victor Hugo 1 * manuscripts 
and drawings. 

•New Morning (id: 453351.41) 
JAZZ— Dee. 17: Shum. 

•Opera ftd: 47.425750) 

BALLET — Dec. 20: Nutcraek- 

a" (Tdnkovsky) 

OPERA — Doc. 15 and 18: "Romeo 
and Juliette” (Gounod) - 
•Palais dc Tokyo (td: 47335653) 
EXHIBITION— ToJan. 13: "Indiain 
Photographs.” 

•Salle Gaveau (td: 45.633030) 
RECITALS— Dec. 16: Dominique de 
VBlemcourt cello (Badi, Debussy) 
Dee. 17: Pedro Ibanez guitar (AJbeniz, 
Laoro) 

•Salk Pleyd (id: 455107.96). 
CONCERT— Dec. 15: Concert* L*- 


moureux, Ura Schneider conductor 
(Cbopin, Strauss) 

•Tbt&lre du Rocd-Poinl (tel: 
4256.60.70). 

RECITAL — Dec. 15: Jean- Pierre 
Rempal flute (Mozart. Schubert) 
'•ThCAtre Musical de Paris (tel: 
4161.1953) 

JAZZ MUSICAL — To Dec. 19: 
“Black and Blue" (Segoria/Orezzoli) 
RECITAL — Dec. 16: Jane Rhodes 

Valirie Chevalier 

Tamborini piano 

VmG). 

•Tour Montparnasse (tel: 
41719141) 

EXHIBITION — To Jan. 5: "Four 
Centuries of Ballet in Paris." 

•WaBv Findlay GaBety (4235.70.74). 
EXHIBITION — To Dec. 17:“Andrt 
Bourrifc* 


Shoshana Rndiakov piano (Chopin, 
Rosshri) 

Dec. 16: Berlin Radio Symphony Or- 
chestra, Riccardo Chailly conductor 
(Ives, Mahler). 

FRANKFURT, Oper (td: 25621). 
OPERA — Dec. 14: “Tosca"'(Pucd- 
m) 

Dec. 15.: “The Gypsy Baron" (J. 
Straus) 

Dec 18: “TheTalcs of Hoffman*’ (Of- 
fenbach) 

Dec. 20: “FalatrfT (Verdi) 
HAMBURG. Siaatsoper (tel: 
35.1555) 

OPERA — Dec 14: "Boris Godunov" 


Dec 15: Xatinen" (Bizet) 
Dec 16: “LaTraviata" (Verdi) 
Dec 19:*Turandot"(Pucdni) 


GERMANY 


BERLIN, Deutsche Oper (tel: 
34144.49) 

OPERA — Dec 15 and 18: “Hansel 
and Gretd" (Humperdinck) 

Dec 14: “Tnsum and Isolde" (Wag- 

Dec 16: "SalomeTfR. Strauss) 

Dec 17: *Tosca“(Pncdm) 

Dec 19r“FWdkr (Beethoven) 
•PhQharmomeftd: 25488-0) 

C ON CERTS — Balm PhUharmofitc 
Orchestra — Dec 18 and 19: Segi 
Ozawa conductor, Peter SerJdn piano 
(Mozart, Tchaikovsky) 

Dec 15: Hans Zan o t dli conductor. 


ITALY 

MILAN, Tealro alia Scala (tel: 
887.92,11) 

OPERA — Dec 14 and 17: “Aida" 
(Verdi). 

Dec. 20: “Madame Butterfly 1 ' (Pucd- 

•PadigEone d*Ane Contcmpo ran ca 
(td: 7846.880. 

EXHIBITIONS —To Jan. 13: “Gina 
Pane: Partitions." “Richard Long - 
Salvatore Scaipitta." 

ROME, Accademia National di San- 
ta CedHa(td: 679 .03.89) 
CONCERTS— Dec 14-17: National 
Academy Orchestra, Giuseppe Sino- 
poli conductor, Uto Ughi violin (Bee- 
thoven, Bruckner) 


Dec 18: Chamber Orchestra of Eu- 
Salvatore Accardo conductor 
, Rossini) 

HAL — Dec 20: Ann e-Sop hie 
Muller soprano, Alexis Weissenber pi- 
ano (Brahms) 

•Museo dd Folklore (tel: 58 137. 17) 
EXHIBITION — Dec 17- Jan. IS: 
‘“Technipress: photographs.” 
■Palazzo Braschi ( icfT 65 5 8.80). 
EJiMIBmON — To Jon. 5: "Tiber- 
Seme: two odes, two rivers." 

JAPAN 


TOKYO, Bunka Kaikan (tel: 
82831.11) 

CONCERT — Dec. 19: Tokvo Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra. Tadaak'i Otaka 
conductor, E. M&ezawa soprano 
(Bach) 

•Kosd Nenldn Hall (teL 356.1 LIT). 
CONCERTS — Dec 19 and 20: Yo- 
miuri Nippon Symphony Orchestra. 
Hans- Peter Frank conductor. Vences- 
lava Hraba-Fraberger soprano. 
EXHIBITION —To Dec 15: “300th 
Anniversary of Bach’s Birth." 

•Tobacco and Salt Museum (tel: 
47630.41). 

EXHIBITION — To Dec 22: “An- 
cient Mexico: History and Civilization 
in Michaacan.” 

•Yarns tune Museum (id: 669.76.43). 
EXHIBITION— To Dec 25: “Japa- 
nese Paintings." 

NETHERLANDS 

AMSTERDAM. Conccngebouw ( tel : 

CONCEPTS — Dec. 1 5- 17, 20: Am- 
sterdam Philharmonic Orchestra. An- 


ion Kersjes conductor, Danid Wayen- 
berg piano t Haydn. Lisa J. 

Dec. 18 and 19: Conceigebouw Or- 
chestra. Bernard Haitink conductor, 
Viktor Liberman violin (Bruckner, 
Shostakovich). 

Dec. 20: Raphael String Qiunet. Gi- 
rard van Blerfc piano (Schlegel, R&nt- 
gen). 


SCOTLAND 


EDINBURGH. National Gallery (tel: 
556.8931). 

EXHIBITIONS— ToDec. 24: “Neth- 
erlandish Drawings." 

To Jan. 5: “The Christmas Story." 
•Na tionaJ Gal lerv of Modem Ant tel; 
556.B93H. 

EXHIBITION — To Jan. 5: “BOa 
Uitz. Prints 1920-1923." 


SPAIN 

MADRID. Fundacion Juan March 
Mel: 435.42.40) 

EXHIBITION — Through Decem- 
ber “20th Century Theater in Spain." 
•Museo dd Prado (id: 468,0950) 
EXHIBITION — Through Decem- 
ber: “The Century of Rembrandt." 

•TeatrodclaZanaieladd: 429.82. 1 6) 

BALLET— Dec. 14-20: Sp anish Na. 
tional Ballet. 

•Teatro Real (tel: 24858.75) 
CONCERTS— pec 14 and 1 5: Span- 
ish National Orchestra and Ch^fVic. 
“^^^^^cooductorfBeethove^ 

Dec 19: RTE Symphony Orchestra. 

Ehlqnm KMDicnM coS^S 

(Mendelssohn, Shostakovich 






> 



n^n 


Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY; DECEMBER 13, 1985 


**• 


Thursday^ 


N1SE 


Closing 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to ttoe dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


niHaitti 
HtfiLnw Stack 


Dtv.YkLPE 


Sis. 

UteHMitxn 


Case 
OndOi^fl 


(Continued from Page 8) 


100* £7 67 <7+1 

tv Z9* zava 2?* + * 
10 31* 31 V6 sits * % 
3 16 16 16 

4600z 74 V, 74* 74* +1* 
20*66% «% *9%-* 
10* 90* 90k ffftt — tt 
13 - % 

.. 71 + * 

2930* 73 71 73 +1% 


&9 

4.1 


49% SS OhEdpf 830 122 
29* 24 OhEdpf 3X0 II J 
31* 24% Oh Ed or 3.92 12 J 
16* 13* OhEdpf 1-00 1U 
7B% 40* OhEdBf 9.12 123 
72 47 OhEdpf tM 124 

95 B0 OtiEpf 10JB 115 
16* 10* OhMotr JO 11 17 1337 13* 13 
71% SB OhPof B.B4 113 100*71 71 

71k, 56 OhPpJB 7x0 1(24 ~ “ 

21* 17 OtlPotG 237 105 
24* 21% OkJoCE 208 LI 11 
94 7% OfekiGirf M 
37% 38* Olln 150 
IQVj 5Vi Orancro 
17% 12 Onckla JO 

33*. 24* ONEOK 254 

27 23% Oran Rk 214 

12* 7% Orange 
33 30* Or tone .76 25 

29 23 OrtOOC pfl.12 74 

12* 8% ortonP 
v* 6% Orion of JO 7J> 

33* 34 . Orion pf 275 lai 

11% 19* OsrtbdM M 25 IS 

43 24Vi OwnTr M 1.7 1* 

19 13 OvStllp JO 24 17 

37% 30% OwenC 140 27 9 

iBU 38* Owen I II 1.90 23 II 

15% 10% Oxford 44 13 29 


47 SI 

L6 11 
7J 10 
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357 

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21* 

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25* + % 

1007 

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277 

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38% 

750 

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29* 

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25* 

25* 


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472 

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54 

13% 

S3* 

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13%— % 


ir-i 3«* pmh 

51* 31% PPG ___ _ . 

31% 19* PSA JO 23 12 

23% 14 PSAdte 1.90 ?X 

14* 13 PacAS 154 127 

SOU 15* PaCGE 

471.1 38% PacLtg 

41% 24% PcLum 

ia* 5% PocPes 
31% 13% PacRSPf 200 105 
17% 12* PocSd JO 2B 13 
83* 66* PocTeie 5-72 7JJ 9 
15 9V, PocTIn JO 3J 7 

31* 34% PadfCP 2J0 RO I 
36 JOtt PocH Of 4J57 115 


1X0 27 14 235 3S» 34* 34*— % 
17ft 27 11 3415 48% 47* 47% 

701 24 25* 24 + * 

205 21 20* 21 + * 

23 14* 14* 14* + % 
4470 19* 19* 19* — % 
450 44* 45* 45*— * 
134 37* 37% 37% 

405 10* 10* 10* + M 
17 20 19* 20 + * 

44 14* 14% 14* + M 
2447 83* 82 82*— 1* 

14 12* 12* 12V4 
425 30% 30* 30*— * 
9 35* 3S» 35*- U 


1X4 

3J8 

130 


9J 7 
7 A 13 
33 24 
11 


73 

IX 10 


43* 25'*. PalnWb M 13 21 20*4 35* 35* 35% — * 
34* 25* PalnWpf225 
43* 20* PonABit JO 
8* 4- PanAm 
4 . l* Pan A wt 
21 - 13* Patrick n 20 t.l 19 
41% 32* PanhEC 2J0 4X 12 


24’e 13% Pansefi 
9* 3% PantPr 

is* 4% Pardvn 
17* 11% Park El 
7% 4 ParVDri 

37V, 28* ParMf 


14 


34% 14* ParkPn 
5 . 3 Pal Ptrs 
15* 11% Pay UP 
23* 13% PavCsh 
1% Tt Penoo 
58* 45 PenCm 
56% 44* Penney 


81 31* 30* 31* + * 
7 44% 43* 44% + * 
5102 I 7* 8 

307 2* 2* 2* 

105 18* 18* 18*—* 
434 3S* 34% 34* 

425 25% 24% 25* +1* 
5797 9* 9* 9* + * 

2127 9* 7* 7*— 1* 

324 16% 16* 14* 

484 4* 4* 4* 

354 38* 37% 37% — * 

750 21% 24* 24*— * 

244 3* 3* 3* — * 

_ _ 979 14% 14 14* + * 

IX 14 2498 16* 15* 19% + * 

349 * _ — K 

14 1406 50* 49* 50tt + * 
234 42 11 2254 54* 55* 54 


me J 11 
.as 1.9 
1.12 3X 13 
J2I 2.1 35 
19 

X4 45 14 
.14 


27% 23% PaPL 2-54 9J 10 2160 27* 24* 27* + % 
40* 32 PaPL pf 440 1V7 302 37% 37% 37%— * 


llMarril 
HMiLoa Moc* 


Dtir.Yia.PE NtaHbhLow 


CMn 
Oate-Oree 


40% 33 PdPLpf 450 11 J 
71% 62 PaPL PI LX0 11J 
27* 2SH PftPLOPlXC 11.9 
27% 22* PoPLdBl2J0 107 
29% 24* PaFLdpri25 11X 
31* 27* MPLlWS 33 123 
183% 80% PaPLBrtlXO 11A 
76* 42 PaPL PT 830 11J 
41% 34 Penwtf 230 5J 
25% 20 POflwpf 1X0 6X 


ppr“ 

14 29 28* 28* 

30 27 24* 27 4- * 

6 28* 21% 28% 

7 30* 30* 30*— * 
2DZ100 100 100 + * 
I Ofe 74 74 74 

381 41* 40* 40* — 

52 25* 25 23 


‘=6 


73 34 Pwwwf MO « » g2 “ *»-** 

18* 14* POOPEn 1J® 4X 8 3350 18% 18 IBM 

246k 14* PWBV3 X J 22 W 0* 26% B* +1% 

73* 40* pwnfCo 178 2-5 13 200 73* 72 72*— * 

30% 22tt PDrtEI X0 20 17 1787 31* JO* 30* + % 

9% 6* Printed 1,110157 6 mi 7 6% 7 f * 

Iff* 10* PonrDs 301 18* 17* 18* + Vk 

53* 31 Pi trie 1X0 27 17 929 54% 51% 51*— 2* 
20* 24* PefRs mi MX 97 26% 25* 25*— * 

17% 14% PotFbpf IJ7 M 84 16* W6 

5* 2% Ptrlnv XSBZtt 63 3 2% 3 + % 

54* 37* PfhW 1X8 2J16fi»to*Xm54%+* 
24 13% PMW 554 23 22* 2Z*— * 

53 34 PtWtPPr 5X0 9.1 34 55% 55 55 

44* 29 PhlhrS 54 13 23 4421 45* 44* 45*— % 

M* 13* PhlteBI 230 1M 6 W ** «% 16% - % 


32 25* PhllEPf 3X0 125 

37* 31% PWlEpf 4X0 123 
70 57 PMlEpf US 13X 

11* 9* PMlEpf 1X1 121 

11% 9 PtiOERf 133 123 
43 51 PMlEpf 7.85 T23 

10* 8* PMlEpf 138 120 
1* 110% PWlPt 17.12 13X 
114% 10Z* PMlEpf 1535 H3 
83% 64* PhUE pf 952 II J 
74 02* PMlEpf 9 JO 125 

64 51% PMlEpf 7J0 123 

63 50% PMlEpf 775 12X 

21* l«* PWlSub 132 41 13 
95% 72 PhUMr 400 5J 9 
26% 16 PhUPln XO 23 U 


3Kiz 31 31 *|' + % 

mi 33 37 38 +1% 

15DZ4V* 69* 69* + * 
176 11* 11% 11*—% 

30Q 11% n* 1#%—* 
20Bz 63 63 63 +% 

213 10* 10% 10* + % 
2102127% 124% 127% +2* 

3200x116% 115 T1S — 1% 

120* 84% 83 83 + % 

70* 76 76 74 

40x64 M 66 
1ffi£s33% 62% 62% + % 
17 2Uk 21* 21*— % 
6881 SO* 79* 80* + % 
354 26% 26* 24% + * 


18% 11 PhflPte 1X0 8-5 1012317 11% 11% 11* + % 


25% 22* PhIPtpf 1.843 45 

30% 20* PMIVH XO IX 13 

35% 24* PledAs 

36 29% PlerNG 

Z7 % 14* Pterl 

63% 38* PIUMY 


X - 
64 15 
15 

172 27 U 


232 


397 23% 22* 33% — % 
126 29* 28% 28*— K 
413 34% 34* 34% + * 
54 94% 34 36 

295 27% 24* 24*—% 
946 63* 62* 63%-% 


34 21% Pioneer 134 5.1 13 2541 2C* 22% 24* +1* 


14% 

21 

19 

14* 

1M 

28 

19 


X 
24 16 
23 


170 18* 18 IB* + * 

449 47% 46% 46*— * 

2*93% 93% 93*— * 
594 12 11* 1»— % 

147 17 14* 14* + * 

474 17% 17% 17*—% 

70 14% 13* MK— % 

101 9 0% 8*— * 

1 24 26 24 

377 11* 11 11% + % 


1X0 24 57 1005 39* 38% 3I%— % 

XO 29139 1113 14 13% 13% + * 

-80b 42 88 84 19* 19* 19* + * 


24% 13% PlonrEI 
49% 33% PHWB 1X0 

97 47% PffnBpf 212 

9% Pltfitn 

16% PkuiPtn X7 j 
11 PlaiRs XO IX 15 

7 Plantm -14b IX 14 

7* P lav bay 80 

19* Plesev X4a 25 19 

-- 10% Pt«*0 Pd XO 5J 53 

39* 24* Poland 1X0 

%* 10% Porters 

21% 15* PapTol _ 

22* 14% Portec XO 24 10 17% 17% 17% 

22* 16% PartGE 1X0 8X 9 1205 22% 22% 72% + % 

23 20 ParGpf 240 105 13 24* 24% 24% + % 

35% 31 PorGpf 4J0 128 24 35* 34* 34*— % 

34* 30* PorGpf 4X2 126 9 34% 34* 34* 

43% 28% Potftch 1J4 4J 14 143 35* 34% 34% — % 

34 23% PotmEI 216 64 18 1089 33% 33* 33% + * 

46% 38* PatEIpf L50 9X 220a 44 46 44 + % 

41% 33 PatEIpf 4X4 1IU 330x40% 40% 40%—* 

27* 18* Prwnl 1 31 1J 21 94 27* 27 27* 

21% 14% PriitlkS 1.10 5XJ 161 20 19% 19% 

ZJ% 14% Prime M 2464 23* 22* 23 

39 14% PrhnMS XV J 27 162 37*36*37 -* 

71% 50* PreefG 2X0 3X 18 3780 71 68* 6V*— 2 

17* 8 PrdRsa 28 1J 25 223 16% 16% 16% 

45% 35% Prater 1X0 3J 16 14 42* 41* 43 

3* 3 PniRCn „ 341 2% 2 3 

8% 7* PrvRI n X8e IB 145 8 7* 7* 

24* 1BU PSwCsl 2X0 9X 10 1023 21% 21 21* + * 


70 54 P5COI pf 7.15 10J 

21* 17% PSCOlpf 210 10.1 

io* 4% psind ixo i*J 
Z6* 21% PSIllPf 3JD 147 
9 4* PSIllPf 1X4 129 

8* 7 PSIrtpf 

51 41 PSIn Pf 

71 52% PSIllPf 

63 48 PSIllPf 

43 49* PSIn Pf 8X8 15X 

44 51 PSIllPf L96 15.9 

8* 3% PSvNH 

18 B% PSNHpf 


1X8 MX 
7.15 159 
9J4 15L7 
L52 155 


1008 48 48 48 +1 

4 20* 30* 20* + * 
7 2844 7* 4* 7 — * 

430Z23* 22% 23* +1* 
UK* TV, 7* 7% + * 
18182 7* 7% 7% 

1420z 45 45 45 + * 

780Z 60 59 40 

3MOl 54* S3 54* +1* 
2120x 53 52* S3 

203Z57 56% 54% —1 

3 4299 8* S* 8* + * 

1040X21 18* 28 « 


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Dhr. YBL PE 


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Mtefiiahijw 


CUM 
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51 8* PNH MB 

26% 13 PNHpfC 
25% 11% PNHpfQ 


2S% 11* PMH j>je 


31% 9* PNH 

21 10% PNHpfG 

29% 23* PSvNM 292 TOX 10 
32% 25* PSvEG 2J4 9.1 ■ 
IS 12 , PSEGPf 1J0 1CL2 
■40 30* PSEGPf 4X8 105 

40% 31* PSEGPf 4.U 1(U 
41% 32% PSEGPf 4J0 125 
30 38 PSEGPf 5X5 105 

-21% U% .KEG Pf 2.17 105 
2 5* 18* PSEGPf 243 HU 
33* 58 PSEGpf 7J0 10J 
74 $9 PSEGpf BXI 1U 

72% 55% PSEGpf 7J2 19X 
71% 54% PSEGpf 7X0 HL6 
91* 70 .PSEGpf 9X2 W 
4% 2* Puoiidt 

9* PihUo .16 IX 11 
« PR Carn 6 

12% PupetP 06 1BJ 8 
. . X* Pul Pan S3 

21* 10* PffitHm .12 J 15 
11% 16* Puratot A4l 15 
TO* 5% Pyre 7 


14% 

8 

17 

M 


1 % 21 21 

38% 27* +1* 

25% 2956 + * 

90 26* 25 25% + tt 

25 23 . 21% 22% +1 
137 23* 23 23* + * 

534 29* 29% 29%— % 
1574 31* 31 39% + % 

5 13ft Htt 13*—% 
2»I JV 39 39 +* 

20z 40 40 40 + * 

2008 41 41 41 

»?*<* « SL +vs 

47 28* 20* 20* 

29 23* 23* 33*— * 
631 OZ 75% 74 74 +1 

40r 72 71 72 +1 

50(7110 71* 71* + * 
1502 70 70 70 +2 

Ws fa ¥® 90 

wans 

212 16* 16* 14% + % 
18 7% 7% 

7490 17 IS* U* +1% 
04 H M IK 
650 13% 12% 12% + tt 


K 10 '43 

• 2113 


42% 32 ROCtiTl 2X4 
20* 17% RcttCtrnU6 
41* 29 Rackwl T.n XI 
147 103 Rklnfpf 1X5 IX 
75* 56% Rfltmfi 230 3J- EL 

70 41* Rofirln 10 

27* 15% RotnCm XO IX 33 

18* 4%RoilnEt .08 S 30 

13% 91ft Ra Hint . X6 3X 19 
3% 1* Ronton 
19 11' Roper M 4 X 



133 

267 

IX 


28 15% RukB^ 

» 15% ftusTM 

31* 21, RvwH 
35* 22 RydBrt 

29 19% Relond 
20% M8 Rymer 
13* 10* Rymer pfl.17 



38* 37* 37% — * 

It* 17* 18% + * 

9 2748 37% 35* 34*— 1 
3 131 131 131 
117 75 73* 73*- * 
554 57* 57 57* + % 
440 23* 37* 28% + * 
954 18% 17* 17*—* 
13* U* 13* 

2% 2 2 
16% 18% 14% — % 
35* 3S* 35% + % 
7* 6* <*— * 

m 

178 33* 33* 33% + % 

fli « Si ss-« 

SS*.^ SL.* 

633 27 28* 27 + tt 

91 18 17* 18 + * 
7 12* 1M im 


11 18 1738 


H ^ 80% 59* 


524 


83 X OurtOt 1X0 2J 16 1066 61* 69% 69*— * 
105* 91 QuoOpf 9X4 9J 4QZNU 104 104 +1 

25 17* OuofcSO JOd 34 19 131 23%23%23%+M 

ID* 5 Ouonex 18 166 4 6tt 5tt— tt 

34* 27 gurgor 1X0 52 11 2S 31* 31 31 


13% 

3 1* 5fodSwl 

26* 15tt SOttKIO 
37* 26* Sofmrv 


30* M* i 


X4o X 20 387 Site 30* 31* +1 


9* 5% RBind 
63% 34* RCA 
40 29% RCA Df 

135 80 RCApf 

40* 32* RCA pf 
9* 6* RLC 

4* 3% RPC 
22 14% KTE 66 

18% 8* Rodlce 
49 33* RotePur 1X0 

9% 5% Homed 

21% IS* Ronco X4 
Sfx 2 % RaftorO 
94* 52 ROVCm 
14% nt Roymfc 
20* 19* Ravnrn 227 

53% 37% RaytfM 1X0 3X 12 3022 
10* 5* ReadSt X4 J 444 

21*13 RdBatptXn 15X 
33* 14* RdB0tpf3X3el85 


14* 11*. RltRef 
17% 0% ReaiEa 
12* 7 Redmn 

im e* Reeee 
i% * Raeal 
42* 27* RalChC 
11% 4* RwAlr 

3 1% RepAwt 

12* 4* RpGyps 

52 36* HepNY __ 

29 23* RNY pfC X12 11 J 

57* 52* RNYpfAAXlellJ 
34% 24* RopBk 1X4 SJ2 
38 23% RepBkpfX12 7J 

183% 86* Stem OA.n» 9.0 
25% 15% RahCat -22 U 
29* 22* Revoo 
17* io% Revere 


Xfl J 53 » 5% 5% + % 

1X4 IX 22108729 61* 51% 59% —4% 
3JB L5 3170(41 38* 41 +2% 

m ID 216 HO 135% 135% + % 
3X5 BX 324 41* 40% 41 -M 
2D US MO 7% 7* 7* + * 

251 3* 3% 3% + % 

157 23* 21* 21*-% 
346 IM 15% 15% 

437 48% 48% 48% + * 
945 7* 7* 7T 

II 18% 18 Tl 
2103 3% 3* 3* + * 

599 93 92 92* + * 

51 10* 10 18 

20 % 20 % — * 
52* 54 +1% 

5* 6* 

13* 13* 13* — % 
“I T7% 17% + * 
14* 14% 14% — % 
13* 13% 13* 

■9* 9 9 — % 


2X 11 
W 
XI 15 
21 
4J 9 


74% 41% SGM 2X0 28 16 89 72* 73* 72* + * 

13* 9W£Llite 22b IX 10 3S7 1M12%12* + tt 
14% 19% SPST*C J8 X6 16 133 34% 34% 34* + % 

19 15 Sabtee M 2«'W 18% 16% 14% 

iff* 13% SahnRy 2J4el6J .445 u% u% i5% + % 

90* 13 SIOtfM 30 16 II *64 20 19% 20 + % 

— " 32 221 13* 13% U* + % 

105 314 3 3% + % 

J2 13 25 201 24* 25* V> + % 

1J0 4X 9 3351 37% 35* 37 + % 

X2 2P 13 449 25% 23* 25* + % 

172 M t 23 23* 22% 22*— tt 

1X8 10X 84 10* 10* 10* + M 

89 4* 8* IU — * 

jU 3 . 15 Ml 15* 33tt 35 - * 
2X4 M 9 735 28% 27% 27% + % 

xoerax v 2180 b* s* >* 

18 a ii* im 11% + % 

. XO IX 21! 7m 3ff* 37* 37* + * 

25* 20% SAnflRt IN U 12 B4 23% 23* 23* + * 

37* 34* SPeSoP 1X9 28 14 2512 35* .34* 35%— M 

50% 31% StraLae 1X0 12 13 1840 49%.' 49 . 49% + * 
39% ZMSfttWti 1X1 M 17 64 Wtt W 39 - * 

19% 15* SeuIRE 3® 1.1 46 8 II 17% 17*— % 


****iaSLp 


11 % 


9* 

12% 


18% I 

9% SPaul 
3% vlSotant 

MVSaUWA 
21% SDIeGs 
4* SJuanB 
8% SJuanR 


43% 29% Sandr 


X4 J 29 




.. 36 

31 471 
16 17 510 
41 94 

953 . ..... 

2.7 14 257 SOU 29* 30* +% 

6 5208 IT* TO* IT fa + te 

1053 2M 2* 2% + * 

534 9* 9 9 

184 51% 51% 51%-% 
9 27te Z7h 27% + % 

39 S3 53 53 

293 31% 31 31*— % 

5 27* 27* 27* + * 

2 181*181*101% + % 

_ _ 234 2» 24* 25* +1* 

XO 12 28 1179 24 25* 25*— % 

2 176 IM W* 1C% 


22* 17* ScwElP 1X0 70 
12% IBM SavEpf 1J2S 118 
V* 3 KMn 
13* 4* Savin pf 1J2I 

28% 21* 5CANA 116 L2 
42 35* SchrPlo 1X8 ^ 

43* 32* Schlmti UD 
14* 9* SdAH 

41% 53% Scot Pet 
47* 31* samp 
W* 12* Scottyi 
45 2516 SaaOit ... .. 

13 ID* SnaCtpf U6 110 
14% 1416 SaaCpfBlW IM 
14% 14 SoaC pfC 2_10 111 


15 12 
X 15 7 


27% T7% SsaLnd 
5%- SHSaaCo 
46* 34% Seaarm 


1X4 


3X 11 
12 9 


20% 15% Seoul 
". SateAkr 


32% R avion 1X4 12 19 30 57* 57% 57* 

180% 93 Rv%pfe9X0 9J 14 99* 99* 99* + % 
25* 18% Rejdrni JO 27 17 2S4 25K24*S%+* 
16* IT* Roxnrd 44 U n Ml 14% 15% 14 + U 

32% 24* Revnlns 1J8 S3 7 I£n75 28* 27* 28 — tt 

SO 47* Reytnpf 4.10 L5 4 48* 4816 .48* 

113% 103% Reylnpfll-50 1B5 614 110*110 Ira +16 

131 123* ReyinpfUM MX 985 110*130 130 — * 

41* 30 RevMH 1X0 28 57535*30*35* + % 

t7 45 ReyMpf 450 59 6 76 74 74 + * 

27% 24 RevMof 3J0 M 567 27% 27* 27% + % 

33% 71% RHeAM JO 2X 16 1170 24* 34* 24% 

7% 2% RvrOak k W M »■ 2%- 

39* 28* Ratnhw 120 3X 9 93 39* 39% 39* 

41* 19% Rotrtwi 1201 214 24 22% 23 

24* 5% vlRDtrim 669 IT* tl 11 — % 

24* 18* RocfiG 220 9J 6 427 24 23* 23* 


US. Futures 


Via The Associated Press 


Dee. 12 


Season Season 
Hlafi low 


Open Hl&li Law Ckse On. 


Grains 


WHEAT (CBT) 

5X00 du mtatmum- dollars per bushel 
3X3% 279% Dec 3J7 3J8% 143% 3J7 +X0% 

3.74% 187 Mar 147% 3JS 3J1% 3J5* — X0% 

4.03 284 May 125* 126* 120% 121% —XT* 

173% 2X3 Jul 2X7% 2X7* 2X8% 2X9* -X6% 

145 147 S«> 2.98 198* 289 2X9* — X616 

108 L. 293 Dec 3X8 3X8 3X0 3X1 • — X6 

Esf. Sales P rev. Sales 4.191 

Prc+.DavOpmlnt 30,138 up 347 
CORN (CBTJ 

SXQQbu mini mum- dollars per bushel 
295 214% Dec 242* 247 242% 244* +X4% 

297 224% Mar 244* 248 243% 247 +X3 

291* , 231 May 248 £51* 247* 250* +.03% 

284 233 Jul 247* 251 247* 249* +X2 

270 -,-224* Sep 2JS 234% 

2.35% 220* DOC 228* 230 

274% 232* Mar 215% 234 

Esf, Scries -Prey. Sales 22X30 

Pnjv. Day Open int.l34J95 off 1X13 
SOYBEANS f CBT) 
sxao tai minimum- dollars nor bushel 
6.79 4J8 Jon 5,17% 5L3t% 5.14 525 +.11* 

7X2 6X5* Mor 528 527% 527% 526* +.12 

729 4X9 May SJ9 5J8tt 527 547* +.13* 

6X8 .. -4X7 Jut 542% SJ4% 542 5X2% +.12 

6J1 498% Aua 544% 551 544% 5JD 

628 496 SOP 524 528 523 528 

622 498 Nov 5.17 525 516% 524% 

56J 5X9 Jan 528% 5X4% 528% 533% +. 

6X7% 519% Mar 539* 545 539* 5J5 

Eat. Sales Prev. Sales 33.911 

Prev. Day Open Jrif. 6942T off 1218 


134% 2X6* +X0% 
227 229 

224 226 


iM 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT] 

100 tans- dollars per Ian 

18400 12540 Dec 14120 14420 142.10 14120 

Jan 143JH) 14440 143J0 143X0 

Mar 14530 14620 144X0 14520 

May 147X0 14750 14600 t46X0 

JUl 148X0 149X0 147 JO 147 JO 

AUS 14750 14850 14750 14820 

Sep 14400 144X0 143X® 144X0 

Oct 1 3950 140X0 139X0 12950 

Dec 14020 141.90 140X0 14150 

Jon 140X0 

Prev. Sales 11X14 


163X0 
20650 
16250 
167X0 
15270 
167X0 
14950 
150X0 
15C-D0 
Esf. Sales 


127X0 

130.00 

13250 

13400 

11550 

13500 

13600 

134X0 

13600 


Prev. Day Open Inf. 42X34 w>237 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBTJ 


40X00 lb* dollars oar 1 00 lbs. 
29X5 11X3 DK 20X2 

21X0 

20X0 

21X0 

+1X1 

29X7 

1&72 


20x0 

21X7 

2QJ5 

21X7 

+1X0 

28X0 

1898 


21x2 

22X7 

21.18 

22X7 

+1X0 

27 J5 

l?^i 

MOV 

21J8 

22JU 

21 J5 

22J7 

tK 

25i25 

)9J6 

Jul 

21 XD 

22X5 

21X0 


2615 

19J0 


21.75 

22J5 

21J5 

3240 

+X2 

3605 

19J5 


21X0 

22X5 

21X0 

22X0 

+50 

zuo 

19 JO 

Oct 

21.75 

21X5 

21X0 

21X5 

+J5 

21.90 

19 JO 

DK 

2IJ5 

2L75 

21X5 

M 


21JO 

19X0 

Jan 

21X0 

21 JO 

21 90 

Est. Sales Prev.Sates 22X92 

Prev. Dav Open Inf. 44.741 uo)JS3 





Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

40000 ibt- cents per lb 
49J5 55X0 DOC 

6745 5 05 Feb 

6757 55 JO APT 

4625 5625 Jun 

6SJ0 5530 Aua 

fflliffl 5750 OCt 

6550 59.10 Dec 


6515 

61X5 

4120 

61X7 

4027 

59X0 

60X5 


65.9D 

42X0 

61.75 

61X5 

6050 

«50 

4020 


4445 

6127 

40X5 

6125 

59X0 

38® 


45X2 

42.17 

61.10 

61X2 

men 

58X5 


+J7 

+X2 


— X3 
— X5 
— X3 


ESI. Soles 21504 Prev. Sales 20399 
Prev. Dav Open Inf. 45281 up 75 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

44j«o Km.- cents per lb. 

'W «L50 Jan 6513 45X0 

71.70 60.42 Mar 6170 6670 

nxo 6060 Aar 6560 6635 

TOGO 60 fl May 64 JO 6517 

EM. Sales IJ93 Pre^Sates**! 1 J40* 
Prev. Day Open Hit. 10X69 up 392 
HOOS (CME) 

30X00 ids.* cents per Us. 


44X5 

6523 

6515 

4619 


6542 

6657 

66X5 

4470 

66X0 


+JH 

+57 

+J0 

+20 


SOX5 

J4JS 

Dec 

49JJ 

49.10 

4822 

48.97 

-vfl 

S0J7 

38.10 

Fab 

47.15 

47X5 

4652 

4730 

—32 

47 JS 

3612 

Aor 

4240 

4270 

41X5 

42J0 

— >15 

49X5 

39X0 

Jun 

4440 

4695 

4600 

4662 

+.12 

49 AJ 
51.90 

4CU5 

*075 

Jul 

Sff 

4650 

43X0 

45.10 

43.90 

4620 

4340 

4662 

43X5 

—.13 

41.10 

38X7 

4U0 

4035 

40X2 

48.15 

+X5 

49 JO 

38J7 

Dec 

41.15 

4L15 

41.15 

41.15 

+.10 

_ 41.75 40JO Feb 41 J5 41 JS 

Est. Sale* 6977 Prev. Sales 5X7S 
Prev. Day Ooen Ini. 26323 up 202 

41.fi 

41 J2 

—XI 


Season Season 
Hum Low 


Open Hteh Low aose Chp. 


Food 


COPPER CfNYCSCEl 


37500 1 bL- center 


ll 
19420 
19640 
199X0 
203X0 
3D650 
21050 
eryt^ 


Dec 187X0 188X0 18100 I86M 
Mar 189.96 189X4 188X0 189X6 
May 193X0 193X8 191.00 193X0 
Jul 19750 197X0 17125 177X0 
Sep 201.14 201.14 198X0 201.14 
Dec 20S5D 20567 20250 WCT 
Mar 2D6X0 20600 204X0 286X0 
May 21025 23025 20500 20MS 


Esf. Sates 4128 Prev. Sales JX4S 
Prev. Day Open Int. 14X06 off 234 


+728 

+6X0 

+6X0 

+6X0 

+600 

+6X01 

+6X0 

49X01 


SUGARWORLD 11 (NYCSCE1 
112X00 lb#^ cent* per lb. 


7J5 

3X0 


520 

520 

520 

5X8 

—07 

933 

334 

Mar 

611 

622 

607 

607 

-JD 

7.15 

3X8 

May 

630 

639 

625 

626 

+X1 

690 

339 

Jul 

645 

654 

641 

642 

+JS 

695 

434 

Sea 

653 

6S3 

6X3 

653 

+JM 

730 

607 

OCt 

6J0 

677 


& 

735 

+ 06 

735 

625 

Jen 

Mar 

738 

732 

735 

+X6 

JMmJEMW 





COCOA (NY CSCE) 
lomefrictan^Sf 


Z337 

1945 

Dk 

2185 

2193 

ZIB4 

2190 

+27 

7392 

19S5 

M or 

as 

2259 

2236 

2249 

+23 

2422 

19*8 

Moy 

2297 

2278 

2290 

+24 

2429 

1968 

Jul 

2292 

2315 

2292 

2306 

+27 

2430 

2023 

Seo 

2115 

2334 

2314 

2328 

+28 

2425 

2385 

20® 

2029 

Dec 

Mar 

2334 

2334 

2330 

2340 

2351 

-Ml 

+31 


Bet. Sales ' Prev. Sales 1X61 

Prev. Day Open lot. 17,927 up 178 


ORANGE JUICE (NYCE1 
15000 tab- cants per lb, 

IB0X0 11120 Jan 11750 117X0 112 
Mar 119X0 120.10 11B 
May 12020 121X0 119X9 128X0 
Jul 12150 122X0 17M0 17150 
Sep 11TX0 119X0 119X0 11525 
Nov 11840 110X0 11L40 110X0 
Jan 119XQ 

Mar 119X5 

May m.23 

Prev.5des 2X33 


17750 

16250 

15750 

10050 

11850 

113X0 

161X5 


Est. Sates 


+1X0 

+1.10 

+1X5 

+1X9 

+1X9 


Prev. Day Open Int. 10X38 up 122 


Metals 


COPPER (COMCX) 
25X00 IbL- amts per lb. 


8435 

58X0 

dk 

6610 

6615 

63.15 

6130 

8620 

5673 

Jon 

Ms 

6610 

6610 

6610 

6169 

■un 

5930 

Mar 

64X5 

6670 

6333 

*3X0 

7600 


Moy 

6695 

6693 

6600 

64X6 

74J0 

60S 

Jul 

65.10 

65.10 

6630 

6630 

70.90 

6050 

Sop 

65L30 

6530 

6670 

6650 

7030 

7030 

6135 

6330 

Dec 

Jon 

65J0 

6440 

6100 

64X0 

6690 

<7.90 62X5 

*7-30 6190 

6620 6335 

66X0 61X0 

E*t. Soles 

Altar 65X5 65X5 
MOV 

s 

Prev.Soles 11329 

65X0 

64.10 

6535 

65X8 

64X5 


—X 
—X 
- J5 
— J5 
— iTS 
—XO 


Prev. Dav Open ML 80X99 


ALUMINUM (COMEX) 
48X00 lbs^ cents per lb. 


70X0 

7650 


41X0 


73X0 

6675 

43J5 

52.10 

52X0 


42X0 

44X0 

44J8 

46X0 

4895 


49J5 


51X0 


49X0 

5045 

51X0 


DOC 
Jan 
Pib 
Mar 
May 
Jul 

SE. 

Dec 
Jar 
Mar 

SMS 49 JO May 

50JO 50X0 Jul 

52.15 5L90 _Sep 

Set. Sales Prev. Sales 318 
Prev. Day Open ML 1X75 up32 
SILVER (COMRX) 

SXOO fray az.-cenfi per trey az. 


49 JS 
etn 
91X0 


48X5 
4935 
49 JO 
5040 

51 JS 
51X0 


53X0 

5190 

SS 

56X0 


+X0 

+X5 

+J5 

+J5 

+J5 

+JU 

■MS 

+J5 

+X5 

+J5 


12300 

5700 

DK 

5800 Wn 
SSflLO 

579X 

5867 

+83 

12150 

5765 

Jon 

5060 

587.1 

+7X 

619X 


Feb 

5888 9900 

9*00 

5910 

+73 

11910 

5788 

Altar 

5908 596J 

5880 

5958 

+60 



May 

5960 *060 


SRI 


wsx 

S9SX 

Jul 

608X 612X 

MO 

4113 

9400 

6050 

top 

6150 6190 

6120 

<183 

•HIX 

799X 

789X 

6)10 

6300 

Jan 

6220 6300 


*305 

6368 

+BX 

+90 

7700 

62SX 

Aur 

6413 6413 

6365 

6433 


752X 

*468 

Aiiav 

*500 6500 

*485 

6523 

746X 

6500 

Jiri 

6645 6605 

657X 

661X 

+9X 

7293 

«vx 



u&o 

671X 

493 

EsLSates 

Prev. Sales 26.925 





PORK BELLIES (CME) 

3LOOO lbs.- cents per lb. 

76X0 55.75 FSb 4LM 

7540 55X5 Mar 6SJO 

75X0 £7.05 MOV 66X0 

7600 57 JO Jul 46M 

73.15 5550 AuO 63.75 


Eit Jafes 5X24 Prev. Sales 6705 
Prev. Dav Open Inf. tfll off95 


67 JO 
66X5 
67X0 
67 JO 
65X5 


64X0 


j Gurrency Options 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
OPJW* Straw 
Undertylna Price 
..Dee Jan Mar Dec Jan 
12X00 BritUli Peandvcantc par (toH. 
B Pound 
T4U1 
143131 
I43J1 
I4JJ1 
141X1 
141X1 
14131 
I4M1 
140J1 


Dec. 12 


110 

33X0 

* 

r 

r 

t 

r 

ns 

28X5 

* 

r 

r 

8 

r 

120 

ms 

* 

r 

r 

s 

r 

i» 

1BJ5 

* 

r 

r 

8 

DOS 

no 

1400 

r 

13X0 

r 

r 

0X8 

I3S 

858 

830 

r 

r 

r 

1X5 

148 

3X0 

r 

r 

0X5 

1X0 

3X0 

IU 

0.10 

130 

3X0 

1X0 

140 

5X5 

1)0 

r 

0.40 

150 

r 

r 

r 

iw r r Hoe 

km DoHore-ceal* Per unit 

r 

r 

r 

71 

r 

r 

r 

r 

an 

r 

73 

0.10 

r 

0X7 

0.10 

0J6 

073 

73 

r 

r 

038 

1JOO 

1X6 

r 

74 

r 

r 

4.15 

r 

r 

r 


0X1 


COeilr 
71X1 
n.9i 

71.91 _ 

«j580 west German Mar* rants per 
37 7X7 g 

3267 33 661 > 

7 14 5X2 1 

39X7 35 4L63 r 

»X| 36 164 r 

£X7 37 2X4 r 11 

39X7 38 1X4 1X2 3X7 

»X7 19 0X4 0.97 1X8 

»67 40 LOS 0J6 IJM 

41 r 0.19 0X9 r 

inXM French Francs-iom of a cent per usH. 
FPnonc 115 14X0 r r r 

129 4X0 r r r 

6290X01 Japanese Yen-IMKit M a oef per tmlL 
JYrn 41 849 i r r 

4»Jf 42 7J9 r r r 

44 5J3 r r r 

*9J§ 45 r r r r 

4948 46 245 f * r 

49J8 47 U4 247 2X5 r 

49J8 48 1J5 r 1JB 

4948 49 044 UX0 1X9 

SO 0X3 L19 0X4 

iUOOMtt FroMs-centi per unit. 

S Franc 38 9J4 * r 

S J-3 • m« 

47J5 43 4JS r r 

47J5 44 3X0 r r 

47JS 49 r f f 

47JS 46 U6 r r 

47JS 47 0J5 0X5 lAl 

47J5 48 001 0X6 1.18 

47X9 «9 r 0,14 r r 

„ F»h Mm Aue Feb May 

fUHwmt German Maflocenfs per unit. 

DMarfc 43 r s s 2J0 

Total call vol HUM Call eeae Inf. 

Total pvt veL 6309 PMePealaL 

i — nbi traded. •— Naept ion offered. 

La t l is premium l purchase price). 

Sourer: 4P. 


0.14 

0X3 


0X6 

0X9 


0X2 

nm 


0X1 

DX1 


0X6 

0X0 

0.74 


0X2 

0X0 

1.11 


ax* 


0X3 0J1 


0X2 

1X8 


Av* 


»SX*9 

189X86 


Prev. Day Open Hit. 87J84 off 443 
PLATINUM (NYMS) 

50 tray uz.-doflaa per tray OL 

352X0 330X0 DtC 32650 

37150 257X0 Jan 326X0 332J0 326X0 328.90 

3SZX0 329 JO Fib 329X0 

3 6 7 JO 264X0 APT 332X0 336X0 331X0 332X0 

366XO 273X0 Jut 315X0 339X0 33100 33620 

369X0 303X0 Ocf 340X0 34200 339X0 339.90 

371X0 347X0 Jon. 344X0 

EcL Soles Prev. 5cl«s 6443 

Prev. Dov Open Int. 16X87 off 704 
PALLADIUM (NY ME) 

100 trey or-dolkr* par oz „ 

141X0 B9J3 Dee 93X0 93X0 92X0 93X0 

127X0 90X8 Mor 94X0 9*73 933a ?C70 

114X0 91XO Jun 96X0 MX0 94X0 95,70 

115X0 «4X0 Sep 97X0 97X0 96X0 96X5 

110X0 9425 Dec. 90X0 99X0 98X0 9820 

en. Solos 400 Prev. Soles 613 
Prev. Day Dean I id. 6J6S offBl 
GOLD (COMEX) 

loo tray oz*- dollars per tray oil _ 

489X0 301X0 Dec 31630 318.10 31620 317.U 

Jon 318X0 

Feb 319.10 321x0 31670 m*ai 

Apr 322X0 325X0 22260 324X0 

Jun M7.10 OTX0 326X0 327X0 

Awe 33200 mOO 331X0 331XO 

OCt 33670 33670 33620 33S.» 

Dec 339X8 3«IX0 338X0 

Feb 344X0 344X0 344X0 344X0 

Aar 3485(1 348X0 346S0 34050 

Jun 353X0 353X0 353X0 353X0 

Aua 35670 astro Sbjo 

„Oct .363JS M«® 363X0 

Prev. Sales 43X40 


+5X0 


+5X0 

+5X0 

+5.10 

+610 

+5.10 


+215 

+2X5 

+235 

+2X5 

+2X5 


485X0 

496X0 

4257D 


30600 

31470 

320X0 


39570 

393X0 

36280 

9BSJ0 

7MX0 

3tBJ» 

JS44JSLI 
Est. Sales 


331X0 

33690 

313X0 

34630 

350150 

3SAJH) 

36600 


+J0 

+J0 

«n 

+xo 

+X0 

+X0 

+J0 

+J0 

+J0 

+XE 

+XD 

+X0 

+X0 


Prev. Day Open inL134X83 unZ283 


Financial 


92X4 

9117 

9106 

92X1 

9253 

*2X8 

92X0 

9179 


*2X8 


fin 

9287 

*2X1 

9230 

72X4 

91X0 


+X1 
— JJ3 
— JQ 


—XI 


— X2 


92-2 

91*4 

9D8 

89-13 

88*20 


92+ -9 

91-18 -13 

90-12 — M 
89*17 —19 

80*25 -16 


US T. BILLS(IMM) 

81 million* phenol) PO. 

93X0 0577 Dec 9195 *104 

9131 8640 Mar 9126 9XSS 

93X0 87X1 Jun 9116 «119 

92.95 8800 top 91X9 92X3 

92X9 19X5 OK 92X3 92X6 

92X3 I9J3 Mar 9?J8 9228 

92X9 9050 Jun 92.00 92X0 

9174 90X3 ..Sep 91X7 91X7 

Ete. Salts Prev. Sales 17X46 

Prev. Dav Open Hit. 36X40 uel^l 
« YTL TREASURYfCBT) 

Sl06000prln-nt9&32rute el 108 per 
92-24 75-13 Dec 92-8 92-21 

*1-31 75-14 Mar *1-16 91-30 

91 7630 Jun W» *0-29 

tw BO-7 Sep 89-22 89*22 

to* 8G2 Dk 88X8 88*28 

EiLSblea Prey, Sales 71485 

Prev. Dav Open ML 70X88 up 795 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 
(Bpa-5100X004ni632ndSOfl0QpCt) 

8617 Dec 84-7 8629 8340 8341 -IS 

03*12 97-2 Mar 83*1 83-16 82-13 E-22 —15 

82-7 56-29 Jun 81-25 82*11 814 81*18 —13 

81-2 5629 Sep 80-22 81-8 80*10 80-16 -13 

W*6 5625 Dk 7941 80*10 79*17 79-17 — U 

79-9 5627 Mar 7J-1 79*15 78*25 7628 -7 

78-18 63-12 JWl 768 78-26 78-3 78J —4 

77-JU 63+ Sea 77*19 78-7 77*14 77-14 *4 

77-13 62-24 DK 77-3 77*16 76X8 7628 —8 

762 67 Mar 7615 7648 7615 7619 —6 

7626 6629 Jun, 766 766 766 766 -3 

EsI. Sales prev. SaiesI34J31 

Prev- Dav Open lnlX00X83 ua2X61 
MUNICIPAL BONDS CCBT1 
SUMx lnden-«Ni632nitae( lOOnct 
90-70 81-17 DK 89-* 9GB 89*20 89X0 —4 

90-21 80+ Mar 90-2 90-14 IM4 09-30 —11 

2.. Jun 862* 09-7 0617 8624 -11 

868 79-10 Sen 

Eif. Sales Prev. Sates 4X48 

Prev. Dav Open int. 12X39 wi42 


87-24 —11 


Season Season 
Hkdi Law 


Open Hiah Low Ctase Ow- 


es RT. DEPOSIT^IJHNU 


>1 mllHon-pfiofli 
9Z5D 85X4 

92X3 B6X6 

92X4 8643 

91.79 87X6 

f\M 8834 

9025 88X0 


Ok 

Mar 

Jun 

top 

Dk 

Mor 


9232 

92X1 

9243 


92X4 

92X7 

9243 


92X9 

9255 

9241 


Eat. Sales Prev. Sates 137 

Prev. Day Open Int. U66 off 65 


92X8 
9259 
924) 
9213 
vi jn 
*1X4 


141 23 22% 32% + % 

5 11% 11% 11% 

453 3% 3% M + tt 

87 4%. 4% 4%— % 

._ 9 377 26% 26% 26% — % 

27 17 7074 61% 59% 61% -HZte 

14 1020241 36 33 35% +2% 

.12 IX 16 1696 11% 11% 11% + % 

XOe IX 11 41 60% 60% 60% + % 

1X4 24 11 944 47% 46% 47 + % 

“ 618 15 14% 15 +% 

163 37% 27% 27% — » 
20 12% 12% 12% — % 
29 16% 16% 16% 

46 16% 16 16 — % 

J8 21 13 *08 22 22% 2»— % 

141 3% 3% 3% 

IX 14 1930 46 45% 45% + % 

25 IM 17% T7% 17% + % 

34% 22% SeaDUr J4 U 11 219 33% 33 33% + Vi 

32% 22% SealPw 1X0 3.4 10 216 27% 2636 27% + V 

40% 301ft Sears L76 43 11 14115 41 40% 40%— % 

107% 97% Saonrt pf 9XBe U 200 103% 103% 103%— % 

31 1ft 24% SecPocs L34 4J 7 1615 31% 30% 31% + tt 

33 18 SvcQpg 22 294 32% 32% 32% + % 

18% 11% Shaktee X 4.1 18 406 17% 17% 17% 

27% 17% Shaw In JO 2X 9 324 28 27% 27% 

40% 29% Sheirr 2 57a 65 7 1831 37 36% 36% + % 

30% 21 ShetGto X0 3.1 7 2734 29% 27% 29 +1% 

36 23% StMlGpf 1J0 45 11 31% 30 31% +2 

46% 25% Shrwin .92 2-0 15 473 46% 45% 45»— Vk 

9% 5% Shoetwn 12 752 0% 8% •%+% 

15% 12 SitimM XO 4fl 15 181 15% 14% 15 +% 

20% 15% SlerPac 1X6 BX 11 106 30% 19% 19%— fa 

43U 26% SI near JO IX 10 1870 41 «% 40%— % 

33% 2SU. ST nor pf 3X0107 15 32%32%32% + % 

T7% 12% Skyline 41 12 It 249 IS* 15% 15%— % 

30% 20% Stottenr JOe U 23 19-31% 30% 31% .+ % 

14% 7% SnUKlIn J24J 291 7% 7% 7% + % 

73 SBM SmkB 3X0 39 12 2136 76% 73% 76% + % 

51% 24% S [defers 103 50 49% 49%— % 

41% 31% StnmOn 1.16 2X 14 323 42 40% W-%— % 

15% 12% Snyder 2X0 15L7 16 114 12 12% 12*— % 

43% 31% Sana! 2X06X 9 . 685 32% 31% 32 +% 
20% 13% SanvCp .16e XT749M20%20tt20% + % 
32% 22% SooUn 1X0 4X . 36 28% 28 ~ 

41% 33% Source 3X0 78 77 42% 41% 4X6 + % 

23V. 19% SncCppf 2J0 HU 26 * “ 

25% 20% SCrE Pf 2X0 10X 

30% 34% SaJerln 248 87 12 

49% 38% Soudwn lXOb 24 11 

38 24% SeefBk 1X0 3J 12 

V 5% 5oetPS 2131287 43 

27% 21% SCalEd 2.16 El 

23% TTftte South Co 2X4 9J 


26% Zlte SoInGss 1X0 65 T 

45% 33%SNETT 2X0 61 12 

39% 32% SON Ear X82 9X 

30th 24% SoUnCo 172 6.9 


T 23% S%-^lte 

256 36% 35% 35* + tt 
. 118 7% 7V, 7% + % 

8 2663 26% 26% 26% + % 
7 4863 22% 22 22 — * 


<2 25% 26 26 

165 46te 45* 46 + 

3 40 40 40 +‘ 

917 25% 24% 24% 


48% .44% 40 
43% 60* 


EURODOLLARS (IMM) 
Slmlllton-otsaf IOOpcL 
92.17 14X0 Dk 92X1 

92X4 86.10 Mar 92X7 

92.10 0673 Jun 92.10 

91X1 B7X8 Sep 9L83 

91X9 87X8 DK 91X4 

91J26 B7X4 Mar 91X4 

91X1 80X4 Jun 90X6 

9073 89X9 S«P 9073 


92X9 

92X5 

92X0 

91X2 

91X9 

91X9 

91X2 

9075 


*1X8 
92.19 
9204 
9177 
91 J7 
91.17 
90X3 
9073 


92X0 

92X6 

92.10 

91X3 

9L53- 

71X2 

90X11 

90X7 


45 24% Soutlnd 1X0 2.1 11 4701 

601ft 49% SOuild Pf 4X0 64 45 „ „ . 

10 111ft So Ray .12 7 23 329 17 16% 

10% 5* SoumriC X® 13 6 1017 10% 10% 

51 46 Somkjrf 6XM137 10 47% 47% 


31 


— X4 


Eat. Safes Prw.Sates 79X83 

Prev. Day Open I nt J59J1 1 up 1X17 
BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

Sperpound-ljiolnt equal s smiOOl 
1 MTS L0200 DK 1J32S 1-4425 1J29S 1J325 

1J86S 1X680 Mar IJ200 U295 1J17D 1J2B0 

1J75S 1.T9D5 Jun 1J120 1JT75 1J0AO 1JB70 

1.4300 1X785 Sap 1X835 1X835 IXS35 1XS95 

1.4550 1.1590 OK 1-CM! 1J00O UNO 1X908 

Est. Sales 22530 Prev. Sales 24X16 
Prev, Day Open Int. SUM up4 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

Sperdlr-lptenteaualsSlunei . _ 

,7566 7006 Dec 7197 7273 7191 Tin 

7504 X9B1 Altar 7174 7193 TTHi 7172 

7360 TWO Jun 7166 7176 7755 71* 

7303 7090 Sep 7152 7155 7152 7137 

7568 7H7 Dec 7120 

EH. Sales 3X18 Pnev.SaleS 5X10 
Prev. Day Open Int. Hi5i7 off 559 


— -B2 

-JM 
— JD 
— JD4 


+135 

+135 

+125 

+135 

+131 


16*. 9% SwtFor 
12* SwfGai 
88% 66 SwBell 
29 19% SwEnr 

20 SwtPS 

17* 13* Searion 
27* 15% SpectP 
59 17* Sperry 

40 31% Springs 

43* 35% Square 
801ft 49% SauM 
24* 18% Staley 
23% 18* StBPnt 
17 10% StMatr 

55% 39* StdOOtl 

76 71% SOOhpf 17S 

23* HMStPocCs JO 


.13 J 17. 1094 29* 29 


303 11 10% 

1XS 7J 8' *3 17* 16* 

600 73 t 1549 fAti 83% 

X2 2X 8 317 20* 19% 

202 7J 10 W18 2S* 25* 

57 14386 132 15% 15% 

. . 151 23% 23 

1X2 37 87 3507 51% 51* 

168 4B% 39* 

675 41* 
U87-'ffl% 


i-3 



—7 
• —7 

— 18 . 


FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

S p er franc- 1 point equals 50X0 001 
.13078 -09670 DK .12990 .12990 .12*90 

.12985 .10985 Mar 

.12930 .12130 Jun -• ■ 

Eit. Sates 8 Prev. Sales 18 
Prev. Day Open Int 200 off 5 * 


28% Wft StdPrd JU 2.9 I 

16% 12* Sfemdsx 51 27 ID 

32 24 StimWk 1X4 3J 12 

38* 29 Slarrett 1JB 2X 11 

11* 9% staMSo ixo lax 
2% Steego .121 4A 

14% Started 76 U 10 

9* sweep X0 57 10 

41* 26% SterTDO IXO 3X 15 

30* 16% StavdJ 1X0 . 4.1 
>1 25% StwWm L6B 5J 21 

14 10 SflCVCpf LOO 74 

54 


.12998 

.12930 

.12890 


+40 

+150 

+150 


X9S9 J971 


JQ23 JIMS J821 


JIBS 

Jora 

J110 


GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

Spartnarfe-l point eaua Is 10X001 
J009 397} Dec X961 X985 

J046 X040 Mar J995 J018 

-4000 X33S Jun 

J122 X762 SOP MU JOTS 

J156 X300 DK JOS® -6110 

Est. Sales 25X37 Prev. Sates 31.148 
Prev. Day Open InL SUM up Ml 
JAP ANISE YIN (IMAM 
sper ran- lpgtait equals 01800001 
004988 mm Dk JD4935 X04953 J004931 X04942 
084996 4I04B2S Mar JD493BX049S7J004935. 804944 
HUMID 00*230 Jun JU4951 JH4970 -004949 JB49SI 
085005 X04690 Sep J049tl JB4974 X04960 X04972 
004985 -004158 Dwc JM07 

Est. Sales 19,137 Prev. Steel 11554 
Prev. Day Open Int. 37X66 up 915 
SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

Sper franc- 1 Paint equals S0X001 „ 

JB31 ^1 DK J735 J760 -4730 AU 

.4885 X835 MOT J7B4 J807 J775 -4783 

J925 mm Jun J82B J849 J8I6 JOBS 
J93D -4798 Sep J86S 

J905 JteS.DK J9K _J*05 J905 J9BJ 
Est. 


+18 

+18 

+18 

+19 

+17 


J8 IX 16 


2J0 


■HO 

+31 

+31 

+24 

+29 


38* StonOW 1X0 3X 10 
34 Slonec M 17 43 
StapShp UD U U 
. . StorEO 1X2 WX 13 
r , l* vtsiorT . 

I' 17- StrtefW TlltoTX..-. 
k 14% StridRt JO 35 40 
• 4* SuavSft 

38* SunCh 
j 6* Sun El 
« 22* Sun En n 
i 43*S»mCo m 
no* 9016 Suite pf 2X9 13 
53% 40 sundstr 1X0 3J 14 
9% 5% SuiMn 
7* 7 SunMpf 1.19 15X 
40 31 SunTrst 1X0 3.1 11 

23* 14% SupVall X8 17 17 
50 30% SupMkt JB X 14 

17% 12 Swank M IX 21 
22% UK Sybran 1X8 13 19 
19% .30% Svbrnpf 2J0 73 

16% 10% SymsCp 16 ._ 

86% 44% Syntax 1X2 12 17 1DB 88% 89% 86* +* 

43% 36 SyntXWt 50 44% 43% 43* + % 

44* 31% Svscn 44 IX 19 398 44% 43% 44* +1% 




52% 

9% 

7% 

37* 

764 5\ 49* 

Ml 12* 

337 T9* 

20 33% 33% 33% 

73 13% 12% 12% — % 



n 


49« J015 DK J9Q5 JB 

it. Salem 23X02 Prev.Sates 22X17 
w. Dav Open Int. 31.M6 up 934 


+19 

+18 

+17 

+13 


50% 30* TDK 
36* 27* TECO 
12* 7 T&F 

21* 13HTNP 
31% 19* TRE 


Jte 7 , 
2X6 6X 10 
13 
1X5 
1X0 


S3i° 


•3% TRW 3X0 |X 40 


19 


Industrial* 


LUMBER (CMS) 


lS§Og SM.f S. - £per IJMD b^ft 


34 45% 45* 45% — % 
457 34% 34* 34% — * 
195 8 7* 7% 

149 X0% 19* 20 +* 
573 rn 29* 29*— * 
468 B3tt 82* B3% + « 

772 is T“fcn+ iK 

30* + % 


187X0 

195X0 

174J0 

183X0 

176X0 

101X0 

171X0 


13348 

13970 

14930 

149X0 

1S2JU 

156X0 


Ete.Sales 1.1 ■ Prev. Sales 1729 
Prev. Doy Open Int. 6X87 off US 


HB5070 132X0 150X0 151X0 
Mor 1MX0 157-30 T55.1D 156X01 
May 159X0 16050 TS8J0 l gw 
Jul 163X0 16370 162.18 IM 
Sep MUD 165X0 164X0 165X0 
Nav 165X0 165X0 164J0 165X0 
Jan. 16830 168X0 168X0 170X0 



COTTON 2CNYCBI.. 

SO^bwcKtepw^r 

7UXO 58J0 MOV 

70X5 58X0 Jul 

2S-2 2? 

59X5 4970 [*C 

UJS 5149 Mar 

®75 50X5 Mai 

Esf. Sales Pm, 

Prev. Day Oaen Int. ~ 


193 ISO TRW or LSD 
5% * WTocBt 

■7% 52* TtrffBrd 1.16 1 J 16 
21% 13% TaHev JOe 1.1 13 . 

23% 15 Talley Pf U» 4X 5 20* 

■9% 56* Tamfard 2J0 3X 16. 372 89 BBW 80% - 

41 23* Tandy 20 3281 41* 40* 41% + * 

17* n* Tndvcft 17 31 .17* 17 17 

MV, 47* Tektrnx 1X0 IX 14 3M1 56* 55* 56% +1 

5% 2* Teicain .9 66 2* 2* 2*—* 

300 227 TeMvn 11 401 299 294* 296 -3 

94 12* Tel rote JO 24 22 345 16% 16% 16*— % 

60 31 Telex 14 352 59% 58% 5Rk— ■% 

61% 31* Tempi n 44 IX 12 1361 43* <» 43* +1 

45% 38* Tetinco 3JM 7X 14 3531 38* 38* 38*— * 

105% *4% Teacpr 11X0 107 , 9 103 !02%10Z*-I . 

32* TT* Terdvn 19 3612 25 24* 38% + * 


G Marts ^ 
High Low Slodt 


Dlv. YW. PB 


Ste. 

NBlHWILOw 


Clew 
Ouoi. are* 


12 Manfli 
manure Bode 


Dfv. YfcLPE 


5* 

Mk Mon Lew 


Owe 

QuoLOiToe 


594 41% 41* 41* + 1ft 1 
1 55% 55% 35%—* •• 
9S4 30*. 29* 29% — * . 
2262 35* 34* 34% + * ' 


i% wSiss 204 ot ^ S ^+* _ 

13M6 tS|FH 1 2X0 1X194 1304 MB* 1K% - * 34* ®* Wuge? 

13* tS0G6 .18 IX 11 13TO 14% 14* 14*— % 

34% 2ff% TltPoe -40 IX 24 24 31% 31% 21%— S 


J6 


25 IS 
7X 


31% 25* Taxlilll 252 W 
-4* 2 Texflln „ 

59% 31 TMiBfl 1X0 XX 9 
. 65 34% Texfrpf 2X8 

lltt 4* Thock 
28 24% Tbodorf 4.15 15X _ 

23* 10* Ttirnit & a 

43% JOtt ThmBel 1X4 M 19 
20 15* Thom in Mb 37 io 

is* H% ThmMed JO 3X 11 
£4* 18* Thrmv X0 
24 . 12* Thtwtr X0 
10% 9* Ttoertn ^ 
em 40 Time 1X0 
23% 14% Ton phi 
58% 38 TlnwM 1X0 
53 .41% Timken 1X0 

9% 4* THcei 
11% 8* manp( 1X0 
39% 24* TodSiW 1X2 
21% 15% Tokhms J8 
21% IM TolEtes 25atelX 
29* «* TolEdPf 172 12X 
30% »% TolEdPf 375 1ZX 
28* 23% TalEdpf 3J7 125 
33* 28% TolEdPf 428 12X 
20* 16% TalEdpf 2X6 11X 
18* 15*T«eite 2X1 11X 
3) 10 Tonkas .It X 


BX 

47 14 
27 11 
6 


41% 26 TOotRol 
2D% 14* Trcftm ■ 
19* 11* TarsCn 



X3f 


2JS 15.1 

Tranent 1X8 4X 17 

. T ranine IX 105 
14 11% TARltv un 7J 91 

21* 15* TmCdanl.12 73 6 

57% 44 Trentca 6.990144 48 
66% 53 Trascpf 3X7. 65 
54* 50% Tmeepf 475 9J 
24* 18* Tran Ex 2X6 12X 
13* 5* Troraat 7 

97 . 85% TrGPpf 854 90 

26 22 TrGPpf 250 95 

13* SM TrasOh 6 

47% 29% Tranwy ixo 3X 13 
43% 28% Tmwfd 


25% 1^% Twkf wtA 


7 3295 30* 29* JO — » 
248 3% 3% Jtt + tt 
9 1884 51% 51 51 - % 

2 55% SS% 55% + * 
61 W% IM* 1«— » 

3 27% 27* 27% + tt 

£33 21% 30 m-1 

T41 40 39 40 + % 

143 lfftt j*% Jfif + % 
104 14% 13* 13*— tt 
5W 24% 24% M%-* 
496 13 12* 17* + * 

674 8 7% 7% — % 

U 18 2811 63 43% 62* + % 

19 474 21% HJ% 2HJ + * 
27 15 1492 50*54* 55% + % 
42 55 473 43% 41* 43 — * 
334 8* 8% 8* 

4 11% 11% 11% 

57 2M 28tt 28% + * 

429 18% 17* 18 + % 

469 21* 21* 2T« 

J?S*5Sg* + tt 

30 27* 27% OTft- * 

23 33* 33* 33* 

11 20 19% 20 + % 

19 Utt 18% 18% + tt 
358 3® 29tt 29*— * 
40 57% 54 54 —1 

425 24* 24% 24% + * 
272 19% 19% 1» „ 

879 4 3% 3%— tt 

250 7 6 ft*—* 

3fi 3 2* 2* 

30 4005 39* 38* 39% +1 
IX 13 31B8 20% 1»% 19* + % 
197 13* 13* 13*— tt 
11211 18% 14% 16% —2 
311 15* 14* 14*— * 
761 34* 34 34% + tt 

42 23% 21* 2V% + tt 
3 12% 12% 12% 

364 15* 15% 13* 

564 48% 48 48% + * 

M 59% 58% 59% +1% 
10 51% 51% 51% 

531 19% 18* If* + * 
310 7% 7% 7% + tt 

6* 97 96% 96% + % 

579 26% 26 26* + % 

417 13% 13% 13% 

89 46* 46% 46% 

38% + * 


28% 20% watUn -= 
u* 8% wayGitt X0 
92 19% WavG Pf 1X0 

12% 3 * WeonU 


IX 11 
7X 


+ % 
+ tt 


15 


J8b X 
X8 ZJ 12 
JO 2.1 11 


Mt 24 23 23* + % 

2946 37* 36% 37% + tt 
IX 12 154 27 26% 26% 

- 10 lltt 11* lltt— tt 

W 23 23 23 +1 

58 4* 4% 4% + tt 

via* tew vrrhhn X0 1.1 10 381 19 18* 19 + % 

19 wotnRn Si 10 35 19% 19% 19% 

WettMl 3B U 23 778 42 41* 41%— % 

S «% wSteF* 27244 8 293ftZtt62 42tt+tt 

29% M% WteFrt 2X0*125 9 414 22* 21tt-% 

SS irM . 6 xitiinsiiM S^TlS 

ls-S-sbj fCSS ; 

M% 10* WetetTO 1X4 ■” YM ’I* * 7 % '?*"+ tt 

9% 3% WnAW- 0 Ttt 79e 4 * + % 

3 % ft WfAIrwt 313 2tt 2% >% 

M% 11 WAtrpf 2X0 XX * M 24 +■* 

IU) WCNA 46* Mi 2 2 

, 5 ^% 16% WCNA at 775 3U I » W* » 

I 3 B% 99 % WPad 11 .39 139 138% 139 

Stt 4* WstSL S JO I J 5 M 1 J* 14 

S3 wuteon SUB Wft I3tt 1» + * 

45 % 34* MfnUnaf 2 Jf® Jf" Jf” w 

46 26 wnu ptc 4 ** 46 46 

7% 2% WnUafS J* + 

14% 4tt WnUptE W ]?tt 12* , . 

*9 M Wim Df J 41 41 41 — i 

IS* 5% WUTIteA 22 lltt 14% MW ■ 

IS? S E I JO 17 1410328 45tt 44 45V.— tt 

34 24% Wrveril 1J0 4.1 30 323 3) % 3) gtt- tt 

44tt 37% tetevrpf IM 6X ml— ‘tt" 

7X m. 76tt 75 76tt +ltt 
ZB 8* 8% 8% + tt 
2708 19 18% 18% 

3307 14% 14% 14% 

4.1 11 1683 49% 48 49 +! 

467 34 33* 34 + tt . 

4 41% 41% 41% + tt ■ 

180 26 25% 25* — tt.. 

495 21% 20* 21 + % 

5 13% 13% 13% 

39 13* 13tt 13V>— * 

... _ _ 333 14* 14% 14% + Vi-, 

33% 26% William M0 5X 21 1814 28* 28 28 + tt 
6* 7 WllmEI 9 N tti 6*— * 

7* 5tt WllShfO .10b 1.9 13 
38* 30tt WhiDIx 174 5.0 13 

1b0 16 


f 


' t 4\ 

r- 


& 


51* 46 Weyrpr 4X0 
91 75 WhetLE 575 

lltt ftttviWhPlt 

37% 14* vNVPIl PfB 

31% ratt vlwnpttirf 

Sfffe 40% Whlrtpl 2X0 
34* 25% WhltC 1X0 <14 
45* 38* White P«3X0 73 
34* 19* Whltehi 10 

26% 17% WMHak X0 19 10 

13* 6% WMrttfdt 3X 

IS* 8 Wilfred .12 X IS 

14% 7* WlllocG .10 7 6 


IX 13 2114 38% 38 . . 

2 20 * 20 * 20 * + % 

34* 27% Twfdpf 2X0 6J 13 31* 31% 31%— % 

49% 34% Trovler 2X4 4J 11 3277 46* 46% 46%— % 


55* + tt 


58% 50* Travpf 4.16 7X 

29* 22* Tricon SJtollX 

30 2z* TriCnpf 2X0 9X 

35 7* Trfcdns XO X S 

37 23* TriaPc 1X0 28 ID 

94* 32 Tribune 1J» ix IB 
6* 3% Triaitr X3B13J 5 

7* 5* Tries X0 3X 13 

im 12* Trtotf XS 3.1 

35* 14* TrltBia .lob J 19 1146 24* 23* 23* +1* 

43* 32* TUC&EP 100 6X 10 342 43* 43* 43*— tt 

19* 9* Tultex J8 £6 16 31 18* 18% 10* — * 

20* 16 TwinDs JO 48 15 11 18* 18* 18* + * 

48* 31* TyCnLb X0 17 14 W 48% 47* 48 — % 

17* 12* Triers JO 2X 14 196 16 15* 15* + * 


66 55* 55 

244 29 28ft 

9 27 26* 27 — tt 

595 34 31% 33 +1* 

66 36* 35* 35* 

304 54* 53* 54 

276 3* 3* 3* 

35 6* 6* 4*— tt 
572 16% 16 16M + tt 


20* 8% WlnrtbO X0 

9* 5tt Winner 
9* 3U WlnterJ 
40% 20* WlSCEP 2J8 
93% 72* WllE Pf 8X0 
81 63% WISE Pf 775 

40* 28* WbePL 276 
40* 29* WlscPS 2X6 
41* 30% WltOD 1J8 
9% WolvrW 34 


64 9 
9X 
9X 

7 X 9 
73 9 
38 10 

61* W% Wtetwth 2X0 3X 12 17S 62% 61* «tt + % 

85% 50% Wtewpt 2X0 25 .? “St % +2 & 

5* 2* WrtdAT ,, 61 4* 4tt 4V4- * 

94* 54* Wright 1X00 MIS S 91 90 *1 +1 

4* Ztt wiintxr 5 3% 3tt 3tt 

X2 2X 65 1*1 15% 14* 14* - 

40 3a 13 79 16* 16% 16* + % 


153 5* Stt S% 

153 35* 34* 34% — * 
469 11% lltt lltt — tt- 
216 7* 7* 7* 

43 9 8* Btt— tt 

455 39* 38* 39 + % 

SOM 90 89 90 +1* 

Bill 79 7V 7* 

104 39* 39* 39* 

50 40% 39% 39%— % 
229 48 39% 39% 

423 12* 12* I2H 


16 10* WvleLb 

23* 15% Wvrms 


60% 36* Xerox 1X0 5.1 20 3537 99* SB* 59%— % 

56* 48* Xerox Pf 5JS 10X . 14 54* 54% 54%—^ 

29 20% XTRA M IB 13 263 22* 22% 22% +* 


u 


59% 39* UAL 
36% 28% UAL Pi 
17tt 18* UCCEL 
30 22* UDC/1 

24* 20 UGI 
25% 21 UGI Df 
11% 8* UNCRm 
14 10% HRS 


1X0 

2J0 


39* 25% U5FG 
48* 26* USGs 
19* 12* UnIFrst 
138* 84* UntNV 
41* 33% UCamc 


5.1 


66* 32* UnCorb 3J0 
7% 4* Union C 

23* 15* UnEtec VM 89 
40 31% UnElpf 4X0 11X 

41% 3D UnElpf 4X6 11X 
34* 2B* UriEI pfflftUIO 124 
74* 57% UEIPfL LOO UJ 
28 21* UnEI pf 2X8 107 

20% 16* UnElpf 213 187 
26* 22* UnElpf 272 102 
72 56% UEJpfH 8X0 IM 

24 . 37* UnEXSn Jin 23 


1.9 2520 S3* 51 51*— 1% 

77 306 32% 31 tt 31tt— I* 

1« 16* lft% 16% + % 

4X0 17X I 198 m 22* 22*—* 
204 97 12 185 21* 21 21 — % 

275 1L2 24% 24% 24% 

165 10 9* 9*— tt 

JO 3.1 15 361 W* 12% 12* + % 

58 1199 31* 38 38% — * 

3X 8 571 48* 47% 47% — % 

12 15 32 17* 17* 17% + tt 

430e 3X 13 117 135% 134% 134* — % 
1X4 4X 17 1652 39* 37% 39% — % 


30% Z4* ZotaCP 
23% 19% ZalePtA 
17 7% Zapata 

61% 32* Zavres 
25 16% ZonittiE 

21* 15% Zeros 
41% 24* Zumln 


1X2 4X 13 67 29 28* 29 + tt 

J0 U 5 22% 22% 22% — tt 

.12 IX 57 401 8 7* 8 

J8 X 18 1440 63* 99* 6T* +H 

908 2911 20* 19* 19* + * 

32 IX 18 1® 21 20* Wtt + * 

1X2 3J 14 49 38* 38% 38%- * 


2X0 

U8 


| NYSE Hghs-Lows 


13717 67* 65% 67 +1% 
713 M 7tt 7* + % 
1615 20* 20% 20* 

701 39 39 39 + * 

400E 40* 40* 40* — * 
45 32* 32 32*— tt 

26ftz 71% 71 71 —3* 

97 27* 27* 27* 

33 20 19* 19* + tt 

12 26* 26* 26* 

770z 70% 69% 70 — % 
1908 IB* 17% 17%—* 


NEW HIGHS 211 


52* 38* UnPae MO 3X 12 3840 50* 49* 49* 

115% 89* UnPcnf 7X5 ftX 68 110% 109% 110% +1% 
74 - S3 Unrripf 8X0 11.1 2014Qz 72% 72 72%—% 


AS* X 13 


5* 2% UnltO r 
25 10% UnBmd 

18* 10% UBnd pf 

33* 18* UCbTV* .10 X 52 

26* nift.UUIum 132 LB 5 
% 24 UlUupf 3X7 137 
20 14% Ultlupr 2X0 1L9 

32U. 24% Ulllupf +00 13J 
15% 12 Ulllupf 1X0 13A 
25 15* Unfttnd X0b 2J 10 

43 35* UnitTnn 32 S 42 

37% am UJerBi 1.16 37 11 

10* 11% UldMM 

m 2 UPtEMn 

38% 27% UaafrG. 

8* 5 USHam 

*2% 31% USL0O8 

46 24% USShoe 


.13 J 


JIO 21 11 
.92 U 14 


33 23* USSteeJ 1X0 47 24 BS2S 26% 


56M 49* USSII pf SXlelLI 
38 25% USSff pf 2X5 BX 

39* 29% USTab _ 172 55 10 
88* 66* USWest 572 6J ^9 


41 2% 2% 2% 

12 24* 24% 24% — % 
23 18% 18* 18*— tt 
138 33tt 32* 32* 

165 26* 26% 26% + tt 

14 29* 28* 29 - % 

1002 18% 18% 18% 

16 30% 29* 33 — % 

53 IS 14* 14*— % 

174 25% 24* 24* 

7 44* 44* 44*— tt 

134 34 35% 35* + tt 

263 18% IBM 18* + * 

85 3% 3* 3% + tt 

3536 31% 30 30%—% 

B99 6 5* 6 + % 

194 38* 38% 38% + % 
616 4Mb 44* .45. + * 
““ H 


AGSCpfr 
AdvanSvst 
AmBTO275Pt 
AmlntGrp 
Amertm 
And ran Grn 
AaxTDGPf 
BoxtTr pfB 
BlkHlIlPw 
Barman 
ColFed 
Cartel 
CtmebaP 
Clarion Hm s 
CwEllTOpf 
Cromte Kn g 
Dean Foods 
DhmoCp 
DukePpfP 
EajtnUtll 
Par West Fn 
FlnCpA dip 
FtOearbnS 

GIANT Group 

GriAmFst 
Harcouri 
HuntMte 
infra Res pf 
Keycorp 
LfbertyCP 
Mark Ctrl 
MasMut me 

raiser* 


ARX Inc 

Aterandrs 

Am Express 

Atna-T&T 

AmrepCPS 

Anhewr i 

AVEMCO 

R ea rS t r nen 

BIOCkHRl 

Brunswick 

Cal Fed Pf 

CenLaEtoc 

arm Bell 


CteumblaSviio Comdla 
CwE 237 Pf Cent Tel. 


«* unSicfc 




45* 34% UnTecti MO 51298 3436 <5* 44% 44*— tt 


526 37% 36* 
1494 23% 22* 
71 21* 21% 
105 23% “ 

57 23 
125 28% 

238 23* 

32*5 23% 


39% 31% UTdtPf 2X5 69 
25 20% UniTel L92 83 9 

21 15* UWR . 1X8. 6X 16 

32% 17* Unitrde JO X 21 
23* 16%' UnfvoP 60 li I 
29* 22% UnlvFd 1.12 3X 11 
23*. Iff* UnLeof 1X0 43 9 
S3 26% JJnpcol . 1X0b.4X 6 __ _ _ 
141%I63 *i.UPMU>v2XD X.1- 23 2968 13V* 
43 32% USUFE 1.12 2X 11 430 40% 

11 . 9%. UllfeFd TABOWX " 

25* 21 UtePL 2X2 9X 13 
28 22* UJPLPJ 2X0 10X 

28* 23* UtPLpf 2J0 lOJ 
34 - W UtPLpf 2X6 WJ 
21% 16* UtPLpf 2X4 10X 
27 19 UHIICd MObSX I 

24* 28% util COPT 2X1 1L9 



9 10* ra* 10* + tt 
660 25* ^4* 25tt + tt 


51% 25* VP Cara 1X8 2J 12 
14* ft Votero . 139 

25* .15* Voter Pf 3J4 141 
Stt .2% Vateyln 
28* If VonDrii 1X0 3X I 
3* 2%. Varco 
42* 22% yoritm X6 X 24 
15% 9* Vara JO Zb s 

25* 13 Vseco JO 2.1 15 

11* 9* V ertSs IXDalOX U 
13% lKteVBntn 13 

66% 30% Viacom JS X 23 
74* 59 VaEPpf 773 10X 
83* 66 VaEPpf LB4 10J 
*3 70* VOEP Pf L60 10X 

95 -74 VaElnf L60 M .. 
94* 74* VaEPpf 975 10X 
75 5m VaE pfj 772 MX 
71 SS VoEP D» 7X0 IM 
74 SB VaEPpf 7J5 103 

13% VfihOVS ■ 1| 

83 33% Vamad 25 

90%. 66% VWcnM 280 U 14 


689 52* 51% 52* + tt 
7t6 12* 12% 12% + .tt 
40 24% 24% 24* + tt 
71 2* 

113 27% 

45 4* 

497 29% 20* 29% + * 

144 14* 14 14%— % 

339 18* 11% 18* + % 

157 10% 10 10 — % 

183 11* 11* 11* 

232 Tl* 11* 11*— tt 


NCRCp 
New Ena El 
Nucor 
OverShlp 
Pansoptilc 
I PertsElmer 
Ptilia Elec 
PtlEI 775pf 
PSNH429MC 
PSNH 345pfG 
RCA JSQpf 
■ RqytfMon 
RexhamCp 
Rubermde 
SfesrdScwt- 
StarteryGp 
SourceCappf 
SautfiindPf 
SferinoBnep 
Syntax 
TnrlftvCp 
Un Carbide 
VOEP 772»f 

jssS,* 

wouihix mi 


Crown Crk 

DelexCh e 

Dattedson 

DukeP pfM 

EastKadaki 

PedICa 

PstWtec 

Friotfronc 

Gillette Co 

Greyhoun d 

Herman5ptn 

HydroulCo 

Jamas River 

KoreaFd 

LincPIacPd 

Market 120 p 

Metmtmx 

ManarchCap 

Motorola 

Nat Distill 

NorflkSaa 

OtiEd 3S0pf 

OwensCno 

PontrvPrtde 

Petries tr 

PtlEI 460pf 

Ptedmt NGs 

PSNH375MD 

PSEG 7B0pf 

RCA Cv4of 

Reece Cp, . 

RavnMZ3Bpf 

RvderSy** 

Savannti EP 

SnapCkiTool 

SouNEngTI 

Sprlnoslnd 

StoeMWeb 

Syntax wl 

Toledo Ed 

Unftlnd 

VaEP884pf 

WavrrGaspf 

Wotewttite 


AbbtLab* 

AltenGa 

Am Sou Bop 

Anhnnrpf 

ESSW 1 

BollBemk 
BundyCp 
Coro Fratif 

Isco 

Jem 

DartKrfts 

DetE 745pt 

EotanCp 

FedNotMta 

Flemlno 

Gaplnc 

GlendataFdl 

Gallon ind 

HoUdavCOrp 

ICN Ptiarm 

JeweKnr 

L B O BM CBBn 

LaGtnISvc 

Marriott 

Merc o ntSt 

Mont Paw 

Murntnas 

Natsvctnd 

NoemlUtil 

OhPtv 7*ptB 

PoeffTel 

Pmaft 160pf 

Pfizer 

PhEl 171 2pt 

PSNHZTSte 
PSNH-386ofE 
Pueblo int 
RCASASPf 

ssmsaKi-**' 

SPSTetei 
Soars Roev 
Sony Carp 
SauNET pfA 
Sou tab Core 
Sundstrand 

Tandy 

TmGPL2S0p 
utdWafer 
Wat Mart 8 
WnPoc Ind 
Zayre » 


Adam Minis 

ALLTEL Pf 

AmHerlTU 

AmWatrpfC 

Analog 

Antnem ~ 

BardCR 

Benat5fi0pf . 

Bardens 

CIGNA 410pt 

CatarpTr 

Churned 

ClnG928Pt 

ComlMefl 

CrayRschs 

DarionHud 

Dexter 

Dreyfus 

OuqU210Pf ■ 

EnmonEI 

FederDStr- . 

FordMot 

Gen Record 

GtedWstFn s 

HarUtm Inv 

HondoyCpA 

IndionaGass 

Jahnun 

LeagPtaft 

Magic Chef 

MascoCp 

Merck Co 

Mon loom Se 

NCHCoro 

NevodaSL 

NnwtPlpepf' 

OftPw227Pf- 

PanABnk 

PeoBovse 

PhefpsDSar 

PhEiwapf 

PSNH 281 PfB 

PSNH 32SpfF 

Quick Re) I 

RTE Core 

RmrchOJ. 

Rollins 

SofwrdSci 

Shawl ltd 

SourceCOD 

Southland 

stdProd 

SuprMkf 

Tmdycrtt 

TrantO Fin 

Van Dorn 

WalMwtpfA 

WlTIcoxGbs 


6 


NEW IJ3W5 If 


on jmm t n 
2* 2* 

28% 20% — tt 
4% 4% 


Alglnt2l9p 
BoxtTr pfA 
CrystBrdn 
GtobMarpi 


5S52lS? ,pir 5^2y2 , “? D gankAmodlp- 

BTOteiHtl ButtraGSPt ChasMn RTF 
DtamStim EntaxEra GtobMar 
NrixxamGp MesaLPn RevereCopr - 
v(T acorn Boat UntonE*P) n 


**** 


„ 74 75% +2 

MX. 85 83 15 +3 

84 84 84 + * 

20k 91* 91* 91*— tt 
lOOr 93 93 93 + tt 

?5te 73 74 73 +2% 

.150* 69 49 49 +2 

12001 73% 72% 72% + % 
105 X .29* 30 . +.1* 
.73 78* 69* 70 + * 
37 10* 90 90 — % 


EC Imposes Duty on Imports 
Of Ethylene Glycol From Sandier 


nr 


1 


31% 2ft WICOR 242 
25* 16% Wodtht JO 24 


OX 9 


102 30* 30% 30% 

_63 24. 21. 23*— tt 


Agenee France- Presse 

BRUSSELS — The European Comm unity 
imposed on Thursday a 13.5-percent tariff for 
the rest of the year on Saudi Andrian ethylene 
glycol, a petrochemical used in antifreeze ami 
other products. 

Petroch emi c al s from the Gulf countries nor- 


f 




snh ivttwumt''M a so is£ sal 3?%. 3§i + * mally enter the EC free of duty up to a certain 
m n* watern..4? « ra am ^ gjj + 1 amount per year. But the EC imposes duty 


25* mt WUfRsolS 
40* 29* Wdcsv JO IX n -245 


39* 40% + .* 


when rn^orts go above the amount 



GoimaSiities 


London 

Commodities 


HEAT I He OIL (NYME) 

asrs 

as sa ss 

60X0 «675 Apr 

MOV 

75X9 63JD Jun 

JJXQ 65X0 Jul 

7L15 64X0 Aug 46X0 

EM.Sateg _ Prev.Satai 21x76 
Prev. Dav Opon Int. 33J2S off 963 


Dee. 12 


7V70 80.15 
7190 79X0 
73X0 74X5 
70.10 70J5 

66X0 69 JO 
64JD 66X0 
6650 66X0 


79X0 
77 JO 
73X5 
6* JO 


(6X0 

66X0 


79J0 

7BJ0 

as 

66x0 


+X0 

+91 

+J1 

+X7 

+.11 


+J5 

+JU 


HM Low BW 

SUGAR 

Fnmdbi froaca Mr.motrte tan 
1X90 1X73 U87 

May 1J15 1X94 IJB6 

Aua ij60 um M55 

Oct MM 1J83 MI5 

DK N.T. N.T. 1X10 

/War N.T. ' N.T. 1 J65 


Aik Cb*gg 


Dec. 12 


Aik aw AM 


1X89 —8 

Mia —10 
1J65 —7 

1X00 —3 

lAH —11 
1J79 -14 


CRUDE OIL (NYME) 

1X00 bt»L- doUare MT DDL 
31.17 24X8 Jan 27X0 

30J3 24X5 FK 26X0 

29J8 2613 Mar 25X9 

»JS ZL93 APT 25. T 5 

XXS 7516 May 24J0 

»X6 23X7 Jun 268) 

27X3 2X60 Jul 24X5 

Z723 ^50 Aug 23X2 

27X0 23J0 Sop 24X5 

3*X3 2X32 Oct 2667 

26X0 2X16 DK. 23X0 


EsLSaJea Prov.Safin 31,191 

Prev. Day Op«n Int. 67J9S up him 


27 JO 
2670 
25L99 
25-50 
25X0 
74 o n 

2690 

23X2 

24X5 

26X7 

.23X0 


27X9 

26.10 


+XB 


24X5 

2603 

23X2 

23X2 

2667 

23X0 


26X0 

^ a 

is 1 

2XA2 — v22 

33 33 


Stock Indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
points and rent* 

307X0 175X0 

210X0 182JB 

228.15 1B3.90 

7UXS 1B7X0 


Ete- Sales 97X27 Prev.Satai 9L520 
Prev. Dav Open Int. B2J5B up 357 


D«C 206X0 207 JO 20550 207X5 
Mm mx 21 MS 2DB+2 210.15 
Jun 211X0 212X0 210X5 212X5 
Sep.? 1X3 214X0 212X0 2H2S 


+XS 

+JS 

+Ai 


Ep. voL: 1J50 tot* of 50 tan*. Prev. actual 
■atas: 1X72 lot*. Opralntarrat: 30340 
COCOA 

BPirlNbi 

Dra 1X75 1X73 1X85 1X05 + 20 

Mor 1X25 1XH 1,925 1.929 +18 

May N.T. N.T. }JM0 . — +15 

Jftr ILT.. N.T. UW — +20 

SOP N.T. N.T. 1X35 — +20 

Me H.T. N.T. 1X55 - +20 

. _ N.T. N.T. 1X60 — +20 

E*t. voLi 40 lot*, of 18 ton*. Prev. actual 
■ate*: 71 lot*. Open tntareftf: 412 
COFFEE 

SMUT 1881m 

Jan 2X30 2,140 2X10 . 2X30 — 10 

Mar 2314 1236 2X86 237 —8 

MOV N.T. N.T. 2320 2X50 -10 

Jly 2X45 2X65 2X90 2J0S +17 

toP N.T. KT. 2J44 2J66 +20 

Nav N.T. N.T. 2466 — +19 

Jan N.T. N.T. 2J» .— +30 

Est. voL: HO tots of S ton Prev. edute 
aates: 133 lot*. Open biterate: 37* 

Source: Bourse du Commerce. 



Mar 


VALUE UNE(KCBT) 
points and cants 

317X5 1BL40 Dk 21 M0 3)2X0 710X0 

717.00 19QSB mar 21il0 ?16J0 

1^-9? JWl ZIB30 218X0 21675 
218X0 200X5 58P 271J0 

Est. Sola Prev. Sate* 7X48 
Prev. Day Open Int. 16X13 uoflS 


URIreasuries 


Dec. 12 


NYSE COMP. .INDEX (NYFE1 
poJntaandCMife 

119X5 101X0 Dec 1193 119X0 11670 119X5 

ni£ » MW m-10 121 jo mra izijo 

123.10 10690 Jun 122-70 122X0 T21J5 f 

mas lCLto Sop mxs rasas rauo 

ES.Sote* 13X38 Prev.Sates 16221 
Prev. Day Open Int. 12X54 up 683 


-US 

+25 

+20 

+.13 


DteCfflot 
Offer. Bid 


YteM TteWi 


SnmidtTbiU 

ftaaanbni 

TfiarM 


7X4 

7X2 

7X3 


7X2 . 

7X0 

7X1 


727 

7J9 

7XS 


729 
7J2 | 
7X6 


HM Low Bid 

SUGAR 

Starflra »or iPteric ton 
MPT 161X0 TSU0 159X8 1OTJ0 lS7.2g U7J0 
Moy IftSJO 16U0 163X0 1020 14128 Ml JO 

» 169X0 167 JO 167 JO 76660 166X0 16660 

. 174J0 171X0 171X0 1T2J0 WU» 17020 
Volume:. 1,117 tot* of 50 tom. 

COCOA 

starting par metric In 

un 1201 U» 1205 1206 

1236 1248 12W 1252 1253 

1248 1288 1 X9 12a 1“ 

1281 127D 1274 . 1275 J 

. . 1286 w8f IJM 1X00 

1X00 7X00 1295 1X83 1X09 1X10 
Vofumo: 2685 Iota of W ton*. 

COFFEE 

Starting per metric too 

■ DM 1X99 2X73 2X80 2X43 2X80 
2.160 2X45 2230 DU 2X96 2.100 
Zoo 1110 lifts 11M 1155 1160 
.1255 1165 1315 2220 23) 2212 
. 1292 2217 12S2 t3m 2258 3255 
2X30 1265 2J86 1290 2X73 2X99 
on N.T. N.T, 1328 3X80 US 1340 
Volume: nm let* of 5 fen. 

GASOIL - - 
UX-dollm pot metr ic te n 

.24225 231X0 23675 229X0 235X023523 
237X0 moo moo 234XD 23U5 232X0 
227X0 219X0 225X0 m2S 222X0 

217X0 Z1MD 2T3X0 215X0 21173 

213X0207.00 207X0 2HL00 202X0208X0 
210X0.207X0 207X0 M50 28475 203X0 
zn» 208X0 20BM 209X0 205X0 206X0 
210X0 207X0 20L00 209X0 204X0 204X0 
-N.T. N.T. 207X0 20X0 200X0 212X0 
VatamK AUS tots of ISO torn.; 

CRUDE OIL (BRENT) 

UJL doUCK par barrel 
Jan 2648 SXD 2605 2610 24X0 2650 

Fob 2673 25X5 2125 25J5 24J5 2520 

M ' HM UB . 25X0 24X0 .25X0 

2405 24X5 2610 21X0 22X0 25X0 

23J0 2U0 23X0 M0 21X0 25X0 

2390.2290 2281 2620 20X0 2SX* 


SL 

Sap 


Feb 


Ate 


JIT 

AUf 


API 


Jim - 


MAJOR MKT INDEX (CBT) 
point* and right* 

288* 249* Dk 287* 218% 285* 

289% m Jn atemm! 

M* 271 Mar 290% 290% 217* 

Eta-totes Prev, Soles 248 

Prev. Day O pot Int. 1X20 oH 6 


Sftyr.band 


Bid Offer 
1032/32 W4/3g 


Ytetd- 

9X6 


YfeH 

■9X3 


Votanw; 117 lots of 1X00 Barrels. ■■■ 
SowvMiAeutenomiLaMaaPetratevmEx- 
ehmm fgaoolL crude oH). 


Sam: Sala/nan Brottmn. 


Commodity Indexes 


Moody's. 


Reuters. 


dj. Futures, 


Close 

ra jo f 
1JT670 
125X7 
229 JO 


Com. Research Bureau. 

Moody's r base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
d - preliminary: f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 16 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1974. 


Previous 
92630 f 
1,781 JO 
124X8 
227X0 


JfttsriB Lrntei Trmary tedeu 716X5 
amgeterOwdor: — OJl 
AimNlWCMIh 

Scarce: Merrill L/peb- 


. S4PW0 
Index Opfions 


DM(Uure$ 

Options 


Dec. 12 


IV. German M akJJUCtBmtoaOt eer oat 


Martet GuidP 


CBT; 

CME: 


NYCSCEU 

NYCE: 

COMEX: 

NYMB: 

KCBT: 

NTFS! 


CMeogo Board of Trade 
CMcaao Mercantile Externa* 

Iriwryrttencl 

B*ta Yortt cgtan Exchange 


strike - a*nmo 
Price Mar Jn Sop 

22* IB — - 
3* 1X5 X» - 

« 1X0 lx* 201 

41 4161 150 1X6 

a 035 066 Ml 

45-BX1- 


. Dee. 13 

PVMMM 


U4 

0X1 

OlH 

LSI 

LB 


8X7 172 

899 .— 
IB . Mt 

£ 2« 
1U — 


Stt* . CflBftLsft .' . 
Met Dk. Ja* M Mar 
IN 32* - - - 

175- Wh 25%' 2M 

W TIE a- 2H — 

It) Wt 17* IT* 17 

HO O SB U% 14* 

MS -7% Mb W M 

m 2* 5h Nft KA 

as * -3* 4% • HA 

hi te . wj a* m 

2715 - W% 1L - IBr 


Pttlf-LBH . 

OK tee FW Mor 
1/tt - Iri* - 
I/M 1/U 1/IB - 
1/16 VM % * ' 

VW.W Mi urn 
i/iftji i i/uin 
3ri6 I5/M2M » 

1% » 3* 'I 

4 a 4* r 
t* m Hum 

— 14% 14%. 1491 


Ssnsfi* Yor* 

• wwrwnfiw 


Jgrara CW tewra' S TrS?” 
New York Futures Exchana* 


EMta|teHMMV8L60B t 

Coo*: WM.KL 3X49 raeoteL 36647 

Pute; WteveLUII trap tat, WU9 
So u rce: CMC. 


Ttaft* aW wtetK EUti- 
T*Ma«wntaLENtH . 
TDtnJ put va to ne 15* JB 
Total But swnhtieMW- 


MdbTOU LowSATI 

Source: CBOC. 


■X3eum24*0S2 



SlliaAPORI GOLD FUTURES 

■uxxr 


Dec. a 


DK. 


HM LOW 
N.T. N.T. 

. 319J0 319 JO 

Mor N 7f. N.T. 

Volume: 41 lots of ioo oz. 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 


BM 

181X0 
181X0 
18200 
18400 

May — 11653 

Jun . 189X0 

Volume: 0 lata. 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Sttgapore cent* per Mlo 



RSS1 Jan— 
RftSl.Feb- 
RU7Jtm_ 
RS53Jan— 
RSS4JOO— 
RSSSJan— 


155L75 

151X0 

W9X8 

145X0 


156X0 

15625 

152X0 

130X0 

M7J0 

142X0 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Ntalantan ringgtiiper 35 tan 


Prev tom 
BM A* 
156X0 156X0 

15650 157X0 
15UD 132X0 
149X0 150X0 

145X0 147X0 

140X0 142X0 


OK. 
Jon, 
Fob. 
Mar . 
Ate - 


BM 

ne 


rewtera. 


899 

855 

835 

a » 
810 
800 
NO 


ixo 

853 

85S 


no 

025 

IQS 


S70 

860 

850 

850 


Nav 

VObme a tata of 25 ton*. 
Source: neuters. - 


810 

800 

790 

780 


020 

KM 

040 

850 

860 

■» 

840 


830 


j London Metafe 


Dec. 12 

CJoie 
BW 

ALUMINUM 
Starung par mairic tan 
toot 7»A 730X0 731X0 732X0 


BM AIK 


forward - 755X0 7BXB SftJO 757x0 

^S R p^?S MB, ‘ 0 ™ fcJ 

tote . 969X0 969X0 992X0 992X0 

Hfe 8 »«w — 

to9T WM0 979X0 

8KX0 977X0 997X0 99fS 


Forward 


Stcfftae mt mterfc ton 
spot W7X0 368X0 360X0 26LSD 

276X0 


PogWd 27SJB 2MXQ -274X0 

Siwflna per mMrtc ton 
to®* rauu rauxo moxo 3cnun 

3HSM 2050X0 2900X0 SSxo 


SILVER 
wen per trey oun c e 

402X0 403X0 '4)4X0 
413X0 41600.415X0 416X0 


Forward . 

TIN (Standard) 

Staring per metric ton - 
tote... - sun... .sun, — — 

xitte swp. ta uv - 

Starling per maMe ton 
too* . .. 44508 450X0 445X0 44650 


SOaraerAP. 





Commodtlv and Unit 
Coffee 4 Santas, lb 


Prlnfdolh 44/20 38 %, yd _ - 

State Wlfeta (Pitt.), Ion 

iron 2 Pdry. PWta. hm 

Start ftterap No 'hw p, it _ 


Sliver N.Y.oz 
Scarce: AP. 


Company 


Dec. 12: 


Per Amt Par Ret . : 


9 —41 

Q 37Vz 


INCREASED 

Cornel Core 

□leboid Inc 

Dwfexprocucts q ,« 

Mart G rowth tnv Q JO 

Sbawmut Corp Q m 

Slandard Registar a .id 


Grow Group Inc 


STOCK 


i-n i-d - . 

3-10 2-18 v 

l-M 13G»- -* 

1-15 1-8.. 

I-a 13-23 

W 2-2^. _ 


Iv 


. 9* 1-31 l-W-.b 


STOCK SPLITS 


-2+ot^l 

— 2-tOtal 


USUAL 

Caro Carp CM 
Commer. Metal* Co 
ComgrtheiL Cceie - 
Conchemcoinc 
P tatw o nd-flatti urai 

“AC Industrie! 

Eneta Bute. Forma 
S«2“«*2tenPwr 
'^P^&tewPubl, 

ij£35Jr£!5 M * i 

MCGODCOtp 

~?S£'Kr»* 

Jtortakinc 

Prrlnl Core 
Perftil inv Prop. 
PWraiitacorp 
PoiWeiusu Inc 

totfe n ’ erua 

too Una Corp 
Stoctnun Control 
JCA Oibta Tv Inc 
Tela. A Data 8y* 

TabcanCora 

Texas Oil s. Co* 

TrtnjtYbwramra 

yxi&rz*** 




13S2B '•* 

1-23 M-- 

«0 Min, 

s TO- 

« 1-15 • 


J4 12-31 lMH 7 1 
■JS W 1V24 • 

■10 1-W 12-27- ra 
-16 3-10 1J0 
X9 1-10 12-27. ry 

36 2-1 1-2 ■ 
jn Kn -12.77-. ■ 

JD 3-14 2-14 . 

■J" »■" MJ. i 
x i-w - . 

■» M 12G3 »•. 

% 1-23 vfl - ■ 

jo i-ix 

jp 1-17 12-23 . 
^ »■» *T4'". 
■“ 1-31 MOV. 
* 1-2 12.19 
1-0 




& 


S J2% 
J5 


gTfaht j wm E) Co 


Zapata ■■ 

Zayre Core 


narnmnr: rararttriy; 


Q ' JS ijm 
- XI 12-27 iWi--: 
0X4% l-« 1^27-.^ 

i'Jl ns.:; 

Mi 2-14 __ 
3-3 T-E-r' 
2-3 1-3 , 

M7 2-21, 

2-3 1+ -- 

1-3 1343 " : 

2- 14 1-31 

3- 27 2-6 : .4 


8 35 
Q 25 
O 44 

9 M 

«X9% 
G JB 
O .12 




v\ 


•40BR- 


town*: upu 




^MB^WTIONAl. 

HUiUQB 









Reties Index 


P-M Earali®* mart* P.17 
■:■* pl,MSNtflM>P. M- «■ «*»"•» PM 

! '-•'•• .V ( mien P. 8 Gold morttttt P.U 

J •? <!MsAm P.W nm P.tt 

‘ & stocks; P.18 narWswnwv P..8 
- - rotes. P.» tWlPM . P.» 

: "* MS .OTC ftA - p.17 

- » :’; ? iias ' P.T3 OtarnaiMt fc»: 


HeraliOEEribune 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, M-l, Page 8 


j= ^flPAY, DECEMBER 13, 1985 


** 


■ s;^ 


■-« *;■; 

-■• V 


Page 13 


TECHNOLOGY 


'■vi 


he Hypersonic Airplane 
i Speeding Toward Reality 





Officials foresee 
it as a 


By DAVID E. SANGER 

New York Times Service 

EW YORK — Tremendous progress in the design of a 
new class of jet engines known as scramjets is propel- 
Hug the fantasy of a hypersonic plane toward reality. 
For years research on these jets, also known as super- 

ic-combusdon ramjets, bubbled along in federal research 

jratories on a shoestring bud ge t. 

; / ' ‘'hen three weeks ago President Ronald Reagan’s science 
*’j :A'isa and the drief of research and development for the U.S. 

■*. ' ■ Force disclosed that they were ready tn commit half a hfllirm 
! .‘ s' ars over three years to refine the engine technology, in hopes 

- developing a plane that 

- -vki cross the United States 
■: il2 minutes and circle the 

J :-jein90. 

- . - ■ ; the effort works, it could 
S f‘ ‘.-h® 03051 significant change yfSV to lanndi and 
. airplane design since the J m 

- y Ration of the jeL Air force retrieve satellites. 

-J -rials say scramjets may ' 

^ : i ae it possible for a plane to 

- ' off from an ordinary runway and quickly accelerate to Mach 
even Mach 25. With the aid of an on-board rocket booster, 
~ 7 ^->^plane could even propel itself into orbit, paving the way for a 
less expensive way of launching and retrieving satellites. 

— ^J The uses are limitless,” Major General Donald J. Rutyna said 
i-ZI^aitly. “Transport and reconnaissance are obvious uses. But 

- .^prospect of an engine that works so efficiently and doesn’t 
J - y : ounter the costs of launching a rocket or even the space 

v )• rtlle is one that we'd be foolish to ignore.” 

! ; if Most jet airplanes use conventional turbojets, which suck in air 
— ^^Idnmp it into a turbine-powered compressor. Tbc compressed 

! bdly| jjj the back nozzle. The process isideal forsubsonic travel, both 
±es its Hmit at about Mach 3. The weight of the compressors, 
^ of a plane’s heaviest components, slows the aircraft. More 
wrtant, the temperature of combustion and aerodynamic 
-ting rises so precipitously at high speeds that engines begin to 

a. 

: :X '-r CRAMJETS, however, require no compressors. Instead, air 

/ j % flowing through the engine at supersonic speeds compresses 
’ / itself because of the “ram action" — familiar to anyone 
:Vi?_ ding his hand out the window of a speeding car — of air from 

- •; yf outride colliding against the engine. The self-compressed air 

- r hen mixed with fuel and burned. 

•.-.‘7, iowever. as researchers at the National Aeronautics and 
r ice Administration have learned in a decade of research, it is 
; that easy. "The air moves so fast that it becomes a problem,” 
oris Robert A. Jones, chief of the high-speed aerodynamics 
ison at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Vir- 
y ia. “You have to mix the air with the fuel and have it react in 
v a few milliseconds. That’s barely enough time for cambus- 
’•'Jw a.” 

fhe answer, NASA engineers say, is to fill the tanks with liquid 
... irogen, which bums much faster than hydrocarbon fuels. 

red at minus 423 degrees Fahrenheit, the hydrogen initially 
• . 4s the engine. But as it is fed into a fuel injector taking the 

' * nt of the aerodynamic heating from the ram action, the liquid 
Irogen quickly heats to more than 1,500 degrees and tu rn s mto 
■_ * irogen gas. 

. What we arp doing is turning the aerodynamic hearing to our 

_• antage, converting it into thrust,” said Mr^ Janes, whose 
: \ Tra tones have. tested scrang’ets upto Mach .7 In wind-ttranel 
; s. • . ’ . ‘ ., ‘ ' ’■ 

- : or the rmhtaiy, the embrace of scramjets marks something of 
'. range of heart- After several years of frustrating research, the 

(Owtimri on Page 16, CoL 8j 


Currency Rates 


w RatM 



FJ=. 


ILL. C Mr. B-F. 

MJH ■ IM*7" 5S23 • 

esn iw ■ u.m — 

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11«5 2X49 JD 4J0H TUBS 

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1B952 52906 


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1»X7* 1547* 

182* 29090 

81439 8511 

21185 20220 

2X485 29047* 

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law 171991 
13*0 2088 


* Bailor Values 



U&8 

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Crwuarac. 15025 
mug Kobo s 7X0*5 
MoriNC 12X1 

Indoi runlak 1,12400 
Irish 4 


Cumacv per usx 
Me*, peso <7100 
Mann, krone 7X82 
ML poo 17X0 
ParLescsds 1WXB 
Saudi rtrod 1X505 
SMB. 8 21195 

S. Air. rand 2X54 


KMHdtar 02901 
Malar, rtna. 2X29 


S. Kar.waa 


interest Rates 



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Franc 

1124-12* 

1VW-I2* 

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11 9b-ll 94 12V4-IZM 
11 Wr 1114 118M188 


Dec. 12 

II SOR 
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Rate* aopttcoble to tntertan k dopoalts ot$i mMton rr.tnkrwm tor eautvoieatl. 


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550 


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4X0 455 
490 490 
4X5 4X5 
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lift lift 
lift lift 
111714 I117M 
11 13744 117/32 


5 5 

tfe 8 7714 
13/16 83/14 


Renin CenvmrTtxBjk, Credit 
Baikal Tokyo 


Aslan Hollar B oy— 1 1 * 

Dec. 12 

1 moon. 8- Oft 

2 mocrftn 8-Bft 

3 months 7<ft-8ft 

6 months 74 s<8h. 

I rear Sh-Oft 

Source: Route rs. 


UA Money Market P mB 

Dec. 12 

Merrill Lynch Raodr A*»sts 
30 dor overawe vteM: 7X9 

Telerale imerest Rote '»d«: 7732 
Source: Merritt LynOL Telerate. 



AML 

H0P0KBO0 3I75S 

UndabMrt 3I7JB “ UnCil 

MtnSUM) 3I5J* 31502 -AM 

Zurich 31680 317X5 + 1X0 

L6MM 31&0S 31750 + 200 

New Vark — 317.10 +038 

Luxembourg. Parle aid Leade n official tlx- 
tnoai Hate Kane and Zvrlai eaentn o and 
dosing ortao; How York Come* currant 
contract. Alforteot m 4LK Shot ounce. 
Source : Reuters. 


)ur Readers 

Euromarkets cohntm is not available in this edition 
<4 > munications problems at Reuters. 


The Potential for IHore Vigorous Economic Growth 

Average annual change in real gross national product tor the major Industrial economies, in percent 


IMP'S 



BRITAIN UNITED STATES CANADA W. GERMANY FRANCE 


ITALY JAPAN 

Source: Morgan Guaranty 


The New YoHi T— 


Overproduction Gives World a Glut Economy 


By Winston Williams 

New York Tima Senlcr 

NEW YORK — In London, an eerie si- 
lence hangs over the tin-trading ring at the 
Metal Exchange; trading has been halted 
because there are amply not enough buyers 
fex 1 the vast quantities of tin that producers in 
faraway Malayan keep turning out. In the 
ILS. farm bdt, more dun a mimon bushels of 
this year's record corn crop went directly into 
storage, piling up on top of last yeu's surplus. 
In corporate America, such blue drips as 
General Motors, Warner-Lambert and Stan- 
dard (XI of Ohio are reding from lackluster 
demand for their products. They have been 
forced to cut prices, lay off thousands of 
workers and write off billions of dollars in 
redundant production capacity. 

AH over the globe, in developed and devel- 
oping nations alike, producers in a broad 


spectrum of industries are turning out more 
than consumers can buy, crating a new 
world economy — a glut economy. 

Overabundance has replaced the chronic 
shortages of the 1970’s. There are rising 
stockpiles of raw materials, underutilized and 
mothballed factories and vast pods of idle 
labor. Prices are weak or falling, not ratchet- 
ing out of control in an inflationary spiral. 
And protectionism is gaining m popularity as 

a quick way to bar some of the outpouring of 
new goods. 

“Every protectionist bin in Congress repre- 
sents a glut,” says Edward Yardeni, arid: 
economist for Prudential Bache Securities. 

Even in the United States, whose economy 
has been growing faster than those of most 
other advanced co untries, the glut is taking a 
heavy uriL 

Edward Denison, a Brookings Institution 


economist who studies growth, estimates that 
the United States has “the largest reserve of 
imno»rf production capacity since the 30’s.” 
His figures show that the drop in demand 
during the last recession, in the early 1980s, 
was so great that even a relatively strong, 
Lhree-year-long recovery has not taken up the 
slack — and is not likely to in 1986. 

The glut already has produced widespread 
problems — among builders who flooded the 
market with too much office space and too 
many condominiums; among manufacturers 
of personal computers, cars and color televi- 
sions who also overproduced, and among 
executives who borrowed heavily to expand 
their businesses in (he hope that higher sales 
would justify the risks. 

But the new glut economy has its bright 
(Continued on Page 16, CoL 5) 


U.S. Retail Sales 
Increased 1.1% 
In November 


Oil Prices Rebound, but Downturn Is Forecast 


By Bob Hagcny 

International fferaS Tribune 

LONDON — Oil prices snapped 
back Thursday from six-year lows 
hit early Wednesday, but many 
traders and analysts say a persist- 
ing glut probably will keep the 
(raid downward. 

The market still is struggling to 
assess a vague pledge by the Orga- 
nization of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries last weekend to secure “a 
fair share” of the world market 
despite the risk of a price collapse if 
production rises further. That 
statement, which underlined the 
desperation of most OPEC mem- 
bers for higher revenue, triggered 
this week’s plunge in prices. 

Britain's Brent crude for January 
loading roseas high as about $27 a 
barrel before slipping late Thurs- 
day to S2&2Q, up from $2525 
Wednesday evening and a six-year 
low of $21.80 recorded early 
Wednesday. Brent, which rose 
briefly to more than $30 three 
weeks ago, is widely traded and 
subject to wOder speculative swings 
than most other grades of crude ofl. 
Brent for March delivery was 
noted at $24.75, up from $23.95 a 
' earlier. . • ■ 

On the New York Mercantile 
Exchange, West Texas Intermedi- 
ate crude aO futures for January 
delivery settled at $27.30 on Thurs- 


quot 
day i 


day, up 52 cents from Wednesday's 
settlement price of $26.78 and a 
high of about $31 three weeks earli- 
er. 

peter Gignoux, a senior vice 
president responsible for energy- 
futures trading at the investment 
hanking Ann Of Sh Carson Txhmari 
Bros, in London, predicted that the 
price of Brent would be below $25 
once (he market settled down. “It 
feds awful loppy up there,” he said 
of Thursday’s price levds. 

Some OPEC ministers, mean- 
while, sought to dispd fhe impres- 
sion that the cartel had derided to 
flood the market Sheikh Ali Kha- 
lifa al-Sabah, Kuwait’s ofl minister, 
was quoted by the OPEC news 
agency as saying , that this week's 
frenzy was merely “exchanges 
among speculators and not ihe. 
beginning of a price war. 

Many delega tes to the end-of- 
the-ycar OPEC meeting in Geneva 
hxH m is g i v ings about statements 
by some ministers, including Tam 
David-West of Nigeria, suggesting 
that OPEC was eager for an aB-om 
Edit for market share with non- 
OPEC p roducers, which account 
for about 65 percent of sales in the 
non-Commtmist countries. Iran 
and Algeria both argued for further 
restraint on OPEC production in 
an attempt to prop up prices, while 
others cautioned against sharply 
higher output 


But delegates conceded that 
OPEC members could not agree on 
bow to share among themselves 
production of as little as 16 million 
barrels a day, the group’s self-im- 
posed ceiling Current OPEC out- 
put is estimated at 17.5 million to 
lg million barrels a day. 

Big exporters outside OPEC 
have shown no sign of heeding 
OPEC’s pleas for reducing outpuL 
David Gray, chief ofl analyst at the 
London stockbrokerage of James 
Capri & Co, said he expected only 
token reductions from non-OPEC 
exporters to help support prices. 
But he predicted that falling prices 
eventually would frighten OPEC 
members into another effort at re- 
straining their production. 


Britain, a big exporter outride of 
OPEC, has reaffirmed its opposi- 
tion to ordering cuts in North Sea 
production, even though Nigel 
Lawson, chancellor of the exche- 
quer, acknowledged Thursday that 
lower oil revenue would diminish 
the scope for planned tax cuts. 

While lower oil prices are incon- 
venient for Britain, they can threat- 
en much greater suffering for 
OPECs poorer members, such as 
Nigeria, Ind onesia and Ecuador. 
Nigeria, for example, relies on ofl 
for about 95 percent of export 
earnings and is struggling to service 
$20 billion of foreign debt while 
feeding a rapidly growing popula- 
tion of about 100 milli on. 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Retail sales 
in die United States rose 1.1 per- 
cent in November, rebounding 
from the sharp October decline, as 
both auto and department store 
soles advanced, the government re- 
ported Thursday. 

The Commerce Department said 
retail sales totaled $1 15.9 billion in 
November, an increase of $13 tril- 
lion from the revised October sales 
figure. 

Sales had fallen a record 4 2 per- 
cent in October as purchases of 
new autos dropped 173 percent 
after two big months of gams gen- 
erated by cut-rate financing. 

A White House spokesman, 
Larry Speakes, said, “Nearly every 
category of the economy continues 
its strong performance. We look 
forward to second-half growth in 
the gross national product in the 5- 
percent range, and we expect 1986 
GNP growth of 4 percent” GNP 
measures a country’s total output 
of goods and services. 

Mr. Speakes said the increase in 
retail rales “should portend a 
strong 1985 holiday sales season.” 

The new report said auto sales 
rose a slight 0J9 percent in Novem- 
ber but the total sales figure of 
$24.8 billion was far below the 
$29.7 billion in cars sold during 
September. 

Without autos, total retail sales 
rose 13 percent in November, the 
best gain since a 2-percent increase 
in April. 

The non-auto category was led 
by a 13-percent increase in sales at 
department stores, a substantial 
improvement over the 03-penmi 
gain in October. 

The November gain was likely to 
give encouragement to analysts 
who think consumer spending will 
rise at least moderately post during 
the Christmas season. 

However, some analysts are still 
worried that consumers will cut 
back on spending because of a re- 
cord debt burden and a record low 
personal savings level. The behav- 
ior of tbc consumer sector is crucial 
pnre- consumer spending accounts 
for two-thirds of the overall econo- 
my. 


The 1.1 -percent November sales 
gain was the best since a 2.1 -per- 
cent increase in September. 

It induded a 0.9-percent increase 
in sales of durable goods, items 
expected to last three or more 
years. 


Interest Rates 
In U.S. Continue 
Their Decline 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dupordtet 

NEW YORK — U.S. interest 
rates continued to tumble 
Thursday. 

Interest rates have been un- 
der downward pressure because 
of falling ofl prices, the U3. 
balanced-budget measure 
signed Thursday, and indica- 
tions that the Federal Reserve 
may be earing its policy. 

The Treasury Department 
sold $7.6 billion in three-month 
bills at an average discount rate 
of 7.05 percent, down from 7.19 
percent last week. Another 57.6 
billion was sold in six-month 
bills at an average discount rate 
of 7.02 percent, down from 736 
percent 

The three-month rate was the 
lowest since 6.81 percent on 
Sept 23, and the six-month rate 
was the lowest since 7 percent 
on July 8. 

UMB Bank & Trust Co., the 
U.S. subsidiary of United Miz- 
rahi Bank of Israel said Thurs- 
day that h hod cut its prime rate 
to 9 percent from 93 percent, 
effectively immediately. The 
prime is a benchmark used to 
determine rates for a bank’s 
best corporate customers, many 
of whom pay below die prime 
rate. 

For the second consecutive 
month, the Veterans Adminis- 
tration lowered its maximum 
mortgage interest rate by Vi per- 
centage point, to 10ft percent, 
the lowest rate in six years, ef- 
fective Friday. 

(AP. I /PI) 


. a hr London md Zurich, ttxtnirs tn other European centers. Now York ratal at 4 PM. 
" notarial /tunc M amount* needed to buy one potmd (d Amounts needed to buy one 
'■> Units of 100 fxJ umteonjmtv) Unttsof 1GOOQ N.Q.: not mated; HA.: not awrRobte. 
.. ter mto wooed: WMMtS 


Long Trade Battles Fuel 
Drive to Boost GATT 


OSS 
Soviet rvUr 07642 
157X0 
77075 

was 

TMlMft* 26X85 
Turkfaft Bra 14595 
UAB dlrtan 3X725 


■91.18 Venae, body. 1525 


«: 1.172 irWi c 

«r Banaue du Bemhnt t Brussel*); Banco Gommer ct ate ttodona (MBon); mew* Mo- 
de Port* (Part sj; Bank at Tokyo I Tokyo I; IMF (SOR); BAH /(floor, rtyot. ttirtiam); 
X (rvble). Other date tram Reuters and AP. 


By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribune 

GENEVA — Identity cards of 
employees of the General Agree- 
ment on Tariffs and Trade here do 
not say GATT, but cany die name 
of the Interim Committee for the 
International Trade Organization, 
an agency that was to have been 
formed 35 years ago. 

Today, some trade officials and 
consultants *hmk that, amiH re- 
newed efforts to liberalize world 
trade, an organization resembling 
ITO and hence much stronger than 
GAIT may some day emerge in 
Geneva. 

GATT has turned out to be 
weaker in resolving major trade 
disputes than many trade nffiriai* 
had hoped. While the ITO was to 
have set broad rales over interna- 
tional trade, commodity prices and 
investments, and have strong sanc- 
tions power, GATT has been most- 
ly a trade-monitoring operation. 

As Clayton K. Y outer, the U3. 
trade representative, said at a news 
conference in Paris Wednesday 
atom the so-called d&us-pasta war 
between the United Stales and the 
European Community. 

The long citrus-pasta war “dem- 
onstrates all too deaxiy GATTs 
ineffectiveness in solring difficult 


not mean a fuD-fledged revival of 

rro. 

Work oa organizing ITO was 
started in Washington during 
World War H, bat primarily be* 
cause of strong opposition to provi- 
rions that would regulate trade, 
voiced in the U3. Congress and by 
American business, the project was 
dropped in 1950. 

Toe process toward a new kind 
of organization wfll be slow, con- 
troversial and closely finked to 
preparations for a new, seventh 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


GATT round of trade-liberaliza- 
tion negotiations currently getting 
underway in Geneva,- according to 
recent interviews with senior trade 
officials from faflra trinKrftri and 
developing countries. 

Those negotia tions, which are 
expected to begin early in 1987, 
should be completed in three to five 
years, according to Mr. Yea g e r , the 
U.S. trade representative. Other es- 
timates range upwards to a decade. 

Mr. Ycotter has expressed sup- 
port Tor strengthening GATTs 
powers, bat he has stopped short of 
o utlining specific proposals. Dur- 
ing a visit to West Eun 
this week, he has 


because of 


Specific support for giving 
GATT substantial new powers has 
been expressed privately by gov- 
ernment trade officials in Western 
Europe, Japan, Canada and Aus- 
tralia; the International Monetary 
Fund, and in a study mi GATT 
reform published in Mardx. In ad- 
dition, members of the U.S. Con- 
and American ac a d e mi cs 
; pushed for these new powers. 

Some GATT officials expect an 
entirely new organization to grow 
out of GATT, an acronym rtf erring 
to a 1947 trade treaty. GATT has 
operated as a amah, trade-momtor- 
ing agency in Geneva on an “inter- 
im” basis ever since. “I think we are 
heading towards a revival of the 
ITO concept, not as it was, but in 
some farm/* a GATT official said. 

Most officials said, however, that 
establishing such an agency would 



auspices, focusing on 

liberahzmg trade in agriculture, 
services, investment and inteDectu- 
al property rights, such as copy- 
rig hts-' and trademarks. 

Specific reform proposals have 
come from several U.S. senators 
and congressmen, tndnding Sena- 
tor John C Danforth, the Missouri 
Republican who is chairman of the 
Senate Trade subcommittee, trade 
consultants and aca d emics, in die 
United Stales. 

“There are gro w in g signs for 
support fra- institutional reform, 
winch could lead back to the idea 
of a trade agency that would be 
more responsive . . .than what we 
have now,” said G Mi chad Aho, 
director of trade ' studies at the 

(Coutinoed ou Page 15, CoL 1) 



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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE^ ERDDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1985 


Thursday 


»Menfn 
Ugh Lew SHa 




Tables Inctada W»e noHanwicle prices 
dp to Hie dosing on wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


12 Month 
HMIUw Stack 


Hv. YU. PE WlMWiLow QUM.drw 


18 5ft AL LOO* ,1« 1 6 18 
14ft 8 AMC S 14 

5* 2ft AM InH 11 


4 

3* AOI 



193 

92* 

49 ATT 

Fd SJleXl 


115 

4 

2% Aon 

ePr 


11 

11% 

9% Aem 

*U J2 U 

30 

23 

IBH 

Mu Actk 

to 

14 

224 

5ft 

lft Acta 



48 

* 

Vk Acta 

wt 


15 

4* 

1% Adm 

Rs 

7 

15 

30% 

22% AdR) 

wl .1* 6 

18 

479 

B 

3% A*ra 

ne 


98 


a 134 4% 4% 
18 V Iff* T« 
14 U TW IT* 
11 3249 5ft 5% 


57 30 

s* M 
12 4 


13* 

9* 

3* 

% 

MB 

45% 

9* 

5% 

to* 

5* 

1 

"ft 

34 

31 

34ft 

17% 

4 

2% 

10% 

10% 

11% 

5% 

13% 

4% 

a% 

4* 

59* 

37% 

50 

21 

V 

4% 

e 

4% 

10ft 

3* 

8* 

4* 

17% 

11* 

Uft 

12% 

Sft 

1 

4% 

3 

42% 

47% 

1* 

* 

15* 

13% 

8% 

4% 

14% 

lift 

4 

3 

54* 

49* 

toft 

44 


ti 4 n 

.40 1.1 7* 110 57 aw 
14 Sft 8% 

10 n Hk IH 

ibo iu ra lift lift 

128 hi la 

11 20 11641 11484 

37 4ft iVi 

78 im 10% 

OS 5 1|« lift 10£ 

10 

ITS 1X9 400: 34% 34% 

44 3454 32V, MS 

68 64 20 17 JH JU 

JO 1J 20 504 134* 1» 


7V» 5V, 

3% IV. 

8* an 

SM . 144 

158k 9 

9% Sft 
19Vk U<k 
7* a 
4% 24k 
74k 5% 

BH 34k 
11% 4% 

104k 74k 
21% 14% 
10 4Vk 
14% 9ft 
24k a 
174k 7% 
Ik. 4k 
4*4. 7Vj 
5% 3 
MW mi 
19V. 13>k 


JH ID 79 7% 7* 

.15 14 S IB 10% 104k 

12 14 81 48 

160a IJ 15 I 59* S?ft 

517 51k. SOU 
4213700z 5Vk 5 
34 134002 44k 4% 
9 473 5 44k 

4 79 84k 8% 

.52 IB 45 22 13% 134k 

J2 18 45 24 134fc 134k 

604 54k 54k 

19 3 » » 

ZOO 19 16 11 51 51 

2 % ft 

J4b IB 20 28 13% 131k 

4 7 Ik 1 

1,78014.1 509 12% 12% 

20 43 414 44k 

.V0e IB 2 MV, sow 
.900 2B 10 45% 45% 

23 41b 61k 

JK IS 10 43 24k Mk 

31 7* 84| 8 

17 2% 2 Ik 

.72 76 18 11 9% 94k 

IBS 44 B4k Bft 

4 194k 19% 

172 144 Ilk 

280 3 24k 

8 37 4 59k 

14 41b 44k 

8 217 44k 44k 

JO 22 I 25 91* » 

16 7 22% 22% 

JO 24 53 244 84k 84k 

13 147 U4k 14% 

274 Ilk 1 

1B0 13J 5 13% 134k 

420 h 4k 
2 34k 34k 

II 21k 24k 
56 13% 13 

BO 45 118 11 174k 174k 


J2 3B *s 
J2 3B 45 

19 

ZOO 19 14 
J4b 16 2D 

1J8014.1 * 

20 

■90b IB 
.900 2B 

M 15 U 
31 

J2 76 18 
105 


44k— V. 
16 

114k + 4k 
54k + 44 
3% _ 

91 — 144 
24k + 4b 
10% + 4k 
121k + % 

? 

2H 

27 + ft 

3ft + % 
5Mk + v. 
8% + Vk 
84k — ft 

"it 

114% 

4%- ft 
10% + % 
11 + * 

% 

344k + 4k 
314k + % 
245 
13% 

7% + Vk 
I OH— % 
4% 

59% + 4k 
50% + % 

5 — 4k 

4% 

44k— % 
■% 

134k— 4k 
13% + ft 
5% + 4k 
3% — Ik 
51 — U 
Vk 

134k + 4k 
84k + Vk 
13% — 4k 
4H— % 
MW— 2% 
454k + % 
5% + % 
Mb— % 

8 — 4k 
24k 

94k 

8% + 14 
19Vk — Vk 
1% 

3 + % 

6 + Vk 
4Vk 

44k + Ik 

9 — 4k 
221k + 4k 

14k 

14% + % 

I 

134k 

4b 

3Vk 

24k + VI 
13 — 4k 
17% + 4fc 



53 

14 

4 

-10 J 14 

3 

15 

27 

14 

19 

560 104 

SIDY 

10 

4 

BOb 46 12 

2200 86 

83 


9* 


3 


71 

U7e11B 

21 

14 

1 

JO 2B 17 

87 


Sh. Close 

Otir. YU. PE tab Utah LOW QUBLOrte 


1* + %k 
13% + Vi 
13% 

4% + % 
«* + * 
47%—% 
2% 

17% + % 
24% 

1% 

2% 

8%-* 
13% + % 
IS —4k 
7% 

1% 

19 

18% -1 

20 — Vk 
19% — % 
9* + % 
33% 

34% — % 

36 +2 

32 %+ % 

45 + Ik 

10% 

33% — % 
15% + % 
3% 

9% — % 
5% + % 
23% — % 
BVk + Vk 
1214 + % 
7 + % 
99k + Vk 
18% + % 
714 

18 + Vk 
14% + 6 
7 — % 
3% + % 

4%-Vk 
15 +14 
13 

254k— % 
im— 4 h 
14% + 14 

^♦% 

104k 

2% 

12% + % 

35 + % 

37 +44 
18% 

14% + % 

*3= it 

23* — 14 


HMCflSB 
Hlati Low Stock 


la got* 

BBtHMiLow Owl Chip 


25 

72 34 18 
.16 B M 
.14 B 15 
UOaU 12 

.17 .5 29 

1B0DZ8 10 
1J0 3J 10 
1J30 4J 

&Z'l 

M '* 75 
JO Zl 10 


20 

60 12 M 

242 

9 

6 


67eZ5 
.150 12 II 
164 4.1 16 
160a Z7 11 
9 
7 

162 7B 


4772 
5 _ 

W MVS. 
48 1% 
2224 32% 
383 3$ 
205 34 
23 32% 

13 44 

4 10% 
12 34% 
10 15% 

9 3% 
W 9% 
23 51k 
3D 23% 
3024 8Vk 
40 12% 
304 7 

91 9% 

7 18% 
a 7% 
35 16% 
£7 14 Vk 
77S 7% 

222 3% 

101 4% 

244 14% 

223 134k 
16 25% 

111 II* 

*2 

vi 

5 

40 

127 

3 

14 
22 
10 

201 
5134 
120 



88 7.0 8 477 
JC SB 25 SB 
.10b J 13 311 
108 57 

JO U 1Z 65 
4 to 


3 Ilk 

15% 7% 

15% 64k 

S% 3% 
244k 17% 
26% 19% 
20% 10% 
8% 3Vk 
8 % 2 
4% 3% 
374k 25% 
14% 13g 

7 3% 

9% 7% 
15% 10% 
11% 8% 
9% M 
94k SH 
20% 6 

*% £ 
70% 34% 

4 2% 

« ’V 

13% 84k 
34% 23 
21% 12* 
141k 12 


J1 U II 
174 105 9 

J3t 4.1 20 
13 
443 

MO 1 55 

97 

80 

17 


in i% 1% 
423 7% 6* 

298 M W 
284 3% 3% 

6 19% 19 
21 21% 23% 
430 16% 15* 

a * a 

5 2 ft 2% 

l3 3&3?" 

si “ft 16 * 

16 H H 
11 9 8 * 

41 14% 14% 

a a% 7% 

44 7% 7% 

2 SH 6% 
1244 28% 26% 
44 I I 
41 4k Ml 
237 70* 70 
19 4% 4 

3208 M Pk 
SO 


4ft 

3ft BAT In ,14e 21 

' 

945 

4% 

4ft 

4% + ft 



27 

88 

35* 

25% 

25% 



7 

33 

7* 

7% 

2% 




5 

2% 

7* 

2% 

15* 

9% B5N 


170 

13* 

17% 

13% + % 



12 

12 

10% 

UU 

10% 4 % 

17% 

9U Baker 

17 

18 

14% 

13% 

14% + % 

10% 

fl* BoldwS 32 33 


10 

9* 

9* 

9* 

4% 

2 BolyM wt 


58 

3% 

7* 

2% •+• % 

27% 

22% BanFd Zrael0-1 


1 

27% 

27* 

27ft + % 


7% 4* 
94k 4% 
4% 34k 

4 TV, 
8% 5* 
A* 4 

IS* 9% 

12 4% 

14% 9 VI 

4% % 

32* 21% 
44b 2% 
26% 10* 
14% 10 
28* 31* 
24* 9% 
24 Vk 94k 
394k 14% 
1% % 
19% II 
194k 11% 
23 11% 

14 9% 

10% 7% 

5% 2Vk 
204b 12% 
24% 19% 
39% 27 
49% 29 
4* 34k 

5 2% 

S* 3% 

34* 24% 
13% 4'k 


24 7* 7 7* + % 

27 8* 8% 8* + % 
8 3% 3V, 34k 

II 2% 2% 2*— ft 

6 6 4 4 

35 5H 5% 54k— % 

60 9% 9% 9*+ % 

70 TVk 8% 9% + Vk 

iS ’ft Tt V* 


16% 134k 
■% 5 
I* 2% 
3% 2* 

40 30% 

% 1C 

254k 15% 

4* 2% 

8 % 2 

134k IDVk 

74k 3* 

Ha Tt 

T a if 

17% 10% 


22 

BO 27 37 
66 2J 12 
Mb 2B 16 
J7e IB 12 
BO 12 11 


BO 4J 34 
J2 Zl 27 
18 

J7t 46 13 
13 

4.94CS1J 7 

.12 

160 57 10 
42 


» PC 

s'?* '% 

13 9 8* 

22 29% 27* 
89 21* 20% 
58 14Vk 14 
347 15* 14* 
16 25% 25* 


14k— Ik 
7% — 4k 
6*— % 
3* 

19% 

23*+ % 
144k — 14 
0* 

2* 

3% 

V* 

3* 

f* 

14* + * 
7*— * 
7* 

\ 

70* + % 
44k— % 
Sft — * 
2% 


8* 

29*—% 
20 %—* 
14* + % 
15 + % 

25% + * 


7% HAL ,10k U 
10% HMG Jt> 18 
4% HolEfcot 64e B 
lft Halml 
I Habnfwt 
64k Hamptl <X» 9.9 
Zl* Hndymn J5e J 
13% Ha^df JO IB 
% Horaey 

21% Hashfs .15 A 
24* Hcabrpf ZOO 47 
28% Hapfna A 9a 1 J 
a* Him 

12* HHtiCrs B8I 27 
5* HlttiCh 
6H HltllEx 

11* HeWiM M 4.1 
4* HefOWr JSa 27 
10% Htfn k* .W 7 
1% HsJdor 
3 Halient 
tb HtlmR 
3* H«rahO 
1* Hlndrt 
9* Hlptran 
l* Hofmon 
846 HBlIvCwl 
15* HmOn 
20 HmlmptZ9S 1Z4 
14* Hormls M U 
6 HmHof 
* HmHuvt 
13% HottPtv 1B0 75 
?* HoltPwt 
3% HouOT B9C24B 
12* HovnE 
8* Howl In JSo IB 
17% KutwIAj 76 11 
16% HuMBl 74 3J 
17* HudGn BO IB 
4* Husky 0 J4 SA 


25 8* 
S 70* 
13 SH 
1280 3 

181 1* 
9 40 7* 

9 17x26* 

14 147 Z74k 
31 1* 

U 444 35* 
4 41 

10 2 31* 

542 B* 

8 *3 14 
311 M 

T7 S3 TVk 

11 57 15* 

9 5 8* 

7 52 15% 

A S3 2% 

52 3 * 

57 52 4% 

3 1* 

14 19 15% 

15 2* 
245 1 1% 
3396 23% 
8186 22% 
13 101 2* 
319 7* 
48 * 

17 84 19% 

aB St 

n a M* 

I 18 12* 

13 45 24% 

13 ia a 

18 B 22% 
323 4* 


113 9* 8* 8* + % 

34 15* 15% IS* 

44 7* 7* 7* 

41 0* 8* 8* + % 

98 2* 2* 2* 

7 32* 32* 32* + * 

3 2 a 2 s: 2 a-* 

473 2% 2* 24k 

14 12* 12* 12*— * 

s 4 % * 

if? "S 


8 2HICEEI 
55Vk 33* ICHl 

7* 1 ICO 
444 244 

9 3* 


40% 30% 
13% 5 
234k 11* 
2* 1* 
3 2* 

13 7* 

15 * 10 % 
444 394 
1* * 
10% 5* 
1114 9* 
7* 3* 
4% 1* 

W* 2* 
TO* 2* 
7 5* 

23% 13% 
41 2514 


9 37 4* 

B 140 52% 

113 a m 

9 3* 

H f 

.12 Z4 15 

.128 3J » A 

1B0 525 37% 

4 105 6H 

JO 7 71 24X21* 

0 266 1* 
JStlOO 101 2% 

jo a 12 

.12) B 21 15* 
» 3% 

60 -TS 

a m ik 

76 9.1 54 ID* 

4 4* 

20 3 

896 3* 

74 3% 
41 6* 

21 71 2Z4k 

» 41 3744 


131 % * fc 

22 8* I 8 — 46 

3 * * *— ft 

34 14* M* 14* + * 


32 

16 

15 

775 

37 

31% 

31* + U 

3ft 

2% Era 

r pf .480156 


4 

3ft 

3 

3% 

62I1Z4 


5 

3% 



12ft 

Oft Era 

nd 

10 


10% 


10% + % 

























ry pf 160 145 


7 

Aft 

Aft 

Aft 




37 






ft A0 22 

B 

174 

19% 

18% 

18% — % 



19 

71 

73% 

77* 

22H— % 

4ft 


it 


7 

1% 

1% 

1th— ft 



19 

3X1 




37% 

32% EBO 

Id 33a 16309 

1 

37% 

37% 

37% 


16 

12 





34ft 

9* Etzl 

_av .lie 1.1 

13 

57 

lOVh 

9ft 

91k — ft 




to 


ft 




B .10 16 

74 

13 

10ft 

urn 

rOH + % 

65 

28 

17 







A JO 16 

» 

30 

10ft 

10% 

10ft + % 

60 

24 

1* 

94 

15ft 

15ft 

15ft 

11 

4% Exo 

ti Mb3J 

14 

54 

10ft 

10* 

10ft + % 


14% 11 Jodyn BOb 4J 11 a 11* 11* 11* + * 
7* 5* Jocobs 12 184 5* 5* 5* + ft 

4% W JttAffl 7 148 114 » 3H + % 

Ift IbJWAwt 140 * * * + %■ 


9% 5% j«tron Til 44 14 57 •* 8% 844—* 

64k ZVk John Pd IS 3* 3* 3% 

11* 5 JohnAm JO 52 1 365 5* 5% 5% + % 

11% 6 Johnlnd 3 64 B* S* 8*—* 

4% 2* JumpJk M 37 3* 3* 3* 


146 14* 16 16*— % 

47 10* 10% 10% — * 

3 lOVh 10% 10* 

717 5% 5* 544 + % 

537 21% 20% 20% + % 

48 26 25* 2545 — % 

34 39% 39 39% — % 

60 43% 43% 43% — % 

4 4% 4% 4% 

92 4% 4 4* + % 

47 5V, 5% 5* + * 

10 30% 30% 30* + * 

31 7* 7* 7* 


■% fPA 

16* RXjInd JO Zl 

6% FtXrFin 
1* MrniC 
15* Pcrtvuf Al\ 29 
3% Fetota 
PtAusln 
1* FCopHd 
9* FtCoon lBOa BJ 


11 FWvmB BO 57 13 122 13% 13% 13* + * 

7H Frtcro i 10 305 16 15% 14 + * 

II* FlschP B8t 4J 22 40 144k 14% 14% + % 


12 * 6 % 

3% * 

94k 7* 
14% 9 
■M 4* 
44* 10* 

f% m 
IB* 11* 
3 1% 

17% 13% 
23% 16% 
54* 27* 
13 4* 


COI 11 

CM I CP 10 

CMXCp 

CSSn 

Co«NJ 14 

CooioA 6 

COIRE 1J8 IM B 
Cntareo J6I 9B 21 
Cnmco AA 11 8 

Comprt 

CMarca SH 17 
CdnOcc M 
cwm* n 

CondlH 10 


21* 71* 

8 * 8 *- % 
» 1 + ft 
• «* + * 
11* 11*—* 
4* 7 
11 11 
8* 8% + % 
14% 14% + * 
]% 1%— * 
14* 15 — % 
16% IB* 

53% 55 +1% 

10 % 10 % 


4* FltcGE 
23* FltCE Pt 400 134 
4* vlFlonla 

27* FtaRck .90 21 8 
21 Fluke 1JBI 48 15 
B% Fdodrm 4 

7 FOOtaM 
5% FHUIIG 
87V, FortOid4j008 
19* PandCA JO 1J 29 
124k FamtL 33 

* Fotomt 

32* Pronto IBOs 26 12 
4% FrcWlv 

15% FroaEI 30 


IM 17% 
20 14k 

46 161h 
108 5 

9151 10* 
1689 6* 
3 12 
122 13% 
305 16 
40 144k 
27 n% 
2 29% 
2 4% 

45 42* 
102 29% 
125 15* 
5 7* 
632 4* 

330B115 
* 25% 
441 30* 
422 1* 

2x31% 
17 5* 

111 27 


10 10 

22% 23* + * 
19* 19*— * 
1 * 1 * + * 
16 16 — * 
4* 4%— % 
10 ID* 

6 % 6 * + * 
11* 12 


11 * 11 % + * 

29% 29* 

4* 4* 

42* 42* + % 
29* 2B*— * 
WW 14%—* 
7* 7* 

6 * 6 * + % 
IU IM +2 
25* 25% + * 
27% 27*— % 
1* I* 

38H 38% 

5* 5*—* 
a 27 +1* 


40 31% 

4* 2* 
16% 10 
14H 1DH 
15* 9% 
24 T5% 

23* U 
4* Z* 
12% 7* 

7* 2% 
2* * 
4* 2% 

4* 3* 
4* 2* 
4 2% 

.5% 4 

3* 2 
16% 10% 
30* 22% 


KnGSBt 470 IM 
KopofcC 2 

KoyCp JO 16 10 
KavJ n JOB Zl 12 
KMTNt AO 27 18 


.151 4.1 21 


Idf 38% 
2 31 3H 

10 247 15% 

12 ft 14* 
18 41 14* 

9 6 19 

20 ST 20* 

21 5 3* 

26 1932 IT* 


38% 38% + % 
3* 3* 

14* 14*—* 
14* 14%—* 
13% 13% + M 
IS* 19 +* 

19* 20 — * 
3* .BN + * 
10* 10*—* 


KeyCowt 
Kioto wt 


KleorV Mr U 

Knoll 15 

KaacrC Z32 IB 94 


8 

107 

40 

2ft 

* 

* 

Jft + % 
ft 


73 

3% 

3% 

3%— % 

29 

14 

3% 

3ft 

3ft— % 


19 

3ft 

3* 

3ft + % 


689 

2% 

7%. 

ZftJ- % 

15 

u 

Sft 

5ft 

'5% + ft 


3*3 

2* 

2% 

2ft 

IS 

28 

15 

14ft 

Uft + ft 


2* 1% LSB 

34k IVk Ld Boro 

«4 3* LoPnl 9 

32 12% LndBnc 60 27 12 

Zl* 13% Lndmk B U I 

wh a* Lo*r 17 

5% 4% LozKac 

27% 16% LearPP 100 17J 

9* 2% LcePh 11 

34* 20% LaMgh s 60 U 12 


24* 26% — * 


223 2 I* 2 
24 1% 1% 1% 

16 4 4 4 

48 20* 2D* 20* + * 
9B 21 20* 71 +* 

94 9% 9* 9* + * 
12 4* 4% 4%—* 

II 17* 17 17* + * 

44 7* 7% 7% — M 

10 M 34* 35 + % 


INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE 


IN MONTE-CARLO 

i;l i, 

IT I I 

LE FLORESTAN 

i.; itvvk 


LUXURIOUS TROPICAL RETREATS 


and Coymaa lit mid, ZWli O torf do Ma n 1h> Caribbwon, knaxVou*. 
2-lxvaf nimbhed candaraMuni hema h H» M lr» ut of Bun Point, part of 
Iha Coywian Koi rwort cora pft x. wn;0)n ou U Bondbtg oraw dllBj and iB u a oO onei 
facJiSa, ndudvtg soft. Bandy beodi and frwhwalar pool. The oH ro el tvw 
iwiidaMa offw ipwdoaJar l a aB capa ki 3 cbwdlam, ipbiil rtcmxxam to bnpra»- 
stow mtnl w safe, w w n a n do ra d 60fl. balcony and priwato 32+t naming 
tarrocn. Broxfaow MT-flldSlS. $4 8 3 , 0001 


Hiww iaii y ftw, twan ed ea , WXi Hlgli QHf b o ttunring trtJayal 
a hflWda ll xj l uf fca tb p— cti J c v*w» of #10 nxrauncSng co 
twraiiaba boo. Urn 17«aara, tvbaibaon vdla rnifoys a torraoB r 


tuiauaba lea. Tha 17-roara, 6 4i a tb o > 
of ttm iwsidanca, a 62 A.-iong vwknc 
lasidanM cboo on 8* faaWonablw I 


Floresum is the name of a luxury real estate project located 
in the heart of Monaco. The residence, an architectural 
tribute to art and history. olTere you the freedom to create 
your own personal “an de vrivre" in truly prestigious sur- 
roundings. 

A few luxury apartments for some privileged ones (from 100 
to 900 sq. meters). 

LE FLORESTAN 

62, boulevard ctttalie BP 222 MC 98000 Monaco 
T«. (int 33) 9L3&06.70 - T4lex SAE 620581 F 


BEAUTIFUL HOMES 
IN SUNNY CLIMES 

Terrt Bona. Sr. Mwdn, French W. I j Surrounded by hi bums, bougainvillea aid 
oleander, tha beautiful 3-bedroom heme's two wings embrace a poof border e d by a 
tage paha. A debghtW covered portico offers soft breezes and two of the three 
skdmg glow woDs m the bvmg room offer glorious water views. On S kiwiricx* acres 
and between the picturesque viBage of Marigot and the airport. Brochure WT- 
816297. $450,000. 

5t Thomas. Pa r bodos, W.I.: Sited on an escarpment offering pcanmic sea views 
and refreshing breezes, this lovely secluded home a designed for duraWity and low 
maintenance. It enjoys 3 or 4 bedrooms. 3 berfhs. patios and separata rtaff 
house/ garage. Accessible to shappmg and arpert. Brodmro IHT-816294. 

smooo. 




v surrounding cwifryiiai and Ihs 
envoys a tarrooe rurrtng the length 
d end 2 staff bedrooms. In a prim 
bast IrodWBW PfT-816310. 
S3 OOj0O0l 


309 Royrd Pofndana Pix. M 

(305) >32-7131 ev 1-800 - PV2-2222 (outside < 


a 33480. 

I- 


Own land in the great ☆ 
American West 

’ I this land can 

Here's an outstanding oppor- I yours, 
cunity to acquire a sizable I credit 
piece of America's ranchiand I ton ^, . 
at a very modest cost. " available 

Sangre de Cristo Ranches Inc., the land de- 
velopment subsidiary of Forbes Magazine, 
the American financial publication, is now 
offering for sale scenic ranchiand in Colorado's 
Rocky Mountains. Spectacular land for a 
homesite and a life tim e of appreciation. 

Minimum 5-acre ranch rites starting at $4,500 

Send today for fact kit and full color brochure 





int l«4J. maifcnMgihc — rtJ i Gikm ml nun 

309 Royd Pomoano Fh. Palm BsKxh, H. 33480, 

(305) 832-7131 or l-{800) PV2-2222 (Ouhkfa Colorado). 


NEW YORK an 

57th STREET & 
PARK AVENUE 

RITZ TOWER 

Luxury Co-op Apt/ Hotel 
2 b edroom s . 2 baths, living room, 
kitchen e tt e . South & 

East exposu r es. Law maintenance 
I includes hotol services. 

$450,000 - firm. 

Cad 212-752-501 1 anytime 
or 212-421-2207/2250 
Monday to Friday 9 am.- 5 p.m. | 


r= SO. FLORIDA = 

I OPPORTUNITIES 

PA 1 M BEAOf-SMGGR ISLAND 

■ 4«m imh 19 m. OcsantaA Sun4ta to 

tofcj pr Ccndm. 

* 1^5? *■ Crow nan pouft. 

•BOCA BATON 

ftvmk of S to 20 oe. w top** 

* FT. LAUOOOALE 

72 cc or Go* Comafe 1409 ms. 
l5.tt.oi Alport fe HMto, Often. 
™«™ UU IIWK BfeRpng 

conn A attar tytM of «w. ^mn|mi W- 

«aoB»a»*»> 

WB. Prfefe tartar Aurdnta 

nsstaqMTTBW. 

Cwim iBi Jut awton 

I - — ^n » u i UJ Ct»«r,33SXFW».5fe H j 

Ban fetor. Wwta u . OSJ4- 33432. 

TaL- 30S068-300a T*.: 44134. 


BEST KEPT SECRET 
IN FLORIDA IS ON KEY 
BISCAYNE YACHTSMAN'S 
PARADISE 

15 minutes hum downtown Mb ml 
465 feet on protected inter contempo- 
rary i wkute hidden in tropical rate 

{oral, enn land ter lenniB court, meal 

boiae or private recording Btndiaj an>- 
leer co-opeatiaa encouraged. 

Dorothea Bailey, Assoc. 
Cams rota Lindstnra Realty 
706 Crandon BlvcL 
Key Kacayne. FL 33 X 49 
( 305 ) 361-5757 


international 
REAL ESTATE 

appears every FRIDAY 

To place an adworfoement contact 
ow office In your eoudry 
(Fisted in □ossified Section) or* 

DosnMqiM Bouvet, 

bit mn utimad Harcdd Tifama, 

181 *—r flnwlna r 8. 


93321 Nestfy Codex, trance. 
TaU 47A7.1 2A5. Tain 61 3595. 


7; Matei Qom _ _ 

WteiL—ataO. Dto.YM.FE IWBHtohLBW g*Ota 

,s..8aar; 

^ ig 

6ft 4 Llonte- J* 4 9 4 1016 5 4* . » 

R ft LlerriwtA 40 * ft * + ft 

* n UonlwtB as * * *— ft 


imk 7* Frttdm J8b Zl 14 37 9* « 9 + % 

26 15 '^rteto J2b 9 52 B SS JSS— % 

16* 6* FurVH OO 16 27 73 15* 14% 14% — * 


* * 

4* 4* + H 
2 2 —ft 

11% 11*+ ft 
1 1 

25% as + ft 

Bft 8* + * 
12* 12* 

1* 1* + % 
11* 1Z% + * 
2* 2ft 

l Kit 

n* n* + % 
10% 10* 

2% 2* + * 
10% 10%— % 
26ft 26ft—* 
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lft WkWear J2Z3 8 51 22% 22% 22ft + W 

2* WWdeE 292 3% 2ft 3 

2* WWdepf 1B0 127 23 14% 14ft 14% + % 

9 Wortfin JST 71 11* 11% 11* + % 

6* Wrottir JS2 .1 28 58 19* 18* 18*— to 


7 9* 

5 24% 

6 27% 

237 ft * ft- 
9 2S% 25 25% 

■4 7% 7 7% 

• 45 2% 2% 2% 

94 28% Z7H 77% 
23 IT* 11* II* 
19X12 11* 12 ' 

679-2* 1* 2 

28 % % % 


8* 5* YonkCo 


8* 3* Timer 


6* 6* 6ft— ft 


4* 4*_ ft 


AIVIEX IfighsJjOws 


24 5* 5% 5%— ft 

93 15% 15% 15% +1% _ 

. 5 76* TMk TV* oatei value «i pvdlvldand or gptetetrtbuMon dote. 

57 7 6* 7 —ft u— irewveorfyrdgii. 

27 14* 14% 141k— 1k v—lradtaa halted. 

187. 14* te% 14*.+ ft te —to bonknretev or rectevren W p or being raaiaaimodwn- 
1 3 3 3. d*r to* Bankruptcy Ate. or oecurtttasareumodbv ouch corn- 

33 3 3 — ft MM*. 

T 22% 22* 22* + ft wd — s*m dtefrtbatad. 

306 3* 3% 31k— % wl— wbmtewedL 

191 lift 11% 11* + lk ww— wttti warranto. 

99 14* lift Ulk— ft x— ax-dJvtdendorex-rhtat*. 

3 Sft 5ft 9* + ft xdls— ex-dtstrSwlton. 

31 23* 23 ZS — % -XW— wMboot womnita. 

23 7% • 7 7% + % v— ex -dividend and iotas to lutL 

50 ft fir ft yta— ytakt 
10 11% lift 11%+% i— safes to tun. • 


• 34 
JO 16 13 


J2 Zl 11 

JW 


AmExprwt 

BowneCa 

CresfFoam 

EtecAm 

Flrsfcorns 

Gretoer 

MocNlSch 

MtoPLpfC 

OfilaArt Co 

FGE 125pfD 

PLtS434pt 

SJWs 

Std Shares 

VtecoMI 


tsEbr 



Devon Resin nl 

^7nSr 


BMP IWTEBFUMDS 


— — ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Dec. 12, 1985 

Met g re a t vgtaeaaetoMsas are s upeBid by the n wc U Batad wnftlhe eMceeBaa of seme w e e tas hared « 

Tbemrewtaal cymbals todlcotafrweeacv of neetatloMSBPPltad:(«)-daay; (Wl-woeMr; (b)-bteno«itM*; (ri-reguireiT;^ (IJ- brow tarty. 

ALMACSyMAOCtaEMT t i^T*LT P. IIIV. Apyi5»« 5 * ”” |^jS| uS?S }$l If KMO I i ? 1 gr5S5^ r - 1 

jus »ae» . co. lm . 5-— ga g»WM ff,. tKS !S! SUS S B^SS?SS^=-i 

hh. — ViSS fciag8lBC==: l KJ i&j— ™ UMSfa- 

was ssuosas^s^rr^M fflSj -a . — ,ss 

i r sf 108460 -<d) FUemvAmor. Assets 1 7768 -(w ) Ooss C - Japan S UXL59 iri 

Bar SF 170400 -Id I Ftoaurv Australia Fund * 1161 OBUFLBX LIMITED |wl FUted InSiTWTraS i 

RFUHDS 4 d) Fidelity DbcoveryFund — ^ *- tDB9 -lw) MulHcurrencv $ 1Z62 ! w Fm^iexT^ViS™ ci 

xxid Fund 8 129B3 -<dl PktaWfyOlr.Byge.TT.. .— - I 13861 -jw{ Dollor Medtam Term s 1161 (wi w, “ ■ . 

wrrencr im , S WJ* -fdj FkteOty Far east Fund—— S 25.1* Dollar Lnno Twrm_ x 1164 1 w) FwmutaSatoetUvTErf — «5 

arrency DM DM 3065 -{dj Fidelity lim Fund % that -(wj jowonese Ybi s lisi I " i FSn3it!?^ tecm *' ^ s / 

urrenev Starting C WU3 -<d| FMtelly Orient Fund t 3X58 3w) Pound Starting t 1066 ( d ) FrWFTrtST dertta*. nu 

retetvPacWc Offer— 1 1A75 -Jd J Fktegtv Frontier Fund 8, UBB -Cwt Deutsche Mora DM 10S2 <w) GeSdi, 


AL MAL MANAOEMENT -Jwrl LonaTerm S 2SB3 -H»| uevds InM Growth SF I7Z7D Id D gutter 

-[wj Al-Mal Trust. SjV 8 189.10 FAC MOmt. ltd. imv. adHismrs -+twj uoyds Frin income — sf 32un ? Drauw 

BANK JULIUS BAER A CO. Ltd. 1. Lawrence Poonty HIIL EC4. 01-423+600 -Mwf Lloyds Inn M. America—^ t 111 JO d DravfwTc 

-tdl Baerbond SF 92Z1S -twl FBCAHontto ~ 1 1365 -+twj Uoym InTI Pateflc SF 13360 d DrwvfiteF 

■id j Conbor SF U73J0 -iwj FAC Enropaan .. — -- s 14.1 1 -+<w) uoytIj InTLSmolter Cos_ $ 1561 w Drayftte i 

-id! BautoaerAmertai ST23Z000 -{wl FSC Oriental S 8Z17 NIMARBEN w fteEshd 

-(d) KauDrear Europe SF 1440600 FIDELITY POS47X KomlltoB Bernwdg _ -Id ) Ckns A _S 97 JB d EWWO 

-Id Eflutboer Pacific— 1 SF 122460 -4m) FAAHeidiires S 7768 -jw Class B-UB. 8 10763 w FlrWEao 

^d! Crotxir SF 108460 -id) FWemyAnrer. Assets * 7768 -iw Ocss C- Japan s woS 7 FWrasS 

-(d) 5Mcbar - SF 170460 -id I ndteitv Australia Fund a HJi OWJFLHX limited * 5% trie 

BMP IMTBRFUMDS -id FldtetTy Dtvaveryptad — _ S -1069 4« isulltaurrsncv $ 1Z62 w Ftmsalir 

-<vr) Irtferbond Fund 8 T29B3 -id) PkteHtY Dlr.5vgs.Tr .1 12861 -jw Dollor Medtum Term S 11X1 w Fa^n 

-j«) IntarcvrrancT USX— s to* -id) FVteaty Far eote Fund * 25.1* -4w Donor Long Term s lij* w pSmui? 

-jw) Intarwrency DM DM 3055 -fd) FWefffy IrrfZ Fund S 7867 .fw Japanese Ym 1361 d FMtetanc 

-jw) interc re r en cr Starting t MUU -id FWWIfy Ortant Fund. t 3X58 -iw Pound Start tap t 1056 3 PranxFTi 

•jw) InttraauUy Pacific Offer S 1*75 4di Pktamy Fran tier Field J 15-58 -Iw Deutsche Mora DM 1062 w Game V 

-iw) Irttareoutfr N.Amr. Offer— 8 1060 -4 d FIdefTty Pacific Fund S1526B Aw Dutch Ffein — FL 10b40 Id Gmmn 

BANOUE l H DO SUEZ -Id) FldteltV SpcL OrawWl F«L 9 1661 -lw Swiss Franc SF l5T& w HacmnTa 

-(d) Aston Growth Fund.. . S 1UI -id i Fidelity World Fund— S 3968 ORAMOE NASSAU GROUP Z SesttaFa 

-lw) Dtverbond SF 0260 FORBES PO BU7 GRAND CAYMAN PB 8557* The Hague (1179) 469670 wHortzSnF 

-lw) 9IMmrn S 17B7 London Apart 01-439-3013 AO Bever Bete ggl ng en I I 8 31 JB m ibeXkm 

-iw) FIF-Euroee 8 16.15 -fw) Dmtar Income-. S 4J5 PAROBAS-GROUP I r la-Vgb 

-(d) FIF-lirtemollenol s 11.19 -tvyl Forbes High inc.-out Fd e 9430 -(d Cortaxa intarateianal S im.97 (r LArics" 

-iw) FIF-Poetflc S aOJB -jw) Goto Income :S 7J1 Hd ECU PAR ECU 103767 d ntarh^T 

-4d> IridOMNBMUtttoendBA S 11069 -iw) GoW Asurectanen S 466 -jw OBU-DM DMIWDBO w n&rJErt 

-< a 1 incsuoez Mcltrbonde B S T2J9 ^ m) Stra tegic Trading S 160 -iw OBUGE3TIOM W 9Z« 7 

^id IndasuezUSD(MMP) 1104*57 GBPIMOR FUMDS. . . -fw OBU-DOLLAP S 115760 r rinSSJ 

BRITANNtAJ'Ob 271, si. HeRer, Jgnrey -(w) East ta ve te me n r Fond S 44X92 -iw OBU-YEN Y 16*00630 a 

Aw) BrttXtaitar Income S 0J82* Kw) Scrttteh WOrW Fund C 13865 -(W OBU-GULDEN FL106Z72 f il^MAn 

-(wl BlitJMonawCuir T ‘.HUS -{w! state 5t Amertcan — . — S 17468 -Id PAROIL-FUHD * <u t£ \ iSShT.*** 

-id) Brit InttSMieingenrM -S 1.173 London Geneva :4V-2Z35553p -jd PAR EUROPE GROWTH inn 1 jEiSj'jS 


-tdl Indontai MuWbondaA. S 110^ -<w) Gold Auprvctotao % 4j 

-j a ) inaasoez Maitrbonde B — — s 1«Z09 A mi Strotantc Trotflna S L 

-id) ladasuez USD 1104457 GBFIMOR FUNDS. 

■RtTANNULPOg 271. »- HeBer. Jeteey Aw) East Investment Fund 9 

MW) BrlMTotfor Income 3 86*2* -{wScrtttetl World Fund— £ 13BJ8 

■ wl BrttJMonawEuir T \ MBS -(w) State 5L American S 17468 -id PAROfL-FUMD » "^62 t r 1 IlSi^ 

-fdl BntlnttSMievigenrH - 6 1.173 Landentel-rtn^a. Geneva Ai-ZniXiSX A. 0 ) PAREUROPE GROWTH Sll^ elKsSIrttaSMP** f 

- dl Brtt.IntLLMcsiagJ'ortT t 119J GLOBAL ASST MANAOEMENT COUP. -id PARINTER FUND % 131^ w) .* J5-2 

- w> BrU.Am.lnc.fc FdLtd— * 1J44 PB 1T9, St P*tar Port, Guernsey. W8L2B715 -id) PARINTER BOND FUND SI0J7 m 

-<w$ BrttJSted Fund— 9 0 643“ -lw? Futyr GAMSA . , S 12X27 -id) PARUSTreas. Bend TXBr^S IT76J | d ! iSSSJS?ni2!Lri&rEa — 

- wl BrtLMonagjCurTencv— _ I 14BB* Aw) GAM Arbitrage Inc S ICB ROYAL B. camnxPOB 2<LQUERHseV (wl KWmlSrt « ££ 

-jdl BdL Japan Dir Pert Fd S L177 -<w) GA4*rlco tnc — S 15464 -Hwl RBCConadton Fund U4. S 12JI7- twl R> ini?* 

- w) BrtUemy GUt Fund C 0JU -jw GAMAwtralta inc.„ S W.I8 -Hwl RBC For EastAPocfflc FtL s iS ’ KorBaGrow,ft Tru « K ’? , - 3 S^ 

-(d) Belt. Wartd Lels. Fund : S U40 -jw GAM Bost on Inc - — — 8 11964 ■+ w) RBC InH Caslkd Fd___ % 279* a 1 nliran mm S -„IS^S 

- dj «rtt world Techa Fund — s • 0X0 -jw gam ermi toee . S 1761 -+ w) RBC Inn income F a... * ,£ i2SSL^?!2.~T7a; S’lSK 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL -iw GAM Frorngrol — — SF 12167 -+ d 1 RBC MmvCurrencv Fd * 1JM 7 uEESSy** H0 “ 1 19569 

. w) Capital inrt Fund — ... ■ S 45JB -(wr GAM Hons Kona Inc. 3 99J2 ra w! R8C Nonti Armr. Fa_ j ^79 w ‘ 13 «M 

- wi COPtKH Italia SA S T965 -i w) GAM lotarmitlooaJ tec X 14X50 SKANDI FOND INTI FUND (4+8-23427*) Z hRgSSrT liar 1 J «U1 

CITICORP INVESTMENT BANK (LaxJ -{W> CAM JaPafl lnc._ S 12263 -jwllncj BW-_S 655 *0* T jSSSJlSSL S 1 5* 22 

POB 1373 Luxembourg TeL47755J1 -(») GAM North America Inc. S 11861 -iwJACc^ 6JB nffm - i ynk f MewoljM tam 5tL Fd— — — 8 22J3 

I d ) OHnvegt Ecu ECU W1W8 -fw) CAM N-Anwriai Unit Tru*t— llZTSp SVEHSKA INTERNAT10KAL LTD. m L ISSar™' Y 1H97260 

(d LCIttoveft UauldHy J. X181AW -jwJCAMPOcHfCInc. S 13872 T7 Devonshire Ea-LondorKn J77-8D40 , ’ tf — S„1U5 

CREDIT 51H53C U55UE PRICES) -iw GAM Penx& Owr.WorhJw.- 10960 p -l r ) SUB Band Fund- «u “ Nto^fSST 

-Id Actions Sut»to 5F 497J5 -Iw) G AM Pet to & Char. UJL Fd.. WJBp -jwl.SHB InH GrawtoFSteZl^Is 2SAg S MOTTEcpSiSS — 

-Id Bond valor Swt SF 10465 -jW) OAMr tot — — S 114J2 SWISS BANK CORP-USSUEPRICK) w nSirl T T 7 *579461 

-<tf Bond Voter D-mark— DM I0&43 -iw) <2AM ftngppore/Motav Inc — • 81.12 -jd America- VaIor___^_ sf 51860 w SiMr fnvnttment Food. — * 10X17 

A0 Bond Voter US-OOLUU* S 11079 -jwf OAMStefl* Intf UnBTru*t_iaiS*» -id P+ftalc Bend Sgtetekm_ DM lSS 2 n^fTt ! 

-jd Bond Valor (Start tog B 10041 -jw) GAM WortOwlde Inc S mas -Id &ol tar Bond Setactton_ZL_* uTa r£u£-i L.„- j * ln -** 

.- d BotS Valor r«n_ YgnKUMBO ^wl GAM Tyctre&A. Ckm A. — S 129J1 -id Florin Bond Selection IHT ^l iS S »i PAN?iraDl^S. ,nvT ‘ Fa, “ S 122369 

A0 convert Voter Swf. SF 12Z75 -jw Q5AM I tetrwt Inc OS Ont. - X 9967 -(d Intarvotor ZZ £f Sjs ?( SSiSgL'SF-.- g _* 21J6 

- d Convert vnior US-DOLLAR. s laUB -<w GJAM interest inc.UJSpe_ s 9753 A0 Japan Porttaao nji* r SF W* 

I(d M«K SP 49X00 -iw) GSAM Intarast Inc. SF 9*61 -jd Storting Band Selection 10X4] m p 2222L V “ ,U * NiV 13S3J9 

AO G5 Pond s- Bon rtl . SF ;7460 .-jw) GSAM fB terwt Inc.^— Vfei9644 -jd Swtsi Fareftn Bond Sol SF 1)167 w) ^ — S1148J5 

-d C5 Fomft-inn , . sf 12160 -jw) gSAAftl nterett Inc • DM 9968 -id Swfsavntar Now Sertes___ SF 3*60 w pIS 5 132» 

. d CS Manor Market Fund. S1TO7J0 -jwj pAMInteneteint— .1 10060 -id Universal Bond Setete.. SF rajs wl J5 , Y=rTrt? * **4 

-d CSMgmy Market Fvnd_ DM104460 G-T. MANAGEMENT (UIG1J*. ■ v- Jfl UnhtarscJF^ te S p Z) ^ T r * W* 

- dlS/Wtoey Market Fund (105160 -4GI grery PtK.FdZ». — S .1161 -id Yen Bond SelectJon YlKuon r Funtf — * 7 

-Idi cs Momv Market Fd Yen- Y10M1660 -jr) G.T.AgpttedScianoe 1 1463 union bank OF Switzerland w{52-2 cfl TL-^..iv. — s 94060 

- d ) (taBvte-Valar _ SF 147J5 -id) G.T. AMan HJL OwtftFd S 1163 -jdl Amra UB.8b.__Z_w= re* w ) Ouate urn Fu nd N-V. S3S13 

-jd uStoC SF IS5D0 -jdlG.T.Asta Fund S <2T -jd j §S tF»9« 

A.0) Eurapo-Voter SP 1MJS -jdl G.T. AuslrotJa Fund . ■ 1 . X 2567* d Fonsa Swiss Sh. sp i mbS 3 1 B 4 **** 1 "* **-— lb SSm 

Ad\ pS^-VOftr. - ■ -- SF MgJB 4Bl&I-glNbPeFltod_^-— — . J UA9 -{0 JwHiWttt SF 9M6B V) S 112462 


Aw Brit Gold Fund. : 9 

-Iw BrtLManaejCrerency— 1 
-Id Brttr Japan Dir PerLFd S 


l-Cwl FulurCAMSA 

1-jw) GAM Arbitrage In 
U*l GAMerfeo hKL_ 


j d PARINTER FOND 

id j PARINTER BOND FUND. 


t p »Kn ‘2 D. ratter WM Wide I hrtTte f 13J1 

« Si'S I Drafclw r InvesLFreto W.V it22X84 

d DravftK America Fund ® 1062 

d Drwvfus Fund mri % 4167 

■ * 1SJ1 * OrwftBinteficonttoent 3 34.92 

_ w Tt w Ete cbnshmenl Trust t 1J4 

— s treaf 1 fworaCWtoattaite — Ecu 64M 

-f I2Z-“ w Hrat Eoota Fund— S 1862X93 

— * WO-59 r Fifty Star* Lid X 93565 

_ w Fixed rncome Tran» S 1X95 

fffl w F^^ i”‘” Pr — ~ ^ 

- iS ! Baa ?**"™- — ^ & 

rai ioS S. £ ranK| - T. f V s 1 Inlerilns DM 41J9 

“f? iSS U Sggg VIJIV.BONDF. I11J3 

cc L rt sec. Fund* s <n.9i 

6 : — i as 

■ * 31JB i^^SSteLM SF 

S 100.97 r ILA-IQS ' "' «*' 'inju 

D*iSSm d - ~ *T IW 

■S5 1S S L *S ^ ! «ferrn erket Fund » 292J9 

** 1157 jS S toyrntaln^ Mut . Fd. U.-B- - s S51.19 

VieimtS. i 'nFISecurtftes Fund s 1457 

b) B S 2S£*J d inwdnnwi DM 4X93 

r nwtetAHantlaireB s wS 

■ *.ifm r ItoHortune InH Fwid SA__ S 1965 
—_*!!■“ f" Joaan Selection Fund. 1 1 


* ■te 0 ' 1 Ferfflc Fun® 

* m J*ir Ptne- Intt Lti 

11763! id ) KMnwort Benson II 


-(w) BtltJersay GUt Fund C 0JT8 1 -1*1 GAM Australia 

-jd) Brit wartd Lets. Fund : X TJte[-(wi CAM Baetra In 

3 dJBrtt world Tecftn. Fund — 9 ■ 0623 |-jwi GAM Ermltage 
CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL |-iw) GAM FYrro^ol 


-tw) CoatMt mn Fund ... ■ S 45JB 

■( w) Capital Itolta S A , ■ S T945 

CrnCONP INVESTMENT BANK (LexJ 
POB 1373 Uirambourg TeL 4776X51 
( d ) GHnvagt Ecu ECUWMJf 


I • 0623 -jw) GAM ei-rnttaBt — . — 
A w ) GAM Frmc-vnl _i_ 
S 4SJ6 -jwi OAMHong Kong Inc., 
S T965 -iwIGAMiDtarnoflatrelu: 


CAMintBmoflotxil IM X 14X50 SK 

GAM Jraan lnc._ ■ S 12263 A* 

GAM North America Inc. — S 11X41 A « 

CAM fLAmertai Unit Tru*t- 113J5P XV 


S T2l» -I dl PARUSTreas. Band XX B a . S 11751 id! SiriiwNMBraMMiNni 

l MS 5 K?fefeSKS 5 ^i 5 ?SS aE 5 ,,s 5 )L jS SSMSSCtaJffi 

- VgjS 31 * RBcS^SwSSiJ^d. *S lw ' KarBdGrowtfi Trusty. 

I TO M Letoem F und I 

* wj.iWCNwib Amor. S rara W lSSST 


X 14X50 1 SXtANDIFOND I NTL FU NO (4fr+23427* 1 , a ” m 

I T2Zte|-jw]lnC6 Bid S L55 0ffeZ_J 6JB r?{ FHrtVri^.i^YrFn 


, INTERNATIONAL LTDl 


t d l attovate UaiUtfJtv L t IBlAMI-jWJ CAM PdClflC Inc. X 13X72 1 J7 Devorahlrg &QjjBnd»v4n-377-8040 

CREDIT SUISSE U55UE PRICES) Rw) GAM PaitoB Ore. Wort**. _ lMJBaj-l r 1 SHB Band Fund T 


-Id Actions Suteres 5F 477J5 

-Id Bood voior Swt SF 10465 

AO Bond Voter D-mark DM 10663 

-jd Band Voter US-DOLLAR— S 1ICJ9 

-jd Bond Voter CStarUis B 10041 

.At Bora Valor TNI YgnlOMOO 

•jd Convert Voter Swf— — SF 12Z75 
,3d Convert valor us-DOllar. S 13X03 

jd Canarec SP moo 

Jd CS Fentte-flenrti , SF '7460 

Jd C5 FonA-mn . . SF 12160 

-id cs Money Morkgt Fund. S1TO760 

Jd CS Moray Market Fund— DM104460 


0 I-jw) GAM Petto & Qtar.wxxidw.- 10968 p J r ) 3HB Band Fund 

5F 497J5|-(w) GAMPNtoXOrer.UX. Fd.- 10MB p -iw) 5HB InH Growth Fund 

SF 10445 1 -tW) GMWrtot : S 11422 SWISS BANK CORP. (ISSUI 


DM 10463 -iw) CAM Stogaaore/Mofoy Inc — 8 81.12 |-jd) Amerioa-Valor, 
. S 11079 Jwj 0AM 5ltol 8, Inti Un«Tru»l_ 152.15* p JdJDJAark BondS 
_ s 10041 JwjGAMWorkMdelne s 19455] -{ d > Dollar Bend Sei 


GAM Tyche SA. Oars A S 179J1 -jd) Florin Bond Select fan. 

G5AM Infertsf Int U J OnL. - * 99J7|jd) Intavotar 


SE 111- 4 ? lw) PSCO Rural H.V._ 


IBB ^S. lnvT ‘ F q ~ * 1^9 

^ - am 1 jijx 

5w. RE st Geneva- SF1397JB 


t 10060 - d Universal Bond Setect SF rajs i wl hraUfimtarr? > 1 

. ■/"- - d unhwreJPiM d ce 7 >vl 7? J 7, „ Cnv Infc, Sc, Tr__ % 

i . 1U1 Jo Yen Bond Setactlon .Y1HU60 r Fund — ** 

a 1441 ueine uw na wnreei l " 1 *" iri Pn-Tnrh - , 


Ii Stefe-Vdter $p KUIH« RT.e»iww___. s U69IJ01 JapohJnv«>t 

OHEXEL BURNHAM LAMB ERT INC . ■ »» &T. eu raSinoB COB- Fund S 15.Wjjd) Saftt South AtrSh. 

wincnester Hauee.77 LmdenWall • • Hr) G.T. Pcflat' — ■ ■ ■ ■ I iLto l-i d ) Sima (stock once). 


Wbam t Horae . 77 Lond on Woll ■ -f rj G.T. Potter' Fund S 1465 -< d ) smo (stock orirei 5F 

LOTOON eC 101 920 9 797) I d) C.T. Bend Ftot_: S. 12J7 UNION INVnrTMENT FrwiWBrt 

-jw) Finsbury Group Ltd S 12968 JO) G.T. Global Teteintav Fd s 1360 -jiii inu«ntn . nu 

' Wtntetastre Dhrartefted S 21 JO* Jd j P.T. Henihu Pefh ftodkr s 3157 Jdiitnito yK gJJ 

s^ rJm SSS S^sz l 8JS 

WlncMater Hohfln8i__^FP 1^ ^^T.T^gV Hmd— , 2^ Other FUDdS 

Worldwide SecreWm S SU B HILL SAMUEL iNVRjnMQMT.lNTUSJL w) Acttbands Invectmettts Fund. 

WorldwWeSgeteal *18*065 Jeraey, PJZ B^jffl,Tef OSM7W29 . wl Atelvre taH. ‘ 

INVBSTMRNT FFM — . Etafp e- P.a 6cg to2 Z T1.4 U12X4051 ^ „ ml Allied LWL— 

1 Cegceiit ra .. m .... DM S12 iS? _*?*!■» w l A«»Rlo;niwrankr»3j Fund “ 

I tnrt Re n tentand_— dm 9148 J fl 1 CS FjBafancod) ___ — SF 2482 r 1 Arab fJnance i f 

i X Heram+Lterd O eera e , B twwn Jd) EunManEatelY Fund*— DMHJ2 rua.. "**l 

r>ui Commedlty Pool — *3*363 ““ JO) IntaL Brad Fund.. , * 1UI w) Trustcrelnn Fd. ueifi_~ 


jw) Worldwide Secwtttei S SUB 

jwlWorldwKteSradte^ S 18*063 

WT INVBSTIWDIT FFM 
-HdlCegceni ra .. i ... DM. M60 

. -»(d I InH Re n tentand_— dm 9Z40 

DeBBXH^ m+LftT deeBrgfeBnnBett 

Jm) DLH Cimnwfity Prat— 

-(ml Currency *■ GaMNeei— — s 14U0 ~~ 

w^sssmaec= -«h* 

S d Cw- OW. S 12JS Offer, SI 2627 

U^rBTtIONAL INCOME FUND ■ 

Jd 1 Short Term ’A (A«W»— S 1J0W! 
JdlShorfTgrWA'IpiBW-i; — S iBOtei 


= r$z 

s=*" 5F V 'SS 

OM Sk d I- lS 

JSdi "" '™ s*F 

llnOS. <o.) Thornto n AuitrteigFdUrt « 9*i 

Ef=i - 1 sg i ii 

rss= l AS : teiHi*"— .ilS 


id) InL Currency UJ. 

ld| tTP Fd (Tachnotovr 
I d 1 OSeaB Fd (N. AMSR 


Jdl O*S0OB Fd (N. AMERICA) J 

JARDIME FLEMING, FOB nCPOHB 

-J r 1 j.F.currencyXto'd X 

-|r) J.F Hong KBrcTrur X 

Ar ) ±F Pacific Income Truaf __ Y 
JryjJ Jaeen.Tniot V 


Jd Short Term 'A* jowrlja — s 
Jd Snort Term jAeojte)—. J 
Jd Short Term ■ff I Ptehr) — — t 

DM -Dauteehe Marie BF* 


t am -Hwl Lloyd* mrr DoOar.- 
36*74 -Hwl Ltovds ion Euraae, 


^.ntusjl ajjgstfc=2Si \ SS -fi 

sis nssiraSSE ss j gstte aaggzr- » ™ 

EE s 1 ilaSS 

$ zs B 858 — ■ a& 5 ■®®s«b= === ! iisf 

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BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1985 


Page 15 



ota Chief Sees End 


otas 



' By James Risen 

J ;■ l<w AngriaTTmer Service 

■f C'. H LEXINGTON, Kentucky — Ja- 
•, \ jus’s voltmtaiy import quotas on 
4 - ?Vuq exports wiH be criminated 

* '•) l"xt March, allowing for wide- 

competition in the US. car 
.-i '■ ;arb*t for Ihe first dine since 1981,’ 
J - .. chai rman of Japan's largest 
1 -' tomaker predicted here. 

• ’ * ;! Eji Toyoda, chairman of Toyota 
U' *• '■ { otor Corp„ said Wednesday that 

| : expects the Japanese govem- 
'* ^.inl to end its trade restrictions, 
1! : ; • " • lieh limit shipments of Japanese 
" } : -rs to the United States to 13 
'' ii 1 f ilion units per year. 

■ ; Mr. Toyoda was in Lexington to 

• ‘ ,->rmaily announce his company's 
■' - t '..,ans to build its first U.S. assem- 

l y plant, an $800-xnflEon facility 
— be located outside Georgetown, 
T^entucky. a small town of about 
•„ $ ,000 just outside Lexington. 
'-'{Toyota announced Thursday 
£ ?at it will build a 400-million-Ca- 
' ; '-idian-dollar (about $287 milli on) 

*. 'ant near Toronto, its first Cana- 
I -an production facility, Reuters 
. : -ported from Toronto. The plant 
jftajld be capable of producing 
-..i; * ’),000 cars a year of the 1,600- 
i' lbic-cendmeter class, tbe auto- 
said.] 

■ZAF Widens 
' v Carbide Bid 
-^■\To $4 Billion 

x^ y'iinmJed bv Our Staff From Dispaieka 

. 7Tr> NEW YORK — GAF Corp. said 
’ i: Thursday that it would launch an 
immediate $68-a-share cash take- 
, ] ?./cr offer for all the shares of 
' : ‘inion Carbide Corp. that it does 
;h already own and that it would 
: .1 longer seek the approval of Car- 
%:-de directors to complete the 
. i *rs* r - 

- . , GAF. which already holds a 10- 
: ‘rcent stake in Carbide, had eadi- 
< ; offered $68 a share, or S3 3 bil- 
. ; on, for 70 percent of Carbide and 
_ id sought the approval of Car- 
: - de's board. The change in tactics 
1-mounced Thursday means that 
i ‘ AF must now raise nearly S4.1 
' ilion to finance the takeover. 

: Carbide has about 67.5 milli on 
i ’u res outstanding. The big cbemi- 
: — . ils producers advised sharehold- 
ers on Wednesday to take “no im- 
. ediate action** on GAPs earlier 
:■ for. 

-• - 1 GAF said it intends to finance 

s purchase of additional shares of 
;; ' ; irbidc in the merger with the pro- 
' edsof the sale of additional secu- 
\ies of GAF, or a subsidiary of 

'\v. ' " :■ ■; 

... Drexel Burnham- Lambert. 

^AFs dealer manager, advised 

"'_jr AF Thursday that it is highly 

- ■nfident it can place additional 
trinities in an amount necessary 

purchase any remaining Carbide 

i 1 i;,JJ ares for cash, the company said. 
V I iClo' GAF. a New Jersey-based mano- 
L’turer of building products and 
ecialiy chemicals with sales of 
. ... .*out $730 million, disclosed on 
ednesday that it plans to seDcer- 
■' in Union Carbide assets if its 
■Sj oposed merger with the chemical 
; J ant is completed. 

‘-..-In a Securities and Exchange 
Commission filing , GAF said it 
! xild sell “substantially all” of 
trbide’s consumer-products seg- 
ment, its metals and carbon-prod- 
... ts segment, and a “substantial 
“ ", ..unber” of Carbide's businesses in 
'. technology-services and spe- 
. V. ally- prod acts segment. 

Carbide has raised a line of cred- 
- — -"in excess of SI billion io defend 
— , >lf against any hostile offer. As 

irt of a massive restructuring pro- 
- i'ain announced earlier this year, 
— - -f'irbide said it would buy back 10 
illion shares of common stock. 

(Reuters, UPl) 



Eji Toyoda 

Mr. Toyoda said in Lexington 
liiax Toyota is basing its production 

and marketing plans on the as- 
sumption that the restraints will 
not be extended for another year 
when they expire at the end of 
March 1986. 

“Since we are proceeding under 
the assumption that this quota sys- 
tem will be abolished next year! we 
are not even thinking about num- 
bers of cars that would be allowed 
under new quotas," Mr. Toyoda 
said in an interview. “It is not 
something that we are concerned 
about at this time." 

The quotas on Japanese cars 
were begun by the Japanese gov- 
ernment under pressure from 
Washington during the recession in 
198L and originally limited ship- 
ments of passenger cars to 1.68 
million units annually. After the 
UJS. economy started to recover, 
the ceiling was raised to 1.85 mil- 
lion units in 1984. 

Although the Reagan adminis- 
tration urged that the quotas be 
dropped this year, the Japanese 
government extended the restraint 
program while raising the ceiling to 
23 million units. 

Toyota nffirisfo said that the 
Kentucky plant w£D employ about 
3,000 workers building 200,000 
cars a year and will house the same 
kinds of manufacturing operations 
that are performed at the Fremont 
California, plant erf Toyota's joint 
venture with General Motors. 

Mr. Toyoda said that tbe cars 
produced in Kentucky will include 
about 50 percent domestic content 
including the value of the labor 
performed at the fadhty. 

Hc said that engines and trans- 
missions for the cars will be im- 
ported from Japan. He also said 
that Toyota has no plans to build 
further ’U3. parts-minufactnring 
plants of its own. 

Earlier estimates by government 
officials here that the plant. would 
employ 2,060 workers and repre- 
sent an investment of $500 million 
were revised Wednesday when 
Toyota officially announced its de- 
cision to locale m Kentucky. 


British Telecom Profit 
Rose 29% in First Half 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — British TdecommunicatioDs PLC, the tele- 
phone company, said Thursday that pretax profit rose 29.4 percent to 
£885 million ($127 billion) fat the six months ending Sept 3Q; 

Pretax profit was £684 million m the first half ofl 984, which ended 
before the government sold half of British Telecom to private inves- 
tors. 

After-tax profits rose 192 percent to £522 minion, or 82 peace per 
share, from £438 mUEon, or 7.1 pence; the year before. The company 
said that sales expanded OJ percent to £4.65 bfflion from £3.68 bahon 
a year earlier. 

British Telecom declared an interim dividend of 3 pence a share, 

Qualifying US. and Canadian resident holders of tbe company’s 
interim American depositary receipts, or ADRs, are entitled to an 
interim dividend of 4185 pence per ADR. Faeh ADR represents 10 
British Telecom shares. 

The e a rnin g s were slightly tower than London* * financial commam- 

ty had expected, and British Telecom shares fell Thursday by I peace 
to dose at 193 penoe each cm tbe London Stock Exchang e. 

- Capital spending totaled £868 ariffion during the sbc-monlh period, 
and British Telecom said it had a positive cash How of £188 tniHinn_ 

The volume of domestic telephone eall< rose by 7 percent and the 
volume of international calls rose by 13 percent, it said. 

The company said tbe outlook for the second half was favorable 
and would reflect price increases introduced in November. The 
company said growth in business volume was “slightly less vigorous" 
in the second quarter than in the first. 

The British government raised £3.91 NBion in December 1984 by 
selling 5tL2 percent of British Telecom to investors under Prime 
Minister Margaret Thatcher's piogram of HwnnWuiwnig ftug com- 
panies. The government kept the remaining 49.8 percent. 

The heavily oversubscribed sale was tbe largest stock issue in 
Britain’s history. It attracted five times as mneb inves tment capital as 
the shares on offer could cover. 


COMPANY NOTES 


Ajprieot Computers PLC said it 
would bring out software in Janu- 
ary to enable its Xen computer Ktm? 
to run major software designed for 
International Business Machines 
Corp. models. 

Barlow Rand Ltd. said it hopes to 
maintain earnings in the year end- 
ing next Sept. 30 at last year’s level 
of 164.9 Smith African cents per 
share (61.6 cents at current rates), 
which were down from 1702 cents 
the previous year. 

Chrysler Corp. expects fourth- 
quarter earning s to fall below last 
year’s record $4.91 a share because 
of earlier strikes in the United 
States and Canada,- the chairman of 
its Chrysler Motors unit said. The 
executive, Gerald Greenwald, said 
the company expects 1 986 to bring 
a “tough, snptm market.” 

Eastern Air lines Inc. said it. will 
seek deep cuts in wages, vacation 
time and sick leave from its pilots 
because of increased competition. 
Tbe Miami-based airline proposed 
to cut pilots' wages by 20 percent to 
40 percent, side leave by 30 percent 
and vacation benefits by 20 per- 
cent. 

Floor Coqk, Los Angeles-based 
international eng in e erin g concern, 


-reported? toss qf 56332 miPiopfor laqguired a .site on Hang Kang Is- 
its fiscal year ended Ocl 31 n large- land for 199 million Hong Kong 


ly as a result of $400 milli on in 
asset write-downs. It earned SI Bul- 
lion in 1984. 


dollars ($25-5 nrillioo) and wonld 
develop it at an additional cost of 
100 million dollars. 


Daimler Expects Sales to Rise 18% in 1985 


By Warren Geder 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Daimler- 
Benz AG’s group sales should in- 
crease 18 percent this year to a 
record 51 S billion Deutsche marks 
($202 billion), Grom 43.5 billion 
DM in 1984, the managing board 
chairman, Werner Bretlscnwerdt, 
said Thursday. 

Mr. Brdtsehwerdt declined to 
provide a profit projection, saying 
only that the group expects higher 
net income. 

But analysts are convinced that 
Daimler's profit will rise signifi- 
cantly this year from 19S4’s 1.1 
billion DM and that the company 
wtQ lift its dividend from last year’s 
unchanged 10.50 DM. 

Additionally, market observers 
expea Daimler to pay a bonus as 
pan of the group’s lOOth-axmiver- 


sary celebration next year of Mer- 
cedes’ first car production. Daimler 
makes Mercedes automobiles and 
trucks. 

Car production is expected to 
reach 541,000 vehicles this year, a 
13-percent increase from 1984. The 
projected increase seem larger, Mr. 
Bredtscbwerdt said, because 1984 
production was lower because of a 
seven-week metalworkers’ strike. 

Robert Beton. West German 
mark et analyst at London-based 
Phillips & Drew, said he expects a 
31-percenljump in net profit to 80 
DM per share from 612 DM in 
1984. 

The projected sales increase is 
considerably higher than last year’s 
8 .6- percent rise, but the figure is 
distorted somewhat by the inclu- 
sion of sales at two newly acquired 
Daimler units, Motoren & Tur- 


binen Union GmbH, maker of air- 
craft engines, and Dormer GmbH, 
an aerospace company. 

Dander's bid to increase its 
stake the electronics conglomerate 
AEG AG, to a majority interest 
from its 24.9-percent holding is be- 
ing considered by the Federal Car- 
tel Office. If approved, as expected, 
the takeover will make Daimler 
West Gennany’s largest company, 
with consolidated annual sales of 
mare than 60 billion DM. 

Mr. Breitscfcwerdt said MTU 
and Dornier acquisitions contrib- 
uted about 15 billion DM to 
Daimler’s 1985 consolidated sales 
figures. 

Sales of Daimler cars in tbe do- 
mestic market -were up 18 percent 
by volume in the first 10 months 
from a year earlier, with exports up 
16. percent 


J jmg Trade Battles Fuel Drive to Strengthen GATT 


f (Continued from Page 13) 

' : <unciJ on Foreign Relations in 
■ < tw York. 

In his new book, “Trade Talks," 
*. A ho outlines many of the pro- 
. sals being discussed. These in- 
\ de empowering the GATT sec- 
mint to undertake studies an 
.,<■ de practices, surveillance proce- 
•res, similar to International 
■)neiary Fund reviews of mem- 
... V economic policies, and estab- 
. ting a permanent minis terial- 
cl body under GATT to address 

- de issues on a regular basis. 

Hie dispute-settlement proce- 

\ « at GATT also would be 
suulined and ils decisions could 
- enforced by means of direct 
. unions, 

- ' \nolhcr recent study, published 
the Washington-based Institute 
r international Economics, also 
• . is that the GATT participa ve in 
parations for IMF economic- 
blization programs and in dis- 
sions of World Bank loans to 
.. r loping countries. Some consul- 
ts also have suggested that trade 

7 listers regularly attend meetings 
; he IMF Interim Committee. 

• .. dost reformers also agree that 
*. ■; GATT secretariat currently 
' - . Roving about 300 people, prob- 
v would have to be expanded. 
' . Aho notes that the IMF em- 
' vs about 1,700 people and the 
'? rid Bank more than 6,000. 

The GATT is in urgent need of 
'■ air." Mr. Yeutter told the the 
\ . rid Economic Foram, a Genva- 
--■* zd foundation, as he bq^n bis 
last week. “We can strengthen 
f GATT, to refurbish it in what- 
- ways is necessary to make it 

- *i the needs of tbe international 
ling sphere in the coming de- 

y. a” 


The Reagan administration’s 
first priority is improving GATT’s 
dispute-settlement machinery, 
which has led to what Mr. Yeutter 
described as “utter frustration” 
among U.S. businessmen, particu- 
larly over the 16-year Gtrus-Pasta 
War between Washington and the 
EC. 

That controversy is expected to 
be among the subjects discussed by 
Mr. Yeutter and his EC counter- 
part, Willy De Gocq, commission- 
er for external relations, during the 
animal EC-U.S. meeting in Brus- 
sels Friday. 

In his Geneva speech, and at a 
news conference in Paris on 
Wednesday, Mr. Yeotter said that 
although the trade flows involved 
were modest, the case shows 
GATT’s ineffectiveness in such 
cases, be said. An EC official esti- 


CGE Told to Resume 
Talks With AT&T 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Edith Cresson, 
France's trade minister, said 
Thursday that the French gov- 
ernment had decided to ask 
state-owned Ge. Graerale d’E- 
lectridife to resume its talks 
with American Telephone & 
Telegraph Co. 

The talks had been aimed at 
strengthening each company’s 
positions in the other’s domes- 
tic market, especially in public 
telephone switching. But nego- 
tiations were baited as a Nov. 
30 deadline for a French gov- 
ernment decision passed with- 
out action. 


mated the total value of the trade at 
$50 million a year. 

Tbe U.S. official noted that the 
dispute originated with a U.S. com- 
plaint about preferential treatment 
granted by the EC to imports of 
citrus fruit from Mediterranean 
countries, particularly in North Af- 
rica. That triggered recent U.S. re- 
taliation against pasta imports and 
counter-retaliation by the EC 
against U-S. lemon and walnut ex- 
ports. 

The EC considers its preferential 
treatment for Mediterranean farm 
products a key ingredient in its aid 
program fa developing nations. 

Mr. Yeutter asserted that the 
commission had “blocked both the 
adoption of the GATT panel result 
(which ruled in the U.S. favor) and 
a negotiated settlement” 

On Wednesday at tbe news con- 
ference he compared the EC action 
to veto power used by tbe Soviet 
Union in the -United Nations. 

Mr. De Gercq, brushing off the 
assertions, said in a telephone in- 
terview from Brussels on Thursday 
that tbe commission would contin- 
ue to defend its system of granting 
preferential treatment to Mediter- 
ranean products. “This program 
has been previously accepted by 


that the idea of reviving the 170 
“might someday become a reality, 
bat it is not dose.” The EC fully 
supports improving the existing 
GATT system. “We do not want a 
trib unal established, with [powers 
to order] sanctions.” 


Austrafian Jobless Rate Up 

Roam 

CANBERRA — Australia’s sea- 
sonally adjusted unemployment 
rate rose to 7 3 percent erf the esti- 
mated work force in November 
from 7.8 per c ent in October, the 
Statistics Bureau said Thursday. 
Tbe rale was 8.7 percent in Novem- 
ber 1984, when 620^00 people 
were out of work The number of 
jobless rose to 588,900 last month 
from 564J00 in October. 


to find a peaceful solution 
negotiations, but only in tbe con- 
text of our long-established prefer- 
ence system,” Mr. De Gercq said. 

“We are aware about the U.S. 
complaints regarding our trade 
practices, but there are quite a few 
trade practices going on in tbe 
United States, which we consider 
illegal,” and include “substantial 
U.S. government aid to exporters," 
he added. 

Continuing, Mr. De Gercq said 


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Settlement Predicted in Texaco Case 

Analysts Say Expensive Appeal Could Lead, to Chapter 11 

By Allen Van Qancbrock 

Retnrn 

HOUSTON — Texaco Inc. is 
expected to reach a settlement with 
Pennzoil Co. in lieu of the $10.53- 
biHk» judgment against iL 

On Tuesday Judge Solomon 
Casseb Jr, a Texas district judge, 
upheld a jury award, totaling 
SI 1.12 bQtion including interest 
since Jan. 6, which is thought to be 
the largest in the history ofthe dvil 
justice system in the United Suites. 

Lawyers and analysts say Texa- 
co’s only alternative to settling is an 
expensive, lengthy appeal process 
that could drive it into reorganiza- 
tion proce e d in gs under Chapter 1 1 
of tbe U5. Bankruptcy Code. 

The judgment “puts pressure on 
Texaco to remove this liability, ” a 
Houston lawyer said. 

On the New York Stock Ex- 
change Wednesday, Texaco share 
prices fell and FeonzoS gained. But 
on Thursday, Texaco rose 62.5 


wants is to see Texaco in Chapter 
1 1,” he added. 

Sutton Keany, a partner in the 
New York law firm of Winlhrop 
Stimson Putnam & Roberts, said 
the judgment “set tbe stage for a 
settlement” by giving Pennzoil and 
its chairman, J. Hugh liedike, the 
satisfaction of seeing their claim 
supported by a court. 

Hie jury had agreed with Peon- 
zotTs diarge that Texaco had in- 
duced Getty OQ Co. and its princi- 
pal stockholders to breach a 
binding agreement with Pennzoil in 
early 1984. 

The award gave Pennzoil all the 
actual damages it sought, $7.53- 
billion, plus $3 billion m punitive 

rianvigPf 

Fred Parks, a veteran ofl lawyer 
in Houston, questions the amount 
of damages. 

“Texaco should be permitted to 


exercise all appellate procedures 
available to than, without the ne- 
cessity of an appeal bond,” he said. 

Bui Mr. Keany said that higher 
courts seldom reverse such deci- 
sions. 

“It's very tough io get an appel- 
late judge who did not hear the 
evidence to second-guess a jury." 
he said. 

Although Texaco said it would 
file a motion for a new- trial, one of 
its attorneys. David Boies, dis- 
closed in court that the company 
had discussed a settlement with 
Pennzoil involving a transfer of as- 
sets. 

Mr. Margoshes estimated that 
the suit would be resolved at SI. 7 
billion in cash or assets, plus SI 
billion in lieu of the fee Texaco 
would otherwise pay for an appeal 
bond. 


Pilldngton Posts 
Decline in Profit 

Rivtrn 

LONDON — Pilkingion 
Brothers PLC reported Thurs- 
day that pretax profils for its 
first six months fell 24.5 percent 
to 09.4 million (555.6 million) 
from £512 million a year earli- 
er. 

Sales also fell. 4 percent, to 
£594.1 million from £618.9 mil- 
lion. 

The glass and optical compa- 
ny said overseas operations 
continued to trade well in their 
own currencies but there was 
some uncertainty about the ef- 
fect of exchange rates. Overseas 
results were translated into 
pounds at rales as of SepL 28. 
The decline in profits from 
overseas operations also reflect- 
ed a drop in earnings from 
South Africa and Argentina, 
the company said. 


Fond Motor Co. said it and 
MandoMadsneiy Carp, will estab- 
lish a joint venture company in 
South Korea to produce aluminum 
radiators. Mando is South Korea’s 
leading maker of automotive com- 
ponents. Value of the accord was 
not disclosed. 

Gaimrtt Co, the giant US. me- 
dia concent, said it has withdrawn 
11 suburban New Yoric Gty news- 
papers Croat membership in the 
Audit Bureau of Gradation, an 

Bsairimiwn that vfrifi ff ? CXTCUiatlOQ 

figures for 95 percent <rf all U.S. 
and ranwHun newspapers. 

Junes Hflffdie In&stiies said its 
net income in the first half ended 
Sept 30 rose 20 3 percent from a 
year earlier, to 26 l 5 mfllion Austra- 
lian dollars (517_9 nriffion) from 
22.02 millio n a- year earlier. 

KlOcbner Indostrie-Anlagen 
GmbH said it has won an order to 
bufld a valve factory in East Ger- 
many. No value was disclosed. 

Noranda Mines said it would 
dose a zinc mme in Qudxc be- 
cause prices for the metal have 
dropped, making operations un- 
profitable, h said it also would shut 
an adjacent gold mine, which is 
running ouL 

Swire Properties Ltd said it bad 


cents to $28,875 and Pennzoil fell 
$1275 to $65,875. 

Sanford Margoshes, an oil indus- 
try analyst at Sheaxson Lehman 
Brothers, said be believed there was 
“a high probability of a mutually 
satisfactory out-of-oourt settle- 
ment-" 

“The last thing either company 

JMB Comments 
On Currency Case 
Affecting Nigeria 

Agence France ■Attse-- 

LONDON — The management 
of Johnson Matihey Bankers Ltd. 
acknowledged Thursday that some 
of its employees might have had 
knowledge of transactions that 
may have breached Nigerian cur- 
rency regulations. 

The bank, which was rescued 
from collapse last year by the Bank 
of England, said that certain trans- 
actions involving a small number 
of its clients, amuvl at avoiding 
Nigerian currency controls, were in 
some cases apparently known to 
some bank officers. 

British police investigator* re- 
cently said that frauds involving 
(he hank may have occurred in 
1981. Press reports here have said 
that JMB was allegedly used as a 
conduit by currency smugglers in 
frauds that coold have cost the Ni- 
gerian treasury several billion 
pounds. 

TWA to Add Europe Routes 

United Prat International 

NEW YORK — Trans World 
Airlines said Thursday that it plans 
to expand ils international service 
next summer to offer new links 
between Los Angeles and Paris, 
New York and Stuttgart and Sl 
L ouis and Rome. Tbe carrier also 
said it will serve 21 cities in Europe 
and the Middle East from its Pa ns 
hub during the peak season begin- 
ning April 27. 



I 1 


f I K M S 


Comite Colbert 
Gmstian Dio:: A Luminous Legend 


Bernard Arnault, PrtsiuW.r 


On Feb. 12, 1947, a brilliant fash- 
ion designer presented his first 
collection. A masterstroke of fash- 
ion genius, it sent shock waves 
rippling around the world. The 
designer: Christian Dior. The col- /. 
lection: the unforgetable "New '/ 

Look.” Dior lived and designed ; , 
for only ten short years more, but ■ ^ 

today, almost 30 years after his .;V{;'.. N y 
death, the name of Christian Dior p \ 
blazes brighter than ever in the l 
fashion firmament. 

"Christian Dior is one of the most 
prestigious names in the world, a part of the 
french heritage and a symbol of elegance in the 
widest sense of the term," says Bernard Arnault, 
36, tbe new president of Christian Dior. "We 
will never tamisb that name by going for a policy 
of easy short term profits." 

Dior in 1947 empoyed 80 people and reported 
sales of about $300,000. In 1985 with more than 
1,000 employees, Christian Dior will declare a 
turnover of $800^000,000, an 18 percent rise over 
last year, with profits, too, showing an important 
increase. 

The careful capitalization on the name of Chris- 
tian Dior is one of the merchandizing miracles of 
the 20th century. As early as 1949. Dior instigat- 
ed and developed a system of licensing agree- 
ments which has become the role model for the 
entire fashion industry. Today Dior has granted 
about 200 licenses for 84 different Dior label 
products manufactured in 100 different countries. 
♦The quality of our licenscd-produced products is 
one or the great advantages of Dior ” says Ar- 



nault. "We have been able to find 
vctv high quality licensing part- 
ners an3 we are rhe only company 
established in this way in Japan, 
the United States. Europe and 
South America.” To maintain 
their exacting standards of qualify, 
style and price. Dior has represen- 
tatives in countries where their 
stylists work directly with the li- 
censees. 

Looking ahead to the year 2000, 
Arnault foresees an even more 
splendid future for this magic 
name. He is instilling new vigor into overseas 
expansion by opening a new wholly-owned bou- 
tique in New York in 19ST and a proiecred string 
of franchized American boutiques to follow', with 
contacts already established in Los Angeles, Dallas. 
Houston and Chicago. Creativity will srav firmly in 
the talented hands of Dior's celebrated designer, 
Marc Bohan, who along with Frederic Gastet, 
designer of the incomparable Dior for collection, 
has been responsible for the perpetuation of Dor 
as an exceptional emblem of elegance. The ready- 
to-wear line will move under the sole direction of 
Bohan and his couture design team and the results 
should sparkle anew' in next spring’s collections. 
The highly successful men’s line, Christian Dior 
Monsieur, designed by Dominique Morlotti. has 
made stunning strides in the United States, now 
accounts for 52 percent of turnover. 

Dior’s magical mystique is more dazzling chan 
ever as it prepares to celebrate the 40th anniversa- 
ry of the house. Arnault can proudly say, "We are 
still number one." 


AS ASSOCIATION OF Tilt MOST FRlSTUilOUS SAMLS OF THE FRL SCII SRTIV VI* HI - HIS MU l>» L.% JMUMI . -Mu* PARIS 

ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE COM1TE COLBERT 
















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17TH VI LUSK. Beautiful cpartimrt, 
line iccapwn, 2 bo*oc 
FI 0.000 + charges. Tefc 
48 3)34 73. 


7TH RAC Smcfl 2-room apartment, 33 
+ uffihey Tefc 45 *8 <8 42. 


snmo TO 4 ROOMS. Vftek. manrti. 
ng&e . No agency F ee. 4325 3509. 


BFTa TOWHL by owner, Www, 


1 ATH. XHJVBCT. BO Kym. My fiv- 
listied duple*, beano. SrepioaB. J 
room*. phone. Tel; Owner <702 29 28 


BEAUBOURG Stadm afl am forty 
dwrf term F2.450.Tcfc 46 «B 16 34. 


OWNER'S DUPLEX APARTMENT, 

well furmdied. high das. 4257 0414 


TROCADBK3. LUXURIOUS 2 roomy 

Tefc 1-46475282 / 45534275 


LATIN QUARTER, 2 rooms, brih, takfr 

en. hetf. pbeme. Tefc 43 54 65 (iff 


NEAR PANTHEON, lovely duplex 

with Qgden. Tefc 43 31 64 03. 


PLACE CUCHY, jtuefco. comfort, 3 or 4 
trmelhy F2300 nrt. Tefc 45 22 22 26. 


2 ROOMS M HOUSE. F4000 per 
month. Tel: 1-43 67 21 00. 


5TH. Up to 3 month* my superb %■». 
F13fl00/roorth no bib. 48 87 76 56 


SWITZERLAND 


Brand New 


THE EXCELSIOR 


A Unique 

Hotel Suits 
Residence 


Featuring 

1-, 2-, and 3- 


Bedroom Suites 


AH Magnificently 
Furnished With Luxuriously 
Appointed Kitchens & Baths 


Offering 

RESIDING FOR FOREIGNERS 
FISCAL ADVANTAGES 
UNIQUE SETTING 


BWRONMENT FOR 
SPORTS AND LBSURE 


SWIMMING POOL. 


HT1CSS FAQUTES 


24 HOUR MHHCAL ASSISTANCE 


EXECUTIVE SERVICES AVAILABLE 


MODS, sums 


SWITZERLAND^ ^1^051 -04 


W BON 
1820 MONTREUX 
Ccdl for cppaJnhnenJ 


LUGANO FOR RENT, CHARMING 
townhexse on mpunkwnido, 5 nin- 
litas from center. 3 bedroono, 2 brim, 
tonaOM, private gendety 2-ar Bo- 
rage, Fv enlace indoor & outdoor. 
TmefuBy furnished with cd anenitiei 
greod over 3 floor*. SatrKoe: 
5F?, 450/ north. Renan moving to 
US. AvaAjfcio Jan 86. Contact own- 
er: Private 091/54 36 B5 or Office. 
091/23 11 24. 


LAGO MAGGK3RE - Bringa Conv 
fortable 5-room haute, ft ert M alang 
viewt. S65Q/ morth. London: 8641264. 


USA 


NEW YORK CITY PBOHaAgb 

endased vim of Manhattan eanlem- 
porary tumshens. 2 bedrooms, 2 
Darin. 2500 ki ST made, SOX) iq. ft. 
outside. 14500/ morth for mnmum 6 

months. mcMnum 1 year. TrvCoastof 

Properties. 3050 Runyan Canyon Rd, 


Los Anodes. 
874739A 


i USA. tel (213) 


CBfTKAL PARK WEST a) 86tii SL 

Fumohed, 4 bedrooms, 3 bet hr oomv 

Avrdoble immediately. 69 montits. 
S3.800/ month Tel: London 3B2 0127 
day. 431 2324 eves. 


(Continued From Back Page) 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


U-9JL 


Brand New 

THE KIMBBILY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 


A Unique 
Hotel Suite 
Residence 


off er in g 


preopening savings on 
6 mo., 1 yr. & 2 yr. leases 

ferturing 

Studio, 1 -Bedroom & 
2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and all with 
luxuriously appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 


Executive Services Available 
Model Suites 

(212) 371-8866 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


LUXURIOUSLY RjflMStCO 36edL2- 
bath rtmdi type house, «un 
impeccable landscaped _ 

Spread over 3 acres, comr m rfng 
view on intmcODShti waterway, locat- 
ed JodaonvZe, Honda Owner wish- 


«„i.*ta™ £g .| SS3 


in Span or Canary — ... 

i wrfttfc Prawn. P.O. Bax 50399, 
, FL 32240, USA 


SfSC PROFESSIONAL FAMILY to » 
change our 5 bedroom home 30 mm. 
From NYC Need house or lame. 
tmj atment in Pin Aug. 1966. Write 
M-Morron. 13 Concord bl, ArtiUey, 
NY 10502 USA 


AMBUCAN SfflCS smart apartment ii 
Pwis from Feb. 1 thru Morth 15. 
Prefer 6th or 7lh arron Jn e m e rt . Box 
2970, Hero« Tribune. 92S21 Neuty 
Cede*, France 


AMERICAN WOMAN worts fur- 
nished 1 yr rertal. 1 bed, Kensington, 

S. Kensington, Otebsa. Kiurt,:-; 

bridge. refTTeJ 01-937 5679, OTW. 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


MEDICAL 

SECRETARIES 

BSnguoi English 

INTERDOMU5 ETT 


28 rue du 4 5eptembre 
Metro Opera — Tefc 42 66 27 77 


DOCTORS 


conambon o* 


WANm) to pro- 


vices far USl anmeha company. Lib- 
erd rem u ne r ation for 1 day/morth. 
Seeing ifcotic surgeon, dutiiuKib 


pot. arid dwl or mjtnJion tpeaafct 
Interv i ewing ' “ 


1 London Dec 15 For ap- 
AVs. “ " 
phone number London 445 90 
5 & 10. 


ENGREB JOURNA LIST. Leadi ng US 
pubfioatian covering dsctiunu ssfan* 
try worldwide b -looking for fill time 

Correspondent based mux rdorvMust 
be able to carer business mid technol- 
ogy news and develop featwa mti- 
dei. ExceUert srticry and benefits. 
Send CV mdsakry requirements: Bax 
034264, LH.T, 63 long Acre, London 
WC2E9JH. 


TAX PREPARER. American law fim 
wh experienced person for prepa- 
ration or US & Hand) mcome ton 
retuna. Tefc 45 63 91 23 Farb. 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


MINCDVE SffllS for AMERICAN 

mintKve brms p pabs. 


Englah, 
sec clones. 


«F*ed, Endbfa 
.vSfito 


•olexkty 

V«or ttiflo, 7511 
PI 47 2/ 61 69. 


Dutch or German 
of French ro- 
Wnguol 


p hone: 138 Avenue 
6 Pons, France. T4 


Don't niM 
MTBRNATIONAL 
SECRETARIAL POSITIONS 

TUESDAYS 

in the BIT Oamified Section. 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


ENGLISH NANME5 A mothers helps 
Nosh Agency, 53 Chwch UL Hove. 
Tefc Brighton 1^312904 


MAN SEEKS JOBa rneUMf**/ 
bodygvord Tefc Frcmce 94 73 B9 33. 


AUTOMOBILES 


MBKHCLJ S00SL NEW, IHD,Uh 
itmtdkc. QfcOOD or equnalert cur- 
.ency. Tefc Andorra 3M 11. 


AUTO RENTALS 


CHAHC RHW A CASS. 

with phone: Rob Spu-, Sprit, 
Porstht, Mercedes, Jaguar, BMW, 
Iknousnes. small asm. 46 r Pierre 
Charon, 75008 faris. Tefc 47203040. 
Tetox 63C997 F CHAHjOC 


AUTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCAR 

THE CAR SWFMG 
9’EdAUSTS 

PARIS [1J 42 25 64 44 

CAW4ES/MCE J93J 39 43 44 

FRANKFURT (061 (P) B0 51 

BONN / COLOGNE {&2BJ 212921 
STUTTGART fflHffll B8081 

MUNCH [089] 93 

BR£MHHAV9rt ^ 

NEW YORK QfZ 69S 7061 

HOUSTON 713} 931 7605 

LOS ANGELES 20 568 9288 

MONTREAL 514j 666 6681 

AGSJTS WORLD M 
Leave it to us to bring it to you 


’.H 


FRANKFURT/ MA1N-W. 
bermam GmbH. Tefc 
Hdi-up over Europe Iro/roehaa. 


AUTO CONVERSION 


* SUSECONVFRT • 


The eafeet way to bn 
aar Mo he 


birapMi car Mo he UJJL 
Worldwide Amenaon insurer 
provide] d required nsurmoa 


ond guanntees your cor wR 
JUS. gown 


pass of OS g ov em m en l st u tdonds 
or your matiey bade inckxfng 
Carnar v on eoA 

Write or rtwne for Free brochure. 
GERMANY (0) 697152425 or 


(0) 7031 / 223059 

AMBDCAN B4TI UNDERWRITBtS 


Obtrindau 76-78 
D6000 Frarfcfwt/Mcrit 


DOT A EPA 
CONVERSIONS 

Dana h The LLSJL 
The Hghl Way! 

WE PROVSC BONDING. 


US CUSTOMS CLEARANCE & 
PKXUP SBW1CE FROM PORT 

EUROPEAN FINE CAR 

Imports & Conversions 
36-21 31s 
718729-2407 


31st ST. LLC, NY 
' Tlx S10T009922 


EPA / DOT 

CONVBtSONS 
■ Customs bnokeroge/bondmg service 


Kdc-up £ Mw| anywhere in the 


Eastern US_ 

• Prefaswed work using only (ha 
highest quJty o o mponert s 

* C&orarteed EPA / DOT approval 
CHAMPAGNE IMTOKTslfc. 


2294 North he Rd., HaffiekL 
822 6B52 


PA. 1944g USATebaiB 822 
Telex 4971917-CHAMP 


DOT/ffACONVHSIONS 


SHpping, bonctng, insurance. 
Door to door service Europe 
to USA, acceptance gu or orteed 
Eunspean Automotive Camp|imn, 
Severs Deynootweg 126, 

2586 BP The Hogue, Holcni 
Pttone M7Gfi59245 Tht 3300 EAC NL 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


BUY YOUR NEXT CAR 
TAX FREE AND USE OlA 
BUY-BACX PROGRAM 

AND SAVE 


WRITE FOR FREE CATALOG OR 
■ HOE BUY-BACK FOLDS TO: ■ 


Inc, 576 FHi Avenue, 

7th Roar, New Ymt N.Y. 10036, USA. 
Pham [212) 86M484. T that 


SH0WC SA. Owmee de Wowe 
465, 1040 ftveh, Belgusn. 
Phone: (00)6499062. Tritat 63290 


MHtGEDES SPECIALISTS 
FOR USA + MIDDLE EAST 


for 20 yen 
1985 Models at Dta cu m it aricee: 
280SL2S0SB. 500 ffi. 

5& SL, 500 SEC 
1986 Mod* from Stadc 


500! 


300 SH, 500 5Lf 500 
SfipnMl & delivery 

NASSAR EXPORT GMBH, 

MAMZER LAND5TR. 191 

06000 FRAMOURT/M 


IHs |0^69-73 30 61 


i 414018 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TRASCO 

LONDON 

The Mercedes Spedafisf 


fetched UmewnM 

Armoured Cars - 
Coachfcult Cars 
B»A& DOT 
100 Units a Stack 
DirKt from Sources 
Worldwide Defcvery. 


65-67 Park Lorn, London W.I. 

Tdb (44} 1 - 6297779 
Telex: (51) 8756022 Tnu C 

Gennony - London - Svritzarksnd 


LMLSA 

OFFICIAL ROUS ROYCE 
DEA1S FOB BRGIUM 

TAX FRS CARS 


ROUS ROYCE BENTIEY 
RANGE and LANDROVHl 
SAAB 


Also Used Can 
me MDOOBOLAG 7482 
1178 Brussels 
TEL: 2-673 33 92 
TLX: 20377 


TRANSCO 


THE LARGBT SHOWROOM 
AND STOCK W EUROPE 


Keeping o constant stock af mare than 
SOObrcrd 


-iiewanofoflBnspecei + 

Japonex mtdas competivdy priced. 
Tax free sdadrnmi in eem stc e . 
Sand far melficolar free cuki t uif v. 
Trmsco SA, 95 M nerdelng n 
2030 Anhrm Belghai 
Tel 323/ 542 6M0Yx 852071 Tnm 


TAX FRS CARS 

UDorBHD. We eon Reply maf new 
or pre-owned models in the BoB i Royos, 
Mercerdes, BMW, Jogoar, Porsche & 
Ferrari range. 

Cob or write for »fc*r4'« 
HUGte MOTOR CO LTD. 
105)CorBmerrid Rd, PluLslo iw. Poole, 
Done!. 


Tab (0) 202 

41254 HUGHS a 


Tlx 


OCEANWIDE 
MOTORS GmbH 


Since 


1972, experienced car trader for 
Mercedes, Fondle, BMW, Joguor. 1m- 
" fe dnSvurr. import/oeport. U A 


m e da l e deE v ery . . . . 

DOT & EPA, dipping for tourist ond 
dadar. Oaeonwide Motors GmbH, 
Tnrstengenstr. 8. 4 DuesseUorf. W. 
Germmy (0) 2lf-434646, Ac B587374. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


NEW MERCEDES 
PORSCHE HIOM STOCK 

Seri ierviee, iMhimh kitaunce, 

RUTEtNC 

TAUNUSSHL 52,6000 FRANKFURT 
W Gtnt, hi Hfr23225), Ac 411 SB? 

EUROPORT TAX 

FREE CARS 

GcA or write for free catalog. 

Bax 13011 1 

Rottaniara Airaari Hoflandl 

TdiO) 1M3Q77 

TefaTSri 9CAE NL 

BUROffiAN ft USA SPECS. 

Afl oiafcet far warUvmle (Mowy frw 
Mode Send far a TAX-HOSE artolag. 

BMW - JMOCEDB - PORSCHE 
VW - SAAB - VOLVO - FBX3EOT 

Bmp* Ante Mm tec 
POB2T4,3«J Afl NniyteMfli hfoflcnd 
Tot P) 3402-413*6. H» 7*66 EAS 74. 



HEALTH SERVICES | 


LEGAL SERVICES 

DO YOU WANT A 2ND PASSPORT? 
IMC BCM 6567 London WCN 3XX 

FOR SALE & WANTED 

VARKX1S TEAK furniture lor trie. Tefc 
■ *5 73 09 03 Pam, aftor 6 jam. 

COLLECTORS 

COLlfiCIDR'S ITEM, MMT SET, 6 18 
ri gold on aher piato, 10 indi dern- 
ier, engraved Dickemwo wm 
£2,000. View London now, an deSver 
OS. Jm. Tef London 871 7119. 

SERVICES 

BllllWM. Private Aerobic tratnio 
tiar NYC. For Firther information adi 
212-734.9240. 


Mom Tow Classified Ad Qtiiddy and EasUy 

In tha 

MTERNATIONA!. HERALD TRIBUNE 


By HieitatGofl your toed IHT lepres ent uli v with your text You 
w3 be informed of tite oast immedately, and once prapaymeirt' is 
made your ad win eppear within 48 hours. 

Conk The baric rate is $9-80 per Sno per day + bcoltaMB. There are 
K letters^aipB and spaces in tfte fbt Eneatd 36 in the Mowing fctrn. 
Mesmuns space is 2 fines. No uhh -erirtiortt acmpted. 

Credit Cede Atneriaet Express, Deters Gub, Euroc u rd, Moetar 
Card, Access and Visa. 


HEAD OFFICE 


IATINAMBHCA 


P«TS; (For dcmvfiod ortyfc 
[I] 47,4746.00. 


Aires: 41 4031 


(Dept. 312 
: 3314 ! 


EUROPE 


26-36-15. 
Athens: 361-8397/360-2421. 
Brussels: 343-1899. 
Copenhagen: (31) 32 9440. 
Frankfurt: (069)7267-55. 
29-5B-94. 

67-27-93/66-2544. 
(01)8364802. 
Mmfcidi 4B-28P1/45M306 
Mm fH) 7531445. 
Nerwajc (02) 41 29 53. 

: 679-3437. 

|DB) 7569229. 

Te( Aefv: 03455 559. 
Vienna: Contact FranlderL 


154 

Geayaaeib 51 4505 
Ifamc 417852 
PanaaMa6909 75 
Suntfaaa: 6961 555 
Saa Paula: 852 1893 


MIDDLE EAST 


1246303. 
Kuwait: 5614485. 

: 341 457/8/9. 
r 416535. 

Saudi AsvUa: 

Jeddsds: 667-1500 l 
UJUL: Dubai 2*4167. 


FAR EAST 


Ban g heh i 39D06S7. 

- b: 5^1 3671. 
10091 
: 817 07 49. 
Sew* 735 87 73. 
Shw^erae 222-272S. 
Tdeee 732 44 25/9. 
Takyae 504-1925. 


New Yurta (712) 752389a 

Wart Ceos* (05) 3628339. 


AUSTRALIA 


SOUTH AFRICA 


use 


421599. 


00 8231 
9295639.904320. 
9831 


S3. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 


ESCORT 

sama 

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Head trffice in New Yart 
330 W. 56th Si, N.Y.C 10019 USA 

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128 Wi^nore St- London W.l. 
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Schliimberger Writes Off 
$485 Millio n in 4th Quarter 


The Amdated Pren - 

NEW YORK — SdUumbager 
Ltd, the world’s largest ofl-Gdd 
services company, announced on 
Thursday a charge apinst fourth- 
quarter earnings of S485 miTHnn 
and said it would sedc to repur- 


shares, ot about 8 percent of its 
stock owstandmg, over a two-year 
period. 

Schlumberger is the fourth ener- 
^ related company to declare 


Last weds; Standard 03 Co. 


chase about 8 percent of its shares (Ohio) said it would take a $1.15- 

bfllion after-tax charge 


outstanding. 

The write-off concerns the Fair- " 
child Semi conductor Division of 
the company, inri tiding about S2S0 
milli on in goodwill, representing 
the difference between the Fair-' 
child's net worth and the S425 mil- 
lion it paid for the company in 
1979, -said Seth McCormick, a 

Schliimberger spokesman. 

The charge also includes $113 ' 
million for disposal of certain, as- 


theaist of reorganizing its 
operations and Amerada Hess 
Corp. announced a $430-million 
after-tax charge as part of resume-, 
fm-j ng its refining and marketmg 
operations. On Tuesday, Phillips 
Petroleum Co. said it would write 
down about S3 SO million of miner- 
als and chemical assets. 

. la the third quarter, Schlum- 
bereer’s earnings. fell 31,9 percent . 
to £208.1 million from $305.4 mil- 


hon in the July-September quarter 
abated the decline to 


sets and S80 milli on for consolidat- 
ing some production faeflilks, a 

statement said. a drilling slump in North America 

SchJumbager’s board of direc- and losses at in semuonductor and 
tors has approved a stock-repur- computer-design subsidiaries, 
chase program allowing the compa- Sales slipped 3.7 percent to Si .56 
ay to repurchase up to 25 m illi on bfllioa from $1.62 billion. 


Korea and U,S. 
BreakOffTaJks 


United Press Tnttnwmnal 

SEOUL — U.S. and South 
Korean officials abruptly broke 

off talks Thursday on a package 

of proposals aimed at easing 
trade friction between the two 
countries. 

The talks focused primarily 
on U.S. demands for protection 
of trademarks, patents and 
copyrights as well as measures 
to open the market to American 

insurance companies. 

Kim Ki-bwan, secretary gen- 
eral of the International Eco- 
nomic Policy Council, said pro- 
gress had been made, but the 
talks were called off because of 
differences on some points. He 
did not elaborate, but Korean 
government sources said the 
two sides contrasted sharply on 
the issue of patents. 

“Contacts will be made to 
schedule another round of 
talks," Mr. Kim said. 


Hypersonic 
Air Travel 


k 


v. 


(Continued from Rsge 13) 
services abandoned scramjet 


re- 


search in the early 1960s, deciding 
to use rockets to launch satellites. - 
Twenty-five years later, scramjets ‘ ‘ ' 
look more economical. 

“What weve learned in recent 
vears is that rocket engines, are a . 
terribly inefficient way to get - : 
things into space," General Kutyna / 
said recently. . 

Whai makes rocket engines so 
expensive is that they require an 
oxidizer — usually vast reservoirs 
of liquid oxygen — to bum their 
fuel Because the scramjet draws its , • 
oxygen from the air, the liquid oxy- 
gen is unnecessary. 

The result could be an inexpen- 
sive alternative to the space shuttle. 

But no one is coontmg on that 
soon. Testing the engine designs 
will take until about 1990. The ma- 
jor engine manufacturers, such as 
General Electric and Pratt & Whit- 
ney. have only recently begun to 
come up lo speed. 


4 


I- 


Overproduction Has Created a Glut Economy 


(Continued from Page 13) expansionary policies for the fu- 
sde. The changed environment, tnre.” 

some say, presents an oppor tuni ty That swing is not yet evident, 
for economic growth without the particularly in Western Europe and 
nightmare of volatile inflation — Japan. According lo the Morgan 
and the chance for consumers to Guaranty stndy, the lack of growth 


The Work Ftorco - Grown Too 
Large for A vaftaMe Jobs 

i uHHMvaw": 18 penart 


stop racing after products whose 
prices keep rising from ooe week to 

the next. 

However they view it, most econ- 
omists and businessmen agree that 
the economy is undergoing a major 
chang e , far more significant than 
its usual tendency to swing between 
shortages and gluts as the business 
cycle plays itself out 

“This is definitely hot an ordi- 
nary period,” said Alan Green- 
span, former chairman of the 
Council of Economic Advisers and 
president rtf Townsend -Greenspan, 

an economie-oonwilting firm. 

Despite the change, governments 
of the industrial nations are stiO 
directing their economic policies as 
if inflation and overiy rapid eco- 
nomic growth were stiD the greatest 
dangers. 

But the suddenness of the shift 
has forced business leaden to des- 
perately shave costs and overhead 
to remain competitive. 

“After years of growth and years 
of expansion the climate for busi- 
ness in the United States has 
changed dramatically," said Ralph 


Ablon, chairman of Ogden Corp 
which has shed most of its manu- 
facturing operations and moved 
into services. “The adaptation to 
the new environment is going to be 
very painfuL” 

Same economists argue that the 
failure of government policy-mak- 
ers in the industrialized countries 


in those countries has totally offset 
whatever stimulus that the United 
States 'provided. In the industrial 
countries as a whole, growth has 
averaged 22 percent a year since 
1979, compared with 3.6 percent in 
the 1970’s and S.7 percent in the 
1960's. 

* In part, the changed environ- 
ment is a result of the 1970’s, when 
skyrocketing inflation forced busi- 
nesses to bund and expand as if the 
shortages and the ■ pressnres on 
prices would never end. 

“In the 70s, there was this idea 
that we were .going to run out of 
everything. The Gob of Rome was 

saying there was going to be m ass 
starvation,” said Thomas G. 
Moore, a member of President 
Ronald Reagan’s Council of Eco- 
nomic Advisees. Investors then 
went overboard, he contends. 
“When the worldwide inflation 
stopped, people found themselves 
with a lot more capacity than was 
warranted by the market” 

In the United States, that realiza- 
tion came skwly. It took the effects 
of the strong dollar, which were fdt 
initially in surging imports last 
year, and the slowing of economic 



prices, for example, have plunged 
from SI JO a pound in 1980 to 


that may be insignificant in them- 
selves but would be inflationary in 
ihe aggregate, he says. 

But not all of business is waiting 
for a bailout A phenomenal wave 
of cost-cutting is washing across 
corporate America. Companies are 
paring down and writing off mar- ' 
gjrtal assets as never before. Amer- 
ada Hess announced last week, that ■ 
it would take a $430- million after- 
tax write-off to squeeze its refining, 
marketing and tanker operations “ 
down to more appropriate sizes. 

But corporate America's most 
frequent response to the glut prob- 
lem has been to appeal for protec- 
tion. US. car makers, steelmakers- ~ 
ouna now. uu • d text ii e spinners all have ap- 
major produc- .. , . _ 


A 


NYT 


about 62 cents a pound now. In 

that period Chile a myor produc- pIied for _ recdved 

— some 

er, has increased its production by £ roieclioo ^ Iasl Dve yean, 


growth to less than 4 percent in the 
first thn 


three quarters of this year from 
1984?s booming 6.8 percent to drive 
home the fact that excess produo 
tion had become a serious problem. 

Nowhere is it more senous than, 
in the Third Worid. As the glut 
forces 'down, prices, those debt- 


■ I . 1 - a * . • AWfclrtaS uvwu puvw, lUWV HVV ■ 

to switch gears to soa k up the glut ts trapped nations continue to pomp 
making the adjustment more pam- orftfigr products anyway, hoping 


more than 80 percent . 

“Everybody felt that the growth 
rate of metals would continue and 
they went searching the continents 
for new mines, ” says David Wil- 
liamson, a metals analyst in the 
London office of Shearson Lehman 
Brothers. 

“So all this new production came 
on stream m 1981 and walked right 
into a recession. Massive inven- 
tories developed,” he continued. 
“But once you're committed to 
opening op new mines and smelters 
that cost billions, you have to con- 
tinue to operate them even if 
there's a surplus.” 

In the United States, debt-bloat- 
ed balance sheets have made many 
businesses vulnerable to glut. 
American corporations owe debts 
totaling Sf-56 bOfioa with animal 
real increases of 8.6 percent in the 
last two years. 

A number of companies that re- 


ft- 


fill than necessary — not only for 
business but for millions of unem- 
ployed workers. 

Attempts to keep inflation under 
control by restricting credit and 
carefully controlling government 
spending have created a situation 
that economists fear weakens 
and extends the duration erf 
glut economy. 

“The combination of forces 


mam in manufacturing are having 

to raise tite same income with more ®*** prices to move their prod- 
ucts. And many companies m- 


outpuL 

South Korea and Taiwan are 
heavily into color television manu- 
facturing. Petrochemical plants 
and refineries, dot Saudi Arabia 
and other ofl-prodneing countries. 
China has expanded its . textile in- 
dustry. Yugoslavia is preparing to 
export cars. Argentina has doubled 


volved in price wars are top-heavy 
with debt. 

Economists worry that many of 
the most debt-strapped companies 
will end up ini 
extended 

“Excess deot creation nas many . 
the characteristics of intoxication.'’ 
warned Mr. Greenspan. “The early 


L up m bankruptcy after an 
id period of weak profits, 
rdebt creation has many of 


And there seems to be no end to 
the pleas for relief. Petitions to 
Washington for import relief are op 
22 percent this year, according to 
International Trade Commission 
figures. In the 1980-84 period, they 
increased 44 percent. 

In a pre liminar y finding last 
week, the Commerce Department ; 
ruled that Japanese semiconduc- 
tors, the silicon circuits used hr 
computers and other electronic 
products, had been dumped in the 
United States at unfair prices. 

The United States also ended an 
imbroglio with the European Com- 
munity over imported steel. Ihe 
government banned European steel 
for a week while quotas tor 1986 
were negotiated. 

But the Reagan administration - 
generally has opposed protection- 
ism as an adequate response to the. . 
glutted worid. For several yean, ” 
government policy-makers in many ' 
countries have been in a quandary, 
fearing that if they stimulated ' 
growth to soak up the gluts, they 
would set off another price spiral. 

So far, there has been little agree- . 
ment on policy prescriptions and 
the steps to reduce the gluts have 
been tentative. 

But many cronomists saw Sep- 
tember’s meeting in New York of 
the finance ministers of France, 
Britain, Germany, Japan and the 




n 

c 


its com and wheat acreage. Brazil- . 

pointing to low worid inflation also ian shoes have become ubiquitous stages are beady and expansionary. United Slates as a first step toward 

points to low economic growth,” in North America and its sted out- But the hangover is inevitable and a coordinated approach. The min- 
saidMorgan'Gtiaranty Trust Cain put is growing. unpleasant" isters agreed to work in concert, 

its December economic bulletin. The overcapacity, however, is He is worried that massive fail- intervening in foreign markets to 
“The policy-makers should hardly most acute in .raw materials. In ures of marginal companies and drive down the value of the dollar, 
stand idle before this troubling some countries, production has ac~ farms will create widespread finan- 


prospcct. What is needed is a cau- ederated to compensate for the 1 5- 

tious swing — away from the infla- percent drop in metals prices dor- 
tion-fighting preoccupations of the mg die last year and to finance the 
last several yean — in favor of importation of necessities. Copper 


A weaker dollar, theoretically,, 
would lead to lower interest rates in 
the United States and throughout 
sis would coax the government into the world, sparking more economic 
a series of case-by-case bailouts activity and eating into the gluts. 


dal hardships that are “no longer 
politically acceptable.” Such a cri- 



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Si- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1985 


Page 17 


/’• The Assodand Press 

r ^TROIT — American Motes' 
'• r c- has set in motion a reorgaui- 
"t-., a of top mana g ement that 
r < -7-l^grve the company anew pn»: 

'*■ sources sakf Thursday. 

•.S’ T' ;. e directors of AMC, wfaichis 
■'■« v v-ircent owned by Renault, 
■ ■; . Vs statoowned auto compa- 
chednled a meeting in New 
- 'i+.for Friday. . 

■ '^changes could be announced 


.v : 

* 


. . x v or at subsequent meetings ear- 

- ,' v " ^ict year, said AMC officials 

0 { ipake mi condition that they 
: _ 'f; ' e identified by name. 

' cording to the officials, 
':J‘s president, Jose Dedeor- 
: ^ who is also chief execo- 
• " -c - would be promoted and sent 
' ^ _ .; 'ris to head international sales, 

j ~ sting and manufacturing for 

■ ICs new top officer would 
to Mr. Dedenrwaerder, 
— 5 new job would include su- 
>dng AMCs car and Jeep op- 

1 ms in North America and Re- 
lUmv operations around die world, 

" t in France and Belgium, the 
' es said. 

r ’ rv ntioned most often as re- 
’ - V: ment for Mr. Dedeurwaerder, 
■' Joseph Cappy, SI, a market- 
:ecntive whom AMC has been 
- - dog for the job for more than 
. " ' r. 

. Cappy, formerly of General 
.^-rs Corp-, went to AMC as vice 

- . -.”. knt for marketing in 19S2. 

'I then, sales, parts and service 
... ' - been placed under him, as 
" r is international operations, in- 



Jose Dedeurwaerder 

eluding AMCs joint venture to 
build Jeeps in China. In June 1984, 
Mr. Cappy was named executive 

vice president for operations. 

Holiday hms Set 
For Expansion 

By Brenda Erdmann 

Iniemalkmal Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Hobday Inns Inc, 
which has embarked on a develop- 
ment program that win triple the 
number of hotels it has in Europe, 
now has set its sights on the Middle 
East and Africa. It currently oper- 
ates 12 holds in Africa and the 
Middle East and 65 in Europe. 

The Memphis, Tennessee-based 
lodging, casino and restaurant 


Company Results 

Revenue and profit s or tosses. In millions, ore In local currencies 
unless otherwise indicated. 


t univerol Stores 
: :> 19B5 1984 

„ M U190. 9772 

' Profit 1149 1022 

...» 0281 0248 

‘ “orthero Foods 
- I IMS 1984 

.. .rn 7427 6117 

Profll 342) 272) 

are 01016 00933 

-Unstoa Brothers 
f 1985 1984 


Pretax Profit 

39 A 

52.2 

Per Share. 

_ 0J4 

076 

Per Stare — 

BtlM 

000 

9 Month* 

1985 

1984 




Revenue _ 

SZ7J 

776J 

Jip8« 



Net Inc. _ 
Per Stare. 

_ 50-92 

_ 2J5 

4873 

236 

Mitsubishi 
W Half 1985 

1784 


Fluor 



87 T 

8JT 

emetuar. 

1985 

1984 

Profit*. 

70490. 

1&8SQ- 

Revenue — ijva 
Net Laos 369.9 

ijiiol 

Par Share — 

MJ4 

1201 

21 J 

T: trillion. 



Year 

1985 

1984 


(kited Slatn 

Collins & AUunan 

3rd door 1983 19*4 

Revenue 2952 2592 

Net inc. tail 1036 


Revenue 4.170. 4J0Q. 

Net Inc (0)6333 12)1 

Per Stare — am 

a: tan. nes net includes tan 
otSSVJi million in quarter ana 
lass of 160 mUlkm in rear 
from discontinued opa uHara 
and extraonUnarr Item. 


:e Officers 


group, has widened the responsibil- 
ities of Peter Gee, its vice president, 
development, Europe, to mdnde 
the Middle East and Africa. He will 
continue to be based at the Europe- 
an head office in Brentford, En- 
gland. 

To begin with, a spokesman for 
the company said, Holiday 
wants to expand in North Africa. 
Mr. Gee said Holiday Inns sees 
Turkey, Morocco, Algeria and Tu- 
nisia as “priority locations” for fu- 
ture development.- 

Earlier this year, Sigi Bergmans, . 
manag i ng director for Europe, said 
the group intends to be operating 
Holiday Inn holds in 140 new loca- 
tions in Europe within the next 10 
years., 

Gtibok has appointed Sheena 
Stewart country corporate officer 
for Senegal beginning in February. 
Based in Dakar, she will succeed 
Rkxsrdo di Lorenzo, who moves to 
Naples to take op a management 

S aturn with Baiua Gatro Sud, 
tibank’s subsidiary in Italy. Ms. 
Stewart was based in Abidjan as 
unit head in charge of the market- 
ing of Citibank services in a num- 
ber of West African countries. 

United Bank of Kuwait Ltd, 
London, has named Christopher 
Keen general manager, effective 
March 31. Mr. Keen, currently 
deputy general manager, will suc- 
ceed David West, who has been 
appointed adviser to the bank’s 

rirainrum 

Basque National* de Paris in 
London. namwl Sh* Alaft afr 
PiTking inn a director. He is presi- 
dent of PQkmgton Brothers PLC, 
the British glass maker. 

Hertz has named Russell Taylor 
as director of sales and marketing 
for its Asa-Pacific region. Based in 
Melbourne, Mr. Taylor takes over 
duties formerly hdd by Michael 
Gardiner, who, as previously re- 
ported, moved to London to take 
up the new post of staff vice presi- 
dent, North American marketing 
of the UAL Inc. unit. 

The Confederation of British In- 
dustry has named David Wood as 
bead of its Brussels office from Jan. 
1. He will be CBTs permanent dele- 
gate to UNICE, the European em- 
ployers’ organization, and win rep- 
resent the CBI in discussions with 
European Community institutions. 


Banks in U.K., Japan, U.S. 
Vow to Support Debt Plan 

Compiled ty Our Staff Fiom Dupatchts 

. NEW YORK — Banks in the United States, Britain and Japan 
pledged support Thursday for a U-S.-proposed plan to help the 
. world’s most indebted nations, as long as other countries do likewise 

The U.S. Consultative Group, which includes nipc major commer- 
cial banks, described the proposal an Thursday as “a positive and 
constructive development.” 

similar support for the jSac Six major London banks, ^group of 
leading merchant banks and the central banks of England and 
Scotland said in London that they welcomed the initiative and would 
be wining to take pan on a case-by-case basis. 

The pledges of support were the first from bank consortiums in 
democratic industrialized nations for the bail-out plan proposed by 
U.S. Treasury Secretary James A Baker 3d. 

At the October meeting or the Internationa] Monetary Fund and 
the World Bank, Mr. Baker called cm commercial banks to increase 
their lending to the 15 most indebted nations by $20 billion. 

He also proposed that international development banks increase 
their annual leading rate by 50 percent to $9 billion from the present 
S5.9- billion level, offering a total of 527 b3Hon over the next three 
years. 

the group expressed its “willingness to consider a contribution on a 
case-by-case basis, provided that aU other parties — debtor govern- 
ments, creditor governments, international institutions, and other 
f inancial institutions — do the s ame " 

That provision also was stipulated by the British banks and the U.S. 
group in letters they sent to the International Monetary Fund and the 
World Bank. 

The U.S. group said in the letters that it had received expressions of 
support by banks representing more than 95 percent of the loans 
outstanding to the countries covered by the so-called Baker plan. 

(AP, Reuters) 


China to Extend Joint-V enture Term 
From Current 30 Years to Up to 50 




MARKETS 


The Associated Press 

BEIJING — China plans to ex- 
tend the maximum length of joint 
business ventures using foreign in- 
vestment fiom the present maxi- 
mum of 30 years to 50 years, the 
official news agency Xinhua re- 
ported Thursday. 

The agency quoted an unidenti- 
fied State Council official attend- 
ing an economic seminar in Canton 
as saying that the decision would 
be announced formally later this 
month. 

He was quoted as saying some 
types of joint ventures ww be able 
to apply for extensions beyond 50 
years. 

The aim is to absorb large-scale 
forego investment, and introduce 
advanced technology and manage- 
ment in order to produce interna- 


Sterling Rebounds; Dollar Weakens 


By James Crate 

International Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
turned lower in light U.S. and Eu- 
ropean trading Thursday amid 
fears of central-bank intervention 
and more signs of sluggish econom- 
ic growth. 

The British pound, meanwhile, 
gained more than 2 cents against 
the dollar and strengthened against 
continental currencies as oil prices 
recovered from their three-day 
slide. 

Dealers said there was relatively 
strong corporate demand for dol- 
lars but dial the currency was held 
back by fears of central bank inter- 
vention and by reports of lackluster 
U.S. retail sales in November. 

The central banks of the United 
States, West Germany and France 
intervened in currency markets 
Wednesday to cut short a dollar 
rally that had taken the U.S. cur- 
rency to a high of 2^6 Deutsche 
marks. 

One U.S. securities dealer said 
the action served to keep traders 
out of the market on Thursday. "A 


lot of people got their wrists 
slapped hard when the banks came 
in Wednesday," he said. "Most 
traders have taken their profits for 
the year, and they’re not in any 
tnood to lose them taking on the 
central banks." 

Dealers said the currency also 
was depressed Thursday by a U.S. 
Commerce Department report that 
rctai] sales fell 4.2 percent in Octo- 
ber instead of the 3.3 percent ini- 
tially reported. November sales 
rose 1.1 percent, about even with 
analysts' projections. 

In New York, the dollar eased to 
2.5190 DM from 2.5310 on 
Wednesday; to 2.1 105 Swiss francs 
from 2.1195; to 20220 yen from 
203 JO, and to 7.6980 French francs 
from 7.7275. 

In earlier trading in Europe, the 
dollar fell in London to 2.5142 DM 
from 2.5430 on Wednesday; to 
7.6840 French francs from 7.7650, 
and to 11020 Swiss francs from 
2.1300. The Japanese yen strength- 
ened in London to 202.02 from 
203.95. 

The British pound, meanwhile. 


rose in London to $1.4400 from 
51.4155 there on Wednesday and 
from S 1.4200 at the close in New 
York. It also gained 3 pfennigs 
against the Deutsche mark, rising 
to 3.6205 from 3.5918 at Wednes- 
day’s close. 

in New York, the British curren- 
cy rose cents from Wednesday’s 
close, to SI. 4345. 

Dealers cautioned, however, that 
sentiment toward the pound was 
tied to the outlook for oil prices, 
and noted that Thursday’s price 
recoveiy was largely technical in 
nature.' 

“The sell-off in oil since Monday 
may have been overdone." one 
London dealer said, "but everyone 
still secs the overall trend as being 
lower" 

In other European markets 
Thursday, the dollar was fixed at 
midafternoon in Frankfurt at 
2.5234 DM, down from 2.5466 at 
ihe Wednesday fixing, and at 
7.7110 French francs in Paris, 
down from 7.7770. In Zurich, ibe 
dollar closed at 2.1060 Swiss 
francs, down from 2.1270. 


ICO Raises Coffee Export Quotas 


tionally competitive goods, the re- 
port said. 

Joint ventures currently run 
from 10 to 30 years, with most in 
the 15- to 20-year range, after 
which the foreign partner steps 
down. 

Joint ventures were introduced 
in 1979 as a means of quickly open- 
ing China to outside investment 
and expertise. The first was the 
Peking Air Catering Co„ set up by 
a Hong Kong company. 

The government reported in Oc- 
tober that there are now 1 ,681 joint 
ventures, with a total investment of 
$2 billion. Three-quarters of inves- 
tors are from Hong Kong and Ma- 
cao, but other joint-venture part- 
ners include American Motors 
Corp-. Volkswagen and Hitachi 
Corp. 


Compiled bp Our Staff From Dtipauha 

LONDON — The International 
Coffee Organization raised the 
quotas governing its members' ex- 
ports Thursday, and more in- 
creases are in prospect because of 
sharply increasing coffee prices 
caused by a drought in Brazil trad- 
ers said. 

The increase prompted diplo- 
mats in London to speculate that 
an emergency meeting of the orga- 
nization, which groups 75 produc- 
ing and co nsumin g nations , may be 
called next week to consider action 
to halt the rise in prices. 

“A meeting would be advisable 
in the light of market conditions 
provided it had a plan of action to 
consider," Colombia’s permanent 
ICO representative, Nestor Osorio, 
said after the group's announce- 
ment. 

In Thursday's action, an increase 
of one million 60-kilogram (132- 
pound) bags was authorized by the 
ICO. 


The grouping has set itself the 
goal of keeping market prices sta- 
ble. at between 120 and 140 cents a 
pound. 

Quotas are regulated by a trigger 
price rnwhiinicm and the latest 

J jtiota increase came when the 
CO's 15-day moving average of 
prices hit 148.81 cents a pound. 

If the sliding scale reaches 1 50.08 
cents a pound, as is soon expected, 
a further three million bags will be 
released, traders said. 

The ICO said the one- million 
bag increase, the second in the cur- 
rent quarter, win bring total quotas 
available for export in the 12 
months to October 1986 to 60 mil- 
lion bags. It will be distributed 
among ICO exporters. 

Fears that the long-running 
drought could halve Brazil's coffee 
crop next year has sent coffee bean 

? rices soaring in London and New 
ork. 

Confirming these fears, traders 


in Brazil, the world's biggest coffee 
producer, have predicted that the 
country’s honest next year could 
sink to as little as 13 million bags 
from some 30 million this year. 

Under ICO rules, all quota re- 
straints will be lifted if Lhe price 
remains above SI .5008 a pound for 
45 consecutive market days. 

ICO delegates explained that 
once quotas were lifted it could be 
difficult to re impose controls on 
the market at some future date. 

One possible area where pressure 
could be removed from the market 
would be to allow countries hold- 
ing huge slocks of coffee, like Co- 
lombia. to moke available addition- 
al supplies to the market. ICO 
delegates said. 

Colombia is the world's second- 
biggest producer and holds about a 
year's production in store, accord- 
ing to ICO estimates. 

(Reuters. AP) 


Thursd^ 

arc 


Prices 


NASDAQ prices as Of 
3 pan. Mew York time. 
Via The Associated Press 


DI*. YU. IDO* High Lew 3 PALCO 


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15* + to 
Tto + Jk 
21 + ft 
20% 

3Z%— 1k 
14* + ft 
19% + to 

llto + Vi 
3*— ft 
23% . 

6ft + * 
16* + % 


Sto 3ft 
15 U 
5* 5ft 
49 67% 

^ V 

25% 25Vk 
4* 6ft 
19* 19* 
14 13ft 
18% 18ft 
2SK 25ft 
17* 17* 
H% 19ft 
Vk Oft 
Uft Mto 
Bft 6to 
26% 25ft 
8* Bto 
20% 19ft 

'% ^ 


17% IM 
8* 8% 
16% 16* 
6* 6% 
2ft 2% 
17ft 17 
19 18ft 
34* 34% 
9ft 9ft 
Sto 2* 
1% lto 
Bto 3* 
19ft 18% 
19% 19ft 
3* 3* 
30 19K 

33% 33 
2* 23 

11 10 
7ft 6* 
32* 32* 
lft 1 
2B% 28 
4* 4% 
31b 30% 
2V 27ft 
12W 12 
27% 27 
30ft 29* 
14% 13% 
t 8 


9% 9% 
33* 32% 
15% 14* 
7* 7ft 
Uft 12* 
5% 5ft 
53 SBSa 
25% 25 
16% 16% 
23* 23 
3% 5* 
16% 16 
5* 5ft 
16 Uft 
30% 29% 
4* 4* 
2 1* 
11 % 11 % 
13 12* 

35ft 34ft 
Bft 7* 
13ft 12* 
8 7ft 
11% 10* 
Bft 7* 
20 19* 

16* 14 

% ft 

lift 11 
12 * 12 * 
ink io 


u* nu 
6* 6% 
40ft 40 
24ft 33* 
4* 4% 
22* 22* 
6 5ft 
8% 0* 
23% 23 
17* 17ft 


3% , 

14% + * 

5* + Jk 
57% —1ft 

W 2 -to 
HS-to 

19to— ft 
13ft- % 
van— ft 

25% + ft 
17* + * 
19% 

14to- ft 

Jft-g 

i5?S=5 


17% + % 

16*- ft 
6ft 
2% 

17% + to 
19 + * 

34* + ft 

^ft 

r + % 

19 — % 
191k 
3% 

19ft + % 
33% + » 
23ft + Jk 

11 + ft 

Bft— Jk 

28 + % 
4* + to 
31% + % 
28ft +1 

12 -* 
27 - % 
29% — ft 
14% + Jk 

B + ft 


9% + ft 
B*+l% 
15 + to 

7* + % 

«** 

25% + % 
Uto— to 
23 — ft 

»*-* 

ifig 

29% - % 

f* + ft 
HSft 

^ + ft 
13 -ft 
7ft . , 
lift + ft 
7*— % 
19* 

T + % 

im + * 
12* + % 
ID —ft 


11%— ft 
Bto 

40% + % 
24 —% 
4%-* 
22 ft- Jk 

5ft— Jk 
S*- Jk 
23% + to 
17* + % 


9 4% 

26ft 13% 
19% T3ft 
17% 9% 
W* 6% 
65% 42 
61% 31ft 
Bft 4ft 
11 6% 
7 1% 

21ft Uft 
13ft 4% 
16* 11* 
29ft Bft 


KVPhr 
Kentons M 
Kardir 
Kasiar 251 
Kay don 
Kamp 120 
KvCnLf 120 
Kavax 
KnvTm 
Ktmbrk 
Kinder 26 
Kray 26 
Kmser 26 
KiMdkP .121 


8% 8 
24% 23ft 
15% 15b 
11 * 11 
10% 10% 
65% BSft 
56 54ft 
6% 6* 
10* 9* 
2b 2 
19* 18* 
9 8% 

14% 14Vk 
12* 12* 


B 

23% 

15% — * 
llto + % 
10% + ft 
65ft + to 
54ft— * 
6*— to 
9*— to 
2 

19* + to 
B%— to 
14* 

12Vk— to 


llto 5to 
24% 9% 

Uft 9% 
21% 9* 

54 33% 

26 12* 
18ft 11 
17 12to 
17% 14% 
59% 36% 


32 

23% l 

jnmi 

1 32 

u 

187 

27% 

27ft 

27ft— % 

7* 

4* L 

aDia 


697 

5ft 

5* 

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ISMi 

8% 1 

-elner 



23 

IB 

9Vj 

9ft 

99k 

6* 1 

-eiirtiP 

3Bb23 

75 

7* 

7* 

7ft 

4 

lft L 

jndcan 



284 

2ft 

R 

J*— Ik 

3% 

1* l 

-axhtta 



461 

2% 

Zto 

25 

17% l 

Jabrt 

Sft 

J 

313 

24ft 

23% 

23%—% 

48 

41ft 1 

Jlnva 

36 

3 

9 

48 

47% 

47%—* 


8ft 4* 
20% 11* 
38* 19ft 
37 28% 

Bft 4ft 
49ft 23ft 
29 20% 

33% 15% 
26% 19 
19* 6 


783 

20 12 15U 
1»5 

220 5.9 23 

.16 3j0 9 

25 J 1031 
1,4) 5J 273 
3183 
11 
1113 


2ft 
2* 
5% 
Uft 
37 
12% 
7% 
12 
4ft 
2 

1* 
6 

4% 
9% 4% 
27* 14* 
42 21 

12ft 7ft 
31 23ft 
33ft 19* 
36 21% 

18ft 9ft 
30% 10 
14ft 1% 
4% * 

14% 7 

15 
28% 
30% 
5ft 
5 

6* 
15* 
19* 
19ft 
40ft 
4% 
4* 
10* 
6% 
6* 



34ft 13ft KLAl 


4* 1* 

17ft 10 
46% 33% 
73% 41* 
35% 20% 
41% 23 
22ft 19% 
33% 14ft 
9% 3% 

19% lift 
48% 22% 
19% 13 
Bft 5ft 


Oceanar 

8» u» 

OltksCo 2J0 
OWKntS 1.70 
OMROS 74 
OMS p4C 260 
OMBep J2 


200 

2i 313 

42 149 

3L1 130 
L] 262 
111 28 
17 112 
213 
269 
110 
104 
429 


23 — b 
8* + Vk 
11*— % 
Sift + * 
18% + % 
36ft 

27ft— % 
17 

15*— % 
35b— ft 
Uft— % 
19* + * , 
3* + ft 
16% 

17*— * ! 


3% + ft ■ 
4*— Vk 
11 

22% + ft 
48% 

Mto „ 
17ft + % 
IB* + ft 
4% 

3ft 

Bft 

6% — to 
61k— % 

5 + ft 

23 — ft 
39%—% 
8% — ft 
30ft + % 
31 — ft 
35* +* 
17* +ft 
21% + ft 

13*+ to 
17 —1 

r±i* 

ito— ft 
7ft + % 
18% + * 
18* 

25ft + % 
24* + ft 

Isjs 

11% 

9% 

0 +* 


1* 1* 
lift 11 
42ft lift 

71 ZB* 
36ft 35ft 
35* 15% 
21ft 21ft 
31ft 31ft 
8% Bto 
14* 13% 
30 29% 

Mto 14 
9ft 6* 


1* 

11% + ft 
42% + % 
70* — * 
36 +1 

J5* + ft 
21ft— Ml 
31% + % 
8% 

13V, — % 
29% — % 
14 — to 
6*- ft 


■ 4% OrfoCst 475 

30 12ft Oshmn 20 12 231 

34* 27% OttrTP 276 8.1 88 

15 8% OvrEw 13 

17* B OwnMS 28 lA 88 

4* % Oxoco 77 


6ft 6% 6% + Vk 

23 22% 22ft — ft 

13% Uft 13% 

3K& 2B 20* + * 
53% 53 S3 — % 
26 25b 25% — % 

IB 16 17% +1% 

MU 13% 14 + % 

17ft 17 17 

59 58 58ft + % 


8* 8* Blk + to 
Uft 15* 15ft— * 
37* 37to 37% + % 
37 36to 37 +% 

5* 5ft 5* + % 

46% 45% 45% — % 
28% 27% 28 +1 

25% 24 34ft—* 

231k 22ft 22ft— % 
19ft 18% 19* + * 


Bto + to 
10* 

9 

4ft 

23 + ft 

32ft 

lift + M 
27ft + to 
SVk 
11% 

18 + to 

22% 

41% + ft 
19* + ft 
4* + ft 
Sto + ft 
33ft + % 
I9to + to 
!%— to 
33 — ft 
17ft + % 
Mto — ft 
2 * + to ; 
4ft 

35% + to ! 
11*— % 
8* + ft 
5 + * 

16 

20* + to 
41% + to 
77ft +4 
IS — * 
39ft + % 
22ft 

15* + ft 
21* +1M 
3* — * 
7* + * 
5*— % 
Hk— * 
8* + * 
Vk — Vk 
2%— ft 
19ft 

43*— ft 
Bft 

23ft + ft 


35* 21* 
53% 39% 
15* 8 
16 lift 
17% 1* 
8% 6ft 
17% lift 
B 4ft 
U 6 
21 8% 
17ft 18% 
>0% 5% 
35ft 25% 
31% 20* 
15* 7* 
30ft 23* 
Uft 4ft 
12% 7% 

20% Mb 
4* 1 
33b 17% 
26* Uft 
37ft 29ft 
10 7 

IS 8% 
34% lift 
27* 21 
3* 1% 
IS* 9% 
14ft 5% 
37% 20 
10* 5 

7% 3 

16% 716 
68 Uto 
18 9 

6 I* 
46 21to 
15* 10* 
211k 13* 
29 13b 


122 3.9 881 
120a 23 236 
615 

JO S2 M 

.13 12 541 
20 S3 95 


JM 2 135 

22» 62 9 

28 23 50 

■BSr J 5900 
1.12 43 jg 

.ise 12 2264 
JOn 25 1456 
42 
478 

20 23 226 
IJM 28 2209 
.12 12 32 

111 
3044 
ITO 
30 

39 

.12 A n 

615 
1423 

I 87 

936 
348 

-M 4JD 69 

.12 3 1 

120 102 116 

1246 

J M 37 


6* 6ft 6b— to 
U% 14ft 14ft— % 
34ft 34 Mb — b 
10% 10% 10b— % 

"* 17 to ,J K-to 


33ft 33* 

45b 45b— I 
10ft 10ft + ft 
15b 15b— ft 
16% 16*— to 
8Va 81k— Vk 
11% 12% 

6b 6*— % 
13* M% + * 

12W 12* + to 

3k 3^+.* 
29% 29%— b 
9 9W 
26% 26%—% 
8* I* + to 
10 * 10 * + % 
19* 19* 

31% 31% — to 
26 26 — % 
36b 37 + % 

9ft 9ft 
11% lift + ft 
21 21% + ft 

24* 24 ft + to 
1% 1* , . 
12% 13 + % 

12% 12% — * 
29 29ft + % 
10% 10b 
61k 6ft — ft 
7% 7% 

67ft 49% +1* 
13 13% + % 
4 4 — ft 
45V: 45ft— ft 
11 11% 

21% 21ft 
27% 27% 


15ft 

9* 

6 OMS 

3* Quadnc 

529 

1240 

9b 

Bto 

9 

7* 

9 + to 

.5. . .. 

13% 

9 QuakCs 

J8 10 19 

Uft 

Uft 

Uft t S 

32b 

17ft Quantm 

517 

25% 

25 

25ft + % 

Sto 

29k QuertM 

316 

4* 



18% 

Bft Quixote 

221 

iBto 


18 

16% 

S Qualm 

2952 

12 

11* 

lift— ft 


12% 5 

10* 13 
Uto 8* 
14% 7 
10ft 5* 
7* 3 

Sift 22* 
20% 12ft 
7to 1ft 
23* 17% 
12ft 5ft 
35b 25% 
12% 5ft 
7% 4* 

18 11 
12ft 3ft 
10ft 7ft 
»% 9* 
20ft 11% 
lift 6* 
30ft im 
49ft 29 
18ft 10* 
10 3* 

22* 12* 
18* 11* 
35% 24% 
Uft 11 
Uto Bft 
28 16* 
lift 6* 
9 2ft 
17% 10b 
34% 11* 


16 8 
15* 10* 
231k 13 
11% 5% 
23 16. 

25* 6* 

46% 29% 
15% 7ft 
21ft 7% 
82* 47* 
G* 2* 
10 4ft 
8% 5ft 
31ft lift 
20* 12ft 
10% 6% 
17 10ft 
14% 8* 

27% Uto 
6ft 3% 
Uft 6ft 
20% 6 
9ft 3% 
8% 4* 

4ft Ilk 
7ft, 1* 
25% 16 
9* 5ft 
9* 6% 
16* 10* 
25ft 17ft 


I 442 

10W 
569 

-10r 1J 39 
J» 4J 63 
20b J 553 
U0 32 114 
19 
300 

3J0 18 1000 
93 
45 

.14 2.1 38 

J8a 2J 69 
i J4 2.1 165 
1KZ 
616 

22 22 42 

400 12 320 
87 
14 
177 
TO 
5709 
Ml 
HI 

JO U 2« 

JOS 2 4810 
JW 2 2507 
JO 15 445 
1 123 

42 

.id s m 

JB 14 669 
SJS8 42 419 
.16 J 644 
69 

.15 S 531 
259 
347 
213 
5S 
60 
31 

JO 10 122 
204 
38 

JIB J 61 
748 

124 16 823 
154 
35 
158 

lilaU 1H 
400 IB 5a 
92 

42 22 153 
M 12 38 

.10 12 £8< 
120 4.1 490 
788 
121 

27 S 102 
298 
337 

20 24 308 
1.08 32 157 
347 

120 42 » 

JO 12 3187 
J5nl2 105 


7b 6% 
18% 10ft 
14* MM 
lib 9 
7b 7% 
SVk 3* 
32* 321k 
» 18 
1* 1* 
22* 22% 
10% 10% 
32% 31ft 
11* 11% 
5* 5ft 
17ft 17 
5% 5ft 
9b 9 
TO* 10* 
20 19* 

b% a* 

27 26* 

51 49% 

17ft 16* 
7% 71k 
21 % 21 % 
17* 17% 
35% 34ft 
14 13% 

10ft 9% 
25ft 25 
8% Bb 
2* 2* 
11% lift 
22% 21ft 


10 9ft 
15 14* 

22% 22ft 
7 6ft 
18 17* 

25% 25ft 
46* 45* 
11% lift 
21ft 21 
BOVk 79* 
5* Sft 
6* 6ft 
6% 6% 
lift 31 
20* 2D* 
10 9* 

17% 16% 
14% 14 
28ft 27% 
4% 4ft 
7 7 

7% 7 
4ft 3* 
7ft 6* 
1* 1* 
.3ft I* 
21% 21 
7 6* 

9* a* 
13ft 13 
23% 22% 
24 23 

4ft 4* 

IB* 18* 
35Vk 34% 
41% 41* 
24 23* 

9 'A ?b 
29 26ft 
12* 12% 
4% 4* 
14* 14ft 
16b 15% 
23% 22% 
5% 5 
16* 16ft 
11* 11% 
17 16% 

10% 10ft 
2* 2* 
S3 Sift 
24ft 24b 
9* 9* 
Uft 16* 
31% 31 
17 16 

4ft 4* 
20* 20% 
IB* 18% 
6* 6% 
31ft 30* 
19ft 19% 
24% 23* 
Oft 7* 
15% 15% 
9 BVk 
8* 8* 
31 30 

15* 15 
27 26 

40* 38* 
4ft 4* 


7* 4* 
lift lib 
2S 18% 
8ft 5* 
231k 8% 

42ft 29ft 
24* 15 
171ft 112 
85ft 40b 
4* 1* 

14* 7b 
2* * 
10ft 6ft 
56% 7% 

4* 3 

14 8* 

14* 4 

Ub Bft 
26% I 
B 4 
11% 6* 
27% 14% 


Steiner 
Slows TV 

Slwlnf 
Slltal 
Stratus 
SirwCIS 36 
Starters 
Subaru £28 
SubrB 1.92 
5umma 
SurntHI .10 
SunCa 
SunMed 
SupSky 
5martwc 
Svm&T 
Svntecti 
Svnlre* 
Syscons 20 
SyAsoc 
Systln 
Svsinto 
Syitmi M 


6b 6 
IS 14% 
Uft 23 
8% 8 
24% 23b 
41ft 40% 
24ft 241k 
158ft 1SS 
84% 83% 
1 2* 
V* 8* 
Ilk I 
Ub 10>k 
8% 8 
3% 3ft 
ID* 10* 
5% 4% 
5ft S 
Ub Uft 
Oft 9 
B 7% 
10% 10b 


6 

14% 

23ft + % 

8 

24b +1 
40% — to 

24 ft + ft 
155 -3 

nr H 

n + * 

8 — ft 
3ft— b 

10*— ft 
5ft + * 
5 

13ft 

9 

7*— to 
10% + % 
aft— % 


14 a TBC 

7TA 13% TCACb 

7ft Sft ToeViv 5 
28* 12* Tandem 
8* 2* Tendon 

15 5* TcCom 

22 9 Tela 


Rlk 

21% 31% 


II II — ft 
25% 25% 

3 31k 

31* 31* + * 
3* 4 

14% 14% + % 
13% 13 + b 


36ft 

aito TicmA 

t 

3799 

37 

36 

36to +1 

12% 

6*k TrlPliK 


2023 

9b 

Bto 

9 

27 

13» Teteeta 

33 

1J 365 

23% 

27% 

23 

22b 

9ft Telpd i 


140* 

22ft 

21% 

22ft- Vk 

4% 

1% Totvld 


451 

JVk 

7* 

2to— b 

20 







22 

9% Telxon 4 

01 

437 

21% 


21b— ft 

nib 

2"k TermOl 

t 

346 

3lk 


3 + to 

Mb 

5b TherPr 


379 

6* 



Uto 

6% Th routs 


70 

lift 

lib 

lift + to 


6%— b 
IB* + * 
14ft— ft 
11 +1% 
7%— to 
J*— Jk 
32* + ft 
18 — % 
1* + to 
22% — % 
10ft— b 
31ft-* 
11b 

5* + to 
17 — ft 

10*+ b 
20 + to 
Bft— * 

27 

50% +!ft 
17ft + ft 
7ft 

21% + % 
17% — ft 
34ft— % 
U + ft ' 

2P 1 -* 

Bft— * 
7ft— to 
11% + * 
22 + % 


9*— b 
14*— * 
22% + to 

!»-* 
25b — ft 
45ft— ft 
lift— b 
21 — ft 
79*— % 
Sft + to 
6ft 

6% + Jk 
11 + % 
20*— b 
7ft . 
17* +lto 
14 

38 + % 

4ft 

7 + V4 

7* + to 
4 

7 + to 

1* 

3* 

2ib- % 

?* + to 
13* + * 
23 + to 

23ft— ft 
4*— ft 
IB* 

34% — % 
41% +* 
23ft + to 
9b 

28ft + % 
12*- ft 
a* + to 
Mto— to 
15% — % 
23 — % 
5% + to 
I6to— Vk 
iiu + % 
16% 

«=# 

51* 

24* f to 
9* + to 
lito 

11 -to 
16 

4*— to 
20ft , . 
15ft + ft 
i%— to 
SB* + U 
19U 

M + to 
Bto + to 

is*— to 

9 + * 

b%- to 

30% + Jk 

is — * 

26Vk + to 
40ft +1» 
4* 


Mto 5ft Ttartec 
30ft Sft TtauTr 
15 3* TlmeEn 

ISto 0ft TnwFlb 
2 to Ttorory 
30 Bft TatlSy 5. 
17% 10 TrnkAu 
17ft ito Triads v 
30b 20 Tniila 


IB U5LIC 1 
13* UTL 

5 Ullny 
10% Urtornn 
7% LtmR 
15ft UnPhtr 
34% UnTBcs 
12* UACm a 
8% UBAIsfc 

21ft UBCOl 

6 UFnGrp 
11* UEstFd 
6 UGrdn 
?b UPresa 
2* U5 AIM 

22* USBCP 
1ft US Cap 
2ft USDson 
71k U5HCS 
3b U5 Shell 
14* US5ur 
25% USTrs ■ 
17b USIotn 
15% UnTelev 
33* UVaBs 
Mto UnvFm 
10 Ur.vHH 
7ft UFSBk 
3b Uscof 


J4 24 375 
857 
1019 
290 

3 
285 

4 

1122 

IDS 

JO U 121 


2*ft 26 26ft + ft 
Bto 6ft 7ft +1 
6* 6b 6* + ft 
4 3% 3% — % 

15. 15 15 — ft 

28 28 28 
10% 10% 10% + to 
im, 18* 10* 

26* 2* 26ft + % 


27* 27* 

16 16* + to 

Bft Sft— b 
13* Mlk + ft 
M Mlk + to 
27% 27% 

63% 63*6 + ft 
24Vk 24ft + % 
9 9b 
28% 28% 
ito 6* + to 
18% 18% — % 
8 SVk 
10% 10ft 
4b 4% + Vk 
28* 28*— to 
3% 4 + to 

2* 7% + ft 
lift 17% + to 
4Vk 4ft— Vk 
15 16* +lft 

42 42% + Vk 

22ft 22* + to 
24* 34* 

47b 47ft 
22ft 22ft + % 
13* Uft +!ft 

18* 11* t- % 

5 Sft + to 


5b VLI 
7to VLSI 
3* VMX 
71k VSE 
6 Valid Lb 
B to ValFSL 
27 VaINTI 
19* VoILn 
lib VanDliS 
4% Vanzetl 
2* Ventrev 
13* vicorv 
6ft viedeFr 
9ft Viking 
13% viratak 
5% Vodavl 
14% Veit Inf 


1636 

771 

899 

Joe IS la 
952 
51 

122 3J 729 
JO U tl 
JO 10 32 

83 
807 

.120 J 1025 
22e 19 328 
76 
148 
109 
65 


5ft 5ft 
T5to 15 
Sto 4* 
10* 10ft 
9* 9 
19b 19% 
38ft 38b 
27* 27b 
Uft 19ft 
6ft 6% 
5% 4ft 
20* 20ft 
7* 7ft 
16ft 15% 
71 to Sft 
7ft 7% 
I9U 19% 


S* + ft 
15b + to 
<V — b 
I Oft 

9 — to 
19% 

38* + to 
27* 

19ft + ft 
6b— % 
5ft— Vk 
Sto — Vk 
7* + to 
15% 

20% + to 
7to— b 
19b— to 


2Sb 17* WD40 
17 10 WolbC 9 

13* 6ft WlkrTel 
25% IB* WahE 
30ft lift WF5L S 
17 ID* WMSB 
9% 6 Wavetk 

Mb 10ft Webb 
19ft B* WrtFn 
17* 5b WstFSL 
10% 5% WMtcTc 

18* 6% WtTIA l 
23 15ft WmorC 
17ft 6* WstVfCs 
38* 24ft Wettra 
6* 3 Wicat 


1JU 42 48 

22 1.9 42 

174 

126 7J 431 
JO 11 80 

1106 
49 

JO 13 3 

36 
63 
47 
208 

JO 20 55 

121 

.98 2J 312 
1783 


22% 22 22% + to 

17to 16% 17% + % 
10ft 9ft 10 
23ft 23* 23ft + * 
9b 29 29 

17* 16% Uft — Vk 
7ft 7% 7*— to 

12% 13to 17to 
1 7ft 17 17% 

17 16* 17 

B% 8b 8* + ft 
Uft 16* 16* + Vk 
Sft 20 20ft 

12ft 11 12 +to 
37* 37Vk 37ft „ 
4ft 4* 4ft— * 


Uft 

3 Wldcom 



327 

3* 

Sft 

3% 

50ft 

31ft Wlllmt 

1-45 

13 

170 

51 

50% 

50ft + % 

15* 

7* W1IIAL 



521 

IS 



19 

8 * WmsSn 



5 

19 

IRIk 

lBft 

104k 

4% WllanF 



2 W 

5* 

5* 




J3I 


724 

5* 

Sto 

S* 

»% 

14* WherO 

JO 

4.1 

137 

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Seize the world. 

Tte International Herald Tribune. 
Bringing the WorhfsMost 
Important News to the WorkTs 
Most Important Audience. 








Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERAU) TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1985 


IHaHHHHIHaiH 


PEANUTS 

DON'T PUSH JUpl-l JU5T MOUSE YOU'RE DON'T PUSH ME! I 1 
i/un i rvon $amta claus, you uas tmn§ to help. I 

®k‘TT CAN’T THROW ME OUTi YOU! YOU'RE TOO PAT] I 








ANPVOU have a 
crease in your 

EAR LOSE.'.' 




BLONDIE 


iiiimiaaiiiii 


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■r TO SET UP.'.' t—-' 


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NW OFFICE TOW H 


1 Mf SO I DON'T MAWE 
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jo*. 


'll MOW POES SHE SEE 
THROUGH Tt-ESE 
V ^ THINSS ? 


aaaH aain aaa 

aHHiaulilaw 


ACROSS 
I Lunar area 
5 "The night 

thousand 

eyes'* 

9 Outstanding 

13 Exercised 

14 Thirst and 
memory 
quencher of 
mythology 

15 Rating a 10? 

16 Stan of a 
Franklin 
quotation 

19 Williams or 
Weems 

20" ear..." 

21 Canon thread 

22 Actor Richard 

23" Kapital” 

24 Quotation: 

Pan II 

32 Resign 

33 Poison 
sometimes 
blown from 
guns 

34 Artie’s wife, 
once 

35 Reeking • 

30 An anagram 

for trace 

38 Some Feds. 

39 Masefield 
heroine 

40 Placket 

41 Moroccan 
capital 


42 Quotation: 

Pan III 

46 Salt's dir. 

47 Famed 
coloratura 

48 Chimp's cousin 

51 Kind of wit 

53 Men or boys 

56 End of 
quotation 

59 Kett of comics 

60 Perform 

61 Wild plum 

62 Spool 

63 Spoils 

64 Prove 

DOWN 

l Jeffs buddy 

2Notednetman 

3 Marsh growth 

4 Anglo-Saxon 
letter 

5 Stalkers of tiny 
fish 

6 Envelope abbr. 

7 Brogan or 
sabot 

8 Gen. Per- 
shing's men 

9 Palookallke 

10 Sparks 

11 Chemical 
compound 

12 Printing 
directive 

14 The Pineapple 
Isle 

17 Octave 


'^ttarian lass f. 

rwosome 

BEETLE BAILE 




18 Wingy 

22 Arthurian lass 

23 Twosome 

24“ Know 

Why," Wonder 
hit 

25 Psalms sound 

26 Ammonia 
derivative 

27 Hilarity 

28 Romberg's 

" Kiss" 

29 Dear deer 

30 Eye pans 

31 Plume holder? 

36 Aid for Spade 

37 Islet 

38 Shooters 

'40 Carols 

41 Western estate 

43 Low; servile 

44 Branch of 
physics 

45 Palm off 

48 Hebrew period 

49 Assessment 

50 Stake 

51 Partaf A.D. 

.52 Who ar which 

53 Irwin of golf 

54 Antony's 
faithful 
servant 

55 Another 
printing 
directive 

57 Comparative 
wiling 

58 Superlative 
ending 



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WIZARD of ID 


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DENNIS THE MENACE " 





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usually have too many of— "DE-TAILS" 


WEATHER 


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NORTH AMERICA 



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FRIDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: No. FRANKFURT: Cloudy. Tame. 
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reme, *— 9 (39-331. NEW YORK: Rntn. Tama. ( — 4 (46—3*1. PARIS: 
Ovaront Tamo. 4—0 t» — 32 1. ROME: Ooodv. Tamp. 10— a iso— 43I.TBL 
AVIV: No. ZURICH: Cloudr. Temp. 3-0 (36 - 331. BANGKOK: Milt Tame. 
73 — 33 191 — 731. HOMO MONO: Ooody. Tamp. 16—11 161 — S3). MANILA: 
Showers. Toma. 39 — 23 1 77 — 73). SEOUL: Snow. Tome. -3— -II (29— 121. 
SINGAPORE: Thunderstorms. Temp. 39 — 24 184— 751. TOKYO: Fair. Tamp. 
9 — 3 ( 48 — 36). 


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BOOKS 


DREAMTIME 


By Htmi Pair Duerr. 

Translated by Feticitos Goodman. 462 
pages.S24.95. 

Basil Blackwell, 432 Park Avenue South, 
New York, N.Y. 10016 

-Reviewed by Kenneth Archity 

O NE of the chronjc affiudiruui of Western 
education is its insistence on resolving 
contraries instead of embracing their simulta- 
neous validity. Time can pass quickly and 

slowly at the same time. The truth can be a lie 

and a lie can be true. Loj>jcal language is able 
to comprehend the relativity that myth adores. 
Every Westerner has experienced the paradox, 
but our schooling makes it hard for us to say 
we “know" iu 

Hans Peter Duerr’s book is outstanding for 
its weirdness and provocation, even though its 
anthropology is neither original nor precise. Its 
300 pages of footnotes are even more interest- 
ing than the 100-plus pages of text “Dream- 
erne" celebrates the simultaneity of contraries 
at die crossroads of the logical and the mythic 
mind. “The ‘dream place' is everywhere and 
nowhere, just like the ‘dreamtime’ Is always 
arid never.” It was predictable from the time 
wheat scientific specialization began in earnest 
early in tins century that the most fascinating 

imrig hfa him the himuwi mind tmri Hie culture it 

has left behind- would occur wherever people 
observe two pathways crossing. 

Readers of Graves’s “The White Goddess," 
Butierwortb’s “Ihe Tree at the Navel of the 
Earth,” de Rougemonfs “Love in the Western 
World," Fraser’s “The Golden Bough” or even 
Carlos Castaneda’s powerfully conceived fan- 
tasies about Yaqui sorcery vnll recognize fa- 
miliar tenant here, and may find it surprising 
that “Dreamtime" was a controversial best 
setter when it was first published in West 
Germany in 1978. It offers nothing essentially 
new except the energy of its serendipity. 

As he moves through space and t»™ with 
file freedom of a comparative anthropologist 
wifir no loyalties to systematic logic, Duerr 
focuses amorphously on the premise that civili- 
zation. proceeds most securely when it allows 


Sotatfon to Previo u s Puzzle 


□ECH2 □□□□□ □□□□ 
KCHE QdtDQQ □□OH 

□□□□□□□h aaoQa 
□□a □□□□ 
Boanaa □□□aaaaa 

BDDOCi □□□□ □□□ 

DEsnaBaaianaaaaa 

□DO □□□□ □□□□□ 

□□□□□□□□ Daonaa 
□□□□ □□□ 
snnsa nDmuanaa 

DEHIQ □□□□□ SSCIQ 

□nan □□□□□ □□□□ 


the boundaries between its self-defmidon and 
the wilderness against which that definiikm js 
Fonned to be dissolved at least on an occaacfF 
al routine basis. We “should nun wild so as not 
to surr end er to our own wildness, but ratber to 
acquire in that way a consciousness of Twr. 
selves as tamed, as cultural beings," be writes. 

Duerr’s study is in perfect sync with other 
contemporary explorations that insist that, 
whether it be in the chemical bath of the 
brain's neural network or in the study of psy- 
chotic disorders, the most Fascinating interplay 
occurs on borderlines where limits are both 
defined and broken through: “Human societ- 
ies, as we have seen, erected the fence between 
themselves and the wilderness in many ways; 
and this fence assumed a number of different 
meanings.” 

Illustrating his loosely jointed argument 
Duerr discovers or rediscovers provoking hi# 
lorica] byways. Considerable documentation 
indicates that during the Middle Ages the 
courts were aware that women accused ef 
witchcraft were often under the influence of 
hallucinogens and that witches' “flights" were 
explained by dregs. Duerr speculates Oat the 
legal system’s choice to ignore the chemi c al 
connection was made because of the C aih otic 
Church: “If the sexual intercourse of the witch 
with the Devil or her dance at the witch's 
5 -,hH*»h turned out to be nothing but as illu- 
sion, item the next logical step would be the 
conclusion that the Devil himreif was nothing 
but a phantom also.” 

In “momboto" (as the Tolai inbe of. New 
Brittany rails dreamtime), “nbh” (ancient . 
Egyptian) and “aradaga" (Germanic), every- • 
ihmg turns upside down: “Humans behave 
‘like wild animals,’ and men sleep with thnr L 
sisters." Pursuing inversions and reversals (tag 
occur at the borderlands of experience. Dues 
spins off many tangents: fear of flying and the ' 
evaporation of ego boundaries; the transfor- 
mation of the White Goddess or the huntress 
Diana into the Virgin Mary; werewolves (espe- 
cially Chapter 6: “Wolves, death, and the he 
land of ethnographers”); the Huicfaole Indians' 
practice of traveling back along their previous, 
path, compared to the Tan trie botymea whjlV 
walk a gains t the current by “causing all 
process, from breathing to the flow of sccs§& ; - 
to go ‘backwards’ and the erotirizatiemra 
the late Middle Ages. 

Duerr traces the interwoven cross-cultaCnrr; 
■leitmotif in Teutonic mythology of the^wfitflF: 
tree Yggdrasfl. Sl Peters upade-down cr(pi 
and the axis of the world and its reLiuonriiipar. 
noon: The ™giw»n climbs down the tzeetmd::'. 
various worlds, just as Buddha sat under-the 
tree to see many visions in heaven. “Its rqotx 
reach into the lower world, its top stretches^ 
the upper world, and humans live around . 
middle section of its trunk. Ijakyl, the ‘urinal 
mother of shamans,' lies among the roots. She 
swallows the shaman's soul and gives birth to it 
in animal shape. From that day forward, the 
shaman possesses ‘another side_ of his person, 
his ‘animal part* . . . which lives out in the 
taiga (or steppe) in a lonely tree." 

Kenneth Atchity is the co-editor of “ Dream* 
works." His book U A Writer’s Time 1 " will be 
published by Norton in January. He wrote this 
review for the Los Angeles Times 


BRIDGE 


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Page 19 



M 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1985 


SPORTS 


III 6 




rre 


. ' ; V- 


\iupikd tpOtr Staff f*mDiq>ctdta • 

o HICAGO —Wayne Gretzky is 
;•’< i a gifted athlete that he cm 
O', ride whatever the Edmonton 
>.T ts’ offense needs. If it needs 
;> ‘iag, be can provide as many as 

’■ V lulls in O CMKUM1 Wltje WM B M 


: also the best in the game at 

' op goals. 

retzky. in the last two seasons, 

• Redded be is more valuable as 

y NHL FOCUS 

^ • ifaymaker. last season setting a 
' < -tonal Hockey League record 
. 135 assist*. 

' ind after his performance 

' tnesday night at Chicago, bock- 

*;S best player is on a pace that 

. Jd «h»n« that mark. 

~-ia wild 12-9 defeat of the Blade 
: ' Vks, Gretzky had seven assists 
<ea record he already shared, set 
! * HEy Taylor of Detroit in 1947 
tied by Gretzky in 1980. 
retzky did such a terrific job as 
maker that both Hnemateg, 
‘-in Anderson and Jari Kmri got 
- 1 trick. Gretzky did not score, 
have a special rale and it is 
; i : ng up my wingers," he said, 

- •• rJ there is no reason for me to 
V a lot of chances when I’ve got 

- c; e kind of players on my line.” 
J:. he fact the teams scored 21 

, : s to equal a mark established 
> Montreal (14) and Toronto (7) 
.--t 



sisls 




0 & Jan. 10, 1920, was too difficult a 
made for the Hawks’ cocoach, 
Rmer Ndbon, to swallow. 

.Ifs bad enough to make every 
mistake in the bode and then watch 
Edmonton exploit them,” he said. 
'‘But when yon tie that Hnd of a 
record, it makes losing even ti wt 
much harder to accept." 

In the first 23 minutes, Gretzky 
led tbc Oilers to a 6-0 lead. Then, as 
they have so often tins season, Ur 
two-time Stanley Gup ehapipj nmc 
relaxed. At one point m the second 
period it was a 7-5 game. 

Each team had 18 shots in the 
second period and each scored six 
tunes. It was not surprising that, 
for the final period, both ream? 
came oat with new goalies. For the 
Oilers, Grant Fubr replaced Andy 
Mbog. For Chicago, Bob Sauve re- 
placed Murray Baxmennan. 

Some defense was played in the 
third period and only -five goals 
woe scored an 23 shots. For (he 
game the Black Hrivks had 46 
shots, the Oilers 44. 

Anderson, who has 23 goals this 
season, said, “In our last seven or 
eight games we have been getting 
ahead, but then becoming compla- 
cent.” 

It may be that if the OQers do not 
start playing better defeiw they 
might put Gretzky at defense. He 
would probably lie a star at stop- 
ping goals, too. (LAT, A?) 


Skier Seriously Hurt 

Austria’s Pate Gradies in Race 

Cotrplled by Our Stqff From Dispattha 

VA L DISERE, France — Micfaada Gerg of West 
Germany won the first women's Worid Cup dwnhiB ski 
rape of the season Thursday, but Christine Pstz of 
Austria and Pam Fletcher ctf the United States were 
injured by heavy fstfis on the very fast track. 

The Austrian team doctor, Sgi Wagnex, said he found 
Putz “with blood in her lungs" and that her “fife is in 
danger. Sic suffered a heavy head injury and now is 
unconscious.” 

An official medical bulletin issued Thursday after- 
noon said Putt was in a coma and that doctors were 
awaiting the results of brain scans before making any 
statements. 

Putz, 19, had been taken by hcficopter to the Sabkms a 

La Tranche hospital in Grenoble while Fletcher, 20, ■ 
from Acton, Massachusetts, was examined at the Yal 
dTsoecfime. 

Officials of the U.S. rid »«i m said that Fletcher had 
“bumped her head" in her spectacular crash but that Ae 
was not seriously hurt. 

Putz, an Innsbruck native in only her second year of 
Worid Cup competition, was the 30th starter and weal 

oat of control at 100 Irilomcters per hour (62 mph) going 

into the Bank Turn of the 2.1-ksJometer “O-K." coarse. 
She took the wrong line with her rids and stxugggkd 
fruitlessly to recover going into the hi g h , sloping tuna. 

Her da tip caught ou a bright orange riddme restrain- 
ing bag, pan of the safety system that is designed to 
prevent racers from going off the coarse. 

That launched her skyward and she crashed over the 
omngeplastic barrier and onto the ground. Then rite was 
thrown into a second samersanltmg arc of 10 to IS 
meters before crashing face down off the course. 

Gog was timed in 1 minute, 25.59 seconds, bearing 
Canada's T-awie Graham by eleven -h n ndr eri ths of a 
second, about the length, of a ski. Maria WalHser of 
Switzerland was third at 1:25.75. (AP, UPI, AFP) 



Christine Putz received “a heavy head injury,** a doctor said, after 
faffing at 62 mph during the domdnD race at Val dPlsere, France. 


Denny Sent to Reds 
At Major Swap Meet 


The Associated Prest 

SAN DIEGO — The Philadel- 
phia Phillies traded Cy Young 
Award-winning pitcher John Den- 
ny to the Cincinnati Reds on 
Wednesday as major league base- 
ball's annual winter meetings 
turned into a swap meet. 

The Phillies traded Denny, 33, 
who won theJNatiooal League Cy 
Young award in 1983, and minor 
league pitcher Jeff Gray to the 
Reds for pitcher Tom Hume and 
unhappy reserve outfielder Gary 
Redus. 

The Los Angeles Dodgers sent 
catcher Steve Yeager, 38, to the 
Seattle Mariners for left-handed re- 
lief pitcher Ed Vande Berg, the San 
Francisco Giants traded veteran 
infidder Manny Trillo to the Chi- 
cago Cute for infidder Dave Owen 
and the Baltimore Orioles out- 
fielder Gary Roenicke and a player 
to be named later to the New York 
Yankees Tor infidder Rex Hudler 
and pitcher Rich BordL 

The Yankees said later they had 
acquired infidder Mike Fischlin 
from the Cleveland Indians for a 
player to be named later. 

The Texas Rangers reportedly 
were dose to a deal that would send 
outfielder Gary Ward to the Kan- 
sas Gty Royals for lefL-handed 
pitcher Bud Black, the Boston Red 
Sox still were Interested in striking 


'Big Four 7 Gather Again as Old Indians Honor Dying Teammate 


Mike Garda 


By Andrew H. Malcolm 

New York Tima Serrice 

CLEVELAND — The Big Foot 
rode again recently. 

Thirty-one years after the Cleve- 
land Iwiiinn compiled the Ameri- 
can League’s all-time best single- 
season record, their starting four 
pitches tmri maim gw from riiat 
team, some other Indians and even 
a couple of football’s Cleveland 
Browns got together an a snowy 
night with a few hundred support- 
os and several dozen memories to 
pitch a little refief for one of their 
own. 

For 11 years from 1949 through 
the 1950s, Mike Garda, the broad, 
burfy kid out of California’s Oroa 
High School was one of the pitch- 
ing stalwarts for (he Cleveland In- 
dians in another era of baseball 
when every pitcher still tried to bat, 
when teams traveled by trains and 
when $35,000 was a year’s salary 
instead of a bonus. 


When (heir manager, Al Lopez, 
set op his pitching rotation in those 


days be could, choose from Garda, 
Bob Lemon, Early Wynn and Bob 
FeDer and, later. Herb Score. “It 
was a manager’s dream," Lo- 
pez, now in the Hall of Fame, “It 
was the best pitching staff I ever 
saw (hiring 33 years in the majors.” 


of Garda, “the Big Bear” as fans 
called him, is gone now. Friends 
instinctively move to beta the 62- 
year-old pitcher to stand. He is 
much smaller. His mm/t wanders. 
His big hands are bony, fragile and 
full of pain instead of tricks. Garda 
is dying of ltidney failure 
three time* a week now, more 
often than he. even pitched at the 
peak of his strength, Garda and his 
wife, Gerda, make the 20-minute 
ride from their home here to allow 
Garda, who is also a diabetic^ to 
spend four hours on a kidney dialy- 
sis unit. For the last several years 


that machine has drained his blood, 
flushed it dean and pumped it back 
into bis body, leaving Urn physical- 
ly and emotionally chained for half 
the time until the next treatment. 

“It’s no way to five,’' said Garcia, 
pausing to cough- “I been so big 
and strong so long, going every- 
where, you know, this is tough. 
There's no cure I know that. Tm 
just surviving a while.” 

Last s umm e r fully real- 
ized how weakened Garda had be- 
come, physically and financially . 
He had sold his dry cleaning busi- 
ness and real estate to cover medi- 
cal tells. Having retired in 1961 
with a 142-97 record, Garda, who 
never made more than $35,000 a 
year in baseball, is not eligible for 
the same generous pension and in- 
surance coverage as today’s ball- 
players. 

The pension plan has become 
lucrative only since the creation of 
the Players Association m 1967. 


Players whose employment predat- 
ed the association receive smaller 
pensions. 

This remains a sore point for 
many aging veterans who fed they 
laid the popular foundation for the 
modem athlete's financial bonanza 
and that coverage should be ex- 
tended more generously. “Today’s 
players don't have any legal obliga- 
tion to the old-timers," said Lopez, 
“They do have a moral obligation." 

Md Rose, a local restaurateur, 
donated the evening's drinks and 
meals, 1,000 pounds (453 kilo- 
grams) of beef. Waitresses donated 
their tinML The coliseum donated a 
banquet room. Bob Dugan, an art- 
ist, did 500 copies of a drawing of 
the pitchers and Lopez, which were 
autographed for sale for $100. 

George Stdnbrenner, the owner 
of the New York Yankees, sent a 
representative and an $8,000 check. 
Even Will Rosen winkel Garcia's 
World War II sergeant, drove nine 


hours throogjh a blizzard to attend. 

When all the bills were paid, said 
Dino LucardK, an organizer, they 
hoped to deliver $60,000 into a 
Mike Garcia investment fund. 

In 1954 the Indians went 111-43 
with the Big Four providing 78 of 
those victories, 19 of them Garcia's. 
That year he a league-leading 
2.64 eamed-run average and five 
shutouts, with 129 strikeouts. 

The team eventually lost to the 
Giants in the Work! Series, four 
straight Bnt what Garda remem- 
bered best was actually pitching in 
one of those games. “I lost," be 
said. “It happens.” 

They reminisced abont the 
changing game: players who spe- 
cialize more, reKevere now who get 
10 times what starters used to get, 
batters who bow after home runs. 
“There was greater camaraderie 
then,” said Lemon, “You traveled 
by train together, roomed together, 
ate together. We had team family 


picnics. These young guys get all 
the money. But we had all the fun. 1 
wouldn’t want to play today." 

But that night at the banquet 
they praised Edward Miguel Gar- 
da mare as a gentleman and friend 
than as a pitcher. And when it was 
his tun to speak, Garcia had few 
words. “If I tried to say what I'm 
thin Icing ," he said, “I'd fall apart. 
Cleveland is a terrific town with 
wonderful people. Maybe TD get 
bade to the park sometime for a hot 
dog and some more bubblegum. 
God bless all of you and thank 
you." 

Then, as the crowd stood to 
cheer, Garda slowly sat down and 
tinned to Lopez, who bad all those 
calming talks with him on the 
mound three decades ago. 

“Bow’d I dor whispered Gar- 
da. 

“You did good, Mike, yon did 
real good." 


a deal with the Chicago White Sox 
for Tom Seaver, and the Yankees 
reportedly were working on a deal 
that would send designated hitter 
Don Baylor to the White Sox for 
pitcher Britt Bums. 

The White Sox also were negoti- 
ating to retain tbdr free- agent 
catcher, Carlton Fisk. They report- 
edly want to sign Fisk, and then 
trade him to the Yankees. 

But The Associated Press 
learned Wednesday that Fisk has 
refused thus far ic give Lhe White 
Sox any assurance be will waive his 
right to turn down a trade. If Fuk 
re-signs, he will be a 5- and- 10 man 
— five years with the White Sox 
and 10 years in one league — and 
thus have the right to veto a trade. 

So far, nine trades have been 
made at these meetings. 

While the Reds were able to 
move a discontented player, the 
agent for Kirk Gibson of the De- 
troit Tigers was becoming discon- 
tent himself by what he saw as a 
conspiracy among owners io 
“stonewall" free-agent negotia- 
tions. 

“There is a very, very unified 
effort to dose off negotiations, spe- 
cifically with Kirk,” said the agent, 
Doug Baldwin. Baldwin said he 
had been unable io arrange meet- 
ings with any team here other than 
the Tigers. 

“We're at an absolute dead end 
right now," he said, adding that he 
expected no negotiations before he 
left the meetings Thursday. 

Gibson, the lop nam e among this 
year’s free agems, baited 287 with 
29 homers, 97 runs batted in and 30 
stolen bases in 1985. 

The team owners, meanwhile, 
held their first joint meeting, but 
the only item acted upon was the 
approval of the sale of the Pitts- 
burgh Pirates. On the agenda were 
two potentially controversial is- 
sues: expansion and drugs. Com- 
missioner Peter Ueberroth offered 
no guarantees on expansion but 
vowed baseball would do some- 
thing about dings. 

“We have learned that the play- 
ers association is formulating its 
own drug program," he said. “We 
are encouraged by that." 

The owners also listened to a 
report from their long-range plan- 
ning committee on expansion. 

Ueberroth said no timetable was 
set for expansion. “We’ll probably 
have more meetings," he said. “We 
didn’t come to any dear conclusion 
on the next step.” 


SCOREBOARD 

Basketball 

tional Basketball Association Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic DMtfaa 

W L Pet OB 

.1 1* 3 Mi — 

lalnMa 13 IS StS 7 

wrwr 13 11 J22 7M 

■ natoa II II MO S 

fork t 14 m 13 

Central DtvisKn 

■ ukoe 17 » ABO — 

t U TO JB3 2*1 

a ii 13 An s 

and * is Mt M* 


a ii 13 An s 

and Ml At w 

M 6 17 J30 * 

a t M si m 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest DMstaw 

'in M> 7 4M — 

r 19 ■ 452 1 

It 11 -M0 3 

’ Uinta U II Al M 

II U St 4 
nento 7 16 .»< 9 

Pacific DMaton 

Bkgn II 2 SO - 

nd 14 13 JOB 7 

10 14 .417 10 

Uppers a 15 .348 111ft 

t* state f 17 J46 12 

* A 16 373 13 

' WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 
mate 36 33 21 >1—101 

32 34 X 14—111 
5-176-72LMc»tateB-143-«19; Henry 3* 
nwai 7-12 0-0 14, Tyler 4-12 0-2 14. Ke- 
: Saaemento 50 ( Kletne 13). Baetan 47 
Wattan 7). Assists: Sacrame nt o 24 
S). Boston 25 CBIra Alnae 51. 

» 39 M 34— 97 
I 30 34 23 39— IBS 

« 12-27 7-7 31. River* 5-0 M 13; 
let 9-14 6-4 24, Chambers 9-30 4-4 32. 
Mi: Sccdfte 44 (dMintiers 111, Atlanta 
(Ins 131. AssMe: Seattle 16 (You no 31. 

1 22 (Riven B). 

taeta 34 24 31 3*— 141 

l M 71 36 33— 1M 

le 13-19 4-6 2B. FlemlnO M0 1-3 15.SH- 
3i 3-7 94 15; Moore IMS 4-4 30b Roben- 
i 1-1 17. RefcwedKi Son Antonio » 
in 7), Indiana X (Tisdale 10). Assists: 
ealall (Mttdwtl SI. indkna32 (Ptetn- 

Noe HUB 34— 1H 

24 26 31 16—104 

nson U-20 M 27. Rabtawn 7-15 B4 22. 
8-13 6-9 22. Tripucfca 12-22 0-0 24, 
ent-14 2-2 IB. Re bo u n ds : Washington 
nd 13), Detroit 65 (Lxslmbeer 19). As- 
ashlnstan 35 <F. Johnson ID). Detroit 
mas 14). 


Skiing 

idCnp 

WOMEN'S DOWNHILL 
(At Val truer*. France) 
seta aero. Weet Germany, 1 minute, 

■onds 

le Graham, Canada. 1:2530 
a wamser. Switzerland. 1:25J5 
n Guiensahfw Austria. 1 :2fc» 

44 Armstrong, US, 1:2*27 
eta ttgtnl Switzerland. 1:2432 
le Merle. France. lJAAI 
aa KWH. west Germany. 13L49 
l Hess, Switzerland, 1:2454 
One Emancti France, 1:2LS7 
Uta Walllnger. Austria 1:2454 
‘^•taaa. Switzerland. 1:1440 
■ Elm, SwUzertartd. 1:27.08 
i Wott, Austria 1:2723 
» Mtesenfcchner, W4*f Germany, 

Mews overall standings 
55 aoinis 
.45 
.37 

»e Oertft, Swttaerlcnd, 3J 
NT. 30 
franc, 28 

Vrenl Schneider, Switzerland, and 
irdotens. us. u 
ltt» Steiner. Austria 25 
Granam, Gutansohn ond FloJnL 20 
a 5 vet Yuaostovkv 15 
Tamara McKJrmer. UiL. and ftto- 
ir, 13 

i Eoer, Austria 12 
■a Hibson. Sweden, n 
Pootettn Auaanl, Holy, amt Ml- 
arzota. iMv.atd Anna-Flora Rev. 


Soccer 


UEFA CUP 

(Third Round, Second Leo) 

Real Madrid (holder) 4. Bonnsla Moen- 
cticnokidbrKhB l a gorou ata 3-5; Red wins on 
away Boats). 

Milan 1 ■ Warto em , 2 (worp g en advan ce * on 
3-2 aggregate). 

Nantes 1. Spartak Moscow i (Norte* ad- 
vances on 2-1 aggregate). 

CataeneXHammartv 1 (Cologne advan ce s 
an 4-3 ag gre ga t e). 

NeudttW Xomasl Dundee unltedl (after 
extra Hme; NaudiaM Xaimk advances on 4- 
3 ooin eeataS. 

Leak] Warsaw 0. Internazlonsle 1 

Sporting Lisbon 1 AtfHeHaa Bilbao 0 1 Soort» 
ino Lisbon advances an 4-2 aggregate). 



NHL Standings 


Cleveland 29 » 31 39— 119 

PModeMUa 34 33 19 39— 125 

Malone 12-21 10-11 34, Ervlne 11-17 M 23; 
Free TO-T7 7-12 27, Hinson B-U S-5 21. Re- 
beaadsi Cleveland 46 (Foauette TO), PtiHadel- 
pMa 41 (Barkley 15). Assists: Cleveland 35 
I Boater TO). PWladetpWa 34 (Cheetass 4). 
LA. CHpp en 1731 2431—95 

Denver 31 37 31 31—134 

E radish 9-17 6-W 24, cooper W-I5 2-2 33; 
Edwards 5-14 55 15, Oar-dan 59 44 14. Re- 
boeods: LA. a topers 51 (Johnson, Coor 3). 
Denver 51 (Schaves 13). Assists: LA. a topers 
9 (Edwards 4), Denver 31 (Lever 14). Total 
fouto— LA. 

Porftaod II 33 31 33— lit 

Utah 23 34 37 19— lit 

Danltev 11-33 14-11 34. Malone 3-13 44 30; 
Drmctar H-14 24 19. vandeweahe M3 M 16. 
R eb o ee ds: Portland SB nhamnsMi 91, Utah 55 
(Eaton 141. Assists: Portland 24 (Drexler. 
Bowie 6), Utah 29 (Stockton 7). 

Phoenix 39 M 11 39-133 

Oet dsn state 37 35 33 33—113 

DavtaT7-279-l043,N«tce0- , M5431;5hartf- 
M 5-9 36. Carroll 9-15 7-1025. Rskooeds: Phae- 
nbc S3 (Adams 14). Gotten State 51 (Smith. 
Carroll 10). Assists: Phoenix 25 (Humphries 
9). Golden State 20 (Ftovd B). 


Selected College Results 

EAST 

American U. 67, George Washington 64 
Buchned 73, St. Francis. N.Y„ 63 
Georgetown 74. New Mexico 51 
Maryland 42. West Virginia 41 
Ohio U. 7tL Wagner 57 
Penn 5L 76, Indiana, Pa. SB 
providence M. Maine 63 
Rutgers 72. Columbia 60 
Seton Hall 71 F ordnom 66 
St Banaventure 73, Massachusetts 77 
SL John's 42. Manss « 

SOUTH 

VM1 76. Lvnchbure 72 
w. Kentucky 87. Co (umbos ii 
MIDWEST 
Davton 69, Butler 55 
Miami, Ohio ML Denison 55 
Missouri 81. Middle Tent 77 
Merehead SL 77. Ohio Western 71 
SOUTHWEST 
Texas 82. Oral Roberts 66 
Texas AIM 88. Prairie view 60 
PAR WEST 
Colorado It, Colorado St. 65 
Portland 54, Metal 53 
San Jaw St. 4& Eon Francisco 61 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Mrkk Dtvbfao 

W L TPtl BPS* 


PNkMMpNa 

31 

8 

• 

42 

131 

86 

IMMtamUllll 

17 

7 

3 

37 

M3 

00 

NY Rnnatro 

U 

14 

1 

29 

US 

95 

NY Istandon 

11 

10 

7 

» 

187 

110 

PIIMMngti 

11 

14 

4 

24 

no 

106 

Now Jmv 

AM 

12 

14 1 

Mvtafaa 

25 

WT 

TO 

Qurtwc 

16 

TO 

1 

33 

TO 

84 

Montreal 

14 

ID 

3 

31 

131 

100 

Boston 

12 

10 

5 

3) 

no 

102 

Buffalo 

13 

13 

2 

28 

TO 

92 

Hartford 

12 

13 

0 

26 

TO 

102 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Dtvhden 


SL Louts 

12 

12 

3 

27 

99 

IN 

Chicago 

9 

14 

4 

22 

111 

139 

MlmtMla 

1 

U 

4 

23 

113 

113 

Toronto 

1 

17 

3 

19 

W 

126 

Dofralt 

7 

Sanrttn 1 

14 4 

MvMNb 

18 

87 

138 

Edmonton 

2t 

5 

4 

46 

143 

119 

Cataarv 

14 

8 

3 

35 

122 

94 

Wtimtoag 

10 

17 

3 

23 

KB 

MB 

Vanawwf 

9 

11 

3 

31 

no 

131 

Los Anwtes 

7 

17 

4 

18 

97 

142 

WEDNESDAYS RESULTS 



Minnesota 3 4 3-19. 

oatren 1 1 e— a 

Blugtlad 3 (14), Acton 2 (9), BeUawsd (15), 
Graham (SI; Oargdnkfc (131, Barrett (2). 
Shots ea goal: Minnesota (on Stefan) 94-7— 
25: Detroit (on Boaupre) 144-7—29. 

N.Y. Istaederi 3 3* e— r 

pttts bei gh 2 113-4 

B. Sutter (4). a Sutter (9). Bossy (19),Gfl- 
lles (2J; Rusfeawsu (10), Buttant 2 (12), Le- 
mtoux (IB). Shots aneaal: N.Y. isfandsTo (on 
Motodie) 11- 10-13-2— 36; Pittsburgh (an 
smith) 10-7-1D4—3I. 

SL Leals 113-4 

Toronto l i 3—6 

Kotmoulas (2), McGill (IL Fryer (18). 
latrata (3). Thomas 17), Stastnv (11); GD- 
mour (10), Sutler 2 (14), Hunter (M). Shots an 
goal: St. Louts (on WregeM) 7-13-11—31; To- 
ronto (on Wtamsley) 10-16-13— W. 

N.Y. Rangora 111—4 

jffify a i i j 

LotdtowRLRJdloy (D.PavoDch (15), Whis- 
tle (1); Preston 2 (11). Shots on goal: M.Y. 
Ronaors (an Reich) 4-144-26; Now Jersey 
(on VOnWeahrauck) 45-U-03. 

Montreal 3 1 *— l 

Hortford 1 I O—l 

Galnev (H.Mothmd an.NUan O); Teroloo 
nSI. Shots oo goal: Montreal (on Llut) 8-7-0— 
15; Hartford (an Roy) 14-M3-24. 

■diMAtn 4 i >-42 

Chicago 0 6 3-9 

Anderson 3 (23). Lumloy IS). SemonlM (SI. 
MeSorfev 2 (51. AtedeOmd to, Fogeiln (SL 
K«m 3 (Zn;9ctvord (15), Fraser (14), Watson 
(4). T. Murray 2 (15). O^ahahan (1), Brawn 
(3), Yaremchufc.2 (4). Shots on eoai: Edmon- 
ton (on Bamtermon. Sauve) 1UU-44: OW* 
earn (an Moos. Ruhr) O-TB-TS-46. 

wuntlpee 1 2 1-4 

Vanco u ver l l 1—4 

ArnW (71. HffiMRTwk (18). Small (4). Mill 
ah Bewtanan 2 (14); Sundstrem (6). Tantl 
(if). Neetv (7). Shota aa goal: Winnipeg (on 
Brodevr) 77-15-29; Vontsevar (ea Beh- 
refld) iVO^-a. 


Transition 


TEXA S Hawed Mike BueeJ monaco r el 
Salem e( Northwest League and Oil no Cado- 
MamanaerDf Daytona Beach ot the Florida 
State League. 

Ifcrttoiaj 

PiTTSBURGH-Purahased contracts a( 
Mafias Comila outfielder, tram the Mexico 
atv Tlaera nd Martin H ernando s pitcher, 
tram the Meadm Cttv Rede of Hw Meekm 
Leagu e . 

BASKETBALL 

NaHeM BaekolheB Assodottoo 
PORTLAND— Announcod that Kenny Corf. 

tarwani, ututaneent orthndttpta luraery ta 


Ms right knee and will net heme teptayfarat 
least throe weeks. 

FOOTBALL 

Natfamal Fsottm LeagM 

GREEN BAY-Gtancd Vince F erragoma 
auartertaefc. to a anavoar contract. 

NEW ORLEANS— Placid Scott Penuer.’ 
linebacker, an Wired reserve. 

PITTSBURGH — Placed Dove Eduards, 
safety, on the Mured re s erv e. 

TAMPA BAY— signed OavM Verier, wMe 
re ce i v er , and Paul vegeLltaebaeker. P faced 
ptdi Freeman, Udc rsturncr, and Scot Brant- 
ley, linebacker, on inlured reserve. 


Race in Perth Seeded Teams Chosen for Soccer’s World Cup 
Draws a Fleet 


United P re ss International 

PERTH, Australia — Sixteen 
yachts — the biggest congregation 
of 12-metex boats in history — have 
been entered in the world 12-meter 
fleet racing championships off 
Freeman tie in Jannaiy-Februaiy 
1986, officials announced Thurs- 
day. 

The event wiQ marie the begin- 
ning of the official campaign for 
the America's Cap races that will 
be held near Perth in Western Aus- 
tralia starting Jan. 31, 1987. 

“It is undeniable that the syndi- 
cates will be using the worid series 
to try each other out before the 
cup," said Stan Reid, chtrirnuin gf 
the Royal Perth Yacht Chib’s race 
committee. 

“Not only is it the biggest assem- 
bly of 12-meters, the yachting tal- 
ent we wiD see will be unmatched 
anywhere." 

Six countries are represented in 
the cha m pio ns h i ps, with Britain 
the only America's Cup challeng- 
ing nation that has not made an 
entry. 

The Australia HI, the Taskforce 
'87, the Ccmsorzio Italia and the 
New Zealand Syndicates each have 
entered two yachts. 



Compiled by Oar Staff FI eel Dispatcher 

MEXICO CITY — Italy, Mexico, France, 
Brazil, West Germany and Poland were cho- 
sen Wednesday as tins seeded teams for the 
1986 Worid Cup soccer tournament. 

Fattier, officials of the Interna tiona l Fed- 
eration of Football Associations (FIFA) an- 
nounced that Walter Baumann, president of 
the Swiss Soccer Federation, had died here of 
a heart attack Tuesday night 

Italy wifi head the group playing at Pueb- 
la, while Mexico, as the host team, will play 
at Mexico Gty. France will head the group at 
Leon, Brazil at Guadalajara, West Germany 
at Queretaro and Poland at Monterrey. 

The 24 national teams will be divided into 
six groups of four teams each by assigning 
each of the other 18 teams to groups A 


Pierre littbarski celebrated after team- 
mate Uwe Bent scored in Cologne during a 
3-1 UEFA Cup victory over Hammarby IF. 


through F. The draw to place the 1 8 teams in 
their groups will be held at noon Sunday in 
Mexico Gty and televised around the world. 

But because there are 14 European teams 
in the tournament and only four South 
American (he r emaining teams have 
been pm into three blocks for the draw. 

In the first block, made up of Argentina, 
Paraguay, Uruguay, England , Spain and the 
Soviet Union, the first non-South American 
team to he drawn will be assigned to BraziL 

Belgium, Bulgaria, Hungary, Portugal, 
Northern Ireland and Scotland are in the 
second block, and Algeria, Morocco, Iraq, 
South Korea, CanstAa and Denmark the 
third. 


Group A is beaded by Italy, group B by 
Mexico, group C by France, group D by 
Brazil, group Eby West Germany and group 
F by Poland. (AP. VP I) 

■ Fans Riot as AC Milan Is Upset 

AC Milan fans, angered by a controversial 
penalty that was decisive in their highly fa- 
vored team’s elimination from the UEFA 
Cup. pelted match officials and their own 
dub’s president with stones, empty bottles, 
coins and fruit Wednesday night. United 
Press International reported from Milan. 

The Belgian team Waregem won, 2-1, to 
gain the quarterfinals on a 3-2 aggregate. 

The penalty was called on Milan full-back 
Filippo Galli by the referee Voj tech Quistov 
of Czechoslovakia in the 43d minute. As the 
first missiles rained down, Waregem’s Des- 
met tied the score at 1-1 with his penalty 
kick. 

As the referee and two linesmen left the 
field, all three were hit by objects and one 
linesman was cut on his forehead. 

In the dosing minutes of the match the 
fans directed their main attacks against the 
Milan dub president, Giuseppe Farina, and 
police had to restrain several fans who 
climbed over barriers to try to get to Farina's 
seat. Some 500 spectators threw stones at 
Farina as he left the stadium and police had 
to make a baton charge to drive them into a 
nearby parking lot. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Santa Becomes an Odds-On Favorite 

HOLLYWOOD, Florida (AF) — Some children calling Santa Oaus 
for the latest on activities at the North Pole instead got the latest tenting 
line on the Pacers-Knicks game in the NBA. 

Amixnp switched a Dial Santa line to a sports betting service featuring 
pro basketball point spreads. That lasted about three hoars Tuesday until 
a parent called from Columbia, South Carolina, to complain. 

“We use a computer device that stores various programs,” said Dave 
Ryder, the president of Dialup Inc. “Somebody pushed the wrong button 
and you got betting information instead of ho, ho bo.” 

The service advertises in 10 Southern states and Ryder did not know 
how many calls were received Tuesday afternoon. But on Wednesday the 
only nrixop Santa was reporting was that “Hfie" had accidentally been 
loaderfinto his sleigh with the toys. 

Argentine Grand Prix Race Canceled 

BUENOS AIRES (AP) —The Argentine Grand Prix, scheduled for 
March 9 as a replacement for the Formula One auto race in South Africa, 


It Pays to Be Sharp in Buying a Knife 


Cesar Harman, president of the Argentine Automobile Club, said the 
track would have needed a complete reparing, as wdl as repairs to thepits 
and other costly improvements. Airoitma held a Formula One race 
annually until 1981, when it dropped omfar lack of money. 


For the Record 


weight boring diampkroship in London by drawing with British chal- 
lenger Dennis Andries. (AP) 

Borifag Green University's football coach, Denny Stolz, in Fresno 
preparing his team for the California Bond, decided to stay on the coast as 
the new coach at San Diego State. (AP) 

Mike Gottfried, who has coached the University of Kansas for three 
seasons, was hh^ as footliaUccach at the Unjversity of Htisburgh. (AP) 


Quotable 


• New Mexico University’s basketball coach, Gary Colson, on losing 
to Georgetown: ‘‘And there I am with an 18-year-oM kid ru nnin g around 
with my paycheck in his mouth making bad dedskms.” (AP) 


By Angus Phillips 

Washington Pat Serrice 

WASHINGTON — Knives are 
a hot item these days, what with 
Rambo running amok on the stiver 
screen. So it stands to reason that 
many will find their way into 
Christmas packages. But if yon are 
going to give somebody a knife, do 
not make h a survival knife These 
things are a fad, and just about 
useless. 

“1 gness they’re good if you want 
to chop down a tree, but I don’t see 
much use for them otherwise," said 
Marv Walls, who is selling his share 
of survival knives at Angler’s 
Sporting Goods in Annapolis, 
Maiyiand. 

“Any knife with a blade over 
about four inches [10 centimeters] 
long is, in my opinion, pointless,” 
agreed John Sehdin of Scftelin 
Guns in College Park, Maryland. 
“With a ax-inch blade, you use the 
last three inches, and lhe first three 
sit there. It’s that much more to 
sharpen." 

So, after cross-checkup sane 
concepts and prejudices with sudt 
folks as Sehdin and Walls, who 
know a lot, let me pass on a few 
ideas about inexpensive knives that 
might truth; nice gifts. 

• The best pocket knife is a 
Swiss Army knife. 

There are a few products around 
damring to he Swiss Army knives. 
The one to get has the following 
inscription at the base of the big 
blade: “Victorinox-Switzexiand'- 


Stainless-Rostfrei" on ate side and 
“Offider Suisse" on the other. 

Of the many models, the best I 
have found is the Spartan, small 
enough to cany easily in the pocket 
but with the best features of its 
more cumbersome kin. The Spar- 
tan has two cutting blades, one 2li 
indies long and the other IK inches 
long, an excellent can opener, a 
bottle opener, two screwdrivers, a 
wire stopper, a corkscrew and a 
leather punch. 

These knives are beautifully 
made and are more useful than 
money. The steel is moderately 
hard and takes a keen edge with 
modest wotk on the stone. 

• The best fish knife is a Rapala. 

No fisteaman should be without 
one of these stainless-steel filet 
knives with blond wood handles 
and leather scabbards. 

The beauty of a Rapala is the 
ease with which it sharpens. If it 
was dull after cleaning 30 or 40 
fish, hit it a few licks on a Slone or 
steel, and it is razor sharp again, 
nris is a mystoy, since most knives 
made of steel hard enough to bold 
an edge are lough to sharpen. Ra- 
palas TJtlra and hold an edge. 

They are beautiful, wefl-made 
knives. Each blade hears the signa- 
ture of the manufacturer, “F. Mart- 

tini, Finland." 

A wonderful big-fish filet Vn-f ’ 
a Swibo, a 9Vt-inch, Swiss-made 
knife usually available only at res- 
taurant-supply houses. 


• The best hunting knife is a 
Buck. 

There would be a dispute on this. 
Some favor a Schrade, others like a 
Kershaw or Gerber. All are good, 
but when you run with hunters, you 
see mostly Bucks and rarely hear a 
discouraging word. 

When deer burning, I cany a 
nonfolding Buck with a 4 I A-inch 
blade in a leather belt sheath. This 
knife is so strong you can cut bolls 
by banging on the blade with a 
hammer. 

If there is a complaint about 
Bucks, it is that they are so hard 
that they are difficult to sharpen. 
Sehdin said Buck recently softened 
its Steel slightly, which may help. 

One reason people have trouble 
putting an edge on a Buck, Walls 
said, is that they use too shallow an 
angle when drawing it across the 
stone. A Buck edge is beveled at 
about 20 degrees, be said, so that, 
to sharpen it, the knife must be 
raised a bit more toward the verti- 
cal than one might normally. 

Any outdooranan who does not 
already have one would appreciate 
a lock-back, wood-handled pocket 
knife with a 3- or 4-inch blade. 
Buck. Kershaw, Gerber and Case 
all makegood ones. 

Finally, I am convinced that 
what is needed is an urban survival 
knife just sharp enough to cut 
French bread and spread Brie. In 
the handle, for emergencies, would 
be a Valium and bus money for 
when the car breaks down. 




I9^« 




Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1985 


OBSERVER 


PEOPLE 


That’s Entertainment? Hugh Nissenson: An Intellectual on the Frontier 


By Russell Baker were pathetically uaderenier- 

EW YORK — It gets harder tohwaL There ^ about us in 


By Paula Spaa 

Wajhfngm Pw Service 


N EW YORK — Hugh Nissenson can 
eo for six. mavbe seven sentences 


meat ovedoad- At our house, for 
instance, you get a minimum of 
Four entertain menu in the sboit 
journey from the front door to die 
kitchen. 

As you enter, you bear the pierc- 
ing sound of television in the room 
to the right, where, if it is nridmoni- 
ing, a group of astonishingly frank 
neurotics is usually trying to enter- 
tain with embarrassing disclosures 
about the mechanical aspects of 
their love lives. 

If able to resist this and take the 
few steps necessary to get into the 
room to the left, you will bear 
snatches of Beethoven or one of his 
fellow lough airs issuing from the 
radio. A few steps more take you 
into the dining room, where you 
will find a newspaper open to the 
comic strips. 

Pause to enjoy them and you will 
hear the Beethoven on the radio to 
your left and, on your right, the 
music of Bruce Springsteen issuing 
from a radio in the kitchen. If the 
TV is turned up just a mile too 
loud, it is entirely possible to find 
yourself staring at “Andy Capp" 
while struggling to ignore both the 
Moonlight Sonata and “Bom in the 
U. S. A.” so that you can bear a 
sidesplitting anecdote about sex- 
change surgery. 

□ 

The entertainment used to be en- 
livened by the spectacle of Daddy, 
purple in the face, screaming for 
somebody to turn down the enter- 
tainment so he could think. You 
won't see that anymore. Daddy 
went lo a specialist, who set him 
straight. Afterward, Daddy told us 
about iL 

“As I understand it,” be said, 
“time is divided between then and 
now. Now is good; then is old hat. 
Thinking is then; that is, pass£, 
outmoded, over the hill. Entertain- 
ment is now; which is to say, hot, 
with it, in, dandy, double-peachy 
and the only way to go for people 
who know where it's at” 

I know it sounds as if Daddy’s 
mind had gone off the scope, but it 
hadn't. He was just trying lo talk 
the way the ordinary thoroughly 
entertained American talks. 

For example, a consulting firm 
came to the house and aid that, 
contrary to Daddy’s complaint 
about entertainment overload, we 


To show we could fit right in like 
everybody else, we bought a video- 
cassette player to record TV shows 
we missed while out buying radio- 
cassette tape lo tape radio shows 
we missed while out buying pop- 
corn to eat while we watched video 
cassettes of the TV shows we had 
missed white out buying — Well, 
you get the idea. 

Anyhow, that's when we noticed 
that Daddy never appeared for 
meals anymore. One morning 
about 3 everybody saw him; next 
morning he didn’t show up for 
breakfast Grandmother said he 
was probably just exhausted In- 
deed, he hadn’t stayed up with the 
rest of us until 6 A.M. to watch the 
videotapes of “Bowling for Dol- 
lars” plus the two MacNefl-Lehrer 
News Hour tapes from the summer 
of 1984. We had fallen so far be- 
hind on the MacNefl-Lehrer News 
Hour that we had to watch two per 
night if we were ever to have a hope 
of catching up. 

Because we'd had to watch the 
VCR movie of “Amadeus” earlier 
in the evening and then get through 
10 back issues of People magazine 
and a dozen back issues of The 
New York Times Sunday Arts and 
Leisure section, we had to stay up 
until 6 A. M. to get in the “Bowling 
for Dollars” and MacNeal-Lehrer 
cassettes. 


iNgo for six, maybe seven saliences 
without nsmg one of the profanities that 
season one’s conversation if one grew up 
cm the pre-gen trifled West Side. He cannot, 
however, utter more than three sentences 
without quoting or invoking Keats, Proust, 
Kafka, Joyce, Malnmx. 

By his speech —intense and quick and 
opinionated — and by the sports Jacket 
with suede elbows, the West Side apart- 
ment full of sunshine and art, the sheepdog 
at the feet and other credentials, Nissenson 
seems a prime specimen of the New York 
intellectual sobgenus novelist. It takes 
considerable effort to imngjna him me- 
thodically learning how to hurl a toma- 
hawk, hunt with a flintlock rifle, trudge 
through the underbrush in fringed buck- 
skins. Thai one either opens the door to 
Nissenson’s study, where pelts, snowshoes 
and old muskets engulf the word proces- 
sor, or one reads the resulting novel “The 
Tree of Life.” 

It took Nissenson sewn years to re- 
search and write this diary of an inverted 
frontiersman, already in its s ffynd printing 
and being received by critics with some- 


thing like awe. 
when he bea 


It was six weeks later before we 
got our next break in the entertain- 
ment Mama took the opportunity 
to ask if any of ns had seen Daddy. 

A few months later I beard Dad- 
dy had turned up on a PhD Dona- 
hue show whose subject was enter- 
tainment ovedoad. Apparently he 
was in the care of an entertainment 
specialist who had trained him to 
watch Shirley Temple movies on a 
TV set while wearing headphones 
wired to play Wagnerian opera in 
one ear and Rolling Stones records 
in the other while simultaneously 
telephoning a radio call-in show to 
aigue for putting more people in 
jad 

We have all the Phil Donahue 
shows on tape, so if that's where 
Daddy really wound up well see 
him sooner or later. 


When he began work on “The Tree of 
Life," Nissenson said, “I had come to the 
end of a period, my mid-20 to 40$, which 
explored what it was to be a Jew in the 20th 
century." He was die author of four books, 
respectfully reviewed and rarely pur- 
chased, about the shadow of the Holo- 
caust, the immigrant experience, the state 
of Israd, “death and rebirth, a drama that 
obsessed me.” 

It was time, he decided to address an- 
other lingering obsession: John Chapman, 
who as Johnny Appteseed has “been pre- 
sented as a Walt Disney character” but was 
actually a religious mystic sowing Sweden- 
borgian tracts along with his seeds. “1 was 
in a sense conflicted, and also scared con- 
fronted by the richness and power of the 
American tradition,” be said of his abrupt 
change in subject matter, pausing to men- 
tion Melville, Poe and Twain. 

Besides, he continued with animation, 
“you get bored. You want to tiy something 
new. Why do the same [expletive] thing 
when by an effort of the imagination per- 
haps you can tty something different?” 

There followed a consideration, enliv- 
ened. by references to Conrad and Flau- 
bert, of whether there was “an innate drive 
in the artist which is reflective of evolution 
— an unconscious urge to m«l»> up some- 



Author Nissenson anrid Us frontier artifacts. 


thing new for its own sake, for the joy, the 
fun of iL A creative person gets bored very 


New York Tima Service 


in Mansfield, Ohio, during 


ileseed was 
ic War of 


1812, Nissenson began three years off re- 
search. “I knew nothing about American 
pioneer life. I went out to Mansfidd I don't 
know how many times, in all weather. 1 
teamed how to fire all the weapons, I went 
on a deer hunt To make you fed you were 
experiencing iL I had to experience iL” 

Every U. S. high school English student 
hears how Stephen Crane wrote “The Red 
Badge of Courage” without serving in the 
Gvil War. Nissenson’s said his “effort of 
imagination was much greater. He gestured 
toward West End Avenue, 20 stories be- 
low. “I mean, [expletive], look where I 
live.” 

He turned his study into what looks like 
a small-town nrnswini- its shelves are full 
of history books, but written history. Nis- 
senson said, was not enough. He amassed a 
collection of reproduction weapons: an 
American long rifle, “simple and deafly”; 
the Harper’s Ferry rifle his diarist carried; 
a blunderbuss. Wire hangers hold a Hud- 
son Bay coat and deerskin garments. Nis- 
senson asked an Ohio taxidermist for a 
specimen of the land of rattlesnake drat 
lolled one of the novel's characters; the 
result sits coded atop a file cabineL Stuffed 


raccoons and horned owls, snowshoes and 
baskets, an Indian scalping wand and sev- 
eral scalps (wigs, actually) line the small 
room. Nissenson also obtained a human 
skull from an anatomical supply house. 


“I used to come in here at night and light 
a candle,” he said, eyeing the skull, “and in 
the flickering light think and feel This is a 
human being. My God! Like myself.’ And 
I'd be filled with the ehili of death.” 


“The Tree of Life,” though 'leavened by 
humor and romance, evokes that drill, a 
time when Mansfield had 26 citizens and 
death could come by rattler, Delaware war- 
rior, cholera, the bloody flux or childbirth. 
After initial skepticism about “some New 
York Jewish guy obsessed by the histbry of 
Ohio,” Nissenson reported, Mansfldd’ s 
latter-day residents are “thrilled” by die 
book and have invited him to address the 
Ohio Historical Society. But -he is even 
prouder (citing Woolf, Mann, Pasternak et 
al) of having incorporated his paintings, 
drawings and poetry (ostensibly by his • 
journal-keeping protagonist) into his art- 
fully minimaKgt book. 

“The whole tiring is an attempt to push 


the novel into poetry,” he said. The classic 
narrative, whose death he has pronounced- 
“will still exist as middlebrow fiction, but 
for serious novels? Can I write better than 
Tolstoy? Dostoevsky? Jane Austen? Dick- 
ens? It's been done!” 

Watching his era temporaries publish 
nonetheless, while he painstakingly crafted 
stories for The New Yorker, Commentary 
and Esquire, “I thought Td be a short-story 
writer all my life. This juvenalia, these 
endless, animistic novels of self-discovery, 
were just boring. Another Philip Roth nov- 
el and I'd cut my throat” 

He calmed long enough to say that actu- 
ally be thought “Portnoy’s Complaint” was 
brilliant It’s the repetitiveness of the form 
that he disdains. “ ‘Novel' means some- 
thing new,” he insis ted. “If a novelist for- 
gets that he's in the wrong business.” 

Nissenson believes that with “The Tree 
of Life” he took “perhaps the greatest risk 
of any writer of my generation,” and he is 
basking in the exhilaration of having 
pulled it off. His next book, to be called 
“The Song of the Earth," will “go even 
further into the juxtaposition of written 
arid drawn images-” 

An anecdote: Faulkner once said he had 
taken more risks than Hemingway. “Well, 
goddamn,” Nissenson concluded, “I took 

more risks than W illiam F aulkn er." 

It was a risk shared, he readily acknowl- 
edged, by his wife, Marilyn, a television 
producer whose earnings allowed him to 
write just five bodes in 25 yean. “It’s a 
shamef ul thing for a man to say at 52, 1 
suppose, that he’s never been able to sup- 
port his family.” 

“It’s never been an issue between us,” he 
said. A love poem be wrote his wife on his 
40th birthday found its way, modified, into 
“The Tree of Life." 

Nissenson said he owed his feminism to 
the “profound education” of living in “a 
house full of women,” including daughters 
Kate, 15, and Kore, 9. He likes to quote 
Joyce on the virtues of being “a womanly 

man. " 

Marilyn Nissenson figured in a dream he 
had recently, a few days before the Ameri- 


Paris Fashion Museum 
Opens Balmain Exhibit 


opened a tribute to Ptarre Bataan 
a 40*year retrospective ofhis 
creations. The exhibition, through 
April at the Galliera Museum of 
fashion, shows about 100 designs - 
by Balmain, who died m 1 982 at the 
age of 68. The show covers 1945 to 
1985; the most recent designs are 
by Balmain's successor, Erik Mar. 
lessen. . - - As usual the clothes 
worn by the guests at Diana Vi**, 
land’s annual gala edebrating the 
latest exhibit at the Metropolian 
Museum of An’s Costume Institute 
in New York rivaled those that 
made up the exhibit — this year 
devoted to “Royal India.” Guests/' ■ 
included Henry Kfarin ge s. who* : 'i 
wife, Nancy, wore Valentino, asdkl 
Ann Getty, wife of the oQ heir Gor- 
don Getty. Also attending were the " 
designers Bill Bfatss, Oscar -de U 
Renta, Louis ddFOlio (of the Anae 
Klein labd) and Pieany.E3h.Mhc 
exhibition is the 14th organized by 
V reeland as spatial consultant to 
the Costume Institute.. V 


I 


A gold chain reputed to have 
been cursed by Marie Antoinette 
when it was tom from her neck on 
her way to the guillotine has been 
left to the British Museum, accord- 
ing to a will published Thursday ia 
London. The bequest of Aw ft 
teas said the Austrian-bom queen 4 
was given the chain as. a wedding ■ ; * 
present It had been blessed by a " 
priest and was supposed to bring 
luck to its owners “who do right.” 
When it was taken from her in 1793 > 


the queen reputedly laid a curse 
upon it “and it will accordmelv 


can Bode Awards ceremony, he said. “The 
Tree erf Life” was one of three nominated 


Tree of Life” was one of three nominated 
novels (Don DeLDlo’s “White Noise” 
won). In his dream, Nissenson and his wife 
were seated at a round table. They heard 
the master of ceremonies announce that 
this year, both the fiction and nonfiction 
categories had been swept by a single work, 
“I Was Hitler’s Tennis Coach." 

“I looked at Marilyn and we both started 
laughing,” N issens on recalled, shaking his 
head. He regrets that his laughter awak- 
ened him before he could leaf through the 
volume and see photos of the Fflhrer in his 
tennis whites. He does not seem to regret 
modi else. 


upon iL “and it mil accordingly 
bring bad luck to those who do 
evil” the bequest said It was not 
known how the chain came into 
Piteau’s possession. 

O : - 

Girard de Viiliers, one of 
France's most widely read writers 
of espionage and adventure novels, 
has been sentenced to sixmonihs in 
prison on charges of tax fraud. Vp- 
liers was convicted of “systematic, 
fraudulent avoidance of income 
tax” for the past 15 years; largfy 
by creating fictitious pubCshmgfc 
bouses. 

□ 


Jessica Tandy collapsed on stage 
during a performance of “Foxfire” 
in Los Angeles and was hospital- 
ized, but doctors said the 76-ytar- 
old actress was in good condition 
and in no danger. 


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PARIS, SATURDAY-SUNPAY, DECEMBER 14-15, 1985 


in U.S. Abduction 


Sernas 


^\>§VASH^GT0N —Tptte&ikk- 




By Steven V. Roberts 

New York Times Service 




President 


Ronald Reagan 
a balanced U.S. 



ti^ ay from the legislative branch, 
• zi j^Kntfing.tolaronakezs from both 

'-“i iCT : Thomas P. O’NdD Jr., the speak- 
^ of the House, voiced .a common 
~ -w when he said “there is no 
.7 ^.estioa tbai Congress has given 
•"* 4 7',' ' ^ power in the legislation. 

. ' t-Even before the president agned 
i V~- fobs bill Thursday, efforts were un- 
--"i-i it'r way to limi i that shift of power. 

• \\ : ' s ^To some, the issue is a legal one, 

. d Rqnasentative Mike Synar, 

;■ * - Ay. ~ l anocra t of Oklahoma, filed a suit 
: ; 'f' U.S. District Caun here Thors' 

• l - Li: -~y challeng in g the oomti tnlioMl - 

^ of the measure. 

’■ '* '-frj-vln signing the bill, Mr. Reagan 
'■ 1 ~ «.;d be was “mindful of the serioos 

■-■a isti rational questions” raised try 

'cii.’i l^islation. and he expressed 
lid v. Is hope that those questions could 
‘ “promptly resolved” by the 

“ Ij; t- . JTtS. 

r -^CTo other lawmakers, the real is- 
H : is not legal bot legislative. Urey 
... . ‘ qicd that the new budget process 

^ %/e die president enhanced lever' 
! **5 in the battle between Congress 

• J i- -ssijj ^ white House over how to 
••"■^■ae the yawning budget defiat. 
-As a result, they said, the legista- 
v ^-'s have abdicated their response 
-.7**9 to make “hard choices” and 
" : ?*■ i' priorities for the government. 

- Wj The drafters of the COdstitu- 
. n,” Mr. Synar mam tamed, “be- 
- /ed Congress should make these 
wj Lah : _-d chorees because Congress is 
•• '" r ' “c;: branch of government doses! 
-the people.” 

-Mr. CTNdD called the measure 

• - > fake and a fraud,” and saicL“it , s 

t going to work.” By next year. 
Congress would be so upset 
^h its own handiwork that it 
B£>li.uld try to change the procedure 
TO fifr soften hs impact. 

77*Nexi year,” said Representative 
'.BiiiEnjam H. Gray 3d, Democrat of 
B in nsyl vania, who heads the 
_Juse Budget Committee, “people 




Mike Synar 


ON PAGE 3 

■ The Reagan administration 
and House Republicans offered 
a proposal to encourage consid- 
eration of the tax reform ML 

■ Congress, stalled on a bud- 
get, adopted an emergency 
spmding bin. 


are going to say, “Ob my God, is 
that what we did 7 ” 

Sponsors of the bill have a differ- 
ent view. Representative Connie 
Mack 3d, Republican of Florida, 
said the measure redefined the 
power of Congress but did not cede 

basic responsibilities to the execu- 
tive branch. 

“The power is still within our 
hands, as I see it,” Mr. Mack said. 

What Congress created was a 
system to deal with budget deficits 
that are soaring past $200 billion in 
the current fiscal year. 

Under this system, that deficit 
would be reduced in annual steps 
over the next five years, and would 
reach zero by 1991. If in any given 
year Congress failed to pass Legfekt- 
(Cootinued on Page 3, CoL 1) 



,o»c> 


in Beirut Reported Dead 


reports 

^'r^Uanified intelligence : 

V State Department spokesnu 
Redman, said Friday: “ 
- i 1 ** 1 - . e said many times, we open 


The Associated Press 

.__njyASHINGTON — U.S. intelH- 
officials believe that two of 
_ /^-Americans kidnapped in Leba- 
•- have died in captivity, two U.S. 
t^-^spapex columnists reported, 
'^^vne columnists. Jack Anderson 
. Dale Van Alia, said Thursday 
_ f . the Central Intafligpnce Ag en- 
. p^nad determined that one, WD- 
i Buddey, died last firing in 
'i of a heart attack after torture 
r^Pvforiem extremists. 

-- 4 ‘-^ihey said that the CIA believed 
: Mr. Buckley, 57, a U.S. diplo- 
had died in ApriL On Oct 4, 
.o-vi*. 5 - Shiite Moslem Idamic Jihad 
.‘j- it had killed Mr. Buckley in 
..__>aige far the Oct 1 Israeli air 
jaH p ; on Palestine Libera ikm Orga- 
' l;. : /hon headquarters in Tunisia. 

’ a report Friday, the cohnn- 
,:v- vr? •* said that another hostage, Pe- 
. *1 Cflburn, had also died in captiv- 
Both reports quoted 
i sources. 

nftn, 

“As 

many times, we operate 
. he assumption that all six hos- 
are alive.” 

columnists said that Mr. 

_ ^urn, a librarian at the Ameri- 
University of Beirut who was 
Dec. 3, 19S4, had died 
'■Mart attack. Officials had con- 
that his death was not -the 
? ■ t of torture or abuse, they said. 

' jr. Buckley was listed as a polit- 
at the U.S. Embassy in 
but the columnists said that 
r ^'as actually the CIA station 
h ,: v and had collected infonna- 
on terrorism before militant 
-■?: Modems kidnapped him cm 
>t s-^h 16, 19S4. 

e columnists said that Mr. 
ley was taken to the Syrian- 
> Bekaa VaDcy in eastern 
.non, where Iranian Revolu- 
’ Guards are stationed. 

.{(Id by the radical Hezballah, 
CL^rty of God, Mr. Bodclty was 
and, at <me point, taken to 
of Baalbek and icterro- 
by Iranian Revolutionary 
J ]!» is, they said. 

.1’* 1 cohmmists ■grid that the 
v iQah transported Mr. Buckley 
in March because iijty 
■j-1 he ought be released bySyn- 
'■Ahmjtks. 


Tortured and inteopgated in the 
Iranian Foreign Ministry, Mr. 
Buddey required frequent medical 
treatment and was hospitalized at 
least once, the columnists said. 

He suffered a heart attack in 
mid-April and died that month in a 
Tehran hospital they added. 

' Neither Mr. Kilburn nor Mr. 
Buckley was seen by Benjamin 
Weir, a Presbyterian minister who 
was released Sept. 14 after 16 
months of captivity and who re- 
ported seeing all the four other U-S. 
kidnap victims in Lebanon. 


Cuban Diplomats 
Held, j Target Scad 
To Be a Defector 

By Edward Schumacher 

New York Timet Serrice 

MADRID — Four employees of 
the Cuban Embassy in Madrid 

tried Friday to kidnap an exiled 

former Cuban official but were 
foiled when abom. 30 bystanders 
intervened, thopoBoe said. 

The four, including an embassy 
vice consul waving a pistol, were 
arrested an the scene after the by- 
standers and a passing taxi blocked 
the kidnappers' car and helped the 
Cuban escape; the police said. 

The police identified the former 
official as Manuel Antonio S&n- 
chez F6rez and said he was listed as 
a senior economic official in the 
government of Fidel Castro. Interi- 
or Ministry officials he 
for political asylum 10 days before 
during a stopover en route to East 
Beilin and it was provisionally 
granted. 

His exact position in the Castro 
gove rnment, however, remained 
unclear. Western intelligence 
sources said die kidnap attempt in- 
dicated that Mr. Sinchez Pfcrez, SO, 
was more than a technocrat- Nor- 
mally weO-infonned sources in the 
Cuban ' exile community said he 
was involved in political infighting 
inride the Castro government and 
may have had deKcate mtriTigwMy 
mfnnratirn 

Foreign Ministry officials said 
that the attempted kidnapping hag 
riled the Spanish government of 
Prime Munster Felipe GouzSlez, 
which until now had urmfntaTnwT 
cordial relations vrith Cuba. 

[The Associated Press reported 
that Spain intended to expel the 

Ciihatt Rmhagg y offidfll!; 

{The Interior Ministry, with the 
approval of the Foreign Ministry, 
had soughl court permission to ex- 
pel the arrested Oibans, a spokes- 
iTkJin said.} ’ ■ 

The. Cuban ambassador, to 
. _ Spaing Oscar Garda Ferrifadetf 
was. summoaed to tfee Porejgn 
Ministry moments after Fordgri- 
Minister Francisco FemAndezQr- 
ddflez remised from Biussds. •’ 
The police identified the four 
foiled kidnappers as Vice Consul 
Angd Alberto Le6n Cervantes, 
Abdardo Ldpez Henrindez and 
Ramdn Burroto Cfaivez, both em- 
bassy clerks, and Ventura Ventura 
Torrientes, sun embassy school 
teacher. 

They said that Mr. SAnchez P6- 
rez had emerged at 10:40 A-M. 
from a bank when he was assault- 
ed. 

Ms screams of ‘They’re killing 
me, they're killing roe” alerted 
bank attendants. A crowd gath- 
ered, hampering the assailants 
while Mr. SAnchez PArez ran back 
into the bank. 



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Remains of US. solders and air crew lying in a makeshift morgue in a 


at Gander, Newfoundland. 


Ho\v to Make a Merger in Just 34 Days 


Soviet Aide’s Visit Nudges 
Moscow, Beijing Qoser 


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INSIDE 


9 C ‘din America’s provioces re- 
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FS/IZISURE 

Museum of 
Art has been 
an Eartinrorfc: two giant 
'•■ l '^chcs in Nevada. P^e 6- 

.^■ilNESS/ FINANCE 
^ 5, wholesale prices rose 0,8 
; *- eat ia November, die gov- 
" lent reported. Page 9. 



By Daniel Southerland 

Washington Post Service 

BEUING — The Soviet deputy 
foreign minister, Mikhail S. Ka- 
pitsa. left here Friday after haring 
helped better Chinese-Soviet rela- 
tions, according to diplomats. 

Mr. Kapitsa's eight-day visit im- 
proved the atmosphere in relations 
and resulted in agreement on ap- 
proximate dates for an exchange of 
visits of foreign ministers, an East 
European diplomat said. An ex- 
change had been agreed upon in 
principle more than two months 
ago. 

The Chinese foreign minister, 
Wu Xuequm, is to visit Moscow 
next May or June, the diplomat 
said, while Mr. Wu's counterpart, 
Eduard A. Shevardnadze, is to 
come to Beijing in the fall for the 
first visit by a Soviet foreign minis- 
ter to the Chinese capital in more 
than two decades. Soviet-Chinese 
relations deteriorated in the 1960s 
over a range of ideological issues. 

While trade, cultural and diplo- 
matic exchanges between the two 
nations have been increasing. Mr. 
Wu said in an interview with the 
Qunese news agency Xinhua earli- 
er this week that no progress had 
been made toward removing what 
China calls the three main obsta- 
cles to “n ormalizat ion" of rela- 
tions. 

These indude the stationing of 
Soviet troops along common bor- 
ders and in Outer Mongolia, the 
Soviet presence in Afghanistan and 
Soviet support for Vietnam's occu- 
pation of Cambodia. 

But Western diplomats argue 
that Mr. Kapitsa's visit and the 
agreement to exchange foreign 
ministers are signs that. Qunese 
rhetoric notwithstanding, a kind of 
nonnahzatiou is mkrog place. 

At the same rime, China is 
strengthening its ties with the rest 
of Pastern Europe. Vice Prime 
Minister li Peng is visiting Czecho- 
slovakia and Bulgaria from Dec. 13 



By Geraldine Fabrikanr 

• New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — It tookjnst 34 
days for General Electric Co. and 
RCA Caro, to forge their mahi- 
biDian-douar merger. 

Negotiations began late on the 
pleasant fall afternoon of Friday, 
Nov. 8, with a cocktail meeting at 
the apartment of Felix Rohatyn. 

Mr. Rohatyn, a partner with 
RCA’s investment banking firm, 
Lazard Frtres & Gx, had been 
asked by the chairman of GE, John 
F. Welch Jr, to introduce him to 
the chairman of RCA, Thornton F. 
Bradshaw. 

That introduction was to lead to 
the agreement announced late 
Wednesday night. With their 
boards’ approval, the two compa- 
nies disclosed the biggest nonoil 
merger in U.S. history. 

GE. the electronics and defense 
company, will pay S6J8 bittum for 
RCA, owner of the NBC broadcast 
network and a leader itself in de- 
feat and consumer electronics. 

• The agreement would pay 366^0 
a share for the company's 94.4 mil- 
lion shares outstanding. 

The news followed six days of 
frantic, frequently round-the-clock 
discussions, at GFs law firm. 
Fried, Frank, Harris, Shrivel & Ja- 
cobson. in the Wall Street area; at 
GF?s headquarters in Fairfield. 
Connecticut; and at GFs Waldorf 
Towers apartment, where Mr. 
Welch and Mr. Bradshaw met sev- 
eral tunes .. 


All weekend can ferried docu- 
ments from Fried. Frank’s offices 
to GFs Connecticut headquarters 
as lawyers and executives struggled 
to structure the agreement. Bylaie 
Tuesday night, the differences had 
been narrowed to a handful and the 
lawyers for both rides worked until 


in 1981. has consistently said he 
wants to increase GFs investments 
in the fast-growing services and 
technology segment of the econo- 
my and decrease its exposure to 
more industrial businesses. 

Thursday, his jubilation was evi- 
dent. His eyes were bright and be 


Despite the mood of mutual satisfaction, 
sources close to the negotiations said there 
had been some differences as the agreement 
was being structured. 


6 Wednesday morning to move 
the negotiations to their final phase 
and complete the papers. 

The intention was to keep the 
talks secret. But by TUesday the 
word was out that something was 
up at RCA. On Wednesday, Wall 
Street went wild. RCA’s stock rose 
$10,375 points, to reach $63.50 by 
the dose of trading. Volume in 
RCA totaled a remarkable 5.1 mil- 
lion shares. Late that night, after 
both boards met, .a formal release 
verified what had been rumored 
that day. 

For Mr. Welch, the merger 
moves GE closer to the structure he 
has envisioned and has frequently 
described to Wall Street bankers 
and analysts. 

The tough, aggressive 50-year- 
old chairman, who took over at GE 


occasionally stumbled over words 
as he talked enthusiastically about 
the merg er during a jammed press 
conference at GE’s offices in Man- 
hattan. 

“It’s great for the companies and 
for the United Stales,” he said. 

For RCA, the pending merger 
accomplishes a number of the aiwt 
set forth by Mr. Bradshaw since he 
became chairman there, also in 
1981. 

“It gives us enormous amounts 
of capital, effort and talent,” Mr. 
Bradshaw said Thursday. “It gives 
us the financial capacity to do what 
we have to do.” 

The agreement also protects 
RCA against the bitter takeover 
battles that have recently tom 
apart a host of American compa- 
nies. 


Dedaring that “we are safe as a 
hedgehog,” Mr. Bradshaw rgected 
the notion that takeover fears were 
a motivating factor. 

Like most executives, however, 
he is keenly aware of the forced 
restructuring that look place at 
CBS as a result of Ted Turner’s bid 
for that network. And be did say. 
“We did not want to see the compa- 
ny broken up wiDy-nilly.” 

A financial expert who has fol- 
lowed RCA for years believes that 
“Bradshaw has always been con- 
vinced that RCA cither had to buy 
or sell — but that it had to merge 

Indeed, Mr. Bradshaw had 
sought earlier in the year to foige a 
merger with MCA Ino. until the 
Los Angeles-based entertainment 
company unexpectedly pulled out 
of talks in September. Immediately 
thereafter, RCA instituted a provi- 
sion to protea itself against an un- 
friendly bidder. 

Despite the mood of mutual sat- 
isfaction among the corporations’ 
representatives at the news confer- 
ence, sources dose to the negotia- 
tions said there had been some dif- 
ferences as the agreement was 
bang structured. 

There was confusion initially 
over whether the transaction would 
be all cash, or cash and stock 

GE also wanted a guarantee that 
it could buy two of RCA’s particu- 
larly desirable television stations to 
discourage other bidders from set- 

(Continued on Page 11, CoL 5) 


ESTABLISHED 188 7 

Air Crash 
Clues Are 
Examined 

Aides Refuse 
Speculation on 
Sabotage, Ice 

By Jane Amf 

Reuters 

GANDER, Newfoundland — 
Officials searching for dues Friday 
in the crash of a DC-8 airliner here 
refused to speculate on whether the 
plane should have undergone ice 
removal procedures during its stop- 
over or whether the accident might 
have been caused by sabotage. 

Eveiyone aboard' the (light was 
killed in the crash Thursday, which 
occurred as the plane, carrying U -S. 
soldiers home from peacekeeping 
duty in the Middle East, took off 
after refueling at Gander Interna- 
tional Airport. 

The reported death toll in the 
crash dropped to 256 from 258 as 
Pentagon officials said Friday that 
248 soldiers had been on board the 
chartered plane. The crew of eight 
also perished. 

It was the eighth worst crash in 
aviation history and the U.S. mili- 
tary's worst air disaster 

Canadian officials said the pilot 
of the airliner, which was owned by 
the Arrow Air charter company of 
Miami, did not request routine de- 
icing of the plane before taking off 
in freezing weather. 

Canadian and U.S. authorities 
said Thursday that there was no 
evidence that “hostile action” had 
been involved in the crash. 

However, officials of the Canadi- 
an Aviation Safety Board said later 
that the board was investigating all 
possibilities, including sabotage. 

“Nothing has been ruled out — 
we are investigating every angle at 
this point,” said Christianne Beau- 
lieu, a spokeswoman for the board. 

Earlier, an anonymous caller to 
an international news agency in 
Beirut slated that the crash had 
been caused by a bomb set by the 
Islamic Jihad group, a Shiite Mos- 
lem extremist organization that has 
claimed responsibility for numer- 
ous guerrilla attacks. 

The caller asserted that the 
group had planted a bomb in the 
plane to prove “our ability to strike 
at the Americans anywhere." 

Pentagon officials dismissed the 
claim. 

More than 50 Canadian and U.S. 
airline safety experts continued to 
comb the chaired wreckage Friday. 
The plane’s cockpit voice recorder 
and flight data recorder were found 
Thursday. 

Tbe two officials who discussed 
de-king — the manager of Gander 
International Airport and a Royal 
Canadian Mounted Police sergeant 
— would not speculate what role, if 
any, the lack of the ice removal 
procedures may have played in the 
crash. 

Aviation experts noted that wing 
ice buildup has been died as a 
factor in previous fatal air acci- 
dents, including a winter J9S2 
crash of an Air Florida plane in 
Washington that killed 78 persons. 

The DC-8 charter, loaded with 
military equipment and 101,000 
pounds (45.450 kilograms) of fuel, 
appeared to go out of control mo- 
ments into its predawn mkoff. ac- 
cording to some witnesses. I: 
crashed in a fireball on a woody 
hillside 400 yards (364 meters) be- 
yond the runway. 

Tbe plane bad landed at Gander 
in a freezing rain 67 minutes earlier 
on a flight that began in Cairo and 
had included a fuel stop at Co- 
logne. It was carrying the soldiers 
home to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, 
after a six-month tour as peace- 
keepers in the Sinai peninsula. 


Mikhail S. Kapitsa 


to 22, and is to stop in Moscow on 
the way back to Beijing, tbe East 
European diplomat said. 

_ in his year-end summary of for- 
dgn relations, Mr. Wu dwelt upon 
ties with Eastern Europe and said 
that C hina had improved Its deal- 
ings with the Soviet Union “to a 
certain extent-” 

He said that China and the Sovi- 
et Union had agned, a five-year 
trade agreement this year, and. had 
exchanged parliamentary delega- 
tions after a long estrangement 

But Mr. Wu said, “to our regret, 
there has been ro fundamental im- 
provement in relations as yet," 
adding- “The ™in reason is that 
barriers remain.” 

Mr. Kapitsa, upon his arrival 
here last week for talks on interna- 
tional issues, sounded more posi- 
tive. “Our bilateral relations are 
improving very rapidly” he said. 

The East European diplomat 
predicted that the Russians eventu- 
ally would remove some troops 
from the common border in an rf- 

(Contisued on Page 5, CoL 7) 


Soviet Union Trying to Control Video Revolution 


Taubman 

Vew Yorif Times Service 

MOSCOW — The Russian 
host, a nonconformist writer, 

flipped cn his television, slipped a 

cassette into the Japanese video 
player and pressed the play but- 
ton. 

•The first frames of l *The Good, 
die Bad and the Ugly,” an early 
dint Eastwood film, flickered on 
the screen. 

“These opening scenes are 
great,” the host said with antici- 
patory pleasure as be soiled into 
an armchair. 

Video recorders, which made 
their entry on the Soviet scene m 
the late 1970s as novelties that 
only tbe efite could find or afford, 
have started to became a mass 
phenomenon. 

Although the mxmber of own- 
ers remains far gnwTiw and the 
cost still is far higher than in the 
' West, increasing numbers of Rus- 
sians are watching movies at 
home, according to newspaper re- 
peats and Muscovites. 

Mast of tbe films they watch 
woe made in the West and are 
banned officially in the Soviet 
Union, the Russians mid 

He growth in video usage has 
forced the government to rethink 


its initial response to video play- 
era, which was a heavy-handed 
effort to prevent their introduc- 
tion and discourage their use. 

Apparently persuaded that tins 
approach only forced the business 
underground, the government is 
trying to control the trade by em- 
bracing it 

In recent months tbe Soviet 
Union has started mass-produo- 
inj> video players, made available 
a lira ted bat growing selection of 
ideologically safe films, and 
opened video stores that, like 
their counterparts in the West, 
real movies overnight. 

Despite (he efforts, the Soviet 
authorities have had a difficult 
time keeping home video viewing 
within acceptable political Omits. 
Pornographic films, which woe 
popular when video recorders 
made their debut, have been sup- 
planted fay more serious movies 
that pose a greater threat to politi- 
cal orthodoxy. 

One of the most popular mov- 
ies in Moscow this fall according 
to Russians, has been “Man of 
Iron," a Polish film directed by 
Andizri Wajda that, sympatheti- 
cally chronicles labor unrest in 
Gdansk, the birthplace of the Sol- 
idarity tade union movement. 



A _ Th» Naw Yart Tim* 

Axsen Kucbuberiya, a mechanic in Moscow, signing a contract to rent a video cassette.' 


The films of 
Federico Fellini, Milos Forman 
and Bernardo Bertolucci circulate 
widely in Moscow. “Amadeus," 
Mr. Forman's U.S. Academy 
Award-winning movie about Mo- 
zart and Antonio Salieri, is among 
the hottest video properties in the 


Soviet capital according to Mus- 
covites. 

Older films such as Mr. Berto- 
hicri’s “Last Tango in Paris” and 
Mr. Bergman's “Fanny and Alex- 
ander” also are very popular, 
Muscovites said. 

Sylvester Sta^pne's first 


Rambo movie, “First Blood,” has 
attracted a large following. Video 
owners said they were eager to see 
“Rambo; Fast Blood, Part D," 
released in tire West this year. 

The going rate for having a 
movie dubbed into Russian is 
(Continued on Page s’ CoL 1 ) 












Page 2 




Qadhafi, in BurMna Faso, 
Urges Revolution in Africa 


United Press Internationa/ 

PARIS — Moamer Qadhafi 
and three planeloads of body- 
guards descended “like a con- 
quering army” this week on 
Burkina Faso, where the Liby- 
an leader uraed revolution m 
Africa, according to a report in 
Friday’s editions of the French 
daily newspaper Lc Monde. 

Colonel Qadhafi was com- 
pleting a tour of West African 
nations that had taken him also 
to Senegal, Mali and Ghana. 
“Two Boding 707s and a big 
Antonov transport plane were 
needed to bring in 450 Libyans 
whose main job is to guard their 
leader," Laurent Zecchim wrote 
from Ouagadougou, the capital 
of Burkina Faso. 

“Gad in military fatigues 
with blue berets or civilian dress 
and carrying Kalashnikov as- 
sault rifles, they literally took 
over the airport,” he reported. 
“They showed no hesitation 
about giving the locals body 
s ffarrhwt and demanding identi- 
ty papers, both at the airport 
and at holds in town.” 

Mr. Zec chim said that Colo- 
nel Qadhafi was surrounded by 
bodyguards as he moved 
through the airport budding, 
and that some of them were 
teen-age girls and boys. 

President Thomas Sankara of 
Burkina Faso was quiet when 
Colond Qadhafi raised his fist 
at a rally and called on the local 
people to form three-member 
revolutionary cells aimed at 
eliminating Western influenc e 
from Africa, the Le Monde arti- 
cle said. 

“Libya will give you every- 
thing you need," Colonel Qa- 
dhafi was quoted as having 
said, “gasoline at favorable 
prices, cement that you badly 
need.** He also pledged military 
support. 

Fears were expressed this 
week, during a conference of Af- 
rican leaders in Paris that Colo- 
nd Qadbafi's tour was aimed at 




Moamer Qadhafi 


cracking French influence in 
Africa and at threatening Chad. 

[French television repeated 

the Central African Republic 
had resumed reconnaissance 
flights over southern Chad fol- 
lowing reports that Libya had 
recently built up its military 
strength in the north, Reuters 


[President Frauds Mitter- 
rand of France received Andrt 
Kofingba, leader of die Central 
African Republic, on Friday. 
General Kolingba said after- 
ward that France had every 
freedom to reinforce its troops 
in his country because of the 
situation in Chad. 

[In addressing African lead- 
ers earlier, Mr. Mitterrand sent 


a public warning to Colond Qa- 
dhafi against any drive into. 
Chad. He also declared that 
France would never accept par- 
tition of Chad. The three-day 
summit meeting ended Friday.] 
In Ouagadougou, Colond 
Qadhafi was quoted as having 
mid at an airport rally: “The 
non-Francophone countries at 
that summit, like Egypt, are be- 
having like dogs hanging 
around under the table." 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14-15, 1985 


Africa Faces Choice: Ivory or Elephants? 


- ? 


WORLD BRIEFS 


By Edward A. Gargan 

New York Tima Service 
SERONERA, Tanzania — On 


years, most experts believe, be- 
cause of a sharp dedirie in the rhi- 


noceros population. POadbss seek- dous increase in 


killed illegally evoy year. Then is carved into 
1977 and *78, there was a tremea- markets exit 


SERONERA, Tanzania — On ing to supply the trade in rhino gone from several hundred rhinos 
the coastal Dares Salma. Gabriel bon have hunted diem almost to down to about a dozen. They just 
Nguli carves ebony logs into w3- extinction. As in other parks and wiped diem out" ■ 
lowy black swirls of grace and reserves in this part of the country, in Zambia, tile poachers have 
movement He also works in white, when the rfunos disappeared from slaughtered so many rhinos that 
but then he uses ivory, not wood, the Sereoged pad, the poachers there axe not enough left to hunt, 
So do hundreds of other carvers, turned to elephants. said Michad Faddy, the director of 

who, like Mr. NgnB, come to work “The rhino has been nearly the Save the Rhino Trust, a private 
each day in one of marc than 60 wiped out from the Serengeti,” said conservation group that is working 


but then he uses ivory, not wood, the Sereoged park, tie poachers 
So do hundreds of other carvers, turned to elephants, 
who, lilre Mr. Nguli, come to work “The rhino has been nearly 
each day in one of more than 60 wiped oat from the Serengeti^said 

mud-walled stores that stretch , _ 

along Mpkani Road in the gm ft aT , p __ . 

abort 50 miles (about 730 kflome- rhino hag bf&n I 

ters) southeast of here. •!. c ^ «a . , 

More than half the stores sell ulC SCFCDgCtL lllftt It 

under veryheavy pre 

from a angle tusk. Much of the 
ivory comes from poachers who il- 
legally hum the herds here in the assoologit 

Seraigeti National Pa*. ' 

Elephants have disappeared „ ■ . , . 

from many parts of Asia and Afri- Markus Bonier, a zoologist who is 


there ait not enough left to hunt, 
said Michad Faddy, the director of 
the Save the Rhino Trust, a private 
conservation group that is working 


The rhino has been nearly wiped out from 
the SerengetL That has put the elephant 

under very heavy pressure.’ 


tremo^ marSts^t^S Far East, where Khme r RoUgC RepOltS Major RaM ; £ 
Wehave ■ Amo bop. has a reputatkiD as an BANGKOK (AFP) — Khmer Rouge guerrillas said Friday they lad 
d Amos aphrodisiac. , ^ attacked the Viemanwse military headquaners ai &an Reap, 185nfes 

Hjeyjust- ^ambmisde^tdyAonaf ^ other tai^ in western Cambo- 

fOTap eurrenq y, Mr- ifHiing 175 people, including several Vietnamese comnwnrifis and a 

St3f.SK of ^ K,™ 

^^! e fli ^^ SSure 011 ^ h^separate repeat, the radio said that Vietnamese fraoa had btsnbed 
^S.^rSLvevcr.thepri- villa^ in western CamlmAam three opmtions from Smxday to TW 

tomtom attack, Virtnam^ 

m ^ecaoseofttK nearby market," targets in Cambodia and bombing by^ Vietnamere aircraft bin Indo^ 

rim «pem and Western diplomats here gexuaaDy cons^ the daims W 

to kill elephants and sell the ivory. 1 


— Mortals Bomer 
a ssoologist at Sesvngeti National Path 


toSel^K^idl^ivoxy.I 

Kfflega? ^ ^ Sakharov Rights Prize Established ; 

($100?^SSSte CTRASBOURG, France (AP) - The Bpjpe^aAiuam^ 

es SakaX^ Frit^ty to establish an annual human rights prize named after Andrei D. 

“That makes poaching very prof- Sakharov, the Soviet dissident. . 

liable.” Mr Tine soln- The Parixament said m a resolution that the pnre would be awarded for 

tiou he favors is ro educate buyers work in the devdopmmt of Ea«-W^ rekriOTs, the defense of human 

about the source of the may. n^ts or ^c«n a «im g ' 

Greek Communist deputies vehemently opposed the resolution and 
■ Singapore to Halt Trade tried to convert the prize into a tribute to Ndson Mandela, the nupos- 
Singapore, where dealers active- oned South African nationalist leader. However, the resolution was 
ly ttadewfld animals, rhinoceros adopted. 94-30, whh 20 members abst aining . . 


ca, and evea in the game paiks of “ charge of the FraukfurtZoologi- 
Keaya, Zambia and Tanzania the ^ Society’s management and coo- 


herds are shrinking. In an effort to servation efforts at the part “That 
protect those remaining, many has P« the elephant under vety 

< ■ - _ 1 1 .IT t hpflw MWCCltt* " 


with the govmunenim the effort to about the source of the may. 
St< ^red<wn to a few hundred ■ Singapore to Halt Trade 


countries have banned the cf 
ivory, but in Tanzania the trade is 


rhinos, so the poachers have gone 
after the elephants," he said. That, 


said tribes that live 


still legal, even though drooling the 011 ^ pack's boundary often 
elephants to obtain ivory may be poach to obtain meat But the large 


and business 
z Packer, a 


in turn, has sent the elephant popu- bom and hraiy, has again pledged 

m fa * i ” hom ' Pope Ui^es More Dialogue, Solidarity . 


of wildebeest and zebra that 


Minnesota professor studying ani- 
mal behavior on the Seroiged 
Plain, hopes to organize an aerial 


fgjvecBty of 10301 the- park, and the smaller 


1973,” Mr. Faddy said. “We Singapore had announced Iasi VATICAN CITY (Reuters) — P 
dropped to 50,000 in 1978, and ^ it would rigo the United issued Friday, called for East-West 


numbers outside its boundaries, 
can supply enotuh meat to satisfy 
the needs of local tribes. Neariy 1J 


census of elephants in the Selous Bunion wildebeest and 200,000 ze- 
Game Reserve in southern Tama- bra .live in the paxk, Mr. Bcrnei 


■nifl. Bigger than S witzerland ft is sa ^*' . , 

the largest game reserve in East « “ trophy poachers who 


now we’re down to 25, 000.” Nations- sponsored Convention oi 

Although dealing in ivory is pro- Trade in^ Endangered Species, 
hibited in Zambia, the country’s A National Devekmment Nfims- 
deterioratmg economy has given try spokesman said Wednesday 
poaching for both rhino hom and that Singapore had again stated 
ivory a new popularity because of thgt ft would sign the convention. 


John Paul n, in a peace message 
'ogue and North-South solidarity 


ri pf i on to create a new world order of “peace without fro ntiers .' 


have decimated the rhinoceros 


“We think there are 100.000 e(e- population and threaten to do the 
phants there now” Mr. Packer same to the elephants. 


said. “But within a year, 
could be as few as 50,000." 


Elephants have become mnch 


“The rhinos have been wiped out ■ 
in two years without os being able 
to respond," Mr. Bomer said. **Be- 


more vulnerable in the last few fore 1976, there were a few animals 


the foreign exchange the trade gen- 
erates, according to Mr. Faddy- A 
whole front ™nn hom, which 
weighs about 10 pounds (43 kilo- 
grams), can bring about $45,000. 

Acorading to familiar with 
the trade, the primary market for 
the homs is the Middle East, par- 
ticularly Yemen, where they are 


Trade in Endangered Species. In the message for the Roman Catholic Church's 19th World Day of 

A National Development Minis- Peace on Jan. 1, the pope said tensions caused by uuderdevdopmait m 
by spokesman said Wednesday the Third World could not be separated from East-West nuclear rivalry. . 
that Singapore had again stated ‘There can be only one peace, ^ he said inthc 17-page document, whiditj 

that U would sign the convention, will be delivered personally to many heads of stale. He urged more talks 

on disarmament and “the kinds of dialogue that take place when borders 

are open and people can travel freely” and “when scholars are free to 
New Beriin-New York Flight communicate, when workers are free to assemble." 


The Axsadaud Prea 

BERLIN — Pan American Air- 
lines said Friday that it would be- 
gin direct flights from West Bedin 
to New York on Feb. 15, 1986. 


Uganda, Rebels Fail to Sign Accord 


3 Get Life in Prison for Killing Israelis 


The Associated Press 

NICOSIA — A Briton and two 
Palestinians were convicted Friday 
of murdering three Israelis aboard 
a yacht in a Cyprus marina in Sep- 
tember. They were sentenced to life 
in prison. 

The defendants, Lm Michad 
Damson, Khaled Abdel RmW si-. 
Khatib and Abdd-Hakun Saado 
al-Khalifa, stood silent as Judge 
Y aimalris Poyadjis read the sen- 
tence. 

Judge Poyadjis said that because 
the three were found gmhy of pre- 
meditated murder, “the only sen- 
tence I can pass is life imprison- 
ment for each of the three 
accused." Cyprus does not impose 
a dea A penalty. 

Israel barf contended ibat the 
gunman were members of an elite 
Palestine liberation Organization 
unit called Force 17, and retaliated 
for the slayings with an Oct. 1 air 

■ attack on FLO headquarters in Tu- 
nis. However, FLO officials in Cy- 
prus denied that the gunmen were 
members of Faroe 17. 

The three def aidants had ac- 
knowledged they killed the three 
Israelis after commandeering their 
moored yacht in Tarnaca on Sept 
25. 

They refused to plead guilty, 
however, assorting that they acted 
out of “moral dure” Mr. Khatib 
said that he and his companions 
killed the Israelis “because they ran 
a spy ring in Cyprus and were re- 
sponsible for the arrest of many of 
our comrades as wdL as the murder 
of many women and children." 

■ Hijacker Pleads Not Gutty 

The only surviving alined hi- 
jacker of an EgyptAir Boeing 737 
that was forced to Malta last month 
and s t o r med by Egyptian co n unai i- 
dos has pleaded not guilty to 16 
counts of mutter, assault and hos- 
tage taking. United Press Intern* , 
dual reposted from Valletta, Mal- 
ta. 

Omar Mohammed Ali Rezaq, a 
22-year-old _ Palestinian bom in 
Lebanon, said in a court in Valletta 
on Thursday that he rgected the 



PLOSemding 
Personnel to 
Iraqi Capital 


. Reuters 

TUNIS — The Palestine Libera- 


NAIROBI (Reuters) — The 
Ugandan nnHtaxy government and 
rebels failed Friday to rign a peace 
pact despite strong pressure from 
Kmyan mediators. 

The leader of the National Resis- 
tance Army, Yoweri Museveni, de- 
chned to comment, as did Presi- 
dent Daniel Arap Mot of Kenya, 
who has been chairman of the ne- 
gotiations. «ini* they iv yn in 
August After the mAe*, the Ugan- 
dan head of state, Tito Okeflo 
would say only: “Not yet, gentle- 
men." 

The f ailur e to sign a peace pact 


tion Organization is redeploying came as no surprise, as both sides 
personnel from its T urn's headquar- have said they disagree on a wide 
ters to Wa gfirfarf and other Arab range of issues, inrfnrfmg future 
capitals in a strategy aimerf at re-’ representation in the Ugandan gov- 
btukhag its miHiaxy muscle, ac- eminent and the composition of a 




cording to Palestinian sources. new national army. Talks were 
PLO staff members have joined scheduled to continue Saturday, 
the group’s nuBtaiy wing, the Pal- 
estine liberation Army, and left 

for the Iraqi cqrital with thrirfam- U.S. City Exteildi 
flies m the past , three weeks m a J 

move of 250. to 300 people, the PHILADELPHIA (AP) — _1 
sources «>id emergency order for a predomin 

• Iraq has agreed to pay for nrifi- after a suspicious fire damaged i 


Yoweri Museveni 


U.S. City Extends Emergency Order 



move of 250 to 300 people, the PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Mayor W. Wilson Goode extended aa 
sources said. emergency order for a predominantly white neighborhood Friday, a day 

1 Iraq has agreed to pay for mifi- after a suspicious fire damaged a house onoe occupied by a black family 
tary tr aining in Baghdad, which is targpted by white protesters. * 

becommgamqot PLO base, and is The Noy. 22 dedaration, whidi prohibits gatherings of more than four 

treating the Palestinians as units in people for other than recreational or religious purposes,, had been 
itsaimy, the sources added. ; sdteduled to eiqpto'Friday, but Mayor Goode extended it until Dec. 27. 

ihePLO leadership and the oare '"'Die' blaze Thursday night at a vacant row house, which had be^i. 
of its main departments are to stay reclaimed by the Veterans Administration after the occupants moved 
in Tunis, but many sections are because of protests, was quickly controlled by firefighters. The FBI is 
being cut bade by 50 to 75 percent, investigating the blaze because ft occurred on federally owned property. 
Other staff members are to be according to Robert Welsh, acting first assistant UJS. attorney. 


becoming a mqor PLO base, and is 
treating the Palestinians as units in 
^itsarmy, the sources added. 

•* IhePLO leadership and, ihe core 
of its main departments are to stay 


From left, Abdd-Hakftn Saado al-Khalifa, lan Michael 
Davison, partly hidden, and Khaled Abdel Rader al-Kliatih 
leaving court after being imprisoned for fife in Nicosia. 


only surviving alleged hi- f ¥•_ - /» A Cm" 

.lias Indictment of Arafat 
SSlfa Sought by U.S. Groups 

Jan* United Press Intemar C7 %/ X 


By Gaylord Shaw 

Lea Angela Tima Service 


JT .4. cniiseship Achillc Lauro by Paks- 

'■ jrLiUI tM . . tinians a week later, m which an 
/ J dderiy American cripple was mur- 

dered. 

„ f tI*/)Y ff)jS They added that the cause of the 

■ V move was not Tunisia’s reaction to 

the two events. However, dipkanat- 
fully sought the extradition of Mo- ic sources said. President Habib 


Otter staff members are to be according to Robert Welsh, acting first assistant U.S. attorney, 
moved io Jordan, to Algeria, to the 
PUD’S military headquarters in 

U.S. Fusion Reactor Tests Successful 

The objective is to step up mili- WASHINGTON (WP) — A nuqor step toward the long-sought goal of 

taiy preparedness for operations producing electricity, from atomic fusion occurred late Wednesday night 
against Israel in the occupied terri- whai the most powerful fusion reactor everbmlt was successfully fired at 
tones of the West Bank and Gaza, Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico, 
the sources said. - The device contained no nudearfud, but the testproved that the newly 

Sorior PLX) officials emphasize designed and built machine can perform as intended. About two yean of 
that the decaSOn to move personnel timber t«rin^imrf tuning anil hc.nw»rf<»rf lapimtiR tRpntnmjtHgfad 
was made before Israd bombed the into the machine, called the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II, and try 
FLO head qu a rters in Tunis on Oct to ignite the first controUed fusion reaction in the laboratory. 

1 and the damag i n g hijacking of the The Sandia machine represents one of two U.S. expe rim ental 
cruiseshvp Achille Laura byPales- approaches to achieving controlled fmann, enflerf mertinT con finemen t- A 
t mian s a week later, in which an nval method, called magnetic c onfineme nt and using a device called a 
eldedy Amdican cripple was mur- tokamak, is under development at Princeton University in New Jersey i 
dered. 


the sources said. ■ : - 
Senior PLO officials emphasize 
that the dedsonto move personnel 


hammed Abbas, a Palestinian guer- Boumuba had serioudy consid- p. t? — . , - c .. 

WASHINGTON — The De- alia leader released by Italy over ered reducing the PLO presence in. Fran90is Mittecrand <* 

xtment of Justice is being pressed UJS. protests. Thnfc Itba&c faaefi x£d. ^ 


For the Record 

Cha noritor Hefant Kohl of West Genuaoy wfll have mformal talks in 

DnJ. "F T1 : J . t, _ . - a .* *• .1. 


partment of Justice is being pressed 
by conservative and Jewish groups 
to seek the indictment of Yasser 


President Ronald Reagan told 
an American Bar Association con- 


Mr. Rezaq bad been identified 
earlier as Omar Marzouki and his, 
age was given as 20. 


Arafat, the leader of the Palestine ventiou in July that “we wfll seek to 
liberation Organization, for his al- indict, apprehend and pxxKecute” 


leged involvement in tbe murder of 

two U.S. diplomats 12 years ago. 


tectonsts. 


The number of Palestinians leav- 

PLO chief, moved his Ixadtmartets 
after the Iaradi invasion of Leba- 
non in 1982, has nevertheless in- 


Mr. Arafat’s “role in worldwide cr ^ od 


Prisoners in IsraeR Jails 
Call OR Hanger Strike 


A spokesman for Attorney Gen- taro-km » wdl-known,” said a The sources said a significant 
rxal Edwin Meese 3d said Thursday gpokcaman for the American land h«or in the revaluation of the 
that the department had received 


To: Siixcriprfion Manage-, International Herald Tribune, ^ 
1 81, avenue Chcrles<!e-Gaul!e, 92521 NeuDyGedex,Frcnae. | 
Please enter my subsaiplian for: 


Reuters 

JERUSALEM — Several hnn- 


that the department had received KwfcAffeiis riwirmtw “you FLO’S presence in Turns was (he 
“new allegations" about Mr. Ara- can’t have a serious anti-tenor po- P rob] f m of Palestinian unem- 
fats role in the 1973 slayings in Key without H«.lfa g wfth the Wp ptoy«L whose potential was bong 


Khartoum, Sudan, of Geo Nod, 
the ambassador, and G. Curtis. 


dred Palestinian guerrilla praonos 


SSffiSWMS -As 

P& West Bank. Iaadi and Pa^. poftb^. 


fjgtn-Kt " wasted with nothing to do far from 

^OiarteMIjcbensteiu,aformer to 


Frtmce’s Commatist-led trade tnon irifl strike Thursday to protest a 
bill introducing flexible working practices, according to the leader of the 
General Confederation of Labor, Henri Krasudri. (Reuters) 

Researchers at the Pasteur Institute in Paris announced Friday (hat 
they have filed legal action in the UJ5. Court of Cbfms to win recognition 
of their claim that they discovered the deadly AUK, or acquired immune 
defi c iency syndrome, virus earlier than their Amwiran raileagiy* (A?) 

A judge fa Knoxville, Ten n essee, dismissed Friday a $55- million suit 
against die tobacco unit of R_J. Reynolds Industries, saying that as 
amputee, Floyd Roysdon, had not proved the company’s cigarettes were 
“fc^wand unreasonably dangerous." Mr. Roysdon had contended 


that smoking Reynolds products led to the anqnuation of his leg.. (AJ& 
Admiral Jobs AL Poindexter, the new Tr. ff. wummI securiiy 


pied West Bank. Israeli and Palts- 
tmian sources said Friday. 


diplomatic and legal questions for 
the Reagan administration. But 




nior fellow at the Heritage Founda- 
tion, a conservative Washingt on 
dunk tank, said he raised the issuc 
with Mr. Meese last month wfaenhe 


r IT persoand, the PLO saw this as an 
f*™*- ideal oppratnniiy, the sources said. 


Nicaragua’s Sandhxist govemmeuL 


prisoners 


prosecution view the case as a test 


with MT. Meese last month whence n ■ • Tr rr - « noo 

encounter ed him ^ , White Home RUSgUL, 17.0. tO tlLTSUe EjjOjtS U.S. tO Replace 


the protest 


CHURCH SERVICES 


CENTRAL HAPIlSr CHURCH. 13 Am du 
VWCotonbiw. 75006 Pont. Matro St- 
Solplea. Sunday wenhip In EngRsfe 9ri5 
o.a., Rtv. A. Sommarvilla. Tal.i 
{\}A 6 XffjtffXXL 


After the hijacking of TWA 
Flight 847 last June and the brack- 
ing of the Italian cruise ship Achille 
Lauro in October, the Department 
of Justice obtained indictments or 
arrest warrants for the extremists 
allegedly involved and unsuccess- 


“He expressed interest in seeing 
the information that I and some 
others had been able to compile," 
Mr. Udienstein said, adding that 
“the material was later put m his 
hands.” 


Mr. LKnenstem saio, aomn^ tnar By Philip Shabccoff 
‘the nmtenal was later put in his 

. . . . . ■ WASHINGTON - Presidem 

Tbemj^ uushidesaD wser- ^ MBchafl S. 


Onlfotection of Environment St^mEastBIoc 

By Philip Shabccoff monitoring global air petition to AlEteWCRHS 

New York Times Service SO CX c h a ng e of wild arrimnlc ft Washington Post Service 


nuusniaK 

EMMANUrt BARIWT OMKH, 56 Rw dn 
Bam-RoUii, Ruult-Malmoiioo. Englhh 
ipaddng. owwgu fl c d L dl danonAwflom.. 
SlS. 9*45, WenNpi 1 0U5. Ottw ocUvMm. 
Coll Dir. B.C. Thomoi, Pqitor. 
[\)J7A9MIJ9. 


. . A tion, of scientists and of monitor- 

toa that the _U.S. government has a Goahachev approved a broad, de- mg technology. . 
tape recording of an intercepted tailed agreement on eavnorimental Environmental cooperation be- 

messagem whicn Mr. Arafai all eg- protcctkm at tbrir meeting in'Ge-- tween ihe two countries began in 

^ BWilffltmonth.iraorikitoad. 1972 with m 

the rwn U5. ainlomaK wbn wer* • » ».. . 


TT1T hi. r -1 J ' the droUA diplomats,^ were Prashknl Ri 

UJL Editor Jailed ^ accord was reached inM06- Leonid I- Bn 

_ Palestinians sazed the Sara h Aja^ cowjurtbefaediesuminix meeting Washington. 

For RflPlKt Artu*]pfl .h*an Embassy m Khartoum du ring - gfyg negotiations between detega- like othc 

rorimOSlAmaeS aKcejrtkmonMmch^im -- •. tweadtetw, 

The Associated Press Department of Justice SPOkCS- srfiiiiiihttrMtnr nf the Fnvtmmrum- vironmciltal ; 


Washington Pott Service 

WASHINGTON — Substantial 
numbers of > American drivers, 
guards and other support pqson- 
nd wfll replace local employees io 
U-S. embassies and ccanilates^ 
the Soviet XJru<a and other £® 
European;«qttotriei . 

A Stale Department spokesman 


ttmistranon offiaals. - rresiaaA Richard M. Nixon and Europeanoonntriei . 

Tbe accord was reached in Mbs- Leon id L Br erimev at a meeting in A Stele Department spokesman 
cowjnstbef<xe the summit meeting Washington. said Thursday that the m^m, 

after negotiations between delega- like other ]oth programs be- desimd “lb corater infi&ice- 
tionsherfed by Lee M. Thomas, tween the twogovanmenta. theen- threats against our embassies 


SIOCKHMM 


yy*^*?*. , I ! W L d| J’ ****■ P 00 ? National Front has been im- 

Pjraed for one ysar Tor writing 


BRUSSBS 

AMERICAN LUTHERAN CHURCH wtkomi 
ok Stndov V sun. Onfcnai Ev» B pja. An. 
Srioma 7, WdwwrSt rtaim. TaLi 771JSZrfO. 


LONDON— The editor of the men refused to disc 
mflgnTnw of iftg white supremacist now before Mr. h 
group National Front has been im- existence of such a 
prisoned for one year for writing be independently o 
articles that allegedly incited racial . Neil C Uvingsto 
hatred. the recently pul 

Joseph Pearce, 24, wrote articles "Fighting Back: Wi 
under the pseudonym “Captain Agamst Terrorism, 

7Vll(h M in lh, •- mU. a 


Department of Justice spokes- administrator of tbe Enviromnen- vircminental accord was not active- 
men refused to discuss the material tal Protection Agency, and Yuri A. \y pursued after the Soviet 
now before Mr. Meese, and ■ the Izrad, chairman cl the Soviet gov- intervention in Afghanistan m = • 


could not -emmeni's StateCojnmittee far Hy- 
Btd. drcHnetebrctogy and Enviionmeo- 


Nril C Livingstone, coauthor of tal Control, offiaals said Thntsday. etmuninees under the Reagan ad- 


the recently published book A joint statrtnent issued in Ge- “^^tratitmtinffl lastmonlh’s ne- 

D ^1— H/i • vtr ■ It! -• !- W 


the War neva after the sunrnut meetin g said gotianoos in . Moscow. 


Dora was not active- abroad," had been set in motion 
Arfik Soviet before Preaderit Ronald Reagan's 

1070 - M .u ?^“ stan m «“cufive order Nov. J tMtening 

^ “cnoty tfatngh tlteSx? 
v ™ jomt ^environmental polygraph tests and other means. - 
to- the Reagan ad- -Seoretaiy of . State GeoigB.P. 
iffl last month’s ne- Shulte toarited for S5.^m3&D in 
Moscow. fiscal 1986 antf $17,9 nuIBoo'in 


said drat a cbnsnlutioM on new coopoattye Among the new projects is a ^ 1987 T to rmlace oneribW.tt 

1 fn fb* Ctot# nnuprfa in HaM ofndii tk,. * mm. - ■ «. « . 


To place an advertisement 
in Ais section 


1>Uh" m the organization’s maga- ctmfideitial cable sent to the Sate prefects m teeuvironmental ^Celd^ ^ study of the causes £?dfects of otfo^of theSSaSSent 


rine. Bulldog, that “harped on DeprtmenifrorntheUAEmba* -^to-be-hdd.iteXtyearm-Mos- nud^roimd TOte “ 


Mn £)Ls±wth HER WOOD 
'Cl Atv. OmMuIIc, 
92521 N«ulfly Cedot, Fiuoe. 
TeL: 747JLSL6S. 


colored people as blade animals,” 
the prosecutor, Andrew Collins, 
said Thursday in court. 

The article- ats stacked 
Asians, Jews and the police, Mr. 
Collins said. 


™ of technology for Moscow and the U.S. consdaftV 

treating waste and redudngwaste Leningradwitii Amerkam wj&b* 


lions from Bdrw, whde the PLO 
had its headquarters at the time 


parallel program rtf roptacog 
1 wtukera with Americais ffl 

ox Warsaw Pact countries 0 * 


The Moscow, accord- covers is- and tuning 
wk niigiag bpm coapentioD in ^ 







MA 




\Ac> 


9§S 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14-15, 1985 


Page 3 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


Latin Provinces Remain the Underdogs 





By William D. Moncalbano 

Lea Angela Times Service 

SALTA, Argentina — Life spins 
at its own individualistic pace here 
on Argentina’s northwest frontier. 
The people chew coca and spend 
money- thai-isn’t. They love their 
country, but they sue the central 
government, 

Salta province borders Bolivia. 
Chile and Paraguay. In heritage, 
lifestyle and outlook, it has men in 
common with those countries than 
with Buenos Aires, the Argentine 
capital 1,200 miles (1,944 kilome- 
ters) away. 

An economically stagnant tobac- 
co- and grain-growing region of 
738,000, Salta is a microcosm of the 
distress and frustration that mark 

provincial life in Latin America. 

In almost every Latin American 
country, provinces are second-class 
citizens yet proudly wedded to 
their relaxed lifestyles. They dwell 
on the outside of national life, look- 
ing on with a mixture of envy and 
disdain , 


Pacific 

Ocean 


{PARAGUAY 


Buenos i 
Alrsa 


ARGENTINA 


lkm in back payments is before the 
Argentine Supreme Conn, accord- 
ing to Raul Eduardo Pacsani, Sal in 
province's treasury secretary. 

The province fights the under- 
dog’s war with innovation. Two 


The provinces are 
second-class 
citizens, yet are 
proudly wedded to 
their relaxed 
lifestyles. 


[crest while awaiting revenue-shar- 
ing funds from Buenos Aires. 

Public employees in Salto, who 
comprise the largest pan of the 
won force, are paid in bonds. 

Argentina is not the only place 


In Salta, complaints about Bue- and provincial bonds, circulate on 
nos Aires parallel the grievances of the streets of this provincial capital 


kinds of currency, Argentine pesos where provincial ingenuity discom- 

and provincial bonds, circulate on fits national authorities. 

the streets of this provincial capital In Talara. an oil-producing city 


Third World raw-materials pro- of 290,000. The bonds are good in northern Peru, a municipal bor- 
ducers against the industrialized only within Salta province and are dello called The Red Rose is an 
countries. redeemable only at provincial important source of civic revenue. 

‘They take our oil and refine it banks. The mayor who originated the idea 

elsewhere," said Carlos van Cauw- The bonds look like money, feel is a local hero, although officials in 


laen, head of Salta's Chamber of like money and are spent like mon- 


Commerce and Industry. “We fell ey with a value equal to Argentine poUticaJ party. 


The mayor who originated the idea 
is a local hero, although officials in 
Lima have expelled him from their 


trees so Buenos Aires can make currency. 


Provinaal discontent bred by the 


The capitals, which usually are 
distant both in miles and in their 
priorities, adopt policies, pay the 
bills and appoint officials ranging 
from governors to traffic police- 
men and teachers. In Colombia, few 
example, the president appoints the 
mayor of BogotA and all of the 
provincial governors, who in turn 
appoint all mayors. 

By contrast, the constitutions of 
Latin America's largest countries, 
Brazil, Mexico and Argentina, em- 
brace a U.S.-sty le federal system in 
which provinces elect governors 
and legislatures, raise taxes and 
theoretically administer their own 
affairs. 

But fact differs from theory. Sal- 
ta scrapes together just 28 percent 
of its annual S ISO million budget, 
and the rest comes from Buenos 
Aires. Only five other Argentine 
provinces raise more money. 

Capitals dominate the national 
life of every major Latin American 
country except Brazil, where the 
backiahd capital of Brasilia was 
conceived to challenge coastal pre- 
eminence. 

Brasilia, with about a million res- 
idents. is the seal of government, 
hut the nation's capitals in every- 
thing but name are still Rio de 
Janeiro and Sao Paulo, whose com- 
bined population approaches 20 
million. 

Important provincial centers do 


FULL OF SPIRIT — It's off to work for a busload of New York sidewalk S antas MiBrfwl by Volunteers of America. I Buenos Aires have the biggest in- 


planks. We harvest tobacco, but Provincial officials sotemnly in- rentrafaation of power is not a new- exisu p ^ ch £ Guadalajara and 
mnk no cigarettes." mi, however, that the bonds are theme m Laim America, but the M „ ■ M - J Ci d d 

Latin American capitals like not money. Only the central gov- histone inequity is aggravated in Guv^in Venezuela, and Guava- 


_ eminent has the constitutional au- these times of economic hardship. 

dustries, the most jobs, the best thority to issue currency, they say. Maoists seeking to ignite rcvolu- 
schools, the latest movies, the The bonds, in an anomaly per- lion along the spine of the Andes 
smoothest asphalt and the best soc- haps typical of the relationship be- mountains chose Ayacucho, Peru, 
cer iM»m: They are both the cause tween Latin American capitals and as their headquarters, largely be- 
and the result of massive internal their provinces, are primed on con- cause Lima governments have vir- 
migration since World War n. tract by the national mint in Bue- tually ignored Ayacucho’s needs 
Salta is an oil-producing prov- nos Aires. for four centuries, 

i nry. But like all oil in Argentina, The bond concept, which was . A number of Latin American na- 
Salta's product belongs to the cen- adopted in Salta last year and has lions, including Colombia. Chile 
tral government, which pays prov- been copied by a number of other and Peru, are unitary republics, 
inces a pittance for what it takes. A provinces since, is a strategem to Such provinces depend entirely on 
suit filed by Salta seeking $60 mil- avoid having to borrow at high in- the national government. 


San Francisco’s Smoking Law 
> Proves No Cause for Alarm 


. enforcement of San Francisco's landmark 
" r; -anti-smoking.Jaw has proved neither expen- 
sive nor difficult during the 21 months it has 
been in effect The Washington Post reports. 
F ’ - -The law requires employers to mamrain a 

rJ ^ ^ stroking policy satisfactory to both smokers 
* andriongmokera. If compromise is not possi- 
' * Y. - We — if even one nonsrnoker is dissatisfied 
- with the policy — the employer must ban 
4tj| smoking in. work areas, but not in hallways, 
Y.J1 lounges and lavatories, which are not includ- 
ed in the ordinance. Violations are pmrish- 
able' by fines of up to $500 a day. 

Tt has been one of the biggest nonevems 
n.'-'-Hm in San Francisco,” said Dr. Michael Martin, 
* : -- ■iaE an epidemiologist who made a special study 
A q" of me low. He said that during the first 10 
Y months the law was in effect, the city health 
, -V department received only 102 com plaint s, 
but resolved all of them without legal action 
or fines. Complaints have declined steadily 
l i*tri % since. 


TgetKrt 


No new employees were hired to enforce 
the law. 

Short Takes 

April Veness, a lecturer at the University of 
North Car olina who comes from the Middle 


West, says traditional Southern hospitality, 
alive today in such customs as telling depart- 
ing guests, u Y*aD come back,” or youngsters 
addressing grown-ups as “abr” or ‘‘ma'am,” 
probably derives from geography and settle- 
ment patterns. Wealthy planters adopted the 
manners of the rural English aristocracy, and 
tbdr farms were so isolated that the arrival of 
a guest, even a stranger, could be a major 
social event By contrast Northerners lived 
closer together in towns and cm small farms 
and had no slaves to do household chores 
when guests came calling. 

Hie Democratic Party is not abandoning 
its donkey mascot despite news reports to the 
contrary after the party ordered a new design 
for its stationery. Paxil G. Kirk Jr., chairman 
of the Democratic National Committee, said 
the donkey “is here to Stay." Like the Repub- 
lican elephant and the Tammany tiger, the 
donkey comes from the 19th-centuiy car- 
toons of Thomas NasL It first appeared as a 
mule, with a caption that some might say is 
up-to-date: “The Democratic Party is like a 
mule — without pride or hope of posterity." 

Shorter Takes: Sixteen tall-masted sailing 
ships were the hit of the 1976 UJ>. bicentenni- 
al celebration in New York harbor. Organiz- 
ers of the 1986 Statue of Liberty centennial 
aim to outdo that display with 20 tall ships 


from as far away as Indonesia. . . : Shawn 
Thompson, a television actor, was charged 
with uttering when he sent a Ken doll — 
boyfriend of the Barbie DoB — over Niagara 
Falls in a sealed Kentucky Fried Chicken 
bucket. Ken survived. 


Ebony, al4Q, Keeps Its Focus, 
Poshing Power of the Positive 

Ebony, a glossy ma gazine for blacks, was 
founded in 1945, two years before blacks 
were allowed to play major league baseball 
and nine years before segregation was out- 
lawed in the public schools. 

Although Representative Louis Stokes, an 
Ohio Democrat, said on an earlier anniversa- 
ry that “Ebony magazine has been at the 
forefront of the black man’s struggle for po- 
litical and social equality," the 1.7-nriHk®- 
dreuiation monthly is still criticized for run- 
ning too many articles about athletes and 
ente rtainer s. 

Its editors say its tone was set its first year, 
when Ebony said it would Try to mirror the 
happier side of Negro life — the positive, 
everyday achievements from Harlem to Hol- 
lywood. But when we- talk about race as the 
No. I problem of America, well talk turkey." 

— Compiled by 
ARTHUR HIGBEE 


Monterrey in Mexico. Ciudad 
Guyana in Venezuela, and Guaya- 
quil in Ecuador. Bui they usually 
are pale echoes of the' capitals 
whose policies spawned them. 

In Argentina, about 10 million of 
the 30 million citizens live in and 
around Buenos Aires. In Chile, 
□early half of the population lives 
in greater Santiago. 

In Peru, where decentralization 
is a major national priority, five 
million of 19 milli on inhabitants 
live in industrial Lima. 


Nicaraguan Rebels Say They Have Soviet Missiles 


White House Offers Plon to Save Tax BUI 


_ The Associated Press 

’ WASHINGTON— The Reagan 
‘ Administration and Republican 
ongressional leaders offered a pro- 
^ wal Friday aimed at keeping 
jlhfresident Ronald Reagan’s tax- 
•verhaul plan alive, but they failed 
' -■ rp deliver the 50 to 75 Republican 
*• ■• rT ~ -^oves that Democrats say areneces- 
- . vs.& ai y t0 ih c biD. • 

The bQl remained available for 
' :r jbe House to consider Monday, 
giving Mr. Reagan time to seek an 
. : --- ddihonal 17 Republicans wining 
■ ■■■ vote for a tax plan that be do- 

- j.- -' : -cribes as the No. 1 legislative goal 
• - . i ~f his second term, 

Only 14 of the 182 Republicans 
.raided with the president Wednes- 

- i - ■ ay when (he House refused to 

onsider the bill. 

Mr. Reagan has expressed reser- 
aiions about the changes that the 
louse Ways and Means Commit- 
. .jc has made in his original tax 
*’■ ; lan, but be hopes that the Senate 
‘ - •“ ** an make the bill more to his Hiring. 
^ He has said that unless the 
- -‘ rM -louse passes the bill before it ad- 
" rams for the year next week, ef- 
im to achieve a major revision of 

- - - le nation’s 72-year-old tax code 

lay be doomed for years. 

. : •• Republicans in the House, how- 
C :r-'*rer, have written their own rival 
; -ix reform bill 

.....r; The speaker of the House, 

' A'-.- homas P. O’Neill Jr n Democrat of 
/ -..v lassadiuseus, emphasized that 
A j , ' >einocrais would not even discuss 
: '. laking concessions to Republi- 

...ms until the president showed 
. m that he had the votes to pass 

- ! ebiD. 

- : ' “As soon as the president in- 

arms me personally that be has a 
— .1 of 50 to 75 Republican votes for 
p issage of the bflL we will begin 

- (tPoving ahead with the bipartisan 

■ 1 . Form process." Mr. O’Neill said. 

i! 'n b 1 *- O’N 6 ® m ^de his comments 

;l!t 1" ^Ler listening to Treasury Secre- 
i rtitfy ■^ anttS A. Baker 3d explain the 
j »]j W Lest Republican offer, which was 
1 . sembled by the House Republi- 

n minixity leader, Robert H. Mi- 
.s ; s .dtrfinaMis. 



Thomas P. OTNefll Jr. 

At issue is a bill that would make 
broad changes in the ways Ameri- 
can individuals and businesses are 
taxed. The measure, which was 
written chiefly by Representative 
Dan Rostenkowslri and other 
Democrats on the Ways and Means 
Committee, is reasonably dose to 
what Mr. Reagan recommended to 
Congress in May. 

Under the proposal offered Fri- 
day by the Reagan adminis tration 

and House Republicans, the House 
would vote on the Ways and Means 
Committee bill, on a Republican 
substitute and on a new Republi- 
can amendment. The amendment 
includes a $2,000-per-person pre- 
tax exemption, as favored by Mr. 
Reagan. 

During negotiations Thursday, 
Democratic leaders insisted (hat 
they would not permit such an 
amendment to be considered. They 

allowed to vote ocHhat proposal 
they also would demand other 
amendment, including many that 
were rejected fay the committee 
when it wrote the bffl- 


But Mr. Rostenkowdd raised the 
possibility .that Republicans would 
be allowed to vote on the $2,000 
exemption as an amendment to 
their own bin, rather than to die 
Democrats’ plan. 

Since there is almost no chance 
the Republican plan can be passed 
by the House, the amendment 
would be little more than a face- 
saving gesture for them. 

The overall bdl would sharply 
cut individual and business tax 
rates, curtail or diininn te some de- 
ductions and credits, excuse .six 
million lower-income families from 
paying taxes, reduce taxes for moat 
Americans and raise taxes on cor- 
porations. 

■ Congress Approves Funding 

Jonathan Fucrbringer of The New 
York Tunes reported from Washing- 
ton: 

Congress, deadlocked over fed- 
eral spading in 1986, has adapted 
an emerge n cy funding bill to keep 
the government running through 
Monday. President Reagan signed 
the measure Friday. 

Congressional approval came 
|at« Thursday, against a midnight 
deadline, as the House mid Senate 
grappled with a number of mea- 
sures, inrfiidiTig a major farm bill. 
The farm bQI was left unfinished 
after their agreement Wednesday 
on legislation to force a balanced 
federal budget. 

That bin. which President Rea- 
gan signed Thursday morning, 
would reduce the budget deficit in 
steps and eliminate it by 1991. 

The stopgap money ball ap- 
proved Thursday will finance some 
government operations through 6 
PM. Monday. 

The measure was needed because 

House and Senate conferees who 
were woriemg on a separate catchaU 
appropriation tall for the rest of 
fiscal 1986. which began Oct 1, 
could not finish before a previous 

emergency financing bill expired at 
midnig ht. - 

WithouL action* parts of the gov- 


ernment faced & shutdown by mid- 
day Friday. 

Negotiators also continued to 
seek agreement on a hum bill and 
on separate deficit -reducing legis- 
lation to cany out a major portion 
of the $55 J-bQlion savings prom- 
ised for this year. 

The adm i nis tration and confer- 
ees on the catchall appropriation 
are working to write a compromise 
that the White House could accept. 
The administration has threatened 
to veto both the Senate and the 
House versions of this legislation. 

Some issues have beat resolved, 
Tp rU iirffpg foreign and 

transportation. But the overall xml- 
itaiy budget and funding for many 
specific Pentagon items, including 
nerve gas,, the anti-saleHile mwaale 
and the president's space-based 
missile- defense project, remained 
unsettled. 

The administration was still in- 
sisting that the Pentagon appropri- 
ation for fiscal 1986 be increased 
by the rale of inflation. 

Regardless of the final figure, the 
newly signed budget-balancing 
measure wlU force additional cuts 
by March that are expected to push 
military funding below the 1985 
level 

U.S. Senate Panel Backs 
Product Safety Nominee 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — The Ui 
Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science and Transportation has 
voted. 9-7, to apjjrove the nomina- 
tion of Terrence M Scanlon as 
chairman of the Consumer Product 
Safety Commission. 

Before the vote Thursday some 
senators said they felt that Mr. 
Scanlon had not been forthright 
when he said that he had not used 
commission staff members for anti- 
abortion, church or personal activi- 
ties. Mr. Scanlon acknowledged 
last week that he had done so but 
said that the incidents had been so 
minor that he had forgotten them. 


By Shirley Christian 

iVeH 1 York Times Service 

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras — 
A Nicaraguan rebel leader said this 
week that the Nicaraguan Demo- 
cratic Force, the largest of the 
groups Lrying lo overthrow the gov- 
ernment in Managua, had obtained 
“about 20" portable SAM-7 anti- 
aircraft missiles, which be said were 
purchased this year. 

Aristides Sdncbez, a member of 
the directorate of the guerrilla 
group, said in an interview here on 
Monday that his forces had' suf- 
fered heavy casualties in several 
encounters with Soviet-built Mi-24 
attack helicopters. 

But he said said the" insurgents' 
acquisition of theSAM-7s, surface- 
to-air missiles also of Soviet manu- 
facture, had made them optimistic 
about their ability to defend them- 
selves against the Mi-24s. 

“Now the Sandinisis know that 
our units travel with SAM-7s and 
that one of their helicopters can be 


s >>>■■ 

*.t ***' ■■ 


urn. 


\ *w i 

!«f- ")Sj< ! 


Adolfo Calero Portocarrero 


hit by a rocket at any moment," 
Mr. Sdnchez said. 

Last Thursday, UJS. officials 
confirmed a report that the Nicara- 
guan Democratic Force shot down 
a Soviet-built helicopter with an 


US. House Pond Cites 2 Men 
For Silence on the Marcoses 


SAM-7 missile on Dec. 2, killing 14 
military personnel aboard. It is be- 
lieved to be the first use oT such 
missiles in the Western Hemi- 
sphere. 

The Nicaraguan government as- 
serted that the rebels had acquired 
the missiles from the Central Intel- 
ligence Agency. 

Rebel leaders have said previ- 
ously that they bought the SAM-7s 
on the international arms market 
with money donated by individuals 
in Europe and Latin America. They 
have denied that any of their mis- 
siles were provided by or manufac- 
tured in the United States. 

Adolfo Calero Portocarrero, the 
leader of the Nicaraguan Demo- 
cratic Force, who has been primari- 
ly responsible for arms acquisition 
since the U.S. Congress ended aid 
by the CIA last year, said he would 
not identify the country through 
which he bought the missiles. 

“I would love to be able to reveal 


SATRE IN WORDS AND PICTURES 
DOONESBUKY 
UAtYINTKIHT 


it." he said by telephone in Miami, 
“because it would surprise a lot of 
people. Bui I warn to be able to buy 
there again." 


CHRISTMAS 

DREAM 

CASHMERE 

DREAM 

CASHMERE 

GIFTS 

Tax free 

jru’ •h/pmen: .ill out ihe '.nr!,: 

25^- off for even 1 purchase 
of 9 cashmere sweaters 

Alexandre Savin 

7 'he Cashmere speck:! ht 
.tn exclusivity 


Cashmere House 

2, rue d'Agucsseau 
angle 60. Faubouig St-Kooore 
- PARIS 8« 


By Jeff Gerth 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — A House of 
Representatives subcommittee has 
cited for contempt of Congress two 
New York men who refused to an- 
swer questions on purported hold- 
ings in the United Slates of Presi- 
dent Ferdinand E. Marcos of the 
Philippines and his wife, Imelda. 

The contempt action, approved 
Thursday on a 6-3 vote; died Jo- 
seph Bernstein, a lawyer who helps 
foreigners invest in the United 
States, and his brother, Ralph 
Bernstein, who is the head of a New 
York City real estate company. The 
two have been linked in court re- 
cords and published reports to real 
estate transactions involving Mr. 
and Mrs. Marcos. 

Both refused to testify in closed 
bearings before the House Foreign 
Affairs subcommittee on Asian 
and Pacific affairs on Wednesday 
night on the ground of the attor- 
ney-client privilege. Ralph Bern- 
stein is not a lawyer. 

The attorney-cheat privilege al- 


lows communications between a 
lawyer and his cheat to remain con- 
fidential except in certain narrow 
exceptions. 

Contempt of Congress citations 
must be approved by the full com- 
mittee as well as the House and can 
be prosecuted by the Justice De- 
partment 

A conviction can result in a max- 
imum fine of $ 1 ,000 and as long as 
one year in prison. 

Representative Robert G. Torri- 
celli, a Democrat of New Jersey 
and a member of the subcommittee 
who voted with the majority, said 
that the two witnesses had “refused 
to answer questions about whether 
they ever met the Marcos family, 
questions about times, dates arid 
places before legal representation 
could ever have taken place and 
questions about nonlawyer activi- 
ty." 

The minister of information for 
the Philippines, Gregorio S. Cen- 
dana, has called the accusations of 
hidden holdings by the Marcoses 
“baseless and without foundation 
in truth and fact” 


FINLANDIA ^ 



■J.S. Lawmakers Say Budget Bill Shifts Power 


(Contained from Page 1) 

u that met its own goals, a series 
'< budget reductions would auto- 
' itically go into effect. 

(be legal challenge to the WD 
: used mainly on this question of 
L omatic reductions. The decision 
. wt these cuts into effect is kit to 
se government agencies, which 
. required to decide whether 
ogress has, in fact, met its deft- 
.reducing goals. 

•"he lawsuit argued that thispro- 
ure amounted to an illegal (We- 

■ on of congressional authority. 

■ What we really did is nun the 
' Igfft over to a bunch of imekct- 

■ bureaucrats,** kb. Synar said. 

! o addition, the suit argued that 
bill violated a recent Supreme 
. in decision that said Congress 


can take a formal action in only cue 
way: it must pass a b31 through 
both houses and present it to the 
president for bis signature. The 
automatic features of the budget 
bill, goes the argument, do not con- 
form to this principle. 

For instance, many federal pro- 
grams now include aimnal cost-of- 


labHshcd by law. If the automatic 
budget cuts went into effect, those 
increases could be limited, or elimi- 
nated, even though Congress did 
not specifically pas a law to that 
effect 

“II takes a law to repeal a law,” 
said Mr. Synar, a member of the 
Judiciary Committee. 

If the automatic provisions of 
the bill are ruled unconstitutional, 
the measure has provided for an 


alternative process. Both houses of 
Congress would have to adopt a 
law, and the president would have 
to sign it, that declared the legisla- 
ture’s failure to meet its own goals 
and specifically puts the across- 
the-board budget cuts into place. 

Another question is a more prac- 
tical one. The original version of 
the new budget procedure would 
have given the president wide dis- 
cretion in how the automatic 
s pending cuts would be made. This 
was changed in negotiations, and 
now the president serves a largely 
“ministerial function,” with little 
latitude in making the cuts. 

Still, the president would have 
some discretion, particularly tnthe 
military area, and some leg i s lat ors 
called this clause “an extremely 
dangerous step.” 






i . "■ 


Page 4 


SATORDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14-15, 1985 


- V. 


Hcralb 


OIVAL 



Pub&hed With Hk No, York Tm» ad H* Wmbrngtom Port 


trib une For M^cos, Facing a United Opposition, No Way to Win 


The Balanced-Budget Box 


The Gramm-Rudman budget amendment, 
now signed into Law, is the wrong way to 
allocate public funds, a sign of impotence, an 
effort to deceive, an abdication of responabQ- 
ity — and we welcome it. The measure em- 
braces the goal of a balanced budget by 1991 
and sets up a process whereby, if the president 
and. the Congress fail to reach deficit targets 
each year, a sturdy robot will supposedly do it 
for them. A little over half the budget would be 
exempt; the rest would be cut in lockstep. 

There is no question that the amendment is 
a dodge. One need only look at the bifi to 
which it was attached; a piece of necessary 
legislation to raise the debt ceiling beyond $2 
trillion for the first tune so that the Treasury 
can continue to borrow to cover tbe deficits of 
the last five years. If there were a true disposi- 
tion to deal with the deficit, the president and 
members of the Congress could have done that 
instead of this, which puts off the hard part. 

There is no question, dither, that next year 
they mil try to put off the bard part again. 
They always do; they already are trying. There 
is talk that the reconciliation bill making cuts 
in domestic programs to conform to this year's 
budget resolution (it would reduce tbe defidt 
by S20 billion) may be set aside in the rush to 
adjourn. Tbe president has threatened to veto 
it anyway, since it contains tax increases, and 
when the Congress reconvenes, tbe Gramm- 
Rudman process will be in place to fall back 
on. Thus the leaders comfort themselves. 

It is uue that the Gramm-Rudman meat ax. 
if it ever does fall, will have uneven, chaotic 
and in some cases even counterproductive ef- 
fects, saving in tbe short term only to cost 


Hold Marcos to His Pledge 


Judging only by the big print, there is hope- 
ful news from the Philippines. President Ferdi- 
nand Marcos may lose the snap election he has 
been forced to call for Feb. 7. Hours before the 
filing deadline, a bickering opposition agreed 
to a single slate, teaming the personable but 
untested Corazon Aquino with tbe seasoned 
but wily Salvador LaureL 

The opposition leaders differ on vital mat- 
ters. But so do Mr. Marcos and his new run- 
ning mate, former Foreign Minister Arturo 
Tolentino, who has even questioned the legal- 
ity of the vote. Thus, even if Mr. Marcos wins, 
fairly or not, he has at least felt it necessary to 
pass over his wife, Imeida. in naming a consti- 
tutional successor. 

But there is the fine print. Mr. Marcos can 
legally switch running mates before the vote, a 
contingency Mr. Tolentino does not rule oat 
And if Mr. Marcos finds tbe campaign going 


against him, it could conveniently be found 
unconstitutional by his Supreme Court 
The Constitution provides for special elec- 
tions if the president dies, resigns or is im- 
peached. To bypass that law and to ding to the 
advantages of incumbency, Mr. Marcos has 
“resigned” prospectively — saying he will “ir- 
revocably vacate” his office after the voting. 
Many Filipinos, including Mr, Tolentino, find 
that legally unpersuasive. But who decides? 
The same judiciary that has just cleared Mr. 
Marcos’s soldiers of any complicity in (he 1983 
assassination of Bemgno Aquino. The presi- 


dent’s Supreme Court will most study be fol- 
lowing the campaign news. 

Also following die news — and probably 
rooting far Mr. Marcos — is the New People’s 
Army, a Conmumist insurgency that has flour- 
ished imifar his misrule. Some estimate its w™ 
as high as 30,000, and detect among its leaders 
a fanaticism resembling Pd Pot’s in Cambo- 
dia. The NPA is incontestably home-grown, 
and wins converts in a predominantly Roman 
Catholic country by centering its attack on the 
“U-S.-Marcos dictatorship.” 

A Co mmunis t victory is by no means likely 
in a former colony tied to the United States by 
a shared language and legal tradition. But 
those ties are not proof against the revulsion 
inspired by a discredited regime. Americana 
cannot directly dislodge Mr. Marcos from 
power. Nor can they directly inspire the oppo- 
sition, drawn from the same elite that supports 
Mr. Marcos. But Washington can press for an 
honest camp aign and an e nd to the corrupt 
uses of its military aid. 

Most tangibly at risk are two vital U.S. 
msiaUatirm^ Quk Air Base and Subic Bay 
Naval Base, for which Mr. Marcos has 
squeezed generous ransom in successive leases. 
The best security for those bases is also what 
would be best for the PhUippmes: a democrat- 
ic deliverance in Manila. To that end, Ameri- 
cans should use every reasonable means to 
hold Mr. Marcos to his big-print pledges. 

— THE HEW YORE TIMES. 


Panama’s 'Beheading’ 


According to a report from the police in 
Ciudad NeOy, Costa Rica, witnesses last saw 
Dr. Hugo Spadafora alive reading a newspaper 
at a Panamanian National Guard border 
checkpoint, where he was bring detained after 
having been removed from a bus, about noon 
on Sept 13. The next person the Costa Rican 
police could find who had seen him was the 
young man who found his body, “completely 
decapitated,” in La Vaquita River just across 
the border from Panama the next afternoon. 

Dr. Spadafora was known, among other 
things, for having formed a battalion in Pana- 
ma to fight against tbe Somoza family in 
Nicaragua. He was also known for bring a 
keen critic of, among other things, the alleged 
drug trafficking connections of General Ma- 
nuel Antonio Noriega, who as commander of 
Panama’s National Defense Forces is the 
country’s strongman. 

The murder stunned Panama, which is not 
one of those Central American places where 
tbe lolling, let alone the evident torture and 
beheading, of critics is routine. In an impor- 
tant sense, however. Dr. Spadafora was not the 
only victim. There is reason to believe that the 
elected president, Nicolds Ardito Barietta, was 
planning to launch an inquiry into the crime 
upon his return from a trip to the United 
Nations in October. While he was still in New 
Y ork. General Noriega forced his ouster, actu- 
ally. Mr. Barietta, stru g glin g to maintain a 


thread of constitntionality, “separated” him- 
self from office under an obscure article and 
technically remains president 

The story was pat out that the Barietta 
economic policies were largely to blame, but 
knowledgeable Panamanians look more to the 
Spadafora affair. Panama’s painful progress 
toward democracy was thus “beheaded” too. 

In Panama, the atmosphere reeks of police 
intimidation, but large numbers of citizens 
have come out in the streets calling peacefully 
far an inquiry into the Spadafora murder. 
Meanwhile, the aimed forces are bringing un- 
der their control a whole range of functions — 
ports, railroads, customs, immigration — pre- 
viously and more properly under dvfl adminis- 
tration. The Barietta economic policy, which 
had been sanctioned by the political parties, 
threatens to go by the boards, with immense 
potential costs to the country’s economic via- 
bility and credit-worthiness. 

General Noriega is well known in Panama. 
He is becoming wdl known outside Panama as 
an imperious leader who fears to let indepen- 
dent investigators examine the Spadafora af- 
fair and to let independent dozens control 
their government- Almost every country in 
Latin America is going the democratic way 
except Nica ra gua and Panama. General Nor- 
iega is an embarrassment to his country, and to 
the integrity Of the Panamanian armed forces. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


FROM OUR DEC. 14 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: West End Chorus Girls on Leave 
LONDON — Forty choir boys have supplant- 
ed the gay and festive chorus girls for which 
the West End’s Gaiety Theatre has been world 
famed for two decades. In its place is a school- 
boy play, with only two female characters in 
the cast. And forty boys. No more do titled 
stage-door “Johnnies” send diamonds and 
flowers up to the dressing rooms. No longer is 
there a line of 40- horse-power automobiles 
waiting to pick up tbe footiight favorites. All 
this has come about because George Edwardes 
has leased his theatre for a Tew weeks to 
Frederick Mouillot, who is giving a comedy of 
English boarding-school life. The rosy- 
chedeed choir boys are only allowed to sing 
once as the curtain goes up on the final act. 
They almost saved that final acL 


1935: War Debtors 1 ’ Somber Regrets 
WASHINGTON — The semi-annual parade 
of grave-faced diplomats bringing to the State 
Department regrets on the eve of the Dec. IS 
war debt payment date has been resumed. The 
“diplomatic comedy” started when the United 
States a month ago informed the 14 debtor 
nations it was “willing" to hear proposals for 
resumption of payments. This was followed by 
prolonged study over an answer. Now formal 
notes are being presented professing apprecia- 
tion of tbe reminder. These add that condi- 
tions have changed insufficiently, but that the 
debtor nations will be glad to wwm t discus- 
sions whenever hope of a satisfactory result is 
warranted. By Dec. 16, tbe total overdue [will 
be] SI billion. Finland, as noml, is getting 
favorable editorial comment as the only payer. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chatman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

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® 1985, International Herald 7nhafe A0 rigfas reserved. 


M ANILA — The eleventh-hour 
compromise between the Phil- 


more in tbe long. Defense wiD suffer, but so 
will the other targets, the so-called discretion- 
ary domestic programs that are subject to the 
nnnnal ap pr opriations process. Aid to educa- 
tion, highway funds, small business and envi- 
ronmental programs, support for state and 
local governments — all would be cut 
Still, we think it is a good idea. You know a 
proposition partly by its enemies. As finally 
written, this was opposed most vigorously by 
those whose victories in the first five Reagan 
years are the very reason the deficit is sow so 
hi gh, the chief protectors of the first tarn's tax 
cuts and defense increases. The Gramm- Rud- 
man amendment does this: For the first time 
in the Reagan administration it says to the 
president that be cannot have it aH It is meant 
to force him finally either to cut military 
spending (which the Congress has curbed) or 
fund the taxes to pay for it. 

Opponents have worried that the amend- 
ment will transfer power to tbe president. On 
the contrary. He continues to say as be fanci- 
fully has for five years that there is another 
way to bring down the deficit — through 
in domestic spending. But be has concurred in 
exempting from any aits tbe largest domestic 
program. Social Security; and the Democrats 
now have civilized the Gramm-Rudman 
amendment by exempting the less costly pro- 
grams that help sustain the poor. There is not 
enough left on tbe domestic side to cul 
The admin istration when it first 

endorsed this amendment; Reagan aides may 
have thought the Congress would back off. 
Instead, it built a box for him — and for itself. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


JLVJL compromise between the PhiL- 
ippine opposition leaden Corazon 
Aquino and Salvador LaureL result- 
ing in a umted ticket for the Feb. 7 
election, confronts President Ferdi- 
nand Marcos with his toughest elec- 
toral battle m 20 years. 

Mr. Marcos called the election on 
the assumption that bis heretofore 
fragmented opposition would be in- 
capable of ranting against him. He 
hoped to prove to critics both here 
and in the United Stales that he re- 
mains the country’s only viable lead- 
er, that only he would be able to re- 
establish his government's political 
legitimacy, to curtail a growing Com- 
munist insurgency and to turn 
around an economy in crisis. 

The fact of a umted Aquioo-Laurd 
ticket, however, puts Mr. Marcos in a 
virtual no-win situation for the first 
time in his 20-year rale. If he calls off 
the ejections now (the Marcos-domi- 
nated Supreme Conn is expected to 
rule soon on the constitutionality of 
the unscheduled election), he will be 
pictured as an isolated dictator afraid 
of his own people. If he legitimately 
wins what & expected to be a dose 
election, inevitable cha rges of elec- 
toral fraud will undermine his dariw 
fora new six-year mandate. And if he 
is outpolled and forced to cheat on a 
large scale, be will be vilified for try- 
ing to save a corrupt regime. 

In fact, with a united opposition, 
any scenario that has Mr. Marcos 
remaining in power win do nothing to 


By Gay Sacerdoti 


rebuild tbe public confidence n eeded 
to end 30 months of dissent and polit- 
ical uncertainty. For that, the elec- 
tions will only show what many for- 
eign observers fear and many 
FDjpinos take for granted: that re- 
form is anathema to Mr. Marcos, 
Few analysts believe that Mr. Mar- 
cos, 68, win ever leave Malac afi a ng 
P alace aKve, least of all to vacate for 
tbe widow of his former rival, Ben- 
igno S. Aquino Jt., who was assassi- 
nated at M anila Airport in Aug. 21, 
1983. But more than anything else, 
“Cray” Aquino's candidacy has put 
Mr. Marcos in this predicament 
For while few doubt the political 
brilliance of Mr. Marcos, the master 
of Philippine politics has so far found 
it difficult to deal with this 52-year- 
Ctld fanner housewife who has pre- 
sented herself as a moral force stand- 
ing above the political fray. 

Since her husband's assassination, 


geance, of prayer instead of power. 
And yet she is imdligpit en ou g h to 
joggle the petty political deals in, 
braiding a unified ticket' without di- 
lutingthe primacy of her cause. 

For Cory Aqmno is fax more an 
anti-Marcos than a pro-Aquino can- 
didate. Her chances of actually beat- 
ing the Marcos machine lie in a rather 


If he calls off the 
election, he vri&be 


dictator; even if he tans 
legitbnatefy, there wBl 
be charges of fraud. 


Cory Aqumo has become a symbol. 
More than picking up “Nino/’ 
Aquino’s thwarted attonpts to pro- 
mote national reconciliation, she has 
come to represent the honesty, sim- 
plicity and religious commitment 
that are the traits of the people of this 
85-percent Roman Catholic nation. 

WhDe politics is a Philippines na- 
tional pastime, she is a reluctant poli- 
tician. While ftanriiHateit have an an- 
swer to everything, she will admit 
otherwise when she has none. She 
speaks in terms of justice, not wen- 


amazing feat: In the process of unify- 
ing the opposition, she has brought 
together both traditional opposition 


to respond to personal diatribes, 
brin ging ho*. down into trad i ti o nal 
Filipino political mudsli fl g in g- 

Just as important will be tbe role of 
the Catholic Church, led by the effer- 
vescent archbishop of Manila, Cardi- 
nal Jaime Sin. His rote cannot be 
understated. As perhaps the only na- 
tionwide institution that Mr. Marcos 
has been unable to co-opt, the church 
has nonetheless fdt its stature as tbe 
key to social stability undenmned 
during tbe president's relentless drive 
to tm hra tire and maintain power. 

In the pre-Marcos era of a more 
pluralistic political system, the 

church (much like the role of the king 

in Thai politics) set the popular psy- 
chological parameters within which 
the political game could be played. It 
obviously would like to see that role 
returned. And with Mrs. Aquino (a 
per sonal friend of the cardinal) as a 


candidate, priests can quietly support 
her moral stand in weekly sermons. 


lists, proponents of both the right and 
left, of those favoring foreign invest- 
ment and retention erf the two major 
U.S. mili tary bases as well as hard- 
core nationalists. 

Much of her appeal, and ultimate 
success, will depend upon her ability 
to parry Mr. Marcors expected at- 
tempts to force her to commit to 
specific policies that could split her 
Hetieate coalition — or to entice her 


her moral stand in weekly sermons. 

In the face of almost unlimited 
administration funds available for 
the government's campaign and tbe 
traditional political largess of Mr. 
Marcos's New Society Movement 
party, the church can say, as it did 
during National Assembly elections 

attenirallies is no^^o^^one 
votes his or her conscience. 

Cardinal Sin played a major rde in 
budding the unified opposition tick- 
et Returning from the synod in 


The Pros Know: In Espionage, It’s a Jungle Out There 

W ASHINGTON — Presidents and pditi- By Philip Geydin mention the Israeli case - - be is not just sqg 

, , , . . „ , ‘ • r » MMhnir h* « htmiina rnirail* mV1M«lflfl<nB 

cal leaders seem obliged to talk down to 


W cal leaders seem obliged to talk down to 
the people about the delicate, disagreeable and 
dangerous game of international espionage. 
Keep it simple is the rule: There are good guys, 
bad guys and modi you should not trouble 
yourself about 

Old pros in the in telligenc e trade — and I am 
talking about real spies, not the high- technology 


types — talk differently. They talk cynically, up 
fronL Knowing it’s aiunde out there, they do not 


fronL Knowing it's ajungleout there, they do not 
onnfnse espionage with crime in the streets. 

The two lands of talk we hove been hearing 
about the recent rash of spy cases, and particu- 
larly the one involving Israel are aperfect illus- 


larly the one involving Israel are a perfect ilia 
(ration of why. if you want a rounded view, it is 
good idea to stick with the professionals. 


the professionals. 


In his recent radio address on tbe subject, for 
example. President Reagan dwelt on the threat to 
the West from a growing swarm of KGB agents 
working is the United States and around die 
world for the Soviet Union audits satellites. 

“There is no reason to sugaicaat reality,” the 
president said, adding "Die Free World is today 
confronted with some of the most sophisticated, 
best orc h est ra ted efforts of theft and espionage 
in modem history.” 

True enough- But when tbe president promises 
to “root out and prosecute the spies of any 
nation,” and insists, “we win let the drips fall 
where they may” — and still cannot bear to 


mention tbe Israeli case — be is not just sugar- 
coating; he is harming public understanding. 

The same may be said for the arguments we 
arc gettin g from Israel’s best friends in America: 


arc getting from Israel’s best friends in America: 
That the case of Jonathan Jay Pollard is the work 
of irresponsible, overzealoust underlings. “We 
<nn straighten fhig out in no time,” Senator 
Daniel Patrick Moynihan, a New York Demo- 
crat, said tbe other day. 

If so, why did it take the Israeli government a 
full week to dear its throat before issuing an 
apology “to the extent that” roying on the Unit- 
ed States “did take place”? Why did even that 
non-apology have to be negotiated by tbe U.S. 
secretary of state? 


Rome at the end of November, be ! 
found Mrs. Aquino trying desperate*- ; 
ly to work exit a united coalition. Mr. 
Laurel was steadfast in his belief that 
with his United Nationalist Demo- 
cratic Organization, or UNIDO, hav- 
ing the strongest grass-roots political - 
machine, he would be the best bet to ' 
c halleng e Mr. Marcos. 

Cardinal Sin met separately several 
times with both Mrs. Aquino and Mr. 
LaureL in essence backing her stand - 
as the moral alternative but empha- 
sizing to both the need to break the . ■ 
impasse for the national good. 

The Aquino Laurel slate will not 
be without problems. Most difficult 
wifi be melding tbe two organiza- 
tions, both dominated by their re- 
spective families, into a campaign 
with similar thrusts. Mrs. Aquino’s 
major concession to Mr. Laurel was ’ 
to run under tbe UNIDO banner. But ■ 
ii is likely that her PDP-Laban coali- 
tion supporters will want to cam- 
paign with their own party structures 
m areas where they are strangest. 

At the same time they wiH have to 
counter the presence on the Marcos 
ticket of former Foreign Minister Ar- ' 
turo M_ Tolentino, 75, chosen as tbe 
president's running mate. Mr. Tolen- 
tino was dropped from the cabinet 
last March after publicly criticizing 
Mr. Marcos's policies. The Marcos 
strategy in pi clang a critic as his vice 
president seems dear. He will appear . 
tolerant of criticism and amenable to 
reforms demanded by the opposition, 
while taking advantage of Mr. Tolen- 
tino’s vote-getting appeal particular- 
ly in Manila, where the opposition is 
especially strong. 

As the election date nears, the criti- 
cal factor may be whether the oppoo- . 
non can stay united. Opposition ana- 
lysts now say they expect to win by a ' 
3-2 ma rg in, an estimate even some * 
high government officials do not see 
as unreasonable. But, as one analyst _ 
said, “gjven 10 percent for cheating, . 
it will be touch and go.” 

WhDe Mr. Marcos probably will 
have contingency plans for retaining 
his presidency, it is more probable ' 
that his “master stroke” of calling ■ 
early elections will result in yd an- 
other presidential embarrassment . 


You might have thought that when Mr. Pol- 
'd, a UiL Navy inteQigaice analyst cOenedly 


. TELL TH E ISRAHJS r WE 
ACCEPT THBR APot06r, /IN0 
WE DON'T WANT TO GATtH THEM 
SPYING ON US AGAIN!** 







lard, a U.S. Navy intelligence analyst allegedly 
offered to sell U.S. militar y secrets to Israel, die 
Israelis would have warned their good American 
friends about a serious threat to U.S. security 
instead of apparently exploiting it for their own 
purposes. But that wold not be in the nature of 
the U-S.-Israeli relationship, -nor in the nature of 
tbe espionage games even friendly nations play. 

The United States and Israel cooperate on 
in tellig ence matters up to a point The United 
States holds back that would threaten 

relations with its Arab fnends in the region. The 
beleaguered Israelis venture off from time to 
time without tbe slightest sense of obligation to 
oocmsel with Washington in advance. 

Which brings us back to the professionals and 
the it’s-a-jungic-oul-there theory of the case. The 
old bands take it far granted that Israel conducts 
intelligence operations in the United States. 


The writer, Manila correspondent 
for the Far East Economic Review, 
contributed this comment to the Las 
Angeles Times. 


In Austria, 
A Shadow 
On the Snow 


By David Hermges 


V IENNA — The local image- 
makers have their work cut out 


They assume as well that after assorted surprises 
— the 1956 Suez war, the Israeli bombings of 
Iraq and IXmisia, and the full scale of Israel's war 
in Lebanon — the United States has been doing 
its own intelligence checking on IsraeL 
And yet when they say so out loud — wdL 
consider the reaction recently when a former 
director of Central Intelligence, Richard Helms, 
did just thaL He said that “the only sin in 
espionage is getting c a ught.” 

Asked on a Sunday talk show whether Ameri- 
ca could conceivably be spying on its NATO 
a ll i es , be said: “I hope so. Espionage is not 
playedfry the Marquis of Queensberry rules.” 

WdL you could have knocked ABCs Sam 
Donaldson over with a classified document If 
the otriy crime was being caught, why have espio- 
nage laws? By that standard, Mr. Donaldson 
pressed on, we might wdl cheat on our income 
taxes — as long as we don't get caught 
Mr.' Helms struggled m vain to explain tbe 
difference between taxes and espionage. He tried 
to explain that the subtleties and just plain law- 
breaking involved in inteHigeoce and counterm- 
tdfigence activities are not so much a meiw of 
cops-and-robbers as o t damage limitation. But 
the espionage struggle in the shadows, between 
friends as wdl as adversaries around the worid, is 
not a subject that, leads itself to Sunday talk 
shows or to presidential radio chats. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


d 


r ^ 

WE ACCEPT YOUR 
apology; and •#«»«. 

A 



f 


lu’j 


V makers have their work rat out . 
for them this Christmas season. The ~ 
oozy vision of an Alpine country J[ 
dotbed in spotless snow, with cheer- • 
ful natives quaffing Gluhwein, is be- 
coming more difficult to maintain. - 
The snow has fallen on cue, yet 
here in the capital H is anything but 
pristine white; and the wine . . . wefl, 
the less said the better, especially now . 
that a new scandal has appeared. . 
(Tbe latest additive, found in hun- 


LETTERFROM VIENNA 


The Fight Over Morality, Birthrates and Survival 


W ASHINGTON — A federal ap- 
peals coart here has made & 


YV peals coart here has made a 
foreign polity decision on a techni- 
cality that highlights the peenfiar 
means same conservatives are using 
to force tbdr view of morality on the 
rest of the world. 

The coun ruled that the UJ3. Agen- 
cy for International Devdopment 
may release to ce r t ain countries a 
total of S10 milli on that it had with- 
drawn from the United Nations 
Fund for Population Activities. Wer- 
ner Fora os, president of the Wash- 
ington-based Population Institute, 
had sued to freeze tbe money in an 
effort to restore it to the important 
United Nations agency. 

What all this lejpl wrangling is 
really about is abortion and steriliza- 
tion in countries straggling against 
explosive birthrates that menace not 
only tbdr own hopes for the future 


By Flora Lewis 


Then it repeats the urgency of speed- mean disaster in the world's new tar- 
ing Mr. Lord to Bering, where Ik cu instances. The dominant official 
now has taken up his assignment. view in Africa had been that more 
The connection is not drawn ex- people m 
plidtly, but it is perfectly obvious. It- only way 
is also obvious that by holding up countries ' 
dozens of diplomatic confirmations At pres 
until be got bis way, and threatening the21st a 
to do it again, Mr. Hdms has cowed population 
the State Department into an ernbar- Kenya twi 
rassing and counterproductive stand, lion. Thor 
Tbe $10 million that China was braking p< 
receiving was a drop in the bucket control — 
compared with the $1 billion it carc,betfc 
spends to try to stabilize its popula- there has- 
tion at a projected 1.3 bfflion by tbe number a 
year 2000. But it was an important bow they 

symbol of U-S. support for an exem- 
oatinghr difficult national effort, and 
the prohibition was an insult 
It is ironic that tbe United States - - 
wdl not take China’s word on 0 k Howto 
population control measures that it - . 

uses, but accepts more dubious a$$nr- _ + n 
an ces that Cmna will not allow bit 
lions of U-S. dollars in nuclear tech- 
nology aid to seep out and thwart Tbe old 
efforts at nuclear nonproliferation. with anidi 
But it is evra more hypocritical to out mono 
cut off birth-control support in the now berq 
name of a 1J-S -l egislated defrnirirwi man pedd 

of morality in a worid of ^xeaifing allies led t 
famine and strained resources. This is Britain'! 

a month race, alongside the arms “1984; &h 
race, because there is no. way eco- dity of da 


but the fate of the world. Specifically, 
it is about the charge that Chma 
forces some people to undergo these 
operations, or offers than financial 
incentives to do sol 
E vidence that China does this was 
not even offered, but the administra- 
tion petition was that it is up to 
China to prove it has punished any- 
body who has forced sicfa an “abuse" 
on us citizens. Not is there evidence 
that the administration really wants 


people mean more power, and tbe 
only way to catch up with better-off 
countries was to outnomber them. 

At present rates, by the middle of 
the21st century Nigeria will have the 
population that <Trm» h«r now, and 
Kenya twice tbe presem U.S. popula- 
tion. There are many more factors in 
braking population growth than birth 
control — education, better health 
care, better agricultural policies. But 
there has to be recognition, that die 
number of people in the worid and 
how they five are directly related. 


Until about a century and a half ago, 
the worid population had been al- 
most stable over two millennia. The 
biblical injunction to reproduce was 
needed to assure human survival. 

. _ Now science has duinpd the sur- 


dreds of vintages, is sodium azide, 
which is potentially toxic and is used 
as an explosive; newspaper cartoon- 
ists are having a field day.) 

What has really thrown the Advent 
scene into disarray, though, and has 
given the man in the street a chance 
to vent his wrath against “those at the 
top,” is the news from Liny 

Voest- Alpine AG, often described 
as Austria's industrial flagship, has 
nm aground. If it woe not a national- 
ized enterprise it would be doomed. 
The losses expected this year by the 
unwieldy giant — it employs 70,000 
people in tbe steel, en gineering and 
electronics sectors — are fri ghtening , 
on tbe Older of 4.2 billion schffiings 
($232 million). Only a huge injection 
of capital from its owner, the Repub- 
lic of Austria (otherwise identifiable 
as Johann Q. Taxpayer), has kept tbe 
vessel afloat. Tbe captain nnd all his 
bridge officers have had to go over- 
board. Herbert Ap falter, Voest's di- 
rector -general. resigned Nqv. 26, 
along with the company’s directors. 

By Austrian standards the debacle 
is so huge that the country's econom- 
ic structure may never be the same. 

Much of the ef pr mn (je attrib- 
uted to the activities of Intertrading, 


vival question, requiring huma n care a Voest subsidiary. Intertrading was 
to protect nature’s ability to support set up to make countertrade arrange- 


<jut numbers. 

It is incredible that a privile ged 
group in tbe United States should 


meats for Voest products and ser- 
vices. Quickly, however, it found it- 
self embroiled in switch-deals 


presume to punish others trying to involving tanker loads of erode oil 
fact tins duemma, and in the name of that certain Middle Eastern and Afri- 

VtWollHl CnAmml * ■ a * _ 


morality. Survival remains the issue, can countries wanted to use fra* pay- 

mtxigh in different terms. Senator m®L to sidestep thdrOFECmtotax. 


Helms’s dictated position is not only 
bad policy, it is immoral In the most 
profound human sense. 

The Hew York Times. 


LETTERS TO THE ^EDITOR 

How to Nail SDI phisticated computer, ' 


In response to “Britain Jobts in SDJ 
Program ; First AJfy to Accept U.S. 
Ofj&(Dec. 7): , 

Tbe old caricature of Unde Sam 
with an idiot's grin tnrnritewly d nlirig 
out money - for idiot schemes must 
now be replaced by & make crilsales- 
man peddHag his wares to gullible-- 
allies led by John Bufl. 

Britain’s own Arthur C. Qarke,jn. 
“1984, Spring,” points out the absur- 
dity of those “orbiting mirrors? and 


phisticated computer, whatever, 
turning it instantly to scrap. 

: BEN LANE. 

Soflentuna, Sweden. 

In coqtmction with a horrifying 
range of weapons in the U.S. nr*en*i 
including MX, Pershing-2 and 
chiise missil es and Trident subma- 
rines — “star wars” is intended to 
pin a first-strike advantage over the 


For a while ail was well But early 
this year oil prices began to fall, leav- 
es Intertrading with heavy forward 
commitments. Traders appear to 
have panicked. Wild speculation eo- 
sued.lt was like a roulette player vfoo. . 
stakes his shut on rouge, only to see ' - 
now come up. At this point the minis- 
ter for nationalized indnstrieSvFerdi- 
nand Larina, stepped in with “Rien# 
ne va pins!” Eveiythm» he said, ; 
must be turned around within, three ’■* 

years; the books must be balanced. 

. He announced thar strict legists- 
tKm would be implemented to give ■ . 
Added motntives to managers whose 
nationalized enterprises showed a 
profit .Cdaveisdy, those who slipped 


> 

N 


Union. In addition to costing ^ would suffer financ ial 


'bilfiocis of dollars, it is bringing us “““equraces and, most painfully, 
closer to midear holocaust • have their penaons cat. 

HANS STUDER. ^ pro- 

the major * 

should be addressed “Letters to the ***** lor granted; That the socialist’ 

Editor* tmd must contain the writ- s * !txx <*wld benefit from observance- : 
er's ripi ature. name md 0 ad- « arch'a capitalist concept as profit- ' 

dress. Letters should be brief and an ™* has come as a shock to the 

are satt/edg editing, We cannot J^rage Austrian as he polls out his ‘ 
be. response for the return of . “ads for the mountains to 

unsolicited manuscripts. gftt away from ball 


Reagan to Senator Jesse Helms, dat- 
ed Ocl 6, explains the political trade- 
off that Mr. Hdms extracted. 

The “Dear Jesse” letter starts off 
saying bow much the president want- 
ed confirmation of Winston Lord as 
U.S. ambassador to Ouna. Then it 
switches to a lengthy assurance that 
China will not get any American 
funds through the UN program to 
bdp its population control efforts. 


comic devdopment can keep up with ' “space-based electromagnetic do- 
unlimited demographic growth Jja , vices" mentioned in tins report- The 


most of the poor countries. Hie bfllion-doilar 
choice is between “natural” popula- how fierce, c 
don control — Malthusian tragedy means so sinq 
— and human responsibility. their use is eve 

As .Werna- Foraos notes, under- ’ According ti 
mining the UN fund will make only a necessary id pi 
token difference to China. But it will same orbit, bui 
really hurt up to a hundred other :* ate direction. 


bfllion-doilar satellites, :rio matter 
how fierce, can be destroyed by 
means so simple that it is a wonder 
thrir use is even contemplated. •• 
According to Mr. Gance, it is only 
necessary to place a kegofnafisin the 
same orbit, buttrndmgmthiBoppov' 
ate direction. Tbe nails eventually 


- HANS STUDER. 
L cnz burg, Switzerland. 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed ^Letters to the 
Editor? and must contatn tbe writ- 
er’s signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
tire subject to editing We cannot 


countries thar are just be ginning jq would collide t- at 25,000 mph — 
understand that age-old altitudes with the space mirror, rril'gun, so- 












Page 5 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14-15, 1985 


^Intelligence byU.S., Israel 


^ By Dstvid K. Shipler 

' v New York Thnea'Senrice 


who say it will' undermine other 
espionage rfforts, and the degree of 
Israeli cooperation has to become 
ctearyet 

The team of American officials. 
ted by Abraham D. Sofaer, the 
State Department le g al adviser, 
was reported to have begun meet- 
ings Thursday with officials in Isra- 
el who are said to have received 
stolen documents from Mr. Pol- 
lard. 

The VS. team is understood to 
be concentrating on two areas of 
inquiry: first, to determine whether 
this was an isolated case orpart of a 
broader Israeli spy network in the 
United States; aim. second, to make 
what one flfffeial e*TM “a damage 
: * ed questioning Isradi assessmau" that will detail what 

probed in thecase. information Mr. PoOartTs docu- 

‘In some areas," Mr. Armhage 
d,*Thae has been slowdown in TheUmtedSt 


v; 

- ~i“ ^ WASHINGTON —The United 
.!T‘ r ' has reduced its- sharing of 

>:^;'<eI]jgenaMoimarioo with Israel 
* Jonathan Jay Pofiard, a for- 

" rt dvifian intelligence analyst for 
: , r<i U.S. Nayy.was arrested Nov. 

iJ -* ;^ : °n charges of espionage, accord- 
' to a senior Defense Depart- 

; ."i ■< J’ :nt 

senior Pentagon official, 
; diard 1. Armitage, assistant de- 
\t \se secretary for international se- 
v/, ity affairs, said Thursday in an 
' ‘‘Ijf^-erview that a resumption of 
r ~ fy.: :* intelligence relations would 
- . ‘. ‘Nib to wart until the American 
- ;'m that now is in Israel has fin- 


‘ • m t : dGgence cooperation — not in 
al areas. Ana we're waiting the 
7 -- .-.- lilts of the Pollard fact-finding 

•• ‘'esiigation." 

T, yir. Anniiage said U.SL officials 
ume that “full cooperation will 
- ~ forthcoming" in accordance 
• ' " c; .'h a statement to that effect by 
J: -' '.^me Minister Shimon Peres. 


Pens has apologized to the short term, at least, relations w3Z 

: Slates has rvmraveri the denend nn the inFnrmntinn T< 


>uted States, has poruayed the 
operation as independent of 
ael’s main intelligence agencies. 
i has pledged to help American 
'-r-^estigators. This abroach has 
iwn criticism from some Israelis 


i odet Union Is Attempting 
o Control Video Revolution 


■;:r ’ft 


‘■■y. (Continued from Pqge I) 

- -ant 30 rubles. A ruble is 51-28 at 
' official exchange rale, and the 

' L '*rage Soviet worker earns about 
} rubles a month. 

‘But Russians said this was a vast 
“ ’ provement over the first efforts 

' ■ translate filiw^ which involved 
ing someone to do a shnnlia- 
oos translation while a movie 
s shown. 

i , i Blank tapes are particularly ex- 
|| jafflasive. A tape that costs J5 in the 
‘‘ u iited States sells for the eqtriva- 
I . it or between J60 and $70 on the 
1 n maj k r> *n Moscow. 

■ HuUvPrices, however, have fallen in 
ent years as the availability of 
'> lea playera and movies has in- 
Japanese ami other fer- 
n-made video players sell for 
out 2^500 rubles m Moscow. Two 
i tin llrraarsapo the cost was 3,500 rubles. 
Copies of Western movies, avail- 
-le only on the black market, may 

- I for 200 or 250 rubles in Mos- 

- -v. Western movies are brought 

. . Yedisb Group Protests 
•ench Nuclear Teste 

Agence France-Proof 

- - STOCKHOLM — Several fain- 
■ ■■ -sd members of the Swedish 

- - ice Movement emptied bottles 
... . - Eteaujobus wine into the snow 
—^day in protest of French nodear 

in the Sooth Pacific. 

The protest was staged against 

-tear tests conducted by France 
• tsMunxroaatoQ, and in support 
- the Greenpeace environmental 

- - - alp’s campaign against the tests. 


into the country by tourists, by 
Russians who travel abroad, and 
by some diplomats, whose luggage 
is not checked at customs. 

Soviet video players and televi- 
sion sets are not compatible with 
American, Japanese or most West 
European models. The Soviet 
equipment, however, can be con- 
verted to handle movies recorded 
for other video systems, and a pros- 
pering underground business has 
developed to do just that, accord- 
ing to Muscovites. They raid it 
costs about 400 rubles to have a 
Soviet color television converted. 

The Soviet video player, the 
Sekmnufca VM, costs 1,200 ra- 
bies. In October, as part of a new 
drive to increase the availability of 
consumer goods, the government 
announced that it planned to pro- 
duce 60,000 video players a year by 
1990 and 120,000 a year by 2000. 

By Western standards, the goal 
was smaH MBHons of video players 
are sold every year in the United 
Stales. But for the Soviet Union, 
the totals were considered less im- 
portant than the fact that the gov- 
ernment had decided to mass-pro- 
dnee a product that until recently it 
considered decadent and politically 
ins. 

are two video rental out- 
lets in Moscow. One is in the base- 
ment erf a movie theater near the 
central farmer's market The decor 
is drab, and, unlike American video 
stores, there are no cassette covers 
lined up along the wall to advertise 
the selection of movies. Andrei G. 
Tkachenko, a salesmen, said the 
store has a library of 270 films. 


which resulted when Israeli offi- 
cials refrained from their usual' 
meetings and am tacts with Ameri- 
cans because they were embar- 
rassed by the Pollard affair. ! 

Shortly after the arrest,' for at- 
ample, two Isradi generals — Ebod 
Barak, bead of imluajy intelli- 
gence, and Amos Lapidot, com- 
mander of die air force — reported- 
ly canceled a scheduled : visit to 
Washington. They are unmake the 
, at a date not yet set, an 


Jnhed States has asked for 
the return of all the documents, but 
it was not known whether Israel 
wjH comply. 

Although Mr. Armitage slopped 
short of linking renewed American 
sharing of hneUigence to Israeli co- 
operation in the Pollard case, the 
anger and resentment expressed in 
various government agencies sug- 
gest to some officials that in the 


depend on the information Israel 
gives to the American investigators. 

Some of the reduction m the 
sharing of intelligence has been a 
mutual and natural devdoptmait, 
(me American official explained. 


Some of the mlhibiitipns may de- 
rive Cram a message being driven 
borne in tbe government that an 
official who conveys rk«a fieri in- 
formation to Israel without formal 
authorization is committing espio- 
nage, even if he does it without pay. 

*T think there is a deplorable 

amount of that," sad one high- 

ranking official. “Any individual 
who sees Israeli and US. interests 
as parallel is dead wrong." 

Officials say the Pollard case has 
helped u> create a new atmosphere 
of toughness in it* etiwr^rintwTli - 
gence fidd that tiny believe could 
throw a chdl into some of tbe infor- 
mal Israeti-American relationships. 

In tbe past tbe two countries 
have shared a broad fange of infor- 
mation, especially on terrorism, 
electronics countermeasures and 
weapons systems. 

■ Export Law Violation Probed 

Meanwhflej, go v e rnm e n t officials 
said Thursday they are investigat- 
ing the possible illegal export to 
Israel of plans and technology for 
malting tank cannon barrels, The 
New York Times reported. 

Frederick Scufiin Jr, the UJS. 
attorney in Albany, New York, 
said in a statement that customs 
agents had raided factories owned 
by three companies in Connecticut, 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey in 
search of evidence in thecase. 

A spokesman for the Isradi Em- 
bassy, Asher Naim, denied Thurs- 
day night that the government of 
Israel had participated in any viola- 
tion of export laws. 

“Maybe somebody at one of 
these companies did not fill out a 
form," he said. “But it is not accu- 
rate to say we connived to steal 
something It does not work that 
way ” He said that all Israeli mih- 
taiy procurement from the United 
States was done through the Penta- 
gon and with rts approval. 


What’s in an Acronym? 
Ask Workers for SEDA 

International Herald Tribune . 

STOCKHOLM.— The Swedish 
International Development Agen- 
cy, which has the acronym SID A, is 
to change its name to the Swedish 
Office for. International Aid, with 
the acronym SOIA, because of as- 
sociations with a lethal disease. 

Workers for the government-fi- 
nanced agency discovered the 
problem when Stockholm sent a 
consignment of T-shirts with tbe 
printed slogan “SIDA e’estmof* — 
“SIDA that's, me” — to Swedish 
aid wodeera in Francophone Afri- 
ca. Swedish officials then discov- 
ered the initials also stood farsyn- 
drome itnmuno defidtmre acquis, or 
AIDS in English. 



FLOTILLA — Minesweepers from North Atlantic 


the Themes Barrier, commissioned in 1983 to protect 
London from flooding, on a visit to tbe British capital. 


Shultz Says European Allies Value 
Security Over Arms-Control Accord 


By John M. Goshko 

Washington Past Sendee 

BRUSSELS — Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz said Friday 
that European allies of the United 
States, while anxious for a U.S.- 
Soviet arms control agreement, did 
not want accords “that are made at 
the expense of Western security or 
Western values." 

“There’s no pressure for that at 
all,” Mr. Sbnltz said after West 
European foreign ministers told 
hrm that Western public opinion 
expected concrete steps toward 
arms control at the next UiL-Sovi- 
et summit mwering , expected dur- 
ing 1986. 

At a news conference canchufing 
the annual year-end North Atlantic 


put in the position where some 
deadline or the prospect of some 
meeting will cause us to agree to 
something we don’t think is in oar 
interest we «««» die Soviet 
Union would feel rirmkriy on 

that " 

The Geneva arms talks involve 
three areas: intercontinental nucle- 
ar micqii-< medium-range missiles 
and outer space weapons. Bui it is 
the medium-range area that has at- 
tracted the most European atten- 
tion. 

“I recognize that people want 
that" Mr. Shultz said in reference 
to European calls for an interim 
agreement on medium-range mis- 
siles when Mr. Gorbachev and Mr. 
Reagan meet again. 


The missile deliveries were halt- 
ed in January after three UB. sol- 
diers burned to death in a fire while 
unloading components from a 
shipping container. 

An army investigation conclud- 
ed that a rocket motor, packed with 
solid fuel, ignited from static elec- 
tricity and caused a flash fire. De- 
ployment resumed only after the 
missQes and their transportera were* 
modified to prevent a recurrence of 
the fire. 

The final IVf t hhlg nKlallmm rc 

mean that NATO has based a total 
of 140 medium-range launchers in 
Western Europe to counter the So- 
viet arsenal of SS-20 missiles.. 

Britain, Italy and Belgium haw 
already stationed 32 cruise missile 
launches on their terr ito ry, 


“We all want it," Mr. Shultz said. 

Treaty Organization foreign minis- “But I believe also people warn us cruise launcher carries four mis- 
ters' meeting, Mr. Shultz focused to be realistic, and I don’t think our ales. The Netherlands has agreed 

publics here or in the United States 
want the United States to make 
agreements that are at tbe expense 
of Western security or Western val- 
ues." 

In the section of the meeting’s 
communique dealing with arms 
control, the ministers put NATO 
on record as sayings “We strongly 
support UB. efforts in all three 


on European hopes that U.S.-Sovi- 
et arms talks in Geneva would pro- 
duce an agreement reducing or lim- 
iting the number of UB. and Soviet 
medium-range misales based in 
Europe. 

Several Europeans, including Sr 
Geoffrey Howe of Britain and 
Hans-Dietrich Geuscher of West. 
Germany, stressed Thursday that & 


new meeting betwe e n President areas of negotiation.” 

^li5l Swiet ■ Pershings Deployed 
leader, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, must . „ % TT *. _ m 

produce more specific results WilUam Drozdiak of The Wadt~ 

was the case at their Geneva meet- Fy reported from Bom v 

West Germany said Friday that 
the UB. Army has completed the 


ing last month. 

“Yon can be sore that the United 
States win be bending every effort 
to find a good agreement if there is 
such an agreement to be found," 
Mr. Shultz said. “Whether any- 
thing wfll be agreed remains to be 
seen. We wffl search hard for any 
good agreement that is posable." 

Bat, he added, “we win not be 


deployment of the 108 Penthing-2 
missiles on its territory 
Defease Ministry officials said 


to take another 48. 

■ Gorbachev on SS-20s 
Mr. Gorbachev has said that the 
Soviet Union “kept its pronuse” to 
dismantle launchers for SS-20 mis- 
siles in Soviet Europe that he said 
were withdrawn from standby alert 
two months ago. The Associated 
‘Press reported from Moscow. 

Mr. Gorbachev made the com- 
ment in a meeting Thursday with 
Louis Mennaz, president of tbe 
French National Assembly. 

During a visit to Puis in Octo- 
ber, Mr. Gorbachev said that the 
Soviet Union had removed the mis- 
siles that had been deployed on its 
European territory since June 1984. 
The Soviet Union said the mis- 


ihat the 56th Field Artillery Bri- sfles were placed in response to 
gade was now eq uip ped with 36 NATO’s deployment of Pershing-2 
single-warhead Pershing-2 miB^lgjt and cruise missiles in Western Eu- 
at three sites near the towns of rop* sod were in addition to 243 
Mutlangen, Heflbronn and Nco- triple-warhead SS-20s already de- 
Ulm in southwest Germany. ployed west of the Ural Mountains. 


impr 

Afrit 


Russian Ends 
Visit to China 


(Continued from Page 1) 
fort to reduce tensions. The Af- 
ghanistan and Cambodia issues 
would be more difficult to solve. 

Western diplomats, meanwhile, 
said (hey were baffled by China's 
intense reaction to the recent arrest 
of a Chinese research scholar in 
Berkeley, California. 

According to the UJS. State De- 
partment, campus policemen ar- 
rested the student on Nov. 18 for 
allegedly peeping into a girls' dor- 
mitory. They later acknowledged 
mistake. 

The Chinese government says 
tbe police beat the student, but the 
local authorities said they believed 
that no more force was used than 
was necessary to get him to the 
police station. The State Depart- 
ment expressed regret to tbe Chi- 
nese that the campus police bad not 
informed Grina’s consulate general 
in San Francisco. 

On Wednesday, a Chinese For- 
eign Ministry spokesman called it 
“a grave inrident, winch consti- 
tutes a violation of personal free- 
dom and the safety erf rMnese na- 
tionals in the United Slates." 

He also criticized continuing 
Western restrictions on transfers of 
high technology to China as well as 
the UB. Senate’s approval on Dec. 
9 of a draft proposal that he said 
mnHft “unreasonable demands" for 
unilateral changes in the newly 
signed U 5. -China nndear cooper- 
ation agreement 

Yet another spokesman voiced 
concern over a proposed U-Su tex- 
tiles quota bilL 

Diplomats said that this list of 
complaints, which was given great 
prominence in the Chinese press 
Thursday, constituted a record air- 
ing of differences at a time when 
they thought U -China relations 
were steadily moving forward. 


South Africa 
Bans Book 
By Winnie 
Mandela 


Reuters 

CAPE TOWN — South Africa 
has banned a book by Winnie 
Mandela, the black nationalist, ac- 
cording to the latest list of censored 
material published Friday. 

“Part of My Soul," by Mrs. Man- 
dela. wife of "Nelson Mandela, the 
jrisoned leader of, the banned 
frican National Congress, pre> 
sumably falls into tbe category of 
“undesiraWc’* because she has been 
banned since 1976 and cannot le- 
gally be quoted in South Africa. 

Banning people is a South Afri- 
can method of silencing political 
dissent. Under the order, Mrs. 
Mandela has been banished to in- 
ternal exile near the remote town of 
Brandfon. She is prohibited from 
meeting with more than one person 
at a time and from addressing pub- 
lic gatherings. 

Tbe book ban makes it illegal to 
possess a copy in South Africa. 

In Johannesburg, meanwhile. 
South African radio accused Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan of hypocrisy 
for denouncing apartheid in a 
speech on Human Rights Day. 

“The United States associates 
and trades freely with countries 
curtailing democratic freedoms 
and even with those actively work- 
ing Tor America's downfall,” the 
South African Broadcasting Corp. 
said in a commentary reflecting 
government views. "To many 
South Africans this is nothing short 
of sheer hypocrisy." 

Mr. Reagan imposed limited 
economic sanctions against South 
Africa in October after lobbying by 
ami-apartheid groups. 

In his speech Tuesday, Mr. Rea- 
gan mentioned rights abuses in sev- 
eral countries. But his condemna- 
tion of South Africa was especially 
harsh. He described the official po- 
licy of apartheid as “abhorrent." 

The commentary said that Mr. 
Reagan “mentioned other coun- 
tries whose human rights records 
left much to be desired, but there 
was not a word about what they 
should do to set the matter 
straight." 

■ Danes Vote to End Trade 

The Danish parliament, domi- 
nated by leftists, voted Friday to 
cut off aD trade with South Africa 
as soon as possible despite con- 
cerns expressed by Prime Minister 
Foul Schluter, Agence France- 
Presse reported from Copenhagen. 

Coal imparts, accounting for 
1, 130 million kroner ($125 million), 
will end next year. 

_ Denmark’s exports to South Af- 
rica were worth 709 nriHian kroner 
last year. Danish employers say the 
trade ban will mean the loss of 
ZflOO jobs in the country. 

Robbere Steal 3 Billion lire 

The Associated Press 

FLORENCE — Twelve robbers 
armed with pistols and submachine 
guns stoic about 3 billion lire (SI. 74 
milium) from a post office Friday 
after holding the manager and a 
cashier overnight, Italian poboe re- 
ported. 



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Radio and Radar Systems 
Railway Systems 
Standard Products 
Turbines (AEG KANIS) 

AEG employs 73,000 people in 110 countries 
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5 


(I 

ta 


■; 






Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14^15, 1985 


ARTS/LEKURE 


Michelangelo: First Mann erist 


By Susan Lumsden 

F LORENCE— The only undiluted panel paint- 
ing by Michelangelo was nnvdled anew last week 
after a long and revealing restoration by experts at the 
Uffizi Gallery. 

Officially titled “The Holy Family” the work is 
known as the Doni Tondo because it is round (1.2 


heaven." This spiral curve of her body and the child’s, 
Verdon added, is subsequently echoed in Mannerist 
and Baroque art 

The complexities of the painring are comp o unded 
by those of the frame, perhaps the most beautiful in 
me Off™- It is a rare original, carved under orders 
from Mkhriangjo by Florentine artisans. Experts are 


an uk uvui iuuuu umuiac n a iuuuu « r- , ,• 

mag in diameter) and was i mealed for ihe Rmais- 

nnivTHlmn nn/i omnt merenanf Aonnln TVim nnwn- . _ ■'“6“ C/ 


H3*. a— ^ B 


du Sisriue Quipel ediing in Rome: 

raietie ns clearly Mmnerut m its achramstic. aimori -m. 

d>odong coloa era Mom to i aid of to High 

Ronassaoco Wiih to, goto smoko ot emtanc. is- notn ™^^ 


would later .bo a Mmark of to M-Ma f+nn J?S -tSrJSinfSSi 


shine brightly in the tondo and the frescoed Sistine 


ceding. 

“MUchdangek) can now be considered the first 


angdo’s brush woric in the remarkably fused colors of 
the od and tempera pand The Dooi Tondo has a 
homogeneity and smoothness that required only mini- 
mal intervention in the restoration. 


iwunaanKciu tan now oc tuimucrcu ujc uiov »^TT -u- r r L .»i: JLJ . ___ 

ManngiM — not Pontoimo. toso Gimgio Bonsg.^ director UfBrf&ato^ 

Bronzino. .sod Anlomo Godoh. mi UBm oBcod g-JSmot. “ItS azensetahe and™* and irfur- 


Bron^a-taid Amomo God* an UBm oBchd audita 

d “ ^ «*»& ■*&»?■ *•> ^ dBeraUr ®i“ 


century will now have to be reconsidered.” 

Rather than an isolated masterpiece, the Doni Tan- 


time. Obviously, the artists knew this and painted 
accordingly. That is why it’s risky to touch their 


do is now seen to be closer in style and time to the natrn» i nr waling varnis h. Once the ori ginal iggr^n e. r ti 
S istine frescoes (1508-12). Indeed, it probably was a artificial a ging process sets in, at least one not intend- 


direct predecessor of the Sistine’s powerful figures, ed by the artist This knowledge of and respect for 


including the mole nudes, Godoli said. A perennial hist©™ is what disting uishes Italian from other, more 
point of controversy in this religious painting, the drastic restorers. ” 


male nudes in the background are more visible than ^ “'flu: Holy Family," the solid skin tones were 


ever after restoration and have elicited new interprets- merely cleaned. More noticeably restored are the blue 


tlons of Michelangelo's art. 

Timothy Verdon of the Florida State University 
Studies Center in Florence called the Doni Tondo the 
key to understanding Michelangelo. “In this singular 


robes of tbc Virgin, where the paint had cracked under 
the weight of the glue needed to bind the relatively 
heavy lapis lazuli used to color it. 

It is significant that, pretmrinary infra-red reflecto- 



Miller’s 'Don Giovanni’ -i* 

• V' ■ 

Takes Many liberties T 


Restored “Holy Family” confirms Michelangelo's colorful palette. 


painting, he achieves religious, pereonal and sexual graphy erf the painting reveal no trace of underdraw- 
synthesis for the first time by pictoriafiy endorsing the mg. Mi chelang elo. who fKgparflg fn gfy tairf that pain t. 


neo- Platonism of the Renaissance, with its em phasis 
on the desire for virtue. This is expressed by homosex- 


ual Jove, not heterosexual, where desire is an end in directly onto the pan*) without an underlying sketch. 


mg. Michelangelo, who disparagingly said that paint- TT ffi J Tpw f w m 

- Huge Trenches Donated to Museum 


Verdon, a specialist in Renaissance religious art. 


His restored masterpiece is being shown in the 
natural fight of the Uffizfs Sala Niobe until February. 


said the tondo represented “the first time in Western Then “The Holy Family” wffl return to its former 
art in which the Virgin Mary is portrayed with a place in Sala XXV, the Michelangelo Room. 


By William Wilson 

Los Angeles Times Service 


kilometers) from Las Vegas, is a The museum's director, Richard 


L OS ANGELES — The Museum oneof its leaamgpractmoners, Mi- 
/ of Contemporary Art here has chad Hdzer. Tided “Double Nega- 
aceepted what is sorely a unique tive," it consists of two long. 


powerful androgynous body. The cleaning of the The restoration was carried oat entirely in the 


painting shows the musaihrity of her arms even more, natural habitat of the painting, in the Uffizi, avoiding 


prime example of Earthwork art by Koshalek, sees the “Double Nega- 


tive” acquisition as comparable to 
a traditional museum's ondertak- 


Michdangdo has opted for the beauty of the male 
body as the most noble subject in art Yet, be transmits 
his sexual preference in religious terms through the 
loving gaze of the Virgin upwards toward her child in 


ible damaging reverses of temperature and 
idity. 


accepted what is sorely a unique 
work of art for its permanent col- 
lection : the equivalent of a hole as 
big as the Empire State Bafidihg. 


The hole, in the vastness of the covers an area 1,500 feet (456 me- 


t consists of two long, ing stewardship of, say, a period 
(reaches that Hebxr exca- boose. There are, however signifi- 
vated in 1969-70 by moving about cant differences. Among them is 
240,000 tons of desert sandstone. It the fact that ihe museum will nn- 
n area 1,500 feet (456 me- dotake no conservation of ihe 


Susan Lamsden writes about the arts from Florence. Nevada desert about 80 miles (130 ters) long. Each trench is 30 feet piece. Koshalek said Heizsr wanted 


INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


wide and 50 feet deep. 

The work was donated by Vir- 
ginia Dwan, a pioneering sponsor 


nature eventually to reclaim the 
land through weather and erosion. 


Jr “iT 1 Earthworks are of imponderable 



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7MT57 





By Henry Pleasants 

L ONDON — Dr. Jonathan 
e Miller’s new production of 
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart sod 
Lorenzo da Ponte's “Don Gio- 
vanni” for the English National 
Opera comes after a year he has 
spent at Sussex University doing 
research in cognitive psychological 
preoccupation and cognation. 

It also reflects the contemporary 

fashion among opera producers of 
giving us not an opera as conceived 
by composer and librettist and 
passed on more or less faithfully 
from generation to generation, but 
rather an opera as they feel it cookl 
have been, should have been or 
might have been conceived — by 
themsdves, of comse — with an 
underscore by the composer, scru- 
pulously preserved. 

Il would seem hard to imagine a 
“Don Giovanni" costumed almost 
wholly in black, played throughout 
in the dead of night, against a back- 
ground of immense, towering mov- 
able blocks of crumbling brick ma- 
sonry, intended to evoke a vaguely 
18tb-ceatray setting (perish the 
thought that it might be SevOle!) 
but succeeding only in the sugges- 
tion of the bare walls of abandoned 
warehouses or textile miHn But 
Miller has imagined iL 
He has also imagined a Don Gio- 
vanni more as social butterfly or 
playboy than as veteran womanizer 
and scoundrel Only in his dreams 
could his callow Giovanni, engag- 
ingly sung and played by wafiam 
ShimeU, have seduced the Z000- 
odd women in Spain, France, Ger- 
many and Turkey listed in Lepprel- 
k»’s famous catalog. Miller has said 
he diagnosed Don Giovanni as an 
"erotofegist” This don does not 
appear old enough or mature 
enough to be an “-ologtsf of any 
kind. 

He is teamed, moreover, with a 
Leporeflo older and larger than he 
— Richard van Allan, who was 
protagonist of an ENO “Don Gio- 
vanni” several seasons ago, and a 
memorably good one. Throughout 
the evening one has the feeSng that 
the casting might better have been 
reversed. Shimell has the vocal and 
histrionic nralring s of a good Le- 
porefio — if da Ponte’s rather dum 


shortcoming is corapounded byftc 
fact that Philip Prowse's mocBrnte 
towers tend lo make pygmies 
singing actors, especially in i tfe. 
ater the size of the Ccrfiremn, ". 

There are other disturbing odffi. 
ties, most notably MjflerYtfem&i 
to abandon ihe commend atqfrs 
statue in favor of the tomb Ǥ-< 
French field marshal and havels 
commendatore appear at DontCn^ 
vahnfs s u pper as a ghost, 'taalys 
upon a doud of dry ice, clotfacaais 

perishing m b^re^^GiovamHitt 
carried off by a vrfntMkdtev^ 
his remale conquests, possibly^ 
producer’s idea of a heu mo refi®. 
ous than flame. - 

The production is reason^ 
well sung by Josephine Bacndw 
(Donna Anna), Feficty Lott (D$f- 
na Elvira), Lesley Garrea (Z^ 
Una), Maldwyn Davies (Don Otta- 
vio), Mark Richardson (Masettd) 
and John Connell (Commenda- 
tore), in addition to Sbiiodl and 
Van Allan. 

AH, in their recitatives and arias, 
are handicapped by the apparent 
prohibition of the appoggtanna&j 
and other ornaments that Mczsrlf 
as was the custom two centuries 
ago, left to the discretion (or indis- 
cretion) of his singers. Responsibil- 
ity for this reversion to the bad $d 
puritan days of Fritz Bosch’s Glyn- 
debotirne presumably lies with 
Mark Elder, the conductor and (be 
ENCs music director. - - 

Further performances Dec. 14. IS, 
21. 27. and Jan. 2, 8. 11. 14, 18. 23 
and 28. 


Henry Pleasaus is a London- 
based writer who specializes in musk 
and opera. He is the author of several 
books on these subjects. 


Huge Campaig n . » 
For f Jedi’ Video • 


Part of the motive for the creation 


earth onthe banteofUt^’s Gi^ market impute in the 1970s. 

Salt Lake called “Spiral Jetty." The KmhalA mIH that tha mus«rm 


Salt Lake called “Spiral Jetty.” The 
lake has since risen, covering the 


planned to organize tours of the 


Another dtsturtang aspect of this 
'production is its busy-ness, a com- 
mon. fault among today’s produc- 
ers, who apparently are fearful of 


work. Among the few earthworks site and to prepare a. publication, 
under way is James TnrreTs “Ro- but that a large port of the muse- 


trusting the musk: to speak for it- 
self. There is always a lot going on 


den Crater Project” at an extinct nm’s role would be keeping interest 
volcano in Arizona. If is document- in such work alive and lending in- 


ed in an exhtbitioa at the Museum sti t utitm al cachet tn its hfgtnrim) 


of Ctmtemporaiy Ait 


importance. 


sdf. There is always a lot going on 
to divert the eye, but it does not 
add up to much, and has the dis- 
tressing effect of nuilring the great 
scenes and arias seem like interrup- 
tions instead of high points. This 


New York Times Service 

I OS ANGELES — CBS-Fox 
t Video will begin a $2-mflHou 
U. S. advertising campaig n mat 
month for “Return of theJedL* ’ 
Most of the money wffl be spent 
on a television commercial A de- 
cade ago, studios rarely spent more 
than $2 million on the theatrical 
release of a movie. 

Priced at S79.98 each, about 
400,000 cassettes of the third “Star 
Wars” film wifi be shipped Feb. 25. 
“Jedi” will try to break the record 
of -^Ghostbusters” as the largest- 
selling expensively priced cassette. 
Thorn- EMl-HBO’s “Ramiro” wffl 
also be trying far (he record. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14-15, 1985 


Page 7 


ARTS /LEISURE 


The Importance of Private Provenance 






.. Alyson JReed and Terrence Mann in “A Chorus Uoe.’ 

? A Chorus Line’ limps 
In Transfer to Screen 


By Sheila Benson 

~ Lot Angeles Times Service 

F you were one of that legion 
‘ • - -X who saw “A Chorus Line” more 
than once in the theater, the fit™ is 
. ~~ enough to make you doubt your 
' s judgment. If you nave never seen 

j MOVIE MARQUEE 

^ibe stage piece, you may come out 

wondenng what all the fuss has 
. . been about. 

l^mte In dns stately and fairly slavish 
representation, directed by Sir 
I edi* l {Richard Attenborough, what pokes 
'nhroogh with the pain of a broken 
--bone ts how thin the material is. 
. m That was a secret wcffl-dugmsed by 
.. . 7 , . the exuberant theatricality aftoe 
^original production, conceived, 
:7 '-‘"choreographed and directed by Mi- 
/-..'cfaael Bennett and produced by Jo- 
. _^.sq>h Papp. 

As 16 auditioning singer-dancers 
. ^confided snatches of autobiogra- 

“ ‘ ‘phy U> Tad] an r wrmr pntent and 
1 unseen choreographer at the bade 
. :of the theater, such was Bennett’s 
assurance that it hardly ever oo- 

• - . -curred to us to ask why their inner- 

's most secrets needed airing when a 
. .dean bfll of health from their den- 
.. or podiatrist might be more to 

jhepoutL 

. “A Chorus Line,” performed 

-without intermission, had an ur- 

coherence and its choreogra- 

'*WB? h y was crisply eleganL Such is no 

fplMionger the case. The film travels in 
and starts. Bennett's chorcogra- 
^‘TlsBP’hy has been all but erased. In the 
INptMinal number, “One.” you can see a 
ofhis s^le, but eveiytlniig else 
^vKas the stamp of Jeffrey Homaday, 
perpetrated “Flasbdance." 
|£§pGI The love affair of the near past 
M^^fcetween Cassie (Alyson Reed) and 
HljlMZach (Michael Douglas) has been 
g jlMb iiflt up. She is hisprotegfe who has 
|g|P*Jared to reach for stardom “in a 
Fff jH hoHywood musical” (In what, 

* f-^B’FlashdanceT’? Did no one tdl her 
^■Bibout the “Hollywood musicals” of 
HlHpe past decade?) Now she is back, 

"^■desperate for any job. 

I|CB Her new number, “Let Me 
iflHpancefor You,” is interrupted by a 
jg^Kook ai their past. They are not the 
most charismatic couple. In 
pf ■TOiis: department, “A Chorus 
Jjfijne's" one real killer is Terrence 
gg^Bteuw as Larry, Zach’s assistant 
^^K&preographer. Warm, authorita- 
wMve, ugly-handsome, effortlessly 
, f ^flal, wrth a sense of intelligence 
his »rting and his dancing, 
is the film’s unalloyed deli gh t 
^^j^Yihbent Canby of TheNew 
' S | ft .- - ■ ... . 

^P^g^Aiin’bMosoow 

U'-'jM' Untied Press International 

ALBANY. New York — The 
Empire State Institnie for the Per- 
orming Arts will peifonn “Rag 
Tolly: The Raggedy Ann Musical" 
an. 6-12 in Moscow — the first 
J. S. theater company to visit Mos- 
ow since 1979, under the cultural 
xchange agreement signed at the 
J. S.-Soviet summit last month. 


XIONESBURY 


York Times writes: “They said ‘A 
Chorus Line’ couldn't be done on 
film — and they were right Papp 
and Bennett declined to work on 
the movie. So did Mike Nichols 
and Sidney Lumet among others. 
Attenborough is listed as director, 
but what he actually seems to have 
done is act as the escort to the 
screen of a reasonable facsimile of 
the show, not noticing it was dying 
en route.”) 

□ 

Capsule reviews of films recently 
released in the United States: 

Janet Mashn of The New York 
Times on “Tba Jewel of the Nile": 

There’s nothing here that wasn’t 
funnier or more fanciful in Robert 
Zemeckis’s “Romancing the 
Stone," although that film was by 

no means a landmark in the annat e 

of armchair adventure. Derivative 
as it was, “Romancing the Stone” 
did have a certain spunk, thanks to 
its contrast between the workaday 
life of Joan Wilder, romance novet- 
ist (played so gamely by Kathleen 
Turner), and the far-flung adven- 
tures into which the screenplay 
propelled her. Sadly for the sequel 
(directed by Lewis Teague), the 
novelty in that contrast was more 
than used up the first time. 

(But Paul Attanasio of The 
Washington Post finds the film 
“splashy, spoofy and goofy, both 
more fun and less touching than 
the original; what was once a love 
story is now an out-and-out romp, 
a smartly written and playfully di- 
rected crowd pleaser.”) 

□ 

Maslin on “One”: 

Like the board game on which it 
is based; the movie is most fun in its 
eady stages. The setting-up, which 
emails introducing a group of sus- 
pects and their thief victim- to-be 
and confining all of them to a ba- 
roque mansion, is the only part of 
the film that is remotely engaging. 
After that, it begins to drag. 
Though it takes only 87 minutes to 
arrive at one of its three solutions 
(“Clue" is shown in different ver- 
sions in different theaters), it has 
long since worn out its welcome by 
then. Jonathan Lynn, its screen- 
writer and director, has in clud e d 
plenty of stupid double-entendres, 
making the film mflxfly unsuitable 
for the young audiences that might 
like it best 

■ New Wolfgang Petersen F3m 

A sci-fi fantasy movie from the 
West German director Wolfgang 
Petersen, who made the World War 
II submarine thriller “Das Boot” 
(The Boat), went on general release 
in West Germany Thursday after a 
premiering in Munich, United 
Press International reported. The 
S25-mfiKon 20th Century- Fox pro- 
duction is titled “Enemy Mine — 
Gdiebtcr Fond” and stars Dennis 
Quaid and Lou Gosset Jr. as sapee 
travelers landing cm an alien plan- 
et It will be released in the United 
States before Christmas and else- 
where in Europe next year. 


MHAT ABOUT 
OmrtZONKER? 
HOttiDO&yOJR. \ 


• Internationa} Herald Tribune 

M ONTE CARLO —The 453-nrilEon-fraiic 
(S5 .9-million) sale of. French furniture 
and objets d’art by Christie’s last week demon- 
strated the increasing importance of private 
provenance, untainted by speculative motives, - 
as a selling argument. ’ 

The 55 lots m the sale —which started with a £ 
garniture of three Vincennes porcelain vases 
made in 1756 and concluded with a commode • 
by Jean-Fran^is Leleu, a cabinet-maker of the 
Louis XVI period — came from tbe estate of Sir . 
Charles Gore. A quarter of a century ago such a £ 


SOUREN MeLJKIAN 


provenance would not have made a great tin- ; t 
pressiain. Gore was too busy making millions as 
the owner of Selfridge’s and other British com- 
panies to have a great deal of rime to acquire 
expertise in 17th- «nd 18th-century furniture. 

Being immensely rich, he bought tbe most ex- 
pensive, which means the best in some cases but 

not invariably so. 

A little Louis XV mlipwood and floral mar- 
quetry table and a Lotris XV “petite commode," 
as Christie's called a table of similar type with 
cabriole legs joined 19 a rectangular platform, 
both of which were scoffed at by dealers, sold 
for 166,500 francs and 111,000 francs, respeo- wht 
lively (all prices include sales charges). An am- dot 
bitious tmipwood desk stamped “P. Flfchy T 
JME," which sold for 444,000 francs, was snnT- mac 
lariy derided by dealers. These and other items hie) 
of the same ilk formed a striking contrast with a tele] 
small group of very grand pieces, remembered Flet 
by those who attended the Akram Ojjeh fund- tod 
Cure sale in Monte Carlo in June 1979 at Soto- ing< 
dry’s, where Gore bought them. will 

Until recently, such a strange mix might have sale 
fared poorly. The fact that the splendid pieces beh 
had beat acquired six and a half years earlier die 
would have weighed against them. Christie's fdt abo 
so uncertain about the outcome of the sale that higt 
its chairman. John Floyd, refused to disclose 1 

Christie’s estimates on the main lots two hours tbe 
before tbe sale. jecl 

The market for top French furniture has been wit! 
wobbly in the last year or so, two major U. S. ner 
collectors baring stopped buying. For Chris- star 
tie’s, which was holding its maiden sale in Mon- ly n 
te Carlo, a failure would have had long- teem sup 
repercussions. waj 

The auction house surpassed itself in its pub- afte 
licity campaign before the auction. Gore's name mai 
was featured prominently. Possible buyers were laid 





Louis XVI commode by J. F. Leleu sold for 1L21 milli on French francs. 


contacted long before the sale by members of 
Christie's staff, from the director of the furni- 
ture department. Hugh Roberts, to Charles AD- 
sop, deputy chairman of Christie’s Loudon, who 
is credited with haring won tbe sale for Chris- 
tie’s. 

The result of all this spadework could be seen 
at the Dec. 6 sale. The minute Allsop started 
calling bids, seven telephones that had been laid 
out on low tables started buzzing. 

The sale began with porcelain. The first lot. 
the Vincennes garniture of three vases dated 
1756, sold for 721,500 francs, 50 percent over 
Christie's high estimate. As Hugo Moriey- 
Flelchers very scholarly catalog entry points 
out, these vases form part of a small group 
incorporating a book in the decoration, on 
which the name Anacrton is to be read. This was 
tbe tide of a ballet by Rameau performed in 
1754 to celebrate the birth of (he Due de Beni 


who later became Louis XVI. The royal connec- 
tion undoubtedly boosted the price. 

The nett lot, another garniture of three vases. 
made at Sfcvres in 1763, also sold over Christie’s 
high estimate, fetching 421,800 francs from a 
telephone bidder operating through Moriey- 
Fl etcher. When yet another telephone battle 
took place between anonymous bidders, pitch- 
ing Christie’s staff members against one another 
with hardly any intervention from the room, the 
sale look on an unreal atmosphere. Roberts, on 
behalf of a telephone client, outbid Floyd’s 
diem and gpt a S&vres “Greek vase," made in 
about 1765, for 499,500 francs, twice Christie’s 
high estimate. 

That momentum could have been lost when 
tbe sale plodded through a series of lesser ob- 
jects. Thanks to Allsop — who operated the sale 
with just tbe right touch of Enghshness in man- 
ner and speech and revealed himself as an out- 
standing auctioneer — it did not. An exceeding- 
ly rare set of four Louis XIV ormolu candelabra, 
superbly relieved tbe monotony half- 

way through and sold for 333,000 francs. Soon 
after, the bad form cure sold wdl — a “Louis XV 
marquetry table with trellis parquetry, top in- 
laid with putti,” tririch had a markedly mid- 1 9th 
century look, more than doubled the high esti- 
mate at 12Ji milli on francs — and the good 
furniture even better. 

Two Leans XV encoiprures or comer cabinets 
with floral marquetry and lavish ormolu mounts 
in the Rococo manne r went up to 4.995 million 
francs, nearly doubling the 1979 price in nomi- 
nal francs. An important Louis XVI commode 
by Martin Carlin went up to 333 million francs, 
exactly doubling its 1 979 price at Sotheby’s. The 
top lot — the Louis XVI commode by Leleu — 
soared to 1231 million francs, almost tripling 
the 1979 price. 

In comparative terms, a pair of Louis XTV 
co mm o des in the Boulle mann er made the mast 
remarkable score, selling for 888,000 francs, 
four times toe 1979 price. Their powerful archi- 
tectural appeal «nd the outstanding quality of 
toe ormolu mounts are perfectly attuned to toe 
taste of^toe day. Each commode is stamped by 


Etienne Levasseur. who became a master in 
1767. indicating that he must hove restored the 
pieces shortly after that date. Louis XIV furni- 
ture is winning recognition ai long last 

Another significant price is the 3.33 million 
francs for a pair of Empire console tables by 
Jacon Desm alter. Tbe amboyna veneer is en- 
hanced by the bronze and ormolu legs and 
various ormolu fittings in tbe neo-classical man- 
ner. The heaviness of the design would have 
ramed off buyers until a few years ago; in 1979, 
toe price was 777,000 francs. Early 19th century 
furniture is now going up, however, and the 
context of Christie’s sale gave the period an 
additional boost. 

The day after, Christie’s followed with a sale 
of furniture from various owners that brought 
almost 21 million francs. Christie’s has made a 
breakthrough on toe Monte Carlo front, where 
Sotheby’s quasi-monopoly was mildly chal- 
lenged by Paris auctioneers. 

■ Canaletto Sold for £528,000 

A painting of Venice by Antonio Canaletto, 
discovered m a Glasgow bouse, was bought 
Wednesday at Sotheby’s in London by an 
American collector for £528.000 (5755,000), in- 
cluding sales charge. The Associated Press re- 
ported. Sotheby’s said it was a record price for 
toe artist. The American, wfao bid by telephone, 
was not identified. 

A copy of “Tbe Entrance to tbe Grand Canal 
Looking Toward the Barino" in toe Windsor 
Castle collection of Queen Elizab eth IL but tbe 
location of the original had been unknown since 
toe 18th century until this year when Anthony 
Weld Forester, 31, a Sotheby’s employee in 
Glasgow, saw the painting, which the owner had 
thought was a copy. It was Forester's second 
remarkable find in Scotland this year. Six 
months earlier he spotted a huge oil of “David 
With the head of GoHato" that was identified as 
an unrecorded work of the 17th-century Bolo- 
gnese artist Guido Reni. It was auctioned in 
April for £2.2 million to a private buyer and is 
now on a three-year loan to the National Gal- 
lay in London. 


until January 1986 

JEAN DUBUFFET 

Retrospective exhibition 

GAI. ERIE BEYELER 

Bfi umlringass e 9. 4001 Basel 
Tel. 061 23 54 12 


MUSEE MARMOTTAN 

2, rue Louis Boilly PARIS 1 6th 

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GRAPHICS - MULTIPLES 

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Photos by: Bischof, Burn. Capa, CarDer-Bressan, Erwin, Hass, and other Magnum photographers. 

From the archives of Magnum Photos, a photographic record of Europe 
in the immediate postwar years — striking images of a continent shaking 
off the debris of destruction and coming to life. 

Mary Blume, the International Herald Tribune’s distinguished 
feature journalist, sets tbe postwar scene and interviews many of the 
photographers in her introduction. The LILT, is pleased to present this 
unique volume that captures a decisive epoch and commemorates the 
work of some of the 20th century’s master photqjoumalists. 

Here youTI find some of the most famous images and faces of our ^H^^^^^Hardcover, 
time. Once you open its pages, you will want to spend hours poring over 200 pages, 

this magnificently produced collection. Truly this is a book to treasure for 168 dnotone illustrations, 

yourself, and a beautiful gift as wdL 32x26cm (12.5xl0.25xn-) 

Available from the International Herald Tribune. Order today. ^ ^ 

AFTER THE WAR WAS OVER 

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Address 


Card No.. 


{necessary for credit raid purchases) 


Exp, dale City and Code. 


= WALLY FINDLAY = 

Galleries International 

new yerk - Chicago - pdm beach 
beveriy hffls - pans 

2 Ave. Mofignon - Paris 8th 

r«L» eUHM4 i— toy tbn. mi.Ji ,, 
IDaja. to I pja. . 2 JO t *7 pj*. 


UlITWZl 


BOW 


Permanent exhibition of 
ADAMOff, ARD1SSQNE, AUGE, 
BOUDEt, CANU, CASSiGNBA, 
CHAURAY, DUCAIRE, BTH, FABIB4, 
GALL, GANTNER, GAVEAU, 
GOfBtm, HAMBOURG, HSSO, 
KBME, KLUGE, l£ PHO, MAIK, 
MKHEUe«Y, MttNCOV, K£SS), 
hCUQUHMAN, SBSE, SIMBAIS, 
THOMAS, VIGNOIBS, VOUET. 


WARWICK ARTS TRUST 

Pimlico London 

- 

ARTS FAIR 

3 

Today, and Sundav 

d 

only, 10 a.m. - 6 p.’m. 

n* 

Admission free 


Artists, Craftsmen & Recordings 

— 

33. Warwick Square. Si George's 
L— Drire, SVTL T<1 {01} 8U7S56 

■l 


= FISCHER FINE ART s 

30 King St., St. James's, London SW 1 
01-83? 3942 

From Expressionism to Dada 
and Neue Sachlichkeit 
GERMAN ART 1909-25 
Until 20 December 
===== Mon.-Fri. 105:30. 


14-12-85 



























rwte''. 


Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14-15, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


voL HU Low Last CKs. 


RCA 
Rmmini 
SDIaGs 
UnCoib 
ITT CD 

Tnon 

PftliMr 

miocon 

BnkAm 

IBM 

AmExB 

PtillPts 

CmwE 

AT&T 


tozn ao 
29511 33 
28296 28% 
vim n» 
vm 37ft 
26014 AIM 
22297 29% 
19461 Bfft 
19340 <3 
19170 ISM 
10899 1S1V, 
1B629 941k 
17299 12ft 
17154 30% 
15431 24% 


594k + * 

33 +3* 

2BH + 16 
4944 +1* 
34H +1 
4M 

29% + Ik 
MM -MVh 
41 % +2% 
1514 + 4b 

1SW +1% 
54* +m 
17 +14 

30ft + M 
26ft + ft 


OMH HMh LOW Lott On. 

Indus 151 £40 1S6A64 15K75 15K31 + »97 

Trora. 71120 73960 709.27 72141 + 1129 

UHI 167,27 16947 IM 5 14000 4- 139, 

Comp 68649 41039 40111 41191 + MB 


NYSE Diaries 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


UilllllM 

Industrial* 


Close cam 

8140 +022 

81.14 + 0.12 

0343 +032 


Advtmced 
Declined 
Un ch anged 
Total issues 
New HM» 
New Laws 
Vo tame up 
volume down 


One Pttv. 

1305 920 

420 721 

354 433 

2079 2074 

307 235 

II 19 


137.293£0 

25424430 


NYSE Index 


Conwasile 

industrial* 

Tramp. 

Utilities 

Finance 


HU Low Oen ewe 
9LA. NA 12034 +171 

— — UU3 +U9 

— — 11567 +M1 

— — 41J5 +044 

— -— 131.12+155 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


Bur Stales -suit 

Dec. 12 224345 nuns 4822 

oee. 11 4KMS 734479 *999 

DOC 10 282851 47*745 *345 

Dec 9 291.702 631^833 1M0 

Doc 6 17&M2 540,934 M75 

•included in the solos fteures . 


Friday^ 


MSE 



TDtHes incUKto the mrnomvf da prices 
• ui> toflw dosing os Wall Street and 
do not reflect tote Trades elsewhere. 

. Vui The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


Ad vgKod 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
Now Hlohs 
Now Lows 
volume w 

Volume dawn 


B79 8BQ 

s s 

11973,100 

240320 


Standard & Poor’s Index 


Industrials 

Trans*. 

utilities 

finance 

Composite 


Mob LOW Close ewe 

233,78 22944 23346 +190 
?ffU9 10868 191-44 +3419 
91 JB M63 91.19 +JJ4 
94 4S 2S20 2847 +037 
21031 7 0+43 209.M +031 


nasdaq Index 


jiriKzilliHl 


Com pPjrit o 

Industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

utilities 

Banks 

Tramf- 


Week 

Close arae ABO 
32399 +3X1 31*59 

S 41 +4JJ6 30258 
SB +148 *WW 
30398 +124 WJJO 
30199 +4X4 290M 
234*24 + 248 33442 
294.91 +491 28190 


AMEX Sales 


4 pj/l volume 
Prev.4PAA. vplunw 
prav.oano volume 


17,71 OOtt 
1SA4MO0 
153140000 



AMEX Stock Index 


Mtoti . Lew Clou C&w 

24*97 24X45 24*78 +390 




41 9 

385 

800 

1DJ1 

9.1 

15 13 

4 

62 

26U 

17 

73 65 

21 1 
54 

29 10 

32Ax 

66 

4068 

3 

1.9 

14 11 
\2 23 

2 « 
5 1 
222 
Alt 
MO 

U 

234 

14 16 

22 

14 IS 

1019 

U 35 

iai 

74 14 

3072 

18 

144 


Share Prices Surge in New York 


NEW YORK — Share prices leaped to an- 
other all-time high Friday cm the New York 
Stock Exchange in the sixth heaviest trading 
day in history as investors scrambled at a fre- 
netic pace to accumulate stock positions before 
the end of the year. 

Hie Dow Jones industrial average dosed at 
1.535.21. up 23.97 on the day. 

For the week, the Dow advanced 58.03 
points, the largest gain since the week ended 
Aug. 3, 1984, when the Dow climbed 87.46. 

Advances led declines by 1,267-426 among 
the 2,064 issues traded. 

Volume totaled 177 imHi rm shares, up from 
170.5 million Thursday. 

One factor propelling the market higher was 
the need of money managers to buy stocks for 
their portfolios before the end erf the year, 
analysts said. 

“Money managers are in a frenzy to make 
sure they have long stock positions on the 
books,” said Philip Erianger, chief technical 
analyst at Advest, Inc. in Hartford. “They jump 
on any piece of good news and bad news they 
ignore." 

Increased talk that the Federal Reserve may 
be ready to cut the discount rate also gave the 
market a boost, participants said. 

“We need a cut in the discount rare,” said 
Suresh B hired, portfolio strat^pst at First Bos- 
ton. “If we don’t get it, the market could very 
easily move down five or 10 percent." 

The latest surge in the Dow is believed one of 
the steepest on record. 

The fust time the Dow closed above 1 300 was 
on May 20 of this year when it finished the day 


3416 Boolnos 148 21 
37* BotoeC 1.90 *2 
50*6 BobaC pfSJSQ &3 
184k BoltBer .10 4 

3UV6 Borden > 152 29 
19V2 BoraWa ,94 *0 
4% Barmns 
33 Vi BolEd 144 7.9 
M BasE Pt 188 1IL4 
99h BasE pr 1.17 104 
lift BosEor 144 104 
19ft Bowair 42 10 
25% BrtsSi 150 S3 
47ft BrlstM 198 29 
3ft BrltLnd 
71ft BrKPt 2910 45 
22 BiiT2pp 410 22 
ft Brock 

17 Brckwy 192 49 
34ft BkyUG 212 72 
21ft BkUG pf 247 95 
30ft BkUG Of 295 U.9 
14ft BwnSh 20 4 

25 BrwnGp 144 42 
33ft BrwnF 128 2) 
2814 Bmswk 190 22 
29ft BfshWl 52 15 
14ft Bundy 90 29 
16ft BunkrH 216 109 
14ft BurlnCt 
24ft Burllnd 194 54 
45ft BrlNffi 140 20 
Aft BrINopf 55 72 
20 BrlNol 212 89 
47ft BrlNpf 210*102 
9ft Burndv 44 24 
52 Burroti 240 29 
11 Butlrin 52 24 


15 5950 Sift 50ft 
25 1077 45ft 45 

43 58U 57ft 
34 129 36ft 35ft 
14 4794 5Zft Sl» 

12 1079 23ft 23 

7 234 lift 10ft 

9 305 43« 43U> 
430z *5ft 85 
28 lift 11 
34 141h 14 
9 1430 23ft 23ft 

13 398 28 27ft 
18 4207 64ft 65ft 

19 4V» 4 

7 415 31 2m 

13 52 28 27ft 
1044 ft ft 

14 477 28ft 28 

9 98 43ft -429k 

1 26ft 26ft 

20 33U> 33ft 

16 40 24 23ft 

18 306 34ft 34ft 

19 999 «lft 40ft 

TO 2541 45ft 43ft 
16 751 1ft 35ft 
89 70 21ft 20ft 

9 191k 17ft 

« 567 19ft 18 
927 31ft 30ft 
9 1747 71ft 71 
18 7ft 7ft 
5 24 24 

474 49ft 48ft 
44 195 12ft 12ft 

13 4490 44ft 63 
19 424 15ft 15 


lift Aft 
26ft 17ft 


350 55 6 
525 106 
589*115 
853*175 
.72 25 10 
152 45 14 
248 55 4 
157 4 2 
559*11.1 
154 22 14 
240 45 IS 
240 £5 9 

- '* 
60* 1.9 n 
541 28 203 
599 


150 25 3 
156 27 15 
■05 6.1 
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.lo w n 
222 85 10 
213a 55 9 
E. 216 1(M 7 
Pf ATS 115 
P< 950 115 
Pf 754 115 
Of 958 115 
Of 952 115 

31 4 2 . 

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13 
u ; 

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32 8.9 5 
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1.10 45 

13 

150 S5 11 
250 95 
254 185 7 
740 115 
754 115 
, 501 
Pi 1.111 
Pf 521 

156 28 14 
50* 5 
150 25 21 
60 JJ 15 
.50 1.1 12 
1JQ 35 
294 X4 17 

150 41 20 
156 45 51 
458 85 
1 50 27 18 
.12 5 IS 
‘ • *B 11 
' 19 9 
U 

2 

135 
135 . 
42 8 
24 
J 13 




at 1304JS0. It topped the 1400 mark far the first 
rime an Nov. 6 when it dosed at 1403.44, and 
broke the 1500 mark for the first time, on 
Wednesday dosing at 1511.70. ' 

In less than five months the Dow has climbed 
nearly 240 points. 

Strong demand fra: Honeywell, IBM and oth- 
er big computer concerns drove share prices xqj 
early in the day and by midsession the widely 
watched Dow index had raced ahead by 20 
points. 

Traders said rumors, later denied, that Hon- 
eywell was planning a -leveraged buyout to take 
the company private seated enthusiasm which, 
spread through the computer group. 

After the denial, Honeywell yielded some of 
its earlier nine-point gain but it still ended four 
higher at 77VJ. 

IBM hit 150 for the first time, adding 1% to 
finish at 150%, while Digital Equipment, Bur- 
roughs, Sperry, NCR, Data General and Hew- 
lett Packard woe also higher. 

Analyst Hugh Johnson of First Albany Corp. 
said investors were pleased with economic 
news, including yesterday’s report that retail 
sates increased 1.1 percent last month and one 
Friday that November industrial production 
rose 0.4 percent 

“Some people interpret it as a sign that manu- 
facturing is responding to the decline in the 

The many cm Waff Street is that the Fed 
aright see an opportunity to relax its credit 
policy now that Congress has taken some action 
on the federal budget deficit On Wednesday 
night it passed the Gramm-Rudman bill, which 
caffs for a balanced budget by 1991.- - 

(UPI, AP, Reuters) 


lift US .. 

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80 80ft + ft 
14ft 1MJ- g 
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i£Voi* + £ 
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«t Bars 

184), 19ft + ft 
38ft 39ft +lft 
4 4ft + ft 
38 % TOVi + VS 
II* 31ft + ft 
39ft 39ft 
8ft 8ft + ft 
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24 24ft— ft 

19ft 19ft- ft 
17ft JUL + ft 
29ft 29ft- ft 
65ft 44 + ft 

17ft 17ft + Ik 
51ft 52ft +lft 


51ft +114 
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57ft + ft 
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34ft + ft 
61 ft + ft 
45ft +lft 

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71ft + ft 
7ft + ft 
24 + ft 

49ft + ft 
12ft 

64 +3ft 
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19 + ft 

115ft +1 

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lift 

60ft + ft 
33ft + ft 
54ft- ft 


21 + ft 
51*+ ft 
25* 

21ft 

14* + ft 
31 +ft 
29ft— ft 
9ft + ft 
25ft + ft 
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27ft— ft 
59ft 

17ft— ft 
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12ft + ft 

22 + ft 
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52ft— ft 
12ft + ft 
5 


on 


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76 

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68 

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42 

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48 

14 

41 

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44ft 33ft 
41ft 22* 
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49 53 

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18ft 
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21 

38ft 38ft 38ft 

34 §ft 3Sft 
33ft 33ft 33ft 
42ft 41ft 42 
10ft 10 10ft 
12ft 1 2ft 12ft 
44ft A2ft 43ft 
19* 1 9ft 19* 
20ft 
29% 


23ft W 

711 57* 

41ft 24 
22ft 12* 


3 3- 

24% 24 ft 

14* 13ft 
10 9ft 
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IS* 15ft 
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15* 15* 
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21 20 * 
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30* 30ft 
3» 32ft 
15% 15* 
10 * 10 * 
35* 34* 
25* 25* 


22ft HolOFB IjOOT 
24ft Hofbfrt ISO 29 13 
> 1 Ha II Ml M U 13 

- 7* Hatvwfpf M 21 
24* HamPS -1J6 19 12 
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18 HanJI 1840 82 
17* Hflndls SS 20 14 
16 HondH M 38 23 
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40ft HarBrJ lflD 16 18 
Tift HarM i M 1J 22 
7* HaraWi It 

24* Horn PfB 240 128 
24* HaruPfClU 72 
15ft HraffwS 60 26 15 
Oft Harr It M U U 
10* HarGrp 10 

a* Ham» TJS 4j 11 
24* Hartmx us u n 
Uft Halts* IJN 106 12 
l?*Hawei 132 7.1 10 


483 36 

£ 35ft 
41 15ft 
60 22* 
2219 20 
142 17ft 


789' lift 
16 as* 
113 30* 
.64 23W 
737 27ft 
413 Uft 
217 33 


19% HowCI 132 7.1 10 
9ft HoyesA 60 II 9 
20* HftdAtn 60 16 
9ft HO2L0l> 23 IT 
to Htthjvm , 

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25ft 24 _* 

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i »ft 71ft -M* 

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11% 11* + ft 
1 36ft am 
29* 2»— ft 
aft 23*—* 
27 27ft 

■W 33-fi 
,^?K + 2 

24 24ft + * 

1|* W0— ft 
13. jgft-'M 
20ft 20ft— ft 


Next Major 
Gains in Energy; 

Gold, Platinum and: 
Heating Oil could : 
Mount by Multiples 

In the midst of (he latest OPEC-induced 
furore about falling oil prices, Indigo efienis 
wens receiving a report calling for cruder 
petroleum prices to double over the longer 
term. Then as news from the OPEC confer-': 
ence in Geneva drove heating oil down-the- 
M.vve issued furmerprpfections calling for 
an ultimate rise to $1.40 per gallon from* 
roughly 80 cents. We also stressed that we 1 
had started buying platinum during the 
December 9 session because we feif an off 
market driven to excessive depths by pure 
politics had resulted in gross underestimat- 
ion of the value of platinum-group metals as 
catalysts in cracking plants and catalytic 
converters, we are calling platinum to move 
up by roughly $200 per oz. from latest levels' 
of damacfic liquidation. Also under cover- 
age in weekly indigo reports is the drive 
being led by internationals such as Ultramar 
on the LSE to push northward across the 
Canadian prairies in search of oikmd-gos 
reserves that have been dwindling In me 
southwestern U 5. Here, there are tow-priced 
stocks that could multiply In the manner of 
petroleum and preclous-metats futures- 
where equity is expandedfive-times-over by 
a $100 efimb in platinum or a 20-csnt rise in 
heating oiL The first heating-oil advance 
projected by Indigo technicians ran to 23 
cents; and if you wan fcompfimentary cover- 
age of next an fid paled movements, comple- 
te and return the coupon. 

Inc^o 


f'lvftiiivrCtXiwjlCT b * 


Keizersgracht 534, 1017 EK Amsterdam 


Gentlemen: 3 

Please begin providing complimentary reports 
I cavertng prospects for inter-related energy and 
I metals futures plus promising exploration and j 
I development prospkfe. 


rnuiic : 

FHT SOj 


25* 
33ft 
25% 
32% 
31ft 
25% 
I 41* 

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— ft | 1* 

+ 1 * 

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21ft LnStar 1JO 5.9 5 
45% LOOB5 Of 537 89 
5% ULCa 3 

21ft LILpfE 
40 LlLpfK 
16ft LILpfX 
16% LILpfW 
16ft LILpfV 
19ft ULtafU 
15* LlLpfT 
11% LILpfP 
12% ULpfO 

21* LonoD A 32 24 15 
23ft Loral .53 16 19 
IB% LaGenl JB 4.1 17 
28% La Land MO U 9 
17* UJPOC JQb 14 40 
2gk LaPLpf 36M116 
17% LaPLpI 2JB\ 93 
LauvGs 252 81 9 
20% Lowes J4 U 15 
19% Lubrzl 1.14 46 14 
26ft UlfaVk 60 15 24 
J4% LucfcyS 1.16 45 12 
lift L ufccns 68 37 16 


135 JL 

269 70ft 
3S5 Mft 
54 40ft 
5704 8* 

12b 34 
3200Z 48 

£ S* 

30 22 
32 21* 
24 25* 
16 20% 
11 15% 
U 18* 

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86 U 
2707 31% 
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34 31ft 
127 24* 
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1370 25* 
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m «o* 

Tir 


3* 2%— K 
2Dft 20ft + Vk 
32 32* + ft 

60 60ft + * 
7% 8* + ft 
25 26 | 

47 48 + W 

21% 21*+ ft 
71% 21 ft— ft 
21* 21% + ft 
25% tek + W 
20* 20*— * 
15ft 15% + * 
17% 11* + * 
29ft 29*— ft 
37* 37* =. 

13* 14 + % 
31ft 31*— ft 
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26* 25 +■* 
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39* 39% + W 
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13% 15 tl | 


MC 190 11.1 

*1 6.12 11.1 


BOOH 









































































Saties Bides 


: cries* - P.12 Eomhwt' neorts P.» 
ibteM/MaP.tt Htn» nd* hu*s p.re 
,'^MYSfi saloa P. 5"' <Mtmmkate P. • 
P.W . Inters*! rote* P. 9 
ktwioNon'Noda «otW.*wwnohr P. * 
ctuttonev rates ' P-* Orttm -. P.M- 
CMlMdNOE: . P.W OTC stock p.w 
‘■DMdnra - ~ l P.W Other swrteia pj< 


•>, 




SATURDAY -SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14-15, 1985 


Herat b^KSribitnc. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


Dow Industrial A verage 
Soars 24 Points, Page 8 


** 


Page 9 


2 t 


ECONOMIC SCENE 



jg§ Despite Accord for Talks, 
Trade Threats Continue 

By LEONABD SILK 

Wow York Tima Service 

£W YORK — The Reagan administration has finally 
got agreement on the new round of trade talk* h has 
been seeking for the last two years. On Nov. 28, the 90 
— members of the General Agreement on Tariffs and 
Tirade, or GATT, agreed to start forma] preparations for opening 
multilateral trade negotiations next September. 

Speaking at an international monetary and trade conference in 
Philadelphia Monday, Arthur Dmxkd, director-general of 
GATT, said: “We can now look to the future with co nfid ence 
that the tensions which have bedeviled international trade rela- 
tions in recent years can be resolved through negotiation and not 
through threats of unilateral 
restrictions on trade which 
would endanger the survival 
of the trading system itself.” 

But many threats to the sys- 
tern remain. One is the chal- 
1 leuge to the old industrial 
leaders posed by the emer- 
gence of Japan as the world’s 
hugest exporter of manufac- 
tured goods, surpassing the Ur 

total exports, Japan is now tied for second 
Germany, with each country’s exports in 1 
percent of world trade. 

The United States remains in first place in both exports and 
imports. As its share of world exports slipped to 11.4 parent in 
1984 from 123 percent, its share of imports climbed to 17.1 
percent from 1 1 .6 percent, resulting in the biggest trade deficit in 
history. The American trade deficit could well become the mam 
issue in the 1986 congressional election. Althoug h President 
Ronald Reagan appears to have blocked the threat of protection- 
ist legislation for the time being, recession and rising tmemploy- 
.ment could still overrun his resistance. 




High unemployment 
is intensifying 
protectionist 
sores. 

i and West Germany. In 
X with west 
equal to 8.9 


: -"’l* 
r ^=ici 


O 


r 

> 

igo 


THER Pacific nations besides Japan are shaking the 
world economic order. From 1973 to 1984, Taiwan moved 
up from 27th to 12th place among the world’s top export- 
■exs; South Korea, from 35th to 14th; Hong Kong, from 24th to 
1 15th, and China, just getting under way, from 21st to 18th place. 
.Two-way trade across the Pacific now exceeds trade across the 
[Atlantic. 

i Steams on the trade negotiations will be heightened by world 
■ « overcapacity in energy, agriculture, mining and manufacturing, 
i High unemployment in Europe and other countries is intensify- 
: ling protectionist pressures in new forms. 

: 1 At the Philadelphia trade conference this week, Sylvia Ostry, 
; i the Canadian ambassador for multilateral trade negotiations, 
' spoke of “neo-protectionism,’' which she said had accelerated 
| since the recession of the early 1980s. She noted that neo- 
i protectionism, which included such non tariff barriers as quotas 
| on imports of autos or steel, reached 30 percent of the total 
i consumption of manufactured goods in the industrial countries 
■ in 1983, up from 20 percent in 1980. 

But, she added, neo-protectionism also took “another insidious 
form, more difficult to measure: a proliferation of domestic 
: policies — subsidies, regulation, tax expenditures, transfers — 

: that have the effect, if not always the express intent, of managing 
; the flow of trade but are considered domestic terrain and largely 
.. immune to the rules and procedures of GATT. 9 ' 

In the name of “cultural sovereignty,” Mis. Ostry’s own 
; country practices what some American publishers, such as Pren- 
tice-HaH, and some authors, such as this writer, whose economics 
; textbook has been used in Canadian schools but now has been 
' excluded, regard as a form of neo-protectionism. 

' fit a Canadian government advertisement in The New York 
’ Times Tuesday, urging a new trading relationship with the 
• United States, David Peterson, Premier of Ontario, declared: 
“We must maintain our ability to develop and support our own 
cultural and communications industries. We must maintain our 
lability to publish books and magazines, produce records and 
films, and create television and radio programming that help us 
(Cbnttaied on Page U, CoL 6) 



Dee. 13 



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44095* 

1JJ11 

17*019 

1 SDR 

umu 

ojssa 

174282 

NA 

NJ2. 

LOOM 

540359 

2290* 

220412 


^Ctae/nai tn London and Zurich. fixing* In other European canton. Now York rates at 4 PM. 
Jo) Cemmerelal fame (U Amounts needed to buy one paint (ei Amounts needed to bur one 
ipnarr) Units of 100 lx) Urdu of UUO tv) Units of IOOOO NO.: notouotwd; NA.: natovoHabta. 
to) To bat MW pound: SUJUAU 

' MkerBollar Vahtent 


. Jtevancv oar 

aso 

Currency ear UAS 

Cerrencr pot UJ4 

Cun oner nr U55 

-■ inmnnlni 

4U» 

Fin. markka 

i 49 

MBLoem 

4*0100 

Soviet ruble 

07642 

tacSnUi 

14653 

Onafcdrac 

15050 

none, krona 

7X73 

Sean, poem 

156X8 

' tadr.sam. 

17X7 

Kano Hones 

750*5 

pMLmso 

1750 

Steed, krona 

748 

\ Wo.Hn.fir. 

51,74 

iKlninm 

12.1507 

Port, sanda 

15950 

TMwans 

3955 

IrasHcnx. ltssjK 

Mb.rnetah 

1,13400 

Soml rival 

X&505 

TM bat* 

2ft *H4 

Wmflait 

1089 

Irtefec 

05147 

Sbn.3 

2.122 

TnrKlsb Urn 

56095 

teMnae 

30015 

bread Chafe. 

1,49250 

SbAfr.ieed 

24247 

UAE (dream 

3472S 

■ Ttabtakroae 
teistma* 

9.125 

loss 

KOenM dinar 0291 
MMav.rine. 2X295 

S. Kor. wen 

091.18 

Varna. baBv. 

1477 


[Marten: 1.1741 IrWi x 

- Sourcas.- Bottom do Benelux (Brussels); Banco CammerckDe ItaDona (men); Bmu* Nth 
Tooele dr Ports (Parts); Bank of Tokyo (Tokyo); IMF (SDR); BAH (dinar, rtyaL dtrham); 
MtaM (ruble), other data from Reuters and AP. 



Dec. 13 



Dollar 

D Murk 

Fnmc 

Starting 

Fnmc 

ECU 

SDR 

mean 

Wie 

4AAMAL 

4K-4 r. 

11 flrll V. 

1V11V4 

9 *4-9 14 

aw 

montfem 

7*V8te 

AHrAWk 

AVyAV. 

114V114* 

11M-12 

914-914 

814 

month* 

rtvon. 

41te4 9W 

4W4VI 

1144-1144 

11te-12U 

9W-9U, 

8 

moatk* 

79V6H. 

AVrAV 

4tV41* 

1144-114* 

1144-1216 

914-916 

7te4 

rear 

anrsn 

4%-S 

4W4K. 

11VM1H 

1V11W 

B*h-9 

7* 


tens: Morgan Guaranty (dollur, DM, SF. Poona. FF): Lloyds Bank (ECU); Reuter* 
SDR). Rates aapiieoble to totertxmk deposits at SI million minimum (oreaulrolentj. 


Kgy Mon ey 


Dec. 13 


Broker Loon Rale 
Cm Pwar 10-179 dan 
I omiti Timor* Bids 

— urn— warn 
CViMdm 
Ctr« «»«r dsn 

• jriBmr 

UMkVMi 

OWdMMt 
One MtMb Mtjtook 


" CM Many 
OmmmoM Intertask 
H—MMtMk 
twnlfcMortmk 


m 
m 
m 
. 9 
7J0 
4*4 
643 
MS 
7 JO 


5M 

435 

490 

435 

499 


Stt 

» 


TYl 

7tb 

m 

9 

755 
7 JO 
755 
7JSS 
7 J3 


490 

435 

490 


(Pk 

n 


MtaRM 
coaiioMr 
H4qr THowry BH 
huanttuwlm* 


■DtematRate 
-Cob Moan 
Rhtor Mortook 


n i iins 
015/u n 
fl/1# *1/14 


ns im 
in nts 
UJ/16 11 3/l« 
117/301113/41 


5 5 

ova tn 

m 3 3/M 


Source,: Rmdvn. Ccmrmrztxn*. Criat 
-rams. Book a/ Tokyo. 


Asian PaUar Pcpn lis 

Dec. 13 

1 omotti 8-OW 

2 month* 7W-8H, 

Smooths 7*0-814 

Cmnnu 744-814 

1 year 8>8M 

Source: Reuters. 


U-S* IHooey Market Fmub 

Dec. 13 


MOfTM Lrecfl Ready Adttfc 
38 dsn average yield: 


171 


Tettnrie Interest Rota IMtex: 7522 
Source: Merrill Lynch. TtiaraUL 



Dcc.13 



AM. 

PJ*. 

Otan 

HoneKoag 

31759 

31825 

til# 

Luxembourg 

31850 

_ 

+ 150 

Part* (125 Uni 

31024 

31846 

+1M 

Zoned 

31758 

JUUO 

+ 045 

London 

31750 

31755 

+ 025 

Near York 

— 

319 JH 

+ 1.9# 


Luxembourg. Parts and London rfflcW fix- 
ings; Hano Kona and Zurich oeenkrg and 
dosing prices: New York Cemex ament 
contract Ailorlcesln US. $ per ounce. 
Source: Reuters. 


U.S. Says 
Wholesale 
Prices Up 

Rise of 0o8% 

In November 


Compiled bj Our Staff From Dtqmdia 

WASHINGTON — Wholesale 
prices in the United States rose (18 
percent in November, mainly be- 
cause' oT a jump in beef prices, the 
Labor Department reported Fri- 
day. 

In another report Friday, the 
Federal Reserve Board reported 
that UK industrial output rose OA 
percent in November after two 
consecutive monthly declines. 

The Commerce Department re- 
ported that business inventories 
rose &5 percent in October, the 
biggest in 12 as 

sales feO 0.6 percent. 

The increase in wholesale prices 
followed a 0.9-perceotrisem Octo- 
ber and means that wholesale 
prices for finished goods have risen 
at an annual rate of 1.8 percent 
through the first 11 months of 
1985. Retail inflation is running at 
an annual rate of 3 3 percent tins 
year. 

The November Producer Price 
Index showed that food costs rose 
1.6 percent after seasonal adjust- 
mat, after a 1.4-percent increase 
in October. Beef costs rose 4J> per- 
cent 

The Producer Price Index had 
fallen for three of the past six 
months. 

David Wyss, an economist with 
Data Resources Ino, in comment- 
ing an the industrial production 
figures, said, “This is a very poor 
performance.” Mr. Wyss earlier 
predicted a 23-percent increase in 
overall economic growth for the 
final quarter. 

Manufacturing production rose 
0.5 percent, after faffing 0.3 percent 
in both October and September. 

The Federal Reserve said the 
output of consumer goods rose 0 j 4 
percent, after falling 0.5 percent in 
October. Production of durable 
goods — products expected to last 
three years or more — rose 1.4 
percent, rebounding riighdy from a 
13 percent decline in October. 

In its report, the Commerce De- 
partment reported that total busi- 
ness inventories rose by S3.ll Ni- 
hon. with the 05 percent increase 
the largest since a Olfi percent rise in 
October of last year. The 0.6-per- 
cent drop in sales followed a 03- 
percent September decline and was 
the largest setback since a 23-per- 
cent plunge in June. 

(AP, VPI, Reuters) 


Farm Securities Gain Popularity 

Despite Woes, 


Credit System 
Is Called Safe 

By Robert A Bennett 

New York Tana Service 

NEW YORK — Peter J. Car- 
ney is remarkably calm, even 
cheerful, considering that the 
Federal Farm Credit System is in 
such deep financi al [rouble. 

It is Mr. Camey’sjob, as presi- 
dent of the Federal Farm Basks 
Funding Corp n to raise the $70 
Whan that the system lends to 
American farmers. The system is 
the farmers’ biggest creditor and 
with many Cannes in default oo 
their loans, h is likely to have a 
loss of S3 billion this year, ac- 
cording to some estimates. 

If arch Losses were to continue, 
and most analysts expect that 
they wifi, Mr. Carney could be 
saddled with the huge problem 
of not being able to repay inves- 
tees, among them pension funds 
and money-market mutual 
funds. At the very least, the 
Farm Credit System should be 
haring trouble rasing new mon- 
ey . After all, it is privately owned 
mid does not have an explicit 
government guarantee. 

Despite such woes, Mr. Car- 
ney is calm. “The government 
would never let us default,” he 
says flatly. That view seems to be 
widespread, for throughout the 
months-old crisis, Mr. Carney 
has been able to raise the money 
be needs — easily — although he 
must pay a premium interest rate 
for it. Many wefi-heded and as- 
tute institutional investors are 
putting new money into the higb- 
ykdding farm-credit securities, 
betting heavily that the federal 
government will bail out the 
agency if necessary. 

“Fll be dead wrong if Con- 


Piirchasers of Farm Credit System Debt 

Estimated shares ot new larm credit system notes purchased at October 
auction 


Others 


Individuals 


Commercial 

Banks 


Stale, Local 
Governments 


Savings ■ 

Institutions 



Pension funds, | 
money market 
hinds 


Westland Takes 
Sikorsky-Fiat 
Rescue Offer 


gress doesn't come through," 
said Stephen S. Smith, vice presi- 
dent of Provident Capital Man- 
agement, a Philadelphia invest- 
ment advisory service, whose 
clients are pension funds and 
other institutional investors. “A 
default would have a tremendous 
impact cm all US. government 
agencies, and there would be tre- 
mendous disruptions in the mar- 
kets” 

By late summer, when the sys- 
tem's interest-rate premium was 
at its peak, farm-credit securities 
accounted for as much as 15 per- 
cent of some of Mr. Smith's cli- 
entf total investments in fixed- 
income securities. 

And Mr. Smith is not alone. In 
October, for example, institu- 
tional investors bought almost 
25 p erc e nt of the six-month 
notes the Farm Credit System 
sold. That was about double 
what they had bought before it 
became widely evident last sum- 
mer that the system was in trou- 
ble because so many farmers 
could not repay their loans. 


Nm York Trwa 

In September, institutional in- 
vestors bought up 85 percent of 
very short-term discount notes, 
up from 45 percent in August 
L.F. Rothschild, for one, advises 
its clients that “Farm Credit se- 
curities continue to represent an 
attractive investment opportuni- 
ty for those who am hold the 
paper until it matures." 

What has attracted the inves- 
tors were yields that were, at 
times, as much as a percentage 
point above those paid by other 
privately owned government 
agencies such as the Fedoal Na- 
tional Mortgage Association and 
the Federal Home Loan Mort- 
gage Carp. The reason: Many 
traditional investors in farm- 
credit securities, such as bonks in 
agricultural areas and money- 
market mutual funds, have been 
reluctant to buy new issues. This 
d demand, pushing 


has reduced 
down prices and pushing up 
yields. 

Last week, the Senate ap- 
(COntinued on Page 13, COL 5) 


Compiled fry Our Staff Frm Dispatches 

LONDON — Westland PLC. 
Britain’s financially troubled heli- 
copter company, said Friday that it 
had accepted a rescue package by 
Sikorksy. a subsidiary of United 
Technologies Corp. of the United 
States, and Italy's Fiat SpA 

Westland’s chair man, sir John 

Cuckney, said his board had unani- 
mously recommended the proposal 
for a partnership with UT and Fiat, 
which would together have an ini- 
tial 29.9 percent of Westland. 

The board rejected a bid favored 
by Britain's defense secretary. Mi- 
chad Hesdtine, who had hoped to 
form a West European helicopter 
consortium that would compete 
more effectively with US. compa- 
nies. 

Earlier in the day. industry 
sources said that Mr.' Heseltine’s 
proposed consortium — Aerospa- 
tiale of France. Messeisdunidt- 
Bdtkow-Blohm GmbH of West 
Germany and Agusta or Italy — 
had decided to make a bid to rescue 
Westland. 

The sources said the three West 
European companies would offer 
to take a 29.9-percent stake in 
Westland after an agreement 
Thursday night between the de- 
fense ministers of Britain, Italy. 
France and West Germany io pur- 
sue an all-European helicopter pro- 
curement policy. 

Earlier this week. Westland sus- 
pended dealing in its shares on the 
London stock exchange to dampen 
speculation about a possible rescue 
package. 

Failure to win orders for W-30 
helicopter that Westland has devel- 


oped has brought the company, 
Britain’s only helicopter maker, to 
the brink of collapse. 

A joint statement from United 
Technologies and Fiat said that full 
details of the tentative agreement 
and of a capital reorganization 
would be announced as soon as 
possible. 

Sir John, in announcing the deci- 
sion to take Sikorsky-Fiat up on its 
offer, would not disclose how much 
the offer was worth until share- 
holders meet to consider it, proba- 
bly next week. 

The arrangement would license 
Westland to build and sell Sikor- 
sky’s successful Black Hawk heli- 
copter. which was recently selected 
by Australia's defense forces. 

The new partners would have an 
option to increase their stake in 
Westland. 

Sir John said at a news confer- 
ence that the decision to adopt the 
Sikorsky-Fiat bid and reject the 
European consortium was made 
because “financially it was at least 
as good” and it “greatly enhanced 
prospects for employment." 

Westland, based in the Somerset 
in western England, announced 
economy measures and layoffs last 
week designed to save £15 million 
(S21 million) a year. Sir John said 
that the economy measures would 
still go into effect. 

A Westland spokesman said a 
number or LIT directors would join 
the Westland board. (Reuters. AP) 


gjgp U.S. Automakers Report 12.6% Drop in Sales 


United Press International 

DETROIT — Domestic auto- 
makers in the United States report- 
ed Friday that December car sales 
had dropped by 12.6 percent, re- 
flecting the failure of renewed sales 
incentives to draw modi buyer in- 
terest. | 

The seven companies. General 
Motors Coup., Ford Motor Co., 
Chrysler Corp., Honda Motor 
Coro., American Motors Carp., 
Volkswagen of America^ and Nis- 
san Motor Manufacturing USA, 

reported combined sales of 161,278 

cars in the United States during the 
latest reporting period, Dec. 1-10. 
That compares with 184,470 ve- 


hicles sold in the comparable peri- 
od in 1984. 

The daily selling rate of 20,159 
cars compared with 23,059 for the 
period a year earlier. 

The annual rate for the industry 
during the period was 13 million 
cars, compared with a strong 82 
million last year. So far in 1985, the 
companies have sold 73 million 
cars, up 3 J percent from almost 7.6. 
mifiioa units sold in the compara- 
ble 1984 period. 

There were eight waning days in 
the 1985 reporting period, the same 
as in the early December period a 
year ago. 

For the period, GM managed a 
slight gain m market share to 58.9 


percent, while Ford’s declined from 
263 percent to 24.8 percent. Chrys- 
fcx’s share rose two- tenths of a 
point to 123 percent 

During the period. GM an- 
nounced an 8.5-percent finance 
program on its J-car line, which 
indudes such compacts as the 
Chevrolet Cavalier or Pontiac Sun- 
bird. Ford joined a day later with 
7.9-percent financing on its Escort 
and Lynx subcompacts. 

Neither program is as large as 
the one by Chrysler, which the 
week before kicked off 8.6-percent 
cut-rate financing or rebates of 
$500 to $1,000 on almost all mod- 
da. The exceptions were some large 
cars. 


AMC is once again offering 8.8- 
percent financing on its Renualt 
subcompacts. 

VWA led the way in volume in- 
creases with a 603-percent gain. 

A VW spokesman. Joseph Ben- 
nett, said that about a quarter to a 
third of the gain was caused be- 
cause of tight supplies of its Golf 
subcompact last year after the Rab- 
bit was discontinued, but that the 
rest was a legitimate sales increase. 

Figures show, however, that 
VWA was naming at only 44 per- 
cent of capacity last year, making a 
higher percentage of this year's in- 
crease attributable to constricted 
supplies last year. 


U.S. Bank’s Computer Failure Raises Concern About System 


By John M. Berry Bank of New York’s cash account 
Washington Peat Service ■ to pay the sellers f or the incoming 
WASHINGTON — The Bank securities, all of which are repro- 
of New Yod, the 18th largest U.S. ' seated simply by computer records, 
bank, had a brief $32-billron over- rather than the familiar paper 
draft on its wish account at the bonds still used by most coipora- 


New York Federal Reserve Bank 
when a computer failure last month 
snarled thousands of govemment- 
securities transactions, a congres- 
sional committee has learned. 

By the end of the day, the over- 
draft had been reduced to $24 bfl- 
lion, and the bank actually had to 
borrow that amount from the New 
York Fed — pledging all of its 
assets — to balance its accounts 
overnight. 

Aside from the unprecedented 
scale of the borrowing, and the re- 
sulting effects on the gpverameat- 
securities market, the incident in- 
tensified concern at the Federal 
Reserve aver the vulnerability of 
the nation’s financial-payroen ts 
system to a technological glitch 
that could have disastrous conse- 
quences. 

Paul A Volcker, chairman of the 
Federal Reserve Board, and E 
Gerald Corrigan, president of the 
New York Fed, went before a sub- 
committee of the House Banking 
Committee on Thursday to de- 
scribe bow the computer failure oc- 
curred and how the Fed and the 
bank dealt with the crisis it caused. 

On Wednesday, Nov. 20, trans- 
actions involving more than 32,000 
different government-securities is- 
sues poured into the Bank of New 
York, one of the largest processors 
of such transactions on behalf of 
others. 

The bank’s computer system was 


to 36,000 issues, but a program- 
ming glitch developed and, un- 
known to anyone, the computer be- 
gan to “corrupt” the transactions 
and make it impossible for the 
bank to keep them straight 
Because of the breakdown, the 
bank could not instrnct the New 
York Fed where to send the securi- 
ties arriving at the Fed on behalf of 
the bank’s clients, and therefore 
could not be paid for them. 

The New York Fed was auto- 
matically taking money out of the 


nous. 

By the evening of Thursday, 
Nov. 21, as hundreds of employees 
at a host of banks and govcn u neot- 
securities dealers tried to sort oat 
the problems, the bank had a $32- 
bQlion overdraft on its cash ac- 
count at the New York Federal 
Reserve Bank. 

The bank’s computer specialists 
finally came up with a ’‘patch" for 
its computer program — a process 
described Thursday by its chair- 
man, J. Carter Bacot, as the deo- 
tronic equivalent of fixing a tire — 
that allowed it to begin to dear 
some of the backlog But just after 
midnight the patch failed too, after 
the overdraft had been whittled 
down to about $242 billion. 

The Fed kept both its nationwide 
wires for securities and cash trans- 
actions open in the early hours of 
Friday morning. When the patch 
failed, the Bank of New York was 
still able to borrow $700 million 
from other banks. 

The rest was covered by a $23.6- 
biflion loan from the New York 
Fed. As collateral, the bank 
pledged all its domestic assets and 
all its customers’ securities, which 
it was allowed to use for such pur- 
poses. Altogether the collateral was 
worth S36 billion, according to the 
Fed. 

The drama was not over. Arortad 
5 AM. Friday, Nov. 22, the bank 
finally completed reconstruction of 
its customers’ t ransactions from 
Wednesday. By 10 A.M, it had 
done the same for the Thursday 
transactions. 

Meanwhile* the rest of the gov- 
ernment-securities indusoy had be- 
gun its Friday activities, and securi- 
ties and m overdraft were pfling up 
again in the Bank of New Yak’s 
account at the New Yak Fed. 

“Faced with this situation," Mr. 
Conigan told the banking subcom- 
mittee, “at abort 11:30 AJM. we 
temporarily stopped accepting se- 
curities transfers for the account of 


Bank of New York in an attempt to 
stabilize the situation somewhat, 
and to see whether it was practical 
to prevent further increases in the 
overdraft without causing excessive 
disruption in the market more gen- 
erally.” 

“Ope rationall y, this meant that 
holders of government securities 
who had contracts to deliver those 
securities ... to the Bank of New 
York fa one of its customers were 
temporarily imahlg to make deliv- 
ery under those contracts,” Mr. 
Corrigan said. 

The stoppage lasted only for 
about 90 minutes that afternoon, 
and news of it did not spread wide- 
ty for nearly an hour. Yet that dis- 
ruption ax the dealing bank was 
enough. Mr. Conigan said, to make 
some market participants unwilling 
to trade securities among them- 
selves. 

“Perhaps most importantly. 
there was also some evidence that 
investors were beginning to seek to 
break trades financing transac- 
tions with dealers serviced by the 
Bank ot New York," he said. 

Shortly after noon the Bank of 
New York was able to begin han- 
dling the Friday transactions that 
had been piling up. and the Fed 
was again able to accept securities 
destined fa the bank. 

The crisis was over, but its final 
bill is g rin mounting. 


The Bank of New York was out 
about $5 million, equal to about 7 
percent of its earnings in the first 
nine months of ihfa year, to pay 
interest on the money it had to 
borrow. 

It is still negotiating with marry 
of the parties who may have had 
losses in transactions that were not 
completed on time. Such negotia- 
tions are common, said an official 
of one major securities dealer, be- 
cause a few transactions always go 
awry. This time it was thousands. 

Some customers walked away in 
better shape. “Indeed, those indi- 
viduals and institutions who 
bought securities in question re- 
ceived a windfall in that they re- 
ceived interest for the day, did not 
incur any cost of financing.’* Mr. 
Conigan said. 

What worries both Federal Re- 
serve officials and participants in 
the government-securities market 
is the potential fa a failure of the 
system. 

On an average day, about $200 
billion in government-securities 
transactions take place involving 
about 27,000 separate transactions, 
Mr. Conigan said. Some days the 
totals are far larger. 

“Like it a not," Mr. Volcker 
told the subcommittee, “computers 
and their software systems — with 
the possibility of mechanical a hu- 
man failure — are an integral part 


of the payments mechanism. The 
scale and speed of transactions per- 
mit no other approach. 

“In the last analysis, no mechan- 
ical system can be entirely Tail- 
safe’ and also be commercially via- 
ble. The costs would simply be too 
high, and the money and Treasury- 
securities markets could cot oper- 
ate at the present level of efficien- 
cy.” 

Mr. Volcker said that in this case 
the Fed was available to lend the 
S23.6 billion, on good collateral. 
“The effects in this instance were of 
unprecedented magnitude, mea- 
sured by the amount of the over- 
night loan,” he said. “Bui the ef- 
fects in terms of market 
performance and risk were well 
contained. 

“I believe it would be wrong to 
overd ramatizc this incident.” 

Mr. Corrigan in his more de- 
tailed testimony sounded more 
notes of concern. “I believe our 
actions were prudent, disciplined 
and appropriate. In saying this, 1 
should also confess that in some 
respects were were a bit lucky," he 
said. 


ICO Raises 
Its Quotas 
For Coffee 

The Assanatcd Pros 

LONDON — The Interna- 
tional Coffee Organization an- 
nounced Friday that a further 
rise in prices had triggered the 
release of all additional in- 
creases in export quotas permit- 
ted for 1985-86. 

The 75-nation grouping, 
which includes producer ana 
consumer countries, said that 
all quota limits may be sus- 
pended as a result of the move. 

The quota limit was raised 
Friday by 3 million, taking to 
63 million bags the total export 
quotas available for the year to 
October 1986. One bag equals 
60 kilograms (132 pounds). 

Under ICO rules, it needed 
the 1 5-day average price of cof- 
fee to move above $13008 a 
pound to trigger the release of 
quotas and start the countdown 
to suspension. The price fa 
Thursday, available Friday, was 
SI. 5009. 

The 15-day price has to re- 
main above SI 3008 fa 45 con- 
secutive market days to trigger 
the suspension of all quota lim- 
its, which would enable the 
ICO’s 50 producing member 
governments to ship whatever 
quantities they liked. 

Prices have been driven up 
sharply by heavy speculative 
buying in recent weeks, fueled 
by fears of substantial losses to 
next year's Brazilian crop 
through drought 

Brazil supplies about 30 per- 
cent of the world's import 
needs. 

An ICO spokesman said 
there were no plans to hold an 
emergency meeting of the orga- 
nization before Christmas to 
consider possible special mea- 
sures to check the rise in Lhe 
price. 


BANQUE NATIONALS DE PARIS 

Floating rale note issue of U.S. S225 million 
Jane 1981/1986 


The rate of interest applicable for the period 
December 13, 1985 and set by the reference agent is 8W 
annually. 


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Efflutton 

MANAGED CURRENCIES 
PROGRAM 


PERFORMANCE RESULT 
FOR BEGINNING EQUITY OF 


$ 10,000 

JANUARY 1st 1985 


HAS BECOME 


$ 30,361 

DECEMBER 1st 1985 


AFIK ALL COMMISSIONS 


NEXT RESULT M DECEMBER 14h ISSUE. 
THBE S NO M4NM3EM&JT FBi 

MST PSFCftMANCE IS 
NO GUARANTEE 
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14343 , 1S3 r r 12 SJD r r 

SMN CaMdtan Dollars-ccan par uML 
coollr 71 044 r r t t r 

71 n 72 001 r 054 OJU 045 043 

71.92 73 r r OJi r 1.23 r 

71.9* 74 t r r 107 r r 

tiUM west Herman Mortvcmls nor unit. 

OMort 32 7.55 a r r s r 

3*43 35 4J0 r r r r t 

3943 34 342 r 347 r r r 

»43 37 25S t 3JJ3 r r r 

3943 31 la r 125 r 003 0J0 

3943 39 040 042 r t 0.15 058 

3943 4 Ml 02? IJIO M3 MB r 

3«43 41 r D.W 040 r r r 

125400 French Frano-VOttn of a am nr golf. 

FFronc 125 5.10 r r r r r 

, 17941 130 r U5 3.N r r r 

WM4M Japa n me Yen-ionm w a cent ner unit. 

JYM 41 035 s f r • r 

49 jo 43 7J8 r r r r r 

49 JO 43 Ut r r r r r 

rtJO 45 244 r r r r p 

« JO 47 2J2 r 2J6 r r r 

49 JO a 121 t 148 r r r 

4? JO 49 025 047 0.90 002 024 r 

49 JO SO 04)1 0.15 047 0.75 r r 

*1500 Swiss FrancMwiK per unti. 

SFrunc 38 r s 940 r 9 r 

4742 39 BJS i r r i p 

4742 40 r 5 7J5 r ■ r 

4742 41 r s 4.79 r j r 

4742 O 544 ■ P p s f 

4742 43 4J8 r r r r r 

4743 44 340 r r r r r 

4743 45 134 r no r r r 

4742 44 TJ8 r 2J4 r r p 

4742 47 041 OJS r 001 020 QJ9 

4742 40 r p 120 041 r r 

Total coll vt>L ISM Call mo M. 21*493 

Total Out *0L . 1819 PatOpoa lot. 1 90432 

r — Not traded. »— No oaHon offered. 

Last b PTonHwa (Mrefwse price). 

Sauna: AP. 

































































































|T«' 


;,?•> ThoAssodared Pros 

. DElROrr —m chairmanship 
of AmerktnMoiors Qxp. passed 

■ *’■ from Americas to French hands 

Friday with the installation of atop 
i; jj: official of the .French state-owned 
automaker ttwumlt which has a 
i ; ;4djpexcent stake in AMC 

fere Semerena, 58, will, leave 
•.« i- j Kenaolt, where he has been esecu> 
tive vice president, to become 
f i.' AMC chairman. He replaces Paul 

dapav duties witinlecampa- 
^inykApriL Mr. Tippett will remain 
t ; : a director, the company said 
5 *v Jose Dedeurwaerder, AMCs 
president since 1982 and chief ex- 

' C ecufive officer for more than a year, 
: will remain the company’s top afE- 

; . dal His duties were expanded to 
V indude chairman of the board's et- 

• r ' ecu tivc committee, AMC said. 

/ ; The Bdgjnm-bora Mr. Dedeur- 

• wander is expected to be given 
control of Renault's auto opera- 

| . pons outride France early next year 
: while retaining the top office at 
r:; amc 

: Hi Renault rescind AMC under a 

^ Mercantile 
: Studies Sale 
Of U.S. Unite 

By Bob Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Mercantile House 
Holdings PLQ. signaling a strategy 
shift, said Friday that it is discuss- 
ing the sale erf most of its New York 
investment banking unit, Oppen- 
;.} heimer Holdings, to a group led by 
r;; the unit's management. 

| Mercantile paid $ 163 million for 

■ Oppenhdmer in mid-1982 as the 
: & centerpiece of a strategy of diverai- 

lying from money and bond bro- 

- kerage into international invest- 
meat hnkfag The planned sate 

i": illustrates the difficulty of pieting 
together international financial 
; u '- conglomerates from such disparate 

■ : parts. 

John Berkshire, chairman of 
V- Mercantile, last year called Oppea- 
‘.’r heimer a model for “a new breed of 
. ; securities house" that would 
emerge in London as financial mar- 
kets were deregulated. 

On Friday, Mr. Barkshire said 
'. Oppenhdmer was becoming meat 
; focused an share dealing in its 

• ; home market and thus had grown 

■ ■i “less relevant" for Mercantile’s 

drive to become, a leader in the 
international bond market. 

: ; Mercantile said it expected to. 

- retain about 20 percent of Oppen- 
■’ • heimer as weD as aD of the compa- 
ny's mutual-fund-management 

.'business. One analyst es timated 

■ _ Mercantile would receive $120 mil- 

lion for the unit. 

MercanUle eventually might ac- 

• quire a U.S. bond- trading business, 
Mr. Barks h ire said. 


1979 agrcanent and own* 46.1 per- 
cent of the American company’s 
stock. 

AMCs setup is nn fifo rhqqy of 
many large U.S. corporations. 
Where the ehairman typ ically hi the 

(^irf executive officer and tiKprcsr 
ident is the chief of operations. 

The top American at AMC will 
iwwbeexecutivevicepreskleiit Jo- 
seph Caj^, 51, who Friday was 
made chief operating officer. 

Mr. Cappy, once the main mar , 
keting and sales man at AMC, 
yiincri supervision of manufactur- 
ing and parts supply earlier 
year. Now, the remainin g opera- 
tions also will report to him; engi- 
neering, product planning and styl- 
ing. 

The moves were derided Friday 
in New York by AMCs board, 
which includes four present or for- 
mer Renault executives phu two 
outside directors with ties to Re- 
nault. 

Executives inside the company 
viewed the moves as a vote of confi- 
dence in Mr. Dcdeurwaerder and 


Mr, Cappy. AMC has posted a cu- 
mulative loss of $741 nwiiwffl ance 
1980, hut the company fltfl rifr ” 1 ** 6 
most of that to the faHmg fortunes 
of subcompact cars, the only kind 
AMC makes in the United States. 

AMCs Jeep vehicles are consid- 
ered highly profitable and (be com- 
pany's plans to bring oat ahigher- 
profit midsize car at a new,lughfy 
automated plant in ratiaHa are 
said to be on schedule. 

MtTippett became a figurehead 
chairman over the past year. In 
Juty, he was named president of 
Springs Industries Inc., a South 
Carolma tactile company. 

Mr. Semerena was appointed to 
the AMC board m 1980, but re- 
signed in December 1982 to 
the international automotive divi- 
sion of Renault 

Also elected to the board Friday 
was Allan Chapin, a partner in Re- 
nault’s New York law firm, Sulli- 
van & CromwdL He is no relation 
to Roy Qmpin, a director and for- 
mer chairman of AMG 


Schaffler Named 
Head of Dormer 

Reuters 

STUTTGART — Johann 
Schiffler, rice president and 
| general manager of the Airbus 
Industrie consortium, has h«n 
f iar Ty*d managing board chair- 
man of (he West German aero- 
space group Dornier GmbH, a 
Dormer spokesman said Fri- 
day, confirming earlier reports. 

He win replace Manfred Fi- 
scher, who wQl continue as an 
adviser to the group, in which 
Daimler-Benz AG bought a 
65-5-percem stake eariier this 
year. His appointment is effec- 
tive Feb. I. 

Industry sources predicted 
last week that Mr. Schlffler 
would be given the chairman- 
ship. Mr. Scbfiffler, a former 
official at West Germany’s larg- 
est aerospace group, Mes- 
scrschmilt-BOlkow-Blohm 
GmbH, bad been with Airbus 
since the spring. 


S&& Lowers Its Credit Ratings of Texaco 


The Arsadatcd Press 

NEW YORK — Standard & 
Pom's Corp. sharply dropped its 
credit ratings of Texaco Inc. senior 
debt and commercial paper to 
speculative grade Friday, saying an 
out-of-court settlement of a $10.53- 
biUion judgment against the oil 
company “appears unlikely” 

The move was the latest indica- 
tion of the pressures building on 
the third largest U.S. oil company 
since a Texas state judge on Tues- 
day upheld a $ 10.53-billion jury 
award plus interest against the 
company. 

Analysts said the specter of a 
protracted battle to overturn the 
judgment awarded to P ennzofl Co. 
could make it more difficult for 
Texaco to secure credit from sup- 
pliers and banks for its day-to-day 
operations and could make pouai- 

COMP ANY NOTES 


Banque lndosuez, the Paris- 
based banking group, said it 
opened its first branch in China's 
special economic zone of Shenz- 
hen. The license allows Banque In- 
dosuez to operate in the whole of 
China in foreign currencies for im- 
port-export operations with joint 
ventures in Hong Kong and Macao 
and foreign entities: 

Exxon Corp. of the United Slates 
said its subsidiary, Esso Explora- 
tion & Production Australia Intx, 
plans to acquire the entire issued 
capita] of Citco Australian Petro- 
leum Ltd. from Occidental Petro- 
leum Corp.Yumt, Occidental In- 
ternational Exploration & 
Production Co. The purchase price 
was not undisclosed. 

Fisoas PlX of Britain said it has 
received approval from the U.S. 
Food and Drag Administration to 


tial business partners wary of en- 
tering into ventures with Texaco. 

Texaco did not ‘comment on 
changes in its bond ratings. 

S&P lowered Texaco’s senior 
debt rating to B from A-plus, an 
investment grade rating, and low- 
ered its commercial paper ratings 
from A-I to C — a category of 
short-term debt that S&P considers 
to have “doubtful capacity for re- 
payment.” 

S&P, which also lowered (he se- 
curities ratings of certain Texaco 
subsidiaries, said its action affected 
about $8.4 biHian of Texaco debt. 

Moody’s Investor Services, the 
other major investment rating firm, 
lowered its ratings of Texaco debt 
to speculative grade on Wednes- 
day, affecting about $2.4 Mhon in 
commercial paper and $ 8.8 bQHon 
in long-term debt. 


market an aerosol version of its 
bronchial asthma drug, IntaL At 
present in the UlS. market, Intal is 
sold in a form that has to be inhaled 
through a special device. 

LTV Corps the UR steel con- 
cern. was allowed by the Justice 
Department to adl its Gadsden, 
Alabama, plant to employees. The 
department reversed an. earlier re- 
jection erf the sale. 

Peugeot SA of France said its 
unit. Automobiles Peugeot and BL 
PLCs Austin Rover division in 
Britain have signed an agreement 
far Austin Rover to distribute three 
versions of the . Peugeot 205 mini 
car in Japan. Under the acoor<L 
Austin Rover Japan wodd import 
and distribute up to 1,000 Peugeot 
205s a year, starting next March. 

Repco Corp. of Australia has de- 
scribed as inadequate a hostile bid 


The rhang r* were important be- 
cause institutions such as bank 
trusts and pension funds are barred 
from investing in securities rated as 
speculative. 

SAP’s action came a day after 
Japan’s Nippon Ofl Co. said it 
would delay a SlOO-milEon project 
to head a consortium exploring and 
devetoping some of Texaco's U.S. 
o3 natural gas fi el d s until the 
Pennzral case was resolved. 

S&P said in a news release that it 
based its credit action on its opin- 
ion that a Texaco banknqrtcy filing 

was an “increasingly attractive op- 
tion” if the company was forced to 
post the SI 1-biliioo. bond in order 
to appeal the decision. 

“A bankruptcy filing would re- 
lieve Texaco of its onerous require- 
ment to post a bond,” S&P s tated. 


by Ariadne Australia LuL, which 
offered 1.50 Australian dollars 
(5 1.02) a share for the 78 percent of 
Repco' s 219.60 nation shares that 
it did not already hold on Wednes- 
day. 

VereJnigte Aluminium- W erke 
AG, West Germany’s largest alumi- 
num producer, said profit came un- 
der pressure in the third quarter, 
daring which sales rose 1.1 percent 
from the previous quarter to 880 
million Deutsche marks (5349.2 
million). 

Weyerhaeuser Ql of the United 
States, whose acquisition from 
Meoasha Corp. of a corrugating 
mill in North Bend, Ore- 
gon, has been challenged on anti- 
trust grounds, is bong allowed to 
proceed by the Federal Trade 
Commission. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 



INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


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(Continued from Page 1) 
ting op a contest, but RCA did not 
want to provide that. 

Nevertheless, with RCA willing 
to walk up the aidg red GE an 
eager escort, the negotiations 
moved along. 



teg 




A-AMEBCAN Escort Sarvira Erary 1 1 
whorol 900337-0092/81 3-9Z1-7W&. 1 I 

m 



came together in the hard-char g in g 
Wall Street community, it all start- 
ed at a routine breakfast earlier this 
fall 

During this breakfast Mr. Welch 
mentioned to Mr. Rohatyn, with 
whom be often shares coffee and 
orange juice, that he wanted to 
meet Mr. Bradshaw. 

Mr. Rohatyn called Mr. Brad- 
shaw and arranged the Nov. 8 
meeting. 

“The discussions were quite gen- 
eral," Mr. Bradshaw said Of that 
first meeting. “It was a very low- 
key feeling." 

But GE was galvanized. 

Mr. Welch immediately put a 
team of four executives ou the case. 

“We tore the numbos apart," he 
said. “We knew everything about 
that company by the time we were 
through-” 

By shortly before Thanksgiving. 
Nov. 28, Mr. Welch was convinced 
that he wanted the company. Its 
nationwide network. National 
Broadcasting Co., had never been 
in better health; its television sta- 
tions were doing very well, and its 
defense business seemed compati- 
ble with GPs. 

Mr. Welsh decided that be and 
several of his top executives should 
think it over during Thanksgiving 
weekend. He did his thinking on a 
brief trip to West Palm Beach. 
Florida, with his family. 

The next week, he put in a call tc 
Mr. Rohatyn, who in turn called 
Mr. Bradshaw. A meeting was ar- 
ranged for Dec. 5. 

Mr. Bradshaw recalled that Mr. 
Welch came by to see him thai 
night at the Dorset Hotel in Man- 
hattan, where Mr. Bradshaw u 
temporarily staying. 

The meeting did not take long 
but it was long enough to make Mr 
Bradshaw late to a dinner party. 


Moscow Reports 
Faster Growth 

United Press International 

MOSCOW — The Soviet 
economy grew at a 3.8-peroent 
rate through the first 1 1 months 
of the year but continued to 
suffer shortfalls in vital areas 
such as oil production, the gov- 
ernment said Friday. 

The figures from the Central 
Statistical Board, primed in the 
Communist Party newspaper 
Pravda, said industry had ex- 
ceeded marketing plans by I 
percent bat did not mention (he 
production plan target Total 
production stood 3.8 percent 
above a year earlier, while labor 
productivity was 19 3.4 percent, 
the government agency said. 

Figures published a year ago 
listed the 1985 labor productivi- 
ty target at 3.7 percent and pro- 
duction at 3.9 percent 





UwAorcrad Pi«u 

John F. Welch Jr., chairman of GE, and Thornton F. 
Bradshaw, chairman of RCA, after announcing the merger. 


“We had a conversation that 1 
could only construe as an offer,* 
Mr. Bradshaw said Thursday. 

Mr. Bradshaw reached Robert 
R. Frederick. RCA’s president anc 
chief executive, at 6:30 the next 
morning in Los Angeles, where bt 
had gone for business meetings 
Mr. Frederick canceled his plans it 
stay the weekend and returned to 
New York to begin a series of meet- 
ings with RCA’s lawyers and bank- 
ers. 

Mr. Bradshaw also began con- 
tacting board members to plan a 
Sunday afternoon meeting at the 
law office of Wacbtell, Upton, Ro- 
sen & Katz. Martin Upton, the 
firm’s senior partner, has been ad- 
vising RCA on takeover issues. 

‘'There was the usual concern 
that RCA was losing its indepen- 
dence," said a source familiar with 
RCA. “But the board was very 
thorough and very fair." 

Ultimately both boards voted 
unanimously for the agreement. 


Meanwhile, talks among Mr. 
Welch, Mr. Frederick and Mr. 
Bradshaw continued on Monday 
and Tuesday at GE*s Waldorf 
Towers apartment 

According to sources familiar 
with the negotiations, there was 
some wranglmg over price. Initial- 
ly, GE offered about S61 a share, 
but RCA held out for more. 

Another major issue was how 
GE would protect itself, and its 
offer, if a second bidder surfaced 
with a higher offer. 

The sources said GE wanted to 
protect itsdf with what is known in 
the takeover game as the “crown 
jewel" arrangement involving two 
of RCA’s five television stations — 
those in New York and Los Ange- 
les. Guaranteeing their sale to GE 
would destroy much of the value of 
RCA to another bidder. However. 
RCA argued that such an agree- 
ment would seriously affect the val- 
ue of the television network. 

“It would have been imprudent 


World Trade Threats Persist 


(Coiitiimed from Page 9) 
define our hopes and dreams, our 
way of seeing ourselves and the 
world." 

Such neo-protectionism is likely 
to be a subject of controversy in the 
bilateral negotiations with Canada 
that Mr. Reagan, according to ad- 
ministration sources, is now pre- 
pared to begin. These bilateral 
talks would move in parallel with 
the multilateral GATT talks. At 
GATT, the United States is expect- 
ed to push bard for fairer trade 
rules on services, such as communi- 
cations, hanking, insurance and 
data processing, as well as on high 
technology and intellectual proper- 
ty, where America believes it has a 
comparative advantage and can re- 
dress its trade imbalance. 

Probably the most difficult prob- 
lem confronting the multilateral 
trade talks will be linking trade 
with such crucial problems as ex- 
change rates, world debt and na- 


tional fiscal and monetary policies 
for growth. As complex as this may 
be, it appears impossible to avoid 
the necessity of accompanying the 
trade talks with formal negotia- 
tions to strengthen the world mon- 
etary system and improve coordi- 
nation of national economic 
polities, if a breakdown in the trad- 
ing system is to be prevented. 

UJL Consumer Prices 
Rose 03% in November 

Agenee France-Preue 

LONDON — Consumer prices 
in Britain rose 03 percent in No- 
vember, bringing the rate of infla- 
tion Tor 12 months to 5.5 percent, 
the government announced Friday. 

Prices had risen 03 percent in 
October after falling 0.1 percent in 
September. The annual rate of in- 
flation in October stood at 5.4 per- 
cent. 


CA. Merger 

to lock up the stations because they 

are an integral part of a network 
system,” Mr. Frederick recalled 
Thursday. Instead the companies 
agreed on what is known as a 
"stock lockup," that is. GE has an 
option to buy 28 million shares of 
RCA stock at SS3 a share. 

These issues were resolved dur- 
ing meetings Monday and Tuesday 
at the Waldorf Tower apartment, 
as well as at various lawyers’ of- 
fices. 

Lawyers at Fried, Frank, includ- 
ing Arthur Flasher, a leading take- 
over lawyer, worked all Tuesday 
night on the final papas. About 2 
A.KL, Mr. Upton, the takeover 
specialist at WachteL Upton joined 
the Fried, Frank contingent and 
discussions continued for another 
several hours. Finally the papers 
were complete and the lawyers 
went home to shower and change. 

By Wednesday night ibe boards 
had approved the agreement. At 
GE, there was euphoria. 

“We’ve looked at 3,000 compa- 
nies in the past five years," said 
Larry Bossidy. a top executive at 
GE. “But this one is a blockbust- 
er." 


Japanese Liberalize 
Oil-Product Imports 


TOKYO — Japan's parliament 
has approved a bill to liberalize oil- 
product imports, a parliamentary 
official said Friday. 

The bill for specific petroleum 
product imports of gasoline, kero- 
sene and gasoil will be effective 
within one month, at the discretion 
of the Ministry or International 
Trade and Industrv. he said. 


Net Asset Value on 
December 5, 1985 

Pacific Selection Fund N.V. 
H.S.SU6 per U.S.S1 unit. 

Pacific Selection 
Fond N.V. 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INGERSOLL-RAND COMPANY 

(CDRa) 

The undriMfimi announce* thai as from 
20th December 1985 ai Kaa-.Wiuir 
N.V.. Spuktraat ITS. Amsterdam, tUv. cp. 
do. 50 of the CDRn lu^moli-ftand 
Company each npr. 5 sbs., will be 
payable with DOo. 7,84 net (div. per 
record-dale 1 1-20-1985; gross $-.65 p. ah.) 
after deduction of 155- US. A. tax — 
S-.4875 ■ Dfl*. 1,38 perCDR. Dir. cps. 
belonging to non-res idema of The Nether- 
lands util be paid after deduction of an 
additional IS 1 * USJt.-ux (- &.487S *• 
Dfla. 1,38) with Dfls. 6.46 net. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 
Amsterdam. 6th Deivmber. 1985. 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


AGRICULTURAL 
EXTENSION SPECIALIST 
ICARDA/ PAKISTAN 

The Internationa l Center for Agricultural Research n the Dry 
Areas (ICARDA) is looking for an agricultural extension specialist 
to complete a team of five scientists in a newly established project 
funded by USAID, based at tfie Arid Zone Research Institute, 
Quetta, Pakistan. This project has two principle objectives: (1) to 
develop an integrated cropping and rangeland management 
reseandi program under rainfed and srwwmelt diversion, pma- 
paOy m Bakidiisfcsv (2) to strengthen the research eapabSly of 
the Pakistan Agricultural Research CounaTs Arid Zone Research 
hstBule with HQ in Quetta, Baluchistan, and subs tati ons in each 
of tiie remaining three provinces of Pakistan. 

Applicants should have the foflewring qualifications. 

a) A PbJD in agricultural extension or a related discipline. 

b) Appropriate postdoctoral experience working within agri- 
cultural extension in a developing country. 

c) Knowledge of modern methods of communication in agri- 

d) Possess the ability to liaise closely with, and encourage the 
activities of provincial extension services. 

e) Be ftwwt in Kngfcah TangnapUL 

Salary and benefits, inducting home leave, free housing, 
education allowance, pension and insurance w31 depend on 
quafificafions and experience but will be in Ene with ' nte mational 

standtxds. 

Interested applicants should send a copy of titer C.V. together 
with the names and addresses of two referees, to both of the 
foBcwmg addresses.- 


Depuly Director General 
for fctemationd Cooperation 

ICARDA 
P.O. Bax 5466 
Alamo 

J “r w 

SYRIA 


Project Leader 
ICARDA 

Arid Zone Re soot h Institute 
P.O. Box 326 
Quetta 
PAKISTAN 


DIRECT FAN 
SAJLES 



A large international distributor of Axial Flow 
Fans to the petrochemical and utility industries 
has an excellent opportunity for an aggressive in- 
dividual who will be responsible for direct fan 
sales and supervising European distributors. 

The qualified candidate must be free to travel, 
have had extensive contact with the petrochemi- 
cal and urilirv industries, and must be able to 
speak English, French and German fluently. 

Salary commensurate with experience. Interest' 
ed candidates please submit resume detailing ex- 
perience to: 


Mr. A. Thoma 
Postfach 101140 
2000 Hamburg 1 
West Germany 

An tonal iHf w ifi Lui nn 


Maintenability Engineer 

Working in our Network and Telecom Special 
Systems Department in Annecy - France. 


ft. Please send your resume ret. HTB 1 14 TO. Ken Parker. 
' 4r Engineering Manager. DIGITAL EQUIPMENT Co, 
Worton Grange READING - flG2 0T£ ENGLAND - U.K. 


Move and Live. 


N" 2 mondial de Pinfcxmalique 



8STBS BCOKT SHNKE. London. 
Toi: 01-339 20N 


"INTERNATIONAL 

POSITIONS” 

appears every Thursday A Saturday 

TO PLACE AN ADVBlTISEMBfT contact your nowatt 
International HoraM TrOwno fop re t on lot hr o or Max htfto 
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T#L: 47-47-12-65. Tatax: 613 595. 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


EXECUTIVE 

41, BELGIAN, living Antwerp B.A„ M.BjL, speaks En glish, 
French, Dutch, German. Italian. North American and European 
experience with Multinationals in General Management, Inti 
Marketing, Sales, Financial analysis & reporting. Export 
management and Administration seeks suitable position. 

Box D-13L, Herald Tribune, 9252 L, Neoffly Cedex France. 































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14-15, 1985 



Tobies Include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


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AMEX Highs-Lows 


NYSE Highs-Jjtms 



INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Dec. 13,1985 

__ HM wot vale* quota float ora tappMod by Hw Fonda Ita ta d w l lb Ite —p o o p — 0 * wm w n 6 — b i te m bw Prtc*. 

Ttw moral not wiwbota hidicota Irani way ot oaotiWna nlM :M-6d»i lul- wO lw W- M rnmom t (r)-i»p ub a«»7 tn-b ww ta rty. 


AL MAE MANAGEMENT 

-Iw) A I- Mai Tnnt. SA 

BANK JULIUS BAER B CO. Ud. 
■Idl BaorMnd 

-t a 1 Con bar _ — — 

<1 d 1 Eooiboer America 

-(»> EauHncr Europe, . . 

-( d ) EmHbtwr PocHlc 

-Id) OrObor 

-Id 1 Stackbar — 

BNP INTERFUNDS 

-In) InMfWKl Fund 

-Iw ) I filer currency USS 

-Iw] imercurrencv DM 

■1 «* I I n te l cur r e ncy SlerlkKj 

-I w 1 intwreouJrv Pacific CMfer_ 


SF 923.15 
SF 1323J0 
51234000 
5F 14*3000 
SF 123300 
SF 108300 
SF 172200 

. 5 12903 
. 5 1086 

DM 3055 
■ t 1003 
. S TIOl 


-In) IntereouftY N, Am*r. Offer s 1045 

BANQUE INDOSUE2 

-C d 1 Aslan Growth Fund S 1178 

-(*■) Dlverpona SF- 8240 

-(wl FIF-Arnnrlca . 3 17.77 

-lv» FIF-Euraoe I 16.15 

-Idl PlF-iittoraattonoi S 11,19 

-fwl FIF-PocIBc 1 2088 

-I d 1 Indasue: Muinbonda A S 11059 

-( 0 ) lnOOWi*z MufTlOanOl B s 1B109 

-{d> IndowezUSO IMJM.F) — _ *10*457 
8R ITANNIAPOB 27L II. Metier. Jerevr 

-<»»> BrlMTotlar Income I 00*8* 

-fwl BrfU ManaoXurr. * 10-70 

-< d 1 Or II. I nl 1-3 Mcnau^ortt S 1.183 

-Idl Bril. infEiManaoJWf i 1215 

-<«*! Brit. Am. Inc. A Fd Ltd * El&i 

-Iwl Brtl.CotO Fund S 047V 

•Iw) Brit-Monaa. Currency c 1502* 

-Idl BrIL Japan Dir Pert. Fd S 1 jzn 

■<wl Brit J»ney Gilt Fond c 0818 

-Idl Brit. World Let*. Fund * 1.2J7 

■Idl Brit. World Teclm. Fund— 8 0018 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

■I wl Copilal Inn Fund S 4538 

■Iwl Cartlal rtallaSA- * 1145 

aTICORP INVESTMENT BANK (Link] 
POB 1373 Luxembourg TeL 477.9571 

Id) GKrm»t Ecu — ECU 1016.97 

Idl CINneesf Ltaukfltv S 101677 

CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES] 

•(dl Actions Sullies- — SF 497.2s 

-idl Bono voter swi SF 10445 

•4 a 1 Bona Valor D-marfc Dm Wk43 

■idl Band Vblor UHWLLAR S llOJV 

-( d ) Bond Volar t Sterilns [ 1«U1 

-Id I Band Valor Yon Yen loj*4iXl 

■Idl Convert Valor Swf SF 12375 

•(d) Convert valor U&-DOLLAR. S I2U3 

-IdlCantMOC-.,. SF 69380 

-(dlCSFowa-nonffii SF 7680 

-idlCSFoMts-inn 5F T2180 

-(dlCSMamvMartetFund. S 110780 

4 dies Monty Mortef Fond _ DM 106480 

■I dlCSMonav Market Puna (105180 

Kd) CS Motev Markot Fd Ywi. Y1 0041680 
-(dl Eiftrpie-Vqlor SF 14725 

■(diysspc SF 85540 

-1 0 ) EuroeO'Valor SF 19075 

-Idl PoetflC -Untnr SF 16275 

DREXEL BURNHAM UUWBERT INC 
WlndHstor House. 77 London Wall 
LONDON EC2 (01 92097971 

•Iwl Flntburv Group LM S 12948 

-(ml Winchester Dlvmifbw 1 2170* 

-(Ml w mcM s ter Financial Ltd. 1 944 

-(ml WlnctMsler Frontier s 10881 

-Iw) WhKMtferHokOnps FF 10743 

S 12J4 

-(wl worldwide Soairmn % si JO 

-|w> WrtrtOrrlOe 3n*thil S 186045 

DIT INVESTMENT FFM 

-H d | Cogcontr n . .. — DM 3S47 

-4(d) Inti KfTfe nl on fl DM 9341 

Dana A HoroUT 6 Uayd Geerga, Bnneol* 

-(ml DitH Commodity Poo(^_ *34383 — 

-(in) Currency & Gold Poof 4 H4JQ — 

-(ml Wlncn. ufe Fut. f*ooi-,,_. * sous — 
-(ml Trans W»nd Fut. Pool *879.98—. 
BBC TRUST CO. (JERSEY) LTD. 1 

1-3 Seat* SIJU. HMler; 0534-36331 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 

S t d line: Bkl_S 1 0.71 -Offer SU851* 1 

(dlCao.: SW— J 1?7J Otfer^^n2427 
INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND . 

-(dl EhortTormWIAccuml— S 1 J098 1 

-( d I Short Term 'A' lONr) * 180*7 

-[d ) Short Term U’ (Accixul t 17993, 

-(d) Short Tenn V IDIitrl * 0.9674 . 



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68 11 3 28ft 

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30 4ft 4ft 4ft + ft 

1 41* 4ft 4ft— ft 

57 5ft. 4ft 5 — ft 

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J0b37 10 8 9ft 99* 9ft + ft 

40 44 U 40 9 8ft «— ft 

80a U 11' I 28ft 20ft 20ft + ft 
8 U6 6ft 4 4ft 






Unilever Group to Buy 
Units in Brazil, Mexico 

Roam 

LONDON — The Unilever Group and An- 
doson Clayton & Co. of Houston have agned 
definitive agreements for Unilever to buy Clay- 
ton’s interests in Brazil and Mexico for about 
$] 123 million, the companies said Friday. 

Completion of the accord, which is subject to 
shmefaokler and regulatory approval, is expect- " 
ed in early 1986, the companies said. 

The companies said the sale price is subject to *' 
aujusUuent when the transaction is completed f "J 
The two units have a book value ofS88.6 ' 
million. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14-15, 1985 


Page 13 


/ Jose Maria Ruiz Mateos 


ire Battles On From Spanish Jail 




Vjjy Edward Schumacher 

, £ 5 Sat York Fima Sendee 
'•>i- ?, MADRID — lost Maria Rmz 
-_l>''iteos, csrtraditcd Kov, 27 firom 
‘1* Gennanyon charges related 
;■ t]lhe expropriation of ms business 

^<^J:pire, has been sitting without 
in a higb-sccurity prison here. 

would scan a remarkable 
for a man. who was the soie\ 
; Xsaer of the Ruzoasa group —232 

^apanics that ranged from banks 

1 1 hotels and that accounted for 
■OW^rly 2 percent of Spain’s econo- 
^ Even behind bars, however, 
Ruiz Mateos is Still making 
'res. • • Y- 

q a defense that is as much, po- 
L-al as le gd, he has trri pKpgfBri 
•“ay Spanish leaders — inducting . 
£ tocral&, matadors and even the 
Rodent of the Cbostitutional Tri- 
■^aL the country’s top court — in . 
£ Rnmasa scandal He has also 
"ned a rare window an the work- 
's of Opus Dei, a powerful and 
*' ■* -etive Roman Catholic fratexni- 
. *f business leaders. 

><• peeking the equivalent of S3 bfl- 
v i in compensation, Mr. Ruiz 
teos, 54, had tried to rally inter- 
jYSonal pressure by retaining an 
^KijKerican. Arthur E. Teele Jr n to 
^_^rdinate his defense. However, 
week Mr. Tede, who does not 
Elk Spanish, was withdrawn by 
: ! ' Ruiz Mateos from representing 

■ r interests in Spain, because of 
V.'J-.;: talks m a television interview in 
£ Y -vch Mr. Teele had questioned 
Y Y i extent of Spanish democracy. 

’ L Teele had been deputy secre- 
;i of transportation in President 
: .paid Reagan’s first term. 

. 1 U; -“he sensitivity of the case has 
owe so intense that officials in 
Y;V j Socialist administration of 
ine Minister Felipe Gonzfilez 
4 they were reluctant, to have 
Yr i Rue Mateos back in Spain. 
Y : ;y said it was the judge, Luis 
=ga, who had sought and won the 
L ‘adition. 

Uos£ Maria will not go quietly 
‘\-z l \ passively to iafl,” Mr. Tede 
i m an interview. “His return 
* : -Y b is not the end of anything. It’s 
Y ; the h ^inning .” Mr. Ruiz Ma- 
j himself, who h«g blamed his 
f;; -blems on a plot by business ri- 
. ^ said at a Dec. 2 hearing: “Til 


win, reason is on my side and the 
government will fall*’ Previously, 
he- had said that- “Pm going to 
defend myself by means cutheiaw 
and not through the press.” ' 

- Mr. Rniz Mateos, an obsessive, 
self-made matt, built Rnmasa from 
a small sherry-exporting company 
in the hot dry region around Jerez 
in the south into Spain’s largest 
holding company. He did so 
through heavy borrowing, much of 
it from banks he came to own, and 
*a dose relationship with Franco, 
the late dictator. 

Seeing himself as a folk boo, Mr. 
Ruiz Mateos said he was driven by 
a messianic vision 'of employing 
100,000 people, {hit Franco died in 
1975. and by 1979, the Bank of 
Spain and major private banks, 
.many of which refused to finance 
Mr. Ruiz Mateos, began warning 
that the bedding, company was 
over-extended. He refused to allow 
audits by outsiders. 

Hie government, seizing his 
headquarters in a midnight raid, 
charged that an imminent collapse 
of Rnmasa endangered the Spanish 

economy. 

Mr. Ruiz Mateos fled the coun- 
try, and from abroad he bitterly 
ac c used his friends of betrayal to 
keep their own operations from be- 
ing expropriated. A member of 
Opus Da, be said be bad acted 
under the advice of fellow members 
led by Luis VaRs, president at 
Banco Popular, one of Spain’s “Big 
Seven” banks. Mr. Rmz Mateos 
said that they had introduced him 
to Bank, of Spain officials before 
the expropriation of Rnmasa and 
afterward advised him to flee. 

He also disclosed how Vails and 
Opus Dei H«d sent emissaries and 
letters to him in attempts to b rail 
the rift. They have denied any ill 
intentions. 

“This is a very delicate and 
touchy thing,” Mr. Ruiz Mateos 
said recently. “First, you have to 
distinguish between the institution. 
Opus Del which is sacred and 
which I would never do anything to 
damage, and then there are the 
men, who are mean and ram make 
mistakes and abuse.” 

Mr. Ruiz Mateos damaged his 
standing in public opinion when he 



Jose Maria Rnxz Mateos 


tuned on the highly respected 
King Juan Carlos. The king had 
been close to Mr. Ruiz Mateos, but 
nonetheless signed the expropria- 
tion decree Mr. Rmz Mateos 1ms 
accused the king of accepting a $3- 
million bribe to get rid of Bank of 


Spain officials. No proof has been 
fnrmsbed. 

But one group still sticks by the 
entrepreneur: Hundreds of people 
who were diehard Franco siipporl- 
ere stood outside the court bmkfing 
last week and cheered Mr. Ruiz 
Mateos. 

And the Popular Coalition, the 
conservative opposition, formed a 
commission last week to investigate 
what it says were irregularities 
committed by the government in 
sel l i ng off many of Rumasa’s com- 
panies. 

Legal battles have become a 
nightmare. Mr, Rmz Mateos has 
filed some 700 civil suits related to 
the expropriation. One appeal to 
the Constitutional Tribunal lost 
najTowfy, but a second appeal re- 
mains pending. Meanwhile, even a 
number of Socialists have ques- 
tioned the necessity and legality of 
the expropriation. 

Under West Germany’s extradi- 
tion terms, Mr. Rmz Mateos can be 
prosecuted only for accounting ir- 
regularities aim possibly for tax 
evasion, although the Madrid gov- 
ernment wanted to charge l™> 
with emherrierne nt, fraud and li- 
beling the' king. 


Swiss Post a Monthly Trade Swrplus 

Compiled by Our Slaff Fran Dupatcha 

BERN — Switzerland’s merchandise- trade balance, benefiting 
from falling imports, swung into surplus in November for the first 
time in nearly seven years, the government said Friday. 

The government said that exports exceeded imp or t s oy 90.9 million 
francs (about S43.1 million) in November, in contrast to a 582JJ- 
mfllion-franc deficit in October. 

Imports fdl to 5.9 trillion francs in November from 6.8 bfltion 
francs in October, while exports fell to 6 bflUco francs from <l 2 
bflDon, the government said. 

The last monthly trade surplus, in December 1978, was 284J2 
million francs. The overall deficit for the first II months of 1985 now 
stands at 7.6 billion francs. 

Union Bank of Switzerland expects the Swiss current account, a 
broader gauge that measures trade in goods and sendees as well as 
interest, dividends and certain transfers, to show a surplus of around 
9.5 billion francs in 1985. 

Separately, the government also a small rise in unem- 

ployment in November, to 0.9 percent of the working population 
from 0.8 percent in October. Officials said this rise was also seasonal. 

The federal Office of Industry, Trade and labor also said that 
Swiss industrial production feD 6 percent in the third quarter after an 
upward revised 7-percent rise in the second three months of the year. 


Securities 
In Farming 
An Popular 

(Continued from Page 9) 
proved a bill that would authorize 
the Treasury to give an unlimited 
amount of aid to the system if the 
administration deemed it neces- 
sary. Tbe House Agriculture Com- 
mittee approved a simil ar bill and 
the full House voted its approval 
this week. 

As the legislation wended its way 
through Congress, a key issue was 
to what degree the government 
should pour money into the pri- 
vately owned system before it use d 
up its own resources. At one point, 
according to some reports, the 
Farm Credit System was proposing 
government aid of $10 billion, or 
one-seventh of the $70 billion that 
the system has outstanding in 
bonds and notes. Later it sought a 
$3-biUtoa tine of credit from the 
Treasury. 

Now the biR passed by the Sen- 
ate sets no aid figure, but specifies 
that the Treasury will not step in 
until the system uses up hi own 
reserves of about SU btHkm. The 
House trill is similar. 

The Farm Credit System was 
created by Congress, piece by piece 
beginning in 1917, with the man- 
date t ha t it make loans to tire na- 
tion’s farmers. Today the system 
consists of 37 fanner-owned finan- 
cial institutions, each operating 
fairly independently of each other 
although they au raise funds 
through Mr. Carney’s Federal 
Land Funding Corp. The 
overall regulator is tbe Farm Credit 
Administration. 

But this connection with tbe fed- 
eral government gives rise to the 
confidence among so many inves- 
tors in a government baflouL Oth- 
erwise, the depth of the Farm Cred- 
it System’s financial troubles 
would probably prechide it from 
raising any money at alL In the 
third quarter alone, the system had 
a S5 223-billion loss because of the 
failure of farmers to repay loans, 
com pa red with a net income of 
5126.4 million in the comparable 
period in 1984. 


CURRENCY MARKETS 


Dollar, Pound Stable in Quiet Trade 


Contptltd fa Ovr Staff Fran Dapatcfas 

NEW YORK —The doDar end- 
ed slightly firmer in tbe United 
Suites and Europe Friday amid 
mounting signs that tbe Federal 
Reserve Board would not cut its 
be nchmar k discount rate. 

Some analysts said a cm in the 
rate at this time was highly unlikely 
given current economic data, espe- 
cially tbe hi gh er than expected rise 
of $53 billkm in the most recent 
US. M-l money-supply figure. By 
tbe dose of trading, a cut had not 
been announced. 

A reduction in the rate, the Fed’s 
charge on Inane to member banks, 
would act topush all U5. interest 
rates lower. Thau in turn, would act 
to dqircss the doQsx. 

“If tbe Fed doesn’t cut tbe dis- 
count rare, the dollar could rise 
slightly Monday,” Earl Johnson, 
vice president at Chicago’s Harris 
Bank, said before the dose of trad- 
ing. “But it doesn’t have much up- 
side potential because of the cen- 


tral bank intervention this week.” 

In New York, the dollar rose lo 
2.5230 Deutsche marks from 
2.5190 on Thursday; to 20175 yen 
from 20120, and to 7.7175 French 
francs from 7.6980. 1 1 slipped 
against the Swiss franc, however, to 
2.1080 from 11105. 

In earlier trading in Europe, (he 
dollar ended in London at 15210 
DM. up from an opening 15110 
and 23140 at Thursday’s close. It 
also rose there to 11055 Swiss 
francs from 11015 Thursday; to 
7.7125 French francs from 7.6825, 
and to 20150 yen from 20105. 

The British pound, meanwhile, 
weakened in quiet trading as mar- 
kets reassessed the anticipated im- 
pact on the currency of lower oil 
prices. After surging 2 cents on 
Thursday, to dose at SI. 4400, ster- 
ling ended in London Friday at 
$1.4365. It dosed later in New 
York at S1.4360. up from SI. 4345. 

Dealers said the main influence 
on sterling this week — wildly fluc- 


tuating oil prices in the wake of last 
weekend’s meeting of the Organi- 
zation of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries — receded in impor- 
tance Friday as oil prices stabilized. 

Britain’s benchmark crude. 
North Sea Brent, was quoted for 
January delivery Friday at S2635 a 
band after dropping to under $22 
i barrel on Wednesday. 

But dealers pointed out that 
most oil analysis and economists 
expect weaker oil prices in the near 
term, and warned that the slightest 
hint of price instability could spark 
3 further round of selling. 

In other European markets Fri- 
day. the dollar was fixed at midaf- 
lemoon in Frankfurt at 15172 
DM, down from 15234; at 7.6960 
French francs in Paris, down from 
7.7110, and at 1,71730 lire in Mi- 
lan, down from 1,720.50. la Zurich, 
the dollar dosed at 11060 Swiss 
francs, unchanged. 

(Reuters, IHT. AP) 


THE EUROMARKETS 


Most Borrowers Continue to Shun Markets 


By Christopher Pizzey 

Reuters 

LONDON — Both the primary 
and secondary areas of the Euro- 
bond market were exceptionally 
quiet Friday, with prices showing 
tittle change and only one new issue 
emerging m kmdon, dealers said. 

The new issue, of bonds, was a 
$ 150-million dollar-straight for 
Procter & Gamble Ox, which had a 
15-year maturity — long for this 
sector. But other borrowers contin- 
ued to shun the Eurobond market 
because better tenns are generally 
available on tbe U3. market. 

Secondary-market activity was 
generally restricted to light book-s- 
quaring a ired of the weekend, 
dealers said. 

The Procter & Gamble issue 
pays 9ft percent and was priced at 
10014. The lead manager was Gold- 
man SipIk Inter national Corp., 
and tbe issue was quoted at a dis- 


count of about 1 within the total 
fees of 2V6 percent. 

Over tbe week, dollar straights 
totaling some $980 milli on had 
been launched, most of which end- 
ed within their total fees. 

The $200-miUion bond issue 
launched Tuesday for the World 
Bank ended above its 100*4 issue 
price at 100K. Dealers speculated 
that tbe issue was sold short at the 
lime of its launch by some opera- 
tors who did not realize that sole 
lead manager, Shearson Lehman 
Brothers, was also sole underwriter. 

Prices in tbe dollar-straight sec- 
ondary market finish ed anything 
between ft and 214 points firmer on 
the week, but prices in London still 
continued to tag behind those in 
the United States. 

Dealers noted speculation in the 
United Stales that the Federal Re- 
serve Board was about to cut the 
discount rate; but they generally 
preferred to await developments 


rather than establish long positions 
over the weekend. 

A trader at a European bank 
commented: "Most people are 
treading warily because of the dan- 
gers of gening too enthusiastic 
when the market could be at the 
top.” 

Only two dollar floating-rate 
notes were launched during the 
week — the S400- mil lion, two- 
tranebe offering for Belgium and 
the $ 100-million issue for Barings 
BV. Both finished within their total 
fees. 

With activity in the dollar sectors 
relatively slow* this week, attention 
tended to focus on sectors denomi- 
nated in other currencies. An ap- 
parent swap window opened in the 
Euroyen market with five issues 
emerging — including two 
yen/U.S. dollar dual-currency is- 
sues — that totaled 80 billion yen. 


Jnday^ 

ore 

Rrices 


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13 

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328 

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165 

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101 

200 

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571 

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236 

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11 

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lift 

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1166 

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198 

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865 

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554 

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1174 

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29 

20 V LeogF 

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1706 

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23 

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9 

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2ft 

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344 

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3 

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3W 

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7* 

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225 

4V 

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6* 

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7 

6ft 

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13£ 

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13 

211 

30ft 

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138 

15 

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78.- ft 


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51 

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192 

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14* 

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205 

9ft 

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42 

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14 

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134 

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34 

37 

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24ft 

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411 

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73 

22 * 

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567 

7 

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530 

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15 

279 

46 

46 + V 

15* 

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676 

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504 

22 ft 


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82* 

47* StPoul 

200 

13 36*3 

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me 

BO* +IW 

6 * 

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102 

5ft 

5* 

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10 




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6 ft 

6 ft 

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XI 

76 

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36 

31W 

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221 

31 

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126 

10 ft 

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378 

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Sain iloures n unaHldaL yearly highs and Inn refled 
the preuloos 5B nooks glus lha eurrenl woak. Mil not tha tales! 
rrodtag day. Wliorg a saill or stock dividend amounting to 25 
oorcant «r man has been odd. the ywi WgNew range and 
dividend are shown lor me new stock on rv. unless otherw is e 

noted, rotes of Svidends are annuo! disbursements bared on 

the u»s dedaratlaR. 

a — tfvtdend du exire(s)-/l 

b— annual rote of dividend Mus flock dlvldondVl 

c— ilnutaotlns dMdenayl 

dd— coNedyi 

d— new yearly lenyi 

e — dtvktano dedored or MW In preceding » mgrthsJl 

0— dtvWend In CannaSan funds, tuMed lo 15V non-residence 
tax. 

1— dividend doctored after sbUUjoot stock dividend. 

I — dhrbtend paid this year, omlttoa deferred, or no aetlfli 
token at latest dividend mailing. 

k— dividend Hectored e t sold this year, an accumulative 
issue with dividends In arrows, 
n — newUsuemitM easts week*. TheMgh4ow range twglns 
with the start of trading, 
nd— nestdavdallvgrv. 

P/E— price-cam Wot ratio. 

r— iSvIdend declared or Paid In preceding 12 months. oh» 
sfedk dividend. 

* —slack mill. Dividend Begins with dale ol bpIH. 
sis— sales. 

i— dividend paid in slock In oraoMUng 12 months, estimated 

cash value no ex -dtv Mend w ejMUstrlbvtfon dale, 
u— new yearly Wgh. 

v— trading hailed. 

vi— W ban fcm pi c y or reoelvarahlp or bolng reoro an lMd un- 
der the Bankruptcy Ad, or securities assumed By such cam. 
penfoo. 

«id — vffwn dtatntMtea. 
wl— wnenteuea 
ww — uHih warrants, 
a — e* -dividend or ex-rlghh. 

*dH— ex-tHstrtbuitavL 
xw — without warrants. 

Y— ev-dly Mend and sales In hdL 
v Id— Yield, 
z— sales la iulL 


fi 


■■ ‘-ft*. 













Page 14 


ACROSS 


ACROSS 


ACROSS 


I Poe V ‘The 

Cat" 

6 Bric-a- 

10 Judicial attire 

15 Atlantic route 

17 Rushing sound 

19 Portuguese 
wine city 

21 Fearof 
thinking 

23 Remained 

24 Tantrum 

25 More tricky 

26 Lots and lots of 
lots 

28 Due follower 

29 “ Got a 

Secret" 

30 Encircle 

31 Porticoes 

32 At that time 

33 Exam 

35 Islands. 

off New 
Guinea 

36 Stick 

37 Golfer Julius 

38 Lovers of 

beauty 

40 Folded part 

41 Rest 

42 Breathing 
sound 


44 Sharpens 
pencil 

45 Place in 
proximity 

48 Heart cherries 

49 Flamboyance 

51 Minute 

52 One of the 
Dryads 

53 Bevels or 
whines 

54 Ethiopian 
river 

56 Tale start 

57 Fear of public 
places 

59 Oriental 
bishop 

60 Moccasin 

61 Item Polonius 

hid behind 

62 Deals with a 
discus 

63 Handbill 

64 Sailors’ 
opposites 

66 Mercutlo's 
friend 

67 Monks 

68 Galsworthy 
novel 

69 Construction 


71 Omitted _ 

73 The Flying K 

Scotsman, e.g. BE 

75 Abstruse 15 

79 Pollster or 

cowboy 21 

80 Lobster daw 

81 Counterfeit . 24 

82 Actress 

Merrill 29 

83 Fail cries 

84 Seethes 33 

85 Amaz 

86 "Sprechen — 36 

Deutsch?” 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD tribute, SATURDAY-SUZyPAY, DECEMBER 14-15, 1985 


Fraidycat! ByBertKKmse PEANUTS 


h Z 3 4 5 


|6 p p N IMlII lu ll/ III Ilf 




UlHATS 
GOINS ON? 


m UIATCHIN6 THE THEY TOOK HIM TO 


NEUJS..A DEPARTMENT .1 THE HOSPITAL, AND HE 


STORE SANTA CLAUS 
MAP A HEART ATTACK. 


HAP TRIPLE BYPASS 
SURGERY... 


THEY SAIP THAT JUST 
BEFORE HIS HEART ATTACK, j 
THERE UIAS SOME JONP Q6£ 
{DISTURBANCE BY A LITTLE f 
GIRL AT THE 5T0RE.. 


I 2 ? " 


134*35 


g lW I W lH f * W t 0 ,n aa 



43 Radar image 


piece 
70 Dash 


87 Excitement 

88 Reproduction ® ■ — 

89 Indian 45 46 47 

symbols ^ 

91 Alveoli 

92 Leg bones 

94 Fear of 

ridicule go MB 

97 Negatively 18 

charged ■■5T" 65 

particles 

98 Customs 

99 Kind of ■ ■ 

performance n 72 

100 Shoots the — 

breeze n 

101 Caresses — 

102 Harden 83 


BLONDIE 


r« i 55 


I'VE WANTED TO) f 
OD*AE HERE POR J l 


Z SIMPLY LOVE 
FRENCH FOOD 


WHAT'S THE I SNAILS 
SPECIALTY Jv_ 

-r HS3E “^Jr \IW 




HOW CANVOU TELL) \ 
r THEM PWJATHB ■ <1 
V ^^.^r wAr rggS?f IJ \ | 


{76 1 77 f 76 


yj] 


iC? 


A \ J 


W /, 


BEETLE BAILEY 




DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


r WANT THIS MAN 
PUT IN THE STOCK APE 
FOR iMSUKJRPlNAnOhl/. 


WHATMAN? 


J WAS HOLPIKJ0 NiM 
TILL YOU C&OT HERE 


1 Isn't naughty 

2 Adjective for 
Alaska 

3 Drug plant 

4 Fire 

5 Was versed in 

6 Party pooper 

7 Hijack 

8 Oriental, e.g. 

9 Old Spanish 
dance 

10 Picardy sight 

11 Chooses 

12 Neckpiece 

13 Fearof 
blushing 

14 Fine players 

15 Elf 


16 U.S.S.R. 
fugitive, e.g. 

17 Skyline feature 

18 Hone 

20 Andersen's 
birthplace 

22 Mixtures 

27 Part of a 
lemon 

31 Scions 

32 Theme 

34 Sovereignty 

35 Salt tree 

36 Fear of going 
to bed 

37 Greek letters 

39 This does it 


40 Last word of 
Mont.'s motto 

41 Designer de la 


43 Teddy and 
honey 

44 Indian queens 

45 On 

46 Kind of colony 

47 Fear of sin 

48 Punster’s 
evocation 

49 Picasso or 
Casals 

50 Grate sight 

52 Plume 
producer 

53 Kitchen utensil 


DOWN 


© Neu-Yaek Tones, edited by Eugene A blwh. 

DOWN DOWN DOWN 


55 What tholes 
hold 

57 Mailed 

58 Mistake maker 

59 Made true 
61 Freud 

colleague 
83 Campus bunch 

65 Protuberances 

66 Iranian money 

67 Growler 


70 "Engravers of 
the Arctic" 

71 Printing goofs 

72 Kind of zone 

73 Ideate 

74 Unhand 

75 Prop for de 
Kooning 

76 Funny 

77 Monogram 
part 


78 Lyricist for 
Gershwin's ■ 
“Swanee" 

80 Bill’s compan- 
ion • 

81 Honors, in a ' 
way 

84 Sampler verb 

85 Palazzo Du- 
ctile resident 

88 Sweet plant 


89 Labels 
B0N.Y..LJL. 
S.F., etc. 


91 Pope John '' 
Paul II, for one 
93 Cyclades isle ' 


ANDYCAPP 


95 Produce lace 

96 All up (be-. 

sideoneseif) 


MERRY GENTLEMEN (AND ONE 
LADY) 

By J. Bryan 3d 324 pages. Illustrated. $17.95. 
Atheneum. 597 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
10017. 


BOOKS 


It seems odd, as it always does in accounts of the 


Algonquin circle, that someone as endearing, even 
as Lovable, as Benddey could have been such a dose' 
friend of someone as unlovable as Dorothy Parker'. 
Bryan does Ins loyal best. to assure us that she was 
“wonderful company,” bin his account is largely a 
catalog of iU-nanned jeers poring as epigrams. 


Reviewed by John Gross 


J . BRYAN 3tTs first brush with glory was in 1917, 
when he rode in the same elevator as Jess WH- 


Biyan comes across as someone who has a nota- 
ble gift for friendship. He is also a seasoned story- 
teller. with a sprightly turn of phrase — Benchley’s 
mind, he tdls os, was “a flea-market of uncleared 
trifles,'’ Steinbeck's barely legible handwriting “a 






Bryan recalls a good many happy inspirations. 
There was Steinbeck's code for social survival, for 


WIZARD 6f ID 


J when he rode in the same elevator as Jess Wil- 
lard, the heavyweight champion. His next approach 
to it, in a somewhat modified fashion, was m 1934, 
when he got to know Arthur Samuels, editor in chief 
of House Beautiful By this time, Bryan was manag- 
ing editor of Town ana Country, but Samuels came 
t railing glam orous associations of a different order 
— his wife was a well-known actress and he had 
collaborated on the score of a musical starring 
W.G Fields. 

Even more than that , Samuels had the reputation 
of being a wit, a humorist, a joker, what you wifl. He 
belonged to a species that over the years was to 
provide Bryan with many of his closest friends, and 
he is the first of the 13 gentlemen (and one lady. 
Dorothy Parker) who are celebrated in this amiable 
collective memoir. The others indude Robert 
Benchley, S. J. Pcrdman and — less predictably, in 
this connection — John Steinbeck; they range from 
such wen-remembered figures as Fred Allen and 
Marc Connelly to half-forgotten ones such as the 
author Finis Farr and the mraatpainter and dedi- 
cated practical joker Hugh Troy. 


mumble in pendT — but he doesn’t try to set up in 
competition with his meny heroes. Indeed, he often 


seems happy to present himself as a straight man or 
stooge. Frank Sullivan, for instance, frequently sent 


stooge. Frank Sullivan, for instance, frequently sent 
him letters like the one in which he described & party 
be had been to, then broke off. “But enough of my 
social triumphs. They can only serve to make you 
even more dissatisfied with your drab and inferior 
position in society.** 

The sketch of Sullivan is one of the most satisfy- 
ing in the collection. It conveys a strong sense of 
Sullivan's personality; it also contains some charac- 
teristic examples of bis humor, such as his habit of 
si g nin g off with an unexpected flourish (as The 
man whose immature your wife wears next to her 
heart," for instance). 

The chapter on Benchley, equally good, is rather 
more of a straightforward profile, but written with, 
obvious affection and warmth. Bryan’s friendship 
with him began as it meant to go on; Benchley was 
□luring an impressive hangover when they were 
introduced, and virtually the first words he uttered 
(or muttered) were that all be had had for breakfast 
that morning was “one aspirin, lightly grilled.” 


There was Steinbeck’s code for social survival, for 
instance (Rule 4: “Never let a drunk catch your 
eye”), and Connelly’s i mp romptu speech at a con- 
ference of travd writes where he had no business to 
be, elaborating on his duties as editor in chief of 
Popular Wading (“America's leading magazine of 
shallow-water sports”). And while the humor of 
tinmen has its limftgfirtnq, it is hard not to warm to 
Normally Johnson’s notion that Latins Beebe 'may 
have had a sister called. Phoebe B. Beebe, or to die 
game devised by George S. Kaufman that consisted 
of assigning the names on menus to fictional charac- 
ters — the cowardly mafioso Chicken Caotiatore, 
for example, and his girlfriend Fluffy Potatoes. - 
The alcohol content of the book, it has to be said, 
is high Fred Allen did not drink, and Connelly, 

IWarnim and Arthur Samuels drank m mo deratio n, 

but the other characters in Bryan’s cast “fairly 
lapped up the stuff.” The martini cast a particularly 
long shadow iiuheir lives. To Finis Farr, it was “the . 
Breakfast of Champions’* while Bendtiey's formula 
for meting one was “gin, and just enough vermouth 


WHO GOES THffEp 


2 THOUGHT )OU GUYS WERB 
IN QUARANTINE 


R0BBMH00DW 

4 muNm m 


r v&fcGor 
locmee -m 

HWE0F7H&. 

L cor flr,J 


REX MORGAN 


to take away thar nasty, watery lode.” 
There was a price to be paid for all tl 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Solution to Last Week’s Puzzle 


n -»Y 



□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□ 
□□an □□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□ 
UUaflBDDUUU □□□□□□□□□□ 

□□□□□“□□□□□□□□□□d □□□ 

auaa uulo □□□□ □□□ 

□□□ □□□□□□□□□□□ □□□□□ 
□□□□quuu □□□□□ ULujaau 
□UQOU □□□□□ 3HUUU 

aufjuQo ucjuau □□□eoocje 
□ueiejb auaaaaaoQDD □□□ 

□ DU PDQLi □□□□ □□□Q 

□uo □□□□□□□□□□□ oudoo 
oanaa □□□□□ □□□ 
□□□□□□ □□□□□ aaaaaao 
□□□□uo □□□□ □uuuuaao 

□□uuuuaaua □□□□□uuaoo 
□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□ 
□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□□ □□□o 


There was a price to be paid for all tins, and a few 
of the mezrymakas had sad ends. The gloom that so 
often goes with being funny never seems far away; 
few volumes of memoirs can have had as cheerless a 
title as Fred Allen’s “Treadmill to Oblivion,” and 
Frank Sullivan was probably not being altogether 
lighthearted when be spoke of retiring to “the Petro- 
leum V. Nasby Home for Aged and Indigent Hu- 
morists.” StiD, for the most part, Bryan’s book gives 
off a pleasant nostalgic glow. 


1 KNOW YOLTK6. 
PRO0A&LY BUSY -WITH- A. CUSTOMER, 
KAY— SO I WONT KEEP YOU/ 1 JUST 
HAD .A PHYSICAL CHBCKUP- AMD THE . 
DOCTOR SAYS I'M IN P&SPECT. 

r 1 health < jn^ ah - A rr^ 

I'D LIKE TO t==^lTfl WZSU I g 
CELEBRATE { I I SBL 

can you go K/fc* L-a 

TO DINNER fJ.JyflM 

WITH ME THIS wSfryrm 
EVENING"* 


YES — BUT YOU'RE GOING . 
TO GET TIRED OF SEEING < 
ME, GRANT/ WHAT TIME'* J 























Page 15 


3 m,i i >— J* ■ 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14-15, 1985 


Si r. ^ 


SPORTS 



as Dolphins in Game That May Decide Title 


-if.' NEW YORK — Given the turnover rate of players in 
w Jqhe National -Football League — most have com e and 
in five, yean or so — one' team's domination cl 
jj.T'N.snotbCT is not always easy-to expbm..lt 
=j5^ead to genaalfraKons. like the f< 

^'iv The New England Patriots cannot win in Miami . 

* /_ That is not eating tine because they did win there, 
*' -once, in 1966, die first time the Dolphins and the Patriots 
\ ^[^yBd.Snce,howev«, the Patriots havelost 17 straightin 
, | ibe Orange Bowl, whkhis as compeffing a reason as any to 
■t. a s s um e No. 18 is coming 
P , k Ot maybe il is. not 


,thePadotf gener- 
lal imma^Rr, whose career in football began when he was 
'"jit 8-ycMHdd ball bey, said the" Patriots’ game with the 
Dolphins on Monday night in dm Change Bowl “is the 
Eaggest in our franchise’s history.” ■ 



NFL PREVIEW 


Perhaps ft is because of the fireak and the fatt that the 
Jolphms, the Patriots and die New York Jets are all tied 
or the lead in the American Conference- East with 104 
ecard* With a victory Monday and another six days later 
cainst the CSnchinaii Bcogals, the Patriots could win a 
Svirion tide for the fust tone since 1978. They can win the 
Monday night, if the Jets lose Saturday to Ae 
Beats. ‘ 

\ lbs Patriots can clinch at least a wQd-catd entry to the 
with a victory if the Denver Broncos lose Satnr- 
to the Kansas Gftf Chiefs. 

lot all those possibilities rely an a victory over the 
nhfns and more than cne measure suggests it win be 



• The Dolphins are 6-0 ai home this season. 


• In neariy 1 6 seasons under the coaching of Don Simla 
the Dolphins are 47-15 in the last four games of the 
season, and are 20 this year. 

• Of those 62 games. & have been played in the Orange 
Bowl, and the Dolphins have won 32 

“One of the reasons, I'm sure, is the weather " Sullivan 
said. “Last year, vc played them in Miami inth&second 
game of the season, and it was brutally hot. In New 
England, we had already gotten into the cooler part of the 
year.” 

To hefc aednnato themselves, the Patriots went to 
Miami on Wednesday and scheduled daily practices 
through Sunday. It is something they had done before, but 
this time odder weather made practsang more difficult in 
the East. 

That could help soap the streak. But even if it does, 
SuMvgn will not be convinced arriimariao accounted for 
the victory. . 

“We have a better team titan in past years,” he mid, 
“This team has a lot of characteristics that are uncharac- 
teristic of previous teams. That's why its such a lag 
gamd" 

Haxxah’s Reno Race & Sports Book has made the 
Dolphins 6-pcint favorites. 

AMERICAN CONFERENCE 

Kansas Gty (5-9) at Demo’ (Mb The Broncos, beaten 
in a seoond overtime this season by the Los Angeles 
Raiders, still have a chance to make the playoffs. And as 
bad as the ir mim ing game was last week they are not Hkrfy 
to lose to a team that has so few talented players who are 
healthy. (Broncos by 10.) 

Seattle (8-6) at Los Angeles (10-4): The Seahawks can 
be a headache for die Rmdeo. Sx games as>, the Sea- 
hawks won trig, 33-3, with the defense contributing two 
touchdowns, six sacks and four interceptions. The Raders 
have not played as badly since, winnin g four of five but 



Saturday, the Jets have to stop Walter Payton. 


IOC i-OS AUgEUS 

s playoffs. And as not in overpowering fashion. They cannot put anybody 
they are not Hkely away, winch puts this game within the Seahawks’ reach, 
d players who are (Raidas by 4%.) 


not 
away, 

(Raidexs by 

BrfMo (2- 1Z) at P lt ribtwgh (6-fo The B ilk migh t be 

as overmatched as the records suggest. The Stedere have 
lost their last three games, giving up 115 po ints in the 
■ p rocess. But in the Bills’ last nine game* they have scored 
only ] 13 points. (Steeters by 10.) 

Houstoo (5-9) at Clereland (7-7): Jerry GlanviUe makes 


his debut as interim coach of the OSere, but he might be 
more valuable as a defensive lineman. His team could use 
a few new onesjudgmg by the number of rushing yards it 
allows. The Odds’ average yield in points the last four 
games is 36, and last time the Browns beat them by the 
score of 21-6. (Browns by 10.) 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 

New York (9^) at Oafias (9-5): Tbe Cowboys have been 
embarrassed twkx this season, first bythe Bears, 44-0, and 
last Sunday by tire Bengal* 50-24 They rebounded the 
first time, drubbing Philadelphia To rebound fl eam, they 
must slow Joe Moms, the league’s leading touchdown 
scorer, and Util Simms, who threw for a career-high 432 
yards wrijen the teams played 10 weeks ago. The Cowboys 
won that one, 30-29, but since their defense has eroded 
considerably and the Giants* offense has improved. If 
recent form holds, the Giants should win. Buttais is a lag 
game, and the Cowboys are more accustomed to winning 
those than the Giants. (Cowboys by 3.) 

Green Bay (6-8) at Detnrft (7-7): The Lions are at home; 
that mm™ they win. That *!«> m*an* they could wwt> 
amends lor their worst game of the season, a 43-10 loss to 
the Packers in the fifth week. (lions by 4%.) 

Mhmesots (7-7) at AtitrUa (2-12): The Vikings’ defense 
has improved wink the Falcons continue to be a too- 
injured team, with an offensive line that has sprang a few 
leaks too many. (Vikings by 1.) 

St Loris (5-9) at Los Angeles (10-4): Coming off their 
most emotional and satisfying victory of the season, 27-20 
over the 49os, the Rams need only one more victory to 
clinch the division. They should get it here. The Cardinals 
have problems along the offensive fine and in their sec- 
ondary, which should make h a rough day for NeD Lomax 
and a good one for the Rams’ Dieter Brock. (Rams by 9 Vi.) 

San Francisco (8-6) at New Orleans (5-9): The 49ers* 
numbers were imp re ss ive last Monday night but they lost 


to the Rams because Joe Montana threw two key intercep- 
tions, their kickoff team gave up a touchdown and the 
secondary does not scare opponents the way it used to. 
The Saints are not very good, but they did squash the 
Rams two weeks agp. (49ers by 10.) 

INTERCONFERENCX 

Chicago (13-1) at New York Jets (10-4): The one thing 
the Jets’ Ken O’Brien has been criticized fa this season is 
bolding the ball too long before passing. That could get 
him into trouble Saturday against the Bars’ pass rum, 
especially when they use their “46.” with eight men at the 
fine , The Jets fllcn wiQ have their hands fuD with Walter 
Payton, who has nm for more than 100 yards in nine 
straight g ames , and with Jim McMahon, who is just about 
fully recovered from shoulder tendinitis. (Bears by 24.) 

Onrinnati (7-7) at Washington (8-6): Considering that 
the Redskins have scored as many as 30 points only twice 
this rawwi, it does not seem possible they can beat the 
Bengal* who have scored 95 in their last two gomes. The 
Bengals do, however, have problems with good defensive 
teams, and the Redskins have the second-best pass de- 
fense in the league. The Redskins also have the running 
that can control a game and k ee p Boomer Esiasoo 
and his buddies off the field. (Redskins by 2.) 

PMaddpMa (6-8) at San Diego (7-7): This could be a 
meeting of two future former coaches, Marion Campbell 
of the Eagles and Don Coryell of the Chargers. Both had 
high hopes for the season, only to be undone by an 
inconsistent Offense, the Eagles', and an inconsistent de- 
fense, the Chargers*. Chalk this one up for the Chargers, 
who have sewed 30, 40, 24, 35, 40 and 54 points in their 
last 6 games. (Chargers by 7.) 

Indbnapofis (3-11) at Tampa Bay (2-12): By all rights, 
this game should end in a tie, a kicker missing a field goal 
14 minutes 59 seconds into overtime. (Bucs by 3 Vi.) 


SCOREBOARD 


£«43S- 

ǤSS. 


Basketball 


VfU Standings 



THURSDAY'S RESULTS 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 

a h— n c dmsn 


YSwa 


fe—kmL 



7 :« 


Hockey 


= -'^HL Standings 


WALES CONFERENCa 




7 lnarfatomo 

W 

L 

T.Pto GPUS 

22 

■ 

8 

44. 

137 

89 

nMngtaa 

T7 

7 

3 

37 

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M 

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27 

105 

95 

* f Idptoui 

11 

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7 

to 

107 

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£ itouandi 

It 

14 

4 

to 

no 

184 


12 

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25 

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108 

l-tbec 

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f* .toon 

■ / niraal 

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10 

4 

32 

111 

m 

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124 

M4 

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13 

13 

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100 

92 

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12 

13 

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102 

V. J CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
*2 RunR. Dtvttoau 


Lout* 

12 

12 

3 

27 

77 

104 

tonoo 

7 

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111 

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^wmoto 

8 

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112 

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-,-'■■11*17 7 14 4 

J, . ■ SnrvUM Divtiiou 

18 

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117 

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• e 

s i 

Orter 111. Otto 2(4>. Faptlmkl 3(10). ! 

«N: Los Angolas (on LenuHTn) S4f-a 
sanr (on Janocvfc) 18-15-17— «*. 


Transition 


■■ A— touted PfrEowwL Clow ma dln- 
'jt pratkfcmf. to imrior laosuoa* axocuilvo 
to*. AppoMad Marly Sprtnatoaad as 
INV ctdof (unervtMr of umpirMaiid OkSt 
•rasspodafanMoaMDltiBlflaa— prato- 

. LWAUKEE — Sont Dion Jamas, outflow- 
l Vcneouvsr, Pacific Coast L— sue. 

■ MTLE— Trodud Damall Colas. ItWrd 
m to Detroit tor Mdi Monts leono. 

.-or. 

-XAS— AocMrstf JOM Motts, (nfletdor, 
CMcaso WMto Sex to oomptol* oorflor 

HONT0 OMolnod o frondiNo at Pur>- 
ln tea Ftortda Slate Laagua, to etartbv 


' A p pointed Bill Gtles, PMtodstoMa 
-or prasidsnt, to tho raaitto couocl! 
4W Bartholomav to Hm laaoua* ostecu- 


TSBURGH— Hlrod BUI Vinton as bo»- 
jwlr wt tur umi outflow coach. Wet KM- 
. as nm ban coach and Wdi DenntBv at 
to coach. 

( FRANascO-BtaMd Rantfv Johnson, 

. basmaa and Brad Gutdon, anchor. 
BASKETBALL. 


3T0W— Stoned Danmr Alnw, guard, to a 
-war contract 

5HINGTON— SOU Jeff Rutond. confer, 
Irotoursd toikto ham and will be unoblo 
y tor shr weeks. 

FOOTBALL 


1 FRANasCO— AMhatod BUI RMi 
to bat*. 

tHIfiCTOM S lg nod Stove Porttoiwfcl. 
•toefc Relcassd arts KMtlna. Rne* 

r- 

HOCKCV 


toNTOM-dahnod JMV Brobakor. toft 
aalvors from Toronto. 
COLLEGES 

■ tit CAROL! NASTATE—ABfeod for Hto 
■ • ffion ol WR savto, toWflolt eon*. 

^RHATl — Exttndod the contract of 
V. ^ry, loortmt) eoocn, tttrousf Wt seo- 

UHAMi-Annoiiocadlhoioolfl nntt— ot 
Tutoto. toottall eooeh. 

/ fi 1 1 A iwounetd tot t m an aHo n d 
' 'orrsautt, foetoatl coach. 

. ^-SaUllwtltnolponaDMflMlhilvor- 
- Csrtrai Ptortda tor bookrtboK vtoto- 
Uoonion.Wonf 1 n wnde d an d e»rauffM 
*e Toch tor vtotottan ovor a lour- 
riod. PenaOtu Austto Poor ono too*. 
‘ nHMW to 1WH7 ter r ecru tone vlo- 

, , I ON Amwunasd Its* re sW WHon of 

toksr, IlMBaChor coach. 
HWCSTERN LOUISIANA— Di»- 

Oraml Alton, guard, tram the take* 

■ .m 


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9 

CONFERENCE 


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3S 31 Zt 31— US 
Nn York 31 S 33 31— IS 

WUtJams MIN Q Rfchordsoo 4-13 44 
U:WUnr *■» 54 2XOrr 3-n M-n TL Ra- 
b— dit Now Jtraoy 57 (wRltarat 10), Now 
York <1 (Ewtooaa).AsMstR New Jorsry 24 
(Cook 7). Now York H (Sparrow S). 

17 nn 37 M— too 

33 to 37 33 15— IK 
Roblnaon 7-13 7-1831, RoundfMd 4-U TVU 
2L Malone 7-U 7-7 31: J t sd p so 13-1» M 17, 
Phhtstii Trni-rn nmosim mu miinnui 
(Ltatarl3).WosMnalonS(RsMnoivRowMl- 
ftokf 14). Aptfili: MUwaukooto (Moncrtof u), 
WBlH mo R 27 ( Robinson I). 

Ilia U 34 31 37— in 

31 31 31 D-W 

Croon 6-14 10-10 23, Gorvta M4 5717: Barktor 
1 7-1754 3&ervlns7-138-8K BRllsB: PMI- 
ndHWB S> IBUloy 13).OilcoooS4 ( O rson 
14). Assists: PtiDadoWdato (Choaks 18), Chi- 
cago 17 (Woolrtdn 4). 

Danas nan as-tas 

Hoosieo 37 31 to *7— m 

Otoluwwi IMS M 27, Sonwm 733 73 Ui 
Porklns 11-147-13 31, Vtocsnl 11485423. Ho- 
bn — Us : Dattn 54 (Porklnt m Houston 48 
(Otofuwon IS). AssMs: Da Ho 21 (Davis t). 
Houston 31 (Sompson 8). Total touto— Dallas 
2L Ho— ton 3L A — U477. 

to 33 33 O-ltt 
37 37 31 37-127 
AfeM-Jatttar lMi M ac Scott M3 N 28: 
Noaco M7 58 23. Edwisils AW 54 17. Ro- 
bso— s: PhoonixW (Nanco9),LJi. Labors S2 
(Kupchak. Green 7). AnUc PhoaUx 28 
(Humphries 7). LA. Lafcors 37 CJohnspnlO). 

Selected College Results 

EAST 

- Boston Can. «l utlca'M 
Dokmaro 42. Prin c ol u ii 40 

south 

South CWVfina Bl, Augusta 51 
MIDWEST 

Doficnca 4L Bowflnu Orson 44, OT 
MMUgoi K. Cam. Mkhtas 41 
W. Michigan 73. Late Superior St 47 
Wisconsin 74, N. Illinois 47 
SOUTHWEST 

Stephen f. Austin 71. OUaboraa St 44 
FAR WEST 

Arizona 72. tai Diego St 44 
N. Arizona 77, Arizona SL 47 
Nebnufc o 79, w usl U ng l on SL 72 
Oregon SL 40, Babe St. SL OT 
Tasms-EI Paso A N. MMdco A 52 
Wyomlna 77, KardhvSkmiiont 78 


Skiing 


THURSDAY'S RESULTS 

• 1 2-3 

I 3 7-4 

-V Mn (3). HOWO (18). ZatM IS), PouDn (11), 
: \r 2(27): N—tond A 8mHh 8. DoBtols 4. 
f Montreal (at Jen— n) 174-7— 

r ■ ) MtUaMehia (on Roy. Ponnlp) 11-174-0L 
jjoec ■ • i g—i 

■ *toi ■ 1 4 • 4—1 

—tnn.-Owrtnall O). Shots —peal: Quo- 
ton Rtoelnl 13-14-14-1— 42. Boston (an Mo- 


WoridCnp 


WOMEITS DOWNHILL 
(AT Vat arson. Franco) 

1. Laurto Graham, Canaria, 1 minute, 2581 


2. Morio woJltaor, Switzerl an d. 1:25.13 

1 Mlriweto Cora. West Gormonv. i^SJS 
4. Mi chela FUrtnL BwKzeriand, 1:2574 
1 Kofrtn Gutensohn, Austria, 1350 
& Arieno Etirot Switzerland. 1:2S» 

7. DobWe Armstrong, US. lrWJTI 

3. Marina KtshL West Germany. naUB 
9. Zoe Haas. Sw W zorhoxL l^Lto 

14l LHu JavDarvL Canada, 1JL72 
OVERALL STAN DINGS 

1. Goro. 40 points 

2. Erika Hess, SNttzsrionL 54 

a. Wall her. 58 

4. (H*> KfsM and Graham, 43 

4. BriaHIo OortIL Sw U zetksid 30 
7. Armstrong. 37 
L FlgtoL 32 
7. Gutensohn. 21 

KX (Ho) Eva Twardaksns, US, end Vrani 
Schneider, Switzerland, to 

12. Rocwttha ScfmekJer. Swltzarkmd. 23 

13- ReglneMoesenfechner,W—t Germany, 18 
14. Mcriela S—L Yugoslavia, 15 

13. (fie) Ttonora McKMmv. UA, and Artane 
Ehrat Switzerland, 13. 


Graham Wins 
Another Oose 
Gup Ski Race 

He Associated Prrss 
VAL DTSERE, France — Lau- 
rie Graham of Canaria tnarir; q) for 
her narrow defeat Tborsday by 
winning Friday’s women’s World 
Cup downhill race: But just as nar- 
rowly. 

Graham, the 1982 bronze medal 
winner at the world champion- 
ships, posted a time of 1 inmate 
and 25.1 second* the week’s best 
dnrlring, to edge Maria WaBiser of 
Swi tzerlan d by 12-hnndreths of a 
second over the 7,198-foot (2,194- 
meter) track. West Germany's Mi- 
nharfa Getg, who won Thmsday’s 
downhill, was third. 

G raham* * put her in 

first jdace in the season-long Worid 
Cnp downhiD rianrirngo with 45 
pomts. Gerg is second with 40. 

Debbie Anostrong of Seattle; the 
1984 Olympic giant slalom gold 
medalist who finished seventh, was 
exactly one second behind Gra- 
ham. 

. . *1 had high hopes for today, but 
am glad to ge t out of there witii a" 
seventh,” she said. “Truthfully, I 
just wanted to get tins day over 
with because of the falls yesterday. 
Hut kept creeping into my mind.” 

■ Pufz StiB in Coma 
Christine Putt of Austria, who 

crashed heavily during Thursday’s 
race, remained in a coma Friday at 
the Sabkms i La Tronche hospital 
in Grenoble, United Press Intona- 
tions! report e d from Val cfTsere. 

The Austrian team doctor, Sigi 
Wagntz, said Pntz nnght be im- 
proving slightly because “she 
showed some movement Thursday 
night and that’s encouraging.” 

“She’s still in a coma, but she’s a 
little better," Wagner sahL “She 
might remain unconscious for three 
days or it could be a week.” 

He said Put* 19, had severe con- 
cussions and skull irguries. 

■ TJ^. Skier Hurt in Italy 
Rraig Sonrbeer, 20, from East 

Burke, Vermont, fractured a verte- 
bra in his neck, after losing control 
of his skis in mid-course and tum- 
bling several times during a prac- 
tice downhQl nm Thursday at Val 
Garden* Italy, The Associated 
Press reported from Santa Cristina. 

Officials at Val Gardena said 
Sonrbeer was in good condition at 
a hospital in nearby Bressanooe 
and would be flown to the United 
States for treatment. He had been 
practicing for the season’s second 
wold Cup race, set for Saturday. 



^ Yanks, Chisox Make 

Trade, Seek Another 


TWO WAYS TO HURDLE — Surapol Sop-Kla of Thailand headed under the penulti- 
mate hurdle as Fauzan SunanB of Indonesia headed for the finish fine on Tfarasday in the 
final of the 110-meter competition during the Southeast Asia Gaines in Bangkok. Surapol, 
despite his different approach to miming in a hurdles race, (fid not receive a medaL 


The Associated Press 

SAN DIEGO —The New York 
Yankees and Chicago White Sox 
settled for second-best, swapping 
pitchers when they really wanted to 
trade hitters, as the official portion 
of major kagug baseball’s -mmial 
winter meetings came to a close 
Thursday. 

The trade that the two dabs 
™rip. sent left-hander Britt Burns 
and two minor leaguers to the Yan- 
kees for right-hander Joe Cowley 
and catcher Ron Hassey. 

The trade they might yet make 
would send free -agent catcher 
Carlton Fisk to the Yankees for 
ated hitter Don Baylor. 
Boston Red Sox later an- 
nounced they had acquired left- 
handed hitting utility player Mike 
Stenhouse from Minnesota for 
right-hander Charlie MitchdL 

There were 12 deals involving 26 
major league players made at the 
winter meetings. 

Bum* 26, broke in with the 
White Sax in 1979 and was 18-1 1 
with a 3.96 eamed-nm average last 
season. He had asked to be traded, 
■but an earlier deal with Atlanta fell 
through. 

Before making a second trade 
with the Yankee* the White Sox 


must first sign Fisk, and both play- 
ers are demanding bonuses for 
waiving no-trade rights. Jerry Kap- 
stdn, the agent who represents 
both player* said that neither has 
yet given assurances these rights 
will be waived. 

The White Sox’s general manag- 
er, Ken Hanelsoo, said, “It’s Kap- 
strin’s party now. You have to fol- 
low his lead, and that’s what we’re 
doing.” 

A source dose to the trade nego- 
tiations said both Baylor and Fisk 
would ask for monetary consider- 
ations for waiving their rights to 
refuse a trade. 

The only catchers now left cm the 
Yankees’ roster with major league 
experience are second-year player 
Scott Bradley and Juan Espino. 

“We have plans to take care of 
our catching need* and we’re not 
concerned about it.” said their new 
manager, Lou Pinidla. 

Fisk, who wQl be 38 on Dec. 26, 
had one of his best seasons in 1985. 
with 37 home run* 107 RBI and a 
batting average of .238. He played 
in 153 games with 543 at-bats. 

Baylor, 36, hit 231 with 23 
bomos and 91 RBI, but was un- 
happy that the Yankees platooned 
him as the designated hitter. 



Bol Blocks Bucks, Bullets Triumph 


Qfiff Robinson run into a tangle of Bocks, them scored tbe 
winning prints for tbe Bcdlets in overtone Thursday night. 


The Associated Pros 
LANDOVER, Maryland — If 
Manute Bol goes qo to become one 
of the great defensive players in the 
National Basketball Association, it 
will be said that this was tbe game 
that marked die start of his career. 

Put into the Washington Bullets* 
starting lineup for the first time 
Thursday night because of Jeff Ro- 
land's injured ankle, the 7-fooi-7 
(23-meter) rookie from the Sudan 
blocked 11 shots in the first half of 
the game the against Milwaukee 
Bucks. He went on to post a sea- 
son-high 18 print* a team-record 
12 blocked shots and nine re- 
bounds as the Bullets won, 110- 
108, in overtime. 

“That was the most dominating 
performance by one player I’ve 
sem this year,” said the Budc/ coa- 
ch, Don Nelson. “We tried many 
things to stop him, and it’s a tribute 
to him that we couldn’t stop him.” 

Other tea m s are going to get 
their chance to tty, because the 
Bullets said that Roland, their top 
scorer and rebounder, will be out 


NBA FOCUS 


six weeks with a dripped ankle 
bone. 

The Ballets finally beat the 
Bucks when Giff Robinson made 
two baseline jump shots in the Iasi 
10 seconds of overtime, thr second 
breaking a 108 tie with one second 
to play. 

With Bri in the center of the 
Bullets’ defense, the Bucks made 
only 37.4 percent of (heir shot* 

“He made us make quite a few 
adjustments with our shot*" said 
Terry Cummings, who was 4-for- 
25. “A few weren’t even dose, and 
you can Name him.” 

Nelson made several adjust- 
ments to try to neutralize Bol, who 
broke Efvin Hayes’ team single- 
game record of 1 1 Nock* 

Bri, who played 48 of the game’s 
53 minutes, had eight Nocks in the 
first 9% minute* and the Bucks 
stooped driving tbe middle. 

Then Nelson tried fouling Bri, 
who was 2rfor-19 from the free- 
throw fine after missing his first 


four attempts Thursday night. But 
Bri convened right of his last 10 
free throws to foil that strategy. 

“It ended up backfiring on us,” 
Nelson admitted. 

■ Suns’ Davis Missing 
The Phoenix Suns’ all-star guard, 
Walter Davis, missed Thursday 
night’s game against the Los Ange- 
les Lakers because of “personal 
problems" and is not expected to 
return borne to Phoenix or rejoin 
the team for an undisclosed period 
of time. The Associated Press re- 
ported from Inglewood, California. 

“Citing personal problem* Da- 
vis has come forward seeking help 
and is currently in the bands of 

league counselors," said a state- 
ment released by the Sun* 
Officials would neither confirm 
nor deny that Davis’ problems were 
related to drugs or alcohol. 

Davis, 31, had scored 43 points 
against the Golden State Warriors 
on Wednesday night, but missed 
the team bus and a 10 AM flight 
from San Francisco on Thursday 
morning. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Cauthen in Anti-Alcohol Program 

CINCINNATI (AP) — Steve Cauthen, the first Ame ri can in 71 years 
to become Britain’s champion jockey and the youngest to win racing’s 
Triple Crown, is completing a three-week program for alcohol dependen- 
cy at a Cincinnati hospital, his father said. 

Cauthen, 25, of Walton, Kentucky, started the program at Christ 
Hospital to coincide with Ms annual holiday visit to the family home, 
accordin g to George Cauthen, who said, "He quit drinking about three 
months ago. Probably, this is a thing that 1 s bruit up over a period of time. 
He just frit it was interfering with what he was doing.” 

Farina Quits as AC Milan President 

MILA N (UPI) —Giuseppe Farina, president of AC Milan, resigned 
Friday, two days after the soccer team’s elimination from the UEFA Cup 
competition and two days before AC Milan, tied for third in the first 
division standing* plays league-leading Juventu* 

After AC Milan was eliminated Wednesday night from the Cop 
tournament by the Belgian club Waregem, hundreds of fans shouted 
insults at Farina, told Mm to quit and stoned him. 

For tire Record 

Andos Janyd, who Monday won the Australian Open title, has a knee 
injury and may be unab le to play for defending champion Sweden in the 
Davis CUP final against West Germany, the team captain said. (AFP) 
Tom Gorman, 39, a member of the 1972, 1973 and 1975 U5. Davis Cup 
reportedly will succeed Arthur Ashe as the team captain. (AP) 
Mike Ruth, the Boston College noseguard, won the 1985 Outland 
Trophy as tbe outstanding interior lineman in VS. college football (AP) 
j uu-twl Jra vfem, star guard of the Chi c a go Bulls of the NBA, must keep 
bis broken left foot in a cast on two weeks longer than antrripaied. (AP) 
Britafart Nick PUpps and Aba Ceams beat the favored Sonet and 
Italian teams to win the two-man World Cup bobsled competition m 
Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy. (£**) 

Ro« Mari* 51, who Mridsbasebaffs single-season homeruiiiiimc of 

61 has been hospitalized at MJJ- Anderson Hospital and Tumor Insti- 
tute in Houston. He was diagnosed in 1983 as having lymphoma. (AP) 


U.S. College Soccer: A Paradox of Foreigners 


By Robot Lohrer and Doug Cress 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — American University’s 
NCAA semifinal victory over Hartwick last 
weekend epitomized tbe paradox that confronts 
. college soccer. 

While enthusiasm , attendance and the quality 
of play in the match all were high, suggesting 
strong interest in the sport, it was dominated by 
foreign player* Only eaght erf the 22 playen who 
started the game are US. arisen* symptomatic 
of a direction in wind) some coaches worry the 

^“Tbe cnrrentttecSa taking away opportum- 
ty for American ldds to play at American 
school*” said Virginia’s coach, Brace Arena, 
who, along with coaches ai Duke, damson, 
Connecticut and UCLA has been successful 
with US. player* 

“Foreign playera are easy to sign and a num- 
ber of schools have taken advantage of that 
fact,” said Connecticut's coach, Joe Motrone. 
“They all want to come here now.” 

To compete, lesser-known programs such as 
those at American University, Georg; Meson, 
EvansvtBe and Hartwkk, all of which werc in 
tiie NCAA tournament, have had to use both 
UJS. players and those from countries where 
soccer is the dominant sport, not baseball, bas- 
ketball and footbalL 

“Unlike football and basketball, in soccer 
there are a limited number of Americans at the 
top level," said AUs coach, Pete Mefalert 

In Saturdays nitiooal -chin qnoiisfai p game in 
Seattle, for example, American’s roster wiD in- 
dude nine foreign player* The opponent, 
UCLA, will have none, 

- lathe Atlantic Coast Conference, which once 
dominated tbe NCAA tournament with teams 


built largely around the skills of Africans and 
West Europeans, there has been a commitment 
to US.-bam athlete* Yet Virginia, Duke and 
Gemson stfil are among the nation's top team* 
These schools have been able to regularly sign 
the top native-born players. This year, Virginia 
signed four high school all-America* 

Mefalert believes he understands why these 
schools succeed in attracting tbe top player* 
“You first think about academics and the 
programs offered and the quality of Hfe," he 

^Foreign players are easy to 
sign and a number of 
schools have taken 

advantage of that fact 7 

— Joe Morrone, Connecticut 

said. “Gmerally, a school like Duke is associat- 
ed with all these factor* Where does that leave 
schools like Long Island, Fairieigh Dickinson. 
Fresno Stare and San Francisco? 

“If these schools have fun-time coaches and 
their job is to win, what’s left? Second-rate 
American player* Do you think you can win a 
national championship with that?” 

The inflax of foreign players has raised the 
general level of play across the country, earing 
the stranglehold teams such as SL Lods and 
Indiana held mi the sport in tbe mid-1970s. 

Coaches also say that many athletic d^art- 
ments have begun allocating more resources for 
soccer farilitie* scholarships, recnritmK and 
travel, fueling tbe desire to secure top 
and produce winning teams. 


Maryland is an example. In 1984, it finished 
7-10-1 and the athletic director, Dick Dull, 
decided the school had ceased to be competitive 
within the South Atlantic region and the confer- 
ence. He hired a new coach, Alden Shattuck 
from Syracuse, gave him a full complement of 
11 scholarship* up from the previous 9, and 
resodded the field with Bermuda gras* 

Shattuck says he was hired too late to com- 
pete for tbe top UJ5. recruits and Ms only option 
was to turn abroad. He brought in five foreign 
freshmen and had a successful season, 15-5-1. 

“Before we can sign top players in this area, 
we have to elevate the program to a level that 
iheyH want to come mid play here,” he said. 

Many programs, such as the one at American, 
do not have 11 foil scholarships. The Eagles 
have two foil scholarships and eight for tuition 
only. 

“The foreign player is willing to accept less of 
a scholarship,” said Mehlm. “They want to 
come to America and we can offer them a 
chan ce to play quality soccer and continue their 
education. They can’t always do that abroad.” 

Other coaches see another side to all this. 

“Maybe we’ve created a monster in our re- 
gion,” said Arena. “To beat Virginia and Duke, 
they’ve reseated to foreign player* College soc- 
cer is regressing because American players are 
being brashed arid*” 

“I don’t believe Long Island should have II 
foreign starter*" said Gordon Bradley, the first- 
year coach at George Mason in suburban Vir- 
ginia and former coach of the now-defunct 
professional Washington Diplomat* “1 think 
those who are complaining are singling out 
soccer player* Flayers come here to stay. They 
come here to make their home. Yon shouldn’t 
stop it That’s not what this country is about” 


FIFA Eases Ban 
On the En glish 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — The governing 
body of world soccer said Fri- 
day it has lifted the ban on 
English clubs playing exhibi- 
tion matches in Europe, be- 
cause it was satisfied “adequate 
measures” bad been taken 
against hooliganism. 

It said the suspension of En- 
glish teams from official tour- . 
naments in Europe still stand* 

“Everyone in Europe has 

learned from the Brussels disas- 
ter,” Guido Tngnooi, of the In- 
ternational Federation erf Foot- 
ball Associations (FIFA), said 
by telephone from Mexico Gty. 
“We want to open the door just 
a little to the English chib* who 
we feel have suffered enough.” 

Following last May’s riot in 
Brussel* in which 38 persons 
died, and for which Liverpool 
supporters were laigdy held re- 
sponsible, English dubs were 
banned indefinitely by the 
Union of European Football 
Associations (UEFA) from tak- 
ing part in competitive tourna- 
ments. FIFA followed suit by 
banning the dubs from playing 
against all foreign teams any- 
where. 

At UEFA headquarters in 
Bern, spokesman Andre Vieli 
said that the UEFA ban “was 
unlikely to be changed soon.” 








1 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14-15, 1985 


PEOPLE 


Japanese Feminist Leaden 'Only a Little Radical’ Restaurant in IrnlyWimlu 3d Star 


By Christine Chapman 

T OKYO — “The first lesson 
in sexual education for girls 
... is to teach them that moth- 
erhood is not the only reason for 
their existence." 

“Even in education, where it 
would seem that boys and girls 
are equal, teachers and adminis- 
trators siffl discriminate between 
them." 

“In today’s Japan mother and 
child are too close to each other 
both physically and psychologi- 
cally” 

“We have been bringing up nei- 
ther boys nor girls as real human 
beings but trying to make them 
pseudo-human beings according 
to the ready-made molds of man- 
liness and womanliness." 

Keiko Higuchi, S3, the author 
of these statements in the book 
“Bringing Up Girls," considers 

heradf “only a little radical”; 
nonetheless she is one of the lead- 
ers of the genteel Japanese wom- 
en’s movement. The writer and 
social critic said: h I am angry, but 
with hope. Many women are not 
angry. 1 am angry about that and 
the (act that many women accept 
the idea that girls, and boys, 
should behave in a certain way.” 

Higuchi’s 250-page handbook 
on raising daughters was pub- 
lished in 1978 by Bimka Shup- 
pankyoku Co. of Tokyo. It was a 
best seller at 100,000 copies. In 
February a paperback edition will 
come ouL 

Last spring an English-lan- 
guage edition appeared, bearing a 
sketch of a defiant little gid on the 
bright red cover. Translated by 
Akiiko Tomii and published by 
Sboukadoh Booksellers, the wom- 
en’s bookstore in Kyoto, the En- 
glish version, now in its third 
printing, was taken to the Nairobi 
conference on women last sum- 
mer by a Japanese delegate. 
Though it is seven years old, the 
book is as relevant as if It were 
written yesterday. 

“In Japan the ideas are not 
old,” Higuchi said in an interview 
at her home. “In the United 
States, after seven years, (hey 
would be. I’m happy not ha ving 
to rewrite it, but sad that Japan is 
so slow to change.” 

“Bringing Up Girls” describes 
a process of discrimination be- 
tween the sexes that is the basis of 
women's education in Japan. At 
school and in (he family — tin- 


m 



Keiko Higuchi: Trying to break traditional molds. 


consciously, Higuchi charitably 
suggests — society creates situa- 
tions in which a girl learns to 
become the Japanese ideal of 
woman: She learns to be “tender 
and docile,” to curb her zest and 
curiosity, to work silently and not 
assert herself . 

In kindergarten girls “sit in a 
line along the edge of the sandbox 
and make look-alike cakes” while 
boys, working as a group, con- 
struct a sandbox dam. “Woman- 
ly” attitudes of obedience, order 
and passivity are fostered by 
teachers’ remarks, such as, “Boys, 
go out and play. Girls, dean up 
the room,” and by a public junior 
high school curriculum that as- 
signs girls to home economics 
classes and boys to carpentry. 

In the home, although mothers 
say they do not have to expect as 
much from a girl as from a boy, 
the daughter is expected to help 
with cooking, cleaning, preparing 
the bath and other chores, while 
her brother is allowed to concen- 
trate on his schoolwork. “Boys 
are kept away from household re- 
spcmsibililies in their home,” Hi- 
guchi said. 

The three major sections of her 


Still hopeful saying “things are 
changing very slowly” Higuchi 
believes that the United Nations’ 
International Women’s Decade, 
tdiicb ends this year, was effective 
in Japan. “I think no other coun- 
try was as successful as Japan, 
both in a legal sense and in atmo- 
sphere,” she said. “Two amend- 
- meats to the constitution were 
passed ; a nationality law, which 
gives citizenship to the children of 
Japanese women married to for- 
eigners, and an equal employ- 
ment opportunity law, ' 

“People came to care abom 
womens opinions. Before, men 1 ' 
thought, 'orma, kodmo,' or “wom- 
en are like chUdrcn.’ It’s different 
now. Men often ask what women 
think.” 

She noted, “Democracy has not 
developed in the Japanese people. 
They like to follow the advice of 


They like to follow the advice of 
others. During the women’s de- 
cade the government helped the 
movement by suggesting bow 


people should 
Although tfa 


book ■— on schooling, parental 
influence and marriage — pile op 
the evidence against the tradition- 
al idea of “womanliness” as a ba- 
sis for educating girls. It leaves 
them, Higuchi writes, “with psy- 
chological htruting s on their mind 
— like the boot-binding in old 
China.” 

Through anecdotes, excerpts 
from the diaries and memoirs of 
famous Japanese women, various 
surveys, and her own observa- 
tions, Higuchi depicts a society 
that teaches women to wait — for 
marriage, for late-working hus- 
bands, for death. In its straight- 
forward, no-nonsense style, the 
book is an indictment of a coun- 
try that honors its women for be- 
ing strong mothers and depend- 
able housewives while refusing to 
admire their individuality or ad- 
mit that their intelligence equals 
men’s. 

Most women in Japan do hot 
read newspapers on trains or sub- 
ways because it is considered 
“haughty.” “Even in the Taisho 
Era,” 1912-26, Higuchi con- 
firmed, “it was not unusual for a 
wife to be divorced on the 
grounds that she read the newspa- 

per- 


Although there are 48 women’s 
groups in Japan, according to Hi- 
gudii, they seem to focus on prob- 
lems of the moment. 

Higuchi is a member of a group 
trying to bring co-education into 
housework by revising school cur- 
ricuiums that require only girls to 
take classes in home economics. 
a» commented on two new orga- 
nizations, a group called “Both 
Men and Women Need Mother- 
ing-Time” and another on caring 
for the aged. 

“There are men in both 
groups,” Higuchi said, smiling. 
“Tm inspired Next year HI write 


In “Bringing Up Gtrls” she at- 
tacks the way boys are reared 
criticizing tbar mothers’ obses- 
sive concern f or then. “Japanese 
mothers’ attachment to their sons 
is more than natural” she writes. 
“A woman is so happy to have a 
boy that, in bringing him up, she 
neglects her husband and even 
hex own life." The boy, mean- 
while. leaves “bis personal life to 
his mother or wife and grows to 
be a guest in his own home.” 

Girls are taught to be amiable, 
“to care about other people,” said 
Higuchi “Boys are dol They’re 
taught to study, to get a good job, 
then they’ll get a good wife. 

“Most Japanese men lack ami- 
ability.” 

She added however, that the 
man she fives with, a professor, 


makes their breakfast and helps 
with tiie housework. 

■ “We’ve been tiving together for 
10 years now, but we’re not legal- 
ly married. My husband died af- 
ter six years of marriage, when 
our daughter was only 4." Refer- 
ring to Ikt . companion, she said 
with a wry smile: “Without mar- 
riage this man is still alive.” 

After graduating in journalism 
and art Ins lory from the Universi- 
ty of TokyOin 1956, Higudri, who 
was born in 1932, wonted as an 
editor for a year before marrying. 
She quit bar job and became a 
housewife for four years, then re- 
turned to publishing. Later, while 

working in advertising, she began 
to write on women's issues for 


Higadri is the author of several 
books on women from early 
childhood to old age. She was the 
Japanese contributor to “Sister- 
hood is Global: The In tetnational 
Women's Movement Anthology,” 
a 1984 publication of Anchor 
Books. Last month in Tokyo she 
participated in a New York-To- 
kyo seminar on the status of 
working women as part of the 
activities honoring the 25th anni- 
versary of the two cities' “sister 
city” status. She appears regularly 
on radio and television programs 
and gives frequent lectures 
throudiont Japan. 

“when 1 lecture to high school 
girls and their mothers together, 
the mothers ore impressed, the 
girls not,” she said with a sigh. 
“High school and junior college 
students are waiting-girls. They 
are not aware of toe problems 
between men and women. They 
do not have a special plan after 
age 23 or 24, when they plan to 
many." 

Higuchi’s daughter, Mutsmm, 
who served as a test case for her 
mother's ideas about raising giris, 
is a 26-year-old doctor, an X-ray 
specialist at Tokyo Women's 
Medical University Hospital 9m 
lives by herself, does not seem 
interested in the womenls move- 
ment, according to her mother, 
and, when asked if she plans to 
marry, says: “Why?” 

Perhaps, as Higuchi hopes, the 
“present-day girls and their par- - 
eats who are going to create a newi 
age” have arrived. 

Christine Chapman is a Tokyo- 
based journalist ■who apeciaBzes in 
the arts and education. 


Gnaltiero Marcfaesfs restaurant 
in Milan has won a coveted third 
star in Midulin's 1986 red guide to 
restaurants and holds in Italy. Lo- 
do Zoom, chief of restaurant and 
hotel inspectors for Michelinin Ita- 
ly, said the Gnaltiero Marchesi res- 
taurant, with its high-tech decor, 
was ated for “its care, finesse, way 
of presenting its food and the in- 
ventiveness of tire chef” — and 
especially, he aririwt, "for not ig- 
noring the traditions of Italy.” 
Zonno said Micbelm's other three- 
star restaurants — hitherto limited 
to France, Belgium, West Germany 
and Britain — were all French, 
with perhaps same regional special- 
ties. Marches, ■ now 55, shunned 
pasta dishes when be opened the 
restaurant that bears his name 
eight years ago, and he came under 
criticism for offering an Italian ver- 
son of nouvelle cuisine. Now, 
though, the restaurant offers ravioli 
stuffed with shrimp — one of the 
dishes cried by (he guide — and 
other Italian dishes. Zonno said 
Mkhdin estimated a meal at Mar- 
ches) cost 52,000 to 90,000 lire ($30 
to S52) for one, not including wine. 
... In a rare French tribute to 
American cuisine, the Internation- 
al Action Committee for Gastrono- 
my and Tourism has awarded its 
annual prize for the the best foreign 
food in Paris to Papa Maya, a Tex- 
Mex restaurant run by Mario 
Gutu, a San Antonio chef. Claude 
Durand de Freyssmet, president of 
the committee, said tire group was 
founded in 1901 to promote French 
cuisine and tonnstn. It began 
awardingprizes for the best foreign 
restaurant in 1976. 

□ 

Christine Craft, who sued a tele- 
vision station in Kansas City, Mis- 
souri, claiming it demoted her be- 
cause of her age and appearance, 
has bear hired to co-anchor a new 
late-night news program at KRBK- 
TV, an independent station in Sac- 
ramento, California. “I find in 10 
years of news television experience, 

I prefer the smaller stations be- 
cause I could indeed go out and do 
a story,” she said. Craft, 40, said 
she planned to file an appeal next 
week with the U. S. Supreme Court 
against a federal appeals court rul- 
ing that reversed a S3 25,000 jury 
verdict against her former employ- 
er, KMBC-TV of Kansas City. 

□ 

A Soviet kangris who apparently 
has been fairing unconsciousness 



TJw AojcoMrf ftui 


Vladimir Leontev en route back to France. 


for two weeks has become the 
problem of French police, and they 
have no bettor idea what to do with 
him than did their British col- 
leagues. “I really don't know what I 
am going fo do,” said Yvan Guer- 
betie, director of the French border 
police in Calais. Vtafimir Leontev, 
43, an electrical engineer who lives 
in France, was sent home by British 
police on the ferry from Dover to 
Calais. British authorities had 
wanted to talk to him about more 
than 258,000 French francs 
($33,500) round on him when his 
motorcycle was in an accident 
northwest of London on Nov. 16, 
the day after he arrived in Britain. 
Leontev later collapsed and was 
taken to a hospital where doctors 
said he was feigning unconscious- 
ness. His French papers are in or- 
der and he is not under arrest, 
Guerbette said, but French cus- 
toms officers are interested in 
where the money came from. 

□ 

The family of a German field 
marshall whose baton was broken 
over his head by an angry British 
brigadier at the end of World War 
II has blocked the planned sale of 
the symbolic staff of office. The 
damaged baton of Field Marshall 
Erhard MDcfa had been scheduled 
to be sold Friday by Anne Walsh, 
daughter of Brigadier Derek Mffls- 
Roberts, at the London auction 
bouse Phillips. W alsh agreed to 
withdraw the baton from an auc- 
tion of war memorabilia following 
a court bearing, promising that she 
would offer it on loan to a museum 
until the Question of ownership was 


settled. Lawyers representing 
Milch's family asked to oar the sale 
on grounds that the baton was tak- 
en, not surrendered. The sOver and 
ebony baton, about 18 inches (46 
centimeters) long, has been valued 
at about £8.000 ($11,400). Walsh 
said her father broke the baton over 
Milch’s head because he was en- 


raged by a massacre of concentre- . 
tion camp prisoners in northern 

Germany in 1945. Another British *, 
officer repaired the baton and gave * ■ 
it to Mills- RoBens, Walsh said. She 
said that it was put away and for- . 
gotten after the war, and that when- 
she came across it in a drawer she 
derid 1 ** it was “too evQ” to keep. 

□ ■ 

Armand Hammer said Friday in 
Moscow that 40 masterpieces from 
Moscow’s Pushkin Museum and 
the Hermitage in Leningrad would 
be displayed in the United States 
next year in the first art exchange 
under the new U. S.-Soviei cultural 
agreement. The industrialist said 
that the exchange had been under 
negotiation for two years but that 1 
Soviet officials agreed to it only . 
after the cultural scientific and * 
educational accord was signed at w_-> 
the Geneva summit Iasi month. He 
said he and Yevgeny V. Zaitsev, 
first deputy culture minister, 
signed a contract Friday under 
which two American collections 
would be sent to the Soviet Union ; 
in exchange for the works, which he 
called “the greatest collection oT~ 
Impressionism and post-lmpres- 
sionism ever to have left the Soviet 
Union.” The Hermitage works — . 
paintings by Paid Cezanne, Claude 
Monet, Pierre August Renoir, Raid 
Gan gjfo, Vincent van Gogh, Henri- j 

Matisse and Pablo Picasso — were J 

displayed in 1983 in Lugano, Swit- ’ 
Zetland, where Hammer saw them. 

The exhibit will open May I in 
Washington for two months, then 
be shown for two mouths in Lo& . : 

Angeles. Hammer said. -jF ; 

□ l 

Jessica Tandy, 76, who collapsed ■ 

on stage Tuesday in Los Angeles 
and was hospitalized for exhaus- 
tion, was to rejoin her husband, 
Hume Crcmyn, for Friday’s perfor- 
mance of “Foxfire." a theater 

spokesman said. 


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American family living in Europe Age 
ZL ftee: from January. Leng u aptw 
baSan/FTondi/GorraWbanc ■ tn- 
Brunrtar. PX). Bax 853 OW 830 
1 -let 0039 J 1 J 1 Q 2 C 3 . 


Mac* Your Classified Ad Quickly and EasBy 

In to 

M1BNATIONA1 HERALD TRIBUNE 

By Phan*; Cat yar local IHT reprasartcaive with your text You 
*•-31 bfl Mori nod of the cad bn m oifcdriy, and onco prepayme n t it 
nsada your ad wd appear within 48 hoar*. 

Gorii The baric refe *$ 9.80 par Sna per day + local taxa*. There are 
25 letter*, spa and qaacei in the first Ena and 36 in the blowing Knot. 
Mianiurn ipixs a 2 Enu. No abbreviations aocopted. 

Cmt American Cuprous, Diner i Cfcib, Euraoord, Master 
Ord, Access and Visa 


W* |Por iVmi/i o d anty)r 
(1J47X7A6JD0. 


USA Aflied Van lines bit! Carp 
(OIOI] 312-681-8100 

Or caH car Agency European offices: 

PARIS Desbardes Interna tio nal 
(I] 43 43 23 64 

FRANKFURT 

(069) 250066 

DUS5RD0O7 RATING&i 

(02102) 45023 UHLS. 

MUNICH unls. 

(0S9) 142244 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


LONDON IrfUfariE GfNTLEMAN'S ESTATE, 150 km from 

(OH 953 3636 F 0 ? 1 inwi hoon: 5 

bedrooms, 2 guesi bouses, covered 
BRUSSELS: Ziegler 5 .A. pool, tmj court, perfect condition. 

(02)425 66 14 
CaU fcr AlW. fro- ***** 


1/lAtn/UM. a . 

THE CROWN JEWEL OF THE SPANISH COSTA DB. SOL 
PROUDLY PRESENTS 
A NEW LB SURE RESIDENCE VILLAGE 
SURROUNDED BY THREE 1 8-HOLE CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF COURSES! 

NUEVA ATALAYA 

Apartments and Town Houses overlooking the Mediterranean and adjacent 
to the famous golf course* of GUADaLMINA, ATALAYA and EL PARAlSOl 


beach facilities with all water sports and tennis courts. 

Only minutes from Marbella center, San Pedro and Puerto Banusl 
Infrastructure and landscaping completed! No further co n s tr u ction 
to be undertaken within the vidnrtyl 

HEADY FOR IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY! 

Two bedrooms, two bathrooms, separate guest's doackroom, 
fully fitted kitchen, marble floors, waH-to-wall carpeting in 
the bedrooms, highest quality of cons tr u ction) planned and 
built by German General C on tractor! 

Living surface of 128 to 139 m2 
US. WOO — to 85/300 — 

Ton yoors mo rtgag e made available by 
BANCO INDUSTRIAL DU. MB3ITBIRANEO MARBELLA 

Our offer for an inspection visitf 

Spend this years Christmas and New Year vacation fo our pleasant 
Leisure Residence Vdfage fo Marbella! 

We will provide one of the above described Apartments or Town Houses 
which will com f ortably accommodate four persons, at the charge of 
US. $60 — PER UNIT PER DAYI 
We will provide ground transfer from and to Malaga Airport. 


LATIN AMERICA 


(Dept. 312) 
Caracas: 33 1454 
Oroya*** 51 45 05 
Lana: 41/852 
Panama: 69 09 75 
SotHobo: 6061 555 
Sao Ptarfte 852 1893 


Bahrain: 246303. 
Kowv*fc 5614485. 
U h a n o n: 341 457/8/9. 
Ocean 416535- 
Saadi Arabha 
JedcW* 667-1500. 
UJU Dafaai 224161. 


390-Q6-57. 

Hang (Com: 5-213571. 
Jafael u. 510092. 
Maui* 817 07 49. 
Seoafc735 8771 
Sfopapom: 222-2725. 
Imam 752 44 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 


me* 690 8231 
9B _ 56 39. 957 43 20. 


AUTO CONVERSION I AUTOS TAX FREE 


Often lax foe con and 

dam* aS makes. Nn & uwt 

2W0, «00 CB. BREDA f 
Holland. Tel n 76451550 Tic 74282 


Should you decide to purchase one of these units before your 
partvre, this charge will be waved and we shall reimburseyau 
your air travel cost far two persons from any European Qtyi 


For travel arrom 
or coil us 


il arrangements please contact your travel agent 
coil us for direct flight booking assistance) 


Spain will join the European C o m m un i ty fo 19861 
This will bring 1 2% Value Added Tan to Property Transactions! 
One reason more to avail yourself of our offer; combine an enjoyable 
.holiday with a useful! inspection visit and, by making a may be 
already fang-time pending decision to buy a holiday home in Marbelfa 
AT THE RIGHT TIME, SAVE VALUE ADDB> TAXI 

We are at your disposal) 

ALFRED WILLNBt A ASSOCIATES MARBELLA 
Developer* and Promoters of Leisure Property 
Carolina Park No j, Marb*riki^[M^i^aJ^Sfxdn, Tel. (3432) 772388 

We are looking forward to welcoming you fo Marbella this Christmas I 


Whan in Bone: 

PALAZZO At VHABXO 
luxury vfatretnt bomt with furnished 
flats, tsaUiii far 1 -wait and nos 

Phan* 6794325. 6773450, 
Write: Via dd Vdbbro 16, 
00186 Borne. 


f* - - - -- ^ 

•mnwi mMoa 

cnaBcbls b Manogtenent Ca. 

Wri te Bos 2935, HeddTrifauM, 
92521 NouBy Cades, France 








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