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The GIoM Newspaper 
EifiteSin Pans 
Printed 

in Paris, London, 


V^THStlMT^WrEAK OKPAGE 14 



INTERNATIONAL 




(tribune 


lished With The New York Ernes and The Washington Post 


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PARIS, MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 




1 giant 

■-.: mortgage-insurance company that 
^produced a profit of 59.4 urilHoii 
1 ■_•' last year.- It has been credited with 
- pmkrng the United Slates a nation 
C" of home owners by assisting many 
■ ..V fhsl-tinie home buyers who have 
moderate incomes. 

The agency was created by the 
", '' National Housing Act of 1934 to 
- . ' -combat the effects of the Depres- 
sion. Its polities set standards that 
are fallowed widely in the home- 
building and mortgage industries. 

The housing agency cannot be 
dismantled unless Congress ap- 
proves legislation to do so, and 
there has been bipartisan support 
for the agency's programs. 

Confidential budget documents 
state that under the proposal 
“FHA will be sold in its entirety as 


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Republican 
Faults Reagan 
On Tax Rill 

By Cass Peterson 

NixMng/mr Post Service 

WASHINGTON — A key Re- 
publican member of the House of 
Representatives blamed President 
Ronald Reagan directly on Sunday 
for a party revolt that may have 
killed tax-overhaul legislation, and 
suggested that the president's plan 
nr^uat Congress on Monday to 
make a personal appeal was not 
likely to resuscitate the bill 

“In the final analysts,” said Dick 
Cheney of Wyoming, chairman of 
the House Republican Policy 
Council, “the president bears the 
responsibility for what his admitus-, 
[ration does. I don't thmk hecan 
pass the blame off to Iris: subordi- 
nates." 

His remarks in a television inter- 
view came as Mr. Reagan, prepared 
ta pay a visit to Capitol H2J in a 
last-ditch effort to salvage tax revi- 
sion, which he has called his admin- 
istration's highest domestic priori- 
ty- 

House consideration was 
blocked last week by a Republican- 
backed move to defeat the rule for 
debate, and Speaker Thomas P. 
O'Neil], a Massachusetts Demo- 
crat, said the measure would not be 
brought up again unless Mr. Rea- 
gan could deliver enough Republi- 
can votes to pass a bdL 

But Mr. Cheney’s unusual per- 

(Gontinned on Page 6 , CoL 6 ) 


a single package, including all* ex- 
isting assets and liabilities,” to 
“private bidders” in the “private 
sector." ... 

The proposal, tentatively ap- 
proved by Mr. Reagan, dramatizes 
his commitment to sell federal as- 


ON PAGE 3 

■A Pentagon budget of 5298.7 
billion has been approved by 
House and Senate conferees. 

■ U.S. lawmakers agreed on a 
draft for a $52~biffion farm bilL 


sets and to transfer federal pro- 
grams to private industry. 

The budget documents, provided 
to The New York Times on Friday 
by a White House official on the 
condition that Ue not be named, 
say: “The sale <rf FHA to the pri- 
vate sector is assumed to take place 
by the end of 1989. Sale at this time 
presumes that at least two years 
will be required to develop an ap- 
propriate sale price, obtain legal 
authority, advertise and negotiate 
final sale.” 

It is not dear what would hap- 
pen to the agency’s employees, or 
who would want to buy the agency, 
which derives substantial income 
from mortgage- insurance premi- 
ums. The officials have estimated 
the value of the agency at about S3 
billion. 

Even though congressional ap- 
proval for the sale seems unlikely, 
Mr. Rea gan might include the pro- 
posal in his budget to help reduce 
projected future deficits. Presidents 
often include proposals even if they 
are unlikely to be accepted because 
they want to shrink the deficit fig- 
ures listed in the budget. 

Cabinet officers got their first 
glimpse of Mr. Reagan's budget 
Thursday, but it will not become 
public until it is submitted to Con- 
gress in early February. 

The 1987 draft budget also pro- 
poses reducing Medicare physician 
fees, restricting federal payment 
for home health services and cut- 
ting spending on AIDS. 

Doctors' fees under Medicare, a 
health insurance program for 26.5 
milli on dderly and disabled 
pie, have been frozen since 
1984. .- - r .-■/. -w-.'-- 

The new proposal to the fiscal 
year that starts next Oct 1, would 
for the first time call for a reduction 
in Medicare payments to physi- 
cians tor services that the govern- 
ment identifies as overpriced. 

In addition, according to budget 
documents, the Office of Manage- 
ment and Budget is proposing an 
across-the-board reduction in the 
maximum fees that Medicare pays 
to physicians for various services. 

The draft budget also seeks to 
cancel a portion of 1986 spending 
for AIDS, acquired immune defi- 
ciency syndrome, reducing the 
amount to 5190 milli on, from the 
5238 mdlionjust appropriated by 
Congress. The budget proposal 

(Continued on Plage 6, CoL 6) 


France, 
China Set 
Atom Sale 

French Firms 
Will Provide 
Two Reactors 


. PARIS — After seven years of 
negotiations, France and China 
have reached agreement in printi- 
ple for (he constrocnoa of a unclear 
power station at Daya Bay in 
southern China, according, to 
French government sources. 

The agreement, valued at 51 3 
billion, was reached during a visit 
to Paris last week by Deputy Prime 
Minister Li Peng of China, in 
which remaining problems such as 
pricing and finance were settled, 
the sources at the Ministry far In- 
dustrial Redeployment and Exter- 
nal Trade said Saturday. 

The project calls for construction 
of two reactors of 900 megawatts 
each by the French companies Fra- 
matome and Hectritito de France. 
Britain's General Electric Corp. is 
to provide turbines. 

China will sign a letter of intent, 
which virtually has the legal value 
of a contract, by March 1. the 
sources said. 

“In terms of the money, h is 
certainly China's biggest deal 
ever,” said a French diplomat who 
handles nuclear affairs in China. 

The entire cost of China’s first, 
full-scale nuclear power plant is 
estimated at 53.5 bfllion. Ground- 
work for the station is already un- 
der way at Daya Bay, near the 
border with Hong Kong. 

An ini rial F rcDch-Qnnesc 
meni for nuclear cooperation was 
signed in 1975, and three years later 
discussions opened on a proposal 
that Framatcune build a power sta- 
tion at Sunan, near Shanghai. 

The project was shelved in 1979, 
however, amid Chinese concern 
about funds. Talks reopened in 
1980 on proposals to build the 
plant at Daya Bay in Guangdong 
Province. 

The talks speeded in 1982, when 
Mr. Li visited France, but there 
were still uncertain moments in the 
past year, especially over interest 
raiescharged byFraacfTBaHka 

A Qunese-Hong Kong cosnpa- - 
ny, the Guangdong Nuclear Power 
Joint Venture Co„ has undertaken 
to sell Hong Kong70 percent of the 
electricity the plant generates. 

Chinese sources said the project 
would be completed by 1991, but 
French officials said that such a 
timetable would be impossible to 
meet (AFP, UP1) 

■ UJS.-China Agreement Gains 

Patrick E Tyler <4 The Washing- 
ton Post reported from Washington: 

Assisted by last-minute lobbying 
from industry and Vice President 
George Bush, the first UJ5. nud ear- 
power cooperation agreement with 

(Co m bined on Page 6, CoL 2) 



Shultz Raises 
Rights Issues in 
Ceausescu Talks 


George P- Shultz at the Berlin Wall with Eberhard 


the mayor of West Berlin. 


U.S. Offers to Be a Guarantor 
In an Afghan Peace Settlement 


By David K. Shipler 

New York Tima Semen 

WASHINGTON —The United 
States has announced its willing- 
ness to serve as a guarantor of a 
peace settlement in Afghanistan 
that would include both a with- 
drawal of Soviet troops and an end 
to U.S. aid to the rebels. 

Formal notification of the U.5. 
position was made in a letter sent 
Wednesday to the United Nations 
secretary-general Javier Perez de 
Cufcflar, and made public in a 
speech Friday -by John G White- 
head, deputy secretary of state. 

He said the letter conveyed the 
Reagan administration’s accep- 
tance of tbe.draft text ofjid tailed 
instrument that is brag n^o#ted' 
indirectly between Afghanistan 
and Pakistan, with the UN as a 
mediator. The text, not yet made 
public, reportedly includes provi- 
rions to noninterference. 

The accord technically would be 
between Afghanistan and Pakistan, 
but Soviet -and UJS. guarantees 
would be needed to make it viable. 

Diego Cordovez of Ecuador, the 
deputy undersecretary-general 
heading mediation efforts, said the 
U.S. position would be helpful 

“I am very happy and satisfied 
that the United States has taken 
this step," he said. 

Soviet officials are said to have 
expressed increased interest recent- 
ly in a political settlement to the 


war in Afghanistan. Soviet troops 
intervened there six years agp. 

But Moscow has accused the 
United States of trying to subvert 
the Afghan government by supply- 
ing weapons to Afghan rebels 
through neighboring Pakistan. 

Mr. Whitehead did not speak ex- 
plicitly of ending aid to the rebels. 
But officials fammar with the issue 
said that acceptance of the draft 
text implied a willingness to halt 
such support. A State Department 
official said this represented a new 
step in U.S. policy. 

“It basically means that the 
United States will support the obli- 
gation of noninterference that 
would be undertaken by Pakistan,” 
raid & foreign, diplomat, familiar 
with , the situation. “The issue has 
now readied a very critical* stage 

In his speech, Whitehead said 
that three of four baric documents 
had already been drafted: agree- 
ments on mutual noninterference 
and nomnUarventian, voluntary re- 
turn of two to three million refu- 
gees and certain international guar- 
antees. The fourth, dealing with the 
withdrawal of Soviet troops, re- 
mains to be written. 

“The issue of withdrawal lies at 
the heart of the Afghan problem,” 
Mr. Whitehead said, noting that 
approximately 120,000 Soviet mili- 
tary personnel were in Afghani- 
stan, with another 30,000 just 
across the border. 

He said the letter conveyed “our 





John G Whitehead 

readiness to acoept the draft guar- 
antees that Cordovez has present- 
ed” provided that “the central issue 
of Soviet troop withdrawal and its 
interrelationship to the other in- 
struments” are resolved. 

The Soviet Union reportedly has 
already agreed to act as a guaran- 
tor, although h has raised questions 
about some aspects of the drafts. 

The next round of talks, sched- 
uled to begin Monday in Geneva, is 
to address how a Sonet withdrawal 
would be linked with other aspects 
of a peace accord. 


By John M. Goshlco 

Washington Post Semce 

BUCHAREST — Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz conferred 
Sunday with President Nicolae 
Ceausescu in an effort to ease ten- 
sions between the two countries 
over Romania’s human rights re- 
cord. 

Tbe two men agreed to tiy to 
resolve the problem through sys- 
tematic consultations. 

Mr. Shultz, apparently trying to 
avoid the impression that tbe Rea- 
gan administration is using Roma- 
nia's lucrative trade with the Unit- 
ed States to pressure Mr. 
Ceausescu, said that the talks were 
“frank and constructive.” 

He added that “we have set up 
some procedures that we hope will 
resolve the problem.” but he re- 
fused to elaborate. 

A senior U.S. official, speaking 
on condition he not be identified, 
said later that there had been agree- 
ment for regular discussions on two 
levels “about the whole broad 
range of rights issues.” 

The official said the talks would 
be conducted in Washington be- 
tween the State Department coun- 
selor. Edward J. Derwinskl and the 
Ro manian Embassy, as well as in 
Bucharest between Foreign Minis- 
ter Hie Vaduva and the U.S. am- 
bassador, Roger Kirk. 

“I think we will see, instead of 
infrequent discussions, a sustained 
effort in Washington and Bucha- 
rest to meet these problems bead 
on and see if they can be resolved.” 
the official said.' 

Romania has depended on ex- 
ports to the United States to earn 
billions of dollars to pay its huge 
Western foreign debt, Mr. Ceauses- 
cu's chief economic priority. 

In return, U.S. administrations 
have granted Romania most-fa- 
vored-nation trade status for the 
last 10 years as a way of encourag- 
ing it to continue policies relatively 
independent of the Soviet Union. 

During the past year, however, 
the Reagan, administration has 
come under growing pressure from 
-critics of Romania's repressive in-, 
tonal rule. 

La particular, many members of 
Congress, angered by persecution 
of some religious groups such as 
evangelistic movements of Baptists 
and Seventh Day Adventists, have 
mounted a drive to revoke Roma- 
nia’s trade benefits. 

Despite administration efforts to 
play down the issue publicly, that 
was the principal topic during Mr. 
Shultz’s three hours of talks with 
Mr. Ceausescu. Their private meet- 
ing took up half of the six hours 
that Mr. Shultz spent in Bucharest 
following his arrival Sunday morn- 
ing from Berlin and his departure 
Sunday night for Budapest. 

In Berlin, Mr. Shultz called the 
city a symbol of the “unnatural and 


inhuman " division of Europe and 
said Saturday that the United 
States does “not accept incorpora- 
tion of Eastern Europe, including 
East Germany and East Berlin, 
into a Soviet sphere of influence." 

He said that the Russians for 40 
years had forced East Europeans 
“to live in a continent divided by 
barbed wire, under governments 
sustained by military power." 

Mr. Sbuitz said that the U.S. 
search for better relations with 
Moscow has not caused Mr. Rea- 
gan to forget “that there can be no 
true peace where there is repres- 
sion, partition or mutual fear, or 
where we avert our eyes from un- 
pleasant facts.” 

instead, be said, the postwar his- « 
lory of Berlin is a reminder that 
“guns and tanks and rockets are a 
manifestation of basic differences, 
not the underlying cause.” 

Before delivering his address. 
Mr. Shultz visited the Berlin Wall, 
accompanied by Foreign Minister 
Hans-Dietrich Genscher of West 
Germany and Eberhard Diepgen, 
the mayor of West Berlin. 

In Bucharest on Sunday, Mr. 
Shultz also gave Mr. Ceausescu a 
letter from Mr. Reagan and pre- 
sented Mr. Vaduva with a letter 
fiom Representative Robert C. Mi- 
chel a Republican of Illinois and 
the minority leader of the House of 
Representatives. Mr. Michel has 
met the Romanian foreign minister 
at international parliamentary 
meetings. 

Mr. Shultz refused to divulge the 
contents of what he called “private 
messages.” but the senior official 
said that Mr. Michel's letter had 
been written at Mr. Shultz’s request 
after the secretary learned of his 
acquaintance with" Mr. Vaduva. 

The official added that the letter 
was intended to reinforce to the 
Romanians the mood in Congress 
about h uman rights conditions. 

In brief public remarks before 
the meeting, Mr. Ceausescu. re- 
flecting his government's annoy- 
ance at US. criticism, said. “The 
relationship between the United 
States and Romania is good, but it 
could be better.” 

- There have been persistent ru- 
mors that Mr. Ceausescu, 67, is in 
01 health and that the severe eco- 
nomic austerity be has imposed on 
the country might be weakening his 
grip on power. 

(IS. officials said that while Mr. 
Ceausescu appears to have lost 
weight in recent months, he ap- 
peared energetic and alert in the 
meeting Sunday. 

■ Sonet Assails Shultz 

A Soviet commentator accused 
Mr. Shultz on Sunday of dashing 
hopes of better relations that were 
raised at the Geneva summit meet- 
ing last month. The Associated 
Press reported from Moscow. 




-CCS*. 




Spain Expels 
Cubans After 
Abduction Try 


Reuters 

l MADRID — Spain has expelled 
-coirf * ' four Cuban Embassy staff mero- 
bm whom it accused of trying to 
kidnap a Cuban defector said by 
—■ ***v exiles to be a spy. 

The four, including the Cuban 
\\j^ vice consuLAngel Le 6 n Cervantes, 
were put mi a Cuban airline flight 
to Havana on Saturday. 

* , . They were detained Friday when 
; . they tried to force Manuel Antonio 
1 Sincbez P 6 rez into a car. The police 
" said that Mr. Letin Cervantes and 
an embassy derk had guns. 
pcf The Spanish foreign minister, 
. j Francisco Fernindez Orddnez, 
fC* handed the expulsion notice and a 
.■Afi" strong protest to the Cuban ambas- 
^ sador, Oscar Garcia Fem&ndez. 

Mr. Garda Fendndez said he 
could not explain the incident, but 
added: “This gentleman tried to 
’ money that was not his.” 

:> Spanish officials said that Mr. 
•Sfachez Perez, 50, who ranked as a 
yto minister, applied to political 
asyhtmNov. 18 and roid the poGce 
fire days ago that he was being 
■Mowed. 

/.'‘.Western diplomats said he 
l&radccd to Cuba’s G-2 secret sor- 
jfrioe, Cuban exiles said be was the 
hwymaster for Cuban spies in Eu- 
|P$£aad the United States, 
vln Havana, tbe Foreign Ministry 
\ saii that Mr. Stachez PArez was a 
— . — who caused a disturbance 
jwhea prevented from illegally with- 
Ldrawing. half a minion douan. of 
fCobsn government money from a 
fsdrid bant 
Mc.S4nchez Pfirez was i 
fey the Stale Committee for 11 
’ Material Supply and had ar- 
in Spain on Nov. 16 on a 


i trip, the Foreign Ministry 



toen 


Carlos Romulo, a Founder of the UN 
And Ex-Philippines Minister, Dies 


Angel Le6n Cervantes, left, tbe Caban vice consol in Madrid, and another Cuban Emb a s sy 
employee hid tbeir faces as they left Barajas Airport for Havana after being expelled. 


Reuters 

MANILA — Carlos P. Romulo, 
86 , a long-time foreign minister of 
the Philippines and one of tbe 
founders of the United Nations, 
died Sunday after a lingering kid- 
ney ailment and other problems, a 
Philippine Foreign Ministry 
spokesman said. 

Mr. Romulo underwent emer- 
gency surgery on Tuesday for intes- 
tinal bleeding and died from circu- 
latory collapse dne to brain, heart, 
lung,' liver and kidney failure. 

His wife, Beth Day, three sons 
and a daughter-in-law were with 
him when he died at the National 
Kidney Foundation, the ministry 
spokesman said. 

President Ferdinand E Marcos, 
whose government Mr. Romulo 
served, mourned his death and 


called him “a great and beloved 
compatriot.” 

The U.S. Embassy issued a state- 
ment that described Mr. Romulo as 
“one of the truly great statesmen of 
the 20 ih century.” 

Spoke for Third World 

By Eric Pace 

New York Tima Service 

As a co-founder of the United 
Nations in 1945, Mr. Romulo suc- 
ceeded in having its charter explic- 
itly endorse the independence of 
colonized countries. He lived on to 
become one of the last survivors of 
the charter’s 51 signers. 

Mr. Romaic's charm, energy and 
oratorical skill made him a tower- 
ing figure at the United Nations, 
especially in its early years. He felt 


that one of his chief missions there 
was, as he once pul it, “voicing the 
aspirations of millions of voiceless 
Asians.” 

He was also a leader at the Ban- 
dung Conference of Asian and Af- 
rican nations in 1955 and in other 
forums. Bandung, an Indonesian 
city, was the site of a notable early 
effort at Third World solidarity. It 
expressed what Mr. Romulo de- 
scribed at the time as “the aroused 
will of people determined to be 
masters of their own fate.” 

Earlier, he became tbe first Asian 
president of tbe UN General As- 
sembly, which he led in 1949 and 
1950. He was elected three times to 
one-month terms as president of 
the Security CoundL He served as 
bis country’s chief delegate to the 
United Nations from 1945 to 1954. 



Nrr;i 977 

Carlos P. Romulo 

Though some of Mr. Romulo’s 
views changed during his lifetime, 
be was for years a tirdcss advocate 
of anti-colonialism and democracy, 
an implacable critic of communism 
(Ctatinoed oo Page 6 , CoL 8 ) 


Meager Military Belies Canada’s Size, Commitments 



ItheCuban version 
j false statements and 
} tolerable judgments on the bc- 
jhavior of the Spanish government” 


By Christopher S. Wren _ 

New York Tima Service 

OTTAWA — When the Canadian armed fanes hdd their 
largest maneuvers in several decades in Alberta last May and 
June, they fielded every tank they had in the country — a 
total of 18. 

That is fewer than the number maintained by Britain and 
West Germany at tbeir own armored training centers in 
western Canada, according to Canadian officers. 

. r^mndinns like to point out that their navy is outnum- 
bered in submarines by an amusement paric in a shopping 
mall at Edmonton that offers underwater rides. 

Tbe navy has three obsolete diesel subs for patrolling more 

than 36,300 (59,000 kilometers) miles of coastline on three 
oceans. Canadians note that the submarines are used not to 
paired duties, but in target practice for anti-submarine frig- 
ates. 

Canada has fewer than 83,000 men and women under 
arms to defend a territory larger than the United States. It 
also spends barely 2 percent of its gross national product on 
defense, less than any other NATO ally except Iceland, 
which has no army at all and Luxembourg. 

Tbe polar approaches to North America are so exposed 
that a Canadian Senate committee warned last January that 
Soviet bombers could Hy undetected into the heart erf North 
America. 


In September, Foreign Minister Joe dark alluded to the 
presence of Soviet submarines under the Arctic ice. Yet the 
number of fanafKan aircraft that perform maritime surveil- 
lance has fallen, from 99 in 1955 to 36 this year. 

- The Progresrive Conservative govmunent, which took 
office in September 1984, has promised to rectify such 

Canadians joke that their navy is 
outnumbered in submarines by an 
amusement park in Edmonton that 
offers underwater rides. 

weaknesses by increasing spending. Prime Minister Brian 
Mnlmney mid during his election campaign that a firsr-dass 
nation needed a first-class defense force. 

Canadian*, however, often seem unconcerned because 


Jith snow and ice to the north and a friendly superpower 
to tbe south, Canada has had little incentive to do more. Any 
increase in mflitaiy spending is unlikely to enhance fire 
nation’s security, and any reduction, is unlikely to di mmi sh 
it. 


Even so, its armed forces find it a challenge to cany out 
their four conventional commitments: to protect Cana dian 
territory, to join the Americans in defending North A me rica, 
to contribute forces to the North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion and to provide peacekeeping units for the United 
Nations. 

“If all my nusaons were pulled on me smmltaneously, I 
would hare some severe problems," said lieutenant General 
Char les R ReTrile, the commander of Canada's land forces. 

Though Canada laA« the military tradition of some 
countries, the ability of Canadians to fight is not in doubt. 

More than 100,000 Canadians died in two world wars. By 
the end of World War U, Canada had more than 500,M0 
volunteers in its armed forces, an air force as bis as Britain's 
and the third largest navy in the world, with 200 ships. 

* Today, wiih barely 8,000 combat troops, Canada can no 
longer field a full infantry division. Most of its 23 aged 
destroyers and frigates still run on steam in a navy that is 
barely larger than Ecuador’s. The air force has two squad- 
rons of intoentns deployed in Canada's territorial defense, 
compared with nine squadrons in 1960. 

Forty percent of Canadians surveyed in a Gallup poll in 
October thought their country was spending too little on the 
military, while 17 percent thought tbe nation spent too 

(Conthmed oo Page 6 , Col 5) 



Maris, 51, who 
! tasetalPs home-run 
record, tfied. Pages (5,15. 


INSIDE 

■ A bitter dispute came to a 
head when French researchers 
sued the U.S. over who round 
tbe cause of AIDS. Page 2. 

■ Amur Air said its DC-S that 
crashed in Canada had prob- 
lems earlier this year. Page 3 . 

■ South African police battled 

blades in Durban after a rally 
for United Democratic Front 
leaders. Page 6 . 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ GAF Corp. inticated it might 
be willing to raise its bid for 
Union Carbide Corp. Page 7 . 

■ European companies vowed 
to contest Sikorsky's rescue bid 
for Westland PLC Page 7. 

TOMORROW 

The first woman ever to bead a 
major American Indian tribe 
has been installed as principal 
dtief of the Cherokee Nation. 


S 








Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, 



Fame , Patents at Slake as French Sue U.S. Cher AIDS Claim 


By Lawrence K. Aleman 

New York Tuna Service 

PARIS — A lawsuit filed by a 
French research organization 
against the U.S. government to de- 
termine who first established the 
cause of AIDS promises to bring a suit says, 
public airing of a dispute between specifying 
French and U.S. medical research- shared for 
ers that has been building for more 

than a year, 

fidab^rf^e^asteor Institute an- 
nounced Friday that the institute 
had sued the U-S. government. 

The director of the institute, 

Raymond Dedonder, contended at 
a news conference that its research 
tftgm hwatfc d by Dr. Luc Montag- 
nier found the virus that causes 

acquired immu ne deficiency syn- 
drome and developed the first test 
to detect antibodies to the virus in 
1983, a year before an American 
ream led by Dr. Robert C. Gallo of 
the National Cancer Institute. 

Mr. Dedonder said that after 
months of fruitless negotiations 
with U.S. officials over recognition 
of the institute's contributions to 
AIDS research and related com- 
mercial rights, the institute was su- 
ing to have its “rights recognized in 
the name of the scientific ethic.’' 

But Dr. Gallo, the American re- 
searcher, said in a telephone inter- 
view that the Pasteur Institute was 
exaggerating its contributions. 

“We helped them a lot more than 

they helped us," he said. 

Patent rights to a procedure for 
detecting antibodies to the AIDS 
virus in blood have become both 
the material and symbolic center of 
the dispute. In the suit, the Pasteur 
Institute charges that the American 
researchers made use of virus speci- 
mens and research data supplied by 


AIDS virus and developing a viral 
antibody test 

The American researches subse- 
quently took out a patent on the 
blood test on b ehalf of die U.S. 
government In doing so, the law- 
suit says, they violated a contract 
specifying that tire materials were 
snared for noncommercial research 


American scientists counter that 
they did not use the virus samples 
they had received from Paris in 
developing their antibody test. 

Intertwined with the matter of 
credit for a major scientific discov- 
ery have been such factors as the 
prestige of national scientific estab- 
lishments, the fame and fortune of 
scientists and their y gsHtnfcs, and 
possible shares in a future Nobel 
prize. 

The French institute, founded by 
Louis Pasteur in 1887, is a private, 
nonprofit foundation, a g 
institute and research center. 

In a statement, lire Pasteur Insti- 
tute said it had three main goals: to 
obtain recognition that the French 
researchers were the first to discov- 
er the virus that causes ADDS; to 
receive permission for companies it 
licenses to seU. the blood test with- 
out being sued by the U.S. govern- 
ment for counterfeiting; and to se- 
cure the right to share in royalties 
collected fay the U.S. government 
for sales of blood tests % its licens- 
ees. 

Spokesmen for the Department 
of Health and Human Services in 
Washington, which administers the 
National Cancer Institute, refused 
to comment on the suit until they 
could study the complaint, which 
was filed Thursday in the US. 
Court of Haims in Washington. 


Ik. Lowell Harmison, science 
adviser to the federal health agen- 
cy. said when asked tocomment on 
the lawsuit: “We were a bit amazed 
to learn of this. 1 think there has 
been a very sound and constructive 
dialogue between the parties over 
time, and everyone involved has 
been extremely concerned about 
the sensitive matters bang raised." 

Dr. Harmison said that in nego- 
tiations this summer and fall, 
American and French scientists 
had agreed to wodc toward a state- 
ment of the roles of all parties in 
the scientific discovery of the virus 
that causes AIDS, a disease for 
which no core has been found. 

Dr. Harmison also said that die 
federal government had made 
known its willingness to allow a 
Pasteur Institute licensee to market 
an antibody test in tire United 
States without legaTchaflenge. : 

The Genetic Systems Corn, of 
Seattle has applied to the Food and 
Drug Administration for permis- 
sion to market a blood test kit it 
makes under license from tire Pas- 
tear Institute. 

The Pasteur Institute raid the 
U.S. Patent Office had ignored its 
request in December 1983 for a 
patent for a blood test to detect 
antibodies to the AIDS virus. 

The Patent Office subsequently 
awarded a patent for a similar pro- 
cedure to the National fanw in- 
stitute research last May. 

“They didn’t receive a patent be- 
cause they didn’t have a working 
blood test," said Dr. Gallo. 

Royalties bom sales of the test, 
which now is marketed by five UA 
companies, go to the federal gov- 
ernment. The test is widely used to 
screen donated blood for evidence 
of the AIDS virus and is increas- 
ingly used by individuals. 



Dr. Luc Mootagnier, 
right, of the Pasteur In- 
stitute, holding pictures 
showing the reuses that 
his research team, and 
one headed by Dr. Rob- 
ot C GaBo of the Na- 
tional Cancer Institute, 
above, finked to AIDS. 


WORLD BRIEFS 

Conunemorafioii in Poland Is Barred > 

GDANSK, Poland (UPI) — Ptilice Wodred Solidarity' s founder, L eft 
Walesa, and W)QQ Poles on Sunday from hotdmgan anniversary-eve ■' ’ 
observance at a monument to workers killed in 1970 unrest along the ’ 
Baltic Coast. 

Several hundred riot police cordoned off the monument — three tall r 
c rosses joined by an anchor, the symbol of hope — and warned those 
. approaching it they would be detained. Witnesses co unted at least 70 * 
trades of riot police and five water camions around the drarchand near ■ 

the memorial. ; 

The police cordon was set up after a mass to comme m orate the unrest - 
15 years ago Monday, during which more than 50 people were shotdead ‘ 
by police. Solidarity, founded as an inde pend e n t union in 1980 bet ; 
banned two years latex, considers itsdf an outgrowth of the protests. * 

Syrian Missiles Moved, Israel Reports ; 

JERUSALEM (WF) — The Israeli miliiaiy command said Sunday that A 
Syria had moved batteries of surface-to-air nrisales dose to the Lebanese,- 

border, seriously impairing the ability of Israeli jets to conduct rtoomuis- * 
canr»» flights over Lebanon. 

Mib'taiy officials said that Syria bad deployed fixed-place SAM»2sin - 
three locations, each several mites from the Lebanese border. The - 
medium-range niggles can fly over most of central and northon Leba- ; 

non, the officials said .... _ , , . 

Lieutenant General Moshe Levy, the army chief of staff, noted that a ‘ 
<iiTiiinr redeployment of missile batteries m 1982, shortly before the ; 
Israeli invasion of Lebanon, led to Israeli air strikes against the installa- 
tions. 

2 Confess in Killing of Envoy in Moscow 

MOSCOW (UPD — The son and stepson of a Mexican diplomat, ' 
Manuel PortOla Quevedo, 43, have confessed to the murders c# Mr. 
PortiUa and his housemaid, Maria del Carmen Cruz, in October, the 
Medcan Embassy here said ^ ' 


At stake in the lawsuit could be 
minion* of dollars in royalties from 
rales of the test Mr. Dedonder said 
that as a private institution, the 
Pasteur Institute “needs money 
that comes from the application of 
research.” Future royalties in the 
U A market have been estimated at 
SS mtTHrm a. year. 

Although time proved them cor- 


rect, when the French researchers 
first claimed they bad discovered 
the cause of AIDS in 1983, they did 
not offer what many scientists re- 
garded as conducive evidence. Nor 
were they then able to sustain and 
duplicate the vims in a test tube, a 
vital step for most research. 

Supporters of Dr. Gallo argue 
(hat hlS j nihKshpd 


last year in the journal Science, 
conclosrvdy linked the virus to 
AIDS and included much more de- 
tailed information about the agent, 
which American researchers were 
able to grow in quantity. 

But many observers say that 
both the French and American 
twimit npute crucial contributions 
to the understanding of AIDS. 


French Group Uses Une Strong-Arm, Tacdque to Defend Mother Tongue 


By Richard Bernstein 

New York Tima Service 

PARIS — A private group here has 
Stepped op the longstanding effort to 
keep English words out of the French 
language by suing those who break this 
country’s laws about linguistic purity. 

The group is called AGULF, a French 
acronym for the General Association for 
the Users of the French Language. It has 
collected modest aril damage from 

6ra, TransWorid Airibcs and the daify 
Le Monde, for using English words to sell 
or promote a product, a practice banned 
by a 1975 law. 

AGULFs strong-arm tactics have 
been denounced fay some as silly and fay 
others as dictatorial. But its efforts come 
amid other signs that the French, includ- 
ing the government, are becoming more 
combative in the struggle to ward off the 
taint of foreign words. 

' Many in tins 'country argue that the 
preservation of French from what com- 
monly is called “Anglo-Saxon hegemon- 
ism’’ u not a nmter of petty chauvinism. 
They see the Tarignagr, as being in real 
danger and believe that it is the essential 
ingredient in nothing less than the surviv- 
al of an independent national identity. 


This point was made recently by the 
minister of culture, Jack Lang, who, in 
something of a public relations gimmick, 
wrote a letter in FngH«h t complete with a 
couple of small tO the of 

the government's broadcasting authority, 
protesting that French radio and televi- 
rion were favoring English and American 
performers over French. 

“Should we fail to take steps prompt- 
ly,” Mr. Lang said, “we will most certain- 
ly lose our identity as a nation — give up 
our very sooL” 

Every year, about 15 government min- 
istries publish a fist of foreign words, 
most of them En glish, that axe then 
harmed from use in official communica- 
tions. The list also furnishes French 
equivalents, often newly minted, of the 
banned terms. 

Last month, the Secretariat for Tech- 
nology and Communication published a 
list of 100 banned words along with the 
substitute terms, most of them, for show 
business. For “one-man show," the office 
suggested “spectacle solo^ The French 
word, “ammateur” is to replace “disk 
jockey,” and “palmarts” means “hit pa- 
rade:” 

Making new words is something of an 
industry here, with members of the gov- 


ernmental Hi gh Commission for the 
French tanpup laboring on substitu- 
tions for English words that have crept 
into the tangimg e, many of »h«n a rising 
from new technologies. 

A recently published book of 1,500 
neologisms includes French words for 
computer (onfinateur), brain-storming 
(remue-mfatinges), joystick (manche & 
balaiX software flojapdd) and digital 
switching (commutation numhrique). 

It is into this scene of linguistic defense 
and invention that AGULF has entered, 
bringing 44 suits against purported, viola- 
tors of the language law, wine* prohibits 
non-French wards in efforts to sell prod- 
ucts, except in cases where there is no 
French equivalent. 

AGULF, a small gro up with two law- 
yers that operates hugely oat of the home 
of one of its members, has won virtually 
all the cases it has pressed since it was 
formed in 1980. 

It sued the Paris Opfra for selling Eu- 
gfish-laqgnage programs at a .pofor- 
mance of “Bubbling Brown/Sugar.” It 
made Trans Wddd Airlines pay a fine of 
about S500 for' distributing boarding 
passes in FngHati at Charles de Gaulle 
Airport. It brought the bottled water 
company Evian to court for a new prod- 


uct tailed as “le fast drink des AIpcs.” 

“We don't want to cause financial 
problems for any enterprises,” said Kfi- 
cfaehne Fame, the general secretary of 
AGULF, in an interview. “We only want 
to make them pay attention to die law of 
1975." 

The result, in the view of some here, 
however, is to give an unpleasant prose- 
cutorial edge to the defense of the lan- 
guage. This certainly is the view of 
Hogues Steiner, a Paris furniture maker 
who was accused by AGULF of violating 
the law and has been embroiled in a 
costly legal dispute ever since. 

Mr. Steiner's offense was to use the 

term “showroom” in his advertising bro- 
chures. AGULF argued that the words 
“salle d’exposrtion” or “hall” — an En- ' 
gUsh wont taken into French earlier — 
existed as alternatives, and the group 
sued Mr. Steiner for damage cm behalf 
of an aggrieved public, 

Mr. Steiner, virtually alone among 
AGULFs targets, fought back. He alert- 
ed sympathetic- jafarnansts,- prom p tin g ' 
highly visible articles. He hired a lawyer 
and contested the case in court, arguing 
dial “showroom” was part of his trade- 
mark. 

Confusing “the legitimate defense of 


authoritarian > 

dark period in the life of oar country,” 
said Mr. Steiner, who was deported from 
France in World War II and survived 
confinement in the Auschwitz conceatra- 
tion camp . He made the comment in a 
letter to President Francos Mitterrand. 

Hie result of die case was happy for 
Mr. Steiner, at least at first He won and 
collected modest damages from AGULF. 
But AGULF has appealed the verdict 

The appeal says the judgment came in 
a “hateful context” Mr. Steiner, it con- 
tends, was a deportee who accused 
AGULF of “fascist practices.” 

The appeal, using langnao<» that Mr. 
Steiner says is slyly anti-Semitic, argues: 
"The president of the Court cf Paris, 
Miss Gnmstem, wight have been influ- 
enced by these outrageous remarks.” 
■ Francophone Conference Set 

A meeting of leaders f rom French- 
speaking countries is scheduled for Feb. 
17 to 19 in Paris, The Associated Press 
reported from Paris. The meeting which 
will fociis on protecting^ and developing 
the French language, will be attended by 
de l egations from at least 3T countries, 
said Roland Dumas, minister for external 
relations. 


Bid to Free U.S. Hostages 
Has Failed, Sheikh Says 


By Charles P. Wallace 

Lot Angela Tima Service 

BEIRUT — A prominent Shiite 
Moslem cleric says he bos run into 
a “blank wall” in his efforts to 
arrange the release of four Ameri- 
cans being held hostage in Leba- 
non. 

Sheikh Mohammed Hussein 
Fadlallah, who is widely regarded 
as the spiritual leader to Hezbollah, 
the pro-Iranian Army of God, said 
Saturday that he had “exerted ef- 
forts no one else has” to try to win 
freedom to the hostages. 

Sh eflth Fadlallah said that he 
had sot been in contact with the 
kidnappers but with persons who 
exert influence over them in an 
effort to obtain the Americans’ re- 
lease. The kidnappings have been 
claimed by TyUmie Jihad. 

“Tin afraid I’ve come op against 
a blank wall,” Shaikh Fadlallah 
said in an interview. “Tm at a dead 
end and have not had any results.” 

Sheikh Fadlallah said he believes 
that the Americans are bring hrid 
not as an act against the united 
States, but solely as bargaining le- 


vers to achieve the release of Arab 
prisoners bdd in Kuwait 

Seventeen Arabs have been tried 
by Kuwaiti authorities in connec- 
tion with die car bombings of tire 
U.S. and French embassies in 1983. 

Fadlallah said that the 
case of four French hostages bring 
bdd in Lebanon is “far more com- 
plex,” an apparent reference to the 
political difficulties between 
France and Iran over Frances rela- 
tions with Iraq. 

On Friday, Terry Waite, a spe- 
cial envoy of the archbishop of 
Canterbury who has been seeking 
the release of the American hos- 
tages, delayed his re t u rn to Leba- 
non. 

Mr. Waite, who has visited Leba- 
non on two occasions in the past 
few weeks and apparently met with 
the kidnappers of the Americans, 
was denied a visa to visit Kuwait 
last week. He had hoped to travel 
there to discuss die hostage crisis 
after u»nr< in Washington mH Lon- 
don in late November. 

Mr. Write became involved in 
the hostage problem when the four 
Am e rican hostages addressed an 



Ethiopian Relief Official Is Missing, 
Believed to Be Seeking Asylum in U.S. 


Sbeikla FmBaflah 

appeal to die archbishop of Canter- 
bury. The contents of me message, 
which was de li v ered to a news 
agency office in Briznt, were not 


FINLANDIA 



FINLANDIA ON ICE 


The four American hostages are 
Terry A. Anderson, a correspon- 
dent of The Associated Press; The 
Reverend Lawrence Martin Jenco, 
a Catholic priest; David F. Jacob- 
sen, director of the American Uni- 
versity hospital in Beirut; and 
Thomas M. Sutherland, the omver- 
aty*s acting dean of agriculture. 

The fate of two other Americans 
is undear. Callers spoking to Is- 
lamic Jihad riwimt-ri jn October 
that Wflham Buckley, a political 
officer at the U.S. Embassy, who 
was kidnapped on March 16, 1984, 
had bees executed. Frier Kflbunz, 
a librarian at Amoican University 
who disappeared in November 
1984 in West Beirut, has not been 
m en ti on e d by the kidnappers for 
several months. 

On Thursday, two U A newspa- 
per columnists. Jack Anderson and 
Dale Van Atta, quoted U& intelli- 
gence sources as raying that Mr. 
Kilbum and Mr. Buddey both bad 

died in captivity. 

Shaikh Fadlallah, wto is increas- 
ingly being cast as a moderate de- 
spite his stature as a fundamental- 
ist, apparently played a key role in 
obtaining the release of twopronri- 
nent Le banes e Christian 
from the American University of 
Beirut who were kidnapped Dec. 7. 


A UNIVERSITY 
W DEGREE 

SAOfi.6. »MASTBfS • DOCTORATE 

Air VKirfi, Aadnak Ufa rijiwina. 
Sana detailed resume 
tar free evaluation. 

PAORC WESTERN UNIVERSITY 

vai* .^PUlveda Blvd» 

Lrtis *»>i#aiest Cal bom la 
90049, Dept. 23, U^A. 


By Blaine Harden 

Washington Peat Service 

NAIROBI — Dawit Wolde 
Gkrgis, head of the Ethiopian gov- 
ernment’s famine relief program, 
has been for more than 

three weeks since completing a 
fund-raising tour in Western Eu- 
rope and the United States. 

Western relief officials in Ethio- 
pia who are in contact with senior 
members of its govenunent said 
that Mr. Dawit is widely believed 
to be seeking political asylum in the 
United States. 

A spokesman to the the U.S. 
Embassy in Addis Ababa srid it 
had no information on Mr. Dawn's 
whereabouts. 

(In Washington, a State Depart- 
ment spokeswoman refused Son- 
day to discuss die case, saying it 
was department poficy not to com- 
ment on requests to political asy- 
lum, The Associated Press report- 
ed-] 

As commissioner cf Ethiopia’s 
Relief and Rehabilitation Connnis- 
skm, Mr. Dawit has become ooe erf 
the most visible and widely quoted 
officials m Ethiopia’s Marxist gov- 


ernment He has repeatedly as- 
sailed Western governments to re- 
sponding too slowly last year to 
Ethiopia's severe famine. 

His de fection would be likely to 
embarrass the Ethiopian govern- 
ment, which is a dose ally of the 
Soviet Union and a frequent critic 
of the United States. 

Mr. Dawit left Ethiopia on Oct 
25 on a trip intended to raise dona- 
tions to combat the famine; which 
is expected to exmtinne next year. 
He reportedly visited Britain, Bd- 
gram, Germany and the United 


Relief officials srid Mr. Dawit 
met officials in Washington and at 
the United Nations in New York, 
and was last heard from in Bd- 
ghnn. He was expected to return to 
Ethiopia the weekend of Nov. 23. 

Mr. Dawifs brother defected 
from Ethiopia to the United Stales 
in September, according to diplo- 
matic sources. The sources said 
that Mr. Dawifs brother joined Ms 
wife in New York, where Mr. 
Dawit had given ber a job with the 
Relief and Rehabilitation Commis- 


Mr. Dawifs absence has delayed 
planning by the 35 countries and 47 
nongovernmental organizations 
who are working in Addis Ababa 
mum year’s relief effort 

A graduate of Columbia Univer- 
sity law school in New York and a 
major in the Ethiopian Army, Mr. 
Dawit has been an important and 
often controversial figure in the 
govenunent beaded by Ids personal 
friend. Lieutenant Calomel Men- 
gistu Haile Mariam. 

During the eariy 1980s, Mr. 
Dawit saved as governor of Eri- 
trea, a region in northern Ethiopia 
where rebels have been fi ghting 
against the government since 1962. 

Two years ago, Colonel Men- 
gistu. named twin to head the gov- 
ernment twenty responsible for co- 
ordinating famine relief. Mr. Dawit 
was widely respected by Western 
relief officials.. 

In recent months, however, 
Western aid officials said, Mr. 
Dawifs influence hi the govern- 
ment had waned. 

-Mr. D&wit, who is divorced, is- 
believed by relief officials to own a 
borne m Calif onria. ' 


“From inv estiga tions and statements rendered by the accused, the 
statement said, “it was proven that the murder of Dr. Portflla was due to ~ 

: famil y problems.” It added: “George and Jos6, the eldest and youngest . 
sons of Mr. PortiUa and Mrs. Smnm, declared tbemsdves guilty of the 
double homicide.” 

Guatemala’s President-Elect on Tour ■ 

GUATEMALA CITY (NYT) — 

The new president-elect, Marco 
Vinicio Cerezo, has begun a quick 
tour of Central American capitals, 
the first in a series of trips he plans 
to take before assuming the presi- 
dency of Guatemala next month. 

He will spend much of the five 
weeks before he takes office travel- 
ing in Latin America and Europe, 
according to aides. 

Mr. Cerezo said Saturday he 
would visit El Salvador, Honduras, 

Costa Rica and Nicaragua drmng 
his two-day trip. Aides said he 
would meet with leaders of each 
country and present his proposal 
for a Central American parfiament, 
which would be directly elected 
and would have as its principal task 
the search for peace in the region. 

Mr. Cerezo, who was the over- 
whelming victor as the candidate of 
the Christian Democratic Party in 
elections Dec. 9, is expected to writ 
the United States next week where 
he will press his case to increased mjr * : 

economic aid. Marco Vimcio Cerezo _ 

Trial Begins for 23 Algerian Activists • 

MEDEA, Algeria (Combined Dispatches') — Twenty-three Algerians 
accused cf belonging to illegal organizations went on trial Sunday in what 
was expected to^ be one of the biggest political trials since independence in’ 
1962. 

The defendants are members of the Algerian Human Rights League, 
and the Sere of the Martyrs of the Revolution, whose parents played 
prommenl roles in the fiboation war against France. Neither organiza- 
tion is recognized by the govenunent of President Bendjedid QukQL 

The defendants, inducting leaders of the Berber Cultural Movement, 
are accused of prejudicing toe authority of the state, establishing illegal 
or gan i z a t i on^ producing .and distributing pamphlets, and organizing 
unarmed gathering s. Many were arrested in July for frying to stage 
demonstrations daring the country’s national holiday.^/* AFT, Roam) 

Liberia Party Drops Election Protest ^ 

MONROVIA, Libaia (AP) — The Liberian Action Party, which has 
been accused by the militazy leader. Major General Sflnwj K. Doe, at 
backing an unsuccessful coup, has said it is dropping a com plaint that 
dections OcL 15 were tigged in favor of General Doe. 

Than Wreh, the party’s chairman, said Saturday that the party had" a 
decided to take the 11 seats it won in the 88-seat legislature “consistent ft 
with the spirit of promoting genu i ne n a tional reconstruction, uni ty. peace,* 
'and understanding.” 

Mr. Wreh appealed to General Doe to grant executive clemency to 
party members still in detention after the Nov. 12 coup attempt, indud- 
ing the party’s presidential candidate, Jackson Doe, no relation to the 
head of state, arid EUen Jahnson-Sirieaf, who was elected to the senate. 



For the Record 


Egypfs Supreme Court nded Satradsy that a mflitary tribunal could 
l«alN try apobceman accused of kiffing seven Isradi umristsin October,' 
to Middle East News Agency reported from Cairo, (Ratters) 

Voter turnout was moderate under dear, chilly skies Sunday as the' 
Portuguese Ijegan voting in nationwide local dections. (AT) 

-JiT 11 V *??***^ 10 m F «day night in Lcndar 

after he dimherf min ilw mnT nf u-: w; _ “r"**. 


SmRt Singh Bareab, a moderate Sikh leader and the diief of Pttniafc* ; 
state, was unanimously elected president Sunday of to Akali Dal irartC' 
m Amritsar, India. JAoi 


Jewish Leader Talks With Jaruzelski ip= 

Bronfman's Meeting m Warsaw Fottows Visit tp Moscotc . fir 


doonesbury 


/far York Tima Service 

WARSAW — Edgar M. Bronf- 
man, president of to Wold Jewish 
Congress, who met last week with 
the Polish leader. General Woj- 
riech Jaruzelski, spent three day$ m 
Moscow before has arrival here but 
declined to give details of his visit 
there. 

During his three-day stay in Po- 
land, newspapers in Paris and Lon- 
don published speculative reports 
suggesting that Pteadeot Francos 
Mitterrand of France discussed 
with both Mikhail S. Gorbachev, 
to Soviet leader, and with General 
Jaruzelski a proposal c alling for 
15.000 Jewish families to be trans- 
ported from to Soviet Union to 
Israel by French planes. 

At the Polish government guest 
house where he and three asso- 
ciates stayed, Mr. Bronfman ac- 
knowledged that to trip to Mos- 
cow was his second since 
Se pte mber and that he hoped to 
visit there again soon. 

He said that he was interested in 
the plight of Sov ,.-t I*-.', who want 
to emigrate but uisi no interests 
would be served by revealing who 


he met with, what toy talked 
about or even where be stayed. . . 

Ooe newspaper report of to 
plan suggested that a would be 
linked to a conference cn the Mid- 
dle East Another suggested that 
to Soviet Jews would go first to 
Poland, where .they would board 
French plants. 

Mr. krorifoan dismissed the 
French and British reports as fanci-' 
fnl and tWIirw-d fimW CQmaWfl. 

Elan Strinbat to executive di- 
rector of to Wodd Jewish Con- 
gress, who is with. Mn Bronfman, 
said that “thee are a to of roman 
out thee.” 

He added. “Some are true, some 
are not.” 

High Polish officials have said 
Soviet Jews were not mentioned in 
General JaruzdsE’s talks with Mr. 
Mitterrand. Officials in Paris .also 
have AaueA that the Mitterraod- 
Jnruzdtiti meeting was about Sovi- 
et Jews. 

The Bronfman group was not 
reticent about its reasons far visit, 

'. . j^I.'vdjLrc to prewar J-j*- 

ui p,. t | ..ii:4iu.rt three milKr« has 

been reduced to about 6,000. 


“We arc busmessroen who have 
come . to do bittiness,” said Israel 

Singer, secretary- general of to 

. Jewish organization, which repre- 
' sects Jews in. -70 countries around 
to world. 

- . ^We wanted to emphasfee to to 
general that the road to to West 
can lead through Jerusalem,” said 
Mr. Steinberg, adding tot the 
group-had stressed that “the fact 

- that. Romama and Hungary have 

most-favored-natkm status in to 
US. Is not just accidentally -talked 
.to the fact that those governments, 
have relatively good records in 
that treatment of Jews'and Jewish 
issues." ‘.‘ v 

- Poland lost to favorable tariff 

arrangements, known as most-la- 
voretomtion status, 8fter martial 
law was declared, in December. 
1981. . - • - u - 

Mr. Bronfman said Genera! jar- 
uzelski was resentful that^ U£. 
sanctions remain m -foroc despite 
. Pound’s refeare of politick Rtisodh 
ers, which to Americans bail said.', 
was a condition far lifting sand-. 

' lions. 


imiLmeio 

B£7HELASrQURS~ 

.-nonw&mvm 

TOGET0ACK.JW 

mm booksi 

L. * 


ypumBtfutHr' - 

MomtGfcmmjKm “ 
TDaAss&HBGfinre: 

BPBfPOCOUEG&CF , 


KxvpomoFeEr 

COMING ACOnrv , J 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1985 


Page 3 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


Tir^toRemln 




TkeTew* Rau§ers, 94 strong 
.“-"Sw -are. in trouble agam, not for the 
, \ first tinre since they wtire enlisted 

StepbeaF.'Aastm m 1823 to 
iV^,- u rangtf’ over die new imitaryhe. 
was putting 

r^Si 


Jnriiang and 


i tea settlers when there was no 


other law. 

V 192Qs - 


s» 


Prohibition Jn - the. 
the manufacture 
and sale of alcohol was illegal in 
the United Stales, they were crit- 
icized for bemg too honest — 
breaking up liquor stills in defi- . 
if aooe of corrupt local authorities. ■ 

1930st bycontrast, they 
N swore in a number of convicted 
Tluj _. criminals. 

Le^v^'i This month the Texas attorney 
'■'■V! general’s office accused the 
‘^VRangere of “incredibly sloppy 
>*- f ol M police wodcT in accepting the 
iv*? wMdrrfHenrv LeeLucas, act»- 

r, that he timt 
more than 200 mnr- 
ders,-and in dosing the books on 
that have remained 
open. ' 

Ranger police work was once 
' . L more rough-and-ready than that. 

S .One early report went like this: 

" - Crime — cattle thefL 

K Defendant — OHie Peterson. 
Disposition — Damn bad, had 


^vgjjHessed serial 
■^V committed n 


ovi 




10 kffl him. 


•ty-pS* Short Takes 


-^<55? 





' ' iSfieC 


The National Paric Service has 
aimed down a request by the 
Community for Creative Non- 
Violence to include a Nativity 
scene dramatizing, the plight of 
the homeless in its 1985 Christ- 
mas pageant near the White 

jmsaon to 

pining three black persons — a 
man, a woman and a child — on 
A- beating grate: The inscription 
■is ‘And' still there is no room at 
inn.'-" The group is suing in 
federal, court to get the scene 
‘indnded. ' 

- to a victory for environnrental- 
ists, theU.S. Supreme Court has 
juiAt hhamm^^ ly that the fed- 
-esal government has broad pow- 
der to control development on all 
300. milli on acres (40 xrtiQiosi 
'hectares) of wetlands : — i 
Inud flats and marshes — in 
country. The court overturned a 
Iowa court ruling that federal 
writ extended only to lands that 
were frequently flooded. Wet- 
lands me being developed at the 
rate of 450,000 acres a year. 

; Shorter Takes: The average 
selling price nationally for an 



MOTOR-MOUTH BEAR — The denumd foTeddy 
Ruxpin, an animated storytelling toy, is outstripping 
the supply at toy stores In the United States. The eyes, 
nose and month more in synchronization with his Voice. 


American dwelling is $93,163, 
according to Homes «wut 
Gardens magazine. Averages 
vary from $47,500 in Buffalo, 
New York, to $435,000 in Saddle 
River, New Jersey Six hurri- 

canes came ashore in the United 
States this year, the most in at 
least 65 years, killing 1 36 persons 
and causing $4.45 billion in dam- 
age, according to the National 
Hurricane Gaiter in Miami ... 
Wisconsin has winnowed 46,000 
entries down to five finalists for a 
new license plate and ww rfing to 
replace the long-lived slogan 
“America's 


Notes About People 

Edward L Koch, mayor of New 
York, has published a new mem- 
oir titled “Politics,” a sequel to 
his best-selling “Mayor. Mr. 
Koch confides that “what used 
to be called the white Be,” or 
false praise, is permissible “when 
you are getting rid of someone 
who is inadequate.” He ”t«r> dis- 
likes “Modi statements. If I'm 
going to say something, it's going 
to be substantive and at the least 
provocative, Hopefully it wQl 
also have some humor. That’s my 
style, it’s me. I couldn't chnng e it 
now, at 61 years of age, if I want- 
ed to. And I don’t want to.” 

Secretary of Defense Caspar 
W. Weinberger was reported to 

in President 


met Mikhail S. 
Soviet leader, in 


Ronald 
Gorbachev, 

Geneva. So 

of State George P smoziajced 
at the annual Kennedy Center 
Honors dfrnnw in Washington, 
that among the cables Mr. Shnit* 
received from the nation’s capi- 
tal while he was in Geneva was 
one from Mr. Weinberger stat- 
ing, “Wish you were here and 
vice versa.” 


Police Chase Burglar 
Into Sewer, Get Lost 

Three policemen in Warren, 
Ohio, who followed tracks in the 
snow from a burglary scene that 
led to a sewer opening spent two 
and a half boors in the city’s 
maze of storm se wers before 
finding their way out again. Offi- 
cers on the streets above lost ra- 
dio contact with the three and 
resorted to malting noises to sig- 
nal » hurt ■ 

“We tried sirens and that 
didn’t work,” said Lieutenant 
John Mandopoulos. Police then 
began rapping on manhole cov- 
ers with tire irons. The officers 
finally emerged wet, weary and 
empty-handed. Their quarry dia- 
led. 


of sewers, said his workers al- 
ways use a guide rope to keep 
from getting lost. 

— Compiled by 
ARTHUR HKSBEE 


17 . 5 . Conferees Approve 
$298 Billion for Defense 


By Jonathan Fucrbringcr 

New York Timer Service . 

. . WASHINGTON — House and 
Senate negotiators have agreed on 
a Pentagon budget of $298.7 KQkm 
for 1986 and approved limited pro- 
duction of. chemical weapons be- 
heading a 16-year 


Military negotiators from the 
House and Senate Appropriations 
- committees also agreed to ban test- 
ing Of wnlj ^attriff t* missfl ps y yy i ftp. 
. moved $2.75 billion for President 
Ronald Reagan's program to devel- 
op a space shield against attacking 
m iss iles. ■ 

The accord, which was reached 
Friday night, must be appro v e d 
this week by the full conference 

committee before it can be consid- 
ered by the two houses. 

[Mr. Reagan is likely to accept 
the ban on anti-satellite weapons 
tests to avoid upsetting the agree- 
ment (Hi higher spending levels for 

The Defense Department, congres- 
sional and administration sources 
told The Washington Post on Sat- 
urday.] 

The proposed app ro pri a tion for 
the Pentagon budget is about half- 
way bet w een the position held by 


the Senate, which allowed an in- 
crease to make up for inflation, and 
that of the House, which wanted to 
bold the budget to the 1985 level 

Bui the balanced budget bffl that 
was signed into law last week prob- 
ably would require cuts that would 
bring funding below the 1985 leveL 

In separate bargaining on Capi- 
tol Hill, an agreement was reached 
to rescue a price support program 
for tobacco by passing legislation 
that would subsidize the sale of 
surplus tobacco to cigarette com- 
panies. The Reagan administration 
opposes the plan, which it says 
would cost $1.1 billion. 

The proposal is included in a 
package of tax and spending mea- 
sures aimed at cutting the federal 

budget deficit below projected lev- 
els. The hill would carry out part of 
the savings that were mandated in 
the budget resolution for 1986. 

Conferees still must reach final 
compromises on other dements of 
the plan, which would reduce pro- 
jected deficits by $60 billion to S80 

billion over three years. Among the 
unresolved issues are outs in Medi- 
care, a program u provide medical 
care for tbe aged, and the financing 
of a program to dean up toxic 
wastes. 


lawmakers Agree on Draft 
Of $52-Billion U.S. Farm Bill 


By Ward Sinclair 

Waddngion Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — Congressio- 
nal conferees have agreed on a fann 
bfll that could send U.S. agricultur- 
al policy in abrupt new directions, 
although it feD short of administra- 
tion demands for less spending. 

With around of last-minute bud- 


projected costs for fann pro- 
at about SS2 bOBon for three 


cesser 
grams at; 
years. This was S2 billion more 
than the White House wanted. 

Agriculture Secretary John R. 
Block refused to say whether he 
would recommend that President 
Ronald Reagan sign the measure. 
But Robot J. Dole, Republican of 
Kansas and tbe Senate majority 
leader, and E. de la Garza, Demo- 
crat of Texas and the House Agri- 
culture Committee f*Kafrmim [ were 
optimistic about presidential ap- 
proval 

The measure, which must be ap- 
proved by tbe House and Senate, 
ends months of Utter debate over 
ways to help US. agricultnrcTegain 
lost export markets and at the same 
time reduce rapidly mounting fed- 
eral faun spending. 

To achieve those aims, the con- 
ferees agreed to steps that would 
reduce toe price support floor of 


basic commodities such as wheat, 
com and milk while modestly cut- 
ting fanners' income subsidies. 

The administration dwnanHeri 
less spending and a “market-ori- 
ented" policy, while state legisla- 
tors from fanning states argued 
that the staggering agricultural 
economy required more support 
from Washington. 

Final agreements Saturday on 
dairy supports and food stamps 
epitomized those arguments. 

Tbe food-stamp agreement, 
while more costly than the White 
House wanted, was made as House 
Democrats and Republicans ar- 
gued that any further cuts would 
lead urban legislators to kill the 
farm bill next week. 

The outcome on dairy supports 
was less than either the House or 
Senate wanted, but it shaped up as 
a major victory for tbe administra- 
tion in its longstanding effort to 
override the influential dairy lobby 
and cut federal supports to discour- 
age surplus mitV production. 

According to Representative 
Tony Codho, Democrat of Califor- 
nia, an architect of the agreement, 
the dairy dump* would reduce 
federal spending by about S3.4 bil- 
lion over the life of the InD by 
gradually dropping supports. 


Arrow Air 
Says Jet Had 
Problems 
Early in Year 

The Associated Pros 

MIAMI — Officials of the Ar- 
row Air charter company have coo- 
firmed that the DC-8 airliner that 
Crashed in Canada, kilting all 256 
people on board, experienced me- 
chanical difficulties earlier this 
year and aborted two takeoffs in 
thepast six months. 

The plane, which was carrying 
U.S. soldiers home from peace- 
keeping duty in the Sinai peninsu- 
la, crashed Thursday on takeoff at 
Gander International Airport in 
Newfoundland- 

On a Nov. 15 flight from Grand 
Rapids, Michigan, the jet’s nose 
lifted into toe air but quickly set- 
tled back onto the runway after the 
tail hit tire runway, said Rolan 
Mattefl, a spokesman for toe Mi- 
ami-based company. 

On that flight, ibe plane was car- 
rying 99 U.S. Marine reservists 
from Grand Rapids to Camp Le- 
jetme. North Carolina, on a week- 
end emergency mobilization drill, 
Mr. Mattel! said Saturday. He said 
that a “loading problem” at toe 
rear of toe plane was believed to 
have caused tbe incident. 

After stopping, the airplane took 
off again and completed its flight 
without incident, Mr. Mattel! said. 

On July 28, he said, tbe same 
plane was carrying members of the 
Kentucky Guard and Ohio Air Na- 
tional Guard when forced to abort 
a takeoff from Toledo, Ohio. After 
a delay, the plane flew to Bangor, 
Maine, and West Germany without 
further problem, Mr. MalteD add- 
ed. 

He said Ire did not know the 
nature of the “mechanical prob- 
lems” on the flight, but stressed 
that reports of an explosion and 
engine fire were incorrect. 

“I want to emphasise that we 
have never flown an airplane that 
was not completely safe to fly," Mr. 
Mattel] said. 

When it crashed Thursday, toe 
DC-8 was carrying right Arrow Air 
crew members and 248 soldiers of 
the 101st Airborne Division to 
their home base at Fort Campbell, 
Kentucky, from Egypt, where they 
had completed a tour with the 11- 
nation Sinai peacekeeping force. 

They were the first fatalities for 
Arrow Air. Mr. Matrril said toe 
airline has flown 40 milli on miles 
(about 65 million kilometers) and 
logged 85,000 hours of flight time 
in its four-year history. 

However, Arrow Air had a num- 
ber of safety violations in 1984 and 
last summer agreed to pay a 
134,000 fine for record-keeping 



Mike Reton, left, of Canada's National Research Council 
and Beniie Caiger of the Canadian Aviation Safe!}’ Board 
display flight recorders from the jet that crashed at Gander. 


that did not meet the requirements 
of toe Federal Aviation Adminis- 
tration. 

■ De-Icing Still in Question 

Christopher Wren of The Sew 
Yak Times reported from Gander: 

It remained unclear over the 
weekend what might have caused 
the four-engine DC-8 to crash al- 
most immediately after taking off 
before dawn from its 67-minule re- 
fueling stop. 

Peter Boag, chief investigator 
from the Canadian Aviation Safety 
Board, declined Saturday to attach 
significance to the fact that the 
plane had not undergone de-icing 
at Gander before taking off for 
Kentucky. 

Tbe investigator also played 
down speculation that the plane 
was overloaded with personal and 
unit equipment of the soldiers. He 
said toe flight’s weight document 
had shown that cargo weight and 
balance was within toe aircraft’s 
requirements. 

Although the aircraft's four en- 
gines have been found, Mr. Boag 
said “no information of any signifi- 
cance” about them had been dis- 
covered. 


Mr. Boag said he had been told 
that conversation between the con- 
trol pilot and the aircraft before toe 
crash was normal. 

There was initial confusion 
about whether tbe aircraft had ex- 
ploded in flight or when it slammed 
into tbe ground. But no debris was 
found on toe runway or on tire 
Trans-Canada Highway, which tire 
plane flew over before crashing. 

Mr. Boag reported Friday that 
toe flight data and cockpit voice 
recorders, which were recovered 
and taken to Ottawa for inspection, 
had sustained internal damage. But 
he said Saturday that “it appears 
now that we are going to get some 
useful information" from the flight 
data recorder. 


Fire in U.S. Injures 7 
At Costa Rican Embassy 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON— A fire at tbe 
Costa Rican Embassy here injured 
seven persons Sunday, indnding 
five members of toe family of Am- 
bassador Frederico Vargas. 

Mr. Vargas was away at the time, 
a hospital spokesman said. 


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.Page 4 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribimc. 


Mtiafae4 WWiTheNew Y«k1bnndTbe WaJd^ioa Pam. 


Genocide in 

- Using a second repeat on Afghanistan by 

"Felix Ennacora, an Austrian parKam^ntnrian 
.and and a companion report car 

■'Iran, the United Nations has for the first rime 
^debated human rights in those countries on the 
..basis of official UN reports. By a vote of 75 to 
'23 with 33 abstentions {India, lamentably, was 
‘the lone democracy holding Moscow’s hand), 

■ the General Assembly registered its “profound 
’concern.” Af ghanistan was singed out sot just 
•because a Third Wodd Moslem country is the 
^victim of aggression but also became of the 
* terrible and deepening intensity of its ordeal 

- Soviet troops with their Afghan diems have 

)driven 4 milli on people out of the country and 
-perhaps another 2 million oat of their homes. 
’Massively and indiscriminately, they bomb 
^civilians — they bomb funerals. They destroy 
"Villages, crops and agricultural facilities. For 
^the children they drop limb-shattering booby 
-traps disguised as harmonicas and birds. Tor- 
nure is ‘’commonplace” the judicial system 
'inspires “anguish. " “There is apparently no 


Afghanistan 

health care for the majority of the population. 
Asa consequence, the infant mortality rate has 
reached 300 and 400 per 1,000.” Civilian 
deaths nomba “approximately 500,000." 

When half die popabtioii is uprooted and a 
third is driven into ode, when infant mortality 
readies plague Jewels, when half a mflBan civil- 
ians die and uncounted mil lions of others are 
maimed and malnnnrislied, and when, SS Mr. 
Ermacom reports, the situation is getting 
worse, all this moves Soviet conduct wdl be- 
yond what is ordinarily called human rights 
violations. The word that comes to mind whm 
one reads tta report is genocide. 

Soviets who talk aboil Afghanistan with 
foreigners sometimes solicit a certain sym- 
pathy for their policy dilemma and thrir costs. 

That is callous and arrogant. The people who 
deserve the sympathy are the Soviet Union’s 
victims. ‘’Every hour lost is detrimental to the 
population,” Mr. Ermacora warns. Moscow is 
committ ing one of the great crimes. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Cracks in Pretoria’s Wall 


‘ South Africa's biggest political trial in two 
; .decades came to a sudden end last Monday 
! *wben the government’s treason case against 12 
• ; black and Asian dissidents collapsed. The ac~ 

. cosed are not traitors bat determined political 
opponents who are denied legitimate ways to 
express the rebellions grievances of a power- 
- less black majority. Jailing them would only 
.reduce what chances remain for nonviolent 
change. Negotiating with them is the only 
alternative — a reality that may finally be 
. penetrating Pretoria's white laager. 

The trial that failed to happen last week 
'.tmderscoras what is happening in that tor- 
-menied society. Winnie Mandela defied a 
“h arming " order by arirfrwBtmg an anti -apart- 
heid rally, she was neither stopped nor arrest- 
■ed afterward. And there aze persistent reports 
'that President P.W. Botha's mnristos aze de- 
bating the once unthinkable release of her 
* husband, Nelson Mandela, whose 23-year im- 
. prisonment has made him the symbolic leader 
of those seeking to negotiate for a share of 
"power. The regime has also abandoned its 
.ferocity in responding to business and cfan rdi 
-leaders who cross frontiers to meet the heads 
'.of outlawed organizations Hke the African 
-National Congress. It denounces these meet- 
ings and series some passports, but the sound- 
ings continue. The walls are cracking, «nd the 
' -government appears to realize that it can no 
- .longer wholly suppress these contacts. 


By its own acts, too, the Botha regime is 
eroding the legal foundations of apartheid. A 
bill now before Parliament would for the first 
time since 1913 allow Macks to own land in 
rariaGy segregated townships. Although this 
concession would not apply to “white” neigh- 
borhoods, it is a step worth noting. 

The trouble with many of these reforms and 
repentances is that they are being offered veiy 
late and only as uirilatend favors. They will not 
therefore qneU the unrest that continues de- 
spite e m e r ge nc y de cr ee s and attempted news 
blackouts. What Sooth Africa needs is an 
urgent commitment by its white leaders to 
negotiate an end to apartheid with leaders who 
certifiably speak for the system’s victims. 

The regime should be grateful for the col- 
lapse of its ignobte treason triaL The flimsmess 
of the charge was exposed in testimony before 
a fair-minded judge. A supposedly expert wit- 
ness tried to read treachery into the colors, 
songs and symbols employed by the mass- 
based United Democratic Front, whose lead- 
ers sat in the dock. But under examination he 
conceded “fundamental mistakes” about the 
doctrines of nonviolence, as developed by the 
young Mohandas Gandhi in Sooth Africa. 

Just such “experts” feed the fears of change 
among Mr. Botha's white constituents. If what 
happmed in an open court also opens minds, it 
could be the beginning of a he g jimin g - 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Protect Arab- Americans 


It has taken too long for the rising violence 
against supporters of Arab causes in the Unit- 
ed Stales to get the attention it deserves. In this 
year alone, bombings and other te r ro rist acts 
directed against “enemies of Israel” have 
killed two persons and injured many mere. 

The targets, like the American- Arab Anti- 
Discrimination Committee, are often de- 
nounced by leaders of extremist groups, Hke 
the Jewish Defense League, just before the 
violence occurs. The extremists deny commit- 
ting the violence but consistently add that tb«y 


are not sorry K occurred. Now William Web- 
ster, the FBI director; has served notice that 
federal agents are rallying their forces and 
gathering evidence of howlhese terrorists and 
hate-spreaders operate. He warns Arab- Amer- 
icans that they may be in a “zone of danger.” 

That dmuldjUso warn those prone to vio- 
lence of die FBI’s stepped up pursuit Mr. 
Webster’s words are welcome, as is Ins effort. 
Both show that there targeted Americans have 
finally aroused concern in Ugh places. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


UNICEF Has Good News 


If you want a lift in this holiday season, take 
a look at the annual report of the United 
Nations Children's Fund. In the poorest parts 
of the world children die of simple dungs. 
Malnutrition, contaminated water and dehy- 
dration caused by uncontrolled diarrhea are 
major killers. So are childhood diseases that 
have been all but eradicated in the West — 
measles, tetanus, whooping cough, polio, diph- 
theria and tuberculosis. Many of these prob- 
lems can be attacked at relatively low cost The 
return to breast-feeding, as opposed to infant 
-formulas, has cut down on water-borne infec- 
tion. Simple rchydratkm packets have saved 
the lives of half a million children this year and 
will save right times that number as the proce- 
dure becomes more widely known. Growth 
charts distributed in villages enable mo then to 
spot ea rly sig ns of malnutrition and seek help. 

UNICEF's priority for the remainder of this 
decade win be to meet a UN goal to inoculate 
all the world’s children by 1990. The vaccines 
are readily available at low cost, but new 
strategics are being developed to transport and 
administer them, to enlist the support of local 
governments and to educate and encourage 
mothers to lake advantage of the service. Some 


vaccines can be freeze-dried to prolong their 
potency. “Cold chains” of refrigeration, based 
on kerosene, bottled gas, electricity, solar ener- 
gy or iceboxes, have been set up in most 
nations. Hundreds of thousands of volunteers 
have been trained lo administer vaccines, and 
governments have proclaimed highly or g a - 
nized imm u ni z ati on days that have been well 
advertised, promoted by dmnebes and schools 
and available in evro tee most remote areas. 

In Brazil 20 nrQHcm children are vaccinated 
every tune a national imm u nizati on day is 
held. Two-thirds of Turkey's young children 
were vaccinated in eight days. The Indian 
government, as a firing memorial to former 
Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, has raised im- 
munization rates in Ddhi from 20 percent to 
more than 80 percent in a year. 

Private groups make important contribu- 
tions, too. Botary International for example; 
has pledged to supply all the polio vaccine 
required in any developing country for the 
next five years, a gift that could cost SI20 
mflHon. This is exciting and invahiable work in 
which spectacular resalts are bring adhtawd at 
low cost. The UNICEF report is good news. 

—THE WASHINGTON POST. 


FROM OUR DEC 16 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910 : A Two-Horse (M War Debt 
-NEW YORK — As erect as when he terrorized 
'ibe Potomac Valley 47 years ago, Cokind John 
-Mosby, Confederate guerrilla leader, recently 
jMssed two days ofhis 77th year here. “When- 
.ever 1 come to New York." he said. “I feel 
-nervous, especially passing through Herald 
"Square, for 1 owe the Herald two good horses. 
-I have owed them since August 1863. 1 have 
‘had it in my mind to pay back those horses, but 
probably never wflL After Gettysburg, 1 was 
■ hanging around in the rear of Lee’s retreating 
^army . . . and passed the nights harassing 
•Union troops. One night we nude a laid, but 
all we got was two Herald correspondents and 
.thrir horses. They ate a great deal the corre- 
'Spondents, so I took them to the military 
."authorities. They were later exchanged. The 
-horses were useful and we kept them." 


1935 : Tsb<ddKEddapH? 6 ^a 

ASMARA - — Miss Muriel Coney, English 
author, who is writing a history of the Italian 
camp a ig n in the Tignfc province, returned to 
Asmara in Eritrea province [an Dec 13] after 
marching three weeks with the Askari troops. 
She said her greatest thrin was in the nigh t 
time when she played bridge with Italian offi- 
cers while the hyenas howled around. He 
thing that impressed her most was the grim 
h^bl in the eyes of the Askaris when an Ethio- 
pian they had just shot dead was carried by. 
“At night [the Askaris] sat around fires buzz- 
ing with gossip as the girls in nearby villages 
catcalled to them in their shrill Ethiopian 
voices which could be heard between the howls 
of the hyenas. The hyenas put me off my 
bridge, as several times I called two spades 
when I should have said three spades,” 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY. Outomn n 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Gv-Ctarnm 


PHILIP M. FOISJE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
Carl gewirtz 


LEE W. HUEBNER, PubSshv 
Executive Editor REN£BONDY 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR 

Btpm> fitter RICHARD H_ MORGAN 

Drpmy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY 

Axocuae Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS 


Deputy PMidar 
Aaodau PMther 
Associate Pt&ti&er 
Director 
Director 


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0 1985, international Herald Tribune. AQ righu reserved. 



t 


y 


■■ ; vraMr* 


MONDAY, DECEMBER. 16, 1985 


For Serious l eadership, Look Elsewhere 


TT WASHINGTON —The biggest gap in Ameri- • 
YY can politics these days is not between Re- 
publicans and Democrats but between state-level 

nffinfnk whn ate mwring regpnnghilitiftg and gain- 

mgamfidence,andfederal officials who are falling 
down in their jobs and losing self-esteem. 

To mow last week from a meeting of ItgxM- . 
can governors in Wilmington, Delaware, to the 
sessions of Congress in Washington was to travel 
backward and downward. The governors talked in 
straightforward teams about concrete achieve- ! 
meats in their states and about hopeful plans for 
the future. The legislators, debating and passing 
the Gramm-Rndman budget bill, were confessing 
thrir past failures in fecal policy and wanringaf 
worse confusion and dire consequences ahead. 

Thespectade of Congress voting to stripitsdf of ' 
the power of the purse, which has been the hall- 
mark of legislative supremacy since the origins of 
parijament, was remarkable but not reassuring. 

For those with any sense of institutkaial history, 

the mpst^pengnant moment in the House debate 
came When Representative Peter Rodino, a New 
Jersey Democrat, said, “This is a flagrant abdica- 
tion of congressional responsibility.” 


By David S. Broder 


so. 


.Mr. Rodino gave the House one of its proudest 
moments 11 yeara ago wfaa he guided the Judicia- 
ry Committee to the painful but profoundly neces- 
sary iame arimrf m rW Pnasident Nixon for his violfl- 
tion or the' Constitution and his oath of office:. 
Now Mr. Rodino came forward in what be knew to 
be a. vain effort to slow his colleagues’ headlong 
rush to discard thrir own constitutional authority. 

• He and such Republican riders as Representa- 
tive S&wo Conte of Massachusetts said they could 
not understand how Congress could vote to bring ■ 
Usetf to Us knees. Why-dud. it? ^ 

. Not because the backers believed in the process 
they- woe creating; Tm not going to get into 
specifics,” said Mississippi's Trent Lott, the Re- 
publican minority whip, speaking for Gramm- 
Kudnun. “Tm afraid what we might find onu. M 

“Gramm- Rndman is going to tie the Congress 
in knots,” , said Richard Gephardt of Missouri, 
who chairs the Democratic caucus and is one of 
the principal architects of the final compromise. 
“It could be a disaster,” Mr. Gephardt added, and 


there were— v — — - 

Gramm-Rndman adds a whole new- layer of 
aon-making to an already complex budget pro- 
cess. It sets tough and arbitrary deficit targets for 
each of the next five years. It exemp ts lar ge parts of 
the budget- from any cuts and significantly in- 
creasesthe president’s leverage over Congress in 
dete rmining how scarce resources are spent It 
ultimately subjects both the president and Con- 
gress to mandated cats imposed by the cakula- 
. dons of unelected dvfl servants. 

The reason — the only reason — why Congress 
voted tins irresponsible and possibly unconstitu- 
tional procedure was its shame at its inability to 
force itself and thepreadent to pay the bills for the 
military and domestic programs that both support 

Jim Wright of Texas, the Democratic majority 
-leader and a supporter of Gramm-Rudman, called 
it “an act of legislative desperation." 

*Tt dearly acknowledges our failure to respond 
to Crisis," said California’s Leon Panetta, another 
Democratic backer. “We know what has to be 
done — to limit Hwfanm gjynding^ to limi t entitle- 
ments, to raise revenues. But we refuse to move. 
No bill is going to replace the courage, the guts and 
the leadership it takes to get action.” 



Because tfiey know that to be true, there was 
.more emba&assment than exultation in Congress 
over the passage of Grazmn-Rudman. By contrast, 
' the atmosphere among the governors in Wilming- 
ton was genuinely upbear, ukc their more numer- 


ous Democratic "counterparts, these Republican 
eople win 


f — NOW, 9 dworedcaUy 


j speak as people who measured up to 

responsibilities when times were hand, and 

now are enjoying the benefits of that courage- 
. Their current hero is Governor Tom Kean of 
New Jersey, who was re-elected last month with 70 
percent of the vote. His first election - — the closest 
in state history — four years ago coincided with 
the onset of the recession. Like many other gover- 
nors of both parties, he cut spending and nosed 
taxes in that crisis, kept his budget balanced and is 
now reaping the rewards of a surging economy. 

He is investing heavily in education, hu m a n 
services and infrastructure improvements — the 
very areas in which the domestic cutbacks of 
Gramm-Rudman are most Hkely to fall, and the 
ones the country can least afford for its future. 

Governor Kean said his objection to Gramm- 
Rudman was that “it’s a straigackst and an avoid- 
ance of responsibility.” He is right. Unlike Wash- 
ington officials from the president on down, the 
governors have met their responsibilities. 

The Washington Post 


South Africa: Who Witt Salvage the Youngsters? 


W ASHINGTON — My two- 
week visit to South Africa is 
over, and it is time to write about 
other things. But before I do, I fed 
a need to do one more piece: not a 
collection of the odds and cads a 
traveling journalist always has at 
the bottom of his bag, but a sharing 
of a few disturbing reflections. 

The pictures of the Soweto slums, 
the Crossroads shantytowns, the 

ert^araf despair* are*what wdl- 
tnfwrmtg journalists and reformers 
hold up to the wodd: See for your- 
self the bitter fruit of apartheid! 

The pictures, even if only wend 
pictures, serve powerfully to turn 
the world’s stomach against apart- 
heid. It is one of the better things 
journalism has done. . • . 

And yet there is this unsettling 
thought, gleaned as much from the 
American experience as from South 
Africa: Apartheid caused it, but 
ending apartheid won’t cure it 
I look at the unbelievable stretch- 
es of a Crossroads, several kilome- 
ters on a side, with its endless rows 


By William Raspberry 


of corrugated tin' hovels, tagged 
ehfldrM^ mangy dogs a«d utterly 
defeated men and women, and I 
curse the system that produced it 
Then I drive away in my rented car 
and wonder what it will take to give 
dignity and hope to such a places to 
render such a place unnecessary. 

To ask the question is to answer 
it. Repealing the Group Areas Act 
that assigns people to residential 
areas based on their ethnicity, elimi- 
nating the detestable pass laws , and 
influx-control laws, even granting 


the full franchise to these people — 
: awful condi- 


all that will leave their 
tion fundamentally unchanged. 

I thmV particularly of the young- 
sters whose growingand irrepress- 
ible militancy wifi get modi of the : 
credit when dian^efinafly bopaes td ; 
South Africk These are die adete- ; 
cent revolutionaries wha put their 
bodies on the line, cfcaflmgnig 'ar- 
mored personnel carriers with noth- 
ing more than stones and petrol 
bombs; who sacrifice their wodEully . 


limited educational opportunities in 
an effort to bide the government to 
improve nonwhite schools; who g p 
. to jail and. loo frequently, to thexr 
graves, in noble sacrifice. 

Nothing seems clearer than that 
the youngsters who make the great- 
est sacrifice against apartheid are. 
the least likely to reap any benefit 
when apartheid finally falls, t am 
astonished that this fart, winch now 
seems so obvidiis to me, seems not 
to figure at all in prescriptions for 
South Africa. But then, why should 
Americans see it in South Africa 
vdien they fail to see it at home# 

- Only recently has even the blade 
. leadership in America started to 
, confront the problem of what we 
now call the made “underclass” — 
Mhdse ' penile, * especially tlie dbil- 
fdrea, vmosearilbitioq, attitudes and 
’ prospects bavebeen so destroyed by 
racism that- thrir plight would re- 
main fundame nt ally unchanged, if 
racism were eliminated from Amer- 
ican fife. The government keeps 


urging the nonsense that ending of- 
ficial racism is all that is necessary, 
that anything designed to address 
the effects of racism amounts to 
“reverse discrimination." 

In South Africa, as in America, 
there arc some for whom transform- 
ing the system will make all the 
difference in the wodd. 1 think of 
the bright and eager students and 
their doggedly hopeful parents who 
do everything thqr can to improve 
their prospects, even with the full 
force of the system arrayed against 
them. I think of the irrepressible 


tmon- 


tg shoes and groceries to 
thrir captive cHentde. I think of the 
man in the black Cape Town town- 
ship of Langa who, without even 
access to normal bank loans, has 
mu together a fleet of 46 Mercedes- 
Benz buses. To such people, libera- 
tion will come as a godsend. 

But for too marry of the rest, 
whose hmnamty has been ripped 
out by state-ordained racism, liber- 
ation. wfll.be nothing bat a word. 

The Washington Pool 


A Debunked Comet Brings a Message All die Same 


W ASHINGTON — A Lutheran 
minister cnee called comets 
the “dock smoke of human sms,” a 
hypothesis that finds little support 
nowadays among scientists. They 
prefer to see comets as big dirty 
snowballs trading tads of gas and 
enthralled by gravitation. And as 
coming not from God but from the 
Oort dond, a gigantic shell Ear be- 
yond the solar system where aspiring 
comets mend eons of quiet despera- 
tion until disturbed by some celestial 
accident and called to race toward 
the son and make men weep. 

Except that we aren’t weeping. 
HaUqr’s comet may have brought vic- 
tory to the Normans in 1066, her- 
alded the descent of Turkish annks 


By Charles Krauthammer 


with fear. Halley’s has turned into a 
celebration, a scientific romance. 
The romance is in the return. Hal- 


s comes back, exactly on time, 
srtwdlt 


Hardly Worth Looking 


H OPEFUL Haney watchers in 
Britain win get a last chance to 
witness the ence-m-a-fifetime visit of 
astronomy’s most famous comet tins 
week. If present conditions continue, 
they should see low-lying clouds, 
strerilighriandlitttedsc.Raut,clond 
and appalling astronomical condi- 
tions nave coribaned to make the 
1985 visit of Haney’s comet uninspir- 
ing. In the official words of the cura- 
tor of astronomy at the Old 
Observatoiy, Greenwich: “It’s f 
Absolutely terrible.” 

— The Observer (London). 


on Belgrade in 1456 and, in 1910, 
killed Mark Twain and thrit Edward 
VIL This time around all is forgiven. 

After aD, it knows not what it does. 
And we know what it is: a forlorn 
mass of rod: and tee caught in end- 
less revolution around our rim. Now 
an object, not an omen, it is the 
source not of panic but of curiosity. 
Five Earthly spacecraft have beat 
seat to greet it and soap its picture. 

Science has desacrihzed the uni- 
vase. You hear it in ibe language. 
When in the last election Walter 


its current pass it will travel five 
billion Idtemeters away from Earth 
and then tum to revisit your children: 
It is the grandest reminder that an 
mdmdnaTcan bchoM of the constan- 
cy of nature: It returns about every 
75 wars, once in a lifetime; 

The sun rises regglady, but so of- 
ten that we are dulled to the wonder 
of its rhythm. And what rhythms, 
beyond that of the familiar year, rcal- 
ly touch us? Sunspots come every 11 
years, and what layman cares? Eco- 
nomists are forever coating up with 
“teog waves” (50 years) and other 
putative business cycles. Freud's the- 
ory of neurosis was buflt on the no- 
tion of a distant return of the child to 
the mind of the adult Such cycles can 
moat charitably be called roecnlative. 

Others are too long. Tne ice age 
will be baric, but fit that into your 
calendar! Halley’s has a human scale. 
Birth and death are perhaps tire only 
events that match. Halley’s periodici- 
ty, and neither, is. nearly as reKablri 
They come with regular irregularity 
(to borrow a term from cardiology). 
Haney’s you can count on. ' 

We know, for example, absolutely 
nothing about what the world will be 
like in 2061, except ode thing. In that . 
ummagpaWe year, ayear whose vay 

number has an otherworldly look, 
Halley's will light up the sky. - . 

One price of demystifying the uni- 


verse is that science, unlike religion, 
asks only how, not why. As to the 
purpose Of things, science is sflenL 
Bm if it cazmot talk about meaning, it 
can talk about harmony. And Hat 
tar’s is at once a symbol and a proof 
of a deep harmony of the spheres— 
The anginal detector at that har- 
mony was Newton. One of the earli- 
est empirical demonstrations of his 
theories was provided by his friend, 
Edmund Hatley. Twenty-three 
after the great comet of 1 682, 
deciphered its logic. He predicted its 
return in 1758. Halley died 17 years 
before be could be proved right. The 
return of the comet was a sensation. 
It made Km immortal True to its 
natnre, science wed die comet forever 


to the man who did not discover it 
but was the first to understand it 
. Thu time around there will be no 
sensation. - Halley’s will give one of 
ibe worst shows ever. This may be its 
dimmest apparition in more than 
■2,000 years. What we will celebrate, 
then, is not the spectacle but the idea. 

Halley’s comet is a monument to 
science, a spokesman for its new ce- 
lestial harmonies — and an intima- 
tion of mortality. It is at once recur- 
ring and, for us individually, angular. 

. Tins wifi be nw only Haney's. If you 
are old enough to read tins without 
moving your bps. it wifi be your last 
one, too, Tm afraid. Mark Twain 
liked the fact that he came in with 
Halley's and would go out with it 
Ashes to ashes, Oort to Oort. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


A Sooth African Option 


in 


“the heavens,” the usage 
quaint. After Ned Armstrong and 
George Lucas, what is up there now is 
amply “space.” The heavens were a 
place for a n gels, gods and portentous 
messe ngers. Space is now home to 
extraterrestrials, the Force sad snow- 
balls cruising through emptiness. 

Don’t get me wrong. I am not pin- 
ing the days of the witch doctor. 
Things are much better now. There 
are costs to demystifying the universe 
and turning it over to science (the 
ubiquity of Carl Sagan is among the 
heavier ones), but the gain is great 

Haney’s, like the rest of space, is 
friendly now, tamed. Thu will proba- 
bly be the first time in history that 
Halley's win bring wonder unalloyed 


on ' the side of 
South Africa, as columnist 
Lewis advises (Dec. 6j, is not all that 
difficult for European, American and 
Asian companies with aihridiaries 
there. AQ these companies have the 
possibifity to reooghize, negotiate 
with and accept as a. fall partner 
independent black trade unions that 
represent a million workers. The 
unions are democratic and represent 
tative and have much 10 tose if South 
Africa descends into woleru chaos. 

■ IT violence is the only way ' to ^re- 
move apartheid, then themostdano- 

forestall that possjoiKry, the more 


most talcs shidter behind the larg4y 
irrelevant nqiwrwndatory ^European. 
Ctmnnmity.wSiiOrrancbdes. . .. 

lent trade 


unions and accepting their kgitimato 
aspirations ifcbne of the test hopes: 

btu^®^etq>lhisdi^^gS 
■ HERMAN REBHAN,- 

Geheral Secrctaiy.. . 
International Metalworkers’ 
Federation, Geneva. ' 


privileges so aa to pass perfunu, spir- 
,.>Uy money and' -assorted presents 

across borders freely and imeharl^fi 
• — at the risk of Eves, international 
; Security tad dviOzaaon itself? 

- It is high time that the diplomatic" 
representatives of the czvifizcd na- 


Latin Debt: 



Shows How $ 


By Joseph Kraft 


W ashington — T he Qma. 

mas season brings economic 
cheer in the United States — a con- 
sumer shopping spree, falling ofl 
prices, a stock market boom, and 
signs that there will be no recession 
next year. So it is prudent to look at 
the one big cloud m the blue^ky— 
Latin American debt. 

Events in Mexico, Brazil and Pent 
show that the debt crisis still menaces 
the big U.S. hanks and the whole 
international financial structure. Butjf 
Argentina bolds out a fair hope that 
organized rescue operations can con- 
tinue to stave off a concerted default. 

Mexico, roughly $100 bflhcai in 
debt, used to be the model popiL 
After it went to the edge of baakajpfr 
cy in 1982, President Migud de k 


Sothecasehy-case 
rescue effort is still in . 
business . Even though 


ifRei^ngeuwig 

the debt cloud is not 


yet about to break 


Madrid accepted an austerity pro- 
gram worked out with the. IMF u a 
condition for financial assistance. 
Imports were slashed, real wag® fefl, 
subsidies were cut and economic 
growth turned negative. But the bal- 
ance of payments looked rosy, and 
financial help flowed. 

However, three years of austerity 
seem tike forever. Before midterm 


elections last July, the Mexican au- 
thorities eased the 


verge 

down,” a hi g h U.S. official says. ' 
Brazfi, also in the $100 bfltioa 
class, presents an opposite case. Ex- 
ports of manufactures — shoes, sted. 
auto parts, weapons — soared with 
the U.S. recovery of 1983 and contin- 
ue high. They generate an annual 
surplus of more than S10 billion. But 


the Brazilians have never applied the 
e IMF. 1 


-W1AUV0, X XOUXXJ IV KO 

from Buenos Aires ■ 
gentme miracle,'’ T 

Lien nf n » 


ing in South Africa should take the 
lead in coating to terms with black 
unions. At the moment,, most of the 
evidence suggests that only a handful 
of companies are willing to do so; 


What sense does it make to re- , 
inforce the front doorand-add three 
■more locks- if the, bade, door is left ’ 
open? What sense does it make to : 
reinforce airfield .security ^ ^and inulfi- .; 
ply passenger checks if embassy arid . 
consular personnel and couriers of all 
'nations oass - their tar &H «e and bans 
unchecked! Whais^«QoesitmS 
for the diplomatic personnel of dvi- 
tized' nations to hang on to . their little 


butty as public servants. Does any- 
one seriously deny that in most cases 
it is- in so-called nfiplotnalic baggage 
that guns, grenades, bombs and other 
explosives get Into airplanes? 

. BARENDWOLF. 

. . ..Paris.- 


i, _ ~ — — ii vtiu JJOJJA dj 

wd Mnlford of the. U-S. Tr 
Th^rarelming up Argentina as the 
Woe-eyed boy for the plan, named 
mcrTreasuiy Secretary James Bak- 

S 25 “ake nw money from 

PtMue banks, international leading 


/ 




fc: 1 


$ 




disciplines Infla- 
tion mounted and holders of dollars 
began to ship them abroad. A terrible 
earthquake compounded lack of con- 
fidence in the regime, and the drop in 
oil prices makes matters worse. When 
Mr. de la Madrid meets President 
Reagan on Jan. 3, the Mexicans will 
be asking fra* major new lending an \ 
much easier terms. If they fail to get4f? 
it, the talk is that Mexico will stop 


discipline dictated by the IMF. The 
government of President Jos6 Satney 
has rejected no-growth policies, and 
that decision was endorsed in the . 
otherwise confusing municipal dec* 
tions of Nov. 15. Brazil is in a cantin- . 
nous but never quite successful nego- 
tiation with the IMF. tJntirits export M . 
boom plays out, Brazil goes it alone. * f 

Peru offers a different way to go it 
alone Austerity, tried from 1982 
through 1984, produced the usual fa- 
tigue Unlike Brazil and Mexico, 
however, Peru does not have manu- 
factured goods to export. Prices of 
raw materials have been held down 
by dis in fl at ion in the advanced coun- 
tries. Per capita income is about what 
it was 20 years ago. 

Enter, stage left, a new leader with 
telegenic personality. Elected presto 
dent in July, Alan Garda decreed 
sweeping reforms in August. These 
feature wage and price controls, cut- 
backs in military spending and pro- 
grams to fight left-wingguenillas and 
coca cultivation. But musest rates 
have been cut, discouraging invest- 
ment, and Mr. Garcia has called on . 
all of Latin America to limit debt'A 
repayment to 10 percent of expert^' 
receipts. That appeal , smacks of orga- 
nized default on debt repayment. 

Although a small debtor (about ' 
SI0 billion), Peru has become a pari- 
ah for commercial banks, U.&. au- 
thorities and international financial 
institutions. In October, U *> regula- . 
tors ordered commercial banka to 
classify loans to Peru under a special 
category that requires setting aside 
larger reserves against default Bank 
credit to Pent has been cutway back. 
There is informal talk of denying it 
access to tire aid of such international' ' 
institutions as the World Bank. 

Argentina, by comparison, tea rift 
from heaven. President Radi Attbn- ' 
sfn inherited from the discredited 
milit ary junta a stagnant 1 economy -jk . 
with an nual inflation running at 400 ■ . 
percent and international Sebl' erf 
around $35 billion. At first he triad . 
the painless solution — wage in- 
creases and a gflrry* rtf .B fjgiTan 
Mickey Mouse with the IMF. Annual 
inflation climbed past 1,000 percent. 

Last June Mr. Alfonkai started a 
dramatic U-turn. A newcurrmey, the . 
austral, replaced the peso. Wage aid 
pnee controls were instituted, money 
supply was restricted and a tight fid " 
was applied to government m ending 
unemptoyment rose but -iaftetioa 
slowed to less than 25 peamt The. 
“austral program” passed muster -af 
midterm elections on Nov.-3. 

The -latest Nobei.. laureate, in eco* 


' letters intended jar publication 
sbotM be addressed "Letters tQ the 
Editor* and must contain rfi« wfl- 
£r*s signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are sufyect io , editing. We cannot 
re^httrMbie fir the return of 


"WKunjacnavauameto 

hTtaiSf* 8, A *** 


*i,nr — sqnmc 

bze bloated public sectors. 
Such a r—--— — 


«... — r^fey Proud, sever- 

mm 



we effort ts still- m. ba&ness. Eves 


'■A-' 

i 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1985 


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': .< Photographs by Werner Bischof . Rent Bum. Robert Capa, Haem Cartier-Bresson, Effiot Enwtt, Ernst Hass, Erich 

From the archives of Ma gnum Photos, a photographic record of Europe in 
the -immediale postwar years — striking images of a continent s hakin g off 
the debris of destruction and coming to life. 

x \ Mary R lnm e, the inte rnatio nal Herald Tribune’s disting u is h ed feature 

journalist, sets the postwar scene and interviews many of the photographers 
in her introduction. The LH.T. is pleased to present this unique volume that 
captures a decisive epoch and commemorates the work of some of the 
20th century’s master photojoumalists. 

Here you’ll find some of the most famous images and faces of our 
lima Once you open its pages, you will want to spend hours poring over this 
magnificently produced collection. Truly this.is a book to treasure for 
yourself, and a beautiful gift as well. 

Available from the International Herald Tribune Order today. 


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Tusamg^ Inge MOTath, Man* Riboud, David Seymcur. and other Magnum photographers. 


7f iHn«niiMi» . 4 

licralck^enbune. 


■ AFTER THE WAR WAS OVER 

I International Herald Tribune, Book Division, 

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Page 6 


EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1985 


Reformists Wary of Marcos Military Shifts Police Clash Roger Maris Dies of Cancer at 51; 

WtihBlacks Held Baseball’s Home-Run Record 


By William Branigin 

Washington Put Service 

MANILA - — A reorganization 
of the armed forces ordered by 
President Ferdinand E. Marcos is 
shaping up as a maneuver to pre- 
serve the power structure and pre- 
pare 1(7 a presidential election in 
February, Philippine military 
sources and foreign analysts say. 

The reorganization was an- 
nounced last month, a few days 
before a court acquitted the aimed 
forces chief of staff, General Fabi- 
an G. Vex, and 25 other people, of 
involvement in the assassination of 
a popular opposition leader, Ben- 
igno S. Aquino Jr., and a subse- 
quent cover-up. 

General Ver, 65, a cousin and a 
close confidant of Mr. Marcos, was 
reinstated by the president as chief 
of staff within hours of his acquit- 
tal, despite U.S. opposition. 

Among the changes announced 
in the military have been the retire- 
ment of the navy commander, Rear 
Admiral Simeon Alejandro, and 
the reassignment of about 50 offi- 
cers to the provinces. 

The highest-ranking officer to re- 

^l^dby^^emBsfgu^comh Imelda R- Marcos, wife of President Ferdinand E. Marcos, sings with two pilots dining 
mander. Commodore Brill ante graduation ceremonies for the Philippine Air Force flying school in Batangas province. 
Ochoco, who is considered 

staunchly loyal to General Ver. „ , .... , . _ _ , 

Last Year Commodore Ochoco *hn&' General Ver has reassigned in the government and m state- Commodore Ochoco, Lieutenant 
initiated a manifesto that expressed the custoras commissioner, Btiga- owned corporations. General Fidel Ramos, who is the 

“loyalty and support” for General dier General Ramon Farolan, to a Such changes, heralded as part vice chief of staff, and the cora- 
Ver after a fact-findm* board im- lesser P^on in the air force. of the reorganization, have left re- manders of all the service branches, 
plicated him in the minder of Mr General Farolan was the only fomrisl officers cynical and disillu- Mr. Marcos said Dec. 9 that the 

Aquino. The manifesto purported- t0 repudiate publicly bis sioned about the prospects for gen- armed forces reorganization would 

purported signature last year of the uine reform, military sources said, “reach the levels of Ver and Ramos 


New York Times Service 


South Africa 


, be advanced to the Indians 


NEW YORK — . Roger Maris, in 1957 but was traded in 1958 to 
5 1, who hdd tbemajor league base- *e Kansas Gty Athletics and then 
ball record for ihemost home runs to the Yankees in 1959. 
in a single seasdn, died Saturday at In 15*61, the season that made 


home runs, critics asking why not 
He hit 33. 

In 1966, be was traded to theSt, 
Louis Cardinals and then he retired 


. United Press International mor Institute 

JOHANNESBURG — The po- two-year boul 
lice’fought a running battle Sunday officials said 
in the white central area of Durban Mr. Maris*! 
with' black members of the digs- his bedside w 
dent United Democratic Front af- .said. 


MX). Anderson Hospital and Tu- http both famous and comrover- * 

mor Institute in Hasten after a sal, he ported iteieniitobat: 161 

two-year bout with cancer, hospital games, 590 um^at bat, 159 fats, 94 5,101 ^jS/: ^ SN 

officials said walks, 67 strikeouts. 132 runs home runs, 826 runs, *51 nra bat-* 

Mr. Maria’s wife. Patricia, was at scored, 142 runs batted in, a bat- ted u and an av^ra^^of -SfiO. In- * 


In 1961, the season that made in 1968. „ 

him both famous and comrover- His career record for 12 years in 


Mr. Mans’s wife, Patricia, was at scored, 142 runs batted m a rai- 
his bedside when bedied, officials ting average of .269— and 61 home 


W .'3^35? BascJjaD ^ ** ta. if MI - a £ 

drawal of treason charges against Mr- Mans «-the home-run twin to (or Mr. Maris, he soon found that 


drawal of treason charaes aaainst 

12 black leaders of the oiS Mickey Mantle, -the Yankee out- IWw an oraern ne was «- JJI 

tion. iBamzar . ^ * no W h the Hall of gulfed wherever he went, with fans where be owned a beer distnbui 

In Pretoria, meanwhile, the po- Fame, and generations of fans will askingif he could hit more than 61 ship, 
lice said' Sunday that a "inn was .remember him as the man with the 

killed in a mysterious hand-are- asterisk in the record books: _ _ 1 £ m* - « .» 

nade explosion, a policeman was * Hit 61 home nuts in 1961 in a (y()vp,rilor"lj6I16rBl 01 WfllinllUS 1/16S 

wounded in an. attack whh Soviet- '162-game season. 

made AK-47 rifles and four blacks . Die asterisk was inserted to dis- A Fm{e .pr*se 

were arrested as racial unrest con- tmguish Mr. Mans’ home-run re- „„ M sir 

tinned across the country. cord from the one set in 1927 by PORT LOUIS, Mauritius b 

About 4,000 members of the' Babe Ruth, the Yankee player who Sid 

United Democratic Front, South hit 60 m a 154-game season. *JSS*ESSL ^he 

Africa’s largest legal' opposition It was inserted unto the record prune minister 
group, met in a Durban sports sta- books by Ford C. Frick, the com- years 

dium to greet the 12 in- nassioner of baseball, who appar- died Sunday, an official announce- 

d uding Archie Gumede, 70, and “dy reflected the traditionalist mentsaid. 

Albertina. Sisulu, 67, co-presidents view of many fans that the Olympi- The cause of death was not im- 
of the oreanizaiion. an feats of Ruth must be defended mediately given, but Sir Seewoosa- 


1962 was an ordeaL He was en- 


bome runs, 826 runs, 851 runs bat-£ 
ted in and an average of -260. in '<■ 
seven Worid Series, he hit six home 
runs. 

Aft a 1 retiring from baseball. Mr. 
Maris, his wife and their seven chiL 
dren lived in Gainesville, Florida^- 


gulfed wherever be went, with fans where be owned a beer distributors 

rZlT: .71. u .,U mnn> than A 1 chm J 


wounded in an. attack with Soviet- 
made AK-47 rifles and four blacks 
were arrested as racial unrest con- 


Albertina. Sisulu, 67, co-presidents 
of the organization. 

Charges of high treason, which 


Age ne* Fnmce-Presse 

PORT LOUIS, Mauritius — Sir 


The cause of death was not im- 
mediately given, but Sir Seewoosa- 


initiated a manifesto that expressed ^ customs romnnsaoner, Bnga- owned corponmons. 

“loyalty and support” forGeneraJ ? ,eT General Ramon Farolan, to a Such changes, heralded 
Ver after a fact-finding board im- lesser position m the air force. of the rerapmzanon, havt 
plicated him in the mSder of Mr. Gen®® 1 FaroUn was the only fonmsi officers cynical and disfllu- 


carries the death penalty, were and newly arrived sluggers. 


against long seasons, short fences gur was known to be in poor health 


and had been receiving periodic 


withdrawn last Monday, about a But, on Oct. 1. 1961, asterisk or treatment in London, 
year after they were first detained 110 asterisk, Mr. Maris made histo- Under British rale. Sir Seewoo- 
withoiil charge and six months af- *Y when he hitJris 61st home ran of wa5 successively chief minis- 
ter they were released on baiL the season m his 161st game on the ter and premier from 1961 before 
After the rally, crowds stoned final daycf the 162-game seawn in \ xcon ^Z ^ riret prime minister 
shops, buses and police vehicles on Stadium again st Tracy Qf j nc |rpffKfrm Mauritius in 1968. 

the western edge of Durban’s dty StaUard of -the Boston Red Sox. ^ appointed govemor-gener- 
cemer. Mr. Mans, an accomplished out- ^ ^ jggJ 

The police confronted the crowd fieldw with a powerful arm and ' ■ 

in armoredtnicks and battled riot- bat, was besieged as be pursued the He <*amnM of the Orgm- 
ers with whips and tear gas. It was m«WHy and the record of Ruth, ration of African Uni ty m tv o- . 
not known immediatdy whether but he was not universally em- He received a United Nations 
anyone was injured. - braced for his achievement. award for outstanding actoeve- 

Meanwhile, a soundman with Roger Eugene Maris was bom in meats in human rights m 1973. 


plicated him in the murder of Mr. ,y cne ™ rara JP was me omy lonmsi oracers cymcai ana uuuiu- wir. Marco 
Aquino. The manifesto purported- officer to repudiate pubhdy his soned about the projects for gen- armed forces 
lv was signed bv 68 too officers. purported signature last year of the uine reform, military sources said, ^each the levels 

J — mnnifoetA ll Vat rainnm ntvl f A fft atwn. . Qflor •s'KahI ■ 


ly was signed by do cop ouicers. 

Commodore Odioco also was 
the only senior officer to oppose 
publicly the armed forces reform 
movement known as “We Belong.” 

In one change, the highly regard- 
ed regional commander in central 
Luzon island was sent to the south- 
ern island of Mindanao, where 


purported signature last year of the uine reform, military sources said, “reach the levels of Ver and Ramos 
manifesto supporting General Ver. “This revamp and reorganiza- after about a week,” implying that 
“This is a punishment,” said a lion is only an attempt to satisfy they would be retired. 

Philippine colonel “It's a signal to the American pressure.” said a col- There has been no further word 


Philippine coloneL “It's a signal to the American pressure,” said a 
those who are not loyaL" oneL 

Since the reassignment of Gener- At present, 29 generals of 


There has been no further word 
about these retirements. But mUi- 


Since the reassignment of Gener- At present, 29 generals of the tary sources said the moves an- 
al Farolan was announced, the mil- approximately 100 in the aimed nounced so far appeared to be de- 
ilaiy has said it was planning to forces haw remained beyond man- signed to secure the power and 
recall about 160 officers and enust- datory retirement. influence of General Vex by pro- 

ed men assigned to civilian offices The 29 include General Ver, mo ting his loyalists. 


Communist guerrillas have a strong ed men assigned to civilian offices The 29 include General Ver, moting his loyalists, 
presence, reportedly because of his 

French Firms to Build Nudear Plant in China 



the western edge of Durban’s city Stallard of the Boston Red Sox. n < 
center. Mr. Maris, an accomplished out- ^ 

The police confronted the crowd fielder with a powerful arm and 
in armored trucks and battled riot- 'bat, was besieged as be pursued the 


411 iviauiiuiw 

in ted goveraor-gener- Seewoosaguz* Kamgoolam 


anyone was injured. 

Meanwhile, a soundman with 


Britain’s Independent Television Hibbmg, Minne sota, on Sept. - 10, 
News, Brian TQJey, was hospital- 1934, but was still an infant when 


had been in command on the cen- 
tral island of Negros Occidental. 
Military sources said that Gener- 


al de Guzman had a reputation for “ expected to dear its find con- 
his ability to bring in the vote. gressional hurdle before the Christ- 

One of the major charges of re- “process, 
formist officers^ that theMarcos StiD unresolved is an amendment 
government has used military M 3 .* continuing budget resolution 
forces to help rig elections. bemfi conadered by Hrwse and 

~ _ , ,, . . Senate conferees. It was offered by 

On Saturday. Mr. Marcos Senators John Glenn, Democrat <rf 

Ohio, and William S. Cohen, Re- 


(Costinued from Page 1) push for similar legislation next 
a major Communis t n at i on , China, y eM * 

is expected to clear its fin a l con- The amendment went beyond a 


gressional hurdle before the Christ- compromise resolution adopted by 
mas recess. both chambers requiring that the 

StiD unresolved is an amendment president certify to Congress that 
to a continuing budget resolution firimi has clarified its nonprolifer- 
being considered by House and g^a policies before any nuclear 
Senate conferees. It was offered by technology leaves the United 


would not be diverted to norimi* A friend said that Mr. Tilley sus- 
aspiring to build atomic weapons, tained a multiple fracture when the . 

Mr. Glenn and Mr. Cohen stud police fired shotguns and tear gas 
they spoke with Mr. Bush on Fri- during a dash with mourners after 
day. “He said they don’t want to a funeral in the black township of 
see this forced into renegotiation Mamdodi near Pretoria, 
and they just fdt the fftiru-o> The latest violence came as a 
would dump the whole thing,” Mr. controvert over a black boycott of 
Glenn said. white-owned stores escalated in Jo- 


during a da«h with mourners after Cleveland Indians persuaded him formerly managed the careers of 


to try fc 
. After 


for a baseball career. 


He was chairman of the Organi- er< Thursday of a heart attack ini' 
ration of African Unity in 1976-77. Ang eles . , 

He received a United Nations Chmdp E. BorBot, 75, forma * 
award for outstanding achieve- TJ.S. representative of the Suez Ca- 
meats in human rights in 1973. nal Co_ Wednesday at his home im ? 

Mother deaths: NewToAGty ^ 

■ . , . , lstvan Otah, 59, defense minister • 

Ian Stewart, 47, the keyboard 0 f Hungary, 59, Sunday of a heart 
player who helped to found the acc^g to the Soviet^ 

^Dm^Stones rock tend in the news agency TASS, which cited a * 
1960s, Thursday of a heart attack communique: from the Hungarian 1 *’ 
in London. newsage^yMTL 

James Joseph Waters, 59, who Eadel fahm, 69, a noted con- ~- 
formeriy managed the careers of ductin’ and viola player, Wednes- , 
Sammy Davis Jr_ the entertainer, day in Cambridge, Massachusetts, ‘ 
and Hoyt Axton. the country sing- after a heart attack. 


Other deaths: 

tofomfly moved to Fargo, North 

tawlby tgun fire from the po- ^ ^ m ^S|Sto«ie8 rodt bMd in 

A friend said that Mr. Tilley sus- school the University of Okkho- ■ 1 n 9 ^’ P i ursda >' ^ a beart altack 
tained a multiple fracture when the . rna offered Mr. Maos a football - 

po licy fired Rhrt tfnnic and tear gas scholarship, but a scout for the James Joseph Waters, 59, who 


James Joseph Waters, 59, who 


Sammy Davis Jr_ the entertainer. 


three years in the minor and Hoyt Axton, the country sing- 


Lrpa, the home province of Salva- 
dor H. Laurel the vice presidential 

candidate of the opposition. rffect lasl ^ f<i eqiripmait for. China’s ambitious Blacks who asked that they not 

He said there would be “10 years The amendment requires that nuclear-powered electrification be identified alleged that radical 

Of instability” if the opposition any nudear technology sold to Chi- am- young people were imposing a 

won the Feb. 7 presidential elec- na meet the same standard for safe- oS’, Zv The administration has vigor- «gn of tenor in black townships 

8 nudear nraterial that oth- Worid ously defended the agreement It near Johannesburg and Pretoria.. 

nen ts of having bedded down «- nations meet m their nudear we 3nons. ^ 110168 t ^ at < * ur * n 8 niore than two Shoppas have been forced to eat 

with Co mmunis t insurgents. agreements with the United States. years of negotiations, Ghina has detergents and to drink rimming 

Die president and his entourage The Senate approved it 59-28, and The accord has been criticized as renounced the spread of nudear fluids, and huge quantities of food 

were greeted by small crowds- Mr. Glenn and Mr. Cohen say that, lacking dear guarantees that ship- weapons and has joined the Inter- have been destroyed, a*»mrri»wg to 

As part of the military reshuf- if the conferees reject it, they win ments of nuclear material to China national Atomic Energy Agency, black commuters in Johannesburg. 


publicanof Maine, bothmtiraof ^*a 

^enmdrarpacL The accord took <rf the strategiciUly im- 

effect last week. — w — . rrc 


»» Glenn said. white-owned stores escalated in Jo- 

c^ology leaves the United ^ a ^ aMQt nu , hannesburg and Pretoria amid 

'ZT . . . dear-supply companies, such as daims of attacks on people defying 

The controversy mvolves those WestinSmse mdSeral Heo- the boycott and tou^ police action 


trie, to bid on contracts to simply agamst as organizers, 
equipment for. China’s ambitious Blades who asked that they not 


nuclear-powered electrification be identified alleged that radical 


program. 


Reagan Budget Proposes 
Sale of Mortgage Agency 


(Condoned from Page 1) 


tanoe to low-income fancies. At 


Romulo Dies r 
In Manila 


(Cootmoed from Page 1) 


young people were imposing a calls for spending the same present, they do not have to pay and a grateful admirer of the Unit-*- 

j - U > * _ _ _ “ y. ' .anna.n* tflAft til- - - 1 A 1 V 7 nntr tltA 1 — * -* AAAfA I WW . a ■ a ■ mm a ■ • ■- 


amount, $190 mfllion^ in 1987. any of the administrative costs. ed States, which acquired his home- • 
Congress has consistently pro- •Ending the inflation adjust- i^d in 1898 and gave it indepen-^’ 
vided more money than the admin- meat for federal housing subsidies, deuce in 1946. 


istratioa sought for AIDS. Die pro- • Requesting Congress to permit But from 1968 to 1984, be lent ' 
pored $48 mQlian-cia would not the use of Social Security data in his prestige to the government of - 
directly affoa biomedical research vaifying the income of people Mm Mr. Marcos, a that - 

but could affect the treatment of live in federally subsidized housing, amc to be widely considered as - 
patients, officials said. ■ • Sdling housing loans made or undemocratic, serving as foreign 


The money would come from insured by the government to pri- 
^ ^projects jtfwt finance blood testing, .yate investors The Office of ^ Mtan-..;Mr. Marcos's prodamarion of mar- 
telephone hot lines, and hospices ageniemand $udget hopes to real- dal law in 1972, a measure that was 
and home health care far AIDS, ne S3Q0:.m31iOQ m reoeipts from criticized as authoritarian, 
patients. - such sales. . • - T „ . , . . . 

Medicare cost S7L4 billion in the • Fading all rental housing de- th _ , 


Our exdusivdy-de^cned 
leather pocket diary 

is thin, flat and elegant 


■ - •• -wm • ' . — . ^projects j^at finance blood toting, 

SlTinl I It A1VIA telephone hot lines, and hospices 
uliutU J. U1UC home health care for AIDS 

ll /hf* f OTlorla^Q AiMcare cost S7L4 billion in the 

J. UJ. ■ ■nUa O fiscal yiar that ended Sept. 30. The 
^ # ' ptOpcwed changes in payments to 

Kl rr I PI*nfA|nr .-dojaois would save $340^ mDlion in 
.LPlg 1CI i KWM. J . J987, the budget offia estimaled- 

The budget also indudes the fol- 
' (Continued from Page 1) lowing other proposals related to 

much. Nearly a third considered .u~ 

the expenditures to be about right. 


It was also as foreign minister'. 


fiscal yen ffiat ended Sept. 30. The vdopmmt gnmts,^ to subsidize ^ frSom ^ecanST^ 


ymeats to construction csr rehabilitation of 
imlli on in rental housing in low- and modcr- 
•stimated- ate-imxmreneighbodioods. 


The budget also indudes the fol- ' »Exiainigmbandevdqpmentac^ 
lowing other proposals related to lion grfiht^ designed to assist dis- 


tressed pities and urban counties. 


of press freedom, became a reso- 
nant oitic of what he called ixre-’- 
sponsibOity in some journalists. 

It was as foreign minister, too,' 
that Mr. Romulo signed a formal, 
diplomatic note, in 1974, that in- " t ' 


riuinMuiimnK t uuuuu ui • Frcpring federal subsidies for formed Arab foreign ministers that 

$95 bfflion that Congress just jq>- the operation of local public boos- Arnold Zeitlin, chief of the Manila^ 
for housing assistance ing projects trt 1986 levels. _ bureau of The Associated Press, ^ - 


No sooner was it introduced than 
everybody wanted one! 

The Inter n ational Herald Tribune diary, 
started as a distinctive Christmas present for a 
few of our friends, was such a huge success that 
now we make it available to all our readers. 

This ingeniously designed diary is flat as 
can be — neat and luxurious — including a built- 
in notepad. Slips into your pocket without a 
bulge and is ready with instant ^jotting” paper 
the second you need it Personalized with your 
initials (up to 3) at no extra cost The perfect 
Christmas gift for almost anyone... including 
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— Note paper sheets are fitted on the back of the 
diary — a simple pull removes top sheet 
— No curled up edges. No tom pages. 

— Crimes with note paper refills. 

PLUS: Pages of useful information. 

^ am Mflfc Conversion tables of 
weights, measures and 
distances, a list of 

K -fjiis handy national holidays by 

M pdte v ^ country, vintage chart 


w with low « moderate - • Ending the Solar Energy Bank wm “suspected to be a Jewish jour- 

v - income: In addition, $2.1 billion of ■ program; which subsidizes invest- naHst” Mr. Zeitlin was accused by*; 

M h~ the money appropriated for the menis in energy conservation and a Philippine press-monitoring-" 

i-. r* j , • 1986 fiscal year would be deferred solar energy technology. council of malice in rcportmg oo 1 -‘ 

After Fiore EUiott Tradran be- 1987. . Neady half of the 1 1,400 people fighting between Philippine gov--’ 

caropirae^ mmistom i96Vte • Requiring state and local gov- employed by the Dq»rtment of troops and Moslon rebds.-- 

OTderediialtier cut^aa^r 1978, enimems to pay half of the admin- ' Housing and Urban Development Before coming to world pronu-"' 
nnn isuaavt - 00818 federal work for die FHA or on its pro- nence at the United Nations, Mr. 

dwmdlcd to 78,000 from 126,000 program providing rental assis- jects. •• Romulo had beoome eminent in 

‘ ' 1 1 = fiw Philippines, initially as a jour- ' ‘ 

The Liberal government tned to nalist. He was chosen to acconroa- 

re^ the dasioration m. ranks -p ' ™ n ny the U.S. anned forces Lnwaoiw, 

™ Repnbhcan Blames Reagan 


.wwHiwm. propriaied 
began in 1964 when initial steps 
were proposed to merge the army, iBC ££ Jsi 
navy and arr force into a single 
service to save money. . 

After Rare Elliott Trudeau be- 1957 
came prime minister in. 1968, he • Romu 


new F-I8 Hornet fighters and is 171 T1 1. /\ ' m . ts hi 

buildmg six frigates. T^ Mitinm^r t OT tfeYOlt \JVeT l^X Bill 


Republican Blames Reagan 


government announced in March 

th^ 1*200 more troops would be (CoDthmed from Pace I) - publican opposition in the House 
sent to remfona its NATO con tm- .last Wednesday, 
gent m West White Horn* strategists said that 

A mqor priority has been to co- persuasion may be fadna a critical 8 compromise was essential, not 
operate with, the Umted Slates m S before the embittered Hoose to save Mr. Reagan’s favored 
modernizing the obsolete North Republicans. ' program but to preserve oongrcs- 

Amerion an defense system. Can- ^ sional seals in the 1986 election and 

ada s 3500-million task mdufes Cheney ^d. “I cannot bnng ray- long-term hopes for party reaHgn- 
aipplymg two squadrons of F-18 sd/.n^canmanyoFmy coDSgnes ““*• 

interceptors and 24 long-range ra- ^ o^ves. to the T Representative Guy Vander 

dar stations. . ** would vote for a bill that the a-Midiigsn Republican and 

The qpabty of Canadian service- president himself admits is t zia » f i tia n of the Rqniblican Ccaa- 
men has, if anything, improved flawed.”-, grasionai Campaign Committee, 

over the lean years. Soldiers grew Mr. Reagan has been critical of 5®“' Frida y that it “is very, very 


interceptors and 24 long-range ra- ^ ou^ves. to the print where T Representative Guy Vander 
dar stations. . we would vote for a bill that the 5^ a-Midiigsn Republican and 

Tbe qoabtir of Canadian service- president himself admits is e bnioi i a n of the Republican Coa- 
men has, if anything, improved flawed."-. grosumal Campaign Committee, 

over the lean years. Soldiers grew Mr. Reagan has been critical of 2® 1 " Frida Y that it “is very, very 
adept at improvisations like travel- some parts of the bill aaftixl by the ™P°ttant” to Republicans that 
ing by night in convoys without any Home. Ways and Means Commit- “Y a W to bring the year- 


arid other facts... all in 
this incredibly flat ■ 
k little book. 


lights. Because of Canada’s cold tee, which is controlled by Demo- . . „ 

climate, the troops train more in -craivbut insists that flaws can be ” 0 ‘® e l his week, 
winter warfare than almost any corrected in the Senate. His argn- 
other army. • ' meats appear to have had tittle nn- 

“ Every man in every unit in the pact on Republican leaders in the 
Canadian Army is issued apak.pf House. 

showsboes,” said Brigadier Gener- Die chaixxnan of the House 
al Keith Corbould, commander of Ways and Means Committee, Dan 


they find a way to bring the^year- 
toe, vrinch is controlled by Demo- Reagan effort back to hfe in 




the Special Service Force! 


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— Plenty of space for appointments 

— Tabbed address section 
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— Note that quantity discounts are available. 


also has . a battalion deployed in Administration of ficials said pri- 


— Format 8x13 cm (5 l A X 3 in.) 
- Gold initials induded 


ms for UN 
ttahon of 8 


almost any corrected in tfre Senate. His arcn- ■¥ r ;« an ? er - Ja 8*» wito 

meats appear tohave had titde mi- others of the 182 House 

art bn Republican leaders in the K^jmhcms in voting down the 
gugg, procedural motion for conodering 

Die <±airman erf the House a * t S? at * v ^ and Re- 

ays and Means Committee, Dan - ? ab . hcan *** WUs Wednesday, .was 
Wtehkowski, an iBmmg . Demo- “ V01 * second Noughts Friday, 
at, said Sunday that he remained “It appears today that it’s the 

itimtaic that Mr. Reagan would Democrats who simport tax reform 
t the votes. - and the president,'* hesaid. “That’s 

Admimtfr atirm oTfirials said pri. not the fact, bnt only by gjettmgthe ' 


Rosteokowdo, an minafe Demo- 


amj vatdy that they bebeved'Mr. Rea- usuc up again and havmjf a big 


of the Phfliroines in October 1944, { 

He was then a military aide to h 
General Douglas MacArthur, and 2 
the general to«t; him along when he, 
landed on the Philippine Island 6t^ 
Leyte, along with 200,000 troops. 

Mr. Romulo, who rose- to 
come brigadier general in the US>- 
Army, recalled later; “Ii is imposst- 
ble to adequately record ttaejoy of <-*■ 
ffie Philippine people at MwAr-^. 
“Ur’s retina. The people who met 
us at the beach, with tears in their '-iT 
eyes, some of them starving ac- 
tons in rags, saw the Americans as a. .. 

godsend.” !•£ 

Mr. Romulo served in Philippine 
^y ernm em positions under nine ^ ; 

Phuippme presidents. He was am- b v>’ 
bassador to the United States in;^ 
1952 and 1953 and again from 1955 ^ - 
to 1962. • • r \ 

He headed the Foreign Ministry^- 
from 1950 to 1952, as well as lata * . 
mder Mr. Marcos. He Erected the>> 
Edmation Ministty from 1966 to^ 
1968 and from 1962 to'M W£ 
president of the Univeraty of the 
rhilippinfiS, in Manila ; . 

_ It was in the town of Camflm&in k 
Jarlac iprovihce, that Caries Pena l 

Romulo was bom on Jan, 14, 1899rtJ 

the son of Gregorio Romulo ftntV * 
the former Mam Plena. . . 

He went to high school in Ma- . • 


men u commit- S 30 muster enough support *** for *1* Republican alternative J 3 *. received a bachdor of arW^A 


uauuiv uuMiiuiuaiWiavquauiC, ^ 

Return Order Form to: Paul Baker, Program Coordinator, International Herald Tribune 
c/oDataday House, 8 Alexandra Road, LondonSWI9 7JZ, England 


ted to defend northern Norway. to get the measure to the .Door, hut ^nwemrireit dear we’re for tax 
ti,., nwr (»•. Jn.4 .they warned that Democratic de- refomi and have, a better way <tf 

dJtSTtSJTtaAf- fcSon,«ai eight «dM4.UL i, Mrompliitad.” . 

though it looks better than in 1981, ■ RqnbBcan Fwnbte Seen ^ 

S n un 8 °«S^ i ta^ ,rae D<KidS.Brod*4neWaM,l. bffiaSfcfi 

laid up with cracked toiPaj "ported eariier: _ man of the Democratic NaS 

The associate minister of de- -Mr. ^Reagan andthrrRcpubhcans Committee, sp<*e scornfully about 

fense, Hanne Andre, agreed that fumbled away the tax-refonn issue, earii«’ Wtifc Hbnse talk of “a fan 
the navy was m ^tte most deplor- polifcal sttatt^su of both parties offensive on the great reaKgama 


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JP-19 AddfUanalpostair 
.. gint ” oueUtEorape 

UASlSgacfa UiS3eadi ' 


INTITAtS 
pio 3 per diary 



rarqDantliyadai. 

pkasemejqanieaieet 


able state of alL” say,hutztisnotdearifthebaho- 

To augment their regnlar units, . erm can make electoral gsmis 
which operate at 60 to 70 percent based on that niistalre. - 


the 23,800-man miniia [ as Cana- 
da’s reserves ire called. votere woma Know, or care wno which raised . *”***ocmtaI Pnss : “i 

The Wffi«tinm«diment to in- iRcagan's maswry. of Congress aS ^GSCpw — . Braisl Gostev,*^ ‘ji 

creasmg tbe armed forces is lack of P ^ « his domestic agenda, damagedhis rektioni «itE his oar- Part y economist, hasSf ' 

money. Defense pending con- Howwa; White Hoirie and Re- ly’s leaders on Cmntdl ML wastoe appointed Soviet finance ^ 

mhr 9 percent (rf the federal nnblican camnmcm offlaak said svmntAm M l * ie r, Taxs reobned Sfltnr/tw'' ! 


, r . . .t executive director (rf the Democrat- 

fflfirfwcrsr 

voters would know. or care who ‘ Us 


- — ouauflUTc ---» a uamaor Oi : 

c^i we make h dear we’re for tax from the Univcrsity of HmUM- 

refomi and have, a bettor way .of Philippines in 1918, earned a nuSiF^ 
»^^ng^taceolI^idled.' , . jet's degreein Engjisfa at Cohmilna , 4 

Democrats were doing their best University h 1921. taiight EtoSsIlT 
to explat the Rqmhlicans' p«rf>- , sacral years at the Univeisityk? 
terns. Paul G. Kiric Jr^ the chair- “e Phffipmaes, and thta be^5 
man of the Democratic Nati onal ca ®e a journalist. •?; 

Comthittee, sprAe scornfully about Hewtm a Pulitzer PSafbrarfi- 1 ’* 

earlier Wiiie House talk of “a fall J®* « ^rote.in 1941 on Sootheast-^ * 
offensive on the great realigning Aaa, warning ^that Asia was vnhou.# 
tssue<rf taxrefonn.” able to Japanese aggression. - 

Me. and Martin D. Franks, ~ . / '-$%■ - 

executive director of theDetnocrat- 


The Associated Press 


16-12-85. 


sumes cmly 9 percem crf tbe federal publican campaign officials said symptom (rf a squandered re-deo- 7’? " Ta y r q>bned Satigd^r" Hg*” : , 
budget in Canada, compared with’ they thcra^ht it wai.essential tore- aon^landsE^s anda pttaent of a Vaali R. Garteaov, 

29 percent of the US. budget write the record of near-solid Re- . Democratic comeback in IMS k-j m ^ post! or 25 years ntHd*-* 

- . . . ' ’ ms death last iniSitlL „ • • 











rs 


HtcralbS^Sribunc. 


* 




BUSINESS / FINANCE 


MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2985 




Page 


US. Bid 


' 4“ 

•*H3? 


■ *«.■ 

Uitematio 



■•'is 




,J V- 


ByCABLGEVXRTZ 

International Hendd Tribune 

‘W" ONDON — Eurobond investors remained spectators to the 
I powerful raflyin the New York bond market last week, 
I . showing no sign of fear that they may be missing a 
buying opportunity. Tins means that either Eurobond 
u Uj (trices are poised to surge to catch np with New York, or that 
rices in New York have been carried to a speculative high that is 

. . .nsustamable. ' ' • ’• " ‘ ' 

' . The consensus is that the mtcnrari mml market « Tagging Thic 

" : pinion is so widdy held that even some optimists privately 
y m - ^knowledge a concern that theta may be more froth in theNew 

’mk Tatly than is appa rent 

Ostensibly, the rally is 
driven by a conviction that 
Federal Reserve will be 
l to lower interrat rates, 

.! view that is faded by Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan’s agree- ■ 
bent with. Congress cm a 
i Schedule to reduce the size of 
<jbe federal deSdt 
Yet to be demonstrated is 
the president and Con- 
i' ;ress will be able to work out 
he necessary cuts when the 
ime comes. In addition, it is 
'" v 2ur R^iot certain that the Fed feds 
'o comfortable about rnfla- 
ion that it can disregard the 
' -Strong overshooting in the 
, a, jowth of the money supply 
.1 ^ '.o nudge rates down further. 

. The slide in the price of ad 
, vill be a big hdp in keeping industrial prices down, but analysts 
ji^ : . tote for example that service prices in the United States Have 
- t '^leen rising at a worrisome 7 percent ammai rate. 

' Others, notably Kurt Ricfaebachex, a retired Dresdner Bank 
t'icV economist who now pots out his own monthly economic letter, 

. : .vam that inflation is not showing up in the U.S. price index 
^because of the fall in commodity prices but is amply apparent in 
he securities market, where an overabundance of credit is fading 
\-'i takeover binge that drives stock prices ever higher. 

.1 & r ' Vet another uncertainty, one that dearly has European inves- 
- Vijors reluctant to make new commitments, is what all this meatm 
or the value of the dollar. The official talk continues to be 
on the need for a farther fall to hdp reduce the widening 
rade surplus. 



Eurobond Yields 

hr WmIc Ended Dm. 11 

UAS to term, bid inst — 

U £3 Ions term, tod. — 

U && medium form, I net. M 

.Cans medium term 

■French Fr. short term 

Sterling medium term 

Yen medium term, toHI nst. 

Yon to term, inn lust. 

ECU short term I 

ECU medium term 

ECU loan term 

EUA tong term 


UixF mod term Inn . Inst. 

LuxF medium term 

CeteutateO by I ta LmnSnrsSMt fit- 


ion % 

1035 % 

10.91 % 

mss % 

HU* * 

10.92 % 
6 At % 
436 % 
8 M % 
907 % 
909 % 
184 % 
9.77 % 
901 % 


Market Turnover 

for WmIl Ended Dm 13 
(MKlora or US. Dollars) 


Cedel 

.Euroctoar 


T«M 

T7J74J0 1174830 
31,951-9027,80210 


5.S25JO 
4,14? JO 


uulo 


E 


1INALLY, there is some saspkaan that the New York rally 
may be artificial. There has been an explosion in the 
issuance of tax-free municipal brads in the U.S. market, 
‘impelled by a fear that proposed changes in the tax structure 
night eliminate their appeal to investors. This antiqpatary bor- 
i.ta^Knving has provided municipal treasurers with a temporary cash 
' - urplus, winch is being invested in Treasury securities. Skeptics 
: -.~-varry that yields may surge higher when those funds are with- 
..-J Irawn from the market 

-- Whatever the reasons, the only clear message from last week's 

- ■ . xtivity is that investors were, unwilling to commit funds to the 
\ . .ntenmtioual bond marirct This was not much of a deterrent to 

issuers. Corporate treasurers dearly find the cu r rent level of 
. :: interest rates, the lowest in six years, attractive. 

. . .n, AH but five of the issues announced last week are payable next 
.. r:-._ear and by then underwriters believe that theNew Year’s rally 
-■ . -yffl allow tbexnio sell these holdings ata hefty prefit 
-"I.ii: Givrai the lackluster performance of the Eurobdnd market.Ihe 
. .. _ association of International Band Dealers chose an excellent 
-..ime to sche du le their e xtr aor din ary general meeting in Lond on 
■ Friday. 

_ ” The membership voted unanimously to accept the propo sa ls 
Transferring rule-making powers to the board. Die annual gmeral 
. 4 TTheeting usua&y held in May now will approve or veto the board's 
jite changes rather than, as in the past, be asked to initiate them. 
M -r' The association’s chairman, Damien Wigny, executive director 
• r • ' '-hi Kredietbank Luxembonigecase, said the ref arms “will put the 

• - JBD in a better position to cope with change” resulting both. 
- Tom deregulation of financial markets and innovation in mstru- 
“T'.uents offered. 

• ' - The reform also included a revamping of the board. The 17 

members will now be reduced to 15 to be elected far a throe-year 
: ‘-am. One-third of the boazdis to stand for election each year and 
" ; 'he first new board elected next May will draw straws to see 

- : Which members sit for only one and two years. A nominating 

Committee has also been created to propose ca n di d a t e s in the 
- : ope that senior bankers, virtually assured of election, will accept 
3 stand for office. 

- The meeting also approved the board’s proposal that new rules 
(Continued ou Paps 9, CoL 1) 


Firms Vow light 
OverWesdand 

Compiled by Our Stttff Fnn Dispedrba 

LONDON ■— Europe’s major 
aerospace companies have pledged 
a renewed fight to persuade share- 
holders of Britain's afloghdicop- 
ter concern, Westland PLC, to re- 
ject a financial rescue bid by a 
United Technologies Crap, subsid- 
' y, of the United States, 
agreement in principle ap- 
proved Friday by Westland's chair- 
man, Sir John Cockney, provides 
fra- Sikorsky to secure control of 
29.9 percent of the company, Brit- 
ain's sole helicopter manufacturer. 
The accord would include a «n«n 
share set aside for Hat SpA of 
Italy. 

It prompted Aerospatiale's 
chairman, Henri Martre, to warn 
that if the Sikorsky agreement went 
ahead, Aerospatiale would be 
forced to look elsewhere for com- 
ponents for its Soper Poma heli- 
copter, currently manufactured by 

Westland. 

The agreement, to bs submitted 
to a meeting of Westland share- 
holders on Thursday, has raised a 
storm of protest among four Euro- 
pean companies whose parallel res- 
cue bid was summarily rejected 
Friday less than two hours after it 
was submitted 

The rival European tod, put for- 
ward by British Aerospace PLC, 
Aerospatiale of France, Messersch- 
midt-Bfilkow-Blohm GmbH of 
West Germany and Agusta of Italy, 
would provide Westland with im- 
mediate orders to keepits order 
book filled as wdl as £30 milli on 
($42 miUton) in operating capital 

Industry specialists said Sunday 
that Michael Hesdtine, Britain's 
defense secretary, would launch a 
bid to overturn the U.S. accord. 

Mr. Ha Htine , Him Ids European 
colleagues, has expressed concern 
that the United Technologies ac- 
cord would relegate Westland to 
the role of subcontractor. 

“We imaid to do all dun is hu- 
manly posable to try to ensure that 
a European deal comes into exis- 
tence,” said David Home, director 
of Lloyds Merchant Bank, which 
represents the European compa- 
nies submitting the oval bid. 

(AFP, Reuters) 


RepubUcBank Thrives on No Risks 



By Eric N. Berg 

New Turk Tima Service 

NEW YORK— Republic Na- 
tional Bank of New York is the 
30th largest U.S. bank. But one 
would never know it from its 
operations. 

Under the hrfm of MmimH j. 
Safra, its conservative Lebanese 
founder, Republic neither courts 
big corporations for loans nor 
casts a wide net for consumer 
deposits. Its loans, in fact, repre- 
sented only $2.71 Nllfon, or 21 A 
percent, of its S12A3 bQtioa is 
assets as of Sept. 30, probably 
the lowest percentage fra any 
major b rokin g organization. 

• What Republic does do — 
quite profitably, analysts say — 
is earn interest on money it de- 
posits at other banks, deal in 
gpld and deliver foreign curren- 
cies to governments and finan- 
cial institutions. 

And with a booming business 
as wdl in “factoring” — buying 
accounts receivable from manu- 
facturers in New Yoik Gt/s 
garment district — Republic 
New York Coqx, the parent 
holding conmany, is dearly 
marching to the beat of its own 
drummer. 

However unlikely these activi- 
ties areas the focus fra a bank, 
they have earned Republic into 
the major leagues of banking and 
wan fra its parent the respect of 
Wall Street A new headquarters 
building to be completed this 
month an Fifth Avenue at 40th 
Street should ™kg the bank, 
which has more than 30 branches 


of cradle tndcMmrinfl _ . 

foreign omrancia* 4.7% »-o%l 

‘Mm turn Md oOw ■ 


in New York City, more visible. 

“Republic is the banking in- 
dustry’s pacesetter in terms of 
earnings quality,” Thomas H. 
Hanley of Salomon Bros, said in 
a research report. 

Indeed, however one classifies 
Republic — as bank, gold bul- 
lion house, currency dealer or 
factor — its results have been 
impressive. Before securities 
transactions. Republic’s 1984 re- 
turn on assets was 0.98 percent 
compared with 0-58 percent fora 
composite of 12 money-center 
banks, according to Salomon. 
Republic’s return on equity was 
15.6 percent, compared with 12 A 
percent for the composite. 

These high returns have not 
been lost on investors. Republic 
New York Crap, stock, which 
has traded at a higher price rela- 
tive to earnings than that of most 
big money-center banks, has ris- 
en steadily from a low of $32 in 
mid-1984 to around $51.25 now. 

To be sure, material amounts 
of Republic’s earnings have 
crane from nonrecurring items, 
such as repealed sales of New 
York City real estate. Moreover, 
one reason that Republic may be 
such a skimpy lender is that it 
has performed relatively poorly 


Ha Nm Yorii Tmw 

Jeffrey C. KdL presi- 
dent of Republic Nation- 
al Bank of New York, at 
the bank's new head- 
quarters under construc- 
tion, and the present 
trading center. 

in that area, extending huge 
amounts of credit to debt- ridden 
Latin American countries. But 
even after adjusting fra those 
factors. Republic’s results are 
still above average, analysts say. 

“I consider it a terrific opera- 
tion," said Charles N. Cranmer, 
an analyst at Goldman, Sachs & 
Co. 

Analysts, in fact, tend to use 
superlatives to describe the com- 
pany. “Possibly the safest bank 
m the United States,” said Rich- 
ard X. Bove, banking analyst at 
Shearson Lehman Bros. 

Even when Republic tries a 
new venture, it does not tackle 
anything too risky. One of its 
latest ventures is trying to repeat 
in Europe a business it has suc- 
ceeded with in the United States; 
providing “private,” or exdu- 
sive, banking services to the rich. 
It has increased tenfold the num- 
ber of staff in London, bought a 
bank in Paris and rolled out an 
international advertising cam- 


GAF Indicates 
It May Raise 

Bid for Carbide 


i private banking business, 
however, was entered years ago 
by other U.S. Kanlcs and is al- 
ready intensely competitive. 
Wall Street analysts say that 
profits from Europe, if they 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 5) 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dupatcba 

NEW YORK — GAF Crap, has 
indicated that it might be willing to 
raise its S68-a-share bid for Union 
Carbide Corp. 

In a letter sent Friday to Union 
Carbide's chairman. Warren M. 
Anderson, GAFs chairman, Samu- 
el J. Heyman, said: "GAF is willing 
to negotiate the terms of its propos- 
al. And so that there will be no 
misunderstanding on your part, 
you and your board should know 
that GAF is willing to discuss any 
aspect of the proposal, including 
price, whether or not there are oth- 
er bidders.” 

A spokesman for Union Car- 
bide. winch has been fighting the 
takeover bid, said the company had 
no comment. 

GAF sweetened the terms of its 
bid on Thursday by offering to pay 
$68 in cash for all of Union Car- 
bide's outstanding shares — a pur- 
chase that would cost GAF nearly 
$4. ! billion. GAF also said that its 
bid was no longer contingent on 
approval from Union Carbide's 
board. 

Originally, GAF had offered to 
pay $68 for 70 percent of Union 
Carbide’s shares, a proposal valued 
at $3 J billion. The balance of the 
shares would have been exchanged 
for preferred stock of equivalent 
value after the takeover. 

GAF decided to increase its offer 
because it was able to raise more 
financing than it originally thought 
it could, analysts said Friday. The 
transaction would be financed by 
the sale of high-yield, high-risk 
bonds, commonly called “junk” 
bonds. Additional financing is 
coming from a $1. 5-billion line oT 
credit from banks. 

Analysts said Friday that by 
sweetening its offer, GAF had 
made the bid more appealing to 
Union Carbide shareholders and 
harder for the giant chemical con- 
cern to resist. 

“A better offer could be in the 
offing,” said one investment ana- 
lyst who asked that he not be iden- 
tified. 

Traders apparently were specu- 
lating about that possibility on Fri- 
day, when Union Carbide's slock 
rose $1 .75 a share, to $69.75, on the 
New York Stock Exchange. It was 
the fourth-most-active stock, with 
2.7 millio n shar es chang in g bands. 


GAFs shares were up S3 JO. to - : 
$65.25. 

By converting the bid completely 
to endi, GAF has disarmed the so- “ 
called “poison-pill” defense that ■ ' 
attempts to make a target company 
too expensive to acquire. It has . 
worked in several cases because ' 
shareholders had doubts about the ' . 
value of the securities they would 1 ' 
have received after an acquisition. 

"In making the offer all cash 
they hare removed that cloud of , 
uncertainty,” said Robert W. Wien. .. 
a vice president in the mergers and . . 
acquisitions group at Dean Witter , 
Reynolds Inc. 

In a separate development. 
Union Carbide said Friday that it .. • 
had agreed to sell its worldwide • * 
films packaging business to Envir- - 
on dyne Industries for S230 million .. y 
in a transaction expected to be ■ ! 
completed by the end of January. • 

The sale is pan of a restructuring 
program that began in August, ac- ' ■ 
cording to Union Carbide, which • 
denied that the move had any thin g •• 
to do wiih the GAF offer. 

f.VIT. APj : * 


AT&T Unit Says 
Paris Backs Pact 

Retaers 

HILVERSUM, Netherlands 
— France has approved the en- 
try of a U.S.-Duicb telecom- 
munications group. ATT-Phil- 
ips Telecommunications BV, 
into its home market, according 
to the group. 

In return, the group's U.S. 
parent, American Telephone & 
Telegraph Co., has agreed to 
support the French state-owned 
Cie. Gtntraie d'Eleclririti in 
the U.S. market, a spokesman 
for ATT-Philips said Friday. 

He said that financial and 
technical details still had to be 
worked out. Plans for produc- 
tion in France of an ATT-Phil- 
ips digital telecommunications 
system would, however, go 
ahead promptly, he said, and 
CGE and ATT-Philips also 
would set up a joint microwave 
transmission company. 


EfrStockholder FSes Suit 
Over RCA-GE Disclosure 


Last Week’s Markets 

AH figures are as erf due of tracing Friday 


Stock Indexes 

ted Sates 

LMWk. PravJM. CMa 
■ lndu*__ 153452 1477.18 +3JB% 

UHL 16&50 165S7 +177% 

Tnm_ 722.14 mSf +4.12% 

PI 00 20440 19672 +190% 

PX0 — 20979 30278 +3J6% 

SECO_ J3074 11A» +X»* 

■■cKNmtHLnAPwla 


■ tafa 

SE 700 MMdfln 

110430 


139900 -134% 
111440 —134% 


United Steles lmmc. nwwc. 

Discount rate— — 

Fsdorol funds rata ~ 

Prims rots— — - 

JSS5 

Discount—— 

CnH mousy 
MMov Interbank — 

West Germany 
Lombard— — 

Owmtotrt — — 

Vmonth Interbank— 

raws 


7Vx 

TV 

9Yi 


5 

an 

8ft 

550 

435 

450 


7ft 

7ft 

tft 


5 

aim 

8ft 


X>Ssrs_ T73SJ8 172139 +029% 


ks<Dj__ 13107.90 1279150 +246% 

gtGamro 

nmsrcbk 181130 1726X0 +454% 

*Jro»Oral*cs,tMbB 


lift 
lift 

a-month Interbank— 117/22 


Bonk base rate. 
Call money. 


550 

445 

490 

lift 

MA. 

NJL 


By James Scemgold 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — A framer RCA 
Corp. shareholder has filed a dass- 
action lawsuit m US. District 
Court against General Electric Ca 
and RCA fra not disclosing earlier 
than they did on Wednesday that 
they had agreed to a merger. 

The suit was filed Friday in 
Manhattan by JecroLd Suffer, an 
RCA shareholder who was said to 
have sold his shares Wednesday. 
RCA’s stock soared more than $10 
by the end of trading Wednesday, 
to $63.50, before the companies 
made any public disclosure that 
they were engaged in merger talks. 

Late Wednesday, after the stock 
market dosed, the companies an- 
nounced that GE had agreed to 
■ RCA fra $66 JO a dure, 
(meant that, in the frantic trad- 
before this news, anyone who 
' the stock because he did not 
know a merger was imminent 
miwwl the increased price: 

The heavy trading and sharp rise 
in RCA node before the axmotmee- 
roent have raised questions about 
the possibility of iTfapoF in cuter 
trading. RCA’s stock jumped 33 
it from 


day. The Chicago Board Options 
Exchange said it was investigating 
that activity. 

The New York Stock Exchange 
has said that it is conducting a 
routine analysis of the trading in 
RCA and GE stock before the 
meqger announcement The Securi- 
ties and F.xchangr Commission 
also is investigating. 

“Whenever there is a price move 
that dramatic it is of concern to the 
commission,” said Mary McCue, 
an SEC spokesman. 

. The Big Bond did not hah its 
trading until minutes before 
the dose on Wednesday, and then 
because of an order imbalance. 

The trading pauses are intended 
to provide a break fra new develop- 
ments to be disscfninaied to inves- 
tors, allowing a fairer chance to 
learn fbe news and assess the situa- 
tion. 

“We acted in an adequate fash- 
ion,” said Richard Trarenzano, an 


jumped 33 Nst 
iy through the 


Polar LartHfe. PnvJNk. Ofm 

Bk Ena I Index— 12490 12730—0.14% 

GoM 

London pun. fbt.S 31775 32230 —1X3% 


comment about business develop- 
ments that might have accounted 
for the move. 

The action in RCA options was 
even headier. The price of the De- 
cember call option, which enables 
an investor to buy the stock at 50, 
rose to 11, from 3ft, on Wednes- 


In other developments, GE stock 
jumped S2J575, to $71, in heavy 
of mare than 5 million 
r riday as investors and ana- 
its responded more positively to 
terms of its merger with RCA 
The increase was, in part, in line 
with a market rally- But analysts 
said that their views of GE after the 
merger were more upbeat after hav- 
ing studied the transaction’s finan- 
cial implications. 

RCA’s stock rose 37 J cents, to 
$59,625, Friday in heavy trading 
after nimNing $4.25 Thursday. . 


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h Indicted by State Grand Jury 

United Fra* International 

CINCINNATI — Marvin Warner, the framer owner of Home 
State Savings Bank, whose collapse set offa banking crisis m Ohio last 
Match, has been indicted on one count of theft by deception, four 
counts of securities violations and 45 of willful misapplication of 
funds. 

T he q^a lsmeffland jury was impaneled on Se^L3^ tomv^gate 

nor Richard F. Celeste to close ten^ra^70 stale-chartered savings 
and loan institutions. 

Home State lost 5145 tnfflinn in the bankruptcy of ESM Govern- 
ment Securities Inc. of Fart Lauderdale, Florida, whose operations 
are under scrutiny by state and federal investigators. 

Thomas Tew, court-appointed receiver fra ESM, testified before 
the state Legislature's Jcmt Select Committee on Savings and Loans 
last month that Mr. Warner had ewtiriwt bfnwidf by 51.8 nritlinn in 
the early !98Qs with 37 straight successful “day trades" through ESM. 

Also indicted Friday were two former presidents of Home State, 
David Schkbd, who was charged with 44 counts of willful 
cation oS funds, five of securities violations and one of theft by 
deception, and Burton M. Bongard, on 44 counts of willful misappli- 
cation of funds. 

Ronnie Ewton, an ESM official, wasindicted on 40 counts of aiding 
and abetting willful misapplication of funds, 12 counts rtf theft by 
deception and four counts of obstruction of justice, and another 
official, George Mead, was indicted on 10 counts of theft by decep- 
tion and one count of obstruction. 


\JIS The Royal Bank 
jt of Scotland 
Group pic 


This hasbeen amomentousyearfbrtheGroup.Ourtwo principal banking subsidiaries 
have been successfully merged. We now have a streamlined bank, headquartered in 
Edinburgh, and we have once again achieved record profits. In addition, two major 
developments have greatly enhanced the spread of financial services we are able to 
offer the public. First, the acquisition of The Charterhouse Group pic adds a new 
dimension to our expertise in serving corporate customers at home and abroad. 

Secondly, we have successfully launched the first venture by a leading bank into the 
underwriting and direct selling of motor insurance. This last novel and highly 
automated operation Is still in its early stages, but initial indications, and customer 
reaction, are encouraging and augur well for the future. 

GROUP OPERATIONS The profit before taxation for the year ended 
30th September 1985 was £166.3 million, an increase of £35.0 million or 27 per cent 
over the previous year Although the clearing bank arm of the Group has been the 
principal contributor to our profits, it Is pleasing to report a creditable profit 
performance from The Charterhouse Group since acquisition. Costs this year 

“IN 1985 WE HAVE MERGED OUR BANKS, ACQUIRED 
A MERCHANT BANK, LAUNCHED AN INSURANCE 
COMPANY AND STILL PRODUCED RECORD PROFITS’ 

Sir Michael Herries, Chairman. 


Key figures 

Year ended 
30 Sept 1965 

Year ended 
30 Sept. 1984 

Change 

Profit before taxation 

£16&3m 

£131.3m 

+27% 

Total assets 

C15^31m 

£ 13.386m 

+12% 

Dhridends per 25p ordinary share 

0.6p 

Rip* 

+19% 

■Adjuaiad ter me Bttectg oltnerignts issue in itobnutty 19B5 



included more than £11 million in respect of non-recurring items associated with the 
merger. 

Our domestic banking policy will continue to be the maintenance of our strong 
base of banking activities throughout the British tstes from Lerwick in the Shetlands to 
St Helier in the Channel Islands and to increase ourshareofthismarket-D espite fierce 
competition we have achieved very satisfactory increases both in numbers of 
customersand inthe use customers make of our services. Internationally, the stronger 
organisation created by integration of resources will enable us to take up any 
opportunities that arise for growth by acquisition. 

LOOKING AHEAD Looking ahead, the only prudent course is to assume that the 
volatility we have experienced in recent years will continue, in both international and 
domesticmarkets.itwouldbeprudentatsotoassumethattherewiiibenolesseningin 
competition. Everything indicates that this will continue and, indeed, intensify. 

These developments make it necessary for us to ensure that our efficiency and 
our service to customers are maintained at a high level. They also make it necessary to 
review carefully our longer-term strategies. This we have been doing, and the new 
ventures we have entered into in the past year are all part of this. 

The unification of our clearing bank business, together with the recent 
acquisitions, will enable us to respond with speed and flexibility to the changes that 
are coming. 

CoiMeaof tt» 1885 Annual Report and Account* may bo obtained from the Secretary, 

TtwHoyal Bank of Scotland Group Wc,3B Si Andrew Square. Ettaiburflb EH2 2YB 


■■A 







































































c W j, )l£i 


TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1985 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


STYLE 


BENEFITS OF LIFE 
ON THE A-LIST 


1 1 | ^ veryone — guests, function- 
: J Hi aries, waiters, the press— 
: -L-iwas looking around, cran- 
king his neck, taking in the amaz- 
! ; ing scene. Up on Ihe Grand Tier 
;f a tail, thin, expensively dressed 
I f woman strode past. A photogra- 
J pher called out, “Mrs. Kissinger!" 
1 5 She turned around, on automatic 
- ? pilot, and struck a winning pose. 
:j A series of flashbulbs went off. 
’i-She walked on. Another celebrity 
\[ -moved past. "Mr. de la Renta!" 
[ Automatic pilot. More flashbulbs. 
; '"Mrs. Kempneri" "Mrs. Taubmani” 

I \- "Mr. Petrie!” 

; • It was the opening night gala at 
;? New York's Metropolitan Opera. 
;i! Chanel had paid $250,000 to un- 
'■ derwrite the affair, which would 
; raise $12 million for the Met The 
; * three-hour performance of Tosco, 
j featuring Montserrat Caballe and 

• Luciano Pavarotti, was finished, 

• ! and the glitterati, who had doled 
‘out $1,000 to $10,000 per seat 

I I were preparing to dine on French 
; food and to watch a fashion show. 
}\ After the curtain came down 
: : ;and the doors opened, it became 
; clear that the main attraction was 
i j-the audience. This evening at the 
;; opera was attended by everyone. 

\ ■' "The Met is a national institution, 
very prestigious organization, 
j.and we attract people from all 
I • over.” said Cecile Zilkha, chair- 
; - man of the gala committee. "They 
flew in for the party from Lon- 
;don. Paris, Switzerland, Corpus 
IXhristi, San Francisco." Gettys, 

: Mellons, Sculls and Rockefellers 
were delighted to be there. A few 
; tables clustered together in front 
held Mrs. Zilkha, Mr. and Mrs. 


Walter Annenberg, Nan Kempner, 
Pat and William Buckley, and 
Nancy and Henry Kissinger. 

They came to see and be seen, 
and that is the crux of the matter. 
They till could have donated 
$1,000 to the opera quietly and 
anonymously and dined instead 
at a charming French restaurant 
where the seats would have been 
more comfortable, the service 
more refined and their table com- 





VENUE 


and institutions for donations 
and publicity has brought about 
a sort of "gala war,” a glitzkrieg 
in which the prime ammunition 
is glamour. 

Public relations man Whitney 
Tower says the competition is 
fierce; “Once the peak season 
begins in the fall, there are often 
three or four big charity events a 
week. It gets very competitive, as 
institutions try to get as many 



Helen Gurley Brown and Kathleen Hearst were among the guests. 


panion chosen by themselves. But 
that’s not the point. 

They came to party, and to 
party in style. In the past five 
years the number of events bene- 
fiting charities and nonprofit in- 
stitutions has increased many 
times to make up for the short- 
fall caused by the Reagan Admin- 
istration's cutback .on funding. 
The competition among charities 


famous people to be on their 
committees as possible. By Christ- 
mastime a lot of people are 
‘committeed-out/ " 

‘It’s imperative for the orga- 
nizers to tailor-make an event 
that's guaranteed to be an attrac- 
tion," says another close observer 
of the scene. 'It's a one-hand- 
washes-the-other situation. The 
magnitude of the Individuals they 


attract to the parties shines on 
the institution, and vice versa." 

Corporate involvement has be- 
come the key ingredient in the 
drive to make bigger, better bene- 
fit parties, and the degree to which 
corporate money is involved is in- 
creasing— even to the point where 
the New York Times reported that 
some guests "questioned" the 
"strong commercial tie-in" with 
Chanel at the Metropolitan opera 
gala. But fund-raising officials say 
that without corporate sponsorship 
the scale of these events would be 
vastly reduced. And to reduce the 
scale of the event means losing 
ground in the glamour war. 

Almost everyone agrees that 
the leading event on the benefit 
circuit is the Metropolitan Mu- 
seum's Costume Institute ball, 
held each December since 1973. 
Sissy Cahan, the Metropolitan’s 
senior development associate, has 
been in charge of putting together 
the gala from the beginning. "The 
Costume Institute had been 
closed for five years, and Tom 
Hoving came to me and said, 
'We've got to make some money.' 
So we said, 'Okay, well give a 
party.' And if you could have seen 
my pathetic little list . . 

Cahan’s pathetic little list wasn't 
all that pathetic. There were about 
450 people on hand for that first 
Costume Institute opening, paying 
$150 a ticket, and they included 
such luminaries as Bill Blass, the 
Oscar de la Rentas, Estee Lauder, 
Princess Diane von Furstenberg, 
Mrs. Jacob Javits, Mollie Pamis, 
Ethel Scull. Simone Levitt, Max- 
Please turn page 


FOOD 


A TASTE OF 

THEIR OWN MEDICINE 


C riticize the critics?” 

New York's leading res- 
taurateurs are never too 
eager to discuss the town's food 
reviewers. In fact, after agreeing 
to be interviewed, one owner of 
two popular eateries demanded 
that his name be stricken from 
the story. Whether this is culinary 
fear and loathing combined with 
a dash of healthy deference is 
not important. The fact remains 
that reviews have enormous im- 
pact — for chefs and owners there 
is nothing more wonderful than 
a food critic's praises, but a bad 
review can mean bankruptcy and 
deep . depression. 

Although word of mouth, a 
good location, ready cash and 
sufficient advertising can help 
overcome a negative review, res- 
taurateurs say it’s not easy to 
bounce back. But according to 
New York magazine's Gael 
Greene, a review alone cannot 
close a good restaurant. It can, 
however, put a bad restaurant 
out of business. 

To this day no reviewer has 
sparked more controversy that 
the former New York Times col- 
umnist Mixni Sheraton, who has 
as many fans as she does critics. 
"I would have loved a better re- 
view from her," says Marvin Page, 
whose popular seafood establish- 
ment, Claire, received a one-star 
appraisal. He concedes Sheraton 
was right and that he was the 
one who made mistakes — in the 
form of an overcooked hambur- 
ger and an imperfect salmon. 

'1 respect Mimi Sheraton very 
much," says Andre Soltner, the 


maestro of the four-star Lutece. 
"But we didn’t always agree. She 
wrote us up five years ago and 
gave us three stars. I expected 
the Fourth one. She objected to 
the duckling with raspberries. I’ve 
used that recipe for a long time,” 
he continues. "I thought she was 
wrong. I'm sure she thought she 
was right. It’s difficult to be 
judged by one person.” 

At least Sheraton got to enjoy 
her dinner at Lutece. Several 
years ago Michael O'Keeffe, 
owner of the Water Club, refused 
to serve Sheraton and asked her 
parly to leave. The highly publi- 
cized skirmish caused quite a stir. 
"Everybody told me that the press 
would kill me," says O'Keeffe, who 
also owns the River Cafe in Brook- 
lyn. "But I ended up getting flow- 
ers from all over the country.” 

Charles Masson of La Gre- 
nouilie is particularly indignant 
about his two-star review in the 
Times last March by Bryan Miller. 
"He described dishes that we 
never serve and that were not on 
the menu. They aren't even a part 
of our cuisine," explains Masson. 
The New York Times critic alleg- 
edly mistook shallots for white- 
fish caviar. 

Gael Greene recognizes that 
some of her colleagues are more 
knowledgeable than others. ‘If 
I'm eating a cuisine that I have 
never tasted in its home ground, I 
judge it strictly on whether or not 
a person who loves to eat would 
love to eat it,” she says. "There 
are some critics who just have 
stronger backgrounds and more 
Please turn page 













INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1985 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


O D LOT 

ORFtVRE A PARIS DEPUIS 1690 







A wine decanter in sterling silver or silver gilt and crystal Goldsmith since Louis XIV, Odiot was at die 
height of his career between 1785 and 1825 when he created his unrivalled masterpieces in gold and silver 
for .the most important people of the time. His clients included the Emperor Napoleon I, President Thomas 
Jefferson, the Tsar Alexander I of Russia, the Due d'Orleans and many others. The tradition lives on at 
“Matson Odiot 1 *, giving you a piece as beautiful as hs famous original 


7;>LACE p^^.M^EIHNE -.SARIS. Tel: 42.65.00.95 - 42.65.76.58 










Available in the Duty Free Shops at Charles de Gaulle Airport and in Finer Select 
Stores throughout France and the United States. 

Showroom* : Pi 7 is 1C riiL 1 Jr; Piriuiw 

i ork. rirrn Avcir.it. 


CALENDAR 


DECEMBER 

Le Louvre des Antiquaires pre- 
sents “Puppets and Asian Shadow 
Theater/' a collection of 500 Asian 
puppets and dolls. Admission is . 
18 francs. Through March 2. Ttoo 
Place du Palais Royal, Paris. For 
information, call 42.972720. 

OO The 31st International 
£d\D Debutante Ball takes place 
tonight in the Grand Ballroom of 
the- Waldorf-Astoria Hotel for the 
benefit of the Leukemia Society 
of America and the Soldiers', 
Sailors' and Airmen’s Club. Mrs. 
Gregory Hedberg is chairing the 
white-tie gala, and Mrs. James H. 
Van AJen is the honorary chair- 
man. The receiving line forms at 
730 pjn., and afterward there 
will be dinner and dancing to the 
music of Lester Lanin and his 
orchestra. Tickets are $175. Park 
Avenue at 50th Street For infor- 
mation, call (212) 861-5911. 

O "1 The Cathedral of St John 
X the Divine's New Year's 
Eve Concert for Peace features 
Leonard Bernstein and Michael 
Barrett conducting the Cathedral 
Symphony Orchestra. The eve- 
ning begins at 730 pm and is 
free of charge. Amsterdam Ave- 
nue at 1 12th Street For informa- 
tion, call (2 12) 678-6998. 

JANUARY 

I The 65th Debutante Assem- 
bly and New Year's Ball will 
introduce debs from the U-S. and 
Europe to an international circle 
of guests at the Plaza Hotel. Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Stith Williams 
head the receiving line, which 
forms at 7:00 pan. Lester Lanin 
and his orchestra will perform. 
Tickets are by invitation only. 
Fifth Avenue at 59th Street For I 
information, call (2 12) 472-0499. I 

3 The Manhattan Urban League ' 
hosts its 19th annual New 
Years' Reception at Windows oh 
the World. Five community ser- 
vice awards will be presented at 
the black-tie gala, which takes 
place from 1:00 to 5 KM) p-m.; 
Brenda Neal serves as chairman. 
Tickets are $50. One World Trade 
Center. For information, call 
(212) 926-8000 . . 


"1 A The Sons of the American 
JLvJ Revolution hosts its 51st 
annual Colonial Debutante Ball 
in the Hotel Pierre. Edward Gynn, 
president of the SAR New York 
chapter, and Mrs. James E O'Don- 
nell are chairing the white-tie eve- 
ning. The receiving line forms at 
7:00 pm., followed by dinner and 
dancing at 8:00. Entertainment 
will be provided by Philip Bennett 
and his orchestra, as well as a fife 
and drum band. Tickets are $95. 
Fifth Avenue at 61st Street For 
information, call (212) 206-1776. 

1 D Alan King serves as mas- 
1^) ter of ceremonies at the 
ATP/JAKS benefit for the Cystic 
Fibrosis Foundation at the New 
York Hilton Hotel Awards will be 
presented to tennis players con- 
sidered most valuable by their 
peers. James Welsh, president and 
cl Jef executive officer of Nabisco, 
is chairing the black-tie event 
Cocktails are at 6 KM) pint, fol- 
lowed by dinner at 7:00. Tickets 
are $250. Avenue of the Americas 
at 53rd Street For information, 
call (212) 889-2244. 

*1 /. The Museum of the City 
JL^T of New York presents 
“Stuart Davis' New York," a com- 
prehensive exhibit comprised of 
some 80 drawings, paintings, 
watercolors and lithographs of 
New York street scenes by the 
prominent early-20th-century 
artist Through March 16. Fifth. 
Avenue at 103rd Street For in- 
formation, call (212) 534-3672.- 

The 12th annual auction benefit 
at Sotheby's for the Lenox Hill 
Neighborhood Association will be 
an evening of sales, dinner and 
entertainment beginning at 6:00 
pjm. with cocktails and a silent 
auction. Edward Lee Cave cpn- 
ducts an 830 auction; dinner and 
dancing will follow. Mrs. Sydney 





Gould, Mrs. Nina B. Griscomand 
Mrs. Robert Wood Johnson IV 
serve as cochairmen. Tickets are 
$175. 3334 York Avenue. For in- 
formation, call (212) 744-5022. 

*1 Cl Members of the American 
JL_y Horse Shows Association, 
the largest national multibreed 
equestrian service organization, 

■II .1 . _ IKU 


John A. Morris is the honorary 
chairman. Committee members 
include Mrs. John R. Hearst. Mp. 
William Randolph Hearst. Jr., 
and Mrs. Howard Phipps. Tickets 

range from $75 to $175. 256 Wes 

47th Street. For information, call 
(212) 661-9846. 

O / A benefit at Avery Fisher 
ZZt Hall for Project Rescue is 
sure to lure even the most con r 
finned wallflower onto the dance 
floor. Contemporaxy, swing and 
disco music will be performed 


A, p 


equestrian T . 

will- gather at the Hilton Palacio for dancers of all ages. The Mac* 
del Rio Hotel in San Antonio for tie evening is sponsored by 

their annual convention. High- group of young professionals and 


lights of the three-day assembly 
include the second annual trade 
show on January .15, a gala din- 
ner-dance and. auction on Jan- 
uary 16 and a full schedule of 
educational seminars. 200 Alamo, 
San Antonio. For- information, 
call (212) 759-3070. 


1 Q -TFe Foundation for Chil- 
-LO dren with Learning Dis- 
abilities' annual benefit begins at 
the 1230 pm. semifinals of the 
Nabisco Grand Masters tennis 
tournament at Madison Square 
Garden. Afterward,, guests' will 
head to the Marriott Marquis for 
a 5:00 pan. cocktail reception and 
dinner-dance. Entertainment will 
be provided by Peter Duchin and 
his orchestra. Mrs. Peter Rozelle 
and D.C. Staley, chairman and 
• chief executive officer of NYNEX, 
serve as chairmen. Dress is in- 
formal Madison Square Garden; 
1700 Broadway. For information, 
caH (212) 687-721L ' 


A T The Girl Scout Council 
Zi 1 of Greater New York 
hosts its annual , benefit at the 
Brooks Atkinson Theater with an 
8:00 pan. performance of the 
award-winning play Benefactors. 
Mrs. Robert N. Downey is chair- 
ing the black-tie event, and Mrs. 


runs from 830 p.m. to 2:00 a.m. 
Tickets are $35 in advance, $45 
at the door. For information, call 
(212) 677-2352. 

An opening-night Patron's Pre- 
view Party launches the 32nd 
annual Winter Antiques Show at 
the Seventh Regiment Armory 
for the benefit of the East Side 
Settlement House. The 5:00 p.m. 
cocktail/buffet will be held in 
the armory's Tiffany Room. Tick- 
ets are $250. The show begins 
tomorrow and features an array 
of antiques and objets d’arL The 
Honorable and Mrs. Angier Bid- 
dle Duke are honorary chairmen 
for the event Through February 
2. Tickets are $7. Park Avenue at 
67th Street. For information and 
a listing of show hours, call 
(212) 665-5250. 

The Araerican-Russian Aid Asso- 
ciation's 36th annual Bal Blanc in 
the Plaza Hotel will ring in the 
Russian New Year. Mrs. TLJ. Oak- 
ley Rhinelander and Betsy von 
Furstenberg are chairing the 
black-tie event Cocktails at 8:00 
p.m. will precede dinner and 
dancing. AJex Donner and his 
orchestra will entertain. Tickets 
are $175, $90 for juniors. Fifth 
Avenue at 59th Street For infor- 
mation, call (212) 787-0206. 


STYLE 

Continued from opening page 


ime de la Falaise, Denise Hale 
and, of course, Diana Vreeland. 
Still, most of the guests , were 
drawn from the fashion industry. 

From relatively humble origins 
the Costume Institute affair has 
grown to the point where more 
than 800 of the A-list pay $750 for 
cocktails and dinner, and hun- 
dreds more, are left disappointed 
at being unable, to . attend. It has 
become such a hot ticket that 
gate-crashing is now a big prob- 
lem. "We catch them. We know 
who they are by now; they're pro- 
fessional crashers. There's one 
very attractive young man. I wish 
he'd give me Ws name, because 
we have a lot of old ladies who'd 
be happy to bring him. He 
wouldn’t have to crash." 


F ifty years ago Elsa Maxwell, 
the legendary caffe society 
party giver, summarized 
what she expected from her 
guests: "First, I want a woman 
guest to be beautiful. Second, I 
want her to be beautifully 
dressed Third, I demand anima- 
tion and vivacity. Fourth, not too 
many brains. Brains are always 
awkward at a gay and festive 
party. Above all things," she con- 
tinued, "a man should be good- 
looking. Then he should boast a 
tailor who is an artist Third, he 
must not be overly married” 

Just as styles in; fashion, food 
and decorating change over the 
years, so do tastes in party guests. 
Today power— more than looks— 
is the magic ingredient “Invite 
anyone who will cause a com- 
motion,” says Aileen Mehle, who 
chronicles the parties of the rich 
in her daily "Suzy” column in' the 
New York Post "Any top movie 
star or rock star. Or TV star, 
somebody from 1)31138.' Heads 
of state are the most powerful 
Find a powerful person with a 
sense of humor, like President 
and Mrs. Reagan." 

One regular on the circuit out- 
lines the perfect party roster 
'Abu have to have representatives 
of talent beauty, money, success- 
ful business acumen, lineage. If 
you got the Meflons to come, that 
would take care of the lineage 


thing. Then, Barbara Walters; Bill 
Paley, the best-known model the 
world's richest person currently, 
someone like what Henry Ford 
used to be thought of; Jerzy 
Kosinski. These people know 
what's going on in the world — 
who's taking what drugs, who's 
got how much money. They know 
where the bodies are buried, they 
know what the relationships are, 
who’s who in the Kremlin. AH 
that stuff that gives them dimen- 
sion. Barbara Walters could be 
at a party talking to one person, 
and ten people will stand around 
and listen.” 

Another requisite for a success- 
ful party is strict adherence by the 
hosts to the dictum: “Nothing suc- 
ceeds like excess.” Nikki Haskell 
a professional party person who j 
teaches a class on how to get in- 
vited to the right affair, found the 
Costume Institute event a little on 
tiie boring side, because of the 
Party’s equestrian theme. It wasn't 
quite excessive enough. 

The impact of excess is espe- 
cially pronounced when the party 0- 
is private. Says Suzy: "Drue'- 
Heinz, Mrs. Jack Heinz the 2ndU ” 
threw the biggest splash for 
Jack’s 75th birthday last spring* 
in a little park behind their house 
in Sutton Place. People came “ 
dressed up in 1890s costumes. * 
There was a barge on the river,-- 
fireworks after dinner, sheep'. I 
roaming on the meadow, actors-;- 
on swings, .mimes and clowns} /- 
the guardrail was garlanded witfrU 
fruits and flowers— all in that lit- ' 
tie park. It was the perfect pri- A 
vate party." * 

An'^what of the current boom 
w . -nd party giving? Will it ’ 

* fr out soon? No, says Hugh^ / 
Ptuey, a SoHo gallery owner and * 

LT eguI ^' on party circuit.:? 
tnese days not only do you note : 
need an excuse to have a party/ V! 
u J* s aJroost obligatory. Any'l; - 

^ bUSineSS ' new P^uct, new-P 
fnyttung seems to warrant hav-^ 
a party. Clubs compete witb/ h 
each other, a charity has to raise 3 
5?* a rock band has a new * 
video, whatever. You have to -J 
have a party.” j 

- — Justine BUur^ 








JOTTONATIONALHERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1985 


m 


h i 


r-. . 'ht ' 


ABVERTISINGSECnON 


ADVERTISING SECTION 




;*i&r 

V 


SUBURBAN STYLE 


r<&. TAKES ON NEW YORK 

Lji- ^ : 


•i». C r f ’Vi .... 

- . • 

\ s \\i Jr ' ,; sjT* olor" says Verna Gibson, 
Gt r A her; ready, but- her 
* 1 Invoice a little hoarse for a 
'^-^5 am discourse on .the latest 
?rr U*.jd in women's fashions, "is in 
year. Patterns are bold and, 
; ; :| iting. The emphasis . is. very 
ln !‘j;> j:h on self-expression.'' 

plor is in? Patterns are exdt- 
* Self-expression is being 


selves or the, parent company that 
owns- them, Based in Columbus, 
Ohio; .but perpetually expanding 
under the aggressive stewardship 
of its- founder and -chairman, 
Leslie Wexner, The Limited, Inc., 
boasts of being known as “the 
fastest-growing, most profitable 
_ specialty, retailer- in the Country/’ 
according to Forbes magazine. Its* 





■•''ijj 00 ” ^ erna Gibson has brought the Limited Stores to A few York.. 


V‘ s ’** ^hasized? Somehow the state- 
! ‘ j: ^ r -’ats don’t sound all that con- 
- r “ ] S^ing, even coming, as they do, 
the president of one of the 
■ L'A'i^iry's largest fashion retailers, 
• - Jr -Y; Limited Stores, whose spar- 

• ' g new triple-decker showpiece 

• : vijjust opened at the comer of 
1 ^^ison Avenueand Sixty-second 

: v.-.-.-.iset in Manhattan, 
i. "''certainly, the typical Madison 
nue consumer, who knows a 
i or two about color and pa t- 
is (to say nothing of self- 
ression), may nonetheless be 
jiven for not being exactly up- 


1984 sales totaled $13 billion. 
This megachain has more than 
1,400 retail outlets— nearly 600 
of them under the Limited Stores 
banner and hundreds more un- 
. der such specialty names as Lane 
Bryant, Sizes Unlimited, Pic-A- 
Dilly's and Lemer's. Just this fall . 
The Limited purchased Henri 
, BendeL the prestigious West Fifty- 
seventh Street specialty store. But 
its footholds in tony urban set- 
tings beHeitsfargreater habitat — - 
the- suburban shopping malL 
There are those who might 


question the boldness of opening 
late on the successes of the .... sw^ajay^sperialty depart- 
ited — either the stores them- ‘ ment store in the heart of the 


.city's .most competitive fashion 
. turf. Add to that the significant 
differences in marketing; traffic 
and style between Madison Ave- 
nue and the average shopping 
mall, plus the recent slump in 
both the apparel and retail indus- 
tries, and clearly, the Limited has 
its work -cut out for it. 

Gibson has her own brand of 
confidence: "I truly believe the 
New York girl has been waiting 
for us — for our service, our pric- 
ing and our merchandise.” In fact, 
she claims, some haven't been 
able to wait at all. “We came 
across a lady from one big East 
Side apartment house who took 
a cab out to our Paramus store 
and bought 82 Forenza sweaters. 
She had gone around her build- 
ing getting orders from all her 
friends." So much for any mall 
stigma along the avenue. 

In Gibson's world there is but 
one driving creed. 'It's our job as 
merchants to predict what 
women will buy and get it to them 
at the best value and with the 
highest level of excitement," she 
intones. Clearly, this is muse to 
Les Wexner's ears. The energetic 
Limited chairman credits his 
Limited Stores president with 
much of the company’s growth 
and direction. “Verna started with 
us. when we were still a Midwest- 
ern chain of just a few stores," 
says Wexner. "She’s aggressive, a 
super manager and a super mer- 
chant — -which in my book means 
listening to the customer’s point 
of view. We couldn't have gotten 
where we are without hen" 

Still, Wexner acknowledges the 
“enormous expectancy" in setting 
up a first-time New York shop. 
"Operationally, Madison Avenue 
will be our toughest challenge,” 
he admits. 

V erna Gibson is a staunch 
family loyalist — married at 
the tender age of 18 "and 
still going strong” 24 years and 
two grown daughters later. Thus, 
although she now is constantly 
on the road, Gibson will readily 
cut short a jiinket to Hong Kong 
or Paris to Return home . to 


her husband in Columbus. 

A native of Elkview, West Vir- 
ginia, Gibson began working her 
way through Marshall University 
in the early ’60s as an assistant 
buyer For the local Smart Shops. 
She wound up staying at Smart 
Shops for six years, working her 
way up to merchandise manager, 
until her husband Jim, then an 
executive for Schick razors, was 
transferred to Columbus in 1971. 
At the time, Les Wexner’s Limited 
Stores was a modest regional 
name in sportswear boasting all 
of eight locations. But its reputa- 
tion was growing, and Gibson 
remembers her first encounter 
with the Wexner product as if 
the store were a matinee idoL 

'1 was walking down a mall in 
Columbus/' she recounts, "and as 
soon as I saw my first Limited 
Store I fell in love. I ran to a pay 
phone, called Les Wexner and told 
him I had to meet him right away.” 

The Limited's young boss of- 
fered his new recruit a slot as mer- 


chandise trainee. That continued 
for some months, until the day 
Wexner, says Gibson, "came into 
my office and told me to go to Cali- 
fornia to do our Christmas buying. 
I was scared to death. Suddenly I 
had to fill up a whole holiday line. 
It was. quite an education.'' 

From there, Gibson's rise was 
fairly straight— advancing over 
the next 14 years through every 
rank a retail executive could ex- 
pect. Finally, this past June, she 
was named president of the 563- 
store division. There were a few 
uneven moments along the way, 
such as the rare closing of a Lim- 
ited store, which Gibson attrib- 
utes to “poor mails out in the 
boondocks.” More memorable 
were a couple of terrible seasons 
she suffered as a merchandise 
manager in the mid-70s — a time, 
she recalls, when "a lot of people 
said we weren't going to make it 
as a business." 

Gibson has scored her share of 
knockouts — for instance, the line 


of lambswool sweaters she im- 
ported one year from Hong 
Kong that set a national rage for 
their sequined panda bear de- 
sign. Or the shiny Lurex sweaters 
brought out early one July that 
sold out immediately. 

And now Madison Avenue be- 
comes the latest trophy, though 
Gibson isn't likely to linger in New 
York very long. There are. after 
all, 562 other stores to worry 
about, not to mention overseas 
manufacturers, a new business 
plan and next year's merchandise 
forecasting. Most of all, there is 
Columbus, where her husband 
now runs a pair of upscale home 
furnishings stores and where her 
daughters check in from college. 
Becoming reflective for a mo- 
ment, she says of the new Sixty- 
second Street showcase: ‘Tve 
waited a long time to open a store 
as spectacular as this one, but as 
much as I love New York, Colum- 
bus is still my home.” 

— Allan Ripp 


FOOD 


Continued from opening page 


positive tastes in one area or 
another. I'm not going to start 
naming names.” 

W ith more than 10,000 
restaurants in New York 
and as many as three se- 
rious restaurant openings a week, 
staying on top of food trends isn't 
easy. “You can't cover everything," 
acknowledges Greene. “The food 
world is so busy and gossipy. 
Everyone considers himself or 
herself a food critic, so you are 
constantly getting leads. There are 
neighborhoods where you might 
not be likely to discover some- 
thing while walking down the 
street, but you will nevertheless 
get letters, phone calls and tips. 
It's important to find out what 
New Yorkers like, but it doesn’t 
•mean it will match what a 


demanding palate thirsts for.” 

Just as it is possible to question 
a critic's taste or judgment, it is 
possible to engage in polemics 
about the star rating system. Soh- 
ner finds this method inadequate, 
contending that restaurant re- 
views should be more like those 
for theater or films. 

Greene says that using the star 
system on a weekly basis would 
drive her crazy. 'T deliberately 
chose not to do it,” she says. 'It’s 
hard to compare a tiny Inexpen- 
sive restaurant in Chinatown with 
Le Cirque. When 1 do something 
about 20 restaurants in the same 
category, I find it's possible to give 
stars or mouths signifying plea- 
sure. I admire the Times critics 
for being able to take on that task, 
but sometimes they slip." 

O’Keeffe is also against a sys- 


tem that lumps decor, ambiance, 
service and price together. "They 
should have a board with lots of 
people giving input,” he says. 
“Miller gave the Water Club one 
star, but it reads like a two and 
one-half star review.” O’Keeffe 
cites the Washington fbst’s sys- 
tem as an example of a more 
efficient rating method. There a 
restaurant's characteristics are 
judged individually. 

Rating system or no, reviews 
can often teach restaurant own- 
ers a thing or two. Soltner re- 
counts a visit from Gael Greene. 
"1 was sure she was going to de- 
stroy us,” he confesses sheepishly. 
"She’s a tough cookie. At one 
point she said my frozen rasp- 
berry souffle was grainy. OF 
course my reaction was who is 
she? She writes better, but I'm 
the cook. My recipe is a classic 
from 20 years ago. It annoyed 
me. The next day, when I was 
calmer, I ate my souffle, and you 
know what? It was grainy." 

— Blanka Nedela 


*c- 


• -V. 



monsieur carven monsieur 


NOEL 



75 

Faubourg St Honore 
75008 Paris 

47.42.66.62 


r 








Page 8 


IN'I'KRNA TIftN ^I, PP PAin TOlPiriim iirtam i ! 


k\ TOR K\ R TWBVm; MOWiJCIi 19«S 




saN^samo «smo^ 


Magie noire 




LANCOM E 

PARIS 
































INTERNATIONAL HERAXJOTRIBXJNE. MONDAY, DECEMBER 16,1985 


Page 9 
M 


a s 

kT‘ 



• ■•“T 

¥ 



i 

r nirosiona issues 

. ^ by Laurence DardeUes from information supplied by European bond traders. 


v|§|: . 

' i. V ‘ 

Amoimt. 

{mHBon^ 

Mat. 

Coup. 

% 

Price 

Price 

end- 

week 

Term 

RATE NOTES 

' 






. $100 

2001 

3/16 

100 . 

9970 

Omr 6nxirdfa Liber. Cdfobfa at per in 1971. Fma 045%. 
DarinMoa SID^OOQ. PayiiloJan.15. 

.. . 

$150 

..1996. 

fiba 

ioaio 

9937 

toina peggvl iq tfw offorod rotate AtepMh EuredoOan. 
Noncafloble. Feei (LI SILDenemnatieni $100/100. PaycUe 
Jhl». 


..$750 

•2011 

003 

100.10 

9935 

6«nerth Ufaer. CaHebfo at per in 1 987 end redeemable 
or per in 1998. Eeoi 11U1 Denommetiew S100/XS. Pay- 
able Jon. 9. 

ftjjhfeffta' 
reefifk s?Jt . 

DM250 

1996 

• Y* 

IX 

99j6D 

Owr twth Lfcor . Ataamam eoupen IX. NniaMb 
Feat 0 J0V Peyobta Jan. B. 

JFDpoon Investment 

arifo-V* ’• •• 

DM125 

1990 


IX 

■ — 

Over trnontfi Ubor. Manun coupon 7604. Noeorlnble. 
Fen not cfodand. Payable Dec. 19. 

EtwbiiK'fincmca " 

DM300 

:>996 

3/16 

IX 

— 

Dnr 6menlh Libor. Mbbmi coupon 8S4. Noaoalabla, 
Rm« 0/4394. Payable Jan. 9. 

XHttOUPON 

’■Gapilulr: 

$150 

1993 

9K 

1XK 

9fL38 

NomxUM. PayaUe Jot 16 

uenorrHectric 

. 

$100 

1.995 

. 

vm 

98.40 CalattQ al 101 Min 1990. Aiw 100/X1D warraiW, pncod at 
$25 «adv — rainfeto at pa Mb an trffrficnl, waJablt 
bond. LoMar bond can ba bought with wuiuiiU pica hod 
bon* during tho fir<t 5 yocwj, ihea Mth wronb end cwK 
Warrcnb may be pat back for $15 oodi during tha lost 5 
yam or be ladmnod til mateHty at S25nadi.Pnyjbli Dae. 

27. 

^uitable Lord Realty 

$105765 

1995 

10M 

99ft 

99.X 

Noncnfldbln. Sinking fund to (tort in T993. Initial by 
prepvly. Pbyabie Dec 30L 

jjfiabfe'Lord Realty 

$100 

1997 

1016 

99ft 

98A3 

NoncdUk. SUdng font to stmt in 1996. BcxW by 
property. tayefaU Doc 30. 

-odw-8. ^Gamble 

$150 

20Q1 

9H 

10016 

98X 

NonceCafale. Payable Jen 14. 

afefa^Secwoe Bedtric 
.GariCo. - .. •' 

$75 

1996 

W 

1X16 

— 

Cdlabb at 10116 m 1999. Payable Jan. 14. 

.yddHhExport Credit, 

$100 

1993 

9M 

101% 

9975 

NonrcUnhlo. Feyrfde ei Jag. 

/qr&Badk 

$200 

2001 

10 

100% 

10025 NanodfoU*. DananncOions $10/100. Payable Dec 23. 

ipanTtfiancfl Corp. 
jirMmqpal 

DM 100 

1992 

6ft 

9934 

99 JO 

CdH4e at VXtA in 1990. Paycbie Dec 23. 

riitNcrfond 

FF500 

2000 

10H 

9934 

98X 

CofinbUt md ladnemcWe at par in 1993 v4ien new tm 
may be fat Payable Jan. 14. . 

erifAwst 

BCU 40 

1993 

9 

IX 

9838 

NencafaMe. Ptayable Feb. la 

ibAun.ydma. 

ECU 50 

1996 

9 

IX 

98X 

NanodUile. Smleng fond to riwt ei 1992, PuyuUe Jen. IS. 

Export Getft 

ECU 60 

1993 

8% 

1X14 

9836 

Calable or 101 in 199Z SMang fond to (tort ia 1 988. Payable 
JmvM. 

urtpicriNew . 
sdlrindBanking' 

Au450 

1990 

15W 

1X16 

9830 

NnncJiAlt. BayeAle Jan. 29 in ntorfa or in US. dolpn. 

jxrifyaspnde 

E^AgpcobUp 

AujS 40 

1991 

1534 

10034 

99 . 13 

Nonadabie. Payable Jwl 29. 


AutS 40 

1990 

1416 

IX 

9730 

Noneoloble. Payable in Jan. 


Y 20,000 

1993 

6ft 

101 

9930 

NanedUh. Aiyedde Jwu 10. 

jroSjna l . • 

Y20JXX) 

1993 

6ft 

10114 

98.63 

GUIa 1O0X a 1996 Ptayable Feb. 16 


Y 20,000 

1996 

8 

101V6 

— 

Noncofcrfile. Bedeemable at molvrity at 177JD yen per 
dollar for a total of $1127 raiBofi. Payable Jan. 17. 

lonsooto 

T • 

YlOJIOO 

1996 

8» 

10164 

9875 

NencJable. Bedeemable at moTurity c* 12V yen per dollar 
far a Met of $5SL9 aflon. Payable Jen. 31. 

uMOmerico 

rionpai 

Y10JXX) 

1991 

a & 

101 

99.13 

1.1 W R-». i__ m 

rOullUUIO. 1 UJIIAAB JuL Jlfc 

3UHY-UMCH> 







qiih'&Nephew 
imriated 
xnpantes . 

$60 

2000 

open 

IX 

9830 

Coupon Moated at 5I46M04. Noncaflable. Cenwertible at 
ai eaerttii 5 to 764 premium. Terms to be (et Dec 18 
Payable Jem. & 

aruzen Showa 
yii 

DM 25 

1990 

2% 

IX 

— 

NoneaUiia. Eedi SJMOrmk bond with one eunrt aaer- 
aabie Wo 873 dune at 466 yen per (hme end at 81 35 ymi 
per iooHl 

iH Group 

Au$75 

1995 

11 

10016 

’ 

Nancalabia. ConvarlUe ct Ane$ 1292 per (harai Payable 

Dec 26 


^EtfROPEMTCOflltMOiVflTY' 


J''."' .w W1 - <•.*«&«& 



(Cartoned from Page 7) 

leaning arbitration procedures 
pot . forth, at the meet general 
etiqg. : 

■ir. Wigny also announced that 
- .bona had commissioned a 
fy on establishing an electronic 
hog system in which prices 
ild be available cm video display 
ts on bankas’ desks. Such a 
ins, Mr. Wigny said, would sat- 
• “the market’s need for more 
lSparency." Al present, indjvid- 
3 market makers show their 


prices oo screens that other banks 
can consult 

Hie smdy on establishing a com-' 
pater-assisted trading and quoting 
system is being undertaken with 
the aid of the National Association 
of Securities Dealers whose Nas- 
daq system is used in the U.S. over- 
the-counter equities market. The 
study is expected to be oomplriflrt 
in September 1986. 

Mr. Wigny also said the board 
would meet with leading market 
makers at the end al next month to 


s New York 


discuss whether the existing level of 
capital committed to the Eurobond 
market is adequate. Mr. Wigny 
noted that the explosion in the vol- 
ume of new issues marketed each 
year has not been accompanied by 
a significant increase either in the 
number of market soakers or the 
capi ta li zatio n of existing firms. 

Market makers put capital at 
risk and provide liquidity to the 
market. The question, he said, is 
whether the existing level of liquid- 
ity is adequate or whether it is a 
potential problem. 


discount Rate Cut Seen E.F. Hutton 

& Unlikely This Month Expects Loss 

biQuarter 


By H.J. Maidenberg 

- No* York Timer Service 

EW YORK. — The Federal 
rve is unlikely to cat its dis- 
it irate to financial institutions 
site current lewd of 7 5 percent 
[ after New Year’s Day because 
is been relatively generous in 


IS. CREDIT MARKETS 


_ credit according to W3- 
SulKvan Jr, senior vice 
idem of Dean Witter Ram- 
is credit markets waited in vain 
aFriday foe the Fed to cut its 
; Treasury bill and other short- 
i rates fe5 further. The rate on 
current 90-day bills, for exam- 
fdl 7 basis points, to 6.78 per- 
, its lowest since late Septem- 
;Vwheu the major industrial 
ads moved to reduce the doL 
T«dne, 

idds on Treasury notes and 
3% maturities that arc usually 
one from direct Fed credit 
(it maneuvers, dosed narrowly 
xt'" 

the Fed does wait until the new 
Wwomeot securities dealers 
costly carrying chaiges for 
Treasury bill inventories, an- 
te factor that may have de- 
ped runs recently, Mr. Sullivan 
One reason is that the repur- 
K or repo, rate on Mb is cur- 
py dose to the federal funds 
which was at 7 13/16 percent 
Bday. Hie difference between 
epd rate and the rate on bilk is 
feet what it now costs dealers 
tny Treasury Mis. 
softer reason for the decline in 
rales, Mr. Sufflvan said, was 
many institutional portfolio 
agns are starting to dose their 
i for the quarter and year, a 
: that is expected to become 
r evident tins week. At such 
t, ' institutions tend to park 
cash in Treasury bflls and oth- 
lort-tcrm instruments. The re- 


sulting dwnnnd tends to weigh 
down rates. 

In the secondary market for 
Treasury debt issues, current 90- 
day biDs were bad at a rate of 6.98 
percent, off 7 basis points. The 
companion six-month bills also 
dosed at a rate of 6.98, down 4 
basis points, and the one-year bin 
rate was unchanged at 7 .02 percent. 

Among the intermediate issues, 
the 8-5-percent notes of 1987 rose 
1/32, to 100 2/32, for a yield of 
7.90; the 914s of 1991 gained 1/32, 
to 101 28/32, to yield 8.66 percent, 
and the 9Js of 1995 lost 3/32, to 
101 28/32, and now yield 9.21 per- 
cent. At the long end of the market, 
the 10.75s of 2005 rose 1/32, to 109 
1/32, for a yield of 9.70, and the 
9M& of 2115 gained 2/32, to 103 
10/32, for a yield of 9.53 percent, 
compared with 9.86 percent a week 
earlier. 

While cash prices of longer-term 
Treasury debt issues moved nar- 
rowly, buyers eagerly bonght Trea- 
sury bond futures in Chicago, 
where the spot December contract 
dosed up 17/32, to 84 13/32. 


US. Consumer Rales 

Far Week Ended Dee T3 

Passbook Savinas 

_&50* 

Tax Exempt Bonds 

Bond Buyer ZH&cnd Index- — — 

_ 842 % 

Money Market Fundi 

DonogtM's 7-Day Average— — 

_ 7.51 % 

Bank Money Market Accounts 
Bank Rato Monitor index 

_687% 

Home Mortgage 

-1243* 


Sahara Consider IMV Tic 

The Assadartd Press 

BELGRADE — Subaru, the 
Japanese 'auto manufacturer, is 
Studying joining with a Yugoslav 
manufacturer, fMV, to make a car 
to compete in the United States 
with the Yugo GV, another Yugo- 
slav auto, by Zastava. 


By Eric N. Bag 

New York Tima Soviet 

NEW YORK— RF. Hutton has 
disclosed that it bad a loss of 57 
million during October and No- 
vember and would take one-time 
char ges totaling $24 mtftinn before 
taxes in December. 

As a result, the brokerage firm 
said Friday, it would probably re- 
port a loss in the fourth quartet. 

Wall Street analysts oiled the 
disclosure surprising in fight of re- 
ports by analysts that other broker- 
age firms are enjoying robust prof- 
its. 

Hutton attributed its prospective 
loss to three factors. 

First, it will take a 514-million 
charge to account for losses from 
dealings with First American 
Mortgage Co, a Baltimore concern 
that scad Hutton mortgages and 

soot afterward collapsed. 

Second, it will take a SlO-nriDion 
charge because of its inability to 
collect fully on a 544-ntiDkm fOU 
from an investment banking cheat 
that it would not identify. Hutton 
had previously disclosed the exis- 
tence of this problem. 

Third, in the first two months of 
the quarter, Hutton had a S3 1 -mil- 
lion decline in profits from ils bond 
department, contributing to the $7- 
milliop nfitloss. 

Al though the company earned 
commi&aons from baying and seflr 
mg bonds fa- clients, it suffered 
significant losses in bonds it 
bought fa its own portfolio. 

“Fa Hutton to rake a tet ou this 
is quite surprising” said Perrin 
Long, an analyst who follows the 
securities business for Lipper Ana- 
lytical Services Inc. 

■ Earlier this year, Hutton pleaded 
gnilfy to government charges of 
bilking banks out of nnlHoos of 
dollars in interest through a com- 
plex check-id ting scheme. 


Akzo Uses New Measure 
To Contest Fibers Ban 

. By Steven J. Dtyden 

International Haeld Tribune 


BRUSSELS — A new measure 
by the European Community to 
counter unfair trading practices 
has beenput to usefor the first time 
by a Dutdi petrochemicals group. 

The community’s New Trade 
Policy Instrument was invoked by 
Akzo NV when it asked the EC 
Commission Dec. 10 to investigate 
a ban by the US. International. 
Trade Commission on imports of 
Akzo’s Twaroo aranud fibera 
The EC measure was created last 
year to enable die community to 
respond mac quickly to such U.S. 
trade moves. 

A longstanding patent dispute 
between Akzo and Du Pon t Co. 
over the aramid fibers, a durable 
thread used by the armaments in- 
dustry, resulted in the nC rufing. 

The comnns&on has 60 days to 
determine whether to accept the 
Akzo complaint. If it does, and 
subsequent talks with the United 
States do not resolve the issue, h 
can then recommend retaliatosy no- 
tion against Dn Pont 
In a separate development, the 
commission fined Also the equiva- 
lent of S8J1 milfioa for violating EC 
antitrust rules, a conmnsaan state- 
ment reported. It said it was the 
largest antitrust fine ever impoteri 
by the ftwimiwjon and ft was or- 
dered because the c om p an y had 
abused its dominant position in tlu> 
otganic peroxides market by at- 
tempting to drive a smaller compet- 
itor from the market 


The issue, wfaDc not i 
large amounts of trade, 
symbolic importance for the Unit- 
ed States because of a ruling 
against die community by a panel 
of the General Agreement on Tar- 
iffs and Trade. 

The United States had argued 
unsuccessf ully that the community 
should accept the GATT findings 
on the issue, which President Ron- 
ald Reagan cited in September 
when he opened a campaign 
against tradmg practices he stud 
were banning U S. exports. 

Commissum Portfolios 

Are to Be Reallocated 

The EC Commissi on is facing 
what could be an unusually diffi- 
cult meeting Jan. 3 when it reorga- 
nizes the sharing of portfolios to 
make room fa the new Spanish 
and Portuguese commissioners. 

Jacques Delos, the commission 
prescient, has said be would relin- 
quish two of his portfolios, mone- 
tary affairs and social aid funds, 
but other commissioners wifi also 
be expected to give up certain re- 


GATT Delegates 
Cite Trade Goals 

The Associated Press 

NEW DELHI — Delegates 
from 47 developing countries 
have concluded a meeting by 
calling fa the exclusion of 
trade in services from, a new 
round of global trade talks, say- 
ing the issue “poses a serious 
threat” to free trade. 

The countries wQ] present 
their proposals next month to a 
preparatory committee that will 
make up the «g«da fa negoti- 
ations of the General Agree- 
ment on Tariffs and Trade, a 
conference spokesman said. No 
date for the new GATT talks 

The meeting in New Delhi, 
which ended Friday, was aimed 
at preventing industrialized na- 
tions from including services, 
such as hanking, shipping and 
insurance, in future GATT ne- 
gotiations. 


U.S. Saiclto Abandon TEreat 
To Future Japanese Chips 


By Smart Auerbach 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The White 
House has backed down from a 
plan to penalize imports of the next 
generation of Japanese semicon- 
ductors if the government finds Ja- 
pan is selling existing computer 
chips below market value, accord- 
ing tO artimnictratinn somCK. 

A ranking White House aide said 
Friday that Commerce Secretary 
Malcolm Baldrige overstepped the 
authority given him by President 
Ronald Reagan by threatening 
computer memory chips still on the 
drawing boards. 

He said Mr. Baldrige was autho- 
rized only to investigate charges 
that Japanese companies were 

“dumping" existing chips —selling 
them fa less than their cost of 
production to capture a major 
share of the U.S. market. 


Mr. Baldrige was unavailable fa 
comment. Bui Commerce Depart- 
ment aides asserted Friday that 
Mr. Baldrige believes (hat his an- 
nouncement on Dec 6 followed the 
president's directions and that he 
would defend his position at the 
White House on Monday. 

Sources at the department said 
extending penalties to future gener- 
ations of chips is “routine*' and is. 
pan of a dumping investigation ini- 
tiated by Micron Technologies of 
Idaho. The only difference they 
said, is that this investigation was 
started by the White House. 

William Walker, an attorney 
with the New Yak and Washing- 
ton firm of Mudge Rose Guthnc 
and Alexander, said that the Japa- 
nese felt Mr. Baldrige was being 

“excessively aggressive" in trying 

to indude future generations of 
computer chips in the investiga- 
tion. 


Guidelines Over Noise 
Approvedby Council 

The Council of Ministers has ap- 
proved the first comnmnitywide set 
of guidefines on noise levels in the 
workplace 

TTiR gniiMinw gay that ar a “ gfn- 

eral principle” rides resulting from 
expos ur e to noise most be reduced 
to the lowest level technically and 
economically possible 

Noise prevention measures are 
required when the level exceeds 90 
decibels on the average Hming * 
working day, and when it exceeds 
85 decibels at any twe mrv. Unions 
had ratlwd fa an average t hrwthnld 

of 85 deribds. 

Because of objections from some 
member states, a proposal requir- 
ing tighter standards for new fac- 
tory installations was not approved 
by the ministers. 

Agreement an Subsidies 
To Canners Announced 

The United States and the com- 
munity have settled another trade 
issue, co n cern in g the US. com- 
plaint over EC subsidies to frim 
camera . 

Under tire agreement, the com- 
munity wifi reduce its aid to peach 
canners in 1986 and eventually 
phase out other p ro cessing subsi- 
dies. 


One commission source said that 
while Mr. Delon's initial delega- 
tion of wwimicriwi tasks in 1984 
was accomplished with a minimum 
of Dl will, “h does not look so 
smooth time.” 

Mr. Ddors’s ideas fa the new 
division of labor are not known, 
but he must also try to into 
account the desires of some com- 
missioners fa more appealing re- 
sponsibilities. 

Commission sources said that 
the responsibilities of several com- 
missioners are not e xpected to 
i-hnng ^ wdnifag ChlMC CheyS- 
son, who is in charge of North- 
South and Mediterranean rela- 
tions, Willy De Clerq, die external 
relatio ns *nd trade commissioner, 
and Lord Cockfidd, the commis- 
sioner in charge of internal EC 
market affairs. 

Two Bpawith oo mn riasio nera and 
one Portuguese commissioner will 
join the executive body Jan. 1, en- 
larging its membership to 17. 

Portugal, meanwhile, has nomi- 
nated Antonio Cardoso e Cunh a. a 
parliament member and former 
minister fa foreign trade and agri- 
culture, as its commissioner. 


SHERD BIA/OlLC. WUTOtt 


BtD ASK 

Apollo Comp. 14* 14% 

Mr Gasket 8% 9 

Bitter Carp. 5 5% 

Modulaire 9 914 

Rodime 10 Hr 1114 

jjS&k WITH COMPLIMENTS OF 
\§§S CONTINENTAL AMERICAN 


THE TOP FRE 



AL1TY FIRMS 


Comite Colbert 
Champagne Ruinart: Exquisite Elixir 


The elegant ef fer ves cence of vin- 
tage champagne holds no myster- 
ies fa the v en erable house of 
Ruinart, fa over two and a half 
centuries, the ultimate master of 
this noble art. But what else 
should one expect of those who 
learned the treasured technique ar 
thevery source. When the legend- 
ary Dotn Pcrignon invented this 
most glorious of wines, another 
Benedictine monk, Dom Ruinart, 
was in on the se cret . He passed it 
on id his nephew Nicholas Ruin- 
art, who founded the femily firm, die oldest of 
the champagne houses, in 1729. 

The distinctive 18th century silhouette of their 
vintage wine boede has reflected some unforgeta- 
blc moments of history in the making. Talleyrand 
ordered his champagne from the house of Ruin- 
art at the time of the Congress of Vienna, no 


Bertrand Mure, President 

Sherry Lehmann in New Yak 
and cither such prestigious restau- 
rants and stores. 

"We don’t want to exceed a certain 
production,” says Ruinart president 
Bertrand Mure, a direct descendant 
of the firm's founder, "so we can 
guarantee our loyal clientele the 
Best champagne possible." Ruin- 
art’s acquisition by Moet-Hennessy 
in 1963 has allowed Mure the nec- 
essary capitalization to withstand 
the irregularity of champagne har- 
vests and continue to produce only 

connoisseur's champagne. 

The results of this elitist policy are as sparkling as 
the wine itself. 1984 sales were $8.1 million and 
in the first six months of 1985. $4.3 million. 
Exports to 85 countries account fa approximate- 




mayor a Roms, when the king 
arrived fa his coronation in 1825. Seven years 
later, a Ruinart was at the White House of 
President Andrew Jackson, introducing his luxu- 
rious liquid to the New World. 

Ruinart today is just as bccachcakingly disrin- 
lr has always been served by the presi- 
lt of France in the Elysee Palace and by the 
prime minister in the Hotel Marignon with other 
leading brands. Only just over a million bottles 
are produced each year fa a privileged elite thar 
dines at Paris’ Taillevenc, for example, flies chc 
Concorde, lunches at New York’s Lc Cirque a 
Los Angeles’ Spago, stays at the world’s grand 
hotels a shops ar Fauchon a Hediard in Paris, 

AN ASSOCIATION OF Tilt MOST PRESTIGIOUS NAMES OF TIIE FRENCH ’ART DF VIVRE" ’ BIS RUt DE LA BAUME. 7J00» PARIS 

ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE COMITE COLBERT 


Iv 50 percent of turnover. Their major customer, 
me United Scares, uniquely imports the regal 
Dam Ruinart vintage Blanc de Blancs only 
produced in exceptio na l years. As Mure pcunrs 
our, in the champagne industry "everything de- 
pends on nature.” This year, forecast as a disaster 
last -spring was metamorphosed by a superb 
Indian summer and now promises to be a memo- 
rable vintage. "A particularly well-balanced wine 
and a remarkable harvest,” says Mure, "but unfor- 
tunately a very small quantity." 

Down in the nmrirre hush of the picturesque 
Ruinart cellars, ancient chalk c av e s rh*r date fr om 
Gallo-Roman days and are classified as an historical 
landmark, hundreds of thousands of bottles of 
vintage Ruinart undergo die same immutable 
champagne ritual thar will assure there will always 
be jusr enough of this precious liquid for that 
discerning clientele who knows the difference. 


This announcement is neither an offer to sell nor a solicitation of an offer to buy these securities. 

The offer is made only by the Prospectus. 


$500,000,000 





r, l»\ ixll 0 ' 


International Bank for Reconstruction 

and Development 

Zero Coupon Bonds of 1986, Due 2002-2016 

Serial Zero Coupon Bonds Due Annually 
February 15, 2002— February 15, 2016 

The Bonds are being offered by the undersigned in face amount 
denominations of $1,000 and integral multiples of $1,000 at 
varying prices which will be determined at the time of 
sale, based upon market conditions at such time. 


the 


may be obtained only from 
the securities. 


December 11, 1985 


Shearson Lehman Brothers Inc. 

Manager and Underwriter 

In cooperation with 

The Nikko Securities Co. International, Inc. 


TT 



































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, 



•" -- 5 -- • •. -- - «- «-• — • . 



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dncagi^Esdiange OptifNos 


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This announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


SKNP 


Koninklijke Nederlandse Papierfabrieken N.V, 

(Royal Dutch Papermills) 


Gtf TO77 11471 
5m T7L53 NL 
Fix 10174 NL 
WHtor: 

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iwrt HU* NL 

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DWG! 1430 NL 
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NHR4C 773 NL 
Option 10.12 NL 
SoorTx 1173 NL 
Tax AOv HUS NL 
Tax Ex 1070 11.15 
USCvl HUB NL 
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Mdawani Gw: 
DMC KUO 11.13 
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Delaw 3072 2244 
DMdt 776 949 
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Delta U42 1447 
CG 1376 NL 
AjQ 2170 NL 
Cl IOlII nl 
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St 2074 NL 
t UJH 1L51 

j Burnham: 

Burah 3149 2247 
Emrano 1347 NL 
Govl HUB NL 
Gwth 1171 NL 
MwvfM Sip: 

A Bnd 109 NL 
COlTx 1400 NL 
Drey# 1373 1S01 


Dm 040 NL 
FndTx 1479 NL 
HIYM 447 NL 

Indus) 469 NL 
incom *43 nl 
select 692 NL 
wrWT 97* NL 
Pd Ibvumii: 

Bnd Ap 124* 1370 
DllCO 11.13 1Z16 
Gael 1230 1379 
Grwttl 675 6J4 
tncom 557 6JZ 
inti Sac 12791377 
Nat Roe 47* 4J0 
NYTF 1279 137* 
*0-10 1243 1442 

Optn 542 141 
Tax Ex *40 10.13 
FtooeMF Orotip: 
CpCsh 4745 NL 
MidlDO 943 HUH 
OMODb *.70 1613 
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44WIEQ 460 473 
44 Walt X72 NL 
Fe wn dori Groan: 
Grwttl 940 NL 
inaxn 1469 NL 
Mutual *70 NL 
seed 2666 NL 
Franktla Groan: 

AGE 342 377 
CroCrt *76 NL 
DNTC 16(0 UTS 
EWlltV 564 630 
FndTx 16*4 1140 
Gold 7.17 733 
Grwttl 1444 1657 
MdlTF 104V 1073 
NY Tax 10J0 UTS 




Beyond the debt crisis- 

Latin 

America 

the next ten years. 


Sponsored by the International HeraM Tribune & the Inter-American Development Bank. 

London, January 27-28, 1986. 

and asperate leaders from T^irn Europe and^STjnited States to examine 

the outlook for Latin America over the next tm years. 

As peaces at the conference are strictly limited, we recommend that senior executives from tbe 
hfmkrng and b usiness mmmnnity inter ested in attending, complete and mail die registration fonn today. 

JANUARY 27, 1 986 JANUARY 28,1986 


Established at Maastricht, the Netherlands 


Chairman: Lee W. Huebner, Publisher, 

International Herald Tribune. 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS 
Antonio Oriiz Mena, President, 

Inter-American Development Bank, Washington D.C 
SNAPSHOT OP THE DffiT CRISIS, RESCHEDULING MOVES, 
ADJUSTMENT PROGRAMS 

E du ar do Wiesner Duran, Western Hemisphere Director, 
htemationd Monetary Fund, Washington D.C 
LATIN AMBOCAN fNmATIVES TO TACKLE 
THE DST PROBLEM 

Jesus Silva Herzog, Finance Minster, Mexico. 

Femao Bracher, Governor, Central Bank, Brad. 

HOW TFfl: IbflTERNATlONAL HNANOAL SYSTEM 
SHOULD ADAPT 

Midid Camdessus, Governor, Banque de France. 

Robin Leigh-Pemberton, Governor, BctiIc of England. 

HOW MULTINATIONALS HAVE MADE A SUCCESS OF 
OPERATING IN THE REGION 
CJ. van der Kkjgt, Vice-Charrman, 

Phffips Industries, Endhoven. 

Peter Wallenberg, First Vice Charman, 

Skancfinaviska Enskflda Banken, Stockholm. 

REVIVING INDUSTOB IN LATIN AMBHCA 

The Honorable Edward Seaga, MP., Prime Minister, Jamaica. 

Francisco Swett, Finance Arrester, Ecuador. 

Amaldo Muskh, Director, Organizod6n TecHnt, Buenos Aires. 


Chairman: Anthony Sampson, international writer, 

EdHor of The Sampson Letter. 

NEW EFFORTS TO STIMULATE TRADE WITH THE AREA 
Claude Cheysson, European Commissioner, Brussels. 

Felipe Jaramillo, Chairman of the Contracting Parties 
to the GATT, Geneva. 

IFHE NEED FOR A LONG-TERM SOLUTION TO THE DEBT 
PROBLEM AND FOR NEW CREDITS 
Enrique iglesias. Foreign Minister, Uruguay. 

Manuel UUoa Elias, former Prime Minster, Peru. 

THE COMMERCIAL BANKS' VIEW OP LATIN AMERICA 
David Rockefeller, Chdrrnan, International Advisory 
Committee, The Chase Manhattan Bank, New York. 

William Rhodes, Chairman, Restructuring Committee, 
Citibank, New York. 

Werner Blessing, Member of the Board of Managing 
Directors, Deutsche Bank, Frankfurt. 

PBBPKTTIVE5 ON EGOhOAt AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT 

a) Centred America: 

Carlos Manuel Castillo, former Vice President, Costa Rica 

b) Andean Region: 

Manuel Azpurua Anreaza, Finance Minster, Venezuela 
THE FUTURE REVIVING GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT, 
TFE COMMON INTEREST 

Lord Horold Lever, former Chancellor, Duchy of Lancaster. 
ROUND TABLE DfSCUSSIONOF A QJRR0NT ISSUE 
POrtiapafion from severd key speakers. 


N ‘ ' VS: 

,rr( r< 


NLG 75,000,000 

7 per cent. Bearer Notes 1985 due 1990 


.V Person, Heldring & Pierson N.V. 
J Algemene Bank Nederland N.V. 
’V 'Sank Mees & Hope NV 


' December 16, 1985 

„«?>v 


Amsterdam-Rotterdam Bank N.V. 
GeneraleBank 

Swiss Bank Corporation International 
Limited 


RBG3S1RAHON INEOieMAllON 

The fee fcr the conference b $595 or the 
equivalent in a aanverfible ajmsney far ecch 
pa'iidpurt 

Al UX besed pcrbdparte are sufapset to VM 

15 %. Fees aw payofale n advaioe arid wS be 
returned in fill for any carcefcrion pcsknariasd 
on cr before January 13 L 
- Please netum raghtr cA yi form to: 

WamaBond Herald Triune, Conference Office, 
181 Avm*Gia4esdeGauBe, 

92521 NaJyCedex, France. Or telephone: 

® | (33 1) 47 47 16 86 or tdac 613 595 l 

WTBWMBaCAN 

DEVaOPMBVTBANK 

ReralfeSteSribunc, 


CCWFERENCE LOCATION 

Tte FW Lem Hotal ftexay, LondeftWtY^ Tel9ghont{tt 1I«9 SBl. Tiltt:21Sa. 

A tfed of roonx hm bawi naarved far eonfer er ca porkdpextts. Bacaa oartoa kXaf dredy 

GONREXENCE RECKTIllATTON PtMlM 

Hyw fwrfiMMau e ngpwSqpnr* far te conteio Jawy 3/48.0 Qwtk endoad. □ Ptoa i 


ntSTNAME. 


00MWNY- 

















































NASDAQ National Marked 

OTC Consolidated trading for week ended Friday. 


SoHnm Net 

1001 Hfoti Low Clow Ch'w 


somm Net 

100* HMi Low Clow Cnve 


Man Net 

inn HFotr low aow onw 


Sales In Net 

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Kamons 44 ij> 141924ft 22ft ft 

Kamnst 30 2ft 2ft 2ft - 

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Karcfir 250414ft 15ft 151ft- ft 

Kastar 251 135411ft 11 II -A U 


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Kanlor .251 
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Consumer pofciiusf ,f-,- if 

atthe homes of ^JL 

readers is higher and more select: 


TTTT' 


FAMILY 


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MORE THAN SIX 





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US! 

I ' IB <'W Wi' Bi'li 


To: Subsaiption Manager, International Herald Trfcune, •■_ 

181,avenueChcsHes<te-Gauie,9!^l r^SyGed^Franca.TeL*47^0729.Te|ec:612832. H 
Please enter my subscription for; | 



Please enter my s ubscrip tion for; | 

_ Bmwfat+VS - ! □ fimanlhs Q 3™rths ( + j^ | 

Mydiedcisendased. [ | Please charge my crecftaanJaccourih ' 


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COMPANY MANAGERS 




4BC. Pivstigio de la Pivnsa de Espana, 




*. 
















































sous in Nat 

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(Cootiwied from Page 7) 
come at oQ, are years off for Re- 
public. 

How Republic came to be a mav- 
erick bank is one of the most un- 
usual banking stories of the post- 
Wotid War n era. It centers on Mr. 
Safra, who came to the United 
States only 20 years ago, started 
Republic from scratch and almost 
singlebandedly made it into a dis- 
tinctive bank. 

Republic conducts a significant 
part of its business in the Arab 
world. Analysts say the bank’s suc- 
cess there is noteworthy consider- 
ing, that Mr. Safra, along with Re- 
public’s vice chair man, Cyril S. 
Dwek and Joshua S. Yedid, and 
other senior officers, are religious 
Jews. 

Many other companies with 
strong Jewish identities have foun- 
dered when attempting to do busi- 
ness with the Arabs. Although Re- 
public does not emphasize its 
Jewish management, neither does it 
hide it. Its corporate dining roans 
have mezuzas, or encased Scrip- 
ture, on their doorposts, and guests 
are served strictly kosher food. 

“It just has never been an issue 
with us what our religion is," said 
Jeffrey C. Kdl, 42, Republic's pres- 
ident. 

Warren R. Marcus, a former 
banking specialist at Salomon, 
said: “Safra lived much of Ins fife 
with the Arabs, and he is comfort- 
able with them. They trust him.” 

Because he shuns puhhdty, little 
is known about Mr. Safra, other 


AMEX Most Actives 


■■■■■■■ -11 

Low 

UaS 

C*M. 

5ft 

4ft 

59* 

+1M 

22ft 

2V> 

18ft 

3 

* 

*SV» 

— 9* 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft 

+ ft 


5ft 

4ft 

+ ft 

lift 

10ft 

lift 

+1 

34ft 

30ft 

31ft 

-av* 

Mft 

27ft 

23ft 

— n* 

27ft 

aoft 

22ft 


13ft 

tn* 

17ft 

— ft 

5ft 

5ft 

5ft 

+ V* 

10ft 

*ft 

*ft 


lift 

14ft 

17ft 

-i-lft 

20ft 

18ft 

Nft 

* ft 

Sft 

4ft 

Sft 

— ft 

12ft 

9ft 

nv. 

+7ft 

25 


24ft 

+ ft 

WU 

15 

15ft 

— ft 

14ft 

13 

u 

+ ft 

34ft 

2*ft 

349* 

+Sft 


8ft 

■ft 

— ft 

3 

7ft 

3 

+ ft 

4ft 

Sft 

3ft 

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14ft 

171% 

17ft 


14H 


14ft 

+ ft 


471 319 

336 344 

It* Ml 

72a TIB 

IM B 

72 SB 



Republic Bank Thrives on No Risks 


Treasury Bffls 

Figures as at dose at trading Frida* 


than that he was bom in Beirut, the 
scion of a wealthy Lebanese Family 
that traces its roots to financiers of 
the Ottoman Empire. As a young 
man, Mr. Safra established the suc- 
cessful Trade Development Bank 
in Europe, subsequently sold to 
American Express Co, as well as 
hanks in Chanda and South Ameri- 
ca. 

While those ventures established 
Mr. Sofia's reputation as a savvy 
banker and built many of the per- 
sonal contacts that now serve Re- 
public so well, it has been the 
bank’s penchant For risk avoidance 
that is its trademark. “We manag e 
to keep busy and profitable with- 
out making loans," Mr. Kril said. 

Instead of making loans. Repub- 
lic has been placing its depositors* 
money in bank accounts al other 
financial institutions, in money- 
market instruments and in other 

short-term IOUs. Last year, well 
over half of Republic’s 575.6 mil- 
lion in net income came from in- 
vesting in these noniraditional 
lending outlets. 

That formula — bang a stingy 
lender, pursuing narrow, nontradi- 
ri fmal businesses and investing in 
safe liquid assets — has madeRe- 
pubtic the big money maker it is, 
analysts say. It has also inspired 
depositor loyalty. Many of Repub- 
lic's depositors sue Americans nnf l 
Middle Easterners who forsake 
earning higher interest for safety 
and privacy, analysts say. 

Mr. 53, is Republic’s prin- 


U.K. Croup Wins 
Missile Order 

A genet France- Prase 

LONDON — British Aerospace 
PLC, the recently denationalized 
aircraft «rnw manufacturer, 
has won a new contract from Indo- 
nesia for its Rainer anti-aircraft 
missile system, this time worth £80 
millio n ($112 mflliaa), the compa- 
ny announced Saturday 

An initial contract worth £140 
minion was signed last year. 

Rapier, a system that was used 
during the Falklands War in 1982, 
is in service in 13 countries. Orders 
for the weapon during the past 12 
months total £450 million, British 
Aerospace said. 


Japan Sources Expect 
Groop-of-Five Meeting 

A genet France -Press* 

TOKYO — The leading indus- 
trial democracies that make up the 
Group of Five are likely to hold a 
financ e ministers* mflfftfn g next 
mouth on monetary and economic 
policies, according to official 
sources here. 

The five, the United States, West 
Germany, France, Britain and Ja- 
pan, agreed at talks in New York in 
September on measures to drive 
down the dollar. 


□pie shareholder. Although he is 
not Republic’s chair man — Waller 
H. Weiner, a New York attorney, 
officially holds that title — Repub- 
lic insiders say Mr. Safra is none- 
theless in total control, making alt 
major policy derisions. 

Mr. Safra is known as a consum- 
mate haggler for whom every hu- 
man interaction poses an opportu- 
nity to deal. In an apartment that 
fie owned until recently in New 
Yak’s Pierre Hold, Mr. Safra 
would regularly telephone while 
shaving, friends say. 

They also relate how, m a trip to 
the Italian Riviera, Mr. Safra bar- 
gained with a taxi driver for nearly 
half an hour before agreeing on a 
price for a tour around Portofino. 
Mr. Safra may wdl be a billionaire. 


HI La Mel Bfe AM VM C»fl 


?J3 440 Dk Mas 
9.34 4X3 Die MSS 
7J4 4.11 Jon 0384 
7.41 MB Jon 0784 
7.48 4X7 Jon i486 
937 4J3 Jen 3384 
7X7 7.06 JM 3084 
7xl 7J07 Feb da 84 
7X4 7117 Feb 1384 
7.25 487 Fab 3084 
7X5 7H7 Feb 2784 
IM 7-05 Vurr 0484 
7X3 7114 M at 1384 
935 484 Mar 3084 
7J4 487 Mar 2704 
74S 707 Acr 0384 
7X4 708 Apr 1064 
8X5 4.73 Apt 1784 
7 0 708 Apr 34 84 
139 708 Mar 01 BA 
7.38 709 Mar 0884 
704 404 MOV 1584 
7J4 708 Mar 22 84 
7X3 707 May 2*84 
732 70S Jun 0584 
7X3 4.93 Jun 1284 
7X4 707 Jut 1084 
7X7 708 Aug 0784 
7X4 704 SCB 0484 
7X2 707 Oct 0284 
7X1 707 Oct 3084 
7J7 703 Mov 3884 


404 5X2 
6.90 402 
5.93 501 
400 192 
434 418 
402 474 
471 4X3 
407 474 
485 479 
691 407 
490 404 
4«8 494 
498 4.94 
495 4»l 
494 492 
700 494 
700 4«4 

700 4.94 

701 497 
707 498 
;jc a«8 

703 499 
703 4*9 

702 4*8 
707 6«8 
4.97 4.93 

703 497 
74M 700 

702 498 
305 701 

703 499 
7.00 498 


5X09 JO 
493- 05 
5.91— .18 
403— 09 
430- 33 
490— 09 
AJB- J8 
497- 37 
4.94- 33 
70S— .!* 
70S— .17 

7.15- .12 

7.16- .10 
7.13 — .14 

7.15— .12 

7.21— .11 
723— .11 
703— .11 
725— .W 

707— 08 

708— 09 
7X3- 08 
7J1 — 07 
7X1— JO* 
7X3- 09 
707— .10 
7JS— .12 
7J8— .11 
7J7- .13 
7X3- .10 
7X3— .11 
7x5— .10 


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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1985 



PEANUTS 


U)OW' 


I THINK TOE TEACHER 
15 TKVIN6 TO TELL 

ME SOMETHING, MARCIE 


WHAT GRAPE PIP 
. TOU 6ET, SIR? . 


BOOKS 


AN EXTRA-STRENGTH 
v P MINUS ' ! 


LONDON MATCH 


By Lett Ddgfatm. 407 pages. $ 17.95 \ 
Alfred A. Knopf, 201 East 40th Street, New 
York, N.Y. 10022. 


BLONDIE 


Reviewed by J. L M- Stewart 
T EN DEIGHTON published “Berlin Game” 
JLd in 1983, followed it np with “Mexico Set** 


ACROSS 


1 Nuisance 

5 Call day 

8 Planted 

13 Scamper 

14 At once, once 

15 Having one 
component 

16 Smoothed over 

18 Varnish 
ingredient 

19 From Z 

20 Drill master? 

22 " Haw,” 

TV program 

23 Finishes 
25 Pursue 

27 Played a role 
30 Uris best seller 
33 Serve the soup 
36 Singer Jerry 

38 Sweet, 
fortified wine 

39 Iniquity 

40 Get control 
over 

41 Anatomical 
fold 

42 Unless, in law 

43 Guest houses 

44 Provide the 
provender 

45 Stick 
47 Clipped 

49 Minneapolis 
suburb 
51 Hatch 

New York 


55 Put two and 
two together 

57 Cope mi can 

theorist 

60 Hwy. 

61 Fair structure 

63 Empties 

65 Vinegar bottle 

66 Arkinor Alda 

67 Concerning 

68 Gluts 

69 Ship-shaped 
clock 

70 Reviews 
unfavorably 


1 Troy’s last 48 Tbeboi 

king main 

2 Have an 50 Highwj 

the ground Fairba 

3 Ice-cream 52 Swedis 

server 53 About-1 

4 Take a drivei 

(rest) 54 Rose ai 

5 Having a share Founta 

of 55 Basics 

6 Praise highly 56 Copper 

7 Prank first wi 

8 Levy on top of 58“Winni 

a levy Pu" 

9 Just of 59 Thing ti 

those things from so 

10 Pale and wan one’s b< 

11 Buffalo's lake 62 Kickoff 

12 Force unit 04 Draw oi 

14 Skilled straw 

Times, edited by Eugene Maluku. 


17 Draw forth 
21 Cots wo Id. for 
one 

24 Set out briskly 
26 Member of a 
choir 

28 Tied 

29 Advents 

31 Egg on 

32 Headliner 
33Chanteuse 

Home 

34 Eager 

35 Doled 
37 Opulent 

40 Tuscan city 
44 Sing like Bing 
46 Some are civil 
48 The bounding 
main 

50 Highway to 
Fairbanks 

52 Swedish coin 

53 About-face for 
a driver 

54 Rose and 
Fountain 

55 Basics 

56 Copperfield’s 
first wife 

58 “Winnie 

Pu" 

59 Thing taken 
from some- 
one’s book 

62 Kickoff gizmo 
64 Draw on a 
straw 



BEETLE BAILEY 





COME OUT 
ANp FIGHT 
LIKE A 
MAN// j 



and now comes forward with “London 
Match." The. analogy with tennis is sketchy, 
since a good many games have to be played to 
win a set and several sets to win a match. I 
suppose we are meant to conclude that by the 
ena of this volume there has been a decisive 
dimax to a long and complex action, and that 
one player orsde has gained a victory. The 
characters, however, have little sense of this. 
“If s not game, set, and match to anyone,” the 
protagonist says on the final page. “It never 

Is. this perhaps a neat way of hinting that 
there may be more to come about Bernard 
Samson crf London Central, his wife, Fiona — 
whose sheer inconceivability establishes once 
and for all the robust character of Ddghton’s 
imagination — vmd a prodigal array of men 
and women nearly all of whom have some 
connection with espionage? The writer would 
be entitled to reluctance to have done with 
them and their environments jn London, Mexi- 


recamed the War Office the Mmistiycj Qq. 
fense.' " '■ 

With what bethinks of as the English '-fypSSF 
oust Drighton is less assured. *Ihusawm«^% 
called Daphne has, we are told, the kind vofes • 
and upper-dass accent that go with wedasodj* ' 
in large tmbealed country houses wbotatthL \ 
one talks about horses and reads Dick Fr ^jj 
paperbacks. This is fair enough, down evtaj^ 
Dick Frauds. Then Daphne suddenly *& .. 
“I’m sony we can’t go into the UwngeJ5‘ : 
England (as Mr. Ddgtuon. who is 100^ - 
boro, ought to know) only quite shocks^*-*' 
vulgar and plebeian people call a tbiBL* 
room or firing room a ksmgt Lounges' ''KtS^- 
hotds or ai airports. . : i: : 

“London Match" is full of this daastufei. . 


co City and Berlin. The characters, though 
liable to bore a little during their frequently 


“London Match" is full of this dass stair!' 
which is conceived of largely in toms QtcK&g? 
rive dressing and eating and drinkiai vug*; 
plenty of brand names thrown in. WtkargU 
exactly what claret or Champagne is 
poured, and the “public-school mafia" at US’!? 
don Central goes to Savile Row for its ttilorii[5/ J 
almost to a mao. This general expenavtnefs 
though irritating and often seemingly norncre"' 
than inconsequent padding, is by no- i«anp”' 
without its function in (he total picrare. lt ijp 
come to us from Bernard Samson on a note 
ready compliance alienation, and f 

thus fed him to be wbai a secret agent slanld?' 
essen daily be: a loner in disguise. H 

What is this book — what are these books — - ' ' 
“about”? The answer, if it has to be green ini " 


-ANDY CAPP 


' soggy. ANPv.jBjrjVE 
NO OPTIOK, R0MTP r 


MUCH PD 
J-ATtVES . 


TU«r*NV 

HtSSHOI 

TRY/VOE 


7THSSMN-LAWOF S 
S4NK«3 tOWAS TO I 
ROE THE RULES — J 


'DIABOLICAL 


UNBORDONABLE,] 

Dm-, PET . — — 


habte to bore a Uttle during their frequently 
overextended verbal fencings, are tenaciously 
true to themselves even if not quite to human 
nature. Ben Jonson would have approved of 
them. The places, urban of rural, arc triumphs 
of painstaking observation and striking de- 
scriptive power. This is particularly true of 
Benin, as, for example, the edge of theTiergar- 
iftfl, with its abandoned embassy buildings 
“Hke die gigantic hulks of a rusting battle- 
fleet" 

Sometimes Deighioo’s linguistic resource- 
fulness is at odds with mdsembtance, but this 
happens less frequently thaw in the earlier 
books. In “Mexico Set,” for example, we come 
os somebody with “a hard unyielding face, 
smooth like a carefully carved netsuke handled 
by generations of coOiectors, and darkening as 
elephant tusk darkens when locked away and 


word, is treachery. There is scarcely a character . 
whose main concern is not with the dangertf - 
betrayal of one sort or another. Neither British:? 
intelligence nor the KGB ever seems to defter^ 


WIZARD of ID 


ived of light.” It seems improbable that 

elegant fancy should come to Samson 


tins elegant fancy should come to Samson 
when it does. 

But other secret agents too are keen phfldo- 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


KPA TftfNSCPIfTOF 
SREgoil sap 
I9t IH A ‘S&lfywftS&gp 
&Nt aefiSs- J 


..ACT Will/ AW? 
GerA *V° 
IW 


mm/r 

tTBgggTTHS 

IF JUST 


WZ-rmryUr 


“ These airline blighters speak (heir own 
language,’ said Dicky. ‘Have you noticed that? 
Stewardesses are hostesses . . . safety belts 
are lap straps, and emergency exits are safety 
exits. Who thonght qp afi that double-talk?’ 

“ It most have been the same PR man who 


m 


W4Y P A\ 



Sohaion to Friday’s Puzzle 


□ceiq (naan edee 
G 3E3EE nasaciE nacia 
BEDdEnaaHQnaHEH 

OE0 naans ansas 
□aaa □□□ 
nsaaansnEiGjaciGiniEa 
qeqdo □□□□ □□□ 

BODE HOEOD □□Ed 
ECC3 anno □□□na 
OEsnaaaaaaaaiiEis 
boo EBtaa 
bqoqe aaaas ass 
Emnanannsasasa 
EBQD Eansa EBBS 
deed aaao assa 


a man or woman a double agent, or susceptible;' 
of being “turned”? If apparently succcssftdki^' 
“turned,” is the success illusory and theamds-n 
true allegiance still where it began? In u Berfi»'- _- 
Game" there is somebody in East Berim wfao^ 
has been transmitting to England specific eb«t 
formation in the Scad of economics and fkV 
nance. But in general the rival secret services... 
are concerned only with their rivalry. At Qaer*. 
point we are, rather s ur p ri singly, taken ana*’ 
extended tour of the interior cif 10 Downing ; 
Street But although we are told that theprio^. ' 
minister flidiicgs wimiring, neither tie horaqy^ . 
other minister of the crown is shown as laHog , . 
the slightest interest in the goings on at 
don Central ; -T , 

And at London Central there is another and v. ! 
wholly interiorized network of suspicions mef 
treacheries. Everybody — to express the tiang " 
loosely — is after everybody rise’s job. Almost 
everybody, moreover, is after — or suspected' 1 
of being after — everybody rise’s husband or X 
wife. The spectacle is not without a cextatd’ V ' 
power to entertain. But, Hke Restoration ccgno-tf,- 
dy, it is a purdy speculative scene of tiring*.' ^ 
Closing these undoubtedly diverting books,'* 

I am r emin ded of what Sainte-Beuve had to say ~ 
to Flaubert after reading “SalammbO”: “Ifyotr " 
want to interest us. depict for us people who'-', 
are similar or analogous to ourselves. Look?’ 
well and you will find some, even down you-': 


J. /. AC Stewart — who as Michael Inneifuq' ■■ 
written many detective novels — is the author bf . 

“Eight Modem Writers” and “A Staircase hr*' 

Surrey. ” He wrote this review for The Washing- - ’ 
ton Past t . 


Cddbralmg Donatello’s 600th TJ 

Agence Fnmce-Presse ; -it,- 

FLORENCE — Six months of oriebratiotri ' 


12/14/86 


here next year will mark the sixth centenary af 

the birth of the sculptor Donateilo. The city is -y 
refurbishing the Bargello museum, whkhJ 
houses most of Donateflo’s major works,' 
eluding his David. 


By Alan Truscoct 


/^N the diagramed deal, 
v/ West achieved a brilliant 


\Jr West achieved a brilliant 
defense position. He ted the 
club ace against four spades 
and.securcd a dub ruff. Since 
rite (gening bid placed the 
spade king, the other declarers 
Tnftff e the gama by playing the 
spade ace eventually. 

West, however, ruffed with 
the spade king instead of the 
ten and led a diamond. South 
won in the dummy and confi- 
dently finessed the nine of 


spades, knowing that the ten 
was an his righL He was not 
pleased with the subsequent 
developments. 


WEST (D) 

«K10 
CKJ100S4 
0 812 
♦ A 2 


NORTH 
*S92 
■7A7I 
•» AQ J5 

* J43 

EAST 
A J 4 

14 0882 

6973 
*K»878 
SOUTH 

♦ A Q 9763 

4 K 114 
*Q 19S 


First West produced the ten 
to defeat the game. Tima!. 
South's partner pointed out- 
that he could have afforded to 
play the spade ace and return-; 
to dummy, if necessary, withaT. 
heart lead. And finally Wcsu 
confessed the truth: His spade" 
ten had been hidden during tbe 
bidding and most of the play. 


BoUi « Mas were vuiiieraMe. Tt* . 


PM PM 2* 

4* Pm ' Pw 


West led Dm dub see. 


CONDES 


KELCHE 


A TACTFUL HUSE5ANF 
ALWAYS REMEMBERS 
H15 WIFE'S BIRTHPAY 
BUT FORGETS THIS. 


UCLA, at Last, 
Wins Soccer Title 


Stenmark Ends Dro ught 


Now arrange the dr clod totters (O 
fonn me surprise answer, as sugh 
gesied by the above cartoon. 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Fntjoy-,, I Jumbles: OPIUM DAUNT CLEAVE RARITY 

I Answer What kjnd of milk does an Invisible baby oat, 
naturally?— EVAPORATED 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Mnrn 

Amttmcrrn 

Ailtefis 

Barcelona 

Batorode 

Berlin 

Brussel* 

Bucharest 

Budapest 
Copenhagen 
Cmto Dei Sal 
Dublin 
Edlnbervh 
Fiore nee 
Prank tori 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

I Stan mil 

Las Palnsos 

Usban 

LoMaa 

Manna 

Milan 

Moscow 

Munich 

HKm 

OB* 


17 43 II S3 
12 S4 10 SO 


13 SS II 52 
IS » * 39 


7 IS 1 » 
II 52 7 « 


13 M 10 50 


« 4t 2 U 

II SO < 9 


lr 

A5IA 

HIGH 
C F 

LOW 

Bangkok 

39 




Q 

Belling 

1 




0 

Haag Kong 

18 




fr 

Manna 

30 

U 

23 


r 

ItowDtfM 

26 

79 



r 

Saoul 

-6 




o 

SbanaMB 






Staoooor* 

28 




9 

Toipei 

14 

57 

8 

46 


17 61 6 43 
13 SS tO SO 


Prwrue 

Rcrkfavik 

Rome 

Stock balm 

Strasboare 

Venice 

vkmna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


MIDDLE EAST 


12 St 11 52 sh 

8 44 « » lr 

10 SO 4 3? a 

< 43 -3 27 fr 

0 32 -2 29 f r 

9 49 7 45 r 

21 7D IS 59 o 

12 54 4 43 hr 

14 57 9 48 a 

9 48 0 30 lr 

V 48 -1 30 fr 

2 31 -3 2| a 

10 SO S 41 r 

17 13 7 IS lr 

0 32 4 IS m 

12 54 9 49 o 

9 48 I 37 a 

4 39 2 » r 

16 11 t 34 tr 

-2 29 -5 23 to 

7 45 S 41 o 

10 SO I 34 lr 

17 SI 4 3J a 

6 43 2 31 f 

9 41 2 31 a 


Tokyo 

AFRICA 


Ala tor* 

Cairo 

Cape Town 

Casablanca 

Harare 

Loom 

Nairobi 

Torts 


14 37 7 45 

21 30 16 61 
35 77 11 32 
U 64 10 SO 
2? 73 11 11 
31 88 21 70 
23 77 14 57 
17 63 7 45 


LATIN AMERICA 


Bueno* Aires S3 77 17 13 tr 

Caracac 96 79 17 63 el 

Una 24 7S IB 14 d 

Mexico Cltr 4! 

Rio de Janeiro — — _ _ M 

NORTH AMERICA 


Ankara 
Beirut 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
Tel Aviv 


S a I 34 a 

ZS 77 15 59 cl 

16 61 0 32 a 

16 61 9 49 a 


OCEANIA 


23 73 14 57 el 


AnctniMe 

Alton la 

Boston 

Chtama 

Denver 

Detroll 

Honolulu 

Houston 

USAlWOtoS 

Miami 

MtoMapelh 

Montreal 

Nassau 

Near York 


San Francisco 12 


Auckland 

Sydney 


22 72 16 Ol 
26 79 19 M 


cl-cJouflv; ta-toaav: fr-fato; h-hall; 
SMftowera; nronaw; W ■stormy. 


Seattle 

Toronto 

wasfilnptaa 


(rover coal; ocooniv 1 


FO a ,^ CA fT r r Sliflhtlv ChaoDv. PRANKFURT: 

Cnercasl. Temp. TO — * (50—391. LONDON: Overcast win, Jmwm t— ■ 
I 159— 48f. MADRID: Pair. Temp. 9—1 14a— 301. NEW YORK* 
g~dv tans .1—5 (34-731. PMU5. (N^,T^vp™,!r^5 4 ^2y 
ROME : Pair. Temp. 14— 1 (57—341. TELAVnft Nrtmeitofale. zutaai: 

««-32».BANOKOIt: Fooev. Temp. 10—21 (B*— 79) 
HONG KONG: Fair, Tcma. 17 — 10 143 — SOI MANILA: Cbnxfv ri 

181-731 SEOUL! Frtr.Temp..7--n|19-ei^BAmREMui2IKi^ 

28 - W (92 — 73). TOKYOrRrtr Temp. 8 — 3 146 — ShWW * T#W * L 


tot Angela Tima Serrtct 

SEATTLE — Andy Buxfce, the UCLA soph- 
omore, could not have waited much longer to 
score his first goal of the 1985 U.S. college 
soccer season. 

Not only was it the last game of the year it 
was the longest game in National Collegiate 
Athletic Association soccer history. 

But in the eighth overtime, Burke took a 
lead pass from Paul Krumpe and blasted a 15- 
yard (13.7-meter) shot with his left foot past 
Steven PhriL goalkeeper for American Unner- 
sity of Washington, D.G, to give UCLA its 
first NCAA Division I soccer title, 1-0. 

Saturday night's game in the Kingdame last- 
ed 166 minutes and five seconds. That was 
almost seven minutes longer than the 159; Id it 
took Indiana to beat Duke in eight overtimes 
in the 1982 final. 

Burke, who had fractured a bone in his left 
Toot earlier this season and had played in only 
10 games, none daring the playoffs, did pot 
enter the game until tbe seventh, overtime. 

Just before the winning play, the American 
University star, Michael Brady, limped to the 
sideline with a muscle cramp, leaving the Ea- 
gles two men short Te amma te Sage Torralles 
had been ejected in the third overtime. 

Had Brady stayed cm the fidd instead of 
coming to the sideline, officials might well 
have stopped play. That was a mistake." said 
Sieve Sampson, UCLA’s assistant coach. 

Sigi Schmid, the Brains' coach, said, **I 
think we were a fitter team. All tho* horns of 
practice paid off.” 

■ Eland’s Pledge to FIFA 
England will withdraw from the European 1 
Championship if any of its clubs’ supporters 
cause (rouble on the continent, the chairman 
of the Football Association, Bert' MQlkhip, . 
has said, Agence Fnmce-Presse reported Sat- 
urday from London. 

The FA made the promise to the Interna- 
tional Federation of Football Associations , 
FIFA, in return for Thursday’s decision to 
allow En glish teams to again play friendly 
matches in Europe. 

The FA will not permit English clubs to play 

in potential trouble spots, such as Belg i u m or 
Italy. 


' . r " "’\ 

l'. 


• • »*' '* 


• * • X. 


Complied by Our SU$ From Dlsp&cha 
LA VILLA, Italy — Tn gemwf 
Stenmark, the Swedish ski racer, 
aided nearly two years without a 
World Cup victory on Sunday 
when he won his 80th event in 13 
years on the drcuiL 

Stenmark charged back on the 
second run to ■ lake the o pe ni ng 
men’s giant slalom of the 1985-86 
season, ahead of Austria’s Hubert 
Strolz, fastest on (he first nm, and 
Robert Erlacher of Italy. - 
Stenmark bad been fourth best 
on the morning run, 0.59. seconds 
behind Strolz. Steomadds aggre- 
gate time was 2-3SS5, which was 

0.42 ahead of Strolz. . 

Tbe 29-year-old Swede's last 
World Cop victary bad been in & 
giant slalom atVaii, Colorado, on 
March 3, 1984. 

The owzaD World Cup ; boider, 
Marc Girarddfi of Lnxembmng,- 
26th in Saturday^ downhill at San- 
ta Cristina, Italy, and sixth in the 
giant slalom, wen the combined 

Niall Quinn of Arsend beat the Liverpool goalkeeper. Brace Grobbebar, ririit i - 

final goal in Satuntay’s 2-0 decision in London that ended UrapooTs 14-garaembeatoi 
streak id English soccer. Quinn, a IE-year-old Irishman, was making Sta^iie debut 


H’. 


' 

. 


& n-.-.kd#. ... - y-*. 

^ V 


— * 

. . .* 


V» L> 

•• > >■ 


' . CoetpOod bf Oar Staff From . 

RICHFIELD, Ohio — It -was 
just a year ago that the Ctevdand 
Cavafiere starred their drive to re- 
spectability. They bad won only 
two of their first 2 1 games and were 
the joke of the National Basketball 
Association. 

But under the patient handling 
of George Karl, their coach, the 
Cavaliers improved rapidly and 
posted a 34-27 record the rest of the 
way to reach the playoffs. 


Cavaliers FinaJlv Wi 


Peter M Oiler and West Gemnojii ■ 
Sepp WEdgruber. .. 

Wlrnsbetger scored his fiftfc.- 
Worid Cap downhill victory ori the 
■Saslonch track in 2:0429. ; J -. 
Mailer was docked in 2:04.82^ ■ 
Karl Alpiger of Switzerland * 
overall leader going into Saturday*/ 
race, fefl in the final straight a ftop 
losing his balaiioe at the last jump»t 
But he skidded aaross. the fiaislri' 
fine for 15th placeandcaief>oint'm' 
the overall standings. (AFP r APp. 
: ■ Hess Wins Women's Sfahari^ 

Erika Hess of Switzerland i 
moved to the top of the women's * 
overall standings with a victory” 
Sunder in the slalom at Savognm, 
Switzerland, Tbe Associated Pre&-' 
reported. 

Hea, 23, docked the fastest* 
first nnr- 

and tbe66^ate second nm to finish ' 

with a combined time of 1:418^ 
the artificial snow coarse. 

sJhS! 0 *? 6 B , rigitte Gadient 

a 1 ;43.36, md Nad& 
of Italy, with 1:43.37 

“f^Gerg of West GermafiyZL 


NBAFQCIB 

This season, the CavpEcrs were 
off toa better start but still below 
300.1tmaybethat,oflthaaimrver- 
sary of last season’s turnaround, 
they have started another. 

With guards Worid B Free and 
John Bagley each scoring five 
points in the last-three mhn , n<^ of 
Saturday night’s game, the Cava- 
liers held .ou to beat the Boston 
Critics, 109-99. • • 


lire Critics had beaten the Cava- 
liers in 16 co nse c uti ve regular-sea- 
son games and swept the Cavaliers 
in four games in tbe-first round' of 
the playoffs last spring. The Critics 
Had lost only three of 23 games tins 
season. • 

The Cavaliers are 11-13, but they 
have defeated, division leaders in. 

the last two grnus. Friday night hi 
Mtiwankee, Free scored 39 prints 
in hdping bekt the Bucks. - -. 

■ The Critics fed by as many as 


ei^t prims in the fiiw half but 
trafled_by eighf ai halftime and 


trailed eighf ai halftime and 
ttae quarters. Larry Bird 
scored 31 points, but only two in,' 
tire fomth quaner, and he picked 
up atedmreal foul u ^ (gitics’ 
rally faded in the dosing • 

.“B«iy .Pfcyed his first game. The6- 
foQt-10 (ZltmetBri forward played 
.four mintites, made all three shots 
ahd gbt ttro rebounds." (EAT, AP) 


Three American 
Been awarded the s< 
M’s races for the l 
Cup season. The As 

mvwtaJ e — . 


City Utah, was 

and giant dafom 

is to mi 

per Mountain, Colorad 

ShSS? l0ttI)ec ‘ 3 »an 

S^^NewHamp 

Seas on-openins rsnw v 


■'&> 

i: 

© 

r 

-AV 


£ oi cany. 

“Euiopem recent yj 




2T-- 






1 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1985 


Page 15 


SPORTS 


^Maris Remembered 


j c Teammates Land Record-Setter 
^s^iLoyal Friend, Consummate Player 

£ ’• ^ H.tfW lyOvrSwgFnm Dbpckka ^ tbe attention. He really didn't 
’■ 3; > ,^-W YORK — As the baseball care about the KmeEght.” 

‘Mantfe was imported insednsioo 
age of 51, Roger Maris, the Saturday at ahold in Fort Lauder- 
’ ; - [jt" r Yankee shiver who kit a dale, Florida, but in his recently 
";'- f 4,-j.i'iil 61 home runs in 1961, was published autobiography, “The 
~ ’'inhered as a multitalented - Mick," he bad nothing but praise 
whose home ran record for his former teammate. 

2 : r r-^-sd bis other skills. He was 
" - ‘' -. ^Ecalkd as a loyal and unas- 
' fricod who had dealt with 

T\ ; user dwt would daim his life 

~'l \ Same wy ha had honriWI the 

•" < r^-’.^.-'xes erf chasing Babe Ruth's 
run record — with quid 
‘‘%S* 


‘The greatest single feat Z ever 
saw " he wrote, “was Roger Maris 
hitting 61 home runs to break Babe 
Ruth’s record. I was with him prac- 
tically every step of the way and I 
know the dues be paid to get there.” 

Bobby Richardson, another 
twnwm»p ^ on the Yankees, remem- 
■-.t V^pb Hook, who was the Yan- bered the thrill of being there when 
“ ' n '' " * Maris tied and broke Ruth’s re- 

cord. 

“I remember he came into the 
dngout" after hitting his 60th home 
run, in Baltimore, “and Mantle 
kind of pushed him back out to 

smmidf^ere wasaaraiendous 
ovation, and then of course the 




manager m 1961, recalled 
both as the con summate 
■ ■» «.?J*^hyer who “put winning above 
'fz m accomplishments” and as 
, 7 _._‘ ' good family man, the kind 
’ ! » you would want for your 

- ' ‘-t /QCL" . 

wV ^-e was a great ballplayer and 

1—4 " t_T- 1 - X 


'A lot of people who 
didn’t know him 
don’t realize that he 
was a great team 
player. . .He was a 
modest gay. I think 
he would have just 
loved to play the 
game and not get aQ 
the attention.’ 

— Ralph Houk, 
Yankee manager in 
1961 


warm, he was giving and he was 
one hell of a ballplayer." Tike oth- 
ers, McCarver stressed that Mans’s 
drills went beyond those of a stag- 
ger. “Most people thought of him 
m terms of iwting Kmw mns, but 
he was a oourolete ballplayer," 
McCanns’ said. “He could ran, he 


Bears, Cowboys Deal New York Double Blow 


modest," added Hook, who _ 

"."'i'jjc thought that Maris haH excitement continued to build could throw and he gave so much to 
■ « when be hit the baD in New York.” -* »- ! — ****- 


ed the pressure of tbs home 
" : <:'iaso better than the fans and 
. . . j; ;i /tess had given him credit for. 
/ . j '71’t think rve ever seen a ball- 
7 5: under more pressure than 
was that year. There were 
' 2 h ' ' ; :ands of questions day after 
“ 7 'i«od it hurt him a lot when the 
■ ’■ tt 1 - blasted him. And yet he want- 

win the pennant as wm-h 35 
; : a, of us.” 

V ’ -ris and Mickey Mantle waged 
■■ . V^alTs most famous home run 
until Mantle was injured late 
and had to settle for 54 
. . _ "s. Hook said Maris did not 

' race for personal gam, 
ing instead to help the team 

- .-'1 ,"; >ay he could. 

r lot of people who didn’t 

- c - ‘7 ~ him don't realize that he was 

‘.V u at team player,” recalled 
>1, who now lives in Pompano 
Florida. 

. ' W '; 'emember one time late in the 
2, ~ when we were in a pennant 
' ' ~ rv^-md be had about 50 boners. 
~'. ’Z Tinned on his own with a man 
" :, -iird to get the man home. 
‘ l; i the kind of man he is. A lot 


Richardson, now the baseball 
coach at Coastal Carolina College 
in Conway, Sooth Carolina, also 
recalled that Maxis had to live 
down 1962, the season when he hit 
33 homos. 


those I '. ti m npi^n^tp learnt: qJ 1967 

and 1968.” . 

Mike Shannon, the Cardinals* 
third baseman who became Maxis’s 
closest recalled hfm primar- 

ily as a loyal and fan-loving com- 
panion. “He will be iemonbered. 


“The one thing I do remember no doubt, for tbe 61 home runs, but 
was the next year he had what I I wffl remember him as a friend and 
thought was a great year, and they a very compassionate person,” said 
kind of voted him flop of die year, Shannon, noting that after Marirfs 
and it was a tremendous year in retirement from baseball he rarely 
comparison to what most people turned down an appeal to 


would have.' 

“While he will be remembered 
for bis brilliant assault on the home 
ran record in 1961,” the commis- 
sioner, Peter V. Ueberroth, said in 
a statement, “we should also re- 
member the courageous battle he 
fought against this 
these last two years. 

Although the p ress ure s of the 
1961 borne ran battle led to criti- 
cism of Maris by members of the 
New York press, who felt he was 
imwiwwwiaitiv t to the point of 
being sullen, there were others who 
iwwnikH that the 1™«*« hiri 
been off target 


- -■ t . . . . _ - Tim McCarver, who was the 

• opkremembCThmjustfor catcher for the St Louis Cardinals 

— M» nm^ but he was a great when Maris was traded to than in 

- • -»nd ball player. December 1966, recalled that when 

<_ -ok also recalled that people Maria reported for raring training 

• -pubic recognizing that Maris fa 1967 the other Cardinals had 

t . n outstanding outfielder with been prepared to tfistike him be- in the Dominican Republic. “He 
ogann- cause of Us reputation of being tried to leave a legacy . . . Perhaps 

“i was a modest guy,” Houk insensitive. 

71 think he would have just “He was the very antithesis of 


fund-raisers for chanties supported 
by his friends. 

Maris, according to Shannon, 
who now is a broadcaster in SL 
Louis, was never vain about his 
fame. Shannon recalled a time after 
Mans's r et ir ement when he was vis- 
disease j Hng Sh mn nn at .spring training. 
The two left die dubboose together 
and Shannon was qniddy sur- 
rounded by children asking for his 
autograph while Maris went unrec- 
ognized and ignored. “He really got 
a kkk out of that," Sh«mm said. 

Tony Kubek, who played short- 
stop for die Yankees, noted that 
Maris tried to help his fellow mu 
right to the end erf his Hfe. 

“He tried to do something f or tbe 
rest of tbe world and got involved- 
in some eg perimejitfl? eanew re- 
search,” said Kubek, a television 
baseball analyst who was readied 


: . n- l inmK nc wouia nave just nc was me very ram uresis ox 
-■ play the game and not get that," McCarver said. “He was 


wnh 

his consent wflf save some ^ 

(NYT.AP) 


Jets Lose, 19 - 6 , 
AsDefeme, Wind 
Thwart O’Brien 

By Gerald Eskenazi 

New York 71ma Service 

EAST RUTHERFORD, New 
Jersey — The Chicago Bears, the 
wind, the fumble — and an ex- 
posed quarterback —helped send 
the New York Jets to a 19-6 defeat 
' Saturday, sidetracking them in 
their struggle to make the National 
Football League playoffs. 

Ken O’Brien, the quarterback, 
was rushed so often and so power- 
fully that many of Us passes fell 
into a chad zone far from reedven. 

And wbca he and tbe Jets bad a 
final opport u nity to rally, trailing 
by a touchdown in (he tnhd quar- 
ter, but with the wind at their 
backs, he was sacked on consecu- 
tive series and lost the ball each 
time. 

lire Jets’ defense, however, was 
virtually equal to the Bears. It held 
Walter Payton, the National Foot- 
ball League’s leading career rusher, 
to only 53 yards cm 28 carries — an 
average of 1.9 yards an aitenmt — 
and halted his record streak of 100- 
yard games at nme. 

But the Jets still fiwleH to hdp 
themselves in the playoff race, and 
are now virtually in a most-win 
situation in their last game, next 
Sunday against the Cleveland 
Browns. A victory would guarantee 
the Jets, now 10-5, at least a wild- 
card berth in the American Confer- 
ence. The Bears, 14-1, won the Na- 
tional Conference’s Centra] 
Division title a month ago. 

The Bears slopped the Jets' run- 
ning game, holding Freeman 
McNeil to 63 yards on 20 ariempts, 
and they stopped O’Brien from 
finding receivers, allowing no pass 
play longer than 22 yards. 

O’Brien, the league's top-rated 
quarterback going into the game, 
completed only 12 of 26 passes for 
mily 122 yards. He was sacked four 
times and his two fumbles were, 
part of a three-turnover game for 
the Jets’ — Mickey Shuler also lost 
the ball 

“We blew our chance today,” 
smd the defensive Hwenum Joe 
Kleclco. 

To their coach, Joe Walton, it 
was this ample: “From my vantage 
point oq the sidelines, it looked like 
Kenny O’Brien was under duress." 

O’Brien, who entered the g*mg 
having been sacked 55 times, was 
sacked on consecutive series in the 



John Elway, the Broncos’ quarterback, made no headway against the Chiefs on a flrird- 
and-ooe play Saturday. But, despite also throwing five interceptions in the game, in the 
dosing minutes he passed Us team to a 14-13 victory that kept its playoff hopes afire. 


third quarter and each time lost the 
ball They were his 10th and 11th 
fumbles this season — the rest of 
the Jets combined bad turned over 
the ball only 9 twnei By the time 
the fourth quarter han started, 
O’Brien bad been sacked three 
twniwi His season's totabaf 58 put 
him one behind the league record 
set by Tony Eason of New England 
last season. 

The Jets — the NFL’s best team 
at avoiding turnovers — were in the 
Bears faring the league's best at 
creating 

Tbe second half belonged to the 
defenses — perhaps by default 
Flayers slipped when passes head- 
ed their way, and passes often were 
off the mark when the receivers 
were standing. 






Hockey 


Basketball 

World Cup Skiing 


■ S tandings 

WALES CONFERENCE 


Nfltinngl RaskpithaTl Asan riiitirm S tanrirngw 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 



Patrick Dtvfzlea 





Attaattc DtvUao 




W 

L 

T Pfl GF GA 


W 

L Pet. 

GB 

pWo 

23 

8 

a 

44 

143 

93 

Boston 

19 4 

J26 


"ton 

18 

7 

3 

39 

108 

M 

Hew Jersey 

14 11 

560 

6 

. . . -wlen 

1 II 

U 

8 

30 

W* 

112 

Washington 

12 11 

sa 

7 

oers 

14 

15 

1 

29 

107 

99 

PhltodeMiia 

12 12 

500 

m 

-gn 

11 

16 

4 

26 

114 

m 

New York 

7 17 

-292 

T2Vj 

■ T-fteT 

12 

15 

1 

26 

VM 

117 


central otatstoa 




Adam* [ 

DMatofl 




Milwaukee 

17 10 

A30 

— 


17 

10 

2 

36 

118 

98 

Detroit 

14 11 

540 

2 

• ' 

M 

18 

6 

34 

115 

105 

ANenta 

12 13 

.480 

4 


15 

11 

3 

33 

130 

10* 

Cleveland 

11 13 

AS8 

4Vfc 

1 

U 

13 

8 

28 

111 

110 

Chicago 

9 18 

MS 

8 


13 

14 

2 

21 

104 

M 

Indiana 

7 17 

392 

BVj 


15 


.. AMP8ELL CONFERENCE 
Nwrta DtvtUon 

.:» n u 4 a mi 106 

la a 14 7 21 lit ITS 

r * U 4 22 114 13S 

t 17 4 20 112 UI 

K 7 17 4 IB VI 144 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest DhrllhM 


Houston 

Denver 

Utah 

San Antonio 
Dallas 


17 B 
H 9 
IS II 
14 12 
12 11 
fl 14 


Sntvtto DlvtUea 

22 S 4 
17 V 1 
10 U 3 
10 10 3 

7 1* 4 


48 148 122 
37 130 100 
23 114 134 
23 106 144 
IB 181 IS2 


L-Dni 

i 

•inVfe 


FRIDAY'S RESULTS 

• 3 3-6 
3 18-4 
J (*). Eraon 2 (2) SUtanen (4); Sell- 
tndrwem* 111), Howtov (Bl.Tucher 
ttsaoaol; Horltord (on Bottomo) 8- 
■I Buffalo (an Lull) 54-lfr-V. 

i • 1 6—6 

3 • 8-3 
II. Anderson (24), Hunter (6). Sum- 
H. Cretzkv 2 (21) Eaves (1 ). AmM 
Ml (12). Shots an goal: Edmonton 
rand) 12-14-10-36; Wbmtoea (an 
-3-7—22. 

. SATURDAY*! RESULTS 
MH 1 1 8-3 

I 1 2—4 

- 4). Pedersen 2 (T2)r Pasln (V); Mo- 
4). Osborne (8). Shots a* tool: N.Y. 
(on Keans) 4-n-*-24j Boston (an 
t-13-1 


I— A. Lakers 
Portland 
Seattle 
LA. Clippers 
Golden State 
Phoenix 


W 3 

II 12 

11 14 
8 16 
V IB 
6 17 


333 

361 


I 

2W 

3W 

4 

Bto 


m 

VM 

12 

17W 

iavb 


2 2 2 8-4 

■S 2 2 2 8-4 

»). Hodman 2 (B). BenMng (4). Court- 

Frrcer (ill; Aden (10), Bellows 3 

ruk (3), Biuastod 2 116). shots aa 
-onto (on Beaupro) &0*S-aa; Min- 
in Wraaant) w-18-18-1— 31. 

1 B 1 8-3 

■dors 18 18-3 

Brian Sutter (IS); Trottter (ID, 

ter C71- Shots <» teas: SL Louis (on 
SV-s-7 — 2f ; N.Y. litamtars (on MR- 
M«-d 

h 121—4 

2 3 1-4 

■ID). Oavm (9). Robertson IS). Tur- 
. 17); Badoer (31. Ltnd s from (7), 
4>.Buftard (U). Shots on ooo4: Pitts- 
i (Jut) 8-11-7—37; Hartford (on Ra- 
-3W-a 

■ »r 18 3-3 

1 5 3— V 

07), Anderson (8), Goulet 4 (22), 
no); Adams (V), Muller (I), Ander- 
wboaoool: New Jersey (on Motor* 
U— 30; Quebec (on Ounrrler) 1823- 


*Ja 114-4 

1 > 4—4 

1 ■ Creoaman 3 (2). Propo B1 ). Poulhi 
ran (in; Young (8). Loixlle (i), 
* IUJ. Shod or goal: PMIadeMila 
MU B-ID-15— 33; Detroit (on Froow 
-Ri) 158-7—31, 




1 1-3 


■Crewford Q), Peterson (2>.Gradln 
SI.Mdeoun (1), Konroyd (3). Shots 
MBOfY Ian Bredeue) 1MV7-3D} 
f (an Letnelin and D’Ajnour) 9-10- 

I I 1-3 
3 2 1-4 

(7). Naskmd 2 (23). Richer (10), 
*). C or ho nn oau (10) t Wltun (3), 
. 116). Souord (16). Shots eo oont: 
an Penney) 11-7-13—30; Munlioud 
') 13M— 3L 


»>. C hris ti a n (17). Hatcher (3). 
.17); Haehbom 2 (2). Williams (»). 
- *4). Shots on port: Wt u htagto o (on 
■D— 32; Los Angelas (on Jensen) 3- 


FRl DAY’S RESULTS 

SMI AntOOlO 42 21 31 2S — 119 

Detnril 34 38 3S 31-113 

Mitchell 12-24 « 29. Robertson 8-11 7-7 23; 
TTwmos 10-23 8-10 79. Ltrimbeer 8-18 54 21. 
Reboendi; Son Antonio SI I Robertson 8), De- 
troit 40 ( Lolmheor 17). Assists : Son Antonio 27 
(Moore 8). Detroit 24 (Thomas 8). 

Aftarta 21 17 ■ II— 88 

Indtano 24 24 3* 28—18* 

nsdato 1517 1-9 27, Richardson 7-11 M U; 
WeU>51 1 6-6 lfc Wilkins 6-17 1-3 13. Levlnocton 
57 1-9 IX Rebounds: Atlanta 44 l Willis 8). 
Indiana SB (wiHtame 12). Assists: Atlanto 21 
(Rtvora. wafab 4). Indiana 32 (Richardson 8). 
la. Lateen m m » »— no 

Denver SS 2S 31 33-134 

W.Coooor 1522 4-4 32, Engltsh 1522 1512 30; 
Worthy 1521 7-7 37. AbdoKlabbar 1521 5724. 
Reboaods: Los AnpelM 57 (Johnson 11). Den- 
ver 62 rWCoopor 10). AisMi: Lai Angeles 20 
(AbdUk-Jabbar 71. Denver 21 (HcutdBc 5). 

Clove toad 34 28 38 3S-B8 

Milwaukee 26 33 35 18—124 

Free 1523 9-14 39. Turpin 7-10 3-3 17, Davis 3-7 
71-1417; Mondial 1520 513 34.Cumrn4tKH 517 
6-8 20. Riboaads: Oovetand 63 (Hineoa 11), 
Mll«mukeoS4 (Cummlnge 13). Assists: Cleve- 
land 26 ( Bagiev M). Milwaukee 23 [Moncrlet 
6). 

LA CHppen 31 25 17 30— 8S 

Beattie 17 3f 97 33-414 

Chambers 1517 7-7 31. Stkrna 511 53 IS; M. 
Johnson 9-14 7-0 2S, Nixon 515 50 IX Bn dae- 
mon 56 54 IX Rebounds: Los Anastas 43 
(Com 8). Seattle 90 (Chambers T2). Antals: 
LH AfioeM 19 <NbaM6),5aatttaIl (HomIW- 
san 6). 

Portland 38 IS 79 » 14-127 

GoWsa State 29 27 27 33 TJ-T34 

PAxton 152057 33, Conor 51551026; Carroll 
11-2858 35 Short 1521 542*. Raboeads: Port- 
laral 57 (Bonde 1». Golden states (Smllh 17). 
Asststs: Porthmd2S(Drextartl.Go(don SW» 
29 (Floyd 6). 

SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
Houston 18 » 24 18— 188 

Utsd 32 » 25 90— 1M 

Dan hey 1525 513 35, Malone 521 510 22; 
OhdlMon 7.18 15M 26r Lloyd 11-26 M 2X R5 
bonds: Houston <7 (Otohwon 19), Utah 66 
(Eaton 16). Assists: Houston 15 (Luos 51, 
UtWi 26 (Stockton 8). 

I mono IS 20 23 24- 99 

New Jane* B 25 24 24-114 

Kina 15135292. R]etwr(h8n7-n AAlB; F tam- 
ing 1518 54 24. H. WRItom* 9-50 3-4 21 . He- 
boands: IndlanoSKMlpanovkhlD.NewJer- 1 

bov 41 (B.Wiirkaml6).A«asti: Indiana 20 (H. 
William. Fltmtoa 4). Itooi Jersey 28 (M. 
RWtarttWi «)- 

Denver 29 3MB 14-188 

Danas 34 31 34 21— 127 

Sdmnpl 513 MB 23. Perk lns514 7423; Nall 
11-2051 2XEng(Wi516Mli(Jwer 7-T7V4 li 
Reboonds: Denver 51 (NattBJ,DaHas69(Doo- 
OMS4n22). ASStSto: Denver 19( Lever 7), Dal- 
las 30 (Horner TV. 

i B Bsn m h 24 22 33 28— Ml 

CMOORO 3S 17 » 22-103 

Theus 7-13 74 21. Johnson 520 3ta 19; Green 5 
15 54 21, Woolffitoe 1519 04 70. WOOWB: 
Sac r ame nt o 60 (Thnmasson 14). Odcoga 44 
(Green U). AssWs: Sacramento 29 (Theus 
11). Chicago 27 (Mow 13). 

PtalhnMpbla 1* M ® »-W3 

Attoala 79 M 73 20-187 

Wilkins 12-2J 54 29, EJohnson 44 7-* 16, Ma- 
lonct-71 12.1635 Cheeks 51056 K R oba iin ds; 
PhUadetohto 44 (Malone ill. Atlanta 37 (Wit- 


kins, Wilds SI. Amtata: PMiadeipMa 
(Cheeks S). Attanta 2S (E-tabnsan 9). 
Boston 24 X1 28 29—99 

C l eveland 28 XI 29 IMH 

Free 7-91 572ZHtnsan5124-t2B; Bhrll5a55 
231. Parish 511 *7 U. Re heond s : Bataan 60 
(McHalol2l, Oevetandsa (West nl.Antats: 
Boston 29 (AJnge 9), Cleveland 30 (Bagiev 8). 
San Antonio 36 M 3S 18— 98 

New York 27 2i 26 29— ISO 

Cummhm 517 3-4 21, Ewing 1517 51 20: 
MttcheO 511 510 35 R obortaon 517 1-2 19. 
Rebo und s: San Antonia 53 (Greenwood 14), 
Now York 50 (Cummings 14). Assists: San 
Antonio 11 (Moore 7). New York 32 (Sparrow 
M>. 

Phoenix 38 28 27 XI— 114 

LACOpnen 23 27 1725— n 

Nano 514 11-15 29, J. Edwards 1514 54 22; 
Johnson 1515 54 26. Maxima 511 11-14 21. 
Rebounds: Phoenix 67 (Janos 10). LA CHp- 

POTS 34 (Maxwell W. Assists: Phoenix 24 

(Humphries 11). LA Clipper* 18 I Nixon «_ 

Selected College Results 

SATURDAY’S RESULTS 
EAST 

American 84. catholic U. 78 
Conmcttcm n Rhode island 42 
Duauosne 91, Iona 66 
Georgetown 85 Florida ABM 66 
La Salle 68. Princeton 48 
Manhattan 81, Harvard 49 
Morcvtmrst 83, Atailand 80 
Now HamataUre 72, Maine 60 
Niagara 75, vwmant 73 
Norttnanom 71. MasaatawscHs 61 
Penn SL 78. Morgan 5L 51 
Rutgers 74, Monmouth, NJ- 70 
St. Bowavont ura 64. Cantalut 63- OT 
St. Francis. N.Y. 82, Rader 46 
SL Peter's 61. Seton Hon 60 
Staten Island 89, CCNY 68 
Stanohlll SB. LawoU 56 
ftHHughcnM 81. Gettysburg 75 
Syracuse 192. Brooklyn Coll. 61 
Tomato 81, VU lanova 73 
W. Vo. Westayon BL BYU-Hawan 74 
W. Virginia St. 1TX West Liberty 82 
Wbtsh 74. Paint Park £7 
West Virginia 74, Plttiburah 63 
Westfield SL 78. Amerlcon Infi. 716. OT 
Whoofina 45. Bctttanv. W. Vo. 62 
Worcwter Tech 76. Thomas ColL 46 

SOUTH 

Alabama 92. Mercer 49 
Auburn 77, Stetson 54 
Cincinnati 68. E. Kentodkv 65 
Citadel 78, Bapttst 68 
Clemsan 87. Bemune-Coohman 60 
Davidson 68. NX. Chadalte S3 
Florida 5L 122. Florida Toe* 83 
Georgia 104, Georgia St. 64 
Georgia Southern 64 , Augusta 45 
Grambang SL Paul Qutm 44 
Jacksonville 67, Cent. Florida 47 


Kama* SL <X Mtacteslpai St. 60 
Louisiana SL 87, Hardht-Shrunons 71 
Louisville 73, W. Kentucky 70 
Memphis SL 119. X Caratlpa SL 73 
.MHStatappi 65 BE Louisiana 5* 

Morabeod SL 74. Bowlins Grgen 71 
Norfolk SL 99, Wlnstonfiatam 73 
North Carolina 99. onto U. 57 
Old Dominion 67, James Madtaon 68 
Te n n ess ee <7. Mis souri 64 
Vanderbilt 89. Pm 74 
Virginia Tech 59, Va. COmmonwoaUti 67 
MIDWEST 

Dayton 182, Texas Southern 70 
I [Knots 102, Houston 93 
Iowa 81, Furman el 
Iowa SL S3. Michigan SL BA OT 
Kansas BA Kentucky 46 
Marquette 76, Qretohtan 63 
Miami. Ohio ML Xavier, Ohio 74 
Michigan 74. w. Michigan 64 
Minnesota 42. Colorado St. 68 
NarHiwo sl o m 64. Wta-Graen Bay 33 
Wichita SL 74, SW Louisiana 63 
SOUTHWEST 
Arkansas 79, Ohio SL 70. OT 
Lamar 73. SL Mary* Texas 49 
Oklahoma 93. Texas 92. OT 
Oklahoma SL 71, Houston Bontlta a 
Texas AIM 8L Oral Roberts 75 
Texas CbrtsMan * 4 . Texas Lutheran 61 
FAR WEST 

Arinna 70. New Mexico SS 

Gonsoga 72, Idaho 61 

Nebraska 76, Montana 5). 59 

NevrLns VSgas 74. Nevada R e no S3 

New Mexico 5L 7X E. New Mexico 68 

Oregon SI, Wyomlne 59 

Oregon SL 77. Santa Clara 62 

Pacific 4X Montana 57 

San Dtaoa BL San Otago SL 64 

Son Prantaaoo SL75 Crd-Daralnguez Hills 72 

SL John's 69, UCLA 65 

Utah 82. Colorado 62 

Washington SL 80. e. WostUndai 71 

Weber SL 181, Utah St. 76. 

TOURNAMENTS 


Iton oor dt ne BA Brigham Young 73 
Third Place 

Lang Booth SL 51, W. Iillnota 49 


So. Mot h o d l it 68, Illinois SL 55 
Third Place 

McNooso SL 7A N. Texas SL 46 
Drake 1 


Drake 64. Bavtor 58 

Third Place 
Idaho SL 70, Ill^Chloago 69 


Indtano 74. Texas Tech 69 


Louisiana Tech BA Alcorn St. 73 


MEN 

DowoMtt 

tat Val Gardena Italy. Dec. Ml 
L Peter wln>sbenier.Auatrta.2niliL0429 secs 
X Peter MOHer. Swibertond. X04J3 
X Sapp Wlldnrubor, West Germonv, 2:0538 

4. Leonhard Stock. Austria 2:0530 

5. Front He Inzer, Switzerland, 2:0633 
6_ Michael Moir, Italy. 2:0L4* 

7. Nlktos Harming. Sweden. 3to6el 
X Gustav OahrtL Swltzariand. 2d8J6 
9. Erwin Rosth. Austria, 2:0594 
10 (Me) Rob Boyd. Canada. 2:06.10 
and Martte Bed. Orttoln. 7:BL1D 

13. Mathias Haas, Austria 2:06.11 

IX PMItoM VeraereL Franca 2:0630 

14. Armbr Aningcr, Austria 2:0635 

IX Karl AlPloor, SwttzertamL 2to6J6 

Qtamt EWam 
(at La VI Ua Italy, Dec 16) 

I. ingamar Stenmark, Sweden, 2:3055 
A Hubert Strata. Austria 2J9J7 

X Robert EHacher, Italy. 2:3950 

L Rak Potravlc Yugoslavia 2:4X15 
X Joel Gasoaa 8 wtteor l orrd. 2:«JB 

6. Marc Glrardoin, Luxembourg, 2:41X2 

7. Richard Pramottoa Itofy. 2:41A9 
X Mam TonazrL Italy. 2:41 JS 

9. Baton KrtzoL YUgoofavta 2;4ua 
IX Joroon Sumktvtta. Sweden. 2vCL09 
Com M ee d Ptactags (Points) 

(Val Gordina downhill and La Villa giant 
taatom): 

1-Marc Glrardem, Luxembourg, 2490 
A MlckJas Honnlna Sweden. 3950 
1 Ptrmbi Zurbrtggoa Swttaertand. 4750 

4. Leonhard Stack, Austria 4952 

5 . Franx NAw, Switzerland, 5649 

6 Andreas Wenzel. UechtensMa 5758 
7. Franck PteconA Franc*, 5X43 
a Richard Fram a thw. Italy, 9955 
9. Martin Hanoi, Switzerland, 6039 
TO. Peter MOIIer. SwttzertamL 7655 

II. Aidon Stainer. Austria 7759 

IX Peter Wlmbereer, Auetrta 8X11 
IX Thomas Burg tar, SwttzertamL 8156 
VL Bruno Keraea Switzerland. 8452 

15. Michael Mair, Italy, 86.11 

IX Denis Rev. Franca 91 J6 

Mead world Cue 
Overall Stan dle o s (Potets) 

1. Peter Mflfler, SwttMrtand. 70 Pis 
A More GirarttellL Luxembourg, 48 

X Peter wlrmberger. Austria 66 
X Karl Atatoer, SwttzertamL 55 
5. Rok Petrov le, Yugoelavta, 37 
X Michael Malr, Italy, 36 

7. 1 roomer SMnmork, Sweden, 35 
X Leonhard Slock. Austria 31 
9. Helmut Heftahner, Austria 30 
TO. NlckTas Honnlna Sweden. 39 
IT. Solan KrtaoL Ydgostovla 27 
IX Franck Piccard, Franca 26 
IX Franx Heireor. Swttxortand, 26 
M. Mmrkus wasmetor. West Germany. 26 
15. Robert Ertadier, Holy, Z! 


The offenses had such difficul- 
ties that neither dub could convert 
a third-down play until midway 
through the fourth quarter. 

In other g/mes, The Associated 
Press reported: 

Browns 28, Oilers 21: In Cleve- 
land, Basie Kosar threw three 
touchdown passes, one set up by 
Herman Fontenot's 81-yard kick- 
off retain, and the rookie quarter- 
back also ran for his first NFL 
touchdown to enhance Cleveland's 
tide hopes in tbe AFC Centred. 

Kosar completed 14 of 28 passes 
far 161 yards and touchdowns to 
Ozzie Newsome, Fred lhnh and 
Kevin Made. He was not inter- 
ceped and ran two yards for a 
touchdown on a first-qnnrter boot- 

Fontenot, a rookie running back 
filling in because regular kick re- 
turner Glen Young had a sprained 
shoulder, cut through a seam in the 
- middle of Houston’s kickoff cover- 
age to start the third quarter and 
took the ball to the Oflers’ 16-yard 
fine 

Two plays later, Kosar drilled an 
eight-yard touchdown pass to the 
rookie Banks for a 21-7 lead. Ko- 
sovs five-yard touchdown throw to 
Mack made it 28-7 midway 
through the period after Houston’s 
Warren Moon was intercepted for 
the second time. 

Steeles 30, Mb 24: In Pitts- 
burgh, Waiter Abercrombie scored 
on a two-yard run with 47 seconds 
to play as the quarterback Scott 


Campbell led Pittsburgh back from 
a 21-0 deficit 

Despite the victory, which ended 
the Steelers’ three-game losing 
streak, they missed out on the play- 
offs for only the third time in 14 
years when Cleveland beat Hous- 
ton. 


1 bird Quarterback 
Interception Run 
Beat Giants, 28-21 

The Associated Press 

IRVING. Texas — Jim Jeff- 
coat’s 60-yard touchdown intercep- 
tion return and third-string quar- 
terback Steve PeEuefs amazing 
poise under fire carried the Dallas 
Cowboys to a 28-21 victory Sunday 
over tbe New York Giants and 
gave them the National Conference 
Eastern Division title. 

Jeff coat's second-period return 
of a batted pass turned (he game 

around for tbe Cowboys, but it was 
Pelluer’s 28-yard third-down com- 
pletion to the rookie Karl Powe 
that set up the game-clinching 
touchdown in the fourth quarter. 

Victor Scott staved off the Gi- 
ants' last-ditch Giant rally by inter- 
cepting a pass on the Dallas nine- 
yard-line with 46 seconds 
remaining. 

Pelluer, who had never played in 
a regular-season National Football 
League game in two years with the 
Cowboys, led Dallas on a 72-yard 
drive capped by fullback Timmy 
Newsome's one-yard run with 4:06 
to play. That score gave the Cow- 
boys a 28-14 lead. 

The Giants, helped by an un- 
sportsmanlike conduct penalty 
against Dallas defensive tackle 
Randy White, rushed 73 yards in 
eight plays with Joe Moms scoring 
on a one-yard run with 2:09 left. 

Pdluer entered the game in the 
third quarter after Gary Hogc- 
boom suffered a blow to 'the head 
and the starting quarterback. Dan- 
ny White, suffered bruises to the 
shoulder, ribs and hand. 

Redskins 27, Bengal* 24: In 
Washington, George Rogers' 34- 
yard touchdown run midway in the 
fourth qiurter capped a string of 24 
consecutive Washington points as 
the Redskins rallied to keep their 


playoff hopes alive. 


Redskins trailed by 24-7 two 
minutes into the second quarter, 
but stormed back behind injured 


Campbell, a third-tea mcr play- quarterback Jay Schroeder to lie 
ing only because of first-half inju- with San Francisco and New York 


ties to David Woodley and Mark 
Malone, threw three yards to Lends 
Lipps for a second-period touch- 
down, then set up Abercrombie’s 
score with a 44-yard completion to 


31,Bnocaoeere23: In Tam- 
pa, Florida, George Wonsley 
scored first-half touchdowns on 
runs of 7 and 3 yards and Mike 
Page! and Albert Bentley ran for 
touchdowns in the fourth quarter 
for Indianapolis. 

Pagd’s two-yard quarterback 
keeper with 10:57 to play ended a 
67-yard drive the Grits began after 
Bugs’ place- kicker, Donald Igwe- 
buSte, missed an extra-point that 
would have riven his team a seven- 
print lead five seconds into the 
final period. 

Raul AUegre’s print-after gave 
the Colts a 24-23 advantage and 
they pat the game away when Bent- 
■ley ran 26 yards around right end 
for a touchdown with 4:55 to go. 

The win snapped the Colts' six- 
game losing streak and was their 
first on the road in 1985. They had 
lost 10 straight away from tbe Hoo- 
sier Dome, seven this season. 


On One Indian Golf Course, 
The 18 th Hole Is State Away 

Py Dilip Ganguly 

Agence Franee-Pnsse 

NEW DELHI — Golfers in the northern Indian city of Chandigarh 
soon will have more than bunkers and water hazards to cope with. 

By a qniik of the agreonent signed in July between the government 
and Sikhs, half of the city’s only golf course will be in Punjab state, 
while the other half will remain in Haryana. 

That will lead to golfers teeing off in Punjab, crossing into Haryana 
for nine holes and returning to Punjab to finish their round. 

Part of the peace agreement signed by Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi 
and the Akah Dal, the Sikh political party, was that Chandigarh, the 
city created by French architect Le Corbusier in the 1950s, would 
revert to Punjab, excepting certain Hindi-speaking areas that would 
remain with Haryana. 

Tbe golf course fell astraddle the Hindu-dominated and Sikh- 
dominated areas of tbe city. 

The Tribune newspaper said golfers in Chandigarh had been 
assured that players and caddies would not need travel visas to go 
from one part of the course to the other after the handover to Punjab, 
set for Jan. 26. 

Generally, there are no restrictions on travel from one state to 
another in India, although there are checks for contraband goods. 

Bui, it has beat pointed out, foreigners will be unable to oranplete 
18 holes on the Chandigarh course, as their entry into Punjab is 
banned by a government order Hinted at curbing Skh militants 
agitating for a separate stale. These golfers will have to {day the nine 
holes in Haryana, or the nine in Punjab. 


in a scramble for two NFC wild- 
card playoff berths. 

The Bengals had a chance to tie it 
in the closing seconds but on third- 
and-five from the Washington 21- 
yard line, linebacker Rich Milot 
sacked the quarterback Boomer 
Esiason for a 12-yard loss. With 
seven seconds to go, Jim Breech's 
51-yard field-goal attempt was 
wide to tbe right. 

Schroeder, playing in obvious 
pain Iran a cracked rib suffered 
last week, completed 18 of 35 for 
273 yards and a touchdown. Wide 
receiver Art Monk set team records 
for both receptions and yards with 
13 catches for 230 yardx 

49ers 31, Saints 19: In New Or- 
leans, Joe Montana got a sluggish 
offense going in the second half to 
keep San Frandso's playoff hopes 
alive. 

San Francisco trailed by 9-7 at 
halftime, and Montana was under 
30 percent in passing. But in the 
second half he was 12-14 for 204 
yards and two touchdowns. 

Falcons 14, VQtings 13: In Atlan- 
ta, tackle Dan Benish set up a 
touchdown with a fumble recovery 
and blocked a fidd goal, but Min- 
nesota lost when Jan Slcnerud 
missed a fourth-quarter extra point 
attempt. 

Stenerud, who had one field goal 
blocked and missed on two other 
attempts, kicked wide right on his 
extra prim after the Vikings scored 
with 8:03 left in the game on Tom- 
my Kramer’s 49-yard pass to An- 
thony Carter, who made the recep- 
tion at the Atlanta 40 and outran 
the secondary to the end zone. 

Packers 26, LJons 23: In Pontiac, 
Michigan, A1 Del Greco's fourth 
field goal, a 27-yarder as time ran 
out, gave Green Bay its victory. 

The Lions had tied at 23 with 
1:01 left on a 30-yard touchdown 
pass from Joe Ferguson to Leonard 
Thompson. Eddie Murray’s extra 
point try was wide right. 

Mike Douglass, a 6-foot, 214- 
pound linebacker, had icked off 
Eric Hippie’s underthrown pass at 
the Packers' 20 and lumbered the 
length of the field, weaving in and 
out of traffic and breaking lackles, 
to give Green Bay its first lead, 23- 
17, at 5:31 of the fourth quarter. 
Thai was one of five turnovers for 
the Lions, who lost for first time in 
the seven games at the Silverdome 
this season. The Packers had won 
only once on the road in seven tries. 


Marshal) 7V. AriUJttto Rode 76 
ram Mac* 

Gaorg* Mama 84. Austin Jtoay 62 



ENGLISH FIRST DIVISION 
AtbmmI 9 Lhwpool 9 
Astro Villa 1 MTOdtoster United 3 
Che boa 2 Sheffield Wednesday 1 
Ewton l Lt) raster 2 
ipswkii 1 QueonY Parte Dawn O 
Manchwtar City S Coventry 1 
Newcastle 2 Southampton 1 
Nott in gham Forest 1 Luton 6 
Oxford 7 west Bromwich 2 
Wofford 1 Tottenham 8 
west Ham 2 Birmingham X 

FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Auxerra 3 Nancy S 
Nice 2 Brest 2 
Bastta 0 Sochaux 0 
Tautouse 4 Nantes 2 
Lille 2 Rennet B 
Bordeaux 2 Teuton 1 
Laval 2 Lana 1 
La Havre 4 Strasbourg 1 

ITALIAN FIRST DIVISION 
Avemno 8 Bari 0 
Como 1 Inter Milan a 



Selected College Results 

CaOtaratar Emit 
(Al Prom, CadtortUa) 

Fresno State 51, Bowling Gram 7 


Lecce 8 Ai Roma 3 
Milan ac s Juvenrut 0 
Pisa 0 Verona 1 
Sarngdorla 2 Napoli 0 
Torino 0 Atalanta 0 
UdJlWM 2 Ftorentlna 1 

SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
AtteHra Madrid L Omturo 8 
Zaragoza X AlWefte Bittern I 
GI|on X Root Madrid 2 
Real Sodadod Z Vullodalld 1 
Betts xendta 1 
Valencia 1. Barcelona 2 
Ewonol x Hercules I 
Santander 1, Sevflla D 

WORLD CUP PAIRINGS 
First koead 

GROUP A (raptav In Mexico CHv and Pueb- 
la); V. Italy; X aulaarlo; X Argentina; X 
South Korea. 

GROUP B (to ptav lit Mantes aty and TNu- 
cai: i Mexico; x Belgium; 7, Paraguay; X 
(rax 

Group C (to Ptav In Leon-lrapuato): 9. 
France; Ul Canada; ILSovtot Union; 12. Hun- 
gary. 

GrouoD Itortav In Guadaiol ara]: VL Bra- 
zil; u Soota; UL Algeria; IX N orthern Ire- 
land. 

Group E (to May In Ouetotore-Nezahaal- 
oeyotl): 17. WastGormenyi U. Uruguay; 19. 
Scotland, - 29. Pemrort. 

Group F (taptov In Monterrey): 21. Poland.- 
22. Morocco; A Portugal; XL England. 


giant Statom St uw Bi m 
l. Stomnork2S,t Sralz 20,1 Ertadier 14 A 
Petravfc 12.5. Joel Gapes (Switzerland) n 
World Cup 
Contained Staadtam 

1. Glrardem 21 7. Hoantoa 20, X Ptrmln 

Zurbrtoean I Switzer load, 11 X Start: 12> 1 
Helnzor 11 

WOMEN 

Ste latn 

(af Savoenln. Switzerland, Dec. 15) 

I, Erika Hess. SwttzertamL 1:4259 

X Brigitte Gad lent, SwUznUmd, i^XM 
X Nadia BonIM, Italy, 1:4337 
X Vranl Sctmrtdor, SwttmrkmL 1:4131 
1 Perrin* Poton. Franc*, 1:4X39 
X Tamara McKJnev. United State*. IMH 
7. Caradne BBWr Austria, 1:4431 
1 Helen* Odrttor, France, IM450 
9. MateJa Srab Yugoslavia 1:44X7 

IX Sytvta Bder. Austria. 1:*L9» 

Wwiert World Cap 
Overall Stand eo* 

T. Erika Hess, Switzerland, 81 eoirrti 
Z Michael G*to* ww» Germany, M 
1 Maria Wall her, Switzerland. 3D 

X (dal Marina KtatiL West Germany, and 
Laurie Graham, Canada 43 

X (tie) Vrenl Sdmektor.5irit2ortaad.ond Bri- 
gitte OertiL Switzerland, 38 
X Oeteto Armslroro. United State*, JT 
9. Mkhoto Flow, Switzerland. 32 
H. Katrbi Gufemohn, Ausfria, 31 

II. Eva Twgntokera, United States, 26 
ix Roswrem Stainer, Aintria, 26 

IX Tamara McKinney, united State*. 33 
ix Motalo Brat YugaUavla. 22 
V. Ute) Nadte BonftaL ttatv.ima Brtottte Go- 
AMM Switzerland, 20 

World Cap 

Mortal Statom HoMtaat 

7. Bess 4Sr 2. Stainer as. X SrtmeMer 21, 4. 
God lent 2& J- Petan W 


100 Redskin Tans’ End Up in Jail 


The Axtoamed Press 

WASHINGTON — Using the 
lure of free tickets to the Washing- 
ton Redskins’ game as bait au- 
thorities arrested 100 fugitives who 
showed up Sunday at a pregame 
brunch where police and federal 
marshals posed as waiters and 
served warrants. 

UA marshals called it the largest 
mass arrest of fugitives in recent 
memory. 

“It was tike an assembly line," 
said Herbert Rutherford HI, U.S, 
marshal lor the District of Colum- 
bia. “It was party time, and they 
fell for it, hoar, line and sinker" 

"This ain't fair, this just ain’t 
fair,” said one prisoner bang led in 
handcuffs firm one of two large 
buses that carried the prisoners to 
jail 

“They said they was takin’ us to 
a football game, and that’s wrong, 1 ' 
said another man. “That’s false ad- 
vertising.” 

“I tame to see Boomer, I came to 
see Boomer,” said a third, referring 
10 the Oncumati Bengals’ quarter- 


back, Boomer Esiason, who starred 
at the University of Maryland in 
Washington's suburbs. 

UJL marshals, working with the 
Metropolitan Police Department, 
sent out invitations to 3$j0 wanted 
persons. The invitations said that 
as a promotion for a new sports 
television station. Flagship Inter- 
national Sports Television, they 
were winners of two free tickets lb 
the NFL game between the Red- 
skins and the Bengals. 

The invitation said 10 of the 
"lucky winners" would receive 
1986 Redskins’ season tickets and 
that a Brand prize drawing would 
be beta for an all-expenses- paid 
trip to Super Bowl XX in New 


The initials fra- the TV enter- 
prise, FJ.S.T., also stand fra the 
Fugitive Investigative Strike Team, 
a special U.S. Marshals force. 

About 100 fugitives responded 
to the invitation and appeared at 
the D.C Convention Center for the 
special brunch. The building was 


decorated with signs saying, “Let’s 
party" and “Let’s all be there." 

One marshal was dressed in a 
large yellow chicken suit with over- 
sized red boots while another 
turned up as an Indian chief com- 
plete with large headdress. 

Buses that were to take them to 
the game, however, took them to 
the police department's central 
ceD block several blocks away. 

Arrested were two people want- 
ed for murder, five for robbery, 15 
for assault, six for burglary, 19 for 
bond or bail violations and 18 for 
narcotics violations, officials said. 
Others were arrested on charges of 
rape, arson and forgery. Two of 
were on the D.C. police depart- 
ment’s 10 most wanted list 

The cost of the project was esti- 
mated to be 522, 100, ra about S225 
per arrest. 

One man who got into the Con- 
vention Center before apparently 
being spooked by the circum- 
b unices was arrested on the street, 

still wearing his “HeDo, my name is 

..." sticker. 


•’ --*u 


s 





Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1985 


The Rarefied Sutherland Voice Remains Largely Intact 


By Lon Tuck 

KinAoigmn Post Service 

W ASHINGTON — At 58, 
Dame Joan Sutherland is 
006 of those rare singers, as Kir- 
sten Flagstad was, whose voice 
remains largely intact at an ag: 
when most singers have retired. 

Are there any concessions 
age? “WeU, I don't think I want to 
try and sing Fs anymore," she said 
— that's F above high C. “I dunk 
Erflat is about the extent of my 
range." 

The soprano was in Washing- 
ton Tor a Kennedy Center concert 
performance of Donizetti’s daunl- 
ingly difficult “Anna Bolen a," 
one of his trilogy of operas about 
ihe Tudor queens. This was the 
first fuD Sutherland performance 
in Washington in 15 years. 

What she caQs “my freaky 
voice" is the only one in music 
today— or for a long time— that 
combines such power with such 
astonishing agility and range. It 
harks back to (he dazzling voices 
of the Italian bd -canto era, for 
which Rossini, Donizetti and Bel- 
lini wrote, and which had a kind 
of proficiency that largely van- 
ished from the opera stage for 
many decades. “ Anna Bolena" 
was written for arguably the most 
fabulous of those early singers, 
Giudiua Pasta. 

Sutherland's voice is very large. 


and she is a large woman, ap- 


proaching six feet in heels, 
height, she has said, made her par- 
ticularly self-conscious when she 
was young. The head and face are 
especially broad, with a strong jaw 
and imposing brow — perfect 
physiognomy for her formidable 
vocal cords. 

Her mother, also a distin- 
guished singer, raised Joan to be a 
mezzo. The gift was clearly there, 
but her mother kept the voice low 
until Joan's late teens. “I think she 
was being protective, and I think 
she was right," Sutherland said. 
After winning some contests at 
home in Australia, she went to 
London for what amounted to a 
seven-year apprenticeship with 
the Royal Opera at Covent Gar- 
den. “They sort of tossed me this 
and that from time to time and I 
agreed to do most iL I did Gilda 
[in 'Rigoletto") but I also did sev- 
eral Aldas." 

The story of how Joan Suther- 
land became the Joan Sutherland 
— Dame Joan Sutherland since 



oped the Domzetti-BelMtenden- 

Titey worked together explor- 
ing her voice. “I think I developed 
a knowledge of my own capabQi- 
ues. I think Richard has a great 


knowledge of my capabilities. I 
don't thmk I have 


Bdurd Opan/Gomara ftas laidon 

Dame Joan: “The whole vocal mechanism is you.” 


1979 — involves one of the most 
remarkable partnerships in mod- 
ern music: Sutherland and the 
conductor Richard Bonynge. 
They are husband and wife (they 
recently celebrated their 30th an- 
niversary), star and conductor, 
singer and coach. From time to 
time there have been potshots 
from rivals who refer to Bonynge 
as Mr. Sutherland, implying that 
his career would not have flour- 
ished had he not been married to 
Dame Joan. 

But without his guidance as ad- 
viser and, sometimes, goader 


(Sutherland describes herself as 
lazy), the extraordinary combina- 
tion of artistic traits that make up 
the mature Joan Sutherland migh t 
never have come together. Suther- 
land had the voice. Bonynge. a 
fellow Australian, had immense 
knowledge of the craft of sin g in g , 
and of bd-canto opera especially. 

When Sutherland left Australia 
for London it was beginning to 
look as though her future was in 
Wagner or heavy Verdi “Nobody 
really got on to the coloratura 
ability, tbe agility, the range of 
voice. It was Richard that devd- 


stretched tbe 
voice beyond where it was capable 
of going at a given time. WeU in 
fact, at times I was pushing ft a 
little hard. But in point of Act it 
just felt worse than it was, I don't 
mean that it fdt sore or anything. 
I had to make an effort to control 
every facet of the vocal equipment 
to get the results. 

“I think Tve remained in a rep- 
ertory that suited me. I have done 
a few that were not strictly my 
meat” — including a brilliant re- 
cording of PuctixrTs “Turandot," 
which she has never done on a 
stage — “bat I didn’t do tfa-m 
early on, just when I thought! was 
capable. Look at 'Norma.' We 
worked on that for 10 years before 
f actually did it on stage. We kept 
looking at it here ana there and 
deciding that I couldn’t get 
through the role. We just kept 
working over the difficult sec- 
tions. 

“And even when I did 'Nonna' 
for the first two times, we did 
them too dose together. And I 
ended up with the most ghastly 
attack of some kind of nervous 
stomach, disorder. I had this pain 
right back here” — she points to 
the noddle of her abdomen — 
“the doctor said, ‘Wefl, it might be 
some kind of gpD bladder prob- 
lem. But you tefi me you think it is 
nervous tension.’ And I said, Tm 
sure it is, because I’ve no history 
of Any thing like that ’ And he said 

that ‘if it continues you better see 
your doctor when you get back to 
London.’ But after a rest there was 
nothing anymore.” 

It was Bonynge who led her to 
develop those incredible high 
notes. She recalls a particular ex- 
perience: “We were working and I 
was having trouble with the E-flaL 

I StOl mairiiamwfi that my voice 

was not as high as thaL And Rich- 
ard said, ‘Come on, do a scale for 
me, do a scale for me, you can do 
it on a scale. 1 So I did it on a scale, 
and 1 went beyond the octave and 
kept on singing and finally 
screamed an F-shirp in tbe scale. 
So I was hoisted on my own pe- 
tard. After that I didn't have a kg 
to stand on.” 

Has she undertaken any more 


Jr-sfcaips? “Never. 1 mean, some 
people will sing a G. Bat I don’t. 
Really. Who needs it?” 

- What is the top of “Anna Bo- 
lero”? *T don't get above an E-flal 
or even a D. I get confused be- 
cause some of tbe keys have been 
changed." 

She paused for a moment, 
seeming to muse an the subject of 
ha- high notes. Then she said: 
They are like the old gid with aU 
the jewels. If you got 'em, you 
wear ’em." ■ 

Sutherland once remarked fh«t 
“to survive as a diva, you have to 
be absolutely tike a hone.” 

“WeC, after all” she said, “the 
whole vocal mechanism is you, 
not the way it is with a trumpet, or 
an oboe, or anything where you 
can sort of replace a reed, or a stop 
or a string. And if you are tired, if 
you are run-down — -or if you talk 
too much” — she interrupted her- 
self with gales of laughter, then 
added. “But you don't really talk 
tbe same voice with which you 
sing. Though many singing teach- 
ers think that you should sing with 
the mwjinmi^Ti with wbick 
you speak, I certainly don't If the 
way I ring was tbe way I spoke, I 
might be the most fantastic 
Shakespearean actress. 

“Bui, back to being like a hone. 
You need a terrific constitution to 
stand up. There is the sheer physi- 
cal effort of singing some of these 
redes, tike Norma or Anna Bolena. 
You have to have great physical 
relaxation." 

For her, relaxation, means nee- 
dlepoint and books, both pOed on 
a table in tram of hex. The current' 
book is Ann Edwards’sbiograpby 
of Katharine Hepburn. 

“But 1 think you have to cope 
with knowing, tot instance,” sne 
said, with a gjint in ha eye, “when. 


^on can manage to fit in things 


interviews with journalists. 
You have to face cameras, ordi- 
nary cameras, cinema cameras 
and television cameras. You have 
to be able to take direction from 
both a conductor and a producer. 
You have to have a working 
knowledge of a couple of lan- 
guages, as well as your own. And 
you have to be prepared to be 
approached in the street by 
groups of fans, possibly in snow, 
rain or .windy weather, and be 
asked for autographs and stiH 
manage to be smiling and pleas- 
ant It takes a lot” 

Sutherland ha U. S. de- 


but in Dallas in 1960 with Han- 
del’s “ Airing. ” It was a major tri- 
umph. Hka Maxwell tbe ultimate 
party giver of the international 
prejet set, presented ha with five 
dozen long-stem roses. 

She retailed a glorious “Don 
Giovanni" from the same Dallas 
<«»snn in which rite sang Donna 
Anna and Elisabeth Schwarzkopf 
mng Donna Elvira. “That was 
some cast,” she exclaimed “and 
do yoa remember Schwarzkopf 
with that great handkerchief, and 
how she threw it upstage while 
poor old Luigi Aha was singing T1 
mio tesoro?’ 

Deliberately upstaging AWal 
“Qfa! And bow!” 

Sutherland has had few of the 
stormy career controversies that 
stalked Maria Cabas, ha tempes- 
tuous predecessor in so many 
roles. But there have been occa- 
sional spats. She recalled the time 
she was supposed to do Constanze 
in Mazaifs “Abduction from the 
Seraglio" for the Metropolitan 
Opera. “I started to study it with 
Richard in Australia. Arid I said 
to him after a while, ‘I think the 
time for me to do this is past.’ I 
would have had 13 performances 
and the tour. And I said, T don't 
think I can turn in 13 goodies.* 
And they didn’t tike it at alL But I 
gave them 18 mouths' warning. 
That’s time enough to find anoth- 
er Constanze. I thought I was be- 
ing honest. They thought I was 
bemg a traitor.” 

During the interview, the only 
obvious frustration she voiced 
about ha career was ha weari- 
ness with ab the travel. “We find 
we like it less and less,” she said. 
“We hope to do less each year, 
and spend more time at home” in 
the hills above Montreux, Switzer- 
land. “We will certainly not sort 
of phase me out completely, but I 
certainly would like to do less.” 

After a Christmas holiday in 
Switzerland — their first visit 
home in three months — she and 
Bonynge will embark upon a rig- 
orous six-month tour over three 
continents. Next summer she will 
violate ha normal ban on most 
summer extravaganzas, giving 
joint concerts with Luciano Pa- 
varotti at tbe Hollywood Bowl 
and outdoors in San Francisco. 

“Large people in large venues,” 
she smiling 

And large voices? “Well we 
hope so. If we’re not worn out by 
then." 


language 


Fed Up With Full Plat, 


By William Safire 

W ashington — stressed 

out? Overworked? Wrapped 
too tightly? In this condition, you 
no longer use the simile “busy as a 
one-armed paperhanger”: the 
phrase died out because of overuse 
or because it is now viewed as a slur 
against the handicapped. Instead, 
we have embraced, or swallowed, 
the metaphor of the full plate. 

“I find myself with a very full 
plate," reports the actress Linda 
Hunt, featured in the movie 
“ElenL" 

Israel “has a full plate” in deal- 
ing with its economic problems, 
said Senator Richard G- Lugar of 
Indiana, precluding wider agree- 
ments. 

Craig R- Whitney, an assistant 
managing editor of The New York 
Times, called full plates to my at- 
tention: "This is probably a confu- 
sion with Matthew 26:39, ‘If it be 
posable, let this cup pass from 
me.”* 


out Fred Cassidy’s tooena*, 
achievement in DAREsd&eft 

«y-. •• 

If you need mnemonics to hs'*' 
you remember anything — 
wish I could figure out a ^ 


□ouuccu njicc, ui even way j 

starts with a k and not a g fc in, , 
— tiy Michele Sung’s “The ^ > 
sent- Minded Professor’s Mt& 
Book” (Ballantme, jwpnb i , 
55.95). I now walk around in 
“Nights Grow Darker Aft*, 
gust," which draws curious 
from colleagues but is suppo# 
remind me of the dedeotiog 
Latin (nominative, genitive, d® 
ablative, accusative). On hoy 
pronounce quay: “Wteo bv 
quay, think of tbe sea.” 


Whence this vogue trope? Tbe 
full dinner pail has been tracked to 
Theodore Roosevelt, in 1894, and 
was the slogan of the 1900 McKin- 
ley campaign, but is those days the 
word full was something to be de- 
sired. In the 1920s, however, the 
adjective gained a connotation of 
that’s enough, already, and the 
word-picture appeared in a 1928 
Daily Express article quoting one 
Elton Pace as saying: “I cannot 
say. I have a lot oumy plate ... a 
lot of worry, my lord." 

Tbe expression has been crowd- 
ing the platter ever since, overrid- 
ing overloaded, surfeited and up to 
here. Writers who use it regularly 
are urged to go on a diet. 


Lengthen your life by shoots 
your sentences: If you do noth 
“Simple and Direct," fay Jam 
Baxzuu, m your library, yaaV 
mg without a classic (Haipg 
Row, paperback, 56.95) Tfeyf 
the Modern Language Assotisf 
has brought out “Line by Li 
How to Edit Your Own Wri® 
by Claire Kehrwald Cc 
(Houghton Mifflin, S 14.95) lb 
more helpful than hortatory, « 
solid sections cm putting modj 
in their places (auoktiag the la 
only ana how to come to grips*, 
a comma). The best pronuuaaj 
guide to names since the m on* 
tenrive NBC Handbook is “Kb 
in Clay,” by Wilfred J. McGdq 


(University Press of America; 
perbaefc, $3.95) It 


’T 

X IS the season to shower word- 
ly goods on wordlovers. (71s is an 
itsy-pooism for It is; never use a 
construction that began in poetry 
and song and has been overworked 


by off-key, holly-draped copywrit- 


ers. That sentence shook 
“WonJIy goods should, in this sea- 
son, be showered on wordlovers." 
O.K^ now — back to tbe Christmas 
spirit, to guide shoppers to gifts for 
literate loved ones.) 

Dare to give the first volume of 
the projected five- volume DARE 
— the Dictionary of American Re- 
gional English (Belknap Press, 
549.95) You cannot tdl a chip- 
munk from a ground squirrel witb- 


pobaefc, 53.95) It strai ghten 
architects (Marcel BROY-ar- 
co re-boozy -AY, mees-van-i' 
ROE-uh) reminds you tharac . 
pie of writers have the first naf ' 
Ayn and Anals — Ayn, wt 
rhymes with nine (Rand) and'. 
NIGH-is (Nin) ■ — and even reac - 
out that finger to touch die Sa i • • 
cdling painter, Mick foot M4e- 
AN-jullo. 

Philip Howard of The Tin*/ 

London has turned out an angf . 

and thoughtful book. He uat 
beats me to the punch on zij..., 
titles for column collectiv- a ' 
(“Words Fafl Me,” “A Word 


Your Ear") but this year he ' v 


written a bode from scratch 
one hopes, for much scratch) til 


“The State of the Language" ft \ j 
ford University Press, S14.95) : 


New York Tima Serrict 


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tees & rerenaet required. 

PARS PROMO AS 43 23 40 


AT HOME IN PARS 

PARIS PROMO 

APARTMENTS FOR RBfT OR SALE 

4563 2560 


LOMWPL FarAe ba: fumistod ftab 
»d house:. Consull the Spadatato 


Ptoip ^K ag and Lewis. TeL' South pi 


Pat 352 8111, North o# Pert 722 
5135. Telex 27W6 BSCE G. 


SWITZERLAND 


Brand New 


THE EXCELSIOR 


A Uaqoe 


Hotel Suite 
Residence 


Featuring 


1-, 2-, ond 3- 
Bedroom Suites 


VICTOR HUGO 


tftxSa. F20JXXI 


SHORT IBM STAY. Adrontaget of a 

hotel wihor4 mconveraencBt, feel at 
home m ntae tfutt ee, on e bedroom 
and more m Pbne. SCSaWk BO me 

do rUnvenai, Pott 7>h. 4544 3940 


STUDIO TO 4 ROOMS. _ 

year ratei. Luaembourg & . 
natso. No agency fa«. 4325 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


4TH PIACT DB VOSGES. In lepowd- 

•d an ye en yy. Beartt M 

lope tving, fittpacc, 2 uedrooms, 2 
betfn. Es«en rhort term. 43 06 33 77 or 
43 57 790. 



*7 ^eifaS 

tekher^wvSl fanehed. raBoo. 
Td 42784136 



J'"V I ’V '*i 'i'"— ' 



RB’UBUC Lowly ttedot, latehrav 
both, twwty radon. F2S0; 42561 847 



FAST EXECUTIVE HOMffMDMB- 
Ports a Wettere suburbs. 45 5J 09 45 

REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 

■' 3 > 1 .8 ! -Tl 

EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


TAX PKMRBL Arataon tow fim 

steta ananenoed perron far (npo- 

rebon of US 8 French i nc om e tat 
returns. Tel: 45 43 91 23 FWo. 


employment 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


ANYTHMG ANTWHBBE at tang as 
g wel rnmuneneecL European male. 29,\ 


raJ^itanted, i m A &on i . dynamic^ 


CUSTOMBt EUKVEAN SUPPORT 


tpeddto. currently employed in Ger- 
many taefa padtion it Autfrafa. Con- 
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34, D4200 WMtaden. 


SECRETARIAL 
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Doglde 
„ WTHNAHONAL 
SECRETARIAL POSTOONS 

TUESDAYS 

» the MT 


SECSEEARIES AVAILABLE 


IOORMG PGR TOP HUNOUAL 

■ snmett CoS Ihe enwrti GR 1NIB 

Mi Mulor 47 5B82 30 Porit 


AUTO CONVERSION 


The eetal way <e h e el a 
EBMMan car tole *e UJLA. 


I American i 
provfciei afl required in 
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mnverson c 0&. 


gjyta.Srb.bH*-. 


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MHCEDES SPEOAUSTS 
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1985 Mortob pricee. 

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FtaHe: (Far damHied ani^r 
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: 41 4)31 

Coiraaae: 33 14 54 




BJROPE 


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Umat 417 85 


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Rome: 479-3437. 

Sweden: (06) 7549229. 

Tel Avhr. 03-455 559. 
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17852 
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Saa Ptwlar 652 1893 


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Lebanon: 341 457/8/9. 
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MR EAST 


UNFTB> STATES 


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Wert Gooofc (415) 342-8339. 


Bwtgiwfc 3900457. 

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Jakrote 510092. 
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Seoul: 7358773. 
Ww g^ nr o : 2&272S. 
Taiwan; 752 44 25/9. 
Tofcyw 504-1921 


AUSTRALIA 


SOUTH AFRICA 


erne: 4908231 

S 929 56 39, 957 43 Z 
B9B33. 


6 421599. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


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PAGE 13 


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ATTENTION CXECU7IVB 

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